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39 Die in U.S. Cult Suicide 

Counting on a Comet, They Sought a Better Life 



By Brian Knowlton 

Intern ational Herald Tribune 


VI 4 A J. Trmll/nv uird I'r.— 


A body being loaded onto a truck carrying victims Thursday outside the house in Rancho Santa Fe, California. 


The bodies of 39 men and women 
were removed Thursday from a two- 
story mansion in a wealthy enclave near 
San Diego, the victims of what the po- 
lice said appeared to have been “a well- 
staged and orchestrated mass suicide.'’ 

A local businessman who alerted po- 
lice to the deaths said that he had seen a 
letter and video tapes in which members 
of the group, a cult that operated an 
Internet business, rejoiced in their im- 
pending deaths. He said they expected 
to be carried to a better life by aliens 
traveling in a spacecraft hidden in the 
tail of the Hale-Bopp comet, which is 
currently visible from Earth. 

The bodies, clad in black sneakers 
and black sweat suits, were found Wed- 
nesday, scattered through the Mediter- 
ranean-style house in Rancho Santa Fe. 
one of the most affluent towns in Cali- 
fornia. 

Most bodies were lying on cots, mats 
and beds, their hands a: their sides, as if 
peacefully sleeping. Their heads and 


chests were covered by purple cloths 
folded into triangles. There were no signs 
of struggle or trauma, the police said. It 
appeared that the deaths might have taken 
place over a period as long as a week. 

The police said Thursday they had 
identified all of the dead but would nor 
release names until relatives were no- 
tified. Reuters reported. 

It was not clear how the group had 
died, but a spokesman for the San Diego 
County Sheriff s Department. Lieuten- 
ant Jerry Lipscomb, said that containers 
of food and an unidentified liquid were 
found near the bodies. 

“They may have ingested an un- 
known drug which caused their de- 
mise,” he said. 

The mansion apparently was the cen- 
ter of a thriving business that involved 
designing Web pages for businesses that 
want a presence on the Internet Cus- 
tomers of the company, called Higher 
Source, described the occupants of the 
home as cult-like and clannish, but busi- 
nesslike and proficient. 

The businessman who alerted the po- 
lice, Nick Matzorkis. employs a former 


* 


Bust Before Boom? Indonesia Puts Mine on Hold 

Dispute Over Lode Shakes Gold Share Prices 


By Anthony DePalma 

Hew York Tunes Service 

OTTAWA — The Indonesian gov- 
ernment said Thursday it was suspend- 
ing the mining rights of the small Ca- 
nadian company that once claimed to 
have made the world's richest gold 
strike, in Borneo. 

Indonesia mining officials said the 
Busang gold project in the province of 
East Kalimantan would be put on hold 
until die companies involved cleared 
up just how much gold there was in the 
site, over which the world's largest 
mining companies have been squab- 
bling for most of the past year. Bre-X 


Minerals Ltd. of Calgary, Alberta, a 
small exploration company that has 
been working Busang since 1993, on 
Wednesday told its prospective Amer- 
ican partner. Ffeepon-McMoRan Cop- 
per & Gold Inc. of New Orleans, that 
estimates ranging from 70 million 
ounces of gold to as much as 200 
million ounces at the Busang area of 
Indonesia may have been inflated be- 
cause of invalid geologic sampling. 

■Hie president of Bre-X, David 
Walsh, said the company stood behind 
its original reserve estimares for its 
Indonesian gold property and had hired 


an independent consultant to carry out 
an audit. 

Only last month, Freeport entered an 
agreement to become a partner of Bre- 
X and build a $400 million mining 
complex, contingent on the results of 
its own analysis. On Wednesday, the 
company said it had drilled seven test 
holes and found “insignificant 
amounts of gold.” 

Trading of Bre-X slock was sus- 
pended Wednesday on both the 
Toronto Stock Exchange and in the 
United States, where it is traded on the 
Nasdaq market. The shares resumed 


trading on both markets late Thursday, 
Bre-X plunging to 2.40 Canadian dol- 
lars. a loss of 13.10, in Toronto and to 
$1.9375. down $9.4375. in New York. 

The announcements are the latest 
chapter in a saga of high political in- 
trigue, a mysterious file and the strange 
helicopter death of the Bre-X executive 
directly responsible for estimating the 
amount of gold at Busang. 

The expected reduction of gold es- 
timates is considered evidence by some 
analysts that big mining companies, 
which had jockeyed for position to 
develop the Indonesian find with Bre- 

See MINE, Page 12 



a Fag/ 

Kcacn 

Bre-X’s David Walsh says he 
stands behind his firm's findings. 


TV- 


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Fujimori Cites 
Progress in 
Talks to End 
Hostage Crisis 

CoefSrdlyOlrSti^FrvaDi^x^ha 

LIMA, Pent — The longest hostage 
standoff in Larin American history 
reached 100 days Thursday, with rebels 
still occupying the Japanese ambassa- 
dor’s residence in hopes of winning 
freedom for jailed comrades but with 
reports that a solution to the crisis was 
nearing. 

President Alberto Fujimori con- 
firmed Thursday that talks with (he 
Marxist rebels vriio are bolding 72 hos- 
tages had progressed, 

* 'There is a rapprochement, although 
there are still natural difficulties.” Mr. 
Fujimori said at a ceremony to start off 
the Easterboliday weekend. 

“We have concluded the stage of 
preliminary talks, and while we have not 
entered final talks there is an inter- 
mission now for a period of reflection 
during Easter week,” he said. 

Rebels of the Tupac Amaru Revolu- 
tionary Movement seized the hostages 
at the home of the Japanese ambassador 
on Dec. 17 to demand the release of 440 
of their jailed comrades and an easing in 
austere economic policies that have left 
up to 10 percent of the population job- 
less. 

The Kyodo news agency said 
Thursday that Japan was considering 
economic aid to Cuba if that country 
takes in die rebels. 

“Cuba has not mentioned any eco- 
nomic aid at all as a condition, but it 
isn’t gladly accepting the rebels,” Ky- 

See PERU, Page 12 


AGENDA 


The Dollar 


ntowYOrfc numday 0 4 P.M. previous dosa 


DM 


1.672 


1.6889 


Pound 


1.6325 


1.6303 


Fears of Higher Rates Jangle Wall Street 

Bond yields rose and the Dow Jones 
industrial average fell more than 200 
points in late trading Thursday as signs 
of rising prices, a week ago discernible 
only to a relative handful of anti-in- 
flation hawks, reared their heads. 
Stock prices suffered as investors 
feared the Federal Reserve Board 
would extend interest-rare increases 
beyond the one or two adjustments it 
seemed to have embarked upon this 
week. The economic statistics that 
weighed upon the market included a 
report of rising home sales and in- 
creased advertising for jobs. Rag? 13. 


Yen 


123575 


124.13 


5.694 



-140.11 


674059 


S&P 500 


6860.70 


eftanga Ttuwlay O A P.tt prmnoub doffi 


-16.65 


77358 


79053 



Yth TKMbunVrhe Auoctued Prrta 

TIBETAN IN TAIPEI — President Lee Teng-hui of Taiwan, left, 
greeting the Dalai l^ma in their first meeting Thursday. The exiled 
Tibetan leader urged Taiwan to seek compromise with China. Page 6. 


Partisan Wars Bog Down 
The State Department 

Top Posts Go Unfilled as Clinton Plays It Safe 


By Steven Lee Myers 

Yurt Times Service 

WASHINGTON — One top candi- 
date to become ambassador to France 
has withdrawn, said to be tired of wait- 
ing for the- call from the White House. 
No U.S. ambassador has been posted to 
several other countries, like Russia, Ja- 
pan and Germany. Many other top jobs 
under Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright also await appointees. 

Two months into President Bill Clin- 
ton’s second term, the selection of the 
senior diplomatic corps has bogged 
down, a victim of White House in- 
decision caused in part by the furor over 
campaign financing. 

With the administration under scrutiny 
for the favors that it may or may not have 
granted donors the presidential campaign 
last year. White House lawyers are scru- 
tinizing the backgrounds of potential 
nominees for anything that might drag 
Mr. Clinton into a new controversy. 

“The system has lost common 
sense,” said one person under consid- 
eration for an appointment, who, despite 
having clearance to see some of the coun- 
try’s top secrets, still faces an arduous 
background check by the White House. 
“Everybody is so afraid of scandal.” 

Top ambassadorships have gone to 
top contributors, but now politics has 
further intruded into one of Washing- 


ton's most intense and partisan games, 
sowing confusion and anxiety. And it 
has left some prospective appointees 
hanging, with jobs, businesses and repu- 
tations on the line as Mr. Clinton makes 
up his mind and the lawyers make sure 
that creates no new headaches. 

Now the process, which even some 
White House officials concede has be- 
come unusually slow, appears to have 
claimed its first victim: Frank Wisner, 
the ambassador to India and one of the 
nation’s most respected career diplo- 
mats. has withdrawn from consideration 
to be ambassador to France, a senior 
administration official said Wednesday. 

Mr. Wisner. along with Felix Ro- 
hatyn, a New York investment banker, 
was considered a top contender to re- 
place Pamela Harriman, who died Feb. 
5- But he informed Mr. Clinton and Mrs. 
Albright last week that he would leave 
the Foreign Service and take a job with 
American International Group, an in- 
surance company, the official said. 

The official, who spoke on condition 
of anonymity, said Mr. Wisner had per- 
sonal reasons to step down now. But a 
close friend of his said Wednesday that 
Mr. Wisner simply could not wait any 
longer for Mr. Clinton's decision- Mr. 
Wisner, who recently returned to New 
Delhi after a visit to the United States. 

See DIPLOMATS, Page 12 


U.S. Is Rebuffed on Plan for Internet Eavesdropping 


f 


Books 


Crossword.. 


Opinion — 

.... Pages’8-9. 

Sports 

Pages 22-23. 

Sponsored Section 

Pages 20-21. 

INVESTING IN AUSTRIA: VIENNA j 

International Classified 

Paged. 

.■The tHT on-iine http:/. 

\v v: iht.cornH 

_1 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Service 


In a setback for the Clinton admin- 
istration that demonstrates the difficulty 
of setting global policies for the Internet, 
the leading industrial nations have de- 
clined to embrace a U.S. proposal to 
allow computer eavesdropping by die 
world’s law enforcement agencies. 

The proposal, backed by Britain and 
France, was an attempt to restrict die 
private use of advanced data-scram- 


bling technology that can protect the 
privacy of e-mail and other forms of 
computer communication. The equip- 
ment can make it difficult for law en- 
forcement officials to crack a code when 
they suspect it is masking criminal or 
terrorist activities. 

The plan called for international 
endorsement of a system in which 
mathematical keys to computer-secu- 
rity codes would be held by escrow 
agents. The keys would be released to 
law enforcement officials if they ob- 


tained a court's wiretapping warrant. 

But policy guidelines released in Paris 
on Thursday by the 29-nation Orga- 
nization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development did not endorse the U.S. 
proposal. And they leave such leeway 
for members to regulate data-scrambling 
technology — or not — that computer 
security experts say any uniform in- 
ternational policy remains elusive. 

* ‘The difficulty with the guidelines is 
that anybody can interpret parts of them 
in their own way.” said Konstantine 


Papanikdaw, a policy analyst for in- 
formation security at the European 
Commission in Brussels. 

Htroko Kamata, an OECD official 
who has worked on the guidelines for a 
year, said the OECD member countries 
hope die guidelines will give the debate 
an international scope — especially 
since the Internet does not have any 
national boundaries. 

“Several countries were working on 

See CODES, Page 12 


member of the group. Mr. Matzorkis 
said Thursday that his worker on Wed- 
nesday showed him a letter and two 
video tapes in which the leader, an el- 
derly man, and group members an- 
nounced their suicidal plan. 

In the letter. Mr. Matzorkis said, 
“they explained that by the time this 
letter has been received, they would have 
already, as they described it, ’shed their 
containers,’ ” meaning their bodies, and 
gone to a better life on another planet. 

A rumor that an unidentified flying 
object has trailed the Hale-Bopp comet 
has been circulating on the Internet. 
Astronomers say the UFO. cited by an 
amateur astronomer, is actually a star 
distorted by the amateur's telescope. 

Mr. Matzorkis’s employee said the 
letter and tapes from the group had 
arrived the previous evening in a Fed- 
eral Express package. 

Mr. Matzorkis said that he and his 
employee, whom he identified only as 
Mr. Rio. then drove to the mansion, two 
hours away, where Mr. Rio went inside 

See SUICIDE, Page 12 


All Quiet 
On Russian 
Strike Front 

Unpaid- Wage Protest 
Attracts Poor Turnout 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Service 

ZHUKOVSKY, Russia — On the 
main square of this renowned center of 
Soviet space and aviation research, a 
couple of thousand elderly people came 
with their red banners Thursday de- 
manding that President Boris Yeltsin's 
government resign. 

But 20 yank from the crowd's rear 
fringe, under the watchful gaze of Len- 
in's statue, bustling shoppers in the 
packed central food market couldn 't have 
been less interested. They were too busy 
inspecting pyramids of fresh sausage, 
glistening racks of fish and a cornucopia 
of cans, jars and bottles that might have 
caused a riot in Soviet times. 

That was part of the story of the 
much-publicized but ultimately under- 
whelming nationwide general strike 
across Russia on Thursday. 

Organizers from Russia’s trade uni- 
ons had predicted a massive turnout of 
workers angry at not having received 
nearly $9 billion in salaries and pen- 
sions owed to them by the state and 
private employers. But with the sig- 
nificant exception of elderly people in 
the cities — the big, bereaved losers in 
Russia's reforms — people in 
Zhukovsky and elsewhere are not shak- 
ing tin cups. And they did not turn up to 
protest in anything approaching the 
numbers forecast 

“People are earning money on the 
side,” said Alla Mikhailovna, 50, an 
engineer who has not received a foil 
month's salary from the main aviation 
research institute here since June bur who 
makes ends meet by moonlighting in a 
stationery stem;. “Russians are either in- 
credibly patient or else they're fools.” 

In some cases, wage arrears in Russian 
factories and businesses are a year or 
more old, the product of the govern- 
ment's own failure to collect taxes and a 
vast interlocking web of debts among 
state and newiy privatized enterprises. 

Everyone in Russia agrees this is an 
outrage. Yet in towns and cities from the 
Pacific port of Vladivostok to Moscow 
and Sl Petersburg in the west the low- 
key thousands who marched in a one- 
day protest strike seemed a faint re- 
flect] on of the social calamity regularly 
described by the government’s Com- 
munist and nationalist opponents. 

Police, who deployed thousands of 
riot-ready reinforcements, estimated the 
number of protesters at 1.8 million at 
nearly 1,000 demonstrations nation- 
wide. Union organizers, who had orig- 
inally predicted a turnout of 20 million, 
said police estimates were much too 
low. Clearly, though, the crowds were 
sparser than expected. 

Among the largest demonstrations 
was one in Moscow, where a peaceable 
crowd estimated in the tens of thousands 

See RUSSIA, Page 12 


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For Japanese Business 9 Starting Small Isn’t All That Beautiful 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

International Herald Tribune 



TOKYO — Aldo Morita, the founder of Sony 
Corp., may be revered as an entrepreneurial genius 
and titan of industry, but few Japanese realistically 
dream of following in his free-spirited footsteps. 

As a result, entrepreneurship continues to plod 
along at a snail’s pace in Japan despite government 

efforts to speed it up. , 

for Japanese salarymen and working women, 
job conditions are bleak these days. Wages are 


stagnant- Many companies have turned their back 
on Japan's lifetime employment system, firing 
workers outright or sending them into the streets 
with severance payments. 

The government is offering people more fi- 
nancial incentives than ever before to start their 
own businesses, and more and more Japanese are 
saying they want to be entrepreneurs. But there are 
still relatively few who act on that desire. 

Japanese officials have watched with envy as 
new U.S. businesses have created 20 million jobs 
since the 1970s. Fearing that unemployment could 


more than double in the next few years, Japanese 
authorities would like new businesses to perform a 
similar miracle here. 

But the growth of new businesses in Japan has 
been stagnant. According to government statistics, 
there were 63 million companies in Japan in 198 1 . 
By 1994, that number had edged up only to 6.5 
million, and officials say few have been created in 
the three years since the last statistics were com- 
piled. 

"The key problem is that while we have taken 
steps to relax what you could call barriers to busi- 


ness, a lot more needs to be done,' ’ said Nobuyuki 
Hiraisuka, deputy director of the planning division 
of die Small and Medium Enterprises Agency at thus 
Ministry of International Trade and Industry. 

Many Japanese balk at bunching out on their 
own because entrepreneurs here face daunting eco- 
nomic and cultural obstacles . Banks often refuse to 
lend money to new companies, and under Japanese 
law, family-owned companies pay a corporate tax 
rate of 70 percent, while those listed on stock 

See JAPAN, Page 12 


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=•* A..f -V ’. - ^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Hey, Need a Cab ....ora Nikon? / Eras About to End 


Checker Cabs Make Their Last Stand in New York 


Zaire to Open 
Talks Soon, 
Rebel Asserts 


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N EW YORK — The father, the mother, 
the daughter and the tiny white 
Maltese dog barreled across 49th 
Street bri mming with intent, waving at 
the bloated yellow taxi that seemed to have 
materialized from the mists of some golden age 
of cabs, yelling for it to stop, stop, just stop, 
please stop. 

What they flagged down could well be the last 
legal Checker cab in New York City. 

“Now this is a real taxi." extolled the father. 
Stuart Sugarman, sinking back deep into the 
bench seat planted so far from the partition that 
you could almost fit the Brooklyn Bridge in 
there. “This is a New York City taxi. Stepping 
into a Chevy is like stepping into a foreign 
country.*' 

He jiggled one of the twin round jumps 
seats. 

“Brittany,” be said, addressing his 9-year-old 
daughter, ‘ ‘you will probably never ride in one of 
these again.” 

Nor will hardly any New Yorkers. It is not 
news that the Checker cab is the dodo of the taxi 
fleet, a vehicle instantly recognized worldwide 
yet one headed, for many years, for certain 
extinction. 

But now things are getting really serious: 
Since Tuesday, there has been just one licensed 
Checker out of the fleet of 12,053 yellow cabs in 
New York. 

The lone one is owned by Johann Struna, a 63- 
year-old Slovenian immigrant who has been a 
cabbie for almost two decades and wants to make 
it just two more years. 

“Something that was nice and likable is dying 
off," Mr. Struna said. “It almost feels like a 
piece of me is dying off." 

There had been two Checkers, but one had its 


By Neil MacFanquhar 

Sew York Times Service 



allow exemptions for cars with distinct aesthetic 
or historic values. 

“Wc love die Ch ecker as much as New York 
or die world does,*’ said Alan Fromberg. spokes- 
man for the commission. “However, a Checker 
is more than rolling history. It has to function as 
a safe vehicle.” 

There were 10 in 1993, Which will be the 
last? 

It is a question very much cm everyone’s mind 
at Mira Auto Body Repair in Astoria, Queens. 

Mira is to Checker cabs what plastic surgeons are 

to Hollywood stars, endlessly extending die ca- 
reers of te rminall y sagging bodies. Drivers 


era still used as private cars and even as the odd 
gypsy cab.) 


O UTSIDE the garage, Rudolph Torres, 
who lost the license for his Checker a 
few years ago, sauntered up to Mr. 
Struna. 

“There is a battle between you and Eari,” Mr. 
Tones said. “He said he is going to see you our 
so he can be top man. You better watch out so he 

doesn’t sabotage your cab." 

Mr. Struna laughed at the thought. He can 
afford to. He has a distinct edge. His 1981 cab 
has 353,000 miles, while Mr. Johnson's 1978 
model has more than 900,000. 

Five thousand Checkers once roamed the city. 
As their numbers dwindled, the Checker drivers 
evolved into a loose fraternity. They all share 
s imitar backgrounds: older immigrants who 
have been in New York for decades and who 
used the cabs to make it here. 

They get no joy from another Checker getting 
knocked out of the fleet One had already been 
lost this year. Fritzgerald Cajuste, a 63-year-old 
who came to New York from Haiti 34 years ago, 
stopped driving on Valentine's Day because of 
lung cancer. 

The Checkers are as central to the lives of the 
drivers' families as to the men themselves. When 
Mr. Cajuste was in Mount Sinai Medical Center 
over the past month, his health deteriorating 
rapidly, his 4-year-old grandson climbed up onto 
his bed. "He said, ‘Grandpa, don't forget: if you 
die, I get the car,’ ” Mr. Cajuste said, chuckling 
at the memory. 

Passengers worshiped the space. You could 
get five adults OegaUy) into one. Baby carriages 
rolled in without being folded. 

As a memorial, the Museum of the City of 
New York plans to make a Checker a centerpiece 
of its new building, suspending it from the 
ceiling of a main entrance hall. 

On one recent weekend, a fashion photo- 
grapher who was shooting a catalogue for a 
German department store frantically- waved 
down Mr. Struna in front of Tiffany’s. "TO pay 
you like S20 to sit here for 10 minutes," he 
begged, while the art director gushed at her good 
fortune. 

* T would never shoot these cars,' ’ said Tanya 
Valerien, the art director, dismissivdy waving at 
the regular hacks sailing past "This one gives 
that old New York feeling* original. When. you 
go to New York you have certain ideas how you 
want to see New York. It will always be that 
way." 


Rcvt/Hic Ptcw forkTimta 


license temporarily lifted when it failed its in- 
spection because of serious undercarriage rust. 


spection because ot serious undercarriage rush 
The driver, Earl Johnson, has 10 days to fix it and 


be is unsure whether he can afford the repairs. 

The two Checkers were already saved from 
the brink of certain death earlier this month. The 
chairwoman of the city's Taxi and Limousine 
Commission granted them special exemptions 
from the new taxi law that takes effect April 1. 


Under the law, any taxi more than three years 
old in a fleet or more than five years old and 
owned by an individual must be replaced with a 
new car. 

Because the Checker assembly line in Kala- 
mazoo, Michigan, closed on July 12, 1982, the 
Checkers would have been automatically dis- 
qualified. Then a barrage of pleading letters from 
hard-core fans persuaded the taxi commission to 


Another Victim of the Times: 47th Street Photo 


N EW YORK — A landmark name in 
New York electronics retailing for 30 
years, 47th Street Photo, has closed 
down, laid off its work force and may 
not reopen. 

‘ ‘We're re-evaluating our position.*' said Stu- 
art Held, president of Tut Services Inc., which 
has been doing business as 47th Street Photo 
since 1995 under a licensing agreement 
Mr. Held said he closed the Ma nhattan store 
and its mail-order sales department “several 
weeks ago" after a number of issues, most 
notably whether his company would be able to 
continue using the 47th Street name, became 
uncertain. 

He said he expected a resolution of the issue, 
with a final closing or another phoenix-like re- 
emergence of the once- thriving company, in tire 
next few weeks. 

“Our condition right now is a wait-and-see 
attitude,” Mr. Held said. “It has to do with 


By Kirk Johnson 

New York Times Service 


whether we can make money in the business and 
the raising of funds.” 

Beginning in 1967, 47th Street Photo helped 
pioneer the idea of discount consumer-electron- 
ics retailing in New York. Through die 1970s 
and 1980s, as such chains as Crazy Eddie and 
Nobody Beats the.Wiz exploded onto the scene, 
47th Street Photo maintained its own distinctive 
New York, flavor. It was noisy, hectic and — 
because of its largely Orthodox Jewish work 
force — always closed on Saturdays. 

The company stumbled, along with many 
other consumer-electronics chains, in the eco- 
nomic downturn of the early 1990s, when its thin 


margins were squeezed still further by a slump in 
demand. At its peak, the old company had five 


demand. At its peak, the old company had five 
locations and more than 300 employees. When 
the current company closed this mouth, only 39 
workers were left, and it had only one location — 
which was not even on 47th Street but on West 
45th Street. 

The company’s original owners filed for 
bankruptcy protection in 1992 and are not in- 
volved in the company's current incarnation. 


Mr. Held, a former employee of the old com- 
pany, and his brother Ira, backed by an Israeli 
manufacturer, Tutnauer Co., licensed the rights 
to tile 47th Street name and its West 45tii Street 
lease for $2 million in 1995. 

A lawyer for the creditors' committee in the 
bankruptcy case, Ted Berkowitz, said the issue 
was whether Tut Services still could make its 
payments on the licensing agreement. If it de- 
faulted, he said, the name would revert to the 
bankruptcy trustee and would probably be li- 
censed to another store operator. “I think the 
name still has value,” Mr. Beikowitz said. 

Retailing analysts said consumer electronics 
— one of the most cyclical of industries because 
so much of its fate is tied to innovations, con- 
stantly revolutionized technology and consumer 
tastes — suffered nearly everywhere in the 
United States in 1996. 

“Things tapered off because consumers had 
all the consumer electronics products they 
needed and there were no exciting new 
products," said John Hughes, a retailing analyst 
at Piper Jaffray Inc. 


The Associated Press 

LOME, Togo — Rebels in Zaireand 
officials of the government they are 
trying to topple will meet face-to-facc 
soon, probably in South Africa, a rebel 

representative said Thursday. 

“They have decided to be serious and 
meet us, 1 ’ Bizima Karaha, foreign af- . 
fairs strategist for the rebels, said Airing #. 
the second day of a meeting of 15 Af- 
rican leaders in this West African cap- 
ital. 

But he added: “We don’t trust them 
much because they are known for mak- 
ing promises they don’t keep. 

The leader of the rebels, Laurent Kab- 
ila, has refused to call a cease-fire umfl 
direct talks begin with President 
Mobutu Sese Seko, the 66-year-old dic- 
tator he is trying to depose. 

Marshal Mobutu has insisted on a 
truce before talks can begin. _ 

On Wednesday, the rebels rejected an 
offer from Zaire’s ruling party that it 
share power. 

The rebels and the government sent 
representatives to tire meeting of the 
Organization of African Unity, which 
was convened to discuss the crisis in 
Zaire, but they would not talk with each 4 
other. 

Mr. Karaha did not give a date for the 
start of talks, nor did he say whether 
they would bring together Mr. Kabila 
and Marshal Mobutu. He said only that 
they would be “in a very few days to 
come," probably in Cape Town or Pre- 
toria. 

There was no immediate statement 
from government representatives at the 
meeting. 

Mr. Kabila's Alliance of Democratic 
Forces for the Liberation of the Congo 
(Zaire) appears to be in a strong position 
to hold out for its conditions. The rebels 
have seized control of a third of the 
country since September in a swift push 
from the eastern border toward the in- 
terior. Kisangani, a major river port and 
vital transport link, fell March 15. 

On Thursday, rebel radio said Mr. 
Kabila's forces were nearing Mbuji- , 
Mayi, the diamond center in soulh-cen- f 
tral Zaire, and Lubumbashi. capital of ' 
the mineral-rich Shaba region in the far 
south. 

Mr. Karaha emphasized that the 
rebels were not seeking to split up Zaire, 
the third largest country in Africa. 

“The world should know what are 
the real issues in Zaire. The integrity of 
Zaire is not an issue — no one is threat- 
ening that integrity," he said. “The 
problem of Zaire is that the Zairian i 
people want freedom, a better life, hu- 
man rights — these are the issues we 

will be fighting. for." , 

• . Outside observers have expresed 
concern that the conflict could lead to a 
breakup of Zaire, where some regions 
already exercise a great deal of 
autonomy. 


■r-wtssi ' 4 


(Jicago 


wi n '" 


■m 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Washington Hopes Mobutu Loses and Kabila Doesn’t Win 


Air France Europe Pilots Set Strike 


PARIS (AFP) — The pilots’ unions at Air France Europe, 
formerly Air Inter, called Thursday for a 48-hour strike on 
Monday and Tuesday, days on which many travelers will be 
returning from the long Easter weekend. 

Management sources said the company would be able to 
judge the effect the strike call would have on air traffic by the 
end of the day Thursday. 

The unions are protesting what they see as management's 
desire to impose unilaterally changes unfavorably affecting 
the pilots' status. 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


Nonsmoker Loses in German Court 


FRANKFURT (AFP) — German airlines are not legally 
required to provide nonsmoking seating on their flights, a 
Frankfurt court announced Thursday. 

The judgment resulted from the case of a nonsmoker who was 
demanding 2,000 Deutsche marks ($1,100) in damages from an 
unidentified airline that had placed her in the smoking section of 
a flight on June 10, 1996, despite confirming a reservation in tire 
no-smoking section. The unidentified traveler said the ex- 
perience had given her “a sudden onset of bronchitis." 


Cyprus Airways said Friday it would add four new 
destinations in Europe to its summer schedule. Twice-weekly 
flights to Dresden are to begin Sunday. Weekly flights on 
Tuesdays to Strasbourg and Lyon will start April 15, with one 
weekly flight on Tuesdays to Stansted Airport near London, 
beginning May 6. (tourers) 


The U.S. government wants the rebellion in 
Zaire to topple President Mobutu Sese Seko. 
but without an outright victory for the rebel 
leader, Laurent Kabila, officials familiar with 
U.S. policy in the crisis say. 

But U.S. leverage is limited to political 
pressure and economic promises, without any 
possibility of Western intervention of the son 
that rescued Mr. Mobutu’s regime several 
times during the Cold War. 

Instead, Washington hopes the upheaval 
will end Zaire's tradition of one-man dic- 
tatorial rule. Ultimately, the officials said 
Thursday, only a more democratic, more de- 
centralized government is capable of reviving 
the shattered economy and protecting the na- 
tion’s unity. 

Such idealistic hopes contrast with Zaire's 
tradition of chaos and corruption, but U.S. 
officials in Washington contend that a polit- 
ical change of this kind is in the cards — 
sooner or later. They said that more rep- 
resentative government has increasingly 
come to be seen as the only viable long-term 
formula for stability among a growing num- 
ber of Zairian leaders and by all the outside 
powers involved, mainly the United Stares. 
France and South Africa. 


In urging a cease-fire and peace talks. 
Washington is walking a fine line, trying to 
ensure that a truce does not turn out to be a 
device for perpetuating dictatorship in the 
form of an informal partition of Zaire or as a 
Mobutu-style regime under a new strongman, 
such as Mr. Kabila. 

Hie Americans dismissed suggestions that 
the U.S. military might be used in any way to 
influence the course of political events in 
Zaire. One source cited the failure of a West- 
ern plan Last fall to send a multinational force 
to protect relief workers fighting famine in 
eastern Zaire. 

“The idea there was humanitarian relief, 
but people edged away from it. in no small 
part because they were afraid it might take on 
political overtones," an official said in Wash- 
ington. 

Already positioned just outside Zaire's bor- 
ders, U.S. forces would be used only to evac- 
uate Americans and other foreigners, officials 
said. That would be a quick in-and-out op- 
eration. 

For the moment, the prime obstacle to the 
change, in U.S. eyes, is Marshal Mobutu. 
"His objective is keep the money flowing, 
assure his own security and stay president for 
life," said an official with access to U.S. 
assessments of the situation. 

In Washington. Marshal Mobutu is seen as 


a lost cause. As the U.S. official put it, ‘ ‘Kab- 
ila is probably unstoppable, so it either ends 
earlier with negotiations or it ends later with 
Kabila having taken the whole thing.” 

Even in Pans, where the government values 


Marshal Mobutu’s possible role in a political 
endgame, a Foreign Ministry official agreed 


endgame, a Foreign Ministry official agreed 
Thursday that it was time he cut bis losses. If 
he negotiates now, the official said, “be might 
have enough political capital to save some of 
the wealth be has stashed in Europe.” 

But neither capital is enamored of Mr. 
Kabila, whom several Western officials de- 
scribed as a career rebel for whom politics go 
hand in hand with personal enrichment. 

Publicly, officials in Paris and Washington 
are wary of public criticism that might ali- 
enate Mr. Kabila at a moment when he ap- 
pears poised to topple Marshal Mobutu and 
take over the country himself, but privately 
Western officials describe him as a Mobutu- 
style leader unlikely to bring stability to 
Zaire. 

"Laurent-Desire Kabila is utterly unsuited 
to be ruler of Zaire: he is not interested in 
accountable, elected government — which is 
the only thing that can give that place a chance 
of turning around,” a U.S. official said. 

In the U.S. view, Zaire has a chance of non- 
violent change if the upheaval results in na- 
tional elections and a revived political life. 


Many democratic reforms have already been 
passed by Parliament but never carried out — . j 
including a new constitution allowing in- ' I 
creased regional autonomy. 

Even though Mr. Kabila has set his sights 
on taking over the whole country, officials 
said, his ambitions may be curbed by his 
dependence on the Tutsi, a tribe in neigh- 
boring countries, mainly Burundi, Rwanda 
and Uganda, that have financed and armed the 
Zairian rebellion. 

Mr. Kabila — often wrongly said to be a 
Tutsi himself — is a full-fledged Zairian, 
whose father was from the Luba tribe and his 
mother from the Lunda in Shaba Province. 

But his dependence on Tutsi help is un- 
popular in Zaire and could well force him to 
seek a political deal short of one-man rule. 

The Tutsi “are going to have enough on 
their hands just hanging on in Burundi and 
Rwanda in the next five to 10 years to uy 
running Zaire with its 45 million people," a 
U.S. specialist said f 

Paris frequently suggests that the Tutsi — 
and by extension, Mr .Kabila — are a tool of 
U.S. influence aimed at curbing the role of 
France in east Africa. 

“Thai’s just flat untrue,” the U.S. official 
said. “We helped some countries, but that 
does not mean we helped tbeir man — we 
didn’t." 


Judies' [ 


*■ '‘U.'f-r ./if# 


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- -cfcjV 

• * acne 

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EU Net’s English Nettles France 


WEATHER 


ir / 




rom W 


Classified 

Marketplace 

Monday 

International Recruitment 

Tuesday 

Education Directory 
Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

Thursday 

International Conferences and Seminars 
Friday 

Real Estate MarketpLice/Holidays and Travel 

Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
. Monday thro ugh Saturday. 

For further information contact 

Kimberly Cuerrand-Betran court in Paris 

TeLr + 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 / Fax: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 92 12 


Agence Frmure-Presse 

PARIS — Foreign Minis- 
ter Herve de Chare tie has a 
grumble: There’s too much 
English on the European Uni- 
on's Internet site. 

In a letter to the president 
of the European Commission, 
Jacques Santer, Mr. de Char- 


ette expressed dismay that so 
many of the Union's avail- 
able documents and Web 
pages were in English. 

Officially, the EU has 11 
working languages that are 
supposed lo be of equal 
status. 

“I would be very grateful 
if you could ensure that the 
equality of the 11 official 
working languages is prop- 
erly respected," Mr. de 
Chare tie said, “and let me 
know the commission's 
plans for the development of 
I multilingualism on the Inter- 
net," 


Europe 




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Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


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North America 

A siorm across ihd Mid- 
west and East will bring 
wet wither to these areas 
Saturday, followed by a 
shot of chilly air moving 
from the Graai Lakes, Into 
the Northeast by Monday. 

A period of wai weather Is 
slated lor the Northwest 
Sunday no Monday, white 
the Plains wSl turn dry and 
warm. 


Europe 

Western Europe, ndudrtg 
Pans. London and Amster- 
dam. win turn dry and grad- 
ually mkdor through Mon- 
day. Much of eastern 
Europo will atay cool lo 
ch«y with unsettled weath- 
er, espacttAy in the souih. 
Storms will continue to 
track tito and across Scan- 
dinowia. 


Asia 

A shot of arctic air will 
Invade Manchuria this 
weekend. Bering and 
Seoul will be on the fringe 
of Oils cold shot with some 
moderation Ukeiy by Mon- 
day. Mild In Tokyo 5 aiur- 
day wtti showers possible, 
ihen turning cooler. Sea- 
sonable in Hong Kong with 
a shower possible each 
day. 


Almaty 

Bafi 

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Bootey 
Catena 
Chong MW 
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HoCNMMi 

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teamaoao 

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K. Kkiaealu 

Mann 

New DaM 

Pnnom Penh 

Phutart 

Hangoon 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Stngapwj 

TakMI 

Tokyo 

Vtorftaiw 


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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


Pacific Western University 

1210 Auatn Street, Dept. 23 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 199 


THE AMERICAS 


Fund-Raising Fiasco Puts Democrats in Need of, Well, Fund-Raising 


By Richard L. Berke 

.Vph- Yn/k Time/ Scrvirr 

WASHINGTON — The Democratic National 
Committee is in its most precarious financial 
position in decades, facing debts of S14.4 million 
and projected legal bills of $4 million in the next 
year alone, party officials say. 

They also say the party* does not have the 
money to repay $1.5 million in unlawful or 
questionable 1996 campaign donations that it 
has promised to return. 

This monetary hole has left party leaders in the 
uncomfortable position of having to turn to 
loyal, and legal, donors to help pay back the 
money to donors whose motives have" been ques- 
tioned. In a further complication, as the con- 
troversy over last year’s fund-raising efforts 
intensifies, there are signs of strain in the re- 


lationship between the White House and the 
Democratic Party. 

Several veteran Democrats said it could take 
years for the party to recover from its financial 
and political turmoil. 

The party’s general chairman. Governor Roy 
Romer of Colorado, said in an interview Wed- 
nesday that disclosures about Democratic fund- 
raising practices in the 1996 campaign had been 
so disruptive that he had found it nearly im- 
possible to get anyone to listen to how the party 
stood on issues. 

Instead, the national committee spends much 
of its time responding to subpoenas. 

“If you just look at the subpoenas you know 
that are coming out," Mr. Romer said, “some- 
times you think they are calculated not to get 
information but just to occupy you so much that 
you can’t do anything else but answer sub- 


poenas." He added that it had been difficult to 
extract details from the White House about many 
of the allegations. 

Mr. Romer said he could not even get answers 
from his own staff about whar happened in die 
frenzy of fund-raising in 1996. 

“I am confident 1 don't know everything.'* 
Mr. Romer said, explaining that he got much of 
his information from newspapers. 

Amy Weiss Tobe, a party spokeswoman, said 
the committee had $1.7 million on hand. 

Mr. Romer said the party was having more 
than the usual amount of trouble raising funds in 
this noneleciion year. 

He said it was considering loosening some 
restrictions in its fund-raising procedures that it 
announced in late January, although he denied 
that such a move would be intended"to relieve the 
financial pressure. 


In addition to paying off the debt, the parry 
needs to raise S50 'million for operations this 
year, officials said. 

Donald Sweitzer, a former political director 
and finance director of the national party, said 
that traditionally, donors often gave to the party 
“because they truly care about electing Demo- 
crats." Now, he said, what he hears is: “I don’t 
want my money to go to paying for some bunch 
of lawyers defending the sins of the past." 

Brian Lunde. a former executive director of 
the Democratic committee, said current party 
officials “are in survival mode — they just want 
to survive until tomorrow.” 

Mr. Romer expressed frustration with the pace 
at which the White House had authorized the 
party to release documents on its fund-raising. “I 
think, it is dumb not to have those documents 
out." he said. 


In another sign of tension with President Bill 
Clinton's administration. Mr. Romer suggested 
that it was unwise for the White House to have 
had the party put so much empbasis on helping 
the president's re-election last year at the ex- 
pense of Democrats running for Congress and 
for governor. 

But Mr. Romer, who rakes two days a week 
from his job as governor to preside at the Demo- 
cratic National Committee, refused to criticize 
the president. 

He said, "I don't have any evidence that he is 
holding out from me. I don't." 

The Republican National Committee has a 
debr of $7.5 million, Mary Crawford, a party 
spokeswoman, said. But unlike the Democrats, 
the Republicans are not saddled with huge legal 
fees or embroiled in a fund-raising contro- 
versy. 


Doesn't^ 


Chicago’s Soul at Stake in Hate Crime 

Attach That Put Black Boy in Coma Rekindles Racial Tensions 


By Don Terry 

New ypri. Times S erv ice 

CHICAGO — For the last few days, a 
parade of politicians and preachers have 
• made their way to the bedside of a 
comatose 13-year-old black boy to pray 
for his recovery and for the city’s soul. 

In a storm of Fists and feet, the boy. 
Lenard Clark, was beaten into a coma by 
' a pack of white teenagers as he rode his 
bicycle last Friday on the edge of 
Bridgeport, a neighborhood known for 
producing mayors and racial hostility. 
According to the police, the teenagers 
later bragged about keeping blacks out 
of the neighborhood. 

These are tense times in Chicago. The 
beating of Lenard came on the heels of 
another ugly but less serious racial in- 
cident two weeks earlier. During a high 
school basketball game, dozens of stu- 
dents from a predominately white. Ro- 
man Catholic boys school taunted play- 
ers from a largely black school with 
chants of “Buckwheat" 

Officials from the Catholic school. 
Brother Rice High School, apologized 
and the uproar seemed to be dying down 
when word spread through the city that 
an even worse incident bad sent a child 
to the hospital, fighting for his life. 

“Lenaiti is still in a coma." his aunt, 
Tallulah Black, said Wednesday. "It’s 
going to be a long process for him to 
recover. Lenard is going to have to be 
taught how to do everything all over 
again. He's moving his leg up and 
down. But the doctors say the move- 
ment is reaction to the pain, the pain 
from the beating." 

Now at least three protest marches 
through Bridgeport are being organized. 
Political, religious and civic leaders, 
from Mayor Richard M. Daley to the ■ 
Reverend Jesse Jackson, are pleading 
for calm, and the Archdiocese of Chica- 
go is promising to “redouble” its ef- 
forts to teach its young tolerance. 

Three white teenagers have been ar- 


rested and charged with attempted 
murder in Lenard 's beating. They have 
been released on bond. 

Two of the suspects. Frank Caruso, 
1 8. and Victor Jasas, 1 7, are students at 
De La Salle, another Catholic high 
school and the alma mater of Mayor 
Daley. The third suspect in the case. 
Michael Kwidzinski. 19, is a recent 
graduate of the school. 

“We are deeply troubled that stu- 
dents from a Catholic high school are 

‘I never realized it was 
this bad, that a little boy 
couldn’t ride his bike on 
a beautiful spring day 
without fearing for his 
life.’ 


alleged to have been perpetrators of a 
hate crime," the Reverend Raymond 
Goedert, diocesan administrator, said in 
a statement. 

The suspects are from Bridgeport, a 
place where black people have rarely 
felt comfortable after dark. 

“Over the years. I’ve heard that 
people of color should be careful going 
to Bridgeport," Ms. Black said. “But I 
never realized it was this bad. I never 
realized that a little boy couldn’t ride his 
bike on a beautiful spring day without 
fearing for his life." 

Bridgeport was die home of former 
Mayor Richard J. Daley, the city’s le- 
gendary boss and the faiher of the cur- 
rent mayor, who until a few years ago 
also called the neighborhood on the 
South Side of Chicago home. 

Mayor Daley went to visit Lenard at 
Cook County Hospital and condemned 
the child’s attackers as “thugs." But 
lawyers for the three suspects say their 
clients were not involved in the brutal 


POLITICAL NO 


beating and that the media and the may- 
or have “rushed to judgment" because 
it is a racially charged case. 

On the streets of Bridgeport, several 
residents of the neighborhood ex- 
pressed sympathy for Lenard and his 
family. 

“It's a shame things like this happen, 
but that is the way it is.” said Tony 
Hoskins, 28, a baggage handler at 
O’Hare International Airport. 

“Chicago is a racially segregated 
town. Bridgeport symbolizes that." 

In the last few years, many more 
Asian and Hispanic people have moved 
into the blue-collar neighborhood, ac- 
counting for about 40 percent of the 
population. 

Bur almost no blacks live in Bridge- 
port. 

Meanwhile, Lenard’s mother. Wanda 
McMuxry, continued her vigil at her 
son's side. 

“This man called me today and said 
he was putting on a march for Lenard,’ ' 
Ms. McMurry said. “I told him that was 
line, just as long as it wasn't just blacks 
marching. I tola him to get whites and 
blacks and Chinese and Mexicans to- 
gether and then march. We're supposed 
to get along with one another. What 
happened to my son should be the whole 
city s business." 



Date! MerdfTte Avoancdfau 

HAITI TENSIONS — Pro- and anti-government supporters tussling outside Parliament in Port-au- 
Prince. Opposition lawmakers failed Thursday in a bid to censure Prime Minister Rosoy Smarth over his 
economic policies. Meanwhile, violence claimed the lives of four more people, including two policemen. 


Colombians Now Push Heroin to Stem Losses 


By Douglas Farah 

Washington Post Sen'ice 

CALL Colombia — Colombian drug 
traffickers, stung by the loss of markets 
and profits to rival Mexican organi- 
zations that are taking over the cocaine 
trade, are aggressively turning to heroin 
production and distribution, posing a 


Clinton Pushes Bill of Rights 
For Health-Care Consumers 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton has appointed 
a 34-member advisory panel to draft a bill of rights for 
health care consumers and to assess the need for die federal 
government to regulate private health insurance plans. 

The panel immediately came under fire from such House 


Republicans as Representative Bill Thomas of California, ^ ^ House •• W here appropriate, inft 
who denounced it as "a politically inspired gimmick de- jo protect and advance national security 

signed to ratify" further regulation of the health care serve the intesrritv of criminal investigations." 1 


signed to ratify” further regulation of the health care 
I market. Mr. Thomas heads the health subcommittee of the 
Ways and Means Committee. 

But Donna Shalala, secretary of health and human ser- 
vices, said she wanted to “move away from heavy-handed 
front-end regulation" toward new ways of measuring the 
quality and results of medical care. 

The panel, the Advisory Commission on Consumer 
■Protection '-arid Quality in the Health Care Industry, is 
headed by Ms. Shalala and Cynthia Metzler, the acting 
secretary of labor. It will investigate the practices of health 
maintenance organizations and other forms of managed 
care, which now provide coverage for more than 150 
million Americans. The commission will seek a middle 
ground between health main tenan ce orga nizati ons, which 
oppose federal regulation, and consumer advocates and 
doctors, who say federal standards are essential. (NYT) 

FBI Hears From White House 

WASHINGTON — President Clinton has reiterated his 
concern about the FBI’s reluctance to provide the White 
House with information about China's alleged efforts to 
influence political campaigns in the United States, but 

Away From Politics 

• Engineers calibrating the refurbished Hubble Space 
Telescope have discovered a problem in a newly installed 
S105 million infrared instrument that could th® 

number of observations by about 6 percent, said Edward 
Weiler, the chief Hubble scientist at NASA. ( wrj 

■ Hispanic- Americans wiD surpass blacks by the year 
2005 as the largest U.5- minority, according to projections 


maintained he still has full confidence in the FBI director, 
Louis Freeh. 

“I think everyone understands that there are significant 
national security issues at stake here and that the White 
House, the National Security Council, and the secretary of 
state, as well as (he president, need to know when the 
national security issues are brought into play," Mr. Clinton 
said Wednesday, responding to reporters' questions during 
an Oval Office ceremony. 

He added that the FBI bad “dual obligations" to share 
with the White House "where appropriate, information we 
need to protect and advance nanonal security and to pre- 
serve the integrity of criminal investigations. * ’ Where there 
are difficulties the attorney general must resolve them. Mr. 
Clinton said, expressing confidence that this had been done 
in the past. 

Mr. Clinton's concern stems from Mr. Freeh's decision 
not to provide the White House a full briefing on allegations 
that the Chinese government tried to funnel money into 
federal elections. The White House had requested a briefing 
before Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s recent trip 
to Beijing. Mr. Freeh rebuffed the initial request for in- 
formation about the allegations, but the Justice Department 
brokered a compromise in which a more limited summary 
was provided. (WP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Representative Michael Castle. Republican of Delaware, 
unveiling a balanced budget proposal that would rely 
heavily on a ‘ ‘fiscal dividend” — the long-term savings in 
interest on the federal debt and increased revenues from an 
expanding economy — and the closing of tax loopholes to 
provide $1 12 billion of tax relief: “We can talk about 
balancing the budget and whether it includes tax cuts or not 
and never get there. We have to break the logjam." (WP ) 

in a report by die Census Bureau dial documents explosive 
growth in the nation's Hispanic population. (NYT) 

• A second suspect was arrested in connection with a two- 

month string of armed robberies in suburban Washington 
homes. (WP) 

• Shortly after saying 4 ‘Excuse me*' to a fellow passenger 
who jostled him on a subway train, a Brooklyn man was 
slashed across die face by the passenger, leaving him with 
a wound that required 23 stitches, the police stud. (NYT) 


major challenge to U.S. law-enforce- 
ment officials. 

Unlike the large cocaine cartel that 
made this city infamous, the heroin traf- 
ficking organizations tend to be small, 
extremely violent and willing to form 
■alliances with the nation’s Marxist guer- 
rilla groups for protection of opium 
fields, Colombian and American offi- 
cials said. 

“Colombian heroin is a global threat 
of growing proportions," Barry Mc- 
Caffrey, the Clinton administration’s 
national drug-policy director, said in a 
recent interview. “Colombians have 
gone from zero to producing 6.5 metric 
tons in five years, and are now using an 
incredibly aggressive marketing 
strategy." 

Mr. McCaffrey and others said that, 
while Colombian organizations pro- 
duced only a fraction of the world's 
heroin — Southeast Asian organiza- 
tions still provide more than 90 percent 
of the global supply — the Colombians’ 
deliberate strategy of focusing on the 
U.S. market made them especially wor- 
risome to American law-enforcement 
officials. 

Last year, according to Drug En- 
forcement Administration figures, 62 
percent of the heroin seized in the 
United States was made in Colombia. 
The drug agency uses a chemical pro- 
cess to identity the "signature,” or ori- 
gin, of each load seized. 

The growing Colombian-led traffic 
comes at a time when heroin use in the 
United States is growing, while cocaine 
use has dropped. American officials es- 
timate that in the last three years, heroin 
use in the United States expanded from 
500,000 users to more than 600,000, 
including many young people who find 
the drug fashionable. 

General Rosso Jose Serrano, com- 
mander of the Colombian National Po- 
lice. predicted in an interview that with 
the emerging dominance of the Mexican 


cartels in trafficking cocaine, “heroin 
will replace cocaine" as Colombia’s 
main drug export. 

The expansion of Colombian groups 
into heroin trafficking and their reor- 
ganization into small, widely dispersed 
units are part of a global trend in drug 
distribution that is making fighting the 
multibiUion-doUar industry more dif- 
ficult for police agencies worldwide. 

Around the world, the growth of in- 
ternational trade brought on by the end 
of the Cold War and a shift toward ffee- 
market economic policies has made 
possible a huge expansion both in mar- 
kets for hard drugs and in potential 
suppliers. - 

Where the cocaine trade once was 
dominated by a few large Colombian 
organizations, now the trade is split 
between the Colombians and a group of 
Mexican crime families. And while 
Colombians are moving into heroin, a 
drug long produced in Southeast Asia, 
new players are breaking into the drag 
business in the United States, including 
Russian and Chinese crime syndicates, 
Albanians, Nigerians and South Afri- 
cans. 

“Traditionally, Colombian criminals 
were dealing only with the boys in Peru 
and Bolivia," said Mr. McCaffrey, re- 
ferring to the South American countries 
where most of the world’s coca — the 
raw material for cocaine — is grown. 
“It is much more complicated now. We 
have the Mexicans and a whole set of 
new actors from Dominicans to Rus- 
sians to Nigerians." 

Nigerian gangs, for example, carry 
much of die heroin produced in Thai- 
land to the United States using human 
"mules" from a host of nations as cour- 
iers. The same groups. American and 
Colombian law enforcement officials 
say, are in touch with Colombian 
heroin-trafficking organizations, who in 
turn use Dominican gangs in New York 
to distribute the drug at street level. 


Organized crime families from Rus- 
sia and other former Soviet-bloc coun- 
tries have been moving their operations 
to the United States and their money- 
laundering operations to the Caribbean, 
U.S. law enforcement officials say. 

South Africa, with the largest finan- 
cial centers in Africa, has become an 
attractive site for money-laundering and 
drug trafficking. Even the Taleban guer- 
rillas in Afghanistan, despite their stated 
intention to adhere to Islamic religious 
law, are believed to be involved in 
heroin trafficking, according to senior 
U.S. officials. . 

While die criminal groups protect 
themselves by building their operations 
with family and dan members, there is 
more willingness among criminal or- 
ganizations to do business across ethnic 
tines, because no single group can 
monopolize a drug or a route any 
longer. 

“The relationships are transactional 
and short-term, but they hook up all the 
time now," said a senior American of- 
ficial. “The route the drugs take 
changes with every transaction." 

Robert Gdbard, assistant secretary of 
state for international narcotics and law 
enforcement, called the relationship 
among the criminal organizations ‘ ‘pax 
mafiosi." with various groups profiting 
through temporary alliances with oth- 
ers, thus largely avoiding violent turf 
battles. 

Amid these many changes, the 
Colombian move into heroin is one of 
die most striking shifts, authorities said. 
Tbe traffickers are believed to be ship- 
ping much of tbeir merchandise through 
Venezuela. Ecuador or the Caribbean as 
a way of keeping the business away 
from tbe Mexicans. Because the street 
value of heroin is 4 to 10 times that of 
the same quantity of cocaine, heroin 
traffickers can make huge profits while 
moving only a fraction of the tonnage 
that cocaine organizations move. 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAY'S 

HOLIDAYS 
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Appears 
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Legal Notices 


LEANT HOLMNGS SA 


Tta tfarehtados ta Ltatf Hofc&ig* SA, 

Parana, fire Mod to Send a lueeBng 
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hmgs-tmd Prim Bank. Aatate ea ssa S. 


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1. To pw UndeB No. U94 al tte 
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of Gd Benfl tadushta United, 
Mai, UAH on November 5. 1S94- 

Z To appro* fte repods of to Boad of 
Dtaaora an to sdMtos of to 
Cfflrpny lor to Rranctf Yean 
anted December 31, 1833; 1994 and 
1995 

3. To approra to Balance Sheet and 
Proffi and Loss Aconi* tor to 
Financial Yeas ended Decentor 31. 
1991 1994 end 1995 and to 
appropriate) ofto net prods. 

4. To approve to appotonert of Alag 
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INTERNATIONAL 


AZT During Pregnancy: Good News 

Drug Helps Prevent AIDS Transmission Even for Very Sick Mothers 


By David Brown 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — The anti-viral 
drug AZT largely prevents mother-to- 
child transmission of the AIDS virus 
even among pregnant women with re- 
latively advanced HIV infection. 

That was die welcome, although un- 
expected, finding of a study looking into 
an entirely different issue, officials at 
the National Institutes of Health an- 
nounced Wednesday. 

“This is very good news for infected 
pregnant women, and for their chil- 
dren,” said Lynne Mofenson, a pedi- 
atrician at the National Institute of Child 
Health and Human Development 
One of the biggest therapeutic suc- 
cesses in the AIDS epidemic was the 
discovery several years ago that mother- 
to-child transmission could be cut from 
23 percent to about 8perceni if AZT was 
given to pregnant, HIV-positive women 
in the final weeks of pregnancy and dur- 
ing delivery, and if the newborn then got 
the drug for the first six weeks of life. 

But the study "proving this involved 
healthy women whose immune systems 


Freed Oil Workers 
In Nigeria Report 
Captors Beat Them 


Reuters 

WARRL Nigeria — Shell oil workers 
who were held hostage by Nigerian vil- 
lagers making political demands said 
Thursday that they had been beaten by 
their captors and threatened with death. 

The political grievances of the vil- 
lagers against the military government 
have caught die country's oil giant. Roy- 
al Dutch/Shell, in the middle and 
threatened a possible disruption in vital 
oil exports. 

Ijaw tribesmen seized Shell's oil flow 
stations in Delta state on Saturday and 
held 127 Nigerian staff members to 
protest the government's relocation of 
its local headquarters from Ijaw terri- 
tory. 

“A group of 40 Ijaws armed with 
automatic nfles. cudgels and crude im- 
plements attacked the Egwa flow station 
in flying boats and disarmed the lone 
policeman,” said a station attendant 
who was among the nearly 80 hostages 
who have been freed. 

“They flogged me with cutlasses, 
threatening toldli me,” said another. 
Both declined to be identified. 

The cause of the problem is rivalry in 
the Warn area among three tribes — the 
Ijaws, the Itsekiris and Urhobohs. 

