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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON 




jj The World’s Dally Newspaper 


London, Thursday, March 27, 1997 




No. 35.480 


High Demand 
For Tall Men 

U.S. Schools Comb World 
For Basketball Potential 


By Marc Fisher and Ken Deniinger 

• Wl nluHfiltVi Post Sen ic t 


Lloyd Ukwu, a Washington lawyer, was back in his 
native land of Nigeria, on the hum for height. 

His driver guided him along rutted roads, through 
hardscrabble villages, until the lawyer's back ached. 
Suddenly. Ukwu spied something of great promise: a 
ragged basketball hoop. 

* 'I said to the woman of the house, “Madam, why is that 
here?" ' Ukwu recalls. The woman said that her boy liked 
to play the game. Ukwu asked how tall he was. “WelL" 
the mother said, "he bends down to get into the house." 

That was enough for Ukwu to "suck around until 
evening, when the son showed up. He measured 6 feet 10 
on the tape Ukwu always carried. Ukwu said he called his 
contact at George Washington University in Washington 
D.C. who jumped to help. It helped the Nigerian win a 
visa — writing to the U.S. ambassador to Nigeria — and 
recommended a U.S. high school. 

Even so, the Nigerian, Obinna Ekezie, eventually 
chose to play for the University of Maryland, where he is 
the starling center. 

For hundreds of very tall foreigners, the hardcourts of 
U.S. high school, college and professional basketball 
seem to be paved with gold. 

The roster of foreign players in Division I of men’s 
college basketball jumped from an estimated 144 in 1992 
to 243 last year, according to the most recent National 
Collegiate Athletic Association study. Among Division I 
women's teams, the number of foreigners increased from 
75 to 158 over the same period. 

In this year’s NCAA men’s tournament, there were 62 
foreign players on 37 teams. Of those 62 players. 35 were 
6 foot 9 inches (2.05 meters) or taller. Two of the teams in 
the Final Four have foreign playeTs; North Carolina has 
four, Kentucky one. All of those players are 6-9 or taller. 

"Bottom line, it’s ail about big kids," said Ed Meyers, 
a former assistant coach at George Washington who has 
traveled to Africa in search of players. "Coach says, i 
need a seven-footer to build my program, so get me one. ’ 
That's what overseas is all about" 

Competition for the tallest foreign players has spread 
to high schools which routinely stock their teams through 
student exchange programs that were designed to give 
foreigners only a one-year taste of American life. High 
school coaches pursue players who later skirt immi- 
gration laws by staying in the United States, even though 
they promised to return to their native countries. 

College recruiterelhust at least pay fip service to strict 
NCAA rules about when and where they may speak to 
potential players, but middlemen are free to roam the 
globe in search of the next Hakeem Olajuwon, the 
National Basketball Association star from Nigeria who 
started the rush to foreign talent. 

"Olajuwon is a folk hero around the world," Meyers 
said. "People have hoop dreams all over the globe. And 
there are middlemen searching everywhere, because in 
every male in the world, there’s a little jock in him and he 
wants a little piece of the action." 

“I invest a lot in the kids, and I don’t get anything," 
complained Toyin Sonoiki, a lawyer in Lagos, Nigeria, 
who says he has spent $500,000 of bis own money to send 
nine players to U.S. high schools. 

"This is a problem," Sonoiki said. "I don’t even have 
a shoe contract. I am aware that somewhere down the 
line, some people are making money, and I'm be g inning 
to get pissed pff. Because 1 don’t get anything." 

Links between middlemen such as Sonoiki and high 

See RECRUIT, Page 18 





Juouf SaoDfa/Agcoct Fiancc-Pimc 

TALKING ABOUT ZAIRE — OAU leaders convened to end Zaire violence: from left, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, 
Thabo Mbeki of South Africa, Maawiya Ould Sid Ahmed Taya of Mauritania, Paul Biya of Cameroon, President Gnassingbe 
Eyadema of Togo and Sam Nujoma of Nambia. The rebels spumed an offer by the governing party to share power. Page 10. 

Malaysia Moves to ‘Cool 5 Ties With Singapore 

Kuala Lumpur Still Irked at Comment by Lee Kuan Yew Despite His Apology 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


SINGAPORE — Malaysia said Wednesday 
that it would temporarily freeze official ties 
with Singapore, including the awarding of new 
government contracts to Singapore companies, 
as a sign of its continuing displeasure with what 
it says is the attitude of Singapore leaders 
toward Malaysia. 

The decision was made at a cabinet meeting 
led by Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, 
the Malaysian national news agency Beraama 
said, quoting several cabinet ministers. 


The move, which appeared to catch Singa- 
pore by surprise, marked a further deterioration 
in relations between the two neighbors, whose 
economic rivalry and political tensions have 
become increasingly evident in recent weeks. 

Although major projects could be affected, 
such as plans to have a fast train service be- 
tween Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, and to 
replace the old causeway linking the Malaysian 
state of Johor to Singapore with a new bridge, 
analysts said that Malaysia's action was likely 
to be more symbolic than substantial. 

The Beraama report made it clear that 
private Singapore companies, who are among 


the leading investors in Malaysia, would not be 
stopped from doing business in the country and 
that Singaporeans would continue to be able to 
travel freely to Malaysia. 

Commercial trade, worth more than 50 bil- 
lion Singapore dollars ($35 billion), is also 
unlikely to be affected in any major way. 

Still, any continuing or planned bilateral 
talks between the two governments or their 
agencies will be postponed for the time being, 
one Malaysian minister said. 

Beraama quoted another minister as saying 

See MALAYSIA, Page 8 


That ‘Green Light 9 : Did Arafat Truly Flash It? 


By Serge Schmemann 

New Yori Times Service 


JERUSALEM — For several days now, the 
Israeli government has pummeled Yasser Ara- 
fat with charges of deliberately resorting to 
violence and terror, depicting the Palestinian 
leader as a master manipulator capable of loos- 
ing bloodshed at will to achieve his political 
ends. 

But diplomats, Palestinians and Israelis fa- 
miliar with Palestinian affairs paint a far more 
complex picture of Mr. Arafat's dealings with 
the Palestinian streets and with the Islamic 
militants to whom he stands accused of giving 
a "green light” to renew terror attacks. 


In their view, many of the actions that Is- 
raelis depict as a deliberate encouragement to 
the militants, such as releasing detainees, are in 
fact part of Mr. Arafat’s strategy to co-opt 
opponents in the areas he controls and to split 
them off from outside radicals. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

And what the Israelis describe as a "green 
light" for terror derives as much from the 
frustration and fury of the average Palestinian 
over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s 
policies as anything Mr. Arafat might have said 
or done. 

In any case. Israeli investigators have yet to 


determine who sent a Palestinian to set off a 
bomb in Tel Aviv on Friday. An anonymous 
caller said it was the work of the military wing of 
Hamas, the largest Islamic movement among 
Palestinians, and Hamas hailed tbe action. But 
the organization has not issued its trademark 
statement taking responsibility. 

The intensive media blitz from Mr. Net- 
anyahu and Israeli security chiefs portrays Mr. 
Arafat as having tacitly sanctioned the revival 
of violence earlier this month, and contends 
that his Palestinian Authority has orchestrated 
the rock-throwing riots that have erupted daily 
in Bethlehem and Hebron. The Israelis further 

See ARAFAT, Page 10 


Gore Ends 
China Talks, 
Promising 
Better Ties 

He Asserts Planning 
For Jiang’s U.S. Visit 
Will Go Forward 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Ne*‘ Times Senior 

BELTING — After two days of high- 
level dialogue with China's leaders. 
Vice President AJ Gore said Wednesday 
that despite domestic political pressures 
that are vexing Chinese- American re- 
lations, the Clinton administration re- 
mained determined to “‘strengthen and 
broaden" its bonds with Beijing. 

Mr. Gore said at a news conference 
here that planning would now go for- 
ward for President Jiang Zemin of 
China to visit Washington this fall and 
asserted that "a strong consensus in the 
center of the American political sys- 
tem” supported the continued dialogue 
and engagement with China. 

Bui while Mi. Gore's first visit here 
provided the impetus for Chinese of- 
ficials to close large commercial trans- 
actions with Boeing Co. and with Gen- 
eral Motors Corp., the substantive 
political breakthroughs that had seemed 
possible only a few months ago did not 
materialize, just as they failed to ma- 
terialize last November when President 
Bill Clinton met with President Jiang. 

Political prisoners, such as Wang 
Dan, a Tiananmen -era student leader, 
whose cases were mentioned by 
Chinese officials this winter as possible 
candidates for medical parole, remained 
in custody. 

Chinese officials refused to say if 
they woudl sign two United Nations 
covenants on human rights, something 
they have been asserting for months 
they are considering. 

There was no substantive progress to 
be claimed on ending China’s weapons 
sales to Iran or to Pakistan. Mr. Gore 
also got nowhere on persuading China to 
narrow its trade deficit with the United 
States or in dropping the extensive trade 
barriers that are keeping many Amer- 
ican companies out of the Chinese mar- 
ket while also keeping Beijing out of tbe 
World Trade Organization. 

"Given the enormous importance 
that we attach to the U.S.-Cruna re- 
lationship,” Mr. Gore said, "there was 
naturally a very long list of issues" on 
tbe table. 

That is where they will remain when 
Mr. Gore leaves the Chinese capital 
Thursday for a day of sightseeing with 
his family in the ancient city of Xian and 
in Shanghai. 

Mr. Gore got about as cordial a treat- 
ment as any visiting dignitary gets here, 
but the tangible gains he might have 

See GORE, Page 8 


AGENDA 


U.S. Expels Belarus Consul in Retaliation 


WASHINGTON (AFP) — The 
United States expelled Belarus’s first 
secretary and consul. Vladimir 
Gramyka, on Wednesday "in retal- 
iation' ’ for a similar measure taken 
against an American diplomat in 
Minsk, the State Department said. 






Pages 6-7. 

Sports 

.. Pages 18-19. 

International Classified 

Page 4. 

1 The IHT on-line http:// 

•vvww.iht.com 1 


Earlier, Belarus said it was recalling 
its ambassador-designate to the United 
States far consultations after Wash- 
ington recalled its ambassador. The 
new Belarussian ambassador, Valeri 
Tsepkalo, named two days ago, was on 
his way to his post when he got the call 
during a Frankfurt stopover, a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said in Minsk. 

A U.S. Embassy spokesman said 
Washington had recalled its ambas- 
sador, Kenneth Yalowitz. for consulta- 
tions to protest the expulsion Monday 
of a U.S. diplomat. Serge Alexandrov, 
who was arrested at an anti-govern- 
ment rally and accused of spying. 


[] The Dollar 1 

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Wodnesdsy « 4 P.M. 

previous dona 

DU 

1.6889 

1.6898 

Pound 

1.6303 

1.6195 

Yen 

124.13 

123.715 

FF 

5.694 

5.699 


The Dow 


b$a 

Wadractay cios6 

previous don 

+4.53 

6880.70 

6876.17 

1 S&P 500 | 

.change 

Wednesday O 4 P.U, 

previous dosa 

+1.46 

790.53 ■ 

780.07 


This Time Ask Tokyo 

U.S. Treasury bonds can weather 
the Federal Reserve Board's move to 
increase interest rates — as long as 
Japan doesn’t follow suit Page 13. 


CITIC: Keeper of the Keys to China 

Wbrld’s Capitalists Now Flock to the Company Set Up by Beijing 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Sendee 


BEIJING — Wang Jun has sipped coffee socially with 
President Bill Clinton, met informally with Morihiro 
Hosokawa when he was the Japanese prime minister and 
chatted with President Fidel Ramos of the Philippines. 

He golfs with China's business elite and hobnobs with its 
political leaders. He frequents, and is chairman of, the ex- 
clusive Capital Club, a dining spot at the top of one of 
Beijing’s tallest buildings. 

Mr. Wang's key to this select company is his chairmanship 
of China International Trust & Investment Corp., the most 
influential financial and industrial conglomerate in China. 

Founded 18 years ago at the dawn of tbe late Deng 


Xiaoping's economic ref orm e ra as tbe government's window 
onto the capitalist world, CTTIC today reflects China's emer- 
gence both as a major force in the global economy and as the 
ultimate potential market for companies around die world. 

This week, while in Beijing to help patch up U.S.-Chinese 
relations. Vice President AJ Gore watched Boeing Co. sign a 
deal to sell planes and General Motors Corp. agree to set up an 
automobile factory. The size of the GM investment alone, 
which will spur about $1.5 billion in U.S. exports, far ex- 
ceeded what China attracted in foreign investment for an 
entire year during the early part of CTTlC’s existence. 

M irroring the explosive growth of the Chinese economy, 
CITIC has ballooned into a sophisticated $23 billion con- 

See CITIC, Page 8 


A Case for Delay on the Euro 

French Bank Official Prefers Waiting for Italy and Spain 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — A senior official of the 
Bank of France broke with French 
policy Wednesday, saying it would be 
better to delay the launch of Europe’s 
single currency beyond 1999 than to go 
ahead without Italy and Spain. 

Jean-Pierre Gerard, who is the first 



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senior official of the Bank of France to 
question the planned January 1999 
launch date for the euro, also said it was 
time for France to recognize that its 
commercial interests were closer to 
those of Italy, Spain and Portugal, than 
to those of Germany and the north of 
Europe. 

Mr. Gerard, one of nine members of 
the decision-making monetary policy 
council of the French central bank, de- 
scribed Germany’s possible overshoot- 
ing of its 1997 budget deficit target as 
* “very worrying." Nonetheless, he said 
be was confident that Bonn would 
achieve the key single currency pre- 
requisite of a 1997 deficit egual to 3 
percent of gross domestic ptoaucu 

“I want to see Italy, Spain and Por- 
to ml join economic and monetary union 
immediately,” Mr. Gerard. 56, told 
Agence France-Presse.-And ifn 
comes to this, it is preferable to delay the 
launch of the euro for a year or two. even 
by adopting the date 2002 for com- 
pletion of the process, rather than begin 

See EMU, Page 10 



Mr. Kinkel being escorted by an honor guard in Ankara after a wreath-laying ceremony 
Wednesday at the mausoleum of Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modem Turkey. 


Kinkel Tells Turkey 
It’s Not Ready for E U 

He Cites Rights, Greece and Economy 

By Stephen Kinzeer 

New yurt Times Service 

ANKARA — Turkey’s campaign to join the European 
Union within the next few years was dealt what appeared to 
be a fatal blow Wednesday when Foreign Minister Klaus 
Kinkel of Germany asserted here that T urkey is far from the 
standard expected of new members. 

"It is clear that Turkey will not become a member of the 
European Union in the foreseeable future,' ’ Mr. Kinkel said 
at a news conference after meeting with Turkish leaders. He 
said Turkey did not qualify because of its record on 
"human rights, the Kurdish question, relations with 
Greece, and, of course, very clear economic questions.” 

In recent months, senior Turkish leaders had declared that 
early membership in the European Union was the country's 
principal foreign policy goal. They hoped it would provide 
a guarantee of prosperity and political stability. 

From the moment the Turkish campaign began in earnest 
last year, European leaders sought to signal Turkey that it 
was setting its sights too high. Turkish negotiators con- 

See TURKEY, Page 10 


















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


fPixshington Bemused / Friendship Eases Capital's Tensions 



Albright and Helms: Improbable Amity 


By Steven Lee Myers 

New York. Times Service 


W INGATE, North Carolina — It might 
have been her salty use of Spanish to 
mock Cuban fi gh ter pilots who shot 
down two civilian planes. Or maybe 
his courtly. Southern way. Or maybe yet a mutual 
zeal for blunt talk about Communis ts and other 
international scoundrels. 

Whatever the reason, it is becoming clear that 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Senator 
Jesse Helms of North Carolina are nurturing one of 
the menu improbable relationships in Washington 
— one that at once seems perfectly natural and 
utterly astonishing. 

This strange political courtship reached a new 
level Tuesday. Mr. Helms even indicated that the 
warm relati onship might help the chances of an 
internatioaal chemical-weapons ban that he bad 


on the treaty after the Senate returns from recess 
April 8, possibly clearing the way for a vote. 

The Republican chairman of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee and the Democratic secretary 
of state were spending the day, at his invitation, in 
his home state of North Carolina. The two swept 
through meetings with executives in Charlotte and 
students here in Wingate. 

Then the foremost advocate of President Bill 
Clinton’s foreign policy and the foremost critic of it 
stood together at the Jesse Helms Center here, not 
far from the little town where the senator was bom, 
and declared that they actually liked each other. 
(You can almost feel Beltway cynics shudder.) 

“All day long, in Charlotte and now here, people 
have come up and whispered in my ear, ‘She's just 
as great as you said that she was,' " Mr. Helms said, 
before escorting Mrs. AJbright on a tour of the 
center, a sort of museum dedicated to his political 
life and philosophy. 

Beyond a greased ride through her Senate con- 
firmation hearings and the sorts of fuzzy moments 
of congeniality on full display Tuesday, it is not at 
all clear that the “pretty solid friendship," as Mrs. 
Albright called it, has produced much bipartisan 
support for Mr. button's foreign policy. 


M R. HELMS remains a reliably out- 
spoken opponent of almost all Clinton 
initiatives. Besides holding up a vote to 
ratify the international ban on the man- 
ufacture and use of chemical weapons, he has been 
resisting a plan tx> pay SI billion in dues the United 
States owes the United Nations, and insisting on a 
reorganization of the State Department and its af- 
filiated agencies before be will consider Mr. Clin- 
ton’s proposed increase in the foreign affairs 
bucket 

Yet after a day of shuttling about together, with 
long stretches in car rides for talks, both Mrs. 



Mrs, Albright and Mr. 
Helms, here at Wingate 
University, share a zeal for 
blunt talk of Communists. 


But, he declared, turning to Mrs. Al- 
bright, “I’m willing to look for them, 
particularly with the secretary.” 

In Washington’s hyperpartisan cli- 
mate, the political calculations in- 
volved cannot be overlooked. 

Since taking office, Mrs. Albright 
has avidly tried to cultivate Repub- 
licans on Capitol Hill and beyond. Her 
first trip as secretary was to Houston 
to visit Mr. Bush and Mr. Baker. A 
year ago, as the U.S. representative at 
the United Nations, she appeared with 
Mr. Helms before the Women's Fund 
of North Carolina. 

Mr. Helms, for his pan, seems in- 
clined to demonstrate his ability to 
shape the State Department construct- 
ively, after a sometimes ruffled re- 
lationship with Mrs. Albright’s pre- 
decessor. Warren Christopher. 



VEN SO, their relationship 
appears to have expanded be- 


yond politics, aides to both 


'said. Mr. Helms appears 
genuinely moved by her much bal- 
Lyhooed “tell it like it is" approach 


and is said to have been greatly im- 
i panish vul- 


r A. HdnWThe Associated ftw 


Albright and Mr. Helms reported at least some 
progress on issues dividing them. 

Barely two weeks after strongly signaling he 
would block, the chemical -weapons treaty, one of 
Mrs. Albright's highest priorities, Mr. Helms said 
there was “a very good chance" that Republicans 
in Congress could reach agreement with the ad- 
ministration. 

The treaty — originally negotiated under Pres- 
ident George Bush and Secretary of State James 
Baker 3d, fellow Republicans — takes effect April 
29, with or without U.S. participation. Mrs. Al- 
bright and her aides contend that participation by 
the United States is crucial to the treaty's success. 

Mr. Helms, still sounding curmudgeonly when it 
comes to Mr. Clinton's priorities, expressed doubt 
that there were many things worthwhile in the treaty. 


pressed when she used a Span! 
garity to mock the Cuban fighter pi- 
lots last year during a Security 
Council debate on the downing of the 
unarmed planes off Cuba's coast 
At the Inauguration in January, the 
senator, with his family in tow, sought 
out Mrs. Albright for a photograph together. 

“It was not exactly traditional for the Helms 
clan," one official recalled. “It shows the respect 
he has for her. And likewise she respects him." 

As part of her tour Tuesday, Mrs. Albright visited 
Sea-Land Service Inc., a container shipping sub- 
sidiary in Charlotte of CSX Corp. The company's 
president and chief executive officer, John P. Clan- 
cey, expressed concern about the dispute between 
the United States and Japan over duties on ship- 
ping. 

Mrs. Albright delivered the eighth address in the 
Jesse Helms Lecture Series at Wingate University, 
a small private college affiliated with the Baptist 
Church and an alma mater of Mr. Helms. Later, she 
gave the senator a blue T-shirt inscribed, "Some- 
body at the State Department Loves Me.” 


An Enigma in Tel Aviv Bombing 

Father of 4 Didn’t Fit the Profile of Palestinian Martyrs 


By Joel Greenberg 

New York Times Service 


BETHLEHEM, West Bank — The 
way his mother tells it, Musa Gh- 
neimat gave no sign that he was about 
to embark cm a suicide mission when 
he had bis last cup of tea in her house 
last Friday morning. 

Mr. Ghneunal, 28, was a father of 
four from Surif, a village tucked 
away in the rocky hills southwest of 
Bethlehem. He seemed to be starting 
another routine day, his mother said, 
not a journey that would end in a 
deadly explosion at a Tel Aviv cafe. 

“Had I known what be was going 
to do, I wouldn’t have let him out of 
the house," said Zeinab Ghneimat, 
52, who lives in the building where 
her son lived. “He gave no indi- 
cation. He came in at about 7:30, had 
a cup of tea, and at about 8 o'clock he 
said, ‘I’m going off to the course.’ ” 

Mr. Ghneimat was enrolled in an 
air-conditioning technician's course 
in Hebron. After years of working in 
Israeli restaurants, he wanted to learn 
another skill, his mother said. 

But a former employer said he had 
been dismissed from a dish washing 
and cleaning job about a month be- 
fore the blast He worked for three 
weeks at a restaurant in the Israeli 
town of Rishon Letzion, south of Tel 
Aviv, said the owner, Moshe Zan- 
zuri. "He wasn't a yes man," Mr. 
Zanzuri said. “He would argue, and 
his behavior caused a discipline 
problem. He didn’t fit in." 


Several hours after Mr. Ghneimat 
left home on Friday morning, his fam- 
ily heard the news of the explosion in 
the Apropos cafe that killed him and 
three Israeli women. Soon after the 
toiler’s identity was established, ar- 
rests followed. Mr. Ghneimat’s fa- 
ther, wife and five of his brothers 
were taken into custody and inter- 
rogated by the Israeli authorities. 

Surif, which is under Israeli se- 
curity control, was put under curfew, 
and the Israeli army blockaded the 
village. Mr. Ghneimat *s apartment 
was sealed with corrugated metal in 
preparation for demolition. 

Mr. Ghneimat, the father of two 
boys and two girls, did not fit the 
profile of previous Palestinian sui- 
cide bombers, and his behavior on the 
days before the attack was different 

In the past bombers have usually 
been single young men who dropped 
out of sight several days before their 
attacks and left behind letters or video- 
tapes in which they declared readiness 
for martyrdom. Tbeir testaments were 
often made public by Hamas or Is- 
lamic Holy War, the militant Islamic 
groups behind die bombings. None of 
this happened in connection with the 
latest attack, for which no group has 
claimed responsibility. 

Mr. Ghneimat had a permit to enter 
Israel, spoke Hebrew and had been 
working in Israeli restaurants for sev- 
en years, his mother said. He would 
sleep in Israel during the week, then 
come home on Thursdays and stay 
overnight. After attending Friday 


prayers at the local mosque, he would 
head back to Israel, she said. 

“His relations with his family 
were very good,” his mother said. 
“He would play with his children, or 
go out with them to buy food or 
clothing." He had never been in- 
volved in politics, she added, and his 
only run-in with the Israeli author- 
ities was a few years ago, when he 
was detained for 28 days after clashes 
between local youths and soldiers. 
"He was concerned with his work 
and his children," she said. 

Iyad Ghneimat, a neighbor and re- 
lative, said, “He didn't support 
Hamas or Fatah." The latter is the 
faction of the Palestinian leader, Yas- 
ser Arafat 

"We would say hello to each oth- 
er, he would go to pray, but he didn't 
talk to people or mix much with 
diem,” Iyad Ghneimat said. “His 
life was good. He was a happy guy. 
No one knows how this happened. 
Maybe he had a reason." 

What happened in the weeks be- 
fore the bombing is still unclear. Is- 
raeli security officials suspect that 
after he was fired from his last res- 
taurant job, Mr. Ghneimat was re- 
cruited for a suicide mission. 

His mother maintains that he slept 
at home for a few days last week, and 
that he intended to go back to work in 
Rishon Lection. Instead, he surfaced 
at the Apropos cafe with a bomb. 

“This is God’s decree," she said. 
“What can I do? It doesn’t make any 
sense." 


Arab Protesters 
Rock West Bank 


Reuters 

RAMALLAH, West Bank — Isradi-Pal- 
estinian clashes spread on Wednesday to the 
West Bank town of Ram all ah where hun- 
dreds of rock-throwing Arabs charged an 
Israeli Army roadblock, drawing volleys of 
tear gas and rubber bullets. 

Hospital officials in self-ruled Ram all ah 
said 25 Palestinians were treated for rubber 
bullet wounds or tear gas inhalation on the 
seventh day of violent protests in the West 
Bank over Israeli settlement policy in Arab 
East Jerusalem. 

Ip Bethlehem. Palestinians clapped and 
whistled as they burned Israeli and American 
flags. 

The U.S. Middle East envoy, Dennis Ross, 
was returning to the region for crisis raJIcs 
with the Palestinian leader. Yasser Arafat, 
and the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Net- 
anyahu. 

Hundreds of Arabs swept past Palestinian 
police and hurled rocks toward Israel’s Araq 
checkpoint outside RamaiJah as other pro- 
testers threw stones on the main highway 
Uniting the town to Jerusalem, just to the 
south. 

Israel rushed reinforcements to the scene 
as troops repulsed the challenge with rubber 
bullets and tear gas. 

It was the first time in (he current wave of 
violence that clashes that have been limited 
mainly to Bethlehem and Hebron, also in the 
West Bank, have erupted in Ramallah. 

Palestinians have said Israel’s settlement 
drive strengthens its hold in East Jerusalem, 
which Palestinians claim as the capital of 
their future state. 


Anti- 

Spread Colombia Terror 

Rightist Paramilitaries Kill Peasants 



By Diana Jean Schemo 

New Ibrit Times Service 


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5. yy Mexander v wfatf; 

^■ ^poinBofthegam 

NBAXAII 


plant . 

people and wounded 15. 

“I did it out of necessity, for which at 
this moment I feel deeply sorry," said 
the teacher, Alvaro Jose Taborda, in a 
recording made after he was abducted 
by Colombia’s most powerful paramil- 
itary force. “And I will do whatever I 
can to make up for this mistake.” 

His captors executed him. 

A few days later, Carlos Castano, the 
leader of the country's paramilitaries, 
smoldered as he played the tap e for a 
reporter visiting one of his training camps 
in the hills of San Pedro de Uraba. 

Mr. Castano ordered the execution of 
Mr. Taborda and two other teachers for 
aiding the guerrillas. 

“They exploded a bomb at 2 in die 
afternoon, in die center of Monteria." 
he said over the teacher's recorded 
voice. “I want to make it very clear — 
that’s why he deserved the death sen- 
tence. How could we fight such a war in 
a humane way?" 

The killing was part of an all -out 



campaign by rightist paramilitaries and 
'guerrilla 


their guerrilla enemies to expand their 
power into the vacuum left by the polit- 
ical crisis of President Ernesto Samper, 
who has been weakened by charges he 
took drug money for his election cam- 
paign. In the last t hre e months, Mr. 
Castano ’s group, the Peasant Self-De- 
fense Group of Cordoba and Uraba, is 
believed to have killed more than 100 
peasants it accused of helping the 
rebels. 

Although the paramilitaries, drawn 
mainly from the land-owning class, en- 
joyed a measure of official tolerance 
when they began their vigilante cam- 
paign against leftist guerrillas, they have 
gradually come to be seen as an almost 
equal threat to Colombia’s stability. 

The U.S. State Department describes 
the paramilitary offensive as driven 
more by greed than ideology — as a 
power grab for the Uraba corridor, a 
major transit route for drugs and aims. 
The United States calls Carlos Castano 
and his older brother Fidel “known 


except in silhouette. To see 
outsider is led deep into the ere 
world populated only by his tpupwees^ 
On a recent afternoon, he s'-*** 
reporter at one of his tramn 
four hours over dirt roads _ 
nearest town and an hour more by . I 
back into die hills. 

He said his family began., 
guerrillas after his father) a dairy 
was kidnapped in 1981- The.G 
raised about 10 percent of the - 

ransom demanded and their father wjjs 
killed, be said- - 

Mr. Reyes, who spent threfidayswafr. - 
Fidel Castano in 1991, said Ms ve^ng^ . 

differed somewhat. . _ m ~ : 

Fidel Castano said his father^ ^ - 
whom he described as violent, arhfcjai© 9 : 
and alcoholic — had thrownbim but at \ 
age 13. He made a fortune infold 
diamond minin g and later as a-drqg-. 
trafficker and art dealer. By 1981* be.. 
oould have afforded his father T sransbirt 
but refused to pay it, Mr. R 
Instead, he went after the guerrillas, 
with backing from the military.. ;*'•>? ■ 

Years later, Fidel Castano learned of ’ 
his father's fate from a rebel he capteoji 
and tortured. The father had /been -. - 
tethered to a tree and when he wastofiF 
that his family had come up with oniy-fy 
percent of his ransom, he ran head first : 
against the trunk, in an imsucbessfi0 . 
effort to kill himself. The guerrillas shot 
and killed him. ‘ : '":v . . . 

By the time Fidel Castano told diifc 
story. 8 of his 1 1 brothers and sistershad — 
been killed by guerrillas, and he .wahte^ - 
to stop fighting, Mr. Reyes said- - • " 

The paramilitaries are again ;talkh% ,. 
about entering the political pioc^ mpf ■: 
according to a copy of the minutes “ofa •- 
secret meeting they held last ye?tr, &ey - 
are “determined not to make the samfc ;• 
mistake that Fidel made" by unflaf- - 
erally laying down their weajxn&as.fcfr.C 
did at that stage. • • i 


throw line in the 

• ana Cavatars 

berw«n the-ftM! 

£nd Boston C£l0C V.. ^ 
■*I don’t care 
ms - the Spurs com 
W -h said "What mat 
*2 then's cave *c salt 
.^Vl&el&etheydfi 
- Cleveland s final ton 

tied the second-'.ow^M 

The Milwaukee Hawtes 
Jg*>5 same acains«lfce{ 

has been matetodt 

in February 

7 pers and b> the Oila 

&ber.when&«M 

a ^-pointer to tie with t 
Jd after a Ions 
Alexander was touted^ 
remaining, rie added-, 
noints from the free-thna 
Bulls 94, 

Steve KerT led a . 

comeback wtm! 2 of te 

points as MichaeUmJ 
pippen staved cm the sidi 

of the fir.al period. 

Michael ana Scotia 
ine the bail or playing w 
Jackson, she Balls* coach 
was. time to make an 
wanted to set some tfiffc 
there, set afresh look,” 
Jordan scored 20 pomi 

reached 60 victories. 


jeneo ou *■ i».»oncs. j 
“It wasn't one of our gi 

it was No. bO." Jordan sa 


n was >0. tH'. JUluuu 

9 Dennis Rodman had 2.1 
fore limoica off the court 
in the left knee with three 


Scores* 


\r 


drug traffickers." 


jlombia supplies about 80 percent 
of the cocaine used in the United States 
and most of the heroin on its East Coast 
Groups on. both the -left andcright. are 
believed to be involved with trafficking 
as a source of income. 

Mr. Castano'strongly denies any hole 
in the trade, contending that lie acts 
solely from hatred of the guerrillas. He 
is also maneuvering for a role in any 
eventual peace talks between the gov- 
ernment and guerrillas. 

Analysts dismiss political represent- 
ation for the paramilitaries as unlikely, 
but position here is often gained and 
measured in blood spilled. 

In December, the Colombian defense 
minister offered a $1 million reward for 
Carlos Castano ’s capture. He described 
him as the ‘ * supreme c hief ’ of the para- 
militaries, who are behind a killing 
spree that one human rights worker 
called "vertiginous." 

Most victims are abducted from their 
homes at night, shot dead and left by the 
sides of country roads, their hands tied 
behind their backs. 

The paramilitaries aim ro choke off 
peasant tolerance and support for the 
guerrillas through the assassinations, 
said Alejandro Reyes, a specialist in 
violence at the National University. 

The killings occur in an atmosphere 
of overwhelming violence. In the First 
nine months of last year. 19,685 hom- 
icides were reported in Colombia; ac- 
cording to the Colombia Commission of 
Jurists, 2,492 of the deaths were po- 
litically motivated. 

The Center for Investigation and Pop- 
u]ar Education, a human rights orga- 
nization. attributes 59 percent of the 
political murders to paramilitaries and 
one-third to guerrillas, with the military 
and the police responsible for the rest. 

Mr. Castano enjoys unreserved sup- 
port from local ranchers, who answered 


TRAVEL UPDATE ! 


Exhibition Basujuj 


ParisFinnonSchenj 


PARK (Rei^as). 

Jacques Chirac reiterated Wednesday 
that France would not “for, the thnp 
being” give up its right to mamtaiy - 
controls at its northern Jbcwdere despite 
the Schengen accord. * • ; : - 

The government's spokesman._Alaii? 
Lamassoure, quoted Mr. Chirac as makt -t-- 
ing the remark in a cabinet meeting i 
the presentation of a bill anthorizm^ 
approval of Austria’s membership iirthp _ 
Schengen convention. • ^ri'v’L 

On July I, Austria is scheduled to joii 
the Schengen group of seven Europead 
Union countries — France, 
the Netherlands, Luxembourg, 

Portugal and Germany — that 
agreed on a system of open borders and : ' 
passport-free movement. '. -{ 

• i . 

\ 

Airline Strike Delayed! - 

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) 4 
American Airlines and its pilots’ union 
are extending a strike deadline until at . 
least 30 days after the union's boarder 
its membership rejects a proposed 

agreement in principle. 

That means travelers can be assured - ' 
there wifi be no strike during April and 
possibly into May, according to Ainer- ; 
ican officials. The pilots' union Wad 
previously agreed not to strike — - and .. 
the airline agreed not to lock but tie 

pilots — before Anri] OR “ v . 


rasa Mrs i 

»*v«t ■.*.«? K -- 

Atera ~ Vohjw : 
ft*ro& Sew.:'?; 
Pmc^r- * acr;- - 
Ow«iewsi T ac*'e ' * - 
He* for, -cr.kceii 
5an Weso 

StmFmrcxscr ; l - 

OMifliKl e . •IsS'sc : 
ScaiMI vac,<h: 
dncfnncfl (. Or-V 
Kansas Gfr ‘ 4:. rr- ■ 
Si. Lows 4. 3 p - ; 

OtaW Sc. i. >rs: 


NBA Stakdimos 


tflSTIBH commutes 

*tusntc : vs-c* 

* L. Her. 

■■ sa 

-■ n r. s 

-■ “ 530 

Si AZS 

* JOT 

•: zl ■?** 

Knicosc ^ 

■k-Ananta 

- D O j 


‘■Mloflii 
* Hew Ycr» 
tManflo 
Wtoninclw 
JMey 
amaodoeis 
Boston 


DENNIS THE ME] 


pilots — before April 28. 

Paris Metro services were slightly 


disrupted Wednesday because ~of hJ 
strike protesting plans to review- and 
possibly withdraw a mini hue service 
drivers who finish work lat<- alnigbianfl 
do not have cars. (AFP) 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 



Resort 

Dspfb 

L U 

Mtn. Res. Soon 
P iste Piste State 

Lost 

Smw ComeKDts 

Resort 

Depth 

L u 

Mtn. 

Piste 

Res. 

Piste 

Andorra 

Pas da la Casa 

3b 

130 

Frtr 

ekEh spnng 

15C at S Ks open, goal spring slang 

«taS» 

Bormio 

0 

145 

Fair 

fin 

Soideu 

20 

140 

Far 

afadi ipraiy 

15a m 2 im open, goat at aUudB 

Cervirua 

40 

320 

Good 

Open 


Snow Lost 




Europe 


Forecast tor Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


Asia 




i SWM ca 

4S4HIL£,* 


Austria 

lechgl 

20 

150 

Good 

Open 

Pwk 

24ft 


KBztwhei 

0 

105 

Good 

Oosed 

to 

233 

moo BBSS* shkig sfior snovtiB 

Lech 

90 

z» 

Gwd 

Open 

ftrt 

ZM 

el 34 *» cpai eneencantBons 

Mayrtnfen 

55 

80 

Good Dosed 

Pw* 

m 

2 SOD BIS otto, gooil natter string 

OOorgurgl 

60 

170 

Good 

Op*i 

PM 

25ft 

rt^abqpsn.wpw&sung 

SaaSMcfi 

IS 

GO 

Good 

Sans 

to 

22ft 

rtbtifteBesnto/litftia 

SL Anton 

45 

310 

Good 

Op*i 

Pito 

25ft 

M3? Ms open. mcaSentUtm 

Lake Loube 

15Q 

230 

Good 

0pm 

to 

24/3 

rriTr.^jar 

Whartter 

50 

250 

Fair 

0pm 

to 

24ft 

of as Si and iff nfe open 

Franc* 

AJpfi cfHuez 

9S 

250 

Good 

Open 

to 

23ft 

BBtBBU open, fpmt atom 200 tkn 

Lea Ares 

to 

m 

Good 

Open 

to 

2513 

TVfTT Hb opav pccdtksnp 

Avoriaz 

120 

140 

Good 

Open 

to 

23ft 

arm epen, arytyptue qmng step 

Chamonix 

15 

255 

Good 

Closed 

Ftadr 

34ft 

ZtU Bis open. ogenSen best 

CowcheveJ 

105 

190 

fiiwl 


to 

34ft 

at 68 Rtf qm. potto mosSjGoOd 

LMDeuxAlpeft « 

285 

Good 

Open 

to 

24ft 

SQftSRteepovnpeibafaUM 

Msgav* 

c 

150 

Good 

OP*! 

to 

24/3 

mm m ppoa gocdipdnjaUng 

Mdnbei 

40 

195 

Good 

C*W1 

to 

23ft 

b*KS*n UOcm el naw 

LaPlagne 

140 

220 

Good 

Open 

to 

25ft 

fd»Tl3 m a, N. tidng us bast 

Seme Chevofler 30 

190 

Good 

Open 

to 

34ft 

Timm open, greet spring dm 

Tlaiaa 

125 200 

Good 

Opai 

Mr 

34ft 

nosf fib qpen atefcnf attig 

vaerwra 

90 

200 

fowl 

Op* 

Pm* 

34ft 

most *s a. opob asm m aqey 

tolThorena 

SO 

210 

Good 

Open 

Pm* 

24ft 

2 iSB ms open, sem gnat sking 

Qonoany 








Berchtes^den 

0 

70 

Good 

Quoad 

to 

26ft 

1031 SBsopan. runt good 

OboreNtotr 

0 

150 

Good 

Open 

Pm* 

34ft 

Msgdeo^greamrettaUMe 


Coumaywur 

Uvigno 

MadesJmo 

Selva 


25 140 
60 190 


290 

70 


Fa* 

Good 

Fu 

Fair 


mb 

Open 

Some 

Ait 


Kar 03 line Ms open, nAiumg 
VSr 2OT aB 25 U!s open, patos mostly good 
itar 250 29Sr Mb open, ajtyttfe lift up 
Mr 1W3 ms open, good afloreZadm 

to 2W at SO Ub open, pales man, good 
203 is,v ms o.pmrbdim 3000m 

to 2W 7&8I Uts and sofa rondi open 


Geilo 


55 Good Open and 2313 at IBUbomn. socaaweraBomt 


Crans Montana 10 160 
Davos 
Wasters 
Murran 
SaasFea 
SL Moritz 
Verbter 
Wengen 
Zermatt 


25 215 
a 205 
5C 140 
3S M0 
20 100 
23 190 
10 ICO 
10 160 


Good Some 
Goer} C^en 
Good Open 
Good Open 
Good Cy 

Good Cf 

Good eon 
Good Some 
Good Opm 


to 243 
to 24A 

to 24/3 

to 2«3 
to 240 

to aua 
to 2*13 
to 240 
to 1V3 


U JS. 

Aspen 

Bredcanndga 
Crested Buae 
Mammoth 
Park City 
tod 

Winter Parte 


3SMI Ids open tjrea saw 2100m 
SIS «s open, gnat apmg sting 
3*08 Hits ran. gnodm aHufc 
jfl 12 Mb open, at on tarns gooe 
2S0f Ms o . poor iwrt eenSuns 
SOSS Ks open, good atow 21 tm 
iiaa? As (pan. excetent hgh up 
17133 BB open, suMy aims patshr 
BJTSifeqpfflT. jraaratoegTOftn 


160 175 
160 2 C 0 
173 190 
2E5 375 
IBS 260 
l£3 1 95 
165 205 


rae Opai 
Fee Open 
Far Had 
Fair Open 
Good Had 
Good Had 
Good Open 


to 25/3 hay epen, m/fyxMXl p&ts 
spng im rssw and 133 Iris open 
to 2S0 atf 13 Sh good spmg ^ing 
Pdd 1W 22/30 a? open, pood aasJursldnp 
to ISO iff MSto and asm* open 
to 2SO &8b0tf.&i4*Ks<¥wi 
to 180 aB JOBS ana a* 121 tob open 


KByi,U: tfepihia 
teffifcigiDiSOTftvffljso Art AnfiMl snon 


Reports sufeSedfty the SWCUifllQwSntai 




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North America 

Temperaiufos across 


much of ihs nation will 
average near ro above nor- 
mal. A frontal iysforn is 
expected to move across 
the Plains Into the Great 
Lakes Friday, then kdo Bio 
East Saturday Wot 
or is expected io return lo 
Die Northwost Sunday. Dry 
and warm in the South- 
west. 


Europe 

A poworfui storm will lash 
Seondnavte and nanrnwasi 
Russia through tho week- 
end. Windy, unsettled 
weather will aifect north- 
east Europe, including 
Warsaw, while chilly air 
pushes Into oastem 
Europe. Wasiem Europe, 
including Parts and Lon- 
don, w* siay mainly diy. 


Asia 

A cold front will bring 
"towers to Belling Friday, 
than Seoul Saturday, lol- 
lowod by a shot oi cooler 
weather. Tokyo will stay 
rather mild, though show- 
ora wiB arrive Sunday. Arc- 
us oh wH invade northern 
Manchuria. Warm n Hong 
Kong with a shower possi- 
ble each day. 


Bamnay 

Cstcuas 

Qmgua 

CtHomhj 

Kara 

►to Cht Utah 

HonflKong 

Wamsbsd 

Jakaru 

Karsem 

K. Lumpur 

K. KnaOoto 

Manfla 

NawDsW 

PWtoml*Bnh 

PiMwi 

HangBon 

Seal 

9nngnai 

J'Wom 

T«P« 

foetyn 

VtonBana 


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33191 Z2T71 cc 

3 MM 23nc 

awe swaps 

3 Z ®9 2 V 70 s 
anas mi 

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Printed hv .V< « sfar fnirniarioiial, London Registered as a newspaper at the post off hv. 


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sms 

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,n the IHT * 








r.n.inrrnnnnuc CDTHAV HJARPH M. 1QQ' 


PAGE 3 


*5 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


PAGE 3 


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THE AMERICAS 


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Reformers Go Outside the Beltway 

2 Senators Travel to Boston to Preach on Campaign Funds 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Times Service 


BOSTON — Mike from Cambridge 
"was calling from his car phone to tell 
two U.S. senators just how mad he was 
.hbout the latest campaign fund-raising 
“mess. 

‘ “What's typically taken for apathy is 
\ not apathy, but great anger,’ ’ Mike told 
.the out-of-town guests on “The Con- 
duction,’’ a talk-radio program on 
WBUR. * ‘We’re in danger of losing our 
^democracy or even our liberty unless we 
take action to connect it.” 

The tiniest seeds of change may have 
taken hold as the two senators. John 
McCain, Republican of Arizona, and 
~Russ Feingold, Democrat of Wisconsin, 
tbok to the road with their determined, if 
uphill, campaign to revamp the much- 
Tnaiigned system of financing U.S. 
^political races. 

With their bipartisan legislation sty- 
mied in Washington, where Senator 
McCain says incumbents have too much 
. at stake to change the rules of the money 
[ game, the two senators are trying a more 
populist approach — through pep rai- 
l-radio prc 


is and newspaper 
— to win grassroots 


lies, talk- 
> editorial 
support. 

£■" And what better places to start their 
4uest, they said, than two cradles of 
■American democracy: Boston on Tues- 
~day and Philadelphia on Wednesday. 

“We have a system awash in money 
dominated by special interests, a system 


that cries out for repairs.” Mr. McCain 
told a lunchtime crowd of barely 100 
people outside historic Faneuil Hall. 
"Change will not come from within the 
Beltway. We need your help.” 

Nora Ranney. a 25-year-old clerk 
from Boston, nodded in agreement. 

“People feel so alienated from pol- 
itics, but they don’t realize the ability to 
change things is at their fingertips.” she 
said. 

The senators' trip coincided with the 
kickoff of a drive by Common Cause, 
the advocacy group, to gather, by the 
Fourth of July, 1,776,000 citizen sig- 
natures in support of overhauling cam- 
paign financing. 

Bill Bradley, the former Democratic 
senator from New Jersey, is a chairman 
of the effort, called Project Indepen- 
dence. More than 7.500 volunteers na- 
tionwide have started canvassing, hop- 
ing to fill enough petitions to pressure 
Congress into {passing the McCain- 
Feingold bill, which President Bill Clin- 
ton has said he would sign. 

The legislation would encourage can- 
didates to limit spending in exchange for 
30 minutes of free prime-time television 
advertising, ban unregulated “soft 
money” contributions to political 
parties and urge candidates to raise most 
of their campaign money from people in 
their home states. A companion bill is 
pending in the House. 

“People feel very strongly that the 
political process has been taken away 
from them,” Senator Feingold said. 


The senators acknowledge that they 
face a tough fight. Opponents say the 
legislation's restrictions would violate 
First Amendment rights of free speech. 

