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I 



INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


L? The World’s Dally Newspaper 


R 


Paris, Friday, May 2, 1997 





AS BRITAIN FOIES, FINAL POLLS SHOW LABOUR HOLDING ONTO ITS LEM 

Blair’s Popularity Threatens 
To End Tories’ 18- Year Rule 



By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — British voters turned 
out in heavy numbers under warm, 
sunny skies Thursday in what pollsters, 
pundits and politicians alike predicted 
right up to the end would most likely 
prove a watershed election for the La- 
bour Party, ending 18 years of Con- 
servative rule and handing the keys to 
No. 10 Downing Street to Tony Blair. 
Polls in Thursday' 


lay’s papers showed 
Labour holding on firmly to most of the 
huge lead that it has enjoyed since die 
campaign began six weeks ago. Those 
election eve polls gave Labour a lead of 
anywhere from 10 to 22 percentage 


tteay ItagiMfMW Baaeeftej* 

The Labour leader, Tony Blair, kissing his daughter 
after voting in his Sedgefield constituency Thursday. 


r's first victory since 1974, a year 
when Mr. Blair, die 43-year-old party 
leader, was still a student at Oxford uni- 
versity, and many of those casting their 
ballots Thursday had yet to be boro. 

Experts say that even a lead at the 
lower end of the predicted range would 
mark a remarkable reversal of the Tor- 
ies" 8 percentage point lead in the last 


election, and would restore Labour to 
power with a hefty parliamentary ma- 
jority of more than 100 seats in the 659 
seat Commons. 

For the party that saw Britain through 
the FaDdands War and through such 
trend-setting transformations as the sell- 
off of state assets ranging from its phone 
company to its rail network, such a show- 
ing would mark an ignominious end. 

According to many, it would also 
mark a largely self-inflicted one for a 
party now bitterly at war with itself over 
such issues as Britain's place in a rap- 
idly unifying Europe, where national 
currencies and even sovereignty are on 
the wane. 

’ As Prime Minister John Major and 
his wifi, Norma, cast their ballots 
Thursday morning in Mr. Major's Hunt- 
ingdon constituency, north of London, 
theprime minister held on to his official 
optimism. “I’m feeling entirely con- 
fident and very relaxed." he said 

Back in London, however, reports of 
plot and counterplot by party heavy- 
weights as they maneuver to wrest the - 
leadership from Mr. Major's hands as 


soon as possible after the anticipated 
defeat, have all but drowned out cam- 
paign news for days. 

Some senior Tories are even said to 
be turning their sights to lusher pastures. 
The Times of London carried a front 
page report Thursday suggesting that 
Michael Heseltine, the deputy prime 
minister, had tentatively smiled upon 
offers to make him the chairman of 
GEC. one of Britain's largest industrial 
firms. 

For Labour, the sworn enemy of 
much of the 44-day campaign has been 
nothing scarier than the threat of a se- 
rious bout of complacency. With a com- 
manding lead in the polls that surprised 
just about everyone by wilting only 
slightly even in the brat of the cam- 
paign. Mr. Blair was until the last warn- 
ing his troops and the nation against 
taking victory for granted 

On the eve of the election, he de- 
scribed as rubbish the very polls that 
insisted that come Friday be would he 
picking up his mail at Downing Street 

See BRITAIN, Page 8 



4 me Skdty/nc AMoOKti turn 

Prime Minister John Major eqjoying a beer outside a 
pub in his constituency of Huntingdon on Thursday. 


( 


EU and an Angry Iran 
Turn Up War of Words 

Standoff Over Terror Ruling Is Worsening 


By Tom Buerkle^ 

International Herald Tribune 




BRUSSELS — The European Union 
engaged in a new round of diplomatic 
retaliations with Iran cm Thursday, ur- 
ging its members not to send their en- 
voys bock to Tehran after the Xrariian 
government moved to block theretum of 
the German and Danish ambassadors. 

The worsening diplomatic standoff, 
backed up by harsh verbal exchanges 
between Tehran and some EU capitals, 
dealt a major blow to European attempts 
to contain the damage to relations 
caused by a German court ruling that 
Iran’s leaders were responsible for the 
1992 murder in Berlin of three exiled 
dissidents and their translator. 

The moves on both sides left Europe 
veering toward the sort of isolation that 
the United States has advocated for Iran, 
but which most European governments 
have rejected as had in principle and 
harmful to Europe’s economic interests. 

In the Netherlands, which holds the 
rotating EU presidency, officials said 
the government would discuss further 
retaliatory measures coming days, pos- 
sibly including economic sanctions, 
with the 14 other EU states. 


The German foreign minister, Klaus 
Kinkel, praised the demonstration of 
s up po rt fr om his EU partners. “We will 
not impose our ambassadors on 
Tehran," Mr. Kinkel said Thursday in 
Bucharest, where he was visiting. “We 
Germans won’t let ourselves he black- 
mailed or divided.” 

On Tuesday, EU foreign ministers 
agreed to suspend official ministerial 
visits to Iran and to keep on hold 
Europe's so-called critical dialogue 
with Tehran. But insisting on the need to 
maintain some channels of communi- 
cation with the Iranian government, the 
ministers also agreed to return ambas- 
sadors to Tehran; they were recalled 
immediately after the German court rul- 
ing on April 10. 


responded harshly. Foreign Min- 
ister All Akbar Velayafi said Wednes- 
day that his government would not wel- 
come the return of ambassadors from 
Germany and Denmark, two countries 
that had led the campaign for EU dip- 
lomatic sanctions. 

“If they never return to Iran, we will 
not be sad and may even be happier,” 
Mr. Velayafi said. “We have no need 

See IRAN, Page 6 



ihf rt li tf rhe to a diU ftai 

SLOW GOING ON NATO CHARTER — Madeleine Albright with 
an unidentified Russian official in Moscow, where she held three hours 
of talks with Yevgeni Primakov. Little progress was reported. Page 6. 


AGENDA 

Confusion Reigns 
For Zaire Meeting 

President Mobutu Sese Seko of 
Zaire and the rebel leader, Laurent 
Kabila, prepared Thursday for a face- 
to-face meeting, despite confusion 
over the timing of their talks. 

Marshal Mobutu's camp said the 
talks would focus on a peaceful tran- 
sition of power, with elections open to 
all, while Mr. Kabila insisted that the 
strongman must step aside. 

But Marshal Mobutu did not depart 
Thursday for the talks, as scheduled. 
No explanation was offered. Page 8. 

Palestinians Soften 
Stand on Peace Talks 

RAMALLAH, Israeli-Occupied 
West Bank (AP) — Yasser Arafat's 
spokesman said Thursday that peace 
talks could resume even u Israel does 
not freeze its housing in East Jeru- 
salem. The apparent softening of the 
Palestinian position was announced by 
Marwan Kanafani in RamaUah. 


PAGE TWO 

Bosnian Orphans Go to Uncertainty 


Mike Royko Dies at 64 


Mike Royko, 64, whose cantanker- 
ous' newspaper column seemed as 
a c much a part of Chicago as the wind, 

Seoul Seuses on American as a Spy died Tuesday ai a ho$taL Page 2. 


ASIA/PAC1F1C 


Page 4. 







. Pages 10-11. 


.Pams 22-23. 

■ 

International Classified 

Page 14* 

1 The IHT on-line http://' 

.‘.'ww. iht.com \ 


Abuse at 35,000 Feet: Airlines Take Aim at Rowdy Passengers 


By Edwin McDowell 

New York Times Service 


from 


an 

was 


NEW YORK — On a crowded flight fir 
Chicago to Las Vegas last year, Gail Scott, 
America West Airlines flight attendant, 
punched and pushed to the floor by a female 
passenger who became irate when told there were 
no extra sandwiches. , 

' While the passenger was sentenced to two years 

ibafion and 200 hours of community service, 
. Scott, an 11-year veteran of the once-friendly 


still carries psychological scars from the 
assault. 

“It’s gotten so you’re almost afraid to ask. 
passengers to raise their seat backs, or not smoke in 
the lavatories, for fear of what might happen,” Ms. 
Scott said. 

What mig ht happen, increasingly, does happen. 
Airlines report a surge of disruptive behavior in 
recent months by passengers herded into cramped 
seats, lubricated with too many drinks and denied 
the freedom to smoke. They corse or spit on 
flight attendants, fling food trays and sometimes 


strike them. On occasion, they even attack pilots. 

While such violence is far more dangerous in die 
air because ef the potential for causing crashes, it is 
even more common on the ground as travelers 
explode in rage over delayed flights or missing 
luggage. A passenger who missed a connection at 
O'Hare International Airport in Chicago two years 
ago hurled a suitcase at Karen Brennan, a customer 
service director for United Airlines — who was 
right months pregnant. 

“He missed,” said John Brennan, her husband. 
“So the only thing she could do, and did do, was 


bar him from flying on United from O'Hare.” Mr. 
Brennan, also a United customer service director, 
has also been cursed and threatened, and more than 
once has been grabbed by late-arriving passengers 
demanding that he “do something” to bring a 
departing airplane back to die gate. 

So senous has the problem become that the Air 
Line Pilots Association organized a meeting Wed- 
nesday in Washington — the international Con- 
ference on Disruptive Airline Passengers — to 

See SKIES, Page 8 


More Evidence of Healthy U.S. Growth 

Spending by Consumers Increased in March 


The Dollar 


NtmYotk Tfawday O 4 PM pmtomdm 


DM 


1.7225 


1.7305 


4 WASHINGTON — The government 
said Thursday that U.S. consumers 

earned and spent more in March toanrn 

February, more evidence of 


the same time, spending totaled $537 
trillion, up 03 percent from S5.35 tril- 
lion a month earlier. 

Consumer spending makes up about 
two-thirds of U.S. economic activity. A 
surge in spending helped propel, foe 


folio* up its 

fastest pace in nme years m “Consumers have jobs, incomes and 


confidence,” Everett Ehrlich, the un- 
dersecretary of commerce, said. 

The strong data are likely to cause 
policymakers at the Federal Reserve 
Board to grow concerned about infla- 
tionary pressures. Indeed, in announ- 
cing foeir decision to raise the overnight 
bank lending rate by a quarter-point, to 
530 percent, oo March 25, central 
bankers released a s ta te me n t citing 

See GROW, Page 16 


Pound 


1.8227' 


1.6242 


Yen 


126.55 


127.115 


5.8071 


The Dow 


5£346 


TtauradtydBH piWtautdOM 


■3251 


6976.48 


S&P 500 


7008JK) 


change Thuadey ® A PJW. pnwloue dooa 


-331 


798.03 


B01.34 


U.S, Nearing Accord 
On Balanced Budget 

White House and Republican nego- 
tiators were apparently on foe verge of 
agreement Thursday cm a plan to balance 
foe federal budget by 2002. a goal the 
two rides have wrangled over for years. 

Some Republicans expressed confi- 
dence that a deal was about to be sealed. 
But the White House spokesman, Mi- 
chael McCimy, said that while Pres- 
ideol Bill Clinton was encouraged, there 
was no deal yet He said that talks could 
extend into Friday. Page 3. 


^^fewnmerce Department said U.S. 
incomes totaled $ 6.75 trillion at a sear 
sonafly adjusted annual rate, up u.t> per^ 
cent fom $6.71 triton in February. Ai 

Newsstand PfrjcgT 


Clinton Gets 
Chinese Vow 
On Colony 

But a Wary Congress 
Puts Beijing on Notice 

By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President BUI 
Clinton has pronounced himself “quite 
satisfied" with the assurances on the 
future of Hong Kong he received from 
the Chinese foreign minister, Qian 
Qichen, but said he was waiting to see if 
Beijing's words matched its actions. 

The speaker of the House, Newt Gin- 
grich, warned this week that China’s 
favorable trading status depended upon 
how Beijing handled foe British 
colony’s transition to Chinese rule. 

Clinton administration officials have 
repeatedly said that they regard the way 
China manages its reassertion of sov- 


China’s U.S. trade privflfeges are 
more crucial than ever. Page 19. 

ereignty over Hong Kong on July 1 as an 
“important benchmark” for the larger 
U.S.-China relationship. 

But for a widening coalition in Con- 
gress, the transition is seen as a litmus 
test for the entire relationship with 
Beijing and a way to bold Mr. Clinton's 
feet to the fire. 

Mr. Gingrich said in a speech Wed- 
nesday that if Beijing did not live up to 
its commitments to preserve democ- 
racy, human rights and a market econ- 
omy in Hong Kong, “there would be 
serious long-term damage to our re- 
lations'’ and to China's relations with 
the rest of the world. 

On the other band, he said, “if 
Beijing handles the transition well, it 
will substantially brighten its future re- 
lations with the United States.” 

Mr. Gingrich said that he supported 
legislation to renew China's most- 
favored-nation trading status for only 
three to six months. That would allow 
Congress to monitor the transition in 
Hong Kong and debate renewal ag ain fa 
September or December. 

under current legislation, the 

ident must certify annually that 

deserves to retain its low-tariff trading 
status with the United States. Congress 
then has 60 days to pass a law over- 
turning his certification and then to 
override his veto, should that be nec- 
essary. If all goes well with Hong Kong, 
administration officials do not believe 
Mr. Clinton will need to veto this year. 

Mr. Qian spent three days in Wash- 
ington meeting administration officials 

See CHINA, Page 8 


Biotechnology’s Hope: Palatable Replacements for Chemotherapy 


Andorra. 


,....1000 FF Lebanon LLOOM 

.-1050 FF Mb«bo---— 1BOJ! 

Cameroon ..1.600 CFA Qatar lODORab 

Egypt EE&50 Motion 


By Lawrence M. Fisher 

New York Tima Service 


1250 FF; 


... 1250 Din 

_iaooDWi 


Kay Coast. 1250 CFA 



mune system. Next year, a therapeutic vaccine for 
malignant melanoma that is as effective as chemo- 
therapy but has none of its side effects could reach 
foe market, as could effective drugs for metastatic 
breast cancer and inoperable brain cancers. 


lives — ■ or at least make treatment more bearable A study of Norwegian women hints that ex- 

— -•*“ "* rvtir^nv 5md ^rcise protects against breast cancer. Page 2. 

If the biotechnology companies are as success- 
fid as they expect to be, the end of the decade 
should see many more new therapies for cancers of 
foe breast, prostate, lung, colon, liver, ovtuy, pan- 
creas and kidney, among others. 


Perhaps foe biggest gain in the new therapies is naturally occurring proteins or genetic material 
that, u n l i ke chemotherapy drugs, their side effects And where chemotherapies kill a broad ranee nf 

ana fani onrl rviiM Rmiid. ku.11 *«( mmiJIi, - ■ o • 


NEW YORK — ’Hie biotechnology industry is 

10.00 FF Saudi AraWa...10.00R , ^ w a host of cancer drugs in foe next 

GdSSl 1100 CFA - wo to foree years. Some of them promise tom^d 

ZBMUn Sprin ?5PTAS jjves — or i feast make treatment niwebean^ 

them foe current practices of chemotherapy and 

ia 15tefoan 30 such drugs are m thcfma 1 ptasetf 
clinical trials required for U-SJF°°d and Drug 
Administration approval, more dan ever before. 

A Byfoewd of foe year, oncologists “wldhavem 
their arsenals a new nontoxic drug for the ttramaat 
^faoti -Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a cancer of foe im- 



be taken for many years. 

As with new drugs called protease inhibitors that 
suppress foe virus that causes acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome, people are not so much 
talking about a cure — though some cancers may 
be curable — ■_ as about lengthening lives. People 
will still (fie with cancer, buttbey will die less often 
of cancer. 

Unlike chemotherapies, which are chemically 
based, these new drugs are biological, based on 


Biotecbnoli 
reaping the 


. executives say they are 
ts of agreater understanding of foe 


V , , . , r— iWTUIK 

m the production of novel therapeutic agents and a 
liberalization of regulatory policy ai foe Food and 
Drag Administration that eases the path to approval 
of new drugs for life-threatening diseases. 

This fast-track approval process has been a 

See DRUGS, Page 8 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Back to Sarajevo / Past Is Prologue 


Bosnian Orphans Return 
To Very Uncertain Future 


•' • * ... s 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 


S ARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
Drag an a Seferovic tells her story in the 
soit of jumbled haste that 7-year-oids 
are prone to, full of disjointed images 
and leaps in time. “My mother was shot,' ' she 
said. 

'‘She was all red. So I had only a daddy." 
In other words, at the moment she found 
herself abandoned, her father could run fast, 
but her mother could not. So her mother was 
shot in what she called Sarajevo's “little war” 
and now she has only a father, whom she does 
not know. 

But she was 2 or younger at the time, so no 
one can be sure what parts of this story are true. 
It may, in fact, be only a version of reality 
designed to make sense of a short life that has 
been incomprehensible so far and will prob- 
ably remain so. 

Dragana was one of a group of orphanage 
children bundled out of Sarajevo under sniper 
fire that killed two of the children in August 
1992, to take refuge in Germany. 

Just over three weeks ago, under pressure 
from the Bosnian authorities, she was one of 30 
children five years or older who reversed that 
journey, returning to a land so ruined that, in 
some parts of this town, shell-struck homes 
stand like rows of bkck teeth in bad gums. 

Now they are back at the Bjelave orphanage, 
from which they were rescued, but there are 
doubts, even here, that this latest wrenching 
change in their lives will help than. 

When the children left Sarajevo, some Bos- 
nian officials protested that removing them to a 
foreign land, however safe, was wrong — 
depriving the land of its children, and the 
children of their connection to the land. Now. 
some people who are looking after them whis- 
per that they were better off in Germany. 

So their plight seems, like so many things 
here, to be another untidy loose end of a drama 
that many outside Bosnia prefer to forget 
At the orphanage one day recently, in an 
unfurnished reception area, five children met 
with the mothers who left them in the orphan- 
age before the war. The hugs were close, tight 
as koalas, but some of the mothers had been 
judged mentally unfit by social workers, so 
there was no guarantee that they would be 


permanently reunited with offspring they once 
abandoned. 

“In Germany they had a real home,” said a 
West European volunteer worker with close 
knowledge of how the children are looked 
after. 

“This is an institution. There is no in- 
struction. They have no personal possessions. 
There’s no routine. Their lives here are a 
negation of everything childhood should 
be." 

Like others fearful of offending the orphan- 
age's prickly management, the volunteer 
agreed to speak in return for anonymity. 

During the war, rescues of children by West- 
ern countries made spectacular, feel-good 
headlines, as infants were spirited to safety in 
Italy, Germany. Switzerland and elsewhere. 
Their homecomings, though, are filled with 
much grittier imponderables: Will they have 
schooling, beds, toys like they are used to? 
Will they have a life? 


P ART of the dispute about the kind of 
life the children can expect here steins 
from Bosnia's poverty and distress 
after a war that left it ethnically di- 
vided, its population depleted by hundreds of 
thousands of refugees, its reconstruction hos- 
tage to a shattered economy. 

“To be realistic," said Ermin Terko, a so- 
cial worker charged with the emotional wel- 
fare of die children here, “this orphanage 
needs a lot of money to keep going." That 
translates into, among other dungs, a shortage 
of trained staff. 

But part of it, too, lies in what Rune Stuv- 
land, an official of Unice f, the United Nations’ 
children's agency, termed “different stan- 
dards than in Western Europe or the United 
States" concerning the care of children. 
“Among institutions in Bosnia-Heizegovi- 
na." he said of the Bjelave orphanage, “this is 
not the worst place for a child to be." 

The saga of Dragana Seferovic and the 
others here began in August 1992. when a 
rescue plan by German politicians from the 
East German state of Saxony-Anhalt imme- 
diately and tragically ran into trouble. Two of 
the children were killed in sniper fire and nine 
were abducted by Bosnian Serbs as their bus 
was driven through an area under Bosnian Serb 
control. 



After five years in 
Germany, 30 children 
have returned to a 
Sarajevo- orphanage. 

-• Among institutions in 
Bosnia-ffenegovina, this 
is not the worst place 
for a child to be 



.Gil 100 ' 


Pi-turn L-rnur, V'-nr*- Ftudll IV m 


The evacuation was criticized in Germany 


as grandstanding by the politicians who had 
UN officials said it was 


arranged it Here, 

“criminal negligence" to take the children 
unescorted in an unmarked bus through Sa- 
rajevo's notorious “Sniper Alley” at exactly 
die time file Bosnian Serb snipers usually 
started opening fire. 

By the time the rest arrived in Germany, said 
Rosemarie Franke. directorof one of three East 
German orphanages where the children were 
finally housed, they were “rotally exhausted 
and very disturbed." 

Then, though, began a stay of more than four 
years where they lived in small groups, ac- 
companied by three women from the former 
Yugoslavia who spoke their language and 
looked out for them. 

From 1994 onward, Bosnian authorities 
started requesting the children's return. Ger- 
man officials argued that facilities at the Bos- 
nian orphanage were inadequate. The previous 
building has now been replaced by a modem 
building built with British aid. but in October 
German officials secured another delay, say- 
ing that the children should not have to endure 
a Balkan winter right after their return. Earlier 
this year, though, they agreed to let the children 
go- 

“When they first learned they were to re- 


turn. they thought Sarajevo was still at war and 
they were frightened," said a health worker 
close to one group of children. The worker 
requested anonymity. “In the end. they were 
just told they were going on holiday. 

“Now they are told: You are too small to go 
back," the worker said. “You don't have a 
passport or a job: but when you're older, you'll 
be able to choose. But most of them will never 
leave this orphanage.” 


M RS. FRANKE, in Germany, said, 
“When they realize they are stay- 
ing forever, there'll be some 
tears.” 

That is not the only disappointment waiting 
to ambush them. 

Throughout their stay in Germany, said Mr. 
Terko. the social worker, the children were 
told they had at least one parent. Few of those 
parents have come to claim their offspring, 
who were abandoned not because of Bosnia's 
war but because of broken marriages, teenage 
pregnancy or other family problems. 

The children now live differently from the 
way they did in Germany, according to people 
who look after them. They sleep in dormitory 
bunk-beds, not individual beds in their own 
bedrooms. They are housed in an institution of 
107 inmates aged from infancy to 18. notin the 


s m all er places in Germany that eo 
by the name , ‘KmdeIfleim , ’ — 
childrens home. Those who stud- 
ied w Germany mj longer go to 
schoo l. In the past, they were in 
small groups, but now just one adult 

looks after 23 of them for 12 hours a 

day. 

. ^Tbere s just no time anymore 
just to cuddle than,’’ said a woman 
familiar with their lives in Germany 
and Bosnia. 

The children’s return has raised 
other issues, too, notably whether 
children should be removed from 
war zones. At the Unicef office 
here, Mr. Stuvland said his orga- 
nization believes that, unl es s their 
lives are directiy threatened, chil- 
dren should stay put “The di- 
lemma is: What are you going to do 
with them when things get better? ’ * 
he said. 

Azem Mujan, a Bosnian government of- 
ficial dealing with refugees, said: “We were 
cheated into believing this was for the best 
when it wasn’t These children have permanent 
holes in their identity. They never know who 
they are or where they come from." 

Other Bosnian officials said the children 
should never have, been evacuated. “These 
children belong to Bosnia," said Amir Seric, 
the director of the Bjelave orphanage, which 
was hit eight time s by mortar fire during the 
war. * ‘This is the best place for them." 

Mr. Stuvland said there were now some 
3,000 children living without parents in foster 
homes or orphanages in Bosnia. Mr. Mujan 
said another 3,000 Bosnian orphans lived in 
Croatia and Serbia. 

Indeed, the children's return from Germany 
is perceived by officials here as the proper 
thing. 

“The fact is that these children had another 
homeland. But the real feeling of identity is 
this country, 1 ’ said Mr. Terko, the social work- 
er. “They can only feel they really belong in 
this country.” 

As she told her story, by contrast, Dragana 
spoke several times of “going home." A re- 
porter asked her where home was. “The 
Heim, ’ ’ she said, meaning the children's home 
in Germany. 







,~r. _r. ■ l — ... • 

• rr* * ■ 


kj. r a*-**. • 1 









Mike Royko, 64, Chicago Columnist, Is Dead 


By Don Terry 

New York Times Service 


was fair “He was an equal 


CHICAGO — Mike Royko, 64, 
the increasingly cantankerous voice 
for this city’s little guys and work- 
ing stiff's, whose newspaper column 
seemed as much a part of Chicago as 
the wind, died Tuesday at North- 
western Memorial Hospital. 

Mr. Royko collapsed in his home 
in suburban Winnetka on April 22 
and underwent surgery last week for 
an aneurysm, a weakening or rup- 
turing of a blood vessel. 

For nearly 30 years, every young 
journalist who ever set foot in a 
Chicago newsroom wanted to be 
like Mr. Royko. He had a tough skin 
and a generous heart as a columnist, 
and he won almost as many awards 
— including a Pulitzer Prize for 
commentary in 1972 — as a Chica- 
go election has dead voters. 

One morning, he might be blast- 
ing a bumbling politician, the next 
“die rich, smoke-belching indus- 
trial fat cats” who he said were 
threatening to turn Chicago's lake 
front into a wasteland with pollu- 
tion, overdevelopment and greed. 

In his column of Sept. 23, 1981, 
Mr. Royko sought to explain Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan's policies of 
"hacking away" at federal pro- 
grams for the poor “while spending 
more and more on the military." 

“Contrary to popular belief," 
Mr. Royko wrote, “it's much wiser 
to take money from the poor than the 
rich. Reagan's approach will 
achieve one of the basic goals of the 
conservative: Things remain basic- 
ally the same. The rich stay rich and 
the poor stay poor, or even a little 
poorer." 

He took on such people and sub- 
jects five days a week, decade after 
decade for paper after paper. When 
he reluctantly cut back to writing 
four columns a week in 1992 . he saw 
it as a sign of weakness. 

“He always doubted himself, but 
that’s what drove him," said James 
Warren, a friend and colleague at 
The Chicago Tribune, where Mr. 
Royko wrote his column, syndic- 
ated in about 800 papers across the 
nation, since 1984. 

Mr. Royko loved politicians; they 


equal oppor- 
lity shot taker,” said the Rev- 
?nd Jesse Jackson. Mr. Royko 

Jet- 


erer 

dubbed Mr. Jackson “Jesse 
stream” because he thought he 
moved from crisis to crisis too 
quickly. 

Mr. Jackson recalled one column, 
written in 1972 when he was cam- 
paigning on the West Coast on be- 
half of Senator George McGovern's 
bid for the White House. He was 
preaching that every vote counted. 
But on election eve. rather than take 
a red-eye flight back to Chicago and 
cast his ballot, Mr. Jackson decided 
to stay out West 

“It was contradictory to what I 


had been saying," Mr. Jackson re- 
called, with a chuckle. “Somehow 
Royko found out about it, and opened 
up with both barrels. I didn't like it, 
but I haven’t missed a vote since.’* 
A recurring character in Royko's 
columns was an alter ego named 
Slats Grobnik. Slats took the work- 
ing-class perspective in conversa- 
tion with the columnist about the 
issue at hand, from how to age 
gracefully to sending volunteer 
troops to foreign hot spots (said 
Slats: “See, what made the draft so 
wonderful was that when it was run 
on the legit — until the Vietnam 
War — ir gave everybody the same 
opportunity. To get killed."). 


But Mr. Royko didn’t write for 
decades without being criticized. He 
offended many Hispanic people 
when he satirized the anri-krumgra- 
tion views of Pat Buchanan during 
the commentator's run for presi- 
dent. That prompted an anti-Mike 
Royko rally. 


And he upset many gay men and 
dice omcei 


lesbians and police officers a few 
years ago when he was arrested for 
drunken driving and insulted the of- 
ficer. using a derogatory term for 
homosexuals. 

Critics of Mr. Royko said the two 
incidents were proof of what they 
said was his increasingly conser- 
vative views. 



Exercise Might Lower 
Risk of Breast Cancer 



By Gina Kolata 

New York Times Service 


who enter menopause, eariy. 
Exercise, researchers have 
found, reduces foe amount of 




NEW YORK — A study of estrogen pumped out by a 
more than 25,000 Norwegian woman’s ovaries. 


The Ainviard Pro' 

Mike Royko, an “equal oppor- 
tunity shot taker" iu columns. 


Lord Taylor of Gosforth, Critic of Justice System, Dies 


By Eric Pace 

New York Times Sen-ice 


Lord Taylor of Gosforth, 66. a 
former Lord Chief Justice of Eng- 
land who was a critic of the British 
criminal-justice system, died Mon- 
day of cancer at lus home in Guild- 
ford, England. 

As Lord Chief Justice from 1992 
until he retired in 1996 in ill health. 
Lord Taylor presided over the Court 
of Appeal. Britain's second-highest 
court, after the House of Lords. He 
was originally Peter Murray Taylor, 
was knighted in 1980 and was made 
a life peer — a baron — in 1992. 

His paternal grandfather was a 
tailor named Teiger who was given 
the surname Taylor, the family story 
goes, by a British immigration of- 
ficer when he arrived from Vilnius. 


Lithuania. Lord Taylor was bom in 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, in northern 
England, to Herman Louis Taylor, a 
doctor, and the former Raie Helena 
Shockett. He grew up in Newcastle, 
studied at Cambridge, was called to 
the bar in 1954 and became a prom- 
inent prosecutor. 

He became a Court of Appeal 
judge in 1988 and wrote an influential 
report about the deaths of 95 Liv- 
erpool soccer fans after grandstands 
collapsed during a game in 1 9S9. The 
report urged safety measures that 
then were widely implemented. 

He used his seat in the House of 
Lords to criticize the criminal- 
justice system and the Conservative 
government's efforts to make major 
revisions in criminal law. 

In 1996. he said: “In the last three 
years, almost everything has been 


changed or thrown overboard in the 
criminal justice system. When you 
are going to legislate, you should do 
it less hectically.” 

His wife, the former Irene Harris, 
died in 1995. His survivors include a 
son and three daughters. 

Elliott Merrick, 91, Writer 
Of Books About Vermont 

styir York Times Sen-ice 

Ellion Merrick. 91, a writer, ed- 
itor. teacher, farmer and sailor who 
distilled his experiences into books 
about Labrador and northern Ver- 
mont. died April 22 at his home in 
Asheville. North Carolina. 

His “Northern Nurse” (1942) 
was on national best-seller lists for 
months. His last novel. “Green 
Mountain Farm” (1948). a tale of 
farm life in northern Vermont, is 


still in print, as are "The Long 
Crossing and Other Labrador Sto- 
ries" and his first book. “True 
North" ( 1933), a diary about living 
in Goose Bay, Labrador. He also 
wrore for magazines, including The 
New Yorker and Reader’s Digest. 


Peter Tali Coleman, 77, a native 
of American Samoa who was its first 
popularly elected governor, from 
1978 to 1985. died Monday of liver 
cancer in Honolulu. He was a long- 
time resident of Pago Pago, the cap- 
ital of American Samoa. He is sur- 
vived bv his wife and 1 2 children. 


Ann Petry. 88. who rook a pan of 
Harlem and brought it disturbingly 
to life in her 1946 novel. “Ilie 
Street," died Monday at a convales- 
cent center near her home in Old 
Say brook. Connecticut. 


women suggests that regular 
exercise protects against 
breast cancer. 

Compared with sedentary 
women, those who exercised 
at least four hours a week had 
a 37 percent lower risk of 
developing the disease, and 
the more women exercised, 
the less likely they were to get 
breast cancer, the investiga- 
tors found. 

The study followed more 
than a dozen smaller studies 
that found a similar effect, 
none of which, taken alone, 
was conclusive. So, with the 
weight of other evidence 
pointing in the same direc- 
tion. several leading research- 
ers said they would advise 
women to exercise even 
though die larest study was 
not definitive. 

Although it is nor known 
why exercise might affect the 
likelihood thar a woman will 
develop breast cancer, one 
leading hypothesis is that it 
reduces a woman's exposure 
to estrogen. The idea is that 
the more estrogen a woman is 
exposed to, the greater her risk 
for breast cancer. That may be 
why. for example, women 
who begin menstruating late 
ore at a lower risk, as are those 


The study, which was pub- 
lished Thursday in The New 
England Journal of Medicine, 
comes at a time when women 
have become increasingly fa- 
talistic about breast cancer. 
With the discovery of genetic 
mutations in a small minority 
of women that confer as much 
as a 90 percent risk of de- 
veloping the disease, many 
women have decided that 
there is little that they can do: 
either they are destined to get 
breast cancer or they are not. 

And researchers, searching 
for environmental or behavi- 
oral factors dial may influence 
a woman's risk, have looked 
earlier and earlier in life, with 
some now saying that what 
matters is the hormonal en- 
vironment before birth. 

The exercise finding indi- 
cates that there is at least one 
thing women can do as adults 
that may substantially reduce 
their chance of developing 
breast cancer. _ 

“It's provocative, said 
Dr. Regina Ziegler, an epi- 
demiologist at the National 
Cancer Institute. “The excit- 
ing thing is that we're talking 
about a risk factor for breast 
cancer that can be modified 
during adult life." 


jStoSNiat-U 

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TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 




Paris Rebuffs RA Move 


PARIS (AP) — British Airways pro- 
tested Thursday the refusal by french au- 
thorities to allow it to move its’ flights from 
Charles de Gaulle Airport to another Paris 
airport because of security concerns about 
Air Algerie. 

BA, whose check-in counters abut those 
of Air Algerie, said it was “very dis- 


there after a two-year suspension. BA is 
demanding tighter security for the Algeri- 
an airline, which is considered prone to 
terrorism from Islamic guerrilla groups in 
Algeria. 


A Skyscraper Museum 

NEW YORK (NYT) — New York 

made Vudi easy and one appointed by the decision" Wednesday Jj™!* Si! 

helpedmakehtar.ationaUytoous: nidlt about 60 ^ ThSy lt is stored ml 
Mayor Richard Daley was the sub- daily flights to Orly Airport on Thursday . • s kv scraper in the middle of a district 
ject of Mr. Royko’s best-selling British Airways has allowed only cany- scraper in tne miomeoi a msmct. 

book “Boss," published in 1971. on baggage on flights out of Charles de 
Even some of his targets say he Gaulle since Air Algerie resumed flights 



EUROPE 


Exquisite style, witty provoca- 
tion, right on the inside track 
of European government. 


If you missed his reporting in the 
John Vinocur IHT, look for ft on our site on the 
Senior Correspondent World Wide Web. 


http://www.iht.com 


Wall Street, whose manmade canyons 
were once considered an architectural 
wonder of the world. 

The inaugural show. "Downtown New 
York: The Architecture of Business, the 
Business of Building." features 100 ob- 
jects. including rental brochures and ad- 
vertisements from the 1920s and '30s. 

Among the objecTs is a plasiic-and- 
wood model of the World Trade Center 
that survived the bombing in 1993 intact, 
even though ir was located just 100 feet (30 
meters) from ground zero. 


Radar scopes monitoring air traffic 
failed briefly at Washington National Air- 
port for the second time in six days. A 
Federal Aviation Administration spokes- 
woman said the problem created no safety- 
related incidents or delays. iAP) 


Europe 



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Snow 


North America Europe Asia 

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’AGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 





Budget-Balancing Accord at Hanct 

Tax Cut to Be Offset by Slowing Growth in Medicare Spending \ W ■ £ 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHnjGTON — White House 

S Juoncan negotiators were ap- 
on the verge of agreement 
y on a plan to balance the fed- 
eral budget by 2002, a goal the two sides 
have wrangled over for years. 

Some Republicans expressed confi- 
dence that a deal was about to be sealed. 

But the White House spokesman, Mi- 
chael McCuny, said that while Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton was encouraged, there 

was no deal yet He said that talks could 

extend into Friday. 

Reports emerging Thursday pointed 

^SPsPS!^® 1058 *** 0111 °f *135 billion 
to 15150 billion over five years. 

That would be paid for in part by 
slowing growth .in spending on Medi- 
care, the big and politically sensitive 
program for the elderly, to save $115 
biHion. 

There would apparently be a modest 
cut in cost-of-living increases for Social 
Security recipients. 

The deal, as it was taking shape, 
would allow Mr. Clinton to preserve or 
restore some domestic programs he has 
championed. He sought $43 billion in 
additional spending to build schools and 
improve education, expand health care 
for poor children, and restore welfare 
benefits for legal immigrants. 


But the size of tax cuts and the failure 
to cut defense spending more angered 
many liberal Democrats and appeared to 
threaten a split in the party. 

Tax cuts would, of course, be greeted 
with relief by many voters. The proposal 
reportedly would provide tax credits for 
families with children and credits and 
deductions for college students. 

It also would reduce taxes on capital 
gains, a change long sought by Re- 
publicans. Estate taxes would also be 
lowered. 

But changes in Medicare and Social 
Security could face opposition from the 
powerful lobbies representing the na- 
tion's elderly. 

A budget standoff between Mr. Din- 
ton and congressional Republicans dur- 
ing the president’s first term led to gov- 
ernment shutdowns that most voters 
attributed to the Republicans and par- 
ticularly the House speaker. Newt Gin- 
grich, according to opinion polls. 

Passage of this budget would be the 
most striking accomplishment of what 
has been a do-little Congress. 

But it was not clear Thursday that the 
plan's backers could marshal the sup- 
port they would need in Congress for 
passage. 

There was immediate criticism, some 
of it withering, from some members of 
both parties. 

“This isn't the way to legislate," said 


the Democrats' Senate leader, Tom 
Daschle of South Dakota, a liberal. 
“This isn’t the way to make derisions, 
not only for the next year but for the next 
five yearn." He added, "I think it's just 
atrocious.’ 

Senator Phil Gramm, a conservative 
Republican and erstwhile presidential 
candidate, was equally blunt. 

He said that while * 'the president gets 
what he wants — mesne government, and 
a lot of it," and Republicans get “a 
claim of a short-terin tax cut," the 
American people were being cheated. 

“In the end," Mr. Gramm said, “the 
American people will not get a balanced 
budget." 

A 1990 deficit-reduction accord be- 
tween President George Bush and 
Democratic leaders was scuttled in the 
House by conservative Republicans and 
liberal Democrats angered by its renns. 

Some Republicans in this Congress 
have said Mr. Qinton's administration 
was being given too much leeway for 
new domestic spending without ad- 
equate assurances of tax cuts. 

But some Democrats have criticized 
Mr. Clinton for giving up too much, 
cutting defense spending by too little 
and being too eager to reach a deal. 

Republican proposals, Democratic 
critics charged, would only briefly bal- 
ance the budget before causing the def- 
icit to balloon in the years after 2002. 





Rfla HriBnfThe Anodised Press 

ROADBLOCK — State police officers keeping a car from ap- 
proaching a secessionist group that is holed up near Fort Davis, Texas. 


Mexico Rebuilds Anti -Drug Force 


V'Ti.'W- 


«»i 


• By Sam Dillon 

[ New fort Times Service 

! MEXICO CITY — Mexico has dis- 
J mantled its main anti-drug force, which 
I was disgraced in February when its di- 
> rector and many of its agents were dis- 
j covered to be working for traffickers. 
» and announced that it had been replaced 
) by a new organization to be built from a 

• nucleus of trusted agents. 

\ The new agency will be headed by its 
. current chief, and the 1 ,100 officers who 
■ woiked for the old agency will be eli- 
' gible, alongside new people, to apply for 

• work in the reconstituted force. 

1 Bui all of these .applicants will be put 
through a battery of chug, polygraph and 
other tests to certify their trustworthi- 
ness before they are hired. Attorney. 
General Jorge Madrazo Cuellar said. 
Such screening of agents is new. 

The new agency, to be known as die 
Special Prosecutor’s. Office for Atten- 
tion to Drug Crimes, will occupy the 
same Mexico City h e a d q u arters as the 
organization^ wul replace, which was 
known as fee Institute for Combating 
I Drags. ’ 

The inauguration Wednesday of the 
Special Prosecutor’s Office appeared to 
have been timed, at least in.part, to give 


a sense of momentum in the war on 
drags five days before President Bill 
Clinton is scheduled to arrive for his first 
state visit 

The Special Prosecutor’s Office is 
part of a law enforcement shake-up that 
Mr. Madrazo has been carrying out, 
largely in secret, in recent weeks, in an 
effort to curtail the influence of traf- 
fickers and organized crime. 

Another new agency whose formal 
creation was announced Wednesday, the 7 
Organized Crime Unit, is to bring to- 
gether trusted investigators to combat 
not only drug smugglers but also money 
launderers and arms dealers. 

Despite security precautions, 
however, questions have been raised 
about the ability of the new units to be 
effective. Two police investigators as- 
signed to rate of the recently organized 
specialized anti-drug units were kid- 
napped last month and found dead Fri- 
day in tiie trunk of a car in Mexico City. 
Authorities said the two officers had 
been pursuing a drag trafficker, Amado 
jCamllo Fuentcs. 

The U.S. ambassador, James Jones, 
said Wednesday that in response to a 
plea from Mexico for investigative help, 
two agents from the FBI arrived in Mex- 
ico City on Sunday to examine evidence 


relating to the murder of the Mexican 
officers. Mr. Jones said a hypothesis was 
that the two officers had been murdered 
by traffickers. 

“They seem to have been honest cops 
who were doing their work and were 
found out and were killed," Mr. Jones 
said. 

The two officers join a long list of 
agents murdered in recent drug violence. 
About 200 Mexican officers were killed 
in foe year that ended Oct 1, U.S. of- 
ficials said. 

The creation of the new office appears 
to be the most ambitious law enforce- 
ment shake-up here since 1993, when 
die Institute for Combating Drugs was 
created. But how much more effective 
the new anti-drug organizations will be 
remains to be seen. 

When die government created the In- 
stitute for Combating Drugs in June 
1993 with technical help from American 
drug agents, Mexican and U.S. officials 
hailed it as a great advance over other 
law enforcement organizations that had 
been corrupted by traffickers. On Wed- 
nesday, Mr. Madrazo said the institute 
was being abolished partly because of 
“the well-documented corruption in 
which public servants from that orga- 
nization have fallen.” 


Herman Confirmed 
As Labor Secretary 

WASHINGTON — Alexis Her- 
man won easy approval in the Senate 
to be secretary of labor after a three- 
month confirmation battle that ended 
only when President Bill Clinton 
made a last-minute concession to Re- 
publicans. 

After all the controversy and delay 
surrounding Ms. Herman's nomina- 
tion, she was swept into office Wed- 
nesday by a bipartisan vote of 85 to 13. 
For the administration, however, her 
passage came at a cost: The White 
House bowed to Republican demands 
that Mr. Clinton drop plans to issue an 
executive order that was designed to 
encourage organized labor on federal 
construction contracts. 

Vice President A1 Gore had an- 
nounced the planned executive order 
in February, a move that was widely 
viewed in political circles as a bouquet 
to organized labor in exchange for its 
support in the 1996 election. 

Senator Don Nickles of Oklahoma 
had led a Republican charge against 
the plan, threatening to block a vote on 
Ms. Herman unless the president 
dropped it Democrats countered that 
they would bring Senate business to a 
standstill unless Republicans acted on 
tbe nomination. 

Senate and White House negoti- 
ators finessed an aid to the stalemate 
late Wednesday, in a deal that left both 
sides claiming victory. The White 
House said That instead of an exec- 
utive order, it would issue a “pres- 
idential memorandum" to federal 


POLITICAL NOT 


agencies that would have the same 
effect of encouraging union labor on 
large contracts. 

But a spokesman for Mr. Nickles 
said that the senator had forced the 
administration to back down, a view 
that was shared by the U.S. Chamber 
of Commerce and other groups that 
had been protesting the planned ex- 
ecutive order. (WP) 

Reno Firm on Probe 

WASHINGTON — Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno on Wednesday de- 
fended her refusal to seek an inde- 
pendent prosecutor to investigate 
campaign finance issues and said she 
would accept the consequences of her 
decision, telling her Republican crit- 
ics, “If I do what I think is right and I 
don’t have a job, too bad.” 

Republicans on the Senate Judi- 
ciary Committee accused her of mis- 
interpreting the independent-counsel 
law m a case that (hey said could be 
credibly investigated only by an out- 
side prosecutor. That, they said, was 
because the inquiry involved the 
White House, the Democratic Nation- 
al Committee and President Clinton's 
legal defense fund, which created se- 
rious conflicts of interest for the 
Justice Department. 

But Ms. Reno stuck by her decision. 
Two weeks ago, she enunciated her 
views in a letter to the committee's 
chairman, Orrin Hatch of Utah, saying 
that the Justice Department’s own in- 
vestigation had uncovered no evi- 
dence against senior Clinton admin- 
istration officials and no conflicts of 
interest for her department. 

“We do not have any specific and 


Away From 
Politics 

. A military jury found a former drill 
sergeant guilty of raping six female 
trainees, sending a signal that sexual 
encounters between superiors and 
subordinates in the military will not be 
tolerated. A jury of five men and one 
woman found Staff Sergeant Delmar 
Simpson guilty on 18 charges of 
rape. 

• Scientists tinkering with a newly 

discovered gene have created a strap- 
ping breed of mouse with muscles that 
are two to three times bigger than 
those of normal mice. The mighty 
mice may help researchers find treat- 
ments for muscular dystrophy, the sci- 
entists said, or for the gradual muscle 
was tine that accompanies cancer or 
AIDS. (WP ) 

• The parents of JonBenet Ramsey 

met separately with investigators to 
discuss their daughter’s death, four 
months after the 6-year-old gzri was 
killed. No arrest has been made in her 
death, and the authorities said last 
week that her parents were the focus 
of their investigation. (AP) 


credible evidence that any covered of- 
ficial violated the law," Ms. Reno said 
Wednesday, paraphrasing the language 
of tbe independent-counsel statute. “If 
yon have any such information forward 
it to us and we will review it" (NYT) 

FBI Brief on China 

WASHINGTON — After com- 
plaints from the White House, the di- 
rector of the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation, Louis Freeh, briefed 
President Clinton’s national security 
adviser on tbe status of a Justice De- 
partment inquiry into possible attempts 
by China to influence U-S. elections. 

Mr. Freeh and Attorney General 
Reno on Monday gave what admin- 
istration officials called a general 
overview of the issue to the national 
security adviser, Samuel Berger, and 
his deputy, James Steinberg. 

The previous week, according to 
sources, Mr. Berger called Ms. Reno 
to ask .why she ami Mr. Freeh had 
given a briefing to senior members of 
the Senate Select Committee on In- 
telligence but not offered a similar 
meeting to the White House. (WP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Senator Ted Stevens, Republican 
of Alaska and chairman of the Ap- 
propriations Committee, addressing 
Democrats as flood aid for North 
Dakota was tied up-by bickering over 
ah unrelated amendment to the $8.4 
billion emergency relief bill: * ‘If they 
will quit stomping their feet and pout- 
ing and threatening, then we'll sit 
down and work this out.” (NYT) 


Phone Industry Feels FBI Pressure on Wiretaps 


By Jim McGee 

• .• ; Washington Post Service 

I WASHINGTON — The 
FBI is pressuring phone 
1 com panie s in the United 
States to install equipment in 
-their new digital communi- 
i ' cations . systems that will 
® - “significantly expand" the 
‘ nature of electronic surveil- 

- lance, according to a joint fil- 
"ing by privacy advocates and 

the telecommunications in- 
dustry. 

That assertion was made 

- Wednesday in response to an 
9 FBI statement in March that a 
' proposed industry sta ndard 
u for ensuring the use of wire- 
taps on digital systems ‘ ‘does 
not jnr*iiing all the fimetion- 

: aKty required to satisfy evid- 
‘ “.entiary needs dictated by law 
and the courts." 

. - Tb/t two documents are the 
T latest volleys in an escalating 
'dispute between an industry 
that has historically been a 
, .valued partner of law enforce- 
ment, and the FBI, which 

views itself as an advocate for 

- all federal agencies and police 

departments- , _ 
Congress passed the Com- 
• mnmeations Assistance for 
Law Enforcement Act of 


1994 because the traditional 
methods of wireta p ping 
would not work, on the new 
digital phone systems. The 
law requires telecommunica- 
tions companies to ensure 
that their systems accommod- 
ate lawful wiretaps, but left it 
up to the industry to come up 
with a standard of surveil- 
lance capabilities. 

The FBI has contributed to 
tbe standards-setting process 
by offering its own recom- 
mendations. Wary of other 
technology programs that , 
have been mismanaged by the 
FBI, the appropriations com- 
mittees put a hold on $100 
milium in FBI funding for im- 
plementing the statute until 
the FBI more clearly ex- 
plained its intentions. Now, 
foe House and Senate will 
have to sort out the conflict- 
ing claims. 

in the meantime, foe im- 
plementation of tbe important 
wiretap statute has fallen be- , 
bind schedule. Industry offi- l 
fiiais said they know of no 
case in which the delay has , 
prevented the use of a court- 
authorized wiretap. 

But the passage of time has 
raised the financial stakes for 
ffie phone companies because 


they continue to install new 
switches foal do not have the 
new surveillance capabilities. 
Many of those will have to be 
replaced or upgraded once 
there is agreement on require- 
ments in foe industry surveil- 
lance standard. 

Thomas Wheeler, presi- 
dent of the Cellular Telecom- 
munications Industry Associ- 
ation, said foe industry has 
adopted foe majority of the 
FBrs suggestions, but has 


balked at FBI recommenda- 
tions font he said had become 
noonegotiable d e m a nd s. 

“The frustration that we 
have had is that the efforts to 
resolve these issues have 
been rebuffed," said Mr. 
Wheeler. 

Edward Allen, foe FBI’s 
section chief for electronic 
surveillance technology, said 
the agency had taken part in 
more than 300 meetings with 
the industry and had no rea- 


son to delay tbe process. 
“Stalling it is to the detriment 
of public safety and national 
security,” he said. 

Under the law, any party 
can appeal a provision of foe 
industty standard to the Fed- 
eral Communi carious Com- 
mission. Robert -Litt, foe 
deputy assistant attorney gen- 
eral of foe Justice Depart- 
ment’s Criminal Division, 
said it was appropriate for foe 
FBI to press its case. 


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Airport Authority 


EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST 
Vehicles and Equipment ; 

The Airport Authority Is responsible for constructing and operating Hong 
Kong's new airport at Chek Lap Kok. When the new airport opens in 1998 
it will cater for an estimated 35 million passenger movements In its first 
year of operation. 

The Authority Invites expressions of interest from companies interested in 
tendering for the supply of the following vehicles and equipment, and will 
consider only organisations with a proven track record 

Category Item Description 

1 1.1 Runway / Road sweeper 

1.2 Mobile workshop 

1 .3 Highway type bucket truck 

1 .4 Wrecker (Recovery Vehicle) 

1 .5 Portable light stand 

2 2.1 Goods vehicle 

3 3.1 Automobile (saloon car) 

3.2 Passenger mini bus 

3.3 Limousine 

4 4.1 Electric bucket lift / aerial platform 
4.2 Electric cart 

Interested parties are invited to express interest on or before Thursday, 
29 May 1997, specifying the category of vehicles or equipment, in writing 
or by fax to 

The Purchasing Controller 
Airport Authority 
25th Floor, Central Plaza, 

18 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, 

Hong Kong 

Attn. : Mrs Jaime Cheng 

Tel No. : (852) 2824 7677 
Fax No. : (852) 2598 1332 

Tender documents will be issued immediately upon receipt of the 
expression of interest. Tenders must be submitted in four (4) copies and 
placed in the Tender Box on the 25th Floor at the above address not 
later than 12:00 noon (Hong Kong time) on Thursday, 26 June 1997, 
Late tenders will not be accepted. The * * « m v m m 
Authqrity is. not bound to accept the lowest ^ 

or any tender and reserves the right to ^ 1 — 

accept all or any part of any tender. 




i Y=„v» 

. - "* ■ i i •. . 




PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 




ASWFACIFIC 


Papua New Guinea’s Sun- Soaked Terrorizers 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 


PORT MORESBY, Papua New 
Guinea — Lonbun is a rascal. He has 
been one for most of his life, and now, at 
the age of 27, he says be will probably 
always be one. 