But “people in the Delta area believe 
government does not exist in physical 
context," said Steve Menta, a commu- 
nity leader. "It is only Shell that we see. 
people feel government will listen if 
11 is involved." 


and 

She 


were not yet heavily damaged by the 
virus. Many AIDS experts doubted that 
women with more advanced disease 
would show the same magnitude of ben- 
efit from AZT. In fact, they theorized 
that sicker women would transmit the 
virus to their infants in 11 percent to 15 
percent of cases. 

A second study not intended to test 
that theory nevertheless proved it 
wrong. It involved women who had 
levels of key immune system cells, 
called CD-4 cells, that had dropped to 
less than 500 cells per millili ter of blood 
— evidence of moderate immune sys- 
tem damage. About one-quarter had 
CD-4 counts less than 200, which marks 
even more advanced infection. 

All the women got the standard AZT 
treatment. In addition, half were also 
randomly assigned to get a second treat- 
ment — HIV immune globulin, which is 
a blood product rich in proteins called 
antibodies that attack the human im- 
munodeficiency virus. 

An independent board of scientists 
monitoring the study, but not directly 
involved in it, last week reviewed the 
dam accumulated so far. It found that 4.7 


cement of the women getting the im- 
Jnune globulin treatment passed toe vi- 
rus to their babies, compared witfa4-8 
percent of women not getting the extra 

treatment. ■ * 

The study, which began in laie 1993, 
had enrolled 445 women, with a target 
of setting 800 women m by July 1998, 
Because toe rate of HIV transmission ta 
so low in both groups, however, far 
more than 800 women would have to be 
included in the experiment for it to have 
the “power” to detect a real. benefit A 
from the immune globulin — - should 
one exist The review panel calculated, 
specifically, that 2,000 women would 
be needed, and that it would take until 

2002 to recruit them. 

This information was passed on to 
officials from toe three health institutes 
sponsoring the experiment. They con- 
cluded that the study was not worth 
pursuing for that length of rime, and shut 
it down this week. Although the study 
did not answer the HIV immune globulin 
question, it did show that “standard” 
ACT therapy for mother and newborn 
works well for all women, regardless of 
the stage of their HIV infection. 


BRIEFLY 


Iraq Assails Albright 
For Jfhrningon Deal 

BAGHDAD — Iraq hit back at U.S. 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
on Thursday for her warning that a UN 
oil-for-food deal could be scrapped if 
Baghdad stepped out of line. 

1 ‘Iraq categorically rejects any con- 
dition or modification to UN reso- 
lutions.” Deputy Prime Minister 
Tareq Aziz said, quoted by toe official 
Iraqi press agency, IN A. 

In a speech Wednesday. Mrs. Al- 
bright described the ofl-for-food deal 
between toe United Nations and Iraq, 
which came into effect in December, 
as an “experiment" that could be 
terminated. 

Mr. Aziz described Mrs. Albright’s 
comments as new proof that the 
United States was exploiting the UN 
Security Council to serve its own eco- 
nomic interests in toe region. (AFP) 

Sudanese Rebels Try 
To Cut Main Road 

NAIROBI — Sudanese rebels said 
Thursday that they were on toe of- 
fensive In toe east of toe country to cut 
toe main road from Khartoum to Port 
Sudan. 

The Sudanese Army earlier said 
Eritrean troops and Sudanese rebels 
were shelling its positions on Eritrea's 
border, but the rebels denied that any 
Eritrean forces were involved. 

“Our forces in the last 48 hours 


were ordered to start an operation with 
toe aim of interrupting traffic on the 
Khartoum-Port Sudan road to nuke it 
unusable,” said Sampson Kwaje, a 
spo kesman for the Sudan People’s 
Liberation Army. (Reuters) 

Argentine Aide Bars 
Spanish Warrant 

BUENOS AIRES — Foreign Min- 
ister Guido Di Telia said in an in- 
terview published on Thursday that 
Spain's arrest warrant for the former 
military ruler General Leopoldo Gal- 
tieri was “totally inadmissible 1 ' and 
Tihflf the “dead are dead.” 

In an interview with the Argentine 
newspaper Pagina 12 in Paris. Mr. Di 
Telia said “nobody in their right 
minds” would try to put the general 
on trial abroad. A Spanish High Court 
judge, Baltazar Gaizon. investigating 
toe disappearance of 300 Spaniards in 
the Argentine military’s “dirty war" 
in the late 1970s, charged General 
Galtieri with ordering the killings of 
three of toe Spaniards. * (Reuters) 

For the Record 

Nigeria is to re-run local council 
elections next Thursday in 139 areas 
out of 774 where similar polls held 
about two weeks ago were inconclus- 
ive, toe electoral commission said. It 
said that elections would be held in 112 
municipal councils where none of toe 
five registered political parties gained 
an absolute majority. (Reuters) 


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QUEBEC - Gracious taro on 6 hectare 
estate. 900 metera & boatfuusa on Lac 
das Sables, near Iretaric downtown Ste- 
Agathe, 40 mil. Montreal rfl akport Joe 
Graham, Doncaster Realties Inc., Tek 
(819) 3264963. Fax: (819) 3268829. 


French Provinces 


FRENCH SIDE OF GENEVA 
10 mins. GENEVA / UN Or ga ih a So m 
(FEHNEY/YOLTARE, Franco,) In a tow- 
nous guarded residence, surrounded by 
<yaen parte and tans courts. 

LARGE 205 SOU APARTNBIT 
55 sq.m. terraces, ffigh class. 5 bed- 
rooms, two bathrooms, 1 visitor's WC. 
Magrtfoent vow ol Jura S Alps mo un- 
tans Undergromd gaaga FF3500000. 

Tet +41-22-73346.58 (eventa] 
E-malfc GkodeUMHCaCH 


Hagntieail RENOVATE) FARM0USE 
fi 150 acres nth mmderU van of he 
Pyrenees. 5 beds ensure, hwi uchen, 
2 large racepoons. ones room, pool 6 
stables & 60m x 30m train arena, 
ingunes krTet:+33(D)4 68 G9 93 7a 
Fax: +33 (Q)4 68 69 90 79. 
wnafl 1D071B27MeCompBSenrexaa. 


UBBfflES LUBSXW 
inque beam Hsoncal sfe. 200 sqm 
landscaped garden. Pool Sold by owner 
Documentation: Fax +33(0)4 42 26 32 14 


AH EN PROVENCE ■ CENTER, dd erty. 
Poets duplex, targe terrace, exceptional 
vim, fireplace, renovated, fumEhed. 
FF1.000.0X. Tet +33 (0)4 42 23 52 32. 
Fax +33 (OK 42 23 29 07. 


NORTH CHARBITE 
Deep m rural France, but 
taws from Paris on he TGV. i 
Manor House Uly renovated by an 
American to tiighest comfort standards. 
Stanton on a ha top to 10 ha. Dowered 
park. Spectactaar vrws. Guest house 
also Mly renovated. Total 7 baboons. 
3 receptions. FF3 .500.000. Additional 
tend mittfe nduSng tnfle orchard. 

TeL owner +33 (0)5 45 31 04 74 


REIMS-EPERNAY-CHALONS Triangle. 
Luxurious property buffi in 1993, 
set to 11/2 acres petals ground, border- 
ing late (sprrtter systems). 3500 sat 
Smg space: 3 reception looms, 5 done' 
bedrooms, 3 befrnrems, 2 enstate 1 ekh 
jacuzji. Indoor poor. same, shower, 
double oarage, wire cellar. Luxury 
fihmgs. Selreg price FF5U or nearest 
ofler. TeF Oaner ,33 (Q)3 26 68 56 7t 


Komandy, tor sale by owner, 4km 
Deauvie, 2 Boas, home 400 MZ+ celar 
■rib detached guest house and garage 
on one hectare of land, complete^ 
fenced. Perfect condton, 1,650000 FF. 
Contact Jacqtan. La Caur Nonrande, 
14800 Bomwfle STTouques. 


PEHGORD, LOVELY STONE HOUSE to 
12th cert riBsge. Beams, fireplaces, 
wew. F375.000. Tet +33(0)1 43253687 


French Riviera 


BAY OF CANNES Port la Galere, 
In priraie property ta 25 ha on sea front 
duplex 140 sq.m, terraces with nothing 
oppose, paroramc mr of 180 degree, 
2 pools, lam pirate port. Restaurants, 
deanlng and housekeeping assured by 
ctab. Tel: +33(0)2 43 47 18 45 


BETWEEN ST TTtOPEZ & Ranefuelle, 
splendid vita, 3iQ sqjn. (possible 450 
sqm). BO pooL Panoramic sea view. 4 
ha land Price 51JM. Tel: Philip Guy, 
Paris +33(0)143069479. office 
<0)145487286. 9 Trope* (0)494542502 


FRANCE 


CAP D'ANTIBES 


Exceptional Opportunity 
for developers and private investors to buy 
in the magnificent 'Baie des Milliardaircs” 


Superb 2Q.QQQ sa.m. Land 


dy of the birds and the 5 gl 

In addition to its south faring exposition overiooking die pari and the 
sea, ihis bcauiiful property is oah 200 maos away fitra tiw post-card 
setting of the Garaiqie hay and its fieac&es.' 

Thfcwiadise tend, ideal Tor one, two, or seven privileged fimDics, docs 
benefit from two buMng permits tooling seven high class luxury villas 
with pools and a caretaker's house, is valued at over US$ 15m. 

Outs offers starting DSS 6 mBoa wti be arastotend for a qakk sale. 

Contact owner atm YAFt 

1, avenue du Dr. PicauA, 06400 Cannes - Frtuux 

Fax: *33 (9)493 99 13 02 


CAP MARTIN NEAR MONACO 

Large 1 bedroom aparfrnent 
plus 40 sqm garden terrace wlh an 
enepfionta view, overiaokhg the sea t 
the Ights of Monte Carlo. This unll 
is abated to a snail exdusra block 
laabring privacy, saarty 6 a rota 
lop pota, main wflh a magnfcent view. 
Pitot FFiat wte garage & Store room. 
Phone owner +33 (0)4 33 28 96 36. 


CANNES 

80 sqm flat Av. <ta Letts tie Tassigny, 
ground floor on garden, 4 bedrooms, 2 
bafts, washroom. 4 ws. 45 sqm taring 
wih targe bay widows, covered marble 
terrace facing south's outfi+jast new on 
bay, private 900 sq.m. 3-tevel garden, 
pool, shower, sauna. 2-3 car garage. 
FF4M. Fax owner +33 (0)1 42 88 47 79 


CANNES 

CAUFORME 

Townhouse. 6 bedrooms. 6 bathrooms, 
2 taring rooms, 1 (bring room, terrace. 
3«rininijy pool View an see. air 
coreflnring. garage, maid's roam. 

5 mms Port Canto. Urgera. 
toanhert Tet +33 (0)6 09 54 11 70. 
Fee +33 (0)4 93 69 84 89. 


NEAR Sophia Antq»8s, fflceA Cannes. 
Rare opportmry Estate with authentic 
IBtfi century ofive oi mffl + independent 
mas + separate garment, tnafeng 650 
sq.m. kving space, 9.000 eq.m. land. 
Posable talking extension. Stream bank. 
PooL Pod-house. Sold dretaty by owner 
50% inter value lor retirement reasons. 
FF4 JOtUXa Tet +33 (0)4 S3 77 36 57. 


cawes - sumo 

30 sqja. + 7 sun. 

Wchen. M baft. Uy hirtshed 

50 m. fnim he sea, paty newel 
Uedterranean. FF4S.OOO. negotiate. 
T* +4039-221020 oe +49- 171-4844812. 


CANNES: Top Boor. 180 degree view, 
high class residence, renovated 150 
bjjil apartment, 100 sq.m. solarium 
which can be ted out and decorated 
■Mating to me deni’s taste and figures 
provided FF2.75OJM0 FRANOR TeL 
+33 (OK 93 15 17 81. 


SOUTH ol FRANCE PAYS VARQIS 
1 hr Sahri Trapes 2 his Monte Carlo. 
Fu9 charm ta Provence. Via on nfeda. 
EtoreonSnary war. 330 stun, fi ha land, 
pooL housekeeper's bdgng, sold ready 
to mw to. SIM. Fax +3(9)142225784 


CANNES CAUFORME, panoramc wew, 
big terrace, garden, pod Punished du- 
plex. 3 bedrooms, 3 bams, garage. Tel 
owner +33 $147201817 / |Q£80S4!9& 


SAINTE NAX2UE, MCE 1993 VILLA, 
1,500 bun gattian, wra on see & mffi 
course. 4 rooms. 2 bathrooms, heated 
swimming pod Tel: +322-270.00.58 or 
+33-4-94 43 89 66. 


CAP FERHAT WATERFRONT. UNKXJE 
♦-bed room yffla. Private beach, jetty, 
gueet house. $3M 1990 now SiiU. Tet 
+377 £5)7935198. Fax +377 93507197. 


COTE D'AZUR - VMrmhe sur II v. 
UagnScenl 3 toons, retrace, sum, sea 
wew, Roadsteads Jean, retoed decora- 
m FF2.35U. Tet -33I0K 93 60 flO 10 


VUENEUVtlOUBET 

Private domain, luxurious, new vlla. 

150 sq.m. + ouftuMngs. Sea view, 
aoufc+resl exposua Gatiea Swumtop 
pool. Reduced lees. Direct owner 
FF5JU Fax: +33 (0)4 92 13 19 32. 

CAP FERRAT - Beautihdy decorated, 
unkflM home. 3 beds. 3 bate sfotog- 
dirting room, fireplace, gartiea paridrg, 
tanaerge. TeL owner +M (0)4837B1(Ha 

Great Britain 

HOUESEARCH LONDON LTD Let us 
search lor ww. we And homes / flats 
to buy ana rem. For individuate and 
conxanies + FuS Corporate Heiocatitm 
Servces. 7 days-a-week. Tet +44 171 

838 1066 Fax ♦ 44 171 838 1077 
rita7/Wrrrtwne5earctu».i*/hom 

Italy 

ASSSL HEART OF MEDIEVAL TOWN. 
magnArem aparmeru m IBtfi century 
mansion. Courtyard, garden, terrace. 
Panoramic war. 300 sa.m.. 2-car ga- 
rage. Tel 39 2 69003107. 

VSKE ■ Apartment on GRAM) CANAL 
between Accadertea Bridge fi Palazco 

Grassi - 145 sq.m. ■ Some restorahon 
necessary. USS6M.OOO Rm# Sox 

0256, HT, 92521 Meurfiy Cedex. France. 

Jamaica 

JAMAICA: FOR SALE / Jolnl Venture. 

210 Acres of lav xi Sana Cnq mou>- 
tatos SL Qizabett Conrad C. Poncho 

Teh (34) 6£6 34SE3 (Spain) 

Monaco 

It THE PBWCPAUTY OF MONACO 

AND THE FRENCH RIVERA 

We set and lei dfleraif types of 
aoatmenfs n vffias. induing office 
space and start term accwrerradatioa 

Various range of pncei Fk isigusges 
spoken. Feel free to contact us. 

parktagence 

La Pai Palace 

25 avenue de la Costa 

IK 88000 Hade Cario 

Tel (3?g 93 a 15 00 

Fax (377) S3 a a 33 
MWJnomecaitoJttoleader^ agence 

Now Zealand 


H0TB. SITE FOR SALE in Queenstown, 
New Zealand lor boutique hoUHfluxury 
mn. Ideal serviced site only 5 mins, to 
town Super lake and mountain views. 
Design and zoning appovafs hi hand JV 
dewnpment consktered Coraact owner- 
Hyperao Cotp. Lid.. Oueanstown, HZ 
Tel: (64-3) 442-5340 Fax (64-3) 
■42-5417. Emat property Shypemotauu 
URL hnjh/riRw.hypemajaiB 


Paris and Suburbs 


35 bn Pans, near Monriort L'Ameuy 

LARGE CHARMING ESTATE 

on 17.000 sqm landscaped park 
bordering the woods Irian house 
+ Itiatchfltired guest cottage. 

Both enfraty renovated wffli period 
beans S ting. About 500 sqm taring 
space wth al modem condons + care- 
Otars' quotas, greenhouse fi garage. 
Easy kxess to Paris by car. RBI train 
to La Defense or 5NCF to Mo n tpa rna s se 
Contact owner 

Tet +33 (0)1 40883617. Fax 40683259. 


15 HN A 15 KM WEST OF PARC by 
the A 14. 20 min Si Lazare stated. Vary 
beatabi 1956 MQ0ERN6T house. 270 
arm. Swig space on 2JXU sqm garden 
r private domain. Luxurious fitfings. 60 
sqm tang, large Braptara, bay windows 
lacing South, terraces, 4 bedrooms. 2 
bads. 2 shwm. Office. Room wtti (a- 
cuzzl fi sana. Outdoor healed swtm- 
rnng pool Private quay on Seine, water 
sklng. floW- Quiet. Greenery. Qualty 
itastyla. Near shops. USJ700.000. Teh 
NY 212 219 9565 Fax NY 212 965 1348 
Tta. Pans 01 39 75 61 62 


GOUffli TRIANGLE - SAMT GERMAN 
DES PHESI LOFT - PIED-A-TERRE. 
2 rooms in sunning 17tti cent, towi- 
housa. 24 m SEOURin /CARETAKER 
heated POOL gym. sauna.. 4m 
. 1. redone, ARMOURED door, cur- 
tains. lamps, equipped TMIELF kitchen, 
marti/e bathroom, wardrobes, dry cellar 
room. FF2.1M ♦ parking. TeWax owner 
+33(0)145491960 or ran FFlSJXXVma 


LUXURY PENTHOUSE 

UniquB wew on Tulenes 
Gardens Gogeous Master suite 
w» terrace. 

BELLES DE1BJRES DE FRANCE 
Tet Paris +33 (0)1 40 06 11 16 


PARK ■ HE ST LOUS 
95 sqm apartment 3 large rooms 
(posstBty of 5 roams), ceing by 
modem artist, mound floor, calm. 

3 fireplaces. USS 300,000. 

Tel +33(0)1 43 25 40 61(otfice), (Ml 46 
SI 02 mjvom), Fax W 43 25 S3 96. 


TR0CADER0 8 ROOMS 

Kgh teas buUrtg, 9h floor 
320 sg.ni Large reception, a bedrooms. 

3 mats’ room wew, greenery. 
MERRE BAZM Tel +33(0)1 47 04 76 75 


EXOUSnE-ILE SANT LOUS 
17th century butting view on 5etne. 
extremely elegant, 140 sqjil, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 bate. Ugh ctffings. US$1 AL 
Tti +33 W114329450T / 1 


95, AUVERS SIR OISE historical iriflage 
(VAN GOGH). Restored Ifflh centray 
stone Itousa, 120 sgm., Airing, dWn g, 
3 bedroom 1 bathroom, 2 wesnxxns + 
430 sq.m garden. S275.000. Tet +33 
(0)134480214. Far +33 (0)648332237. 


50km WEST PARE by freeway S 2Skm 
Iram Verseda. 200 sgni. house hdy 
rarawared. 4 bedroom ras* md etejpn 
1 tia park wtih term court. FF3M. Tel 
+33(0)130791635 Fax (0)1X791638 


7th RUE DE BABYL0NE, perfect con*- 
don, freestone bidding, large studio (pos- 
2 rooms), 40 sqm. 4th Boor, HL 
Uchen. bath. Rreplece, charmmg, calm. 
Pnce FlJMOU. Owner +33(0)146478286 


7th - FACING INVALIDES DOME, 
240 sqjn. superb reception, 34 bed- 
roono. high offings. ST. GERMAIN DES 
PRES, psd-jr+era, 65 ayr, open view. 
DQURDJN Tet +33 (0)1 46 34 S3 31 


AV ENUE MONTAIGNE (8th) 
apartments: 39 sqjn. to 320 sqje. 
Tet: ROffTHX +33 (0)1 47 2D 27 17 


"CASTS. D’ORGEVAL” (B1L 
by H GUIMARD (1904) 'Art Noutaau 
styte". 20 km from Paris, 450 sqm I 
space in 9X0 sqm perk. FF7J 
FONOA Tet +33 (0)1 49 54 77 77 


PARIS 16th, W CALII VILLA, kounus 
1930 town house. 450 sq.m. Superb 
reception. 6 bedrooms, Id, garage. 
BCS +33 (0)1 47 27 X 39 


71b, SEVRES BABYLONE, tad buUrn, 
4 room renovated fiat, 80 sq.m.. 5to 
floor, m, quiet. kghL FF2.5U. Leave 
message for veto at +33 {0)1 43266370 


PARIS 2ND, METRO LOUVRE, magr*- 
cent I02jg.m . apartment, fireplace, per- 
fect condHon, X sqm firing room. Price 
FTSL300.00Q. Tel: +33(0)1 W 86 {Q 05 


PARIS PED-A-TERRE (BOULOGNE) 
62 sq.m., parquet taring mom. 2 bed- 
rooms. 1 ensue, equipped kitchen. 
FFffiQ.000. TeL +33 (0)1 48 25 90 57. 


BOULOGNE (Parts). 96 sqm to front ta 
river Seine & Stent Qoufl park, dear, 
sunny, 3 bedrooms + parking 
FF1,400riMO. Tet +33 (0)146049237 


AVE FOCH seine 200 sqm, 3 bedroom 
luxury tumtawd flat, 4th boor, boauUta 
view, garage. Tet +33(0)147 20 18 17 


BUY OR RSIT LUXURY APARTMfflTS 
r 7m, 891, 16th S Neully. Jutted hah 
prices. Tel / Fax: +33 (0)1 39 65 7G SB 


NEAR BARBZDN, fine horse on park + 
Ite. tag pod mil. Tel: +33 
(0)609854823, TeWax +32 2-7327065 


NEAR OPERA, 48 sqm, exceptionally 
charming, wstte beams & stones. Pnce 
FF1.450M. Tet +33 (0)1 42 85 59 04 


NEULLY SUR SOME. 2 ■ 3 HOOKS. 
65 sqjn. Garage. Exceptional condtbn 
FFI.900,000. Tet +33 (0)1 47 57 94 49. 


PARIS 3rd. studio tor sale, 40 sqjn, 
2nd floor, vlsfcle beams. Price: 
F 750.000. T* +33 (0)1 48 15 40 60 


ST. GERKMN DES PRES, top floor 
apartment to 16th century house 3(4 
rootm. calm, wi. T* +33 (0)14329375? 


Portugal 


PORTWAO, LUXURY HOUSE 300 sqm 
on privae gd couse. Guesthouse 
100 sqm. pooL Price S65UXB 
Tat +46 8 590 36300 Fas 8 590 362S5 



Romania 

BKHMEST - ROMANIA, the mote * 

_ IraJivB, promising investment & busness 

opporamBes country In South-East of 
Europe. Now. you can buy 2 racelenfy 
located pieces tatond (ore 10000 sqm. 
and Die other 4^00 sqm) In Die best 
rasderttal area, stiaUe tor tuttig ho- 
tels, luxury homes, offices etc. For de- 
Med into: Bucharest 00401-8624575 or 
Franttvt 004MW7467173 

Seychelles 

RATE SEYCHELLES - 5 bot beach- 
front property, new house, forest. 
USS30a0(XL rat Satedero 246- 234 344 

- Switzerland 

F^LMEGBHR&AIPS 

L J Sato to foreigner auttxrrttBd 
m M our apedahy since 1875 

Abradwe properties In HON1RSJX 

VEVEY, VfllARS, DtABLERETS, 
CRANSMONTANA, Me. 1 to 5 bed 
roams, SFr. 200,000 to 15 into 

REVAC 

52, UoalbriUnt CH-1211 Genera 2 

Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fsx 734 12 20 

USA Residential 

MIAMI • FLORIDA 

Prme waterfranf property on Pakn Hart 
(7500 sqiL on 100 x 300 tatf. 

■ 9 bedrooms, 7 bafts, spnewto 

Hollywood penthouse on top flow m 
private fenace; 

-2 separate guest horses, pool 
and mate dock 

- Offered utaunvhed at 51,790,000 

Tet (0)1 47 20 94 94 

Far +33 (0)1 47 20 94 95 

ANCRAM, NY- 2 hra. NYC. Sfiocro farm 
wttti dramafic contemptnary, bam, hour 
stream, pond & pool -Fantastic news. 

Ask SG95K. Copate Beaky 5I8-32W251 

USA Farms 3 Ranches 

SGlfTHWEST HSSOUR1 approxmetety 

3^8 sere operating cattle ranch m 

3 homes. Broker protected. Cal or write 

&7 ( T n ?£^ S, !! n9 Cm* Fom Ul 

2001 S. Hanley Road, SL Lous, UO 

63ia USA Tefffljc 314*4-5010 

■ 

Real Estate - 

for Rent 


Hotiand 


PSmiOUSE iNTaWATJONAL 

No I in Hotand 

tor (sarQ finished housesflra. 
Tet 31-20^48751 Far 31-206465909 
whown 1021, 1083 Aril AmsUfftan 


Italy 


PORTO FINO. LUXURY VILLA sat in 
lush greenery, directly or the sea. 
Langs tooting onto spectaaAar terrace. 
5ve double bedrooms pto two stogies. 
Summer Beeson onto. Otter opportutafes 
t TeL « ' 


for sale or rant 
285781 


lax. 39 185 


VENICE ZATTEHE. ELEGANT, FUR- 
NISHB) apartmenL Ideal tor two. Ter- 
race overlooking Gtafecca. Tel: (39-Cj 
E71778. 


FLORENCE STUDIO, 25 squere metres 
to tauious residence: near D Baffistora 
140000 USS. Tet 44 171 258 0346 


Paris Area Furnished 


14fh, tadng Pare Momsouns. 2 rooms, 
lumished. 4ft floor, ffl, surety. FS^OO + 
(400 charges. Tet +33 (0)1 4542 3964 



Ideal wrommodann: slutfo-5 bedrooms 
Quabty aid save? assured 
_ . READY TO MOVE IN 
Tel +33(0)1 4312980a Fax (0)143129008 


AT HOVE IN PM8S 

PARIS PROMO 

Apflrfnwflg io rent lunfefted or not 
&des S Pmatf Uanaqemait SenfeK 

<3 Av Hod® 75008 Parts FxOI-45611020 

Tet +33 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


„ . C APITALE 1 PARTNERS 
rantpckK} qififty apartments, si sizes 


Tte+33 (0)1-46148211. Faj(0)l4614ffi15 


BASTIU.E. beautiful studio, hrmishsd 
“Pareto kitohai, fifly 
Wed, vraiMr 1 iNosat Free 1 May. 
FF4J0MHO. net let *33(0)140213674 


f q m ' „ !u * wious W - 

Hanoram F11000 / small studio, balco- 
ny. FSOOa Owner. +33 1 4502MB4 


Switzerland 


GENEVA ■ 5 new untu 
?enu lor rent behind ft 
School Quiet environmei 
by pate Fax +4122-7001 


USA 


PflUCItiquI: * 2124 
212-4484220 E-Mait . 


•1 





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. ■;■ ■-"■■i-rjvi-Jtf'fc'. 

••••■-•O', -l 

... ■ ... :: ■*-3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


RAGE 5 


EUROPE 



■ - • ~ ~ n : 
:$*•****. 

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Make the EU a Defense Alliance? Debate Deepens Security Policy Rifts 


By Tom Buerkle 

tuTcratimmuf Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — A French-German 
proposal to transform the European 
Union into a defense alliance has re- 
kindled a debate over Europe's military 
future that could be as divisive as mon- 
etary union. 

The proposal presented earlier this 
week would have the 15-nation Union 
gradually taking over its 10-member 
military affiliate, the Western European 
Union, as well as its commitment to 
mutual defense. 

The plan reflects the long-standing 
ambition of Continental countries to 
win greater independence from Amer- 
ican tutelage and to give Europe mil- 
itary strength equal to its economic 
might. But although it aims to advance 
the cause of European unity, the pro- 


posal immediately fanned tensions over 
security policy. 

The proposal drew strong opposition 
from the Union's four neutral countries 
— Ireland. Sweden. Finland and Austria 
- — which are unwilling to consider join- 
ing any military alliance. It also met 
with the promise of a vero from Britain, 
which fears the idea would undermine 
the trans- Atlantic link at NATO that is 
the bedrock of European security. 

That fear was underscored by clear 
U.S. opposition to die idea. Washing- 
ton’s prime concern is that the proposal 
could provide a virtual back-door entry 
to the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation because European governments 
could extend security guarantees to 
today's neutrals or to EU* candidates in 
Eastern Europe, guarantees that can be 
met only by the Atlantic alliance with 
U.S. military might. 


“A merger of the EU and WEU 
doe.sn '1 add anything to Europe’s de- 
fense capability, or the willingness to 
use it.” said Robert Hunter, U.S. am- 
bassador to NATO. "We would be 
more interested in European countries' 
increasing their defense spending than 
in tinkering with the machinery.'’ 

Many European officials acknow- 
ledged that the bloc’s ambitions to de- 
velop a common security policy far ex- 
ceed its ability to deliver. That point was 
driven home when, at the same meeting 
in Rome where the proposal was presen* 
ted. EU foreign ministers continued to 
disagree aboul the need for a modest 
intervention force in Albania. “You 
can’t solve that with a treaty change." a 
senior EU official said. 

Support for the proposal runs deep, 
however. Italy. Spain. Belgium and 
Luxembourg endorsed the proposal. 


and the Netherlands also indicated sup- 
port. although as holder of the EU pres- 
idency it declined to take sides openly. 

The plan would make a common 
European defense capability “no longer 
a theory but a real prospect." Foreign 
Ministers Lamberto Dini of Italy and 
Herve de Charette of France said this 
week in an article in Le Monde. 

French and German officials insist 
that their plan is consistent with reforms 
under way at NATO that are designed to 
allow European members to conduct 
operations such as peacekeeping on 
their own through the WEU, using as- 
sets and personnel borrowed from 
NATO. They also say their proposal 
assumes that future EU and WEU mem- 
bers would also belong to NATO. 

Opponents, meanwhile, say that the 
proposal poses a risk io the broader 
process of enlargement. Sweden and 


Britain argue lhar Russia could turn 
hostile to the EU membership ambitions 
of the Bailie republics if the Union 
transformed itself from a primarily eco- 
nomic bloc to a defense alliance. 

“It makes the whole process of the 
enlargement of the European Union po- 
tentially far more controversial than it 
would otherwise be,” said Malcolm Ri- 
fkind. the British foreign minister. 

Given the depth of opposition, even 
the plan's backers concede they are un- 
likely to have the proposal included in a 
new treaty that EU leaders hope to con- 
clude in Amsterdam in June. Many of- 
ficials predict that the leaders will en- 
dorse a more general declaration calling 
for closer cooperation between the EU 
and the WEU. 

The .Albania debate highlighted 
obstacles to forging a common Euro- 
pean security policy. Only Italy. France 


and Greece were willing ro contribute to 
a modest force to help restore order and 
deliver aid. and their EU partners failed 
to endorse the effort, so that any in- 
tervention will be carried out under the 
Organization for Security and Cooper- 
ation in Europe. Jose Cutileiro. who 
leads the WEU. said it had not received 
a request from any EU member to plan 
for an Albania mission. He also raised 
doubts that it could fulfill such a task on 
its own. saying only that “we would 
probably be capable of doing it.” 

Europe's difficulty in projecting 
force reflects a rapid decline in defense 
spending since the fall of die Berlin 
Wall, to 2.3 percent of gross domestic 
product, versus 3.7 percent for ihe 
United States, and a heavy dependence 
on the United States for such assets as 
reconnaissance and communications 
satellites and troop transpons. 


Italy’s 6 Trial of Century 9 
Seems to Last That Long 

Andreotti Case Drones On and On and On 


By Celestine Bohlen 

Nm Yvrk Tones Sm- ice 

ROME — A Mafia turncoat, testi- 
fying under government protection, 
drones on from behind a white screen. 
Journalists doodle in their notebooks. 
Even the 78-year-old defendant — Gi- 
ulio Andreotti, seven times prime min- 
ister of Italy — seems more stooped 
than usual as he takes his seal in a high- 
security courtroom usually reserved for 
crime bosses and terrorists. 

Billed as Italy's trial of the century 
when it began 18 months ago. the case 
against Mr. Andreotti on charges that he 
acted as the political patron of the Mafia 
has now acquired a timeless quality not 
uncommon to the Italian judicial sys- 
tem. 

”At this pace, it is going to last an 
eternity,” Franco Coppi, one of Mr. 
Andreotti’s lawyers, said in exasper- 
ation recently during one of the trial's 
many breaks. 

This trial, which switches between 
Rome and Palermo, the Sicilian capital is 
only one part of the Andreotti case. In a 
separate trial now entering its second year 
in the central Italian city of Perugia, Mr. 
Andreotti also faces charges of having 
commissioned the killing by the Mafia of 
a muckraking journalist in 1979. 

The cases are held on alternating 
weeks ro allow both the defendant and 
his accusers to be present at both trials. 

* ‘Only the Italian genius would allow 
lor two trials to lake place ar the same 
time with the same witnesses." Mr. 
Coppi said recently as he was about to 


stan a cross-examination of Salvatore 
Cancemi. 3 Mafia informer who is under 
Italy’s state witness protection program 
and who testified in the Perugia trial 
Dec. 7. “Today I will ask him the same 
questions — exactly the same." 

While the snail-like pace of Mr. An- 
dreotti ’s case is typical for Italy, he is no 
ordinary defendant. He was an Italian 
institution, a member of nearly every 
government since World War II and a 
leader of the then-dominant Christian 
Democratic Party. He still holds polit- 
ical office as one of Italy's 10 senators 
for life. 

Now Mr. Andreotti, a familiar figure 
with his hunched shoulders and his 
acerbic wit. has become a Italian an- 
omaly — a politician who divides his 
time between the courtroom and the 
Parliament. He has earned praise in both 
places for his close attention to the mat- 
ter at hand — whether testimony from 
former Mafia hitmen or debates about 
NATO expansion in the Senate's for- 
eign affairs commission. 

“Of all the 25 members of die com- 
mission. Andreotti is one of the few who 
can always be counted on to be pre- 
pared. alert and to participate.” said one 
of his colleagues, who values the senior 
politician 's astute and unsentimental as- 
sessments of international affairs. 

Mr. Andreotti has always been a para- 
doxical figure — a Roman Catholic who 
attends Mass daily and. at the same 
time, a Machiavellian politician who 
plays for keeps,-He gets standing ova- 
tions at Vatican conferences, bulls por- 
trayed as a sinister “Beelzebub" by 



Deadly Attack on Bus Reflects 
Climate of Violence in Albania 


Enc FeMogMfMR PmoePnaa 

PRINCE AND PRESIDENT — Prince Charles passing his host. 
President Jacques Chirac, at the Elysee Palace in Paris on Thursday. 


The Associated Press 

TIRANA, Albania — Doctors on 
Thursday fought for the life of a child 
critically wounded when gunmen raked 
a passenger bus with machine-gun fire, 
but said he was unlikely to survive. 

One person died and seven, including 
the child, were wounded Wednesday in 
the attack on the bus, 10 kilometers (6 
miles) south of Tirana. Other passen- 
gers said the gunmen opened fire after 
an argument with the driver, but there 
were no details. 

The incident reflected the instability 
that continues to reign in Albania as its 
leadership tries to cope with the af- 
termath of economic unrest that de- 
veloped into armed insurrection. More 
than 1 60 people have died since early 
March, and hundreds more have been 
wounded. A Tirana hospital admitted 24 
people, including thpse on the bus, with 
bullet wounds in a number of overnight 
shooting incidents. 

The dead bus passenger was iden- 
tified as Hekuran S alla, 32. The crit- 
ically wounded child was named as Iris 
Hysmeta, 6. 

The random shootings came despite 
pleas from Prime Minister Bashkim 
Fino that all Albanians lay down their 
arms. The government is trying to se- 
cure aid shipments from the rest of 


Europe io stave oft' famine, but the 
European Union is reluctant to send in 
convoys in the current climate of law- 
lessness. 

Jean Marchant d'Assembourg. the 
head of an EU delegation that arrived 
Wednesday, said the* Albanian govern- 
ment has asked the-EU to help in se- 
curing the main airport and the pons of 
Durres and Vlora to facilitate aid ship- 
ments. 

“I think it’s obvious that Albania 
does need protection even for the hu- 
manitarian aid. and this is what we're 
working for,” he said. 

He said any European force would be 
between a few hundred or a few thou- 
sand troops. 

EU ministers have agreed to prov ide 
an initial $2.3 million in food and other 
relief. but only if Albania works ro 
eliminate unrest. Mr. Fino said in an 
address Wednesday carried on state 
television. 

“We must organize to restore order 
and calm to our towns, because without 
guarantees, this aid can’t reach its des- 
tination,” he said. 

The EU civilian and military del- 
egation was in Tirana to offer guidance 
in ending a month-old insurgency that 
has sent nearly 12.000 Albanians flee- 
ing to Italy. 


some of the Italian press. 

Mafia turncoats have testified that he 
was known as ‘ ' Uncle Giulio' * in Mafia 
circles. But public opinion has begun to 
swing against the credibility of such 
testimony, which some see as tainted 
and sometimes preposterous. In recent 
weeks, two witnesses have withdrawn 
testimony that had been damaging to 
Mr. .Andreotti. who has steadfastly ar- 


U.S, Tells New Belarussian Envoy: Stay Home 


Reuters 

MINSK — The United States has told 
the new Belarussian ambassador not to 
come to Washington yet to take up his 

C ost because of Minsk's expulsion of a 
I.S. diplomat, a U.S. embassy spokes- 
woman said Thursday. 

The - spokeswoman. Janet Demery*. 
told Russian Television in an interview 
that the new ambassador, Valeri Tsep- 
kalo, had been asked to stay at home. 

“It was felt that his arrival in Wash- 
ington was aot appropriate at this time. 
This is in connection with the recent 
expulsion of the U.S. embassy first sec- 
retary,” she said when she was asked if 
it was true that Mr. Tsepkalo would not 
be allowed into Washington. 

The move followed the expulsion of a 
Belarussian diplomat from Washington, 
announced Wednesday, in retaliation 
for a similar move against the US. first 
secretaiy in Minsk, Serge Alexandrov, 
who is of Belarussian origin. 

The first secretaiy and consul of Be- 
larus, Vladimir Gramyka, was declared 
persona non grata and given 24 hours to 
leave the United States. A Foreign Min- 


istry spokesman in Minsk said that Mr. 
Tsepkalo had flown as far as Frankfurt 
but had returned to Minsk “for con- 
sultations." 

Belarus arrested Mr. Alexandrov at a 
rally against the hard-line president, Al- 
exander Lukashenko, on Sunday. 

The U.S. ambassador. Kenneth Ya- 
lowitz, was also recalled for consulta- 
tions to Washington this week. 

■ Lukashenko Resists Reform 

Steven Erlanger of The New York 
Times reported from Washington: 

Washington recalled Mr. Yalowitz as 
it searches for ways to respond to the 
former Soviet republic's “accelerating 
slide toward authoritarianism.” as a 
State Department official. John Dinger, 
called it Wednesday. 

But American officials say the United 
States, which has suspended its $40 
milli on in annual aid to Belarus, has few 
effective levers to pull against Mr. 
Lukashenko, a popular Soviet-style 
leader. 

Mr. Lukashenko has resisted eco- 
nomic and political reform, has cracked 


down on the opposition with a series of 
arrests and has expelled the executive 
director of the Belarussian Soros Foun- 
dation. which supports independent me- 
dia and trade unions. 

He has also ordered an audit of the 
foundation and other nongovernmental 
organizations and clamped down on 
Russian journalists trying to cover 
events in Belarus. 

“Why Lukashenko feels the need to 
poison relations with the United States 
just now we don't know, but he’s doing 
it, and if he doesn’t know he's doing it, 
he needs better advisers." a senior 
American official said. 

“The effort to intimidate embassies, 
muzzle the press and crack down on 
Soros and other private foundations is 
all of a piece.” the official continued. 
“It's an effort to neutralize any possible 
organization outside government con- 
trol, and shows a man without the con- 
fidence to act democratically.” 

Even Russia has criticized Mr. 
Lukashenko, issuing a statement Tues- 
day rebuking Belarus for hampering 
Russian journalists working there. 


gued that be knew nothing of the links 
between his chief political ally in Sicily 
and the Mafia. 

The Mafia trial is by most estimates a 
good year away from wrapping up. The 
prosecution has already heard about 400 
witnesses and could call as many as 300 
more. Then it will be the turn of the 
defense, which has several hundred wit- 
nesses of its own — including Mr. An- 
dreotti himself, who will be the last to 
take the stand. 

Closing arguments are certain to fo- 
cus on the centeipiece of the Palermo 
“prosecutors’ case — the famous kiss 
.'said to have been exchanged between 
•Mr. Andreotti and Salvatore Riina. the 
Mafia’s boss of ail bosses. 

“There are three prosecutors, all of 
whom want to talk, and at the pace they 
are going that will take up a few 
months, ” said Mr. Coppi. who is one of 
Italy’s most prominent defense lawyers. 
“And then if they start asking which 
cheek Andreotti was kissed on, the left, 
or the right, and what kind of kiss it was, 
that will take up more time.” 

The trial will probably end no earlier 
than the summer of 1998. If Mr. An- 
dreotti is found guilty, it could still be 
years before he gets a final sentence, 
which in Italy is served only after the 
entire appeals process is exhausted. 

In fact, five years after the start of die 
wave of bribery and corruption scandals 
that broke the back of the political sys- 
tem that Mr. Andreotti once represent- 
ed, many leading defendants have yet to 
receive a final conviction or to serve a 
day in jail. 

“I had a teacher once who said that 
Italy was the cradle of the law, but it has 
been in the cradle so long that it has 
fallen asleep,” Mr. Coppi said. 


Turkey Reinforces 
Secular Dress Code 

.ANKARA — Turkey's health min- 
ister. Yildirim Aktuna, has ordered 
provincial governors to ensure dial 
public health workers comply with 
laws that ban wearing religious dress, 
a ministry official said Monday. 

“I think the order was made in the 
framework of the National Security 
Council decisions." the official said. 

Turkey's security council, which is 
dominated by the military, last month 
ordered the country’s first Islamist 
prime minister. Necmettin Erbakan, to 
crack down on rising Islamist act- 
ivism. 

Among the council’s demands was 
the enforcement of the Islamic dress 
ban, as well as action to close down 
Islamist sects and rein in illegal re- 
ligious instruction c\asses.(Reuters) 

Strasbourg on Alert 

PARIS — The mayor of Stras- 
bourg appealed for calm before a 
weekend congress of the far-right Na- 
tional Front, saying that the presence 
of the party leader, Jean-Marie Le 
Pen, could provoke clashes. 

Some 20.000 people from across 
Ranee are expected to take part in 
demonstrations here during the Na- 
tional Front's annual congress. 

Catherine Trautmann, the city's 


mayor, has called in national police 
reinforcements to avert feared clashes 
between anti-fascist demonstrators 
and far-right militants, t Reuters f 

Tapie Appeal on Boat 

PARIS — The bankrupt French 
business tycoon Bernard Tapie, who 
is already serving an eight-month jail 
term for fixing a soccer match, ap- 
pealed Thursday against a six-month 
sentence for tax evasion in the man- 
agement of his yacht, Phocea. 

In his first public appearance since 
be was jailed two months ago. the 
former cabinet minister appealed 
against the sentence for passing off the 
7 4-meter l245-f oot J ship as a means of 
promoting his business, although he 
was its only beneficiary. (Reuters) 

Biker War Backlash 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden is 
thinking of making membership in 
biker gangs and neo-Nazi groups n 
criminal offense. Justice Minister 
Laila Freivalds said Thursday. 

The Social Democratic govern- 
ment has until now been hesitant to 
make sucb an amendment for fear of 
violating freedom of association laws. 
But the biker war being aaged be- 
tween rival gangs in the Nordic coun- 
tries, which has resulted in nine deaths 
since 1 994, is one of the main reasons 
for the change of heart. [AFP) 










PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


ASIAIPACIFIC 


Malaysia Denies Talk of a Rupture of Links With Singapore 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Malaysia sought Thursday to 
play down reports of a major new breach in 
relations with Singapore, with ministers denying 
that the cabinet had decided to freeze official ties 
with the island-state. 

A statement issued in Kuala Lumpur by the 
acting Malaysian foreign minister, Abang Abu 
Bakar Abang Mustapha, said that the government 
was “studying the implications" of recent ten- 
sions with Singapore but that no decision had 
been made to freeze ties. 

But the nationaJ press agency, Bemama, 
quoted Sabbaruddin Chik, the culture, arts and 
tourism minister, as saying that tourism, cultural 
and sporting links had been suspended. 

Reports Wednesday of a wider and more se- 
rious freeze on official ties were given prom- 
inence in the Malaysian, Singaporean and in- 
ternational media, causing shares in both 


countries to fall Thursday. The two neighbors — Singapore leaders. The cabinet meeting Wed- 
whose economic rivalry and political discord nesaay in Kuala Lumpur followed an official 
have become increasingly evident in recent weeks Malaysian protest earlier this month over remarks 

have extensive trade, investment and other by Singapore's senior minister, Lee Kuan Yew, in 

jhiks. a court affidavit that the Malaysian state of Johor 

Analysts said that Malaysian ministers were was “notorious for shootings, muggings and car- 
evidently divided over how to handle relations jackings." 

with Singapore. Mr. Lee later apologized and said he would 

On a visit Thursday to Tokyo, Prime Minister apply to the court to have the offending passage 
Mahathir bin Mohamad of Malaysia said that die removed. But Malaysian officials said that they 
issue with Singapore was not a major problem and were unhappy with the behavior of other Singa- 
would be overcome with time. pore leaders, including Mr. Lee's son. Deputy 

The Bemama press agency, which usually re- Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, who had signed 
fleets government views, reported Wednesday the same affidavit as his father but had not apo- 
that the cabinet had decided to halt official deal- logized for the section on Johor or renounced it 
ings with Singapore, including talks between die Mr. Abang said in his statement Thursday that 
miing parties and the award of new government “what is meant is that the government is studying 
contracts to Singapore companies. the implications of the episode toward two-way 

Malaysian officials said that die government relations with Singapore following the statement 
had decided to “cool off ties for now” with by Singapore Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew on 
Singapore as a sign of continuing displeasure at Johor and the reaction of the Singapore gov- 
what was seen as lack of sincerity by some eminent toward the statement.” 


Earlier, Singaporeans expressed surprise and 
dismay at the reports that Malaysia had decided to 
freeze official ties. But a Singapore Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman said Thureday night that the 
Singapore government had noted the statements 
from Prime Minister Mahathir and Mr. Abang. 
The spokesman said that Singapore had a con- 
tinuing commitment to maintaining close bilat- 
eral relations with Malaysia but would let Malay- 
sia set the pace and level of cooperation. 

Meanwhile, the Malaysian railroad company, 
KTM Berhad, is to take legal action to evict 
people it says are occupying land it owns in 
Singapore. lawyers for the company said- 
Thursday, according to Reuters. 

KTM owns more than 200 hectares of land in 
Singapore on a 999-year lease, most of it on either 
side of a rail line to Kuala Lumpur. KTM’s land 
holdings in Singapore were highlighted earlier by 
Mr. Mahathir as one of the difficult issues in its 
relations with Singapore. He said Singapore was 
pressing Malaysia to give up the land. 


China Tells Gore It Found 
No Illegal Fund-Raising 

U.S. Group Demands Details of Rights Talks 


fry Oar Sag From DnpuLrhrs 

SHANGHAI — The Chinese gov- 
ernment told Vice President A1 Gore 
this week that it had investigated al- 
legations of illegal Chinese contribu- 
tions to U.S. campaigns and found no 
evidence, U.S. officials said Thursday. 

As Mr. Gore left Beijing, a human 
rights group demanded that the vice 
president provide specifics of his talks 
with Chinese leaders. 

The U.S. ambassador to China, James 
Sasser, said Chinese officials had told 
him that they were angry and offended 
by the political campaign allegations. 
But Mr. Sasser said such emotions did 
not surface in discussions with Mr. Gore 
this week because the Chinese had 
wanted the sessions conducted in a busi- 
nesslike manner. 

“Unofficially. I know that there was 
an investigation, and they say the in- 
vestigation turned up nothing.” Mr. 
Sasser said. ‘That is what they say.” 
Other U.S. officials said they had few 
details on how the Chinese looked into 
the matter, so could not pass judgment 
on it. 

On Thursday, the Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Cui Tiankai, said the 
United Stares’ should investigate how 
reports emerged that China might have 
sought to funnel money into the elec- 
tions last year. “Some news media have 
already created a sensation out of this 
affair before they got conclusive ev- 
idence.” he said. “I think this is ir- 
responsible.” 

“Furthermore, there are some 
people, possibly some government of- 
ficials in the United States, who also are 
frequently irresponsible and reveal this 
so-called intelligence to the news media 
in breach of U.S. law,” he said. “This 
affair also should be looked into.” 

It is illegal in the United States for a 


foreign government or a foreign cor- 
poration to support candidates for a fed- 
eral office. 

Mr. Sasser spoke to reporters aboard 
Air Force 2 as Mr. Gore flew from 
Beijing to Xian and then onto Shanghai 
to complete a five-day China visit Mr. 
Gore's two days of talks with Chinese 
leaders in Beijing included a brief dis- 
cussion of the allegations. 

As he left, the New York-based Hu- 
man Rights Watch issued a statement in 
Beijing saying the vice president should 
have done something publicly to un- 
derscore the U.S. commitment on hu- 
man rights in China. 

After two days of meetings with 
Chinese leaders, Mr. Gore said Wed- 
nesday that be got a “more receptive 
response” on human rights than in pre- 
vious discussions. 

Mr. Gore predicted Thursday that his 
talks with Chinese leaders would lead to 
“significant progress” in the next few 
months on several issues dividing 
Washington and Beijing. 

“This mission here this week is part 
of President Clinton’s efforts to estab- 
lish a high-level dialogue that will en- 
able our two nations to build a new era 
of cooperation for a new century,” he 
told the American Chamber of Com- 
merce in Shanghai. 

“We have had lull and vigorous dis- 
cussions, very productive discussions, 
and I'm optimistic dial in the coming 
months we will make significant pro- 
gress on many of these issues," he 
added. 

Mr. Gore did not specify what areas 
would see progress. 

Earlier Thursday, when the vice pres- 
ident went to the ancient Chinese capital 
of Xian, he inspected the more than 
2000-year-old army of terracotta war- 
rior statues. (AP, Reuters) 



Aptcban Wccrawng/Rciiten 

HOME REPAIRS — A Karen refugee fixing the roof of his hut at a camp near the Thai-Burmese border. 
Karen NationaJ Union rebels say they are being pressured by the Thai Army to hold peace talks with Burma. 

Dalai Lama Urges Taiwan Accord With China 


C vrqaled fry Our SktfFn m Dnj*Ai-/kv 

TAIPEI — Tibet’s exiled spiritual 
leader, the Dalai Lama, ended his first 
visit to Taiwan on Thursday by appeal- 
ing to the Nationalist-ruled island and 
his own Himalayan followers to seek a 
compromise with China. 

“i believe my visit here can promote 
closer understanding between the 
Tibetans and Chinese,” the Buddhist 
spiritual leader said after a meeting with 
President Lee Teng-hui. 

“The Tibetan problem is neither 
good for Tibet nor for China,” said the 
monk who has led a govemment-in- 
exile in India since a failed anti-Chinese 
uprising in Tibet in 1959. “We must 


find a mutual solution.” he said. 

In a statement. Mr. Lee's office called 


the talk with the Dalai Lama a meeting 
of philosophers. China, however, sees 
the visit as part of a campaign for 
Tibetan independence. China’s official 
Xinhua press agency denounced the vis- 
it as “a joint attempt to split China” thai 
“harbors evil intentions.” 

“Taiwan authorities have taken an 
extremely dangerous step on the road of 
separating the country." Xinhua said in 
a strongly worded commentary' that also 
accused "Taiwan's government of lying 
about the purpose of the Dalai Lama’s 
trip. 

.Although religion dominated his 
agenda, the Dalai Lama turned to politics 
on the last two days, dining with Prime 
Minister Lien Chan at a Taipei hotel, and 
meeting with the main opposition, the 


Democratic Progressive Party. 

The Dalai Lama said that, despite 
some Tibetan opposition, he favored for 
his homeland the “one country, two 
systems” formula of wide local 
autonomy under China's sovereignty 
that Beijing is pioneering in Hong Kong 
in July and hopes to spread to Taiwan. 

“I "believe very much in the spirit of 
'one country, two systems'." the 61- 
year-old monk said at a news briefing, 
repeating that he sought only self-rule 
for Tibet, not independence. 

Touching on the volatile issue of 
Taiwan's own independence, the Dalai 
Lama hinted strongly that he opposed it, 
saying that Taiwan's people had a right 
to choose but urging them to accept 
close links with China. (Reuters. AP) 



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China Defends Oil Rig in Feud With Vietnam 


North Korea 
Seeks Pledge 
Of Food Aid 
Before Talks 


SEOUL — North Korea has told the * 
United States and South Kona it will 
join proposed four-nation Pf*“ . 

they first guarantee substantial food aid. . 
Seoul officials said Thursday. • 

But South Korea and the .United . 
States made it clear that any majpr food . 
aid could only be- discussed during, the 

peace talks. ... . ' 

The South Korean Foreign Ministry 
spokesman. Lee Kyu Hyung. said North 
Korea made its first formal response on 
the peace talks by requesting the food aid 
at aNew Yoik meeting Wednesday 
among working-level officials from the 
two Koreas and the United States. 

“North Korea asked the United 
States and South Korea to guarantee 
food aid in advance,” Mr. Lee said. 
“You could say it was a conditional 
acceptance of the proposal. 

“We have repeated our position that 
food aid can be discussed in the four- 
party talks in the framework of easing 
tension and building peace,” he said. 
“The United States maintains the same . 
stand.” 

Mr. Lee did not say if Pyongyang gave 
a figure for the food aid, but the local . 
daily Chosun 11 bo put it at 1.5. million 
tons. 

International aid agencies say North 
Korea, devastated by two consecutive 
years of floods, is weeks away from 
starvation. Seoul officials say that by 
linking food aid to the talks. Pyongyang . 
had revealed its desperation. 

The meeting in New York was die 
first working-level contact since senior 
representatives from the United States 
and South Korea met North Korean 
diplomats for a briefing on the talks this 
month. 

In Tokyo, Prime Minister Ryutaro 
Hashimoto expressed caution Thursday 
about providing further food aid to North 
Korea, portly because of the alleged kid- 
napping of Japanese by North Korean 
agents. Kyodo News agency reported. 

Japan, which has no diplomatic re- 
Unions with North Korea, shipped 

500.000 tons of rice there in 1995 — ' 

1 50.000 tons free of charge and the rest 
under a 30-year loan. Through the • 
United Nations, it gave $500,000 in ' 

1 995 and $6 milli on last year. 

“I am cautious about food aid be- 
cause of such a case,” Kyodo quoted 
Mr. Hashimoto as telling Japanese re- 
porters at the prime minister’s resi-. 
dence. He was referring to the alleged 
kidnappings. 

Vice President A1 Gore is due in. 
Seoul on Friday for a two-day -visit on 
the last leg of an Asian trip that has taken 
him to Japan and China. North Korea is 
expected to top his Seoul agenda. 

Five U.S. senators led by Ted 
Stevens. Republican of Alaska, the 
chairman of the' Appropriations Com- 
mittee. met President Kim Young Sam 
on Thursday and were due to fly to 
North Korea on Friday. (Reuters. AP) 


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John Vinocur 


C&nptUd by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

BELTING — Government and oil of- 
ficials on Thursday defended Chinese 
oil exploration in disputed waters near 
Vietnam, saying drilling in the area was 
“irreproachable” and that China had no 
plans to withdraw. 

But China also offered to hold talks 
with Hanoi to resolve their arguments. 

A Vietnamese Foreign Ministry 
spokesman restared Hanoi 's claim to the 
area where the Chinese Kan Tan 3 rig 
and its exploratory oil wells have set off 
a diplomatic crisis. 

But in Beijing, the Chinese Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, Cui Tiankai, said: 


“It is irreproachable for China’s Kan 
Tan 3 rig to carry out normal operations 
in the north pan of the South China Sea 
on China’s declared continental shelf 
and exclusive economic zone.” 

He added, however “We are willing 
to hold friendly consultations with Vi- 
etnam. to appropriately handle relevant 
problems between China and Viet- 
nam." 

