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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


A The World’s Daily Newspaper 

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Paris, Wednesday, May 7, 1997 



Face-Saving Exit for Mobutu 

As Rebels Near the Capital, He Will ‘Visit’ Gabon 


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By Howard W. French 

jfa* York Tunes Service 


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KINSHASA, Zaire — Wiih ami-government 
rebels closing in on the capital, state television 
announced Tuesday that President Mobutu Sese 
Seko would leave the country Wednesday on a three 

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day after the rebel 

leader, Laurent Kabila, threatened to hunt down 
Marshal Mobutu and his closest supporters in die 
streets of Kinshasa if he did not resign. 

The televised announcement read Tuesday 
evening said Marshal Mobutu’s trip was to attend 
a summit meeting of French-speaking regional 
leaders on the crisis in the African Great Lakes 
region, which comprises Rwanda, Burundi and 
Zaire, and government officials were quick to 


insist that the president would return afterward. 

“It is almost certain that Mr. Mobutu will leave 
tomorrow,” a senior presidential aide said. “He 
will return by alt means from Gabon on Friday.” 

But another member of die presidential entourage 
said of Marshal Mobutu, who is suffering from 
advanced prostate cancer, “We all expect that after 
Gabon he will go to the hospital somewhere for 
treatment." 

Diplomats from the United States. South Africa 
and other countries have been working steadily in 
the last few days to ease Marshal Mobutu out of 
power and avoid a violent takeover of this crowded 
city of 5 million. 

Mr. Mobutu's departure on Wednesday, if it 
rakes place, would mean that the 66-year-old dic- 
tator would be able to leave his countiy on official 

See ZAIRE, Page 11 


Swiss Urged to Freeze His Assets 


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By Elizabeth Olson 

New York Tones Service 


GENEVA — With President Mobutu Sese 
Seko's power waning, the Swiss authorities have 
come under pressure to disclose, and freeze, 
whatever part of the huge sums he is believed to 
have looted from Zaire that-he may have deposited 
or invested here. So far, however, they have de- 
cided not to do so. 

It is widely assumed, here and abroad, that some 


or much of Marshal Mobutu's fortune has been 
deposited in Swiss banks, but unless the gov- 
ernment acts to block the assets, nobody can say 
how much. While estimates of the Zairian leader’s 
fortune range well into the billions of dollars, some 
officials say only a small part of it may ultimately 
be traceable to bank accounts to which he can be 
linked. 

• The uncomfortable suspicion that Marshal 
See SWISS. Page 11 




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Labour Empowers 
U.K. Central Bank 
To Set Interest Rate 


■ By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


mb p pL WojaarfTbe Attorned Pim 

An aide said Marshal Mobutu would return by Fri- 
day, but a member of his entourage contradicted that 


A Bartered Bride’s 6 No’ Stuns Papua New Guinea 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 


MINI, Papua New Guinea — The compensation 
demand for the killing of a clan leader in this remote 
mountain village followed a complex tribal calculus: 
$15,000, 25 pigs and an 18-year-old woman named 
Miriam WilngaL 

Dollar by dollar the offending clan began to collect 
the money. One by one die pigs were rounded up. But 
then something happened that shocked the elders of 
both clans and has since reverberated through this 
largely tribal nation. 

Miriam Wilngal said no. » 

At first, she said, h had not occurred to her to 


Rejection of Tribal Custom 
Is a Sign of Changing Times 

object Women have been bought as brides in parts of 
Papua New Guinea for centuries. It has been only a 
few decades since the tribes that populate the remote 
mountains here discovered that they are not the only 
people on earth, and village life still mostly follows 
ancient codes. 

But in a striking sign of changing times. Miss 
Wilngal had a personal' ambition. She wanted to 
finish high school “I want to learn to be a typist,” 
she said in an interview in Port Moresby, the capital. 


300 miles (.500 kilometers) to the southeast, where 
she has taken refuge from her angry relatives. 

“I want to have my own money,” she said, 
covering her face with her hand in embarrassment. “I 
don’t want to have to depend on & man.” 

As Papua New Guinea, an independent nation for 
just 21 years, seeks to find a way to integrate tra- 
ditional and modem values, the “compensation-girl 
case” has taken on broader dimensions. 

Susan Balen. another woman who broke with tra- 
dition to become a lawyer, has taken the case to court, 
using what is known here as “written law” to chal- 
lenge the treatment of women under tribal tradition. 

See BRIDE, Page 10 


LONDON — Britain’s four-day-old 
Labour government put a bold new 
stamp on economic policy Tuesday by 
effectively granting the Bank of Eng- 
land its independence, in the biggest 
expansion of the central bank's powers 
since its founding in 1694. 

The lightning move by the new chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, 
to transfer the power to set interest rates 
and other monetary policy from an elect- 
ed politician — himself — to a bank 
panel stunned the financial community. 

Mr. Brown also announced, a day 
ahead of schedule, a 0.25 percentage- 

Vote altered Ulster outlook. Page 5. 

point increase in the official base in- 
terest rate, to 6.25 percent, in a bid to 
hold down inflation. 

“I would give the new chancellor a 
10 out of 10 in what is effectively his 
first day on the job,” said Nigel 
Richardson, chief bond strategist at Ya- 
maichi International. Stocks, bonds and 
thepoundall rose. 

The Bank of England’s new status 
gives it powers that most central banks 
in the industrialized world have exer- 
cised for years, including the U.S. Fed- 
eral Reserve System and the Bundes- 
bank in Germany. The British central 
bank will be able to raise or lower the 
base rate — the rate at which it lends to 
commercial banks, and thus the determ- 
inant for commercial and retail interest 
rates — whenever h decides economic 
conditions warrant a change. . 

In announcing his decisions. Mr. 
Brown made dear that the Labour Party 
would stick to the careful and conser- 
vative stewardship of the economy that 
it had promised during the campaign. 

Saying that Britain had been in eco- 
nomic decline for much of this century, 
Mr. Brown pledged to rebuild the na- 


Cross-Border Abortion 
Bending Europe’s Laws 

dimes for Foreigners Are a Thriving Option 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 


BARCELONA — Lying in bed un- 
der a pile of blankets at the clinic, the 
dark-haired Frenchwoman looked re- 
markably chipper for someone who had 
had an abortion only two hours before. 
C oming to Spain to rad her unwanted 
pregnancy, she said, had restored her 
™ Wire. 

Because the 31 -year-old secretary 
had recently stopped taking birth con- 
trol pills, she had not realized she was 
expecting until after she was 10 weeks 
into her pregnancy — beyond the limit 
set by French abortion law, one of die 
strictest in Europe. 

Because she was no longer with the 
father, she said, keeping the baby was 
not an option. Then she learned that one 
option was a four-hour drive away. 

‘ T had no idea that in Spain you could 
go up to 22 weeks of pregnancy” until 
the trip was suggested by a French fam- 
ily-planning organization, stud die 
woman, who asked that her name not be 
used. “Europe is getting closer, but we 
don’t always know about each other’s 
laws. I was a tittle nervous about coming 
here, but being welcomed so much 
helps.” 

Welcomed in her own language, too. 
The clinic here, about 20 percent of 
whose .patients are French, has several 
employees who are fluent in French, as 
are most of die doctors and the staff 
psychologist. Carlos Morin, die Spanish 
physician, who runs die clinic, said he 
catered to French patients because 

J “geographically, we are responsible for 

woman who can’t find answers in their 
own countiy.” 


Irish. Italian and French women go to 
Britain to obtain abortions that, for one 
reason or another, would be illegal at 
home. German. French and Belgian 
women go to the Netherlands for die 
same reason. Growing numbers of 
women from die south of France are 
traveling to Spain, which in 20 years has 
gone from having (he tightest abortion 
controls in Europe to among die 
loosest 

As women were crossing borders for 
the procedure for much of the 1990s, 
governments preferred to ignore the 
phenomenon. 

But as die 15 -member European Un- 
ion moves toward a single currency, 
loosens border controls even more and 
debates accepting new members from 
Eastern and Centra] Europe, the issue of 
cross-border abortion is likely to gen- 
erate more concern. 

* ‘We are in absolute hypocrisy,” said 
Celia Gabison, a coordinator for die 
French Family Planning Movement, 
which provides names of foreign clinics 
to women over die 10-week limit. “It 
also creates a social injustice. When you 
have money, it’s easier to find a solu- 
tion.” 

It is clear that serving foreign panrats 
is a thriving business. At some clinics in 
die Netherlands, particularly those spe- 
cializing in * later-term abortions, as 
many as 90 percent of the patients are 
non-Dutch. Dr. Morin’s gleaming, 
modem clinic in a well-to-do neigh- 
borhood of Barcelona is dearly well 
financed. Patients pay rates depending 

See ABORTION, Page 10 



j The Dollar J 

Now Ycrtt 

Tuesday « 4 P.M. 

previous dose 

DM 

1.7233 

1.7325 

Pound 

1.6333 

1.623 

Yon 

125.40 

126.575 

FF 

5.8155 

5.847 

r- The Dow | 

C J 

■ Tuesday doss 

prevtousdoas 

+ 10.83 

7225.32 

7214.49 

| S&P 500 I 

change 

TUeactty • 4 PJK. 

previous dose 

- 2_63 

827.57 

830-20 


Books 

Crossword— — 

Opinion — . 

Sports 


L Page 9. 

Phge 20. 

Pages 8-9. 

Pages 20*21. 


Thefntermarket 


Pages. 


The IHT on-line http://rAvv.Mht.com 


YMfukaza Tuao/Afcaec Fnacr-Pime 

MARKET EXCITEMENT — A 
floor trader yawning at the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange on Tuesday. The 
Nikkei stock average rose 3.4 per- 
cent to a 1997 high. Page 18. 

Celtics 9 Coach: Pitino 

Rick Pitino is leaving one of college 
basketball's most successful programs 
to coach the National Basketball As- 
sociation’s most storied team — the 
Boston Celtics. His reported $70 mil- 
lion, 10-year contract is believed to be 
the richest for a coach in U.S. sports. 

Pitino, who called the Celtics* job 
“the greatest opportunity ever af- 
forded a coach,” announced his de- 
cision Tuesday at the University of 
Kentucky, the school he led to die 
Final Four three times in his eight 
years there, winning the national title 
m 1996. Page 21. 


* AGENDA 


Holocaust Report 
Criticizes the Swiss 

WASHINGTON (AFP) — A U.S. 
report to be released Wednesday 
harshly criticizes Switzerland for hav- 
ing the “deepest and most crucial re- 
lationship with Nazi Germany” of all 
neutral countries during World War n, 
officials said. 

The report describes Swtizcrland as 
a “reluctant” partner in efforts to ne- 
gotiate a fair postwar distribution of 
Nazi assets. But it also targets Sweden, 
Spain, Portugal, Turkey and Argentina 
far tbeir dealings with Nazi Germany. 
The inquiry also concluded that 
“neither thcU.S. nor the Allies pressed 
die neutral countries hard enough to 
fulfill their moral obligation to help 
Holocaust survivors by redistributing 
heiriess assets for their benefit” 


NATO and Russia 
Back at the Table 

PARIS (NYT) — Negotiations be- 
tween NATO and Russia in Luxem- 
bourg on Tuesday were expected to 
clarify details of a security charter to 
govern relations alter the Atlantic al- 
liance expands eastward. 

Russia last week dropped its de- 
mand that NATO set overall limits on 
cbe number of weapons an expanded 
alliance would be permitted to field. 
NATO agreed, however, to negotiate 
country-by -country limits instead. 

PAGE TWO 

Lead's Heritage : Turn Very Sick Cities 

THE AMERICAS Pag* 3. 

Should a Drunk Driver Be Executed ? 


sSSSSSmS Alien Life? It May Be Right in Cosmic Neighborhood 

officials worry about free flows of drugs J d tv 

or of illegal immigrants. Although no 
one likes to talk about it. they also are 
keenly aware that abortion is as much a 
European issue as a national one. 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tunes Service 


Newsstand Prices . 

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Anffles- — 1E50 FF Jwdcco.— 
Cameroon ..1 .800 CPA Qatar 

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Italy A800 lie Spam fSPTAS 

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Join - 1250 JD UAE. 

Kuwait .700 Frfs U.S. MU- (Eur-)--S1-2Q 




NEW YORK — Dumb or brainy, fair or hideous, 
extraterrestrial life forms are often pictured by sci- 
entists and writers of science fiction as inhabiting 
worlds just the right distance from stars — neither too 
hot nor too cold. 

Rays of starlight in such temperate zones are sera as 
wanning planetary surfaces and alien races, providing 
a ready source of energy and, most important, the right 
amount of heai to keep life-giving water from boiling 
away or turning into ice. . • . . 

But a quiet revolution is challenging this view and 
shaking the foundations of exobiology, thesmdy of the 
possibility of life elsewhere in the cosmos. 

‘a lien life, the new thinking goes, might not actually 
need the wanning rays of a nearby star. It might ihnve 
inside dim moons and planets. The dark ecosystems 
would be warmed by inner heat, bathed in melted ice 

and powered by chemicals. L _ , 

Lightless realms on Earth have been found to teem 


with interesting creatures. Now scientists wonder 
whether similar environments elsewhere in the uni- 
verse are home to alien microbial hordes and, in some 
cases, to large beasts and beings higher up the ex- 
traterrestrial food chain. 

This change in thinking drives the excitement over 
Mars and Europa, a large- moon of Jupiter, both of 
which have recently yielded tantalizing clues of con- 
ditions favorable to subsurface life. 

Last August^ NASA scientists said they believed a 
meteorite carved from the Martian depths and found in 
Antarctica harbored compelling signs of primitive life. 
And last month. NASA released the most detailed 
pictures yet of Europa and scientists said they were 
more confident than ever that a global sea or liquid 
water or slush lay just beneath the Jovian moon's thin 
crust of cracked ice. That, they added, might be the 
perfect place to look for extraterrestrial life. 

Scientists speculate that the interiors of up to 10 
bodies in the solar system may harbor extraterrestrial 
forms of life. So might the dim netherworids around 
distant stars, where scientists have been finding more 



and more evidence of planes. If these theories are 
right, alien creatures may be far more numerous 
throughout the cosmos than previously thought — and 
much closer to home. 

That idea is rapidly changing plans for space probes 
as well as for research programs that study dark 
stems on Earth, which are increasingly seen as a 
od way to get to know the extraterrestrial odds. 
“We’re in a paradigm shift." said Frank Drake, a 
pioneer in the scientific hum for extraterrestrials. 
“We’re realizing that biology is veiy opportunistic 
and can adapt to a much greater variety of conditions 
than we imagined.” 

‘ ‘The number of planets capable of sujjporting life is 
probably much greater than we thought ui the past” he 
added. 

Wesley Huntress Jr., associate administrator for 
space science at the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, said discoveries on Earth were largely 
behind the changed view of the possibility of life 

See ALIENS, Page 11 


Mai Na&Tbc AncdjmJ Ptcb 

Gordon Brown announcing the 
last government-ordered rate rise. 


tion's economic vigor “on the solid 
rock of prudent and consistent econom- 
ic management, not the shifting sands of 
boom and bust." 

To vouchsafe that pledge, the chan- 
cellor said die government would set 
only the target for inflation. 

While Mr. Brown had said for years 
that he intended to grant the central bank 
power to set rates, most had thought the 
change unlikely, especially in the near 
term. 

Effective immediately, though, the 
keys to monetary policy have been 
handed to what will become a nine- 
member Monetary Policy Committee. It 
will include the Bank of England’s gov- 
ernor, two deputies and two other of- 
ficials plus four outsiders to be appoin- 

See BRITAIN, Page 10 


The Question 
Along Loire: 
What’s This 
Vote About? 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 

BLOIS, France — Was President 
Jacques Chirac clever or foolhardy to 
ask French voters to give him a new 
legislative mandate for the economic 
sacrifices he says are necessary to get 
France in on a European common cur- 
rency in 1999? 

Here in the Loire Valley chateau 
country in the heart of France, the euro 
seems so abstract, and yet so popular, 
that Mr. Chirac’s Socialist opposition is 
scrambling to frame the election cam- 
paign around a different issue: the un- 
popularity of the conservative prime 
minister, Alain Juppe. 

Maybe this is because the Loire is at 
the beaut of Europe in many ways. Plant- 
agenet and Angevin kings fought over 
its castles and rich farmlands in me- 
dieval times. Joan of Arc drove the 
English out of Orleans, just upriver, in 
1429. 

A few kilometers west, Leonardo da 
Vinci, whose compatriots brought the 
Renaissance style to France, lies buried 
in the flamboyant Gothic chapel of the 
Chateau d'Amboise, where busloads of 
German, Spanish and British tourists 
flocked last weekend to pay homage. 

The mayor of Blois. Jack Lang, a 
Socialist member of the European Par- 
liament. had no problem a few weeks 
ago giving his enthusiastic support to a 
special promotion by the merchants in 
the center of town to familiarize their 
customers with the euro. 

“Joining the common European cur- 
rency is an opportunity,” he wrote in his 
European Parliament newsletter, also 
noting that the majority of the French 
have long told poll-takers that they sup- 
port a strong Europe. “The euro can 
really speed up our economy and our 
enterprises, and will let us compete 
fairly against the dollar and the yen.’ ’ 

Mr. Chirac, who used to be only 
lukewarm in supporting the Treaty of 
European Union providing for the new 
currency, puts the issue almost exactly 
the same way. 

But now the Socialists have back- 
tracked on the euro, demanding a rene- 
gotiation of its terms so thar France and 
other European countries can let up on 
the relentless deficit reduction required 
for them to join it and try to stimulate 
creating jabs in an effort to jostle un- 
employment figures, which have been 
stuck in the double digits for years. 

The French Socialists’ allies in the 
Communist Party oppose the idea of the 
new currency as a triumph of global 

See FRANCE, Page 10 










PAGE mo 


Pus Poisoned Land / Deadly Lead in Russia 


Krasnourabkls Sick, Vary Suk, but the Factories Spew On 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 


K! 


E 


RASNOURALSK, Russia — 

Inside Little Flower School 
No. 7, preschool children 
awake from an afternoon nap 
and scamper about the playroom, the 
boys happily fastening plastic blocks 
Together, the girls cooking an imaginary 
lunch over a toy stove. 

But the children of Krasnouralsk are 
ill. They suffer from chronic respiratory 
ailments, and, according to tests, many 
of them have high levels of lead in their 
blood, which can lead to brain damage 
and behavioral problems. 

“People are getting more and more 
sick every year,'* said Rima Yer- 
makova, director of the school. ‘ ‘We do 
what we can. But there is no improve- 
ment, and the level of sickness is grow- 
ing." 

Russian analysts say the source of the 
sickness is die tall smokestacks of the 
Krasnouralsk Copper Works, a smelter 
built in the days of Stalin’s drive to 
industrialize the Soviet Union. 

For 65 years, the smokestacks have 
been raining pollution on Krasnouralsk, 
a town of 33,000 in the heavily in- 
d us trial ized heartland of the Ural Mountains. 
High levels of lead have accumulated in the soil, 
tests show, and many young children may 
already be suffering from lead poisoning. 

The town is not alone. A government report 
Wished by Russian specialists concluded that 
ead contamination was blanketing the country, 
another in a long list of environmental disasters 
in the former Soviet Union that have been ac- 
knowledged in recent years. 

“A large part of the territory of Russia is 
experiencing lead fallout loads that exceed the 
level critical for the normal functioning of the 
ecosystem,” said the document. The chief 
source of lead is auto emissions, since half of 
Russia still uses leaded gasoline, but metals 
factories, such as the copper smelter, are also a 
major cause of contamination. 

Although the report calls for urgent measures to 
reduce lead pollution, it comes at a time when 
Russia's economic crisis has overshadowed en- 
vironmental concerns. Now in the sixth year of 
industrial depression. Russia lacks money to clean 
up the pollution of earlier generations. And if the 
economy begins to recover and factories go back 
to work, the pollution is expected to get worse. 

The conflict between economic needs and 
ecological hazards is starkly evident in 
Krasnouralsk. in pine and birch forests about 200 
kilometers (125 miles) north of Yekaterinburg, 
the regional capital. The Svyatagor Joint Stock 
Co., which runs the copper works, is the town’s 
biggest taxpayer and its biggest employer. 

Vladimir Gurvicb, deputy chief physician of 
the regional health inspectorate, said the lead 
contamination was so severe that the town 
should be evacuated. 

"Everyone knows what you have to do,” he 
said. “You can wily do one thing with the people 
— move them out What does that mean? A 
population left without work or income? It 
wouldn’t be a problem if it was only one town, 
but towns like this are many.” 

He added: ”lf this situation existed in the 
West, die factory simply would not operate. It 
would not be profitable, because of fines it 




Dnid HoBa-a/The WwtogtM ftw 


those who have been 

exposed to high concentrations of lead. ‘ People are getting more and more sick every year.' 


Children at Little Flower School No. 7 in this factory town are among 

% andn 


would have to pay.” But the factoiy cannot 
realistically be closed, he said. “The people 
living on that territory are hostages. They have 
jobs. The jobs feed them. Where can they go?” 

The Krasnouralsk smelter employs 4,500 
people and produces 60,000 tons of unfinish ed 


copper a year. Sergei Litovsldkh, the general 
director, said the company had a profit of $3.6 
million last year on sales of S61 .8 millio n. 

But the smelter uses equipment dating back ro 
J932. Extracting copper from the ore releases 
dangerous elements, including lead and gases. 


New antipollution equipment is to be 
installed later this year, but in die mean- 
time die factory is spewing about 150 
tans of lead into the air each year. 

HE COMPANY takes some re- 
sponsibility for the town’s 
plight, Mr. Litovsldkh said, but 
the whole region is polluted 
“It’s a problem, but not only the factory 
is to blame. There are other factories. ” 
Tests show the soil is badly polluted 
Vyacheslav Lupinin, chief physician of 
die town’s health inspectorate, said soil 
sampling at 27 locations showed lead 
levels far in excess of die maximum 
allowed by Russian standards. The soil 
samples are important because experts 
believe children often absorb lead from 
playing outside and from eating foods 
grown in contaminated soiL 
In recent months, health specialists 
have started to measure the effects here 
of lead poisoning, which often does not 
have immediate symptoms. Lead poi- 
soning is especially risky for young 
children, since it afreets the developing 
brain and nervous system. In October, a 
study was begun on about 180 
Krasnouralsk children. It checked their 
overall medical conditions, their blood 
lead levels and their mental abilities. 

“We concluded these children were in poor 
health,” said Larissa Privalova, deputy director 
of the Ural Regional Center for Environmental 
Epidemiology, who oversaw the research. “And 
those with a lot of lead are in poorer health.” 


Digging Up 100 Years of Pollution in Idaho 


By Joby Warrick 

Washington Post Service 


s 


MELTERVTLLE, Idaho — Say some- 
thing stupid in this town, and you are apt 
to be accused of being “leaded.’ * That is 
how locals attempt to laugh off the effects 
of lead poisoning, an all-too-serious threat in a 
community that has recorded some of the highest 
blood-lead levels ever measured in humans. 

For nearly a century, a perpetual coating of 
toxic lead dust covered this former mining cap- 
ital like a gritty blanket. It spilled from the 
dozens of lead mines that pock the nearby 
hillsides and it spewed from the unfiltered stacks 
at the local smelting factoiy. Some of it seeped 
into the bones of workers like Sylvia Sjogren, a 
grandmother and former smelter worker whose 
blood- lead level soared to 10 times die level 
considered tolerable. 

“To the company we were just thumbtacks on 
a wall," Ms. Sjogren said of the bankrupt Texas 
corporation that ran the smelter. “We were not 
families or faces or communities.” 

The smelter has been demolished, and the 
town's contaminated soil is being hauled away 
in a gargantuan, federally run- recovery effort. 
But the region’s mammoth lead problem — and 
the equally massive legal battle over the cleanup 
— gets bigger and more confusing each day. 

New cases of lead damage are popping up like 
iron weed across Idaho's history-scarred Silver 
Valley, while efforts to remove the contaminants 
become further mired in lawsuits and coun- 


ter-suits over who should pay. The legal 
wrangling is being watched not only by Idaho- 
ans, but by national groups that say the Silver 
Valley experience embodies much of what is 
wrong with the country’s so-called Superfund 
hazardous-waste cleanup program. 

Created 17 years ago during the outcry over 
New York’s Love-Canal disaster, die Superfund 
program is a $1.4 billion-a-year bureaucracy 
charged with cleaning up hundreds of contam- 
inated sites nationwide. Critics say the program is 
slow and spends more money on lawyers' fees 
than on actual cleanup. Though reforms are under 
way, the nearly 1,400 sites on the Superftmd list 
will take an average of 12 years each to restore 
and will involve about 70,000 lawyers in all. 

A sizable chunk of those lawyers have found 
profitable work in Silver Valley, where cleanup 
of the nation's second-largest Superfund site 
was delayed for adecade by lawsuits and amaze 
of engineering studies. 

Since the actual cleanup began in 1992, work- 
ers have demolished die old smelting plant and 
removed contaminated dirt from schools, 
churches and hundreds of private lawns in Smelt- 
erville and four other villages inside a 2 1 -square- 
mile (55-square-kilometer) cleanup zone. 
Dubbed die Bunker Hall Superfund site, after die 
original 1885 silver mine that solidified the 
valley’s reputation, iris one of a few Superfund 
sites to encompass residential housing — and the 
only one with a functioning ski resort. 

This summer, the cleanup is to enter a new 
phase with the excavation of 2 million cubic 


yards (1.5 million cubic meters) of contam- 
inated earth from a flood plain along the Coeur 
d’Alene River. Hie dirt will be cased in plastic 
and piled on top of a mountain of mine tailings 
and toxic smelter slag that runs for a full mile 
along the Interstate 90 highway. 

A final challenge will be to delead houses and 
buildings and stabilize the steep, barren slopes 
of the mountains that surround the town. After 
nearly a century of dumping and smelting, the 
lead-tainted hillsides are so acidic that virtually 
nothing will grow on them. 

But while the cleanup of the Superfund site is 
progressing mostly on schedule, the briefcase 


surviving mining companies, after agreeing to 
pay $40 milli on toward the federal cleanup, 
have been hit in recent months by a new spate of 
lawsuits from the Justice Department, envi- 
ronmental groups, American Indians and even 
neighboring Washington state. 

Driving die litigation is the growing aware- 
ness of the enormous scale of the Silver valley’s 
toxic-waste problem. With each rainfall, heavy 
metals are flushed from countless piles of lead 
tailings Into creeks and rivers, which then ferry 
them downstream toward the population centers 
of Coeur d’Alene and Spokane, Washington. 

On a single day of flooding last February, 
federal engineers say, 1 million pounds (450,000 
kilograms) of lead washed into Lake Coeur 
d’Alene, a popular resort area that now wears a 
permanent foot-deep carpet of metallic sludge. 


The Tobacco Verdicts Jury Saw Smoking as a Personal Choice 


By Donald P. Baker 

Washington Post Service 


JACKSONVILLE, Florida — The 
jury that ruled in a closely watched 
smoker’s liability case here accepted the 
arguments of the R.J. Reynolds To- 
bacco Co. that the second-largest Amer- 
ican tobacco company was not respon- 
sible for the lung cancer death of a 
longtime customer. 

The six-member jury deliberated 
eight hours before returning the unan- 
imous verdict in a case that could in- 
fluence the mounting legal challenges to 
the tobacco industry and the negoti- 
ations to settle those cases out of court. 

The verdict prompted praise from the 
tobacco industry and disappointment 
from anti -smoking advocates. But ana- 
lysts predicted the decision would have 
little impact on tobacco litigation over- 
all and might help push both sides to- 
ward a negotiated settlement 

“I think this is a plus for the set- 
tlement talks," said Diana Temple, a 


tobacco analyst for Salomon Brothers 
Inc. The verdict should help even the 
strength of the negotiating positions of 
the two sides by slowing the momentum 
of anti-smoking advocates, she said. 

The panel of three nonsmokers, two 
former smokers and a lone, occasional 
smoker found that R_ J. Reynolds was 
not negligent and that its Salem cig- 
arettes were not “unreasonably dan- 
gerous and defective and a legal cause 
of the death" of Jean Connor, who 
smoked two to three packs of Salem 
cigarettes a day for more than two de- 
cades. 

Mrs. Connor’s family, which pursued 
the suit she filed six months before her 
death on Oct. 1, 1995, at age 49, sat in 
stunned silence as a clerk read the ver- 
dict. Later, outside the courtroom, fam- 
ily members said they were bitterly dis- 
appointed. 

“It’s like watching her die all over 
again,” said Dana Raiilerson, Mrs. 
Connor’s sister, fighting back tears. 
“And there’s still an industry that 


doesn't care that she's dead because of 
their product I don't know how they 
sleep at night" . 

After reading their verdict members 
of the jury told Judge Bernard Nachman 
that they did not want to discuss their 
decision with reporters. They were es- 
corted from the packed courtroom to 
their cars by uniformed sheriff’s depu- 
ties: 

A lawyer for Reynolds, Paul Crist 
said the verdict meant that “cigarette 
smoking, no matter what label is ap- 
plied, is very much a matter of personal 
choice.” 

Daniel Donahue, the top Reynolds 
executive at the trial, credited the out- 
come to the aggressive posture the com- 
pany displayed by emphasizing that the 
dangers of smoking are common know- 
ledge and that individuals continue to 
.use cigarettes at their own peril. 

Miss Temple predicted that the ver- 
dict would discourage other smokers 
from suing cigarette manufacturers and 
that the industry would prevail in a 


class-action suit scheduled for trial June 
2 in Miami. That case was filed by flight 
attendants against several tobacco 
companies over the effects of second- 
hand smoke. 

Melissa Rattan, a consultant to the 
Wall Street tobacco analyst Gary Black 
of Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., said that 
while lawyers for Mrs. Connor 
“presented a strong case and proved 
what they had to prove — that their 
client died of lung cancer caused by 
cigarette smoking," the jurors sided 
with Reynolds because Mrs. Connor 
“didn’t tiy to guit.” 

“People believe in personal choice,” 
she said. 

Nuss Ronan. an observer throughout 
the monthlong trial, added that ‘ ‘people 
were wrong” when they thought a 
$750,000 verdict last year in the same 
courthouse against Brown & William- 
son Tobacco Corp. represented “a sea 
change” in attitude toward cigarette 
companies. She predicted that plaintiffs 
will win “maybe one in five times” in 


Hamas Chief, 
Freed by U.S. 



future cases against tobacco compa- 
nies. 

"It's a huge victory," said David 
Adelman, a tobacco industry analyst 
with Dean Witter Reynolds. "It means 
the world hasn't changed, and jurors are 
still reluctant to give money to someone 
who is, quote-unquote, too addicted to 
quit.” 

One difference between the Reynolds 
case and the verdict last year was the 
smoking behavior of the plaintiffs. 

Mrs. Connor, in videotaped testi- 
mony taken shortly before her death, 
admitted that she “knew smoking was 
hazardous” to her health. She never 
tried to quit smoking until three weeks 
before she went for a physical exam- 
ination in preparation for plastic surgery 
and was told she had cancer. 

In contrast. Grady Carter, the air 
traffic controller who sued Brown & 
Williamson, testified that his addiction 
to cigarettes was so strong he had tried 
everything from hypnosis to a nicotine 
patch to stop smoking. 


Will Battle On 


Reuters 

AMMAN — Mousa Abu Marzook, 
political leader of the militant Pales- 
tinian movement Hamas, pledged Toes-, 
day to continue to work for the or- 
ganization now that " he has been, 
released after nearly two years in a New 
York, jail on suspicion of terrorism. 

Mr. Marzook was deported Monday, 
and flown to Jordan aboard a UJS. mil-' 
itaryjet. 

“I will continue in political activ- 
ities.” he said at his home in Amman.; 
“Naturally the motives that made me 
stand with the hopes and aspirations of 
my people still exist. I still have a lot tot 
do to serve my people and help them 
achieve their aspirations. " „ 

■ An Embarrassing Case 

His release ended what had become 
an embarrassing case for both the United 
States and Israel, The New York Tunes 
reported. Both countries sought to keep 
him in jail but could not come up with 
persuasive evidence of his complicity in 
a series of violent attacks by Hamas. 7 
In an unusual agreement, Mr. Mar- 
zook relinquished his permanent-res- 
ident status m the United States and said 
he would not contest the terrorism ac- 
cusations that prompted his initial de- 
tention. In exchange, the United States 
released him from solitary confinement 
and allowed him. to go to Jordan. 

Mr. Marzook was detained in July 
1995 at Kennedy Airport in New York 
because his name was on a U.S. ‘ ‘watch- 
list” of people suspected of terrorist, 
activities. - 

He was never linked to any specific 
terrorist act, and he insisted that hi s 
fund-raising activities were separate, 
fro m Hamas attacks. 

His release followed complex nego-' 
nations between his lawyers and the, 
UJS. Immigration and Naturalization- 
Service over how the allegations would, 
be handled. 

Under the agreement signed April 25,. 
both sides agreed to withhold comment r 
until he arrived in Jordan, which an- 
nounced last week that ir would accept 
him. 

As soon as the plane landed. Mr. 
Marzook’ s lawyers and American of- 
ficials offered sharply differing assess-, 
merits of the deal. 

“He refused to admit to the charges; 
because they are false and baseless, 
Michael Kennedy, a lawyer for Mr % 
Marzook, said. 

The United States, on the other hand, 
said it believed that by pleading no. 
contest to the terrorism. charges, Mr? 
Marzook had not cleared his -name. 
“The United States government corn 
sidered him deportable for engaging in 
terrorist activities,” said Russell Ber- 
geron Jr., a spokesman for the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service. 

The deal to release Mr. Marzook was 
the same one he offered after U.S. au-, 
thorities detained him in 1995. 

Soon after his detention, Israel reques- 
ted his extradition, saying it wanted to try 
him on charges of helping to raise money, 
for and directing a series of bloody at-* 
tacks for which responsibility was 
claimed by the military wing of Hamas.. 

Mr. Marzook insisted that he had ncr 
connection with violence and that the" 
money he raised supported projects 
such as clinics. 

Israel dropped die extradition request- 
last month, saying' a trial would disturb' ^ 
the already beleaguered Middle Eastfp 
peace talks and open Israel to further 
attacks. But Mr. Marzook ’s lawyers, 
said Israel did not have enough evidence 
for a trial and had acted out of fear that it; 
would lose a high-profile case. 

In January, Mr. Marzook stunned Is- 
rael and the United States by saying he 
would no longer fight extradition and 
would be willing to face trial. 

When Israel decided not to try him,- 
the search was on for a country that, 
would accept him. The United States.- 
which in early 1995 pressed Jordan to 
expel him, reversed itself and urged; 
Jordan to take him back. 

Israeli officials said they welcomed 
the decision by King Hussein to take 
him. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Transport Strikes Due in Greece 

ATHENS lAP) — A series of work stoppages announced 
by rail, subway and bus workers this week will severely 
disrupt Greece’s transport services. 

Trains stopped running at noon Tuesday and are not due to 
resume for the next two days. 


c 


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The Athens subway will be operating with restricted ser- 
vices on Wednesday and Friday, with trains running from 9 
AJVL to 8 PM., while the city’s trolley drivers will hold a six- 
hour work stoppage beginning 10 A.M. on Friday. 

Olympic Airways employees have joined the wave of 
strikes with announced work stoppages May 12 and 19. 
Pilots, technicians, ground staff and flight attendants held 
rolling work stoppages Monday, causing many flights to be 
delayed or canceled. 

Italy’s railworkers will bold a 48-hour work stoppage 
starting May 19. union sources said Tuesday. The strike will 
begin at 9 PM. (AFP) 

American Airlines pilots have approved a new five-year 
contract brokered by the White House, ending the threat of a 
strike against the second-largest U.S. airline. ( WP) 



MkeZwerin 
Music Editor 


| SOUNDS 

l The Jazzman who took 
| on Bach 
* Woody Allen 
The Fugees 

If you missed it in the IHT, look for it 
on our site on the World Wide Web; 


http://www.iht.com 


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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



UnwaseraMy 

JMsffwm 

North America Europe 

A cold front will bring Cloudy, chilly and wot 
‘showers and thunder- weather will be the rule 
storms across the Ohio across Most of England, 
VaHey Thursday, whHe the nonhem France and the 
Mtfweat M-rif be windy and Netherlands Thursday 
chiBy. The front wtf move through Saturday. Except 
lo the easl const Friday for a few showers In the 
with showers and Blunder- north, Spaki *H be diy and 
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Boston. Sunny, dry and showers in Romo fhurs- 
warm In the Southwest. day. then some sun and 

dry into Saturday. 


Asia 

Party sunny and season- 
able In Beijing Thursday 
through Saturday. A from 
will cause showers and 
thunderstorms In Seoul 
Thursday, then windy and 
cooler into Saturday. Most- 
ly cloudy with showers and 
a thunderstorm In Tokyo 
Thursday and Friday, out 
some sun will return for 
Saturday. 


Asia 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


Jury in North Carolina Weighs Death Penalty for a Drunken Driver 


By Kevin Sack 

New I'ori Tmtrs Sen tee 


« . - _ ■ '*()u ^ L 


■'Ji'??? !T > 

. r ■»* 4is» hi 


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••• 


WINSTON-SALEM. North Carolina — For 
more than !6 years, ever since he lost part of his 
left leg in a lawn mower accident. Thomas 
Richard Jones has popped narcotic painkillers 
like jelly beans. Often he chased the pills down 
with streams of beer. 

Warnings from doctors and his mother did not 
stop Mr. Jones from mixing the combustible 
components. Neither did a siring of convictions 
for driving while impaired. 

Lasr Sept. 4. his habit aimed lethal when Mr. 
Jones, high on pills and beer, veered his Nissan 
AJiima at 45 miles an hour into the side of an 
oncoming car. The crash killed two young wom- 
en — 1 9-year-old sorority sisters at Wake Forest 
University — and injured four others. 

Now in a landmark trial, a jury here is con- 
sidering whether Mr. Jones deserves to die for 


As the penalty phase of the trial began 
Monday. Mr. Jones look the stand and described 
a life marked by painful injuries, habitual al- 
coholism, drug addiction and repeated scrapes 
with the law — at least three other times for 


driving while impaired, as well as for drug pos- theory might 1 
session, spousal abuse and solicitation of pros- “Everybod; 




his negligence. 

On Friday, the jury convicted him of first- 


degree murder in the deaths of the two girls. 
Expens on capital punishment said the trial 
seemed to be the first in the country in which 
prosecutors have sought the death penalrv in a 
drunken dri ving-related case. 


titution. He knew he should not have been mixing 
alcohol, prescription drugs and 
driving, he said, and he was " 

‘ ‘sorry somebody had to die. * * ^People W, 
Addressing the parents of . 

Maia Witzl, a sophomore from J^l 3S mi 

Arlington. Texas, who aspired 

to a career in law, and Julie Hansen, a sophomore 
from Rockville. Maryland, who wanted to be a 
doctor, he added, “1 know they're with Jesus.” 

The novel theory posed by prosecutors here, in 
which a driver’s negligence substitutes for any 
clear intent to kill, illustrates just how far the 
legal and social movement against drunken driv- 
ing has advanced in the last decade. During that 
period, politicians and law enforcement officials 
have shown increasing intolerance for behavior 
that, not so long ago. often merited little more 
than a slap on the wrist 
While it is doubtful that existing death penalty 
statutes would allow capital prosecutions for 


drunken driving homicides in every state, similar 
cases are pending elsewhere in North Carolina 
and in Kentucky, and the Jones case is being 
watched closely there. 

Prosecutors here said they believed that their 
theory might be applicable in 15 to 20 states. 

“Everybody needs to wake up and realize that 
these things don’t just happen by accident,” said 


Teople who drive drunk and recklessly can kill people 
just as much as they can kill them with a gun or a knife. 9 


Vincent Rabil, the assistant district attorney who 
is prosecuting Mr. Jones. “People who drive 
drunk and recklessly can kill people just as much 
as they can kill them with a gun or a knife.” 

But several experts on capital punishment have 
criticized the pursuit of the death penalty in the 
case, saying it opens die door to capital pros- 
ecutions for crimes that traditionally have not been 
considered severe enough to meric the ultimate 
penalty. They predict that Mr. Jones’s conviction 
would be vulnerable in the appellate courts. 

Defense lawyers and law professors said that a 
death sentence for Mr. Jones would broaden the 
application of the penalty so much that it would 


dilute its significance as a punishment for the 
very worst crimes. They said that regular use of 
the death penalty in drunken driving homicides 
would tie up cases in appeals, increase the risk of 
capricious and arbitrary sentencing and might 
constitute cruel and unusual punishment. 

‘ ‘If you can impose the death penalty in a case 
like this, you’ve pretty much lost any basis for 
limiting the deaih penalty to the 
■ ■ most heinous crimes and the 
eople most incorrigible defendants. ’ ’ 

I , said Stephen Bright, director of 
■ a Kmle. the Southern Center for Human 

Rights, a group in Atlanta that 

monitors death penalty cases. 

Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death 
Penalty Information Center, questioned whether 
the death penalty would be pursued against 
“every drunk-driving white-collar bureaucrat or 
lawyer who gets involved in one of these.” 

He added. “I don’t think it’s likely to be 


“We would rather he have to live, to ny to get 


through each day as her father and I must do,’ 
said Joy Witzl. die mother of Maia. 


: 

Gun Lobby Survives 

W SBSft Rebellion by Militants 

't New Mainstream ’ Slate to Lead the NRA 


Even die parents of the girls who lost their lives 
do not want Mr. Jones to lose his. All four parents 
said in interviews that they were pleased that Mr. 
Jones was convicted of first-degree murder, but 
that they hoped the jury sentenced him to life in 
prison without parole rather than to death. 


said Joy Witzl, die mother of Maia. 

Both sets of parents described their daughters 
as believers in forgiveness. “Julie was not a 
vengeful person.” said Barbara Hansen, whose 
daughter had beat a member of Students Against 
Drunk Driving. “She was kind and loving and 
giving. I’m sure she has already forgiven 

Mr. Jones's blood-alcohol level measured 
.051 when he was tested 90 minutes after the 
crash. North Carolina law defines legal intox- 
ication as .08 or higher. But he also had taken a 
number of prescription drugs, including Fioricet 
and Percocet, both of which are strong pain- 
killers. and Xanax, an anti-depressant. 

Mr. Rabil prosecuted Mr. Jones under North 
Carolina's felony-murder statute. That allows 
the death penalty when a murder with a deadly 
weapon, whether premeditated or not, is corn- 
mined in the course of another felony. In this 
instance, Mr. Rabil argued successfully dial Mr. 
Jones’s car was a deadly weapon, and that the 
assaults be commined with his car against the 
surviving victims were the felonies needed to 
charge him with first-degree murder in the 
deaths of Ms. Witzl and Ms. Hans en. 




Away From Politics 




h. -s 


m: 

•; tr- * 












By William Claiborne 

Washington Pott Service 


- SEATTLE — The National Rifle As- 
sociation has ended one of die fiercest 
internal power struggles in its 126-year 
history by turning back a challenge from 


insurgents who sought more militancy 
in the leadership of the powerful eun- 


" H.:, . 


in the leadership of the powerful gun- 
rights lobbying group. 

The vote for officers by the NRA's 
76-member board of directors Monday 
at the association's annual meeting here 
was a dear victory for the group's ex- 
ecutive vice president Wayne LaPierre 
Jr., who campaigned as a “ main - 
u stream'* advocate of the Second 
■y Amendment’s right to bear arms against 
what he characterized as an attempt by 
rightist anti-government radicals to take 
over the association. 

Mr. LaPierre. 42. appeared set to be 
returned to the $l90,000-a-year post he 
has held since 1991 as the NRA s chief 
operating officer, while the candidates 
he backed for other leadership positions 
easily defeated those who were sup- 


lobby. and diminish its clout with the 
members of Congress who have ben- 
efited from its political largess. 

Mr. LaPierre ’s candidacy received a 
major boost when Mr. Heston, one of 
his most ardent backers, was elected to 
an at-large seat on the board with 74 
percent of the vote. 

Mr. Heston said tbai a victory by Mr. 
Knox and his supporters could ‘ ‘reduce 
the NRA to kind of a sideshow on the 
radical fringe of the American scene.” 

In an interview on the eve of 
Monday’s vote, Mr. LaPierre said the 
NRA had reached a “watershed mo- 
ment” at which its members would 
have to choose between mainstream 
strategies for defending the Second 
Amendment right to bear arms and the 
“fringe” ideology of radical anti-gov- 
ernment militias. 


m 




S 3 



. T\ ‘ n It. 


. I 

«:a. • ■ 


• An army drill sergeant received a 
25-year prison term for raping six fe- 
male trainees and for other offenses. 
The court-martial jury at Aberdeen 
Proving Ground. Maryland, convicted 
Staff Sergeant Delmar Simpson last 
week after 31 hours of deliberations. It 
took about 216 hours to reach a decision 
on his sentence on 1 8 counts of rape and 
34 other offenses, mostly other forms of 
sexual misconduct. He could have been 
sentenced to life in prison on a single 
rape conviction. (AP) 


¥■: : 


• Almost three years after the rape 
and murder of 7-year-old Megan 
Kanka triggered a national movement to 
quire that communities be notified of 
community sex offenders in their midst, 
testimony has started in Trenton, New 
Jersey, in the trial of the suspect in the 
case, a twice-convicted pedophile who 
lived across the street from her. The 
defendant, Jesse Timmendequas. 36, is 
charged with murder, sexual assault and 
kidnapping. (WP) 


I Armed: 1 in 3 Households 


A new Justice Department survey 
says that more than one of every three 
U.S. households owns firearms, but that 
the number of gun owners may not be as 


ported by dissidents who accused him of • widespread as previously thougju. 


BA Aadbota/n* Amoral ftew 

Martin Cash, center, being greeted by Charles Tomlin, left, and Roy Sells at the federal courthouse in 
Denver where Timothy McVeigh is being tried. All three men lost family members in the bombing. 


• About 2,000 fewer American babies 
a year are dying of sudden infant death 
syndrome since doctors began telling 
parents to put babies to sleep on their 
backs instead of their stomachs, said Dr. 
Eric Gibson of Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege in Philadelphia. (AP) 


jS~ -: 

’ #1?. r 


- 

- -I 'Jt 

i • .■ rsi »■ 

. • • it 


IK! - 

_ kr -• • ’ 


■ : Liv.i: 


inept leadership and financial misman- 
agement at a time when the associ- 
ation’s assets and membership have 
been declining. • 

Chariton Heston, the actor, who has 
become almost as famous as a spokes- 
man in NRA advertising as for his earli- 
er screen roles as Moses and Ben Hur, 
narrowly ousted the association’s hard- 
line first vice president, Neal Knox, 62, 
on a 38-to-34 vote. Mr. Knox had led the 
divisive, yearlong campaign to replace 
Mr. LaPierre and the other incumbent 
officers. ■ " 

The internal struggle bad threatened 
to weaken the association, widely re- 
garded as Washington’s most powerful 


POLITICAL NOTES 


. No News: Bad News 


. i*?r -- • •- 
^ *:• 
pfcxv.; 

af'-VT - ' 

• .*.• 

f or r *. 


si $ [ WASHINGTON — There’s a 


whole lor of journalistic moaning 
these davs about the lack of news. If 


9fca«. •» 

1 

•\ w. .-- 


the a:-" 
*«=-.■ 


these days about the lack of news. If 
; .you define news as congressional _ 
hearings. Supreme Court rulings 
and NATO expansion, that might 
be true. 

What’s really behind the whin- 
\ ing is that the political world has 
been moving at a molasses-like 
pace. The campaign season is over, 

■ President Bill Clinton's second 
term has been a snooze, and the 

. Republican. Congress is flounder- 
ing. 

