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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


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Paris, Saturday -Sunday, March 29-30, 1997-4f 



No. 35,482 


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Cufe Blended Computer Savvy With a Biza 



eology 


Web Site Seemed Professional, 
But the Messages Were Strange 


By Joel Achenbach, Laune Goodstein and Marc Fisher 

Waihingion Pan Scn ifp 


U wasa doomsday cult with computers, and through rhe internet 
it told the world exactly what it believed and whai it would do. The 
only minglen was to wait for the comet — and the hidden spaceship 
— to amve. r r 

'‘Hale-Brad’s approach is the ‘marker' we've been waiting for 

the fame for the amvaj of the spacecraft from the Level Above 
Human toiake us home ro ' Their World. ‘ ’ a * ' Red A leri ' ' message 
said on what is apparently the cult's World Wide Web home 
page. 

The 39 persons found dead of suicide in Rancho Santa Fe. 
California, on Thursday were Internet Web site designers who 
called their company Higher Source. They were also members of a 
cult that mixed end-of- the -world Christian-stvlc eschatology with a 
space-alien obsession several steps beyond that on television's 
“The X-Files.” 

Like many marginal cult groups, this one had two faces: a public 
one, renting houses and cars and running a computer business 
advertised on a professional-looking Web site; and a private one. 
promoting a bizarre ideology, speaking a private vernacular and 
denigrating outsiders as evil or misguided. 

The cult also had a messianic leader, who called himself “Do" 
and ‘ ‘The Representative. ’ ’ Although police have not identified the 
leader, all signs point to one man: Marshall Herff Applewhite, a 
former college music professor. Mr. Applewhite ‘s body was among 
the 39 found in the house. 

Mr. Applewhite and a partner, Bonnie Nettles, launched the 
space cult in the mid- ] 970s. but after winning much publicity they 
suddenly went underground. Their “anew” drifted away. They re- 



So, What Is It About California 
That Feeds the ‘Crazy 5 Stereotype? 


By Peter H. King, 

Las An fetes Times Semce 


Afettu Fraw-Plr.-.v 

Marshall HerfF Applewhite, believed to be the leader of the 
California cult, in a video made before the mass suicide. 

emerged a few years ago. Mr. Applewhite began calling himself 
“Do” (pronounced doe) and gave himself the title “The Rep- 
resentative. "The cult had various names, from “Total Overcomes 
Anonymous" to the “Next Level Crew" to “Heaven's. Gale." Ms. 
Nettles apparently died; she was, as one cult member told a reporter 
in 1994, “recalled to the Next Level." 

Cynthia Kisser, director of the former Cult Awareness Network, 
a hotline and support group for families with relatives in cults, said 

See CULT, Page 3 


SAN DIEGO — Of course it happened in California. Where else 
would 39 keyboard-tapping monks, holed up in a S10 t 000-a-momh 
adobe mansion, choose to “shed their containers" and hitch a ride 
to the “Next Level” on a spacecraft said to be trailing the comet 
Hale-Bopp? 

Iowa? Kansas? 

Most of the dead were not from California. People almost always 
come from someplace else, drifting out from the com states, the 
Southwest desert, the Eastern cities, to make their stand on the 
continent's edge. 

William Money, first of California's legendary cult leaders, was 
a Scotsman who migrated to Los Angeles in 1 840 only after, by his 
telling, he received his marching orders from Jesus on a New York 
street comer. Jim Jones founded his Peoples Temple in Indiana and 
obliterated it in the Guyanese jungle. And yet. because his church 
gained prominence in San Francisco, he was to go down as one more 
piece of evidence in the case of Normalcy vs. the Lotus Eaters. 

So. too, will these poor lost children of something called 
Heaven's Gate be attached to the list of crazed Californians. It will 
matter little that, according to the drivers licenses and passports 
they nicked carefully into their kit bags, all but a few had come from 
elsewhere — New Mexico, Texas, Colorado. Arizona. 

The cliche has been fed anew. It is a well-established stereotype. 
Listen to the journalist Brace Bliven. writing about California in 
1935: “Here is the world’s prize collection of cranks, semi-cranks, 
placid creatures whose bovine expression shows that each of them 


See STATE, Page 3 


Hanbo Chief Arrested in Seoul 

Questioned on Funds 

CimipileJhf Our Strf Firm Pispaurhu 

SEOUL — Prosecutors on Friday ar- 
rested the chairman of the stricken 
Hanbo Group, whose steelmaking flag- 
ship company collapsed in January. 

The chairman, Chung Bo Keun, 
“was arrested and taken to the Yotmg- 
dungpo prison" after being questioned 
at die prosecutors’ office, a prosecution 
official said. 

Prosecutors have accused Mr. Chung 
of taking about 37 billion won ($41.6 
million) from Hanbo Group funds. 
Hanbo, with 22 affiliated companies, is 
South Korea’s 14th-biggest industrial 
conglomerate, or chaebol. 

Mr. Chung’s father, Chung Tae Soo, 
the founder of Hanbo, is currently on 
trial along with nine other people in 
connection with the Hanbo scandal. He 
is in custody at a Seoul prison. 

Also questioned Friday were eight 
executives of two of Hanbo’s creditor 
banks, Korea First Bank and Korea De- 
velopment Bank. They were asked 
whether massive loans that the banks 
had extended to Hanbo were the result 
of pressure from government officials 
or politicians. 

The Hanbo conglomerate collapsed 
in January under the weight of $5.8 
billion in debts incurred while expand- 
ing^ highly leveraged steel project 
The failure triggered eba 
level corruption, leading to 




. 

. ' ■ * • 

Win MeWnMiWrwn 

FIRST LADIES — Hillary Rodham Clinton with Janet Museveni, wife of the Ugandan 
president, in Kampala on Friday. The meeting followed Mrs. Clinton's two-day safari 
in Tanzania, where she bad a welcome respite From Washington’s wilds. Page 8. 


Chung Bo Keun, left, at his arrest Friday. He is the 
11th person to be detained in Korea’s Hanbo scandal. 


* 


Europe’s Clocks Gain 1 Hour 

Agents Frtmce-Presse 

Clocks go forward one hour in European countries this 
weekend with the switch from winter time to summer 
time. Clocks and watches should be put forward at 0100 
GMT on Sunday. 

Britain, Ireland and Portugal are on Greenwich Mean 
Time in winter, with the rest of Western Europe one hour 
ahead. Daylight Saving Time begins next weekend in the 
United States and Canada. 


arrests of 

10 high-ranking figures including three 
close aides of President Kim Young 
Sam, who were accused of pressuring 
banks to extend loans on easy terms to 
Hanbo. 

Prosecutors said they would seize the 
Chung family’s assets Vo “end the bad 
practice of the past, when businessmen 
survived even when their businesses 
collapsed” 

On Thursday, prosecutors said they 
had so far uncovered family assets total- 
ing 344 billion won that would be seized 
because of evidence the family had 
evaded taxes of 432.7 billion won. 

“The prosecution will set up a sep- 
arate team to track down the Chung 

See HANBO, Page 8 


U.K. Campaign Opens Luridly 

Tabloids Have a Field Day in Runup to the May I Election 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New Vwt Times Semcf 


LONDON — The British like to contend that 
their elections are more rational than American 
ones. Members of Parliament do not ran for elec- 
tion, they stand Comparatively small sums are 
spent on campaigning. And the electioneering lasts 
little more than a month. 

But, oh, what a time it is! 

The campaign opened this week with a bumper 
crop of lurid sex and bribery scandals as prominent 
enemies of the Conservatives vowed to bring down 
Prime Minister John Major’s government, The La- 
bour Party leads by more than 20 points in the polls, 
with five weeks to go before the May 1 vote. 


Thursday morning's headlines trumpeted a re- 
ported affair between Piers Merchant, a 46-year-old 
Conservative member of Parliament who is a strong 
advocate of ‘ ‘family values.” and Anna Cox, a 17- 
year-old nightclub hostess, who told all. 

Max Clifford, Britain's most feared “kiss and 
tell" press agent, has delivered one lurid story after 
another to tabloids, obtaining large sums for his 
clients and hefty commissions for himself. He says 
he is sitting on at least two more sizzling sex 
scandals involving Tory MPs. 

Mr. Clifford’s trophies include a former min- 
ister , David Mellor, whose extramarital affair with 
a woman was leaked to the tabloids, provoking his 

See TORIES, Page 8 


U.S. Envoy 
To Mideast 
Calls Calm 
‘Essential’ 

Finishing His Talks, 
Ross Raises Hopes 
Violence Will End 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — President Bill Clin- 
ton's special envoy to the Middle East 
concluded a 24-hour round of emer- 
gency consultations with Palestinians 
and Israelis on Friday and headed back 
to Washington, raising hopes of an im- 
minent end to the latest round of re- 
criminations and violence. 

“One thing that's clear as I leave is 
that it's essential to re-establish calm," 
the envoy, Dennis Ross, said. 

He spoke after more than three hours 
of meetings Friday with Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyalyi and senior mem- 
bers of his government. On Thursday, 
Mr. R oss met with Yasser Arafat, the 
Palestinian leader, in Morocco, and on 
Friday he met with Mr. Arafar's senior 
negotiators. 

Latest Palestinian rebellion puts 
new pressure on Arafat. Page 8. 

Public statements by the Israelis and 
Palestinians betrayed no moderation 
after the meetings. 

But there were various signs of a 
lifting of tensions, even as Palestinian 
youths went out for die eighth success- 
ive day. this time in Hebron, to stone 
Israeli soldiers and to be punished with 
tear gas and rubber bullets. 

After weekly prayers at A1 Aqsa 
Mosque in Jerusalem, for example, 
some Palestinian youths began stoning 
Israeli policemen. But the Israelis took 
no action, and let Palestinian guards 
restore order. 

In Morocco, die meeting of the “Je- 
rusalem Committee” of ministers from 
Islamic stales, which Mr. Arafat had 
been attending, issued an unexpectedly 
moderate denunciation of Israeli 
policies. Before meeting with Mr. Ara- 
fat. Mr. Ross spent two hours talking 
with King Hass an of Morocco, the 
chairman of the committee. 

There were also reports from Gaza 
that several Islamic militants had been 
arrested and that Ibrahim Maqadmeh, 
who has been identified as a leader of 
the Hamas movement, might be among 
them. 

The release of the militants from Pal- 
estinian jails during the last several 
months has been assailed by Israel as an 
encouragement to Islamic terrorists to 
resume attacks on Israel. 

U.S. officials said a major thrust of 
Mr. Ross's meeting with Mr. Arafat was 
to persuade him to take convincing steps 
against violence and terrorism. 

Mr. Netanyahu and senior Israeli se- 
curity officials have charged that Mr. 
Arafat gave a green light to Islamic mil- 
itants to resume terror attacks, such as the 
suicide bombing in Tel Aviv last week in 
which three women were killed, and has 
orchestrated the daily rock-throwing ri- 
ots outside Palestinian cities. 

“It's clear that until it is established 
that Arafat is doing everything possible 
to fight terrorism, it's going to be dif- 
ficult to deal with the other issues.,” said 
an American official. 

Mr. Arafat returned to Gaza on Friday 
and was scheduled to meet with his 
cabinet before leaving on a visit to Cairo 
on Saturday. 

See ISRAEL. Page 8 


Milosevic May Exchange 
Jobs to Hold Onto Power 


S 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Post Service 

BELGRADE — A weakened 
Slobodan : Milosevic has positioned 
himself to ex chan ge his powerful post 
as president of Serbia for the hitherto 
figurehead office of chief of state of the 
Yugoslav federation. 

Diplomats here portrayed his appar- 
ent willingness to shift institutional 



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gears as an attempt to prolong his 10 
years in command, hoping that the pres- 
idency of the Yugoslav federation, com- 
prising Serbia and the smaller southern 
republic of Montenegro, can be trans- 
formed into something more powerful. 

Mr. Milosevic has said nothing in 
public. But analysts here suggested his 
plans are dictated by the Serbian con- 
stitution’s two-term limit on the pres- 
idency, reinforced by the likelihood that 
any attempt to circumvent this restric- 
tion would reignite the protest move- 
ment that blocked his recent effort to 
nullify opposition election victories in 
14 of Serbia’s largest cities. 

In any case. Mr. Milosevic s inten- 
tions were sufficiently clear this past 
week to prompt the first of many can- 
didates to succeed him to throw his hat 
in the ring, even though Serbia’s pres- 
idential and parliamentary elections 
need not be held before December. 

“This country is too crazy to predict 
what will happen,” a veteran diplomat 
remarked, “but a pattern is emerging 
suggesting Milosevic wants the safest 
roure, and that means the presidency 


See SERBS, Page 8 


AGENDA 


3 Albanian Refugees Die as Boat Capsizes 


BRINDISI, Italy (AP) — A boat 
carrying Albanian refugees to Italy 
capsized in the rough waters of the 
Adriatic on Friday while under escort 
by an Italian Navy ship, and at least 
three people were dead, reports said. 

Three bodies had been recovered 
and 30 people rescued so far, RAI 
state television said. Port and police 
authorities estimated that 45 to 60 
people were aboard, but did nw con- 

EUR0PE Pago 2. 

Reflections of the ParisArchbishop 

THE AMERICAS Pago 3. 

One Senator's Interest in Beijing 

ASlAjPACIFIC Page 5. 

Japan Eases Grant- in-Aid to China 

ART Page 9. 

Kuwaiti Seeks Stolen Treasures 

Books - Pages. 

Crossword Page 5. 

Opinion Page 6. 

Sports Pages 16-17. 

frrtecnatfonef Ctasstfiett 


The IHT on-line httpi/Avvv'.v.iht.com 


firm the fatalities. Navy ships, a coast 
guard helicopter and other vessels 
converged on the scene and were try- 
ing to rescue the Albanians. 

The boat capsized and sank about 
65 kilometers (40 miles) from the 
Italian coast, coast guard officials 
said in this southern port. 

Darkness and rough seas were 
hindering rescue efforts, the officials 
added. 

NCAA Final Fours 
By Monday, Just One 

“The Road Ends Here,” is the 
message of the NCAA Final Four. 

Indianapolis, where the basketball 
tournament winds up. Is where that 
road ends for North Carolina. Ari- 
zona. Kentucky, and Minnesota — 
with a defeat Saturday evening, a loss 
Monday night or a reservation on a 
victory stand. 

Wim three top-seeded teams 
among the four national semifinalists, 
and with No. 4-seeded Arizona going 
strong after it defeated top-ranked 
Kansas, each school can claim a shot 
at the championship. Page 18. 


U.S. Weighs Security Pact 
With the Baltic Nations 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Past Service 


WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration is offering to negotiate a 
security agreement with the three Baltic 
nations in an attempt to ease concerns 
that they might be left out in the cold 
after the proposed expansion of NATO, 
U.S. officials and Baltic diplomats say. 

So far, however, Washington has 
stopped short of making any commit- 
ment that Lithuania. Latvia and Estonia 
eventually will be granted membership 
in the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation, a step that would anger Russia. 

The issue of how to deal with the 
Baltic countries is taking on new im- 
portance now that President Boris 
Yeltsin of Russia has signaled he is 
prepared to accept the admission of sev- 
eral former Soviet bloc countries into 
NATO, albeit under protest. Russian 
officials have made clear that they will 
be much more assertive in opposing 
NATO membership for countries that 
formerly were part of the Soviet Union 
itself, such as the Baltic stales. 

The first round of candidates for 
membership is due to be announced at 


an alliance summit meeting in Madrid in 
early July. 

while U.S. officials have refused to 
name the countries involved, it is widely 
assumed that the list is headed by Po- 
land, the Czech Republic and Hungary. 
That in turn raises the question of what 
wiU happen to the countries that fail to 
make the first cut. 

“ What we fear is that either the door 
will be slammed shut after the first 
round of admissions, or the whole issue 
will be pushed back for another 10 
years,” said Ojars Kalnins, the Latvian 
ambassador to the United Stares. 

U.S. and NATO officials accept that 
the Baltic states, which the Soviet Union 
annexed in World War n, have made as 
much progress toward democracy and 
free markets as their southwestern 
neighbors since the collapse of com- 
munism. But their aspirations of joining 
NATO and otherwise exercising full 
autonomy on the international stage 
have been complicated by their sen- 
sitive strategic position on Russia’s 
northwestern border. 

To reassure the Baltic nations, and the 

See BALTIC, Page 8 


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Archbishop of Paris / Reflections on Le Pen, Immigrants and Catholicism 


‘My Job Is to Clear Minds,’ the Cardinal Says 


By John Vinocur 

International Herald Tribune 


P 


ARIS — It’s not your usual leg-of-Iamb-and- 
Monday ’ s-a-holiday Easter weekend in France. 
Jean-Marie Le Fen, the right-wing extremist leader, 
has chosen to give the Resurrection and the Pope a 



party congress in Strasbourg 

Mr. Le Pen offered a short laugh when he was asked by 
a reporter if the juxtaposition risked shocking Christians. ‘ *1 
could have just as well chosen Christmas or Assumption. 
There’s a celebration every (fey in the Catholic religion.*' 
he said, and then, setting himself up as canon law expert and 
ecumenist, reminded listeners that although Judaism pro- 
scribed activity on the sabbath, Catholicism did not much 
care. 

When news like this — or any of the other daily tales of 
the meanness and sadness that now stitch through French 
life — reaches him, Jean-Marie Cardinal Lustiger, the 
archbishop of Paris, reacts quietly. Accounts of intolerance 
and racism, the subtexts of anti-Semitism, the resistance to 
change, the flight from responsibility, Mr. Le Fen hims elf: 
The cardinal weighs and thinks and slowly says, “I am 
enraged.” And he stop there. 

He is not a talk-radio priest, a s linger of sound bites or a 
cardinal who think s he should be doing the job of politicians 
or editorialists. But he is literally such an unusual person, one 
so sensitized to die odor of the National Front, that he 
struggles to express himself in a way he feels is compatible 
with his own convictions and his view of the church's role. 

How does a prince of die Roman Catholic church, who 
says he has “always considered myself a Jew.*’ and 
someone “who knows what it is to be an immigrant and 
without rights,’* react to a party that focuses on real frictions 
in French life but with a racist and xenophobic tonality? 

The cardinal’s dile mma is largely the same as that of 
French politicians and the media who have accused each 
other of legitimizing the National Front and demonizing its 
voters by talking too much or too little about its dangers. 


As the leading Roman Catholic prelate in France, as the 
archb isho p who will celebrate mass at Notre Dame on 
Sunday, but also as the son of Folish-Jewish immigrants 
and as a man whose mother was killed at Auschwitz, 
Cardinal Lustiger makes it clear that be must skirt daily 
politics. But be also insists there is a tine he has defined for 
himself, and keep to himself, that the Le Pens must not 
cross. 


“I think I've got work to do cm building respect and 
establishing a climate of nonviolence,” he said in an 


interview. “My job is to clear minds. I am not going to go 
into polemics until it is time. Occasionally I have this image 
in ray mind of Latin America and those scenes whore 
everyone shoots in the air to express pleasure or displeasure 
with this or that My view is that when there's so much 
shooting, nobody knows when the war really begins.” 

Privately, Cardinal Lustiger. now 70, has told mends that 
be received Mr. Le Pen once and found him horrible. His 
line on responding to Mr. Le Pen was briefly crossed last 
summer when the rightist said that there is a basic inequality 
between races. 

The cardinal replied that the notion was cynical, mur- 
derous and essentially pagan stuff “going beyond some 
harmless theory and capable of causing real horrors. ” Not 
without irony, he also called on Mr. Le Pen “to convert, not 
only in his intentions, but in his heart, words and deeds.” 

This was too much for Mr. Le Pen, who leaped at the 
opportunity to point to the cardinal's own conversion to 
Catholicism at age 13, saying, “I have never needed to 
convert because at birth I was baptized in a religion that I 
personally have never rejected.” 

The exchange stopped there. The analysis of the situation 
in relation to the National From by the French council of 
bishops is that the church must stay on a moral, rather than 
political, line, avoiding the personality of Mr. Le Pen. 

Telling the faithful not to vote for his party — polls show 
practicing Catholics are more resistant to the Front than the 
population at large — is excluded, except for a situation 
where, in the words of a church official, “You’re talking 
about atomic weapons.” 

Beyond Mr. Le Pen, much of the concern for the future of 


| France and Europe felt by the cardmalrelaies to what he 

sees as a failure to anticipate crises and change with greater 

strength. 



„ — immigr ation _ — 

avoidable. The issue is how these old cultures welcome 
these ’new others' they cannot refuse. It’s not a matter of 
immigration policy.” 


I HE RESPONSE, which he said politicians woe 


running away from, has to do with ‘ ‘helping people 

while being 


T 

■ to be conscious of their own history 

JL welcoming.” This was nothing less than an 
for the West to not abandon its character or traditions, 
build on its humanism. 

“You cannot foresee history, but there are situations you 
can analyze. We seem paralyzed to look forward or to 
organize the future. We’re so excited by technological 
change that we avoid the rest You’ve got to work for the 
future even if the premises turn out not to hold completely. 
If you prepare, it all wodss out. 

“The current problem in France is that people feel that 
nothing is moving for the better at the same time they are 
shaken by change that is making them lose their life 
guidelines. Unemployment brings to mind the worst times in 
our history. The disintegration of the family has done 
terrible things to our youth. Our countryside is emptying.” 

And as a cultural fact, traditional Catholic life in France 
is diminishing, the cardinal said. But he is optimistic 
nonetheless about its transformation, a man whose own 
extraordinary experience justifies every sighting of blue on 
darkened horizons. 

“Catholicism as a culture here is coming apart, perhaps 
to come together in rhythm with society. Society is ques- 
tioning itself, and the evangelical and biblical message, 
however challenged, asks good questions and brings to- 
gether courageous people who want to work for good 
things. There is a new generation without the intellectual 
conformity of the previous generations. That bothers die 
older people, bin mar may be good news, too.” 




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Cardinal Lustiger carrying a cross 
during a Good Friday procession to the 
Sucre Coeur Basilica in Paris. 


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IRA Claims 2 Blasts; 
Attacks Seen as Effort 
To Alter U.K. Election 


Reuters 

BELFAST — IRA guer- 
rillas claimed responsibility 
Friday for two bombs placed 
this week on railroad tines in 
northwestern England that 
badly disrupted services but 
caused no injuries. 

The attacks took place 
amid early campaigning for 
the British general election on 
May 1 and were seen by se- 
curity sources as a bid by the 
Irish Republican Army to 
force Northern Ireland onto 
the political agenda. 

The claim for Wednes- 
day’s double bombing in the 
town of Wilmslow in 
Cheshire county was made in 
a call to Ireland’s semi-state 
broadcasting network RTE. 
An anonymous caller using a 
recognized codeword had 
warned the police that the 
bombs had been planted. 

IRA guerrillas fighting 
British rule of Northern Ire- 
land for the past 28 years want 
the British government to ad- 
mit their Sinn Fein political 
wing to peace talks in Belfast 
that have brought together Ir- 
ish nationalists and pro-Brit- 
ish Unionist groups. 

But Britain says Sinn Fein 
will be kept out until the IRA 
abandons violence and com- 
mits itself to democracy to 
pursue its goal of uniting 
Northern Ireland and the Irish 
Republic. 


Britain's governing Con- 
servative Party and the main 
opposition Labour Party have 
adopted a bipartisan approach 
to Northern Ireland 
throughout a three-year-old 
initiative to get Unionists and 
Irish nationalists to negotiate 
a lasting settlement to a con- 
flict in which about 3.200 
people have been killed. 

It is not an issue in the 
British election. 

Friday's claim was made 
as Sinn Fein organized a 
protest outside the gates of 
Northern Ireland’s Maze pris- 
on against the withdrawal of 
privileges for IRA inmates to 
punish them for an attempted 
breakout through a tunnel. 

Prisoners are being locked 
in their cells at night and have 
had privileges withdrawn be- 
cause of fee attempted es- 

X , which was thwarted 
i prison authorities found 
the tunnel on Sunday. 

A small group of protesters 
gathered outside fee gates of 
the Maze waving placards 
and calling for the restrictions 
to be lifted, witnesses said. 

In fee past, inmates were not 
locked in their cells at night 
but were allowed to mingle 
throughout their cell blocks. 

They have also been 
denied handicraft, gym and 
computer training facilities to 



OfavkrHMhVXaKn 


STEELED FOR BATTLE — Workers from the bankrupt Clabecq steelworks battling police on a 
superhighway south of Brussels on Friday after the workers tried to block it with construction equipment 
over job losses. Eight workers and 17 policemen were hurt in fighting after a bulldozer plowed a police car. 


BRIEFLY 


Scot 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strikes Disrupt French Air Travel 


PARIS (Combined Dispatches) — Easter weekend air 
travelers faced major disruption on France’s domestic airlines 
because of wildcat strikes over pay and working conditions. 

A surprise stoppage by ground staff at Orly airport will 
ground all flights from there by Air France Europe on Sat- 
urday, the company said Friday. 

The strike Friday by one of fee main ground staff trade 
unions caused delays and many cancellations, fee airline said. 
Only 10 flights were able to operate, the company said. The 
workers were protesting fee merging of their pay and em- 


Air France Europe pilots and flight crew have called a two- 
day strike Monday and Tuesday over pay and conditions, but 
the company said ail flights would be maintained. “Traffic 
will be completely assured with hardly any chartering,” a 
company spokeswoman said. 

Pilots and ground staff at TAT European Airlines, French 
subsidiary of British Airways, staged a 24-hour strike Friday 
against restructuring plans, forcing fee cancellation of about 
three-quarters of 1 80 scheduled flights. (Reuters. AFP ) 


Paris Clears Airport Expansion 


PARIS (Reuters) — The French government said Friday that 


punish the escape attempt, of- ployment terms with those of fee parent company. Air France, it had given fee go-ahead for the 1.5 billion franc ($265 million) 
ficials said. when fee two companies unite Sept. 1 . expansion of Roissv-Charies de Gaulle Airnort north of Paris. 


Sept. 


RELIGIOUS SERVICES 


AMSTERDAM 


SWITZERLAND 


CROSSROADS INTERNATIONAL 
CHURCH Interdenominational & 
Evangefcal Sunday Service iftOO am. & 
ii:3D a.mj Kids Welcome. De 
Cuserstraat 3. S. Amsterdam Into. 020- 
641 88120T 0206451 663. 


BASEL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
EngHsh-Speaking non-denominational. 
Tel. -»41 61 302 1674, Sundays 1030 
WWse Sdasse 1 3, OM056 Basel 


ZUR1CH-5WTTZEKLAND 


BRUSSELS/WATERLOO 

ALL SAINT'S* CHURCH. Is! Sun. 9 & 
1 1:15 am Holy Eucharist with CMdren'S 
Chapala 11:15. ABaherSuncfeys: 11:15 
am. Maly Eucharist and Sunday School. 
563 Chaussde de Louvain. Ohain, 
Befcjun. Tel 32/2 384-355B, 


FRANCE/TOULOUSE 


HOPE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH 
(Evangefcal). 4, bd. de Ptoac, CDtomter. 
Sunday service. 6:30 p.m.Tel.: 
0562741155. 


ENGLISH-SPEAKING CATHOLIC 
MISSION; 5t. Anton Church, 
MtnervasJraOe 63 Sunday Mass: 8:30 
am. & 11-J0 am. Services held in the 
crypl ct St Anton Church. 


FRENCH RIVIERA/ COTE D'AZUR 


NICE: Holy Trinity (Anglican). 11 rue 
BuSa. Sua 1 1; VBCE; SI Hughi 22, av. 
Resistance. 9 am. Tet 33 04 93 87 1 9 83. 


THE EPISCOPAL CHURCHES 
Of EUROPE (Angficon) 


WIESBADEN 

THE CHURCH OF ST. AUGUSTINE 
OF CANTERBURY. Sun. 10 a.m 
Family Eucharist. Frartkfurtar Strasse 3. 
Wiesbaden, Germany. Tel.: 
49*611.306674. 


PARIS and SUBURBS 


MONTE CARLO 


MONACO CHRISTIAN FELLOWSWP 
Worship Service. Sundays: 11 a.m. 
9. me Louis Notary, Monte Carlo. 
Td; 377 sets 56 47. 


MUNICH 
INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY 


THE AMB0CAN CATHEDRAL OF THE 
HOLYTRWmr, Sun. 9 & 11 am. 10*5 
am. Sunday School for children and 
Nursery care. Third Sunday 5 p.m. 
Evensong. 23. avenue George V, 
Parts 75008. Tel-: 33-01 53 23 84 00. 
Metro; Geotge V or Akna Maceau 


WARSAW 

KAPUCA RES SACHA MISER, Sun. 
9:30 am. Holy EuchansL with Sunday 
School and Creche. Next door lo 
Kratawfcie Przcdroesde 62. TeL (0048- 
22)6243730. 


NICE - FRANCE 

LB.C. 13 rue Vernier. Engfish service. 
Sirdayev9»ni850.pasiDrFk)yMier- 
TeL (0493)32 05 96. 

PRAGUE 

La FELLOWSHS*. Vmohradska * 68, 
Prague 3. Sin. 1 1 ro. Tel: (02) 31 1 7974. 

WATERLOO 

WATERLOO BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 
Sua 1900 at Swedish Church, across 
from MacDonalds. Td.: (02) 353 1585. 

ZURICH - SWITZERLAND 
I.B.C of Zurich. Gheistra&se 31. 8803 
Huschtfron. Worship Services Sunday 
mornings 1030. TeL 1-481001& 


ASSOC OF INTI 
CHURCHES 


EUROPEAN 

BAPTIST CONVENTION 


BERLIN 


FLORENCE 


CHURCH. Evangelical Bftjte Believing 
sovices ri Sigfch 430 pm Smdays at 
Ertfiuberetr. 10 (U2 Therestenstr.) (069) 
8508617, 


ST. JAMES CHURCH, Sun. 9 am. FRe 1 
All am Rbe U. Via Bernardo Ruceta 9. 
50123, Florence. Italy. TeL 395529 44 17. 


I.B.C.. BERLIN. Rothenburg Sir. 13. 
(StegTitz). Sunday. BftHe study 10.45. 
worship Service 12.00 noon. Charles 
Warlord, pastor. TeL: 030-774-4670. 


BREMEN 


BERLIN 

AMSBCAN CHURCH N BERUN, cor. 
o# Ctay Alee & PWsdamer Str_SS. 930 
am, Wbrehip li am Tel: 030S1 32021. 

FRANKFURT 

TRINTTY LUTHERAN CHURCH. 
Nbekranalee 54, Sun. WorsNb il am. 
TeL 06^663 1066 or 5 12552. 

GENEVA 

EV. LUTHERAN CHURCH 20 rue 
Verdaina Sunday wortf* 930. T Germai 

11 -00 in Ertfsh. Tet (022) 3105069 


PARIS cmd SUBURBS 


FRANKFURT 


EHUANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH - An 

evangefcal rtufehttaHestemsfeuta, 

all are welcome. 9:45 First Service 
concurrent »rth Sunday School. 11:00 
Second Service with CMdrart's Church. 
French Service 630 pm. 56. rue des 
Bons- Raisins, 92500 Ruefl-Maknaison. 
For rto, OS 01 4751 2963. 


CHURCH OF CHRIST THE KING 
(Episcopa [/Anglican) Sun. HoJy 
Communion 9 & 11 am. Sunday School 
and Nursery 10-45 am Sebastian F&e 
SL 22, 60323 FrarMun. Germany. U1. 2. 
3 MqueMlee. Tet 49B9 55 01 84. 


IBXX, Hohertohestr. Herinam-Bose-Str. 
Wotsftp Sir. 17:00. Pastor telephone: 
04791-13377. 


ish. Tet (022) 311 

JERUSALEM 

LUTHERAN CHURCH of l he Redeemer. 


OU aty. Mutstan Ftt. Engfcfi washp S ul 
m. Al are weteurre. TeL(02) 6281-049 


BUCHAREST 


LB.G.. Strada Pops Rusu 22- 3:00 pm. 
TeL 3123861 


BUDAPEST 


GENEVA 


HOPE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH 
Hotel Ongn at PadsteOetense. 8 bd de 
Neuiy. Worehp Smdays 930 am Rev. 
Douglas Miller, Paster. Tel.: 
01 43 33 04 06. Metro 1 to la Defense 


EMMANUEL CHURCH, 1st & 3rd Sun. 
10 am Eucharist aid & 4»i Sun Morning 
Prayer. 3 nede Morthotrc. 1201 Geneva, 
Switzerland. TeL 41/22 732 80 7S. 


Srnnaznm. Torokvesz ul 48-5^'sun. 
IttOOi TSL 2503802. 


BULGARIA 


MUNICH 


1B.C.. World Trade Center. 36. Drahan 
Tzankov Btvd. Worship 1 1:00. James 
Dite. Pastor. TeL: 669 66ft 


SAINT JOSEPH'S CHURCH (Roman 
Cahoft* MASS N BIGUSN Sat 630 pm: 
Sun. 9:45. 11:00 am. 12:15. 6:30 p.m. 
50. avenue Hoche. Paris 8th. 'Tel.: 
Qi 42 2? 28 56- Meta Chafes (to Cade -Bole. 


THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION. 
Sun. 1 1 :4S a.m Holy Eucharist and 
Sunday School Nursery Care provided. 
Seybotttetrasae 4. 81545 Munch (Har- 
Ifttirg). Germany. TeL 49/89 64 81 85. 


FRANKFURT 

JN^RNATtONAL CHRISTIAN FEL- 
L^WSHff*. Ev.-FredethSche Gernevtde, 


Sodene^S. n-ia. 63150 Sad Horrtua 
y & SS: 


TOKYO 


ROME 


Sunday Worship. Nursery 

1150 AM Mid-week m inistrie s. Pastor 
Mlflwry. CaE/Fa* 0617M2728. 


9 am. Mare welcome. Tet: (02)6281-049 

PARIS 

AMSBCAN CHURCH M PAMS. Easter 
Services. Sunrise Service 720 am on the 
Ouai across from the Church: Easier 
Marring 9:15 am.; Easter Momma 11D0 
am (Services are identical) 65. Quai 
tfOrsey. Paris 7. Btfi 53 ai door. Metro 
AfrnaMarceau or kwafidss. 

VIENNA 

VIENNA COMMUNITY CHURCH. 
Suiday worship In English 11:90 AM.. 
Sunday school, nursery, mtematanal. aS 
denomnaeona vwfcome. Dordheergasse 
16, Vienna 1. 

ZURICH 

INTERNATIONAL PROTESTANT 

CHURCH English speaking, worship 
service. Sunday School 8 Nurserv. 
Sundays 1130 a m. Schanzangasse 25. 
Tel: (01) 2625525. 


expansion of Roissy-Charies de Gaulle Airport north of Paris. 

The plan calls for two new short runways, parallel to the 
existing ones, to be used for landing only. The statement by 
Prime Minister Alain Juppe and other ministers said feat this 
replaced a previous plan for a fifth full service runway for both 
landing and takeoff. 

An independent body will be created to monitor noise, 
which the government said would be equal to current levels 
“or if possible less.” 

A spokeswoman for fee Transport Ministry said that the 
first of fee two runways would be opened at fee end of 1998 
and the second in 2000. 


Correction 


An article Marc h 1 7 misstated fee political orientation of 
Belgium's FGTB union. It is a broadly based Socialist union. 


Albanian Leader Renews Calls 
For Foreign Protection of Aid ; 


TIRANA, Albania — President Sali Berisha renewed 
calls Friday for a foreign force to safeguard aid to Albania 
after the United Nations Security Council began con- 
sidering an Italian request to authorize intervention. . 

“Berisha stressed that the escort of convoys of aid by . 
police or mili tary units” of fee countries Albania has: 
asked aid from “is indispensable to provide the necessary 
security of this operation,” an official statement said. 

Meanwhile, police were investigating the deaths of 20 
people in a shootout Thursday in central Albania* the 
worst bloodletting in two months of crisis. Villagers in 
Frakull shot and killed 17 gunmen, and wounded one 
other after they drove to fee hamlet and began firing 
weapons. Three villagers were killed. (Reuters) 


ExHismoi 


Russians Go Back to Work 


MOSCOW — Russian workers returned to fee normal- 
routine of waiting for long-delayed paychecks oaFriday 
after a day of strikes and demonstrations marked by. • 
apathy and resignation. ... 

Mikhail Shmakov, a union leader, said more than 20 
million people had joined Thursday’s day of protests 
Against wage and pension arrears, but it was not clear ! 
where his figures came from. 1 

The Interior Ministry, basing its calculations on protest : 
marches in Moscow and other cities, had put the number * 
at just under 2 million. (Reuters)' 


High Winds Kill 8 in Europe 


BONN — Hurricane-force winds blasted through parts 
of Europe on Friday, killing at least eight people, up- 
rooting trees and peeling off roofs. 

Winds exceeded 120 kilometers (75 miles) per boor ml 
many parts of Poland. Uprooted trees killed four people 
there and several other people were injured, the PAP press 
agency said. 

In Germany, winds of up to 146 kilometers an hour 
were clocked in some areas. A 19-year-old woman near 
fee East German town of Golzow was killed by a hay- ' 

wagon feat was blown on top of her, fee police said. 

Record winds of up to 198 kilometers an hour roared 
through the Czech Republic, and a 23-year-old man was 
killed by a falling tree near Prague, the CTK press agency 
reported. (A/*) ' 


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9ENNIS ' 


6 Fire Victims Buried in Hague 


THE HAGUE — Thousands of mourners wept and 
prayed in a square here Friday over the coffins of six . 
victims of what Dutch media said may have been a racist 1 
arson attack. 


A Turkish woman and five of her children died in a fire ' 
at their home in The Ha 


at tneir nome in Ihe Hague on Tuesday nighL Her 
husband mid the couple’s five other children escaped by” 
jumping from an upstairs window. The mayor of The 
Hague told relatives of fee victims feat fee fire had" 
apparently been deliberately set, reports said. (Reuters)- 


WEATHER 


Europe 


UNITARIAN UNIVBSAUST 


ST. PAUL NTHWATTONAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH, near Iktabashi Sn. TaL 3261- 
3740. Woshp Service: 930 am Sundays 

TOKYO umon CHURCH nea Omcfesando 

Sfe TfiL 3WM047. Waslto Sento: 
Sunday - 630 S 11:00 am, SS a 9:45 am. 


ST. 

630 &m 

Choral Eucharist Rite II: 10:30 a.m. 
Church Sdud tor UAfiw & NuSery care 
provided; 1 pm. Spanish Eucharist via 
Nape* 56, 00184 Rome. TeL 396 488 
33390-3964743569. 


HOLLAND 

TIBBTY MTERNfflONAL iMes you to 
aChna ceraered toflowahlp. Services: 
MO and 1030 am. 6toemcamplaan 54. 
Wassenaar 07D-517-8024 rAjrSeryprov. 


WJUl 

R av. MacLean d Bciston Surefay. March 
30. 12 noon. Foyer de rAn®. 7 tie, me 
Pasteur Wagner. 11®. M® Bastille. 


: educaflon tor lams and chicken, 
and Spiritual growth groups. 
Soca acthnttes NFO- 01-* 827533. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAl'-SUNDAX, MARCH 29 


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in F.urof 


One Senator’s Interests in China 

Spouse of Foreign Policy Maker Has Investments in Beijing 


By Glenn F. Bunting 
and Dan Morain 

Los Angeles Times Servi ce 

WASHINGTON — Senator Dianne 
Feins tern of California is one of the 
staunchest proponents of closer U.S. 
relations with China, fighting for per- 
manent most-favored-nation trading 
status for Beijing. 

At the same rime, far from the spot- 
light, Ms. Feinstein’s husband. Richard 
Blum, has expanded his private busi- 
ness interests in China; His company is 
now a prominent investor. 

Ms. Feinstein and Mr. Blum have 
said that they maintained a ** firewall” 
between her role as an influential for- 
eign policy maker and his career as a 
private investor overseas. 

But such closely coinciding interests 
are highly unusual for major public fig- 
ures in Washington. And now, as con- 
troversy heats up over allegations of 
improper foreign influence in the Amer- 


ican political process, the effectiveness 
of the firewall between those interests 
could be called into question. 

On Thursday, after he was inter- 
viewed about his China investments, 
Mr. Blum announced that he would 
donate future profits to his nonprofit 
foundation to help Tibetan refugees. 
“This should remove any perception 
that I. in any way. shape or form benefit 
from or influence my wife’s position on 
China as a U.S. senator.” he said. 

In 1992, when Ms. Feinstein entered 
the Senate, Mr. Blum’s interests in 
China amounted to one project worth 
less than $500,000. according to her 
financial disclosure reports. But since 
then, his financial activities in the coun- 
try have increased. 

In the last year, a Blum investment 
firm paid $23 million for a slake in a 
Chinese government-owned steel enter- 
prise and acquired sizable interests in 
the leading producers of soybean milk 
and candy in China. Mr. Blum's com- 


Shift on Mammogram Policy 


New York rimes Service 
BETHESDA, Maryland — In a 
reversal of its position, the National 
Cancer Institute now says that women 
in their 40s should have breast X-rays 
every one to two years. 

The institute also advised women 
who have an above-average risk of 
breast cancer for a variety of reasons, 
including a genetic predisposition or 
having a first child after the age of 30, 
to seek guidance from their doctors on 
how often to have such mammograms 
and whether to start before 40. It said 
regular mammograms could reduce 


the death rate from breast cancer by 17 
percent among those women. Previ- 
ously. the cancer institute said it did not 
recommend universal mammogram 
screening for women in their 40s. 

On Sunday, the American Cancer 
Society, which has always recom- 
mends mammograms for women in 
their 40s, advised them to have mam- 
mograms every year rather than every 
one to two years. But the cancer in- 
stitute disagreed with die cancer so- 
ciety on annual screening, saying that 
the evidence for that frequency of 
mammograms was not there. 


% ?, aemd Sheriff Is Ordered to Seize 
! °f A O.J. Simpson ’s Belongings 


Los Angeles Tunes Service 

SANTA MONICA. California — A 
judge has ordered OJ. Simpson to turn 
over his Heisman Trophy, golf clubs, an 
Andy Warhol sen graph of himself and 
jewelry, furs and silverware worth more 
than $500,000 to satisfy partly the $33.5 
million judgment a jury rendered 
against hun. 

A $40,000 gold necklace with 89 
diamonds, the $25,000 Warhol sen- 
graph and a $26,500 full-length fur coat, 
were among the highest valued pos- 
sessions cm a list of 107 items. 

Also on tire list is a collection of 
Italian silverware by BuceOati assessed 
at $16,297. 

The order from Judge Hiroshi Fuji- 
saki of Superior Court directs Mr. 
Simpson to turn the property over to the 
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Depart- 
ment within seven days of being served. 
The ju d ge acted on a request made by 
attorneys for Fred Goldman, who won a 
civil trial verdict in February holding 
Mr. Simpson liable for the Jane 12, 
-1994, slayings of his son, Ronald, and 
Mr. Simpson’s former wife, Nicole 
Brown Simpson. 

A jury awarded Mr. Goldman 
$13,475 million, in compensatory and 


CULT: 

To the ‘Next Level’? 

Continued from Page 1 

'she remembered receiving calls from 
-around the country in the early 1990s 
; about a couple calling themselves ‘‘Ti 
and Do.” 

"They were very secretive and yet 
high-profile,” Ms, Kisser said. “They 
would give these talks but left no for- 
warding address. When you tried to find 
them later, they had disappeared with- 
out a trace.” 

The cult attracted men and women of 
.all ages. They traded to be gentle and 
i nonassertive, according to Nannie 
Brown, the mo&erof one member. The 
cult members were required to give up 
their personal possessions, cut ties to 
their families and abstain from sex, 
drugs and alcohol. 

An advertisement placed in USA 
-Today by the cult three years ago stated 
that members must shad ‘‘all h uma n- 
mammalian behavior.” 

Nick Matzoritis. the Beverly Hills. 
California, computer expert who dis- 
covered the 39 bodies — - accompanied 
by an employee^ who is a former mem- 
ber of the group — said he had met 
about 15 members of the cult Do’s 
writing matches almost precisely the 
message in the pre-suicide videoapes 
that were delivered to Mr. Matzorios’s 
office Tuesday night. 

