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UrnliC 


INTERNATIONAL 


Sribun^ 




The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
r London, Thursday, March 20, 1997 


No. 35,-s 



Kim Hyun Bae, left, with a colleague before Wednesday’s announcement. 

2d Korea Steelmaker Falls; 
Domino Effect Is Feared 


CjHp&d by Our Stuff Fnwn Dvpac/ia 

SEOUL — The South Korean steel 
conglomerate Sammi Group filed for 
court protection from its creditors Wed- 
nesday under the weight of mounting 
losses and debts, raising fears of a dom- 
ino effect on other businesses and banks 
as the economy slows. 

The conglomerate’s steel unit, 
Sammi Steel Co., was declared bank- 
rupt hours later, unable to honor 1.1 


AGENDA 

De Kooning Dies; 
Painter Was 92 

Willem de Kooning, 92, a dom- 
inant figure in the abstract expres- 
sionist art movement, died Wed- 
nesday in Springs. New York, 
where he had long lived. 

Mr. de Kooning went to New 
York City from his native Rotter- 
dam and dramatically altered the 
shape of American art after World 
War II. 

He returned again and again to 
the female figure in his long career, 
and out of this preoccupation came 
many of his most hotly contested 
works: the toothy, blowzy images 
that have been described as sexist 
and pornographic, affectionate and 
funny, and sometimes all of these at 
once. Obituary: Page 7. 

RAGE TWO 

The Anguish of Being Albanian 

THE AMERICAS Pas*3> 

Court Widens Environmental Suits 

AS1A/PACIFTC Page 4. 

Burma Crocks Down in Mandalay 

EUROPE 1*9*5. 

Storms Clouds at the Summit 


BtlSINESS/FI NANCE Pafi«11- 

Krupp Suspends Takeover Bid 

Books.'. Page 3. 

Crossword l ®* 

Opinion * Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 20-21- 


Ms motional Classified 


line iHT on-line http://v> 

avw. iht.com] 


S The Dollar f 

nsw York 

Wednesday 9 * P-M 

previous dose 

■ DM 

1.681 

1.673 

Pound 

1.596 

1.5905 

Yen 

12.75 

122.425 

FF 

5.671 

5.645 


^TheDo^ 

previous dow 

; -iaaa 

6877.68 

6896.56 

SR S&P 500 1 

change 

Wednesday 6 A PM. 

previous dose 

-3J36 

785^0 

789.66 


billion won ($1.2 million) in debts at 
two local banks. Under South Korean 
law, a second failure to honor a debt 
results in automatic bankruptcy. 

With annual production of 1 5 million 
tons. Sammi Steel is the world's third- 
largest producer of specialty steel. 

In requesting court receivership for 
Sammi Steel Co. and its trading arm, 
Sammi Corp., Kim Hyun Bae. president 
of the conglomerate, said he would re- 
lish management control. 

for three other subsidiaries 
were returned for more documentation, 
and mil be filed again at a later time, 
Sammi said. 

It was the second steel maker to 
founder this year after Hanbo Steel Co. 
folded under $5.8 billion of debt in 
January in the country's biggest bank- 
ruptcy. 

Samrai’s troubles were a fresh blow to 
the economy, officially forecast to grow 
at 6 percent this year, down from growth 
of about 7 percent last year. Some econ- 
omists predict growth could slow to 5 
percent, the lowest since 1980. 

The news sent share prices on the 
Seoul stock exchange tumbling Wed- 
nesday, partly on worries that tighter 
credit as a result of the failures could push 
other indebted companies over the edge. 
The composite index lost 1.8 percent ca- 
ll. 68 points, to close at 646-29. 

“There is a good possibility of fur- 
ther bankruptcies coming on line," said 
Lim Chun Soo, head of research at 
Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Capital Mar- 
kets Ltd. 

The won continued to slide, propelled 
by renewed concerns that the latest cor- 
porate crisis would reduce the inflow of 
foreign lending and squeeze the supply 
of dollars. The won ended at 88430, 
down from Tuesday’s close of 883.00. 

The won has fallen by about 12 per- 
cent since the start of last year, slashing 
corporate profits by raising the burden 
of overseas debt-servicing costs. 

The news also caused a key South 
Korean interest rale to rise to an 18- 
month high cm fears that liquidity could 
dry up further. 

S ammi Group, the country’s 26th- 
largest conglomerate, said it was seek- 

See SAMMI, Page 6 


Year Later, 
‘Mad -Cow’ 
Still Runs 
The Bill Up 

But Feared Damage 
To Humans ’ Health 
Remains Uncertain 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — One year after Britain 
acknowledged a possible link between 
“mad -cow" disease and a fatal human 
brain illness, the economic and political 
damage caused by Europe's beef crisis 
continues to mount even as the risk to 
human health remains uncertain. 

Consumers by the milli ons have cut 
back on red meat or given it up entirely, 
forcing a dramatic shakeout in the beef 
industry that will cost taxpayers dearly. 
Across the European Union, beef con- 
sumption fell by an average of 10 per- 
cent in 1996. 

Britain and its European Union part- 
ners have committed to spend more than 
$10 billion through 1998 to buy up 
surplus beef and destroy animals at risk 
of contracting bovine spongiform en- 
cephalopathy. 

“It’s not an anniversary we ’ll be cel- 
ebrating," said Gerry Kiely, a spokes- 
man for the EU farm commissioner, 
Franz Fisc hi er. who is coordinating the 
effort. 

Politically, the beef crisis is among 
the reasons why most analysts expect 
Prime Minister John Major’ to lose his 
job in Britain's election May I. 

His government is widely perceived 
as having bungled the affair, first by 
dismissing the potential health risk for 
years and then by waging diplomatic 
war against its European partners rather 
than tightening its veterinary standards. 
The best that can be said for Douglas 
Hogg, the hapless agriculture minister, 
is that he was recently named man of the 
year by Britain’s Vegetarian Society. 

The affair also has shattered many 
notions about European unity. The EU 
ban on British beef exports has rein- 
forced the divide between London and 
its partners, and die bloc has run rough- 
shod over die principles of its vaunted 
single market in an effort to reassure 
consumers about food safety. 

On Wednesday, EU farm ministers 
approved legislation to require countries 
to label the national origin of meat by the 
year 2000 despite the opposition of the 
EU' s executive commission, which said 
the labels would violate die spirit of the 
single market and fail to give any useful 
information to consumers. 

With all those casualties, it is perhaps 
the ultimate irony that the toll on human 
health — the fear that sparked die crisis 
— so far appears minimal. 

Since Health Minister Stephen Dar- 
rell announced on March 20, 1996, that 
bovine spongiform encephalopathy was 
suspected of causing 10 fatal cases of 
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, only six 
more cases have been found in Britain 
(three of the victims remain alive). 

That is a far cry from the scenarios of 
a year ago. when some researchers pre- 
dicted thousands of deaths. But research- 
ers admit they do not know the real 
health risk because the incubation period 
for Crcurzfe 1 dt- J akob disease remains 
unknown — it is believed to be years or 
even detrades. The eventual number of 

See BEEF, Page 5 



Kav lusuftiThr %ik!uict«Mi IW 

George Tenet, acting director of central intelligence since December. 

Acting Director of CIA 
Ready for a Promotion 

Tenet Called Willing, Able and Confirmable 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton has decided to nominate George 
Tenet, the acting director of central in- 
telligence, to become head of die CIA, 
senior administration officials said 
Wednesday. 

"The president believes he is well 
qualified for die post," said a senior 
White House official. “He’s more than 
satisfied." 

The nomination of Mr. Tenet, 44, 
who was deputy CIA director before his 
interim appointment as acting director 
in December, would replace that of An- 
thony Lake. 

He withdrew from consideration 
Monday after harsh Senate confirma- 
tion hearings. 

■ A Familiar Search 

Tim Weiner of The New York Times 
reported earlier : 

For the fifth time in little more than 
four years, the Clinton administration 
found itself looking this week for 
someone to fill the job of director of 
central intelligence. . 

In the aftermath of Mr. Lake's de- 


cision to withdraw his nomination, gov- 
ernment officials said. President Clin- 
ton and his advisers did not have many 
choices other than Mr. Tenet 
He is one of an exceptionally small 
number of people who met three tests 
fora new nominee: someone who could 

A high-ranking Democrat warned 
die White House about Mr. Lake's 
prospects. Page 6. 

be approved by the Senate, is capable of 
doing the job and is willing to take it 
* * I can ' t give you a better name' ' than 
Mr. Tenet’s, an intelligence official 
said, or. given those three standards, 
“even a name at all." 

Other potential candidates included 
Deputy Attorney General Jamie Gorel- 
ick, who is preparing to leave the Justice 
Department; Frank Wisner, ambassa- 
dor to India and son of the CIA cold 
warrior of the same name, and former 
Senator Warren Rudman, once a mem- 
ber of the Senate intelligence commit- 

See CIA, Page 6 


WHO Hails 
Advance in 
Tuberculosis 
As Milestone 

Millions of Lives 
Could Be Saved, 
Agency Predicts 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

GENEVA — Claiming "the biggest 
health breakthrough of this decade,’’ 
the World Health Organization forecast 
Wednesday that millions of lives could 
be saved over the next 10 years through 
a tuberculosis treatment that has been 
field-tested in such disparate places as 
New York City and rural Tanzania. 

Researchers said the benefits of the 
system, known as Directly Observed 
T reatment Short-course, or DOTS, have 
become apparent only in the past few 
months as a mass of new data has shown 
dramatic increases in the numbers of 
people cured as a result of the regi- 
men. 

The new treatment and management 
regime is based on close monitoring of 
tuberculosis patients to ensure that they 
fully complete a course of powerful 
medication lasting six to eight months. 

In the past, said Dr. Paul Nunn, the 
head of the World Health Organization 
Tuberculosis Research anti Surveil- 
lance Unit here, patients who failed to 
complete such courses ended up gen- 
erating drug-resistant and incurable 
strains of the disease. 

The new system — in use in 70 of the 
world's 216 countries and territories — 
differs markedly from other forms of 
treatment where the therapy regimen is 
not standardized or where tuberculosis 
treatment centers on mass scanning of 
the population by X-ray and institu- 
tionalization of infected patients, re- 
searchers said. 

The development was revealed si- 
multaneously at the World Health Or- 
ganization headquarters in Geneva and 
at the institute in Berlin named for 
Robert Koch, the German physician 
who announced his discovery of the 
bacilli causing tuberculosis on March 
24, 1882. 

Since then, the disease has killed un- 
told millions of people, said Dr. Nunn, 
but "completely fell off the public 

See TB, Page 5 


Hollywood Gives Tibet Star Billing 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — One thing the 
Academy Awards will not have this 
year is a speech on Chinese repression 
in Tibet by Richard Gere, the actor 
who has led the way in Hollywood’s 
growing concern for Tibetan rights. 

But in a larger sense, Mr. Gere — 
banned as an Oscar presenter after his 
televised denunciation of China in 
1993 — no longer needs to steal a 
platform to advance his favorite cause. 
Whatever happens at the Academy 
Awards on Monday night, Tibet is 
looming larger than ever on the show 
business map. 

Last June, 100,000 people attended 


a two-day Free Tibet concert in San 
Francisco, where saffron-robed 
Buddhist monks talking about their 
imprisonment mingled with music 
groups including the Beastie Boys and 
Smashing Pumpkins. 

In August, at an American Him- 
alayan Foundation dinner in Los 
Angeles, Harrison Ford, Sharon 
Stone, Steven Seagal, Shirley 
Mac Lai ne and other stars lined up to 
shake the Dalai Lama's hand. 

And three weeks ago, at an an- 
niversary benefit for Tibet House in 
New York, founded 10 years ago by 
Mr. Gere and a Columbia University 
scholar, Robert Thurman, the per- 
formers included Allen Ginsberg, 
Philip Glass and Natalie Merchant. 


Honorary chairmen included Roy 
Lichtenstein, Henry Luce 3d and Mr. 
Thurman's daughter, lima. 

Most important, perhaps, die iso- 
lated mountain kingdom, for the last 
decade the concern of a relatively small 
group of scholars, human rights ad- 
vocates and celebrities, is the subject of 
four movies being made. Two of them 
— “Kundiin," Martin Scorsese’s 
movie based on the life of the Dalai 
Lama, and one by Jean Jacques An- 
naud — are major productions that 
seem likely to draw worldwide atten- 
tion to the Tibetans’ plight. 

“Tibet is going to enter Western 
popular culture as something can only 

See TIBET, Page 6 


For America’s Hip, Young and Mobile, the Next Stop Is Victual 


By Keith B. Richbuig 

Washington Post Service 

HO CHI MINH CITY — For Amy Everitt, the 
biggest and best party she has ever known was at 
San Francisco’s Fairmont Hotel on election night, 
1992, when the Democrats regained the White 
House and all was well in her political world. But 
the morning after brought a new heada che — 
thoughts of finding a job, starting a career, getting 

3 So she deferred the decision: She came to Vi- 
etnam. “I had to go out and buy a suit and buy a 
briefcase and high heels and stockings and get a 


job," said Ms. Everitt, who now works for the local 
American Chamber of Commerce. “But instead of 
buying a briefcase, I bought a backpack and came 
here." 

It might seem an odd choice, this faraway city in 
one of fte last avowedly Communist countries on 
Earth, and the place that an older generation of 
Americans, including President Bill Clinton, did 
their utmost to avoid. But Vietnam — - and par- 
ticularly this bustling; freewheeling capitalist city 
in the south — las become one of the hippest 
destinations of choice for a growing number of 20- 
soraething American expatriates. 

Some, like Ms. Everitt, came as backpackers and 


decided to stay on. Many others are Vietnamese- 
born Americans — the Viet Khieu. as they are 
called here, most of whom left as children just 
before the fall of Saigon in 1975 — and they are 
coming back to find that missing piece of them- 
selves. 

A few come hoping to cash in on the country’s 
rush to commercialize and make a million. Many 
others come to do good, working for private or- 
ganizations and relief agencies. A few dabble in 
journalism. And most, it seems, at one point or 
another, end up like Ms. Everitt did when she first 
arrived, teaching English to Vietnamese as the 
easiest way to make money and pay the rent. 


Some struggle with the language, many have 
visa hassles, and power blackouts and computer 
viruses torment their desktops. But they stay be- 
cause somewhere along the way, they became 
infected with Vietnam’s pulsating rhythms as the 
entire country races to catch up with its more 
prosperous Asian neighbors. 

“At Berkeley, it seems like everybody — 
whether they 're studying anthropology or linguist- 
ics — wants to go to Vietnam." said Steve Dahl- 
gren. 27. a 1992 Berkeley grad who recently 
moved here and is teaching English. “They like it 

See VIETNAM, Page 6 


On Summit Eve , Finns Ponder Past 


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12 . 



By Alessandra Stanley 

New York Tunes Service 

HELSINKI — For 40 years. Helsinki 
was known mainly for saunas, spying 
and summitry. Finland, tbe closes! Nor- 
dic neighbor of a vast Communist em- 

oire. kept its hard-won independence 
Sfter World War n by pledging a friend- 
ship for the Soviet Union it never really 

^Forced by geography and the Cold 
War balance of power to placate Mos- 
cow Finland called itself neutral. The 
world called its precarious condition 

Union collapsed in 
1991, Finland eager!); sought tojomtirc 
European Union, which it did m 1995, 


shaking off its allegiance to Moscow 
and carving out a new identity for itself 
as a loyal partner of the West. 

As they prepare to play host again to a 
summit meeting between East and 
West, Finns are experiencing a form of 
identity crisis. Like a struggling actor 
who goes back to waiting on tables to 
make ends meet, in bolding the U.S.- 
Russian s ummi t meeting this week Hel- 
sinki is returning to a role it had thought 
it had left behind when the Soviet Union 
collapsed. 

“I saw it as a regression," said Risto 
Pentrila, 37, a member erf 1 Parliament 
from the Young Finnish Party. "Instead 
of finding a role in the new Europe that is 
our future, we went back to our old 
position of acting as a broker between 


Fast and West.” F inns are also looking 
backward in another direction. There is 
no nostalgia for Soviet interference, but 
as Finland snuggles to restructure an 
economy that went into a tailspin when 
flic Soviet Union fell apart, some are 
beginning to ask whether their country 
can retain its social democratic ways if it 
remolds itself to fir ixuo a Europe pre- 
occupied with reducing die welfare 
state. 

Reliving the past was not the Finnish 
government’s intention when it impuls- 
ively offered Helsinki, a two-hour flight 
from Moscow, as a more convenient 
place than Washington for the then- 
ailing President Boris Yeltsin of Russia 

See SUMMIT, Page 5 



IVlerlirjnng/Tbe A*udal*d|*r*» 

A police van outside Helsinki's presidential palace, again a summit site. 



EVTERNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Stay or Flee?/ An Albanian Dilemma 


Hope Battles With Fear 


T IRANA, Albania — When the bullets 
were flying around die dusty alley at the 
front of her apartment, Elsa Baliauri, a 
poet and mother of two children, was 
tom. Should she go? Should she stay? 

“I'm doing well. I have a job. I have friends I 
love,” Mrs. Baliauri. 36, said in her book-lined 
living room where Albanian and French language 
editions of her works are' on the shelves. “Bur 
a gain i was thinking perhaps we should leave.” 

Now that the shooting has subsided, Mrs. 
Baliauri has persuaded her husband, Viktor, 40, 
an engineer, that it is best to remain, even though 
’she knows it is an uneasy calm. On Monday they 
turned down an offer to be evacuated by heli- 
copter with a group of Russians. 

Thousands of educated Albanians, many of 
whom were persecuted under the Co mm u n ist 
dictatorship of Enver Hoxha, have already gone 
into exile. Others, despairing of the broken prom- 
ise, and misrule of the six years since the collapse 
of communism, wonder if their poor country on 
the periphery of Europe will ever recover from 
the shock of the last two weeks of violence. 

But some, better off than most and with 

dreams of a democratic future, are eager to show 
that not all Albanians are potential refugees. 

For Gazi Haxhia, 28, who attended Columbia 
University's School of International and Public 
Affairs and is now the first General Motors 
dealer in Albania, staying is a matter of pat- 
riotism. 

“We are Albanian and if I leave this country it 
means I'm leaving when this country needs 
me.” he said. Even so. Mr. Haxhia is buying a 
house in Turkey as a hedge. 

A veneer of normalcy has returned to the 
capital with government offices open and traffic 
back on the streets. But there was no sign of any 
surrendering of the weapons that were handed 
out last Thursday by loyalists to President Sali 1 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tutus Service 


Berisha. At die main agricultural university at 
Kaxnsz, on the outskirts of Tirana, a group of 
aimed men looted the campus and set Are to the 
library of 150,000 books. 

In southern Albania, rebel leaders in 
Gjirokaster set a deadline of Thursday for the 
resignation of Mr. Berisha. Their d eman d fol- 
lowed a call by Fatos Nano, leader of the main 
opposition Socialist Party, for Mr. Berisha to stop 
meddling in the affairs of the new coalition gov- 
ernment headed by BashJtim Fino, a Socialist. 

Mr. Nano fled from jail during the mayhem 
last week. He had served four years of a 12-year 
sentence on charges of misappropriating state 
funds, but was considered a political prisoner by 
human rights groups. 

For Mrs. Baliauri, the appeal for national 
healing from Mr. Nano and the new government 
was a tentative start to reconstruction. 

“We are at ground zero,” she said. “People 
are not only worse off economically. They are 
also angry. And to have people armed in this 
situation is a real tragedy. 




7hr Nw, Vbrfc Thao 


W ITH much of the country our of 
government control and after three 
days of tenor in Tirana during a total 
breakdown in law and order, Mrs. 
Baliauri said she seriously thought of leaving. 

“For my daughter the shooting outside the 
apartment was traumatic," she said. “She hears 
rumors, she is afraid.” 

Everyday life, bringing up Anya, 8, and Jay, 
18 months, is difficult and likely to get worse, 
she said. Even though she can see her daughter’s 
school from their apartment window, she or her 
husband had been walking her there because of 
the prevalence of kidnappers. The school has 
been closed for two weeks and it is unclear when 
it will reopen. 

Bui despite the stress, Mrs. Baliauri said she 
was stirred by her long family history in Albania 
and a sense that she cannot abandon it. 

Her grandfather, Agneii Baliauri. was im- 


Elsa and Viktor Baliauri with Anya, 8, and Jay. "The poverty in this 
country is extreme, not onfy of material things but of the spirit. 

But I belong here; only a terrible war will make me leave. 9 


prisoned for eight years after die Communists 
came to power because of his bourgeois back- 
ground. She was tormented by schoolmates be- 
cause it was rumored, she said, that her family 
once maintained 12 housekeepers. 

“My sister and I were always dreaming — 
how could we leave this country,” she said, 
recalling the bleak Hoxha era when foreign 
literature was scarce and foreign travel banned. 

Their desire to leave was heightened by a copy 
of “We, the Living,” the partly autobiograph- 


young Russian girl who eventually manages to 
go to the United States. 


ical first novel of Ayn Rand, published in 1936, 
which she found in her father's library. The 


which she found in her father's library. The 
novel describes the deterioration of spirit and 
mind under Soviet communism and features a 


go to the United Stares. 

“After reading that, we were determined to 
leave,” Mrs. Baliauri said. “But then when the 
changes came in 1991 and there were all these 
crowds outside foreign embassies with people 
wanting visas, we couldn’t enter.” 

Instead, Mrs. Baliauri began to work as a 
journalist and established the Albanian Human 
Rights Group. 

“The poverty in this country is extreme, not only 
of material things but of the spirit,” she said. 
“Historically we’ve not had anyone who is en- 
gaged in politics who has any idealism. But I belong 
here; only a terrible war will make me leave.” 


Mexico Protests Arms Inflow at Leaky U.S. Border 


By Clifford Krauss 

New York Times Service 


MEXICO CITY — Parrying almost 
daily attacks from Washington be- 
littling their efforts against mug traf- 
ficking, Mexican officials are com- 
plaining to the White House and 
Congress that the United States needs to 
do more to stem the deluge of illegal 
weapons crossing die U.S. border into 
Mexico. 

Mexico’s quiet lobbying campaign 
for stronger U.S. gun controls on the 
bonier began in earnest when the hand- 
gun that killed the secretary-general of 
the -ruling ' political party in 1994 was 
traced to Texas gun merchants. 


But the effort picked up new urgency 
st week after the accidental recovery 


last week after the accidental recovery 
by U.S. Customs Service agents of two 
truckloads of grenade launchers and M- 
2 carbine barrels and magazines at a 


border crossing near San Diego. 

Mexican, officials say thousands of 
guns and large caches of heavy weapons 


are crossing the border under the noses 
of UJ3. Customs agents every year, for- 
tifying drug cartels and guerrilla groups 
as well as fueling a crime wave in Mex- 
ican cities. 

“They always ask us to do this or do 
that,” Mipuel Ruiz Cabanas, die Mex- 
ican Foreign Ministry's top official in 
law-enforcement matters, said. “Bui 
when we say the U.S. is the source of 
illegal arms trafficking into Mexico, the 
answer we receive is very limited.” 

U.S. law-enforcement officials say 
they are making efforts to satisfy foe 
Mexican government by training dogs 
to sniff for ammunition, deploying giant 
X-ray machines to inspect trucks cross- 
ing the border and stepping up tracings 
of guns captured in Mexico. 

A U.S. official who deals with Mex- 
ico policy said, “We’re willing to do 
everything possible to work with Mex- 
ico to control foe flow of guns.’ ’ But foe 
official, who spoke on condition of an- 
onymity, added, “Since foe United 
States doesn’t have very tight gun-con- 


trol laws, there is only a limited amount 
of things we can do/’ 

Mexico does not produce armaments 
and has strict gun-control laws. 

Mexican officials said President Ern- 
esto Zedillo intended to raise the issue 
of gun control when President Bill Clin- 
ton visited Mexico next month. 

In the meantime. Jesus Silva Herzog, 
Mexico's ambassador to Washington, is 
plying the halls of Congress asking for 
stricter outbound enforcement at the 
border. 

“We’re simply not satisfied,* * Marco 
Provencio, the assistant undersecretary 
for foreign relations, said. 

• Mexican officials say the capture of 
the huge arms cache at the Otay Mesa 
border crossing near San Diego last 
week showed just how porous the bor- 
der is. The shipment had entered the 
United States through the port of Long 
Beach, California — foe same place that 
was foe point of entry for a three-ton 
shipment of illegal chemicals for nar- 
cotics production that was found in 


Mexico City last year, Mexican officials 
pointed oul 

U.S. law-enforcement officials re- 
fuse to say where they think foe arms 
cache originated and where it was go- 
ing. But they conceded that they had 
discovered the armaments only by 
chance, after warehouse workers 
peeked into a damaged crate and re- 
ported what they saw. 

Most troubling, both American and 
Mexican officials say, is that the captured 
M-2 carbines and rocket launchers were 
unassembled and incomplete, suggesting 
that part of the shipment may have 
already crossed the border. The M-2 
carbine, light and reliable in jungle con- 
ditions. is a favorite of guerrilla groups. 

Mexican officials said they were step- 
ping up their bonier controls on weapons 
but said their agents were handicapped 
by a lack of equipment and training. 

A special task force of Mexican and 
U.S. law-enforcement officials started 
work on improving gun-law enforce- 
ment 18 months ago. 


BodyonTmdt 
Doesn't Delay 
20 UJL Trains 


Tutu to Get Cancer Therapy in U.S. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Reuters 

CAPE TOWN — Th&Nobel peace laureate 
Archbishop Desmond Tutu said Wednesday 
foal his prostate cancer appeared to have 
spread and that he would go to the United 


States for radiation therapy. 

Archbishop Tutu, 65, a leading campaigner 
in the fight against apartheid, baa most of his 
prostate cut out in January after foe gland was 
diagnosed as cancerous. 

Doctors told him at the time he would need 
further surgery or treatment with radiation 
and hormones. 

Archbishop Tutu, now chairman of foe 
Truth and Reconciliation Commission inves- 
tigating apartheid crimes in South Africa, said 
that after consulting with doctors in the United 
States last week, he had decided on a com- 
bination of hormone treatment and radio- 
therapy. 

The former archbishop of Cape Town vis- 
ited two U.S. clinics — Johns Hopkins Med- 
ical Center in Baltimore and Memorial Sloan- 
Kettering Cancer Center in New York. 

“I have been advised that foe cancer is 
suspected to have penetrated beyond foe 
prostate gland and that as a result radio- 


therapy is foe best option,” he said in a 
statement 

Archbishop Tutu said medical specialists in 
Cape Town would begin a three-month course 
of hormone treatment Thursday. 

“After foe hormone treatment, I plan to 
have the radiotherapy at a clinic in foe United 
States,” he added. “This will take two 
months." 

He said that while he was in foe United 
States, he would set up an office through 
which he would remain in close contact with 
the truth commission, which is investigating 
human rights abuses by both sides of the 
apartheid divide. 

Archbishop Tutu was awarded foe Nobel 
Peace Prize in 1984 for his efforts to end 
apartheid. 

But he has not hesitated to criticize President 
Nelson Mandela’s African National Congress, 
which won historic elections in April 1994, 
over what he sees as its weaknesses. 

He said Wednesday foal be hoped to follow 
a normal schedule during the hormone treat- 
ment but that he would be “unable to continue 
squeezing additional commitments in foe 
schedule.” 


Customs Strike at Polish Border Ends 

WARSAW (Reuters) — Polish customs officials called off a go-slow 
protest Wednesday that caused long lines at several border crossings. 
The protest, which began Monday, involved meticulous checks of every 
second vehicle and goods consignment rather than one in 10, as is 
usual. 

Both sides announced they had reached a deal on the dispute, which 
largely concerned methods of paying a bonus that makes up half of foe 
officials’ pay. 


Delta Flights Delayed in Frankfurt 


FRANKFURT (AP) — For foe second time in three days. Delta Air 
Lines workers delayed some trans- Atlantic flights Wednesday in a 


dispute with management over severance pay. 
On Monday, 14 Delta flights from Frankru 


On Monday, 14 Delta flights from Frankfurt were delayed from 30 
m inures to two hours when 140 employees stopped work on short notice 
to attend a meeting. Delta is cutting 600 to 800 jobs in Europe, most of 
them in Frankfurt, because of restructuring. 


Morocco’s state-owned railroad said Wednesday it would invest 
2.167 billion dirhams ($233 million) to build a 136-kilometer (85 -mile) 
double track. Unking Kenitra, 40 kilometers from Rabat, to the central 
city ofMeknes. (Reuters l 


U.S. airlines must inspect some Boeing 737 rudder power control 
units for a possible problem that could cause foe rudder to swing on its 
own, foe Federal Aviation Administration ordered. f AP J 


Agence France-Presse 

LONDON — Up to 20 rush-hour 
trains in southern England passed 
over, but did not disturb, the 
covered body of a young woman 
left lying between railroad tracks in 
order to avoid delays while a med- 
ical examiner was summoned. 
Rail crack said Wednesday. 

A spokesman for the company 
that owns and runs much of the 
British rail infrastructure said foe 
woman, an apparent suicide, was 
found on foe rail bed Feb. 6 by a 
train engineer near a station in 
Billericay in southeastern England- 

Press reports Wednesday said 
that engineers had complained of 
being traumatized by the incident 
and mat a spokesman for their uni- 
on asked, "Just how sick and un- 
caring can this new regime of foe 
privatized railway become?" 

A spokesman for Railtrack said, 
“When we find a body on the 
tracks, we are not allowed to move it 
until a medical examiner sees it” 

“Obviously, you call for foe 
medical examiner straight away,” 
he said. “But it may be hours be- 
fore he can get there. And in the 
meanwhile, we try to keep the trains 
running if it is at all possible with- 
out touching the body.” 

He said this was what was done in 
foe incident Feb. 6 after consulting 
with foe railroad. Great Eastern, and 
the local police. The woman was 
believed to have been struck by a 
train earlier that morning. 

“This procedure has been in our ; 
rule book for years, ’ ’ foe Railtrack 
spokesman said. “If foe body can 
fc« covered and foe trains moved 
without touching the body in any 
way, that’s what we do, and ask foe 
drivers to continue. 

"If they object, then we have 
someone else move the train," he 
added. 

A Great Eastern spokesman said, 

* ‘There was no question of any profit 
motive being involved in this.” 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 



Italy Tighten^ 
Controls on ■■ 
Refugee Flow: 
From Albania. 




..IT UlN 


The Associated Press 

ROME — While promising to c big v 

dime to give temporary rcfiige to . 

gitives from chaos in Albania, Italy bd. 
Wednesday sent back to Tirana the firsgf . 
of hundreds of Albanians branded as 
troublemakers. ^ /. *1 

Three military helicopters ferried A 
total of 135 Albanian men from foe 
military airport at Brindisi to Tirana.* , . 

“They gave us a piece of paper fosk : 
we signed without knowing what'it 
was," one said after landing in Tirana: 

“We only saw we were sent to Albany y . 
when we looked out of foe window.*' : 

Under growing political pressing ’ * 
Prime Minister Romano Prodi’s cabinet - 
approved a decree Wednesday assuring - . 
that those seeking “temporary" refuge; x : . 
would receive assistance but that those ; 
considered dangerous for public order y l 
would be expelled., - - - - y - ; 

The government also said it. -was «■*_. 
sending food and medicine to Albania. . 

Interior Minister Giorgio Napolitand; ’ - - c 
briefing the Chamber of Deputies, said A 
that by early Wednesday a total of ' *. # .. : - 
1 0,6 1 9 refugees had landed in Italy sinbe 
a week earlier cm a total of lfil boats, ; - 
which have since been confiscated. 

A day earlier, Mr. Napoli tano caHeg ]0J_ 
foe exodus “alarming and difficult 3a 
manage. ' ' Stays will be permitted for up ;> 5? 

to 60 days, or possibly 90 if foe chaq§ . i 
continues in Albania, Mr. Napphtaho' ‘ 1 
said. He said authorities would check to . : : 

see whether refugees come from area® 
still gripped by violence. ■ 

While at first taking in all the AI-; '>* 
banians who sailed to southeastern Italy • 
last week, the Italian authorities la$f 
began seizing weapons and boats arid ~_ l 
warning of criminals who fled when . 
mobs emptied Albania’s jails. : 

Most of foe refugees had no papers, - _ 
and officials acknowledged that that " - 
problem, compounded by the break- 1 
down of authority in Albania, made It 
difficult to identify criminals. 1*4 •• 7 : 

Fingerprint checks turned up some 7 2 - 5 
people who either had tried to enterTtaly 
illegally in the past or had criminal i ~ 
records in Italy, officials said. 


From 


Pofit 


■ EU Urges Albania to Act 

Albania must get its own house in 
order before it can expect the European 
Union to help rebuild the impoverished 
state, the brad of an EU mis sion said 
Wednesday, Agence France-Presse re, 
ported from Tirana. 

Albania's government rejected an uf- 
timatum from rebels In foe south fiat 
President Sali Berisha to resign by 
Thursday, state-run television said. 

“Ultimatums are unacceptable. We 
favor dialogue,” Prime Minister 
Bashkim Fino of the Socialist Party 
said, following a meeting with all foe 
political parties. 


In Tirana, Count Jan D’Ansembouxg, 
leaking at the end of a 48-hour Eu 


speaking at the end of a 48-hour Eu 
fact-finding mission, said that “Albania 
has to solve its own problems before we 
can help and that help is very relat- 
ive.” r 

Large parts of Albania are controlled 
by rebels and armed gangs following 2 
rebellion this month that at one pomt 
reached foe capital. j"! 

The EU mission leader conceded, 
however, that the Albanian government 
lacked the means to bring the situation 
under control. 

"The whole police, security infra- 
structure is in a shambles," he said! 
“There's no border police, no prisons; 
There’s hardly an army. They need jOst 
about everything.” 

Widespread looting in the last two 
weeks has stripped army depots of arms 
and grain warehouses of their contents. 
The government also lost control of foe 
police force in some areas and many 
officials abandoned foeir posts. ’,*1 I 
Though some people have stir-: 
rendered their guns, the vast majority 
are still armed. Fourteen people, uij $ 
eluding four children, died from gun- 
shot wounds in foe previous 24 hours! 
the Interior Ministry said Wednesday :** 

The deaths raised to more than 100 
the number of those killed since rebels 
seized army and police weapons and 
took control of many towns amid anger 
over the collapse of pyramid schemes: 1 


MM. nuL. Sra Lost 
PbtEs pistes State Snow 


Mtn. ms. Snow Lost 
Pistes nstas State Snow 


Pas dels Casa aQ to 

SofctaJ 20 iso 


Fafc 'frag ISO. 

Fob atoeh sfrtifl 150 


i open, beg «i 
liraLMiin 


Austria 

Ischgl 

KitzbufieJ 

Lach 

Mayrhofen 
Oberflurgi 
Saatoach 
St Anton 


GooH Opoi Mr ISO at 411 

far Ctosed to IflQ «mi 

Good Open to 103 af»J 

Far Ctosed to 190 SOSBI 

Good Open to IBIS 0221 

fair Some to ISO HA 

Far An to 1 B» at32i 


itpen, Wan at best! i 


■ open, tarns jraarsfttg 


Italy 

Botrrdo 

Covtnla 

Cortina 

Courmayaur 

Lbrigno 

Madesano 

Selva 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


Ftk An to S3 MOBS open good sbo*> 2200a 

Good Opta to 27 12 ef2SMts open, pates most/, good 


Norway 

Goto 


Good Opon to I S3 at 18 Hte open, n Fa&q me bear 


Lake Louise 135 190 Good Open to rtfi Bt 12 ' 

WWader to 265 Good Open pw*- itt3 idXl 


S w ft wfaod 


AfpscfHuez 


Lea Arcs 

Avoriaz 

Chamonix 

Courchevel 
Lea Deux Alpes 
Megeva 
MdrfbeJ 
LaPtagne 
Serra Chevalier 


Good Ctosed to 1M 2SWmsapan.gm 


loan ai bash pauhr 


icy to 19Q 


Davos 
lOoeteis 
Murren 
Saaa Fee 
St. Moritz 
Vwtfer 
Wengen 
Zermatt 


18b tarn I3ooo stator 


Valtflsera 

VaiThorens 


Good nan aping ISO 

Good Open to 18/3 

Good icy to ISO 

Good toy var \m 


180 W3 fib open, sane panti? 
180 mew to traps® 


mat ms open Mtf) snow to onto 


tt S. 

Aspen 

Bracken ridge 
Crested Butte 
Mammoth 
Parte City 
VaH 

Winter Park 


25 

MO 

Fair 

irt to 

60 

170 

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Open 

45 

330 

fair 

etojh 

5 

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50 55 Good Open 

5 

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wan 

25 

165 

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30 

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95 

far 

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30 

ISO 

fair 

by 

5 

70 

fair 

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IS 

215 

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Open 

IBS 

175 

Good 

Hard 

165 

210 

Fat 

Open 

T70 

180 

fair 

Hart 

280 

390 

Good 

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210 

285 

Goad 

Open 

175 

200 

fair 

Hart 

170 

210 

Good 

Open 


ISO 21/22 S/18 open, same Mi 


Apm 

Aimraoam 

AiVcara 


kiod icy to 130 2S/X fits qpaa wnftp mnj a m a 

far ter to 190 shlto open, goad atone 2Xna 

fair Icy to 180 77I8S 0>S apw, same Imsh PwOr 


29 and sets eats open 


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Bemhtes^dan nn rVa 

Oberatdori a is 


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far Ctosed to ISO 2028 Hbs open, gnantog or 


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tadng to resort iflage. Ait Mfcd am 

OBporia tappfed by As Sh CUi d Seal ftton. 


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tauoMb 

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London 

Madrid 

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man 

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vrae 

Vienna 

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Zurich 


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Jmswom tsawno 12229™ Cs 

North America Europe 
Mild air will M«ir the Much of wesiein Europe, 
nabort from iha West Con si Including Paris and Lon- 
» the Plains through iha don, wtH enjoy a mode rat- 
weekend, though cooHng Ing trend, whSe episodes at 
wffl work into the northern showers wffl affect Amstar- 
Plain® by Sunday. A front dam and Berlin. Eastern 
could trigger showers over Europe ml remain fihBy to 
U»e MkIwom Friday before cold, (bough Iha cold air 
exiting the Bam Saturday should retreat soma Sun- 
morning. Cooler behind day as a storm alteco the 
this system. region. 




Asia 

A front could clip Tokyo 
with a shower Friday, while 
a tfisluttarca tolling easi- 
ern China could bring 
showers to Seoul rhis 
weekend. Mainly dry and 
seasonable weathor In Bai- 
ling Warm in Hong Kong 
wttn some sunshine. Typt- 
cafly warm and humid in 
Singapore with a thundar- 
shower each day. 


Bal 

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Bfllpng 

Bombay 

Calcutta 

CnangUal 

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Hanoi 

HOChJMnh 
Hong Kong 

toismabad 
JokHna 
Karachi 
K. Lumpur 
K. Kinabulu 

UorMa 
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Rangoon 

S«u 

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26/79 10/64 pc 
23/73 9/48 pg 

29/B4 22m pc 
2373 15158 b 
3M» 22/71 pc 
32®9 JWTSpc 
31 wa euro pc 
28»4 11/52 pc 
32m 21/70 PC 
32m 23/73 pc 
32/Sfl 23/73 pc 
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PAGE 3 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


Table Is Turned in Funds Inquiry 

Congressman Tracking Donations Is Accused of Shakedown 


By Charles R. Babcock ~ 

Washington Post Service 

. .^ASWNCTOISJ — An American 
lobbyist for the Pakistani government 
£"?***? to ti? client last summer that 
he had been shaken down” for cam- 
paign contributions by Representative 
Man Burton, who now is heading a House 
Wuuy into allegations of campaign 
itond-raising abuses by Democrats 
; 2}? tobbyist. Mark Siegel, then 
working for the government of Prime 
Minister Benazir Bhutto, said he was 
approached by Mr. Burton early last 
year to raise “ar least $5,000' ’ for hisre- 
election campaign. Mr. Siegel said that 
when he was unable to do so, the Indiana 
Republican complained to the Pakistani 
fcjnbassy in Washington and later 
dtfeatened to ensure that ’'none of his 
mends or colleagues” would meet with 
Mr. Siegel or his associates. 

- “I should tefl you,” Mr. Siegel wrote 
on July 25, in a two-page memo to a 
Bhutto aide in Islamabad, “that I worked 
in. Washington for over 25 years and 
have never been shaken down by anyone 
before like Dan Burton’s threats.” The 
memo was made available by a Demo- 
cratic source in Congress. Mr. Siegel, a 
' .jjangtitne Democratic activist, confirmed 
us authenticity in an interview. Mr. Bur- 
ton declined to be interviewed. 

Kevin Binger, a top aide to Mr. Bur- 

Away From Politics 

• The judge who gave OJ. Simpson 
custody of his children said the family 
qf his murdered former wife, Nicole 
Brown Simpson, were unfit guardians 
who tried to make the children hate their 
father, the New York Post reported. In a 
sealed ruling obtained by the newspa- 
per. Judge Nancy Wieben Stock of the 
Orange County, California, Superior 
Court rejected a request from die Brown 
family to keep the children, saying that 
"residence in the Brown household was 
detrimental to the children,” with “a 
highly emotionalized atmosphere of ill- 
feeling toward the father. " (Reuters) 

• The Los Angeles police department 

is getting more firepower, with AR-1 5 
rifles, the civilian version of the military 
M-16, installed in the cars of field su- 
pervisors and officers being given per- 
mission to buy and carry their own .45- 
cali her pistols. (AP) 

•District of Columbia officials have 
found caches of stolen parking meters 
at several sires across the capital, and 
they suspect organized crime rings are 
looting the devices at a cost of millions 
of dollars to Washington. (WP) ; 


ton, said the congressman asked Mr. 

w early 1995 if be could raise 
55,000 from Pakistani Americans and 
confirmed that Mr. Burton had men- 
tioned Mr. Siegel’s failure to do so to the 
Pakistani ambassador last year. But Mr. 

Mr. Siegel's memo was 
foil of egregious exaggerations and 
untruths.” and he took issue with most 
of the quotes attributed to Mr. Burton. 

The disclosure of Mr. Burton’s com- 
plaints last year ro Mr. Siegel and the 
Pakistani ambassador. Maleeha Lodhi. 
comes at an awkward time because the 
congressman is taking tire spotlight as 
chairman of the House Government Re- 
form and Oversight Committee, which is 
investigating allegations of fund-raising 
abuses in last year’s election campaigns. 

Mr. Siegel’s memo was written in 
response to a faxed message from a top 
Bhutto aide, Zafar Hi Laly, earlier that 
same day. The aide wrote: “We were 
distressed to know from the embassy that 
Congressman Dan Burton says that you 
were unable to keep certain promises 
regarding fund-raising for his re-election 
campaign and that you were also very 
unhelpful in other matters. So much so 
that you are no longer ‘persona grata’ in 
his office. This is most upsetting as be is 
good friend of Pakistan. ” 

Rifaat Hussain, minister of informa- 
tion at the Pakistani Embassy, said se- 
nior officials at the embassy had no 


knowledge of the communications be- 
tween Mr. HiJaly and Mr. Siegel and no 
record of Mr. Burton contacting the 
embassy about campaign donations. 

Mr. Burton has regularly backed 
causes of importance to Pakistan. He 
was a key supporter of a bill that would 
have blocked $25 million in aid to India 
because of its refusal to allow inves- 
tigations of alleged atrocities in Punjab 
state, where Sikh separatists have battled 
Indian security forces. Nearly a quarter 
of the individual donations to his 1996 
campaign came from the Sikh and Kash- 
miri communities in the United Stales. 

According to Mr. Siegel’s memo, in 
conversations last year about fund-rais- 
ing efforts, Mr. Burton said that “he had 
been there for Pakistan and he expected 
me to be there for him.” 

Mr. Siegel wrote that be told Mr. Bur- 
ton he “would do his best to try to 
identify Republican Pakistani-Americ- 
ans who might contribute to his cam- 
paign" and he tried to organize a fund- 
raising event on July 1 5, but die plans fell 
through. “When I informed Congress- 
man Burton of this he became extremely 
agitated and in fact abusive.” the memo 
states. “He said if ‘1 knew what was good 
for me’ I’d deliver the money." 

Mr. Burton, through his aide, denied 
making any of the threats quoted in the 
memo or that he had “shaken down" 
the lobbyist. 


Supreme Court Widens Right 
To Sue in Environmental Law 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Supreme 
Court ruled Wednesday that a U.S. en- 
vironmental law allowed people to sue 
even if they sought less — not more — 
protection for endangered species. 