* ‘ News stopped happening, oh, a 

■ good two or three months ago,” 

I Michael Wines said in The New 

York Times. 

At the heart of this debate is the 
- reality that newspapers and the 
evening TV newscasts were out- | 
paced long ago by faster media : 
outlets. Since their ‘ ‘news” is now 
outdated, tbey are struggling for a 
new definition, one that encom- 
passes the sorts of subjects — 
health and consumer news, crime, 
celebrity gossip — thai engage or- 
dinary folks. (Howard Kurtz. WP) 


About 44 million Americans owned 
192 million firearms in 1994, including 
65 million pistols and revolvers . ac- 
cording to. the study completed for the 
National Institute of Justice. 

• The survey of 2,568 adults, described 
as one of the most comprehensive as- 
sessments of firearms ownership ever 
completed, found that 35 percent of U.S. 
households and 25 percent of all adults 
owned guns. 

And more often than not, those who 
owned firearms were likely to possess 
more to an 1 one. Nearly three-quarters of 
gun owners had two or more, primarily 
for protection against crime, the study 
found. 

But while the report showed that fire- 
arms ownership was commonplace, it 
held that “the proportion of American 
households (bat keep firearms appears 
to be declining.” 

Polls dating to 1959 showed that 
about half of ILS. households possessed 
guns. Research this decade shows the 
percentage of households with guns 
hovering from 38 percent to 43 per- 
cent. 


Cult Deaths Angered Me Veigh, Sister Says 


By Lois Romano 

Washington Post Service 


DENVER — The younger sister of 
Timothy McVeigh, the defendant in 
tiie Oklahoma City bombing trial, has 
testified that Mr. McVeigh was “very 
angry” over the 1993 government as- 
sault on the Branch Davidian com- 
pound near Waco, Texas, and that he 
felt “someone should be held ac- 
countable’ ’ for the sect members who 
died. 

“He thought the government 
murdered the people there,” Jennifer 
McVeigh said. 

He also told her five months before 
tiie Oklahoma bombing on April 19. 
1995, in which 1 68 people were killed 
that he was no longer in the “pro- 
paganda stage” but in the "action 
stage," she testified. 

The 23-year-old college student 


from Lockport, New York, has been a 
staunch defender of Mr. McVeigh. 29, 
since his arrest two years ago. She 
testified for tiie government Monday 
under a grant of immunity. Her testi- 
mony is largely being used to bolster 
the contention that Mr. McVeigh det- 
onated a huge bomb in front of the 
Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building out 
of an escalating hatred for tiie gov- 
ernment. 


Ms. McVeigh told jurors that her 
other bad written a hostile letter to 


brother had written a hostile letter to 
the American Legion on her computer 
in which he referred to agents from the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Fire- 
arms as “fascist tyrants” who are 
“infamous” for depriving citize n s of 
their rights. 

She spoke of her brother's increas- 
ingly secretive behavior, before the 
blast and his use of aliases and dis- 
guises. She identified several cryptic 


notes Mb’. McVeigh had sent her in 
1995 advising her to call him only 
from a pay phone and to * ‘keep an eye 
out’ ’ for private investigators, adding 
that “they'll more likely be looking 
for me, and they don’t follow the 
rules.” Sbe also confirmed another 
note from her brother that read. 
“Won’t be back for . . . ever.” 

She testified that Mr. McVeigh had 
told her he had almost gotten into an 
accident while transporting explo- 
sives in 1994. When Ms. McVeigh 
said thatshedidnotrecaU the quantity 
of explosives her brother was trans- 
porting, the prosecutor, Beth Wilkin- 
son, said that Ms. McVeigh had told 
the FBI it was 1.000 pounds (450 
kilograms). 

Ms. McVeigh smiled at her brother 
at least twice during her testimony, 
while he watched her intently. He 
faces the death penalty if convicted. 


• While new drugs are helping men in 
the war against AIDS, women are dy- 
ing in increasing numbers as doctors 
struggle to define the unique way the 
disease progresses in women, special- 
ists said at the third National Confer- 
ence on Women £r HTV in Pasadena, 
California. Women .often go un- 
diagnosed longer because doctors fail to 
recognize that some of their vaginal and 
throat infections, as well as cancers, are 
signs of HIV infection, (AP) 


• Trans World Airlines rebuked the 
director of the FBI, Lotus Freeh, and 
other officials of the agency for saying 
mechanical failure — not terrorism — 
was the most likely cause of the crash of 
TWA Flight 800. even though inves- 
tigators have not yet definitely reached 
that conclusion. It called the comments 
‘ ‘unproven speculation." (LAT) 


• A Chicago real-estate developer 
known for ois grand vision and phil- 
anthropic activities was found dead in 
his garage in the wealthy Gold Coast 
neighborhood The developer, Lee 
Miglin, 72, had received multiple stab 
wounds and might have. been tortured, 
the authorities said. (AP j 


School Board Backs Off on Ebonics 


By Peter Applebome 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Four months 
after Oakland. California, became 
the nation’s first school district to 
declare that blacks speak a separate 
language called ebonies, the Oak- 
land schools task force studying the 
subject has come up with final rec- 
ommendations in a report that does 
not mention ebonies at alL 
The report, a detailed proposal to 
spend $2 mill ion over five years to 
help improve the English skills of 
black students, is an attempt to put 
the recommendations adopted by the 
school board last December into 


practice. 

It is not clear how much the final 


document reflects a backing away 
from the original plan to help stu- 
dents leam English by instructing 
teachers in ebonies, described as a 
separate language spoken by many 
black Americans, and how much is 
just a more politic wording of the 
original proposal. 

But school board members say the 
report is a more carefully worded 
attempt to reach the original goals of 
greatly improving the language skills 
of African-American children. The 
proposed program awaits a vote by 
die school board, which is to be given 
the report at its meeting Wednesday. 

“I think they’re trying to be very 
careful,” said the Oakland School 
Board’s president, Jean Quan. 
“They’re probably trying to clear 


things up and stay away from any 
indication that they’re going for bi- 
lingual funds. Ana it may hive also 
been an emotional decision: I think 
they took so much ribbing for this 
they may have just backed down.” 

The word ebonies is not men- 
tioned in the 1 7 pages of the report. 
The only mention of the uproar over 
ebonies comes in a covering letter 
from the Oakland superintendent of 
schools. Carolyn Getridge. . 

“The resolution sought to estab- 1 


A STRUCTURAL INTERPRETATION OF A CLASSIC 
IN MODERN DESIGN. 


lish a policy that would link learning 
success with die students’ mastery of 


f - Jt 


Affirmative Action 


Vi 


HP* ***’ " 


WASHINGTON —The Clinton 
administration will announce a new 
approach in the awarding of gov- 
ernment contracts that may end 
race-bi^ed preferences for some 
minority-owned businesses while 
making available billions of dollars 
in federal contracts for others, of- 
ficials said. The effort reflects a 
commitment to preserve some af- 
. firmative action programs while 
complying with court rulings that 
severely limit them. (NTT) 


Fuhrman Lied About Racist Attacks , 
But Degraded Women, Report Finds 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Post Service 


Quote/ Unquote 


• ft . -■ 


.. David Kendall the private law- 
yer for Hillary Rodham Clinton, on 
reports of discrepancies in White- 
water testimony by the first lady. 
“It’s simply not true that her testi- 
mony has changed over time m any 
material way. Thai her testimony 
may differ in some respects from 
that of other witnesses k ne ™£? 
surprising nor significant. (*r) 


' LOS ANGELES — A long- 
delayed report on the Los Angeles 
Police Department has dismissed as 
fabrications most of the claims made 
by Mark Fuhrman, a former detect- 
ive. that he engaged in brutal and 
racist treatment of suspects but con- 
finned that an organized anti-wom- 
en group of officers had existed 
withm the department 


quitral of four white police officers 
in tiie beating of a black motorist. 

The report found that a "hostile 
working environment” for women 


success with the students ’ mastery of 
Standard English.” she wrote. “But 
in stating this linkage, the intern of the 
resolution and policy became lost in 
controversy over terms such as 'ge- 
netically based’ and references to 
ebonies as a primary language of Af- 
rican American students. ’ * 

The original resolution, unani- 
mously passed with little review by 
the beard of the 52,000-student dis- 
trict, said all teachers should be 
trained to respect the language 
spoken by many black students. 

The resolution was later toned 
down, and some of the more pro- 
vocative language, like an assertion 


About the legendary gold 
dot dial: 

Nathan George Horwitt. The 
artist, conceived of a watch 
without numbers as an exper- 
iment in pure, ftjnctionaf and 
"uncluttered' design. 


existed for 10 years at the West Los that African language systems are 


The outgoing chief of depart- 
ment, Willie Williams, said Mr. 
Fuhrman ’s accounts were “bigger, 
bloodier, and more violent than tiie 
jacts ” Mr. Williams, a black who 
replaced Daryl Gates, a white, as 
chief after tiie 1992 riots, has said 
that there should be “zero toler- 
ance” for any officers who engage 
in discrimination or use excessive 
force. The rioting followed tiie ac- 


Angeles Police Station where Mr. 
Fuhrman said he belonged to a group 
called “Men Against Women. ” 

The report made 15 recommen- 
dations to improve conditions within 
tiie department, most of them dir- 
ected at sex discrimination. 

It examined 29 “issues," as it 
called Mr. Fuhnnan’s accounts to 
Laura Hart McKinny. a screen- 
writer, of events he said he took part 
in as a detective. It found 1 7 of them 
were fabrications, some "lud- 
icrous,” and the 12 others exag- 
gerated. Mr. Fuhrman’s claims were 
a focus of the trial of O. J. Simpson, 
who was accused of murdering his 
ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, 
and her friend Ronald Goldman. 


“genetically based,” was removed. 
Supporters of the resolution said ref- 
erences to genetics referred to lan- 
guage groups, not to human genet- 
ms, ana dia not mean to imply that 
blacks are genetically equipped with 
a particular language. 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Japanese Visit to Isle Angers Chinese 

Tokyo Regrets Lawmaker’s Stop; Beijing and Taipei Complain 




Accused Seoul Spy 
To Admit His Guilt 


r„rnske 


toi" 


Tory F 


f'y Our Suff Frtm Ih^ufhn 


TOKYO — Declaring it a duty to 
inspect bis nation's territory, a Japanese 
legislator traveled Tuesday to die islands 
at the center of a dispute among Japan, 
China and Taiwan. 

The visit provoked the anger of the 
governments in Beijing and Taipei, and 
the Japanese government quickly dis- 
tanced itself from the visit. 

The rocky, uninhabited islands in the 
East China Sea are known as Senkaku in 
Japan and Diaoyu in China. 

“After landing on Senkaku today. I 
was convinced of the revival of a proud 
Japan, and an awakening in people's 
consciousness definitely begins here,” 
Shingo Nishimura. a lawmaker of the 
main opposition New Frontier Party, 
said in a statement. 

Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto 
said the landing was regrettable. The 
chief government spokesman. Seiroku 
Kajiyama, urged calm, acknowledging 
that the visit might hurt Japan-China 
relations, the Kyodo news agency re- 
ported. 

China called the landing a serious 
infringement of Chinese sovereignty 
and said that expressing regret was not 
enough. 

“We demand that Japan takes ef- 
fective steps to dispel the bad con- 


sequences and negative effects this has 
caused," said Shen Guofang, the 
Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman. 

“This incident will definitely affect 
the normal development of Chinese -Jap- 
anese ties," he said. 

In Taipei, the Foreign Ministry ex- 
pressed “grave concern" about Mr. 
Nishimura’s visit 

“We urge Japan to exercise self-re- 
straint and not to create any trouble that 
will affect our friendly relations.” the 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, Roy Wu, 
said at a news conference. 

More than a dozen Hong Kong ac- 
tivists protested outside Japan’s con- 
sulate in the colony's financial district to 
condemn the landing on the islands. 
They said it represented a revival of 


Japanese militarism. 
Mr. Nishimura st3 


Mr. Nishimura stayed for about two 
hours on die islands and left on a small 
fishing boat, according to Hiroaki 
Udetsu of the Maritime Safety Agency, 
the coast guard of Japan. 

Shin taro Ishihara, a former transport 
minister and author of “ 'The Japan That 
Can Say No," slowly circled the islands 
on a separate ship but did not land, the 
Japanese coast guard said. 

The islands are a volatile issue be- 
cause China and other Asian nations 
hold bitter memories of Japan's aggres- 


sion during World War Q and are ex- 
tremely wary of any signs of what they 
consider to be ultranauonalism coming 
from Tokyo. 

The dispute over the islands resur- 
faced when rightist extremists built a 
lighthouse on the islands last summer. 
Demonstrators protested the action by 
taking to the streets in Hong Kong and 
Taiwan, 

The Chinese government accused Ja- 
pan of using the dispute as an excuse to 
build up its military. Last year, a Hong 
Kong activist drowned after jumping 
into waters near the islands on one of 
several protest boats from Taiwan and 
Hong Kong. 

The islands, 175 kilometers (110 
miles) north of Taiwan — lie amid rich 
fishing grounds and possible oil and 
natural gas deposits. 

Japanese government officials do not 
expect China to resort to military action 
to take over Senkaku. But conservative 
Japanese, such as Mr. Ishihara. have 
been annoyed that Washington has not 
tried to resolve the dispute. 

The islands were administered by the 
Japanese from 1895 to 1945, when they- 
were taken over by U.S. forces after 
World War n. 

Washington gave them back to Japan 
in 1972. (AP, Reuters) 




MS. Reduced Charge Leads to Accord j ■ . 


*$C 




«■ ^ 


•• - issc - 




..-1 






So Muraknta/Tbe Anscsted Pren 


Japanese walking the beach Tuesday on one of the 
islands that are chimed by Japan, China and Taiwan. 





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By Brooke A. Masters 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — 
Robert Kim, die former naval 
computer specialist charged 
with spying for South Korea, 
is expected to change his plea 
to guilty Wednesday, federal 
court and FBI officials said. 

Prosecutors and Mr. Kim’s 
attorneys would not comment 
on details of the plea agree- 
ment they said they had 
reached. 

But federal officials said 
Mr. Kim, who pleaded not 
guilty in March to three 
counts of giving defense in- 
formation to a foreign gov- 
ernment, was scheduled to 
plead guilty to a less serious 
espionage charge of gather- 
ing, transmitting or losing de- 
fense information. 

Under the original indict- 
ment, Mr. Kim, 57, faced the 
possibility of life in prison. 
The lesser charge carries a 
maximum sentence of 10 


years. 

Mr. Kim, a civilian analyst 
with the Office of Naval In- 
telligence. was arrested in 
September and charged with 
using a computer system at 
his agency to gather classified 
information on North and 


South Korea, China, and on a 
computerized maritime track- 
ing system. 

Prosecutors allege that be 
gave seven defense docu- 
ments classified as "secret;" 
.or “confidential" to a South 
Korean Navy officer. 

A guilty plea would allow 
prosecutors to claim a victory 
in the most serious rash of 
American spying cases since 
Aldrich Ames was convicted 
in 1994 of spying for Mos- 
cow. 

In a four-month span la& 
year, officials arrested Mr. 
Kim; a former CIA case of- 
ficer, Harold James Nich- 
olson, and a former FBI coun- 
terintelligence agent, EaH 
Edwin Pitts. 

Mr. Nicholson and Mr. 
Pitts have pleaded guilty to 
spying for Moscow. ; a 

They face sentencing next* 
month. 

Plea agreements often rep- 
resent the best possible out- 
come for the government in 
spying cases, analysts said. • 

Usually the defendant 
agrees to tell the government 
what secrets got away, and 
die plea protects the intelli- 
gence agencies from having 
to disclose classified infor- 
mation during a trial. 


BRIEFLY 


Rao Is Indicted for Vote-Buying 


NEW DELHI — A court indicted former Prime Min- 
ister P.V. Narasimha Rao in a vote-buying case on 
Tuesday, dealing another legal setback to the embattled 
politician who quit in disgrace last year as leader of the 
Congress CD Party- 

Judge Ajit Bharihoke, presiding over a special court of 
inquiry, ruled that there was sufficient evidence to try Mr. 
Rao for criminal conspiracy and abetting bribery, ac- 
cording toR-K. An and, the lawyer for the former prime ' 
minister. Both charges carry a maximum penalty of five 
years in prison. 

Mr. Rao is the first Indian prime minister or former 


prime minister to face criminal charges. Judge Bharihoke 
scheduled arraignment for May 14, when Mr. Rao and 19 
other people accused in the four-year-old case will be 
asked to enter a plea. ( Reuters ) 


Bangladesh Strike Turns Violent 


CHITTAGONG. Bangladesh — More than 50 people 
were wounded in bomb blasts, clashes and an attack on a 
train during an opposition-led general strike Tuesday in 
' Chittagong port and neighboring areas, the police said. 

Supporters of the main opposition Bangladesh Na- 
tionalist Party exchanged gunfire and fought sporadic 
battles with supporters of die governing Awami League, 
the authorities said. 

Bangladesh Nationalist Party supporters ransacked 
railroad offices, damaged a locomotive and attacked an 
Awami League office in Chittagong, witnesses said. 

The Bangladesh Nationalist Party chief, Khatida Zia. 
called for the dawn-to-dusk strike to protest what she said 
was “government-led terrorism and the ruling party’s 
subservient policies toward India.'’ 

Begum Zia has accused Prime Minister Hasina Wazed 
of being pro-Indian and jeopardizing Bangladesh's na- 
tional security. ( Reuters ) 


Taiwan Sets Ties With Sao Tome 


T AJPEI — Taiwan said T uesday that it had establ ished 
formal ties with West Africa's small twin-island nation of 
Sao Tome and Principe, scoring a minor victory in its 
four-decade diplomatic tug-of-war with its archrival, 
China. 

"The Republic of China has established full dip- 
lomatic relations with Sao Tome and Principe.” Foreign 
Minister John Chang said at a news conference in 
Taipei. 

A total of 31 countries now maintain official relations 
with Taiwan, although that number will decline to 30 later 
this year when South Africa switches ties to Beijing as 
planned. 

The move was sure to anger China, which views 
Taiwan as a rebel-held province after a civil war split 
them in 1949 and has warned other countries against 
forging ties with Taipei. tReuters) 


Sunni Link in Pakistan Killing? 


LAHORE, Pakistan — Gunmen killed a senior police 
officer Tuesday in the Pakistani city of Gujranwala in 
what the police said might have been revenge for his work 
in tracking down Sunni Muslim militants. 

They said the unidentified attackers ambushed Mo- 
hammed Ashraf Marth, a police superintendent, on his 
way to work in an official vehicle at about 8:45 A.M. 

Mr. Marth, 35, died along with his driver, Mohammed - 


Tabassum. The assailants escaped in a car. the police said. 
Police sources said the attack was likely to have been 
linked to Mr. Marth ’s arrest of six Sunni militants in . 
connection with a February assault on the Iranian cultural 
center in the Punjab city of Multan, where he was then 
posted. 

Eight people, including the center's Iranian director, p 
were killed in the Multan attack, believed to be the work ■ ' 
of a militant anti-Shiite group known as Lashkar-i- 
■Hwngvi- / Reuters ) 


For the Record 


Indonesian policemen clashed Tuesday with knife- 
wielding supporters of the Muslim-oriented United De- 
velopment Party in Java after detaining a party member 
campaigning for the May 29 general election. The clash 
occurred in Panjentek, 60 kilometers southeast of In- 
donesia’s second city, Surabaya. (Reuters) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. MAY 7, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


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2 Euroskeptics 
Join Tory Fight 

l' Biji.Vd IW Jtr* fn im Ifrpjrch.-. 

LONDON — Two opponents of British 
participation in a European single currency 
jumped into the race Tuesday to lead the 
defeated Conservative Party. 

John Redwood. 45. has been an outspoken 
opponent of the single currency since he 
resigned from the cabinet as minister re- 
sponsible for Wales to challenge John Major 
unsuccessfully, for the party leadership in 
1995. K 

Michael Howard. 55. the former home 
secretary, said he had argued against the 
single currency in the cabinet, although in 
public he supported Mr. Major’s "wait and 
see" policy. 

Mr. Major announced his resignation Fri- 
day following Labour's landslide victory in 
national elections. Kenneth Clarke. 56. the 
former chancellor of the exchequer, and Peter 
Lilley. 53. the former social security’ sec- 
retary. have already joined the race. 

Mr. Clarke is an advocate of the European 
Union, Mr. Lilley a Euroskeptic. 

Writing in The Daily Telegraph on Tues- 
day. Mr. Lilley said the party's new leader 
faced a daunting task. 

“The fact is. we are not liked," he wrote. 
"We have allowed ourselves to be caricatured 
as the patty of self-interest and greed." 

No date has been set for the election. 

Divisions over European policy were a 
constant problem for Mr. Major throughout 
his six and a half years as prime minister. 

During the campaign, more than 200 Tory 



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John Redwood announcing his position. 

candidates publicly dissented from his policy 
of keeping options open on joining a single 
currency. 

When he challenged Mr. Major for the 
party leadership in 1995, Mr. Redwood ran 
on a program demanding that British mem- 
bership in the European single currency be 
ruled our. 

He played the unity card T uesday at a news 
conference. 

"I don't want a sectional party, a factional 
party, a party obsessed by only one issue," he 
said* 

"1 believe the Conservative Parry is a 
broad church. Jt must stay a broad church. 
The trouble is we don’t have enough wor- 
shipers at the moment." l AP. Reuters) 


U.K. Vote Alters Northern Ireland’s Outlook 

Sinn Fein’s Gains Could Help the Peace Process or Embolden IRA Militants 


briefly 


Cash-Strapped Romanian Clinic 
Buried Infants’ Bodies in Tank 


By James F. Clarity 

.Vo Fort Times Sen-ice 

BELFAST — The convincing 
gains made in the British elections 
last week by Sinn Fein, the political 
wing of the’ Irish Republican Army, 
have changed the face of Northern 
Ireland. But Sinn Fein's successes 
have also raised essential questions 
about the future of the flagging effort 
to end sectarian violence in this Prot- 
estant-dominated British province. 

Will the overwhelmingly Roman 
Catholic Sinn Fein and its president. 
Gerry Adams, who won a seat in the 
British Parliament in Thursday's 
election, use their new strength to 
persuade the IRA to restore the 
cease-fire that it ended in Febmarv 
1996? 

Will peace talks that are to resume 
June 3 be rendered useless as they 
were last year when hundreds of an- 
nual Protestant parades through 
Catholic neighborhoods led to new 
violence? 

Will the new Labour government 
of Prime Minister Tony Biair take 
risks that his predecessor, John Ma- 
jor. would not to get Sinn Fein to a 
negotiating table with the Ulster Un- 
ionist Party, the province's largest 
political group? 

Without those two parties, the 
talks are unlikely to produce anything 


BRIEFLY 


beyond the haggling that has char- 
acterized them since they began. 

Mr. Blair and his new Northern 
Ireland secretary, Marjorie (Mo) 
Mowlam, stand firmly behind the 
basic policies of the departed Con- 
servative government and the Irish 
government of Prime Minister John 
Bruton: Sinn Fein will not be allowed 
at the talks until there is another IRA 
cease-fire, and there will be no 
change in the political structure of 
Northern Ireland without the consent 
of the majority. Northern Ireland is 
about 60 percent Protestant and is 
expected to remain so until well into 
the next century. 

In Belfast on Saturday, Ms. Mow- 
lam said again that there must be a 
new IRA truce. 

But if there is. she has given no 
indication how quickly Britain 
would allow Sinn Fein to join talks. 

Mr. Major, who had been depend- 
ent on Protestant Unionist votes in 
Parliament, was careful not to let 
Sinn Fein into the talks during the 
IRA’s cease-fire, which lasted 17 
months. Mr. Blair could take a 
chance and bring Mr. Adams to the 
table within a tew weeks of a new 
truce. But that would have to be done 
without driving the Ulster Unionist 
Party out of the negotiations. 

The Unionists gained one seat in 
the new British Parliament, giving 


them a total of 10. and their leader. 
David Trimble, has said he will meet 
with Sinn Fein only when he is con- 
vinced that the IRA's campaign of 
violence has been permanently 
ended. His actions depend on how 
politically strong he feels, and that 
will be determined in pan by how 
well his party does in Ulster's local 
elections May 21. 

As well as electing Mr. Adams and 
his deputy. Martin McGuinness, to 
Parliament, Sinn Fein won 16 per- 
cent of the vote in the province, mak- 
ing it die third-strongesr party in 
Northern Ireland, ahead of the hard- 
line Protestant Democratic Unionist 
Party of the Reverend Ian Paisley. 
For some Protestants, that shift raises 
the dreaded prospect of Northern Ire- 
land eventually splitting from Britain 
surd joining with the overwhelmingly 
Catholic Irish Republic. 

Ulster’s second-largest party is the 
Social Democratic Labour Party, a 
mainstream Catholic group that says 
ii is ready to meet with Sinn Fein 
members almost immediately after a 
new cease-fire. But Mr. Adams has 
given no indication of his intentions, 
insisting that the election results 
gave Sinn Fein a moral and political 
mandate to be at the talks, cease-fire 
or no cease-fire. 

Over the weekend, he sounded al- 
most belligerent, telling supporters 


that there would be no peace 
dement before die release of all Re- 
publican "political prisoners,’ Sinn 
Fein’s name for anyone convicted in 
British or Irish courts and im- 
prisoned for bombings or killing po- 
lice and army troops. . . 

Paul Arthur, a professor of polipcs 
at Ulster LTniversity, said it was im- 
possible to know what the IRA lead- 
ership and Mr. Adams were thinking. 
* ’The gains put Sinn Fein in an awk- 
ward position,” he said, as the in- 
crease in their in electoral power 
could strengthen the argument that 
political action was preferable to 
IRA violence. 

But IRA commanders could feel 
that, because the political gains were 
achieved even as the IRA was con- 
tinuing its violence here and in Eng- 
land. the new British government 
should be kept in doubt about when 
its next attack might come. This is 
consistent, experts said, with the 
IRA's core belief that history shows 
violence to be effective, that the 
founders of many countries were 
once considered terrorists by others 
and that it was IRA violence that got 
London's and Dublin's peace effort 
started. 

"If Adams and McGuinness can’t 
produce a cease-fire," Mr. Arthur 
said, "it will demonstrate that their 
influence counts for very little." 


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Agence France-Pressc 

I CLUJ. Romania — The bodies of 47 infants were stored in 
formaldehyde in an underground tank at a hospital here in 
central Romania because the clinic could nor afford to bury 
them, the police said Tuesday. 

• ‘There are 47 infant corpses, 28 boys and 1 9 girls between 
one month and three years old," a police spokesman said. 

The bodies were stored in formaldehyde in a tank sunk into 
a pit and topped with a metal cover. The police said the oldest 
body dated from 1990. 

Doctors at the hospital said they had taken "perfectly 
legal ” measures to preserve the corpses because there was no 
money available to bury the children properly. 

1. . They said the clinic lacked adequate refrigeration facilities 

. " to store the bodies. 

" * Local authorities in Cluj, however, insisted that the hospital 

budget included funding for burying those without means. 

Romanian law requires parental consent before children 
who die m hospitals can be buried, but many of the babies had 
been abandoned at the clinic shortly after birth. 

So far. only corpses with hospital-issue identity bracelets 
have been identified, the spokesman said. 

. - . - -p n ‘ ‘This business is macabre, but completely legal," a Health 

>tnl;r I HI7:> I Ministry official said. "Cluj hospital did not have the nec- 

essary structures. Others do.” 

; . ; . . v .- ^ Police who are investigating have sealed off the tank area. 


■ - ■ MaTri>- 





Meeting on Nasi Gold Is Urged US. Digs Deep for Foreign Aid 

LONDON — Britain on Tuesday offered to sponsor an PARIS — The United States recovered its rank among 
international conference aimed at resolving the questions the leading donors of nonmilitary aid last year by climbing 

“ r orid War back from fourth place in 1995, an American aid official 


surrounding gold seized by Nazi Germany in World 

fl. 

Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said there were strong 
reasons to consider compensating victims of Nazi per- 
secution or their descendants. 

Mr. Cook, who took office last week after the Labour 
Party swept elections in Britain, said the Foreign Office 
would consult organizations in Britain and abroad about 
how to convene an international conference. 

The Tripartite Commission, set up in 1946 and run by 
Britain. France and the United States to restore looted 
wealth to its rightful owners, has always maintained that the 
gold it is holding was looted from the central banks of 
countries occupied by the Nazis. But Jewish groups contend 
that 5 to 10 percent of the weahh belonged to private 
individuals. 

"It is clear thai some gold taken from individual victims 
of Nazi persecution may have found its way into the pool,* ’ 
Mr. Cook said “This strengthens the case for looking 
imaginatively for ways of compensating victims or their 
direct descendants. ’ ’ ( Reuters) 


place 

said Tuesday. 

‘ ‘The United States and Japan will be No. 1 and 2. and we 
don’t know in what order.’ said Brian Atwood, admin- 
istrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development 

U.S. overseas development assistance, which does not 
include food aid, financing for the Peace Corps or aid to 
newly independent states, reached about $9.1 billion last 
year, "maybe more," he said. 

The United States fell to fourth place in 1 9 95, after Japan, 
Germany and Prance, when U.S. aid was slashed to $7.3 
billion. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

A strike by French truck drivers eased Tuesday, a day 
after a union official was killed when be was crushed under 
the wheels of a truck. Bordeaux was the only area still 
affected by blockades. Unions called the strike Monday for 
one day to press the government to put in place benefits won 
in a 12-day strike last fall. (AP) 






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PAGE 6 


Scavengers Chip Away 
Prague’s Gothic Glories 

Patrols Set Up to Guard Charles Bridge Statues 


By Christine Spolar 

Washington Post Service 

PRAGUE — Sl Christopher, the pat* 
ron saint of travelers, is up the river 
without an oar. St. Joseph has lost his 
gilded lily. The Pi eta is mournful, per- 
haps in part because it is missing a 
golden lantern, circa 1859. The Cru- 
cifixion stands tragically — with only 
one bony claw left of the 40-poimd gold 
eagle that once graced its base. 

Both rime and man have taken a toll 
on the Charles Bridge, but it seems man 
has been stuffing his pockets. The Goth- 
ic glories of Prague are being eroded by 
thieves and tourists. 

Nearly half the statues on Charles 
Bridge are missing a stone finger, a 
golden frond or man-made halo. So 
susceptible to scavengers is the 14th- 
century sandstone bridge that it is now 
under the watch of the Union of Artists, 
which provides almost around-the- 
clock patrols. 

Volunteers stroll across the span of 
the Vltava River — known in the West 
by its German name, the Moldau — 
every day on the lookour for pilferers. 
On what curators here call crisis days — 
New Year’ s Eve, for instance — each of 
the 32 statues has two volunteers posted 
at its base. 

"It's a very big problem, and every 
person who comes to Prague — that’s 
80 million people in the pasL four years 
— w alks over the Charles Bridge.’ ’ said 
Alexander Kohak, coordinator of the 
security effort. "We’re watching for 
thieves, but there’s also some basic edu- 
cation to do. We have to tell people: 
’Don’t sit on the statues. They're a 
national treasure.' ” 

There is temptation on nearly every 
block of a city studded with crosses, 
orbs, spires and steeples. More than 500 
statues, monuments and plaques are re- 
gistered with the Gallery of Prague, 
which monitors and maintains the 
works of art. Of those, about two-thirds 
are in parks or open spaces. 

Petty thievery, of course, is a problem 
in any major city. But the end of Com- 
munist rule and changing market con- 
ditions that sent prices of bronze, gold 
and copper soaring here, put the fear of 
God, so to speak, in those who want the 
saints preserved. 

Scrap dealers say prices for metals 
have jumped ninefold since 1989. Un- 
der the Communists, the state regulated 
prices and kept diem so low that a pound 
of copper would be worth a few pennies. 
Today, the same scrap would be worth 
about a dollar. 

Some of the cruelest indignities to the 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNES DAY, MAY 7, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


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Charles Bridge happened soon after 
price controls ended The Crucifixion 
lost its golden eagle to a nighttime thief 
in 1991. But the weight of the bird 
apparently undid the thief. An employee 
of the mayor's office, walking' to work 
early the next day. found the gleaming 
eagle had been dropped in rite middle of 
the bridge. It is now kept in a guarded 
city gallery. 

The Pieta’s loss, in 1995, left pre- 
servationists questioning whether the 
most expensive metal pieces should be 
replaced. A damaged golden lantern was 
replaced in December 1995. By New 
Year's Day, the lamp was gone. 

Criminals prospecting for profit have 
moved beyond the most carefully 
guarded comers topartake of Prague's 
everyday grace. They have pinched 
shiny brass drain covers, once a com- 
mon sight in subway corridors, and 
ripped open towering lantern poles in 
city parks in search of strands of copper 
wire. 

The police say prevention is nearly 
impossible in this city of a million 
people. Instead, officers try to nip the 
trafficking of stolen goods by monit- 
oring metal dealers, antique stores and 
flea markets. More recently, the police 
have begun tracking thefts by scanning 
Internet home pages for suspicious 
sales. 

“Every scrap-metal dealer has a sus- 
picion," said Miroslav Profeld of 
Prague Metal Dealers, whose company 
is one of about 50 salvage companies in 
the capital. 

“We have to keep a register of sup- 
pliers and what they bring us. And if 
someone brings in a big piece of wire or 
a piece of a statue, they are supposed to 
notify us. 

“But it's done on a case-by-case 
basis," he said “Shop owners aren't 
obliged to tell us anything, and we aren 't 
the police." 

Across the Czech Republic, bronze- 
filigree and copper bells have been 
filched from town squares. In Prague's 
Plzen Gardens, a five-foot bronze 
nymph was swiped a few years ago only 
to surface in a local antique store. A 
customer reported seeing it to the police, 
who re ruined it to me Gallery of 
Prague. 

when the gallery curator. Jindra 
Hubena, was notified by the police of 
the recovery, she choked at the bargain 
riie thief had struck. He bad sold the 
statue for SI .200. She estimates its 
worth at $25,000. 

No more chances for this nymph. 
Miss Hubena decided. The statue was 
placed in a guarded city park. 










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RAINING FIRE — Security forces protecting the regional prefecture in the French city 
of Metz coming under a shower of fireworks tossed by protesting coal miners Tuesday. 

Keith Porter, Cell Biologist, Dies at 84 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Keith Porter, 84. a biologist 
who made the first photographs of tissue cells with 
the aid of an electron microscope and thus helped 
found the modem field of cell biology, died Friday 
in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, of pneumonia, a 
complication of Parkinson's disease. 

Mr. Porter, who did much of his work in the 
1940s at the Rockefeller Institute, which is now 
Rockefeller University, in New York City, devised 
methods of microscopy that are substantially the 
same as those used today in the study of cellular 
growth, normal and malignant, and the division 
and function of cells. 

‘‘There can be no doubt," said Lee Peachey, a 
biologist at the University of Pennsylvania, “that 
his goal of understanding the basic structure and 
functioning of cells contributed in an almost in- 
estimable way. and. through the work of many 
others, to our present understanding of disease 
processes and to future advances in medicine." 

Mr. Porter's achievement came after he grew 
embryonic chick cells on layered plastic in a glass 
pecri dish. When he found cells that had spread 
suitably thin, he used a watchmaker's forceps to 
peel off one layer, of the plastic and insert a wire 
grid, which was like a piece of fine window screen- 
ing. He then treated the cells with a chemical to 
preserve them and dried them. 

The new electron microscope could see detail 
1,000 times finer than the older light microscope, 
but it required that the objects observed be both dry 
and thinner than those the scientists had been able 


to isolate for analysis. The microscope illuminates 
its objects for observing and photographing with 
streams of subatomic electrons instead of beams of 
light. 

Joseph Charles Swidler, 90, New Dealer 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Joseph Charles Swidler. 90. 
one of the last New Dealers of 1933 and a Wash- 
ington utilities lawyer who overhauled the Federal 
Power Commission, died of a heart attack May 1 at 
Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland. 

Mr. Swidler worked in the law office of David 
Lilienthal. whom President Franklin D. Roosevelt 
picked as the first administrator of the Tennessee 
Valley Authority, a power and flood control proj- 
ect that was a major part of the New Deal. 

Mr. Swidler was the authority's counsel from 
1 933 to 1 957. He then went into private practice in 
Tennessee until President John Kennedy named 
him chairman of the Federal Power Commission in 
1961. 

At his death, he was senior counsel and a retired 
founding partner of the Washington law firm of 
Swidler & Berlin. 

Paul Lambert, 74. a character actor in movies 
and on television, died April 27 in Santa Monica, 
California. Mr. Lambert played cowboys, gangsters, 
ministers and executives, and the national editor of 
The Washington Post in * ‘All the President's Men." 
He made his movie debut in 1960 in "Spartacus." 
and acted in 300 shows on television. 



THE INTERMARKET 


BRIEFLY 


^ P * 

Arafat Agrees to Security Talks / 

EREZ CROSSING — President Ezer Weizman oflsraei ! 

said Tuesday ihat Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian president, rtf | ^ 
had agreed to renew security coordination with the Jewish | 

state after a seven-week crisis to peacemaking. T ,• < 

“He will do everything so that security will be UK.and 

be will bring about a resumption of talks between security 

chiefs of the Palestinian Authority and our security - 

chiefs," Mr. Weizman said after meeting with Mr. Arafat 
at Israel ’s border with Gaza. ‘ This point was agreed uponi 
I hope it will begin operating within a few days." t s 

But at a news conference after the talks, Mr. Arafai * 

stopped short of declaring a renewal of high-level se- 
curity contacts. A Pales tinian official confirmed that 
security meetings would be held, but .only with U.S. 

representatives present * ^ 

An official of the Palestinian Authority, Yasser Abed 
Rabbo. said none of the basic issues between the two sides 
has been resolved, including, the PLO’s demand that -H 

construction on a Jewish settlement in Arab East Je- .== 

rusalem be halted. (Reuters) S- 

Israel Backs Naval Exercise } 

JERUSALEM — A joint Israeli, Turkish and Aiuer- ^ 

ican naval exercise in the Mediterranean will contribute 
to the stability of the Middle East Israel’s defense , 

minister says. 

Defense Minister Yitzhak Mordechai met Monday - ; . 

with General Cevik Bir, Turkey’s deputy military chief of ^ j 
staff, to discuss security cooperation between Israel and ” I 
Turkey, including the exercises, which are expected to ■ j j? 
take place this summer. f . 

He told General Bir that he had “no doubt that this r . 

cooperation will contribute to stability in the Middle East, 
and that it is Israel’s intention to widen and deepen the 
links, ’ ’ the Defense Ministry said. ■!.- 

Syria asserted Tuesday that a “covert alliance’’ be- J-j- 

tween Israel and Turkey threatened the region. (API s ~ 

Winnipeg Hopes Worst Is Over f 

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Winnipeg’s confidence 
grew Tuesday as the Red River’s crest began to recede. . 
but emergency officials cautioned against succumbing to 
a false sense of security. •-'* 

"We’re still in the mode of being very vigilant,” 

Mayor Susan Thompson said. “We’re still on pins and 
needles for the next two weeks at least. " 

Dikes holding back flood waters in the Red River —— 

Valley took a beating from high winds Monday but came ^ 

through without any major breaches. : jf: 

Winds were forecast to gust up to 25 miles an hour 
Tuesday, further battering the flood defenses that have so i 
far saved Winnipeg, a city of 650,000, from serious fcsra 

damage. (Reuters) ~ . 

Chile Police and Miners Clash £ 

SANTIAGO — Riot policemen used clubs, tear gas * ■___ 

and water cannons Monday to scatter hundreds of coal “ 

miners who are dissatisfied with the- compensation ^i. 

offered for the loss of their jobs when a state-owned mine ~ 

in Lota was closed. "/ 

The police said that 28 people had been detained and ' fi 

that about 10 had been injured. _! 

The clashes occurred during a protest march by about ^ 

S00 miners when the demonstrators attempted to reach : 

the presidential palace. President Eduardo Frei was away V- 

in northern Chile. (AP) :■ 



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"Stock Loan* 

"Prelect Raiding 
"Lstten d Cres 
‘Accounts Receivable Financing 
"Private Placement 
"PUifc Strife 

Tel: (212) 758-4242 
Fax: (212) 758-1221 
faker's Welcome 

375 Park Avt, NY. NY 10152 USA 

Refundable Retainer 
Sometimes Requaed. 


Diamonds 


ROUGH DIAMONDS. We wi pay retort 
cash tor gem quafty. African ortgr 
volume only. Fax: 954 474*3866 USA 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


FRENCH RIVIERA ■ Between Cannes 
and Nfce. 1M hr from Nee Airport. Beau- 
W modern oficea. 12 moms. 450 sqjn. 
4 parkings, kfaal tor h^v-tecti. school 
et. FF2M Dfract from owner. Futoer 
Mr Fax *+49 89 791 89 86 


Announcements ■ 


LEGAL CHILD ADOPTION from South 
America. Quick S efficient prauderw. 
Backed by legal wrsutoa. Ter 972 
50883135. Fax 972 4 86670 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S! 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


lr 



If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you Havel, why not 
also get it at home? 
Same-day detfveiy avafabte 
h toy U.S. cities 


(In New York can 212 752 3890] 

—fY 1 [vmnnijrtii m • # 

ticralo ^p ^fcn b u n r 

na who* dim 


VIENNA. AUSTRIA. Tel: 713 • 3374. 
Are you rad or woman 7 Lcnety or de- 
pressed 1 Are you despairing or snorter? 
ft helps to lah about l Phone: 

BEFRtENDERS m total confidents. Mon- 
Fn 950 am - 1 pn and every day 630 
pm - 10pm. 


Legal Services 


DIVORCE 1-DAY CERTOED 
CaS or Fax IT14) 966-8S5 Wmc 16737 
Beach Btvd. 4137. Hunnyjton Beach. CA 
92648 ILSA- Mai ■ wsajnriSpjnoxam 


DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. No Travel. Wmp; 
BO 377, Sufflury, HA 01775 USA. Tfii. 
508/44^6337, Fas 506 44343133. 


French Riviera 


CAP FERRAT Waterlront - Celebrity 
sells or rems hideaway. Beacte]Bhy 
Sleeps 6 J ire-Sept 2A weeks. UcCrea 
Tel +377 93505931. Fax *377 93507197 


Great Britain 


DfSCOUNTED UK PROPERTIES - UP 
TO B5% BBjOW THE MARKET VALUE 
FAX +44 (DIT71 501 9244 


Paris and Suburbs 


78 - FEUCHEROLLES - 15 urns Pans 
La Oetonsa. 17th cenruy fwise Lewd. 
By owner US3TOO.DOO. Teh USA -1 
407-3763460. Far *1 407-6763481. 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Paris Area Furnished 


AT HOW M PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

Apartments to rant furnished or nol 
Sales & Property Management Servces. 
25 Av Hoche 75008 Pans FxOI-4561 1020 

TeL +33 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


CAPITALS ■ PART7EHS 
Kandpicied ojaflty apartments, al sras 
Paris and suburbs. We help you best l 
Tel +33 (0)1-46148211. fex (0)1 -48148215 


Residence Hotels 


Employment 


Escorts & Guides 


IP 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

Specahsts- 

rumshed apartments. 3 moretis or mere 
or whim shed. resOentat areas. 

Tet +33 (0)1 42 25 32 25 

Fax: +33 (0)1 45 63 37 09 


PARIS 6th, dose Place Si Suipura. 
beautiful studio, bathroom, kitchen. 
FftSX n& Ter -321011 4S 25 90 30 


AUTOMOBILES 


Alfred Eacner Sfretn ID 
CH-8027 ZurKh 
Fax 01/202 76 30 
To! . 01/202 78 10 
new TAX-FREE used 
ALL LEADING MAKES 
Same day ngunwi pa«ab**. 
iwwwaMe up to 6 ysare 
We also register cars wKh 
(anUred) hw«^F< fMF-fraai pw»g 



Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DERGI FRANCE 
WEEKEND: FF5M. 7 DAYS: F15M. 
TEL PARIS *33 10)1 43 68 55 55. 


SAVE ON CAR SHIPPING. AUESCO. 
Knbbesjr 2, Antwerp Belgaer. Torrrom 
US, Afnca. Regui* Rfrfla saSng. rw 
hotel Tel: saaaai-O Fax 2ffl«353 


Autos Tax Free 


UTTLE USED USfCANADAWBflVANS 
off-rad vehicles. P.U Cara. Wcitdmdfl 
Exptm. Fax -41 32 6>S 27 Td 37 


2D YEARS WE DELIVER 


CARS TO Tffi WORLD 

A 8 mates and rrodete 
Export Sales - RegisiaKn 
Shpping ■ euiflznce 

Trareco, 51 vassescfifisfr. 
2030 Arwerp. Beaten. 
Tel: -32 3 542.534) 
Fax: *22 3 542i89? 


25 YRS OCEANWIDE MOTORS 

womwtte sfeBJt v and smswg ct AUDI 
Mercedes. BMW. Pwscte CeS Germarn’ 
*49-21 1-43C&6 or fax 2n-»54 2120 ' 


ATK WORLDWIDE TAX FRE E CARS. 
Export * sbeeng * regkJidJuu of nes & 
used cars. ATK NV Tamtcwa 40 . 2930 
BrasEcnaa. Baiguim. Pnone- *32 3 
6455002. Fa* +32 3 6457109 ATK. 
smee 1953 


BELGRAVIA 


LONDON - PARIS 

TIE FINEST & THE MOST SINCERE 
IS - 38+ INTERNATIONAL 
B EAUTIFU L & ELEGA NT STUDEN TS 
SECRET AHES. AIR HOSTESSES A 
MODELS + 

AVAILABLE AS YQUR COMPANION 


Escort Agency Credtt Cards Welcome 

TEL" LONDON ++ 44 (0) 


0171 589 5237 


ROYAL PLATINUM SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

LONDON PARIS NEW YORK 
Switzerland Benelux Cote d’Azur 
WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

4+ 44 (0) 7000 77 04 11/22 

kiss@at-star.com - 


ALICE BEAUTIFUL CHARMING Bfcrat 
proposes Private Escort Senna London 
Tet 0356 659862 


CUIQD0E CHKUPS ELYSEES 

High dess rooms £ sates 
Daily, weekly S monthly rates. Paris 
Tel*33 [0)1-44133333. Fax(B)1 42250488 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
ments. From studtos to 4 bedrooms. Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 7362671 


CHIC-VIP 

WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON PARIS NEW YORK 
STOCKHOLM PRAGUE 

SOUTH OF FRANCE AND GERMANY 
+-+ 44 (0) 7000 24 26 91 


S1OTZEHLAND-GERMANY-BELGKJM 

++31-20-427 28 27 

Zrelch-Genm-8BHi-Ban»- 
FranJdortMatr&Wtesta^^ 
Bom4krsseJdori-Munidi-Ber<b)- 
BnaseteAirtwaip + A: Vienna 

LONDON: (0)171-978 6608 

COSMOS Escort Aguncy - Credit Cads 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

World's First A Most Erdusve Service 
Uarria, Beauty Queens, Actresses 
MifttStngual Travsl Conqnnfons 



Hdqtrs. 212-765-7896 NY, USA 

ofUceebitFescortexom 
Rated 'Best In New York" by New York 
Magazine Serwee wldaidB. 