Some people at Tuesday ’s rally called 
the senators the bravest lawmakers in 
Congress, especially since both are in 
effect acting as advocates for chal- 
lengers — their legislation would level 
the financial playing field in campaigns 
— while preparing for re-election in 
1998. “Some would say we're the 
dumbest, given the crusade we’ve been 
on,” Mr. McCain said. 

About half of the 45 Democrats in the 
Senate endorse the bill, but only one 
other Senate Republican. Fred 
Thompson of Tennessee, does. But Mr. 
McCain and Mr. Feingold are counting 
on history to repeat itself. Just as it took 
Watergate to produce major campaign- 
finance changes in 1974, Mr. Feingold 
said, the current litany of scandals may 
drive this generation's fund-raising 
overhaul. 

The results of Tuesday’s efforts were 
mixed. At an editorial board meeting of 
The Boston Herald, the newspaper's 
publisher, Patrick Purcell, agreed to 
publish a copy of the Common Cause 
petition. 

The phone lines at WBUR lit up earli- 
er than usual when listeners heard the 
topic of the houriong program. But the 
turnout at Faneuil Hall was disappoint- 
ing. Mr. McCain blamed the bone- 
chilling cold and declared the event a 
“good start.” 



ixecution 
Sets Off Call for Reform 


By Donald P. Baker 

Washington Po st Service 

MIAMI — Moments after Pedro 
Medina was strapped into Honda's 
electric chair and 2,000 volts of elec- 
tricity surged into his body, flames 
leaped from his head, filling the 
death chamber with smoke and hor- 
rifying two dozen witnesses. 

“They’re burning him alive,” a 
witness, Michael Minerva, muttered 
as flames shot four to six inches into 
die air from die metal helmet that 
covered Mr. Medina’s shaved head. 

It was the second time flame s rose 
from the mask of an inmate's head 
dining a Florida execution, and the 
events Tuesday immediately drew 
renewed attention to die electric chair 
■ and whether it is an appropriate form 
of " 


execution brought new calls 
far reform from fries of capital pun- 
ishment in Florida, which along with 
.' Texas and Virginia, most frequently 
invokes die death penalty. 

Mr. Medina, a Cuban refugee con- 
■ vie ted of stabbing a school teacher in 
1982, was the 39th person put to 
death in the state since the U.S. Su- 
• prone Court lifted a ban on the death 
penalty in 1976. 

Governor Lawton Chiles said after 
Mr. Medina’s death that Florida 
would consider changing its method 
of execution. 

Criminologists who study the 
death penalty said that, around the 
country, there have been at least a 
half-dozen malfunctioning electro- 
cutions since 1983. 


Witnesses said Mr. Medina's last 
words, as he was strapped into the 
oak electric chair, were: “I’m still 
innocent.” The chair has been in use 
at the Florida Stale Prison in Starke, 
near Gainvesviile, since it was made 
by inmates in 1923. 

Mr. Minerva, a lawyer for the Cap- 
ital Collateral Representative, the 
Florida agency that defends ftearh 
row inmates, said that after the 
flames were extinguished, “you 
could smell burning flesh,” 
something he had not experienced 
during five previous executions that 
be had witnessed. 

Another witness, Ron Ward, an 
Associated Press reporter, wrote that 
“blue and orange frames up to a foot 
long shot from the right side” of Mr. 
Medina's head, “and flickered for 6 
to 10 seconds.” 

As the witnesses gasped, a Cor- 
rections Department spokeswoman. 
Kerry Flack, said a maintenance su- 
pervisor wearing electrical gloves 
patted out the flames while another 
official opened a window to disperse 
the smoke. 

Michael Radelet, chairman of the 
sociology department at the Uni- 
versity of Florida and the author of 
four books on capital punishment, 
said that Mi. Medina had a lifelong 
history of mental illness and that the 
Florida Supreme Court was deeply 
divided on the penalty for Mr. Med- 
ina, voting 4 to 3 to uphold the ex- 
ecution. lbe case also bad drawn the 
attention of Pope John Paul Q and the 
state's Catholic bishops, who had 
pleaded for mercy. 


First Woman 
Is Set to Lead 
Bermudans 


The Associated Press 

HAMILTON. Bermuda — The gov- 
erning party has chosen the daughter of 
a well-known civil-rights leader as Ber- 
muda's next prime minister, in a move 
apparently aimed at establishing a rap- 
port with voters before national elec- 
tions. 

The United Bermuda Party named 
Pamela Gordon, former environment 
minister, to the post after no other cab- 
inet ministers challenged her nomina- 
tion. Ms. Gordon, 41, is the first woman 
to be prime minister in Bermuda and the 
youngest leader in its nearly 400-year 
histojy. 

Prime Minister David Saul, 57, 
resigned last week to make way for what 
he hoped would be a younger and more 
popular leader. 

“This is a fitting tribute to the new 
start of a new day for the United Ber- 
muda Party.” Ms. Gordon said. She will 
be sworn in Thursday by the British- 
appointed governor. Lord Waddington. 

Ms. Gordon, a relative political new- 
comer, pledged to bridge differences 
between Bermuda's majority black pop- 
ulation and its white business elite. She 
faces the difficult task of restoring the 
party’s popularity in time for general 
elections, which must be held within 18 
moflths. 

Ms. Gordon is the daughter of E. F. 
Gordon, a native of Trinidad who foun- 
ded the Bermuda Workers Association, 
which later became the Bermuda In- 
dustrial Union, the island's biggest 
labor organization. 


Simpson’s Lawyers Seek a New Trial 


By Duke Helfand 

Los Angela Times Service 


■* SANTA MONICA, California— Ar- 
; -gtung that jury misconduct, insufficient 
evidence and other irregularities had 
prevented O. J. Simpson from receiving 
a: fair civil trial, lawyers have filed mo- 
tions seeking a new trial and asking 
Judge Hiroshi Fujisaki of Superior 
Court to reduce the damage awards of 
$33.5 milli on that jurors voted against 
-the former football star. 

^ Mr. Simpson’s attorneys contend that 
Ins civil trial was tainted on 12 legal 
grounds, including what the defense 
.said were er r o rs in law and “abuse of 
discretion” by the court 


They say that each of the 12 grounds 
‘ ‘materially affected the substantial 
rights of the defendant and prevented 
him from obtaining a fair trial." 

The legal papers, in which Judge 
Fujisaki was asked Tuesday to set aside 
the jury verdicts, offer only an outline of 
the defense’s case for a new trial. Mr. 
Simpson’s lawyers must file a full ex- 
planation of their arguments by April 4, 
and the plaintiff’s attorneys will have 10 
days to respond. 

Judge Fujisaki set April 25 as the date 
to hear the request for a new trial, ac- 
cording to Mr. Simpson’s lawyers. 

One source close to Mr. Simpson said 
an extended version of the defense 
pleadings would deal partly with claims 


that Judge Fujisaki erred when be ad- 
mitted lie-detector evidence and al- 
lowed a counselor for battered women 
to testify about a call she believed to 
have come from Nicole Brown 
Simpson, although the source of the call 
was never clearly determined. 

The plaintiffs' lawyers insist that Mr. 
Simpson received a fair trial. 

A Santa Monica Superior Court jury 
last month found Mr. Simpson liable for 
the murders in 1994 of the former Mrs. 
Simpson and of Mr. Goldman and 
awarded foe victims’ families a total of 
$33 J million in compensatory and pu- 
nitive damages. Mr. Simpson was found 
not guilty of the murders in a criminal 
trial that ended in October 1995. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Waist Deep and Counting 

With flood waters from the North 
p ushing more silt down the Missis- 
sippi River, the BigMuddy is muddier 
than ever. 

- “The c o ncentration of sand in foe 
water is heavier *han I’ve ever seen 
it," said Captain Jack Levine, pres- 
ident of the Bar Pilots Association, 
which guides ships from New Orleans 
to the Gulf of Mexico. 

The river bottom has been rising; a 
coal-laden freighter ran aground near 
the mouth of the gulf last week. As a 
result, ships have been ordered to float 
. two feet (60 centimeters) higher than 
' usual, and that means less cargo. The 
- difference, said Charming Hayden of 
the New Orleans Steamship Asso- 

• nation, “could cost a shipper $68,400 

to $82^00, possibly all his profits." 

Farh year, about 59 million tons of 
sflt has to be dredged. The mud may 
win but this year. “They're dredging, 

but foe sfltation is just about as fast as 


the dredge,” Mr. Levine said. “It's 
very bard to get ahead.” 

Short Takes 

What is the best test of whether a 
piece of fiction is truly Southern? 
Twangy speech? Sultry weather? 
People fanning themselves in an over- 
crowded courtroom? To Jerry Mills, 
the answer is clear a dead mule. Sur- 
veying the writings of authors from 
William Faulkner to Richard Wright, 
he has found more than 200 dead- 
mule references. The mule. be ex- 
plains. was once the work animal cm 
nearly every farm, and its death can be 
evocative, whether by overwork, 
beating, gunshot, or in one case de- 
capitation by an opera singer. Mr. 
Mills’s theory, which he has been 
espousing for years, has spawned a 
literary magazine and a Dead Mule 
dub in Chapel Hill. North* Carolina. 

A decades-long rise in interracial 
marriage has been most pronounced 
in foe military. Researchers at foe 

University of Michigan have found 
that in 1990, 8 percent of black men 
aeed 25 to 34 were married to 
someone of another race, compared 
with fewer than 2 percent in the 1 940s 


and 1950s. Among white men in the 
same category, about 4 percent were 
married to someone of another race, 
compared with 1 percent in foe earlier 
period. White men who had served in 
the military were three times as likely 
to marry black women as white men 
who had never served. White women 
who had served were seven times 
more likely to many men of other 
races than those who had never 
served. 

For years they did it on the sly, 
lurking in their kitchens and feeling 
guilty about iL Then Norm Hank off 
had an inspiration. While wolfing 
down tuna salad over his sink, using 
extra-strength potato chips as utensils, 
he decided it was time to remove the 
cloud over the table-impaired. He 
formed foe International Association 
of People Who Dine Oyer the Kitchen 
Sink, and decreed foe day after 
Thanksgiving to be Sinkie Day. In 
1994, when Hillaiy Rodham Clinton 
was looking for an American chef. 
Mr. Hankoff sent a letter suggesting 

' Mis. 

But 

suspects the president 
was privately intrigued. 

International Herald Tribune 



POLITICAL NOTES 


Gingrich Takes Heat 

WASHINGTON — A Republican 
congressman from Long Island, New 
York, says Newt Gingrich is ’ ‘roadkiJl 
on the highway of American politics” 
and should be replaced as speaker if 
Republican lawmakers are committed 
to the agenda they embraced after 
taking control of Congress. 

Representative Peter King's com- 
ments were published in foe March 31 
issue of The Weekly Standard. 

“He came to power amid tri- 
umphant cries of 'Revolution!’ ’* Mr. 
King wrote in the political journal, 
whose editor is William Kristol. foe 
conservative commentator. “Now his 
motto seems to be, ‘If you can't beat 
'em. join ’em.’ " 

Mr. King wrote that he was not dis- 
paraging the speaker for his problems 
regarding ethics violations, but because 
he had lost faith in Mr. Gingrich's 
leadership. He asserted foatthe speaker 
had abandoned conservative Repub- 
lican principles, including support for 
tax cuts and opposition to race -based 
quotas. He also wrote that Republicans 
in Congress were adrift and “in danger 
of losing our identity as a party.” 

Mr. Gingrich was in Asia on Tues- 
day, and an aide said he could not be 
reached for comment. (NYT) 

Democrat Stays Mum 

COLUMBIA, South Carolina — 
Donald Fowler has declined to say 
whether, as Democratic national 
chairman, be intervened with a Na- 
tional Security Council aide in an ef- 
fort to gain a presidential audience for 
an international oil financier who con- 
tributed heavily to the Democratic 
Party in 1995 and 1996. 

Speaking to reporters here Tuesday, 
he suggested foal his role in getting the 
financier, Roger Tamraz, into the 
White House had been misstated. But 
be refused repeated offers to explain 
iL “I'm not going to respond to those 
questions," said Mr. Fowler. “It is so 
complicated, and there is so much 
misinformation already that there’s no 
way to get it straightened ouL" 

According to government officials 



May Ann CtawOart/Tbc Aaoourd Pccn 

Mr. Fowler addressing a business group in Columbia. The former 
Republican chairman, Haley Barbour, right, appeared with him. 


investigating questions about Mr. Tam- 
raz's access to the White House. Mr. 
Fowler intervened in late 1995 with foe 
aide. Sheila Heslin, to tty to persuade 
her to reverse her recommendation that 
Mr. Tamraz not be allowed ro meet 
with President Bill Clinton. 

Mr. Tamraz, who personally and 
through one of his companies donated 
$177,000 to the Democrats, ultimately 
was invited to the White House over 
her objections. He was seeking sup- 
port for an oil pipeline from foe Caspi- 
an Sea through foe Caucasus Moun- 
tains to foe Mediterranean. (NYT) 


stantial assistance” that warranted a 
reduction in his 28-month sentence for 
defrauding the government. Mr. Hale 
has contended that in 1 986, when Mr. 
Clinton was governor of Arkansas, he 
asked Mr. Hale to make a loan of 
$300,000 to Susan McDougal, a part- 
ner with Mr. Clinton in foe Whitewater 
land venture. At the time, Mr. HaJe 
was running an investment company 
sponsored by the Small Business Ad- 
ministration, which backed foe loan. 
Mr. Clinton has denied the accusa- 
tion. (NYT) 


Starr Helps Witness Q^Vnqaote 

i Plinlfin annniini 


WASHINGTON — The Whitewa- 
ter independent counsel has asked a 
federal judge in Arkansas to reduce 
foe prison sentence of David Hale, a 
major prosecution witness who has 
accused President Clinton of helping 
to arrange an improper federally 
backed loan in foe 1980s. 

In papers filed in U.S. District Court 
in Little Rock, Arkansas, the counsel, 
Kenneth Stair, and his staff said Mr. 
Hale had continued to provide "sub- 


President Clinton, announcing that 
foe injury to his right knee had forced 
foe postponement of a trip to Mexico 
next month and a more expansive Lat- 
in American visit in May: "Among 
other things, we’re going to Argentina 
and Brazil. They're big countries. 
There’s going to be a lot of moving 
around, and I need a little more phys- 
ical mobility. Besides. I'm going to 
ride horses and do some other things, 
and I'm not quite ready for that, as you 
can see." (WP) 


Away From 


Politics 


• Ordered to abort Its landing only 
after it was already on foe ground, a 
private jet arriving at La Guardia Air- 
port in New York smashed into a 
maintenance truck on the runway, nar- 
rowly missing two workers. (NYT) 


• A New Jersey Transit train en- 
gineer who ran a red signal a year ago 
and caused a collision that killed him 
and two other people was going blind 
from diabetes but had kept his con- 
dition secret, the National Transpor- 
tation Safety Board said. (NYT) 

• The CIA, unhappy about the de- 
parture of experienced analysts, has 
begun to cut back on middle level 


managers in its analytical branch to 
give their comparatively well-paying 
slots to intelligence analysts with ex- 
pertise it wants to retain. (WP) 

• An estimated $2.1 million in gold 
was discovered at foe Cranston. 
Rhode Island! home of foe mother of a 
man convicted of laundering $136 
million in Colombian drug money, a 
top prosecutor said. (AP) 



In a year’s time it will be a Rolex. 

Every Rolex begins its life as a solid ingot of 18ct. gold, 
platinum, or stainless steel. Not until a full year later, with its 
self-winding movement beating safely within its Oyster ♦ 

■it - u j c i-c ROLEX 

case, will it be readv tor a t g g gjfe lifetimes service. of Geneva 









PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 

EUROPE 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin met 
with top government leaders Wednesday and 
completed a wide-ranging cabinet reshuffle 
on the eve of a nationwide strike to protest 
unpaid wages. 

Union officials predicted that as many as 17 
million Russians would join the one-day 
strike Thursday. They are demanding back 
pay that many workers have not seen for up to 
six months. 

; For weeks. Mr. Yeltsin has been expressing 
sympathy for the strikers' plight, which most 
Russians attribute to the economic policies of 
his government. He has promised that the 
wage-payment crisis would be a top priority 
of his newly revamped administration. 


“The government does not object to the 
national protest action." the financial news- 
paper Kommersant said Wednesday. "The 
government is openly supporting the strikers’ 
demands.” It has sanctioned the protest 
marches on Thursday. The Interior Ministry is 
deploying 16.000 police officers in Moscow, 
but ministry officials have expressed con- 
fidence there will be no violence. 

Kommersant suggested thru Mr. Yeltsin's 
government — ostensibly the target of the 
strike — wanted workers to believe their real 
enemies were local authorities and company 
directors who had mishandled federal sub- 
sidies. 

Another newspaper, the English-language 
Moscow Times, suggested an opposite scen- 


ario — that the strike was being supported by 
factory directors and regional governments 
who see it as a way to squeeze more rubles out 
of the federal government. 

Mr. Yeltsin met with Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin and his two top deputies, 
Anatoli Chubais and Boris Nemtsov, to fill 
remaining vacancies in the cabinet. Most key 
posts were filled previously, but on Wed- 
nesday Mr. Yeltsin kept former Economics 
Minister Yevgeni Yasin in (he cabinet, mak- 
ing him a minister without portfolio. 

Wage and pension arrears nationwide are in 
the tens of trillions of rubles (billions of 
dollars) and strikes have become common, 
affecting 5,360 plants in February alone, ac- 
cording to the Interfax news agency. 


France Plans 
Steps to Aid 
Immigrants 


!l:i $ • t 

I liiiiiiPii 


Reuters 

PARIS — The center-right gov- 
ernment, assailed by the left and 
iextreme right over the explosive im- 
migration issue, announced mea- 
sures Wednesday to hasten integra- 
tion of legal immigrants into 
mainstream society. 

■ * ‘The unfavorable economic con- 
text, marked by unemployment, has 
had negative effects on integra- 
tion,” said the minister for territ- 
orial planning, urban affairs and in- 
tegration, Jean -Claude Gaudin, 
'adding that this had “aggravated 
■tensions with native-born French 
people.” 

; He spoke after Eric Raoult, junior 
minister for urban affairs and inte- 
gration, presented at the weekly cab- 
inet meeting 1 8 steps designed to help 
lover 3 J milli on foreign nationals and 
[up to 1 .7 million of their French-bom 
■children better adapt to France. 

1 The measures include free French 







* 


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liligil 

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Death Toll 
In Albania 
Exceeds 200 


Jocfacn Edod/Rubn 


FATAL GERMAN BLAST — Fire fighters in central Leipzig searching the scene of gas explosion 
that destroyed an apartment building Wednesday, killing one person and injuring eight. 


lessons, help with homework for 
children of non-French-SDeakme 


•children of non-French-speaking 
.‘parents, aid In finding jobs and re- 
ducing foe tune needed for natur- 
alization. seen as foe key to ime- 
.gration. President Jacques Chirac 
'wants to cut the minimum time peri- 
od to six years instead of seven. 

! There also were moves to close 
■some hostels for single foreign work- 
,’ers, which foe police say are some- 


times hotbeds of Islamic militancy or 
centers for chug trafficking. 

Mr. Chirac told the cabinet that 
the measures could be taken only if 
the government simultaneously 
cracked down hard against illegal 
immigrants. 

Officials say the immigrants 
number in foe hundreds of thou- 
sands. 

The new measures, which will 
cost 3.5 billion francs ($6 IS mil- 
lion), came hours after the National 
Assembly approved a bill to clamp 
down on illegal immigration. 


The bill had prompted wide- 
spread protests by artists, intellec- 
tuals and leftists who said it was 
discriminatory and violated human 
rights. 

The new measures to keep out 
clandestine immigrants and better 
integrate legal arrivals are also aimed 
at checking foe rising power of the 
extreme-right National Front party 
which wants to expel all foreigners 
from France, Mr. Gaudin said 
The tensions caused by diffi- 
culties in integrating immigrants, he 
said, were “feeding foe speeches of 


hate and exclusion of a racist and 
xenophobic party." 

He added, “And we don't need 
lessons from the left, whose sug- 
gestions of giving foreigners the 
right to vote only automatically pro- 
duce more backers for the National 
Front." 

The National Front, which opinion 
polls indicate can count on foe votes 
of about 15 percent of the population, 
has seen its fortunes rise in foe past 
decade parallel with unemployment, 
now at nearly 13 percent, and with 
changes in immigration patterns. 


Complied by Oar Stcff From Oitpatdtei 

TIRANA, Albania — A total of 
19 people, including a police man, 
were killed in Albania in a 24-hour 
period as armed bands continued to 
rampage unchecked around the 
country, various sources said Wed- 
nesday. 

The new bring to more 

than 200 foe number of those killed 
since residents began looting arms 
depots Feb. 28. 

* The Albanian authorities are not 
able to protect the population, and 
that's why it is very difficult to 
persuade people to hand in their 
weapons,’ ’ declared Deputy Interior 
Minister Lush Perpali. 

He said that foe 19 who died were 
mainly victims of c riminal gangs 
that had looted army barracks. 

President Sali Bensha, meanwhile, 
said he would support European Uni- 
on efforts to ease the Albanian crisis 
and put an end to lawlessness and the 
threat of famine. 

He spoke after meeting with 
Prime Minister BashJdm Fino, who 
just returned from talks with foe 
foreign ministers of the EU, in 
Rome. 

The Albanian Foreign Ministry 
said it was awaiting the arrival of an 
eight-member EU delegation that 
will assess foe situation, and male* 
proposals on how to end foe armed 
insurgency. (AFP.AP) 


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Yeltsin Finishes Cabinet Reshuffle on Eve of Big Strike 


briefly 


* Bureaucrats to Lose Luxury Cars 

In a. blow to bureaucrats who have grown 
accustomed to foreign luxury cars. President 
Yeltsin banned the government Wednesday 
from buying imported cars and ordered that 
those in use be sold at auction. It was not clear 
whether the ban extended to Mr. Yeltsin him- 
self -He is chauffeured around Moscow in a 
stretch Mercedes limousine, accompanied by 
security officials in a fleet of imported cars. 

The step was proposed by Mr. Nemtsov, die 
former reformist governor of foe central re- 
gion of Niz&ni Novgorod, who was named 
first deputy prime minister this month. He 
said expensive foreign cars should be re- 
placed with the Russian-made Volga sedan. 


IRA Suspected in 2 UJC Blasts 


[f.JIoBgKoi 
f To Increai 


WILMSLOW, England — Two suspecta i IRA tmatxi 
damaged railroad tracks and signahng^mpmMl mite 
northwestern town of Wttaslow on WedoKday.m an 
annarent effort to disrupt the British electrons May I . 
^Mme Minister John Major said the blasts looked very 
muchUkefoe work of the banned Irish RepubbcmAmjr 
and called them a “two-fingered insult to democracy . 
before foe election. . 

There was little damage, and no,casu" Qes ; _ . : 

Mr. Major added that he hoped the IRA and Sum Fem, 
its political wing, were “not going to conduct their 
campaigns at foe ballot box m Northern Ireland and wiflj 
bombs on the mainland of Britain." (Reuters) 


sapp'y of 


signaling equipment in foe' . .. 

slow on Wednesday, man , A fiQ\ UUUi 
British elections May I. - ; 

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Spain Bars Financier’s Exit 


MADRID — The National Court on Wednesday 
ordered foe convicted Banesto financier Mario Condfe to 


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Mr. Conde was ordered not to leave the country and to 
appear before court twice a week. The Interior Ministry 
was asked to watch over his movements so that he does 
□ot try to escape, national radio said. . . ' _ 

Mr. Conde was sentenced last week to six years in jail for 
misappropriating 600 milli on pesetas ($4.2 million) while 
chairman of foe Banco Espanol de Credito SA. (AP) 




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Belarus Recalls Envoy to U.S* 


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tified sources. 

The ambassador, Valeri Tsepkalo, named Monday,, 
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The dispute began Monday when Belarus expelled a f 
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larus, a U.S. Embassy spokeswoman said. (AP) 


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French Teaching Hospitals Strike 


PARIS — The staff of most French teaching hospitals 
went on strike Wednesday to protest government-decreed 
health curbs, but emergency services remained oper- 
ational. 


China 


A spokesman for the hospital staff union said 22 of 26 
riversity centers were affected by the strike. The pro- 


university centers were affected by foe strike. The pro- 
testers were planning to march through Paris on 
Thursday. (Reuters) 


V -UtvESfr . 


NATO May Move Headquarters $ 


BRUSSELS — The North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation is considering changing headquarters because foe 
building it has occupied for the last 30 years in Brussels is 
too small and run down, diplomats said Wednesday. 

Among the first suggestions were either to build new 
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PAGE 6 


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


IteraU* 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISH E0 HITU THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POET 


Value a Leaner UN 


The new secretary-general of the 
United Nations, Kofi Annan, has 
checked in with his first refoim pro- 
posals. The staff trims (1,000 jobs out 
of 9,000) and budget cuts ($123 mil- 
lion out of $1.3 billion) and other steps 
have encountered a frosty reception in 
the U.S. Congress. An aide to Senator 
Jesse Helms warns that Mr. Annan, 
who has personally courted the power- 
ful Foreign Relations Committee 
chairman, may be playing a “shell 
game." There is a wide gap between 
the United Nations and its strategically 
placed Senate antagonists. 

People should be clear about what 
the parties are arguin g over. The United 
Nations is, despite some past shrink- 
age, a notoriously undisciplined bu- 
reaucracy. It needs reform, urgently. 
Mr. Annan, a veteran insider who 
knows where the bodies are buried, 
needs no reminding of the requirement 
to make the United Nations, as be says, 
leaner, more efficient, possessing more 
impact well managed and accountable. 
Rea sonab le people differ over whether 
his proposals go far enough. We think 
they are a good-faith effort that de- 
serves American encouragement. 

Unfortunately, the Annan sort of re- 
form is remote from the views that 
Senator Helms expressed recently in 
Foreign Affairs ma gazin e. The chair- 


man has no sense of an evolving world 
or ganizatio n serving the disparate pri- 
orities of its 1 35 members. Rather, he is 
driven by an angry apprehension that 
“the UN" threatens American sover- 
eignty. It follows that he would warn to 
cut the bureaucracy by 50 percent and 
the budget by 75 percent and to allow 
members to pony up just for the items 
they select. The reform “benchmarks" 
by which he would release funds are 
designed with a similar killer purpose. 

In short, there are good reasons to 
press rigorous reform at the United 
Nations, but pleasing Chairman Helms 
is not one of them. His position is 
principled in its antique isolationist 
fashion but otherwise is sheer destruc- 
tion. The Clinton administration has its 
work cut out for it in convincing le- 
gislators that the United Nations is a 
useful adjunct to and instrument of 
American foreign policy. But among 
the Republicans who currently lean to 
Mr. Helms, a fair number must realize 
that there is a mismatch between the 
global interests and the limited re- 
sources of the United States, and that 
this critical difference can be partly 
made up by an effective, well-run 
United Nations. The adminis tration 
cannot possibly want to pay the price 
Mir. Helms asks for his support. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Progress at Helsinki 


According to some congressional 
Republicans, last week's Helsinki 
agreement between Bill Clinton and 
Boris Yeltsin on missile defenses dan- 
gerously threatens American security. 
They are wrong on two counts. The 
Helsinki deal permits all current Amer- 
ican missile defense programs to pro- 
ceed as planned Beyond that, it is cru- 
cial to a large r arms control package that 
win make Americans safer by helping 
to lock in radical reductions in Russian 
offensive nuclear weapons arsenals. 

By almost any measure, this was a 
big victory for the White House. 

But the administration will still have 
to cultivate moderate Republican sup- 
port to win the congressional approval 
necessary to turn a summit understand- 
ing into a binding agreement. 

The controversy hinges on the dis- 
tinction between exotic and unproven 
systems for defending the entire North 
American continent, like the Reagan 
administration’s 4 ’star wars' ’ program, 
and more modest systems designed to 
shield local theaters of battle from at- 
tacks by shorter-range missiles 
launched by rogue states like Iraq and 
Iran. Continental systems for defend- 
ing the United States against Russian 
missile attack are effectively banned 
by the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile 
Treaty, while battlefield theater-de- 
fense systems like the Patriot missiles 
used in the Gulf War are not 

Last week's deal in Helsinki cla- 
rified die status of more advanced 
theater-defense weapons that could, in 
theory, be used to defend the entire 
continent. The agreement allows the 
United States to proceed as planned 
with all its theater-defense programs. 
They cannot, however, be tested at the 
higher speeds and longer ranges nec- 


essary for continental defense, nor be 
tested from space. Both sides also 
agreed not to deploy these theater de- 
fenses against each other's missile 
forces. Research on continental and 
space-based systems would still be 
able to proceed. 

This agreement to restrict defensive 
missile systems should help persuade 
Russia's Parliament to ratify the huge 
missile reduction that Mr. Yeltsin 
signed in 1993. That is for more im- 
portant to the security of the American 
continent than missile defenses. Given 
the dubious reliability of Russia's ad- 
ministrative controls, Washington's 
main concern is to reduce nuclear 
stockpiles to the lowest possible levels. 
Russians will accept lower ceilings if 
they can be sure that the remaining 
warheads will not have to run a gaunt- 
let of continental missile defenses. 

Many Republicans, however, would 
prefer to scrap the Anti-Ballistic Mis- 
sile Treaty, contending that it is out- 
moded in the post-CoId War world. 
Rogue states, they argue, may one day 
develop long-range missiles that will 
require a continental defense system. 
But this is a hypothetical danger. The 
real and present danger lies in the Rus- 
sian stockpile. That can best be met by 
locking in the dee}} negotiated reduc- 
tions in Russian missile forces, while 
pursuing research against potential 
dangers from rogue regimes. 

Resident Yeltsin had to stand up to 
his own hawks to accept the Helsinki 
deaL It is a deal that answers America's 
legitimate defensive needs while 
brightening the prospects for an im- 
portant arms reduction package. Con- 
gress should recognize these benefits 
and give its approval. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Colombian Journalists Slain 

Last week, Gerardo Bedoya, the 
chief editorial writer of El Pais in Cali, 
Colombia, was shot to death as be left 
his home, the second journalist killed 
in Colombia this month. Forty-two 
Colombian reporters and editors have 
been killed in the Iasi 10 years. The 
administration of President Ernesto 
Samper can delay no longer in taking 
action against this outrage. 

Mr. Bedoya. a prominent lawyer and 
economist who had also been a con- 
gressman and later an ambassador to the 
European Community, was dogged in 
uncovering what he charged were ties 
between Samper administration politi- 
cians and Colombia’s cocaine cartels. 

A week before Mr. Bedoya's mur- 
der, Freddy Elies Ahumada, a pho- 
tographer for the Bogota newspaper El 
Especiador, was found slain. He had 
been tortured, stabbed and shot several 
times. It is still not clear whether his 
death was related to his work, but both 
his murder and Mr. Bedoya's have 
come at a time of increasing threats 
against Colombia’s courageous jour- 
nalists and newspapers. 

In one of his last columns, Mr. 
Bedoya wrote: “The narcos have cor- 
rupted the state, the government and 


society. They have discredited us be- 
fore the world." He was a patriot and a 
prosecutor of the best sort 

— Los Angeles Times. 

The News Costs Too Mnch 

Television is the most expensive 
medium for news. A correspondent for 
a newspaper, magazine, press agency, 
or radio station or network can travel to 
the scene of a story alone, cover it 
alone, write it up alone, and transmit it 
alone via telephone, fax, or e-mail. The 
basic working unit in international 
television news consists of a corre- 
spondent, a field producer, a camera 
person and a sound engineer. The cost 
of this journalistic caravan, including 
hotels, per diem expenses, car rentals 
and local support staff, begins at 
around $3,000 a day. 

New channels have cut the net- 
works' share of the television news 
market approximately 25 percent from 
the peak years. The decline has pushed 
network news producers to the ap- 
parently logical, if journalistically un- 
desirable, conclusion that foreign news 
is expendable unless it is of compelling 
interest to a mass audience. 

— Garrick Utley, quoted in 
The Washington Post . 



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EDITORIALS/OPINION 



What Was That About Preventive Diplomacy 


VJCT ASHINGTON — The threads of 
YY the foreign policy challenges that 
Bill Clinton faces in his second term 
have come together in a compelling 
pattern in the final 10 days of March. It 
is a pattern that reveals the strengths and 
weaknesses abroad of President Clinton 
as a leader and of American power and 
purpose beyond the Cold War. 

Consider this juxtaposition: While 
Mr. Clinton was returning from Hel- 
sinki with a clutch of tentative but 
impressive security agreements with 
Russia’s Boris Yeltsin, and while Vice 
President Al Gore was reluctantly gear- 
ing up to go to China, the assault ship 
Nassau began a historic journey of a 
different kind last weekend 

The Nassau is now steaming from the 
Mediterranean, where it helped evac- 
uate U.S. citizens from the chaos of 
Albania, to sub-Saharan Africa, where 
it is to help evacuate U.S. citizens from 
the chaos of Zaire if that becomes nec- 
essary. From Afibania) to Z(aire), the 
worid-’s only superpower is pulling its 
citizens out of deeper involvement in 
the conflict of troubled lands. 

The symbolism of the episodic en- 
gagement in foreign crises by foe Nas- 
sau, which carries 1 ,400 Marines and 20 
helicopters, runs even deeper. It is mid- 


By Jim Hoag! and 


way through a six-month tour as pan of 
a battle group originally sent to the 
Gulf. But it had to leave behind the 
uoublemaking potential of Iraq and Iran 
to pull U.S. citizens out of ham’s way 
first in die Balkans and then in Africa. 

Even in the Middle East, where 
American interests are vital and with- 
drawal is not an option, the United 
States seems at the moment to stand on 
the sidelines as Palestinian -Israeli vi- 
olence flares and the era of peaceful 
accommodations launched at Camp 
David teeters on the brink of collapse. 
Mr. Clinton’s efforts to placate each side 
sequentially with White House visits 
and irreconcilable statements of support 
have done nothing to calm the storm. 

This mosaic suggests, perhaps not 
surprisingly, that Mr. Clinton does best 
abroad in areas that he also dominates 
at home. When be can tackle problems 
as a politician, focusing energies and 
effort as he would on the campaign 
trail, he usually brings the bacon borne. 
Exhibit A: his sujnmit meeting with 
Mr. Yeltsin in Finland. 

The accomplishments of Helsinki 
are the accomplishments of two ex- 


perienced politicians who have agreed 
not to embarrass each other at home 
and who are willing to pay something 
politically for that arrangement. There 
was no drama over NATO expansion, 
and instead a package of sensible ac- 
commodations on missile defenses and 
a future treaty to reduce U.S- and Rus- 
sian nuclear warheads equitably. 

This was accomplished despite Mr. 
Clinton's barely concealed irritation 
with the way Mr. Yeltsin harped in 
public and private on his startlingly 
strong recovery from heart surgery and 
pneumonia and on the injured Mr. Clin- 
ton’s appearance in a wheelchair. 

No such higher motives were on 
display in Mr. Gore's first public ap- 
pearance in Beijing on Tuesday, when 
he lent his presence to the ceremonial 
signing of two business deals worth 
almost 52 billion in Chinese orders to 
Boeiag and General Motors. 

And the administration wonders why 

the Chinese think they may be able to 
purchase American politicians? Won- 
der no more about that, or about why so 
many Americans have misgivings 


Mr. Clinton has beenrelatively con- 
sistent on Russia and Chma (afer an 
initial flip-flop on Beijoig> Bathos 
engagement with other foreign prob- 
tahas been much spot^r He^ 
handled many of them as he rhd cam- 
S trail bnish fires: as Pf^**** 
cycle or a presentation problem. Since 
Somalia, damage limitation has been 
the guiding principle of American ac- 
tion in the Third W orld. 

This is not to criticize A merican 

prudence in itete °f "g 
eruptions in Albania and Zaire. The 
administration was wise to stay out of 
these unpredictable combat situations, 
and to bring U.S. citizens to safety. 

The question that history will ask u 
whether the world’s “indispensable 
superpower.” to use foe .afbnmistra- 
tion’s clichd. did enough to identify and 
respond to early warning signals, when 
these national tragedies ought have 
been moderated by diplomatic or poet- 
ical responses from the world s 


strongest nations. 

Mr. Clinton came to office more than 


of Clinton & Co. when it comes to 
China, campaign contributions or other 
areas where money is a driving force. 


four years ago promising that prevent-, 
jve diplomacy would be foe hallm a r k 
of American involvement abroad. The 
world still waits. 

The Washington Post . 


* 


For Lack of Healthy Nation-States, ‘Europe’ Is Going Awry 


P ARIS — “Europe’s" 40th 
birthday on Tuesday was 
not a happy affair. European 
ambition is still there, but the 
project has gone awry. 

In explanation, people cite 
the linked economic and social 
problems of foe European coun- 
tries today, but that does not 
really satisfactorily account for 
the widely held sentiment that 
foe official program for the 
European Union's future is not 
the right one. 

“Europe” has become in- 
creasingly associated with in- 
security rather than security. 

In foe beginning it meant no 
more war between European 
nations. That is what European 
unification was all about. Then 
it came to mean prosperity 
through cooperation and inte- 
gration. That phase in Europe's 
development led up to foe 
single market The single cur- 
rency is meant to revitalize that 
economic progress. 

But “Europe" recently has 
come also to suggest loss of 
popular control over govern- 
ments, submission to anonym- 
ous international authorities 
and to destructive international 
forces. The unelected officials 
in Brussels promote globaliz- 
ation and competition, and too 
often, to voters, that signifies 
unemployment and the loss of 
European social solidarity. 

In the past, unity was ex- 
pected to produce a more 
powerful Europe. It has re- 
vealed a weaker one, humiliated 
by the war in ex-Yugoslavia, 
incapable of agreeing even on a 
policy to help chaotic and im- 
poverished Albania, dominated 
in global affairs by a United 
States that does not even allow 
the Europeans the dignity of be- 
ing ignored. Washington does 
not only do what it wants to do. 
On matters like NATO expan- 


By William Pfaff 


sion, it tells the Europeans what 
they are going to do. 

Enlargement to Central and 
Eastern Europe seems neces- 
sary. otherwise how can the 
Union be called “Europe"? 
Yet everyone understands that 
this will simply make European 
institutions even more cumber- 
some and incoherent. 

A recent analysis by a so- 
ciologist at foe Paris Institute of 
Political Studies, Henri Men- 
dras, argues that foe cumulative 
effect of all this has undermined 
people's belief that foeir gov- 
ernments are still in charge of 
their personal as well as their 
collective security, and has thus 
diminished their confidence in 
citizenship. 

He sees this as in part ex- 
plaining foe relative success in 
France of the rightist National 
Front. In the past it was taken for 
granted that government would 
be able to protect people’s 
health and retirement, defend 
employment and foe nation's 
great enterprises, and secure the 
country against internal threats 
as well as foreign enemies. 

Globalization as well as Eu- 
ropeanization have instead 
robbed states of control over 
their economies, and made 
people customers of privatized 
state services and enterprises, 
removing foeir claim on these 
institutions as citizens. 

Private interests profit from 
what before bad been public 
goods and services. Even armies 
now are compelled to function 
under international constraints 
or control — under the United 
Nations and then NATO in 
Yugoslavia, and under the 
United States in foe Gulf War. 

People are told that all this is 
necessary for Europe to prosper 
in foe future, play a great role 


again in world affairs, or even 
for it to survive today against 
competition from Asia and 
America. True or not, all this 
contributes to a European pub- 
lic sense of impotence. 

The policies now followed 
offer no solution to this uneas- 
iness. The prospect of a single 
currency to replace national 
currencies upsets a great many 
people, most of all the Germans, 
whose government leads in pro- 
moting this change. Expanding 
the Union so as to take in 1 1 new 
candidates (and maybe more, 
later) can only worsen the com- 
plications. The idea of a com- 
mon foreign policy for 26 na- 
tions is ludicrous. 

Much of the trouble has come 
from foe conviction of many 
foal Europe must emulate the 
United States, as a highly suc- 
cessful and thoroughly integrat- 
ed federation. But the federation 


of 13 American colonies pos- 
sessing language, philosophy 
and history in common, with 
shared patterns of economics 
and trade, bears no resemblance 
to Europe's problem of putting 
together ancient nations and 
peoples of different languages 
and sometimes radically diver- 
gent histories and cultures. 

The American social model is 
also a dangerous example for 
Europeans. The experiences of 
the wilderness and immigration, 
their legacies of individualism 
and egalitarianism, foe chance 
in America to move on to a new 
homestead — to “go west” — 
if things went badly, have cre- 
ated American popular attitudes 
hostile to Europe’s Bismarckian 
welfare state, and to its Chris- 
tian Democratic/Social Demo- 
cratic “social capitalism." 

It would seem to this observ- 
er that Europeans, four decades 
on from Jean Monnet must 
look again into foeir own na- 


tional as well as coUectiye ex? 
periences to solve this crisis of 
“Europe." They did this when 
they began this extraordinafy 
experiment, locking uptheit 
war-making capacity in a 
shared institution, foe Coal and 
Steel Community. «; 

People today still find foeir 
identity in nationhood, national - 
citizenship. “Europe'’ now in- 
terferes with that felt identity 
and perceived security. Legit* 
imacy still lies with national 
government. - 

This will not be changed by 
institutional innovations; it lies 
deep in European politick! cpHia 
tore itself, where foe spell of foe w . 
nation is. in most placesyra£ 
dimmed, even though foe ac£ 
complishment of Europe is also 
unquestioned. This is a reality: 
which has to be accommodated ■ 
in an original way. rather than 
defied or denied. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. ■ ' ■ 


The Thrust Is Toward Federation 


L ondon — wmiam Pfaff, 
in “Britain Has a Point 
When It Objects to Full Euro- 
pean Union" I March 13). calls 
for a public debate on foe shape 
of a democratic Europe. But 
such a debate has been going on 
for most of this century. 

Richard Coudenhove-Kaler- 
gi wrote his book "Pan-Eu- 
ropa" in 1923. Aristide Briand, 
as French foreign minister, put 
forward his plan for a “Euro- 
pean Federal Union" in 1930, 
Altiero Spine Hi his plan for a 
“United States of Europe” in 
1942, members of the Resis- 
tance groups in Europe a dec- 
laration on “European Feder- 
ation" in Geneva in 1944. 


By Roy Denman 


Chiquita Banana and Huhhell 


N EW YORK — I’m Chi- 
quita Banana and Tve 
come to say / Bananas have to 
ripen in a certain way ... 

“Soon we'U hear about Ba- 
nanagate" was the prediction 
here (IHT Opinion. March 
11). as a veteran right-wing 
tycoon and philanthropist. 
Carl Lindner of Chiquita 
Brands, was spotted giving 
$415,000 to foe Democrats in 
hopes of getting foe World 
Trade Organization to clear 
the way for Chiquita to make a 
bundle. Time magazine's Mi- 
chael Weisskopf and Viveca 
Novak advanced that story 
this week. 

Chiquita worked with foe 
Democratic National Commit- 
tee to steer another half-mil- 
lion dollars into foe Democrat- 
ic maw through two dozen 
state parties, avoiding foe scru- 


By William Satire 


tmy^jven campaigns. 


donors go to great 
lengths to duck disclosure, 
they usually have something 
to hide. In this case, it was 
Chiquita’s need to get Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton to bring 
American trade power to bear, 
even though few U.S. jobs 
were involved. 

Mr. Lindner is a rock-ribbed 
Republican, a big giver to foe 
party for years; foe very quiet 
largesse to the other political 
side helped guarantee that Mr. 
Clinton would trounce foe 
Europeans in trade. 

When they are flecked with 
brown and nave a golden hue. 
/ Bananas taste the best, and 
are the best for you. 

The golden hue began last 
April 12, foe day after U.S. 
Trade Representative Mickey 
Kantor asked the WTO to take 
up Chiquita’s grievance, on 
which the body ruled favor- 
ably this week. 


Within 24 hours, notes 
Time, Mr. Lindner and his 
men began shoveling heavy 
money into Democratic cof- 
fers in two dozen states. 

Mr. Kantor, Mr. Clinton's 
1992 campaign manager, in- 
sists to me from Bangkok that 
it was a staff recommenda- 
tion: “1 had no earthly idea of 
his contributions. I was once 
asked by somebody in foe 
White House — no. I won’t 
say who — should he meet 
with Lindner, and I said, ‘No, 
you should not.' " 

Mr. Lindner not only met 
Mr. Clinton, but turned out to 
be one of the Lincoln Bed- 
room 900. And after its polit- 
ical investment of a measly 
million, Chiquita got U.S. 
sponsorship for a ruling that 
profits it a bunch. 

Mr. Clinton has that Midas 
touch. Turn to his intimate, 
Webster Hubbell, who was 
able to multiply his earning 
power fivefold as the jail- 
house loomed. 

Just before entering foe 
slammer on Aug. 7, 1995, foe 
man who may hold the secrets 
that could bring Bill Clinton 
down sent an intermediary 
(probably through a cutout un- 
known) to Michael Carlisle of 
foe William Morris agency in 
New York. On Sept. 2S. 1995. 
Mr. Hubbell signed a contract 
with Harper Collins for a 
$ 125,000 advance for a quick- 
ie book tentatively entitled 
“Friends in High Places,” in- 
terminably subtitled "an in- 
timate look at the character of 
our president his wife, his 
circle and perhaps his entire 
political generation." 

The publisher (part of 


Rupert Murdoch's empire, but 
that mogul was unaware of a 
deal involving such small 
potatoes) paid foe felon 
$41,667 on signing and 
$20,000 more in May 1996, 
which it is now trying to get 
back. Other providers of the 
more than $500,000 that Mr. 
Hubbell received while he 
was deciding to clam up have 
been more understanding. 

Mr. Hubbell did turn out a 
work product in jail, which is 
more than he did for some 
other "clients" — thousands 
of pages of rambling rumin- 
ations on a yellow pad. plus 
answers to editors' queries 
and their pleas for “more 
compelling" material. 

Most of foe manuscript was 
recently delivered under sub- 
poena to foe independent 
counsel, who is belatedly try- 
ing to establish a connection 
between Mr. Clinton and the 
college friend of Mr. Car- 
lisle's who brought foe agent 
foe proposal. 