Hus sun-drenched tropical city wit fa 
its views of the pure blue Coral Sea is 
filled with rascals. That is the local 
name forthe tough young criminals who 
have taken over the streets of the capital, 
terrorizing local and foreign residents. 

Over the last decade, an influx of 
unemployed people, a faltering econ- 
omy and the breakdown of many gov- 
ernment services have contributed to an 
epidemic of assaults, burglaries, car- 
jackings and gang rapes. 

People live in a state of alert, check- 
ing to see who is behind them on the 
street and fortifying their homes with 
guards, walls and razor wire. There is a 
curfew from 10 P.M. until dawn, shut- 
ting off nightlife in this city of just under 
300,000. 

“It feels like lightning striking all 
around,’ ' a Western diplomat said. And, 
although no reliable crime statistics 
have been tallied, another diplomat ad- 
vised, “The safest thing is to go inside 
and lode your door and stay there.” 

The alternative is to enjoy the coun- 


try's beauty and the warmth of i 
people and accept the risks, said John 
Renaud, an Australian who teaches 
mathematics at the University of Pdgnia' 
New Guinea. 

“I’ve been robbed a few rimes,’^ 
said. “I've had my head cut open. fife 
been stabbed once. I think rm faffty 
average. One takes precautions sod 
goes On with life.” 

A local newspaper columnist, Lucy 
Palmer, while chfcung visitors for their 
fears, admitted, “I would be lying if I 
said I was never frightened here, or that 
the tension of Uvtng in Port Moresby— 
ever alert to danger or attack — does, pot 
make life exhausting.’'’ * ■* • ■' * "MP 

These fears are caused by.peopfe: Jlkfe 
Lonbun, a leader of the “13 Casmjo” . 
gang that includes 100 or more young 
men livingin the Hohola area of the city , 
with its dirt paths and ramshackle 
houses. 

He described his violent life on con- 
dition that only his gang nickname be 
used. Lonbun — literally “long bone" 
— means “Slim" in the common lan- 
guage here of Pidgin. !, 

Lonbun is inAwf lanky and slender, 
with a wisp of beard and an easy smile 
that reveals teeth and gums stainedjred 
from chewing betel nut, a mild stim- 
ulatiL His specialties are arined robbery 
and carjacking, and he considers tum- 



NYT 


self a! professional, avoiding the gra- 
tuitous violence that is so common 
among the younger members, who are 
known as “up-aud-comers." 

“Normally for most of us it’s a pro- 
fession, it’s a job,” he said. Violence is 
used only when people resist “Forthe 
young ones, it's just fun. It's like a 
game.” 

But Lonbun was an up-and-comer 
himself oneb. He was first arrested at 13, 
he said, for armed robbery and assault 


“I robbed a foreigner and chopped his 
right hand off,” he said. “If I want my 
demand to happen in a minute it should 
happen in a minute. It shouldn't take 
two minutes.” 

Lonbun spent two years in a juvenile 
detention house- for that crime, but be 
said all his arrests since then had been 
dismis sed for lack of evidence. He is 
careful not to commit crimes in his 
home settlement in Hohola, and with his 
wife and foree children he is accepted as 
a member of the community. 

Port Moresby was not always so dan- 

S i$, but a strain of violence does run 
gh traditionalsociety,wbere tribal 
conflicts have customarily been dealt 
with by aims and the violent “pay- 
back” is a cultural norm. 

By tradition, paybacks can be aimed 
at any member of a rival's clan, making 
apparently random violence common. 
A recent domestic killing in the South- 
ern Highlands town of Tari, for ex- 
ample, has set off a small war between 
two mountain tribes that has already 
claimed two victims. 

“People here are hunting each other 
as they would for a nimals, or as if they 
are animals themselves,'’ said the local 
police inspector, Frank Gamea. “They 
are just observing .each other and once 
they find their enemy they will kill 
him.” 



„ - Sedl ftfrWIk New Y«t Tone. 

Gangs of aimless young men such as th^gatlipM cm a street In Port 
Moresby, the Papuan capital, prey on bbtfiToreigners and local citizens. 


Perhaps the most horrific aspect of 
the violence here is the prevalence of 
mass rape. 

Women have traditionally held low 
states and have been traded as com- 
modities in Papua New Guinea, ami 
now they seem to have become an cutlet 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Mwhuigion Post Service 


Espionage Arrest in Seoul 
Baffles American Officials 

Executive ofU.S. Defense Contractor Is Held 

A Litton spokesman said Thursday 
that the company was not aware of any 
illegal activity by Mr. Ratcliffe, aretired 
mili tary officer who has wotked for 
Litton for 20 years. ! 

U.S. officials in Tokyo skid Mr. 
Ratcliffe had spent 18 years working for 
Litton is East Asia and was currently 
based in the Bangkok office of Litton 
Guidance and Controls Systems. Of- 
ficials from the South Korean military 
and the Agency for National Security 
Plannin g, foe domestic intelligence ser- 
vice, were questioning Mr. Ratelifie at 
an undisclosed location Thursday. . 

Some U.S. officials have said that 
military purchasing plans might not ne- 
cessarily be classified information in tbe 
United States. But that is what South 
Korea has charged Mr. Ratcliffe with 
obtaining, and be could face the death 
penalty if convicted of espionage. 

South Korean media reports said that 
security officials would question Mr. 
Ratcliffe on whether he handed over 
militaxy secrets to foe U.S. government. 
American officials denied that the tLS. 
government was involved in any es- 
pionage by Mr. Ratcliffe. 

South Korean media speculation that 
the United States might be spying on its 
close military ally in South Korea is not 
surprising. Many South Koreans felt 
deep anger and resentment last year 
when U.S. officials arrested a South 
Korean native,. Robert Kim, and 
charged him with spying far Seoul. 

Some in Seoul nave suggested foal 
Mr. Raicliffe’s arrest might be in re- 
taliation for foe arrest of Mr. Kim, a US. 
Navy computer specialist He was ac- 
cused of supplying tbe South Korean 
Embassy in Washington with classified 
documents and is awaiting triaL 
A spokesman for the South Korean 
Foreign Ministry denied any connection 
between die Kim and Ratelifie cases. 

A South Korean Air Force officer. 
Lieutenant Colonel Kim Taefc Joon, and 
five civilians were also arrested in con- 
nection with foe Ratcliffe case. Au- 
thorities said the air force officer passed 
secret documents to Kwak Jae Jin, 47, a 
Korean- American who runs a trading 
company that buys and sells airplane 
components. 


TOKYO — U.S. officials in Seoul 
said Thursday that they were puzzled by 
foe case of an American businessman 
arrested on espionage charges by South 
Korean security agents. 

Donald Ratcliffe. 62, an executive for 
a unit of the U.S. defense contractor 
Litton Industries Inc., was arrested 
Wednesday and charged with obtaining 
classified military documents related to 
South Korea’s plans to boy AWAGS 
airborne-surveillance technology. 

“There doesn’t seem to be any reason 
why he would be interested in that,” a 
U.S. official said. Tbe official said Litton 
had a “near monopoly” on sales of 
navigational-control and guidance sys- 
tems for South Korean nmrtaiy aircraft. 

“If they’re enjoying that kind of a 
good business climate in South Korea, 
you wouldn't think they would need 
classifieddocumenls,” foe official said, 
noting that AWACS “wouldn’t even be 
a major part of their business here.” 

The case is also unusual because 
Washington and Seoul are close mil- 
itary allies, sharing a wide range of 
military intelligence and equipment 
There are 37,000 U.S. troops stationed 
in South Korea as a deterrent to threats 
from Communist North Korea. 

Seoul’s plans to spend billions of 
dollars over foe next few years to beef 
up its aircraft, defense-missile systems 
and other military hardware are com- 
monly known. 

American military contractors stilt do 
a lucrative business in South Korea and 
stand to benefit from Seoul’s increased 
military spending. But U.S. defense con- 
tractois are facing increasing competition 
for South Korea's business from Euro- 
pean and Russian weapons suppliers. 

The U.S. defense secretary, William 
Cohen, criticized Seoul on a recent visit 
there, saying foe South Koreans should 
buy U.S. patriot missiles instead of a 
Russian-made anti-aircraft missile sys- 
tem it is also considering. That contract 
is. reportedly worth $1 billion, illus- 
trating the high-stakes competition that 
U.S. suppliers now find themselves in 
against makers from other nations. 


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Political Violence 
Flares in Indonesia 

JAKARTA — Fresh political vi- 
olence has flared in the town of 
Pdcalongan on Indonesia's main is- 
land of Java, where at least 18 persons 
were injured in fighting ahead of elec- 
tions May 29, residents said 
Thursday. 

They said that supporters of foe 
governing Golkar party and die 
Muslim-oriented United Develop- 
ment Party dashed in foe town on 
Wednesday and that troops had been 
called in to maintain order. 

■ ‘The town is tense today and many 
shops are closed because the owners 
are afraid of fresh violence,” a res- 
ident said. 

The police in Pdcalongan declined 
to comment The town has been foe 
site of clashes since March between 
s u pporters of foe two parties. 

Tensions have risen since die start 
last Sunday .of the campaign for foe 
elections, and there have bran clashes 
..between supporters of the two parties 
elsewhere in foe country. (Reuters) 

India Offers to End 
Rifts With Pakistan 

NEW DELHI — India is ready to 
resolve all outstanding disputes with 
Pakistan, Prime Minister Ewer Kumar 
Gujral said Thursday. 

“India is committed to resolving 
the outstanding issues between foe 
two countries through dialogue,'' he 
said. “But foe sovereignty of India 
and foe national 1 interests of India are 
nonnegotiable,” he continued in a 
television interview. 

“Among other issues, trade rela- 
tions will have, to improve. The pro- 
cess had already begun.” 

Earlier Thursday he said he would 
meet with Prune Minister Mian 
Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan in an at- 
tempt to advance reconciliation. The 
two are scheduled . to meet during a 
South Asian regional summit meeting 
in Maldives be ginning May 12/AFPJ 

Tokyo Reform. Plan 

TOKYO — An advisory panel to 
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto 
proposed Thursday to give him more 
power to cope with emergencies and to 
establish a post in charge of crisis 



SHOWING THE FLAG — Japanese workers marching in Tokyo to 
celebrate May Day. About 2 million gathered at nationwide rallies. 


management, officials said. The Ad- 
ministrative Reform Council set up by 
Mr. Hasfaimoto in November made the 
proposal in its interim report, showing 
ways to streamline bureaucracy and 
strengthen functions of tbe prime min- 
ister’s office. (AFP) 

Japan Holds Chinese 

TOKYO — The Japanese police 
arrested 71 Chinese nationals 
Thursday on suspicion that they il- 
legally entered foe country through 
foe southern island of Kyushu, of- 
ficials said. 

The Chinese were quoted as telling 
the police that they left northeastern 
China by boat late in April and arrived 


in Kumamoto Prefecture on foe island 
Wednesday night 

The police found a truck carrying 
the Chinese in the town of Itsuwa in 
tbe western part of Kumamoto on 
Thursday morning. 

They also arrested foe truck driver, 
who was identified as Kazuya 
Tareishi, a 29-year-old Japanese, on 
suspicion of supporting tbe illegal 
entry, officials said. 

. The National Police Agency said 
that 692 foreigners had been arrested 
for trying to enter Japan illegally in the 
first two months of this year, with 
Chinese accounting for 84 percent of 
the total. 

There were 679 arrests for all of 
1996. (AFP) 


for fo£ frustrations and anger of aimless 
young men: Wberi.a small bus was held u 
up on a rural road in early April, 10 ■fr 
-women ranging In age from 15 to 21 — 
all members of a church group — were 
dragged into tbe bushes and raped, local 
papers reported. 


S 




Respite 
Manila Protest 


The Associated Press 

MANILA — Chinese ships have re- 
mained near islands claimed by foe Phil- 
ippines in tiie South China Sea despite 
protests by Manila. Defense Secretary 
Renato de Villa said Thursday. 

On Wednesday, the Philippine gov- 
ernment summoned China's ambassa- 
dor and formally protested foe entry of 
the Chinese ships into waters near two Ir 
of foe Spratly Islands that are claimed * 

. by foe Philippines. 

The Chinese ambassador, Guang 
Dengming, told officials in .Manila that 
he was not aware of foe ships’ pres- 
ence. 

Foreign Secretary Domingo Siazon, 

, attending ameeting in Thailand, said foe 
presence of die Chinese ships, which he 
said were armed, was a “clear viola- 
tion’ 1 of an agreement that “there should 
not be a militarization of the area.'’ 

Manila and Beijing have overlapping 
claims to the Spratiys, which are po- 
tentially rich in oil and natural gas. Six 
countries — Brunei, China, Malaysia, 
foe Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam — . 
claim all or part of tbe islands. 

General de Villa said die latest aerial 
photos, taken Tuesday’ showed that 
three ships had deck guns and that one 
was capable of carrying a helicopter. 

He said that there were also several 
smaller vessels believed to be fishing 
boats. 

“The ship that had been reported 
earlier are still there, 1 ' he said. “If they 
were foe usual fishing boats only, we 
don't say anything any more. But if 
there are armed ships in tbe area, then 
we are concerned about foe matter." 

Tbe ships were first seen April 25 by 
Filipino troops on Kota Island, one of 
eight islands in the Spratlys claimed and 
occupied by the Philippines. 

General de Villa said a hut-like struc- 0 . 
ture also had been constructed on one of w 
the reefs, similar to those constructed by 
the Chinese on Mischief Reef, which is 
also claimed by Manila, in 1995. Thai 
incident led to a flare-up of tension 
between Manila and Beijing. 

General de Villa said Thursday that 
there were no plans to send more troops 
“as of today’ to Kota and foe seven 
other islands, but that the air force was 
conducting daily surveillance flights. 


Exile in Hong Kong 
Urges Others to Flee 


The Associated Press 

HONG KONG — The 
leading Chinese dissident in 
Hong Kong says foe others 
should leave because they 
risk being persecuted when 
China takes over the British 
colony July 1. 

The dissident, Han Dong- 
fang, said Thursday that polit- 
ical exfies from China might 
be arrested to intimidate de- 
mocracy campaigners in 
Hong Kong and dissidents in 
China. 

Mr. Han, 33. is a former 
railroad worker who set up an 
independent trade union in de- 
fiance of China's monopoly 
on organized labor. He was a 
high-profile figure at the 1989 
democracy demonstrations in 
Tiananmen Square. 


He spent 22 months in pris- 
on before being allowed to go 
to the United States for med- 
ical treatment Beijing would 
not let him return, and he 
settled in Hong Kong in 
1993. 

Mr. Han said he would stay 
in Hong Kong after tbe change 
of sovereignty because be was 
here legally. 

But others could be arres- 
ted under residency laws be- 
cause they entered Hong 
Kong illegally, he said. 

In February', Western gov- 
ernments were reported to 
have reached agreement to 
give asylum to an estimat- 
ed 45 dissidents living in 
Hong Kong. Many of them 
are believed to have left since 
then. 


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topping 

as Shakespearean 
locale 

40 Bad-mouth 

48 Fumes 

43 Bit of bad luck 

44 Gating 
4# Additional 

charge 

47 Lizard with 
efingy toe pads 

48 Arctic (ur 

■8 Site Tor a race 
«3 Snags 

■■ Make judgments 

■• Marie, e.g.: 

Abbr 



naan by h«sww l iMiM 

© New York Times/Edited by Will Sharia. 


>Phys„ but not 
Ptys. ed. 


Solution to Puzzle of April 30 


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nBsnn nnananaaa 
SBSEUDaaaanincnoitna 
S0E3 ciEna aaaa 

□□□□nag 
ananag aaaaa 
hoed staaaa agg 
□aaggasisnoangna 
□eq Hoasa aaaa 
gggaaa 

□Banana □□□□ 

aacag aasi 

□□□aaaggGiisaEiEisa 
gnciEiBgaQH □□□□a 
bbb BDEjaa gaaaa 


















PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


EUROPE 


■ 


Moscow Trumpets Ties to the East, but Its Heart Belongs to the West 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tunis Service 

MOSCOW — When President Boris 
Yeltsin wants to play the nationalist card 

United^ States* mostvexin^nvals and 
bitter adversaries. 

Id recent weeks. Moscow has osteo- 
tatiously turned toward the East, inviting 
officials from China, India and Iran. Mr. 
Yeltsin has posed for the cameras hug- 

aocf Russian officials have boasted of 
fashioning a “multipolar world" in 
which the United States would no longer 
be the dominant player. 

The Kremlin’s goal is, in part, to 
tweak the United Stales, which many in 
the Russian foreign policy establishment 
resent for promoting the expansion 


of NATO and winning the Cold War. 

But for all the symbolism, Russia's 
talk of a new strategic partnership wife 
the East is more theater than substance. 
Even when they are not playing host to 
the American secretary stare, 
Madeleine Albright, .who .was here 
Thursday, Russia looks mostly to the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

West and its financial institutions, such 
as tire International Monetary Fund and 
World Bank, for money, technology and 


was underscored this week 

AnatoliChubais, first deputy pr 

ister and a top reformer, flew io Wa^H 
ingtontoseektheIMFsbl«5Ssihg-^fod 
financing — for economic reforms. 

And despite its vocal opposition to 


NATO expansion, Moscow is still seek- 
ing an accommodation with the Western 
affiance. The focus of Mrs. Albright’s 
visit was a proposed NATO-Russian se- 
curity charter. 

Though substantial differences re- 
/jmin, Moscow’s calculation appears to 
*>6e that tire expansion of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization is inevitable 
and that tire charter should be concluded 
and used to play up Russia’s importance 
in world politics. 

It was Mr. Yeltsin, no t Western lead- 
ers. who urged that the charter be con- 
cluded and signed by Russian and 
NATO nations mi May 27 — well in 
^a&d.of tire July meeting of NATO 

loss toirvite Bast European nations 

foat Were once part of the old Soviet-led 
Warsaw Pact to begin the process of 
becoming members. 


To be sure, the Yeltsin government 
has several motivations in turning to tire 
East Politically, the strategy enables 
Mr. Yeltsin to play to nationalist sen- 
timents at borne. 

Yevgeni Primakov, the former intel- 
ligence chief and Middle East specialist 
who was appointed foreign minister be- 
fore last year's presidential election, 
abandoned tire pro-Westem tone of his 
predecessor, Andrei Kozyrev. Address- 
ing nostalgia for the days of Soviet 
power, Mr. Primakov emphasized Rus- 
sia's relations with former Soviet re- 
publics and with Asian and Middle East- 
ern states. 

Economics are another factor. China 
is a growing market for Russian arms. 

India is also a weapons customer and a 
potential buyer for Russian nuclear tech- 
nology. The United States has urged 


Moscow to drop its plans © sell two 
nuclear reactors to India, arguing that tire 
sale would breach a 1992 agreement 
among nuclear suppliers. But Russia has 
defiantly insisted that it will proceed 
with die mottibiffion-dollar sale. v 

Iran, which is treated as a pariah by 
Washington, is also a market for Russian! , 
weapons and nuclear technology. Tof 
bolster its beleaguered nuclear eaa&- 
lishm enL Russia has agreed to sell Irani a 
nuclear power plant despite Western 
warnings tiiat the project will help 
Tehran s program to develop nncleac. 
weapons. But Moscow has been careful 
not to completely defy Washington.^ 
has promised to turn off the weapons- ; 
spigot to Iran aoqe existing contractsfor 
conventumal weapons are filled. 

Iraq is attractive to Russia because it 
has oil, which Russian companies want 


to help dtswsU^fcliaq also has substantial 
debts to Moscow* which will not be 
repaid unless iqtBmeaional sanctions 

againstBa^ida^ehfted. : 

The Kremhn’sj-tiim toward the East 



Albright-Primakov Talks 
Leave ‘Open Question 9 on 

Timin 



By Michael Dobbs 

WeuAotgum Port Service 


MOSCOW — Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright spent mare than 
three hours Thursday discussing a pro- 
posed NATO-Russia charter with the 
Russian foreign minister, Yevgeni Pri- 
makov, but lime progress was reported. 
American officials said it was an “open 
question" -whether the negotiations 
could be wrapped up in time for a sign- 
ing ceremony (hat has been tentatively 
scheduled for the end of this month. 

The charter is the centerpiece of West- 
ern efforts to alleviate Russian fears 
about the planned expansion of the U.S.- 
led alliance to the former borders of the 
Soviet Union. While broad agreement 
has been readied on much of foe doc- 
ument, inrtnHing the creation of a con- 
sultative NATO-Russia council, nego- 
tiations have been bogged down for 
several weeks over Russian demands for 


pose no security threat to Russia. 


Swede Sentenced 
In Trans-Atlantic 
Telephone Attack 


Ca i yffu fly Om-St^fFiom D ii pacha 

GOTHENBURG, Sweden — A 
Swedish teenager who paralyzed 
U.S. telephone switchboards for 
months, pro mpti ng a global hunt by 
the FBL has been fined the equi- 
valent of $345 for harassment. 

The prosecutor saidhe would have 
liked to try the 19-year-old for foe 
more serious crime of sabotage but 
was unable to under Swedish law. 

The self-styled “Demon Freak- 
er," who was not identified, jammed 
switchboards in Florida last year by 
linking them to sex lines. He had 
cracked the codes of a company tiiat 
serves Americans calling home from 
abroad, allowing him to call any- 
where in the United States for free. 

He made about 60,000 calls, run- 
ning up 2 minion kronor ($255,000) 
of phone bills for the U.S. company. 
He was able to dial into 11 Florida 
►'-service systems on their 
itial seven-digit numbers 
rather than the 911 number used to 
reach emergency services, 
lines dedicated to emergency 

The FBI picked up his trace in 
February 1996 and contacted 
Sweden’s computer crime unit, 
which tracked him through phone 
records. In addition to the fine, he 
was placed in a state-care institu- 
tion. (Reuters. AP ) 


At a press conference, both Mrs. Al- 
bright and Mr. Primakov said tiiat 1 talk* 
would continue over the next few; weds 
to tty to work out an agreement that 
could be signed in Paris on May 27 by 
Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris 
Yeltsin. But both ministers- weie also 
adamant that there were ceitaiapoHtical 
limits beyond which they were rib£_ peer 
pared to go in seeking a compromise. 

“There are some outstanding, issues 
that must be resolved before we can sign 
this document," Mr. P rimako v said, ap- 
parently referring to Russian demands 

for legally binding language that would 

make it impossible for NATO to deploy 
nuclear weapons or station combat 
in countries close to the Russian 
such as Poland or Hungary. 

The Russians are asking foe North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization to ^pell out 
inmuch greater derail what was meant by. £ 
a statement in December that foe affiance- 
had “no intention, no plan, andnarea- 
son” to deploy nuclear weapons On foe 
territory of new member, states. They 
want similar kinds of guarantees about a 
NATO statement on March 14 declaring 
tiiat tiie affiance had no current plans to 
permanently station “substantial combat 
forces" in Eastern Europe. 

Mrs. Albright's talk* with Mr.Pri- 
makov were interrupted by a 20-nrinute 
telephone call from PresideutYeltsiL His 
press office later said that Mr. Yeltsin had 
mged the two foreign ministers to give 
“concrete form” to the utrierstendings 
reached atameeting in Helsinki on March 
21 between him and President Clinton. 

En route to Moscow, Mrs. Albright 
said the United Stales had “basically" 
reached its “bottom line" in negotiations 
wifo the Russians on the military aspects 
ofNATO enlargement Later, however, a 
semra member ofher delegation said that 
Washington might agree to foe inclusion 
of some additional language in the 
charter “explaining" or “clarifying” 
the two NATO communique. 

“I think that neither side has yet said 
its final word," Mr. Primakov said, sug- 
gesting that he expects several more hard 
rounds of bargaining. He is scheduled to 
meet wifo the NATO secretary-general, 
Javier Solana Madariaga, in Luxem- 
bourg on May 6, and there is also talk of 
another meeting between him and Mrs. 


Albright. 
U.ST of 


U.S. officials said foar the Russians 
were seeking to link foe negotiations 
over die charter wifo talks in Vienna 
updating a 1990 treaty on conventional 
forces in Europe. Last month, Russia 
made a proposal in Vienna that would 
effectively impose rigid quotas cm 
NATO’s overall conventional troop 
holdings and make no allowances for the 
addition of new members. The Russian 
plan is fundamentally at odds wifo a 
NATO proposal in February that seeks Co 
replace bloc-to-bloc quotas with “na- 
tional" and “territorial’' ones. 


May Day Brings Protest 
And Clashes in Germany 


CcHfriof tj> Otr Staff Fran Diipaeha 

LEIPZIG, Germany — More than 

100.000 Germans demonstrated across 
the country ai May Day rallies, protesting 
against record unemployment and an ac- 
companying rise in rightist extre mis m. 

As workers rallied, hundreds of neo- 
Nazis and dozens of leftist extremists 
smashed windows and stormed through 
the northern town of M u enderi, where 
rightists organized an unauthorized 
march after being banned from Leipzig. 

Trade union demonstrators in Berlin, 
Leipzig, Hamburg and other major 
towns, meanwhile, paraded through 
streets shouting slogans and waviqg 
banners that blamed Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl for Germany's 4_5 million unemr 
ployed, foe highest total since Hitler 
came to power in the 1930s. 

Speakers at the largest rally, of about 

20.000 in foe historic eastern town. of 
Leipzig, said Germans should be wary of 
letting economic hardship lead to a re- 
petition of history. 

“Sixty years ago it was tile Jews who 
were blamed for everything. Noways 
apparently foe turn of foe Tinkspffie 
Africans or foe asylum-seekexs.’J|sa!d 
Klaus Zwickel, chairman of foe IG^etalJ 
metalworkers and engineering muon. 

“But we must stop other groups being 
made scapegoais for a second time in 
Germany history,’’ Mr. Zwickel said. 

The crowd applauded as he said Mr. 
Kohl’s government could not address the 


jobless crisis and should be dissolved. 

NearTLefori^, about 150 leftist ex- 
tremists hurled rocks and fireworks at 
police who were trying to keep them 
- ^ from a small group of skinheads 

ally there. 


a ban on a rall y 

ymvf leftist extremists hurled bottles 
and stones at the police in Beilin, where 
about 6,000 people took part in two 
demonstrations. 

The worst violence was in the small 
tourist resort of Muendeo, where the 
police said they detained 150 people in 
clashes between rightist and leftist ex- 
tremists. 

Opposition politicians around foe 
country used tin; May Day demonstra- 
tions to attttk Mr. Kohl’s government 
for its failuit to reduce unemployment 
and accused it of widening the divisions 
in society between rich and poor. 

• In Russia, meanwhile, more than 14 
million people took pan in street marches 
and protests in Moscow and most other 
big cities, according to police esti m ates. 

*‘We don’t trust either foe president or 
the government,” foe Communist Party 
leader, Gennadi Zyuganov, said at rally 
outride the Kremlin. 

During Soviet times, the International 
Labor Day holiday was celebrated with 
enormous parades presided overby Com- 
munist leaders. But since the Soviet col- 
lapse, the day has become a time for anfr- 
govemment protests, especially for Com- 
munists and hard-liners. (Rearers, AP) 


j&sZ 


W 


- 

- 7 - . 


* 

!Yr . 


* 




*1 rf 


• * 



Alain Juppe of France, center, flanked by minis ters and allies, waving lilies of the valley, 
a traditional May Day flower, at a rally. Below, Mr. Le Pen speaking to the National Front in Paris. 


10,000 in Paris Cheer 
Leflen Warning on Vote 


. By Charles Tmeheart 

Washington Post Service 

PARIS — Nearly 10,000 
flag-waving backers of 
France’s extreme-right Nation- 
al Front party cheered the 
harshest anti-European oratory 
of the 10-day-old French elec- 
tion campaign at a boisterous 
May Day rally here Thursday. 

Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader of 
the- France-first, anti-immigrant 
National Front, urged his fol- 
lowers to reject President 
Jacques Chirac’s call for a re- 
newed mandate at the polls in 
four weeks to prepare foe coun- 
try for membership in a single 
European currency. 

“Chirac is asking you to be 
accomplices to national sui- 
cide,'’ Mr. Le Pen said in an 
open-air speech at the Place de 
1’ Opera in central Paris. 

“France is threatened wifo 
disappearance,’’ he continued, 
“not in 100 years, not in 10 
years, but by the end of foe cen- 
tury," when the planned merger 
of European national currencies 
is scheduled to begin. 

The snap legislative elec- 
tions, with a first round May 25 
and a second a week later, offer 
the National Front its latest op- 
portunity to build on recent vic- 


tories in four French cities by 
electing its first deputies to' the' 
National Assembly, foe lower 
house of Parliament 

Current polls indicate that the 
National Front is not likely to 
win more tfaan two or three seats 
out of the 577 at stake, but 
strong- showings by its candi- 
dates could tip the balance 
against candidates of the gov- 
erning center-right coalition 
parties in the second round of 
voting June 1. 

In die {residential elections of 
1995, Mr. Le Pen garnered 15 
percent of the vote, and his 
party’s growing support in eco- 
nomically depressed and immi- 
grant-heavy regions of southern 
and northeastern France has been 
a worry to foe government. 

Mr. Chirac's sudden election 
call , nearly a year ahead of the 
expected date, was designed in 
part to stifle foe National 
Front’s momentum. 

Mr. Le Pen and his party were 
caught flat-footed by foe un- 
expected campaign, most main- 
stream analysts have con- 
cluded. The 68-year-old 
National Front founder said 
Wednesday that be had decided 
to forgo a legislative candidacy 
of his own, denying that he 
feared an embarrassing loss. 



Micfarl Eota/Dir AwacUtrd IY*. 


foewestteke Moscow ’s tactic of 
to titef^tob^erioosly. 
^□msppiiu^&wiet and Russian 
tenied to til® East, ” a 
rianor Western, diplomat gajfl “But these 
a aie BhOr^temr phenomena. 

Russia ieahros that ifsaoey interests re- 
qttirfe it to si% engaged with the West * 


A Tug-of-War 
For Control * 



a 


: ; M: By Michael Specter 

4 jS- New TorkTbnes Service 

iCOW — The tenuous peace be- 
iweespRnssia and Chechnya, its rebel- 
lious. southern republic, dissolved this 
week into foe kind of violence, threats 
and recriminations that have been com- 
mon there for three centuries. 

On Wednesday, a gunman shot and 
killed a local official in foe neighboring 
republic of Ingushetia. Russian officials 
insisted ^ the attack , and others rim 
week, were carried out by Chechen 
rebels, an assertion that leaders of the 
republic deny. On Sunday, a bomb — 
ap p ar e nt ly planted by Chechen sepa- 
ratists — tipped through a railway sta- 
tion in soufoem Russia, killing 2. people 
and injuring 17. 

And early Wednesday morning, the 
Russian police and rebel fighters en- 
gaged in the most- sustained fi ghting 
since a 21 -month war for the region 
ended in September. 

- “This is not apolitical struggle; it is 
. banditry,** said Interior Minister Anatoli 
Kulikov. **We wffi catch and destroy 
these criminals." Mr. Kulikov was (me 
of foe chief architects of foe war — which 
human rights experts say killed as many 
as 90,000 people — and comments like 
those were a cmHy part of the conflict 

The situation in Chechnya has de- 
teriorated steadily all year, since foe elec- 
tion of Aslan Maskhadov as president. 
The region is split into factions, as it has 
almost always been. Some rebels want 
an all-out fight for total independence 
from Russia. Others, like Mr. 
Maskhadov, are willing to live at least for 
a while with what they have: No Russian 
troops on their soil and real freedom to 
conduct their affairs as they wish. 

Fizrther fighting is unlikely to resolve 
a conflict that has raged since Russia 
first claimed the mountainous region as a 
colony in foe 19th century. Still, neither 
the Russians nor the Chechens have put 
forth a coherent vision for ending the 
struggle. Russia refuses to yield the re- 
public and Chechnya refuses to consider 
itself a part of foe federation. 

Lawlessness has spread across foe re- 
public. Kidnappings, particularly of for- 
eign journalists and relief workers, have 
now become common. Russian leaders 
assert their need to control foe republic 
while doing everything possible to stay 
away from it 

Moreover, the Chechen government 
led by Mr. Maskhadov, who was foe 
chief commander during the war, asserts 
its independence daily while attempting 
to extract from Russia the money it 
needs to rebuild the devastated land. 

. Last week, foe government there in- 
troduced a new currency — which is 
against the law in foe Russian Feder- 
ation. Leaders have also courted the help 
of Islamic countries, like Saudi Arabia, 
Jordan and Afghanistan, in rebuilding 
the predominantly Muslim region. 


BRIEFLY 


IRAN: EU Standoff Gets Harsh 


Wiesel Named to Board 
Managing Holocaust Fund 

. BERLIN — The Swiss government Thursday 
appointed Elie Wiesel as honorary chairman of a 
seven-member board that will supervise the 
operations of a multimillion- dollar fund for 
Holocaust victims. 

The selection of Mr. Wiesel. foe Nobel Peace 
Prize laureate, and two Israeli politicians ended 
a long, bitter dispute between the Swiss cabinet 
and Jewish organizations over who should be 
empowered to choose recipients for foe nearly 
$200 million that has been donated by Swiss 
bonks for destitute survivors of Nazi concen- 
tration camps. 

The World Jewish Restitution Organization, 
which nominated Mr. Wiesel for the board along 
wifo the Israeli elder statesman Yosef Burg and 
a member of foe Israeli Knesset, Avraham 
Ffirshson, demanded special status for Mr. 
Wiesel to balance the clout wielded by four 
Swiss representatives. (WP) 

Turkish Coalition Stands 

ANKARA — The deputy prime minister of 
, Tansu Ciller, pledged Thursday to stand 
; Minister Necmetin Erbakan. 

Ciller said her True Path Party would 
•nothing to do with an attempt by her fellow 
secularists in foe opposition to form a shadow 
government and unseat Mr. Erbakan. Her party, 
she said, "is not going to bide behind anyone 
andtake part in action to topple foe government 
For today, stability is necessary." 

The army is demanding that Mr. Erbakan 


curtail moves that it believes have resulted in a 
rise in Islamist sentiment m foe nation. 

TOe pressure has exposed cracks in foe co- 
alition. Analysts say that the govemmsit is 
slowly collapsing but that Mrs. Ciller, who is to 
take over the government next year in a power- 
sharing deal, will try to stay with Mr. Erbakan 
for now. (Reuters) 

Is Cow Disease Spreading? 

LONDON — “Mad cow" disease may be 
quietly spreading across Europe because farm- 
ers and veterinarians are failing to report sick 
cows, a magazine reported Thursday. 

New Scientist quoted officials across Europe 
as warning that ignorance and fear were con- 
tributing to the spread, and the officials urged 
that governments devise better checks for the 
disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 

The European Union banned British beef 
exports a year ago, when scientists said a new 
form of Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease, a rare brain- 
wasting illness that affects humans, had been 
linked to beef infected by BSE ( Reuters ) 

Croatia Cemetery Defaced 

ZAGREB, Croatia — Swastikas and other 
fascist symbols were Scrawled on tombstones in 
a Jewish cemetery southwest of Zagreb, a hu- 
man rights group reported Thursday. 

The cemetery in Karlovac, 50 kilometers (32 
miles) southwest of the capital, was vandalized 
Wednesday night, the Croatian Helsinki Com- 
mittee said. It accused the local police of deny- 
ing access to reporters "in an attempt to cover 
up foe crime." (AP) 


Continued from Page 1 

for a one-way relationship 
with Europe." 

The nation’s religious 
leader. Ayatollah Sayed Ali 
Khamenei, mged the Foreign 
Ministry to bar the return of 
the German ambassador “for 
some time," and to “not 
show haste" in returning to 
European capitals the ambas- 
sadors that Iran had recalled 
late last month. 

“We don’t give a damn 
about your ending die critical 
dialogue,” Mr. Khamenei 
said. “We never sought such 
a dialogue, and we have more 
criticism against you than you 
do against us." 

At The Hague, the Dutch 
Foreign Ministry said 
Thursday that it was urging 
EU governments that had not 
yet returned their ambassa- 
dors Co Tehran to refrain from 
doing so “until further no- 
tice." The Italian ambassa- 
dor, the only EU envoy tiiat 
had already returned, was ex- 
pected to stay in Tehran. 

The ministry also 
summoned the Iranian charge 
d’affaires at The Hague to ex- 
plain Tehran’s actions. 

"The presidency will 
make it clear to the Iranian 
charge d’affaires.” foe For- 
eign Ministry said in a state- 
ment, “that the EU policy 


with regard to Iran is sup- 
ported by all EU member 
stares and that the EU will not 
accept that Iran takes arbi- 
trary measures against some 
member states for a policy 
supported by all." 

nan's harsh reaction ap- 
peared to strengthen the hand 
of EU governments that favor 
tougher measures to punish 
Tehran for its support of in- 
ternational terrorism. 

But the possibility that all 
15 EU governments would 
endorse dramatic new mea- 
sures was uncertain, at best. 
France, Italy and Greece took 
the softest line this week, re- 
jecting any discussion of eco- 
nomic sanctions and stressing 
that the ban on official min- 
isterial visits would not pre 
vent informal contacts fron 
taking place. 

Despite the outcry in Ger- 
many over foe court ruling, 
Bonn has resisted economic 
sanctions. Germany sold 22 
billion Deutsche marks of 
goods to Iran last year, which 
made it Iran's biggest trading 
partner in Europe. 

Privately, Goman officials 
credit the Iranian government 
with protecting Bonn’s em- 
bassy in Tehran from mobs 
that protested the ruling. They 
fear that tougher EU mea- 
sures will only strengthen the 
position of hard-liners. 


m 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


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The introduction of the single worldwide brand, UBS, underscores our commitment 
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ESTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRI DAY, MAY 2, 1997 

~ INTERNATIONAL 



Peace Talks for Zaire 
Are Mired in Confusion 

Mobutu Delays Departurefor His Meeting 
With Kabila as Rebels Continue Advance 


OmjMbnOrSkgPnMDuvttdiB 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Despite con- 
fusion over the timing of their meeting. 


“We are happy that Mobutu has 
agreed to come and negotiate one and 
onJy one thing: his departure from 


President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire power," Mr. Karaha said. 


and the rebel leader, Laurent Kabila, 
prepared Thursday for face-to-face talks 


Bill Richardson, the special U.S. en- 
voy who helped persuade Marshal 


ax sea with President Nelson Mandela of Mobutu and Mr. Kabila to meet, said in 


South Africa. 

Marshal Mobutu's camp said the talks 
would focus on a peaceful transition of 
power, with elections open to all, while 
Mr. Kabila insisted that the strongman 
must step aside. Marshal Mobutu has 
ruled Zaire for more than three decades. 

But as the civil war rivals and me- 
diators variously announced that the 
talks would start Friday, Saturday and 
Sunday, the rebel advance on the capital, 
Kinshasa, continued. 

Meanwhile, no explanation was given 
for why Marshal Mobutu did not depart 
Thursday for the talks as scheduled. It 


Kinshasa on Wednesday that there were 
no conditions for the talks. 

And Mr. Mandela said through a 
spokesman that he would lead the talks 
Friday aboard a South African naval 
vessel in international waters oS the 
coast of West Africa. 

But Marshal Mobutu’s son Nzanga 
said the talks had been postponed untO 
Saturday, while Mr. Karaha said Mr. 
Kabila could attend only on Sunday. 

Hon ore Ngbanda, Marshal Mobutu's 
security adviser and chief negotiator, 
envisaged talks on “a peaceful tran- 
sition leading to transparent and demo- 



A Model for 
French Left 
(And Right) 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New YoriiTma Service 

PARIS — Long before the British 
election returns started coining in 
Thursday, conservatives and leftists in 
die French election campaign had been 


was announced only that the president cratic elections that exclude no one." 


would not be leaving as planned. 

“The talks will just be about Mobutu 
and what we do with him,'* Mr. Kabila 
said before leaving his headquarters in 


Ministers and other government of- 
ficials who were to accompany Marshal 
Mobutu to the meeting with Mr. Kabila 
were at the airport ready to depart, but the 


A group of Rwandan refugees emerging from their hideout in the forests of eastern Zaire near Biaro on 
Thursday as 1 the UN picked up the pace of repatriating thousands of Hutu scattered around the region. 

SKIES: Citing Abuse, Airlines Take Aim at Rowdy Passengers 


Lubumbashi for talks in neighboring president never arrived. Sources close to 


countries. “Our uncompromising de- 
mand is that he leaves power and we 
shall look after him." 

He added: * ‘There can be no cease- 
fire or indeed elections in this country 
until Mobutu and all he represents is 
removed and thrown away.” 

There was no indication that Marshall 
Mobutu, who seized power in a coup in 
1965 and is now sick with prostate can- 
cer. was ready to quit, although the rebel 
“foreign minister," Bizima Karaha, 


the presidency said that the situation was 
1 ‘confused" and that the meeting might 
be postponed until Saturday. 

Mr. Kabila’s rebels, who took up arms 
in October, say they expect to seize the 
capital in 10 to 15 days. They now 
control more than half of the sprawling 
Central African nation — including all 
the main cities outside the capitaL 

Residents of Kenge, 200 kilometers 
( 125 miles) from Kinshasa, said that die 


Continued from Page 1 train flight attendants on ways to deal 

with in-fright fractiousness. 

discuss ways of dealing with it The main thrust of die industry’s ef- 

Tbe meeting reflected a hardening of forts is defensive. Figuring they can cool 


the industry’s position toward unruly 
passengers. “We want to create an 
awareness among airiine travelers that 
disruptive behavior is unsafe, and it also 
is a federal offense that can get you some 
serious jail time." said Captain Ran- 


passengers' passions quickly by raising 
the specter of prosecution, airlines are 
bombarding troublemakers with early 
warnings to shape up. American Airlines 
workers caution disruptive passengers 


a model; 

For the governing French conserva- 
tives, Labour is a model of the modem, 
■wilh-h party they say their Socialist op- 
ponents have failed miserably to become. 
For the Socialists, Labour’s victory is a 
model for their own when the French go 
to the polls on May 25 and June 1. 

“Tony Blair is a friend. I wish La- 
bour, who are the British, socialists, suc- 

cess," said the Socialist Party leader, 

oa^cMiibwiteucii Lionel Jospin, at a campaign rally 
sts of eastern Zaire near Biaro on Thursday near Toulouse. It was a hoi- 
Hutu scattered around the region, iday across most of the Continent — |pf 

_ May Day, the day Europeans pay w 

’ homage to labor with a small “1." 

r» j r n _ But “radical centrism," as Mr. Blair 

\ OWCtY ittSSCngCTS calls Labour’s new and more capital- 

friendly doctrines, means many things to 
increase. Cases reported to the FAA of many people in Fiance, 
passenger interference with crews dor- “His success will be the end of a 
mg flights nearly doubled in two years, policy of ultraliberalism, the one that our 
to 174 in 1995, the last full year for government here is applying," Mr. 


which statistics are available, from 96 in Jospin said, referring to me s imilari ties 


1993. And those numbers do not include 
confrontations that were handled by lo- 
cal police or flight crews, 
few carriers keep statistics on abuse 


between tbs policies of Prime Minister 
John Major of Britain and his prede- 
cessor, Margaret Thatcher, and French 
policy undo: Rime Minister Alain 


dolph Babbitt, president of the Air Line message is more intimidating because it 


orally first, then in writing. The printed or assault, mostly because such incidents Juppe, whose conservative coalition the 


Pilots Association. 
Adding his voice to the 


said die president had agreed to discuss calm and waiting for the rebels to arrive 


can be ostentatiously detached from 
was forms for reporting misbehavior to both 


sporting ii 

army had retreated and that the town was Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater, the police and the Federal Aviation Ad- 


his departure. 


— a familiar pattern in the seven-month 


who told the conference that his de- 
partment was “committed to doing its 


ministration. 

Some airlines are t raining their pilots 


Terror’s Toll: 
1996 Among 
Deadliest Years 


By Tim Weiner 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — International ter- 
rorist attacks killed 311 people world- 
wide last year, one of the highest death 
tolls recorded, die U.S. State Depart- 
ment said in its annual report on political 
terror. 

Nearly 2 00 of those deaths were the 
work of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil 
Eelam, a separatist group in Sri Lanka, 
according to the report. 

Once more, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North 
Korea, Sudan, Syria and Cuba were on 


Residents of Kikwit, the rebels' for- 
ward base for their march on Kinshasa, 
said an expected rebel airlift into the 


part to help prosecute those who choose and flight attendants on the best way to 


to put the flying public at risk by en- 
gaging in unla wful behavior/’ ■ 

Trans World Airlines just announced 


apply handcuffs — devices that have 
long been required under federal law to 


were rare until the last year or two. They 
are still few and far between, consid- 
ering that U.S. airlines flew a record 
581.2 million passengers last year. 

But Delta Air Lines said in an internal 
bulletin to employees last September, 
“We have recently seen an increase in 
the number of incidents involving se- 
rious passenger misconduct toward crew 


Socialists and their Communist allies 
hope to defeat at the end of the month. 
Francois Hollande, the Socialists’ 


that the French conservatives were try- 
ing to hijack Mr. Blair for themselves. 

“In B ritain, there are two conser- 
vative parties," said Pierre Lelloucbe, a 
member of Mr. Juppe’s neo-Gaullist 


town had not begun but that reinforce- a zero-tolerance policy toward violent keeping a pair of handcuffs handy grew 
ments had been arriving by truck. passengers. “Any employee who is sub- out of the wave of airiine hijackings in 
The war has trapped thousands of jected to assault while at work will re- the late 1960s and 1970s. In those days, 
Hutu refugees, who fled Rwanda In 1994 ceive the full support of the company, ” armed undercover federal agents were 
fearing reprisals after die genocide of TWA said. “This will include in-house placed on random flights to deter the 


be carried on all flights. The practice of members and other personnel, involving Rally for the Republic party. 


keeping a pair of handcuffs handy grew instances of assault and battery.” 
out of the wave of airiine hijackings in Passenger misconduct at American 
the late 1960s and 1970s. In those days, Airlin es gates and aboard its planes 
armed undercover federal agents were soared from 296 cases in 1994 to 882 in 


Tutsi. Zaire's Tutsi-dominated rebels legal assistance, reasonable travel ex- piracy, and that deterrent, combined physical contact, which quadrupled to 


instances of assault and battery.” He commended Mr. Blair's “New La- 

Passenger misconduct at American hour’ ’ for saying it would continue tight 
Airlin es gates and aboard its planes controls on government spending and not 
soared from 296 cases in 1994 to 882 in increase income taxes, leaving in place 
1995; those statistics include cases of the hallmar ks of Conservative policy. 


have been accused of killing refugees, or penses and necessary paid absence for with international treaties that require 


of leaving them to die. 

International efforts to repatriate the 
Hutu gathered pace. A UN refugee 
agency official said 1,438 were flown 
out of Kisangani on Thursday to the 


any criminal proceeding associated with 
the prosecution of the attacker." 


the return of hijackers to face long sen- 
tences, lowered the number of air hi- 


140 in 1995. 

“Some of them were taken to the 


Alain Madelin, a conservative who 
has tiie reputation of being one of Lady 
Thatcher’s few intellectual soul mates 


Almost all the major earners have jackings on U.S. carriers from a record 


hospital, treated and released, but thank- here, joked at a campaign rally that even 


adopted similar-soundmg positions. 
Northwest Airlines, which estab- 


Rwandan capital or its southern town of lished a Violent Passenger Task Force 


Cyangugu. 


(Reuters, AP) this year, is hiring psychologists to help 


40 in 1969 to none since Feb. 10, 1991. 

While nobody keeps count of all the 
rowdy incidents at airports and aboard 
planes, the evidence points to a sharp 


DRUGS: Biotechnology Yields a Swarm of Would-Be Substitutes for Chemotherapy 


Continued from Page 1 

particular boon to small biotechnology 
companies that had felt they could not 
afford tiie long clinical trials at several 
hospitals that traditionally have been 


Early biotechnology drags such as izes attacking rapidly growing cells. The aons. Side effects were limited to a 
alpha interferon and interleukin-2 are ding's side. effects were reported to be temporary fever and chills. Genentech 


effective against some cancers but only 
in doses as toxic as the most potent 
chemotherapy drugs. 


minimal, with most of them resembling 
mild to moderate flu symptoms. 
Genentech and Idee filed for gov- 


fully nobody was seriously injured,” he would never have dared put forward a 
said Cliff O’Neal, communications co- campaign proposal to make the top 
ordinaior for the Independent Assoc i- French tax rate 40 percent, the level Mr. 
ation of Professional Flight Attendants Blair said be would not increase in Bri- 
at American. tain. 

“Even dial, he thinks, is too much, 
and he promises to lower it!” Mr. 
1 ,i Madelin said The top rate in France is 54 

hemotherapy percent 

1 Mr. Madelin, who served briefly as 

. Side effects were limited to a finance minister in 1995, holds the view 
orary fever and chills. Genentech that France is top-heavy with bureau- 
the drag could be submitted for crate — an idea that President Jacques 


the department’s list of nations that required to establish the efficacy of new 
sponsor such attacks. But the report said cancer therapies, 
that only Iran, by assassinating dissi- The new process admittedly raises the 

dents abroad ana supporting violent risk that some drags of questionable 
groups, was directly linked to any of the value will reach tiie market. But some 
terrorist bombings and killings last cancer patients say that is a risk they are 


The problem is that chemotherapy eminent approval ofrituximab on March 


drags, interferons and interleukins loll 
not only cancer cells but also cells es- 
sential to life. Reducing dosages to tol- 
erable levels limits their effectiveness, 
so cancers return. 

By contrast, the new “biotherapies” 


federal approval as soon as next year. 

If the breast-cancer drag works, 
“we’re ready to pull the trigger on a very 


Chirac, the top conservative here, has 
also come to embrace. 

Even there, the French press finds an 


3 and expect a response by the end of the broad antibody program/ ’ said Arthur echo of Blairism. An editorial this week 


year; if approved, rituximab will be the 
first monoclonal antibody for cancer. 
Monoclonal antibodies are genetically 
engineered copies of proteins that are the 
immune system's front-line defenses. 


Levinson, Genentech 's president and in Le Nouvel Observateur magazine 
chief executive. “My guess is, if you said, “It is true that Chirac's slogan ‘less 
work bard enough, you can find points of government, less taxes' could as well be 


vulnerability on all solid tumors.” 

Like monoclonal antibodies, thera- 


Tony Blair’s." 

But another French conservative. 


willing to take, and oncologists and in- draw on the growing knowledge of the Other companies, including Coulter peutic vaccines for cancer are, after former Prime Minister Edouard BaJ- 


No international terrorists struck the dustry executives say they believe that process of cancer to target specific mo- Pharmaceuticals Inc., Immunogen and years of equivocal results, beginning to 
United States last year, the report said; it trials will weed out those drags whose lecules or genes known to play a role in a Protein Design Labs Inc., have mono- pay off. Ribi Immunochem Research 


made no mention of the midair explosion 
of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island in 
July, which killed 230 people. The Fed- 


potential harm outweighs their benefits. 

The companies acknowledge that 
many of these treatments will fail; nine 


specific disease. 


clonals 


clinical trials for 


eral Bureau of Investigation is still not out of 10 experimental drugs do. But the 


sure what caused the disaster. 


sheer numbers — with hundreds of such 


“Domestic terrorism," the report treatments now clinical trials — make it 
said, “is probably a more widespread virtually certain that some will succeed. 


While Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. has Hodgkin ' s lymphoma that offer the pro 
essentially owned the chemotherapy pea of greater potency than, or at lea 
market for two decades, the biotherapy competition for, Genen tech's drug, 
market is wide open. Genentech has another monoclonal an- 


years of equivocal results, beginning to ladur, said: “It seems to me that the 
pay off. Ribi Immunochem Research British Labour Party has had its cultural 
Inc. of Hamilton, Montana, will seek revolution, butnot tiie French Socialists, 
government approval this year for Mela- Mr. Jospin is still talking, and thinking, in 
cine, which consists of fractured pieces the outdated concepts of state interven- 
of two kinds of human melanoma tumor tion that failed in toe early 1980s." 


cells combined with a powerful im- 


Among the drugs likely to reach the tibody in clinical trials for advanced meta- mune-system stimulant 


phenomenon than international terror- 
ism today," taking a far higher toll in 
such nations as Sri Lanka, Algeria, In- 
dia, Pakistan and the United States. • 
Still, 24 American citizens died in 
international terrorist attacks Last year. 
Nineteen were killed in the June 25 truck 


Like all new biotechnology products, 
these drugs will be expensive, typically 
thousands of dollars for an annual sup- 
ply. But if they work, they will in many 


market soonest is rituximab, co-de- static breast cancer. The drug, known as 
velcrped by Genentech Inc., the pion- Anri-HER2, focuses on a cancer-promot- 
eering biotechnology company in South ing protein on the surface of cells that is 


San Francisco, California, that is now 
controlled by Roche Holdings of 


cases cost less than the multiple chemo- Switzerland, and Idee Pharmaceuticals 
therapy drugs they replace and will re- Inc., which is based in San Diego. 


suit ur savings from shorter hospital 


bombing at a U.S. military base near stays, fewer repeat surgeries and in- 
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Five more died creased productivity. 


In clinical trials against non- wh 
Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the drug shrank due 
sased productivity. tumors by at least 50 percent in about res; 

The biotechnology industry began in- half of the patients. Most important, it for 

worked in patients with the s low-growth to 1 
form of the disease, which resists chemo- fiv< 
therapy because that treatment emphas- ren 


iw overproduced in 25 percent to 30 percent 
of of breast-cancer patients, typically those 
ils in the most unbeatable stages. 

An initial study of 43 patients for 
n- whom chemotherapy had failed pro- 


In clinical trials, Melacine has showed 
survival times equivalent to those seen 
with an aggressive experimental regi- 
men of four chemotherapy drugs — but 
without the debilitating side effects. 

Monoclonal antibodies focus on pro- 
teins implicated in the cause or main- 
tenance of cancer. As such, they can be 


duced the first statistically significant more specific than a chemical drug that 


ise to a monoclonal antibody drag 
ast cancer, the disease was found 


five experienced a complete or partial 
remission and two had minor rerais- 


in bombings and shootings in Israel. The biotechnology industry began m- half of the patients. Most important, it for breast cancer, the disease was foi 

The 296 international terrorist ind- vesting in cancer research from its in- worked in patients with the slow-growth to have stabilized in 14 patients, wt 
dents recorded in 1 996 represented a 25- ception 21 years ago, but it met initially form of the disease, which resists chemo- five experienced a complete or par 
year low, and most were minor blows with only mixed results. therapy because that treatment emphas- remission and two had minor re ft 

against commercial targets that killed no . 

one. The deadliest attacks were carried 

Eelam. The group carried out the biggest CHINA: Clinton Gets Vow on Hong Kong BRITAIN: 

that killed 90 Continued from Page I a position to make a bold proposal, we’d JLdboUT Holds L/C (id 


simply kills fast-growing cells. Newer 
approaches, such as antisense drugs, of- 


to have stabilized in 14 patients, while fer the promise of even greater precision; 


BRITAIN: 


bombing of 1996, an explosion in central 
Colombo, the capital, that killed 90 
people in January, and it blew up a 
commuter train in July, killing 70. 


they work on the genes within cells that 
prompt the production of these proteins. 


Parliament Before the Election 

A total of 651 seats 


Mr. Jospin and the Communist Party 
leader, Robert Hue, agreed Tuesday 
night on a joint campaign statement 
promising to unfreeze government 
spending, to immediately pass a law 
reducing the work week from 39 to 35 
hours without any reduction in pay, and 
to create 700,000 new jobs for young 
people. 

They denounced government auster- 
ity policies aimed at cutting budget def- 
icits in order to qualify for membership 
in the common European currency 
planned for 1999. 

“Together,” they said, “we refuse to 
allow our people to be called upon to 
make new sacrifices.” 


Continued from Page I 
and congressional leaders with two pur- 


The second-deadliest group of 1996 poses, American and Chinese officials 


was the Islamic Resistance Movement, 
better known as Hamas, wbose most 
militant factions want to establish an 
Islamic Palestinian state in place of Is- 
rael. A Hamas suicide bomber blew up a 
bus in Jerusalem on Feb. 25, 1996, 
killing 26 people, including 3 Amer- 
icans. A second struck a Tel Aviv shop- 
ping mall a week Jater, killing 20, 

The seven nations on the State De- 
partment's terrorism list are barred from 
receiving U.S. military and economic 
aid or importing American-made items 
that can be used for military purposes. 
Still, the report said, there was no ev- 
idence directly linking Cuba, Iraq. 
Libya. North Korea, Sudan orSyria to 
acts of state-sponsored international ter- 
rorism in 1996. 


said: to prepare for the state visit this 


be in a position to make a bold re- 
sponse," a White House official said. 

He said the United States still hoped 
that agreement could be reached with 


autumn of President Jiang Zemin and to China this year on the terms of its mem- 
reassure the Americans about Beijing's bership in the organization. 


commitment to preserve the autonomy 
and free market of Hong Kong. 

Mr. Qian met with Mr. Clinton for 40 
minutes Wednesday, discussing issues 
ranging from Hong Kong to China's 
growing trade deficit with the United 
States, now approaching $40 billion by 
some accounts. White House officials 
said that Mr. Clinton made an “espe- 
cially strong presentation” to Mr. Qian 


on “the need to redress and reduce any proved by Beijing. 


On Tuesday, Mr. Qian said that under 
China's rule “the democracy, freedoms 
and human rights enjoyed by the Hong 
Kong people will be more extensive" 
than under British colonial rule, which 
introduced more freedoms only in the 
last few years. He also promised that 
Hong Kong would have autonomy “un- 
matched in the world” and would be 
governed solely by local officials ap- 


baniers to freer trade.” 

Better market access is the American 


Continued from Page 1 

“The polls have been wrong before and 
they can be wrong again,” Mr. Blau- 
said. “Eveiy last vote counts." 

Yet, repeated Toiy attempts to cast 
doubt upon the validity and the dur- 
ability of the sweeping reforms that Mr. 
Blair has rammed through his party since 
taking over have fallen flat: In fact, many 
pundits identify the emergence of Mr. 
Blair as party leader in July 1 994. after 
the death of his predecessor. John Smith, 
as one of two crucial factors that finally 
turned Labour's fortunes. 

The other was the ignominious ejec- 



f 

Conservatives 

3S3 

Labor 

274 

Liberal Democrats 

26 

Minor Parties 

Referendum Party 

1 

Scottish National Party 

4 

Plaid Cymru 

4 

Ulster Unionists 

9 

Social Democrats and 
Labor Party 

4 

Democratic Unionists 

3 


Two seats were vacant. f- 1 

U.K. Unionists 

Sources- British Inhumation Sendee; Eurapa World Yearbook ; Associated Press 


Asked about Mr. Qian’s assurances. lion of the pound from the European 

_ “TV- L ■ r . « « IWI 


Mr. Clinton said: “We had a good dis- 


awiw , requirement for China to join the World cussion about Hong Kong, and he as- 

sets of state-sponsored international ter- Trade Or g an iz ation, and Mr. Clinton sured me that C hi n a intended to observe 
rorism in 1 996 told Mr. (Jan that “were the Chinese in the terms of the agreement of 1 984 tiiat 

they made with Great Britain and that the 

— — — United States supported back then. I was 

Belfast Inmates End Revolt Over Security certainly hope that it will reflea Chinese 

policy." 

Reuters The prisoners had tried to bum down Mr. Qian has publicly denied a/le- 

BELFAST — Convicted pro-British two watchtowers and had climbed on to gationsjattributed to unnamal officials 
gueirilias ended a tense three-day dis- cell-block rooftops to protest security at the FBI, that officials at the Chinese 
puteTTmr^^overnew security mn- measures brought in arfer a tunnel es- Embassy in Washington talked among 
sures at NmSem Ireland’s main prison cape attempt last month by Irish Re- themselvesabout giving mono; illegally 
near Belfast, a leading Protestant politic .publican Army inmates. The unionist to influaice the 
dan Sid ^inmates said they were being unfairly Mr. McCuny confirmed that the FBI 

Gary McMichael, the leader of the punished for IRA wrongdoing. director. Louis Freeh, bnefed the na- 

they ^ 

a£S' tU “ thdr COnCen,S haVe b "" portcrs'of^he priwners* 6 * " P ‘ *=" -eau ij tenors. 


currency grid in September 1992, That 
catastrophe seemed to kick away the 
underpinnings of long-standing Conser- 
vative claims that they and they alone 


own cabinet colleagues and back-bench- shoulders of its media backers, who car- 
ers. Early on in the campaign it was ried it triumphantly the final mile, 
accusation of sleaze, of Tory MPs’tak- Thursday’s editions of Britain's 

mg cash from prominent businessmen to largest selling tabloid, The Sun, which in 
ask questions in Parliament. Later, it was 1992 loudly backed the Tories, ran a 
the divisions in the party over whether front page editorial noting, “There is a 
should pitch its currency in favor passion burning within Blair that can set 
of signing up for Europe’s new single this nation alight.” 
currency beginning in 1 999. The Minor, traditionally Fleet 

By the final week of the campaign Street's staunchest Labour supporter, 
things had degenerated to the point struck a nastier tone Thursday. Ii im- 
wnere the party's own chairman, Brian plored its readers to “get even today” 
Mawhinney, was widely reported to no for what it calculated as 6,207 “dark” 
linger he on speaking terms with its days of Tory rule, 
chief advertising guru. Lord Saatchi. and Security was heavy to combat any 

Vice veren Rmh .1 . . . .. , ■ , n ' , J 


had a mastery of business and the econ- of signing up for Europe’s new single 
omy- currency beginning in 1 999. 

Despite the Tory campaign slogan of By the final week of the campaign 
New Labour, New Danger, when it things had degenerated to the point 
came to ihe Conservatives own pros- where the party's own chairman. Brian 
pects, it was its own members that Mawhinney, was widely reported to no 
proved most lethal. In fact, while Mr. longer be on speakin° terms with its 
Blair crisscrossed the nation with his chief advertisine Pltm I nrrt 


inmates said they were being unfairly mt. wiowiiny connnneo uiauncroi 
punished for IRA wrongdoing. director. Louis Freeh, briefed tiie na- 

. Mr. McMichael denied media reports tional security adviser, Samuel Berger, 
that false bomb alerts that caused traffic on Monday about the bureau s inquiry, 
chaos in Belfast were the work of sup- after the White House discovered that 
porters of the prisoners. the bureau had first briefed legislators. 


ciously short on concrete proposals. Mr. 
Major rarely made it to the hustings 
starting gaic. 

Repeatedly, the prime minister found 
himself thrown on tiie defensive by his 


* P°] ] flings sank to all-time bombs and bomb hoaxes. 


lows for the closing days of a cam- 
paign. 

While the Tory campaign descended 
into chaos in its final days. Labour’s, in 
contrast, was hoisted iniaci upon the 


In Northern Ireland, polling was 
delayed by a series of security alerts 
involving abandoned vehicles. Belfast 
City Airport was closed at one poinr. but 
no bombs were found. 






PAGES 



For AluThosh Who Missed 
COMET HALE-BOPP, 

Singapore airlines announces 
Another Spectacular Event In The Sky 
A CHATEAU MOUTON ROTHSCHILD ’93. 




; f 



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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL 


PlftLSHED WITH THE NEW TOU TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Mobutu Must Go 


The first consideration in the face- 
to-face talks that American diplomacy 
has organized in Zaire is that Mobutu 
Sese Seko not be allowed to exploit 
them to han £ on to power. The purpose 
of tbe exercise is to get him out of mere 
with as little further pain to Zaire as 
possible. There is no call for a sen- 
timental indulgence of the man on the 
barfs that in fee past he had his uses far 
the West and that now he is gravely ill. 
He had his run, and he is owed nothing. 
Indeed, he owes. The billions be seeks 
to retain from tbe bruits of his looting 
are not his. They belong to the country* 
and they will be immensely helpful m 
tbe rebuilding that his misr ule now 
makes a national priority. 

The second consideration goes to 
the challenger whom Marshal Mobutu 
has finally agreed to talk with. Lament 
Kabila. He is going to have to swiftly 
make the whole difficult transition 
from rebel leader to likely head of a 
sovereign state. At the outset that re- 


quires rescue, relief and repatriation 
for the lareelv Hutu Rwandan refugees 


for the largely Hutu Rwandan refugees 
who were trapped in eastern Zaire, who 
were then assaulted and hundreds or 
more of them murdered by Mr. Kab- 
ila's Tutsi army and who are Mr. Kab- 
ila's direct responsibility. Exploiting 
his military momentum, be has thus far 
refused a cease-fire; as his talks with 


Pentagon Spending 


With foreign military threats reced- 
ing and pressure to balance the budget 
building, the Clinton administration 
and Congress have a rare opportunity 
to reduce Pentagon spending to more 
reasonable levels. 

Maintaining American military su- 
periority is vital, but it does not require 
an annual Pentagon budget of $250 
billion. 

Making reductions must begin with 
recognition dial Cold War benchmarks 


The Pentagon is examining military 
requirements as part of its Quadrennial 
Defense Review, but do not expect 
much creative thinking from this ex- 
ercise. The generals should be redesign- 
ing the American military to meet the 
threats of a new era, an exercise that 
might well slash budgets and discard tbe 
principle that America be able to fight 
two regional wars simultaneously. 


are misleading. Arguing that a 1998 
Pentagon budget of $250 billion is 
dangerously dimini shed because it 
falls 40 percent below tbe 1985 level is 
tomfoolery. It dodges tbe essential 
point that most defense spending from 
1947 to 1992 was devomd to dealing 
with tbe Soviet Union and its allies, a 
threat that no longer exists. 

Politicians should also recognize 
that Pentagon spending is a significant 
force only in communities with large 
defense manufacturers or milit ary 
bases. Pentagon spending is not the 
flywheel of prosperity in a $7 trillion 
national economy. 

Certainly, the United States cannot 
be complacent about its security. Iraq 
remains a threat to American interests 
in the Gulf region. North Korea, 
strained by famine and heavily armed, 
could seek relief by renewing hostil- 
ities on the Korean Peninsula. China 
aims to be a military power in the 
decades ahead. Terrorism is a constant 
danger, and the need to send American 
troops abroad in peacekeeping roles is 
likely to grow. But no current or near- 
term peril comes anywhere close to die 
former Soviet threat. 


That principle has justified an army 
495,000 active-duty troops and a 


of 495,000 active-duty troops and a 
navy with 12 aircraft carriers, just one 
less than the Cold War fleet Scaling 
back to a more realistic one-war doc- 
trine. plus sufficient air power to pin 
down an enemy elsewhere, would save 
$10 billion to $20 billion a year, even 
with more spending on stealth aircraft 
Closing and consolidating bases and 
other support operations would pro- 
duce additional savings. 

Instead of looking seriously at these 
options, the generals are trying to 
determine how little they can cut with- 
in the administration's five-year 
budget plan for the Pentagon. Under 
that plan, the budget would grow stead- 
ily, reaching $278 billion in 2002. 

It includes a whopping 40 percent 
increase in spending for new 
weapons. 

It would be interesting to see where 
planning would lead if it were not 
governed by the Clinton administra- 
tion's escalating Pentagon budgets and 
the military’s exaggerated threat as- 
sessments. It is not unreasonable to 
believe that American security can be 


adequately protected for considerably 
less than $250 billion a year. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Getting the Gunrunners 


Using data from the Federal Bureau 
of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, a 
congressional staff study has con- 
firmed what many Americans have 
long suspected A large percentage of 
the guns used in crimes nationwide can 
be traced back to a handful of states 
with die weakest gun control laws. The 
study, prepared by the staff of Rep- 
resentative Charles Schumer, a New 
York Democrat, confirms the urgent 
need for a federal crackdown on pro- 
fessional gunrunners and their deadly 
export business. 

States like New York and New Jer- 
sey, which have strict handgun laws, 
are lucrative targets for gunrunners, 
who legally purchase several dozen 
cheap pistols in less restrictive states 
and then transport them to more re- 
strictive states for resale on die black 
market Just this week, for example, tbe 
Manhattan district attorney, Robert 
Morgenfeau, and New York City's po- 
lice commissioner, Howard Safir, an- 
nounced indictments against parti- 
cipants in a Harlem gunrunning ring 
that purchased large quantities of hand- 
guns in Georgia and resold them at a 


firol laws — Honda, Georgia, South 
Carolina and Texas — accounted for 
frilly a quarter of all guns seized in 
crimes nationwide in 1996 that were 
originally purchased outside the state 
where the crimes were committed. 

A commonsense measure intro- 
duced last year by Mr. Schumer. and 
ignored by the Republican Congress, 
would limit a customer's gun pur- 
chases in any state to one a month. 
Tellingly, a 1995 study by Handgtm 
Control Inc. showed a big drop in 
Virginia's share of the gun trafficking 
trade after it enacted a one-gun-a- 
montft rule four years ago. 

Together with two Democratic sen- 
ators. Robert Torricelli of New Jersey 
and Richard Durbin of Illinois, Rep- 
resentative Schumer has introduced 
another promising measure to stiffen 
tbe penalties for gunrunners, and to 
hold them responsible when a gun they 
smuggle is used to kill or seriously 
injure someone. 


So far, there are no Republicans 
Hina to co-st>onsor die bill. 


huge profit to drug dealers and other 
criminals in New York. Of the traced 
guns used in crimes in New York and 
New Jersey in 1996, more than three- 
quarters came from out of state. 

Four states with the loosest gun con- 


willing to co-sponsor die bill. 

Yet it should appeal even to many 
gun control opponents, who argue that 
instead of controlling guns Congress 
should concentrate on punishing gun 
crime. By cracking down on gun- 
runners, the new proposal would do 
exactly that. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


America Rules and the World Grows Restive 


W ASHINGTON — Success in die 
Cold War and its robust cco- 


President Mobutu begin, that is going 
to have to change. Then — assuming 
that Mr. Kabila takes over — he must 
plunge into the establishment of a first- 
stage political framework resting on 
tbe participation and consent of tbe 
diverse groups that make up Zaire. The 
goal ought to be a reasonably prompt 
and orderly transition to a democratic 
government. South Africa and some 
other African states have good advice 
to offer. 

The leader of the diplomatic reach 
for a softer rather than a harder landing 
in Zaire is Bill Richardson, the Clinton 
administration’s man at the United Na- 
tions. He brought, and appears to be 
embellishing, his considerable repu- 
tation as an international troubleshoot- 
er. Others have had and will have roles 
to play in helping tbe Zairians restore 
their country. But it is notable in this 
instance that only the United States 
was in a position to make die end- 
game as painless as it was still possible 
to make it, given all that had gone 
before. 

Still, there is no cause for American 
self-celebration. Some considerable 
part of Zaire's primal agony unfolded 
from an undemocratic, exploitative re- 
gime that the United States, not alone, 
brought to power. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


VY Cold War and its robust eco- 
nomic performance in the 1990s have 
made the United States the only un- 
challenged world power in modem his- 
tory. Now other nations are looking for 
ways to constrain and perhaps redis- 
tribute that power — to exercise what- 
James Schlesinger called in a recent 
speech “the historic tendency to cut a 
leader down to size.” 

Mr. Schlesinger. an American man- 
darin who held cabinet positions in the 
Nixon, Ford and Carter administra- 
tions* cited the Russian-Chinese sum- 
mit meeting in Moscow last month as 
one example of dial trend. Another is 
die sharp, unified reaction by European 
countries to U.S. legislation attempting 
to restrict international trade with 
Cuba* Iran and Libya. 

“We seem oblivious to- others' re- 
action to what we are doing.’' Mr. Schle- 
singer told an audience at the Center for 
Strategic and International Studies here. 
“Our triumph in the Cold War has un- 


ify Jim Hoagland 


dermined our judgment" and has led to 
“an arrogance of power" in America's 
dealings with the rest of tbe world 
Mr. Schlesinger knowingly chose 
provocative language and clear ex- 


amples to drive home a fairly subtle 
point Except for rogue states like Iran 
and Iraq, foreign nations will not. de- 
clare that they are out to limit American 
leadership. They may be uncomfort- 
able with that leadership, but there is no 
clear alternative at this point. 

But there is a clear mood of dis- 
enchantment with American hegemony 
that Mr. Schlesinger has picked up. 

"We Europeans find ourselves again 
and again dealing with situations in 
which the United States is vitally needed 
and very often resented precisely _ be- 
cause it is vitally needed,'’ a British 
official told me last week in London. 

Chi recent trips to Europe, I heard 
small echoes of Mr. Schlesinger’ s large 
point in tbe way Europeans discussed 
global trade and monetary union. 

It is increasingly accepted in Europe 
that eight to 11 countries will join to- 

f ether to create a common currency, 
ubbed the euro, at the beginning of 
1999. U.S. policymakers must now 
ask seriously what impact this new 
money will have on the dollar and on 
America’s overwhelming dominance 


of international finance and trade. 

Skepticism that the euro w21 work as 
planned still abounds in Washington 
and in world financial markets; skep- 
ticism that it will come into being is 
rapidly dissipating. 

“The euro will happen, but it will 
not be sustainable,” federal Reserve 


observed privately. That is slightly 
more negative than the view held by 
senior officials at the Treasury De- 
partment, who predict that melding tite 
Bench franc, German mark, Spanish 
peseta and a half-dozen smaller Euro- 
pean Union currencies will not affect 
the dollar’s role as the highly preferred 
international reserve currency and will 
not diminish American global power. 

The euro already is making itself felt 
in European politics and diplomacy. 
Rome and Bonn have clashed over 
predictions by German politicians that 
Italy will not qualify for early mem- 
bership in tbe euro’s issuing authority, 
the new European Central Bank. Elec- 
tions in Britain and France this spring 
have focused on the euro, which is 
likely to dominate Germany's nati onal 
elections next year as welL 


A firm new commitment this spring 
from Germany’s Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl to the 1999 euro target date has 
created much of tins ferment. 

President Jacques Chirac of Fiance - 
called pariiamoQtafy elections a year 
early only after receiving what he felt, 
was an ironclad private co mmitmen t to 
the euro from Mr. Kohl, according to a! 
senior French offidaL 
Europeans admit that the creation of 
the- euro, which will not replace, na- 
tional currencies in daily ufe until' 
2002, is still an experiment But itj has 
progressed far enough for them to won- 
der aloud what th& American attitude, 
and policies will be toward this □ew i 
challenger to the dollar — the medium,' 
of exchange for half of all international 
trade transactions today. ) ' 

American officials need to lode be- 
yond the technical monetary data they' 
now use to examine the euro and 1 to 
calculate U.S. policy. 

A new continental money is coming. 
to fruition as .other nations look for 
ways and means to counteract U.S.' 
unilateralism. No longer a unicorn, die - 
euro carries a political message for 
Washington. . 

The Washington Post. . ! 


A Saudi and Iranian Heart-to-Heart on the Khobar Bombing 


W ASHINGTON — Crown 
Prince Abdullah of Saudi 


YY Prince Abdullah of Saudi 
Arabia and President Hashemi 
Rafsanjam of Iran met recently 
in Islamabad, Pakistan, to try to 
ease tensions between their two 
countries. Here's what I imagine 
their conversation sounded like. 

ABDULLAH: Hashemi 

nice to see you again. Let's get 
right to the point We have the 
goods on you. The Americans 
have the goods on you. Even the 
Canadian Mounties nave the 
goods on you. We know that 
you supported die Saudi 
Hezbollah team that carried out 
the June 25, 1996. Khobar 
Towers bombing, which killed 
19 Americans, and that you're 
harboring at least one of the 
bombers, Ahmed Mughassil. 
Ham Sayegh, the Saudi Shiite 
arrested by the Canadians for 
suspected involvement in die 
bombing, alluded to some of his 
pals being in the “country of 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


Lafsanjam” in phone calls with 
is wife that we were tapping. I 


his wife that we were tapping. I 
believe that's your country. 
We’ve also been tracking an 


Ir anian intelligence officer, a 
certain “Abu Jallal,” who was 
your link with the Saudi Hezbol- 
lah in Lebanon. He’s a bad boy, 
Hashemi And what about those 
German courts, accusing you 
mullahs of personally ordering 
the 1992 killings of four Kurdish 
dissidents in Berlin? 1 believe 
the Gomans even had an in- 
former from your inner circle. 

Hashemi for all these reasons 
tbe Americans have been having 
a lot of quiet discussions with 
their sillies to see who might join 
them in either bombing you or 
blockading you. You say you're 
not afraid, but your foreign min- 
ister has been traveling all over 
the Arab world warning every- 
one against participating in a 
U.S. retaliation. And then of 
course your Supreme Religious 
Guide. Ayatollah Khamenei, 
said any Gulf state that suppor- 
ted an attack a gains t Iran "will 
bum in the fire ... particularly 
those living in glass houses." Hie 
wasn't talking about us, was he? 


Is that why you’ve been cozying 
up to the Russians, trying to buy 
new SA-12 surface-to-air mis- 
siles? You see. Hashemi, our 
intelligence is much better than 
you think. We’ve bought off 
every Middle East intelligence 
service, even yours. It's amazing 
what you can do with an Amer- 
ican Express card. 

Now. Hashemi we told your 
secret service people in dial 
meeting we just held that we're 
ready for a deal. The Americans 
are crazy: C-R-A-Z-Y. They 
want to blow up your reactor and 
intelligence headquarters. So 
I've got a little proposal for you: 
You give us Mughassil — which 
would send a signal to all his 
pals that you won’t protect them 
— and we '11 just call it even. 
We’ll sure the Americans 
never get enough evidence to 
flatten you. We'll chop a few 
beads off and close tbe file. 

RAFSANJANI ANSWERS: 
Abdullah. Abdullah. Abdullah. 
You make me laugh nay turban 


off. Don’t you get it? The 
Americans aren't crazy. 
They’re cowardly. C-O-W-A- 
R-D-L-Y. They’D do anything 
to avoid military action against 
us — even if they have die 
evidence. Look, the Americans 
wouldn't even convict that foot- 
ball star. Simpson, for murder- 
ing his ex-wife, and they had his 
DNA on every piece of evi- 
dence. DNA, Abdallah* DNA. 
And you think they are going to 
convict us on the basis of a few 
vague wiretaps? No way. 

Abdullah, there is a lot about 
Saudi Arabia that has changed 
in recent years, but there is one 
thing hasn’t changed — 
your geography. Your main oil 
fields are still well within our 
missile range. Anything the 
Americans do to us, we will do 
to you twice. By die way, how 
did you like those war games we 
staged all along the Gulf last 
week — 200,000 troops and 
surface-to-surface missiles? 
Impressive? 

Sure, the U.S. can hurt us for 
a day or a week, but they’ll get 


tired. They always do. Some 
idiot congressman will demand 
to know how much it all casts. 
And when one American boy is 
scratched his mother will be on 
CNN within minutes demand- 
ing that the president be im- 


Whal’s that American ex- 
pression? People who live ! in 
glp frg houses shouldn’t throw 
stones. That’s you, Abdullqh. 

T ve told you. we’ve never heand 
of Mughassil. The people ypu 
are looking for are under Syrian 
control in Lebanon's Befcia 
Valley. Tbe Syrians are trying lo 
shake us both down. So I wajn 
you* Abdullah, if you come after 
us, shoot to kill — shoot to kijl. 
baby. Because if we’re sijll^, 
standing when tbe smoke clean, 
you'll be sorry. Here’s my offpn 
Sup giving die Americans eij- 
idence* behead those you*yp 
already arrested, call the whole 
thing a domestic plot and we A 
just forget it Anyway, we’ri 
innocent Really. And we£B 
never do it again ... ’ j 

The New York Tones. • ■ 


West Should Support, Not Demonize, Hong Kong’s New Chief 


H onolulu— A dvisers to 

the man designated to be- 


A Afee man designated to be- 
come Hong Kong's first non- 
British ruler in more than 150 
years, Tung Chee-hwa, have 
apparently convinced him not 
to travel to the United States in 


By Ralph A. Cossa 


May ahead of the territory’s 
handover to China on June 30. 


handover to China on June 30. 
This is probably good advice. 
While Mr. Tung may have an 
important message of patience 
and tolerance that Washington 
needs to hear, it is doubtful that 
anyone will listen seriously. 

Nothing appears to provide a 
greater curse in Washington 
these days than to have received 
Beijing's blessings. As China's 
designated successor to Hong 
Kong's British governor, Chris 
Patten, Mr. Tung would have to 
expect a decidedly cool recep- 
tion in the United States — es- 
pecially if contrasted (as the 
press would have done) with the 
reception accorded Martin Lee, 
chairman of Hong Kong's 


Democratic Party, who re- 
ceived what one U.S. congress- 
man described as a "hero’s” 
welcome during his April visit 
to Washington. It is not difficult 
to understand why; Americans 
love democracy and those who 
fight for it. 

But this moral commitment 
to freedom should not be 
equaled to automatic support 
for Mr. Lee and his confron- 
tational approach toward 
Beijing. On Capitol Hill Mr. 
Lee told legislators that 
"Chinese intentions toward 
Hong Kong can be summed up 
in one word: control. They do 
not want the golden goose to fly 
free.” That's true, but they have 
no wish to kill it either. 

The challenge is to find a bal- 
ance between China's desire for 
control over Hong Kong's des- 
tiny and the desire of die ter- 
ritory’s people to continue en- 


joying tbe economic and 
political freedoms and benefits 
they have now. China may have 
the power to deny these 
freedoms — its sovereignty over 
Hong Kong from July 1 is un- 
disputed — bat it cannot change 


people's hopes and aspirations. 
Mr. Tung, the man assigned 


Mr. Tung, the man assigned 
to achieve this balance, has 
been roundly criticized by Mr. 
Lee and many members of the 
U.S. Congress for being more 
concerned with making Beijing 
happy than with assuring Hong 
Kong's future security and 
autonomy. Yet the former must 
be accomplished if the latter is 
to be realized. 

Mr. Tung recognizes Beijing 
is as eager as he is to achieve a 
smooth transition and prove the 
validity of its "one country, two 
systems' ’ formula. The political 
and economic stakes are enor- 
mous. This is why China in 1984 


The Last Toffee-Nosed Lothario 


W ASHINGTON — You 
don’t often get to hear a 


YY don’t often get to bear a 
political candidate described 
as “louche" these days. Es- 
pecially when the word is used 
as a selling point. 

That is why, before I left 
London, I had to go see Alan 
Clark, the last great rake of 
British politics. 


Bv Maureen Dowd 


The rest of the Tory party 
iv be in Titanic mode — 


may be in Titanic mode — 
like Bob Dole, John Major’s 
last resort is to warn voters to 
“wake up” — but Mr. Clark 
is breezing to victory in 
wealthy Kensington-Chelsea, 
called “the toffiest-nosed 
constituency” in Britain by 
the pollster Bob Worcester. 

It is quite a comeback for 
the former Thatcher defense 
minister and military histor- 
ian. who drives a red Bentley 
and lives in a 17th-century 
castle in Kent. 

The 68-year-old son of 
Kenneth Clark, of “Civilisa- 
tion” fame, once played tbe 
Black Adder to Margaret 
Tharcher’s Lady. She loved 
his roguish swagger, in return, 
he said she had nice ankles, 
but added that he ' ‘didn't want 
to jump her.” 

He left the House of Com- 
mons in 1992 and wrote “Di- 
aries,” in which he mocked 
colleagues and described toilet 
habits, expenses (“I’m down 
three bottles of Dom Perignoo, 
three Talbot blanc. four ’78 
Morgon. one Cockbum '60 


and a lot of brandy") and li- 
aisons — including “three, 
girls related by blood.” 

The family of Judge James 
Harkess came forward and 
sold the story of Mr. Clark's 
affair with the judge’s wife 
and two daughters to a tabloid. 
Mr. Clark's loyal wife, Jane, 
who regrets once throwing an 
ax at her husband when he was 
on his way to an assignation, 
observed: “If you bed people 
of below-stairs classes, they go 


Mr. Clark’s headquarters is 
deserted except for his wife on 
a folding chair — “That's 
what wives do,” she smiled, 
“sit and wait.” The elegantly 


dressed Mr. Clark, stretching 
out his long legs, said he dif- 


out his long legs, said he dif- 
ferentiated between sex scan- 
dals and money scandals; 
“It’s dishonorable, period, to 


signed a Joint Declaration with 
Britain in which it willingly 
gave up some of its sovereign 
rights by promising, in general 
terms, to preserve Hong Kong’s 
existing social, economic and 

g ilitical structures. The 1990 
asic Law was intended to in- 
stitutionalize these unprecedent- 
ed concessions. 

Enter Mr. Patten. China 
claims, not without some jus- 
tification. that he violated die 
spirit and intent of the 1984 dec- 
laration in his attempt to ensure 
that Hong Kong would have 
greater freedom in the future 
than it had traditionally had un- 
der British rule in the past 
The Chinese decision to dis- 
band the current legislature in 
the territory and void some por- 
tions of the 1992 Bill of Rights 
and other civil liberties laws 
(promulgated without close 
consultation and over Beijing's 
complaints) is seen by China 
not as a violation of the 1984 
declaration but an attempt to 
return to chat agreement 
This is not intended to justify 
or endorse Chinese actions. 
Beijing has missed a real op- 
portunity to show its commit- 
ment to "one country, two sys- 
tems” by letting Mr. Patten's 
changes remain in place. Mr. 
Tung’s ream seems somewhat 
embarrassed and apologetic in 
having to implement some of 
the more recent changes de- 
manded by Beijing, including 
tbe banning of political parties 
and the requirement for police 


heavy-handed Chinese pressure; 
plays to everyone’s worst fe^rsi 
about Beijing's behavior when! 


it takes control of Hong Konfc. | 
The 1984 declaration and the j 
1990 Basic Law are the stdn- , 
dards by which China has agreed j 
to be judged when it assumes ; 
authority over die territory. Tljey 1 
mig ht not be as good as Mr. Lee 
and other democracy advocates ■ 
desire, but they are a significant I 
improvement over life in the resT 
of China and a mutually agreed ; 
starting point In the final count- i 
down to handover, those inter- 
ested in the fate of Hong Kong 
should be insisting that Beijing 
live up to these understandings, 
agreed on with Britain. 0 
Beijing must realize that, 
whatever it thinks of Messrs. 
Lee and Patten, it cannot change 
the desire of the people of Hong 
Kong for the freedoms they 
have been exposed to over the 
past five years. 

Conversely, politicians in 
Hong Kong, the United States 
and elsewhere need to focus on 
the agreements China has 
pledged to honor and rally be- 
hind Mr. Tung, the man wife the 
heavy responsibility both of 
keeping Beijing happy and pro- 
tecting the freedom and 
prosperity of his people. 



idol** 






-t.'A 

•ij’Vi; - 


The writer is executive direc- 
tor of the Pacific Forum CSIS. a 
foreign policy research institute 


affiliated with the Center for 
Strategic and International 


take money from anyone ex- 
cept the Crown if you’re in 


approval to hold aprotest meet- 
ing or inarch. Inis type of 


Strategic and International 
Studies in Washington. He con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


cept the Crown if you're in 
public service. It may or may 


to the papers, don’t they?” 
They do. James and vale 


They do. James and Valerie 
Harkess. lifelong Tories, have 
flown back to London from 
South Africa, where they now 
live, fo campaign for the 
Labour candidate running 
against Mr. Dark. 

But while Mr. Clark's party 
may be going to defeat partly 
because people are fed up with 
all their sleaze and sex scan- 
dals. this cad is thriving. 

Young women in Chelsea 
mutter feat he’s an “unrecon- 
structed pig.” But the news- 
papers are full of stories about 
stiver-haired ladies cooing at 
him, “Qooh, you are the 
handsome one. ” 

Simon Hoggait of The 
Guardian wrote that the vot- 
ers wanted someone with a 
„ louche reputation” who 
would enliven cocktail 
parties.” 


public service. It may or may 
not be dishonorable to mis- 
behave sexually." 

The man who “brings out 
the sex kitten in women of a 
certain age and class,” as The 
Telegraph pur it, scoffed at 
Tony Blair s aides’ efforts to 
talk im “a swoon factor” 
around the Labour leader. 

“Women find him not so 
much unattractive but slighdy 
— I’m embarrassed about 
repeating this — repellent,” 
Mr. Clark said. “He hasn’t 
got it.” 

Mr. Clark discussed fee 
comparisons of Bill Clinton 
and Mr. Blair. “Well, Blair 
has not been hassled the way 
Clinton has, with girls and 
bank managers.*’ He paused. 
"Thar’s a bit much, to have 
girls and bank managers going 
at you simultaneously.” 

As I left, 1 asked him what 
issues were important in his 
district. 

“How to stay rich," he 
replied. 

The Nnv Kurt Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Hawaii’s Future 


SAN FRANCISCO — Com- 
plications have arisen over fee 
United States’ sending of fee 
Philadelphia to Honolulu. Jap- 
anese officials claim feat the 


anese officials claim feat the 
cruiser was sent as a menace to 
Japan, and that it foretells the 
annexation of Hawaii. Regard- 
ing the Japanese labor problem 
on fee islands. Chief Justice 
Judd, of Hawaii, expressed the 
fear that if fee Japanese gained a 
numerical supremacy, they 
would also seek political su- 
premacy in fee islands. 


feat “predatory international f 
nance has its appetite up and 
believes it sees loot in Russia.” 
He denounces Lenin as a “ban- 
dit merchant ready to take what 
he can get in exchange for the 
heritage of the people, rendered 
helpless by him and his. ” 


1947: French May Day 


1922: ‘Base Betrayal 5 

CHICAGO — President 
Samuel Gompers, of fee Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, is- 
sued a statement against Amer- 
ican recognition of Bolshevist 
Russia, calling it “a needless 
and base betrayal of civilisa- 
tion.” He declares feat America 
is flooded with propaganda and 


PARIS — Disagreement result- 
ed in a split in the French Cab- 
inet, wife fee Communists 
holding out for wage increases 
against fee government’s policy 
of keeping salaries frozen. Dis- 
solution of fee Cabinet was 
avoided following a call for a 
vote of confidence in the gov- 
ernment in fee National As- 
sembly. Meanwhile, fee largest 


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the liberation took place wife' 
almost 200,000 persons march- 
ing to demand higher wages, 
and wife the strike of 30,000 
workers at fee natio nalize d 
Renault automobile plant. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAS, MAY 2, 1997 


PAGE 11 



OPINION/LETTERS 


■ji. 
’■ •• 


$ 



~ -=3 

*■ 


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; • --ti 
'■-‘•Si 

- 


An Adolescent Air Force 
Meddles in Private Affairs 


v ‘i By Richard Cohen 

W ashington _ Dwight 
Eisenhower’s biographer. 

, steprea Ambrose, insists the gen- 
' era! dd not have an affair while 
; comnander of Allied forces in 
; Euro*. Others, including Harrv 

■ Tw i w o n AkL. _ _ • Z 




Tr unan, thought otherwise. A 
court-martial would have settled 
the natter. 

Uider military rules. General 
Eiseihower, all five stare of him. 
coull have been accused of adul- 
teryind, if found guilty, drummed 
out of the army. Instead of be- 
aming president, be might have 
end*! his days a lobbyist for some 
miliary contractor. 

tow absurd, I hear you say. I 
agne. But the general’s supposed 
affar with his driver would have 
beta far more serious than what 
Lieutenant Kelly Flinn has done. 

This pilot, this first woman to 
flya B-52, had what the U.S. Air 
: Fcce preposterously calls an 
» atbUerous affair. In the first place, 

; shs is not married. In the second 
•—pice, her lover — a married man 
vwo lied about being legally sep- 
aated — is a civilian, not to men- 
^•din a cad. Her career is probably 
rLrened anyway. 

The 26-year-old pilot says that 
. se is guilty of “mistakes in judg- 
'ment” but that, to say the least, is 
Dt the way the air force sees it It 
;*hs instead accused her of having 
*’ hd “sexual intercourse with a 
'tarried man, not her husband, to 
~'ie disgrace of the aimed forces.” 

" T convicted, she could be jailed, 
ismissed from the air force or 
" rounded. The last is no mere slap 
!« i the wrist to a pilot 
It seems to me that that “dis- 
■ jrace of the anned forces” cited 
“jy die service is something it has 
.^rou^ht upon itself. Instead of 
'■ limitin g its concern to azeas where 
3 ex can really be a problem — a 
threat to morale, an abuse of au- 
thority — it has gone after officers 
~ ; $icb as Lieutenant Flinn whose 
^nistake is the stuff of country 
■'music songs. 

tj She chose neither an officer nor 
a gentleman, but a mere civilian. 
’■Why is that any business of the air 
force’s? 

Last year, the air force alone 
^conducted 67 courts-martial for 
adultery, up from 16 just niiv> 
‘years tefore. No doubt, the mil- 
itary has its own, peculiar, needs. 
When, fcx- instance, men and 
women not only work in the same 
f place but sleep in the same place, 

J — ; ; — 


norma! civilian rules will not suf- 
fice. 

But what are the rules govern- 
ing Lieutenant FI inn’s case? I can 
think of two. Either her com- 
manding officer was afraid not to 
follow regulations or, more likely, 
he had it in for her. She was. it 
seems, something of a celebrity 
on her base and, moreover, a sexu- 
ally active woman. I don’t know 
what to suspect here: sexism or 
Puritanism. Neither one. though, 
is commendable. 

Whatever the answer, the reg- 
ulations concerning adultery and 
fraternization have allowed mil- 
itary investigators to snoop into 
the sex lives of officers and others, 
asking all sorts of personal ques- 
tions that should elicit at least a 
slap in the face. I myself, having 
perused the relevant documents, 
now know things about Lieuten- 
ant Flinn that, really, I should 
not. 

And Lieutenant Flinn is not 
alone. In March, yet another fe- 
male officer. Lieutenant Colonel 
Karen Tew, was dismissed from 
the air force for having an affair 
with an enlisted man Five days 
later she killed herself, although 
no one can say for what reason. 
Anyone can say, though, that 
when a 4 1 -year-old mother of two 
has her sex life aired in public, the 
experience must be mortifying. 

Given that an admir al was con- 
victed of adultery in 1995. it*s 
hard to argue that only lower- 
ranking officers are targeted. Giv- 
en that more men than women 
have been brought up on such 
charges, it’s hard to argue that 
sexism is the culprit But it is 
nonetheless clear mat command- 
ers can decide when to bring 
charges, when to order counseling 
and when, as has often been the 
case, to slap the fellow on the back 
and look the other way. If the rule 
against adultery was strictly ap- 
plied, tire Pentagon would be a 
ghost town. 

like an adolescent die U.S. 
military ap p a rently is having a 
hard time with sex. But it is acting 
out its confusion in ways that are 
truly disastrous. The prosecution 
of Lieutenant Flinn for adultery 
really amounts to a persecution of 
a woman for being sexually ac- 
tive. Maybe she needs sane coun- 
seling, but the airforce sure needs 
to grow up. 

The Washington Post. 


AH, MR.. KABILA! THE WAY YOU 
GOT RID OF 1H05E HUTU 
REFUGEES! WHERE DID mQM ynll 

YOU LEARN SUCH ff course. 

CLEVER, BRUTAL m ’ 

MOVES? M08UTU- 



nvNZICEBFLo, Aigek, Tira Svttrfatr. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Turkey’s Generals 

Regarding “ Civilian Rule for 
Turkey " f Editorial , March 26): 

This editorial is off the mark. 
The Turkish Army does not 
“meddle" in the political pro- 
cess. However, it is its consti- 
tutional duty to “intervene" to 
prevent abuse of democracy and 
to safeguard the republic against 
‘ ‘clear and present dangers” such 
as terrorism, civil strife and re- 
ligious reaction. 

The Turkish Army is the ul- 
timate guardian of Atatuik’s re- 
public. Today, there is the real 
danger of encroaching religious 
reaction by Prime Minister Nec- 
mettin Erbakan's Welfare Party. 
If not checked, that reaction might 
weD destroy the secular republic. 
If that happens, our well-meaning 
but officious foreign friends will 
not be able to come to our as- 
sistance. 

The Turkish armed forces, 
within their legal rights, have 
warned the Welfare Party that sec- 
ular basic laws should not be 
trifled with and eroded. A large 
silent majority supports die com- 
manders. 

ALTEMURHUC 

Istanbul. 

Taxes and the Rich 

Regarding “How the Rich Stay 


That Way: By Paying No Tax” 
( April 19): 

This article on legal means 
people use to avoid American in- 
come taxes mentioned the use of 
the foreign tax credit. But it is 
important to remember that the 
foreign tax credit is a way not to 
escape all taxes, but to avoid 
double taxation. For example, a 
taxpayer with income from 
French real estate is already pay- 
ing a hefty sum (higher than what 
the United States would charge) in 
French taxes; with die tax credit, 
he is merely being freed from be- 
ing taxed twice on the same in- 
come. 

LEE KENT. 

Paris. 

Celebrating Robinson 

An article celebrating Jackie 
Robinson's debut in Major 
League baseball (“Jackie Robin- 
son’s Fans: From Mailer to 
Dinkins to Cuomo, Memories of 
the First Black to Play in Ma- 
jors" April 16 1 quotes a number 
of people who express their joy at 
this integration. They consist of a 
notorious leftist author, the direc- 
tor of the American Civil Liber- 
ties Union, die former Democratic 
mayor of New York City, the 
former Democratic governor of 
New York and three other people, 
whose political tendencies are not 


UgllL LkJ TIUU/lira UVI 

discrimination, a position whic 
is itself a form of discriminatioi 


Marketing Woodstock ™ 
With Smoke and Mildew 


By Christopher Buckley 


clear, but who, it can be assumed, 
are left-leaning as well. 

The implication of this choice 
is dear conservatives have no 
right to celebrate victories over 
which 
ion. 

HOLT GODDARD. 

Hong Kong. 


Believing in UFOs 

Regarding “For Many Amer- 
icans, Existence of UFOs is an 
Article of Faith" ( April 5): 

The writer smugly dismisses 
John Mack, the Harvard psychi- 
atrist, as having the view that “if 
people believe they have been 
taken by aliens it must be true.” 

But Dr. Mack is no believer. 
Indeed, he continually disap- 
points the UFO fanatics by deny- 
ing that he is one of them. He is 
first and foremost a scientist, hon- 
or-bound to try to develop the- 
ories that fit all of the facts, not 
rally the ones that are convenient 
A theory is not a belief. 

I transcribed several hypnotic 
regression sessions used as raw 
material for Dr. Made’s best- 
selling 1994 book, “Abduction," 
and despite the writer's sugges- 
tions to the contrary, I never heard 
evidence of Dr. Made leading a 
patient in any particular direction. 

JOEL SPEERSTRA. 

Gothenburg, Sweden. 


N EW YORK — A memor- 
andum: 

TO: Alan Gerry, chairman and 
chief executive, Woodstock Na- 
tion Inc. 

FROM: Zeit & Geist Design. 

’ RE: Your ' proposal to turn 
Woodstock festival site you have 
justpurchased into theme park. 

The fun will begin 20 miles 
away on Route 17 (Legal depart- 
ment checking if road can be ex- 
panded to eight lanes) with re- 

MEANWHILE 

creation of huge traffic back-up. 
Vintage 1969 New York police 
cars will be posted along the 
way. 

Psychedelically painted school 
buses will ferry visitors from the 
satellite parking areas (designated 
JANIS, JIML WAVY GRAVY. 
ARLO) to the entrance portal, 
where this time drey will need 
tickets to get in. 

Visitors will also be able to 
arrive via regular flights from 
New York City aboard Jefferson 
Airplanes™, the Official Airline 
of Woodstock Nation™. (Legal 
advises the Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration is playing hardball 
with us on the all-smoking sec- 
tion. Rethink?) 

At baggage carousel, visitors 
will be serenaded with Ario Gu- 
thrie tune: “Don't touch my bags 
if you please. Mr. Customs Man.” 
Passengers arriving by air will 
board the Peace Tran monorail to 
the park. 

As visitors approach the en- 
trance portal, loudspeakers will 
play loop of new Country Joe and 
the Fish song: “Gimme an F! 
Gimme a U! Gimme an N! What’s 
that spell? FUN!” Entrance will 
be marked by neon dove-on-gui- 
tar logo over portal. (Tie-in with 
dove “Guitar Bar”?) Roving 
vendors in period attire will offer 
official Purple Haze™ breath 
mints for $5 a “hiL* ’ (Tested well 
in focus group.) 

To get to Cow Pasture and 
Main Stage, visitors will have to 
pass through concession area. 
Among items they will be able to 
purchase: 

• Tie-dyed polo shirts with of- 
ficial Woodstock Nation™ logo. 

• Peace symbol car hood or- 
naments (Legal advises Mercedes 
still threatening trademark in- 
fringement action). 


• “Dime” and “nicker’ bags 
of Pot-pourri™ (mixture of syn- 
thetic h e mp -aroma product — Le- 
gal is checking — and mud, mil- 
dewed blanket and cheap ros6). 

Next to Concession Alley will 
be a life-size display showing 
hungry, thirsty ’69 cooeextgoers 
to encourage patronage of the 
Woodsnack™ stands in the shape 
of national guard and army heli- 


Jtaff, dressed as national guard 
crew, will toss out updated ver- 
sions of the 30,000 sandwiches 
distributed in '69 (traditional avo- 
cado and sprouts combined with 
mozzarella and sun-dried toma- 
toes). This time, visitors will toss 
money back. 

Land-O-Port-O-San™ will 
consist of hundreds of replicas of 
the original portable toilets. These 
will flush. (Focus group in d ica t ed 
strong preference for up-to-date 
sanitary conveniences.) 

As they continue toward the 
Cow Pasture and Stage, visitors 
will experience th rilling historical 
exhibits and rides, including 
these: 

• Whoops Itock™ — farmer in 
tractor running over concertgoers 
in sleeping bags. 

• Whoopeestock!™ — young 
festivalgoers cavorting au nature! 
in muddy pond. (Tested ex- 
tremely well among focus group 
males; Legal checking local or- 
dinances.) 

As visitors enter the Cow Pas- 
ture and Main Stage, loudspeak- 
ers heighten aura of excitement by 
playing (check song title?) “I 
want to Take You Higher” re- 
frain from Sly and the Family 
Stone. 

Main Stage to feature 24-hour 
music by lookalikes of original 
performers. Bonus: This time, 
“Bob Dylan" will show up. 

(Per your request, “Pete Town- 
shend" will not destroy guitar 
after each performance.) 

For opening-night extravag- 
anza, negotiate with company that 
launched Timothy Leary’s ashes 
into Mbit to retrofire satellite 
thrusters so as to bring about at- 
mosphere re-entry over the site, 
creating "far out" fireworks dis- 
play. (Legal nervous about debris 
striking visitors.) 

The writer, an essayist and nov- 
elist, wrote this comment for The 
New York Times. 



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March 1997 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 




PAGE 12 


m 


Sea-Swept Galicia: Celtic Potions and a Roman Lighthouse 


By Penelope Casas 


A YON A, Spain — Wedged into the 
northwest comer of Spain, bordered 
by Portugal and isolated by the sur- 


rounding sea, Galicia is a green re- 
gion with more than a dozen fjord- 
like waterways known as rias. These inlets, often 
lined by broad beaches, forests of pine, eu- 
calyptus and chestnut, and small fanning plots, 
bring the Atlantic Ocean inland to create some of 
the most memorable coastal scenery in Spain. 