VENUS IN FURS 

24HR WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 382 7000 

AH cards Advance bookings weteome 


AR1ST0CATS Escort Service 

3 Shoutdhem SL London WI 
0171 250 0090 


ffilDTS MGH SOQETyVIENNA'PARIS 
COTE D'AZUR i ZURICH • GENF 
toterobonai Escon £ Travel Sendee 
Verna «43.1-5354104 aU mm cards 


AMSTBIDAM " DREAMS • ESCORTS 
and Dnner Date Serves tor Hm « Her 
*3i 10) 20-64 02 111 7 64 02 666 



General Positions Wanted 


SWISS GENTLEMAN, 45, free to travel, 
mu Id Ungual, loyal, rfirareat professoral 
in tounsm, PA to VIP, PS to bus mess- 
men, seeks challenging position as 
PA/PR/PS or In HOTEL/TOURfST 
TRADE woridwlda. Ereeiert references. 
Please sent lex to Zunch-Switzertand 
Fax no. 0041-1-291 63 4i. 


EXCSIENT RATES & SERVICE 


SILVER STAR 




LONDON - PARIS - NEW YORK 
NEW YORK: 212 7B5 19 18 
EUROPE: ++ 44 (0) 7000 74 57 67 


HIGH SOCIETY 

Executive Escort Sendee 
Germany. Paris. New York. London 
Tet London 0171 266 1033 


ISABELLA AQUINAS 

ESCORT AGENCY 
LONDON Tel: 0171 498 5789 


GUYS 8 DOLLS ESCORT AGENCY 
MILAN 'ROMETTALY "LONDON "PARIS 
BRUSSELSIUGANO-UAMUOTUUNJCH 
0 DORF-FTUHT - S'GARTVlBWAl YON 
COTE D'AZUR'MARBELLA'GLASGOW 
Tet +39 (0) 336 652 37M Craft Carts 


ESCORT*DINNER TRAVEL SERVICE 
B«h , Zjrich’BaserGeheva‘Luz»n 
T(ttlOliterolinch*Fferb 
Only Inn Fhst Class Ladies 
■"VOGUE - " +41 <0179 407 0931 


ULAN ' ITALY * TOP CLASS 

jufe Escort Sendee 3W03«22577F7 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
SI Beauchamp Place, London SW1 
Tet 0171-584 6513 


ANGEUQUE "WP Escort Sewee 

London 0171 589 9S40 
Cretfl ords adapted late mgw 


ANNE MARES ESCORT SERVICE 
and ttrwr Date Servfce London 
Tet 0171 385 1174 



TO PLACE 
Al¥ AD 


iwTIT 


Bcralb^SiSribunc 

Contact the Paris office: 

XeLi (33-1) 41 43 93 85 
Ew: (33-1) 41 43 93 TO 

E-mail; classified iS'iliLcoin 


BEAUTIFUL DANISH MODEL FrtenUy 
and Very rtgti Class Escort Serves. Tet 
Cenual Lorwn 0171 376 7921 


BELGUM UNFOfl GET ABLE 
escort Service. 24T24. 

Tel' (SafiiM 05 


BSTN, BASEL, ZURICH 
Esooh Service. 

+41/7748 55 05 AI canfs. 


BLACK KAUTY ESCORT SERVICE 
Exclusive Elegant Educated 8 FnenOly 
London & Heathrow. 01819082261 .Cards 


COLOGNE-FRANKFlfflT-DUSSELDORF 

- — LQNJXW — 

Gaffs Escort Service +49(0)171-5311605 


ESAN ESCORT SERVICE. Coin an 
Appealing Back Lady Amencar Express 
Ac^tetL Tet +44 |0] 121 429 1682 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
BASEL LAUSANNE, M0NTRSJX 
CaS 022 / 346 00 69 Escort Agency 
Cm* canto accepted 


■"HIGHLIGHTS'* 
FRANKFURT INTL ESCORT SERVICE 
PLEASE CALL 069 955 20 774 


HARMONY & NMA. SPAM 

EXCLUSIVE Top Escort Service Er 
UadPtf-Tet +34-1 386 35 881906 31 

Barcelona - Tet 34-tt* B6 96 


WES Escort Service . 
R0TT6NBURG. Exquisite. 
VS +49 (0)7472 - 66 49 


JASIIWS ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON 0171 935 0564 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


LONDON HEATHROW GATWKK 
JAPANESE ESCORT SERVICE 
0956 572543 Credc tarts 


VIENNA "PRAGUE: KENNEDY'S Escort 
Service. Friendly, elegant aBracthre. 
canto. Day A ffgfti: (++43 t) 5335044 


MICHELLE VERY PRETTY Franfly. 
Young Blond Gal Private Escort Saws 
London TeL 0958 449 643 


SARAH, CHARMWG, SOPHISTICATED. 
Sim Beauty. Pnvate Escort Semw 
Chelsea Tet 0171 349 0564 


*2URICH * CAROLINE* 
Esccr; Servtee 
Tet 01 i 261.49.47 



















































































!«ie7 


uifi 4 



THE INTERMARKET 


S 1 ++4 171 420 0348 




fcr.;WeaL-r.:_‘ J7; 
»nkr i-C; 
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I.Bcwi. "VI 
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tatty A F 7 ! ". 
tenuis- - V~; '- 

d^rs-nr^v-r,-’" - 

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Credited. .: 

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tlukfd 


.... ; ■"•“• bai 




'^• 5 $ 


BacAw \ 

«LE M - - . 

pUnntt 3 *f .‘ 

3b® ry ~ 


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<nal & 


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#fcCc*»i.B:r — ■ 
scan.* wrarr.’."- 
(^fading ftu 

Mta 

■Efcacraj B; : • 

if lira 's ;r:-.-: - 
-Defend V!;- 
WltfcJ T^r.-u- . 
aiaadTtrV- • . 


... .. . '%■; 

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:- - . . .V 11 ^ W 




Hopes Wbrstho^ 


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r WhfU/ --. ' • - r- • • : 


rifiU in ; 

an Th^-v-.- - 

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Import/Export 


BUYING OUTLET FOB THE LARGEST 

trading companies 

Branded ft Luzuy goads. rqgrances/ 
cosmetcs. watches, peris, ctimawaie. 
crystal. hflndbags, apical francs, sun- 
basses. bne 'Spars, Giro. Tag Keuer. 
Cartier. WetbewMd, Swarovsta, Herend. 
Ffinmmsj, Praia. Hemes, etc 
Pm caAfar TRADING DESK 
Tat USA 4MT2-807-CB73 
fte USA +1-2T2-807-905B 
All cab treated with utmos confidence 


NO AMEX INC. 

LAMS GRADER OP USED CLOTHING 
For women ■ men ■ chftJren 
PPBMJUS DOMESTIC QUALITY 
DENW JEANS ft OBflM JACKETS 
Expon teg bates, small bales, boxes. 
AFRICA, ASIA, EUROPE. MID-EAST. 

CENTRAL ft SOUTH AMERICA. 
Tet718-342-2278 Fax:718-342-2258 US 


CASKETS 

American Casket tor export 
Become a lepresentanw 
For intension tax m fa US 


GENERIC CIGARETTES, American 
Hand tobacco. lowest prices, private 
labeffing araiaWe. FAX USA: 1 (554) 
474-3866. 

DOUNICAN CIGARS. 9 styles, land 
rolled, volume purchases only. 
Tetetac U5A-S&W4-3066 

raoZEN CHXXBL Whole Mb Powder. 
Maraerine and other commotfities at 
good pnces. Fax USA 5® 584 3483 

LEVI Sol’S. Used and Now. Quality 
jests direct from the USA. Hones and 
RrfaUe. Fax 503428-0749 USA 

QUAUTY USED JEANS al teante men, 
women, aB sees. Also Levi 501’s. 
Fax 508 584 9483 USA 

SHALL ARMS AHHUWTIONIIIlLirARY 
equipment and supplies. lowest prices, 
warn* only; FAX USA *954474-3866. 

USED LEVI 501 JEANS - A9 cotes & 
grades. For price 1st FAX: 001 -561-3849 
USA RECYCLEWEAR 


Business Opportunities 

2nd PASSPORTS J Drawg Licences I 

• Degrees/Camouflage Passports/Secret 

• Bank Accourts. GM. P.O. Box 70302, 

• Athens 16610. Greece. Fax 8862152. 

, hltpirwww.globaknoiiey.com 

’ FOR BUYING AID FflTWG UP: Cruse 

• ship, pilot hotel, ber-nwtainm, very 
j tashtenbto, m franctne. Stage concerts. 

, parang ft sculpture aposftons, racod- 
. ngstefio. Suite tor Hbt or VP. Centre 
, SC seeks partner. Tet Paris +33 (0)1 

■ 4757 3880- Far +33 (0)1 4758 5517 

• CASH CUBRENCWCtwws changed h- 

■ to Swiss Francs. Casn/DrafL Capital 
- Partners 51D0K minimum also sought tor 

■ Stock Market Action yokflng high ratlins. 

; Oetafc Tetfax 00 44 (0)117 5739 830 

CIGARtITES. m^or bran* evahUe at 
_ excspUomifly low prices, lor essim 
Eurape. CJXrie. ladb. See and buy. fine 
377TPD5-78 94 . 

4— 

COMPANY SPECIALIZED seflng big ' 
quant&les of second hand ptotocoptera: 
KoniCB-Gesiatnei-Nashua.-Tel 
■♦33(0)148855580 Fax ' +33(0)1 48656628 

COMPLETE 3AGEL HACMNE mtooT 
' Tompson USA mada.’ Brand new, tone- 
da defewy + know tow. Good price. 
Cal +32.75.409 Jfift, +1J31Q.470J2541 

FAMOUS DtSCOTHEQUB OFFStED. 

2 iwwrtarge successful handtisi oralats 
« Shgapore end BH. Avalable In May. 
Owner ratong. Fax IBS) 834 0395 

2ND PASSPORT: S1«C Also EU. 
Dotenatic, Drtvejls Licences. Emat 
cqudOiiKUiBLph Fax: 632431 7552 


FOR SALE,- Overseas kwestment Bank- 
ing A&nce INC ft mere Germany Tef 
-*9 117221 B07 597 fax 1 23 0) 779 381 

ProCi and Growth 
Bustasa Opporiunfty 
The Uagrelcer Group, me lUSA Man- 
utasmari has i7 yearn o> RftD ot pa- 
tented and unique magnetic IMJ dawc- 
es am eaabfchad maor customer case 
m USA, Japar< and Europe. Ass Divi- 
sion now seeking representatives and 
d'Strtutors for Asia Several coun- 
faslemmnes sm opei"' 

Magnates! products gnrs qiwi return cn 
imrestmert. reduce nrernlBnance costs, 
help prKeci the envirorrmem, promote 
good beafflt. are easy to mall and run 
to user" A «te range at commercial, n- 
dustnai and restoetmal products means 
many business opponunses™ 

' Coord bcate. coiTQScn. tegae, and 
poawev energize water m HVAC. 
coding tnrats. heal exchangers, 
boiera, condensers, rasaeraiai water 
Wes. heaters Be 

' Save 10 - 25 > , costs on tuet; reduce 
dearly CO and HC emesons m 
furnaces, betas, pucks and 
automcWes, etc 

* tocraase human wetness wah bo 
magnetics, a modem development ot 
tune-read and anaem magnate 
therapy. 

For information on dratribubon terms 
pteasa contact 

The Uagnenzer Gm® tnc. • 

Asa Dmsaxi (Tokyo. Japan] 

TaL +813 5570-1022 
Fax +813 £82-1664 
The Itegnracer Group. Inc 
(Ftenylvpna. USA) 

Fax +1 215-7E6-7320 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COIIPANES & TRUSTS 
IMSHGRAT10N/PASSP0RTS 


Aston Corporate Trustees 

19 Peel Road, boogiae, Me of Man 
Tel: +44 (0) 1624 626691 
Fax: +44 (<J J 16M €25126 

London 

Tet +44 (0) 171 233 1302 
Fax: +44 M 171 233 1519 

E Uafl: aston§enterpdsejiet 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE CO's, FULL ADMW 
TRADE DOCUMBfTS AND UC 
BANKING ft ACCOUNTING 
CHWABUSBCSS SERVICES 

Contact Stsila Ho tor mnedate 
services & company brochure 
MACS LTD, Room 1106, Allan Plaza 
2-6 frannSe Hoed, T5T. Kowtocn, 
Hong Kong, emal: nacsfihiL8Up8r.rte 
Tab 8SM7241223 Fax 27224373 


m socey OF FKANCERS 
Networking brUftme oraieanonate wflh 
mjBCts for haring or infrf tor 
projects. FREE Airmailed Report. 
704-2S26BQ7 fisc 704-251-5061 USA 

LS£. SEEKS “ACTIVE PARTNERS tor 
cteafion ol LB.C. Trade Ceram in USA, 
Asia, Africa, Europe. Tet PARIS +33 
( 0)1 47573880. Far +33 (0)1 47585517 

LB.C. seeks tor b European. American. 
Aslan arxi African carters al new prod- 
ucts tor cflsMwttcm. Tab PARIS 433 
(0)1 47573890. Fax: +33 (0)1 4758 5517. 

OFFSHORE COMPANES. For fraa bro- 
chum or advice Tet London 44 181 741 
1224 Fax: 44 181 748 655818338 
wwwjppletoriflHik 

SEEKS commercial partner to develop 
mporftexport acsvfty. kfin 5 years pro- 
hsmnal experience. Reply to: Box 280. 
IHT. 92521 Neuffiy cadex. France. 


WANTED - STOCK BfiOKER/FMIS 

Ira^esiefl m lucrative letaicnshtp with 
U S investment Bank. Leave Message 1 
1-212-473-5482. 


Telecommunications 


MANAGING HRECT0R-PARI5 

WORLDxCHANGE. an imamabonal 
teteptane company. 6 seeking a tegnty 
motivated managing (hiMlor with tale- 
communcainns experience to manage 
cur operator* m Pars 

The suxesshi (antedate win k resptm- 
stee lor and epemirg a satanne office m 
Paris. Dutbs retude adoressng busmess 
oppommitiBs. devaiopeij phcSg strate- 
gies. completing sates cojecTweslofe- 
casc. Pftl responsbtov and an other 
aspects of operations. Requires strong 
knowledge of mensural busmess prac- 
tices and accounting (including PSL 
siaiemenu ft balance sheets) and 5 

S en directly related job experience, 
its be hdinguai lEngksh-French). 

To apply, please mail resume te 
Linda Condon, WORLDxCHANGE Com- 
muncatons. 4356 La Jo<a Viage Orw 
i IDO. San Dtfga Catania 92122 USA 
You may also FAX resume to: 
(619) 625-5500 or 6end na internet to 
Linda Condon t'axFcls con 


kallbacK 

Iff 

w -L, i fc* **^ soamt.KH eerie 


The Original ft Largest Discount 
Telecommunications Company 

Tel; 1.206.599.1991 

Fax: 1406.599.1981 
EimA: MaOkaflbechxaei 
wwwJralbBCiuom 


Capital Available 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING 
VENTURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENTURES 
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Ktihuioxjl Vi NT till 

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Far +44 113 2727 569 
Feee are not requested prior to 
an offer of furring being mode. 


CAPITAL C0RP. 

M & A . 

Coronate Financing 
Venue Capital 
(WOrtende} 

Tel; 001-407-24^0360 
Fax: 001-407-248-0037 USA 


"IUEDIATE & UNLIUTED ” 
Capital avafeble tor 
All busmess pngects! 

MM US. SI iriL/no max. 

Jnfl Busmess Consubn 
(717) 397-7490 (US. FAX) 
hdpJwwwmtbuBCOacom (traemrt) 


COMMERCIAL IfTL BANKING LTD 

CREDIT 

INFO; FAX +30 1 32 43 527 


COMMERCIAL/BUSINESS FINANCE 
available for any viable protects world- 
wide. Fax briel synopsis m Entfeh to 
CrapORK Aterances. (+)44.1273«1300. 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISES 


! HeralbSfefcribunc 

1 -T v\m M uft cm »*■»*»» mi 

THE TCTJRUyS DAny newsbipek 

If you would like to Teceive fuxtlier information on any of the 
advertisers who appeared in our Inter national Franchise 
Sponsored Section -April 25, 1992, simply complete this coupon 
andysend to: r 

Judith King 

The International Herald tribune 
. 650 Third Avenue, 10th Floor 
New York, NY 10022 
• or Fax: 212-255-8785 

E-mail: jkiiig@iht. com 


Tickbox 

f. A^phagraphics Q 

2. AFC (America’s Favorite 

■ CMdien) > ^ 

■ 3 . BSmiae ^ 

4. Change Plus D 

5. Fastframe O 

6. FVauduse Magazine O 

. 7. HCM (Hair Club For Men) □ 

8. HI Franchise Guide □ 

9‘ intefe Travel/Mr. Kahn D 

20. Jafla Press D 


Name; — 

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Company;. 

Address: — 
City: - 

Country:— 

Tel: — 

Fax: — 


11. Lox of Bagels 

12. New Horizons 

13. Radio Shack 

14. Signal Graphics 

15. Sir Speedy 

16. Steaxnatic 

II. Studebakar’s 

18. Swisher 

19. TOden 

20. Travel Network 

21. Umglobe Travel 

22. Eebart Tidy Car 


7-5-97 


m < , IH*ISTON*CO. 

International Funding Experts 
New York - Frankfurt • London 

. CdareralXaararoas Programs 
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aa isWail 


No fees until cortrad signing 
CALL US FIRST! 

Teh 516-873-7200 
Fax: 516-873-7201 


ANGLO AMERICAN GROIT 
. — *PIC ■ 


PROJECT FINANCE 
VENTURE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Ccqnae Brochure and 
ntormaton pack 
Tet *44 1924 201 355 
Fax: *44 1924 201 377 
You are welcome to von us. 


LOANS AVALABLE at 3% PA teawi- 
ttown wittun 14 banking (fays. Fax 10 
0060-7-353 3383 


NON-RECOURSE FINANCING 

AVAILABLE FOR IflTERfiATlONAL 
PROJECTS AND BTVESTVtENTS 
HAVING SATISFACTORY CfSDfT 
SUPPORT Cffl GUARANTEES 

Sdiere Prcecad 

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Tcrrre. Canada 


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RJ1 INTERNATIONAL 
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ED1T0R1ALSJ OPINION 


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INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


PL'BLISKED KITH THE new TORK TIMES AM) THE WASHINGTON POST 


NATO-Russia Charter 


The United States is skirting a polit- 
ical danger zone in its negotiation with 
Russia over the proposed NATO-Rus- 
sia “charter.” The charted* is part con- 
solation prize for Russia’s acceptance 
of NATO enlargement and part ex- 
ercise in post-CoId War cooperation. It 
is meant to ease the anxieties many 
Russians feel as they see an alliance 
they had come to perceive as hostile 
moving closer to their shrunken bor- 
ders, and. to induce deeper collabor- 
ation with the West. 

The problem is whether the allies, in 
their good-faith effort not to put Russia 
at a further strategic or political dis- 
advantage, are diluting the alliance 
with imprudent military pledges and 
affording Moscow a veto in the name 
of "consultation.” This is the question 
the Senate will surely ask when a re- 
written NATO treaty eventually comes 
before it. A proper caution compels the 
administration to inquire on its own. 

The administration approaches the 
charter with an eye to Wancing the 
integrity of the alliance and the le- 
gitimate national concerns — as dis- 
tinguished from the swollen nation- 
alistic claims — of the Russians. But 
this is no simple balance to make. 
Everyone in the West can agree that 
new members should come first-class, 
not second-class, and that Russia's se- 
curity should not diminish as a result. 
But that merely pushes the argument 
from principle to details. The deploy- 


ment of particular weapons, conven- 
tional as well as nuclear, must be re- 
solved. and the explicitness of the 
assurances that NATO will provide. 

Diplomatic art led the alliance to say 
that it has “no intention, no plan and no 
reason’ ’ to deploy nuclear arms on the 
territory of new member stares and that 
it has no current plans to permanently 
station “substantial” combat forces. 
When the Russians refused to take such 
statements as NATO's last word, the 
United Stares proposed a split-level 
negotiation. Instead of writing conven- 
tional-force levels into a NATO-Rus- 
sia charter, American officials thought 
to leave them to a parallel negotiation 
on limi ts on conventional forces in 
Europe. The rationale is that, while 
Russia is not a member of NATO, it did 
sign the treaty limiting those forces. 

The particulars remain to be as- 
sembled and fined together. What needs 
to be kept foremost in mind at this point 
is the destination. NATO is an alliance 
of democracies. It is a military alliance, 
ensuring in the wanner conditions now 
prevailing the stability of Europe. The 
process of enlarging the alliance should 
not leave it less capable of providing 
either defense or stability. It would be 
good to have the complicated business 
of a charter wrapped up in the few 
weeks remaining before NATO decides 
on a first round of enlargement But the 
matter is too important to be rushed 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Latin American Poverty 


As President Bill Clinton meets Cen- 
tral American and Caribbean leaders 
this week, he will find that some basic 
economic assumptions have changed 
A few years ago, despite warnings from 
many economists, politicians in Latin 
America and Washington assumed that 
economic growth alone would take 
care of even the poorest Latin Amer- 
icans. Many people believed them. 
They do not anymore. Growth has been 
too slow, and m Latin America, which 
has the largest gap between rich and 
poor, the gains have gone mainly to the 
rich, buying too many cell phones and 
not enough rice. 

Because of inequality and high pop- 
ulation growth, there are more poor 
people in Latin America than ever be- 
fore. Market reforms have removed 
many disastrous policies and bureau- 
cratic obstacles to long-term growth 
and possibly long-term relief tor the 
poor. But Latin governments are now 
realizing that even with market econ- 
omies, they need sound social policies 
and stronger education and health sys- 
tems to reduce poverty on a broad 
scale. The Inter-American Develop- 
ment Bank is now focusing on such 
programs. President Clinton will men- 
tion poverty, but the issue deserves 
more emphasis chan it wifi get. 

Latin America's economies have 
grown 3 percent a year in this decade, a 
welcome contrast to the sharp decline 
during the debt crisis of the 1980s. But 
many forget that from World War n 
to 1980, Latin America grew 5.5 per- 
cent each year. Its swift population 
growth requires economic growth of at 
least 6 percent. 

The picture is not uniformly bleak. 
Several countries have reduced 
poverty since 1990, mainly by taming 
inflation, which is hardest on the poor. 
Brazil is the most recent success. But 
this is a dividend that only pays out 
once. To sustain the decrease in 
poverty levels, countries would do 
well to copy Chile's example. Chile 
has not only enjoyed steady growth but 
has moved to attack poverty in ways 
the market cannot Among its impor- 
tant initiatives have been reforms in the 
education system, including special 
emphasis on better elementary school- 
ing for poor children. Bolivia has also 
made important reforms. 

Social security is now more access- 
ible to the poor, and new banks spe- 
cialize in very small loans. 

Other nations have been less in- 
novative. In general, Latin countries 
need to invest much more' than they 
have in basic health and primary edu- 
cation, which have been slighted in 
favor of universities and high-tech urb- 
an hospitals that largely help the 
middle class. They should also focus 
on women and girls, who are the 
poorest. Many needed reforms, such as 
widening access to credit or land tides, 
cost very little. 

These reforms would benefit the 
United States as well. Middle-class 
Latin Americans will be less likely to 
emigrate. The wealthier people be- 


come, the more they will buy Amer- 
ican exports. The United States now 
exports more to Central AmericS than 
it does to the whole of Eastern Europe 
and the former Soviet Union. 

Mr. Clinton will hear complaints 
from leaders -who have watched with 
dismay as the United States shifted its 
trade and investment to Mexico after 
the signing of the North American Free 
Trade Agreement The World Bank 
estimated that the Caribbean could see 
Mexico take over a third of Its exports 
to tiie United States. Mr. CLmton 
should renew efforts in Congress to 
give bard-hit exports from the Carib- 
bean the same entry to the United 
States that Mexico enjoys. 

The United States is also $20 million 
in arrears to a special fund at the Inter- 
American Development Bank that fi- 
nances anti-poverty projects in Latin 
America's five poorest countries. Con- 
gress should promptly pay off that 
shortfall. 

Mr. Clinton has a lot to talk about 
during his journey, including migra- 
tion, environmental protection and 
drugs. But he should make time to talk 
about fighting poverty. Washington 
played a major role in persuading Latin 
America to institute free-market re- 
forms. It can now usefully promote a 
second wave of reforms to extend the 
market’s benefits to the poor. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Louts Aloft 

The rise in loutish behavior in recent 
years is deplorable. But when it occurs 
30,000 feet in the air it also is dan- 
gerous. A one-day conference in 
Washington, designed to highlight the 
problem posed specifically by unruly 
airline passengers and to outline some 
solutions, throws some light on the 
broader problem. 

The number of reported incidents 
of violent or hostile air travelers is 
still small but sharply increasing. 
Cases of passengers interfering with 
crews during flights nearly doubled 
in two years, from 96 in 1993 to 174 
in 1995. Those cases, reported to the 
Federal Aviation Administration, ap- 
pear to be just the tip of the iceberg. 
One major carrier reported 882 cases 
of passenger misconduct in 1995, a 
broader category that includes physi- 
cal contact as well as verbal abuse. 
That number soared from 296 inci- 
dents in 1994. 

Alcohol is often a big part of the 
problem, and the stress of travel and 
crowded planes also contributes. But 
as one official noted: “Airline pas- 
sengers mirror society. They’re less 
willing to accept problems or delays, 
and many are aggressive.” 

And the rest of us? There’s 
something called the Golden Rule. 

Look it up. 

—Los Angeles Times. 


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Britain’s Changing of the Guard: A Few Lessons 

^ ^ Blair’s campaign. They form the nuc- 

nofncial foreign 


W ASHINGTON — Elected on 
Thursday, Tony Blair took office 
at No. 20 Downing Street on Friday 
possessing one giant advantage over a 
newly elected American president The 
British prime minister does not have 
time after his election to ponder what 
he intends to do with power and with 
whom he intends to do it 
Like most leaders in Europe — only 
more so — the British prime minister 
has to arrive in office with an estab- 
lished agenda and already knowing his 
cabinet ministers and the roles he ex- 
pects them to play. A 24-honr transition 
such as the one Mr. Blair and John 
Major have just accomplished does not 
permit the extended agonizing over 
personnel and policies that the Amer- 
ican system encourages, complete with 
unpleasant surprises. 

In France, where a long presidential 
transition is a week, it is common for 
Americans to be asked with genuine 
puzzlement how we can elect and 
choose complete strangers to lead us. In 
this case, the French nave a point 
Moreover, like a French president 
Mr. Blair and his ministers can change 
only a handful of the senior civil ser- 
vants who am their departments and 
offices. In Europe ana Japan, expe- 
rienced, nonpartisan government 
employees are expected — and trusted 


By Jim Hoagland 


— to guide the new officeholders. 

In return, the politicians do not have to 
use up time and moral authority finding 
jobs for the boys and girls who rang 
doorbells or the donors who bankrolled 
them. Thai might have a certain appeal 
for BQl Clinton at this moment 
Don’t get me wrong. There, are ob- 
vious pitfalls in the swift executive tran- 
sition- It does not correspond to many 
needs of the much larger, more het- 
erogeneous American polity. But watch- 
ing Mr. Blair on television hit the ground 
running, I could not help dunking that 
we Americans have something to gain 
by shorte ning and tig htening the travesty 
that the 10-week U.S. interregnum and 
celebratory inaugural have become. 

Nor do I mean to suggest that gov- paign that has just ended was the way m 
emmentai harmony will reign in Bri- which Mr. Blair’s New Labourites won 

the open support of a major segment of 


leftist guard who doe? nOpmScularly leus of an unofficial foreignpoli^ col- 
want £joL Mr. Cook wants to be the 






1 I, ; r i 


chancellor of die exchequer, a space 
already filled by the one-time Blair 
rival Gordon Brown. 

But in the British system this is not 
likely to be a serious problem. Mr. Blair 
and his aides already know many of the 
Foreign Office senior officials and am- 
bassadors abroad and will be able to 
work directly with them. 

Mr. Blair and other Labour leaders 
began touring key foreign embassies 1 8 
months ago as part of a British tradition 
in which the “outs” begin to prepare 
themselves well in advance for pos- 
sibly taking power in the next election. 
It is the British equivalent of barbecues 
in Iowa — bur much more productive. 
One remarkable aspect of the cam- 


tain because Mr. Blair has already been 
working with his future ministers, in a 
publicly declared shadow cabinet, in 
Parliament and during the campaign. 
To know them is not necessarily to 
love them. 

The most obvious and important ex- 
ample of this comes in foreign affairs. 
For reasons of factional balance within 
the Labour Party, the centrist Blair was 
obliged to name as his foreign secretary 


Britain’s foreign policy establishment, 
which traditionally has been nonpar- 
tisan or in the Conservative camp. 

■Sir Robin Ren wick, the former Brit- 
ish ambassador in Washington: Lord 
Gflknorc of Thamesfield, the former 
head of Britain’s diplomatic service, and 
Sir Michael Butler, ex-ambassador to 
the European Union, were among those 
who contributed ideas and papers to Mr. 


Not everyone sees the heavy reliance 
the British system encourages on civil 
servants and retired - mandarins as an 
unmixed blessing. “The bureaucracy 
will inevitably take all risks, and there- 
fore all initiative for change, out of 
governing if the politicians depend too 
heavilv on diem,” says a former Tory 
officeholder. "People who have just 
verted for change will wind up dis- 
illusioned if they get immobiusm" 
instead. 

But in any case Mr. Blair in his 
careful campaign did not reveal any 
desire to strike out in new directions 
abroad. 

His advisers say that they hope to . 
mend relations with Washington, frayed 
by the Clintonites’ welcoming political ' 
representatives of the Irish Republican 
Army at the White House. 

Mr. Blair’s Britain will also be more 
outspoken on human rights abuses 
wi thin the Commonwealth and more 
open to cooperating with Europe. 

Otherwise there will be lirtle change 
in policies and procedures that Blair & 
Co. have taken the trouble to get to 
know and prepared to implement long 
before Election Day. 

The Washington Post. 


Japan Is Not in Bad Shape, So Why All the Hand-Wringing? 


T OKYO — Japan seems 
strangely dispirited these 
days, in almost a throwback to 
the early 1960s before the Jap- 
anese economic surge began. 
Consequently, and contrary to 
die .expectations of many 
Americans and the anxieties of 
some Asians, Japan is for from 
emerging as a political power 
with greater security responsi- 
bilities in Asia. 

In the late 1980s, the spec- 
ulative, inflated “bubble econ- 
omy" ballooned as the Japa- 
nese became overconfident and 
even arrogant That bubble 
burst in the early 1 990s and sent 
land prices, the stock market 
foreign investments and the yen 
slid into a 
which it is just 
now recovering. 

Today, despite every indica- 
tion that Japan is on the rebound, 
government officials, business 
executives, political commenta- 
tors and strategic thinkers be- 
moan the state of the nation. 
Specifically, Prime Minister 


By Richard Halloran 


Ryutaro Hashimoto sits atop a 
shaky coalition that precludes 
the Japanese government from 
taking initiatives in foreign 
policy. The once-vaunted bu- 
reaucracy has been tainted by 
allegations of bribery, incom- 
petence and cover-up. Business 
leaders have been embarrassed 
because recovery from the re- 
cession has been slower than 
-expected and the public ques- 
tions their ability to revive 
prosperity. 

Underlying this malaise is a 
Japan still encased in the pa- 
cifist cocoon in which the na- 
tion wrapped itself after the 
devastating destruction of 
World War n and the U.S. oc- 
cupation. Thus, far from seek- 
ing to exert political influence 
or to become active in die se- 
curity of Asia, the disheartened 
Japanese seem content with 
their nation's low profile. 

It was against this backdrop 
that Mr. Hashimoto and Pres- 


ident Bill Clinton met in Wash- 
ington on Jan. 25, a year after 
they issued a joint declaration in 
Tokyo under which Japan was 
to shoulder a heavier defense 
burden and toprovide more sup- 
port for U.S. forces in Asia. The 
January meeting was devoted to 
commonplace issues and no 
new ground was broken. Today, 
a senior Japanese official said, 
"notiiing has changed." 

Not all Japanese are satisfied 
with this low profile, some 
pointing to tensions with most 
of Japan's neighbors. Perhaps 
at the top of the list are hostile 
relations with North Korea. 

Also on the list is China, 
which regularly berates Japan 
for its banalities in World War 
II, for what the Chinese claim is 
a potential resurgence of Jap- 
anese militarism and for Ja- 
pan’s alliance with the United 
States. The Chinese contend 
this is part of a U.S. conspiracy 
to contain China. 


South Koreans become emo- 
tional over any perceived slight 
from Japan, which occupied 
Korea from 1910 until 1945. 

Japan's relations with Mos- 
cow remain strained over the 
Kuril Islands. And the Philip- 
pines and other Southeast Asian 
nations have bitter memories of 
Japan's invasion during the war 
and worry about its economic 
domination today. 

Some Westerners in Japan 
caution against writing off the 
nation as an economic power, 
although the Japanese have no 
blueprint for the future. 

At $217 billion, Japan’s for- 
eign exchange reserves are lar- 
ger than those of the United 
States, Germany, Britain and 
France combined. Japan’s 
growth rate in 1996, at 3.1 per- 
cent, was die highest among the 
large industrial nations. Indus- 
trial production was the highest, 
unemployment the lowest and 
inflation the lowest of the major 
economies. 

Glen Fukushima, vice pres- 


ident of the American Chamber 
of Commerce in Tokyo, wrote 1 
recently that the recession ' 
which began in the early 1990s 
has led many in Japan to “be- 
moan the state of me economy 
and to engage in self-flagella- . 
non, which the Japanese have ! * 
mastered to a fine art." 

Thus, he argued, many in the . 
West underestimate Japan just 
as drey overestimated it in the 
1980s. 

Mr. Fukushima. once a se- 
nior official in the U.S. Trade 
Representative’s Office who 
negotiated extensively with Ja- . .. 
pan, wondered whether the Jap- 
anese were wringing their 
hands just a tad too much so as J 
to divert foreign attention: 

“Japan is spared the close ; 
scrutiny of its government/ 
policies, corporate practices, 
trade behavior and investment 
patterns whose asymmetries 
and imbalances attracted the 
world’s wrath only a few years 
ago.” . . 

International Herald Tribune. 


This American Now Believes Clinton Did Not Tell the Truth 


N EW YORK — As of May 
5, 1997, it became im- 
possible for me to believe it 
happened the way President 
BUI Clinton and his wife said 
it had. 

On that day I rejected, for 
myself, the story by William J. 
Clinton and Hillary Rodham 
Clinton that neither they nor 
anybody else ar die White 
House knew that when their 
good friend Webster L. Hubbell 
resigned as associate attorney 
general in 1994 he was facing 
the likelihood of criminal ac- 
cusations that could land him in 
jaU. They did. 

If the president did know, 
then after the resignation he 
opened himself to possible 
charges of obstructing justice 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


by approving White House job- 
hunting for Mr. Hubbell. It 
would not take a particularly 
suspicious mind — let alone a 
prosecutor's — to see high-pay- 
ing jobs as bush money to keep 
a defendant sUenL Why would 
he take that risk? 

On May 5, The New York 
Tunes reported f IHT. May 6) 
that before Mr. Hubbell 
resigned, David E. Kendall, 
the personal lawyer of the 
Clintons, and James B. Blair, 
one of their closest Arkansas 
confidants, received certain in- 
formation from the Rose Law 
Firm in Little Rock. Mr. Hub- 
bell and Mrs. Clinton had been 
partners in the firm. 


The information was thar the 
firm had "pretty strong woof of 
wrongdoing” by Mr. Hubbell 
while he was a partner. The 
Times account said Mr. Blah- 
then warned the Clintons that 
Mr. Hubbell had to resign, fast 

Mr. Kendall was also in- 
volved in getting die resigna- 
tion. 

Until The Times report, I 
found it hard to believe the Clin- 
tons would take the risk of an 
obstruction of justice charge, 
the accusation that led to 
Richard Nixon's resignation — 
and down the same road of 
stonewalling. 

And like most Americans, I 
think, I was and remain sick at 


Dignity for Holocaust Victims 


N EW YORK — My moth- 
er. Dr. Hadassab Bimko 
Rosensaft, has been honored 
as a heroine of the Holocaust. 

Ar Auschwitz, she risked 
her life to save hundreds of 
women from the gas cham- 
bers. And at Bergen-Belsen. 
from December 1 944 until the 
camp's liberation by British 
troops in April 1945, she or- 
ganized efforts to keep 149 
orphaned children alive dur- 
ing epidemics of typhus, 
typhoid fever, diphtheria and 
other diseases that killed tens 
of thousands of inmates. 

Having lost her entire fam- 
ily, my mother had every rea- 
son to give up on the world, but 
she never gave in to despair. 

Yet she and tens of thou- 
sands of other Holocaust sur- 
vivors continue to suffer as a 
result of the physical and psy- 
chological torment they were 
subjected to during World 
War II. The small monthly re- 
parations checks many of 
them receive from Germany 
are inadequate to cover the 
medical costs they face be- 
cause of illnesses they con- 
tracted in the ghettos and 
camps. Thousands of others 
receive no reparations at all. 

My mother had malaria and 
hepatitis at Auschwitz. Be- 
cause these were not treated at 
the time, she now suffers from 
severe cirrhosis of the liver. 
But the German government 
has refused to pay for her 
now-frequent hospitalizations 
without conclusive proof that 
her condition is die direct 
result of her imprisonment 


By Menachem Z. 
Rosensaft 


in the concentration camps. 

My wife and I can see to my 
mother' 5 medical expenses 
that are not covered by Medi- 
care and health insurance. But 
many Holocaust survivors 
cannot afford medical care or 
adequate insurance, and do 
not have children who can 
help them. 

While the German govern- 
ment disingenuously main- 
tains that it has met all its 
obligations to survivors of the 
Holocaust, it is extremely 
generous to veterans of 
Hitler's armed forces — in- 
cluding non-German veterans 
of - the Waffen SS. the elite 
Nazi corps. These former 
Nazi soldiers receive pensions 
from Germany, and those who 
are German citizens also get 
full medical insurance. 

Many Germans, among 
them Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, want to dissociate them- 
selves from their national 
shame. It was not us, they ar- 
gue, but Germans of another 
generation, and anyway we 
have paid more than enough in 
so-called reparations. 

That is not true. My mother, 
who is almost 85 years old. 
has never received a penny 
from Germany for the 
murders of her first husband, 
her 5-year-old son, her par- 
ents, her brother and her sister. 
For her own suffering, she re- 
ceives only a few hundred dol- 
lars a month. 


But the real issue is fun- 
damental decency, rather than 
money. Mr. Kohl and other 
German leaders should imme- 
diately establish a comprehen- 
sive insurance fund to cover 
the medical expenses of all 
Holocaust survivors. 

At a 1981 conference of the 
U.S. Holocaust Memorial 
Council, my mother observed 
that, for most Holocaust sur- 
vivors, "there was no ecstasy, 
no joy” at liberation. 

"We had lost our families, 
our homes. We had no place to 
go. nobody to hug. Nobody 
was waiting for us anywhere. 
We had been liberated from 
death and the fear of death, but 
not from the fear of life.” 

Now, 52 years after the end 
of the Holocaust, the surviv- 
ors deserve not charity but 
dignity and respect. 

That means the "new” 
Germany must settle its re- 
maining accounts with those 
whose lives were ruined by 
the “old" Germany. 

So, too. must those other 
countries and institutions — 
such as Switzerland and its 
banks — that failed European 
Jewry during and after the 
Holocaust 

No survivor should have to 
spend a single additional day 
with “fear of life.” 


the thought of the damage to the 
United States of the destruction 
in office of another presidency. 

After the article appeared, 
the White House said it did not 
know "the full nature and se- 
riousness” of the charges 
against Mr. Hubbell until he 
leaded guilty. Note “full." 
ut did it know that the 
“nature” and “seriousness" 
involved criminality? 

Perhaps others will still be- 
lieve the White House did not 
know. But now that means ac- 
cepting the following: 

1. The Clintons' lawyer and 
Mr. Blair, who has been in- 
volved in their decisions for two 
decades, including Whitewater 
and Mrs. Clinton's commodity 
trading, both found out in the 
spring of 1994 that Mr. Hubbell 
was likely to face criminal 
charges. But neither bothered to 
tell that to the president. 

2. Then both told the Clintons 
that Mr. Hubbell should resign. 
But neither told them exactly 
why. 

3. To hear the president keep 
telling it, “everybody” at the 
White House thought it was all 
just about some billing dispute 


nrm, 


ispi 

with the Arkansas law flu 
nothing “improper.” 

But the Clintons never asked 
their lawyers why. then. Mr. 
Hubbell had to be kicked out 
of the job to which President 
Clinton had appointed him, to 
keep him near. 

4. For three years the Clintons 
have kept saying that nobody 


around the White House knew .. 
the “nature” of the allegations 
against Mr. HubbelL President 1 
Clinton said it qgain on April 3, I 
Nobody knew, ‘‘so no, I ao not _ 
think they did anything improp- - . 
er." “They " would inclutte Mr. _ . 
and Mrs. Clintoh. 

Yet all that tiz le Mr. Kendall 
and Mr. Blair r ever informed 
the president that it was untrue 
that nobody knew, since at least . 
they had been told the charges 
would amount toltheft. 

5. If Mr. Kendall did not in- 
form them of the Seriousness of 
the charges, he must have been ; 
unaware that the omission was a jf. 
violation of trust! and law. as 
their personal lawyer. 

6. The lawyers aid not know 

it was an offense td recommend ‘ 
anybody for a job (without dis- 
closing possible criminal action 
against that individual. 

How many Americans now 
will still believe thalthe Clinton 
lawyers and his closest advisers 
concealed from the president 
and his wife the ihformation 
about the criminal niture of the 
allegations against Mr. Hubbell 
— or that the Cimians never 
asked if crime was ir volved? 

We do not know i the Clin- 
tons or their lawyer: ever ex- 
pected it all to cbme out. 
someday, and that the the pub- 
lic would ask what Webster 
Hubbell might have I nown to 
make Mr. Clinton ndanger 
his presidency. Some Jay was 
May 5, 1997. 

The Nov York Time 






Ay 


- :.J 


i 

: t- 

r- 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS 1 


The writer, a lawyer, is the 
founding chairman of the In- 
ternational Network of Chil- 
dren of Jewish Holocaust Sur- 
vivors. He contributed this 
comment to The New York 
Times. 


1897: Plans for Peace 

LONDON — The Times on the 
war says: “All the six Gov- 
ernments are anxious to see the 
contest terminated. Even the 
Pone is to be willing to forego 
vengeance for peace. But the 
Greeks must show a firm dis- 
position to accept the advice of 
the Powers before the Powers 
can be asked to interpose on 
their behalf. They will have to 
evacuate Crete and in all prob- 
ability to pay a war indemnity. 

1922: Chinese Maids 

PARIS — Many men have en- 
vied King Cophetua because it 
was in his power to choose as 
his bride the most beautiful 
maid in his realm; but the titular 
boy-Emperor of China might 
be accounted more fortunate. 
China is' reputed to have a 
population of no less than 
400,000,000 souls. Possibly 
the maids eligible for marriage 


number one-fifth as mlny, or, 
80,000.000. The Emperor s se- 
lection appears to be officially 
recorded, and a "secondary 
wife” was picked out fc 
But it is reasonable to si 
that little sixteen-year- 

Uan-Tung would che_ 

dispense with any wife inprder 
to be hist like anv other hiy. 


1947: Hunting 

PARIS — Mr. J. Edgar Hcbver 
told the House Appro priaions 
Committee that there are tiore 
Communists per capita ini the 
United States today than tlere 
were in Russia in 1917. Inpie 
result he got every cent ofjhis 
requested appropriation forme 
police activities of the FBI. Jut 
the committee gave nothing tor , 
the Slate Department’s cultural? 
and information program re- 
signed to meet the Communist 
challenge on the plane bf 
ideas, purposes and facts ratter 


than on that of police work. 



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OPINION/LETTERS 


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Money Doesn’t Matter, 
But Character Does 

By Robert J. Samuelson 


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klTASHINGTON-EverNone 
* flV involved in ''welfare re- 
[Vonrt could useful!* read "Whai 
[Money Can’t Buy." a study bv a 
sociologist. Susan Mover of ihe 
University of Chicago.* 

Its message is somber; As a 
^oeiery. America is fairiv helpless 
to correct the worst problems of 
child poverty. This is not a new 
insight, but b\ contlrmine it. Ms. 
Majrer discredits much ofthe 'wel- 
fare -debate's rhetoric. 

"Welfare reform" mav raise or 
lower poverty a bit (nobodv can 
say which yet), but neither its sup- 
posed virtues nor its allesed vices 
are powerful enough tcTalter the 
status quo much. 

Ms. Mayer, a self-described 
"hard nosed” liberal, asks a basic 
question: How imponant is 
money in enabling families to 
help their children escape 
poverty? 

Ms. Mayer reviewed studies 
and; tried to match parents' in- 
comes with children’s outcomes. 
Good outcomes were high test 
si^jHes. having a job tor being in 
$ci»)oll at the age of 24 and earn- 
ing high wages? 

Bad outcomes included drop- 
ping-out of high school and be- 
coming an umvec mother. Not 
surprisingly, children of middle- 
daw parents do better than chil- 
dren of poorer parents. But Ms. 
Mayer also tried to distinguish 
between the effect o; income and 
other influences. Otce she did. 
income's impact dropped sharp- 

"The parental characteristics 
thaf employers value aijd are will- 
ing to pay for. such ai' skills, di- 
ligence. honesty, good health and 
reliability, also imjrove chil- 
dren's life chances.” she writes. 
“Cfuldren of parents with these 
attributes do well even if their 
parents do not have much in- 
come.” 

Ms. Mayer notes thtl this con- 
tradicts die common Iberal claim 
thaTaJl “the poor as just like 
everyone else except that they 


fWe less money.' 

'♦Hut the study also shakes the 
reassuring conservative assump- 
tion that if pushed, tie poor can 
become setf-sufficiat through 
wofk- Precisely because many 
long-term welfare " recipients 
areri't as competent or disciplined 
as middle-class parerts, they may 
not jfmd and keep jeos, let alone 


•a 

3a 


well-paying ones. The thrust of 
Ms. Mayer's grim analysis is in 
support the existence of a per- 
manent "culture of poverty." an 
argument first advanced in the 
modem American context by the 
political scientist Edward Ban- 
field in 1970. 

Mr. Banfield split tlie poor into 
two groups. Some simply lacked 
money. These included many dis- 
abled and unemployed people, 
and single mothers who had been 
widowed, divorced or abandoned. 
These people had middle-class 
values and could moke their way 
back to self-sufficiency with the 
help of government aid. Then 
there was the true "lower class.” 
who would “live in squalor” 
even if their incomes were 
doubled. Mr. Banfield wrore. be- 
cause they had an outlook that 
“attached’ no value to tvork. sac- 
rifice. self-improvement, or ser- 
vice to family, friends or com- 
munity.” 

The* Banfield theory ignited 
outrage, because it meant that the 
effort to eradicate poverty would 
fail. But it has stood the test of 
Lime and taps into popular am- 
bivalence about social welfare. 

Indeed, the present “welfare 
reform" fits into a 200-year-old 
tradition of trying to improve the 
moral character of the poor. It is 
not as harsh as critics charge. For 
example, it does not impose an 
absolute five-year lifetime wel- 
fare limit ta fifth of a state’s case- 
load can exceed five years). It 
correctly presumes that what 
people do for themselves matters 
more than what government does 
for them. By allowing states to 
experiment, America may discov- 
er which policies succeed. 

But reform could easily fail. 
The real test is not reduced wel- 
fare caseloads. These have 
already dropped 21 percent since 
early 1994, mainly as die result of 
a strong economy. The real tests 
are fewer pregnancies among 
teenagers, more stable marriages 
and better homes for children. It’s 
a tall order for government to re- 
engineer family life and human 
nature. 