What do the astounding fi- 
nancial successes of Chiquita 
Banana and Webster Hubbell 
have in common? Only this: If 
you have a really nice bowl of 
golden-hued fruit to contrib- 
ute to foe flecked Clinton 
cause, you can expect your 
government to make your case 
before foe world. 

And if you have- information 
to withhold that could break 
the Whitewater case, you can 
expect to find Asian wheeler- 
dealers. financial cash cows 
and as-yet-un known cutouts 
making deals for you that can 
toil foe sleaziest fraud out of 
foe most horrific hole. 

So you should never put ba- 
nanas / In the refrigerator. No- 
no-no-no. 

The New Times 


The Schutnan plan for a Coal 
and Steel Community and foe 
Treaty of Rome 'were fully de- 
bated in member state Parlia- 
ments. The Treaty of Maastricht 
was put to a referendum in sev- 
eral member states. And foe de- 
bate will continue. The declared 
aim running all the way through 
has been foe creation of a Euro- 
pean Federation. 

“The EU structure,” Mr. 
Pfaff wrote, “requires govern- 
ments to set policy for the Com- 
mission. All important matters 
have to be settled between gov- 
ernments. ” In other words Euro- 
pean trappings are not serious. 

That is not how the Union 
works. The European Council, 
foe Council of Ministers, foe 
Commission, the European Par- 
liament and foe European Court 
all have a role to play. 

The Commission has certain 
supranational powers; it can 
take member governments to 
court if they disobey Union de- 
cisions; it has the sole right of 
initiative in proposals to the 
council. The council decides, 
but foe decision is powerfully 
influenced by whar has been 
proposed by the Commission. 
Without its initiative and drive, 
the single market and monetary 
union would have got nowhere. 

But foe Commission and foe 
council have to be sensitive to 
foe European Parliament. This 
interrogates the Commission 
and has powers to block de- 
cisions by the- council. During 
the last 10 years these powers 
have been substantially in- 


creased, and foe Parliament is 
more willing to use tbem_ Ahy^ _ 
one in any doubt about this 
should ask foe thousands of lob! 
byists who swarm round It 7. 

The next decisive step wig 
come with a single currency! 
This has' to happen because ofo* 
erwise currency fluctuations 
will destroy foe single market/ . ' 

A single currency raustirnpfy . . 
a greater degree of political in- Tr- 
tegration, and thus a movi 
along foe path to federation 
Whether foe end result will t&I 
semble foe German Federal Rfrf 
public or foe Swiss Confedefri 
ation or foe United States of 
America, only time will telL 4 

The British insist on the-SO** . 
ereignty of the nation-state to 
elude foe dilemma in which the 
prospect of a united Europe has 
always placed them. Either foe£ 
abandon such cherished dels? 
sions as being foe center oFfi 
great Commonwealth and foe 
special pet of the United States) 
and get mixed up with a lot of 
Continentals who eat wursf and 
garlic and babble away in ft#?' 
eign languages. Or they face « - 
future, on their own, of uririn? * 
portant isolation. . ~3 m : 

So the reaction is to pretend 
foar the European move will not 
happen and that if it does it win 
not work. Thai was foe British 
attitude to the Schuman plan 
and to the Treaty of Rome, But 
they happened and worked. 1 ■ 

So will monetary union. Aria 
years later, as before, the Britfcft 
will apply to join, facing rules 
made years before without Brit- 
ish interests in mind and which- 
cannot be changed. • 

International Herald Tribune, i 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS ACfg 


1897: Illegal Divorces 


NEW YORK — Judge Kean, of 
foe Supreme Court of foe State 
of Washington, has decided that 
more than fifty persons who se- 
cured divorces in that State dur- 
ing the past three years and mar- 
ried again are bigamists. The 
Court holds that, when foe 
second marriage took place 
within six months after divorce 
it was unlawful. This is not 
known to many divorcees, who 
went to Washington in order to 
avail themselves of the fax di- 
vorce laws of that State, and in 
some cases were married im- 
mediately to the persons of foeir 
second choice. 



it longer. The ceremony 
witnessed by huge crowds 
there was scarcely a dry 
the throng of real “wets" wits 
witnessed foe mingling of fo$ 
liquid joy with foe muddy ws£ 
ters of foe river. % 


1947: Equality Repoil 

NEW DELHI — The Intel 
Asian Relations Conference ad 1 
cepted today [March 27] 
group report condemning 1 
discrimination and legisi 
based on it and urging 
tty between all citizens of 
country irrespective of raceac. . 
Cl ! ee d as a ‘rule for all count . 
*P es - ” Mrs. VijayalakshnS . 

sister of Pandit Jaw* 
narlal Nehru, who was activl _ 

n before : 

United Nations against xari# 
aiscnnunation in South Africfc-- 
sajd; “I feel that this racial di?-'- 
crimination is something whiefi 

foeSre.”^ “ 



1922: River of Liquor 

CHICAGO — Dry agents in 
tins city yesterday [March 26] 
dumped 350,000 gallons of li- 
quor into the Chicago River, 
because there was no storage 
space available in which to keep 



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OPINION /LETTERS 




China’s Chan ipagne Toast Makes Gore Dizzy 


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B LUING — The vice pres- 
ident stood as still as a 
terra-coua warrior, facing the 
cameras in the Great Hall of 
the People with a fixed smile 
as the Chinese tossed him 
bouquets of Buicks and Boe- 
ing jet deals worth $2 bil- 
lion. 

t But his eyes were darting 
back and forth. And there, on 
the periphery of his vision, 
Was a terrifying sight: two 
i women beneath the glistening 
) chandeliers, coming toward 
him bearing glasses of cham- 
pagne. 

' He got a Gore-in-the-head- 
lights look, a look that this 
vice president, unlike the last, 
more easily rattled one, Dan 
Quayle, rarely gets. 

; Mr. Gore was outfoxed, 
hianeuvened Into a cozy 
champagne toast at a morning 
business-deal signing cere- 

' Picnicking with a 
\ tiger is folly. 

mony with Li Peng, the man 
who choreographed the mas- 
sacre of the Tiananmen 
\ Square protesters. 

It was the sort of cozy toast 
that got Brent Scowcroft, then 
the national security adviser 
for President George Bush, 
into trouble when he sneaked 
over not long after the mo- 
mentous atrocity; the sort of 
cozy toast that Representative 
Richard Gephardt is panting 
to use in a campaign ad in 
2000, to suggest that the Clin- 
ton administration's China 
policy prefers money to mor- 
ality. 

The frazzled Gore crowd 
clearly underestimated the 
complexity of this trip and has 
been caught up in an ever- 
escalating series of clarific- 
ations. On Tuesday, Gore 
aides spent the evening ex- 
plaining how they got shang- 
\ haied on the toast 
* - “You rent the room, you 

f et the glasses." said Ginny 
erzano, Mr. Gore's press 
secretary. 

During the marathon nego- 
tiations for the trip, the Gore 
team tried to put a news black- 


fiv Maureen Dowd 


out on anything that could 
seem embarrassing, even 
American Chamber of Com- 
merce meetings that might in- 
clude corporate donors. 

The toasts at Tuesday 
night’s dinner with Mr. Li 
were cut out. and an admin- 
istration official lamely ex- 
plained that highly unusual 
action by saying: “This 
wasn't a banquet. It was just a 
large social dinner. “ 

But it is unthinkable that 
the Chinese, whose culture is 
so drenched in protocol, 
would not have wanted to 
toast such an honored guest at 
a formal dinn er — and per- 
haps leak the pictures, as they 
did with Mr. Scowcroft. 

Besides, Mr. Gore’s rela- 
tionship with Mr. Li is any- 
thing but social. Even though 
the prime minister wants the 
visit to go well, so the post- 
Deng Xiaoping leadership 
can show it can still get Amer- 
ican technology and market 
share while doing little in re- 
rum. he could not resist a pub- 
lic jab. He admonished Mr. 
Gore that the United States 
“should play a more positive 
role in international affairs.” 

China resents America for 
holding up its admission to 
the World Trade Organiza- 
tion. Chinese officials are also 
fuming over the assertion in 
“The Coming Conflict With 
China,” by Richard Bern- 
stein and Ross H. Munro, that 
China threatens world peace. 

Picnicking with the tiger is 
never easy. But this time it 
was folly. The Chinese may 
have tried to buy the U.S. 
government. They may have 
tried to use espionage to pen- 
etrate the White House 
through the Democratic fund- 
raising operation. They may 
be engaged in a ruthless at- 
tempt to transform them- 
selves into a military and eco- 
nomic superpower. 

And here is A] Gore re- 
assuring his hosts that, while 
federal agents are investigat- 
ing whether the Chinese tried 
to corrupt Democrats, or 
whether the Democrats 
wanted to be corrupted, this 


will in no way deflect the 
Clinton administration front 
pursuing its polio,- of engage- 
ment with China. 

But Mr. Gore wanted it 
known that he had told the 
Chinese the administration 
was taking the inquiry “se- 
riously” — to avoid an un- 
fortunate echo of Mr. Scow- 
croft's secret reassurances 
that Tiananmen would not de- 
rail engagement with China. 


THE EG&E ARE OR. 
BUT WE'U HAVE TO 
STOP T»S CLUCKING! 


When Mr. Gore's national 
security adviser. Leon Fuerth. 
was asked about complaints 
that the United Stales has 
link to show on human rights 
in China, he dismissed the 
idea ' ‘that it’s got to be on on- 
the -barrel head exchange,” 
Mr. Gore raised the issue of 
human rights in a way he con- 
sidered "vigorous." But he 
talked more To his hosts about 
the environment, whipping 
out his carbon dioxide emis- 
sion charts for the prime min- 


ister. (“They were all fascin- 
ated.” insisted Ms. Terzano.) 
He opined about the start of 
civilization, recalling the last 
ice age. "when humankind 
moved from hunting and 
gathering to agriculture*’ and 
then to technology. 

He might also have pointed 
out that, at least in other parts 
of the world, it moved from 
hunting and gathering to ag- 
riculture to technology’ to hu- 
man rights. 

The New York Times. 


Cheat Your Way Into College 



By YEENENBi l " 1 in Ii»r Sundard IViunal f '.A W Sndicvk. 




Sitig 


W ASHINGTON — The 
newest ruse facing 
elite U.S. colleges arises, as 
do many other social patho- 
logies, from the anarchy of 
the Internet, where anything 
goes, and no one knows 
what to do about it. 

This one. reported in The 
Chronicle of Higher Edu- 

MEANWH3LE 

cation, involves the elec- 
tronic peddling of admis- 
sions essays — now being 
bought from their presum- 
ably original authors by an 
outfit called Ivy Essays and 
offered for sale to the next 
wave of applicants. 

The recycled essays are 
touted as models for the en- 
lightenment of the applic- 
ants. rather than as texts to 
be copied. But the chance of 
being caught in outright pla- 
giarism is extremely small. 

Only about 60 so-called 
competitive colleges, busi- 
ness and law schools require 
essays from would-be stu- 
dents. These colleges are 
swamped with high-ranking 
applicants, and endearing 
essay accounts of stunning 
extracurricular accomplish- 
ments. admirable long-term 
goals and sensitive intro- 
spective insights can make 
the difference. 

As Ivy Essays states on its 


By Daniel S. 

Greenberg 

Internet home page: 
“Everyone applying to col- 
leges you're applying to has 
decent grades and their own 
gifts and talents. But no one 
else will have your essays. 
The essays are the best way 
ro distinguish yourself from 
the thousands of others who 
are like you." 

Cited by The Chronicle is 
a sample essay in which the 
applicant, recalling a child- 
hood experience of fishing 
for the first time, touchingly 
wrote: “1 stood ready to 
clear the first hurdle of man- 
hood, triumph over fish. At 
the age of seven, I was con- 
fident that my rugged, strap- 
ping body could conquer 
any obstacle." 

The rates offered to essay 
sellers, who are asked to 
provide proof they were ad- 
mitted to the college of their 
choice, range from S25 to 
$40, although essays that 
made the grade at Harvard. 
Stanford, Northwestern and 
the University of Penn- 
sylvania rate $75. 

On the buying side, pack- 
ets of 5 to 1 0 essays cost $ 10 
to $60. with swift delivery 
provided by e-mail or fax. 

Purists, of course, will de- 
plore this venture in brazen 


commercialism. But purity 
long ago departed from the 
ferocious competition for 
admission to .America's re- 
lative handful of oversub- 
scribed elite institutions. Al- 
though any sentient body 
with a high school diploma 
or its equivalent can get into 
more than a few of Amer- 
ica's 2,200 colleges and uni- 
versities. the top schools can 
afford to sit back and wait 
for the mail from applic- 
ants. 

And it's the hordes racing 
for admission to these in- 
stitutions that underpin the 
tutoring industry and the 
booming business of admis- 
sions counseling, for a fee. 
Along with essay peddling, 
they provide an advantage 
for those who can pay for 
it. 

Are students ethically 
tainted when they, or more 
accurately, their anxious 
parents, buy these advant- 
ages? That's hard to know. 

But they surely are learn- 
ing a valuable lesson, early 
in life; Advantages can be 
bought, even in such sup- 
posedly meritocratic mat- 
ters as college and uni- 
versity admission. 

The writer is editor and 
publisher of Science and 
Government Report, a 
Washington newsletter. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


-ratios 


Swiss Superiority 

Regarding " Holocaust 
Fund: Next Battle Challenges 
Swiss Self-Image" (March 
8 ): 

The writer says the Swiss 
proposal to create a fund for 
victims of genocide is also ‘ ‘a 
point of departure for what is 
likely to be a hard-fought 
battle to persuade some Swiss 
to see their past in anything 
less than the heroic light of 
moral superiority. ’ ’ 

• The Swiss do not believe in 
any nation's moral superior- 
ity, least of all their own. A 
Label of superiority is usually 
tagged on them by foreigners 
impressed by their political 
institutions or their belief in 
hard work, or humanitarian 
creations like die Red Cross. 

. In the same vein they do 
not like to be given moral 
lessons. Most Swiss refuse to 
feel guilty for having man- 
aged to survive World War II. 
They also fed that the re- 
newed outcry for the victims 
of the Holocaust, half a cen- 
tury after the event, is strange 
in its timing and selectivity, 
in which hole compassion 
seems to be spared for the tens 
of millions of other victims of 
inhuman ideologies and men- 
talities. The fund proposed by 
the Swiss government is for 
oil those victims. 

JEAN BOURGEOIS. 

Sotogrande. Spain. 

The writer is a former 
Swiss ambassador. 

The Fate of Kashmir 

• : Regarding "Time for an In- 
dia -Pakistan Rapproche- 
ment" ( Opinion . March 14) 
by Ramesh Thakur: 


By voicing the views of the 
Indian establishment, Mr. 
Thakur glosses over the In- 
dian occupation of Jammu 
and Kashmir. He says that 
20,000 Kashmiris have been 
killed, but fails to mention 
who is guilty of their murder. 

When will India learn a les- 
son from the experience of the 
United States in Vietnam and 
the Soviet Union in Afghan- 
istan and start realizing the , 
depth of Kashmiri alienation 
from Indian rule? 

India has sidestepped a | 
peaceful resolution of the 
Kashmir dispute under one 
pretext or the other. The latest I 
pretext is that the prime min- 
ister might be accused of 
selling out if Kashmiri aspir- 
ations far self-determination | 
are recognized. 

It would be imprudent for 
Indian leaders to reject the 
hand of friendship extended 
by Prime Minister Nawaz 
Sharif of Pakistan: The fate of 
Kashmir can no longer be 
shelved nor wished away. 

ALIZECN KAZML 
Beijing. 

St unning Abuse 

Regarding " Prisons Trade 
In Chain Gangs’ Shackles for 
the Zap of Stun Belts" ( March 
12): 

For the jailer, stun belts 
represent the ultimate tool 
with which to casually and 
repeatedly inflict great abuse; 
these belts should have no 
place in a democracy. If such 
devices become common- 
place, then China could right- 
fully accuse the United States 
of human rights violations. 

DOUGLAS KREMER. 

Zurich. 


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PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


After 3 Years , India and Pakistan to Start Talking Again 


BRIEFLY 



By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Post Ser\ke 


NEW DELHI — India and Pakistan, 
archenemies capable of making nuclear 
weapons, are about to sit down and talk 
for me first time in three years. 


facilities. There is only one border cross- 
ing open between them, and no direct 
flights between their capitals. 

Bilateral talks were suspended in 
1994. The coming talks are unlikely to 
produce imm ediate breakthroughs on 
the major issues of nuclear profileration 

. , rr 1 


prime ministers, H. D. Deve Gowda of 
India and Mian Nawaz Sharif of 
Pakistan, when a South Asian grouping 
meets in the Maldives, a chain of Indian 
Ocean islands. 

After Pakistan’s election in February, 
Mr. Sharif and Mr. Deve Gowda ex- 


Pakistan released 38 children who had 
been seized from fishing boats and de- 
tained in a dispute over territorial waters 
in the Arabian Sea. 

Not all signals from Pakistan lately 
have conveyed a mood to resolve dis- 


home to more Muslims than Pakistan. 

Last month. Chief Minister Farooq Ab- 
dullah. elected leader of the Indian state, 
suggested that both countries should rec- 
ognize an existing cease-fire line dividing 
Kashmir as an international border. 


putes. During a meeting of Islamic coun- Only Pakistan has mentioned nuclear 

J rill - . • :i_l taltc 


tween 

day with officials of the foreign ministries 
meeting in India’s capital, has raised 
hopes of reducing 50 years of hostility 
that has resulted in three wars since Brit- 
ish India was partitioned in 1947. 

The unremitting tensions have 
prompted two of the world's largest and 
poorest countries to keep large, costly 
armed forces, slowing development 

Both India and Pakistan have the ca- 
pacity to quickly assemble nuclear 
weapons and have competed to develop 
missiles to deliver them. Each country 
has accused the other’s intelligence 
agents of terrorist bombings in its heart- 
land, often striking public transportation 


expect 

Foreign Minister LK. GujraJ of India 
told die Asian Age newspaper this week. 
But enough progress appears possible on 
secondary issues involving disputed 
borders, fishing rights and trade to ease 
tensions and rebuild relations. The 
United Stares and China, major allies of 
Pakistan, have encouraged the two na- 
tions to talk. 

Mr. Gujral and his Pakistani coun- 
terpart, Gohar Ayub Khan, are sched- 
uled to hold a second round of talks next 
month when the Nonaligned Movement 
convenes here, possibly to be followed 
May by discussions between the 


in 


have occured whenever either country 
has chosen a new leader, but expec- 
tations are higher this time because of 
Mr. Sharif s large majority in Parliament 
and the ‘ ‘good neighbor’ ' policy that Mr. 
Deve Gowda’s coalition government has 
applied to other nations in the region. 

Last week, India and Pakistan traded 
conciliatory gestures, setting a con- 
structive tone for four days of prelim- 
inary talks between the top bureaucrat in 
each country's foreign ministry. Mr. 
Gujral relaxed travel restrictions on 
Pakistani business executives, retigous 
pilgrims and other categories of visitors. 


and Mr. Sharif predicted the nation 
would gain sole control of Kashmir dur- 
ing his government. Pakistan controls 
about a third of the territory now. 

India and Pakistan fought two wars 
over Jammu and Kashmir, the only 
Muslim majority state in predominantly 
Hindu India. The Kashmir dispute has 
been difficult to resolve because the na- 
tional identity of both countries is in- 
volved. Pakistan, created as a haven for 
Muslims, believes absorbing the rest of 
Kashmir would make it wtaole. For India, 
retention of the state reaffirms the na- 
tion's identity as a secular democracy and 


ippy to di» 

said Tuesday in Islamabad. 

If the scheduled rounds of talks do not 
founder on the Kashmir dispute, both 
sides appear willing to make progress on 
these issues: 

• De mili tarizing the Siachen glacier 
in the northern part of Kashmir, where 
thousands of troops along an undefined 
border engage in high-altitude sniping. 

• Defining the westernmost border 

along a 100-kitometer estuary and fish- 
ing rights to nearby Arabian Sea waters 
rich in prawns and lobster. 

• Expanding trade, as the nations' 
business leaders have urged. 


Prime Minister Resigns 
To End New Guinea Crisis 


Leader Cedes to Pressure From the Military 


Retaers 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New 
Guinea — Prime Minister Julius Chan 
bowed to military and popular pressure 
and stepped down Wednesday to end 1 0 
days of turmoil in the South Pacific 
nation. 

The threat of bloodshed immediately 
gave way to scenes of jubilation and an 
impromptu street carnival. 

Thousands of protesters who were 
gathered outside the gales of Parliament 
roared their approval. Soldiers who bad 
been blockading the building were hois- 
ted into the air. 

Mr. Chan, 57. who was serving his 
second term as prime minister, had tried 
to withstand a crisis over his decision to 
hire foreign mercenaries to crush an 
ethnic uprising on the island of Bou- 
gainville. 

The army chief. Brigadier General 
Jerry Singirok, demanded that Mr. Chan 
resign. But the prime minister in turn 
dismissed General Singirok. sparking 
widespread protests and violence ana 
looting by criminal gangs. 

“I am not a hero, f think everyone is a 
hero,' ' General Singirok said as his s 
porters celebrated their victory, 
fought for something for everyone, and 
everyone that fought with os is a 
hero.” 

On Wednesday, Mr. Chan finally told 
Parliament that he would step aside, 
along with Deputy Prime Minister Chris 
Haiveta and Defense Minister Mathias 
Ijape, during an inquiry into the mer- 
cenary contract 

Mr. Chan said he made the move “in 
order to defuse something dial I consider 
a little bit explosive.” He added. “I will 
have the cabinet to consider to appoint 
the acting prime minister.' ' 

The finance minister also agreed to 
resign while an interim government runs 


ant 


spot 


ssup- 

“We 


the country until national elections in 
June. 

Mr. Chan said he had resisted de- 
mands for his resignation for so long 
because the pressure from the mutinous 
army was “against the principle of a 
stable democracy.” 

Under the constitution, the prime min- 
ister could not have been forced out of 
power in the 12 months preceding na- 
tional elections. 

At a news conference after announ- 
ig his decision to step down, Mr. Chan 
oke of his move to hire mercenaries to 
the nine-year secessionist con- 
ilict on the resource-rich island of Bou- 
gainville. 

“It may have looked very cold- 
blooded at times,” be said, “but a de- 
veloping country has to take very tough 
decisiuns at times.” 

The worst crisis in Papua New 
Guinea’s 22 years of independence start- 
ed March 17 when General Singirok 
turned on Mr. Chan, de mandin g that he 
resign and expel about 70 mercenaries 
flown in by the British company Sand- 
line International. 

The mercenaries had been hired in a 
secret deal to crush the war and to re- 
capture a vast copper mine forced by tbe 
fighting to close in 1989. 

General Singirok said the use of mer- 
cenaries to end fighting in Bougainville 
was morally wrong as it would lead to 
tbe deaths of many civilians. 

The conflict has already left thou- 
sands dead, either from fighting or a lack 
of medical facilities due to a blockade of 
die island, 800 kilometers (500 miles) 
northeast of Port Moresby. 

Port Moresby has failed to solve the 
Bougainville question, despite 13 
rounds of peace talks, numerous military 
offensives and billions of dollars in mil- 
itary costs and lost revenues. 





NOT QUITE IN FORM — Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad of Malaysia, left, following through on 
a toast Wednesday in Tokyo, while his host, Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, winked at another guest. 


Dalai Lama Turns to Taiwan’s Politics 


Carv&dhyOurSajTFmm Dupatdm 

TAIPEI — The Dalai Lama's visit to 
Taiwan took on a stronger political tone 
Wednesday as he met with the vice 
president and leaders of the main op- 
position party. 

Tbe exiled Tibetan spiritual leader 
will also meet President Lee Teng-hui 
before ending Ids six-day visitThuisday , 
the presidential office said. But that 
meeting will be held at an official guest 
house instead of Mr. Lee’s office to try to 
avoid the appearance that he is treating 
the Dal aiLaroa as a foreign bead of state, 
the office said. 

The Dalai Lama has been welcomed 
as a citizen of the Republic of China, the 
island’s official name. 

The Dalai Lama is on his First visit to 
Taiwan, which still lays claim to Tibet as 
part of the Chinese motherland. 

China, which has ruled Tibet through 


military force since 1950, regards Taiwan 
as a secessionist province. It has said it 
will view a meeting between Mr. Lee and 
the Dalai Lama as a convention of * * sptit- 
tists.” its term for those it accuses of 
trying to break up the motherland. 

After four days of largely religious 
events, the Dalai Lama entered Taiwan’s 
political arena by dining with Lien Chan, 
who is prime minister and vice pres- 
ident, at a Taipei hotel Wednesday. 

The meeting with Mr. Lien also was 
likely to pique China, because their talks 
concerned politics and the occasion was 
arranged by the anri-Communist World 
League for Freedom and Democracy. 

“I’m not anti -Co mm uni st or anti- 
Chinese.” the Dalai Lama told Mr. Lien, 
according to a Taiwan spokesman, Su 
Chi. 

“I want to develop peaceful relations 
with the Chinese. We should get over the 


unpleasant pasL 1 very modi admire 
Taiwan's complete democratization.” 


Mr. Lien, alikely candidate for pres- 
ident in 2000, praised the “quiet re- 
volution” that in 1996 enabled Taiwan 
to hold tbe first popular presidential 
election in Chinese history. 

* ‘Democracy is not only just a way to 
seat a government,” Mr. Lien was 
quoted by Mr. Su as having said. “It's a 
democratic way of life.” 

Mr. Su said there had been no dis- 
cussion of Tibetan independence. 

The Dalai Lama met earlier with of- 
ficials of the Democratic Progressive 
Party, which advocates independence 
for Taiwan and an end to the idea that it 
and China are one country. 

Beijing has often said that it would use 
force to prevent any move by Taiwan to 
become formally independent of 
China. (AP, Reuters, AFP) 


Japanese yjj «-■«*' 
Admits Corruption 


Official 


TOKYO — A former senior bu- 
reaucrat pleaded guilty Wednesday 
to accepting about a balf million 
dollars in bribes in a case that has 
focused attention on corruption m 
japan's government. 

Nobuharu Okaraitsu, me former 
vice minister of the Ministry- of 
Health and Welfare, accepted 60 
million yen in exchange for helping 
a businessman obtain government 
subsidies for building nursing 
homes, prosecutors charged on ithe 
first dav of the trial in Tokyo Dis- 


first day of the 

trict Court. 

Mr. Okamitsu was also given the 

use of two cars by the busmessinan, 

Hiroshi Koyama, who also pleaded 
guilty Wednesday, as did another 
Health Ministry official. 

He apologized for his act in court, 
saying that although he considered 
Mr. Koyama his friend. “Given the 
importance of my job at that.time, I 
cannot deny it was a bribe. (ATT) 


Seoul Bus Drivers 
End Strike Swiftly 


SEOUL — Strikes by South 
Korean bus drivers in Seoul and 
another city crumbled in a day on 
Wednesday, arousing optimism that 
labor militancy had run out of steam 
after weeks of stoppages. 

Government officials said public 
bus drivers in Seoul accepted a 5.5 
percent wage increase, lower than 
the 13 percent they had originally 
demanded. 

Management accepted a demand 
for an additional half-month bonus 
payment per year. 

Drivers walked out about 10 
hours earlier with bus workers in 
two other cities, Taejon and Inchon. 
The officials said Taejon drivers 
had accepted a similar pay settle- 
ment to end their strike, f Reuters ) 


Bhutto Storms Out 
Of New Parliament 


ISLAMABAD — Former Prime 
Minister Benazir Bhutto stormed 
out of an inaugural session of 
Pakistan's new Parliament with her 
opposition party deputies on Wed- 
nesday. demanding that President 
Farooq Leghari step down. 

Members of Miss Bhutto's 
Pakistan People's Party tried to in- 
terrupt Mr. Leghari's address to a 
joint session of the Senate and Na- 
tional Assembly before walking 
out. 

But Mr. Leghari appeared un- 
ruffled and continued his speech, 
expounding the government's 
policies at the start of tbe parlia- 
mentary year. (Reuters) 


Quake Hits Japan 


TOKYO — A strong earthquake 
caused landslides, damaged homes 
and roads and injured at least 19 
people Wednesday on Japan's 
southern main island. (AP) 


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CITIC: Holding Keys to China, Firm Opens Door to World’s Capitalists 


Continued from Page I 


glomerate with huge holdings in Hong Kong 
and substantia] assets throughout the world. 
Because of its size and impeccable connec- 
tions, it is avidly courted by foreign companies 
eager to establish or expand operations aimed 
at China ’s 1 2 billion potential consumers. 

CITIC owns a steel mill in Delaware and 
forests in Washington state in its U.S. hold- 
ings, as well as a meat processing company 
and aluminum smelter in Australia. It owns 
one of China's largest banks and parts of a 
myriad of ventures in China: satellites, 
bridges, power plants, accounting and law 
firms, pharmaceutical makers, department 
stores, auto plants and textile manufacturers. 

It even governs its own island — Daxie 
Island near Ningbo, south of Shanghai — 
which it plans to transform intoasuperporL Its 
Hong Kong affiliate is a major player in that 
close-knit business world, steadily muscling 
its way into bigger roles in tbe territory's main 
utility, telephone company and two major 
airlines. 

Since it was disclosed in Washington that 
Mr. Wang attended a White House meeting 
Feb. 6, 1996, for major Democratic Party 
contributors, at which he shook hands with 
Mr. Clinton and exchanged pleasantries, some 
people in the Justice Department and Congre ss 
also have been wondering whether CITIC *s 
tentacles are reaching int o Am erican politics. 

Access is a key part of CITIC business, but 
it is usually the part lhat CITIC sells, rather 
than buys. 

Business people in China say they believe 
that Mr. Wang's visit had more to do with U.S. 
companies trying to win friends in China than 
with Beijing trying to gain influence in the 
United States. In an interview this month. Mr. 
Wang said his U.S. trip had been initialed by 
Lehman Brothers Inc., which is competing for 
a bigger role managing China’s new stock and 
bond offerings. 

A Lehman Brothers spokesman said four or 
five Lehman executives gladly hosted a 
breakfast for Mr. Wang in New York the day 
after he visited the White House. The spokes- 
man. Bill Ahearn. said, “It made perfect 
sense, because CITIC is one of the largest 


aged to break through a local-government 
obstacle and bridge a gap between the U.S. 
co mpan y and local Communist politicians. 

CITIC was founded in 1979 at Mr. Deng’s 
behest To head it. he passed over Communist 
regulars and tapped Rong Viren, whose fam- 
ily built a fortune in tbe textile business before 
th e Com munist takeover in 1949. 

ClTlC’s efficiency and pragmatism soon 
provided a sharp contrast to the plodding state 
planners and lumbering stare-owned enter- 
pris es tha t dominated China's economy. 

“CITIC has forged close ties with indus- 
trial ministries and economic planning in- 
stitutions. the central bank and even pro- 
vincial governments, so if there are any 
problems in the course of setting up a joint 
venture, with CITIC it is easier to settle those 
problems at an early stage,” Mr. Wang said. 

Mr. Wang is the son of a one-time vice 
president of China and senior general, “Big 
Cannon” Wang Zhen, who was in the con- 
servative wing of Mr. Deng's reform-minded 
coalition. The younger Mr. Wang studied at a 
Harbin engineering school, spent 10 years at 
shipbuilding plants and served two years in 
the military. But he did not join the Com- 


uj pbe at Mr. Rong proposed that Bechtel join 



follow orders of superiors.” He joined CITIC 
as soon as it was created. 

Now, like many of China's emerging cap- 
italists. he talks about assets and profit mar- 

g ns. He complains about high business taxes. 

e keeps a computer on his desk. He drives a 
blue BMW and keeps a golf club in the 
office. 

With China awash in foreign investment — 
more than $40 billion poured in last year — 
would-be deal-makers now seek out CITIC. 
One person who has knocked on its door is the 
former U.S. secretary of state George Shultz, 
on behalf of his old engineering and con- 
struction company. Bechtel. 

Mr. Shultz and two Bechtel executives vis- 
ited Mr. Rong in Beijing on the day in March 
1993 that he was named vice president. The 


in building a superport on sparsely 
populated Daxie Island. 

Later. CITIC bought the island and won the 
right to issue permits and approvals, a power 
normally reserved for local or provincial gov- 
ernments. Bechtel is the lead developer with 
plans for ports, warehouses, railroads, roads, 
water and elec tricity infrastructure. 

Nowadays, CITIC can be choosy about its 
investments. Two years ago, Mr. Wang 
lamented that it was a shareholder in more 
than 200 Chinese enterprises, many of them 
flops. A light-sensing company in Xiamen 
had run up big losses; a textile and cotton plant 
in He ilongjiang was losing money. Overall. 
CTTIC's return on its domestic manufacturing 
investments was zero, Mr. Wang said in an 
interview then. 

Since that time, the company has focused 
more on high technology, infrastructure and 
financial services. Among its projects is a deal 
with Siemens and Deutsche Bundespost 
Telekom to set up a phone-service company in 
four cities to challenge the state telephone 
monopoly. 

CITIC has also been wheeling and dealing 
in Hong Kong, where companies are looking 
for political cover before the return of the 
British colony to Chinese rule on July 1 . Many 
leading Hong Kong families and co mpan ies 
are suddenly ready to sell shares to CTTIC’s 
Hong Kong" affiliate, CITIC Pacific Ltd. — 
o ften at bargain prices. 

CITIC Pacific is 26.5 percent owned by 
CITIC Hong Kong, a wholly owned uni L of the 
Chinese parent company. The chairman of 
CITIC Pacific is Larry Yung, die son of Mr. 
Rong and now a high-profile member of Hong 
Kong’s business elite. 

The Chinese parent company recently 
raised eyebrows in Hong Kong when it sold a 
stake of about 1 5 percent in CITIC Pacific to 
Mr. Yung and other managers for about $1.4 
billion — a 25 percent discount from the 
market price ai the time, saving Mr. Yung an 
estimated $465 million. 

Mr. Wang said the deal had been made to 



GORE: Talks in China End 


r.rcsr 

“ - fid 


Continued from Page 1 


’ - »:> hohd'a 


MvhoWTbe Si*h»nflon Tn-i 

Wang Jim, the chairman of CITIC. 


give CITIC Pacific greater autonomy and 
flexibility. 

[But Mr. Yung provided a different reason 


for the sale, saying^ Bey'ing ’s desire to cash in 


Pacific was behind its 
controversial sale. Page 


on the success o 
parent company's 
17.1 

Asked whether it was considered unseemly 
in Communist China for Mr. Yung to appear so 
rich, Mr. Wang said Mr. Yung had borrowed 
most of the money for the stock purchase. 
Restrictions were also placed on Mr. Yung’s 
freedom to resell the shares, Mr. Wang said. 

“We gave him a big discount,” Mr. Wang 
said, “but he will not rest easily, because the 
interest he has to pay to the banks far exceeds 
the dividends from his stake in CITIC Pa- 
cific.” 

Analysts say that, given CTTIC's advant- 
ages, its performance is still weak. 

Mr. Wang also said that three times last 


hoped to pocket during this high-profile opportunity to display 
his foreign policy skills for the voters of 2000 eluded him. 

If anything, those gains appear to have been undermined by 
the onslaught of investigations and publicity surrounding 
China's possible role in funneling illicit contributions to 
members of Congress. 

Mr. Gore called those allegations a speculative matter that 
were under investigation. 

He also sought late Wednesday to clarify his remarks to 
Prime Minister Li Peng on Tuesday about U.S. concerns over 
allegations that China may have sought to buy influence in 
Congress. 

* ‘Li Peng raised it first and he repeated the strong denials by 
China,” Mr. Gore reported. 

“I then said that the United States views these allegations as 
very serious. However, they are the subject of an ongoing 
criminal investigation within our Justice Department and it is 
premature to speculate on what the outcome of that in- 
vestigation is." 

He added, “The discussion of the controversy, pending the 
completion of the investigation, should not affect the re- 
lationship between China and the United States. 

"Should the allegations prove to be true, then, of course, 
that would be a different matter, and I made it clear that that 
would be senous indeed.” 

The fact that Mr. Gore's news conference was dominated 
by questions about the possible Chinese role in illicit political 
fending only contributed to the sense of deadlock in (SSese- 
Amencan relations that has permeated his visit. It also raised 
the question of how long a high-level dialogue can be sus- 
tained without substantive progress on the iSsues of human 

technology 6 proI,feration of dangerous weapons and 

In rejecting the notion that paralysis has set in, Mr. Gore 
seemed slightly equivocal. 

ma ^ ? ^^ wh ^«- Ihc ,‘■ shad ? w, ' of the investigations was 
making it more difficult to make progress with C hina he said: 



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year, state auditors conducted “massive in- in the center of the American political ?° nSCn ^!o 

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improprieties and bad loans but found nothing 


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significant. He added. “An important lesson engaging with Chinl in a constructive 

- communicate effectively, not oniv nn SSL “ ‘ - t 

sues, but on issues like homS ,S - J? 


my father taughi me is 10 be an upright per- 
son. 


$ 

s* 

iS 


Li; 


IVi 


■- ur 


'.'■Ti 


sense, because L1I1C is one of the largest ]iyT A T a a , w .„ _ _ _ __ 

^bS^’iTcw^ ?UIdllket0 S1AS Angry With Singapore, Kuala Lumpur Temporarily Freezes Official Ties 

Lehman Brother is not the only company Continued from Page 1 Lee Kuan Yew, in a court affidavit that 

. .. „ Johor was “notorious for shootings, mug- 

olnoe J : 1.: >• 


China's leading “red-chip” company. CITIC 


is tile most sought-after partner for “blue- 
nrms 


in 


chip” foreign rums seeking ti 
China. Its partners include Bechtel G 
Inc.. Coopers & Lybrand, Siemens Al_ 
United Technologies Corp., Ciba-Geigy AG. 
Reynolds Metals Co. and Cable & Wireless 
PLC — to name a few. 

Because of its knowledge of both foreign 
business and Chinese politics, CITIC mon- 


dial awarding of contracts to Singapore 
companies and meetings between ruling 


political parties would also be affected. 
A Malaysia 


Jaysian official close to the cab- 
inet who was contacted by phone in Kuala 
Lumpur said that the government had 
decided to “cool off ties for now” with 
Singapore. The action follows an official 
Malaysian protest earlier this month at 
remarks by Singapore's senior minister. 


gmgs and carjackings.' 

The Malaysian official said that al- 
though Mr. Lee had apologized and ap- 
plied to the court to remove the offending 
words from his affidavit, his son. Lee 
Hsien Loong. Singapore's deputy prune 
minister, had not taken similar action even 
though he had also signed the affidavit. 

The official said Malaysian ministers 
also objected to comments made by 


Singapore's prime minister. Gob Chok 
Tong, and foreign minister. Shunmugam 
Jayakumar. after the Malaysian govern- 
ment decided a week ago to accept Lee 
Kuan Yew’s apology. 

The Malaysian foreign minister. Ab- 
dullah Ahmad Badawi. had warned then 
that the damage caused would take time ro 
heal “because this episode has deeply hurt 
Malaysians of ail sections of society.” 

Analysts said that many Malaysians 
were sensitive to derogatory remarks by 


Singapore leaders, viewing them as an 
underhand way of frying to discredit and 
slow Malaysia s rapid economic growth 

"We felt there was a lack of sincerity in 
the behavior of other Singapore leaders 
after Mr. Lee Kuan Yew apologized ” a 
Malaysian official said. 

According to a report Friday in the 
Straus Times newspaper, based in Singa- 
pore. Deputy Prime Minister Lee said that 
Singapore and Malaysia should not e e t 
hung up on individual issues. 6 


memorial NOTTCK 


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a 

137 




A Requiem Sewice for 

MBS.PAMHAHARRIMAN 




—-'5; - . V 




will be held at 
Tbe American Cathedra!, ■ 
23 ave. Geoige V, Paris 8, 
Hasd^ 1 toril3 1 aU2;30RM: 
All French and American 


‘ues 


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*•*« 

•••V 


are invited. 


S %e s 


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‘**8 Me*, 


iroi, 

: UTA 
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— . . n mnnwT^ir< U.ADrll >10 1007 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


THE CURRENCY 
OF THE FUTURE IS 
NOT THE POUND, 
THE DEUTSCHMARK, 
THE FRANC, 

THE DOLLAR OR 

THE YEN. 

. -.rra 


PAGE 9 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


71 


IT’S INFORMATION. 


I 


It's the nanosecond Nineties. Keeping ahead means being able to 
gather data from around the globe. Assimilate it, make lightning 
decisions based upon it. You may have a competitive advantage 
for months, days even. Ideas must be rolled out quickly. 

The exchange of information is becoming mission 
critical. A global market is emerging. Its currencies? 

Digital information. . . digital information. . . digital 
information. 

Data that demands to be distributed, processed, managed. 

In the 21st century, every multinational company will 
need the most sophisticated telecommunications available. 
The days when carriers would rent out ‘big pipes’ are no more. 
We must now offer value added services. Systems integration 
and management. Computer networks. 

Multimedia too. You’re demanding to see and exchange 
not only the printed word but also data incorporating video, 
voice and fidelity sound. 

On January 8th, the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone 
Corporation announced an intention to pursue global business. 
Our determination could be of great interest to you. 

And a clear grasp of the possibilities, of the future 
direction of the telecommunications industry will give your 
company a significant edge. 

INFORMATION HIGHWAY OR INFORMATION CUL-DE-SAC? 

Within the next decade, your ability to transact in the 
global information market will depend entirely on the calibre 
of your telecommunications services. 

An effective world-wide network allows local empires 


to exchange ideas, multiply rather than duplicate efforts. 

Isn't the knowledge, clout and experience of your tele- 
coms provider a critical issue? 

NTT has critical mass, vast technical expertise and a 
Japanese affinity for efficiency and process. 

We’re one of the largest telecommunications companies 
in the world with 60 million domestic lines, 13 R&D labora- 
tories, exceptional capital investment capabilities. .. 

We already serve some of the most powerful corpora- 
tions in the world. (Think of any household Japanese name.) 

But, in this industry, size isn’t all. Its not necessarily the 
biggest carriers, but the smartest, who will lead the Information 
Age. Those most aware of their markets. 

Which is why, as a service oriented company, we’ve 
put together Global Total Solution. 

GLOBAL TOTAL SOLUTION. OR WOULD YOU RATHER 
CONDUCT THE COMPLEX NEGOTIATIONS WITH SUPPLIERS?' 

Contract negotiations are just the beginning. The hassle 
and effort of setting up and maintaining a network are limitless. 
(As limitless as the global information marketplace.) 

So we’ll provide the total solution to your company’s 
individual needs ~ tailor made, one-stop shopping. 

In one intergrated package, we’ll consult with you, plan 
and construct your LAN, WAN and Intranet. Your local NTT 
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Well manage your computer network. Or you can out- 
source ~ we’ll take on your staff and assets, invest in more 
and run the network for your company. 


■i it 


¥ 


£ 


; r- 


fa Wbn—*. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


Q 




,Vt 


? - ... ««** 




N-^R&FT-^ 

. - g&ftfe fcs ' 



• ^v;-/ 



E INTERNET IS A BIGGER PART OF YOUR BUDGET BUT 
\ ARE YOU HAPPY WITH THE SERVICE? 

20 years ago, our R&D began research on strands of 
glass fibre that could carry light waves. Today fibre optic 
cabling can traoport phenomenal amounts of data. A single 
pair of fibres, etch the width of a human hair, can transmit 
more than 10 rillion million bits of information per second. 

Certain' we have invested heavily in optical fibre, laying 
networks throghout Japan. 

An inaluable experience because many networks 
around the gloe are not up to carrying such traffic 50 million 
Internet subsnbers will be 500 million by the 21 st century. 

As anT director are you happy with current systems? 
NTT’s HiglSpeed Internet Backbone, in the final stages of 
developmen can transfer the information contained in one 
year s subsection to this newspaper in a single second. 

CAN WE 0NTR1BUTE TO YOUR COMPANY'S EXPANSION 
IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC RIM? 

I 

Imasingly as Asia and the Pacific Rim come on stream, 
multinariol corporations need access to the right technology. 


And importantly too, the right local knowledge. 
NT T can help you penetrate these markets 
and establish the most cost efficient links. 
Were currently helping to put together 
infrastructures in Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia 
and the Philippines. 

A joint venture between NTT and the Shanghai Post 
^Telecommunications Administration is consulring on the new 
telecommunications services for China. 

We re also developing advanced multimedia systems ~ 
the Malaysian Multimedia Super Corridor is one of the most 
spectacular examples. 

This visionary project will have an IT City at the 
centre of a global multimedia hub. 

So you couldn’t have a better partner on the ground. 
No-one knows Japanese and Far Eastern systems like we do ~ 
we built many of them ourselves. 

But giving multinational corporations a foothold in 
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It’s not only the workplace but education, culture, 
human development that's evolving in this Age of Information. 

Our president, Jun-ichiro Miyazu, has commented. 
‘Tf we ignore the social change brought about by the aggressive 
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real direction of the multimedia society.” 

To find and contribute to that direction is the future 
for the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation. Please 
contact. http:// www. ntte.co.uk. For more information. 


COBAL NETWORKING. WORKING WITHOUT LIMITS. 

© 

NTT 

\ 

NIPPON TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE CORPORATION 

19-2 Nishi-Shinjuku 3'dtoroe, Shinjuku-ku. Tokyo 163-19 Japan. Telephone: 81 (3)5359*5111. 

PARIS ■ DUSEU30RF -GENEVA • BANGKOK • BEIJING ■ HANOI • HONG KONG ■ JAKARTA • KUALA LUMPUR ■ MANILA ■ SHANGHAI • SINGAPORE • NEW YORK ■ LOS ANGELES ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW ■ RIO DE JANEIRO 


PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 



Zaire Rebels Spurn Offer by Mobutu’s Party to Share Power 


briefly 


Carjidrd H Otr SztfFran D u p a sc ha 

LOME, Togo — The first interna- 
tional conference to bring Zaire’s war- 
ring parties to the same room opened 
here Wednesday as the rebels rejected 
sharing power with President Mobutu 
Sese Seko's political party. 

Asked about a proposal made on 
Tuesday by Marsha) Mobutu's Popular 
Revolutionary Movement for it and the 
Alliance of Democratic Forces for the 
Liberation of the Congo (Zaire) to share 
power before elections, a spokesman 
said: "There cannot be power-sharing 
between us and Mobutu's people. It is 
impossible." 