•• The colt actively solicited interest 
from troubled individuals. From June 
through October of last year, “Rep” — 
most likely an abbreviation of "Rep- 
resentative,” according to Internet ex- 
perts — posted copies of a treatise tided 
‘-■Time to .Die for God?” on several 
Internet newsgroups targeted at lost or 


punitive damages. The estate of Nicole 
Brown Simpson was awarded $12.5 
million, while Sharon Rufo, Ronald 
Goldman’s mother, was awarded 
$7 .525 million. 

Mr. Simpson has appealed the verdict 
and has asked the judge to reduce the 
damage awards. But he has not obtained 
an order to keep the plaintiffs from 
proceeding in the meantime. 

There was a sign that Mr. Goldman 
may be in a contest for Mr. Simpson’s 
assets with Nicole Simpson’s estate. 
Judge Fujisaki on Tuesday issued a sim- 
ilar order in response to a request by 
lawyers for the estate. He unsealed that 
order after Thursday's hearing. 

That order directs the sheriff to seize 
66 items, a-. Shorter list than the one 
submitted by Mr. Goldman, but includ- 
ing some items not on the Goldman list. 

Other items on the Goldman list in- 
clude an 18-karat gold Rolex watch 
valued at $7,600; a $10,200 Chinese 
enameled porcelain bowl; a $24,480 
Wisteria lamp; a $7,140 Chinese Coro- 
mandel screen; and Lalique glassware, 
women’s jewelry and sports memor- 
abilia, including one of his Buffalo Bills 
helmets valued at $714 and "any and all 
golf clubs and golf bags.” 


pony, Newbridge Capital Ltd., also won 
a $10 million investment from the In- 
ternational Finance Corp., an arm of the 
World Bank. Experts said that backing 
from the International Finance Corp. 
typically confers legitimacy and can 
help attract other investors. 

Ms. Feinstein became a member of 
the Senate Foreign Relations Commit- 
tee in January 1 995, giving her a prom- 
inent platform for her efforts to support 
China’s trade privileges. 

Since 1995. she has made three visits 
to confer with senior government of- 
ficials in Beijing. Mr. Blum has ac- 
companied her each time at his own 
expense and has attended many of her 
meetings with President Jiang Zemin 
and other top Chinese leaders — an 
unusual degree of access for a private 
businessman. 

Ms, Feinstein said this week that her 
Senate position in no way had affected 
her husband's business. She said that 
Mr. Blum had never sought to exploit 
her influence or access to increase his 
opportunities in China. 

"My husband has never discussed 
business with Jiang Zemin; never 
would, never has,” she said. 

Federal investigators have detected 
that the Chinese government might ha ve 
attempted to seek favor with Ms. Fein- 
stein. Last year, she was one of six 
members of Congress who were warned 
by the FBI that Beijing might try to 
influence them through illegal cam- 
paign contributions. There is no ev- 
idence that Ms. Feinstein received any 
contributions from China. 

The inquiries into supposedly im- 

E roper Chinese political efforts in the 
tailed Stales have increased the sen- 
sitivity of Mr. Blum’s associations 
there. Investigators are looking at the 
activities of such business-government 
entities as China International Trade & 
Investment Corp., or CITIC, a $20 bil- 
lion, state-owned conglomerate that is 
the most influential financial enterprise 
in China. 

Mr. Blum's businesses come in con- 
tact either directly or indirectly, with 
such entities. There is no indication of 
impropriety in any of these relationships 
or that Ms. Feinstein was even aware of 
any overlap between her husband's in- 
vestments and Chinese firms. 

In separate telephone interviews 
Wednesday, Ms. Feinstein and Mr. 
Blum emphasized that they share a 
deep, persona] interest in China dating 
back two decades. 

As a pro-business mayor of San Fran- 
cisco in the 1980s, Ms. Feinstein 
worked intently to expand economic 
ties in the Pacific Rim, especially in I 
China. She set out eariy in her tenure to j 
establish sister city relations between 
San Francisco and Shanghai. 

In 1986, Ms. Feinstein and Mr. Jiang, 
then mayor of Shanghai, agreed to des- 
ignate various corporate entities to 
foster trade and other business relations. 
One was named Shanghai Pacific Part- 
ners; Mr. Blum served as a director. 

In 1992, the value of his stake in 
Shanghai Pacific Partners was between 
$250,001 and $500,000. according to 
Ms. Feinstein 's financial statements. By 
last year’s filing. Mr. Blum’s interest 
had grown to between $500,001 and $1 
million. Mr. Blum said that less than 2 
percent of the approximately $1 .5 bil- 
lion his company manages is committed 
to China. 



Joo Levy/AEroce France -ft e«* 

RUSH TO THE ALTAR — A couple waiting in line to get married Friday in New York. The number of 
ceremonies has doubled on immigrants’ fears of an April 1 change in the law on US. residence. 


Away From Politics 

• A baggage handler was killed when 
he slipped under the wheels of a jetliner 
being pushed from a gate at New 
York’s Kennedy International Airport. 
The Delta Air Lines worker fell be- 
neath the wheels of an L-1011 jet 
bound for Nice as a ground vehicle was 
pushing iL (AP) 


• A three-member panel of the Cali- 

fornia Board of Corrections has de- 
cided that Charles Manson, 62. is still 
too dangerous for society, denying him 
parole for the ninth time. Manson is 
serving a life sentence for orchestrating 
the deaths of the actress Sharon Tate 
and six others in 1969. (AP l 

• Federal officials increasingly are 
worried that some of the massive dams 


POLITICAL NOTES 


that dot the West could become tempt- 
ing targets for terrorists, so the gov- 
ernment is stepping up security at the 
facilities. Reclamation Commissioner 
Eluid Martinez emphasized at a press 
conference in Washington that he was 
unaware of any specific threats from 
terrorists to any of the dams, but that he 
was boosting security and making local 
officials at the dams aware of the po- 
tential problem. (AP) 


Ruckus Over the Federal Bench 

WASHINGTON — Republican worries dial President 
Bill Clinton could flood the federal bench with moderate or 
liberal judges could be easing a bit. thanks to a combination 
of deft Republican strategy and Democratic ineptitude. 

The Republican Senate's slow motion on Mr. Clinton’s 
judicial nominations — some have been twisting slowly fin- 
two years with no sign of confirmation — has paid off 
handsomely. There are 95 vacancies in the 835-member 
federal judiciary. The White House has only 29 nominees at 
the Senate, hardly a logjam worth clamoring about Mr. 
Clinton's advisers figure they need maybe 50 or more 
nominees to even start making the case dial the Republicans 
are engaged in some unconstitutional rope-a-dope. (Word is 
Mr. Clinton will nominate another dozen or so judges in the 
next few weeks.) 

Better yet for Republicans. Senate Democrats and the 
White House have been pointing fingers at each other — 
though they are said to have made up lately — over why 
there are not more nominees. Mr. Clinton’s advisers say it is 
because Democratic senators, who make the initial sug- 
gestions for district court seats, have not supplied can- 
didates. 

But senators say they can’t send more names to the White 
House until some of those trapped in the Senate are con- 
firmed. And the fund-raising mess makes it harder because 
the White House would like senators to find someone who 
was not a fund-raiser and yet someone the senator wants to 
do a favor for. (There are very few of these people in 
America.) 

Meanwhile, die Republicans, some of them demanding a 
reduction in the number of federal judges, can have it both 
ways; They can keep the number of filled judgeships down 
to around 750 or so, obviating the need to legislate a 
reduction, then put a complete freeze in place during Mr. 
Clinton ’s last year. 

If all this breaks right, Mr. Clinton would leave office 
with about 150 open judgeships. Then, if a Republican is 


elected president in 2000. the Republicans will discover the 
Democrats were right and the country needs 835 federal 
judges after all, maybe more. (WP) 

House Conservatives Eye Coup 

WASHINGTON — The conservative journal Human 
Events is to report in next week's issue that 40 Republicans 
are exploring how to depose Newt Gingrich as speaker of 
the House — for what they consider to be his betrayal of the 
conservative cause. 

The magazine, in its April 4 issue, said the lawmakers, 
whom it did not identify, were considering calling for a vote 
of no-confidence in the speaker. Republican House rules 
say that 25 members can offer a resolution and that with no 
action, 50 members can petition for the vote. 

John Gizzi, the magazine’s political reporter, wrote; 
"From numerous interviews on Capitol Hill, it is clear that 
a significant group of conservative backbenchers have 
started plotting what would amount to a coup against Newt 
Gingrich.” 

The House was in recess, and Mr. Gingrich was traveling 
in China and not available for comment. His supporters 
have said he has no intention of stepping aside. 

Conservatives complain that Mr. Gingrich has retreated 
on making tax cuts a priority, erasing affirmative action 
programs and eliminating money for the National En- 
dowment for the Arts. (NYT) 


Quote/Unquote 




At left, the group’s Internet home page, which 
joyfully announced that Comet Hale-Bopp 
was “the ‘marker’ we've been waiting for * 
Another image from the site, above, showed 
How a member of the Kingdom of Heaven 
might appear.” 

NYT 


’Hie smridal group appears to have 
created a Web sate at wwwheavens- 
gate.com. According to the Web site, 
the group believed that earthly society 
.was controlled by. demonic extrater- 
restrials, “Ludferians.” and that an 
apocalypse was imminent: The Earth 
was about to be “recycled,” or “spaded 
under.’.’ toserye as a garden for a future 
.human civilization. 'i 

For the cult members, however, sal- 
vation took the form of a spaceship, 
hidden behind comet Hale-Bopp- They 
would kill themselves and reappear on 
board the spaceship. The comet made its 
•closest approach to Earth last Sat- 
urday. ' 

7 Joe Sztmhart, a cult specialist and 
counselor based in Ponstown, 
Pennsylvania; said that when he came 


across the Heaven’s Gate Web site 
months ago, he noted a high level of 
paranoial The Web site’s text warned 
against a scenario like those that oc- 
curred near Waco, Texas, and at Ruby 
Ridge, Idaho, in which armed law-en- 
forcement agents attacked compounds 
bousing fringe groups. “They seemed 
to be New Age fundamentalists,” Mr. 
Szimhart said. 

The cult followed the pattern set by 
doomsday groups of the past. Like die 
members of the 

People's Temple “ 

who died en masse They formed 

Christian-sty 

1970s, the Heav- several steps 

en’s Gate members i 

followed a single 

messianic leader. He claimed to have 
been incarnated on Earth 2.000 years ago 
under die name of Jesus. He demanded 
absolute loyalty. In dying, he promised, 
cultists would merely depart their * ‘con- 
tainers,” leaving one’s humanness on 
the way to the Kingdom of Heaven. 


admonitions that marriage and peg- 
nancy are barriers to resurrection. 
“Those who are considered worthy of a 
place in that age and In the resurrection 
from the dead neither marry nor are 
given in marriage,” it says in Luke 
20:35. one of the passages cited. 

The group produced a book. “How 
and When ‘Heaven’s Gale’ (The Door 
to die Physical Kingdom Level Above 
Human) May Be Entered. ” At (me point 
the text complains about the difficulty 


They formed a colt that mixed end- of- the- world 
Christian-style eschatology with a space-alien obsession 
several steps beyond television’s 6 The X-Files.’ 

claimed to have of talking about extraterrestrials from a know,” she saic 
h 2.000 years ago religious perspective: choice but to go 

is. He demanded ‘ ‘One of the greatest struggles we’ve on this planet fi 
ng, he promised, had from the beginning is the termin- nothing here for 
tepart their * ‘con- ology — if we try to correct the vision of The Internet 1 
s hu manness on tire Christians and talk their language, an abundance o; 
□ of Heaven. we're seen as a' religious cult on an ego called unidentifi 


s wav to me fianguom oi nw»su. — - — & . 

The Heaven’s Gale Web site ridicules tnp — if we try to state our information 
And veL in an- in language more relevant to our actual 


Christianity repeatedly. And yet, in ap- 
parent contradiction, the Web site's ser- 
monizing is heavily laden with respect- 
ful biblical and Christian references to 
Armageddon, the Kingdom of Heaven, 
John the Baptist Lucifer and the An- 
tichrist Its author cited several passages 
from the gospels of Luke and Mark and 
uraed readers, “Check these out" 

The scriptural references all refer to 


m language more relevant to our actual 
situation, the masses see us as attempt- 
ing to make the ‘Trckide’ vernacular 
into religion.” 

The cult apparently had become dis- 
couraged. Its desire to broaden its reach 
by touring college campuses did not 
work — the reaction was mostly ri- 
dicule and hostility, according to a his- 
tory of die group posted on its Web site. 


The history hints that this widespread 
rejection inspired the decision to com- 
mit suicide. 

“This was the signal to us to begin our 
preparations to Tetum ‘home,* ” it said. 
* ‘The weeds have taken over the garden 
and truly disturbed its usefulness beyond 
repair — it is time for the civilization to 
be recycled — ‘spaded under.* ” 

On a videotape made by the cult 
recendy, featuring Mr. Applewhite in- 
viting people to follow him, a woman 
who was appar- 
■ ently a member ex- 

,Orld plained her de- 

, . cision to leave the 

!D obsession “vehicle.” mean- 

a ’ ing her body. 

“Maybe they’re 

crazy for all I 
know,” she said. “Bur I don’t have any 
choice but to go for it, because F ve been 
on this planet far 31 years and there’s 
nothing here for me." 

The Internet has long been noted for 
an abundance of material related to so- 
called unidentified flying objects. There 
are thousands of UFO Web sites. The 
Internet, for example, helped to rapidly 
spread the belief last autumn that the 
comet Hale-Bopp had an enormous ar- 
tificial object in its wake. 

But a characteristic of the Internet is 
that it is not always clear who, precisely, 
is posting material. The group’s oc- 
cupation, designing Web sites, enabled 
it to create for itself a particularly at- 
tractive site replete with photographs of 


stars, comets and interstellar dust 
clouds. 

There have arisen a number of New 
Age-type groups who take a religious 
attitude toward extraterrestrials. The 
Heaven's Gate group, however, took its 
beliefs to a tragic extreme. 

“This is part of the imminent mil- 
lennial fever,” said Michael Fersinger, 
a Laurentian University psychologist 
who has written about UFO sightings 
and cults. “I think you’re going to have 
these lands of events happening more 
frequently.” 

Other groups distanced themselves 
from the Heaven’s Gate cult 

“They were dead wrong,” said 
Charles Spiegel, director of the Unarius 
Educational Foundation, also based 
near San Diego. His group teaches that 
extraterrestrials will not come to Earth 
until 2001. 

Another group with a presence in 
California is the Raelians, which 
spreads the word of a Frenchman named 
Rael who says that in 1974 he saw a 
four-foot humanoid emerge from a hov- 
ering spaceship and learned from die 
visitor that the extraterrestrials, who 
live on the planet of Eternal life, will 
come to Earth sometime before 2035. 

A member of the group said he had 
never heard of Heaven’s Gate. 

“We have nothing to do with groups 
like that, groups that commit suicide,” 
said Felix Clairvoyant, who runs the San 
Francisco chapter of the Raelians. 
“We’re a very balanced group.” 


Robert Reischauer, once a director of the Congressional 
Budget Office who now is at the Brookings Institution, on 
the claim that billions could be cut by Congress from 
non defense “discretionary” spending — the third of the 
budget spent cm everything from government salaries to 
paper clips to airline safety inspectors: “With a calculator 
and a piece of paper, anything is possible. The challenge is 
to assemble die votes needed for enactment” (WP) 


STATE: 

Why in California? 

Continued from Page 1 

is studying, without much hope of suc- 
cess, to be a high-grade moron, angry or 
ecstatic exponent of food feds, sun- 
bathing, ancient Greek costumes, dia- 
pbram-breafeing. And the imminent 
second coming of Christ” 

Callers to talk radio were quick to 
maire the connections linking the mad- 
ness at Rancho Santa Fe to Charles 
Manson, Jonestown and beyond. 

“Why does this stuff seem to happen 
only in California?” Alan from Vista 
wondered aloud on one talk show, “ft 
must be the water or something.” 

“Let’s hope it’s not the water,” the 
host replied earnestly. “I mean, feat’s 
another conspiracy theory we can get 
into later.” 

Perhaps there is something to this 
notion that geography can influence 
lunacy. Why do so many cults come to 
attach themselves here? It is a question 
feat has been asked for as long as there 
has been a California. 

Curt Gentry, in “Die Last Days of fee 
Late, Great State of California,” listed 
the leading theories: 

“According to one, in moving to 
California people wanted a new start; 
they shopped not only for a new job, 
new bouse, new furniture, new auto, 
new friends, but also for a new re- 
ligion. 

“Another explanation had it that 
California was so democratized, so 
lacking in a clearly defined society, that 
people craved something extra-exclus- 
ive. Still another thesis claimed there 
were so marry other distractions in Cali- 
fornia life that religion, to compete, had 
to be startling, sensational, different.” 

Tolerance must be added to the Why 
California? list Certainly the state can 
be forgiving of weirdness. Across the 
dial, the radio talk kept evolving 
Thursday into debates over what dif- 
ferences, if any, there were between the 
Heavens Gate travelers and the 12 
Apostles of Jesus. They all died for their 
religious beliefs, declared one caller 
after another. 

Maybe it is, most simply, the weather. 
John Steven McGroarty, a poet his- 
torian, pointed out a half century ago. 
“Los Angeles is the most celebrated of 
all incubators of new creeds, codes of 
ethics, philosophies. ’ * He added: ‘ ‘It is a 
breeding place and a rendezvous of 
freak religions. But this is because its 
winters are mild, thus luring die pale 
people of thought to its sunny gales.’ ’ 







i' .V 1-" • 


^rrovATinwu OTi-H AiJi TRratiVPL S ATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAX, MARCH 29-30, 1997 



Canada Links Jailed Saudi 
To a Branch of Hezbollah 


Court Pursues Iran Tie to Bombing in Dhakran 


By Howard Schneider 
and Pierre Thomas 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Canadian offi- 
cials contend that a Saudi man detained 
in Canada for his possible role in the 
bombing of a U.S. military residence in 
Saudi Arabia last year is connected to a 
branch of the Iranian-backed Hezbollah 
movement 

American officials said the evidence 
behind the allegations, asserted in court 
papers made public Thursday in Ot- 
tawa. added credibility to Saudi claims 
that Iran was involved in the June 25 
bombing of the Khobar Towers military 
residence in Dhahran, which killed 19 
Americans and wounded 500. 

The U.S. officials said that Canadian 
surveillance of the Saudi, Haiti Abdel 
Rahim Sayegh, shows that he made 
contact with a number of Iranians after 
he arrived in Canada last August 

While the Canadian allegations are 
not conclusive, they appear to represent 
the first independent support for as- 
sertions by some Saudi officials that the 
attack was backed by Iran. 

The Canadian findings represent “a 
notching up of our concerns about Iran, 
but there is still a lot of work to be done 
to see who is ultimately responsible,” a 
U.S. official said. 

If it is proved that Iran was behind the 
bombing, which Tehran denies, the 
Clinton administration would face a de- 
cision about whether to respond with 
military strikes, economic or other sanc- 
tions, or some combination of such mea- 


sures. Saudi government officials have 
expressed the desire that the United 
States refrain from retaliating on its own 
and instead act jointly with allies in the 
Gulf and elsewhere if Iran’s involve- 
ment is demonstrated. 

At this point, there are no criminal 
charges pending against Mr. Sayegh. He 
is being detained as an alleged threat to 
national security, and the papers made 
public Thursday were aimed at bol- 
stering the case for his detention. 

In an interview Monday, he acknow- 
ledged being a Shiite Muslim active in 
the opposition to the monarchy that 
rules Sunni-majority Saudi Arabia, but 
he denied being a member of Saudi 
Hezbollah and said he was in Syria at the 
time of the bombing. 

But drawing links between the Saudi 
arm of Hezbollah and the Iranian- 
backed Hezbollah group based in Leb- 
anon. the papers released Thursday con- 
tended that Mr. Sayegh should not be 
allowed to stay in the country. 

Witb most of the records in the case 
sealed because of national security con- 
siderations, the court papers offered 
tittle evidence to support the allegations 
other than to stale that a detonator found 
at the site of the blast was similar to 
those used by Hezbollah members in 
Lebanon. 

The documents contend that Mr. 
Sayegh drove a car that signaled the 
bombers to enter the Khobar Towers 
parking lot 

The details noted in the documents 
are thought to reflect information 
provided by the Saudi government a 








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Talks Begun 
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Kamil KntoraStoM 

PARTNERS — President Nelson Mandela of South Africa, left, walking with his host, Prime Minister 
H. D. Deve Gowda of India, before they signed an economic and political accord in New Delhi on Friday. 


senior U.S. law enforcement official 
said this week. 

The court document identified the 
mastermind of the bomb attack as 
Ahmed Ibrahim Ahmad Mughassil, but 
offered no further details about him. 

Saudi officials told U.S. officials in 
November that they believed the bomb- 
ing was carried -out by Shiite members 
of Saudi Hezbollah, which they say is a 
wing of the radical Lebanese-based 
group known as Hezbollah, or Party of 
God — long thought to be financed, 
trained and equipped by Iran. 

American officials had expressed 
some skepticism about the Saudi claims 
of Iranian involvement, in part because 
they had been frustrated by what they 
saw as inadequate cooperation by Saudi 


investigators, particularly the reluc- 
tance to allow the FBI to interrogate 
suspects. 

In addition, American officials noted 
that the Saudis have a vested interest in 
portraying the attack as the work of a 
foreign state rather than of homegrown 
militants. 

But now U.S. administration officials 
say that a developing patchwork of ev- 
idence pointing toward Iran must be con- 
sidered. “We are still working on this,” 
said a senior U.S. official, noting that the 
matter was extraordinarily sensitive. 

Mr. Sayegh is being detained by im- 
migration authorities, who must decide 
if he is to be deponed, and if so, where. 
Federal Judge Donna McGillis set a 
hearing on die matter for April 28, at 


which point the authorities must present 
their case that Mr. Sayegh is a terrorist, 
and Mr. Sayegh will have a chance to 
respond. 

The documents made public were re- 
leased after Judge McGillis reviewed 
the infor mati on developed by Canadian 
authorities since Mr. Sayegh entered the 
country in August 

Carrying a Saudi passport and a Syr- 
ian driver's license, he claimed refugee 
status on the grounds of religious per- 
secution as a Shiite opponent of the 
Saudi government. 

He had been working at a conveni- 
ence store in Ottawa while his refugee 
claim was processed, but was detained 
by the authorities last week as a * ‘threat 
to the security of Canada.” 


Washington Fosl Service 

NEW DELHI — After a hiatus Oat 
lasted three years, diplomats from India 
and Pakistan resumed talks Friday on a 
range of issues, including the disputed 
terntory of Kashmir. . . 

Salman Haider of India and Sham- 
shad Ahmad of Pakistan, tire top bu- 
reaucrats in the two coiintnes foreign 
ministries, met for several hours to es- 
tablish an agenda for four days of pre- 
liminary talks. , . . A 

Representatives of both countries y 
said they wanted to keep jhe substance 
of th e discussions confidential until 
Monday, when the talks were scheduled 

to conclude. .. . 

‘‘We are not going to talk about the 

talks: it has been agreed upon,” Mr. 
Ahmad said. 

The last round of talks between the 
regional rivals ended in 1994 without 
agreement because of the dispute over 
Kashmir, which both claim and which 
they have fought two wars over since 
1947. 

Among other issues in the talkscludi 
are nuclear armaments, border disputes 
and trade. 

Mr. Haider and Mr. Ahmad are at- 
tempting to lay the groundwork for talks 
between their foreign ministers next 
month and possibly between Prime . 
Minister H D- Deve Gowda of India and ¥ 
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif of 
Pakistan in May. 


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Gingrich Pushes China 
On Rights and Religion 

In Beijing, Speaker Walks Delicate Line 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

.Vnr York Tunes Service 


BEIJING — The speaker of the U.S. 
House of Represen moves. Newt Gin- 
grich. told the leaders of China's Com- 
munist Party on Friday that they would 
nave to tolerate freedom of speech, as- 
^rnblv and religion if they wanted the 
respect of the international community. 

He called on the government to re- 
lease political prisoners, stop arresting 
religious leaders and cooperate with the 
United States to track down any “reneg- 
a de" officials who may have tried to 
funnel illegal campaign contributions to 
• American politicians. 

At the same time, he said in an in- 
terview, Washington is seeking an ap- 
proach to Beijing that would promote 
the rule of law and greater religious 
freedom. "I mean, we don’t "want 
people in jail," he said after meeu'ng 
. President Jiang Zemin. “We don’t want 
persecution of people who are engaged 
in religion." 

He said Congress would like to play 
ils own role in opening a dialogue with 
Chinese leaders under a ‘’coordinated 
foreign policy” with the administration 
of President Bill Clinton. 

The speaker's muscular formulation 
of American expectations for China and 
his commitment to support Mr. Clinton’s 
policy of engagement reflected the polit- 
ical pressure on Mr. Gingrich as he has 
tried to recover from an ethics inves- 
tigation. and as new criticism has arisen 
over his leadership and his commitment 
to the Republican “revolution.” 

His remarks about the repression of 
religious and political freedom here 
were an effort to appease hard-liners in 
the Republican Party, who have been 
calling for a tougher line on China, 
while his offer to open new lines of 
discussion was an attempt to stay within 
the bounds of statesmanship. 

Mr. Gingrich said he had held ex- 

- tensive discussions with Mr. Clinton. 
Vice President A1 Gore, the State De- 
partment and the National Security 

- Council before delivering those mes- 
sages. But it was not immediately clear 
how great an expansion of congres- 


sional involvement in policy he anti- 
cipates. He said he would send Rep- 
resentative Douglas Bercuter. chairman 
of the House subcommittee on Asia, 
“regularly” to consult with Chinese 
officials on issues of contention. 

Mr. Gingrich's visit follows a four- 
day rrip this week by Mr. Gore, the most 
senior American official to visit China 
since the Tiananmen Square massacres 
of 1989. 

■ Gore Moves On to South Korea 

Mr. Gore ended his visit to China on 
Friday and flew to Seoul to brief South 
Korean leaders on his talks, which in- 
cluded an effort to begin peace nego- 
tiations for the Korean Peninsula. The 
Associated Press reported from Seoul. 

After briefings by U.S. embassy of- 
ficials. Mr. Gore met with Prime Min- 
ister Koh Kun. President Kim Young 
Sam was to meet with Mr. Gore on 
Saturday, before the vice president re- 
turned to the United States. 



BRIEFLY 


Roby o Bncfc/Afmx Fnacr-ftotr 

Newt Gingrich and his wife, Marianne, touring the Forbidden City in Beijing on Friday. 
The House speaker arrived in the Chinese capital in the footsteps of Vice President A1 Gore. 


In Nod to China, Japan Ends Ban on Grants 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan acted Friday to improve 
ties with China by lifting a freeze on grant aid. 
Foreign Minister Yukihiko Ikeda. wbo travels 
to China on Saturday for a two-day visit, an- 
nounced an end to die ban on grant-in-aid. 
which was frozen in August 1995 after China 
conducted a nuclear weapons test. 

Mr. Ikeda. the first senior Japanese official to 
visit China since the death of Deng Xiaoping, 
said he would sign a document in Beijing for a 
1.7 billion yen ($13.8 million) grant for a 
medical project in Nanjing that would mark the 
resumption of aid. 

Japan froze the grants, worth about 7 billion 
yen a year, as a mainly symbolic protest, saying 
that China's nuclear test violated a moratorium 
on such tests. 

However, the Japanese government did not 
touch the bulk of its aid to China, which totals 
about 580 billion yen in loans planned for the 
1996-1998 period. 

In September 1996. more than a year after 


Japan suspended grant-in-aid. China signed the 
Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty at the United 
Nations and imposed a moratorium on nuclear 
testing. 

Last year, a bitter dispute over a small group 
of uninhabited islets in the East China Sea ana 
Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto’s visit to a 
Tokyo war shrine disrupted Japan's ties with 
China. 

Chinese verbal attacks on Japan became so 
aggressive that Japanese Foreign Ministry of- 
ficials described relations between the two 
countries as the worst since they were nor- 
malized in 1972. 

The dispute over the islands, called Sen- 
kakus in Japanese and Diaoyus in Chinese, 
flared last year after a Japanese ultranationalist 
group constructed a makeshift lighthouse on 
one of the islets. 

Japan has claimed the islands since the 19th 
century, but China says it has owned them for 
centuries. Taiwan also claims the islands. The 
dispute triggered violent protests against Japan 


in Taiwan and Hong Kong last August. The 
Japanese government moved to cool the dis- 
pute by promising China it would try to bead off 
further actions by the ultranationaJists. 

Last July, China sharply reacted against Mr. 
Hashimoto's visit to the Yasukuni Shrine be- 
cause no Japanese prime minister had paid 
homage at the shrine since 1985. Yasukuni is 
dedicated to Japan's 2.6 million war dead since 
the 19th century, including C!ass-A war crim- 
inals like the World War n leader General 
Hidefci Tojo. 

Last November. Mr. Ikeda reassured Foreign 
Minister Qian Qichen of China that Mr. Ha- 
shimoto's new government stood by an apo- 
logy made by another prime minister, Tomiichi 
Murayama, to mark the 50th anniversary of the 
end of the war. 

Japanese officials do not expect the two 
disputes to play a major role in Mr. Ikeda’s 
talks in Beijing. Tokyo. expects the foreign 
minister’s visit to mark a new start in relations 
between the two countries. 


Saul Eisenberg, 76, Influential Israeli Industrialist, Dies 


Agence France-Presse 

BELTING — Saul Eisenberg, 76. the Israeli 
magnate who played a key role in establishing 
diplomatic relations between China and Is- 
rael in 1992, died of a heart attack Thursday in 
Beijing, where he was staying at a hotel. 

In Jerusalem, Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu paid tribute to Mr. Eisenberg. 
“Saul Eisenberg was one of Israel’s greatest 
industrialists and contributed greatly to the 
Israeli economy and to Israel’s links with 
other countries." 

Mr. Eisenberg conducted a lot of business 
with China through his Hong Kong-based 
company United Development Incorporated. 
He headed Israel Coip., a finance company 
that controls Israel Chemicals, the country’s 

• largest industrial group, the Tziin shipping 

• concern and other companies. 

Harold Osrow, 80, Gadget Inventor 

1 NEW YORK (NYT) — Harold Osrow. 80. 


an entrepreneur who could not leave well 
enough alone until he was satisfied he had 
made it better, cheaper, or more convenient, 
died of lung cancer March 20. 

He was chairman of Osrow Products, the 
company he founded to produce an array of 
novel household items. 

With his younger brother, Leonard, Mr. 
Osrow introduced the Osrow Twin-Sweep 
broom in 1947. Mr. Osrow. wbo held more 
than 30 patents, also developed a refrigerator 
defroster, a plastic windshield scraper-cum- 
snow brush that sold millions every year, a 
cordless iron and introduced the talking ice 
cream machine that played “Happy Days are 
Here Again,” when the ice cream was done. 

Richard Marsh, 58, Researcher 

Richard Marsh. 58. whose research in 
veterinary science at the University of Wis- 
consin at Madison led him to sound an alarm 
about the risks of “mad cow” disease a 


decade before its outbreak in Britain last year, 
died of cancer Sunday in Middleton. Wis- 
consin. 

Mr. Marsh observed diseases in minks and 
learned from a mink rancher that the animals 
had been fed with a food supplement made 
from cattle parts. He theorized there was a 
pathway for transmission of cattle diseases 
that the industry was unaware'of and urgeda 
ban on such feeding. 

The disease, mink spongiform encephalo- 
pathy. destroys brain tissue in a manner sim- 
ilar to the way bovine spongiform enceph- 
alopathy, or "mad cow” disease, affects 
cattle. 

Nina Mason Pulliam, 90, Journalist 

PARADISE VALLEY, Arizona (AP) — 
Nina Mason Pulliam, 90, the first woman 
admitted to die Society of Professional Jour- 
nalists and who. with her husband, founded 
newspapers in Arizona and Indiana, died 


Wednesday. Eugene Pulliam, her husband, 
founded the Central Newspapers Inc. group. 
He died in 1975. Mrs. Pulliam, a reporter as a 
young woman and a well-known philanthrop- 
ist in her later years, served until her death as 
one of three trustees of the Eugene Pulliam 
Trust, which bolds the majority of the group’s 
stock. 

Mrs. Pulliam was president of Central 
Newspapers and publisher of several news- 
papers from 1975 until she retired in 1979. 

Joseph Frayman, 85. an editor and re- 
porter in the London bureau of The New York 
Times for nearly 40 years, died March 1 in • 
London. 

James Arthur Ryder, 83, who built a $20 
million fortune in truck leasing before losing 
it all trying to build another fortune, died 
Tuesday in Coral Gables. Florida, after suf- 
fering a stroke. 


Japan to Prosecute Officials 
Of Nuclear Plant Over Accident 

TOKYO — Prosecutors said Friday they were pre- 
paring to file criminal charges against top officials of a 
nuclear plant for an alleged cover-up of on accident a year 
and a half ago. 

The plutonium breeder reactor in western Japan 
spewed caustic sodium from a secondary cooling system 
on Dec. 8. 1995. 

No one was hurt in the accident, but an official com- 
mitted suicide as details of a bungled cover-up emerged. 
The reactor has been shut down since the accident, 
delaying Japan's ambitious plutonium program and fan- 
ning public opposition. 

The prosecutors’ investigation follows a criminal com- 
plaint filed a year ago by local anti-nuclear activists, a step 
intended to urge prosecutors to file criminal charges. 

The top executives and several other officials at tire 
government-funded Power Reactor & Nuclear Fuel De- 
velopment Corp., or Donen, are suspected of having 
heavily edited a videotape taken after the accident to 
conceal die most serious damage, while having hid a 
second videotape. They are also suspected of having lied 
in official reports about the accident. (AP) 

China to Fix Up Mao’s Tomb 

BEIJING — China is to close and renovate the mauso- 
leum in the heart of Beijing where the embalmed body of 
Chairman Mao Zedong has lain for 20 years, officials said 
Friday. 

Tbe mausoleum will be closed to visitors from April 1 
to Dec. 31 for tbe work, an official of the mausoleum 
administrative office said. 

“We need to do some renovation work on the in- 
terior.” the official said. “After all, the hall has been open 
for 20 years.” 

But he declined to say whether any of die renovation 
work would include touching up the embalmed body of 
Mao. who died Sept. 9. 1 976. “I can ’r tell you specifics of 
what we will do. the official said. (Reuters) 

Canberra Holds Mercenary Gear 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — Australia 
has impounded a plane reportedly carrying helicopters, 
missiles and other weapons to Papua New Guinea for use 
by foreign mercenaries hired to quash a rebellion. 

Controversy over Papua New Guinea's $36 million 
deal with Sandline International, a British-based mer- 
cenary firm, forced Prime Minister Julius Chan to resign 
this past week to cool civilian and military protests. 

On Thursday, Australian Air Force jets intercepted a 
cargo plane in airspace between northern Australia and 
Papua New Guinea, according to repor ts Friday in the 
Sydney Morning Herald and in the Daily Telegraph. 

If was not clear why military supplies were being flown 
to Papua New Guinea, since nearly all the mercenaries 
were deported a week ago. (AP) 

Japan Pessimistic on Peru Crisis 

LIMA — Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto of Japan 
said Friday be did not foresee dramatic progress soon in 
talks aimed at ending the 101-day i-ima hostage crisis, 
contrasting with official optimism in Peru. 

“I can’t say with confidence that there will be sig- 
nificant progress.” Mr. Hashimoto said in Tokyo. 

“I am not optimistic,” he said without elaborating. 
President Alberto Fujimori said Thursday in Lima that 
obstacles remained but that the government and Marxist 
rebels holding 72 men at the Japanese ambassador's 
home were progressing toward a peaceful end to die 
hostage siege. (Reuters) 

Bomb Near Algiers Kills 4 

ALGIERS — A bomb attack in a restaurant in the 
eastern suburbs of the Algerian capital has killed at least 
four people and left 27 wounded, authorities said Fri- 
day. 

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the 
bomb, the latest attributed to a five-year Muslim in- 
surgency. 

Meanwhile, security forces announced the deaths of 
seven Muslim militants in die western coastal city of 
Oran. France Info radio reported. The group was blamed 
for the slaying of a retired general ii January. (AP) 


PARADOX, By Elizabeth C. Gorski 


ACROSS 
1 One may be 
checkered 
5 Night ftgttf 
9 April honoree 

13 Fairy tale figures 

17 Baseball's 
Tommie . 

18 Devour 

20 Fjord 

2] Part of a monk's 
title 

22 Beginning of a 
though* by the 
72- Across 
102- Across 
80-Aorass ' 

26 Bedtime genie 

27 Stamped 
approval?: Afabr. 

28 Patsies 

29 Sushi suppfies 

39 Scrooge's look 

31 Quitters' Match 

32 "Dr. Zhivago" 


66 Palestrina piece 

67 Ale, eg. 

7J Tc a ijerfcct s , 
sometimes 
72 Uke80^Across 
74 Lacto — — 


35 Mocking 

40 End of the 
thought 

45 Seat of Garfield 
County. Okla. 

46 Olympics jump 

47 Nor theirs 

48 Canon 
competitor 

49 P Jit. hours, to a 
bard 

sok^a™.^ ™3£SF' 

54 Practices girth 


vegetarian 

75 Beer variety 

76 Lady Macbeth, 
for one 

77 CrazyquQt 

78 Corp. V.LP.’s 


1 

s 

3 

4 

T7~ 









2” 


_ 



control 
55 With grace 

(airplane 

section) 

59 Two Tudors 

60 Regatta 


86 See 22 -Across 
85 E-mail 

87 Bar, at the bar 

88 Taxi door info 

89 Personals, tg. 

90 Isle on which 
ApoDo was bora 


34 Type choices 


81 Catch of the day, 91 Protec tion for 
maybe 

62 Somewhat, to 
Salieri 

63 Part of a 
rainbow 



Esl 191 1, Paris 

“Sank Roo Doe Noo’ 


A Space for Thought. 


someLRA.'s 
93 Item oil aim 

97 Each 

98 Vexes 

162 What 80- Across 
became m 1996 
106 Start of a 
Dickens title 
197 River to tbe 
Fulda 

168 Certain string 
ensemble 
109 “Eugene 
Onegin" 
mezzo-soprano 
1)0 Famous tiger 

111 Root b e er br an d 

112 EBot character 
US Old news agency 

DOWN 

1 Dog's "dogs" 

2 Mideast title 
8 Spaaed 

4 Bid 

5 OnfrU-N. 
member whose 
flag is not 

rectangular 

6 Clears 

7 Ear-Prefix 

8 Mother Teresa, 
for one 

9 Most enamored 
(of) 

10 Pianist Levant 

11 1982 country hit ■ 
“Same — - Me 

12 Cobs 

13 Peddled 

)4 vera 

15 “Dumb* 
Dumber" actress 

16 Caesarand 
others 

19 Jump (on) 

21 Trkkay 

23 -That is-.." 

24 - — - directed" 

25 Chutzpah 



CJVeu York Times/Edited by Will Short*. 


30 Not go directly 

32 Eye makeup 

33 Dresa style 

34 Godliness 

35 Oporto's river 
38 Young Fontaine 

role 

37 With increased 
reserve 

38 Cuckoo 

39 Bar request 

40 Trickle 

41 Black, yeDow 
and white 

42 Jean-daude 
Duvalier, eg. 

43 Big bar order ■ 
48 Second- fiddle 

51 Prefix with 
linear 

52 Plottage 

53 Liking 

54 An style, 
familiarly 

56 Rubbish 

57 Yard sate staples 
59 Associate 

61 Roman sandal 

62 Jewish holiday 
03 Faith m Turkey 
64 Static 


65 Historical info 

66 Gaqgster'sgnls 

67 Nodule 

68 Verb for thou 

69 Call to mind 

79 Santa -.Calif. 

72 Sit fora photo 

73 Nincompoops 

76 Erects, as a 

contraption 

78 Loon 

80 DuckwaBt 

81 Sorry sorts 

82 "M must 
have been 

news 

dsp" 

83 Visit 

84 Bit of NASA 
equipment 

88 With a level 
head 

90 In a fog 

91 O v erexpos e d to 
die sun 

92 T-S . Eliot 
book-essay 

93 Premed 
dass: 

Abbr. 


94 Computer 
programming 
phrase 

95 Israel's Abba 

96 He once had 
stable work on 
TV 

99 Degas’s “Miss 

-at the 

Cirque 

Fernando" 


106 Brain scans, for 
short 

161 Timetable 
listings Abbr- 

103 Rhode's TV 
mom 

104 Head, in slang 

105 Liverpool-to- 
Newcastte 
dir. 


Solution to Puzzle of March 22-23 



ROOKS 


ERRANDS 

By Judith Guest. 335 pages. 
$25. Ballantine. 

Reviewed by 
Reeve Lindbergh 

J UDITH GUEST’S beauti- 
fully rendered and finely 
focused new novel about 
family life and family loss is 
tbe story of Keith Browner, a 
Michigan high school teach- 
er, husband and father, whose 
sudden death from cancer af- 
fects his wife and children 
seismically, in every aspect of 
their lives. 

Before the hook even be- 
gins, its author draws our at- 
tention to its title: “Errand. A 
journey matte for a special 
purpose; an expedition; amis- 
sion” (from the New Shorter 
Oxford English Dictionary). 
"I love this wider take on the 
word,” Guest writes. 

"The modem view is so 
limited; shallow in its defin- 
ition. I read once that those 
founding fathers who came to 
explore the New Woridcalled 
their mission ‘an errand into 
tbe wilderness.’ I can only 
think that each life — the 
whole of Me — must be 
simply that, and nothing 
less.” 

Traveling into die wilder- 
ness together and separately 
are Keith Browner himself, a 
dying man whose perspective 
and perceptions inform the 
first section of the bode, and 


his wife, then widow, Annie, 
whose struggle to come to 
terms with her husband’s 
death dominates the rest of 
the novel. 

The couple’s three children 
also move inevitably, if un- 
willingly, into the bleak ter- 
ritories of grief and change. 
Harry at 13 is defiant at home, 
gets into trouble at school and 
begins to form unsavoiy 
friendships. Jimmy, tbe mid- 
dle child, tries to keep the 
family peace and to maintain 
a sense of personal control at 
all costs, while 9-year-old Ju- 
lie secretly skips school and 
records her private observa- 
tions and confessions in a di- 
ary she hides from everyone 
else in the household. 

Yet another companion on 
this journey is Annie's sister 
Jess, who tries to offer her 
support to the Browners 
while negotiating her own 
complex relationship with a 
man who is. perpetually, not 
quite divorced. 

Guest's affectionate sensi- 
tivity to every nuance and de- 
tail of daily life gives at times 
a kind of haloed quality to die 
pictures she presents of a fam- 
ily unraveling in crisis. 

But Guest has never been 
the kind of writer who glosses 
over tbe tangible, sometimes 
insurmountable difficulties 
that arise in a family after a 
death. On the contrary, as in 
her earlier classic, “Ordinary 
People,” she reveals very 


clearly the harsher con- 
sequences of loss: financial, 
social, psychological. 

And yet, even in tbe wil- 
derness, there is progress. 
Slowly, over many months, 
the Browner family moves to- 
ward recovery along a path 
strewn with false starts, ac- 
cidents and blunders. Each 
family mishap, in this 
fogged-in and single-minded 
atmosphere, reverberates far 
beyond its own significance, 
always echoing fee greater 
loss: a new bicycle stolen, a 
window broken, a speeding 
ticket, a kitten tun over by a 
car all seem equally dis- 
astrous. 

Ironically, it is a second, 
potentially devastating true 
crisis that brings the Browner 
family back to itself again, 
wife a renewed strength of 
purpose and a sudden, healing 


release of fee love feat has 
been frozen within each fam- 
ily member since the father’s 
death. 

To arrive at this point was 
surely tbe “errand”'' of tbe 
boolC but it has taken a skilled 
and masterly guide to bring us 
safely to tbe end of tbe jour- 
ney. 