Ms. Mayer herself has no pat 
solutions. After finishing her 
study, she said, she felt depressed 
by the realization that ending 
poverty "may be beyond die ca- 
pacity of even a rich nation-" 

The Washington Past. 



Deep Blue Can Win , 
But Can It Think? 


By John Horgan 


N EW YORK — Even before 
the world chess champion 
Garry Kasparov faced the com- 
puter Deep Blue on Saturday, 
pundits were calling die rematch 
another miiesrone in the inexor- 
able advance of artificial intel- 
ligence. the effort to create ma- 
chines that mimic human 
thought. 

Computers will soon hecome 
"smarter than us." the supercom- 

MEANVHILE 

purer designer Danny Hillis wrote 
m a Newsweek essay. 

Actually, whatever its out- 
come. the contest only under- 
scores what a flop artificial in- 
telligence has been, especially 
considering its founders’ goals. * 
The naivete of Marvin Minsky 
of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and other pioneers in 
the field is legendary. In 1 966. Mr. 
Minsky gave an undergraduate. 
Gerald Sussman. the task of build- 
ing an object-recognition device 
out of a computer and a televi- 
sion. 

Object recognition is what you 
do when you 're having lunch with 
a prospective employer and you 
suddenly realize that the person at 
the next' table with his back to you 
is your current employer. Bald 
spot, blazer, jowls ... yup. it's 
him. 

Mr. Sussman did not fulfill his 
assignment, although he eventu- 
ally became a prominent research- 
er. 

Since then, computers have be- 
come unimaginably fast. But their 
ability to recognize a face or con- 
duct a conversation, activities that 
humans perform almost, well, 
thoughtlessly, remains primitive. 

Computers can do very well in 
situations with simple, clear-cut 
data, rules and goals. They do 
very poorly in situations with 
complicated or ambiguous data, 
rules and goals — that is. in real 
life. 

Chess is tailor-made for com- 
puters. and Deep Blue is prodi- 
giously powerful, capable of ex- 
amining hundreds of millions of 
positions a second. If this silicon 
monster must strain so mightily to 
beat a mere human, what hope is 
there that computers will ever, 
say, replace diplomats in nego- 
tiating weapons treaties? 

Sure, some programs can 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Ending the Standoff -‘ 

Regarding "Sudden End in Test 
of Wills in Peru" t April 2*IJ; 

While everybody seems to be 
basking in the euphoria of the 
"successful" raid that ended the 
hostage situation in Lima, it 
should be noted that 17 people, 
including 14 ofthe hostage takers, 
lost their lives. These were human 
beings and their deaths should not 
be gloated over. 

I am not saying Lhat hostage 
taking is not a violation of law, but 
the penalty should not be death. 
The hostage rakers should have 
been captured alive and tried in 
court This would have been a 
more successful outcome of the 
siege, deserving of tributes in 
Peru and the world over. Instead, 
the Peruvian government engaged 
in a cowardly action that con- 
tinues the cycle of violence. 

THOMAS OLUFUNSO. 

■Rome. 

Referring to the Tupac Amaru 
hostage takers as "terrorists” is 
wrong. Terrorists do not negotiate 


from the beginning, release most 
of their hostages, allow in food 
and first aid. or welcome reporters 
who want to visit. 

President Alberto Fujimori's 
actions were quick and clean — 
except that he killed ail the rebels 
without any chance to surrender. 
phiup f. McCracken 3d. 

Wheaton. Maryland. 

What is all this post-raid sniv- 
eling about rebels who wanted to 
surrender? They should have 
thought of that well before defeat 
was right in their faces. The mil- 
itary raiders had to. as the saying 
goes, shoot first and ask questions 
later, or risk being killed them- 
selves. 

ANTHONY TELL1ER. 

Berlin. 

An Unhappy Merger 

Regarding "A Case of Corpo- 
rate Culture Shock in the Global 
Arena ” ( April 2SU 

Any identity consultant could 
have predicted the cultural prob- 
lems that beset Pharmacia & Up- 


john from the inauspicious start, 
when the Swedish and American 
companies involved could not 
settle on a single name. 

By contrast, when the finan- 
cially stronger Chemical Bank ab- 
sorbed Chase Manhattan, it rec- 
ognized that the smaller 
organization had the bener brand 
name and so “Chase” became the 
new bank's identity. 

HENRY STEINER. 

Hong Kong. 

Gassical Music Hype 

The show business atmosphere 
of today’s classical music scene 
was described perfectly in “Clas- 
sic Hype: Celebrity Circuit 
Sweeps Up the Star of 'Shine' ” 
(April 30). 

If the big record companies and 
concert agents were to donate 1 
percent of their earnings to music 
education, they would have a 
large, discerning audience willing 
to pay for quality instead of gim- 
micks. 

HARRY-KJNROSS WHITE. 

Lorrach, Germany. 


“hear” a limited number pf 
words. Banks use neural networks 
to weigh the merits of loan ap- 
plications. The U.S. immigration 
service plans to test face-recog- 
nition software at borders. 

But these achievements are 
paltry compared with the dreams 
of artificial-intelligence enthusi- 
asts. 

As recently as 1993. Hans 
Moravec, a roboticist at Carnegie 
Mellon University in Pittsburgh, 
assured me that by the middle of 
the next century robots would be 
intelligent enough to usurp the 
roles of doctors and chief exec- 
utives. Mr. Minsky fantasizes 
about convening human person- 
alities into strings of ones and 
zeros and “downloading” them 
onto machines. 

More sober sorts roll their 
eyes. 

“.Anyone who expects any hu- 
man-like intelligence from a com- 
puter in the next 50 years is 
doomed to disappointment.” 
Philip .Anderson, the physicist and 
Nobel laureate, wrote in the jour- 
nal Science two years ago. 

For the foreseeable furore — 
and perhaps forever — HAL, the 
murderous machine in “2001: A 
Space Odyssey'' (1968). and 

Computers are still 
not all that smart . 

Data, the charming cyborg from 
“ Star Trek; The Next Genera- 
tion.” will remain creatures of 
science fiction. 

One day. if not this month, a 
computer will surely be world 
chess champion, proving that the 
game, like loan analysis, is re- 
ducible to number-crunching. But 
the most essential aspects of hu- 
man thought will continue to 
elude scientists. 

As the linguist Noam Chomsky 
has said, we will probably always 
Jeara more about ourselves from 
novels than we will from sci- 
ence. 

The question is. should that 
shortcoming be cause for con- 
sternation or celebration? 

The author, a senior writer at 
Scientific American and the au- 
thor of "The End of Science 
contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


BOOKS 


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ANDRft^tAtR/fe: 

A Biography 
By Curtis Cate. 45 J pges. 

$ 29.95 . Fromm. 

Reviewed by Deidre 
Bair ■'< 

A ndre maliaux is 

curiously abftnt from 
this' book that purprts to be 
the -story of his tfe. Curtis 
Cai£. an Americarexpatriate 
who has lived in prance for 
marly years, has witten a bi- 
ography that dweis more on 
that country's ferary and 
political history than on 
Malraux, whom te presents 
as ? offhandedly , happemng 
qrto the scene c the public 
(Qlma that unflds around 
him. 

From the Sparsh Civil War 
to World War l Cate gives 
detailed hisroric of exterior 
events, slantedjtowever. by 
sometimes quity and ques- 
tionable source . After basing 
one such acount on a 
Malraux collegue. he later 
describes th man as 
“something oh braggart^and 
even capable >f fiction.” ft 

hardly inspire^ onfidence. 

Cate is deejy enamored of 
his adopted hmeland, and he 


eannofc .-resist -parading Es 
knowledge; He- is incapable 
of naming an obscure French 
village or a tiny street in Paris 
without enveloping it in ad- 
verbs and adjectives. The 
same is true for the passing 
parade of writers, artists and 
politicians whose mini-bio- 
graphies pad his tale, even 
though most, like "the tur- 
bulent artistic trio ... of Su- 
zanne Valadon, her painter- 
husband Andre Utter and her 
bibulous painter-son, Mau- 
rice Utrillo,” merely hap- 
pened to live years before in a 
house now and then visited 
by the young Malraux. 

But what of Andre 
Malraux, as he wanders 
through this panorama of pub- 
lic history? In a large com- 
pendium of pages, what 
passes for his life fills very 
few. It may be partly because 
Malraux himself was adept at 
disguising (if nor outright ly- 
ing about) so many facets of 
his life that documentation is 
scant for much of it. Cate does 
try to distinguish fact from 
Malraux 's self-created fiction, 
but mostly he is content to 
repeat the little that is known. 

Malraux ’s parents' mar- 
riage was brief. When it 


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fetled be. lived witWas raoth- 
'er, grandmother and aunt In 
an apartment in a poor Paris 
suburb. He left secondary 
school before taking his bac- 
calaureate. supporting him- 
self by his talent for selling 
rare books picked up cheaply 
in the stalls along the quais 
and then as a successful pub- 
lisher of pornography — all 
before he was 20, when he 
married Clara Goldschmidt 

She was 23, the intellectual 
daughter of a wealthy Ger- 
man-Jewish business family 
settled in Paris. She put her 
fortune at her husband’s dis- 
posal and he quickly dissip- 
ated it in bad investments and 
flamboyant schemes ro steal 
statuary from the Khmer 
temples along the “Royal 
Way” in Cambodia. If there 
is life anywhere in Cate’s bi- 
ography, it is in' the early years 
of Andre and Gam’s mar- 
riage. when they did indeed 
travel to the Far Hast to steal 
temple art, after which he was 
jailed and she indulged in 
semi-suicides and hunger 
strikes to gain his freedom. 

Malraux began his polit- 
ical life in the 1920s as a 
Communist and ended it as 
an apologist for Charles de 
Gaulle, whose minister of 
culture he was in the turbu- 
lent decade 1959-69. In the 
1930s, Malraux cut a dashing 
figure, rushing from Moscow 
to Madrid in the Spanish 
Civil War. getting himself 
command of an air squadron 
even though he could not 
drive a car. much less pilot a 
plane. 

For the first three years of 
World War IL Malraux told 
all who asked him to join in 
organized resistance that he 
would “not play at being boy 
scouts” and would ~ l do noth- 
ing." But in 1943, when the 
Allies were clearly winning, 
he christened himself “Col- 


oqpl Berger.” donned a 
series of dapper uniforms, 
and became, in Cate's inter- 
pretarion.of the history of the 
Resistance in southwest 
France, a central figure. 

Cate provides further bio- 
graphical snippets and de- 
tailed exploits of many brave 
men, and, oh yes, Malraux 
does seem to have been there, 
too. But what he thought or 
felt or in some instances ac- 
tually did is seldom revealed 
— probably because, as Cate 
tells us of Malraux 's later 
years as a Gaullist function- 
ary. “in all these doings we 
know next to nothing." A 
few pages later, the perplexed 
biographer asks, more to 
himself than his readers, 
“But what, in the midst of 
these upheavals. was 
Malraux doing?” What in- 
deed? Cate’s frustrating an- ( 
swer is “curiously enough, 
not much.” 

C ATE tries to give the ob- 
ligatory literary criticism •. 
of Malraux ’s writing, but it . 
amounts to little more than a 1 
few garbled quotations from 
some passable critics and ! 
blurbs from various reviews. 
Frequently, he refers ro "sev- 
eral” or “other" biograph- 
ers. as if to justify his own 
hesitant views. 

Only last year, French 
President Jacques Chirac en- 
shrined Andre Malraux 
among other great writers, 
such as Voltaire and Rous- 
seau, in the Pantheon. If we 
had only Cate's biography as 
evidence of Malraux 's a- 
chievemenis, we would cer- 
tainly have to ask "why?" 

Deirdre Bair, who has 
written biographies of 
Samuel Beckett, Simone de 
Beauvoir and Anais A iin. 
wrote this for The Washing- 
ton Post. 



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BRIDE: Woman Challenges Tribal Custom in Papua New Guinea 


Continued from Page 1 


' v-< ■ 


’ ■ 


Stlti '•ljiiaiv/Thc New Vurl Tones 

Miriam WilngaJ with John Muke: 
“I don't want to depend on a man/* 


“This is a landmark case in recog- 
nition of women’s rights to equality and 
freedom/’ Miss Balen said. “Women 
are not animals/’ 

The customary law of the tribes co- 
exists in Papua New Guinea with the 
legal system, she said, but can be chal- 
lenged if it is in violation of the nation's 
democratic constitution. 

A National Court judge in the city of 
Mount Hagen, 40 miles from Minj, re- 
cently ruled in favor of Miss Wilngal, 
saying her rights to personal freedom 
and equal status had been violated. 

But the elders of the aggrieved 
Konumbuka subclan of the Tangilka 
tribe have only become angrier. 

“They say, 4 We still want a wom- 
an,” 1 said John Muke, a professor of 
archeology at the University of Papua 
New Guinea, who is a Kumu Kanem 
clansman of Miss Wilngal's and at 
whose home she is now staying. “They 
warn to take my clan to court forcheating 
them, for denying them their rights.” 


In effect, they are threatening to use 
the modem legal system to demand their 
traditional tribal rights. 

The continuing court battle demon- 
strates the resiliency of tribal customs, 
he said, which absorb and adapt the new 
ways that have intruded on them. 

Viewed within the belief system of the 
country’s highland culture, he said, the 
demand by the Konumbuka clan for 
Miss Wilngal appears less shocking. 

“Yes. a woman is treated as a com- 
modity, but in a spiritual sense it is much 
more than that,'' Mr. Muke said. “A 
woman is an object, but she is a divine 
object" 

In Papua New Guinea's highlands, as 
in much of Melanesia, he said, women 
are at the heart of a complex system of 
relationships that is based on what he 
called a “botanical concept of growth." 

In his tribe's language, the mother is 
known here as the “base” of the family 
tree. Her children are her cuttings or 
transplants. Her brothers — their uncles 
— are called root people. The father, he 
said, has no blood tie to the family and is 


FRANCE: Along Loire, They Ask, ‘ What’s This Vote All About?’ 


Continued from Page 1 


capitalism over the right to make a de- 
cent living. 

Thai leaves Mr. Lang, who served as 
minister of culture and education when 
the late Francois Mitterrand was pres- 
ident, in a quandary about how to kick 
off his own campaign for a seat in the 
French National Assembly. 

“People don’t understand why 
France had to have an election now,” 
said Mr. Lang, who is unhappy with Mr. 
Chirac's decision to call one nearly a 


year early. “With all the holidays this 
month, and the good weather, people 
may not come out in large numbers, 
either, and that's bad for us." 

In 1995. Mr. Lang bucked a con- 
servative tidal wave and won a par- 
liamentary seat here, but his victory was 
invalidated because he had exceeded 
campaign spending limits. 

“I’m not campaigning, really.” he 
insisted Saturday, making a couple of 
rounds through die Blois fanners’ mar- 
ket to buy strawberries and greet people 
who know him well from the eight years 


Strike Puts a Gag on French Diplomacy 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — French diplomacy was 
tongue-tied Tuesday with its en- 
coders, responsible for sending sen- 
sitive information between embassies 
and government ministries, on strike. 

“Communication has been slowed 
down." said Jacques Rummelhardt. 
the Foreign Affairs spokesman. But he 
added that there was “no threat to 


communications security." 

The encoders, who went on strike 
Monday for three days, are protesting 
the changing status of their work 


brought about by the increasing use of 
sophisticated electronic communica- 
tions. 

“The work used to be as you ima- 
gine it to be in a John Le Carre novel/' 
Mr. Rummelhardt said. “These days, 
there are computers and the Internet/’ 

There are 270 encoders involved in 
the strike in France and in French 
embassies around the world. 

The strike was blocking telegrams 
between Paris and its embassies, ac- 
cording to a group of strikers outside 
the Foreign Ministry. 


BRITAIN: Central Bank Free to Set Rate 


Continued from Page 1 


ted for three-year terms by the 
government. None of the members, Mr. 
Brown emphasized, will be politicians. 

He blamed politicians for too often 
setting policy to suit electoral needs, 
with the result being that the British 
economy has long been plagued by dam- 
aging cycles. While several formal chan- 
cellors have come to endorse indepen- 
dence for the central bank, in office none 
could surrender the government’s cru- 
cial power over what in effect is the 
economic accelerator. 

"I don’t think that anyone will be in 
any doubt after today that we are pre- 
pared to take the tough decisions," Mr. 
Brown said. 

Some analysts said there also was a 
tactical benefit for the new government 
in empowering the Bank of England. 

*'Yes, Mr. Brown has given away 
some of his power,” said John O’Sul- 
livan of NatWest Markets, “but he has 
also devolved a lot of the hassle. The 
next time the bank says rates must go up, 
the chancellor will be able to hold up his 


Fighting Continues in Burundi 


Renters 

BUJUMBURA. Burundi — Burundi 
state radio said Tuesday the army killed 
more than 1 00 rebels in fighting Monday 
in the south of the country. 

An army spokesman said earlier that at 
least 26 people had been killed in fight- 
ing in the area, the Rutovu district, about 
75 kilometers south of the capital. 


hands and say, 'Don't blame me/ ” 

But although Mr. Brown said his 
policies were designed for the long-term 
good, his double-barreled crackdown on 
inflation produced some immediate ef- 
fect Tuesday. 

The London stock market soared, 
with the FT-SE 100 index finishing up 
63.7 points at a record 4,51 9.3. The bona 
market also gained, with the yield on the 
benchmark 10-year government bond 
finishing at 7.10 percent, down from 
739 percent Monday. 

“Gordon Brown has gained more 
credibility in one day than many chan- 
cellors earn in years,” Mr. Richardson 
said. 

In the bond markets analysts bet that 
under the Bank of England, monetary 
policy would be tighter than ever. At 
Kleinworr Benson Securities, econo- 
mists increased to 7 percent from 6.75 
percent their forecast for the base in- 
terest rate at the end of the year. 

In welcoming the bank's new powers, 
the Confederation of British Industry 
predicted that the move “will enhance 
the credibility of the U.K.’s monetary 
policy/’ 

More important, the lobbying group 
for the country's largest companies said, 
the change will lower interest rates on 
long-term loans for business as investors 
gain faith that inflation in Britain will 
remain under tight control. 

Some economists predicted a lasting 
decline of half a percentage point simply 
on the supposition that the so-called risk 
premium in long term interest rates will 
now follow political influence over 
monetary policy into oblivion. 


he has been mayor. On Sunday night, 
interviewed on national television, Mr. 
Lang played on Mr. Juppe's low ratings 
in public-opinion polls, which show 
fewer than 30 percent of the electorate is 
happy with him. 

“The question really is: Do you want 
Alain Juppe to be replaced by Alain 
Juppe?” Mr. Lang asked. 

The euro is not the issue, said Michel 
Oberle, a Blois oil dealer present at an 
event that Mr. Lang attended on the 
outskirts of Blois later Saturday morn- 
ing. “All people ever want is a little 
dough in their pockets, and jobs,” Mr. i 
Oberle said. 

Were people willing to sacrifice for a 
new kind of dough? he was asked. Mr. 
Oberle shrugged, saying, “People aren't 
really aware of the connection." 

Mr. Oberle also said he did not believe 
that the conservatives were in grave 
danger of losing the election to the left. 

The latest polls give the conservatives 
only a very narrow lead over the So- 
cialists and Communists, though the 
conservatives had 465 of the 577 seats in 
Parliament just dissolved. Voters go to 
the polls May 25. with a runoff vote June 
1 in districts where no one gets more 
than 50 percent of the vote. 

In Blois, Marie-Jose HaugueL pres- 
ident of the Heart of Blois Business 
Association, explained the city's euro 
promotion. 

“The idea was that Jan. 1, 1999, was 
really just around the comer," she said. 
“So this week we'll have price tickets in 
both francs and euros, and distribute 
booklets explaining how the two are 
linked." 

Though there is no euro today, there is 
a European currency unit, the Ecu, now 
worth 6.58 francs or $ 1 .20. So in her Pas 
a Pas children's shoe store, she will have 
blue tickets with the 15-star European 
Union symbol telling you that a pair of 
baby shoes that cost 145 francs today 
would cost about 22.30 euros, if the euro 
were worth the same as the Ecu. 

Did she see a link between the euros 
and the election campaign Mr. Lang 
hopes to win? “I'll answer like the Nor- 
mandy native I am. by saying neither yes 
or no," Mrs. Hauguel said. "We’re just 
Hying to help our city get ready.” 

She hoped she could look forward to 
fewer fluctuations in prices from her 
Italian and British suppliers if both Italy 
and Britain used the euro. “A strong 
Europe will help us all,” she said. '‘But 
the euro is only one of the subjects in the 
French election — not the main one.” 


Chirac’s Popularity Tumbles 


An opinion survey made public Tues- 
day revealed that 65 percent of die 
French people are dissatisfied with Pres- 
ident Chirac, the highest level of un- 
popularity registered by a head of state in 
the last two decades, Agence France- 
Presse reported from Paris. 

The survey showed Mr. Chirac, who 
has been in office two years, sliding 
further down the political popularity 
charts than either of his two prede- 
cessors. Mr. Mitterrand, in office for 14 
years, and Valery Giscard d'Estaing. 
who served a seven-year term. 


ABORTION: Women Bend Europe’s Laws by Crossing Borders 


Continued from Page J 


on income. The secretary paid about 
S430. 

The more than 15.000 European 
women who cross borders for abortions 
each year present a curious policy di- 
lemma. abortion -rights advocates say. 
On the one hand, women who want 
abortions are not held hostage by strict 
laws, as in Ireland and France. They 
have more choice. 

On the other hand, advocates say, 
women must pay more money and, if 
they are going to a country with a dif- 
ferent language, potentially experience 
more difficulties if they cannot have the 
procedure done at home. And politicians 
in those countries can escape pressure to 


revise their laws, given a safety valve 
across the border. 

Tony O'Brien, chief executive of the 
Irish Family Planning Association, said: 
“People say there is no abortion in Ire- 
land. We say. ‘Yes there is, we just 
export it.’ ” 

Leaders of the fragmented anti-abor- 
tion movement in France, where 
250,000 legal abortions are performed 
annually, say they are aware that women 
obtain elsewhere what is illegal in 
France, but that there is little hope a way 
can be found to keep home the 5,000 or 
so Frenchwomen who receive abortions 
elsewhere each year. 

“You cannot keep someone from go- 
ing abroad, and you certainly can’t tell 
whether someone crossing a border is 


Prodi Wins Confidence Vote on Budget 


ROME — The government com- 
fortably won a confidence vote in Par- 
liament on Tuesday thaL was called to 
speed the approval of a. supplementary 
hudget it says is vital for Italy to join a 
single European currency. 

The center-left government won the 
vote in the Chamfer of Deputies by a 
vote of 318 to 2ftfi. parliamentary of- 
ficials said. The victory, which had 
been expected, .sweeps aside hundreds 
of opposition amendments to the 
budget package, which will now go to 
the Senate for a vote. . 

The supplementary budget is in- 


tended to trim the 1997 deficit by 15 A 
trillion lire ($9 billion) to bolster 
Italy's bid to join economic and mon- 
etary union in January 1999. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi has 
repeatedly said he would resign if Italy 
failed to join the single currency. 

The supplementary budget, has 
been criticized by the opposition and 
even centrists in his governing co- 
alition for seeking to have companies 
pay taxes on severance payment funds 
before they were due. Because of the 
outcry, the government cut lo 5 trillion 
lire, from ft trillion lire, the amount it 
expected lo raise this way. 


pregnant." said Bernard D'Hartoy. del- 
egate general of Let Them Live, the 
oldest French anti -abortion group. 

The French government is perplexed. 
“If we pushed the deadline back a month, 
we'd have the same situation,” said Jean- 
Francois Girard, a director general in the 
Health Ministry. “The answer is more 
information, more education, to let wom- 
en make their decision early enough.” 

Abortion laws in Europe vary from 
Ireland's total prohibition to France's 
1 0-week limit (with exceptions for med- 
ical reasons) to Spain's 22 weeks and to 
24 weeks in Britain and the Nether- 
lands. 

But it is not just laws that affect wom- 
en's choices. In France, making an ap- 
pointment for a pregnancy examination 
can take several weeks. By that time, the 
1 0-week deadline has often passed. 
Some physicians also try to dissuade 
women from having abortions, delay 
scheduling them until after the deadline 
or simply refuse to perform the pro- 
cedure — a stance permitted under 
French law. 

In Germany, where the laws are com- 
plex, ambiguous and can require nu- 
merous tests and consultations, women 
often prefer to go to the Netherlands. 
Nearly 3.000 did so in 1995. 

Either for marketing reasons or out of 
necessity, clinics catering to foreign pa- 
tients have made a special effort to wel- 
come them. 

Dr. Morin's clinic has two employees 
whose job is to handle French patients, 
“I'm sure there is no private clinic in all 
of Europe that can give this kind of 
attention.” he said. 


known by a term that literally means ■ ’the 
place where 1 stay most of die time.” 

When a girl is given in marriage her 
husband's family receives the bounty of 
a "cutting” from the maternal base and 
acquires an obligation to her brothers. 
The labor of a wife and mother is given a 
material value. It must be repaid. 

When a generation has passed, ac- 
cording to tnbal custom, one or more of 
her granddaughters are expected to be 
returned to her family, in a tradition that 
is known as “returning the skull in a net 
bag" or sometimes simply “head pay.” 

Rather than merely betns* die boner of 
young women. Mr. Muke said, it is a social 
custom that is not so different from the 
marriage system of European royalty. 

“I would do the same,” said Mr. 
Muke. “I have maternal uncles. I have a 
daughter. I must repay the debt of all the 
work my mother did. One way is to make 
the payment in a lump sum and give my 
daughter back in mamage." 


. . 0 250 

^ ; Kundiawa psr 


j Arafura Carts! Sat"** 
j *** l AUSTRAUA 


Car Bomb in Algiers ! 
Kills Four Youths j 


j 1 

' *■ 





The Assotiawd Press j 

ALGIERS — A powerful car bombj 
exploded Tuesday near two schools in an 
Algiers neighborhood, killing four! 
people — all children or adolescents — I 
and wounding 25, officials said. 

TVo mr u/as packed with etnliKiifi 






AUSTRALIA j 

The Sirs* Veil Time, 


In a complicated application of this 
adition. it is Miss Wilngal's uncles in 


tradition, it is Miss Wilngal's uncles in 
the aggrieved clan who are demanding 


her as "bead pay.” Seen in this way. her 
refusal is a fundamental challenge to the 
social order of her tribe. ' ‘There must be 
a continuity, and this continuity _ is 
through the woman, the source of divine 
relationships.” Mr. Muke said. "Miri- 
am’s case strikes at the root of things: it 
is kinship on trial.” 


The car was packed with explosis^ 
and pieces of metal, security forces said. 
The explosion just before noon in the 
Bab el Oued neighborhood blew out 
windows in buildings up to 300 meters 
(1,000 feet) away. 

Doctors at Maillot Hospital, where 
most of the victims were taken, said that 
a 12-year-old died in the blast, along 
with three adolescents aged 15 to 18. 

The car bomb exploited near both a 
primary school and a high school in Bab 
el Oued, a working-class neighborhood 
not far from the Casbah. considered a 
stronghold for Muslim fundamentalists. 

There was no immediate claim of re- 
sponsibility for the bombing, though sus- 
picion fell on Muslim militants waging 
an insurgency for the past five years. 


. :..fL 











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INTERNATIONAL 


°H3,. 



V.;.. 


Zedillo and Clinton Agree on Drugs and Migrants 


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MEXICOCIT\ - - In j show ofsoli- 
uamy on ihe nmsi divisive issues he- 
eween l he two countries. President Bill 
Clinton and Ernesto Zed j] Jo pledyed 
Tuesday to crack down on drau traf- 
fickers and cooperate on inunii>ialion. 
... Overlooking the lawn of ihe Cantno 
Mane parade ground. Mr. Clinton said 
that Mexico and the United States must 
conquer our common enemies ciJdrws 
and crimes.' 1 = 

The joint declarations were an- 
nounced after a 2 1 -gun niiliurv salute 
officially welcomed President 'Clinton 
for two days of talks and tourism. Pres- 
ident Zedillo called Mr. Clinton "a good 
friend to Mexico — a friend who re- 
spects Mexico as a sovereign nation. *’ 
The remarks played to the widespread 
belief here that U.S. aciions on trade and 
drug trafficking undermine Mexico’s 
national integrity. In a nod to that sense 
of nationalism. Mr. Clinton areued that 
the United States and Mexico are equal 


partners, even on the must contentious 
topics. 

“Lei us reach across our common 
frontier to embrace our tomorrows to- 
gether — to enter the 2 hi ccmurv us 
valued partners and misled friends." 
Mr. Clinton said. 

A summary of the joint declaration on 
lighting drug trafficking gives the Ze- 
dillo and Clinton cabinets until Ihe end 
of the year to complete a common 
strategy on 16 specific objectives — 
ranging from a crackdown on money 
laundering to negotiations of an extra- 
dition agreement and further cooper- 
ation on efforts to stem die fimv of illegal 
firearms across the harder. 

The immigration agreement, de- 
signed to belter manage the 2.00U-nii/c 
border, colls for new checkpoints and 
bridges and for a redoubled effort “to 
work together on migrant trafficking, 
protecting the rights of migrants and 
removing criminal aliens.'* 

Those words were carefully selected 


to address both Mexican concerns that 
immigrants* rights are violated in the 
United Slates and Mr. Clinton’s desire to 
hold the line on unfettered immigra- 
tion. 

At the welcoming ceremony . Mr. Ze- 
dillo and Mr. Climon were joined on 
stage by their wives. Nilda Patricia 
Velasco and Hillary Rodham Clinton. 
They stood as both countries’ national 
anthems were played and watched as 
cavalry' and military academy cadets 
paraded by, trailed by horse-drawn can- 
nons. 

Despite the presidents' progress, anti- 
American sentiment was obvious. Mr. 
Clinton's visit was the target of at least 
two demonstrations Monday. “Clinton 
Go Hontef” read one sign. 

“We view him as a symbol of im- 
perialism.*' said a protester. Carlos Mar- 
tinez. 

Mr. Clinton, the first U.S. president to 
visit Mexico City since Jimmy Carter in 
1 ^79. arrived Monday night for a tour of 



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an anthropology museum with Mr. Ze- 
dillo. On Tuesday, the leaders were con- 
ducting official talks and holding a news 
conference before a state dinner at the 
National Palace. 

Mr. Clinton's schedule included 
meetings with leaders of the opposition 
to Mr." Zedillo's Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party, which has ran the country 
for decades’ 

Eight members of Clinton's cabinet 
met with their Mexican counterpans 
Monday id work out agreements in ad- 
vance of the visit, including $6 million 
from the U.S. government to help Mex- 
ico train anti-narcotics officers. 

Mexico is the first stop on a weeklong 
trip that also will take Mr. Clinton to 
Costa Rica and Barbados. 


■ A Changed Central America 

Douglas Farah of The Washington 
Post reported from San Salvador: 

The last time a U.S. president visited 
Central America was 1989, when the 
region was engulfed in civil wars and 
George Bush angrily faced off with 
Daniel Ortega, Nicaragua's Marxist 
president, over the threat of communism 
to the hemisphere. 

When President Climon arrives in San 
Jose. Costa Rica, on Wednesday to meet 
the region’s leaders, he will find a Cen- 
tral America at peace for the first time in 
decades, with democratically elected 
governments replacing military dictat- 
orships. He will be meeting with the 
presidents of El Salvador. Costa Rica. 
Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, the 
Dominican Republic and the prime min- 
ister of Belize. 

After his two-day visit to San Jose. 
Mr. Clinton will go to Barbados to meet 
with leaders of the Caribbean, another 
region enjoying an unusual wave of 
democratic governments and economic 



LiAc FranaWpciwr lYmcr- 

President Zedillo welcoming President Clinton to Mexico City. On 
Wednesday, Mr. Clinton is to attend a regional summit in Costa Rica. 


liberalization. The sole exception is 
Cuba, w'hich remains under one-party 
Communist rule. 

With the end of the proxy wars of the 
Cold War era. Central America dropped 
from being one of the most contentious 
U.S. foreign policy issues to one of its 
most forgotten. U.S. aid has been 


slashed across the region. In El Salvador, 
where the United States once gave $1.5 
million a day to fight communism, the 
total aid package is now less than $50 
million a year. 

U.S. aid to the region as a whole has 
fallen from $226 million a year in the 
1980s to $26 million now. 


ZAIRE : A Face-Saving Exit for Mobutu as the Rebels Close In 


Continued from Page 1 


business, as bead of state, rather than 
surrendering to Mr. Kabila or resigning, 
as he has vowed never to do. 

With Marshal Mobutu gone, diplomats 
here say, there would be far less chance 
that the Special Presidential Division, a 
loyalist guard composed of troops drawn 
from his northern Ngbandi tribe and re- 
lated ethnic groups, would mount a last- 
ditch battle to defend the city. 

Tension bas steadily risen in Kinshasa 
in recent days along with expectations of 
an imminent rebel arrival. Kinshasa has 
been heavily looted twice this decade by 
government soldiers, and many in the 
city fear a repeal of the destruction if 
soldiers were to panic. 

Unconfirmed reports by rebel sources 
said that government soldiers pillaged 
Marshal Mobutu’s hometown Gbadol- 
ite, in the far north, on Tuesday. Gbad- 
olite is the site of Marshal Mobutu’s 
principal palace. Mr. Kabila’s forces re- 
cently, took Mr. Mobutu's birthplace 
nearby, Li sal a. and were believed to be 
advancing on Gbadolite. 

According to diplomats and travelers 
arriving in Kinshasa from the south, the 
rebels were already present in limited 
numbers on Kinshasa's southern out- 
skirts, and they were reported to be pre- 
paring a much larger buildup in the city 
of Kikwit, 270 kilometers ( 1/0 miles) to 
the east 

A Western diplomat in Kinshasa said 
he expected that once Marshal Mobutu 
departed, the rebels would make a quick 
thnist to capture the international airport 
25 kilometers east of the capital. Mr. 
Kabila has said it is an objective. 

Control of the airport would allow the 
rebels to begin flying troops to Kinshasa 
in large numbers from bases in the south 
and from neighboring Angola, which 
has become Mr. Kabila’s biggest backer 
in the war’s final weeks. 

In a move that was interpreted by 
many as an effort to calm rumors of the 
rebels' arrival in Kinshasa. Marshal 
Mobutu's military government an- 
nounced Tuesday that it had recaptured 
the city of Kikwit and killed 500 of Mr. 
Kabila's forces in fierce fighting there. 
Government officials also reported fight- 
ing at Kenge. a rebel forward base less 
than 1 60 kilometers east of Kinshasa. 

Diplomats and regional military ana- 
lysts dismissed the report of the capture 
of Kikwit and said the skirmishes at 
Kenge most likely involved Angolan 
forces hired by Marshal Mobutu to slow 
the rebels’ advance on Kinshasa. 

Far from falling back into government 
hands, these analysts said, Kikwit has 
become a major staging area for the 
rebels, who are said to be flying troops to 
the city of 250.000 in large numbers 
from Lubumbashi, in the south, and from 
Angola. 

“What you’ve had in the last couple 
of days is basically every kind of aircraft 
imaginable flying rebel troops into 
Kikwit,” a regional military analyst 
said. “Once Kenge is secured, they'll 


start flying smaller planes in there, and 
from there. Kinshasa is just a short hop 
away.*’ 

To visitors to Marsha) Mobutu's 
palace in Kinshasa, in a normally tran- 
quil military garrison known as Camp 
Tshatshi, the busy movement of soldiers 
suggested that for the president's guard, 
the front line in the six-month-old war 
had reached the camp’s entrance gates. 

Trucks carrying soldiers and rocket 
launchers ferried back and forth in front 
of a huge billboard painted with a por- 
trait of Marshal Mobutu that read, 
“Welcome Back Papa Marshal." After 
a few moments’ efforts to inquire after 
Marsha] Mobutu's family, jittery sol- 
diers chased a journalist away. 

For most residents of the capital 
however. life went on as usual, despite 
reports of the rebels’ continued advance. 
Most of the population of Kinshasa seems 
to await Mr. Kabila's arrival eagerly, see- 


ing him as a liberaior after three decades 
of ruinous rule by Marshal Mobutu. 

“After 32 years under one man we are 
saturated.’' said Jocelyn Kimbombo. 27, 
a seamstress. “We don’t know exactly 
what Kabila will do for us, but we all 
hope that he will think about his country 
more than Mobutu did." 

Mr. Kabila's international reputation 
has continued to deteriorate, even us 
people prepare to celebrate him in Kin- 
shasa. His movement, the Alliance of 
Democratic Forces for the Liberation of 
Congo, was created with the help of 
Rwanda six months ago amid an uprising 
in eastern Zaire by ethnic Tutsi there. 

Throughout the alliance's campaign 
for power in Zaire, relief officials say, it 
has simultaneously waged a merciless 
war against die large population of Hutu 


refugees in Zaire, many of whom par 

of the 


ticipated in a 1 994 Hutu genocide i 
Tutsi minority in Rwanda. 


SWISS : Freeze Urged on Despot’s Assets 


Continued from Page 1 


Mobutu's spoils have been stashed away 
here has left the Swiss squirming — 
particularly because the speculation 
comes while revelations continue to 
emerge about Switzerland's dealings 
with Hitler’s Germany during World 
War II and Swiss banks' slowness to 
return money that the Nazis stole from 
Holocaust victims. 

The Swiss are also in the midst of a 
long economic downturn, and are eager 
to avoid further damage to their coun- 
try’s upright image and to banking, the 
crown jewel of their economy. 

Swiss legislators across die political 
spectrum have called for an inquiry into 
how much Marshal Mobutu may have 
deposited here. The Zairian rebel leader. 
Laurent Kabila, said in an interview with 
a German radio station last month that he 
would demand an accounting from the 
Swiss once he took power. 

“Apart from the moral and legal rea- 
sons for returning the money to Zaire’s 
people, other countries do not under- 
stand this practice of taking such money, 
and it hurts our image abroad and causes 
continued debate about our banking," 
said Christian Grobet, a member of the 
Swiss Parliament. 

Last month, the seven-man Federal 
Council. Switzerland's governing body, 
considered freezing accounts linked to 
Marshal Mobutu but held back. The For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, Livio Zan- 
olari. explained that no official demand 
had been made to block assets or to open 
a criminal investigation of the money 
and that no other nation had done that. 

In an interview with the Swiss national 
radio. Finance Minister Kaspar Villiger 
added that Marshal Mobutu, “in terms of 
international law. is a head of state." 

Of the Mobutu money, Mr. Villiger 
noted that “there might not be so much 
here.” 

No one really knows because rhe 


amount of such accounts or their lo- 
cation in specific Swiss banks need noi 
be disclosed unless the federal govern- 
ment requires it. 

Nevertheless, if the governing council 
acted to freeze the assets, the banks 
would then be legally obliged to report to 
the country's banking commission 
which accounts are in Marshal Mobuiu's 
name, and how much money is in them. 
Swiss banking law has been changed in 
recent years to require that banks know 
who their depositors are, rather than 
allowing them to deposit money in an- 
onymous accounts. 

That does not guarantee full disclos- 
ure. however. Dictators, drug dealers 
and tax evaders can and do use false 
names or send relatives or friends to do 
their banking. That was the case with ! 
Raul Salinas de Gortari. brother of Mex- i 
ico's former president, who used a 1 
phony passport with another name when 
he deposited money in Geneva's Banque 
Pictet & Cie. His wife was later arresied 
trying to close the $84 million account. 

In Marshal Mobutu's case, the Swiss 
Banking Commission took the unusual 
step of reporting last month ihai rhe 12 • 
largest banks have denied holding : 
Mobutu deposits. I 

‘ ‘Either banks have chucked him out. ? 
or he has left himself.’’ said Daniel 
Zuberbuehler, managing director of the 
commission. “There’s no excuse to take 
money from someone who is known to 
be corrupt. And it certainly would not be 
billions in Swiss banks." 

Still, many people remain skeptical 
that Marshal Mobutu has abandoned 
Switzerland. 

“The banks said that about the Mar- 
cos monies, too.’’ said Mascha Madorin. 
an economist for the Action Swiss Fi- 
nancial Center, an organization that 
campaigns for government controls on 
the secret accounts. “And the wartime • 
monies. But then when they looked, they 
found them." 


ALIENS: They May Be Quite Close By 


Continued from Page 1 


elsewhere. In the past, exobiologists al- 
ways focused on surface life, he said. 

“Now we’ve found that life on Earth 
doesn’t need light and can exist under 
extreme conditions we never expected,” 
he added. “Those aren't so different 
from what exists on other planets. So the 
probability that life may have arisen 
somewhere else in this solar system has 
gone up.” 

Bruce Murray, a scientist at the Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology and pres- 
ident of the Planetary Society, a private 
group in Pasadena that backs space ex- 
ploration. said the exobiology fervor 
was being fed by the recent findings 
about Mars. Europa and extrasolar plan- 
ets. "The confluence of new discoveries 
incredible." Mr. Murray said. 
“They’re driving ihe paradigm shift." 
Thomas Kuhn, one of the century’s 


leading historians of science, coined the 
term “paradigm shift” in the 1960s to 
describe how plodding science some- 
times breaks into revolutionary periods 
in which old frameworks are quickly 
tom down and new ones erected. By ail 
accounts, the field of exobiology is now 
in such ferment. 

The tumult is changing not only mind- 
sets but also exploratory plans. The Na- ■ 
[tonal Science Foundation, the govern- 
ment's main source of financing for ba- 
sic science, recently started a program 
called Life in Extreme Environments, 
which aims to study tetrestrial darks, 
hells and ices for clues to the existence of 
otherworldly life. NASA is revamping 
its approach to alien hunts. Biologists 
are being hired to help shape the agenda 
as other agency experts revisit aind revise 
plans for existing probes of Mars. Jupiter 
and Saturn as a first step toward the 
development of new missions. 


Skeleton Identified 
As Martin Bormann 


Agemv Front v-Pmne 

FRANKFURT — Human re- 
mains found in Berlin in 1972 are 
definitely those of Martin Bormann, 
Hitler's secretary and senior ad- 
viser. the prosecutor's office in the 
Hesse region said Tuesday. 

Bormann's children have said 
that they want genetic tests carried 
out on the remains to remove any 
doubt about their identity. 

But a spokeswoman for the pros- 
ecutor's office said the authorities 
were “ i 00 percent" sure the skeleton 
was Bormann's. who disappeared 
after Hitler s suicide in 1945 . 

His family agreed to provide blood 
samples for the genetic tests, but the 
spokeswoman said she could not sav 
when a result would be available ' 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 
PAGE 12 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 




■ ~ ’ '■ At: ’ • Z' 

••• ■" * ’ 



Mozart’s ‘Tito’ N® 
At Paris Opera ^ 

y4 Re-Emergence of 1 791 Work 




A scene from Michael Winterhottom’s “ Welcome to Sarajevo ,” j/iof in London and Sarajevo, with Woody Harrelson playing a TV correspondent. 

Jeanne Moreau and the Pleasure of Movies 


By Joan Dupont 

Inlernuluinal Herald Trthun e 

C ANNES — Poised on a ban- 
quet table among Champagne 
bottles, she sang "Parlez-moi 
d ’amour," a dreamy siren 
presiding over a feast that lasted forever. 
That was Cannes 40 years ago. long 
lunches, short films, scandalous nights. 

"I was just standing there, somebody 
asked me to sing." recalls Jeanne Mor- 
eau, who has grown up with the festival 
and will preside over the 50th an- 
niversary ceremonies. "That was a Bal- 
main I was wearing, but the year of my 
humiliation was the year I wore that 
polka-dot bathing suit. Imagine a pen- 
sionnaire from the Comedie Francaise 
half-nude on the beach!" 

The starlet who started her career at 
Cannes on a song, who escorted Louis 
Malle, Francois Truffaut and Orson 
Welles, won the best-access prize and is a 
former jury president, has become a mis- 
tress of ceremonies for all seasons, served 
up as a supreme French specialty — 
outfitted in Saint Lament. Cfenuri, John 
Galliano — to do what nobody else seems 
to be able to do: turn this ponderous 50th 
anniversary into a graceful event. 

From Wednesday night's opening, 
through this weekend’s anniversary cel- 
ebration to the closing night on May 1 8, 
Moreau will be on stage. In between. 


she will promote a festival that she is 
preparing, a small response to giant 
Cannes: The Equinox Film Festival of 
European independent films, to be set in 
Santa Monica. California. “Yes. 
Cannes has become gigantic." she says, 
"but my pleasure is sell the same, see- 
ing the movies. One day I'll come in- 
cognito, and see them all." 

This year, the selection has been de- 
prived of major directors for ideological 
reasons: The Iranian filmmaker Abbas 
Kiarostami has been forbidden to at- 

50TH CANNES FESTIVAL 

tend, China has withdrawn Zhang 
Yimou’s "Keep Cool" — a comedy 
that can hardly be accused of political 
resonance — and government officials 
confiscated the passport of Zhang Yuan 
(the prize-winning director of “Beijing 
Bastards”), whose "East Palace, West 
Palace," about the underground gay 
community is slated for Un Certain Re- 
gard. The most fervent ideological film 
m competition may turn out to be "A1 
Massir" (Destiny), by Egypt’s good 
genie Youssef Chahine, the man with 
the musical comedy touch, who pits the 
forces of enlightenment against funda- 
mentalist obscurantism. 

The festival opens with Luc Besson’s 
“The Fifth Element," a stylish futurist 
frolic starring Bruce Willis and Gary 


Oldman, shot at Pinewood studios in 
England, costumed by Jean Paul Gault- 
ier. scored by Eric Serna, produced by 
Gaumonu and presented out of com- 
petition. "The Fifth Element" will be 
released in France, the United States and 
Australia this week. Another heavy- 
weight, Matthieu Kassovitz’s “ Assas- 
sin^)," is in the nouveau film noir genre, 
with Michel Serrault playing a hired 
killer. At the other extreme. French 
cinema of the fin de siecle includes Phil- 
ippe Hard’s first-person "La Femme 
Defendue" and Manuel Poirier's road 
movie, "Western," as well as Robert 
Guediguian's "Marius et Jeannette," 
which opens Un Certain Regard. 

Expanding co-production has created 
some intriguing cross-breeds: Besson is 
the producer of Oldman's directing de- 
but, “Nil by Mouth.” portraying a fam- 
ily in the south of London, music by Eric 
Clapton; a French team that includes 
Gerard Depardieu is behind Nick Cas- 
sevettes’s “She’s So Lovely," from a 
script by his late father. John, starring 
his mother Gena Rowlands. Sean Penn 
and John Travolta. And Jeremy Thomas 
of Britain produced Johnny Depp’s de- 
but feature, * ’The Brave.” adapted from 
Gregory McDonald's novel, starring 
Depp and Marlon Brando, music by 
Iggy Popp. 

Literary adaptations abound. Ang 
Lee’s "The Ice Storm.’’ adapted from 



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Rick Moody's novel, is set in Con- 
neticut in the political '70s and features 
Kevin Kline, Joan Allen and Sigourney 
Weaver; Curt Hanson's "I^A. Confid- 
ential," from James Ellroy’s novel, 
lakes place on the seedy side of the 
LAPD in the '50s. Canadian director 
Atom Egoyan's "The Sweet Here- 
after" is adapted from Russell Banks's 
novel: Banks's loners with their family 
secrets seem well suited to Egoyan’s 
eye for uncovering the bizarre in the 
banal. Italy has Marco Bellocchio's "□ 
Principe di Horabourg,” from Heinrich 
von Kleist's play, and Francesco Rosi's 
"LaTregua" (The Truce). from Primo 
Levi’s 1963 memoirs of the ordeal that 
continued after Auschwitz, in which 
John Turturro plays the writer! 