Bizima Karaha. the chief foreign 


policy strategist and a leader of the rebel 
team at the Wednesday meeting, also 
rejected power-sharing but said he be- 
lieved negotiations might start soon. 

* ‘We shall never, never enter into any 
power-sharing with the government in 

fv- _i 1, ddp 


Kinshasa," he told BBC radio. "One 


thing for sure, we are not fighting for 
power-sharing.” 

A major question facing leaders of the 
Organization of African Unity remained 
over which must come first — a cease- 
fire in the six-month rebel offensive led 
by Laurent Kabila, or negotiations be- 
tween rebels and representatives of Mar- 
shal Mobutu. 

“It’s necessary for everyone to re- 


nounce violence and get to the nego- 
tiation table." said Kon Annan, die UN 
secretary-general. "The fighting must 
stop, and dialog must begin." 

Mr. Kabila, whose rebels have cap- 
tured much of eastern Zaire, has refused 
calls for a cease-fire until Marshal 
Mobutu or his representatives agree to 
enter into negotiations with the rebels. 

Neither Marshal Mobutu nor Mr. 
Kabila attended the summit talks, but 
both sent delegations. 

Mr. Annan said the United Nations 
and the OAU were “working within a 
joint framework for peace: the com- 
prehensive five-point plan endorsed by 
the Security Council.' 


As well as negotiations and a cease- 
fire, this plan calls for the protection of 
refugees and displaced people, the with- 
drawal of foreign troops from Zaire, 
respect of the country’s sovereignty and 
integrity as well as for the convening of 
an international conference on peace, 
security and development in the eastern 
region of the Great Lakes. 

"We must keep human rights issues at 
the forefront of our considerations." Mr. 
Annan added. “Atrocities should be in- 
vestigated.” 

The OAU secretary-general. Salim 
Ahmed Salim, appealed * ‘to both parties 
lo rise to the occasion of die hour.” 

“I have high expectations that this 


summit will provide a framework for a 
speedy solution to the crisis in Zaire," 
he said. 

Presidenr Gnassingbe Eyadema of 
Togo used an African proverb to warn of 
the dangers of ignoring the crisis in the 


[Change on Iraq, 
Confirms 


Stall 


Great Lakes region. 


“If your neighbor's hut begins to' 
bum. one should put out the fire lest it ',/ 1 
spread to your own hut," he said. _ ; 

President Daniel arap Moi of Kenya - 
said: "The people of Zaire are anxious 
that this summit will come up with rec- ‘ 
ommendations for a lasting solution to 
their problems." . j 

“All diplomatic efforts should be in- , 
tensified," he said. (AFP. AP. Reuters ) • 


Bahrain Sentences 15 
As Plotters Aided by Iran 

All Defendants Shiite Muslims Seized in 5 96 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Service 


CAIRO — In a case that has become a 
focal point for charges of Iranian med- 
dling in Gulf regional affairs, a Bahraini 
court sentenced 1 5 Shiite Muslims to jail 
terms of up to 1 5 years on Wednesday on 
charges of having plotted to overthrow 
the ruling al Khalifa family with help 
from Iran. 

Bahraini authorities charge that the 15 
men are part of a larger group of 
Bahraini citizens, some of (hem still at 
large, who received military training in 
the Iranian city of Qom with the goal of 
overthrowing the monarchy and in- 
stalling a pro-Iranian government. 


U.S. Senator Warns 
East Europeans on 
NATO Obligations 


Reuters 

PRAGUE — Congressional approval 
for NATO's expansion to countries of 
the former Warsaw Pact is not assured, 
and those seeking to join must still prove 
that they will fulfill their commitments. 
Joseph Biden. the ranking Democrat on 
the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee. said Wednesday. 

"1 think many of my Czech friends 
and my Polish friends think this is a 
foregone conclusion in the United States 
„ Senate,” Mr. Biden. a supporter of ex- 
panding the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization. said during an official visit. 
But he warned that it was not a “done 
deal." 

Mr. Biden said it still would be nec- 
essary to fight what he called a “grow- 
ing neoisolationism in the United 
States.” 

Todo that, he said he had to be able to 
prove that the top candidates for North 
Atlantic treaty membership — which he 
listed as Poland, Hungary, the Czech 
Republic and Slovenia — were ready to 
fulfill all the requirements for joining the 
alliance. 

He said that when, as the spokesman 
for the Democratic Party on these issues, 
he proposed expanding NATO, oppo- 
nents or skeptics of such a move would 
respond, in effect, “O.K.. are they ready 
to pay?” He added, “And to be very 
blunt with you. I don't think those ques- 
tions — that question — has been ad- 
dressed in Poland or here in the Czech 
Republic.” 

NATO is expected to invite a number 
of countries to join the alliance at a July 
summit meeting of member states in 
Madrid. But Mr. Biden said that achiev- 
ing the two-thirds vote required in the 
U.S. Senate to approve a change in the 
NATO charter may be difficult. 

He said he was * ‘confident' ’ the ques- 
tions about the applicants’ commitment 
to carrying out an expansion — which is 
expected to cost new and current mem- 
bers billions of dollars — would even- 
tually be answered by the aspirants. 

"If they are not. I think we lose the 
day," he said. "If they are, I think my 
position prevails.” 


AJ 1 of those arrested in the alleged plot 
last June are members of Bahrain 's rest- 
ive Shiite Muslim community, which 
has long complained of discrimination at 
the hands of the a! Khalifa family, which 
is from die Sunni branch of Islam. Shiites 
constitute a majority in the tiny island 
nation of 600,000 near Saudi Arabia. 

Since December 1994. Shiite griev- 
ances have erupted into street protests, 
arson and occasional bombings that 
have raised fears in Western capitals 
about the stability of Bahrain. The coun- 
try is an ally of the United States, and its 
capital. Manama, is the headquarters of 
the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. 

U.S- officials have generally treated 
with skepticism claims by Bahraini au- 
thorities that Iran is responsible for the 
Shiite unrest, seeing the country’s prob- 
lems as essentially home-grown. But 
they also give credence to Bahraini al- 
legations about Iranian involvement in a 
plot against the al Khalifa family, a 
charge Iran has denied. 

Shortly after the arrests were an- 
nounced in Manama last June, Robert 
Pelletreau. then assistant secretary of 
state, told the House International Re- 
lations Committee: “Iran's involvement 
in terrorist activities in the region is well 
known. There is credible evidence that a 
small group of Bahraini militants with a 
stated aim of overthrowing the govern- 
ment had received assistance and train- 
ing from Iran." 

Mr. Pelletreau said Iran forged links 
to Bahraini opposition figures through 
its embassy in Bahrain and through the 
Bahrain Studies Center in Qom. a center 
of Shiite religious training. 



5HINGTON — Secrctaiyof 
fadeleine Albright reaf- 
haxd-IineU.S.pohcy to- 
on Wednesday and 
ftfiaUnitedNationsofl- 

[ program could end if Bagh- 
lot live up to its promises, 
eech at Georgetown i Unt- 
/bere she once taugjht m- 
relations, Mrs. Albngnt 
that U.S. insistence on 
ons and other pumsh- 
^ Iraq would not change 
President Saddam Hus- 
icd in power, 
is prologue, under the 
bvenunent, an Iraq . 
sanctions and scrutiny 
ap where it left offhalf a 
[ago —r. before die moth- 
dons 'stopped it dead in 
lbright said, ac- 
pre pared text. “For 
our policy will not 


V 


change," sfi said 1 


(Reuters) 


Japan Ploys Down 
Optimumin Peru 


v .. i ' r - .. - Hft. —•y t 


ln»q>h Bamfc/Ajmce Fnmt-Pm» 

BEIRUT QUAKE AFTERMATH — A family on a street in the Lebanese capital after an earthquake 
Wednesday that also hit northern Israel. The quake damaged buildings, but did not cause casualties; 


ARAFAT: Not So Obvious That He Flashed That 6 Green LigHf 

Continued from Page 1 


TOKYO— 1 Jajxn does not expect 
la breakthrough indie Peru hostage 
srisis before The ad of the Eastra - 
pliday despite ecent optimistic 
ledia reports, a r oreign Ministry 
x>kesman said Wdnesday. 

'The spokesmar said that media 
pectations of anmd this weekend 
idle 100-day dam a at the Jap- 
fese arabassado’s residence : “ 
Tia might be owrblown. 
lie re have bee» a flurry of Jap- 
afce media repots from Lima in 
thoast few days about a possible 
de between die Peruvian govem- 
mt and the lefist rebels of die 
The Amaru Revbluticmary Move- 
me holding 72 lostages. 

T media repots have spoken of 
a dethat would Allow die hostage- 
take asylum ir another country, 
possy Cuba. (Reuters) 


charge that over the last eight months, 
Mr. Arafat has released many of the 
Palestinian militants who were rounded 
up after the spate of suicide bombings 
last year, enlarging the ranks of potential 
terrorists. 

The Palestinians have denied all the 
charges and have accused Mr. Netan- 
yahu of trying to deflect responsibility 
for the current wave of violence from hi’s 
recent decision to build more housing for 
Jews in East Jerusalem. 


Israelis, though, have always per- 
In a telephone .interview from London ceived suicide bombings as actions too 


on Wednesday, a spokesman for the 
Bahrain Freedom Movement, a Shiite 
dissident group, condemned the trials as 
unfair. Thar charge was echoed by Am- 
nesty International. 

“I don’t believe there is a case against 
them,” said the spokesman, Shehabi 
Saeed. “It is convenient. It is an easy 
way out of their internal problems." 

Bahrain's charges against Iran last 
June were unusually detailed. According 
to information made public by the 
Bahraini Interior Ministry, the suspects 
were members of "Hezbollah Bahrain." 
a Bahraini offshoot of the Lebanese Shiite 
group Hezbollah, or Party of God. which 
is armed, funded and trained by Iran. 

The Bahraini group was founded in 
Qom in 1993 with the backing of the 
intelligence service of the Iranian re- 
volutionary guards, according to the 
ministry’s account 

Bahraini authorities arrested 44 
people in the alleged plot according to 
press accounts. Six of them appeared oo 
television to confirm the government’s 
account, saying dial they had been re- 
cruited by Iranian intelligence while un- 
dergoing religious training in Qom. The 
two alleged ringleaders — Ali Ahmed 
Kadhera al Mutaqawwi and Jassim Has- 
san Ali al Khayyat — received prison 
sentences of 15 and 12 years, respect- 
ively. The Associated Press reported 
from Manama. Thirteen defendants re- 
ceived sentences of three to eight years, 
and 11 were acquitted. 

Shiite dissidents abroad bad expected 
the death penalty and speculated that the 
government chose the lighter sentences 
in fear of sparking major unrest 


savage to be explained as a reaction to 


trage 

any Israeli policy, however provocat- 


ive. 


Whatever the level of Mr. Arafat's 
direct responsibility, there is little doubt 
that he was furious with Mr. Netan- 
yahu's decision to go ahead with the 
housing and to order a withdrawal in the 
West Bank that the Palestinians saw as 
insultingly small. Diplomats close to 
Mr. Arafat said he concluded there was 
no purpose in continuing to negotiate, 
and he severed all contacts. 

It was also clear that public outbursts 


would rouse the streets, especially after 
Israeli security services warned that the 
start of bulldozing on the contested site 
would be a signal for violence. 

Mr. Arafat’s strategy in his dealings 
with militants has been a combination of 
brute force and offers of cooperation — 
not unlike the tactics the Israelis used for 
years with the Palestinians. 

Danny Rubinstein, a veteran Israeli 
writer about Palestinian affairs for the 
Ha'aretz newspaper, said, though, that it 
is not in Mr. Arafat’s interest to en- 
courage street terror, because of the dam- 
age it does to his standing with Israel, the 
United States and the world and because 
it undermines his authority. 

The specific charge leveled by Mr. 
Netanyahu and the chiefs of the army is 
that Mr. Arafat released a Hamas leader 
after meeting with opposition figures on 
March 9. At this meeting, where the 
Israeli decision on the scope of its with- 
drawal was discussed, the political lead- 
er of Hamas in Gaza, Mahmoud Zahar, 
demanded that the Palestinian Authority 
release all remaining Hamas detainees, 
diplomats said. 

“At the March 9 meeting Arafat was 
passive and didn’t react," one diplomat 


said. “Then evidently after thameeting 
he decided to release Ibrahim Maqad- 
meh as a gesture to Hamas. Oni' Maqad- 
meh. So aid he give the great light (o 
Hamas? We don’t have am confirm- 
ation that he did." 

Israelis contend that the rele secfMr. 
Maqadmeb, who is regarded t ' Israel as 
the head of a secret organ ation in 
Hamas, gave the Islamic opp rition the 
distinct sense thai it had ben given a 
sanction to renew violence. 

On the day of the bombag in Tel 
Aviv. Mr. Maqadmeh made i stirring 
speech at a Hamas rally dee ringjhat 
only ' 'holy warriors who carry ombs on 
their body and blow up the' d mies of 
God will stop the bulldozes" Soon 
after, a warrant was issued for s arrest, 
but he reportedly has yet to b| caught. 


Lupins to Mecca 



TURKEY: Kinkel Dashes EU Aspirations 


Continued from Page 1 


Paris Police Going Back to Bicycles 


Reuters 

PARIS — Police patrolling the 
streets of Paris are to take to bicycles 
again, restoring a presence that was 
immortalized in dozens of films until 
the police switched to mopeds in 
1984. 

The Paris police chief, Philippe 
MassonL said Tuesday that bicycles 
would be used mainly in patrols of the 


Bois de Boulogne. Bois de Vincennes 
and pedestrian areas near the Seine. 

The bicycle police, who numbered 
about 2,000 in 1950, were commonly 
called “swallows” because of their 
billowing, short black capes. 

After the bicycles were replaced by 
mopeds, officials found that the 
motorbikes moved too quickly for 
close surveillance of the streets. 


tinned to press their case, however, and 
at one point they threatened to veto the 
expansion of NATO, of which Turkey is 
a member, if the European Union did not 
consider their application favorably. 

They also suggested that Western pre- 
judice against Muslims was a hidden 
reason behind the European reluctance 
to accept their application. 

These gambits appear to have back- 
fired. European leaders appear to have 
decided that since Turkey was pressing 
so hard for a definitive answer to its 
application, they should respond with a 
clear no. 

Their rejection was first expressed 
publicly two weeks ago at a meeting in 
Brussels of senior European leaders 
from center-right political parries. After 
that meeting, the spokesman for the lead- 
ers, Wildred Maartens, a former Belgian 
prime minister, said that Turkey “is not 
a candidate lo become a member of the 
European Union, short-term or long." 


some of which are influential in the 
Lslamist government of Prime Minister 
Necmertin Erbakan. 

Mr. Erbakan has publicly supported 
his country’s drive for membership in 
the EU. but he has appeared more en- 
thusiastic about improving relations 
with Libya. Iran and other Muslim coun- 
tries. 

The statements by Mr. Kinkel could 
be used by Islamists here who believe 
that Turkey is fundamentally incompat- 
ible with Europe and should look for 
friends elsewhere. 

Perhaps the strongest supporter of 
Turkey’s bid to join the European Union 
has been the United States, which views 
Turkey as a vital pillar of European and 
Middle Eastern security. Nicholas Bums, 
the chief State Department spokesman, 
recently said thatTurkey’s future “ought 
to be grounded in Europe.” 


ng 


est 


at 


Following the attack Friday, 
took no known action againsL 

In the view of diplomats am 
familiar with the Palestinian 
presume that Mr. Arafat willed 
and the Tel Aviv attack, is 
dersiand the depth of anger 
estinians feel over Mr. Net 
policies. 

Palestinian leaders have coi 
bitterly that Mr. Netanyahu cl 
helpless before every demand of 
wing backers and then requires 
estinians to accept the decisions, 
much they object and however 
it is to Mr. Arafat’s authority. 

"Judging from the mood in 
Bank, it is safe to say it wasn’t 
who gave the Hamas a green li 
the broad public in the West B 
Gaza which urged Hamas to 
lion." Mr. Rubinstein wrote. 

A Western diplomat who re, 
meets with Mr. Arafat said, 
he’s repeatedly told me he's tryij to 
splinter the groups.” 

Mr. Arafat's strategy broke do 
February 1996 when Hamas and Is 
Jihad terrorists sent four su 
bombers against Israel. 

Under intense Israeli and U.S. 
sure, the Palestinian leader round 
about 1 .000 radicals and opponents 
closed down Hamas operations. 

But as relations with Mr. Netan 
deteriorated. Mr. Arafat began relea? 
some of the detainees. 


, ; — Egypt’s national car- 

rier, i EgjAir, will begin flying 
11,000 Igrims from Libya to 
Mecca in udi Arabia on Friday for 
die third aight year, a Cairo air- 
port offici said Wednesday. 

Libya h, been under an air and 
arms emb» 0 since 1992 for its 
refusal to h/j over to Britain or die 
United Slat two suspects in the 
1988 bombLof a U.S. plane over 
Scotland th^iiied 270 people. • 

. ButtheUied Nations, sanctions 
committee haauthorized Egypt to 
fly Libyan proms to die annual 
Muslim pilgriiige in Saudi Arabia, 
known as the In. EgyptAir has ar- 
ranged 45 fligb for the Libyan pil- 
grims. the spokman said. (AFP) 


Yemen Ats In Halt 
Abductiorof Tourists 


but 


SANAA, Yenxi — Yemen has 
launched a canaign to protect 
Western tourists aainst kidnapping 
by local tribesmen weekly Arabic 
newspaper said Wdnesday. 

“The Interior Nnistry and con- 
cerned authorities re currently un- 
dertaking security ixangements to 
curb the phenomena of kidnapping 
foreigners and to enure they are not 
repeated .again.” Adul Rahman al 
Mahyoub, head ol tfa^ country’s 
tourism authority, ,oltj al Wahda 
newspaper. 

Yemeni tribes wtl grievances 
agarnst the goverrapejt or foreign 
oil firms have kidnapfed scores of 
tourists, diplomats ail other for- 
eigners in recent ye*s to use as 
bargaining chips. A] have been 
freed unharmed. I ( Reuters ) 


For the Red 


The South African government 
introduced draft legislation Wed- 
nesday to outlaw whpping as a 
criminal sentence. (Reuters) 


rd 


¥ 


,7 


Turkish diplomats sought to down- 
play the results of 


the Brussels meeting 
by pointing out that it did not officially 
reflect the views of either the European 
Union or any member government. The 
statement Wednesday by Mr. Kinkel, 
however, was an official declaration by 


EMU: French Bank Aide Prefers Delay to blit on Monetary Union 


Continued from Page I 

union without these coun- 


monetary 
tries." 

Mr. Gerard said later in an interview 
with the International Herald Tribune 


one of the Union's most important mem- that going ahead without Italy and Spain 


3 Die in Rioting by Nigerian Tribesmen; 
Shell Oil Says 88 Workers Still Are Held 


Reuters 

LAGOS — Three people were re- 
ported killed Wednesday in violence re- 
lated to protests in which more than 100 
Royal Dutch/Shell oil workers have 
been taken hostage. 

The tribal protests in the mid western 
Nigerian oil town of Warn are over the 
relocation of a local* government 
headquarters. 

In Lagos, a spokesman for the British- 
Dutch oil company said 88 of its workers 
were still being held by tribesmen who 
had occupied six of the company’s flow 
stations since Saturday to protest the 
move of the government offices. 

Thirty other Shell workers were freed 
Tuesday. All of those who were taken 
hostage were Nigerians. 


Local newspapers reported that three 
flaw 


members of the ljaw tribe were killed in 
rioting Tuesday and that the home of 
former Information Minister Edwin Clark 
was destroyed in a fire caused by arson. 

The Ijaws. a tribe of about 3 million, 
are angry over the relocation of the 
headquarters of the newly created Warn 
South-West local government area to 
a rival lown, Ogidigben, from Ogbe- 
Ijofa. 

The unrest does not directly involve 
Shell, but the company is caught up in it 
because of its high profile in Nigeria and 
large operations in the Warn area. 

The Shell spokesman said community 
leaders had met with state officials and 
that the company hoped this would lead 
to the release of its workers. 


her states. 

While rejecting Turkish hopes for 
quick membership in the European Uni- 
on, Mr. Kinkel assured his hosts that 
Turkey “belongs to Europe” and is “an 
important country with great respon- 
sibilities." Foreign Minister Tansu 
Ciller of Turkey seized on those as- 
surances in an effort to extract 
something positive from a strikingly 
negative message. 

“We are on the main track to Europe, 
not on >ome outside track." Mrs. Ciller 
asserted. “Naturally there are obstacles 
and problems which Europe has brought 
up repeatedly." 

“The Cyprus problem cannot be 
solved quickly because we need flex- 
ibility on both sides," she continued. 
“As for human rights, we take these 
problems very seriously in Turkey. We 
have taken very important steps. In the 
interest of the Turkish people. Turkey is 
determined to improve this situation." 

Supporters of Turkey's application to 
join die European Union have warned 
that □ clear European rejection like that 
which Mr. Kinkel delivered would 
strengthen anti-Western factions here. 


could damage French interests. 

“If one accepts that countries such as 
Italy and Spain enier later, then wc will 
see an economic balance skewed to the 
north of Europe," he said. “And in that 
situation. France would suffer more than 
Germany, because our trade with south- 
ern Europe Is much more important for 
France than for Germany." 

In explaining how he saw French and 
German interests diverging. Mr. Gerard 
told AFP that “Germany's interest lies 
in an economic organization based on 
nonhem Europe, whereas we have an 
inrerest in the economic center of gravity 
being based, as it is today, roughly in 
Lorraine." 

Mr. Gerard stressed that he was 
speaking in a personal capacity, but 
when asked if others on the Bank of 
France monetary policy council shared 
his view*, he replied: 

“I prefer not to comment except lo 
say that some are in agreement and oth- 
ers are not.” 

Eric Chaney, a former French Treas- 
ury official who is now the Paris-based 
senior economist at Morgan Stanley, 
noted that Mr. Gerard is known to be 


close to Philippe Seguin, president of 
National Assembly and a critic 
Maastricht-mandated austerity mi 
sures. 

“Therefore." said Mr. Cham 
“these views by Mr. Gerard on a 
sible delay are really a call for an ab; 
donment. although he is using the Mi- 
dday. This represents the view of mi 
people in the governing majority, j! 
eluding Mr. Seguin and Charles Pasquj 
the former interior minister. ' ' 

Mr. Gerard's remarks contradict! 
the position of the Bank of Frame 
governor. Jcan-Claudc Trichet. who 


x Value of ? e doUar - "hid, are _ 
lughly damaging for olt economy. ' ’ 

fnr a SSu* ***? "jp TOOID 7 

for a small cut in French short-ieim 1 
interest rates, by about one-tenth of 1 • 
percent from its present level of 3 10 » 

EEf tppearances, ihe 1 

monetary policy set by the Bundesbank ‘ 

X re fl™ce-' thM ' Scl by ^ : 


•Tw Chai !* y Mor S an Stanley said ’ 
The fact that Mr. Gerani is spSg i 


Wednesday contended in a newspapelrichet 


the 


interview that any delay 
currency project would “pt.se a vei 
serious legal problem.” Mr. f richet sai 
that Bank of France lawyers had as- 
certained that the Maastrichi treaty on 
economic and moneiar- union “does 
not allow such y delay.” 

In his interviews Wednesday. Mr. 
Gerard also said that the current ex- 
change rate of the U.S. dollar against the 
franc was "acceptable \o the Germans 
and to us." The rate Wednesday was 
5.70 francs to the dollar. 

Mr. GeranJ slated that "the right rate 
for French industry would be about 6.20 
francs to the dollar, hut the Germans take 
another view of this." As u result, he 
added. “It would lx- better to try* to 
maintain the dollar rale at 5.50 lo 6 
francs rather than suffer strong changes 


'*. ver y ! 

? ls 8tro ? g °PP° sil ion, with- ! 
jlJL ^eWtypdJCy council, to Mr. * 

Jj*J“: The 1 fi 1 * 1 conclusion I j 
W is that there is now definitely a • 
ssibility that the Bonk of Sill ! 
rates ro the German level ” • 

W PH^'w ei ? rd s P° ke <*• Wed- : 
y. Prime Minister Romano Prodi - 

Lit 35 P re P ar ' n 2 to announce a ' 
darhX supplementary budget ■ 
7 Jr to reach the 1 WJ \ 

' Hr, 3 ^^ C,t to 3 percent of 1 
d P™5 st ' c product (Page 1 5) I 

rn^whit minister of ,* 

TSafiLr 1 " a *lephone ; 

M "Wednesday that reports sue- ■ 
El* Was **^2 a delay in * 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 


- 4 



PAGE 11 

.^7 


Risk of Long, Crowded Flight 


By Susan Okie 

Wasliingicn Post Service 


Tips tor Preventing 
Blood Clots 
During 

Airplane Flights 

Point foot 
downwards, 
clench toes, 
and hold for 
three seconds 


Bill O'lxuo’^be Wntaguti Ptm 

Dr. James Powers elevates his injured leg as he recuperates from “economy-class syndrome ." 

Alarms Sounding Over Hepatitis C 


W ASHINGTON — The 
window seat on British 
Airways’ night flight from 
Washington to London 
was cramped, but the price was right — 
$600 round trip, economy class. So Dr. 
James Powers, a physician in Chevy 
Chase. Maryland, who was treating bis 
wife and his mother to a New Year’s 
holiday in London, squeezed his long 
legs into the meager space allotted to 
him and tried to get some sleep. 

When he arrived in London early the 
next morning after sitting nearly im- 
mobile for most of the seven-hour flight, 
both legs were swollen. But Dr. Powers. 
51, an obsietrician/gynecologist accus- 
tomed to reassuring pregnant women 
about puffy ankles, figured the fluid 
would disappear once he walked 
around. He took in Westminster Cathed- 
ral. then returned to his hotel for a nap. 

He awoke seven hotro later with 
severe pain in his left calf. 

“I hobbled aroupd the room,*’ trying 
to stretch the muscles, he recalled. “I 
thought, ‘Well. I just got a cramp.* '* 
The next morning, he was worse. “I 
could barely walk, it was such intense 
n,” he said. Determined to enjoy the 
ef vacation, he limped around the 
city, then flew home. 

He returned to a full schedule of sur- 
gery and patients and did his best to 
ignore the persistent pain and swelling 
in his left leg. After a week, he could 
ignore it no longer and consulted a vas- 
cular surgeon. Diagnosis: a dangerous 
blood clot in a calf vein. 

Dr. Powers was hospitalized imme- 
diately for treatment with heparin, an 
intravenous anti-clotting drug. 

Dr. Powers was lucky, the specialist 
told him. At any time during the pre- 
ceding 1 0 days, a piece of the clot could 


have broken off and traveled through his 
heart to lodge in his lungs — a com- 
plication that occurs in 10 to 40 percent 
of such cases. If dial had happened, it 
might have killed him. 

The athletic doctor was suffering 
from a condition he’d never heard of, 
one that some experts say is becoming 
increasingly common in this era of fre- 
quent air travel and airline deregulation: 
“economy-class syndrome.” 

That’s the name coined by British 
researchers for patients who develop 
blood clots in the deep veins of the legs 
after sitting through long flights in 
cramped airplane seats. 

Dr. Powers, who is still taking an ami- 
clotting medicine and has had to cut 
back on vigorous exercise, is outraged 
that he learned about economy-class 
syndrome from a magazine article only 
after he developed the blood cloL 

“The airlines don’t cut you any 
slack,” he said. 

“They don't tell you that this can 
happen to you.” he said, adding. 
“They’re nor talking about what you 
can do to be healthier and safer.” 

R. POWERS said many air- 
line passengers have risk 
factors that increase their 
chances of a blood clot, but 
many of them probably don’t realize it 
People with varicose veins or cancer are 
at risk, as are smokers and people with a 
history of leg clots, leg or pelvic sur- 
gery, a leg injury, recent bed rest or 
recent general anesthesia. 

Pregnancy, birth-control pills and 
hormone-replacement therapy also in- 
crease the likelihood of a cloL In ad- 
dition. people who are overweight, el- 
derly or tall are more likely to develop 
leg clots. 

Getting up and walking around the 
plane is the best way to prevent a clot 
from forming. But Dr. Powers noted 



that, instead of urging passen- 
gers to move around, airlines 
seem to discourage it. 

“They start by saying. ‘We cannot 
move the aircraft until you are in your 
seats.' ” he said. "Thai son of sets the 
tone.” 

Then, after takeoff, “almost imme- 
diately the carts start coming up and 
down,” he said. “You are basically 
obstructed from walking.” 

Many airlines close off the first-class 
and business sections with curtains. If a 
passenger walks through the galley on a 
stroll around the plane. Dr. Powers said, 
“they look at you really funny, like. 
‘Get out of here, please, because you're 
in the way.’ ” 

Susan P. Baker, a professor of health 
policy who does research cm injury pre- 
vention at Johns Hopkins School of 
Public Health, said airline crews worry 
about passengers being injured if they 
are out of their sears when a plane hits a 
patch of turbulence. She speculated, 
however, that leg clots caused by im- 
mobility could actually be more fre- 
quent than turbulence-related injuries. 

A spokesman for British Airways 
said that for several years the airline has 
included in its in-flight magazine an 
article with advice to passengers on how 
to stay healthy during air travel. 

Besides urging passengers to wear 
loose clothes and to go easy on alcohol, 
the article suggests a foot exercise that 
stretches and contracts the muscles of 
the calf. A few other airlines advise 
passengers to exercise in their seats, 
including Northwest Airlines, which 
shows a six-minute exercise video near 
the end of its intercontinental flights. A 
spokesman said more than half of the 
passengers usually do the exercises. 

But neither the British Airways ar- 
ticle nor the Northwest video urges pas- 
sengers to move around the plane, the 
spokesmen said. 


By David Brown 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON— In 1972. 

Vernon Sears was fresh 
out of the Marine Corps. 

with time on his hands and 
a feeling of omnipotence. One day he 
took up a friend's offer and injected 
meth amphetamine, the drug known as 
speed. 

“If I counted on one hand the number 
of times I tried it. I'd have fingers left 
over," he said recently. 

It didn't matter, though, that this peri- 
od of risky experimentation was brief. 
In a shot with a borrowed needle. Mr. 
Sears became infected with the hepatitis 
C virus. He’s bad it ever since. 

Over the past 30 years, about 4 mil- 
lion Americans have contracted hep- 
atitis C, an infection of the liver that 
usually is lifelong and incurable. It is 
four times more common than the AIDS 
virus. 

What will happen to those people — 
1 .8 percent erf the U-S. population — is 
one of contemporary medicine's biggest 
questions. 

"I think it's going to be die next big 
public health problem in infectious dis- 
ease, though we're not going to see it 
until the next century.” said David L. 
Thomas, a hepatitis researcher at the 
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. 

Although the existence of the disease 
had been suspected for decades, the 
virus that causes the infection was not 
isolated until 1989. A laboratory test for 
hepatitis C. and a flood of research, 
quickly followed. 

Since then, researchers have begun to 
develop a better understanding of the 
magnitude of the hepatitis C problem. 
Hepatitis C rarely causes immediate 
illness. Often, h is dragnosed by chance, 
years, or even decades, after a person 
contracts it. In about 85 percent of cases, 
the infection is permanent and people 
with it become ‘^chronic carriers.” 

In a minority of cases, hepatitis C 
causes severe liver scarring — known as 
cirrhosis — or, more rarely, liver can- 


The Origins 

Ho iv people get hepatitis C 


Types of exposure reported by 
Americans with acute hepatitis C, 
1992-94: 

Injecting drugs 50% 


Sexual/household 


13 


Blood transfusion 


Occupational 


None 


Unspecified* 32 

*Hnlte darned urhncwn, but many m thte group ham 
hig h -ris h behavior. Source; Centers far Disease 
Cortot and Prevention wp 


cer. Although neither complication 
emerges until decades after the infection 
occurs, about 20 percent of patients are 
expected to develop diem sometime in 
their lives, according to current pro- 
jections. Already, complications from 
hepatitis C are the leading reason for 
liver transplants in the United States. 

‘ ‘We may have an epidemic of chron- 
ic liver disease in 20 years," said Miri- 
am J. Alter, the chief epidemiologist of 
the hepatitis branch of the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention. 

“The medical system may be over- 
come with individuals,” Dr. Alter said, 
“coming to get it treated.” 

Carriers can transmit the virus in- 
definitely, although not by casual con- 
tact- Sexual transmission occurs, but 
appears to be relatively uncommon. In 
blood, however, the virus passes with 
astonishing ease. 

“If I had to draw a moral from my 
drug use, it's (hat it can bun you trying it 
just once.” said Mr. Sears, whose in- 
fection was not discovered until 1994, 
when be was hospitalized for a different 
ailment. 

While the hepatitis C virus was iso- 
lated only eight years ago. physicians 
had long suspected a microbe was be- 
hind a mild Form of liver disease that 
was noticed in the late 1960s in people 


who had received blood transfusions. 

When those patients were tested, they 
did not have either hepatitis A or hepatitis 
B. the two most common viruses known 
to cause inflammation of die liver. 

Doctors called the new liver disease 
“non- A, non-B” iNANB) hepatitis be- 
cause they could not identify the vims. 
Once they identified the virus, doctors 
determined that most of the cases were 
actually hepatitis C. 

Experts now believe that hepatitis C 
started to spread to a larger segment of 
the population when, by chance, a few 
of the people infected with it became 
intravenous drug users decades ago. 

By studying those who originally re- 
ceived NANB hepatitis diagnoses, re- 
searchers have gotten a rough picture of 
the “nannal history” of hepatitis C. 
Mild symptoms, such as fatigue and 
vague abdominal pain, do not appear for 
a decade or more. It takes 20 years, on 
average, for cinhosis to develop. Liver 
cancer rarely occurs until nearly 30 
years after infection. 

Despite what is known about hep- 
atitis C, however, it is unclear whether 
the disease shortens the lives of many 
people who are infected. 

A STUDY of 568 people who 
contracted NANB hepatitis 
from transfusions — some as 
long ago as 1967 — found no 
difference in mortality between them 
and other transfusion recipients after 21 
years. That observation, however, may 
be misleading, in part because more 
than half of the people in both groups 
had died at the time of the analysis. 

The only existing treatment for hep- 
atitis C does not work very well. Patients 
get three injections a week of interferon- 
alpha, an anti-viral substance made nat- 
urally by the body in minute quantities. 
Given as a drug, interferon can cause 
flu-like symptoms and depression. 
Treatment costs about $2,500 for six 
months, and two courses are often giv- 
en. It only permanently suppresses liver 
inflammation in 10 percent to 20 percent 
of patients. 


Can Wine Prevent Alzheimer’s? 


Reuters 

P ARIS — Three or four glasses 
of wine a day can help prevent 
Alzheimer's disease or senile 
dementia, according to a study 
by scientists in France's wine capital. 

The study, by researchers at Bor- 
deaux University Hospital, showed that 
moderate consumption reduced by 75 
percent the risk of developing either 
condition. 

The study prompted extended cov- 
erage on television and radio in a coun- 
try where about 350,000 people suffer 


from Alzheimer' s and wine is part of the 
national culture. Some 90,000 new 
cases of Alzheimer's are reported each 
year. 

Dr. Jean-Marc Orgogozo, who dir- 
ected the nine-year project involving 
almost 4,000 subjects, said it was too 
early to advise the elderly to drink wine 
to fend off senility or Alzheimer’s. 

But he said the study suggested 
strongly that it could help. 

“U seems that there is no medical 
rationale to advise people over 65 to quit 
drinking wine moderately as this habit 


carries no specific risk and may even be 
of some benefit to their health,” Dr. 
Orgogozo wrote. 

The study, to be detailed in the French 
medical magazine Revue Neurolo- 
gique, suggested that moderate drinking 
was the key: Heavy or light wine drink- 
ing carried no health benefiL 

Dr. Orgogozo said dial even in the 
light of previous research showing 
wine’s protective effect against heart 
disease, the extent of the benefit was 
surprising. He added that the wine in- 
dustry had no role in the study. 


BOOKS 


k 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 14 Common-sense 

1 MakssiBy . MWwMhfOUS* 

• Undergoes 

■ Out of cards in a t* BaU 9 oer 

suit i7Pu»ng 

« Peter it Happy 

Tchaikovsky - spymastar? 


fflanmpd 

Est. 1911, Paris 

‘Sank Roo Doe Nog’ 


A Space for Thought. 


at Heartfelt 
a* Record-owning 
as Poolroom aid 
■a” And thereby 

hangs ' 

as A party to 
2 * Kind ot beer 
jo I nt e rp ret ati on 
sf Summoned 
a* Happy Wagner 
hero? 

asTreWoekloi 
m Province 
ae Subject of 
academic study 

42 Viking deity 

43 Hodgepodge 

as spumante 

ascertain riding 

horses 
ea Like many 


Co Happy 
ex -Mayor of 

New York? 

B 2 Play backup for 
34 Make fit 
■a “Damn 

Yankees' vamp 
■7 Plunked items 
as Eugene who 
wrote 'Wynken. 
Btynkenand 
Nod* 

se 58-Across, e.g. 
e» Minster seat 
■1 Business 
concern 


DOWN 

1 Dribble gun*** 

2 Like a Thomas 
Gray work 

3 Schoolmaster's 
order 

4 Word of the 
hour? 

■Yonder 


■ Doubter's 
outbursts 
t Member ofa 
very old 
kingdom 

• Dotty, perhaps 

• Antonio or 
Bassanio, a.g. 
Compliant 

11 Investigator’s 
employer. Abbr. 

13 Hairstyles 

14 Hon 

ia Inadequately 
se Boardroom 
easel dfeplay 

21 Lanka 

as Miney follower 
as Omega 
zr Year's record 
aa Modem ink 
source 

3* Singer Zadora 
■ax Hem aboard a 
merchant ship 

33 Awards tor 
Sheryl Crow 
as Overhaul e 
soundtrack 
3B Jean, kx one 
aa Witness's reply 
si wonderwork 
aePequod hand 

40 Bell site 

41 Prefix with life or 
write 

43 Grab 

44 Tremulous 

43 Park in Maine 
47 Issue maferiel 

44 Toronto Maple 

« Fteaurgentty 
sa Swiss eminence 
■a Pigeon sound 

3S Kingdoms 

scores, for short 



ARKANSAS: Three Novellas 

By David Leavitt 198 pages. $23. 
Houghton Mifflin Co. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

I T HAS been four years since David 
Leavitt's last book, “While England 
Sleeps,” was published, and three years 
since his publisher. Viking, agreed to 
stop selling that novel (in its original 
farm) in response to a lawsuit brought 
by the English poet Stephen Spender, 
who charged that the bode was little 
more than a thinly disguised and lub- 
ricious retelling of parts of his own 1951 
memoir. “World Within World.” 

This contretemps is directly referred 
to in one of the three novellas that make 
up Leavitt’s disappointing new book, 
“Arkansas.” In this novella, “The 
Term Paper Artist.” the nanator is 
someone named David Leavitt who 
pointedly asks himself: "Would I ever 
be allowed to forget what had happened 
with ‘While England Sleeps’? 

“Would the scandal that had attached 
itself to the novel's publication — to 
quote a helpful journalist — ‘taint my 
aura' forever?” 

This David Leavitt tells us that he has 
been having trouble writing, and that he 
has left New York to stay at his father’s 
house in Glendale, California. Both his 
sense of exile and his experience of a 
premature midlife crisis are shared by 
die heroes of the two other novellas in 
this collection, a mise-en-saine that un- 
fortunately results in stories that feel as 
narrow and self-absorbed as Leavitt’s 
earlier works were emotionally ample. 

In “Family Dancing” (1984). his 
astonishing debut collection, and later 
novels like “Equal Affections” (1989). 
Leavitt demonstrated a remarkable abil- 
ity to limn, with tenderness, wisdom 
and humor, a vast array of human re- 
lationships, both straight and gay — 
relationships between parents and chil- 
dren. husbands and wives, friends and 
lovers. There was a Luminous empathy 
to his writing, an appreciation of the 
sorrows and consolations of everyday 
life, and an understanding of how the 


present is shaped and measured by the 
past. 

These qualities are noticeably absent 
from “Arkansas.” To begin with, these 
novellas — with the qualified exception 
of "The Wooden Anniversary,” which 
features characters who have appeared 
in earlier Leavitt stories — take place 
within a claustrophobic present. 

Although there are perfunctory al- 
lusions to troubles in tbe past — die 
aforementioned literary travails of 
“David Leavitt" and in the other two 
stories, the death of a lover — these 
troubles are never made palpably real. 
Their sole purpose is to galvanize the 
hero’s current state of alienation, dis- 
affection or emotional paralysis. 

In “The Term Paper Artist,” which 
recently caused a brouhaha when Es- 
quire magazine abruptly dropped the sto- 
ry from its April issue, the fictional 
“David Leavitt” spends his days aim- 
lessly driving around Los Angeles, 
listening to a radio shrink known as Dr. 
Delia, visiting a pornography store called 
the Circus of Books and pretending to 
research a new novel We are supposed 
to believe that he rediscovers the pleas- 
ures of writing and finds a redemption of 
sorts, by ghostwriting term papers for 
college students in exchange for sex. 

In “Tbe Wooden Anniversary," 
Nathan, a wealthy dilettante whose lov- 
er has recently died, visits his old friend 
Celia in Italy, where she is running a 
cooking schooL In the course of his stay, 
he has a series of panic attacks and tries 
to seduce Mauro, Celia’s young chef. 

In “Saturn Street,' ’ a would-be 
screenwriter named Jerry who is re- 
covering from the suicide of his lover 
spends his days driving around die city, 
likening to the radio shrink Dr. Delia 
and visiting tbe pom store tbe Circus of 
Books. 

The similarities between his expe- 
riences and those of die fictional ‘ ‘Dav- 
id Leavitt” in “Term Paper” do not 
result in a postmodernist point, as Leav- 
itt perhaps wishes, but simply under- 
score the poverty of imagination in this 
volume. Jerry takes a volunteer job with 
a group that delivers lunches to house- 


bound AIDS patients, and in doing so 
meets a former pom star named Phil, 
develops an infatuation and says he has 
learned the lesson of acceptance. 

Whereas Leavitt's earlier stories and 
novels excavated his characters' entire 
emotional lives, the novellas in ‘ ‘Arkan- 
sas” pivot almost exclusively around a 
single aspect of their characters' ex- 
istence, namely, sex. Sex is what these 
heroes devote most of their time to look- 
ing for or thinking about Sex is what 
drives the plots of these stories. 

And sex — real sex, telephone sex 
and video sex — is what Leavitt spends 
die bettor part of his time describing. 
Perhaps this is because the heroes of 
these stories are supposed to be de- 
pressed, alienated and confused, unable 
to address tbe larger questions in their 
lives. 

Or perhaps it is because Leavitt, in tire 
wake of accusations by Spender that 
“While England Sleeps” was porno- 
graphic. decided, consciously or uncon- 
sciously, to willfully focus on explicitly 
sexual material. 

T HE problem is that the sex in these 
stories does nothing to illuminate its 
heroes' lives, other than reveal them as 
fellows who are obsessed with sex. It is 
repetitious, tiresome and sophomoric, 
arid it also results in some terrible writ- 
ing. People say things in these stories 
like "Frankly, I’ve always preferred 
hairy men,” and “Well, the way I see it, 
you're gay and I’m sexy.” One narrator 
compares the joy of writing to “the 
fruity perfume of a 20-year-old boy’s 
unwashed sheets." 

This sort of adolescent writing is un- 
worthy of the richly talented Leavitt, 
wbo has unaccountably elected to aban- 
don the emotional chiaroscuro of his 
earlier stories and novels. Tbe reader 
can only hope that this volume rep- 
resents a temporary exile or sabbatical, 
like those experienced by the heroes of 
these stories, and that Leavitt soon re- 
covers his old form. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


QNew York Times/ Edited by fflll Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of March 26 


nnnnn raranre anra 
nnnnn rarirni mmrnra 
Dnnnn mnnn nnraa 
nrnnrannnrnannn 
rcnn snn nnn nnra 
eehe nnEfi raonnm 
Rnnnnnnn nan 
nrananriRranrarinsno 
nna nnnaanaa 
□rarasn anno nono 
tnnR E 0 ro nras nan 
namnanennann 
□hbd nsnn □□ana 
0120s snran nmaora 
ego HBEin doana 


By Alan TVuscott 

T HE recenr death in Los 
Angeles of the Grand Old 
Man of Bridge, servered the 
last link with the founders of 
contract bridge. Alfred Sbein- 
wold, who was 85, began writ- 
ing about the game in 1933 
and continued to do so all his 
life in magazines and syndic- 
ated newspaper columns. One 
of his books, “Five Weeks to 
Winning Bridge,” sold mil- 
lions of copies. 

His bridge career included 
service as chairman of the Na- 
tional 'Laws Commission and 
editor of the American Con- 


tract Bridge League's Bullet- 
in. The Kaplan-Sheinwold 
system he developed with 
Edgar Kaplan was important 
to the theory of tbe game and 
is still widely played. 

Although bis busy sched- 
ule left him few opportunities 
for competition, Mr. Shein- 
wold was a fine player wbo 
captured two national titles 
and many lesser ones. 

On the diagramed deal, 
played in 1958, he held the 
East cards and defended four 
hearts after opening one 
spade. 

He won the opening spade 
lead with the ace and returned 
tbe suit. South won with the 


king and cashed die king ace 
of diamonds. He ruffed the 
third round with the jack, and 
Mr. Sbeinwold made the key 
play: He refused to overruff 
and threw a club. Now he 
could not be prevented from 
taking three trump tricks to 
defeat tbe contract. 

A much less obvious line of 
play would have succeeded 
for South. If he had imme- 
diately played the heart ace 
and followed with the jack, he 
would have been able to draw 
trumps. He would then have 
made a tenth trick, either by 
establishing dummy's clubs 
or by squeezing West in the 
minor suits. 


WEST 

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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


Missae 


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PAGE 3 






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s .'i irniiftf 
i^rliam 




IV WTFWS.nWHAL®* • I 

HcralOrfafetenbunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


THURSDAY’, MARCH 27, 1997 


WEEKEND BREAKS 
FROM ONLY $60 

see our ad in this paper 


PAGE 13 



Seth Mydaoa/Thc Sew Yrvfc Time* 

The Suppaya Cooperative plant in Thailand, which makes products for Nike Inc. and others. Nike has hired 
Andrew Young, a former UN ambassador, to study and make recommendations on its labor practices. 