The unanimous decision said people 
who claimed to have suffered economic 
harm could use the Endangered Species 
Act to file lawsuits accusing the federal 
government of having done too much to 
protect some species. 

The ruling, in a case from Oregon, was 
a defeat for President Bill Clinton's ad- 
ministration, which sought a “one- 
way” interpretation of the law. meaning 
it would be used only to enhance the 
protection of species. The decision is 
expected to affect environmental dis- 
putes across the country. 

“It’s terrific,” said Nancy Marzulla 
of the group Defenders of Property 
Rights, which is based in Washington. 


“We believe the Endangered Species 
Act must also protect the rights of prop- 
erty owners and commercial interests. It 
can’t be viewed as a one-way street” 

During a drought in 1992, the gov- 
ernment cut off irrigation water to farms 
and water ranches near Oregon's Lost 
River to help preserve two species of 
fish, the Lost River sucker and the short- 
nose sucker. Officials had determined 
that the federal Bureau of Reclama- 
tion's operations at reservoirs in Oregon 
and Northern California might jeopard- 
ize the two species’ continued exist- 
ence. Both have been listed as en- 
dangered since 1988. 

But without water, ranchers had to 
sell cattle they could not feed and farm- 
ers watched crops die in their fields, their 
lawyer, Gregory Wilkinson, said during 
oral arguments in the case last Novem- 
ber. He said ranchers and farmers had 
suffered about S75 million of damage. 


Senate Vote Steps Up 
Pressure on Reno 

WASHINGTON — In a party-line 
vote aimed at increasing pressure on 
Attorney General Janet Reno, the Sen- 
ate on Wednesday adopted a Repub- 
lican resolution seeking an independ- 
ent counsel to investigate illegal fund- 
raising in the 1996 presidential cam- 
paign. 

The nonbinding 55-to-44 vote asked 
Ms. Reno to petition a federal court to 
appoint the counsel. Democrats ob- 
jected to the wording because it does 
not call for an investigation of con- 
gressional fund raising and contended 
that Ms. Reno does not need the advice 
of Congress on the matter. 

A Justice Department task force ap- 
pointed by Ms. Reno has already start- 
ed to investigate campaign funding. 
She has repeatedly staled she would 
petition for a counsel if legal require- 
ments were met: specific and credible 
evidence of a felony by high U.S. of- 
ficials covered under the law, or spe- 
cific and credible evidence in cases 
involving a conflict of interest. 

The Democratic leader, Thomas 
Daschle of South Dakota, had pre- 
dicted that Republicans would boll 
from their leadership, as they did last 
week in approving a broad Senate in- 
vestigation of campaign funding 
sought by Democrats. 


POLITICAL 


But this time, the Republicans 
joined the majority leader, Trent Lon 
of Mississippi, who sponsored the res- 
olution. (AP) 

Gingrich Takes Heat 
For Delay of Tax Cut 

WASHINGTON — Newt Gin- 
grich's decision io put off action tem- 
porarily on the Republicans’ tax cut 
plan has infuriated dozens of fellow 
conservatives, many of whom believe 
the move represents a dangerous 
gamble that could undermine the 
House speaker’s fragile hold on 
power. 

While Mr. Gingrich’s retreat was 
hailed by President Bill Clinton, more 
than two dozen conservative House 
members have threatened to block any 
budget deal unless the Republican 
shifts strategy. 

Moreover, Mr. Gingrich of Georgia 
is on a collision course with the House 
majority leader, Richard Armey of 
Texas, and the Senaie majority leader, 
Trent Lon of Mississippi, who fear the 
consequences of abandoning or down- 
grading a tax cut plan that once was the 
“crown jewel” of the Republican re- 
volution. 

Mr. Gingrich did not consult Mr. 
Armey in advance before announcing 
his strategy, according to an aide to the 
majority leader, even though the 
speaker has ceded responsibility to Mr. 



Alexis Herman, center, being greeted on Capitol Hill by Senator 
Barbara Mikuiski, Democrat of Maryland, and Mr. Jeffords, right. 


Armey for the day-to-day operation of 
the House. During a meeting with re- 
porters Tuesday, Mr. Armey openly 
chastised Mr. Gingrich for publicly 
suggesting the temporary shelving of 
the Republican tax proposal. 

Some conservative Republicans are 
privately complaining that Gingrich 
betrayed them on an issue of paramount 
importance after they faithfully backed 
him when he admitted violating House 
ethics rules and was formally reprim- 
anded and fined $500,000. (WP) 

Dole’s New Cause: 

A War Memorial 

WASHINGTON — Fifty-two years 
after a German shell nearly tore off his 
right arm and shoulder. Bob Dole, the 
former Republican presidential candi- 
date, on Wednesday took on the new 
mission of remembering fellow Amer- 
icans who fought in World War II. 

The 73-year-old former Senate Re- 
publican leader, who lost his presi- 
dential bid to President Bill Clinton in 
November, accepted his first postelec- 
tion job: co-chairman of a drive to 
build a World War n memorial on the 
Washington mall. 

While the many monuments in Wash- 
ington include memorials to veterans of 
the Vietnam War and the Korean War. 
and to those killed in all wars whose 
remains are unidentified, none specif- 
ically honor the 16 million Americans 
who served in World War n. 

Mr. Dole said he was honored to 
help raise 5100 million to build the 
memorial. 

“World War D has been called ‘the 
good war,’” Mr. Dole said. “But there 
is nothing good about war for those 
who have known the heat and hate and 
horror of battle. Only causes can be 
good. And in this war we found a cause 
to justify the greatest sacrifice.” 

That cause, he said, was a fight 
against aggression. 1 

Officials said Mr. Dole’s co-chair- 
man in the effort to raise funds has not 
been named yet but would be a cor- 
porate leader. The memorial will be 
funded by private, corporate and foun- 
dation donations. (Reuters) 

Quote! Unquote 

Senator Jim Jeffords. Republican of 
Vermont, after a Senate confirmation 
hearing that tread lightly on allegations 
that Alexis Herman, nominated to be 
secretary of labor, bad mixed politics 
and policy as a White House aide: 

‘ ‘Fortunately for ail of us, the standard 
for public office is not perfection. But 
neither is it sufficient to say, ‘Every- 
body does it.’ They don’t” (LAT) 


A SPY FOR ALL SEASONS: 

My Life in the CIA 

By Duane R. Clarridge with Digby Diehl. 

4fD pages. $2750. Scribner. 

Reviewed by David Wise 

I T wasn’t easy running the Central 
Intelligence Agency’s unsecret war in 
Nicaragua during the ’80s, according to 
Duane R. (.Dewey) Clarridge, the con- 
troversial CIA official in charge. There 
was the liberal American news media, a 
bad. leftish lot and the pesky Congress 
that kept passing “cowardly ’ ’ laws to try 
to siop the agency’s covert operation. 

“ Then there was the president of Hon- 
duras, too drunk to meet with the CIA; 
the propaganda balloons that floated off 
ijt the wrong direction, and the constant 


problem of resupplying the contras. 
Clarridge sent in pack mules from Hon- 
duras, but “Once inside [Nicaragua], the 
guerrillas ate the mules! ’’ 

One scene above all captures the tone 
qf this swaggering, defiant memoir. The 
freewheeling William Casey, Ronald 
Reagan’s CIA director, was pressuring 
Clarridge to do more to support the 
contra rebels in their war against 
Nicaragua’s Sandinista government- 
■ One evening early in 1984, Clamdge 
was at home, thinking. “I remember 
sitting with a glass of gin on the rocks, 
smoking a cigar (of course), and pon- 
dering my dilemma, when it hit me. Sea 
mines were the solution. We should 
mine the harbors of Nicaragua. . . . To 
this day I wonder why I didn tthmkof it 

sooner.” , . 

'--Mining the harbors proved a political 
disaster, as Clarridge concedes. Soviet, 
British, Dutch and Japanese ships hit the 
CIA’s mines, and Congress and me press 
w£ni into “hysteria.” In pa^ 1 ^ 
Barry Goldwater. the conservative 
chairman of the Senate Imelhgence 
Committee, was upset. DearBdl. be 
wrote to Casey, “I am pissed offl . . - it is 

an act of war.” . 

Clarridge was a natty dresser knovm 
around the agency for tos white silk 

suits, colorful pocket bandkerchiefr and 

f* matching tough-guy vocabulary. In his 


BOOKS 

30 years inside Langley, he made a lot of 
enemies, and he forgets none. He settles 
old scores with undisguised glee. CIA 
chief William Webster, an Amherst 
graduate and a former federal judge and 
FBI director, is dismissed as a “hay- 
seed” and a “social climber.” Web- 
ster’s sin? He reprimanded and demoted 
Clarridge over the Iran-contra scan- 
dal. United States senators are “piran- 
has,” the members of the Tower Com- 
mission “The Three Stooges.’’ And so 
on. 

Clarridge has no use for “spongy lib- 
erals.” But he reserves his greatest con- 
tempt for the “bounds of the press.” He 
confesses to “my lifelong distaste for 
journalists” whose “motives” he began 
to question as a young case officer in 
India. Although Clarridge suffers from a 
chronic case of machismo, and an un- 
bounded ego (he describes his treatise on 
terrorists as “probably the most brilliant 
paper.. . that I had ever put together”), his 
memoir is redeemed in part by flashes of 
unusual candor. He describes bis mistakes 
and and the agency’s failures as unspar- 


ingly as his triumphs. 

For example, he says be knows of not 
a single significant case where the CIA 
recruited a Soviet — even though that 
was the agency’s major target around the 
globe during more Than four decades of 
Cold War. (The Soviet agents who 
worked for the CIA were all walk-in 
volunteers, he reports.) He admits that 
the agency’s intelligence about tiny 
Grenada, hardly a difficult place to pen- 
etrate, was “lousy.” He is frank to de- 
scribe the CIA’s conflicts with the Drug 
Enforcement Administration and tells 
how the agency used pornographic 
videos to recruit African diplomats, and 
discloses that, some time after the Black 
September murder of Israeli athletes at 
the 1972 Munich Olympics, the CIA had 
a “relationship” with the Arab terrorist 
who masterminded the crime. 

A dentist’s son from New Hampshire, 
Clarridge went to prep school and 
Brown University, joined the CIA and 
was sent by die Clandestine Services, die 
agency’s spook side, to Nepal, New Del- 
hi, Madras. Istanbul and Ankara, where 

BRIDGE 


he had the wit to spot Aldrich Ames as 
poor case-officer material. To Clar- 
ridge ’s later regret, he recommended 
that Ames be assigned to counterintel- 
ligence. After a stint as Rome station 
chief, Clarridge came into his own and 
became chief of the Larin America di- 
vision and architect of the contra war. 

Alas, Clarridge became entrapped in 
his own war when Oliver North asked 
for a spot of help in moving a shipment 
of Hawk missiles from Israel to Iran, part 1 
of Reagan's scheme to trade arms for ! 
hostages. Clarridge later testified to coo- i 
gressional investigating committees 
that, at the time of the shipment, he 
thought the cargo was “oil drilling 
equipment.’’ In 1991, Clarridge was in- 
dicted on seven felony counts of lying, 
carrying a potential penalty on each 
count of five years in prison and a fine of 
$250,000. He wore a camouflage jacket 
to his arraignment 

Clarridge never went to trial; he was 
pardoned by President Bush along with 
five others on Christinas Eve of 1992. At 
his farewell party at the agency, he 
proudly recounts, he was given ‘ ‘a mod- 
el of the mine we had used in the harbors 
of Nicaragua.” 

I N a coda reasonably free of bombast, 
Clarridge offers some interesting, 
even valuable, thoughts on the agency's 
problems and its future. He is pessi- 
mistic about the future of the clandestine 
services, and — in his typical take-no- 
prisoners style — chaises that former 
CIA director John M. Deutch “drove a 
knife into its back.” 

Clarridge says his only motive in join- 
ing the QA was to advance U.S. in- 
terests, defend his country and contain 
Soviet communism. But those laudable 
goals are not accomplished by running 
covert operations that circumvent the 
jaw or by misleading Congress. One does 
not save democracy by violating its rules. 
Clarridge didn't get it. He still doesn’t. 

David Wise, the author of “Night- 
mover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA 
to the KGB for $ 4.6 Million wrote this 
for The Washington Post. 


By Alan Truscott 


O NE of the high points in 
the Vanderbilt Knockout 
Team Championship at. the 
American Contract Bndge 
League's Spnng Nationals 
was the quarterfinal in 
Richard Schwartz opposed a 
'foursome ledby Wt W oolsey. 
With two deals left, Schwartz 
led by 9 imps- But on tne 
penultimate deal. ^ 

gained 17 when 
nents reached a bll EW 
ferior slam and were beaten 
by good defense. His team 

now led by 8. • 

- On the final deal, shown m 


the diagram, both teams 
reached seven hearts. The only 
w ayloimkel3lridowM'» 
finesse in spades and nna a>J 
split. Ruffing out toe queen 
offered no hope, for Sou* 
needed three diamond dis- 
cards. 

In one case, toe contract 
was undoubled and toe club 
queen was led. South rufied m 
dummy, came to fof han^ 
with a trump lead and tried the 

spade finesse. This lost, but he 
escaped for down one, as he 
^^daUhisdrarnonds. 

In the replay. ** shown, the 
response to one heart was a 
sprinter bid, showing short 
clubs and interest in a heart 


slam. Woolsey, as South, was 
eventually doubled and West 
perhaps thought that this was 
a Lightner double, asking for 
an unusual lead. He tried a 
diamond, which turned out to 
win the match. 

When South tried to make 
his contract by taking toe 
spade finesse, he went down 
two, losing 500. Schwartz 
gained 9 imps and won the 
matohby 1. 

Woolsey was left with the 
mournful reflection that he 
could have won the match by 
the weird procedure of con- 
ceding a one-trick defeat in a 
grand slam to avoid going 
down two. 


NORTH 

* AKJ54 
CQ10B832 
032 

* — 

WEST EAST 

*1093 * 08 S 

08 95 

OJ1078 OKQ5 

4QJI0 88 4AK974 3 

SOUTH (D) 

*72 

O AKJ74 
0 AB84 
*52 

North ad sooth woe vulnerable. 
The buffing: 



South 

West 

North 

East 

19 

Pass 

4* 

5* 

50 

64 

7? 

DM. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 


West led Jack. 



200 reasons to buy a Rolex. 

There are well over two hundred individual parts in the 
movement of a Rolex chronometer. Every single one of 
them will have been tested, inspected, and cieaned until 
they sparkle like jewellery. Which is why we made # 
such a safe place to keep them in: the Oyster case. 


psr--^- 



PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MARCH 20, 1997 



ASIA/PACIFIC 


A Curfew 
Is Imposed 
In Burma 


Mnslim-Buddhist Gash 

Reported in Mandalay 


Comptiedt* Our Skiff mm Disfuadm 

RANGOON — The military gov- 
ernment in Burma has imposed a curfew 
and other restrictions on the nation's 
second city, Mandalay, with a spokes- 
man contending that clashes there were 
meant to destabilize the country. 

The spokesman said a curfew had 
been Imposed in parts of Mandalay 
Province after fighting erupted last 
weekend betweea Buddhist monks and 
Muslims. 

Residents said newspapers in the city 
bad reported that martial law had also 
been imposed, but copies of the paper 
could cot be obtained m Rangoon. 

The spokesman did not respond to 
questions on martial law, and diplomats 
said they could not confirm that it had 
been imposed. 

Residents said a curfew was imposed 
from 8 PJVL to 4 A.M. in five townships, 
effective Monday. They said that bar- 
ricades had been set up on some streets 
in Mandalay and that the main market 
was closed. 

The government spokesman said 
.Buddhist monks in Mandalay had at- 
tacked several houses and mosques after 
a young Buddhist girl was molested by a 
Muslim youth. 

He gave no details of the incidents, 
but a diplomat said that at least two 
mosques had been destroyed and that 
several people had been wounded in the 
weekend attacks. 

Another diplomat said: “My under- 
standing is that there were riots on the 
1 5th and 16th. It seemed to be more of a 
socio-religious problem than a political 
protest.” 

Residents said the police fired over 
the heads of rioters Tuesday to disperse 
attacks against mosques and property 
owned by Muslims. At least two 
Buddhist monks taking part in the riots 
were hospitalized with ballet wounds 
from ricochets, they said. 

There apparently was no connection 
betweea the fighting and the govern- 
ment’s crackdown on Daw Aung San 
Suu Kyi and her pro-democracy move- 
ment But the government spokesman 
said the unrest appeared to be (he work 
of people intent on destroying the sta- 
bility of the nation. 

“Some elements are exploiting the 
situation by trying to promote misun- 
derstanding between die two reli- 
gious," he said "The main reason for 
Ithis is to cause- unnecessary problems 
.for Myanmar so that Myanmar's entry 
into ASEAN, wili face problems-" ■ - 
Burma hopes to be accepted this year 
as a full member of the Association of 
South East Asian Nations, which com- 



Looting Follows Protest March in Papua New Guinea 


Anti-government protesters in Papua New Guinea looting stores after a march in Port Moresby on Wednesday. 
The police fired tear gas and live rounds at the looters, forcing them to disperse. 


BRIEFLY 


China Said to Plan Executions Nepalese Wins Confidence Vote 


ALMATY, Kazakstan — Uigbur exiles from Xinjiang 
Province in China said Wednesday that the authorities there 
planned to execute two students of the Muslim ethnic group 
on Thursday. They were arrested in connection with anti- 
Chinese riots in the province last month. 

“Two young men. accused of leading the February 
events, will be executed,”- Mukhiddin Mukhlisi, spokes- 
man for the United National Revolutionary Front of East 
Turkestan, said in Almaty, the capital of Kazakhstan. 

Mr. Mukhlisi said the condemned Uighurs, Abu Khair 
and Abdu Medchit, were arrested Feb. 7 in Yining, near die 
border with Kazakhstan and the scene last month of some of 
the most violent disturbances in the province since the 
Communist takeover in 1949. 

The United National Revolutionary Front is one of 
several Uighur groups fighting for an independent “East 
Turkestan” in Xinjiang, home to a majority of Turltic- 
speaking Muslims Uke the Uighurs. 

Exile groups said last month that the Yining riots were set 
off by the execution of about 30 Uighurs by the Chinese 
authorities. About 10 people were killed and 100 were 
wounded in the disturbances. (Reuters) 


KATMANDU, Nepal — Prime Minister Lokendra Ba- 
hadur Chand won a crucial vote of confidence Wednesday 
for his week-old coalition, which comprises Communists 
and former royalists. 

Parliament officials said Mr. Chand won 113 votes in die 
205-seat House of Representatives. Mr. Chand took power 
in the only Hindu kingdom last week after a center-right 
coalition in office 17 months, undermined by charges of 
corruption, narrowly lost a vote of confidence. ( Reuters ) 


For the Record 


A cyanide spill may have poisoned river waters in 
Wuzhou in Guangxi Province, the authorities warned Wed- 
nesday. They said a truck carrying the toxic chemical 
plunged into a tributary of the busy Pearl River in southern 
China, which flows into the South China Sea. (Reuters) 


An ammunition depot near Jalalabad in eastern Af- 
ghanistan blew up Wednesday, showering a residential area 
with unexploded ordnance. The Red Cross said 16 people 
were killed and 200 were wounded. (AP) 


North Korean Defector 
Saw Beyond Slogans * p 



« Cit 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tones Service 


Malaysia Accepts Singapore Leader’s Apology 


TOKYO — When Samuel Lee, a 
professor at Songsil University in. 
Seoul, was the South Korean speaker at 
a conference in Japan in 1987 on peace 
in Asia, his counterpart from North 
Korea was its leafing ideologue, 
Hwang Jang Yop. 

Though it was illegal for Mr. Lee and 
risky for Mr. Hwang, the two men, both 
trained in philosophy, met secretly for 
two nights in Mr. Hwang's hotel room 
for long, earnest discussions about ideo- 
logy and politics. 

Mr. Hwang acknowledged even back 
then that North Korea had economic 
problems, and he expressed admiration 
for Christianity, which is officially 
shunned by his country, Mr. Lee re- 
called recently, adding, “1 found him a 
very reasonable thinker, and quite free 
from indoctrinated Communist and 
North Korean ideology.” 

That might be a s ur prising thing to say 
about the man who is considered the. 
architect of North Korea’s ideology of 
juche. or self-reliance, which has been the 
philosophical undeipinaing of one of the 
world’s most repressive governments. 

But Mr. Hwang, it now appears, saw 
beyond his country's slogans. Fearful of 
North Korea's fierce militarism and 
growing economic woes, disheartened 
by his own fell from favor and driven by 
idealistic but perhaps naive dreams. Mr. 
Hwang entered the South Korean Con- 
sulate in Beijing on Feb. 12 and asked 
for asylum. After weeks of delicate ne- 
gotiations, he was flown from China to 
die Philippines on Tuesday. 

Many experts say the defection is a 
sign that North Korea’s economic crisis 
has spilled over into political disinteg- 
ration. 

Mr. Hwang might have had a harder 
side to him than mat of die kindly pro- 
fessor who courted foreign scholars. 
How else, some experts say, could he 
have survived in the upper reaches of 
such a cruel government for so long, and 
been its most ardent propagandist? 

But just what Mr. Hwang’s defection 
actually says about North Korea de- 
pends on his motives. 

Based on a statement he wrote after 
seeking asylum. Mr. Hwang wants to 
confer with leaders in die South in an 
effort to save North Korea from star- 
vation and the Korean Peninsula from 
the war he thinks his country will resort 
to in desperation. 


South Korean intelligence months be- 
fore he defected. 

“We didn’t know when he would 
defect, hot we knew that he might ay,” 
a senior South Korean official said. 

After years as a professor and ad- 
ministrator at Kimilsung University, 
Mr. Hwang started his political career^ 
deputy chief of propaganda of the Com- 
munist Party, and in 1972 becamechaip r h 
man of the Supreme People's As- 
sembly. His most recent- title was 
secretary for international affairs of t£e 
party's central committee. ■ ■ . 

Ram II Sung called on him ib tft£ 
1960s to help develop the ideology bf 
self-reliance. A split bad developed in~ 
die Communist world between the So- 
viet Union and China, and Mr. Kim did 
not want his country to became too 
dependent oneither. ~ 

Those who know him say- things 
began to turn against him after Kim Q 
Sung died in July 1994; ■ ~ 




‘People will think I have 
gone out of my mind. 

But the question is; Am i 1 
the only mad person? 9 ■; ** 


Kim Jong B, the successor, began to 
put some of his contemporaries into 
positions of power, pushing out his fa- 
ther’s comrades. 

Mr. Hwang was formulating a “new 
juche” feat called for introducing scan? 
market mechanisms into the economy. 
That put him on the outs with hard-liners 
who want to maintain the tightly closed 
society, and did not endear him to young- 
er, more pragmatic reformers either. 

In May, fee North's official news- 
paper, Rodung Sinmun. criticized Mr. 
Hwang without mentioning him ty 
name. Kim Jong 12 is expected to take on 
his father’s titles of head of state and 
Communist Party leader formally afters 
three-year moaraing period ends in July. 


Before then he is expected to consol- 
id Mr. Hwang face# 


Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR— The Malaysian 
government on Wednesday accepted an 


about a Malaysian state, but said the 
damage done would take time to beaL 
Foreign Minister Abdullah Badawi 
said the government had accepted Mr. 


pnses Brunei. Indonesia. Malaysia, the 
■Philippic 


Lee's apology for describing the south- 
are of Jc‘ 


ippines, Singapore, Thailand and 
Vietnam. 

Thousands of students took to the 
streets in December in rare demonstra- 
tions against the government. Since 
then, ail major universities have been 
closed. (Reuters, AP) 


era state of Jobore as “notorious for 
shootings, muggings and carjackings'’ 
in a Singapore court affidavit 
hi a statement issued alter a meeting 
of fee Malaysian cabinet. Mr. Abdullah 
said that Malaysia also viewed positively 
Mr. Lee’s move to have the offending 
remarks deleted from the affidavit 


“The Malaysian government accepts 
the unreserved apology tendered by Se- 
nior Minister Lee Kuan Yew and views 
positively his intention to retract the 
offending paragraphs,” he said. . . . 

“However, it should be acknow- 
ledged that this episode has deeply hurt 
Malaysians of all sections of society and 
that restoration of the old level of re- 
lationship would take time,” he said. 

The statement appeared to defuse one 
of the worst diplomatic disputes in years 
between the two countries, which are 
competing fiercely for regional eco- 
nomic power and influence. 

Mr. Lee filed the affidavit Jan. 27 as 
part of a libel suit against a Singapore 
opposition politician, Tang Liang Hong. 


The comments on Jobore became front- 
page news in Malaysia after fee affidavit 
was leaked to news organizations. 

Mr..Tang, who had criticized fee gov- 
erning People's Action Party of .Singa- 
pore during campaigning for genera! 
elections, fled to Johore Bam, fee cap- 
ital of Johore state, after losing a race for 
a Parliament seat in the Jan. 2 elections. 
He later said he had left Singapore be- 
cause be feared for his life. 

After the furor developed in Malaysia. 
Mr. Lee issued a statement apologizing 
“unreservedly" for his remarks on Jo- 
hore. But Malaysians demanded a re- 
fraction. The youth wing of Prime Min- 
ister Mahathir Mohamad's party 
threatened to sue Mr. Lee. 


“People, starting wife my own fam- 
flf thii " 


ily. wUT think I have gone' out of my 
mind.” Mr. Hwang said in his hand- 
written statement. “But the question is: 
Am 1 the only mad person?. 

“How can we. furthermore, call 
people sane who loudly talk about hav- 
ing built an ideal society for workers 
and fanners who are starving?” 

But foreign scholars who know him 
say other factors may have contributed 
to his defection. 

A close aide to the late dictator Kim II 
Sung. Mr. Hwang apparently felt that he 
was being put out to pasture — and 
might be purged — by Mr. Kim's suc- 
cessor. his son Kim Jong II. 

One thing feat seems clear is that Mr. 
Hwang's dissatisfaction was known to 


idate his power, and 4TJU- ftlWOli^ lOLCy 4 
being purged, said Masao Okonogi, n # 

professor at Keio University 

But Mr. Hwang’s foreign friends say 
a purge would merely have meant fe- 
tiremem, not punishment. So those who 
know him say he would not have de- 
fected, subjecting fee family he left be- 
hind to retribution, had he not had 
broader goals of helping his people. "■ 
“There isn’t much time remaining in 
my life.” he wrote in his statement “I 
am a failed man in politics. I have no 
intention of benefiting from switching 
sides, nor have I any desire to live long. 

1 wish my family would consider nte’a 
dead man from today. J only hope to 
help bring about reconciliation and -uni- 
fication of North and South Korea until 
the last moments of my life.” 7 




■ Hwang to Leave Manila Soon , : 

Mr. Hwang will leave the Philippines 
quickly as possible. President Fidel 


as 


Ramos said Wednesday, without spe- 
cifying when feat might be. The As 1 
seriated Press reported Mr. Ramos de- 
clined to say where Mr. Hwang waS 
staying during his stopover. ^ 


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V% U.S. -Ukraine Exercise 
Casts Cloud on Summit 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 



By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Sericc 


• HELSINKI — It all began innocently 
enough: an American-Ukrainian naval 
exercise planned for this summer off 
Ukraine’s Black Sea coast — not the 

•..first such maneuver and very likely not 
.the last, 

But before the blueprints for “Op- 
eration Sea Breeze'’ have even been 
finalized, it has blown up into a serious 
point of friction in U.S.-Russian re- 
lations, and a symbol of Moscow's 
deepening distrust of American inten- 
tions. 

• President Boris Yeltsin and other 
Russian officials have seized on the 
exercise, in which U.S.-led forces 
would land on the strategically sensitive 
^rimean Peninsula in Ukraine, as ev- 
idence that Washington's soo thing as- 
surances of partnership and cooperation 
"Cannot be trusted. Washington insists 
the fictitious scenario for Sea Breeze — 
a humanitarian relief mission in the face 

of an earthquake and armed unrest is 

entirely innocent. 

. [Russia Launched a fierce attack Wed- 

# nesday on NATO expansion, sa' 
would be the West' 
since the end of the 
.reported from Helsinki. 

- [On the eve of a U.S.-Russian summit 
meeting in Helsinki, the Kre mlin 
spokesman, Sergei .Yastrzhembsky, 
said: “President Yeltsin and the Rus- 
sian leadership are convinced that 
NATO's plans to expand to the East, if 
realized, could be the West’s biggest 
strategic mistake since the end of die 
.Cold War."l 

' The flap over the naval exercise, 
which Russian officials say Mr. Yeltsin 
may raise with President Bill Clinton 
when the two meet in Helsinki starting 
Thursday, has become emblematic of 
the rut of distrust and conflicting per- 
ceptions these days in U.S.-Russian re- 
lations. 

In their first face-to-face encounter in 
nearly a year, how Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Yeltsin manage the atmospherics of that 


distrust may be just as important to the 
outcome of the summit meeting as 
whatever substantive progress they 
make on a host of security, arms control 
and economic questions. 

On both sides there is a sense that the 
Bill and Boris Show, a long-playing 
friendship between the two leaders that 
has anchored Russian- Amen can rela- 
tions through seven summit meetings in 
the Iasi four years, may be headed for its 
rockiest stretch. 

“No, Yeltsin’s not going to pound on 
the table,” said Igor Malashenko, a 
Russian television executive and in- 
formal public relations adviser to Mr. 
Yeltsin. “But he could say very con- 
fidently that we’re not going to accept 
what the Americans want, just because 
they want it.” 

Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright, who tried without evident signs 
of progress to massage the issue of the 
naval exercise this week with the Rus- 
sian foreign minister Yevgeni Pri- 
makov, said: 

"We know it will take time for the 
process of trust to catch up with the 
process of change.” 

The summit meeting will address a 
handful of irritants that have festered in 
Russian- American relations in the past 
year nuclear weapons reductions. Mos- 
cow's ambition to join various clubs of 
leading industrialized nations, limits on 
conventional weapons in Europe. 

Most of all, what the Americans want 
at the two-day meeting is some progress 
toward a deal under which Moscow will 
accept the West's plans to expand its 
main security umbrella, NATO, into the 
territory of former Soviet allies in Cen- 
tral Europe. 

So far, almost every serious foreign 
policy figure in Moscow has spoken out 
vehemently against the expansion of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 
which plans this summer to invite Po- 
land. Hungary, the Czech Republic and 
possibly other countries to join. . 

It is one of the very few issues on 
which Russian reformers. Communists 
and hard-line nationalists all agree. 



BRIEFLY 


fVltr Dejung/Thr td Rre»* 

Helsinki’s Mantyniemi presidential residence, where Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin will meet Friday. 

SUMMIT: Latest Superpower Meeting Gives Finland a Flashback 


Continued from Page 1 

to meet President Bill Clinton. Helsinki 
has been the site of many such meetings 
in the past, including the famous one 
that led to the Helsinki accord of 1975 
that ratified post-war borders of NATO 
and Warsaw states, and it prides itself on 
efficiency and smooth service. 

“Most Finns think it is flattering that 
the great powers trust us to manage 
this. ' Lasse Lehtinen, a well-known 
novelist and host of a weekly talk show, 
said. “We are known as the headwaiters 
of world policy. But this summit def- 
initely has a sense of d£ja vu.” 

He was referring to the contentious 
issue of bringing new members, includ- 
ing the former Communist countries of 
Europe, into the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization. The issue is expected go 
dominate the s ummi t meeting and has 


spilled over into Finland’s foreign 
policy and its sense of self. 

This week, Mr. Yeltsin reopened old 
wounds by saying in an interview with 
Furnish journalists that Moscow would 
oppose any attempt by Finland to join 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
and warning that Finland's noaalign- 
ment was a key factor in his decision to 
agree to Helsinki as a meeting sice. 

“It was a voice from the past,” said 
Janne Virkkunen, editor in chief of 
Helsingin Sanomat, Finland's most re- 
spected newspaper. “ ‘His views were no 
surprise, but the way be said it was very 
aggressive and not ar all diplomatic.” 

Mr. Virkkunen, 48, said it reminded 
him of the days when the head of the 
Russian news agency in Helsinki would 
march into the newsroom and berate 
editors for articles that were not to Mos- 
cow's liking. 


ITS: World Health Organization Hails a Treatment That Could Save Millions of Lives 


Continued from Page 1 

health radar screen” in the 1960s and 
1970s amid widespread assumptions it 
was under control. 

. Only in the early 1990s, when “huge 
increases” in tuberculosis cases began 
to be identified in New York City, did 
health officials focus anew on the dis- 
ease, Dr. Nunn sad. ' 

He added that tuberculosis claims 2 to 
3" million deaths per year from a re- 
ported 6 to 8 million cases. 

In an interview. Dr. Nunn said that 
several factors explained die worldwide 
upsurge in the ailment in the 1990s. 
These included the spread of the HIV 
virus resulting in reduced natural im- 
munity, immigration from developing 
to developed countries and the break- 
down of health-care systems in Russia 
and parts of Eastern Europe following 
the collapse of communism. 

- The epidemic "has been running un- 
abated in most of the world’s countries 
and has even begun to worsen in Eastern 
Europe and parts of Western Europe,” 
said Jaap Broekmans, an official who 
helped in the development of the DOTS 


strategy. According to Mario Ravigli- 


one, a medical officer at the World 
Health Organization, recently compiled 
data from surveys of 98 percent of the 
global population show that the new 
treatment and management system pro- 
duces cure rates of 77 percent, com- 
pared with 41 percent from other pro- 
grams to combat tuberculosis. 

Die highest rale using the new system 
was recorded in die mid- 1990s in China. 
Dr. Nunn said, in a project where 95 
percent of 1 14,000 people infected with 
tuberculosis were cured. 

Hiroshi Nakajrma, the director-gen- 
eral of the World Health Organization, 
said in a statement that the new system 
was “the biggest health breakthrough of 
this decade, in terms of the lives we win 
be able to save.” 

Dr. Nakajima said die organization 
anticipated that “at least 10 million 
deaths” would be prevented in the next 
10 years "with die introduction and 
extensive use” of the new strategy. 

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease 
almost always transmitted through air- 
borne bacteria from an infected person. 
It destroys the lungs, leading to bleeding 


and asphyxiation. Patients also display 
wasting as muscle tissue is eaten away. 

According to die World Health Or- 
ganization, the disease dates back about 
6,000 years and was once known as tile 
•‘white plague." 

It was so much part of the fabric of 
19th century European society that it 
inspired poets and musicians in works 
including Puccini’s opera “La Bo- 
heme.” 

In the early 20th century, richer pa- 
tients were confined to sanatoriums 
such as die institution depicted in 
Thomas Mann's novel. "The Magic 
Mountain.” 

These days. Dr. Nunn said, tuber- 
culosis claims more lives than AIDS. He 
said a full one third of people stricken 
with the HIV virus — and thus sus- 
ceptible to infection — die from tuber- 
culosis. 

An assessment by the World Health 
Organization published Wednesday 
called the disease die “leading infec- 
tious killer of youths and adults*' in the 
world, claiming most of its victims 
among economically active people pre- 
dominantly in the Third World. 


Die DOTS program centers on the 
use of four established, low-cost tuber- 
culosis drugs — isoniazid, rifampicin. 
parazinamide and either ethambutol or 
streptomycin — taken in conjunction. 
An advantage of the system. Dr. Nunn 
said, is that the frill course of treatment 
can cost as little as $1 1, much less than 
other cures. 

Under the new system, health officers 
must physically witness a patient taking 
a full course of medication. 

“The most important thing is to hold 
on to the patients,” Dr. Nunn said. 
‘ ‘People take drugs for a month and feel 
much better and dunk. ‘Why should Igo 
on seeing this health worker?’ ” In fact, 
by breaking off a course of treatment. 
Dr. Nunn said, patients encourage drag- 
resistant, incurable tuberculosis. 

The DOTS program is billed by the 
World Health Organization as a break- 
through in part because other research 
has not so far produced a vaccine to 
prevent tuberculosis. 

“ Prevention lies in the cure,” Dr. 
Nunn said. ‘ 'If you cure patients, you 
prevent them from transmitting die dis- 
ease.” 


Many Finnish citizens who profess to 
pay Little or no attention to security 
issues also were irritated by Mr. 
Yeltsin’s remarks. 

"That was really bad, like telling 
tittle brother what to do,” Maj Britt 
Las senilis, a nurse, said. She said she 
was concerned mainly that the summit 
meeting would reawaken old stereo- 
types of Finland “Journalists come.” 
she said, "and say it is a cold place 
where nobody smiles.” 

The meeting has also reawakened 
concern about Finland’s relationship to 
Moscow. In 1995, Finland stated that it 
would not seek membership in an ex- 
panded NATO, but it also said it would 
retain the right to reconsider later. Since 
then, the question has become a subject 
of much debate wi thin Finland and the 
summit meeting has put the issue pain- 
fully in the open. 

When Prime Minister Paavo Lippon- 
en delivered a report on Finland's se- 
curity and defense policy to Parliament 
on Monday, his wording about Fin- 
land's relationship to NATO was far 
more elliptical than it was two years 
ago. He spoke of a "military alliance” 
but avoided mentioning NATO. He also 
omitted the word "reconsider" and 
said, "Military alignment is always a 
question that has to be evaluated as a 
part of the whole security policy.” 

Pertty Torstyla, a Foreign Ministry 
official, said: “The policy hasn’t 
changed We just didn’t want to repeat 
the same language." 

Finns are known for their reticence 
and tact. "Finland does not want to 
become an issue at this summit,” said 
the American ambassador, Derek 
Shearer. "This is not a reversion — 
Finland is hying to be of assistance and 
play a positive diplomatic role in the 
world” 

But others in Helsinki interpreted it as 
a sign that Finland was backsliding into 
accommodation with Moscow. "It was 
a reaction conditioned by the Cold 
War,” Mr. Pendila said, “bat it is not in 
tine with what Finland is trying to do to 
position itself at the core of Europe.” 

Some Finns have also begun to ques- 
tion what their identity should be within 
Europe. 


6 German Soldiers 
Charged in Attack 

DETMOLD, Germany — Six 
German soldiers were charged 
Wednesday with incitement to ra- 
cial hatred in the beating of two 
Turks and an Italian with baseball 
bats, amid widespread reactions of 
shame to the attack. 

They were charged with incite- 
ment to hatred causing bodily harm 
and a serious breach of public order 
after three foreign youths were as- 
saulted by soldiers, some drunk and 
wearing hoods, who beat them and 
shouted racist abuse Monday even- 
ing in this West German town. 

Three other soldiers who were 
arrested Tuesday in connection 
with the assault were not charged 
after the court ruled that their in- 
volvement was limited (AFP) 

EU Asks New Curbs 
On Sex Harassment 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission criticized govern- 
ments Wednesday for not doing 
enough to fight sexual harassment 
in the workplace and warned that it 
might propose new legislation. 

Existing national laws are often 
ineffective because they aim to 
punish severe cases rather than to 
prevent harassment, or they refer to 
abstract concepts such as "good 
behavior," the commission said 

It asked the European Trade Uni- 
on Confederation, die Union of In- 
dustrial and Employers* Confed- 
erations and the European Center of 
Enterprises with Public Participa- 
tion to prepare a comprehensive 
policy against sexual harassment 

They were given six weeks to 
decide whether they would seek to 
formulate such a policy. (Reuters) 

Sicily Archbishop 
Quits Under Fire 

PALERMO, Italy — The arch- 
bishop of Monreale in Sicily, Sal- 
vatore Cassisa, has resigned after 
being accused of corruption and 
links with the Mafia, Roman Cath- 
olic Church sources said 

The bishop of Caltagirone, Vin- 
cenzo Manzella is expected to suc- 
ceed him. 

The church sources said that 
Archbishop Cassisa, 75 had 
“reached retirement age” and had 
been expected to step down. He 
went on trial in Palermo on Feb. 28. 
accused of corrupt practices in con- 
nection with restoration of the 
cathedral at Monreale, a reputed 
Mafia bastion near Palermo. (AFP) 

Danes Must Defend 
Beverage-Can Ban 

BRUSSELS (AP) — The Euro- 
pean Commission ordered Den- 
mark on Wednesday to more fully 
explain its ban on the sale of beer 
ana soda in metal cans. 

The commission said it was “not 
convinced dial the Danish ban was 
compatible” with EU fair-trading 
rules. Denmark asserts that dis- 
carded metal cans harm the envi- 
ronment. (AP) 


BEEF: 'Mod-Cow’ Anniversary 

Continued from Page 1 

cases "could still be tens of thousands, or it could be around 
100 ” said John Pattison, the London medical microbiologist 
who chairs the government’s spongiform encephalopathy ad- 
-visorv committee. *’We won’t know until about two or three 

>e Wtait > i 5 clear is that the number of "mad” cows is falling 
sharply in Britain, because of tighter enforcement of a ban an 
thetype of feed believed to have spread the (hsease and the 
destruction of 1.3 million older cows at risk ofdevdcpmg tte 

disease. The number of bovine cases fell by more than half m 

'“"SStenta? tffeSs. British demand for^ea^ of 

S to pose a 

hamtager am processed _ jo the Meat ami 




Sse^mo^trevalen. and to t&oree bans on potenhally 

contaminated [feed- consatoer confidence will return only 

Many priority to food safety as 

when governments attac incomes. 

.they have long S 1V 5P “ J^Ljon^has promised to more than 
The EuropeanCom*"^ safety experts in its consumer 
double the o umbe T “ f . f 283 officialspSe in comparison to 
■^(SfSSTSM * the U.S. Food Ad- 

Consumer £ 

priority in European Parliament investigation 


German chairman of al ^g^laroe for the crisis on lax 

saw S5£ “ dtbeBriti!hgov - 

eminent. 




Barry James 
Reporter 


Current Affairs 

WelMnfo nned ’ . . 

newsbreaJring, the ms and 
outs of current events. 

If you missed his reporting in 

jPiookfbritonour site on the 
World Wide W efo 



d groups that 


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'n the International 
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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Netanyahu Seeks to Speed Up Talks 
On Final Status of Palestinian Land 


Agetice France-Prase 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu has proposed com- 
pleting talks on the final status of Pal- 
estinian territories in the next six months 
instead of the scheduled two years, Is- 
raeli public television reportkl Wed- 
nesday. 

Under a proposal sent to the Pal- 
estinian leader Yasser Arafat, the two 


sicks would begin discussing immedi- 
ately the final status of the self-rule areas 


ately the final status of the self-rule areas 
in the West Bank and Gaza Strip to reach 
an accord by September, the television 
report said. But the Palestinian Author- 
ity categorically refused the proposal. 

The Israeli-Palestinian peace accords 
call for the so-called final status ne- 
gotiations to begin this week and to be 
completed by May 1999. 

■ Egypt Assails Housing Plan 

Douglas Jehl of The New York Times 
reported from Cairo: 

Having failed to persuade Israel to 
reconsider its plans to build 6,500 apart- 
ments for Jews in East Jerusalem, Egypt 
has taken the lead among Arab states in 
voicing powerful condemnation of a de- 


cision that Egypt's president warned 
Tuesday would mark “the beginning of 
a new cycle of violence" in the Middle 
East. 

“If this settlement is built this will 
not be the end of the whole thing," 
President Hosni Mubarak said Tuesday 


of the construction now under way on a 
hillside that the Israelis call Har Horaa. 
“The situation is very dangerous, and in 
case they don’t realize it, the con- 
sequences will be terrible.” 

A longtime defender of the Palestinian 
cause, Egypt had made clear its oppo- 
sition to the Israeli project, and it is not 
surp rising that it has joined nations around 
the world in condemning the decision. 

But the tone of Egyptian protests in 
recent days has turned unusually harsh, 
suggesting that Mr. Mubarak and his 
government believe that now is the time 
to be seen as taking a firm line toward 
Prime Minister Netanyahu. 

So far, Mr. Mubarak has not gone as 
far as King Hussein of Jordan did this 
month in sending a letter to Mr. Net- 
anyahu that accused the Israeli of in- 
tending to “destroy" the peace process. 
But in a series of statements, Egyptian 
officials have said that Israel's decision to 
go forward with the construction project 
had cast doubt on that country's com- 
mitment to a wider peace in the region. 

The Egyptian foreign minister, Amr 
Moossa, who has called the Israeli de- 
cision shortsighted and the current situ- 
ation “extremely grave,’ ’ said Tuesday of 
the construction project: “If Netanyahu 
thinks it will lead to Arab submission, 
then he is making a great mistake.” 

Among other Arab leaders who have 
reiterated their strong objections to the 
Israeli project, the Syrian foreign min- 


ister, Farouk Shara, was quoted in Syrian 
newspapers Tuesday as saying that Mr. 
Netanyahu might “succeed in drawing 
Arabs into conflict that he would be 
responsible for.” Mr. Sharaa accused 
. the Israelis of seeking “to put the region 
on the verge of a new war." 