Reeve Lindbergh, who has 
written several books for chil- 
dren and adults and is work- 
ing on a family memoir , 14 Un- 
der a Wing.” wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


NEW AUTHORS 

PUBLISH YOUR WORK 
AIL SUBJECTS CONSIDERED 
Authors world-wide Invited 
Write or sand yxjr manuscript to 
MINERVA PRESS 
20tD BFIOMPTON RD. LONDON SW7 3DQ 



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Global Economics 
Correspondent 


ECONOMICS 

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If you missed his exclusives in the 
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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


K/BUSHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND 1KB WASHINGTON FOST 


British Parallels 


Britain is heading for a May 1 na- 
tional election, and the parallels to the 
1992 U.S. election are striking — in 
the personalities, the debate and, most 
notably, the blurring of party differ- 
ences. There's a reason for that. 

Like President George Bush in 
1992, Prime Minister John Major is 
defending a long conservative incum- 
bency; his Tories have been in power 
for 18 years. Like Mr. Bush, the ami- 
able Mr. Major succeeded a strong and 
ideological leader and is perceived, by 
comparison, as weak ana indecisive. 
Supporters of both men feel they do not 
get proper credit for their accomplish- 
ments. Britain is enjoying low unem- 
ployment, low inflation, a falling crime 
rate — in many ways, it is the healthy 
exemplar on an uncertain continent. 
Yet Mr. Major trails in the polls by as 
much as 27 points. 

His Labour Party opponent, Tony 
Blair, is telegenic and well-spoken ana 
has modeled much of his approach on 
President Bill Clinton. He has moved 
to the center, shedding old dogma and 
cutting ties to traditional constituen- 
cies (m Labour's case, the industrial 
unions). He wants every schoolchild to 
have an e-mail address. He's promised 
not to raise income taxes. The Tories 
are warning that Mr. Blair’s govern- 
ment will be more leftist than be lets 
on. Labour has a rapid-response ‘ ‘war 


room” ready, just like the Clinton 


campaign s. 

The similarities are more than in- 


teresting coincidence; politics have 
changed along with the global econ- 
omy. Labour and the Conservatives are 
both in favor of deregulation, privat- 
ization, liberalization. This is partly 
because of the Mure of Communist 
and socialist governments throughout 
the world, partly because the dereg- 
ulated economies of Britain and Amer- 
ica seem to be working - better than 
those in Japan, Germany and France, 
and partly because governments no 
longer have much choice. Capital is so 
mobile now that if it feels overtaxed or 
overregulated it will go elsewhere, tak- 
ing jobs with it. 

But that has also produced a sense of 
insecurity, with which parties in both 
s till - are struggling. Globaliz- 
ation seems to be widening the gap 
between haves, who can prosper in the 
new environment, and have-nots, who 
lack the education and training to do 
so. And government's diminishing 
sense of control and its requisite com- 


mitment to fiscal prudence complicate 
of aiding those who fall 


the task of aiding those who fall be- 
hind. There's no consensus yet, within 
either party in either nation, on how to 
frame this new debate, let alone on how , 
to meet the new challenges. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Fresh Mideast Ideas 


With diplomacy stalled and vio- 
lence spreading on die West Bank, the 
Clinton administration has sent its 
Mideast mediator, Dennis Ross, back 
to the region. Once again he will try to 
revitalize the search for peace. Some 
imaginative new thinking is required to 
break the cycle of repeated crises. 

Mr. Ross will encounter at least two 
promising new ideas on his trip. One is 
an Israeli proposal for speeding up the 
peace talks in the hope of achieving a 
final settlement within the next six 
months. The other is talk of a new 
Israeli coalition government led by 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
but also including Labor Party figures 
like former Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres. Such proposals might provide a 


This partem threatens to repeat itself 
unless the Netanyahu cabinet is 
changed. That is possible under new 
Israeli laws that make Mr. Netanyahu, 
who was directly elected last year, in- 
dependent of his parliamentary ma- 
jority. He could, for example, form a 
coalition government with Mr. Peres. It 
could include both Labor members and 
representatives of his present coalition 
willing to live up to his campaign slo- 
gan of “peace with security." 


Another intriguing alternative, 
suggested by Mr. Netanyahu 


way out of the impasse. 


: latest violence has been fanned, 
at least in part, by Yasser Arafat, pres- 
ident of the Palestinian Authority, 
whose warnings of violent protest over 
a Jewish housing project in East Je- 
rusalem predictably heightened ten- 
sions. Meanwhile, his conciliatory 
gestures toward leaders of the Islamic 
group Hamas have been taken by Pal- 
estinians and Israelis alike as implicit 
acceptance of Hamas's calls far re- 
newed terrorism against Israelis. 

Mr. Netanyahu carries his own re- 
sponsibility for the negotiating break- 
down. He has been insensitive in press- 
ing ahead with the Jerusalem project 
and in his packaging of a recent pro- 
posal for transferring additional West 
Bank land to Palestinian control. On 
each issue, Mr. Netanyahu shunned 
advance consultations with Mr. Arafat 
and gave the demands of rightist Cab- 
inet members priority over the larger 
needs of peace. 


already 

himself, would be to skip over plans for 
18 more months of phased Israeli with- 
drawals on the West Bank and try 
instead to negotiate a final peace agree- 
ment in the next six months. Such an 
agreement would resolve issues like 
Jerusalem, settlements, territorial 
boundaries and Palestinian statehood. 
The Palestinians have thus far rebuffed 
to this proposal because they feel that 
proceeding with the phased withdraw- 
als will enhance their bargaining 
power on other issues. 

But Washington seems interested in 
trying to package this idea in ways that 
might induce the Palestinians to look 
again. With no additional pullbacks 
scheduled in the next six months, there 
seems little to lose in trying. Perhaps 
the price of Palestinian acceptance 
would be for Israel to enlarge the scope 
of its first-phase pullback. 

The key to reviving the peace may 
not lie with either of these new ap- 
proaches. But Israelis and Palestinians, 
with American help, need to begin 
thinking more imaginatively. The al- 
ternative is diplomatic deadlock and 
escalating violence. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


China Goals 


The United States seeks the eco- 
nomic and strategic advantages of co- 
operation with China. But it is unclear 
whether this sensible diplomatic am- 
bition can be consummated with a gov- 
ernment as insistent on its own ways as 
the People's Republic. Meanwhile. 
Bill Clinton comes under increasingly 
heavy scrutiny at borne to ensure that 
he goes about it in the right way. 

the effort was not notably advanced 
this week in Beijing by Vice President 
A1 Gore 's visit The question of wheth- 
er Chinese officials directed money to 
Democratic candidates in 1996 is cen- 
tral. A finding by the FBI that China 
had done so could have convulsive 
political and diplomatic effects. 'Yet 
the vice president’s party created the 
impression that Mr. Gore had not ini- 
tially passed on such a warning to his 
hosts. It seems that for a while they 
were left to believe there would be no 
price for any interference in the Amer- 
ican campaign. 

Then, no substantive issue cuts 
closer than whether the United States is 
pursuing trade at the expense of human 
rights. Here Mr. Gore suddenly found 
hunself required to decide publicly 
whether and with how much enthu- 
siasm to toast the signing of a couple of 


business deals. His embarrassment re- 
flected the difficulty the United States 
has bad in conveying that rights, in- 
cluding Hong Kong and Tibet, counL 

Dealing with China is bard and is 
about to get harder. There are signs of a 
building challenge to the Clinton “en- 
gagement" policy in both die Repub- 
lican and Democratic parties. The op- 
position can draw on human rights 
constituencies, on unions and on ele- 
ments alarmed by the notion of a rising 
and hostile power in Beijing. An early 
target may be the renewal of China's 
most-favored-uation trading status. 

China's size and its vigor compel the 
United States to pursue mutual benefits 
across a broad policy spectrum, not just 
in regional political conflicts such as 
Taiwan and Korea. The possibilities of 
this repressive one-party state building 
a rule of law on its immense economic 
and social advances must be kept open. 
But the administration's wobbling has 
put it under a special burden. It must 
show that trade works for die United 
States, that “delinking" human rights 
does not mean downgrading them and 
that Washington will confront Chinese 
evasions of the rules on transfer of 
military technology. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


INTERNATIONAL 


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UJC. Advertising Office: 63 Long Acre. London WC2. Td. ( 171)836-4802 . Fax: (171 ) 240-2254 
SAS. au capital de 1 2002)00 F. RCS Nanterre B 732021126. Conomssbm ParUaire No. 61337 
QJ997. Imenasimd Herald Tribune, AU rights reserved- ISSN: 029480 52. 



The Deal: Pass a Treaty , ‘Shrink’ the State Dept 

o/- .. (foirns know that she 






W ASHINGTON — A grand bar- 
gain is waiting to be struck that 
could finally reshape America’s for- 
eign policy apparatus, pay off the 
United States' overdue bills to the 
United Nations and pave the way for 
Senate ratification of a global treaty 
that will ban chemical weapons. We are 
talking about a big, big deal, and it is 
just sitting there, ready to be had 
All it needs is for three leaders to 
show leadership; Commander in Chief 
Bill Clinton, Curmudgeon in Chief 
Jesse Helms and Republican in Chief 
Trent (Don ’t-Ask-Me-To-Do- Any- 

hlr. Clinton wants to get the Chem- 
ical Weapons Convention, already rat- 
ified by 68 countries, passed by the 
U.S. Senate, and he wants to get his 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


overdue debts to the United Nations 
and the World Bank and to upgrade the 
State Department so that UJS. ambas- 
sadors don’t have to bum furniture for 
hcaL But to do both he needs Jesse 
Helms, chairman of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee. 

Mr. Helms is holding up a ratifi- 
cation vote on the chemical treaty be- 
cause be doesn’t trust arms control and 
because be wants to use the treaty as a 
bargaining chip in his campaign to 


shrink the U.S. foreign policy estab- 
lishment He wants to eliminate the 
Agency for International Develop- 
ment, the U.S. Information Agency and 
the Arms Control and Disarmament 
Agency and fold their functions into 
the State Department 

So here is the deal; Mr. Clinton 
should give Mr. Helms what he wants 
on reorganizing the State Department 
Jesse Helms may be a Neanderthal, but 
" on this one he’s right, even if it's for die 
wrong reasons. 

The Agency for International De- 
velopment was created in the Cold War 
to bribe countries to join the Western 
camp. It has since evolved into an 
agency that supports sustainable de- 
velopment and democracy around the 
world. Those are worthy functions — so 
worthy in fact that they should be frilly 
integrated into the State Department. 

As for die anus control agency, the 
secretary of state already dominates 
arms negotiations, and folding the 
agency into State would only enhance 
the secretary’s ability to deal with the 
most important arms control issue of the 
day — stepping missile proliferation. 

Regarding the information agency, it 


does valuable polling, abroad, radio 
broadcasting ana running of U.b. li- 
braries — so valuable that they should 
all be integrated into the State De- 
partment’s public diplomacy. 

In addition to giving in to Mr. Helms 
on reorganization, so that he can go 
back to North Carolina and boast 
“Honey, I shrank the State Depart- 
ment,’ ’ Mr. Clinton will have to answer 
(if be wants the votes) any legitimate 


and let Mr Helms know that she. is. 


Helms is a Neanderthal \ 
but he’s right. 


Republican reservations on the chem- 
ical weapons treaty that are not in- 
tended to kill the treaty outright- 

A committee set up by Senator Lott 
and Senator Joseph Biden has worked 
through the 30 reservations that Sen- 
ator Helms has raised and reached 
compromise solutions for 21 of them. 
The nine others are treaty killers. Clin- 
ton aides believe that, given the 21 
compromises, they could easily get a 
majority for the treaty — provided Mr. 
Helms lets it come to a vote by April 
29, the deadline for ratification. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright went to North Carolina this week 


Beauty ana me tom* 

Helms softly growled that a 

bright remans fleable,andtfNta™- 

ton keeps negotiating 

tions about the chemical treaty, ne 

might be ready to deal himself. 

To close the deal, the pres«je 
assure Mr. Helms that ttcr&rizitoM 

witi happen provided he lets the^mn- 

ical treaty come to a voce and agrees to 
finance the United Nations and up- 
grade the State Department ■_ 

°My fear, though, is that Mr. Helms 
will cry to pocket aU these concessions 
and still till the chemical treaty.) tftmai- 
case, Mr. Lott has to step m and bring 

Uietreaty toafloorvoteon hisown. . 

Mr. Lott dreads such a confrontation. . 
He feare that if he overrules Mr. Helms 

he will be discredited with the itepUD- 
.. ■ _ 'r rc Mr Clinton lives 


lican right Tough. If Mr. Chmon lives 

i - - -i _ Ln*vvain Mr I /nr 


has all the political cover he needs. 

If he still won’t roll Mr. Helms, then 
we shall know that Mr. Lott has sur- 
rendered Republican foreign.poucy to 
the fringe right and is majority leader 
for domestic policy only. Where is Bob; 
Dole when you need him? 

The New York limes. 


When U.S. Interest Rates Rise, It’s the Workers Who Suffer 


By James K. Galbraith 


A USTIN, Texas — Why did 
Alan Greenspan just raise 
interest rates? Because he 
could. 

Because two of the more in- 
dependent members of the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board, the pro- 
growth conservative Lawrence 
Lindsey and the moderate Janet 
Yellen, have departed. Because 
he has been under pressure from 
banks and bond traders for two 
years — why not throw them a 
bone? Because be knows that 
the Clinton administration will 
say and do nothing in protest. 

Here is the Fed r s official ex- 
planation: “The action was 
taken in light of persisting 
strength in demand, which is 
progressively increasing the 
risk of inflationary imbalances 
developing in the economy that 
would eventually unde rmin e 
tee long expansion." 

These words had been care- 
fully foreshadowed in Mr. 
Greenspan's congressional tes- 
timony four days before, so the 
action was not a surprise. 

But in that testimony he 
offered no serious evidence of 
inflation. Instead he spoke of 
the low and “benign" inflation 
of the past year. And be said that 


“competitive pressures here 
and abroad should continue to 
act as a restraint on inflation in 
the months ahead." 

The only risks Mr. Green- 
span sees are these: First, a con- 
tinued tight labor market. 
Second, the rising minim um 
wage later this year. And third, 
the possibility that “larger in- 
creases in fringe benefits could 
put upward pressure on overall 
compensation." 

The gentleman could not have 
been more clear. He is not con- 
cerned about inflation. He is con- 
cerned about the possibility, re- 
mote and uncertain though it is, 
that the American worker might 
start to demand, and receive, a 
slightly bigger share of the eco- 
nomic growth that has occurred 
in die past seven years. 

Repressing wages is the es- 
sential thing, and the way to do 
that is to slow economic 
growth, raise unemployment 
and make sure that the job in- 
security that Mr. Greenspan ex- 
plicitly credits for suppressing 
wage growth does not diminish 
or disappear. 

But repressing wages is not 
the only thing. The Fed is also 
the tax collector for the com- 


mercial banks, which instantly 
raised their prime rate and thus 
their revenue from every ad- 
justable-rate loan they make. 
(Higher rates paid out for sav- 
ings will be very slow to fol- 
low.) 

Mr. Greenspan has also hint- 
ed that he wants to deflate the 
stock market Why? Not to pro- 


tect middle-class families from 
a bursting bubble, but to scare 
them out of stocks and back to 
the banks and their measly 
money market funds! 

Finally, the market churning 
that accompanies speculation 
over die next rate move is good 
for bond traders, who have pined 
and whined through the quiet 


times of the past two years. 

“ L’etot , e’est moi ” could 
well have been uttered by Alan 
Greenspan this week. 


The writer, an economist at 
the Johnson School of Public 
Affairs at the University of 
Texas, contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 





In Dealing With Iraq, the West Has to Find a Middle Way 


W ASHINGTON — 

“Think strategically, not 
emotionally," say the foreign- 
policy realists for whom the 
current American policy of isol- 
ating the Islamic Republic of 
Iran is a dead end denying 
Washington the very access, 
company and influence it could 
use to alter the Iranian policies it 
abhor. 

But wait a minute. Thinking 
strategically means taking into 
account Iran's weight and sen- 
sitive geography, Russia's geo- 
political overhang and the great 
coining prize of Caspian oil. 
Fine. It also means in some 
measure accommodating a re- 
gime that after 18 years still 
engages in terrorism, violence 
and subversion and secretly 
pursues weapons of mass de- 
struction. Not so fine. 

Besides, the country that 


By Stephen 5. Rosenfeld 


most needs strategic dunking is 
Iran. Tehran’s feud with the 
United States is for a risky and 
expensive national distraction 
for Iran. The principal reason for 
Iran’s isolation is not American 
hostility but its own contempt 
for the international rules. 

“Thinking emotionally” is a 
loaded way to describe a con- 
cern for human rights and 
democracy. It suggests they are 
frills. In the case of Iran, 
however, the two ways of think- 
ing are not inconsistent. Argu- 
ably, the United Stales has stra- 
tegic reasons to stand off from 
Tehran. Without doubt, there 
are “emotional" reasons, too. 

Take the case of the Iranian 
writer Faraj Sarkuhi, im- 
prisoned eight years under the 
shah, arrested for the fourth 


time in five months by the mul- 
lahs’ police last Nov. 3. His 
open letter appears in The New 
York Review of Books dated 
April 10. He wrote it on Jan. 3. 
in a state of extreme agitation, 
expecting that he would soon be 
arrested again, tortured again 
and murdered 

His police tormentors appar- 
ently were using him as an in- 
strument of their crackdown on 
writers and intellectuals. They 
also intended to use his coerced 
confessions to paint him as a 
French and German spy in order 
to deflate the uproar over what 
is known as Mykonos affair. In 
a trial that has sobered much of 
European opinion, an Iranian 
and four Lebanese stand ac- 
cused in Berlin of assassinating 
an Iranian opposition leader and 


No Gracias , and No Thanks 


N EW HAVEN, Connecti- 
cut — Spanglish. the 
composite language of Span- 
ish and English that has 
crossed over from the street to 
Hispanic talk shows and ad- 
vertising campaigns, poses a 
grave danger to Hispanic cul- 
ture and to the advancement of 
Hispanics in' mainstream 
America. 

Those who condone it as a 
harmless commingling do not 
realize that this is hardly a 
relationship based on equal- 
ity. Spanglish is an invasion of 
Spanish by English. 

The sad reality is that 
Spanglish is primarily the lan- 
guage of poor Hispanics. 
many barely literate in either 
language. They incorporate 
English words and construc- 
tions into their daily speech 
because they lack the vocab- 
ulary and education in Span- 
ish to adapt to the changing 
culture around' them. 

Educated Hispanics who do 
likewise have a different mo- 
tivation: Some are embar- 
rassed by their background 
and feel empowered by using 
English words and directly 
translated English idioms. Do- 
ing so, they think, is to claim 
membership in the main- 
stream. Politically, however. 


By Roberto Gonzalez- 
Echevarria 


Spanglish is a capitulation; it 
indicates marginalization, not 
enfranchisement. 

Spanglish treats Spanish as 
if the language of Cervantes, 
Lorca, Garcfa Mdrquez, 
Borges and Paz did not have 
an essence and dignity of its 
own. It is not possible to speak 
of physics or metaphysics in 
Spanglish. whereas Spanish 
has a more than adequate 
vocabulary for both. 

Yes, because of the pre-em- 
inence of English in fields like 
technology, some terms, like 
biper for beeper, have to be 
incorporated into Spanish. 
But why give in when there 
are perfectly good Spanish 
words and phrases? 

If. as with so many of the 
trends of American Hispanics. 
Spanglish were to spread to 
Latin America, it would con- 
stitute the ultimate imperial- 
istic takeover, die final impos- 
ition of a way of life that is 
economically dominant but 
not culturally superior. Latin 
America is rich in many ways 
nor measurable by calculators. 

I suppose my medievalist 
colleagues will say that with- 


out the contamination of Latin 
by local languages, there 
would be no Spanish (or 
French or Italian). 

We are no longer in the 
Middle Ages, however, and it 
is naive to think that we could 
create a new language that 
would be functional and cul- 
turally rich. Literature in 
Spanglish can aspire only to a 
sort of wit based on a rebel- 
lious gesture, which wears 
thin quickly. Those who prac- 
tice it are doomed to writing 
not a minority literature but a 
minor literature. 

Hispanics must remember 
that we are a special immi- 
grant group. Whereas the 
mother cultures of other eth- 
nicities are far away in geo- 
graphy or lime, ours are very 
near. Immigration keeps our 
community in a state of con- 
tinuous renewal. The last 
thing we need is to have each ■ 
group carve out its own 
Spanglish, creating a Babel of 
hybrid tongues. Spanish is our 
strongest bond, and it is vital 
that we preserve it. 


The writer, a professor of 
Hispanic and comparative lit- 
eratures at Yale University, 
contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


three companions at the 
Mykonos restaurant in that city 
in 1992. 

WelL yes. I did feel a bit 
“emotional" reading what may 
well have been Mr. Saricuhi’s 
last public word; “I don’t know 
how long I have. I await im- 
minent arrest or an incident 
whereby 1 will be murdered and 
my death will be presented as a 
suicide. Torture, prison and 
death await me." But what is 
one supposed to do with the 
emotion generated by the spec- 
tacle of a decent man in possibly 
terminal distress? Be tough and 
ignore it? Be sentimental and 
declare war? 

The Europeans and Japan 
have their own. flabby re- 
sponse. They agree that the 
Americans are right to view the 
Iranian regime as an outlaw. 
But, without asking for mod- 
eration in Iranian conduct, they 
ignore the unilateral American 
trade boycott and decry the U.S. 
sanctions penalizing foreign 
companies that do major energy 
business with Iran. Better, they 
say. to work quietly on the in- 
side and conduct a “construct- 
ive dialogue" on human rights 
with Iran. 

But the case of Mr. Sarkuhi. 
which is not an isolated case and 
which has unfolded just in the 


past few months, seems to con- 
stitute a telling comment on 
what can be expected from 
“constructive dialogue." 

There’s an antidote in a 
policy paper of the Washington 
Institute for Near East Policy: to 
press our principal allies and 
trading partners, who now ask 
nothing from Iran, to join Amer- 
ica in setting concrete standards 
forjudging the actual efficacy 
of "critical dialogue" and in 
adopting a common policy 
based on the results. 

Both Washington and Tehran 
pronounce themselves prepared 
for some kind of dialogue. of ; 
their own. But the Americans 
want to discuss first Iran's ter- 
rorism and weapons programs, 
while the Iranians bring up the 
political and economic consol- 
idation of their regime. • The 
makings of a common agenda 
are not yet in sight. : ; 

In the interim, someone 
should figure out how to restore 
a permanent American diplo- 
matic presence in Iran. Formal 
relations, broken off in Iran’s 
Carter-era hijacking of the 
American Embassy, have never 
been restored. To listen and to 
follow up whatever leads de- 
velop over time. America 
should be back in Tehran 
The Washington Post. " 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: The Die is Cast 


LONDON — With the depar- 
ture of the Greek Crown Prince 
for the Turkish frontier it would 
seem that the die is cast and war 
with Turkey inevitable. It is the 
opinion of all that the Greek 
Government could Dot now en- 
chain the forces it has invoked; 
if the order were given for the 
army to retire, it would simply 

make its way back to Athens 10y47 « . . , ' 

and dethrone King George, hi foreign Pobey 

foreign diplomatic circles t****™, — — - 

blame for this condition is cast 
on England. It is said that but for 
Lord Salisbury's antipathy to 
the coercion of Greece the 
clanger never would have 
reached its present magnitude. 


thought such as drink implies. 
When a group of fanatics takes 
away such a privilege as wine, 
not only freedom takes its 
wings, but the graces are not 
long in following. You cannot 
have good art or good literature 
without drink. Unless something 
is done toward ameliorating the 
prohibition laws art will go to 
the devil Li America." 


PARIS [The Herald says in an 
Editorial:] A two-faced foreign 
Pohcy never pays, exceptm 

term ^ of grief and loss of 
age. We 


1922: Art and Wine 


NEW YORK — ■ Mr. Joseph 
Pennell, the eminent American 
etcher and illustrator, says: "No 
nation ever produced or main- 
tained art without freedom of 


prestige. We protested minor 
damage done to United States' 
property by Japanese bombs at 
whuhu and Chinkiang, while si-.. 
JttHJy condoning the murder of 
Uunese women and children by 
those same bombs. Now Chinese 
confideiKe in the integrity of the 
S , taIes M a nation com.- 
itted to an anti-aggression 
policy has been destroyed. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 

PAGE 7 

1 PAGE 


SPONSORED PAGE | 


NORTH AMERICAN SUMMER CAMPS 


A Summer Program to Fit 
Every Taste and Talent 

There is no shortage of options for parents and children to choose among . 


F or many people, ihe 
mention of summer 
camp conjures up 
J memories of bunkhouses, 
hiking trips, swimming 
instruction, dining-hall 
meals and color wars. But 
above all, summer camp 
means friendships made 
and kept. 

With nearly 10,000 
sleep-away camps in the 
United Slates attended by 5 
million children each year, 
the main challenge facing 
parents is choosing the 
right one. With so many 
types - sports, religious, 
day, academic, art and other 
specialty camps - choosing 
the right camp can be as 
bewildering as finding the 
right university. 

Factors to weigh 
Many parents use a referral 
service such as the National 
Camp Association or Am- 
erican Camping Associa- 
tion. The child should be 
involved in the process 
from the start, says Jeffrey 
Solomon, who directs the 
independent National 
Camp Association. 

In most cases, if them is 
any separation anxiety, it is 
on the parents’ side. 

‘It's harder for parents of 
younger children to let 
them go,” Mr. Solomon 
says. 

Another myth is that 
shorter sessions are superi- 
or to longer ones for the 
) first-time camper. 


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“In fact, the longer are 
more beneficial,” according 
to Mr. Solomon. It takes 
time for a child to gel used 
to new surroundings; after 
the adjustment, “the fun 
kicks in ihe for the child.” 

Traditional theory 
Some sleep-away camps 
now offer programs for 
campers as young as age 
five - up lo 18 or 19. In 
fact, the years just before 
college can be an awkward 
time for some young adults 
to be at home or with par- 
ents on a summer holiday. 
By that age. most young 
people will be most inter- 
ested in a specialty camp. 

Traditionalists argue that 
an all-around summer 
camp can offer the best of 
both worlds; specialty time 
alongside the normal range 
of camp activities. 

“We're much more inter- 
ested in working with kids 
in an outdoor environment 
in a general way than dev- 
eloping particular skills.” 
says Frank Bell of Camps 
Mondavin & Green Cove 
in North Carolina’s Blue 
Ridge Mountains. “We 
don’t promise to take a kid 
and put out a competitive 
tennis player. We’re inter- 
ested in working on initia- 
tive, self-confidence and' 
self-esteem.” 

Tailored programs 
At Camp Somerbill in New 
York’s Adirondack Moun- 
tains, campers plan their 
own programs. Larry Sing- 
er describes it as a “camp 
within a camp. They can 
play sports all day and be 
very much involved in a 
music or drama program.” 

Someihill began as a spe- 
cially camp in the 1960s, 
but Mr. Singer “found them 
wanting. I think there’s an 
overemphasis for a young- 
ster to spend more than two 
bouts a day in a coaching - 


activity.” Mr. Singer, him- 
self a former high school 
athletic coach, thinks “it’s 
overkill. Kids would come 
back and quit; when I asked 
them why, they said they 
were burned out. U’s too 
much for youngsters.” 

Connecticut’s Camp 
Pok-O-MacCready offers 
“majors” and “minors." On 
the second day, campers 
meet counselors at an activ- 
ity fair, so that everyone 
ends up with an individual 
schedule. Within most of 
those activities, campers 
are put in ability groupings. 

“It gives children a 
chance to make some 
choices when they come to 
camp," says Pok-O- 
MacCready’s Jack Swan. 

For the specialist 
Specialty camps offer 
campers the opportunity 
not only to perfect an activ- 
ity, bui also to socialize 
with peers who share simi- 
lar interests. 

At Comp Wa tonka in 
Hawley, Pennsylvania, 
boys interested in science 
fraternize with others from 
around the world. In a nor- 
mal day. there are two peri- 
ods of sciences and three 
periods of other camp 
activities (athletics or aits 
and crafts). The advantage 
of a same-sex camp, says 
Director Don Wacker, is 
that “there should be a time 
in a child's life when girls 
should be girls, not having 
to dress up or impress boys 
- and vice-versa.” 

Finally, there are camps 
that aren't camps at all, at 
least in terms of their phys- 
ical plant 

Putney Student Travel’s 
Adventure Travel Programs 
takes campers to other 
countries - Ecuador, for ex- 
ample - where they do 
community service in a vil- 
lage while taking weekend 
trips that expose them to - 



Learning and participating in outdoors activities together fosters enduring friendships. 


nomadic tribes. Putney's pre -college pro- 
grams take place on the campuses of 
Williams and Amherst Colleges in 
Massachusetts. Putney, now 47 years old. 


was founded for older children, ready for 
“a broader and more enriching experi- 
ence," according to Director of Admissions 
Peter Shunlin. • 


Camps Reflect 
Spofus Trends 


Summer camps mirror 
trends in the rest of soci- 
ety 

As children's tastes in 
sports and other activities 
change, summer camps 
are running to keep up 
with their charges. The 
hottest activities right now 
are mountain biking, rope 
climbing, beach volleyball 
and golf. 

All-terrain bicycles and 
'‘extreme sports” shows 
on television have helped 
to popularize mountain 
biking. Rope climbing and 
beach volleyball have 
also been promoted by 
the media. 

As for golf, Jeffrey 
Solomon, who runs the 
independent National 
Camp Association, thinks 
that adult sports often fil- 
ter down a generation, as 


happened several years 
ago with tennis. 

With many summer 
camps near or even adja- 
cent to golf courses, inter- 
ested students can take 
advantage of the proximi- 
ty. 

Camp Pok-O-Mac- 
C ready recently installed 
street hockey, another “in" 
sport, as well as mountain 
biking. Interested camp- 
ers will travel to Canada 
for a biking expedition this 
summer. 

“Kids very much want- 
ed ft,” says Camps 
Mondavin and Green 
Cove's Robert Danes 
about mountain biking. 
“It’s definitely a supply- 
and-demand situation.” 
Dan os's camps also 
added a climbing tower 
last year. 


Overseas Students Supply and Find Enrichment 

Children from abroad - who are both learners and teachers at camp - find a very warm welcome in the United States . 

certified English teachers 


T he fastest-growing 
trend in summer 
camps is the increas- 
ing presence of internation- 
al campers. A uniquely 
American phenomenon, 
summer camps are increas- 
ingly popular among non- 
U.S. parents. 

These parents find Am- 
erican camps to be an 
excellent opportunity for 
their children to learn En- 
glish as well as to partici- 
pate in the camping experi- 
ence. 

Referral services 
Jeffrey Solomon, who 
directs the independent Na- 
tional Camp Association, 
cites the ‘’tremendous, ex- 
ponential growth in chil- 
dren from all of the world,” 
including the Middle East, 


the Pacific Rim and 
Western Europe. 

Families learn about 
camps through the Internet. 
American newspapers. U.S. 
embassies and consulates 
and word of mouth from 
other parents. 

Many use referral ser- 
vices. such as the National 
Comp Association or Tips 
on Trips and Camps. Tips 
has offices in Paris, 
Brussels, Hong Kong and 
several U.S. cities. The ser- 
vice, which is free, fields 
calls from around the 
world. 

The view from Paris 
Suzanne Anpeby, who 
works with Tips from Paris, 
says that Europeans are 
“overwhelmed by the orga- 
nization of the camps and 


the serious encadrement." 
or comprehensiveness of 
the programs. There are 
distinct cultural differences, 
such as the range of choices 
offered to campers in the 
United States, as opposed 
to the rigidity of formal 
education in Europe. Also, 
Ms. Anpeby cited the 
“Protestant ethic of individ- 
ualism - a very different 
mind set.” 

Networking starts early 
U.S. camps are unanimous 
in their enthusiasm for 
these foreign visitors be- 
cause of what they, in turn, 
offer U.S. campers. 

‘The American camp 
directors feel that having a 
few campers from other 
countries does enrich their 
camp” says Marge- Ross, 


who works for Tips in New 
York. 

Camp Redwood, for 
example, in upstate New 
York, now draws 20 per- 
cent of campers from over- 
seas. The camp offers a pro- 
gram in English as a 
Second Language, with 


3 fcngu 
on staff. “Kids who are the 
leaders of tomorrow are 
developing relationshi 
with kids from around 
world during the small win- 
dow of opportunity called 
summer camp," according 
to Mr. Solomon. • 


“North American 
Summer Camps” 
was produced in its entirety 
by the Advertising 
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International Herald 
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WRITER: Steve Weinberg, 
based in Aten* York City. 
Program Director: 
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> 3 -, 4 - & 6-wek ESI programs tor ages 1D0R 17+ 
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TW. (910) 342-4100 • Far (310) 342-41M » M: lnto<MM«H 



emtu 


RED PINE 
CAMP FOR GIRLS 

60ih Season. Personal attention to 
individual development of 
1 15 £iris 6-1 6. Bdl waterfront, 
riding, hndsparts & the arts. 

4 or 8 weeks. ACA accredited. 
Write: Mrs. Sarah RoHey 
RED FOtECAHF FOR GIRLS 
P.O. Axes. Uaocqoa. WX 54548 or 
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A 



laiH tmi mu Fwcn 
THE ULTIMATE CAMP HHRHI 


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EXPERIENCE 
tipNm tk> K ri *vpn«m. IW* la oJ 

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Kuan Urnas !■ UiriL 

[Di.LfH • iMif |H tH . tmtMmijnr Hunt 


Muring Stud ies 


(Acadia hstitate of Ocessojpipky 

seeks (mure biologists, chemists & 

geologists. Spend 2 weeks on the 
coast of Maine Jiands-oo academic 

program for students 12-18. AH " 

marine w i v i m ninHtfs. Recreational 

activities. Co-ed. Certified staff. 

Contact: Sheryl Gilmore, Director 

P.O. Box 98, 

S. Berwick, ME 
103908-0098 
KM7) 384-4155 
b-mrik AI01 ©aoLcora 




PUTNEYSCHOOL 

SUMMER PROGRAMS 

■ Stadia A PerformhiS Arts 

■ Writtag ■ Inhmlwiul 

timalHa (E5LI X 

TWa Ht m MttkmmUag Jw» 

Fartga I3ttrt»pftl7 
Looted tti tte 500-aa« twm at Lbr Putney 
School, the Sonner PraCnaB offer imafl 
dwa, IndM oaKsed tanructlon, many 
oaldoor>ctMlfes.n*ei6art>ferilKte.md 
a safeoUwortiMBvutcr l*b- 

Also attaint a trip lo the CalapaflM 
bfandsanda Crwt-TVa Intafi Carap. 
Mwofete TXan Scfcoal Soawer Prauaw 
EteLa FB».pfe«T.VTmfeusA«aiiJ*teu« 


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LEE MAR 

SUMMER CAMP 
FOR CHILDREN AND 
YOUNG ADULTS 
WITH LEARNING AND 
DEVELOPMENTAL 
CHALLENGES 


necua of rampers. TrwitHonal 
camping plus academics, speech 
& language therapy, computers, 
& daity living skills. AH buildings 
air conditioned. FOR BROCHURE: 

Mr. Arid I. Segri, Exec. Dtr. 

. Lee MenoM, Adnlssiou Dir. 

560 E. 72nd St-Sfette A-71 1 
New York, NY 10021 
WESr www Jee am r Jom 
212-988-7260 


SCIENCE— 

CAMP WATONKA 



R Wnchr.PA tn M, ftepod, PA 18451. 
Vi (717)857-1401 


The Best little 
Camp in 
Massachusetts 


Camp Half Moon 

Over 25 activities or) land 4 water. 
Safe, alnxuuvd. family environment. 
Boys & girls 6-15. Elective Program. 
Mature Staff. NCA Accredited. Riding. 
Team Sports, Arts, Tennis. Sailing. 
Gymiiatlic&.W{tcrcL<iDg, Swimming 
Overnight Camping and much more. 
Brochure & Video on Request 
413 S28 0920/Fax 413-52S-0941 
Ba* IBS, Ci flarrinttim. MA 01230 



GHEUyOVE 



Ma. nTTT— n"rm- 

1_VF F«amlA«i Wo nv 
M nr OBmp— ... 

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k Mna ttnoMio. KmU« 

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ett-rn j; cnoi S v m -r c r Pr - - 



a/ 


CULTURAL EXPEfVBiCE 
Smai groups, experienced staB. 
BSL. academics, travel . . . 

June 23 -August 22 
Boys a Girls • Ages B - 14 

CONTACT: The Haritar School 

500 Saratoga Ave. 

SanJoteTcAKl29 

406-249^51 OexL 624 

Fax 408-984-8361 

Visit otr wab ste: www Jiaitarxrg 


POW-AkW 

OUTSTANDING 
RIDING PROGRAM 

32Hors88*Farm 

friendy Mature Staff 
WSdamessA Canoe Hris 
Ftd Sports* 33rd Year 
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1 7-18 4or6wHks 

Jade & Sarah Swan 
203-775^865 • 203-740-7884 ta 
Box SOI. Brookfield. CT. 06804 


EXCEL at Williams or Amherst College 


S. 4. & 3 Week Sessions • Grades 9-12 


Theetni • tha Arts * Seteneea • Humanities • ErufMi mo m v 

Second Language • the Princeton Review SAT Prep »• ; 

Ten Weed. EXG& Pregnuns, Box 808, Putney, VT 05346, USA 
Tat (802) 387-5685 FAX: (602) 367-4276 



CAMP NASHOBA NORTH 

Co-Ed ages 7-15. in Raymond, Maine 
Oflara quality programs In watersiding, safilng, wirtesurfng, theater, dance, arts, 
Hoff.hotsebadc riding, tennis, canoe ttps. wilderness hiking, and lots more! Learn 
the Engfari language in Ihe USA. We meet campeo at the Boston arport. Cariig 
staff for let-time campers, S a sate environment ACA accredfod. 4 and 8 weeks. 

For brodtun A vidao contact TEL: 508-486-6236 or FAX 50B-9S2-Z442 
Maertota North. 140 Nashoba Rtf. Uflletan. UA gum 


Computer-Ed High-Tech Camps 
In Boston and San Francisco \ 


High-Tech 
Learning at 
its Best ! 


Internet 6 World Wide Web -9 Build & Repair e PC -9 Windows 95 -+ 
[Networking RC Cara -h Computer Arts S Graphic* -D CADD Imago 
Processing -ft Animation -ft Video -ft Radio ~ft Recreation -ft Sports Clinic* 
ft Tennis Lessons and Moral 


Call 1-617-933-7681 

Fax: 1-617-933-3075 Trade Center P^rk 

Email; camp 5 computjrsd.ccm 100 Sylvan Rd. 
URL. vv w vv .ccmputered.coin Woburn. MA 01301 


FIND THE RIGHT CAMP THIS SUMMER 


Personalized Guidance & Referrals to 
the Finest Sleepaway Camps Worldwide 
General • Speciality • Academic * Travel 



A FREE Service cf 

NATIONAL CAMP ASSOCIATION 

‘A Rc rn g ni a rri Authority on Samtacr Camp* 

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610 Fifth Avr - NY. NY - 10185 
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HIDDEN VALLEY CAMP • MAINE 


SUPPORTIVE, NON-COMPEimVE, BALANCE OF STRUCTURE AND FREE CHOICE. 


INTERNATIONAL C AM P’^TAD VENTURES PROGRAM 
Co-ed 8-13 Co-ed 14-15 


IndivIduaSnd atlemion tor tst-timers In a 

peaceful, larm-tike seUng. En|ey Fine Arts, 

Spoils, Dines, Theater, Riding, Llama and 
Animal Cara. Ml Biking. Tamils. Hopes 

Course, Trips and more In « crea&ve axn- 

rauMyMSOOncnseitaipaeiapti- 

vne bta. IMgue. modern todteles. 


From our base camp, wa explore the Mime 

'uies takes 

mAcadu 


mp. 

'txiutoofsi Hiiasen Valley Ac* ensures takes 

you Canoetno. Rafwig, ML Bdungat Acadu 

tan Park. Kayaking and more. Visa Quebec 
&ty and naarhy pravmcol parts 

with a small grot® of teens 
and experienced staff 


ACA accredited. Engteti fenguaae fenora. Healthy dfeL 27tti year 468 weeks. 

PWsr & MroKasssn, Dnctors. HMdnValley Can*. Freedom, ME 0«4l. Flaw. 2D7-8C-5T77 
v Fax: 20?- 342-5685 wttehtodenwIeyBimpjaun BaaflJwcgtihtoenuMtoycanip cmn 


Bolleltieri 

sports academy 


Sunmer Cnips: Tennis, Golf, Baseball, Soccer 


800 872 642S. Bradenton, Florida 


CAMP CAYUGA 


- POCONO MTS. rA CC7ED * 5-15 
"Spectaizhg to Bm-dneanpen dote 1967.5 
^HMecsuB. One umcnUDe. 3 is t rade.5 
^HoderacaUK. 3 poefe, late, 25 hones, en.^ 
^Seperaie teea tmp. Specfal program ter 
.,.ihrr B0 bod 6 ntrr (porn, pertoniMS 
r-DaRf Hondnck Sdng, pwwh. Orcu.^ 
►Rjfag trnxzr, kaoie. manta, nthlej.4 
^Hoota UVt, ESI. Hone Swm.^ 

jTrips: Magara Ml fmrfi, Bnch CateK. 4 
. Fatey owed fc eperaU. ACA accneteed. ** 
TO BOH 457-H, WXSHIHgrOH, 111 07aa? * 


1NTERNA31CBUL 


THE WO RUTS DAliy NEWSPAPER 

If you would like to receive farther information on 
the advertisers who appeared in our North 
American Summer Camps Sponsored Section 
on March 29th, please complete this coupon & send 
it to: 

The International Herald Tribune 
c/o CARRIER DIRECT 
1 Upcott Avenue - Pottmgtaa Industrial Estate, 
Barnstaple, Devon -EX31 IHN, England 
Fax: 44.1271.328.422 



Tickbox 

1. Acadia Inst, of Oceanography 1 

□ 

2. CampBoumedale 

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□ 

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9. Camp Somethin 

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10. Camp Watanka 

□ 

1 1. College Preview Toms 

□ 

12. Computer-Ed High Tech Camp 

□ 

13. ELS Language Centers 

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14. Exploration Summer Programs 

□ 

15. Harker School 

□ 

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f I- 












PAGE 6 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 


PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY; MARCH 29-30, 1997 


For Hillary Clinton, a Respite From Wilds of Washington 


By Peter Baker 

Washington Peat Sen-ice 


kilometers away. This is a place where cheetahs for Mrs. Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, recalled something similar from Mis. Clinton s 
and elephants and rhinos rule, not presidents and The first lady did make a half-hearted attempt to childhood- * ‘We’re from the politically incorrect 
committee chairmen, a place where there are no tie the trip to government policies back home, age when you argued with your brother and your 

a, Cmmr maAkinac at laact imhl tlw ctnnnino hv Dlrlnvti Onra* fl SUilnmuter <raeti oietar ahnuf nrhn ant ttw* hfint* " chp. Oil U. WS 


SERENGETI NATIONAL PARK, Tanzania telephones or fax machines — at least until the stopping by Olduvai Gorge, a 50-kilometer gash sister about who got the bone," she said. 

. . . . • i *« tv .4 . CC aL ■■ JfcL IZtrt dinhnn in fliA Aflivh nikam tlia Anflimitr^lnmafp umm a*S 17 ammLimm 1 * 


— After passing by teeming herds of zebras 
roaming the fields and a rare black rhinoceros 
sleeping alone in the grass, first lady Hillary 
Rodham Clinton and her daughter came across the 

1 ■ .1 II 1 1 T *1 dL 1 I- I . 


White House staff shows up with satellite dishes 
and radio wires that snake up their shirt-sleeves. 

Separated from civilization by a bumpy plane 
ride to a dirt airfield, followed by an even bumpier 


in the earth where the anthropologists Mary and were still evolving. 
Louis Leakey made significant discoveries of But the wildlife 


big cats, three goldenrod lions that looked up two-hour drive on unpaved roads, Mrs. Clinton 


lazily at the well-worn Land Rover. 

The one in the middle bore the distinctive, regal 
mape of darker hair that identified him as the male, 
flanked by a pair of equally impressive lionesses. 
Mrs. Clinton’s guide told her and her companions 
that the two females would go out and hunt down 
the night's dinner. The male would simply lounge 
around until they returned with supper. 