Housecleaning, or Image-Buffing? 


By Dana Canedy 




Depresses 

' TWA Stock 

Auditors Express Doubt 
.(her Airline's Survival 

Ctmrpitd by Our SuflFrm Oupju hn 

ST. LOUIS. Missouri — Trans 
;World Airline Inc. shares fell 9 percent 
"Wednesday, a day after the company 
said its auditors said they had “su£ 
standal doubt” about the carrier's abil- 
ity to survive. 

TWA shares were down 62.5 cents in 
late trading, at $7.00. After the market 
closed Tuesday. TWA’s auditors. KP- 
MG Peat Marwick, expressed their con- 
cerns about the airline's future in their 
portion of the company's annual report 
to securities regulators. 

The disclosure is another sign of the 
. Sl Louis-based airline's financial woes. 
It has been to bankruptcy court twice in 
"recent years, and has struggled with the 
crash of Flight 800 off Long Island, 
New York, last July. Last week, TWA 
posted a loss of $284.6 million for 
1996. 

Although the KPMG report will not 
be riled with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission until the end of the 
month, the airline made the information 
public because it is trying to raise $50 
million through a private sale of se- 
curities. 

The company needs cash to bolster its 
reserves, which stood at $ 1 8 1 .6 million 
at the start of the year but have probably 
fallen in the rim quarter. 

TWA 1ms been hit with the “sub- 
stantial doubt” clause before — in the 
7 spring of 1991 when it was struggling 
under its former owner, Carl Icahn. 

The airline wound up in bankruptcy 
court in January 1992. but cut costs, 
slashed debt and kept flying. A second 
trip to bankruptcy court in 1995 also 
faded to ground the airline. 

Mark Abels, the vice president for 
communications at TWA, sought to re- 
assure travelers holding the airline's 
tickets for spring or summer vacations. 
He said, “TWA has every intention of 
flying them to their destinations.” 

Investors might give greater weight 
to the positive news of the $50 million in 
fresh financing, said Stephen Klein, an 
'analyst at Standard &. Poor’s Equity 
Group. (AP, Bloomberg) 


New terk Times Sen-ice 

N EW YORK — As an out- 
spoken civil-rights leader, 
crusading UN representative 
and mayor of Atlanta whose 
oratorical skills were honed in the pul- 
pit, Andrew Young has rarely been 
short of words. But in his private busi- 
ness dealings, Mr. Young says he can 
be more effective out of the limelight. 

Even so, Nike Inc. eagerly fired off a 
news release last month announcing 
that Mr. Young and his new consulting 
film. Good works International would 
review the company's recently updated 
code governing working conditions at 
the company's worldwide plants. 

Nike — which has sought to shake 
off claims that its products are man- 
ufactured in Asian sweatshops — said 
Mr. Young's involvement had added a 
level of oversight to its commitment to 
being a leader in international work- 
place standards. The company's critics 
take a more cynical view, contending 
that just as Nike pays Michael Jordan to 
sell its basketball shoes, Mr. Young has 
been hired to promote Nike’s image. 
While Mr. Young insists on his in- 


dependence — *T don't see myself as 
a spokesman for Nike at all,” he said 
in a brief and reluctantly granted in- 
terview — the mixed reception to his 
involvement underscores the obstacles 
to the venture's success. 

A growing number of corporations 
have hired nigh-profile lawyers or 
former government officials to con- 
duct what the companies say are in- 
dependent investigations inro their af- 
fairs. Besides Nike, the list includes 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Mattel Inc., Bausch & Lomb Inc. and 
Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing Corp. 
of America. But the appointments often 
just become one more source of skep- 
ticism. doing little to appease the critics 
they are intended to answer. 

“Your First inclination from a pub- 
lic-relations standpoint is to hire 
somebody whose credibility will con- 
vince the public that in and of itself, the 
conclusion they reach is the right con- 
clusion,” said Edwin Stier, a lawyer 
who specializes in independent inves- 
tigations. But appointing a fact-finder 
is never enough, he said. “The public 
has got to be reassured that the process 


you went through is one that is ef- 
fective at getting the bottom-line in- 
formation you need.” Mr. Slier said. 
“If you take the position that 'we’ll let 
you know what the results are, but 
we're not going to tell you how we got 
there,' then you run into a serious risk 
that the whole effort will backfire.” 

When, for instance. Mattel Inc. was 
in the market last year for a consultant 
to look into accusations that it had 
overstated its earnings, the toymaker 
hired Gary Lynch, die former director 
of enforcement for the Securities and 
Exchange Commission. In public life, 
Mr. Lynch was the scourge of Wall 
Street, bringing cases against prom- 
inent traders such as Michael Milken 
and Ivan Boesky. But Mattel’s critics 
objected that, among other things, the 
toymaker had declined to release Mr. 
Lynch ’s report, saying only that he had 
uncovered no wrongdoing on the part 
of company executives. 

In May 1996. a month after the 
Equal Employment Opportunity Com- 
mission sued Mitsubishi of America 
and charged that women at its plant in 
Normal. Illinois, bad been subjected to 

See IMAGE, Page 17 


German Steel Merger 
To Cost 8,000 Jobs 

Thyssen and Krupp Plants Idle 
As Unions Protest Layoff Plans 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The merger of 
Germany's two biggest steel companies 
will result in the loss of one of every 
three jobs at the merged entity in the 
next four to rive years, union and com- 
pany sources said Wednesday. 

Meanwhile, steel production re- 
mained shut down at both Krupp 
Hoesch AG’s steel mills in Dortmund 
and Thyssen AG's works in Duisburg as 
striking steelworkers protested the pro- 
posed job cuts, which are expected ro 
total 8.000 from a combined Thyssen - 
Krupp work force of 24,900. 

The estimated cuts are more than 
double the 3.S00 jobs that both compa- 
nies had planned to phase out as pan of 
unrelated restructurings conceived be- 
fore the merger talks, the merger, which 
would create the world’s fifth- biggest 
steelmaker, is expected to go into effect 
Tuesday, the companies said. Thyssen 
will hold a controlling 60 percent stake. 

Separately, Belgium's biggest steel 
group, Cockerili Sambre SA, an- 
nounced a loss of 8.97 billion Belgian 
francs ($257.2 million), its first loss in 
three years, and said it would omit its 
dividend. 

The Belgian company's loss, and the 
jobcuts at Thyssen and Krupp, reflect the 
overcapacity in Western Europe and the 
effects of cheaper imports from Eastern 
Europe and Asia that have handicapped 
many other European steelmakers. 

Germany's economics minister, 
Gunter Rexrodt, hailed the Krupp- 
Thyssen deal as one that would “height- 
en the competitiveness of the German 
steel industry" and was "in the best 
interest of the workers.” 

Economists said that neither German 
company was able to produce steel ai 
competitive prices on world markets, 
making job cuts inevitable as a way to 
lower production costs. 

Following a decade of unsuccessful 
merger talks, the April 1 incorporation 
date reflects how quickly Thyssen and 
Krupp were able to find common 
ground after Krupp announced a hostile 
takeover bid for Thyssen eight days ago. 
After mass protests, strikes and a polit- 


ical uproar, Krupp dropped its hostile 
takeover plans this week when it be- 
came clear that the two were prepared to 
merge on friendly terms. 

The outline of ihe merged Thyssen- 
Krupp steel company will be presented 
Thursday at a news conference at 
Thyssen ’s headquarters in Duesseldorf, 
a Thyssen representative said. 

Local politicians and unions declared 
a partial victory after the companies 
gave assurances that jobs would be cut 
through a costly program of voluntary 
departures, early retirements, retraining 
and transfers rather than layoffs. 

Even so, the cuts will add to the high 
unemployment in Germany's depressed 
coal and steel heartland in the Ruhr 
Valley. The Ruhr region has an 18 per- 
cent jobless rate, roughly the average in 
Eastern Germany. 

Dieter Vogel, chairman of the 
Thyssen management board, said on 
German television thai the con- 
sequences of a hostile takeover “would 
have been far worse than what will 
happen now that Thyssen will steer the 
fusion.” 

“This is not about cutting jobs, but 
rather restructuring that will be accom- 
panied by new technologies and con- 
siderable investments so that we remain 
competitive,” Mr. Vogel said. “Nat- 
urally, this cannot be done completely 
without reductions, but we will tty to do 
this without layoffs." 

Hardest hit by job reductions will be 
Krupp ’s technologically outdated plan! 
in Dortmund, company sources said, but 
there were conflicting reports Wednes- 
day about plans for Dortmund. 

The IG Metall steelworkers union 
said all blast-furnace operations there 
would be phased out Hans- Wilhelm 
Grasshoff, the chief of Krupp’s steel 
unit, told workers that two of the three 
Dortmund blast furnaces there would be 
closed down, while Wolfgang Clement, 
the Social Democratic economy min- 
ister of North Rhine-Westphalia, said 
3,600 of the 5,700 steel jobs would be 
cut at Dortmund. 

"We are still uncertain about what 
will happen at Dortmund in terms of 
jobs and output,” the Thyssen repre- 
sentative said. 


Hibjap 


This Time , Japan May Help Determine How U.S. Bonds React to Rate Rise 



By Floyd Norris 

New York Times Service 

v ‘ NEW YORK — Three years ago, a 
■move by the Federal Reserve Board to 

• raise U.S. interest nates set off a huge 
: retrenchment in a Treasury bond market 
iwhere prices had been driven up by 
: speculation. 

r This year, such a move is likely to 
“ have a much smaller effect on the fi- 
' nancial markets, for ir is Japan's central 
‘ bank, not America’s, that has done the 
. most recently to foster speculation. 

The U.S. central bank’s move Tues- 

• day to raise the federal funds rate, at 
..which banks lend to one another, by a 
■quarter-point to 5.50 percent caused 
■httle immediate market reaction, in part 
;.because it had been widely expected. 

- The general Wall Street view is that 

• the economy, and the stock and bond 
'.'markets, can escape this round of credit 

■ k ^tightening without major damage. But 
V- .-that could change if the Fed proves to be 
: - : ; more determined to raise rales than most 

- now expect, -or if Japan were to join in 
. raising rates. 

On Wednesday, the head of the Bank 
■ of Japan said the central bank would 
. .maintain its current monetary policy, 

• signaling that interest rates will remain 
at a record low. 

In the early 1990s a huge amount of 
’ .. ’ speculation bad been built up, largely in 

bonds, by traders who borrowed at 
‘ short-term American interest rates and 
"then bought various kinds of longer- 
, term bonds whose rales were higher. 

- When the Fed moved to push up short- 



term rates, it cut profits of the spec- 
ulators and threw fear into them. A sell- 
off in bonds ensued. 

There is no shortage of speculation 
now — and stemming that speculation 
may have been one of the Fed’s goals — 
but it does nor appear to be based cm 
borrowing at U.S. short-term rates. 

Now, the speculation is more in 
stocks, and for many aggressive pro- 
fessional investors the preferred source 
of borrowing is Japan, where short-term 
interest rates are well under 1 percent 

“If you want to talk about the spec- 
ulation associated with low short-term 
rates, you have to go halfway around the 
world," said Robert Bartera, chief 
economist of Hoe nig & Co. 

An increase in Japanese rates would 
be more likely to throw fear into spec- 
ulators right now. But those rates are 
held down, as they were in this country 
in the early 1990s. in an effort to help 
banks that have been damaged by bad 
loans, as well as by a desire to stimulate 
economic growth. It is not clear how 
soon the Bank of Japan will feel it can 
afford to begin raising them. 

The increase Tuesday had been re- 
peatedly hinted at by the Fed chairman, 
Alan Greenspan, and had been almost 
universally forecast. By contrast, Mr. 
Greenspan's hints in late 1993 and early 
1994 were largely ignored, and the in- 
crease came as a shock to many. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 
96 points, or 2.4 percent, on Feb. 4, 
1994, the day the Fed acted, and the rate 
mi long-term Treasury bonds rose to 
635 percent from 6.30 percent the day 


before. That was not a big move, but 
bigger ones were to come soon, as spec- 
ulators sold bonds, driving prices down 
and interest rates up. By later in 1994. 
the rate was above 8 percent. 

During the months after the first 1994 
tightening, the Dow fell nearly 10 per- 
cent, and lesser stocks fell farther. The 
Nasdaq Composite index managed to 
rise to a new high on March 18 of that 
year, a few days before the Fed made 
clear it was serious by pushing rates up 
again, but it then fell almost 15 percent 
over the next three months. 

Few expect bond yields to rise as 
much this time as they did in 1994. “Tbe 
reaction will not be as vigorous this time 
around,' ’ said Henry Kaufman, an econ- 
omist and money manager. He said 30- 
year Treasury bond yields would "be in 
the range of 7 percent to 73 percent” by 
the second half of 1997. That would not 
be much of a move. On Tuesday, after 
tiie Fed moved, the yield on 30-year 
Treasury bonds rose from 6.92 percent 
to 6.96 percent. It was at 6.98 percent in 
4 P.M. trading Wednesday. 

The general view now is that the Fed 
is unlikely to push rates up more than 
one or two additional times and that 
such moves will slow the economy a bit 
but not tin it into recession. 

If tbe view holds that the Fed 's action 
will have little economic impact — and, 
by delaying inflation indefinitely, may 
even prolong the current six-year eco- 
nomic expansion — - then the impact on 
stocks could be slight. 

In announcing tbe move Tuesday, the 
Fed said it was acting “in light of per- 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 




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Other Dollar Values 

Ootisc I Pars Oan«Wf F** 
Argaatpew 09MB Greek**. 2*&35 
AoctraSaaS 1.2771 HwgKmgS 7.749 
Aaxrkaificfai 1150 Haag, ferial 17650 
Bndmat 14615 lofflonropoa 3549 
Oitomywn 03Z/B I ado. rtf** -,23*7-5 
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OntaMaatt 4449 taraeRstek. 3J655 
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f*L»rttn 54402 Motor. f»9- 24787 


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M. Zealand 5 
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Russ ruble 
Sauactftd 

sms-f 


Pars 

7-895 

14407 

68743 

3634 

3JM 

17034 

57100 

17S 

14418 


Forward Rates 

• Conwy 
Pwred Staffing 
OuhotfO 
DeotKtamait 


C uin ecy 
S.AIr.nmd 
S. Kar.woB 
Spied, tosno 
Taiwan! 
Tint MW 

TnrMstifea 

UAEdHam 

VeoAbeav. 


pars 

4418 

88070 

7479 

2756 

25.96 

126365 

34705 

477.15 


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14212 14205 14197 JapaiaWIWl 

13694 15666 U639 SwteBnsc 

14884 14853 14817 


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12348 12115 12242 

14620 14577 14531 


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Llbld-Llbor Rates Man* 26 

Swiss Fnmch 

Deilor D-Mark ftuoc Sterling Prone Yen ECU 

1-montn 310-31* 1 <V* - lto 6¥k - 6Vk 3V» - 3V» 4V0-4V4 

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Rales apptlcabte ki Interbank deposits of SI mlWan minimum (orequHtdenO. 


Key Money Rotes 





United State 

dose 

Pm 

Britain 



Discount rale 

540 

540 

Book base rata 

640 

640 

Prime rote 

816 

8V. 

Cali money 

6M. 

611* 

Federal fonts 

5% 

5V» 

1-oaatti Interim* 

6* 

6rt 

HHkqr CDs itadwni 

549 

543 

3-McMrth iatatMafc 

6V» 

6Vn 

IMMtay CP Motors 

548 

540 

6-tnutto MMtaaak 

6V» 


3 noatli ITeosarr MR 

5-70 

574 

Ifryureai 

740 

746 

1-fear Treasury MR 

5-57 

5-55 




2-rear TracBorybBI 

A36 

678 

France 



5^ear Treaiurf aata 

646 

641 

lntorreflfem rale 

MB 

110 

7-fear Treasury note 

672 

646 

CoS money 

3Vi» 

3V» 

lO-yaor Tmuvy aote 

679 

673 

1-moafti Wertaak 

3 1 * 

3tt 

aM-oor Treasury taad 

679 

6.95 

3-aoatO iotmtMBfc 

31% 

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446 

446 

leirp* Oflurt— y 

3V» 

3U 

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10-yaarOAT 

578 

579 

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840 

(US 

050 

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Semes: Reuters, Biooatxm, Merrill 
Lynch, Bank ol ToKfo-Mllsublshi, 
CarmerzbmL Credit Lwbnak 

inmoflaiotetlHBk 

078 

041 




Moonfe weM 

049 

075 

Gold 



6-cmufli Mortem 

073 

07B 

AJ/L 

PM. 


10-ymr Govt bood 

2J9 

242 

2BU 34725 

24825 

—075 

ogijjg 


440 

Landau 346J0 

34645 • 

-345 

imMior 

440 

Neva York 34820 

35120 

+ 3J0 

Codanmy 

340 

122 

UJ, dollars per ounce. London otfkJal 

l-neatbMaihnk 

frWMrtlllHtataBfc 

128 

128 

IX 

329 

litinjt® Zurich Hew Yorft cxwikrg 

mdciosiim prices: Now York Comet 

6-amtii totaimk 

320 

132 

(Am ) 



IR-year Bond 

549 

5.88 

Soatjr ftmritrs. 




sisting strength in demand, which is 
progressively increasing the risk of in- 
flationary imbalances developing in the 
economy." Wall Street found two ways 
to read that, one encouraging and one 
noL 

Some said the talk of a “risk" of 
inflationary imbalances, rather than of 
actual ones, meant that the Fed was 
unlikely to do more until it really saw 
inflation. Others said that the focus on 
“persisting strength in demand" might 
be a signal that the Fed would act until it 
was clear that strength had dissipated. 

If the latter interpretation becomes 
widely accepted, it could cast a paU over 
the stock market by raising the risk of 
recession, or at least of an economy 
slowing enough to damage profits. 
Profits have grown rapidly in recent 


years, and stock prices generally as- 
sume that trend will continue. 

Mr. Greenspan drew much attention 
in December when he spoke of possible 
“irrational exuberance” in the srock 
market. Prices have gyrated some since 
then, but money has continued to pour 
inro stock mutual funds at a rapid rate. 

So far, most investors appear to be- 
lieve that the Fed will not do anything 
nasty enough to really damage one of 
the greatest bull markets in histoiy. But 
if Japan's central bank were to act de- 
cisively, that market confidence might 
weaken, if not vanish, analysts said. 

■ Durable Goods Orders Are Up 

Orders for big-ticket manufactured 
items rose unexpectedly to an all-time 
high in February, providing some after- 


the-fact justification for the Federal Re- 
serve Board’s interest-rate increase. 
The Associated Press reported form 
Washington. 

Spurred by demand for communi- 
cations and other electronic equipment, 
durable-goods orders to U.S. factories 
increased 1-5 percent last month to a 
seasonally adjusted $1783 billion, die 
Commerce Department said. 

Many analysts had predicted a de- 
cline of about 03 percent The rise came 
on top of a revised 4.1 percent gain in 
January, the best in four months and 
even be tier than tbe 3.6 percent orig- 
inally reported. 

Orders for durable goods — long- 
lasting items ranging from aircraft to 
computers — are a key barometer of 
manufacturing strength. 


Technology Accord 
Hailed as Landmark 

39 Nations in WTO Agree to End Tariffs 

Compiled byOwStcffFnm Ptxftttrltrs 

GENEVA — A total of 39 countries agreed on a $600 
billion global pact Wednesday to scrap tariffs in the boom- 
ing information technology trade by the year 2000, said the 
chief of the World Trade Organization, Renalo Ruggiero. 

The landmark information technology accord will ben- 
efit customers, manufacturers and global trade, according 
to analysts arid officials at the 130-member trade or- 
ganization. 

“This is more seamless good news for the end user and 
industry, unless you truly believe in protectionism, which 
very few seem to these days,” said Kees Dobbelaar. 
analyst at Gartner Group's Damquesu 

The accord, under which the first tariff cuts must take 
place in July, was shaped in December by ministers 
meeting in Singapore under the auspices of the WTO. 

Tariffs are to be cut in four stages between 1997 and 
2000 in five main product categories: computers, tele- 
communication products, semiconductors or manufac- 
turing equipment, software including diskettes and CD- 
ROMs, and scientific instruments. 

The United States, the European Union, Japan and a 
dozen other nations already agreed in December to remove 
tariffs on computer monitors, chips and other products by 
2000. They set a March deadline to enlist enough countries 
into die pact to cover more than 90 percent of the global 
trade in computers and information technology. 

Companies that make computer and telecommuni- 
cations equipment, including Compaq Computer Corp.. 
Hitachi Ltd. and Samsung Electronics Co. stand to profit 
from the accord because lower tariffs mean they can sell 
their goods more cheaply on world markets. 

Analysts said the pact would drive European and Third 
World countries to focus on computer services now that 
they have lost the hardware battle to U.S. computer giants. 
They said attempts by some European nations to back 
national computer hardware makers has been abandoned. 

“This agreement is a triumph of common sense and 
realism, and it shows the center of gravity in the IT market 
place has changed,” said Will CappeUi, principal con- 
sultant at Ovum, the high-tech consultancy. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


A LITTLE SOMETHING 
FOR YOUR GREAT 
GREAT GRANDSON 



The Corum Gold Coin Watch. An 
authentic $20 U.S. gold piece, first min- 
ted more than 100 years ago, is halved 
and an ultra-flat mechanical or quartz 
movement is cushioned inside. Heralded 
as one of the world’s great timepieces, it 
is prized as an heirloom to be passed on 
from generation to generation. 



Maitres Artisans d'Horlogerie 

SUISSE 

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— 'I J ' v 



R 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield - 


6300 




5700 — — 

V 

135 ^ 






Souice: Btoombe/p, Reufsis 


P— - - - - • I tl^.1,1 Twitta-Vlto 

unciMuaD&i now lihwk 


Very briefly: 


Who Wins in Big China Deals? 


By Paul BJustein 

Washington Post Sendee 


To bear top U.S. officials tell it, 
the economic benefits of trade 
with China were on vivid display 
in Beijing's Great Hall of the 
People this week when Vice Pres- 
ident A1 Gore and Prime Minister 
Li Peng toasted the signing of $2-4 
billion in contracts for Boeing Co. 
and General Motors Corp. 

Deals in China such as Boeing's 
and GM’s offer a potent retort to 
complaints about the U.S. govern- 
ment’s alleged coziness with 
China's leadership, according to 
Qinny Tenzano, Mr. Gore's 
spokeswoman, who told reporters 

“is Xing the wads, to benefit 


people across the country in a pos- 
itive way — in their pocketbooks 
— there should be less criticism,’’ 
Yet the transactions, especially 
GM’s, highlight aspects of the eco- 
nomic relationship with China that 
trouble many analysts, who ob- 
serve that China's economy hardly 
operates by textbook free-market 


rules. The Boeing contract that Mr. 
.Gore toasted Tuesday, for the sale 
of five Boeing 777 jets, did not 
involve any new manufacturing 
concessions by the company. 

With China ’s market of 1.2 bil- 
lion people growing at an explo- 
sive rate, creating an economy 
leaping past Japan s in sheer size, 
companies such as Boeing and 
GM find themselves obliged to 
offer far-reaching concessions to 
China’s state planners — often 
valuable technology and invest- 
ments — to gain access to those 
potential consumers. 

In GM's case, for example, the 

company pulled out all the stops to 

beat competing automakers for the 
right to join a Chinese state en- 
terprise in building a major car 


logy, including the establishment 
of five institutes to train Chinese 


factory plant in Shanghai to make 


100,000' Buick sedans a year. 

Although GM emphasized that 
it would export $1.6 billion of 
U.S.-made parts to the plant in the 
next five years, it agreed that die 
factory would buy most of its parts 
locally after that GM also pledged 
a significant transfer of techno- 


automotive engineers. 

Although such deals may well 
be in the interest of individual cor- 
porations, by bowing to Chinese 
demands to build factories and 
help C hina ’s manufacturing 
prowess, companies may be ship- 
ping jobs overseas and may be 
helping to create formidable com- 
petitors for themselves. 

Defenders of such deals say 
China is pursuing a tradition that is 
practically worldwide when it in- 
sists on technology and investment 
as a price of market entry. 

“The Chinese are following a 
pattern that is indistinguishable 
from the ones followed by vir- 
tually all other countries, be it Ja- 
pan, Singapore or Israel.” the top 
international executive of a major 
aerospace company said. 

Moreover, in winning access to 
the Chinese market, GM — says 
the company’s chief economist, 
Mustafa Mohaiarem — is protect- 
ing itself against the emergence of 
a China-based competitor. 


Technology and Oil 
Lead Stocks Higher 


>lK s 




MO Lands Bonanza Postal Order IBP to Buy Foodhrands America 

WASHINGTON ( API — MCI Com. said Wednesday it W 


WASHINGTON (AP) — MG Corp. said Wednesday it 
would create a telecommunications network for the U.S. 
Postal Service in a deal that could bring MCI as much as $3 
billion over the next five years. 

MO said the network would connect up to 34,000 postal 
service locations, allowing die government agency to stream- 
line operations and offer new services to customers. MCI said 
the deal was its largest single contract ever. 


Bre-X Cuts Back Gold Estimate 


CALGARY, Alberta (Bloomberg) — Bre-X Minerals Ltd. 
said Wednesday a report by its independent consultant 
showed “a strong possibility” that earlier estimates of 70.9 
million ounces of gold reserves at the Busang deposit in 
Indonesia may be overstated. 

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc., which last month 
agreed to develop the gold find into a mine, said that initial 


Caapdal by Our 5*# Fran Dtipscha 

OKLAHOMA CITY — IBP Inc., the world’s largest 
producer of beef and pork, said Wednesday that it 
would expand into the frozen-food industry by ac- 
quiring Foodbrands America Inc. for $640 million. 

The deal represents a major step in IBP’s strategy to 
move beyond its core meat business into food-service 
and branded products. 

“We have been exploring ways to capitalize on the 
trend by Americans of spending more on food prepared 
outside the home,” said Robert Peterson. IBP’s chair- 
man and chief executive. 


Under the deal. IBP is to pay $23.40 in cash for each 
Foodbrands share and will assume Foodbrands’ debts. 

In afternoon trading on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, Foodbrands shares soared $7375, to $23,125. 
IBP shares rose 75 cents, to $25.75. 

Foodbrands, based in Oklahoma City, had 1 996 sales 
of $835 million and net income of $10.9 million. IBP 
had 1 996 sales of $123 billion and net income of$ 198.7 
million. IBP. based in Dakota City, Nebraska, said it 
would operate Foodbrands as a largely independent 
business. The transaction is subject to regulatory ap- 
proval. (AP, Bloomberg) 


by 0* Staff Frm Dispcaha 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose 
Wednesday, led by semiccmdactor 
and oil shares, anud optimism that 
those companies' earnings will be 
able to rise the fastest in the face of 
rising interest rates. 

Intel and Exxon paced the ad- 
vance. After two months of declines 

that shaved about a quarter of the 
value from many amputee-related 
shares, some investors said soft- 
ware and semic onductor shares had 
fallen to appetizing levels. 

“With investors focused on 
earnings, technology and -energy 
companies are the best bets,” said 
Michael Carmen, a money manager 
at State Street Research & Man- 
agement Co. “Technology is a crit- 
ical component to the way compa- 
nies do business, and it’s not such 
an easy area to cur when rethinking 
your investments.” 

The Dow Jones Industrial Av- 
erage closed 433 points higher at 
6,880.70 after falling 29.08 points 
on Tuesday. For every 12 stocks 
that rose, 11 fell on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index was up 1.46 points at 
79033, while the Nasdaq compos- 
ite index closed up 21.02 points at 
1,269.08. 

Treasury bond prices were lower 
on a government report of an un- 
expectedly sharp rise in factory or- 
ders for durable goods in February. 
Bonds were also under pressure 
after Tuesday’s decision by Federal 
Reserve Board policymakers to 
raise short-term interest rates 25 
basis points, the first increase in 
more than two years. The Fed's 
statement implied further rate in- 
creases down die road if economic 
growth remained strong. 


The benchmark 30-war W 

uty bond was W32l»jnto«wmK 

17/32, taking its yield up to 6.98 

r ^L t Z 6 St SfiSd marhi 
continues to set the tone for our 
maricet, and right now that is vetf 


US. STOCKS 


tentative,” said Jon Olesky, bead 
block trader at Morgan Stanley. • ; 

Bank shares were among the 
bi gg est dec liners amid concer n th at 
rising interest rates would restrain 
demand for new loans and make rt 

less profitable to lend money. ; 

Since the Fed took its ac&oq, 
banks have begun raising interest 
rates. * 

Citicorp fell 2 to 113%, 
Rwnir A merica dropped VA to I09 J A, 
and Chase Manhattan fell 1% 

99%. * 

The rise in borrowing costs cooJa 
sfits in the rcmain!- 



erates also helped other oil shared 
rise. Texaco rallied 


2% to III. and 

Amerada Hess rose % to 54%. I 
Intel climbed 7% to 140% amid 
optimism that new uses for semi- 
conductors in the digital video mar- 
ket would offset slowdowns in com- 
puter-chip demand. Linear 
Technology climbed 1 % to 46%, and 
Texas Instruments rose 3% to 81Vk 
Motorola rose 3% to 62 after two 
Japanese cellular-service providers 
chose it to set up new digital calling 
networks in a deal valued at $13 
billion. (Bloomberg, AP) 


analyses of core samples it took at the mine “indicate in- 
fs 


significant amounts of gold.” 

Freeport said it would participate in the Busang project only 
if it proved to be economically feasible. 


Interest-Rate Outlook Sends Dollar Higher Against Yen 


• F. Hoffmann -La Roche Ltd. and Jungbunzlauer In- 
ternational AG. two Swiss chemical companies, have agreed 
to plead guilty and pay $25 million in criminal fines for 
participating in an international scheme to fix the price of 
citric acid and allocate world markets between competitors, 
the U.S. Justice Department said. 

•International Business Machines Corp. and Rational 
Software Corp. plan to create an industry-standard visual 
modeling language that would simplify application design. 

• IDX Systems Inc. agreed to acquire Phamis Inc. for $147 

million in stock to increase its share of the health-care 
information systems market Reuters. Bloomberg, ap 


Ceupdcd trr Pot Surff Fran Oapmches 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the yen Wednesday as 
traders speculated that higher in- 
terest rates would lure investors to 
U.S. assets. 

The Federal Reserve Board on 
Tuesday raised its target for 
overnight lending between banks by 
a quarter-point, to 5.50 percent, and 
could raise rates again when its poli- 
cymakers meet in May. 

The move widened the difference 
between rates in the United States 
and those in Japan and other eco- 


nomic rivals, making American de- 
posits more appealing. 

“After the rate hike, investors 
clearly favor buying the dollar,” 
said Scott Gallopo, chief currency 
dealer at Chase Manhattan Bank. 
“Interest-rate differentials are driv- 
this market. 

le dollar was at 124. 130 yen at 4 
P-M., up from 123.715 yen die day 
before, but it fell slightly against 
other major currencies, sopping to 
1.6889 Deutsche marks from 
1.6898 DM and to 1.4635 Swiss 
francs from 1.4655 francs. 


ing di! 


The dollar was also quoted at 
5.6940 French francs, down from 
5.6990 francs. 

The pound was at $1.6303, up 
from $1.6195. 

The British currency was buoyed 
by expectations that strong growth 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


would lead to higher interest rates. 

By contrast, rates in Japan are 
likely to stay low. The Bank of 
Japan's governor, Yasuo Mat- 
sushita, said die central bank would 


maintain its current monetary 
policy, indicating it would not fol- 
low the Fed’s move. 

The bank has kept rates low in an 
effort to jump- start Japan’s ailing 
economy. 

* ‘Considering die problems Japan 
has with its economy, and that in- 
terest rates there are almost neg- 
ative, it’s kind of hard not to like the 
buck,” said Varick Martin, manager 
of foreign exchange at Manufac- 
turers & Traders Trust 

The U.S. currency readied a five- 
week high of 12430 yen in early 


trading in Asia. It later slipped bad: ^ 
after a news report quoted a U.S. ’ 
investment adviser as saying thfc 
U.S. government would not let the 
dollar rise above 125 yen. ! 

Richard Medley, an adviser to the 


financier George Soros, said U.S 
aw 125 y 


officials saw 125 yen as a “barrier’* 
for the dollar and would act to pr er 
vent it from rising above it, accordr 
ing to Bridge News. * 

Last month, leaders of the Group 
of Seven leading industrial nations 
.suggested the dollar had risen for 
enough. (Bloomberg; Bridge News) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Wednesday 4 p jn. Close 

Tto np 300 nxwt-acb're sharet, 
up lo tha down or Wal Street 
The Associated P/ass 


Sate HMi LmrLotefl Owe 


Indexes 


un mu , 

Comp 214007 21. 


Standard & Poors 


Dow Jones Bond 


Trading Activity 



Dow Jones 

QpM Mgh IM US1 Cftf. 

influs ansa mssa imp tamo +453 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


d/iau/ no un in 

+2J84 


miO 22324 

3131-15 2142.19 +425 


JO* 

nuMart 


vml mu 


106,11 US 


Wok Low am 
929.67 91084 920.14 
577.42 5&4J9 56436 
19653 193.16 194.7B 
9355 9125 9225 
796.11 78(09 78957 
77659 766.91 767J4 


TMkqr 


92541 

565.95 

19X43 

9020 

79053 

76958 


AW.l 

Oirjrdrs 

Cocoas 

IBM 

NoeflUl 

Ejowi 

AMD 

SSS5 


71296 
62055 rm 
53996 

42211 &* 
41540 3M 
WOO 5P» 
33506 1411* 
33ZM n 

16 nnt 
43V* 

lmw 

30149 2DU 
30 m 479. 
29982 24 


33115 

30560 


Uv bat a«. 
1 6ft 17W +* 

38 41 +21t 

29*6 29*4 +lt 
59** a +M 
3 H 36 +» 

M J 

■2$ 'I 

99** 9WJ -in 

if*. 2»* +n 

4511 a +H* 
JIM 34 +JW 


March 28, 1997 

HWi Low Latest Qigo OpCnt 


Ktfltl Law Latest Choc Optnt 


High Low Latest Ops Optat 


High Low Latest Qige Optof 


Grains 


M>96 IW Wt CH 

£» *19 
%£ 3&3 3S3 

385.93 381.23 38U8 <64 


Nasdaq 

WL Mgb Low L«f 


S5SS&* 


134M 14W* +7* 

«n w *r 


126853 125462 1 266-43 
0S5.M iSSIf 


10S*_32 

1413.97 141159 141231 
1455.94 144681 1455.11 
174187 1735.17 1735.17 
BMUJ 856.75 86608 


+ 1034 
+730 
-1.90 
♦879 
-1160 
+ 1033 


00796 12ft 

54362 2414 
5165 4 30*4 
49ZH «» 
45532 50ft 
44401 71ft 
37906 SO* 



_ 15» 

ZJ*4 23ft 
2Bft 30** 

39 40ft .... 
48ft SON +lft 
67ft 71** +3*ft 
51ft 54W +14* 


H+jU LOW LOtr 
58655 58299 58307 


AMEX 


CORN (CBOT) 

54100 bu minimum- cwf* per bushel 

Moy97 305% 302 305ft +3 147,287 

JM97 307ft 303ft 307 +3ft 109.239 

Sep 97 297ft 295ft 297 +14 17,549 

DOC 97 »5 293 294ft 85.731 

Mir 98 29816 297ft 29816 -ft 8.752 

Est. sate ma. Tub's, afe 57.248 
MtamW 374-003 uo 1711 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 tuns- Oalmiurton 

May 97 27820 27630 27670 —050 46*279 

A4V7 27440 27X80 27140 Z7J36 

Aug 97 26600 25270 26170 +09 8723 

Sen 97 247 JO MLS0 M6J0 +130 5m 

Oct 97 227 JO 226JD 227310 +2 M 4483 

D«C 97 mSS 231 JO 221 JO +OJO 9J72 

Est. soles NA Tub's, srtes 17,933 
Tue'iapaTof 101379 up 86 

SOYBEAN 00. (CBOT) 

IUM*- corn* nwto 

May 97 2127 24 J* 2126 * 0.10 41,038 

JW97 2166 2148 2166 +007 29J67 

Aua 97 2U5 2168 2U3 +006 6J71 

Sep 77 25.®J 2182 2SJ53 +005 1603 

Oct 97 2SJJ5 2453 25.® +004 1596 

Dec 77 2130 2110 2130 10998 

Est sate FLA. Tile's, sales 10310 
Toe's Open M 95,706 all 628 


ORANGE JUICE INCTN) 

tOOOO Ob., cents Mr lb. 

Majr77 82.95 8170 81 JO -1.55 14654 

A497 8170 8175 8195 —135 5J91 

SWW 8690 86.15 86J0 — 1.2S 3.784 

NW97 8PJ0 8875 8875 -1415 1463 

ESL sate MA. Toe's, sate 1794 
Tub's open inf 26.759 up 80 


Metals 


+120 

+100 

+110 


-109 


TWA 

XP-LW 


-V» 

+Mi 


dost 

10X18 

98J7 

10549 


CUB. 

-0J9 

— 0i56 

— 072 


SPEW j 
Echofloy 

IB9b 

No boa 


VW. High Un Laf 

31«8 7h 6*i 7V. 

24471 IS «t VI ... 

£3 ^5 m 9 

f * 

4855 19ft 


SOYBEANS (OUT! 

6400 bu mfntnixn- ewrts per bwhai 


60UMNCMX) 

106 buy col- dDOors ow bwy ex. 

Mar 97 351 J00 34100 3S1J30 +130 
Aw 97 3S2JJ0 34640 351:50 +338 
May 97 3S.S 

Am 97 35110 34830 35330 
Aua 77 35640 35130 3S5J» .... 

00 77 35930 354.80 356..® +120 
DK07 36130 3SL00 361J0 +3JB 
F* 78 36190 35830 36190 +340 
Esi. sales FLA Tun's, sale* 71563 
Toe's open <nt 163439 off 2621 

HI GRADE C0PPBZ (NCMX) 

23400 fas. can Mr B>. 

MOT97 119 JO 115J0 11115 -135 
A*rw 11190 11160 11145 -X1S 
MOV97 11120 109 JO 11065 — 2J5 
Am 77 11040 10X85 10845 — LBS 
Ju197 10740 10640 107J5 — ' l.«s 

Alio 77 SfflS_B5 — 

Sec 97 10540 10440 104.55 —1^5 
Oct 97 I B B — 7 55 

Nov 77 1(045 — 145 

ES-sate 8LA Toe's, sate 1X516 
Tin's open atf 57484 ua 829 


2 

27,140 

2 

53419 

13400 

5635 

21674 

5484 


1418 


43,763 
21975 
506434 
—042 329468 
—043 2S9423' 
- 4UM2G8425 
-044 161^48 
-043 12X509 
—043 10(402 
-043 81418 
—043 75442 


24496 

1,194 

8.967 

684 

1974 

635 

749 


% ^ 
WW 6ft 


6*k ... 

10 TOW 
ft tv 
IBB 194* 


-V* 

+A 

+u 

+fti 

+m 


May 77 843ft 838 841 

JUI97 846 840ft 844ft 

AU097 827 821 826ft 

Sep 77 760 7561* 758ft 

Nov 97 709ft 704ft 706ft 

Fs t .snte HA Tile's sate ssjta 
Tub's apwi bit 186406 off 320 


-1 75429 
+ft 57480 
+2 1558 

— 1 5419 

14,119 


Nasdaq 


pm 1324 

1186 1191 

J 44 “7 

SSa 3322 

73 n 


AdvoaoeO 
DecOned 
itncnanoed 
Ton tapes 
New mom 
New lows 


Market Sales 


1725 2006 

1607 IW 

2425 1790 

5757 5733 

46 .57 

W 109 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

5400 bu mMmum- cam per bfiflM 
Atay 97 377ft 387ft 375ft +6 27,739 

JM97 392ft 385ft 390ft +5 42,121 

Sep 97 393 388 393 +5ft 5,941 

DOC 97 407ft 396ft 401ft +6ft 6474 

Est. sales HA TUB'S, sales 12412 
rue's open Jnt 82.155 up 1476 


5H.VBIWCM30 

5400 tray ce.- ants par bw ot 

AAar97 51740 51040 51440 +440 97 

51440 +470 3 

MOV97 51948 51040 51640 +440 53487 

4497 mjo 51540 52140 +4J58 18440 

Sep 97 SOM aw -n 526.60 +440 

Dec 97 53540 527.00 534J8 

Jan 98 53J jd 

Mar 98 54240 54040 54X40 
Est. sues ha Tub's, sales 19400 
Tue’s open bit 1 


+4J0 
♦ 4J9D 
+480 


3448 

5401 

13 

5454 


Livestock 


m 239 

S % 

’ll "3 

is 15 


Today 


Pie*. 


NYSE 

Arnex 

Nasdaq 

ittmBtkm. 


49140 57946 

2147 1944 

555.71 54445 


CATTLE (0900 
ULooa ns- can dm fa. 

Apr 97 68.47 67.90 68.17 +047 

JUD77 64.17 SU7 6197 +045 

Aim 77 6442 6335 6177 +IL2S 

Oct 97 6742 6742 6742 +IUS 

Dec97 67 JO 6940 6942 +007 

RUjSB 7080 7030 7M7 +CJK 

Est. sties 15495 TUe's.sdns 13427 
TuAopwtM 108,171 up 1303 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

S7DWOZ.- dolors oar frovoz. 

Apt 97 37840 37440 377 JO 

MOV 97 388JB 

M97 380.70 37740 3U.7Q +240 

0097 38230 38030 nt: « i +2.00 

Jan 98 384J0 +240 

Es*. safes HA Tub's, sate 7414 
.Tim's wen M 19434 off 305 


+1J0 9492 


7476 

1.735 

1.165 


3075* 

27484 

21492 

13462 

7.366 

31382 


Previous 


dose 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

DiHlors per moMc ton 
Aluminum (High Grade) 

Spat l«teft 1607ft 161640 161740 

Forward 163940 164040 164940 166040 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FF500400 - at* of 100 pet 
An 97 12844 12744 12840 +X10 137419 

Sop 97 126.42 12642 12660 +4.10 2441 

Dec 97 9646 9646 96X +0.1 D 0 

EM. mtotae. 21 L601 . Open t«L 13X260 off 1417. 

ITALIAN COVE BAM ENT BOND (UFFQ 
ITL200 mWon ■ pH of 100 pd 
Jllif»7 lag 12460 125L38 + 0.17 107406 

S6p97 12530 1ZS30 12543 +OJ7 3462 

Est sales: 67404 Pm/. Sato: 44471 
Prey, open kit: I lame up 802 
EURODOLLARS KttBQ 
*1 mHon-pfsgfloopct. 

Apr 97 9441 98.19 04.19 

May 97 *4.12 94L09 9110 
4m 97 «UH 9441 9UB 

Sep 77 73JV 7172 93J6 

Dec 77 9156 9148 9331 

MOT98 9144 9135 9138 

Jun98 9134 9126 73S29 

Sep 98 9Ui 9117 9341 

Dec 98 9116 9148 7111 

Atar97 9115 9107 9118 

3m 99 9112 9345 9347 

&t.»*s NA Tub's, spies 5434M 
Tile's open Int 245740 up 17589 
BRITISH POUND (GWBU 
8UD0 Munds. t per pound 
4m 97 13200 13142 13274 32314 

Sep 77 13250 13180 13250 755 

Dec 97 13226 91 

EM. sate 10310 Tub's k*s 7.95T 
Tub's open int 33360 off 1526 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CturaU 
1 00400 doOara, • per can. «*r 
Jim 97 7331 4290 4324 

Sep 97 7375 7355 7346 

Dec 97 7114 7X0 7403 

MerTB 4441 

Bst KAes SJ03 Tub’s sate 4320 
Tub's open int 74473 off 601 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

125300 marks, i per nurt 
Jun97 3965 3918 3950 60,155 

Sep 97 3995 3968 3989 2395 

DOC 97 3031 3104 3(01 130 

Mar 98 3074 27 

Est. sate 17326 Tub's, soles iuu 
Tim's men M 62307 ua 533 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER} 

lXSmBBpn yen, spot lOByan 
Jun97 3193 3128 3156 66318 

5ep 97 JSU2 3245 3767 819 

Dec ft 3303 sm 3383 22S 

EM. SBto 1L680 Tim's. Sl»e$ 21.127 
Tub's open mt 67362 up 2715 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

SOBOB H>&- CMS per lb. 

MOV 97 7239 7X45 7X45 + 036 

JU97 7430 74.10 7424 +031 

0097 7530 7530 7535 -008 

Dec 97 7630 7635 7674 HUB 

Alor 98 7775 77.3 7775 +070 

May 98 . 7735 +070 

Estsdes NA Wi sate 2 W 
Tub's open int 74715 up 1877 


3X919 

16336 

1.686 

21362 

1.995 

525 


4EATWG OB. (NMER) 

4X000 ml oenti par pal 
Apr 77 57.15 5570 553) -130 

May 97 56.50 54 JSD 6430 —178 

54 M 5435 -173 

5475 5495 -173 


: ( 


Jur 97 5635 
Jut 97 5630 


16704 
11385 
1X19 


Aug 97 5735 55.45 5535 —1.18 


Sep 97 5730 
Od97 5830 
Nov 77 M) 
Dec 97 5930 
Jain 5930 


5XTO 5610 -1.18 

5630 5630 — 1.13 

££ 5* ~ ,M 

5775 -138 

— 5870 5870 — 130 

EB.R8es NA. Ute's-stfos 39728 
Tub's men int 123.754 up 1339 


8301 

iff 

4326 


LfGHT SWEET OHIDE (NMER) 
iJOO&bi-iMlaraporbM. 


68312 

4776 

1389 

695 


JuJ97 21.18 
31*97 21.05 
Sep 97 2073 
Od 97 2Bi84 

Nov 97 2077 
Dec97 2075 
Jon 98 2038 
Feb 98 

Marie 2055 
Apr 98 2035 
May 98 


Cotbodes (High Grade) 
■240930 Mlitete 


Z CATTLE (CMBI) 

50300 lbs.- cents par fa. 