By contrast, in Jordan on Tuesday, 
King Hussein was reported to have de- 


cided to replace his prime minister, Ab- 
del-Karim Kabariti, who had adopted a 
harder line toward Israel than the King 
would have 1 iked. As part of the surprise 
move, the king was said by Jordanian 
officials to have picked Abdnl-Salam 
Majali, a former prime minister who 
signed the counties 1994 peace treaty 
with Israel, to return to the post. 

The shake-up was seen m part as a 
signal from King Hussein that he is com- 
mitted to warmer ties with Israel, and may 
help further to mend ties that were frayed 
by the king's angry letter to Mr. Net- 
anyahu and die shooting that followed 
last week, in which a Jordanian soldier 
killed seven Israeli schoolgirls in a shared 
patch of land on the countries' border. 

Mr. Majali, 71, who was prime min- 
ister from 1993 to 1995, has good re- 
lations with Israel, while Mr. Kabariti, 
47, had criticized Israel's policy of ex- 
panding Jewish settlements in the West 
Bank and by pursuing a rapprochement 
between Jordan and the Palestinians. 

Egypt and Jordan have signed peace 
treaties with Israel, but what had been 



ilk ,u 




TboOTa Cnrx/Aggnrc F rau P lmM 

Soldiers taking a break on land the Israeli government has set aside for Jewish housing in East Jerusalem. * 


increasingly warm relations with the 
Jewish state have turned considerably 
cooler since the election in May of Mr. 
Netanyahu and his conservative gov- 
ernment. 

While it was King Hussein's critical 
letter 10 days ago that most recently 
underscored the depth of Arab alarm, 
Egypt has traditionally adopted a harder 


line toward Israel than has Jordan, and 
Mr. Mubarak now appears ready to 
voice complaints that he kept to hims elf 
fftrring Mr. Netanyahu’s visit to Cairo 
two weeks ago and his own pilgrimage 
to Washington last week. 

In an interview published in the cur- 
rent edition of The Jerusalem Report, 
Mr. Mubarak was quoted as predicting 


that relations between Israel and Egyp^. 
would “stay cold for a long tune -/.to; 
come,” and that attempts to bre ed clos er 
cooperation between the two countries 
would be premature. • =- • 

“Don’t ask us to educate our people 
for peace with Israel,’ ’ Mr. Mubarak, was- 
quoted as saying. “They’ll tell me to go 
to hell.” •" 


Leading Democrat Says He Voiced Doubts Over Lake Nomination 


By Elaine Sciolino 

Ne w York Tones Service 


WASHINGTON — The highest- 
ranking Democrat on the Senate Intel- 
ligence Committee has said he warned 
the White House on Saturday that he had 

thonyTake's qualifications to head the 
CIA and that Mr. Lake might not win 
Senate confirmation to the post 

The senator. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska, 
whose views carry considerable weight 
with the eight other Democrats on the 
Intelligence Committee, said Tuesday 
that he had told both the deputy chief of 
staff, John Podesta, and the White House 
counsel, Charles Ruff, that he needed 
more information about Mr. Lake's han- 
dling of National Security Council bar- 
riers to White House political and fund- 
raising operations. 

Specifically, Mr. Kerrey said, he was 
deeply concerned about recent articles in 
The Wall Street Journal about a major 


Democratic contributor with a 
checkered background, Roger Tamraz, 
who apparently had unusual access to 
National Security Council staff mem- 
bers. Mr. Tamraz ended up meeting with 
President Bill Clinton several times de- 
spite the objections of a security council 
staff official. Mr. Lake apparently did 
not know about the incident. 

Mr. Kerrey said his concern had not 
been allayed by conversations with both 
White House officials again Monday. He 
then called Mr. Lake. Shortly afterward, 
Mr. Lake met with Mr. Clinton and with- 
drew his nomination, blaming the con- 
firmation process, which he described in 
a letter to the president as “nasty and 
brutish without being short” 

Mr. Clinton repeated Mr. Lake’s as- 
sertion, blaming the Republicans and a 
process of “political destruction" for 
sabotaging the nomination. 

But the fact that Mr. Kerrey felt by the 
end of last week that Mr. Lake's nom- 
ination was in trouble raised questions 


about whether the White House could 
have responded in a way that might have 
preserved the nomination. 

Although there were ugly moments in 
the three days of Senate questioning of 
Mr. Lake, it was by no means as difficult 
and mean-spirited as the process that 
Robert Gates endured to become di- 
rector of the Central Intelligence 
Agency in 1991. 

But as the confirmation process 
dragged on with no fixed dale for a vote, 
a much more basic question was being 
raised by senators: whether a man who 
seemed to have difficulty running a 151- 
person National Security Council staff 
could nin the CIA. with more than 
1 6,000 employees, as well as 12 related 
intelligence agencies. 

Mr. Kerrey said he and other senators 
also were troubled that the FBI had 
briefed two of Mr. Lake's senior staff 
members on the security council about 
potential efforts by China to use cam- 
paign donations to try to influence the 


1996 presidential election and that Mr. 
Lake aid not know about it. 

“It never went to the top. never went 
to the president,” Mr. Kerrey said. “I 
think it goes to the management ca- 
pability. Was he capable of man- 
aging?" 

Mr. Kerrey's comments undercut 
White House efforts to cast Mr. Lake as 
a victim of partisanship. 

Although Mr. Kerrey never said di- 
rectly that he would vote in favor of Mr. 
Lake, the White House saw his role as 
crucial because he is the senior Demo- 
crat on the committee that conducted the 
nomination hearings. 

Asked how the White House had re- 
sponded to Mr. Kerrey’s warnings, the 
White House press secretary, Mike Mc- 
Curry, said officials had begun sounding 
out senators on the degree of support for 
Mr. Lake. Still, there was an overall 
feeling in the White House that Mr. Lake 
had the votes for confirmation both in 
the committee and in the Senate as a 


whole. Despite Mr. Lake's extraordi- 
nary intellect and his loyalty to die pres- 
ident as national security adviser, he was 
not known for running an efficient Na- 
tional Security Council. He jealously 
guarded access to thepresident, who was 
often briefed by Mr. Lake on cabinet- 
level meetings rather than attending 
them himself. 

His relationship with his deputy and 
successor in the job. Samuel Berger, 
became increasingly strained, although 
both men put on a public display of 
amity, and Mr. Lake sometimes crit- 
icized Mr. Berger openly in meetings, 
current and former White House of- 
ficials said. 

Mr. Lake also did not hide his im- 
patience with other senior national-se- 
curity aides. He was repeatedly rude to 
Madeleine Albright, now the secretary 
of state, shouting his exasperation by 
drumming his fingers, gazing around the 
room or cutting her off in meetings, 
administration officials said. 


CIA: 

A Promotion Likely 


Continued from Page 1 


VIETNAM: Next Stop for America’s Hip 


Continued from Page 1 


if you have a teaching certificate. A lot of 
them like it if you have a white face." 

Bradford Edwards, an artist from 
Santa Barbara, California, with a studio 
in Dal at, the mountain resort town north 
of here, said, ‘ 'The core group came here 
as travelers, and they just fell in love 
with Vietnam.” 

Mr. Edwards’s father, a U.S. Marine 
Corps colonel, was a helicopter pilot 
during the Vietnam War. and Mr. Ed- 
wards grew up with Vietnam as a part of 
his own history. He has been coming 
here for four years now, spending six 
months at a stretch, painting, putting on 
exhibitions and working with Viet- 
namese artists. 

A well-known watering hole for the 
backpacker-tumed-English-teacher set 
is the Zen, a vegetarian restaurant just 
off Pham Ngu Lau Street in what has 
emerged as this city's unofficial back- 
packer district The neighborhood is 
crowded with small caf&s; guest bouses; 
shops selling used paperbacks, compact 
disks and local artifacts; and tourist of- 
fices that can arrange side trips up the Ho 
Chi Minh Trail or all the way over to 
Dien Bien Phu, site of France's major 
military defeat in 1954. 

Adrian Crawford is a Zen regular. 
When he isn’t teaching English, he’s 
helping out at Zen. “A few years ago. 
there was a limited number of foreign- 
ers,” said Mr. Crawford, 28, from San 
Jose, California. “And none of the 
people here knew that much about Vi- 
etnam. ' ’ Mr. Crawford, who was bora in 


1968, the year of die Communists' Tet 
offensive against American forces here, 
also concedes he knew little about the 
place before be arrived. He came across 
an advertisement in the San Jose Mer- 
cury News for a new school recruiting 
teachers. “There was this push for 
American teachers, because they wanted 
that American accent,” Mr. Edwards 
said. 

After two years in Vietnam, Mr. 
Crawford now teaches about 25 hours a 
week. He still is not sure bow long he 
will stay — “at least another year, pos- 
sibly two.” 

“The first month there was always 
something new,” Mr. Dahlgren ex- 
plained at a table near the front of the 
Zen. The ceiling fans swirled slowly 
overhead, and he was oblivious to the 
constant assault of shoes hine boys and 


kids selling old maps, postcards and 
copies of Graham Greene’s classic Vi- 


copies of Graham Greene’s classic Vi- 
etnam novel, “The Quiet American.” 

Mr. Dahlgren teaches English about 
four hours each day — enough, he said, 
to pay the bills. He became interested in 
Vietnam because of his Vietnam ese- 
American girlfriend. Lien Tran, an ar- 
chitect from Berkeley. They moved to 
Ho Chi Minh City together to live with 
her relatives, and she landed a job in an 
architectural firm. 

Miss Lien said she finds annoying the 
frequent insults, the slights and the put- 
downs she has to bear living in her 
ancestral homeland as a young woman 
with a Vietnamese face and a Caucasian 



SAMMI: 

2d Steel Firm Totters 


Continued from Page 1 


ing court receivership for all of its five 
subsidiaries, including Sammi Steel. 

Sammi Steel had liabilities of 1.45 
trillion won at the end of 1996, against 
assets of 1.53 trillion won, according to 


company figures. 
Korea Fust Ba 


Korea Fust Bank is Sammi Steel's 
biggest creditor, with 395.9 billion won 
of loans outstanding at the end of 1996. 
The bank said it would seek a buyer for 
the stricken company. 

Korea First Bank is also the biggest 
lender to Hanbo Steel. Last month the 
bank's long-term debt rating was 
lowered by Moody’s Investors Service. 

Sammi Steel has been struggling un- 
der debt repayments and falling prices 
for stainless steel products. In calendar 
1996. it posted a net loss of 119.98 
billion won, wider than its 1995 loss of 
39.45 billion. 

Trading in shares of Sammi Steel and 


“needs good. Inspired leadership, for 
all the reasons that would be perfectly 
obvious to anyone who has read a news- 
paper over the last several months. I 
mean, that’s an agency that is desperate' ' 
for good, strong leadership." * 

The agency has been battered during 
the Clinton administration by disaster, 
many of them self-inflicted: 

Two traitors from the agency’s 
clandestine service, the Directorate of 
Operations, have been convicted of 
selling some of the CIA 1 s most precious 
secrets to Moscow. CIA officers have 


its marketing affiliate, Sammi Corp., 
was halted Wednesday. The eroirn's oth- 


Mpijwn TTii MjJ/Wiuhinpliin Fi»l 

Adrian Crawford, from California, at a Ho Chi Minh City restaurant. 


because of the cash they think he has, or 
the novelty of white skin in this coun- 


ucasian 

boyfriend. “People really look up to 
him," she said. “I don't know if it's 


She recalled several incidents she de- 
scribed as “infuriating,’' such as walk- 
ing into an office to get information 
about a job and being treated rudely by 


the receptionist — until Steve appeared 
behind her. 


Or going on vacation to a nearby 
beach, she said, and drawing rude com- 
ments and dirty looks from local Vi- 
etnamese. Miss Lien left in 1975 when 
she was only 4, and all she remembers of 
her escape was being carried onto a heli- 
copter by a burly American soldier. Now, 
she said, “I don't see myself living here 
permanently. I don't consider it home." 


was halted Wednesday. The group's oth- 
er troubled units — Sammi Metal 
Products Co., Sammi Technology & In- 
dustries Co. and Sammi Fine Ceramics 
Co. — are not listed. 

If court receivership is accepted, 
Sammi ’s assets and liabilities will be 
frozen until it can get back on its feet 
under court-appointed management, or 
is sold off to a third party. 

Mr. Kim said he was confident the 
group would recover after selling as- 
sets. (AP, Bloomberg, AFP ) 


been caught spying in France, Ger- 
many, Italy and India — all friends of 


the United States. The agency's covert 


operations aimed at Iraq's ruler, Sad- 
dam Hussein, collapsed last fall. 

Further, the agency has dismissed a 
former station chief and a former di- 
rector of Latin America covert oper- 
ations for misconduct in Guatemala, 
where the CIA had more than a few 
murderers and torturers on its payroll as 
foreign agents. And an internal report on 
the agency's ties to violent military units 
in Honduras during the 1980s is under 
review. The list goes on. 


Solidarity Launches 
Protest on Shipyard 


TIBET: Hollywood Puts the Isolated and Beleaguered Mountain Kingdom Firmly on the Show Business Map 


Continued from Page 1 


Reuters 

WARSAW — The Solidarity 
union began nationwide protests in 
Poland on Wednesday to demand 
the rescue of the collapsing Gdansk 
shipyard, and it reacted with fury 
when riot policemen ousted work- 
ers occupying Warsaw government 
ministries. 

“A horrible provocation” was 
bow the rightist trade union's lead- 
er, Marian Krzaklewski. described a 
decision by the government to send 
policemen to expel scores of work- 
ers from the Economy, Treasury 
and Finance ministries. 

Solidarity began the national ac- 
tion after a receiver announced 
plans this month to wind up the 
Baltic coast yard where the union 
arose in defiance of communism in 
1980. 

While about 2,000 demonstrating 
shipyard workers in Gdansk bricked 
up the door to offices of the gov- 
erning Democratic Left Alliance, 
which Solidarity accuses of allow- 
ing the yard’s collapse, scores of 
workers in Warsaw moved in to 
occupy the three ministries. 


when Hollywood does the entertainment injection 
into the world system,” said Orville Schell, a China 
scholar who is writing a book on Western con- 
ceptions of Tibet. “Let's remember that Holly- 
wood is the most powerful force in the world, 
besides the U.S. military.” 

Why Tibet rather than some othercause, whether 
the oppression of women in the Islamic world or the 
continued detention of the Burmese opposition 
leader. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who like the Dalai 
Lama is a Nobel Peace Prize laureate. What is it 
about Tibet, which has languished in obscurity for 
most of the last half century, that makes it the cause 
dujour for celebrities and noncelebrities alike? 

The answer has several factors. There is the fe- 
rocity of China's actions in Tibet, and China’s status 
in the post-Cokf War world as the most important 
large country still holding another land in subjug- 
ation. But there is also the growing appeal of 
Buddhism in the United Stales, Tibet’s remoteness 
arid mystenousness and the D alai Lama’s person- 
ality. For Tibet is not just a good cause. Tibet is also 
a state of mind, a distant place onto which Westerners 
have long projected their fantasies. 

No other cause just now contains the full mix of 
ingredients of the Tibetan plight: the size and 
grouting power of the occupier, the reputation for 
spirituality of the oppressed, the country’s con- 
tinued image as a pristine place where spirituality 
takes precedence over materialism. 

“The Tibetans are the baby seals of the human 


rights movement,” said Mr. Thurman, who is in a 
sense the academic godfather of the Tibetan cause, a 
former monk turned scholar who has translated 
some of the Tibetan Buddhist classics into English. 

The image is apt, suggesting the innocent, pacific 
and largely defenseless Tibetans being clubbed by 
giant, powerful, merciless China. Given the harsh- 
ness of the Chinese occupation, Tibet is a legitimate 
and compelling cause. 

In some ways, the Chinese occupation of Tibet is 
a very old story. 

It began in the 17th century, but since China put 
down an insurrection in 1959 and forced the Dalai 
Lama. Tibet’s political and spiritual leader, into 
exile, China has sought to eradicate the Tibetan 
identity, to annex the territory culturally as well as 
physically, Tibetan activists say. 

Chinese spokesmen retort that Chinese rule has 
brought modem ways to a poverty-stricken and 
superstitious land run by a kind of medieval theo- 
cracy. But human rights advocates accuse China of 
closing; all but 13 of the small territory's 6,254 
Buddhist monasteries, sending thousands of monks 
to re-education camps, banning the display of pho- 
tographs of the Dalai Lama, and resettling tens of 
thousands of ethnic Chinese colonists on Tibetan 
land. 

The argument is that Tibet’s existence as a 
distinct culture is threatened by Chinese policies. 
And given the acceptance of that accusation in the 
West and the exotic appeal of Tibet itself, the 
surprise may be that Tibet took so long to become a 
celebrity cause. 


“The fascination is the search for the third eye,” 
said Melissa Mathison, wife of Harrison Ford and 
the screenwriter of “Kundun.” 

“Americans are hoping for some sort of magical 
door into the mystical, thinking that there’s some 
mysterious reason for things, a cosmic explan- 
ation.” 

Ms. Mathison, explaining how she became in- 
terested in Tibetan culture, said tbe first step might 
be a search for spiritual meaning, which is soon 
replaced by an awareness of the Tibetans them- 
selves, especially of the personality and character 
of the Dalai Lama. 

“Tibet offers the most extravagant expression of 
the mystical,” she said, “and when people meet 
His Holiness, you can see on their faces that they're 
hoping to get this hit that will transcend their lives, 
take them someplace else.” 

In a telephone interview, Mr. Gere explained that 
he first became interested in Tibet more than a 
decade ago when he became a Buddhist and was 
introduced to the Dalai Lama during a visit to the 
leader's home in exile in Dharmsala, India. 

“It became clear to me that the situation for the 
Tibetans was worsening, and they had no public 
voice, no contact with the media, no presence at the 
United Nations,” Mr. Gere said. “They had been 
gobbled up by the Chinese and had no protector." 

Mr. Gere denies that there is a “critical mass” of 
interest building on Tibet. Many of ihe same- people 
who became interested in Tibet a decade or so ago, 
be said, are still working for the cause. 

The work includes regular meetings in Hol- 


lywood and elsewhere, as well as support for in- 
stitutions like Tibet House in New York and tbe 
International Campaign for Tibet in Washington, a 
lobbying group with close ties to the Tibetan eov- - 
eminent in exile. 6 

To be sure, other perceived injustices in the* 
world have long generated their own movements, 
from opposition to Indonesia's occupation of East' 
Tunor to the detention of Daw Aung San Suu 

Almsman & W ^ movie sympathetic to Daw* 

A^fSan Suu Kyi, Beyond Rangoon,” directed 

But miUtaf y dictatorship of; 
^Jima did not become the focus of a Tibet-styte 

Tibet es P eciall y given their star 

rhtn?’ now even become an issue in 
Chinese^mencan relations, making Washine- 

SLEZA-TT'** atmosphere will' 

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duSnc "V s A .T* busme ss in China by pro-' 
Ivwooci fiffnmc r!n' 5 9 prominent SoK 

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said JohHSI!? 1 ^ bad its ups and downs”! 

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demonsStions 


Jaoq« es 

Gaulli' 1 


tee and now deputy chairman of the 
President's Foreign Intelligence Advis- 
ory Board. 

But none of these possible nominees, 
expressed any great desire for the job;- 
according to a variety of people familiar 
with their thinkin g- : 

The president’s press secretary, Mi- 
chael McGurry, went out of his way to 
praise Mr. Tenet on Tuesday. . '■* 

“George Tenet.” Mr. McCrary said, 
"does a spectacular job and has gat a' 
great reputation inside the agency.’ ’ 

He said that Mr. Tenet was “very weB 
liked” in Congress, where be once, 
worked as staff director of the Senate 
intelligence committee. 

Mr. Tenet has been acting director of 
central intelligence since December; 
when the Clinton administration let go 
John Deutch, who had been director for 
19 months, and nominated Mr. Lake as 
bis successor. 

The turnover rate in the post atop the 
national intelligence network has 
brought the CIA to a state approaching' 
“institutional collapse," says a formed 
deputy chairman of tire Senate inteK 
tigence committee,. Daniel ..Patrick. 
Moymhan, Democrat of New York. 

Now, with the withdrawal of Mr. 
Lake, the man who the administration 
had hoped would bring some stability to 
that post, Mr. Clinton wanted to choose a 
new nominee “as soon as possible, giv- 
en the enormous needs we have,” Mr. 
McCrary said. 

The CIA, Mr. McCrary added, 


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Willem de Kooning, a Giant of Postwar American Art, Is Dead at 92 


- B y Michael Kim me! man 

Wtiv York Tima Serv ice 

^ NEW YORK — Willem de Kooning, 
JZ. who came to New York City from 
tos native Rotterdam and dramatically 
altered the shape of American an after 
World War n, died Wednesday at his 
home m Springs, New York, 

■ A .9 ea! ; m y* ic figure in American 
g*\. Mr - de Kooning became the em- 
ooaiment of its heyday in the 1950s, 
w hep t he movement thai he epitomized! 
■4 Abstract Expressionism, rose to inter- 
national prominence. Even before then 
jte was a charismatic presence on the 
New York art scene, a regular at the old 
Cedar Bar, the artists’ hangout in Green- 
wich Village, where he became le- 
gendary for his choirboy good looks, 
soft-spoken charm and hard drinking. 

: Late in life, he remained a striking 
man, half Dutch sailor, half Charlie 
Chaplin in baggy trousers, with his thick 
Dutch accent, home-grown English 
patois, clear blue eyes and shock of 


white hair. His off -again, on-again mar- 
riage to the gifted painter Elaine de 
Kooning lasted until she died in 1989. 

Mr. de Kooning was known, among 
other things, for his “Women.” The 
female figure became the tonic note to 
which he returned again and again in his 
long career, and out of this preoccu- 
pation came many of his most hotly 
contested works: the toothy, blowzy im- 
ages of the late 1940s, '50s and '60s. 
which have been described as sexist and 
pornographic, affectionate and funny, 
or all these things at once. 

Long before Andy Warhol thought of 
silk-screening Marilyn Monroe, Mr. de 
Kooning culled sources from as far 
afield as tobacco advertisements and 
fashion spreads in women’s magazines. 
“I always seem to be wrapped in the 
melodrama of vulgarity." he said. 

He suffered from Alzheimer's dis- 
ease since at least the late 1980s. hi 
February 1989, his daughter, Lisa, and 
his lawyer, John Eastman, filed a court 
petition asking that he be declared in- 


Jacques Foccart Is Dead, 
Gaullist Power in Africa 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Timex Service 

■ PARIS — Jacques Foccart, who mas- 
terminded coups and clandestine op- 
erations in French-speaking Africa for 
de Gaulle and three French presidents 
after him, died at his home Wednesday, 
apparently of a heart attack. He was 

Mr. Foccart ’s secrecy and preference 
for operating in the shadows were le- 
gendary. But he was trusted by France's 
friends in Africa and remained a power- 
ful influence on his country’s African 
policy almost to his death, serving as an 
honorary adviser to President Jacques 
Chirac after his election in 1995. 

, Mr. Foccart’s hand was seen lately in 
Mr. Chirac’s policy of indirect support 
for President Mobutu Sese Seko in 
Zaire, despite his crumbling support. 

For much of the past year, Mr. Fo- 
ccart had suffered from Parkinson's dis- 
ease and rarely left home. 

Mr. Foccart was bom in Arabrieres in 
we st -central France on Aug. 31. 1913, 
into an Alsatian family mat bad ag- 
ricultural interests in Guadeloupe. 

Drafted into the army at the start of 
World War II, he avoided capture when 
France fell and, according to his bio- 
grapher. Pierre Pean, joined the Re- 
sistance only after the German occu- 
piers brought a criminal complaint 
against him in connection with con- 
struction work he was doing on for- 
tifications on the Atlantic coast 
_ For his Resistance work be won an 
award from the U.S. Army and friend- 
ships in the inner circle of the leadership 
around de Gaulle. After the war, he 
started an import-export company. 


called Safiex. that did business in many 
of the French colonies in Africa. It also 
did so well that Mr. Foccart almost 
single-handedly, was able to finance the 
party that de Gaulle called into being as 
a mass movement in 1947, the Rally of 
the French People. 

Mr. Foccart also became one of the 
founders of a police force the movement 
had to do battle against the Communists 
— the Service d ’Action Civique. Its 
school in Cercottes, outside Orleans, be- 
came a gathering place for the keepers of 
the Gaullist flame in the 1950s. 

Mr. Foccart masterminded the 
strategy that brought the general back to 
power in 1958, using networks he had 
forged to create popular fears of a coup 
led by angry paratroopers from Algeria 
and simultaneously to make sure that 
when the Fourth Republic fell, de 
Gaulle and not the diehards in Algeria 
would get power. 

As president de Gaulle made Mr. Fo- 
ccart one of his closest aides. He became 
secretary-general of the French Com- 
munity, die vehicle created in 1960 after 
giving France’s colonies in Africa nom- 
inal independence. 

'‘Foccart was assigned the task of 
orchestrating an arrangement whereby 
French interests could maintain the upper 
hand in her former colonies, for whom 
she had done virtually nothing to prepare 
for independence.” Douglas Porch 
wrote in “The French Secret Services." 

Many were the coups in French- 
speaking Africa that Mr. Foccart and his 
agents were accused of instigating- In 
1964, he sent French troops to oil-rich 
Gabon to keep Leon Mba in power 
against an American-supported rival, 
and to keep the French Elf petroleum 


Mobutu Leaves Hospital 
And Sets Return to Zaire 


CompHtd by Ov iqf/' Fn*r Dupncha 

NICE — President Mobutu Sese 
Seko of Zaire, faring a fast-spreading 
revolt back home, left a hospital in 
Monaco on Wednesday after undergo- 
ing cancer treatment, witnesses said. 

Marshal Mobutu was driven from 
Princess Grace hospital to his French 
Riviera villa in Roquebrune-Cap-Mar- 
tjn. His press service said he planned to 
return to Kinshasa by the end of the 
week to lead an attempt to quell the 
rebellion in eastern Zaire. 

’ Nzanga Mobutu, who is acting as his 
father’s spokesman in France, said Mar- 
shal Mobutu continued to consider 
Prime Minister Leon Kengo wa Dondo, 
who was apparently ousted by Zaire s 
Parliament on Tuesday night, as the 
acting prime minister. 

“As long as there is not a new prune 
minister, we consider Kengo to be the 
prime minister,’’ he said. 

Nzanga Mobutu also denied reports 
piat members of his family had fled to 
Congo, saying dial only dis t an t relative; 
had fled. Close family members, be said, 
were with Marshal Mobutu m France or 
had remained in Zaire. 

In Nairobi, meanwhile, African lead- 
ers called Wednesday for a negotiated 
end to the war. 


President Daniel arap Moi of Kenya 
told Mr. Kengo, representing Zaire, and 
the presidents of Zimbabwe and Congo, 
South Africa’s deputy president and 
representatives from Cameroon that 
failure to end the five-month conflict 
would have wide repercussions. 

“The deteriorating situation in Zaire 
calls for all our energies to check it to 
avoid further bloodshed and human suf- 
fering,” Mr. Moi said. 

“It goes without saying,” he added, 
“that if the crisis in Zaire goes out of 
hand, die repercussions will be felt far 
and wide." 

The Zairian radical opposition in 
Kinshasa, led by Wa Malumba Etienne 
Tshisekedi, sponsored Tuesday’s par- 
liamentary motion of censure against 
Mr. Kengo, which also called for a 
cease-fire and talks with Laurent Kab- 
ila, the leader of the rebel Alliance of 
Democratic Forces for tbe Liberation of 
the Congo (Zaire), which has taken the 
eastern 20 percent of tbe country. 

In Kinshasa, a spokesman for Mr. 
Tshisekedi said he would begin contacts 
soon on forming a government to ne- 
gotiate with the advancing rebels. 

In the rebel headquarters of Goma, 
the rebel official responsible for infor- 
mation, Raphael Nghenda, shrugged off 


capable of looking after bis own busi- 
ness affairs. Much debate has focused 
on the nature of his art from the im- 
mediately preceding years, specifically, 
how much his works from the 1980s 
may have been affected by his disease 
and also how much his assistants con- 
tributed to them. 

A traveling show of late pictures, now 
at the Museum of Modem Art, has dis- 
pelled some of the worst rumors about 
the circumstances in which they were 
made, and proved that, nearly to the end, 
Mr. de Kooning worked as he always 
bad, improvisation ally and episodic- 
ally. But inevitably the show leaves 
unsettled the issue of the quality. The 
last works are flat, weightless ribbons of 
color against vacant fields of white. 

This became the final contested 
chapter in a career in which each artistic 
shift was greeted with acclaim by some 
and as a retreat from previous triumphs 
by others. Over the years critics con- 
tended that his decline began as early as 
1950, barely after he had his first one- 


man show; others said it started in the 
’60s, still others in the ’70s or '80s. 

Mr. de Kooning eventually became a 
victim of his own tremendous grav- 
itational influence. He spawned count- 
less imitators who could not begin to 
match the fluency, wit, sexual energy 
and sheer invention of his art, and they 
tarnished gestural abstraction, or “Ac- 
tion Painting,” as the critic Harold 
Rosenberg termed the style with which 
Mr. de Kooning was linked. 

Somewhat paradoxically, Europeans 
never regarded Mr. de Kooning with 
quite the reverence Americans did, 
partly, perhaps, because they saw him as 
too European. They considered his vo- 
luptuous paint to be merely a modernist 
twist on works by Dutch masters rather 
than a truly new form of art. The fact is. 
it was both original and indebted to 
painters of the past. 

By consensus, his works from the late 
1 940 's and eariy ’50s are touchstones of 
20th-century American art. After that, 
Mr. de Kooning's evolution can be said 


to have had about it an ebb and flow, so 
that significant works came out of 
nearly every phase of his lengthy and 
fecund career. 

By the time Mr. de Kooning got to 
bravura canvases like “Gotham News” 
(1955) and “Saturday Night" (1956), 
his art had become a near-volcano of 
raucous, nervous and uncon tainable en- 
ergy. These paintings were brilliant dis- 
cursions on Cubism, the Cubist grid 
stretched, pulled and twisted until it was 
barely recognizable as the skeleton for 
fleshy paint. 

By the early 1960s his art seemed to 
empty out, like air being let our of a 
giant balloon. His new paintings, with 
their big, long brush strokes crisscross- 
ing large canvases, also suggested the 
flat stretches of potato fields and 
beaches at his new home. 

In the '80s there was another empty- 
ing out in Mr. de Kooning’s work: 
heavy impasto gave way to flat, sanded 
and scraped surfaces, rainbows of color 
yielding to red, orange and blue bands 



U.S. Supreme Court Weighs 
Law on Internet Indecency 


Laird Rua/Agmor ftwar-tYenc 

Jacques Foccart advised de Gaulle. 

group in business there. He also became 
a close friend of President Omar Bongo, 
who succeeded Mr. M'ba after be died 
in 1967. 

There were six military coups in 
French Africa at the end of 1965 and the 
beginning of 1966, but, Mr. Foccart 
said, France did nothing to foment any 
of those, including one that brought 
Jean-Bedel Bokassa to power as pres- 
ident of the Centra] African Republic. 

The threat of calling off a visit by Mr. 
Bokassa to Paris in 1969 was enough, he 
recalled, to get the African leader to halt 
an economic boycott of Chad. “Tell 
him there won’t be any trip if he doesn 't 
promise to stop calling me Papa," de 
Gaulle complained. 

After de Gaulle left power in 1969, 
Mr. Foccart stayed on, first for President 
Georges Pompidou and later, despite 
some interruptions, for President Valery 
Giscard d’Estaing, who finally author- 
ized French support for an uprising 
against Mr. Bokassa after he proclaimed 
himself emperor. 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The Supreme 
Court took up for the first time on Wed- 
nesday the slippery question of how to 
guard children against indecency on the 
vast computer network known as the 
Internet while preserving adults* right to 
free speech. 

The justices spent 70 minutes in a 
vigorous and wide-ranging examination 
of the constitutionality and practicality 
of a law that seeks to screen materials on 
the Internet. The case is being closely 
watched: About 40 million people use 
the Internet, as do many thousands of 
businesses. 

A lower court in June blocked en- 
forcement of that law, tbe Communi- 
cations Decency Act, saying it was 
vague and too broad. The law is the first 
effort by Congress to regulate tbe In- 
ternet. One of the three lower court 
judges, Stewart Dalzell. praised the In- 
ternet as “die most participatory form 
of mass speech yet developed.” 

On Wednesday, justices asked ques- 
tions ranging from the highly technical 
to matters of the deepest principle, 
seeming mindful that explosive tech- 
nological change, and the amorphous 
nature of the Internet, make attempts at 
restraint problematic. 

They gave no clear indication of how 
they would rule, but appeared to agree 
with the government’s attorney. Deputy 
Solicitor General Seth Waxman. on the 
fundamental stakes involved. 

* ‘The Internet threatens to give every 
child with access to an interactive com- 
puter a free pass into the equivalent of 
every adult bookstore and video outlet 
in the country,” Mr. Waxman said. 


The American Civil Liberties Union, 
joined by other free-speech groups, has 
acknowledged the need to protect chil- 
dren but challenged the Decency Act, 
saying it would infringe on adults' right 
to free speech. 

“The government cannot reduce the 
adult population to reading or viewing 
only what is appropriate for children, 
said Bruce Ennis, representing the 
American Civil Liberties Union, the 
American Library Association and oth- 
er groups opposing the law. 

Tlte Decency Act, which would rely 
largely on electronic screening by pro- 
viders of pornography to ensure their 
materials go only to adults, would be 
virtually impossible to enforce effec- 
tively. Mr. Ennis said. 

Not only are an estimated 30 percent 
of the 8,000 sex-related web sites based 
outside the United States — and thus 
beyond the scope of U.S. law and en- 
forcement — but also, those based in the 
country could easily reroute their ser- 
vices through foreign addresses. 

The law, not yet enforced because of 
the legal challenge, calls for punishment 
of up to two years in prison and fines of 
up to $250,000 for anyone transmitting 
sexually explicit material to anyone 
younger than 18. 

Justices’ questions pointed to a 
series of ambiguities in the law. What if 
an adult viewed ‘indecent’ material in 
the company of his 17-year-old child? 
What if a parent sent a ‘patently of- 
fensive’ e-mail message to his 17-year- 
old child at college? Is a library re- 
sponsible for everything viewed on its 
computers? 

A ruling in the case. Reno v. Amer- 
ican Civil Liberties Union, is due by 
July. 



Rebels arresting a suspected government soldier Wednesday in Kisangani, which fell to the insurgents over 
the weekend. The suspected soldier denied being in the army, but tbe rebels found photos of him in uniform. 


mounting international pressure for a 
cease-fire and said tbe Nairobi meeting 
would not solve anything. 

“What counts for us is our people,” 
he said. “Although we cannot ignore 
outside pressure, our people need this 
war to finish quickly and do not want a 
cease-fire." 

“Tbe Nairobi summit could only 


have a very doubtful impact without our 
presence,” he added, “and it is clearly 
not going to produce a serious result 
when Moi is such a close ally of 
Mobutu.” (Reuters. AP) 

■ US. Studying Evacuation 

The Pentagon said Wednesday that a 
team of about 30 U.S. military spe- 


cialists was en route to Zaire to study 
airfields, roads and communications in 
case a decision is made to evacuate 
Americans, Reuters reported from 
Washington, 

Lieutenant Colonel Nancy Burt of the 
army, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said 
the visit did not signal any decision to 
evacuate Americans from Zaire. 


twisting on white backgrounds. Some- 
times, in the process of working, he 
blanketed areas with white, leaving only 
a fragment of previous detail to bob up 
from beneath the fresh covering, like 
flotsam in the waves. 

The best early '80s pictures can be 
airy, lyrical and elegiac, almost like a 
memory of his paintings from the '40s, 
without the stress and strain. One can 
still see his rhytiunical, seemingly ef- 
fortless graphic virtuosity in the forms 
that spin and loop across a few of these 
late canvases. But there is also a 
poignancy, an icy silence hard to dis- 
sociate from mental decline. 

Mr. de Kooning was boro on April 
24. 1 904, in Rotterdam. His father was a 
wine, beer and soft-drink distributor. 
His mother ran a workingmen's bar. 

They divorced when he was a small 
boy, and he was brought up first by his 
father, then by his strong-willed mother, 
who sent him when he was 12 to ap- 
prentice at a commercial art and dec- 
orating firm. 


Bombings Wound 5 
In Colombian Town 

BOGOTA — Two bombs ex- 
ploded Wednesday in northeast 
Colombia, wounding five people, in 
what the police said was an esca- 
lation of a wave of dynamite attacks 
by leftist guerrillas in the region. 

The attacks in central Bucara- 
manga, Santander Province, were 
carried out the same day that Pres- 
ident Ernesto Samper and the na- 
tional police chief. General Rosso 
Jose Serrano were to visit the city. 

A police spokesman said two 
men were captured shortly after the 
explosions, which damaged the 
premises of a cattle ranchers* as- 
sociation and the chamber of com- 
merce. 

The spokesman said the National 
Liberation Army, Colombia’s 
second largest rebel group, was 
thought to be behind the attacks. 
The group was set up by radical 
Roman Catholic priests in the mid- 
1960s ( Reuters) 

Ireland Advances 
President’s UN Bid 

DUBLIN — The Irish govern- 
ment has formally proposed Pres- 
ident Mary Robinson for the post of 
United Nations High Commission- 
er for Human Rights. 

A cabinet statement released' 
Wednesday said the government - 
would “actively support the pres- 
ident’s candidature in eveiy pos- 
sible way.” 

Mrs. Robinson announced last 
week that she would not seek re- 
election as president, a post she has 
held for nearly eight years. Mrs. 
Robinson is a constitutional lawyer 
who has spent much of her pro- 
fessional life publicizing Third 
World causes, notably in Africa. 
The UN post is expected to be va- 
cant soon. (Reuters) 

Somali Leaders 
Seek Arabs 9 Aid 

CAIRO — Somali faction lead- 
ers called for greater support from 
Arabs to help defuse the crisis in 
their country during a meeting 
Wednesday with the secretary of 
the Arab League, General Esmat 
Abdel Meguid. 

The meeting was attended by a 
delegation of the Somali National 
Salvation Council, headed by Adam 
Abdallah Nur, and representatives 
of the 22-member pan-Arab group, 
of which Somalia is a member. 

The council called on the Arab 
League to set up a special fund to 
help the Somali people overcome 
economic hardships and asked the 
council to appoint a special envoy 
to Somalia, Mr. Nur said. 

An Arab League statement called 
on “all Somali factions to take part 
in the peace process under way’ ’ in 
Somalia in order to convene a na- 
tional reconciliation conference. 

Somalia has been tom by civil 
war since the fall of its leader, Mo- 
hammed Siad Barre. in January 
1991 and has been without a gov- 
ernment since then. (AFP) 




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Comprehensive yet concise, informed yet impartial, the affairs of the world unfold on the pages of the World s Daily Newspaper. 







^ ■ 




PAGE 8 


THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Hcralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE HEW YORK- TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


tribune 2 he Cdd War’s Nuclear Mess Is Stitt With Us 

THE WASHINGTON POST 


* It 


tfr 11 




Ben 


Catching Up 


By Flora Lewis 


Russia now has in place its most 
forward-looking, pro-reform cabinet 
since the first post-Soviet government 
took office more than five years ago. 
President Boris Yeltsin, resurrecting 
himself yet again after having been 
written off for die umpteenth rime, 
named the new. relatively young team 
on Monday . If he now gives the team his 
full backing, as he has promised to do, 
the reform process that began in 1992 
but then ground to a damaging standstill 
might resume in a serious way. 

The first burst of reform Creed prices, 
which had previously beat set by the 
gate and privatized thousands of en- 
terprises that previously had been stale- 
owned. Thai was enough to fill ooce 
empty shelves with a prolusion of goods 
and to unleash a wave of small-scale 
entrepreneurship. But mortal apposition 
from the “Red directors" — managers 
of big, stale-owned factories that could 
not survive in a free market — kept Mr. 
Yeltsin from finishing the job. 

In one way or another, be kept fun- 
neling huge subsidies to money-losing 
enterprises, which stoked inflation for 
far too long and discouraged new in- 
vestments in really productive enter- 
prises. At the same rime, the govern- 
ment continued to interfere in the 
market, protecting natural -resource 
monopolies and subsidizing credit, 
which fueled corruption and an ex- 
panding gap between rich and poor. 


inflation now is under control, and 
there are signs that Russia’s long de- 
pression may have bottomed out; in- 
comes and production figures inched up 
in January and February, probably tire 
first such increase in more than a de- 
cade. But rite government, as Mr. 
Yeltsin recently said, still interferes far 
too much where it doesn’t belong and 
fails to accomplish what a government 
should: collect taxes, administer justice, 
provide a social safety net ihe Red 
directors are no longer much of a force, 
but a powerful new class of corrupt 
capitalists — many of whom call them- 
selves reformers — will fight to main- 
tain its monopolies and privileges. 

So the challenges facing Mr. Yelt- 
sin’s new team are daunting. His prime 
minister remains unchanged, in part 
because a new candidate would have to 
win confirmation from the anti-reform 
Duma. But two new first deputy prime 
ministers — former privatization chief 
Anatoli Chubais, 41 , and regional gov- 
ernor Boris Nemtsov, 37 — nave 
proven reform credentials. Just as im- 
portant, they have succeeded as canny 
political operatives with practical 
skills that the first wave of reformers 
too often lacked. In the latest reshuffle, 
they seem to have had a reasonably 
fiee band in assembling a team of like- 
minded deputies. Now they will try to 
make up for lost time. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


P ARIS — During the Cold War, the By Flora Lewis There are otherdtfficutaes, especially Georges ^rpak 

focus of U.S.-Soviet negotiations having to do with Russian fears that the Garwui, a .French ^ inmortant 

ums control, especially nuclear United States plans to circumvent, or scientist who each' played unporan 

control. The reciprocal madness year, delaying so long not because the even break, the ami-ballistic missile role in his coun^ s w^po y 

arms race had created arsenals so treaty was controversial but because treaty. But the need to press ahead with program, have jtwtpJwUOT ^ • 


was aims control, especially nuclear 
arms control. The reciprocal madness 
of the arms race had created arsenals so 
vast that many strategic experts were 
convinced there would be nuclear war 
sooner or later, by accident if not by 
design. Both sides realized that they 

needed to cul back. 

The Cold War has ended. Public at- 
tention has shifted to other problems, 
other tensions. But a large part of the 
weapons is still there. It has turned out 
foatit is almost as hard to get rid of them 
as it was to build them, both costly and 
dangerous. They can't just be thrown 
away, and they won’t just go away. 

The governments involved know 
t hat. But in the absence of public con- 
cern and pressure, the priority for mak- 
ing sure that the stocks are safely and 
far more substantially reduced is slip- 
ping. This is a mistake. 

The START-2 treaty outlawing mul- 
tiple-warhead land-based missiles and 
cutting each side's stock of long-range 
warheads to some 3.000, from the cur- 
rent level of some 6,000, was signed in 
January 1993 just before President 
George Bush left office. It still has not 
been put into effect. 

The U.S. Senate finally ratified it last 


Senator Jesse Helms, chairman of the more reductions is certain, urgent and a book called WUi-o^ Ff - ‘ii 

Foreign Relations Committee, held it very much in the interest of both sides as Nuclear Mushrooms, w p . 
hostage to his personal crusade for re- well as the rest of the world- laymen why nuclear oe renww i, 

organization of the Stale Department. To many who have followed the fantasy that became an mcretn ,, 

By then the political evolution in Russia nuclear debates from the beginning, nightmare. The illogic ot n 
had developed hostility in the Duma, even START-3 won’t go nearly far remains nuud-boggling. . . r, 

which has yet to consider ratification enough. In addition to the 2,000-2^00 Alongside the grave reqm rem j 
and has new doubts and demands. remaining operational missiles on each get on with nuclear arms wmcroi is me .« ^ 
Once again, as in the Cold War peri- side, it will leave a huge amount of need to apply the conyraomi oanmng ^ w 
od, arms control has become a test of fissile material from stocks and dis- .chemical weapons, which is aue to raxe c 
Russian-American relations. mantled weapons that could be used to effect in April although me unitea 

President Bill Clinton plans to offer make new ones. States has not yet ratified iL Agpmjvtr. ^ 

some new assurances that the United There is an insistent argument from Helms is bolding it hostage, despite 


a book called “WiU-o’-tfae-Wisps and,,: 
Nuclear Mushrooms,” to explain to ^ 
laymen why nuclear defense 
fantasy that became an incredible ., 
nightmare. The illogic of nuclear logic ^ 

remains mind-boggling. Tj 

Alongside the grave requirement to ^ 


od arms control has become a test of 
Russian-American relations. 