An official of China's main offshore 
oil company said it had no immediate 
plans to move the rig from the disputed 
area, about 65 nautical miles off the 
coast of mainland central Vietnam. 

“Any decision to leave the drilling 


CROSSWORD 


area would be based on the drilling re- 
sults," the China National Offshore Oil 
Corp. official said. 

“Why should we leave the area?" the 
official said. “When the exploration is 
finished we will move the rig.” 

The Chinese comments were in con- 
trast to repealed demands from Hanoi for 
an immediate withdrawal. 

“As we have made clear, the area 
where the Chinese oil rig Kan Tan 3 is 
operating is completely located in the 
special economic zone and continental 
shelf of Vietnam." a Vietnamese For- 
eign Ministry spokesman said Thursday. 

(Reuters. API 


Senior Correspondent World Wide Web". 


http://www.iht.com 


In this Saturday’s 


ACROSS 
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superiors 

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21 Bygone empire 
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JSanm-’i 

Esc. 1911, Paris 
‘Sank Roo Doe Noo ” 


28 Lampblack 
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30 Hobbits' home, 
with "The’ 

ai Late pop singer 
FranchietaL 
33 Whirlpools 
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4« Family of Danish 
physrasts 

46 Certain suckler 

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48 Cries tor Joselito 
48 Skating event 
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10 Long hair 

11 Nature 

12 Bulb cover 

13 Bewitches 

14 Put under 

21 Results of 
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24 Bass players? 

26 Cocktail 
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34 Mart 

37 Glassed-in 
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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


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Ainu People Win Japan Ruling 

TOKYO — For the first time, a court formally rec- 
ognized the Ainu people of northern Japan as an in- 
digenous minority Thursday and criticized the govern- 
ment for having ignored their rights. 

Judge Kazuo Ichimiya of the Sapporo District Court 
said the state had illegally expropriated land from two 
Ainu to build a dam on Hokkaido. Japan's northernmost 
island, where most Ainu live. 

“The state, although required to give full consideration 
for the culture of the Ainu race, unjustly ignored or 
belittled this” by expropriating land for the dam. he said. 

It was the first court ruling that recognized that the 
Ainu, who have lived in northern Japan. Sakhalin and the 
Kuril islands since prehistoric times, had legal rights 
protecting the preservation of their culture. (Reuters) 

Gingrich Treads Carefully 

HONG KONG — The speaker of the U.S. House of 
Representatives, Newt Gingrich, said Thursday that any 
weakening of civil liberties in Hong Kong would un- 
dermine trust in China, and he urged Beijing to accept that 
political and economic freedom go together. 

In a speech to American business leaders, he forcefully 
defended democracy as the wave of the future. But in 
remarks added to his prepared text, and in answering 
questions, he struck a conciliatory tone, appealing for 
more dialogue. 

China frequently complains that the United States 
thinks it is superior to other countries. So Mr. Gingrich 
stressed America’s own historical failures, saying thev 
were abundant enough “to not look on anyone with a 
judgmental sense of superiority.” But he said that the 
changes governing the right to demonstrate and form 
political parties would diminish freedom. (AP) 

Papua Now Guinea Gets Leader 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — The gov- 
ernment appointed a caretaker prime minister Thursday 
to replace Julius Chan, who stepped down in the face of 
civilian and military demands for his resignation 
Mr. Chan 's replacement is John Giheno, the 'mining 
and petroleum minister. He said that he would restore 
jteace to the capital, but that mutinous soldiers who joined 
die protests should be charged. Mr. Chan stepped aside 
Wednesday pending the outcome of an inquiryinto a $36 
million contract with mercenaries to quell a rebellion on 
ougainviiie. (Reuters) 

VOICES^FromAsia 

Cui Tiankai, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry 
writing in China Daily: “Why such a hugeSp b£mj 
China s realities and its portrayal in the ^neri omS&> 
To focus on a developing country like China, there is 
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many car manufacturers are making progress in controlling exhaust emissions, but perhaps none as effectively as 
Honda. We'll soon be producing a Civic that will run on natural gas and whose emissions will be practically zero. 
We'll also be offering an electric town car which will have no emissions at all. In fact, it won't be all that long before 
many of us are driving around in solar cars. Hopefully by the time the children pictured here have grown up. 


First man, then machine. 










PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


llcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Confused About China 


A1 Gore did oot look like a happy 
man in Beijing this week. At every tum 
the vice president seemed to ran into 
the White House’s 1996 fund-raising 
abuses, and he seemed uncertain 
whether to flee the connection or con- 
front it In the end he awkwardly did 
some of both, making clear that the 
Clinton administration was not sure 
exactly how to conduct relations with 
China in the shadow of die scandal. 
That is cause for worry in a year when 
China figures to be at the center of 
American diplomatic activities- 

Tbe timing of Mr. Gore's trip was 
unfortunate. Designed to showcase his 
diplomatic s kills and prepare the way 
for an exchange of presidential visits, 
his two-day stop in Beijing instead 
served to underscore China’s possible 
role in the fund-raising abuses. If 
China turns out to have slipped money 
into the American political campaign 
last year. Washington will have no 
choice but to reassess its effort to im- 
prove relations with Beijing. 

For now, as investigations proceed, 
the United States should deal cau- 
tiously with China. It should maintain a 
consistent approach that encourages an 
expansion or trade while vigorously 
pressing China to become more demo- 
cratic and end its human rights abuses. 

Mr. Gore could not seem to sustain a 
consistent line during his visit. He raised 
U.S. concerns about China’s suppres- 
sion of dissent, but conspicuously left 
Hong Kong off his itinerary. With less 
than 100 days to go before China regains 
control over Hong Kong, he should be 
visiting the city to demonstrate Amer- 
ican support for its liberties. 

He seemed most uneasy when deal- 


leaders announced a joint business 
deal He agonized over whether to even 
attend this signing ceremony, at which 
C hina awarded coveted business con- 
tracts to General Motors and Boeing. 

Such sensitivity about endorsing 
business deals with China is mis- 
placed. When sound deals are fairly 
arranged that will benefit both coun- 
tries, there is no reason American of- 
ficials should not welcome them. The 
problem comes when Washington is in 
such a rush to promote business with 
China that it neglects other interests. 


something that happened too often dur- 
iillOint 


ing with the related questions of Amer- 
ica’s commercial interests in China and 


the fund-raising affair itself. On Tues- 
day he spilled his champagne trying to 
avoid an unexpected toast offered by 
Prime Minister Li Peng as tbe two 


ing Bill Clinton’s first term. 

When Mr. Li brought up the fund- 
raising issue, denying that China had 
maA» any effort to influence last year’s 
election, Mr. Gore said the matter 
would not affect relations with China 
unless tbe charges of Chinese involve- 
ment proved true. That, at least, seems 
to be what he said. Differing accounts 
provided by him and his aides obscured 
exactly what was said, but did make 
clear that the vice president was acutely 
sensitive about how his handling of this 
matter would play back home. 

The time for such concern was last 
year, when tbe Clinton administration 
seemed ready to set up White House 
meetings for just about anybody bear- 
ing a big enough campaign check. Un- 
less American investigators prove ac- 
tual Chinese influence-buying, Mr. 
Gore and other top American officials 
should conduct foreign policy without 
becoming fixated on die potential polit- 
ical fallout of the fund-raising abuses. 

As a dress rehearsal for the meetings 
planned between President Clinton 
and President Jiang Zemin, Mr. Gore’s 
visit was not a promising sign. With the 
Hong Kong transfer coming soon, then 
a Washington visit by Mr. Jiang, the 
White House needs to get its China 
policy in order quickly. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Millennial Meltdown? 


What will happen if, at 12:01 AJV1. 
on Jan. 1. 2000. computer chips and 
programs in everything from pace- 
makers to air traffic computers begin to 
assume that it is Jan. 1, 1900. and 
calculate accordingly? Will there 
simply be massive confusion and in- 
convenience, followed perhaps by 
lawsuits, as citizens chase after their 


mysteriously canceled pension checks 
nd. for the hi 


and, for the hundredth time, reprogram 
their VCR clocks? Or will the stock 
market the national defense and other 
unforeseen sectors screech to a halt? 
Nobody knows for sure. 

Those seeking to raise the urgency 
level on the so-called “Year 2000 
problem” in the world's computers — 
tbe question of what will happen to 
programs when the two-digit date turns 
over to “00” — have first had to get 
past a widespread and understandable 
impression that the whole thing is 
some kind of joke. 

Testimony before a House techno- 
logy subcommittee hearing last Thurs- 
day could help dispel that impression. 

For reasons that tech people have 
had trouble explaining in English but 
that people in the field insist are un- 
assailable. a lot of essential computer 
functions are built atop the programs 
by which a computer keeps track of tbe 
passage of time. Those programs were 
mainly designed early in computer his- 
tory — as long as 30 years ago, an 
eternity in computer time — and then 
built into the guts of the fancy func- 
tions that came later. (Veterans say no 
one expected those early computers to 
last die century without being replaced, 
a prediction that underestimated both 
human and government inertia.) 

Now the computers are poised to 
enter unmapped territory. Congress 
cannot solve the technical problems for 
government agencies; it can only push 
them to do this themselves, and urge 
private-sector companies (which could 


suffer s imilar meltdowns) to take tbe 
problem seriously. 

As for what exactly to do. no one yet 
has translated urgency into simple in- 
structions that could be applied across 
the board, except to say that, basically, 
you have to either hire someone to 
scrutinize every line of code (expens- 
ive), throw out your entire system and 
buy a new one (prohibitive) or guess 
where the problems are and apply 
patchwork (risky). 

All the options are time-consuming. 
Language in last year's budget re- 
quired the Office of Management and 
Budget to draw up a strategy for fixing 
the problem throughout the federal 
government, but some say die resulting 
plan is overly optimistic and the price 
tag of $3.2 billion too low. 

Some agencies have indeed run their 
computers ahead to see what happens 
when the year-2000 date is simulated; 
they report that the machines either 
crash or sendback an error reading, not 
a good outcome for, say, air traffic 
control computers. 

Witnesses before die committee last 
week reported more indirect effects. 
Insurers are beginning to provide 
“year-2000 insurance” a gainst dam- 
age caused by a company's equipment 
failing to navigate the date change. 
(Two-digit date functions, it turns out, 
are also strewn through such semi -elec- 
tronic products as elevators and pace- 
makers, which could malfunction.) Pro- 
grammers who know die antique codes 
in which the date functions are written 
are becoming more sought after, so tbe 
price for their services is rising. 

This isn’t reassuring, exactly, but it 
may occasion a certain perverse pride. 
The existing world stock of computers 
may be too dumb to navigate the mil- 
lennium, but some fraction of their 
hardheaded human overseers are sure 
to figure out a way to do just fine. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Hope for India and Pakistan 


In recent years, both India and 
Pakistan have realized how far they 
have slipped behind die booming eco- 
nomies of Southeast Asia. One of the 
main reasons why the Southeast Asians 
have prospered is that they have con- 
centrated on economic development, 
setting aside old quarrels and territorial 
disputes. Former adversaries, such as 
Malaysia and Indonesia, have better 
things to do than shoot at each other. 


If India and Pakistan could learn to 
set aside their differences, they might 
be able to divert their energy into drag- 
ging more of their people out of 
poverty. The economic benefits of im- 
proving relations are potentially huge. 
Both governments need to cut defense 
spending if they are to tackle their 
chronic indebtedness. Both would ben- 
efit enormously from increased cross- 
border trade and investment. Trade be- 
tween the two countries could boom. 

— The Economist (London). 


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Poor Visibility Both Ways Across the Beltway 

J •/ I .Stales 


W ASHINGTON — After a long 
absence, a plunge “inside the 
Beltway,” as Washington calls its hot- 
house surrounded by roads leading out 
to the “real” continental nation, 
shar pens awareness of abrasive misper- 
ceptions. The difference in how Amer- 
ica perceives itself and is perceived by 
others has hardly ever been greater. 

What sets Washington abuzz and 
afire looks so trivial from abroad that it 
is considered meaningless, if not de- 
liberately deceptive. 

The sense of American determina- 
tion to establish world hegemony, 
widespread in other countries, is taken 
here as so ignorant of what duly mat- 
ters, which is domestic politics, that it 
gets scant heating. 

The big noise of tbe moment here is 
about how and from whom tbe stag- 
gering $2 billion estimated to have 
been spent on 1996 elections was raised 
(or extorted), plus alleged sexual dal- 
liance by the president. Try to explain 
that as a major political problem to an 
En glis hman, a Frenchman, a German, a 
Russian, a Chinese or a Japanese. 

What they see is a United Stales de- 
nouncing diem for pursuing their com- 
mercial interests, wnen it comes to con- 
troversial states like Cuba, Iran or Iraq, 


By Flora Lewis 


while it pushes as hard as possible for its 
own interests elsewhere. Oran America 
seeking to force them into internal 
change by American prescription. 

What Americans see is a lot of coun- 
tries demanding their support or their 
indulgence with no real awareness or 
concern that America has its own prob- 
lems. and has both equal need and 
equal right to pursue its own interests. 

A minority, but quite vocal, see dan- 
gerous conspiracies threatening tbe na- 
tion. But their response, just the op- 
posite of what conspiracy theorists 
abroad suppose, is to shut out the 
world, not to take it over. 

In a way, it is the opposite of the 
straightforward kind of confrontation 
of the Cold War. It is a suspicion that 
professions of friendship or partner- 
ship or engagement (now tire code 
word for difficult relations with China) 
are an entrapment, a fool's concession. 
A mutually beneficial agreement, such 
as Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin prom- 
ised each other in Helsinki (although 
without definitive commitment), is at- 
tacked on both sides as a sellout 

President Clinton came home eu- 


phoric, for whai seems to me good 
reason, but was met by criticism from 
members of the congressional majority 
that be had given away the shop and 
should be blocked. President Yeltsin 
has a worse parliamentary position but 
perhaps a better political hand. 

For evidently domestic political pur- 
poses. Mr. Clinton has taken to pro- 
claiming the United States the ‘in- 
dispensable nation,” and there are 
good grounds to support the assertion 
when it comes to whether or not the so- 
called international community will re- 
act or merely deplore when something 
awful happens that a lot of people feel 
somebody should do something about. 

If die United States says “Let’s go, 
we’re ready,” and presses the point, 
others join. If not, they argue and pos- 
ture and do no thing much. Bosnia, 
Haiti. Albania, Zaire, Rwanda are as- 
sorted cragjc examples. 

But from outside there is an im- 
portant difference in whether the 
United States is saying that it ready 
accepts a special responsibility deriv- 
ing from its special capacity, or that it 
expects everybody else to line up and 
salute when it makes a decision. 

Americans tend to feel that too much 
is asked of them for too little benefiL 


Others feel that the United Staiesseeks 
to impose its might without regard for 
their legitimate concerns. 

There is nothing new in contT ^ _ 
tion, even conflict, in foe wa |? ****"- 
states see how they should deal ™ 
each other. What is now is asensethat 
hostility is harmful all around, 'rifhout 
yet a sense of what accommodation 
implies and how to achieve iL 

Underlying these misperceptions is a 
common feeing in all these counmes 
that have more or less democracy that 
politicians and governments are not 
doing their job. People are discontented 

— in America, despite low unemploy- 
ment. low inflation, national satisfac- 
tion; in Britain, which has improvedon 
some statistics; in France, which has 
not on key ones; in Russia, with its wide 

distress — practically everybody. 

Tbe one perception that seems to be 
shared is that politicians are not doing 
what they should do. But somehow, no 
matter how much people distrust and 
dislike their own government, they 
suppose that what they notice of other 
governments represents an indomitable 
national will that they must confront. 

Despite foe information revolution, 
distance distorts the image. 

© Flora Lewis. 


India Will Be the Place for Statesmen to Visit in Mid- August 


N EW DELHI — Bill Clinton 
should celebrate India's 
50fo anniversary of indepen- 
dence this year — in New Del- 
hi. No U.S. president has been 
here since Jimmy Carter almost 
two decades ago. This simple 
gesture is necessary if the 
United States is serious about a 
partnership for peace with the 
world's largest democracy. 

That is the lesson that we. a 
group of American business ex- 
ecutives, take home after a 
week of give-and-take with al- 
most every major political and 
military figure in India. 

To ignore India is a slap in the 


By Stanley A. Weiss 


face to nearly a billion people. 

GDP of 


India has an annual 
$300 billion, significant natural 
wealth, and as many highly edu- 
cated middle-class citizens as 
the total U.S. population. It sits 
next to or near China, the Indian 
Ocean and foe huge oil and gas 
reserves of the Gulf and the 
Caspian basin. Yet it makes 


scarcely a blip on America's 
strategic radar screen. 

The Clinton administration’s 
first-term foreign policy prior- 
ities were preventive diploma- 
cy, promotion of human rights 
and democracy, and prevention 
of tiie proliferation of weapons 
of mass destruction. In foe case 
of India, these all fused into foe 
Kashmir dispute with Pakistan 
and foe nuclear issue. 

The undeclared but acknow- 
ledged Tndia -P akistan nuclear 
capability has probably de- 
terred large-scale warfare be- 
tween them for nearly 25 years. 
Previously they had engaged in 
three major conflicts. 

There is reason to be cau- 


tiously optimistic that peace 

t Kashmir 


talks on Kashmir and other is- 
sues may benefit from foe ex- 
ample of India's treaty with 
China over their conflicting Hi- 
malayan border claims. 


In foe second Clinton admin- 
istration, America seems to be 
finally waking up to its unreal- 
istic goal of rolling back the 
nuclear capabilities in India and 
Pakistan. Early this year, an in- 
dependent task force sponsored 
by the Council on Foreign Re- 
lations urged new policies to- 
ward both countries. Its report 
called for foe more realistic goal 
of maintaining tbe subcontin- 
ent’s nuclear status quo, in 
which Pakistan and India would 
not test their ability to assemble 
or display atom bombs. 

And India has now recog- 
nized that economically much of 
the developing world, especially 
in Asia, has left it b ehin d. 

For almost half a century. In- 
dia's GDP grew by an average 
of less than 4 percent a year, 
rationalized as the “Hindu rate 
of growth.” Taiwan’s GDP 
grew by an annual 8 percent 


during the same period, and 
South Korea's by 9 percent. 
Foreign direct investment in 
China, the world’s largest Com- 
munist country, is now running 
at $37 billion a year, in India the 
figure is $2 billion. 

With the Cold War over and 
the U.S.SJL gone, India began 
in 1991 to renounce Nehru- 
style socialism and liberalize its 
economy. It took a hard look at 
foe dragon to its north and the 
tigers to its east, and decided, as 
Commerce Minister P. Chi- 
dambaram said, “to Asianize 
itself ' — deregulating, freeing 
up the economy's supply side 
and cutting taxes. 

India, however, will not fol- 
low the dragon’s path or be- 
come the next Asian tiger. It 
can’t It is an elephant — with a 
long memory, slow, deliberate, 
but unstoppable once started. 

Despite corruption at many 
levels, and endless layers of bu- 
reaucracy. India should be very 


Southeast Asians Wonder if China Aims for Cooperation 


H onolulu— once again 
China and Vietnam are at 
loggerheads over disputed sea- 
bed in the South China Sea. 

The focus this time is not the 
Gulf of Tonkin, where foe two 
Communist neighbors nearly 
clashed before, or the Vanguard 
Bank area, which each side has 
leased to a different oil com- 
pany, or the Spratly Islands, 
where they fought a naval battle 
in 1988. This time it is a pre- 
viously obscure area southwest 
of China's Hainan Island. 

The problem became public 
on March 7 when Hanoi pro- 
tested China’s drilling in a zone 
that Vietnam has designated as 


By Mark J. Valencia 


part of its petroleum block sys- 
tem. The zone apparently has 
some gas potential 

Vietnam claims that the zone 
is on its continental shelf and 
within its 200 nautical mile ex- 
clusive economic zone. It has 
protested to Beijing and deman- 
ded that the rig be immediately 
withdrawn- China ignored foe 
protests as well as warnings 
from foe Vietnamese coast 
guard, asserting that the bound- 
ary in the area was unresolved, 
and that in any case foe zone is 
in Chinese waters. 

Vietnam's call for negoti- 


ations was met by silence and 
continued drilling. Frustrated ai 
this intransigence. Hanoi ap- 
pealed to its fellow members of 
tbe Association of South East 
Asian Nations to persuade Chi- 
na to negotiate. Some ASEAN 
countries supported Hanoi’s 
position. Only then did Beijing 
say it was considering the pro- 
posal for talks. 

This Thursday, China said it 
had every right to be drilling 
there. Yet foe area in question 
does appear to be on the Vi- 
etnamese side of a median line 
between the coast of Hainan 


An Israeli Idea Arafat Should Buy 


N EW YORK — Dennis 
Ross’s latest trip to the 
Middle East will focus on Je- 
rusalem. an issue that the parties 
had agreed would not be tackled 
until the very end. because of its 
emotional complexity. 

If it was Israel’s purpose, in 
allowing foe Har Homa bousing 
project to go forward, to re- 
inforce its claim as sole sov- 
ereign in Jerusalem, foe tactic 
failed. Condemnations of the 
Israeli plan by the international 
community, and criticism by 
President Bill Clinton, served to 
remind everyone that tbe status 
of Jerusalem remains very 
much unresolved, an unhealed 
wound that is infecting the en- 
tire peace process. 

The American mediator will 
also have to deal with the prob- 
lem of terrorism, specifically 
the very serious charge by Is- 
raeli officials that Yasser Arafat 
gave terrorist groups a “green 
fight" to renew their murderous 
activity. No Israeli government 
can sustain a peace process that 
allows Mr. Arafat to resort, 
however indirectly, to terrorism 
against Israel’s population. 

At the same time, no Pal- 
estinian leader can sustain a 
peace process that allows Israel 
to dispose unilaterally of the 
single most emotional and con- 
troversial issue on the agenda, 
foe future of Jenisalem. 

Benjamin Netanyahu has 
warned Mr. Arafat that he can- 
not replace negotiations with 
terrorism every time he has a 
grievance. It is an admonition 
that loses much of its force if 
Mr. Netanyahu removes the ne- 
gotiations option, as he did 
when he shut the door on Mr. 
Arafat’s demand that the Har 
Homa project be discussed at 
the negotiating table. Mr. Ara- 
fat was told repeatedly that Is- 
raeli construction in Jerusalem 
was none of his business. 

In any event, trust between 
Israel and the Palestinian Au- 


By Henry Siegman 


thority, foe critical and indis- 
pensable ingredient in the peace 
process, is in free fall. 

The deus ex machina that foe 
peace process needs was dis- 
closed last week by none other 
than Prime Minister Netanyahu, 
and disdainfully rejected by Mr. 


Arafat. Mr. Netanyahu pro- 
address 


posed that the parties 
immediately foe most critical 
issues in the final-stage nego- 
tiations. and conclude a peace 
agreement within six months, 
instead of foe three years stip- 
ulated in the Oslo accord. 

He argued convincingly that 
the staged interim measures 
called for by Oslo not only fail 
to provide foe “confidence 
building” for which they were 
intended, but are destructive of 
any residual mutual trust. 

This is so because neither 
party now believes that its most 
important concerns, to be ad- 
dressed in the final-stage ne- 
gotiations. will be accommod- 
ated. It was that expectation that 
in the past made compromise on 
lesser issues possible. 

Progress in stages, such as foe 
recent Hebron agreement, no 
longer build confidence for an- 
other important reason as well. 
Mr. Netanyahu attaches major 
importance to foe preservation 
of his current coalition govern- 
ment. He therefore follows 
every concession to the Pales- 
tinians with a concession to his 
own right wing, which imme- 
diately wipes out whatever 
goodwill the agreement with foe 
Palestinians generated. 

The Palestinians ought to re- 
consider their initial rejection of 
Mr. Netanyahu’s proposal. 
Their fears that this Israeli gov- 
ernment may use such discus- 
sions to finally sink foe Oslo 
accord are understandable, but 
there are ways to prevent this. 
The Palestinians should accept 


Mr. Netanyahu's proposal on 
foe basis of three conditions. 

First, he must affirm that Pal- 
estinian statehood is on the 
agenda. It should be clear to 
everyone by now that without 
some form of statehood, not 
only will there be no peace, but 
what has been achieved will be 
undone. A clear majority of Is- 
raelis understand and accept the 
inevitability of statehood, pro- 
vided Israel’s security concerns 
are felly accommodated. 

Second. Israel must agree 
that these negotiations do not 
supersede agreements under 
Oslo, which will be implemen- 
ted in a timely fashion. Mr. Net- 
anyahu has already said that if 
foe negotiations he proposes are 
not concluded in six months. 
Israel will make the further re- 
deployments in foe West Bank 
that are stipulated in the Oslo 
and the Hebroa accords. 

Third, and most important. 
Israel must agree to a temporary 
freeze on further construction in 
Jerusalem during this six-month 
period. If Mr. Netanyahu is se- 
rious about his proposal and 
truly believes that a peace 
agreement can be achieved, a 
brief delay to the Har Homa 
project surely does not matter. 
If it does matter, his proposal 
cannot be taken seriously. 

Among this approach's ad- 
vantages is that it will enable the 
parties to return to negotiations 
on the most important issues 
separating them without having 
to back down on their publicly 
declared positions. Mr. Netan- 
yahu will not have to agree to a 
permanent halt to new construc- 
tion in Jerusalem, and Mr. Arafat 
will not have to accept Israel's 
felt accompli as a condition for 
resuming the process. 


and claimed Vietnamese base- 
lines, assuming that those 
baselines are legitimate. 

Whatever foe merits of each 
country's claim, China has a 
growing credibility problem. 

Its behavior is being increas- 
ingly scrutinized by Southeast 
Asians, particularly since foe 
demise of Deng Xiaoping has 
evidently given nationalist hard- 
liners in foe government and 
aimed forces greater influence. 

It is not clear to these nations 
whether China will be a co- 
operative neighbor, as it claims, 
or whether it will proceed in- 
exorably to dominate and con- 
trol foe South China Sea and 
then Southeast Asia itself. 

These nations wonder wheth- 
er China will behave as a mem- 
ber of international civil soci- 
ety, or will make its own rules. 

Beijing recently ratified tbe 
Convention on the Law of the 
Sea, which provides some guid- 
ance in sealing boundary dis- 
putes. The latest dispute raises 
the question whether China will 
abide by foe treaty when its 
national interest is at stake. 

The initial signs are not en- 
couraging. They indicate, at a 
minimum, that a learning pro- 
cess will be required. 

For example, immediately 
after ratifying the treaty, China 
declared a system of baselines 
enclosing foe Paracel Islands, in 
clear violation of the treaty. The 
islands were seized by Chinese 
forces from Vietnam in 1974. 

Beijing's ratification of the 
treaty may be a delaying tactic, 
not a show of genuine interest in 
regional cooperation inspired 
by the priority of economic re- 


form. It may be a product of a 
desire to try to avoid antagon- 
izing neighbors when China’s 
relations with the United States 
are still liable to tension, or a 
consequence of limited Chinese 
military capability. 

As China's economy contin- 
ues to grow rapidly, modern- 
ization of foe aimed forces and 
their ability to operate farther 
and farther from Chinese shores 
will be hastened. 

Beijing has belatedly said it 
would “study'’ Hanoi's call to 
discuss foe latest dispute in foe 
South China Sea, fait it has es- 
tablished a pattern of actions 
that do not match its words. 

In 1995, China occupied 
Mischief Reef, which is 
claimed by foe Philippines, and 
refused to discuss foe issue. It 
was only after Manila appealed 
to ASEAN and foe international 
community for moral and polit- 
ical support that Beijing prom- 
ised that it would resolve such 
differences peacefully accord- 
ing to international law. China 
and the Philippines are discuss- 
ing the issue, but China con- 
tinues to occupy the reef. 

Now, with China unilaterall y 
drilling in an area claimed by 
Vietnam, and initially refusing 
even to discuss foe matter, foe 
tendency in the region may be to 
see this as sundering foe last 
shred of Chinese credibility. 

If so, Beijing will have 
played into foe hands of those 
who wish to paint it as a threat 


The writer, a senior fellow at 
the East-West Center in Hawaii, 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


The writer is a senior fellow 
at the Council on Foreign Re- 
lations. These views, contrib- 
uted to the International Herald 
Tribune, are his own. 


1897: Senility Study 

PARIS — Dr. T. D. Savill has 
read before foe Medical Society 
of London a paper on Senile 
Decay, Its Causes and Treat- 
ment. The paper was based on 
409 cases of death in persons of 
sixty years of age and upwards 
observed during seven years. It 
dealt with foe normal and ab- 
normal symptoms of old age, 
among the former being weak- 
ness. nervous symptoms, the 
senile heart, the senile pulse, 
and various external signs, 
among foe latter being “senile 
vertigo, senile epilepsy,” and 
conditions attended with high 
arterial tension. These condi- 
tions he considered dependent 
upon changes occurring chiefly 
in foe muscular coats of tbe 
arteries. 


American territory, has had its 
ups and downs since it was pur- 
chased from Russia by William 
H. Seward. Lincoln's Secretary 
of State. These have been due to 
foe varying prospects of min- 
eral exploitation and to the lack 
of a steady Federal policy of 
encouragement to settlement 
and to material development. 
President Harding has been 
quoted as saying that he intends 
to “open up" Alaska. 



i. 


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attractive to U.S. investors. It 
has enduring institutions, rooted 
in the principles of democracy 
and justice, a free press, firm 
civilian control of foe military, a 
strong legal and accounting sys- 
tem, Englis h as the principal lan- 
guage of business, and a scru- 
pulously independent judiciary. 

U.S. Ambassador Frank Wis- 
ner has often talked of India as 
one of foe six future power cen- 
ters of foe world. Prime Min- 
ister H. D. Deve Gowda told us; 

“If foe world's two largest 
democracies cooperate, every- 
thing is possible. ' ’ 

Mr. Clinton needs to be in 
India for tbe 50th anniversary, 
on Aug. 15. The elephant is w 
beginning to move. 




The writer is chairman af 
Business Executives for Nation- 
al Security. a group ofU.S. busi- 
ness leaders. He contributed 
this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 






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1922: Alaska Trouble 


PARIS — [The Herald says in 
an Editorial:] Alaska, as an 


1947: Sicily Apart 

PALERMO — Following elec- 
tion of a Parliament on April 20. 
Sicily will receive autonomy. Ft 
will stui remain part of the Itali- 
an nation, subject to foe Rome 
government in matters of com- 
mon national interest, but in 
control of ail its own local af- 
fairs Rome’s post-Fascist le- 
gislators hope that foe Sicilians 
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foe Italian national interest al- 
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U.S. Citizens Have Duties, 
Not Simply Rights 

By William Raspberry 


W ASHINGTON — The class 
was discussing proposals to 
make English the official lan- 
guage of the United States, and I, 
as their devil’s advocate profes- 
sor, was attacking their near unan- 
imous opposition. 

Isn't a common language the 
sine qua non for transforming a 
multiethnic, multicultural, mill- 
's, tiracia! society into a nation? Is 
there anything wrong with insist- 
ing that people who want to come 
to America pay at least the price of 
learning the dominant language? 
How else can they be expected to 
be informed voters and know- 
ledgeable citizens? 

One student interrupted my 
spiel to make the following point: 
There are Americans bom here, 
whose parents were bom here, 
who are not informed voters, who 
take no particular interest in the 
political, social or civic life of 
their community or their nation. 

Should their citizenship rights 
be taken away? Aren’t they cit- 
izens. not because of how they act. 
but because they have satisfied the 
constitutional requirements of cit- 
i„ izenship? Why should foreign- 
bom speakers of a different lan- 
guage be required to jump through 
any additional hoops? 

“Good questions.” I said, 
meaning I had no good answers for 
them. I still don't. The questions 
remind me of another question 
I’ve beat struggling with for some 
time: What is an American? 

Being from a different era. I’m 
more likely than my Duke Uni- 
versity students to see America as 
a very special place — not just 
richer or more successful or luck- 
ier than most other nations, but 
fundamentally different. One ele- 
ment of that difference is that 
America includes such an 
astounding array of people who 
have decided to become Amer- 
ican. (The slave origins of my own 
people does not change this. My 
. ancestors may not have decided to 
' come here in the first place, but 
their progeny have become as 
American as anyone else.) 

To see what I mean, imagine 
my telling you that my family and 
I, having informed ourselves and 
considered the options, have de- 
cided to become Korean. If the 
idea strikes you as funny — even 
ludicrous — it’s not because you 
think leaving America for Korea 
is a bad choice, or because you are 
uncertain whether Korean law 


would allow us to become citizens 
there, it is because the idea of 
anyone from somewhere else be- 
coming Korean seems preposter- 
ous on its face. 

And yet Seoul brothers and 
their families make the opposite 
decision all the time. They decide 
lo become American. 

But if the volitional aspect of 
Americanism makes this a special 
place, it also makes Americans 
special people. My students, and 
perhaps young people more gen- 
erally. react negatively to the idea 
that the foreign bom (or Amer- 
ican-bom minorities, for that mat- 
ter! should have to give up some 
of their ethnic specialness in the 
quest for full American!] ood. But 
the America-seekers themselves 
seem to see the process not as 
sacrifice but as a source of pride. 
If America is special, becoming 
American must be special too. 

What, then, of die argument 
that this specialness demands a 
price? The more I think about it, 
the more I’m convinced that’s 
correct. Not about official Eng- 
lish. which is a side issue. Most 
new Americans desperately want 
to learn English. What they need 
is not coercion but help. 

Still. I think there are citizen- 
ship obligations that we Amer- 
icans are inclined to forget Our 
emphasis is too often on what we 
are owed as citizens, and not on 
what we owe. We have become 
expert at demanding our citizen- 

i „ . 



K* flW/inf’R. Ltn Tin** hadiralr. 


Marshal Mobutu comes home for a few things he forgot to steaL 


TV's Full of Deceptions, 
So Who Notices the Lies? 


By Daniel Schorr 


W ASHINGTON — Like 
many of my colleagues. I 
bemoan the use of deception as an 
investigative tool. But critics err, 
in my view, in treating television 
journalism as part of journalism, 
rather than as part of television. 

The ABC program “Prime 
Time Live” smuggled its person- 


MEAiWHILE 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Kurds and Turks 


ship rights and seem, at rimes, to 
believe that ii 


if everybody’s rights 

are enforced, we’ll have achieved 
the American dream. 

That attitude is the path to na- 
tional disaster. Left unchecked, it 
will turn America — and may 
already be turning it — into a 
nation of victims, of clients, of 
grievants, eternally shortchanged. 
Of course citizenship is about 
rights, but it is at least as much 
about responsibility. 

That is the point Georgie Anne 
Geyer strives to make in her new 
book, ‘ ‘Americans No More. ’ ' 
Ms. Geyer surveys the inter- 
group warfare, which together 
with our strident demands for 
group rights threatens to Balkan- 
ize America, and asks how it 
might begin to reverse the trend. 
Her answer. Citizenship. Not just 
to demand rights but to take con- 
certed action, to help make Amer- 
ica what it ought to be. 

The Washington Post. 


Regarding “Kurdish Fighters 
Wage War for Public Opinion . but 
Ankara Wins Some Hearts and 
Minds ” (March Hi: 

Neither tile Turkish Army nor 
the Kurdish Workers Party is 
known for its subtlety and both 
use terror as a means of keeping 
those they wish to control in 
check. How could anyone have 
expected the villagers of 
Caliskan, where the army has set 
up a base, to say anything derog- 
atory about its armed neighbors? 

Ifc Kurdish issue cannot be 
seen in isolation from the many 
problems faced by Turkey. The 
army’s scorched-earth policy and 
the forced relocation of the Kurds 
of southeastern Turkey to the cit- 
ies of western and central Turkey 
have served to spread the Kurdish 
problem throughout the country. 
The young Kurds now living in 
the slums of Ankara and other 
major cities are joining with other 
disaffected ethnic and religious 
groups under the banner of 
Muslim fundamentalism. 

If the activities of the Turkish 
Army are not curtailed and true 
social and democratic reforms not 
introduced. Turkey will eventu- 
ally break apart. The West may 


rely on the fallback plan of a mil- 
itary coup to keep its ally in check, 
but a more realistic policy on Tur- 
key is required. 

ANDREAS E. ALEXANDROU. 

London. 


The Cost of Vietnam 


Regarding “ For America’s 
Hip, Young and Mobile, the Next 


Stop Is Vietnam ( March 20): 


What’s Schizophrenic? 


After reading yet another ref- 
erence in a newspaper to schizo- 
phrenia in the context of foreign 
relations (“ Albright in China: A 
Tough Suitor,” Feb. 28). I feel as a 
mental health professional that 
there is a need to clarify this term. 
Schizophrenia is a menial dis- 
order characterized by disorgan- 
ized thought or speech, psychotic 
processes and auditory hallucin- 
ations. Although derived from the 
Greek words meaning “split 
mind.” schizophrenia is now 
defined as an entirely different 
disorder from “split personal- 
ity,” wbich is now known as dis- 
sociated identity disorder. 

Countries’ relations with one 
another may be contradictory, 
paradoxical or inconsistent, but 
they are not schizophrenic. Off- 
handed references to schizo- 
phrenia are disrespectful to those 
who suffer from this disorder. 

BONNIES. MILLER. 

Athens. 


lis article accurately portrays 
the mind-sec of the young Amer- 
icans teaching English in Viet- 
nam. but fails to mention the 
wheeling -and -dealing with land- 
lords, suppliers and everyone else 
needed to exist here. 

While living in Vietnam can be 
glamorous and fun for a while, 
doing business here is quite an- 
other story. 

BENOIT PERDU. 

Hanoi. 


Watergate Crimes 


Regarding a sentence that Wil- 
liam Safire forgot to finish ('“/rs 
Time to Expose Watergate II to 
Public View,” Opinion, March 6): 

Mr. Safire writes that ‘ ‘the high 
crime of Watergate was Richard 
Nixon’s abuse of his White House 
power to affect his 1972 elec- 
tion.” What I waited in vain for 
him to add was “by apparently 
ordering his re-election staff to 
commit a felony offense of break- 
ing and entering.” 

STEVEN JOHNSON. 

Esbly. France. 


nei into the Food Lion store not io 
learn the story of tainted meat but 
to enable it to tell the stoiy vividly, 
with pictures. It was competing 
for audience with the exciting 
reenactments and inventions of 
docu dramas and syndicated 
tabloid shows. 

Television news is inevitably 
affected by die television climate 
of make-believe. When I went in- 
to broadcasting in 1953, the first 
piece of advice I received from a 
young CBS producer, sardonic 
beyond his years, was: “The 
secret of success is sincerity. If 
you can fake that, you’ve got it 
made.” 

Small deceptions soon became 
conventional, like looking down 
from the TelePrompTer intermit- 
tently to simulate referring to 
notes, or “cheating” left or right 
of the camera as the director dic- 
tated. 1 came to understand the 
clever technology that enabled 
one to be seen standing in the halls 
of Congress while actually against 
a blue screen in the studio. A 
harmless little lie. 

In this movieland world, it be- 
came routine to act out a gamut of 
“listening shots” in various 
modes to be edited into an in- 
terview. It fell to me to have to 
explain about these “reaction 
shots” to CBS's chairman, Wil- 
liam Paley, when he complimen- 
ted me on my composure during 
an interview with the East Ger- 
man Communist boss Waltber Ul- 
bricht, who started raging at me 
for an unwelcome question. By 
the time I posed for my reactions. 
Mr. Ulbricht had stalked out of die 
room and I had regained my com- 
posure. 

“But was thax honest?'* Mr. 
Paley asked, and I could only 
reply that it was conventional 

Chi the corner of the vast en- 
tertainment stage inhabited by the 
news people, there is a seamless 
line between the small and the 
large deception. Interview sub- 
jects like General William West- 


moreland have complained of 
tendentious excerpting of inter- 
views. In 1971. CBS's president. 
Frank Stanton, risked a congres- 
sional citation for contempt rather 
than furnish the “outtakes” that 
would show bow isolated sen- 
tences from a filmed interview 
with Assistant Secretary of De- 
fense Daniel HenJrin were woven 
together for a documentary. “The 
Selling of the Pentagon. ’ ' 

NBC was aghast at the outcry 
when its “Dateline NBC” pro- 

K staged an explosion to il- 
Lte an unsafe feature on a car. 
ABC and CBS experimented with 
the use of actors for recreated 
events on magazine shows. 

In 1989 ABC crossed some 
great divide when the evening 
news with Peter Jennings showed 
what appeared to be surveillance 
film, complete with a clock run- 
ning in the comer, of a spy sus- 
pect. Felix Bloch, handing a 
briefcase to a Soviet agent on a 
Vienna street. ABC neglected to 
say that this was a simulation us- 
ing ABC persooneL 
Edward R. Munrow saw the po- 
tential for deception when he said, 
a generation ago. that “the tricks 
that microphones, cameras and 
film make possible should never 


Television news is 
inevitably affected 
by a climate of 
make-believe. 


be contrived to document an event 
that we missed or may never have 
happened.” 

Since then, .technology has 
provided smarter tools for decep- 
tion and surreptitious investiga- 
tion. For TV journalists, the show- 
biz imperative has blurred the line 
between reality and pretense. 
Competition for exciting pictures 
has dulled ethical constraints. 

Let me answer the question, 
“Should journalists lie?” with 
another question: In a medium so 
laden with mendacity, do you 
think they are really aware of what 
a lie is? 


The writer, a senior news ana- 
lyst for National Public Radio, 
worked in television for 25 years 
with CBS and five years with 
CNN. He contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


TEN INDIANS 

By Madison Smartt Bell. 264 pages. $23. 
Pantheon. 


Reviewed by Jabari Asim 

I N “Fist Stick Knife Gun." Geoffrey 
Canada detailed his efforts to help 
inner-city youths by beginning a martial 
arts program. He wrote movingly of 
teaching children to live peace faUy-even 
in the face of constant violence, and to 
find reasons to live even though death 
lurks all around them. Coincidentally, 
Mike Devlin, the fictional hero of 
Madison Smartt Bell's fine “Ten In- 
dians,” attempts a s imil ar mission- Al- 
though he fails to save most of his young 
charges, be does manage to touch their 
lives with something like grace. 

Bell's previous novel, “AD Souls’ 
Rising,” was a finalist for both the 
National Book Award and the PEN/ 
Faulkner Award. “Ten Indians” is 
neither as majestic nor as ambitious as 
its predecessor, which attempted to ex- 
plore the 18th-century Haitian revolu- 
tion in both human and spiritual terms. 
Relationships between races remain a 
critical aspect of Bell’s concerns, al- 
though the black-white interaction he 
depicts in the new novel is in many ways 
less contentious than the intraracial re- 
lationships at toe book's core. 

Devlin is a therapist and martial arts 
devotee who is facing psychic burnout 
The suicide of a teenage patient seven 
years before has sent the second-degree 
black belt on a slow downward spiral 
marked by a preoccupation with finding 
meaning in his life. 

“I’m forty-six,” be privately muses 
during a session with a moody teem “In 
another forty-six years. I’ll be dead. I’ve 
got through quite a lot of time already.” 

Devlin’s emotional meandering com- 
plicates his domestic life as well. His 
wife, Alice, is a former psychiatric so- 
cial worker who, after 10 years on the 
front lines and “exhausted by dealing 


with an endless succession of hope- 
lessly self-destructive lunatics.’ ’ has es- 
caped to an administrative job. Their 
marriage has stalled to a near halt, 
bogged down by awkward silences. 
Devlin’s reticence plays a significant 
part in the troubling lulls: “He had been 
bolding his tongue a lot lately, not with 
an effort of restraint, but with a sort of 
fond possessiveness.” 

The couple's 17-year-old daughter. 
Michelle, also a black belt, is as moody 
and secretive as her dad. which makes 
the family hearth a fairly chilly place. So 
when Ryu, Devlin's taekwon do master, 
encourages him to open a branch of his 
school in a dangerous Baltimore neigh- 
borhood, Devlin agrees. 

While scouting locations for the 
school, Devlin witnesses die murder of 
Jaynette, the unintended victim in a 
streetside gun battle. The teen mother's 
death, the first of JO to take place during 
toe course of the story, introduces the 
other family at toe novel's center. 
Jaynette and Froggy, her toddler son, 
lived with Jaynette ’$ close friend S bar- 
mane and Gramma Reen, Sharmane’s 
grandmother. Trig, Sharmane’s half 
brother and Froggy’s father, is a frequent 
visitor whose drug dealing; creates palp- 
able tension in the struggling household. 

Meanwhile, Devlin’s up-close en- 
counter with mortality becomes the 
point around which die novel turns. The 
story begins at the end, then moves to 
the middle, then returns to the end. This 
structure isn’t nearly as confusing as it 
sounds, however. Most chapters are nar- 
rated in the first person by Devlin’s 
students; the others, devoted to Devlin, 
are described in third-person narrative. 
Curiously, Bell never allows Devlin to 
tell his own story. 

Id both the passages about Devlin's 
private life and in those related by 
youthful nanarars. Bell displays his tal- 
ent for portraiture. His apparently fear- 
less depiction of black characters might 
be expected of Bell, whose Toussaint 


L’Ouverture in “AD Souls’ Rising’ 
was as complex and full-bodied as 
reader could wish for. His forays into 
black street slang are dead-on and 
devoid of condescension. Happily, he's 
smart enough to uncover the poetry 
that’s often contained in vernacular. For 
instance. Sharmane, the book's most 
memorable narrator, describes her 
brother as “locked down in his wrap- 
arounds. lost in a loose black suit.! 
Later she watches him move by her 
“with that same tiger step, like he was 
honey pouring out of a jar.” 

Considering the enduring fuss about 
white authors' creation of blade char- 
acters, it’s tempting to devote more dis- 
cussion to the topic here. But it's hardly 
an issue where Bell, a Baltimorean, is 
concerned: His black characters are 
neither overly noble nor hopelessly car- 
toonish; it is sufficient to say they 
simply are, and convincingly so. 


I T is a testament to Bell’s talent that 
readers will find themselves hoping 

r^t tSat toe authOT showed^them 
exactly how the book would conclude 
more than 200 pages earlier. During a 
final showdown with Trig’s gunslinging 
rivals. Devlin tries to demonstrate what 
be has stressed to his students all along: 
Violence resolves nothing. 

By offering us a faint strand of op- 
timism in toe shape of a reformed drug 
dealer. Bell seems to suggest that Alice 
was wrong: You can save the world, ooe 
person at a time. 

“Ten Indians” is a compact, deftly 
written novel dial's well worth readm 
although its grim subject matter makes it 
hard to digest. Bell’s admirers, knowing 
his penchant for talcing on tough topics, 
should come away satisfied — and won- 
dering toward what subject he will next 
turn ms discerning gaze. 


Jabari Asim is on the staff of The 
Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscort 


T HE American Contract 
Bridge League’s Charity 
Foundation collects small 
sums from games throughout 
North America and then 
makes large grants to worthy 
recipients. 

Three special grants of 
$5,000 each were given rer 


call, in the modem style, 
showed length in the red suits. 
This made it more dangerous 
for East to bid spades, in the 
fyn* of a likely misfit, and 
South reached five clubs 
without any action oo his 
right 

West led the club jack, 
fearing to give away a trick by 
leading any other suit South 
was happy to take two trump 
tricks but then faced prob- 

* ■ • . i>. 


having physical problems. 
One went to the Chemother- 
apy Foundatkm honoring 
Edgar Kaplan of Manhattan. 
Kaplan helped his team win 
the Open Swiss Teams at the 
Spring Nationals with fine 
play as South on (he 
diagramed deal. 

West’s two no-trump over- 


lems. It might seem that he 
to lose 


was due to lose a p&srt trick 
and two diamond tricks, but 
he was helped by the two no- 

trump bid, which indicated 
that the red honor cards were 
on his left. 

At toe third trick be led a 
low heart, putting West to toe 
test in a “Morton’s Fork 
position. If toe king had been 


played. South would have 
been in a position to use his 
heart winners to discard dia- 
monds from the dummy. 
West did toe best he could by 
playing low. and the queen 
won in dummy. 

Now South ruffed a spade 
and led a low diamond, thus 
scoring a diamond trick 
whether or not West took, his 
queen. South collected eight 
trump tricks and three red- 
suit tricks to make his 
game. 

In toe replay. Kaplan’s 
teammate in the East seat bid 
and made four spades with 
the East-West cards. He suc- 
ceeded because the red-suit 
honors were weD placed for 
him. This represents a curi- 
ous paradox: Both declarers, 
in opposite directions. 


needed well placed red-suit 
cards, and both got what they 
wanted. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


PAGE 10 








Cairo, Sprawling and Dusty, 

Is Best Seen by Just Plunging In 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 


C AIRO — Maddening, exhaust- 
ing. endlessly fascinating — 
this is Cairo, the sprawling, 
dusty capital of the Arab world 
that juggles the strains of overpopu- 
lation with the wealth of a long history 
in a rich, chaotic mix. 

With notorious pollution and traffic. 
Cairo can be off-putting to Westerners, 
and tourism declined precipitously be- 
ginning in the early 1990s after a small 
number of tourists were among those 
targeted by Muslim militants in a cam- 
paign of violence against the govern- 
ment 

But the government has quelled most 
of that violence, and tourists are flood- 
ing back. Some 3.8 million visitors ar- 
rived in Egypt in 1996, a record and an 
increase of more than 40 percent from 
just three years earlier. 

Many visitors are on package tours, 
and certainly, in a city of 14 million 
people, group travel can spare a visitor 
some of the logistical headaches that are 
part of everyday life. 

Remember to Recharge 

But whether alone or with a group, 
the best way to see Cairo is to plunge 
into the sights and sounds and colors — 
and then always to recharge, perhaps on 
horseback in the desert or ou a felucca 
on the Nile. 

In the markets and back streets, ven- 
turers will sometimes encounter insistent 
merchants and imploring children, which 
can be annoying but is almost never a 
cause for concern. With a strict moral 
code rooted in Islam, Cairo is probably 
safer than most Western capitals. 

Early spring usually brings dry. 
sunny days that allow for comfortable 
walking and, when the winds are right, 
can make the city shimmer. 

Every Wednesday and Saturday 
through June, Whirling Dervishes at Ai 
Ghoury Palace perform the al-tanoura, 
the dizzying ritual dances of the al- 
Mawla wia, a medieval offshoot of Islam 
that has now all but disappeared. The 
70-minute show is performed in a re- 
ception hall of the medieval palace, built 
for a 15th-century Mameluke sultan. 

Performances start at 9 P.M., and 
admission is free. For information about 
the program and other Arab folkloric 
music, call Al Ghoury Palace at (20-2) 
510-0823. 

At the Mahmoud Khalil museum, in a 
magnificent mansion on the West Bank 
of die Nile, a new gallery will open in 
early May to exhibit Pharaonic pottery, 
furniture and other antiquities found in 
ai-Fayoum Province, south of Cairo. 
The museum, at 1 Kafour al-Iksheed 
Street, is open every day but Monday 
from 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.; tickets are 
$8.60; (20-2) 336-2376. 

IN CELEBRAXION OP HORSES About 45 
minutes outside Cairo, die annual Ara- 
bian Horse Festival will be held May 4 
in Insbas ai-RamL, on the desert road 
that runs northwest toward the town of 
Bilbeis. With competition in both dis- 
cipline and beauty, the festival attracts 
dignitaries and royalty from around the ' 
Arab world, where the Arabian — smal- 
ler in stature than the Thoroughbred — 
is regarded as the pinnacle of equine 
grace. Call the provincial Tourism Pro- 
motion Office at (20-55) 322-403. 

To appreciate Cairo m all its vastness, 
start at the Citadel of Saiah al-Din, die 
enormous thick-walled fortress that is 
the most prominent landmark on the 
city’s eastern skyline. Built at the end of 
the 1 2th century, the Citadel functioned 
for centuries as both a fortress and a 
royal city. It was renovated in the 19th 
century by Mohammed Ali Pasha, for 


whom its grandest mosque is named. 
Because it is perched on a steep spur 
above the city, it is cooler and less 
crowded than the rest of die capital. 
Open daily from 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.; 
admission is $7. 

In die heart of the city, the Khan al- 
Khali li bazaar and its alleys beckon every 
tourist with jewelry and copper handi- 
crafts. But a more authentic glimpse of 
day-to-day commerce can be found 
nearby in the area surrounding the 
massive Bab Zuweila, a fortified 11th 
century gate. Its archway marks the en- 
trance to what remains of a royal en- 
closure founded by the Fatimids in 969 
and to an area that has been vital to the city 
ever since, with commerce in everything 
from clothes to machine parts. 

And just outside the gate, a covered 
alleyway marks the beginning of the 
Tentmakers' Street, where merchants 
still stitch the boldly patterned fabrics 
that line traditional tents and are now 
also prized as wall hangings and pillow 
covers. 

The most awe-inspiring among 
Cairo's places of worship may be the 
Mosque of Ibn Tulun. whose central 
courtyard alone spans four acres. 

Built by a Turkish general between 
876 and 879, it has been embellished 
over-the years but still retains a majestic 
simplicity and. even in the heart of Old 
Cairo, an aura of peace. Open daily 8 
A. ML to 5 PJM. except on Friday from 
11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M., when it is 
closed for prayers. 

Still a wonder of the world, the an- 
cient Pyramids of Giza now lie so near 
to modem sprawl that they are best 
approached indirectly. 

Turn left from Pyramids Road just 
before reaching the site, and head for the 
row of stables that front the desert south 
of the Sphinx. A nag. a Thoroughbred, 
or anything in between can be rented for 
between $5 and $9 an hour, a bargain 
prized by the Egyptians and expatriates 
alike, who treasure riding into the Saha- 
ra to see the Pyramids rise from the 
sands. One of the best is F.B. Stables, at 
(20-2) 385-0406. 

food with A View For dining with a 
view of the Nile, tiy Le Pacha 1901, a 
renovated steamer moored on Saraya al- 
Gezira in Zamaiek. Among an eclectic 
collection of restaurants that share the 
four-level boat. Piccolo Monde serves 
good pasta, veal and beef, including 
spaghetti with pesto ($5) and fillet alia 
Robespierre, slices of steak with olive 
oil, rosemary and peppercorns ($7). 
Dinner for two with a modest French 
wine (in Egypt, local wines are poor and 
imported ones overpriced) is about $S0. 
For any of Le Pacha's six restaurants, 
call (20-2) 340-6730. 

Kebabgy, on the southern tip of 
Gezira island in the El Gezira Sheraton, 
serves puffy, fresh-baked Arabic bread 
hot from a day oven and has spectacular 
river views, the traditional mezze plat- 
ter ($9) of Arabic appetizers and salads 
including hummus and baba gannouj is 
more than enough for two, while the 
mixed grill of iamb chop, chicken and 
minced-lamb kofta ($13) is simple and 
delicious. Dinner for two with local 
Stella beer, a palatable if sometimes 
inconsistent alternative to more expens- 
ive imports, is about $45. Telephone 
341-1333.341-1555. 

F OR a budget meal, Felfela. now 36 
years old. is an institution. The 
restaurant, with a shady teirace. 
features grilled chicken, kebabs and lo- 
cal favorites like Shakshouka. fava 
beans mashed with tomatoes, eggs and 
butter. Dinner for two with local beer is 
about $17. The original restaurant (there 
are now 10 branches) is at 15 Hoda 
Shaarawi Street, a 1 0-minute walk from 
Tahrir Square. Call (20-2) 392-2833. 


Luxor’s Little- Visited Left Bank 
Allows Visitors to Step Into Past 


By Meg Bortin 

International Herald Tribune 


A guide gestures at a statue at Luxor, left : the temple of Ramses II at 
Luxor, right; Meddinet Habu, inset; arid, below, a felucca at Luxor. 


Mdinda Sae Gemini 


Jim Carrey, right, in a scene from Tom Shadyac s "Liar Liar. " 

Liar Liar 

Directed by Tom Shadyac. OS. 