Michael Haneke, who made the om- 
inous “Benny’s Video,” is 1 in com- 
petition with "Funny Games!,’' which 
promises to be even more o min ous. 
Wim Wenders is back with “The End of 
Violence." Another Palme d’Or win- 
ner. Shohei Imamura (“The Ballad of 
Narayama"), presents "Unagj” (The 
Eel), about a man true to his jaft male, a 
pet eel; Idrissa Ouedraogo from Burkina 
Faso is here with “Kini et Adams" 
about buddies looking for a way out of 
the village. Michael Winterbottom shot 
“Welcome to Sarajevo" in London and 
Sarajevo, with Woody Harrelson play- 
ing an American television correspon- 
dent. The only woman in competition is 
a new face: Samantha Lang, an Aus- 
tralian. presenting "The Well." 

Light entertainment is not writ large 
on the program: "Welcome to Woop 
Woop." by Stephan Elliott ("The Ad- 
ventures of Priscilla. Queen of the 
Desert"), about a New York con-man 
trapped in the back lands, may be a 
welcome exception. From Hong Kong 
comes maverick Wong Kar-wai’s 
“Happy Together”: In an opening 
scene that reportedly will rock the 
bunker, Leslie Cheung and Tony Leung 
are the happy couple. 


By David Stevens 

Ini enurioaif Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Mozart's “La Clem- 
enza di Tito" — his last written 
opera and next to last performed 
— was brought, into being in 
baleful conditions and only in the latter 
part of this century has it begun to 
emerge from oblivion. 

It was a last-minute commission from 
Prague for the coronation of Leopold II 
as king of Bohemia. It was taken on by 
Mozart, apparently after Salieri’s re- 
fusal on the ground that he was too busy, 
and composed in what must have been 
chaotic conditions at the end of the 
summer of 1791. interrupting the final 
touches to ‘ ‘The Magic Flute. 

The subject was imposed —Pietro 
Metastasio's almost 60-year-old libretto, 
shortened and modernized. For Mozart it 
was a Late return to opera seria, an 
already old-fashioned form he had not 
touched in 10 years. Yet it contains some 
of his finest, most deeply felt music. It 
must have touched a responsive chord, 
with its Masonic-like ideals of magnan- 
imity and tolerance — which the Em- 
peror Titus of the opera’s title carries to 
such extremes in forgiving his would-be 
assassins. 

The problem for any stage director, 
however, is to introduce some sem- 
blance of activity into what, despite its 
revisions, is a very static business. In the 
new production at the Palais Gamier, 
Willy Decker and his designer, John 
Macfariane, grapple with the problem 
with some, if not' total, success. 

The opera opens with the center of the 
stage occupied by a huge cube of marble 
or granite that progressively crumbles to 


mm 


reveal a huge stone head, seen only from ( 
a rear angle — the official public face of ) 
the emperor, in contrast to the emo- * 
tionally tom human whose clemency 
wins over the harsh judgments that 
political reality would demand. 

A number of props are introduced, 
notably a cardboard crown that gets ' 
quite a bit of symbolic handling in the 
course of the various conspiracies. * 
Much of the action takes place in front [ 
of painted drop curtains with such im- . ' 
ages as outstretched arms reaching fora 
crown or a hand propelling a stiletto 
through a blood-red heart. 

Publio, the emperor's law-enforcing 
factotum, is dressed in black, with a *• 
highly stylized wig, as is the entire 
chorus, the censorious opponents of any •- 
kind of clemency. 

Musically, matters were in the steady 
hands of Annin Jordan, who conducted 
with a nice balance of forward moving 
firmness and voice-friendly relaxation. 

In the title role, the tenor Keith ^wis *• 
brought ample tone and noble bearing to ^ 
Tito's terrible emotional conflicts, aiding r 1 
credibility in some rather incredible situ- •' 
ations. As Vjtellia, the chief villainess. 
Cynthia Lawrence met the extreme dif- .z- 
Acuities of the role head on. although at 
times she seemed at the edge of vocal 
control in reaching for dramatic impact 

Anne Sofie von Otter excelled in the ”- 
originally castrato role of Sesto, tom •- 
improbably between friendship for Tito ' 
and emotional submission to Viteliia's 
ambitions. Christine Schaefer and An- 
gelica Kirchschlager were appealing as 
the Servilia-Annio duo. and David Hit- * 
singer’s rich bass-baritone and impos- v - 
ing presence made Publio a character to ^ 
reckon with. • x 


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MEDIA MARKETS 

Post-Prod u 


MoamA)peni NmJomJ Je Parfa 

Anne Sofie Von Otter, left, and Keith Lewis in “ La Clemenza di Tito. ” 


‘Frankly Scarlett,’ a Fling at Farce 


-r' 


By Sheridan Morley 

Iniemnliunul Herald Tribune 


L ondon — The 

funny thing about 
farces is how very 
unfunny they often 
tend to be. We had in this 
country, following hard upon 
the Parisian lead of Feydeau, 
an honorable tradition that ran 
from Ben Travers and Vernon 
Sylvaine to Ray Cooney, but 
with the darkening of Neil 
Simon and Alan Ayckbourn, 
the line seems to have ended 
somewhere in the 1 960s. 

Since then Lhere has been 
Michael Frayn's wondrously 
inventive backstage "Noise’s 
Off." but elsewhere not a lot. 
Just as "Sleuth" killed off the 


BROADWAY 
A FUNNT THING HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY TO THE FOBUM 

WHOOPI GOLDBERG 
Tue -Sal al 8 p mjTtfafc. Wed & 

Sal 2 f-m. Sunday; al 3 pm 
Call (2121 23MI2M'ieiOO) 432-7250 
Si James Theatre, 2JG W-W S l 

CATS 

Mom and Forever 
Mon -Wed . Fri. & Sal B p m. 

Mats Won. & Sat 2pm. Sun. 3 p.m. 
TrtMtiflrge 212-200 -<5200 
Winter Garden Thooln? 
Broadway & SOtti 51. NYC 

CHICAGO 

The Muscat 

Tue-Snt at B. Uus. Wod & Sal all Sup at 3 
Cal Tcki Cha UK Ijlay (8001 432-7250 
Groups 18001 223-7565 
Shutxn Thrairo (♦( 22S W St 

L£$ MISERABIXS 

10th Anniversary Year 1 
Tichcis From SI 5.00 
Tues-S.il 8 p m 

Mau. Wed & Sat 2 p m Sun 3 pjn 
Tolachai^o 212 23^^200^4 hre 7 days 
Impaiai Thoatro. 249 W 45 SI 

MISS SAIGON 

6th Sensalroiu! Year' 

Ticktls From SI 5 On 
Tuec-Sal 8pm 

Mats Wod & Sal 2p m Sun 3p m 
T-Noehanie L , ir-239-62O0-'24tu!! 7 days 
Beudwav Tht-alre 53rd 8 Broadway 


stage thriller by being so much 
better than any of its postwar 
rivals, so “Noises Off” seems 
to have paralyzed other farce 
writers. Those few who do 
still attempt it seem to be op- 
erating in a time warp. 

In which case, maybe the 
answer is to write farces still 
set in the heyday of their 
genre: that, on at least one 
level, would seem to be the 
thinking behind “Frankly 
Scarlett" at the King's Head. 

The idea is enviable: We 
know, from successive mem- 
oirs and biographies of the 
principals involved, that the 
shooting of "Gone With the 
Wind" in 1938 was often 
vastly more dramatic behind 
the camera than on the screen. 


BROADWAY 

RENT 

'Shmmens with hope tor the future 
at the American MustoaT The NY T«noa 
Tties-Sar 8p.m. Sui 7pm 
Mala Sal-Sun 2p.m. 
Trchotmastor 212-307-4100 
Necteftantfer Thealna, 208 W41« St 

SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE 

The Songs of Lefcer & Si otter 
Direct od by Jerry ZakC 

GRAMMY WINNER! Bast Musical 1996 
Tua-S* Spm U*r Wod 4 Sat 3un . Sin 3pm 
CaH Tetediarge (Si 2) 239-6200 
Vrguriij Theatre 245 W 52nd Si. 

Ro dgers & Hammerstein's 

THE KING & I 

*tn n word. MAGNIFICENT-— 

Tho Now Yorker 

Tue-5.il BpfMats Wed A Sal 2p Sun 3p 
TrcJcetovMior 212-307-4 TOO 
Noil Ssnon ThralrB. 250 W 52nd Si 

TH E PH ANTOM OF 
THE OPERA 

Tieheis From SI 5.00 
Mon-SatBp.ru. 

Mak Wod s Sat 2p.m. 
Tetochargo 2l2-239^200r24hrs 7 days 
Map*,*? Thoairo. 247 W 44th St 

VICTOR/VICTORIA 

Best Musical 
Outer CntICS Aw.lfd 
Tuos Sol 8p.m. 

Mali; Wed & Sat 2p.m. Sun 3p m. 
M.nqus Theatre. B way & 4fl(h St 
Mtpj.mm) hqo «m,victarAnctofia/ 


The megalomartic obsessions 
of Selznick, the single-minded 
British determination of Vivi- 
en Leigh to land the leading 
role, Clark Gable's eagerness 

LONDON THEATER 

to fire the direcror. George 
Cukor, because they had once 
had a brief gay affair — all 
this is the stuff of high drama 
and also, with a minimal 
twist, of high farce. 

So the authors Peter Morris 
and Phillip George, who also 
directs, are into strong movie- 
buff territory. Unfortunately 
they are also into Earl Grey, 
an off-Broadway mimic who 
does impressions of all the 
Scarlett wannabes — Tallu- 
lah Bankhead. Bette Davis. 
Katharine Hepburn — with- 
out telling us which one he is 
doing at the time. 

As Grey's impressions are 
a little underdeveloped, the 
evening fast degenerates into 
one of those horrendous off- 
Broadway cabarets in which 
female impersonators remind 
us why none of them have 
ever really made good. 

And although the King's 
Head has pulled Together an 
strong cast, from Peter 
Polycarpou as Selznick to 
Nicholas Colicos as Clark 
Gable, there comes that awful 
moment about halfway inio 
the first act when you realize 
that they are having lots more 
fun onstage than we are off it. 

At the neighboring Al- 
meida. now the most fashion- 
able of all London theaters and 
sometimes the most inventive, 
the director Phyllida Lloyd 
and the translator-poet Peter 
Oswald have come up with a 
rich and rare treat, Federico 
Garcia Lorca’s “Dona Rosita 
the Spinster," which though 
written in his richest dramatic 
period, between “Yerma" 
and*'BemardaAlba"in 1935, 
remains curiously unknown. 

A wonderfully starry cast 
(Eleanor Bron. Phoebe Nich- 
olls, Clive Swift, Celia Imrie 


and Kathryn Hunter) now 
bring to life a bittersweet folk 
fable about love and betrayal 
and loneliness and the ravages 
of time, in which each char- 
acter gets his or her moment 
center- stage to explain pre- 
cisely what has gone wrong 
with the life they originally 
envisaged. 

What marks out Garcia Lor- 
ca’s unique territory is that 
constant sense of a chill com- 
ing over sunny evenings, of 
man destroying God's work, 
of women doomed io be loved 
and lost. 

And finally, at the Lyric 
Hammersmith, an equally 
rare Tennessee Williams re- 
discovery but one which, un- 
like the Garcia Lorca, does its 
author no posthumous good 
of any kind. “Out Cry"dares 
from 1967. when it was 
briefly seen here with Peter 
Wyngarde and Mary Ure. 
You would need to be a psy- 
chiatrist deep in old Tennes- 
see to appreciate fully this 
shambolic scream from ihe 
family closet. 

Two American actors, a 
brother and a sister, arrive in a 
small town to discover that 
they have been abandoned by 
a bankrupt touring company. 
Undeterred, they decide to do 
their weary show there and 
then, and the show is of 
course the story of their tor- 
tured sibling lives. Echoing 
through the empty theater are 
half-remembered moments of 
relative madness from 
"Srreetcar." the flower- 
power symbolism of "Rose 
Tattoo. the incestuous 

brother and sister of countless 
other plays and even the hints 
of lost stardom from "Sweet 
Bird of Youth." 

Bui none of ihis hangs to- 
gether, and it is not the fault of 
the director. Timothy Walker, 
that his two players. Sara 
Stewart and Jason Morrells, 
flail around in what seems 
increasingly to he a parody of 
all that once mattered about 
Williams. 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 


PAGE 13 


fr- 




t 


Indonesia 
Demands 
10% of All 
New Mines 


Bloomberg News 

JAKARTA — Regulations prompted 
by the controversy surrounding Bre-X 
Minerals Ltd. will require new mining 
projects to set aside a 10 percent interest 
for the government, Indonesia's min- 
ister of mines and energy said T uesd ay. 

Executives of mining companies said 
the request could discourage in vestment 
in Indonesia. 

Indonesia has asked Newmont Min- 
ing Corp. to give it a 1 0 percent stake in 
the stalled $1.5 billion Batu Hij'au cop- 
%«r and gold project, l.B. Sudjana, the 
minister of mines and energy, said. 

“Ten percent isn't too much to 
give," he said, adding that companies 
close to a daughter of President Suharto 
were interested in a stake as well. 

“We have no interest in giving the 
government a stake if we don’t have 
to.” said Erik Hamer, president director 
of PT Newmont Nusa Tenggara, New- 
mont’s Indonesian unit 

An independent auditor found that 
Bre-X's deposit in Borneo, once touted 
as the largest gold find ever, was a hoax. 
Bre-X shares traded in Toronto lost 97 
percent of their value Tuesday, tum- 
bling to 8J> Canadian cents (6 U.S. 
cents), down 3.215 dollars. The stock, 
which was suspended from trading 
Monday, broke the record for a single 
issue on the Toronto Stock. Exchange, 
with volume repotted at 52.33 million 
shares as the market was closing. 

Siti Hardiyanti Rukmana, the eldest 
daughter of President Suharto, teamed 
up with Barrick Gold . Corp. of Canada 
last year to try to buy a stake in Bre-X’s 
. now-infamous Busang gold project in 
^ Borneo. Mr. Sudjana said then that Bre- 
^ X might not get the necessary pennits if 
it did not work with Barrick. The threat 
was later withdrawn. In Toronto, Jack 
Geller, chairman of the Ontario Secu- 
rities Commission, said the panel had 
asked die police for a criminal inves- 
tigation of the Bre-X scandal. 

On the Nasdaq exchange, trading of 
Bre-X shares was halted until next 
Tuesday, when company officials have 
been asked to appear at a hearing of the 
Nasdaq Listing Qualifications Panel. 


P ftodi of haavy Iratdf oafllng In IW g 



Chwkjmh 

donut 

SB 


20 


rat 


... i.. 


Fool's Gold 

Obscure Bre-X 

Minerals stumbled on what looked 
Hce a huge gold find at Busang in 
Indonesia In 1993. As eslimaiBS of 
Uie holdings climbed, insiders 
exercised cheap options and sold 
millions ol shares at high prices. But 
in March came word that Busang is 
lust a gokUess jungle. Here Is Bre-X's 
stock price in Canadan deters, 
adjusted for splits. 


j way 1996 

(Bre-X shares apfit 10 for 


No mstOmr mbng 
aaasMvataUa 
lor 1037 


I.S'5 


Estimate of tha 

amount of gold 
at Busang: 

jimoonoz. 


SS 


March 1997: Tha ColUfMN* 
After me sudden death of Michael de Guzman, a Bre-X ■ 
geologist, word leaks that tests by Freeport -McMo ran do 
not match Bre-X’s estimates for Busang. Freeport then 
says it has found only insignificant amounts of gold. 

May 1997: Tha End ^'1 

independent tests by Strathcona Mineral Services say 
there are no gold deposits worth mining at Busang and 
that Bre-X’s test results appear to have been falsi! 


s 


J I A I S I O 1 N 1 o 

Over Dio chanod period, tho Canadian dokar has boon wonh 
between 70 and 76 American cents. 


j If l li U l m i j i j l a l s I o I u I a ' j I f i u I a ‘ u 
1996 I 1997 

wcos:BkxmbeigFmandal Markets: CX3AlnwsmmntTechnoiagias(lnsttier trading} ? 


Canada, the Wild North of Stocks 

Bre-X Is Just Latest Fraud From Its Lightly Regulated Markets 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — The Bre-X Min- 
erals Ltd. fraud, in which a gold find 
said to be worth billions of dollars 
tuned out to have no gold worth min- 
ing, may turn out to be the most costly 
stock-maritet fraud ever. But in one 
respect, it was a case of dejS vu: Once 
again, investors had lost big by pur- 
chasing Canadian stocks. 

Canadian markets are hardly the 
only ones ever to have been marred by 
fraud. Britain had Robert Maxwell, the 
media baron whose companies were 
real but whose balance sheets were not; 
the U.S. markets have contributed a 
long list of fraudsters, among them 
Barry Minkow, the teenage wonder 
whose carpet-cleaning business, ZZZZ 
Best, was mostly fictitious, and Crazy 
Eddie Antar, the croaked electronics 
salesman. 

But it does seem as though Canada 
produces more stock-market fraud, at 
least on a per-capita basis, than a lot of 
other countries. Unlike other major in- 
dustrial nations, P-ana/fa has no national 
regulator for securities; it leaves die task 
to die provinces, which pursue it with 
varying degrees of enthusiasm. 

Efforts at reform have been incom- 
plete. 

Now, with Bre-X, Canadian stock 
fraud has hit a new peak, at least in 


terms of dollars. At its height last au- 
tumn, Bre-X was valued by the stock 
market at more than $4 billion. There 
have been other companies that gained 
large valuations without anything be- 
hind them, but never this large. 

In one sense, Bre-X represents an 
unfortunate tradition, that of die junior 
mining company, for which the Van- 
couver and Alberta stock exchanges 
have been notorious since scandals in- 
volving phony Canadian uranium 
companies erupted four decades ago. 
The listing rules for junior companies 
are lax. and there have been many 
companies that traded for far more than 
they turned out to be worth. 

There have been assorted efforts at 
reform in Canada, and some progress. 
A British Columbia commission, re- 
commending reforms in 1994, de- 
nounced "the continuing occurrence 
of scam s, swindles and market ma- 
nipulations' ’ in the Vancouver market. 
Changes have been made since, but 
some of the commission's most im- 
portant proposals were rejected. 

Canadian officials resent tbeir mar- 
kets' bad image, which Rowland Flem- 
ing, the president of die Toronto Stock 
Exchange, on Monday called "a legacy 
factor with the Vancouver Stock Ex- 
change, rather than a reality today.” 

Bre-X “wasascamofunprecedenied 
proportions,” he said, but scams have 
happened in die United States, too. 


Jack Gellei; chairman of the Ontario 
Securities Commission, said Canada’s 
reputation far securities fraud “is not 
fair.” The Toronto exchange, he said, * ‘is 
one of the world's most satisfactory ex- 
changes.” And Vancouver and Alberta? 
“I don’t comment cm exchanges outside 
my jurisdiction,” he said. 

American securities regulators speak 
with dismay of frauds from Canada, but 
only when assured they will not be iden- 
tified. “There are international sensib- 
ilities here.” one said. 

But Deborah Banner, the Washing- 
ton state securities administrator, said 
she was getting fewer complaints about 
Canadian frauds ihar> she used to. 

American regulators concede that 
frauds do emerge in die United States 
as well. Bre-X was able to gain a listing 
on die Nasdaq national market, ana 
Mr. Fleming said that even in ret- 
rospect he could not see any reason for 
an exchange to have refused to list iL 
Mr. Geller said laws apparently had 
been broken in the Bre-X case and that it 
was thus up to the police, not his 
agency, to investigate. But. he said, if 
the police did refer any securities vi- 
olations to him, he would act 
Mr. Fleming said las hoped 
something good would come out of the 
scandal. “Maybe this will act as the 
much-needed stimulus to get Canada to 
have a national securities regulator,” be 
said. 


Birth of a Chip: Intel 
Tests (Again) for Flaw 

Pentium II - in More Ways Than One 


By Lawrence M. Fisher 

Ate*' York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Intel. Corp. 
win riot formally introduce its Pentium 
n microprocessor until Wednesday, but 
the World Wide Web is already buzzing 
with reports of a flaw that causes the 
new chip to make errors in some com- 
plex mathematical calculations. 

Two and a half years ago, a similar 
flaw in the original Pentium chip caused 
a crisis for Intel when the company 
initially stonewalled customers, only to 
later relent and offer refunds. The prob- 
lem was corrected, and Intel recovered 
from the misstep. 

The Pentium n is a version of the 
Pentium Pro, a more advanced chip than 
the original Pentium, and it will incor- 
porate new multimedia technology. The 
bug. which reportedly also afflicts the 
Pentium Pro. was disclosed by Robert 
Collins, a Silicon Valley engineer who 
maintains a Web site called Intel Secrets. 
Mr. Collins said the bug had been 
brought to his attention by a professor 
who would not identify himself. 

Though the chip, which is intended 
for high-end desktop computers, will 
not officially be introducea until Wed- 


nesday, Intel has been : 
bum U to customers, arid some have 
appeared on the gray market, he said. 

Intel shares fell $4,625 in Nasdaq 
trading, to $157,875. 

[Intel said Tuesday that it was in- 
vestigating the flaw. The Associated 
Press reported. The company said it 
expected to figure out the problem by 
the end of the week and promised to 
make its findings public. It also said that 
if an error did exist, it would come up 
with a solution as soon as possible. The 
problem will not delay the planned in- 
troduction of the chip, Intel said. 

[A spokesman for the company said 
the problem appeared to crop up when a 
computer was required to perform a cer- 
tain obscure calculation. Intel said en- 
gineers were running tests on the chips 
but that it had no plans to recall them.] 

Analysts said they were confident 
that Intel would deal with the issue and 
avoid a rerun of the 1994 drama. A 
successful introduction of the Pentium 
II is important because, for the first time 
in years, Intel has a competitor with a 
compatible but faster chip: Advanced 
Micro Devices Inc., with its K6. Intel is 
relying on the Pentium II to restore its 
bragging rights about speed. 


An Auchan- Agnelli Accord 


CarfUeti by Ota Staff Ftvnt Ddputchn 

MILAN — A major French retailer 
and an investment company affiliated 
with the Agnelli family said Tuesday 
they would form a venture that would 
control Italy's largest retailer. La Rinas- 
cenfe SpA. 

As part of the accord, Auchan SA of 
France will sell Rinascente four shop- 
ping centers in Italy and one under con- 
struction for about 530 billion lire 
($309.4 million). 

Rinascente plans to pay for the ac- 
quisition by raising 390 billion lire in a 
capital increase and selling 390 billion 
lire in 4.5 percent, six-year bonds 
through Mediobanca SpA. 

The agreement represents the latest 
jockeying among Europe’s largest retail- 
ers to increase market share. Last year, 
Auchan acquired Docks de France SA. 


Once the transaction is completed, 
Auc han, an operator of hypermarkets, 
and IFIL SpA, an investment company 
controlled by the Agnelli family, will 
create a company that will hold the 40.5 
percent stak e in Rinascente currently 
held by IFTL’s Eufra unit 

1 'This accord opens a period of long- 
term strict collaboration between our 
two family groups,” Gerard Mulliez, 
chairman of Auchan’s advisory board, 
said. 

Once the transaction is completed, 
IFIL will control a 51 percent stake, and 
Auchan will have 49 percent plus an 
option to buy 1 percent from its partner 
within 10 yeans. 

Rinascente shares rose 14 lire to 
9358 Tuesday before trading in the 
stock was halted. IFIL shares rose 34 to 
4,959. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


% 


in 


mntvw 








•A 




MEDIA MARKETS 


Post-Production Feels the Squeeze 


By Trip Gabriel 

New York Times Service 


These are Hell Weeks in the movie 
business, the frenzied period before the 
release of summer blockbusters, when 
armies of workers perform the many 
technical tasks that go by the name of 
post-production: , editing, scoring, 
sound- mixing, creating digital effects. 

Little understood outside the in- 
dustry, post-production is essential if 
raw footage shot on a set is to be al- 
chemized into a polished movie. The 
laborious process has traditionally taken 
longer than the 20 or so weeks of actual 
filming on a major studio release. 

But in recent years the incentive to 
crunch post-production schedules has 
increased as studios advance the release 
dates of movies to avoid competition 
from other films or to earn a quicker 
return on £100 million investments. 

This may also be partly because di- 
gital technology has given some stu- 
dios the impression — falsely, accord- 
ing to many involved — that the pace 
can easily be quickened. 

“Everybody is frantically trying to 
get pictures into the marketplace, 
said Ron Burdett, chairman of the In- 
ternationa] Teleproduction Society, a 
trade group cf 300 companies in the 
UnitedStates involved in the technical 
end of filmmaking. 

The panic is greater than ever this 
year as major studios plan to release ] 5 
or more films, many heavy with digital 
effects, between mid-May and August. 


Post-production for “Speed 2: 
Cruise Control, 1 ’ a megabudget action- 
film sequel due this summer, was 
squeezed down to 15 weeks when" the 
release date of the film was advanced 
from late July to June 13. 

“It’s enormous pressure,” die di- 
rector, Jan De Bont said. "You have to 
double the crew size.” 

Post-production is also causing mi- 
graines for the $180 million "Titan- 
ic,” the most expensive movie ever 
made. Workers on the film, which is 
directed by James Cameron, say its 
July 2 release date cannot help but be 
pushed back by the demands of editing 
miles of footage. 

Post-production crews working on 
“Titanic” are being told to aim for a 
late- July release, even though the two 
studios making the movie. Paramount 
and Twentieth Century-Fox, have not 
yet announced the expected delay. 

“We’re going to bring in the tents 
and the cots,” said Gloria Borders. 

f en era] manager of George Lucas’s 
kywalker Sound in Northern Cali- 
fornia, who plans to hire 50 sound 
editors next month instead of the cus- 
tomary six. “It’ll be like going to work 
on Desert Storm.” 

At special-effects shops like Mr. Lu- 
cas’s Industrial Light & Magic, in edit- 
ing rooms at Hollywood studios, and at 
independent “post” houses 
throughout the Los Angeles area, the 
work habits common to Silicon Valley 
prevail: 80-hour weeks, catnaps on of- 
fice cots, trips home lasting only long 


enough to assure spouses that the film 
worker has not run off. 

Although (here is a general sequence 
to post-production, the tasks overlap, 
particularly on films with shortened 
schedules. Ideally, once the director 
has shouted “It’s a wrap!” an editor 
reviews the multiple takes of each 
scene and splices them together. 

A rough version of the film then goes 
to a composer, who writes a score; to 
digital -effects houses, which insert 
computer-generated aliens or tornadoes 
into filmed scenes with actors, and to 
sound editors, who dean up back- 
ground noises ‘and re-record muddy 
dialogue with the actors in a studio. 

Finally, sound mixers marry the 
many tracks of dialogue, sound effects 
and music together. 

In these high-speed days, these tasks 
routinely are shortened by hiring more 
people and renting more equipment, 
dividing the work among teams. The 
problem then is coordination: With 
many tasks proceeding at once, 
changes made by one team must be 
instantly accommodated by the others. 

But, like the end man in a game of 
snap the whip, those at the tail end of 
the post-production process, such as 
composers and mixers, find it hard to 
hold on for the ride. 

“While we’re working, every day 
they’re cutting,” said Chris Ward, a 
music arranger cm "Speed 2,” who 
must revise the score to fit each newly 

See HITS, Page 18 


\*t 




CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 




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twenty *ws 
Atgeet. peso 0.9986 
AastreOms 7.2889 
AatMenstb. 12.173 
BrazfliM 1-0*43 
eWneutysn# SJ247 

CttchtaiuH 30.91 
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US OoHan peroitna. London official 
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Sourer. Anders. 


Global Private Banking 


We 


SPECIALIZE IN 


RELATIONSHIP BANKING 
THE LONG-TERM KIND. 



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iVitlnu.il/ liuult i j -Wir luri 
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In tkis age of electronic mail and digital 
everything, private banking by Republic is still a 
matter of personal relationships. 

\)fe believe, and have always l,c-l ioved, tli at our 
number one job is to build a close, enduring 
relationship with each private banking client. 

In fact, il's.ono of the main reasons for 
fvepub lie’s success, worldwide. 

As a Republic private banking client 
you have your own personal Account Office someone 
you can count cm to look after your interests, l ie's 
there to evaluate investment opportunities, warn you 
against pit-falls, and make certain your instructions 
are carried out to the letter. 

It is a long-term relationship based on genuine 
concern and commitment - the rare combination 
that makes Republic a truly one-of-a-kind bank. 



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Republic National Bank of New York"’ 

Strength. Security. Service. 

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* Yilniul ImhL.'I \,iij,, |mit. 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30- Year T-Bond Yield 



Dollar in Deutsche marks H Dollar in Yen 



NYSE. 


The Dow 


7225*32 


:ypw, % 

■■ Close Change 
' 72f^68- v +ais 


HTSE 

s&m 


«Y^ 

,-aSptbo.- 

- \ -0.12 . 


NYSE 

Composite ! 


OJSL 

ftfasdaqCrai^Joste 432&2S *' 133&33- - -O 52 

■AJfflEJC 

.Martel. Yafoe 


Toronto . <s 

.ISEtade* . •• - 

' 611S»ea -6152.30 - s - 0.55 ; 

Stio Paulo 

.Soyespa . .. 

. a.66 9993.57 +^25- 

Mexico cay 

Boise 

37sah4 376^88 ■ +0.77 

Buenos Afros MervaJ • 

"'wafer'- 

Santiago- - 

IPSA General - - 

S370M* ■ 5357-38; +OJ04- 

Caracas . 

Capital General ■ 

6S&2S -6461^6'- j 


‘Made in U.S.A. ’ - or Someplace 


By David Segal 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — A product 
is stamped “Made in U.S.A.“ So 
where was it made? 

That might sound like a self- 
evident riddle in the tradition of 
“Who is buried in Grant's 
Tomb?" But under guidelines pro- 
posed Monday by the Federal 
Trade Commission, it is becoming 
a legitimate question. 

Responding to pressure from 
U.S. manufacturers, the agency 
has drafted a set of guidelines that 
would expand the types of mer- 
chandise that could use the “Made 
in U.S A.” label in advertising and 
on its products. 

Under the old standard, if a 
product was not “all or virtually 
all" made from American parts 


and assembled by American work- 
ers, it could not carry the label. 

The “Made in U.SA." label -is 
a powerful marketing tool, par- 
ticularly for corporations — such 
as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. — that 
cater to' consumers concerned 
about a loss of American jobs to 
overseas labor markets. 

For years, companies have 
chafed at what they describe as the 
Federal Trade Commission's rigid 
rules about use of the label. Labor 
unions have opposed any changes 
as making it easy for companies to 
ship U.S. jobs overseas. 

Under the new proposal, which 
mi gh t become official by year-end, 
tire label could appear on any 


product “substantially” made 
from A 


American parts and as- 
sembled by American workers. 
Specifically, if 75 percent of a 


product's manufacturing costs 
were incurred in the United States 
and its assembly were completed 
in the United States, it would qual- 
ify. Agency officials said the re- 
vised standards, which were 
sought by one group of lawmakers 
and denounced by another, were 
intended to update a set of rules 
established 50 years ago for a 
wholly different economy. 

With manufacturing now a de- 
clining part of the U.S. economy 
and with more companies assem- 
bling 'products from imported 
parts, proponents of the change 
said, the existing standard presents 
an excessively high hurdle. 

“We live in a globalized econ- 
omy, and we need a set of rules that 
reflect that fact,” said Jodi Bern- 
stein, director of the agency's Bu- 
reau of Consumer Protection. 


Blue-Chip Stocks Rise,; 
Technology Shares Lag 


Carpdedbi Our SitfFrnx DaputriV! 

NEW YORK — Stocks closed 
mixed Tuesday as General Motors 
led the Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage into record territory for the 
second consecutive day. while Intel 
and Microsoft dragged the Nasdaq 
composite index lower. 

“The earnings growth that we've 
seen so far this year is very en- 
couraging,” said James -Margard. a 
fund manager with Rainier Invest- 


seen as a victory for the industry as ^ 
it seeks to settle huge health claims * - 


US. STOCKS 


GTE to Buy an Internet Service Concern 


ment Management in Seattle. Still, 
“there remains the issue of sus- 
tainability of earnings growth,” 
Mr. Margard said, adding that 
companies that have risen the most 
in the past month's rally — com- 
puter shares — were most likely to 
decline. 

The Dow rose 10.83 points, to 
7 225 32. Advancing issues nar- 
rowly outnumbered declining ones 


filed by state governments. 

Duramed Pharmaceuticals and 
Barr Laboratories dropped sharply 
after the Food and Drag Admin- 
istration rejected die companies' 
generic version of Premarin, a men- 
opausal drug matte by American 
Home Products. Duramed and Barr 
had been counting heavily on in- 
troducing their lower-priced copy 
of Premarin. the most widely pre- 
scribed drug in the United States. 
Duramed feu 5 1/16 to 5 5/16; Barr 
dropped 216 to 40%. 

Stock in Aetna rose .5% to 96 afiqr 

the health insurance company posted 
first-quarter earnings that were better 
than many analysts had expected. , 



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Aetna's earnings dropped 20 perr 
cent from a year earlier, to $279.3 
million, pulled down mostly by the 
sale of its professional management 
business- (Bloomberg, AP) 


I 


Source; Bloomberg. Reuters 


[ucfiuboaal Herald Tribune 


America Online Inc. Posts a Profit 


NEW YORK (NYT) — America Online Inc. returned to 
profitability in its third quarter after six months of heavy 
losses. The result surprised analysts, who had predicted an- 
other loss for the largest U.S. on-line service provider. 

America Online said Monday its advertising revenue 
surged while its marketing costs fell as part of a legal set- 
tlement with state attorneys general that forced the company to 
cut back its advertising. The company earned $2.6 million in 
the quarter, as revenue rose 46 percent, to $456.2 million. 

• James Harmon, chairman of the New York investment 
bank Schroder Wertheim and a veteran of 37 years in in- 
vestment banking, has been named by President Bill Clinton 
to head the Export-Import Bank, which helps provide U.S. 
ex porters with loan guarantees. 

• The United States moved back up among the world’s 
leading donors of nonmilitary aid last year, climbing back 
from fourth place in 1995, a top U.S. aid official said. “The 
United States and Japan will be No. 1 and 2, and we don't 
know in what order," Brian Atwood, administrator of the 
Agency for International Development, said. 

• Tobacco-industry opponents raised their demand by 50 
percent, to $375 billion, and refused to limit awards individual 
smokers could seek in future lawsuits as settlement talks 
resumed in Dallas. 


Bloomberg News 

CAMB RIDGE, Massachusetts 
— GTE Corp. agreed Tuesday to 
buy the Internet service provider 
BBN Corp. for $616 million, or $29 
a share, as part of an aggressive push 
to expand beyond the local phone 
market. 

GTE also agreed with Cisco Sys- 
tems Inc. to jointly develop net- 
work-management services. The 
moves came a day after GTE said it 
would buy part of Qwest Commu- 
nications Corp.’s fiber-optic net- 
work for $485 million. 

All the moves are aimed at mak- 
ing GTE a “national ‘one-stop* pro- 
vider of local, long distance, In- 
ternet and wireless services,” said 


Kent Foster, president of GTE. He 
said they would establish an “ad- 
vanced data network” that would be 
fully operational next year. 

“At that point, we will be in a 
position to reach virtually the entire 
U.S. population." Mr. Foster said. 

The BBN purchase, which gives 
BBN shareholders a 28 percent 
premium over the stock's closing 
price Monday of $22,625, is pan of 
GTE ’s plan to offer a wider range of 
telecommunications services to 
compete with AT&T Corp. and oth- 
ers. These investments, though, 
come atacost to GTE, which said its 
1997 per-share earnings growth 
would be “flat to slightly posi- 
tive.” 


Stock in BBN ju mped 

f5. GTE shares 


$6.25 

Tuesday, to $28,875. 
slipped $1.00 to $45,125. 

* 'This short-term reduction in our 
earnings growth is due to the critical 
investments we must make for the 
future,” said Charles Lee, the GTE 
chairman and chief executive. 

GTE, the largest U-S. local phone 
company, also reported that its 1 996 
profit from operations rose 10 per- 
cent, to $2.79 billion from $2.53 
billion in 1995. Revenue was up 6.9 
percent, to $2 1 J4 billion. 

BBN, one of the so-called back- 
bone Internet providers, had a loss 
of S56.6 million on revenue of 
$2165 million in its 1996 financial 
year, which ended June 30. 


an the New York Stock Exchange. 

Oindexfell 


Dollar Slides Against Major Currencies 


• Brazil's auction of a controlling stake in the iron-ore mining 
company Vale do Rio Doce was suspended indefinitely after 
a last-minute court order blocked the sale. 


• Gruntal & Co. agreed to pay $750,000 to six current and 
former female employees who accused branch managers of 
sexual harassment. 


• UJ5. factory orders fell 1.6 percent in March, the first drop 
in seven months. 


Walt Disney Co.*s ESPN cable sports channel said it would 
sklv 


start a biweekly magazine aimed at taking readers away from 
Time Warner Inc.’s Sports Illustrated, one of the most 
profitable periodicals in the United States. IHT. Bloomberg 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar slid 
against major currencies, dragged 
down by a Bundesbank official's 
remarks, a Japanese stock rally and 
a rise in British interest rates. 

The dollar’s drop against the 
Deutsche mark came after Ernst 
Welteke, a council member of Ger- 
many’s central bank, said, “We 
couldn't be enthusiastic if die dollar 
continued to rise.” 

It posted most of its loss against 
the yen in earlier trading after Ja- 
pan's Nikkei 225 stock index hit its 
highest level since Dec. 17. Grow- 
ing foreign demand for Japanese 
assets and the yen ro pay for them 


boosted . the yen against other cur- 
rencies. 

“A lot of people started to get an 
itchy trigger finger, saying. We 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


i get the hell out of the dollar.' ” 
on the day’s events, said Vic- 
tor Polce, head of foreign exchange 
marketing at Commerzbank. 

The dollar fell to 1.7225 
Deutsche marks in late trading, from 
1.7325 at the end of the day on 
Monday, and to 125.30 yen. from 
126575. It fell to 5.811 French 
francs, from 5.847, and to 1.4614 
Swiss francs, from 1.4745. 


The dollar also slumped against 
the British pound after die new La- 
bour government raised interest 
rates a quarto* percentage point The 
pound rose to $1.6382, from 
$1.6230. 

The dollar slipped immediately 
after reports cited Welteke as saying 
the Bundesbank won't be pleased if 
the dollar rose to 1.7350 DM, and that 
an exchange rate of 1.70 DM would 
reflea economic fundamentals. 

“Welteke made a strong dollar- 
capping statement,” said Andrew 
Hodge, currency strategist at Bank 
Brussels Lambert “As usual, it's 
good mark-confidence building on 
the part of the Germans.” 


The Standard & Poor’s 500 index 
2.72 points, to 82757. That index 
also set a record Monday. The Nas- 
daq Composite index, which con- 
tains many computer-related shares, 
fell 10.95 points, to 1,328.29. 

GM led the Dow industrials high- 
er as a decline in the dollar against 
the Japanese yen was viewed as 
making GM’s cars and trucks 
cheaper than rival imports. 

Bond prices fell for the first time 
in seven days after the Treasury's 
auction of $17 billion of three- year 
notes met with I ower-than-a verage 
demand. The price of die bench- 
mark 30-year issue slipped 4/32 to 
96 and 23/32 pushing its yield up to 
6.88 percent, from 6.87 percent 
Traders said a drop in the value of 
the dollar hurt bond prices.- 

The Russell 2000 index of stocks 
in relatively small companies 
slipped 0.71 points to 361 .72. Some 
investors said smaller stocks had 
room to climb, even though the 
Russell 2000 has risen 8 percent in 
five days. 

“The bargains in the market are 
still in tiie small-cap arena,” said 
Don Hays, investment strategist at 
Wheat First Batcher Singer. 

But Mr. Hays said he doubted that 
a stock rally could be sustained 
without a reduction in interest rates. 
Braid yields have fallen in recent 
weeks, but not enough for Mr. Hays 
to change his outlook, he said. 

Tobacco shares retreated after 
surging on news Monday that a 
Florida jury had found RJR Nabisco 
Holdings not responsible for the 
death of a smoker. The decision was 


U.S. Carmakers : 


Suffer Slump 
In April Sales 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — A sharp decline . 
in car sales forced overall 
vehicle sales down 4 percent last . 
month, with America's Big . 
Three losing ground while im- J 
ported models gained. 

Ford Motor Co. on Monday 
became the last domestic auto- , 
maker to report April results,. - 
posting a 4.4 percent decline 
from the like period a year earii- . 
er. Last week. General Motors 
Corp. reported its April sales 
were down 5 percent, while 
Chrysler Corp. posted an H 
percent decline. The Big 
Three’s overall sales were 
down 6 percent 

The results contrasted with a 
2 percent rise for Japanese auto- 
makers and a 20 percent surge J 
for European automakers. 

But some analysts said the 
Japanese makers' results may be 
misleading, because they did not 
have a strong month in April , 
1996 They also are getting ] 
short-term benefits from putting . 
new vehicles an the market and ’ 
from cutting costs in recent 
years, said Susan Jacobs, an ana- 
lyst with Jacobs & Associates. 




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233 

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ISM 

15* 

■Jft 

EgAhMn 

1*4 

12N 

II* 

77k 


Email 

1S4 

17 

IAN 

lift 


RhisThu 

.13 

ft 

* 

ft 

m 

Fen Hit 

149 

2ft 

: 

2 

_ 

FterM 

1SS 

38* 

37* 

38ft 

♦1 

F1AU9 

157 

SN 

Ift 

ft 

*Vm 

FAasPr 

Ml 

M 

9 

9ft 


nci»i 

184 

Ift 

1* 

1ft 


Fiber 

295 

12 

II* 

UN 


FofiU 

2177 

3J* 

m 

J3* 

dill 

FMEI 

1ST 

Fft 

9N 

9ft 

■ft 

FmclB 

109 

14N 

14* 

UU 

-s* 

C51TM 

«S 

6h 

A* 

A* 


GanaS 

Mr 

4* 

4 

4M 


Gna 

114 

20N 

17ft 

20* 

M 

Coffin 

1MI 

6ft 

Aft 

fit 

*V* 

Cok» 

277 

Pb. 

21* 

22* 


CnAm 

111 

1ft 

1* 

Ift 


CenCr 

91 

14* 

14* 

1416 

45 

GsrMM 

1462 

n 

■ 

38* 

tlH 

Ctonffd 

42* 

HU 

BN 

33M 


GWB 

566 

17 

14* 

U*» 

■J* 

GUM 

121 

2ft 

3* 

3* 

— 

Cav'ffeo 

71 

I* 

IM 

1ft 

mm 

GaCHlR 

174T 

»* 

7ft 

86* 


CMPd 

619 

* 

* 

t 

¥• 

GOfTrSk 

M7 

24 

2A 

24 

eM 

CrtyOML 

19U 

3+1 

J* 

JN 

-v* 

hOy-r 

430 

S 

4ft 

49* 

■Jfn 

HffnrMD 

897 

I9N 

19* 

19* 

tm. 

Hangar 

174 

7N 

7N 

7ft 

■V* 

HoihCV 

201 

U 

ft 

ft 

_ 

Haten 

61H 

4»> 

<N 

4* 

_ 

Hmoms 

9715 

34^1 

24* 

J4N 

■H 

Ho* Air 

Ur 

IN 

3*. 

3*k 


Hhr 

32M 

2 

IN 

Ift 


HmrViiB 

HI 

11* 

17* 

18 


HWWH 

213 

11* 

lift 

'SI 


Hungin 

» 

7h 

9ft 

9ft 

■ft 

rci 

107 

5* 

5ft 

Sft 

■u 

Wte 

3(9 

8ft 

7ft 

6 

-H 

•WCM N 
ImOeg 

a 

24J* 

«N 

*« 

4AN 

24ft 

46* 


naan 

■ 71 

12'+ 

lift 

12* 


» 

18 

2* 

4ft 

Jl. 

4*. 

JV* 

r* 


leMh) 

1024 

5‘* 

5 

5*4 

il« 

«wny 

U3 

■. 


r n 

■ 

Mnuj|H 

MUuC 

438 

l 

IB* 

Ml 

M* 

r-i 

10N 

JN 

•4* 

• t| 

rmWri 

18ft 

18* 

11* 


wtaief 

tta 

Fi 

7*» 

7" 1 -. 

- l 4 


Stock 


sdB Mgi m uiw aw Indexes 


Most Actives 


May 6, 1997 


JTScSqi 

Jane* 

Jo* 

KFXIac 

KVPhA 

KOBM 


Dow Jones 


NYSE 





Opwi H*D Law Lite 

an. 


wl rate 

Low 

Los) 

O*. 

Indus 71 sun Tmjn 7187.19 72KJ2 

Trans 2617.fi 342432 3(0351 260151 

U1I 22659 mm vkjo TOSS 

Camp 224X23 226460 224157 2252^4 

Standard & Poore 

t-llLBS 

-20J0 

PHMari 

GTE 

173205 Cft 
137257 45M 

41M 

42* 

41ft 

45ft 

-21} 

■1 

+1X7 

Ste^pWd 

67001 22ft 

21 Vk 

22* 

+lft 

-1.40 

Fo 3M 

ss?? 

SiSStoe 

ass 

m s 

53(95 en» 

HZ 

65ft 

36ft 

3» 

66ft 

-ft 

Wwffm 

hwi uw Oon 

MIT 

4PJ4 

47984 5M 
47543 31M 
teS 32ft 

I 

29ft 

4W* 

31 

30 

-2ft 

+18 

-Ift 


High Low Latest Chga Open 


Grains 


Industrials 

Transp. 

UHtles 

Finance 

SP5O0 

.SP100 


976-63 9SBJBS 
601.24 587.00 
19421 189.70 
93.77 9224 
83029 81130 
81241 795.16 


97643 97093 
60093 59405 
19420 19SL81 
93J6 9433 
83029 827.57 
81235 81138 


S33* 


44021 sm 
42169 31ft 
40156 28ft 
28878 99V, 
37493 93M 


5B SB* +M 
2BM 31 +1N 

28 2Bft 


96* 

91*4 


OORN (COOT) 

MOD uu mWmurn. cam per butfm 
MOV 97 293 281ft 2B8Vt —4% 10511 

JU97 290 285 VI 28Sft —5* 138452 

Sep 97 27414 20 289ft -5% 2L566 

Dec 77 Sm 267*i 267ft -4ft 109390 

Mar 90 276 272 27214 — « 103? 

May 98 Z79ft 277 277 _4ft 815 

Jut 98 28214 280 '4 28014 -» 230 

EsLsdes NA Titan's. sates 70378 
Mon's open Int 309329 off 64 



Hfgii 

Low 

Latest 

dgo 

Opted 

ORANGE JUKE (NCT70 



IMOOftn.- arts POT fa. 




May 97 

7175 

7100 

7X40 

+005 

871 

Juf 97 

75L30 

7455 

7485 

-005 

17,398 

Sep 97 

7100 

7)35 

77 JO 


W91 

Nov 97 

80S 

UJ0 

BtMS 

-aw 

2.973 


High Low Latest rage Oplat 


High Law Latest rage OpM 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIF1 

FFSttUnO-ptSOflMpd 

Jun 97 12936 12932 129^8—002149,908 

Sep 97 128.10 12736 127.94 +030 10359 

Dec 97 9730 9730 97,48—002 0 


EsLsdes NA. Man's. sdes 1344 
Man's own W 27,750 up 270 


BsL volume: 107,166 .Open Mf 160267 off 
672. 


Metals 


NYSE 


Nasdaq 


Compand 

iwtatitab 




43275 429-46 43076 -047 

39173 39404 


+ffl 


Nasdaq 


Tratsp. 


tom Law Ln> Ob. 