President Bill Clinton plans to offer 
some new assurances that the United 
States wants to continue getting rid of 
these most dangerous weapons when 
he meets President Boris Yeltsin in 
Helsinki this week. He will o utlin e a 
proposal for another pact eliminating 
another 1,000 warheads, already re- 
ferred to as START-3. 

This is important for Moscow be- 
cause current asymmetries would leave 
Russia well behind the United States 
after it complies with START-2, and it 
would face having to build a lot of 
expensive new smgle-wazfaead mis- 
siles unless the new lower ceiling is 
established fairly quickly. 


an impressive number of people who 
have had nuclear responsibility that foe 

only conceivable use for these aims is 
to deter atomic attack by an opponent, 
and for that, 500 each would be more 
than enough, and much easier and 
cbeaper-to safeguard. 

General Lee Butler, former bead of 
the Strategic Air Command , General 
Andrew J. Goodpaster, former com- 
mander of NATO, and Robert Mc- 
Namara, former secretary of defense, 
are among those urging rapid move- 
ment toward an ultimate goal of elim- 
inating all nuclear weapons. 


appeals from the American chemical ^ 
industry, which welcomes it, as well as ^ 
from the administ ration. 

So fer there has been nothing like the ^ 

public support for these essential, and 
still not adequate, measures to limit the 
danger of nuclear and chemical horror. 

It is as though people decided that since 
foe forpflt of laun ching major war has 
disappeared, they needno longer worry f 
about foe means. - 

But the hardware legacy of the Cold - 
War is still there. It must be removed, x -_ 
and that should be a popular demand. 

© Flam Lewis. 


A Deal to Bring Russia Into Stable Sync With the West 


W ASHINGTON— Wash- 
ington and its NATO al- 


mgtoni 

lies are finally focusing on the 
crux of the matter, bow to in- 
clude Russia in a stable Euro- 
pean political framework. 

The Helsinki meeting be- 
ginning this Thursday will 
send a critical si gnal. Discus- 
sions between Bill Clinton and 
Boris Yeltsin should reveal 
whether a deal can be made to 
meet the minimum require- 
ments of both sides before the 
NATO summit of July 8-9 in 
Madrid, when the alliance is 
committed to inviting the first 
new East European countries 
to begin accession talks. 

Heated debate over enlarge- 
ment has obscured the reality 
that an intensive, multilayered 
process of negotiation, has 
changed the framework of the 
Russian-NATO dispute. 

There have been talks be- 
tween NATO Secretary-Gener- 
al Javier Solaria and Foreign 
Minister Yevgeni Primakov, 
plus trips to Moscow by Chan- 


By Andrew J. Pierre 


Lake Exaggerates 


Some of Anthony Lake's bitter la- 
ment about the Senate confirmation sys- 
tem is understandable. His opponents 
generated a blizzard of irrelevant ques- 
tions, and some Republican senators 
were dearly eager to kill his nomination 
as director of central intelligence. But on 
the whole the Senate proceedings and 
the general climate in Washington are 
not as haywire as Mr. Lake suggested in 
his withdrawal letter to President Bill 
Clinton. In the end, Mr. Lake was un- 
done by Mr. Clinton's reckless 1996 
election campaign and the failure of top 
White House officials, including Mr. 
Lake, to insulate American foreign 
policy from fund-raising efforts. 

Senate consideration of senior pres- 
idential appointments should not be a 
blood sport, but the national interest 
may be served when it is a vigorous 
contact sport. The Senate has a con- 
stitutional obligation to examine the 
qualifications of nominees and to chal- 
lenge them forcefully when warranted. 
A careful exploration of Mr. Lake’s 
nomination was justified by legitimate 
questions about his record and his abil- 
ity to manage some of the govern- 
ment’s most sensitive and troubled 
agencies. He was not, to use his mem- 
orable phrase, turned into “a dancing 
bear in a political dire us." 

The idea that the Senate, in general, 
has substituted confrontation for con- 
firmation is not supported by recent 
events. All bnt two of Mr. Clinton’s 
second-term cabinet nominees have 
been confirmed, the exceptions being 
Mr. Lake and Alexis Herman, the des- 
ignated secretary of labor. Several of 
them, including Secretary of Stale 
Madeleine Albright and Defense Sec- 
retary William Cohen, sailed through 
without so much as a bracing question 
from foe Senate. 

In hearings last week. Mr. Lake 
overcame many of foe doubts about his 
determination to reform foe CIA and 
insist on the highest standards of con- 
duct by its employees. His command of 
national security issues and his com- 
mitment to make the CIA an effective 
and accountable espionage agency 
commended him for confirmation. 

His failure to sell holdings in energy 
companies when requested to do so by 
foe White House was a mistake. So, 
too, was his decision not to inform 
Congress about foe 1994 White House 
acquiescence in Iran’s arming of foe 
Bosnian Muslims. But in our view 
these were not disqualifying issues. 
Much time was wasted by die Senate 
Intelligence Committee on extraneous 
matters tike Mr. Lake's resignation 
from foe White House in 1970 after the 
invasion of Cambodia and the panel’s 
unreasonable demand to review raw 
FBI files on him. 

His role in foe campaign financing 
mess — and what that said about his 
managerial skills — were more serious 
impediments to confirmation. 

There is no evidence to date that Mr. 
Lake improperly tried to adjust foreign 
or trade policies to accommodate the 
Clinton campaign's intense courtship 
of donors with business interests in 


Asia and other regions. His staff some- 
times tried, although ineffectually and 
without adequate leadership, to block 
questionable people seeking access to 
Mr. Clinton, including Roger Tamraz, 
an international oil man charged with 
embezzlement in Lebanon. Mr. Lake 
and his aides did not do enough to erect 
a fire wall between the campaign and 
foreign policy. 

Indeed, as evidence mounted last 
year that foe rampaign was carelessly 
mixing fund-raising and relations with 
China, there is no sign that Mr. Lake 
insisted on a sharp separation. When 
issues were raised, his staff acted as if 
foe possible distortion of policy toward 
C hina was a regrettable but unavoid- 
able part of the campaign. 

This pattern left senators doubtful 
about Mr. Lake’s ability to manage a 
large enterprise. It also raised the un- 
settling possibility that some future 
disclosure about foe campaign might 
reveal a more serious breakdown in his 
White House operation. 

Mr. Clinton must now quickly find 
another nominee. The CIA badly needs 
assertive leadership to cement the re- 
forms initiated by John Deuteh. foe last 
director of central intelligence. Former 
Senator Sam Nunn would bring great 
expertise and integrity to the job, and 
would no doubt be quickly confirmed. 
George Tenet, the acting director, has 
command of foe issues and worked 
alongside Mr. Deuteh as his deputy, 
but the Senate must be sure he is strong 
enough to overcome foe resistance to 
change at the CIA. especially within . 
the operations division. 

Mr. Lake may get a lot of attention 
for bashing the confirmation process. 
Citizens should remember that the pro- 
cess kept an erratic John Tower out of 
foe Pentagon and Robert Boik. the 
former judge and solicitor general with 
an aberrant view of individual liber- 
ties, off foe Supreme Court 

In this case, the committee was dig- 
ging into legitimate questions concern- 
ing Mr. Lake’s managerial compet- 
ence and attention to conflicts of 
interest between politics and policy. 
He has a right to quit but he has not 
earned foe right to be taken as foe last 
word on the confirmation process. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


cell or Helmut Kohl, President 
Jacques Chirac, Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright and 
Deputy Secretary Strobe Tal- 
bott. Prime Mmister VTkior 
Chernomyrdin and Mr. Prima- 
kov have visited Washington. 

A good accord is now within 
reach. 711656 should be its five 
basic elements: 

• The principles of foe fu- 
ture Russian-NATO relation- 
ship should be codified in a 
political document. It need not 
be a “charter" (an American 
concession), nor should it be 
legally binding so as to require 
ratification (a needed Russian 
concession). Formally en- 
dorsed in an international set- 
ting, it could be politically 
binding, as is foe case with the 
Helsinki Final Act. 

• A NATO-Russian Council 
should be created in Brussels, 
enabling Russia to participate 
at the early stage of discussion 
of many issues. The council 


could undertake joint action in 
future crisis management and 
peacekeeping. 

The new council should be a 
venue for consultation and co- 
operation on such matters as 
nonproliferation and missile 
defense, military doctrines and 
defense conversion, interna- 
tional terrorism and environ- 
mental degradation. It would 
be active at many levels, from 
head of state to military com- 
mands. Russia would acquire 
an important voice, but not a 
veto, in NATO's business. 

• Finn and written guaran- 
tees (beyond foe current as- 
surances) should be made by 
NATO that neither will it de- 
ploy nuclear weapons in new 
member states (drop foe caveat 
about “no intention' * to do so) 
nor will it permanently station 
foreign combat forces on their 
territory idrop the “foresee- 
able future’’ reservation). 

Russia in turn should drop 


its demand for limitations on 
new equipment for new mem- 
bers or other “infrastructure” 
items. Moscow’s concerns 
about enlargement adding to 
NATO’s capabilities, through 
for example the upgrading of 
Polish aircraft and air bases, 
can be addressed with specif- 
ically tailored confidence- 
building measures. 

• It should be agreed that 
additional military issues re- 
lating to troops and their equip- 
ment will be dealt with in the 
separate 30-nation negotiation 
on foe revision of foe Con- 
ventional Forces in Europe 
treaty. An overall capon forces 
in Central Europe, to cover 
Poland. Hungary, die Czech 
and Slovak republics, Belarus, 
the western portion of Ukraine 
and the Kaliningrad Oblast, 
and based on national, terri- 
torial and zonal ceilings, 
should be sought 

• Mindful that for many 
Russian politicians ratification 
of the START-2 agreement is 


The writer is a professor qf Wj 
European studies at the Nice, 
School of Advanced Interna- ", 
tional Studies of Johns Hop- 1 
kins University. He contrib 
uted this comment to the'. 
International Herald Tribune. 1 ‘ 


Europeans Can’t Afford to Dodge Intervention in Albania 


B RADFORD, England — 
The European Union has 


-U The European Union has 
been just as irresolute toward 
foe Albanian crisis as it was 
when the Bosnian tragedy start- 
ed five years ago. The only 
measure that EU foreign min- 
isters could agree on this time 
was to send a team of diplomats 
and advisers on a 36-hour visit 
to assess the situation. 

France and Italy’s call for a 
l, 000-stroag force to act as a 
barrier against spreading chaos 
was vetoed by Britain and Ger- 
many. Once again foe Balkans 
cruelly expose foe inability of 
the Union to coordinate foreign 
policy in an emergency. 

The relative calm of the past 
few days is deceptive. Except in 
Tirana, foe state has evapor- 
ated; everywhere food stocks 
are running out If unrest con- 
tinues. power is likely to grav- 
itate to militias foal will fight 


By Tom Gallagher 


with rivals over territory, con- 
trol of feel and foe right to tax. 
In failed states, such armed 
groups are bard to contain, as 
foe United Nations found in 
Somalia and foe Organization 
of African Unity in Liberia. 

The entire Albanian political 
class is discredited, and crim- 
inal elements are poised to fill 
foe void. Unless they are 
checked, there will be no com- 
punction about delivering 
weapons next door in Kosovo, 
where a revolt is already brew- 
ing against Serbian rule. 

Greece could declare a zone 
of influence in the south, where 
a small Greek minority resides. 
Such unilateral action by ad- 
joining states could lead to a de 
facto partition of the country or a 
clash between regional interests 
that would be hard to contain. 


A lucrative trade in drugs, 
military hardware and illegal 
immigrants has already muds 
Albania one big transit depot 
for all kinds of contraband. The 
Albanian underworld, in league 
with its more professional Itali- 
an cousins, has enormous scope 
to spread its operations in the 
absence of law and order. 

Albania could soon become a 
bleeding ulcer exporting crime 
and misery across foe continent. 
No Western society whose se- 
curity is harmed by such a rogue 
society will stand by and endure 
foe fallout But if foe interven- 
tion is punitive and comes when 
well-armed factions have solid- 
ified their power, an outside 
force is likely to come to grief. 

A police action designed to 
restore order, disarm citizens as 
far as possible and pave foe way 


for foe return of an elected gov- 
ernment based on the rule of law 
would command majority sup- 
port Despite the country’s 
fabled isolation and turbulence, 
it is wrong to see the Albanians 
as a race of wild fanatics. 

Such cheap Balkan stereo- 
types warped Western flunking 
about Bosnia and should be laid 
to rest before more policy blun- 
ders result 

The Danish foreign minister 
has suggested that financial in- 
centives be offered to encour- 
age the surrender of weapons. 

Perhaps more effective still 
would be an offer from the 
European Union linking the 
laying down of arms with con- 
trolled emigration. If the EU 
states promised to take in one 
Albanian for every 500 auto- 
matic weapons banded in, it 
could have an electrifying ef- 
fect on a people eager to rejoin 


Other Comment 


Europe. A lottery for work per- 
mits. with eligibility carefully 
scrutinized by EU immigration 
officials, could rekindle hope in 
West European institutions. 

The West has it in its power 
to mobilize the law-abiding ma- 
jority against amoral elements 
profiting from foe turmoil. 

A more responsible political 
elite drawn from foe well-edu- 
cated professionals who exist in 
surprisingly large numbers 
could emerge if outside inter- 
vention were linked to a plan to 
restore the country’s shattered 
i nfrastructure. Social invest- 
ment, carefully targeted, can do 
more to prevent the problems of 


Onto Kabila’s Bandwagon New York Has Habits to Change 

Tlv. fon nf v: i 


The fall of Kisangani has no doubt 
given Mobutu supporters in Kinshasa 
cause to reconsider tbetr political fu- 
tures. Not only for opposition politicians 
but even for Marshal Mobutu's own 
generals the temptation must be grow- 
ing to jump onto the seemingly un- 
stoppable bandwagon from the east and 
reach some sort of modus vfvendi with 
rebel leader Laurent Kabila. Marshal 
Mobutu himself may ultimately be 
tempted to try to make a deal, but be will 
have to make concessions far more se- 
rious than tile cease-fire he has offered. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeitung ( Zurich 


N EW YORK — Joe Roby, 
president of the securities 


3teraib3»ribunc 


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i. v president of the securities 
firm Donaldson, Lufkin & Jen- 
rette, took borne $33 million 
last year. Perhaps shareholders 
did not mind, because the com- 
pany, like most of Wall Street, 
had a very good year. 

But the city’s unemploy- 
ment rale rose last year to 9.9 
percent, one of America’s 
highest big-city rates. 

In 1968, when Wall Street 
was enjoying a similarly long- 
running market boom, foe un- 
employment rate in New York 
fell to 3. 1 percent much lower 
than foe national average. 

In the 1980s the recovery 
on Wall Street created hun- 
dreds of thousands of jobs, not 
even counting spin-off em- 
ployment for building main- 
tenance people and limo 
drivers. Those were foe glory 
days when midlevel clerical 
workers were pocketing 
$75,000 in salary and bo- 
nuses, and secretaries who 
worked past 6:30 got over- 
time, dinner money and a 
driver to take them home. 

During the 1996 market 
boom, by contrast, the city’s 
financial sector created only 
12^00 new jobs, and those 
include jobs generated by all 
the stepped up activity among 
primers, law firms and ac- 
countants. By the end of foe 
year. Wall Street was actually 
cutting employment 

Since its 1989-1991 reces- 
sion, Wall Street has been 


By Charles R. Morris 


automating with a vengeance. 
Until foe 1980s, most trading 
and securities transfers were 
paper-based. It took an army 
of workers to deliver, register 
and keep custody over mil- 
lions of bond and stock cer- 
tificates, and to make sure that 
dividends and interest were 
collected on schedule and 
properly accounted for. But 


the big market players have 
long since switched from pa- 
per to computerized registries, 
and foe workers are obsolete. 

The city has managed to 
retain its share of the financial 
services business in foe 1990s. 
but only by keeping a rough 
parity with the cost efficiency 
of a host of new competitors 
— off-hours exchanges, com- 
puterized trading systems and 
discount brokers. 

Shareholders and top exec- 
utives of the big corporations 
can continue to pocket big 
profits and bonuses only if they 
keep rigid control over oper- 
ating costs. The downsizing 
likely to follow the oext market 
downturn may be cataclysmic. 

The old Wall Street job en- 
gine was foe last vestige of 
New York as Empire City, 
when its position as foe 
world's business, financial, 
entertainment and media cen- 
ter cushioned foe economic 
ups and downs. But New York 
can no longer defy foe eco- 


nomic laws of gravity. Most of 
foe recent business revolu- 
tions. like those in computer 
technology and biotechnolo- 
gy, have simply passed it by. 

Like the old* Soviet Union, 
New York has acquired its 
own nomenklatura, a priv- 
ileged elite who feed off foe 
regulations and high costs that 
make the city such a mine 
field for everyone else. 

Take foe rent laws that ben- 
efit the well-to-do on the Up- 
per West Side and create ar- 
tificial scarcities and exorb- 
itant prices in the “free mar- 
ket,” Or the featherbedding 
entertainment unions that al- 
most succeeded in driving se- 
rious theater out of the city. Or 
the blackbird flock of inspect- 
ors, “environmental consult- 
ants." lawyers and mortgage 
brokers who collect a toll from 
routine transactions. 

Only in New York, and 
places like Beijing, does one 
hire “expediters’* for routine 
government approvals. In a 
city of small businesses, we 
levy punitive taxes on small 
proprietors — a flat 4 percent 
on anyone making more than 
$20,000. plus a uniquely high 
municipal income tax. 

Rolling back the bureau- , 
cratic encrustations will be foe I 
work of decades. 


The writer, professor df 
peace studies at Bradford UnT 
versify, contributed this corfc 
mem to the Imernational Her ■- 
aid Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGC l 


1897s Clash Expected 


ATHENS — The streets of 
Athens are crowded with 
people, who with frantic ap- 
plause cheered the last troops 
leaving for the frontier, one re- 
giment of foot, 3.000 men and 
two batteries starting for Arta 
and Larissa respectively. It is 
feared that a fight may occur at 
the post of Menexe. on foe fron- 
tier of Thessaly, in consequence 
of the reinforcement of Turkish 
troops at that point. 


chartering a ship, and the wine? 
growers have pledged theofr 3 
selves to provide the vessel with 
samples innumerable, from or- - 
dmaiy claret to the finest virn* 
tages, the best champagnes and 
also liqueurs. 


1947: Paraguay Rebel! 


1922: Wine Cruise 


The writer, a business and 
financial consultant, contrib- 
uted this comment to The New 
York Times . 


PARIS — Not to be outdone by 
British venturers, with their 
plan of anchoring a ship outside 
the United States territorial wa- 
ters and making it a drinking 
resort for thirsty New Yorkers, 
the French wine-growing in- 
dustry has decided to send a 
vessel, loaded with free drinks 
on a trip round the world. Funds 
are now being collected for 


ASUNCION — The Paraguay^ 
an government declared a state 
of war, following reports of sue-i 
cesses by army insurgents who. 
revolted last week. Rebels hav,£ 
gained virtual control of the en n 
tire Paraguayan side of the: 1 
Paraguayan-Brazilian border* 
but officials denied that a govj 
emment junta had been set up at 
Concepcion. Paraguay was al- 
ready under a state of siege* 
which suspended most const£ 
hmonal guaranties. The gov- 
crameni will now be able to> 
conscript men, goods and 
money. Rebels are recognized 1 
as “enemies of order,” not en- 
emies of the country. 


to be kept hostage to the 
NATO enlargement issue, and ,, 
that there are deep Russian.^ 

concerns about foe costs of im- 1 
plementmg the nuclear agree- ^ 
meat and about U.S. plans for ^ 
missile defenses. President it 
Clinton should pledge to ad- * r 
dress these concerns in con - 1 
turning bilateral discussions, q 
Progress at Helsinki along ~ 
these lines would underline the, . 
intent to build a cooperative T; 
NATO-Russian relationship. 
The latter could be greatly re- J, 
inf creed through economic 
measures such as support for ^ 
makin g Russia a full member ^ 
of the Group of Seven at the^ 
group’s Denver meeting in ;; 
June, and by Russia’s early ad- ^ 
mission into the OECD. 


the Balkans from cascading 
across the Adriatic than 
plans to enlarge NATO or 
promises of someday expand^ 
ing the European Union. ’ 
The case for a minuscule q? 
zero response to Albania 
well -rehearsed. Western prdr' 
fessional armies capable of 
peacekeeping are badly ovei£ 
stretched. Intervention would 
be open-ended and intermit^ 
able. Troops would be pinnwl 
down by well-armed defc 
peradoes operating in familial 
terrain, and an airlift of body- 
bags would resulL 
But intervention is inevitable 
if Albania becomes an a fa 
chipelago of waning statelets 
exporting trouble far and wide. 
A half-baked intervention when 
criminal thugs are dug in and 
able to pose as freedom fighterti 
would probably have the dismal 
results seen in Somalia. *.> 
Albania is not Bosnia. It fs 
not riven by ethnic disputes; 
relations between Christian^ 
and Muslims are actually the 
best in the whole of Europe. Bui 
it could become an anarchic 
Medellin or Palermo, polluting 
the rest of Europe, if powerful 
neighbors do not intervene to 
restore order and help the Ui- 
used and largely blameless mai 
jority of Albanians to recon- 
struct their country. 


$ r/' 


• - 







£ 









Svr 


PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MARCH 20, 1997 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Ultrasound Is Tested 
To Break Up Blood Clots 


Comet Hale-Bopp 


Farther away than the sun yet brighter than the brightest stars. 
Hale-3opp is bitted as the most spectacular comet to pass Inside 
the Earths orbit since the areat comet of 1577. 


By Denise Grady 

New York Tunes Service 



EW YORK — The treatment of 
heart attacks has changed dramat- 
ically in the last 20 years. While 
once doctors stood by and did what 
they could to pull a patient through die crisis, 
today they try to sum the crisis, using ag- 
gressive treatments armed at actually inter- 
rupting the heart attack and preventing per- 
manent cardiac damage. 

In the latest bold approach, doctors in Israel 
have blasted the coronary arteries with ul- 
trasound to break up blood clots that were 
piurfng off blood flow to the heart muscle. 
Tested in 15 patients, the high-frequency 
sound waves worked in 13. researchers report 
in the current issue of the journal Circu- 
lation. 

Hie treatment, still experimental, is not 
available in the United States. But researchers 
here apA in Europe have also been studying 
ultrasound to open blocked arteries. The Is- 
raeli study is the largest (me so far of patients 
having heart attacks. New trials in the United 
States are being planned for later this year, 
testing the ultrasound device used in Israel as 
well as one developed by other researchers. 

To treat a heart attack, the ultrasound 
source must be guided into the blocked artery. 
Doctors insert a catheter into an artery in the 
upper thigh and snake it through die cir- 
culatory system up to the clot in the heart At 
the tip of the catheter is an ultrasound probe 
that delivers two or three 60-second bursts of 
ultrasound at a frequency of 45,000 cycles per 
second, enough to liquefy the clot. The pro- 
cedure can take as little as 20 minutes; the 
patient stays awake and does not feel the 
ultrasonic vibrations. 

Ultrasound is one of a series of techniques 
that cardiologists have developed to try to stop 
heart attacks in progress. When the attacks are 
caused by clots or fatty arterial deposits that 
cut off the blood simply to a portion of the 
heart, the muscle will cue unless blood flow 
can be restored within 12 hours. 


harming surrounding tissue. He said be and his 
colleagues believed the procedure could even- 
tually be used to treat sane stroke victims, 
people with blood clots in their legs an d dialysis 
patients with clotting problems. 

Dr. Rosenschein invented the ultrasound 
device used in his study and is a vice president 
of the company that manufactures it Angio- 
sonics Inc. of Research Triangle Park, North 
Carolina, which paid for part of the study. 

In an editorial accompanying Dr. Ro- 
senschein’s article. Dr. Paul iock and Dr. 
Peter Fitzgerald of Stanford University Med- 
ical School, who are not associated with the 
company, suggested that ultrasound might be 
especially useful in heart attack patients with 
clots too large to treat with balloon an- 
gioplasty or drugs. 

Commenting on the study, another inde- 
pendent researcher. Dr. Michael A. Bettmanof 
the Dartnrautb-Hhcbcock Medical Center in 
Lebanon. New Hampshire, called the use of 
ultrasound “interesting and exciting.'* One 
potential advantage, he said, is that unlike the 
clot-dissolving dregs, it does not pose a risk of 
bleeding in brain arteries. But threading a cath- 
eter into the heart carries other risks, Dr. 
Bettman said, and he does not think that ul- 
trasound will replace clot-dissolving drugs. 

■ Invasive Heart Test Is Questioned 


30 ALTITUDE AT 
START OF 
TWILIGHT 


March 16 


- 20 


& . 
,\v>V 




March 1 

i - 

A— 


Feb. 15 



April 1 y ' V 


ft-". 




Sty ft THewpo te*®**H*. : 


Dust and Light: Wishing on a 


'L, ■ 




ETHODS already in use to 
closed vessels include dot- 
solving dregs and angioplasty, in 
which a balloon attached to a cath- 
eter is momentarily inflated inside an artery to 
Batten dots and deposits against the vessel 
walk Devices called stems are also inserted 
permanently into narrowed arteries to prop 
them opal. 

The patients in the Israeli study, 14 men and 
one woman ranging in age from 36 to 69, 
underwent ultrasound treatment to destroy 
clots and then immediately had balloon an- 
gioplasty to open their narrowed arteries fur- 
ther. The director of the study; Dr. Uri Ro- 
senschein of the Tel Aviv Medical Center, said 
the sound waves easily liquefied clots without 


Tim Hilchey of The New York Times re- 
ported: 

Challengin g the way many cardiologists 
treat patients, a study by researchers at the 
Department of Veterans Affairs suggests that 
routine early use of coronary angiography 
testing may be harmful to survivors of one 
land of heart attack. 

Those survivors do just as weO, the re- 
searchers found, without the invasive test, 
which involves threading a tube into the heart 
and taking X-ray pictures to find and measure 
clogging of arteries. The study was coordinated 
by Dr. William E. Boden, director of medical 
services at the Veterans Affairs Upstate New 
York Health Care System in Syracuse.. 

Of the more than 1 .5 million heart attacks in 
the United States each year, slightly more than 
half are “non-Q-wave,” so called because of 
the shape recorded by an electrocardiogram. 
Unlike the more severe Q-wave variety, dam- 
age from non-Q-wave heart attacks does not 
run through the entire thickness of the heart 
muscle wall. 

It was the treatment of “non-Q-wave” 
heart attack survivors th at the study ex- 
amined. Treatment of these patients has be- 
come more aggressive in the last decade. Dr. 
Boden said, based oa the unproved assump- 
tion that invasive testing is superior to 
“watchful waiting.” 

“The absence of definitive data may im- 
plicitly encourage the performance of pro- 
cedures that are of questionable benefit.’ ’ Dr. 
Boden said 


By Kathy Sawyer 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — The giant comet 
Hale-Bopp, sweeping toward the sun 
at almost 1 00,000 mph, is literally just 
war ming up its act. But the audience is 
already applauding. 

“It's really a remarkable object,” said Michael 
Neufeld, a curator at the National Air and Space 
Museum, who spotted Hale-Bopp before dawn last 
week from his yard in Takoma Park, Maryland, 
despite the glare of streetlights. “It's further away 
than the sun, yet it rivals the brightest stars in the 
sky.” 

With an icy core up to 25 miles in diameter, this 
whale of a comet is trailing dust and gas tens of 
millions of miles across space as it dives into the 
melting warmth of the sun. Astronomers estimate it 
is 10 tunes die size of the typical comet and four 
times that of the famous Halley. The last comet this 
hefty to pass close to Earth was the Great Comet of 
1811. 

“Hale-Bopp is a stupendous comet,” said Brian 
G. Marsden of the Harvard-Smithsonian Astro- 
physical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. “I saw it through my kitchen window!” 

As for glow, Hale-Bopp is “the brightest visitor 
to pass inside the Earth's orbit since the great comet 
seen by Tycho Brahe in 1577.” says Sky & Tele- 
scope Magazine. 

But great size and intrinsic brightness do not 
guarantee an awesome display for observers on 
Earth. The comet's distance from Earth and sun. 
how much dust the comet is spewing (and at what 
angle to Earth), how full the moon is, whether the 


observer is in city glare or rural darkness- and, of 
course, the local weather all affect the look of it. 
Besides, comets approaching the sun are volatile 
and unreliable. The hyped Kahoutek in 1973 and 
the heralded Halley in 1986 fizzled in terms of 
public drama. 

Hale-Bopp will pass Earth at a vast distance 
compared, say, with last year's comet Hyakutake. 


“It would be nice if Hale-Bopp could pdf nktir 
dust into its tail,” Dr. Marsden mused. W 
would improve surface brightness, and Ltbinr 
that’s what the people want” The tail cuittnltf 
spans the width of at least one fist held up atann?! 




length against the sky. 
ft at 


While Hale-Bopp’ s core is likely more than 13 
of F 


times the size of Hyakutake, it is 13 times as far 
away as Hyakutake. Even at its closest approach, to 
Earth next Saturday. Hale-Bopp will be 1 22 million 
miles away — or almost 30 million miles more 
distant than the son. 

Douglas Duncan, an astronomer at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Adler Planetarium, says he 
already has made a killing by investing $2,000 of 
his savings in Hale-Bopp futures. He arranged 
some time ago to rent a small telescope at Arizona's 
Kit! Peak National Observatory for two nights in 
late March and early April, where he will escort 
family, friends and paying customers, box-dinners 
included, to see the comet in its full splendor. 
' 'Anybody stuck in the city, unless [the comet] falls 
on your head, no matter how spectacular it is.” he 
said, “you’re not really going to see it." 

Even the largest telescopes can’t see the comet’s 
core, believ ed to be a ball of ice and stardust The 
sun's warmth has vaporized material from the core 
into a glowing gaseous cloud (known as the bead, or 
coma) more than a million miles across. And the 
much larger multipronged tail (a bluish train of 
glowing gas molecules and a fan of dust particles 


appears stubbier than it actually is because 
Earth sees it from a foreshortening angle. • • : - J 

For scientific observers, Hale-Bopp has beeri m 

■ r p . JaunHul 1 fi hiimM 


ago — independently on the same July-nj ghrjbya - • 


concrete company worker, Thomas Bopp, stitfgazT J‘ 

‘ r-i Alaq 


reflecting sunlight! is stripped from the core by the 


high-speed wind of charged particles that flows 
constantly outward from the sun. 


mg in the Arizona desert, and an astronomer. 

Hale, of the Southwest Institute for Space Res 
in New Mexico, observing in. his driveway. 

Bopp was then beyond the orbit of Jupiter. ^ ^ 

I T was returning for the first time in at leas{ 
3.000 years. Dr. Marsden said, and Hkdyhas 
made. a dozen such round trips. Like other., 
comets, it is believed to be a remnant of rubble — . 

essentially unchanged since die formation of the 
sun and planets some 4 J billion years ago. Studies A 
of Hale-Bopp's composition already are producing W 
new refinements in researchers’ understanding of 
those early conditions. ‘ •• 

“This is the first opportunity for us to watch die 
sublimation of ices in detail as a comet approaches 
the sun," said Harold A. Weaver of Johns Hopkins- - 
University. He has studied the comet with the 
Hubble Space Telescope and the NASA Infrared 
Telescope Facility in Hawaii. But he also recom- 
mends binoculars with big lenses (rather than 
powerful magnification). Watching a comet past 
he noted, is a subtle affair. “You < 2 rFi expect — 
Fourth of July fireworks;" . . . . 


.‘tr j aftrw 


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Yeast’s Greatest Gift? A Guide to Genetics 


By Nicholas Wade 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — Without 
beer, wine and bread, the 
rise of civilization would 
scarcely have been pos- 
sible. All are the gift of yeast, and 
now the microscopic, one-celled 
fungus is being asked to fork over 
ye* another grand donation: the ge- 
netic working manual common to 
all plants and animals . 

Some people may not consider 
themselves particularly close cousins 
of yeast, but too much disdain would 
be misplaced. The basic housekeep- 
ing duties that a human and a yeast 
cell must perform are the same and 
are programmed by recognizably 
similar genes inherited from a com- 
mon, single-celled ancestor. More 
than 40 percent of (he genes that in 
defective form are known to cause 
human disease have directly related 
counterpart genes in yeast. 


■ Researchers have chosen yeast to 
help in addressing one of the out- 
standing problems in biology, that 


of gaining a full description of how 
slls work by 


plant and animal cel 
identifying a role for each of an 
organism’s genes. The project was 
conceived by Dr. Ronald W. Davis 
of the Stanford University Medical 
Center and is being undertaken by a 
consortium of universities in the 
United States and Europe. It may be 
die most ambitious experiment so 
far in what biologists are calling the 
post-genome era. 

The goal of the genome era, itself 
far from complete, is to decipher the 
full sequence of chemical units in an 
organism’s DNA. From the DNA 
sequence biologists can read off 
how many genes an organism has. 
But that information fails far short 
of giving an explanation of how the 
organism works. The genome, as the 
full DNA is called, is like a parts list 
for a strange machine, but it offers 


no idea of how the machine works. 
The task of the post-genome era is to 
figure out what each gene does and 
how it is controlled. 

The immensity of the post-gen- 
. ome enterprise is well illustrated by 
yeast. Its entire DNA was sequenced 
last year by a consortium of 96 lab- 
oratories. It is still the only euk- 
aryote — the biological kingdom 
that includes plants and anim als — 
whose genome has been se- 
quenced. 


quenced by 2005. Current estimates 
are that the DNA contains the cod- 
ing sequences for some 70,000 
genes. Identifying the role of all 
those genes, and of the control re- 
gions on the intervening DNA, is a 
daunting challenge. 

That is why a novel idea for trying 
to understand all yeast genes very 
rapidly is drawing considerable in- 


terest amongbiologisls. The plan is 


I TS 12 million units of DNA 
cany the code for 6.000 genes. 
Although yeast has been in- 
tensively studied for many 
years, fewer than half of its 6,000 
genes were known to biologists. The 
functions of the rest remain to be 
determined. 

Other organisms are even less 
well understood. The human gen- 
ome contains three billion base pairs 
of DNA. It is scheduled to be se- 


to prepare 6,000 strains of yeast, in 
each of which biologists will delete 
a different one of yeast’s 6,000 
genes and substitute an identifying 
tag of DNA. The procedure is called 
molecular bar coding. 

Sets of the 6,000 tagged yeasts 
will then be grown in a variety of 
environments in which the yeast 
might be expected to switch on dif- 
ferent sets of genes in order to sur- 
vive. If biologists are clever enough 
to imagine all the conditions in 
which yeast has been equipped by 
evolution to thrive, they stand a rear 


sonable chance of stirring into ac- 
tion almost every gene in yeast's 
repertoire. 7 

At a meeting at Stanford ^this 
week, a group of biologists known as 
the deletion consortium is planning 
methods for creating the deleted* 
gene strains as fast and as accurately 
as possible. i - 

To make the approach worit, the 
Davis team has had to invent orhelp 
develop two significant pieces of 
technology. One is a machine for 
synthesizing short stretches of DNA 
fast and cheaply. Dr. Davis calcu- 
lates that he will need to synthesize 
i-3 million units of DNA for the 
genetic engineering required to 
make the deletions, bar codes 
other snippets of DNA that help 
manipulate the tagged strains 
The other is the machine that 
reads the bar code. The device, a chip 
carrying billions of shorts strands of 
DNA. has many other potential ape 
plications in biology and mediciner 



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^ New York Times/Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of March 19 


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Living Longer and Staying Healthy l 

WASHINGTON (AP) — America’s elderly are not only 

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THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


PAGE II 



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France Telecom Looks to Britain 

Phone Firm Eyes New Ally and Outlines Plan for Share Sale in May 


CSw^/jCWrisaf-ftop, Oapakha, 

LONDON — The chair man of 
France Telecom, Michel Bon. said 
Wednesday thairalks were under way 
5* §“? * Wireless PLC to becom£ 
me Bntish arm of Global One, the 
rrench phone company’s joint ven- 
ture with Deutsche Telekom AG and 
fcpnnt Communications Corn. 

'■ F raoce Telecora SA also said the 
government would sell shares in the 

2? mj, ^X,^ 0rth ■* ™uch as 50 billion 
francs ($8.8 billion) in May, the coun- 
biggest initial public offering. 

France Telecom, Europe's second- 
biggest telecommunications com- 
pany, said 1996 net profit fell to 2,1 
billion francs, from 92. billion the year 
before, because of charges for de- 
preciation costs aimed at preparing 
the company for sale. Excluding one- 
time items, profit rose to 14 3 billion 
francs, from 14.0 billion. 

The shares, due to be listed in Paris 
and New York, will begin trading on 
June 9, but the government declined to 
specify how much of its holding 
would be sold. 

Mr. Bon denied a published report 
that Cable & Wireless was in talks 
with France Telecom to support a bid 
by the British telecommunications 
company for Sprint Corp. as having 
‘ ‘not the slightest basis of truth. ’ ’ 

Attempts by telephone companies to 
gain partners for global reach are reach- 
ing high pitch after 69 countries agreed 
at the World Trade Organization in 
February to speed deregulation of their 
telecommunications markets. 


“There’s a lot of rejigging going on 
among the global telecommunications 
players as deregulation gathers pace,” 
said Steve Scruton, telecommunica- 
tions analyst at Credit Lyonnais Laing. 
A spokesman for Deutsche Telekom, 
Hans Ehnen, said there would be no 
change in Deutsche Telekom’s stake in 
Sprint. 

A Cable & Wireless spokesman, 
Peter Eustace, declined to comment 
on the report, except to say, "We’re 
talking to everyone.” 

In New York. Sprint 's chairman and 
chief executive. Bill Esrey, said the 
report of a bid was “dead wrong.” 
Cable & Wireless’s shares closed at 
508 pence, up from 506 pence on Tues- 
day. Sprint’s shares were at $45.00. up 

BT and Telefonica: 
Rumors of Alliance 

Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Shares of British 
Telecommunications PLC rose Wed- 
nesday on a report that it was in talks 
to buy a stake in Telefonica de Espana 
SA’s international unit. 

BT was the biggest gainer in the 
FT-SE 100, closing at 462 pence 
($734), up 20. Telefonica shares 
closed at 3,400 pesetas ($23.70), up 
50. An alliance would also give Tele- 
fonica access to the U.S. market 
through BT's recent alliance with 
MCI Communications Corp. 


$1,875, in late trading in New York. 

France Telecom's share sale comes 
amid a glut of telecommunications 
offerings as some companies 
scramble to raise money to invest 
abroad and governments that own 
telecommunications companies seek 
revenue to reduce debt. 

“They’re not going to find it easy to 
attract investors if they don’t offer it at 
a discount to other telecoms, such as 
Deutsche Telekom,” said Frederic 
Sauvegrain, who trades French equities 
for Credit Suisse First Boston in Lon- 
don. 

A sale in November of shares in 
Deutsche Telekom AG. Europe's 
biggest telecommunications com- 
pany, raised 17.1 billion Deutsche 
marks ($103 billion). The shares have 
risen 9.4 percent since their offering in 
November. They closed Wednesday 
unchanged, at 36.37 DM. 

The French government originally 
said it expected to raise at least 25 
billion francs from the partial pri- 
vatization of France Telecom, but a 
Finance Ministry official said Wed- 
nesday that the final amount sold 
would depend on demand, with the 
state retaining at least 50 percent 

In 1994, the government raised 
35.7 billion francs with the sale of 
shares in Elf- Aquitaine, the largest 
state asset sale at the time. 

The France Telecom sale will start 
May 6. with three weeks reserved for 
private investors. Hie market float will 
take place between May 27 and June 
3. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — Jardine Matheson 
Holdings Ltd. said Wednesday it had 
been assured of equal treatment in 
China, a pledge that could pave the way 
for it to receive lucrative securities and 
infrastructure contracts. 

- The trading company most closely 
linked to British colonial interests dur- 
ing its 165-year-hisiory in Hong Kong, 
Jardine was ostracized by Chinese lead- 
ers after 1992 for having supported 
political reforms launched by Hong 
Kong's British governor, Chris Patten. 

A company spokesman said that Lu 
Ping, the top Chinese official in Hong 
Kong, said in a meeting in January with 
Charles Powell, the company’s director, 
that he would intervene to stop any 
discrimination against Jardine. 

-• The comments could help the con- 
glomerate’s investment bank, Jardine 
Fleming Securities Co., secure man- 
dates to underwrite share sales by 
Chinese companies. The company said 
die official's pledge also would increase 
hopes chat a level playing field for 


Chinese and foreign businesses would 
be maintained after China fairer over 
Hong Kong on July 1. 

“Lu Ping said Jardine will be treated 
as any other company in China,” the 
company spokesman said. 

The dispute between Jardine and the 
government had become a symbol of how 
politics might come to interfere whh busi- 
ness in Hong Kong, particularly that of 
British companies such as Jardine and 
Swire Pacific Ltd. 

Jardine’s stock, which is traded in 
U.S. dollars in Singapore, has lost about 
25 percent of its value in die past 12 
months, while the Hang Seng Index of 33 
major Hong Kong companies was tiring 
20 percent. Jardme Matheson’s shares 
were unchanged Wednesday at $5.80. 

Jardine Matheson is expected to re- 
port its second successive year of falling 
profit Thursday because of a slump in 
local retail and trading markets. 

“I am delighted to see that any doubts 
that might be hanging over Jantines have 
been removed,” Peter Srnch, chairman 
of Swire, said. “It was not a situation that 


cent fee to underwrite a stock sale. 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


The Hostile Takeover Gets Civilized 


By Charles V. Bagli 

_ New York Turtea Service 

N EW YORK — In the 1980s, 
America’s takeover battles 
were like Wild West shoot- 
outs, and descriptions of the 
strife relied on the imagery of violence: 
g reenmafl ers and raiders with then - bear 
hugs and Saturday night specials were 
fitted against white knights and corporate 
managers who fended off their attackers 

with poison pills and 

There was even a famous Predators 

Ball” to celebrate the mayhem. 

r,. j .... miens in 


die takeover game, ino longer u« 
Ekes of T. Boone Pickens, .Ronald 
Perelman and Carl Icahn begin raids 
with high-risk junk bonds only to «rve 
up their acquisitions and sell on me 
pieces for a quick profit. 

^Instead, corporations seek to forge 
"strategic aWanus*' that will enable 
them to grow and prosper m an in- 
creasingly competitive marketplace. 


and the lexicon of even the most hostile 
endeavors is filled with sober phrases 
such as synergy, the global marketplace 
and accretion to earnings. 

And almost everybody, it seems, is 
doing it Such mainstays of the Fortune 
500 as Johnson & Johnson and Inter- 
national Business Machines Corp. began 
their first hostile takeovers in 1995. 

In January, Hilton Hotels Corp . made 
a $103 billion hostile bid for ITT Corp., 
and a month later HJ. Ahmanson & Co., 
a large savings-and-loan company on the 
West Coast, made a $5.9 billion hostile 
offer for Great Western Financial Corp. 
to try to shift toward retail banking. 

Ahmanson sweetened the tad to $6.6 
billion. So far this year, there have been 
12 hostile or unsolicited bids in the U3. 
tnnrirgt, with a total value of $25 billion. 

Once content to tend their regulated 
monopoly franchises, utilities and rail- 
roads are suddenly conducting their 
own raucous hostile battles in the wake 
of deregulation and consolidation. 

Felix Rohatyn. the investment banker 


at Lazard Freres & Co. who once likened 
Mr. Perelman to “the Huns and the 
Visigoths” for his hostile raid on Revlon 
in 1986, now works with the financier. 

The truth is, American corporations 
have been so thoroughly downsized and 
restructured that there is little fat left for 
a 1980s-style raider to squeeze out, and 
junk bonds have mostly dried up as a 
source of corporate financing. In the 
1990s, the driving force behind 
takeovers is the scramble to stay big and 
strong enough to withstand the twin cur- 
rents of globalization and deregulation. 

With a rising stock market, corpo- 
rations are well financed for such deals. 
At the same time, investors are playing 
one of the raiders’ old roles — prodding 
chief executives to increase earnings. 
When revenue is fiat, many corporate 
chiefs now look for an opportunity to 
unite with similar businesses and so 
dominate markets and cut costs by elim- 
inating overlapping operations. | 

See TAKEOVERS, Page 15 ; 


gfPBENCY & INTEREST RATES 


March 19 

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P. HntDiM Bna/Agencc Bmec-Preoe 

Thyssen steelworkers carrying a mock coffin of the Kjnpp chairman at a Wednesday protest in Duisburg. 