In his meteoric rise from "In Living 
Color’s" second banana to top of the 
bunch, Jim Carrey has made maxi m us 
use of the gluteus — his own bruised 
bum and. in one case, that of an un- 
suspecting rhinoceros. While Carrey 
does not altogether abandon the bot- 
tom in the laudable “Liar Liar," the 
facile physical comedian does add a 
new toot to his hom. Essentially, he 
removes the red rubber nose and plays 
a realistic human being. Like Robin 
Williams. Carrey has learned to do his 
side-splitting sbtick in character. He’s 
not only under control, but funnier 
than ever as the truth-impaired 
Fletcher Reede. Fletcher, an unscru- 
pulous trial lawyer who puts his ca- 
reer before his family, is hardly an 
original in yuppie iconography, A ha- 
bitual liar both in and out of court. 

Fletcher always wins his cases, but 
he's a loser in his personal life. His 
ex-wife. Audrey (Maura Tierney), is 
about to remarry a nerd (Cary Elwes) 
who is attempting to take Fletcher’s 
place with his 5-year-old son. Max 
(Justin Cooper). Though Fletcher sel- 
dom shows up as promised and Max 
usually rebounds, the moppet is dev- 
astated when his lather misses his 
birthday party. Once again he calls 
Audrey with a work-related excuse, 
only this time. Max doesn't buy it — 
and before blowing out his birthday 
candles, the child wishes that “for 
just one day. Dad couldn't tell a lie." 

Apparently the truth fairy is listening, 
because Max’s wish comes true. To 
Fletcher's distress, even innocuous 
inquiries from panhandlers and col- 
leagues elicit unvarnished responses 
instead of the little white lies that 
civilitv demands. The director, Tom 


Shadyac. never lets the star's comic 
ingenuity overwhelm the character or 
story, yet still leaves room for spon- 
taneity. He allows Carrey bis sins of 
emission, but prevents the “Liar Li- 
ar’s" pants from catching fire. 

(Rita Kempley. WP J 

Love and Other 
Catastrophes 

Directed by Emma-Kate Croghan. 
Australia. 

This is a well-paced funny tale of 
adolescent angst, rampant hormones 
and joie de vivre in the budding groves 
of Melbourne academe. Alice (Alice 
Gamer), a graduate student is four 
years overdue with her thesis, “Doris 
Day as Female Warrior.’’ and spends 
most of her time ducking under tables 
to avoid her professor, her younger 
chum Mia (Frances O’Connor) is 
frantically trying to switch faculties to 
follow her favorite prof, while being 
thoroughly beastly to her adoring les- 
bian lover Dartni (Rad ha Mitchell). 
Mia and Alice are looking for a suit- 
able candidate to share the warehouse 
apanment they’ve just moved into. 
But will shy but sweet Michael (Matt 
Day), who is desperately trying to 
escape the drug-crazed medics he is 
rooming with, hear about it before 
someone else gets there first? Alice 
looks set to fall for the classicist, cam- 
pus Casanova and part-time gigolo. 
Ari (Matthew Dyktynski). This is 23- 
year-old director Croghan *s first fea- 
ture, and that of most of the cast, and 
all acquit themselves with conviction 
and verve. Despite the very low 
budget, the film looks good and has 
some nice visual as well as verbal gags 
— altogether a remarkable debut for a 
sparky group of young taJenL 

( Roderick Conway Morris. IHT ) 


L UXOR, Egypt — In the old days, 
crossing the Nile from east to 
west at ancient Thebes was a 
journey of no return, a voyage 
from the land of the living to the realm of 
the dead. The only souls who actually 
lived on the Left Bank were the care- 
takers of the deceased: the embalmers 
who dipped the bodies of the pharaohs 
and their queens in solutions of rare 
spices and wrapped them in bands of 
linen; the builders who erected the giant 
monuments to the greatness of kings; 
the aitisans who painted the rates’ 
proud exploits and humble offerings to 
their gods onto the walls of tombs built 
into the stony mountains that rise in 
stark pyramids above the fertile valley. 

Today, the Right Bank of the Nile at 
Luxor is a thriving city visited by 1.5 
million tourists a year. The Left Bank 
remains a quieter place, where donkeys 
haul water up dusty trails to stone-poor 
villages, where accommodations are 
less than luxurious and the rhythm of 
life is slow. Few tourists choose to 
spend the night on Luxor's Left Bank; 
after a quick foray to KingTut’s tomb or 
die Valley of the Queens, most shuttle 
back to the bustle of the other side. But 
for travelers willing to rough it a bit, life 
on the Left Bank offers a chance to 
experience an Egypt where past and 
present coexist in sometimes startling 
ways, where visitors can feel they are 
stepping directly into another era. 

And, of course, you can go back 
again: The return journey across the 
Nile takes only 10 minutes and costs 
less than a dollar. 

On a recent weeklong visit to Luxor, 
my companions and I made our 
headqua r ters at the Pharaoh Hotel, a 
pension quite accurately described be- 
fore we got there as funky. Rooms are 
simple but clean; a few have bathrooms. 
The cost of $15 a person per night 
includes breakfast in the hotel’s spa- 
cious garden, a pleasant spot where 
passeisby, Egyptian and foreign, stop to 
drink mint tea or play a round of bil- 
liards beneath the shady eucalpyrus 
trees. 

branching ovt From the Pharaoh, 

we branched out to the monuments on 
foot or by taxi (which usually costs 5 
Egyptian pounds a ride, about $1.50, 
regardless of distance), although don- 
keys and camels are also available for 
transportation. We also crossed regu- 
larly to the other side of the Nile, trav- 
eling by colorful private motor launches 
(5 pounds a boatload) with names like 
Lotus and Rasta Ferry. 

And one sunny afternoon, we in- 
dulged in a felucca ride, borne past lush 
fields to nearby Banana Island by lazy 
sailboat 

Time is the primary dimension in 
Luxor. The present takes on a strange 
elasticity, days seeming to stretch far 
longer than 24 hours. As for the past it is 
everywhere in evidence, jutting from 
fields and hillsides in mud-brick and 
sandstone configurations, millennia su- 
perimposed upon each other in an as- 
tonishing panorama of one of the 
world's most fascinating cultures. 

A good place to start is Medinet Habu. 
the enormous ruins housing die mortuary 
temple of Ramses HL the last of the great 
Theban pharaohs (1 198-1 166 B.C.). 

Ahmed, a turbaned local guide, 
provided an unsolicited running com- 


mentary on the temple as we wandered 
among its colossal walls. We rounded a 
comer and came across rows of massive 
round stone slabs. "Those are bases of 
those columns over there,’’ said 
Ahmed, indicating a field of fallen pil- 
lars overgrown by weeds. 

"They’ve been there since the war." 
The war? "The war against the Ro- 
mans." Oh yes. that war — fought just 
over two millennia ago, around 30 B.C. 

Ancient Travelers 

conquer 

became the area's first tourists. They, 
too, marveled at the Colossi of Mem- 
non. the two immense statues of Amen- 
hotep HI rising out of afield not far from 
Medinet Habu. Built 14 centuries before 
the Romans arrived, the Colossi were 
said to sing until an overin dustrious 
emperor repaired a fault in the stone. 

Some of the ancient temples and 
tombs bear modem scars, like the tomb 
of Rainses VI, in the Valley of the 
Kings, shameftilly scratched by obvi- 
ously recent graffiti. One tomb, 
however, remains in nearly pristine con- 
dition, the colors of its magnificent 
paintings as brilliant as they were when 
executed during the reign of Ramses II 
(1304-1237 B.C.). This is the recently 
restored tomb of Queen Nefertari, that 
pharaoh's most beloved wife. Just 150 
visitors a day are admitted to the tomb, 
which was opened to the public only 
recently. Tickets cost 100 Egyptian 
pounds ($30), well worth the expense. 

The best time to visit the tombs is 
afternoons, when most of the tourist 
buses have departed Tickets must be 
purchased at a stand beside the river, but 
this is only a minor inconvenience. 

The riverside also offers a series of 
relaxed cafes. like the Africa Restaurant 
where we dined one evening as the 
lights of the Right Bank twinkled across 
the water. Egyptian cuisine was a rev- 
elation, similar to but earthier than other 
Mediterranean cooking. Don’t miss tire 
grilled pigeon stuffed with rice and pine 
nuts, a local specialty, or the simple 
salad known as baladi. 

One of the charms of the Left Bank 
was the ease with which we were able to 
mix with local people. The Egyptians 
we met were gregarious and hospitable, 
going out of their way to introduce us to 
the pleasures of their culture. Although 
we traveled at a time of relative tension 
in the Middle East, our French-Amer- 
ican group encountered no hostility. 

On the other side of the Nile, we were 
underwhelmed by the sound and light 
show at the ruins of Kamak, but enjoyed 
wandering through the bazaar and 
lunching m the garden of the splendid 
Winter Palace Hotel (the upmarket trav- 
eler s best bet, with rooms in the old 
wing starting at $150 a night, plus tax). 

I T was on the notice board of the 
Winter Palace that Howard Carter, 
the British archaeologist, an- 
nounced the discovery of the tomb of 
I utanknamen 75 years ago. 

Luxor is now preparing to mark the 

HSTTL *9® Diamond Jubilee in 
October. A highlight will be six outdoor 
performances °f “Aida" beside the 

°J Hatshe PSut on the 

Left Bank. The event is being staged 

Siih £2’ 1 ?- to V 7 b * ftc Open* 

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INTERJNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


PAGE 11 


LEISURE 


Meet the Concierge of the Future 


By Roger Collis 

International Herald Tribune 


A FTER all these years and 
goodness knows how manv 
expense-account stays in 
grand hotels. I have never 
quite lost my fear of the traditional hotel 
concierge — a man of a certain aee 
redolent with dignity and putative wis- 
dom. Typically, he has a phone tucked 
under his chin, another babbling on the 
desk, while sending semaphores to a 
guggle of doormen, pages, bellhops and 
drivers. The twice-over he gives you as 
you walk across the lobby to his desk is 
challenge to your management style. 

So imagine how stressed I was to find 
myself addressing nearly 500 conci- 
erges from around the world at the 44th 

The Frequent Traveler 


International Congress of Les Clefs 
d’Or (the elite corps of professional 
concierges who wear lapel pins of 
crossed golden keys) in Rome a few 
weeks ago. Fortunately. I got a laugh for 
saying what I just wrote. They are a 
jovial crowd. 

My second surprise was to see a re- 
freshing number of women concierges 
along with a younger generation ded- 
icated to dealing with guests’ mundane 
or outrageous demands, from renting a 
tuxedo, getting tickets to a soid-out 
show, or finding an elephant for a photo 
shoot at two hours' notice — that’s a 
true story. Such legerdemain is 
shrugged off somewhat disingenuously 
as simply the “art of the impossible.’ * 

COMPUTH literate Simon Thomas. 
26, head concierge at the Royal Carden 
Hotel in London, who claims to be the 
youngest Clefs d’Or member in the city, 
says: ’ ‘ The job of the concierge is chan- 
ging along with the changing needs of 
guests. Business travelers now walk 
through the door with laptops under 
their arms and expect the people they 
deal with to be computer literate. 

“The concierge is all about infor- 
mation. The Internet is a huge step for- 
ward: we use it a heck of a lot For 
example. I can check on someone's 
package with Fedex, UPS or DHL 
simply by logging on. typing in the 
airway bill number, and it will come up 
— who's signed for it, where it is right 


now. ... I can check Eurostar: Is the 
train delayed? Has it left the station? 
Whatever. 

“The concierge's job is changing 
back to what it used to be in the grand 
hotels until the 1950s as the general 
manager's righihand man; greeting 
guests, controlling reception, the whole 
of the from hall. 

Tony Facciolo. 58, corporate chief 
concierge at the Sheraton on the Park, 
Sydney, and world president of Les 



Mum GuUcnfwe.flHT 


Clefs d’Or, who started as a bellboy 41 
years ago at the hotel Gritti Palace in his 
native Venice, serves as peripatetic 
trainer of fellow concierges within the 
Sheraton group. 

“You think of the client as God.” 
Facciolo says. ‘After all, he pays your 
salary. Whatever it is you want, provid- 
ing it is lawful, we will provide. You are 
ambassador for the city: you have to sell 
the city and add character to the hotel. 
’Hie hallmarks of a concierge? Discre- 
tion. honesty, helpfulness, and, above 
all, patience, no matter what. Once you 
check out, I want to see you coming 
back again and again.” 

Les Clefs d'Or was founded — in 
Paris, where else? — in 1929: the Euro- 
pean Association, formed in 1952, be- 
came the International Concierge In- 
stitute in 1970. Today, it has more than 
4.000 members in 32 countries with 
strict conditions for entry — five years' 
service as a concierge in a good hotel 
and proposed and seconded by two ac- 
tive Clefs d’Or members each of three 
years running. 

In 1984, the institute formed the first 
concierge school in the world, accord- 
ing to its director. Pierre Berthet, at the 
College Sainte Barbe on Paris's Left 
Bank. It offers up to 18 young men and 
women an eight-month- program for a 
career dedicated to hospitality and solv- 
ing other people's problems. Mornings 


are spent working in a Paris hotel: af- 
ternoons in the classroom. 

“Discretion is an important quality," 
Berthet says. “See everything, hear 
everything, say nothing — that’s the 
code we work under. You won’t read 
books of memoirs by concierges.” 

The goal of the school is to turn out 
polyglots — well, at least two languages 
— with some knowledge of hotel man- 
agement. law. accounting, body lan- 
guage, geography, psychology and 
cross-cultural relations. Graduates can 
expect to start as assistant concierges; 
but it still takes five years before they 
get to wear the golden keys. 

The Human Touch "" 

Carolyn Moore, divisional manager, 
hotels, for Hogg Robinson Travel in 
London, says: “We still need the human 
touch that good concierges can offer. 
Bur I think many hotels underresource 
the front-desk.” 

Holly Srie], a concierge at the Grand 
Hyatt in San Francisco, author of “Ul- 
timate Service — The Complete Hand- 
book to the World of the Concierge” 
l Prentice Hall), now a concierge trainer 
and consultant, says: “Introduce your- 
self to the concierge at the beginning of 
your stay, and deal with the concierge in 
person as much as possible to establish a 
relationship. And create a vision of what 
you’d like to experience, either in a 
restaurant or an outing. 

“Concierges can work small mir- 
acles. but sometimes a show really is 
sold out ora restaurant really booked up. 
So give the concierge as much time as 
possible.” 

M ANY people avoid asking fa- 
vors from the concierge be- 
cause they're worried about 
tipping — how much or how to do iL 
Whether you tip at the beginning or end 
of your stay may depend on how chintzy 
you actually are or appear to be. and 
whether you plan to come back. 

“I’d tip at the end of the stay.” 
Thomas says. “Say five pounds if 
you've used the desk a few times and a 
thank-you note. The nicest compliment 
is a note.” 

Stiel suggests $5 to $1 5 for a hard-to- 
get restaurant reservation or at least $20 
“for a complex project, such as plan- 
ning an itinerary.” 






■: ■ .:4 a 




m 


m 


Honda’s Prelude to an Enigma 


By Gavin Green 

OBODY — except maybe 
Toyota — makes cars better 
than Honda. They are bolted 
together with watchmaker ac- 
curacy, which explains their reputation 
for keeping out of mischief. And the 
engineering is marvelous — especially 
the engines. Pull a Honda engine apart 
and compare it with most European or 
American mass-made motors, and it’s the 
difference between precision engineer- 
ing and mere metallurgy. It’s night and 
day. Just like Honda’s schizophrenic 
styling philosophy. 

One type of Honda car — let's call 
these the progressive yang cars — are 
beautifully styled, drive in a sporty hug- 
the-road manner, and are a cut above 
their rivals. Yang cars include the NSX 
sports car, most old Civic hatchbacks 
and the CRX.The passive yin cars (most 
Accords. Legends. Civic sedans), on the 
other hand, have about as much dress 
individuality as a boardroom of gray- 
suited businessmen. 

Yin and Yang of Styling 

Just as perplexing, Honda seems to use 
the yang and yin styling departments at 
random. The last generation Civic, such a 
gorgeously organic little thing, was yang 
par excellence. The yin guys did the 
latest one. The last Prelude was pure 
yang. The new one, as tested, is yin. 

Quite why Honda's management has 


such mood swings from model to model 
is anyone’s guess. The derision — 
openly acknowledged by management 

— to make the new Prelude more con- 
servative (translation: duller) than the 
last one is especially baffling. Sports 
coupes sell on style. 

But the conservative clothes clad a 
car of real class and nonconformity. The 
test car had Honda’s stunningly brilliant 
variable- valve-timed VTEC engine, 
which goes as well as a turbo motor of 

The Car Column 

equivalent capacity but without all the 
huffing and puffing. It is the world's 
finest four-cylinder engine, as well as 
the most fun to drive. It will rev to 7.800 
rpm. and gets there with such inspiring 
zing and refinement. 

The five-speed manual gearbox goes 
about its business well, but the clutch 
feels abrupt and rather dead, which 
makes stop-start city driving a jerky, 
tiring affair. A “sequential spoils shift” 
auto is optional, and allows you to shift 
up or down gears by the mere push of a 
lever — or you can be lazy and drive it 
tike a normal automatic. 

Unlike most European mass makers. 
Honda isn’t frightened of deviating from 
the straitjacket of motoring conformity 

— witness the novel four-wheel steer- 
ing. In tight parking maneuvers, die rear 
wheels countersteer, which means the 
car steers so sharply you'd swear it was 
bending in the middle. At high speeds, 
the back wheels steer in the same di- 


rection as the fronts, which is supposed 
to aid high-speed stability but doesn't. 

At least in one area the styling is 
consistent: The inside looks just as dull 
as the outside, probably worse. It is coal 
black, apart from the dreadful-looking 
fake wood, clearly sourced from a tube 
rather than a tree. The rear seat is just 
about big enough for two adults on a 
short journey, and the whole cabin has a 
low waisdine and a low roofline, two 
Honda trademarks, which reinforce the 
sporty demeanor. 

It's ironic that the Prelude, peppered 
with clever engineering, is likely to be 
bought mainly by coupe conservatives 
rather than a more progressive clientele. 
The stodgy looks are the reason; that 
and Honda's reassuring reputation. 
Bolder buyers will pick the rakishly 
avant-garde Fiat Coupe. 

H ONDA will probably realize 
this with the next Prelude, and 
give us a car of gorgeous style. 
Then again, it may notT With Honda, 
you never can tell. 

• Honda Prelude VTi. About 
$35,000. Four-cylinder, variable-valve- 
timed engine, 21 57cc, 185BHP at 7,000 
rpm. Five-speed manual gearbox, four- 
speed “sequential” auto optional. Top 
speed: 227 kph (141 mph). Acceler- 
ation: 0-100 kph in 7 _5 seconds. Average 
fuel consurapion: 10.4 liters/1 00km. 
Next: The Toyota Picnic. 

Gavin Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine. 


ARTS GUIDE 


M AUSTRIA 

Vienna 

Bank Austria Kunstforum, tel: 
(1) 71191-5737, open {ferity. Con- 
tinuing/To June 1: “William Turn- 
er." More than 40 paintings and 75 
works on paper by the British artist 
(1775-1851). 

Kunstfustorisches Museum, tel:' ' 
11) 525-24-403, closed Mondays. 
To May 25: “ Vitoria Cokxtna: Di- 
chterin und Muse Michelangelos." 
An exhibition devoted to Vrttoria 
Colonna, the 16th-century Italian 
poet, who was in the confidence of 
popes and emperors, and had a 
dose relationship with Michelan- 
gelo. Features portraits of con- 
temporary theologians by Titian 
and del Piornbo. as wefl as 
Michelangelo's drawings, sonnets 
and letters dedicated to her. 
Kunstfemaus, tel: (1) 521-77- 
504, open daily. To April 20; 
“China!” More than 150 works by 
30 Chinese artists trace the re- 
lationship between tradition and 
Western behavioral patterns. 


Brussels 

Musee d'Art Anclen, tel: (2) 508- 
3211 . closed Mondays. To July 27: 
“Paul Delvaux, 1897-1994." 120 
paintings and more than 100 
works on paper as well as etching 
books. Includes the best known 
paintings of naked women loiter- 
ing in empty railway stations, or 
wandering through deserted an- 
cient towns. 

BRITAIN 

Loup o m 

National Gallery, tel: (171) 747- 
2885, open daity. Continuing/To 
May 5: "London's Monets." Fea- 
tures more than 20 river views, 
snow scenes (ram the Impression- 
ist yearn and examples from the 
haystack series of the 1890s. 
Also, to May IS: "Discovering the 
Baroque: The Denis Mahon Col- 
lection." Sir Denis Mahon, a Brit- 
ish historian, has assembled a col- 
lection of 17th- and 18th-century 
Italian paintings including works 
by Guerrino, Guido Rani and 
Caravaggio. The' entire collection 
Is shown here together with 30 
drawings by Gusrclno on whom 
Mahon is one of the foremost au- 
thorities. 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: 
(171) 494-5615, open daily. To 
June 8: “The Berlin of George 
Grosz: Drawings, Watercolours 
and Prints, 1912-1930.” A satirist 
and social commentator, George 
Grosz depicted life in Germany 
from the end of World War I to the 
rise of fascism. Also, lo April 6: 
"Braque: The tale Works." 

■ P1HMARK 

Copenhagen 

Arbejdermusaet, tel: 33-93-25- 
75. closed Mondays. Continuing! . 
To Sept 1:. "Bed and White: 
Posters from tiie Russian Civil 
War 1E17." Propaganda during 
the Civil Viter tint followed the 
191 7 Revolution. 

■FRANCE 

Grenoble 

Musee da Grenoble, tel: 04-76- 
63-44-11. jo May 24: "Signac et (a 
liberation de la Cotdeur De Ma- 
tisse a Mondrian." The exhibition 
presents tfw works of the French ‘ 
painter (1863-1935) from 1895 to 
1910. His influence is illustrated 
by the presentation of works by 
Matisse, - Derain. Braque, 
Delaunay. Kirchner. Kantflnsky, 
Mondrian, Balia and Bocdoti, 
who ail adopted, at some stage, 
tiie DMsfcmlrftecfmiquB. 



’ Leslie Caron as Gigi by Cecil Beaton , in Luxembourg. 


Pams 

Grand Palais, tel: 01-44-13-17- 
17, dosed Tuesdays. To July 14: 
"Paris/BruxeDes - Bnatelfes/Par- 
is." A confrontation between Bel- 
gian and French art in the second 
part of the 19th century. Also, to 
May 26: “Angkor et Dbc Siectes 
d’Art Khmer." 

Musee d'Art Modemede la Vtile 
de Paris, tab 01-40-70-11-10. 
dosed Mondays. ContimiingRb 
May 25: “Les Armees Trente en 
Europe.” European art in the 
1930s, and its ImpBcafion in the 
historical and political context 
Uusee-Galerie de la Sefta, tel: 
01-45-56-60-17, dosed Mondays. 
To June 14: “BeUmer Graveur.” A 
member of the Surrealist move- 
ment, the German artist {1902- 
1975) became notorious for the 
obsessive exploration of the fa- 
mate body. The exhibition features 
60 drypoints dating from the 
1960s and 70s. 

■ »» MAIIT - 
Berlin 

Alts Natfonalgalerte, To May 11: 
“Adolph Menzel, 1815-1905: Das 
Labyrinth tier wfrkBchkeit" More 

than 1 20 paintings, drawings, pasr 

lets and watered ore by the Ger- 
man artist A prolific draftsman. 
MenzBl drew to record the world 
around him snd capture asense of 
the historical time and place- 

Cologne 

WaMraf-RIcttartz Museum, tel: 
(221) 221-2372, dosed Mondays. 
To May 11: •'Tiepolo und Die 
Zefchenkunst Venedigs im 18. 
Jahrundert" From the 18th-cen- 
tury Venetian painter, a selection 
of sketches, studies aid draw- 
ings, as well as the celebrated red 

drawings on blue paper. Aba m- 
dudes contemporary scenes of La 
Serenissima by contemporary 
artiste such as Marco Rica. Pay- 
ette and Guardi. 

KunsthaHe der Hypo-Kulturstlf- 
tuno. let (89) 22-44-12. open 
dSST To March 31: “Schmkft- 


Rottiuff, 1884-1976." Presenta- 
tion at paintings, watercolofs, 
drawings and sculptures by the 
German Expressionist known for 
his stark drawing, raw colore, and 
inspiration from African sculpture. 
The exhibition also displays about 
1 5 African sculptures from his col- 
lection. 

■ : ~ r ~ 

Jerusalem 

Israel Museum, tel: (2) 6706811 . 
open dally. To end of May : “Felix 
Nussbaum, 1904-1944: Pictures 
From There." 80 oil paintings and 
gouaches by the German Jewish 
artist who perished in Auschwitz: 
The still Fifes, landscapes and self- 
portraits reflect Nussbaum’s ex- 
perience in Nazi Europe. 

m ITALY ~ 

Palazzo Ducale, tel; (010) 562- 
440, dosed Mondays. To Juiy 13: 
'Van Dyck a Genova: Grande Plt- 
tura e Colteaonismo." 40 paint- 
ings by the Flemish painter (1599- 
1641) together with works by 
Rubens, Caravaggio. Titian and 
StrozzJ. 

Milano 

Fondazhme Antonio Mazzotta, 
tel: (2) 878-197, closed Mondays. 
To June 29: "Otto Dix." 180 works 
by the German painter and graph- 
ic artist (1 891 -1 969) that testify to 
Ufe in Germany between the two 
World Wars. 

Venice 

Palazzo Grass!, tel: (41) 522- 
1 37S. open dally. To July 1 3: “Aria 
del '900'. La Pittura Fiamminga e 
Olandese.” A selection of works 
by 20th-century Belgian and 
Dutch painters. Features works by 
van Gogh and Enson paintings by 
Knopff. Fefiden Raps and Jan 
Toorop illustrate the styfe. 
splendor and decadence of Art 
Nouveau; Expression rst works by 
Constant Permeke and Surrealist 
paintings by Magritte and 
Delvaux. The exhibition con- 
cludes with a collection of works 


by artists of the new generation 
representing the recent tenden- 
cies in the art ol the two coun- 
tries. 

Tokyo 

National Museum of Modem 
Art, tel: (3) 3214-3305, dosed 
Mondays and May 6. To May 11: 
“Tetsugoro Yorozu." Paintings by 
the Japanese artist (1885-1927) 
who developed a style that was 
influenced by the Cubist and 
Fauve movements from Europe 
but later Introduced Oriental tech- 
niques into his repertoire. 

M Luxembourg 

Musee National d'Hlstoire et 
d’Art. tel: 47-93-301. closed 
Mondays. To May 11: “Cecil 
Bealon: Portraits rfun Esthete." 
Documents 60 years of creative 
activity by the Vogue and Harper's 
Bazaar photographer (1904- 
1980). 


■ ■ il l i it i n 


Amsterdam 

Van Gogh Museum, tel: (20) 570- 
5252. open daily. To June 15: "Vi- 
enna 1900: Portrait and Interior." 
Viennese works of art between 
1870 and 1918 that throw fight on 
portrait and interiors. Features 
works by Klimt Schiele, Gereti, 
Otto Wagner, among others, as 
well as furniture and objects. 

■ SPAIN 

Bm yi im i 

Centre Cultural de la Fimdacio 
La Caixa, tel: (93) 458-89-05, 
closed Mondays. To April 27: “Os- 
kar Schtemmer." Works by the 
German artist (1888-1943) who 
taught at the Beuhaus. The ex- 
htoition brings together his first 
Cubist paintings, as well as the 
drawings he did from the window 
of his house when considered a 
“degenerate" artist by the Nazi 
regime. 

■ SWEDEN 

Stockholm 

Modems Huseet, tel: (8) 666-42- 
50. dosed Mondays. Continuing/ 
To May 19: "Picasso and the 
Mediterranean Myth. " Documents 
the relationship between Picas- 
so's work and Cydadic, Mycenae- 
an, Archaic, Iberian, Etruscan and 
Greco-Roman ait 

■ SWITZERLAND 

Geneva 

Musee d'Art et d’Hlstoire, lei: 
(22) 418-2600, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/To Sept 28: “L'Art 
tflmlter: Falsifications. Maripuls- 
tions. Pastiches." A selection of 
30 pastiches of paintings of the 
Italian Quattrocento, that were 
created at the turn of the century. 

Lausanne 

Musee des Beaux-Arts. tel: (21) 
312-83-32, dosed Mondays. To 
June 1: “Giovanni Giacometti." 
Retrospective of the Swiss painter 
(1868-1933), Inducting more than 
100 works created between 1889 
and 1933, inducting paintings, 
drawings and watercoiore. Giac- 
ometti often used for inspiration 
landscapes, Ms family and the 
daily Ufa of the "montagnards." 

Lugano 

Museo d'Arta Modems, tel: (91) 
994-4370, closed Mondays. To 
June 22: "Georges Rouault. 1871- 
1958; Retrospective.'' More than 
120 works by the catholic painter 
that Diustraie his favorite themes: 
religious scenes, arcus, prosti- 
tutes, WbllcaJ figures, etc. 


j UMITID STATES 

Boston 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Mu- 
seum, tel: (6 1 7) 566-1 401 , dosed 
Mondays. To April 6; 'Botticelli's 
Witness: Changing Style in a 
Changing Florence.* Five paint- 
ings by the Florentine painter 
(1445-151 0), three paintings from 
his artistic drcle, and four prints 
derived from his designs. The 
works document how changing 
times' during his lifetime influ- 
enced his style, from the kieafized 
forms of his early Madonnas to 
series of agitated figures, moving 
with compulsion. 

Fort Worth 

Kim bell Art Museum, tel: (817) 
332-8451. dosed Mondays. To 
May 11: "Georges de La Tour and 
His World." La Tour (1593-1652) 
palmed common men and women 


Holidays and Travel 


with sympathetic insight and Ns 
religious paintings are among the 
powerful expressions of the 
- Counter-Reformation. The exhto- 
ition traces La Tour's development 
from the early, realistic daylight 
works to his later nocturnal 
scenes, in which forms are dra- 
matically illuminated, to his final 
works. In which figures are re- 
duced to ample, sculptural forms 
rendered in warm colors. 

Hew York 

Guggenheim Museum SoHo, 
tel: (212) 423-3500. dosed 
Mondays and Tuesdays. Con- 
tlnuing/To June 8: “Art/Fashion." 
Features works by artists such as 
Giacomo Balia. Christo. Sonia 
Delaunay, Lucio Fontana, Natalia 
Goncharova, Man Ray and Andy 
Warhol who made forays into the 
realm of fashion. 

Metropolitan Museum ot Ait, tel: 


(212) 570-3791 , dosed Mondays. 
Continiungnb July 6: ‘The Glory 
of Byzantium.” With more than 
350 objects, the exhibition doc- 
uments the influence of Byzantine 
culture on Islamic states and 
Christian kingdoms from the 9th to 
the 13th century. Also, to June 1: 
“American Tonalism.” Paintings, 
drawings, prints and photographs 
by Whistler, George inness and 
other American artists whose art. 
in the late 19th and early 20th 
century, emphasized poetic mood 
and muled coloration. 

Washington 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
737-4215, open daily. To May 11: 
The Victorians: British Painting in 
the Reign of Queen Victoria. 
1837-1901." A selection of paint- 
ings by Turner, Whistler, Sargent, 
Burne-Jones and other Victorian 
painters. 


CLOSING SOON 

March 30: “Michelangelo and His 
Influence: Drawings from Windsor 
Castle." Kim bell Art Museum, 
Fort Worth, Texas. 

March 30: “Barbizon: Au Temps 
de J.F. Millet 1849-185." Kyoto 
City Museum of Art, 
Kyoto-March 31: “Schmidt- 
RotHuH, 1884-1976.” Kun- 
sthalle der Hypo-Kulturstif- 
tung, Munich. 

March 31 , open all night Saturday: 
"La Plata- Oeuvre Divine." 
Chapetle de la Sorbonne, Paris. 
March 31 : " Alighiero Boetti: 1 965- 
1994.” Museum Modemer 
Kun st Stifung Ludwig, Vienna 
March 31: “Young Gainsbor- 
ough." National Gallery, Lon- 
don. 

March 31: “Mike Kelley." Museu 
d'Art Contamporanl, Bar- 
celona 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 199’ 


INTERNATIONAL 


Trying to Salvage Peace Process, U.S. Envoy Meets Arafat 


Expecting Spread of Violence Sunday , 
Israel Sends More Troops To West Bank 


The Associated Press 

■JERUSALEM — Dennis Ross, the 


special U.S. mediator, returned to the 
Middle East on Thursday to try to save 


Middle East on Thursday to uy to save 
the collapsing peace process as Israel, 


■’Therefore, there are forces there." 

Mr. Ross was scheduled to meet late 
Thursday with Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu in Jerusalem. 

The gaps between Israelis and Pal- 


me wuimi/aiuK ucaec yiiA.ua oa ©t- — — . 

anticipating more violence, sent troop estmians appeared far more difficult to 
reinforcements to the West Bank. bridge than they were the last tone Mr. 


Mr. Ross, who met for two hours 
Thursday in Morocco with Yasser Ara- 
fat before flying to Israel, faced a cool 
reception In the region. The Palestinian 
legislative council accused the United 
States of bias and joined calls for Pal- 
estinians to take part Sunday in protests 
against Israeli land expropriations. 

“The goal of my mission is to. take 
account of the situation in the Middle 
East for the president and the secretary 
of state and to give them a report at the 
end of this week, 1 ’ Mr. Ross said after he 
met with Mr. Arafat. 

Near the West Bank town of Ramal- 
lah. hundreds of Palestinians threw 
stones at Israeli soldiers in the eighth day 
of protests against Israeli construction in 
East Jerusalem. Israeli troops tired tear 
gas and rubber bullets, and Palestinian 
police moved quickly to disperse the 


protesters. 

Concerned that the violence will 


spread Sunday, Israel deployed more 
troops around Palestinian cities in the 
West Bank. 

“We will not wait to see how things 
develop,” said the armed forces chief of 
staff, Lieutenant General Amu on Shahak. 


Ross visited the region — in January, 
when he brokered Israel's military with- 
drawal from most of the West Bank town 
of Hebron. 

“The tensions between the Palestin- 
ians and Israelis have reached a very , very 
serious level,” said Edward Abmgton, 
the U.S. consul-general in Jerusalem. 

Israel demands that before peace talks 
can resume Mr. Arafat must send a clear 
signal to Islamic militants that he will 
not accept terrorist attacks against Israel 
and that Palestinian stone-throwing riots 
must end. 

Mr. Netanyahu insists that Mr. Arafat 
gave the militants tacit approval for at- 
tacks before the suicide bombing in a Tel 
Aviv caffi last Friday. 

“There can be no advance in the 
peace process unless we see a total dis- 
avowal of terrorism and actions by the 
Palestinian Authority against terror or- 
ganizations,” said David Bar-Ban, a se- 
nior Netanyahu aide. 

The Palestinians want Israel to stop 
construction of the Har Homa housing 
project in East Jerusalem and for the 
United States to guarantee that there will 
be no further budding of settlements. 



Convict Tells 
King's Son 


Mr. King replied. “I believe you 
and my family believes you." 

At the outset of the meeting, Mr ; 
Ray told him, “I had nothing to do 


David ShmMn/Bnarr* 


Israeli soldiers crouching in defensive positions on the West Bank on Thursday as Palestinians hurled stones. 


Mr. Ray, 69, who was brought to 
the meeting room in a wheelchair, 
was at times mumbling and ram- 
bling. 

Mr. King, 36, sat a yard away 


The United States, while criticizing 
Israel's decision to g;o ahead with the 
Har Homa construction, twice vetoed 
United Nations resolutions denouncing 
the project. 

"We condemn the American posi- 
tion, ’ ’ the Palestinian legislative council 


said in a statement. “We consider this 
protection and support of Israeli aggres- 
sion and blatant Israeli violations.” 

Mr. Arafat's Fatah faction of the PLO 
issued a statement Thursday saying that 
* * the extreme government of Netanyahu 


because it is a reaction to the provocation 
of this government and its practices of 
organized terror against Palestinian land 
and the peace process.” 

Fatah, which organized most of the 
recent West Bank protests, also con- 


is responsible for all acts of violence, demned the U.S. vetoes. 


MINE; 

Bust Before a Boom 

Continued from Page 1 


X, may have been taken in by a seem- 
ingly irresistible pitch. The interest in 
Bre-X and its apparent gold strike went 
beyond just companies like Freeport- 
McMoRan, Barrick Gold Corp. ana Pla- 
cer Dome Inc. to stock market investors, 
who sent the value of Bre-X shares on a 
dizzying rise since the company began 
exploring at the Busang site in 1993. 

At that time, Bre-X shares sold for 30 
cents, and the estimated amount of gold 
was 1 million ounces. The company's 
only real asset was its claim to Busang. 



CODES: U.S. Rebuffed on Plan for Eavesdropping on the Internet 


Continued from Page 1 


policies, but there was no international 
consultation before that,” she said. 

Indeed, the industrial world seems to 
be deeply divided on whether govern- 
ments can ever legitimately eavesdrop 


That seeming contradiction, however, 
did not prevent the administration in re- 
cent months from waging a vigorous be- 
hind-the-scenes effort for its proposal. 


And hoping to Tesolve some of the policy 
conflicts, the administration is circulating 


conflicts, the administration is circulating 
draft legislation on Capitol Hill that would 


on the electronic communications of attempt to control even the domestic use 


'ever, cryptographic keys or encrypted data," ’ 
in re- the report says. 

is be- Even supporters of the U.S. position 
»saL acknowledged that the guidelines were a 
olicy disappointment. “The United States 
ating probably had more success raising con- 
rould sciousness than getting language that 
c use could be treated as an endorsement for 


their citizens. Because messages on the of daia^scrambling software and put in key recovery,” said Stewart Baker, a 


$250. It was then split 10 for I. and the 
value rose and fell on revised estimates 
of gold and continuing turmoil in se- 
curing the drilling rights from the In- 
donesian government. 

“I stand behind all the work we have 


cent of the project and the rest went to the 
Indonesian government and local 
companies aligned with President 
Suharto and his associates. 

Indications of Freeport's wariness be- 
came evident last week in an Indonesian 
business publication which reported that 
after drilling its own test holes, Freeport 
discovered serious discrepancies with 
Bre-X foldings from core samples taken 
over the last few years. 

At the same time, the Bre-X geologist 
who had been one of the principal dis- 
coverers of the Indonesian field died in 


Internet are easy to intercept, more in- 
dividuals and corporations are protecting 
foe privacy of their communications and 
the security of their commercial trans- 
actions by scrambling the information. 

Some OECD nations, including Bri- 
tain and France, have either outlawed or 


place a national key-escrow system. 
While the OECD has no authority to 


former National Security Agency of- 
ficial who worked with the American 


set international policy, its recommen- delegation to the OECD. 


dations are frequently used by member 
nations to set their own foreign and trade 
policies. 

The privacy and law enforcement as- 


are in the process of tightly regulating pects of the Internet are issues on which 
foe private use of data-scramblm g sys- member governments have been des- 
tems. But other nations — including 


done technically, and. like all foe other what seemed to be suspicious circum- 
trials and tribulations we’ve gone stances when he fell from a helicopter In 
through since discovering foe project, an area near the Busang site. Company 
we will be exonerated ana the property officials said the geologist had taken his 


through since discovering foe project, 
we will be exonerated and the property 
will stand as we indicated," Mr. Walsh 
told Bloomberg News. ^ 

Other gold shares on the Toronto 
Stock Exchange tumbled 3 percent 
Thursday, dragging down the market 
Freeport, known by its stock listing of 
FCX, said Wednesday that the analysis 
of the cone samples was not yet complete 
and that it would continue to study the 
site. But while the company was not 
immediately walking away from the 
project it expressed clear doubts. * ‘FCX 
will elect to participate in foe devel- 


own life by jumping out of the helicopter 
because he had recently been told that he 
had an incurable disease. There were 
also reports from Indonesia that a fire in 
January destroyed much of his work. 


terns. But other nations — including 
Australia. Canada, Denmark and Fin- 
land — have policies that protect in- 
dividual privacy. 

Japan had resisted the U.S. proposal at 
first, bur was said to be moving closer to 
it, while Germany remained deeply di- 
vided. 

Most other countries, inside or outside 
the OECD, have yet to confront the data- 
scrambling issue. And even the United 
States has a somewhat contradictory na- 
tional policy that permits citizens to use 
whatever dam-scrambling software they 
wish within the nation’s borders, but 
restricts the export of the most up-to- 
date computer-coding technology. 


perare for guidance. 


But U.S. computer industry execu- 
tives criticized the OECD for even leav- 
ing the door open for governments to set 
national policies on data scrambling. 

“We mink that markets, not govern- 
ments, should be foe primary determ- 
inants of technology solutions.” said 


But even though most of the OECD Jon Englund. a vice president at the 
discussions involved law enforcement Information Technology Association of 


Mr. King, 36, sal a yard away 
facing Mr. Ray, listening patiently 
and guiding the conversation with 
foe man who is suffering from ter- 
minal liver disease. ~ ; 

“We are going to do everything 
in our power to try and make sure 
that justice will prevail," said Mr. 
King, who was 7 years old when his 
father was assassinated in 1968. 

“I guess in some strange way our 
destinies, that of my father’s and 
that of yourself, somehow got tied 
up together," he added, “and we 
still don’t feel as a family that we 
have all of the questions 
answered." 

The two shook hands before re- 
porters at the start of the meeting. 
After 25 minutes, the reporters were 
ushered out and the two continued 
to talk privately. 

Mr. Ray said a lot of misinform- 
ation had surrounded the King slay- 
ing. 

“The only thing that should be 
relevant is foe facts of the case,'’ he 
told Mr. King. “Maybe you can 
come to conclusions. I think it could 
be done today. I don’t think it could 
be done 30 years ago." 

The King family has joined in a 
call for Mr. Ray to obtain a trial for 


officials, who have been the main ad- America, a trade group. 


the assassination. The family says it 
would be the only way to discover 


vocates for measures that would insure 
their ability to crack codes. European 
officials say there was never much 
agreement on what to do. 

So the primaiy recommendation in 
the report, a copy of which was obtained 


by The New York Times, simply gives 
OECD member nations the latitude to do 


OECD member nations the latitude to do 
as they see fit when it comes to data 
scrambling, formally known as cryp- 
tography. 

“National cryptography policies may 
allow lawful access to plain text, or 


Many experts question whether gov- 
ernments can ever hope to ensure law 
enforcement access to electronic mes- 
sages or to restrict foe spread of super- 
strong coding software, -because -newY- 
more powerful versions can always be ■ 
developed and easily transmitted over 
the Internet in the blink of an eye. 

And any international effort is almost 
certainly doomed if some countries re- 
fuse to go along with a common ap- 
proach: People looking for encryption 
can acquire it wherever the laws are lax. 


would be the only way to discover 
the truth about foe civil rights lead- 
er's death. 

Martin Luther King was shot as 
he stood on a hotel balcony in Mera- 
phis,-Tennessee, where he had ar-- 
rived to -help- direct a sanitation 
workers’ strike. - - 
Mr. Ray initially pleaded guilty 
to the slaying, avoiding a possible 
death sentence. 

. He recanted a few days later and 
has been proclaiming his innocence 
ever since. 


RUSSIA: Strike Attracts Sparse Turnout 


Continued from Page I more than in 1991. A new survey by 

Russian Market Research Co. found that 
and heavily tilted toward elderly people average household incomes, officially 


will elect to participate in me (level- ana neavny tinea toward eioerty people average nousenoia incomes, omciany 
opment of foe Busang project only if marched along with foe Communist listed at $120 or so, are in factor least 70 
development is, in FCX’s opinion, eco- Party leader, Gennadi Zyuganov. Flut- percent higher. Even the government has 
nomically feasible,” it said. tering red banners and slogans dotted foe acknowledged its statistics may under - 

Trying to determine how much gold procession. state real incomes by a quarter or more. 


development is, m r LA s opinion, eco- 
nomically feasible,” it said. 

Trying to determine how much gold 
lies underground by drilling holes only a 
few inches wide is one of the riskiest 
parts of mineral exploration, and dis- 
crepancies often occur, experts said 
Still, foe possibility that what last month 
had been considered one of foe greatest 
gold finds ever may now not be even 
economically feasible has left mining 
analysts shaking their heads. 

But the other companies involved in 
the contest to win a deal to develop the 
find denied they had been nicked 

“We never discovered any evidence 
of wrongdoing,” said Vincent Borg, a 
spokesman for Barrick Gold, the world's 
second-largest producer, which attempt- 
ed a hostile takeover of Bre-X by align- 
ing itself with members of foe Indone- 
sian ruling family before its efforts 
collapsed "Having said that, we never 


tering red banners and slogans dotted foe 
procession. 

“The column is marching from Ka- 
liningrad (on Russia's western edge) to 
Vladivostok and it cannot be stopped by 
government reshuffles that have fooled 
no one,” said Mr. Zyuganov. 

Alexander Lebed a former chairman 
of Mr. Yeltsin's national security coun- 


The survey, based on nearly 4,000 
interviews in 2,000 households across 
Russia in late 1996. also found an enor- 
mous generation gap in wealth and ex- 
pectations. While nearly three-quarters 
of Russians aged 16 to 24 say life has 
improved over the past year, two-thirds 


cil who was fired and became a bitter of their grandparents — Russians over 
opponent of foe government, said he 65 — say things have become worse or 



PERU: Optimism on Ending 100-Day Crisis 


Continued from Page 1 


odo quoted a senior Japanese Foreign 
Ministry official as saying. The Japanese 
government, therefore, must study eco- 
nomic aid to Cuba in foe future, the 
official, who was not identified was 
quoted as saying. 

President Fidel Castro offered to give 
asylum to the guerrillas from a human- 


itarian point of view when Japan's par- both sides to hammer out details of apian 
liamentary vice minister of foreign af- to end the crisis that includes asylum for 


supported the demonstrators. The gov- 
ernment “is no longer in control of foe 
situation.” be told a Moscow crowd. 

Many economists say Russians’ teal 
standard of living, although it varies 
according to region and industry, is often 
not as bad as official statistics suggest, 
largely because Russians lie to foe tax- 
man to conceal their real incomes. 

Consumption of cars, home electron- 


unbearable. 

There are other explanations for why 
salary delays have not triggered a social 
explosion in Russia. Some cite Rus- 
sians' generally low expectations of 
their leaders. Others believe Russian his- 
tory has produced a people who are 
particularly well adapted to suffering. 

In response. Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin, declared this week that 


SUICIDE: 

39 Cult Members Die 


Continued from Page 1 


completed our due diligence." 
After a struggle between foe 


ics and household goods is up in many just over a fifth of back wages and pen- 


After a struggle between foe compa- 
nies lasting months, Freeport and Bre-X 
in February worked out a deal. Freeport 
was to control 15 percent of the Busang 
project and be sole operator of the mine. 


parts of Russia, and often up dramat- 
ically. Ford Motor Co.’s sales tripled in 
foe first two months of this year com- 


pared to the same period a year ago. 
Izvestia reported in December that in- 


upon satisfactory completion of its own 
site examination. Bre-X retained 45 per- 


Izvestia reported in December that in- 
habitants of the poor, largely rural region 
of Arkhangelsk in the far north had 
bought 25 1 cars last year — 20 times 


sions would be paid off by the end of 
March. Few people believed him, bur few 
were predicting a new revolution either. 

The newspaper Kommersant said: 
“The government does not object to the 
national protest. The government is 
openly supporting foe strikers’ de- 
mands.” 


JAPAN: Trying to Instill an Entrepreneurial Spirit in the Citizenry 


Continued from Page 1 


their American or European counter- 
exchanges pay an average of 50 percent, pans might. Often the expressed mo- 


moving to a tropical island, as many of companies more competitive and 
their American or European counter- slowed foe pace of layoffs, as a weaker 


to investigate. Twelve minutes later, Mr. 
Matzorkis said, Mr. Rio emerged “as 
white as a sheet” and said. “They did 
it.” 

Mr. Matzorkis said on CNN that on 
foe tapes, the members appeared “quite 
joyous about the fact that they were 
going to be taking this step.” 

The shroud-like coverings over the 
bodies had led the police to report at First 
that only men had died, and that all 
victims were aged 1 8 to 24. 

On Thursday, however, the author- 
ities said that an unknown number of 
women were among the dead, and that 
the age range was broader, although no 
children had been found. 

Apparently all the victims were white 
or Hispanic. 

Lieutenant Lipscomb of the sheriffs 


fairs visited Havana earlier this month. 

One Japanese Foreign Ministry offi- 
cial said Japan had not provided any loans 
to Cuba. It has, however, provided tech- 
nical aid. accepting 167 engineers from 
Cuba for training and sending five tech- 
nicians to Havana, foe official added. 

For theiT part, the rebels said 
Thursday that a peaceful solution was in 
the hands of the government. 

The rebels' leader. Nestor Cerpa Car- 
tolini. asked the families of the hostages 
ro “understand that a possible peaceful 
solution to the crisis is in the hands of foe 
government" and “includes attention to 
our demands made since the occupa- 
tion.” 

Mr. Cerpa, in communication by 


walkie-talkie, reiterated criticism of exchange for freeing the hostages. 

Presideni Fllllmnn « anvomnwnt „all_ D..» r» ■. • . 


President Fujimori's government, call- 
ing it “authoritarian” and “anti-nation- 
al and unpopular.” 

* ‘Social justice is achieved only with a 
fight.” he said. 


But Peru’s opposition daily La Re- 
public^ citing unidentified sources in the 
anti-terrorism police, reported that the 15 
or so rebels inside the compound were 
bickering over the issue. (AP. AFP) 


DIPLOMATS: Bogged Down at State 


Continued from Page 1 


“In foe United Stales, the entrepren- 
ixial spirit is automatically bred into 


ureu rtiutuvaii ur tuiupcuii luuuici- aiuweu uie pace or layorrs. as a weaker or Hispanic. continued From Paop 1 . . 

changes pay an average of 50 percent, pans might. Often the expressed mo- yen lowers prices of Japanese goods and Lieutenant Lipscomb of the sheriff’s 8 nificanJL P, y r 0wn “8" 

Among other things, the high cost of rivation was ro contribute to foe good of services internationally. Nevertheless, department confirmed that members of could not be reached for comment. nmlnna^ iJJE: • / y noting that 

doing business in Japan means entre- society, Mr. Ono said. some academics insist Japan still needs a the group had sent videotapes and a The Paris embassy U one of 14 with no oostsifnnt ™ S ■ ■ gn 

preneurs rarely have more than one shot Haruo Miyagi, a founder of the Col- wave of new businesses and jobs to wash lengthy letter to Mr. Rio. ambassador, and dozens of others are fad? ^HSf nin ? str “ t ^P?" 

at success. legiate Entrepreneurs Association, said across its shores. The letter, he said, was "not a suicide expected to open when ambassadors Albriahr n ®" Uls 

Japan’s group mentality and lack of an Japan’s group mentality often hindered "If a significant number of Japanese note perse, but it does imply it was their leave this summer. The top administration SrSnSSnC?' l 
independent, pioneering spirit also stand entrepreneurs by fostering suspicion of don’t start new businesses that create intention to take their own lives. ’ ’ official said it would be wrong to assume ^ J t1e P bers of 

m the way. individuals starting companies. Foun- jobs, unemployment could rise sharply He said foe group, which went by the that Mr. Wisner's withdrawal would “o™ 

ded in 1994. the association has about over the nest lflvMr>; ” tiunn nnm* ww Hiohp-r Source, was "not a guarantee the oner frvr Mr j. “ipromai wno retired 


some academics insist Japan still needs a 
wave of new businesses and jobs to wash 
across its shores. 


Lieutenant Lipscomb of the sheriffs ® 

department confirmed that members of could not be reached for comment 
the group had sent videotapes and a The Paris embassy is one of 14 with no 
lengthy letter to Mr. Rio. ambassador, and dozens of others are 

The letter, he said, was "not a suicide expected to open when ambassadors 


v 


curia! spirit is automatically bred into 
children from & young age,” said Seichi 
Ono, editor of Entree, a monthly 
magazine for entrepreneurs. “But Japan 
doesn’t have its own frontier spirit or its 
own ‘American dream’ to harden 
people’s attitudes and give them the 
confidence to start their own busi- 
nesses.” 

Entree, which was launched last 
month and was foe first Japanese pub- 
lication aimed solely at people interested 
in starting their own companies, is 
bwned by a conglomerate called Recruit 
Group. 

Asked why they started their own 
companies, Japanese entrepreneurs 
rarely cited dreams of retiring young and 


ded in 1994, the association has about over foe next 10 years,” Iwao Nakatam, name WW Higher Source, was 
2,000 members and offers advice on an economics professor at Hitotsubashi solinter Broun of anv Other n 


how to start companies. 

‘ * As Japanese people like to say. ‘The 
nail that sticks out is hammered 
down,’ ” said Mr. Miyagi, who started 
his own test-preparation school in 1994. 


an economiesprofessor at Hitotsubashi splinter group of any other religious 
University in Tokyo, said. It could easily group." was based only in the western 


rise to 5 percent or 6 percent, he said, states and was "not international 


compared with the current 3.4 percent, 
already a postwar high. 

The Japanese government shares 


There was no immediate confirmation 


guarantee foe post for Mr. Rohatyn. 

Decisions appear to have been made 
on a number of ambassadorships in- 
cluding James Collins, the State’ De- 
partment's special adviser for the former 


“There is still a perception in Japan that those fears. To make it easier to set up 
running your own company and making businesses, foe trade and industry min- 

vrinnaii ir rnmaKAiu Knri anrf that «iam in«w. ^ i* . 


of a link to recent deaths of followers of nations of the Soviet Union, to Russia, 
the Order of the Solar Temple, a cult and John Komblum, the assistant sec- 


money is somehow bad and that you 
have an ulterior motive.” 

The problem for Japan today is that its 
giant manufacturing and financial sec- 
tors are shrinking. When foe yen reached 
its postwar high against the dollar in 
April 1995, the government said as 
many as 1 .2 million jobs could disappear 
by 2000. The yen’s slide since then 
against the dollar has made Japanese 


istry has raised the limit on start-up loans 
from government financial institutions 
by 50 percent, to 300 million yen ($2.4 
million). Of that, 70 million yen can be 
borrowed without collateral. 

To make it easier to acquire new tech- 
nology, the ministry has ordered public 
financial institutions to lend new compa- 
nies as much as 30 million yen for re- 
search and development. 


based in Switzerland. 

Mill Silverman, an attorney for the 
owner of the mansion, said Higher 
Source had branches in Arizona and 
New Mexico. 


retary for Canadian and European Af- 
fairs, to Germany, 

For her part, Mrs. Albright said the 
delays would not affect foe State De- 
P®rtniem s work. She noted that many 


respccica career diplomat who retired 
from foe Foreign Service last year, as 
undersecretary of state for political af- 
fairs, and Stuart Eizenstat, who served as 
domestic policy adviser to President 
Jimmy Carter and is now an under- 
secretary of commerce, as the under- 
secretary of state for economic affairs. 


U.S. Plans Cate at Turk Base 


Mr. Matzorkis said the group members top officials, like Deputy Secretary of 
referred to themselves as "monks” and State Strobe Talbott, are staying on and 
spoke of belonging to a “monastery.” that even vacant embassies have capable 
They had tola real estate sales people chiefs of mission serving in lieu of am- 

. . , .1 L J.'. rn I,m - .... 


not to show foe house this week to pro- bassadors. “Obviously it would be bet- 
spective buyers, because this was their ter if we had everybody in place," Mrs. 
holy week. 


Albright said in a telephone interview. 


Reuters 

aS W S T ° N -^ number of 
D ■ Jr°T ce personnel at Incirlik Air 
Base in Turkey will be cut by up ro 50 
Peg*nt, or about U00, by Sept. 30, 
1998, as part of a realignment of U.S. 

Ur0pe ’ Defense Secretary Wil- 
liam Cohen announced Thursday, 


-m 



The Associated Press 
NASHVILLE, Tennessee — A"" 
son of foe Reverend Martin Luther. 
King Jr. met Thursday for foe first 
rime with afrafl James Earl Ray and - 
asked him point-blank. Did you 
loll my father?' ' 

Mr. Ray answered: WO, - X • 
didn’t.” - 

“Sometimes you have to make a. 
personal evaluation,” Mr. Ray told 
Dexter King at foe Lois DeBerry 
Special Needs Facility, where he is . 
serving 99 years for killing foe civil . 




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Mr. Fujimori said he hoped that foe 
government’s negotiator, Domingo 
Palermo, can meet with the rebels, and 
local media reports said foe meeting 
could come as soon as Monday. 