1337.36 132448 132839 -1095 

106844 105891 106L80 445 

l4m3S 141496 142475 +5 Ml 

148237 146248 1480. W +1L0I 
1ML54 173139 174193 +5.W 

89336 87942 88736 -6.99 



’591* 

i 161 

106915 26* 
95406 36 

K Slft 
ljw 

'1MB lift 
67907 45 
6*48 SB 
61686 24 
48872 Tilt 
54435 61 . 

385 Iff 

49275 11 


56 571k 
157*4 158 

25*i 26 

35 35ft 
4M 49*1 
116* 117* 
11 * 11 * 
43K 44*. 
47* 47* 
Jl 23 
88* 90* 

« £ 

8* 8V> 

8* 9*» 


-1 

-4* 


-V» 
■2** 
-2* 
♦ ft 


-1* 

♦1* 

-2 

i 

■5* 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTJ 
100 tons- O bKtb Per ton 

May 77 29930 29470 29930 +230 12.122 

Jul97 293.00 287.10 29230 4270 51,079 

Aug 97 27X00 27430 27730 +130 14,950 

Sep 97 25990 25120 257.10 +0.10 1453 

W97 53200 22930 23030 -U0 9318 

Dec 97 22230 22030 22230 *0.10 17366 

EsLsdes NA Mm's. sales 26394 
Man's open id 117.121 up 1)0 


GOLDfNCMX) 

100 Mr donors per tear oz. 

May 97 3MB -130 

Jun 97 34530 34030 34150 -330 
MSI 34230 -230 

Aug 97 35230 34330 34430 —2-70 
Od 97 34930 34630 34630 —230 
Dec 97 35170 34990 349 JO -230 
Feb 98 36330 35230 35230 -330 
Apr 91 355.10 -330 

Jun 98 357.90 -230 

Est. sets NA Man's, sdes 25.976 
Man's open M 166339 Off 1125 


LI* UAH GOVERNMENT BOND CUFFE) 

ram) mWon -aft an » pfl 

£2K ]££ 128-15 12893 *0991179^14 

S*iW 129.05 12835 129.10 * 196 5.946 
gtsdes 605*4 Pie*, sates 42.931 
PW. open laL 114280 off 1,757 


HEATING OO. (NMERJ 
42400 oaL ends per gal 
API 97 5410 5290 5340 +035 

JuJ97 5405 5305 5345 +03* 

Aug 97 5450 5370 SU0 +0.16 

Sep 97 5520 5440 5475 +836 

00 97 5598 5530 5530 +036 

Nov 97 5645 5690 5630 + 031 

Dec 97 5735 5630 5695 +031 

Jan 98 5790 57.15 5735 +031 

Feb 98 5730 5795 5730 +046 

Est.sdes NA Mon's, sates 15328 
Mon's open int 135378 up 559 


37304 

30309 

14152 

33*4 

3379 

7339 

Hilt 

7,823 

X6S> 


1 

73179 


13362 

3312 

21,906 

4307 

3161 

6515 


39321 

474460 

7,174 


AMEX 


Lot. L«. a* AMEX 


KIPoW 


57258 56995 57051 -2JI7 

Dow Jones Bond 

TUay 


SOYBEAN 0L (CBOT) 

60000 era- certs par to 

May 97 25JD 2464 2485 —0.11 1415 

JUI97 2536 2496 230 -097 '51440 

Aug 97 2137 25.01 2118 -097 11143 

Sec 97 2536 2595 2532 -096 7447 

0097 25J3 25 10 2531 +107 7J25 

Dec 97 25SI 2525 2549 +0.10 19401 

Est. sates NA Mean's, sdes 17319 
Mon's open id 101398 up 395 


JTSCoip 

SPDR 

EdnSoy 

Kokni 


20 Bonds 
isufflte 
10 indusbtats 


10198 10197 

9839 9891 

105.18 105.13 


77B60 1* 
16908 a3V> 
11929 m 

9550 29* 
6762 49* 
5492 7M* 
4196 29« 
3954 19* 


in m 

bz* aan 


l&i 2 4* 
8 * 8 * 
2 m 28* 

** 4n 

7* 7* 

7* 24* 
18* 19* 


•M 

-V* 

•1 

*n 

■v» 

+n 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5400 Ou mfnlmon*- centt per bushel 
May 97 BB 885* 894 +1 4.297 

Jut St mvt 882 892 + 2Vj 106434 

Aug 97 M2* 852 Ml* +2* 19.112 

Sep 97 761* 752 Vi 759'A -4* 8404 

Nov 97 703 696 701* —7* 47437 

Est. sales NA Man's, sdes 66354 
Modsopenirt 191429 up 655 


HI GRADE COPPER (MCMX) 

75400 B».- certs per to. 

May 97 11230 10930 10935 -2JB 
Jlin 97 11130 K935 10935 -135 
Jut 97 111.10 HBJOO 109 JH —140 

Aug 97 108.75 107.15 1®-15 -140 
Sep 97 10740 10575 10575 -138 

0097 10540 lOLOS 15445 —135 

Novf7 KH25 10X05 10305 — U0 

Dec 97 10140 10200 W2JB -1.15 

Jan 98 100.95 -1.15 

Est.sdes NA Man's. sote 2392 

Man's open id 51336 aft 167 


4438 

2497 

23460 

USB 

5305 

965 

1.116 

*431 

497 




Trading Activity 


WHEAT (CBOT] 

5400 bv mWMTi. cants mr buM 


PGECopd 

HP 


NYSE 


Adnnail 

Detuned 

vssss 

Ne* Highs 
New Lam 


1287 

1287 

798 

3372 

30 

17 


1971 

09 

TO 

3336 

287 

IB 


AMEX 


Adwoced 

DetSneo 

unaiaiged 

Totdissoes 

NewHIgM 

New Lows 


191 

738 


7 g 

7 






Mov 97 m 

394 

394 

-lift 

456 





JU 97 408 

«n 

402ft 

— B*. 

60355 

Nasdaq 




Sep 97 414 

4UH 

40H 

-9V. 

7X4MS 



HUM 

Pf*t. 

Dec 97 42A 

419 

419ft 

— B 

15,271 



1609 

2601 

Est.sdes NA 

Man's. Sdes 

21,939 


Decfiote 






Off 930 


iSrtSS 


5361 

5737 






KewHIffB 


82 

169 






Hew Lows 





Livestock 



Market Sales 




CATTLE (CMBO 













Tktey 


Put 

Joti97 ASS) 

M07 

65.17 

—035 

3732S 




cans. 

AUB97 A5L55 

65JK 

MM 

-0.15 

VM\ 

NYSE 




0097 68.95 

M52 

68.80 

—005 

16359 

Amex 

2X37 


2148 

Due 97 7070 

7937 

7057 

— 4W7 

0.568 

Nasdaq 

70424 


8X9.13 

FebW 71 JO 

7Ma 

71 JR 

—005 

Sl094 


SAVER (MCMX) 

S400 fro* sar trovar. 

May 97 47240 46900 469.10 -330 611 

Jun 97 51100 470.90 470.90 —330 2 

Ju!97 47940 47240 47X30 -330 56.946 

Sep 97 48230 47730 47830 -050 5339 

Dec 97 49140 4040 48540 -330 7J20 

API 98 «7.7fl -350 II 

Md98 49040 49100 49110 -150 7332 

May 98 50240 49830 49830 —330 2494 

Est. sates NA Aten's, sates 6342 

Man's open int B4355 off 664 


EURODOUJUtS (CMER) 

II mBIon-prsof in pd. 

MOV 97 94.15 9113 9114 

An 97 9448 9446 9447 

JUI97 9100 9X99 9140 

Sep 97 9349 9144 9107 -041 426377 

Dec 97 9169 9X64 9166 -042 313303 

Mar 98 9338 9332 9153 -O0J 2K443 

JWl 98 9145 9X40 9143 -002 223^421 

Sep» 9134 9131 93JH -042158318 

Dec 98 9135 9X32 9333 -043 124J90 

Mar 97 9124 9331 9X24 -041 95280 

Am 97 9121 9118 9X20 -041 7X014 

Sep 99 9117 9115 9116 -041 61483 

Est.sdes NA Man’s. sdes 228J34 
Mon's open id 24D2.3IT aft 1862 
SMTEH POUND (CMB1) 

SUD0 pounds. S nor pound 
Jun 77 14400 14152 1.6364 

SEP 77 14380 14JS0 14350 

Dec 97 14174 

Est. sates NA Man's, sates 7302 
Man's enen Id 39,204 df 267 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBU 

iouae<uhn. spared,.* 

7W 3W 3282 69466 

Sep 77 J332 3320 3328 5466 

Dec 77 3372 3360 3367 1383 

EsLsdes NA Man's. sales 5488 
Man's open id 773*8 off 60 


3M28 

915 

101 


LIGHT 5WST CRUDE (NMER) 

1400 bbL-dsaars oor bU. 

Jun 77 194* 1741 1942 -041 

JUI97 W49 1949 19J1 

Aug 77 1947 1942 1944 -048 

Sep 97 1948 1942 1934 +042 

Od 97 1945 1945 1933 +041 

NOV 97 1942 1936 1936 +0JM 

D6C97 1947 1945 1934 + 043 

Jan >8 1942 1935 1935 +045 

Feb 98 1936 1933 1933 + 043 

Mar 98 1935 1945 1935 +047 

EsLsdes NA Mon's. sdes 51,124 
Mon's open id 39(729 aft 2306 

NATURAL CAS (NMER) 

Hum mm oWs, t per mm Hu 
4*197 1300 12D5 1290 

All 77 1330 2365 1325 

Aug 97 2315 2310 2310 

Sep 97 2J0S 1233 2300 

0(297 2325 2355 2310 

NW97 2415 2370 2415 

Dec 77 2530 2467 1525 

Join 2475 2312 2475 

Feb 98 2490 2440 2490 

Mar«8 2365 2325 2360 

EsLsdes NA Mods. sdes 35326 
Mon's open W 202403 up 92812 


91481 

5339* 

3X18D 

17469. 

15432 

13.967 


14312 

8.132 

4357 


40421 

26424 

17450 

14684 

14529 

73K 

1131T 

12315 

7481 

SJC 


PLATINUM (NMER) 
n«wDz^do«vsuei irava* 

JUJ97 37480 37130 37X00 -0.10 134*5 
Oct 77 3753d 37440 37440 -030 2433 

Jan 98 37660 -020 1,180 

Est.sdes NA Man's. sdes 13*0 
Mot's open Id 16372 off 01 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 2 S-OOD mams, s per mor* 

An 77 3835 3779 3B22 11358 

Sep 77 3870 3839 3161 34S2 

Dec 97 3900 3895 3900 328 

EsLsdes NA Man's. sates 7488 
Man's open id 85381 up 70 


Close 

LONDON METALS (UN E) 
Dalian per metric ton 
AAminuni Of Igb Crads) 


Preyfaus 


5pat 159840 159940 157740 
Forward 


InmrSons. 




Ruvn 


Dividends 

Comptmr Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

GrupoCaWAubey b .1435 5-20 5-29 
Sctme Royalty Tr -.1908 5-15 5-29 


Apr 78 7X00 7X75 7237 

EsLsdes 1X338 Mon's. sdes 9483 
Aten's open id 9548* off 231 


Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


SPLIT 

Comdba me 3 ter 2 spiff. 


CgriMierlnti 2 fgr 1 sp*L 
f 1»P« 


EnaftaSyst92forisp» 


SPAU 


INCREASED 

Coratfiscalnc 0 J375 5-23 6-16 

AteWBonRnd Q 32 5-8 5-21 


INITIAL 

CenbtryBnepNC - 30 5-15 5-29 

EmenanEtectn - 37 5-16 M0 

EnertoSystn _ 475 6-18 7-3 

SALES Getters b .193 5-76 M3 


REGULAR 


Artesian Resour A 
BrasauiLMAg 
CM I Corp Vc* A 

Cambrex Corp 


Cdn Nil Roll wa y g 

kifmrft l 


Cdorws) 

CoionkdlnvGrd 


Q 23 5-14 5-20 
Q 36 7-30 8-31 
- JH 5-16 6-2 

Q 45 5-9 5-23 
O J3 M 6-24 
M 478 5-15 6-2 

M 453S 5-15 6-2 


Cooper TbeRubta 

Q 

.085 

6-3 

6-30 

DwrerCorp 

O 

.17 

5-30 

6-16 

EASCOInc 

Q 

.01 

5-15 

5-30 

GAPndffc 

0 

30 

5>16 

5-28 

Garen Inc 

a 

30 

5-ld 

5-23 

Gerber Sdenfflic 

a 

-08 

5-16 

5-30 

Golden W Rn 

0 

.11 

5-15 

6-10 

Harbor Bnep 

Q 

.125 

5-12 

5-23 

Hatteras incosec 

M 

395 

5-16 

5-30 

Home Praps 

a 

AS 

5-16 

5-28 

JtHJendlnC 

0 

32 

5-15 

6-2 

LAFARGE Cbrp 

0 

.10 

5-16 

6-2 

Lauftlano Pac 

Q 

.14 

5-15 

5-29 

MetruBanCorp 

0 

35 

5-13 

6-13 

MidOnd Bacp 

s 

36 

6-2 

6-30 

RahaiHaas 

Q 

AS 

5-16 

6-1 

SIFaulCos 

Q 

JO 

6-30 

7-T7 

Efiadtve Insur 

Q 

38 

S-1S 

6-2 

ShorEne Fin 

Q 

31 

6-2 

6-13 

Soarce Capital 

0 

325 

5-23 

6-15 

Sarrtharo Incg 

□ 

MS 

6-1 

6-15 

Southdown me 

a 

.10 

5-15 

5-30 

SMMHetsen 

X 

35 

5-12 

S-2B 

USTlnc 

0 

■40S 

6-S 

6-16 

UDramarDkmond 

0 

375 

5-20 

6-4 

srMtttlHgndR 

tote a 

mount per 



FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

504B0 ■».- mnd ov to. 

May 97 74LS 700 7442 +042 

Aug 77 77.00 7640 74.95 +04) 

Sen 97 7675 7t« 7645 +CL20 

Od97 7745 7675 76.97 +0.17 

Now 97 7159 7W5 7145 +025 

JOT90 79 JS 79.00 79.15 +035 

EsLsdes 1492 Mot's. sates M6i 
Atai’sepenM 194 a off 136 


Load 

Si 


162940 163040 162640 
Caftudos (Htek Cnde) 
2429* 2431* 244040 
236340 236440 236740 


159X00 

162740 


244340 

236840 


4321 

8331 

1448 

1933 

1*454 

355 


Spat 

Forward 

Ktekd 

SJ 


615* 

na*nn 


616* 

62740 


614* 

62540 


615* 

62640 


JM197 

5eu77 

Dec97 


733040 734040 729540 
744540 745040 740540 


KOGS-Leon (CMER) 

404100 TO. - cants nor b. 

Jlin 97 84^ BX45 8652 +142 17,936 

Jut 97 8X25 84JS 85.15 t(U5 LUS 

Aug 97 BIZI 8245 1115 +080 6.142 

0097 75i5 74.95 7152 + 030 5,130 

Dec 97 7240 7150 7255 +125 1114 

EsLsdes 10589 Aten's. sdes 10412 
Mon's open fd 41,197 off 79 


FSnud 

Tin 

Spd 576540 577540 572040 
Forward 579540 580040 575540 
Zdc (Special High Grade) 

Spot 1255* 1256* IZ45.00 
Forward 127740 1277* 1265V, 


730540 

741540 


572540 

576040 


(246.00 

12 66'/, 


High Low Close Chge Op Ini 


Financial 


PORK BELLIES (CMER) - 
40400 Kk,- cents per b 

MOV 97 8756 3630 gJJU +1J0 842 

All 97 9050 0755 89.95 +2 35 6J74 

Aug 77 8930 86.10 BL75 +230 1322 

Est. sales 1576 Man's, sates 3453 
Man’s open int 9368 at) 716 


US T. BILLS (CMSU 
si miuan. prior 100 Pd. 

Am 97 MJB 9166 9459 630 

Sep 97 9457 9645 9456 -041 1646 

DK97 9458 847 

Ed. sates NA Man's, sates zn 

Mon's open ml 9,949 off 169 


JAPANESE YEN (CMBR) 

125 mtOon van. 1 per 100 van 
JOT 97 JN3B 397S M29 87.148 

Sep 97 1141 J 10 b J11S 1443 

Dec 77 1245 1230 JQ45 703 

Est.sdes NA Mon's. sates 6410 
Man's open Id 89,704 up 1095 

SWISS FRANC (CMER] 

1254m vro. » eer tmne 
JOT 97 j&n £795 5874 43401 

Sec 97 5950 5890 5946 2310 

OK 77 JOOJ 5964 7003 435 

EBjdm NA Man’s sates 8441 
Man's open int 46,196 up 290 

?dsssi H i?isyi NG wpfe) 

»52 9330 9141 + 046117,942 

2HA S - 07 ♦ 046 91,749 

SI? S2 S“ +a - , ° 81040 

nm 9 i 77 +ai 2 a. 767 

n.93 n.72 run , 0.1 r 42400 
•OM 9254 9255 +0.17 75915 

9UQ 9247 9180 * 030 23471 

92JB 9242 9277 +023 154JS 

***** rUMn. Pm. Mat I1M61 
Pm. open Oil- 481437 up UI 6 

3-MONTH EUROMARK CUFFE] 

DMimaHM-pboflOOiKl 

l S28? Jili J L 0640 UnctL 4.753 

9 fr ? 1 'ft? ^679 + 051 Z3I409 

NT N.r. 9677 +041 1422 

2tS 308.977 

+001 230403 
W? + OJR 187.296 

Toll *6J7 9630 + 042 14U05 

«.10 +OA212L032 
9S17 954« 9517 + 044 80832 

^ _ not 9i6o os* +ojM am 
EAsdes: 149491 Sdes: 99J26 

Pm. open ml: off xin 


UNLEADED GASOUNE (NM5R) 
43400 ooL cants par od 
JOT 97 6010 6045 60.15 -039 

A! 97 60.10 59 JO 5915 -0,17 

Aug 97 5975 5JL50 5850 -0.17 

Sep 97 5745 5750 5770 +048 

0097 56JD 5640 5640 +0.15 

NW97 55J0 5530 55J0 +0.15 

Dec 97 55J05 55.05 5545 +075 

EsLsdes NA Man's. sales 13783 
Man's Open id 89727 up 2429 


50.118 

17464 

7J37 

3771 

2784 

1799 

1914 


GASOIL (1 PE) 

US. donors per metric ton - km oflOO tans 
May 97 167.75 16440 16640 +140 17,967 
Jun 97 16675 164J0 16675 + 1J» 21.031 
Juf 97 16775 165.75 167^0 +140 7,951 
Aug 97 16975 167.7516975 +175 
Sept 97 17075 16940 17140 +175 
Od 97 17X00 17175 17340 +1.75 
Nov 97 17125 17125 17475 +140 
Dec 97 17540 17375 17535 +1.25 


7446 

1234 

3-590 

1.587 

7479 


1,204 


Est sates: 17400. Open biL:74639 up 


Slock Indexes 


££ 


SAP COMP. MDEX (GUER) 

SDOaltvfert 

Jun 97 B3B.40 8XJO 83420 —240 184,286 
5«97 B4S40 81740 8*140 -US UB 
Dec 97 85445 BH40 85040 -44S 

Es. sates NA Man 1 ! sates 88410 
Mon'saaeninl 197495 up I3n 


3-384". 


Juf97 

5*197 

DCC97 

Mart# 

JanW 

Sap98 

Dec98 

Mart? 


*S|t" 


S YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

S1Q0JU0 prb>- pn &64ftwaf 1H Pd 
JunWlOJ-B 105-79 IK-27 -01 234.784 


FTSEI0Q CUFFE) 

QSperlndeiaaM 

J«W7 4Sfi34 4473.0 *5374 + 79 J 60360 
S«J97 45634 45154 <5694 +0H4 

Dec97 N.T NT +al(4 +824 
Ed-sates: 1BJOV Pnv.SdBK 10141 
P1W. open ML- 64478 00 93 " 1 

CAC40 CMAT1F) 

FF200pe/ Index poM 

May W26M4 26274 2*454— 174025,949" 
»" 2 V# 15 Z°214-174024741 

SfP W J6704 2416.0 263X5- I7JM 1X369 
Dec 97 26404 2640.0 265<5— 1740 452 

Est. vahime 19436. Open biL:7ai48uD24. . 


3-MONTH PIBOfl (MATIF) 


X743 

70 


ibarefADR; g-pajuble to Canadian fuwdv 
m-aMatUy; qt-puarfeHn s-semLaaaaal 


Food 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sdes flcyuRS unofficM. Yeariy WQhs and loure reflect Die prateus 52 weeks plus Ihecuneit 

ireefcbdntflhe kilii st1iodingdoy.WheBospgorslud ( dMdendawMflngte25peitertormoB 
has been paCdthe years Ktf»4nr range and dMdend am shawl far Renew stocks only. Udesa 
affnrwise noted iniestf dMdends me aarwal rQmunemads based an the latest dedaratton. 
a - divkfeiid also extra (s). b • annual ime of dMdend plus stack dhildnd. c • flquMating 
dMdend. ee - PE esasrts 99.eld - caDed d - new yoarfy tern, dd - loss rn the last 12 manms. 
e- dividend dectared or in preceding 12 months. » - annual rme. Increased on Iasi 
declaration, g -dividend in Canadian funds, subject to 15% mm-resteteneetaM- dMdend 
declared offer ssBMjp or stack dMdend. [- (Wdend paid Ihis yean omiffed, defenwt or no 
action taken at latest dMdend meeting. K - dMdend dedared er paid this year, an 
acniirmlafivte iswie w*ti dMdemis In orrears. n * annual rale, reduced on last dedaratten. 
b - new Issue In the past 52 wedks. The WgtWow wange begins with the skirt of hading, 
nd - neat day delivery, p - IniW dMdend, rmnuol rate unknown. P/E- pricMarrflngs ratio. 

a-ctesed^draufudfuraLr-dMdend«c»iBdorpaMmpiBO0dlnsrl2ffwnfhs.Pft«srock 

dMdend. s - slock spH. DMdend begins with date of spH. sis - stfes. t -dMdend paid in 

stocklnpiwerBrigiamanttaesHmaledxnshiialueonesFdryideridofex-dhtrtbuttoniiaie, 

u- new yearly hlgh-v-trading haHedL\»l-ln bankrephw o rw» i v«« , iipflr being leergomKd 
underlie Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by sudicntppantes.wa- wnen (totrl bated. 

wi - when issued/ ww- with warrann. x • ex-dhidend orex-nghn. xns - ex-dlslmiution. 
nr - wittwuf warrants. Y - ex-dWIdend and sales in tul yfd - yieldL x - soles In hiR 


COCOA {He*) 




io metric ten- leer ton 



May 97 



1399 

+25 

Juf 97 

14)1 

1385 

1407 

+14 

Sep 97 

1440 

14t» 

1416 

+17 

Dec 97 

1471 

MJB 

1465 

+ 14 

Mar 98 

IM 

1485 

un 

+34 

May 98 



1513 

+34 


ESLsales 7JS2 Man's. sates W80 
Man's DDHlM 94.9S off H7 


205 

32.158 

13JI7 

IL376 

20452 

(JS3 


304.160 
34441 
1 490 


COFFEE CfNCSE) 

17. SO Ik. ■ certs Mr h 
Mart? 25440 249.00 34940 —UO 
Jul97 23150 71SJ5 21245 -545 
Sea 97 19740 IB9JB HO. 1 5 — L79 
Dec 77 17550 16640 IB-65 —WO 
MorTS 16140 15640 15740 -148 
Est.sdes 9454 Aten's. sates 8455 
MOT'S open rrt J14B6 off 364 


1,143 
IS. 9*3 
7 JO 
4J4P 
1 & 


Sep 97 105+14 10546 105*14 

DecW 105-00 

Edjates NA Mar’s, sdes 26J76 
Man'samnM 778.SO off 1067 

» YR. TREASURY (C80T) 

liotLMo win- oh u Hms« wo pa 
Jun 97 107-1J 107-02 107-09 

Sep97 106-27 106-21 106-36 - 01 

D«« 104-14 +01 

feLsaies NA Man's. sdes 28 3SP 
Man's apenkff 30UR9 off 1728 

us treasury bonds icaon 

na-03 + 02 <77J77 

j>OTt7 109-24 109-09 109-21 * SJ 60410 

DrcBIOf-H 106-21 109-10 *01 9466 

108-31 1.735 

Est.sates na Mot's. srffR I63J79 
Man s open int SUl r M 4 oil fmn 


FF5 mOHan - pts ol 100 pel 

Jun VJ 0637 96-33 96-34 Qni mau 

S«P 97 9W5 9641 
Dee 97 96-45 9&ff] 9t<2 _ (JJJ3 34.90 1 
Mar W 9648 9646 9*47-041 27^31 
Jun M 96J28 76J4 «6l2S — 042 2A093 
Sep 98 96.11 96.09 96.11 +040 JI394 
Dec 98 9548 9547 9548 +841 T1BU 
Mar 99 95*5 95*4 95*5 + 042 12436 
^sr. wffume; 6X753. Open ftif.,-27’1254 up 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's 
temera 
OJ. Futures 
CRB 


Close 

NA 

1,988.78 

15946 

24542 


Pravlesj 

TLA. 

1,98940 

16037 

24640 


iagCM^toffl: Assodam Pkss. Landau’ 

MSRnanoal Futures EtOmtoa mn 

Pptiuleum Extfungt, 


J-MOWTH EUIKKJRA (UFFE) 

fflrw-JBT** +1 




OOMO - Ms 8 32n* Sf 180 pc 
113-1: 


rrr- t DM 

Sm ♦ “45 

93M + 046 
«.73 93*7 9175 * 047 
*3*5 9149 + OJ)] 

9K4 9X60 9143 « OK 

*152 wis l XU 

93*5 0H5 9X46 ♦ 0.07 

Prey, open W- 30U7S off 1491 


5*0*7 

D«97 

Mam 

Jun98 

Sep9B 

Derta 

Mar9* 


111.161 

75450 

51.930 

3X622 

ZX333 

7406 

1*31 

1*35 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) 

1 174)80 Bn - rim Dor tt. 

JU197 IMS WJ6 HUS *02W 7L068 

0097 10.73 1X63 1X77 +046 39J16 

Marta 10.46 1061 1067 +00 23,218 

May 78 1962 1058 1863 * 041 SJW 

Eg sdes 7661 Man's, sates S.925 
Mon's open ini 14X367 off 1254 


cSIm UJ-25 "HP 113-13 +24»1«>f94 
S*P*7 113-22 111-06 113-10 +j.|4 tat* 

,,7 ' w 

prn.aernnt: 18LI79 up *JU9 


EERMAKeOVERNMEIIT BOND (UFFE] 
DMsaaoo - pts or loo oa 
jOT?7 J0I.H 101*1 10166 ♦ 031 77*340 
5ep97 100 85 10046 KIMS * 033 21551 

CS. rates. 1SD.S41 Pm. sates- 191.120 
Pm open M* 299491 oH 2475 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 IHCTN) 

50,000 cults dot b 

MOVW AU5 67.70 7020 -008 76 

cSn nm Jim 5* ‘ ftw 41 

OflW 73J9 77 JO 7140 -_n ?7 

OecW 7445 7105 74« Zo.19 UM 

SL?* 0 "ML sales 10299 
Man's open Int 7IJ45 ad 187 


For investment 
information 

Read 

MS MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday 

in the IHT. 


licralb^^jtnbunc. 


rn xwinxium mi sum. 




-f 




Jiv.;:- 


E? v 


2?;,“ 

fel-f. - .- 

v*. 


?- 


.•T* j 


: ■ 


!' 


‘a:' ’ 


b-;- . 


-JCi s-; 





'-3 ^cr+j 





.-. r ‘‘‘fa f"/.: ; j> 


1^' 





- _ .... 


: - ; Si -if I!;- 


*;• ’i..- 





\&£> 


C H 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY', MAY 7, 1997 


PAGE 15 


EUROPE 




&* dosed 
lt ; Msfi3p. 

Skid a*. 
:rfor •<- 
P^dnie: 
*}***ha 




L> . . r- - 


Ex Chi f " 11 11 " - - ■ 1 "■ ■ 

Of Alcatel ® oim Discounts a Drop in Jobless Rate 


Frankfort 

DAX 


London 

FTSE100 


> 


i fn- 


rcH- * 


Sentenced 


--- & 
’jr. 1 ■ ‘■duari^ 


P*. Sail. 
fe-rf'SlB- 


ijl.-tfw 

*Skrt> ic 




' - ’■ "*v-L*!sr 




_.ell 

wdci 
Hk.'Naa- 


J 




#«"««*. as 


^•^-Car^ 

Suff «Sl Bls 

In April Sail 


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XT 

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“■' .. - .'•■• J 

' ; . -• '. J 


’ ■ 1 - 

-y' : ' v 


> S 






* A' 

fi* "fo 


- 1 


J 


<ft • • 


Suard h Fined, but 
Term Is Suspended 


Cirogrtrd bt OarSjtgFrvM Ikqufehn 

■ HVRY, France — The former 
duurman of Alcatel Alsthom SA, 
the French industrial giant, received 
a three-year suspended sentence and 
was fined Tuesday for using com- 
pany funds to pay for security work 
On his private homes. 

* Pierre Suard, who was forced to 
resign in June 1995 after being 
placed under judicial investigation, 
was convicted by a district court in 
the Pans suburb of Evry of abusing 
Corporate funds. He was fined 2 
million francs ($342,000). 

About 40 other executives also 
were convicted in the case. 

Mr. Suard, 62, also was ordered to 
repay 4.9 million francs to Alcatel 
■®Msthom, the cost of the security 
systems put in his three homes. 

; His lawyer said his client would 
appeal. “This condemnation is un- 
just, we dispute the very principle, 
and we are immediately going to 
submit an appeal/’ the lawyer, 
Maurice Guigui, said. 

Mr. Suard told the court he had 
taken the security measures on the 
advice of the government after the 
head of the automaker Renault was 
assassinated in 1986 by members of 
a terrorist group. Action Directe. 

Investigation revealed, however, 
that workers had been paid only 60 
percent of die normal rate for their 
.work on two of his homes in the 
Paris region and another in the 
French Alps in the 1980s. It also 
showed that Mr. Suard had author- 
ized them to overbill the Alcatel CIT 
unit for other services rendered 
Pierre G uiche t, former chairman 
of Alcatel CIT, was acquitted of 
abuse of corporate funds but was 
fined 100,000 francs for forgery. 
Among others convicted in the 
-k case were the two Alcatel C3T man- 
i agers who disclosed the matter in 
.1993 after being fired, Jose Corral 
and Antonio Leal. Leal was ordered 
to jail for three years and fined 2 
million francs, and Corral was sen- 
tenced to six months in prison plus 
an 18-month suspended sentence 
and fined 300,000 francs. 

(Reuters, AFP, AFX) 


Cvmq»ltJfa (Ha Ui fFumitkipiAttn 

BONN — The German unem- 
ployment rate fell, government fig- 
ures indicated Tuesday, but sea- 
sonal factors accounted for much 
of the drop, and a senior govern- 
ment official said economic 
growth was “too weak” to change 
the trend in the country’s unem- 
ployment situation. 

The jobless rate, not allowing for 
swings in seasonal employment, 
fell to 1 1 .3 percent from 1 1 .7 per- 
cent in March. 

The number of unemployed 
workers in Germany dropped to 
4.35 million in April from 4.48 
million in March. But that decline 
was due “entirely to seasonal 


factors,” Bernhard Jagoda, the 
head of the Federal Labor Office, 
said. 

Taking seasonal factors into ac- 
count, the number of jobless work- 
ers actually rose by 8,000 from 
March to April, Mr. Jagoda said. 

Gerhard Kleinherz, a Labor Of- 
fice economist, said a first-quarter 
slowdown in growth hod discour- 
aged some employers from hiring. 

The economy would have ro 
grow more than 3 percent for em- 


ployment to rise, and this was not 
likely to happen, be said. 


likely to happen, be said. 

The federal government has pre- 
dicted economic expansion of 2.5 
percent this year. But a Bundes- 
bank council member, KJaus-Di- 


eter Kuehbacher, said Tuesday that 
forecast was too optimistic. He pre- 
dicted expansion of 2.25 percent. 

Mr. Jagoda said the April jobless 
data were “only a continuation of 
the seasonal spring recovery.” 

He said the latest seasonally ad- 
justed data, which showed the 
labor force shrinking by about 
70,000 to 33.72 million people in 
Febmary after tailing by 150.000 
million in January, indicated “a 
continued negative tendency.” 

Mr. Jagoda added. “The eco- 
nomic impulses arc- still too weak 
to bring about a turnaround in the 
German labor market." 

German joblessness rose to a 
postwar record in the first two 


months of the year. The Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund said in its 
latest report that 80 percent of the 


country’s unemployment was a re- 
sult of “structural burdens’* such 


suit of “structural burdens’* such 
as high nonwage costs and inflex- 
ible labor laws. 

Separately, the government said 
new manufacturing orders rose 1 . 1 
percent in March, with orders from 
abroad rising 2.0 percent, confirm- 
ing that Germany's growth is srilJ 
largely driven by exports. 

“Overseas demand is still the 



2800 


4300 - 

4200- f 

4,00 7N 

4000 U- 


CACAO 

2850 

2700 : 


2550 ~~i 


2250’ 


^'D A M JF 

1998 1997 1996 


'MAM 2100 6 JF 


MAM- 

1997 


Exchange 


A ms t erdam 


main support for the economy,” 
Thomas Mayer, an economist with 


Thomas Mayer, an economist with 
Goldman Sachs Ltd., said. 
“Growth is not creating jobs.” 

(Bloomberg, AP, AFP) 


Italian Inflation Slows to 28 - Year Low of 1 . 7 % 


Reuters 

MILAN — Inflation slowed to its lowest level 
in 28 years in April in Italy, fueling speculation 
that the Bank of Italy may move to lower interest 
rates soon. 

Figures released Tuesday by the narional stat- 
istics institute Istat showed consumer price in- 
creases slowed to 1 .7 percent year-on-year last 
month, compared with 2.2 percent in March, for 
the tamest price performance since 12 months 
that ended in Apni 1969. 

The monthly rate for April was 0. ] percent, the 
same as the March rate. 

Italian bond and futures prices climbed after the 
news, which was viewed as increasing chances 
that the Bank of Italy could cut its official discount 
rate 50 to 75 basis points in the near future. A basis 


point is a hundredth of a percentage point. The 
discount rate, which now stands at 6.75 percent, 
was last reduced in January. 

“The markets are buoyant because people are 


speculating on the possibility of a cut,” Pio De 
Gregorio, an economist at NaiWest Markets in 


Uregono, an economist at IN at west Markets m 
Milan, said. 

The rate of price increases has dwindled sharply 
in the past year, as shown by the year-on-year 
inflation rate of 4.5 percent posted in April 1996. 
Economists say this is due to depressed domesdc 
demand, the high cost of credit and a favorable 
trend in international commodity prices. 

Government ministers and business executives 
have been calling for interest rates to be brought 
down, but Mr. De Gregorio said he expected their 
hopes to be disappointed in the near term. 


“Clearly there is scope for an easing in mon- 
etary policy, but the Bank of Italy would prefer to 
wait for the government’s longer-term budget 
plans and French election results,” be said. 

The center-left government of Prime Minister 
Romano Prodi is due to present its three-year 
rolling plan of economic goals by the end of May. 
The plan sets targets for inflation, economic 
growth and budget deficit levels and will be a 
guide to what steps the government intends to 
lake in its effort to join in European monetary 
union at its scheduled January 1999 start. 

Mr. De Gregorio said the French elections, set 
for May 25 and June 1. also are important ro die 
outlook for Italian rates, because an opposition 
victory in France could mean a delay in monetary 
union. 


Frankfurt 
Copenhagen 
Helsinki 
Oslo 
London . 
Madrid “ 
m an ; 

Parte 

Stockholm 
Vienna , 
Zurich . 


• AEX‘ 

PAX- ...... 

Slock Market 
HEX Genera* ■ 
QBX 

Free too 

StockBcchange 

MtBTEL 

CAC4Q 

SXf« : 

•ATX. • 

SPI ■ 


Close 


..779.S7 


jg53lj7 &2S4.S7 

3,56*28 3^528.78 


■fogs 


3,031.04 agjgjff 
687.03 606J91.. 


4^20,10 *AS$£Q 
527.23 521 ^4- 


2^51.93 2.672.84 
2,901.18 . 2.90&68 
1,2*7.47 1,21135 
3,150.77 ai7$56 


.4 O&Z 
■»f,4g 

r 4-1.09 

.-OJS 

-0,30 

-OB2 


Very briefly; 


Growth in U.S. Spurs Adidas to 33 % Profit Rise 


• British Petroleum Co.’s first-quarter profit rose to £752 
million (51.22 billion) from £629 million a year earlier, on a 
current-cost basis. Current-cost profit values oil inventories ai 
current market prices. 

• Skandia Insurance AB and Trygg-Hansa AB, Sweden’s 
largest insurers, said first-quarter profits rose about 60 percent 
from a year earlier. Skandia’s operating profit came to 1.48 
billion kronor ($187.5 million), while Trygg-Hansa’s pretax 
profit rose to 1.18 billion kronor. 

• Scandinavian Airlines System had a first-quarter pretax 
loss of 269 million kronor, reversing a profit of 31 1 million 
kronor a year earlier. 

• Reed Elsevier PLC will team up with Microsoft Corp. to 
offer its scientific and business publications on the Internet. 


Bloomberg 


Bloomberg News 

HERZOG ENAURACH, Ger- 
many — Adidas AG said Tuesday 
that its first-quarter net profit rose 
33 percent, helped by strong growth 
in the United States amid rising 
sales of shoes and clothing. 

Net profit was 169 million 
Deutsche marks ($98.2 million), up 
from 127 million DM a year earlier. 
Operating profit rose 40 percent, to 
219 million DM from 156 million 
DM. Analysts said the results 
showed Adidas was reaping tire re- 
wards of a four-year marketing cam- 


paign. including its recent sponsor- 
ship of the New York Yankees 


baseball team, aimed at raising its 
global profile and challenging the 
market leader, Nike Inc. 

“The results are simply a reflec- 
tion of a very strong company.’ * said 
Susanne Seibel, an analyst at Merrill 
Lynch & Co., who recommends 
buying the stock. 

Adidas’s shares rose 1 .92 DM to 
close at 182.42. 

Adidas, the fourth -largest seller of 
sports shoes in the United States be- 
hind Nike, Reebok International Ltd. 
and Hla Holding SpA. raised its U.S. 
market share to 52 percent in 1996 
from less than 2 percent in 1992. 

Pretax profit in the first quarter 


rose 42 percent, to 243 million DM 
from 171 million DM. The company 
had forecast pretax profit of “not 
less than” 23S million DM. a rise of 
37 percent 

Since 1992, Adidas has been 
spending more and more money on 
endorsements, sponsorships, com- 
mercials and other marketing cam- 
paigns. The company spent 123 
percent of sales, or roughly $336 
million, on marketing in 1996. up 
from 6-5 percent of sales in 1992. 

Adidas outfitted more than half of 
the 10300 athletes competing in the 
Olympic Games in Atlanta last sum- 
mer and has secured a number of 


other high-profile sponsorships, in- 
cluding an eight-year contract as 
sponsor of die International Am- 
ateur Athletics Federation. The 
company also will sponsor the 
World Cup soccer finals in France 
next year. 

Most recently. Adidas secured a 
10-year sponsorship contract, for 
which it will reportedly pay $95 
million, with the Yankees. 

“It’s too early to judge the impact 
of the Yankees contract, but in terms 
of the visibility it provides, what we 
can say is that the company’s suc- 
cess in the U.S. will continue,” Ms. 
Seibel said. 


Keep Telecom, French Left Says 


Reuters 

PARIS — The opposition Socialists, taking a tough stand 
on privatization before the French parliamentary elections, 
said Tuesday they would scrap the planned partial sale of 
France Telecom if they won power. 

The party, which polls suggest is gaining on the governing 
center-right coalition before the two-stage vote on May 25 and 
June 1 . said it would not proceed with the planned sale of 30 
percent to 35 percent of the telecommunications giant. This 
would mean “abandoning the principle of public service,” a 
Socialist spokesman, Francois Hollande. said. 

Finance Minister Jean Aithuis said the government was 
counting on money from the France Telecom sale to re- 
capitalize ailing state companies. 

Analysis say the state could receive from 48 billion to 73-5 
billion francs ($83 billion to $12.6 billion) from the sale. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Hfeft Low dose P rev. 


High Low Clue Prev. 


High Lav Ctose Prev. 


High low close prev. fTh© Trifa Index 


Tuesday May 6 

Prices In local currencies. 

Teiekvrs 

High I am dose Pick 


Amsterdam 


ABW-AMRO 
fagon 
Ahold 
AtanNofcrf 
Boon Co. 

Bob 'Hess evo 
CSMCH _ 
Ocnttrdie Pel 
DSM 

BbMiar 

FMbADKV 

Getimta 

G-e rococo 

Hogeraeyer 

BefcetafJ 

Hoogowra«o 

HwrtDoootos 

ING Group 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPI* 

N«fltoydGf> 

Kuan* 

OceGiMen 

-PNBpfcElec 


MUD 13M0 13&S0 137.10 
14230 13930 14030 14070 
142.90 14030. 142 1« 

mso 258-10 25? 25730 


3830 3838 
11250 11240 
36030 322 

i 19850 19830 
32-JO 3130 
7630 • 7830 
6290 63JD 
66.90 <890 
17470 17130 
33830 34130 
90J0 9030 
17130 171.90 
7930 7830 
5930 5930 
3930 39-78 
6930 6940 
44JC 4530 

aw » 


Robe® 

Rndamc p 

RoOdcd 
Rorcnto 
Ruvtji Dutch 
Ufflewfom 


10450 10520 
I 9860 9930 
18120 ?82» 
168 1» 
60-70 41 

I 171.20 171 JO 
H.T. ILT. 
35230 35530 
330-50 382 

' 95J0 9478 
4050 40.90 
226 22630 


High 

Deutsche Book 93J0 
DeufT Hetam 39J0 
DresdnerBmft 5860 
FreswOtf 3 64 

FiesenlusMM 157 
Rtatftupp 340 
Gebe 113 

HeUefljgZirt 149-50 
Henkel pM 97J0 
HEW 495 

HocMef 6830 

Heeded «L35 

KOBtadt 537 

Lrtvneyr 7iao 
Linde 1292 

LuflhmWO 2631 
MAN 50850 

MnnnesiTKBifl 692 
Meta«BM«*Kfiot12460 
MMra m 

MundrRiadrR 4370 
Preutsog .444 

RWE 7435 

SAP (M 321 

Sdwtofl 173.10 

SGLCnrbcn 247 
Semens 90-90 

t£ 5 £%r '8 

jar 

VEVT 503 

vSUogen 1215 


Low ctaw 

9230 9175 
3875 3930 
5810 5815 
3S6 361 

15530 154 

33450 33SL5D 
112 112-50 
1485Q 14850 
96 97 JO 
492 492 

67.50 6850 
67 JO 6808 
53150 535 

74 74^0 
1275 1282 
2478 26 

505 508 

687 690 


Sorocncnr 

Sasol 

SBtC 

Tiger 0a& 


133 

133.75 

132J5 

Wndorae lauts 

5X3 

310 

323 

317 


46 

46Ji 

*£75 

Vodafone 

2X0 

2 J1 

2 X0 

275 

Paris 

5/ 

57 J5 

57.75 

WWbreod 

7.92 

IJ2 

7X8 

/X7 

211 

211 

211 

V/maraHdgs 

32* 

310 

314 

320 


7/ 

//JO 

77X0 

WtesHey 

5X5 

4J5 

4.9B 

4.96 

Ac tar 




WPP Group 

2X5 

250 

252 

2X1 

tap 


CAC-4& 2651.93 
Prevteos 267234 


1930 1893 19.10 1873 


Kuala Lumpur c e m ie inr ratio 

K Previous: 109497 


AMM0 Kdgs 

Geftftog 

Md Bonking 

MlJMSMpF 

PelrormsScs 

Ptxfioci 

PebBcBk 

Renong 

Resorts Worid 

RrtbmnsPM 


16450 169 

4330 4345 
442.10 44230 
74J0 74JQ 
312 317 

171-50 172-50 
240 241 

9735 98 

1490 149D 

835 84S 

37B 379 

9830 9335 
500 506 

7S3 798 

1203 1206 


SlmeDoby 

TdetomMnl 


1530 1490 
1370 1330 
2550 2475 
460 5JD 
850 855 

1440 1470 
442 448 

3M 334 
9.10 9.10 

2110 2130 
735 7 JO 
17J0 18 

1TJ0 UJ0 
1750 17 JO 
955 1810 


Madrid 


Baton briae 527.23 
Pmtous: 52815 


London 


FT-SE 180:452830 
PtMtoos 445538 


A£H*?IW 
•ACESA 
Agrros Bcrakm 
AroefiToria 

asv 

BtmeHo 

BaAWer 

BcoOsrtroHbp 

BarPowtar 

BcoSontondw 

CEPSA 

Condnttne 

eg**, 

FECSA 

GosNoSmJ 


Abbey Nall 860 

AffledDoroea) 4J0 


Helsinki 


HEX General todne 3031 34 
PrevtoMs 299757 


Bangkok 


SET ktdec 64838 
PlRtMHi 66810 


A*r Info SVC 

Bangkok 8k F 

KnngThdBk 

PTTEitptor 

StonCwnentF 

3oro Com Bk F 

TVleaxnmki 


TMAbvm _ 
ThafFwmSkF 
UtdComm 


158 160 175 

238 240 240 

29J5 30 31 J5 

372 312 312 

676 676 WO 

151 151 J99 

37J5 37J5 3950 

37 3750 3B 

is 15 JS 

144 145 150 


EiHOA 

HuKomnUl 

Kendra 

Kesta 

Merttt A 

Metro B 

Mttso-SerinB 

Neele 

Nokia A 

taevYMYmne 

OuWkurapvA 

UPlWCynimene 

VMmel 


4150 _ 45 
226 22450 
5150 5070 
7430 74 

!BJ0 7* 
147 14450 
4030 39 JO 
138 13480 
338 333 

204 197 

100 ,99 

123 12150 
8880 8750 


4550 4480 
225 22350 
50-70 5830 
7*50 7350 
18 1758 
145 144 

40 39.10 
13750 136 

33150 S31 

202 1 96-10 
9950 9890 
12250 12050 
88 6810 


Hong Kong 


Hag Star 1357934 
previous 1339934 


Bombay 


BnJojAuto 
modus? Lever 
KkxMstPettm 
tod Dev Bk 


Stole Bfclnda 

StoHAMltwBT 

Ton Em loco 


SasaSObbecVnM 

prettous: 3756J8 

990 imM 880 657JS 
1080 1069 lOTOlO^ 

07.75 *25 43158 4MJ5 

90 8750 83.75 W.75 
411 400 *10-25 400J5 . 