On my first visit to the Galician coast, nearly 
three decades ago, my husband and I stayed at 
the government-operated Parador del Albarmo 
in the seaside town of Cambados and happened 
upon the colorful July 1 1 San Beniuno de Lerez 


ancestry of southern Spain, while exhibiting 
unmistakable ties to the Celtic people of 
Ireland and Scotland. 

The name Galicia derives from Gallaeci, 
die Roman name for Celts: gallegos, as 
Galicians are called, are fair-haired and light 
complexioned; their pallozas — primitive 
thatched cottages, some still inhabited — 
are of Celtic origin, and certain local foods 
are related to Celtic dishes. Empanadas, for 
example — large double-crusted savory 




pies — bear a resemblance to English pork 
pies. Oueimada, a potent, warming brew 


esta. A long procession was progressing at a 
snail's pace through the narrow streets of the old 


pies. Queimada , a potent, warming brew 
made with orujo (a grappa-like liqueur; 
poured into a footed earthenware bowl and 
set afire, summons up Celtic images of 
sorcerers stirring their magic potions. 

One of the two major series of rias begins 



Boats rocking at the wharf of the village ofMuros. 


at Bayona, an important medieval port but today 
a quiet place or old porticoed streets and a 


quarter with the image of San Beniuno, as St. 
Benedict is affectionately called in Galicia, held 


Benedict is affectionately called in Galicia, held 
high. So much paper currency had been pinned 
on his robes by die faithful that he looked like a 
large, well-feathered bird. 

We saw men festively dressed in white shirts, 
cherry red vests, fringed sashes, black gaiters 
and cropped trousers reminiscent of Scottish 
kilts. Indeed, many were playing folk music on 
their Galician bagpipes (gaitas), to which the 
public responded by dancing the muneira — so 
akin to Gaelic dance that an Irish-American 
friend with us joined in with a jig. 

Each of our 10 visits to Galicia reinforced our 
initial impression that this region has little in 
common with the Moorish, Gypsy and Jewish 


a quiet place of old porticoed streets and a 
waterfront promenade. The town is best avoided 
in August, when it fills with vacationers. 


de Vigo as we proceed northward, although 
many swear by its beaches, restaurants and tapas 
bars and enjoy the natural beauty of the dies 
Islands wildlife sanctuary. But we do like to 


A Placi in thi Past 


Bayona entered history when Columbus's 
caravel, the Pima, landed there in 1493 with 
word of newly discovered lands. A copy of die 
ship is anchored in the harbor. But undoubtedly, 
Bayona’s star attraction is its exceptional 
parador, Conde de Gondomar. An imposing 
16th-century castle on a wooded promontory, it 
is surrounded by concentric defensive walls ad- 
orned with Habsburg coats of arms. 

On our trips to coastal Galicia, we generally 
bypass the large industrial city of Vigo on the Ria 


Islands wildlife sanctuary. But we do like to 
pause in Hio to admire an extraordinary 
cmceiro, a type of tall stone cross at road junc- 
tions and in town squares. Hio's 19th-century 
cross is intricately carved from its base, de- 
picting souls in purgatory, to its top, which tells 
the story of the descent from the Cross. 

The old quarter of the provincial capital of 
Poutevedra on the next estuary, Ria de Pon- 
tevedra, is among the best preserved in Spain: 
few squares can match the charm of the di- 
minutive Plaza de la Lena, with a cruceiro at its 
center and simple centuries-old houses with 
wooden balconies on three sides. 

Under the golden stone arches of the Plaza de 


Teucro, a market takes shape each morning. 
Country women arrive with home-grown 
produce earned on their heads, everything 
from sacks of potatoes to wonderful cow’s 
mine cheeses, enormous rounds of moist, 
dense rye and com breads, and fresh vege- 
tables like grelos — a close relative of col- 
lard greens that is used in many local 
dishes. 

I have often enjoyed Pontevedra's 
parador, a cozy 18th-century pazo , as die 
region’s stone manor houses are called, and 
savored the excellent tapas at O'Merio. in- 
cluding braised quail, meatballs and an array 
of vegetable s a l ads . 

kt Granite finds many uses in Galicia, and in 
s. Combarro. about four miles west of Pon- 
tevedra, we found a most curious appli- 
cation, Along hilly alley-like streets, porticoed 
houses descend to dozens of homos — stone 
granaries on stilts topped by crosses — that hug 
the waterfront 

They look somewhat similar to chapels, but 
their origin is unclear; some believe mat they 
began as primitive Celtic dwellings. We have seen 
horreos all over the area, but their concentration 
here has made Combarro a national monument 

The isle of La Toja, just over a fanciful tura- 
of-the-century bridge from El Grove, is a se- 
cluded getaway dm features a Belle Epoque 
hotel, a casino and a spa famed for the waters of 
its natural springs. 

It is said dial The waters’ restorative properties 
were discovered when a man left his dying 
donkey on La Toja, only to return and find him 
the picture of health. 


Noya and Muros occupy another ria ai 
streets of Noya are lined with historic chi 


andpalaces from more illustrious times. 

The estuaries become narrower near the b 
forlorn cape ofFinisterrc, awesome to the or 
Celtic invaders, who believed they had re; 
die end of the earth. La Con mg is a city of x 
230,000 inhabitants set on a rocky peninsi 
the mouth of the boot-shaped Ria de Betan 

Although the city has oil refineries 
smokestacks, once we approached the 
quarter the streets enveloped us in the 
Narrow back streets are a darkly evocative 
dieval world of crested mansions, sta 
squares, intimate comers and Romanes 


oothic oattways A mile or so away su id 
the 2,000-year-old Tower of Hercules, the < ti; 
Roman lighthouse still in use, and a short Its 
tance to the east the town of Betanzos. I is 
entered through three Gothic gateways that e 
main from the town walls. In the church of I u 
Francisco is the magisterially carved tomb c ; 
medieval nobleman, Feman Perez de Andra e 
supported by a sculpture of a bear and a bo an 

As one travels north, the rias become lis 
populated and cliffs rise abruptly from the ora ; 
Cantabrian Sea, affording formidable views. 

The rias end at the Ria de Ribadeo. As t : 
crossed into neighboring Asturias, the distin< - ' 
ive Galician coast — and culture — seemed > ; 
vanish, into the misty sea air. 


Penelope Casas, the author of "Discoverir 
Spain wrote this for The New York Times. 


The Big Apple Reopens a Spruced-Up Plant Conservatory 


c 


c.jr*-* 


By Paula Deitz 

New York Tunes Service 


l 


EW YORK — Few moments 
equal die steamy calm after a trop- 
ical storm, with the soft music of 
water droplets being shed by hun- 
dreds of saturated trees. During 
just such a moment of horticultural theater in the 
New York Botanical Garden's newly restored 
Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, it was transfixing 
to stand still and listen. Clouds of moisture from 
the high-tech misting system had re-created the 
lushness of the jungle among the mahogany and 
kapok trees, the banana plants and chocolate 
trees of the Lowland Tropical Rain Forest. 

The forest is one of four ‘•biomes,” or en- 
vironments, in die splendid Victorian green- 
house in the Bronx — the largest of its kind in 
America. Reopening to the public on Saturday 
after a four-year, $25 million rehabilitation, the 
conservatory is the centerpiece of the garden’s 
seven-year plan for renovation and renewal. Its 


17,000 panes of glass were replaced by hand. The 
huge plant collection, now numbering 3,000. in 


huge plant collection, now numbering 3,000, in 
this museum of horticulture has also been re- 
installed, and a spacious cafe 
now stands in the spruce 
grove near foe conservatory. )2 

A World of Plants, as the 8S!(gffiS^ 
new installation is called, be- 
gins in the Palms of the Araer- 
icas Gallery, under the 90- '$&*^?.K*** 

foot-high 128 -meter) dome of <% $ 
the entrance rotunda. Visitors 7 

move from there through 10 
connecting pavilions and four 
environments — from low- V.t 
land and upland rain forests to 
deserts of the Americas and ■ : .'l 'p-i: ; -v ■■ 

Africa. *'■ ■ ■.* ■ ■ ■ 

Here, the intimate contact 
between visitors and plants is •' 
greater than ever, brushing 
away die banana leaves as you •■’./. ... 
make your way through the 
rain forests and smelling foe 
sweet scent of jasmine in the 
subtropical pavilion takes you 
about as far from the urban 
bustle of New York as it is 
possible to get. 


glass open to clouds and blue sky are direct 
descendants of two monumental glass structures 
in England Richard Turner’s 1848 Palm House 
at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew and the 
Crystal Palace designed for foe 1851 Great Ex- 
hibition in London by Sir Joseph Paxton con- 
stituted a revolution in architectural technology 
that has informed every similar structure since. 

Conceived as a storehouse for the conser- 
vation of tropical plants collected on expeditions 
all over the world, the Palm House became a 
romantic setting establishing a Victorian fad for 
palm-filled conservatories. 

Two young members of the Torrey Botanical 
Club of New York, a Columbia professor, Nath- 
aniel Lord Britton, and his wife, Elizabeth, took 
a belated honeymoon to England in 1888 and 
roamed around Kew Gardens for many pleas- 
urable hours. Her longing for a garden ‘ ‘just like 
that" translated into the founding in 1891 of the 
New York Botanical Garden, with Mr. Britton 
becoming its first director. 

In Europe, leading botanical gardens found 
their genesis in royal properties or major uni- 
versities; but in New York City, the club started 
its garden from scratch in Bronx Park, a 250-acre 


(101-bectare) site that included the former estate 
of Pierre Lorillard, the tobacco merchant. 

B eginning with virgin territory — a 40-acre 
17th-century forest is one of the garden’s major 
scientific and scenic assets — foe first master 
plan included the Lord & Burnham Conser- 
vatory, which was completed in 1902 (the res- 
toration architects are Beyer Blinder Belle). 

The conservatory, with its prominent domed 
Palm House, balanced the Garden's 1901 Mu- 
seum Building, with its central dome, designed 
by Robert Gibttra, architect of the Cartier build- 
ing on Fifth Avenue in M anhattan. Both struc- 
tures display leafy Corinthian pilasters. 


J ilex. Designed by Jacquelin T. Robertson and 
ohn Kirk of Cooper, Robertson & Partners, this 


ARCHITECTURAL SPLENDOR Generally, visit- 
ors are so focused on the gardens and greenhouse 
displays that few are aware of foe garden's 
architectural legacy, from 19th-century indus- 
trial buildings and cottages in fieldstone to these 
magnificent Beaux- Arts designs. 

This year, as part of the 1993-1999 master 
plan (which includes a children's adventure 
garden to open in 1998), under the direction of 
Gregory Long, the energetic president, the 
Garden has added a new building to this com- 


John Kirk of Cooper, Robertson & Partners, this 
simple, solid brick orangery with immense 
arched windows to foe ground houses foe cafe 
that seats 200 indoors and out. 

When half of foe conservatory first opened in 
1 900, Mr. Brition is reported to have spent only 
$100 on foe inaugural display of plants. 

Many survive today (a kapok tree, for one) at 
the completion of this restoration (foe fourth 
such project in the building’s history, and foe 
largest), during which foe glass, steel and wood 
structure was stripped to its skeleton and rebuilt 
with aluminum glazing bars. 

The suite of display houses — five on either 
side of the rotunda — form a -C-shaped pattern 
around outdoor tropical and temperate pools, 
retaining foe balloon-shaped silhouettes that belie 
their new state-of-the-art interiors. Mist and fog 
are created on demand, and vents automatically 
admit fresh air as long as foe wind permits. 

In the Palms of the Americas Gallery, a visitor 
begins to understand foe dimensions of this 
undertaking when Joe Kerwin. the manager of 
the conservatory, who masterminded foe plant 
reins tall ation, points out the Euterpe oleracea 


that has crossed the Pacific by barge from 
Hawaii to take its place here among foe slender 
columns and umbrella canopies of at least lOGl 
species of sister palms and cycads. >J 

Walking into the Lowland Rain Forest, one 
sees through a curtain of vines the massive 
branch of a kapok tree that has been hurled, arch- 
like, across the path. Kapok trees, among the 
tallest in foe forest, are what make rain forests so 





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dark. But here, foe kapok is an artificial, com- ijf 
pletely convincing creation, the stuff of di- \ 





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pletely convincing creation, the stuff of di- j 
oramas; foe top of foe forest has been brought 
down to eye level with bromeliads thriving on 
the tree bark, and foe sun pours through foe gap 
to nourish the forest floor. ■■ 

Emerging from the underground tunnel link- I 
ing this section with foe dry regions of the 1 
Americas, Africa and Australia, one focuses 05 . 
foe sculptural quality of plants in these more opeji 1 
pavilions. Along the way are places to sit under-a ! 
canopy of hanging plants ana seasonal displays, : 
as well as plantings of subtropicals such as 
camellias, olive trees and scented geraniums. Aj : 
every turn, signs entice even the casual visitor to 
learn about foe Garden's larger missions in en- 
vironmentalism and economic botany. 

The conservatory’s season- 
‘ 1 al flower displays will con- 

tinue in two galleries. For the 
reopening, in a tribute to an- 
.' .' other New York institution, 
foe Cloisters, the medieval 
wing of foe Metropolitan Mtir 
seum of Art, foe exhibit will 
be a garden of flowers froiiti 
the 16th-century unicorn 
tapestries. In 1941 , two of the 
garden's botanists identified 
foe more than 80 species of 
plants in the seven Flemish 
tapestries, and their list 
provided foe basis for the dis- 
play. Scenes from the 
tapestries will be recreated in 
foe conservatory. 


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Around the World 






Essentially, foe exhibits 
constitute scientific laborato- 
ries in foe guise of a trip 
around foe world, and then 
beauty and drama derive from 
the patterns found in nature by 
the scientists who have 
traveled to foe Amazonian 
rain forests or African deserts 
to collect plants for research. 
(The Botanical Garden counts 
at least 1,000 such expedi- 
tions in its history, and its role 
as a scientific institution is at 
least as important as its role in 
providing a green haven for 
foe public.) Frequently, foe 
botanists themselves talk 
about their experiences on the 
informative taped tour. 

The conservatory’s curved 
ceilings of glistening new 




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America's largest greenhouse, complete with 17,000 glass panes, has a high-tech misting system and plant " environments " ranging from deserts to rain forests. 


F ROM the garden's new 
entrance at the Conser- 
vatory Gate with rrs 
"lollipop’ ’ standing dock, the 
visitor is now led through 'a 
triangular circuit described by 
Gregory Long as "the garden 
within the Garden." Spring is 
a particularly good time to 
make foe circuit, when showy 
tulips — there are 12.000 here 
— and flowering trees are 
coming into their own. Be- 
ginning with the herb and per- 
ennial gardens just starting to 
bloom, one walks past the 
conservatory to borders ablaze 
with tulips and domestic-style 
demonstration gardens. 

Over foe next few weeks, 
the clear glass of the Enid A. 
Haupt Conservatory will 
gradually be shaded from the 
sun with a wash of lumin- 
escent pale green. And during 
celebratory evening events 
when foe interiors are softly 
illuminated, the dome will 
glow against the night sky — 
a newly opalescent jewel in 
New York City's crown. £ 


DINING 


Le Grand Vefour: New Life for an Old Landmark 




P ARIS — It’s been a long, long time 
since I left a restaurant with such ex- 
citement over the sheer creativity of a 
young french chef. Guy Martin has 
been at foe stove at Le Grand Vefour for five 
years now, and it’s clear he has his feet planted 
solidly on foe hallowed ground. 

A first glance at the current menu makes you 
wonder if this isn’t sheer folly. Or perhaps 
nouvelle cuisine dragged out of foe mothballs. 
Salmon with poppy seeds? Oysters with turnijas? 
Squid with sorrel and orange? Lamb dusted with 
ground coffee? And then, as a grand finale, an 
artichoke tourte for dessert? 


By Patricia Wells 

Inummimut Herald Tribune 


' A v v-* 


seems bold to say foe least. Most would say pure 
insanity, sure to fail. 

Yet Martin is French and sure of himself. 
What's more he has foe technical ability and 
maturity' to pull it off. Best of all. once his 
carefully executed creations are on vour plate, 
foe visuals, foe aromas, the flavors ail transport 
you to a land of culinary bliss. Flavors you 
expect to bop you over foe head just sort of caress 
your palate, blend with whatever ingredient is 
playing the starring role at the time. Once you're 
well into the dish, it doesn't seem weird ar all. 


of the lobster meat is met head-on by the bold 
peppers, bright flavor of coriander and foe 
crunch of the pecans. 

Main-course nuggets of lamb dusted with 
coffee comes off as a simply traditional dish of 
roasted young Iamb with an indescribably de- 
licious sauce. Almost like a trained chemist, 
Martin has figured just how to heighten the 
flavors of the main ingredient, not compete or 
camouflage. 


, . . 7 — — • * ■~V444 WCUU lU OUl 

simply surprising, and satisfying. 

Martin s first-course creation of oysters 
wanned in rhm minute of 




Nk«l*e AkthJIHT 


historic and CREATIVE Imposing a wildly 
creative cuisine upon such a landmark as this 
18 th-century cafe at the edge of foe Palais Royal 


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wrapped in thin rounds of rnmip — ravioli 
lite — is sublime, brushed with a touch of 
sesame to give the dish a very welcoming Asian 
flavor. Hw poached lobsier sauced with a blend 
of chmes. coriander and pecans sounds like 
something from a wild West cooking com- 
petition but. oh, does it do the job. The richness 


B Y all means, save room for the cheese 
tray, which always features some rare 
entity from the chefs native Savoie, such 
as foe almost extinct, far, nutty and naturally blue 
Tenningon. a rustic, crumbling cheese with 
Alpine aromas of grass and wildflowers. 

I do part company with foe chef in his use of 
vegetables for dessert. On one visit, a waiter 
came over to look at my barely touched artichoke 
tourte flanked by two tiny candied carrots and all 


I could respond was. “I don’t like to see carrots 
on my plate at midnight." ? 

And there are some things at the "new" 
Grand Vefour that need attention. The breads are 
uneven and the vegetables are all but nonexistent 
(save for dessert) and badly done when they do 
appear. 

The dining room staff deserves a round of 
applause: Rarely does one witness such a grace- 
ful shift from the old-fashioned, nose-in-foe-air 
service of days past to the friendly, congenial 
service we have come to expect today. The 
waiters move about foe elegant 18th-century 
dining room with the grace of ballet stars, always -r 
attentive yet ever discreet. ' 

le Grand Vefour, 1 7 Rue de Beaujolais, Pari 
I; tel: 01-42-96-56-27: fax: 01-12-86-80-71 
Credit cards: American Express. Diners Club 
\ iso. Closed Saturday, Sunday and August. 325 
franc ($55) lunch menu, 750-franc dinnti 
menu. 


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ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


PAGE 13 




lgil N,f 


MOVIE GUIDE 


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Volcano 

Directed fr v M/dfc Jack™. 

Biblical calamity is hotter 
than usual this week, thanks 
to the explosions, flames 
ash and, in the words of one 

i r? _wilted newscaster 
‘what can only be de- 
scribed as — lava!” that 
Jsvel Los Angeles in the 
happily malicious “Vol- 
cano- ’ * Another perfect day 
. dawns on cabana men, sun 
1 worshipers and roller 

* skaters during ibis film's 

* opening credits. There’s 
r comfort in knowing that the 

La Brea tar pits will be 

* shooting off flaming mete- 
■ ors before that day is over. 

“Lava? Here in L.A.?” 
asks Tommy Lee Jones as 
Mike Roark, the urban 
troubleshooter who borrows 
a last name and a little swag- 

& from “The Fountain- 
The answer, which 
Jerome Armstrong and 

Billy Ray were actual Iy paid 

- to write: “It is unlikely. But 
it is a possibility.'* Like the 
substantially better “Twist- 
er,” this film insists on a 
thunderous, exhausting 
pace that inevitably be- 
comes deflating. Pummel 
an audience this hard during 
a film's first hour, and the 
second is sure to be a let- 
down, no matter how many 
streets are filled with molten 
rock. That wouldn't matter 
if “Volcano” had irony or 
storytelling to sustain it, but 
the plot is an afterthought. 



Tommy Lee Jones and Anne Heche in "Volcano." 


Without special effects as 
the main attraction, there 
would be no movie here at 
all. (Janet Maslin. NYT ) 

SfeCRETOS 

delCorazon 

Directed by Montxo Ar- 
mendariz. Spain. 

Secrets, lies, bitterness, dis- 
covery and the truth. It’s one 
way to live, or grow up, as 
the 9-year-old character Javi 
J earns during his beautiful 
journey across ihe screen. 
Montxo Armen dariz also 
wrote the script, masterfully 
setting the story in his native 
Navarra region of northern 
Spain in the 1960s. The 
young boy bas been sent to 
live with his two bickering 
aunts m the provincial cap- 
ital after a terrible death ar 
his family’s village home. 
He gradually learns there is 
more to life than the truth, 


and haltingly unlocks the 
family “secrets.”. His 
guides are his attractive 
mother, his wise uncle and 
aunt, his grumpy grandfath- 
er and his playmates. It is an 
often hilarious story, finely 
acted throughout, including 
the bright-eyed Andoni Er- 
buru as Javi. The rich pho- 
tography has a close-up 
style that sometimes gives 
the feeling of a cross be- 
tween film and live theater. 
In this film, only his fifth 
since 1984, Armendariz 
continues his odyssey of go- 
ing much deeper than the 
topical to present a lesser- 
known slice of Spain. Here, 
he achieves a universal ap- 
peal. (Al Goodman. IHT t 

The Daytbippebs 

Directed by Greg Mottola. 
U.S. 

Eliza D’Amico (Hope Dav- 


is) lives mi Long Island and 
thinks she is happily mar- 
ried to Louis (Stanley 
Tucei), who works in Man- 
hattan. Then she finds a let- 
ter that was apparently writ- 
ten to her husband and is 
signed "Love forever, 
Sandy.” Even more sur- 
prising than where this situ- 
ation leads “The Daytrip- 
pers” is the way Eliza 
decides to tackle it: with her 
whole family. The Malones 
turn out to be the secret 
weapon of Greg Mottola 's 
spirited, expertly acted first 
feature. Eliza’s family all 
pile into the station wagon 
and head for Manhattan. 
They mean to march into 
Louis's Park Avenue pub- 
lishing office and help Eliza 
while she demands an ex- 
planation. Monola, who 
wrote and directed this film 
and shot it in 16 days with a 
vigor that shows on screen, 
knows his territory. He ap- 
preciates the Malones both 
on their own turf and in the 
wilds of Manhattan. As 
Mottola tackles the techni- 
cal challenge of keeping 
this story busy and moving 
it energetically around 
town, he adds a couple of 
subsidiary interludes that 
are meant to amplify the 
main action but don’t truly 
go anywhere. The film bogs 
down slightly at times. Still, 
the main action is bright, 
real and poignant enough to 
make this journey worth the 
ride. (Janet Maslin, NYT) 


RECORDINGS 


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THE ALAN Lomax COLLECTION (Rounder): Lomax recor- 
ded, produced and edited definitive versions of folk and 
traditional music from the United States, the Caribbean, 
England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy and Spain. Without his 
explorations there would have been no blues explosion and 
probably no rock and roIL He also gave birth to the “World 
Music' ’ phenomenon. Titled “Southern Journey,” volumes 1 
to 6 of a CD reissue series were released in April. They evoke 
the pre-elec tronic rural South — bines, shouts, ballads, reels, 
hymns, chanteys, work songs, spirituals, songs of outlaws and 
desperadoes. 

»■ 

1 ANNIE WHITVNEAD “Naked” (EFZ): A veteran of the horn 
section of the big-time reggae band Aswad, Whitehead is an 
articulate British trombonist with touches of Don Drummond, 
Rico and Jimmy Knepper. Her concept goes from the Congo to 
the Caribbean by way of outer space. 

BUCKSHOT LEPONQUE “Musical Evolution” (Columbia): 
Branford Marsalis, the tenor-playing power behind this mus- 
cular big band, has been taking a direction diametrically 
Opposed to that of his younger brother Wynton. Branford’s 
fusion of the pop spectrum bounces between funk, rock, 
rhythm and blues, jungle and jazz. The actor Laurence Flsh- 
burne and the poet Maya AngeJou recite, Branford’s younger- 
yet brother Delfeayo plays the trombone and David Sanborn 
tfieaatosaxpifflcHie. ' ' ‘ 

NIELS" H INNING* ORflTED* PEDERSON TRIO “Friends 


BOOKS 


-JANE AUSTEN Obstinate Heart 

j£y Valerie Grosvenor Myer. Illustrated. 
268 pages. $25.95. Arcade Publishing! 
Time 'Warner. 

Reviewed by 

"Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 


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I NTRODUCING her sensible and in- 
triguing new biography. "Jane Aus- 
tin: Obstinate Heart,’ ’ Valerie Grosven- 
i pr Myer warns her readers that they 
• , ought not to take too seriously the saintly 
i -jL portrait of “gentle Jane" foisted on pos- 
V ' terity by her family through censorship, 
f selective reminiscence and hype. “Her 
relatives emphasized her attachment to 
family,*’ Myer writes, “but while Jane 
Austen cannot be understood in isolation 
from her relatives, the account of her 
they handed down to us should be taken 
with a large pinch of salt” 
n Myer’s caution comes a little late in 
the day, considering that a dozen years 
flgn John Halperin, in his “Life of Jane 
Austen,’' (1988), set out to demolish 
Austen's benign image with a relent- 
lessly unsympathetic reading of her 
character. . , , , 

:._Myer doesn’t list Halpenn s book 
' among the six dozen works in ho - “Se- 
lective Bibliography,” but this is prob- 
ably less that she is unaware of it than that 
her approach to Austen is so different 
from his. She may seem at first to be 
bffering as one-dimensjonal a view of 
Austen as Halperin did: For instance, her 
subtitle, “Obstinate Heart,” refers to 
nothing more than Austen's weD-taown 
refusal to marry for less than love. And m 
Sex preface. Myer announces flatly thai 
because Austen was never secure finan- 
cially or socially, and "spent her entire 
Bfe as a poor' relation.” hers was a lire 
tef disappointment and frustration. 
^BuHas her 

presents Austen as a highly complex 


woman, by turns frivolous and poker- 
stiff, affectionate and spiteful, generous 
and filled with envy, earthy and refined; 
in short, as rich in character shadings as 
the world of her fiction suggests. 

Offering little in the way of new ev- 
idence, Myer covers familiar ground. 
She relies, like previous biographers, on 
Austen’s letters (or what has survived of 
them), on the memoirs of Austen’s rela- 
tives and on all that is known of the 
years Austen lived. 1775 to 1817. She 
treats such conventional subjects as 
Austen’s residences, her possible suit- 
ors and the production of her novels, 
which she assumes her readers are fa- 
miliar with. 

But instead of trying to dilate the bare 
facts — as another biographer. Park 
Honan, did in his “Jane Austen: Her 
Life" (1988) by imagining certain 
scenes — Myer breathes life into them 
by placing them in a more detailed con- 
text. For instance, on die subject of Aus- 
ten’s beautiful, small handwriting, she 
digresses to the high cost of postage and 
the need to save paper by techniques like 
double-crossing, or writing perpendic- 
ularly across the original message, 
sometimes in a different color, for clar- 
ity, as in a 4 ‘black and red letter" Austen 
received from her brother Charles in 
1813. 

In a similar vein, Myer — the author 
of books on Charlotte Bronte, Laurence 
Sterne, Margaret Drabble and Samuel 
Richardson — writes about the dances 
Austen knew, the games she played, the 
furniture she sat on (uncomfortable even 
in grand houses I, the mud (full of horse 
manure), the labor of preparing the 
meals she ate. 

Detail by detail a palpable world 
builds up, so that when Austen does put 
in an appearance it is all the more vivid, 
as for instance when Myer writes: “It is 
Marianne," a niece of Austen's, “we 


have to thank for the memory of Jane 
sitting quietly in the library Godmer- 
sham, her sewing on her lap, saying 
nothing for a long time. Suddenly Jane 
would burst out laughing, jump up and 
run across the room to find pens and 
paper and write something down. TheD 
she would return to her fireside seat and 
go on stitching quietly as before.' ’ 

Not exactly the material for a Paris 
Review interview on the art of fiction, 
but enough to be grateful for. 

Myer also takes pains to describe the 
landscape of the places Austen lived, 
and in this she is probably aided by the 
recent spate of film adaptations of Aus- 
ten's books. These help you to visualize 
what Myer is describing, and make un- 
derstandable the shock to Austen of hav- 
ing to move from Hampshire to Bath 
when her father decided to retire in 
1801. 

A USTEN lived in a circumscribed 
world, never having traveled abroad 
or farther north in England than Stafford- 
shire, as far as scholarship can tell. She 
died at 41 of either Hodgkin's disease or 
more likely Addison’s disease, as far as 
retrospective diagnosis can determine. 

Yet by revealing her many contra- 
dictory aspects, Myer has transformed 
what could have been a chiaroscuro of 
praise and blame into a full palette con- 
sistent with the richness of Austen’s 
fiction. As with other biographies of 
Austen, we rarely glimpse her directly in 
Myer’s- pages. But her shadow is so 
palpably present that you find yourself 
wishing for just a moment that more 
biographers knew as little about then- 
subjects as Myer does, that they had to 
work with Che same handicaps that she 
has so impressively overcome. 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on the 
staff of The New York Tunes. 


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By Alan Truscott 

T HE Inter-Club Contract 
Bridge League was foun- 
ded in 1933. The league wob- 
fcbly has the world record ror 
Continuous activity, since 
older institutions like the 
Austrian Bridge Federation 
were in hibernation during 
World War IL . ... 

A This year’s individual 
championship. was won tor 
the third straight year * \ Jf: 
icouL by Sam Gnzzardo of me 
fl^Ywk Athletic Club. He 
won in spite of the first deal, 
shown in the diagram- 

j.He climbed ambitiously to 

seven . diamonds, using me 
grand slamforce ro ask fortwo 
of the top three diamond hon- 


ors. After ruffing the opening 
club lead, he realized that his 

prospects were not good. 

Gnzzardo etred by drawing 
trump with the king, queen 

and ace. Hethen played hearts, 

but when that suit Med him 

he had to go one down. 

Since he had to assume a 3- 
*> trump split, a better play 
would have been to test hearts 
immediately. This could be 
done in two ways, and South 
can survive in each case. 

Suppose he chooses to rash 
the heart ace, throwing a club, 
and ruff a bemt. If the qu«° 
appears, he can 
Kps, but when the hearts 
proveto be divided 5-1, he 
needs a small miracle, which 
is forthcoming- Hemusrrtjffa 
club, draw trumps and cross 


to the spade king. Then he can 
throw dummy's remaining 
club cm the heart winner and 
take a spade finesse. This 
makes the grand slam. 

However, this play leaves 
South guessing what to do 
next if both opponents follow 
low cm die second round of 
hearts. He will not know 
whether the suit is estab- 
lished. So there is an argu- 
ment for playing both top 
hearts immediately. 

As it happens. West ruffs 
the second bean winner. 
South overruffs, niffs a second 
club and plays a heart for an- 
other raff. He will then be able 
to tuff a third club, and even- 
tually draw trumps and use the 
spades to make his contract- 
Anattempt by West to up- 


percut with die six and jack of 
diamonds does not succeed. 

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ARTS GUIDE 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Kunsthistorlsches Museum, tel: 
(1) 525-24-403, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To May 25: "Vittoda 
Colonna: Dichterin und Muse 
Michelangelos." An exhibition de- 
voted to vtttoria Colonna, the 1 6th- 
cenlury Italian poet, who was in the 
confidence of popes and emperors 

and who had a dose relationship 
with Michelangelo. 

Petals Uecfrtenstefn, ntf: (V 337- 

6900, dosed Mondays. To June 8: 
“Nahum Tevet." The Israeli artist 
(bom 1945) puts together install- 
ations made from painted wood 
and pfexigias stools, tables and 
easels. 


BRITAIN 



Branford Marsalis, with Buckshot Lefonque. 

Forever” (Milestone): No bassist has a more marure com- 
bination of sensitivity and chops than the Danish NHOP. 
Recorded in Copenhagen, this collection of standards is 
dedicated to the monster American pianist Kenny Drew, who 
lived and died there. 

Mike Zwmn/IHT 


Cambridge 

Fltzwilllam Museum, tel: (01223) 
332-900, dosed Mondays. To 
June 29: “Shakespeare and the 
Eighteenth Century." Interpreta- 
tions of Shakespearean texts 
George Romney, James Barry and 
William Blake and portraits of act' 
ors, playwrights and composers 
associated with Shakespeare. 

Eomburoh 

Scottish National Gallery of 
Modem Art, tel: (0131) 332-2266, 
open daily. To Nov. 9: “Picasso." 
25 oil paintings, etchings and 
drawings ranging from a Bfue-Perf- 
od painting of 1902 to an erotic 
drawing of 1967. 

London 

Design Museum, tel: (0171) 403- 
6933, closed Sundays. To Oct 12: 
"The Power of Erotic Design." 
From Aubrey Beardsley’s "Sa- 
lome" to erotic sculptures kept by 
Freud In his Vienna consulting 
room to furniture and photographs 
by Carlo MoUlno to advertising 
campaigns in which sex sells, the 
exhibition defines the erotic In so- 
ciety's cultural and structural con- 
text 

Tate Gallery, tel: (0171) 887-8732, 
open daily. Continuing! To June 8: 
“Hogarth The Painter A Celebra- 
tion of the Tercentenary of his 
Birth." William Hogatth (18 97- 
1764), as a painter. 

■ > R A N C ■ 

Paris 

Mona Bismarck Foundation, tel: 
01-47-23-38-B8, dosed Sundays 
and Mondays. To June 28: “Arts 
Rituals (fOceanie: La NouveUe lr- 
lande." On loan from the Barbier- 
Mueller Museum in Geneva, more 
than 40 statues, masks and ob- 
jects from New Ireland, a group of 
Islands that are part of the Bis- 
marck archipelago, northeast of 
Australia. 

Musee dee Arts Decorattfs, tel: 
01-44-55-57-50, closed Mondays 
andTuesdays. To May 11: “Vtoleta 
Parra: Hommage." 15 tapestries 
and 30 small oil paintings by the 
Chilean singer, painter and weaver 
(1917-1967), whose work reflects 
the suffering and the hopes of her 
country. 

Musee du Louvre, tel: 01-40-20- 
51-51, dosed Tuesdays. To Jdy 
21 : “Des Mecenes par MilKers: Un 
Siede de Dons par les Amis du 
.Louvre.” Brings together paintings 
and sculptures donated to the mu- 
seum over the last century. 

Musee Rodin, tel: 01-44-18-61- 



Koloman Moser, a Viennese painter, in Amsterdam. 


10, dosed Mondays. To June 15: 
“Vers i'Age d’Airain: Rodin en Bel- 
gique." Brings together paintings, 
caricatures and sketches in red 
chalk created by the French 
sculptor (1 840-1 917) while he was 
in Belgium between 1671 and 
1877, 

■OIRMANY 

Munich 

Aktioneforum Praterinsei, tel: 
(89) 2916-0875, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To May 19: "Robert 
Rauschenberg: Haywire.” High- 
lights from Rauschenberg’s series 
of tachnoiogiCBl works created 
since the 1960s. • 

Tumnqen • 

KunsthaUe Tubingen, tel: (7071) 
9691-0, dosed Mondays. To May 
25: “Robert Longo." Lon go (bom 
1953) displays his Magellan proj- 
ect. a series of 366 pictures in 
chalk, charcoal and Ink on parch- 
ment that were Inspired by news- 
papers or personal photographs. 

■ ITALY 

Milano 

Fondaziona Antonio Mazzotta, 
tel: (2) 878-197, dosed Mondays. 
Continuingflb June 29: “Otto 
DIx.” 180 works by the German 
painter and graphic artist (1891- 
1969). 

j JAPAN 

Tokyo 

National Museum of Modem Art, 
let: (3) 3214-3305, dosed Mon- 
days and May 6. Continuing/ lb 
May 11: “Tetsugoro Yorozu." The 
Japanese artist U 885-192?) de- 
veloped a style that was Influenced 
by the Cubist and Fauve move- 
ments from Europe. 


Yokohama 

Yokohama Museum of Ait, tel: 
(45) 221-0300, dosed Thursdays. 
To June 15: "Pompel: Piets Frag- 
ments Decorazioni Parle tali della 
Citta Sepolta." Murals that were 
unearthed at Pompeii, the Roman 
city destroyed by the eruption of 
Mount Vesuvius In AD. 79. 

■ NETHERLANDS 

Au tY iR ff fl H 

Van Gogh Museum, tel: (20) 570- 
5252, open dally. To June 15: “Vi- 
enna 1900: Portrait and Interior." 
Viennese art between 1B70 and 
1918. Features works by Klimt, 
Egon Schiele, Gersti, Otto Wag- 
ner, among others, as well as fur- 
niture and objects. 

Rotterdam 

Kunathal, tel: (10) 440-0301. To 
June 8: “The Early Mondrian" 
More than 140 paintings, drawings 
and watercolora by the Dutch 
painter (1872-1944). 

TheHaque 

Hot Palels, tel: (70) 338-1111, 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
May 9: “The Golden Age of Danish 
Art.” Masterpieces from Danish 
museums that show how, over 
these 50 years, attention shifted 
from the classicism of tire sculptor 
Thowaldsen (1770-1844) to the 
Homantic landscapes and group 
portraits painted in Italy and Den- 
mark. 

■ SPAIN 

Barcelona 

Museu Picasso, tel: (3) 31 9-6310, 
dosed Mondays. Continulng/To 
June 29: “Andre Derain, 1904- 
1912." The latest in a series of 
exhibitions devoted to artists who 
were influenced by Picasso, it 


brings together . 60 paintings, 
sculptures and drawings create^ 
during the years of a great friend- 
ship between the two artists 

§ SWITZERLAND^ 

Lugano 

Museo d’Arta Modems, tel: (91) 
994-4370. dosed Mondays. Core 
tfnuing/To June 22: "Georges 
Rouault. 1871-1958: Retrospect- 
h/B." More Than 120 works by the 
catholic painter, 

Zurich 

Kunsthaus, tel: (1) 251-6765, 
dosed Mondays. To June 1: “Das 
Capricdo als Kunstprintip." The 
role of whimsical Imagination in art 
More than 100 paintings from 
Ardmbddo to Turner, and 150 
works on paper from Cailot to 
Goya. 

B UNITED STATER 

Baltimore 

Walters Art Gallery, tel: (410) 
547-9000, dosed Mondays. Con- 
tinulng/To May 18: 'The First Em- 
peror Treasures From Ancient 
China” The exhibition features 80 
objects reflecting the history and 
culture of ancient China during the 
reign of Ch'in Shih Huang-ti, the 
first emperor (221-210 B.C.). 

Houston 

Menll Collection, tel: (713) 525- 
9400, dosed Mondays and Tues- 
days. To Aug. 31: "Braque: The 
Late Works." Features 45 paint- 
ings by the French Cubist painter 
(1882-1963) and indudes ex- 
amples from the cycles of his ma- 
ture years as well as a selection of 
interiors and small landscapes. 

New York 

Museum of Modern Art, tel: (212) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. 
Continulng/To May 18: “Manual 
Alvarez Bravo: A Retrospective.” 
More than 175 works by the Mex- 
ican photographer that bring to life 
his journeys through mystery and 
surrealism. 

CLOSING SOON 

May 4: “Lumleres de (Orient 
Chretien." Musee d’Art et d’Hls- 
tolre, Geneva. 

May 4: “Oeuvres Recuperes apres 
la Seconds Guerre Mondlale et Con- 
flees a la Garde des M usees Na- 
tionaux." Musee cfOrssy, Porte. 
May 4: “Lovts Corinth." Ttota Gal- 
lery, London. 

May 4: “Materiali dell' Arte: Rioeroa 
e Sperimentazlone in (tafia dagii 
anni Sessanta ad OggL" Galleria 
d'Arte Modems, Bologna. 

May 4: 'The Florene M. Schoere 
bom Bequest: Artists of the School 
of Paris." Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, New York. 

May 4: “Six Centuries/ Six Artists." 
National Gallery of Art, Wash- 
ington. 

May 5: "Magle der Zalti.” Staate- 
galerla, Stuttgart 
May 5: “Felix Nussbaum, 1904- 
1944: Pictures From There." Is- 
rael Museum, Jerusalem. 

May 5: "From the Glorious Habs- 
burgs to the 20th Century." Sogo 
Museum of Art, Yokohama. 

May 5: “London's Monets.” Na- 
tional Gallery, London. 

May 6: “Contemporary Satirists." 
Royal Academy of Arts, London. 


HOLIDAYS AND TRAVEL 


HoTutays and Travel 


'SUMMER IN FRANCE 1 

Spedal heairg forricWay rentste 
ufl be appeamo again on: 


eav 13m & 2001 June. 

For irate delate contact 
Classified Department 
AITERNATXWAL HERALD TBBUNE 
181 w«ua Charies de Gauls 
92200 Naufflysur-Sekw, France 

T et (f) 41 4S S3 85 
Fee (1) 41 43 93 70 


Hotels 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUST AH. East ol Burnt 
5 star dBkBB. Exceptional location secu- 
rity. contort. Am cuisine, conventions, 
busress savins, sateffita TV. 16 run 
Dander from airport free. LTTELL. Fax: 
1+1) 212-4781 391 / (+33) (0)1-47200007 


Caribbean 


ST. BARTHELEUY, F,WJ_ OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VfLUS- teaefr 
ftonl lo hfltsnte mtnpoola Our agents 
have inspected an vias pereonaBy. For 
reservations cn a Barta. Si Uarin. An- 
guiOa, Barbados, AkeHque. the Yaph b- 
tends... Can WMCO/fSIBAHTH - U.5. 
(401)849-80 12/lax 847-8290. from 
FRANCE 05 90 18 20 ■ ENGLAND 0 
-809898318 


French Provinces 


CHATEAU Near LOIRE VALLEY 

hdepenM ssno. 4 beds, 4 bate, kna 

' Period 


reception. .... 

Uchen. 8 tare TOY & A10. ' . . 

FFig.ttOTno.of F12jOOQ/mi. +6 monte 


FRENCH PROVENCE, CLASSICAL 
MANOR wnffi swunming poof, near meG- 
eval vltage win an tscSte, 6 twdrarm, 
5 bafts. \m uA gardener Mulled. 
Mvnrun 15 days rental July-August 
FF15,000 /h1l Jme-SepL: FFItUOO/wk. 
Tat +32.71 £7.7027 Of +32.7544.78^5. 


PROVENCE / AVIGNON . Owning 
Prounctal via, peaceful, acta®, pool. 
15 mins Avignon, train, airport FuSy 
equipped, sfeqjs 15 July 141 (Avignon 
Festival)- F35,0KJfmo. iw. Tefc +33 
W)1 44506017 day I (On 45516490 BMS 


PROVENCE / COTES 00 RHONE - 
Spaoous modernized tornhouse, 5 beds, 
A bate. Fabulous views. Tel: owner 
-*33(0)475983177, *44 (0)1712824039. 


French Riviera 


fflCE-LUKURY CONDO, FURNISHED 
110 sqm. 2 bedrooms, 2 bate 2 ter- 
races, Mefitenarean view, close to- 
beach. Available after -My 1. Dr. Sum. . 
Far 1-401031*7429 Tat 1-401-331*11® 


NORTH AMERICAN RANCH VACATIONS 




Montana 

"A first rate guest ranch In the last best place." 

wwwj) stray Mc^on/bpr I 1-W-MREHUFK 

■WMinqilMWirr | pH. (406-881-3180) 

Call mbn for spitxd iamnhunty naa. Ifjou'vt wmtui wail tbt las 
XaP minute, plust tall us anjumy, we may still have summer spate avaiUtte. 


LA GARDE FREHET-GRIIIAUD. Pro- 
vencal vfb, 4 bedrooms snauite baths 
ant private terraces, salon, doing room. 
Sbrary-TV, hJy equipped Wtehen. Large 
overflow pool ti 13,000 eqjn. garden, 
beautiful view, quiet and bkcWvb set- 
frig, 12 ton from sea ■ St. Trapez. Mod 
service. 15ft ot June irtJ 31st of August 
Ffi&OOO par *eet Tet owner Germany 
004EW8-745W. 


JuneUuMAugusL 3 min beach. 10 n*l 
Mtmaco/foce, butt by royalty. mouVain 
seevtews. peaceful Garaan. wap round 
pool 8 luxury suites. Visa Tet +33(0)4 
93 80 78 DB. owner +44(0171) 4937484 


HISTORIC BORINS - 4 baftom Viage 
horo-7 persons: $8505850 weeWy. Call 
Owner (feA) Tet (7031 522-128< Fee 
(703) 351-9270. 


CANNES - DELUXE apanmenr-afftce 
during Uni festival, lacing Palais des 
Feshak. Tet +33 (0)4 93 06 26 47. 


RA1IA7UELLE terttahood, 5-bedroom 

house, pool, sea w*. al contort, av* 
able Aug. owner tel +33 (D)1422201« . 


Italy 


Sardinia - capo coda cavajjlo 

Beautfii 600 SQ.m vte 73 ten south ol 
Porto Cenro (Costa SmamHa), 50 km 
south of Pom Rctonda modem design, 
[ limsiifld, on sandy beach, 9 doufie 
s, 8 bathrooms, avadabte May, 
June. Jtrty, September. Tel: +39 335 
473405. Fax +39 2 90571117 am Mar- 


TUSCAN FARMHOUSE 3 bedrooms, 2 
bate, Gorgeous Rental. Superb site. 
CaH/Fac (303^75-1316 USA. 


Paris & Sofcttrts 


H0HTPAHNASSE, July- August, 3+DOin 
fiat, fidy equipped, straps 3. FF60(Wmo 
+ depod. 43 22 05 69 


HOUDAY RENTALS 


Meruydden 

House 


World Class in Wales 
For a tree brochure on the rental 
of our very special, new. 

3BR luxury country house m the 
beautiful Wye Valley, please write: 
Sir Alan Cox. PO. Box 27, 
Chepstow. Monmouthshire 
NF*6 6EY. United Kingdom. 
FAX— 011-44-1291 • 628436 


DISCOUNT TRAVEL 



HEART UONTHARTRE, US owiik nice 
2-room apartment, tuly equipped, cable 
TV. F1350 nrn. F6200 net Ara. Free 
Ifey, July 4 Aug. to 15/9 £ after 15/1. 
Often tenants retera Tet (0)1 41433384 
after 10am or home (0)1 42547062 


THE IMHtMARKET 

will start next Monday. 

It’s the IHT new classified 
advertising feature. 

Don’t miss it every Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday & Saturday. 

A great deal happens 
at the Interznarket 



the tobid-s mm - NFS's kvpek 


Hotels 
at bes - 
rates! 



Phone: Cologne 4+49-221/2077-600 

VTMtidjyv wu«j-i5JlO 

HOTEL RESERVATION SERVICE 

D>u^uS9X*!'.n T-11 • D-GC10G7 Kilr. 

Fix *T45-Z?1;'4J?>-i6C. r-.iuil: on<«. 


r HISTORIC RIVERFRONT^ 

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA | 

Offering 60 gaol luxury coodonuniunu | 
- and 3 bednxjms al pt-cost prices I 
Mid S200.UXVs ro Mid S-lOOJOOO's. | 
Breathlaidog Views | 

For further iajvrmatkm | 

Call: Q04-824-W74 Jwr: 804-824-0734 | 


YACHTING 


FOR CHARTER 



STATIC a 

90' Supercharming 
Benetti Yacht 

4 Staterooms 8/10 guests 
plus 4 crew home 
port Monte Carlo - Rates ’97 


SUMMER US$3800 PER DAY 
OTHER US$2800 PER DAY 
FOOD-FUEL NOT INCLUDED 


Contact: Boat Mararer - ITALY 
TeL: + 39 424 808990 
Fax: + 39 424 808408 
nttp:/ /www-nsoftit/Btatic/ 


Israel 


in ^ m emter 

ra Aw, 3 Ws n g privxs tase hf 






PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 



REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


NORTH AMERICAN RANCH PROPERTIES FOR SALE 


U.S.A. 


The Crescent H Ranch 


JACKSON HOLE, WT 

Consisting of approximately 1 $00 acres, located in world 
renowned Jackson Hole. Wyoming. Featuring 1 mile of Snake River 
frontage and 7 miles of blue ribbon spring creeks for unparalleled 
trout fishing. The ranch has 15 miles of common boundary with the 
Bridger-Teton National Forest. The guest ranch centers around a his- 
toric remodeled 1920s lodge and 10 guest cabins. Portions of the 
ranch are suitable for development and sale as top end hpmesites. 

The ranch fe offered by the Chapter IT Trustee of Rtvermcadcws Associates. Ltd, Case 
#95-20322-11.5. Bankruptcy Court for the District of VfyDrrring. The Bankruptcy Court's 
final hearing for approval of the sale is scheduled for June IT, 12, & 13. 1997 at which time ' 
a Court-supervised auction will be conducted. The trustee entered into a contract with 
Countryside LLC to purchase the property which was authorized by the Bankruptcy Court. 
Under the Court’s order approving the Countryside contract, the Court established proce- 
dures for a Court supervised auction. These indude a minimum bid of $34 ,450.000 in 
cash far the Ranch property, and Countryside has the first right of refusal to match any 
bid. Each bidder must prs-qualify to bid at the sate hearing &. have on deposit with the 
trustee an earnest maw deposit of $5.000.000 bv June 6. 1097- and must execute & 
deliver a contract Identical with the Countryside contract, except the price nuy be left 
blank. By . luna 6. T997. each bidder must satisfy the Trustee that ouch bidder has the 
funds available to dose the transaction immediately after the sale hearing concludes and 
dosing canno t be subject to a financing contingency. Each bidder must ggmgtfftS duff flllfc 
pence prior to the sale hearing, and the sale cannot b e conditioned on obtaining ary regu- 
latory or planning approvals. No bidder will receive ary reimbursement for costs and 
expenses under Bankruptcy Code section 503 or otherwise. 

Contact: Bland Hoke at Jackson Hole Realty 

300 443-9463 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


NEW ZEALAND 


INVESTING FOR 
YOUR PENSION 

NEW ZEALAND FORESTRY 
IS THE ANSWER 
Contact John Lagan 
64-25-343 931, Fax 64-5474 1501 
email: wrigfatson@xtrajCQ.nz 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


Caribbean 


SAKT MAARTEN, fatherlands Anttes, 
Watedrora Home on OySeqxnf. 4 bad 
4 bsto, pool hat dock wtfi 2 m ctefSh, 
3000* sq.ni fend, (tract ocean access: 
USSSOAXL Fax @61) 272-5101 USA. 


French Provinces 


BOURGOOC - ESTATE - 90 MINS 
tram PARS. 2 ha. park wffa nuer. ifth 
century square tower. Mi caniuy (hal- 
ing. Siipert view. 650 sqm. tmg space 
3 living rooms, 2 kitchens, parities. 6 
bedrooms (1 of 80 jqmJ W#i their own 
bathrooms. Fireplaces. Guest house, 
caretakert house: 3 garages. Rare dUr. 
fadusfa negofoBa price; FF 3300,000. 
Tel *33 (0)386412514. Fax (0)388410216 


PBNGORD, LOVELY STOIC HOUSE fa 
f2th asm vitaH. Beams, firagiacas, 
view. F375,OOCLTet *33(0)1 43253687 


GOLF DE LA BRETFSCHE 
tfsslac, Loire rttamtaue 
in (he rricKlte tower of the CHATEAU, 
facing the late, very doming 80 sqm. 
apartment Living room on 2nd floor, 
bathroom & 2 bedrooms on 3rd floor. 

Parting ptace. Funfahad. nipped. 

Far sale. Tefc owner in Pens *33 
(0)1 4317 910801(0)147537382. 