“Everybody’s reaction in the car was the 
same." Mrs. Clinton later recounted with a laugh. 
“ ‘Why are we not surprised?’ ” 

The first lady emerged from the Serengeti Plains 


happily lost herself in a journey through an iso- 
lated sanctuary that guards the wonders of nature 
even as it occasionally surrenders clues to the 
origin of humanity. 

“I've never seen anything like this," she said as 
she prepared to leave for Uganda and the final 
days of her two-week goodwill mission to 
Africa. 

Throughout much of her trip, Mrs. Clinton has 
maintained a grueling schedule of quasi-official 


Louis Leakey made significant discoveries of 
bones from man’s predecessors. 

During a walk around tire gorge with Robert 
Blumenschine, a pal eoanthropolo gist from Rut- 
gers University in New Jersey who is following up 
the Leakey legacy with more excavations in the 


But the wildlife was the real highlight- In 
Ngorongoro Crater, tens of thousands of animals 
roam freely, unbothered by the occasional con- 
voys of four-wheel-drive vehicles. Pink flamingos 
strut in the soda lake in the crater's center. Os- 
triches march pridefully across the field. Zebras 


Zairian Rebels 
OaimaTown 

Near Capital of 
Mining Region 


area. Mrs. Clinton made a pitch for taxpayer and wildebeests are as common as squirrels in 


support of such projects. 

“It’s very important that the government fund- 
ing continue along with the private funding to pay 
for this kind of research," she said, “especially 
when we're on the brink of learning so much.' ' 

That, however, was the extent of the policy 
promxmcements. Mr. Blumenschine demonstrated 


events, from visits with foreign leaden to tours of how humans’ predecessors would strike stones 


U.S. -financed development projects. But there 


after a two-day safan introducing her to a world was little pretense that the last two days exploring 
that, except for a rare moment of feminine com- the Ngorongoro Grater and Serengeti National 
morality, bore no resemblance to die one 12,000 Park were anything other than pure pleasure 


could cut into the skin of animals hunted for food. 

The observation that earlier humanoids drew 
nourishment from the marrow of animal bones 


downtown Washington. 

Mrs. Clinton's motorcade of Land Rovers, 
trailed by clouds of dust, then made its way 
through the Serengeti — Swahili for endless 
plains — slopping to watch giraffes . strolling 
gracefully across the bone-dry fields and munch- 
ing leaves off high tree branches. 

The first lady acknowledged sbe had seen many 
of these animals before, but only in captivity. “I’ve 
seen an ostrich in a zoo, but an ostrich in a zoo is a 
sad, bedraggled thing,” she said. “Out here, he 
looks so noble just walking across the field." 


Arafat, Caught by Events, 
Is Pressured by Uprising 

Israelis Wonder Where the Sympathy Went 


by Barton Gellman 

Washington Post Service 


RAMALLAH. West Bank — A Pal- 
estinian popular rebellion against the 
broken-down peace talks with Israel has 
pm new pressure on Yasser Arafat 


we don’t want to screw up the English." 

No one has died in the clashes so far. 
But Israeli and Pales tinian security of- 
ficials worry about Sunday’s commem- 


oration of Land Day, an annoalprotest 
against Israeli expropriations. Toe ob- 


against Israeli expropriations. The ob- 
servance features Palestinian plans for 


The ferment cuts across all levels of stepped-up confrontation wit 


Palestinian society. It is driven by the 
same kinds of youthful activists who 
launched the six-year intifada, the up- 


troops, according to several Palestinians 
involved in the planning. 

The Palestinians’ anger erupted 


rising against Israeli occupation that clearly at a stormy five-hour meeting last 
began in late 1987 and ended with the Sunday of the leadership ofEI Fatah. Mr. 

i t w 1 i al. a — r ^ nr a 


accord between Israel and the Arafat's own faction in the PLO co- 


Palestine Liberation Organization in alition. The PLO leader's loyalists had 
1993. trouble beating back demands for im- 

Mr. Arafat, who now presides over the mediate return to the “armed struggle,' ' 
Palestinian National Authority, based in according to several leaders present. Jib- 
Gazft, is struggling as be did back then — rii Rajoub, Mr. Arafat’s principal se- 
when Tunis was ms base — to channel, curitychiefin the West Bank, was jeered 
and claim command over, a swell of when he warned against guerrilla attacks 
emotion largely outside his control. and said confrontations with Israeli sol- 
Teenage boys are learning the old diers cany grave risks, they recounted, 
intifada skills: how to fashion a sling “There was a very strong reaction,'* 
from clothesline and scrap leather and said Kamel Hemeid, 35, El Fatah's sec- 
use it to launch a lemon-size stone, how retary-general in Bethlehem. “People 
to ward off tear gas with onions, how to said, ‘Look at the Israeli bulldozers who 
use a wheeled metal trash bin as rolling are burying Jabal Abu Gheneim, and you 
armor against the rubber bullets of Is- tell us not to go in the streets?' If we do 
raeli riot troops. not direct this anger, it will grow and 

“We learned this in the refugee blow up in the face of the Palestinian 
camp," said Firas Jihad, 14, whirling a Authority, and in the face of El Fatah, 



Reuters . . 

LUBUMBASHI, Zaire — . Zaiiian 
rebels captured another town mShaba 

Province on Friday, 

a day after agreeing to hold talks _ wife 
President Mobutu Sese Seko s regime. 

The reported fell of Kaluga was a 
reminder*at Laurent Kabda s rebels 
have a military agenda and are only £ 
willing to negotiate the terms ot Mar- 
shall Mobutu's departure and . not a 
power-sharing agreement. 

Five months after starting the revolt m 
the east, Mr. Kabila’s forces now control 
about a quarter of Zaire and his sup- 
porters already call him ‘'president 

At a summit on the Zairian crisis m 
Togo on Thursday, representatives of Mr. 

Kabila and of Marshall Mobutu agreed to 
hold the first negotiations between the 
government and the rebels, probably m 

South Africa eariy next week. - 

An expatriate source in Lubu m basm, 
capital of the Shaba Province, said the 
rebels made a lightning takeover of 
Kasenga eariy Friday and by the af- 
ternoon the town of about 17,000 oeople 
on the Luapula River bordering Zambia 
was quiet. Kasenga is on Lake Mweru, 

220 kilometers fl35 miles) northeast of ^ 
Lubumbashi, Zaire’s second city, which ? 
is in the center of the region co ntainin g 
the country’s huge reserves of copper, 
cobalt and precious metals. 

There was no confirmation of the fall 
of the city from the government. 

“If nothing changes, then the talks 
will be in South Africa and will begin on 
either Monday or Tuesday, ’ ’ said Moise 
Nyarugabo, a rebel spokesman at their' 
headquarters in Goma. •- 

President Nelson Mandela of South 
Africa said Friday in New Delhi that his J 


M Skiiney 


Hmtry would play a role in the talks. 
Mr. Nyarugabo said the rebels wool 


Mcmbad KataaMgncc Raooe-Pion 

South American worshipers on the Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem re-enacting Jesus’s crucifixion on Good 
Friday. They were heavily guarded by Israeli soldiers because of fears of new violence by Islamic militants. 


Mr. Nyarugabo said the rebels would 
only- agree to discuss the transfer of 
power from the ailing Marshal Mobutu 
to a transitional government led by Mr. 
Kabila's Alliance of Democratic Forces. 
for the Liberation of the Congo (Zaire). 

“The principle is the alliance would 
fonn the government, it is not a questiotr 
of power-sharing. Mobutu’s party has' 
been in power for 30 years and the 
results are evident," he said. 


J7M m 


uy-genenu m neuuenem. reupie 

burying Jabal Abu Gheneim, and you TORIES: Intrigues Multiply as Conservatives Face an Uphill Struggle to May 1 Election 

us not to go in the streets?’ If we do 0 1 ^ * 00 ** 


Continued from Page 1 


bers of Parliament who took cash from 


homemade sling in an underhand arc and in die face of everybody." 


before letting fly his missile toward Is- 
raeli soldiers. 


“If we protect Israeli security, we are 
guards for die agreements." said Mar- 


resignation. A few weeks ago, Mr. Clif- 
ford “arranged" for the tabloids to ob- 
tain copies of love letters from another 
Conservative member, Jerry Hayes, to 


him in brown paper bags or accepted free 
sojourns and meals in the Ritz Hotel in 


sojourns and meals in the Ritz Hotel in 
Paris, which he also owns. 

Mr. Fayed, who employs nearly 6,000 


nounced last week that it was backing 
Labour, a shift from its traditional sup- 
port of the Conservatives. The paper is 
owned by Rupert Murdoch, whose ex- 
panding media empire is finding the 


There is an dement of carnival in the wan Barghouti, who heads El Fatah's Paul Stone, ensuring die end of Mr. 


street clashes, and no small attention to 
the news media. “Any student who 
knows English well, raise your hand," 
one tweed-coated organizer shouted 
through a bullhorn, as nearby craftsmen 
used bedsheets, spray paint and masking 
tape to make Israeli and American flags to 
bum. “We want to read a statement, and 


higher council in the West Bank and has 
spent 13 of his 37 years in Israeli prisons 
or forced exile. “If they are not com- 
mitted to the agreements, I don’t think it 
is rational to protea their security." 

Israelis are closing ranks, united in 


Hayes's political career. 

When Mr. Hayes — who is 43 and 
married, with three children — protested 
that the friendship was “platonic.” new 
letters by Mr. Stone’s mother surfaced 


people, pays millions in taxes every year Tories slow in opening fee doors for 
and has property valued at well over S4 further expansion. 


billion, is believed to be settling scores 
over the government's repeated refusal 
to grant him British citizenship. Mr. 
Fayed, who is from Egypt but has lived 
here for 20 years and is married to a 


Mr. Merchant, who is married and has 


night and leavingW ednesday morning. 

Ms. Cox said Thursday: ‘ ‘I’m not old 
enough to vote, but I'm old enough to 
know when I’ve been used." 

The Sun's rivals had other scandals. . 
Under a front-page headtin^ “Liar.” 
The Daily Mirror printed a photocopy of 
a bill from fee Ritz showing feat a Tory - 




two children, denied all. “Anna is a dear member of Parliament, Neil Hamilton, 


friend of mine and has been helping my 
campaign,” he said. “But there is no 
question of us having an affair. I have 


anger and in the growing belief feat they house when Mr. Stone was only 17, 
are again at the center of unfair in- under fee age of consent 


asserting that the two made love in her British woman, maintains he is fee vie- never made love to her." 


ISRAEL: 

Talks Are Concluded 


temational criticism — a sentiment Is- 
raeli Jews have grown unaccustomed to 


Rounding out the lineup of Tory en- 
emies, The Sun and The Daily Mirror, 


in three years of Nobel Prizes and dip- tabloids feat have a combined rircu- 


Continued from Page 1 


lomatic comings out 
“We are in trouble,” Major General 
Yoram Yair, Israel’s military attache in 
Washington, said in Tel Aviv. Referring 


lation of 6 million copies, say the cam- 
paign to end 18 years of Conservative 
rule has only begun. 

Another scandal has been unleashed 


tim of racial discrimination. 

People close to him say they are cer- 
tain a Labour government would readily 
grant him citizenship, especially be- 
cause he must have some Labour mem- 
bers of Parliament in his debt 

As for Mr. Clifford, he says he wants 
to punish the government over its deep 
cuts in health services, which he main- 


Not according to The Sun and The 
Daily Mirror — and for that matter re- 


enjoyed some $2,000 in free meals with 
his wife at Mr. Fayed's expense. Mr. 
Hamilton had been denying the charge 
for weeks. 

The investigation of three other Con- 
servative officials accused of accepting 




specie d newspapers like The Times bribes has also cast a pall over Mr. 
(also owned by Mr. Murdoch), The In- Major’s election hopes, as has fee resig- 

_ -i rv -i *r» 1 . _ 1 — «ir n !*jl an _ • . m 


(also owned by Mr. Murdoch), The I 
dependent and The Daily Telegraph. 
The Sun and The Daily Minor pul 


lisbed a dozen pages of photos showing 
Mr. Merchant kissing, hugging and 


The first major test of Mr. Arafat's 
readiness to curb violence was expected 
to come Sunday, which is “Land Day" 
in the Palestinian calendar — the an- 


te last week's suicide bombing there that by Mohamed al Fayed, the owner of tains has caused needless suffering for 
killed four people, he added, ‘ 'Even after Harrods, the department store, who has thousands of poor Britons. 

thiC turmr in/n/Lwif tliA ci/mnathir hortn ■«» «-!*>■ iLwiLn r TL„ C.— . <. * J 


s to auh violence was expected this terrible terror incident, the sympathy been disclosing in dribs and drabs fee 
Sunday, which is “Land Day" is not there.” names of eminent Conservative mera- 


Israeli commentators, official and 


The Sun, Britain's largest tabloid with 
a daily circulation of 4 million, an- 


Mr. Merchant kissing, hugging and 
touching what The Sun described as his 
“mini skirted teenage" lover in a public 
park. Other pictures showed fee 
nightclub hostess entering Mr. Mer- 
chant’s apartment in London on Tuesday 


niversary of an Israeli confiscation of otherwise, are meanwhile full of theories 


nation of Tun Smith, 49, a senior Toty 
member of Parliament and former min- 
ister, who quit Wednesday after admit- 
ting he took $40,000 in cash from Mr. 
Fayed. 

Mr. Major said that he expected Mr. 
Merchant “to explain fee stories in this 
morning’s press to his constituents and; 
others.’ 

He added: “As in other cases we need 




l^.Ll t 






an 


sian 


land from Israeli Arabs in 1976. 

Israeli security services have made 
large-scale preparations for violence 
feat day. even moving tanks into po- 
sition around Palestinian cities. 

Israeli and U.S. officials would not 
confirm that fee discussions wife the 
special U.S. envoy also covered steps 
Israel might take to restore confidence. 

The current impasse was established 
when the Israeli government decided to 


that Mr. Arafat has manufactured the 
unrest In a country whose politics are 
fractionated on many issues, there is 
virtual public unanimity — led by Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his 
security chiefs — among the popula- 
tion’s Jewish majority that Mr. Arafat is 
orchestrating every demonstration for 
his own benefit 

Numerous conversations with El Fa- 
tah activists and Western observers sug- 


TT . to find out what exactly has 

HANBO: Loan Scandal Leads to Arrest of Failed Company’s Chief ^°T L " T 


3. 


Continued from Page 1 tacked an earlier investigation as a 

whitewash that failed to bring the major 
family's hidden wealth," a prosecutor players to justice. 


build housing in East Jerusalem and gest otherwise. Some demonstrators are 

nnlpnvl 9 crhprfnlprf usirHrfratual fmm <-allSnn rtu> »«l 


ordered a scheduled withdrawal from 
fee West Bank that Mr. Arafat con- 
demned as too small. 

Although it was certain that various 
Israeli steps were discussed, fee Israelis 
and Americans evidently agreed not to 
make these public — and even to deny 
them, as Mr. Netanyahu did — because 
of the prime minister's sensitivity to 
giving fee appearance that he was mak- 
ing concessions to terror. 

“If the Palestinian side fulfills its 
commitments — again not for just a day 
or two — but if we see a basic change 
during the coming period, we will be 
able to return fee peace process to its 
course,’ ' Mr. Netanyahu said after meet- 
ing wife Mr. Ross. 

“I want to say that altogether we 
spoke only about the issue of terrorism,' ' 


calling the Palestinian policemen “col- 
laborators" for pushing them back from 
conflicts with Israeli soldiers, and many 
Palestinians interviewed said they see 


said. Prosecutors have said they hope fee 
latest steps will help clear suspicions that 
fee government made a secret deal to 
allow the family to keep its fortune. 

The failure of Hanbo Steel revealed a 
web of corruption and influence-ped- 
dling involving top bankers and politi- 
cians feat let fee company secure loans 
far in excess of its ability to repay. 

Prosecutors reopened their investiga- 


The opposition also has charged feat 
fee president’s son, Kim Hyun Chul, 
took a large payment through an in- 
termediary when Hanbo imported ma- 
chinery from a German company. 

But prosecutors hinted that they 
would await fee testimony of Kim Hyun 


Chul at a parliamentary inquiry into 
Hanbo set for mid-April before inves- 
tigating that allegation further. 

Meanwhile, a spokesman said Friday 
that President Kira Young Sam would 


Mr. Arafat as helpless in the face of tion into the Hanbo scandal March 21, 


imposed Israeli decisions. 


after opposition political leaders at- 


meet with opposition leaders Tuesday to 
discuss fee Hanbo matter. 

The discussion also will cover the 
problems in fee country’s economy fol- 
lowing fee collapse of the Hanbo and 
Samrai groups, fee spokesman said. 
Samini, South Korea's 27th-biggest 
chaebol, filed for court protection from 
its creditors March 19, also under the 
weight of mounting losses and debts. 

Separately, fee Bank of Korea said fee 
country’s corporate insolvency rate 
reached its highest level since 1982 last 
month, in the wake of the Hanbo col- 
lapse. (Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP ) 


Brian Mawhinney, the Conservative 
Party. chairman, tried to ensure Friday 
that the Merchant affair would not drag 
on over the Easter weekend by stressing - 
in an interview with fee BBC that the 
election would be decided on “substan- 
tive issues" such as the economy and 
Europe, Agence France-Presse reported 
from London. 

But the press Friday interpreted Mr.' 
Merchant's decision not to resign as an 
act of defiance, particularly after Deputy' 
Prime Minister Michael Heseltine had 
hinted that the legislator should stand: 
down before the May vote. 


•• -i-' foaTJif 
Pawky i 

••:ng3 Had:** 
■ .raaBV| 


SERBS: 

Milosevic Maneuvers 


Continued from Page 1 


of the Yugoslav federation. 

The present federal republic, pro- 
claimed in April 1992 after fee secession 
of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Mace- 
donia from the former Yugoslav fed- 


he said. “We did not speak at all about eration, has been largely a shell, con- 
details of continuing the diplomatic pro- trolled, in essence, by Mr. Milosevic and 

mci " L!. c* l:. . r ■ «• . n . 


cess. 

The Palestinians were equally un- 
yielding in their public statements. 

“Mr. Netanyahu knows very well and 
if he takes one look in the mirror he 
would realize the reasons for this es- 
calation of violence and counterviol- 
ence, and Mr. Netanyahu realizes that 
settlement and peace do not go togeth- 
er," said Saeb Erekat, a Palestinian ne- 
gotiator who met with Mr. Ross. 

The special envoy said he would re- 
port to President Clinton and to Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright on his 
return. 

“They will want to consider the report 


his Serbian Socialist Party. Its current 
president, Zoran Li lie, was installed by 
the Federal Assembly, in which Serbia 
holds l28of 178 seats, in June 1993 after 
Mr. Milosevic engineered fee ouster of 
his more independent predecessor, 
Dobrica Cosic. 

Mr. Milosevic began tipping his hand 
last week, when he dominated the form- 
ation of the new federal government by 
putting in key economic, financial and 
security positions trusted and efficient 
lieutenants who have served him in the 
Serbian cabinet. Especially telling was die 
transfer of Zoran Sokolovic, a Milosevic 
loyalist, from Serbia's Internal Affairs 



BALTIC: Security Pact in Lieu of NATO? 

Continued from Page 1 that the United States will help to n 


fee Doi 

hgrqpj 

TTttTLJlj 


politically influential network of Baltic 
ethnic groups in the United States, the 
administration has said repeatedly that 
fee first wave of new entrants into 
NATO will not be the last 


that the United States will help to pre- 
pare our membership into NATO," said 
Alfonsas Eidintas, fee Lithuanian am- 
bassador to Washington. “This is very- 
important to us.” 

Until now, U.S. officials have not 
provided the Baltic nations with fee spe- 

rtTtA .1 «... , > 


v..- •••• 


ot" Cat 

■£■ Jam* 
tirt* woUd* 
- ar- avWfltit 
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Since Septemter . the administration ' 

has taken several steps, including the The furthest they 
announcement of a "Baltic action plan ’’ the DroDosed drift togom- 

the 




2$ rft 


before deciding what are the most ap- Ministry, which oversees fee police, to 
propriate next steps that might be that of fee two-country federation. 


Sidpa [Write AisOLUled Pirn 

President Slobodan Milosevic walking behind soldiers carrying a wreath 
on Friday to be laid at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier near Belgrade. 


. . — — fvmuwu mm econom- me aspiration of fei» ~ 

ic integration wife Western Europe. The membership! slates 10 

plan includes support for a joint Baltic Some Baltir u 

battalion and assistance in building a skeptically to fee ^ VC reac f? d 

regional air-space control center ford- 

viltan and military purposes that meets feat, a political “T 

West European standards. hard issues immi S f I *** 

According to U.S. officials and Baltic entries” teNATO ^ 

diplomats, fee United States also has in Darticulaf Ltfeuanums. 

been drafting a bilateral chaner senSJ 

out Its future relationship with all three ed thattheJ JS? ■ and havehint ' 
Baltic countries. While work on fee draft ^JSSSSS!^ 10 * 0 * 1 * 
is largely complete, it still has not been „ . y syrabollc document, 

shown to Baltic governments. U.S. of- ■ Insist* on 

ficials explain fee rielnv h«, -m.. r 


Sin's 

~ 7 - r ' anas** 

— the : I® 

- / ; ti -ipy :pea 

: di sfeaiei 

! ‘ KHraw: 


y -tamni 

* s&Frai 


they ^ir wiwntt da^u’^SSMMr UaniaSaidFri ' 


taken,” he said. 

The political crisis and the diplomatic 


_ lu 1992, when Mr. Milosevic began 
his second term as president of Serbia, 


present the document? 7 K 

In the meantime, Baltic governments but streswfJw ^ United StaJes - ■ 
and their suooorter* m S f re * s «d feat such a pact coulrf not ho 


Vc:-,, 




Party of Sodalists ousted Prime Min- Also likely to run are Vuk Draskovic, and their supporters in the United States an alteSaS 0,31 SU SfjUC® t could be 
ister Milo Djukanovic from its ranks, co-leader of the Together coalition fear have been lobbying furiously to extract Reuters TMone?fv!™ • membership. 


moves cast a shadow over celebrations of he used fee reverse process to enhance 
Good Friday by Western pilgrims in his powers, transferring key police files 
Jerusalem. and functions from the Yugoslav fed- 

Normally, Easier and Passover are fee eration to fee Serbian government. 

xj. , . - 


Their decision was seen as a way to forced Mr. Milosevic to back down on some concrete commitment from Wash- Alrittia’ c — j • “«««§. 

punish the popular 36-year-old politi- fee munjcipal elections, Vojislav Seselj, ington on their NATO eligibility. The foreimipff ■ U ^ ar ^ s ’ Lithuanian. 

tian for hk sham iwrumal anrl nnliiiml n riohrici nnri nnssihlv Milan Panic, the Joint Amerirain L. . A _ . anairs minister. 


sported from Vilnius. 


times most visitors come here, but of- 


cian for his sharp personal and political 
attacks on Mr. Milosevic. 

The race for Serbia's presidency is 


a .u , — -- . ,^ r ' Milosevic also tipped his hand wide open. Dragoljub Micunovic of the 

finals said fee numbers were down by this past week when his loyalists in opposition Democratic Center Party was 
more Ulan 15 percent this year. Montenegro's governing Democratic the first to announce his candidacy. 


a rightist, and possibly Milan Panic, the Joint American 
Serbian-born American pharmaceutical which claims to r 
manufacturer who served briefly as lion Baltic Amer 
Yugoslav prime minister before unsuc- letter-writing carr 
cessfully challenging Mr. Milosevic for bership for the fei 
fee Serbian presidency in 1992. “We need to h 


DaJl 'c Committee, would like nT . -*H o: •- " r :;.e -V* 

which claims to represent almost I mil- cussions wife aTvib 6 ? ^ of W' '• 5 

lion Baltic Americans, has organized a secuib^T U S ' But kind of g 7 - v- . ' 

: ^ " *«unty agreement umnU , • ? i 


minister, saife 


'5'A f ■ . 
^ •- 


i icj vkttf 


:cn * #*i-m 


f A" *?i 

n&uh 


iun name rtmencans. has organized a securitv “ DUl kind of 




bers|»p fordie U,r« SSST" Sipbu,\f^^ for NATO » 
We need to have some commitment in the alliance ’^ ath toward membership - 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 

PAGE 9 




i 4 \- m .v. r:.v 


■-» 












A Collector Pursues His Own 

Kuwaiti Tries to Regain Treasures Stolen in War 

International Herald Tribune j 1 - 

K uwait — coi- - ^ggsga^ 

lectors are a deter- k 

mined lot, relent- 
lessly pursuing the 

prey they dream to catch. But '^ mk W& jSam^ 

that is nothing compared with 

what they will do when their 

treasured possessions have . 

been unlawfully wrenched |9| p|^w 

away from them. BBnr ^KS^SSm 

Jasera Homaizi, who start- 
ed buying Islamic objets d ’art 




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Glen Seator s tilted reconstruction of the Whitney director’s office, including carpets and bookshelves. 

Whitney Biennial: Faces Are Back 


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By Paul Richard 

Washington Post Service 

N EW YORK — The sound of 
the 1997 Biennial Exhibition 
at the Whitney Museum of 
American Art is the sound of a 
television in the next room. The gal- 
leries are stocked with cables, little red 
on-lights, laser disk projectors — audio- 
visual machines that aren't particularly 
beautiful/or particularly high-tech, and 
will soon be obsolete. 

Coming as it mostly does from New 
Y ork and Los Angeles, the show is chic 
and brash. But it isn't Jeff Koons cyn- 
ical, or in-your-face political, or wanly 
theoretical. What's notable in the *97 
Biennial is the poignancy of its ait. 

The '93 Biennial hectored, the *95 
Biennial dithered. The '97 version — 
‘t curated by lisa Phillips and Louise Neri 
’ — is the most humane in years, in spite 
of all its hardware. 

You want to know what's new in art 
— at least in that , small realm of art 
known as “advanced practice’ ’ in Man- 
hattan and LA.? Faces are back, that's 
what’s new. 

“It is impossible today to paint a 
face," the critic Clement Greenberg 
told Willem de Kooning in the 1950s, 
but the abstraction Greenberg cham- 
pioned, once central to the New York 
scene, noionger finds much favor. Here, 
instead, the ruling theme is: memories 
retrievedi ;; v ' -••A r 

Gentleness is back as well. New art. 
so this show suggests, doesn't have to 
shock (though shock is still permiss- 
ible), and it doesn’t have to baffle (in 
that snooty David Salle puzzle-picture 
way), fa 1997, art is once again allowed 
to reassure. • '■ 

Unless yon yearn to see great paint- 


ings. Vija Celmins, one of the few paint- 
ers who made die cut in 1 997, once said 
that she retained “great faith in people 
painting forever.” but here she’s much 
outnumbered. Installations — transit- 
ory, vast, soon to be unplugged, difficult 
to sell — fill the Whitney’s galleries. 
Flat paintings may still rule the richest 
New York salesrooms, and the grandest 
art museums, bur this is not a painting 
show, hasn’t been for years. 

Likely to be remembered as the ex-, 
hibition’s stars: multimedia artist Bruce 
Nauman; sculptor Louise Bourgeois; 
painters Kerry James Marshall, Sue 
Williams, Lari Pittman and Ce lmins ; 
sculptors Chris Burden, Jason Rhoades, 
Glen Seator and Jennifer Pastor and 
photographers Philip-Lorca diCorcia 
and John Schabel. 

(Cecilia Vicuna, who has hung a net 
from the ceiling; Sharon Lockhart, who 
makes dull photographs; and Annette 
Lawrence, who makes spiral jottings, 
are as likely to be forgotten.) 

Nauman is represented by “End of the 
World.” a video much less scary than 
most of has; it’s a three-pro j ec to r piece ip 
which the Appalachian fidd le tune is 
variously repeated — on dobro, pedal 
steel and slide guitar — until it weaves a 
kind of elegy, part hymn, pan Texas two- 
step, part Scotcb-lrish lament 

Glen Seator made the tilted room: His 
piece is a life-size reconstruction of the 
Whitney director's office, still carpeted 
amUftMkrshefoed, but balanced on edge. 
Jennifer Pastor maA*. die «*«sh^ng and, 
with admirable fastidiousness, the fag 
furry moth. Celmins paints die comets 
and the stars of die night sky. 

It should be clear by now that you 
can’t tell the complete story of 20th- 
centnry American art while stiffing Nor- 
man Rockwell and leaving out Disney, 


though most museums try. The artists at 
the Whitney are in many ways more 
tolerant. They bow to Walt in various 
ways — in the artificiality of their in- 
stallations, in their cartoony markings, 
their sugary view of nature and in their 
deep reliance on technology and toys. 

Tony Oursler’s portraits — his blink- 
ing, full-face videos projected on plastic 
eggs — resemble Disneyland’s more 


SOUREN MELIKIAN 

in the mid-1970s, was no 
more prepared for the fate that 
befell him than hundreds of 
thousands of other Kuwaitis 
when Saddam Hussein’s di- 
visions drove into Kuwait on 
Aug. 2, 1990. 

fa his house, which stands 
50 meters from the sea, Ho- 
maizi gazed at his objects. 
There were hundreds, from 
fragile 15th-century Mamluk 
glass bowls bought in Cairo 
— his first objets a’art ever — 
to a marble capital from Arab 
Spain carved in 996 for the 
pcriace of the Caliph Hisham 
ibn al-Hakam in Cordoba. 
There was no question of jam- 
ming it all onto a truck. 

Homaizi began to prepare 
the logistics of a tnp that 
would take him, his brother, 
and relatives to Saudi Arabia, 
fa the course of an agonizing 
day, he oversaw the burying 



eggs — resemble Disneyland’s more and relatives to Saudi Arabia, 
than they do Gilbert Stuart's. Pastor's In the course of an agonizing 
giant shells and cornstalks, like Dis- day, he oversaw the burying 
ney’s smiley nature films, have a way of of his most precious pieces — 
making grown-ups feel like kids. The 44 in all — packed in bubble- 
bluebirds flitting through Marshall's wrap, crated, and lowered a 
fine, sad-nostalgic paintings are Dis- meter below ground in his 
neyesque as well. garden. Bui there was no time 

But while theatricalism is in, pure or room for 10 times that 
abstraction is oul The whole Pollock- number. Dozens were hastily 
Newman-Stella line of abstract field lined up on shelves in tire col- 
painting — which used to be a way of lector's strongroom with a 
communing with the void — isn’t much six-inch-thick (15-centi- 
respectedhere. When it shows up it gets meter-thick) steel door. The 
tweaked. capital could not be moved. 


meter-thick) steel door. The 
capital could, not be moved, 
nor a two-meter wooden 
beam dated 898 from some 
monument in Cairo. A quasi- 


S UE WILLIAMS ribs the genre beam dated 898 from some 
by filling up her fields with high monument in Cairo. A quasi- 
heels and spread thighs; the car- unique 17th-century Iranian 
toony line she uses in “Large carpet with trees stylized in 
Blue Gold and Itchy” (1996) is nearly geometricizfag fashion was 
as whippy as de Kooning’s. Pittman fills just left in the hall, a 13th- 
up his with skateboards, radio tele- century funerary stela from 
scopes and garish LA colors, oranges Syria with a Koranic verse 


tographs. At last, be managed 
to draw up a list of 327 items. 
A paste-up volume of images 
was put together. 

The list was handed to die 
Kuwaiti Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs and forwarded to the 
United Nations in June. The 
paste-up albums followed. 
Iraqi officials did not deny 
that looting had taken place, 
but said they had no know- 
ledge of the details nor of the 
whereabouts of the objects. 

Homaizi’ s own inquiries in 
the trade yielded more useful 
leads. A London dealer rang 
to say that be had seen some 
30 of the collector’s objects in 
Baghdad. He mentioned die 
marble capital, the turquoise 
stela from Syria, a celestial 
globe with constellation fig- 
ures signed Mohammed Za- 
man and dated 1054. corres- 
ponding to AD. 1644-1645. 

When the London dealer 
volunteered to go back to 
Iraq, Homaizi agreed. He 


unique 17th-century Iranian made three trips. On one, the 
carpet with trees stylized in collector’s driver accompan- 


and pinks. Rhoades, whose fields are 
three-dimensional, has filled the one on 
view, a zany and enormous piece, with 
orange cables, rag rugs, clay-pigeon 
flingers, ladders, hot dogs, table saws, 
pork and beans, and smoke — all as 
intricately interwoven as Jackson Pol- 
lock’s dnps. 

Avant-garde artists once forged for- 
ward. The Whitney’s seem content re- 
calling what they felt as kids. 

The exhibition closes June 1. 


Syria with a Koranic verse 
molded under its blue glaze 
remained attached to an 
arched niche espousing its 
form. 

Homaizi took under his 
aim a 14th-century manu- 
script of a book of precepts 
and parables by Ibn Zafar al- 
SicjiLli retaining 26 of its 30 
miniatures. With his brother, 
many relatives and 10 other 
cars, Homaizi drove for a 
whole day through the desert 
into Saudi Arabia and down 


ied the dealer. When the ’ 8 |§ Mg „ M H ' 

driver reported recognizing ' ■ • ' ~. ■ 

several of the collector’s rarer fanMoUa 

Western art books, Homaizi An oil lamp, 10th to 11th century, untraced, and, below, 
dug deeper. He found out that the 15th-century candlestick recovered in Geneva. 
auctions had been held m 

Baghdad, in which some of an openwork half-pahnetie Europe, consulted foe Copen- 
his Western books and a pattern and a bronze vase of hagen police, who got in touch 


greater number of objects had the ninth century with a with the Swiss authorities, 
been disposed of. highly distinctive faceted As the dealer went through 

globular body. He inquired customs on tbe appointed day 
T last he contacted about prices and was given his bags were searched and 
the auctioneer, Tal- the name of a merchant called two of Homam’s candle- 
eb Baghdadi, who Osman Saidi. sticks and foe faceted vase 

was by then in Am- The friend saw Saidi who appeared. Taken to court, the 


A 


> Pas cm, Chronicler 


m§mr m V.j i 1 

- -f 




ARTS — He was a 




By Katherine Knorr gees of ease from Vienna to 

International Herald Tribune New OriCOnS to Hav ana. 

— : — ; — : — Although he spent tbe war 

ARTS — He was a yearn in the United States and 
man of the night, of eventually became an Amer- 
crowded smoky ican citizen, his real intellec- 
pjaces where joy. was foal and artistic life was in 
aral aid- sometimes Paris, where he was dose to 
Jules Pascfa today is writers like Pierre Mac Orian 
own for his paintings and Andre Salmon and Ger- 
rtutesfo various states man artists like George 
ss and melancholy. A Grosz. A 1907 photograph 
2 wel of a show from ' shows him on a banquette at 
Hiotbeijne' Nanonale the Dome, sketching, black 
i fas lesfc well known hat against dark leather and 
5S-. and^ engravings, foe dark reflections of other 


. JjK’SfV. ~ s • 7 ; 'j ^ I > y 


to Bahrain, from where tbe jects he had sold. He mea- 
collector flew to London, tioned the celestial globe, 
War broke out. specifying the signature and 

On Feb. 26, 1991, the Iraqis date. At mat point, Homaizi 
were driven out of Kuwait, was sure that the objects had 
and in early April, Homaizi been his. The auctioneer in- 
returned to his house. formed him that 10 other 


the auctioneer, Tal- foe name of a merchant called two of Homam’s candle- 
eb Baghdadi, who Osman Saidi. sticks and foe faceted vase 

was by then in Am- The friend saw Saidi who appeared. Taken to court, the 
the course of said something about “two dealer was ordered to give 
le exchange, dragons.” It became clear them up, including the can- 
ibed the ob- that this was a candlestick diestick with Persian verses. 
►Id. He men- which had belonged to Ho- Scores of other pieces re- 


man, Jordan. In the course of said something about “two 
a long telephone exchange, dragons.” It became clear 


which had belonged to Ho- Scores of other pieces re- 
maizi- They were about to main untraced. A panel of 
agree on a price for that and three expem set up by the UN 
two other candlesticks when Compensation Commission 
foe man backtracked. He had is debating the matter, a 
to get them out of Baghdad. Kuwait source said. On past 

Could they meet in Geneva, experience, it may take a 


Itwas a scene of devastation pieces were still wife him, the Dane asked? A date was while before the collector 


— doors knocked down, the 
debris of broken objects 
strewn about. The precious 
17th-century carpet had van- 


mcluding two early banian 
bronze ewers of the eighth 

Burw^en be put foe^expense 


banian set. The Dane rushed back, to gets his own back. 


eighth 


’ *>■; JL places where joy . was ' tual and a; 
ephemeral aid- sometimes Paris, whet 
costly. Jules Pascfa today is writers like 
: Sr - ' best known for his paintings and Andre 
of prostitutes m various states man artis 
:3&, of undress aod melancboly. A Grosz. A 
?rS S v small jewel of a show from? shows him 

. K the Bibliofoeqne- Nanonale the Dome, 
; displays fas lesfc-well known hat against 
drawings ; airi5 engravings, foe dark re 


ished. He looked at a cabinet involved to compensate foe 
where be had left three can- consignor at about $200,000, 
dlesticks topped by two en- Homaizi left it at foaL “I was 
twined dragons from late 15th- not going to pay a fortune far 


AUCTIONS 






both quick sieefchea and more men, all quite as black as his 
detailed - -compositions, - a own numiere noire works. 


mostly black apd white (in- ' Pascin's vision - was 
deed, mqs^b&dy world of nowhere near as tough as that 
sordidlanguOT.freaetic party- of Constantin Guys, who 
fagand hem^y.daes-paymg - dealt with much of the same 
The Gxavd world as he did, or as caustic 

la Nuit,” is the; result of an as some of the East Europeans 
important donation last year who attacked tbe venal seff- 
of originals to foe Library by importance of foe bourgeois- 


... *• )■ 
^ • • • i 1 A' * " i 

- .'V :s • 




century Iran. Gone. The tor- my own objects,” he said, 
quoise Syrian stela had been Various objects have since 
npped off from its niche. surfaced in Amman. Homaizi 
Down in the strongroom, is currently trying to track 
foe steel door had been un- down 20 pieces of pottery, of 
hinged. One glance told him which he obtained photo- 
foat several hundreds of his graphs through an English 
metal, faience and glass ves- private investigator. The pho- 
sels had yam shed. So had foe tographs have since been for- 
carefully kept records and warded to the Jordanian Min- 
jfao tographs of his acquisi- istxy of Foreign Affairs. The 
tions over two decades, as collector says foe location 
well as his vast art library. where the pottery is held has 
The collector spent the just been identified, 
next few weeks telephoning There were other hot trails. 


Auction Sale 63 

April 22 nd - 24 th 1997 
Rare Books, Maps & Prints 

Ihdudes early printing, travel & voyages, atlases, 
Americana, science, astronomy, illustrated books 

Richly illustrated catalogue with A500 items and many 
bibliographical descriptions in English available 
(DM 40; US $ 40 outside Europe, incL air mail and list of results) 

Reiss & Sohn 

Adelheidsti. 2, 61462 Kbitigstein/Tauims, Germany 
Tel. (+49 6174) 1017 • Fax (+49 6174) 1602 
Internet: http://www.reiss-sohn.de 


U.. «.«■«. 




Giff Kirihg, ra nging fmm ie, thegrossoess ofblack mar- . 

weak done ml&e'tearly port of keteerc. or the stupidity and 

the century, wtep Pascm was nrhrtinai folly of armies after Pascin portrait of Hermine David, 1909, drypoint. 
a very yoahsr- intan ' — like the horrors of World War L 


around tbe world to museums 
where his objects had been on 
loan. He rang up auction 
house experts, dealers, any- 
one who might supply pho- 


Homaizi persuaded a Danish 
friend to travel to Jordan. 
Venturing into a small shop, 
the Dane recognized a late! 
15th-century candlestick with 1 


a very youqg fman — like 
_j { jf ‘ ‘Maikm. de^Readez-vous, ’ ’ 

1903, representing die artist 
among prostatites, with a 
-v bug-eyed, muffitcltioed man 
looking arounSFfoedoor — to 
r ?-vi his Ulostratip&scfor an edition 
* of “CSnder^i” . done in 
1929, the before his 
* death. . .. . uSra*. 

These are ^foe most part 
t sketches of ■tifesnight, often 


-- There was kindness in Pas- 
cin’s vision, and an almost 
romantic safotess in Ms crowd 
and street scenes, for example 
foe' 1908 “Les Fortifica- 
tions,” where three men sit 
idly near a bare tree, a littie 
di^aace from a giri. with her 
back tinned, in foe gloomy 
no-man’s- land on foe edge of 
Paris, smokestacks rising be- 


- ■ ■ ■?.; t 

v- ■ 

. >j-'* ’.-j 




,1^ 
s#* 1 ... 


done at m^^bld with great hind foem. StiU,;his “Cfader- 
foem a ella” illustrations are nor for 
and a children, andhis wildlyfunny 
brief * biblical studies assuredly not 
Sarkpess. for church mice. 

/umougamaBvare erotic, in-. After his death, his mends 
deed bcodering bn porno- - tried to counter the cliches of 
graphy. focre^ a jaded ten- the Montparnarae artist just 
derness thal h^tes over them, . trying to make it through the 


The showgw&Mis insig ht into night, but memories of M ont- 
priyate^Vision of a per- pamasse is'»*atrhey kept 




petuai 
acters were 


mmmm. 


Jewish- fam- ( 

ily. whufoi^Vcscaped as Pet 


whose diar- coming back to, IJfy l“ ff 
tvelcrs of the how he went — by hangm& 
iderweirid. . ' in his studio oo foe Boulevard 
Julius Pin- tie Clichy — but not really 

rfan£ ^Goldie Colbert, 6 Rue drs 

***** «■ Fe ^^nT6M.. 


1 


When- Journalist and Newsmaker meet, 
conversation turns to Hardtalk. 

Join Tim Sebastian in the powerful new talk show 
seeking the person behind the personality. 


WEEKDAYS AT 20.30 CET 


ART EXHIBITIONS 


The Catto Gallery 

100 Heath Street, London NW3 1DP 
Teh 0171 435 6660 Fax: 0171 431 5620 
http://www.catto.co.uk 

Sergei Chepik 

is now represented by The Catto Gallery. 

Oils, watercolours, monotypes and 
lithographs are now available for viewing. 




WORLD' 

*btd a a Undwait d AafliMA B hi du rtiy Cayauft • 


ARTS 

& ANTIQUES 

Every Saturday 

Contact: 

Kmmbqt 

GUBBUMk-fiCRAMOOUR^ 
TeL (33-11 41 43 94 76 
Foe (33-1) 41 43 93 70 

or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 


ANTIQUES 


Japanese Antiques 
Meiji & Edo Periods 


We sefl & punJKJsn nwjevm-quofay 
Japanese Scfauma, bronzes, 

- eJoBoraw, porcsSams & antique 
Samurai swords, armor & fittings. 

FDTNG dUNES ANFlQUe, OD. 

1050 Second At, Nf, Ht 70022 
Mb 2 ) 222W600 ftK 7 . 1 22234601 


auction sales 

IN FRANCE 

m DROUOT RICHELIEU 

US# 9, rue Drouot 75009 Paris -TaL: 01 48002020 


Monday, Aprf 7, 1997 

Room 4 at 2:15 p-m. OLD, 19th century and MODERN 
SILVER - COLLECTABLES. Etude TAJAN, 37, rue des 
Mathurins 75008 Paris, tel.: 01 53 30 30 30 - fax: 
0153 30 30 31- 

Tuesday, Aprf 8, 1997 

9 at 2:15 p.m. OLD and MODERN BOOKS. Erode 
TAJAN, 37, rue des Mathurins 75008 Paris, tel.: 
01 53 30 30 30 - fax: 01 53 30 30 3L 

We dne sd ay, April 9, 1997 

Room 14 at 2:15 p.m. VUITTON TRAVEL BAGS - 
FURNITURE and OBJETS D'ART. Etndt TAJAN, 37, rue 
des Mathurins 75008 Paris, tel.: 01 53 30 30 30 - fax: 
01 53 30 30 31. 

Thursday, 10 - Friday, 1 1 Aprfl , 1997 

Rooms 5 ft 6 at 2:15 pan. ISLAMIC ART - ORIENTALIST 
PAINTINGS. Erode TAJAN, 37. rue des Mathurins 75008 
Paris, rel.: 01 53 30 30 30 - fee 01 53 30 30 31. 