Per Amt Rec Pay C om pany 


Per Amt Roc Pay 


IRREGULAR 

MRP M MM . .13 3-25 3-31 

AARPGwtnincp _ 78 3-25 3-31 

EntetpilseoaPic b 3372 4-1 6-9 

Greater ChinaFcl „ .1219 4.4 4-ia 

Heffli^e Propone - 30 4-2 4-14 

Kum BneweryADR b J9S 3-28 — 

STOCK SPUT 
lIBnios Tooavrtet 2 tor 1 spot. 

SPECIAL 

Soutb Atabemo _ 175 3-7 5-1 

INITIAL 

DaxcrCcip _ 50 4 -X 5-30 

Enterprise Feo Bk _ 75 3-31 4-15 

INCREASED 

ComajFnd Q .125 4-10 4-21 

Wash Gas &Uglir Q 39S 4-lQ 

REDUCED 

Loti ADM! A JH& 4-15 

LoniAbbtt B&C 759 4-15 

SUSPENDED 

Nitrtjast Utte 


AmanceWIdD 


REGULAR 


AmerBncpOH, 

ntanCo 


5-1 


AquotonL- 
AtrionCnrp 

Century Rd Co 

Comm imerfech 
FMdNaBFnd 
GonCorp Inc 
Horizon Fna Cp 
Inland Steel Indus 
Johnston Indus 

KCSEnerw 
LnSafieReHIdos 
Marina LP 
Monism Him Cam 
Nrttim StotesPwr 
Price T Bowu 

Price T Roe 
Smcal&Bnsi 
TianoABartlcHdo 
WEWOCo 
Zwolg GW Fd A. 
ZWelfl Gvt Fd B. 


M .1186 4-4 4-18 

O 75 4-7 4-11 

305 4-11 4-30 

70 5-20 6-1 

.15 4-18 4-30 
.135 5-3 0 6-13 
77 4-11 5-2 

.15 5-1 5-2S 

.10 4-9 5-5 

JOS 4-10 5-1 

-10 4-9 4-23 

-03 4-10 5-20 

71 4-4 4-18 

_ 375 4-3 4-17 

Q 705 4-11 4-30 
O A9 4-9 4-20 

- .14 3-25 3-27 

- .10 3-25 3-27 

O 05 44 4-25 

0 .135 6-6 6-20 
Q £2 4-10 4-30 

M M2 3-25 3-26 
M 4135 3-25 3-26 


69-25 

6942 

+022 

6X4 a 

6885 

+830 

6X9! 

0.N 

+XK 

72J0 

noo 

+XI5 

7340 

7140 

-005 

7155 

748S 

+X20 


Ed. sales 2471 Tub's, sales 2.198 
Tue'sopenktf 72,030 off 175 


1784 

xsza 
5^43 
5799 
1^24 
XI 74 


1X00 2430JW 243X00 

235670 2357.00 237070 237170 

Lead 
Spot 
Forward 
Nktal 

Spol ^ 75aW0 754070 76«U» 76SUJ0 
Hawafd 7640-00 7650J10 7755 JW 776500 

Tin 


<e7ft 

68170 


688ft 6B5JM 
68X00 68000 


6B6M 

68170 


Spot 5800JM 581000 501000 582000 
Form 


Forward 5825.00 5835410 5045.00 585000 

Zbic (Spcdol High Grade) 


o-awruotMpprfadnwir njBoontpsr 
ttmWApR : wapam a Camntofantfa; 
ifaffminiy o-qnarrer^ 1 m at- a a ra l 


HOPS Lorn (CMER) 
aunafas.-cerM0M fa. 

Apr 97 73.90 7240 72J0 -837 

Am 97 B150 80JS 8195 +110 

JU 97 79M 78J5 79-57 +OH 

Alia 97 7640 75 l4J 7630 +167 

Od97 mjs ass 7020 +ILH 

Dec 97 64J0 67 M 67J2 +135 

Est. sate 10,292 Tub’s, sain 11921 
TIN'S OPfin tot 30,736 off 1076 

PORK BELLES (CMER) 

40A00 faB.-cenbPDr to. 

Mar 97 75.95 

May 97 76.95 75J5 75.95 

Jut *7 7050 7535 7SJ5D -030 

Aim 97 7182 7120 7117 -012 

Feb 98 6060 6060 £060 +025 

Mar 98 6010 

Est. sates I486 TUB’S, sate 1434 
Tub's own inr 6300 off 113 


SpcT^ 127330 127400 127M0 127A00 


0563 

0770 

10*9 

2353 

W66 

U18 


129330 1293ft 1295 XU 129000 
High Lew Gas e Oku Oplnt 


2 

1960 

IBB 

4T7 

81 

9 


Rnanaal 

US T. BILLS (CMER) 

11 mfflton-DtoofiaOBer. 

Mar 97 9478 94.74 9474 1U2S 

Jim 97 90S M34 M37 6320 

5*P *7 9429 943 948 -002 1756 

DGC 97 9040 847 

ES. sales ha. tub's, sales 895 

Tub's ootih lull up m 

SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SIOOJM) nrbt- ok 4. t4ttnar 100 pd 
Jtm97 104.55 101-38 10647 —07 220233' 

Sep 97 104-31 —07 3 

Dec 77 104-18 -07 5 

ESI. sales 5O000 Tub's, sales 58,119 
Tub's open inr 2277*0 up 1917 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12 UM 0 franc*. 1 par franc 
Am 97 68*5 JBS6 4879 37,992 

4958 MX 4949 ITS 

Doc 97 3 41 / 

fa*** j^A-^w's. sete 10449 
Toe's apoamt 40JS7 ua 1208 
£MOMTH STERLING (UFFE) 

Emwoo-ptoNioopct 

Jun97 9X33 93JQ 

SffiE S2S 9102 

Dec97 9X«3 92.77 

Mam 9X63 9X56 

JlMM 9X4 9X44 

Sep98 9X39 92J4 

DecfB 9X32 9X27 

Mar99 9X26 9X20 

AU199 9122 92.16 

5«99 9X16 9114 

Dec99 9112 9100 

MwOO 92.06 9106 

E*t sate; 45475. Pnw.sdec 3X31 D 

Pnw.ooeainu 421865 off 709 


7133 — M2 117^18 

7X04 — 0J£J 84L835 

9X80-1104 6X678 
9X60 — 004 40834 
9147 — 0JU 
9JM -a03 21551 
*130 —004 19J98 
23 “M3 11/76 
9X21 -0J13 9850 

9X15 —003 

9X11 —003 
9X07 -003 


May 97 21A2 2tt® KM —035 
JW197 21 J3 20-57 SL53 -QM 

7053 'MJ5 

— A31 

55 2083 —029 
2038 2038 _028 

2033 20L33 —027 

2038 2a2B —027 

7026 7026 — 026 

2025 — 024 

20-23 Ton —02* 

20-71 20 Jt _OM 

. -- 20-20 fl 

^.sate NA Toe's, soles 76/00 
Toe's open int 388X75 oft 7M 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

IMKIOrnni Mu**, s per mm Mu 

MO/97 ?J2D 1JU JJ83 

1.915 1.928 

1P» 1.93 

1-953 1.940 

IMS 1270 
xooo xaiQ 

35 ^ 

— mo mo 

Efl-Mes ha Tub's, sales * uw 
Tim’sapenM 16XO» w 3W^ 

WtEAlffiOGASOLRIE (NMER) 
«*0M«nL cant* per om 

A>*97 6780 64^0 6460 1 99 

Morn 6650 6420 m3) _ M 

6X30 62^38 _]■» 

62A5 63j00 —499 

g£53 S uu low 

E<sote NA Tub's. saw -mm 
Tub's open Int lOcunj ^570 ^ 


91438. 

60JH 

2X7*7 

21 J* 

1179 

M492 

am 

2*4184 

13.9SB 

7M3 


M15 

4,112 


Am 97 1.960 

All 97 1.970 

AUB97 1.985 
Sep 97 1J8S 
0097 zm 
Nov 97 HU 
Dec 97 Z2V 
Jem 98 X330 
Fob 98 2JSS 
Mu 98 XUB 


31479 £ 
14^68 
1X257 
M79 
HIM 
ixen 
SJ53 
10J36 
NLSW 
UH 
*227 


Jun97 65.90 
Jut 97 64L65 

Aua 97 6X20 


164Q6 

4A6S5 

19iW4 

SAD 

X757 


0036 

xm 

\m 


j^NJ^MMARK OJFFE) 


DMImMon - gfitf ioOpcT 

■3 9472 9473 + am 


Stock ^ TdHes Explained 

Veaily Wpta mdlaws leftecMlie pnwtous 52 wbbIb pluj Hie ewifirt 
yg^WtxriltotatestliaiSnB day. Whereusptooneock tartdendomaunBng 9)25 peipintortTiore 
tebwi pftUie yeas Wgwow range ana dvfctorel are shown forthenew stocks w*. unless 
onm*e noted, rates of dMdsuts me annual ifisfaursenleflb based on me Intel tfeeteafton. 

0 -dMriand at sc atm (si. fa - annual note of dMdend plus stock dividend, a - tfauidotlno 

e -dhkto nd dedand or paid In preceding 12 rnemths. f - annual rate, increased on last 
dedarafforeti - dHridend In CunacSai funds. subM to 15% i»Hniderxefin.l - dMdend 
deetaradcftersplB- up arstock divWend. | -dMdend paid tills your, omitted, deferred, or m 
oebcn token at totesf dNldead meeting, k . dMdend declared or paid fhb year, on 
acaimunlve issue with dividends in arrears, m- annual rata reduced on tost dodaraifan. 
«; "??!, fe S HIC , >B r the P* 3 52 Tte hlgh-taw ronae begins wttti the stmtoflmdlna 

na-nEattdayoeuvBry.p-ingioldlvtdeniLcinnualrmeunknouin-p/E-arice-eominflSfiatto. 

rtoctoredorpgkf In preceding 12 months, plus stock 
dMdaw. *-^cxspW. Dividend begins wtttitkne of sjattsks- sates.*- dMdend pa id in 
sta* in preoedlng 1 2 months, esibnated ash val wan cx-dMdend or agHttsMiulton date. 

rU gft-¥- trodinfl halMeVi -in benknjptey origctivwihiporbglng icof uoi ifrfttf 
muter trie BanKruptcy Act or securitfesossumed by such companies, wd - when dlsrrtoirted. 
** - H2? 1 ,rw - '"'I th wmrnrns- 1 - ex-dividend or a-rigtits. nSs - ewfisWjutiofL 

sw - wtthaur warrorax y* e* -dividend and sales hi full, yld - yfe&i. t - Sales h ftriL 


Food 


COCOA (NCSS) 
lOrttafrM fans- f par tan 
May 77 1475 1457 

1461 

+ 16 

37.126 

JW97 

1500 

1485 

I4W 

+ IH 

21449 

Sep 97 

1525 

1510 

1512 

+ 17 

11,497 

Dec 97 

1538 

15m 

153B 

+7 

X763 


1556 

1555 

1554 

+ 11 

1X666 


cm. s um iuw wu 

Tub's open W 10X506 off 999953 


COFFEE CWCSE) 

PJD0 fa*.- eonfa par fa. 

May 97 HMD 1S0JM 15405 *7JB 
Ail 97 I75JB UB2S 17X00 +135 
Sop 97 16130 16X50 161 AO +X30 
Dec 97 15145 147 JOO MX 15 +X50 
Est.sate 1X532 Tim's. sate 1X922 
TIM'S Open ire 37,988 up 15K 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) 
liLfloo lbs.- cms por to. 

May 97 1U8 1X78 1X81 — OjOS 
JU197 1X64 1X51 1X60 -X93 
0(997 1X17 1X52 1X52 -XU 

Mm 98 1X57 1X52 BJ3 -X03 

Est. sate HJ26 Tun'S, sate 14725 
Tub's open in! W4J0J up 2729 


1X824 

X2Z3 

54M 

3474 


62,173 

34111 

24197 

M.WS 


MYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

II D04100iirtn. pH & End* cri in Ml 
Jim 97 106-14 10640 106-07 - 05 30X760 

SeP 97 105-30 105-20 105-24 —05 1444) 

Dec 97 105-12 — 05 SO 

BL sates 71JJ00 Tue's **5 1054a 
TUe'saponW 34X767 10 13122 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOTJ 
to pct-imooo-pis & 3inds or mo pal 
Am 97 108-26 WM4 HB-lS -08 439.711 

50P97 108-11 HP-22 100-01 -08 3X214 

DSC 97 107-21 107-15 107-71 —07 &332 

Mar 98 107.11 -07 IA49 

EsLsate 42X0*0 Tue's.sate 330A27 
Tub's open int 471606 up 3860 

LONG GILT (UFFE) 

£30.000 -pB A ttndfflf 700 pet 
MOW? NA HA NA KA 14434 

Jurt»7 109-18 108-30 107417 -M0 17&,9re 

5ep97 NT. N.T. 108-26 - 04)9 0 

CU-nto 77,778. Prey, into SUP* 

Prpr.opM W.: 19X422 on 1X992 


Aoi97 

Moy97 

Jun97 

Sap97 

Doc97 

Mo>98 

Jun98 

SwM 

Dm98 

MW99 

Jun9f 

5ip99 

D+C99 

MmOO 

JunOO 

SepU 

DacOO 

MoOl 


962 


£2 ^ +xoi 


XMO 


W-70 +aJi: 


OASCHLdPE) 

totwKSLV"""* ’O" ‘ Ws OflOO tons ’ 

fe’ilili 
Ilf f i 1 1 

£ s JS.'«sjJ 


-y 


■rri. 




. _ aftd: 

announcing late Tuesday that n 
would increase the number of shares 
it repurchased- Tbe prospect that der 
mnnd for oil and other fuels will net 
drop off if economic growth mod- i 

r ■ 1 -j — :i -l 


9IL44 96* ■* S’® 

! | k -a n 

a « “ •» 1; 

S S Kgzjffi ^ 
K J : SflrSS! S3 
„ Sf: K ggzffl “» 


Stock Indexes 

|| S 3 22 

raa “J 




SfpiGi W 9 


Sdp 97 9449 SHS ^ 71J10 

Sec 97 9437 

u— m ATS. ?435 +0JD 5j),9l) 


^ +%% tK 


iSs BBSS ss* 

SSw ss Sg S2» 

3S?S gS *Ǥ iSffl 

flit I 


GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFPH 


Mf7 10X50 9*.W 10X23 '024 34X913 

s«77 99^0 99.19 99-30 — X24 1.447 

EStSOHK 30X260. Pnv.SOtoS: 12X432 
Prev-ooni mt-msao up xea 


teS Kut: Nit: t£c 

Eff. vdimas BX45X open bit: 2S5^U2ug j^jsl 

rrfPSIlLf 1 “"“UNA (UEFE) 

■JLi “tata-ntsofioope 

E 1 H iiH'B 

as as ss §!? ?ss ss? 


^WiMApP} 

Sffe'tlxo 

agij Mao 

g97 2015 ^ 

SJ 2. N-T. nix 


JIB 

2,131 


2649A *2X00 
JJSW +ZL00 

»« tal S 
i|;gg » 
.^s:iss 




Commodity hutexes 


Slm'SkE ^ 

^?sssa 


Moodrt 

geutere 

0LJ.RAU* 


Oo» 

UTXbo 

i,pm5o 

'S743 

145.91 


re- V 




rr itMtik 


35?UH S 'I A 


hs} llarch 2B 


■’’telLl 



MJWK * -••.•5.3 

A - -..-.3- 


•?3 v *ss. " 

^ ~-a 









Z3& 



: •+ 


-ixi-ij* 


V ' 

■ .- .. 




: *»**ejr 

S 5 KP 1 . 



J ;•» a* --a 

fo 8 a? 5 SS 




*-ir 


**+m*ti 



Knur cpmiv KiRffl M. 1W 


PAGE 3 



fNTCDIVilTUVU 4 I link irn'Pnrarnin? > • noon iv u inm on 1 fUkrr 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


PAGE 15 


EUROPE 


• . . ■; f Mi., 



r; 

:r nd 

^ r3 ^f : 

: to |; 

led r . 

^•‘nstotBs 

.; aaalysi 

■ lO )fij/ 

:: T,jt ^ £ 

: ;,: - r ‘ s r^is n : 
_ Juc 5^ r ; 

•- v;'eroj % 

■J r •■‘O-lI; 

• ' ; a >i' : 

-*f: If- 
'!«{■ 
- A *-**'•- Jv ^ , 


iust Yen 


Joblessness 
In Italy 
Hit 12.4% 
In January 

Gre^fed if Ore Sufi Fran Dbpncha 

ROME — Unemployment 
rose to a higher-than-expeaed 
12.4 percent-in January, com- 
pared with 32.2 percent in Oc- 
tober, the national statistics bu- 
reau Istat said Wednesday. 

Tbe increase in unemploy- 
ment, which is reported every 
three months, was driven by job 
losses in the northeastern part 
of the country, one of the few 
areas where significant num- 
bers of new jobs had been cre- 
ated in recent years. 

Although the unemployment 
figure was considered likely to 
increase pressure on the gov- 
ernment to stimulate job cre- 
ation, it was not viewed as a 
threat to Italy’s chances of join- 
ing Europe’s planned economic 
and monetary union. 

“The issue of employment is 
not going to go away, and this 
number is a disappointment for 
the government,” said Marco Pi- 
anefii, an analyst at Nomura Re- 
search. “Bur the Italian public 
doesn't make such a big link be- 
tween EMU and employment.” 

Separately, Prime Minister 
Romano Proidi received support 
from coalition partners for a 
corrective budget to put Italy on 
track for monetary union, party 
leaders said- The minibudget 
was expected to include 1 6 tril- 
lion lire ($9.47 billion) of de- 
ficit-cutting measures and was 
expected to be approved 
Thursday by the cabinet 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ Asset Sales Bolster Bank 

Banca di Roma SpA, Italy’s 
second-largest c omme rcial 
bank, said its 1996 net income 
rose 42 percent as one-time 
gains offset 1.6 trillion lire of 
write-downs for problem loans, 
Bloomberg News reported. 

The bank said consolidated 
net income rose to 121.4 billion 
lire from 85.7 billion lire in 
1995, bolstered by 57 1.5 billion 
tire of gains from asset sales. 


Daimler Rolls Out a Robust Rebound 


CVMfirfni hr Oir Stuff Fnmi Ouf Ukftn 

STUTTGART — Daimler-Benz 
AG said Wednesday it h ad reboun- 
ded from a record loss ro post a 
higher-than-expected 1996 net 
profit of 2.8 billion Deutsche marks 
($ 1 .66 billion) as Germany's largest 
company wrote off the costs of a 
large reorganization. 

Tbe conglomerate’s net profit, after 
a net loss of 5.7 billion DM in 1995, 
was nearly 40 percent greater than 
most analysts had expected. Daimler 
attributed the gain in part to one-time 
benefits from deferring taxes. 

Daimler-Benz's revenue rose 10 
percent from a year earlier, to 106.3 
billion DM, it said. Daimler said it 
would propose a dividend of 1. 10 
DM a share for 1996 at a stock- 
holders' meeting May 28. Daimler- 
Benz paid no dividend for 1995. 


The company’s shares surged 2.3 
percent, or 2.90 DM. to close at 
13 1 .70 in Frankfurt. 

“They are good numbers, and the 
turnaround is confirmed.” Georg 
Stuerzer, an analyst at Bayerische 
Vereinsbank AG in Munich, said. 

“Net profit is higher than ex- 
pected, and that is largely due to tbe 
taxes.” 

But the company said a direct 
comparison with 1995 was difficult 
because of special factors such as its 
closings of unprofitable operations. 

Daimler ran up its 1 995 loss after 
paying to dismantle its unprofitable 
AEG AG electronics unit as well as 
selling some aerospace operations. 

Daimler is scheduled to release 
further details of its 1996 results at a 
news conference April 1 6. The com- 
pany said earnings had been cal- 


culated according to generally ac- 
cepted U.S- accounting principles. 

Nearly all business sectors con- 
tributed to the 1 996 operating profit, 
it said. 

Daimler declined to say whether 
its aerospace unit, Daimler-Benz 
Aerospace AG. returned to profit in 
1996. A spokesman said Daimler's 
Mercedes heavy-truck and Temic 
microelectronics units ”did not con- 
tribute to profit growth.” 

Daimler said it had an operating 
profit of 2.4 billion DM, in line with 
expectations, after a 1995 operating 
loss of 1 .09 billion DM. 

This month, a Daimler manage- 
ment board member, Eckhard 
Cordes, said net profit would be “not 
less” than 2 billion DM. The full- 
year result implies that Daimler had 
2.02 billion DM of net profit in the 


second half after posting net profit of 
782 million DM for tbe first half. 

Tbe company decided in 1996 to 
cut off financial support for the Dutch 
aviation concern Fokker NV. to spin 
off tbe majority of tbe electrical en- 
gineering subsidiary AEG and to un- 
dertake a drastic recovery plan for its 
Daimler-Benz Aerospace unit. 

Manfred Gentz, Daimler’s chief 
financial officer, said this week that 
second-half earnings had been 
helped by cost-cutting and a weaker 
Deutsche mack, which gave 
Daimler a price advantage when 
selling its cars abroad. 

A Daimler spokesman said some 
of the company’s one-time tax ad- 
justments had shown up in first-half 
results. He said details of the two 
sets of six-month results were not 
yet available. (AFP, Bloomberg) 


Axa’s Profit Jumps as UAP Absorbs Charges 


Investor’s Europe 


'.•.■London 

FTSE1B0 Index 



,r b 'N o' S fH 

1996 1997 


"O' N' D" J F M" 
1996 1997 . 


O NO' J F' M‘ 
1996 1997. 


Cavpdrd by Our Staff Fn—tPupcxha 

PARIS — Axa SA, which acquired the rival 
French insurance group UAP to create die 
world’s second-largest insurer, said Wednesday 
that its 1996 net profit rose 40 percent, powered 
by a life-insurance business that showed par- 
ticularly strong improvement in the United 
States, France and Britain. 

Axa’s partner. Union des Assurances de Paris, 
meanwhile announced a loss for die year of 6.45 
billion French francs ($1.13 billion) that it said 
had resulted from 7.59 billion francs in one-time 
charges to cleanse its account books and prevent 
unprofitable activities from weighing on the 
combined company’s future. 

This is the last time that Axa and UAP will 
report eanrings separately. Axa agreed to acquire 


UAP in a 45 billion-franc stock swap announced 
in November. The combined company, Axa- 
UAP, ranks second worldwide to Nippon Life 
Insurance Co. of Japan and surpassed Allianz 
AG of Germany as Europe's largest insurer. 

"UAP is a good company which probably 
made investments that were a little risky in the 
past,” said Claude Bebear. the chairman of Axa 
who will also head tbe new company. “We have 
taken the last necessary provisions to erase wfaai 
was done in the past,” he said, adding that he was 
confident about the new company's future. 

Excluding die one-time charges — which 
included coverage for businesses in a collapsed 
real-estate sector and the deconsolidation from 
its accounts of Basque Nationale de Paris — 
UAP had a profit of 1.14 billion francs in 1996, 


after a net loss of 2.1 billion francs in 1995. 

Axa’s 1996 profit after taxes rose to 3.81 
billion francs on revenue of 167.21 billion 
francs, a 28 percent increase. The insurer raised 
its dividend 15 percent, to 7.50 francs a share, as 
earnings per share rose 21 percent, to 20.36 
francs. 

Analysts said the results on balance were no 
surprise, .although “Axa was better than ex- 
pected, while UAP was much worse because of 
the exceptional charges,” said Vincent De bains, 
a trader at Transbourse in Paris. He said tbe UAP 
charges were “probably better for tbe future of 
the company as a whole.” 

Axa-UAP shares rose 1 percent, or 3.80 
francs, to close at 37 1 .80 on the Paris Bourse. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Index 

'•A£X“ i „ ■ 

.. .IWPdfteaiJaiy Ftev. 

; OSosa '; . Class ■ Change 
' 73M0 : 727,84 +0.90 

Stnssefe 

rBEL&Qt * ■ . i. 

Z&kjto ^IOB.18 . +0.87 

Frankfurt 

.PAX j,- 

■ 441*12 3j340.14 . 


■ smjt,; \&m : : : #m 

BefahtW ' 

HEXSen^iaJ 

; 2J25QJS3 ^,84*90 . tf)j2Q 

Oslo 

■ . 

i 591^86 . ■ ' S8&.7Q ." +0^3 

Lorjdcsr 

' FTSH'lob. - 

fi 

l 

1 

HacirW ; 

. SttickOrcbartge 


msn . . ■ -■ 

.,«IBTE V 


Paris T ' ; 

CAG4Q. \ r - ' 

:;s&a03. -zjmjis +0^3. 

Stockftofrn 

iSK-rs’.. ■ • •;•. : 

v ' 2,90&9^ -him 

Vienna • - 

ATX > > >' 

■ -.+0.66' 

Zurich 

'S «•: 

' %SA9.tf : 2^7.96; ' 

Source: Tetekurs 

Uilcreauanal Heiald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


GrenfelVs Costs Depress Deutsche Bank Net 


Canted by Otr Staff Frm Pitpatdta 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG said Wednesday it had set 
aside 12, billion Deutsche marks 
($710 million), about 200 million 
DM more than it previously said, to 
bail out Its Morgan Grenfell Asset 
Management uni t. 

The money is to cover compen- 
sation due to customers and potential 
fines arising from investments in un- 
listed securities by a former Morgan 
Grenfell ftmd manager. Peter Young, 
who was fired in September 1996. 

“It’s not finished yet,” Hilmar 
Kopper, chief executive of Europe’s 


largest bank, said in his last report to 
shareholders before his planned re- 
tirement. He said the costs of help- 
ing Morgan Grenfell and of a re- 
structuring bad weighed down 1996 
net profit, which rose 4.6 percent to 
2.22 billion DM even though op- 
erating profit was up 37 percent, to 
5.81 billion DM from 4.24 billion 
DM in 1995. 

Trading income rose 58 percent 
in 1996, to 3.23 billion DM. helped 
by the initial public offering of 
Deutsche Telekom AG, and revenue 
at Deutsche Morgan Grenfell rose 
about 30 percent But net interest 


income fell 2.5 percent, to 1034 
billion DM, mainly because there 
were no dividends from Daimler 
Benz AG or Philipp Ho lzm arm AG. 
companies in which Deutsche Bank 
has a substantial stake. 

Also hurting net profit were an 84 
percent increase in the bank’s in- 
come taxes from 1995 to 1996 and 
start-up costs for its new direct- 
banking unit, Mr. Kopper said. 

Deutsche Bank shares rose 0.98 
DM to 92.90 as investors welcomed 
the bank’s forecast of higher earn- 
ings. 

But the bank will not be able to 


repeat last year's increase in op- 
erating profit in 1997, said Rolf- 
Ernst Breuer, who will become 
Deutsche Bank’s chief executive of- 
ficer May 20. 

“We will not have die same 
growth rate,” Mr. Breuer said. 
“Times are more difficult now, as 
markets are already sky-high. We 
are confident that we will perform 
better than last year.” 

The Morgan Grenfell costs 
caused Deutsche Bank’s “other ex- 
penses" to leap in 1996 to 2.76 
billion DM from 135 billion DM. 

(Bloomberg. AP) 


• Nestle SA’s 1996 net profit rose a better-ihan -expected 17 
percent, to a record 3.4 billion Swiss francs (.52.32 billion) 
from 2.92 billion francs a year earlier, buoyed by growth in 
emerging markets and the strong dollar. 

• VEBA AG, Germany's second-largest utility, posted a 28 
percent increase in net profit for 1996, to 2.46 billion Deutsche 
marks (S1.46 billion) from 1.92 billion DM in 1995. because 
of cold weather and cost-cutting. VEBA also said it would list 
its shares on the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 8. 

• Caisse Nationale de Credit Agricole's 1996 net profit rose 
1 6 percent, to a record 73 billion Bench francs (51 .32 billion) 
from 63 billion francs a year earlier, helped by the acquisition 
of Banque Indosuez, which reported that profit more than 
tripled, to 362 million francs from 107 million francs. 

• France’s consumer spending on manufactured goods ex- 
cluding cars fell 1 .7 percent in January. 

• Norwegian Cruise Lines Holding ASA will sell $20 mil- 
lion of new shares to Prince Wabd ibn Talal; the Saudi 
billionaire said the transaction would give him a 5 percent 
stake in the cruise-ship operator. 

• Generate des Eaux denied it planned to block a possible 
merger of Compagnie de Suez and Lyonnalse des Eaux 
through a counterbid for Suez, but a spokesman for Generale’s 
chairman, Jean-Marie Messier, said the French company 
wanted a good price for its indirect Suez stake. 

• SBC Communications Inc. of the United States and 
Telekom Malaysia Bbd. will pay 538 billion rand ($1 .26 
billion) for 30 percent of Telkom South Africa Ltd., which 
will be divided 18 percent for SBC and 12 percent for Telecom 
Malaysia, die South African government said. 

• Microsoft Corp. named Michel Lacombe president of its 
European operations, succeeding Bernard Vergnes, who will 
take up the new position of chairman of Microsoft Europe. 

Bloomberg, Reuters. AP) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 




Wednesday, March 26 

Prices ta focal currencies. 

n/ekm 

W* Low aose Piw. 


Amsterdam abcwob^m; 

1 727.84 


ABN- AMRO 
Aegon 
Mold 
Afczo NOW 
Banco. 

Boa Mb an 
CSMan 
DartSsdiePM 
V, DSM 
;• Be* 

Forth Aim* 
Gdnpks 
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H anfpOTglos 
1 KG Group 
KLM 

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OceGifafen 
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Vends* I rtf 

VNU 

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129 126 

13X70 13030 
1SLM 12B20 
249X0. 26440 
KW MSI 
3SJB 3460 
107J0 10AM 
359 3S1JB 
19076 1S530 
3050 29-M 
74 71.10 

urn a 

62X0 6090 
M2 157.10 
335 32A50 
9X30 9020 
156X0 149.10 
7330 7090 
57 55-40 
3930 3930 
6930 6730 

4450 45.10 
268 27X80 
341 231.10 
87X0 84 

9478 9130 
T66 151 

160 159 JO 
6040 ».10 
16X90 16X10 
W6JQ 10830 
rtfiqi 332J0 
345.10 3SBJ0 
07-70 8X70 
3930 3830 
229 WM 


127.90 12450 
13150 131 

13830 12950 
mOO 266 
- (B 8150 
3560 3430 
10490 184,90 
357J0 35230 
19070 18460 
3030 2930 
7130 71 JO 
5930 5930 
41J0 6080 
15930 161 

327 JO 334 

92JP 9060 
150 156 

7230 7130 
5430 SSJ0 
39.41) 39.90 
6830 68.18 
4490 4550 
280 27X50 
23930 23X40 
87 8X40 
94 9230 
16230 15030 
15940 15X30 
£0 59 JO 
16110 162 
10830 10030 
33430 33X10 
36330 35130 
8630 8430 
3830 3830 
vr> 4i 22490 


Mtf» Low. Close Pm. 
DeahdWBank -93XB> 9250 93X7 9135 
Deal Telekom 3830 3732 38.13 3730 

OwdmrBank 5945 5880 5935 5730 

fteseniuj 374 369 JO 367 370 

FrasentosMed 164.90 163 16130 161.90 

Fried- K/opp 334 325 326 331 

Gene 117.30 115 11630 114 

HekfcfcflZm} • 1C. 144 145 143 

HeTOWpM 9250;. 90 92 6830 

HEW 500 405 «5 405 

HoeMhf 73 71 71 JO 7225 

6730 6470 67.40 6535 
596 581 581 593 

1195 1162 1187 1145 
24.15 2X90 24 2335 

479 JO -47450 47830 47X50 
650 64030 640JO 652 

M tfOOB— B c f ip W3d3 0 3430 3455 3630 
Meto 167- 164 16460 16530 

MandlRlKkR 4325 4275 4305 4220 

476 456 476 45X70 

1270 1250 1250 1262 

7530 7X40 7530 7X05 
20050 27730 2SKL50 279 
171X0 1 6980 171 17130 

231 229 229 23130 

8836 8735 BTLS5 3490 
1245 1230 1235 1230 

855 850 853 855 

37330 36730 375 3ZS30 

9895 9735 9735 9838 
500 499 499 49? 

804 79030 799 770 

90*30 892 9Q2JD 89X50 



Higb Loot data 

Piev. 


Htab 

Law 

Close 

Pitt. 

SABmwries 

139 JO 138X5 139 JO 13875 


5.10 

103 

110 

UM 

Srammcur 

55 5450 54 50 

55 

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• 225 

-4X7 

220 

220 

Sate 

49 JO 4825 48J0 

4975 

Whitbread 

728 

ZJ8 

722 

7X2 

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183 1 SILTS 18QJ5 18450 

WlttrottUdgs 

326 

331 

332 

3X6 

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7825 77X5 7825 

7725 

Wdteey 

498 

490 

491 

492 



WPP Group 

2J4 

2X0 

2J2 

2Ji 




Zeneca 

17.78 

I/J7 

17X2 

1748 


High Low Close Pmr. 


Paris 


Kuala Lumpur 


Atr Liquids 
AfcotelAistti 


Knott# 

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Lufthansa 

MAN 


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2290 

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23 

17.10 

16X0 

17 

16X0 

29 

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28l7S 

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6.10 

5.95 

410 

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9.10 

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1620 

1520 

1620 

15.90 

520 

525 

5.15 

5JH 

430 

420 

430 

428 

1120 

10X0 

1490 

1120 

2110 

2220 

22X0 

23.10 

9.10 

9 

9.10 

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19 

W 

19 

19 

1220 

1190 

1220 

1220 

21.90 

2120 

21X0 

2120 

13 

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EnsoA 

HuteoreeWI 


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pmtanK 2*4490 


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AdvlnMSvc 

BtngkofcBkF 


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PraffMK 71838 


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228 

224 

226 

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258 ‘ 

256 

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252 

3725 

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3625 

338 

336 

338 

332 

<92 

668 

680 

672 

159 

155 

159 

153 

4425 

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45X0 

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4425 

176 

174 

174 

172 

171 

168 

170 

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Mafia A 
Metre B 
MOsa-SeriaB 
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245 

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73 

1730 

293 

3420 

131 

x 301 

19530 

9330 

11030 

89 


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243 

5230 

71 

17 

290 

3S 

128 

297 

187 

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107 

87 


4X50 42 

243 344 

5330 5230 
7250 72 

17 17.10 
292 293 

36 3638 
129 IS 
29830 301 

195 187 

93 92 

10930 10990 
89 8730 


London 

Abbey Nell 
ASMDancai 
Angfan Water 

Argos 

Aida Group 

Assoc Br Foods 

BAA 

Barclays 

Bass 

BATlnd 

BrotkSca&tod 

Blue Circle 

BOC Group 

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BPBlnd 

Mhng 

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BG 

Bit Und 
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737 

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632 

637 

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530 

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1034 

8.14 

530 

123 

s? 

473 

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1X37 

441 

134 

445 

735 


132 

499 

170 


Hong Kong 


Bril 

Brit Tehran 
BTR 

Bunnaft Carirai 10.10 
Burton Gp 1J9 

Cable Wireless 
Ca&NByScfcw 
GorttttConaa 
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STD 

533 


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HtadustPriln 

IndDwBk 

1TC 

MotHnagarTtl 
Mhmcelnd 
Slate Bklntfa 
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Tati Fug I «ew 


1011 

100230 

39858 

9238. 

42X50 

275 

29425 

31790 

21-25 

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3B tartar 372X24 
PmtaKE 376X78 

1002 1005 1013 

995 999JSW06JB 
38630 38930 390 

9130 9X50 9198 
41025 41290 42430 
25730 269-75 27550 
289X5 291.25 291.75 
308J5 309.75 318 

2875 21J25 71 

387.25 389.25 79^8 


Bk East Asia 
Catt*iy Pacific 

SffiSSS 

CKimonraa 

CMnaUgM 

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DooHengBk 

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Brussels 


Barca) 

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CBR 

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Arts AG 


GBL 
Gen Banque 


SocGenEkS 
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13308 

5780 

7790 

3470 

14500 

1925 

7920 

3270 

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4930 

13575 

12480 

12100 

4895 

8650 

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UC8 


BElr20 latte 211M0 
proriaoE 210418 

12950 13025 1«M 
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7730 7730 7750 

3290 3345 20n 

13950 M300 1M0 
1910 1910 WT5 

7810 7910 7900 
3180 3270 3300 

5970 6060 5W 

2480 2500 2520 

«20 4910 4*H 

13475 13525 13475 
12200 12350 12100 
11850 12050 11875 
4878 4880 4886 

8510 8600 8520 

2890 2920 2895 
20700 20825 20725 
14700 14750 14700 
89400 91500 897S0 


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HKSecMC 
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8X5 830 

26.95 26X5 

71 6930 
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3430 34.10 
3830 38X0 
3S.B0 3530 
1035 1105 
1430 1430 

84 8X75 
835 7-75 

67-50 66 

1435 T4XS 
2730 27.15 
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4.15 438 

2X95 2X50 

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4330 43 

115 330 

&05 6 

8635 85 

535 535 

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090 635 

61 JO 61 
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8X0 4X0 

2635 2635 

11JB0 1135 

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3430 3X20 
3830 3880 
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10JH 1035 
14X5 1430 
8X75 5X75 
820 7J5 

67 6630 
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27X5 2730 
13X0 1X80 
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18130 18130 
- 50 57JS 

2330 2X75 
1*30 19X5 
17 1195 
43X0 4X20 
ITS 3JB 
635 6 

85 86 

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6ts B 

31 20 32 
17 JO 18.10 


630 
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EMI Group 1123 

BB S 

GartAeeldeirt 830 
GEC 176 

GKN 1420 

GttBWrtcaroe 11JJ6 
GrorextaGp 932 
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Copenhagen 


BGBank 381 

400 

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DenDanskeBIc 578 
QfSSuCfrtxgB 282000 
CVS1V12B 1 96469 
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873 875 875 

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195000 195500 196196 
045 860 845 

654 660 660 

66X67 665 66937 

835 834 04 

329 33X» 

347 3S5 3ST 

33467 341 3S5 


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6600 6535 

11475 11175 
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1J2 U0 1J39 
5X8 5X8 5J8 

405 5.15 5-D6 

TOUTS 1128 10.15 
8L02 107 X07 

523 S32 538 

117 1T7 320 

403 411 406 

9 JO 930 9.69 

440 4M 440 
131 XX3 130 
1321 1X58 1133 
636 6M 636 
1J9 1X0 1J0 

5J9 5X0 5X0 

7J1 7X2 69B 

US 415 436 

1-57 1X1 1X0 

448 4J3 453 

2J4 2X3 160 

10 10X5 1005 
1-55 1JB 1J5 
481 492 485 

52B X4S 5X0 
490 5.13 5X5 

6X2 6X8 466 

4S3 457 453 

141 141 30 

5L16 525 5L1B 

415 416 417 

10-95 10J5 11.15 
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439 455 438 

1J7 1J8 1X8 

8L07 823 8X8 

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1002 1005 10.10 
10X1 1096 1028 

019 9.15 9XB 

473 487 478 

176 181 2J7 

512 S25 512 

496 512 5JT3 

6X1 6X0 6X1 

5L35 5X4 538 

1445 1456 1462 
595 6X6 6J8 

389 416 418 

592 599 595 

223 225 234 

7X2 7X8 7X8 

2X2 2X3 2X3 

3X0 3X0 335 

478 4Sd 411 
1X5 1X5 1X7 

462 481 465 

463 428 470 

1X70 1X80 1X74 

xo7 xn no 

472 425 473 

6X0 6X5 6X5 

597 517 5 95 

Z£B 2X5 X10 

519 6X8 535 

725 7X2 7X5 

1.19 120 1X0 

SB 5X2 5X3 

475 475 477 

5X6 5X6 556 

459 4X0 466 

418 432 421 

8.15 8.17 823 

3X8 3-52 150 

1L01 11.10 11X6 

418 423 418 

598 597 507 

3X2 335 132 

9J3 9X8 9.55 

2X6 227 130 

031 S31 518 

9X2 9X3 9X2 

437 4* 4X0 

3X4 156 3X0 

3X2 338 3X7 

15X5 1585 1505 

M3 W5 443 
3X1 Z3S 135 
2X5 2X6 2X0 

577 677 582 

10X2 1076 10X6 
1025 1031 10X2 
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8X0 8.99 9 

8 -8JB 8.10 
7X0 7S2 731 

5X8 581 565 

1X3 8.2 850 

433 4X8 434 

137 LO 13 
53 557 -- 

SSB SM 5JB 
5J2 553 156 

2JB 2JI 2X4 
15.99 1505 1510 
491 4?S 5 

7J2 7X2 7X7 

503 509 512 


Madrid 


Bttntadec 4B457 


PrettBE 47428 

ACOttOk 

2O2S0 

20000 

20200 

19920 

ACESA 

1685 

1615 

1600 

1615 

AguBBucteoa 

5350 

U>40 

5330 

5250 

AnmdDrio 

BBV 

6200 

8640 

6110 

8480 

6190 

0610 

6120 

84S0 

Bunesto 

1140 

1125 

1135 

1125 

Batedrtw 

19400 

19700 

19400 

19300 


3875 

3800 

3065 

3805 


2800 

2780 

2785 

2780 

Ben Popular 

26100 

26J9C 

26000 

25800 

Bco Santander 
CEPSA 

9940 

y/oc 

9880 

9/» 

4250 

41/0 

4250 

4750 

CanUnerte 

2595 

2500 

25/5 

2520 

CcjMapfro 

7320 

9490 

7050 

9280 

7310 

9390 

W60 

9350 

FECSA 

1235 

1210 

1225 

1710 

GasNartraS 

31300 

30900 

30990 

31150 

Iberdrola 

1605 

1530 

1585 

1540 

Ptyai 

2700 

2665 

2680 

2675 

Hepte 

6830 

5910 

6030 

5900 

SevltanaElec 

1330 

1285 

1315 

1295 

Tonomtain 

7150 

6760 

7110 

6780 

TelefoflkD 

3500 

3450 

1495 

3450 

UteOf) Fenosn 

1190 

1165 

1190 

1170 

VtteacCemert 

1760 

1715 

1/50 

1?» 


Manila 

AyrioB 
Avia Loud 
Bkpmpisi 
COP Homes 
Maria Etc A 
Men Bank 


POflank 
Rtf Long DM 
SwMJguma 
SMPrtaeHdg 


27 JO 
30J0 
184 
1225 
124 
675 
11 
395 
1605 
91 
736 


PSEI 


27 

X 

181 

12 

121 

670 

1075 

380 

1590 

91 

7X0 


322114 
320411 

27 27 JO 
30JO 30 
181 181 
1125 12 

124 122 

675 675 

n iojo 

3B0 300 

1595 15M 

91 90.50 
7X0 770 


Accor 
AGF 
Air . 

Afctti 
A*B-UAP 

Banmire 

BIC 

BNP 

Cml Plus 
Cnrefcur 
Casino 
C CP 
Cetettn 
ChrisdanDtar 
CLF-Cttda Fran 
OadlAgricato 

rvwvw 

EiMipriralne 

EitontaBS 

Eurotfisney 

Euratunnd 

Gen. Eaa* 

Haw* 

UneW 

Lafarge 

LfQriTOd 
LCrcal 
LVMH 
Lyon Eaux 
JWctartnB 
Paribas A 
Pernod Heard 
PeugoasCB 
Pina ud-P Ail 
Promodes 
Renootf 
Renal 

Rh-PaUtencA 

Samsfl 

ScJtndder 

SEB 

SGSTtwnsan 
Sle Generate 


SfGotrtn 

Suez 

SyntWtalM 
TrwnsonCSF 
Total B 
llstoor 


CAC-4tt 264573 
PrevlMS: 26242S 

814 7*6 80S 813 

214 20820 209X0 210 

980 870 877 090 

682 667 670 676 

372JD 368 371X0 368 

760 745 753 761 

S68 859 862 868 

249 238J0 245J0 240 

1173 1116 1166 1130 

35W 3440 3489 3450 
261 256 256 26060 

26450 258J0 261 260 

669 656 668 669 

850 832 850 829 

598 580 585 589 

1285 1285 1285 12Ei 

902 BSO 993 897 

579 5S0 577 566 

922 903 913 903 

1 0.1 5 10X5 law 10.15 
6X0 6X5 670 670 

771 M6 762 741 

430 417X0 42410 42070 
890 870 877 882 

389 JO 37420 38BX0 37420 
1015 990 1010 1005 

1967 1941 1964 1950 

1390 1350 1372 1350 

580 560 566 5R 

343 33SJ0 342X0 337 

398 391.10 39440 397 

31370 30850 31020 309.96 
647 634 666 641 

2340 2247 2302 2247 

1873 1855 1868 1864 

l« 148.10 1« 141X0 

1769 1736 1750 1768 

1W 19650 188X0 188X0 
561 541 549 542 

322 306X0 33070 301X0 
1031 1012 1024 10U 

«S 393X0 39750 392 

666 650 658 660 

2898 2620 2879 2840 

854 839 B40 847 

292 2KL50 292 281 

589 577 585 585 

193 189-10 190 192X0 

473 48420 478 

91X5 BL7D 8950 90S 
37BJD 369.10 37570 372 



High 

Low Ctase 

P«tt. 