CASTLE, 17th CENTURY. Henry IVth 
slyte. h south west of France (LoteFGe- 
ronne). 650 sqm. living space, main 
house entirely moated. Outstanding 
prasoMon. Outtfttings wBi dabkig tor 
7 hones and 4 garages. Pool. 500 m 
frontage on a Me river. About 9 seres of 
landT&tfieh iuntshed. Price FF 85 M. 
T* +33(0)553419688 Fax (0)553419107 


PROVENCE I COTES DU RHONE - 
1 spacious modernized farmhouse, 
. modem convenience s , 5 bedrooms, 
4 tisSwtm. Stoning hews. By owner 
Tet London *44 (0)171 262 4099. 


Huge 
All m 


HE VALLEY). Ctossie es- 
tata, m cedurr house, large wdsn 
Prestigious baton fa oW Tan 6 ns 
+ 62 e& Price FF 2£M negniabfa. Tet 
France *33 (0)2 47 20 46 40. (0)1 
43354562. New Yaric 212 243 9157 


IBERBES LUBERON 

Unqura Toc^ebl Hstarical ste, 160 sqm. 
Drtw space. Landscaped garden Poof, 
fti ddafe far omw +33(0)442263214. 


BRETAGNE, PRETTY, renovated 15th 
centray water rod and manor house. 
Ckse n fate, 26 ha, in tores! 200 sqm 
apartment does 0 mafa road. TGV. te- 
ns, ahport. FF15M. Tet +33 (0)2 90 78 
7261 Fax (02 98 S7 19 SI 


French Riviera 


AGENCE UAURO 
76 Avenue DMh Somrii 
08230 SAINT JEAN CAP FBfflAT 
Tet *33 (0)4 33 7B 52 00 
FfflC +33 (DM 93 75 52 01 


SAM JEAN CAP FERflAT 

• VILLA: about 145 sqm. 
on 2 levels. PossfcSty 2 sepsnate 
apaitmerts. Panoramic view on 
VfflettrttMur-Ater Say. 
Terraces. Garage. 


1 5400ffl APARTMENT: in residence woh 
swimming pod. 145 sqm 
tang space plus wrapraowi 
batata. Panoramic Hew on 
sea and moittatos. Garage. 


■ Y1LLA: about 7B0 nuu, 'plate 
n Panoramic 


ahns real', garden, 
view. Private mooring tor boaL 


* Exceptional VUA: about 400 Bqm. 
+ cantata's hose. Panoram a view. 
6500 sqm Bat taL 


BEAULIEU SUR HER 

■ftaic HOUSE to be renovated. 
110 sqm. in tie mttfe Of ofvs 
trees. Bufldfag perm* tor 240 Bqm. 
Wing space. Abort 1,100 sqm. bid. 
Panoramic view. 


COTE D’AZUR, EZE SUR HER 

WEEN MCE A M 


SETNEEN MCE A MONACO. 
Charming via, period oonffion. 
On hflstde *4h factious sea view. 
Sun b! day. Large taig room, 

2 beds, 2 bad®, fadepenriert atao 


wih iacities. Swimming pool, pine trass. 
i land: 500 sqm. FF17LL 


Plot oil 
T«l / Rbc 433 (0)4 93 01 53 50. 


NEAR ANTIBES. Atoacfara. sunny one 
bedroom fe Slthg room with good bal- 
cony cmriootiiq private marina. Lifts, 
garage evaiabls. large pooL 5th floor, 
views of Alpee Wartimes. TsL 5th to 
14th ol May: 00 33 (0)4 93 73 70 56 


roquebrune cap kartw 

MSJEVAL VUAGE’ A irtqtt 
oppntunfly to acqJre a* d flfe most 
denity houses an toe Coe if Aar. 

300 sqm. hrg SBfl. bwWalong 
view from faB time arnny terraces of 
tents Cario and toe wtatsiear sea. 

PARK TACENCE 

Le Pvk Palace 

25 avenue de ta Costa 

MC 98000 Monte Certo 

TeL(377) S3 25 15 W 
ftx (377) 83 25 35 X 
wmuni&uuAaatulp* agon 

MCE - COTE D'AZUR - Unique, new. 
roof-apartment rat the beach, very high 
class, quiet and sunny afl day 2 bed- 
rooms, study, thg faring end equflied 
open lottian, 126 sqm. Mng spaca d 
parquet and matte. 260 sqm. terraces, 
parking. Direct access to a prime 
beech. S mins horn sraort. Aston price: 

FF6, 500X0 (25% (Sscottted). CaD or 
tec Monaco +377 &5&58.78. 

SUPERS TERRAIN 1.7 ha, 5 mfa. fam 
Avtgrron, calm, panorama, les Bara* 
style. 250 okl oha trees, bukfmg permit 
tor 250 sqm habtetor. garages, swn- 
mmg pock stettes- Tet 00 44 (0)181 

960 3600 Fax 18T 960 3830 

GOLFE AJAN (GAMES). Lowly 4bed- 
room via + pool panoramic Seavfews. - 
FF4.6M. Coast & Country. The Engkh 

P«4atP Agents on toe French Rtvtera Tek 
+33 (0)4 93753107 wvnvjrougnscom. 

Croatia 

VENETIAN 15th century patszdna don- 
natSrtt m Korcula, DaVnstie. Exqurataiy 
caned stone work. Kitchen, dtatog room, 
launch. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths. raJcooy 
and lerrace. Apply Wooler, 19 Shaw 

Law, Leeds L56 4DH England 

Cyprus 

DREAM HOUSE 3300 SQ-FT, m the 

Rost famous high terry antommun of 
tatad. beatoed located, top amentaes - 
location - servross. Office-use afowed. 

USS 1.399*1 - other urate al sold to 

USS 1 Jim* Ownos finanong avafiabto. 
Physical cash accepted. 24 hr. Tel: 
0097150641738affisc 009713629004. 

Greece 

ATHENS Mar HILTON, quiet open 
view. THREE ROOM PENTHOUSE pU 
Behan. 70 sqm. i*s terrace 8 tetany 

125 sqm). Air condtfaned. SFrCHDOa 

Please ttephona *301 779 22B9 

Italy 


COTE D’AZUR - VHafnndra sur Her. 
Magnificent 3 rooms, terrace, sunny, 
view bey St Jean Cap Ferns t rarirwf 
decoration. Tet *33(0)4 93 80 60 10 


AMALFI COAST, 40 sq.m, house, 
unique view, private access to beach. 
500 sqm. lemon TOva. 4000 sqm. Mad- 
toiranm brushwood, own spring 
S2DO0OO. Teita 39 6 6861206 


TUSCANY -FORTE DB 1URIB. 
Famous seaside resort, ow aer Whe s to 
sen dreefya 321 sqm, 6 besktnm vfia 
SrtlBted in 3060 sqm prs cfastar partL 
A )bw nnutBS west from tee saa. Near 
the local golf course. US S2.KB.000. 
Ttfc 003W95-78M9 from ttM« b 
aaopra. FBB 0039685777010. 


TUSCANY - CWANTL 35 raw km 
Florence, mansEftuG stondause *rift 
garden. 12 inns. 220 sqm. hfly ft- 
stored 3 bafts, 2 ktetes. Brans, fire- 
peaces, efc Lire 900V. Qrod from own- 
er. Further dir Fax 49 99 791 B9 38 


SUPERBLY SITUATED FOUR BED- 
ROOM ‘VILA’, tofy air cratBnso sad 
heated, abevs Geneva tevr wih tabu- 
ktus vistas end 4,000 sqm. lot Pteese 
wnte to- The Novecsto Copaffion, Via 
A Garoamo 28 fi, 16126 Genovs, Italy. 


Monaco 


H0NTE CARLO, 

388 sqm, 3 bedrooms. 31G bafts, 
mart* entenca, Brnry, 3 Moor parking 
spaces. 3 tabs, large terraces, 
fabliaus ven crt medteran ea n and 
hknaca Has not been Wed fa sm 
USS15M iwnsteon. For sale by ownw. 
Tit *33 (DM Ofl 37 03 K 


Morocco 


TANGO . Attractive VBta. one Boor, 
festered fa House & Garten October 
1993. Planished wsh antiques, ben, etc. 
Two bge reoepttns. 2 beds, baboon 
kbhH, servants' quartsra. prtty patio 
garden. £150000. Tet 2129 934 926 


Paris and Suburbs 


UYE tN TOE GRES) BELT, dose to 
Pans (50 mins to La Deferse|. Five 
betooned house, garden, dose town, 
countn. forest. FF235Q.Q0Q. Fax for 
deta* +33 |0)1 30 41 76 97. 


VERSAILLES AREA 

LA CELiE ST CLOUD, 300 sqm. houee 
teeing south. Treed 850 sqm. garden. 
FFaaf.Ta>iF*-33ffl139ffi«S 


5th, BORBONNE, 2/3 bedrooms, 80 
sqm. apartment, bngte, tegh certfags. 
vak* beams, Prepare, wooden floor. 
FF251L Tel/Fax owner (0)1 43540867. 
E-ma4 106E64J012ecompusavqcom 


78 - FEUOEROLLES - 15 mins Paris 
La Defense. 17th cemiy house . Listed 
By owner USS700.000. Tet USA +1 
407-B7M480. Fat *1 407-87&8481. 


14 KMS FOWTAflEBLEAU, rare 7 bed- 
room house on park. FF2AM. Tel: *33 
(0)609854823. TeUsx *32 2-7327QS 


4th - 3 MMS POMPIDOU MUSEUM, 
95 sqm, 2nd floor, bright, work to be 
dona FF1.750.00Q. *33 (0)1 42940885. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAY'S 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears on Page 13 


Personals 


MAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be adored, gtorifled. loved and preserved 
throughout the world now and forever. 
Sacred heart of Jesus pray for U6, Sett 
Jude, wo rite* of mttdes. pray tor us. 
Sart Jude, helper of me hopeau, pray 
tor us. Amen. Say tie prayer nine ttmes 
a day. by toe ntth day. your prayer wl 
be answered, ft has new been known 
to (art PuMcabon must be promised. 
DEL 


MAY THE SACHS) HEART OF >ESUS 
t» adored, eporied, loved and preserved 
thnxqhoui the world, now end forever. 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, nay tor us Sart 
Jude, worker of mlractos, pray for us. 
Start Jude, beta of fae hopeless, pray 
tor us. Amen. Say Ws prayer rtne times 
a day, by the ntth day. your prayer wl 
be msnered. tt has never been known 
to fai Pubtaton must be promised. UK 


Announcements 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S! 



If you enjoy rearing the IKT 
when you travel, «Aiy not 
also get it at home? 
Samwlay defray avateble 
in key U.S. cities 


Call (1) 800 882 2884 

(In New York cafl 212752 3890) 

ItfralbSSribunc. 


nm mun ouu<ero»mi 


BAREUE AS 24 

AUDI MA1 1997 
Pro Hors TV A en davts e loca la 
(Irackction dspontote sir dsnande) 
Renpiace lea barames anterieres 


FRANCE (ane C) an FH - TVA 20,6% 
GO: 3.74 FOD*: 2^6 

SC97: 5y41 SCSP: 5J2 


UK en 4 - TVA 175% (kri B%) 

GO: 05229 FOOT 03476 


ALLBIAGtE (zone I) DMA - TVA 15* 


ZONE 1 - 

G: 



GO: 

1.06 



ZONE f- 

1: 



GO: 

1JB 

SCSP: 

1.41 

ZONES- 

F: 



GO: 

1JB 

SCSP: 

1.41 

ZONE IV 

■F: 



SCSP: 

1.40 



zone nr 

-G: 



GO- 

1<04 

R» 

051 


BELGIQUE en FBI - TVA 21% 

GO: 22JJ7 FDD: 1048 
SC97: 3258 SCSP: 3091 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AllTO DERGI FRANCE. Week 
end: FF500 - 7 days: FFl-500. Paris: 
Trt. *33 ©I 43 68 55 55 


Autos Tax Free 


EUROPE AUTO BROKERS, M C 

TetHcfcnd 31(0)306064494 FxB060994 


Legal Services 


DfVOflCE IN 1 OAT. No fravaf. Writs: 
Box 377. SuObay. MA 01775 USA. Tat 
506M43«87. Fas 508ft4M18S 


Auctions 


Origiral Htatortort Document Auction. 


H011ANDE (Z»e2)M£4 - TVA 17^5. 
GO: 1539 FDD: 0786 
SC97: 1.779 SCSP: 1.736 


LUXEMBOURG en LUFfl - TVA 15% 
GO: 2250 


ESPAGNE izone A) en PTASA-TVA 16% 
GO: 8453 

SC97: 10155 SCSP: 102.41 


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Business Opportunities 


CtMOBCIAL AGBfTln eqiort. heavy 
weight sector, eaeiert imwtodge Asia. 
&&£aa, Aha. Seta re pressnaocn to 
enlarge Mr scale. Consular alijropoa- 
lions. Phillips Dury. Tel/Fa* 


JOINT VENTURE M PWUPPWES lor 
Trerer Hctrt wth 120 rooms. Propertes 
18,141 sq.m. in Pasig: 9542 sqjn In 
Carte. 2,110 - 4.128 - 15535 sqm r 
Vaienzuefa and Piano Gafera wrfli 16 
ha Tet (832) 5255S8SS23-*9(K 


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EUROPE 


PAMS: (HO) 18TAw.Cht*rds- 
GadaiVS 


Ufa-P.O.Bo* 




Tel- (01 1 41 4393 
(t*c (0I| 4) 439370 
AMXMU: Guida ^ - 

B. P.279 PFAidcrra is Vela 
(VinaxAvafAwtona 
Tel.r867fil3, FqJc B67 823. 
GStMANT, MJ5IUA t CBiJBAL 
BJFDFtFrreWt^KrailS, 
D40323 Fmniivt 
TJ.: (069)9712500. 
fisc (069) 0712502a 
BaOUhHUXBWXMGc 
MoiadeBtJtefaer. 
57wJACcWB-IO«Brva«k 
T«L |02) 344-3509, (02) 3440117. 
foe P2J 3460353. 
Gfl&Q&Gns&famKfciAlhwiSA. 
32 fOtjBCB >W. Ariia Gtofei, 
BuWngA' -GR151 2SMorouBi, 
AAetrs, Gfww 
T«L +301/68 51 525. 

Fwc. +301/66 53 357. 
DENMAHC'Em KbbaiKnrtAwL 
DK-2100 (Wwgen. Denmark 
Tel: 31 429325. 


POOTJGAfcW.I 
1081. 27751 
tibon, ftirajgof. 

TeL 351 -1-257-7293. 
ftK 351 -1-457-7332. 

5MM 4M0 UifoJI Sormierta 
Akerta Alooar 46dup. 
Cffiall-t 28014 Madrid 
■fcL 4572B58. Fws 4586074. 
SMrZSUNaMonhdWbbr. 

RO. Ion 511. 


BmteaCOFYHetConMianin, 
63 Ian Am, Ionian WC2E 9JH. 
Tel: 71 8364802. 

Fax: 71 2tO 2254. 


100?My.5wrh*Jani 
L (021)7 


TiL (021) 720X21. 

Fbc (0211 728X91. 
7UKEY: Saba Sad. Cumhuriytt 


AFRICA 

eGYFRUfc b*m. TOGamrBAreb 
M t f mJMM W. Cairo, Egyf* 

Td: 34 99 838. 
ltc21274)4PCOUN. 
foe 3444 429. 

SOUTHCPI AFRICA 


Caklto. 149/5, 8elw Art Khl 
i,a B 9*g8020Q,taa_ 
Ti ^2| 2X5996/232 71! 


2X5996/232 7150 

foe (90212J 2479315 
UHTH) WNGDO*fc43 Long Am. 
ia*n.WC2£»t , 

Tel: 017) 8364802 
Tifcx 262009. Fat 2X 0338 


MIDDLE EAST 


FidrW**i3a,S^001» 
Htanlo, HniaxL 
T«l- 3SB96O082& 
foe 358 9 646 508. 

ITALY: Gem SaJdu, Via C6tH^ 6 
htimX122Uy. 

TeL 5831 5738. foe 5462573. 
LUXEMBOURG: Arthur Maixn«r, 57 ru« 
JB CafwH,B-1060Brusseb 
U: 34118 99. 34119.14. 
foe 3460351 

WrtttLWDS: DkmeM. Btoktaq. 
Buyjicode31 E. 1051 HT 
Amjtenfcm. TeL 31 X6841O0O 
foe 31 204881374. 

NORWAY & SWEDEN: Hm !*UJ. P.O. 
Bte 115 5040 foadfa Hagen, 
Nenay 

ftL (4?) 55 91 3070. 

Fax. (47) 55 91 3072. 


KBtf: Dan foUv PO A 99, 

46101, tareLTelMr. 
Ti.-fWMB6245 
97299-586246. 
foe 972-99-585685. 

CMIAtMr FwoutYor*w4, 
GUFOCBALGRCU 1 
p.0. 80s 15407, (tin. Otar. 

m 323290/323376/410129. 
foe (974) 428379. 

OMAKc/oBAoin 
UJhx (973)591734. 

SAUDI ARAHA; Centa tendon, 

63 Lena Am, tendon WC2E 9K 
TeL- 7i 8364802. 
fisc 71 2402254. 

(MRS ARAB BHMMESeM'. ten too. 
PJD. Bex22156, SwjA, IHtad 
AfabEnrtaH. 

TJ. (061351133. 

Fw ^06)374888. 

Mac 68484 UiNGtF. 


Twideb&AMXXM 
P.O. Bos 4171. 
ffiok.2128, 

TJ. (271 1)8035892 
foe (271 II 8039509. 

NOWHAMBHCA 

(CW TORfc 850 IMA*, 10*1 B, 
NawYaV, N.T. 10022 

ItoL (21 21 752J89a ToNfme 

(800) 572-7212 Tie 427 175 
Fbc 21 27554785 

TEXAS; Ftappar Mvphy. 4040 Sjnat 
Ant 307, Hautoi, tx 77D82 
T«L. 281-4969603. 

Fax 28NP695B4 
Tal foe 800-526-7857. 
LATIN AMBBCA 


AGBOOb/tonDcftoa. 

GtOBE MSXA W1W AWB3CA 
Amom 7C7Dap 202 
CcJwna cU Vt£. Mfeoaj D.F 
Fhnx {525)536 56 90 
(fax (52 5) 662 81 22/687 48 
42/ 

5363577. 

HRU: FwncndaSarRNnto, aLwc 
G dsWcr.155, fool Sen Uxtos. 
tnro-27, ftou. 

TeL (51 14)417852 
Ik 204a9 GYDSA. 

Foe 41 6 422 


MMAYSUL- Anttw MaeMwr 
e/olAo=nMdayu(MjSW 
Tngkrf7 ftonaraPGRM 
No. 8 ritxi Picto, Ownn 


KixJcUxnpur 56 ICC 
7d: |03] Ml 2314, 


ASIA/PAOHC 


HDNG «DN& Mdcysa Bldg, 7*, 
ftoar. X GlMtar Rtal fag 
K<ug.T*l [652)2922-1188. 
He.' 41 170 
fee (652) 2922-1 J». 

ROfc tony D. Way. Ramy W*r 
AdwrtngAooodn. 

2388 VT J ~ * — 1 

Badal 
W.:A45i 


-I03J! 
foe (03)9827751. 

MMb Bhean Tmlsna, Made Soudi 
Ana (P)(ld. LazinM-Z Saoin 
Hots*. P.O. Bex B97fl, Wxrnxto, 
taped Td_- (977-1) 420 B48 
focfP77-l>42l 179. 

RAKSTAFtArfSaUutfn , 

INS Mode Sd oFVT]nd. 
iMhunaCrti 

Fatoa JmhRoad 

Kashi 755X.ft*tai 
M. 5673628/6901 
Far 568 3931 


WWC. Us BmR. Grand* 
Abo Rxcie teoHMO 
BumnCatorlne. 
S«l»91CW,(Mlpp«»aoek 


BQUVIAiMgulO 

Zta&P.Uto«,AwdafoRWB 

Nadand 314, Sarto Cnt 
TaL.(591-3)X99X 
foe (591-3)53 9990 

mOt FndfyatyK Btaomia fall 
ALGMMBrt*tei[toSta,366. 
01445-900 Soo PtaJo. SP. Bmd 
Trd-B534]33. 

' foe 8526485. 

OJI& Maud Adun, Hnrfaxa B63. 
foj9C«to2S0e, 

SSoi3?M27937. 
far 6320126. 


— /400U-. 

Frac 645 6372. 

Ik 1 IB5171/2716ADL 

KiaNE5UtoFbialtia>gw,fee& 
taaiwda, TdASyAWob 
Barfing, JcfcnJwfSuJmai No. 
2, Jofecrta Pusd 
TaL: 251 1484. 

Ik 65722 IOKAIA. 

fat 251 2501. 

tiea ae 

■fefc^Japtm 100. 

Ursnazn wimno 
Tk £3673 Far 3201 0209. 


P.O. Bn 12234, Orfgas Canto. 
PaagOv, 1605 Fh&w 
W_}632j 637-3211 
Far (632) 6330751 


3MGAP0RE, WUC: 138 Ced 
SM.bdCourtt07^2, 

5ngnn0I06. 

TeiJldS 2236478. 

Ik. 28749. HI 5K 
foe 3250841. 


VHUMk BURHfc Y«i VbaOuWna. 
famtdaa Media Ud.. Roam 7-D. 


7fa V VenisB Balding. 29 
faO«i*o,PioBKhin 


Ptaurrww.fa^A 1033a 
Tel: 267-9164, 267-9165. 
fac 267-9166. 

AUSTRALIA 


KORSfcKHwjOn 

HeiniComnwMtorofo^. , 
Bbfln 81A ftwirffo VPOfato 

itu GcxnMaicdav, Mppa-to 
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TdL71 8 3X1/3282- 
fex 7183233. 


Ud 


KBBCUMfc 
Bander GuBw. 
HcnalL- - 
L»J7 ( 82CDl»i 
MdbamSOOO.Auada 

TJL. 9650 lira 
fm: 9650 6515 


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[ROQUE, HSTwHSU. VMimA U of 
ctwm, 287 sqm. oi Chamts de Mas. 
infer Sfel Tower; suwy adq 2 bvefe- 
gromd hoot and besemoiL aw bed- 
roars, 3 bate, garden S gataron park. 
Tet Owner +33 Rl 47 05 08 21 


PARS Sto. dose Jstfft des Ptotes, 23 
raanq doutda king, 55 sqm. 3rt Boar, 
Bfevstor. east west expostn, suwy, 
efin. im 2 ados. FFfffUffS. Tflt + 

Far 33 44 62 28 03 ; 

70S, WCVBSITE, SAWT GERMAIN, ‘ 

275 sqm, Mole Bspfltm 3 betkwns; 

2 ttys, mans studb. Paddng. Refined 
deconn. Ti J3 (0)1 45 W 2D 48. ■ 

LATIN QUARTS}, 105 sq.m. rsdofle, 
rare, double exposer, bteotqr, tapbee. 
cairn, Mng room, 2 bedrooms, 2 ttys,' 
F2J9U. Tflt *33991 41 13 73 79 

ST GERMAIN DB PRES bp tor ta, 

16ft rani house, Beef cwpte. 3rt 
rmra. cakq wen. Td *33 (0)143293757 

Switzerland 

F^LAKEGBEVA&ALPS 

L JSatotDferatyefsaJtoaiteed ■ 
M B otg gpectacty etaca 1875, 

Adraefcra ptopertee, ovettooidro news 

1 to 5 bedroanB, from SFr 200,000. 

REVAC SJL 

52, Madbrflisit CH-1211 GBCVA 2 

Td 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 

BOOGEMONT / GStAAD VALLEY 
CFfamnMtae 
announces the consbuctm d a 

LUXURY CHALET 

6 bedrooms with private bttrooms, 

3 recaption rooms, fatten, stasia, 
touKsr fadoor paridng. 

TeL (41)26 925 92 73 

Fax. (41) 26 925 92 75 

LUGANO - SUPERB VILLA. Exctosfw- 
ioedion lor elegant Dying. Price: SFr. 
3,000,000. Seriots pa/ttes only. Pteasa 

fax *41 22 990 2804. 

USA Residential 

NYC /5th AYE *0 ST. BEST ADDRESS 

IN CITY: PRESTIGIOUS PARC V. 315 
rooms, IjOOO sqfl. Vast farinq targe bad- 
roam, waA-in cfosats. Central Parte vow. 

Ready to move-in S335K. Tet JULIA 
CAMACHO +1-212491-7023 / 7S94917. 

Real Estate 
for Rent . 


Switzerland 

GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED tyBrt- 
mants. From sfwfcs to 4 beOooos. Tet 
*41 22 735 6320 fox +41 22 7362671 


Business Travel 


W/Borinm One Frawart Tovehn 
l%afl.Noi 


WorttwWe. Up to 50% ofl. No caifnns, 
no restrictions, bperisi Canada Tel: 
1-514-341-7227 FfflC '1-51 4-34 1-7998. 
e-mail address: imperiBlOloghi.net 
bttp-jPwwwJogfartatrinperW 


Capital Available 


Newly SitecAad, 
national hvestraort Fund 

now providing loan financing, or 
venture capital, for solid projects 
fa most coirtffBS. Minimum 2M USD. 
Fax fuM project summary drect to the 
Fund Mareqjera 8 totahae n t Bantere 
H0MB8-7056. Prompt response. 


Financial Sendees 


PRASE BANK 


GUARANTEES 

Venture Capital Francs AraSaflle 
tor Gwemmeni Projeds and 
Govennanf Companras 
fed are lor sate. 

Laige Protects on SpeoaKy 
A to, Long Term Finance tor 
Large and Smal Concedes 
No commsston UnS Funded 


REPfSSEMTATWE 
Needed to act as Loan 
Pteass reply fa Engfch 


VENTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 


16311 Ventura BteL Sutto 999 
Encfae, cafllomta 9143B USA 
fox No.- (81M 9(6-1698 
TeL (818) 


GREAT BRITAIN 



FrenchRhrfera 


COTE ITAZin, between Le Lavsndou 
and SL Tropaz. vBa on beach, 6 

bedrooms, toby hartrtnd, tor rent for 2 
weeks, only Jung end September. 
FF20.00Q. Tet «. 33(0)1 45 20 10 02 


Holland 


renthouse wiernatxjnal 
M ol InHofand 

tor (sam9 famished housesflfete 
Tet 31-206448751 Ftoc 31-206465909 
. Nhoven 1921, 1083 Am Amsterdam 


Paris Area Furnished 


Y9DO«e INTERNATIONAL 
BASTLE: testaUy dacoratBd.170 sqm. 
seen fa tamous house magazina 66000. 
. . 5ttc averiaiang toe Seine & 

5 bridges, 2 to 3 bedrooms. 
RhijubI floor. FF17JJ00. 

Sening dl your Raotaf Hoots 
Tat +33(0)142788330 F«x(0)1427BB340 


ROYAL APARTMENT opposite Mawn’s. 
1801 certuy isndm&rt apartment in cen- 
ter d Peris, inner couityaRl, qu eL very 
sunny. 260 sqjn. (2800 square feet), 
terga recef&m areas, two bedrooms, too 
bam 18 tool crtBngs, original panels. 
Fuly famished to tty standanl Private 
pendng In courtyaid. S14,500fmo, up to 
12 tnootfu. Tel: Paw +33(0)144698669 


3RD - MARAIS - EXCEPTIONAL 
3 be dro oms. 85 sqm., channng, reno- 
vated. hAy fumahed. washer-diyer, TV, 
Emplace. F1L000. Tef +33 (0)147883132 


BETTER THAN A HOTELI Enjoy an ex- 
11 rail 


cepttonaf 55 sq.m, flat on rail Neul, 
uraque view owr Sana. SBOCWt, indud- 
fag taenfcfeanng. Tek +33(0)142492511 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


VAUCRESSON. chamuig house. IX 
sq.m., 4 bedrooms, 3 bath rooms, 
equipped ttcheq garden, game, near 
htejnrtbB) sducts. June )SL FF16J00. 
No agmta Tet *33 (0)1 47 41 49 48 


USA 

NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 


•eefi to 1 year. Great Locations. Call 
Pa/CHet 2124484223b Far 212- 
448-9226 E4Wh ttnmetwoOaoLcom. 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


tor 

soumoNS 

Cortacf 


BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


Bankable guarantees to serue tuning 
tor viable projaas 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTA7E 


Long tem cataterai 
Smwrted Gueraeaes 


Fac (632) BHM284 
Tet (sax) msssa 


(Comraaon earned only ifaon Furtng) 
Brokers Gnpission Assured 


Employment 


General Positions Wanted 


FMEMCH FBIALE. 22. Fluert m Engieh. 
Maikebng dptotna. Ewenence n adver- 
feang and P JL Tet +33 (0)145532366 


TO PLACE AN AD 
Iff THE 

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lcraliQS»Eritranc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY MAY 2, 1997 


Soros Foundation Faces 
$3 Million Fine in Belarus 

financier Says Government Aims to Close It 



•*S 


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bid 1 ? 


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<****l*0~S»ffF n m'Dapmha 

NEW YORK — The government of 
Betoushas imposed a $3 million fine 

• °°_r clarussian Soros Foundation for 
atieged currency-exchange violations in 
an apparent effort to shut down the 
cou ntry s largest independent nongov- 
ernment organization, spokesmen for 
foundation said Thursday. 

' The fine follows what foundation of- 
ficials w New York called a monthlong 
campaign of harassment against the 

■ foundation, which supports education, 
ecological and medical programs. 

■ - The foundation also supports inde- 
pendent civic groups and activists, some 
of whom have been critical of President 
Alexander Lukashenko’s efforts to sup- 
press opposition opinions in Belarus, a 
former Soviet republic of just over 10 
mini on people. 

Belarussian tax officials, after a 
. monthlong audit of the group, issued the 
fine after an audit concluded that die 
foundation had violated its status as a 
charitable organization by supporting 
unsanctioned opposition rallies. 

The government said the or ganizatio n 
had also taken other actions that Belarus 
state television called “an intervention 
in Belarus’ domestic affairs.'’ 

George Soros, the international fin- 
ancier and philanthropist whose money 
. supports tiie foundation, called the gov- 
ernment’s charges “totally without 
. merit.’’ He said the fine was a “blatant 
attempt to close the foundation by im- 
, posing an exorbitant penalty for nonex- 
lsting infractions.” 

. Mr. Soros said the foundation would 
not pay the fine while it appealed the 
government decision. 

“It is not meant to be paid,” Mr. 
Soros said of the fine. “It is meant to 
dose us down. And it is part of a con- 
certed campaign by Lukashenko to con- 
solidate his power by suppressing the 
independent sector in Belarus.” 

Tax inspectors began an audit of the 
group’s Belarus office in March, when 
the government criticized the founda- 
tion's activities and barred its director, 
Peter Byrne, from returning to the coun- 
ty- 

Belarus had accused Mr. Byme of 
intervening in die country’s affairs by 
taking part in the opposition’s rallies. 

The tax committee said the founda- 
tion had “made big profits through sales 


on the currency exchange due to in- 
flation and changes in exchange rates.” 

A spokeswoman for the Soros foun- 
dation, Veronica Begun, said the Be- 
larus government’s audit had said 19 
grants last year did not correspond to 
their stated goals. 

Auditors said that because the grams 
were not charitable in nature, the fund 
should have paid various taxes, includ- 
ing the recipients' income taxes. The 
sum they demanded equaled almost $3 
million, she said. 

Government officials were not avail- 
able for comment Wednesday, which 
was the start of a national holiday peri- 
od. 

Responding to tax officials' accu- 
sations that the foundation had profited 
from its activities, Ms. Begun sard, “We 
do not even know what they mean. It is 
completely absurd.” 

Ms. Begun said the fines amounted to 
about half of last year’s $6 milli on 
budget The foundation has given more 
than 4,000 grants since ir was estab- 
lished four years ago in Belarus. 

An open letter from Mr. Soros’s Open 
Society Institute in New York called foe 
allegations “without merit” and 
“clearly designed to force foe BSF to 
shutdown.” 

The letter also said that the fin**- had 
come “at the end of a monthlong cam- 
paign of harassment directed by foe 
government against the foundation.” 

Mr. Lukashenko, whom the oppo- 
sition accuses of dictatorial methods, 
has on several occasions accused foe 
foundation of interfering in the internal 
affairs of the country. 

He also has issued a decree calling the 
foundation’s tax-exempt status into 
question. 

Representatives of the Open Society 
Institute say that in foe past four years, 
the Belarussian Soros Foundation has 
provided more than $13 million to sup- 
port development in education, science, 
Internet connections and civic organi- 
zations. 

In January, authorities in Croatia 
filed tax-evasion charges against Mr. 
Soros’s foundation. Those charges also 
were denied. 

Mr. Soros, a native of Hungary, funds 
many economic and cultural projects in 
former Communist countries. 

(MT.AFP.AP) 



The Labour Party leader Tony Blair, left, with Gordon Brown, his shadow chancellor of the Exchequer. 

Labour Toes the Line, the Tory Line 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — British voters went to 
foe polls Thursday knowing little 
about how a Labour government 
would run foe economy if it came to 
power, except that it would probably 
be difficult to distinguish from foe 
way Conservative governments have 
run the economy for 18 years. 

In fact, during this election cam- 
paign. Labour has fought for the 
hearts and minds of voters by firmly 
ontlining what it will not do. par- 
ticularly its pledges not to raise foe 
income tax or even to turn back the 
clock on foe massive privatizations 
that became synonymous with 
Thatcherian. 

“Labour has moved massively to- 
ward foe Conservative agenda,” said 
Ruth Lea, policy director for the In- 
stitute of Directors, the traditional 
arch-Tory lobbying group for small- 
and medium-sized business. Long 
seen as quick to tax and quicker to 
spend, this time around under foe 


flinty gaze of its economic policy di- 
rector, Gordon Brown, the party has 
pledged not to raise income taxes. 

Even more daringly it promised to 
hold government spending for the 
next two years within the exceedingly 
tight bounds already set out by the 
Conservatives in their last budget, and 
to stick to their target of holding in- 
flation below 2J5 percent. 

Where Labour has parted company 
with tire Conservatives is over its 
backing of a minimum wage and foe 
Social Charter, both of which are bit- 
terly opposed by foe Conservatives . 
and many business people. 

While its detractors see foe Social 
Charter as a sort of open-ended com- 
mitment to whatever sorts of pro- 
labor policies gain popularity on foe 
Continent, the fact is that it now con- 
tains little that would do much harm 
beyond such things as setting man- 
datory leaves for new parents. 

• Similarly, Labour has de-fanged 
the minimum wage issue by endorsing 
the concept but declining to set a 
precise level. Labour supporters note 


that America has long prospered with 

a minimum w age 

In some respects foe putative party 
of change now seeks to outdo the 
Conservatives in putting foe govern- 
ment and the nation on a sound fi- 
nancial footing. Though parsimoni- 
ous with . the details. Labour has 
nonetheless won over many business 
people with its newfound probity. 

“Having lived through 30 years of 
booms and busts that have been dev- 
astating for small businesses. I must 
say that if Labour delivers low in- 
flation and stability it will be quite a 
boon,” Ms. Lea said. 

Even the notoriously fickle finan- 
cial markets — where change almost 
invariably is seen as a negative and 
Labour almost anathema — have lost 
little of their luster. 

On foe eve of a probable sweeping 
Labour victory, foe markets remain 
buoyant. 

On Wednesday foe FTSE 100 stock 
market index briefly hit a record high 

See LABOUR, Page 17 


■ > 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 




For Business, No More ‘Mr. Bad Guy ! 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


■: - 


- zs 


W ASHINGTON — In foe mid-1960s, foe image 
of U.S. business took a dramatic turn for foe 
worse from which it has not yet fnfly re- 
covered. Multinational corporations were de- 
nounced as villains by a generation of protesters against foe 
Vietnam War, many of wbom,'lik& President Bill Bin ton , 
now bold influential positions in American society. 

While prime-time television predominantly portrayed 
business executives as good guys until 1965, according to 
- sociological researchers, since the 1970s Hollyw ood h as 
- much more often depicted them as thugs and murderers. 

Since tW», capitalism has triumphed in the Cold War, 
■ multinational corporations have 






t, and many of today’s com p a n i e s 
are behaving better in most respects 
titan ever before. But the villainous 
image of business b aa proved jemaric- 
aWy durable. The caricature of greedy 
multinationals ruthlessly exploiting 
the world’s workers still holds wide sway in the popular 
imagination as ifnotbing had changed in 30 years. The last 
tiling you would expert most of today ’stop executives to be 
called is “socially responsible.” 

And yet, more and more American corporations are 
trying to be just that They are increasingly punnMg policies 
that reflect the political values of their harshest critics. 

In just the past few weeks, major corporations — in- 
cluding some of those, like Nike Inc., who are most often 
attacked for their labor practices — have joined mt ear- 
national campaigns to crack down on sweatshops and child 
labor in developing countries. . 

This week, some of foe country s best-known companies, 

including AT&T Corp^ International Business Machines 

- _ n. tn a flachv conference 


Corporations’ villainous 
image, though outdated, 
has proved durable. 


their personnel to help good causes such as the care of 
deprived young people in inner cities. Bat that is only the tip 
of the iceberg: large numbers of American companies have 
been quietly laboring for years to be good citizens in their 
own communities. 

Many multinationals now have codes and policies re- 
quiring them to -follow their “best practices” in envi- 
ronmental protection and labor relations everywhere they 
operate aroundthe world. Others want investors to know that 
they are promoting jobs for women and ethnic diversity. 

Of course, cymes say that corporations are only em- 
bracing ethics because it is good for business: Hispanics, for 
instance, may behired to promote exports to Latin America, 
and labds certifying that goods are produced in envir- 
onmentally and socially correct conditions are intended to 
improve sales in American mal ls. 

That is obviously true as far as it 
goes — although few companies are 
able to measure foe precise commer- 
cial advantages of good corporate cit- 
izenship. More often, companies 
speak broadly about foe long-term 
benefits to their image and to the econ- 
omy in general. Bat most companies are not just doing good 
deeds for the money. Despite its commitment to maximum 
mums for shareholders, American business practice often 
co ntains an ethical streak similar to that which runs through 
American foreign policy. It is part of die culture. 

Of course, for the most hardened critics it is never 
enough. As Michael Novak of the American Enterprise 
Institute puts it, many people educated in foe humanities 
and the social sciences still think of business as “vulgar, 
philistine and morally suspect.” 

But most companies realize that over foe long ran it will 
do them no good to flout the standards of the society in 
which they operate. Good business and good behavior are 
increasingly seen as two sides of foe same coin. Mr. 
Clinton, who spoke at foe Philadelphia conference, should 


rvmTanrl WaltDisnev Co- flocked to a flashy conference Clinton, who spoke at foe Philarfeipma conference, : 

tell his Hollywood friends dm times have changed. 



Bill Gates and Craig McCaw want to establish an ‘Internet in the Sky.’ 

Billionaires and Boeing 
Flesh Out ‘Sky Net’ Vision 


By Mike Mills 

Wtt/tingion Post Service 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 





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WASHINGTON — A plan by two 
billionaires to build an “Internet in foe 
sky” that would use hundreds of low- 
orbiting satellites to transmit data and 
conversations all over the world has 
turned from a starry-eyed vision to a 
work in progress. 

Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft 
Corp., and Craig McCaw, a pioneer in 
cellular telephones, on Tuesday awarded 
their Seattle-based neighbor Boeing Co. 
a $9 billion contract to coordinate the 
building of their pet project, called 
Teledesic. The company plans to begin 
high-speed two-way service in 2002. 
Prices would be comparable to today’s 
$2Q-armonfo rates for comparatively 
low-speed access, the company said. 

The contract is the biggest ever in the 
commercial-satellite industry. It is in- 
tended to bring closer an era of “per- 
sonal” communications in which people 
could travel anywhere — even into foe 
most remote regions of the world — and 
use a satellite telephone or link a com- 


PAGEX5 


purer to die Internet without any wires. 

The project, in which Boeing will 
invest $100 million of its own money, 
was greeted as a potential lift for foe 
aerospace industry because most major 
aerospace firms would be involved as 
subcontractors on large components. 

“Before, people really discounted 
whether Teledesic was going to be vi- 
able,” said John Hodulik, an analyst with 
Tigard Freres & Co. “Now it’s certainly 
more likely to happen. The fact that Boe- 
ing is committing capital is important.” 

While Teledesic’s breadth is unique, it 
is hardly alone in its desire to offer 
Internet access over satellites. Recently, 
Loral Space & Communications Ltd. ami 
foe French company Alcatel AIsfoom SA 
joined to build and launch Alcatel’s $3.9 
billion system of 64 low-orbiting satel- 
lites known as SkyBridge- That system 
may be combined with Loral’s Cyberstar 
system of four- geostationary satellites. 
Motorola Inc. also plans a $6 billion low- 
orbiting system called M-Star. 

Fifteen companies, including Loral, 

See SKY, Page 17 


Rate Jitters 
Shake U S. 
Blue Chips 

But Technology Issues 
Still Attract Investors 

CompMtdtyOtrSkllFmn Dispart** 

NEW YORK — Fresh evidence of a 
strengthening U.S. economy sent blue- 
chip stocks down Thursday, but faith 
that high-technology companies would 
continue to post strong profits kept foe 
Nasdaq index supported. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed 32.51 points lower at 6,976.48, 
and foe broader Standard & Poor's 500- 
share index lost 2.81 points, to 798.53. 
But advancing issues outnumbered de- 
clining ones by a 7-to-5 ratio on foe New 
York Stock Exchange, and the Nasdaq 
index closed up 9.74 points at' 
1 ,270.50. 

The government said Thursday that 
Americans’ wages and spending both 
rose in March. This followed data re- 
leased Wednesday showing that the 
economy grew at a surprisingly strong 
5.6 percent annualized rate in the first 
quarter. 

The strong data could prompt the 
Federal Reserve Board’s policymakers 

UJ5, STOCKS 

to raise interest rates when they meet 
May 20. 

“There’s no way the Fed ought not 
continue to raise rates, and that's going 
to hurt profits,” said Alan Krai, a 
money manager at Trevor Stewart Bur- 
ton & Jacobsen Inc. 

Higher rates mean higher borrowing 
costs and debt-servicing costs for 
companies, which can limit profits. 

U.S. companies posted an average 
first-quarter profit rise of 16 percent, foe 
biggest increase in years, as die six-year 
economic expansion buoyed aerospace, 
autos, oil and other old-line industries. 
But investors are worried that busi- 
nesses will not be able to sustain that 
growth. 

Treasury bond investors remained 
unconvinced that rates were headed 
higher. They focused instead on a report 
Thursday from the National Associ- 
ation of Purchasing Management, 
which said its index of manufacturing 
activity fell in April from March. 

The price of the benchmark 30-year 
issue rose 17/32 point, to 96 13/32. 
taking the yield down to 6.91 percent 
from 6.96 percent Wednesday. 

In the stock market, investors saw 
opportunities in computer-related 
shares and some smauer-company 
stocks. 

“The timing is great right now for 
smaller-caps,” said Robot Perkins, who 
runs a small -cap fund for Berger As- 
sociates. “I don’t think you’ve seen a 
disparity this wide since 1981 and ’82.” 

Cisco Systems was the most actively 
traded U.S. stock, rising 1% to 53%. 

Informix, a maker of computer data- 
base software, fell 1/16 to 7 J4 after it 
posted a loss of $140 million for the 
latest quarter on a 34 percent revenue 
drop, a far wider decline than expected. 
Informix's loss appeared to be arch- 
rival Oracle’s gain as its shares rose. 

Adobe Systems, a graphics software 
writer, jumped 2% to 4134 after it was 
selected to enter foe S&P 500 index, 
replacing Santa Fe Gold, which is being 
bougju by Newmont Mining. 

Companies often rise on news of their 
inclusion in foe S&P 500, because in- 
vestors expect demand for foe shares to 
increase as fund managers who seek to 
replicate foe S&P 500. Index’s perfor- 
mance will have to buy the shares. 

Deli Computer rose 3 1/16 to a 52- 
week high of 86% as foe computer com- 
pany was rated “speculative buy” in 
new coverage by Sands Brothers & Co. 
analyst Matthew Russo. 

Intel rose % to 153% after it said 
demand for its MMX chip, which has 
enhanced graphics capabilities, was the 
strongest for any processor ever. 

“Intel has got to be one of the cheapest 
of the great growth companies in the 
wodd,” said Marshall Front, chairman 
of Trees Front Associates Inc. 

Cambridge Heart fell 2 to 7% after the 
company said it was delaying applying 
for U.S. approval to make additional 
claims far its heart diagnosis technol- 
ogy- 

Coca-Cola fell 1% to 62% on news 
the beverage company's joint venture 
with Carisberg AS to distribute Coke 
products in Scandinavia would be in- 
vestigated by European Commission 
antitrust regulators. (Bloomberg, AP ) 


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CcapdaltyOsr Saff F ran DispOKtia 

BOSTON — Fidelity Investments 
Inc. is making yet another senior ex- 
ecutive shift, putting James Curvey, 
president of Fioelity Capital, the com- 
pany’s nonin vestment side, in line as tin 
No. 2 to Edward Johnson HI. 

He mil be chief operating officer of 
FMR. the parent company, and chair- 
man of foe operating committee, the 
company said Wednesday. 

Robert Pozen. foe newly appointed 
president of Fidelity Investments’ trou- 
bled mutual-fund business, also moved 
quickly to shake up foe operation Wed- 
nesday, naming three lieutenants to 
oversee Fidelity’s equity-ftmd man- 
agers. 

The three, who include Abigail John- 
son, the daughter of Fidelity’s chair- 


man, succeed William Hayes, who 
headed the equity funds unit for the last 
seven years. Fidelity announced that 
Mr. Hayes, who has been at Fidelity for 
28 years, would retire this autumn. 

The latest move to overhaul foe 
equity-fund business completes foe re- 
placement of the three top executives 
who oversaw Fidelity’s stock funds in 
January, when foe company embarked 
on a nation wide tour to reassure nervous 
investors. 

J. Gary Bmkhead, who for fat past 
decade headed Fidelity’s entire mutual- 
fund business and who led foe com- 
pany’s January road show, was replaced 
by Mr. Pozen last week after Mr. Burk- 
bead was promoted to vicechainnan and 
given responsibility for Fidelity’s re- 
tirement and brokerage businesses. Bart 


Grenier, who in January was promoted 
to assistant head of foe equity division, 
resigned from Fidelity last week. 

Mr. Hayes was the primary architect 
of the last redesigning of Fidelity’s 
equity division, in March 1996. 

None of Fidelity’s diversified equity 
funds has outperformed the Standard & 
Poor’s 500 index over the past year, and 
only two — foe Dividend Growth and 
foe New Millennium funds — outper- 
formed the S&P benchmark over foe 
past three years. 

M Sei S?^ y ’a , flagship 

Magellan fund lost between $690 nuf- 

lion and $720 million in April, marking 
its tenth straight month of net outflows! 
analysts who track foe No. 1 U.S. mu- 
tual-fund company said. 

(NYT, Bloomberg) 




PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 




The Dow 




3 M to Sell 
Billboard 
Business 


Bombardier Gets Big N. Y. Subway Order 

Canadian Transit Firm Beats Rivals for Deal to Replace Aging Cars 


U.S. Settles 
On-Line 


Dollar in Deutsche marks fit Dollar in Yen 



Courted by Our Staff FrmDupctdKx 



’■“'D J'F M A M ; 1 U D ' J F M A M 

”y^ ■ J/ : w ^ . 1 .> 6 £&$ 


s 






Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Imcraukaol Herald Trituac 


Very briefly: 


McDonnell to Resume Launchings 


HUNTINGTON BEACH, California CAP) — McDonnell 
Douglas Carp, is scheduled to resume its satellite-launching 
business Friday, ending a pause that began Jan. 17, when a 


Delta-2 rocket exploded above Cape Canaveral. 
The air force and McDonnell Douglas set 


The air force and McDonnell Douglas separately an- 
nounced die resumption Wednesday. The first launching is 
scheduled from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. 

It will cany the first 5 of 66 satellites planned for Iridium, a 
global telecommunications project led by Motorola Inc. Mc- 
Donnell Douglas is under contract to launch S3 of the 66 
satellites during the next four years. 


ST. PAUL, Minnesota — Min- 
nesota Minin g & Manufacturing Co. 
said Thursday that it would sell its 
billboard advertising business to 
Outdoor Systems Inc. for $1 billion. 

The 3M unit. National Advert- 
ising Co., is the third-largest U.S. 
billboard company, with annual 
sales of about $220 million and 
25,000 billboards nationwide. It has 
530 employees. 

For Outdoor Systems, the pur- 
chase expands its market share in 
California and Texas and provides 
an entry into several Florida mar- 
kets. It also caps a yearlong buying 
spree that began when the Phoenix- 
based company bought Gannett 
Co.’s billboard business for $710 
million in August. 

“This acquisition gives us die op- 
portunity to offer broader national, 
regional and local advertising cov- 
erage as well as maintain our lead- 

dusny,” said Arte Moreno, ^cLief 
executive of Outdoor Systems. 

Outdoor Systems shares closed 
$1.50 higher at $2925 on the New 
York Stock Exchange, while 3M 
finished unchanged at $87.00. 

3M, the maker of Piost-It Notes, 
Scotch adhesive tape, sandpaper and 
other products, expects to post again 
of about $500 milli on in the quarter 
when the sale is completed. The com- 
pany said that billboanls did notfit its 
strategy to expand. 

The company first got into the 
billboard business in 1947. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


OmrAdhrOtrSuffPmDbpmim 

NEW YORK — Bom- 
bardier Inc. has won the 
bulk of $1 .4 billion order 
to replace much of New 
York City ’s aging fleet of 
subway cars, reinforcing 
the company’s d ominant 
position in the North 
American rapid-transit 
market 

The Metropolitan 
Transportation Authority 
of New York gave Bom- 
bardier a $920 million or- 
der on Wednesday for 
680 subway cars. The or- 
der from the authority in- 
cludes an option for 200 
additional cars. 


Kawasaki Heavy In- 
dustries Ltd, of Japan re- 
ceived a $520 million or- 
der from the authority for 
400 subway cars. 

Bombardier. the 
Montreal-based maker of 
rail cars, jetliners and 
snowmobiles, has fought 
hard for this order since 
1989. It not only bested 
Kawasaki but shut out 
GEC-Alsthom, the Brit- 
ish-French company. For 
Bombardier, the order is 
a needed shot in foe arm 
for its recently troubled 
transportation tuhL 

“It's a landmark con- 
tract,” said Ted Larkin, 


an analyst with foe 
brokerage Bunting War- 
burg Inc. in Toronto. 
New York commuters 
are familiar with the 
streamlined look of 
Bombardier cars. In 
1982, Bombardier was 
awarded its first contract 
to build 825 cars. 

The new cars, which 
will replace most of the 
subway’s conoding barn- 
red cars built in foe late 
50s and early 60s, will 
appear on the Independ- 
ent Rapid Transit, or IRT 
liires. They will incorpor- 
ate some significant 
changes, including wider 


seats, glass windows be- 
tween the cars and elec- 
tronic message boards 
showing where the train 
is along its route. 

StfiL foe Straphangers 
Campaign* a ndezs ad- 
vocacy group, criticized 
the new design for cut- 
ting foe number of seats 
by 38 in a 10-car train. 

Bombardier bolds 
about 40 percent of the 
North American market 
for subway cars, but its 
transportation unit has 
struggled recently. In 


3 Services to Clarify 
Offers of Free Trials 


19%, pretax profit for the 
division fell 36 percent 


m fell 36 percent 
( Bloomberg , NYT) 


Dollar Slips as Japan Talks Up the Yen 


NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against most other major currencies 
in late trading Thursday, pulled 
down by lower stock prices and 
speculation the Bank of Japan was 
poised to defend its currency. 