It would be foe first face-to-face meet- 
ing between foe rebels and the gov- 
ernment in more than two weeks. 

Since foe last session, mediators have 
held numerous separate meetings with 


- r y?m 




foe hostages in Cuba or foe Dominican 
Republic, freedom for some imprisoned 
Tupac Amaru members and payment of 
a "war tax” to foe hostage-takers. 

Efforts to end the crisis and free foe 72 
hostages have so far proved fruitless, 
frustrating Mr. Fujimori. 

Mr. Fujimori had promised to elim- ^ 
in ate Peru’s guerrilla groups by foe end v 
of his first term in 1995. He had pro- 
nounced foe Tupac Amaru Revolution- 
ary Movement virtually defeated before 
the group seized foe ambassador’s com- 
pound Dec. 17. 

The Peruvian news media and Kyodo 
both reported Wednesday that Mr. Cerpa 
was ready to accept a deal that would 
take him and his guerrillas to Cuba in 


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FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


PAGE 13 





Korean ‘Frugality’ Targets Imports 


By Paul BLusteia 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — You're in a bar 
in Seoul, trying to impress a South 
Korean business associate. "A bottle 
of Johnnie Walker Black, please,” you 
tell the waiter. 

Sony, Big Spender, but only Korean 
scotch is available. American and 
European liquor isn’t politically cor- 
rect these days in South Korea. 

That’s the way it’s going for lots of 
foreign goods in the Korean market, 
thanks to what the Koreans call a 
' ‘frugality” campaign — and what for- 
eign critics call an “anti-import” cam- 
paign. The campaign includes pledges 
by big conglomerates to curb imports, 
restrictions on overseas spending and 
anti-import exhortations by groups and 
associations such as the Korean Central 
Council of Nightspot Owners, whose 


street banners proclaim: “Don’t Buy 
Imported Cigarettes and Whiskey.” 

The campaign offers a classic il- 
lustration 01 why many foreign ana- 
lysts view South Korea as Asia’s hard- 
est-to- crack market, an ironic 
distinction for a country that owes its 
economic “miracle” to exports. But 
the Seoul government maintains that 
any anti-import activities are strictly 
attributable to private groups, and 
when U.S. and European Union ne- 
gotiators threatened two weeks ago to 
lodge a complaint with the World 
Trade Organization, Seoul responded 
that it bore no responsibility. 

These sorts of campaigns, however, 
seem to erupt when Korea's trade de- 
ficit is worsening: Last year, the deficit 
hit a record $20 billion, and the trade 
balance was deep in the red during 
similar campaigns in the early 1990s. 
One of those previous campaigns in- 


cluded distribution of a comic book in 
Korean schools warning that imported 
food contained poisonous chemicals 
and radioactivity. 

The correlation between the cam- 
paigns and the trade deficit is by no 
means the only reason U.S. and Euro- 
pean officials suspect that anti-import 
activities are traceable to the Korean 
government, which maintains far- 
reaching bureaucratic power over the 
nation's economy. 

Consider the announcements that 
began in January from Korea's giant 
chaebol, or conglomerates, which de- 
clared one after the other that they 
would halt all imports of consumer 
goods starting this year. These business 
groups, the biggest of which are Hy- 
undai, Samsung, Daewoo and Lucky 
Goldstar, exercise extensive influence 
over imports through their trading 
companies and distribution networks. 


In billions of dollars 


$10 


5 


less. 


PI 0 

’Excessive' 

consumption JEt*- - 
campaign 

‘New Life 


mri 

f.riirn 


Lit *3 .1 a 


Current pA 

ssr * vi -15 

campaign cam P a S n [.•] 


f..rM 


^SSI-20 

■88 '89 '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 *95 *96 


Meanwhile, officials at the U.S. Em- 
bassy in Seoul report that in recent 
months they have experienced an “un- 
believable increase” in complaints 
from U.S. firms about bureaucratic 
delays and customs-clearance snags 
that hamper their ability to operate in 


See IMPORTS. Page 17 


Quaker Oats Swallows 
Loss to Unload Snapple 

Beverage-Maker Sold for $300 Million 


Deutsche Denies Conflict of Interest in Steel Merger 


Cimtpdedf* Our Sujf Fnmi Dupuutirt 

CHICAGO — Quaker Oats Co., 
which paid SI. 7 billion to buy the 
Snapple beverage business in 1994 and 
has been disappointed with its perfor- 
mance since, on Thursday agreed to sell 
it for S300 million to Triarc Cos., an- 
other soft-drink company owner. 

Triarc, which makes RC Cola. Diet 
Rite and has almost 3.000 Arby’s, P.T. 
Noodles and TJ. Cinnamons restaur- 
ants. plans to operate Snapple with its 
Mistic Brands Inc. line. 

Quaker said the sale would reduce 
pretax profit by S 1 .4 billion, resulting in 
a loss. 

“The decision to sell Snapple was 
reached after an extensive review of 
various shareholder-building options by 
management,” said Chairman William 
Smithburg. 

The sale was also an admission that 
Mr. Smithburg could not revive the 
juice and ice-tea line. 

Even as shareholders clamored for a 
sale. Mr. Smithburg balked and took on 
an extra year's losses in a last-ditch 
attempt to rum the brand around. 

“Quaker just decided this wasn't a 
business they could make work to their 
satisfaction,” said Gary Hemphill of 
Beverage Marketing Corp., a consultant 
in New York. 

Analysts for months had been ex- 
pecting Quaker to unload Snapple, but 
were surprised by the low sales price. 

“I’m more than a little surprised they 
sold it so cheaply,” said John McMil- 


lan, an analyst at Prudential Securities. 
“There's been a lot of pressure on 
Quaker's management to stop putting in 
good money after bad and I guess if you 
want to do a deal bad enough, you'll do 
a bad deal.” 

But the unloading of the troublesome 
business raised Quaker Oats stock by 75 
cents to $38.25 a share in late trading on 
the New York Stock Exchange, marc 
was quoted up $1,625 cents at 
S17375. 

Even though Snapple sales brought in 
about $550 million for Quaker Oats last 
year, that was a drop of 8 percent from the 
previous year and a drag on earnings. 

A variety of marketing measures by 
Quaker, including a give-away program 
last summer, failed to reinvigorate sales, 
and the fruit-juice and iced-tea tine lost 
more than $100 million. 

Chicago-based Quaker has said that 
Snapple failed to catch on in middle 
America and last year pulled the drink 
line out of several markets. 

The majority of Snapple 's 450 em- 


ployees will move to jobs with Triarc, 
ider 


including the president of Snapple 
Beverages, Michael Schott, said Mark 
Doll ins, a spokesman for Quaker. It was 
not immediately clear what role Mr. 
Schott would play. 

Analysts said that Quaker had paid 
too much for Snapple in the first place 
and that the purchase was plagued by 
bad timing. Sales started downward just 
as Quaker acquired Snapple. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — Deutsche Bank 
AG was forced onto the defensive 
; Thursday as it denied a report of an 
- apparent conflict of interest in its role in 
the negotiations that eventually led to 
the merger of the steel companies Krupp 
Hoesch AG and Thyssen AG. 

The company , Europe’ s largest bank- 
ing concern, had been criticized for act- 


ing as an adviserto Thyssen while it was 
helpi 


ping Thyssen ’s rival, Knrpp Hoesch, 
r er of Thyssen, 


prepare a hostile takeover 
according to an advance report that will 
appear in the weekly news magazine 
Der Spiegel. 

Deutsche Bank said it had helped 


Thyssen organize an investor “road 
show.” but it denied having any access 
to its confidential records. 

Under heavy criticism. Krupp even- 
tually dropped its unsolicited bid this 
week, and Thyssen’s supervisory board 
approved a friendly merger Thursday to 
create a steel company with 15 million 
tons of annual output and 11 billion 
Deutsche marks ($6.51 billion) in sales. 

Executives at other big banks in 
Frankfurt said the steelmaker issue in the 
past two weeks had reopened a long- 
running controversy about the economic 
influence that Germany's large banks 
wield. German banks hold major stakes 
in all industrial sectors, and their di- 
rectors sit on many supervisory boards. 

The nation's bankers effectively can 


steer German industry and often dictate 
the flow of mergers and acquisitions and 
appointments for top executives. 

Deutsche Bank has stakes in many 
blue-chip companies, and its 12 directors 
hold more than 70 seats on supervisory 
boards at German companies. 

Meanwhile, a Deutsche Bank man- 
agement board member, Ulrich Car- 
tellieri, said he would resign from 
Thyssen’s supervisory board May 20, 
the same day he is to retire from the 
bank’s management board. Because of 
his seat on the Thyssen board, Mr. Car- 
tellieri has been a lightning rod for much 
of the criticism. 

“I think it is difficult not to see this as 
a conflict of interest," Matthew 


Brothers, said of Mr. Cartellieri’s role. 

In its report, Der Spiegel said the 
bank’s Morgan Grenfell investment- 
banking division made presentations to 
investors in Britain and the United 
States last month to promote Thys sen's 
stock. According to the report, the as- 
signment allowed Morgan Grenfell to 
look into Thyssen 's books and study its 
cash reserves. 


Rate Fears Hit Markets 


By Mitchell Martin 

international Herald Tribune 


The magazine pointed out that Krupp 

to fi- 


Czepliewicz. an analyst at Salomon 


planned to deploy those reserves 
nance the debt it would accumulate 
from the takeover. 

Deutsche Bank rejected the allegation 
and denied it had had access to internal 
company figures. Only after the investor 
road show did the bank get the com- 
mission for Knipp’s takeover, it said. 


NEW YORK — Signs of rising prices, 
which a week ago were discernible only 
to a relative handful of anti-inflation 
hawks, reared their heads Thursday, 
pushing bond yields higher and sending 
stocks plunging on Wall Street 
The yield on the 30-year Treasury 
bond, the bellwether for many of the 
world's fixed-income markets, rose to 
7.09 percent from 6.98 percent Wed- 


nesday. Trading ended early in advance 
of the Good Biday holiday. 

Stock prices suffered as investors 
feared the Federal Reserve Board would 
extend its interest-rate increases beyond 
the one or two adjustments it seemed to 
have embarked upon this week. The 
Dow Jones industrial average closed 
140.11 points lower at 6.74039 after 
having been down more than 200 in a 
late spill . The broader Standard & Poor's 


See STOCKS, Page 14 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Troubling Times at PBHG Funds 


By Edward Wyatt 

New York Times Service 


EW YORK— PBHG Funds, 


one of the best-performing 
npanies of 


N mutual-fund companies 

the 1990s, has suffered 
shareholder redemptions of more than 
6 percent of the company’s assets in 
recent weeks, as the performance of its 
funds has dropped sharply. 

At some of the company's funds, die 
withdrawals have been even larger. For 
example, shareholders of the PBHG 
Select Equity fund have withdrawn an 
estimated 183 percent of assets since 
the beginning of February , or $87 mil- 
lion of the fund’s $472 million in as- 
sets, according to AMG Data Services 
of Areata; California. 

Through Wednesday, the Select 
Equity fund had lost 13.1 percent of its 
value since die beginning of the year, a 
dramatic setback after gaining 28 per- 
cent in 1996. 

The experience of the PBHG funds 
raises some potentially troubling ques- 
tions for the fund industry, which in- 
sists that its historical date prove that 
fund investors do not redeem, or cash 
out, their holdings when performance 
turns down. . 

But many new shareholders have 
started buying into mutual funds in the 
last five years — when the stock mar- 
ket has not suffered a broad downturn 
— calling into question whether past 
experience will bold true in the future. 
The reversal at PBHG is particularly 


stunning because the company’s funds 
have been so successful. Its largest 
fund. PBHG Growth, was the best- 
performing general equity fund of the 
1990s through the end of last year. 

But fins year, 11 of PBHG's 12 
equity funds have lost money, in part 
because the volatile technology stocks 
in which the funds specialize have 
fallen out of favor. The losses have led 
shareholders to withdraw $480.3 mil- 
lion. or 6.2 percent of the company's 
assets, since the beginning of February, 
accordingto AMG. At the end of Janu- 
ary, the PBHG funds managed $8.1 
billion, according to AMG. 

Gary Pilgrim, chief investment of- 
ficer at Pilgrim Baxter & Associates, 
the firm in Wayne, Pennsylvania, that 
manages the PBHG funds, said in an 
interview that none of the funds had 
been forced to sell stocks to pay share- 
holders for their redemptions. But he 
acknowledged that there had been “a 
steady erosion in the balance of money 
flowing out” of the funds. 

The declines at the PBHG funds 
have been accelerated in part by Pil- 
grim Baxter's investment style. Typ- 
ically, the firm takes large positions in 
email, lightly traded stocks, often mak- 
ing it one of die largest single holders 
of a company’s shares. 

That style has attracted the attention 
of some short sellers on Wall Street 
who have begun to smell blood in the 
water. At least two short sellers, who 
bet against stocks and therefore profit 
when share prices decline, say they 


recently have been scanning the list of 
Pilgrim Baxter's biggest positions to 
try to judge where Pilgrim Baxter 
might face further problems. 

The shareholder redemptions have 
come as file technology sector has been 
roiled recently by earnings disappoint- 
ments that have led to huge sell-offs. 

On Monday, for example, shares of 
Idexx Labs Inc. fell 62 percent, to $12. 
after the company said first-quarter 
earnings would plunge. 

The same day, shares of Medic 
Computer Systems Inc. fell 53 percent, 
to $13,125. after the company forecast 
lower-than-expected sales. 

In each case. Pilgrim Baxter was the 
company's second-largest shareholder 
as of Dec. 31. the most recent data 
available, bolding 6.9 percent of Idexx 
and 9.8 percent of Medic. 

Putnam Investments, a unit of Marsh 
& McLennan Cos., owned an overall 
lmger position in the stocks. But be- 
cause Putnam's holdings were spread 
over more funds and greater assets, the 
declines in roost Putnam funds have 
been less than in the PBHG funds. 

Mr. Pilgrim said the PBHG funds 
limited their holdings of any one com- 
pany to about 10 percent of its total 
shares. However, when the PBHG 
funds receive large inflows, as they did 
last year, “the stocks I buy are the ones 
I already own,” Mr. Pilgrim said. “We 
buy them at the prevailing market 
prices. Does that mean I create in- 
ordinate upward pressure on the prices 
of those stocks? I don ’t think so. ” 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 



Cross Rates 

$ f UK FA Lh Ofl SR IF, YlM O Fss*to 

taux IBnS 1 1249 OJX fcrnr — £65” 129C ISMS U7 UPS 

Jnrn USD- IJM — sifl oaos JS.H5 was 
ura S JJ3U ess MW’ HW 4J4Q* 1.15? USB* >215 

la ^ jjio MU4 iraj? um sww w» tiua nt® 

MUR raw? |UJI JS14 ft «T KdO 41114 97JM 1MA4 ~ 

Muon una tRJB JKO —— ttftS) 4SS UA4 UM 122U0 IIIK 

HewYWUM — 1*» “a I** JjjjJ 'StT 

a B ES SS & S-«S AS s - s 

1 SDR 1302 uc vast 7J29S 2BWJ M® 3 T7W '■ KS 7”^ 

Oosmgs to Ametenkun. London. MBon, Paris and Zw**. * otter an***, New Y*k and 

^SESA***^"-™*"™*^****--* 


March 27 LfbkHJbor Rates 


Ms 

Drier D-Mark Rum 5 Taring Franc Yen ECU 

1 -month 5V*-5*> 3»k-» IK-lft 6V. -6* WV-314 Ve-tht 4V»-4*ii 

3-month 5*6 -S* 3W-3V, Ite-ltt 6*-6<6 3*V-3« V4-** 4M-4M 

6-momh sw». 3*,. 3* ra-1% 6*k-fi1ta 3T6-3* Vi-4* 4H-4U 

1-yeor £Vt-61ft 3*fc-3*o IRfc- im>6Vi»-6iM» %-U 4ttt>4W 


Sources: Beaten Uaytis Bank. _ , „ 

Rotes appOcabte to bUertank deposits of St mOUan mMtnunt (or eautvatenO. 


Other Dollar Values 


..V 


Canemct Pets CarreaCt 

Argent pas* OOT88 Gmk*K. 

AnsmSCMS 1-2602 HMgKMa* 

Austrian icfc. UjB 14 Hoag-tocta* 

Brad mol 1.0573 Imflunipee 

Ckteseynaa 13266 Indo. raptafe 

CncfifeanMa 29.33 Irish £ 

Danfsfatam 6 M 7 S Jwntf shaft. 

Egypt pootd 33942 Knwdktor 

Rg.nwnq £0175 Mokqr.rfDft. 


Par* 

26641 

7-7497 

17736 

35-09 

240130 

0635 

1365 

03038 

£483 


N.ZasftmdS 

Nona, krona 

PROpaan 

Pefttfrirty 

Pwleseuda 

RtosnWe 

Sondrtyal 

sing.* 


Pars 

7JW5 
1.4388 
6441 
2&36 
108 
170131 
573600 
3 JS 
1.4497 


Onrenqr Pars 

S. Air. rand 44225 

5.KBT.VM 69075 
Sin d . Inann 7.5948 
TnhmS 27S7 
Thai hnB 26-01 
THrtfcftlta 126825. 
UAE Itli l ni i n 16705 
vetm. mu. friar 


Forward Rates 

Omency May «Moy JMay Omcncy 

Pound Staring TZ316 !.«» 1-6300 

C om i dhm drier 1J72B 1-3698 1.3672 Swiss Irene 

Deutsche murk 1.6777 1 jBUA 1.6710 


jpdoy MHtojr ridoy 

123.11 12258 12285 

1,4499 1-4456 1.4410 


Deutsche n»t 1.6777 1 i«6 1-6710 „i. mj r 0 i tr Maai 

nbmiBk1MF(SDm.oumda1ofom1heAssXieMPt&* BioomtK,g 


Key Money Rates 

UoiMSftfWS a«M 

Pin* 

DimiglreM 

5J» 

£00 

Mmi* 

av» 

BM 

FedmlAmd* 

5*4 

5H 

»4q tn» rioters 

SSI 

S M 

TMMayCPdMhre 

£58 

£58 

3 reonlb Treoswy biU 

£36 

£20 

1-jwr TreaswyftO 

£02 

£57 

2-y«ar Trcassry bBI 

6X4 

6.36 

synrTwranynrtn 

6J6 

666 

7-yecrTreanny not* 

b£5 

686 

lO-ieorTreawnraoli 

6J0 

£79 

SfrjaarTtwaryfcaad 

7.09 

£99 

MwrUILynca SMiF R* 

AST 

486 


D&eoBot nun 

CL5C 

OlM 

Col money 

(US 

£45 

Hnantti ftrferteak 

<U6 

038 

34Boatta brtertank 

063 

£69 

6-moon UtartMBk 

066 

£72 

10-yaor Govt band 

238 

239 

Craw 

Lsrebmdrate 

AS0 

£50 

Ml money 

185 

£50 

1-gmtffc kiterink 

338 

328 

3-raontti Wertxaft 

338 

£3 

6-montb MetMnft 

3L3D 

130 

10-ytm Bond 

5.92 

£89 


Brtmm 

Brakbianratn 

£00 

£00 

Crinuray 

£00 

6Mt 

1-mralfe Wertanft 

6M 

6V» 

3-rortV KrtwtaX 

6V» 

bV» 

6-<Mnlft Bilnfeanft 


6M 

ih»gk 

7J8 

7M 

ftmet 

iRterwnSon refn 

£10 

£10 

Qfll money 

3Vn 


1 iwnWi trtnrtwft 

3U 

3(6 

2iiwn8iWtnnfc 

TA 

3U 

frmsablnteitamk 

3W 

3 Vh 

I^ywrOAT 

580 

528 

Sources: Reuters, Btooabera, Merrm 
Lfach, Book of Takyo-Mtfsvblsal. 
Comiaanbonk. OedB Lyonnais. 

Gold 

AJM. 

PM. 

Croe 

ZurtCft 34925 

34805 

— £20 

Lmnlsn 34960 

34810 

-4-285 

NmYM 35020 

35220 

+£B0 


US. doOaa per ounce. London afScU 


SnneiMn. 


REPUBLIC OF BENIN - REPUBLIC OF TOGO 

COMMUNAUIE BECTRfQUE DU BEIRN 

(CEB) 


INVITATION FOR PREQUALIFICATION 

ADJARALA hydro-electric Project 


Lot No. I - Civil Works 
Lot No. 2 - Turbines 
Lot No. 3 - Generators 
Lot No. 4 - Transformers 

Lot No. 5 - Powerhouse general electric equipment 

Lot No. 6 - Gates - Steel linings 

Lot No. 7 - Handling equipment 

Lot No. 8 - Lines 

Lot No. 9 - Substations 


I. The Government of the Republic of BENIN and die Government of the Republic of TOGO have applied for a 


credit from the International Development Association (IDA), the African Development Bank (ADB). the West 
African Development Bank fBO AD), T — 

Investment Bank (EIB), the Nordic 



j, the Islamic Development 
and the Abu Dhabi Fund, In various currencies, to cover die cost of the 


Project which will be carried out by the Communaute Electrique du BENIN (CEB) and intend to 
portion of the proceeds of this credit to eligible payments under the con t ra c t s for which this invlta 
Prequalification is issued. 


European 
Africa 
Kowait 
hydro-electric 

. ypfr a 

invitation for 


CEB intends to prequalHy contractors for the execution of the following works, namely: 
Lot. No. I - Civil works 
general installations 
dam 50 m high: 

bask solution 4,500.000 m 1 of fill, 
oftemotive.- 430.000 m 5 of RCC 3,000.000 m 5 of fill 
2 headrace tunnels (7 m In diameter, 155 m long each) for the basic solution, 
spillway: 

basic sakitiorc gated weir, 20,000 m* of concrete, 
alternative : uprated weir, stepped spillway over RCC dam. 
water intake works, 

powerhouse: 200,000 m 1 of excavation, 20.000 m 3 of concrete, 
access road to dam site: &2 km, 

diversion of RN& 2 km, 400.000 m 1 of fill. 150 m long bridge, 
owner's site facilities. 


Lot No. 2 - 


Lot No. 3 - 
Lot No. 4 - 
Lot No. 5 - 


Lot No. 6- 


Lot No. 7 - 


Lot No, 8- 
Lot No. 9 - 


Turbines. Two Francis turbines vertical axis, 54,2 m net head, 105 nrVs and 52,4 MW. each, 

1763 rpm. 

Generators. Two generators 54 MVA - 103 k-V - I76J5 rpm - 50 Hz. 

Transformers (Two plus one). 54 MVA - 1 03 kV/1 70 kV - YNd - ONAN/ONAF. 
Powerhouse general electrical equipment. AC and DC systems. Control system. 
Mechanical auxiliaries and AVAC system. Grounding system. Telecontrol of the powerhouse 
from Lom4. 

Gates. Steel linings. Four sector gates 12 mx 1 1 m and one stoplqg 12 m x 13 m. for the spillway. 
For the intake, three trashracks 7 m x 1 1 m, two fixed wheel gates 43 m x 6 m and one 
stoplqg 43 m x 6 m, one fixed wheel 22 m x 3 m and stopfog. 

For the outlet, one hollow Jet valve 22 m diameter. 

For die power plant two downstream stopiogs 43 m x 53 m. 

Steel linings for headrace tunnels, 5.75 m in diameter and 107 m long each, and for the outlet 
2.45 m in diameter and 100 m long. 

Handling Equipment. Crane-beam 120 t. 18.4 m span. Gantry cranes 2 x 50 t and 2 x 5 t, 
trashrack rake gantry 20 1, fife 630 kg. 

Lines. 66 km of 161 kV lines. 

Substations 


New 161 kV ADJARALA substation. Extension of 161 kV AVAKPA substation. Telecontrol of 
Lom6. 


3. 


substations from 

The prequalification documents are available for a non refundable fee of 300 French Francs or its equivalent in 
any other freely convertible currency and may be obtained from the Consultant by calling, writing faxing, or 
telexing, with due mentioning of the required lots: 

Coyne et BeBerlEkarititi de France 
9, aBte des Barbonniers 
92632 - CameitSiers Cedex- France 
(33.I.)4135j0339 
(33.1.) 4135.03.74 
COYBE6I66I5F 


ir 

Fax 

Telex 


The fee covers the express mailing. 

Submissions of Applications for PrequaAflcarion must be received not later than 16 May 1997 at 5 p.m. 




:S,* 


cTGT a,p t n '-4 cruft is b>< ‘b-rii tbob t n o o.» «3o«k a «to stt«v 



PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 




J Investor’s America 




The Dow 


Worker-Abuse Claims Hit Nike 


30-Year T-Bond -Yield 


635 



uwu ——f ^ 083 


1 635 



Doiter in Deutsche marks If Dollar in Yen 



0 N D J F M 
1996 1997 


0 N D J F M 
1996 1997 i 



The Associated Press 

HANOI — Nike Inc. has sus- 
pended a manager in its Ho Chi 
Minh City factory in response to a 
labor group's charge of worker ab- 
use in Vietnamese manufacturing 
plants. 

Nike representatives in Asia 
were unavailable for comment, but 
a U.S.-based company spokesman 
said a manager had been suspended 
for abusing workers. 

A labor activist, Thuyen Nguyen 
of the U.S.-based Vietnam Labor 
Watch, inspected Nike facilities in 
Vietnam last month in escorted and 
surprise visits. 

Mr. Nguyen said be found vi- 
olations of minimum-wage and 
overtime laws, as well as physical 
mistreatment of workers. 

His 12-page report on working 


conditions in Vietnam was the latest 
in a series of troubles Nike has 
faced with its subcontractors in Vi- 
etnam. 

Last year, a South Korean factoiy 
manager working for a Nike sub- 
contractor, Sam Yang Co., was con- 
victed of beating Vietnamese em- 
ployees with a shoe. 

At least 250 Vietnamese employ- 
ees walked off die job at die Sam 
Yang factoiy last week to protest 
working conditions and low wages, 
according to state media reports. 

“Workers at the factory work in 
an overheated and noisy environ- 
ment,’’ the official Laborer news- 
paper reported. “The requirements 
from the health-care department for 
labor conditions have not been 
met” 

A second Nike subcontractor, the 


Taiwan-based Pou Chen Vietnam 
Enterprise, has been cited for phys- 
ically abusing workers at its plant. 

A Nike spokesman confirmed 
Mr. Nguyen’s visit to the Ho Chi 
Minh City plant and said Nike of- 
ficials were “as distressed as he is” 
about the report. Mr. Nguyen's re- 
port was to be released Thursday in 
New York 

Just weeks before the report, 
Nike announced it had hireu the 
former UN ambassador Andrew 
Young and his Goodworks Inter- 
national group to review a new code 
of conduct for the company's over- 
seas factories. 

The measure was aimed ar 
quelling mounting criticism that 
working conditions at factories in 
Indonesia and Vietnam were sub- 
standard. 


Stocks and Bonds Send 
Dollar Into a Slump 


Sega Closes U.S. Unit to Cut Costs 


Source; Bloomberg. Reuters 


iMmutional Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Ford Speeds Up in Argentina 


BUENOS AIRES (Bloomberg) — Ford Motor Co. 's unit in 
Argentina will double production this year and could become 
the country's leading carmaker, company officials said. 

It will produce about 120,000 vehicles in Argentina in 1997, 

Bra^^and^O.OOO win be sold domestically!* 6 **' 

Ford produced 66,450 vehicles last year and was Ar- 
gentina's second-largest vehicle producer, according to in- 
dustry reports. Volkswagen Argentina SA was Argentina's 
largest producer last year, with 68.913 units. 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Sega Enterprises 
Ltd., one of Japan’s three biggest 
video game makers, said Thursday 
it would restructure its U.S. sub- 
sidiaries in a move it said would not 
affect its earnings forecast 

Sega will close Sega Holdings 
U.S A. Inc„ the parent company that 
currently stands at the head of 
Sega's American operations. A unit 
of that subsidiary, Sega Enterprises 
Inc. (U.S.A.), will assume respon- 
sibility for Sega's three other Amer- 
ican units. 

The closure is designed to cut 
costs by simplifying U.S. opera- 
tions, a spokeswoman for Sega 
said. 

The move follows Sega's disclos- 


ure in Decern berof a $215 .5 million 
loss from its American operations. 
The loss came after the company 
was forced to dump an unsold in- 
ventory of outdated game ma- 
chines. 

In December, Sega cut its group 
net profit forecast 47 percent to 5.3 
billion yen ($42.7 million) for the 
fiscal year ending this month, citing 
the loss in the United States. 

The reshuffling is not related to 
Sega’s coming acquisition of 
Bandai Co., the maker of Power 
Rangers and Tamagotch toys, the 
Sega spokeswoman said. 

Sega and Bandai announced, in 
January that they would combine 
under the name Sega Bandai Corp. 
from October. 


Sega fell 10 yen ro 3,120 on the 
Tokyo Stock Exchange. The com- 
pany ann ounced the restructuring 
after the close of trading. 

■ Oracle Chief Eyes Apple 

The chairman of Oracle Corp., 
Larry Ellison, once again is talking 
about buying Apple Computer Inc-, 
The Associated Press reported from 
San Jose, California. 

Mr. Ellison told a local news- 
paper he was forming an investor 

S and would decide soon 
er to bid for control of the 
troubled personal computing pion- 
eer. 

Apple’s stock was up $2,125 per 
share at $18,875 in laie trading on 
the Nasdaq stock market 


CYkjhW&F' Our 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against other major currencies 
Thursday as U.S. bonds and stocks 
plunged, raising concern that in- 
vestors cutting their stakes in Amer- 
ican markets will sell the currency 
as well. 

“The dollar doesn't perform 
well when U.S. assets are sold,” 
said Kari Halligan. chief currency 
trader at CIC Bank New York. ; 

The U-S’. currency began hs slide 
in Asian trading after comments by 
Deputy Treasury Secretary 
Lawrence Summers reinforced con- 
cern that Washington did not want 
the dollar to rise much further. 

It fell in earnest when Treasury 
bonds slumped, driving 30-year 
yields to their highest in six months. 
Stocks followed, and a general sell- 
off of American assets — including 
the dollar — ensued. 

“The combination of both 
factors was absolutely lethal for the 
dollar,” said Albert Soria, head of 
foreign exchange at Generate Bank. 
* ‘We may indeed have a reversal in 
the dollar's upward trend-' ’ 

The dollar stood at 123.575 yen 
at 4 P.M., down from 124.130 yen 
Wednesday. It was also at 1.6735 
Deutsche marks, down from l .6889 
DM. at 1.4460 Swiss francs, down 
from 1.4635 francs, and at 5.6330- 
French francs, down from 5.6940 
francs. 

The pound was at $1.6325, up 
from $1.6303. 

Mr. Summers said be saw a 
“dangerous possibility that the Jap- 
anese current-account surplus 
would expand substantially' ’ un- 
less Japan took steps to increase 


domestic growth. His big trade- r 
surplus talk” prompted ‘iheiraial ■ 
knee-jerk reaction of sellmg-dpUars ; 
and other cutrenciesfor.yOT, ftd 
Spirgel senior currency owlet -at' 
Royal Bank of Scotland, said. - 
The dollar's rise of more than 50 
percent rise against yen thecas 
two years makes U -S. exports 





FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


more expensive ■ — and Japanese 
exports cheaper —7 widening the 
U.5. trade deficit with Japan. ’ 

A report published Thursday tiy 
the Japanese Automobile Associ- 
ation showed Japanese vehicle* ex- 
ports rose 5 percent overall in Feb- ; 
ruary, while exports to the U:S. • 
increased 9.6 percent. Japan's 11.. 
biggest carmakers forecast exports : 
would rise 6.9 percent in 1 997* their ; 
first rise in more than a decade. - ; 

Mr. Summers's remarksfolldwed; 
statements in recent weeks from ath- . 
er U.S. officials that had led to a - 
belief that Washington does not want * 
the dollar tb.rise much further. j 
. But the dollar's slump may prove ; 
short-lived, as traders speculaied that ; 
U.S. interest rates could be raised 
again soon after Federal Reserve : 
board policymakers raised overnight > 
interbank lending rates a quarter of a ; 
percentage point, to 5.50 percent. 
Another increase could raise the al- . 
lure of the U r S. currency. - . . • 

‘The dollar- should go higher," ; 
said Hans Boman^a currency trader : 
at Swedbank. “'We're expecting ' 
another tightening from the Fed’ ’ of 
at least 25 basis points, or a quarter 
of a percentage point, he said; 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


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• Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts Inc. said talks fell 


■v Ac 1 
."••c 
- liVI 


through to sell a 51 percent stake in its Trump's Castle to 
tor 


Colony Capital Inc. for $125 million. 


National Sleep Foundation reported that a survey it corn- 
found f 


STOCKS : Prices Tumble as Investors Fear the Fed Will Move on to Still More Interest-Rate Increases 




missioned found that 47 percenfof American workers have 
trouble sleeping, impairing their job performance enough to 
cost U.S. companies $18 billion in lost output 

• F. Hoffmann La Roche & Co. and Jungbunzlauer In- 
ternational, two Swiss chemical companies, pleaded guilty to 
taking part in a worldwide conspiracy to set citric-acid prices. 
They agreed to pay a total of $25 milli on in criminal fines. 

• United Auto Workers and General Motors Corp. reached 
a tentative contract agreement to settle a 1 3-day strike at GM’s 
truck assembly plant in Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

• Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc. has 


Continued from Page 13 


formed a marketing alliance with Cisco Systems Inc. as part 
of a strategy to offer higher-priced Internet services to busi- 


ness customers. 


• Norfolk Southern Corp. is expected to acquire more than 
half of Conrail Inch's rail routes for about $5.9 billion. 


• Texas Instruments Inc. plans to invest about $3 billion to 
build up its digital signal-processor line Bloomberg, wp. ap 


500-stock index was down 16.62 
points at 773.88. Both declines were 
equal to about 2 percent. The stock 
market also will be cIosedFriday for 
Good Friday. 

Financial -services companies, 
which are particularly sensitive to 
rising interest rates, were among the 
most noteworthy losers, while the 
recently depressed technology sec- 
tor, which could benefit from ac- 
celerating economic growth, 
showed smaller losses. Nations- 
Bank fell 1% to 57%, and Intel de- 
clined 1% to 139%. 

Hie economic statistics that 
weighed upon the market included a 
report of rising home sales and in- 


creased advertising for jobs. They 
followed the news Wednesday that 
orders for manufactured goods rose 
to a record in February, Joseph Bai- 
tipaglia. chief of investment policy 
at Gruntal & Co., said. February 
sales of existing homes jumped 9.0 
percent after two months of. de- 
clines, the National Association of 
Realtors said. The group attributed 
the rise to low interest rates and mild 
winter weather. 

Separately, the Conference Board, 
a private research group, said its 
help-wanted advertising index rose 
three points in February, to 90, com- 
pared with 82 a year earlier. “The job 
market continues to show surprising 
strength,” said Ken Goldstein, the 
group's chief economist "A pickup 


in job growth mixed with slowing 
layoffs suggests the labor market is 
about to become even tighter. While 
that is good news for job-seekers, 
employers face the prospect of hav- 
ing to offer higher wages to attract 
quality job candidates." 

Providing evidence along that 
line, government figures showed the 
number of people making initial 
claims for unemployment insurance 
payments dropped by 4.000. to a 
seasonally adjusted 310.000, last 
week. Analysts bad been expecting 
an increase, according to 
Bloomberg News. 

The signs of an economy growing 
so fast that wage inflation could be 
expected to lead to overall price in- 
creases caused investors to reassess 


their outlooks for the Federal Re- 
serve Board’s interest-rate policy. 
On Tuesday, the central bank's 
policy-setting Federal Open Market 
Committee raised its target rate for 
overnight interbank loans to 53 per- 
cent from 5 .25 percent The federal 
funds rate effectively farms a floor 
for U.S. money-market rates. 

While some questioned whether 
the Fed needed to raise rates at all. 
many others said the modest rise in 
the federal funds rale, perhaps 
coupled with a second quarter-point 
move at its meeting in May. would 
be sufficient to quell inflationary 
pressures. 

Now, Mr. Battipaglia said, a May 
increase seems nearly certain, and 
then the outlook is unclear. “The 


issue is ‘what about beyond May?’ ", 
he said, “so the bond market started 
to get weaker during the day." . 

Kevin Flanagan, an economist at 
Dean Witter Reynolds Inc., said the 
worries in the credit markets had. 
been kindled by “the fact that, 
you've breached 7 percent, and for 
all intents and purposes it looks like 
you are going to stay there.” Some : 


r£- 


r.-.Ti 




J. 

•rci a*. 




yield could rise as high as 730 per- 
cent before stabilizing. ' . 

Mr. F lanag an said -the-, markets 
would be looking next week at early 
indications , on the state of the econ- 
omy in March, with the -National. 
Association of Purchasing Manage: 
meat index and the government's un- 
employment report due for release. 


• MU! 


_«*rr 


:*d». 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thwsday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most oefive shores, 
up to flie dosing on Wall Street. 

The Associated Press. 


Ma (dpi Lot um Ow 



MS 

IB 

7% 

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9% 

7H 

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lift 

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1311 

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240 

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7% 

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lift 

11V 

2226 

TVk 

7Vn 

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lft 

SIB 

19ft 

1% 

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212 

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4M 

m 

17% 

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17 

to 

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6% 

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224 

3% 

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3lk 

319 

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25ft 

35ft 

25V 

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25% 

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291 

11243 

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214 

JH* 

7ft 

7 

1S5 

39ft 

39M 

39ft 

372 

jk 

26ft 

28 ft 

13S 

in* 

lift 

JB 

IM 

Uh 

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147 

IM 

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15% 

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15% 

7 

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IV. 

mo 

314 


27ft 

2M 

27% 

20ft 

265 

m 

Jftft 

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121 

Mft 

«i 

4ft 

2B 


5 

5V. 

M 


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120 

7% 

7ft 

7% 

416 


36% 

sn 

3W 

21ft 

21ft 

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4% 

4ft 

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M 

13M 

rjft 


w* 

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1*20 

IS* 

1B% 

im 

aw 

S 

3*k 

3% 

125 

126 

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11% 

7ft 

18ft 

97 

4% 

4ft 

4M 

201 

147 

HB 

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a 

7ft 

in 

re 

m 

19ft 

1247 

13% 

12ft 

t3H 

IB 

8% 

8ft 

m 

IB 

H 

9ft 

9% 

IN 

12% 

12 

12V* 

108 

IM 

M 

n* 

169 

6% 

Sftk 

6V. 

on 

4% 

Rk 

3% 

£ 

2*k 

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UM 

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Mu 

ES 

12% 

12 

12 

162 

295 

A 

ff* 

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29k 

704 


3te 

2ft 

131 

lift 

IV. 

19k 

332 

474 

1% 

7k 

1% 

7ft 

m 

Id 

9% 

9% 

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A 

4 

90S 

31% 

30% 

JM 

IK 

m 

l» 

19% 

147 

nft 


lfk 

225 

m 

7ft 

TV 

191 

13 

12% 

I7n 

239 

a* 

914 

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125 

m 

9ft 

rev 

in 

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V 

te 

5615 

6* 

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6% 

135 

9% 

w 

9ft 

ns 

Ik 

% 

% 

na 

& 

j 

69k 

H7 

9<*k 

9fr* 

9ft 

290 

1% 

lift 

19k 

610 

15% 

14% 

14V 


7H 

6ft 

7 

271 

25% 

» 

2% 

210 


ft 

% 

m 

3% 

l¥k 

IV, 

on 

89* 

M 

■ft 

3090 

TV* 

1% 

9Vk 

130 

11% 

lift 

lift 

2d 

W) 

13% 

13% 

730 

39% 

37ft 

PM 

316 

IU 

3% 

2% 

1» 

lift 

3 

3 

in 

11% 

11 

11 

143 

15ft 

15 

11 


Tftk 

Ok 

7 

6% 

<*k 

164 

1% 

IV 

m 

K 

Wk 

« 

9 

117 

Vk 

ft 

u 

2367 

45ft 

41 

42 

2075 

338 

EM 

17% 

r 

IM 

17 

H 

IN 

n» 

12V 

516 

31k 

3% 

34k 

I0B 

IM* 

lfk 

lift 

W 

12V 

11% 

11% 

13 

34ft 

24% 

34ft 

m 

4% 

4% 

4% 

521 

OH 

41k 

Aft 

251 

left 

16ft 

u% 

,30 

6% 

6% 

4M 

100# 

ft 

ft 

•ft 

im 

3 

.4ftk 

A. 

250 

1891 

13% 

a 

% 

i5 

S» 

is3 

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2% 

fi 

2*. 

ua 

im 

12% 

u% 

M 

20 

17 

7% 

IS 

17 

7ft 


« ssr 


s<fe HjBjiLow ioua an* Indexes 


Most Actives 


f® 


IOO 

* 


“■S* 


13 1 m ica 17 

in w on. ** 

m m 9% 9% 

540 Mft m 23 

its m 4P» w* 

M 4* 5Vft 

1« 1M 114 

ft 1-4 ft 

P'1 5 SV» 

in ni is 

w _•% h % 

«i w 

in m 0i 4* 

» »> 1 » 

HI M 711 Ai 

ot7 m 1m mw 

7761 2*>. 7H 21* 

m z% m 

tes ta 

IM ISM lBi 


+11 
♦ 1. 


March 27, 1997 


-Mi 

•V. 

-4k 


Dow Jones 

Opm MM* U»w UM Of. 

Indus <88 BA 4991.28 666350 674059 -140.11 

Trans 2439.07 2446.2 239X14 24004 .3144 

Ulfl 72X52 22173 2 IBJM 219.12 -4.12 

Comp 214434 214i47 2084.97 21HU1 -3LS8 


NYSE 


Standard & Poors 


794 

100 

an 


no 

*71 

1874 

955 

908 

133 

236 

1526 

in 

251 

127 

978 

231 

W 

175 

393 

497 

(8 

741 

W 

in 

200 

199 

434 

04 

IM 

1305 

too 

11117 

258 

412 

733 


♦ft 

& 

2 % 

6% 

I7V| 

TV 

« 

4h 

17% 

I1W 

ffh 


4tt 4W 

in* m 

14M 14M 

1*91 

_39U 4 




indusMotc 

Transp. 

unnitas 

rinonce 

SPSOO 

5P10Q 


T«h» 

HMD La* One 4N 
93003 919.34 92SJ39 90743 
SW.93 SOJA 565.95 55614 
194JB 19X41 19X43 19018 
9X25 9080 90a0 B8J33 

79489 78677 790.5B 77X88 
77606 76693 76928 75624 


HUanT 

Cocoas 

WoCMort 

PG&ECp 

fwsco* 

Iomega s 

Malania 

Qlfcfl&J n 

GenEtoc 

AT&T i 

Bonn 

CbasaM 

IBM 

McOrtds 

Mad Ire* 


V4L 

70671 

46788 


HM* 

111* 


£ 


44471 , 

38042 33M 
37 m |7H 
36405 42* 

35741 18rt 
34163 104* 

33193 36M 
33106 lllM 
31943 lOOVi 
3174* 141*9 136*9 13719 
3I2M 4919 46*9 4819 

31151 431* 58'4 62*4 


taw uat 
39*1 «* 
56H 57*9 
W* 29 
23i* m 
33 to*9 
IM >M 
40*m 40*9 
18 18 
09** 10Ui 
3449 3514 
WM lOHl 
95*1 96H 


a* 

-n! 

s 

>*s 

-w 


High Low Lntesl dge Opinl 


Grains 


CORN (COOT) 

MOO bu nummum- cent* Mr hujliei 



Mgti 

Low 

Latest 

Chge 

Oplnt 

ORANGE JUICE rneno 



1 SAN to*.- anrs per to. 




MOV 97 

BX70 

77 J0 

79A5 

— X35 

1A451 

Jut 97 

KM 

81.15 

81 >15 

—2J0 

6J06 

50] 97 


8400 

84® 

-zx 

1990 

Nov 97 

8X75 

8685 

B465 

— 2.10 

1-733 


High Low LateS Ogo OpM 


'High Low Latest Qtgo Optoj 


-3M 

Jt 

•U2 

-3*9 

■299 

-19 

-3*1 


May 97 308*6 
JU197 309V* 
Sen 97 29919 
Dec 97 297V» 
Mar 98 301 


3om 

3061* 

297% 

29316 

298*4 


308 h 
308% 
29BW 
29619 
300*4 


Ed. talas 65,000 Wad's, sales 
Wed's open inf 37X261 oH 742 


+3 14X033 
•-Uk 109JS42 
-Hi 17.7*4 
*1% 869SS 
*2 6812 
50,717 


E5L sates KA. wer^. sates 3419 
Wed's open ini 27588 up 529 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS 0AATIF) 
FF5oaooo-pfsono0pct 
Jim 97 128.46 12824 12X26 +0416150571 
Sep 97 12680 12622 12664 +004 Xlll 
Dec 97 9650 9650 9636 +006 0 

Est ydunw 9X10S . Open Mj 152^82 oH 
6578. 


DtcM 9X0*-. 9X00 9X98 —006 

Mart? 9100 9X95 9204 —00* 

Est sates: 38391. Pnn.satec 7S014 
Prey, opm lot: 247,99* op X499 


269 

178 




Industrials 


March 27 


Metals 


15 

TV 

14 

2 


29% 

f 

7% 

9% 

Si 

W*I 

ft 


14% 

7% 

14 
1 % 
t 

ft 
17*1 
•l 

Sft 
7% 

29% 

2 

71* 

7*1 7*i 

m 9*1 
344 3 

IM 16% 


e NYSE 


Nasdaq 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CB0T) 

100 %ro- dal Ion par Ian 
MOV 97 286.D0 Z76J0 282JD 


GOLD (NCMX) 

100 iray ol- dollars pot Iror az. 
Apr 97 351 JD 34850 35820 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BO HD CLIFF E) 

m.»; miion • ptsoHOOpd 

Jonw 12564 12474 13473 -0A5106OOB 

S%>97 N.T. N.T. 12498 -045 111086 
^.sataK 45406. Prev. MteK 66810 
Prcv. open InU HUM oH 998 


CoaiaasBa 

IndusJitti 

Tramp. 

imty 

Flnanca 


4VV 

17% 

1 %| 

56% 

29% 

2ft 


sss 

36687 


fP-S 

5142B 
3A548 
25740 
371 77 


-774 

38 


-w 

♦% 


Nasdaq 


491 


'ft 

»5 


m 

171 

1126 

562 

261 

m 




137 

W 

577 

613 


£ 

i 

15% 

10 

h 

% 


"ft 

7% 

B*ft 

UM 

3>ft 

[» 

19% 

10V 

6% 

J5V, 

U% 

70*1 

M 

M 

IM 

3% 

19% 

2% 

23V 


1/ 


m 


147 

861 

ite 

is* 

Ml 

» 

1715 

757 

91 

15J 

12071 

131 

282 

IS 

135 

3M 


St 

'a 

9% 

9 

1% 

i 

17% 

A 

lao 

23M 

21% 


17% 

4% 

IS* 

9% 

s*i 

1% 

21% 

3ft 

,3 W 


22 % 

ft 

3ft 

.Pft 

U% 

4 

15% 

20 

11 % 

6 % 

< 5 % 

M% 

20 % 

3ft 

8 % 

1% 

3ft 

19% 

2 % 

f 

17% 


-% 

■% 

♦ft 

♦In 


insurance 

Flow 

Transp. 


Hip* Low Lm* 

127481 124X56 124X56 
1059.19 703X36 1035J4 
141370 iSaTI 1396.91 
14*145 ]S757 1437.57 
173373 1781.95 17DI7S 
87X33 8ML56 86056 


-25J2 

-2X34 

-1528 

-1834 

-3173 

-942 


Mfcrasfls 

nSwCm i 
BieXMngn 

sse 1 

Oradis 
Ascend 
CosoDa 
3Qn 


SunMIcs 

DeKpJs 


VaL 

172513 l«ft 
155745 5*1 
113809 »% 
98940 19% 
*2798 24% 
61882 2% 
<1716 8% 
41036 24 
S3009 40*> 
52482 55% 
S0990 29 
45770 3S% 
45445 U% 
45050 37 
41416 7J% 


In Last 
137% 139% 

49% SI 
90 93% 
17% 18% 
22*1 22% 
1% 1*» 


S t 8ft 

* 2 m 


38% 39% 
51% 52ft 
27% 28% 
33% 34% 
12% 14 

3% 29% 
68 69% 


0*9- 
-1% 
-1% 
-ft 
♦2 
-1 
-9ft 
♦ft 
<T4 
- 1 % 
-2ft 
*% 
- 1 % 
♦ lft 
- 1 % 
-1ft 


M9I 28150 
Aug97 271 JK) 
5eo97 25100 
Od 97 231 JO 
Dec 97 224JD 


27X00 
2*7 JO 
25X00 
229 JH I 
22X00 


279 JO 
26970 
25170 
23070 
m qi 


♦ US 44,751 

♦X10 27,7n 
♦SJO 8401 
*570 5,931 

♦ 370 X582 

♦ I JO 9445 


May 97 
Am 97 35X40 
A«97 35570 
00 97 357 JO 
Dec 97 3*1.10 
Fed 98 
Apr 98 


Est. sales 1 4.000 Wed's, sales 1X299 
Wed's openH 104785 up 1506 


35170 
3SL5D 3S2J0 
35370 3SSJ30 
35570 357 JO 
35X80 34X40 
36120 

36570 _ 

Est. sate. TLA. Wed'S- soles 7X383 
Wed's mn ini 157710 off 6629 


—170 1X745 
-1J0 2 

— 170 59733 
— X90 11188 
-X.90 5759 
—870 21J49 
-an 1283 

-ajo urn 


COTToenmcnfl 
9MOO tes- ends per fc. 
Mom 97' 7X15 7278 
■M97 7470 7435 

0097 7*75 75iSI 
Dec 97 7XS 7425 
-M4T98 77 JO - 77 JO 
Moy98 


SOYBEAN Ofi. (0307) 

60J00 ■»- canh par IP 
MayOT 2452 2415 

Jut 97 2490 2452 

Aug 97 25JH 2497 
Sep 77 35J25 7SM 
0097 Z5J8 25.11 
Dec 97 2X51 2131 


240 

2486 

2572 

2X25 

2X38 

2572 


* AMEX 


58449 57AJ0 577.90 


a*. 

-X17 


AMEX 


Est. soles 12700 Wed's, soles 9790 
Wed's apart Int 94895 Off 1011 


♦tt.17 39J48 

♦ 0J0 29716 

+0.19 6776 

♦025 3771 
+ 329 1*74 

♦ 322 11,276 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 
25700 Kb.- cents par to. 

Aw 97 11130 111.95 11X75 


a Daw Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
10 U twites 
10 Industrials 


10X10 

9873 

10X38 


a*. 

— 078 

— 07i 
-111 


SPDR 

VincB 

TWA 

PaiDlO 


S 3 - 


w. 

HU* 

MU 

L**> 

27070 

79% 

7#%i 

77% 

23591 

33% 

32ft 

33% 

13206 

74* 

6ft 

.ft 

13171 

3ft 

3% 

14% 

11243 

7% 

69k 

7 

11117 

J 1 . 

19% 

20 

7760 

2Vk 

2% 

24ft 

7033 

5615 

a 

£ 

% 

5429 


■M* 

% 


•lift 

«% 

■ft 

-ft 

-% 


-ft 

-ft 


SOYBEANS (CBOri 

5700 Du minimum- osnrs bv bushel 
MOV 97 8*0 841 856% +15% 7X394 

B44 899 +14% 59732 

830 836 + 9% 8764 

7*3 7*3 +4% 5729 

708 715 ♦*% 34199 

Est. soles 56.000 wed's, sales 37.137 
Wed’s open irt 183796 off 2610 


May 77 U2J0 1099S 11175 
Jim 97 I1Q.10 10830 10975 
All 97 10860 106.90 10B3O 

Aug 97 10670 9770 105.90 

Sep 97 105J0 10445 105J0 
0097 10445 

Nov 97 10X55 

Dec 97 10X80 10170 10X60 
Est. sates N.A. wed’s, sate 
Wed’sopsnlnl 55706 off 2178 


♦ 1.10 5UI7D 

♦ 1J0 2X382 

♦ 1.10 1729 

♦IAS 9,180 

♦us m 

+395 X972 
♦390 638 

+890 757 

♦385 6778 

17785 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

61 tnHon-ptsadoopcL 
Apr 97 9420 9417 9417 
May 97 Kll 9407 9408 

Jun97 9404 9378 9399 
Sep 97 9X77 9377 9361 

Dec 97 9372 9X60 9X41 

Mor 98 9X40 9127 9X28 

JunlB 9131 9117 9118 

Sep 98 9123 9109 913ft 
Dec 98 9113 9279 9X01 
Mar 99 9111 9X99 9X00 

Jun99 9X09 9X96 9X97 

Est. sate NA. Wad's, sate 626766 
WEds open W 2^0X356 up 45103 


7183 

744) 

7185 

7*44 

7740 

77.93 


-M2 44J01 
— (MR 22782 
— 073 HI 792 
— 047 382794 
-410 264961 
-0.10 204914 
—4X11 164471 

-an 12X127 
-aw 109,100 
-ato 8X059 
— aio 76,144 


EsLsdes kla. Wed's. sates 9489 
Wed* Open W 77,122 UP 407 


♦818 34105 
+0.17 1443* 
+820 I486 
+028 --»4Q 
♦W5 2J09 
+60 525 








BHfTlSH POUND (CMER) 

62700 pounds, s per pound 
74197 17312 U238 17298 
Sep 97 17290 17230 17274 
Dec 97 17250 

Est. soles 5771 Weds, sate 26715 
Wod's open int 32499 off 761 


HEATING OR. (NMEK) 

4Z4B0 sol, cams per am 

ffJO SLT0 5430 +087 

Mmf97 5SJ5 5440 54® *030 

♦Sin SUB -54M +OI5 

All 97 H75 5X00 55.® *025 

Aug 97 56J0 5570 5420 +0J5 

SSS 56^ 5670 5470 +Q70 

0097 5775 5730 5775 +075 

USS S-25 g- 9 ® S’- 10 +0*5 

Dec 97 5EL-ES 5825 5875 +070 

£"**■» 5075 BS ♦&« 

SJ** ^ Weds, sales 34787 
Wed'S Open W 123705 up 51 




31749 

759 

91 


JUI97 861 
Aug 97 841 
Sep 97 772 
Nov 97 71* 


- Trading Activity 


NYSE 


Nasdaq 


4K 


rj% 

9% 

9 

1% 

21 % 

3% 


«% 
-% 
ft 
♦ % 


Uncnarqed 
Take Issues 
New Highs 
Now Lam 


633 

20S5 

630 


1314 

1183 

845 

46 


Aihraaced 


Un 

New lows 


2356 

5757 

38 

M 


2094 

1851 

1812 

5757 

77 

171 


WHEAT (CB013 

8000 bu minimum- cents w bmtici 
Mav 97 396 401% +61* 27,311 

JU197 399 391 398% +8 41,9*3 

SCO 71 m TO 399V, ♦£% L30B 

Dee 97 410 402 409% +8 45W 

Esl. sales 20000 Wed's, soles 17798 
weds open kit B2J30 ua 175 


SR.VER1NCMX) 

5700 iror as. - cenra per irav az. 
Apr 97 51470 51X40 51X40 
Mav97 518JJ0 51XC0 51470 
M97 52X00 5T7J0 51970 

Sep 97 52480 52X50 5&UJB 
Dec 97 53X60 53150 53X40 
Jan 98 53550 

Mar 98 ».98 

MOV98 54420 

EsLsdes NA. Weds, sales 


Weds open (nr 88520 alt 193 


-1J0 3 

-170 53727 
—170 17737 
-170 3451 
— 1.70 4304 

-U0 13 

-IJO 4365 
— 170 485 

14284 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER] 
WUHOdallBi, s per Can. Or 
Jun97 J324 7287 J2BB 

Sep 97 .734* 7330 7330 

Dec 97 7300 7367 7367 

Mw98 7418 7405 7405 

Est. soles 6439 Weds, sales 18113 
Wed's open ini 74787 UP 114 


68690 

4482 

1,119 

895 


Livestock 


1% 


is% 

9% 

Oft 

1ft 

6 % 

11 % 


13% 

lft 

15% 

9% 

0% 

lft 

S% 

lift 


AMEX 


Market Sales 


♦% 

♦% 

•% 

♦ft 


Advanced 

Decided 

Taw issues 

New Mote 


2M 286 


Hew Lows 


211 

747 

24 


IV> 


17 

ft 

ft 

22ft 

27% 


NYSE 

Aimat 

Nasdaq 

InmARans. 