BedrttiorB 

470 460X0 470 

462J0 

ErtcsscnB 

265-50 

261 26X50 

260X0 

Hermes B 

1029 

laoe loro 

1017 

A 

514 

5W 513 

513 

Investor B 

355X0 

348 352.50 

340X0 

MoDoB 

235 223X0 229 JO 

234X0 

Nordbanken 

259 253X0 258 

2S6 

PlanttfUpiohn 
Screw* & 

294J0 

769 299 JO 

292X0 

198 

194 190 

194 

SamioB 

191 

105 188X0 

186 

SCAB 

769 JD 

166 167 JO 

167 

S-E Ban tel A 

84J0 

S3 84 

84 

SkanteaFars 

236 

232 233 

233X0 

SKansto B 

345 

337 341 

336 

SKFB 

197 

192 1 96X0 

193 

SparbcnkEdA 

StadstrypotefcA 

142 

190 

139 1 40 JO 
190 190 

140X0 

190 

StaroA 

105 

100 104JO 

102 

SuHamtesA 

228 

225 22630 

229X0 

Astro 0 

207 

197 20530 

197 


Mexico 

Alta A 
flanoad B 
QjMC W 

Moderna 
Gpo Carso A1 
GgoFBconnr 
Gpo F*i Cnauna 
Kmb Clark Mes 
TeiettaCPO 
TelMexL 


PreriME 3827X6 Sao Paulo 


45X5 

1SJ0 

30X0 

11.12 

3975 

47X0 

1X7 

29X0 

3115 

19070 

15X8 


45X0 45X0 
18.14 18X0 
2970 29X0 
10X0 10X4 
39X5 3975 
4675 46X5 
1X6 1X6 
28JB 28X0 
32X5 3X05 
100J0 16070 
15X0 15X0 


45X5 

18X4 

in fin 
11X0 
39X5 
47X0 
1X7 
29 JO 
32X5 
100X0 
15X8 


BrodescoPW 
Broil mo PW 
CerotaPta 
CESPPtt 
Copel. 


ttaubaira Pfd 
rsenrldos 


8X0 

737X0 

45X0 

54.10 

16X0 

455X0 

577X0 


Milan 

MIB TetatoBOcro 1197X08 


Prettas 11821X8 

MnnsiAsGta 

11480 

11250 

mss 

11340 

Ben Comm rite 

3360 

3290 

3330 

3320 

BcaRdetma 

4270 

4150 

4235 

4150 


1180 

1130 

1167 

1126 


20900 

20450 

20600 

HUM 


2360 

2335 


2350 


8960 

8785 

8M0 

8740 

ENI 

8665 

8395 

8660 

8425 

Fid 

5385 

5345 

8345 

5285 

GeneroS Asslc 

29750 

29100 

29600 

29400 

IM1 

14530 

13860 

1446b 

13980 

INA 

2250 

2210 

2215 

2715 

ItalgoS 

Medtoet 

5688 

6755 

5490 

6470 

5635 

6500 

6545 

Meteebonoo 

10640 

102/5 


10400 

MordPriteon 

1160 

1)35 

1195 

1146 

Otoete 

614 

603 

604 

608 

Pormatai 

2370 

2330 

7370 

2340 

Pirera 

3330 

3635 

3830 

3675 

RAS 

14BS0 

14530 

14725 

14600 

Rolo Banco 

14740 

14500 

I450U 

14590 

S PaoB Tortus 

11395 

11060 

11095 

11275 

site 

7620 

7480 

7510 

7495 

Tetacom Itafin 

4VA 

4755 

4790 

4270 

TIM 

4980 

4800 

4925 

4780 


;PM 
PnritriaUB 
5U National 
Souza Croi 
TetehrasPfd 
Telanlg 
TaterJ 
Tete^jPM 
Unftenca 
UslretaasPId 
CVROPW 


331 JO 
221X0 
149X0 
38X0 
8X5 
11370 
151.10 
152J0 
280X0 
4021 
1X2 
25X0 


-"SUSS 

8X5 875 

70100 701X0 
45.10 45X0 
53X0 54X1 
14X0 16X0 
450X0 450X0 
5JCX0 577X0 
442X0 448X0 
33ILS0 331.10 
217X0 22050 
147X0 147 JO 
VM 37 JO 

8X0 8X0 

112-50 113X0 
150X0 15000 
14045 1S2J0 
276-50 276J0 
40X1 40X0 

1XD 1X2 
2470 24X5 


8.90 
733X0 
45X0 
54X0 
16X0 
4CCW) 
587X0 
44SXS 
332X0 
222X0 
149 JO 
38X0 
870 
113X9 
152X0 
153X0 
28TX0 
40X1 
1X3 
25X5 


Sydney 


AiOrttatttaKMXJO 
Previsas: 340X40 

Amcor 

828 

8.15 

XI 5 

8X8 

ANZBtana 

bib 

7X7 

8L07 

XI B 

BHP 

T7JB 

16X2 

1X97 

17 

Boro! 

185 

1/6 

1B2 

176 

Brambles Ind. 

21 

3078 

20X0 

70X0 

CflA 

1X73 

1X63 

12X9 

12X0 

CC Areata 

1X05 

11X5 

1X03 

11X5 

Cotes Myor 

£95 

5X6 

190 

6X7 

Corea ico 

6X1 

6X 

6X0 

6X9 

CRA 

1HJ2 

18X9 

18147 

IB30 

CSR 

4X2 

473 

4J9 

473 

Fosters Brew 

X66 

263 

2X4 

7X5 

Goodrodi FW 

1X5 

1X3 

1X4 

1X3 

ICJ Ausfraia 

IIX3 

11X0 

IIXD 

11X3 

Lend Lame 

2X05 

21X0 

21X5 

21X4 

MIMHda 

NUAustBank 

733 

1XS 

1.70 

1X2 

16JB 

1SJB 

16X9 

16X4 

NMAArtrotHdg 

1X8 

1.94 

1X4 

2 

News Cara 

xw 

X06 

6JI7 

X0B 

Pacflfc Dunlop 

337 

232 

139 

136 

PtonewInU 

A33 

4.77 

430 

4X0 

Pub Broadcast 

6X5 

6X0 

6X6 

685 

51 Gearga Bank 

7X6 

7J1 

7-53 

7X5 


&12 


8X1 

8.10 


7X0 

9X2 

737 

9X2 

739 

9X8 

7X6 

931 

Woohvorths 

142 

3X6 

337 

136 

Taipei 

Stock 

Matatlndac 882X33 
Prottwe 7843X3 

Cathay LNt Ins 

170 

168 

169 

169 

awiaHwoBk 

OitaoTungBk 

171 

167 

170 

l/\ 

76 

73 

76 

74 


114X8 

110 

1491 

ioxo 

CHnaSteel 

26X0 

2X30 

26X9 

2630 

First Bank 

173 

169 

173 

1 71 

Fermaea PtasSc 

71X0 

7050 

71 

70X0 

Haa Nan Bk 

132 

130 

137 

131 

lad Goran Bk 

78 

77 

77X0 

77X0 

Nan Yd Plasaa 

64X0 

63X0 

64 

6150 

SMaKBriLM 

TahronSett 

104X0 

07.50 

03X0 

0250 

65X0 

64 

65X0 

63XO 


55 

52X0 

5X50 

50X0 

6450 

52XD 

64 

50X0 

UM Wand arm 

70 

69 

69X0 

*9X0 


The Trib Index 

Prices as of M0 P.M. Now York 1 

Jan. 1, 1BS?k 100. 

Leva! 

Change 

% ohsngo 

year to data 
% changa 
+15.04 

Wodd Index 

151.70 

+1.15 

+0.76 

Regional hdeai 

Asa/PadHc 

110.77 

-0.19 

-0.17 

—17.50 

Europe 

160.79 

+2.26 

+1.43 

+15.53 

At America 

175.96 

+1.42 

+0.81 

+37.17 

S. America 

138.61 

-0.90 

-0.65 

+55.67 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 

175.78 

+24)4 

+1.70 

+32^7 

Consumer goods 

17Q28 

+1j06 

+0.63 

+2333 

Energy 

183.06 

+2.94 

+1.63 

+34.98 

Finance 

112.93 

+0.31 

+<128 

-11^4 

Mtecsflarwous 

156.63 

+1.06 

+0.68 

+15.33 

Raw Materials 

182.19 

+1.28 

+0.71 

+28.48 

Service 

142.74 

+OJB1 

+0.57 

+18.95 

Utmes 

132S7 

-0.42 

-0.31 

+4.59 

The MamaSonal Horalcl TrBrune World Stock todaxOtradta the U.&OoBor values at 
280 intemationaSy hvestable stocks from 25 countries. For more Information, a tree 

booktet * avattoWe by wrung to The Trib 
92521 NeuOy CoOox, France. 

Indeae, 1B1 Avenue Charles de GauSa. 1 

Con^aod by Btoomherg Nows. \ 

Hitt 

Low Ohm Prav. 


HJgb Law 

Closa Prav. 


Mitsui Fudasm 

Mllsul Trust 

MuirtoMfg 

NEC 

Mm 

rodtasec 


1388 

818 

6270 

1400 

1690 

731 


Nfppao Steel 
Nissan Mrttsr 
NKK 

NamoreSoc 

NTT 

NTT Data 
op Paper 
Osaka GcB 
racofa 
Rohm 
Scfcnc Bk 
Sankyu 
SamtaBank 
Sanyo Bee 
Scan 
SetauRwy 
si Own 


Seoul 

Doom 


Hyvmkri 
Mb Mata 


Eng. 


Korea BPwr 
Karoo ErtrBk 
Korea Mae Tel 
LGSemfoM 
Pahang Inn St 
Samsung Ditty 
SaatsungElec 
SrtWwnBffl* 


101000 
4000 
18200 
15900 
26300 
■ 4960 


29400 

47500 

40SN 

61500 

10500 


96900101000 93900 
SCO 4000 3870 

17000 17800 17500 
15300 15900 16000 
25700 26300 25700 
4510 4960 4600 

445000 480000 470000 
2/360 28000 27900 
44500 46000 46000 
39300 40000 40000 
59200 60000 <0500 
9900 10100 10000 


Tokyo 

AflNtopcriAtr 
Am»mr 
AsoM Bank 
Aiahf Chfim 
Asrtf6Gla5S 
BkTokyaMttsu 
B I; Yokohama 


Singapore nw itaiim c tii ixn 

PmtouK 2099XS 


Montreal 


■B291&53 
Prettaos: 2918X3 



Oslo 


Ate A 


oaxtadtesrui 

Pro item, 5897B 


Att Poe Brew 

CmbosPoc 

OyOeues 

CydeCBntane 

Dotry Penn Ind * 

DflSforelgn 

OSSLnnd 

noser tftawe 

HK Land * 

JanlMiiifm’ 

J red Strategic* 

Kenrol 
KeppelBerh 
KepgtfFeta 
KnoelLinf 
aaxTforelan 
OSUntan kP 
PUtamyHdBs 
SemtoMna 
Stag Alrttetti 
Stag Lana 
SlagPnsttF 
Stag Tech Ind 


DernofSkeBk 

EAwi 

HefttndA 

KwaeBsrASD 

Norsk Hytt) 

tSttgA 


6S Notts 


NyomttA 
Ortda AsaA 
PeflmGeaSK 
- - i A 


m 175 
146 144 

MM uxa 
2870 22X0 
124 122JD 
46X0 46X0 
358 349 

331 325 

218 214 

105 104 

531 SS 


TtaasacanOff 

StarehrendAsa 


114 

134 

396 

4540 


283 

U3 

£ 

45 


177 178 

146 145 

24X0 3620 
28X0 SU0 
124 124 

46X0 47 

258 354 

330 330 

215LS0 217 

10150 1D5JD 
531 527 

288 »2 
1U 115 
134 131 JO 
395 388 

4540 4540 


Tattoo Bank 
UMMusftU 
UMCKuBLF 
vying Tal Hdgs 
tJaUSdean 


8 
9 JO 
13X0 
1530 
039 
17X0 
5.10 
11X0 
2X0 
5X0 
3X0 
940 
4X6 
640 
4J8 
17X0 
1040 
5X0 
7^5 
11X0 
7X5 
26X0 
3J4 
112 
346 

iB 

442 


6X0 

945 

12X0 

1740 

5 

1140 

248 

5X0 

344 

9X5 

404 

430 

448 

17X0 

10.10 

5X5 

7X5 

11X0 

7J5 

26 

3J2 

110 

344 

1 . 1 ? 

1520 

4X2 


8 7.15 

9 JO 945 
13 13X0 
1520 15 

078 078 

17X0 17 JO 
5 5.10 

11X0 11-50 
248 2Jd 
5X0 575 

3X0 348 

93S 9X0 

4M 40* 
440 4X6 

4J8 452 

1740 1740 
10.10 10.10 
5.90 5X 
745 7X5 
11X0 11X0 
740 7J5 

2640 2640 
3L58 3J4 

no UB 

346 346 

1.18 1.18 
1570 15X0 
432 440 


Qrooti 
OiubuEtac 
Chuuatai Bk 
IMN tao Print 
Dotal 

OaMcMKang 
Dnhre Baric 
Datta House 
Oaten Sec 
DDl 
Densa 

East Japan Ry 
Etacl 
Fanuc 
IBank 
I Pinto 


Stockholm 


SX 16 tads 29*36 
Pratts* 2918X1 

ASAB 11250 110 111JD 110 

ABB A 854 843 847 845 

AmIDmui 203 196 200 199 JO 

ArtaA 365 355 360 355X0 

AitaCopcOA 18B IBS 185 18450 

AiltaOv 333 331 333 331 


HMtfunlBk 

Hitachi 

Honda Meter 

IBJ 

IHi 

ttochu 

Ita-Yekade 

JAl 

japBiTobaoaa 

Jura 

KdBma 

kmaiEtee 

Kao 

KsmasttHey 
Kom Steel 
KtaUNtapRy 
KJrfn Breirery 
Kobe State 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocara 
Kyushu Elec 
LTCfi 
Marobeal 
Morel 

Matsu Coaun 

Mtesu Elec Ind 

MolHuBeeWS 

M05uhtshl 

AUtsubbMC3i 

MfeufaWdS 

MfereUMEtt 

MBufafeMHtiy 

MtsufattilMte 

MttuMM Tr 

MRBri 



MM 225:18(7145 


PTCttvt: 18(19X1 

mo 


990 

10* 

■Euj 

j 

■hi 

SI? 

Ei 


Ed 

33* 

841 

647 

631 

644 

647 

1100 

1080 

10W 

1080 

2100 

2050 

2090 

70* 

566 

VO 

4» 

570 

2250 

2190 

2230 

7190 

7650 

2640 

2630 

7640 


2150 

2180 

22* 

2100 

ZUD 

22* 

2080 

ana 

2070 

20* 

698 

690 

697 

694 

1460 

1430 

1430 

144(1 

485 

472 

474 

490 

1400 

1370 

1370 

14* 

917 

891 

W 

921 

7810a 

7760a 

7800a 

780* 

2370 

2270 

23* 

23* 

5500a 

6380a 

5*na 

549* 

2160 

2100 

2140 

2070 

3720 

3630 

3720 

36* 

1570 

1630 

1560 

1640 

4170 

4120 

<160 

41* 

1270 

1250 

1260 

12* 

I860 

HMD 

lore 

1*0 

1070 

1050 

10* 

1070 

3670 

3610 

3640 

36* 

1420 

13* 

14* 

13* 


<17 

<17 

426 


m 

608 

54* 

sn 

53* 


490 

490 

513 

B200a 

BQ6te 

8Wa 

004* 

34* 

3X81 

34* 

1360 

632 

606 

615 

6* 

m 

21* 

2210 

22* 

1310 

13* 

1310 

es 

476 

480 

479 

355 

345 

354 

349 

742 

731 

74? 

746 

1030 

1010 

1020 

1070 

217 

212 

2T5 

210 

9B3 

ms 

890 

887 

533 

518 

529 

533 

7020 


6970 

<750 

7710 

2140 

2730 

9780 

444 

438 

444 

479 

485 

OS 

«7 

490 

1798 

1748 

1790 

1740 

2830 

2760 

2B30 

woo 

1920 

18* 

1910 

7670 

1130 

nos 

n» 

1100 

1100 

1070 

1060 

1100 

379 

365 

370 

373 

784 

6B5 

698 

6/7 

1470 

1430 

1470 

1460 

848 

818 

tut 

in? 

1&I 

899 

1340 

905 

iso 

903 

'S 

B99 

B69 

aw 


Seklsul . 
StaOsul House 
5even-Ele«n 

IhSefai 

Htfntoi 
ShkwtaiOi 
5hfcefdo 
ShtankoBk 
5ortbark 
Sony 

Samlloino 

SwritomoBk 

SunrtOnro 

SutnBomoBec 

SwtetMeftd 

Suntft Trust 

Trisha Pftaffli 

TafcBdaOtam 

TDK 

TohotaiEIPwr 
Tate Bank 
Trido Matte 
Tokyo Bfter 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Cerp. 
Tanw 

ToppanPiM 
Teraylnd 
Tcrttaa 
Tastem 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 


850 
515 
345 
721 
269 
1390 
B780o 
3220b 
630 
300 
1410 
9240 
791 
3460 
7470 
480 
£740 
5360 
1250 
1190 
7610 
1490 
EIPwr 2090 


712 

2370 

1600 

1070 

8150 

8650 

915 

1670 

1670 

289 

1130 

2860 


2050 

906 

1260 

2298 

4000 

310 

608 

1210 

1470 

750 

702 

2BO0 

895 

3130 

2S7D 


1340 1360 
BOO 818 
4250 4260 

1310 1400 

1620 1690 

706 738 

8700 8900 

832 845 

500 501 

338 345 

714 715 

261 269 

1350 1370 

6600a 8720a 
3180b 3188b 
610 630 

292 295 

1370 1410 

0950 9240 

771 783 

3270 1450 

1420 1440 

466 47) 

6650 6650 
5240 5240 

1190 1220 

1 1 BO 1190 
7460 7560 

1460 1«0 

2D40 2040 

693 695 

2320 2330 
1570 1580 

1050 1070 

8000 8000 
8430 S65D 
890 909 

1630 1660 

460 479 

1660 1670 

280 281 
1100 1120 
2780 2860 

2550 2620 

824D 8540 

■xnn urn 
965 982 

1210 1260 
2250 2250 
3810 3950 

305 307 

594 607 

HB0 1210 
1440 1460 

777 740 

689 <98 

2660 2770 
890 892 

3060 3090 
2S30 2570 


1380 

811 

4Z7D 

1360 

1690 

739 

8750 

640 

504 

336 

712 

267 

1440 

8590a 

3200b 

616 

296 

1370 

8850 

785 

3350 

1450 

470 

6650 

5290 

1180 

1190 

7460 

1490 

2120 

693 

2310 

1580 

1050 

9890 

8410 

904 

1660 

455 

1660 

281 

mo 

2820 

2580 

B300 

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37 . 






































































PAGE 3 




— . »• rrnmiTXJC POmAV IMRfH 98. 10Q7 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


PAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Hong Kong 
To Increase 
Supply of 
Apartments 

C&nyiled K Our Stuff Fr.n OtaaL-hrt 

HONG KONG — The govern- 
ment announced a fresh package of 
, measures Wednesday aimed at eas- 
y 'ng Hong Kong's housing crisis, a 
day after frenzied bidding led to a 
record price at a land auction. 

As one means of increasing the 
supply of apartments in the short 
term, the government will allow de- 
velopers to sell apartments 15 
months before they are completed, 
rather than the current 12 months. 

That would immediately add 5.000 
apartments to the market, the gov- 
ernment estimates. The government 
approved the sale of 13,000 apart- 
ments by private developers in 1996. 
Hong Kong property prices rose an 
average of 25 percent last year, with 
luxury properties rising 60 percenL 

'‘This situation must not contin- 
ue." said Tung Chee-hwa, who will 
govern Hong Kong after its transfer 
to China on July 1. 

jj> At an auction of government land 
Tuesday, a developer. Sino Land 
Co., paid 1 1.82 billion Hong Kong 
dollars ($1.53 billion) for a 25300- 
square-meter (275,470-square-foot) 
site for residential and commercial 
use. The price was a Hong Kong 
record for a single plot, and property 
specialists said it might have been a 
world for a plot its size. 

(AFP. Bloomberg i 


Bargain-Hunters Peruse Thai Stocks 


By Michael Richardson 

Inttr/uiiti'nai Herald Tr ibune 

BANGKOK — Professional 
stock pickers ore starting to take a 
closer look at Thailand, where the 
equity market has lost more than 
half its value in the past year, much 
of it during the country's recent 
financial crisis. 

While most brokers are telling 
clients that it is still too early and 
risky to buy Thai shares, a few are 
recommending selective pur- 
chases. 

“You can find some outstanding 
bargains in Thailand now,’* David 
Scott, regional strategist for In- 
dosuez W.I. Carr Securities in 
Hong Kong, said Wednesday. “Fi- 
nancial crises are veiy often good 
times to buy stocks." 

He said that although all the bad 
news might not be out on Thailand 
yet, shares there were likely to 
provide investors with the best per- 
formance in Asia over the next 
three to five years. 

The benchmark Slock Exchange 
of Thailand index closed Wednes- 
day at 71439, up 3.61 points — 
less than half its record high of just 
above 1.700 in early 1994, when 
the economy was one of the fastest- 
growing in the world. 

SBC Warburg, the investment- 
banking unit of Swiss Bank Corp., 
recently advised clients to buy 
shares in four of Thailand's five 
largest commercial banks: 
Bangkok Bank PCL, Krung Thai 
Bank PCL, Thai Fanners' Bank 
PCL and Bank of Ayudhya PCL. 


Although banks and finance 
companies will have to set aside 
more provisions against bad loons 
and sell new shares to raise capital, 
"we still see 35 percent upside in 
selected stocks in the next 12 
months," SBC Warburg said. 

The recommendation reflects a 
belief that the _ 

Thai govern- yAjMHHMMHM 
ment has begun 
to pul in place 
measures to deal 
effectively with - 

the problem of "i?*-.* 

bad loans caused iwCO: ^\r— 

by a slumping v\ 

property market $ 3 B 0 < 

that caused some *Lf.. 

developers to de- 1 

fault on the ; *?£ 
loans. The gov- 

eminent recently •’?^iMareb 2 §£n 
ordered the * 1 V 

country's 15 Source: Bkxxnberq 
banks and 91 fi- 
nance companies — many of 
which have considerable exposure 
to the gluned property market — to 
increase their provisions for sub- 
standard assets and told 10 
weakened finance companies to in- 
crease their capital. 

The package of measures de- 
signed to restore confidence in 
Thailand's financial markets also 
included a plan to rescue property 
developers and their financiers 
through a multibillion-dollar bond 
issue. 

Amnuay Viravan. Thailand's fi- 
nance minister, said this week that 
the worst of the financial crisis was 


over and that he was confident of 
renewed economic growth. 

He said Thailand's gross domes- 
tic product was expected to rise 6.8 
percent in 1 997. slightly lower than 
the 7.1 percent projected by the 
government earlier this year but up 
from the 6.7 percent posted in 
1996. Some 
private econo- 
mists warn, 
however, that 
?raOSeS-. : .> - , the fallout from 
““T the financial 

B Sf ' sector's troubles 
P" * and the need frrr 
p- continued high 
■ interest rates to 
jL ■ support the Thai 
T baht may de- 
ft, il press growth to 
^ V between 4 per- 
gjg> cent and 5 per- 
r.' cent this year 
iht and next. Ana- 
lysts estimate 
that about 40 percent of some 800 
billion baht ($30.81 billion)' in 
loans to property developers is 
either in default or nonperform- 
ing. 

The Thai banking index of !5 
leading bank stocks has fallen 45 
percent in the past year. Banks and 
finance shares make up about 40 
percent of the Thai stock market. 

Mr. Scott told a recent meeting 
of fund managers in Singapore that 
Indosuez W.I. Carr was recom- 
mending companies in Thailand's 
health-care, insurance and con- 
sumer sectors, as well as electron- 
ics companies and small exporters. 


which have “valuations you 
haven't seen for 10 or II years, 
with stocks yielding 13 or 14 per- 
cent.” 

He declined Wednesday to name 
any individual stocks, saying. “If I 
mention them, our clients who are 
buying them quietly will be furi- 
ous." 

Many other brokers, however, 
are telling clients to stay out of the 
Thai market until the financial situ- 
ation becomes clearer. 

“We don't think that the market 
has entirely discounted how bad 
earnings are going to be in 1997. 
especially for banks,” a broker 
said Wednesday. “Finance 
companies are in miserable shape, 
and we think that their earnings 
will plummet" 

Another broker, although he ex- 
pressed the view that the Thai stock 
market was “getting close to the 
bottom," said, “We are cot re- 
commending that our clients 
should be buying just yet." 

In a recent report. Credit Suisse 
First Boston said the average price 
of Thai shares was now only about 
13 times projected 1997 earnings 
and their earnings yield was 8 per- 
cent, one of the highest in Asia. 

But it cautioned that the Thai 
market would remain volatile in 
the short term. 

“For those investors prepared to 
take the risk, we advise buying 
only the large, well-capitalized 
banks and consumer stocks which 
are immune to an economic slow- 
down," Credit Suisse First Boston 
said. 


China’s Motive in CITIC Pacific Sale: Profit 


Ctmfikd by OurSttff Fnm DugwVs 

HONG KONG — Beijing was seek- 
ing to cash in on the success of Hong 
Kong-listed OTIC Pacific Ltd. when it 
decid ed to sell a 15.47 percent stake in 
,-t. CITIC Pacific to its directors, the com- 
' pony's chairman said Wednesday. 

“They raised the possibility of taking 
their profit, we proposed the manage- 
ment buyout; it’s as simple as that." the 
chairman. Lany Yung, said. 

. Mr. Yung made his comment after 
announcing a 1996 net profit of 6.86 
billion Ho ng Ko ng dollars ($885.4 mil- 
lion) for CI TIC Pacific, more than 
double the 1995 figure, though the rise 
came chiefly from one-time gains. He 
also predicted that 1997 results would 
exceed those of 1996. 

Mr. Yung said CITIC Pacific's 1996 


profit gain was due mainly to its sales of 
a 3.58 percent stake in Hong Kong Tele- 
communications Ltd. and a 17.66 per- 
cent stake in Hong Kong Airlines Ltd. 

Excluding exceptional gains, 25 per- 
cent of its net profit came from bridges, 
toll roads, power plants and water plants 
in China. That proportion was up from 
17 percent in 1995. 

Separately, CITIC 's parent company, 
China International Trust & Investment 
Coip., which is China's biggest overseas 
investment company, said profit in 1996 
rose 21 percent, to 2.47 billion yuan 
($296.7 million), the official China Daily 
reported. It did not say what factors had 
contributed to the increase. 

The China Daily report also said the 
company’s net asset value rose 25 per- 
cent, to 213 billion yuan, and that the 


company expected profit to keep grow- 
ing in the next three years. 

The pare nt co mpany in January sold 
330 million ClUC Pacific shares to 65 of 
that unit's directors, including Mr. Yung, 
at a below-market price of 33 dollars a 
share. The sale, for more than 10 billion 
dollars, brought the parent company's 
stake in CITIC Pacific down from 41 .92 
percent to 26.45 percenL 

Mr. Yung said it had been considered 
preferable to sell the shares to directors 
rather than lose 15 percent of the com- 
pany to "outsiders." But the sale, un- 
usual for a so-called red chip — a Hong 
Kong-listed subsidiary of a mainland 
Chinese company — still raised ques- 
tions about the circumstances of the deal 
and the future relationship between the 
company and China. (AFP. Bloomberg ) 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

14000 ----- 

13500 'JfcWWi 

13000— Af- 

T2500 Jt - - - 

iaooo /— — 

1I500 'o'n d' 3Tf m 


Singapore 
Straits Times 

2250 rtlfc - 

2200 AjI— VL- 

2150 V [ -V- 

2100 J J f 

205oV 

2000 o" n'd''T f m- 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225... ■ 

22000 ' 

210O0V\fV - 

20000 \- 

19000 -) *- 

: 18000 wAL 

. 17D00 o“n“d t “ jT^r- 

1996 1897 . 


Exchange 


- Wednesday Prev. 
Close Close 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 12,77638 ' 12 . 838-5 3 -QA4 

Singapore Straits Times • 

Sydney ASOr ifinarles 2,40430 2^463.40 ^*t0.04 

Tokyo Nikkei 22S 18^72^5 18,43831 4&18 

Kuala Lumpur Composite? ‘ . %22Si8. 1,217.34 40.68 

Banefltt* • SET .71*29 710.6S . +931 

Seoul Composite Index 5S6.62 B38.90 ' *2.77 

Taipei • Stock Maritat index 8#2&33 - 7,&&43 +2.37 
ManBa PSE m ' 3g33.t4 ^3 &4X2- fQ£8 

Jakarta Composite Index. . - 659J35 6S7J29 _ +53ft 

WbtHngton- NZSg-40 ' £220.27. .-tOSa 

Bombay . Sensitive Index 3,73324 3,765.76 . -0.88 

Source: Telekurs Iiuenunofwt Herald Tribune 


Hang Sang 
Shafts Tkn^ - 
M Ordinaries 
Nikkei 225 


Kuala Lumpur Composite 

Bangkok SET 1 


Chiyoda, Citing Cost Overruns, 
Predicts a Record Loss for Year 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Chiyoda Corp. said Wednesday it would post 
its biggest loss ever for the year ending this month and blamed 
incompetent subcontractors and its own project managers for 
huge cost overruns. 

Hie engineering and construction concern said its current, or 
pretax, loss would be 46 billion yen ($37 1 .8 million), compared 
with a previous estimate of 24 billion yen. 

Project managers failed to keep proper track of costs and to 
alert top managers to cost problems, Sadao Yokoyama, a 
senior managing director, said. 

Cost calculations were faulty throughout, beginning with 
the planning stage, he said. “We couldn't grasp the profit-and- 
loss situation on the projects until a very late stage." be said. 
Poor workmanship and materials from subcontractors also 
drove up costs, he said, but competition in Asia made it 
necessary to subcontract more work to keep prices down. 

Chiyoda shares fell 4 yen to 529 in Tokyo trading. 


Very brief ys 

• Isetan Co.’s shares surged to close at 1300 yen ($10.51), up 
3 percenL after a New York court awarded the Japanese 
department-store operator $197 million in a case against the 
owners of Barney's Inc., a former business partner. 

• Motorola Corp. received a contract valued at several billion 
dollars to provide cellular-telephone equipment ro DDI Corp. 
and Nippon Idou Tsushin, which are building wireless 
networks in Japan. 

• Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. and Industrial 
Bank of Japan on Thursday will become the first foreign 
banks allowed to conduct yuan business in China. The move is 
Beijing's first step toward letting outsiders compete in 
China's government-controlled banking industry. 

• GmC Enterprises Ltd.'s shares quadrupled in their first 
day of trading, to 4.375 Hong Kong dollars (56 U.S. cents), as 
investors apparently decided that Guangdcng International 
Trust & Investment Corp., the company’s parent, would 
help the construction concern diversify. 

■ Hutchison Whampoa Ltd.'s 1996 net profit rose 26 per- 
cent from a year earlier, to 12.02 billion Hong Kong dollars, 
largely because of a sale of shares in its Orange PLC unit. 
Operating profit fell 4 percenL to 6.26 billion dollars, on slow 
growth in apartment sales and in die company's commu- 
nications units. Bloomberg, Bridge News. AFP 


Peugeot to Quit China future 

Bloomberg News 

BEUING — PSA Peugeot Citroen SA will pull out of its 
unprofitable automobile joint venture in the southern Chinese 
city of Guangzhou, a government official said Wednesday. 

The Guangzhou Peugeot Co. plant, which makes Peugeot 
505 cars, is a joint venture with the city government and 
Den way Investment Ltd., which is controlled by the Guang- 
zhou municipal govemmenL Officials said the 505 was “out- 
dated" and did not “have a market in China." 


IMAGE: Big-Name Fact-Finders Don’t Always Quiet Firms’ Critics 


Continued from Page 13 

widespread sexual harass- 
ment, the company hired 
Lynn Martin, who was labor 
secretary in President George 
Bush's administration, to ad- 
dress workplace issues. 

^ Last month, though, at the 
end of a nine-month review, a 
lawyer for 28 women suing 
Mitsubishi in a private lawsuit 
questioned the company’s 
co mmi tment to enacting the 
changes called for in Ms. Mar- 
tin’s report, though the com- 
pany insisted it would do so. 

In Nike's case, human- 
rights organizations charge 
that by hiring Mr. Young, the 
company is mainly trying to 
deflect criticism that its for- 
eign subcontractors — par- 
ticularly in Southeast Asia — 
Else child labor, pay abysmally 
low wages and subject work- 
ers to sweatshop conditions. 

“Nike all too often looks 
, for superficial solutions," 
V Said Medea Benjamin, exec- 
utive director of Global Ex- 
change, a human rights or- 
ganization in San Francisco. 
“It seems again like Nike 
looked • for someone that 
would give them some good 
pablic-relatioas play rather 
than hiring an organization 

that has a track record." 


Nike considers such criti- 
cism to be beside the point 
For one thing, the company 
says, by regularly updating its 
code of conduct for contract- 
ors, it demonstrates its com- 
mitment to fair treatment of 
workers. For another, it says, 
few people can match Mr. 
Young's tenure as an advo- 
cate for working people. 

“I think he is just without a 
doubt the foremost leader in 
this area." McClain Ramsey, 
a Nike representative, said. “I 
would say that Andrew Young 
is far more than a name: He is 
a man with a reputation that 
goes along with his well-de- 
served stature." 

Mr. Young said his reason 
for working with Nike was 
the chance to change working 
conditions at factories in de- 
veloping countries. The out- 
come of his investigation, be 
said, would depend on infor- 
mation gleaned from both 
Nike’s most vocal critics and 
its top executives, as well as 
from his own assessment of 
conditions. 

His hope, he said, is that his 
involvement will prompt 
Nike to set even higher stan- 
dards that other international 
corporations will endorse. 

“I don’t know whether that 
will satisfy Nike or the hu- 


man-rights agencies," he 
said, 1 ‘but if it creates a lively 
discussion that keeps the issue 
alive, I think it will help.” 

Neither he nor Nike would 
say bow much the company 
was paying Goodworks. 

Mr. Young said it would be 
up (o Nike to decide what to do 
with his report. BuL he said, 
"If I found glaring violations 
and problems that they are un- 


willing to correct or address, 
then I would certainly have to 
say something about those." 

Nike stopped short of guar- 
anteeing full disclosure of | 
Mr. Young’s findings. “We 
haven't yet determined how 
his findings will take shape,” 
Ms. Ramsey said, though she 
added that she did not see why 
Mr. Young's conclusions 
would not be made public. 


In this Friday’s 

-jfeisitre 

The Car Column 



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§THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT 
SANK GROUP 


The AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK GROUP is an international 
finance institution established to foster economic growth in Africa. 
The Bank is based in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, West Africa, with 
membership of slates from Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas. 
Nationals of the Bank’s member countries are invited to apply for the 
following positions: 

INVESTMENT OFFICER 

Candidates must have an advanced university degree in finance, 
economics or industrial engineering. They must also have at least 5 
years of practical experience in private sector project financing in 
loan and venture capital appraisal preferably gained in an 
investment or merchant bank, or with consulting or industrial firm 
with exposure to new capital investment projects. Experience with 
mergers, acquisitions and rehabilitations of industrial projects would 
also be valuable, especially in an international setting. Knowledge of 
financial analysis micro-computer software and personal computers, 
strong numerate abilities, and writing skills are aslo required. 

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANT 

Candidates must have a bachelor's degree and a recognized 
professional accounting qualification (CPA, CA). An advanced 
degree in a relevant field (e.g. accounting, information systems or 
finance) would be an added advantage. They must also have a 
minimum of 5 years of progressive experience in at least two of the 
following areas: financial reporting and analysis (including 
preparation of financial presentations to top management), technical 
accounting and policy; accounting for capital markets; installation of 
general ledger and internal management reporting systems in a 
multi-currency environment. Solid computer skills including 
proficiency in EXCEL and POWERPOINT required. Expertise in a 
database management software (e.g. ACCESS) would be a plus. 
Strong writing skills are also required. 

For both positions, the ability to communicate effectively in English 
and/or French is required. Proficiency in both languages will be an 
added advantage. 

The Bank offers an internationally competitive tax-free salary 
package and benefits, including dependency and education 
allowances, life insurance and medical coverage, home leave, and 
retirement plan. 

Applications with complete curriculum vitae indicating name, date of 
birth, nationality, present address, educational qualifications and 
employment history should be sent before 15 April 1997 to the 
address below. Because of the number of applications expected, 
only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. 

DIRECTOR 

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 
AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK 
01 B.P. 1387 

ABIDJAN 01 COTE D'IVOIRE 
FAX: (225) 20-49-43 


THE TO81IM D*m NEWBBUPEi 



'BffS S.g^K'S-’TP-'S.ir S, ff^STE. 5§S'?s-gs S5-SiB.?iig=> p'fBTf 







PAGE 18 


Hcralb f^^ Sribttnc 

Sports 


XHTJRSDAX, MARCH 27, 1997 


World Roundup 



Ricardo Sa Pinto attacked the 
Portuguese coach Wednesday. 

Star Attacks Coach 

soccer Ricardo Sa Pinro, a 
striker who had been dropped from 
the Portuguese squad, attacked Ar- 
tur Jorge, the national coach, at a 
training session Wednesday. 

Sa Pinto, who plays for Sporting 
Lisbon, punched Jorge and knocked 
him to the ground. He also assaulted 
an assistant coach, Rui Aguas. 

Carlos Moya, an official with the 
Benfica club, said Sa Pinto arrived 
by car at National Stadium in Lis- 
bon fora training session before the 
World Cup qualifier Saturday at 
Northern Ireland. 

“He asked where Artur Jorge 
was, went up to him and lunged at 
him," Moya said. “Jorge fell, Sa 
Pinto continued hitting him and 
then the security guard at the sta- 
dium pulled him off.” (AP) 

Steffi Graf Does Tax Deal 

tennis Prosecutors dropped 
their investigation into Steffi Grafs 
taxes Wednesday after she agreed 
to make a charitable contribution. 
The amount of the payment was not 
disclosed in the one-line statement 
by court officials in Mannheim. 

When Grafs father, Peter, was 
convicted in January of evading 
taxes, the judge recommended 
dropping the investigation into 
Steffi Graf, saying her father bore 
most of the responsibility. (AP) 

Soccer’s Free-for-All 

SOCCER FIFA, soccer’s world 
governing body, said Wednesday it 
was extending die Bosnian ruling 
cmi transfers to cover countries out- 
side the European Union and the 
European Economic Area. Out-of- 
contract players from non-EU 
countries will be allowed die same 
freedom of movement granted to 
their EU counterparts. ( Reuters 

Royals Cut Hametin 

ba ser a h . Bob Hamelin, the 
1994 American League Rookie of 
the Year, was released by Kansas 
City alter the Royals failed to find 
another team willing to trade for 
him. Hamelin broke Bo Jackson’s 
rookie team record of 24 homers, but 
after die baseball strike be reposted 
for camp overweight, and never re- 
’ * is home run stroke. (AP) 


What Samaranch 
Said and Didn’t Say 

On Paper, His Words Grow Dim 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The 
president of the International Olympic 
Committee, Juan Antonio Samaranch, a 
career diplomat, has a handy way of 
making himself beard without saying 
much of anything. 

At a recent breakfast with a few 
American reporters be seemed to be 
expressing his preference for Beijing 
ahead of New York as a potential 
Olympic city; indeed, be hinted that the 

United States might not be able to be 
host of another Olympics until its gov- 
ernment provides financial guarantees. 
And then he demanded that USA Track 
and Field get its doddering act together 
quickly. 

But after breakfast, there was no ev- 
idence in the reporter's notebook that he 

had said anything quite like that, as if the 

words converted to ink had decomposed 
into a fine diplomat's dust 

For example, American trade and 
field has decided to get rid of its long- 
time controversial leader. Oil an Cassell, 
without anticipating who will replace 
him. When asked if be wanted to send a 
message to the U.S. federation, under- 
standing that track and field are the most 
important sport in the s umm er 
lies. Samaranch said yes, he 


Olympi 

would. 


He said, “We in Europe cannot un- 
derstand that you have the best athletes 
in the world and yet track and field is 
facing within your country a very spe- 
cial situation. The ratings are down, 
there are less meetings, die best athletes 
have to come to Europe to earn their 
money.” 

At die time it sounded like more of a 
rebuke than it does now, obviously. 

He spoke graciously of China, which 
lost its bid to be host of the 2000 
Olympics by one IOC vote to Sydney. 
He said he didn't know when Beijing or 
another Chinese city might bid again. 

“In this country. China, time and 
distance is not so important,” Sa- 
maranch said. “They were very much 
disappointed when they did not get the 
Games. We have not pushed them to ask 
for the Games again. I have spoken to 
people in China on ray trips there, and 
they are still very disappointed.” 

He pointed out, promisingly, that 
China has agreed to permit Hong Kong 
its Olympic independence — meaning 
that athletes will continue to march into 
die stadium behind die Hong Kong flag 
— even after the colony is absorbed by 
die mainland this s umm er. 

“I hope that China will run maybe for 
the 2008 Games,” Samaranch con- 
cluded. 

What about New York? someone 
asked. New York is one of several U.S. 
cities contemplating a bid for the 2008 
Summer Olympics. 

“My friends in the U.S. tell me al- 
ways that New York is a very special 


lut he said that the problems that 
ranged him to refer to A tlan ta as “a 
most exceptional games” — - in much 
the same way that New York is “a very 
special city” — had little to do with 
financ es. He was most concerned by the 
breakdowns last summer in the com- 
puter information network and trans- 
portation. 

This led to questions about the bid by 
Cape Town to be host of the 2004 
Olympics. The South African govern- 
ment has offered financial guarantees, 
but what level of organization can be 
delivered by a country with so much 
work to do in areas more important than 
the Olympics? Cape Town's bid has 
become the most provocative issue in 
the election for die 2004 Olympics, 
which will be awarded in September. 
What guarantees can South Africa offer 
should President Nelson Mandela, now 
78, leave office as scheduled in 1999? 

“I hope that Mandela will remain in 
power for many years,” said Sa- 
maranch, 76 and about to extend his 
reign over the IOC for an additional 
term. “Cape Town is the most impor- 
tant city in Africa economically. We are 
very much confident that things there 
are going quite well.” 

■ Sydney Official Quits 

Sydney’s 2000 Olympics organizing 
committee lost its third senior figure in a 
year Wednesday with the resignation of 
its chief executive, Mai Hemmeriing, 
Reuters reported from Sydney. 

Hemmeriing, who held the post since 
August 1995, resigned “to pursue other 
career interests,” said the office of die 
New South Wales state government's 
Olympics minister, Michael Knight. 

The Sydney Organizing Committee 
has been hit by senior personnel losses. 
John Iliffe resigned as its president in 
September; his predecessor, Gary Pem- 
berton, stepped down last March. 

The 15-member Sydney board will 
meet Friday to appoint a replacement 
for Hemmeriing, who previously ran the 
Australian Formula One Grand Prix in 
Adelaide for 10 years. 

Earlier Wednesday, the Australian 
Olympic Committee president, John 
Crates, said he would step down as 
chairman of a troubled casino operator. 
Reef Casino Trust. 

Crates has been criticized for invest- 
ing a large part of the committee’s funds 
in the casino in Cairns, Queensland. It 
has consistently failed to match its fore- 
casts of profit and revenue. 


Lola Pulls Out of Formula One 


The Associated Press 

HUNTINGDON. England — Lola, 
which decided barely five months ago to 
race this season in Formula One, said 
Wednesday it was withdrawing after 
one race because of a lack of funding. 

The team, known as Mastercaid-Lola, 
failed to qualify for the first Grand Prix 
of the season this month, in Australia. 
On Wednesday, it began packing up its 
cars and crew from tbe Brazilian Grand 
Prix, to be run Sunday in Sao Paulo. 

Stuart McCrudden, a spokesman for 
Lola, said plans by die chief sponsor. 


Mastercard, to raise money through a 
membership club among credit-card 
holders had not generated revenue fast 
enough. 

McCrudden said tbe decision was 
made Tuesday after it became clear 
there would be a large shortfall from the 
figure of $35 million usually cited as the 
cost of running a Formula One team for 
one season. 

Lola had supplied chassis to Formula 
One teams from 1962 to 1993, but this 
was its first attempt at entering its own 
team. 


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But would it be suitable? 

“That depends on the bid, what they 
are presenting, what sports installations 
they will use,” he replied. 

It was, comparatively, not an optim- 
istic response. Of the United States be 
a i«*n said, * ‘You are the only country in 
the world who could run the Games 100 
percent private. For the future, hope- 
fully, there can be some public involve- 
ment, no? We would like to have more 
guarantees, because many things can 


f* 


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4 » 




MjBta LmmfetVTho Awnauid Ftaa 


Monica Seles returning a serve to Irina Spirlea of Romania in the quarterfinals of the Lipton Championships. 

Seles 9 Still Haunted, Is Battling On 


By Robin Firm 

New York Tunes Service 


KEY BISCAYNE — For Monica 
Seles, life has gone wrong, but life has 
gone on. 

The alternative, she said Tuesday 
after escaping into tbe semifinals of the 
Lipton championships with a 3-6, 6-2, 
6-3 victory over seventh-seeded Irina 
Spirlea, is to “sit in a dark room think- 
ing dark thoughts about all the bad 
things that are happening around you 
that you can’t control.” 

As far as Seles is concerned, “The 
last five years are just a washout." 

“I’ve got to move on.” she said, “or 
else it’s like getting a bad line call and 
not being able to forget it” 

The trouble is, the misfortunes Seles 
has endured are virtually unforgettable. 
And unrelenting. 

After she was stabbed in the back in 
1993 by a fan who thought her No. I 
ranking should belong to Steffi Graf. 
Seles all but joined a witness protection 
program before making a much-pub- 
licized comeback in 1993. 

Last year Seles, 23. soldiered along 
despite a shoulder injury that took her 
within a scalpel’s length of surgery. But 
no sooner had she finished the 1996 


season with a respectable- enough rank- 
ing of second in tire world than her life 
away from the courts began to close in 
on ber. 

First she learned that Guenther 
Parche, her German assailant, would not 
be incarcerated and that she would bear 
tbe brunt of tbe legal costs incurred in 
her series of appeals. Then she broke a 
finger in Geneva on Dec. 4 after palm- 
ing a practice serve from Mar tina Hin- 
gis, the teenager who recently replaced 
her and Graf as the world’s No. 1 wo- 
men’s tennis player. 

Next, Seles lost her most constant 
companion and best stress-solver; her 
dog. Astro. And finally, she learned that 
her most constant human companion, 
her father, coach, and confidant. Karolj, 
had suffered a relapse in his battle with 
Stomach mann er. 