Pressure also came from a report 
from the National Association of 
Purchasing Management, which 
said its index of manufacturing foil 
in April, a report that some saw 
reduces the chances the Federal Re- 
serve would raise U.S. interest rates 
again soon. But other data showed a 
strengthening economy, which 
made a rate rise more likely and 
limited the impact of the purchasing 
managers’ report 

“The dollar is going up and down 


with speculation of a rate hike,” 
said Shinya Nambu. head of cur- 
rency trading at Bank of Tokyo- 
MitnbUULtd. 

In 4 P.M. trading, the dollar fell to 
126 .550 yen from 127.115 yen 
Wednesday, to 1.7225 Deutsche 


finance officials that they would act 
to prevent the U.S. currency from 
gaining further. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mztsu- 
zuka said the government would 


make an effort to prevent foe yen 
from dropping more against the dol- 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


marks from 1.7305 DM, to 5.8071 
French francs from 5.8346 francs 
and to 1.4695 Swiss francs from 
1.4735 francs. The pound fell to 
$1.6227 from $1.6242. 

Pressure against die yen came 
from rumors that the Bank of Japan 
was selling dollars for yen. Thai 
followed remarks from top Japanese 


from di oppiug more against the dol- 
lar. His deputy, Tadashi Ogawa, 
said Japan would closely monitor 
the currency market and take action 
if necessary. 

Finance ministers and central- 
bank chiefs from the Group of Sev- 
en leading industrial nations said 
Sunday drat “excess volatility” in 
exchange rates was undesirable and 
foal they would “cooperate as ap- 
propriate” in currency markets. 

(Bloomberg. AFX, Market News ) 


■ The United States and foe European Union reached agree- 
ment on an overall framework for recognizing each other’s 
meat and poultry inspection standards. Toe two rides had set 


agreement can reen reacnea 

GROW: Rise in U.S. Consumer Spending in March Renews Rate-Rise Speculation fa i 

i ° * “AOL believes this decree canf 


threatening to block EU meat exports worth $300 million a 
year if no agreement was reached. 

• Time Warner Inc. said it would shut down the interactive 
television network that it introduced with great fanfare more 
than two years ago. Technical difficulties and high costs 
hindered its start-up. 

• Avon Products Inc. and Mattel Inc. will introduce new 
'Barbie dolls and other [noducts as part of an effort to expand 
joint marketing. 

• Aon Corp.’s first-quarter earnings fell 5 J5 percent, to $86.4 
miHion. as the insurance broker faced added costs from recent 
acquisitions. 

• HFS Inc. said first-quarter earnings more than doubled, to 
$58.9 million, on foe strength of its car-rental business and its 
hotel and real estate franchising. 

• Rand McNally Inc, foe world's largest commercial map 
maker, has retained Goldman, Sachs & Co. to seek a possible 

buyer. Bloomberg, AP, AFX 


wMmSSTI Continued from Page 1 


“persisting strength in demand.” 

The possibility that the Fed’s 
policy-making Open Market Com- 
mittee will raise rates when it next 
meets May 20 sent a shudder 
through Wall Street on Thursday. 
The Dow Jones industrial average 
fell 32.51 points, to close at 
6,976.48. (Page 15) 

“Fbr the Fted, these data factor in 
on the tighter ride of die ledger,” 
Ray Stone of Stone & McCarthy 
Research Associates said of foe 
growth data. “While admittedly 
these data are rear-view in nature, 
they still characterized the mo- 
mentum of demand” and showed 
how strong it had been. 


Consumers were responsible far 
foe lion's share of the surge in gross 
domestic product Households 
stepped up their purchases of a wide 
range of goods and services, includ- 
ing new cars, furniture, medical 
care, comparers and brokerage ser- 
vices, as their overall spending rose 
at a 6.4 percent annual rate, after 
adjustment for inflation- That was 
nearly double foe gain in foe final 
three months of last year. 

The increase in inflation-adjusted 
gross domestic product also was for 
larger than economists had expected 
when the year began and even well 
above estimates made as recently as 
a few days ago. 

Moreover, it came on the heels of 
a robust 3.8 percent increase in the 


fourth quarter of last year. 

While many forecasters and gov- 
ernment policymakers said growth 
was sure to taper off in foe coming 
months, foe report showed that over 
foe past four quarters,' the nation’s 
output of goods and services rose 4 
percent. That is roughly double foe 
growth that many economists have 
estimated the American economy 
can generate on a sustainable basis. 

Remarkably, the large increase in 
GDP has come with no added in- 
flation. The Commerce Depart- 
ment’s report said prices paid for 
goods and services bought in foe 
United States rose at a 22 percent 
annual rate in the first quarter, 
slightly less dun they didin the like 
period a year earlier. A White House 


economist, Janet Yellen. said neither - 
President Bill (Hinton's administra- 
tion nor private economists really 
knew why foe natioa had been able 
to combine such strong growth and 
low unemployment with a stable or 
falling inflation rale. 

“We will be studying for a long 
time the changes in foe economy 
that have allowed us to achieve 
this,” Ms. Yellen said. 

She said a key factor had been toe 
competitive pressures faced by 
many businesses: “Producers don’t 
feel they have the scope to pass 
along cost increases. Almost every 
measure of inflation was lower in 
the last 1 2 months than it had been in 
die previous 12 months.” 

(AP, Bloomberg, NYT. WP ) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close *** 

Tlie top 300 most arfhe shares, 
up to the dosing on VYafl Street 

The Associated Pms. 3*5, 


ua w l* um or* Indexes 


Most Actives 


May 1,1997 


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H|p law On 

Industrie^ 933.15 909.41 93307 

Transp. 5B3L61 57422 58248 

Utflmes 186.19 18X61 1B5.94 

Finance 9030 B6J7 90 j09 

SP 50* 79444 77196 794*5 

SP10Q 77851 75551 77834 


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MOO tw rrtnNnunv con* oar 
Mqy97 297ft 294ft 29BU 43ft 
JM97 298ft 292ft 29«* +Jft 
Sep 97 282ft 278ft 281 +1ft 
D«C 97 278ft 275 277ft +lft 

Morn 282ft Zreft 282 +lft 

Moya 286 41 

290 2H Wft +1ft 
EsLKfes NA wars. setes wyes 
Wed's open fnt 312524 Off 5147 


ORANGE JUICE CNCTN) 
154notML-Oaaasparb. _ 

May 97 789 7270 73.10 +0.10 1.U9 

JUI97 75S0 753S 7S70 -025 17594 

Sap 97 789 7820 789 -025 4.155 

NOV 97 819 81 JO HJS -045 1770 

Estates NLA. Wed’s. ates IMt 
Wed's open M vm off 1172 


Utah Low Latest Chgo OpM 
n'AUANGOYEJtHMEJIT BOND (Um 

rrygo nMai - ots arioo pd 

■Jon97 12840 12743 12835 + 043110987 
■Seg97. m.l2_ WX 12849 +OI3 4747 
Bk. safes: 10117. Prw ides: 59,128 
Prav. apabO: 114734 up 2449 


Nasdaq 


CMwnAe 4179 4DJ1 41471 -19 

tadiahWl S27J9 S2136 5201 -L71 

TraanL 381-67 375-03 377J4 -iSO 

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1273110 125054 
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1371-31 1380X3 
1437.39 143330 
10946 168137 
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39k 409k +■*» 

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SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT7 
WO tens- daBars per Ion 
May 97 29140 2899 2899 — 2JD 14,101 

JM97 28BJD 2839 2839 -29 47434 

Auo97 Z779 Z73JS 2739 -1J0 U.900 

Sep 97 2S89 2559 2559 -09 7,90 

0097 23000 22000 28007 -ISO MR 

Dec 97 2229 2199 2209 +OW 1792 

Estates NA WMTs. soles 364 
Weil's open W 11421191 «P 1243098 


GOLD (NCMX) 

un mv az.- aaikn am trwyai. 

May 97 W 8 4040 

Jun97. 34290 34040 3419 F09 
Ju)97 3439 +09 


Aug«7 34450 3429 3449 +09 
0397 3479 3669 34490 +09 
Dec 97 3509 309 309 +09 
Fe0(8 3S29 +09 

Apr 90 35450 +09 

JllII 98 3579 +09 

Est. sales NA WtaTASlteS 2419 
WetfsopanW 161543 up Nil 


EURODOLLARS (C88BQ 
SI miGon-pnaf raopdL 
Mar 97 9212 

May 97 M.14 9413 9414 

Jon 97 9488 949 9487 
JUt 97 94JT 939 94i 

Sep 97 939 9416 939 

DOC 97 9417 939 939 

McrN 9156 ns\ 9155 
-kmn 9145 9839 9245 

Sep 98 9337 9333 939 

Dec 98 939 9320 9325 

MW 99 9126 9120 9135 

Jur 99 9121 9115 9120 
Est. sates NA WRfs-sites 
WWSopsnW USUM off 


Woh Low Latest CBpa Optet 
52 JU 5810 Hjg - TiOT 

HteOO 5800 5800 ftffl +031 3M67 

atsales NA Wed's. skes 43J99 
Wed's eper W T3290 off 9213 ' 

LIGHT5WST CRUDE (NiSQ 
iMOObbl. dOBanparlM. 

Jun«7 2029 2042 2007 -814 94650 


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Jut 97 2030 2005 
AUB97 3825 2800 
Sw 97 2820 2805 
Od97 2815 2ttS! 
Nov 97 333.14 2002 
Dec 97 0.10 19 jH 

Jai98 2008 2806 

Feb* 

Mar 90 2000 2001 
Est safes NA Wed's. 
Wed's open ini 392^73 


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68000 8»- omts par t> 

May 97 2430 2491 2490 -816 4157 

Ail 97 2566 2125 2507 -820 51806 

Ana 97 2SJ0 2501 2541 -820 12JB2 

Sen 97 2583 2548 2S4B -820 ■ 4881 

00 97 2585 2545 28SS -0.15 4971 

Dec 97 2598 2560 2560 -823 N.738 

Estates NA Wed's. sties 91 
WecrsopenH 2 jm off Kn *2 


SOYBEANS (CB0T) 

SOM bu irnWnun- arts ear MM 
Moy 97 897 879 888ft -9ft 11007 

JM97 895 876 177 —10 102,131 

Aug 97 669 SSI 051ft -Ift 14996 

Sep 97 77S 762ft 763ft —4ft 7,727 

NOV 97 704 695 6M -1ft 44780 

Estates na Wars- setts njn 
Wed's open M 10.933 up 5870 


MBRAOE COPPER (NCMX) 

254m BK^canh parte. 

May 97 111.80 11850 11090 —140 

Jun97 11195 11810 11055 —140 

Jul 97 11125 W9J25 W9J5 -1-50 

AUB97 W7JS 107.50 10795 -AM 

Sen 97 10740 WJO HHJ5 -1J0 

Od97 10523 — 133 

NOv 97 W438 1 -1J0 

Dec 97 ROM 10320 10320 -1-30 

Jan* 10240 102.15 102.15 -JJ0 

Estates NA we(rs.sctes wm 
Wad ' s open W 512* up 1112 


BR1TBH POUND (CMER) 

62 A 0 pounds, s per pound 
Am 97 14250 14000 14234 394179 

Sep 97 16230 \jm 14190 913 

Doc 97 1 4176 102 

Est. ates NA Wed's, safes T7.9B3 
Wed's open M 480M off 683 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (WHO 
1004H0 daBara, s per Cdn. dfe 
Am 97 2235 2177 2233 74211 

S6P97 22M 2234 2275 5J93 

Dec 97 2312 2255 J3M U6A 

Estates NA Wed's. sahB 4673 
Wed's open iri 82401 off U 


NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

HUM rnm Mu’s, S per mm Mu 
Am 97 2J*0 2.170 2235 

AA97 2290 2.191 2260 

AW 97 2280 zm sm 
S8P97 2275 £205 2250 

0097 22S 2210 2270 

NOV 97 2290 2320 2355 

Dec 97 2485 2415 2460 

Am 98 3LS25 2455 2500 

Fob 98 24B0 2395 2425 

Mar 98 1335 2295 2320 

Estates NA wed's. sates 47,150 
Wed's open inf J89J34 up 3299 


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uoo bu mwmum- am per bum 
May 97 434 4M 414 -9 120 

AH 97 435 424 435 -Bft 59261 

Sep 97 641 431 431 —7ft UM 

Dec 97 Cl 461 441ft -7ft 18738 

Estates NA Wed's. sates 20252 
wed's tmenint 90299 up 1031 


5B.VER (NC2M70 

54M tray ol- centi par trw a& 

May 97 47858 46340 <7240 +7J0 
Ain« <7440 +7J0 

JUt 97 40800 46740 476J0 *7 JO 
Sep 97 48440 472J0 0120 +740 
Dec 97 491J0 480J0 0940 +760 
Jan 98 491 J0 +7 JO 

MarH 49870 4K40 496J0 +720 
May 96 50140 +740 

Est. safes NA Wed’s, sates 21 451 
Wed's open irt 85.175 off 6005 


GERMAN MARK (01480 
USAW n—k M per ma rt ! 

Jun 97 J84S J785 JE4 B2JB8 

Swff -5B81 JM9 J863 3.10 

Dec 77 J9W jmt J904 326 

BO- sites NA Wed's, sates 18407 
wed's open inf 86,106 up 1479 


UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 
42AM aaL canes par pal 
Am 97 6140 6145 6275 +034 

Ai97 6140 6145 6140 +810 

AUB97 6020 6040 6030 +025 

S4P97 5925 5845 5920 +050 

Oct 97 5740 5620 5740 +860 

Nov 97 5640 56JD 5650 +850 

Dec 97 5L55 5610 5610 +845 

Sites NA Weff6 sates 48458 
Wed's open inf 8X736 off 11539 


Livestock 
CATTLE rOMER) 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

SS few deOors per tw ot 

Jul 97 374J0 37850 374.10 +3JD 

OCt 97 37600 37100 37660 +180 

An« 37740 +180 

Est sates NA weffLotes 2451 

MM'S openin' 16792 off 242 


JAPANESE TEN (CMERJ 

lU rnPlon van, 1 pot HD yen 

Jun 97 2980 JIM 2*46 86404 

Sea 97 4085 4023 4050 IJ93 

Dec 97 JIBS 4135 4115 700 

Est. sales NA Wed's, setfes 12464 

Wed's upon H 16615 up 1363 


Am 97 65JS 6*20 6522 +847 36519 

Aim 97 6532 6420 6630 +050 2X419 

0097 040 6BJD 6L95 +032 16223 

Dec 97 7870 7027 7852 + 020 &3M 

Feb 98 7122 7895 71.03 +610 5216 


ESI. sites 15363 Wad's, seta 13211 
Wed's open int 92238 off 4 


Dividends 

Cafapany Per Ant R*c Pay 

STOCK 

FiM Bancorp W1 . 10% 5-23 W 
Ffest Albany . 5% 5-12 5-27 


raEUEH CATTLE (CMER1 


Qmpmy 

Cedar In 
Qi-Steel 


Per Amt Roc Pay 


INCREASED 

£ outfox Inc o -0875 5-23 A-13 

iShanAltan Q M 7-l'i 7-H 

Providence Wor S 46 SO 5-22 

W U er f edFH Q -105 S2 S21 



Gnipa Indus Mas _ 4101 S 6 S16 

INITIAL 

Acmes RnCap" - ^ 

Nemy^laekn - .055 514 528 


dadvntaFd 

Eiraea 


- 455 514 528 


fago* Steel 
Pn t neWn bb erGtp 
PBgrtfflAm Pf RI 


SPECIAL 

CJewTrustROy - 240 M f-16 

GuttCda fijpfl a ” -21 lil 

Rea IF _ 48 M 515 


REGULAR 

Amboelrse Q -l« W2 

Ambassador Aol O M M2 MS 

BIAmeroifflrf A -4IK |-15 S31 

BkAmeradEfB = IS *25 *Sr 

CamWarlnc 5 452 54 527 


■Esd 

SBR " 


Q .10 5-9 S19 

Q .10 SI 5 514 
A .10 512 5 30 
0 .15 6-2 6-16 

M 4875 5-9 5-30 

Q JB 59 5-31 

Q 20 515 S» 
Q 425 54 7-11 
O 43 S14 S2S 
Q 46 516 530 
O 438 59 515 
Q 22 57 521 

M 4665 515 52 
Q .39 S18 5-98 
Q ASSS S23 6-3 

0 .14 5M 530 
0 .15 53 7-3 

M 4685 512 522 
Q .13 512 527 
Q XL 514 528 
Q JO 59 523 
. 49 512 527 
O AS 515 516 
O 41 512 527 
Q J31 59 515 
Q M 522 516 
Q 48 525 515 


May 97 7190 7100 7175 +875 

Allan 7675 7SJ» 76X7 +075 

Mr 97 7653 7590 76X7 +QJ2 

Oct 77 76.90 7830 ILK +0J0 

MOV 97 7850 7745 78X5 +0X0 

Jan 98 7895 7850 7885 +0X7 

Est. sates 3X74 Wed’s, sates 2X94 
Wetfs open felt 19X05 oft 24 


dose Piwlous 

LONDON METALS CLME) 

Daffan per metric ron 
AlmtauM (Hlgb erode) 

Spat 1597.00 159808 1600ft 1609ft 

Forward 162640 162740 163540 163640 

Capper Cathodes (Hlgti Grade} 

SmT 243940 2442.00 242640 243140 

Forward 296140 236440 234840 23040 

Lead 

Spot 615ft 616ft 600ft 609ft 

Forward 626ft 627ft 61940 62040 

Nickel 


SWISS FRANC (CMB0 
HSMIracblMrtnc 
Am 97 X860 X814 XB35 48743 

Sep 97 4979 J893 X90B 3,175 

D0C97 X973 433 

Ed. sales NA Weffs-sales 15X78 

Wed's open rt 47X01 up 17 


GASOILdPE) 

UAdoOats per meMc ton -tats all 00 ferns 
May 97 17240 17045 17140 -075 18X04 
Jun 97 17075 16975 17040 — ai3 19X45 
Jill 97 17075 169 JO 17025 -OJO 7J27 
Auo 97 17175 17050 17T JO -075 7427 
5ert97 17Z50 17275 17275 -075 3,194 

Oct 97 17473 174J0 174J0 —140 3J7B 
Nov 97 175-50 175.50 175 JO -0.75 1,564 

Dec 97 17775 17850 1767S —OJO 7725 


ES3. safes; 12,138. Open ML72497 Off 760 


Stock Indexes 


Spot 721040 722040 720540 721040 
Award 733040 733040 732040 732540 


SP0 566040 566540 563040 564040 
Forward 570040 570540 568040 5685.00 


Forward 570040 570540 568040 5685.00 
yw- Knacks l Mali Grade) 

Spot ^ 1 749XB 1^40 1244ft 1245ft 
127140 127100 126840 1268ft 


■FAtONTH STERLING OJFFE} 

aaouMO-abnnoopct 

JnnW 9X40 9X36 9137 —043 I 

5ep77 911J m2 9114 - 042 

O0tS7 9001 9244 9196 —043 

Mart? 9189 91M 9792 -OJ77 

jimg6 9178 9171 9132 -801 

sm« 92X2 92X4 Undu 

DkJB 92X0 93J3 9254 Undu 

MOJ99 Bfl 9146 92X6 -041 

JW09 92X7 92X0 92X0 —(WO 

S«p99 92.41 9245 9235 lisas, 

DK*9 9247 92.33 9233 +041 

MaQO RT. RT. 9240 +041 

»■ antes: 5*889. Pie*, sales; 92474 
Pm. open hit: 481X95 up 140 


SAP COMP. INDEX (CMERI 
9M k Index 

Jun 97 B07 M 79885 79830 -4X0 181163 
Sap 77 81 £30 BK20 804X0 -430 6X39 
Dec 97 819X0 11640 81640 -3X0 1264 
Est sites NA MW's, soles 9*728 
Wed's open bit 197,294 up 744 


FTSEiteaima 

CBper Mnpatet 

Jww 44774 44674 44514 —14 59,790 

jWW 44974 44974 44834 + 14 1394 

0*097 45364 45364 45224 —14 2K 

gRicteK WO. Fiav-wtes: 1S401 
ftev. open fuL - 61434 up 1,355 


8460 PfTN EURffiUUUtKCLiFFE] 
DM1 B0hm - pts of 100 DC* 


HOGS-Uan (CMER) 


JunTT ra as 505 +1X0 

AX 97 85X0 I4J0 |£0 +892 

Aug 97 OJ2 82XS ELIZ +057 

0097 76X0 7175 1U1 +832 

Dec 97 73X7 72.90 7137 +0X5 

SP.sotes 18578 Wed's. sales 8726 
HWsopenW 4(40 OP X 


High Law Close Chge opim 


Financial 


POCKBOUBfCMSd 

0400 RUL- CMH aer h. 

MOV97 91X1 9810 9857 -835 
AH 97 9125 9120 91X5 -837 

AUB97 <125 9805 90X2 -822 
ERsaes UTS Wed's stes £270 
Wed's open irn 9,156 up 757 


UST.BRlS g aw oa 

SI iTMon- anal Mo act. 

Jmff tW 94M 9W dill 

Sea 97 WX 8 94X6 *6X7 +801 3X51 

U8C97 980 647 

Estsates NA. Weinutes U31 

WW9 open Int 181&2 off 656 


ffqaatioi«B s J wM tadW O l 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE1 
WmeMc ferns- iper tan 


SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
nooxoa arm- an s. Mm ai ioa m 
JUA97 105-30 105-15 1QS-B +04 231X74 

Sepvr lOS-li H5-QI 105-13 +08 2J36 

DOCW 1D6-57 106-57 106-57 —01 45 

Estates NA Wed's. sales 121,714 

WeffsepenM 2MASS up « 


DMlntetaa - pts OflOOpd 
Mflj97 9640 9640 9640+041 4X98 

JIM97 V 6 JB 96J6 9878 +801 215402 

j uW NT. N.T, 9627 UiK*. 1X32 

59221 SHI W3 * 041209 x 41 

DK97 saffl MM 96X1 +042 224.176 

Marts 9848 98X6 96X7 + 042 )9*S30 

j mrtB 9640 9446 9440 +044147X37 

SS S-I" S Kl1 S *W» 119X60 

Deere 9544 9541 9545 +805 79X96 

M099 9542 9SJ6 95X1 +1146 64X58 

J«T99 95J5 9541 9£3S +806 30346 

Steg 9548 9» 95.10 +046 28,978 

Deere 9445 MAI 94X5 + 046 30,119 

KS 9641 +0^ also 

JuaOQ 9423 0423 9429 + 046 2225 

SepOQ N.T. RT. 9421 + 046 2577 

DadO 93.95 7195 9441 +046 US 6 

MmtJl RT. RT. 9183 +046 427 

EsLMax 7&79X PnHL sates uol50 

Pnv-opmHj 1497478 off 1832 


The Manf futures exchange was dosed 
Thursday fora ttoHday. 


Shell Prof * 1 

Slips D eS P ,t€ 

price 

ift": 4 ' 




The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Three of foe 
largest on-line services have agreed 
to settle allegations that -their free 
trial offers, resulted in unexpected 
.charges to customers, foe Federal 
Trade Commission said Thursday. 

America Online. CompuServe 
and Prodigy agreed to “clearly and 
prominently” disclose any oblig- 
ation of customers to cancel service 
and to provide an easy way to cancel 
before automatically enrolling cus- 
tomers. There wore no financial 
penalties. 

-In television ads, direct mailings 
and newspaper announcements, the 
three on-line services have used free 
trial offers to attract subscribers. 
The Federal Trade Commission al- 
leged that customers had not been 
told they would be charged if they 
failed to contact the service to can- 
cel when the trial period ended. 

“We are pleased that these in- 
dustry leaders have agreed to stan- 
dards that comply with the laws 
enforced by foe commission,” said 
Jodie Bernstein, director of foe 
agency's consumer protection bu- 
reau. “We will continue to work, on 
an industrywide basis, to ensure 






V' ' - 




k 

u ^ v - 




zr r . iW' 


that all companies understand and 
comply with foe laws enforced by 


George Yradenburg 3d, America 
Online's general counsel, said the 
agreement had been reached 
months ago and that many of the 
changes already wene in place. j 
“AQL believes this decree canf 
and- should serve as a ‘best prac- 
tices’ standard for foe entire inter-; 
active service industry,” he said. 

The agreement, subject to a 60- 
day period of public comment, alscf 
commits foe services to obtaining 
written authorization before they 
begin electronic charges and no- 
tifying customers in advance abqy< 
such financial transfers. r ] 

America Online also had been ac- 
cused of adding 15 seconds of con-* 
nection time to each on-line session 
and rouixiing iq) to foe next minutej 
resulting in extra charges. It agreed 
to estaUish a consumer education 
p ro gram about the uses of electronic 
payments systems, involving distri- 
bution of 50,000 brochures and in- 
formation on the Internet. 


j 


Lzf.iV*. • 
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7atc:'”< 

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ba --‘ ■ ■ 

KT+tr.:-; -■ 


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LABOURs '{"!■ ( km 


: i* 


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... . 

v-r. 

'«Er: '.'j: 


flJis-,,.. r ‘ 


.Wj % 
■’fitier'' j-J. 


* ri'j r- . 






Commodity Indexes 


Claw Pmtaus 
NA 1J72.90 
5°*% *. 1,975.10 1,966x0 

DU- Fvtuns 162.13 16 UJ 3 

CRB 24838 Z4829 

^R nanOol Mures Bxetianoe, Ml 
Pamietm ExOrntge. 


>7?" , v 




Stock Tables Explained 


H 1591 

V I 

m m 

27a m 
V6 ft 

5 4ft 

4 ft tV* 

m W* 
9h m 
34ft :+* 
im im 

m m 

39ft 2M 

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lft I 
U IS. 
ift ik 
fti 

IN J7ft 

19 im 
198 I?}* 

St* 4ft 
9H 9k 

13k IM 
ft k 
lft 1 


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5ft -ft 

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n x 

s 

ik k 


^ +s 

Mft -ft 

Sfi +2 

Hft +Zft 


Ik +k 

U. 


ift +k 
ft 

nft +ft 


Sates «oatea« ancflScJat Vcarty Wghs tna lows atecafe 

lte»a^flafctg»)«wM5^»angeandJ» ^i»8sffofento 

W. b - and rote a( dMdfend ph* stock «Men8 e - ^uMBifng 

LSS-^SSwxkl.ajfcdd-ocwyBStytow.te-lasstetTfela^nitMi^ 

a . dtuktend rtRdond or paid In piccctflno 12 hwhUh- I ■ annual nte Inovased on lass 

rf r ,h utd laLa-i9vlOBndteCgno(llmtmid3.sub}Bdtol5%tWlHtSlOa^ tefe[- 

23SSSa , spSmporsiDeAf»ilcl8nd.|-ilJvMarelpaldlhbliW'«nB*Bd,tetai«ff,orno 

SStatofrtteS Marne rwhbb. b ■ 

rvnnwikiffin Issue wlft dlvfaMs in uiiBUii w -aimud rater wtero on nstoeaafufiofi. 

The MoMow range begins s tart of tre aty 

ni p.|rJifei> 8 vfefe«Loftnii^i«l 8 °nlaiowft.P 7 E-prtee-eg 7 ning 5 ratio. 

s * ucK * 1 w.tahrMlmro»fvorrecrirtiStupo f be1no iwgan tteff 


UK 

un 

-14 

156 

1390 

un 

—9 

3X176 

1417 

1417 

-12 

ixs® 

1466 

1445 

—9 

18119 

1473 

1473 

-a 

19JMS 


103 

-3 

850 


WtfsaptnM 95X79 «fl«* 


COFFEE CmCSE) 

^AgjbfewAnrh 

5!" sa75 

An97 22440 naoo 22190 +U58 

r£« 155 !E' W fMS 

!£S 125 

WGAR-RTOLDI1 (NCSE1 
VJ8J0 tei- am dotb. 

*197 1086 10X7 1870 -All 

S£W ]»2 lW ,U1 -•» 

M0 ML59 HUO _ft« 

M 0 V» 1863 MJB 1831 -a 13 

gLsetes NA Wetfs. sates 3U08 
ktersaponint 157465 off 1293 


W«L TREASURY (CBOT) 

noojmoi«i-iHi&»MtaariHDel 

JunW 107-06 108-29 107-06 +07 316.501 

5W77H6-M 106-19 105-19 +03 25475 

Dec 97 106-m 1495 

Est. sates NA wed's, sates 10,113 
WBcriooenw 36U7i off 5537 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 
ttpa-rraM0iH8s & 3Ms« 100 BCI1 
Jun W 109-24 109-06 109-21 + 12 469X0 

SOP 97 10949 HU-25 109-06 +11 47AJ9 

Dec 97 ttt-27 108-22 108-27 +12 8401 

HJW 108-05 1.709 

State s na Wefl's, rates S 2 Cilo 

WafsopenM S77.I65 tv 946 


3-MOHTH EUROURA OJFFE) 

1TL1 irfBOH-nfeWlOOpd 
i'OSZ ’M* «AS +0J0 1134*1 

5«w »as TO.0 9184 *044 78139 

DC07 93X9 93X4 93X8 +808 51,180 

E25 SS 9171 * °-06 nra 

522 22 5 « wxa +046 zmts 

Sort* 91Q 915* 93X1 + 046 740 

DetSo RT. N.T, 9151 +045 L531 

MBI99 N.T. RT. 0X1 +805 1X35 

Est softs 11,948 Piev.HiUi 54J95 
Prev.opon lot: 30758 off 5J<7 


Itetej WLT tUFFE) 

08000 -pteiPnOsM 100 pd 
M 110-78 110-16 IIMJ +1 


*0 110-0 110-16 H075 +006 172X87 

Sop97 110-22 11014 110-31 - 0-07 2J14 

ERatec 34.165. Piev. safes 96X0 
Piev.apaafflt: 174,701 up 2X33 


lodustrlala 

OOTTONKNCTW 

39X09 #*-«•*» per ft- 
MOV 97 710 7850 7850 -1X0 

Jul 97 7120 72JQ 73J1 *.J3t 

Od97 TATS 7340 TIN - 8 » 

Dec 77 7SX5 74J8 75J5 -049 

Morn 7645 74. IS 7625 —OJO 

Est.sotes KA wars. sates <468 
WrFkmuM 72X93 up 74 


Jb8*7 WL* 101 .17 111 


iSS ffi-H 321-* W1A7 +847 274424 

§ffw WpLg_H03B 19863 +847 21273 

EReotes 96x22. Piev. sates 202411 
PichOpanH^ 298199 off 808 


HEATMO OIL (NMER) 

4UHaaLeanteaa+B0 

Jun 97 55X0 54X0 5670 -822 

Jul 77 5855 5445 5545 +0X1 

Auo 97 55XS 5810 5815 +041 


inBdgnmi 

It’s never been easier 
to subscribe and save. 

Just call toll free 
at 0 800 1 7538 

Heralb^Sribune 




5*097 5640 5870 SU0 -4)49 

0(297 5645 56X5 5670 +BJ6 

NOW97 5745 5740 5745 +826 

Dec 97 57.95 BX0 57J8 +041 


l! . 


\,5 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


PAGE 17 






Aur't 






- 


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' . I 


■X 


'<-VL- . 


— -I£5 
■■ L r * 

•" "ri. 

■ ■ V - 






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i 

4 


EUROPE 


S&^rfsr 

U %L •* 


Shell Profit 
Slips Despite 
Price Rise 

Weak Refining Results 

Help Drag Down Net 

Cjf^xfnitnOurSufff-nm Oupatcfn 

LONDON ■— Royal Dutch/Shell 
Group said Thursday its first-quarter 
profit slipped 5 percent as a surge in oil 
prices and a recovery in chemicals was 
undercut by weaker refining and natural 


ft 


Royal Dutch/Shell, Europe’s biggest 
oil company, earned net income on a 
bMi* of £1.55 billion 
(S2_53 ballon), down from £ 1.63 billion 
a year earlier. The 1996 fust-quarter 
results, however, included a one-time 
gain of £90 million. The current-cost 
accounting method values oil invent- 
ories at current market prices. 

The average oil price of $21.20 a 

barrel in the quarter was up $ 2.60 from a 

year earlier. 

Royal Dutch/Shell’s results contras- 
ted with profit increases of more than 15 
percent posted recently by Exxon Corp. 
and Mobil Corp. That raised concern 
among investors that Royal Dutch/Shell 
may-lag its American rivals because it is 
more sensitive to weak European gas 
markets and currency fluctuations. 

“This is a situation which could con- 
tinue in the coming quarters." said Rene 
van Geffen. an analyst at F. van Lan- 
schot Bankiers NV in Amsterdam. 

Shares of the company’s two owners 
felL Shell Transport & Trading Co. of 
Britain, which owns 40 percent, fell 5 
pence in London to close at £10.85. In 
Amsterdam, Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., 
which owns 60 percent, closed at 347.50 
guilders ($178.90), down 70 cents. 

The company said that on a historic- 
cost basis, which values oil inventories 
at the prices at which they were bought, 
its earnings fell 19 percent, to £1.42 
billion from £1 .74 billion. Analysts con- 
sider profits valued on the current-cost 
basis to be more reliable. 

Royal Dutch posted sales for the 
quarter of £20.9 billion, compared with 
£19.2 billion a year earlier. The com- 
pany’s profit from oil exploration and 
production rose 9 percent, to £996 mil- 
lion. while Exxon's surged by a third. 

Its cash flow rose 2 percent, to £2_5 
billion, while capital spending fell 7 
percent, to £1 .4 billion. 

(Bridge News, Bloomberg) 


Iran Emerges as Leading Wheat Importer 


Reuters 

LONDON — Iran is emerging 
as the world's biggest wheat im- 
porter, a report released Thursday 
said, a development that puzzled 
analysis. 

The London-based Internation- 
al Grains Council, a monitor of 
cereals markets, predicted that 
Iran would import 6.6 million 
metric tons of wheat in the 12- 
month period ending June 30. 
That volume would put it ahead of 
both Egypt and Japan. 

The council did not offer an 
explanation for Iran’s imports, 
which appear to be running at 
more than double the previous 
year’s estimated volume. 

Trade analysts said some of the 
wheat might be getting re-expor- 


ted by Iran 10 other countries in 
the Middle East or Asia, such as 
Afghanistan. Pakistan dosed its 
border with Afghanistan on 
March 29 to try to stop an illegal 
exodus of wheat that had caused 
flour shortages in Pakistan, 

Iran subsidizes the bread sup- 
ply of its 60 million people, and 
this may also be a factor pushing 
up consumption. Iran also 
suffered some earthquake damage 
to its wheat crops in March. 

Australia, Canada and the 
European Union have made sales 
of wheal to Iran. 

The council's prediction that 
Iran would import 6.6 mil lion tons 
of wheat and flour surpassed the 
forecasts for Egypt (6.2 million 
tons) and Japan (6 million tons). 


The forecast for Iran was up 
sharply from an estimate of 5 mil- 
lion tons made a month ago and 
from the estimated total for the 
previous year of 3 million tons. 

The council also forecast a re- 
cord global harvest this year of 
coarse grains such as com. Total 
production of maize, barley, 
sorghum rye and oats was forecast 
to rise to 895 million tons from 
889 million, based on higher pro- 
duction in China and in Central 
and Eastern Europe. 

A change in eating habits in 
Asia meant the extra grain was 
needed, the council said. As con- 
sumption of meat, especially pork 
and chicken, has risen, demand 
for maize, used to make animal 
feed, has also climbed. 


Production of wheat was fore- 
cast to fall to 578 million tons 
from 580 million because of 
lower production in the United 
States and Europe. 

Weather remained the big un- 
known, grain traders said. The 
United States has been hit by 
freezing temperatures and flood- 
ing, while die EU has suffered 
prolonged dry weather that has 
damaged crops in Britain and 
France. 

The report was issued against a 
backdrop of renewed concern 
about high grain prices, with 
world stockpiles near 20-year 
lows. Wheat traded in Chicago 
was recently quoted at $4.50 a 
bushel, compared with $3.80 at 
the end of 1! 


Amid Heavy Demand, Bull Increases Share Offering 


ConyM K Out SutgFnm Daf^cha 

PARIS — Groupe Bull. 
France’s biggest computer maker, 
said Thursday it would increase the 
sue of a share offering to indi- 
vidual investors because its ini tial 
sale was 21 times oversubscribed. 

Bull will offer an additional l .46 
million shares, bringing the total 
number of shares sold to the public 
to 3.08 million. The government 
said 70.833 individuals had offered 
to buy Bull shares at 36 francs 
each, raising just over 1 10 milli on 
French francs ($18.8 million). 

The move means institutional 


investors will be able to buy only 
13.12 million shares, rather than 
1458 million. Bull said last week 
its offering to institutional in- 
vestors at 38 francs a share had 
been 16 times oversubscribed, with 
150 institutions ordering shares. 

“These results clearly show the 
confidence the public and investors 
have in Bull’s turnaround and, 
more generally, in the French gov- 
ernment’s privatization program,” 
the Finance Ministry said. 

The share sale will cut the state’s 
stake in the computer maker nearly 
by half, to 1 7 percent The state will 


also sell 1.8 million shares to cur- 
rent and former Bull employees at a 
preferential price, bringing its total 
sale to 1 8 million shares. Thai price 
was not disclosed. 

The stock exchange said trading 
in Bull shares would resume Friday. 
Trading was suspended at 49.95 
francs April 11 when the French 
government announced its plans to 
go ahead with the share sale. 

The government currently holds 
47.7 million shares in Bull, or 305 
percent of its equity. After the sale, 
it will no longer be the largest 
shareholder in Bull, which it took 


over in 1982. Motorola Inc. of the 
United States, Japan’s NEC Corp. 
and France Telecom SA each own 
18.7 percent 

In 1996, Bull’s profit rose 23 
percent, to 376 million francs. Sales 
fell 1.9 percent to 24.05 billion 
francs from 2450 billion francs. 

Separately, the government de- 
cided to suspend the sale of Sodete 
Francaise de Production after 
Havas SA and Cie. Generate des 
Eaux SA withdrew their bid for the 
state-owned film production com- 
pany, the Finance Ministry said. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


Investor’s Europe 


Ffc&l&iit 


London 




'X : , 


pAXV.,-‘ 


FT3 

3600 


4400 

3400 


4300 

3200 f* 

fT 

.4200 

3000 / 


'4100 

2800 V' 


4000 

2«»0 JF 

MAM 

3900 

1996 

1997 




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Amsterdam 7 ££Df - 


Brussels . 


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Yfenna-i. 



Source: Tototcurs ImereMioml Heald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Toyota Motor Corp. could announce a decision about a 
second automobile plant in Europe by the end of May. the 
automaker said. Toyota already builds passengers cars in 
Bumaston. England. 

• Boosey & Hawkes PLC's shares hit a one-year high of 905 
pence ($14.76) before easing to 895, up 275, on news that 
Carl Fischer Inc. had put its 45.3 percent stake in the musical- 
instrument maker and publishing concern up for sale. 

• Switzerland plans to raise its value-added tax on goods 
from 65 percent to 75 percent in 1999 to try to shore up the 


ING Comes to a Crossroads on Its Dillon Read Stake 


CatcrCrd H Our 5nfFrahD a pocka 

AMSTERDAM — ING Group 
NV said Thursday it was consid- 
ering buying the 75 percent of 
Dillon Read & Co. it did not already 
own or selling its 25 percent stake. 

Ruud Polet, an ING spokesman, 
said tiie company expected to make 
its decision in a few weeks. He said 
ING was holding talks with Dillon 
Read on how their relationship 
should continue after July 1 . 

ING acquired 40 percent of 
Dillon Read as part of its takeover 
of Barings PLC but later reduced its 
stake to 25 percent, Mr. Polet 
said. 


An acquisition of Dillon would 
rive ING an instant presence on 
Wall Street and help it catch up 
with its rival. ABN-AMRO Hold- 
ing NV, which strengthened its 
U5. presence late last year with the 
purchase of Standard Federal Ban- 
corp. 

“They want to become a global 
investment bank, and the biggest 
move will be in brokerage activ- 
ities,” said Hans Pluijgers. an ana- 
lyst at Kempeo & Co. in Ams- 
terdam. “They know the company 
and won’t buy a pig in a poke.” 

But a purchase also would be 
something of a surprise. Just six 


weeks ago, Aad Jacobs. ING’s 
chairman, said die Dutch bank 
planned to sell its stake back to 
Dillon executives and said ING’s 
□ext investment in the U.S. would 
be in a life insurer. 

Dillon executives in London de- 
clined to comment on the discus- 
sions. Published reports in London 
said ING would pay between $425 
million and $450 million for the 75 
percent stake, or more than twice 
Dillon’s estimated book value of 
$200 million. Dillon, with 680 em- 
ployees. is no longer one of (he top 
securities firms in the United States, 
lagging far behind Merrill Lynch & 


Co., Goldman, Sadis & Co. and 
Salomon Brothers Inc. 

ING also said it was not in con- 
tact with Societe Pnirate du GAN 
over taking a stake in the French 
concern once it was privatized. 

But a spokesman said ING 
would not rule out studying any 
proposals that may be made con- 
cerning the insurer. 

Denis Pfeiffer, GAN’s chair- 
man, listed a number of potential 
partners this week that included 
ING, as well as Fartis-Amev NV. 
Allianz AG. Assurances Generates 
de France and Assicurazioiij Gen- 
erali SpA. [Bloomberg , AFX 


approval by Parliament. 

• ConAgra lnc.'s United Agri Products unit formed a venture 
in South Africa with Zeneca Agrochemicals of England to 
supply chemicals to farmers. 

• Bayer AG’s pretax profit rose 5 percent in the first quarter, 
to 1.21 billion Deutsche marks ($700 million). 

• Schering AG plans to buy back about 500 million DM of its 
shares to prevent a hostile takeover, a newspaper report said. 
The price it would offer was not known; the drugmaker’s 
shares last closed in Frankfurt at 16750 DM. 

• Andersen Worldwide’s 1 
its Andersen Consulting unit from its . 

Co. accounting business. 

•Philips Electronics NV introduced the first digital video- 
disc player in the United States and launched a joint rental 
program with a PolyGram NV unit. PolyGram Video. The 
rental program allows U.S. consumers to rent Philips Mag- 
navox digital videodisc players and PolyGram DVD titles. 

• Russia began enforcing a law requiring Russian-language 
labels on all food products sold in the country. 

Bloomberg News, Renters, AFP, AFX 


LABOUR: Hopeful Chancellor of the Exchequer Hews to the Party Line -the Tory Line 


Continued from Page 15 

and now stands nearly 8 percent above 
its levels of the beginning of the year. 
The prospect of change — and of La- 
bour, no less — has failed to dent Bri- 
tain’s rallying currency. 

If anything, the pound has strength- 
ened on the likelihood of a new .gov- 
ernment's taking swift action to brake 
an economy that bounded ahead at a 4 


percent a year dip in the first quarter. 

In his first major act as chancellor of 
the Exchequer, Mr. Brown is widely 
expected to take die advice of the gov- 
ernor of the Bank of England and raise 
interest rates shortly after the two men 
meet to discuss monetary policy on May 
7 th. . 

Economists see a number of reasons 
why Mr. Brown might make such a 
move. First of all he could use it to 


quickly begin building a reputation as 
an “iron chancellor,” one determined 
to take no chances with inflation. 

Paying heed to the governor’s advice 
would also be consistent with Labour’s 
stated aim of creating a more powerful . 
and independent central bank. 

Finally, said David Mackie, an econ- 
omist with JP. Morgan, it would permit 
Mr. Brown to “shift the blame” to bis 
predecessor, Kenneth dark, who re- 


SKYs Boeing and 2 Billionaires Make Teledesic a Work in Progress 


Continued from Page 15 

are p lanning global or regional Internet 
satellite services using single geostation- 
ary satellites. They include Hughes Elec- 
tronics Corp.. Lockheed Martin Corp. 
aid AT&T Corp. 

Getting Teledesic off the ground will 

not be easy. Boeing must find a way to 
mass-produce highly sophisticated 
satellites at unprecedented low costs and 
find a way to launch them all by Teledes- 
iected start date of 2002 


ic’s projected start oate os zuu2. 

Moreover, Teledesic’s technology, 
while successful in laboratories, is un- 
proven in space. It calls for an indi vidu al 
customer’s Internet data to be trans- 
mitted in huge quantities to a low-or- 
biting satellite, then down directly to the 


customer's computer. . One satellite 
would handle signals in the several- 
minute period that it passes overhead, 
then ‘ 'hand-off ' to another satellite in a 
computer-controlled coordination. 

Though the prime purpose would be 
Internet access, the system could also be 
used to cany telephone calls. 

Mr. Gates and Mr. McCaw, who have 
jointly invested less than $100 million 
in Teledesic so far, will now begin lin- 
ing up other funding. Among others, 
they will ask the world’s major tele- 
communications companies to be in- 
vestors and service partners. 

For customers, the company intends 
at first to focus cm businesses and in- 
stitutions that need high-speed Internet 
connections but are located in areas too 


remote for land-based fiber optics. Mr. 
McCaw has also said he plans to provide 
remote villages • in underdeveloped 
countries with Internet and telephone 
service, a pledge that has helped 
Teledesic win international support 
Mr. McCaw and Mr. Gates originally 
planned to launch 840 satellites, each 
weighing about 1,760 pounds (792 kilo- 
grams) and orbiting Earth at an altitude 
of 220 miles. But Boeing engineers have 
persuaded Teledesic officials to adopt a 
scaled-down plan using 288 satellites 
plus spares for use when others fail. The 
current plan calls for the satellites to fly at 
about 435 miles and weigh 2,860 pounds 
each. Instead of costing $5 million each, 
as they would under the old plan, tile 
satellites would cost $20 million each. 


sisted the governor's calls for an in- 
crease in interest rates for months de- 
spite mounting evidence of an economic 
over-heating. 

Mr. Brown has said that in June he 
would unveil a sort of minibudget, a half 
year ahead of the formal presentation of 
the government’s tax and spending 

p lans 

The June budget is expected to con- 
tain details of the sole policy initiative 
that has set Labour apart in die cam- 
paign — a one-time-only windfall 
profits tax on privatized utilities. The 
proceeds, estimated to run to 3 to 5 
million pounds, would then be applied 
to job training and programs to sub- 
sidize jobs for the long term unem- 
ployed. 

The crucial questions about Labour’s 
economic policies would not be 
answered until the autumn budget 
Then, warns Andrew Dilnot, director of 
the Institute of Fiscal Studies, “La- 
bour’s mettle will be severely tested” 

At that point the tight reign on public 
spending set by the Conservatives and 
adopted by Labour will be beginning to 
hurt 

Ratfaer than expanding at the 1.9 per- 
cent clip that it averaged in the 18 years 
of Conservative rule, government 
spending is set to grow at barely a 
quarter of that rate until the end of die 
decade. 


Kohl’s Party Denies Getting 
Funds From Elf- Aquitaine 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's party has adamantly 
denied reports in the French press 
that it accepted illegal political con- 
tributions from the French oil com- 
pany Etf-Aquitaine in connection 
with Elf’s 1992 acquisition of a pet- 
rochemical plant and a chain of gas- 
oline stations in Eastern Germany. 

office in Paris, which lutiTbeen’in- 
vesti gating some farmer Elf man- 
agers, said Wednesday it had no ev- 
idence to suggest Mr. Kohl's 
Christian Democratic Union had re- 
ceived secret funds. 

Despite tire denials, German op- 
position politicians called for the 
government to issue a parliamentary 
report on the matter. 

The French daily Le Parisien said 
Tuesday that forma- Elf managers had 
used an intermediary to channel 135 
million Deotsche marks ($7.8 rnDlion) 
to Mr. Kohl's party in 1992, the year 
that Of completed a politically sen- 


sitive agreement to acquire the Leuna 
refinery and die Mmol gas stations in 
Germany. S imilar reports appeared in 
two French newsmagazines. Under 
German law, a political party cannot 
accept donations from foreign-owned 
companies. 

A spokeswoman for Elf in Paris 
declined to comment. French pros- 
ecutors did confirm, however, that 
the Elf investigation, which began in 
August 1994, had once again been 
broadened, this time to trace 135 
billion DM that was missing. 

Peter Struck, parliamentary whip 
for the Social Democrats, called for an 
accounting from tire government 

“ Should it turn out that extraneous 
considerations played a role in grant- 
ing tire contract to Elf-Aquitaine, 
then there will certainly be consid- 
erable consequences,” he said, 

Peter H intze , secretary-general of 
Mr. Kohl’s party, said, “The CDU 
has never received funds from 
France, either directly or indirectly.’’ 
He said the allegations bad been 
planted to damage French-German 
relations. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Hlsb Low dose Piw. 


Thursday, May 1 

. prices in local currencies. 
Tetekurs 

Hfefi Low aw 


CVS Swrafay B 
CyS 19128 
FL5 Ind B 
KobLuttm? 
NvoNortiskB 


SoptoBwB 
Toe Daren* 


Un&anwU 


302302 301698 
213000 309000 
90S 979X2 
£70 <6334 
£56 653 

810 305 

325X7 320 

345 345 

33133 328 


302302299000 
212000 209000 
979 JE 975 

665 667 

655 652 

807.19 300 

m?3 317 

345 344 

329 326 


BAT bid 
Bar* Santa nd 
Blue Ctele 
BOC Group 

BPB lad 
BittAaasp 
Brit Airways 
6G 

Bril Land 
Brit Pettro 


Amsterdam 




air. 1 * 

to* 

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AEXWwe 77234 
Prevfooc 76234 

135J0 13620 13M0 

137 JO 138-10 138 

13330 135J0 in 
25190 35330 251 

10190 10&50 102.10 
3840 3890 39.10 
11030 111 30 11U0 
367 JO 370 369 

19560 19460 W 

31.10 31 JO 31-20 

74.10 74 7450 

59 JO 61-70 59 

64 64S0 64 

16750 169 169 JO 

327 yrt *n 32650 
Bf.10 flPJO ,{g 
160 162.90 lg 
77 jo 78 76J0 
57* SMD 5750 
3SJ0 3840 3840 
4M0 69JJ 6M0 
AAin 4490 4470 
294 29A50 29550 
73650 ■ 238 23&70 
10350 106J0 1gl.g 
Q4 an 97 9550 
17150 175J0 175 

iSjO 16150 160£ 
6030 6050 6050 
16650 16W0 16170 
109 JO 

34550 34750 34820 
•MM JB 381.40 37a." 
uw 9170 WJ0 

40.1 0 414) 4050 
miO 22950 23090 


Hong Kong 

ra a 

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§ 

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S3SSK 35 

HKEtedric 2650 
HKTetecwnm 1350 

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Haw Seng: 1302878 
Pierian: 1298838 


75S 

2860 

1155 

68 

2150 

34J0 

4158 

3650 

935 

1430 

86.75 

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6425 

1230 

2655 

1330 

398 

194 

5735 

2130 

2095 

1735 

4*90 

285 

3 

0350 

585 

735 

AM 

3850 

2&3S 

1195 


7 J0 755 

2630 2655 
11J5 1255 
6930 68 

2130 21.95 
34J0 35 

42.10 41 JO 
3630 36.X 
955 935 

U35 1435 
BS 8 7 

810 8JK 
6635 6425 
12.45 1235 
2fijo 77 JO 
U50 1X30 
4 453 

195 19550 
5&7S 5758. 
2235 21.40 
2! 21 
18 17-75 

46 4*70 
250 290 

103 3X5 

8150 M 

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950 59JS 
29J0 2930 
1635 I*.™ 



■kets Closed 

: %Many markets were cl<*ed 
■^Thursday for the May Day 
^frdiday. ■. 