T«*nr 

470 
481.95 
23.93 
481 .95 


59450 

27.74 

59171 


CATTLE (OMBU 
«UM0 tos.- aenrs per to. 
Apr 97 6840 *7.93 

JUB97 64 XS a95 
AUO 97 6190 619 

0097 67 JS 67.15 
Dec 97 6* JO 6970 
Feb 98 7070 7045 


PLATMIM WMER7 
SO nuv r.- aomra per iniv ot 
Apr 97 37670 37100 37X60 

May 97 38X50 

JU197 38QJD 37670 ViM -XX 

00 97 380J0 32970 17970 -OJO 

JlWlVD JglM — Z3Q 

Est. sate NJ*. Weds, sales 9.110 
weds Open ini 19,763 off 71 


—160 6707 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

124000 manes, 1 per marK 
Jun97 J013 J950 4008 *1773 

Set* 97 J050 J012 J04B X473 

DOC 97 J692 J075 -BW 130 

Mar 98 J1X7 y 

Estsates 1495* weds. sates 18,575 
Weds open W 61903 up hr* 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBU • 

].000bbL-_i»1ors oar bW. 

Mav 97 2X85 2053 2070 +006 

xny sun ajj 20 jb +a» 

Jul97 2076 28 M OTJ3 +008 

Aug 97 2070 20J0 205B +8.10 

S8P 97 5X63 2043 2055 +412 

Od97 M +014 

NW97 20J6 2035 2049 +41* 

JonM M 20X 2045 +019 

fCb9S 20 J1 2035 2044 +019 

SSTS SS +MD 

fif' ™ S 53 20« 2042 +021 

21141 21411 +0 -f 

^jate NA Weds, sates 9451a 
Wedsopemnl 39X778 UP 5303 


T- ~ 


NATURAL GAS OttlER) 

“f*™ Wuftr* per mm utu 
MCV97 1J35 1330 


9J62 

1,979 

1.144 


1^ 

* 

M 


1 % 


lfti 

73% 

27% 


3ft 

10 % 

17% 


3ft 

18% 

11 


3-37 


»ft 6ft 


Jft 


1% 


157 ink lft 
120 3 m 

U7 lift 
MB 9 
IB 10 

1464 

115 
37078 

m 
is 
w 

671 
3(0 
,204 
IBM 


m 

19 

3 

left 

2 


79ft 

n» 

% 

15% 

lft 

Wt 

1% 


Dividends 

Company Per Amt Rec Pay Company 

IRREGULAR 

BwnhnmWA » .11 3-31 

Japan Fund _ .088 3-26 

STOCK SPLIT 
Omega Fnd 3 for 2 9p8t. 

STOCK 

BWC Financial _ 10% 3-31 4-21 

INCREASED 

4-10 
4-21 
4-28 


—023 29,591 
♦ 020 20891 
-0.12 22,162 
♦085 1X152 
7^89 
-017 U74 

Est. sates 10.922 WedV5des 16,166 
Wed's ooen W m rjM off 866 


67.95 

4417 

6X65 

67.27 

69A2 

7050 


Close 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Pol Iras per metric ton 
AtanlMMi (HM Grade! 
spot 1606% uart, 
Forward 


Piwriaua 


JAPANESE YEN (CMSd 

12J mWon ven, s oar loo wn 

J/X>97 J200 JJ33 JH3 71D91 

Sep ?7 J310 JOBS J305 933 

D«97 J471 J421 J421 37B 

gri. sales 1U93 Wads, sate 21.028 

Wed’s open W 72781 UP 4839 


Jun97 
Jul97 
Aug 97 
Sep 97 
Oct 97 
Nav97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Fet39B 


1J65 

1.975 

1.985 

1.995 

sins 

X175 

2300 

2340 

2270 


Autodesk Inc 
CBTCatp 
Cameron Fnd 
Ciaflmade I ml 
Fst UtdCorp 
Final Co 

Intel Cp 


ImaaiieCorp 
StratGtbGvt 


_ Tnaatt 


H ft 


_ TlsnMn 


370 

411 

5H 

93 

481 

103 


4% 

13A 

lift 

17% 

n* 

21 % 


IS 

id 

223 

1(01 

3 


I DU 

loft 

9ft 
28% 
. . 14% 

»• lft 
30ft 30% 
7% 7ft 


2 M 

15* 

“ 

Fsf BkshrsGA, 

O 

JJ9 


2% 

-ft 

Wngtam Irrethut 

0 

in 

*9ft 


■l«S 

Pep Boys Manny 

Q 

-06 

U 

V 

15 

4* 

4* 

Dollar Gent 

INITIAL 

-05 

12% 

IU 

39% 

12% 

14* 

-5 

Mercer Inti 

REGULAR 

JQ 

,49ft 

% 

4V 


Apca Argentina 

Q .1425 


6-10 

5-9 


RCM 

RCSBFndlnc 
Raanaftecas 
ScaOandBncp 
Showboallnc 
Soman Self Star 

Stewart Enteror 
UnOy Bncp 


Per Amt Rec Par 
Q M 4-11 4-25 
O .13 A6 
- JO 4-11 
Q JJ1 3-31 
Q .14 4-17 
Q M 4-18 
0 JX5 5-1 

Q .0125 4-1 

M JJ74 4-10 
.15 4-15 
■26 4-18 
-075 4-10 
.025 4-7 

52 irA 

m 4-4 

-05 4-15 


4-25 

4-28 

4-15 

5-1 

5- 2 

6 - 1 

4- 5 
4-24 

5- 1 
5-1 

4- 25 
4-17 
4-22 
*18 

5- 5 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 
50000 tos.- cents par to. 

Mor 97 69 JO <937 6945 

Apr 97 68.90 6842 68J5 

MOV 97 (9JJ0 6X45 IAS 

Aug 97 7112 7X55 7X65 

5ep97 TIM 7105 73JP 

Oct 97 7192 7165 7145 


_% 1607% 

1639 1640JX) 1639.00 164000 


CaftodtsCHlge Crude) 

207M 2409430 241X00 


♦002 

-OJD 

-042 

—435 

~CU2 


Est. series 2.157 Weds, sales 2.106 
Weds open ini 71 £90 off i« 


1.743 

X75B 

1S#7 

wn 

1496 

X165 


2425.00 
Bid 2366 '4 

Lead 
sktei 


23*7% 235400 235740 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

125400 francs. S per franc 
Am ?7 4973 4885 4949 

Sop 97 J042 4990 JIMO 

DOC 97 _71U 

E^rales 14454 Wtd'Lsate HL713 
W0ds open int 39JB1 off SU 


MW 98 1140 


1-928 

1.960 

157D 

1-982 

1490 

ZfOS 

X175 

Z» 

234# 

2265 

2140 


3X219, 

was 

1X417 

94S3 

9,848 

M4as 

S47B 

IWSfr 

W40# 

4487 

4258' 


van 

2,167 

417 


697.00 

68700 


tMM 

688.00 


687% 
68 UK) 


688 % 

66X00 


Spol^ 761000 762000 753000 754000 


Tin 


7720 JM 7725 JX) 764000 765000 


Spiff 564000 587000 580000 581000 
Fonrarri " 


5875X0 588000 5825.00 583540 


HOCH-eon (CMERJ 
aOJJOO tot- amis dh to. 
Apr 97 7X77 7X17 

Jin 97 81 At 80J3 
MV 8LU 79J1 
AU097 77.10 76.0 

OC197 78.10 *9J0 
0*C 97 68.10 *7 JO 


7X47 

81.07 

19.28 

76.70 

49J5 

<7.73 


—AJO 7 StS 
♦OJD T2J61 
♦ 0.17 1154 
♦048 Ua 

-025 1,795 
1332 


ZhK (Spechff HMi Grade) 

Spiff 126SJS 126600 127X00 127400 
ramarti 1284% 128S , < T2«3J» 129314 


High Law Close Chge Oplnt 


Financial 


MUfSTHSTERtJNC fUFPCl 

ESaam-msatioopd 
JU1I97 9335 9332 

Sejrt7 933)7 9X03 

D«S7 92A5 9X79 

MwW 9X6* 9159 

JIKI9B 9XS2 9X46 

SapW 914S 9X39 

DK98 9X36 9133 

Mww 9230 niB 

wm 9125 9118 

St® 9X19 9112 

OttUt 9X16 9X08 

MW00 9X12 9X04 

Ert- sales 3037 a. Preu.salec *5.943 

prw.mwiinL- *27354 


-jOfll 118JJ* 
9X0* UndL 84871 
9X81 + 0.01 (A650 

UndL 35010 
«JB UlKh. 21712 

9238 — 0.02 211469 
£23 -nm fi5% 
9X10 —M3 xobs 
9X12 — ADS *v5S 
9X09 — OJB 
9X06 — nja 


U68 

16)77 


4-18 


«*Mpls tHippradnaig anogat per 
stea e/AP R) g-poynbie M Oaodtea tandi,- 
HHnomhly; [HWarteTt*; s-senff-Mwal 


EH. SOleS 11-440 Wed'S, sate 10348 
Weds ooen irt 30300 off 656 


Stock Tables Explained 


629 

997 

8S6 

213 

133 

2N 

in 

730 

151 

1U7 

23591 

139 


91 

SO 

117 

1% 

3U 

.20 


IP 

IU 

at 

2» 

U6 

A 

us 


10ft 

13 

2 

11 

7% 

11% 

5% 

ft 

17% 

29* 

ft 

ft 

12ft 

6ft 

m 

JM 

!» 

17 

% 

'i 

£ 


9ft 

12 % 

lft 

W% 

w 

Uft 

5% 

ft 

17% 

26ft 

% 


Bt! 

nt 

9 

.5? 

.P 


4ft 


■% 

■ft 

♦ ft 

♦ ft 


Sates figures ate unofficial. Yeaty highs and lows retted mg wtwious a weeks plus me 

Tteetoonly.Untootlieiwfee noted, rotes of dMdenfe are annual disbwsefftaiTsbwedoii 
me West oeaa rattan. 


PORK BSJJES I CMER) 

AOOOtn.- cam pv to 
Mav 97 75.95 7485 7112 -OB2 

JUtW 75J0 7425 74JB -180 

AU097 73.B5 7X» 7157 -440 

Feb 98 6935 UM 48.82 +022 

MO 98 68.10 

Mav 98 *am — (us 

Est. soles 1772 Wads, sates 1J9S 

wedsapeninT 6fin w ]92 


4129 

UB8 

416 

n 


US T. BILLS ICMBR) 
si nunkn-PRat laopd 
Jun97 9454 94J2 94S3 
Sen 97 9430 M22 94J2 
Dec 97 9448 

Est. sales 642 Weds, soles 284 
weds open H 10.91* off 9S 


—003 

-A06 


0823 

X773 

847 


,tft 

16J 

5% 

,7? 

26ft 

ft 

4ft 

3H 

13 


37ft 

IT* 

£ 

Ih 

IM 


if* 

g% 

£ 

IM 
"k 
ft 
IM 
17ft 
13% 

}?% 

. _ 15% 

IWi 15ft . 
14% 1TV* lift 
15% 7M 15% 
11V» 10ft 10% 
ft % ♦. 

1% !«■ IU 


lift 

K 

12 % 

lan* 

I5>»k 


-% 

■ft. 

■ft* 

*% 

♦v. 

■ft 

♦% 

■% 


■dhridenddsoeidrots). 
b • annual rate of dividend plus stock di- 
vidend 

c • BquUattng dividend 
cc- PE exceeds 99. 
dd-cafled. 

d- new yearly low. 

dd- loss in the tost 12 months. 

e^ -dhridend dedmed or paid In preceding 12 

months. 

f • annual rots. Increased on last deda- 

RrifOIL 

g - dMdend in Canodkui funds, sublet to 
15% nofwefldencetax. 

I - dhridend dedmed after spor-vp or stack 
dividend 

j-dMdendpaUffhsyeaa omitted, dotened or 
no colon taken at lOatdivkJend mcrflng, 

K - dMdend declared or paid flris year, an 
ooaimuwteeteuevym dwidendstn amnes. 
m - annual rate roducsd on last dedoro- 
trofl. 

»- new issue in the past 52 weeks. The hlgtv- 
lowranoe begins wfmitieslaitontndinB. 
nd - not day ddhwy. 


, tuinuol rate unknown. 

■- price-earnings rntto. 

Q-riosed-efid munnritund 

f- dhridend derioredw paid in praasUng 12 

inanity plus stack dhridend 

i • stock spflL Dhridend begins with date of 

split. 

*»s- sales. 

f - dividend paid In stock in preceding 12 
months, estimated cash value on ex-<S- 
vktend arex-dtetrtbutton date, 
v- new yearly high, 
v- trading hated 

vl - in bankruptcy ar receivership or being 
nrorganteed under the Bankruptcy Act, or 
securities assumed by such companies, 
wd-wtwndtetrt&uted 

vri -when Issued/ 
wi* - with warrants. 

* - ex-dhridend arex>rtgtris. 
ate-a-dlsmbufton. 

*w- without warrants, 
y- u-dividend and srtes in ML 
l*d-VWd 
z- sales in lulL 


S YRL TREASURY tCBQT) 
sin.000 prtn- M L urn al 1W PO 
JUn97 104-56 104-18 H4-21 —24 mjru 

Sw 97 ies-05 — 26 3 

D« 97 103-56 - 26 S 

Est.sate BMOO wed's.sates 55,492 

Wed's open Ini 223.932 off 1848 


Food 


OOODA (NOE) 

1 0 metric lam- s per Ion 


May 97 

14*1 

1431 

MSB 

-11 

Jill 97 

i486 

1462 

1479 

-10 

S6P97 

1509 

148* 

1491 

—14 

Dec 97 

1534 

1504 

151* 

-13 

Mar 98 



1544 

-12 


Est. sain NA Wed's, sdes 7.971 
Wed'S open W 101,189 UP 1482 


3i jn 
2X687 
1V59 
9,190 
19 JUS 


18 YR. TREASURY (CBOTJ 
t IDO JXK Brin- pfeJ.Bna>o!lWpct 
Junw 106-13 105-17 1U-IB —21 303.123 
5eo97 105-25 105-03 105-01 -21 15.133 

D« 97 104-23 —21 SB 

Esr. sate 12SJ21 Wad's, sales 75,921 
Wed's Open W 334902 off 4865 


WHP52LEUHOMARK IUFFQ 
£ ^^9473 +0A2 

SgWJ 944* 946J 

Drc97 96J9 9445 

MH98 9031 96M 

96JJ6 
95AS 
9SlS8 
9S33 
95J17 
948* 

94*0 
9439 
N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

ff g55J"JS«HW T, n 


Jun98 

SepW 

DecJu 

wm 

Jun» 

S*p99 

Dec99 

Mdi« 

JunOO 

SepOO 

DecOO 

MarOl 


9411 

95.91 

9564 

K» 

JS.I2 

9489 

9463 

9440 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

f4T. 


9473 + MO 273J7H* 
* JE 187^81 
9447 ♦ 003 1(L837 
9428 ♦&04143£65 
9488 + am 124*1 1 
+004 97JQ* 
9440 + OJB 7*4)11 
9435 +005 5BM2 
9589 ♦ 0JM 
948* ♦ 053 2A28T 
9460 *003 SSi 
9438 ♦ 0JU tsa 
W20 +0JJ! 

9403 ♦ aos 
9184 ♦ OJQ 
9167 ♦ QJf} 


1J3S 
1.99) 

1.965 
1.975 
X010 
1150 
X275 
2310 
2250 

_ H35 

ha werfisate Wjas 
WetTsopenW 1*3204 up 1*97 

U9UADB3GASOLME (NMBU 
Aftoao ora, oamper gal 

-M* 1MS2 
*480 050 *4 TO -021 43,253 

*mJ7 4190 5345 _0CS 2JJ3 f 

Jiff 97 Offi) 030 *XS0 +012 9,736 

4,J0 +BJ2 

5ep97 605Q jjjq 080 +052 ■ X2C2 

Ed-M te NA WH^soles 4U*6 
WWsopenW 99,100 off 833 
6ASOILOPEJ 

^ Uidritan per meWctofi-WBonoo tans. 

*71 6?.75 16050 16475 —050 24438 

n 169 -°° — 7.25 11J05 

jihi97 17235 171 JO 171.25 —400 10873 
j}?” 17X75 17XOQ i*(J7 

Ik™ 3SHS ’Z 4 -” M® 

SepTv7 17475 17450 17450 —im 1 jo 
Oa97 17000 17000 17000 —175 1,692 
J2 1 ® WJJO 17980 —175 852 

Dec 97 180J5 17950 18035 —330 4692 

States: 14901. Open bit; MM off SU 
BRENT Ol LOPE) 

u™22 Da ?„ p< ? tnmi ■ W5 ofl.000 barrels . 
19^5 19.20 1J38 +0JJ9 61.01* 
32-^2 3 489? 

J2-5 }*** +0-12 ^saA 

{*5 w» 19A7 +0.1i 4886 

} 9M +au ' w* 4 

10M il-S +M5 4573 

JJ-M 19J2 +0.17 4169 

19^6 WM 19 J39 +0J8 4610 
t3T. soles: SX896. Open 151 ^63 off 


^8* 







— it 





■Tr.jU 




June 97 
Jiffy 97 
Aug 97 
Sep 97 

OC+97 

NOV97 

Dec97 


•Man*: 


*4 


U1I 

zen 

12S3 

7 


620 


US TREASURY BONDS (C8017 


-- 

(|pa-iioa.ooo-«t£ jswfciff rnooct) OtC 97 9441 9*J6 9440 + 0 M an.«w 

Jlffl 97 108-22 107.11 107-12 —103 SUjn ***2* 96J7 9433 +dffi 

Sep?’ !»-» 106-29 1 06- M -103 3UM8 » 9410 9406 9408 +S« TojS 


CQfVEECmOE} 

37JOOtoj,-c«nisparto. _ 

MovVl 19X00 18380 189-80 +X95 1L3« 

Jul 97 17780 1*880 17255 +055 M*9 

SCO« 16580 15980 1*400 —160 5,955 

Dec 97 149.10 14*80 14*80 -X15 3551 

EStsote MA Wed's, soles 11557 
wed s open tot 37734 off =54 


Stock Indexes 

Si Wfr S3 ■— 1490177J64 
»» «7J» 7910O 7«a -1289 4,201 

MJatS ^ a* "i 


■'Return- 



5epvri«-U7 IB6-ZV I06-3U —103 3X»® . ' ZB I5>1« V 68 A 9406 WUIton FTSClOBILIEm 

ft* W 107-00 104-18 106-18 -1 03 5^9* Sep 98 95.M «8S 95.91 IftS {HS 

... "M S. -J”- 'rt» SS 2 SHI S5# 4S3d8 


Estsate 4X800 wed’s.«ete Ibajh 
wars Open W 491442 m 36 


58,911 


SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE1 

tixud >&• cants nr sl _ 

MOV 97 HUU 107* 1081 59,913 

Jul 77 10*0 1056 1W7 -001 35877 

0097 1053 HUB 1051 -081 2731 

Mor W 1054 10J0 1051 -483 144*9 

Est. scries na Wed's, sate HUNS 
wed's wen int 1C.S52 off 1751 


LDNGGJLT OJFFE] 
tauw-phisa^sotioopct 

JU1197 109-30 108-27 I6S-3! —088 181408 

SWW K.T. N.T. 108-18 — 0-00 
EsLSri+C 27864 Ptw.+ate; BX70I 
Prev. open hri- 1SM28 up 4630 


Mor 99 95A5 9543 ES +Sm ISS? S«p97 SSS iron 1&25 

S 5 H « ® fta®Lp»a“ 

*»•> «« mS :SS s S WanJgSS 1 . 

«*—■ -,■«—=»— SWBam— ■» 






GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFRI 
DM2S(U1I0 - OTS Of 100 DO 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 15 




r, . ' n £ 

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California 
Making 
A Splash 

Pension Fund lists 
Goals for Europe 

Reuters 

LONDON — The California 
Public Employees' Retirement 
System, the largest public pen- 
sion fund in the United States, 
presented its corporate gov- 
ernance principles Thursday for 
companies in which it invests in 
Britain and France. 

Representatives of the fund, 
which has S3.7 billion invested 
in Britain and $1.9 billion in 
France and is a particularly ac- 
tive shareholder in terms of cor- 
porate governance and seeking 
boardroom changes, said at a 
news conference that the prin- 
ciples it had outlined were 
based on six concepts it con- 
sidered fundamental to free and 
fair markets. 

These were director account- 
ability to shareholders, market , 
transparency, equitable treat- 
ment for aD shareholders, easy 
and efficient voting methods, i 
codes of practice that dearly 
define the director-shareholder 
relationship, and a long-term cor- 
porate vision that “at its core’* 
stresses shareholder value. 

In Britain, the pension fund is 
calling for existing corporate 
governance codes to be the min- 
imum benchmark. The fund 
staled its intention to exercise its 
rights as a shareholder and urged 
other holders to do the same. 

The fund suggests changes 
aimed at making directors fully 
accountable and independent, 
including regular elections for all 
board seats, a separate chairman 
and chief executive, and a ma- 
jority of independent directors. 

In France, the hind is endors- 
ing the so-called Vienot code of 
corporate organization drawn 
up in 1995 and recommends a 
one-share, one-vote capital 
structure, an end to cross-share- 
holdings, the regular election of 
all directors and broader dis- 
closure of executive pay. 

The chairman of the fund's 
investment committee, Charles 
Valdes, said. “Ranee needs to 
begin meeting market expecta- 
tions and requirements in order 
to continue to attract capital 
from institutional investors.” 


Bulgaria Plans Sell-Off of 30 State Firms 


Blthmberj! News 

SOFIA — The government has 
approved a list of 30 state-owned 
companies to be sold, including BaJ- 
jran Airlines and two shipyards. 
Deputy Prime Minister Alexander 
Bozhkov said Thursday. 

sates are a condition of Bul- 
garia's loan agreement with the 
world Bank, Mr. Bozhkov said. 

The government also is looking 
for an adviser on the sale of the state- 
owned telephone company as well 
as for several of those on the list of 
30, he said. 

Mr. Bozhkov also said the gov- 
ernment had fired Vesselcin Bal- 
goev. chief of the Bulgarian Pri- 
vatization Agency, in a move that 
cast doubt oh the sale of the Bul- 
garian chemical company SODI to 
Solvay SA of Belgium. 

Mr. Balgoev was fired because of a 
contract he had signed with Solvay 
that gave the Belgian company ex- 
clusive rights until April 15 to ne- 
gotiate for SODI. Mr. Bozhkov said. 
“’This agreement bound our hands for 
more serious talks with Solvay or w ith 
other potential buyers.” he said. 

But Solvay said it was confident it 


would complete its planned purchase 
of SODI. Solvay. the world's largest 
producer of soda ash, said in Decem- 
ber it had agreed to buy a 60 percent 
stake in SODI for $160 million, sub- 
ject to government approvals and 
"due diligence” reviews. 

“We are confident this will be 
finalized." Paul Muys. a Solvay 
spokesman, said. “It could only 
lake more time than expected as we 
arc living in a complicated world.' ’ 

Solvay originally said it wanted 
to complete the purchase by the end 
of February. SODI operates the 
world's largest synthetic soda -ash 
plant, will) an annual capacity of 1 .2 
million tons. 

Mr. Bozhkov's remarks came as 
he announced that a delegation would 
go to Brussels on April 8 to seek help 
with Bulgaria's balance of payments 
from die European Union. World 
Bank and the Group of 24 indus- 
trialized nations. Bulgaria also plans 
to discuss rescheduling $50 million 
of its foreign debt at the meeting. 

By the end of May. Mr. Bozhkov 
said, Bulgaria must fulfill certain 
conditions with the World Bank to 
receive the first tranche of a two- 


tranche, $170 million loan this year. 

Bulgaria had hoped to use 
Solvay *s investment to meet some 
foreign -debt payments. But the Bel- 
gian company has not yet paid any 
money, according to reports in the 
Bulgarian media. Bulgarian offi- 
cials have said the next potential 
investor on the list for negotiations 
for SODI would be the U.S.-based 
General Chemical Corp. 

“It would be a bad thing if all had 
to be renegotiated.” Luc van der 
Elst. an analyst at Generale de 
Banque SA. said. 

■ Foreigners’ Profile in Poland 

The number of Polish companies 
being sold to foreign investors is 
falling, the Polish Central Statistical 
Office said, according to a 
Bloomberg report from Warsaw. 

In 1996. 20.8 percent of the 
companies sold by the Polish gov- 
ernment were bought by foreign in- 
vestors. down from 36 percent in 
each of the two previous years. In 
1992. 66.6 percent of companies 
sold by the government went to for- 
eigners, while in 1993, the figure 
was 57.4 percent 


LVMH Loses First Round in Yquem Battle 


Reuters 

PARIS — Count Alexandre de Lur Saluces 
won the first round of a court battle Thursday to 
block the luxury -goods conglomerate LVMH 
from taking over the Chateau d' Yquem vineyard 
that has been held by his family since 1785. 

A court in Bordeaux blocked the sale of the 
property to LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuit- 
ton SA and rejected the company's request for a 
mediator. 

The ruling did not settle the issue of whether 
other members of die Lur Saluces family could 
sell their stakes in the property without Al- 
exandre de Lur Saluces' consent. 

LVMH said in November it had struck an 
agreement with Eugene de Lur Saluces. Al- 
exandre’s brother, and other members of the 
family to acquire 55 percent of Chateau 
d ’Yquem, which produces one of France's finest 


wines, a sweet, golden Sautemes traditionally 
served with foie gras, or fatted goose liver. 

Alexandre de Lur Saluces, who has managed 
the property for 28 years, said he was traveling at 
the time and heard about the sale of the property 
on the radio. 

He said LVMH’s profit-oriented strategy was 
incompatible with Chateau d'Yquem's goal of 
making an exceptional wine. “Yquem should not 
be relegated to the ranks of banal products.” he 
told the newspaper Liberation. 

Some Yquems can sell for thousands of dollars 
a bottle. 

Alexandre de Lur Saluces challenged the 500 
million franc ($8.8 million) sale on the grounds 
thai it needed both brothers’ approval. Eugene de 
Lur Saluces, saying he was not bound by a joint- 
ownership agreement, asked the Bordeaux court 
to order an independent appraisal of his brother's 


management of the property. He was turned 
down in the ruling Thursday. The court agreed, 
however, to LVMH's request to freeze the assets 
involved to prevent Alexandre de Lur Saluces 
from striking an alternative deal. 

■ Gucci’s 2d -Half Profit Jumped 74% 

Gucci Group NV said strong demand for its 
leather goods and shoes fueled a 74 percent 
increase in second-half net profit, and the luxury- 
goods maker said it was poised for further 
growth, news agencies reported from Milan. 

The company said profit for the period ended 
Jan. 31 was $98.4 million, compared with $56 J 
million the year before. Sales in the period were 
$490.7 million, up from $239.9 million-For the 
year, net profit slightly more than doubled, to 
$168.4 million from $82.9 million, on sales of 


$880.7 million. 


$82.9 million, on sales of 
( Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP I 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


But although foreign investors' 
overall participation in the sales de- 
creased. the amount of money they 
paid in 1 996 rose to l .2 billion zloty’ 
(S389-6 million) out of the total 1.9 
billion zloty the government raised 
through sales of state assets. 

In 1995. foreign investors paid 
944.4 million zloty foT Polish 
companies out of a total of 1 .7 billion 
zloty raised from state-asset sales. 

This year, some of Poland's largest 
companies are to be sold, including 
PZU SA. the country's largest in- 
surance company; Bank Handlowy 
SA. and K.GHM Miedz Polska SA. a 
copper-mining concern. 

Separately, Bank HaodJowy SA. 
the Polish state-owned trade* bank 
that is scheduled to be sold to in- 
vestors this year, said its 1996 net 
profit rose to 530 million zloty. 

Bank officials said the net profit 
was the bank's highest ever but re- 
fused io give a comparative figure or 
to disclose more details of 1996 earn- 
ings until next week. The govern- 
ment plans to sell an initial 30 per- 
cent sake in Bank Handlowy, which 
has assets of 14.6 billion zlory. to 
institutional investors this vear. 


London 

FTSE 100 index 

4650 

4500 

4350 y/\ 

4200 r ' 


Paris 

CAC40 


O N D J F M 


’O N D J F M 


1996 

1997 1996 

1997 

1996 

1987 

Exchange 

Index 1 

Thursday 

Close 

Prev. 
Close 1 

% 

'thnnnp 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

,740-99 

734,40 

+0.90 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

2,146.37 

2,124,40 

+1.03 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3.K&QS 

3,418.12 

+0.32 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

Closed 

5354(1 

- 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

Closed 

2,850.53 

- 

Oslo 

OBX 

Ctosad 

591.66 

- 

London 

FTSE 100 

4,312^0 

i 

8 

+0.27 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

Closed 

480.57 

- 

Milan 

MiBTEL 

12024 

11973 

+0.43 , 

Parts 

CAC40 

2356-68 

2,648.73 

+0J3Q 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

2,960-36 

4 4MP rvi t 

2,940.36 

+0.68 

Vienna 

Zurich 

ATX 

SPl 

1,21524 

2,946^5 

1,223.48 

2,919.17 

-0.67 

+0.93 

Source : Telekurs 

lnicnulHAjl HcroWTnhunu 


Very briefly: 

• Philips Electronics NV wants to sell its printed-circuit- 
board unit, which has sales of about 300 million guilders 
(SI 5 7.9 million), in its drive to get rid of peripheral units. 

• Credit Fonder de France SA. a mortgage lender that the 
French government rescued from bankruptcy last year, said it 
returned to profit, with earnings of 858 million francs ($ 1 50.7 
million) for the year. 

• Canal Plus SA's shares fell 60 francs to 1 , 1 06 after analysis 
said an auditor's report had questioned the company's valu- 
ation of Nethold BV, a Dutch pay-television company that it 
is buying for $1.6 billion. 

• Bulgari SpA. an Italian luxury jeweler, said its 1996 net 
profit rose 46 percent, to 57.7 billion lire ($34.3 million) amid 
booming sales of perfumes and watches. 

• ASLK-CGER. a Belgian financial-services company, said 
1996 net profit rose 25 percent, to 6.82 billion Belgian francs 
($195.6 million), helped by high commission income. 

• Japan denied claims by the European Union that European 
companies had been excluded from the bidding in Tokyo's 
purchase of a satellite system. 

• Zeneca Group PLC will buy the half of Sallk Health Care 
Inc. it does not already own for about $234 million to try to 
expand its abilities in the treatment of serious diseases. 

■ Compagnie Generate des Eaux is considering selling its 
videocommunication cable unit to a p 


Rome Takes Budget Steps to Join Euro Club mg Sees Profit Gain 


Agence Fronce-Pressc 
ROME — The government 
adopted a rainibudget of 15 trillion 
lire ($8.91 billion) Thursday that 
officials said was intended to ensure 
that Italy qualified to become a 
founder member of the planned 
common European currency. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi 
said the budget would enable Italy to 
reduce its government deficit this 
year to 3 percent of gross domestic 


product, the maximum allowed in 
the plan for economic and monetary 
union. . 

The budget included two years’ 
advance payments of taxes on sums 
set aside by companies to pay de- 
parting workers. This move is ex- 
pected to raise 6 trillion lire this year 
and the same amount in 1998. 

The cost to companies would be 
“modest" because the total due 
from industry would not exceed 250 


billion lire, Mr. Prodi said. The prime 
minister also said the government 
had decided to Launch a debate on 
reforming Italy's social-welfare sys- 
tem and that measures would be in- 
cluded in the finance bill for 1998 to 
be presented this summer. 

"An extremely important de- 
cision has been taken today, to 
launch talks with all parties con- 
cerned to lay down the main lines of 
reform of social welfare.” Mr. Prodi 


said. “It is a decision which sets 
long-term targets which are vital for 
the future.” 

Prices on the stock market in Mi- 
lan rose in response, and the Mibrel 
index showed a gain of 0.91 percent, 
to 12,082 points. Some bankers and 
analysts, however, said Italy was 
“window-dressing” its accounts 
with special one-time taxes to meet 
the economic criteria for the launch 
of the currency, the euro, in 1999. 


Bloomberg News 

FRANKFURT — MetallgeseUschaft AG said Thursday it 
expected higher earnings in its current financial year and posted 
a 15 percent rise in pretax profit for its first four months. 

The metals producer and trader, recovering from a near 
collapse that followed huge futures-trading losses in 1 994. said 
it had a profit of 38 million Deutsche marks ($22.5 million) in 
the four months ended Jan. 31 as it continued to cut costs. 

* * We want to further improve the conditions for resumption 
of the dividend payment.” its chairman, Kajo Neukirchen, 
said. MetallgeseUschaft last paid a dividend in 1993. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday^ March 27 

Prices In local currencies. 

Tetekurs 

High Low dose Prev. 


, Amsterdam 

abn-av.ro 

Aegon 1361 

Ahold 
AtauNoW CTOH 

Boon Co. 

Bats Wesson 
CSMew 
DortSdwPH 3A1J 
DSM 1714 

Elsevier 
FwItsAraev 
vwimcs 
G-Brnccw 

ffir 

Hoowwenscw 714 

Hurt Douglas 152J 

I NG Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

Medford Gp 
NuWdn 29U 

OceGrtnten 2465 

PWdpsBec 


Ramfctad Hdg 
Rotacn 
Roaoroco 
Kannuj 
Rorenta 
Row) Dutch 
* Unleuwow 
k Vendra htt 
w VNU 

WoBen Klara 

Bangkok 

AdvInfoSvc 
Bangkok BAP 
Krona Thai Bk 
PTTExok* 
Stan Cement F 
Sara Com Bk F 
TeteannasJa 
Thai Airways 
ThdftnoBkF 

LItti Comm 


AEX Mac 74099 
Previous: 731* 

I 128 129 127-90 

i 131,50 13110 131.90 
I ISO. ID T3&70 130* 
268 269* 26080 

86 84-50 83 

35 35/0 35-60 

! 105* 106-30 106.90 
357 JD 36020 357.50 
18830 189* 190.70 
3020 3030 3030 

72 73.10 7130 

».9Q 61 5980 

I 61 JO 61* 4)30 

159.10 15930 159.20 
32160 327* 22730 

92.10 9230 9250 

MS-70 15230 150 

73 73-90 7220 

— 70 56 56.30 

39 JO 39.90 39* 
6830 4930 68* 
4660 47 JO 46.90 

285 790 280 

23930 242* 23950 

87 8730 87 

■ 93.10 9430 94 

161 16280 
158* 15930 1S9* 
•5930 6030 60 

16320 164* 163.10 
10020 108J0 10820 
338 3*60 336.20 
36420 366.40 36180 
8630 8180 8680 
38* 3830 MQi 
mS 225.90 222* 


SET htdac 71231 
PmtaDE 71429 

228 224 224 226 

260 256 258 256 

37 36 36 37 

338 336 338 33B 

684 676 680 680 

160 156 159 159 

4450 4350 4450 4425 

4650 4450 4650 45 

176 173 174 174 

770 169 170 170 


Bombay s 

BaW Auto 100673 
iffi&sMjvef 1000 
HMMMtm 387 
MOarBk 93 

ITC 418 

MatanogarT* 271 
Reliance ind 293 
State Bk India 311.75 
Steel Authority 31 
Tata Eng Logo 387JS 

Brussels 


k Bacomd 
% BHL 


BHL 

CBR 

Crtruyt 

OeOiatzeLfara 

BedraW 

EtaSaflna 

FothbAG 

Gewerf 

GBL 

Gw Banque 


iasat 30 Mae 373*38 
PiMaata 373X24 

i ’ 996100535 1005 

I 991 996 999.25 

' 383 386 38950 

I 9175 92-75 9250 
I 40750 417.75 41250 
267 26875 26975 
I 288 29275 1M.J5 
: 304 31150 30975 

i Z 382 387.25 38975 

"‘MSS. US 

l 13325 13600 13025 
SB* 5950 5620 

773) 7760 7730 

1 34* 34* 33*5 

i 14100 14100 14300 
1910 1920 1910 

,7880 7920 7910 

J300 3470 3270 

4060 6150 6060 

2500 2570 2500 

4900 4975 4910 

13475 13500 13523 
12900 12400 12350 
; 11950 12000 12050 
|- 4870 4880 4B» 

-8590 B800 B60O 

7050 2995 2920 

M 20800 30QS 
14750 1480 0 14750 
91000 92950 91500 


High 

Bayer Hypo Bk 5850 
Bay.Vernnshank 69.10 
Buyer 7035 

Betasdorf 89 

Bewag 464 

BMW 1370 

acAGCotonta 157 
Conumabank 4835 
DafrnkrBHU 136-70 
Degussa 713 

Deutsche Bonk 94* 
Deut Telekom 3835 
OttsdnerBan* 59* 
Resento 369 

FresedfasMed 764 
Fried. Krapp 328 
Gehe 11650 

HektofegZna i£ 
Henkel pM 9X50 
HEW 497-50 

H0GMWT ,71 

Hoedrsl 6735 

Kartodl 57750 

Unde 1175 

Lufthansa 24* 
MAN 480 

Manrtesnarei _ 638 
McJangesefisdiafl37J5 
Metro 17135 

Munch RuedtR 4340 

SSL >8 

RWE 

SAP pit) 78550 

Sdwrtno 1«90 
5GL carbon 22? 
Siemens 9045 

issr 5 w 
isr ™ 

VEW 503 

W&M0OI 923.50 


Low Owe Free. 

57.55 5830 SIM 
67.50 69.10 6735 
«£Q «* 70 

87 89 8830 

499 462 

1346 1 350 1305 
157 154 

47.75 48 4730 

13230 133* 13130 
711 7M 715 
93* 9190 9167 
38L15 3830 38.13 
58* 5930 5935 
360 360 367 

15930 159.90 16330 
323 305 326 

1U5D 11450 116.90 
144 145.80 145 

91 92 92 

49750 050 050 

70 70.40 7150 
67 6755 67* 
■ 572 57350 581 

1167 1175 1187 

23.95 24.15 24 

47630 479 47850 

63350 638 04050 

37 3750 3655 
16950 171 16650 

4320 43* 4305 

Ml *4935 476 

1230 1230 1250 

7425 7445 7530 
28150 28100 20050 
la6* 168J0 171 

227 229 229 

B955 99.90 8855 
1240 0-00 0X0 

849 853 

373 37650 375 

93.90 9445 9755 
503 499 

— 788 799 

919 922 90270 


Hong Kong 


Ann Props 
Bk East Asia 
Cathay Pacfflc 
Cheung Knog 
CKInMsfcud 


8S53S 

DaoHaMBk 
FtatPodfle 
Hang Lung Dev 
Hang Seng Bk 
Hendenon ny 
HendwsonLd 
HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HKTefccomrn 

Mir 


Keny Proas 
New World Dev 
Oriwitt Press 
PeariOrferrU 
SHK Props 
ShanTakHdgs 
stnoLwaCo. 
Silt CMki Post 
Swire PocA 


Jakarta 

Astro Inti 
8* Inti Ifldon 
Bk Negara 
GudongGwm 
(fldaeenient 

In AJnllll 

ntflOtOOa 

Inriosaf 

SaropoarnoHM 
Semen Gr»* 
Tehfeamurihnsl 


Previous: 1277631 

MS BM 8* 
i.10 2630 2665 
55 1160 1150 
’50 6875 7050 
55 2150 22 

L90 J4J0 3450 
38 3850 3850 
L10 3550 35* 
150 955 1055 

L05 1405 1445 
” 80 8375 

« 8 BJ0 

L50 6425 . 67 
150 1455 1460 
■X 2755 2745 
L15 1130 1X40 
.05 410 408 

179 17950 18150 
25 5850 5B 
LOS 2X25 2360 
65 1970 1960 

55 1720 17 

70 4220 43* 

M no ns 
75 6 405 

75 8225 85 

J15 5JH 535 
75 8 820 

60 660 6.90 

JO 61 6125 
50 2965 31* 
70 16.95 17-50 


Qnfl tadrac 66224 
^Prnloes: 65925 

10 S900 S9W 5WQ 

X 1775 1825 1750 

'5 1350 1375 1375 
D 10*50 10475 10500 
10 3325 3400 3350 

10 5200 5300 5250 

10 6350 6400 6500 

0 11200 11250 11500 
10 5950 5975 6075 

a 3650 3675 3650 


Markets Closed 

Stock markets in Copen- 
hagen, Helsinki, Madrid, Ma- 
nila, Mexico and Oslo were 
closed Thursday for a hol- 
iday. 


Frankfurt 

AMBB 

AMd« 

ASonzHdg ' 
Altana 
Bk Berlin 
BASF 


DAX 342925 
PiWtaSS 308.13 

1230 1180 1208 tl70 
189-50 18670 189 JO 1»» 

3645 3380 3445 SBO 

1350 1321 1336 13*5 
33.95 3360 3195 »■« 
6110 6260 63 6435 


Johannesburg 

plUi 

ES K5 S3 

KI, 3*70 MJ0 2650 2650 

nfiniSroFkr 4070 40JJ5 *05 4030 

EJSEmS 77* 27 27* 27 

2BJ0 20.10 2060 2035 

SF _ ’i s2S ™ siS 

29.10 1760 29.10 27.90 
KS" 0 ” 360 J54 360 3J4 

1 

UbertyHrigS Si ^ 

Ltaeriy LBe isjo isjo 1575 

Vgt 10450 m 10450 
1925 1070 1870 19 

JjSS* ^ ^5 8450 8475 


Rembrandt Gp 
WcrcnnM 
Rust PWflnura 
SA Breweries 
Samoncor 
5as <4 
SBIC 
Tiger Oars 


High Law dose Prey. 

4775 4675 4775 4675 
9US 57 JO 5875 5725 
71 JO 70LS0 71 JO 70 
140 13925 140 139 JO 

55 54-50 5450 54» 
48.75 4775 4775 4850 
18175 180 181 18875 

7975 78 78 7825 


High Low Close Prey. 


High Low Oou Prev. 


High low oase Prey. I The Trlb Index 


Kuala Lumpur CMgdtejmii 

Previous: 122SJ? 

AMMBHdgs 2260 22 * 22J0 22J0 

Genring 17.10 16.90 17 17 

Mot Banking 2975 2875 29 2875 

Mo) totlS Wo F 635 6.15 oTO 6.10 

PefronifiGas 9.10 9 9 9.10 


Resorts World 11 

Rothmans PM 22.90 

Stale Darby 9.1S 

Telekom Mat 19 

Tenaqa 1270 

UtdE^news 2220 

m 13* 

London 

Abbey Hatt 7Ji 

Affiefl Domeaj 464 

AngSamtairer 642 

Asda’broup U? 

toecBJ Foods 5J4 

BAA 573 

Bmxlnys 1053 


Bank Scotland XJS 

Blue Ode 418 

BOC Group 960 

Seals 675 

BPBInd 337 

BraAeresp 1369 

Stfl Airways 554 

8 G 164 

Brfi Land 5.45 

BrtJPeflra 7.11 

BSkyB 672 

BrltSeel 164 

Brit Telecom *J7 

BTR 268 

Burmah Cnstial 11175 
Burton Gp 1-59 

Wireless 5 

CacSMirySchw 5J1 

Cortton Comm 577 

Conreil Union 6-83 

Compass Gp 660 

Courtrotti 367 

Dooms SJ1 

BecJnxnniponerts 418 
EMI Group 1170 

SSSSSSI SI 

FarnCotoaial 1J9 

GeriAcdctwl 832 

GEC 186 

GKN 1057 

GtaraWefleoroe 1175 

Gronada GP 973 

Grand M<S 494 

GR£ 267 

GroenaBsGp 567 

Gubmess 5.1? 

GUS 670 

HS&Htdgs 1X05 

ia 7.04 

JfflpITabacxs 419 

Kingfisher 7J9 

uu£rc*e 278 

land Sec 7.76 

Lasroo 267 

Legal Gail Grp X95 

LtoydsTSB Gp 5.16 

UJcnsVartly 1.98 

Mortis Spencer 48? 

MEPC 483 

Mercury Assed 1263 

HOricmotGlU 2.12 

Natl Power 497 

Marwesi 761 

Ned 470 

Orange 2M 

PhO 663 

Pearean 7* 

^ & 

Premier Famril 47? 

pnnfeidU 56? 

Ra Brack PP 470 

Rank Group 427 

ReckBI Calm BJS 

RBdtand 373 

Reed Inti 117? 

RSfltDkB Mittal 42S 

Reuleis Mgs 672 

Rexam 3J2 

WACGroi* 9-75 

RdSRarce 270 

Royal Bk SaH SJ9 

rTZ nra 973 

R fljdJ SunAfl 

Sdtashuiy ,3^ 

SriBodon 15-3 


Scot Nearccstte 663 

SCflFow 377 

Sacurfccr 2.94 

Severn Trent 4«3 

SheOTianspP 10.W 

stene lOJu 


22* 22J0 

16.90 17 

28.75 29 

6.15 670 

9 9 

!i«0 16 

490 S.0S 
426 430 

1070 1070 
2170 2270 
965 9.10 

19 19 

11.90 1110 

21.90 22.10 
13 1140 


FT-5E 1084312.9* 
Prevleus:4301J0 

736 765 778 
438 460 460 

677 679 630 

660 677 662 

1.10 1-10 1.10 
567 568 550 

5.11 5.14 5.18 

1817 1071 10J1 

807 615 810 

5.16 5.18 534 

117 370 XI B 

410 416 411 

9JJ3 938 9J2 

660 675 666 
X32 135 3J5 

1X58 1365 1159 
664 636 646 

130 163 161 

538 5.42 5* 

7 777 7J25 

620 621 627 

161 163 162 

465 446 452 

161 267 266 

i07U I0.1B 10-02 

134 1J6 136 

490 494 493 

539 5* 569 

5.13 522 &16 

667 672 671 

635 657 659 

339 161 164 

574 - 579 577 

4 401 417 

895 11.15 10.98 

487 5JJ9 490 
648 640 654 

1J7 138 139 

615 B7Q 876 

172 174 173 

9.95 tool law 
9J9 11.17 MSB 
819 9.18 9.18 

4S7 491 487 

260 261 181 
574 5* 579 

5.12 175 5.14 

600 648 663 

562 S6S S65 

430 1437 1448 
695 697 690 

187 417 418 

699 761 7.01 

273 275 276 

768 774 771 

277 2J8 265 

180 190 3-82 

493 5 497 

1.94 1.94 1.97 

475 488 482 

474 478 479 

268 1271 1277 
US 2.10 HQ 

475 467 477 

466 694 697 

617 674 619 

265 268 264 

569 619 6 61 

775 779 734 

1.19 130 171 

5L85 S93 564 

160 463 479 

560 567 5* 

451 453 462 

618 423 420 

L13 618 619 

LSI 360 334 

1.10 1131 11.14 
1)8 420 4M 

563 619 66b 

135 339 

165 973 971 

277 278 278 

5J1 5J7 5J2 

158 964 965 

I* 447 450 

135 157 337 

138 3* 339 

S73 1560 15,90 
1.72 477 677 

LU 154 136 

164 2 9* 268 

L79 693 660 

173 1064 1076 

123 1026 1079 
175 179 1.76 


Smith Kline 

^mlttahid 

Sthem Elec 

Stagecoach 

Stand Choner 

Tme&Lyte 

Tescn 

Thames Water 
3T Group 
Tl Group 
Tomk*s 
Unilever 
(ltd Assurance 
(ltd Mews 
Uld UflMes 
Vendomeuub 
Vodafone 
With read 
WBBamsHdgs 
Wob«ev 
WPP Group 
Zeneca 


9M 

8.98 

0* 

9.02 

XS6 

7.93 

7.97 

U2 

7.95 

7* 

7.92 

7.92 

6.90 

6-75 

6* 

681 

A62 

8* 

&54 

BJ3 

4J7 

4J3 

4J4 

4J6 

X50 

X42 

150 

X43 

A77 

656 

644 

659 

5.12 

5J35 

S.1D 

SM7 

5J7 

5J0 

SJ5 

5J5 

X76 

X7Q 

172 

X74 


1472 1465 
5 464 

774 7 JO 

647 603 

510 S.03 

260 X70 

7.93 773 

334 378 

495 488 
235 251 

1777 1638 


1615 1607 
4B9 496 

734 760 

47B 669 

5.10 no 
179 273 

7.91 774 

130 332 

492 492 

235 233 

1763 1765 


Milan 

MIB ThtaBOtkax 12*2600 


Pretaws: 11973* 

ADetacnAsaic 

11590 

11205 

11315 

11255 


3480 

3330 

3370 

XOU 


4395 

4100 

4700 

4235 


1199 

IIM) 

1185 

1167 

Bnwion 

21850 

20450 

21250 

70600 

CredBo ffolfano 

2430 

2378 

2*5 

2370 

Eaton 

9090 

vm 

TOO 

K940 

ENI 

8720 

8550 

8645 

0660 

Flat 

5520 

5350 

5425 

5345 


30000 

29350 

29800 

29600 

IMI 

l $! 

14300 

14740 

14465 

1HA 

2225 

22* 

2215 

Itaigas 

Medtaset 

5790 

6795 

5620 

6660 

5665 

6660 

5635 

6605 

Mediobanca 

10840 

IMW 

10730 

10560 

Morted ion 

ms 

1176 

>13) 

1135 


61* 

600 

604 

604 

Pa rmnlat 

2400 

2340 

2390 

7370 

PireN 

3878 

3/M 

3/KI 

3830 

RAS 

15060 

14/00 

14810 

urn, 


14800 

14310 

14*0 

14500 

SPooto Torino 

11290 

10910 

11190 

11095 

SW 

7725 

7420 

/540 

7510 


+400 

4240 

<3* 

4290 

TIM 

4995 

+865 

4915 

4925 

Montreal 

buMrtaii fcatac ms* 
Preftooe 29B6J3 

Bee Mob Com 

.43 

421t 

421* 

4X90 






CfrUTCA 

31 JS 

31* 

31.5.5 

31* 


3X40 

31* 

3X+0 

m 


17J0 

1/ 

1/ 

17 

Gt-WesrUfeco 

2X70 

2214 

27./Q 

21.96 


3665 

35.15 

35* 

3515 


2 530 

25 

25* 

7515 


17.10 

17 

17.10 

17,10 


15* 

14* 

1X10 

1560 


28* 

2/.9C 

2755 

28* 


27.15 

2695 

26.95 

2710 

QuebecarB 

24* 

2414 

24* 

24.90 

Rogers Comm B 

8.90 

&90 

X90 

9 

Royal Bk Cda 

58to 

5610 

5690 

5X05 


CAG4fc 245646 
Prmtaus 244673 


Accor 

AGP 

AlrUqutae 

McawiAtath 

AXSHJAP 

bk: 

BNP 

Carre) Ptas 

COITCiOUT 

Casino 

CCF 

CelHem 

Christian Dior 

CLF- Dexia Fnm 

Credit Agricate 

Danone 

EH-AquKoine 

EitdaidaBS 

Earodhney 

Eurotunnel 

Gat. Earn 

Havas 

Imdni 

Lafmge 

tssr 1 

LVMH 

Lyon. Eaux 

iWcimiflB 

PaiWA 

FtafiredRImnt 

Peugwiai 

PM«m-PfW 

Premedes 

Read 

Rad 

Rn-PoutencA 

Sanaa 

Sdmdder 

SEB 

SGSThonaon 

steGenme 

Sodexho 

SiGotraki 

Suez 

SvnsfwiBiM 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
Uafnor 
votes 


210 20530 
867 
MB 
37670 371.90 
758 745 

877 855 

25440 2050 
1148 1092 
3590 3471 
24450 254 

275 *wnn 
445 
BM 
621 583 

1285 1255 
896 882 

584. 572 
920 883 

10.10 10 
670 640 

775 743 

42X80 41730 
879 871 

39X90 384 

1029 1011 
1990 1940 
1400 U66 

5B5 546 

344 332 

399.20 391 JO 
31860 313 

448 440 

2509 2400 
1929 1871 
149 141.90 
1796 1744 

19260 18670 
559 544 

32450 318.70 
1044 1014 
407 305 

467 450 

2980 2882 
B57 842 

294 28170 
588 576 

192,70 1B8J0 
an 483 
9225 WJD 
390 375 


808 
90S* 209* 
889 879 

678 469 

37230 371.90 
745 753 

855 842 

250.10 M5J0 
1104 1164 
3491 3493 

UX90 254 
269 JO 26270 
467 448 

840 846 

407 5SS 
1285 1185 
892 892 

577 577 

BBS 913 
10 10.15 
660 670 

745 742 

418 424.18 
877 877 

389.80 38880 
1015 1010 
1948 1944 
1344 1372 
575 564 

33450 3GM 
271-70 3M* 
31530 31X20 
641 644 

2420 2302 
1905 1868 
14230 148 

mo 1750 
19030 18830 
SM 549 
322 32070 
1040 1024 

3*5 39130 
658 458 

2900 2879 
852 839 

290-90 292 

574 585 

190 190 

«690 «4J0 
92 09 JO 
37820 37530 


Sao Paulo 

Brade*a>Pfd 
BrohmoPtt X 

CemtaPtt t 

CESPPtd J 

Copel 1 

DMrasras 45 

nautancaPht S 

UgWSwvWos 44 

ugwpar 33 

PftpcrasPfd 23 

PaufetaLuz 14 

Sid Nadanal 3 

SaazoQuz 
TefefarocPfd 11 

TeterVa 75 

Total 15 

TeiespPM 76 

irnaxmco 4 

UsfmUwsPW 

CVRD PM 2 


865 865 

7»jo msn 

4690 45-00 
tux) 
14-00 1600 
44800 45000 
57000 57000 
44200 44100 
3X60 33000 
21700 21800 
14700 14700 
37* 3800 
LBO 190 
11X00 11260 
15000 15000 
14645 15X99 
27400 27B.60 
4001 4025 
120 132 

2470 24J0 


MIMHlta 

Not Aust Bunk 

1.72 

1* 

IJ1 

1* 

1620 

1602 

1615 

1X99 

NrtMimjaiHdB 

1.96 

193 

1.94 

1.94 

News carp 

606 

5J5 

A9S 

607 

Pacific Oimlop 

143 

138 

X42 

X39 

Ptonearlntl 

4.48 

4* 

439 

4* 

Pub Bmodcast 

6.9) 

6* 

6* 

695 

SI George Bet* 

7-62 

7J0 

7J1 

7J2 

WMC 

&12 

8.04 

a06 

801 

WtatpocBklng 

Wooi&tePet 

7.45 

9* 

7J7 

9J5 

7* 

9J9 

7J9 

9* 

Waataarths 

143 

XJ6 

141 

137 


Prices as ot 3.00 PM. New Yotk time. 

Jan. 1. I99f = 100- Level Change % change year to dote 

%change 

Woiid Index 151.16 -0.54 -0.36 +14.63 

Regional Indues 

Asia/Pacific 109.64 -1.13 -1.02 ' -18.34 

Europe 162.61 +1.82 +1.13 +16.83 

N. America 172.57 -3.39 -1.93 +34.53 

S. America 139.11 +0.50 +0.36 +56.23 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 174.72 -1.04 -0.59 +31.49 

Consumer goods 169.82 -0.46 -0.27 +23.00 

Energy 183.39 +0.33 +0.18 +35.22 

Finance 112.11 -0.82 -0.73 -11KB 

Miscellaneous 156.35 -0.28 -0.18 +15.12 

Row Materials 182.35 +0.16 +0.09 +28.60 

Service 142.1 1 -0.63 -0.44 +18.43 

UtiSties 132.76 -02A -0.16 +4.42 

The International Hera U Tnoune World Stock Index O hacks the U.S. doSar values ot 
280 intBmetianatyimBStBOtoslocKSlrom 25 countries. For more hlormaOof). a tree 
booklet is avadabfe by wttUng to The Trib Index. 181 Avenue Charles de Gauge. 