Krupp Pulls Back a Hostile Bid 

Steelmaker Agrees to Discuss a ‘ Partnership ’ With Thyssen 


Jardine Gets Chinese Pledge of Fair Play 


was good for any of us in Hong Kong.” 

The apparent thaw came with Jardine 
Fleming on the verge of signing its first 
underwriting contracts in China in three 
years. Jardine companies also are ne- 
gotiating the building of offices, hotels 
and waterworks in China, after a period 
of limiting their investments to small- 
scale trade and manufacturing projects. 

People familiar with Jardine ’s prob- 
lems in China say Mr. Lu wrote a letter 
to government ministries after the meet- 
ing in January - with Mr. Powell stating 
that China had “never had a problem” 
doing business with the company. 

The company is ready to agree to 
underwrite a $40 million sale of stock : 
by a coal mine in Inner Mongolia, a 
person close to the sale said- It also may 
underwrite a Hong Kong safe of stock i 
by Ningguo Cement Co., the biggest | 
supplier of cement to Shanghai. j 

Thai sale could be worth as much as . 
S150 million, depending on which as- 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — In a surprise re- 
treat. the German steelmaker Krupp 
Hoesch AG on Wednesday suspended 
its hostile takeover of rival Thyssen AG 
and agreed to negotiate “on a basis of 
partnership" toward a merger to forge 
Europe's biggest steel group. 

After Krupp 's unsolicited takeover 
bid Tuesday unleashed an outcry by 
German unions and politicians and 
raucous protests at Krupp's headquar- 
ters, Chairman Gerhard Cromme of 
Krupp agreed early Wednesday to meet 
with his counterpart at Thyssen. Dieter 
Vogel, to agree upon a “joint corporate 
concept for the steel sector within eight 
days,” according to a statement issued 
by both companies. 

“If discussions result in a concept 
that is acceptable to both companies, the 
takeover offer announced by Krupp will 
become null and void,” the companies 


said, adding that the goal was to create a 
combined company with “a leading po- 
sition in international markets.” 

Krupp, however, threatened to re- 
activate its unwelcome takeover of the 
entire Thyssen group if no agreement 
was reacted within the period. ’ ’Should 
there be no satisfactory outcome to the 
talks, both sides will revert to their 
original positions,” both sides agreed. 

Job losses, however, remain likely 
even under a friendly merger, analysts 
and union leaders said. Dieter Kroll, die 
head of Thyssen Stahl's works council, 
said 5,000 jobs could be threatened at 
Krupp alone. Both companies have 
teen shedding steel jobs tor years and 
already had plans to eliminate several 
thousand jobs this year alone. 

After shutting down Thyssen ’s steel 
output Tuesday, Thyssen s protesting 
steelworkers began to return to work late 
Wednesday, although they warned they 
would strike again if a deal reached in the 
eight-day talks proved unsatisfactory. 


By disseminating dire scenarios of 
“tens of thousands” of layoffs, deny- 
ing “Wild West” buyout tactics and 
raising fears of asset sales at Thyssen to 
finance the leveraged takeover. Mr. Vo- 
gel is seen as having succeeded in a 
quickly improvised strategy to win the 
sympathy of the German public and 
politicians, sources at the companies 
said. 

Just as grounds wells of protest have 
thwarted government attempts to reduce 
sick-pay entitlements or coal subsidies, 
Mr. Vogel’s public-relations pleas 
prompted Krupp's abrupt retreat in less 
than a day by appealing to Germany’s 
apparent aversion to sudden economic 
change, they said. 

The weeklong cease-fire is an initial 
victory “against the Wild West meth- 
ods of the big German banks,” said 
Klaus Zwickel. president of IG Metall, 
foe country’s largest union and the one 

See STEEL, Page 15 


fiTr 


lit 




Capital expenditure 

7,009 

5,942 

Gross operating Income before non-recurring items 

4,169 

4,040 

Net income, Group share 

1,846 

2,350 

Earnings per share (FRF) 

20.50 

26.60 

Working capital provided by operations 

4,774 

4,796 















7T ; 


m&m 








IN A CHALLENGING 
MARKETPLACE... 

The business environment was unfavo- 
rable in 1996. Despite positive events in 
North America and the emerging econo- 
mies, the year was primarily shaped by 
recession in the French building industry 
economic weakness in western Europe 
and agitated markets in Turkey and 
BraziL 

... LAFARGE DEMONSTRATED 
STRONG RESISTANCE... 

Sales rose by 62% to FRF 35262 miirmn. 
Gross operating income before non- 
recurring items increased by 3.2% to 
FRF 4,169 million, thanks to a solid 
second-half performance. 

Growth in gross operating income 
before non-reaming items was led by a 
combination of 1) earnings growth at 
North American subsidiary Lafarge Goqx, 
which benefited from sustained strong 
demand in the United States and a re- 
covery in Canada, 2) a decline in contri- 
butions from western Europe, and 3) a 
turnaround in Austria. It also reflected a 
sharp improvement in concrete margins 
and a contrasting performance in spe- 
dafty products. 

In tiie absence of exceptional 'items (capi- 
tal gains on disposals totaled FRF 116 mil- 
lion in 1996, compared with FRF 619 mil- 
lion in 1995), net income, Group share 
totaled FRF 1,846 million, against FRF 


2350 million in 1995 (-21%), represent- 
ing earnings per share of FRF 2030. At 
the Annual Meeting on May 21, share- 
holders will be asked to approve a divi- 
dend of FRF 10 (FRF 1 5 induding tax oed- 
H) and, in fight of the Group's financial 
structure, to suspend the dividend rein- 
vestment option for 1996. 

During the year, capital expenditure rose 
a strong +18% to FRF 7 billion. Lafarge 
intensified expansion, mainly in Europe 
(Italy, the United Kingdom, Germany 
Poland, Russia), the United States and 
Latin America. 

... AND FORECASTS HIGHER 
EARNINGS IN 1997 

BBflRAND Collomb, Chairman of the 
Group, said “Lafarge is building three 
progress dynamics: growth, competitive- 
ness and extension of the product range. 
Last year, these factors helped to increase 
sales and operating income, and to 
broaden and strengthen our position in a 
number of markets (Germany Poland, 
Brazil and North America). This strategy 
places Lafarge in a favorable position for 
the future. I expect a noticeable improve- 
ment in earnings in 1997." 




Materials for 

building our world 


f as** -tswnt^ 









PACE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1907 

THE AMERICAS 


I ren" lytCTW urjit-c. 

! Investor’s America 




.*$v Avi., 




Tech Stocks, Once Investors 5 Darlings, Now Look Dear 


7 he Dow 


30* Year 7-Bond Yield 



By David Barboza 

New York Tuna Service 


Dollar in Deutsche marks FJ Dollar in Yen 



NEW YORK — For a time this 
year, they were the high-fliers — the 
darlings of a magnificent bull mar- 
ket that was soaring to new 
heights. 

With leaders such as Intel Or- 
acle and Microsoft, technology 
stocks bounded ahead, easily out- 
pacing the Dow Jones industrial 
average and the Standard & Poor's 
500-stock index. 

But with die approa ch of spring, 
die sector dial many predicted 
would be this year's hottest has re- 
versed course as investors began 
questioning the high share prices 
and speculators found other sectors 
to court. 

The technology-heavy Nasdaq 
composite, which had outper- 
formed every other major index 
early this year, shooting up nearly 8 
percent in a matter of weeks, now 
finds itself in the unusual position 
of being — gasp — down 1.7 per- 


cent for the year, badly trailing the 
broader market. 

On Wednesday, technology 
stocks once again dragged the mar- 
ket down, with Intel and Microsoft 
leading the plunge. 

The Dow slipped 18.88 points to 
dose at 6,877.68, with Internation- 
al Business Machines as one of the 
biggest losers. The Standard & 
Poor's 500-stock index dropped 
3.90 points to 785.76 and is down 
about 4 percent from its all-time 
high of 816.29 on Feb. 18. De- 
clining issues led advancers by al- 
most a 2-to-l ratio on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

In late trading Intel was off VA at 
133. Microsoft dropped 4'/^ at 9516, 
America Online was down 3 at 
3934. Ascend Communications 
chopped 5V6 to 42%, U.S. Robotics 
fell 4U to 5216, and Micron Tech- 
nology fell 2 Vft to 3716. 

Part of the reason for the tech- 
nology slump is that in recent 
weeks investors have been pulling 
tens of milli ons of dollars out of 


technology funds, or mutual funds 
that specialize in technology stocks. 
As a result, technology funds have 
lost hundreds of millions of dollars 
in value in the past month. 
“Investor sentiment is diying 
" said Robert Adler, president 
_ AMG Data Services, which 
tracks mutual fund inflows. - 
What happened? "The short an- 
swer is: Reality set in," said 
Richard Shaffer, a principal at 
Technologic Partners, a New 




U.S. STOCKS 


York consulting firm. "The story 
of the last year or two is the Internet, 
and every time we find a new tech- 
nology we fall in love with h_ But the 
problem is, technology attracts mo- 
mentum investors who don't always 
understand the business. So in many 
ways, it's the herd mentality." 

The herd can swerve suddenly, 
as it has done, because momentum 
investors want stocks that are mov- 
ing higher quickly; so when tbe 


stocks fall, the herd moves else- 
where. 

With the price-eanungs rano 
among Nasdaq stocks peaidng at a 
record 50.3 at the end of 1996, 
investors also began to wonder 
whether technology slocks had be- 
come too expensive. 

“In technology, valuations got 
ridiculous," said Roger Mc- 
Namee, general partner at Integral 
Capital Partners in Menlo Park, 
Calif o rnia, “and the same guys 
who were buying irrationally on 
the way up are now selling irra- 
tionally on the way down.’ ’ 

As a result, even some of tech- 
nology’s longtime darlings are be- 
ing jilted. Intel is down 1/ percent 
since Feb. 4, and Microsoft, while 


still up 20 percent this year,_has lost 
4 percent from it 



jasg* 8 \ .v 

^ \ • ■ -''I- •isi-j? 


r its high on Jan. 5. 

“ft happens almost every year," 
Mr. Shaffer at Technologic Partners 
said ‘‘I’ve been following techno- 
logy for 20 years, and the stocks are 
heroes one year and bums the next. 
It's just like baseball." 


A: • * ■ ■*- • " 

- F-£/*J'T v 






. |i in v i f rfif Tiii ifu r" 

NYT 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


laumnooal HenU Tiflnae 


Very briefly: 


Saudi Prince Snaps Up a 5% Piece of Struggling TWA 


'IBM Chief’s Pay Said to Rise 29% 


NEW YORK (NYT) — Louis Gerstner Jr., the chief 
-, executive of International Business Machines Corp., wok a 
j, $5,000 cut in his nearly $5 milli on salary end bonus last year, 
n according to the company’s proxy statement. 

But his incentive pay package grew by so much that his total 
_ pay rose by 29.4 percent last year, to $20.2 million, according 
~ to calculations by Graef Crystal, an executive compensation 

1 consultant. 

“His cash pay is essentially flat, but don’t shed any tears for 
■ Mr. Gerstner," said Robert Sal wen, a principal of Executive 
• Compensation Carp, in New York. * ‘The stock options he got 

2 more than marie up for the restricted stock and the options he 
7 was given in 1995." 


Time Warner Sues CompuServe 


Cavledtn OmrSkjff From Dbpmha 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri — Trans 
World Airlines Inc. said Wednesday 
that Prince Walid ibn Talal of Saudi 
Arabia bad bought a 5 percent stake 
in the struggling airline. 

The prince, a nephew of King 
Fahd and one of the world's wealfh- 
icst men, told TWA management that 
he bought about 2. 1 million shares on 
die open market and that he did not 
plan to buy any more shares. 

Based on TWA’s current stock 
price, the prince’s stake is worth 
about $14.5 million. 

TWA shares were unchanged at 


$6,875 in afternoon trading. Tbe air- 
line has about 44 million shares out- 
standing. 

“I have a big poitfob'o, and this is 
pan of diversification," tbe prince 
said from his office in Riyadh, tbe 
Saudi capital. He would not elaborate. 
But & statement released by his office 
said this was the first time he had 
bought shares in the airline industry. 

The prince's global interests in- 
clude stakes in the U.S. banking 
main Citicorp and in Euro Disney. 
He also has substantial interests in 
real estate, such as the luxury hotels 
George V in Paris and the Plaza in 


New York, the Fairmont and Four 
Seasons hotel chains, and the Ca- 
nary Wharf development in Lon- 
don’s Docklands. 

The prince is blown to seek out 
bargain investments. He was report- 
ed earlier this month to be interested 
in buying Fokker NV. the bankrupt 
Dutch aircraft maker. 

On Tuesday , TWA reported a lar- 
ger than expected fourth quarter 
loss. It has reported an annual profit 
only once since 1989 and has twice 
reorganized under Chapter 1 1 pro- 
tection in the last three years. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters } 


Bids for Aerolineas 


AMR Corp.’s American Airlines 
Inc.. Continental Airlines Inc. and 
Viacao Aerea de Sao Paulo SA, or 
VASP. have all bid for a stake in 
Aerolineas Argentinas SA, a 
spokesman for the Spanish state 
holding company SEPI said in Mad- 
rid on Wednesday, Bloomberg re- 
ported. 

"There are offers on the table 
from American Airlines, Continent- 
al Airlines and VASP which are 
being evaluated." he said. He could 
not say how soon a decision would 


be made ex', what size stake in Aer- 
olineas each was interested in buy- 
ing. 

SEPI is the biggest partner in 
Andes Holding, which was formed 
1996 to take over most of the 


m 


Spanish airline Iberia Lineas Aereas 
de Espana SA's stake in Aerolineas. 
The other partners in Andes are 
Merrill Lynch & Co. and Bankets 
Trust New York Corp. 

Andes’ s 73.5 percent stake in 
Aerolineas has been on the Mock for 
some time. Neither American nor 
Continental would comment on tbe 
bids. • 


J NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Time Warner Inc.'s Time 
I magazine said it filed a lawsuit against CompuServe Corp., 
alleging it reneged on a contract by seeking to remove Time 
from its on-line service and refusing to make payments. 

' r Time is seeking no less than $33 million in damages for 
^ CompuServe's alleged repudiation of its two-year contract 
with the magazine, and asked the court to force CompuServe 
to continue carrying Time on its service. 

' • American Express Co. said it would buy the advisory, tax. 
, business and technology divisions of tire Chicago-based ac- 
, counting firm Checkers, Simon & Rosner LLP for an un- 
disclosed amount 


Dollar Gains on Inflation Data, but Pound Also Advances 


• Microsoft Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Co. are expected to 
_ announce a broad alliance intended to win tire companies a 
' bigger piece of tbe lucrative business-computing market. HP 

reportedly will give greater support to Windows NT, 

• Giancario Parretti’s claims were dismissed by a court in 
r Los Angeles where the Italian financier charged that Credit 
i Lyonnais SA owed him $3.9 billion, the financial institution 

! Said. Bloomberg. AFP. AP 


Canpfat by Otr Smff Frvm Dispacha 

NEW YORK — Tbe dollar 
finned against most other major cur- 
rencies late Wednesday after pub- 
lication of data showing tbe pos- 
sibility of inflationary pressures in 
the U.S. economy, dealers said. 

But the dollar was lower against 
the pound as the British currency 
rallied in response to strong eco- 
nomic statistics at the start of a gen- 
eral election campaign. 

The dollar was at 1.6810 
Deutsche marks, up from 1.6730 
DM on Tuesday, and at 122.750 


yen, up from 122.425 yen. It was ax 
5.6710 French francs, up from 
5.6450 francs, and at 1.4425 Swiss 
francs, up from 1 .4385 francs. 

The pound rose to $1-5980 from 
$1,5905. 

Dealers said the main factor driv- 
ing up sterling was an increase in 
average pay of 5.0 percent over 12 
months in January, compared with 
growth of 4.75 percent in the 12 
months to December. Analysts had 
expected an increase in January of 
425 percent Rising wages can sig- 
nal inflationary pressures in the 


economy, which could lead the 
Bank of England to follow through 
with its stated intention to raise in- 
terest rates. The British government 
also announced gains in retail sales 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


for February and a significant drop 
in the jobless rate for the same 
month. 

The strength of the dollar against 
the Deutsche mark surprised 
traders, who had expected the Ger- 
man currency to rally on slower 


growth in the M3 money suj 
signs of improvement of 
confidence in Western Germany. 

Paul Lambert, an analyst ai UBS, 
said the German business climate 
remained weak, even though it had 
improved slightly, and die M3 
money supply continued to grow 
strongly even though the rate had 
slowed down. 

Daia showing that U.S. consumer 
prices had risen by 0.3 percent in 
February after an increase of 0.1 
percent in January were in line with 
expectations, dealers said. 


Tbe figures had not given any 
indication of what the rate-setting 
Federal Open Market Committee of 
the Federal Reserve Board was 
likely to decide regarding a possible 
increase of interest rates when it 
meets Tuesday. • 

But Stuart Thomson, an econ- 
omist with Banque Indosuez in Par- 
is, said the Fed would probably in- 
crease its key rate by a quarter of a 
point to choke future inflationary 
pressures arising from die strength 
of die economy and to cord die stock 
market. (AFP, Bridge News) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


| Wednesday’s 4 PJL Close 

Tltt top 3» most odlw shores. 


sob h*» Ldw used at* Indexes 



Most Actives 


March 19, 1997 


Dow Jones 

Owe Hfep las Lad Of. 
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Tub's ooen ml 376J36 off Z159 


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10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FF50aooo-pisonoopd 
Jim 97 12B16 127^4 127^0—002151^00 
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Dec 97 9600 9600 9600— 0JJ2 0 

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52432 51789 53047 
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264.12 260.15 26153 
383.17 37936 38138 


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126093 124249 1 S 096 
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SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT 3 - 
1 00 wns- doltars nr ton 
UtwW 27600 272.00 27170 
Wav 77 27450 2 SaOO Z 7420 
M 9 I 27000 244.70 W3 0 
Aug 97 282.00 75830 24280 
Sep <7 247.70 24450 2473 D 
Oct 77 22550 2 MJ 00 22550 -180 
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-A70 47313 
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Air 97 2SA50 34980 252.99 -250 56584 

f A ct 97 35400 - 250 2 

Jun97 357.00 3S153 35533 -250 35.407 

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Oct 97 3*050 35450 35030 

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Feb 73 36550 

Ea. scies *0500 Tub's, setes 64958 

Tue'SOSBftiffl 172691 up SS39 


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'250 5524 

-230 21404 
-253 5.12? 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFPE) 

rTLawmtSon.pteotlOOpO 

Jim 77 125.10 12435 12487 * 070 10 & 7 O 2 

Sep97 12472 12472 12482 +070 2579 

Est-sdes 46227. Prm.satac 83510 

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EUIODOLLARSfCMER) 

SI mUOon-ors of 100 act. 
f-rrV 94J1 9428 9429 -081 JMSO 

May 97 9473 9420 9421 —081 24,171 

AmW 94.17 94.11 94.12 -082 489571 

S £97 935S «3L87 -083SWVM 


AMEX 


AMEX 


SOYBEAN OIL tCBOD 
604U te*- cents cer te 

Mar 97 24A) 2425 2*34 -089 916 

WiOVTJ VJS 7A30 2420 -08b 47.937 
Ad 97 2115 2488 2184 

Aug 97 213 2107 2119 

Sep 97 2540 2520 2531 

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2S4U ito.- cenrs ser m. 

Mar 97 11383 11185 11250 
Apr 97 11020 10840 10980 
May 97 10950 10420 10850 
Jun 97 107.40 10680 10740 
JU197 10620 10440 10420 

Aub 97 13110 12190 105.10 
Sen 97 1W8B lBUBJ 10400 
0097 10.15 10280 103.15 
NW97 102JD 1020 10220 


Dec 97 9171 9143 9344 -083 252894 

Mar98 9359 9151 93S -883 308.191 

Jun 98 7V0 9341 9141 —084 140415 

SBB98 9340 9132 9133 -003 120425 

Dec 98 9330 9331 9123 —083 101329 


59543 59189 991J9 -166 


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10 UUB 08 S 

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Mor 77 t&H 81 * B 21 1 * -SH. 

May 97 840 825 83 ? -S 

JUJ 97 842 827 lk 841 +714 

Aug 97 SB Vs 81 J B 29'4 »£'/» 

SBP 97 744 759 745’4 + 2 fc 

Est. sales ma Tue'i sates 76,923 
Tue'soomw 189338 OH 1588 


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APT 97 S71-50 

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Sep 97 53980 53280 53480 +380 3337 

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AUB97 6172 6335 6362 

OcJ97 6732 6785 6737 

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Tue'cQpmM 109859 off 103 


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MOV97 38150 

Jul97 384.90 37100 384J8 '440 4858 

00 97 386.90 38380 38190 '440 1430 

Jan 98 399.10 '440 1.U7 

6sl.st*es NA Toe's. sates 1541 
Tie's open inr 23,105 off 258 


+130 35,991 
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FEB3&? CATTLE (CMfiR) 

50JD0 Bte.- COrHi per m. 

Mar 97 HL60 6835 6655 ,030 

Apt 97 6155 HIS 6847 *037 

MOV 97 6940 6180 6U5 '142 

AU9 77 7285 7135 72J80 +04! 

Sep 97 73JD 7280 7335 '152 

Oct 97 74.10 7340 74.00 *042 

Eat.sdes 2352 Tub's, sate 2.773 
Tue'sopentnt 22,150 uO 141 


2>3Q 

3.910 

5350 

S4M 

1453 

2,1*3 


ABM Indus 
ATVT. 


AMonCtm 
er*Tn 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Global TflecaaiSal 
1iw3revierseBpiL 


INCREASED 

CRB Bancorp Q .75 3-31 4-11 

COmdenPr^f)' Q 49 3-31 4-17 

Ktamottl FdBncp Q 875 44 4-21 

MaunoLfla 3 875 3-31 5-15 

Mocodomlo 

Sceptre Invest g Q .96 4-1 4-15 

Uld Naff Bnco 0 JO 4-15 5-1 


Bankers TrustNY, 
BewnamtCasm 
ntlti Thlrt Bncp 
Fst Copun meffti 
PstPaOnBeach 
HHtARaffre Prop 
Krunzo Realty 
Malgn Rffy Invest 
Naff Bncp Akiska 
One VU ley 

Briainc 

PurasrPublbh 
Torctunaric Corp 
Ziegler Cos 


REGULAR 
O .10 
O J3 

a jo 

Q 180 
Q .105 
Q 39 
0 30 

Q .15 
a .36 
O 48 
0 425 
0 80 
Q 34 


4- 15 5-5 

3-31 5-1 

5- 20 6-1 

3-23 4-25 

3-31 4-14 
>31 4-15 
>31 4-15 
>28 4-11 
>31 5-20 

>31 4-22 
3-31 4-tB 

4-4 4-11 
>71 4-15 


Q .13 

q n 

O .13 


4-7 5-1 

4-4 5-1 

4-7 4-22 


HOeS-Uaa (CMERJ 
e^RfeS-WKPtrb. 

APT 97 6880 4385 4837 -0X7 

Jun 97 7630 75 JO 76.15 -040 

Jul 77 74B 7440 7*JE -047 

AU8 97 71.10 7IL67 7070 —070 

0097 iiS 658S 6545 -042 

Dec 97 6343 6335 &55 -040 

Est. sates 8443 Tub's, srtei 74© 
Toe's open trt 30.500 off 501 

PORK BBJLIB (CMER) 

40800 lbs-- acres o*r ih. 

Ha 77 7435 7237 7140 

MOV 97 7440 7245 7130 

JU97 74.15 7120 7387 

Aug 97 7185 7085 m 2 

Feb 98 7880 6830 6830 

Mar 98 7080 JB.» 7080 

Est. sales 1313 Tub's, sdes 2.519 
Tue'soosiw 7J00 up 22 


dose 

LONDON METAL 5 (LME) 

Doliore per metric ton 
AtomiDuai (Klgb Grade) 

Spat 1606'4 1607’6 1612J0 
Fotkrord 164180 1641 '4 164780 
Copper Catbodes fHlgh Grade) 

Spot 234500 234780 23B580 
RuvronJ 231280 231480 234280 
Lead 

Spat 69180 692.00 70680 
Forward 686W 637.00 701.00 

NIckBl 

Spat 7820JW 753080 782080 
FWml 793S80 79*080 7930.00 
Tie 

Spot 6010.00 603080 600080 
ftuward 400000 605080 599080 
zrac (Special Higa Credo) 

Spot 126980 127080 126980 
Forward 129280 129380 129280 


Previous 


161380 

164880 


2387.00 

234380 


70980 

70080 


763080 

794080 


601080 

600080 


127CUJC 

12938C 


KU54 

12834 

23J9 

28*0 

14*1 

919 


High lew Close Otge OpM 


Financial 


-185 

-1.97 

—1.91 

-130 

-290 

-180 


115 

481 


US T. WLLS (CMER) 

61 mraion- 6»s at iso pa. 

Mer97 9A© 9UI 9481 —082 2309 

Jun 97 «47? 9487 9468 -082 5802 

SaP 97 9443 9443 9443 —083 134J 

Dec 97 9(86 M7 

EsLsrte* NA Tire's. Sates 334 
Tub's cwtiint 9JS3 up 72 


Mar 99 9128 9330 9332 -082 77,920 

Jun99 9132 93.15 93.16 -103 71497 

Sep 99 9118 9111 9111 -083 55426 

Dec 99 91 MJ 9383 9383 —883 5IW37 

Est.saei run. Mia's, sates 56281B 
TUe s open mt 24Q857 up 740 
BRTTISH POUND (CMER) 

40400 BOurels, » Pkr pound 

Jun 97 ?J9M 14874 U970 
Sep 97 1.950 14910 149*8 
Oec9T 14926 

Est. soles MA tub’s, srees 9410 
Tub's wen W 62306 up 178 

CANADIAN DOUAR (CMBO 
100800 entires. S per Cun. ter 
Jun 97 7330 .7290 3306 

Sep 97 3357 333* 330 

DOC 97 3405 3370 3385 

Mar 98 3425 3425 3423 

EsLsoies ha Tub's, sties 10830 
Tub's aoenint 75457 up 1906 

GERMAN MARK (OABQ 

125800 malts, | par imk 

Jun 97 4015 4968 SXO 62438 

Sen 97 4026 4017 4020 IM& 

D*C 97 4060 135 

Est sates ma tub's, setts 52.192 

Tire's open Int 109^77 off 1660 

JAPANESE YEN (GMCR) 

1 U mWten yen, S per 100 yen 
Am 97 8275 8211 8243 £0.945 

Sep 97 8368 8340 83M 763 

Dec 77 JM78 4469 4*69 363 

Est.Mfes NA Tub's, soles 27891 
Tub's open M 07450 uH 1B56 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

125800 htncfc s per Irene 
Jim 97 3017 4966 4992 38325 

S»97 3074 3037 3062 Z856 

0x97 3134 252 

EstsdBS MA Tub's, sates 25429 
Tire's open inf 564*9 off 609 

>MOffTH STERLING 0JPFE1 
£500000 -pte on 00 pd 
MOW 9175 «49 

JurOT 9382 9383 

U&H 9Z30 9385 

DUC 97 9109 9383 

MM 9192 9287 

J unite 9238 9155 

Sep» 9245 9145 

DetSB 93JB 9137 

NWV9 9149 9130 

Jun99 928? 9122 

Sep99 9237 9123 

DBC99 9222 9117 

Est nSes: 2308*4. Pm. sates 71*62 
Pret. open ial S 128 S 8 off n, 9 «* 

3-MONTH eUROMARK 0JFFEJ 


(nduntriatte 

COTTON 2 (NCIlO 
S08DO o»^ cores per Bx 

May 97 74*» 7331 7192 -4128 31852 

Jut 97 7530 7585 7527 -026 14408 

Del 97 7t» 7680 7*85 -0.15 1436 

Dec 97 7630 7620 76J2 -021 21200 

Marti 77 JO 7780 77.10 -8.15 1820 

May 98 7748 7740 7740 -420 491 

ERC.006 B MA Tub's. sales 2*279 
Tin’s open lit 7133* off 972 

HEATING OR. 06MBQ 
42800 aaL cents peraM 
Air 97 S7J0 5545 5625 

Moy?7 573S 55lW 5630 

Jun 97 5745 56.10 5640 

JUl 97 574# 5680 5685 

AUB97 58L00 5780 5BX0 

Sep 97 5B45 58.15 5M5 

Oct 97 B 40 5840 5940 

Nov 97 61 06 5940 6000 

Dec 97 6040 5943 BAS 

Jan 98 60-55 6080 60,« 

Est.stOes NA Tub’s, sales 264« 
Tue'saaenM 126,104 up isn 

UGHT SWEET aJODEOflUBO 
1800 ttbt-doBors per DM. 

Aor 97 2245 7) SO 2100 

2143 21JID 
2140 2140 

2135 2142 

2131 2U5 

n,w 2 i jo 
2035 21.12 
2030 21.10 

2035 2035 

2035 3125 

2030 20.95 

2033 2040 
2335 2035 


+087 27,925 
'0.11 24.966 
+0.16 lUR 
+026 12461 
+0J1 7381 
+041 5.183 
+041 5305 
+031 4463 

+046 8350 
+0JI 43B2 


May 77 223S 
Jun 97 2116 
30197 2145 

Aug 97 2130 
Sep 97 2143 

Otf97 21.12 
Nov 97 2186 
Dec 97 212 
Jan 98 71J5 
Feb 98 2095 
Mre-98 2190 
Apr 90 20J0 


Estsnies NA Tiro's, sales 
Toe's open M 416306 up 2509 

NATURAL GAS QMER) 

104)00 mm Wit's. % per mm Ww 
Aor 97 1.905 1365 1390 


-006 35,970 
+ 003 88812 
-084 55455 
—VO 26845 
1135B 
+086 12.941 
-083 13817 
♦084 12,172 
-0,13 27897 
+032 148S3 
♦086 7.722 

'085 lfl7< 
+084 3436 
133.963 


May 97 1.950 
Am 97 1.980 
Jul 77 1.9B5 

AUB97 1.985 
S«P 97 2800 


W49 —085 75416 
WJ3 - M7 127,169 


w-a — fti7 12/, i«y 
9386 —Oil 8581* 
9234 — 033 Sixn 
72M —022 4&5H 
7155 -022 36.750 
91*6 — 0J0 21119 
9137 — 0J0 19.731 
R 3 I -ai? IL 444 
9233 -0.19 
W.19 — 119 
92.13 -ai9 


&3ST 

7.795 

1043 


DM 1 roWaa - ptaoi 100 pd 

9633 96.73 96.73 +081 


556 

42 

1 


5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

S 1008 X prtru w< A i«H M Itond 
MW 9710 S -39 105-77 105-27 —02 iMS 

Jun 97 185-71 105-01 10 WB -07 214.190 

Sep 97 ! 04-58 3 

ED- soles NA Tue's-sWes 4*871 

Tue'smnM 220416 « 34 * 


Sep97 

D«W 

man 

JotrSW 

sun 

Dec9B 

MOT99 

Jun*9 

fss, 

D* 9 V 


9672 

9470 

9680 

9441 

9421 


9472 
9468 
9457 
9437 
9417 
9S24 
9521 
9445 
9523 
9427 
9475 

— 9*23 _ 

Est.swes: 144245. Pre«.Kte 2S45S1 
Prev.epenM: 1.1I&U6 up u,9*g 


0394 

3869 


9526 

W80 

9478 

9456 


9622 + OlQI 

9468 + 407 214301 

?6J7 + 001 157,9*5 
9438 + 082 184*70 

9418 + 082 141^/1 

«» +083122824 
9473 + 083 64482 
+ 083 79838 
9582 + 082 54055 
9499 +0.03 28A79 
M.76 ,082 USB 
9453+001 &2X 


— - 34253 

J" M 

1-93S 1J70 13J27 

1-»S) 1880 11893 

1860 1.780 9^8 

— 1.965 2800 9 

sate* MA Tub's, stees 33876 
Tub's open H 181^87 up in 

UMLEADB9GASOLME (NMER) 

««0 oaL cm per pal 

f SES. S-9S F- 05 aM aw 

MCiyW 6470 6480 6780 +043 31773 

f** 0 +030 17^36 

Jul 97 6420 6495 6S8B +4*5 7M 

AUOW 500 63J0 QJBD +OJ0 4JJ4 

fc»97 62J0 6285 6150 W6S 

ERstees NA Tub's. sates 3JJ37 
Tue'sopenlnl 94444 alt 1916 
CASOIL0PE) 

U 8. doSors per metric ton- kits of 100 tons 

*J>I 97 17475 17480 1758S +3J5 27^50 
MOV W 177-30175-25 17425 +380 4904 
1W97 177J5 17680 17785 +IS 105M 

JUV97 17425 17785 177J5 +>50 43S 

SSS ’S' 25 T78 - S0 ,?9JX +285 ^ 

S^197 T 80.75 10085 180 JO +285 

0097 18125 181 JO 18185 +2J0 

Novw l® 2 - 75 12285 1BZ75 +S 

0^77 10480 18380 18275 +2J0 

JOB 90 18480 18375 18485 +2J0 

°tw W- 44839 off 242 

® RENT OIL HPE) 

* i ^ 6< ^ per tere * ' barrels 

2081 2082 +087 72.984 
MaySV 2065 2087 2023 +012 27U3 
JlmBW 2052 19.96 2010 iaio U0Q 
3 Ply 77 2037 1987 19.9? ZaO? &+S 

® 27 1980 19.90 ,089 <774 

2020 1975 1983 +Q89 4.142 

2010 1975 1976 +007 7855 

20.10 1982 1989 ^086 57S5 

w at.sateK4i743. Open imj 151,779 off 


1.925 

1,404 

1^71 

713 

4337 

1805 


Aug 97 
Sep 97 
Oct 97 
Nav97 


atearWAPR.- 3 ggteMe M Cauoacro ttadu 
9i eintnlyi t+quartenti; vmttI nmnrt 


Pood 


Stock Tables Expfatined 

5cdes unites ae ismfltekl Yfforiy Kghs aid lows reflect the prevfcws 52 rneta plus the anel 
reeelL but noflltelBlesItWifaB day. VWteteos|iBars>gd » 0»WendaniBimlln9rlp25 percent ormoffi 
has been pattfftevwiitiiBMnnqma and t gririend aw sterom Write new dado only. Unless 
(WKreAsB ratal ades of iMdmfc oe mud dstwisements based on ffte blest dedbntton. 

a - dividend also Odra (s). b - annual row of dMdend plus stodc dhrldend. c - liquIdaffxM 
dWWend. ee - PE ehcoeita 9?8ld MBltoO d - netff yoorty tow. dd - kiss In the kistl 2 months. 
p - tftvitfend deefared or paid in preceding 12 monihs. I - annual rate Increased on bsf 


COCOA (NC5E1 


IWV W 
8697 1489 

Sep 77 1509 

Dec 97 1535 
Mar 98 1558 


1430 

1451 

— ® 

2,200 

1456 

142 

-27 

21868 

1480 

1481 

-30 

11270 

1500 

1508 

-22 

BAH 

127 

127 

—22 

14441 


18 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
siaoaao win - ms a 3 m w iMpct 
Mar 97107-11 107-05 107-07 -02 23/42 

Jim 97 10 >» 106-13 106-16 -04 294703 

Sep 97 106-13 105-29 105-29 -07 8824 

EsLKfes NA Tub's, sales 82,979 
Tue's wen W J 2 & 4 W up 330 


Tub's epsn inf 99467 up so« 


dedotaiion. g - dMdend In Canadian fwids, su^atf to 13% non-residence fax. 1 - dividend 
Lj-dhridend paid this year, omitted, deferred or no 


dfidaied otterspfft-up arsiock dividend, j ■ _ w 

odtan taken at latest dMdend meeting, k - Addend declared or paid ttils year, an 

oeaiRHikrttee issue kiWt dMdends n aireare. a - annual retb reduced on last dectoiatton. 

n- new Issue In 1l» past 52 weeks. Tbe Mgh-foar range begins wftti the staff of trading, 
nd - next day MNay. p - btlQal dMdend annual rate unknown. P/E - priem^amlngs rot to. 
R-ckaed-eiMJ nwtwff fund, r- dMdend declared or paid »n preceding 12 months, plus stock 
dMdend. s- stack spet,DMdand begins wffti dote of spffL Ms- sales. t-<flvldsnd paid In 
stock In prece ding l2nwnh>esibnatedcaitavaliiean«-rei4dendci'6x-dlsfribuilonda1a. 
o-new yearly v-fraAig halted. *1 - to bankruptcy or reeefwreNp erbAig reorganlnd 
underffte Bankruptcy AO, orsecurtHes assumed by sudi companies, wte- whan distributed. 
*1 - *twi issued^ ww - wt» srananti. x - «-<Mdend or ewlgms. nSs - ex-dfembirtton. 
nr - affffiout warrants, y- ex-dhrfdend and solas fn fulL yW - yield, z - sates In hifl. 


5C04C56) 

378)0 ta.- OTT* pot Bl 

Mar 73 17140 16550 1HL10 -0J0 ».JW 

Jut 77 15850 15150 154.90 -070 7882 

Sep 77 14025 14250 I4Z65 -078 5J24 

Dec 77 13450 1JUB 13170 +190 1*37 

Ed. sates 9800 Tub's, ides 17479 
He's open inf 37858 off «7 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 {NCSEI 
iiumBu-mtspefe. 

May 97 1088 ML71 1075 -ftll 65.524 

Jul 97 «U1 1652 1DJJ — W0 »4*6 

OCT 97 I0J5 rate 1487 -087 25810 

Mar 93 1056 007 1050 -007 13,135 

EsLsates 19803 Tue's.s«*s TJ13 
Tge'soponint 143856 up 51 


US TREASURY BONOS (CBOT) 

I* pct-sioooro-m & Tartu a ho oat 
Mar 97 1 09- 71 100-20 107-04 -02 50197 

Jun 77 UN -05 UB -09 108-15 -46 419828 

Sw W 108-23 107-30 107-31 -00 27805 

Doc 77 106-06 107.16 107-16 -09 5,210 

Est. sates NA Tire’s, sates 3 * 1.264 
Tub's noenrt 504.566 Of 6210 
LONC C4LT GJFFEJ 
G 5 QJ »0 - prs fates Bf 1 00 pd 
Mor 97 110-25 109-27 109-27 - 0-36 25,737 

Jon 77 1 I 0 - 1 S 109 - 0 * 107-10 - 0-27 174679 

5 *p 97 N.T. N.T. 100-27 - 0-27 0 

ES. soles: 100328 . Piw.sotaB 60541 
PmepaML: a 041 » off &039 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND OJFFQ 
DM 250000 -DtS B + 1 OOpd 
Juef 7 104 A 7 97 S3 99.95 — QJte Z 38 J 93 

Sep 97 9784 9780 97.10 -006 823 

EsLsMBK 205 J 9 t Pi W.sdet 33 X 54 
Piw.operW-- 239 JZ 6 up ? J 89 


>MONTH PIBOR (MAT1F) 

FF5 million -jffs of 100 pet 
Jiffl 97 9d£) 96.50 9652 +0 jO 3 74,290 

Sto 77 9582 9&3B 9680 +0^ SIS 

Dec 97 9*J1 9687 9689 +0^01 28JSH 

«-15 96.12 96.13 +401 

J Ufl ta 95.99 95.95 95.97 sQJ}2 17.T77 

M ft>a 95J9 SQOI Yivn 

EE S ?5j9 +M1 1>519 

S? *5^ +0D1 11240 

^“2 25-22 9510 w " +aoi 

SE « X 4 ?? W ' W 9488 +080 S297 

Dk 99 9486 9066 +080 &743 

Mai 00 9446 9 A 4 S 9 A 45 +O 01 48 

Est. wlunre: 49J71 Open ItiL: 244077 off 4. 


^MOffTHEWROURA (UFFE) 


(TLJjnffltor^gs Of 7D0 i 


JIM77 9i_. 

D6cW 9114 

Ma98 9113 _ 

JunM 9110 929* 

Swg 93JO 9191 

©f 


» OJJS 118.974 

93JB » OOB 2X311 
9M4 +O.10 lS« 

Sii *2-22 300 

92.95 + 008 m 
92-92 +0.n iQ2 


• Stock Indexes 

^oajjP.itataxtCMw 

£2 SS SB ^ :33,25s 

SS “ “ H ^ 

y- M*es 133877 
Tue^aDenlnt 223^76 up jgg 

FnEIOOOJPFEl 

WCfftelMATIR 
R=awpwlnd« point 

Mar 97 26068 MWfl 26008 +2480 33.9*4 
m* ^8 WTJ +2480 ^307 
Wfly 97 2575-5 2575i 2SS8*5 +2AH0 T-Rs 
Vr S' 1 - 5 25 KL0 2S6S8 +2380 9804 
^ 97 25058 25858 25028+2400 6641 

S* 2 H- N Ti 26028 +2J80 0 

2®T 2? N.T. N.T. 26248 +2480 7899 
Sep 96 N.T. N.T. 25798 +2A0Q 1810 
^ Est- volume: 19809. Open bit; 62J70 up 


CMaDdtertntaM, 


Moody's 

ReWers 

Dj-Fuior® 


Prevtoas 

MSS 18458C 

’■B# 1.9M80 

153.M 154.15 

244J5 24631 




* 


$ 


r s ,7+ lf#m 

0, prill i» : 

V J'rxtilH 


1'i.i.i »! 1 tt.lt 

• -/T* 


- r . - *-+ 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 



Renault Tells Unions: 

Closing of Belgian 
Plant Is ^Irrevocable 9 


By Barry James 

Iniemarional Herald Tribune 



‘i Dane* 




PARIS — The chairman of the 
french automaker Renault SA, 
Louis Schweitzer, turned down on 
Wednesday an appeal by unions to 
-Keep the company's Belgian plant in 
operation, staling that his decision to 
close the plant this summer was 
irrevocable.” 

But Mr. Schweitzer said he was 
open to negotiations for the modem 
factoiy near Brussels to be taken 
over, presumably by another man- 
ufacturer, or converted, and he said 
be would be prepared to discuss the 
plight of the 3.1 00 workers who will 
lose their jobs. 

Renault had earlier indicated that 
. it might be willing to give some of 
the workers jobs at its factories in 


Vickers Wary 
Of Repeating 
11% Profit Rise 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Vickers PLC 
said Wednesday that pretax 
profit in 1 996 rose l I percent, but 
it said it was not optimistic about 
matching the increase in 1997. 

The maker of Challenger 
tanks and Rolls-Royce cars said 
profit climbed to £83.3 million 
($132.4 million) last year as 
higher earnings in its marine- 
propulsion and defense units off- 
set a drop in its automotive busi- 
ness. which sold fewer expens- 
ive customizations of its Rolls- 
Royce and Bentley luxury cars. 

The earnings were lower 
than expected, and Vickers* 
shares fell 22 pence, or 8.4 per- 
cent. to close at 239. 

- Sir Colin Chandler, chief ex- 
ecutive, said the stronger pound 
could cut as much as £7 million 
from eamings this year and 
warned that investments such 
as Rolls-Royce upgrades would 
not bear fruit until 1998. 


France, where it is planning to lay 
off. retire or transfer some 2,700 
workers as part of an austerity 
plan. 

Mr. Schweitzer met with union 
representatives on neutral ground at 
Beauvais, north of Paris, after the 
workers refused to negotiate at the 
company's headquarters at 
Boulogne-BilJancourt near Paris 
and he declined to go to the Belgian 
plant at Vilvoorde, where the work- 
ers are holding on to a war chest of 
about 4,000 finished automobiles. 

Mr. Schweitzer met in the 
headquarters of the Beauvais cham- 
ber of commerce with 1 1 union rep- 
resentatives, who proposed a 1 0 per- 
cent reduction in working hours at 
all Renault plants. The Belgian uni- 
ons said they were hoping to per- 
suade Mr. Schweitzer to keep the 
plant in operation beyond the July 
27 deadline for closure until a new 
buyer could be found 

After the more than two-hour 
meeting. Mr. Schweitzer said 
through a spokesman; 4 ‘2 confirmed 
that tiiis decision is irrevocable.” 
But he added that he had told the 
union representatives that he wanted 
to begin negotiations without delay 
“on the options for the site to be 
taken over or converted.” 

The Vilvoorde factory, which 
produces Clio and Megane models, 
is one of the company’s most mod- 
em following renovation last year. 
Belgian and European Union of- 
ficials have accused Mr. Schweitzer 
of betraying Ell ideals by following 
national criteria in deciding which 
plants to keep in operation. 