I In NEW YORK please contact Betty Maisonrouge & Co. I 
Inc. 16 East 65th Street, fifth floor, N.Y. 30021. Phone: 
(232) 737 35 97 / 737 33 13 - Fax: (212) 863 14 34. 





nn v 


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re teey Gtobal Hedge s 31X81 

pi Key Hedge Fundlnc £ 207-39 

m Key BCMEnrenriio Value £ 1652? 

n Key Lengirood Inc 8 12X28 

098 U PAOFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
re K1 Alta PadflC Fd Ltd 8 1X22: 

DM LEHMAN BROTHERS 26MVH 
0 Letenan Cur Arte, .' /il S 9.15 

0 Mull StTOtayv Fd II NV B 8 1X15 

a Mun-HronrorFdUNVA S 1524 

0 MatS-Smtogy Fd NV A S 1427 

d MuM-SIralagy Fd NV B £ 1X99 

0 Plantar Formes 40v A/B 8 16.03 

1M LIBERAL BJLS. RINDS 
TM:SS 71 7T3 4874 Rb: 55 21 242 7250 


0 AJ4S.F Fond S 1IB7.1D 

a F.LLAL I Fund S 112*76 

a FILM. II Fund I 111X92 

0 F.LLM. Ill Fund 8 USX 14 

0 F.I.S.T. I Fund 5 1517 JO 

a F.LS.T II Fund 5 I1L648 

d S-*F£. Fd 8 135C924 

d XTJJ. Rind S 172182 

111 UPM INVESTMENTS 
Tdna-lfiZmil 521-24727] 

F<n 004(42} Cl I 521-2477 

er Java Fund J 6*0 

re IDR Money Martlet Fd a 1643 

re Indontrion Growth Fd S 48.99 

112 LLOYD GEORGE MNGWT (BS2) B« 6433 

re LG 4ntonna FuM S 19.71 

re LG Asian DnalerCKFd £ 712779 

w LG Inda Fund LM S «.£T 

re LG Japan Find S 424/ 

■ LG Korea Fund Pie S 644 

mUOVDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS! Ud 

w Uovds Americas PcrraJo 8 II. "2 

104 LOMBARD, OOIER A Q E - GROUP 
0 LO Serin SAM COPS CHF SF 24X41 

0 LO Inreiuiatogy Fund SF 20824 

104 LOMBARD OfMER OPPORTUNITY 
0 5w07ertand SF 534,89 

3 Fronat FF 47X65 

a united Kmgdam X tretand £ 139.72 

a Germany X Austria DM 45124 

0 Southern Europe SF 199-3" 

0 Sandtoavto SF 17X53 

OBUFLEX LTD (CU 

0 MrriHOJrrency 5 3S.90 

0 Donor Merium Turn S »J4 

0 DoearLanq Term S 2 *4* 

0 Japanese Yen i 571000 

0 Pound SterWu £ 3X42 

0 Deutsche Mate DM 2X01 

0 DWCti Flartn FI 2X31 

0 HY Euro Currencies Ecu 2074 

0 Swiss Franc SF T5.57 

0 U5 Drilw Shwl Terre S 1*76 

0 HY Eero Cun DWd Pay Ecu 1220 

0 Sobs UuUcuraay SF 19.7* 

0 European Currency Fee »,*: 

j RrtgKm Franc BF IRI1 

0 Qmveribte I 19.61 

0 French Franc FF 50127 

0 Swiss MuM-DtvUend SF 1003 

0 Swiss Franc Wrert- Terra SF hum 

0 Canarian DoCar CS 1822 

0 Dutch Florin Mum R 18.72 

0 5«to Franc Dtdd Pay SF 1125 

0 MednerraiwwiQiir 5F lXTj 

a Comertliles SF 1X10 

a Dairuenart Short Ten* DM ia?4 

0 CHF GiObri Botonoeo iF 1X71 

a Dutch Giklder Shan Tem R 10Jo 

a BonasrCcrvCHF-Oamwitmg SF 1CI 

t Yirent C’.-n Dumbuluig IF 1X5" 

c NLGMulttCWr.Dtv FI 102* 

184 LOMBARD ODrER INVEST 
0 Smaller European Caps DM *3 

0 berth An erica S UK 

0 Pecmcnm a 102: 

0 JoponOTC Yen lUIJQ 

0 Eastern Emocean OM 1422 

0 Europewi Bond Fund DM "6« 

IMMJI.SASSRE/EHTERPRUE IHTL LTD 
ffl Class AA 138021 S 1035B8 

IK MAGNUM FUNDS 

mratemjragnwiftnUsni Fp> 242-056-64-10 
re Mannura Amnc. Grata Fd S 155.7* 

re Mowiun Capital Growtn 8 180.78 

re Magnum Edge S 11629 

■ Maipi urn Fund 9 UXM 

re MoflOun GtoM Ea 8 12X77 

re Magnum Moan Fund S 10551 

re Magnum Mum-Fund s 137.0" 

• Magnum Opportunity Fund S 12*7* 

• Magnum Russia Ea s 147.08 

re Magnum Pussta Fd S l(*75 

re Mdgnren SoecW Htwmonj 8 11*10 

» Mopmnn Tech Fund . 8 10*4* 

3 Mapnum Turin Growth 8 14178 

d Magnum US Eoutv 8 15675 

re Metal Ctai id B 8 12*73 

re DLP CopHri Fund 8 I DO DO 

re DLR GTOWfll Fund S 100.00 

• Eweeeen Foare Dcriar £ 14(44 

0 Gaftm Omni 5er A 5 216*9 

/n GaOatxi Own! 5er B s lKUB 

re Lancer Vtanger Fired 8 145.41 

0 Rosebud CosirriC-rowm 8 14*21 

re Trenton Performance Fund S Hta 00 

re via Seva Fund s 108.73 

104 MAGNUS BROS Tel (4513315 82 34 
It Balk Growth Fund DM 2025 

re BaOic GTOMh Fund Set 19.42 

187 MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bettauda) LTD 
ffl Malabar lari Fund S 2*71 

108 MANULIFE GLOBAL FUND 
T:(652) 21*1 -91 M/F: (652) 281G4S1P 
a Auiertam Growth Fund 5 11*552 

0 EutOBcan Growth Fund 8 6J119 

0 Gtobal Resources Fund S **774 

1 hide* Hang Kong Fund 8 0 9246 

0 imemchonai Growrti Fund I XI 585 

0 JHMM Grawm Fond 8 X04I" 

o Pccttlc Baser Growth Fund 8 10)92 

: Pe6?niB Fund S X2F7B 

a TlarrFitad 8 1.9947 

a UK Gnmtti Fund 8 XltlB 

1*1 MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

T ON 9(9 7947 7F 609 949 8340 
m Omr A 1 7644 

194 MAVERICK (CAYMAN) (345) WF4N50 
rrr (Zawikte Find LUC S 274*5 

III MEESPIERSON 

Rriun Si M12lri. Amstentom izo-S21ll(ai 
re Aston Capital Hetongs 8 40.19 

Aston SwObr Fd ItV. Fi 120*9 

n DP Ante*. Grewrii Fd N V. 8 M62 

» Europe Grontn Fund N.v. R OT.00 

■ Leveraged D» Hold 1 9*u 

re Tokyo PadncHririnp FI 8X23 

w Obcra NV S/S 1:4 R 129.99 

111 MERRILL LYNCH BANK (SUISS El SJL 
SWISS FUNDS 

J MLBS Batonced A USD 

J MLB5 Balanced B CHF 

0 IY1LBS FbcM Inc A USD 8 1 789 m 

0 AALBS H«d Inc B £Ol Ecu 1945 77 

LinEMBOURG PORTFOLIO 

0 US Dotar Fteed me S 11.48 

d Ol * Fhe0 Inc 
a ECU Fltee me 
0 USDoRtaBtancrd 

0 ECU Batonerd 

0 Wartdretoe Em 
a Eurono Eauriv 
0 Euraae Equity Hass a 
0 Europe Equlry Oass B 
0 Eunor Equity Cbss B 
113 MERRILL LYNCH EMStUNG MARKETS 
J DOHA J 11JS 

0 Ocsfl 8 1126 

111 MERRILL LYNCH EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE 
SERIES NAV ns<ri27<(XY7 
ASIAN TlGEft OPPGRTUNfTIES PTFL 
0 Oass A S IB 10 

c CB55 B S 1010 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 
0 OauA S 24 13 

0 gauB t 2X<7 

CAPITAL PORTFOLIO 

3 Out 1 1X17 

0 CtaM B 4 nra 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 
0 CtasA ! | fcU 

} CKr,:, B t 15.73 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL IUSS) 
a Oass A S uaj 

a Oass B S |X95 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 
0 CtaSA s Iljto 

0 doss 0 8 10 >,s 

GLOBAL SMALL CAP PORTFOLIO 
0 OasaJ 5 1082 

2. pow B j 1070 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 
0 QbsA i 3142 

0 XtoSSB s 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 
0 COSJ A I 15.75 

e dms B { 1504 

Pacific equity portfolio i 

0 Oovs a s 10.71 

0 CSnsi B 5 1057 

TECHNOLOGY PORTFOUG 

0 Ooss * a 1*30 

0 Ohm B « : j 05 

VISIONARY PORTFOUQ 
0 9“»A 8 1176 

0 CctsB S 11.70 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFv 
0 OKS A S 1*17 

0 OdSM B * f T74 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

0 OOSSA j 1 8-35 

0 DOSSB I 17 JO 


DM 4072 

l 131 
SS 

DM 968 


115 MEJRILLLyNCN GLOBAL CURRENCY 
BOND SERIES HAV riOITTlVyrj 
ADJUSTABLE RATE SECURfflES PTFL 
d CtassA 5 9JS 

d OobB 5 «23 

ASIA TIGER BOND PORTTOUO 
0 ClouA-l S 10 AS 

0 58«a.s • S 1120 

d Ora B-l S 10/15 

0 CtoMB-2 1 1164 

AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
0 CLOU A AS !?T7 

0 Class B AS 21 J* 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d dan A CS 1107 

d CkSsB CS 1720 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 
0 CtosiA-1 8 933 

0 CUM A 2 i 1X73 

0 Ora B-l & 933 

0 araB-2 S 1X60 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
d Ora A DM 15-71 

0 OraB _ DM 1*93 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DW 
0 ChBSA-1 DM 15.44 

0 OS8A-Z DM -19.78 

d Oass B-l rn IS.44 

0 Ctaisw _ DM 1932 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (UH1 
d Oass A-l S 8J8 

0 CtatoA-2 S 1X75 

0 dOS B-l S SJS 

0 OraB-l 8 1051 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
0 OasaA £ 1665 

0 GraB £ 17.91 

CORPORATE INVESTMENT GRADE PTFL 
0 Ora A S 15 l40 

0 Ora B 3 1*50 

TEN PORTFOLIO 

0 CtauA Y 1471 

0 CtoSB Y 1417 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

0 CWJSA-I S 974 

0 OassA-I S 2*90 

d Clam B- > £ F-S7 

a Ck>ssB-2 8 217« 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 
0 Ora A J 9J7 

d OraB 3 1ST 

IK MERRILL LYNCH INC PORTFOLIO 
0 Oass A S 1 1-443 

0 ClossS 8 ll&l 

a cto»c i 11.M 

117 MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC POUT 
0 MeriEon mesPiilCi A S 1042 

0 Mnkan Inc 8 FT* a B 8 10.41 

0 Madam me Pew Pin □ a s iu 

0 Medan Inc Peso Pin cis s Lie 


i 


0 msrtteflonal I Shores 8 IM 

0 IrariuttanriH Snares 5 1.00 

0 Cumtrl Share* S 1 00 

MERPJLL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 
a Ones A 8 7BJ 

0 OllSS 6 S 763 

119 MILLENNIUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
in XMI Ount Lzveropra S 1X1*36 

m SMI Quant Unleveraged 8 111454 

ffl SwfK Franc Cunerxy Fd $= 1131X4 

nr USS GtoM CortHKY "0 8 I IB* *6 

128 MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
nr Lewmed Fund 8 lot 15 

nr Maiign Prander Sports 
ip Month US Lira rouse 
or Mamen US Mstar 
or M omentu m 41 ara ribet 
ia Momentum (nelnerii 
rn AAoniGntum DebUnafier 
rr Maneiiiwr gmeraid 
m Momentum Mocnmatkr 
re Momentum NavrUer Pw( S 1(0.40 - 

m Momertimi Price ♦ Partners 8 13*07: 

Mammluiii Fd 8 InitOB 

Momertajm Sandriwcod 


m Mamcnum Tnram Panera 
nr Meneteun unteen Heagr 
m Moandun Vrauemcsm 

III MULTI MANAGER N.V. 

rn Jrantatse Equflles Y m 

m Emerging .Marten S TIES 

re Aibtmge 5 m«o 

m Hedge 8 is*: 

VD NAM FOREX MANAGEMENT 

re NAM MutH hedge aF :o« 

IK NICHOU1S-APPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 
0 NA Stral OspgnuBfaa Q 4 S 122*1 

0 NA seiri ObMtaurBta OB 8 "t 21 

* na Fterittu Grown Fd : it:*i 

re NA Hedge Fmtd 5 l-'A-U 

125 NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG] LTD 

0 Nomura JiribitE Fund 5 lOi-t 

126 NORTH STAR FUND MANAGEMENT 
TEL v (5-33321122 Far- *4X33326717 

> NSln.eshnentrjnd Dtri *S9j&- 

IV NS High Pertmnann Fd D *a * -Me- 
re NS Muard intamahorul Fa DA'. 2** 'Mr 

re NS Canard Fund DU 27*?0* 

re NS Intcmatlaiwl Currency Fd 8 20 40- 

re NS Bd X Mortgage. Fund DU I59JM- 

127 OLD MUTUAL INTL (GUERNSEY) LTD 
re UK Rued Lnnmrsl £ 623' 

• Steritafl Mancgod £ *jD 

re Earapctwi SbanrcFri r 4.171 

re SteiUK SpKlal Mantel -7 *7jO 

re ln» Fhsd Injfflco 3 **'98 

■ Dollar Miraged : Lb22 

w Emcro Asian Staduriorke* S X379 

re Pnoftc Stactemcnirt 5 5-0S1 

• Doltar Speow Morwr ; 1 c*fl 

128 OLYMPIA CAPITAL IHTL INC 

'.-Iiuoml House. Hcmlhoit MM! i Berm .to; 

Tel: **l 297-IOir Fca. ^1 TK 2333 

re fliS ArourepeF.jnj £ i.sjl 

re AI5 VJdKtrrtv Fun; 8 12" 21 

rr Finsbury GI3U3 J ;9ti. 

■ Ohfflipc Emtrsuijf.lt-ts 2 IH'Jj 

re ftlndi. Eastern Drr as • is;? 

* vyhcTi. Front «■ S -ul"; 

w Olvmpa Star Se-Wi 8 27X72 

re CKrainle 5Titr FF He-2£e Set “ 7(-.XXi 

re Otampd Star FFMnard Set = 221 CJ* 

>1 Wh* L-v.-Bra Hedtacarc =<. u«XH 

n tttiSL hlag inn Moeacn '.f-sx: 

re .Ylnai Ha 3 1nHSr-D £-;l T«i»t2 

u- «IMLH«g 1.3*1 SgrP i-'. ITS: XT 

re Ciymc'c Gut 31 Hrc ;c S 17JU.1* 

re ■.Yfrxn. Never Vital Ov 9d 8 21J9 

re 0<rtti3n ird XrtJlror.c 8 HIM 

re Grymsto Natura S :f4 

I2»OPPENHEIMER4CO.1NCF0llFla«:ne.l . 


1L * P.T.F Emere MBJ [Uril _S 5 

9J3 n P.TJi.Eiir.HBOnlLUX) ECU 

*J3 K P.TJ. Eumwl iLrco Era 4 

re PTF. Inti Sma* Cap (LUX2 S ‘ 

1BU * PiCMePSer ^ ^ SF 1 

11JD w PWrtAsto GreoriiFd .* 

lOjis n- “niri ancpciians SF it 

HO* - wart Sums m at -Sraai Cos SF Jl 

0 PktetVcBUBse (CHJ SF 1C 

^ Ml PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 

21 J* tfP.O Bra tiuo cft. Grand Cayman 
Fmc fOW M9-09W , 

]SW ffl PramtafUE EaulyFutrd S 11 

1 7 JO m Premier hit) Ea 5inrt S 

« PteroierGtoBai Yield PtutFC S J 

rn premier Gtobsl Bd Fd * 

1X73 « Premier Total Petum Fd S 1< 

t7M M3 PRIMEO FUNDS 

,LM ra PitoieoFundA S 

,r T , n Pitatra R01B B S 

1401 141 PUTNAM 

it Eranglno HHh Sc Tntsl * 

15.44 » Pirinan Em. Kria Sc Trjfl S 

.19 78 a Putnam Htoh lot GNMA F0 8 

15.44 0 Putnam m Fund t 

19X2 14a OUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

h Avon Dewtopmert * J 

6JS re Emer^no Croatti Fd N.V. S 3 

10.75 rv Ouartora Fund N.V. 5 21! 

SJS * Quannun Indusna: 3 ‘ 

1IL51 iv Guontum Realty Fund I 1 

■v Quasar inil Fund N.V. S 2 

1665 » Dude Fund N.V. S 3 

.J /W MS RAMBANK -W4B2LWJUI M 

ism 0 Rdto Ho< Fd Duwi Egultv g *1 

0 PBtte HW Fd CMGi Bond g U 

U3 ° 0 BoCOHWFdNLGa® a e - J 

, 0 P-CboHW Fo BE F Cash BF 10M 

Ilf! 4 Paha Sat F0 Equtt) R S 

,4,J 0 Pnto Sei Fd F40 waane H S3 

« 74 144 REGENT FURD MANAGEMENT LTD 

M90 'T CSHMGOPd * 

£% ? * 

ni Gotten Tiger Fund 8 

977 II New KArtd Growlh Fd S 

w : SJS'T&Dnb, ! 

u» tesssar^s 

a 0 Segsrt savn AJaFd S 

,,M m RfoOT Srtbmtai Fd 5 

BT a Rinnan Deb' Fund * 

l(>42 rei 7di4iur Aibttrege 8 

ia*l .- LMder.cl Ass .ernon Syr 3 S 

114 ei UTlench. ?d As* Russia Fd S 

11* re Undervalued ASM** Set I S 

a urtaeracraec Proa Id 2 8 

I nap m 3Fje Tigd S 

a Pec Doer S 

1ZH 0 finite Ttserlnr Co LXl * 

100 147 RSG GLOBAL FUND . , 

100 >v Iteig Gtobal Fond Pta* Pta J 

n Rmg Caocai Fund Ecus Ecu ' 

~ 148 REPUBLIC WIND5 (FAXB2SW 

it BeauDS: US Morey Mated S 

o senuol* USFHed ineFd S 

IT s BeTJULs Gicbcl Fried 5 

1X1*26 0 flee Sltol Term High i 

111*54 a Hep EmeroM n* rf Deot Fd 8 

1131X4 3 fteu Lent ipne. Gtbl Inc 8 

I ib* el a Rrcuooc Aura <s> Plus Fd 8 

r : BeputNU Gtobal ctwO? J 

10*18 0 SantoScGtoSri Bdonctd S 

175 *74 a SnFUbBc ?3 j T: Equliv S 

ljiiZr 0 Rep Eurratecn Fiwrr Fd 8 

138Lei- * Res US =a.rfy r-jnd S 

f?7«3 e ResEmera'-U'NBbb'yPF * 

r-r ii r I c Res 'JSSfflJlCtarcgui'vFd S 

!ifl"i- - ®epubP: Euro:63n Fuefl Inc DA. 

Vi-:/ 7 Reeuhit CM= Vjr-y rv.cmel SF 

1*6-31: 0 PC8--3K jobc.- 6«i*> Fune S 

10X40- ■" Beguti: GoraJ Hedse S 

ijifc r Tea .Mft- Adviser tatFe £ 

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2ji re *Te Hfterltow Fmc 8 me 

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IS4 9*: Tet 3IM S7«961 1 FdK 31 28 (75 06 61 __ 


iT.vir re iWKilite'tarK £ 1SE54E 

■ pKI^3jrr i STri ire S leOjJJE 

m » na*x*ir. rutures ite. 5 }^ 2 jnE 

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1090 re B'Chtau'tCjfjfTumlvLlrc 5 10=5-Li= 

IS*: re p'VKwrtCscm.Lii sir.: r khsjj*. 

MT ROBEC9 GR3UP 

:o« POEvxajgeZ Pp-to-Kr.31' 16 22*127* I M 

0 9i*xe-f ::'ji ej ZXLfO 

l, 0 BG Su-rceF-fflc 3 TOW 

~* . (M Pucfc: F.td Ft 149 70 

^ - a SGD'ffler- Te=arsJ FI S1JJ0 

-;-?r 4 P-S Said P.*s _ 2 £9^6 

■ 6-U . E.Te-c 'to Ysrtn . Ft 17350 

1 P.Ci Vtoce/ Plus F =L IF 12*59 

13.54 .More Poieo see Arrita-sn ssou 

150 ROTHSCHILD ! GROUP EDMOND DE) 
GRCUP FUNDS 

"SS,- Tet *4 171 140 3£3t Fsl44 171 240302D 
LOP- J 3L,=. IjlTxj HMirros Fd S S0I9 

i ')U» m -oeicue: Cep 1-5£rjl S 9CM 

I ?}* t Re^r.r?l-ted ■Lcp u lotknjS 4 121 2C9 

140- ;M'.A3ED FLtlDS „ 

>JW- Tei:lT?4'"3*tl Bd 352*729Je 

7D 0 Fc.-7?CemTreirerne C.- 1 " 5F 10915-*S 

5337 : Face Cesh Trr;- Serrrei Jsj DM 10*53* 

4 jHS e FdrxCosr .Trsr-tr.-e 1 USS 8 1 uM PT 

*1-1 » LC-m 8 2671 D3 

4.750 re OW-.totor S c IffitL?* 

* Bn-CidienteSmss Fund Sp 12B5S9 

3*22 Pnbbnc F3H'- Enter VtoTS S l*iXD7 

X379 > Ptitard =urt =Ct Era 1 53D24 

J»1 ? PntfflWFj-tf JSJ 8 131 J17 

I o*6 b Priet-L ji "ltc =■. tee Era 165B* 

: P:«u'te =, J"0 ’-efvelto SF T35158 

I * B-radr e u->jLsn" art 8 1C1XI8 

1 re 3 r JZIPI r T 5425T 00 

. _ I ; tew:" ■‘P.'T: rr 95*57.17 

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to j i np-m.'c'iteje.-i 


! Artriragc Interoclicr z- j 1*1 -X 

! emerg/.'StolRTiil i If: i" 

• iimHonr.-rtPut'dii ; IX. 77 

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I3BOPT1GESTION FARrS 

CROUPE MARTIN MAUREL 

re CyhtfcS del cc-Fl-*: ir.' j.M I4i 

re. Opugej! .retell FcGe.. Sit F CM I^X" 

ffl CtanpulGtbl Pd* « 5 1 Sut D V li. 

131 OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Pram 5L Hflinviert.36riB J e:«0»ST v6S? 

• Graham Re Future* Lt! 5 It *1 

t Gprirna tuemallm Siral j IXll 

m Optima Emerald Fd Ltd 5 liXS 

c '3cHffla Fund 2 2*3* 

w Oplun Futures F-jrw J lire? 

re OpBmc Global Fund J 15.3 

ffl Duflna Opporturtflv c d Ltd i 2XX: 

re Optima Snort Fimd ; 

re Tlw Manner Fj Lid 8 e U 

.. TK? Ptarinw-i Fd rent : ’1." 

ORBIS INVEST Bemude (441 ' 59t TOCO 
re i4t>p. Gtoeu' i;o .van : : 

re ceets Cphmal IZOAV*. 8 T4C0 

re OrbtsLnoragtd iTG.Meii 8 73-5* 

133 ORBITEJl GROUP OF FUNDS 
Nassau Tel i B09. 1564456 FolU».32«h4l 
hnp-.rortJteuojni 

a Jtbue» AuaPpiFd 5 xsa;*: 

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0 ctebihj. GtbiDL-*7-.rjv E ': : *:r*: 

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p «5tk • mi:- Fc ; ->3*;3r 

0 0 ditto Lons Jhort ~ d .'iCoA; 

-• Orb"d' Newa Rns Fd S3 14 TP-: 

134 FACTUAL 

BnnfcteH5531 13721 1 MstaBCliSai i 5331 661 
■J Etomlfy FwtB Ltd 5 51453” 

1 Indnlty Fund Ltd s 7*0 '”5 

0 Narasiar F-jiui ; 1756615 

d SiarHigni'iriaFaua s 3261759 

a orefl FundLto 8 i*IA6« 

0 Twlnstar High YleU Fd £ IWJII’ 

PARIBAS 

PABVESTIUB-FUNDS 
EOUrTJ POOTFOuo 

e Ponml A--ran s 91W 

0 framed Aston Grojrth 0 • 7f i) 

0 Pwvcsl Bctgrura BF nixco 

4 Pamv Europe 0 Ecu real* 

0 Porvest Europe mm Coo Ecu !7Sj4 

ff Panted France B FF I/6IJ’ 

0 ParvesJ Genrorrv 0 DM. j*X7i 

0 PcrrerJ Grrtritr Ctrlra 0 USD Iff* 

0 Pa wen Hatwnd g n nr> a 

a Fmvaraitaff Ld yiiUreCu 

0 ParwclJapane > 4»j600 

0 Poeresl Japon Small Coo i ' JS26 

0 Porvesi Siananavto 0 Set IF'; 

d Parr-si Smr/ntond SF DF 95 

J PfliveslUlB i 136 75 

0 ParveitUSAB 8 3" 5* 

BOND P0RTFCU05 

j Parvv.J OtHI B^tov 0 LF l»v.l 00 

0 Pawd OM CAD B CS 247 0" 

re Pjnijsl 008 Cue JIOjj 

0 Pdrvea Ob* D».t. B DM 1 1« 8* 

3 Parjud emt Das b D .* ret*) oi 

re Parwst oct. DsJiar P 8 ZIP 72 

J Poucat Oon Ecu B Ecj IaSj31 

a POTVMT 0011 FPF 9 FF 1247.0c. 

■» PanrosJ Ctan Gutavn C FI Fti) 

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SATURJDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 


PAGE 11 


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Oracle Head 
Weighs Bid 
For Apple 

Ellison Says He’d lire 
Firm’s Management 

By Peter Behr 
and Rajiv Cbandrasekaran 

Washington Post Service 

Wa shington — The software 

entrepreneur Lawrence Ellison, chair- 
man of Oracle Corp., says he is con- 
sidering raising $1 billion to acquire 
Apple Computer Inc., his troubled Sil- 
icon Valley neighbor. The goal, in Mr. 
Ellison’s view, is to save Apple from 
itself. 

Facing continued financial losses 
and a new round of layoffs and down- 
sizing, Apple does not have long to 
last, Mr. ELtison told the San Jose Mer- 
cury News in California. 

His first step upon gaining control 
would be to fire Apple’s management, 
he said “Apple is in desperate need of 
all-new management and leadership,” 
he said 

A spokesman for Oracle confirmed 
that Mr. Ellison had set up an in- 
vestment group to look into the pur- 
chase of Apple. 

To acquire 60 percent of Apple's 
stock, as Mr. Ellison is considering, 
would require more than $1.25 billion. 

“He said he’s gotten together a 
group of people who are interested in 
doing this/ the spokesman said 
adding that Mr. Ellison had rfi<!nwa^ 
the idea with his friend Steve Jobs. 
Apple's co-founder. But Mr. Jobs told 
the Mercury News he was not involved 
in any move to take over Apple. 

Mr. Jobs recently joined Apple’s 
board, after Apple’s $400 million ac- 
quisition of Next Computer Inc., the 
company Mr. Jobs founded after be 
was forced out of Apple more than a 
decade ago. 

The Oracle spokesman emphasized 
that Mr. Ellison was speaking for him- 
self, not for the company, which is a 
leading manufacturer of database- 
management software. 

“It’s Larry Ellison as a private cit- 
izen.” the spokesman said An Apple 






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Computer spokesman declined to 
comment, and efforts to reach Mr. El- 
lison for further comment were not 
successful. Analysts were unsure how 
seriously to take Mr. Ellison. Although 
his statements may have helped lift 
Apple shares $1,875, to $18,625. on 
Thursday. Oracle’s stock closed down 
$1,125, at $39375. U.S. markets were 
dosed Friday for a holiday. 

“We believe that Larry Ellison re- 


mains fascinated with Apple and the 
Apple technology, ’ * said Neil Herman, 
an analyst at Salomon Brothers Inc. 
“There is no question that with a part 
of his fortune created at Oracle, Ellison 
could make a major investment in 
Apple.” 

Graham Tanaka, president of Tanaka 
Capital Management in New York, 
said: “Would Apple make a good fit 
with Oracle? 1 can’t think of a reason 


A New Twist in Making Computer Chips 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Cornell Uni- 
versity scientists announced that they 
had found a way to overcome a sig- 
nificant obstacle to making new semi- 
conductor materials for computer 
chips and other uses. By adding a slight 
twist to the base on which the semi- 
conductor is grown, they say, engi- 
neers should be able to produce pure 
crystals of many compounds that are 
almost impossible to make now. 

Researchers said the preliminary 
work could lead to achieving a long- 
term goal of semiconductor research: 
developing a universal base, or sub- 
strate, on which pure, single crystals of 
almost any semiconducting material 


could be grown. Such a development, 
scientists say, could lead to many new 
types and classes of semiconductors 
for computer chips, sensors, lasers, 
switches, data storage devices and oth- 
er uses, and reduce the cost of making 
electronic components. 

Max Yoder, director of the elec- 
tronics division of the Office of Naval 
Research, a sponsor of the Cornell 
work, said thar, if confirmed by further 
work, the Cornell work could revo- 
lutionize the semiconductor industry. 

James Coleman, a professor of elec- 
trical engineering at the University of 
Illinois ar Urbana-Cbampaign. said 
that, so far. the results were “prom- 
ising and exciting. ” 


KeraJd Tnbuoc 

why.” Mr. Ellison told the Mercury 
News that a decision on whether to go 
after Apple would depend in pan on 
how Apple's major institutional share- 
holders responded to the plan. Com- 
ments on the Mercury News’s World 
Wide Web site about Mr. Ellison’s pos- 
sible involvement with Apple were 
sharply divided, as some partisans of 
Mr. Ellison hailed die idea and said he 
and Mr. Jobs could revive Apple, while 
others said it would not work. 

The New York Times reported: 

Gilbert Ameiio. Apple's chairman 
and chief executive, was quoted on tire 
Mercury News Web site as terming 
Mr. Ellison's proposal “nonsense.” 

Analysts said investors might be re- 
ceptive. however unusual Mr. Ellis- 
on's approach, assuming bis interest is 
real, because Oracle is regarded as 
aggressive and well-managed. 

* ‘They are redefining craziness 
here, taking it to a new level, but on the 
other band, we can't dismiss it.” 
Charles Wolf, an analyst with CS Hist 
Boston, said. 

“I think he'd get an awful lot of 
willing investors at a modest premium 
to the current stock price,” Mr. Wolf 
said. “Larry runs a very successful 
company, and there are ways to turn 
this thing around.” 


Suez and Lyonnaise 
Plan Talks on Merger 

Move , to Be Discussed April 11, 
Would Create $14 Billion Concern 


CompJrd by Q*r SatffFran Disptadtn 

PARIS — Compagnie de Suez SA 
and Lyonnaise des Eaux S A said Friday 
their boards would meet April 11 to 
discuss a merger that would create an 
industrial powerhouse valued at about 
80 billion francs (S14.13 billion). 

The announcement marked the first 
time that Suez, an industrial and fi- 
nancial holding company, and Lyon- 
naise des Eaux. a water utility, had 
acknowledged they wanted to combine. 
Reports of a merger have pushed their 
shares up more than 30 percent since the 
start of the year. 

Such a transaction would give Suez, 
which already controls the Belgian elec- 
tricity supplier Tractebel. more of an 
industrial bent after the sale of its bank- 
ing unit last year. Lyonnaise, mean- 
while, needs cash to compete with its 
larger water and construction rival. 
Generate des Eaux. 

Analysts were generally unmoved by 
the announcement, saying it had been 
widely expected and was short on de- 
tails. 

“There were too many news items 
going undenied for the merger not to 
happen.” Jerome Labin, an analyst at 
Jean- Pierre Pinatton in Paris, said. “The 
question now is what the parities for the 
stock swap will be.” 

But a source close to the deal said 
Lyonnaise des Eaux and Suez would join 
forces through a merger rather than a 
share swap, to speed up the transaction. 

* ’With a share swap, we have to sub- 
mit a bid and then wan for the investors 
to turn in their shares,' ' the source said. 

‘ ’Then we have to make a minority buy- 
out bid. That takes time.” 

The source added: “With a merger, 
investors have no choice but to turn in 
their shares. If they don’t agree with the 
merger, they can sell off their new 
shares afterwards.” 

According to other reports, the mer- 
ger will take the form of a stock swap, 
with two shares of Suez to be traded m 
for every Lyonnaise share. Suez already 
owns 18 percent of Lyonnaise. 

Lyonnaise shares closed Thursday at 
575 francs, up 9. while Suez ended ar 


290.90. down 1.10. The market was 
closed Friday for the Good Friday hol- 
iday. 

Lyonnaise shares have climbed al- 
most 20 percent since the beginning of 
the year, while Suez shares have gained 
32 percent. 

Suez, founded in 1858 to excavate 
and manage the Suez Canal in Egypt, 
branched out into banking in the late 
1950s. 

After making several investments in 
France’s real-estate market, which then 
went into a deep slump, it watched its 
flagship investment bank. Banque In- 
dosuez. plunge into the red. 

The company itself registered 10.6 
billion francs of losses between 1992 
and 1995. 

So disgruntled were investors that in 
the summer of 1995, the company’s 
chairman, Gerard Worms, was removed 
and replaced with Gerard MestralleL 

Since his arrival, Mr. Mestiallet has 
tried, in his own words, to make the 
company “more and more industrial 
and less and less financial.” 

He has shrunk Suez's real-estate 
holdings to 4.9 billion francs — a sixth 
of what they were three years ago — and 
sold Indosuez for 1 1 .9 billion francs to 
Credit Agricole, France's largest bank. 

That sale helped' transform Suez's 
finances into a cash pile of more than 6 
billion francs from a debt load of 5 
billion francs a year ago. 

In the meantime, the company has 
returned to profit, earning about 800 
million francs in 1996. 

Still, analysts say that while the ben- 
efits to Lyonnaise des Eaux of a merger 
are obvious, Suez shareholders are un- 
likely to see the union propel their stock 
beyond its current 34-month high. 

Mr. Labin of Jean-Pierre Pinatton 
said a Suez takeover of Lyonnaise 
would dilute earnings per share by about 
5 percent in the short term. 

While it would also allow 33 billion 
francs in tax savings to be made over a 
two-year period — which should help 
earnings per share — “the impact on the 
shares should be neutral.” he said. 

( Reuters . Bloomberg) 


ECONOMIC SCENE 


ithiie Wavj Aid for Nippon Credit Irks Analysts 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Service 




. TOKYO — Authorities scrambled 
( tfc Friday to support Nippon Credit Bank 
: T Ltd., a major bank that faces serious 
financial difficulty, prompting com- 
plaints that such action was contrary to 
the government's push for a major de- 
regulation of financial markets. 

Finance Minis ter Hiroshi Mitsuzuka 
said the Finance Ministry and Bank of 
Japan would extend help to Nippon 
Credit to maintain stability in the fi- 
nancial system. In addition, banking- 
industry sources said the Finance Min- 
istry was asking other major banks to 
bail ont Nippon Credit. 

“We wtxild be very disappointed” if 
the Finance Ministry were asking other 
banks to pump money into Nippon 

banking 


banks to pump man 
Credit, Brian Waterh 


ouse, a 




u . 

ir 

■ N 



analyst at James Capel, said. Such ac- 
tion. he said, would only preserver the 
“convoy system,” in which strong 
^ banks are expected to support weak 
\ 7 banks and which he said was something 
the Finance Ministry had pledged to 
stop doing. 

Mr. Mhsuzuka and other Finance 
Ministry officials declined to answer 
specific questions about their efforts to 
help Nippon Oedit, the sm allest of Ja- 
pan’s three long-term credit banks. Such 
banks, which funnel long-term credit to 
industries, played an important role in 
Japan's postwar economic growth. 

Nippon Credit said Thursday that it 


I a major restructuring to avert a 
lancial crisis. 

The Nihon Krizai Shim bun, Japan's 
leading economic newspaper, reported 
Thursday that the bank’s many financial 
problems could make it difficult for it to 
meet international capital requirements 
and that the bank was therefore planning 
to close all its overseas operations. Un- 
der the Bank for International Settle- 
ment’s guidelines, a bank must maintain 
capital equal to 8 percent of its total 
assets to operate globally. 

Nippon Credit’s overseas loans and 
securities totaled about $14 billion at the 
end of March 1996, or about 9.4 percent 
of total assets. 

“Withdrawal from international 
business would therefore result in a sig- 
nificant reduction in the size of the 
h ank, ” said Alicia Ogawa, an analyst 
with Salomon Brothers. 

At a hastily called news conference 
Thursday night, Nippon Credit denied 
that it was withdrawing from overseas 
markets to become a purely domestic 
hank or that its financial situation was 
grave. But Friday, a number of other 
newspapers carried similar reports. 

“Tbe raw realities of banking have 
come to Japan,” said Paul Heaton, ana- 
lyst with Deutsche Morgan Grenfell. 
The international capital standards were 
adopted three years ago. in part because 
Japanese banks used to operate with 
such low levels of capital and looked 
instead to die Finance Ministry for in- 
surance against failure. 


“The BIS system is certainly the key 
factor that will slow overseas growth — 
in fact, cause contractions in overseas 
growth — for Japanese banks,” Mr, 
Heaton said. 

“There is no way that these banks 
should be operating with these low 
levels of capital. I think we’ll probably 
see a number of other Japanese banks 
concerned about this issue.” 

Nippon Credit has long been con- 
sidered one of die sickest of Japan's 
major banks. In September, it reported 
bad debts of $10 billion, although many 
analysts say the figure is considerably 
higher. Even using tbe bank’s figures, 
its bad loans far exceed its bad debt 
reserve of $2.8 billion, Mr. Waterhouse 
said. 

Furthermore, like many other Jap- 
anese banks. Nippon Credit has a num- 
ber of affiliates that were set up as a way 
to get into other businesses, such as 
leasing, or to lend money to customers 
who would not otherwise qualify for 
loans. 

Three of Nippon Credit’s affiliates — 
Crown Lease, Nippon Total Finance 
and Nippon Shinyo — are now in se- 
rious financial trouble. They borrowed a 
total of $14.6 billion from Nippon Cred- 
it and other lenders. In Japan, a parent 
bank is responsible for the debts of its 
affiliates, so if die affiliates are liq- 
uidated, as is anticipated, Nippon Credit 
would not only lose the $2.4 billion it 

See BANK, Page 13 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 
s 



March 27/March 28 

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LI bid- Libor Rates 


March 27 


Ptrfs 


Tanafo 
Zurich 
1 ECU 
1 SDR 


345* 7X46 mOS 

U6B MS 456*1 * 
15751 S5J7 — 
43996* MS7 Lltfi* 
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1197 *82965 1.606 7*186* 

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1-»W «%-« 3VW-3** 7%-7B^6Bta-OVI*3«i-3*7* 4%-96 4V»-*V» 

la SBen mMmm (orequMeaO. 


Key Money Rates 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


For Paris and Rome, Economic Warnings 


French Recovery? Shaky at Best 


A Slowdown in Italy Raises Fears 


Strong U.S. Growth Data 
Spark Optimism for ’97 


10 


OjnpSedbyOtrSkgFnmDapiMAa 

PARIS — An unexpected decline in 
output and record unemployment 
show that Fiance is poised for a slow 
and uneven recovery at best, econ- 
omists said Friday, despite steady busi- 
ness optimism. 

The government said Friday that 
manufacturers unexpectedly cut pro- 
duction across the board in January, by 
1.2 percent, after they raised it by 0.9 
percent in December. Companies 
made 1.1 percent more goods than they 
did a year earlier. 

Unemployment, meanwhile, re- 
sumed its rise after a three-month lull, 
to a postwar record of 12.8 percent in 
February. The rise comes as the total 
number of unemployed, calculated on 
a different basis than the jobless rate, 
fell 7,500 to 3.09 million. 

* ‘The business climate is improving, 
but there's no concrete sign yet activity 
is picking up," said Madeleine 
Toulouse -Seux, an economist with So- 
ciete Gene rale. “The recoveiy isn't a 
full- blooded one.” 

Econo mis ts had predicted that the 
jobless rate would be unchanged at 
12.7 percent, and that manufacturing 


output would rise 6.2 percent. Finan- 
cial markets are closed for the four-day 
Easter holiday. 

Earlier this week, the national stat- 
istics agency, Insee, said unemploy- 
ment would rise as high as 12.9 percent 
before ebbing back. 

The figures released Friday capped a 
week of poor economic statistics, ran- 
ging from an 11.1 percent drop in 
housing starts in January and February 
from a year earlier, and an unexpected 
1.7 percent drop in consumer spending 
in February, after a 3 percent rise in 
January. 

The data show that it could take until 


summer for the franc's decline against 
the dollar and European currencies 
such as sterling and the Italian lira to 
boost the economy, analysts said. 

With a weaker franc, making French 
goods more competitive abroad, man- 
ufacturers are expected to increasepro- 

duction to meet foreign demand. Once 
they meet production bottlenecks, they 
are expected to invest, increasing de- 
mand for capital goods. 

At least, that is die scenario the 
government is hoping for, with the help 
of interest rates that are at their lowest 
level in decades. 

“Low franc exchange and interest 
rates should give the economy a real 
boost in the second half,’’ said Mrs. 
Toulouse-Seux. 

Recently, Societe Generate SA’s 
chairman, Marc Vienot, was cautious 
on the strength of the recovery. 

“It comes and goes," he said. “The 
start of the year is a bit better, there's no 
recovery, bur a lesser stagnation.*' 

Recent figures show that business 
confidence in March fell back to Janu- 
ary’s levels, its first decline since Oc- 
tober, dragged down by car manu- 
facturers. 

Demand for cars has been falling 
since late last year, when the gov- 
ernment ended a cash incentive for car 


Compiled Our Snff f ion Lhspotthn 

ROME — The economy slowed 
even more than expected in 1996, the 
national statistics office. Istat, said Fri- 
day, and industrialists warned that the 
government’s latest budget package 
could make matters worse. 

Istat said Italy's gross domestic 
product rose 0.7 percent last year. Pre- 
liminary data had pointed to a 0.8 
percent increase. Gross domestic 
product grew 2.9 percent in 1995, re- 
vised downward from 3 percent 

Hie figure for 1996 was in line with 
forecasts by the government which is 
restricting spending and hying to in- 
crease revenue to qualify Italy as a 
founding member of a single European 
currency. 

Italy's Treasury minister. Carlo 


Azeglio Ciampi, predicted recently 
that the economy would grow by 1.0 


buyers. Car manufacturers cut output 
by 0.6 percent in January, and by 1.8 
percent since January 1996. 

The housing starts figures and Fri- 
day's production figures show that 
construction remains France's most 
depressed sector. 

Activity fell 10 percent in January, 
with Insee citing the cold weather. 
Since January 1996, the construction 
business, which encompasses public 
works, offices and housing, has fallen 
7.3 percent. ( Bloomberg , AP) 


that the economy would grow by 1.0 
percent to 1.5 percent in 1997. The 
government estimated earlier that the 
economy would grow by 2.0 percent 
this year. 

The data were released the day after 
Prime Minister Romano Prodi’s cen- 
ter-left government approved a 15.5 
trillion lire ($9.24 billion) minibudget 
in a final bid to get state accounts ready 
for the single currency. 

Much of the package was based on 
fiscal and accounting changes and in- 
cluded a requirement that companies 
band over 6 trillion lire this year and a 
s imilar amount in 1998 in advance 
taxes on severance funds, which are set 
aside to pay departing workers. 