90521 Newsy Cede*. Fiance. Compiled by Bloomberg Atoms. 


Seoul 

Doom 

Domra Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
no Mol are 
Korea ElPwr 
Korea ExchBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LG Semfczni 

Panatig Iroa St 
Samsung Dfstoy 
Samsung Elec 
SMnAanBank 


Composite tadex: 651 65 
FmtaBK 45442 

107000 100000 101000 101000 
41 00 3900 3900 4000 

17800 17100 17200 17800 
16100 15600 19900 15900 
24SC0 24200 2AOCC 26300 
5300 +990 5150 4960 

«0000 469000 469000 480000 
28000 26200 27DQ0 28000 
44300 45200 45500 46000 
40300 39100 39100 40000 
60000 5800C 58000 60000 
10380 9810 9859 10100 


Taipei Stock Marita todec 8889.71 

r Pretax* *829 JJ 

Camay Ufa Ins 
Chang Hum Bk 
CMoo Tung Bk 
Ctilna Devetarm 116 11X50 115 114J0 

China Steel ** » 

First Bank ... 

Foroosc Plastic 7U0 71 71 JO 71 

HuaNanBk 137 132 13+ 132 

MICamniBk 79 77 JO 78 7760 

Nan Va Plashes 45 6X50 6X50 64 

SlUnKangUfe 
Tnhran 


UM Mere Eta 
(rid World Odn 


173 179 

176 171 

77 75 

116 11360 
2670 2430 
178 172 

7260 71 

137 132 

79 77 JO 
65 6X50 
10s 103 

WJ0 (£60 
5560 5450 
5X50 52 

71 6960 


Singapore 


Asia Foe Brew 
CerehasPoc 
ary Devils 


Dairy Famrn* 
DBS toreian 
DB5lW 
Froser&Neove 
HKLand" 
itsdMaCKEn 
•tad Strategic 
Keppet 
KeppdBarfc 
KeppetFeto 
KsppriLnnd 
oCBCferelgr 
(7S Union BkF 
Pnitaroy Hdgs 
SembaxrarjB 
Sing Air foreign 
Sing Land 
Sing Press F 
Sing Tech bid 
Sing Telecom 
Tat Lee Ban* 
12M Industrial 
UWCTSea Bi F 
WlngTaJHdgs 
*; ti US. doflerv 


Stockholm 


Astro A 

Adas Copco A 

Aiitalv 

EledTahaB 

Ericsson B 

HanresB 

IncaVkwA 

immsfarB 

MoOoB 

Nordbamten 

SamtaB 

SCAB 

S-EBankanA 

SiswflnFots 

SksnsMB 

5KFB 

SpanankenA 
Ss atau ypatakA 
Stan A 
SvHondesA 
Volvo B 


Sydney 

Amcrn 

ANZBMng 

BHP 

Bard 

Brootates Ind 
CBA 

CC AredtS 
dries Myer 
CualcP 
CRA 
CSR 

FostareBnw 
GoodmonRd 
ICt Aoslralta 
LBMtUat* 


7.15 0 

9.40 960 

13 13 

1490 1530 
£L75 CL7S 


Tokyo 

AArremata 

Ah Nippon Air 

Arawar 

AsohTBank 

AdoNChem 

Asalri Glass 

Bk Tokyo Mitsu 

BkYbtaritaBre 

BridBEStune 

Canon 

QwtjuEJec 

anrgakuBec 

Dal Nib Print 


Nidta22sstona* 

Previous: 1847265 


1790 

17 JO 

17 Jo 

1790 

DaMdriKong 

5 

498 

496 

5 

DaftwBonk 

11* 

11-70 

11* 

11* 

Dobra Kaose 

147 

138 

2* 

2* 

Dotes Sec 

S9S 

5* 

595 

690 

□D( 

143 

146 

3-48 

X50 

Demo 

93D 

9.10 

9.15 

9J5 

East Japan Ry 

A04 

398 

398 

+04 

Bui 

454 

436 

4J4 

4* 

Funuc 

656 

4J0 

650 

658 

Funeank 


160 

3* 

158 

2* 

106 

108 

144 

144 

144 

1.19 

1.16 

1.18 

15* 

15* 

IS* 

4* 

626 

4* 


77* 17* 
10.10 10.10 
6J5 5.90 

7* 745 

1)60 1160 
760 760 

26.10 2660 


SX16Mae2W0J6 

PiavtoasS4U6 

112 114 1I1JD 

M 853 647 

200 200 200 
361 36450 360 

185 190 IBS 

322 32560 333 

<70 480 470 

26460 266 26360 

1005 1009 lino 

510 510 513 

351 354 352-50 

228 234 22960 

257 260 258 

287 290 28960 

197 200 198 

188 189 18X50 

167 16960 16760 
8360 8360 84 

233 23760 233 

341 342 341 

19760 198 19660 

139 140 140J0 

WO 190 190 

105 107 10450 

777 230 V* 50 

201 202 20560 


AB Otritoaleu 2422JB 
PrmrtaaE 248438 

L e.13 849 6.1S 

I M7 8J0 Bffl 
I 16.96 17 1M7 

I 177 179 2*2 

I 20.90 2067 20.90 
i 1X70 1275 1X» 
I 1295 12.13 12-03 
; 5.90 i 5S0 

I 660 453 660 

! 1863 1886 IS* 

I 461 ABB 479 
26< 264 264 

I 164 165 164 

11 * 11 * 11 * 
i 2160 2166 2185 


HochJ*ralBk 

Hitachi 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Ito-Yoknda 

jAl 

Japan Tobacco 
Jusco 
Ko&na^ 
Kansal Elec 
Koo 

Kawasaki Hvy 
Kowa Steel 
KtaUNippRy 
KkViBieweiy 

Kobe Steel 

Komatsu 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

KmAhuSec 

LTCfl 

Marubeni 

Morel 

Matsu camre 
Mutou Elec Ind 
Matsu Etac Wk 
MBsubbhl 
Mitsubishi Ol 
Mitsubishi El 
MlbubtaUEst 
MltsublsMHvy 
Mitsubishi Mot 
MltouWslUTr 
Mitsui 

Mitsui Fudosn 
Mitsui Trust 
MurataMfg 
NEC 
•Aon 
NBduSec 
Nintendo 
Nlpp Express 


wppoc steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

NarmnaSec 

NTT 

NTT Data 

OP Paper 

OsakaGas 

Rteh 

Rohm 

So ton Bk 

Saikyp 

SanwBonk 

Sanyo Elec 

Seam 

SeibuRwy 

SeUsdChem 

Sektori House 

Seren-Etaien 


950 

793 752 

3540 3480 

791 

<66 644 

T 1 20 1090 
2120 1980 

568 SSI 
2310 2250 

2720 2640 

21B0 2080 

2170 2080 
2050 
697 676 

1460 1350 

479 465 

1410 1370 

912 901 

7940a 7820a 
2410 2350 

5490a 5100a 
2150 2100 

3770 3680 

1570 1460 
4190 4080 

1280 1250 

1070 1W0 

1090 1070 

3710 3U0 

1410 1310 

427 411 

619 605 
5580 5+0 

499 490 

8260a 6090a 
3480 3410 

620 580 

2210 2150 

T360 1320 

491 480 

348 
742 721 

1040 1020 

221 216 
897 961 

537 514 

7070 6950 

2249 2120 
445 419 

470 
1830 1710 

2850 2790 

1940 1900 

1120 1100 
1110 1030 
370 355 

700 690 

1470 1380 
“ 819 

■2 

1380 1270 

910 895 

1370 1250 
8)8 751 

4460 4430 

1430 1400 

1700 1620 

745 715 

8990 8830 
861 832 

528 503 

M 341 
737 720 

269 261 

1390 1350 

8780a BSTtta 
3240b 3200b 
630 615 

300 290 

1420 1390 
905Q 9059 
793 744 

3500 3340 

1450 1378 
485 467 

6760 6720 
5350 5140 
1240 1220 
1220 1200 
TWO 7330 


955 990 

752 780 

34S0 340 

795 826 

644 6*4 

lioo io» 
2050 2090 
551 552 

2290 2230 
2450 2630 

2090 21B0 

2080 2150 

2070 
680 697 

1380 1430 

475 474 

1350 1370 

907 908 

79308 7800a 
2400 2350 

5200a 5500a 
2130 2140 

3700 3720 

1500 1560 

4110 4160 
1250 1260 

1060 1040 

1090 IBM 
3600 36® 

1360 1400 

422 417 

608 608 
5450 5400 

491 490 

8240a 8090a 
3430 3®0 

582 615 

2150 2210 

1330 1350 

481 4® 

352 354 

730 742 

ilia rojo 

— 215 

890 
534 S29 

6970 6P7D 
2120 2230 

425 444 

484 482 

1740 1790 

2840 2820 

7910 1910 
1110 1120 
1100 1080 
360 370 

696 698 

7410 1470 

825 B4I 
903 905 

7310 1370 

900 894 

1320 1360 
760 8)8 

4430 42(0 
1480 1400 
16® 1690 

730 738 

8830 0980 
843 845 

518 501 

30 345 

732 715 

263 269 

1370 1370 

8700a 8720a 
3240b 3190b 
620 630 

293 295 

1410 1410 

9050 9240 
750 783 

3390 3450 

1400 1440 

473 471 

6760 6650 
5310 5240 
1220 1220 
1200 TIM 
7490 7560 


High Low C3ase Pm. 


Shftoku EJPwr 2060 


Shtmtzu 700 

SMn-eeyCh 2360 

Slrisefcta 1*20 

Shizuoka Bk 1093 

Softbcmk 0120 

Sony 8690 

Sumitomo 922 

SumBcraO Bk 1680 

5umKOem 
Sum homo Elec 1670 

SuroHMCtol 288 

SumitTrusr 1120 

TotehoPhorm 2TO) 

Tctoda Dtwi 2650 

TDK 86« 

Tanotaj EtPvrr 2070 

Tcfcai Bank 986 

Tokia Marine 1290 

Tokyo El Par 2270 

Tokyo Electron J100 

Tokyo Gas 
TokyuCBPk 

Tonen 1210 

Tappan print 1480 

Toroylnd 
Ta* taa 

Tostem 2830 

ToroTnta 896 

Toyota Motor 31« 

YamanoucM 2570 

arxinte* MOD 


1440 1460 

1970 1980 

678 682 

2300 2330 

1590 1410 

1010 1010 
5000 BQ2D 
8520 8650 

871 896 

1570 1600 

472 476 

1650 1650 

281 287 

1040 1060 

2840 2850 

2550 2590 
8400 8500 

2010 2010 
952 966 

1240 1290 

2220 2230 
4000 4060 

305 305 

603 604 

1160 U80 
1440 1460 

716 732 

4B1 689 

2770 2810 

B45 870 

3080 31)0 
2520 2540 


Rsnafssana 
RtaAlgmn 
Rogers Carrie! B 
TpraCC 
Cda A 
Stone constat 
Suftair 
TafistncnEny 
TedtB 
Tefegfobe 
iefais 
Thomson 
TarDomBorik 
Trtnsrota 
TronsCdo Pipe 
TAmmkRn) 
TrtzecHahn 
TVXGcfcj 
WtafcoasrEny 
Weston 


High Law Oom Prav. 

a 40 40 41J5 

34JD 33V6 33V4 3414 

26.10 25* 24.10 25* 
54* 53 5X4 54-20 

57 56ta S6H 56.90 
21 Pi 21.35 21J5 21.60 
4S<» 6m 61 K 62M 
43to 4TJ5 +1-55 4330 
31U 30 SOU 31to 

4T«r 41t* 41* 41J5 
2m 21 JO 21 JO 21-55 
28 27 JO 27 JO 28.10 
37V4 36* 361a 37Ht 

16J0 16J0 16J5 16.70 
26.20 25J5 25.55 26.10 
42 40.15 41 W 42 

32.40 31.70 3185 32W 

TOW 1005 I0J0 1CL55 
2490 24V, 2430 24V 

49 V> 68J05 681* 69 V, 


Vienna 

Boehta-Uddeli 

CmStanstPfd 

EA-Generafi 

E9H 

Ruatxrien Wien 
OMV 

cwrEtektriz 
VA Stahl 
VATedi 
WtatoUerg Bou 


ATX tadec 121534 
Prevtow: 122X4* 

815 816 016-50 

452* +«■« 454-50 
3235 3290 3340 

1701 1704 1712 

53550 537.70 S4XS1 
13861396J0 1395 

840 84365 84X55 
484.10 487 JO 488 
1733 1739 1770 

2222 2222 2240 


Toronto 

AbWbl Price 
Alberto Energy 
Alton Alum 
Anderson Expl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Now Scotia 
BantakCdd 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
BkJchera Phonn 
Boatbonter B 
BroscnnA 
Bre-x Minerals 
Comeco 
asc 

CdnNaNRpD 
CdnNulRes 
CdnOcddPet 
CrtaPodSc 
Gamlnco 
Dofesco 
Doeitar 
Donah ueA 
Du Pool Cda A 
Edper Group 
EuroNevMng 
FaJrf axFM 
(toiguntxMge 
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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


PAGE 17 


ASIA/R4CIFIC 


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Power Firm 
To Cut Its 
Nomura 
Dealings 

Bloomberg Nchs 

TOKYO — Shikoku Electric 
Power Co. said Thursday it 
would drop Nomura Securities 
Co. from die list of investment 
houses that underwrite its 
bonds, dealing another blow to 
scandal-tarnished Nomura. 

Shikoku joined several 
banks, mutual-fund managers 
and other companies that have 
said they will not buy or sell 
equities from Nomura. 

The action came two days 
after the Securities and Ex- 
change Surveillance Commis- 
sion. Japan's securities watch- 
dog. raided Nomura's offices 
and the homes of some of its 
executives looking for evidence 
that the company made payoffs 
to a criminal racketeer. 

“We are planning to sell 
bonds without help from 
Nomura, having considered the 
various problems associated 
with the company," an exec- 
utive of Shikoku Electric Power 
said. 

Electric-power companies 
dominate Japan’s 27 trillion 
yen ($217.65 billion) corporate 
bond market, issuing 41 percent 
of all ordinary bonds. 

Last year, Nomura earned 33 
billion yen from underwriting 
bonds issued by companies and 
local governments. 13 percent 
of its total revenue. Corporate 
underwriters typically earn 
commissions of about 0.5 per- 
cent of the bonds' value. 

A Nomura spokesman said 
the company would "work 
harder" to recover the trust of 
its clients. 

Nikko Securities Co., a rival 
of Nomura, said it would be the 
lead underwriter for an immin- 
ent 30 billion-yen issue of 
Shikoku Electric 20-year 
bonds. Nomura, the world’s 
largest securities company, was 
the lead underwriter in Shikoku 
Electric’s previous bond offer- 
ing in October 1996. 

Shikoku Electric’s decision 
could have significant impact 
on Nomura’s revenue, espe- 
cially if other utility companies 
follow suit 


Write-Off and Revamping for Nippon Credit 


Cv-rHlnf*! Oim h.„ Hupvu-hrl 

TOKYO — Nippon Credit Bank 
Lid. said Thursday it was drawing 
up restructuring plans and planned 
to write off as much as 150 billion 
yen (SI. 2 1 billion) of its debt in its 
results for the year that ends 
Monday, as part of a plan to rescue 
itself from a financial crisis. 

The company's managing direc- 
tor, Tadao Iwaki. said Nippon Cred- 
it hoped to announce details of its 
restructuring measures shortly. 

Nippon Credit, one of the top 20 
banks in Japan and the smallest of 
the country’s three long-term credit 
banks, has been plagued with ru- 
mors of impending bankruptcy, 
though it dismissed those rumors 
last month as ‘ 'groundless. ' ’ 

A Nippon Credit spokesman said 


the bank would restructure its op- 
erations. which are weighed down 
with 1 .4 trillion yen of bad loans. 

But Mr. Iwaki added. “As we 
have not finalized details, we cannot 
comment on what sort of options are 
being studied." 

The Ministry of Finance pledged 
to support what it described as a 
“drastic” restructuring plan being 
drawn up by Nippon Credit. 

A spokesman for the Bank of Ja- 
pan said Nippon Credit had told (he 
central bank it was drawing up a 
“thorough restructuring plan” that 
would include firing workers, 
selling real estate and shutting down 
branches. 

A spokesman declined to confirm 
reports that Nippon Credit was 
selling its head office in Tokyo's 


Chiyoda district to raise money to 
help dispose of the bad loons or that 
the bank might shut down its over- 
seas operations. 

The bunk's shares soared briefly 
after the news report but closed 2 
yen lower, at 291. 

“If the report is true, it’s a pos- 
itive move” for Japan's indebted 
banking industry, said Yushiro 
Dcuyo, an analyst at Smith Barney 
International Inc. “We have long 
said financially troubled banks 
should take drastic steps to restore 
their financial health.” 

The daily Nihon Keizai Shimbun 
said earlier in the day that Nippon 
Credit would write off 250 billion 
yen in bad loans and report a net loss 
for the financial year. 

Nippon Credit is expected to re- 


port operating income for the year 
ending Monday of 150 billion yen. 
according to a Nikkei News report. 

In the six months ended in 
September. 35 percent of Nippon 
Credit’s 84.9 billion yen in banking 
profit came from overseas. 

Japanese bond prices plunged on 
reports of the planned restructuring. 
Analysis explained that although the 
move could help ease concern about 
the health of Japan’s financial sec- 
tor. some bond traders have been 
counting on problems in the finan- 
cial sector to keep the Bank of Japan 
from raising interest rates. 

“For the time being, one impor- 
tant factor supporting the bond mar- 
ket has weakened a bit." one 
private-sector economist said. 

( Bloomberg , AFP. Reuters I 


Seoul to Fight the Bankruptcy Rumor Mill 


C^rfvtrJhv Our Stiff Fntm Du/uarln 

SEOUL — Financial regulators 
said Thursday they would move to 
stem speculation about corporate 
bankruptcies that had been sparked 
by the collapse of two leading con- 
glomerates this year. 

"We are paying special attention 
to malicious and often groundless 
rumors about corporate bank- 
ruptcies circulating in the stock mar- 
ket," Lee Jong Moon, a spokesman 
for the Securities Supervisory 
Board, said. Several companies 
have complained that rumors about 
their financial problems have led 
banks and finance companies to curb 


lending, straining their cash flow. 

Chonggu Housing & Construc- 
tion Co., for example, recently saw 
its stock price fail 70 percent in 
about two months on rumors of an 
imminent bankruptcy. The stock has 
soared 25 percent this week since 
die company and its main creditor, 
Taegu Bank, held a news conference 
to deny the rumors. The shares 
closed Thursday at 9,620 won 
($10.82), up 710. 

"We were seriously hun by the 
groundless rumors." a Chonggu 
spokesman said. "People would not 
buy our apartments, finance compa- 
nies would not lend money, and our 


stock price plunged even though our 
cash flow remained smooth. 

Hanbo Group. South Korea’s 
14th-lorgest conglomerate, or chae- 
bol. failed in January under debts of 
S6 billion. Sammi Group, the 26th- 
largest chaebol, failed early this 
month under debts of $2.2 billion. 

Both were brought down by what 
proved to be excessive expansion as 
the economy slowed. The South 
Korean economy is expected ro 
grow less than 6 percent this year. 

Separately, the Korea Securities 
Dealers’ Association called for 
steps to lift the Seoul stock market, 
including raising the limit on for- 


eign ownership of shares to 30 per- 
cent this year from 20 percent. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters l 

■ Hanoi Delays Bank Reform 

Vietnam said it had delayed a 
scheduled revision of banking laws 
to concentrate on existing problems, 
news agencies reported from Hanoi. 

A National Assembly official. Vu 
Mao. said Vietnam did not want to 
face a crisis like that in Albania, 
where faded investment schemes 
bankrupted thousands and led to vi- 
olent protests that put much of the 
country beyond the government's 
control. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


II Investor’s Asia || 

Hong Kong 

Singapore 

Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Straits Times . Nikkei 225 


T4MQ 

n 2250 — j 

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1996 

1997 1996 

1997 

1996 

7997 

Exchange 

Index 

Thursday 

Pm/. 

% 



Close 

dose Change! 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

12^3432 12,778.39 

-1.89 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2.098.82 

2.111.00 

-0.60 

Sydney 

Ail Ordinaries 

2,422^0 

2.404.30 

+0.75 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

18,210.42 

s 

S 

-1.42 

[ Kuala Lumpur Campos&e 

.L223J1 

1,225.5 9 

-0.19 

Bangkok 

SET 

712.51 

714.23 

-0.24 

Seoul 

Composite index 

851.55 

656.62 

-0.76 

Taipei 

Stock Market index 8,088.71 

6,029.33 

+0.75 

Manas 

PS6 

Cibsed 

3,223.14 

- 

Jakarta 

Composite index 

56244 

659.35 

+0.44 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2^36.74 

2(220.07 

+0.71 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

3.735J58 

3.733.24 

+0.06 

Sxirce: Tetehurs 


Inicnuuon.il Horrid Tnhunc 

Very briefly: 


Dispute Shakes Hong Kong Property Shares 


CeufticJtyOwSkffTFimiDnpacbn 

HONG KONG — Property shares 
posted their biggest declines in more 
than a year Thursday as the gov- 
ernment and real-estate developers 
argued over measures aimed at curb- 
ing a surge in housing prices. 

In a rare show of conflict with the 
authorities, the Real Estate De- 
velopers Association said it would 
challenge the measures in court. 

"It is an unwarranted interven- 
tion in the normal commercial de- 
cision-making process," the asso- 
ciation said. “It attacks the very 
foundation of Hong Kong's free- 
market economy principle.’ ’ 

The government’s newest regu- 
lations require developers to pur un- 


finished apartments on the market 
earlier than before to try to increase 
the supply of housing. If the new 
rales take the steam out of the prop- 
erty-market rally, a large number of 
Hong Kong's listed companies are 
likely to feel the pinch. 

New World Development Ltd. 
led the decline among Hong Kong's 
biggest developers, sliding 1.70 
Hong Kong dollars to close at 41 .80 
($5.40). The index of developers 
dropped 3.3 percent, its biggest de- 
cline since March 11, 1996. 

But investors said there was un- 
likely to be an exodus from large 
Hong Kong real-estate companies. 
The territory’s limited size com- 
bined with its population growth. 


they said, virtually assured de- 
velopers of long-term profits. 

* ‘The issue of demand and supply 
is still there," said Stephen Ho. as- 
sociate director of Aid Investment 
Corp. (Asia). Hong Kong's seem- 
ingly endless property boom, which 


has not been threatened by the Brit- 
ish territory’s coming handover to 
Chinese rule, was highlighted Tues- 
day when the developer Sino Land 
Co. paid a record 1 1 .82 billion dol- 
lars for a residential site on Hong 
Kong island. (Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


Taiwan Softens Pork-Crisis Forecast 


Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan sought 
Thursday to play down the cost of 
the island's hog-farm crisis, put- 
ting the damage at less than half of 
what some economists have es- 


timated The cabinet said the out- 
break of foot-and-mouth disease 
that has led to a ban on exports of 
pork would cost the local econ- 
omy 40 billion Taiwan dollars 
($1.45 billion). 


• IBM Japan Ltd.'s sales and profit both rose in 1 996. for the 
third consecutive year. Net profit was 55.61 billion yen ($450 
million) last year, compared with 39.44 billion yen in 1995. 
Sales rose 8.9 percent, to 1 .43 trillion yen. 

• Varity Perkins Co. of Britain set up a joint venture in China 
to make 50.000 diesel engines a year. 

• HSBC Holdings PLC bought control of Banco Bamerindus 
do Brasil SA for almost $1.4 billion, in the London-based 
bank's third investment in Latin America this month. The bank 
is to be renamed Banco HSBC Bamerindus SA. 

• Square Co.'s founder, Masashi Miyamoto, is to buy 79.5 
percenr of the video-game maker T&E Soft Inc. 

• Mitsubishi Estate Co. cut its current, or pretax, profit 
forecast by 22 5 percent, to 15.5 billion yen {$124.9 million), 
and its net profit forecast by 55 percent, to 36.5 billion yen. 

• EVG Barings, the investment-banking arm of CVG Groep 
NV. lost at least 14 securities executives in Asia this month. 
The departures included nine members of the company's 
Taiwan operations. ING Barings' securities division employs 
346 people in Asia. 

• Shanghai Automotive Industry Corp., China's biggest 
carmaker, will acquire 20 percent of Shanghai Dazhong Taxi 
Co. as part of a government plan to expand both companies. 

• Japan’s large retail stores said sales fell 1 .9 percent year-on- 
year in February after a 0.6 percent drop in January. De- 
partment-store sales last month fell 0. 1 percent, reversing a 
rise of 0.3 percent in January. 

• Japan’s motor-vehicle exports rose 5 percent year-on-year, 
to 341.169 units in February, the ninth consecutive month to 
show an annual increase, the Japan Automobile Manufac- 
turers Association said. 

• India’s National Stock Exchange discovered 40 million 

rupees ($1.1 million) of counterfeit shares, according to a 
senior official of the exchange . who asked not to be identified. 
He said the brokerage firm affected already bad replaced 10 
million rupees of shares. AP. Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters 


IMPORTS: In Seoul, ‘Frugality’ Tends to Affect Foreign Goods 

Continued from Page 13 


Korea. In one case this month that in- 
furiated Europeans, authorities cited 
health reasons for banning die sale of 
. canned Guinness ale; the Irish brew was 
judged to be “flat’ ’in a pressure test that, 
according to published reports, did not 
take account of the ale’s lower level of 
> carbonation compared with other beers. 

Municipal education officials in 
Seoul have purchased newspaper ads 
urging students to "stop showing off 
expensive foreign clothes and shoes or 
using foreign stationery. " Such actions 
are blamed by Western diplomats and 




lo onr readers 
iaLmemhongg 

It’s never been easier 
to subscribe and save. 

Just call toll ires 
at 0 800 2703 


business executives for a slump in sales 
of foreign goods, including a fall in 
imported, car sales to 618 in December 
from 1,137 in July. 

Other measures appear aimed at lim- 
iting the flow of dollars abroad, such as a 
Finance Ministry announcement in 
January that it was slapping restrictions 
on the amount of money parents could 
send to children studying overseas. Tax 
officials have leaked word that they will 
be auditing people who take more than 
two foreign golf trips a year. 

The Korean explanation for all this is, 
in effect It's a Korean thing; you 
wouldn’t understand. 

Choe Jong Hwa, economic counselor 
at the South Korean Embassy in Wash- 
ington, contends that the government is 
trying to combat extravagant spending 
in general, not just spending on imports. 
“We are faced with a very tough eco- 
nomic situation,” Mr. Choe said. "We 
have to tighten our belts." 

"Touch" is a relative term. What 
worries Mr. Choe is the fact that South 
Korean economic growth, which 
slowed to 6 percent last year, is expected 
to be less than 6 percent this year, and 
unemployment has risen to 2.8 percent 
By comparison, the U.S. economy grew 
at a shade over 3 percent last year, and 
-unemployment stands ax 53 percent In 
much of Europe, growth is even slower 
and unemployment is twice as high, or 
more. 

Still it is fair to say that the Sooth 
Korean economy has been a bit troubled 
lately — as witness die recent bank- 
ruptcy of two major steelmakers — and 


when Koreans feel economically be- 
sieged, their leaders tend to respond to 
popular demands for shared austerity. 

The widespread antipathy toward 
those who indulge in foreign luxuries at 
times like this was vividly conveyed in a 
recent South Korean newspaper column 
deriding the "banana mentality" (yel- 
low on the outside, white on the inside) 
of Koreans who are "envious of whites, 
try to behave like whites, think like 
whites and prefer imported goods from 
countries dominated by whites.” 

Such nativist sentiment may be no 
different, in kind at least, from the emo- 
tions Americans feel when they see 
"Made in the U.SA-” commercials on 
TV. But what irks Western diplomats 
and business executives is that the South 
Korean government appears to be 
egging on die anti-import zealots. 

Why, for example, have Korean cus- 
toms officials recently staged highly 
publicized investigations of the impor- 
ted-goods sections ar department 
stores? Harassment, pure and simple, is 
one interpretation; another is Mr. 
Choe’s, who says customs officers are 
reacting to "many fraud cases" that 
have been reported since the nation's 
customs regime was changed last year to 
a self-reporting system. 

Among those skeptical of foe South 
Korean explanation is die U.S. trade 
representative, Charlene Barsbefsky. 
"Most business people will tell you that 
the single hardest market in which to 
operate is Korea," she says, 1 ‘because of 
this extreme and severe anti-import bias 
that is inculcated by foe government.'' 




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PAGE 20 


TOT1CRIVATIONAL HERALDJTjRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28 , 1997 _ 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1997 


M’ONSORI O SJ'Cl ION 


S) »ONSOK1 ,)> St'^1 K >N 


INVESTING IN AUSTRIA: VIENNA 


& i 



With foreign mvesiniem in Austria httttog record 
levels, Vienna Is at trac ti ng eveNncreasing ambers 
of intern a t io nal partners. The Austrian capital’s 
sdinantages include topnotch research and 
dev e lopm e n t institutions, sophisticated banking and 
financial sectors, a hi0dy qua/ifiod workforce, 
vibrart cuttnral activities, and significant municipal 
and regional structures to fadBtate business 
relocation and startup. 



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Reaping the Benefits of International Contacts and Local Expertise 


Foreign investment in Vienna continues to rise as 

A fter multinational corporations and international 
organizations, foreign software and high-technolo- 
gy service providers are the newest members of 
Vienna's international business community. These and 
other firms are flocking to Vienna to take advantage of the 
international contacts and local expertise that abound in 
the Austrian capital. 

Foreign Investment indicators 
Initial inward investment {“TDT in the trade vernacular) is 
the key indicator for foreign investment and the glamour 
figure in business development. Public sector authorities 
trot out their annual III totals, if at all positive, on any 


software and high-tech firms from North America and Asia join the Austrian capital's thriving international business community. 

“Our economy gets an infusion of technologies that 
have proven their mettle and attractiveness on the internet 
tional level. The foreign service providers don't havers . 
leave Vienna to reach a highly international, influential 
clientele - or to get access to CEE-related expertise.” she 


remotely suitable occasion. Large-sized individual IH 
transactions are accorded front-page space in the local 
business journals. 

Statistics on what happens to these investments in the 
years following start-up are often not kept, and even when 
they are compiled, they are rarely mentioned. This is sur- 


able indicators, Vienna’s follow-up figures are even better. 

For the average business start-up m Vienna, a new com- 
pany increases its workforce at a 50 percent annual clip, 
with its locally generated turnover showing an equal rise, 
reports the Austrian Business Agency (ABA). 


prising, because these numbers often provide a much bet- 
ter indicator of an area's viability for foreign investment 
than the HI. 

The city of Vienna has extremely impressive in figures. 
Of the 40 billion Austrian schillings ($3.4 billion) in for- 
eign capital that flowed into Austria last year, perhaps 60 
percent went to - or at least through - Vienna. By all avail- 



= Vienna 


Technology and joint ventures 

Equally interesting is what the surveys reveal about the 
make-up of the foreign corporate arrivals in Vienna. 
“We're seeing an ever-increasing number of software and 
technology-driven service providers from North America 
and the Far East,” says Wilfried Gunka. an investment 
analyst at the ABA 

“By the latter, 1 mean companies active in the environ- 
mental technologies, production automatization and mate 


adds. 

A recent study conducted by Vienna's Chamber oif 
Commerce revealed that 700 companies had located thair 
headquarters for all or part of Central and Eastern Europe 
in the city. Of these, 87 are maintained by major multina- 
tionals. 

Custom from these headquarters, from the 42 United 
Nations Organization bodies in the city and from other 
locally based international organizations has engendered* a 
clustering in the city of tax accountants, lawyers, freight 

f«-kTf HI »»- . J _ _•* _ H 1 


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. - . . C I ” ,~r 1IIMW.- MIUU.IIU 5 U1 MIC Wlljr Wl LcLA <n.VASUULcUJlS, laWJCIN, UClHIU 

nals engineering sectors. The offices and operations that forwarders and other professionals versed in the niceties of 
these service nroviders are sertinp tin in Vii’nnn n>nrx/>nf 1 mv>rgtma unih'NnH m PmmI wi 




f. Bakalowits SBhne Gesjn.b.H. 

in Vienna since 1845 
Manufacturer ol crystal tights 


L. Bdsendorter Klavierfabrik Ges.m.b.H. 
in Vienna since 1828 
Piano manufacturer 



these service providers are setting up in Vienna represent 
an attempt to gain access to the local market, and beyond 
that, to the Central and Eastern European (CEE) one,” Mr. 
Gunka adds. 

The foreign companies are long on advanced technolo- 
gies, but generally short on knowledge of local regulations 
and market conditions - and on contacts with the local 
decision-makers. .As these items are. the stock-in-trade of 
their Austrian counterparts, a flood of joint ventures has 
been the result. 

International exchange 

Not surprisingly, the city’s leading economic policy-mak- 
ers view this influx with strong approval. 

“A fair exchange, international for international, and one 
highly beneficial for both parties.” says Brigitte Ederer. the 
Vienna city councilor responsible for managing the city’s 
finances. 


operating widrand in Central add Eastern Europe's T9 
national markets. 

Skilled workforce 

The ABA’s study leaves one key question unanswered; 
What kinds of personnel are these service providers hiring 
to staff their rapidly expanding operations in Vienna? " ; 

“In addition to experts with knowledge specific to the 
companies' fields of endea vor, they're also recruiting peo- 
ple conversant in the CEE’s languages and customs, says 
Mr. Gunka. 

Both categories are abundant in Vienna. Some 7,000 stii* 
dents graduate every year from the city's five universities* 
which have a total enrollment of 120,000. This gives 
Vienna one of the largest higher education agglomerations 
in the CEE region. Many of these students are either from 
the CEE countries or have appropriate language skills and 
cultural reference. Terry Swartzberg 


* 

• :--Avr- 
• . 

Tfsey* 

■ • t K iTj 
. ..... jadt; 




■ - ?!»• 


~ -i, 


Afe 

-arts 


Wiener Porzellanmanulaktur Augarten Ges.m.b.H 
in Vienna since 1718 
Porcelain manufacturer 


Vienna has always been a profitable location. This is shown by the 
continued global success of numerous companies that already located in 
the Danube city before the turn of the century. 

Ready access to a highly qualified workforce, geographical 
proximity to the new democracies in Eastern Europe and inherent cultural 
understanding of these markets make Vienna an attractive centre for 



By Road, Rail, Water and Air 

The emphasis is on public and intermodal networks as Vienna reviews its transport infrastructure. 

W ith Austria due to assume the 
presidency of the European 
Union in the second half of 
1998, Vienna is at pains to present 
itself in the best possible light. 

Preparations range from facelifts of 
major buildings to a review of the 
city’s transport infrastructure. 


Grundig Austria Ges.m.b.H. 

One ol the largest and most modern 
TV production plants in Europe 


McDonald's Central Europe 
Vienna is headquarters ol Ihe company's 
Central European operations. 


Hewlett- PackardGes.m.b.H.r 
Information taphnofogy and management ' 
competence in Central and-Eastaro Europe 


production and trade. Reason enough for many international corporations 
to establish (heir Eastern European headquarters in Vienna. Times have 
changed - yet Vienna never loses its appeal. 


Should you have queries or require 
any information on Vienna as a 
business location, please contact the 
Information Centre of the VIENNA 
BUSINESS PROMOTION FUND. 




A-1082 Vienna. Ehendorlersfrasse 2 
Tel.: +43 (1) 4000-86794 
Fa x . +43 (1 ) 4000-7 0 7 0 
e-mail: Vienna@wWFF.gv al 
URL: hnp://www wwfl.gv.ai/wwff/ 


VIENNA BUSINESS PROMOTION F 


UNO 


Public transport 

Vienna's public transport system is 
good, even excellent The city-wide 
tramway system - much derided dur- 
ing the postwar modernization wave - 
is celebrating its centennial this year 
with the introduction of sleek, futuris- 
tic, low-step-in coaches. 

The modem “Silver Arrow” under- 
ground railway network covens 55 
kilometers (34 miles), and its six 
interconnected lines serve all the 
major business, residential and shop- 
ping areas. The user-friendly munici- 
pal bus service includes nearly 90 
routes and covers 650 kilometers (404 
miles) of roads. 

Busy streets and highways 
Cars and other road traffic - from 
horse-drawn “Fiakers” to heavy deliv- 
ery vehicles - remain a problem on 
the periphery as well as in the city 
center. 

In addition to normal traffic snarls, 
compounded by commuters, sightsee- 
ing coaches and taxicabs, the greater 
Vienna area now finds it has another 
role to play; that of a transit route. 

The well-known bottleneck situa- 
tion in Austria's western Alpine dis- 
tricts is now showing up in the east as 
well. The city’s Southeast Tangent 
(bypass) enjoys the dubious privilege 
of being the most heavily used road in 
Austria. 

The widening of highways in the 
city surroundings - from two to (hree 
or four lanes is at best a cosmetic 
improvement that tends to generate 
more traffic. With the volume of road 
usage expected to increase by a fur- 




v ‘•icrm 

with 


’7 T- 



V s ?- mfe 
V - 


Vienna’s public transport system is one of fteeasfes/to 

fully integrated network of streetcars, buses, and subway and commuter bjuns!^^ 3 


ther 60 percent by the year 2010. a 
more drastic solution has to be sought. 

Vienna region 

Within the framework of TEN, the 
EU's Trans-European Networks 
scheme, traffic planning is under way 
for the whole of the Vienna region, 
understood as extending to cities such 
as Brno (in (he Czech Republic). 
Bratislava (Slovakia) and Gyor 
(Hungary). 


Vienna's Office f 11P c . ■ . 

be tackled by 

SST 5 "- -P-.llyTe r Rivdl 

,. S . inc ? rhe completion of the RhVnd 
Main -Danube Can, l i n 199^: 



The far-reaching recommendations This wSjdKE 6 b >' 2mi 
emphasize the need lor mlenrodal the Danuhe-DdVr p,? he /, “^Proved if 
nansporl with greater use of railways jeci concei vSin . C anul ~ a pro 
for frcicht. Austria has already initial. ^ . ,n I4ih 


n»ok_ 




S55Tta,- ^ wSE J were fiS & ^ »i'cere U ufv''- 

ed a long-term high-pertbnnance ^^i°J? C0,11 r nralitv. .J ^ 

track improvement scheme aimed at «j a record ".?*?. *£5% 

for the first '596. ^. ,..^ 4 "klt hiKM 

paxsenser 9 million 


increasing carrying capacity ratlier 
than just augmenting speeds." 


passenger movemenV' 
biorc than in 1995 


perceq! 


"West pi^arufinsTir opened 
Jtin .g to build a , r iIy ne £°H 

hZl ru "-y 



Water and airways 
In January 1997, a symposium enti- 
tled "The Danube Area as Economic 
Factor” united business leaden, and Sve^annual 
city planners under the chairmanship of ^ mihi^ h ‘ l ”Ulins canac'i v 
of Wolfgang Potribch. head of by 20,™" ,On ^"ger ,4veS 

Oavid Hermges 


-r - 







-> - '? : *~r ; 






SPONSORED 

' ‘ ■ ''*W>jiaSSd>ai&^^^a^yyV- 


INTERNATIONA HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MARCH 28, 1997 


PAGE 21 


SPONSORED SECTION 


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INVESTING IN AUSTRIA: VIENNA 


Out of Austria 

Vienna s stock exchange goes international. 


-1.“ j 

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I n recent years, the inter- 
national financial com- 
munity has been pour- 
ing an unprecedented 
amount of money into 
Austrian stocks and bonds. 
Domestically owned banks 
gand brokers have been 
’bringing in non-Austrians 
. with a command of the 
intricacies of swaps, forfeit- 
ing, zero-bonds and other 
specialized financial opera- 
tions. 

And die internationaliza- 
tion of Vienna's stocks and 
securities exchange has 
only just begun as the 
Vienna Stock Exchange 
takes active steps to reach 
out to foreign investors. 

Foreign capital 
Over the past three years, 
foreign investors have pur- 
chased 254 billion Austrian 
schillings ($21.8 billion) 
^ worth of Austrian securi- 
"ties, a figure exceeding the 
previous high for a similar 
period, and some 50 per- 
cent more than the total 
value of the non-Austrian 
securities acquired by 
domestic investors during 
the same time. 

This inflow of foreign 
capital has helped further 
the sharp, ongoing rise in 
all of the Vienna Stock 


Virtual 

City 

Behind 

Medieval 

Walls 


Exchange's (VSX> key 
indicators. Over the past 13 
years, the exchange’s iota] 
capitalization has increased 
13-fold. Its turnover has 
risen four times faster than 
even that rapid pace. 

None of these increases, 
however, are particularly 
exceptional in today’s over- 
heated financial world. In 
fact, they are somewhat 
below those experienced bv 
Frankfort. Paris and the rest 
of the European bourses. 
And that is one reason why 
a further influx of interna- 
tional capital may well 
materialize, says Gerhard 
Reidlinger. VSX spokes- 
person. 

“The general consensus 
is that the strong and rising 
level of profitability 
evinced by our listed com- 
panies make them relative- 
ly undervalued, meaning 
that the VSX still has the 
‘legs’ for a further rise," Mr. 
Reidlinger says, “a rise for 
which the foreign investors 
are rushing to get in on the 
ground floor." 

On-tine services 
In addition to the world- 
wide trends, the flocking of 
foreign investors to Vienna 
has been produced by 
changes in the operating 



The Vienna Stock Exchange has introduced on-iine services and a tully automated trading system. 


methods of the city’s stock 
exchange. 

In June 1996, the VSX 
introduced the EQOS 
( Electronic Quote and 
Order-Driven System), a 
fully automated trading 
system. 

Surveillance of the secu- 
rities market wilt soon be 
transferred from VSX to 
Austria's new securities 
exchange commission, set 
to begin operation in 1998. 
The commission will 
administer the country's 
newly passed act on stock 
market supervision, which 
beefs up Austria's prohibi- 
tions against insider trad- 
ing. 

The VSX recently in- 
stalled HERMES, an on- 
line system also accessible 


via the Internet, which 
greatly eases the dissemina- 
tion of price-sensitive infor- 
mation by companies fisted 
on the VSX. 

Level ELI playing field 

These moves and measures 
may have a familiar ring. 
They should. Similar ones 
are being implemented and 
carried out throughout the 
EU as member countries 
enact on a national level the 
provisions of the Invest- 
ment Services Directive, 
whose goal is to create “a 
level playing field, open 
equally to air in the finan- 
cial sector. 

Most observers expect 
the result to be a group of 
relatively homogenous 
stock exchanges in the EU. 


each operating by much the 
same rules, and all offering 
virtually the same services, 
via electronic link-ups, 
throughout the Continent 
and the world. Moreover, 
all of the transactions car- 
ried out by the competing 
stock exchanges will be 
denominated in a single 
currency, the euro. 

“I subscribe to this sce- 
nario. and I think the VSE 
and its companies will prof- 
it from it more than most." 
says Mr. Reidlinger. 
“We've been operating in 
the confines of a very limit- 
ed market. Our exchange is 
efficient, our companies, 
successful. We stand only 
to gain from unlimited 
access to international 
clientele and capita]." T.S. 


Big Hopes for Small Caps 

New stock exchange will list small fast-growing companies. 


A record amount of capital is available 
in Vienna these days. The amount of 
new capital provided by the country's 
banking system reached 29 billion 
schillings ($2.5 billion) in 1996. inflat- 
ing the total credit outstanding by a fur- 
ther. record 8 billion schillings. 

in a 17 billion schilling transaction. 
Bank Austria, the country’s largest 
financial institution, made a successful 
takeover bid for Creditanstalt, its 
biggest rival. This was just one of a 
dozen biUion-schilling- 
plus deals made during the 
year. 


U.S. NASDAQ “small caps” market is 
set to start operations this summer. 

Mr. Fiala is forecasting that FIT will 
have a roster of 10 companies by the 
end of the year. This prognosis current- 
ly looks a bit pessimistic. To date. Mr. 
Fiala has received requests for detailed 
information from 220 companies - a 
very hopeful sign. 


High-tech entrepreneurs 
In view of this spate of 
mammoth transactions, it 
might seem surprising that 
much of the Austrian 
financial world’s attention 
is trained upon some 10 
decidedly small compa- 
nies whose total market 
value probably does not exceed several 
tens of millions of dollars. 

“Nothing odd about it at all." says 
Gerhard Fiala, who is responsible for 
the launching of the Vienna’s Stock 
Exchange’s FIT (finance in time) pro- 
gram, “Rather, it’s the first, key step 
toward developing a culture of techno- 
logical entrepreneurship in Austria." 

One of several such launches in 
Europe to provide stock markets for 
small firms, this local version of die 


I ha Vienna Stock 
Exchange's FIT 
(fbtaocn m tuna) pro- 
gram wiB bring capital 
Inve stment to smaB, 
high-tech entrepre- 
neurial companies 
with strong growth 
potential 


Small companies, fast growth 
Many of these companies have already 
secured large amounts of 
capital, which they have 
parlayed into advanced 
new product lines. Vienna 
as a whole is filled with 
young, high-technology 
start-ups. These facts 
would seem to obviate the 
need for FIT. 

Mr. Fiala disagrees. 
“While generally success- 
ful in the long run. most 
of our small high-tech 
companies have found raising capital to 
be a difficult, protracted affair." 

M r. Fiala continues: “The success of 
FIT’S companies will send a message to 
all of our country’s would-be high-tech 
entrepreneurs: starting up your own 
business really pays off. and pays off 
quickly. It will also tell our banks to 
adopt a go-fast policy toward the start- 
ups.” He adds. “All this would encour- 
age more start-ups. thus further acceler- 
ating the process." T5. 



Prime Locations 
And Services 

Industrial parks offer a range of options. 


Viema on-iine: Iran bustiress in for ma tion to health care. 


A ustria is home to a large and increas- 
ing number of small, fast-growing 
ICT (information and communica- 
tion technology) start-up companies. Many 
of these firms have chosen to set up opera- 
tions in the time-hallowed medieval build- 
ings lining the labyrinth of Gossen (lanes) 
in Vienna’s inner city. 

‘There’s a good reason for this.” says 
Robert Hauk, managing partner of trean- 
ge)i GbR. "The rooms in the medieval 
buildings tend to be small, too small for 
many kinds of use. But they're large 
enough to contain an ICT s company ‘pro- 
ductive equipment’ - several high-powered 
computers, their peripherals and a lot of 
wiring.” 

V Treangeli GbR is one company that 
proves there is no connection between the 
size of corporate offices and the scope of 
corporate plans. ‘ ' 

Located on Vienna’s Sonnenfelsgasse. 
one of the prettiest and oldest streets in the 
city, treangeli GbR is currently setting up 
an Intranet that will revolutionize the way 
in which health care is provided in Austria. 

Now being implemented on a pilot phase 
in Vienna, the “Medizin.ai" project links 
participating doctors and hospitals into an 
Intranet 

Through information broadcasts along 
the Intranet doctors will be provided with 
the latest discoveries and technological 
.developments in their particular fields of 
expertise. 

This customizing is made possible by the 
-Tise of advanced “expert systems." These 
Systems will also be configured to aid doc- 
tors with diagnosis of patient symptoms. 

Physicians wishing to consult with spe- 
cialists working at major hospitals will be 
' able to do so on-line. The Intranet will also 
link four of Vienna’s leading medical 
research centers into a “virtual institute.” 

Nor will the patients be left out Using a 
search engine, they will be able to pose 
their questions to a “cyberdoc,” an interac- 
. tive Web site staffed by medical experts on 
a 24-hour-a-day basis. “These cyberdocs 
will also make on-tine house calls, some- 


thing of great importance in rural Austria,” 
says Wilfried C. Brumec-Sesulka. Mr. 
Hauk’s partner at treangeli GbR. 

One of the most striking buildings in 
Vienna is the Rathaus. the city’s town hall, 
whose neo-Gothic spires can be seen from 
almost everywhere in the inner city. The 
Rathaus also hosts an on-line service and 
information provider the city government 
itself. This Web site (http://www.nutg- 
wien.gv.ai ) keeps the city's citizens and on- 
line visitors informed about almost every 
aspect of daily life in Vienna 

Another of Vienna’s major on-line ser- 
vice providers is located just to the north of 
the Rathaus. Its clientele is composed 
essentially of international corporations 
that launch their research on doing busi- 
ness in the city of Vienna by consulting 
http:/Avww. wwff.gv. at/wwff/. 

Maintained by the WWFF (Wiener 
WirtschaftsfQrderungsfonds }, Vienna's 
Business Promotion Fund, this English- 
language Web site provides a comprehen- 
sive briefing on the parameters of doing 
business in Vienna; an overview of major 
business development projects; reports 
from international companies based in the 
city; hyperlinks to other business develop- 
ment corporations, economic agencies and 
technology centers; and a Webform 
through which visitors can request more 
detailed information on WWFF’s range of 
sites and services. 

The Austria Business Agency's Website 
( http://www.telecom.at/Austrian 
Businesslnjo) covers much the same 
ground, but on a nationwide scale. Of par- 
ticular interest is its monthly cyber- 
magazine, which covers the latest trends 
and developments in Austria’s business 
sector. 

Another useful Web site is the one main- 
tained by the Austrian National Tourist 
Office ( http://ausrria-info.at ). Also in 
English, it provides detailed tourist infor- 
mation on all of the country's states and 
major cities, as well as listings of hotels, 
restaurants, castles, museums and mass 
transit schedules. TS. 


W hen Vienna’s Bus- 
iness Promotion 
Fund, the WWFF 
(Wiener Wirtschafts- 
forderungsfonds). was 
founded in 1986 to attract 
potential investors to 
Vienna, the city's existing 
office space sufficed to 
meet the needs of foreign 
companies coming to the 
Austrian capital primarily 
to do business with coun- 
tries behind the Iron 
Curtain. 

With the opening of 
Central and Eastern Europe 
in 1989 and the collapse of 
the Soviet Union two years 
later, Vienna went practi- 
cally overnight from being 
just a convenient outpost of 
the West to a thriving point 
of interchange between the 
European Union and the 
reform slates striving to 
gain admission to the EU. 

” To meet the requirements 
of incoming, and totally 
new. enterprises, WWFF - 
with private-sector partners 
ECOPlus and Wibag, as 
well as Europroject 
Bauplanungs und 

Beratungsges m.b.H - has 
overseen the construction 
of a wide range of industri- 
al parks in and around 
Vienna, offering businesses 
convenient transport and 
key services. 

National support 

Vienna’s initiative was 
given a boost in January 
1997. when the new federal 
chancellor, Viktor Klima. 
said in his statement of 
intent to Parliament: “We 
need new products and 
markeis. The government 
will therefore strongly back 
a policy of innovation and 
technology. We will pay 
special attention to econo- 
my-related research ... so 
that the integration of 


research institutes, technol- 
ogy parks and information 
highways will assure 
[Austria’s) future.” 

In this respect, Vienna 
presents numerous advan- 
tages, including a highly 
qualified workforce, an 
extensive information net- 
work. internationally 
renowned research insti- 
tutes. a soplristicated bank- 
ing structure, excellent 
health services, a vibrant 
cultural life, as well as aca-. 
demic and business sectors 
in which English is com- 
monly spoken. 

Tbe first parks 
Built in the 1970s, South 
Industry Park led the way. 
and today is operating at 
almost foil capacity. The 
international corporations 
based there include Philips, 
Grundig. Johnson & 
Johnson, Sony and 
Panasonic, all with distrib- 
ution and service facilities. 

Opened in 1988, the 
North Industry Park is 80 
percent occupied by 60 
small- and medium-sized 
firms manufacturing print- 
ed circuits, industrial adhe- 
sives and computer soft- 
ware. Negotiations are in 
progress to purchase 
adjoining private land to 
increase capacity. 

Also under municipal 
auspices is the former 
Aspem airfield, dedicated 
as an industrial area in 
1981-82, which covers 
500,000 square meters. The 
only current occupant is the 
General Motors/Opel 
engine assembly works, 
and considerable land is 
still available. 

Located at Vienna 
Airport/S chwechat, the 
World Trade Center opened 
for business in 1 990. Office 
space is occupied, among 



The futuristic Vienna Science and Technology Park is scheduled for completion in 2001. 


others by the Central 
European headquarters of 
Lauda Air and 
McDonald's, while perma- 
nent display and commer- 
cial facilities are provided 
to 250 East European 
exporters for everything 
from bicycles to chemicals 
to real-estate promotion. 

The City of Vienna- 
backed “Films tadt Wien” is 
located on the grounds of 
the historic RosenhOgel 
film studios (1919). 
Renovated in 1992, the 
complex is home to film 
and video firms and related 
services like sound stages, 
costume hire, model agen- 
cies and lighting banks. 

New projects 
Opened only last year, the 
Gewerbe-Park “Wien- 
West," adjacent to the 
Autobahn approach to tbe 
city through the Vienna 
Woods from Salzburg, was 
modeled on existing inter- 
national business parks for 
companies engaged in 
high-technology assembly 
and distribution. It also pro- 
vides office space for com- 
panies wanting to operate 
in a green environment 

A 2^500-square-meter 
shopping center nearing 
completion within the com- 
plex is an added attraction 
for working in this relative- 
ly remote location. 


International investors 
are most likely to be inter- 
ested in two projects that 
have just left the drawing 
boards and are due for early 
initiation. 

First is the “Wien-Mitte” 
complex, to be built at the 
central Vienna transport 
junction (with suburban 
expresses, underground 
trains and long-distance 
coaches, as well as the air- 
port shuttle bus). With a 
capacity of 2J500 people, 
the complex will consist 
primarily of offices, but 
will also boast a luxurious 
lery. 

lenna Science and 
Technology Park is slated 
to occupy tbe Donau-Platte, 


a platform between the 
Vienna International Centre 
and the Danube. 

With a scheduled com- 
pletion date of 2001, this 
future-oriented park will 
promote urban technolo- 
gies for the 21 si century, 
largely in the environmen- 
tal field, taking into account 
the impact of telecommuni- 
cations. transport and ener- 
gy resources. 

The Mechanical Engi- 
neering Faculty of Vienna’s 
Technical University will 
possibly be transferred to 
the Donau-Platte, in order 
to facilitate a direct rela- 
tionship with the Vienna 
Science and Technology 
Park. D.H. 


Stability and Human Resources Draw Big Business 


International business leaders explain why they have made the Austrian capital their base of operations in Central Europe. 

-rhv relocate a husiness or manufacturing enter- Richard M. Donnelly, president of General Motors- 

Xwhere ^Central Europe, which has a plant producing engines and tians- 
V V Europe? Over the past year, international deci- mission assemblies for Opel cars m an industrial area just 
sion-makers tove provided a variety of answers to the outside of the . city, refers to “excellent experiences in 
question, flattering tbe city’s business promotion managers Vienna and speaks of cwr best plant in Europe as regards 


has just announced that Austria has grown to be the fourth 
most profitable country for die corporation. By 2000. he 
expects to see 600 “Golden Arches” restaurants in Central 
Europe. 


but also engendering some soul-searching- 
Research and development 

Hans-Jiirgen I-a»c hs. head of the technology sector few the 
German Boefarihger Ingelheim company, points to some 
obvious advantages. . ... , . r 

“The greatest c halleng e for a pharmaceutical industry 
[involved in] research is to achieve a constant improve- 
tnent of therapeutic possibilities through innovation. 
Vienna, with its universities at which biotechnolog ana 
genetic engineering play an important part, provides 
appropriately fruitful environment-" 


an 


quality and productivity.” 

Among the considerations for settling in Austria were 
“political stability, social peace - with strike losses mea- 
sured in seconds per man/year - a stable currency and fan- 
tax rates, as well as the folly developed infrastructure of an 
industrialized Western country." 

Gateway to the CEE 

When Eastern Europe began to open up, the Coca-Cola 
Company matte a strategic decision to take the lead in its 
emerging markets and picked Vienna as its headquarters 
for the coordination of resources in the region. The loca- 
tion was ideal, and the city had diplomatic representations 
from all the former East bloc countries. 

“Vienna,” says E. Neville Isdell. president of tbe Greater 

‘has been our gateway to 


Responding to business needs 

The Hong Kong-based international business magnate 
Helmut Sohmen, the chairman of the World-Wide 
Shipping Agency Ltd, also expresses enthusiasm for the 
Austrian capital. 