The Renault chief has said the 
company needs to concentrate its 
manufacturing operations at fewer 
plants in order to improve productiv- 
ity in a glutted market. Analysts said 
they expected the company later this 
week to announce a loss for 1996 of 
more than 4.5 billion French francs 
($797.2 million), including the 
charge for closing the Vilvoorde 
plant 

The analysts said Toyota Motor 
Coro, of Japan, which has been 
studying the feasibility of a new 
plant in Europe, was a potential buy- 
er of the Vilvoorde planL 

Renault shares closed Wednes- 
day in Paris at 138 francs, up 1 .40. 


Pay off for Chiquita Banana? 

U.S. Pressure on WTO Aids Leading Political Donor 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Past Service 


WASHINGTON — A trans-Atlantic banana war 
appears to be ending in victory for the United States 
— and for one of America's most prodigious political 
donors. Carl Lindner, chairman of Chiquita Brands 
International Inc. 

The triumph for the Clinton administration and Mr. 
Lindner's Chiquita Banana empire came in a pre- 
liminary ruling delivered by a World Trade Or- 
ganization panel. The WTO held that the European 
union's banana policy violates global trade rules, 
according to people familiar with the decision. 

The decision, which remains confidential pending 
a final public report, is likely to doom EU rules that 
restrict sales of Chiquita bananas in Europe in favor 
of bananas grown in several impoverished former 
European colonies located mostly in the Caribbean, 
including Jamaica, Belize, Surinam and the Wind- 
ward Islands. 

The ruling is a potentially severe blow to the 
economies of those countries. EU officials have 
warned that the Caribbean countries may slip even 
further coward economic ruin if their banana exports 
are denied the special edge they enjoy with European 
consumers over Chiquita 's more competitively 
priced bananas, which are grown mainly in Central 
America. 

The dispute has attracted considerable attention 
among trade experts because of questions about 
Washington's motives in pursuing the case at the 
WTO. 


Bananas aren't exactly a major crop in the United 
States — - a tiny amount is grown in Hawaii — so 
when the U.S. trade representative, Mickey Kantor, 
filed the complaint last year, a number of trade 
specialists speculated that Mr. Lindner's political 
influence was at work. 

Mr. Lindner and companies be controls have 
donated more than $1 million to both major parties 
over the past four years — a bit more to the Re- 
publicans than to Democrats. He has lent corporate 
jets to Bob Dole, the Republican presidential can- 
didate, who as Senate majority leader pushed ag- 
gressively for Chiquita-backed legislation that would 
have punished Costa Rica and Colombia for joining 
the EU banana-trade regime. 

Mr. Lindner also was invited to a coffee reception 
with President Bill Clinton and a sleep-over at the 
White House. 

**We won the banana case? Well, I guess the 
meaning is that it helps to be Carl Lindner,” said 
Gary Hufbauer, a trade economist at the Institute for 
International Economics. He noted that it is unusual 
for the trade representative’s thinly staffed office to 
devote resources to a case in which few, if any, U.S. 
jobs are at stake. 

The trade representative's office has defended its 
actions as a legitimate pursuit of American interests, 
noting that Chiquita employs nearly 10,000 people in 
its Cincinnati headquarters. The EU’s banana trade 
regime “has deprived U.S. banana distribution 
companies, Chiquita and Dole Foods, of half their 
business,” the trade representative's office stated in a 
fact sheet released this week. 







jjonttoo^. 






mm 




-Madrid. 










MSB 




Daimler- ABB Venture Posts Profit 


OmpHed h> Our Sidff From Ehsposcba 

BERLIN — Adtranz, a joint ven- 
ture of Daimler-Benz AG and ABB 
Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., said Wed- 
nesday it had a 1996 pretax profit of 
40.5 million Deutsche marks ($24.3 
million) and an operating profit, after 
write-downs, of 248.9 million DM. 

There were no comparable year- 


earlier figures, because this was the 
first time the company had released 
annual results since Daimler-Benz 
and ABB merged their rail activities 
into a joint-venture company at the 
beginning of 1996. 

Adtranz said new orders totaled 
5.87 billion DM last year, while sales 
came to 6. 1 7 billion DM. 


“Adtranz is on the right track,” 
Kaare Vagner, its president and chief 
executive officer, said. 

“We will conclude the merger in 
1997. The combining of ABB and 
Daimler-Benz's rail activities 
should bring die desired advantages 
from 1998 onward.” 

(AFX, Bloomberg) 


EU Extends Boeing-McDonnell Inquiry 


Consul*] c* ScrfF-zm Dapa: cHa 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission extended its antitrust 
investigation Wednesday of Boeing 
Co.'s proposed S15.4 billion acqui- 
sition of McDonnell Douglas Corp., 
focusing on its share of the com- 
mercial-aircraft market. 


The purchase, announced in 
December, would make Boeing the 
world's biggest maker of military 
aircraft andbolster its lead among 
makers of commercial planes, ahead 
of Europe’s Airbus Industrie. 

The commission ‘s decision to ex- 
tend the inquiry for as long as four 


months came two days after the 
chairman of the U.S. Federal Trade 
Commission said the proposed ac- 
quisition might pose antitrust prob- 
lems. Under a bilateral accord with 
Washington, the European Union 
could block Boeing's acquisition of 
McDonnell. (Bloomberg, Reiners) 


Source: Tefekurs tajani«k»u»l Herald TViNine 

Very brief lys 

• Britain’s unemployment fell in February to 1.75 million 
people, or 6.2 percent of the work force, its lowest level in six 
years, as retail sales showed unexpected strength, rising 0.5 
-percent in February, and average eamings rose 5 percent in 
January to the highest figure since November 1992. 

• The Bundesbank said the M-3 measure of money supply 
grew at a lower-than -expected annualized rate of 9.1 percent 
in February from the fourth quarter of 1 996. slowing from an 
1 1.7 percent rate of increase in January. 

• Western Germany registered a rise in business confidence 
last month, as an index compiled by the Ifo Institute for 
Economic Research rose to 93.6 from 93.3 in January. 

• Volvo AB named Haakan Fri singer, a former chief ex- 
ecutive, as its new chairman, succeeding Bert-Olof Svanholm, 
who died Tuesday . Volvo also announced it would buy back as 
many as 5 percent of its shares for about 5.2 billion kronor 
($672.8 million). 

• An Italian mini-budget under preparation to cut the coun- 
try's deficit to Europe's single-currency qualifying target will 
tighten public finances by 14 trillion to 15 trillion lire ($831 
billion to $8.90 billion), according to press reports. 

• French prosecutors at the corruption trial of Pierre Suard, 
former chief of Alcatel Alsthom SA. called for an 18-month 
jail term, with 12 months suspended, for the man who was 
once Prance’s highest-paid industrialist. 

• Fiat SpA’s Polish unit. Flat Polska Ltd-, plans to increase 
its work force by 700 and expand production. 

• Jean Boissonnat, a former member of the Bank of 
France's monetary policy council, said Italy or Spain might 
not make die first stage of European economic and monetary 
union, set for Jan. 1, 1999. He insisted, however, that all 
European Union countries would have joined four years later 
when euro notes and coins are to be circulated. 

Bloomberg, AFP, AFX, Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


W e d n es day? Ma rcl i lO 

Prices In local amende*. 
Tdekors 

. High Law C tost Pm. 


Amsterdam 


AEX tartar 73104 
Piwtawc 74L73 


ABM-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AlaD Note) 
Soon Co. 

Sals Wesson 

CSMcra _ 

DontothePel 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Forts Ame*. 

Chromes 

C-Broecw 

Hogemeyw 

Htfnaken 

.ttoogwerocw 

■Hunt Dougins 

jNGCwrt 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NednovriGp 

mniicto 

OoeGrintat 

pumps Elec 

Polygram 

RannHodHdO 

ftoteco 

Rodamco 

RoOkd 

Ronentt 

Ron) Dutch 

Unlever cvc 

Vertex lull 

VNU 

WoBwMcra 


13030 
13470 
133J0 
264 
86.90 
36 
107 JO 
35750 
ihs^q 
3050 
7180 
6 OB 0 
6110 
16150 
33250 
91J0 
161 
700 
5670 
4330 
7320 
57 
2PS3D 
24050 
B£2» 
9530 
14430 
1J9.J0 
6030 
16180 
10040 
3353S 
358 
BMQ 
4090 
240 


127-50 12OS0 
13130 13120 
129 13080 

299.10 26150 

8480 8540 
3510 36 

104.10 10040 

350.10 353.90 
181 183.10 

2930 2970 
6930 71.10 
5830 5970 
61 61-50 
159 JO 161-50 
321-50 32770 
8870 9170 
159 160 

7170 71*0 
55 56 

4120 4230 
71 JO 7130 
5530 57 

204 26680 

234.10 238.10 
B330 B4L90 
mm 9480 

142 142 

158.90 139 

5930 60 

162 162 

108.10 108.10 
331.10 33330 
35270 357-50 

B3 84 

39 JO 39.90 
231 232 


130 

13480 

1342) 

263 

8770 

36 

106 

35670 

106 

30.® 

72JQ 

6120 

6270 

160 

329 

0640 

161 

.7370 

5630 

4330 

72 

5630 

29430 

24130 

84.10 

89 

14130 

161 

6080 

16430 

10X50 

33370 

35470 

86 

4080 

23980 


- — - - High 
Deutsche Boot, 9035 

Drat Telekom 3638 

DftsdnerBonfc 56 

Fresenms 355 

Prase Nus Med 16270 

Fried. KMPP 272 

Gche 12030 

HrtfWjflZW 145 

Henkel phi 89 

HEW 492 

Hochtief 71 

HttXteJ 67.15 

Kontadt S93 

Linde 1117 

Lumwnso 2380 

MAN 477 

Mannesmanii 642 

Metoflgese8scMI362D 
Metre 16159 

Munch Rued R 4195 

Pjtussan 460 

RttetoeteMra 1273 

nwe 76 

SAP ptd 275 

Sdiering 16C-40 

SGL Carbon 223 

Siemens 8570 

jar s 

VEW 503 

717 
89930 


Low. -dose Piet. 


9077 9043 
36.17 3637 
5060 

348 355 

160 161.70 
270 272 

117 12030 
14X50 14430 
88 6885 
492 a® 
7050 71 

6670 6638 
586 5BA 
1106 1117 

2X65 2378 
47240 47240 
631 64130 
3580 3670 
16130 16130 
4140 4185 

45230 458 

1260 1273 
7450 7SM 
26830 27230 
15625 1567S 
222 223 

8485 8570 
1230 aw 
825 B25 

H.T. N.T. 
9630 9875 
502 502 

747 7S 
891 89050 


9030 

3637 

5570 

351 

160.10 

272 

116 

143 

a 

ntm 

7010 

6785 

58530 

1110 

2340 

473 

62) 

3630 

16130 

4145 

43770 

1270 

7480 

Z76 

15670 

220 

8485 

£L00 

830 

34680 

96.10 

503 

747 

900 


SA Breweries 
Samoitar 
5osd 
SBIC 

Tiger Oats 


High 

Low 

□ase 

PfW. 


High 

LOW 

Close 

13*2< 135*0 13525 

137*3 

Vendors* Lx ute 

520 

113 

SIS 

5&SS 

56 

sS25 

£625 

Vrtafase 

190 

282 

2*8 

5025 

50 

5025 

51 

■.■/hOjaw! 

7J7 

725 

/.VI 

167 

18625 toS*5 106*0 

wasemsHcgs 

134 


133 

7575 

7525 

75*0 


Waisrtey 

xSI 

4.V2 

4.9$ 


2*7 

2*3 

3*3 





Zflnecr 

I7.M 

7777 

1773 


High Law Close Prev. 


High Law dose Pm. 


735 


Kuala Lumpur C S2S£1SJS 

rlCnUUL IZ2AJSS 


AMMBHdgs 
Genfing 
Mai Banking 

Mai ltd! S hip F 
Prtrenas Gas 
Proton 
PuSBcBk 
Renans 
Resorts World 

Rothmans PM 
SImeDarfjy 
Telekom Mai 
Ti 
UJd 
YTL 


2380 

1780 

2875 

640 

9.10 

1410 

575 

4-30 

11.450 

2530 

970 

1940 

1270 

2370 

1380 


2150 

1730 

25 

410 

9 

1530 

5.10 

416 

11.10 

2430 

985 

19.10 

12-10 

2143 

13-40 


2350 2370 
17-40 1780 
2850 2825 
425 410 

985 9 

1410 1410 

5.10 570 

4.18 430 

1130 117® 
2430 2430 

9.10 985 
1930 19.10 
1350 1230 

23 2230 
1380 1X40 


Bangkok 

AdvMtoSvc 
Banc*** F 
KnjrmTInf Bk 

PTTExplw 

Sam Cement F 
Siam Cam BkF 
Tdea rotBio 

TtalFanuIlkF 
Lira Comm 


SET tadec 780*2 
Prevtas: 69387 

222 216 220 2H 

550 244 248 242 

3S 3535 3SJ5 3SM 

32Q 320 320 320 

660 648 648 

149 1« Mf 

4175 40 4175 

4850 4325 
165 1 60 161 

163 157 163 


Helsinki 

Ease A 

Huhtamakll 

Xenon 

Kesko 

Merilo A 

MebaB 

Mrtss-SeriaB 

Neste 

Nokia A 

Orion-YMymoe 

Outokumpu A 

UPMKymmene 

Vaknel 


HEX General We* 2852*4 
Previous 2*9 134 

4330 4270 4270 4330 

246 2* 244 245 

5350 5270 a _53 
7230 7130 72 7230 

1770 1650 1680 1780 
296 290 295 295 

40 3R30 3830 39 

130 125 12890 12930 

313.90 . 306 soaao 31030 
180 177.10 1^ 180 

9330 9130 9130 93 

111 107-78 108 111 

8730 86 8630 8780 


London 

Afafiev Kali 

AffiedOomeo} 

Angjfan Wtater 

AlflOS 

Asda Group 

Assoc Br Foods 

BAA 

Bmdays 

Boss 

BATlnd 

Banfc5aWond 

Blue Ode 

BOC Group 

Boats 

3PB lnd 

BrtiAerasp 

Brit Airways 

BG 

Biff Land 
BrttPrtm 


FT-SE 100:433230 
Pmtoac 415600 


Brfl : 

Biff Telecom 
BTR 


733 

4J0 

660 

652 

1 JH 

SJ1 

574 

1185 

834 

537 

339 

472 

987 

7.18 
334 
1333 

66T 

175 

533 

7.19 
632 
t-60 
463 
273 


Btmmait Central 1X37 


662 

142 

40 

40 

165 

160 


Hong Kong 

Anw Props 
BkEost/ 


Bombay 

BniajAojo 

Hlndusi Lew 

Hindus* Pedra 
bid Dev Bk 
ITC 

MaflanogmrTei 
Reliance Ini 
stale Bt India 
SteH Authority 
Tam Eng Loco 

Brussels 


Altoona 

Bratnlrt 

BB L 

CBS 

Cotruyi 

Demote Lien 

Ele cMbet 

EMPnffha 

Forts AG 

Gevaen 

GBL 

Gw Bqwtna 
Kredtottrenk 
PHreAn 
Paweffln , 

ISSebei 
liCB 


(fKalOM eeMMff 
3795.17 

1025 IDOnOOiHTOZ*^ 
am 97275 981-50 9W 

3*030 380 390 390-75 

nS 9tL5» 9075 93 

407 407 JO <2980 
2B2JO tn 27LH -BO. 

"TS, 280 280 293 

S 307M 30775 322 

MM WSi 20J5 21-25 
38^ m 3 7375 38475 

BEL-20 lndae2J32.il 

Prevlaus: 213886 

13525 13700 13900 
USD 5680 5680 

79TO 

3270 3330 3Xj> 

18MQ 14250 14250 
1935 1945 1970 

TWO TWO £50 

322® 3270 3250 

5MB 60?® 4050 

^ »20 2520 

inn 13350 13350 
12325 12450 12550 
lljW 

4870 49M 4W0 

B450 8700 8B» 

7755 m5 2835 
pm 21425 21 
14800 14800 1<M0 
94250 94000 


13750 

5760 

8190 

3330 

14325 

1970 

7940 

3250 

<4570 

2525 

5000 

13500 

12*75 

11850 

4950 

8910 

21450 

74925 

94400 


wkbw Asia 
Cathay Pacific 
OteungKaoo 
CKlnfiasfeud 
China Light 
CmcPndfic 
Doe Hera Bk 
RlSlBOC™ 
Hang Lung Dev 
Hang54tngBk 
Hertenenbw 
Henderson Ld 
HK Chino Gas 
HKEtodric 
HiCTefcamm 
Hopewefl Hdg» 

» 

Oriental 
Peart Oriental 

H^ffidgs 

SktBLandto 
sthOrtwPrtt 
SwhePdcA 
Wharf Mo* 
Whedack 


875 

2640 

1170 

6975 

2060 

34J0 

3150 

36 

1075 

1480 

8350 

L25 

6625 

1490 

2685 

1460 

435 

183 

56 

2365 

2035 

18.15 

42-50 

333 

65J 

B4 

5JS 

BJ 0 

7 

30 

1770 


Hung Sen* 1265M2 
PRVlMK 1274871 

880 850 875 

2615 2630 2630 
1180 1185 1185 
68L50 48.50 7025 
1990 20-55 20 

24 40 3460 35 

M 38JO 3820 
3560 36 3560 

1065 1070 1075 
14JQ 1425 1435 

82 8275 82J0 

8-15 820 825 

8150 6475 *450 
1475 1490 1475 
2665 2430 26SO 
1435 1450 1440 

4JB 430 435 

180 18050 1B230 
54 55 5475 

2175 2290 2375 
20.10 20.15 join 
18 1B.10 18M 
4190 42.10 4270 
3J3 823 3J3 

669 645 670 

8275 8275 8425 
625 535 535 

820 820 
690 7 

__ tD 40 
2885 29 JO 3070 
1775 17 JO 1785 


Burton Gp 
Cat* Wkrtes* 
C adbur y Sdre 
Ccrtkm Caatm 
Coarral Urdoa 
Compass Gp 
CimhTuuWs 
D bams 


185 

5L37 

535 

698 

7.10 

1*4 

5.12 


Etodrecamponeiia 421 


805 
690 
58 50 


EMI Group 

ISBSSS 

Fom colonial 
GenlAccMent 
GEC 
GKN 

Gfcao WCBconc 
GnmodaGp 
Grand Mef 
GRE 

GfEonaflsGp 

Guinness 

GUS 

Han 

HSBCWdBS 

ia 

impl Tobacco 


1170 

5.02 

670 

162 

839 


7J2 

455 

647 

640 

1.06 

ill 

455 

1675 

618 

£06 

339 

414 
978 
675 
140 

1330 

471 

168 

534 

699 

633 

7J7 

401 

265 

1030 

L54 

490 

530 

5.14 

670 

690 

357 

495 

415 

1160 

450 

645 

160 

798 

383 


735 7J8 

4 57 <63 
656 634 

650 665 

197 1X6 

ill i!6 
508 508 

1076 1093 
83S 879 

596 117 

361 367 

417 415 

978 983 

685 674 

362 361 

1335 1333 
AM AS! 
170 166 

536 539 

795 7.10 

jlw *J8 
J-58 MB 
461 461 

267 269 

1021 1034 
184 135 

598 596 

530 535 

514 532 

681 693 

698 796 

363 359 

593 495 

418 419 

1169 1165 
483 495 

661 659 

160 162 
895 832 

384 386 


Madrid 

Acerim 

ACESA 

Agaas Bactlon 
^^ntnria 

3enesto 
Bankiiser 
Bco Centre Hisp 
Bco Exterior 
Bco Popular 
5co Saiannder 
CEPSA 
CornSnente 

CcrpMcphe 
Endesa 
fecsa 
G as Natural 

loeratoia 

Pryca 


Boln Mec 47436 
Prevtoas: 473.15 


Sevi Hina Elec 

Tabacalera 
Teietonkn 
Union Fenosa 
Votonc Cement 


20100 

1655 

5400 

6100 

8730 

1155 

19300 

3800 

2800 

26070 

9850 

4305 

2550 

7300 

9330 

1 Z 10 

31980 

1545 

2695 

6000 

1300 

6830 

msi 

T175 

1685 


19950 

1620 

5300 

6040 

8620 

1125 

19050 

3770 

2765 

2S55D 

9720 

4260 

2515 

7140 

9200 

1160 

31650 

1510 

2640 

5830 

1205 

6750 

3375 

1160 

1660 


20000 19900 
1630 1650 
^7 k q 77 m 

6090 fibao 

8660 BfiSfl 
1130 1145 
19200 1«S7D 
3800 3785 

2765 2775 
25600 25900 
9830 9700 

4280 4260 

2545 2535 
7190 7160 

9230 9080 
1175 1190 
319® 31700 
1520 1530 

2665 2£7Q 

5850 5940 
1295 1300 
6760 6778 

3350 
1165 1165 
1600 1675 


Manila 


PSEtadex: 320061 
RmfMta 2215*4 


29 

28 

79 

29 

Ayala Land 

Bk Philip 1st 

30 

29*0 

30 

30 

1B2 

1® 

182 

183 

C&P Homes 

1175 

12 

12 

12JS 

Manila ElecA 

m 

IIV 

119 

IIV 


675 

6/0 

6/5 

475 


10-50 

10.2* 

10*0 

10*0 


410 

3® 

395 

395 

Ptd Lana Dist 

1575 

1155 

15® 

1590 

to 

1 

9 

s 

J 

90 

87 

89*0 

86*0 

5M Prune Hdg 

7JD 

7*0 

/JO 

7® 


Paris 


Accor 

AGP 

AirUoofde 

AtaWAJafi 

Am-UAP 

Bancotie 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Plus 

Cnnrcfoor 

Cnsino 

CCF 

Codm 

ChrWlan Dior 

CLF-Desda Fran 

Crwffl Agrtcote 

Danone 

EN-AqoOnlne 

EridartaBS 

Eurodtenor 

EuratunM 

Gen. Etna 

Havas 

Hartal 

Lafarge 

Legrand 

LOneal 

LVMH 

Lyon. Eaia 

MtctieSn B 

Paribas A 

Psniod Ricmd 

Peugeot Ot 

PI nou IF Print 

Proioodes 

RenouH 

Rexel 

Rh-P/wleneA 

Sanofl 

Schneider 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Six Generate 
Sodexho 
StGobain 
Suez 


CAG-WXSKL77 
Pmnts 257395 


B20 810 

200 198*0 
867 856 

667 660 

3*9-40 36420 
735 715 

Mffi 889 
251.90 242150 
1075 1054 
3439 3400 
25980 25180 
26380 259 JO 
(BO 
801 
558 
1246 
868 
MS 
904 
9*0 
6J0 
737 


690 

826 

578 

1246 

880 

£59 

916 

10.15 

6.90 

762 


409.90 40420 
923 866 

378 
1000 
1924 
1303 
562 


39fi 

1022 

1966 

136? 

582 


33480 323.10 
393 JO 38550 
329 JO 315J0 
650 641 

2211 2156 
1894 1810 

138 133 

1650 1610 

187 1B3JC 
533 525 

289.90 285.70 


975 

483 

6C 

2835 

845 


953 

397 

632 

2779 

835 


TOtOl B 
Ustnor 

Valeo 


CSF 


27650 26880 
S84 565 

185.40 182.10 
47850 462 

9X50 9020 
378.90 372.10 


816 813 

200 700 

960 860 

AM 667 
36460 367 JO 
724 720 

SfflS 883 
250 24550 
1067 1959 

3436 3392 

25150 260 

25950 260 

685 689 

809 815 

568 577 

1246 1246 
875 875 

559 £5 

910 908 

955 10.10 

675 690 

752 733 

40430 40690 
923 B£» 

390 377 

1010 1002 
1951 1924 

J3J0 1337 
570 565 

326 31150 
39150 387 

329 318 

648 649 

2170 2164 

1881 1800 
138 136*0 
1630 1655 

18450 18750 
526 528 

288 285 

956 900 

399 403.90 
637 636 

2810 2835 

841 839 

275 27250 
530 SS8 
18450 18550 
47350 45750 
91 JO 89 JO 
37400 377 


Electrolux B 

Ericsson B 

Hemes. B . 

inoertveA 

Investor B 

M 0 D 0 B 

NOMborken 

PhomVUrfohii 

Sondv&B 

Scania B 

SCAB 

5-EBankenA 
Staixfla Ears 
ShanskaB 
SKFB 

lA 


StoreA 
SvHandlmA 
Volvo B 


479 46850 
28550 254 

10» 1008 
52S 514 

34050 33450 
237 228 

269 IWM 
25S» 285 

192 18650 
185 18150 
16750 16250 
8550 82 

22850 21850 
337 327 

180 105 

133 IX 
190 19B‘ 

106 10350 
225 219 

19250 185 


47050 47650 
25450 261 

■ 1010. U12 
514 528 

34050 339 

237 22950 
267 26650 
28550 290 

190 186 

183 183 

16550 16750 
83 8450 
223 22450 
330 33350 
187 18450 
132 132 

190 IS® 
105 ISM 
222 222 
190 185 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBIdng 

BHP 

Bcml 

Brambles bid. 
C8A 

CC Amato 

CoksMya 

Comrtca 

CRA 

CSR 

Fosters Bravr 
Goodman FM 
ia AUJtmOa 
Lend Lean 
MIMHdgs 
Nat Aust Bank 
Nrt Mutual Hdg 
Hews On 
Podfic Dunlap 
Pioneer hdl 
PufaBinadcast 
St George Bar* 
WMC 

WWtoecBBng 

Ullntimhln Pel 
WWOWK ryji 


Al Onteariec 238SJ8 
Preriaus: 240430 


The Trib Index 


Prioee at o!3M PM. Non Yah time. 


Mexico 


Alto A 

BanocdB 

CBmexCPO 

EmpMadema 

GpaCaisoAl 

GpoFBaaner 

Gao Fin Inbursa 

K/mbClartMex 

TdevtenCPO 

TeUltexL 


1920 

29*0 

TI26 

4045 

kfiw 

1JB4 

2755 

76350 

10350 

16*0 


Beta todec 382176 
P revta s. 379755 
4400 44*5 4190 
19.00 19.00 1BJHJ 
29 JO 29JKI 29J5 
11.18 1120 UJTJ 
4ai0 4025 40.10 
4445 4490 4425 
152 154 151 

Z7J5 Z750 27*0 
16100 163-10 1623«2 
10050 102J0 9950 
1650 1620 1610 


Sao Paulo 


Bradesco Pfd 
Brahma PH 


CESI 
Coprri 
Eldrebrns 
ttanbanca Pfd 
UprtServlcte 


Copenhagen 


BG Bank 
CorfSbWgB 
Codon Pan 


% 
920 

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Cathay Life Ins 
ChangHwaBfc 
OitaoTimgBk 
Otha Dewtomf 
China Steel 
First Bank 
Formosa Ptosttc 
Him Nan Bk 
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Level 

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110.06 

+0-25 

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159.35 

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-0.11 

+14.49 

N. America 

173.94 

-1.65 

-0.94 

+35S9 

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137^6 

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+54.18 

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Capita] goods 

17351 

-1.88 

-1.06 

+30.35 

Consumer goods 

1«1j66 

-1.06 

-0.82 

+2288 

Energy 

177.49 

+0^2 

+0.12 

+30.87 

Finance 

112.30 

-0.08 

-0.07 

-11. 73 

MsceBaneous 

154.00 

+0.36 

+0^3 

+13.98 

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180^7 

-2.7B 

-1.52 

+27.13 

Service 

141.35 

+0.34 

+024 

+17.79 

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133.44 

-0.66 

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The Intumaffara/ Homkf Tr&xjna tVortd Stock Index O tracks tfw U.S. doMar vatuon of 
280 htmaUonafy Imomblo soda bom ffl countries. For mans in ft w na tipn. a tree 
baoUet la ovartaMr by wrMng to The Trib Index, IB 1 Avenue Chertea de GauKa. 

925S1 NmifiyCadex. France. Compiled by Bloomberg Nows. 


Stock Marti! Mac 8441 *2 
Previous: 852630 




SektauK ...... 

SeUuMHauuc 
Seven- Eleven 
Sharp 

Shikoku El Pm 
S htmfzu 
SMn-etmCh 
SMseMo 
ShtanokaBk 
Soffbonk 
Sony 


Seoul 


Docooi 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hwndrt Eng. 
Kki Motors 
Korea El Pwr 
Korea End] Bk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LG Sentient 
Pahang Iren St 

Smosung Dfclay 

SamsungElec 
SNnhan 


gtape snetodec Wg 

PrerkvcfiMI 

102000 «D 0 99*00 100000 
3970 3850 3®® ,3970 

18200 17200 1730 18200 

15800 15300 15800 15600 
256S® 25000 25100 25600 
5300 4790 4790 5200 

474000 460000 472000 474000 
26000 25000 26000 25800 
4000 42500 43100 43100 
39700 38SO0 39200 39700 
55600 5«®» 55500 56000 
10SOO 9800 10000 10500 


Tokyo 

3 a 

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Nteel 225:1 M9171 
Prevtas: I8445J0 


Montreal 


Johannesburg "S 3 SSES 

Ajss-gjp *B ■« “ 

AnrtoAniCDrt " 37^*0 269*0 

S IS ^4 31450 


AngtoAinl 

AVMIM 


175 174 174 17525 

17-20 17 JS 17-10 17-“ 
40,75 49.10 47 JS 47.to 
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Ate Poc Brew 
Cnebos Poc 
□tyDevBs 
Cycle Corrioge 
Dbby Farm Ini’ 
DBSIarebi 
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108 

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113 

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127 

139 

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diunoku Elec 
Dai Nlpp Print 
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DahnBwik 

Dahwa House 

DahraSec 

DDI 

Denso 

East Japan Ry 
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105 108 108*0 

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Japan Tobacco 

JlBCO 

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KansalEKc 

Kao 

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Kawa Steel 
HnklNlppRy 

Kirin Brewery 
Kobe Steel 
Knmrtni 
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Kyocera 
K^ra Elec 

Marubeni 

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Matsu Comm 

Mata Elec bid 
Matsu Elec Wk 
WtSUWsH 
Msubteiai 
Mitsubishi El 
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MbsabtalHvy 
Mitsubishi Mot 
Mitsubishi Tr 
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3380 

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612 

1100 

2080 

566 

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2190 

2240 

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697 

1430 

478 

1370 

909 

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545 

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370 

670 

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530 

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1100 1100 
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566 536 

2180 3180 
2580 2530 

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2190 21® 

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686 688 
1400 13® 

471 472 

13® 13® 
909 898 

7560a 7388d 
2420 2400 

53300 5460a 
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36® 3590 

1520 14® 

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1240 1240 
10® 10® 
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3620 36® 
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413 423 

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479 478 

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Sana anal 
Suntana Elec 
Sumll Metal 
S uatoTTutf 
TabhuPhunn 
TakedaChem 
TDK 

TohotaJ QPwr 
Total Bonk 
T0M0 Marine 
Tokyo El pwr 

Tokyo Electron 

Tokyo Gas 

TnkyuCorp. 

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Mrthanex 
Moore 
Newbridae 
Narendaln 
N often Energy 
MtwmTrtecon 
Nava 
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Potato Sask 


RtoAtgom 

SfW 11 

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IMS 

Tetogtofae 

Trtus 

Thomson 

TarDornBank 

Tnaisalto 

TranaCdoPtoe 

Trimark FW 

TitocHahn 

TVXGald 

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29*0 

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32*5 

30.15 
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31*0 31.90 
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91*5 91*5 
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26*0 27V* 

13.10 13.15 

98*5 99 

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34*0 3480 
26.15 26.15 

5314 S3*0 
5530 55.40 
21*5 3185 
62 6230 
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3985 m 
2135 2116 
2816 2035 
37*0 3780 
16*5 16*0 
2535 25*5 
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30£0 31.05 
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VA Tech 1774 

Wltoiefbeig Bou 2255 


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455 458*0 461*0 
3365 3*00 3390 

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1350 1371 135550 

83520 839*0 338.10 
475 476 479*0 

1764 1765 1776 

22302239.10 2245 


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Atoena Energy 
Alcan Akin 
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BkMoatrert 
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476 490 

3® 343 

736 749 

989 1010 
207 208 

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532 540 

6700 6720 
22 ® 22 ® 
403 408 

462 477 

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3050 2B® 
18® 1870 
1070 1070 
1090 11® 
34S 345 

648 662 

14® 1410 
819 827 

889 890 

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dfiSSSSS’l?- - 



PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


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Sought on 
Nomura 

Bow to Punish Firm 

But Not the Market? 

&**MbrOirStd'Fmnrtt Tcle f K , 

TOKYO — Japanese authorities 
4 arc. unlikely to punish Nomura Se- 
curities Co. in a way that would put 
at risk the large amount of liquidity 
the brokerage concern provides to 
»gtal^rkets, market sources said 

Nomura faces a sterner punish- 
ment for its latest trading scandal 
than was meted out for previous 
mfracnons, the sources said, but its 
key role in the capital markets may 
make authorities reluctant to be too 
harsh with it. 

“Crushing Nomura to pieces 
would be suicidal for Japan’s bond 
market,” said a chief bond trader at a 
major European brokerage house 
who asked not to be identified. The 
trader added that authorities would 
have to weigh the likely repercus- 
sions when deciding on any penalty. 

Nomura exerts a powerful influ- 
ence cm every business in the yen 
bond market and is Japan's top for- 
eign bond seller. 

The sources expect Japan's Min- 
istry of Finance, depending on the 
findings of an investigation by the 
Securities and Exchange Surveil- 
lance Commission, to order Nomura 
to halt some or ail of its business for 
as long as six m onths 

This would be a stiff punishment 
that would take a bite out of 
Nomura’s profit and prestige but 
would not threaten the stability of 
the markets. 

An official of the governing Lib- 
eral Democratic Party, however, 
said the surveillance commission 
also was considering criminal 
charges against Nomura over the 
brokerage concern’s allegedly illeg- 
al stock trading. 

The commission's secretary-gen- 
eral, Shojo Wakabayashi, told a ses- 
sion of the parly's financial and fis- 
cal committees that the commission 
was conducting investigations along 
that line. 

Two former managin g directors 
at Nomura allegedly conducted die 
illegal transactions in March 1995 to 
help a corporate client who had ties 
to a sokmya racketeer, or corporate 
extortionist. 

Hideo S akamaki resigned as pres- 
ident of Nomura Securities Friday 
after a scandal over alleged pay- 
ments to gangsters. 

■ (Reuters, Bridge News) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THUR SDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 15 


RTZ-CRA to Close Australia Base 


by Our Skiff Frrwn Dtqurfc* 

MELBOURNE — RTZ-CRA, 
Ltd., the world's biggest mining 
company, announced a major re- 
alignment Wednesday that in- 

rlllHorl lha I f - ■ r 


based on geography rather than on 
products. 

The restructuring will leave 
Australia-based executives to man- 
age the aluminum, energy and iron- 


eluded the effective elimination of ore businesses from Brisbane, 
its Australian headquarters and a Melbourne and Penh. London will 
definitive shift toward London as 

its capital. ■ - 1 1 — 

The company, formed by a mer- It doesn’t make any sense to have two head 
ger of London-based RTZ PLC and «- , i . J , - 

Australia-based cra Ltd. in 199S. onices, an analyst said alter the announcement. 

said it would manage its global 

businesses along six main product handle the rest and will remain the 
lines: aluminum, copper, energy, corporate headquarters, 
industrial minerals, iron ore and The Salt Lake City, Utah, office 
gold and other minerals. These of its Kennecott Corp. copper op- 


said. RTZ-CRA is trying to become 
more nimble in the aftermath of a 24 

r srcent fail in profit last year, to 
1 .09 billion, as a collapse in cop- 
per and ahiminum prices offset a 
rise in mineral and metals output. 
Copper and aluminum prices have 


handle the rest and will remain the 
corporate headquarters. 

The Salt Lake City, Utah, office 
of its Kennecott Corp. copper op- 


rebounded this year. Mr. Uhrig said 


then trade in London as Rio Unto 
PLC and CRA’s stock in Australia 
as Rio Unto Lid. 

A Melbourne-based analyst said 
the designation of London as the 
lone headquarters had come as no 
surprise. “Itdoesn’tmakeany sense 
to have two head offices,” he said. 

Leigh Clifford. CRA’s man- 
aging director, said the restructur- 
ing of the Australian operations 
would cost between 10 million and 
15 milli on dollars. “ Annual sav- 
ings, we believe, will be greater 


the merger of RTZ and CRA, which than that," be said. 


lines had combined revenue of e ration in the United States as well 
about $8 billion last year from op- as the company's Johannesburg of- 

ti - . _ _ . r r= ...mi i .jj.j 


e rations on all six continents. 

RTZ-CRA said it would shrink its 
Melbourne office, CRA’s home 
base and until now the group’s 
“other” headquarters. It will halve 
the staff there, trimming 100 jobs, 
and leave the office a support role 
only. The new structure will help 
“untangle” the management web 
created by the merger, John Uhrig, 
chairman of CRA, said, and will 
replace a structure that had been 


fice will be closed, it added. 

The move “not only brings 
keener focus on customers and op- 
portunities but simplifies relation- 
ships, better concentrates our tech- 
nological expertise and streamlines 
decision-making,’* Leon Davis, 
CRA’s chief executive, said. 

“We are committed to a global 
approach.” Mr. Davis said. The re- 
organization will “lower our costs 
and improve our efficiencies," he 


maintained the two companies' 
separate stock listings, had so far 
not improved the lot of shareholders 
— but he said it would have been 
“surprising" if it had done so in its 
first year of operation. 

RTZ stock, traded in London, 
fell 1 1 pence a share to 962 pence 
($15.30). CRA stock, traded in 
Sydney, was unchanged at 18.45 
Australian dollars ($14.53). 

RTZ-CRA has already proposed 
to drop its double-barreled name 
and become known, subject to 
shareholder approval this year, as 
Rio Tin to. RTZ’s shares would 


RTZ-CRA has stakes in the 
Escondida copper mine in Chile, 
the Bingham Canyon copper op- 
eration in the United States, the 
Kelian gold mine in Indonesia and 
the Grasberg copper and gold mine 
in Irian Jaya. Ir produces non ore at 
Hamersley Iron Pty. in Australia 
and mines coal from a range of 
operations throughout Australia's 
eastern states ana Indonesia. 

Mr. Davis said the restructuring 
would have little impact on the 
company’s tax structure or the way 
it reported earnings. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX) 


Japan Brokerages 
Forecast Losses 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Most of Japan ’s second-tier broker- 
age concerns said Wednesday they would post 
losses far the year that ends March 31 because of 
the country’s depressed stock prices. 

Many of the firms previously expected to show a 
profit for the current year after recording losses the 
year before, but the downward spiral in stock prices 
early this year changed their fortunes. 

Nine brokerage concerns said the drop in the 
Tokyo stock market had forced them to write down 
the value of shares they owned in listed companies, 
particularly banks. The stock slump, triggered by 
wearies about Japan's sputtering economic recovery 
and the health of its banking sector, also ate into 
co mmis sion income as investors shied away from 
the market 

“While we have profits from hood trading, we 
were forced, unexpectedly, to post appraisal losses 
on shareholdings because stock prices fell sharply 
from January onward.” an executive at Okasan 
Securities Co. said ai a news conference. 

The nine brokerage firms that issued revised 
earnings forecasts were Okasan, Sanyo Securities 
Co.. New Japan Securities Co.. Kankaku Securities 
Co., Tokyo Securities Co., Cosmo Securities Co., 
Dai-Ichi Securities Co., Wako Securities Co. and 
Yamaiane Securities Co. 

The only other brokerage firm in die market’s 
second tier, Kokusai Securities Co., did not revise 
its forecast, which calls for a profit. 


Khashoggi Shares Frozen 

Thais Block $5.4 Million Stake in Cement Firm 


CtmifMbyOw Staff Freni Dispachn 

BANGKOK — The Thai police said Wed- 
nesday they had frozen shares worth 142 
million baht ($5.47 million) in a local com- 
pany, Jalapraihan Cement PLC, held by Ad- 
nan Khashoggi, the Saudi businessman. 

The police issued a warrant last week for 


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StockJ^et Index. $4*? .52 


along with Mr. Khashoggi were Krirkkiai 
Jalichandra, the bank's former president, and 
Rakesh Saxena, an adviser. (Reuters, AP ) 

■ Finance One Official Steps Down 


Source: Tetokurs huanatww) Henld Tritone 


Very briefly: 

• Singapore's Telecommunications Authority plans to offer 
one or two additional cellular-telephone licenses that can 
begin operating in April 2000. Two new fixed-line licenses are 
also being awarded in April 2000. The results of the tenders 
will be announced in mid- 1998. 

• Brunei's sultan, Muda Hassanal Bolkiah, and Thailand's 
prime minister, Chaovalit Yongchaiyut, agreed to broaden 
economic cooperation between their countries. 

• Comfort Group Ltd., a Singapore taxi operator, signed an 
agreement with Usaha Motors Pte. to distribute Malaysian- 
made Perodua vehicles in Singapore through a joint venture to 
be named Perocom Motors. Comfort will own 74 percent of 
Perocom, with Usaha owning the resL 

• Mandarin Oriental International Ltd., a hotel company. 


Finance One PLC said Wednesday that its reported a 12 percent increase in net profit in 1996, to 

mamvlrt TnarmAkn V Dkim/Qtimr __ *195 n l . . . « A . "at" 


managing director. Tbermchai Phinyawat, 


the arrest of Mr. Khashoggi. 61 , on charges of had resigned, effective March 5, Reuters re- 
conspiring to defraud Bangkok Bank of Com- ported from Bangkok, 
merce PLC by securing 2 billion baht in loans Finance One, one of Thailand's largest 


merce PLC by securing 2 billion baht in loans Finance One, one of Thailand's largest 
without adequate collateral. finance companies but said by analysts to be • 

The warrant also names four executives of hit by liquidity problems, signed an agree- 
the troubled bank, which was taken over by ment Friday to merge with the medium-sized 
the government last year after opposition Thai Dana Bank to form Thai Danu Bank. 

charges of the debts triggered a ran on its 

deposits. 

The bank is saddled with more than 70 Aaiirlrc in Tanan’cPrnnA 
billion baht in nonperforming loans, many of V Uirik ® m J d j JtU1 ® 
which were allegedly extended to leading 

politicians who were not required to put up Reuters 

equal collateral, the police said. TOKYO — Western investors are shunnii 

Trading in shares of Jalapraihan were sus- anese real estate despite a recent high-profile it 


million. Sales rose 18 percent, to $227.2 million. 

• Hongkong Land Holdings Ltd. posted net profit of $342 
million for 1996. a 4 percent increase from a year earlier. 

• Laos hopes to welcome more than 500,000 visitors this year, 

up from about 400.000 in 1996. The increase would lift 
tourism revenue to an estimated $37.2 mill ion from $31 
million in 1996. Reuters. AFP. AFX, AP 


Quirks in Japan’s Property Law Deter Western Investors 


exchange pending an announcement about a 
proposed capital increase by the company. 
Jalapraihan executives declined to comment 
on the police statement. 

Mr. Khashoggi said over the weekend that 
be was preparing a response to the Thai 
charges and was hopeful of an amicable set- 
tlement. 

Among those sought by the Thai police 


Reuters turnoffs for Western investors was Japan’s land-use 

. r TOKYO — Western investors are shunning Jap- planning law, which virtually controls land prices and 

Trading in shares of Jalapraihan were sus- anese real estate despite a recent high-profile move by hinders liquidity in the property market 
pended Wednesday by the Bangkok stock an Asian investor to snap up a prime Tokyo site. The law. for example, says Japan's Land Agency 

’ dustry specialists say. They blame a lack of liquidity must be told in advance about transactions involving 
id other factors peculiar to Japan's property market properties larger than 2,000 square meters (2,400 
ir keeping away many big -international investors. square yards) so it can check to see whether the prices 

“Fund managers from the U.S. and Europe have have been properly set 

sited coming to us recently to talk about Japan's “This kind of rule is not seen in other industrialized 
al -estate market, but once we tell them the facts, nations,” Mr. Furata said. As a result, premium 
ey back off.” said Yukio Furata, investment di- property rarely changes hands in Japan, he said, 
dor at Richard Ellis, an international property con- Commercial land prices in Tokyo have fallen more 
tiling firm. Mr. Furata said one of the biggest than 80 percent from their peak in 1991. 


industry specialists say. They blame a lack of liquidity 
and other factors peculiar to Japan's property market 
for keeping away many big -international investors. 