“Companies are becoming blood 
donors, but I don't know if we've got 
much more to give," said Luigi Or- 
lando, chairman of SML a metalwork 
company. Confindnstria, the employ- 
ers' federation, said late Thursday it 
would call an emergency meeting of its 


members April 10 to discuss how to 
fight the proposals — the first time the 
group had called such an assembly. 

In a statement, the organization ex- 
pressed the “strongest opposition to 
1 the corrective package,” which, it said, 
contained “further oppressive mea- 
sures for business.” 

It added: “It will further depress the 
construction sector, which is already in 
crisis. It makes no provision for struc- 
tural spending cuts and will generate 
more unemployment. ’ ’ 

Istat said this week that Italy's job- 
less rate reached 12.4 percent in Janu- 
ary. compared with 122 percent in 
October. The January figure is the 
highest since new counting methods 
were introduced in 1992. 

But Friday, the statistics office said 
the number of people working actually 
rose 02. percent in 1996, die first in- 
crease in four years. 

It added that gross domestic product 
in 1996 was Idled by a 2.4 percent 
growth in agriculture output and a 1 .8 
percent increase in the construction 
sector. The industrial and energy sec- 
tors, however, fell 0.4 percent and 0.7 


percent, respectively. 

Istat ’s director general, Paolo 


Garonno, said the economy had been 
hurt by a rise in the lira against other 
currencies last year, which caused a 0.3 
percent drop in exports, after an 11.6 
percent surge in 1995. 

Mr. Prodi said the minibudget 
would not damage the economy. 

"‘It protects the interests of the weak 
and does not upset prospects for de- 
velopment," he said Thursday. 

But companies warned that if they 
had to find 12 trillion lire in advance 
taxes over the next two years, their 
costs would rise, and this would stunt 
new investment. (AFP. Reuters ) 


CiwpWby Our 5*ff Fran Dapscha 

WASHINGTON — The economy 
grew at a robust 3.8 percent annual rate 
in the final quarter of 1996, the gov- 
ernment announced Friday, slightly be- 
low previous estimates bat stiD well 
above official targets. 

A separate government report 
showed that sales of new single-family 
homes fell less than expected in Feb- 
ruary, and analysts sard higher U.S. 
interest rates would not slow the mo- 
mentum for several more months. 

The final estimate of fourth-quarter 
growth in gross- domestic product — the 
economy’s total output of goods and 
services — was down 0.1 percentage 
point from the estimate released a 
month ago. 

But at 3.8 percent, the economy from 
October through December still grew at 
a much more rapid clip than its 2.1 
percenr pace in the third quarter. 

Hie recent gains have prompted 
economists to sharply revise upward 
their estimates of growth in the current 
quarter to between 3.5 percent and 4 
percent — far above die 2 percent to 2.5 
percent target of the Federal Reserve 
Board for this stage of the economic 
recovery. 

The U.S. central bank raised interest 
rates Tuesday for the first time in more 
than two years, and investors are con- 
cerned that if the economy does not 
slow, more increases will follow. 

Fears of an overheated economy trig- 
gering inflationary pressures and higher 
interest rates sent the stock market into a 
free fall Thursday. The Dow Jones in- 


dustrial average fell 217 points before 
recovering to finish down 140.11 
SS* It was the eightlv-largest point 
loss in history, although the 
decline. 2.04 percent, did not 
the top 25. US. markets were closed 
Friday in observance of Good Friday. 

New-home sales fell 0.7 percent in 
February, the first drop & four months. 
aftSSng an ll-y«u rhtfi ia montij- 
earlier, the Commerce Department re- 
potted. All regions of the country re- 
ported fewer home sales except me 
West Economists had expected a 4 3 

P6 Aim t ou^f sales fell in FabniMy. «al 
estate markets have been helped by high * 
levels of consumer confidence, low un- 
employment and gains in the stock mar- - 
keL 4 ‘The recovery in housing is still on 
track,” said Ian Shepherdson, an econ- 
omist at HSBC Securities Inc. in New 
York. “The housing market will not 
give (he Fed any reason to question their- 
decision to raise rates.” . 

Moreover, the low level of invent- 
ories of homes for sale could help propel 
starts of new housing construction, said 
Robert Dederick, an economic consult- 
ant at Northern Trust Co. in Chicago. 

By the late summer or autumn, 
however, higher borrowing costs stem- 
ming from the Fed’s recent quarter- - 
point increase in the overnight bank 
lending rate could cause home sales to 
slow, Mr. Shepherdson said. 

“ Every move in rates is going to hurt 
you," said Robert Scrudler, chairman' 
and chief executive of U.S. Home 
Corp. (AP. Bloomberg) 


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Belgacom to Cut 6,500 Jobs 
To Prepare for Competition 


-- -v-Vlt 

>10$ 


Investors Flee Bre-X as Gold Rush Halts Abruptly 


Canr^edby Our SiaffFranDupxdta 

NEW YORK — With its prized In- 
donesian gold find turning sour, in- 
vestors have fled Bre-X Minerals Ltd., a 
Canadian mining company whose stock 
once soared on the mine's promise, and 
are likely to remain skeptical of other 
mining projects. 

“Investors will rapidly lose interest 
in such projects, prices will erode, and 
money will be harder to raise,” said 
John Woods, publisher of Stockwatch, 
which tracks Canadian stocks. “It will 
be a large setback for Canadian mining 


exploration ventures around the 
world.” Bre-X Minerals rode the dis- 
covery on a darrling four-year stock 
market run after saying its Busang mine 
contained more than 70 million ounces 
of gold, which would be worth about 
$25 billion after refining. One company 
executive put the figure as high as 200 
million ounces. 

Shares of Bre-X plunged Thursday 
after Freepoit-McMoRan Copper & 
Gold Inc., which has a provisional 
agreement to buy 15 percent of the 
deposit, said it had found “insignific- 


ant” quantities of gold after a prelim- 
inary survey. The stock plummeted 84 
percent in Toronto trading, to close at 
2.50 Canadian dollars ($1.81), down 
from 15.50 a day earlier. 

The steep sell-off was not limited to 
Bre-X. Many other small Canadian 
minin g companies, some of which do 
not even have operations in Indonesia, 
were also battered. Stock markets in the 
United States and Canada were closed 
Friday for the Good Friday holiday. 

For its part, Bre-X stood by its pre- 
vious estimate, but it said it planned to 


conduct more tests. Meanwhile, Indone- 
sia's government will put the process of 
granting mining contracts on hold until 
it is certain of the size of the Busang 
deposit, the country’s top mining of- 
ficial said. 

Indonesia said it was sending a ream 
to the deposit’s site in the province of 
East Kalimantan, on the island of 
Borneo, to make its own checks on the 
size of the deposit The government has 
not physically checked on geological 
work of foreign mining companies in 
the pasL (AP. NYT. Bloomberg ) 


Bloomberg News 

BRUSSELS — The telephone utility 
Belgacom said Friday it would cut 6,500 
jobs, or 25 percent of its work force, to 
help it slash costs before the scheduled 
opening up of the European Union tele- 
communications market next year. 

Belgacom, which employs about 
26,000 people, said 6^00 would be 
offered early retirement and 6,000 oth- 
ers would be redeployed to try to “get 
prepared for increasing competition." 

“We’re not forcing anyone to take 
early retirement," a spokesman said, 
adding that it was impossible to say how 
much the program would cost until the 
number of those accepting early retire- 
ment was known. The program will run 
until Dec. 31, 1998. 

Under the plan, employees bom be- 


fore July I, 1947, who have been with 
the company more than 20 years will 
receive a one-time payment equivalent 
to six months’ salary, a monthly al- 
lowance equal to 75 percent of their 
monthly salary until age 60 and a full 
pension after that. 

Belgacom is 49.5 percent-owned by 
Ameritech Corp., Singapore Telecom- {, 
m unications Ltd. and Tele Danmark - 
AS, with the test held by the state. 

The company already is facing com- 
petition from a rapidly expanding rival 
in the mobile-phone market, Mobistar, 
which claims one of every two new 
subscribers in the country. Three other 
mobile licenses reportedly 'have been 
issued. Belgacom has already an- 
nounced three price cuts this year in- 
response to competitive pressures. 



-.Ti Mir*’ 


Ta n mhf ^ y° u haven't watched the 
1 0 ill § II v Tonight Show with Jay Leno' 


Fears for Stocks Hold Back the Dollar 


SHOW 


look at who you've missed. . . 


Goldie Hawn 
Pierce Brosnan 
Rod Steivart 
Lima Thurman 
Little Richard 
Jamie Lee Curtis 
Diane Keaton 
Shirley Maclaine 
jean-Claude Van Damme 
Courteney Cox 
Denzel Washington 


Sarah Ferguson 


Pamela Anderson-Lee 
Sylvester Stallone 
David Hasseliioff 
Arnold Schwarzenegger 
Earvin "Magic" Johnson 
Ted Danson 
' " "olton 
MeJ Gibson 

impbeJJ 
Jolyfiofd 
lil Collins 
>hn MeJlancamp 
Cindy Crawford 
Bill Gates 


Elizabeth Hurley 
Kathy Ireland 
Julio Tglesias 
Angela Lansbury 
Sheryl Crow 
Mary Tyler Moore 
Barry Manilow 
Harry Conick jr. 
Walter Matthau 
Fattie La Belie 
Richard Drcyfuss 
N r atalie Cole 
Bette Midler 
Charlton Heston 
Sting 

Emma Thompson 
Jennifer Aniston 
Steffi GrdI 
Gloria Esteran 
Kevin Cashier 
Robin Williams 
Michael Keaton 
Alec Baldwin 
Eddie Murphy 
Burt Reynolds 
Nicholas Cage 


Sally Field 
Tom Seileck 
£his Costello 
Gwyneth Paltrow 
Bryan Adams 
Tiijer Woods 


Ctmfdrd tn Out Suff Front Dapmcha 

NEW YORK — The dollar inched 
higher against the yen in quiet trading 
Friday, restrained by concern that U.S. 
stocks could extend their slide when 
trading reopens next week. 

Trading was light, with many markets 
in Asia and Europe as well as the U.S. 
stock and bond markets closed for the 
Good Friday holiday. Many markets 
also wQJ be closed Monday. 

The U.S. currency was weakened in 
New York trading Thursday as the Dow 
Jones industrial average dropped 140 


Tokyo trading, up from 123.575 yen in 
New York on Thursday. In light in- 
terbank action in New York, it traded at 
123.940 yen. 

Against the Deutsche mark, the dollar 
was quoted at 1.6785 DM in the in- 
terbank market, up from 1.6735 DM. 


itics and plans for the single currency" 
they said. 

Glenn Stevens, chief trader at Merrill 
Lynch, said conflicting reports about 
whether the introduction of die euro 
might be delayed had confused the mar- 
ket, leading to an unclear direction for 
the dollar. “Yon have such mixed news 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE coming out. it's difficult to jump on the . ' 

bandwagon.” be said. T } 


points on fears of further moves by the 
Federal Reserve Board to raise interest 


George Foreman 


Federal Reserve Board to raise interest 
rates to ward off inflation. 

The dollar closed at 123.750 yen in 


Traders said underlying conditions 
for further dollar gains against the yen 
and the mark remained in place because 
of a healthy economy and higher interest 
rates in the United States. With the Fed's 
quarter-point increase in rates Tuesday 
now out of the way, the market’s focus 
will probably him toward European pol- 


Another analyst said traders were 
turning toward the mark in the face of a 
growing belief that the euro may not- 
materialize on time in 1999, reflecting 
greater confidence that the German cur- 
rency will not be supplanted immedi- 
ately as Europe's benchmark currency. 

(Bloomberg, Market News, AP) 


■ ’ AV-.-. 


-a. r 


Bps*.;-. 


Uaquel Welch 
Linda Rousted r 
Paul Hogan 
Tony Bonnet 
Cybii Shepherd 
Richard Gere 
Neil Diamond 
Diana Ros-s 
Elie Maopherson 
Anthony Hopkins 
Quentin Tarantino 
Sami id L. Jackson 
John Travolta 
Roivar. Atkinson 
Claudia Sd lifter 
Harrison Ford 
Brooke Shields 
Sandra Bollock 
Andre Acassi 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


The Trib Index 


Jan. 1. 1992= 100. 


Friday, March 28 

Prices In Joed currencies. 
Tdekurs 

High Low Close Pm. 


High Low dose Pm. 


Markets Closed 


Most financial markets in 
1 Europe and North America 
were closed Friday for the 
Easter holiday. 

Most European markets 
will remain closed through 
Tuesday, bur U.S. markets 
will trade Monday. 


Hot 

General) Auk 

IMJ 

INA 

Ultima 

Mediaset 

Mediobanca 

Monied ban 

OOvetll 

ParmoW 

PTrHi 

RAS 

Rota Bcnca 
SPooto Torino 
Stef 

Telecom Itolo 
TIM 


j30D 5425 
29200 29600 
14495 14750 
2240 2250 

5550 5645 

6740 4660 

10410 10730 

1125 mi 

600 604 

2315 2390 
3630 3780 

14940 14810 
14755 14800 
11230 11190 
7295 7540 

4170 4340 

4800 4915 


Composite index; &5ZS7 
Pratoas 651.65 


World Index 
Regional Indexes 
Asm/Padfic 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 
Industrial Indexes 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
Miscellaneous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
Utilities 


lex 

Prices as of 3.00 P.M 

Level 

Change 

% change 

150.48 

-0.68 

-0.45 

108.39 

-1.25 

-1.14 

162.47 

-0.14 

-0.09 

171.53 

-1.04 

-0.60 

139.06 

-0.03 

-0.02 

174.18 

-0.54 

-0.31 

169.33 

-0.49 

—0.29 

182.85 

-0.54 

-0.29 

110.86 

-1.25 

-1.11 

156.03 

-0.32 

-0.20 

181.99 

-0.38 

-050 

141.57 

-0.54 

-0 38 

132.89 

+0.13 

40.10 


f<*r \i 


year to date 
% change 
+14.11 • 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY. MARCH 29-30, 1997 


PAGE 13 


«e I) 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


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id me wat 


, Malaysia Moves 
To Bar Speculation 
In Land and Stocks 


Vietnam’s Capitalist School 

Executives Learn Market Ways From U.S. Professors 


Investor’s Asia 


by Ow Staff Frum Dapaicha 

KUALA LUMPLfR — Malaysia 
said Friday it would make a pre- 
emptive strike against speculation in 
property and share buying to try to 
safeguard the country’s 1 0th year of 
strong economic growth, 
t Bank Negara Malaysia, the cen- 
tral bank, announced the curbs as it 
released its 1996 annual report, 
which showed that Malaysia's cur- 
rent account deficit narrowed but 
economic growth moderated. 

The central bank's announcement 
also came in the wake of a financial 


Fall in Chip Prices 
Hits Acer’s Profit 

Bloomberg News 

TAIPEI — Acer Inc., a personal- 
computer maker, said Friday that net 
profit fell 44 percent last year be- 
cause of declines in chip prices. 

The company said profit fell to 
3-06 billion Taiwan dollars ($1 1 1.1 
million) from 5.5 billion dollars in 
1995. The decline was in line with 
company forecasts. Sales fell 8 per- 
cent, to 57.5 billion dollars. 

Prices for dynamic random-ac- 
cess memory chips fell as much as 
80 percent last year, Acer said. 

Acer said last month that a decline 
in earnings at its Texas Insfcruments- 
Acer Inc. semiconductor affiliate 
would hurt the . parent company's 
earnings. Acer's profit also declined 
because of inventory write-offs of 
more than $50 million at a U.S. sub- 
sidiary, Acer America Corp. 

The company said, however, that 
it expected net profit to rise 31 per- 
cent, to 4 billion dollars, in 1997. 
Sales are expected to rise 35 percent, 
to 77.7 billion dollars, it said. 


crisis in Thailand, where the prop- 
erty market has been strangled by 
overbuilding, high interest rates and 
the slowest economic growth in a 
decade. 

The bank said lending to the prop- 
erty industry would be limited to 20 
percent of all bank loans starting in 
April. Lending for stock purchases 
will be limited to 15 percent of total 
loans at commercial banks and fi- 
nance companies. 

“These measures are primarily 
preempt ve and prudential in 
nature.’* the Bank Negara governor. 
Ahmad Mohamed Don. said. 

The strike against property spec- 
ulation adds to curbs enacted in late 
1995, which included hefty sur- 
charges on foreign purchases and 
other real-estate loan limits. 

Mr. Ahmad said the economy 
would continue to face the cooling 
effect of tight money and fiscal 
policies introduced last year. 

“Excessive lending to the prop- 
erty and stock markets can threaten 
the soundness of the banking sys- 
tem.** Bank Negara said. 

“The exposure of banking insti- 
tutions to these sectors has to be 
contained." 

Analysts said the annual report 
contained few surprises but that the 
credit tightening could slow the 
stock and property markets. 

“It's bad news for the property 
market,” said Victor Wan, senior 
analyst at South Johor Securities. 
“We expect more consolidation 
within the industry." 

Responding to international con- 
cerns. Malaysia in 1996 reined in its 
galloping economic growth to 8.2 
percent from 9.5 percent in 1995, 
reduced its current-account deficit 
to 13 billion ringgit ($5.2 billion! 
from 18.7 billion ringgit and kept its 
inflation at 5.3 percent 

( Reuters . Bloomberg ) 


The Associated Pres r 

HANOI — Class is in session at 
Vietnam's new school for capit- 
alism. 

Inside a makeshift lecture hall at 
the Communist Party's Interna- 
tional Club of Hanoi, about two 
dozen of the nation's corporate 
elite huddle around a television. 
On the screen, the American 
poultry icon Frank Perdue is 
served up as an example of mar- 
keting ingenuity. 

The video shows how Mr. Per- 
due's neatly packed rows of pre- 
plucked, pie-butchered fowl have 
become synonymous in the United 
States with chicken. It is a stretch 
for most Vietnamese, who still se- 
lect their squawking birds live at 
the local open-air market 

“Perdue is the quintessential 
American example of marketing 
success." said Rohit Dishpande. a 

g rofessor from the Amos Tuck 
chool of Business Administra- 
tion at Dartmouth College. “It 
may not be directly applicable in 
Vietnam, but it illustrates the 
concept of brand equity." 

Taught by some of Dartmouth's 
top business faculty. Vietnam's 
leading executives were back in 
the classroom this month for a two- 
week course on free-market eco- 
nomics run by Vietnam National 


University. The Dartmouth pro- 
gram is one of a growing number 
of academic partnerships forged 
between the United States and Its 
former enemy in Hanoi. 

In Ho Chi Mirth City, formerly 
Saigon. Harvard University and 
the Fulbright Center are working 
with the Ho Chi Minh University 
of Economics to help executives 
from stale-owned and private Vi- 
etnamese companies make the 
transition to market economics. 

Mr. Dishpande. like the other 
Dartmouth faculty members in Vi- 
etnam. is aware that these students 
work in a realm different from 
those at his Ivy League school in 
rural Hanover, New Hampshire. 

“We’re looking at marketing 
strategies in a place where the nat- 
ural laws of marketing don't ap- 
ply." he said. 

Until recent years, Vietnam's 
Communist Party ran an austere, 
pragmatic country' where consumer 
choice was as rare as free-market 
competition. Bui economic reforms 
have turned Vietnam into a prom- 
ising new market and triggered a 
demand for knowledge. 

“We're just entering a market 
economy, and our information on 
how things are done is still very 
limited." Dang Thi Cat, deputy 
director of Asia-Pacific Bank Vi- 


etnam, said. His classmate. Duong 
Manh Cuong, the man charged 
with turning the heavily subsi- 
dized. state -run Vietnam Airlines 
into a viable business entity', is 
already a convert. 

"The one thing we’ve learned 
above ail else is flexibility'. You 
can’t be stiff or rigid and succeed 
in a competitive market," he said. 

Much of the nation’s 9 percent 
annual economic growth in recent 
years has been driven by the suc- 
cess of foreign companies entering 
Vietnam's burgeoning new con- 
sumer market. In many instances, 
the stale-run competition has 
struggled to keep up. 

“They see big foreign compa- 
nies coming in, and they say to us. 
‘How do we compete?* “said Paul 
Argenu, a marketing professor 
from Dartmouth. "We’re trying to 
show 1 that you can turn ‘small* into 
a good thing." 

Advertising, for example, is still 
a nascent industry in Vietnam, 
where Binh Ba Thanh, an advert- 
ising executive, estimated the mar- 
ket at $141 million. “The bigger 
companies are beginning to realize 
the importance of marketing and 
advertising," Mr. Thanh said, 
"especially as foreign companies 
with large marketing budgets enter 
Vietnam." 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

14009 - - — -j- 

13500 "R'AfljvW - 

13000 - - \ 

12500 J - — -» 
120 ®/- 


Singapore 
Shafts Times 

2250 -fll 

2200 -A/— 1 

2150 ) — j 

2100 W 

2850 -V 


®6 r ND'TFM 2000 


1996 

Exchange 


1997 

Index 


O N D J F M 


Tokyo 
Nikk&t 225. ■ 

22000! 

21 QI»V\/Ar — — 

20000 — 

19000 

IfflQO Wl- 

17000'q-^j-q' Ty jjf 
1996 1997 j 

•'..Pray.- 


Hong Kong Hang Seng Closed 12453432 - 

Singapore Shafts Tlrnels '^0»ed ri ;2,bafta2- 

Sydney AflOrtfinwes' r 7~~ 

Tokyo N&keFSs 18,18072 *8.210.42 &t1 

| »diata Uimpi^CompO«1W /L217.64 ' -0.46 

Bangkok SET 7P9JQ9 f 'jiz&i. -OAa 

Seoul | Composite Index 1 6S&87'. \ 851-65' +BJ9 

Taipei Stock Market index 01 WO 8,089.71 +0.37 

Mantta PSE • Closed 3,223.14 
Jakarta CompositefixiaxV 'Closed : ’86&24' " - r 

Wellington NZSE-40 ! Closed ,-V. 


Clp§e 'Close Change 
Ctosed 12453432 . # - 

Ctosed -2.09&8Z- 

- . 2,422^30 ~ 

18,183.72 184210.42 -0.11 
H&tsT 1&Z31 * -a AG 
709.09 7126.1. -0-43 

'••5S237-. -i 851-65 


j Bombay 

Source: Teiekurs 


NZSE-40 Closed .22 38*4 

Sensitive Index 3,863.53 3,73538 


ImenuiiODal HtnU Tribune 


Nike Contractors Play Down Charges of Worker Abuse 


C.mpUtJ by Our Skfffit ** OufKJLrfn 

HANOI — A union official and 
a South Korean industry group on 
Friday played down charges that 
factory workers who make shoes 
in Vietnam for Nike Inc. are reg- 
ularly abused. 

Park Chan Shin, director of die 
Korean trade office KOTRA. said 
conditions at the three Korean 
companies producing Nike shoes 
in the Ho Chi Minh City area were 
‘ ‘quite good, especially compared 
with local shoe factories." 


The union chief of a Taiwan 
company that makes Nike shoes 
said there had been one incident 
recently when a supervisor 
ordered 56 workers to run twice 
around the 2-kilometer (1. 2-mile) 
factory perimeter for failing to 
wear regulation workshoes. 

"Before the recent dispute there 
was no big problem, * * said Nguyen 
Minh Quang. chairman of the 
labor union at Pou Chen Vietnam 
Enterprises Ltd. in Dong Nai 
Province. He added, responding to 


specific allegations, that 4 4 if work- 
ers want to go to the toilet or take a 
drink of water they can do so 
whenever they want." 

A senior Pou Chen executive 
said that “we obey the labor laws 
and pay the minimum salary" of 
$40 a month for a six-day week. 

Vietnam Labor Watch, an ac- 
tivist group, charged Thursday that 
companies making Nike shoes in 
Vietnam paid less than minimum 
wages and inflicted abuse on their 
local employees. (AFP, Reuters ) 


Very brief lys 

• Tangshan Steel Co. has floated nearly 1.1 billion yuan 
(S133 million) in new stocks, the largest amount raised by a 
new listing on China’s Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The com- 
pany. China's 10th- largest steel venture, offered 120 million 
A shares valued at 9.22 yuan each on Thursday. 

• Japan rejected a U.S. demand that it agree to expand 
Japanese imports of American paper products. 

• Cathay Life Insurance's chairman, Tsai Wan-lin, is the 
richest person on Taiwan, with a fortune of 275 billion Taiwan 
dollars ($10 billion). Excellency magazine of Taiwan reports. 
In 1996. Forbes magazine listed him as the world’s fifth- 
riche st man. with personal assets valued at $12.2 billion. 

• Chinese still consider bank deposits their primary investment 
tool despite two interest-rate cuts last year, the Economic Daily 
reported. A survey found that 52.7 percent of Chinese in major 
cities prefer to deposit their money rather than spend it. 

• Electric Power Development Co. of Japan will be privat- 
ized in the next five years, with the intention of promoting 
competition within the electricity industry. 

• Evergreen Marine Corp., one of the world's largest con- 

tainer shippers, said sales fell 13.2 percent in February from 
the year earlier. Sales fell to $2.36 billion Taiwan dollars 
($85.8 million) from 2.72 billion dollars a year ago, the 
company said. AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg 


Tokyo Shrugs Off Tax Rise Japan Unveils 3-Year Plan for Deregulation 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — The last time Japan imposed a 
national saJestax, homemakers balked, op- 
position la wmaker s condemned it, and some 
city assemblies threatened not to enforce it 

On Tuesday, Japan’s consumption tax goes 
up to 5 percent from 3 percent die first time it 
has been raised since it was introduced in an 
overhaul of Japan’s tax system in 1989. 

But shoppers here - are taking it in stride. 
"There’s nothingyou can do about it” None 
Suzuki, an office worker, said as she strolled 
out of a Seibu department store in central 
Tokyo. “Things won't be that much dif- 
ferent” But the coming tax increase did set 
off a spending spree, causing department 
stores to extend hours to accommodate shop- 
pers trying to make as many purchases as 
. possible before Tuesday. 

“I want to do my shopping before the 
month ends,” Yoko Obara said as she looked 
F-at.a Seibu shoe display. “It’s only 2 percent, 
* but I don’t wanted pay more for no reason.” 

There are some ferns that the tax increase 
— and the rollback of temporary tax cuts also 
coming Tuesday — could end the economy’s 
current mild recovery from a long slowdown. 
Nomura Research Institute said the tax in- 


creases and government moves to cut the 
budget deficit could depress consumer de- 
mand by 10 trillion yen ($80.6 billion) in the 
new fiscal year, which begins Tuesday. 

The last tax increase triggered protests, and 
the coming increase was an issue in the au- 
tumn parliamentary election campaign, but 
since then it has dropped off the agenda of 
public debate. One reason could be the budget 
deficit. After years of trying to stimulate die 
economy through spending, the government 
now faces accumulated debts of $3-9 trillion. 

The tax increase should help. The new 
consumption tax, which was passed by Par- 
liament in 1994 and approved by the cabinet 
last year, will bring in an estimated $29.3 
billion in additional revenue, while the tax-cut 
repeal will add $1 1.4 billion to that. 

Also muting protests is the fact that people 
already are accustomed to the sales tax. hi 1989, 
when the tax was first imposed, consumers had 
to deal with awkward prices, dig through pock- 
ets for 1-yen coins and wait in long lines as 
cashiers fumbled with the new system. 

In addition, Japanese consumers, long vic- 
tims of some of the world’s highest prices, 
have been enjoying lower prices on some 
items over the past year. 


uxyaMh ihr Staff fmx Dvfwbn 

TOKYO — The cabinet 
approved a three-year pack- 
age Friday aimed at reducing 
regulations on the economy, 
lowering import prices and 
giving Japanese consumers 
more choices. 

4 ‘The package is aimed at 
deregulating rules which 
have been preventing a vig- 
orous expansion of the econ- 
omy and the creation of new 
business,” Prime Minister 
Ryu taro Hashimoto said. 

The package, which also 
includes reforms for Japan's 
troubled banking system 
among its nearly 3,000 mea- 
sures, is the cornerstone of 
Mr. Hashimoto ’s proposal to 
restructure the economy. 

The plan included 890 more 
items than a previous version 
to satisfy demands by die 


United States and European 
Union for wider deregulation. 

The government urged 
ministries to decide by the 
end of September when to im- 
plement the sieps. 

The package is designed 10 
increase imports, dosing 
gaps between prices in Japan 
and overseas and cutting the 
extra costs that Japanese con- 
sumers pay as a result of ex- 
cessive regulation. 

But some analysts said the 
proposal may fall short of ex- 
pectations by focusing on re- 
conciling the conflicting in- 
terests of financial 
companies. 

“The key is whether the 
government can overcome its 
hesitation by June and 
achieve the really sweeping 
reform it has advocated,” . 
said Koyo Ozeki, senior di- 


rector of IBCA Ltd., a credit- 
rating agency. 

(AP. Reuters. Bloomberg) 

■ Tight Budget Passed 

Japan approved a budget 
that had been billed as the 
start of a crackdown on gov- 
ernment debt but was criti- 
cized for raising taxes and do- 
ing little to help economic 
recovery. Reuters reported. 

The 1997-98 budget won 


approval from Japan's uppei 
house and became law four 
days before the start of the 
new fiscal year, as well as an 
unpopular rise in Japan's 
sales tax, on Tuesday. 

Mr. Hashimoto has said the 
budget will mark die start of an 
effort to cut Japan's balloon- 
ing debL At 77.39 trillion yen 
($621.8 billion), the budget is 
only 3 percent bigger than the 
previous year’s budget. 


China Eases Credit for 212 Firms 


BANK; Aid for Nippon Credit Causes Grumbling 


Continued from Page II 

loaned to the three affiliates. It would also be 
expected to share much of the burden of the 
other lenders. That could raise Nippon Cred- 
it's losses from liquidation of the affiliates to 
$7 billion or more, according to analysts. 

In addition, there would be ripple effects. 
The Agriculture Minis try is concerned that 
^liquidation plans could hurt agriculture co- 
’ operatives, who were big lenders to Crown 
Leasing, and many smaller hanks who loaned 
money to the affiliates would be severely hit, 
Ms. Ogawa said. 

The Nihon Keizai Shim bun said the bank 
planned to sell -its headquarters and some 
other offices in Japan to an affiliate for about 
$488 million. 


Most real estate in Japan is recorded at the 
value at which it was purchased — in many 
cases, years ago before land prices soared. 
Thus, a “sale” to an affiliate will look like a 
huge gain, although no new cash actually 
flows in. 

The Nihon Keizai also said Nippon Credit 
hoped to get a capital injection of about $569 
million from commercial banks, $1.2 billion 
from life insurance companies and about 
$700 million from the Bank of Japan. 

Mr. Waterhouse said be was skeptical that 
die plan would go forward, because he ex- 
pected opposition from banks and from the 
Bank of Japan. 

But even if it did go through, it would raise 
far less than Nippon Credit needs to get out of 
its problems, he said. 


Bloomberg A /ch'S 

BEUING — The govern- 
ment granted easier access to 
credit to 212 state-owned 
companies Friday, in a further 
loosening of its monetary 
policy. 

Companies that will benefit 
from the loans include China 
Eastern Airlines Corp., newly 
listed on the Hong Kong Stock 
Exchange, and Cosco Group, 
the parent of Cosco Pacific 
LuL. also listed in Hong Kong, 
according to the official China 
Securities newspaper. 

“Now that inflation has 
come down, monetary policy 
has become quite loose, ' ’ said 
Chen Xingdong, an econo- 
mist with Crosby Securities 
in Beijing. 


The loans would be mainly 
for working capital and for up- 
grading technology, said 
Cheng Guowei. a division chief 
of the economic policy depart- 
ment of the Slate Economic and 
Trade Commission. 

He said the companies se- 
lected also would be given 
greater autonomy in foreign 
trade. In June 1996. the gov- 
ernment designated 300 state- 
owned enterprises for prefer- 
ential access to loans. Analysts 
expect the list to be extended 
eventually to 1,000 companies. 


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* «';'i ,, r y 




For Basic Industries, 

A Turnaround Outlook 

Glass Prospects Gleam as Demand Rises 


r 


Annual growth rate, estimates 
and forecasts, in percent 




By Aline Sullivan 


I NVESTORS HOPING to take ad- 
vantage of accelerating worldwide 
economic growth should take a 
look at glass. The indusny has five 
big worldwide players — four of which 
are publicly traded — at a time 

when sales are expected to rise r- 

and size is an advantage. i ~ ~ 
Glass depends on conditions 
in its two primary markets: con- xfpsp? 
siruction and motor vehicles. ] 

Of these, construction is k 

roughly four times more im- 
portant. That is good news for glass 
manufacturers: Construction spending 
is expected to rise 5 percent each year to 
the year 2000 , more than twice the rate 
expected for motor-vehicle production, 
according to Freedonia Group Inc., an 
industrial-market reseaicher based in 
Cleveland. Ohio. 

Demand for fabricated flat-glass 
products should jump 4.2 percent per 
year, to 2.4 billion square meters (25 
billion square feet) in 2000, Freedonia 
said in a recent report Thai would out- 
pace the 3.7 percent annual projected 
rise in real, or inflation-adjusted, world 
gross product over the period. 

But die outlook is not entirely rosy. 
“Prices are under pressure, notably in 
Europe, because there is so much over- 
capacity," said Emili o Alvarez, build- 
ing analyst at Morgan Stanley & Co. 
“But no one wants to lose market share 
when demand is growing." 

He said prices would have to rise 
about 10 percent to justify current pro- 
duction levels. 

Rising demand should start to erode 
this extra capacity, however, and higher 
prices could be evident in just a few 
months, industry analysts said. 

“These are very cyclical companies 
and are worth buying at the right time of 
the cycle,” Mr. Alvarez said. “I was 
negative about the industry at the be- 
ginning of the year and am now neutral. 
But once we start to see some price 
increases, maybe in the spring ana cer- 


tainly by the end of the year, it will be 
time to buy.” 

Stock picking in this market is not 
difficult The industry is increasingly 
dominated by a few giants. “The larger 
companies will emerge in strengthened 
positions via merger and acquisition 
activity and internal growth,” Freedonia 
said. “The small to medium size 
7~\ will decline in relative impor- 
✓'""'v tance, although unique market 
f J situations wOi continue to 
\L— J J present some opportunity for 
smaller firms.” 

^ The world's five leading flat- 



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if 


1997 1998 


Sales Profit Price/ 
199€cfata, Earnings 
in minions of dollars ratio 


Indicated 
aross jn 
yield ?■ 








Saint Gobain $13.4 


Asahi Glass 


PPG Industries 


nm-' r 13.98 


Pilkington 


glass producers — PPG Indus- 
tries Inc. and Guardian Industries Corp. 
of the United States, Asahi Glass Co. of 
Japan. Pilkington PLC of Britain and 
Compagnie de Saint-Go bain of France 
— have indeed been making acquisi- 
tions. Saint-Go bain, in particular, has 
pursued an aggressive expansion 
strategy in Europe, buying companies in 
Belgium. Britain, the Netherlands and 
Switzerland in the past three years. 

Pilkington, the world's largest flat- 
glass maker and the darling of industry 
analysts, is strong in Latin America and 
the Asia-Pacific region, the areas iden- 
tified by Freedonia as the most likely to 
show strong growth in coming years. 

A trend in the developed world to- 
ward large houses and vehicles, such as 
minivans, is boosting demand for glass, 
notably in the United States. For reliable 
results, consider PPG, which is based in 
Pittsburgh and has paid dividends for 98 
consecutive years. 

Companies with heavy exposure in the 
West European and Japanese flat-glass 
markets are less attractive. These mar- 
kets suffered in recent years, although 
modest recovery is expected dirough foe 
year 2000. According to Freedonia, Ja- 
pan's recovery will outpace that expec- 
ted in Europe, thanks to export prospects 
among its Pacific Rim neighbors. 

Most of foe glass giants have ex- 
panded into other industries. Only 
Guardian, a privately held company 
based in Michigan, focuses almost ex- 
clusively on glass. 


Sources: IMF. Bloomberg ... , . - r 1 hamhpn France 

A worker at a fiberglass factory owned by Compagnie de Saint-Go bain of France, one of the world’s five leading glassmakers, in unamre ji 


sjMBWG, neg. 









A.Kogort/Stpiw 


In the Cyclic Paper Chase, It’s Now Time to Buy 

“ 7 “ TTT " United States are now moving up from a aggravate what is by nature a cyclical done si a, Malaysia. South Korea an 

By Ann Brocklehurst cyclical low in February of S500 per industry by pouring money into capital Thailand are all cited as stro ӣ^ 1 |P^ 


A fter a dismal 1996, foe 

paper industry is expected to 
create opportunities this year 
for investors who do not mind 
buying into a highly cyclical business. 

Industry analysts said paper prices 
had bottomed out and were set to climb, 
pulling profits with them. Global de- 
mand for paper will be strong enough 
not only to boost prices, analysts said, 
but to absorb products from several 
huge new machines in Asia. 

"Our view is and has been that de- 
mand will eventually catch up with ca- 
pacity," said Peter Cardeltichio, an 
economist with Resource Information 
Systems in Boston. "There's been 
strong growth in foe U.S. economy and a 
pickup in economic activity in Europe 
and Japan is expected. From mid-'97 on. 
there should be higher prices and much 
better return to investors." 

The steep drop in paper-product 
prices in 1996 followed a dizzying rise 
in 1994 and early 1995. Prices for news- 
print delivered on the East Coast of foe 


United States are now moving up from a 
cyclical low in February of S500 per 
metric ton. They reached a record high 
of $750 per ton in December 1995, 
according to Pulp & Paper Week. Pulp , 
which is used to make a variety of paper 
products, is now priced at S570 a ton in 
North America after a record $955 in the 
fourth quarter of 1995. 

While the paper business is notorious 
for its cyclicity, Sherman Chao, 
first vice president of Merrill 
Lynch Securities in New York. J 
said he had not seen a cycle as I 
quick and extreme as the current 
one. He said that in 1994 and 
early 1995, “the rate of accel- 
eration was so great, investors 
didn't believe it, and stocks never re- 
sponded." When a sudden drop in prices 
cut into earnings, paper stocks lan- 
guished while other sectors boomed. 

That discouraging recent history, 
combined with forecasts of an imminent 
upturn, mean that now is probably a 


.UUUUO fiutl 

63 


good time to buy. according to Mr. Chao 
and Mr. Cardeltichio. But Mr. Chao was 




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and Mr. Cardeltichio. But Mr. Chao was 
cautious: “Timing is always difficult to 
predict, particularly when you have to 
compete against products from Larin 
America and Asia." 

Jaak Puusepp. a forestry analyst at 
Woodsmith Research Corp. in Van- 
couver. British Columbia, said the stock 
prices of many newsprint companies 
already reflected foe optimistic short- 
term outlook. To cash in on foe 20 per- 
cent returns that he expects foe forestry 
sector to earn this year, he recommended 
that investors look to printing and writ- 
ing paper and pulp produ cers. In Canada, 
these include Domtar Inc. and Avenor 
Inc. and in foe United States. Consol- 
idated Paper Inc., Champion Interna- 
tional Corp. and Mead Corp. 

The pulp and paper industry tends to 


aggravate what is by nature a cyclical 
industry by pouring money into capital 
investments during the good times. In 
foe late 1980s, for example, producers in 
Europe and North America spent bil- 
lions on expansion, diversification and 
acquisitions. The new capacity came 
just as the U.S. economy was moving 
into recession, and (rices plummeted. 
After the most recent boom, producers 
were more circumspect, ex- 

J ponding more selectively than in 
1989. 

In newsprint, foe only signif- 
icant expansion has been in Asia, 
where several huge machines are 
starting up or are about to begin 
production. New facilities for 
the production of con tain erboard, which 
is used for all types of packaging, have 
been built in rite- United Stales and the 
Far East, while coated -paper capacity 
has increased worldwide. 

“There has been tremendous expan- 
sion in Asia, but it's targeted at foe 
tremendous growth in the region,” Mr. 
Cardeltichio said. “Asian growth 
swamps foe rest of foe world. People 
don't believe foe size of the machines.” 

In Indonesia, , Aspex Paper has built 
a newsprint machine with a capacity of 
240.000 tons. In printing and writing 
grades, Asia Pulp & Paper Co. is adding 
600.000 tons of capacity, Basuki Rach- 
mat is adding 150,000 tons and Suiya 
Agung Keitas 200.000 tons. 

Other production increases include 
900,000 tons of newsprint capacity in 
South Korea and a 600,000 ton increase 
in Japanese capacity in priming and writ- 


ing grades as Nippon Paper Industries 
Co., Mitsubishi Riper Mills Ltd. and Oii 


Co., Mitsubishi Riper Mills Ltd. and Oji 
Paper Co. add machines this year. 

Analysts are counting on a surge in 
demand within foe region to absorb 
much of this paper. China, India, In- 


LINE 


An Industry Where Less Earns More 

For World's Steelmakers, the Promise of Profits Lies in Restructuring 


By Conrad de Aenlie 


The Value Line Investment 
Survey is the world's leading 
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W HEN THE dust settled 
after Fried. Krupp AG 
Hoesch-Krupp dropped its 
hostile bid for Thyssen AG 
and the companies agreed to merge their 
steel operations, shares in both concerns 
rose, indicating that investors approved 
of the outcome. 

Indeed, reducing staff and production 
capacity is virtually the only way in 
which European steelmakers can in- 
crease earnings, if they make money at 
a II. This reflects foe fact that for foe last 
20 year?, foe ability to make steel has 
grown far faster than demand. 

Still, this is a prosperous time for foe 
industry, at least by the standards of 
recent yeara: economic growth is ac- 
celerating and inflation remains benign. 
Morgan Stanley & Co. expects European 
steel prices to rise 7 percent this year and 
describes the industry as being in * ‘robust 
condition, with plants operating at close 
to their full capabi lity and order backlogs 
stretching out for up to two months." 

Such an outlook must make steel 
stocks great buys, right? Not exactly. 

“The outlook for corporate profit is 
not very exciting, with steel companies 
looking to achieve half their peak level at 
best,” Morgan Stanley analysts said. 
“The emphasis is likely to remain on big- 
picture restructuring programs to bring up 
the level of profit per ton to foal of the 
global competition. Overall, we have^a 


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Overcapacity in European steel puts a 
ceiling on earnings- In other industries, 
profits are used for expansion, but with 
more steel being produced than is 
needed, and prices reaching lower peaks 
during economic upturns, expansion is 
pointless. Surplus steel is a legacy of 
years of heavy state subsidies granted to 
keep workers employed. 

“What subsidies did was to allow 
steelmakers to overinvest both in ca- 


more competitive globally. Investors 
bid up Krupp-Hoeseb and Thyssen on 
the assumption that a combination 
would force change. 

“They can take out 2 billion 
Deutsche marks ($3.38 billion) in costs 
if they close all the things they can,’’ 
said the analyst, who asked not to be 
identified because his company is an 
adviser to one of the steelmakers. He 
estimated the human cost at 20.000 
jobs. 

U.S. steelmakers, by contrast, took 
the cure when the symptoms 
appeared. As far back as the 
1970s. “mills were closed 
down because the men who ran A 
them knew they wouldn't get a f^A 
return on their investment,” A Y 
said Jeremy Fletcher, who fol- m 
lows the industry for Credit 
Suisse First Boston. 

So zealous were they that there has 
been undercapacity for years, a situation 
that encouraged marginal steelmakers 
to try out new production methods, 
while European taxpayers financed yes- 
terday's equipment. 

“If your company's weak, it’s a rea- 
sonable business risk to experiment with 
new technology that has a structural cost 
advantage," Mr. Fletcher said. 

A prime example of these so-called 
mini-mills is Nucor Corp., which can 
make steel for $240 a ton by recycling 
scrap. Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s cost is 
$310 per ton, which helps explain why 
its share price fell by 37 percent in the 
five years through 1996 while those of 
Nucor rose by 133 percent. 


1+ 


I MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Return all materials in good condition Cwnuy P«.uJCnde I pacity and obsolescent technology. 

I ^ 30 days of the start of your sub scription for a foil refund, Depi 913L29 | one analyst ••Ultimately, the Euro- 


pean steel industry remains something 
of a basket case.” 