So Seles was forced to heal new 
wounds, and she bided her time before 
returning to tbe circuit in 1997. When 
she finally surfaced at the Lipton, three 
months into a season dial had already 
seen Hingis become the youngest Grand 
Slam winner in history by winning the 
Australian Open. Seles was still strug- 
gling with changes beyond hercontnoL 

For the first time in her career, she 
was bereft of the trouble-shooting ser- 


vices of her father, who is undergoing 
chemotherapy and was too weak 1 td 
main the trip from Sarasota to Miami. 
Instead, he coaches her by telephone 
twice daily, although, he confessed, h£ 
doesn’t watch her matches because they 
make him “too nervous." 

Seles hired a former hitting partner, 
Claudio Pistolesi. to coach her here, and 
through four rounds their relationship 
has yielded four victories. But Seles 
admits she is having trouble coping 
without her father. . 

“A lot of things have changed,” said 
Seles, who is seeded fourth. “That’s 
whai I’m still struggling with. He was ' 
such a big part, such a key part of my 
life, and he’s much less of a part 
now.** 

She’s describes her game as “rusty;’ ’ . 
and decried some of her shot malrmjr 
Tuesday as “awful, no doubt a ref- 
erence to tbe seventh game of die third 
set Instead of holding serve for a 5-^ 
lead, she double-faulted three times, die 
last at break point for a 4-3 score that 
gave Spirlea a glimpse at recovery: 

Spirlea, who is 0-4 against Seles, said 
Seles had not totally lost ber touch. ‘3 
cannot say if she's playings better or 
worse,’,’ Spirlea said. “To me v it ? s the 
same.” * 


RECRUIT: U.S. Schools Scour Globe for Big Men and Women 


Continued from Page 1 

school coaches eager for a big player 
to boost their program are part of a chain 
of contacts that stretch around the globe, 
supporting a recruiting frenzy in which 
seven-footers win scholarships even if 
they have no previous basketball ex- 
perience. 

The quest for foreign talent leaves a 
sour taste in some of the sport’s most 
devoted supporters. “We should take 
care of our own first,” said Billy Pack- 
er, a sports analyst with CBS the U.S. 
broadcaster, who believes foreign play- 
ers should be ineligible for the NCAA 
tournament, “the American national 
championship.” 

But coaches and middlemen say the 
foreign harvest is picking up speed. 

For most of this season George 
Washington in Washington D.C. has 
started four foreign players: the Ca- 
nadian JJ. Brade and tbe Belarussians 
Alexander Koul, Yegor Mescheriakov 
and Andrei Krivonos. 

“Could we have recruited Koul and 
Mescheriakov if they were in the United 
States?" Jack Kvancz, the GW Athletic 
Director, asked. “I don’t know, because 
I’ve got to believe lots of schools would 
have been involved. 

“But we’re in the capital of the 
United States, with nearly every coun- 
try’s embassy. We have an advantage. 
Why shouldn't we use that?” 

Jarvis dismisses the notion that 
American basketball is supposed to be 
for U.S. citizens. "What I say being an 
Afro-American is that we’re all im- 
migrants,” the coach said. “That is 
what made America, people coming 
from other countries.” 

Ukwu's law office is a nexus for 
Washington’s Nigerian community. 
Immigrants drop in to check on the 
status of their applications for visas. 
Exiles stop by to hear tbe latest on the 
dicey political situation back home. But 
on Ukwu’s desk lies a stack of telephone 
message slips, most of them from bas- 
ketball coaches at U.S. colleges. 

Ukwu, who came to the United States 
to attend college and stayed to earn two 
graduate degrees, derided to marry his 
legal career with his interest in bas- 
ketball. On a business trip to Africa in 
1988, Ukwu saw some big men who he 
thought might be good basketball play- 
ers. He asked a friend who was an 
assistant coach at American University 
in Washington to write letters inviting 
eight players to visit the United Stales 
— letters that Ukwu says were influ- 
ential in winning visas for the Nigeri- 
ans. 

The players stayed in Ukwu’s house, 
“eating me out of my house,” he said. 
Although most of those first visitors 
turned out not to be good enough players 
to make a college squad, they — like 
nearly all of Ukwu’s 25 recruits to date — 
have stayed in the United States to work, 
raise families and send money home. 

Ukwu said he brings most of his 
players “knowing they would never be 
great players, but so they could get jobs 
here. Nobody goes back to Nigeria." 


The next year, Ukwu brought over “About 10 to 15 percent of die high- 


three players. This time, the quality of 
play was better. One got a scholarship to 
Liberty University in Virginia. 

“They wrote to their friends back 
home, and that's how my sports busi- 
ness began,” Ukwu said. Word quickly 
spread in Nigeria Thai an American law- 
yer could get tall men into U.S. schools. 
Soon. Ukwu was being received in La- 
gos by a host committee. 

Nigeria's national basketball author- 
ity resents U.S. recruiters because they 
sap the country of its best players, sev- 
eral middlemen said. The Nigerian Em- 
bassy in Washington did not return re- 
peated calls for comment 

Ukwu said he followed NCAA re- 
cruiting rules, though “We may have 
made a few blunders” in earlier years. 
He said he was once interrogated by 
NCAA investigators for four hours 
about his practices. 

* ‘Tbe recruiting of international play- 
ers seems headed in the same direction 
as American players,” said David B er- 
st, the NCAA’s enforcement director. 
“And it doesn't surprise me.” 

Berst said the rules governing a play- 
er from Paris can be bent essentially as 
they would be for a player from Paris, 
Texas. 



n «hinemn It* 

Obiuna Ekezie slamming a dunk. 


,- -cr i'seem to be involved]* 

alleged intentional wrongdoing.” Bern 
said. 

Ukwu said he has never accepted 
money for his work, but is paid instead f\ 
in access and contacts. . . 

“You get tickets to any game. It's 
great exposure. I was loving tbe a ih 
tention. But down tbe line, I got tbe idesj(, 
‘Hey. Lloyd, these guys are going pro 
and I’m a lawyer. I could represent these 
players, make some money.’ ” 

That has remained only a notion, said 
Ukwu. whose law practice focuses op 
immigration and personal injury cases. 
But be said his recruits remain grateful, 
and occasionally bring him a bottle of 
whisky or other token of appreciation: 

While Ukwu portrays himself as -'a 
philanthropist, creating oppo r tunity for 
impoverished but tall foreigners, another 
middleman, Sonoiki, the Nigerian law- 
yer, has a more businesslike approach* 
“Right now, it’s like a free-for-all,” 
said Hassan Ochefii, Sonoiki ’s U.S. rep- 
resentative. “Any college that shows 
interest, we give them a kid. Down die 
line, we hope to get our share. I am 
supposed to assume responsibility f6r 
representing the kids once they’re here. 
But you can’t control it. The kid plays 
for us two years, we buy them air ticket, 
then they go to some other agent. So far, 
we have gotten no return.” • 

Sonoiki owns a Lagos team called the 

Islanders Basketball Club, which he 
said grooms teenagers for possible 
transfer to U.S. schools. Bui he said he 

SrtSL"? 7y i , vi g as fo r players without 
substantia] help from U.S. colleges. 1 

Usually Sonoiki tries to plice his 
players in high schools so they have .a 
chance to improve their English andotbfer 
academic skills before taking the Schot- 

^ ss l ^ a . Tesl * which will deter- 
mine their eligibility for college play. 


questions.’ 

describe U.S. hirffc- 
staple of college recruiting for manv 

Sri 

sg* -Ml 

5 ^ provides sub- 

ssi S^s sia: 

European cha^onsWre ^ t a ^ 
games and aUthe rent t0 J $ e Asun 
only American,” Satui a ^ 11 wasthe 
recently resWd Bl P' vn - who 

State. “Nowso 31 Louisiana 

There it’s like £ meri cans are 

Station.” bein * m Central 


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PAGE 3 



n .m rminiWT CDTH.lV MAttrH 5S. IWj 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


PAGE 19 


‘Ten 


p, 


e «s a 


Tits 




: f ' ^ T “P r - , n ijv .. 

'^1 


SPORTS 


' Spurs Score Just 64 
(But It’s Enough) 


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r The Associated Press 

*■ San Antonio and Geveland com- 
bined for the second-lowest NBA point 
total since the inception of the shot 
clock in 19S4. The Spurs won, 64-59. 

T “We expected a low-scoring game, 
but 64-59? Hiat’s ridiculous,” said 
Cory Alexander, who scored die last 
^ .four points of die game from the free- 

■ NBARoun dup 

throw line in the final 18 seconds to keep 
the Spurs and Cavaliers from breaking 
the record of 119 points set in a 1955 
game between the Milwaukee Hawks 
jand Boston Celtics. 

f- “I don't care about the highs and 
Sows.’’ the Spurs’ coach, Gregg Pop- 
ovich. said. “What matters is we won 
■and the guys gave the same effort and laid 
§toatbc lose like they do every night." 
t- Cleveland’s final total of 59 points 
tied the second-lowest in league history. 
jFbe Milwaukee Hawks scored 57 in that 
£955 game against the Celtics, and the 
■total has been matched twice since then 
in February 1996 by the Philadelphia 
£76ers and by the Orlando Magic in 
- '■December, when this season's drop in 
* scoring was most pronounced. 

Cleveland’s Terrell Brandon missed 
a 3-pointer to tie with 10 seconds left, 
and after a long scramble for the ball 
Alexander was fouled with 1 .8 seconds 
remaining. He added the final two 
points from the free -throw line. 

Butts h M a s s t icks 92 At Chicago, 
Steve Kerr led a fourth-quarter 
comeback with 12 of his season-high 20 
points as Michael Jordan and Scottie 
Pippen stayed on the sideline for much 
-of die final period. 

“Michael and Scottie weren’t mov- 
ing die ball or playing well," said Phil 
Jacksoa, the Bulls’ coach. “I thought it 
.was time to make an adjustment. I 
wanted to get some different people in 
there, get a fresh look." 

■_ Jordan scared 20 points as the Bulls 
readied 60 victories. 

“It wasn ’t one of our great games, but 
» it was No. 60," Jordan said. 

N _ Dennis Rodman had 21 rebounds be- 

in die le?t knee with three seconds left 


On Wednesday, Jeny Krause, the 
Bulls general manager, said Rodman had 
a sprained knee ligament and will miss 
the last 13 games of the regular season 
but should return for the playoffs. 

SupMSonic* 126 , Warriors B9 Gary 
Payton scored 23 points in three quarters, 
and Seattle had its highest point total of 
the season as ii won in San Jose. 

The Sonics swept their four-game 
season series with the Warriors, win- 
ning by an average of 30.3 points. They 
led 73-39 at halftime and 101-61 after 
the third, then kept the lead above 30 
even though reserves played most of the 
fourth quarter. 

Sun* nr, Bucks 112 In Phoenix, 
Kevin Johnson scored 28 points as the 
Suns beat Milwaukee despite a knee 
injury to Cedric Ceballos. After jump- 
ing for a rebound with two minutes 
remaining in the first quarter, Ceballos 
limped off the floor and did not return. 

Hawk* 96, Ttail Blazer* 83 Steve 

Smith scored 27 points and Dikembe 
Mutombo added 24 points and 12 re- 
bounds as Atlanta extended its winning 
streak to five games and improved to 
31-4 at the Omni. 

The Blazers still clinched a playoff 
berth when Sacramento lost Portland 
will be making its NBA-best 1 5th con- 
secutive postseason appearance. 

Rockets 112, Tfmberwotves 103 In 

Houston, Hakeem Olajuwon scored 39 
points and blocked six shots, and Kevin 
Willis had 28 points and 14 rebounds. 

Clyde Drexler. who has missed 19 
games because of injury this season, 
suffered a sprained right ankle early in 
the third quarter and did not return. 

Magic 114, Kina* 103 In Orlando, 
Penny Hardaway scored 30 points and 
Rony SeikaJy had 26 points and 14 
rebounds for the Magic, who built an 
early lead and kept it. 

Paeon 98, naptor* 84 Rik Smits had 
28points, 12 rebounds and his second 3- 
pornter of the season, and Reggie Miller 
scored 24 to help Indiana end an eight- 
game road losing streak. 

Clippers 110, Grizzlies 104 In Los 
Angeles, Malik Sealy hit a 3-pointer to 
force overtime, and the Clippers held 
Vancouver to one basket in the extra 
session. 







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Too* KxunA|oicr Fraoce-Pmse 

THE WrNDUP — The Blue Jays' Juan Guzman pitching against the Cleveland Indians, who won their 
exhibition game in Winter Haven, Florida, 2-1. The game was called after seven innings because of rain. 


Final Pits Florida State vs, Michigan 


By Tarik EI-Bashir 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — When Florida State 
and the University of Connecticut last 
met, in December 1995 in Tallahassee, 
Florida, the Huskies embarrassed the 
Se mmoles, 79-61 . prompting coach Pat 
Kennedy to write a letter to a local paper 


NIT Roundup 


apologizing to the Florida State fans for 
his team’s lackluster performance. 

Florida State met Connecticut again 
Tuesday night in the semifinals of the 
National Invitation Tournament at 
Madison Square Garden, and the Semi- 
noles beat the Huskies, 71-65, to win a 
place in the final, where they will play 
Michigan. The Wolverines beat Arkan- 
sas, 77-62. in the other semifinal game. 


It will be Florida State's first appear- 
ance in die NIT's championship game. 

The Seminoles, led by James 
Collins’ s career-high 29 points, came 
from five points down with less than a 
minute remaining in regulation time. 

Florida State tied the score at 59-59 on 
a 3-pointer by Kerry Thompson with 3.9 
seconds left Two free throws by Randall 
Jackson with 47 seconds left had started 
the 5-0 run that caught the Huskies. 

"The clock was running down, and 
all year we had been playing on 
Collins." said Thompson, who finished 
with 20 points. "They were defending 
him. and if I couldn’t get him the ball. 
I’d rather shoot it than put it in someone 
else’s hands." 

In the overtime, the Seminoles (20- 
11) started with a 7-2 run to gain a 66-61 
advantage. The Huskies (17-15), who 
were led by Richard Hamilton's 26 


points, were not able to counterpunch. 

"For us so far, [his has been a tour- 
nament of big shots," said Kennedy, 
whose Atlantic Coast Conference team 
has now defeated three Big East teams 
in the NIT — UConn. West Virginia and 
Syracuse. 

Michigan 71, Arkansas 65 Michigan 

(22-1 1 ) was led by Maurice Taylor’s 19 
points and career-high 15 rebounds. 
Louis Bullock and Jerod Ward added 1 5 
points each for the Wolverines. 

Arkansas got within 63-58 on a 3- 
pointer by Glendon Alexander with 3 
minutes 58 seconds remaining in the 
game but could get no closer. 

Kareem Reid led the Razorbacks with 
19 points. He was one of two Razor- 
backs to finish in double figures. Pat 
Bradley, who had averaged 19 points a 
game during Arkansas’ previous three 
NIT games, was held to 10 points. 


Flyers Gain 
Playoff Edge 
Over Devils 


The Associated Press 

The Philadelphia Flyers haven’t 
missed Eric Linaros, who is sidelined 
with a bruised right calf. 

For the second time in three days, the 
Flyers, without Lin dr os. beat a National 

NHL Roundup 

Hockey League power when they 
knocked off New Jersey. 4-3, Tuesday. 
The Flyers beat Colorado on Sunday. 

The" Flyers are four points ahead of 
the Devils in their race for home-ice 
advantage in the first three rounds of the 
Eastern Conference playoffs. The Fly- 
ers have eight games left, while the 
Devils have nine. 

Vaclav Prospal and Mikael Renberg 
scored third-period goals for the victors 
to break a 2-2 tie. Jofin LeCIair got his 
NHL -leading 48th goal, and Pat Falloon 
also scored for Philadelphia, unbeaten 
in four games. The Flyers have the 
NHL’s best Toad record. 

Avalanche 4, Whalers O Patrick Roy. 
stopped 46 shots, including 23 in the 
first period, as Colorado won in Hart- 
ford. The Whalers outshot the Ava- 
lanche. 23-8. in the opening period, but 
trailed. 2-0, thanks to acrobatic goal- 
tending by Roy and rebound goals by 
Mike Ricci and Valeri Kamensky. 

Capitals a. Blues 2 Sergei Gonchar 
returned after missing nearly a month 
and scored two goals, the second with 
13:31 left, to lead Washington. 

Ugh tning 5, Senators O Goalie Rick 
Tabaracci withstood an 18-shct first 
period and Tampa Bay ended a three- 
game home losing" streak. With 
Tabaracci holding off the Senators, the 
Lightning took a 3-0 lead in the first. 

F1aiTM*3, Mighty Ducks 2 In Calgary. 
Cory Stillman scored a goal and added 
an assist as the Flames beat Anaheim. 

■ Whalers to Leave Hartford 

The Hartford Whalers have agreed to 
pay Connecticut a $20.5 million penalty 
to leave at the end of this season. Gov- 
ernor John Rowlands said Wednesday, 
The Associated Press reported. 

Possible new homes for the team in- 
clude St Paid, Minnesota, and Colum- 
bus. Ohio. 




Scoreboard 


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— ?r£ 


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BASEBALL 


;. Exhibition Baseball 

naa g ij m nn 

-Mew York Mefi 2a Los Angeles 7 

Atlanta 2. Montreal 1 

TOxMa&BaMmaivS 

7 J Wsbiirgh 4 Boston 4’-' ' 

jJevriand 2. Toronto 1, 7 Innfetgu rain _ 

New Yaik Vaikeet «, Mkmesoto 4 

San Dtogo 9, CNcoso Oita 4 

San FnndsoD 16 Anafidm 1 

Oakland 9, Cotorotfofr 

Sentfle7, MBwaukoe3 

□ndnnail& Detroff I 

Kansas atr 9, Houston 3 

Sf. Loobfi, PtiBod«ph!a3 

Chicago WMto Sax X Tons 7 


BASKETBALL 


NBA STANDOfOS 


VrV t £ 

- . 3 X 


ATLANTIC nvaiOH 


ChrataRe 

45 

24 

452 

15 

Portland 22 21 18 28-89 

Cleveland 

36 

32 

-529 

23M 

Atlanta 28 19 24 25-96 

Indiana 

32 

36 

.471 

27Vi 

P: Rider 9-1 3 2-2 22. Anderson 7-17 1-4 15i 

Milwaukee 

28 

40 

.412 

3V4 

A: SmBl 10-14 2-2 27, MutOalbO 8-14 8-10 

Taranto 

25 

45 

J57 

35% 


wunucPMaaia 


Attantn 42 (Mutombo IZ). Assists Portland 

MOWEST DIVISION 



19 (Aruterson 9L Atlanta 22 (Blayiock 101. 


W 

L 

PCf 

GB 

Minnesota 38 26 16 31-183 

K-VWt 

52 

17 

-754 

— 

Houston 37 27 25 29-772 

x-Hooston 

46 

23- - 

467 

■ 6 

M: Marhury 5235-9 16, Garrfclt 68 3-5 15; 

Minnesota 

33 

36 

-47H 

19 

MMehe8 7-10 14 15b H: Okiluwan 13-25 13-13 

DoMob 

22 

46 

■J24 

29% 

39, WBb 11-19 68 2a Rebel ds — M. 57 

Denver 

19 

49. 

J79 

3216 

(Garnett 10), H. 50 (w«te 141. Assists— M. 

Son Antonio 

17 

52 

.246 

K 

30 (Mortmryll), H. 26 (Maloney 7). 

Vancouver 

12 

60 

.167 

41 '8 

Oerataad 19 16 14 18-59 

pAancDwrawN 



San Antonia 16 20 17 11— 64 

x-SeatHe 

49 

20 

Jin 

— 

C: HU Ml 48 Ifc Ferry 5-10 88 IX 

x-LA. Lakore 

46 

23 

M7 

3 

Brandon 5-162-2 1XSJU Johnson 3-34-418 

x-Porltond 

41 

30 

577 

9 

Mraramil 3-10 2-2 10. Rebeands— Cleveland 

LA.Cflppen 

31 

37 

AS6 

17A 

53 (HU12), Sen Antonio 54 (Pedue 14). 

Phoenix 

38 

39 

■435 

19 

Assists— Cleveland 13 (Brandon 51, San 

Soaamcrdo 

29 

41 

A14 

20W 

Antonia 16 (Alexander, Johnson 4). 

Golden State 

25 

44 

362 

24 

Crates 24 28 2* 14—92 

x-cBndied pJayaff berth; 



Chicago 21 31 19 23— M 

TUBMTI 

urn 

■ 


D: Ftntey 12-24 88 2& Bredtoy 7-16 38 17; 

ladten 


20 24 

21 26-98 

O Jordan 9-20 2-2 2a Kwr 810 08 20. Re- 

Traaato 


15 19 

23 27-84 

bounds— 0.53 (Green 13), C 52 (Rodman 21). 


RetaMds— ' Vancouver 52 (Reeves loj. Los 
Angeles Si CWiigW T4), Aulsfs— ' Vancouver 
22 (Anthony 51. Las Angeles 20 (Rodney 
Rngere7), 

Seattle 38 35 28 25—128 

GaMen Slate » 19 22 2B- 89 

S: Payton 9-12 4-6 21 Kemp 9-12 3-3 21; 
G-S^ Smith 6-10 *6 18, Spencer 6-7 1-3 11 
Redounds— Seattle 50 (Kemp 9), Golden 
Siam 44 . (Spencer 6). Aueas— Seattle 38 
(Payton B). Golden stale 19 (Spmmfl 9). 

National Invitation 
Tournament 

SEMFMAL8 

Ftortdo St. 71. ConnecttcuT65. OT 
Michigan 77. ArtMnsas 82 
Championship and third place matches wN 
be played on March Z7 bt New York at Madi- 
son Square Garden. 


HOCKEY 


NHL Stanmnos 


Montreal 27 33 14 88 224 253 

Hartford 27 36 10 64 194 229 

Ottawa 24 34 15 63 200 217 

Boston 24 41 9 57 212 266 

WKimMCOMlUflKa 
CENTRAL mVmoN 

W L T Pts GF GA 
x-Donos 44 23 6 W 228 174 

Detroit 34 23 15 83 229 174 

Phoenix -35 34 5 75-213 222- 
SL LOUIS 31 34 9 71 216 226 

Chfcsgo 29 32 12 70 193 . 187 

Taranto 26 41 6 58 210 253 

mcvKomsoN 

W L T PtS GF GA 
46 19 9 
34 33 7 

31 32 11 

32 35 8 
30 39 5 
26 38 10 
24 42 7 


101 252 178 
75 230 221 
73 218 211 
72 201 210 
45 226 250 
62 194 242 
55 183 243 


ITB 
3 1 

0 8 


.tv *tri 


L 

w 

L 

Per 

GB 

x-Miand 

51 

17 

JSC 

— 

x-NewYork 

49 

20 

.710 

2M 

tWonda 

40 

29 

-580 

11H 

JffaSMnBten 

33 

35 

A&5 

IB 

Mew Jersey 

21 

47 

J09 

30 

'PtdadHptila 

IB 

49 

269 

3216 

■Boston 

13 

57 

-1B6 

39 

camuLomaoN 



x-CNcogo 

60 

9 

-870 

— 

s-DMmlt 

48 

20 

-706 

lt» 

oHMtaido 

48 

22 

686 

12% 


LSmBS 10-20 7-8 2& RJAfllerB-lB3~42*T: 
WNana 5-11 34 1L Caaitiy 5-18 58 1& Stou- 
dcmfae 7-19 08 1A Rehooeds— tadtaw 63 
Omits 12), Toronto 61 (Cttaby 10). Assists— t. 
24 Uacksan 12), T. 17 (StMNkanira 6). 

15 30 25 33 — 103 

30 32 21 31—114 

S: Richmond 11-195-534 MMkWBon 585- 
5 15; O: Hardaway 10-199-12 3a Seflady B-12 
10-13 26. RehoWNh— Sacramento 60 (Smflh 
12), Ortando 50 (SeAofy 14). 

Assists — Sacramento 21 (EiMey 12), 
Orlando 21 (Hardaway 7). 


Assists— D. 23 (Pack 9), G 29 (Ptppen «- 
30 30 27 25-112 

34 22 35 26—117 

At Alien 14-24 1-1 32, RoUnson 12-25 1-1 
25.- P; Johnson 9-16 88 28. Penan 6-13 58 
19. Raboands-M. 60 (Baker 15), P. 39 
(WHBams 0. Asshts-MOwauiiae 34 
(DougkG 15), Phoenix 29 (Kktd 12). 
Vancouver 27 23 24 27 3-11)4 

ULCXppen 24 23 21 31 9-118 

V: Peeler 12-25 2-2 3ft Abdur-ROhim 7-13 
2-2 lfc LA. amieK WflgW 10-15 4-4 24, 
Rodney Rogers 7-IB 8-10 23. 


ATLANTIC OfVISraN 

w L T Pts 
x-Ptinadetphta 42 21 11 

x-New Jersey 39 21 13 

FtorWa 33 24 17 

N.Y. Rangers 35 30 9 

Washington 30 36 8 

Tampa Boy 29 37 7 

N.Y. btamtere 25 36 11 

NORTHEAST MVnWN 
W L T Pts 
vBuffato 38 23 11 87 

pntsburgfi 34 32 7 75 


GF GA 
251 193 
206 169 

201 179 
239 206 
188 206 
199 226 

202 215 

GF GA 
216 182 
251 245 


x-Cotorodo 
Edmonton 
Anaheim 
Calgary 
Vancouver 
U» Angeles 
Son Jose 

K-dbxdted playoff bertc 

ran imy's 

Cotarado 
Hartford 

First Period: C-Riccl 12 (Kean* MMer) Z 
C- Kamensky 23 (OuOnshj (pp). Second 
Parted: C-FOote 2, Third Period: C-Foraherg 
23b (sh). Stmts on goat C- 8-7-13—28. H- 23- 
14-9—46. Goalies: GRoy. H-BurfcA 
PhBadelpUa 2 8 

New Jersey 1 8 2—3 

First Petted: NJ.-Goerln 26 (Gfmour. 
Simpson]- 2. P- Falloon 9 (Prospot, LeOoW 
Ipp). X P-LeCkrir 48 IDruca Therten) 
second Period: None. Third Pwtorfc NJ.- 
AndieyOhuk 26 (Chambers) & P-Pmspal 3 
(Blind Amour. FntaoA) A P-Renhetg 21 
(Zubins. Lea*) 1. N-h-i Thomas 14 (Hailk) 


Bwls aa gold; P- 8-11-8—27. 6-10- 

14—30. Gardtes: P-HexMlL NA-Brodeur. 
5LL0UH 2 8 0-2 

washiagiH l l 1—3 

First Parted: 5.L-Pranger 11 (Murphy) Z 
St. Louis. Turgean 25 (Murphy, Matteav) X 
w-wm 3 murder) second Petted: W- 
Gonchar la (pp)- TVrd Ported: W-Ganchar 
11 (Kammaldiufc, TocdwO Shots an got* 
S.L- 5-6-12—25. W-9-9-8— 24. GOOfleS: 5.L- 
Fuhr. W-Rontord. 

Ottawa 0 0 0-0 

Tampa Bay 3 I 1—5 

Hist Per i od: T-Seftvonov 15 (Cullen, 

Houldet) Z T-Ysebaert 4 (Tams, Houldert 1 
T-, Paulin 12 (Zamuner) (sh). Second Period: 
T-Culen 17 (Senvmw, Bwe) Ttert Pette d. 
T-Ocoorea 31 (Norton) (ppl. Shuts an gw* 
0- 184-6-28. T- 9-9-6—24. GoaBes O- 
Rtudes, Tugnutt. T-Tatxnacd. 

Anaheim 1 0 1-2 

Odgmy 2 i 0—3 

Fhit Perted: C-SttBrmm 5 (Hogfumt 
Domentdw*) 2. A-Kartya 38 (Kurd. 
DaigneaDlt) (pp). 1 GGagner 26 (Hevry, 
Hoglund) Second Period: e-McCarthy 2 
(SttihnaR) TMrd Period: A-Kunf !2 (Van 
loipe, KarpaJ Shots a poc* A- 9-5-9—23. C- 
10-10-3 — 23. Goodes: A- Hebert. C-IOdd. 


wonub euw oaunu 

ASIAN ZONE, OROUP 4 
TUBWAY.W MUSCAT 
Japan la Macao 0 
Oman 1. Nepal 0 

Btanttegm: Japan6palntx, Oman X Nepal 
1. Macao 1. 


SPANISH CUP 
SEMFMAL. FIRST LEO 
Real Beits 1 Cettn Vigo 0 

remcHFwstBivtnoH 
IJBeQ Montpellier 4 
Bordeaux 0 Nantes 0 

StadnpM Monaco 62- Pnits St Germain 
55, Nantes 52. Bordeaux 51. Strasbourg 50b 
Bastla 49, Aunnv 46. Metz 46. Lyon 4X 
MorftpeWet 40. Gulnsamp 40, MaraeWe 37, 
Cannes 35b Le Havre 34> Rentes 3X Lens 3X 
LJBe 3X Caen 2& Nancy 26, Nice )9. 


TENNIS 


UPTON OUUMPIOWSfBPS 
KET WBCAYNE. FLORIDA 
HEN 

<114 ROUND 

Janas Blartanan, Sum. daf. Mark PMOp- 
poussts, Australia, 6J, 64 PetBSamprns OX 
U Jw deL Magnus Lonson, 5w&. 6-2, 68. 

Thomas Muster CO. Austria, det Alex Cor- 
rctja, Spain, 6-4, 64; Jim Caurtw, U det. 
Richard KiaBcok (5), NettL, 78 (B-6), 6-4. 

Goran Ivanisevic (40, Croatfau def. DomfnUt 
Hfbaty, SlovoUa, 6-4. 6A Anrbel Medvedev, 
Ukraine: def. NlckJos Hunt, Swe- 48,6-1 7-5. 

Serpl Bmguaa, SpoUv del Gaston Ettis. 
Arg. 7-6 (780,6-4; Kendrfk Oreekmann, Gar. 
deL Mlkaef Thtshunb Sweden, 6-X 6-4. 

WOMEN 

QUARTER FINALS 

Monica Sales (4), Ui, det Irina Splriea 
(7), Romania, 3-6. 6-2, 6-1 

Bartnra Pautus (1 1), Austria. deL SandrtM 
Testud, France, 6-3. 6-3. 


TRANSITIONS 


■ASKBAU 

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

boston— P wdxwed contract of RHP Car- 
los VOtdez from the 5an Frandsco Glints. 

BALTimosiE — OaJrncd C Tim Laker off 
waivers from Montreal Expos. 

CLEVELAND— Traded OF Kenny Lofton 
and LHP Alan Embre* to Atlanta lor Of 
Marquis Grissom and Of Oavtd Justice. 

Seattle- Released RHP Rusty 
Meacham and OF Lou Frazier. 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
Atlanta— Signed G-F Danin Hancock tor 
rest of season. 

Miami— Signed F Bruce Bowen tar rest at 
season. 


NATIONAL FOOTS ALL LEAGUE 
aNDNMATi-Signed CB Jocelyn Bargeno- 
DALLAS— Re-signed DE Broderick 
Thomas. 

cheek BAY— Terminated contract at WR 
AmheRtson. 

green bay— A rtnounced rettrement at TE 
Keith Jackson. 

MlAMh-SIgned WR Lawrence Dawsey to 
2-yeorconlracL 

NEW ENGLAND — Signed CB Steve Israel 
new yobs jets— S igned OL Rick Lyte. 
Philadelphia— R e-signed LB Sylvester 
w right OB Derut Boykin and WR Freddie 
Solomon. Signed WR Mtte UrtdwelL WR 
Jasper Strang, WR Steve Rtiem, RB Rudy 
Horn* RB YoneJ jourdaJn, RB Larry Jane* 
DB Ketta Cresfrirm. DB AMn Johnson raw DT 
Stacey DllNnf. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




BUJ 

sted 

iave 

ling 

ex- 

and 

reek 

mo- 

cize 

be is 

as a 
jariy 

Tais. 

legal 

ntro- 



iaJ Piew 


t-au- 
■r his 
men. 


es 


jm Rus- 
jccoun- 
ie rations 
money- 
iribbeaa, 
say. 

st finan- 
come an 
;ring and 
»nguer- 
eir stated 
religious 
olved in 
to senior 

s protect 
peratioos 
5 , there is 
ninal or- 
jss ethnic 
roup can 
oute any 

isactional 
up all the 
encan of- 
ugs take 
t\." 

xrretary of 
:s and law 
Iationship 
ions “pax 
5 profiting 
with oth- 
iolent turf 

nges, the 
1 is one of 
•rities said, 
to be ship- 
se through 
iribbean as 
ness away 
: the street 
nes that of 
ne, heroin 
ofits while 
ne tonnage 
love. 


lt 

137 . 



















PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Sky’s the Limit 


George Avakian, Godfather of the Pop IP 


TyASHINGTON — I just 

Y Y read in the newspaper 
that one of the largest dis- 
tributors of credit cards is los- 
ing its shin because of de- 
faults. Ordinarily I would feel 
bad when Z read something 
like this, but everyone knows 
dial the credit 
card companies 
mail billions of 
cards to people 
who don't ask 
for them and 
when the/ do, 
they are asking 
for (rouble. 

I speak from n . 
experience. A Buchwald 

while back my 13-year-old 
daughter received a credit 
card from one of the giant 
companies. Even 13-year- 
olds know what credit cards 
are for. When she opened die 
envelope a giant grin spread 
over her face. 

I said, “Did you ask for 
that card?" 

“No." she said. “They 
just sent It to me. They must 


v * ■ * 


An Egg Hunt, 
Slightly Delayed 


know that I like to buy 
stuff.'’ 

“You have to send it 
back," I insisted. 

She began to cry, “It’s 
mine. It has my name on it." 

“I can see that it has your 
name on it but when the bill 
comes in it will have my name 
all over it" 

She clutched the card tight 
in her fist “I’ll just spend it 
on things I need for school, 
and food." 

I wasn’t getting through. 
“Connie, it was a computer 
error. They thought you were 
old enough to own a card.” 

“How old do you have to 
be?” 

‘ Tin not sure — maybe 18 
— maybe 21. When you 
reach that age, the credit card 
company believes you will 
charge with discretion and 
pay with alacrity." 

“Suppose you don’t 
pay?" 

“The card company gets 
very, very angry and turns 
your file over to collectors 
who threaten to put snakes in 
your bed. Even their mothers 
hate them.” 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


N EW YORK — In the early 
days of tape recording, spli- 


New York Tunes Service 


N EW YORK — On 
Sunday, children in 


-LN Sunday, children in 
many parts of the world will 
hunt for Easter eggs. 

But on April 15, an egg 
created in 1900 by Peter Carl 
Faberge can be had: a cobalt 
blue enamel egg studded with 
diamond crescents to resemble 
a pine cone, enclosing a silver 
Indian elephant automaton. 

The egg. to be sold at 
Christie’s, was created for Al- 
exander Kelch, a gold- minin g 
industrialist in St Petersburg, 
Russia, as an Easter gift for Ms 
wife. But the couple later sep- 
arated, he lost his fortune and 
died in the Siberian gulag. 


“Let me use it just once, 
please Dad." 

'That wouldn’t be a good 
idea. Once you use it your 
name goes into play and they 
get mad at you if you don't 
keep buying." 

“I’m not going to give it 
back — at least not before I 
show it to the kids at 
schooL" 

“They probably all have 
cards of their own,” I told 
her. 

“HI bet they don’t have 
gold ones that have no limit 
on them." 

“How do you know 
that?” 

“The credit people don't 
send a card if you're a dumb 
kid." 


J. i days of tape recording, spli- 
cing — replacing a displayed note 
with another note from another 
piece of tape — was frowned 
upon. 

When word got out that a Dave 
Brubeck record had been spliced in 
several places, the editor of Down 
Beat caned the producer, George 
Avakian, and said, “Hey George, I 
heard you spliced Brubeck-" 
Avakian said, '‘Yeah, that's 
right.” The editor said, “How can 
you do such a thing? You're tam- 
pering with the man's art.” 

Avakian said, “It sounds a lot 
better than what he played." 

“Ithink it’s abad idea,” said the 
editor. 

“Why don’t you call Dave, see 
what he thinks ?" Av akian said. 

So he did, and 15 min utes later 
he’s back on the line: “Dave said. 
‘TeU George he saved ray butt.’ " 

Now 78 and semire tired. Avaki- 
an is a record producer who has 
enough faith in his taste and in- 
tellectual capacity to be able to 
acknowledge what some people 
consider trash credits — discov- 
ering Johnny Mathis, for example, 
and producing “Jealous Heart/' a 
hit for Tab Hunter — with a “we do 
the best we can” smile. 

Avakian is a successful record- 
ing company executive with a deep 
musical culture. A vanishing con- 
juncture. 

He won a Grammy this year as 
co-writer of the album notes for 
“The Complete Columbia Studio 
Recordings of Miles Davis and Gil 
Evans.” Taking into account the 
scope of Avakian's career, such re- 
cognition is as absurdly inadequate 
as the Grammy Charles Mingus 
once won (his only Grammy) in the 
album-note category. 

Avakian was also awarded a cer- 
tificate for having produced a re- 
cord that was inducted into the Hall 
of Fame — Louis Armstrong’s 
“Mack the Knife." 

He was the subject of the BBC 



George Avakian: To the electronic rescue of Dave Brubeck. 


scries “George Avakian, Myth- 
Maker." He played a key role in 
opening the Soviet- American cul- 
tural exchange program in 1961, and 
be initiated and produced the pres- 
tigious LP of Lotte Lenya singing 
the German operas of Kurt Weill. 

A junior at Yale in 1 940, Avaki- 
an went to see Edward Wallerstein, 
the president of Columbia Records. 
It was Thursday, Washington's 
birthday. 


His detailed memories are amaz- 
ing. “I never called him anything 
but Mr. Wallerstein, even behind 
his back.” he said. “He was a very 
austere, kind and thoughtful man. 1 
was hired part-time for $50 a 
week.” 

The my th make r produced and 
annotated the first reissues pre- 
serving jazz classics by Bessie 
Smith. Bix Beiderbecke and others 
in 1940. (He later produced the 


industry’s first pop IPs and box 
sets.) 

When Avakian was drafted in 
1941, WaUeretein said he’d hold 
his job for him and he kept his 
word. First, however, Avakian 
ask ed his father, who wanted him 
to come into the family Oriental 
carpet business, for permission. 

“You’re young, 1 ' his father 
said. “You've been through die 
war. Have some fun." 

So he became a staff producer in 
charge of pop music for Columbia 
Records at the end of February 
1946. (He was in fact die only staff 
pop producer.) 

There were hardly any pop al- 
bums at the time; only singles sold. 
Foreign affiliates sent him records 
in 23 language categories. As di- 
rector and sole employee of. the 

international department — “I 

spoke French, German” — they 
were his responsibility. 

Because of a musicians’ onion 
recording ban, he released records 
like Frank Sinatra backed op by a 
vocal choir. Searching die vaults for 
old instrumentals, be found *Tvc 
Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" 
by Les Brown and his Band of 
Renown. It sold a million copies. 

Just as the ban was ending, he 
released a polka by Frankie 
Yankovic and his Yanks, which hit 
a million in three months. The 
French subsidiary sent over a re- 
cording of “La Vie en Rose" by 
the little-known Parisian singer 
Edith Piaf. Another million copies. 
He was a hero. It was * ‘a helluva lot 
of fun.” 

Back in the early '30s, head of 
RCA Records* classical depart- 
ment at the time, Wallerstein had 
tried to sell classical rnnsic recor- 
ded at 3316 rpm. But die public 
would not accept LPs played on 
hardware made for 78s. The sound 
was horrible. 

In the late ’40s, however, WaU- 
erstein, with Columbia now, made 
a deal with a manufacturer for spe- 
cial 3316 rpm attachments that 
would plug into your own phono- 
graph. Avakian put out pop LPs 
like “Doris Day Sings * ' and longer 


wrafcs’like Duke Ellington’s “Cre- 
ole Rhapsody " by the dozens to get 
a foothold for pop LPs in the new 
; market. In oitfer to move fast the 
first microgroove LPS, released in • 
June 1948, were transferred from 
78s -r- a tricky process. 

“On 78s, the fidelity deterior- 
ated as the needle got closer to the 
label. Also, the pitch might vary. 
The 78 format would often, forces*; 
band to come to an abrupt-Stopaf-' 
thc end of a side even if it wasa^m- 
tbe score. : 

“You’d have to synchronize tEgs* 
end of the side with the beghming* > 
of the next one to make a- ooegg 
dnuous performance on LP_' ; We^ 
would start a second turntable- at, ^ 
just the right moment so it would 
Overlap with a cross fade and hope- ■ 
fblfypick it up with aperfecc sphe&- 
Some times we’d have to try it.12^ 
rimes to get it right. It could drivfe;- 
you crazy." - 

Avakian read in Billboard 
magazine that, ' based on tbe second 
quarter of 1 957, the company ’s pop 
albums were responsible for 82 
cents of every dollar spent" os 
Columbia Records. The industry- i 
wide average was 26 cents. He was 
earning $18200 ayear. He was,ifcfc 
and tired of being tired and sk&(He 
had mon onucleosis .) 

- He quit, rested, and took a-job 
with Warner Brothers, which was 
just getting into the itxroiri busi- 
ness. His first hit was an album by a, 
part-time accountant by the nsene 
of Bob Newhait, whose “The Bitt- 
ton-Down Mind” remains- .the : 
biggest-selling spoken-word air 
bum of all time. . 

Currently, Avakian is producing 
a new edition of the historic 1956 
“Ellington at Newport" perfor- 
mance of “Diminuendo and Cres- 
cendo in Blue.” 

“There were three sets of mikes 

— the house, ours and the Voice of 
America. Duke’smosirians tended 
to wander from one mike to an- 
other. Now I want to get all three 
versions in sync and mix them to- 
gether. We'll finally hear it the way 
it was played. We may even get 







vS'Em 





a 

T 



PEOPLE 


W HILE it may not be imbedded in 
the DODular imagination like 


__ Dong MilWTfcc /Voocixnd PiTM 

DOING A THREE-STEP — Chelsea Clinton joins in a Masai dance with 
her mom, Hillary, and Joan Koisianga at the Olturoto village in Arusha, 
Tanzania, where the Clintons stoppled on their goodwill tour of Africa. 


VV the popular imagination like 
“Play it again, Sara.” Julia Child, 
America's beloved popularizer of 
French cuisine, maintains she never said 
one of those famous asides that “every- 
one" heard uttered. Child wants to set 
die record straight by denying that she 
ever dropped a leg of lamb or a fish on 
the floor, wiped it off and, looking into 
tiie camera, told aspiring cooks to carry 
on because “you are all alone in the 
kitchen.” Child. 84, added, “People 
come op to me all the time and say. ‘I 
saw you do that,’ and it is not true. Nor 
did I ever pick up a bottle of wine and 
swig from it ’ ’ And as for the current fad 
for “healthy” food: "Anything that 
says ‘healthy’ I stay away from," she 
said. “If it’s ‘healthy' they usually elim- 
inate anything that's nice about it. A 
sausage I recently had was so dry I 
couldn ’t eat it. So many awful things are 
labeled healthy." 


cesco Maccarrone, it was a scream. 
The country singer and Maccarrone, an 
airline baggage handler, finally met 
face-to-face six months after she heard 


him crying for help from the cargo bay 
as her plane prepared to take off from 


Country music notes: Tbe last time 
Trisha Yearwood beard from Fran- 


Seattle. “Thank God for you, or I’d 
have been in serious trouble.'’ Mac- 
carrone told her. A supervisor Had 
closed the baggage compartment not 
realizing. Maccarrone was inside. “We 
were about to back up from the gate, and 
I felt underneath my feet that someone 
was pounding and screaming,” said 
Yearwood. “I thought, ‘Maybe I’m just 
nuts.’ ” Yearwood alerted an attendant 
and Maccarrone was rescued. . . . Call- 
ing all friends in low places: Garth 
Brooks reportedly is cooking up an 
urban hoed own. The country music su- 
perstar will play a free concert in Cen- 
tral Park this summer in the only New 
York-area stop on his world tour, the 
New York Post reported. 

□ 

Fargo, North Dakota, swelled with 
civic pride after its namesake movie 


won two Oscars (for best actress and 
best original screenplay). Fargo, as one 
T-shirt slogan put it, was “Winner for 
Best Town in a Title Role." “It’s won- 
derful,” said Lola Holland, acting 
president of the Fargo Chamber - of 
Commerce. “I hope they do a sequel,’ * 
she said. “Maybe they should call, it 
West Fargo," the name of the town that 
abuts Fargo. A radio talk show host, 
however, told his listeners he had heard 
the sequel had already been named. 
“It’s called ‘The Norwegian-American 
Patient.”’ 


he’s a victim of a shakedown," Litz 
said. 


The television tough guy Don John- 
son say s two former employees, a driver 
and an assistant, are being mean to him. 
The “Nash Bridges" star has sued the 
pair he claims tried to extort $1.5 mil- 
lion by threatening to accuse him of 


Oscar-wirmer Billy Bob Thornton 
was honored by his hometown, Malvern, 
Arkansas, whore he’s remembered as a 
milkshake-loving rockL'n’ roller: ‘ T had a 
Tastee-Freez stand before 1 got into pol- 
itics,” said Mayor BID Sernnshire, who 
-declared ““Billy Bob Thornton Day." 
“When be was a kid in high school he 
used to buy h amburg ers and milkshakes 
from me.” hi high school, Thornton 
play ed drums io a tend called Stone Cold 
Fever and cranked out Crecdence Clear- 
water Revival songs. 


■i ot 


iiess in 


I to End 


sexual harassment, bis attorney says. 
Tbe suit contends the women invaded 
the actor's privacy by hiring a private 
investigator to obtain “dirt" from his 
associates, the lawyer, Ronald Lite, 
said. “Basically, Don’s position is that 


Fans snapped up copies of The No- 
torious BXG.’s posthumous album, 
just two weeks after the 24-year-old 
rapper was slain. “Death is a com- 
modity, you know?” said Ramsey 
Jones, a clerk at Tower Records in 
Greenwich Village, where he couldn’t 
keep tbe CD on die shelf. “1 have to 
keep slocking it every five minutes.'’ 


2eCri 




■■a".# sty • •• 



O Nil 


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K» tHJO 6780 till •• 


mnunnm » 


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Half* ... • 

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172*1011 AFRICA 

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75SOOC Kenya* MQ0-1Q 



172*1011 

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755-5042 Kenya* 


AT&T 


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