“Fund managers from the U.S. and Europe have 
started coining to us recently to talk about Japan's 
real-estate market, but once we tell them the facts, 
they back off.” said Yukio Furata, investment di- 
rector at Richard Ellis, an international property con- 
sulting firm. Mr. Furata said one of the biggest 


TAKEOVERS: A New Breed of Wolf at the Corporate Door 


STEEL: Krupp Retreats From Hostile Bid 


Continued from Page 11 

No industry is immune to die new 
merger fervor. Last year, Dayton Hud- 
son Corp. withdrew from an attempted 
$6.9 billion takeover of J.C. Penney Co. 
after Penney rejected the offer. But both 
companies, as well as Kmart Corp., 
remain prime targets of other expan- 
sion-minded retailers, in the view of 
some investment bankers. 

With convergence in vogue in the rap- 
idly deregulating utility industry, nearly 
any natural-gas company is a potential 
target for an electric utility hoping to 
grow and survive into the next century. 

In finance. , hanks and insurance 
companies that want to invade Wall 
Street have been looking at companies 
from PaineWebber Group Inc. to Amer- 
ican Express Co. as potential takeover 
targets, friendly or otherwise. 

In a possible prelude to a takeover 
attempt. Bank of New York Co. an- 
nounced this year that it would try to 
increase its stake in State Street Boston 
Corp. after merger talks between the 

two companies failed. 

All tins activity draws little of me 

outrage vented at the swashbuckling raid- 
ers of a decade ago. Has corporate Amer- 
ica been worn down — or co-opted . 

“The new respectability is reaDy a 
product of the shift from financial trans- 
actions to strategic transitions and a 

shift in the nature of the bidders, raid 

Martin lipton of the law firm Wachtell, 


Upton, Rosen & Katz, which special- 
izes in corporate takeovers and invented 
the so-called poison pQI defense, in 
which a company tries to make itself too 
expensive for an acquirer to swallow. 

“When you have IBM and Johnson 
& Johnson doing it, you’re hard pressed 
to say it’s not respectable.’ ’ 

Certainly, executives al IBM thought 
they had no choice in 1995 but to begin 
their first hostile raid on Lotus De- 
velopment Corp., an event dial also 
marked die country’s first hostile 
takeover in the software industry. With 
consolidation afoot, it had become im- 
portant for computer manufacturers to 
forge direct links with software compa- 
nies or risk being held captive to a 
competitor. 

Lawrence Ricciardi. general counsel 
to IBM, acknowledged that the com- 
pany had some trepidation about a 
takeover attempt, particularly when Lo- 
tus's greatest asset — its employees — 
might flee from an ugly dogfight; so the 
company issued a$10.3 billion bid. high 
enough to be taken seriously on Wall 
Street and at Lotus, and honed a story of 
how well matched tire two companies 
were to assuage the fears at Lotus. 

“We had had conversations with Lo- 
tus and weren’t able to persuade them to 
make a deal with us,’ ’ said Mr. Ricciardi 
— a veteran, like Louis Gerstner Jr., 
IBM’s chief executive, of RJR Nabisco 
in its shell-shocked post-takeover days. 

“We were concerned that if we kept 


pushing them on a friendly basis, we 
might drive them into the arms of a third 
party. The only surprise in the end was 
that it was the shortest hostile deal to 
mm into a negotiated transaction; only 
seven days.” 

Hostile takeover attempts, however, 
still represent only a minority of the 
record-breaking number of mergers 
today. According to Securities Data 
Co., there were 73 hostile or unsolicited 
bids announced in the United States in 
1996 and 97 in 1995, with a combined 
value of $155 billion. In 1988, however, 
there were 168 hostile bids valued at a 
total of $222 billion. 

“It's still very hard to accomplish a 
hostile deal, even though it’s dear there 
is no longer a stigma attached to doing 
one,” Mr. Kindler of Cravath Swaine 
said. “The courts have become more 
favorable to target companies, and you 
have to be certain when you Starr a hostile 
bid dial there is no other company in the 
world that is willing to pay more.’ ' 

John Gutfreund, former chairman of 
Salomon Brothers, offers a voice of 
caution, suggesting that mergers that 
appear to make sense today because of 
rising stock prices could backfire if the 
economy trims sour. “Shareholders, 
particularly institutional shareholders.” 
he said, “want to get the fastest possible 
large return, and that, in effect, endorses 
behavior that was previously considered 
unclub-like. The deal-makers cut the 
cloth to fit the fashion.” 



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Continued from Page 11 

that represents the steelworkers. 

Backed by high-powered investment 
bankers from Deutsche Bank AG, 
Dresdner Bank AG and Goldman, 
Sachs & Co., Krupp’s takeover offer 
was radical by the congenial standards 
of corporate Germany. Its dimensions 
and tactics were more reminiscent of 
Wall Street in the 1980s than of Ger- 
many ’s culture of cooperative company 
relations, nurtured by a web of cross- 
shareholdings. 

Precisely because of those cross- 
shareholdings, Thyssen managers re- 
gistered indignation at the takeover be- 
cause executives from Deutsche Bank 
and Dresdner Bank sit on Thyssen 's 
supervisory board Historically, compa- 
nies have cross-shareholdings with Ger- 
man banks to ward off hostile 
takeovers. 

“People are asking us if we have the 
wrong mends among banks,” said one 
Thyssen official. Steelworkers waved 


banners reading “Cromme and 
Deutsche Bank make Germany sick.” 

With German unemployment already 
at record highs, and joblessness in the 
struggling Ruhr steel region above the 
national average, politicians swiftly lent 
Thyssen their support. 

Krupp’s Mr. Cromme agreed to the 
new negotiating format only after Jo- 
hannes Ran, prime minister of the state 
of North Rhine-W estphalia. and his fi- 
nance and economics ministers con- 
vened a meeting of the heads of the two 
groups late Tuesday and arranged the 
negotiations. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl also ex- 
pressed “great concern” about the 
planned takeover, said Peter Hangman, 
a government spokesman. Mr. Kohl had 
feared a ‘ ’negative effect on jobs” and a 
deterioration in the social climate. Mr. 
Hausmann said 

Mr. Kohl urged both companies to 
seek a “solution of reason” in the in- 
terests both of their employees and the 
economic climate in Germany. 


Foreign Investment 
In India Slackens 


Reuters 

BOMBAY — Foreign investments 
rose in die two weeks after India’s pro- 
business budget was introduced, but de- 
mand is wavering as the market under- 
goes a correction, analysts said Wed- 
nesday. 

Foreign institutional investors “are 
waiting for the markets to cool,” said 
Bharat Iyer, market strategist at UBS 
Securities, the investment aim of Union 
Bank of Switzerland. 

“The markets are overbought,” he 
added. “So a correction is under 
way.” 

Foreign institutional investors made 
net purchases equivalent to $101.1 mil- 
lion from March 1 to March 12afterthe 
budget for 1997-98 (April-March), 
which was made public Feb. 28, cut 
corporate and personal taxes and raised 
foreign portfolio limits in firms to 30 
percent from 24 percent. 


NOTICE TO THE UNITHOLDERS OF 


R e g is te r ed Office: 

16, Boulevard Royal 
L-2449 LUXEMBOURG 

SKANDIFOND BOND FUND 

MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS 
(modifications taking effect on April 1, 1997) 

Referring to the version dated September 1, 1994, the 
foDowing modifications have been brought about. 

New Version: 

ARTICLE 9 - ISSUE PRICE 
First paragraph 

The issue price of units in a Sub-Fund includes the net asset 
value of a unit in dial Sub-Fund calculated in accordance with 
Article 7 of these Regulations, increased by a commission 
which will not exceed 5% of the net asset value; this 
commission includes all commissions payable to banks and 
financial establishments taking part in the placement of the 
units. 

ARTICLE 12 - REDEMPTION 
First paragraph 

Owners of units may apply at any time for redemption of their 
units, which will be affected al the neL asset value ruling al Uud 
time, decreased by a commission which will not exceed 030% 
of the net asset value: this commission includes all commissions 
payable to banks and financial establishments taking part in the 
redemption of the units. 

Fifth paragraph 


THEBBUWMtollEWWPn 


relevant net asset value per unit. Payment will be made in US 
Dollars, Swedish Kronor*, Norwegian Kroner* or in ibe base 
currency of the Sub-Fund within ten bank busmen days 
following the corresponding Valuation Day. 

Luxembourg, March 12, 1997. 

TUED ^B S ffl BANK SSKcoiKS 

LUXEMBOURG SJL 


INSTRACORP 

/A US Public Company! i 

PnnidpaTB la fee Mara by breams now la o ibIoim and rinnffleow 21 1» Cwtrniy I 
iKtuology. A Noodle impulse Gmmbtoi (NIB) wnfcti mh InstotM In elscrricol i 
appSances wa roduco it» coasanpHoa at Mecmaty stgriBcaMty. IHM pun! 8om 1 
mj p un n ulH f to guiclwaa e to n w t ui wd aftame. BequsW brodiwe from: ^ 

AM1NEX: 1 16. roe do Rkdne. CH-1204 Geneva. Switzerland 
>■ — ■ ■ TeL: (41 22) 787 57 57 - Fax: 787 57 58 - J 


FMG MIR SICAV 

Soci£t£ dTnvestissemcnt & Capital Variable 
10 A, Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 53.392 

NOTICE OF MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Genera] Meeting of 
Shareholders of FMG MIR. SICAV will be held at the Registered 
Office. 1 0A. Boulevard RoyaJ, Luxembourg, 

an Tuesday I5th April, 1997 at 11 am., 

for the puroose of considering the following agenda: 

1. Management Report of the Directors for the year ended 
31st December; 1996. 

2. Report of the Statutory Auditor for the year ended 
31st December; 1996. 

3. Approval of the Annual Accounts for the year ended 
31st December: 1996 and appropriation of the earnings. 

4. Discharge to the Directors in respect of the execution of their 
manda tes to 31st December, 1996. 

5. Ratification of the appointment of one Director 

6. Election of the Directors for a new term of one year 

7. Election of the Statuary Auditor for a new term of one year 

8. lb transact any other business. 

The present notice and a form of proxy have been sent to all 
registered shareholders on record at March 24, 1997. 

In order to attend the Meeting, the owners of bearer shares are 
required to deposit their shares before April 7, 1997 at the 
Registered Office of the Company: 

Banque ftrribas Luxembourg 
IGA, Boulevard Royal 
Luxembourg 

The registered shareholders have to inform by mail |!euer or proxy 
form] the Board of Directors of their intention to assist at the 
meeting before April 7, 1997. 

By order of the Board of Directors 


1 


i 




























































































































































. 1; '.•• •'a • 

. * j £.\ 






i* 

j 


PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAX MARCH 20, 1997 



International Education Grows in Importance 

Swiss schools hm>e shed their finishing-school image to join the ranks of the world's most competitive educational facilities. 


E ducated in Switzer- 
land" might have lost 
some or its social 
cachet, but Swiss-style 
“international education'' Is 
gaining in relevance. This 
is good news for Swiss pri- 
vate schools, whose orien- 
tation has always been 
international. At the same 
time, the schools are aware 
of the increasing availabili- 
ty of an international edu- 
cation in other countries. 

The number of schools 
offering the International 
Baccalaureate, which origi- 
nated at the International 


School of Geneva in the 
1960s, has grown to more 
than 700 in 91 countries, 
confronting Swiss schools 
with stiffer competition at a 
time of mounting costs. 

Vital community service 
The International School of 
Geneva and other schools 
that serve a resident inter- 
national community are 
less vulnerable than the 
boarding schools, which 
rely almost entirely on stu- 
dents from abroad. 

Says George Walker, 
director-general of the 


TASIS: The School 
with a Vision 


The first American hoardhtgJday sdxtol in Europe 
-1 H0 IB. ESL. US college-prep curricula ; grades 7-PG 
Dedicated faulty, caring, fmiily-styk community 
A j * Students from mer 40 coumna 

XTElvilCull Extensive UaveL ports, activate: 

Challenging summer programs, ages 6-18 
Oi l Accredited by EOS and NEASC 

OvI lUUi Campuses in Sunsserlmd. England, Greece 

S The American School in Switzerland 

CH 6926 Montagnola-Luguno 
Switzerland 
E-mail: Administradon^tasisch 

Switzerland fia: +41-91-993-2579 



I SCHILLER 

INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

Florida (USA). London (UK), 
Strasbourg and Petris (Franca), 
Heidelberg ( Germany). Madrid (Spain), 

Ley sin and Engeiberg ( Stvilzeriand) 

Associate. Bachelor's & Master's degree programs 
international Business Administration. International Hotel 
& Tourism Management. IntemationaJ Relations & Diplomacy, 
Management, Marketing, Art. Computer Studies, Economics, 
Pre-Engineering. Pre-Medicine. Liberal Arts 

Collegium Pa Latin urn 
intensive English, Spanish, German 
& French language courses 
- Courses begin January, June and September ■ 

SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 
Royal Waterloo House, Dept 1HT/2/3/9? 

51-55 Waterloo Road, London SE1 8TX England 
Tel: (017 1) 92S 8484 Fax: (0171) 620 1226 
http://www.schiiler.edu/ 

Accredited member ACICS. Washington. DC USA 





feCOLE HOTEUERE DE LAUSANNE 

! - : 1 Since /SW 



raspori^!ily,tteopportunitytorissfestmyourfRTjfesaon, 
apd a life of travel and discovery; meeting people, visiting new 
countries, experiencing other cultures? Would you like to 
operate a 5-star hotel... or your own business? What about 
management positions in cruise lines.., an airline catering 
setvkK... an exclusive golf dub? 

Ask iv brochure and video 

Ecole hbteB&ede Lausanne - 1000 Lausanne 25 /Ssoitzerfand 
Tel: 41 21 7B5 1125 - For. 41 21 784 1407 


International School of 
Geneva: “We are obviously 
subject to the worldwide 
economy, which is reflect- 
ed in the international 
makeup of Geneva, as well 
as the local Swiss economy. 
We have detached our- 
selves from the old-fash- 
ioned image of a smart ‘fin- 
ishing school’; we provide 
a vital service to the inter- 
national community of 
Geneva." 

Hie best of all worlds 

Philippe Gudin is the direc- 
tor of Le Rosay, with cam- 
puses in Rolie, on the 
shores of Lake Geneva and 
in GstaadL “Switzerland is 
the only country,” he says, 
“that can offer a truly inter- 
national education that 
combines the Latin and 
Anglo-Saxon systems with 
the orderliness, security and 
discipline that are specific 
to the Swiss way of life/’ 
For these reasons, he sees a 
continued willingness on 
the part of affluent families 
to send their children to 
Switzerland for their educa- 
tion. 


Although the highest 
concentration of interna- 
tional schools with a world- 
wide reach is in the French- 
speaking part of the coun- 
try, schools in the German- 
speaking sector are making 
a bid for a more diversified 
student body. The Lyceum 
Alpinum in Zuoz - a 
unique combination of 
state-funded public school 
for local kids and elite pri- 
vate school that draws its 
students mostly from 
Germany and Switzerland 
- will add preparation for 
the IB beginning in 
September of this year. 
Peter Pasquill, coordinator 
of the IB program, says the 
EB is being introduced to 
widen the school’s services 
and international profile. 

Breakthrough 
Other schools in German- 
speaking Switzerland that 
nave recently added IB pro- 
grams are the Intercom- 
munity School in Zurich 
and the Bern International 
School. Bern has convinced 
the University of Bern to 
accept students with IB 


diplomas on a trial basis. 
This is considered a signifi- 
cant breakthrough because 
Switzerland’s Germanic 
universities have been 
among the most reluctant to 
accept IB students. 

A rang up the ladder 
The concept of an interna- 
tional education is not yet 
widespread at the universi- 
ty level. “There is not a net- 
work of international uni- 
versities as there are inter- 
national secondary 
schools,” says Robert 
Spencer, director of Webs- 
ter University, which 
founded its Swiss campus, 
near Geneva, in 1978 and 
has added facilities in 
Vienna, Leyden and Lon- 
don. 

“More and more of our 
students are coming from 
international secondary 
schools and want to contin- 
ue their education in an 
international setting,” he 
says. 

Is this trend, perhaps, the 
next step up the internation- 
al education ladder? 

Mary Krierike 



Cultural pursuits aiv part of the rigorous academfcatnlcuiiBn In tnany Swiss schools. 


Hotel ‘Passports to Work’ 

The country's hospitality makes it an ideal place to learn innkeeping. 


S witzerland has a long 
and strong tradition of 
innkeeping. Not sur- 
prisingly, its hotel schools 
are among the finest in the 
world. 

Students who graduate 
from a Swiss hotel school 
have the equivalent of a 
“passport to work." Hotel- 
keeping requires business 


acumen, diplomacy, lan- 
guages and a variety of 
skills worthy of an ambas- 
sador. On top of all that, a 
hotel manager also has to 
know bow to run a hotel. 

The oldest of all Swiss 
hotel schools is the Ecole 
Hoteliere de Lausanne, 
founded in 1893. All 
instruction was once in 



AIGLON COLLEGE 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Our well-established Summer courses 
will take place on the following dates this year 
10th- 31st July 
3rd -24th August 


^ excursions, sports and Swiss culture 
for students of all nationalities in the French-speaking 
Swiss Alps. 

Full details are available from: 

Miss juniper Reid, Aiglon College, 1885 Chesieres-VUlars 
TeL* +41/ 24/ 4952721 
or Fax: +41 / 24 / 4952811. mfo@aiglon.ch 


Webster 

UNIVERSITY 

You may earn an Accredited American Degree in Geneva 
and at any of our other campuses listed below 

BA, BBA, BS, MA, MBA 

For information about study at all campuses 
contact Office of Admissions 

15, route de Col lex - 1293 Be I lev u e/Ge ne va/Swi txe ri an d 
Tel +4 1 22 774 24 52 - Fax +41 22 774 30 61 
E-mail: admissions@webster.ch 
GENEVA - LEIDEN - LONDON - VIENNA - SAINT-LOUIS 


i\7 


and IB pioneer 


The International School of Geneva 

welcomes students /torin.'aqes 3 to 18 
throughout trie year. . ■ " 

& frenen. English or F/E bilingual courses 
$ Day school and boarding 

^ International Baccalaureate. iGCSE plus high 
school diploma 

$ Language exams prepared 

International School of Geneva 

Route de ChSne'62. * 208 Geneva. Switzerland 

■T W a p ho n t i. • 4I22.7M.71.JO 
h» + 41 32*735.41.28 


French, but there has been 
such demand from non- 
French-speaking students 
that last year the school 
instituted a program in 
English. Students must, of 
course, also learn French. 
Today, the school’s foreign 
students come from 25 
countries. When Travel & 
Leisure magazine recently 
listed its top hotels in the 
world, EHL graduates were 
in senior management in a 
majority of them. 

The Hotel Institute 
Montreux /HIM) runs a 
three-year program as well 
as an accelerated two-year | 
program. Graduates of both 
programs are awarded a 
Swiss diploma in Hotel 
Management as well as the 
diploma issued by the 
Educational Institute of the 
American Hotel & Motel 
Association. Instruction is 
in English, but students are 
expected to Ieam French. 

Practical training 
At the far end of die Valais, 
the HotelConsult has a syl- 
labus developed in con- 
junction with the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 



Graduates of pnatiffouB kwkeeptng institutions find no shortage of employment opportunUea. 


Students who successfully 
complete the program can 
qualify for a B.S. degree at 
the University of Massa- 
chusetts. The International 
Hotel Management Instit- 
ute, Lucerne, has strong 
links with universities in 
the United States, the 
United Kingdom, Australia 
and New Zealand. 

The Hosta Hotel and 


m mtnfernovonaf Business Educati on 

University 

■ Business Administration 

♦ Snail groups 

■ Communications & PR 

♦ individual superedon 

m Information Systems 

♦ international student body 

■ Hotel Management 

♦ ihtef-cc:Bpus exchange 

■ European Languages 


Belgium 
France 
Germany 
Greece 
The Netherlands 
Portugal 
Spain 
Switzerland 



E-mail: Eumrtia®pop*iost. eunet.be 
imemaflonal Center Cotntrin 

eMe ' k ‘STMhM 

Geneva IS a&opon - Swf&eriond 
Tel: + 41122} 796 93 50 
Fax. + 41 1221 798 90 15 
E-mail Eurgewiprob'nXdi 

Internet: www.Burunl.be 


Tourism School is located 
in the alpine town of 
Leysin, home to several 
other international educa- 
tional institutions, which 
makes for a lively student 
society. Hosta places much 
emphasis on training for 
careers in the airline indus- 
try as well as the hotel and 
general travel industry. Its 
scope is broad and contem- 
porary. 

All schools include a 
period of practical training 
during which students work 
in restaurants and hotels' to 


earn credit, but the WTO 
School of Hotel Managed 
raent in Neuchatel is actual- 
ly located in a hotel, and 
students have on-the-job 
training at all times. WTTT 
has three associate schools 
operating on the same prin- 
ciple in other countries, and 
students can transfer from- 
one to another, giving them 
an opportunity to immerse 
themselves in several dif- 
ferent languages - a skill 
that is essential in the hotel 
industry. 

Barry Edgar 


0 


John F. Kennedy 
International School 

GSTAAD- SWITZERLAND 



HIS KM, 11 ( ST \ K ! 


A unique 

boys and 

HUGH for 
schools. Si 
tion, family 


a superb. 


and day stool for 
4. Thorough prepa- 
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During juiy and August, aaouistend: 
sports. activities, excursions and 


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vocational training— 


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Use language - and languages - professionally 
Learn intercultural communication in speech and writing 

Uniwarefty-level courses for translators and interpreters 
Examinations supervised by the Education Authority of 
the Canton of Zurich- State-recognised diplomas 

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Semesters commence March and October 


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4} 



1 



j>*rr q 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MARCH 20, 1997 


PACE 19 




Business T hrives in a 
Multilingual Setting 

to Astons in pniess^semngs 

A tart*ig"S n S^;^ ^° i .? tum periodteal| y cont ‘ nu ' n 9 

no surarise that 


A s an internationally renowned 
banWn 9 and business center, it is 
no surprise that Switzerland is 
nome to some of Europe’s best business 
scnools. 

IMD in Lausanne is often referred to as 
The Harvard of Europe.” It has both 
undergraduate and graduate programs 
m business studies. IMD also undertakes 
a considerable amount of business 
research and analysis for outside clients 
Thus students often have the opportuni- 
ty to become involved in reaJ-life situa- 
tions. 


A G S B 

(American . 

Graduate 

School of __ 

Business). 

located in H El pi 

La Tour-de- H El El ^ 

Peilz, also FI Pi £1 f 

has both — L 

undergrad- I . • 

uate and 

graduate 

programs leading to bachelor's and mas- 
ter's degrees, and offers an extensive 
program of field trips to major corpora- 
tions as well as to other international 
centers. 

ICMB (The International Center for 
Monetary and Banking Studies) in 
Geneva offers an intensive program in 
finance that enables professionals to 
adapt to the challenges of a rapidly 
changing financial and economic envi- 
■ ronment Students come from 70 coun- 
tries, and marry are financial executives 


s The importance of being a polyglot 
According to Donald Utroska, a partner 

> with Lamalie International, an executive 
i recruiting firm based in Chicago with 
i offices throughout the world, “Lan- 

> guages are one of the most important 
i assets a candidate can have if he or she 

is going to enter the realm of internation- 
al business." Not surprisingly, polyglot 
Switzerland is home to many fine lan- 

g u a g e 

t schools 

where stu- 
dents can 

V/ *• acquire 

fcl " pT these im- 

^It£k3 p| ■*[ fcl p? r,ant 

~ ^ v D O Z 

*" 4 J (Zurich 

School for 
Translation 

and interpretation) trains students to 
become professional translators and 
interpreters, it also teaches German as a 
second language. The school’s two 
semesters begin in mid-March and early 
October. 

The Acactemie de Langues et de 
Commerce in Geneva offers courses in 
French, English, German and Spanish. 
Students are prepared for the exams of 
the Alliance Frangaise, the University of 
Cambridge, the Goethe Instrtut and the 
Institute Cervantes. B.E. 


Day or Boarding Available 

Personal attention and extracurricular activities enhance student life. 


THURSDAY 

INTERNATIONAL 

EDUCATION 

IN 

SWITZERLAND 


S witzerland is known 
throughout the world 
for its lop-quality pri- 
vate schools, most of which 
offer both day and boarding 
facilities. For parents who 
travel a great deal, sending 
their children to a safe 
Swiss boarding school is 
often one of the best solu- 
tions available. 

The Ecole Lemania, 
located in the heart of 
Lausanne, concentrates on 
providing students with 
classical, scientific and 
commercial education. The 
school is also noted for its 
excellent language instruc- 
tion. 

Aiglon College is a high- 
ly respected school that, in 
addition to providing an 
excellent academic pro- 
gram that is both rigorous 
and stimulating, teaches 
students to become self-dis- 
ciplined and self-reliant 
Sportsmanship is taught as 
an elemental part of a wide 
program of year-round 
sporting activities. 

Close relationship 
The Leysin American 
School emphasizes a close 
relationship between facul- 
ty and students. In fact, the 
two live together. If a stu- 
dent is having scholastic or 
personal problems, a 
teacher is on the spot to 
help the youngster over the 
hurdles so that he or she can 
concentrate on studies. 
Levsin is a mountain com- 



. V. 


A group photo shows that students' triumphs take place outside the classroom as well as within it 


munity where skiing is 
available in winter, and a 
wide range of sporting and 
travel activities are includ- 


ed in student programs. 

The American School of 
Institut Montana, Zuger- 
berg is located in the 


German-speaking canton of 
Zug. Founded in 1926, it 
accepts boys and girls start- 
ing in the fourth grade. An 


American section of the 
school was opened in 1952. 
Graduates will, of course, 
develop excellent skills in 
the German language, but 
other European languages 
are also taught. 

Home abroad 
Parents of younger children 
will be reassured by the 
home -like atmosphere of 
the John F. Kennedy 
International School in 
Saanen-Gstaad. With fewer 
than 50 students, the 
school's boys and girls can 
receive individual attention. 
The school is housed in a 
charming old chalet set in 
some of Europe’s prettiest 
countryside. Students learn 
to think internationally and 
are expected to participate 
in sports, field trips and a 
variety of cultural activi- 
ties. 

College du L6man ac- 
cepts students between the 
ages of eight and 19 and 
provides them with a rich 
international background. 
The academic program ful- 
fills ail requirements for 
university entrance, and the 
well-rounded sports pro- 
gram includes tennis, soc- 
cer, swimming, mountain 
biking, windsurfing and 
water skiing, plus a weekly 
field trip to sites in 
Switzerland and nearby 
countries. BJL 


“International Education in Switzerland” 
was produced in its entirety by the Advertising Department of the International Herald Tribune. 
Tomorrow’s Education Week section will be devoted to “ International Education in the Benelux Countries. 

Illustrations: Karen A. S heckler- Wilson. 

Writers: Barry Edgar, based in Lausanne, and Mary Krienke, based in Gene va. 

Program Director: Bill Mahder. 



Student Body Hails From the East 

Student enrollment at Sw iss schools is a mirror of world economies - notably successful ones. 

R ecruiters for Switzer- icons, British and other schools, their numbers are portion that might 
land's international Europeans. The 1970s saw matched by rising represen- the international ball 
boarding schools are a heaw influx from the ration of cnirient« from i * PiTClll uitiif-h hoc 


■^iSlSISSfc 




' '‘"Aifti'ii 

Z- 

mmi- : 






m discreet chalet houses students Irom many countries. 


R ecruiters for Switzer- 
land's international 
boarding schools are 
heading to Russia, China, 
Hong Kong and Japan 
these days because young 
people from Asia arid the 
Commonwealth of Indep- 
endent States comprise an 
increasingly significant 
segment of their student 
populations. 

One of the most frequent- 
ly mentioned advantages of 
an international education 
in Switzerland is the expe- 
rience of mixing with stu- 
dents from other countries. 
In fact, the mix has changed 
rather dramatically over the 
years. Student bodies were 
once dominated by .Amer- 


icans, British and other 
Europeans. The 1970s saw 
a heavy influx from the 
Gulf states and Iran. Next 
came Mexicans and Latin 
Americans, until deteriorat- 
ing economic conditions in 
those countries stemmed 
the flow. -Now .Asians are 
benefiting from the boom- 
ing economies in that part 
of the world. 

Keeping the balance 
The breakup of the Soviet 
Union and the fell of com- 
munism in Eastern Europe 
resulted in the most recent 
wave, notably young 
Russians whose families 
are reaping the benefits of 
capitalism! At many 


Survival of the Fittest, Cost- Wise 

The recession in Europe occasioned some casualties among Switzerland's schools. 

r pi he high cost of doing business in Switzerland, com- International School of Geneva has just complet 


T he high cost or doing ousiness in awnzenana, com- 
pounded by a strong Swiss franc, continues to pur 
pressure on the country’s private schools. Because 
chev do not have a tradition of private endowment, schools 
must depend largely on revenues for their survival. 

'The major casualties of 1996 were Chfileau Mont- 
Choisi. a secondary school located near Lausanne that 
dated back to 1885. ‘and Art Center (Europe), the European 
branch of the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, 
California, which opened in La Tour-de-Peilz, near Vevey, 
in 1986. In addition, a couple of girls schools - once 
^ referred to as “finishing schools” - discontinued opera- 
tions, victims of changing times as much as of nsmgcosts. 
1 Both Mont-Choisi and Art Center were known for the 
excellence of their facilities and educational standards. 
The former was folly accredited by both American and 
European associations, and the latter was widely acknowl- 
edgedas cue of the best design schools in Europe, whose 

graduates were snapped up by industry. 

° Art Center, which established its European campus at 
the request of some leading companies in foe Etropean 
automotive industry - foe companies also provided initial 
financial support - conducted a courageous 10-year strug- 
Klstebl£h a new kind of independent coUege^ m 
Eurone onlv to see corporate support dry up while costs 
S^^and enrollment declined on foe heels of a recession. 
Only Nestle remained constant m its support. 

above Zug, which w ^ b ^ mbi ^ Efforts of faculty, 
liquidity problems. The forroer students and parents 
* sufficient funds fo enable the school 


succeeded m rais.ngsumtne,^^- m ^ 
to continue, and cban-» ™ number of student apph- 


B to rtSTbfoS in foe number of stuttent appu- 

market for our type of school." says 

foe school’s dfrecter AJdo ^ ^gyer, and some 

facilities. The 


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project in Lugano. M.K. 


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schools, their numbers are 
matched by rising represen- 
tation of students from 
China, Taiwan. Hong 
K.orig, Singapore and 
Indonesia, who see an inter- 
national education as an 
entnSe to university studies 
in -foe -United States- or 
Britain - and the opening to 
an intemationai career. 

At L’ Aiglon, a boarding 
school with a British slant, 
Russians now make up 6 
percent of the student body, 
which is considered a 
“comfortable level,” ac- . 
cording to an admissions 
officer. Another school that 
has instituted a “quota sys- 
tem” to prevent any nation- 
ality from reaching a pro- 


portion that might disrupt 
foe international balance is 
Le Rosay, which has decid- 
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cent of foe student body. 
More than half the students 
at both schools come from 
Western Europe. — - MJsL. 


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PAGE 20 


-7f «k INTOTUTMUL « f 

licnud^^ertoune. 

Sports 


THURSDAY', MARCH 20, 199Z. 


World Roundup 


Gordie Howe Plans 
Return to the Ice 

hockey Insisting that he was 
serious, Gordie Howe confirmed 
that be soon hoped to play one shift 
in one game for a minor league 
hockey team ar the age of 69. 

The famous right wing, a mem- 
ber of the Hockey Hall of Fame, 
said in a conference call that he 
would begin training Saturday in 
Florida in the hope of appearing 
with the Syracuse Crunch of the 
American Hockey League on April 
1. one day after his 69ih birthday. ^ 

"Some people say I’m crazy.” 
Howe said. "Well, I’m not.” 

A single shift in a hockey game 
usually lasts between 30 seconds 
and two minutes. Howe said that he 
wouldn’t decide for sure whether 
he would play until the day of the 
game. 

He said he would not wear a 
helmet and that he could protect 
himself from harm. If someone 
tried to check him from behind. 
Howe said, he would treat them the 
same way he treated opponents 
from 1946 through 1980. 

"Whoever attacked Gordie 
Howe from the back got lumber." 
Howe said. (AOT) 

Williams Lifts West Indies 

cricket An opening batsman. 
Stuart Williams, hit a maiden test 
hundred and Shivnarine Ch under- 
paid had a half century to secure a 
draw for the West Indies on the fifth 
and final day of die second cricket 
test against India in Port of Spain. 
Trinidad. 

Williams hit a superb 128 and 
Chanderpaul 79. West Indies, trail- 
ing on first innings by 140, were 
2w for six when light rain brought 
a premature end to the match with 
18 overs still to be bowled. 

Resuming on 118 for one, with 
Williams on 63 and Chanderpaul 
39. the West Indies baited through 
the first session without losing a 
wicket. (A P) 

Elway Undergoes Surgery 

football The Denver Bron- 
cos’ quarterback, John Elway, un- 
derwent arthroscopic surgery on 
his throwing shoulder this week. 

Elway is expected to be ready 
when training camp opens July 18. 
although he will probably miss the 
team’s minicamp and throwing 
camp in May. 

Elway, 36. has played 14 seasons 
in the NFL. Monday’s surgery was 
the second on his right shoulder he 
underwent a similar procedure in 
January 1993 after his shoulder 
bothered him during the 1992 sea- 
son. 

His right shoulder bothered him 
during the second half of last sea- 
son, and the team waited to see if 
rest in the off-season would take 
care of the problem. But the 
shoulder showed few signs of im- 
provement, and the quarterback un- 
derwent a series of tests about rwo- 
and-a-half- weeks ago. On Monday, 
at the Steadman- Hawkins Sports 
Medicine Clinic in Vail, doctors 
performed the arthroscopic sur- 
gery, removing scar tissue. 

“It was very routine.*' said a 
Broncos’ spokesman, Jim Sac- 
comano, on Wednesday. 

Saccomano said missing the 
minicamp would not afreet a player 
of Elway’s caliber. [API 


For 2 Disparate Gubs, 
A War for Recognition 

Monaco Advances Bast Newcastle 


By Peter Berlin 

Interiuuional Herald Tribune 


MONACO — When Monaco 
knocked Newcastle out of the UEFA 
Cup, it earned more than a place in the 
semifinals. It also won the battle for the 
economic benefits that success on the 
field brings. 

On the face of it, this was a clash 
between two utterly different clubs from 
widely disparate towns. Newcastle is 
the center of a declining industrial area 


Thb UEFA Cbp 


that is known for coal, shipbuilding and 
soccer players. Monaco is a jet-set tax 
haven known for casinos, yacht moor- 
ings and Grand Prix racing drivers. 

Newcastle sells every ticket for every 
game in its home park (capacity 37,000) 
and is planning a new 50.00G- seat sta- 
dium. Monaco draws an average crowd 
of 6,000 and fills its 20,000 seat stadium 
only two or three times a year. Tuesday 
was one of those times. 

Both clubs want more than just a cup. 
They also seek publicity for their re- 
gions. Newcastle’s coal mines have 
closed. Monte Carlo’s casino lost S30 
million last year. Both areas want to 
attract the high rollers of international 
business. Newcastle wants its factories. 
Monaco wants its vacationers. 

"Twenty to 30 million people will be 
watching this match across Europe," 
said Sir John Hail. Newcastle's chair- 
man and a fervent booster of England’s 
northeast region, on Tuesday afternoon, 
before the game. "The match will help 
to promote the image of the area." 

Monaco knows the public-relations 
advantage of sport: it has the Formula 1 
Grand Prix, a tennis tournament in April 
and an athletics Grand Prix in august 
The soccer club is heavily subsidized by 
the principality. 

“Publicity is the main reason the dub 
exists,** said Genevieve Berti. the 
club's press officer. "It is the best way 
to communicate with the rest of Europe 
and have the name of Monaco men- 
tioned." 

Soccer, says Sir John, has helped the 
northeast region of England attract in- 


vestment He cited. Samsung, the Korean 
consumer-electronics manufacturer, 
which opened a plant near Newcastle. 

* ‘Samsung was deciding between the 
sites in Scotland and England,” said Sir 
John. "On the night they made their 
decision we played Royal Antwerp. 
They were all at the game and that 
swayed them. Soccer is global. It's a 
global language." 

More than Hi at added Sir John, soc- 
cer has helped restore the area's self 
esteem after the collapse of its tradi- 
tional industries. "We had to brake the 
circle of decline,” he said. “Like the 
area, the club had been in decline for 30 
to 40 years. The club had sold its equity 
— the players — to pay debts. Now we 
are winner again." 

Not quite yet Newcastle's crushing 
3-0 loss on Tuesday night to Monaco, 
which advanced, 4-0. on aggregate, em- 
phasized that Newcastle had not won 
anything except publicity. The club has 
risen from the depths of the English 
second division to the upper reaches of 
the Premier League. But over the last 
three years its challenge for trophies has 
always fallen short. 

That rise, under a swashbuckling 
manager, Kevin Keagan, fueled a eu- 
phoric demand for match tickets and 
club merchandise. Keagan and Sir John 
Hall spent that money like newly rich 
tax exiles in the boutiques of Monte 
Carlo. They splashed out on glittering 
baubles, sometimes with little thought 
as to weather they matched, or indeed 
could all be put on display at once. 

Last summer, the dub crowned its 
spree by spending £15 million (S23-8 
million) for Alan Shearer — a local boy 
missed by the club’s youths scouts. But 
he is injured, so his place was taken by 
Faustino Asprilla, an £8 million re- 
serve. 

Monaco, on the other hand runs it 
affairs in the tightfisied manner nor- 
mally associated with businessmen 
from the north of England. It has also 
concentrated on youth development. 
Four Monaco players were on the 
French squad that won the European 
under-20 championship last year. 

On Tuesday one of those young play- 
ers. Thierry Henry, a 19-year-old at- 



Todd El dredge, who was in second place after the competition Wednesday. 


tacker, faced one of the two home grown 
players on the Newcastle team. Steve 
Watson. It was the key contest of the 
game. Henry — quick, "skillful and rec- 
ognizing weakness — tormented the 
ponderous Waison. Somehow New- 
castle survived almost to halftime. Then 
Watson bungled a clearance, and Sil- 
vain Legwinski swept the ball away and 
swerved the shot into the Newcastle 
goal from 30 yards. 

Five minutes into the second half, tbe 
Newcastle defense unraveled. Again, 
the danger started with Henry. As the 
defense panicked. Sony Anderson . who 
had scored the only goal in the first leg 
in Newcasle, cut into the Newcastle 
penalty area. In the ensuing chaos. An- 
derson, twice, and then Henry had shots 
blocked or deflected before Ali Ben- 
arbia pounced to score. 


No Pinstripes? Japanese Pitcher Will Wait 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Who is going to 
get Hidekj Irabu? And bow soon will the 
cliff-hanging decision be reached? Those 
questions monopolize discussion in 
spring training from Florida to Arizona. 

Why is Irabu so important? 

The consensus both in Japan and 
among American scouts is that the Jap- 
anese pitcher is better than Hideo Nomo 
of the Los Angeles Dodgers, who quickly 
made die jump from Japan to All-Star. 

Three of the four teams with a realistic 
chance to sign Irabu — the Yankees, 
Orioles and Indians — are contenders to 
win the World Series. 

Without Irabu, none is a favorite. 
With him, any of them might well be- 
come the favorite. 

Irabu and his agent want to sign with 
the New York Yankees. However, the 
San Diego Padres, thanks to the team’s 
president, Larry Lucchino, have the 
rights to Irabu. 

As a result, we've got a big beautiful 


font age Point! Thomas Bos will 


mess full of higb-stakes bidding and 
bluffing. 

Many people think that by the open- 
ing day of baseball season the Padres 
will trade Irabu to the Yankees for three 
young prospects and $4 million. That's 
the simplest, most probable plot But it's 
too easy. And it ignores baseball’s long- 
standing animosities. 

Would Lucchino enjoy doing a big 
deal that would help George Steinbren- 
ner win the World Series again? Sure, 
provided Lucchino could throw a basket 
of rattlesnakes into the trade, too. 

Irabu and his agent, Don Nomura, 
were to have returned to Japan on Wed- 
nesday, at least for the time being. 
Nomura says if Irabu isn’t in Yankees’ 
pinstripes by the rime tbe plane leaves, 
the righthander will retire from Jap- 
anese baseball for the 1997 season and 
then sign with the Yankees in 1998- 


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Pitchers, at age 27 and near the height 
of their careers, don’t quit — and throw 
away millions — just because they 're in 
a suit or have a combative agent. Some- 
where over Fiji, Irabu might have turned 
to Nomura and said- "When we land. I 
may pursue alternative representation." 

But the best gossip of the week, is thai 
the long-shot Orioles could actually end 
up with Irabu. 

"We have made a very fair offer to the 
Padres." the Orioles’ assistant general 
manager. Kevin Malone, said Tuesday. 
"We've met all their requirements." 

Perhaps the true core — and irony — 
of the Irabu tale is the way Lucchino 
acquired his rights from the Chiba Lotte 
Marines of Japan. And how Steinbren- 
ner failed. 

"We didn’t do it by phone or fax.” 
Lucchino said Tuesday. Actually. Luc- 
chino unleashed a secret weapon: a 
Stanford professor named Dan 
Okiraoto. Okimoto got a degree from 
Princeton, where he roomed with 
former Senator Bill Bradley and became 
lifelong friends with Lucchino, before 
getting a masters ar Harvard and a Ph D. 
at Michigan. At Stanford, he founded 
the Asia Pacific Institute. Lucchino nev- 
er lost touch. 

Last winter. 15 major league teams 
pursued the rights to Irabu. Lucchino 


sent Okimoto to Japan on the Padres’ 
behaif. The goal: to work out an elab- 
orate. long-term working agreement 
with the Marines. 

Okimoto — and Lucchino in a later 
trip to Japan — laid out a partnership 
between the Padres and the Japanese 
team for the next century, including an 
exchange of scouting information and 
allowing the Marines to use San Diego's 
spring training facilities. 

Many, including Steinbrenner and 
Nomura, assumed the Marines would 
naturally prefer a long-term relationship 
with the mighty and famous Yankees. 
To their shock, the Marines picked the 
Padres. 

Whoever gets Irabu, the moral of this 
taie will be fairly simple: Assuming 
Irabu plays in the major leagues this 
season, the Padres will be the big win- 
ners. Somebody will have to pay a 
king's ransom. 

And how did Lucchino get Irabu's 
rights without opening his wallet? 

Lucchino and the Padres won Irabu's 
rights by being diplomatic and respect- 
ful. By showing, through Okimoto, that 
he had an appreciation for Japanese 
culture. By emphasizing long-term co- 
operation rather than merely the short- 
term pursuit of Irabu. By being the 
antithesis of the greedy American cor- 
porate types. 

Maybe that’s what really bums the 
owner of the Yankees. 


ZURICH & HLAH Escort Service. 
Mode* for &u&rasataveVmiwpraier-6 
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Flurry of Trades in the NHL 

The Associated Press 

Kirk Muller is hoping the Stanley 
Cup is heading south this year. He is. 


hi a move to youth, the Toronto 
Maple Leafs sent the 31 -year-old 
Muller to the Florida Panthers for a right 
wing, Jason Podollan. as the NHL en- 
gaged in its annual trade-deadline car- 
rousel Tuesday. 

"I’m very excited about going to 
Florida," said Muller, a hard-working 
center. With the acquisition, Florida 
filled a void left by an injury to Brian 
Skmdland. 

Muller has 20 goals and !7 assists this 
season, but the Maple Leafs are looking to 
the future- Toronto also traded a high- 
priced defenseman, Larry Murphy, to De- 
troit for future considerations and sent 
Podollan, goalie Marcel Cousineau and 
right wing Zdenek Nedved to the minors. 

Toronto wasn’t alone in the trade- 
deadline frenzy. 

In separate deals, the New York Is- 
landers traded Derek King to Hartford 
and Marty Mclnmsto Calgary . Both play- 
ers were forwards. The Islanders obtained 
a fifth-round 1997 draft pick from the 
Whalers for King and got a center, Robert 
ReicheL, from the Flames in exchange for 
Mclnnis and two other players. 

"We desperately needed someone in 
the middle to play on one of our first two 
lines," said the Islanders' general man- 
ager, Mike Mil bury. "Robert Reichel at 
center could give us some options." 


King was the second-leading scorer 
for the Islanders, with 23 goals and 30 
assists, while Mclnnis had 20 goals and 
22 assists. 

Reichel, who played last season in 
Europe following a contract dispute 
with Calgary, had 16 goals and 27 as- 
sists this season for the Flames. 