The only way to improve financial 
performance is to shut down some of 
foal capacity to cut costs and become 


B UT THE STRENGTH Of the 
mini-mills could prove to be too 
much of a good thing. Much of 
Europe's overproduction is sold to foe 
United States to compensate for un- 
derproduction there. As the low-cost 
mini-mills pick up steam, they will soon 
begin to push out higher-priced im- 
ports. 

Finding a home for the excess will be 
difficult. A likely destination until re- 
cently was Asia, but economic growth 
there has slowed and demand for local Jy 
produced steel — the world's two 
largest steelmakers are Nippon Steel 
Co. of Japan and Pohang Iron & Steel 


Co. of South Korea — has declined. 
Although Japanese steel costs more to 
produce than steel made anywhere else, 
foe plunge in foe yen against the dollar 
makes the price much more compet- 
itive, especially when shipping costs 
from distant locations are factored in. 
Korean steel is cheaper still. 

Chronic overcapacity and the cyclic 
nature of the business make steefr 
companies poor long-term investments j 
analysts say. The best bets include 
companies with technology that gives 

I them an enduring cost advan- 

tage over the competition, such 
. as the U.S. mini-mills. 

Morgan Stanley recommends 
Nucor and Steel Dy nam ics Inc. 

second company is also on 
Salomon Brothers Inc.’s buy 
list, along with Wor thin gton In- 
dustries Inc., which makes processed 
ana customized products rather than flat 
steel. 

A favorite among analysts and money 
mMagers in Europe is Acerinox SA, a 
bpanuh producer of stainless steel. ! 

“ “* ere s a company to say 

SSmm? ft* 1 about * ifs Acerinox, 
said Mche 1 Legros. who runs Con tin - 

MW Eurmcan portfolios for Mercuiy 
st I£L« f a f emem ' “Demand far. 
GDP fnriT 1 ,S ^ 111 relation^ 
pi??; “ d Aeennox is the lowest-cbsf 
producer of stainless steel It’s run bv 
People with common sense” 

it m llt n ^ Weakness in steel. 

niched wifo"^!?* for com P acies ^ 
stain if*«c m ^ 0wt ^ Prospects, such as 

rMSA, a S Si ™^’ lng - S 00 * 1 bu 3 ,s of 

h$-w sa JKEffi sT pany - 
•Thev’re T ™' 

demand "is growfnf 4 ' markets where 
average an H s 4 P^cent a year on 

he H?i?£S7 nl 111 some pW’ 

ic an steel ptJScera 0 ^ 1 ^ AmCr * 

priced are° U gofog V ^ 0 ^ overcapacity,# 
States,” he wamld “h’ 0 c ai5se 

bloodbath ” 1 s S 0U1 S 10 a 



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donesia, Malaysia, South Korea and 
Thailand are all cited as strong future 
buyers. Mr. Cardeltichio noted that 
Chinese net imports of paper and pa- 
perboard rose to 3.8 million tons m 1996 
from 2J5 million in 1 995, but he said part 
of this was due to inventory building at a 
time when prices were low. 

Preferential tariff structures will also 
favor Asian products in .Asia, Mr. Chao 
said. But Mr. Puusepp said the region 
would nonetheless remain a strong im- 
porter of high-quality products. Should 
die Asian companies try to export, they 
will almost certainly face environmental 
concerns about their forestry practices 
and pollution controls. 

As a buy in Asia, Mr. Chao recomj' 
mended Malaysia's Jaya Tiasa Holdings 
BhcL. which he called a well-managed 
company working to show that it was 
environmentally sound. In North Amer- 
ica, be likes companies with softwood- 
based products that do compete with the 
hardwood -based producers of Latin 
America and Asia. These include the 
newsprint producer Bowater Inc. and 
the hnerboard makers Willamette In- 
dustries Inc. and Georgia-Pacific Corp. 
In Europe, he is bullish on Jefferson 
Smurfit Corp. of Dublin, the world's 
largest hnerboard producer. 

But even if the share prices of paper 
producers do pick up, investors would 
be wise to prepare for one last 20 tfi- 
ceotury downturn. 

Another possibility for avoiding 
some of the industry's cyclicity is tim- 
berlands. According to Court Washburn 
of Hancock Timber Resource Group in 
Boston, which manages $2.4 billion in 
timberland assets for U.S. institutional 
investors, timberland returns have been 
relatively high. Bid timberJands are a 
relatively illiquid investment and not 
available to most individual investors. * 



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Shifting the Elements to Create Some Lucrative New Niches for Chemicals 


By Judith Rehak 

I NVESTMENT opportunities in the 
chemicals industry these davs can 
often be found oniy in restructured 
enterprises or niche players. Beset 
by oversupply and squeezed profit mar- 
gins in basic chemicals, some of the 
industry’s global giants have been spin- 
ning off these businesses in favor of 
their steadier and more lucrative phar- 
maceuticals divisions. 

£, In Germany, for example. Hoechst 
W AG and Bayer AG have been exitin» 
many of their traditional lines. 

“They’ve been doing well in stock- 
market terms . because investors have 
realized that they are not boring chem- 
icals businesses, but exciting pharma- 
ceuticals businesses," said David 
Ingles, who follows the industry for 


HSBC James Cape! & Co. in London. In 
the United States, Monsanto Co. is on 
|he same path, looking less like a chem- 
icals company as it pushes growth in its 
agricultural biotech business. 

The trend has many industry 
analysts finding their best bets C 
in turnaround plays or niche 1 J 
players whose products are not L 
impacted by the cyclicity, over- fZ 
capacity and weak prices that 
characterize much of the chem- MpS 
icaJs industry. 

In Britain, for example. Mr. Ingles 
likes Allied Colloids Group PLC. a spe- 
cialty chemical maker whose products 
for pollution control and the paper-mak- 
ing industry are profiting from growing 
demand. Moreover. Allied announced 
in November that it would buy CPS 
Chemical Co., an American maker of 
specialty chemicals in the same niche, as 


It’s Rough Going for Oil 
In Untroubled Waters 

Many Firms Are Hit by Crude-Price Swings 


By Conrad de Aenlle 

I F OWNERS OF oil stocks are un- 
happy with their lackluster perfor- 
mance so far this year, they can 
always blame the weather. The sec- 
tor was one of the strongest in a strong 
stock market in 1996, as expected new 
production was delayed partly because 
of stubbornly rough waters in the North 
Sea. That pushed the price of crude 
sharply higher, which then pulled up the 
shares of companies that produce it. 

In die last two months, however, 
prices have weakened, with the prospect 
of new production sources coming on- 
line in the North Sea and else- 
where. In the 13.S. market, the g 
price of West Texas interne- % 
diate crude has fallen $20.70 ^ 

r from S24.15 a barrel at the end 
--S'of January. # j 

That has left shares of many 
oil companies, particularly ex- 
ploration and domestic American 
companies, with losses so far this year. 
The big international producers, which 
are less susceptible to swings in crude 
because they sell more refined goods 
and typically have long-term sales con- 
tracts uncommon in the United States, 
are mostly up. bat their gains are roughly 
half those of major stock averages. 

The decline include has left investors 
with less room to maneuver. At the start 
of the year, even after the run-up in oil 
stocks. bulls were pressing their case for 
continued strength by pointing out that 
the value of many companies factored in 
a fall in crude to $20 a barrel. Now that 
it has nearly reached that level, the case 
is less convincing, especially to those 
who believe crude could easily fall be- 
low that mark. 

“The oil price is going to be under 
pressure,” said Charles Ober, who man- 
ages energy holdings for T. Rowe 
Brice’s New Em Fund. 4 ‘Incrementally, 
(y there’s more suqpply than demand. 

That's going to push oil under $20 again. 

• As far as stocks are concerned, the ma- 
jors are discounting an oil price of close 
to $20 for the rest of the year. lit could be 
a little bit worse, but I don’t see a lot of 
vulnerability in the major oil stocks." 

Oil analysts at Morgan Stanley & Co. 
said they expected crude to reverse 
course again, attributing the recent price 
decline to a seasonal swoon in anti- 
cipation of warm weather. Oil shares are 
too cheap, they said, and have too much 
bad news factored in, making this a 
good time to buy. 

“Investor sentiment toward integrat- 
ed oil slocks, as proxied by institutional 
ownership and relative valuation, has 
approached extremely low levels, with 
the current situation having been ex- 
* perienced only a few times during the 
p previous 10 years,” the analysts said in 
a research report 

Large professional investors own less 
than 60 percent of the equity in in- 
ternational oil companies, die lowest 
percentage in nine years, showing how 
out of favor the group is, according to 
the report. Dividend yields of about 3 J 
.percent are higher than at almost all 
other times since 1986, when oil bot- 
tomed at $11.50 per barret This shows 
that investors are demanding higber- 
' than -usual annual payments. 

Morgan is recommending several of 
the internationals — Amoco Corp., 
Chevron Corp. and Mobil Corp. — and a 
domestic American producer, USX- 
Marathon Group. 

Mr. Ober, despite, his caution, agrees 
that Mobil is worth a bet, as well as 
Marathon, which he said benefits from 


strong refining margins, as its plants are 
located in regions relatively free of 
competition. This is critical should 
crude continue to fall, as companies 
refining in busy centers, such as the Gulf 
Coast, will be under more pressure. 

He also likes several exploration and 
production companies. including 
Rutherford-Moran Oil Corp., United 
Meridian Corp., Flores & Rucks Inc., 
and Vastar Resources Inc. 

The explorers and production compa- 
nies are die riskiest bets in oil because 
their fortunes depend on the price of die 
commodity they produce, with no cush- 
ion from selling refined products. These 
ig on- examples. Mr. Ober argued, should be 
able to grow fast enough, and 
Vk produce oil cheaply enough, to 
^r' more than make up for reduced 
margins from cheaper crude. 
aJLA Finding such bulletproof 
companies is the goal of in- 
vestors in a soft crude market, 
"We’re much more focused 
on stock selection because of the weaker 
fundamentals,” said Wendy Anderson, 
a Lehman Brothers analyst Like Mr. 
Ober, she said she hoped to select 
companies “that can outperform, re- 
gardless of the oil price, due to growth in 
volumes and cost-cutting.” 

It is easier to do that, she suggested, 
than to try to call the ups arid downs in 
the crude market which are at the mercy 
of economic and political developments 
in the unpredictable places where much 
of the world's oil is produced and. of 
course, squalls in the North Sea. 

“Forecasting the oil price is difficult 
because there are so many wild cards," 
Ms. Anderson said. "It’s not just supply 
and demand.” 

Many of the companies she likes are 
in Europe, in particular British Petro- 
leum PLC and Total SA of France. Total 
expects to have doubled annual pro- 
duction to 1 billion barrels from 1 990 to 
1998 without any increase in employ- 
ment. 

The company has projected a 40 per- 
cent increase in operating profit over the 
next two years, based on $18 crude. 
That may sound optimistic but. Ms. 
Anderson said, “they have set aggres- 
sive targets in the past and met them." 

As for BP, Ms. Anderson said it 
"keeps delivering higher-than-average 
earnings growth, getting more per barrel 
and pushing radical cost - cutting 
through.” 


well as a supplier to Allied. The deal 
should enable Allied io control costs of 
the raw materials it buys from CPS. 

Mr. Ingles is much less enthusiastic 
about Britain’s giant. Imperial Chem- 
icals Industries PLC. He noted 
“7 ■■ that last year, many of the com- 

i • pony's customers were using 
I » up their inventories, causing 
\ demand to fall and putting pres - 

sure on prices, some of which 
fell as much as 50 percent. 

“That had a massive impact 
on 1C1 ‘s profits, which were down about 
£350 million in 1996.” he said. 

But IC1 con count at least one strong 
supporter on the other side of the Atlantic. 
William Young of Donaldson, Lufkin & 
Jenrene Sec unties Corp. in New York, 
shuns the major U.S. chemical makers he 
follows as ioo high-priced and sees ICf as 
an ideal turnaround play. 

BRIEFCASE === 

SEB Breaks Mold, Selling 
Shares Directly to Public 

The French electrical goods manu- 
facturer SEB Groupc SA is breaking the 
mold for private equity investors in 
France by selling shares’ directly to the 
public. 

Although trades ore handled by the 
Paris-based Gilbert Dupont brokerage 
— a subsidiary of Socieie Generale — 
SEB has struck a deal that cuts normal 
trading commission of about 2 percent 
to just 0.65 percent. 

Anyone who wants to buy the com- 
pany’s shares can simply fill in a form 
and send it to SEB. 

There is no minimum commission, so 
small investors have the added advan- 
tage of not being hit by disproportion- 
ately high costs. 

Local buyers have to add on a pur- 
chase tax of 20.5 percent 

SEB also offers a free in-house cus- 
tody service for foreign investors, said a 
spokeswoman. Marie-Dominique Du- 
pont. 

“We already hold shares for a num- 
ber of foreign investors and our man- 
agement service is free,” she said. 

Those who prefer to use outside 
brokers or custodians are free to do so 
without incurring penalties. 

Didier St. George, a trader with JJ\ 
Morgan Paris, said this type of deal was 
unusual in France, where businesses 
tend not to get involved in trading their 
own shares. 

“There may be other businesses out 
there doing the same kind of thing but I 
have never heard of it before.” he 
said. 

UHT) 

For further information: 

• SEB Gret^c SA » I 72 Id 18 18 


"ICf’s share price just hit a two-year 
low. and that’s when 1 like to buy 
them." he said. 

He thinks that the company’s chief 
executive. Charles Miller-Smith, is 
about to shake things up by shedding 
some of its less-profitable, and cyclical, 
bulk chemical lines. The analyst is bet- 
ting the cash from those sales will be 
used to buy more lucrative, and less 
volatile, specialty-chemical producers. 
He thinks ICI shares, now about 700 
pence (S 11 .34 1 . could go as high as 925 
pence in the next 1 2 months. 

■’Besides," he added, “they’ve got a 
darned good dividend, a 5 percent yield, 
so you get paid while you wait.** 

A top pick of David Manlowe of 
NatWest Markets in New York is Air 
Products & Chemicals Inc., a producer 
of industrial gases. 

"The story here is that a number of 


industries are changing their processes 
and thai’s resulting in a huge increase in 
the use of these gases.” he said, citing 
the hydrogen used by oil refiners to 
make low-sulfur transport fuels and new 
steelmaking procedures that use large 
amounts of oxygen. Air Products, he 
noted, has been building plants to meet 
this demand. He said that this should 
boost earnings per share from $3.90 for 
1997 to an estimated $4.55 for 1998. 

In Asia, where bulk chemicals and 
plastics dominate the scene, an over- 
capacity war is looming, despire grow- 
ing domestic consumption. The region 
already has heavyweight producers in 
China, South Korea and Taiwan, and 
countries such as Thailand and Malay- 
sia are entering the fray. 

Moreover, said Huw Williams of 
NatWest Securities in Hong Kong. 
“You're not just looking at domestic 


producers of plastics and chemicals, 
there is also heavy investment here by 
companies like Exxon and Dow Chem- 
ical, who are looking to establish pro- 
duction bases in Asia." 

But in Tokyo, Toshihiko Ginbayashi. 
who follows the chemicals industry for 
Morgan Stanley (Japan), is touting a 
turnaround play. Two weeks ago, he put 
an “outperform" rating on Dainippon 
Ink & Chemicals Inc., the dominant pro- 
ducer of printing ink in Japan. About half 
the company’s sales come from its two 
U.S. subsidiaries, which produce chem- 
icals, but Mr. Ginbayashi said that one. 
Reichold Chemicals, had been dragging 
down consolidated earnings. Reichold ’s 
balance sheet has been improving, 
however, since Dainippon took advan- 
tage of Japan's low interest rates, and 
increased capital to the subsidiary to 30 
billion yen ($372 million). 


Future Stock? Use Your Imagination 

T HE OTHER DAY. I got a erare schools, sell software and text- fashioned nonprofit private ones. 

complaint. A fellow called to books, provide post-graduate training In the futurism game, it’s far t 
say he had put $40,000 into or remedial services. risky to put all your eggs in a sing 

the Torrav Fund after I had “If existing schools can’t take care basket. If vou decide to invest in tl 


T HE OTHER DAY. I got a 
complaint. A fellow called to 
say he had put $40,000 into 
the Torray Fund after I had 
written about it a few weeks ago, and 
was now griping chat it had dropped 3 
percent. 

“Then call Torray up and sell im- 
mediately.” I suggested. “If you can’t 
handle short-term declines, you're in 
the wrong investment. 

Buy a money-market 1 

fund. The stock market is ****** 
for the long haul.” 

But that advice raises a question: If 
you are a long-term investor, don't you 
have to guess what the world will be 
like in 10 or 20 years? 

No and yes. Certainly, you can buy 
shares in a company like Coca-Cola 
Co. or General Electric Co. with a 
fairly high level of confidence that, as 
a well-managed firm with a glorious 
history, it will continue to make lots of 
money well into the 20th century. 

But picking the winning industry 
groups of the future can be even more 
profitable. It is not easy, and there’s no 
secret formula. Just use your imagin- 
ation and try to forecast what people 
will need and buy many years from 
now. At least, such projections make 
an interesting parlor game. 

Here are some of my personal 
guesses for the year 2010 or so: 

For-Profit Education. This is my 
favorite business of the future. Cur- 
rently, Americans spend $650 billion a 
year on education. It is a growth in- 
dustry that turns out a poor product, 
and it is obvious that something has to 
change. Private entrepreneurs see a 
huge opportunity. They own or op- 


erate schools, sell software and text- 
books. provide post-graduate training 
or remedial services. 

“If existing schools can’t take care 
of students, the marketplace will.” 
said Michael Sandler, who heads 
Edu Ventures. Inc., a Boston consult- 
ing and investment firm that focuses 
solely on this industry. 

Business is increasing rapidly, but 

OLASSMAW ON INVESTING 

there is a long way to go. Mr. Sandler 
says that “revenues of for-profit edu- 
cation companies reached $52.6 bil- 
lion in 1 996. a growth of 25 percent 
over the previous year.” 

Today, 106 of these companies 
trade on public exchanges, but most 
are small and nor followed by stock 
analysts. 

The largest of the stocks is Apollo 
Group Inc., whose headquarters in 
Phoenix. Arizona, I visited last year. An 
extremely efficient operation with 78 
campuses in 25 stales (most called 
“University of Phoenix”), the com- 
pany offers undergraduate and graduate 
courses to working adults who want to 
improve their skills and get a degree. 

Apollo also runs a “distance-learn- 
ing” operation that allows students to 
take classes by computer, linking up to 
a center in California by modem, and it 
develops training programs for employ- 
ees in large companies like Intel Corp. 
Total revenues have grown from $125 
million to $214 million in two years, 
with 10 percent profit margins. It is a 
good business with ideal competitors: 
bureaucratic public colleges and old- 


fashioned nonprofit private ones. 

In the futurism game, it’s far too 
risky to put all your eggs in a single 
basket If you decide to invest in this 
sector, you should probably own at least 
three different companies. Consider, 
for example, DeVry Inc., with 14 cam- 
puses that stress technical education; 
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., a well- 
run company thar offers testing and 
instruction for children as 
” well as adults seeking pro- 

Sessional licensing, and 

Nobel Education Dynam- 
ics Inc., which owns 109 for-profit ele- 
mentary schools in 1 1 stares. 

Delivery. The best way to play the 
Internet may be through low-tech, not 
high-tech, stocks. 

It’s a good bet that people will be 
buying many goods electronically 
(check out the incredible bookstore at 
www.amazon.com to see the future). 

Growing e-order business will 
mean more physical delivery business, 
since (so far, anyway) no one has 
figured out how to send a sweater 
through the telephone lines. 

The three American delivery heavy- 
weights are tile U.S. Postal Service, 
which is government-run but faces an 
uncertain future if privatization 
catches hold; United Parcel Service of 
America hie., a great company but 
closely held and not traded as a stock, 
and Federal Express Carp., which, ac- 
cording to the Value Line Investment 
Survey, should earn $340 million this 
year on revenues of $1 1 billion-plus. 

Value Line also gives high marks to 
smaller delivery companies, including 
Air Express International and Yellow 
Corp.. a tracker. 


Picking Up After a Storm: Bricks and Mortar First 


througr 


I T IS A POPULAR choice. Goldman 
Sachs & Co. oil analysts find BP 
shares cheap, compared with the 
British market and other oil stocks, and 
reckon that they could produce a total 
return of 14 percent per year through the 
end of the decade, even with a $16 
average price for Brent crude, the main 
European blend, presently selling at 
about $19. 

Ms. Anderson said European oil 
companies generally offered better in- 
vestment prospects than American pro- 
ducers. 

“There is more upside, with 1 1 per- 
cent earnings growth for European en- 
ergy stocks, versus 5 percent for the 
U.S.,” she said. 

With Europe’s oil companies typ- 


ically trading at lower earnings mul- 
tiples, that additional growth comes at a 
discount. 

“Valuations should be lower in 
Europe because there’s more domestic 
exposure and the political influence is 
greater,” she said, “but the gap has 
widened to an unjustifiable level, it’s a 
good buying opportunity for the Euro- 
peans.” 


By Digby Lamer 

T rying to build a safe 

haven for your money in bricks 
and mortar may have been a 
shaky undertaking in recent 
years. Global recession, cutbacks in 
government spending and falling real 
estate values in many developed regions 
have taken a heavy toll on build- 
ing programs. Bricks and mor- ^ 

tar are precisely the type of 2 
stocks that have suffered. ^jj 

The good news, however, is 
that when economies turn 
around, construction is often 
one of the first sectors to climb 
back. In the United States, the recovery 
has been gathering pace for some time 
and building materials, along with other 
stocks, continue to grow. The Standard 
& Poor’s Building Materials Index — 
although it includes only three stocks — 
grew 10 percent in the first quarter. 

The British economy is also gaining 
momentum, helping major building- 
material businesses report improved 
profits for last year. Even on the Con- 
tinent, where the German and French 
construction industries continue to 
founder, bufi ding-material shares have 
grown up to 20 percent since November, 
thanks to optimistic economic-growth 
forecasts of about 2.5 percent for 1 998. 

Foreign investment is also being 
tempted into the volatile Asian and Latin 
American markets, where the construc- 
tion sector is expected to grow faster than 
the gross domestic product average in 
many countries, analysts said. 

While the overall picture is optim- 
istic, investors need to consider care- 
fully the types of businesses and the 
regions in which they invest, said Mike 
Betts, a building materials analyst with 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. He said the key 
was distinguishing between the perfor- 


mance of building-material shares and 
the underlying industry. 

“Because heavy building materials 
are often considered early-cycle invest- 
ments, they tend to be targeted by top- 
down investors,” he said. ”lf they be- 
lieve an economy is about to pick up, 
they throw their money into construc- 
tion and building materials.” 

This means the value of some types of 
European building material 
shares may have already 

^0 peaked, even ahead of renewed 
construction activity. Imetal 
SA. a French building-mater- 
ials business, appeared to bear 
^ out this phenomenon this week. 

Its construction-materials divi- 
sion announced profit growth of 22 per- 
cent for 1996. The company’s annual 
dividend rose to 16 francs ($2.80) from 
14.50 francs last year. On the same day, 
however, the share price fell 21 francs, 
to 872, on the Paris Bourse. 

In Germany, Tarkett AG, a hardwood 
floor manufacturer, announced a 28 per- 
cent improvement in net profit for 1996 
and predicted improved demand in the 
first quarter of this year. Its share price 
refused to budge from 32 Deutsche marks 
($19.07) and h slid later in the week . 

An apparent exception to this trend 
was Lafarge SA in France, the world’s 
second-largest cement manufacturer, 
which Mr. Betts said still had growth 

S tentiaJ. In part, this was because La- 
ge is less dependent on the languish- 
ing French construction industry than 
most of its domestic competitors. It has 
interests in the United States, East 
Europe and Asia. 

Despite the benefits brought to La- 
farge by its interests in the United 
States, Mr. Betts warned that the U.S. 
building-material sector may be about 
to peak, having enjoyed boosts at both 
the beginning and end of a cycle. 
“Building materials divide into two 


broad categories.” he said. “Heavy ma- 
terials such as cement and aggregates — 
including sand and gravel — usually do 
best during the early part of the cycle when 
spending is increased on roads and other 
infrastructural projects. Light materials 
such as roof-tiling, joinery and heating 
equipment benefit from increased housing 
starts. These tend to appear later.” 

A program created under President 
George Bush to stimulate construction 
through road-building projects is up for 
renewal later this year. “There’s con- 
siderable lobbying to have die budget 
cut,” said Mr. Berts. “The one thing to be 
sure of is that with today’s public spend- 
ing concerns it won't be increasing.” 

Prospects are hardly better for house 
building. Housing starts appear to have 
peaked at 1.45 million last year. The 
figure for this year is estimated at 1.38 
million, falling to 1.28 million in 1998. 
Mr. Betts said cash may find its way into 
emerging markets such as China and 
Malaysia, where construction growth is 
ahead of expectations for economic ex- 
pansion. This week, the Chinese state- 
owned marble-slab manufacturer, Gitic 
Enterprises Ltd., broke records for new 


issues on the Hong Kong stock ex- 
change. Its 90 million shares were over- 
subscribed 892 times. 

Yet emerging markets are volatile, and 
a multinational could find them to be a 
drag on earnings. The British cement 
manufacturer Blue Circle Industries PLC 
saw its share price slip this week, despite 
announcing a 9 percent increase in pretax 
profits. Analysts pinpointed the poor per- 
formance of Blue circle’s Chilean and 
African holdings as the cause. 

Closer to home, Robert Griffiths, a 
construction analyst with the brokerage 
Albert E. Sharp, said that based on his- 
torical performance of building-material 
shares, the sector is set to enter a growth 
phase in Britain lasting up to 10 years. 


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PAGE 16 


Duncan Is Selected 


As Top College Player 


basketball Tim Duncan of 
Wake Forest, the only unanimous 
All- America choice this season and 
the first repeat selection in five 
years, was chosen college basket- 
ball's Player of the Year on Friday 
by The Associated Press. 

The 6-foot, 10 inch (2 meter) 
center, college basketball’s most 
prolific rebounder in the past 25 
years, averaged 20.8 points and 
14.7 rebounds for the Demon Dea- 
cons this season and finish ed his 
four-year c ar eer with 2,117 points 
and 1.570 rebounds. 

The award was presented before 
the Final Four teams — - Minnesota, 
Arizona, North Carolina and Ken- 
tucky — held practices at the RCA 
Dome in Indianapolis. 

Duncan, expected by many to be 
the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft, is 
the first player from Wake Forest to 
win the award, which was first 
presented in 1961, and the third 
player from the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference to win it during the '90s. 
Christian Laettner of Duke won in 
1 992 and Joe Smith of Maryland in 
1995. Marcus Camby of Massachu- 
setts won the award last season. 

Also on Friday, Clem Haskins of 
the University of Minnesota was 
selected coach of the year. (AP) 


Coltart Leads in Madeira 


GOLF Andrew Coltart of Scot- 
land carded a 6-under-par 66 Friday 
to take a one-stroke lead after the 
first round of the Madeira Island 
Open. 

Coltart, 25, who has set his sights 
on the European Ryder Cup team 
this year, holed six birdies to set the 
pace ahead of Rolf Muntz of the 
Netherlands, who finished at 5-un- 
der-par. Muntz was one stroke 
ahead of Fredrik Jacobson of 
Sweden, Ignacio Garrido of Spain 
and Ross McFarlane of England, 
each of whom shot 68. 

Mist and strong winds caused 
Thursday's scheduled first round to 
be abandoned after less than two 
hours of play, and the tournament 
was reduced from 72 to 54 holes to 
ensure a Sunday finish. (AP) 



WiDk AIloync/AP 

Shivnarine Chanderpaul bat- 
ting in bis first test century. 


Chanderpaul Shines- 


cricket Hundreds of jubilant 
spectators invaded the cricket pitch 
to celebrate Shivnarine Chander- 
paul’s first maiden test century in a 
test against India. 

Chanderpaul’ s feat led the West 
Indies from a precarious 131 for 
five to a more respectable 240 for 
seven at close Thursday on the first 
day of the third test with the touring 
Indians. 

Chanderpaul, in his 19th test, 
went to three figures 20 minutes 
before the end with an on-drive for 
three off Dodda Ganesh. Spectators 
swopped onto the pitch to engulf 
die relieved batsman. 

After a delay of about six 
minutes, Chanderpaul emerged 
from the throngs, fell to his knees, 
and kissed the pi tch. 

“It's a big relief and I’m happy, 
too,” he said. “It's been along wait 
and a big weight off my shoulders. 
I’m happy I got it today, and with 
good support from the crowd.’ ’ 

It was the 22-year-old’s 14th 

score of 50 or more in a career that 
started three years ago against Eng- 
land in Georgetown. He ended the 
day unbeaten 102 in 380 minutes, 
off 237 balls with eight boundar- 
ies. f AP) 


Frentzen Looks Strong 


FORMULA ONE Three weeks 
after a disappointing exit from the 
Australian Grand Prix, Heinz-Har- 
ald Frentzen responded Friday in 
the best possible fashion by dom- 
inating opening practice for 
Sunday's Brazilian Grand Prix. 

On a hot day at the sprawling 
Interiagos circuit in the suburbs of 
Sao Paulo, the soft-spoken German 
outpaced his W illiam * teammate 
and world championship favorite 
Jacques Villeneuve of Canada by 
three-tenths of a second. 

Frentzen clocked a best one-lap 
time of one minute, 17.506 
seconds, a performance that led 
many to say he was both fast and 
resilient enough to raise a challenge 
to Villeneuve this year. (Reuters) 


PiTETOUTfOXAl 


Sports 


SAXURDAJT-SUNDAy, MARCH 2 9-30, 1997 


NCAA Survivors Gear Up f< 


By Malcolm Moran 

New York Times Service 


INDIANAPOLIS — In case any of 
die early arrivals had forgotten die im- 
portance of their destination, the signs 
downtown bold a reminder. 

“The Road Ends Here,” is the mes- 


sage heard about as frequently as that old 
Final Four standby, “I need tickets.” 

But the issue now is what will happen 
when that road ends for North Carolina, 
Arizona, Kentucky and Minnesota — 
with a defeat Saturday evening, a loss 
Monday night, or a reservation on a 
victory stand. 

With three top-seeded teams among 
the four national semifinalists, and with 
No. 4-seeded Arizona from the South- 
east Regional here after defeating top- 
ranked Kansas, each school can claim a 


realistic chance at a championship. 
None of the survivors faced the 


None of the survivors faced the pre- 
season hype that began to define seasons 
at Kansas, Cincinnati or Wake Forest 
The differences in the Final Four teams 
from early this season to now are so 
pronounced that North Carolina and Ari- 


zona did not look at tapes of their game 
on Nov. 22 that the Wildcats won. 

“It's not even the same team that 
we’re facing.' ' Lute Olson, the Arizona 
coach, said of the Tar Heels. 

Dean Smith, the North Carolina 
coach, said: “That's so long ago. Both 
teams are different now.” 

Bach semifinalist, even Kentucky, 
the defending champion, got help from a 
reduction of expectations because of 
injuries, inexperience or premature de- 
fections to the National Basketball As- 
sociation. Kentucky, because of injuries 
to Derek Anderson and Alien Edwards, 
was able to experience a rare Wildcat 
phenomenon: a hint of re al i s m at tour- 
nament time. 

Rick Pitino. the Kentucky coach, 
began to speak of the differences be- 
tween the 1996 championship season 
and this tournament run when he turned 
to the expectations. 

“We never thought of it in terms of 
...” Pitino stopped to revise his thought. 
“Well, I shouldn't say that. We did 
think of defending our national title, and 
then when Derek went down, all we did 


was try to get better.” 

Of the champions to reach the Final 


Four in the following season, Kentucky 
appears to have undergone the largest 
change since the 1970 UCLA Brums, 
with Steve Patterson rather than Lew 


they know what to expert. But I don t 
have my entire team back.” 

The Kentucky players who will rake 

.« n n .. i Min- 


the floor Saturday night against Min- 
nesota combined for 59 minutes of ac- 
tion in the c hamp ionship game victory 
over Syracuse last spring. Thai group 
does not include Jared Prickett, a 6-foot- 
9-inch senior who received a medical 
hardship last year and recently set a 
school record by playing in 139 game s. 

Minnesota was able to benefit from a 
perception that the Golden Gophers 
were vulnerable despite building a 16-2 

Big Ten conference record. The Gophers 

were ranked 22d in the preseason As- 
sociated Press poll. Their absence from 
die 1996 tournament field, and the elim- 
ination of the Big Ten by the second 
round last year, allowed the Gophers to 
continue their progress, led by guards 
Bobby Jackson and Eric Harris. 

“This is kind of one of the best-kept 
secrets in basketball,’' Minnesota s 
coach. Clem Haskins, said. “I hope we 
can keep that secret for at least two more 
basketball games.” 

Arizona, making its third national 



Alcindor at center, won the fourth of 
seven consecutive'titles. 

“If I had my entire team back from 
last year," Pitino said, “I think it's a 
little bit of an advantage, because then 


ments, began the seaso tr 

orients role 

cameinto a year with so many question 
ility of Miles Simon, the arnyal of the 

highly recruited freshman guanine 
Bmbv the involvement of the junior 

SitSnsfer Beonett Dawson 

the emergence of center AJ. Bramlett. 

SHeelsbegantbeirs^mvv^ 
a 83-72 loss to Arizona in the Upon 

ClaifeitJ S^rin^eld. 

game in which Serge Zwikker, the 7- 
f&inch Tar Heel center , madel of 4 
shots and scored 2 points. Zw P^r has 


souls tuiu — r . — < . ■ 

since become a reliable and imposing 
r»f rfw. team, averaging 1 1 points and 


part of the team, averaging 1 1 points and 
10.5 rebounds in tournament play. . 

But Smith chose to emphasize the 
absence of Simon, who missed Ari- 
zona's first 1 1 games. ‘ 'They sttil tod us 
bv 17 points with eight minutes to 
play,” Smith said. “I hope we ye im- 
proved or it could be a blowout. 


With ‘Tractor 5 
Paving Way, 
Michigan Rolls 
To NIT Title 


By Tank El-Bashir 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Michigan’s game 
plan was this: Give the bail to its big 
man and get out of his way. Florida State 
got out of his way, too. 

With the path cleared. Robert Traylor, 
Michigan’s 6-foot-8-inch (two-meter), 
300-pound (135-kilogram) center nick- 
named “Tractor,” scored 26 points and 
grabbed 13 rebounds to lead Michigan 
to its second National Invitation Tour- 
nament championship Thursday night, 
an 82-73 victory over Florida State at 
Madison Square Carden. 

■ “The dung I was very concerned 
about was their size and physical 
strength,” said Florida State's coach. 
Pal Kennedy. “We just could not chal- 
lenge them like we wanted to early in the 
game. I don’t think I’ve ever coached a 
team in my 17 years that has been so 
physically imposing as they are.” 

For Michigan (23-11), which won its 
first NTT in 1984, the victory Thursday 
night was not as easy as the score might 
suggest The Wolverines, who got 20 
points from Maceo Bas ton and 1 7 from 
Louis Bullock, could not open a com- 
fortable lead until the final seconds. 

“You build a 20-point lead and it can 
evaporate in a hurry,” Coach Steve 
Fisher said. 

Florida State (20-12), which trailed 
by as many as 18 points in the second 
half, made a 17-2 run and trimmed the 
Michigan lead to 67-65 on a 3-pointer 
by Kerry Thompson with 5 minutes 39 
seconds left in the game. Less than a 
minute later, James Collins, a hero of 
the Seminoles’ semifinal victory over 
Connecticut, was fouled by Travis Con- 
lan as he raced to the hoop after a 
Michigan turnover. But Collins missed 
both free throws, which could have 
evened the score at 68-68. 

* ‘I was extremely happy with the way 
our kids really fought back,” Kennedy 




Michigan's Robert Traylor, towering over Florida's Kirk Luchman. 


said, “They showed great character 
during that final run, and it was epi- 
tomized by when we were down 18 and 
coming right back at the foul line with a 
chance to close in. Credit Michigan. 
They're big and strong around die bas- 
ket, and that really wore us down.” 

The most telling statistic of the game 
was Michigan’s 47-28 rebound advan- 
tage. That was mostly the doing of 


Hingis Blazes Trail to Lipton Final 


By Robin Finn 

New York Times Service 


KEY BISCAYNE, Florida — She 
showed some touches of petulance, 
some touches of brilliance, and finally, 
one hour and 50 overheated minutes 
into what seemed an inter minab le fight, 
she showed Jana Novotna the door by 
rifling an ace, the first and only ace of 
their semifinal bout, at match point 
Martina Hingis, just 16 years old and 


poised to become, on Monday, history ’s 
youngest No. 1 player, made sure her 


youngest No. 1 player, made sure her 
brash and risky parting shot was a per- 
fect shot. 

Top-seeded at the Lipton Champi- 
onships and close to fanatical about 
remaining unbeaten in 1997, Hingis 
outlasted the Czech veteran, 6-3, 2-6, 6- 
4, on Thursday in a hard-boiled match 
on a hard court where the temperature 
had hit 105 degrees Fahre nhe it by the 
time the players took a 10-minute safety 
break before the final set 

In the other women's semifinal. 
Monica Seles, playing in her first tour- 
nament this year, beat Barbara Panlus, 
6-1, 6-0, in 51 minutes. 

"Occasionally I looked in the comer 
— 105," Novotna said, referring to the 
courtside thermometer. “And it’s like, 
‘Nice frying, let’s pour some olive oil 
over me.’ ” 

Instead Hingis poured on the pres- 
sure by breaking Novotna fora 5-4 lead 
in the third set Novotna made 49 un- 
forced errors. 

“Sometimes I was hitting the back- 
hand cross-court so well, she came back 
and played even better volleys, espe- 
cially that short one — I just hated, that 
one.” Hingis said of Novotna’s laterally 
sliced backhand volley. "To the end I 


Goran Ivanisevic's 40 unforced er- 
rors figured prominently in his dis- 
missal from Thursday’s men’s 
quarterfinal. But Jim Courier, playing 
more like Lipton’s 1991 champion than 
its 22d seed in 1997, didn’t require a 
third set to dispose of the fourth -seeded 
Croat. Courier took just 76 minutes to 
pocket a 6-2, 7-6 (7-2) upset of Ivan- 
isevic. who continued a tradition of wilt- 
ing beneath Courier’s battering-ram of- 
fense. Courier has won six of their nine 
meetings. 

“I gave him everything, nice 
presents," Ivanisevic griped “Comes 
to tie breaker and I make double faults, 
two unbelievably easy return mistakes. I 
can beat someone ranked 50 or 100 with 
this game, but not him.” 


just tried to keep it in play, and I made a 
lot of shots down the line. But when she 


lot of shots down the line. But when she 
came to net I made so many errors; that 
makes me very angry." Hingis made 23 
unforced mistakes, a flood for her. 



Robot Soflivan/Acan: Frara-Ptcse 

Martina Hingis celebrating after 
her 6-3, 2-6, 6-4 semifinal victory. 


While Courier hired Harold Solomon 
to coach him this year in the hope that it 
would jolt him back into a top 10 renais- 
sance, Hingis and her mother/coach, 
Melanie, aren't looking to change a 
thing. This latest victory against the 
third-seeded Novotna extended the 
Swiss sensation’s 1997 winning streak 
to 25 matches and left her one round 
away from securing a fifth consecutive 
title for 1997, a year she began by 
becoming the youngest Grand Slam 
champion of the century , winning the 
Australian Open. Novotna won their 
last two confrontations, but Hingis re- 
gained command of their rivalry, 3-2. 

* 'I t hink it was the best match we ever 
played each other,” Hingis said. “She 
makes you run, makes you make a lot of 
mistakes. You feel in good shape if you 
win a match like this.” 

Win or lose in Saturday's final 
a gains t Seles, Hingis will assume the 
top spot on the computer ranking 
Monday. She not only displaces the 
current No. 1, Steffi Graf, who happens 
to be the last person to defeat her, she 
also displaces Seles as the youngest 
woman to hold the top ranking. 

Since August, only the 27-year-old 
Graf and 2 8 -year-old Novotna, tlie two 
elders of die top 10, have been able to 
decipher and defuse Hingis's heady on- 
court chess game. Asked whether her 
romp through 1997 has caused her to 
start to feel unbeatable, Hingis replied, 
without sarcasm, “Well, lam." 

But she wasn't in the second set 
Thursday. Down 5-2. she surrendered 
the set with a lax service game in which 
she double-faulted to 0-30 and blooped 
a forehand out of bounds at double set 
poinL After the 10-miouie breather, she 
returned in an irritable mood: angry at 
bungling a break chance in the first 
game of the third set, she hurled her 
racquet toward her changeover chair 
and received a warning for equipment 
abuse. 



Resisting Temptation 


Women’s Basketball Hears the Call of Cash 


Vantage Po int /HakvetAraton 


K-rm taliu/Tlir liucuird 


Traylor, who dispelled reports of him 
leaving Michigan for the National Bas- 


leaving Michigan for the National Bas- 
ketball Association draft 
"I’m still not thinking about the 
NBA," said Traylor, who was voted 
most valuable player. “My thing next 
year will be coming back to Michigan 
and playing basketball and getting an 
education. It feels great to win the MVP, 
but I’m just happy to win the game." 


New York Tunes Service 

CINCINNATI — The swoosh awaits 
you in your hotel room, on brochures 
slipped under the door as a symbolic 
welcoming and corporate authentica- 
tion of what used to be a cozy gathering 
called the Women’s Final Four. The 
swoosh is all over town this week, as are 
the rival shoe reps and prowling agents 
and recruiters from the rival fledgling 
professional leagues. 

As are the realities of progress being a 
two-way street, presenting the threat of 
head-on collisions between education 
and ambition. 

“This is die business of basketball,” 
said Nancy Lieberman-Cline, who was 
here to do television commentary and to 
silently root far her alma mater. Old 
Dominion, Friday night against Stan- 
ford before Tennessee took, on Notre 
Dame. “People are putting money into 
this game now, and nobody puts money 
into something without wanting 
something in return." 

The issue, then, for women's college 
basketball is whether it wQl follow the 
men’s game, which a long time ago 
surrendered its soul. Will die women’s 
game develop a more honorable in- 
dustry of its own, or will it let itself 
become Frankenstein’s daughter? 

Though still comparatively small and 
sane, the women’s Final Four has ar- 
rived. It’s here. It’s sold our. It’s a na- 
tional event in its own right But where 
are this sport and its leading ladies 
headed? That’s a question that prompted 
Pat Sumxnitc to slide her arm around 
Chamique Hoidsclaw, her star sopho- 
more from Christ the King High School 
in Queens, New York, and say with a 
wink: “She’s not going anywhere.” 

Twenty-two years the coach ai Ten- 
nessee. with 10 appearances in the Final 
Four and four championships, Summit! 
is so respected that the school once 
asked her to consider coaching the men. 
Her response Thursday as to why she 
didn’t was brilliant, a fe minis t mantra in 
the making. ‘ T don’t consider that a step 
up.” she said. 


Her career has been devoted to 
“what’s good for the women's game,” 
and right before her eyes, at Final Four- 
news conferences, dramatic changes 
have occurred. “Wouldn’t need a mi- 
crophone for this, ’ ’ she said of the way it 
used to be. “There ’d be four people in 
the front row.” 

Summitt and others like Stanford’s 
Tara VanDerveer, last summer’s 
Olympic coach, have done their jobs so 
expertly that those jobs will soon be- 
come tougher. “Eventually, we'll have 
to deal with it,” S ummi tt said, referring 


to players parachuting to the pros. 
“That’s when I pull out our 100 percent 


“That’s when I pull out our 100 percent 
graduation rate. ’ 

The coach whose team beat die Uni' 
versity of Connecticut could afford to 
play with the notion: For one tiling, the 
two professional leagues have already 
said they will not draft underclasswo- 
men, at least not yet For another, Hoid- 
sclaw picked up the question and tamed 
it into a statement 

“I don’t think women’s players 
should be allowed to go pro, Hoidsclaw- 
said. “By playing in college, you de- 
velop a name.” 

If the pro game makes It — and that's 
a big if — college players may find it 
difficult to resist, particularly as the col- 
lege game becomes more competitive. 
"The first girl who sues to play will get 
her way,” Iieberman -Cline said. 
“Maybe not for $50,000, though.” ' 

More likely for $150,000. Money 
talks, and often creates a new mandate. 