28850 28025 KUS M 
30350 29850 303 ^-50 

307 w 75 306J5 301.75 
21 2025 3050 20J5 
383 374 377 JS 380 


BKEcsiAsla 
Coltiay Ppaflc M50 

acSSSS 2 zjo 


CWnoLtaW 

ancPacSic 




Brussels 


AJraortJ ' 

SarcDlnd 

SSL 

CBR 

Cakuyr 

Detw&eLion 

QednM 


GenBcew* 

Krefflettank 


SMS 


15300 15075 15125 15303 

SS Sm 

9040 B920 8930 8^90 

300 3565 3990 3575 

14600 14350 14350 14575 
T820 ^0 1800 1900 

S200 3120 B15P 

3575 3550 3565 3530 

6500 W10 6410 6440 

2875 2820 ^ 

Son 5320 5370 5290 

lien 14BH 14875 14850 

48 lS 14075 14275 

12800 12625 12700 12725 
5DM SM0 5060 5M 
£so 9330 9400 

$ S S 3 S 

97000 95900 WOOD 97000 


Hong Lung Dev 15J5 
Hcrog Seng Bk 93 
Henderson Iny 9 
Hendgson Ld (2J0 

HKOrinaGas U60 

K® J 

Hutchison Wh 61 -75 

Mh-o g 

B8&- !« 

295 
91 J5 
Hdgs 5 
_ Co. US 

STchWPWfl 6-» 

SwtjeP«A 

wSrfHOOS 

Wnedock 17.90 


US UJ S4J 
27 JO 2BJ1S 27J5 
11.80 11.90 11J0 
7273 73J5 73J5 
22 25 2135 7U5 
3A60 34.90 3450 
*L 50 4280 4240 
38J0 3840 37.90 
955 9 05 9J0 
IS 15.15 14JS 
91 92 90J5 

8.70 300 895 

70 7025 7050 

1235 12J0 1230 
26J5 2490 26J5 
1245 1410 1125 
358 4 410 

205 205 203 

6050 61.25 60J5 
2130 2165 2110 
2050 21-25 21 

1850 1450 1150 

48.10 48A0 «A0 
2JB 2JB 285 
290 293 293 

9050 90J5 90^ 
488 S 488 
810 4 20 8 

6.70 670 6.78 

62 6225 61 JO 

3050 30jM 3050 
17J0 17 JO 17J» 


AiOedDoroeai 430 

Anglian Water 665 

aw 547 

Asda Group 1.1B 

Assoc Br Poods 531 

BAA 126 

Barclay* 13 

Bass 230 

BAT nO 550 

BankScMtort 3J9 

BhtoCWe 430 

BOC Group 9-54 

Boats 7.23 

BP8M 125 

BrtTAerasp 1101 

BiflAUvroy* 497 

BG 1J9 

BrBLand SJM 

BrftPekra 735 

iSflSwi 152 

BiffTetecoui 442 

BTR 276 

Bunaair Cuttrol 1040 

Burton Gp 145 

Cable Wireless 465 

CndburySchw 5.10 

Carton Carom 5.19 

Corranl Union 743 

Compost Gp 678 

CourtouWs 130 

Dtaons 539 

Etoaroarroponert* 402 
EMl Group 1275 

Energy Gtcxjo 495 

ErterartseOfi 420 

Fora totortcl 1^0 

Gem Acddert 9.19 

G£C . 368 

GKN 967 

GteoWeaeoroe 1220 

GroncdoGp 193 

Grand Mel 122 

GRE 3 

GreenofisGp 5.13 

Ce lu fyr 11B 

GUS 678 

How 569 

HsacHidgs 17.14 

ICl 770 

mm) Tobacco 410 


8X3 

BX3 

£93 

322 

313 

319 

3 

250 

394 

313 

5 

306 

318 

308 

315 

£7B 

£64 

£75 

5X9 

356 

549 


845 838 
427 425 

457 654 

442 436 

1.17 1.17 

535 431 

5.26 5.10 

1172 1145 

826 817 

533 422 

191 376 

430 426 

954 9A7 

7.18 7J36 

331 127 

1284 1257 
49S 488 

170 132 

587 582 

735 7JM 
5l97 567 

1X7 1X6 

459 457 

266 261 
IDL40 10.18 

154 163 

484 471 

5.16 £15 

519 5X7 

7.16. 7.1S 
478 476 

334 336 

537 530 

401 357 

1263 1235 
492 488 

420 415 

160 156 

9.14 9 

163 164 
964 959 

1203 1184 


Pryor 

Repsoi 

SevBanoEJec 
Tabacntero 
Tetefeudar 
Union Fenasa 
MalencCtowrf 


22200 21660 
1750 1685 

5800 5650 

6820 6660 
IC2AJ 10000 
1505 1450 

22240 22000 
4550 4415 

32500 32190 
11530 11220 
*850 4750 
2515 2440 

7850 7700 

10910 10530 
1250 1225 

32000 31020 
1715 16B0 
2670 2610 

6160 6100 
1315 1285 

7540 7390 

3845 3805 

1275 1245 
1820 1770 


21460 27780 
1685 1730 

5700 5790 
6740 6660 
10050 10100 
1475 1415 
22B5Q 22200 
4445 4490 

32400 32150 
11230 11330 
4750 4820 
2455 2465 

7000 7000 

10560 10750 
1225 1225 
31290 31700 
1690 1675 
2625 2S7D 
6100 6100 
1290 1305 

7490 7430 

3815 3825 
1750 1255 

1820 1800 


AlrLtautde 
Alcnta Aisjh 
Axo-UAP 
BroKSdre 

BIC 

BNP „ 

C onte Plu s 

CcITBfOW 

Casino 

CCF 

Ceteten 

ChrisaanDtar 

CLF-Doda Firm 

Credit Aoricote 

OiTOie 

Bt-Aiju«atoe 

ErtdrariaBS 

Eurtxfiswy 


GeaEOHi . 

Hava* 

Irortd 

Laferye 

tW 

LVMH 


Lyon. Eau* 

MdwfciB 


Manna 


PSEbtetoB 277853 
PlMtUB 2734X2 


AwJoLond 

UPMRpM 


BkPMBpM 
OP Homes 
MbdOq Elec A 
Metro Bonk 
Petron 
POBaik 
PhB Long DM 
5enMlguteB 
SMPrbHHdg 


1825 1850 22 

1935 19 JO 19J5 
156 157 156 

10 1035 1035 
90 91 113 

590 600 590 

BXO 890 9.40 

305 307 JO 305 
736 780 1465 

70J0 71 76J0 

£90 730 £90 


PmtxsA 

Pernod Rknrf 

PeugoteOt 

PtnoafrPitat 

Proroodea 

«*nofltt 

Raxd 

RtvPouteneA 
So nofl 
SdmeMer 

sea 

SG5 Thomson 
SteGenetnta 

Cfirtprhn 

StGcbatn 

Sue 


065 873 

191 191X0 
873 677 

646 453 

360.10 360X0 

741 753 

901 90B 

236 247 

1052 1067 

3675 3488 

27140 275.50 

252.10 257.10 

662 643 

862 867 

544 549 

1265 1265 
864 877 

565 567 

855 867 

9X0 9X5 

6J5 £65 

784 788 

43530 440 

812 B34 

38180 383X0 
976 990 

2090 2117 

1397 1402 

540 549 

326.10 32650 
368X0 371 JO 

302 30&J0 
587 >614 
2460 2470 

1970 1973 

139 JO 141 

1565 15S* 

19230 19330 
553 55B 

326-50 329.90 
1026 109 
*60.10 470 

643 MS 
2696 2m 
776 782 

286 290 

71B 719 

ISO 18230 
482 *aoo 
88J0 89X0 
360 367 


EtediteuxB 
Ericsson B 
Henries B 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
MaDoB 
Nortbaiken 


PtxumAJpiorri 

SontfAB 


SmdvfcB 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S-EBcntwiA 
Skandia For* 
aunstatB 
SKFB 

SpartmokHiA 


471 

*62X0 

465 

*62 

266 

256 25BX0 

244 

1220 

1180 

1185 

1178 

531 

520 

525 

515 

361 

3S5 

356 

354 

257 

2S1 

253 246X0 

2*5 

241 

2*2 

2*7 

24B 240X0 

243 23£5D 

210 

202 

210 

203 

215 207X0 

213J0 207X0 

183 

178 

178 177X0 

B3X0 

81X0 

82 

B3 

349 

235 

240 239X0 

3*2 337X0 

3*0 

346 


Jan. 1. 1982 - 100. 


Stan A 
SvKandtesA 
Volvo G 


1B2 m 179 177. 
147 143 146J0 143 
190 190 190 J90 
118 115 11&J0 113J0 
225 222 224 220JO 
214 21250 214 212 


Sydney. 


AlOrakartes: 2512X8 
PravtoMe 249238 


Amcor 

ANZBWng 

BHP 

Baml 

Brorobies ln£ 
CBA 

CCAroaH 
Coles Myer 
Canola) 

CRA 

CSR 

Fasten Brew 
Goodawi FW 
ta Austmia 
Lend Loose 


8X2 8-38 

830 £13 

I BJIZ 18X3 
3J9 374 

2335 2330 
14.11 13X9 
1465 I4JU 
639 632 

630 £23 

1931 19.10 
4J9 4J0 

252 159 

1X8 1X5 
1259 12X7 


Wortd Index 
Raglonal IndwcM 

Asia/Pacific 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 

Industrial (ndmM 

Capita] goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
MsceVaneous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
Utilities 


Lrovol 

Change 

%changa 

. year to data 
% change 

180.01 

+2.83 

■ +1.80 

+729 

117.89 

+3.82 

+3.17 

-4.49 

167.27 

+2.12 

+1.28 

+3.77 

187.30 

+3.08 

+1.87 

+15.68 

147.83 

+2-23 

+1-53 

+29.19 

195.45 

+2.08 

+1.08 

+14.35 

183-87 

+4.41 

+2.46 

+13.90 

187.75 

+3.90 

+2.12 

+9.98 

116.70 

+138 

+1.62 

+0-21 

161.16 

+2.61 

+1.65 

-0.38 

185.94 

+3.40 

+1.86 

+6.02 

147.75 

+1.95 

+1.34 

+7.60 

135.74 

+1.45 

+1.08 

-538 


|77>8 International HaroU Tribune Worid Stock Index C tracks the U.S. doBur vabieo ot 


280 HonwtbnaBy Imostabla stocks ham S5 countries. For mom M ommb an . a tree 
\boatdBt Is BvnBaMo by writing to Trio Trtb lndux.181 Avenue Criarios ds GauHo, 
\S2S21Nsu8lyCerieK. Franco. ~ - - - ■ - 


Ctsnpaed by Bloomberg Nms. 


MIMHdgE 
tal AuHBcmk 
NteMuteteHdB 
News Corp 
Pocffie Dunlop 
Pioneer inn 
Pub Broadcast 
51 Georoe Bonk 
WMC 


2455 24 

131 1J1 


1802 1779 
1X4 1-9) 

558 5X7 
350 3.49 

430 *38 

639 645 

809 7.96 

730 755 

732 7.1S 

10J9 3040 
352 351 


Mitsui Ridosn 

Mitsui Trust 

MurotaMlg 

NEC 

Hlton 

NUOoSec 

Nintendo 


^ Steel 
Motor 

NKX 

NomuroSec 

NTT 

HTT Don 

I^Poper 

Osaka Go* 

Ricoh 

Rohm 

5dkumBk 

Sankyo 

SamwBank 

Sanyo Elec 

Secoai 


Mexico 


AiteA 
BawcdB 
Cases CPO 
OfraC 

EnpModwoB 

GpaCaraoAl 

GpoFBcnraer 


Prevtoot: 376458 SaO PaUlO Bow^olndttl^H 


Taipei snekMoraei wumtxKSi 

^ PrevtoOE 8269X3 


GitoRnlnburso 

35b dart Me* 

TteevtnCPO 

TelMexL 


4550 4350 4550 
167* 1£B2 1672 
26X5 2650 2635 
1256 1234 1256 
*130 413C *150 
45JD 4170 4535 
1.78 152 1JB 

2750 2750 27J0 
2850 29.10 29X5 
9450 «30 92X0 
14X4 1658 16X6 


PievtaOB 1233308 


AMunauAreic 
BoaCmnmBte 
Bca Ftoenram 
Bco dl Ram 


La&roke 2J8 

Land Sec 866 

Lnmo 239 

LesteGeteGrp 4x2 

Lloyds TSBfti 5J5 

Lucosvarty 154 


1656 1£17 
7.13 7 

4 

7 £94 

235 23* 

814 805 

236 234 

437 431 


MortsSpenrar 554 


665 '556 
1X8 1.91 


Oerttottokmo 

Erflsan 

ENI 

Hat 

GeneraB ASSlc 

IM1 

IMA 

ntes® 


MEPC <65 

Mercwy Asset 1876 
NManteGdd 231 


552 *35 

4X4 4X2 


Jakarta 


orepraBefcdegXgxo 

PrevtoBS: 65279 


Copenhagen 


Stack butecHK 
Prtrtous: 54954 


Cadm 
nww« 
toiDamkeBk 
QSSvereteroB 
B5I9126 
fUMB 
Kob LuBhavne 
MwHonflskB 

E_I — »— g 


■ 400 TOO 300 

’ 415 418 4M 

: *5 885 

S S3 s 

rm 600 589 

l21i S2 22 S» ^ 
. S wo 

654 66182 655 

819 82188 816 

1 s s | 

r SB 336 ro 


Astra nrt 

BrlnltlMW 

Bk Negara 
GudungGarrn 

IBdocemwJ 

Indofood 

IndosCT 

SarnpoemoHM 

SenrerrC^' 

TeWs«wi*oii 


6150 6050 6125 6000 

1800 W75 1W0 1775 
1525 1500 m 1«5 

9725 9OT 9TO 9700 

3125 3100 3100 31W 

5200 5150 5200 5W5 
7100 <950 7100 6875 

Off ?7D0 97M 90S 
OQS 5925 597S 6025 
3625 3575 3600 3550 


Johannesburg »«£J3iS 

... -youi Rom 


Natl Power - 523 

MM 7J4 

Ned £72 

Orange 119 

P30 £32 

Pegison 730 

POOngtor 1.15 

POMfGen 638 

PremerFrenefl 4J1 

PTwJwSd 425 

RaBrartPP 486 

Rank Group 
ReddB Cake 
Redbnd 
Reed Urt 
ROntaUMOte 4X8 

Reams Hdgs £90 

Ream 
RMC Group 


1X67 1X53 
118 117 


530 5.13 

7 SI 726 


672 £57 

117 117 


£12 &m 

738 7,14 


1.13 1.12 

633 £31 


Metetejoncn 

Montedison 

OVelff 

Puuvdat 

PVeffi 

HAS 

Roto Sanco 
5 Paolo Torino 
Stet 

TeteccBi Itoto 
TIM 


12050 11635 
3730 3680 
*400 4390 

1778 1252 

23550 22850 
2*40 2425 

3730 9BS5 
8745 8695 

5810 STBS 
29SSC 29150 
15105 14770 
2360 2300 

JB5 5850 
7*70 7335 

18385 10175 
1093 1110 

500 499 SO 
2550 2500 
3810 3780 
14045 13730 
17390 17380 
11215 11275 
8280 8260 
4625 4595 
5405 5360 


BradeicoPfd 
Brahma PH 
CrteoPtd 
CESPPM 
Copd 
Ekrtotra 
ItoubcncoPtd 
Lftlrt Scrvlctos 

PBtraEresPW 

PtrfstoLuz 

SWNoctonte 

Souza Cruz 

TdebrwPfd 

Tetsris 

TatorJ 

TetesoPId 

UnBunco 

Usiminas Pfd 

CVRD PM 


9X0 890 

727X1 725X0 
*7 JO *£60 
57X1 56-5D 

16J0 1£70 
488X0 *81X0 
595X0 590X0 
47400 469X0 
34150 339.97 
moo 229 J0 
172X0 170X0 
3800 37-50 
9X0 895 

126J0 123X0 
170X0 168X0 
778X0 1 76X0 
316X0 309 JO 
40X0 39 JO 
U7 1J5 
2730 27X0 


890 890 

727X0 726X0 
47.10 4£40 
57X0 56.51 
1£70 1699 
487X0 479X0 
594X0 587X0 
469X0 470X0 
3*0X1 337X0 
230X0 228X0 
171X0 170X0 
3800 37 .99 
9J7 895 

12620 122J0 
169X0 170X0 
177X0 17650 
313X0 306X0 
39 JO 40X0 
1J6 1J*0 
27X0 2645 


Camay Lite Ins 


Chtoo'TBng Bk 
China Devefpcte 
Odna Steel 
Orel Bark 
Formosa PMsflc 
Hua Han Bk 

;mt commBk 
NonYoPtasncs 
SHhKangLHe 
ToSWBl 


UttMfcro_ ., 

UMWtortdCMn 


161 16) 
117 118 

69 69 

11150 114 

29X0 20X0 
11650 117 JO 

67 67 

115 116 

68 6SJC 
70J0 7050 

97 97 

9650 97 JO 
5650 5650 
6650 66 

69 JO 69 JO 


1460 1470 
811 B30 
5090 5090 
1620 1640 
I860 1900 
720 729 
9*00 9500 
871 883 
607 616 
379 387 
802 807 


Mtetmex 

Moore 


Newbridge Ni 
NaronttoJnc 


SteboRwy 
SeHsul Caron 
Setisri House 
SnwbElevm 
Sharp 

Shikoku El Pwr 
StVmtaj 

sawteiffl 

5Wsekto 

Shizuoka Bk 

SafttKHik 

Sony 

Saadtome 

Sum Boom Bk 

SumttChefn 

SumOoroo Elec 

SuredMeld 

SumHTnal 

Tateho Phans 

TtetedaChem 

TDK 

TaTioku El Pwr 
TteadBank 

T0W0 Martw 
Tokyo S Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Ctep. 
Toner 

Toppan Prtnr 
Toepybid 


Tokyo 


NDW 225: 28180X2 
PrevtoUK 19514X5 


Seoul 


Cnrooositeto*K70ur 
Pmtous TUUP 


ABnaroato 
AB Nippon Air 
Amwur 
AsateBa* 


Dacorn 

Daewoo Heavy 

%*££*■ 
Kerea SPwr 
Korea Eah Bk 
Korea Mob TW 
LGSroniojn 
Pahang inn SI 
SanswrgDWay 
Samsung Elec 
SUnhanBank 


99000 97200 98000 98500 
5500 5150 52*0 5390 

18700 1730C 17800 1B100 
16500 16200 16400 16500 
27000 26300 77000 26700 
5560 5300 5350 5500 

420000 *11500 412000 415000 
28000 27300 27600 28100 
53500 52800 52800 53700 
42800 41000 41300 43100 
61500 60600 61*00 61100 
10500 10200 10300 10500 


Asa hi Own 
Asted Glass 
Bk Tokyo MOW 
Bh Yokohama 
Brideesrone 
Canon 
QuibuEteC 
OwgotuElec 
Dot Wpp Print 
Dteel 

DaWcWKtng 


Oahvu&jnk 

DtevraHouse 

DateraSec 

DDI 

Oenso 

East Japan Ry 


Singapore 


un 

9X9 

Roistoycp 152 

Royal Bk Scot 5X9 


AngtoAtottrt W 2»a 


Aflg mwg* 1 

Mr ,nd 


Frankfurt 


AMS 9 1300 

H 1B5J0 

69.40 

8£20 

snag 4420 

BMW 1 528 

OWGCMWfc 16-0-70 
CXWtoSeibaBlE 4810 

WntarBenr 13W 
Dggussa flOJO 


Mi 

s| n 

SIS 

85X5 85X5 

u 44.10 4^0 

■i'ii 

13660 134X0 13820 

*781 0 


&h 


Gencor 

jSrtolH«s 

leg weCcot 
Annies Indl 

uSvjkas 

SffiS. 

M««» 

NfflWpO* 

W0f2.^,r.a 


m JB 

’S m A 

lilt 

<n*n 6025 6825 6^ 
3*0 335 333 3j| 

IS £ ”1 ”1 

9* 9SU; on *A9G 


groSUep « 1& ^ 

SS'SESU 7135 TLX> TV* TVfi 


RTZreg 10X3 

Roycl&SunAR 5X3 

Sotewny 3J7 

Stensbuiy 348 

Schraders 1815 

ScteNewaste £96 

Sort Power 173 

Seairlcar 3 

severe Trem im 

SheOTraaspR >1X3 

Stebe 9.55 

SraiOi Nephew 175 

SraBbKBae 10.12 

SrteltaM 

ahemEtee 

Stogeraoeh xm 

Blond Owner 9X7 

ToretLyte £55 

Ten 349 

Thornes Wate £80 

31 Gawp £21 

Tl Group SbSO 

Tomkins 175 

UnSnef 1£69 

Utd Assurance 4.98 

LM News 7X8 

UldUHidcs 671 


449 443 
. £22 £12 
423 431 

4X9 435 
874 858 

3X6 357 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY-7, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


japan Stocks Surge, 
But Warnings Sound 


Concerns Center on Taxes and Rates 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

Inti-riuttuuui! It f nth! tribune 


\ TOKYO — Japanese share prices 
jumped to their highest levels in 
nearly five months Tuesday, but 
analysts warned against euphoria, 
saying lingering worries about the 
economy and rising interest rates 
raised serious questions about fur- 
ther major gains. 

Taking their lead from the United 
States, where many leading aver- 
ages reached record highs Monday, 
investors drove the Nikkei average 
of 225 shares above the 20.000- 
point level to finish at 20. 1 80.92. up 
666. 17 points, or 3.4 percent. It was 
the average's highest close since 
Dec. 17. 

Buying by domestic pension 
funds and foreign investors contrib- 
uted strongly to the rise. 

Analysts said the unexpected 
strength of the rally underscored ten- 
tative optimism about the strength of 
Japan's economic recovery*. But fur- 


Record Profit 
Likely at Sony, 
Analysts Say 


Bloomberg Ne h-j 

TOKYO — Sony Corp. is 
expected to report record profit 
this week, analysts say. on soar- 
ing sales of its PlayStation 
game players and digital video 
cameras and the effects of the 
dollar's rise against the yen. 

Sony's shares rose 140 yen 
(SI. 10). or 1.5 percent, to a re- 
cord close of 92500 Tuesday on 
expectations that the company 
will report robust profit growth 
Thursday for the year that 
ended in March. 

Analysts say Sony's results 
are likely to match the com- 
pany's forecast, made in Feb- 
ruary, of record profit of 132 
billion yen. The stronger dollar 
and weaker yen over the past 
year mean the 70 percent of 
Sony's sales that come from 
exports translate into more yen 
when the proceeds are brought 
back to Japan. 


ther large rises in the Nikkei, which 
has risen 15 percent since April 10. 
were unlikely soon, they said. 

“The atmosphere of the market is 
certainly more optimistic than it has 
been for months,” said Masahiro Na- 
kaofSanwa Research Institute. “But 
it's definitely not yet time to break 
out the rose-colored spectacles." 

In particular, he said, investors 
were unlikely to bid the Nikkei sig- 
nificantly higher over the next 
couple of months because of worries 
about a 7 trillion yen ($55.3 billion) 
increase in sales and income taxes 
that took effect in April. 

Consumer spending surged in 
February and March as people acted 
before the national sales tax was 
raised to 5 percent from 3 percent, 
and spending at large department 
and electronics stores has since 
dropped noticeably. 

The government says the 
dampening effect of the tax increase 
will disappear by summer, but Mr. 
Naka said many investors would be 
hesitant about buying shares until 
the longer-term consumer response 
to the increase was more apparent. 

The economy grew 3.6 percent in 
the year that ended March 3 1 . mak- 
ing Japan the world's fastest-grow- 
ing industrialized country in the 
period. But some private econo- 
mists say economic growth could 
slow to as little as 1 percent this year, 
partly because of die tax increases. 

Mamoru Yamazaki, senior econ- 
omist at Paribas Capital Markets in 
Tokyo, said rising interest rates also 
threatened to prevent any further 
strong rise in Japanese share prices. 

“Right now, shares are caught in 
a loop, ' Mr. Yamazaki said. 

By increasing optimism about the 
economy, he said, rising share 
prices make it easier for monetary 
authorities to raise interest rates. 
Anticipation of such a rise has lifted 
bond yields, he said — but also will 
tend to make shares less attractive. 

Investors chasing such brand- 
name exporters as Hitachi Ltd. and 
Toyota Motor Corp. led the market 
Tuesday, although there was buying 
across die board. Along with other 
Japanese blue-chip shares, the ex- 
porters have benefited from the re- 
cent weakness of die yen, which 
makes their products more compet- 
itive abroad. 

Economists said die bulk of the 
buying had come from Japanese 
pension funds. 


Is Sally Aw Ready to Sell? 


Klntimherg News 

HONG KONG — In 1957, Sally Aw Sian inherited 
. her father’s fortune — built on Tiger Balm, the ubi- 
quitous Asian salve — and, at 25, began to parlay it into 
one of the region's largest publishing companies. 

Forty years later, investors are betting that Miss 
Aw. now one of Asia’s richest and most powerful 
women, is about to sell the company she built. Sing 
Tao Holdings Ltd. 

At 65 and with no children to take over from her. 
Miss Aw is studying an offer from 
Nanyang Press (Malaysia) Bhd. 
to buy her family’s 68 percent 
interest in Sing Tao for 1 .8 billion 
Hong Kong dollars ($232.6 mil- 
lion). according to one of Sing 
Tao’s rivals, the Hong Kong Eco- 
nomic Journal. Executives at the 
companies declined to comment 
on the report. 

The sale, which many analysts 
say is likely, would end a dynasty 
that traces its history back to 
1908. when Aw Boon Haw. Sally 
Aw's father, took over the family 
pharmacy and started marketing 
his mentholated balm. 

It also may cast doubt over die 
future of Hong Kong’s newspaper 
industry once the British colony returns to Chinese 
rule July 1 . Miss Aw, who endowed the Sing Tao 
School of Journalism in Canada, may want to jettison 
her publishing interests to avoid any conflicts with 



Sally Aw Sian, bead of Sing Tao. 


a slump in Canada's property market, where Sing Tao 
invests, are hammering the company's profit. 

The Economic Journal's report did not quote Sing 
Tao officials by name, but investors apparently took 
the news to heart. Sing Tao shares jumped 12 percent 
Tuesday to close at 3.80 dollars in Hong Kong in 
heavy trading. 

Some analysts said they were not surprised by the 
report “The thing for her is that there's no natural 
successor,” said Robert Fong, an analyst at HSBC 
James Capel in Hong Kong. 

For Miss Aw, the reported of- 
fer, which values the company at 
about another 12 percent above 
where its shares were trading 
Tuesday, may be too good to pass 
up. 

Sing Tao, which no longer owns 
Tiger Balm, reported a net loss of 
146 million dollars far the year 
ended March 1996 and is expected 
to earn just 14 million dollars this 
year, ahead of an expected profit 
recovery in 1998. The Malaysian 
company is controlled by the busi- 
nessman Quek Leng Chan, who 
also controls Guoco Group Ltd. of 
Hong Kong and Hong Leong 
Group of Malaysia. 


Ilr WwriJpd fttVi 


Helen Kwan, a spokeswoman for Hong^ Leong, 


Beijing over what she mints. 

'Tao “has been moving toward 


Over die years. Sing 
Peking,' * said Emily Lau. a pro-democracy member of 
Hong Kong’s soon-to-be-disbanded legislature. “But 
it occasionally shows flashes of independence.'' 

For Miss Aw, who was traveling in China and 
unavailable for comment, the financial picture may 
be just as important as the journalistic one. Rising 
competition in Hong Kong's newspaper industry and 


declined to comment except to say that the Quek 
family, which had no investments in China, planned 
to expand its property business in Hong Kong and 
China. 

Miss Aw may have other good reasons to sell. 

For one, Hong Kong’s reversion to Chinese rule 
may cause headaches for local newspaper publishers. 
Next Media Group, Hong Kong’s most popular pub- 
lisher, said this year that it had tried three times in the 
(last 12 years to sell shares to the public but that each 
time, potential bankers had balked because Next's 
publications had irritated Chinese leaders in die past 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

14000 
135D0 | 

13000 
1200 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo;. y 
Nikkei 22S;-;:- : 




Exchange 


Hang Seng 


Close' 







Singapore ’ 

Straits Times 

2 ^ 55.«(8 3 

Sydney 

AS Ordinaries 

£51240 

Tokyo -■ 

DKd(8i225.. 

■ ; 19^4.75 *3*1 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

ijB0.ee : 

Bangkok 

.SET 

643.28 ’. :'«60.1O ■ 



Seoul 

. Composite Index 

781.57 . ■ to ;-.m m 

- - r-. V- 

Taipei 

Stock Martel Index 8^9427. -$2®,43v.+Di30| 

ManSa - 

PSE • 


Jakarta. 

Composite tndex 

653,60 ■ m 

Weffingtoo 

NZSE-4G 

;%30524 2£7B?St 

Bombay 

Sensaiveirxis* 


Source: Telekurs 


Imcnsncnl Rereld Tribune 

Very briefly: 



•Thailand plans to kick off its 50 billion baht (SI. 87. billion), 
borrowing program aimed at rescuing troubled property and' 
finance companies Wednesday, after a five-day delay. - 


Ekran Bhd-'s executive chairman. Ting Pek Khiing. filed aj 

T suit, legal sources, 


Seoul Plans to Privatize Four Companies 


Bloomberg Ne ws 

SEOUL — The government announced plans 
Tuesday to sell shares in four, state-owned 
companies in the second half of this year but ruled 
out selling controlling stakes to the nation’s 
dominant industrial groups. 

The Finance Ministry said in a repeat to the 
National Assembly that it would privatize Korea 
Telecom, KoreaTotacco & Ginseng Corp., Korea 
Heavy Industries Co. and Korea Gas Corp. 

The government has pledged to sell the compa- 
nies as part of its drive to improve the economy’s 
competitiveness by 1998. South Korea also com- 
mitted itself to deregulation as part of last year’s 
agreement to join the Organization of Economic 
Cooperation and Development 

The four companies have assets totaling of 
23.767 trillion won ($26.6 billion) but posted 
profits of less than 700 billion won last year. 

Ruling out speculation it would sell majority 
stakes in the companies to South Korea’s dom- 
inant industrial groups, or chaebol , the ministry 


said it would limi t each share- 
holder to a 5 percent stake, 
though it eventually would 
raise the limit to 10 percent 
The ministry said it 
would list Korea Telecom on 
die Korea Stock Exchange in 
the second half of this year, 
instead of before June 30 as 
originally planned. The gov- 
ernment has been selling 


shares in the nation's largest 
telephone co mpany to the 
public since 1986. By the end 
of 19%. it had sold 28.8 per- 
cent of Telecom. 

foreign investors will be 
allowed to own as much as 20 
percent of Telecom once it is 
listed on the exchange, and as 
much as 33 percent by 2001, 
the ministry said. 


100 million ringgit ($39.9 million) libel 
said, accusing a local freelance journalist of defaming him in 1 
articles published on the Internet about the Bakun dam project' 
the Malaysian company is building. - • 

• Malaysian passenger-car sales rose 69 percent in March, to! 

27,701 units. j 

• South Korea will become the world’s fonnb-largest auto-! 
maker by 2000. with 13 percent of the global market, as a; 
result of aggressive expansion overseas, the Korea Auto-! 
mobile Manufacturers’ Association predicted. Automaking 1 
capacity will grow at a 6.4 percent annual average, it added. J 

• Hongkong Land Holdings Ltd. will buy back as much 5\ 
percent of its stock, worth about $319 million at the current! 
market price, to persuade investors of its value after a 20* 
percent price decline this year, an executive said. 


*■* 




• Si 


■ , J . ■ ,-,r 7 * 

, ,mm — - Ur 


• Swire Pacific Ltd.’s long-term corporate credit rating was ; 
affirmed as “A” by Standard & Poor’s Corp. 


• New Zealand's unemployment rate rose to 6.4 percent in the [ 
first quarter of 1997 from 5.9 percent in the previous quarter. • 

• Century Zinc Ltd. signed a compensation package with 
Australian aborigines, clearing the way for the unit of RTZ- ■ 
CRA Ltd. to develop the world's largest untapped zinc’ 

deposit. Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP. AFX > 


Romanian 


Investment 


Summit 


Bucharest. October 29 & 30. 1997 


Romania is increasingly all Hiding (he aiiemion of (he internniinnal investment 
eonimuniiy. To assess future investment potential and to highlight the progress 
Romania is making in its hid to position itself as one oT tlu* more exeiting 
investment opportunities in the world, the International I lerald Tribune is planning 
in convene a major investment summit in Bucharvsi on October 29 fl JO. 


President firm! Constant incscu will give the opening keymrtc address of the 
“Romania Investment Sum mil." Other speakers will include key members ol 
Rumanian government and business as well as business and financial leaders 

from around the world. 


To ensure that you do not miss this very special event, 
please contact our conference office for further details. 


Rn-ncla Erdmann Ilagerly 

I n k-r national Herald Tribune Conference Office. 63 Long Acre. London WC2L am 
II I. (44 171) 420 0307 l ax: (44 171) 8 36 0717 E-mail: bhagprlyfrihUiim 


k 


ftctalV 

i iif uoici ns mm M iisru’in 



Blue Phone Line and Red Faces for Salomon 


Bloomberg Ne»s 

HONG KONG — Salomon Broth- 
ers Inc. said an “embarrassing but hon- 
est mistake” may have led some in- 
vestors to dial into a telephone sex line 
instead of a conference call for a $ 1 .25 
billion bond sale by the Philippine gov- 
enunenL 

The sale to U.S.-based investors was 
indefinitely postponed April 17 after 
Salomon could not find enough buyers. 
The investment bank cited a deteri- 
orating UJS. bond market 

The confusion over the call arose 


after MCI Communications Corp. 
provided a telephone number that it 
said Salomon could use for the call 
April 10. 

The number, however, connects 
listeners to a service, at a price of $3.99 
a minute, that welcomes them to “the 
wonderful world of wet bodies.” 

MCI and Salomon later determined 
that the number was incorrect and 
changed it by one digit a Hong Kong- 
based representative of the investment 
bank said. 

But, although Salomon informed 


potential callers of die correct number, 
the incorrect one was posted on (be 
firm’s own internal message system. 

Salomon initially denied the inci- 
dent had occurred. 

“It was an embarrassing but honest 
mistake,” Katherine D'Arcy. a 




:T m . S 


as* w« 


: tc , . 

?»»;.•. si. • 


mokes woman for Salomon in Hong 
Kong. said. Tie Philippine central 


said. Tie 
bank may sell the bonds as soon as this 
month, after the U.S. Federal Reserve 
Board's next policy-making meeting 
May 20. analysts at MMS International 
in Hong Kong said. 


iFOjj TheCrans 
sHV| Montana Forum 

’5‘\ Switzerland - VIII yearly meeting 
* 1997, JUNE 26 to 29 



An exclusive business meeting at the highest level 
with limited access where you will meet, informally, 
governmental representatives and the most signifi- 
cant Chairmen and CEO’S from Europe (Western, 
Central and Eastern), Central Asia and the South 
Mediterranean (more than 60 countries represented). 

A Forum based on direct personal contacts, concrete 
issues and real business opportunities. No useless 
debates; only concrete approaches with more than 
150 specialised round tables and restricted meet- 
ings! 

In June 1997 the main topics are on infrastructures, 
tourism, logistic and distribution. National focuses 
are Egypt, Estonia, Kirghistan, Lebanon (the 
reconstruction), Morocco, South Africa and 
Caucausus. 


Information and Registration: 
phone (+41 22) 791 70 40 
fax (+41 22) 791 70 41 


HITS : Hell Weeks in Hollywood : 


Continued from Page 13 


edited scene. “It makes the 
process a little crazy.” 

Barry Sonnenfeld. whose 
films include “Get Shorty" 
and who is directing “Men in 
Black.’ * a $90 million science- 
fiction adventure comedy set 
for summer release, had a 
comfortable 1 1-month post- 
production. But dial is a luxury 
almost unknown in the sum- 
mer-movie business today. 

He said recently that the 
pressure to shorten the post- 
production period was driven 
in part by the studios' need to 
recoup high costs: “More and 
more films rely on visual ef- 
fects. and they cost more 
money. Because they cost 
more, they have to be released 
sooner because of the carry- 
ing costs of the money.” 

Several studio executives 
disputed this. “We try and 
make our films as econom- 
ically as possible.” said Dav- 
id McCann, senior vice pres- 


ident of post-production for ! 
>isney Motion Pictures • 


Who is on the 
Board of Directors 
of Akzo Nobel? 

zvzviv.netherlander.com 


(press once on the archive button) 



The W Netherlander 


ROCK-SO L-I D AND J.CTNTO I J E 


Walt Disney 
& Television, “but we don’t \ 
try and finish a movie quickly • 
in order to recoup our invest- ' 
meat.” The post-production ! 
schedule for Disney films — ’ 

22 weeks for most live-action ! 
films, 26 weeks for musicals ■ 
or films with visual effects — ; jf) 
has not changed in a decade, • 
he said. What everyone seems ] 
to agree on. though, is that the *• 
stakes are sizable and the \ 
deadlines unforgiving. 

The July 4 weekend. In- ■ 
dependence Day in the \ 
Unitcu Suites, is one of the ■ 
busiest movie-going periods ’ 
of the year. When “True « 
Lies." Mr. Cameron’s last ; 
movie, missed its July 4 open- ! 
ing in 1994 and was delayed ■ 
until later that month, the es- ! 
limared loss was $30 million, * 
said Steve Newman, the ' 
film's publicist. 

Mr. De Bont said that when * 
he starred making “Speed 2" . 
for Fox last year, the studio ■ 
set an approximate release ! 
date of late July. When the • 
studio decided to open in \ 
early June, it figured that die ■ 
overtime and other costs of ; 
bringing the movie out early ! 
would be about $5 million. - 
including a $3 munun addi- ! 
tiqn to the approximately $15 ■ 
million budget for computer- ] 
generated effects. £ l 




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Other costs included rent- _ 
ing three sound-editing stages 
instead of one. additional 
computer workstations and 
overtime for almost everyone 
involved. Bur the expense is 
justified in the studio's eyes, 
the director said, because of 
the potential gain in ticket 
sales if the movie can be es- 
tablished as an early hit. set- 
ting up a long summer run. 

The omnipresence of com- 
puters. once billed as a time- 
saving boon, apparently has 
not helped much. 

In the old days — three or 
four years ago — editors cut 
and spliced strips of celluloid 
on motorized machines such 
as the Moviola. Now. at 
Sound One. the largest post- 
production house "in New 
^ or ^- ^hiLh fills six floors in 1 
,he prill Building, several 
Moviolas gather dust in u cor- 
ridor. as quaint-looking as 
foot- treadle sowing ma- 

chines. Today the process is 
almost all digital. 












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PAGE 20 




I’M! BarkerTM-P 


Ken Doherty of Ireland cueing 
during the world snooker final 


Doherty Wins Title 

snooker Ken Doherty became 


the first player from Ireland to win 
the world professional snooker title 


the world professional snooker title 
when he beat Stephen Hendry, the 
six-time champion, 18 frames to 12 
in the final in Sheffield, England. 

Doherty, 27. who led 11-5 
overnight, snuffed out a fightback 
Monday to end Hendry's 29-match 
unbeaten record at the Crucible 
Theater in Sheffield. Doherty won 
£210,000 (S340,000>. (Reuters) 


Capriati Falls in Rome 


tennis Jennifer Capriati of the 
United States was knocked out of 
the Italian Open on Tuesday, losing 
her opening match to a compatriot, 
Chanda Rubin, in straight sets, 7-6 
6-2. Nathalie TauziaL the 15th 
seed, lost 6-7 (2-7), 6-1. 6-2 to 
Dominique Van Roost of Belgi- 
um. (Reuters, AP) 


Griffith Is First Pick 


basketball Yolanda Griffith, a 
who had played professionally in 
Germany, was the first pick in the 
American Basketball League draft 
by the expansion Long Beach team. 

• Jim Harrick, who led UCLA to 
the national title in 1995 only to be 
fired last November for lying on an 
expense form, signed a three-year 
deal to coach at Rhode IslancLfAPj 


Longer Deal for the Irish 


FOOTBALL NBC, the U.S. tele- 
vision network, and the University 
of Notre Dame announced Tuesday 
that they have agreed a second five- 
year extension of their broadcast 
contract. The deal is estimated to be 
worth up to S45 million. NBC paid 
Notre Dame $35 million for its first 
five-year deal. NBC is in the second 
year of its first five-year extension, 
worth about $40 million. (AP) 


Coyotes Fire Head Coach 


ice hockey The Phoenix 
Coyotes, who were eliminated in 
the first round of the playoffs at the 
end of their first season in Arizona, 
fired coach Don Hay on Tuesday. 

• The Hartford Whalers con- 
firmed Tuesday that they would 
move to North Carolina and said 
they would change their name to the 
Carolina Hurricanes. They will 
play for two years in Greensboro 
while Raleigh builds a $120 million 
arena it plans to open in 1999.JAP) 


Woman Seeks Beatification 


baseball The Sl Paul Saints, 
the independent league team that 
gave Darryl Strawberry and a man 
with no legs a chance last season, 
have invited pitcher 11a Borders to 
training camp. If she makes the 
team, Borders would become the 
first woman to play in a regular- 
season minor league game. (AP) 


'V+ rift IVTFJmTHJttJ. 

lirralo^^fcnbunc 


Sports 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7; !$$£* 


World Roundup 


Two Soccer Originals 
Return to Spotlight 

Romario and Kanu Overcome 
Troubles in Very Different Ways 


L ONDON — In a world of 40 
million soccer players, distinct- 
ive talents are as rare as original 
works of art. But two gifted 
originals, feared lost to the game, have 
announced their return: Romario of 
Brazil and Kanu of Nigeria. 

Romario de Souza Faria, a World 
Cup winner, is already back, dumb- 
founding defenders through cheek and 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Tribune 


Vantaoi Point 


invention, challenging authority with 
irritating misbehavior. He is 3 1, a street 
urchin reborn. 

N wank wo Kanu, 21, an Olympic 
champion, has the all-clear from an 
American heart specialist to resume full 
participation in the pro sport, five 
months after being warned that surgery 
on a defective aortic valve probably 
precluded such stress and strain in his 
lifetime. 

In 1996, anyone who knew these two 
men had no choice other than to thank 
them for the memories and write them 
off. In 1997, the players have overcome 
doubts related to head and heart, and 
started again. 

If all goes well, Romario and Kanu, 
players whose styles we would recog- 
nize in silhouette, should grace the 
World Cup in France. 

A decade separates their birth. 
Oceans flow between their playgrounds. 
They are a foot (30 centimeters) apart in 
height — Kanu is 6 feet 6 inches, Ro- 
mario is 5 feet 6 inches — and that 
defines their distinct styles of play. 

Romario scampers around like the 
Pimpernel, twisting here, turning there 
with grace and cunning leamed in die 
slums of Rio de Janeiro. Kanu lopes 
across die turf like a giraffe. He has the 
biggest feet in soccer and a big "heart" 
— the courage to chase a lost cause. He. 
too, possesses an instinct for doing the 
unexpected to score unforgettable goals. 

When Romario returned to the Brazil 
national side, in spite of coach Mario 
Zagailo’s statement that he had walked 
away too often and had grown too fond 
of lazing on the beach, it should not have 
been a surprise. 

He is, after all, as near to genius as 
soccer can get The force is in him. It 
overflowed on his comeback for Brazil 


footwear manufacturer, which is taking 
a $200 million, ten-year ride on the 
greatest team on earth. We have to put 
up with Brazil repackaged as Team 
Nike, but when that makes the Brazili- 
ans run, when we get monthly reminders 
of a game way ahead of European soc- 
cer, who are we to complain? 

Romario. dragged back from the 
beach and the drinking holes, enticed to 
slim down and regain his appetite tor a 
game that gave him everything, has re- 
turned with thinning torso, receding hair- 
line, but absolutely do loss of ability. 

There is a cloud on his horizon, 
however. Brazil's federation, ignoring 
television evidence, let Romario off the 


hook after he brawled with a player, 
Cafezinho. in a club game. Cafezixiho 


carezinno. in a club game, can 
was suspended for four matches. 


Romario, it seems, is too important at 
the box office to be punished. However. 
Monica Santora, the wife he deserted, 
informed the fraud squad about Ro- 
mano's alleged tax evasion and is plan- 
ning to write a book. If it verifies a 
quarter of the rumors, Brazil faces a 
choice' between what Romario can do 
for public morale on the pitch, and what 
the nation will tolerate from him off it 


K ANU, meanwhile, with al- 
most his whole career still 
ahead of him. has flown back 
from Cleveland, where his ap- 
parently successful operation was per- 
formed. He carries a dossier telling the 
doctors at Intemazionale of Milan that 
he is fit to resume training. 

He never doubted iL Kanu. just 20 
when he led Nigeria to defeat Brazil, 
then Argentina, at the Atlanta 
Olympics, would not accept the coun- 
seling of cardiac experts. They, with 


middle-aged attention to duty, had spot- 
ted the defect when he joined Inter from 


ted the defect when he joined Inter from 
Ajax last summer. 

* * We have to be without pity toward a 


aver of world class," the experts said. 
Tne diagnosis is categorical. We have 


in February when Romario, playing just 
a few meters behind Ronaldo, the new 


a few meters behind Ronaldo, the new 
national hero, showed a touch and per- 
ception and selflessness that made the 
new kid blossom. 

"In training I saw how Ronaldo 
moves, so everything was in my bead 
for the game,' ' said Romario. "It's easy 
to play widi him, and he showed he 
wanted to play with me.” 

Ronaldo was the beneficiary that 
night Romario found him and made two 
goals for him, two more for Giovanni, as 
Brazil overran Poland. 

Last Wednesday, in Miami, Romario 
decided it was his turn. He scored three 
times. The second of those was a mem- 
orable piece of Romario magic, a right 
foot volley swept imperiously over the 
Mexican goalkeeper. 

The Miami night said something else 
about Brazil. Once a team wins the 
World Cup. it is effectively put out to 
grass, removed from the competitive 
cycle of qualifying events so that we can 
seldom judge its majesty or its decline. 

Commerce has changed that. Brazil 
has sold its national squad to Nike, the 


Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London 

■ Barcelona’s Hopes Still Alive 

Barcelona maintained its faint hopes 
of taking the Spanish league champi- 
onship with a hard-fought 3-1 victory at 
Extremadura, Re utere- reported. 

The victory Monday left Barcelona 
eight points adrift of the leader. Real 
Madrid, ahead of the clash Saturday 
between the two arch-rivals. 

Ronaldo put Barcelona ahead after 10 
minutes. SLIvani equalized after a half- 
hour, but Barcelona retaliated imme- 
diately through Luis Enrique Martinez. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

l How the boss 
warns things 
done, briefly 
s ditto 


9 Devil dolls, e g. 
in Kind of chop 
13 ‘Family Ties' hid 


is Dander 
17 ‘Oh. woe 1 ‘ 

19 Chimney 
covering 
19 Nick name? 
ao'Don'lteii!" 

23 'Losing My 
Religion" rock 
group 


Mamy:* 


Est. 1911, Paris 

‘Sank Roo Doe Noo’ 


24 Scene of the 
William Tell 
legend 
2s Norma 
Webster's 
middle name 
29 Cash substitute 
27 Certain 
corporate 
career path 

33 Beam 

34 Carthage 
founder 

as Julia, on 
'Semteid' 

38 ‘ — Three 
Lives' 

40 Reggae relative 

42 Brit, decorations 

43 New York county 
49 Reaching as far 

as 

49 Easter parade 
attraction 
so 1948 Irene 
Dunne Mm 
sa Foidaway. eg 
gb Polit. 

designation 
sa Maiden name 
preceder 

57 Arbor 

38 Western 
mountain range 
64 Shade tree 
ae Equine shade 
97 ‘Let's Make a 
Dear choice 

69 "Victory " 

{1954 him) 

99 Secular 

70 Designer 
Cassim 

71 Forfeits 

72 Swirl 

73 "And away -V 


3 Sixth -day 
creation 

4 "Playing" critter 

5 Japanese fish 
dish 

b Facial tissues 
additive 
7Doorsillcry 
b Obiam by lorce 
9 Poker boo-boo 
io Mouths. 

anatomically 
it Eastern taxi. Var. 
12 Prefix with 
arthritis 
ia Sea World 
attraction 

21 Walked (on) 

22 Scarce 

27 Chamber 
group, maybe 

28 Dutch painter 

29 See firsthand 

30 Clinic workers, 
lor short 

31 Mammy 

32 Low! rie 
39 Linguist 

Chapisky 

37 “Como 

usted?' 