“All businesspeople have the same criteria for investing 
abroad: political stability, social peace, a comprehensive 
judicial system, workers with adeq ua te knowledge of for- 
eign languages and technical qualifications. I am of the 
opinion that Vienna fulfills all these requirements.” 

Looking ahead 

In these cost-conscious days, however, a word of warning 
was expressed this month by a Dutch executive, Wim 
Widens, director-general of Philips-Austria. 

“For a company dedicated to the principle ‘order today. 


Useful addresses 


Magistral der Stadt Wien 
City government of Vienna 
Rathaus 
A- 1082 Vienna 
Tel.: (43-1) 4000 
Fax: (43- 1 ) 4000 99 81858 

Vienna Stock Exchange 
Wipplingerstr. 34 
A- 1 01 3 Vienna 
Tel.: (43-1)534 99-0 
Fax: (43-1 ) 535 68 57 

Web site: http://www.vienna-stock-exchange.st/boerse 
WWFF 

Wiener Wmschaftsforderungsfonds 

Vienna Business Promotion Fund 
Ebendorferstr. 2 
A-1082 Vienna 
Tel.: (43-1) 4000 86 784 
Fax: (43-1 ) 4000 70 70 
Web site: http://www.wwff.gv.at/wwfT/ 

Austria Business Agency 
Opemring 3 
A-l 010 Vienna 
Tel.: (43-1 ) 588 58-0 
Fax: (43- 1 >586 86 59 
Web site: http://www.teleconi.at/Aiistrian 
Businesslnfo 

Vienna Chamber of Commerce 
Stubenring 8-10 
A-1010 Vienna 
Tel.: (43-1)514 50 
Fax; (43-1) 513 77 87 




the oft* — 

VAwiss banctoz Research Institute, aoas. „ nTpr f r Central Europe,” where the previously predominant deliver tomorrow,* its individual production centers must 
*jas gradually emerged as a strong and re te _<■ competitor in tbe soft-drinks field has beat clearly over- be able to respond swiftly to demand. Hidden wage costs 

c 0 * and biomedical research m the ety taken. TTie Vienna-based managing director for need to be kept to a minimum and working hours k< - 

fo^rape, offers global synergies and human McDonald’s Austria and Central Europe, Andreas Hacker, flexible.” Vienna is taking note. D. 

•casonable cost.” 


“Investing in Austria: Vienna” 
was produced in its entirety by the Advertising 
Department of the International Herald Tribune. It tvor 
sponsored by the city of Vienna, Wiener Bdrsekammer, 
and the display advertiser. 

Writers: Terry Swartzberg “ based in Munich. 
David Hermges is based in Vienna. 
Program Director: Bill Mahden 


uc- 

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PAGE 22 


licralb J3S^ gritmnc 

Sports 


/■ 


FRIDAY, MARCH 28^3397 ( 



Don Royjfcuren 

New Zealand wicketkeeper 
Adam Parore appealing in vain 
for Aravinda da Silva’s wicket. 

India Takes Control 

cricket The West ladies 
struggled to 144 runs for 5 wickets 
at tea Thursday on the first day of 
the third test agains t India. 

Shivnarine Cbanderpaul made 
an unbeaten half century for the 
West ladies as the Indian bowlers 
exploited a helpful pitch at Brid- 
getown. Barbados. {AFP) 

• Heath Davis caponed four 
wickets for 35 as New Zealand 
bowled Sri Lanka out for just 132 
runs on Thursday in Wellington to 
win the second one day internation- 
al. New Zealand had batted first and 
had scored only 201 runs. (Reuters) 

Royle Leaves Everton 

soccer Joe Royle. the manager 
of Everton of the English premier 
league, left the club Thursday "by 
mutual consent" Under Royle, a 
former star goalscorer for the club. 
Everton won the FA Cup in 1995 
but has struggled every season in 
die league. ( Reuters ) 

NFL Starting Earlier 

FOOTBALL The NFL’s 1997 
schedule will begin Aug. 31, die 
earliest regular-season start in the 
league’s 78 seasons. 

The 14-game opening-day 
schedule features a rematch of the 
1996 Super Bowl, with Dallas play- 
ing at Pittsburgh. Green Bay will 
begin defense of its Super Bowl title 
Sept. 1 , a Monday night home game 
against Chicago. The Packers play 
three Monday night games, includ- 
ing a Super Bowl rematch against 
New England on Oct. 27. (AP) 

Howard Johnson Retires 

raefbaii Howard Johnson’s 
comeback attempt with the New 
York Mets came to an end with the 
infielder announcing his retire- 
ment. Johnson, 36. who signed a 
minor league contract Feb. 10, hit 
.129 in 31 at-bats this spring with 
one homer and two RBIs. 

• Mark McGwire, who has been 
plagued by back problems, left 
Oakland's training camp in 
Phoenix and flew home to receive 
an anti-inflammatory injection in 
his lower back. McGwire led the 
major leagues with 52 home runs 
last season. (AP) 

Key Victory for Efes 

basketball Efes PUsen of Tur- 
key took a big step toward the Final 
Four of the men’s European club 
championship Thursday with an 
87-71 victory over ViUeurbanne of 
France. Efes led from early on, fin- 
ishing the first half with a 41-32 
lead and maintained the advantage 


to the end. 


(Reuters) 


Seeking Final Four Focus, Minnesota Leaves Campus 


.v . i»r If Kentucky’s coach, Rick Pitino, had 

By Timothy W. Smith fas choice, he would not bring his team 

New York rmvsSwce into Indianapolis until Friday, the day 

The hoopla was just too much. Min- before the game, 
nesota’s coach, Clem Haskins, had to “It’s all a matter of what you're con- 

get his team ont of town as quickly as ditioned to, ’ Pitino said, 
possible. So. Haskins whisked his play- He cut through the talk about Min- 
ers away from Minneapolis to Indiana- nesota arriving in Indianapolis eariy. 
polis, where the din of the National “Going in late, going m early, what 
Collegiate Athletic Association’s has- you eat, the distractions are just what 
ketbaU cham pionship countdown, the people pick up, because you have so 
Final Four, is just now building. much media time and don’t know what 

“We needed to get out of town." to talk about,' ‘ Pitino said. 


Haskins said Wednesday. "Our kids at 
Minnesota, it’s unbelievable. The 
phones in the dormitories. They got 
bands playing outside the dorms, people 
patting diem on the backs. They're really 
excited that we’re in the Final Four. 

“But in order to compete with a team 
like Kentucky, you’re really forced to be 
focused. If not, you’re going to be in big 
trouble. We got out of town to get back to 
basics and concentrate on basketball." 

For die few days leading up to Sat- 
urday's s emif inal game against Ken- 
tucky, Haskins said he would ask his 
players to give him two hours on the 
court and two hours of film study, and 
then he would give them five or six 
hours to enjoy themselves and take in 
"the spectacle" of the Final Four. 


“What’s going to win or lose this 
basketball game is how good is Min- 
nesota’s defense and Kentucky’s de- 
fense, both their offenses and bow they 
execute that night. All the other stuff — 
when you show up and when you don't 
show up — is really going to be mean- 
ingless. 

They are two coaches with two ap- 
proaches to their preparation for the 
Final Four. 

And one of their teams, Kentucky 
(34-4) or Minnesota (31-3). will be the 
eventual national champion, many 
people believe. 

Minnesota, die Golden Gophers, has 
a pair of sleek guards in Bobby Jackson 
and Eric Harris, a wealth of depth and a 
drive for the championship that has be- 





Fists Fly as Red Wings 
Take Bloody Revenge 


come a quest for Haskins. Kentucky, the 
Wildcats, is the defending national 
champion, but Pitino would just as soon 
have everyone within the sound of his 
voice forget that fact 
He was asked about the difference 
between the team be had last season, 
which had four players who are now in 
die National Basketball Association, 
and this season’s team, which has one 
sure lottery pick, Ron Mercer. 

“Last year the most important thing 
was we had too many players; we had 
too much talent," Pitino said. 

“We had to tell Antoine Walker, 
Walter McCarty, Anthony Epps. Tony 




Campded by Our Sa&Fim DapoKhn 

DETROIT — On this long. loud, 
violent, bloody night, the two goalies 
were better at throwing punches than 
they were at stopping pucks. Goalies 
Patrick Roy of Colorado and Mike Ver- 
non of Detroit were only two of many 
combatants in a nasty three-hour battle 
for Western Conference momentum as 
the Stanley Cup playoffs approach. 

When it was over, Detroit had a wild 
6-5 victory on an overtime goal by Dar- 
ren McCarty, the ruffian who had in- 
cited much of the evening’s violence 

NHL Roundup 

with both word and deed. It was Detroit's 
47th shot; Colorado managed only 19. 

Referee Paul Devorski called 18 ma- 
jor penalties for fighting and could have 
called more than that indie appropriately 
named Joe Loms Arena. Much of Wed- 
nesday’s antagonism began last spring 
when Colorado's Claude Lemieux broke 
several bones in the face of Detroit's 
Kris Draper with a blind-ride check dur- 
ing the Western Conference finals. Col- 
orado won that series in six games en 
route to a Stanley Cup championship. 

Lemieux was targeted often and early 
Wednesday by the Wings, who have 
slipped to third in the West, behind 
Colorado and Dallas. 

Fans came to the arena in a frenzy. A 
spectator carried a sign shaped like a 
tombstone with Lemieux 's name, his 
birth date, Wednesday’s date and the 
words: “He Never Knew What Hit 
Him." 

Lemieux was targeted early , first for a 
slash from Vladimir Konstantinov, then 
for a check into die boards from 
Brendan Shanahan. Lemieux com- 
plained both times to Devoiski. the ref- 
eree, when no penalties were called. 

After two eariy fights the major brawl 
ignited at 18:22 when Igor Larionov of 
Detroit began exchanging punches with 
Peter Forsberg, Colorado's star center. 
McCarty sought out Lemieux and 
punched him to the ice as Lemieux tried 
to cover up. 

Roy rushed to join the fray and crashed 
into Shanahan. This brought Vernon out 
of his cage. He traded volleys of punches 
with Roy in a center-ice slugfest 

Devorski, curiously, gave five-minute 
penalties only to Roy and Vernon. Mc- 
Carty got two roughing minors for an 


attack that, in most circumstances, would 
have resulted in at least a major and a 10- 
minute misconduct for instigating. 

When it ended, blood streamed down 
die frees of Forsberg, Roy and Lemieux. 
When Roy’s visage was shown on the 
giant screen on the scoreboard, the fans, 
nearly 20,000 of them, roared for more. 

The only goal of the period was 
scored by Colorado, on its first shot, a 
slap shot by Valery Kamensky. 

At foe start of foe second period foe 
teams played a whole 4 seconds before 
foe next fight began, this one between 
Shanahan and Colorado’s Adam Foote, 
swinging away at center ice. 

When play resumed. Detroit’s Sergei 
Fedorov scored on a break to make it 1-1. 
Moments latter. Detroit’s Martin 
Lapointe dropped his gloves and began 
swinging at Keith Jones, who didn’t re- 
spond. Lapointe’s penalty gave Colorado 
a two-man advantage and the Avalanche 
made it 2-1 when Kamensky scored. 

Lapointe made up for it when he broke 
out of the penalty box and scored on a 
breakaway to tie it. 2-2. Then more fights 
broke out This time Mike Keane of 
Colorado clobbered Detroit’s Tomas 
Holmstrom. punching his head several 
times while Holmstrom lay on his back. 

Rene Corbet gave Colorado a 3-2 lead 
on a breakaway, then McCarty and Adam 
Deadmarsh of Colorado engaged in, yes 
— fisticuffs! — with McCarty getting an 
extra two minutes for roughing. 

Kamensky completed his hat-trick 
early in the third to put the Avalanche 
ahead 5-3, the Red Wings tied it late in 
the third on goals 36 seconds apart by 
Lapointe and Shanahan before McCarty 
won it in overtime. 

Canadian* 8, Penguins 5 Montreal 
spoiled Mario Lemieux ’s probable last 
NHL appearance in his hometown, beat- 
ing Pittsburgh despite two goals and 
three assists by the Penguins’ superstar. 

Lemieux fought back tears as me sell- 
out crowd of 21 ,273 at foe Molson Centre 
stood and cheered after Lemieux made it 
8-4 at 15:59 of the final period. Lemieux 
got another ovation when he scored the 
game’s last goal with 52 seconds left. 

Lemieux has said he would probably 
retire after tins season. 

The Canadiens scored five times in 
foe first period. Lemieux ended a career- 
high three-game stretch without a point 
with three assists in the second period 

tsfandanrafSabraa 2 Defenseman Bry- 



Delk. Ron Mercer, Derek Anderson and 
others that in order to win the cham- 
pionship you have to check'your egos 
before you cross .foe line. You all have to 
be for me system, for foe win and then 
someday we’ll be national champions if 
you do that. With this team, foe- only 
thing we’ve been trying to do is get 
better, improve." 

Haskins said Kentucky’s audition 
and its national championship last year 
were important, but he thought the en- 
vironment for Minnesota in the Big Ten 
would go a long way toward helping foe 
Golden Gophers deal with foe frenzied 
atmosphere in foe Final Four. 

“We have a great following in Min- 
nesota,” Haskins said. “Every Big Ten 
game is tike anNCAA game. We led foe 
Big Ten in attendance every year. We’re 
used to playing before a big house, lots 
of fans. We’re looking forward to it” 

Haskins, who is black and grew up in 
Campbellsvilie, Kentucky, said he has 
long since put aside any personal feel- 
ings be might have had about the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, which did not re- 
cruit him when he was in high school. 

Haskins went to Western Kentucky 
University, where he was an all-Amer- 
ican as a senior, and he played in the 
NBA for foe Bulls, Sons and Bullets. 


mm 








LDnidAftaRnmi 


Rick Pitino yelling instru ctiens;to 
his Kentucky basketball players. 

"If you were talking aboutyetesagb, 
yes, it would have made a differe nce.^’ 
Haskin s said, referring to personal fel- 
ines about meeting Kentucky in the 
Final Four. “But I’ve matured alot over 
foe years. / . 

"The things that happened tack m ; 
those days don’t mean anything. F?n , * 
completely over that." - f l 



■ ***■■■ , 


,«‘ 
i- » 





V * W • „ 1 




m 


■ . ' Mi— iUwMWw 

Two goalies. Mike Vernon of the Red Wings, left and Patrick Roy of the Avalanche, fighting at center ice. 


an Berard scored a minute info overtime 
to lead New York to victoiy at Buffalo. 

Blacfchawfc* s. Capitals 3 In Chicago, 
Tony Amonte scored twice in a four- 
goal third period to lead the Blackhawks 
over Washington. 

Maple Leafs 2, Sharks 1 Brandon Con- 
very had a goal and an assist as Toronto 


ended a three-game losing streak. 

Canucks 5, Mighty Ducks 3 Martin 
Gelinas scored a goal and assisted on 
another to spark Vancouver. (NYT. AP) 

■ NHL Visiting Japan 

The NHL said Wednesday that foe 
Anaheim Mighty Ducks and Vancouver 


Canucks would open foe 1997-98 sea- 
son with two games against each other 
in Tokyo's Yoyogi Arena on Oct. 4f5. 
Japan, The Associated Press reported 
from Vancouver. 

NHL teams have played preseason 
and postseason games in Europe and 
Japan, but never regular-season games. 


Playoff Picture Gets Sunny for Phoenix 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


The Associated Press 

■Die Phoenix Suns, who lost 
their first 1 3 games of foe sea- 
son, are in the playoff hunt. 

Phoenix won, 109-107, 
Wednesday in Seattle. It was 
the Suns’ fifth straight road 
victory and improved their re 


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Massenburg matched his ca- 
reer high with 26 for foe host 
Nets. 

Lakers 106, Bucks 84 Even 
without three starters, foe 
Lakers had no trouble with 
foe visiting Bucks, who lost 
for the 14th time in 17 
games. 

Elden Campbell scored 13 
of his 3 1 points for foe Lakers 
in the third quarter. Kobe 
Bryant, a rookie. made his 
fourth start of the season as a 
replacement for Eddie Jones, 
foe Lakers’ All-Star guard. 


and scored 19 points. 

Heat 101, Kings 88 Miami 
welcomed Alonzo Mourning 
back to the starting lineup by 
blitzing Sacramento. Mourn- 
ing. starting for the first time 
since tearing a tendon in his 
right foot on Feb. 21, scored 
26 points in 39 minutes as the 
Heat won their seventh 
straight game. Tim Hardaway 
also had 26 points for Miami. 

Mitch Richmond paced 
Sacramento with 32. 

(bricks 105, Pistons 34 Hie 

Knicks' 50th victory of the 



cord to 31-39. Phoenix cur- in the third quarter. Kobe also had 26 points for Miami 
rently holds the eighth play- Bryant, a rookie, made his Mitch Richmond pace 
off spot in foe conference and fourth start of the season as a Sacramento with 32. 
strengthened its position as replacement for Eddie Jones, (bricks 105, Pistons 34 Tfr 
Sacramento lost. the Lakers’ All-Star guard, Knicks' 50th victory of th 

Phoenix hadn’t beaten 
Seattle in neatly two years. But 
foe Suns shut down the Sonics 
in foe final moments and 
scored the last five points. 

Kevin Johnson, who has 
said he will retire after this 
season, looked spry Wednes- 
day with 3 1 points. 

I “This is a big win for us, 
because we may meet them in 
the playoffs and we haven't 
beaten them in a while,’ 1 John- 
son said of foe Sonics. "It’s a 
good rivalry over the years." 

Johnson was 9-for-14 from 
foe field and 6-for-10 from 3- 
point range. Jason Kidd 
scored the winning basket 
with 2.9 seconds left 

Nets 123, roars 105 Hours 
before the game, the National 
Basketball Association com- 
missioner, David Stem, fined 
New Jersey’s coach, John 
Cali pari, $25,000 for calling 
sportswriter Dan Garcia of 
foe Star-Ledger of Newark a 
"Mexican idiot." 

The fine was foe largest 
ever against an NBA coach, 
and it marked the first time foe 
league punished speech un- 
related to a game. Calipari said 

be would not contest foe fine. , , _ ^ J . j« • u nE »7riiAw^ M 

Jim Jackson tied his season The Timberwolves’ Doug West driving under the bas- 
highwifo28 points, and Tony ket, closely defended by the Nuggets’ Ervin Johnson. 






season moved them one and a 
i half games ahead of Detroitin 
; the race for the third playdff 
' seed in foe East. 

It was the Knicks’ bestni 
i game since they beat Chicagcf ) 
» in early March, a victoiy that 
l was followed by losses on 
four of their next six games. 

1 Patrick Ewing scored 27 
’ points for host New York. - 

1W Blazers 88, Hornet* 87 

l Portland held foe Hornets -to 
one field goal in the final six 
minutes to win at Charlotte. 

The Blazers, who erased a 
10-point deficit by hitting 
their fust eight field-goal at- 
tempts of the third quarter, 
concluded a five-game east- 
ernswing with a 3-2 record. 

Glen Rice had 33 points for 
the Hornets. ; ■ 

-r BUn * 1 ?, 10S * CelUo* 82 

Tracy Murray, a reserve, 
scored a season-high 24 points 
and Rod Strickland had a sea- 
son-high 17 assists as Wasft^ 
ington crept within two. and' 

r Cleveland 

for foefmal playoff spot in foe 

East: Webber scored 14 

of his ~6 points in the fourth 
quarter for the Bullets. 

Pacers 104, Mavericks 80 
Reserve guard Fred Hoiberg 

Sn^" high21 points by 
hitting eig hr of 10 shots. 

it was fantastic," Ihdi- 
Ma s Reggie Miller said of 
< performance. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 38, 1997 


PAGE 23 


SPORTS 


■'Orl 

--'V ****** 
'-no **■ 


■ - *71r* , i»** 

-''•’•■•iU',*.. 


»?3j 


* Novotna Defeats Majoli 
In Main Event at Lipton 


By Robin Finn 

t * - Wffi H»i 7imw Ser vice 

KEY BISCAYNE. Florida — The 
, women were supposed to be a follow-up 
-act to the men at the Lipton tournament. 
;The headline act was the quarterfinal 
- between top-seeded Pete Sampras and 
"Hendrik Dreekmann, another of the 
'i.-ybung Germans intent on stepping into 
■■Boris Becker's shoes as soon as the oft- 
funjured superstar vacates them. 

V- But Dreekmann ’s own shoes failed to 
‘party him safely from a restaurant to his 
!sbotel Tuesday night, and he woke up 
Wednesday with a sprained ankle that 
'forced him to withdraw from his big 
■■tnatch. Jana Novotna of the Czech Re- 
public and Iva Majoli of Croatia were 
/told they had become the main event. 

So they made the only singles match 
•of the day last as long as two. 

■ The third-seeded Novotna and the 
eighth-seeded Majoli battled for 2 hours 
and 24 minutes, and required a third-set 
tiebreaker to reach a resolution that sent 
.Novotna into the semifinals. 

... 1 After Majoli ’s missed overhead gave 

* the 28-year-old Czech a 6-2, 3-6. 7-6 <9- 
7) victory . Novotna dropped her racquet 
■ and flopped on her back like a flapjack 

• on a hot griddle. 

* "When she missed that overhead, it 
was such a relief,” Novotna said. “I 
"was lying there saying, ‘That’s it, 1 don't 
have to run any further.’ ” 


A wistful Majoli called the hot. windy 
conditions difficult but blamed her too- 
breakable serve for the defeat. She 
double-faulted 14 times and blew a 40-0 
lead when she failed to hold serve for a 
6-5 lead in the final set. Earlier. Majoli 
had repaired a 4-2 deficit and wrecked 
Novotna's attempt to serve for the 
match at 5-4. 

The Croat had 52 unforced errors, 1 1 
fewer than Novotna, who matched Ma- 
joli with eight service breaks. 

Plagued by Majoli *s passing shots 
throughout the match. Novotna steeled 
herself to stay aggressive in the 
tiebreaker, where she did all the forcing 
and used a service winner to gain her 
third and final match point. 

The men's quarterfinal, meanwhile, 
never happened. Dreekmann was too 
aggressive with a speed bump in a ped- 
estrian walkway at a Miami mall and 
severely sprained bis right ankle. 

The 54th -ranked Dreekmann. at 22, 
was the youngest and lowest-ranked 
man left in the event. He became the 
latesi victim of the accident syndrome 
that seems to haunt this tournament. 

The mishap occurred not far from the 
parking lor where Thomas Muster of 
Austria had his knee smashed by a 
drunken driver on the eve of his Lipton 
Final in 1989 against Ivan Lendl. 
Muster's knee, and his hard-court ca- 
reer. were ruined by the accident: both 
had to be rebuilt 



WLAF Players Arrive in Europe for New Season 


By Mike Carlson 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

SUWANEE. Georgia — Two hundred and fifty 
American football players landed in Europe on 
Thursday, die latest wave in die gridiron invasion force 
known as the World League of American Football. 

Having survived a three-week tryout and training 
camp at the Atlanta Falcons' training facility in 
Georgia, they will spend the next three months living 
in hotel rooms, p uzzlin g over languages and foods, 
and playing a game as foreign to most Europeans as 
the Scottish delicacy haggis is to them. The WLAF 
season is set to begin on April 12. 

The WLAF originally arrived in 1991 on the crest 


of a wave of TV popularity. That year, London beat 
Barcelona in World Bowl I at Wembley Stadium 
before 60.000 fans. 

But the National Football League, which was 
bankrolling the WLAF, pulled the plug after year 
two, and another two years passed before a part- 
nership between the NFL and the Fox television 
network relaunched it as a development league. 

The NFL remembered the success of Scott Mitchell, 
the Orlando Thunder's quarterback, who wok his team 
to World Bowl H and then stepped into Dan Marino's 
shoes with the Miami Dolphins. Mitchell eventually 
signed a lucrative contract with the Detroit Lions. 

More than a third of this year's WLAF players 
have been “allocated" by NFL clubs who own their 


contracts. Some are genuine prospects who need the 
seasoning of game experience or intense work on 
technique. Others are fodder for training camps, not 
expected to stick unless they surprise someone. 

Two stars from last year's WLAF champion, the 
Scottish Claymores, stayed with their NFL teams last 
summer and turned in solid seasons. Sean 
LaChapelie, a receiver and lost year's Most Valuable 
Player in the WLAF, played for the Kansas City 
Chiefs. A safety, James Fuller, played for the Phil- 
adelphia Eagles. 

Some NLF teams believe strongly that the WLAF 
is useful. The Chiefs have supplied the Claymores, 
the reigning WLAF champion, with five players 
including three offensive linemen. 


Ex-Soccer Referee 
Offered to Fix Game 


I la&m 1 ■rnL/Tli-' Pin* 

Jana Novotna eyeing the ball during the quarterfinal against Iva Majoli. 


Oar SjjJTnwiDojuK-V* 

GENEVA — Kurt Roethlisberger, a 
retired Swiss referee once recognized as 
one of soccer’s top match officials, was 
suspended for life on Thursday for at- 
tempted bribery. 

l/EFA the governing body of Euro- 
pean soccer, said in a statement that 
Roethlisberger admitted attempted 
bribery during investigations into a 
European Champions League match be- 
tween Grasshopper Zurich and Auxeire 
on OcL 30. 

“We can’t say anything about this 
case because we could influence other 
cases.” said Frits Alstrom. a UEFA 
spokesman. “It would only make things 
more complicated. We have other cases 
and sometimes they are combined.’’ 

“I will certainly be speaking to my 
lawyer, ‘ ’ Roethlisberger said Thursday . 
“I won’t allow my name to be dragged 
through the mud in this way.” 

The UEFA investigation found that 
Roethlisberger contacted Grasshopper 
manager Erich Vogel and visited his 
offices on Ocl 18. 

“Mr. Roethlisberger asked whether 
Grasshopper-Club would be interested 
in the referee of the Grasshopper-CI ub- 
AJ. Auxerre match on 30th October 
1996 not giving decisions against 
Grasshopper-Club,” said UEFA after 
the ruling by its Control and Disciplinary 
Committee. Thai match was due to be 
refereed by Vadim Zhuk of Belarus. 

“This would obviously involve fi- 
nancial compensation, and die sum of 
100,000 Swiss Francs ($68,600; was 
mentioned. Mr. Roethlisberger said he 
was friendly with the referee, and that it 
would be easy to arrange the matter.” 

Roethlisberger 1 s actions were report- 
ed to UEFA by Grasshopper, who won 
the match, 3-1 . 

“In the course of the investigations, 
Mr. Roethlisberger admitted attempted 
bribety,” UEFA said. “Through his 
action, Kurt Roethlisberger has violated 
principles which are indispensable for 
sport, namely those of loyalty, integrity 
and sportsmanlike conduct 

“The matter is all the more regret- 
table as Kurt Roethlisberger is a well- 
known figure, who was a FIFA referee 
for a considerable number of years.” 

Roethlisberger has until midnight 
April 2 to lodge an appeal. 


“We cannot make any comment or 
give any Information until after the ap- 
peal.” said Freddy Bickel. the 
Grasshopper media officer. “We would 
like to make a comment, but we a ve been 
told we can’t." 

UEFA said investigations concerning 
Zhuk were contin uing and that he would 
not officiate as a FIFA referee until the 
investigation was complete. 

Roethlisberger retired as a referee last 
year. His 27-year officiating career was 
spotted with controversy. He was at one 
ume considered among the world's top 
referees. He officiated at the 1990 and 
1994 World Cups, the 1988 Olympics 
and European championship matches. 
But he was sent home in disgrace from 
the 1 994 World Cup finals in the United 
States after admitting that he should 
have awarded Belgium a penalty during 
their 3-2 defeat by Germany in a 
second -round match. 

In 1995, Roethlisberger was handed a 
three-month suspension by FIFA for 
misusing his position as a referee in a 
campaign to win a seat in the Swiss 
Parliament He was photographed in his 
official uniform and had the logo of his 
political parry superimposed on his shirr 
beside FIFA’s emblem during an elec- 
tion campaign. 

LIEFA also fined Robbie Fowler, a 
striker who plays for Liverpool, 2,000 
Swiss Francs ($1,400) on Thursday for 
his show of support for dismissed Liv- 
erpool dock workers during a European 
Cup Winners Cup march. 

On Tuesday . Fowler had received apat 
on the back from the world governing 
body FIFA for fair play during an English 
premier league match against Arsenal 
when he appeared to protest to the referee 
that be had not been fouled and Liverpool 
should not receive a penalty kick. 

UEFA's Control and Disciplinary 
Committee made note of Fowler’s 
sporting behavior in assessing the pun- 
ishment beginning its press release: “It 
may seem strange and even unfair...” 

After scoring his second goal in Liv- 
erpool's 3-0 Cup Winners Cup victory 
over Brann Bergen of Norway last 
week. Fowler lifted up his red Liverpool 
shirt to display a T-shirt that read: 
“Support the 500 Sacked Dockers.” 

UEFA rules prohibit players from 
displaying political logos at matches. 


Scoreboard 




; Exhibition Basebau. 

W HBW TlMHa 

Los Angetes £ Florida 4 
Montreal 2. Atlanta 0 
' dndnmrtd. Houston 3 
Boston7,pm5iwfgh2 
PhflodoipNa 14 Kansas air 10 
1 Toronto list Louis 3 
Minnesota 16 Chicago White Sat 3 
New Yarfc Yankees 14. Tam 7 
: BafflrmmllNswYWKMetal 
Chicago Cubs & Son Frandsco 110 innings 
San Diego H Colorado 7 
Oakland 10, MRnaukfie 1 
Sean* & Anaheim 2 
DatrottTA Owetand 11 


NBA STANDINGS 


AtuumemtaM 


- • •. 


w 

L 

PCt 

SB 


i> -Miami 

52 

17 

J54 

— 


i-Mew York 

» 

30 

.71* 

2% 

‘ ^ 

■ Orlando 

40 

29 

-5W 

12 


Washington 

34 

35 

.493 

18 


New Jersey 

22 

47 

J19 

30 


-PMtadetoftta 

18 

50 

.265 

33!4 


■ Boston 

13 

58 

.183 

40 

-y : 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



- ^ . 

x-CMcago 

60 

9 

B70 

— 


x-Demtt 

48 

21 

iM 

12 

x-Atemta 

48 

22 

686 

1214 

Choftolte 

45 

25 

.643 

m 

Cleveland 

36 

32 

529 

2314 

Indiana 

33 

36 

,478 

27 

MINraukee 

28 

41 

A06 

32 

Toronfo 

25 

45 

J57 

3514 

■MnNeeMUM 


MOWeVTOVtoNMi 



W 

L 

PCI 

GB 

X-UMh 

52 

17 

.754 

— 

x-Haujfan 

46 

23 

A67 

6 

Minnesota 

34 

36 

.486 

184 

Dates 

22 

47 

J19 

30 

Denver 

19 

50 

J75 

33 

Son Antonio 

17 

52 

■246 

35 

Vancouver 

12 

60 

.167 

41% 

rwanc wvistON 



x-Seattte 

49 

21 

.700 

— 

x-LA. Lakers 

47 

23 

671 

2 

x-Portkmd 

42 

30 

.583 

8 

UL dippers 

31 

37 

■456 

17 

Phoenix 

31 

39 

.443 

18 

Sacramento 

29 

42 

408 

2014 

Golden State 

25 

4* 

J62 

rsh 

x-dlnched ptoyaff berttc 




wiwnmwi 

■MULT* 


PHhnWphki 

» 

24 

36 25—105 

Hew Jersey 

33 

28 

29 33-123 


4 1&- N j_- Jackson 12-18 2-2 28, Massenburg 
10-12 6-6 2 1 RehomrtF— P. 46 (CaKraan 91 
NJ. 57 (McDaniel 15). Awtefc-P. 25 
(Iverson 51, NJ. 26 (Jackson 9). 

Batten 27 22 25 18- 92 

Washtngton 22 34 23 26-185 

B; WBtams 8-11 8-11 24, Fta 6-1 J 36 17i Wi 


Webber12-181-42«, Murray B-U3-394. Re- 
bounds — Boston 49 (Worker 10). Washington 
54 NlfeMer 13). Assists— Boston 23 (Wesley 
11), Washington 31 (Strickland 171. 
Soo u BMPtO 28 18 28 14— 88 

Miami 25 25 28 23-101 

S: Richmond 9-21 11-11 32. Owens 4-13 W 
17; M; Maunring 9-1 3 B-l 1 2A Hardcnwat'S' >9 
5-626. Rchuuw O t — Sa cram en to 36 tSfflltti 7), 
Miami 49 (Austin 9). Assists— Sacramento 
19 (Edrtey 7), Miami 20 (Hardaway 11). 
Portland 18 21 M 19—88 

□Matte 22 23 25 17- 87 

P; C-Rabinsan 10-1 7 2-4 25, Wallace 8-1 Sl- 
2 17; C Rice 12-22 5-6 33, Geiger 6-116-818. 
R eb o unds — Portland 43 (Wtrfloce 9). 
Chatane 48 (tltvac 9). AnHta— Portland 77 
(Anderson 8), Charlotte 26 (Hogues 9). 
Dates 22 16 25 17- 88 

iMtama 29 38 23 22— 1M 

D: Harper 9-13 (M) 19, Finley 6-15 041 1& I: 
HoBmtb 8-10 2-5 21, SmKs. 9-20 04 ML Re- 
booads— D. 42 (Green 7), 1. 51 (A-Davls 101. 
Assists— D. 24 (Pack 8), L 25 (Jackson 9). 
Detroit 14 28 26 26- 94 

New York 28 28 22 27-185 

D: Hunter 5-1 38-9 19, Hill B-1B 2-4 18; N.Y- 
E wring 10-18 7-9 27. Johnson 6-15 44 id. 
Roboendi Deiroir 53 1HMI 91. New York 50 
(Ewing ID. Assfcts-OetraB 10 (Dumare «J. 
New YOik 23 (ChBds A). 

Minnesota 27 29 26 28-102 

DMnr 26 26 21 27—188 

M: Gugflalta 9-19 7-10 25, Garrett B-13 4-4 
2tt D: LEffls 12-22 7-8 32, GafcMre 7-10 5-5 
20. Reboantta-M. 44 (Gugflotta 10). D. 44 
(LEUs. Johnson 9], Assists— Minnesota 23 


(Maritwy m Denver 18 (Snrim 6). 

Phoenix 34 23 26 26-109 

Seattle 24 35 24 247-107 

P: Johnson 9-14 7-8 31, Chapman 6-22 6-6 
2A Tisdale 10-120-1 20;: Hawkins 8-135-6 2& 
Pay-Ion 9-20 04 19. Rebouuds— Phoenix 43 
(Williams w, Seattle 45 (Payton •). 
Assists— Phoenix 27 IWdd 15), Seattle 25 
(Payton 6). 

Milwaukee 21 26 17 74- 84 

UA. lakers 23 38 24 31—106 

M: Baker 14-18 0-2 21, Robinson 4-19 6-0 
15; LA Lakers: Campbell 9-20 13-18 31. 
Bryant 7-14 3-4 19. Rebounds — Milwaukee 
56 (Baker 12), Los Angeles 65 (Blount 14). 
Assists— Miwukee 22 (Petty 6), Los 
Angeles 22 (Kersey, Bryant Van Enel 4). 


114(11. Standings! 


28 33 14 70 220 258 

27 36 10 64 194 229 

24 34 15 63 200 217 

24 41 9 57 212 266 


ATLANTIC DmSIOH 

W L T Pt* 
x- Philadelphia 42 21 11 95 

x-New Jersey 39 21 13 91 

Florida 33 24 17 83 

N.Y. Rangers 35 30 9 79 

Washington 30 37 8 68 

Tampa Bay 29 37 7 65 

N.Y. tstanders 26 36 11 63 

NORTHEAST DIVISION 
W L T PIS 
x-BuHalo 38 24 11 87 

Pfltsburgfi 34 33 7 75 


24 41 9 57 5 

wmm cnuM i Hrj 

CEHTHALOWnON 



tv 

L 

T 

PIS 

GF 

GA 

x-Dalos 

44 

23 

6 

94 

228 

174 

Detrah 

35 

23 15 

85 

235 

179 

Phoenix 

35 

34 

5 

75 

213 

222 

Chicago 

30 

32 12 

72 

198 

190 

51. Louis 

31 

34 

9 

71 

216 

226 

Toronto 

27 

41 

6 

60 

212 

254 

McmcoansnM 




W 

L 

T 

PIS 

GF 

GA 

x-Cotomdo 

46 

20 

9 

101 

257 

184 

Edmonton 

34 

33 

7 

75 

230 

221 

Anaheim 

31 

33 11 

73 

221 

216 

Calgary 

32 

35 

B 

72 

201 

210 

Vancouver 

31 

39 

5 

67 

231 

253 

Los Angeles 

26 

38 10 

62 

194 

242 

San Jose 

24 

43 

7 

55 

184 

245 

x-eftnehed playoff berth: 





WXDMKSOAY'S MSULTS 


M.Y.Ktandere 




1 1 

0 

1-0 

Buffalo 




1 0 

1 

0-2 


1st Period: B-Moy 3 (Ray. Primeau). 2. 
New York. Anderson 11 (Bertual Green) 
bed Period: New York. Plante 4 (Belanger. 
\mske) 3d Period: B- Satan 19 (Dawe, ZhF 
talk) Overtime: 5, New Yolk, Befflrd 8 
(McCabe. SmaflnsM) Shots on goat N.Y.-12- 
8-6-7—28. B- 8-9-10-0—27. Garries K.Y.- 
Sab. B- Shields. 

Plttsbwgb 0 3 2-5 

Moalmri 5 I 2-0 

1st Period: M-Conon 6 (Recdil) Z M-, 


Stevenson 7 (Thornton, Tucket) 1 M-Rldter 
20 (Bnmetl * M- Recdil 32 (Kofvu. Canon) S. 
M-RJeher 21 (Bureau) 2nd Periote P- Fronds 
23 (Letnleux, Okzyk} (pp). 7, P-Hatefter 15 
(Lemtoux. Fronds) (pp). & M-Kolvu 15 
(MotoMWM. RecchQ (pp). 9, P> moBwy 5 
(Lemteux. Fronds) 3d Period— 10, M- 
Damphousse 26 (Rudnsfcy. Bure) 11. M- 
ReaM 33 (Kirini. Quintal) lZP-tLmirieux 45 
(Frauds. Hatcher) 1Z F-Lemteur 4 6 
(Fronds, OhzyM (pp). Shots aa goof: P-4' 
20-7— 31. M- 10-16-9-33. Gecritas: P-Collme, 
DeRouvflle. M-TMbautl 
entente 13 10-5 

Detroit 0 3 2 1-6 

1st Period: G- Kamensky 24 (Ftesherg) 2nd 
Period: D-Fedonw 29 (Mwptqfr Ywman). X 
C-Kamensky 25 ttones, Otadtosh) (pn)-4> Oy 

Lapointe 13 (Koztovl 5, OCorbet 10 (Yefle) 6. 
C-pBodmwsh 32 (Lefebvre. Lacratx) 7. D- 
Udsbom 15 Merman) (pp)- 3d Period: C 
Kamensky 26 (YWe. LemtevoO 9. D-utpoMe 
14 (Fedorov, Murphy) la D-Shanahan 46 
(Lartonov,Pushor)OT:ll,D-McCartylWSlw- 
nahan Lartonori-SMs ea goafcG- 67-6-0 — 
I9.D- B-23-is-i— 47.teoaBwC41eyXMIleim. 
Washington 2 0 1-3 

Chicago D 1 4-5 

Iff Period: w-Konowalchutc 15 (Oates). Z 
W-Kmawakbuk 16 (Taechet. Gonchar) 2nd 
Petted: C-Moreau 13 (Mantt Wetnridi). 3d 
Period: C-Daze 17 (Zhamnov) (pp). 5. W- 
Gonchar 12 iKonawotdnrk, Oates) tv C-, 
Afiwnte 38 (CheSos, Krfrokrasov) 7, C- 
Savard 9 (Mffler, Daze) a C-Amonte 39 
(Ckxone) Shots on goofc W- 10-12-13-35. C- 
5-7-0—20. GooSeft W-Ronfonl C-Hndrefl. 


Anaheim 2 0 1—3 

Vancouver 3 1 1 — 5 

1st Period: A-BeBows 12 (RuccMn, 
Daigneautn (pp). Z V-MogDny 29 (Nasiund, 
Lumme) (pp). % A-Rucdtln 16 (Bel lows, 
Daigneatfn Ipp). A V-, Lumme 11 (GeHnas, 
Murzyn) 5, V-Gannas 29 (Ridley, Babych) 
(pp). 2nd Period: V-Brashear 5 (Bahama. 
Babych] 3d Period: V-Bohonos 9 (Brosheer, 
RMey) a A-BeBaws 13 (Kartya, Dalgneaum 
(pp). Shots an goto: A- 6-7-5—16. V- 11-9- 
4—24. GoaBes: A- Hebert, Sirtetonkov. V- 
Klrsdi, McLean. 

Toronto 1 1 0—2 

SanJase 6 1 0-1 

II# Period: T-Ganvery 2 (JJmRh, Po- 
doflan) Zed Period: T-SunrUn 39 (Convery, 
Paftrtn) (sh). 3. SJ.-Tumtte 14 (Friesen. 
Rathfel (pp).3dPeriKb None. Shots oa goat 
T- 136-0-27. SJ.- 8-16*17—41. 


KEY BHtCAVNE. rUHtTOA 
auARTeRfMALS 
tel 

Pete Sampras Cl], UJ, det Hendrik 
Oreekman, GenMRy, walkwer. 

Sergl Bruguera, Spain, del Andrei 
Medvedev, Ukraine. 6-ft 6-3. 

WOOKM 

Martina Hingis (1), Switzerland, det. Mary 
Joe Ffemandei (10), Ui, 6-4, 6-1. 

Jana Havana C3). Czech RepuMc, del Iva 
Malol (8), Croatia 6-Z U> 7-6 (9-7). 


SanRNAI, RRST LEO 
Los Palmas a Barcelona 4 

nnai first mvwom 

Nice a Monaco 2 
Aumre Z Paris St Germain l 
Baslta l, Cannes 0 
Metz a Lyon 1 
Strasbourg Z Coen 0 
LeNavreOlGuinganip 1 
MarseBto4.Nancy1 
Rennes 2. Lens 2 


Sparta RoRetdom 0, Heerenween3 
Roda JC Kerkrode 1. UtrechM 
NEC Mpnepen 1 Volendom 0 
GraafEcfiap Doettnchem 1, AZ Manaor 1 


ASIA ZONE, GROUP 4 
THURSDAY M MUSCAT, OMAN 
Japan6» NepatO 
Oman 4. MacaoO 

■tawdfegM Jopon 9 points. Oman a Macao 
T. Nepali. 


fUUIBUtoui 

‘ 2rt> 1-DAV INTEflNATIOMAL 
NEW ZEALAND VS. 8W LANKA 
THUReOAV, IN WmjNGTON 
New Zetdand: 201 In 49JI ovas 
Sri Lanka; 132 in 37.2 overs 
N.Z. won by 69 runs and tied toe series 1-1. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 




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PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MARCH 28, 1997 


OBSERVER 


A Grand Illusion 


A Journey Around the World, Family Style 


By Russell Baker 

W ASHINGTON — Wa- 
shington apparently has 
nothing to do but investigate 
itself. 

This is narcissistic, expens- 
ive and redundant. Reporters 
have already done a terrific 
job of exposing dirty money's 
effect on politics. Why do we 
need two congressional com- 
mittees spending millions to 
do it again? 

All sentient humanity now 
knows that the stupendous 
cost of political campaigning 
has corrupted government all 
the way up to the White 
House. Why not move on to 
doing something about ir? 

The short answer is that the 
habit of not doing anything 
about anything vital has eaten 
into the Washington soul. 


There are the vast waste- 
lands called “inner cities," 
because delicacy forbids us to 
call them “places where we 
keep the great American fail- 
ure out of sight." Now and 
then some statesman resident 
in the Potomac suburbs 
wanders into one of these 
ghastly devastations, recoils 
m shock and fear and, if there 
is a reporter handy, declares. 
“Something must be done." 

What might be done? Well, 
there are those despised wel- 
fare clients who are now re- 
quired to find work. Many live 
in “inner cities." where jobs 
tend not to be. Jobs tend to be 
out in the suburbs. How shall 
low-paid slum dwellers get to 
those jobs from “inner cities" 
with third-rate mass transit 
that doesn’t reach the subutbs 
and, if it does, charges fares 
bottom dwellers can’t afford? 

The need for better mass 
transit is part o f die “inner 
cities" problem, but the only 
transit Washington happily 


underwrites is that of car 
owners farther and farther 
from, those “inner cities" via 
new highway construction. 
Washington loves driving. 
Government license plates 
should say “Drive Or Die." 


There is also a transpor- 
tation problem for small- 
town America. More and 
more small towns are by- 
passed by airlines and inter- 
state bus service. It's hard to 
travel out there unless you're 
able to drive great distances. 

No wonder we’re in for 
these expensive investiga- 
tions of the squalor in which 
president ana Congress get 
their campaign money. They 
will give us the illusion of 
something being done about 
limiting money's sordid 
power. Illusion is probably 
the best we can hope for. 

With their philosophy that 
it’s wise not to do anything 
about anything that looks like 
a problem, ourpols need some 
reason for not leaving their 
year-round air-conditioning 
and going back to Pocatello. 
Little Rock, Dixie and the 
Black Hills. Investigations 
create illusions of vital doings 
going on. 


Of course there will also be 
die usual bark-and-bite ritual 
between president and Con- 
gress about balancing the 
budget. If they really wanted a 
balanced budget, they could 
simply add 25 cents to the 
gasoline tax and watch the 
billions roll in. Americans tol- 
erate big increases in gasoline 
prices when created by the 
market and go right on buying 
bigger, thirstier gas-guzzlers. 

Will our leaders take this 
easy way out? Don't hold 
your breath. It would be too 
much like doing something. 

New York Times Service 


By Patricia Leigh Brown 

New York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — For some people, the 
definition of a family outing is hauling a 
pack of Oscar Mayers and a bag of charcoal 
to the beach. But if you are intellectually 
ambitious, sophisticated New Yorkers — 
like Richard Reeves, an author and syn- 
dicated political columnist, and his wife, 
Catherine O'Neill, a refugee advocate and 
founder of the Women's Commission for 
Women and Children Refugees — you re- 
cruit your extensive family, including chil- 
dren from previous marriages, and take off 
for die great, global beyond. 

You travel around the world, laptop and 
bubble wrap at the ready, visit 16 countries in 
35 days, and then write a book: “Family 
Travels: Around the World in 30 or So 
Days” (Andrews & McMeel. $22.95). 

Many families might fantasize about such 
an adventure. Bur the Reeves-O'Neilf clan 
actually did it. They were led by O’Neill, 55, 
whose militarily precise organizational abil- 
ities cause her husband to describe her as “a 
force of nature." 

The idea for traveling the world en famille 
was hatched three years ago by the couple in 
a taxi on the road from Haiphong to the Gulf 
of Tonkin in Vietnam. Listening to the young 
taxi driver talk about bis family’s expe- 
riences during the Vietnam War, O'Neill 
couldn’t help wishing her own sons were 
with her. She and Reeves had taken a round- 
the-world expedition in 198 1 . No sooner had 
she said, “Let's do it again, with the chil- 
dren!" than the “Dear family" letters went 
out. 

The concept: invite the brood to globe- 
gallop for a month at Mom and Dad’ s ex- 
pense. The motive: a rare chance for the far- 
flung family to get together while infusing 
them with a 21st-century geopolitical per- 
spective, a grand tour for wanks. 

“More than anything," Reeves wrote in 
the book, “we wanted to create or nurture 
this little circle of people born 25 years apart 
to hold together and look inward to each 
other when we are no longer cajoling and 
nagging at the center." 

The family converged at the Reeves- 
O’Neill home in Sag Harbor, New York, in 
the summer of 1994, sticking colored pins 
into a map as they plotted, and bartered, their 
route. On hand were O'Neill's two sons. 
Colin, now 30. and Conor, 27, Reeves’s 
daughter Cindie Reeves Fyfe, 36, and son- 








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in-law Thomas Fyfe, 40, and the Reeves’s 
daughter. Fiona O'Neill Reeves, 12. Cindie 
agreed to vote for Papua New Guinea if 
Fiona voted for Bali. 

The catch was that everyone had to spend 
15 minutes a day writing his or her im- 
pressions. The participants also bad to an- 
swer questionaires written by O’Neill that 
asked things like “Are there jobs in this 
country which don't exist in the U.S.?” The 
book was part of the trip from the start, die 
advance helping to defray thq, cost — 
$29,700. 

Fun, huh? “At first 1 didn’t like it, because 
it was my vacation," said Fiona, noting: 
“My mom and dad are a business, sort of. 
Bur then, it was fun to have my parents know 
my thoughts." 

For O'Neill and Reeves, the trip was an 
attempt to give their children something 
more lasting than a car. When Reeves, now 
60, was a young reporter for The New York 
Times. Pal Brown, the governor of Cali- 
fornia at the time, told him how he arranged 
irresistible vacations to get his family to- 
gether. 

“At the time, it didn ’t seem relevant,” the 
now silver-haired writer i whose syndicated 
column appears in the International Herald 
Tribune) recalled over beer and spring rolls. 
“But when that switch comes," he said, 
referring to parenthood, “and it's hard to get 
your kids on the phone, you think about 
it" 

Reeves and O'Neill bought five around- 
the-world tickets for $2,628.65 each, us- 
able over a six-month period for travel in 
the same direction, with a third off for 





ItBl 






1 1 
KOF-i 


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Ninhc Ancta/IHT 


Fiona. O'Neill booked the trip herself, 
madly dialing 800 numbers into the night 
between a trip to Rwanda and writing 
guest editorials for the Los Angeles Times. 
Then she brokered a deal with her travel 
agent that allowed her to finalize the ar- 
rangements in exchange for the agent's 
discount and half the commission. “Even 
Richard, who would never have asked 
himself, was impressed this time,’' she 
said. 

“Very impressed,” her husband agreed. 
“Usually I leave the room when she starts 
talki ng about money, the same way I look 
away from beggars in India and New 
York.” 

One of their more singular approaches 
abroad is visiting local real estate offices. 
“Agents are extremely knowledgable 
guides.” Reeves said. “And you find 
yourselves in people’s homes hearing how 
much things are worth." 

In the book, the children often provide 
welcome comic relief. Witness Conor’s first 
impression of Israel: “Wow, a lot of babes 
with guns!” 

The nip, in June of 1995, was weighted 
heavily toward Asia, starting with a night 
from Los Angeles to Tokyo. The Asian leg 
ended in Pakistan, where the family had 
lived briefly in 1983 and where. Conor “al- 
most died of hamburger deprivation.” he 
recalled. From there it was on to Dubai 
(“where there was a wider assortment of 
black fabric than I imagined existing in the 
world." O'Neill said), and Cairo, Jerusalem. 
Berlin and a week's decompression in the 
French countryside. 


PEOPLE 


The average family vacation would -prob- 
ably not include tete-5-t&es with ambas- 
sadors (Walter Mondale in Tokyo) or tea 
with Benazir Bhutto, the prime minister of 
P akis tan at the time. 

Not that it impressed their children. To the 
couples* apparent astonishment, Reeves dis- 
covered, “that was our life, not theirs.' 7 

Colin, a television producer in Los 
Angeles, wrote that a hellish overnight train 
trip in Indonesia was like * ‘trying to sleep in 
the refrigerated ice-cream trough of a su- 
permarket. sitting upright on a stack of B rcy- 
er’s, during an earthquake." 

Being sequestered with one's family has 
its moments. War nearly broke out over 
O’Neill's shopping excursions, daring 
which Fiona learned to bargain “the way a 
bear cub would watch Mama Bear swat a 
salm on out of the river,” Reeves wrote. 
O'Neill was determined to accumulate 
“visual expressions” of Indonesia, even if 
that meant buying an extra suitcase and 
causing near-revolt among her filial Sher- 
pas. 

Such stressful encounters caused “every- 
one’s character defects to shine brightly,’’ 
Conor wrote in Hong Kong. But as travelers 
they also found much common ground. “It 
wasn't just squeamish Mom.” O'Neill said. 
“The kids didn’t like the flies and dirt, 
either.” 

In the end, of course, despite noble liberal 
parental goals about “riding the learning 
curve” and giving your children global in- 
sight, countries can ultimately be judged on 
“whether you like the people," Reeves 
wrote. So can family. 


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Tommy Hilfiger with his wife: He denies in cyberspace that he's racist. 


T HE conductor and cellist Mstislav 
Rostropovich, who was once 
stripped of his Soviet citizenship be- 
cause of his outspoken support for dis- 
sidents, has picked up an award from 
President Boris Yeltsin in Moscow. 
The Russian leader commended the 
former National Symphony Orchestra 
director “for service to the state and a 
major contribution to the international 
development of music.” the Itar-Tass 
news agency reported. 


At age 88, the retired Supreme Court 
justice Harry Blackmun has wrapped 
up his first major film shoot: Steven 
Spielberg's “Amistad." starring An- 
thony Hopkins, Morgan Freeman and 
Matthew McConaughey. The film is 
due out at the end of the year. Blackmun 
plays a cameo role as Justice Joseph 
Story, who wrote the 1841 court de- 
cision that 53 African mutineers 
brought to America on the Spanish slave 
ship Amistad had to be freed and re- 
turned home rather than be kept in ser- 
vitude in the United States. Blackmun. a 


justice from 1970 to 1994. held the seat 
occupied by Story from 1812 to 1845. 
His part, filmed in Connecticut last 
week, consisted of reading the decision. 
So how did he like it? In a statement 
long on judicial prudence and short on 
razzle-dazzle, he opined, “It was an 
honor to portray Mr. Justice Story in Mr. 
Spielberg’s significant film about our 
nation’s struggle with slavery." 


Michael Jackson beat the tabloids at 
their own game, selling photographs of 
his new baby that could fetch S3 million 
for his children’s charity. The National 
Enquirer paid $2 million for exclusive 
North American rights to 10 studio- 
quality photographs of Jackson, his 
wife. Debbie Rowe and 5- week-old 
Prince Michael Jackson Jr. They are 
the first pictures available in the United 
States. Rights elsewhere, such as in the 
British magazine OKI. could net Jack- 
son another $ I million, a source close to 
the Enquirer deal said. OK! published a 
photo of dad. mom and child this week. 
A Jackson spokesman wouldn't con- 


firm the amount of money, but said it 
was going to Jackson's Heal the World 
Foundation. 


Tommy Hilfiger is hip-hopping mad 
about rumors circulating on the Internet 
that he's made racist remarks. In a 
memo posted on Internet sites, the cloth- 
ing designer popular with rappers 
shoots down the rumors. “The facts are 
simple and incontrovertible." the elec- 
tronic message says. “Tommy Hilfiger 
did not make the alleged inappropriate 
racial comments.” The message comes 
in response to postings detailing a pair 
of fictitious television appearances in 
which Hilfiger is accused of saying 
Asians and blacks did not look good in 
his clothes. Rappers Snoop Doggy 
Dogg and Sadat X of Grand Nubian 
are amone Hilfieer's fans. 


Even Wynonna feels shy sometimes, 
she reveals on “Sesame Street.” On the 
show, the country diva gives advice 
about making new friends, and, of 


course, sings. Wynonna, once a member 
of The Judds duo with her mother 
Naomi, has since had a series of solo 
hits. 


Many in die scientific co mm un i ty are 
up in arms over the prospect of .cloning 
humans, but what do celebrities think? 
“I'd like to clone myself because then I 
would be able to do the 50 moViesayear 
that I want to do,” John Travolta said 
in Entertainment Weekly. The actress 
Halle Berry is against it. “People are 
one-of-a-kind creations," she said, 
adding that maybe she'd clone “these 
diamond earrings or my --Reflex 
watch.” 


Actress Kathleen Turner is id make 
her British stage debut for just £50Q 
($800) a week. Tomer, 42, known fbr 
her role in “The War of the Roses,” will fa- 
ster at the Chichester Festival Theatre “ ; 
outside London this summer in the play 
“Our Betters." by W. Somerset 
Maugham. 






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