“Four college teams made money 
this year,” Lieberman-Cline said. 
“Other schools will see that.” They’ll 
also notice the visibility UConn, Ten- 
nessee and Stanford have received for 
their women’s teams. 

Competition is, well, competition. 
But the women in recent years have 
developed a sport that doesn't have the 
foul odor of impropriety. Summitt is 
right when she says the men 's game is no 
step up. The women should set their own 
standards. Take the swoosh money. 
Keep your soul. 


NCAA Basketball Finals on Television 


TUa raWi Fkial PburoMiM bagin on March 29 at fee 
PJf- EST. AccowBng to PmSmv Triqvfaton, any »W tm 
broadcast hi the foDonbig counriu: 


Asia ESPN STAR SPORTS* 

Austmflo FOXTEL AUSTRALIA* 

Bamta EURO BROADCASTING CORP. 
CflBflda CJTYTVA CKVR* 

Croatia EUROBROADCASTING CORP. 
Etfrope NBC SUPERSPORTS* 

France CANAL PLUS 
(Rdoaesta SCTV 
IsnwUCS SPORTS LTD. 

Itatf TELEPIU 2 * 

Japan WOWOW 
Latvia Latvian TELEVISION 
Macedonia Al TELEVISION 
Mo n tenegro BK TELECOM* 

Middle East ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS* 


Now Zealand SKY NETWORKT.V.* 
PtMmhm CHANNEL 13 * 

Puerto Rico CHANNEL fi* 

SatttaBK TELECOM* 

Singapore TELEVISION TWELVE 
Soatt America FOX SPORTS AMERICAS* 
Saafb Kdraa PUSAN BROADCASTING 
SpabtCANALPLUS* 

US MUHttry ARMED FORCES RADIO 6. TV 


WORM'S FI HAL row 

AoitroBa FOXTEL AUSTRALIA 
Canada CITY TV A CKVR* 

Eoro« NBC SUPERSPORTS 
Indonesia SCTV 

US MBftary ARMED FORCES RADIO A TV 

11*000 wfth asterisks Mole Uve cover* 

check local flathtga for ttmea. 


Marketers Embrace Robinson 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — General Mills put 
him chi Wheaties boxes. A Coca-Cola 
bottler shipped commemorative bottles 
and canons to stores in Southern Cali- 
fornia. And famous athletes thanked 
him in a Nike commercial. 

Fifty years after breaking the color 
barrier in major league baseball and 25 
years after his death, Jackie Robinson is 
once again a valued marketing icon. 

He could become the most heavily 
marketed sports figure this year and 
could bring in millions of dollars in 
sales. About 20 companies have been 
awarded licenses to use Robinson’s 
name or image to sell products as base- 
ball observes the anniversary of his 
April 15, 1947. major league debut with 
the Brooklyn Dodgers. 

In addition to cereal, soft drinks and 
sneakers, the products include trading 
cards, lapel pins, pewter figurines and 
embroidered emblems. This summer, the 
U.S. Mint will strike gold and silver coins 
with Robinson’s likeness on them. 

Rachel Robinson, Jackie's widow, 
has been very selective in choosing 
which products are licensed, said Darcy 
Ross, president of Indianapolis-based 
CMG Worldwide, the business agent 
for the Robinson estate. 


She didn t want to do plastic cups 
-£55*'° * tasteful/’ Ross said. 

CMG developed a special Robinson 
anniversary logo for licensees, which 
generally pay about 10 percent of the 
wholesale price of the » « 


“ . , — j iu percent or me 

wholesale price of the products as a r 
royalty, Ross said. She declined to es- * 
pmate how much money was expected 
» to generated. Mrs. RobinsoTako 
declined to comment. 

Robinson had a number of deals 
5™ he J?l ayed appearing in 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 


PAGE 17 


SPORTS 





'trying i} 

• v /o tfo 


# Golf for Champs 

Top 50 in Florida Tournament 


By Charlie Nobles 

New York Times Service 

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, 
Florida — It is Dot acknow- 
ledged as one of die four major 
men's golf tournaments, but 
the Players ’ Championship 
here has something that do 
other tournament has been 
able to produce since the world 
l rankings began in 1990. 

The world’s top 50 golfers 
are competing in the same 
tournament, players who have 
a combined 773 professional 
victories between them. 

And Thursday they attacked 
the Saw grass Stadium Course 
at the Tournament Players 
Club — weakened markedly 
by a heavy rain Tuesday — 
with widespread vigor. 

’ Rain left the course soft, 
bringing more predictability, 
especially with little breeze. 

“The course is very vul- 
nerable when it is like this," 
said Fuzzy Zpeller, one of 
five players who shot a five- 
under-par 67 in the morning. 

. Zoeller predicted even 
lower scores in the afternoon, 
and Steve EUcington, who 
won the 199 5 PGA Cham- 
pionship, moved him right, 
shooting oo. Joining Zoeller 
at 67 were Tom Lehman, 
Mark Calcavecchia, David 
Edwards and Russ Cochran. 
Among the others in the 


144-player field is the de- 
fending champion. Fred 
Couples. He announced 
Wednesday that he had 
broken up with his girlfriend, 
while expressing concerns 
about his readiness for this 
tournament, and settled for a 
71 Thursday. So did 21 -year- 
old Tiger Woods. 

Elkington strung together 
eight birdies — including 
four in a row — with a double 
bogey on the 18th to take 
command as the sun was be- 
ginning to set. 

Calcavecchia played the 
day's most electric final eight 
holes — - five birdies, an eagle 
and two bogeys. "I just kind 
of went crazy there for a 
while," he said, shrugging. 

The eagle came on the par- 
5 16th. a 497-yard challenge. 
His best drive of the day and a 
radar-like 3-iron left him 12 
feet from the pin, and he 
rolled it in. 

On the previous hole, Cal- 
cavecchia had assured him- 
self of a birdie with a 40-foot 
putL And nearly as memor- 
able to him was a 20-footer on 
No. 2 that saved him from 
double-bogeying. 

Lehman produced seven 
birdies and a spoil-sport 
double bogey on the par-4 
No. 12: “Hit a bad drive, bad 
second, bad third, bad fourth, 
bad fifth and tapped it in for a 


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Sr' 






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■3ir» 1 rMruia/Dir AoneiMrd IVna 

Steve Elkington leaving the 18th green. He shot a 66. 

bad sixth," he said ruefully, so he is hopeful of a consistent 

Lehman noted that the weekend, 
strongest pan of his game Zoeller mixed seven bird- 
usually is iron play — a dis- ies with two bogeys for his 
tinct weakness Thursday — 67. as did Cochran. 


Who Needs Jordan? Bulls Romp 


The Associated Press 

The Chicago Bulls survived a poor 
shooting performance by Michael Jordan 
and the absence of Dooms Rodman to 
beat the Toronto Raptors, 96-83. 

Jordan scored only 12 points on S for 
17 shooting Thursday night, but Luc 

NBA Rodndup 

LongJey and Scottie Pippen each scored 
16 as the Bulls snapped a two-game 
losing streak at Toronto. Rodman, who 
sprained his left knee in Tuesday’s vic- 
tory over Dallas, will miss the Bulls' last 
1 3 regular-season games. 

Hawks loa, Cfippwr* 88 Mookie Blay- 
lock scored 26 points as host Atlanta 
won its sixth straight 

Steve Smith added 19 points for the 
Hawks, who pulled within percentage 
points of Detroit for the No. 4 playoff 


spot in die Eastern Conference. Rookie 
Lorenzen Wright, who scored a career- 
high 24 points Tuesday against Van- 
couver, had 20 points and nine rebounds 
for the Clippers. Wright made 10 of 1 1 
shots from the field. 

Spurs 97, Magic 93 Monty Williams 
scored 20 points as San Antonio beat the 
visiting Magic. Dominique Wilkins hit 
two free throws with 14 seconds left to 
clinch the victory after a comeback by 
Orlando. Vernon Maxwell added 17 for 
the Spurs. 

Rony Seikaly scored 22 points for the 
Magic, who had their four-game win- 
ning streak snapped. Penny Hardaway 
added 19 points for Orlando in the losing 
cause. 

Rockets 107, Canalhtrs 89 Eddie 

Johnson had a season-high 27 points and 
10 rebounds as host Houston scored the 
highest point total run up against Clev- 


eland this season. Hakeem Olajuwon 
added 23 for die Rockets. Bob Sunt led 
the Cavaliers with 16 points. 

Latum log, atmOmm 88 Rookie Kobe 
B ryant, getting his second successive start 
in place of the injured Eddie Jones, scored 
five of his 20 points in overtime as the 
Lakers beat the Grizzlies in Vancouver. 

El den Campbell scored 25 points for 
the Lakers, who played without starters 
Shaquille O’Neal (injured knee), Robert 
Horry (knee) and Jones (calf). 

Bryant's 3- pointer with 1:39 left in 
overtime gave the Lakers a 99-94 lead. 
Two minutes later, Bryant drove for a 
layup to make it 101-95. 

Lee Mayberry hit a 3 -pointer to cut 
the Lakets* lead to three, but the Grizz- 
lies turned the ball over on their next 
possession. 

Shareef Abdur-Rahim led the Grizz- 
lies with 21 points. 


Islanders Come Back to Top Bruins 


The Associated Press 

Zigrnund Palffy scored twice within 
two minutes in the second period, and 
the New York Islanders overcame an 
early 2-0 deficit for a 6-3 road victory 
over the Boston Bruins. 

Robert Reichel, playing in his third 
game on Thursday night for the Is- 
landers since being traded from Cal- 
gary, also scored two goals and assisted 
on three. One bright spot for the Brains, 
who lost their fifth straight game, was 
Ray Bourque's 1 ,000th assist, the most 
with one team in NHL history. The only 


others with 1,000 are Wayne Gretzky, 
Gordie Howe, Paul Coffey and Marcel 
Dionne. 

Davits 4. Rang»» o Martin Brodeur 
made 26 saves for his seventh shutout, 

NHL ftouMDur 

and Bill Guerin and Scott Niedenxtayer 
scored first-period power-play goals 
for the host Devils. 

Senators 3, Panthers 2 Tom Chorske 

scored twice, including his 100th NHL 
goal on a shorthanded score, as visiting 


Ottawa stayed in contention for the 
playoffs in the Eastern Conference. 

Hfhalavs 5, Lightning 2 Right wing 
Steven Rice scored a pair of early goals 
to propel visiting Hartford over Tampa 
Bay before a sellout crowd of 19,984 at 
tbe Ice Palace. 

Hum 2 , Kino* 1 Brett Hull assisted 
on both goals, and Grant Fuhr made 29 
saves to lead host Sl Louis. 

Coyotes 1, Map!* Lasts 1, Darby 
Hendrickson scored a gift goal in the 
first period for Toronto. Gerald Diduck 
had the only goal for tbe Coyotes. 



Scoreboard 


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Saa Antonio ■ 35 If 25 18-97 

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Stotonei man 94, Oftnpqo Uutftara 90 
Toara System Bologna 7ft Barcelona 65 
PanatMnt8kos49,Olymp!afcos69 
Efes Plteen 87. VUeurbanne 71 


x-Hoddo 

33 25 17 

83 203 

182 

N.Y. Rangers 

35 31 9 

79 239 

210 

Washington 

30 37 8 

68 191 

211 

Tampa Bay 

29 38 7 

65 201 

231 

NX Iskmders 

27 » 11 

65 211 

220 

NORTHEAST DIVtSKM 



W t T 

Ms GF 

GA 

k-Buftolo 

38 24 11 

87 218 

185 

Pittsburgh 

34 33 7 

75 256 

253 

Montreal 

28 33 14 

70 232 

258 

Harttord 

28 36 10 

66 199 

231 

Ottawa 

25 34 15 

65 203 

219 

Boston 

24 42 9 

57 215 

272 

wririRH rnwiwn 


CEXHUL DIVISION 



W L T 

Ms GF 

GA 

x-DaUas 

44 23 6 

94 228 

174 

Derate 

35 23 15 

85 23$ 

179 

Phoenix 

35 34 6 

76 214 

223 

SL Louts 

32 34 9 

73 218 

227 

Chfcuga 

30 32 12 

72 198 

190 

Toronto 

27 41 7 

61 213 

255 

PACIFIC {HVBION 



WIT 

Pis GF 

GA 

A-Cotarado 

46 20 9 

101 257 

184 

Edmonton 

34 33 7 

75 230 

221 

Anaheim 

31 33 11 

73 221 

216 

Catgary 

32 35 8 

72 201 

210 

Vancouver 

31 39 5 

67 231 

253 

Los Angeles 

26 39 10 

62 195 

244 

San Jose 

24 43 7 

55 184 

245 

[x-dtoched ptayofF berth) 



9— 36. T- 10-13-19—42. GoaUetu H-fimke. T- 
Tabaracd. 

Oflaen 1 I 1—3 

Florida 0 ■ 2—2 

First Petto * O-Chanke 16, (sh). Second 
Period: O-Duchesne 16 (YasMa 

McEachern) tpp). TMrd Period: O-Chorske 
17 (Bank. Duchesne) 4, p-wonineri tWrih. 
Nembavsky) 5. F-, Nemkavsfcy 7 (MeBanby, 
Sheppatri) Ippl.StaitaaegaakD- 14-6-8-28. 
F- 2-9-10-21. Goafles: O-Tugnutt F- 
Vanblesfanuck. 

Los Angeles « • 1-1 

SLUMS 0 2 0—2 

Ftot Period: None. Second Period: SJ_- 
Murphy 16 (Hulk Tingeon) (pp). Z SJ_- 
CaurtwO 16 (Hulk Kravchuk! TIM Period: 
LJL-Yachimnev 1ft Sab an goal: LA.- 4- 

10- 1630. S.L- 1264-25. Goanes: LA.- 
Datoe. S-L-Fuhr. 

Toronto 1 0 0 0-1 

Pkaerix 1 0 0 0-1 

First Period: Ptoenbk OMuck 2 (King, 
Gartner) (pp). 2# T-Hendrtckson 11, Second 
Parted: None. TlrirO Period: None. Orerikae: 
None. PemdUes— None. Stetson goat T- 6- 
10-7-2-21 Phoenix 14-8-8-4-34. Goafs: 
T-PoMn. Phaenfik KhabUmOn. 


Novotna OX Czech RepuhBc 63. 2-6 Mr 
Monica Seles (4}, u del. Bcebara Paul us 
ni), Austria, 61. 64L 


CRICKET 


WEST INDIES VB. BOM 
TMiltSIMV. H BtaDGETUWN. BARBADOS 
West kxfies 1st Innings: 240-7 


RUGBY UNION 


SUPER 12 


ACT 38, Narthan Tnmsvaai 19 


TRANSITIONS 


•Son Antanto . ' 18 . . 52 JS7 34W 

Vtorauver.- - 32 61 .364 42 

PACWtoDrVBWW 

*-Sea«e 49 21 JD0 — 

x-LA. Laften 4B.' 23 jSK 1H 

*4tortkmd ^ 42^ 30 J83 8 

LA. CSppers - 31: 38 ^49 1754 

Phoenh ■ • • • 31 39 ^43 18 

Socnxaeiito 29 42 ^08 2054 

CMdenStoto # 44 J62 2354 

(MBnchedptoyoff berth) 


HOCKEY 


NHL STANDOmS 


ATLANTIC DfVISWN 

W L T Pis OF AA 
XrPNtodelphla 42 21 IT 95 251 193 
X- New Jersey 40 21 13 93 210 169 


MUMT'imnn 

HUY. Istaadns 2 3 1-4 

-BertM 3 0-0-3 

Pint Period: B-ttoy ft (Bourque. StompeO 
(pp). 2, B-Cnrtof 8 (AObon) ft New York. 
Sraoltoski 22 (McCabe, Rektiei) (pp>- 4, New 
York, Retold 18 (Poltf/) 5, B-T5weeney 9 
CAHsoa Carter] (pp). Socoad Period: New 
York. Retold 19 (BertuzzO 7, New York. 
Poiffy 40 (RetowO ft Now York, Palffy 41 
(RetoKfl TAM Period: New York, Green 20 
(B«wzzn siwte w geat New York U-15- 
9-35. B- 12-1613—41. SOoOes: New York, 
Sato. B-Caiey. 

N.Y. Rangers 0 0 0-0 

Hew Jersey 2 g 2—4 

Fbst Pertod : NJ. -Guerin 27 (EfleOl (pp). 
Z NJ.-Niederrouyer 4 (EJtofb MacLean) 
(pp). Second Period: None. TIM Period: 
NJ.-TDanw* 15 (RpWon) 4, New Jersey, 
Carpenter 4 (Chambers) (sh-en). Skate 00 
900b Now toft 612-8—26 HJ.- 13-7-1 1—31. 
6<x*e»: New York. Rlchtor. Hj.-BrtxJeur. 
Harttorf 3 0 2-5 

TMpaBay 10 1-2 

First Period: H-Wce IB (Cassete) z H-, 
Rice 19 (5ond«son, Eraeson) (pa). X H- 
Cassefl* 28 (Sanderson, Chtassan) 4, T- 
CuUen 18 (Occardft Hanufflu (pp). Second 
Ported: Nona. 1W Period: TnAndenson 5 
{HouMKWtomeilft H-Primeauai (Knn}7, 
H-Dineen 1ft (en). Shots eg goafc H- 15-12* 


SOCCER 


, Dyisburg 1, Hamburg 1 
' St Pauli ft BariAsia Dortmundl 
VfB Srwtigcrf l, 1860 Munich 1 
Bochum 2, Cologne 2 

sTANMHCUh Borassto Qortmuncl 49. Bay- 
era Munich 4ft VfB ShdtgaiT 4ft- Bayer Lev- 
erkusen 47; 5duilke 37, Bochun 37; I860 
Muntoi 3ft KariwulwM COtogiw VVenter 
Breraen 3ft Hamburg 3ft Arm Into Bielefeld 
3ft Bonssta Maendiengiadbodi 29, Duls- 
burg 2ft Fortwoa Ouessekfarf 25r St PauH 23r 
Harao Rostock 21; Relburg 14. 

WNUaeoatti 

ASIAN ZONE ■ 

Japan 6 Nepal 0 
Omani, MacaoO 


TENNIS 


KSYBWCANE, FLORIOA 

aawrrcnnNALs 

KEN 

Jim Courier} UJL del. Goran tvmteeric (4), 
Croatia 6-2, 7-6 (7-2); Thomas Muster CZ>. 
Austria, dot Jonas Bforionan, See, 7-5, 62. 
WOMEN 
mum mt 

Martina Hingis (1). Swttariand, def. Jana 


Hiunui 

NATIONAL BAOKETBAU. ASSOCIATION 

NBA-Fined New Jersey Nets coach John 
CaHpartS25J)00imdMtamf Heat broadcaster 
David Halbetstoni S2JOO tor making lanarfcs 
of an Offensive nature. 

chicam bulls— P ut F Dennis Rodman on 
the Infured BsL Acthrated F Tbnl Kufcoc Pan 
tamed BsL 

Ktonmu 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Baltimore- S igned S Sievon AWoreandS 
RandeB Janes. 

■UFfAM-Stgned WR jerry Reese. 
mnvea -S igned DT Matt Parfcer 
KANSAS ctTY-Slgmd LB Derrick Thomas 
to 7-year contract. 

san nuuiasco— Signed DB Fiadde Srrditi 
to 3-ygar cantrad. Signed T Franft Podaclc. 
Agreed to terms wfth CB Daraea Walker. 

HOaar 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
ANAHEIM -Recafled LW MDte LeCtorc 
from BafllmonvAJIL 
awiON-Shmed CRandy Rohltntlteto two- 
year contract Assigned LW Andre Ray to 
Providence, AML 

Colorado— R ecalled G Jean- Francois 
LaMefian Fredericton, AHL detoht—Ex- 
erdsed ttwlr apOan to extend toe oanlRKt of 
Brandon Shaiohan ittroogh the 1999-2 000 
season. 

mTsaaam -Assigned F Jeff aiitotkm 
and F Daws Roche to Oevetond 1HL and G 
PfMOgpe DeRauvflto to Kansas Oy, IHL 
torohtd— R ecaitod D Yannick Tterubtoy 
from SL JolOTft AHL 

WASHiHOTOM-AssfgnedOStomrtAlaiaV' 
nos and D Eric Chraran to Paritana AHL 

coil— a 

American— N amed Art Perry nwYs bo»- 
kefbai coach. 


■all state— E xtended cordraa of Robyn 
Markey, wamerrs bariteflxril coach, through 
1998-99 sedsaa. 

clemson— E xtended contract of Rick 
Barnes, men's basfcstbail caacte to 2004 sea- 
son. 

Color ad o A greed to toms wliti Rtcario 
Patton, men* bariwlbal coadv on conmxl 
GEORCETawH— Atmawiced soghmoro G 
Victor Page wn make Mrasett eflgDde tor 
NBA draft. 

Georgia- Ham a d Lefty Driesefl marrs 
basketbat coach. 

lander— N amed SbeBa Rhodes woniem 
basketball coach and womens asstehmt val- 
teybaU coach 

uo-Mamed John Brody mm baskattmtt 
caadL 

’ morris RROWii-Annaunced restgnotton 
of AJac TripWt metrs basftetoaB coach. 

new ORLEANS-Announced resignation of 
He Pitch men's basktaban a»dv so he can 
htee same postoon at Mem p his. 

n.y. marduie— N amed Homd Frnfberg 
metre basMbal coach. 

SOUTHWEST MISSOURI STATB— Agreed to 
terms WM Stem Alford, merrs basketttaU 
coach on 4-yeoi uxi trod. 

Stanford— A greed to terms with Mika 
Montgomery, mem baskelbal coach art 6- 
year contract extension. 

Texas chrmtiak •Amrouncediesignaflon 
of Richard Bocwl metre assistanlbasfcettxa 
coach.' 

tiilsa— S igned Stew RoUnsoiv metre bos- 
ftelbaB coach to axdrocMhrougli 2003-04 
soaBtn, 

YTAH 5TAre— Extended contract af Larry 
Eustodty, metre basfcatbai coach thraogh 
ihe 2003-2004 season. 


The Week Ahead 


SWWWMY, — JUICH 2» 

SoccEh nsiouBsffes—WoridQipouD- 
Bfiers: Croatia v&- Denroartc rtnfyvs.MUito- 
ws Cyprus re. Russks VWdes vs, Backing 
Netherlands ws.&m MmUxs Rommta vs. 
Uedrimdehs Albania n. Ukrataec Northern 
liehsid v*. Pattogab London— IntemaBand 
fttandy, England vs. Medax 
citcxET, East LondOh Saudi Africa — 1- 
day tatemattanoL South AMcn ys. AuthaOa. 
ROWtirfl. London — Oxford-Combridge. 
■aaaNi, Las Vtsgas — Michael Mooter, 
U5, WLVOugbn Bean,US. ISMwnd bout 
ItaMacnrYlBFhcavywefgMmBJrdtoCD- 
*ar CIkkz. Medoa, vs.^ Tony Martin. US. 
Iftfound, nciHttte super Rgbtwrighl bout 


Alex Sanchez, Puerto Rkn vs. Victor Burgas 
MtedCft 12-nxmd bout torSandWZ* WBO ml- 
n H yw etoto ttew Lament Boudouanl France, 
wCart Danteh U5. 12-round bout fee 606 
douanCs WBA {urfor mMdtewefghtfflte. 

Sunday, MaiwiiSQ 

soccer, Luxembourg — World Cup aun- 
Dfltar: Lumpbaurg vs. teneL 
ADTO RACWh tnteriagos. Brad — HA 
Farmtea Onft BrazHan Grand Prtx. 

Monday, March 31 • 

soccer. La VOEetta, Malta— FIFA 
UEFA World Cup ginttfler. Motto vs. 
Skwakia. 

cricket. Part Etatoeth Soute Abfcn — 
KX, one-day tatemaflonaL South Africa vs. 
Austratla. 

TBNNKLHBtDn Head, South Carofna 

—woraen, WTA Tour, Family Gbde Cup, 
through Aprit 6. 

RUGWiraiOh Auckland, New Zealand- 
Super 12, Auckland vs. Queenstand- 

TmtteDAY, ApwlI 

■ASEOAiUJew Vtak— U5. MLB, 

Opening Day 

Wednesday, Ap*ul 2 

soccer, various sites— World Cup 
(pstefylBts: European Group 1, Croatia vs. 
StoventeBoento-Ue m gavton vs. Greece; 
European GraupftPotond vs. ttaty. - 
European Group ft Anthaftm us. 
HntancLEurapeai Group ft Scotland vs. 
Austria. European Group ft Bulgaria vs. 
Cyprus. European Group ft CWh RepuhBc 
vftYkigostovta. European Group 7, Turkey 
vs. NOhettordE. Emopean Group ft 
LHhuaiito vs. Romantar Macedonia w. 
bekaKL European Group 9, ABxinJa vs. 
Getmanyi Emopean Group 9, Ukraine vs. 
Norlham IreJaiufc CONMEBOL various 
sites— Warid Cap Quailiytan, BalMa vs. 
Argentew Uruguay vs. VMMMhv Pore wl 
E cuador; Paraguay vs, CDtoraUa. 

Ii iten x rii a m rri endS es , wrious sites Franc* 
vs. Swcdero Hungaiy vs. Auslrala; 
SwBartond w. Latvia; CMh vs. BrazHr South 
AMcavs.AustnA>. 

Thursday, April 3 

mia NewOrteBMi— mervUJLPGA 
Tbur. RMpgrtMcDermolf Classic, through 
Apifl ft Scollsdalti Artroaa — ILS. Senior 
PGA Tbur, The TtodBlan, through AptO ft 
unoohv COIItomia — woroea UA LPGA 
T3Mtve Bridget LPGA Ckztefe through April 
ft IrmshMi Japar — men, Japan PGA> 
Descsate Classic Munstagweap through 

April 6, 

SPSDSJCATiNd Tbrku, Rntand — sflort- 


trar*, men, womaru 15 U, WOrid Chadenga 
Cup, through April 6 

Friday, Aphil 4 

soccer. Jakarta, Indonesia — FIFA. AFC 
World Cup quoUler, Asia, first 1 round, Group 

ft Indonesia vs.Cnmbodla 

anacn, SL John's, TBA. Antigua - KC 
fourth test match West tnckes vs. India, 
through April 8. 

speed SKATmaSeoul South Nona 
—mere women, ISU, World Short Track 
Speedskating Team ChampiansHpi. 
through Apr# ft 

auto RAanaGaU Coast AustraSa 
—CART, Indycar, Sunbelt IndyCamhn) 
Australia, provtetonal quaflfytag. 

RUGdrumaiL various sties — Super 12, 
ACT vsl Nahto Natal vs. Weftagtorr 
Aucttmd vk. Canterbury. 

TEHMB Darts Cup — World Group, 
second raumfc Uft vs. NNhorfands; 
Austntfa ». C2ech Repubflc Italy ys. Spalrc 
5oath Africa vs. Sweden, through Aprt ft 
Euro-AftlCtm Zone, Group 1, second munch 
Belghna vs. Deranarte Brihdn vs. 

Zknbidrws; Stovakla vs. braeb Austria vs. 
Cnatks Asia-Oceanla Zanft Group 1, 
second round: Indonesia vs. NewZeakmft 
China vs. South Korea; Group 2, seaxid 
round: Iran vs. Ttriwan; Lebanon vs, 
Tlnteand; Ameriasi Zone. Group 1. second 
round: Gmadn vs. VennzuekE CWIrvs. 
AigenlSnu; Group 2, second round: Cotomtda 
vs. Pen* Paraguay w, Uruguay. 

. Saturday, Apwl5 

soccer, variewssries— CupQuoMVtag, 
Afttca, sscmd round,Graap3,Nlget1a vs. 
Grdnecs Group ft Stem Leone vs. Ghana. 

crkket. Durbars South Africa — one-day 
Intemaflontft ICC South AMca w. Aushtrib. 

rugry unkw. Brlibm Auskala — Super 
IZ Queerntand vs. Otogo. 

Sunday, April 6 

soccer, various sites— World Cup 
Quodiytag, AMcft second raonft Groim l, 
Kenya vs. Burkina Rat* Group Z Liberia ml 
E gypt Namtola vs. TUnbla. Group 3, Congo 
VS. South AMctc Zaka vs. Zombis Group ft 
Angola vs.Togo> Conwroon vs. Ztataatwre 
Group ft Gabon w. Marooca Voncouver, 
Brttteh Cotumbla —tnem CONCACAF 
tools Conada vs. El Srdvodac WembteK 
England— League Cup tool 
Middlesbrough vs- Leicester. 

cvojng. UCL Worid Cup, Tour of 
Ftoflders Classic 

ATRLsncft Parts— Parte intenudtonm 
Marathon. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




UNUSiZ FOUND YOUR 
BLANKET ! IT LUA5 
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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-S UNDAY, MARCH 29-30, 1997 


DAVE BARRY 


The First Sign of Disaster 


By Dave Barry 


M IAMI — Disaster movies are 
back. I watched one on TV, about 
asteroids slamming into the Earth and 
causing a devastating worldwide epi- 
demic of bad acting. Also there are 
TWO disaster movies about volcanoes, 
including one set in Los Angeles, al- 
though I doubt that a volcano would 
faze REAL LA. residents, acoura^eous 
group of people who think nothing of 
building luxury homes on steep hillsides 
made entirely of mud. 

MRS. LA HOMEOWNER; Well, 
our hillside home is finally done! 

MR. LA. HOMEOWNER: Let’s go 
inside! 

(He touches the doorknob, causing 
die house to slide down the hillside and 
break into 73 million pieces.) 

MR. L.A. HOMEOWNER: Not 

again! 

MRS. LA. HOMEOWNER: Don’t 
feel bad! The brush fire was almost here 
anyway! 

MR LA. HOMEOWNER; I know! 
As soon as this earthquake tremor is 
over, let’s build another luxury home on 
this exact spot! 

MRS. LA HOMEOWNER Why 
ever not? 

I myself have experienced only one 
real disaster. Hurricane Andrew, and it 
was considerably different from die dis- 
aster movies that I’ve seen. For one 
thing, in the movies, there’s always 
some kind of romance interest; whereas 
after Hurricane Andrew, nobody in die 
affected area was able to take a shower 
for approximately two months. Every- 
body smelled like a cologne named Eau 
de Dead Goat The most romantic thing 
people did during that time was refuel 
each other’s generators. 

But realism is not the point of a dis- 
aster movie. The point of a disaster movie 
is to have exactly the same script as every 
other disaster movie. Here it is: 

(The movie opens in a suburban 
home, where the heroine is having 
breakfast with her adorable son j 
HEROINE: Well, it’s a peaceful day! 
No sign of any disasters! 

SON: Mean, do you have a husband 
or romance interest? 

HEROINE: No, Bobby, although I 
am a top scientist and very attractive. 
(The phone rings.) 

HEROINE: Ufa-ofa ! 1 hope that’s not a 
worker from the lab. calling to tell me 
about an impending disaster! 

LAB WORKER: Trish. a disaster is 
impending! 

HEROINE: I’ll be right there! (To her 
son:) Bobby, you stay here and be vul- 
nerable. 

SON: Mora, will the disaster end up 
striking this exact house and placing me 
in grave danger? 

HEROINE: Of course! 

(We see an exterior shot of the White 


House. Inside, the president, looking 
grim, is holding an emergency cabinet 
meeting.) 

PRESIDENT: Haven’t I seen that 
exterior shot before? 

VICE PRESIDENT: It’s the same 
one they use in the Tom Clancy 
movies. 

PRESIDENT; OX. somebody set up 
the plot 

SCIENCE ADVISER; Mr. President, 
unless something is done, a disaster is 
going to strike in 90 minutes, sending 
miniature cars flying in all directions. 

PRESIDENT: Ninety minutes! Why 
so long? 

SCIENCE ADVISER We need to 
build up the suspense. 

GENERAL: Sir, we must launch a 
nuclear strike against Houston! 
PRESIDENT: Why? 

GENERAL: I hate Houston. 
PRESIDENT (To the hero): Jake, 
you're incredibly good-looking. I want 
you to take your minority sidekick and 
get over to the laboratory immediately 
and develop a romance interest with the 
heroine. 

HERO: I'll do what I can. sir. 

(The next scene is in the laboratory. 
The hero and heroine are staring intently 
at a computer screen.) 

HEROINE: . . . arid so by using the 
mouse pointer, you can drag the three of 
clubs over onto the four of diamonds. 
(A lab worker rushes up.) 

LAB WORKER: Trish. the panto- 
graph is giving us a vector plasma read- 
ing in the cosine range! 

HERO: What does that mean? 
HEROINE: Nothing. It’s movie sci- 
ence gibberish. But it's time for the 
disaster! And my son is home alone! 

(The scene shifts to the heroine’s 
neighborhood. People are screaming; 
miniature cars are flying everywhere. ) 

HEROINE: This is terrible! Thou- 
sands of people are being killed! 

HERO: Irs O.K.! They’re extras! 
SON: Help! Help! 

HERO: I'll save him! 

HEROINE: Watch out for the special 
effects! 

(The hero, dodging miniature flying 
cars, saves the son.) 

HEROINE: Now we can be a family 
unit! 

SON: With Val Kilmer? I thought the 
hero was going to be Tom Cruise. 
HERO: He wasn't available. 

(The final scene takes place back to 
the White House, where everybody is 
relieved.) 

PRESIDENT: Whew! Although we 
lost 124 million people, all the main 
characters survived except the minority 
sidekick! 

(The cabinet applauds.) 

GENERAL: So now can we attack 
Houston? 

PRESIDENT: OX by me. 

© 1997 The Miami Herald 
Distributed by Tribune Media Services Inc. 


Kids in the Kitchen*, Puttin’ on the Ritz 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — French schoolchildren, ft is well known, 
lead overburdened lives, literally in the sense that 
their schoolbags would make a weight lifter quail, 
figuratively in that even their midweek Wednesday 
break from classes is usually spent in forced self- 
improvement. 

But a privileged handful trot off to the Ritz hotel 
Wednesday afternoons to combine the utile and 
child. There, they sweeten their hours by learning to 
make pastries under the guidance of a professional 
chef and ax the end of the afternoon get to eat the 
pleasing result 

The classes are for 6- to 12-year-olds and are held 
eveiy two weeks until the summer break. The Ritz 

MARYBLUME 

has offered respected classes for adults since 1 988 and 
then branched into making cooking child's play last 
May. The course is so successful that there is a waiting 
list despite the fee of 350 francs ($60) a class. 

“It worked brilliantly from the start,” says Mari- 
anne Dufeu. manager of the hotel's cooking school 
“They have a good time, they learn some basic 
principles.” Presumably the hotel craftily also uses 
the classes to build up a future clientele. 

Each child is outfitted in a tiny professional chef s 
uniform, from the blue-checked trousers to the 
starched white toque, and at the end of class they are 
given a certificate, a colored photo, a recipe book and 
a personalized carton containing their confection. 

“We choose recipes that don’t require too much 
help at home but for the most part the mother has to be 
on hand. What I imagine is the 10- or 12-y ear-olds 
telling their mothers you must do this or mustn’t do 
that, the chef said so. I can see that happening,' ' Dufeu 
says. Mothers are not allowed to watch the class. 

Gilies Maisonneuve, the school's pastry chef who 
also does the children’s classes, says be had stage 
fright at first. "At the beginning I talked too much. 
Now there's a dialogue but still there's a difference. 
You try to give them things to do that they’ll like, like 
learning to break an egg or mixing stuff." 

The recipes are basic but they do learn to make a 
g enaise and a pate a choux and even a creme pa- 
tissiere. For mother's day they will bake a strawberry 
heart. Maisonneuve says he is tiredev than after an 
adults' class. “You have to be attentive and keep 
them busy every minute." 

Will learning the principles of good cooking keep 
them out of McDonald's? “I doubt it,” be said. 

He was not on duty that particular afternoon in 
which, for the first time, the children would be 
making not desserts but an Easter pate called oetrfs en 
surprise accompanied by a green salad with oeufs 
mayonnaise. It was the mothers, apparently, who 
asked for die tiny chefs' recipe book to be expanded 
and so a nonpastiy chef from the school, Aime 
B array er, was making his debut in the kids' class. 

He did talk too much at first, while 12 remarkably 
self-possessed children, one third of them boys and aU 
looking good enough to eat in their chefs' kit, stood 
around a rectangular table. At each place was a small 
steel mixing bowl and a cutting board. 

With urgent joviality. B array er tried some small 
talk and then got down to the first job: cutting parsley. 
“You are here to have fun,” he told the children who 
were as obedient as if they were in geometry class. 

“Are you taking notes to give us marks?' ’ whispers 
Lucas, who is freckled and 10 and has a serious frown. 
No, it's for an interview. For television? ask two 
excited small girls. No, just a newspaper. The girls sigh 







Ffritoftld Searie 


and go back to chopping but Lucas has a thing or two 
to add. While some of the children have been taking 
the course from die start, he confides that this is his first 
time and a friend of his mother's suggested it “This is 
a good hotel.' 1 he explains. Normally be spends his 
Wednesdays taking computer or tennis lessons. 

The chopped parsley (“Don *t let your mothers use 
a machine, tell them to cut it by hand." the chef 
traitorously advises) is flung into the steel bowl in 
which a hunk of sausage meat already reposes. Next 
the children must chop an onion, which they do with 
remarkable stoicism. The contents of the bowl are 
mixed and the chef joyously announces that the 
children can use their hands. 

"That's disgusting,'' says a pretxy and fastidious 
blonde named Eugenie. 

While the children make pastry dough to envelop 
the stuffing (the surprise pan of the dish is that halves 
of hard-boiled eggs are inserted between the stuffing 
and pastry). Lucas says he hasn't told his school- 
mates he is taking the course, though he doesn't 
know why since he likes to eat well. The food at his 
school in the 16th Anondissement is awful. 

“Only the teachers are allowed to have salt and 
mustard,” hecomplains. Next year, in junior high, he 
will at last be able to have salt and mustard, of which 
he is deeply fond. 


The chef tells the class he has two daughters, 
Sophie and Raquelle. “Rachel,” Lucas attempts to 
correct him. No, Raquelle. "I would never have 
thought that was a name.” comments Lucas. He 
doesn't think he'll trouble to make oeufs en surprise 
at home. 

The dish is decorated with pastry scraps {‘‘e'est 
bien, e’est joli." says the chef in the severe tone 
adults use when praising French children). And when 
completed and labeled with each student's name, the 
dish is put in the oven to bake. Perhaps prudently, 
when it comes time to taste the finished dish only the 
oeufs en surprise that the chef has made are served. 
Even so, the children leave a lot on their plates. They 
like the pastry class better. 

In the meantime, the oeufs mayonnaise for the 
accompanying salad have to be made. * ‘Do you know 
how to cook eggs?” asks the chef. Yes. the children 
chorus. The chef wears a secret smile, undoubtedly 
aware that the Larousse Gastronomique lists no 
fewer than 292 egg recipes, excluding omelettes. 

Electric mixers are brought out for the may- 
onnaise. “What do you need to make a mayon- 
naise?” asks die chef. 

“Eggs!” the children cry. 

Lucas has the last word. “And MUSTARD,” he 
says. “From Dijon, of course.” 



PEOPLE 


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T hree 

dans, 

patrons of the arts, and 400* students 
from Paris conservatories — all 
friends, one way or another, of Mstis- 
lav Rostropovich — celebrated his 
70th birthday with him with a gala 
concert in Paris, Craig Whitney of The 
New York Tiroes reported. By the time 
the London Symphony, the Orchestra 
de Paris, the Orchestra National de 
France, Seiji Ozawa, Krzysztof Pen- 
derecki, Van Ciibum, Semyon Bych- 
kov, Natalie Dessay, Lord Yehudi 
Menuhin, Vladimir Spivakov, Gidon 
Kremer, Jean- Pierre Rampal and 
many others of equal renown had strut- 
ted their stuff, there wasn't a dry eye in 
the house, the Theatre des Champs- 
Elysees. "Slava” Rostropovich, 
whose nickname means "glory” in 
Russian, choked up after the final sur- 
prise — an appearance by Elton John, 
singing happy birthday in English at the 
end of three and a half ho urs of con brio 
musicmaking. There would have been 
even more if violinist Isaac Stern had 
been able to make it, but he was having 
a dental operation and unable to fly. 
"Most fantastic joy — is not possible. ' * 
Rostropovich said in French, no more 
broken than any of his other languages. 
Then, close to 11P.M.. he went off with 
the likes of the Prince of Wales, 
Prince Rainier of Monaco, and Queen 
Sofia of Spain and other guests at the 
invitation-only affair to a white-tie din- 
ner in the Elysee Palace with President 
Jacques Chirac, who joked, “Slava 
doesn’t really speak any language.” 
What Slava speaks is music, and the 
evening was a tribute to his lifelong 
eloquence as cellist, conductor, and 
passionate exponent of freedom. 



Scan OaJ hep* Renters 

OSCAR IN PRAGUE — The Czech movie director Jan Sverak dis- 
playing the Oscar he won for best foreign film on bis arrival in Prague. 


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310 

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832 

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MUSICAL PAUSE — A tired young violinist 
at a Tokyo concert, in which 3,000 adepts of 
the Suzuki method for children played. 


Robert Pinsky, chosen to be the new 
American poet laureate, is an artist 
whose literacy extends beyond the Eng- 
lish language and into cyberspace. 
“He's got real diversity.” said Prosser 
Gifford, director of scholarly programs 
for the Library of Congress. Pinsky’s 
diversity comes from his translations, 
prose essays, his interest in making po- 
etry accessible on the Internet and his 
own probing poetry, Gifford said. Pin- 
sky, 56, teaches at Boston University in 
the graduate creative writing program. 
He has written five books of award- 
winning poetry. Pinsky will be 
the 39th poet to hold the job, 
replacing Robert Hass. 

□ 

Should Mayor Rudolph Gi- 
uliani of New York trade in his 
pinstripes for lipstick and lace? 
New Yorkers, it seems, like the 
mayor as a woman. Giuliani’s 
performance in drag earlier this 
month at a charity dinner has 
won him accolades from voters, 
who judged his spoof of Mar- 
ilyn Monroe ahit, a poll shows. 
The former prosecutor stunned 
the audience at the annual Inner 
Circle show on March 1, when 
he appeared on stage in a blond 
bouffant wig, pancake makeup 
and bosomy pink gown, did a 
reprise of Monroe's famous, 
breathy serenade to John F. 
Kennedy (“Happy birthday, 
Mr. President”), and cavorted 
with Julie Andrews and other 
cast members of the Broadway 
musical “Victor/Victoria, 
which is about a woman mas- 
querading as a man masquer- 
ading as a woman. A survey 
found that 52 percent of New 
Yorkers liked the mayor’s 
cross-dressing, 25 percent did- 
n’t and the rest didn’t care. 


Bruce Springsteen is taking his 
brand of rock V roll to Eastern Europe 
The Boss for the first time will play in 
Poland and the Czech Republic, his 
publicist said. The concerts are in 
May. 


□ 

A woman aide to Prince Charles 
who annoyed Princess Diana by de- 
veloping a dose relationship with the 
couple's sons is quitting. Charles's of- 
fice said. Tiggy Legge-Bourke, 31. is 
leaving of her own accord, die office 
announced, while Charles and the boys 
are on vacation in Kenya. Charles and 
Diana, who divorced in August, share 
custody of Prince William, 14, and 
Prince Harry, 12. 

□ 

Harold Prince, the director, cannot 
leave the Leonard Bernstein musical 
“Candide” alone. His fourth produc- 
tion of the show opens April 29 in New 
York. “The original production was 
very spare, with 10 people and make- 
shift scenery,” Prince said. His second 
production, at the New York City Op- 
era. had borrowed costumes. “They 
were left over from the opera,” Prince 
said. In the current version, he has real 
costumes. Jim Dale will star as Dr. 
PangJoss/VoItaire. Andrea Martin as 
the Old Lady and Haroly n Blackwell as 
Cunegonde. 

a 

^ Actors Elisabeth Shue and Val 
Kilmer will be in Washington on Tues- 
day for a screening of “The Saint.” a 
film about a debonair master thief who, 
in his way, champions justice. The 
showing is a benefit for Sasha Bruce 
Youth work Inc., which aids young 
people in crisis. It is named for the 
daughter of the late Evangeline and 
David Bruce, who died of a gunshot 
wound in 1975.