Jakarta 

Asia Ml 
Bk WllndOfl 

BfcNeucrtl 

SodongGa™ 

tadotfflwd 

SampoenwHM 
Semen Cffljjk 
TeletoHiunftosi 


CMP "*?* “M" 5 jgff 
Pierian: 652X5 

jfTS 5925 5975 5900 
1750 1700 1725 1750 
1550 1375 1600 13® 
9900 9275 9450 1«» 

3225 2950 3075 3300 
5525 5000 5175 5025 

6700 6650 6700 <57W 

9775 9700 9750 9775 

6300 60M 63® WS 

3500 3*50 3500 3525 


535 115 
175 3X6 

431 4.17 

9-50 9J3 

7X3 6J0 

137 3JI 
13.15 1106 
7X1 *94 

1X2 138 

5X7 5l79 

7.12 7X3 

S32 5X5 

BiB Steel 1-# 137 

BritTetecocn *58 4*5 

BTR l» US 

BaaabCDSmf 1020 10X8 

Bonoo Gp 1 J3 1J2 

CatteWWess 4X0 *73 

Cadbury ScJrw 5J8 -5.12 

Coital Cram 5.14 5X1 

Coam Union 7.11 6X4 

ComaossGp ' 6X2 675 

Cowtouldl 3X5 125 

Dtafls 5.14 5X6 

Bearecontponeiia 3J7 ,3X2 

EM] Group 12*2 1230 

.SI! 

GCMAcddent 899 8J6 

GEC UB 3X3 

GKN 936 9 M 

Gtaa WeOcone 12.13 1093 

GnwjdoGp 0^9 HX7 

Grand Mel 
GRE 

GreenofcGp 
Gutaness 
GUS 
Hays 

HS8C HUgs 

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laedToMcn 
KlngfiEiKr 

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Legal Geft Grp 434 J'rt 

a a 


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Law 

Close 

Ptov. 

497 

4X0 

*84 

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371 

338 

3*0 

3*1 

337 

131 

334 

332 

15X5 

1574 

15X0 

1580 

6X9 

6X3 

6X7 

6X6 

374 

3*0 

373 

173 

2X6 

2X4 

2X6 

2X4 

7X0 

792 

7X3 

7XJ 

1095 

1077 

10X5 

1090 

9.19 

9.11 

9.16 

9.13 

175 

173 

174 

l- 75 

10 

9X5 

9.98 

991 

7X8 

7X5 

7X7 

7X6 

4*2 

*35 

437 

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690 

593 

597 

595 

9*4 

9X3 

935 

934 

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4X3 

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359 

3X6 

158 

3X7 

681 

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6X0 

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5.13 

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535 

535 

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272 

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1620 

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673 

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517 

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276 

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274 

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773 

7X5 

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132 

517 

119 

333 

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4X8 

491 

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2X6 

2X0 

2X5 

2X1 

1662 

1837 

18X6 

18X0 


High Low Oom Piw. 


High Law dose Prow. 


News Corp 594 

PadBcDwttap 546 

Honeerim *25 

Pub Broadcast 6J0 

StGeageBank 796 

WMC 7J0 

WeapacBidng 699 

aiSdePW 1039 

WoafwDritS. 390 


Afnamto 
Afi Nippon Air 
Amway 
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DenfiORsUBk 57SJ# 567 


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6JB 6M 6J4 6.n 

bJ6 635 6*4 6*3 

L16 135 1-15 115 
rn £36 5J7 533 

6,18 5X5 5.19 5-12 

lfJ« 1L4S 11.48 11^ 
M3 793 8X1 7.97 


Premier Fomea 

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495 *88 
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7X0 7.18 
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1J3 1X9 
655 6*2 
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637 598 
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8*6 835 
352 3*8 
11X3 

4X6 *03 
6X1 630 
3X3 2X7 
9X3 928 
2*4 2*0 
592 578 
992 976 




6620b 8510a B670e 8430a 

2920 2840 2850 2890 

5490a 53400 5350a 5490a 

2250 2220 2250 2200 

4400 4290 4310 030 

1500 1410 1430 1430 

4920 4840 4B40 4850 

1370 1340- 1350 1320 
1140 1120 1120 1140 

1230 1170 1210 1150 

3970 3870 3880 3940 

1370 1330 1330 1350 

491 «0 485 473 

607 590 596 601 


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5Mu*uEIPWr 1990 
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8*2 838 

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736 

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587 

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2090 

2040 

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3089 

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346 

351 

341 

487 

479 

482 

471 

2240 

2130 

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2098 

3350 

3300 

3300 

3280 

2100 

2050 

70/0 

2030 

1330 

1300 

1300 

1290 

1250 

lira 

1710 

1190 

433 

<21 

421 

42/ 

712 

701 

/10 

69S 

1640 

1600 

1610 

1600 

842 

830 

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838 

888 

878 

88/ 

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1470 

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972 

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Tokyo Bedron 4930 
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Tokyo Carp. 

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TpppanPreif 
Tony tori 
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Taya Trust 
Toyota Meter 
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1490 

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1470 

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781 

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4/00 


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1560 

15/0 

1.550 

1850 

1800 

1810 

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728 

711 

711 

708 

9370 

9780 

9370 

9710 

885 

861 

S/I 

875 

605 

5191 

597 

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372 

364 

371 

362 

787 

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767 

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274 

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9880a 

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895UB 

3800 

3760b 

3780b 

3710b 

718 

663 

685 

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306 

298 

301 

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1540 

1510 

1610 

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10000 

7850 

9850 

9680 

700 

6 n 

674 

6/1 

3480 

3370 

3380 

3400 

1410 

1350 

1370 

1360 

506 

4B6 

486 

489 

7390 

MW 

75X1 

700 

6250 

6100 

an 

6100 

1250 

1770 

1230 

1220 

1120 

I0W 

11» 

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BD50 

7970 

TWO 

8050 

1680 

1640 

1640 

1650 

1990 

1930 

1930 

1920 

6» 

£04 

605 

603 

2610 

2X80 

MW 

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1840 

1790 

l/W 

1828 

1150 

1130 

1140 

1130 

7700 

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7500 

7450 

9320 

9240 

9260 

9240 

8/8 

354 

855 

854 

1540 

1470 

1490 

USD 

544 

530 

534 

525 

1758 

1770 

1720 

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324 

319 

31? 

316 

1130 

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1110 

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3200 

3130 

3130 

3140 

7990 

2940 

7960 

3930 

9240 

VI/0 

9720 

9150 

1980 

1920 

1948 

1950 

959 

925 

m 

W4 

1288 

1250 

1250 

1240 

22/0 

2250 

2260 

22W 

49X 

4830 

4880 

4W0 

305 

295 

296 

.TO 

671 

656 

658 

666 

1210 

1190 

1300 

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1660 

1630 

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1640 

805 

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787 

790 

737 

720 

734 

712 

3000 

7950 

79/0 

WO 

890 

840 

848 

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3758 

3679 

3680 

3680 

2/50 

2720 

2/40. 

2/10 


The Trap Index 

PHbs* as of 3.-00 PM New York 8mm. 

Jinn. 1. 1982 » JOG. 

Level 

Charge 

% change 

year to date 



% change 

World Index 

154.59 

-0.03 

-0.02 

+3-65 

negtcnal Indues 
Aaa/PadUc 

112.02 

+125 

+1.13 

-9.24 

Europe' 

16&58 

+0.74 

+0.45 

+1.48 

N. America 

179.52 

-2J30 

-1.26 

+10.88 

S. America 

tndostria! Indsxss 

144.91 

+0.01 

+0.01 

+28.64 

Capita) goods 

189.60 

-0.05 

-0.03 

+10.93 

Consumer goods 

. 175.62 

-1-05 

-059 

+8.79 

Energy 

181.67 

-1.43 

-0.78 

+6.42 

Finance 

112.49 

+0.69 

+0.62 

-3.41 

Mscellaneous 

156.43 

+1.01 

+0.65 

-3.31 

Paw Materials 

180.74 

-0.28 

-0.15 

+3.06 

Sendee 

1 44.75 

+1.05 

+0.73 

+5.41 

Utilities 

133.68 

4033 

+055 

-632 

TTtsMamoltans/MsfBk/rribm World Stack IndwtC trades the US. ibbrvaL ant* 

£80 mtemotlonnBylmastnbln stacks tram 25 countries. For mm information, a free 
books# is avaBabls by wnOng to The Trib todax, tgi Avsnuo Cttertes <3s Gou0e. 

3ZS£1NetsFy Cedes. Franca. 

Compiled by Bloomberg News. \ 


Toronto 

AbkM Price 

AtawtaEnnw 

Alan Alum 

AndssanExpl 

BkMeatmal 

UNowScrifa 

BaMlGota 

BCE 


TSEtariMMB 5*8817 
•Purina 597663 

200 rtae n.n ixss 
VA 30 3810 30X5 
47*5 4665 46M 47*0 

1635 1610 1635 1615 
51H SOft 51*5 5670 
54 53X5 53X5 53X5 
31X0 31 31ft 31X5 

6640 65J6 6550 65*0 



High 

LOW 

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Prtv. 

BC Telecomm 

JUO 

37.95 

28 

28 

BtadKmPhonn 

25ft 

25 

25ft 

2*95 

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7/J0 

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28X0 

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33X5 

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33ft 

33X0 

Brw Minerals 

3X7 

2.90 

105 

34R 

Cornea) 

48ft 

47X0 

48ft 

47 JO 

□BC 

3270 

3715 

37*5 

37.10 

CdnltaftRd 

5490 

53X0 

5460 

53ft 

On Nat Res 

33ft 

33X5 

33ft 

3330 

GdnOcddFer 

Z/X5 

26ft 

26.95 

27X5 

Cdn Pacific 

34*0 

33X5 

33X0 

34ft 

Ceratacn 

36ft 

361ft 

3*10 

36 

Dotasa) 

24 

23X0 

23 Ml 

73.95 

DaaTtar 

11X0 

lift 

lift 

11.90 

DonohueA 

7890 

77X0 

28.10 

78X0 

DuPHdCdaA 

35 

34ft 

3*65 

35 

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23 

23 

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39X5 

39.95 

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FoiriiaHnl 

299 

396 

296 

299 

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29*0 

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29.15 

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64ft 

6130 

63*0 

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4520 

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41X5 

41*5 

41ft 

41ft 

19 

18X5 

18.95 

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40*0 

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39.95 

40J5 

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19J0 

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19 30 

19.10 

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73X5 

1115 

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13X5 

73.15 

13.10 

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28 M 

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4*70 

29X0 

4380 

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28.15 

27X0 

28.15 

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10160 

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1*10 13X0 
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38X0 38 

3SJ0 34X0 
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68ft 57 
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20.10 19X0 
29*0 29X5 
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15X0 1535 
2185 25*5 
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31*5 30ft 
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2295 224 
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: : cMj-'uuX 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAX MAY 2, 1997 

ASIA7PAC3FIC ~ 


PAGE 19 


U.S. Trade Debate Is Crucial to China’s Growth 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Smice 

t prepares 

to deb ^ te *e renewal of the so-called most- 
favored-nacon trade privileges that give 
Oma easy access to American markets 
Beijing s stake in maintaining its trade 
is larger . than ever, economists and business 
people here say. 

U.S. consumers are supporting China’s 
rmnd economic growth by buying 18 percent 
* r-T^^_- S ex P orts - which now torn! about 
$151 bub on a year. U.S. companies provide 
specialized machinery and technology in 
areas such as aircraft, computer software and 
medicine. 

In addition, China, winch needs to create tens 
of mUhons of jobs every year, needs American 
investors to help meet the $50 billion annual 
investment target in China's five-year plan. A 
disruption in exports to the United S tates would 
rinde through the entire economy. 

The transfer of Hong Kong from British to 

Chinese control, set for July 1, only heightens 

NEWS ANALYSIS 



lotsaoiouJ HeaU IWbeac 


.. . _ _ _ ~ " ~~ZT. I violently suppressed student pro-democracy 

the importance to China of avoiding a trade demonstrations in 1989. 


Source: Chinese oov&nvnent 

$3U billion, according to U.5. figures, or 51 1 
whether China’s progress on human rights utives who are knocking on doors in Congress billion according to Chinese data, which place 
justifies renewing its trade status. Congress to urge that the trade status be renewed. a different value on items shipped through 
can then pass a resolution overturning his The link between U.S. trade and China’s Hong Kong. 

decision. Although it has been renewed each economic growth cannot be severed. But even the trade figures understate the 
year, China’s trading status has been subject however. In the unlikely event that China’s importance of China for the United Stales, 
to sharp debate in Congress since Beijing most-favored-nation trade status were re- analysts say. Laurence Brahm, a consultant 
violently suppressed student pro-democracy voked, it “might chop three to four per- with Naga Consulting in Beijing, said 33 


families in poorer regions. . 

Hong Kong also would be hurt if Chinese 
trade with the United States were disrupted, 
because billions of dollars of goods pass 
through Hong Kong en route from China to 
the United States each year. 

The United States also has an economic 
interest in trade ties. China accounts for a 
significant slice of U.S. exports, provides a 
source of cheap consumer goods and buys the 
biggest share of U.S. Treasury bonds. 

“K we don’t trade with China, then we don’t 
exist,” said Roberta Lipson, a top executive of 
U.S.-China Industrial Exchange, which has 
sales representatives for U.S. companies in a 
dozen Chinese cities. Last year, she said, the 
firm sold about $35 million of goods, mostly 
medical and mining equipment, to China. 

These exports snll leave the United States 
with a big trade deficit with China — about 
$30 billion, according to U.S. figures, or $1 1 
billion according to Chinese data, which place 
a different value on items shipped through 
Hong Kong. 

But even the trade figures understate the 


Hong} Kong. 
.Hang Sang/ 
I14M0- 

z&k 

. 12500 \ 

12000" ' 


Straits; 
' 2250 , 




- 2250 22000 

2200^/^1*1- •■21000, 

.'.2150 \r ? 20000 

S 2100 19000 

“ 2050 - - U -18000 


. 11500 O J F M A M 


JF M A* M 17000 D JF M AM. 
1996 1997- 1996 1997 ^ 


■ Exchange i ; - lode* • V .Thursc^ 

\ .. • L\ •'■' >. r ptose: ; \:ChatQ< 

Hongkong Hang-^enfr 
• SJogappi*. : Sttwtstirt^s'v^ TlSjaieeicI 


conflict that could damage confidence in 
(fj Hong Kong’s status as a world trade and 
financial center. Chinese leaders “certainly 
don’t want to get into a trade war tfws yea r,” 
said John Seel, a regional economist for Bear 
Steams in Hong Kong. ‘ ‘The last thing, they’d 
want is that kind of instability.” 

Loss of most-favored-nation status, which 
Washington currently denies to only seven 

miM/wio winuM I mi b* ■ ■ — - - 


to sharp debate in Congress since Beijing most-favored-nation trade status were re- 
vioiently suppressed student pro-democracy voked, it “might chop three to four per- 
demonstrations in 1989. centage points from China’s growth in the 


The high stakes help explain why China 
already has been visited this year by more than 
20 percent of the members of the U.S. Con- 
gress and why its foreign minister, Qian 
Qicben, held amicable talks this week with the 
U.S. secretary of stale, Madeleine Albright, 
and Republican leaders in Congress. 

With lawmakers from both parties in Con- 


first year, ’ ’ according to Joan Zheng, an econ- 
omist with JJP. Morgan. 

That is because China would not be able to 
find other markets big enough to absorb die 
goods it exported to the United States, the 
largest consumer market in the world. 

A disruption in exports to the United States 
would ripple through the entire Chinese econ- 


’s growth in the percent of Chinese exports came from en- source: Tetokuts 


Tcfcyo . 

Kuala umjfaycoijposho ' ‘&de8fctipv y'Sc ’ 

-;;Sgr •- 

: Seoqfr,; „.;y:;^€orepfl^e;lnttet < foqmajr>v 
Taipei -v r : h y , StocfcWai 

Boraby; 

Source: Teiekurs iMcmanonai Herald TnTw 


gross talking about revoking its most-favored- omy, far beyond the export-boom areas along Inc. has invested more than $100 million and 


terprises diet bad been created through foreign 

investment. _ _ , . 

Many U.S. multinational corporations fa- V©ry DPIGf lyS 

vor continued trade to protect their invest- 

merits in China. • Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. has been given 

Coca-Cola Co. and its two Asian partners an additional two months to assess Bre-X Minerals Ltd.’s 
have invested about $500 million here, and Busang gold deposit, Bre-X said; the delay until the end of 
the Kentucky Fried Chicken unit of PepsiCo June will allow it time to consider findings that may arrive as 


nations, wwddhmtOiina’s ability to compete nation status, China will need some extra, die coast The coastal province of Guangdong plans to spend a farther $200 million, ac- 
re U.S. markets bysharply increasing tariffs, friends. This week, it is getting a boost from has about 7 million workers from other cording to a report by the Economist In- 
President Bill Clinton must soon decide ' - - . 


about 30 Beijing-based U.S. business exec- provinces who send billions of dollars to their telligence Unit 


U.S. Cites Fairfax Rises on Hints of Looser Media Rules 

i n .. carfHadbfOwSBfFnnt DUptrthn publicly traded company drat- owns magazines in this day and age of convergence, to have c 

OTP fi 6 SYDNEY — Shares of John Fairfax Holdings and the Nine television network in Australia. Mr. media prohibition is anachronistic." 

-*■ * vc m Cuu Ltd., one of Australia’s leading newspaper pub- Packer has made no secret of his desire to add “Whether die government ultimately de 

G7 . ■ Ushers, rose 3 percent Thursday after Prime Fairfax to his media stable, and last week be to change those is a matter the cabinet has ; 

TT • Minister John Howard indicated that the gov- presented his case to Mr. Howard. decide,” he added, “but I have made no sec 

m ym m ym w ym gw eminent might relax laws restricting the own- Mr. Howard said he had not made a deal with die fact that I regard those laws as outdated 

J.M w LilvvIlU' ership of television stations and newspapers. Mr. Packer. Mr. Howard said he was reluctant to remoi 


Minister John 


1 percent 
Howard i 


publicly traded company that owns magazines 
and the Nine television network in Australia. Mr. 
Packer has made no secret of his desire to add 
Fairfax to his media stable, and last week be 


GmviU by 0~S*tfFwmDbp*d*, 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States has warned China 
that it could still be hit with 
sanctions for failing to stamp 
out software piracy despite 
“significant” moves by 
Beijing against copyright vio- 
lations. 

In an annual review of in- 
tellectual-property protection 
Wednesday, the U.S. trade rep- 
resentative, Charlene Barshef- 
sky, said -that “monitoring 
China will put us in a position to 
move direedy to trade sanctio n s 
if there is slippage in China’s 
■ enforcement'* of intellectual 
pr op erty-rights agreements be- 
tween the two countries. 

Last year, both countries 
reached an accord that called on 
China to make greater efforts to 
stamp out rampant piracy of 
U.S. products. 

Ms. Barahefsky also said the 
United Stales was initialing 
“dispute settlement . proce- 
dures” at the World Trade Or- 
ganization against Denmark, 
Sweden, Ireland and Ecuador 
on grounds that they had failed 


eminent might relax laws restricting the own- 
ership of television stations ami newspapers. 

A change in the media ownership laws could 
clear the way for Kerry Packer, Australia's 
richest man, to gain control of Fairfax. 

In an interview with a Melbourne radio station 


indicated that the gov- presented his case to Mr. Howard. 


Mr. Howard said he had not made a deal with 
Mr. Packer. 

Fairfax’s shares climbed 10 cents Thursday, 
closing at 3.27 Australian dollars ($235). 

Analysts said the prime minister’s remarks 
made it more likely that Mr. Packer would suc- 


Wednesday, Mr. Howard said the government ceed in acquiring Fairfax. “It looks like things foreign company, despite its Australian roots, be- 


was considering (hanging the media ownership 
laws, which prohibit a television station operator 
from owning mare than a 15 percent stake of a 
newspaper in the ame market 


are lining up for him,'* said Vince Pepe, an 
analyst at ABN-AMRO Hoare Gbvett . 

Fairfax, with a market value of about 2.4 


newspaper in the same market billion dollars, publishes two major general-in- Brierley Investments Ltd. of New Zealand, to sell 

He also said that Fairfax might be better off terest dailies. The Sydney Morning Herald and its 19.9 percent stake. Some investors predicted 
with one owner. “Yon really don’thave anybody The Age of Melbourne, as well as The Australian the bidding could go as high as 4 dollars a share, 
running the company,” he said. “It’s a pretty financial Review, a national daily. On Tuesday, Brierley ’s chairman. Bob Mat- 

unstable situation.** The prime minister reiterated Ms views an the thew, said his company had not spoken to Mr. 

Mr. Packer, who owns 14.99 percent of Fair- media laws in a television interview, saying, “A Packer about selling its stake, 
fax, controls Pu blishing & Broadcasting Ltd., a whole lot of people over the years have said that (Bloomberg, Reuters, Bridge) 


g Inc. has invested more titan $100 million and early as Friday from Strathcona Mineral Services Ltd. of 
g plans to spend a farther $200 million, ac- Canada, an independent assessor hired by Bre-X. 
a- cording to a report by the Economist In- ■ China warned, on its Labor Day holiday, that workers could 
lt telligence UniL suffer during a “deepening” of reform efforts at state-run 

companies; but it said in a front-page editorial in the People's 

Daily that there was no turning back from an overhaul of the 
_ _ _ _ companies, an estimated 70 percent of which are losing money 

r |V| piIiq and are barred from laying off employees. 

XT-fl.X^U.-I.Cl' At-lilLlj • Japan’s domestic sales of new automobiles fall 12.7 percent 

in April, the first decline in eight months and the steepest one in 
in this day and age of convergence, to have cross- four T 82 * 5 * 35 30 “crease in the national sales tax kept con- 
media prohibition is anachronistic." sumers away, the Japan Automobile Dealers Association said 

“Whether the government ultimately decides • Japan should privatize its postal savings system, a gov- 
to change those is a matter the cabinet has yet to eminent panel stud, noting that the system’s 200 trillion yen 
decide,’ ’ he added, “but I have made no secret of ($1.57 trillion) in deposits made it the world’s biggest bank. 

thf ;? C L th ^i J re ^? lbosc H WS 85 outdate<L ” • Japan's foreign-exchange reserves rose $565 million in 

Mr. Howard sad be was reluctant to remove the ApnUo $219.9^ billion, thl finance Ministry said, 
restrictions on foreign ownership because he T, __ ' , 

feared that the entire Australian news media could • Sam Yan E Tong Sang Co., a Sou* Korean subcontractor 
wind up in foreign hands. He said Rupert Mir- for Nike Inc. in Vietnam, agreed to a 5 percent pay increase for 
doefa’s News Coip. would have to be considered a f3Ctor y workers in Cu Chi. where employees staged a three- 
foreign company, despite its Australian roots, be- h QUr work stoppage last week. 

cause Mr. Murdoch is now an American citizen. • PT Gudang Garam’s shares fell 13 percent, or 750 rupiah. 
To buy Fairfax outright, Mr. Packer would have to close at 9,450 rupiah ($3.89) in Jakarta after Morgan 
to persuade the company’s largest shareholder, Stanley reduced the weighting of the food company 's shares in 
Brierley Investments Ltd. of New Zealand, to sell its Capital International Indonesia Index. 


feared that the entire Australian news media could 
wind up in foreign hands. He said Rupert Mur- 
doch's News Corp. would have to be considered a 


cause Mr. Murdoch is now an American citizen. 

To buy Fairfax outright, Mr. Packer would have 
to persuade the company’s largest shareholder. 


unstable situation. 


minister reiterated Ms views an the 


Mr. Packer, who owns 14.99 percent of Fair- media Laws in a television interview, saying, “A 
fax. controls Pu blishing & Broadcasting Ltd., a whole lot of people over the years have said that 


• Singapore will buy piped natural gas from Indonesia as part 
of an agreement on fueling the island state's power needs and 
its chemical and petrochemical industries; construction of the 
pipeline, to cost $400 million to $500 million, is expected to 
start near die end of next year. Bloomberg. Reuters, afp 


Seoul’s Insolvency Rate Stays at a 14- Year High 


. QmiMbyOur&qffFianDbpadKM 

SEOUL — South Korea’s corporate in- 
solvency rate held at a 14-year Mgh in 
March, the Bank of Korea said Thursday. 

The insolvency rate, measured by the per- 
centage of promissory notes outstanding that 
are in default, was at 0.24 percent, the same 
as February and its highest since May 1982. 


erates. or chaebol, failed under a total of $8.2 
billion in debts this year. 

Separately, government figures showing 
that die merchandise trade deficit shrank in 
April sparked cautious optimism that the 


out The Trade Mnistry said the customs- 
cleared trade deficit narrowed to $1.5 billion 


The rate has risen steadily from a level of in April from $2.04 billion a year earlier. 


0.12 percent last September. 


“This is the first month the trade deficit 


to frilly honor commitments to 
protect intellectual property. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


The figures underline the difficult con- has narrowed year-on-year since die begin- 
ditions facing South Korean companies amid ning of this year,” the ministry said, 
die country’s slowest economic growth in The trade deficit was $1.85 billion in 
- four years. Many of die companies borrowed March, $2.14 billion in February and $3.49 
heavily on ambitious expansion plans early billion in January, 
in the 1990s. Hanbo Group and Samnn “The trade balance will continue to im- 
Group, two of die nation ’s top 30 conglom- prove throughout this year on exports re- 


covery and slowing imports,” said Lee Keun 
Tae, an economist at LG Economic Research 
Institute. Imports rose 1.6 percent last month, 
while semiconductor sales abroad fell 14.2 
percent because of a plunge in chip prices. . 

But exports excluding computer chips rose 
10.5 percent Oil-product exports surged 
34.9 percent while steel products gained 
24.7 percent and automobiles, 11.6 percent. 

Analysts also said prices of South Korea’s 
major export items, including semiconduct- 
ors. had stopped falling. 

The Trade Ministry forecast that exports 
would grow “in the near future,” buoyed by 
a recovery in exports of petrochemicals, 
automobiles, steel products and textiles. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Free-Marketeer Ends His Boycott 
And Joins India’s New Coalition 

CtmobibnrO^SkerFm Dapmcha 

NEW DELHI — Farmer finance Minister Palaniappan Chidam- 
baram. a supporter of market reforms, rejoined India’s new United 
Front government here Thursday, ending a brief boycott that set off 
alarm in business circles. 

Mr. Chidambaram, who was finance minister in the government of 
Prime Minister HJ). Deve Gowda, was the most notable absentee 
when Prime Minister IK. Gujral and other members of his government 
took office April 21. Mr. Chidambaram was inducted with three others 
from his Tamil Maanila Congress party, which joined the government 
after earlier opting out because its leader, G JC Moopanar, had been 
bypassed in the leadership race. 

The former finance minister is a strong advocate of New Delhi’s 
free-marfcet reforms. His absence from the new government prompted 
industry and business leaders to call for his return. (Reuters, AFP) 




NTT Stock Rises 8% as Morgan Adds It to Index 


CaifM by Our tofFum Mjwdta 

TOKYO — Nippon Telegraph & Teta*oae 

Corp.’s shares rose 8 percentThuisday after Mcagan 

Stanley & Co. said it would include the company in 
its Morgan Stanley Capital Internatio n al index. 

Money managers around the world use the index 
to decide in which countries and con rpames t o invest 
hs inclusi on in the in dex could prompt foreign 
investors to buy mare NTT shares, said Hktey oki 
OcosM, an analyst at Yamaidti Research Jnrtttuie. 

“Many funds use the MSCI index as a bench- 
mark, and with this announcement we can expect 
many more to add the stock,” he said. 

OTT shares dosed at 969,000 yen ($ 7 * 639 ), up 
74,000, in active trading. Its gam alsofedp^dfae 
overall Nikkei 225-share index nse 1-42.1 points, 

t0 ^^ 3 speculated feat NTT mayhave tarn 
included in the Morgan Stanley mdex became of the 
increased likelihood of strong armings atfaecom- 
pany.lts outlook improved late ml 996 . 

annoaocedalong-awaitHiplMfcgresmicaJTOgthe 

aoc^S^' 5.1 percent of the Japan 
of Morgan Stanley^^foe recoup 


that of Toyota Motor Corp. Morgan Stanley said it 
would not be dropping any other stocks to make 
room for NTT. 

NTT will be induded in the index at 80 percent 
of its market value because of restrictions that 
effectively keep some of the shares from being 
freely traded. For example, Japan limits foreign 
ownership of NTT to 20 percent, Morgan Stanley 
said. Other tel«^rftrm n nnirairin nK companies also 
have been included in the index at less than their 
full market value because of such restrictions. 

Analysts said another possible reason for buying 
NTT shares was that ibe company was expected to be 
one of ti>e biggest beneficiaries of deregulation in 


at Daiwa Institute of Research. In the current year, 
ending in March 1 998, recurring profit probably wiB 
rise another 18 percent, the report said.' 

The biggest risk for NTT shareholders is that the 
government’s plan to sell more of its stake in the 
company will leave a glut of shares in the market 

TrmntiV iif Prnonrvi nnmo 


profit from the growing use of telephone lines to 
transmit cOTsputer data, they said. 

Analysts also said that, although the company 
was lowering rates, growing use of its local network 
would more than make up for arty loss of revenue. 
Explosive growth in the number of mobile-phone 
users is one reason. Cellular-phone providers have 
to pay NTTfot use of the local lmes needed to make 
the final connection for most calls. 

NTT’s fflmrngs repeat, due to be released this 
month, is expected to show growth of 16 percent in 
its recurring profit, to 380 billion yen, for the yearthat 
ended March 31, according to arepart by Akflriro Ito 


Japan’s Ministry of finance, which owns 66 
percent of NTT, plans to sell as many as 500,000 
shares this year, the Nihon Keizai newspaper re- 
ported two weeks ago. 

The company also has been asked by Japan’s 
Fair Trade Commission to reduce its stoke m its 
profitable mobile-phone unit, DoCoMo, to less 
than half. DoCoMo controls about 50 percent of 
Japan’s mobile-phone market. 

NTT said it would sell stock m tire mobile-phone 
unit as early as next year. The company probably will 
reduce its 94.6 percent share in the unit, but it wfll not 
cut its s take below 50 percent, a spokesman said. 

NTT’s cellular-phone division has chosen Ya- 
maichi Securities Co. as lead manager for its initial 
public offering, a company rep r esentative said. 

■ The DoCoMo division accounts for about one- 
fifth of NTT, according to a February repot from 
Salomon Brothers Asia Ltd. 

At NTT’s current market capitalization, that 
would give the unit a value of about 3 trillion yen. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Seek an Overall Trade Pact With Japan, U.S. Panel Urges 

=w?S=Lia& 


/:■ WASHINGTON 

tial commission on trade 

-has! called on the United Statesto 
make ambitions efforts to i®pn*re 
-American companies access toJa 
pan and other Asian markets. 
S l nwn g fl* 


raanc traus wu 

; W3 »a ! Hoposalfora“compre^^ 

■'S&SSSSgiv 

SSKgg 

pactos” „nd o<te w* 
fions tfcat often stymie U.S- eorapa 


nies seeking to sefl in Japan. prehensive agreement with Tokyo 

“I look forward to studying its that would be aimed at f creating 
recommendations in some detail,” “agreed-upon procedmcs regard- 
theUS trade representative, Char- mg the subtle corporate and burcan- 
. leireBarshefjsky, said, “and I expect oatic practices — such as 

this ^ be 3 

tatioDytomds The current sector-by- 

the current U.S. ‘unlikely to work. lowered, 

approach of neg°- . — — — The commis- 

;:!SL XsLs in specific sec- sion has attracted note .became .of 
ecooomv “nee- the membership on it of Yah Lin 
Jaianie trade “Charlie” Trie, a longtime Doto- 


3££s==sr s£ggssg*"~ 


Asked how much influence Mr. 
Trie had exerted over the group, the 
commission's chairman, Kenneth 
Brody, former president of the Ex- 
port-Import Bank of the United 
States, said Mr. Trie bad not been at 
any meetings since September. 

The commission’s report includes 
a dissent from three of its 17 mem- 
bers, who argue feat its recommen- 
dations “focus narrowly on the in- 
terests of U.S. investors, not U.S. 
workers.” Tbe three — Morton Bhhr, 
president of the Communications 
Workers of America; Kenneth Lewis, 
former president of Lasco Shipping 
Co., ana Ron Sims, county executive 
of King County, Washington — were 
critical of the report’s support for 
agreements with Asian countries to 
liberalize investment by U.S. mul- 
tinational corporations there. 


EGYPT 

THE EMERGING MARKET 

Business Conference in Cairo 
MAY 13 & 14, 1997 

Under the auspices of H.E. Dr. Kamal El Ganzoury, 

PRIME MINISTER, ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT 

Join international business and government leaders exploring opportunities in the region. The government's 
commitment to the economic reform process has pushed Egypt to the forefront of emerging markets. Investment 
opportunities worth billions of dollars are available for the private sector with attractive incentives. 


Speakers: 

H.E. Maher Abaza, Minister of Electricity 
H.E. Atef Ebeid, Minister of Public Enterprise 
H.E. Mamdouh Al-fieitagy, Minister of Tourism 
H.E. Mohie Al-Din El-Ghoreeb, Minister of Finance 
H.E. Youssef Boutros Ghali, Minister of State 
H.E. Nawal Al-Tatawi, Minister of Economy 
H.E. Dr. George Vassiliou, Former President of Cyprus 
Mr. Edwin Brust, Chrysler Corp. 

Mr. Angus Blair, ING Barings 
Ms. Elizabeth Moore, Moody's Interbank 
Mr. Mohamed Farid Khomis, Federation of 
Egyptian Industries 
Mr. Jack Tymnnn, Westinghouse 
Mr. Ismoil Osman, Arab Contractors 
Mr. Paul Raphael, Merrill Lynch 
Mr. Frank Savage, Alliance Capital 
Mr. Robert Shapiro, Progressive Policy Institute 

In addition to other prominent business and political leaders 


Main Sponsors: 

•Artec Group for investment 
& Development 
•EFG-Hermes 

Co-Sponsors: 

•Al-AiomAl-Youm 
•Bank of New York 

• Egyptian American Bank 
•ElBeleidy Group 
•international Generating 

Company (Intergan) 

• Lucent iedinotogies 
“Proctor & Gamble 
•Showki Debitte & Touche 
•Xerox 


Vbroc: Scmimmi* InterContinental Hotel. Cairo, Feet to Attend; S500. AmChtjn Egypt will reserve neeommodauons. 


Portion & Company 

Address 

Telephone 


l wfati to pay by. 

Card No, 

Sjpialure 


Q Ms&tercard 


Expiry Dale 


American UJ Chamber 
Of Commerce In Egypt 

Cain MutMI Haul - Salic IMI ■ 1H: I2D2| 340-IM8, an. 1X1, DU at! 120; ) XMVJ9 
Faa; llUl 340-9462/1 UQ - Wb; hnwim.iailiB.ai]a| - C-aaJI: caaHgawckau.aix.cg 





















































































































































































IMHtftATIIMI. 


PAGE 22 


Sports 


FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


World Roundup 



Allen Iverson was named NBA 
rookie of the year Thursday. 


Iverson Is Voted 
Rookie of the Year 


basketball Alan Iverson, of 
the Philadelphia 76ers, was named 
NBA rookie of the year Thursday. 
He received 44 of US votes from 
sports writers and broadcasters 
who cover the NBA. 

Minnesota's Stephon Marbury 
finished second with 35 votes and 
Vancouver's Shareef Abdur- 
Rahim third with 25. 

Iverson, 21, was the leading 
rookie scorer this year, and his av- 
erage of 23 J5 points placed him 
sixth overall in the NBA. 

Some players have criticized 
Iverson's attitude. Charles Barkley 
said the only award Iverson de- 
served was for trash-talking. (AP) 


Canada Beats U.S. 


ICE HOCKEY Rob Zamuner 
scored after 82 seconds Thursday 
and Canada went on to beat die 
United States, 5-1, in the World 
Championship in Turkku, F inlan d. 

The victory left Canada third in 
Group B, one point behind the 
United States and Sweden. 

It was the first loss of the com- 
petition for the United States, 
which has not beaten Canada in the 
world championships since 1985. 

In a Group A game in Helsinki, 
Vycheslav Busayev scored mid- 
way through the third period to give 
Russia* 3-2 victory over the Czech 
Republic. ( AP, Reuters) 

• Mario Tremblay resigned as 
coach of the Montreal Canadieos, 
riling attacks by the intensely crit- 
ical Montreal media. Montreal was . 
eliminated in the first round of die 
Stanley Cup playoffs by New Jer- 
sey. (AP) 


Bowe Quits the Ring 


boxing Riddick Bowe, the 
former heavyweight champion, re- 
tired on Wednesday ending a some- 
times bizarre career that included 
an aborted stint in the Marines. 

Bowe, 29, was the last undis- 
puted heavyweight champ. He had 
a 40-1 record. He will become a 
goodwill ambassador for HBO, the 
U.S. cable network.fAPJ 


Shaky Argentina 
Beats Ecuador, 2-1 


Reuters 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Argentina’s 
hopes of reaching next year's World 
Cup finals in France were greatly en- 
hanced as it beat Ecuador, 2-1, on a 
peaceful night in die South American 
world Clip qualifiers cm Wednesday. 

Argentina’s victoiy in Buenos Aires 
lifted it above Bolivia and Ecuador and 


World Cup 


into third place in the nine-team South 
American group. The top four teams 
will go to France. 

Argentina also closed the gap on 
second-placed Colombia, which lost 1- 
0 at home to Peru. 

■ Despite two sending-off in the game 
between Paraguay and Uruguay and one 
in the Colomoia-Feni game in Bairan- 
quilla. there was nofemg to match (he 
scenes that marred the Bolivia- Argen- 
tina and Paraguay-Colombia games 
earlier this month. FIFA the governing 
body of world soccer, handed down a 
string of suspensions on the eve of Wed- 
nesday's games. 

Argentina gave another stuttering 
performance in the qualifiers Wednes- 
day. Argentina started well, raring into 
a 2-0 lead with goals by Ariel Onega 


and He man Crespo in the first 32 
hen fell to pu 


minutes, but then fell to pieces. 

Alex Aguinaga, Ecuador’s star 
striker, consistently outshone Ortega. 
Aguinaga pulled a goal back in the 67th 
minute and then lanky striker Eduardo 


Hhrtado missed two good chances to 
equalize forEcuador, which is aiming to 
go to the World Cup for the first time. 

Ecuador's poor away form — it has 
gained only one point from four games 
— could be its undoing. 

Pwpguay 3, Uruguay 1 The group 
leader Paraguay moved six points clear 
by beating Uruguay, twice the World 
Chip champion, m Asuncion. 

Aristides Rojas, Dalis Soto and Jose 
Cardozo, with a penalty, scored for 
Paraguay, which did not miss Jose Luis 
■Chilavert, its star goalkeeper, who re- 
ceived a four-match ban for fighting 
with Colombia's Faustino Asprilla in 
the previous round of games. 

Colombia o, Poru 1 Asprilla, who was 
serving the first half or his two-match 
suspension, was sorely missed in Bar- 
ranquilla. 

Peru never allowed Colombia to 
settle, and won the game with a 61st 
minute goal by Jose Pereda. 

Pereda scored with a spectacular 
long-distance shot after the Colombia 
goalkeeper Farid Mondragon, blamed 
for the goals that allowed Argentina and 
Paraguay to beat Colombia in the last, 
two games, was again at fault, throwing 
the ball straight to the Peruvian striker. 

Colombia's place in France appeared 
to be a formality as it took a runaway lead 
in die nine-team soup last year, but it is 
six points behiod Paraguay and only one 
.ahead of third-placed Argentina. 

• Chile beat Venezuela, 6-0, on Tues- 
day with Ivan Zamorano scoring five. 




Roaches M 




Dro^GdBwMgenceliiace-ftm 

Uruguayan Enzo Francescoli tumbling after a tackle from Paraguayan Roberto Acuna. Paraguay won, 3-1. 


Perfect Romania Closes In on Finals 

Italy Also Improves Its World Clip Chances While Others Slip 


Brazil Sells Soccer Sole 
To Spread Nike’s Swoosh 




;f r - 



' 

■st***-' 






r>J*f V 


By Richard Sandomir 

New York lima Service 


The Br azilian national soccer team 
beat Mexico, 4-0, at Miami’s Orange 
Bowl in a so-called friendly match wife 
no competitive significance — except to 
Nike Inc. 

Nike, fee UJS. sportswear company, 
staged the game Wednesday as part of 
its 10-year, $200 millio n sponsorship of 
fee Brazilian team through 2006. Nike 
intends to try to recoup its $20 million 
annual fee through gate receipts, tele- 
vision rights and sponsorships. 

But the big payoff, if there is one, 
would come from the spreading of 
Nike’s ubiquitous-swoosh logo into yet 
more retail outlets internationally and 
higher sales of Air Jordan basketball 
shoes and Tiger Woods golf shirts. 

"Soccer is fee No. 1 priority in this 
company,” said Jim Small, a spokes- 
man for Nike. “We’re fee No. 1 sports 
and fitness company in fee world and 
we want to be No. 1 in soccer in fee 
world.” 

Michael Jacobsen, the editor of 
Sportstyle, a U.S. trade magazine, said: 

‘ This is by far the most obvious example 
of Nike buying its way into a market. It’s 
die equivalent of Nike sponsoring fee 
entire National Football League. 1 ' 

Each year, Kike will set up five 
friendly exhibitions starring fee Brazili- 
an team, arguably the mo st popular team 
in the world's most popular sport. Each 
of Brazil's games for Nike will feature a 


samba band and will be followed by a 
Carlos Santana concert and a fireworks 
show. The next game is scheduled for 
August and will probably be held in 
SeouL 

The games would not happen without 
Nike's cash and its arrangements to jet 
players who play on other teams from 
league matches elsewhere. 

Contrived? Probably. Small countered 
by saying: “It would be contrived if the 
matches were not' authentic, or the rules 
were changed in some way.” 

Roberto Mueller, head of Mueller 
Sports, a consulting firm, recently ne- 
gotiated a 10-year deal worth $60 mil- 
lion to $80 million for the Argentine 
national soccer team with Reebok In- 
ternational Ltd., where he was once 
president. 

Are such games mere contrivances? 
‘ ‘Maybe," he said. ‘ ‘Many people want 
all games to be part of a tournament. But 
the kids will love these games. The 
whole tiling for Nike and Reebok is 
reaching fee next generation of fans." 


"You need stomach for that.” 

Soccer accounted for one percent of 
Nike’s footwear sates of $2.3 billion in 
fee year ended Feb. 28. 

Nike has smaller sponsorships wife 
the soccer federations in United States, 
Nigeria, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, 
Poland, South Korea and Russia. But 
Brazil was central to its corporate 
strategy. To Nike, the Brazilian team is 
the Nike of soccer the dominant brand. 


Reuters 

Of fee 49 teams battling over fee 14 
World Cup places available to reams 
from Europe, only one still has a perfect 
record. 

Romania has played six qualifying 
games for next year’s finals in France 
and has won all of them. Every other 
team has at least one draw. Furthermore, 
Romania has yet to concede a goal. 

On Wednesday in Bucharest both re- 
cords survived, but .only just, as Ro- 
mania beat Ireland, 1-0, m European 
qualifying Group Eight 

Adrian Die scored the winner wife a 
volley after 32 minutes. In fee 48 tb 
minute, Ireland won a penalty kick. But 
Bogdan Stelea, Romania's goalkeeper, 
saved from Roy Keane. 

Romania leads Macedonia by eight 
points. Both have four games to play. 
Lithuania beat Liechtenstein, 2-0, to 
climb to third place. . 

The nine European group winners will 
all advance to fee finals in France. One 
second-place team will also qualify di- 
rectly. The other eight will be paired off, 
and the four winners will qualify. 

Omul Two Italy dismissed Poland, 3- 
0, in Naples to take another step toward 
a certain qualification, ' 

Roberto Di Matteo and Paolo Maldini 
scored for Italy in fee first half. Roberto 
Baggio, recalled to fee squad, came on as 
a substitute in the second half, and within 
12 minutes he scored a dazzling goal. 

Baggio collected a long pass, 
sidestepped a defender, waited for Pol- 
ish goalkeeper Andrzej Wozniak to 
come to him, then darted to his right and 
passed the ball between two derenders 
and into fee goal. 

England is second in the group four 


Teddy Shexingham and Alan Shearer 
played together for the first time since 
fee European Championships last June 
and each scored once. 

In fee 42d minute Shearer hooked a 
cross into the goalmouth which Sher- 
ingham met wife a thumping header into 
fee goal. 

Georgia dominated fee second half, 
but failed to seme and Shearer added 


Cbrofcan Soccbr 


points behind Italy, but it struggled be- 
fore beating Georgia, 2-0, at Wemb- 


ley. 


England's second — a ferocious shot 
from a free-kick — wife the last kick of 
fee game. 

“I don't think we deserved to win, 2- 
0,” said Shermgham. 

Group Om Greece, fee group leader, 
lost, 14} in Salonika against Croatia. 
Denmark took over in first place cm goal 
difference after it thrashed Slovenia, 4- 
0, in Copenhagen. 

Davor Suker scored in fee 74fe 
minute for Croatia which is third, one 
point behind the leaders. 

Group Tfiroo Norway dropped its first 
points of fee qualifying competition 
when it was held, 1-1. in Oslo by Fin- 
land. Norway dominated the first half 
but fell behind on the hour to a goal by 
Antti Sumiala. 

The Finns defended in depth but Ole 
Guunar Solskjaer scored wife a sweetly 
struck shot from outside the penalty area 
in fee 83d minute. 

Norway leads the group ahead of 
Switzerland which beat Hungary, 1-0, 
in Zurich wife a late goal by Kubilay 
Turkyilmaz. 

Group Four Scotland conceded its first 
goals in seven qualifying marches as it 
lost, 2-1, to Sweden m Gothenburg. 

Kezmet Andersson volleyed Sweden 
into the lead two minutes before half- 
time and added fee second in the 63d 


minute. Scotland, which replied through 
Kevin Gallacher, tops fee group with 
Austria, which brat Estonia, 2-0, 
second. 

Qmp fsvo Israel stayed on top of its 
group wife a 2-0 victory over Cj^tus in 
Tel Aviv. Veteran striker Eli Obana 
scored both goals. ^ 

Russia remained second in the group * 
with a 3-0 victory over Luxembourg in 
Moscow. 

Gmup Six Spain has made a tradition 
of qualifying early Jt had made another a 
fast start in its group but that was slowed 
slightly as it drew, 1-1, rnYu^olsavia. 

Fernando Hierro scored wife a 19th 
minute penalty to give Stain the lead. 
Goalkeeper Andoni Zubizaretta pre- 
served Spain's lead until three minutes 
from fee end when Predrag Mijatovic, 
who plays for Real Madrid, scored wife 
a penalty for Yugoslavia. 

Spain still tops the group with - 17 
points, one ahead of Yugoslavia. 

Spam's Josep Guardiola was appar- 
ently hit on the bead while taking a comer 
by a cigarette lighter thrown by a fan. 

A last minute goal by Tody Jonsson 
gave the Faroe Islands its first ever Viforld 
Cup victory. It won, 2-1, in Malta; 

Group Srnwn The Netherlands 
thrashed San Marino, 6-0, to stay top of 
its group. Two goals by Dennis Ber- 
gkamp and one each for Aron Winter, 
Pierre van Hooijdonk, Frank de Boer 
and John B osman moved Holland three 
points clear of Belgium. 

The Belgians won, 3-1, in Turkey 
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Group Nine Germany climbed into 
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BASEBALL 


Majoii Leaquk Standinus 


AMIMCAM UAOW 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

16 

7 

-496 

— 

Boston 

13 

12 

£20 

4 

New York 

14 

13 

319 

4 

Toronto 

11 

12 

.478 

5 

Detroit 

11 

16 

A07 

7 


CENTRAL OnraWN 



Milwaukee 

12 

11 

sn 

— 

Cleveland 

12 

13 

M0 

1 

Kansas City 

11 

12 

478 

1 

Minnesota 

11 

15 

423 

T/t 

Chloogo 

8 

17 

-320 

5 


WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

16 

11 

-593 

— 

Tews 

14 

10 

-593 

VS 

Anaheim 

T2 

12 

J00 

2 K 

Oakland 

13 

13 

500 

2 % 

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EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Altanto 

19 

6 

.740 

— 

Florida 

15 

10 

■400 

4 

Montreal 

12 

12 

J00 

6’A 

New York 

12 

14 

442 

Th 

PtiRadeiphla 

8 

16 

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10 W 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Houston 

15 

11 

sn 

— 

Pittsburgh 

12 

13 

MO 

Yh 

SL Louis 

11 

14 

440 

3 'h 

Cincinnati 

7 

18 

.280 

Th 

Chicago 

6 

19 

.240 

8!6 


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San Frandsco 17 

7 

JOB 


Colorado 

17 

7 . 

. JOB 

— 

Los Angeles 

13 

11 

342 

4 

San Diego 

9 

IS 

.375 

8 

TUESDAY'S UKK SCORES 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 




100 OSS 101—5 11 3 


]] I 


i 002 010 

istna McElray (71. (71. 

lo (71, Holh (8). James W1 ond Loytitt. 
pa (fl); Wnsdifb Eshetmon (75. Coni 
Uerny (Si and Htaeman. w— MoHz. 2- 
I. Henry, l-l. 5v — James 0). 
d 100 002 100-4 8 I 

md 211 000 33X-10 12 0 
o, SmoO (7). R. Lewis 18) ond Maflno.' 
MJodisw (8) ond L AKmor. 
gy, 4-1. L— Prieto. 2-1. S y-M. 
n (2). HRs— OaUandi Brostus (1), 
n H). Cleveland, S^tomor (B). Franco 
WManu (7), Giles U). 
aee m om ion-2 7 a 
001 000 00»-1 7 2 
Wlckmon (7). Dajones m and 
ty; OOwres. Cummings f7). Mlcell (7). 
(9j and B- Johnson, w— EJdtetl 3 -2. 
area, 1-1. S*-OaJo*s (5). 

, 012 101 000 0-5 B 1 

CHy 003 200 000 l-S 10 0 
inlnBSlHenfgtn. PtedtoC (W. QoanWI 
d oSrieoi Rusdv R. Veres (75. 
to ( 10 ) am) Mocfariane. 
twrela, 1-0. (.-QuanML 3-2. 
Comas City. CDo*fs (2), OWetmon 
orta Merced (31. 5Droguc2 (55, 

000 010 000-1 6 1 
I 010 000 001-2 0 o 


Pavflfc Gunderson CB5, Patterson (95 and L 
Rodrigues Navana and Knrtawtoa 
W— Navarra 2-1. L— Patterson, 2-2. 

Seattts 000 010 ISO-7 12 1 

New York 000 200 003-5 9 1 
Moyer, 5. Sanders (A, McCarthy (7). WeBs 
(05, Charton (9) and D.WBktv Mendoza 
Stanton (73, Boetirtoger (75. Medr (7), Lloyd 
OU and GhaniLW— McCarthy, 14LL—Medb 

0- 1. HR— New York, Be.WHDams 0). 

Brtttmere 101 004 000-4 12 0 

Minnesota 000 040 000-4 7 0 

Coppmoer, Rhodes (S5, Baslde (5), Orosco 
(«, TeJVtottiews (7), RaMyera (9) aid 
HoBet; Robertson, Swfndel (45. ROcMe (05. 
Guardado (63, Aguilera (93 and SfetabadL 
W— BOSkle. 1-1. L— SwtnduU, 1-1. 
Sv-eaMym3 (705. HR — Battbnort, 

IncavtgDa (1). 