39 German article 
4i Police radio msg 
44 Japanese 
entertainers 
as Old Dodge 
47 Period of a 
renter's 
agreement 
48 Provo neighbor 
si Channel 
swimmer 
Gertrude 

32 Grazing area 

33 Plot 

34 "You're — 
talk?' 



Panto 8/ DonNlM 

C .Verr V’tirJr Times/ Ed it pd bv Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of May 6 


A Space for Thought. 


1 In — (having 
trouble) 

2 George Takei 
TV/film role 


39 way to go 
eo Bust, so to 
speak 
6t Handout 
62 Film director 
Nicolas 


63 "Cogito — 
sum' 

ss Middling mark 


sarana nomaa man 
HmncHi sanacD nag 
□□□naasanan ana 

QQEDI3 Sin00[3 
Hnnssma nnaaaaa 
ojoraaas sanaan 
□aHaci aamns aaa 
gnoa aaasa □□□□ 
son aaoao ooaaa 
noatnas asaejaa 
□□sonns sssssaa 
□asacj anaa 
son snaasosssoo 
□sn nanaa □□□as 
nm ix sagas aoaaal 





WP \ 


Under Levla 


Morai KainabmcafAgnm Fnra-ftcuc 

HARD HITTING — Travis Green of Canada, top, trying to stop Saku Koivu of Finland Tuesday at the World 


Ice Hockey Championships in Helsinki Jeff Friesen, of the San Jose Sharks, scored with just over three minuted £ 
re maining to lift Canada to a 1-0 victory and a share of second place in the standings level with Sweden, one ■,? 
point behind Russia. The Russians tied 1-1 with the United States. Marty Mclnnis scored the American goal. 


4 ‘The diagnosis is categorical. We have 
to think of the man before we think of 
die player." 

It was over. A host of players from 
Nigeria, in soccer and basketball, 
seemed to suffer from heart irregular- 
ities: some had died, others had been 
advised to lead sedentary lives. 

Kanu, simply, steadfastly, and with- 
out ever questioning the opinions of 
medical practitioners, kept faith. Inter 
kept him involved and on the staff. 

Last week, the dub doctor for hater, 
Piero Volpi. agreed that there had been 
“positive^' reports from Cleveland. 
“However," he said, "his return to 
professional football is just a distant 
possibility." 

Thai caution disappeared last week- 
end. Inter received a more detailed bul- 
letin from Cleveland, and took the wraps 
off the patient Kanu, the words said, 
will play again. He never doubted it. 


Flyers Take the Sabres, Not the Bait 


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By Rick Westhead 

New York Times Service 


BUFFALO, New York — The Buf- 
falo Sabres first tried to intimidate the 
Philadelphia Flyers, slamming their 
captain, Eric Lindros, into the boards 
and slashing at him from the protection 
of the team bench. 

When that didn’t work, the Sabres 
tried mental games, complaining that 
the bulky pads of the Philadelphia 


NHL Playoffs 


goalie. Garth Snow. were not covered by 
his jersey, as National Hockey League 
rules require. 

But on Monday night neither 
strategy worked. Snow remained un- 
fazed and the Flyers continued to dictate 
the style of play, rarely beaten in odd- 
man rushes and more important re- 
fusing to retaliate when the Sabres came 
at them with fists and elbows flying. 

When it was over, the Flyers won. 2- 
1 , behind 29 saves by Snow at Buffalo's 


Midland Marine Arena to take a com- 
manding 2-0 series lead in the Eastern 
Conference semifinals. 

They move to Philadelphia for 
Games 3 and 4 on Wednesday and Fri- 
day. 

When a Sabres forward, Wayne 
Primeau, committed a turnover, the Fly- 
ers capitalized for the game's first goal, 
Mikael Renberg’s second of the series, 
at 4 minutes 47 seconds. 

After Primeau shot his clearing at- 
tempt into the Flyers' John Leclair, the 
savvy Leclair moved into the slot and, 
with Lindros providing the screen, 
whistled a shot toward the Sabres' 
goalie, Steve Shields. 

While Shields made the first stop. 
Renberg was there to convert the short 
rebound. 

The Flyers increased their lead at 
16:49 when Chris Therien notched his 
first goal of the playoffs from Dainius 
Zubrus and Eric Desjardins. 

With the teams skating four-on-four 
and the Flyers pressing, Therien 
grabbed the puck behind the net and 


rapped it through Shields's legs to make 
it 2-0. 

Then a goal by Buffalo's Jason Dawe 
at 18:18 tempwarily shifted the mo-T 
raentum back to the home side. 

After trapping the puck inside the 
Philadelphia blue line, Buffalo’s Darryl 
Shannon faked a shot before slipping a, 
pass to Dixon Ward, poised at the side of 
Snow. Ward passed through the lip of, 
the crease to Dawe, who scored. 

But the Sabres were unable to solve. 
Snow again. He has allowed just one goal 
since the second period of Game I. 

Snow faced only eight shots in the' 
final period, and the Sabres didn't- 
threaten even when they pulled their" 
goalie in the final moments. 

"Snowy did a good job out there,"' 
said the Flyers’ coach. Terry Murray. 


Clemens Ren 


DtroaTijj 
Boson jr."; 
far. >25 - 
SCBik cli ' 
Map. 
Bobb} Hi;. 
piwW.': 


“He kept coming up with the big stop."_ 
Shields, playing while the star goalie," 


Dominik Hasek served the second of a 
three-game suspension for anacking a 
reporter, made 35 saves for Buffalo.- 
Hasek is allowed to return Friday for’ 
Game 4. 


B asil _ : - 

•EOr* s 

fa .ir-T • 
fare . 
Ostt 


Scoreboard 


“BMSThT 


BASEBALL 


Milwaukee. Ge. Williams (2). Bumltz Ml. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Major League Standings 


Baltimore 
Now York 
Toronto 
Boston 

Demur 


Minnesota 

Chicago 


EAST Ert VISION 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

19 

9 

.679 

— 

16 

15 

-516 

4-a 

14 

14 

300 

5 

14 

15 

.483 

516 

12 

18 

-400 

B 

CENTRAL OnnSON 



} 14 

13 

-519 

— 

M 

14 

-500 

'H 

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14 

-500 

■v 

13 

18 

A19 

3 

10 

18 

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WEST DIVISION 



18 

12 

.600 

— 

16 

11 

593 

■5 

14 

14 

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3 

14 

17 

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4'y 

lunowu LAAOUE 


EAST DIVISION 





W 

L 

PcL 

Attanfa 

22 

8 

033 

Florida 

17 

13 

567 

Montreal 

15 

14 

517 

New York 

15 

16 

.484 

PltBadetphto 

9 

20 

510 

CENTRAL DIVISION 


Houston 

18 

13 

581 

Pittsburgh 

15 

15 

JKM 

St. Louts 

13 

17 

X33 

Cincinnati 

9 

71 

-300 

CTiicnga 

1 

22 

-241 


WEST DIVISION 


Cotorado 

30 

9 

-690 

Son Franckco 

19 

10 

555 

Lk Angetes 

17 

12 

586 

5on Diego 

11 

17 

593 


MOMMY'S Uia SCORE* 
AMSttfiAN LEAGUE 

Kamos dir 001 000 010-2 7 0 

Boston 000 000 000—0 5 9 

Appier and Spehn Hammond, Corel (91 and 
Koseimnn. W — Appier, 4-1. L— Hammond 1- 
1. HR-wmsas ary, J. Belt 17J. 

Detroit 010 009 000— 1 S 0 

Toronto 0M ON 0l«— 3 7 0 

Ottawa, M. Myws [Bl. T. Jones «J ond B. 
Johnson; Clemens and Santiago 
W — Clemens, S-0. L-Oihmos. 1-2. 

AOohcim 400 000 030-7 0 0 

Baltimore ON 020 000-2 9 2 

Dickson, McElroy [73. Janies (7) and 
Leyrttc Komienhxki, TeJIAathews IW, 
Orosco (91 and Holies, w— Dickson. 5*1. 
L— ftamtaatocMh 2-1. Sw— Janes (31. 
HRs-Anh. Salmon M>. Balt. Ban** til. 
MtaaesMO 091 031 202-9 12 0 
Hew York 010 488 003-1 9 1 

Rodrigues SwindeO (51. Aguilera 191 and 
sretnbnelv Mendoza, Motif (53, Stonton It). 
Uovd (71 and Gtrardt. W-SwinddL 3-1. 
L — Mean 0-2. HRs— Minnesota. SWnboti 1 
12). Knoblauch (3). Mearos <4). New Yd*. 
Marline/ (13). Jeter m. 

Oaldud ooi 200 <00-7 13 1 

Milwaukee 101 OAO 211-11 11 2 
Tekjtreder. P. Lewis (5), Acre (7). Groom 
18} and Gawmtotns. Karl, Fetters (6l. 
Wickmcm (7). o. Janes (?) and Mathew. 
W-Knrl. 1-5. L— Trtghedcr. 0-2- 
Hit— Oakland. McGwire (12). B rosins 12' 


Pittsburgh NO ON 000-4 4 1 

Hondo BN 300 OQx — 3 7 0 

Ueber, Wabihause IB) aid Os*c Hettig. 
PoweB 17). Nen (9) and CJohnsaL 
w—H effing, l -l. L-Ueber. 3-3. St-Hen l». 
PhfladeipNa 000 101 Ml— 2 7 0 

Houston 018 040 40* — 9 I 0 

M. Letter. R. Hants (71, Pianteribergrajand 
. Ueberthob HoK, Martin (0), R. Springer 193 
and Ausmus. W— Hob. 3-3. L-M. Letter, 3-3. 
HRs — Philadelphia. Oautton (7). Houston. 
Biggin (4). BagweJJ (9). LGanzalez (1). 
Atlanta ON 011 000-2 7 0 

SI. Loots ON ON 100-1 6 1 

Ncagte. Wohlers m and Lopes AL Bones. 
Fassas (71, T. J .Mathews (91 and DtfeOce. 
Startler (8). W-NeogJe, 5-0. L— ALSenes, 3- 
3. Sv— Wohlers (91. HR— AHnrflo. Klesko (4). 
New York 013 sia 010-4 8 0 

Colorado ON IN 000-1 J 0 

Jones. McMJchael (81. KasWwada (91 and 
Hundteyr ROz. M. Munoz (8). DeJeaa (91 and 
Mnnworing. W— Jones. 5-2. L — Rltz, 3*4. 
HRs— New York. Hundley 2 W. 

Montreal 200 000 000—2 8 0 

Sat Francisco 210 Ml 00*— 4 5 0 

C Perez. Tetfonl (A). Daal IB). M. votdes 
(8) and Fletchon Gardner, Tavanu (7), Poole 
(8}> Beck (91 and Jensen. W-Gardner, 3-1. 
L— C. Perez. 4-2. Sv— Beck (12). HRs — M. 
Lewis 14). Kent «). 

Ctaclnafl 089 810 QQO -1 5 2 

Los Angeles 010 002 00*-3 9 8 

Mocker. Carrasco (6) and Taubensee; 
Noma. Guthrie (93, To.woneB TO and Piazza. 
W— Noma 4-2. L— CO mg sea 1-1. 

Sv— To.WotTBft 191. HR-LA, Ashley (II. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 


Anaheim, SB are fed with 1 
HOME RUNS-Grfffey Jr, Semite. R 
TMarllwa New Yortw U- McGwire, Oakland, 
12; TaOarfc, Detroit. 9; Justice. Cleveland. 9: 
SAJamar. Owetand, a- John, Milwaukee. 7; 
M Vaughn. Boston, 7; Mawnnam*. 

Cleveland. 7; JBelL Kansas Qty, 7. 

STOLEN BASES— BLHunter, Detroit, 13; 
KnoUauch. Minnesota. 13 j Ntxoa Toronto 
n.- Buford, Team. 9: Easley, DelraH, te 
VbqueL Cleveland. 9; Durham, Chicago, fc 
T Goodwin Kansas Cite, 1 
PITCHING (4 DedsfoiE}— ASmalL Oak- 
land. 4-0, Loon 3.05; RaJohasan, Seattle. 4-a 
1 JM0, Z41; Wilt, Texmw 5-0, 1.000, 131; Key. 
Baltimore, s-0. MXXi 3L21.- Clemens, Toronto. 
54 1-000, 1.5& Dickson, Anaheim. 5-1, .833. 
3.13; Pettffle. New York, 5-1. J33. 2.13. 

STRIKEOUTS— Cone, New York. 55; Rn- 
Johnson, Seattle. SO: Appier. Kansas City. 4* 
Omens. Toronto 39; Navarra. Orlaipc, 37; 
Hentgen. Toronto 36: Nagy, aewkmd. 3a. 

SAVES— RaMyers. Bafflmore. It; 
M Rivera. New York. 9; Wctlekma, Terns. 7; 
Chariton. Seattle. T: Taylor. Oakland. & 
RHemandeL Chicago. 5. DOJonm 
Milwaukee. 5; Aguilera, Minnesota. S. 


*9; ATBenes* St. Louis. 48; Noma. Uri 
Angeles. 48: Reynolds, Houston. 45? 
KJ Brown, Florida -to 1 Gardner. San 
Frondsca 3& Smoltz. Atlanta. 33. | 

SAVES— Beck, San Frondsca 12; 
Wohlers, Atlanta, 9; ToWwrett Los AngeJCS. 
9; Nen. Florida B: JaFmnco, New York, 7; 
B Wagner. Houston, « ErWks. Pittsburgh, 6; 
Bottolka Phitadetphto & B Ruffin. Cotoroda 
6: Eckerstey. 51. Louis, fc- 





Japanese Leagues 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

central leaoui 

Yokohama 9, HirasAbnao 

MantLuen 
Daiei 7. Selbu 0 
Orix 4, Lotte 0 
Nippon Ham 5, Kintetsu 2 


hr- 


* d s > : ; 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Playoffs 


NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
L Walter Cal 28 111 33 as a\A 

Blauser All 30 90 18 39 MU 

Tucker AH M 95 lo 38 .«» 

Gwyitn 5D 28 115 18 4? J74 

Piazza LA 36 86 15 31 .360 

Butter LA 24 09 10 32 360 

Lofton All X 134 27 40 35S 

□Sanderson 30 129 16 a JS7 

OtetWd NYM 30 118 23 4? J56 

GakuTDoaCol 25 94 23 33 .35 1 

RUNS — L Walker, Colorado, 31 Lofton. 
Atlanta Z7,- EcYauna Gabmda 2ft Biggie, 
Houston. ZL Galarraga Cotoroda 71 
costaa Colorado. 22 Ofenid. Now York. 22. 

RBI— L Walker, Cotoroda 31 BogweiL 
Houstaa 3Z Atou, Florida. 31; Kent. San 
Frondsca 28; Hundley, New York, 20; 
Casffito cotoroda 27; BkJretto Colorado. 2," 
HITS — Lofton, Atlanta 48; DSandcrS. 
OrtCtotwH 4ft LWolker, Cclorooo. do. 
Gwyrm, San Dlcga 43; EcYoung. Cotoroda. 
42; Oterud, New York. 42; HRodnguex. 
Montreal, 39; Bknrser, Alton la 39. 

DOUBLES— H Rodriguez, Montreal, 13; 
Gniditotonek, Monireal, 12; EcVounft 
Cetanxto 11 Bragna, Philadelphia 11; Kent, 
San Franasea ||,- 0 lento New York, It: 
Ctoyforv SL Loms, 10. 

TRIPLES— WGuencro. Los Angeles. S: 
OSandeto Dnclnnatt, 5: Womark. 
PH«iurat». 1- DeShletoi St. Laws, 1 17 art 
Bed Mill 2. 

HOME RUNS— LWolker. Cotoroda. II; 
CasWa Cotoroda. lOs Bagweft Housiaa 9; 
Hundley. New York. * Atou. Ftorkto, ft 
U ebwltw l. Philadelphia. 7; Rwwte. 
Monttwn, 7: J Lopez, Allarrla 7; HRodrifftcz. 
Montreal 7: Gwynn, San Dlega J. 

”0““ BASES— OSanden. Cincinnati. 
2w LCoslilla Florida IS Lofton. A riant a. 12; 
Womack, Pittsburgh, 11; LWolker. Colorado. 

EcYaung. Cotoroda ft AMiandlm, 
Philadelphia 8. 

PITCHING (4 Decktons)— PJMartiratt. 
Monlreal d -0.1.000. JL Neagte. Aharrta. 5-0, 
1.000, 3A4 WrtatlL Cotoroda 4-1. .BOG 6.4ft 
Estes, 5an Frondsca 4-1. 2.7ft RBaDev. 

Cotoroda 9.1 . boo. 1 71: Gtoviw, Aiignla 4- 
1, Boa 1 Jft 5 ore lied wtth 750. 
STRIKEOUTS— Schilling, Philadelphia. 


SECOND ROUND 
(BEST-OT -SEVEN) 

MONDAY'S RISUU9 




Justice Cle 
RobeiteKC 
5 Alomar Cte 
T Martinez NYY 
By Anderson Bal 
EDavb Bal 
Griffey Jr Sea 
BeWHliams NYY 
iPodrinuer Te* 
DaWiiscn S«j 


27 94 20 34 J83 

26 92 16 35 JW 

22 82 IS 30 .344 

31 139 29 47 .364 

26 97 20 IS J41 

20 81 20 29 JUS 

29 115 27 41 J57 

31 126 29 44 J49 

36 110 14 38 JUS 

29 96 17 33 JJ41 


RUNS— flewiiiioms. New York. 39; 
T Morttiei New York. 29; Griffey j,. SeoiUft 
27; Jeter, New Yatk, 25; APodriguez, Searito. 
25. Gardapona Boston 24; Fryman, Detroit. 
21 EMatiincz. Seattle. 23. 

RBl-TMarttoez. New York. 41; Griffey Jr. 
SMtlte. 35; T aCtoric, Detroit, 31; MaWtmams. 
ueveland. 3w McGwire. Oakland. Us JBelL 
Karoffi, oiy. BcWlllkans. New York. 3* 
C Ripken Baltimore, 24. 

HITS “TMartincz, New York. 47.- 
BeWMbams, New York. 44 ARodriquez. 
5«mte. -H Goictopana Boston 4ft Griffey 
Jr, Se n It to. 41: GAndereon, Anohcim, 3ft 
I Rodriguez. Texas. 38. 
.. PQ . UB . Lfi .^ pw 9tte. Toronto, lft ONeto. 
New York. Ift Spuuia Oakland. 1 1; Lawian. 

1,1 Weiw <l- Toronto. ||; 
ffewtand. II: APodriguez, 
Seome Ift RDovta. seoftto. IQ; oano, 

Mmnesofo, \ vizquet Ciowtond. i Alicea 


Semite 25 30 16 3T— m 

Houston 35 29 32 16—112. 

5; Kemp 11-152-224. Payton 7-164-6 19; H: 
Dretder 8-lS 3-4 72. Elio 7-fl l-l 20. 
Rebowds— Seattle 43 iKcmp in, Houston. 

41 (Ototewonll) Assists— Seattle ?o (Snow- 

7). Houston » [Efe 3). A 

(Houston leads series 1-8) ^ 






ICE HOCKEY 


NHL Playoffs 


cotrammai semotkais 

(BEST-OP-SEVEN] 
MONDAY’S ItKS VLTS 
PMtodelptihi 2 g ju-J 

BoffOia g | g_) 

First Period: P-Renbenj 3 fLeClmrt z P- 
Tnerien J (Zubrus, Deyardins) Second 
g er |°^ B-Dowo 2 (Ware, Shannon) Thhd 
PnrtOlfc None. Shots On goal: P- 1 3-10-14-97. 
B- 9-1 3-8—30. Goalies: P-Snow. B-SWeMs. 
IPhaadeWbia leads series 1-0) 

World Championship , 


|p 


-. r >v &V 


f Mi 


MEDAL ROUND. TUESDAY IN HELSINKI 
Canada 1. Finland 0 
Russia 1. United Stoles I 
standings: Russia 5 points; Sweden * 
Omoda 4; Untied Stoles ft Finland ft Czech 
Republic 2. 




s OCCE R 


SWWUSH FIRST mVEBOM 

Edremaduro 1 Barcelona 3 
STANDINGS: Real Ntodrid 83 ponds.- 
Barcelona 75; Real Bells 7ft OeportNa 
Coruna Tft Altelko Madrid 60; VaDodottd » 
Aihlettc Blitxid 5ft Teneitte 54 Real Soctedod 
Sdr Valencia 48; Racing Santander «7; Cetta 
Vigo -U- Esponyol 42; Composteia *7 Oviedo 
■M; Zaragoza Jft Extremadura 4ft Royo Vot- 
lecana 39; Spading GOon 3ft Hemrie* 3£ 
5evlHa 30e Logrnnes 38. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 



Pitino Takes Celtics’ $ 70 Million 


RJwu * iw/.lfrncr trim fhn* 

The Marlins' ClifT Floyd holding on to second base as the Pirates' Tony Womack made a throw to First, 

Under Leyland., Marlins Beat Pirates 


The Associated Press 

BOSTON — Rick Piano announced 
Tuesday that he was leaving the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky to become coach of 
the Boston Celtics of the National Bas- 
ketball Association for a salary higher 
than that of any coach in any sport. 

He accepted' a reported 10-year con- 
tract worth more than $70 milli on, ex- 
ceeding the S25 million, five-year con- 
tract the Philadelphia 76ers gave Larry 
Brown this week. 

“I look forward to the challenge.” 
said Pitino, adding that he did not make 
a decision until Monday night. 

Pitino would not discuss details of his 
contract, however, which he said he did 
not sign until minutes before the news 
conference. He said he would bold an- 
other news conference in Boston on 
Thursday. 

Pitino, who had called the Celtics' job 
“the greatest opportunity ever afforded a 
coach,” announced his decision at tbe 
school he led to the Final Four three times 
in his eight years there, winning the na- 
tional title in 1996. 

He returns to tbe NBA and the city 
where he began his head coaching ca- 
reer in 1978, at Boston University. 

Pitino, who coached the New York 
Knicks from 1 987-89, faces the daunting 
task of rebuilding the Celtics, who have 
more wins and titles than any team in 
NBA history but finished this season with 
a franchise-worst record, 15-67. Pitino 
had three years, worth more than $7 
million, left on his Kentucky contract. 

The Celtics seemed ready to welcome 
him with a front-office shake-up, which 


might persuade Larry Bird, die team's 
speoal assistant and former gar, to re- 
main. 

Pitino met with Kentucky’s athletic 
director, C. M. Newton, for an hour and 
a half at Newton’s home. When Newton 
returned to tbe campus, he refused to 
give details of the talk but did say that 
nano had matte his decision. 

The Boston Globe had reported Tues- 
day that the team president. Red 
Auerbach, said Pitino would be the Celt- 
ics' coach and “something else” next 
season. 

The newspaper said the ocher position 
was director of operations. 

Auerbach denied making that state- 
ment, according to the Boston Herald. 

Pitino said last month that he would 
be interested in tbe Celtics only if Bird 
stayed, an uncertain prospect since the 
Indiana Pacers are willing to give him a 
lucrative contract to coach his home- 
state team. 

Yet reported personnel moves could 
satisfy some of Bird's public complaints 
about the Celtics* management orga- 
nization. And tbe Herald said that the 
team's owner, Paul Gaston, was still 
dying to keep Bird. 

Tbe Celtics vacancy developed when 
M. L. Gut quit last Wednesday after two 
seasons in which the team was 48-1 16. 

Carr, who stayed as director of bas- 
ketball operations, began notifying his 
assistant coaches they should be pre- 
pared to move on, the Globe reported. 

The director of travel and team ser- 
vices, Wayne Lebeaux, and the director 
of publications and information. Dave 


Zuccaro, were dismissed, both papers 
reported. Two marketing employees 
also reportedly lost their jobs and tbe 
team’s general manager, Jan Volk, also 
might leave after 26 years with the Celt- 
ics, the Globe said. 

It also said that Pitino was expected to 
bring Kentucky’s associate coach, Tim 
O’Brien, with him to Boston. 

Last June, Pitino said he was almost 
certain he would accept a coaching offer 
from the New Jersey Nets, but turned it 
down after a golf excursion to Ireland 
with university boosters. 

“It's a matter of whether I want to be 
a professional basketball coach or im- 
pact lives like I've done in tbe past eight 
years,” Pitino said. 

A1 Skinner, who moved from the 
University of Rhode Island to Boston 
College as coach on April 18, played 
with Pitino from 1970 through 1974 at 
the University of Massachusetts and 
spoke with him about a week ago. 

“He's a very confused man at times 
tike these,” Skinner said Monday .“He 
has a real affection for his players. As 
your emotions get involved, the rational 
thinking goes out the window.” 

“If I do nor take this opportunity, 1 
have decided to be a college coach for 
good,’ 'Pitino said Monday. 

“We took a team from probation to 
champion,” he said. “I think the journey 
was even more fun than the final des- 
tination. Also, a lot of the fun has been 
maintainin g that level.” 

He said the Celtic offer came sooner 
than anticipated, requiring him to speed 
up his decision to return to the NBA. 






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The Associated Press 

■ Jim Leyland managed for the first 
time against the Pittsburgh Pirates and 
his best friend. Gene Lament. 

; “Once the game starts. Gene and I are 
professionals and we're just trying to 
get a win,” Leyland said after Florida’s 
3-0 victory Monday night. 

- After 1 1 seasons in Pittsburgh, which 
including three straight NL East titles 
from 1990 to 92, Leyland left last Oc- 
tober to become the Marlins’ manager. 

• Lamont, his replacement in Pitts- 
burgh, was his third-base coach. 

! Compared with the low-key atmo- 
sphere at the game Monday night in 
Miami, Lamont expects more hype 
when the Marlins visit the Pirates from 
• May 16 to 18. 

■ J “I talked to Jim and we expect it to be 
much different when Jim comes to Pitts- 
burgh,'’ Lamont said. “Jim was a big 
part of titis franchise for 11 years.” 

Rick Helling, wbo moved out of the 
bullpen to make his first start this sea- 
son, allowed two hits in six scoreless 
innings. He was taking the spot of A) 


Leiler, placed on the 15-day disabled list 
' w bee 
right knee. 


Friday because of a severely bruised 


Helling retired his final 12 batters 
after pitching out of a bases- loaded, no- 
outs jam in the third. Jay Powell and 

Nl BOUND«r 

Robb Nen completed the four-hitter, 
with Nen getting his eighth save in nine 
chances. 

Jon Lieber retired 1 3 consecutive bat- 
ters before Edgar Renteria reached on a 
bunt single in the fourth. Cliff Floyd!s 
bouncer got past second baseman Tony 
Womack for an error, sending Renteria 
to third. Both scored on Gary Shef- 
field’s double past third, with Floyd 
awarded home because of Womack's 
interference. 

Braves 2 , CwiBiali i Atlanta gained 
its seventh consecutive victory in St 
Louis as Denny Neagle (5-0) allowed 
five hits in eight innings. 

Ryan Klesko homered leading off tbe 
fifth. Tbe Braves added a run in the sixth 


when Kenny Lofton, breaking for home 
on a squeeze play, scored when Mike 
Mordecai swung away and grounded 
out to shortstop. 

Dodflsre 3, Rads 1 Billy Ashley broke 
a 1-1 tie in the sixth with a two-run 
homer at Dodger Stadium, and Hideo 
Nomo, who allowed six hits in eight- 
plus innings, improved to 4-0 against 
the Reds. 

Hats 6, Roefdaa i Todd Hundley 
homered from both sides of the plate, 
went 4-for-4 and drove in five runs at 
Coots Held as tbe Mets won for the 
seventh time in nine games. 

Bobby Jones held the Rockies to one 
ran and six hits in seven innings. 

Giants 4, Expo* 2 Jeff Kent and Mark 
Lewis homered to back Mark Gardner, 
who gave up two first-inning runs, but 
followed, with five shutout mnings at 
San Francisco. 

Astras 9, Phillies 2 Rookie Chris Holt 
allowed one run and five hits in seven 
innings, and Jeff Bagwell and Luis 
Gonzalez each homered and drove in 
three runs at die Astrodome. 


Long-Range Rockets Sink the Sonics 


Clemens Remains a Perfect Blue Jay 




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The Associated Press 

So far, Roger Clemens is unbeatable 
with the Toronto Blue Jays. 

He pitched a five-hitter Monday and 
improved to 5-0 as Toronto beat the 
Detroit Tigers, 3-1. Clemens, who left 
Boston in the off-seasoo for a three- 
year, $25 milli on deal with tbe Jays, 
struck out 10 and walked none. 

After giving up a two-out double to 
Bobby Higginson in the third, he retired 
13 consecutive batters before Damon 
Easley singled in the eighth. 

“I feel blessed and fortunate to be off 
to such a good start," said Clemens, 
whose earned run average, the best in 
tbe American League, dropped to 1.58. 
"Now, if we can get the hitting going, 
there are going to be a lot of smiles' in 
titis clubhouse.” 

Clemens is having his best start since 


1991, whence won his first six de- 
cisions. He started 14^0 in 1986. 

Melvin Nieves’s run-scoring triple 
put Detroit up, 1-0, in the second inning. 
Toronto moved ahead, 2-1, in the fifth 

on a two-run double by Carlos Garcia 
and added a run in the eighth cm Joe 
Outer’s sacrifice fly. 

Annals 7, Ort*»t ®*2 Tim Salmon hit a 
run-scoring single in a four-run first 
inning and a three-rim homer in the 
eighth as Anaheim won in Baltimore. 
Baltimore lost for only the third time in 
10 games. 

Twin* 9, Yankees 8 In New York, 
Mart Lawton singled home the go-ahead 
run in the seventh inning as Minnesota 
rallied from four runs down to win for 


just the second time in 12 games. 

Royals 2 , Roil Sox o Kevin Appier 
pitched his third complete game of the 
season, and Jay Bell drove in both runs 
with a homer and sacrifice fly as Kansas 
City won at Boston. - Appier (4-1) al- 
lowed five hits, walked one and struck 
out seven for bis 10th career shutouL 

Pwfwors 11 , AtMoties 7 In Milwau- 
kee, Jose Valentin hit a bases-loaded 
triple in his first game back from the 
disabled list, and Scott Karl won for the 
first time in 10 starts. 

Valentin, who missed three weeks 
with a broken left middle finger, helped 
prevent Karl (1-5) from becoming the 
first pitcher in the team ’s history to start 
0-6. Karl was lifted in the fifth, then 
watched his teammates turn a 3-2 deficit 
into an 8-3 lead in the bottom of die 
inning. 


The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — Seattle 
took away Hakeem Olaju- 
won, but the Houston Rock- 
ets' second choice was just as 
deadly. 

Double-teaming Olajuwon 
did not work out the way the 
SuperS onics planned because 
Mario Elie led a 3-point 

NBA PLAYorft 

shooting display as the Rock- 
ets held off the SuperSonics 
for a 112-102 victory in the 
opener of their second-round 
playoff series Monday night 

“We gave them a lot of 
opportunities to shoot the 
ball, and they knocked them 
down,” said Gary Payton, a 
Seattle guard. “We have to 
go out tomorrow and change 
some things. We'll find solu- 
tions. There's a lot of games 
left in titis series." 

Elie, who finished with 20 
points, got the Rockets start- 
ed by making all fiveof his 3- 
point attempts in the first half , 
matching a playoff record. 
The Rockets hit 10 of 15 3- 
pointers for a 64-55 halftime 
lead and finished the game 
15«of-28 from long range. 

“I had no conscience, I just 
let it go,” Ebe said. “After the 
first one went down, I felt 
good. I had fresh legs. I was the 
lucky guy. 1 was getting some 
good looks, and the guys kept 
kicking the bah out to me.” 

The Rockets kept extend- 
ing their lead, ana the Su- 
perSonics, despite just finish- 
ing a five-game series with 
Phoenix, kept charging back. 

The Rockets built a 103-76 



AdrmljtURr 


The Sonics’ Sam Perkins, left, fighting for tbe baQ with the Rockets' Charles Barkley. 


advantage with 10:07 left, but 
Hersey Hawkins hit four 3- 
point baskets in a row during 
a 26-9 run that cut the Rock- 
ets’ final victory margin. 

“It wasn't easy, it was de- 
ceiving,” Olajuwon said. 
“They played very well. We 
can’t ger carried away. The 
pressure is still on until the 
last game.” 

Elie tied the record for 3- 
pointers without a miss 
shared by three players, most 
recently by Seattle’s Nate 
McMillan against the Rock- 
ets on May 6, 1996. 

“He’s been our most con- 
sistent player all season,’ ’ the 


Rockets' Charles Barkley 
said of Elie. “What he did 
tonight didn't surprise me. 1 
was happy with every aspect 
of our game except me. But I 
look at my game differently. I 
expect more out of myself. 
But I will get better.” 

Clyde Drexler led the 
Rockets with 22 points, and 
Shawn Kemp paced the Su- 
perSonics with 24. 

Houston used a 26-9 ran to 
take a 55-35 ‘.lead with six 
minutes left in tbe half. But 
Kemp scored eight points 
over the rest of the period as 
Seattle cut Houston's lead to 
64-55 at the half. 


“In the first half, they shot 
the ball well and we were hes- 
itating,” saidGeorge Kart, the 
Seattle coach. “In the second 
half, with the turnovers and 
missed layups, they became 
sluggish offensively." 

He added, “This is two 
games in a row they’ve done 
staff to us pretty substan- 
tially, and we are going to 
have to evaluate and come 
back and tinker here and 
there.” 

The Rockets* coach, Rudy 
Tomjanovich, said. “I 
thought it was an excellent 
performance by everybody 
that played for us." 




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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Dietary Insults 


Meet J. Peterman, the Man Behind the Duster 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — The 
world of sport has been 


IN world of sport has been 
in shock for days about di- 
etary remarks made by one 
golfer about another. 

The golfer about whom 
these remarks were made is 
Tiger Woods. It is pertinent to 
note that Woods is an Afro- 
Asian-American. The golfer 
who made them is a Euro- 
American, one Fuzzy Zoeller. 

In a brief, and casual en- 
counter ZoeUer intimated, in 
what he says was intended to 
be a humorous vein, that 
Woods's preference in dining 
ran to fried chicken and col- 
Jard greens. 

CNN, which had film of the 
contretemps, kepi it under 
wraps fora week before giving 
it to the world. The print media 
were sufficiently shocked to 
amplify the incident. 


With controversy immin- 
ent. something had to be 
done. Zoeller was advised to 
apologize, and did. But more 
was demanded. Punishment 
was called for. 

There is a classic American 
method for punishing persons 
whose speech or actions, 
though perfectly legal, go 
against the grain of the day or 
the mood of the age. This is to 
cut off their livelihood, as was 
done in the 1950s, with black- 
listing in the entertainment 
industry. 

Obedient to die tradition, 
the chain-store merchand- 
isers whose golf equipment 
bore Zoeller's endorsement 
immediately smote him in the 
bankbook by telling the world 
they had washed their hands 
of him. 

A few days later Woods 
was — I resist the suicidal 
temptation to say he was “on 
the griddle.' ’ or “in a pickle,' ' 


or “ in a jam, ” and stick to the 
facts: He was accused of hav- 
ing uttered off-color remarks 
while being photographed for 
a magazine cover. 

Meanwhile, however, Zoeller 
was repeated to have discussed 
victuals again in an exchange 
with a blade golfing partner. 
Something about watermelon 
this time. 

And so on. 

No sensible person can 
doubt that racism re mains one 
of the two greatest threats to 
American survival. (The oth- 
er is the automobile.) To 
make an issue of a golfer's 
witless crack about Med 
chicken, watermelon and col- 
lard greens is to trivialize a 
grave problem. 

Witless cracks with a racist 
undertone, whether deliber- 
ate or inadvertent, are useful, 
because they reflect the 
somber reality: Try as we may 
to conceal it, the tendency to- 
ward racism insists on 
pulsing silent and apparently 
eternal within us. 

Political correctness suc- 
ceeds only in concealing the 
demon, not in killing it, and a 
demon concealed may be 
more deadly than a demon let 
free where we can see and 
guard against him. 

This empty political cor- 
rectness diverts us from what 
is important to what is trivial 
and sometimes ridiculous. 
Would Zoeller’s attempt at a 
small joke — urging Woods 
not to order Med chicken and 
col lard greens — have been 
bad if he had asked him not to 
order “soul food”? 

The absurdity here is that 
Afro-American people may 
be unable to enjoy the glories 
of Med chicken and water- 
melon without fear of some 
dim pink man laughing at 
them. 

No. that’s not absurd, it's 


By Karen De Witt 

' New York Tuna Service 


L EXINGTON, Kentucky — He 
was already seated at Phil 


tragic. 

Nett York Times Service 


JL/was already seated at Phil 
Dunn's CookShop when she ar- 
rived. At a table in the back, away 
from the crowd. He would always 
have a table. He was a friend of die 
owner. The jeans, the shirt the 
grouse-hunting jacket with the 
suede patch that he wore and the 
look he gave her over wire-rimmed 
spectacles said it all: J. Peterman. 

This description of the man, J. 
Peterman, and the outfit he was 
wearing, could well have been the 
advertising copy in his popular 
mail-order catalogue. As he sits in 
the restaurant, J. Peterman, also 
known as John, looks like a mildly 
eccentric college professor here in 
central Kentucky. 

If people know die J. Peterman 
name, most of diem associate it 
with die quirky fictional character 
on die hit television show “Sein- 
feld” who talks like the ad copy in 
the catalogue. But the real J. Peter- 
man is a rounder and the president 
of the J. Peterman Company, a 
mail-order business known for its 
slim-Jim catalogue, with its uncon- 
ventional items and long, lyrical 
copy by an unnamed narrator as- 
sumed to be J. Peterman himself. 

Tall, trim and with a mustache, 
the real Peterman is laconic rather 
than lyrical. He isn’t kooky, either, 
not like his namesake on “Sein- 
feld," played by John O’Hurley. 
Peterman surely would not talk po- 
etic piffle as his fictional character 
does in the rain to his fictional 
assistant. Elaine. 

At 55, Peterman, who grew up in 
West Nyack. New York, is a hard- 
headed businessman with a distinct- 
ive taste for travel. Luchese cowboy 
boots, cattle ranching, polo and nos- 
talgic relics, from old leather mail- 
bags to a 1938 BMW motorcycle 
with sidecar. His office is full of 
some of his favorite things: walking 
sticks and old leather suitcases, 
autographed baseballs, stuffed 
pheasants, a 10-gallon hat and a 
wall of books; some of these items 


can be found in his catalogue. 

A wall in the lobby of the ware- 
house is covered with signed pho- 
tographs of celebrities with com- 
ments raving abour Peterman's 
unusual merchandise. 

“I've often said that you're 
either a genius or you’re dumber 
than a brick wall." Peterman said. 
"My genius is that I'm average. I 
feel the same things that a lot of 
people feeL I'm an individual. I'm 
a romantic. We provide access to 
individuality." 

“We" includes Peterman’s 
partner and the co-founder of the 
company, Donald Staley, who is 
the “voice of the catalogue." the 
m an b ehind die evocative copy, 
and also an advertising executive. 

Peterman had wanted to travel to 
exotic places since he was 7. But he 
got sidetracked by a career in the 
minors for the Pittsburgh Pirates. 

His baseball career and dreams 
about becoming a major-league 
second baseman ended in his early 
20s. Then, for the next 20 years, he 
went to work as a regional sales 
manager for General Foods and 
later for Castle & Cooke, both food 
distribution companies. His terri- 
tory was Kentucky, Tennessee and 
Alabama. 

In 1981, he was handling fer- 
tilizer accounts when he was dis- 
missed. He had a wife, four kids, 
and $10,000 of debt on his Amer- 
ican Express card. Hie decided then 
that he was going back to that first 
dream. He was going to travel just 
like Marco Polo; ana he was going 
to work for nobody but himself. 

“1 decided that was the first and 
last time I was going to be fired," 
Peterman said. “I became a con- 
sultant.” His new career of helping 
people put together deals sent him 
on die road. 

One of his clients was looking 
for an advertising agency, so Peter- 
man visited New York to interview 
various companies. At one meet- 
ing, he encountered Staley. 

“We liked each other right away 
— we had good chemistry,” Staley 
said. 

“Peterman had an entrepreneur- 



“All the copy is factually true," 
Peterman said “And in the early 
days it was based on my travels.” 

Peterman says he spends about 
30 percent of the yearon the road. . 

ffis wife, Audrey Petennan, said 
that when she married him 32 years : 
ago, she always knew that their life 
would be an ^adventure.” 

* ‘People go places, and they nev- 
er see," Peterman said. “They go 
and they come back, and they 
memorize the- names and places 
and die churches so that they can 
tell people that they’ve been there. 
But they never really see what’s 
going on. I see a lot I was sitting in 


Deux Magots in January, sipping a 
$5 cup of coffee, when I saw a man 
go by in a long general’s coat It's a 
general’s coat because it came 
down to the ankles and had large 
lapels. I noted it in my mind and 
went around and found one. 

“How? Well dial's a secret. It 
was not a new coat, though,- it 
wasn't a designer coat. Certainly it 
was vintage clothing-” 

Petennan is assiduous about 
tracking down those signature 
items that have wooed customers to - 
Ms catalogue and brought the com- 
pany $70 milli on in sales revenues 
m 1996. In addition to the mail- 
order business, J. Peterman also 
has three stores: in Lexington, in 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, and in 
Manchester, Vermont. 

Peterman says Ms catalogue ap- 
peals mainly to the 35-to-55-year- 
old age category, baby boomers 
hopefully with considerable dis- 
posable income. 

Petennan became a “Seinfeld” 
character because the cast and crew 
of die show are all mail-order cata- 
logue aficionados. 

Peterman said he didn’t know he 
was being parodied until Ms moth- 
er called the night his character 
appeared on the show. The pro- 
ducers didn't ask permission, but 
he doesn’t mind. 

“It’s fun,” Petennan said. Sales . 
haven’t gone up, but, he added, ‘ ‘It 
doesn't hurt when 37 million 
people hear the name on the top 
television show." 


J BncfcSanibnVTbrVwYariiTbBe* 

John Peterman in his catalogue goods warehouse in Kentucky. 


ial bent, and be was the kind of 
person I knew I should be partnered 
with. So we kind of made an agree- 
ment to agree that if some idea 
struck us, we'd go forw ar d.” 

The two tried several businesses, 
including a mail-order company to 
heal sick houseplants and the man- 
ufacturing of beer cheese, both suc- 
cessful, before a cowboy duster 
propelled them into retail history. 

Petennan had been on a trip to 
Wyoming when he purchased that 
fateful duster, a long simple riding 
coal common in the West but rare 
in the rest of the country. 

Staley says that when Peterman 
walked in wearing the duster, he 
thought, ‘ ‘Peterman isn’t wearing a 


coat — he’s wearing a business.” 

They sold $2,000 worth of dust- 
ers in one month, February 1987. 
By year-end, after taking out ad- 
vertisements in New York and Los 
Angeles newspapers, they had sold 
$580,000 worm of dusters by mail: 
The J. Peterman company was 


bom, tapping into a postmodern 
hunger for romance and adventure 


hunger for romance and adventure 
without irony. 

In 1988, the company published 
its first catalogue, the Owner's 
Manual, and sent it to 23,000 
people who had bought dusters. 
And Petennan went looking for 
other items, venture capital and 
tales for Staley to write atout in the 
next catalogue. 




PEOPLE 


T HE Australian pianist David 
Helfgott hummed his way into the 



A Helfgott hummed his way into the 
audience's heart at his opening London 
concert but the critics in London, like 
those in the United States, .panned the 
man who inspired the Oscar-winning 
film “Shine.” The audience that packed 
a sold-out Royal Festival Hall could 
hardly believe their ears as Helfgott 
muttered and chuckled his way through 
his opening Mendelssohn piece. 
Throughout the concert Helfgott ap- 
peared immersed in the music, but it was 
often hard to hear it because of his mum- 
blings, atonal groaning and h umming 
But he was heartily applauded during the 
recital and returned for three encores. 


tiny living quarters, only two bedrooms, 
a small kitchen and no dining room. 


among those set to be inducted Tuesday 
in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and 
Museum in Cleveland, OMo. 


Luciano Pavarotti. Jose Carreras 
and Placid o Domingo hope to raise 
about $2.2 million for two European 
opera houses destroyed by fire. The 
money collected in a televised concert 
June 1 7 in Modena, Italy, will go toward 
reconstruction of Venice's La Fenice 
and Barcelona’s Liceu. 


MhtScpdRrarn 

TO JAMES WITH LOVE — Sean Connery waving to a packed house 
at a tribute to the actor Monday at Avery Fisher Hall in New York. 


The oceanfront California ranch of 
former President Ronald Reagan has 
been on sale for eight months with no 
takers. Sotheby's International Realty is 
handling the sale and the asking price is 
$5.95 million. Besides having hosted the 
likes of Mikhail Gorbachev and Queen 
Elizabeth EL the 860-acre (344-hectare) 
property has little else going for it with 


Molly Maxwell is set to become the 
oldest person ever to get a degree from 
Cambridge University. She is to collect 
the award at a special ceremony on her 
104th birthday next Tuesday. Maxwell 
completed her studies in modem lan- 
guages in 1917 and left with an “hon- 
ors" certificate. Women were not al- 
lowed to receive degrees and become 
members of the university until 1948. 


With a glut of books already covering 
every detail of the O J. Simpson case, 
the Los Angeles prosecutor Marcia 
Clark’s late entry this week resorts to 
personal disclosures, saying she was 
raped at age 17 and “closer than lovers” 
with fellow prosecutor Christopher 
Darden during the trial. Clark’s book, 
“Without a Doubt,” is being released 
Friday, but 18 copies were mistakenly 
shipped to booksellers last weekend, 
and at least two fell into the hands of 
Time and NBC, which leaked details. 


nings. “I read where we ‘lost’ Bryant 
G umbel,” Ariedge said. “We didn’t 
‘lose* Bryant Gumbel." Ariedge said he 
made a halfhearted attempt to hire Gum- 
beL “but we had no place to put him.” 


Five hundred years later, a$1.6 milli on 
replica of the three-masted ship sailed by 
John Cabot has left Britain, seeking to 
recreate the explorer's 1497 attempt to 
sail to China. Cabot didn’t make it, and 
ended up in Newfoundland. The 70-foot 
(20-meter) square-rigger sailed out of the 
Bristol Channel for a journey that is 
expected to take seven weeks. 


Dozens of residents showed up tq 
watch as Clint Eastwood started film- 
ing die movie based on the best-selling 
novel by John Berendt, “Midnight in 
the Garden of Good and Evil," in Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. The book is a true 
story about a gay antiques dealer un- 
successfully med four times for the 
1981 murder of ayoung gigolo. The film 
stars Kevin Spacey and John Cusack.; 


Michael Jackson, the Bee Gees and 
the group Crosby, Stills and Nash are 


Bryant Gumbel. the former co-host of 
NBC 's “Today ” show spent his first day 
at CBS on the defensive because of com- 
ments from ABCs news chairman, 
Roone Ariedge. In die latest issue of 
Vanity Fair, Ariedge said that Gumbel is 
“not even in the same league" as Ted 
KoppeL Diane Sawyer and Peter Jen- 


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