Meanwhile, the Edmonton Oilers 
sent a defenseman, Jeff Norton, to 
Tampa Bay for Drew Bannister. Norton 
was the fifth highest-paid Oiler this sea- 
son. ar SI .25 million. Norton has rwo 
goals and 11 assists, while Bannister, 
who is paid $350,000, has four goals 
and 13 assists. 

The Oilers also sent a forward. 
Miroslav Satan, to Buffalo for a de- 
fenseman, Craig Millar, and a left-wing- 
er, Barrie Moore. 

The Anaheim Mighty Ducks acquired 
a center. Richard Park, from the Pitts- 
burgh Penguins for a right-winger. Ro- 
man Oksiuta, and sent foe left-winger Jon 
Battaglia and a 1998 fourth-round draft 
pick to Hartford for center Mark Jans- 
sens. 

Hie Montreal Canadiens made two 
trades with the Phoenix Coyotes. Thev 
swapped defenseman Murray Baron 
and right-winger Chris Murray ro the 
Coyotes for the bruising defenseman 
Dave Manson. Montreal then sent its 
No. 3 goalie, Pat Jablonski. to Phoenix 
for a minor-league defenseman, Steve 
Cheredaryk. 


Skater’s Rise I 

And Fall: A 

Matter of Skill r 
And Politics 


By Ian Thomsen 

Imemationai Herald Tribune 


LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The.. 
Canadian is a two-time world cham- 
pion, he did nothing wrong, and hiT 
name is Elvis. Life should be grand -v 
or it would be. perhaps, in any other, 
sport but figure skating. 

Elvis Stojko was in fourth place after 
skating an almost flawless short program 
Wednesday in the World Champion^ 
ships. Fourth place, according to the 
unfatbomabiy political logic of the roles'. 



[Vtul ttaKb>4jK' F R*rul-» 


Newcastle was on the way out and 
could do nothing about it. 

When Bemabia curled a free kick into 
the top corner of the Newcastle goal 
after 65 minutes, the Monaco fans did 
not cheer — they laughed. It was not the 
sound Sir John wanted to be heard 
around Europe, especially not in a week 
when Newcastle United "shares are be- 
ing placed in London prior to a public 
flotation. For Monaco, that chuckling 
noise was the sound of cash rolling into 
foe casinos. 

In other UEFA Cup games, Tenerife 
of Spain defeated Bronoby of Denmark, 
2-0. advancing 2-1 on aggregate: Inter 
Milan downed Anderiecht of Belgium . 

2- 1. advancing 3-2 on aggregate: and 
Schalke 04 of Germany moved ahead, 

3- 1. on aggregate by drawing with 
Valencia of Spain. 1-1. 


1995 unless at least i 

currently ranked ahead of him slips, falU. 
or loses his nerve in an obvious way. . j 
The top three, beading into foe free’ ?■ 
skating program, worth two-thirds of 
tire final score Thursday night, are" 
Alexei Urmanov of Riissia, the Olympic 
and European champion: ■ .Todd 
Eldredge of the United Stales, the de-- . 
fending world champion, and Ilia Kulfle . 
a Russian who trains in Massachusetts. . - 
The skaters performed a similar pro-, 
gram Wednesday, but the ante will be 
upped Thursday when Urmanov, Kulik' ' 
and Stojko all attempt the risky quatfrupfe“ 
toe loop. Eldredge confirmed that be 
would not attempt the jump. ~ 

Eldredge was dressed in black like &. 
golfer on a cold day, his pullover flap-, 
ping in the breezes as he landed his 
opening combination of triples 
smoothly. . ; 

After recovering from a sprained ankle 
less than two weeks ago, he seemed 
confident of his chances even without a 
big jump. Eldredge also was in second . 
place at this stage last year. ~ 

Of the four contenders in the last ’ 
group Thursday. Eldredge will skate- 
after Kulik and Stojko and just ahead o£ 
Urmanov. ‘.j; 

Stojko was probably the least pro-. . 
vocative of the contenders on an ex^. 
ceptionaJ afternoon of short perfofc 
mances, but he has the greatest potentiaT 
to pull off an outlandish long program. 
Even if he were to earn perfect scores of 
6.0 from every judge, however, h£ 
might win nothing brighter than a silver 
medal, as long as Urmanov’s free per " 
form an ce is rated first or second by thfc. 
panel of nine international judges. 

Urmanov seized the first-round IeacF 
from Eldredge with tbe day’s most spec- 
tacular combination of athleticism and* 
grace. As for Kulik. he fell out of a tit 
with Eldredge because, arcanely, a BuK 
garian judge chose to rate Kulik behind 
Viacheslav Zagorodniuk of Ukraine. - 
One of the most interesting perfor- 
mances was Kulik ’s, who skated to mu- 
sic from "Faust,” dressed in dark red 
and black. "The music is like the devil,! 
and tbe costume is like tbe devil, tb&- b 
colors of blood and the dark," Kulik; 1 
said. "This is about the devil who 
buying the people's soul." Can it buy a 
judge’s soul? “It’s possible," he said,, 

* ‘especially with a good jump.' ’ -■ 


Forsberg Keeps 
Avalanche Rolling, 
Over the Canucks 


The Associated Press 
After an emotional victory over 
the Detroit Red Wings, the Col- 
orado Avalanche were ripe for a 
letdown, but Peter Forsberg 
wouldn't let it happen. 

Rushing up the ice, scrambling 
for the puck and exhibiting the ath- 
letic ability that makes him one of 
the National Hockey League’s best 
players. Forsberg scored a goal and 


NHL Roundup 


had two assists Tuesday nig 
lead the Avalanche over the vis 
Vancouver Canucks, 4-2. 

Claude Lemieux scored two i 
and Patrick Roy had 21 saves. 

Lemieux provided the final 
gin. taking a pass from Fors 
and beating goaltender C 
Hirsch at 14:54. 

"He’s foe best all-around p! 
V ve ’ P* a y®d with/’ Lemieux sa 
the 23 -year-old Forsberg. 

Forsberg seems finally to i 
returned to form after miss in 
games because of a severe t 

bruise that required surgery on! 

-8. He extended his point stres 
nme games as the Avalanche si 
their five-game season series 
the Canucks. 

Forsberg scored his 2 1 st goa 
Colorado at 2:47 of the first pei 
? le £” n g a pass from Bret Hed 
in front of the net and sending it 

- Stephane Yelle made ii 
at 17:36. 

Just 40 seconds later, ( 
Udjick scored his fifth goal ol 
season for the Canucks, his fir 
44 games. 

Pwnguiito 3, Sabres a In p 
burgh, Greg Johnson and 
UaedzTC scored third-period g 

Sr^ e i Un ? r T? nned Pen guins i 
for o nl y the third time ml 7 gai 

Mano Lemieux sal out his sec 

wTahin fi for "iff 
with a hip flexor injury, and Jarc 

fir,-*--? >* 

last 14 with a groin injuiy. 


,v 




ryut* l 










. PACK 3 


> IkAj — 

!‘ r< *ls on IfrucksStop 

u Hee fj ( Vancouver to 

ni End Tailspin 

By Mike Wise 

New York Times S ervice 

NEW YORK — They are nor back to 
where they were 10 days ago, but the 
New York Knicks exhibited enough ef- 

, ■ fort at Madison Square Garden to be 

. . • < = considered in the recovery phase. 

Service came from the Vancouver 
Grizzlies, who fell, 98-73, after putting 
up a decent scrap for three quartern on 
Tuesday night. 

The Grizzlies put up mare resistance 

than the Knicks did resolve. But then. 

MBA Roundup 

after what happened to Jeff Van 
Gundy’s team last week, no one in the 
Kmck locker room was compl ainin g 
. By not allowing the Grizzlies to score 
m the last 9 minutes 5 seconds, the 
Knicks avoided what could have been a 
disaster. Coming off embarrassing 
losses to Dallas and New Jersey last 
week. New York dealt Vancouver its 
14th straight loss and 30th in 34 games. 

And die Knicks won for the first time 
. V since beating Chicago on March 9. 

. The Knicks also recorded their 48th 
victory of the season, one more 
they had all of last season, with 16 
games to play. 

“We had to make sure we stopped the 
bleeding, ” said Patrick Ewing, whose 22 
points and 10 rebounds led everyone. 

In other games. The Associated Press 
reported: 

Raptors 117, 76ors 105 Marcus 
Camby scored a career-high 36 points 
and Damon Stoudamire had 30 points, 
12 assists and 10 rebounds to lead host 
Toronto over Philadelphia. Camby 
scored 16 points in the first quarter, 
making seven straight shots after miss- 
ing his first two. 

Rockets 97 , Nets B9 Reserves Sedale 
Thread and Eddie Johnson scored ] 1 
points each in the fourth quarter as vis- 
iting Houston halted New Jersey's two- 
game winning streak. 

< Clyde Drexler, playing only his 
second game since returning from a 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 

"" SPORTS 


PAGE 21 




l , / V-' • 

/ /sm 



I'ann I jfvirt' Agf Ocr IVwri hn»i 

Seattle’s Shawn Kemp slam dunking as Dennis Rodman looks on. 


hamstring injury, led the Rockets with 
23 points and 12 assists. 

Pacers 115, Tenbemolves 97 Reggie 
Miller scored 27 points, and Dale Davis 
had 23 and 13 rebounds as Indiana won 
at home. Rik Smits added 21 points for 
the Pacers, who shot 57 percent from the 
field and outrebounded the Timber- 
wolves, 41-26. 

BuHs89,SuperSonks87 In Chicago, 
Michael Jordan capped a 32-point, 18- 
rebound performance by hitting two 
free throws with three seconds left in 
overtime. 

Seattle's Hersey Hawkins, who earli- 
er hit two 3-pointers in overtime to give 
the Sonics an 86-83 lead, missed a shot 
at the buzzer and the Bulls escaped with 
their 25th straight home victory. 

Bufl«ts 86, Mavericks 85 Calbert 
Cheaney's lay-up with 1 _5 seconds left 


on a pass from Chris Webber-, gave 
Washington its fifth straight road win. 

Clippers 121 , Suns ill Rodney Ro- 
gers scored 11 of his 21 points in the 
fourth quarter and host Los Angeles took 
a two-game lead on Phoenix in the race 
for the No. 8 playoff spot in the West. 
Kevin Johnson had a season-high 37 
points and 10 assists for the Suns, who 
were denied a fourth straight victory. 

Trail Blazers 92, Kings 87 Kenny An- 
derson scored all 22 of his points in the 
second half to lead host Portland over 
Sacramento. It was die Trail Blazers' 
10th straight victory. 

It is the Blazers’ longest winning 
streak since they won a club-record 16 
in a row at the end of the 1990-91 
season. The 10-game run is the longest 
current winning streak in the NBA and 
the fourth-longest in franchise history. 


Notre Dame Sprints Past TCU 


The Associated Press 

Notre Dame’s coach, John MacLeod, 
has been saying all season that his team 
can run. Now maybe someone will take 
him seriously. 

Texas Christian can run and gun with 
the best of them, but it was Notre Dame 
that sprinted to an 82-72 victory Tues- 
day night in the second round of the 
National Invitational Tournament in 
South Bend, Indiana. 

“We want to run and open the floor up 
and take some pressure off the half-court 
game.” MacLeod said. “It’s not every 
day you have the opportunity to get out 
and make the right connections.” 

Pat Garrity led Notre Dame with 20 
points. Pete Miller, who was 5-of-6 
from 3-point range, added 16 for the 
Irish (16-13). 

Notre Dame didn’t give TCU (22-13 ) 
any time to set its defense, whipping 
passes down the court for easy lay-ups 
and dunks. 

TCU, meanwhile, never got its of- 
fense out of neutral. The Homed Frogs, 
who trailed 35-23 at the half, shot only 
34 percent for the game. They closed to 


78-72 on a 3-pointer from Prince Fowler 
with nine seconds left, but it was too 
late. 

The Frogs had to travel to Noire 
Dame even though they had a better 
record than the Irish and drew a bigger 
crowd in the first round. 

After the teams traded the lead in the 
opening minutes. Garrity broke loose, 

NIT Basketball 

and Notre Dame didn’t trail again. He 
scored six points in a 1 2-2 run that gave 
the Irish a 21-12 lead with 1 1:30 left in 
foe first half. 

The Frogs stepped it up in the second 
half, as Damion Walker scored all but 
two of his 1 6 points. But the Irish had an 
answer for everything. When Garrity 
was covered. Miller worked himself 
free. Phil Hickey added 1 3 points and 1 2 
rebounds. 

In the quarterfinals, it will be 
Michigan at Notre Dame. Florida State 
at West Virginia, University of Nevada/ 
Las Vegas at Arkansas and Nebraska at 
Connecticut. 


Connecticut 63, Bvadtoy 47 In Stores. 
Connecticut, Richard Hamilton scored 
24 points for UConn (16-14) and 
sparked a decisive 16-5 run midway 
through foe second half. Bradley's star. 
Anthony Parker, finished with 25 points 
but was shut out in foe final 12 minutes. 
Kevin Freeman added 15 points for 
UConn, which won foe NIT m 1988- 

Mi c hi gan 75, Oklahoma State 65 In 
Ann Arbor. Michigan, Louis Bullock hit 
six 3-pointers and scored 28 points as 
Michigan (21-11) beat Oklahoma State 
(17-15). Bullock, a sophomore guard 
who already holds Michigan's career 3- 
point record, made a pair of 3-pointers 
during a 9-3 run that gave the Wolverines 
their biggest lead. 69-50. Chianti Roberts 
led Oklahoma State with 19 points. 

Nabrasfut 78, Nevada 68 Mikki 

Moore had 2 1 points and 15 rebounds as 
defending champion Nebraska beat host 
Nevada in Reno. Tyronn Lue scored 18 
points and Bernard Gamer 17 for the 
Comhuskers ( 18-14), who never trailed 
before a record crowd of 1 12175. Paul 
Culbertson scored 1 7 points for Nevada 
( 21 - 10 ). 


Boxer Aims to Clean Up His Act 


By Gerald Eskenazi 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — What to call An- 
drew Golota’s next fight? “Look Out 
Below” and “No Holds Barred” 
were rejected as being in poor taste, 
the promoter Dino Duva said. 

when Golota faces Ray Mercer on 
May 16 at Madison Square Garden, it 
will be Golota's first fight since 
December, when he was disqualified 
fra 1 continually hitting Riddick Bowe 
below the belt. 

Lou Duva. Golota’s trainer, is con- 
cerned foal the Polish-bom heavy- 
weight has a habit he can't break: be 
fights dirty. 

“He didn't go to a psychiatrist, but 
I did, ” Du va said T uesday . * *1 went to 
a couple. I went to football coaches. 
How do I get this kid to stop hitting 


below foe belt?” Duva said foe psy- 
chiatrists told him, “It goes back to 
his childhood." 

Golota, 29, bom in Warsaw, was a 
street kid who always got into fights. 

Duva painted a picture of a frus- 
trated Golota who becomes a street 
fighter when things go wrong. “In 
training, when be does something like 
that, I yell at him and he says. Tm 
stupid.’ and he punches himself in the 
head.” Duva said. “I try to talk to him 
to educate him. I tty to tell him this is 
America. It's not the streets of 
Warsaw.” 

For Golota, who has a 28-2 record 
with 25 knockouts, this could be his 
last shot at respectability. Mercer (24- 
4-1, 16 knockouts) has fought three of 
foe world's most experienced fighters 
in foe last two years, going foe dis- 
tance in each bout. Mercer, who turns 


36 next month, lost to Evander Holy- 
field and Lennox Lewis; in December, 
he defeated Tim Witherspoon, who is 
45-5 with 30 knockouts. 

Golota cannot explain the rain of 
low blows that he showered on Bowe 
in their two fights. Golota said he 
would hold his hands higher, making 
it more difficult for him to punch 
below the belt. 

What Golota also cannot explain is 
why he can take a punch so well. 
“Some guys are dedicated to foe 
sport,” Golota said in describing his 
toughness. “Conditioning is foe most 
important thing.” 

Golota understands that he will be 
watched closely, and the Garden and 
cable-television audiences are un- 
likely to support him if he fights dirty 
again. “I nave to prove I can fight 
clean.” he said. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Baoebjul 

TMBVSMUHI 

New Yqrt/Aetol. Atlanta], tttantags 
Hanson 4 Montreal 2 

Phitadetpnio & Kansas CBy 5 

Teas X Si Louis 1 

Las Angeles 5, Battmore4 to innings 

Chicoga Witte Soil Boston 2. 13 Innings 

Now Yam Yankees 3. Taranto 1 

seotflfrUtCMcpgoCub s a. 

Oakland 5, Anaheim 4 
Cincinnati 9, OcvekHM 5 
San rrondsoo IZ Son Dtego 3 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


NEWEST OtVBfON 



w 

L 

Pet 

SB 

»-Utnh 

49 

17 

.742 

— 

x -Houston 

44 

22 

JtJ 

S 

Minnesota 

32 

33 

en 

16% 

Dados 

22 

43 

538 

26* 

Denver 

19 

46 

592 

79V, 

Son Antonio 

16 

49 

■246 

J2Vi 

Vancouver 

11 

57 

.162 

39 

PACIFIC DIVISION 



K-5eaffle 

45 

20 

-692 

— . 

x-LA. Lakers 

44 

21 

577 

1 

Parttood 

39 

28 

582 

7 

LA. Glppers 

28 

36 

538 

16V) 

Soanmento 

28 

38 

424 

17V, 

Phoenix 

27 

39 

409 

18 

GoktonSUe 

25 

40 

585 

20 

x<flnchad pkryoft spot 





Mtaml 

New York 

Orlando 

Washington 

New Jersey 

Philadelphia 

36sWn 

*-Cmcaga 

Detroit 

Aitanto 

Chortane 

Otuetond 

iniflpna 

Milwaukee 

Toronto 


ATLANTIC DtVKOON 
W L 

48 17 

48 18 

36 29 

32 34 

20 45 

17 48 

13 54 

CENTRAL HVBlOM 

57 9 

47 IB 
44 22 

42 24 

35 29 

31 34 

27 38 

24 43 


Pd GB 

738 — 

-727 Vi 

-554 12 

<485 16V4 
-308 28 
.262 31 
.194 36 


J23 91* 

JbSJ 13 
.636 15 

.547 21 
477 »* 
.415 29fc 
.364 33 


TumunraKsoLis 

PMndefcNa 20 17 33 35— las 

Tomato 33 23 33 2*-ro 

P: Iverson *-19 9-11 2* Coleman 9-20 7-8 
25 ; T: Camby 16-25 4-4 36. Staudamlm 9-16 
11-12 3a Reftoawte— Pttflodeiplito 51 
(Catennn 16), Toronto 56 (Orrtsfie, 
Stoudamire 101- Assists— PMndelpMa 23 
(hereon u», Toronto 28 (Stoudamba 12). 
Vteaom 18 27 18 10- 73 

New York 22 3S 24 17- 98 

V: Abdur-Rdfcn 7-17 *918, Anlhcny2-56- 
6 1 1} N.Y.: Bring 1 1-21 M 22, Storks 6-121- 
1 16. RebouNs— VhncswMr49 (A.WDUotns 
9V, New York « (OeMey IS). 
Assists— Vancouver 30 (Anthony 7), New 
York 35 (CMds 7). 

Houston 18 29 18 32— 97 

New Jersey 26 15 25 23- *9 

H: D rater 9-16 1-2 23, WWIs 6-14 2-2 K 
Otalwnn 7-15 041 R NJ-- GM 7-17 5-5 2a 
Jndsson 7-15 -M 20. Reborn*— Houston 46 
(Ototowan 151, New Jersey 62 (Montrass 18). 


Assists— Houston 31 (Drexler 121, New 
Jersey 19 (Cassell 6). 

Minnesota 22 22 28 75— 97 

lodtapa 29 22 38 26—115 

M: Robinson 9-16 2-2 76, Garnett 9-19 3-2 
2ft I: MfOer 9-16 64 27. D.DovtS 1 D-14 3-3 23. 
Rebo u nds M innesota 33 (Porks 5), Indiana 
51 (D-Davts 131. Assists — Minnesota 76 
(Marbury 71, indtano 32 Unckson 17). 
Seattle 22 24 14 18 9-87 

CMcogo 20 23 16 19 11— 89 

5: Hawkins 0-1 4 2-2 23 Kemp 6-15 4- 7 lot 
fc.tatlonlO-20 12-13 32 Langley 8-170-2 16. 
Rebounds— Seattle 52 (Payton 12). Cbtccso 
64 (Jordan 18). Assists— Seattle 22 (Payton 
141. Ctdcogo 21 (Pippen 7). 

Washington 16 17 31 22— 86 

Dados 19 18 23 25- 85 

WiWebber8-143-52a Howard 5-167-7 17; 
D: Finley 7-14 3-» 1L Bradley 5-10 2-2 12 
Walter 5-9 2-3 12 Peek 4-7 4-4 12 
Rebounds— Washington 54 (Howard 14). 
Dalis 44 (Green IT). A s sists- WbsMWflton 
17 NUMcfcland 5). Dodos 16 (Pack 7). 

LA. CSppers 31 25 25 40-121 

Phoenix 27 22 22 40-111 

l_A^ Rogers 0-1 3 3-3 21, Martin 7-1 5 2-2 2ft 
P: Johnson 10-20 17-18 37, Manning B-15 1-1 
18. Otopmon 6-17 3-4 1& Rebounds— Lus 
Angeles 51 (Vaught 18). Phoenix 51 
(CebaHos 131. Assists— Los Angeles 33 
(Seaiy. Barry 6), Phoenix 19 (Johnson 10). 
Soawaeato 8 30 25 24- 87 

Parttand 22 22 22 26- 92 

S: Richmond 11-23*429, WKSamsan 4-52- 
41ft P; Anderson 7-155-6 22, Wolloce 6-11 3- 
4 15. Reboetuto— Soenrmento 39 (Poiynice 
8). Portend 48 (Sabotds 9). 
Assists— Sacramento 20 (Edney 6), Portland 
16 (Anderson 8). 


NCAA Women’s 
Tournament 

REGIONAL SOUR HALS DRAW 
SATURDAY, MARCH 22 
MIDWEST 
Connecticut vs. IBnois 
Coton: rises. Tennessee 
EAST 

Norm Caroline vs. George Washington 
Notre Dome vs. Ala bo ma 

WUT 

Stanford is. Virg into 
Georgia vs. vanaerbat 

MIDEAST 

Old Dominion vs. LSU 
Florida vs. Louisiana Tech 


SOCCER 


UEFA Cup 

QUARTERFINALS. RETURN LEG 
Burnaby IF (DenmnriG 0. Tenerife (Spain) 2 
(Tenerife won on 2-7 aggregate) 
Irdemaztonale Mflan (holy) 2. RSC Ander- 
ledrt l Belgium) 1 

(imernazianole won on 3-2 aggregate) 
Monaco (France) 3, Newc as tle (England) a 
(Menaas won an 4-g aggregate 
Vatendo (Spain] l.Schofte 04 (Gennany) 1, 
(SehaUre 04 on 3-1 aggregate) 
URlRMAnONAL PRKNM.Y 
TUeSOAY.MUMZ. AUSTRIA 
Austria a Slovenia 2 

■HOUSM Pfisum UtAAUI 
Wimbledon 1. west Homl 
tfndin— r Manchester United 60. Uv- 
erpool 57. Arsenal 57, Newcasde 51 , Sheffield 
Wednesday eg, Aston VBa 47, Chelsea 46, 
Wimbledon 4& Leeds 40, Tottenham 38, Le- 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


kestor 37. Blackburn 36, Everion 36. Derby 
32. Sunderkmd 32, West Ham 3ft Coventry 3ft 
Nofflngnam Forest 29. Southampton 26. Mid- 
dlesbrough 2S. 


1 HOCKEY | 

NHL Standings 

KASTDtH COMPBLDM 

ATLANTIC DlVlSJOfr 

1 



W L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

x-PWkidefohia 

39 21 10 

88 

236 

184 

X-Kew Jersey 

38 20 12 

88 

198 

161 

Horida 

32 23 16 

B0 

192 

168 

N.Y. Rangers 

33 29 9 

75 

229 

200 

Washington 

S3S 7 

63 

179 

197 

Tempo Bay 

27 35 7 

61 

157 

217 

N.Y. Istanders 

24 36 10 

58 

192 

208 

NORTHEAST DIVISION 




W L T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Buffalo 

37 22 11 

85 

210 

I7B 

Pittsburgh 

33 30 7 

73 

243 

236 

Hartford 

27 33 10 

64 

193 

219 

Montreal 

25 32 14 

64 

215 

245 

Ottawa 

23 33 14 

60 

193 

206 

Boston 

24 38 9 

S7 

206 

*4 

ffuiiw CMHinr 

CENTRAL DIVISION 




W L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

X- Donas 

41 23 6 

88 

215 

171 

Detrod 

33 21 15 

81 

221 

165 

Phaenbc 

33 33 5 

71 

204 

213 

St. Louts 

30 32 9 

69 

209 

218 

Chicago 

28 31 12 

68 

186 

100 

Toronto 

26 38 6 

58 

204 

238 

RACtnc DIVISION 




W L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

x-Colorado 

44 18 9 

97 

244 

173 

Edmonton 

32 32 7 

71 

221 

215 

Anaheim 

29 30 11 

69 

203 

201 


Colgray 30 34 8 60 191 202 

Vancouver 29 38 4 62 220 244 

Las Angeles 25 37 9 S9 188 233 

SanJoGe 23 39 7 53 177 231 

x-dlnched p layoff spat: 

INMY'I IHHIf 
Buffalo 0 2 1-3 

Pittsburgh 0 2 3-5 

First Period: None, Second P erio d. P- 
Hatcher 13 (Mudea Nedved) (pp). Z P- 
Johnson 10. X B-Peco 18 CAu detie. Dowel 
[ppl-LB-Grasek 15 (DawelThM Period: P- 
Johman 1 T (Mu ben) 6, p-DDedHc 8 (Hicks. 
Christian) 7, B-, BarrxAy 18 (SmeMk. 
Audette) ft P -Moron 2 (Hiddteri ten). Shots 
00 goto: B- 106-10-26. P- 6-15-12-33. 
GocRsk B-ShJetds. P-Wregget Lalbne. 
Vancouver 1 1 8-4 

comrade 2 l 1-4 

Fbst Period: C-Fasberg 21. 2, C-Yetle 8 
Oxrcrotx. Kennel X V-C<SJfck 5 (Mogtay. 
Walter) Second Period: C-Lemfeux 10 
(Kamensky. Foreberg) (pp). 5. V-Rltfey 20 
(Babydv Aucrttv) ThW period: C-Lemtoux 
11 (Forsbag) Shots aa goafcV- W-7— 23.C- 
11-9-11-31. C o ntes. V-HUseh. C-ftoy. 


SKATING 


Would Championship 

LAUSANNE. SWTT2ZRLAND 


1. Mandy WotozeVtnga Steuer. Germany 05 

2. Marino EfeowYAndrel Bushkov, Russ. 1J) 
X Pena BenehnakVA. Stkhreutkta Russ.1 J 

4. Jend MenoTTodd Sand, Ui 2X 

5. Kyoto maUason Dungten. Ui. 25 

& Oksana Kazokovof Artur Dmtttev, Russ. 10 


7, Sarah AbBtxd/Stephane BertMdfc, Fra. 35 
ft Kristy SargeonVKrls Wlrtz, Canada 4 JO 
P.PeggySrimmz/MbkoMueter, Gann. 45 
la Maikma KhaltuitoWA. Kroutee, Kax. 5J) 

1 1. Dorota ZoparekafMorfcjR Stodek. PoL 55 

12. SBvfa Dhnltrova/RlCD Rex. Gennany 6J) 
135tophonfeStleglec'J. Zk iH neni xiiL U5. 65 
14. Shen XurYZhao Hongba Chino 70 

1& MartoOcnide Savanf-Gagnon/Luc Bro- 
det. Canada 75 


). Alexei urmonov (Russia) 05 
2. Todd El dredge U5J 1.0 
X Ilya Kullk (Russia) 15 
4. EMs Stolko (Canada) 2J) 

5L Alexei Yagudin (Russia) 25 

6. Vlodteslav ZogororMuk (Ukraine) id 

7. Takeshi Honda (Japan) 35 

8. Mlchaal ShmerkIR (Israel) IQ 

9. MkJtoel Wete (U.5J 45 

10L Andrei Vhiscsnko (Germany) 50 

1 1. Jeff Langdon (Canada) 55 

12. igorPashtevtdi (AarboHan) 60 
li Eric MlUot (France) 65 

14. Konstantin Kostin (Latvia) 7 j 0 
15 Stebotcs Vkbrt (Hungary) 75 


TRANSITIONS 


NATIONAL HOCXEV LEAGUE 
anaheim— T raded LW Jan Battaglia and a 
1996 <otv- round draff pick to Hartford tar C 
Mark Janssens. 

BVFFALb-TraikdDCnNgAMarand LW Ba- 
rrie Moore to Edmonton for F Miroslav Srdan. 

calgary— Traded D jomle Husaoft to 
Tampa Bay forGTyier Moss. Traded D More 
Hussey to Chicago far LW Ravo Gusmanw. 


Detroit— A nnounced the retirement of 0 
Mike Ramsey. 

EDUOntoh- T raded D Jeff Notion toToro- 
pa Bay tor D Drew Bannister. 

HARTFORD— Traded RW Kelly Chou to 
Toronto tar a 1998 eth-raund draft pick. 

los ANGELES— Traded F Eddie Olczyk to 
Pittsburgh (or RW Glen Murray. 

MONTREAL— T reded D Murray Boron trod 
RW Chris Murray to Phoenix tor D Dave Man- 
son. Traded G Pot Jabtanskl to Phoenix tar D 
Steve Cheredaryk. 

NEW JERSEY— Oolmed Outs LI Puma off 
waivers from the Son Jose Sharia. 

NEW YOU isunders— A cquired C Robert 
ReKbel from Calgary tor LW Many Mdnnls, 
G Tyrone Gamer and a 1997 6ifwoMid draff 
pick. Traded LW Derek King to Hartford tar 
1997 Sth -round draff pick. 

OTTAWA— Traded F Dennis Chosse. 0 
Kevin Boabruck and a 1998 dth-round draff 
pick to Chicago far RW Mite Prakapac. 

pH OENK— Traded RW arris Murray to 
Hartford tar D Gerald Dlduck. Signed RW 
Jocelyn Lemleux for Iheremotnderar season 

Pittsburgh— T raded C Richard Park to 
Anaheim far RW Roman Okstuta. 

st. louis— S igned F Pnvol Demton to a 
muni year arttiact. 

san Jose MARKS-Oatmed D Chris 
UPuma off waivers Mm New Jersey. 

Totroino-Slgned RW Mike Johnson. 
Traded C Khk Muderto Ftortdo tar RW Jason 
Podonon. Traded D Larry Murphy to Detroit 
tar future arnsl deratio n s. 

Vancouver— O olmed D Stove Stolos off 
wahefs from Boston. Traded F Josef Be- 
nmek to Pltisburgh for future considerations, 
and D Frantisek Kucera to PnHaddpWo tor 
future considerations. 

COUBM 

PORT VALLEY st. — H omed James Kent 
Scharrifleld tootoaK coach. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Smoking on Trial 


W ASHINGTON — The 
battle against smoking 
continues. The most recent 
playing field was Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, where 
the tobacco 
companies de- 
fended them- 
selves against 
the FDA. 

Once again 
the cigarette 
lawyers were 
forced to tty to 

S* £ Bucbwald 

smoking is good for us — with 
an assist, of course, from Sen- 
ator Jesse Helms. 

Here are the facts: The to- 
bacco people claim that nicot- 
ine is not addictive. They say 
that one cigarette does not 
lead to another even when 
you sit in the smoking 

Robert Wilson: 
Debut at the Met 

New York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK— The Met- 
ropolitan Opera is to 
present two company premi- 
eres and three new produc- 
tions during the 1997-98 sea- 


m * i ■‘liliiii i*l f 


and set designer Robert 
Wilson, known for his strik- 
ing productions, is to make 
his first appearance at the Met 
with a new staging of Wag- 
ner’s “Lohengrin. ” 

The new operas for the Met 
will be Rossini's “Cener- 
entola" and Richard Strauss’ 
“Capriccio,” while the new 
productions will be Stravin- 
sky’s “Rake's Progress” and 
Samt-Saens' “Samson et Da- 
li la” as well as “Lohengrin.” 

The season is to open Sept. 
22 with Levine conducting a 
revival of Bizet's “Carmen.” 
Levine is also to conduct the 
house premiere of “La 
Ceneremola,” on Ocl 16. 


section of Afghan Airlines. 

The anti-smoking crowd, 
which includes die states and 
federal government, are tired 
of paying the health bills of 
smokers, and they say, “Why 
don’t they show the Marlboro 
man coughing when be rides 
into the sunset? The cigarette 
companies lie about their re- 
search and are spending mil- 
lions of dollars in advertising 
to convince young people that 
Joe Camel is the only one they 
can trust/' 

Name-calling is a big part 
of the battle. A defrocked sci- 
entist fired by a large tobacco 
company called his outfit 
“Merchants of Death" and 
was sued by his bosses for 
revealing a trade secret. 

The anti-mbac people 
main tain that the major cost 
of smoking goes for radiation 
equipment and hospital tents 
in hospitals. "Not so," say 
the filter people. “You can 
get just as sick sticking your 
□ose under the exhaust pipe of 
an 18- wheeler.” 


The tobacco moguls warn 
that if they are forbidden to sell 
cigarettes in the United States 
they will export them to the 




market that welcomes "safe, 
high quality American 
products.” 

The pro-tobacco types are 
worried that those countries 
desperate for cigarettes will 
start manufacturing their own, 
which could have a very neg- 
ative effect on the Asian Vir- 
ginia Slims Tennis Tourna- 
ment. 

Nobody knows how the 
judge in Greensboro is going 
to rule because as many as 14 
states are currently suing the 
tobacco companies. If they 
win, it will be the first time that 
the feds have been perceived 
as not letting Jesse Helms 
blow smoke out of their ears. 


The Art Nun: Sister Wendy’s Contemplative life 


By Fred Barbash 

Washington Post Service 

L ONDON — “I’ve never met 
anyone quite in my situation,’ ’ 
Sister Wendy Beckett said. 
Neither, it is safe to suggest, has 
anyone else. 

Sister Beckett spends most of 
her time in a small trailer in the 
woods behind a Carmelite mon- 
astery, leading a life of silent 
solitude. She rises at 3 in the morn- 
ing, prays about seven hours a day 
and then reads and writes. It’s been 
roughly the same routine for about 
30 years — except that during the 
last six years she has emerged from 
time to time to appear in television 
productions about art and has be- 
come a celebrity here. 

When she sits in restaurants — 
giving interviews to journalists — 
people stare and whisper. "Isn’t 
that the art nun over there?” “Yes, 
I'm sure it is.” 

Sister Beckett is indeed “the an 
nun.” Her latest production — 
"Sister Wendy’s Story of An" — 
will air this autumn in the United 
States on public television. 

Sister Beckett’s story of the critic 
Sister Wendy is less about an than 
what she calls “this mysterious me- 
dium” of television and its en- 
counter -with its own antithesis: A 
woman, plucked from another 
world, who had never watched TV, 
never been on it, who looks, acts and 
talks like no one who has, who 
shows up on the air one day and 
before loqg becomes a phenome- 
non. 

She does this without changing 
an iota of her style or look. No 
makeovers. No rehearsals. No 
script No cue cards or TeJePrompT- 
exs. She is in her 60s and looks it 
She wears a full habit. Her teeth are 
too big for her mouth, her glasses 
too large for her face, her elocution 
wanting, with the R ’s coming out as 
W’s, Ehner Fudd style. 

She brings instead a vibrant 
childlike wonder about art and 
artists, knowledge of her subject 
and a gift for storytelling. To bor- 
row from the terminology of art. 


Sister Beckett is a television “prim- 
itive/’ Sister Beckett is also per- 
plexing. In one breath, she says she 
really does not like her new life but 
that it is a ‘ ‘sheer pleasure.” 

She says she really does not like 
being around people but nonethe- 
less loves meeting them. Physically 
weak — she sometimes uses a 
wheelchair and must lean on 
someone when she walks — she 
insists (hat she is a “worn-out 
hulk” and will be “glad when it's 
all over and I can just live in the 
trailer again.” But she is contem- 
plating yet another venture, on 
sculpture. 

Wendy Beckett was bom in 
South Africa, where her father was 
a bank clerk who wanted to be a 
doctor. When she was 2 the family 
moved to Edinburgh, where her 
father studied medicine, returning 
to South Africa a few years later. "I 
can't remember a time when I 
didn’t want to be a nun,” she says. 
“I know, from when I was 3 or 4, 
that I was aware of God.” 

After attending a Roman Cath- 
olic boarding school, she entered a 
convent of the Sisters of Notre 
Dame, a teaching order. “I was 16 
and silly. My idea of being a nun. 
was that 1 was going to spend a life 
praying. And with incredible stu- 
pidity 1 entered with the asters who 
are teaching, never realizing that 
this meant 1 would have to be a 
teacher." 

That did not stop her from asking 
the order for permission to lead the 
contemplative life anyway, but she 
was too good a student and was sent 
to Oxford University, where she 
studied English and earned the 
highest accolade available. A pro- 
fessor she knew, JJLR. Tolkien, 
wanted her to teach at Oxford, but 
in those days, she said, nuns did not 
do that sort of thin g . They taught in 
schools, which she did until, at 
about age 35. she started to have 
epileptic seizures. 

“I thought I needed something 
different,” she said. “And the order 
said I was right. ‘You can lead a life 
of prayer/ they told me. so in 1970 
the Carmelite nuns agreed to put me 



Sister Wendy in Rome for her "Grand Tour” show. 


up in this trailer on their grounds.” 

The reverend mother approved 
but reminded Sister Beckett mat die 
order was pressed for money and 
could she, perhaps, earn some? 

She sold a book proposal — on 
contemporary female artists — and 
published the first of what would be 
13 books, including a companion to 
“Sister Wendy's Story of Art," 
which has now sold half a million 
copies. 

Among those who saw, and 
liked, her writing was Nicholas 
Rossiter, a producer in the arts di- 


vision of the BBC. "I asked her to 
do a documentary on the National 
Gallery,” he says. "I thought it 
would be interesting to have some- 
body who had never been there.” 

Sister Beckett, you see, had done 
virtually all her study of art without 
ever leaving the trailer. When asked 
to write on an exhibit, she would 
have the staff send Iter postcards of 
the art. or photographs or books, and 
she would base her writing on those. 
The BBC’s mission. Rossiter said, 
“was to make these six tiny, ex- 
quisite films of pictures she had 


never seen and then capture .her ex- 
periencing them for the first time.".: 

As she looked at the paintings, . 
before filming began, ‘ ^something, 
very intense happened,” Rossiter 
said. "You’d suddenly find her ■ 
miking to the artist ‘Now, dear . 
Rubens, I think you're quite good,' 
and then suddenly she’d be giving 
him a dressing down. She sees ' 
these painters as living people; ft 
was a breath of fresh air, with none 
of the attitudes that critics bring.” 

The first series was called “Sis- 
ter Wendy’s Odyssey.” “The 
audiences were 2 to 4 million/' 
Rossiter said, "as big an audience 
as BBC 2 the higher-brow of the ■ 
two national BBC stations, can get. - 
Something had captured the ima- 
gination of die public.” There foJ- ' 
lowed "Sister Wendy’s Grand 
Tour" and now “Sister Wendy’s 
Story of Art.” which has already 
aired in England. I 

Some TV and art critics don’t I 
really like Sister Wendy. "Once 
again,” Victor Lewis-Smith wrote , 
in the Evening Standard of. the 
“Story of Painnng," “the peripat- 
etic nun is proving to the nation that r 
her knowledge of art is thoroughly, 
unremarkable. So why is. she. 
presenting yet another series when 
many others could do it far. better?.. 
Because TV loves eccentric nups,. . 
that’s why — singing, flytng-.-dan-: ’ 
ring, buck-toothed — anything.”.;. 

"It’s not that her charms are 
undetectable,” Thomas Sutcliffe 
wrote in the Independent “Rattier 
that they are so conspicuous as to - 
almost obscure the objects she' 
stands beside. When she points out, 
discussing the illustration for Feb-' 
ruary in toe *Tres Riches Heines,’ ~ 
that the figures before the fire have, 
exposed their genitals, it is less an : ; 
occasion for respectful observation/ 
than for a popular party-turn — - the ;. 
Nun Who Wasn’t Embarrassed.”^/ 

"I use toe words that come nafc^ 
urally,” Sister Beckett says.:"f> 
haven’t any idea of areas of dang#' 
or misunderstanding. I'm abso*“ 
lutely astonished and bewildered to . 
find people commenting on my de- 
light in a naked body.” 


wr\ 7 ■ L ■ VI rs*: . 



PEOPLE 


M ORE than 1.000 fans mobbed a 
motorcade carrying toe body of die 
rap superstar Notorious BJ.G., causing 
pandemonium in the impoverished New 
York City neighborhood where toe slain 
musician once lived. The motorcade fol- 
lowed funeral services in Manhattan for 
the 24-year-old rapper, whose real name 
was Christopher Wallace. He was 
killed in a drive -by shooting in Los 
Angeles on March 9. The procession 
bearing his body was led by four flower- 
filled cars, one with the letters BI.G. 
spelled out in red carnations, through toe 
Fort Greene and Bedford-Stuyvesant 
neighborhoods of Brooklyn, where Wal- 
lace grew up and was a drag dealer before 
finding success in the music industry. 
Police clad in riot gear and helmets tried 
to keep order, and some sprayed tear gas 
at die crowd. Four police officers and two 
civilians were hospitalized, and a half 
dozen people, including a reporter, were 
arrested on disorderly conduct and other 
misdemeanor charges. 


Jon Lrvj i/Agencr Km f«i [*ir«— 

A T-shirt tribute to Notorious B J.G. during the funeral procession. 


Frank 


□ 

McCourt's 


“Angela’s 


Ashes.” a bittersweet memoir of his 
childhood in the slums of Limerick. Ire- 
land, won in the biography and auto- 
biography category at the National Book 
Critics Circle Awards. The Critics Circle 
named Gina Berriault’s "Women in 
Their Beds.” a collection of 35 short 
stories, the winner in the fiction cat- 
egory, and Jonathan Ration was named 
the winner in the general nonfiction cat- 
egory for "Bad Land: An American 
Romance.” Robert Hass was the win- 
ner in die poetry category' for “Sun Un- 
der Wood,” and William Gass won the 
criticism award for “Finding a Form.” 


The movie action hero Jackie Chan 
joined about 150 recording and film 
artists Wednesday in a demonstration 
against a proposed law in Hong Kong 
that they say will devastate the industry. 
The government has proposed that re- 
cords, compact disks and videos can be 
distributed by companies other than those 
bolding the copyrights on them, and the 
legislature now is considering the 
change. The protesters outside the leg- 


islature said the move would encourage 
piracy, already a serious problem m 
Hong Kong and China. 


A jury has ruled in favor of Michael 
Jackson in a suit by five former em- 
ployees alleging that’ they were wrong- 
fully dismissed because of their cooper- 
ation in a child molestation investigation. 
Jackson's successful countersuit claimed 
that two of the former workers stole 
sketches, personal notes, hats, toys and 
candy from the ranch, selling some Items 
to tabloid newspapers, and those two 
plaintiffs were ordered to pay Jackson 
560,000 in damages. 


British bookmakers have installed 
the romantic epic “The English Pa- 
tient” as the favorite to win the 
Academy Award for best film at the 
annual ceremony on Monday. Anthony 
Minghella’s film, which received 12 
Oscar nominations, was mack the odds- 
on favorite at 1-6, with “Shine" a dis- 
tant second choice at 1 1-2. ‘ ‘This is the 


shortest-priced favorite I can remem- 
ber.’ ’ said Simon Clare, spokesman for 
Ladbrokes. "We have had about. 
£50,000 [$80,000] wagered in bets. 
Several of them are people working 
within the film industry.” “Fargo” at 
7-1, "Jerry Maguire” at 10-1 and 
“Secrets ALies” at 25=- 1 are the other 
films nominated for best picture. 


The Society of Singers has a special 
birthday present for Lena Horne — the 
EUa Award for Lifetime Achievement, 
which wiO be presented during a concert 
at the JVC Jazz Festival on June 23 — a 
week before Home’s 80th birthday. The 
Ella Award was named for its first 
honoree, Ella Fitzgerald, in 1989. 


A fast-moving fire destroyed a turn 1 , 
of-the-century house in Montauk, New 
York, owned by the former talk show ) 
host Dick Cave ft. Only a chimney was 
left standing, the fire department saidl 
No one was injured in the blaze and toe 
cause is under investigation.