IUTTONM- LEAOUE 

Colorado 010 000 000-4 7 2 

Hoestaa 001 100 01K-3 < 1 

R. Bailey, Holmes (61, MJMunaz (8) and 
Manwaitnor Watt RJpringer (7). Motto (B5, 
Hudefc C9) and Einehla Ausmus <85. 

W-Walt 1-a L — R. BaBey, M. S*-Hudek 
M). HRs— Houston. Btmwetl (7), Berry (15. 
Montreal 501 100 010-8 11 2 

Chicago 303 204 OOs-14 14 0 

Bufflnger, Tetfard (4), Doal (41, M. VtMes 
(45, Urbina (B) and Retdiec TradtseL 
BotterrfWa (ffl, Poienon (71. TMaira 01 
and Senate. W— TradtseL 1-1 L—BuUnger, 

1- 4. HRs— Montreat Andrews (4, Lansing 
CD, H. Rodriguez 2 M5, FWdKrPJ.aiteaga 
Klesctmick 2 CO. 

prmtMugh 010 000 100-2 9 2 

PUBadeWa B10 043 BBx-4 11 0 

F.CorJova Ruetiel (5), WaWtause (5). M. 
WDklns (7) and Kendofc Madura SpradBn 
(BL R^tonfa 9) and LJeberttML W-Modura 

2- 2. L-RutiieL 1-Z HR-PWtodeipMa 
Uebentnl (4). 

SaHHego 001 000 000—1 8 • 

Hoddo 000 BOO 02>— 2 3 0 

Bargimat Bodriler (7), Hoftnon IB] and 
Haherlyf Brawn, Nen (9) ond C Johnson. W- 
— Brawrv 3-1. L— Hoffman. O-l Sv— Nen (75. 
Mew YOA 100 110 000-3 9 1 

Ondiwtt 000 IN 010-1 7 1 

MXkvh, Borland (05. JJ^nma (85 and 
HamBey; Morgan, Belinda (55, Camasoo (6). 
Shan (S3, Brantley (9) and Fordyce. W— M. 
CJartc 3-1. l— M organ. 0-1 Sv— J. Franco 
(51. 

LasAegeles oil 902 101-4 13 1 
Attnfe - 000 101 000-2 7 0 
Port. Radmsky («, Coruttatn (45, Guttirte 
(7J. TaWamefl (95 arid Piaun; Wortv Ooatz 
(5). Byrd (4), BMedii (75, BorawsU (05 and J-- 
Lapez. W-Part, 1-1. L— Wade, 0-1. 
Hfts— Los Anoeie& Pfazat (43, Gapw (25. 
Atlanta, J.Lopez (4). 

San Fnradsco 211 2D0 100-7 11 0 

SL Louts 100 ON 23®— 9 12 B 

Rueter, Tovara (75. Poole Ml, Henry (ffl, 
Beekmond Jonsaru Stofflemyra; Rmariore 
( 43 , Baidtaior (7), Fossas (93 and Pagnozzt 
Lumpkin CD, Shaaftar (95. W— Fawn. 145. 
L— Seek, 0-1. HRs— St. Unite, Gant (35. 
London! 2 (35- 

WimiWMIY'SlMKOMB 

AWBWCAN LEAQUE 

M0WBMN 020 001 Ml— 4 10 1 

Detroit 104 021 90s— 8 f I 

Kart. Maloney (S3, VRom W ond 
Motherly. Leris (73 1 JuJIumpM* Scgor Uh 


ToJanes (93 ond Cosamva BJehnson (63. 
W— Ju-Thempsan, 2 - 2 . L— Kart, 04. 
HR— Milwaukee. Joha (4). 

Anaheim OM 010 001-2 7 1 
Boston 104 222 DOM — 11 12 0 

Dickson. DeMay (5). Haaegawa (73 and 
Fabregaa; Hammond, Getces (43, Trtfcsk (7), 
Eshetmon (65, Stacumb (93 and HnMrnon. 
W— Hammond, 1-0. L— DkJaon, 4-1. 
HRs— Boston. Gardapore CD. Bragg (4). 
Seattle 000 010 001-2 I 2 

New York 100 001 OU-3 0 0 

CteMartlnaz, McCarthy (S3. S. Sanders (6) 
and Do,msorc D.Wefls. Netean (S3, M. 
Rivera (9) aid Gtrnnfl. W— O. Weds. 2-1. 
L— OeJStorttnet 1-2. Sv-M. Rivera (85. 
HRs— Seattle. Buhner (4). New York, T. 
Martinez (93, Ralnet (75. 

Teraata Bio no ooo— 1 S 0 

Kansas City OM 0M 000-0 4 I 

Omens. Pkssoc (93, Ttentto (95, SpoQaric 
and Santtago; Appier ond Madarione. 

W — demons. 4-0. L-Appter, 3-1. Sv— Spo- 
Uartc HI. HR— Toronto, C Delgado (55. 
Battfawe 030 001 114-12 19 O 

MtaMSrto 020 010 000-33 2 

KamlenlecM, A. Benitez end HtrileK 
Tewksbury, Naulty (7), Guardada (83, Oban 
(93 and StembadL W-KOmlertecU. 2-0. 
L— Tewksbury, 1-4. Sv-A. BenBez (23. 
HRs— Bolfimore, incarigBa (2), sumoff (1). 
Mbmesata. R-KeBy (13. 

Oahtart MS 001 010 4-11 15 2 
devekisd T10 103 001 2— 913 2 
(10 ImingslTeigtwdK A. Smofl (43. Taylar 
(8), Acre n®, Groan (105 and Mayne: 
HersNser, Kline (7), Plunk (65, Mesa O®. 
A. Lopez no] and SAtomar. W— Taylor. 1-1. 
L-Mesa. 0-2. Sv-imngeri (1). 
HRs— Oakland. Berroa (43. Conseco (51, 
McGwire 2 (It). Cleveland. Ramirez (51. 

Justice (71- 

Torn 4M 002 0-4 9 0 

Chicago 002 0M «— 2 4 2 

(6 Innings) KJHffl, X. Hemandw (23. wm 
(S3 and H. Mercedes,- Ahnjrez, CCAStBe (33. 
D. Darwin (S3, Levine (43 and Kartwlce. 
W— wrn. S4L L— Alvarez, 1-iHRs— Texas. 
GO (11. Simms (3). 

HATKHULL LEAGUE 

San Rcwdue 401 BN 010-4 » 0 

Plttibargb 000 100 004-1 3 0 

GwMer end R- WUMbb LJeber, Peters (S3. 
Wdnhouxc (9) end Kendal W-Gartner; 21. 
L— Uebec 3-2 HR— San Pmdsm Kent (5). 
Atfcmta Ml 032 122-12 17 B 

Ctactnati 2M 1M *0—3 10 3 

Moagte BMedd (65, Emtne (9) and J. 
Lopes Mercker, RenBager (45. Bettnda (71. 
Carrasco (85. Bones (95 and Peniyce. 
W-Neogte, *45. L— Mercker, 1-3. 
HRs^-Aitorta. Tuckar a), MoGrtff 2 (45. 

m 001 003-7 13 0 

020 1M 002—3 11 0 

tomftRodtnsky ( 73 , Hal BLCondWtl (95. 
To.Wanofl (9) and Ptoz» Pitaat W); 
MUriteri R. Harris (85, Ptortertwg TO 
Spradlin ff) and Uebutbei. w-uoma 3-2 
L—M. Latter, 3-2 HRs-PhUadripNo. Raton 
OJ. Lletarthal (7). 

HoustM 904 001 001—4 11 1 

Meatraal 811 3» m-9 III 

Kfle, R.Oarcio (43, Uma TOR- Springer (7) 
and Ausmus CPertt D. Verus TO L-5mflh 
TO urbiMOTofld Ftotdief.W— CP4M24- 
1 . L-KBe. 14. Sv-UitMfl TO 
HR— MontraaL SeguiM). 


Son Diego 020 0M 000-2 7 0 

New York 001 002 03i-4 IB 1 

HOdKOCk, Kroon TO Scan (83 ond 
FWwftyj BJones. McMldwri (85, Borland 
TO Jo. Franco [95 and Hundtey. W—B. Jones. 
4-2 Lr-Httcheodk, 2-2 Sv— JaPranco (65. 
Florida 0M 020 000-2 9 0 

et 1 iwft 100 030 PQ» t B 0 

A. Latter, P. Heredia TO HaBlng (i). Hutton 
(B) and CJotunaiti AL Bones, Fossas (7). 
TJAAothews (S3 and Otftfirx. W— ALBenes. 
3-2 L— A. Letter, 3-2 

Chicago 0M BM 230-5 12 B 

Cntorudo 0M 227 OOz— It 0 0 

Poster, Wendefl («, R.Totts (ft, Bottenfleid 
(85 and Senate; Rite. Dtpoto (81 and 
Marmwlng. W— Rte 3-3. L-ftrter, >2 
HRs — Chieaga MaJSrace (31, Senate (1). 
COtorado. Grtorroga (SI. Cdnfta (91, L. 
WolkerOU. 


Japanese Leagues 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Yatam 

15 

9 

_ 

-625 

_ 

Hiroshima 

13 

9 

— 

J91 

1-0 

Houston 

11 

12 

— 

478 

3-5 

Yoafafl 

11 

12 

— 

478 

35 

OiunfcW 

10 

13 

— 

435 

65 

Yokohama 9 14 

WUMIMAT'K 

- J91 

umni 

5J 


Attaata 20 20 .24 25- 91 

Detroit 24 32 16 27-99 

A; Loettner 9-1864 25. Smith 7-146-831; D: 
Hunter 11-17 0-0 2& HB1 10-19 4-7 24. 
Rab ao p d i Atlanta 49 (Mutombo 2ij, 
Detroit 2B (Mrite 71. Aastets— Atlanta 17 
(Blaylock Ml, Denari 18 (HDU. 

(Detroit leadt aeries 2-1) 

Hewtae 22 27 22 34-125 

MtanesetB 29 30 22 29-120 

H: Moloney 9-11 2-3 24 EKe4-6 5-7 21; M: 
GugBoita 10-19 4-6 27, Garrett 11-17 4-5 24 
Redoamta— Houston 42 (Otatuwon 111. 

MlnnetMta 47 (Ganan 151. Asttete— Houston 
33 (Drawer 91, Minnesota 30 (Mortwry 131. 
(Haertea wIm series 3-0) 

Seattle 40 22 19 22—103 

PftMrir 38 27 25 29-110 

S: Payton 12-242-434, Kemp 7-15 10-11 24; 
P: Person 8-U 74 29, Chapman 8-14 34 ZL 
Rebeunta— Seattle 49 (Kemp 11), Ptioente 53 
(Person 1(51. Asstets— Seattle 24 (Payton 41, 
PhoentK 22 (Kidd 10). 

(PtMenti hods series 2-1) 

WID MOMMY'S BUOUS 

□tap 22 24 22 24— 96 

Washtagfan 23 23 24 23- 95 

C: Jordan 14-24 04) 28, Plppen 8-182-3 20) 
W: Strickland 9-18 5-724 Murray B-ll 2-2 20. 
Rcbouadt -ancaflo « (Rodman 10), 
Washington 37 (Webber 61. 


First Period: A-Karpa 1 OWrarnv, 
Pranoeri Second Period: A-RuaMn 1 
(Kartya. Kaipa) 3. A -Sacco 1 (BeUaws. 
MamhalDT M rd Period: None. Skate aageofc 
Phoenix 7-9-15-31 . A- 10-1 0-4-24 Gearies: 
Phoenix. Khablbulln. A-Hebcrt 

(AnaMmwfen Uriel 4-3) 

World Championships 


ULHELOffria FINLAND POOL A 


Finland 4 Germany ft 
RiHitaS, France 4 
CmcIi Reput) Be 3, Slovakia 1 
Czech Republic 2, Russia 3 
STUUMMOSi Russia 7 points Czech Re- 
pubSc ie Fhilond < SIokMd * France a 
Germany Q. 

M TURKU, F«LAND. POOL B 
Sweden 4, Norway 1 
U5.4, Itafy 2 
Canada 3. Latvia 3 
Canada 5, U.S. 1 

eiMM M O i i Sweden s palms; UJS. 4- 
Canada 5; Italy Z- Latvia 1; Norway 0. 


CRICKET 


Yokohama &YbfcultO 
Hlrashlraa 4 Chanidd 0 
Hansttn 4 . vamlun 3 

iwaeSMY'x muurs 

Yokohama 9, Yaku(t2 
HknsMma 8. ChunkM 0 
Yoanart 5. HmsUnl 



W 

(. 

T 

PCL 

GB 

LORE 

11 

9 

1 

.550 

— 

Da lei 

11 

10 

— 

.524 

0J 

5eBu 

11 

11 

— 

500 

10 

Orix 

10 

10 

— 

500 

IJO 

Kkiteteu 

9 

10 

1 

474 

1J 

Nippon Horn 

10 

12 

— 

455 

IS 


Asstete-CMcaga 12 (Jordan 45. VltasWngton 
16 (Strickland 9). 

(CMcago wins series 340 
LA. Lakers 17 19 22 32- JO 

Portland 32 27 25 14- 98 

LA.- OTIem 10-21 9-1629, 8ryan»7-134B 
22; P: Anderson 9-11 9-10 30.Wa8ace 7-13SB 
20. Retnunds— Las Angeles 43 (Cmral 12). 
Portland 44 (Dudley 7). Assists— Los 
Angeles IB (O’Neal VUnExeM. PW1tartdl7 
(Anderion S). 

(LA. Lakers lead series 2-1J 


MKHIUlOm 

2ND TEST 

SW LANKA VS. PAKISTAN 
WEDNESDAY. 01 COLOMBO 
Sri Lanka; 331 and 384-4 dedared 
Pakistan: 292 and 285-5 
Match ended ki draw. 

Series are Red 04. 


ICE HOCKEY 


mi-oeywrERNATMiuL 
WEST HUMES VS, KM 
1RDNES9XT. IN WNOSTOWN, ST VINCENT 

Wert Indies; 249-9 (50 oven) 

India: 231 oil out (4425. 

West indies wan by 1 Brans. 

West indies lead 4-match series 2-1. 


NHL Playoffs 


WDriBUrSKUlTSi 

Setou 11, Kintetsu 0 

Latte w. Mppan Ham mined ow. 

Orta *4 DflW rained out. 


(BEST-OF-SEYEN) 

mscnKY'SKHinn 


LDtte 4 Nippon Ham 3 
DaW + OrixO 
SeBM&KtaWsuO 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Playoffs 


(BEET-OF-nVE) 

nWRhBY'BBKSSt.TS 


Mind 


29 13 IS 18- 75 

13 2* 23 23-88 

M: Moundng H2 M 17. Lenord 5-13 2-j 
14 O; PJimdawar 14-30 9-10 48, Armsttbrig 
411 7-721. R eB mm d s— Mlpnd 44 (Mourning 
17). Ortando 37 (P.Hantowsy 65. 
Atstete— Mlamt 17 (Titardaway 8), Orlando 
11 (Armstrong fl. 

(MtamlhHds series J-1J 


Ottawa l H W 

BuHrrie O 1 1 1-3 

ftsf Period: 0-McEodiem 2 (Duchesne. 
Yashin) (pp). Second Period! B-Audene 2 
(Hotatnger. Grtrey) (pp). TOW Period: O- 
Redden l (Yashin, Bonk}. 4, B-Ptortm 2. 
OxwttateiS. B-Ptante 3 (Barnoby) Starts*" 
goat a 11-7-4-3—27. B- 2-3-14-4-31. 
GeaMta O-TugnutL B-ShMdS. 

(Buffalo trios series 4-31 

Edmoahm 12 0 1—4 

DoSas 1 2 0 0-3 

Hrat Period: D- Hogue 2 (Nteuwendrt. 
Langenbrimneri l E-Munay t (HudHg) 
Secoad Period: E-MWnov 2 (CrerkuwskJ. 
Grier) 4. D-verbeek 1 (Zubov, Hogue] (pp). S. 
G-Bcmen 3 (Verbeek. Braten) 4 E- 
Kovalenko 3 (Morclamt. WWgtm TbM 
Periotfc Nam. Owsttawi 7. E-Maidxmt 2 
OAWgtm State « goal! E- 4-15^4-33. D- 
10-5-14-13—41. Gaaflesr E-Jonph. D-Maag. 
(Ed m onton wtas series 4^0 

0 0 0-4 

1 2 0-3 


world cap auAimiu 

EUROPEAN ZONE * 

GROW*! 

Denmark 4, StoventoO 

Greece 4 Craeno 

■wuhnosi Denmort 10 paints Greece 
1ft Croatia 9: Bosnia X Skwwilol. 

GROUPS 

Ifatyl Poland o 

England Z Georgia 0 

WTMtoaestsi Italy 16 paints; Engkmd ifc 
POkma 4; Georgia Or Mol daw 0. 

GROUPS 

Norway 1. Finland 1 

SwRzeriandi. Hungary 0 
STANiMMCkB. Norway 10 paktta; Swttzer- 

kmd ft Mungmyft Hntand 4r Aartxrijon 3. 

OROUPe 

Latvia 2, Belarus 
Sweden 2, Scohondl 
Austria Z Estonia 0 

STAND! mosi Scotland 14 paints,- Austria 

Ift Sweden 9 Latvia 4; Estonia 4r Belarus 4. 

GROUPS 

Israel 1 Cyprus 0 
Russia 3. Luxembourg 0 
•YANMMMi Israel 13 points; Russia II- 


Bulgaria 9i Cyprus 4; Luxembourg 0. 

GROUP 0 

Malta 1, Faroe telandi 2 
Yugoslavia 1, Spain 1 

wnmowM Spain 17 potato; Yugoslavia 
1ft Slovakia 12; Czech Republic 4; Fane is- 
lands $ Malta 0. 

OROUP7 

San Mculnol NeTherionds6 
Turkey!, Qeigkjm 3 

•memiMMi Netherfonds 15 pokrtsr Bel- 
gium 12; Turkey 7; Wata* 7: Son MorinoO. 
GROUPS 

Liechtenstein 0. Lithuania 2 
Romania 1, Inland 0 

wtandwgsi Romania 18 pains; Mace- 
donia in Uthoonla 9s Inland 7; Iceland 2; 
UeehnasMaO. 

anowt 

Armenia a Nomwin Ireland 0 
Germany l Ukraine 0 
STANOtNOSi Ukraine 1 2 points; Germany 
1 1; Portugal 9i Northern l ietand 7i Armenia 4; 
Albania 2. 

SOUTH AMERICA ZOM 

Argentina 2, Ecuador 1 
Paraguay 3, Uruguay 1 
CotomWa 0. Para 1 

WTAMDHMMk Paraguay 23 points; Colom- 
bia 17; Argentina 1ft Bodvta 13; Ecuador 11 
Peru ll Uruguay ift CMte ifc Vtaezueta 1 . 

I W T lUft ll OH fti WMDLT 

WEDNESDAY. AT HAM. FLOfOOA 
Braza 4. Mexico 0 

nmm mat mvumn 

Coen 0, MantpeBer 1 
Strasbourg 4 Monaco 2 
Basfla 1, Le Havre 2 
Rennes 1. Mote 3 
Nice a Lyon 1 
Auxems i, cutngamp a 
UtteO, Parb-SG 1 
BanteauxZLenSl 
MoneBte 3. Cannes 1 
Nancy 1, Nantes 3 

stamp wkiti Monaco 71- Parts 5G eft 
Nantes 4ft Bordeaux 5ft Mete 54 Strasbourg 
5ft Auxorro 55: Basfla 55; Lyon 55; Mem- 
paiHer 47; MoneBte 4ft Gutngomp 44 ; Lm 
41; Cannes 4ft Le Howe 39 ; Re was 39r Nan- 
cy 33; uue 3ft Caen 32; Nice 20. 


N8W rorat- Traded RHP John Carter and 
LHP Erick Ot*da to PWsDurgh tar OF Whs 
Oramberkrtn and OP Raman Espinoza. Op- 
Honed Chamberlain and Eipfatomto Norfolk. 
IL Recalled LHP TakasM Kashlwada from 
Norfolk, IL. Dertgnated LHP Brian Bohanon 
toraestonmont 

PITTSWIMH-RWOIM LHP Chris Patera 
from Calgary, PCL. Optioned RHP Joivi 
Carter to Calgary, PCL and LHP Erick 0{ada 
to Augusta 5AL 


NATIONAL dASXeTBAU ASSOCWnON 

BOSTou-Announced resignation a! M.L 
Con. coach, who win remain as director of 
basketball operations. 

0OLD8N STATE— Ftrad Ride Adehnan coacn. 

WOIANA—Anrewued nUgnamn of Lorry 
Brawrv coach. 

sam antonio— E xercised ttnrir option mf to 
extend contract to G Vernon Maxwell tar next 
season. 


TRANSITIONS 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

At-Suspended Chicago White Sax INF- 
OF T on y Ptd B tps 2 games tar octtonsleodtag 
to Ids ejection from an Apr! 21 game. 

SEATTLE —Activated LHP Jamie Moyer 
from ISKtay disabled risf. optioned RHP Ed- 
win Hurtado lo Tacoma. PCL 
TEXAS-Retoosad RHP Kevin Grass from 
OWohoma Chy ot American Association. Pro- 
moted LHP Dai from Tuba. TL lo to 
Oklahoma City. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

cutaNH ATI-Put LHP Joey E lichen on 15- 
daydlsabiad Bst Activated 1 INF Teny Pendte- 
ton from 15-tfoy dtoebted list. Optioned OF 
Eric Owens to indlaMpeds, AA. Purchased 

eortroa of C Joe onver tarn IndtoitapoKS. 

HOUSTON— Aetfvnted RHP Mart SmaM 

from 1 5-riay dlsabM Brt otto optioned hta ta 

Jackson. TL 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Chicago— A greed to terms vritfi OT James 
Williams on 1-yw contract extension, and 
QB Mark Butterfield an 1-year contract. 
Waived TE Keny Cash. 

Jacksonville— R e-slpied DE Pout Frase. 
KANSAS criY-signed LB Tommy Dmsey, 
G Jesus Hernandez and DB Clyde Johnson. 
Miami— S igned P Rob Delgnan. 
Washington— signed OB Brad Otton and 
LB MMmH Ham Irion. 

HOCKEY 

USA HOCKEY # 

us# hockey— A dded G Tom Asker ond F 
Chris TandU to 1997 National Team rooter. 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAOUe 

eomonton— R ecaked & Bryan Muir and 
LW Joe HuOdg from HomWaa AHL 
Montreal Announced rrsigiHiton at 
Marfa Tremblay, coach, 

PHILADELPHIA- C VWJOV PlDSpal will 
mbs the rest of ttie ptoyofts attar breaking his 
left wrist In proaice. 

san Jose— Announced Wot LW Tony 
Granata has exercised Ms option and wit] 
remain wflh team to 1977-98 season. 
st. Louis-Announced retfremenl of C 

Craig MacTavIsh. 

COftUM 

DUKE— P run njted Ouin Snyder, men’s as- 
Ststanl bashatball coach, to me its associate 
head basketaad coach. 

6EDR«a— E xtended contracts ot Tubby 
Smith, mens bo^etbori cooch. far two years 
Wrough 3002-03 season; ond Jhn Donnan, 
football coadv to one year. 

EASTS BN COLLEGE ATHLETIC CONFER- 

encs— A nnounced Malne-Formington has 
lamed conference effective Sept 1. 

TOvrawr state— N amed Mike Joskutski 
mens basketball coach. 

wheaton— N amed Brian Walmsley metre 
basketball coach. 



Ota l - »• 





RKf j | 





TABLE TENNIS 


* 


WowupCM Aam o wi BP 


WEDNEBOAY, in MANCHESTER. ENGLAND 
WOTS TEAM TOML 
CWnal Franco! 

PLACES 3M 

South Korea ft Germany 0 



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1 v;;;: 1 -- ■■ 

: j, ■ " 



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cJ-r’JA 


\&Q> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 2, 1997 


PAGE 23 


SPORTS 



Yankees Give Torre 
k His 1,000th Victory 

Bft ^ Atlanta Also Reaches Milestone 

■ T because of shoulder injuries. 

TK' - ’ 't rlSlh eamcd bis «•<* SOX 11 . Angola 2 No- 

7 • ■ ft J l,0UPtn. victory as a major mar Garciaparra homered. 



Dogged but Doomed, 
Bullets Fall to Bulls 





jeagne manager when the doubled twice and scored four 
: New York Yankees beat the times as Boston solved Ana- 
Mariners, 3-2. heun’s rookie pitcher, Jason 

It means you've been Dickson, at Fenway Park, 
.around for a long time," he Dickson (4-1). who shut out 

: said. It s a pretty good num- the Red Sox on five hits in the 
.bei^anai mproudofiL" second game of the season, 

_ ion®, 1,000-1 ,086 overall gave up seven runs — four 
,in stints with the Yankees, unearned — in four innings. 

; Mets, Braves and Cardinals, ffgon 8, Brmwmrm 4 Melvin 
! - . — ■■ Nieves hit a three-run double 

• lAiiMuRoBMDBf and Detroit stopped visiting 

| — Milwaukee’s four-game win- • 

had a cake and a bottle of rung streak. 

Champagne to show for his In National League games: 
milestone. ^ Bnn»« issued* 3 Fred Mc- 

■■ David Wells won, improv- Griff homered twice and Mi- 
; ing his record to 10-2 lifetime chael Tucker had five hits as 

• at Yankee Stadium, although Atlanta beat Cincinnati. 

j it was his first victory there in Atlanta finished April with 

■ pinstripes. a 19-6 record, the most vic- 

Tjno Martinez homered for tones ever by a major league 
: theYankees and extended his team in the opening month of 






°nFk 


- major league record for runs 
; batted in in April to 34. 

• v «tH«lies11 f lndfamOMark 
' McGwire became the first 
■ player to hit the scoreboard in 
.left field at Cleveland’s Jac- 
*obs Field with a 485-foot 
'blast He then hit a 459-foot 
drive in the 10th inning to win 
the game for Oakland. 


the season. 

“That's because we’ve 
played more games in April 
— that’s why nobody's done 
better," said Bobby Cox, the 
Atlanta manager. 

McGriff and Tucker drove 
in five runs each. McGriff 
broke out of a slump with a 
run-scoring single, a three- 


McGwire and Jose Can- run homer and a solo shot 
scco homered in a game for Tucker added a three-run 




*- 

• *~od 

'Z~ i 


«tbe 44th time, moving them 
past Ernie Banks and Ron 
v Santo into 12th place on the 

Ijmr career list for teammates, 

f Trailing 11-7, Cleveland 

; loaded the bases with two outs 

j ,fn the 10th. Matt Williams 

| -hardy missed a grand slam, 

la Jhds two-run double hitting 

two feet from the top of the 
wall, and Kevin Mitchell flied 
>d ^out to the warning track with 
1 die bases loaded to end it 

* Bhw Jays 1, Royals O Roger 
n .Clemens outdneled Kevin 
riis ] )Appier, thanks to a home run 
by Carlos Delgado, as 
j Toronto won at Kansas City, 
r 23 j - Clemens allowed three hits 

-.j j rin eight innings, lowering his 
1 'earned run average to 1.72. 

. Appiergave op five hits in 


homer as the visiting Braves 
handed the Reds their 12th 
loss in 14 games. 

Giants 6, Pirate* f Jeff Kent 
hit a grand slam and Mark 
Gardner pitched a three-hitter 
as San Francisco finished 
April at 17-7, the team's best 
opening month since going 
18-6 in 1973. The Giants im- 
proved to 8-2 on the road, the 
best in the National League. 

Expos 8. Astros 8 In 
Montreal, . David Segui 
homered and drove in four 
runs, and Mark Grudzielanek 
had four singles to extend his 
hitting streak to 15 games. 

Hats 6, Padres 2 In New 
York, San Diego lost its 
eighth straight while the Mets 
won their fourth in a row. 



Jack Smabfthc AnodMerf firm 

Shaquille O’Neal of the Los Angeles Lakers battling Portland’s Arvydas Sabonis. 


Kentucky Derby’s Tiny Field 

13 Colts to Compete, With Favorites in the Middle 


By Joseph Durso 

New York Tana Service 


1 — 


-j -r- 

- -"rL^E 


- ' 


^his second complete game of Carlos Baerga scored the go- 
lly; season. His only mistake ahead run in the sixth inninjg 
- was a fastball he left over the on a sacrifice fly. 
plate. In die second timing. canfinaf* a, Marfas 2 Alan 
Delgado hit it into the right- Benes struck out nine in 6% 
field bullpen. innings and "Willie McGee had 

<- OrMM 12 , imm 3 BJ. a two-nm doable as die host 
Smhbff had Tout hits, con- Cardinals ended Florida’s 


meeting with Pete Xncaviglia five-game winning streak. 


' 

■w - » 


• : .Jr- 
; — - Li 


-K 3) 1 
' s .-~s2« ' 


. for consecntive home nms as 
Baltimore sent Minnesota to 
its seventh straight loss, 
r. Wa n g a ra 6, White Sox 2 
Mike Simms hit the first 
,grand slam of his career, in 
•the first inning, leading Texas 
. over Chicago in agame called 
■with no outs in the top of the 
seventh because of tain and 
'wind.at Comiskey Park. 


note 6, padres 2 In New LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — Thirteen cohs 

York, San Diego lost its have been entered for the 123d Kentucky 
eighth straight while the Mets Derby on Saturday, the smallest field in 12 
won their fourth in a row. years despite the late addition of Deeds Not 
Carlos Baerga scored the go- Words by D. Wayne Lukas, who conceded 
ahead run in the sixth inninjg that he was “rolling the dice.” 
on a sacrifice fly. Lukas, who won the Derby the last two 

cvdhnfx 6, Marfas 2 Alan years and has won seven of the last eight 
Benes struck out nine In 6% Triple Crown races, seemed to have ran out of 
iruaings and "Willie McGee had Derby candidates this week when the filly 
a two-nm double as die host Sharp Cat was targeted instead for the Ken- 
Cardinals ended Florida’s ftrcEy Oaks on Friday, a race for fillies, 
five-game winning streak. It would have been the first time Lukas 

Roddmii,CiJM5lnDen- missed naming a horse In the Derby in 17 
ver, Larry Walker tied an NL years. Bur he revived his streak, though not 
record with his 11th home run dramatically his chances, when he persuaded 
in April, and Andres Galar- Michael Tabor of Monaco to enter Deeds Not 
raga hit the eighth" grand slam Words, which has raced only four times and 
of his career. won only once. 

. Vinny Castilla also When post positions were drawn Wed- 
homercd for the Rockies, nesday, nobody appeared to be put at a telling 
Walker tied the mark shared disadvantage, and the favorites were lined up 
by Willie Stargell, Mike pretty much in the middle: Concerto at 8-1 in 
Schmidt, Gary Sheffield and the No. 3 gate; Captain Bodgit, the second 
Barry Bonds. The major- choice at 5-2, in No. 4; Silver Charm at 5-1 in 


in April, and Andres Galar- 


of his career. 

. Vinny. Castilla also 
homered for the Rockies. 
Walker tied the mark shared 
by Willie Stargell, Mike 
Schmidt, Gary Sheffield and 


Benji Gil a two-nm Barry Bonds. The major- 


Jhomer for the Rangers and 
-Bobby Witt became the AL’s 
second five-game winner. 

Both starting pitchers, Ken 
H31 of the Rangers and 
'Wilson Alvarez of the White 
Sox, were forced to leave early 


mark is 13, set by Ken No.-5, and Pulpit starting from No. 7 as the 
Griffey Jr. this year. hometown favorite at 2- 1 . 

Dodgem 7, pimIUm 5 Todd The weather forecast for Saturday is a 
Zefle. Greg Gagne and Mike chance of showers and thunderstorms with 
Piazza each drove in two runs warm temperatures. 


as Los Angeles won in Phil- 
adelphia. . 


Frank Brothers, who trains Pulpit for the 
Claiborne Farm of nearby Paris, Kentucky, 


said he was npt at all dismayed by the fact that 
no favorite had won the Derby in 17 years. “I 
had Hansel in 1991," he said of the beaten 
favorite in the Derby that year. “The flip side 
is that you must have done anumber of things 
right to be there.” 

Mike Battaglia, the Unemaker for Churchill 
Downs, explained that Pulpit and Captain 
Bodgit have raced head to head twice, with 
Pulpit winning the Fountain of Youth and 
Captain Bodgit winning the Florida Derby. * ‘I 
thought Pulpit rebounded very nicely in the 
Blue Grass after losing the Florida Derby," 
be said. “And he’s run at 2-5 in his last two 
races. This is the rubber match.” 

Deeds Not Words, a son of Rnbiano and 
grandson of Fappiano, won his debut at Del 
Marin California last August but has not won 
since. He ran third in the Best Pal in August, 
sustained a stress fracture in a hind leg dining 
the race, took seven months off, ran fourth in 
die Gotham at Aqueduct in March and third in 
the Lexington at Keeneland 10 days ago. He 
is lightly raced and lightly regarded. Corey 
Nakatani, one of the leading jockeys on the 
West Coast, will ride him. 

“We thought he merited the chance," Lu- 
kas said. “The weather was a factor. This 
horse is outstanding on a muddy track. And 
there have been some defections from the 
race. This horse is sound, healthy and ready to 

go- 

“It’s my contention that horses have an 
affinity for the track at Churchill Downs or 
they don’t, and this horse has that affinity." 


By Selena Roberts 

New York Times Service 

LANDOVER, Maryland — The Chicago 
Bulls left behind a pile of rubble Wednesday 
night the Washington Bullets. The Bulls not 
only flexed their talents to beat the Bullets, 96- 
95. and sweep their first-round series in three 
games, but also turned the tights out on US Air 
Arena and put the Bullets’ uniforms in a hope 
chest. 

Next season, the renamed Washington 
Wizards wQl play in a new luxury-box arena 

NBA Playoffs 

in downtown Washington with all the amen- 
ities. No more Bullets. No more stale, dark 
comers. But what a way to make an exit. 

The Bullets went down, but at least they 
made this series tougher than the sweep in- 
dicated Rod Strickland Juwan Howard and 
Chris Webber managed to pester the defend- 
ing champions, who squeezed by in Game 1 
and needed an inhuman, 55-point perfor- 
mance from Michael Jordan to take Game 2. 

Whatever it takes. The Bulls, who have lost 
just one first-round gams since 1990, can rest 
their aging bodies now. They can head to the 
whirlpool as Detroit and Atlanta continue 
their series to see which of them gets to face 
the Bulls next. 

Jordan may have had 10 of his 28 points in 
the final four minutes to make up a 9-point 
deficit, but it was Scottie Pippen who won the 
game for Chicago. With the Bulls down by a 
point in the Bullets’ first home playoff game 
in nine y ears, Jordan attempted a jump shot in 
the closing seconds that was deflected But 
Pippen gathered the ball and went aggress- 
ively down the baseline for a dunk to put the 
Bulls up by a point He was also fouled hard 
on the play by Harvey Grant and was left lying 
on his bade. 

Pippen arose and missed his free throw with 
7.4 seconds left The Bullets, with no 
timeouts, raced down the floor, and Calbert 
Cheaney broke open for the final shot at the 
buzzer. He missed everything. 

“That was a tough way to lose,” be said ‘T 
thought I had a real good look at it Jordan 
came by me and got me on the elbow, but no 
one saw ft." 

Besides Jordan’s 28 points, the Bulls got 20 
from Pippen and 16 from Toni Kukoc. The 
Bullets were led by Rod Strickland with 24 
and Tracy Murray with 20. 

The young Bullets wanted more than a gold 
star on their class presentation. They were not 
satisfied to have pestered tire Bolls in Game 1 , 
or content to have forced Jordan into a mes- 
merizing 55-point performance to snatch 
away Game 2. The Bullets had just wanted to 
get to a Game 4. 

That desire was revealed from die start. The 
team followed the undaunted lead of Howard 
and Strickland to build a 14-2 lead in the 
opening minutes. But tire Bulls gathered 
themselves — which means they gave the ball 
to Jordan — and discovered Dermis Rodman 


as a tip-in artist for 7 points as they went on a 
14-4 run to neutralize their early deficit. 

In other playoff games. The Associated 
Press reported: 

Trail mazM-s m, Lakars so In Portland on 
Wednesday, the Trail Blazers Jumped ahead 
behind Kenny Anderson’s 17 first-quarter 
points, and the game stayed a blowout through 
three quarters. 

The victory was Portland’s first in the best 
of five series, and the Lakers lead, 2-1. 

The Lakers outscored Portland, 24-6, to 
start the fourth quarter to close their deficit to 
90-82 on Kobe Bryant’s two free throws wife 
3:15 to play. 

Bryant, who scored 14 of his 22 points in 
the fourth quarter, twice cut Portland’s lead to 
six in the final 33 seconds, but Clifford Robin- 
son and Anderson each made a pair of free 
throws to finally ice the victory. Portland was 
1 -for- 14 from the field in the fourth period. 

Del Harris, the Laker coach, said: “We’ve 
got to look at it as a 30-point loss. We can’t 
say, ‘Everything's fine, we almost had it.' ” 

Anderson made his first eight shots and had 
a career playoff high of 30 points on 9-of-ll 
shooting. Rasheed Wallace added 20 points 
and Robinson 18. 

ShaquiUe O'Neal had 29 points and 12 
rebounds, bur got little help from his team- 
mates until the fourth period. O’Neal outscored 
die Portland center Arvydas Sabonis, 29-0, but 
the rest of the Blazers' starters outscored the 
rest of the Lakers' starting five, 80-15. 

“I don't care about the Lakers." Anderson 
said “I just know they’re going to have to 
check back into their hotel. I hope they don’t 
have any rooms. We've got a series now." 

• On Tuesday night, foe Houston Rockets 
completed a three-game sweep with a 125-120 
victory over the Thnberwolves in Minnesota. 

The Magic came back from a 20-point half- 
time deficit to beat the Miami Heat, 88-75, in 
Orlando. Miami leads two games to one." 

Detroit and Phoenix took 2-1 leads in their 
best-of-5 series: The Pistons beat the Atlanta 
Hawks, 99-91, and the Suns beat the Seattle 
SupexSonics, 110-103. 


■ 2 Coaches Say Farewell 

Two coaches have paid the price for dismal 
seasons. The Associated Press reported. 

Larry Brown quit as coach of the Indiana 
Pacers on Wednesday and immediately flew 
to Philadelphia to search for the next stop in 
his 25-year coaching odyssey. 

Brown, who has been linked to openings at 
the Boston Celtics and the Golden State War- 
riors, resigned with two years left on his 
contract The Pacers were 39-43 this year and 
missed the playoffs. 

Da Boston, MX. Carr said his “mission has 
been accomplished" and resigned as coach of 
the Boston Celtics after the worst season in the 
franchise's history. 

Hie will stay on as director of basketball 
operations, and said he would be involved in 
the search fora “career coach." Boston was 
15-67 this season and 4&-116 in his two 


Mighty Ducks to Take On, Wings inPlayoffs 


Reuters 

The Anaheim Mighty Ducks will start 
their second National Hockey League play- 
off series Friday night in Detroit against the 
RedWings. 

The Ducks qualified to meet the Wings 
by winning the seventh game of their first 
playoff series Tuesday night, 3-0, over the 
Phoenix Coyotes. 

In the other Western Conference semi- 
final, Colorado plays Edmonton. 

Edmonton advanced when Todd 
March ant scored on a breakaway with 7:34 


left in overtime of its seventh game against 
the Dallas Stars. 

The Oilers, the only Canadian team in the 
last eight, won, 4-3. 

The Buffalo Sabres also won in overtime 
in game seven Tuesday. They beat the Ot- 
tawa Senators, 3-2, and will be host to the 
Philadelphia Flyers in the first game of a 
semifinal Saturday. 

The New York Rangers will play the 
New Jersey Devils in the other Eastern 
Conference semifinal, beginning Friday in 
New Jersey. 


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PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1997 


OBSERVER 


No Diversity in Icons 


By Russell Baker 

W ASHINGTON — Di- 
versity is on all lips. So 
is closure. So is icon. Just try 
to get through the day without 
reading or hearing about 
someone who is an icon, 
someone who is looking for 
closure and someone who is 
championing diversity. 

Any day now I expect to 
read that some icon of di- 
versity has achieved closure, 
or dial some icon of closure 
has achieved diversity, or that 
closure has come to the search 
for iconic diversity. 

Why everybody suddenly 
started saying closure is a 
mystery, but that’s what 
happened. One day, right out 
of the blue, everybody just 
suddenly started saying clo- 


Persons whose children, 
lovers and next of kin died in 
the crash of TWA Flight 800 
and in the Oklahoma City 
bombing were said by die 
news reporters to be seeking 
closure. 

You sense the dust of the 
psychologist’s couch in the 
air here. The death of some- 
one you dearly love is a 
dreadful, dreadful thing, and 
not easily endured. Echoing 
inside the word ’’closure." 
however, is the sound of a 
door being slammed and 
sealed shut against the person 
whose loss creates your pain. 

The mourner is trivialized 
by the suggestion that the 
sooner he gets over the death, 
the better. "Time to pull 
yourself together, put this be- 
hind you, and get on with the 
job of expanding the gross 
domestic product” 

This is what I hear when 
the comfort of closure is dis- 
cussed. And closure is always 
made to sound comforting. 


Emotionally devastated sur 
vivors need closure, we are 
told, until it begins to sound 
like a patent medicine: “The 
new miracle Closure, folks. 
Take two at bedtime and 
wake up with all sadness 
gone.” 


Diversity is a good-person 
word. (Not, please notice, a* 
good-guy word.) Good per- 
sons seek diversity in order to 
give every American an equal 
opportunity. President Clin- 
ton boasts of die diversity of 
his governing circle, meaning 
that besides dead white males 
it includes live white females 
and Americans of African, 
Hispanic and Asian descent. 

Diversity's purpose is to 
create a government as di- 
verse as the population. De- 
sirable or not, Clinton has 
failed to pull it off and ought 
to quit boasting that he has. 
The problem with Clinton- 
style diversity is that it lacks 
diverseness. 

Sure, his government gives 
important jobs to women and 
persons of varied racial back- 
ground and ethnic cultures. 
Just as in the bad old pre- 
diversity era, however, it re- 
mains government by the 1 
elite, lacking the experience 
necessary to do many things 
government ought to be doing 
better. 


As for icon, this lovely 
word with its odor of incense 
and hint of Byzantine reli- 
gious mystery is now reduced 
to a pretentious way for de- 
praved language butchers to 
speak of computer cartoons 
and of entertainers and ath- 
letes once dismissed as “he- 
roes” or “stars." 

After the language is 
murdered, will closure be far 
behind? 

New York Tones Service 


The Writer in Exile as ‘Opposition Diplomat’ 


By Zia Jaffrey 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — I was waiting 
outside a Cuban restaurant on 
Amsterdam Avenue when Wole 
Soyinka, die Nigerian Nobel laur- 
eate, stepped up behind me. “You 
didn’t recognize me," he said with- 
out expression. “You looked right 
past me." 

“Why are you wearing that wool 
cap?" I asked. It was a balmy April 
evening and I had been looking for 
his signature halo of white hair. 

“Another one of those absurd 
security measures.” he said mis- 
cbievously. Soyinka, die play- 
wright, poet and critic, has been in 
exile since December 1994. when 
be fled the regime of Nigeria's dic- 
tator. General Sani Abacha. He has 
also learned that he is the target of a 

death squad. And in March he was 
charged with treason. 

For more than 30 years, whether 
in Nigeria or in exile, be has been 
speaking and writing about the need 
for African writers to act as the 
conscience of their countries — or 
watch helplessly as their corrupt 
politicians consolidate their power. 

Soyinka has recalled that from 
the instant he saw the first legis- 
lators of partly independent Niger- 
ia, in the late 1950s, “I knew the 
first enemy was within.” He has 
been fighting Africa’s home- 
grown tyrants ever since. 

Soyinka in exile resembles a 
statesman more than a man of let- 
ters. “An opposition diplomat” is 
how he describes his function. 

At Wellesley College, where he 
gave the inaugural speech for a 
conference on Benin, he had told an 
audience that included many Af- 
rican Americans to beware of “ Ac- 
tioning” Africa, and that the glory 
of the Ashanti kingdom "is today 
appropriated by men of khaki and 
camouflage, guns and brass 
buckles. 

Yes, it is a stirring sight to wit- 
ness an African leader addressing 
the United Nations, be said. 

“Never mind that he's just left a 
nation where millions are on the 





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Wole Soyinka, on the campus at Wellesley College, has been in exile from Nigeria since 1994. 


edge of starvation, where medical 
delivery no longer exists, where the 
educational system has collapsed 
and university students have be- 
come virtually illiterate. 

’‘Nevermind that either before or 
immediately after sounding off on 
the United Nations podium, be and 
his entourage detour to the most 
exclusive medical clinic in Wies- 
baden for a routine medical check- 
up.” he continued, “then stop in 
London and Paris to pick up new 
million-dollar knickknacks for then- 
wives, cronies and mistresses. Nev- 
er mind that he returns home to sign 
a few death warrants for his alleged 
enemies, tried in secret with no 
more evidence against them than 
confessions wrung from ‘witnesses’ 
who have been tortured so brutally 
that they cannot even be presented 
in court so that only their written 
depositions form the evidence 
against the condemned men.” 

Soyinka is a tall man. 63. and 


speaks in an idiom all his own, 
muting the diction of Shakespeare 
with the lang uage of liberation 
movements ana occasional phrases 
in French. 

His statesmanlike bearing (and 
schedule) and his political conver- 
sation make it hard to remember 
that his Nobel Prize in 1986 was for 
literature. He has written, produced 
anohdirected dozens of plays. Some 
have been staged in Europe and 
America as well as in Nigeria, 
where his “guerrilla troupes'’ 
would perform in theaters, in front 
of government buildings, in 
shantytowns and marketplaces. 

Nowadays, he is more often 
found in airports than in theaters. 
He strains to remember the cities be 
has visited in the previous week. 
He has been on Ted Koppei's 
“Nightline,” discussing the plight 
of Zaire (rather than his own pre- 
dicament in Nigeria). He has 
spoken to the beads of an oil com- 


pany be will not name, has given 
lectures at Brown and Eastern 
Illinois University, and be has met 
with State Department officials. 

The charge of treason is just the 
latest of Soyinka’s problems at 
home, and treason is a word that he 
has used against the Nigerian mil- 
itary. In Ins “The Open Sore of a 
Continent” (Oxford University 
Press, 1996 ), be wrote that the re- 
gime was guilty of ‘ ‘the most treas- 
onable act of larceny of all time” 
when it “violently robbed the Ni- 
gerian people of their nationhood” 
in annullin g the 1993 election, ap- 
parently won by Mashood K.O. 
Abiola. Nigerians, against all ex- 
pectations, had crossed ethnic, re- 
ligious and regional lines with their 
votes. Abiola, a civilian Yoruba 
Muslim, has since been jailed. 

“The first time the word ‘treas- 
on’ came up.” Soyinka said, “was 
when we launched the opposition 
radio. Radio KudiraL ' ’ That was in 


1996 and it was done from outside 
the country. 

“The minister of information ac- 
cusal us — accused me — of treas- 
on," he continued, "saying that all 
those behind the radio are guUty of 
treason. Chat the newspapers, the 
local media, if they quoted any- 
thing from the radio, would be 
1 equally guilty of treason. 

“That radio has been the single 
most effective counter against the 
authority of the regime. I mean, 
they’ve really been hysterical over 
die effect of the radio. Until that 
moment, they had total control of 
die media, apart from the under- 
ground press.” 

Protecting these radio stations is 
one of the primary activities of the 
exiled democracy campaigners, 
who skirt the borders of their coun- 
tries, being careful about which jur- 
isdictions they pass through and 
calculating at which airports their 
planes might have to land unex- 
pectedly. He calls it die under- 
ground railroad. 

“hi addition to Radio Kudirat. 
which is shortwave,’ ’ be said, ‘ ‘we 
also require FM mobile stations, 
which can speak directly to sec- 
tions of the country. And we need a 
whole network of those. The gov- 
ernment tried and tried and never 
succeeded in catching any of 
them.” 

Soyinka slipped out of Nigeria 
when he learned that he was about 
to receive the “Burmese Treat- 
mem" — house arrest. He win give 
no details of his family, or even 
whether he is married But he 
slipped back in again to get his 
remaining children out. 

The conversation turned to smal- 
ler things. His outdated computer 
had broken. Until it could be fixed, 
all the lectures he had prepared 
were trapped within. 

“Nothing so dramatic has beset 
me in a long time.” he said. 

What does be miss about Ni- 
geria? “The smell, especially die 
smell of the bush where I go hunt- , 
mg." he answered. 

And where is home? "In my ! 
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Spain’s Princess Cristina, the 
youngest daughter of King Juan 
Princess Cristina of Spain will marry the handball player Inaki Urdangarin. Carlos and Queen Sofia, will marry a 


PEOPLE 


S TANFORD University is a pres- 
tigious school with a picturesque 


U tigious school with a picturesque 
setting in sunny California. It’s also 
3.000 miles from Mom and Dad. 
What more could a college freshman 
want? At least, it’s what Chelsea 
Clinton wants. The only child of 
President BUI Clinton had her pick 
of Ivy League and other top schools, 
including Georgetown, ha father’s 
alma mater, -three miles from the 
White House. But the 17-year-old se- 
nior, who is thinking of becoming a 
doctor, decided to head west next fall. 
The president said he did not try to 
influence his daughter’s choice. Hil- 
lary Rodham CUnton, who visited 
the campus with Chelsea last Septem- 
ber. was glad the quest was over, and 
she offered some insight into 
Chelsea’s choice. "I think she wanted 
to branch out and be her own person,” 
Mrs. Clinton said. 


professional handball player. Inaki 
Urdangarin, in the fell. The 29-year- 
old athlete will formally ask for 
Cristina’s hand on Saturday, and their 
wedding will take place later this year 
in Barcelona, where the two live. 
Cristina, 31, met Urdangarin at the 
Olympic Games in Atlanta last year, 
where he was a member of the team 
that won a bronze medal. Born in the 
Basque town of Zumanaga, Urd- 
angarin is the son of a banking family 
and plays handball for Barcelona. 
Cristina collaborates on cultural proj- 
ects with the Caixa savings bank. 


Congress is bestowing its highest 
civilian award on Frank Sinatra and 
the 81 -year-old performer says he is 
“quite moved" and “deeply hon- 
ored.” Sinatra, whose entertainment 
career spans six decades, will receive 
the Congressional Gold Medal under 
a bill that won final passage in the 
House. Congress initially used the 
award to honor military leaders but 
began during the 20th century to rec- 


ognize excellence in a wide range of 
fields. 


"The English Patient" and 
“Secrets and Lies” dominated the 
British Academy of Film and Tele- 
vision Aits awards ceremony. “The 
English Patient” was voted best film 
and best adapted screenplay, and Ju- 
liette Binoche took the best support- 
ing actress prize. “Secrets and Lies” 
won the Alex Korda Award for best 
British film of the year and it was also 
voted best original screenplay. Its 
star. Brenda Blethyn, won the lead- 
ing actress prize. 


Every year on college campuses in 
the United States and Canada, the 
most brilliant math students struggle 
for six hours with problems from the 
merely intractable to the seemingly 
impossible. Five are chosen annually 
as winners of the William LoweU 
Putnam Mathematical Competition, 
and eveiy year for 56 years, all the 


winners have been men. This spring. 
Io«na Dumitriu, 20, a New York 
University sophomore from Ro- 
mania, became the first woman to win 
the award. Dumitriu, the daughter of 
two electrical engineering professors 
in Romania, was identified as a talent 
early and at 1 1 was steered into years 
of intensive math training camps. It 
was this training, and a handsome 
young coach. Dan Stefanica, 24, that 
led her to New York. They fell in love. 
He chose New York University for its 
graduate school in mathematics, and 
at 19 she joined him there. 


Two Chinese film directors are 
having trouble with the Beijing re- 
gime. China has barred the latest film 
by Zhang Yimou. "Keep Cool,” 
from entering the Cannes film fes- 
tival Zhang Yuan, who had been 
invited to show his film ‘ ‘East Palace 
West Palace” at the festival, has 
already said be may not be able to 
attend because the authorities have 
confiscated his passport.