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Si'SiSt; to Kinshasa, Fear of Its 6 Protectors ’ 

Pillaging Armies 
Haunt the Capital 


Paris, Friday, May 9, 1997 


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Bill Richardson, the U.S. envoy, said Thursday that Marshal Mobutu 
would probably meet again with the rebel leader, Laurent Kabila. Page 6. 



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Open Wide for the Laser 

U.S. Approves Alternative to Dental Drill 
That Could Virtually Eliminate the Pain 


By Patrice Apodaca 

Los Angeles Tims 


In a development that could re- 
volutionize dentistry and virtually 
eliminate the pant of having a cavity 
filled, the U.S. Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration has approved a laser sys- 
tem for treating tooth decay. 

The laser could usher in a new era 
in dentistry in which the often painful 
procedures of using drills to remove 
tooth decay and prepare cavities for 
fillings will be replaced by relatively 
pain-free laser methods. 

The laser system, manufactured by 
a California company, consists of a 
console and a fiber-optic cabtewitb a 
handpiece at the end that looks like a 
standard dental -drill. Like drills, it 
uses water or air to cool and clean the 
tooth during treatment. Dentists and 
patients will be required to wear 


goggles during procedures to shield 
their eyes. 

Previously, dental lasers were ap- 


proved only for use on soft tissue such 
as gums. 

“Use of lasers in dentistry is medi- 
cine for the 2 1 st century, ' ’ said Bruce 
Burlington, director of the Food and 
Drug Administration’s Center for 
Devices and Radiological Health. 
“This will give dentists and patients a 
significant hew option for treating 
decay and doing other related pro- 
cedures.” The food and drug agency 
announced its approval of the system 
Wednesday. 

[An FDA spokesman, Sharon 
Snider, told the International Herald 
Tribune that while it appeared that the 
laser war less painful than conven- 
tional-drills, “we’re not allowing them 
to make a claim Thai it*s pain-free.” 

[A spokesman for die American 
Dental Association. Chris Martin, said 
laser technology was already in use for 
treating cavities and oho- dental pro- 
cedures in Germany and Japan.] 

' See LASER, Page 7 


By Howard W. French 

AVw York Times Service 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Although six 
years have passed, not a day goes by 
when Antoine Nehme fails to recall the 
September 1991 morning when he ar- 
rived at his general merchandise store in 
centra] Kinshasa to discover that he had 
lost everything to army looters. 

“The trouble started early one 
Monday morning, when they told me 
there were soldiers shooting all around 
town and that 1 shouldn’t go out,” the 
70-year-old Lebanese merchant said. 

“1 started down the street anyway, 
and then l ran into ray neighbor, who 
was returning home dressed only in his 
underpants. He told me that’s what they 
were doing to foreigners caught in the 
streets and said that I’d better get back 
home.” 

With thick smoke rising from central 
Kinshasa and gunfire heard throughout 
the day, Mr. Nehme, who moved here in 
1977 to escape the war in Lebanon, 
waited anxiously for daybreak the next 
day, when he set out with asoldierhehad 
hired to accompany him to his shop. 

But like every business in central 
Kinshasa, where money-traders finger- 
ing thick wads of nearly worthless c ash. 
more 
streets 

was already empty. 

“They even ripped out the dirty car- 
pet,” be said. “It was a total loss.” 

For those who lived through the early 
1990s here — a turbulent period when 
opposition groups first began to openly 
challenge the rule of President Mobutu 
Sese Seko, and Mr. Mobutu responded 
by unleashing his soldiers on the city — 
there is no prospect more frightening 
than a repeat of tile pillaging of Kin- 
shasa in 1991 and 1993. 

With its broad boulevards and 
rise buildings, Kinshasa was inti 
first by the colonial Belgians and later 
by Mr. Mobutu himself, to be a show- 
case. But ask anyone when the grungy 
and bartered feel of this city of five 
million .dates from, and almost as if 
speaking of a Biblical disaster, they will 
tell you the fall occurred in those twin 
rounds of destruction. 

As all of Zaire anticipates the transfer 
of power between Mr. Mobutu. 66, who 
is suffering from terminal cancer, and 
Laurent Kabila, the rebel leader who 
controls most of Zaire, no immediate 
stake looms larger than whether this city 
can avoid more death and destruction. 

Some of the fiercest fighting in the 
seven-momb-loug war has been taking 



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ts these days, Mr. Nehme’s store 




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TAKING SECURITY RELIGIOUSLY — A soldier and his dog 
searching 70,000 seats Thursday at Hie site in central Beirut where 
Pope John Paul II will hold Sunday Mass during his first visit to 
Lebanon. The site will be able to hold about 300,000 people. 


Hormone-Treated Meat 
Is Ruled Fit for Europe 

World Trade Body Overturns ELPs Import Ban 


See KINSHASA, Page 6 




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Republicans Return Foreign Donation 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


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WASHINGTON — The Republican 
Party returned a campaign contribution 
,,of more- than $100,000 on Thursday, 
^acknowledging that the money origin- 
ated from a Hong Kong company and 
not from a subsidiary incorporated in 
Florida. 

It was by far the largest reimburse- 
ment by the party, which previously had 
returned $15,050 in questionable cam- 
paign donations. 

It put the Republicans nowhere near 


the $3 milli on in dubious donations re- 
turned by the Democratic National 
Committee, but analysts said it would 
provide Democrats with a handy re- 
buttal when die issue is raised. 

“It certainly puts the Republicans on 
the defensive,” said James Tburber, di- 
rector of the American University Cen- 
ter for Congressional and Presidential 
Studies. ‘ Tt embarrasses them and 
shows that both parties should be in- 
vestigated regarding their foreign con- 
tributions.” 

James Nicholson, chairman of the 
Republican National Committee, said 


Thursday that the party had had no 
reason to question the legality of the 
contributions before Time magazine re- 
ported last week that Young Brothers 
Development-USA, the Florida-re- 
gistered company that made the' dona- 
tion, was a shell company controlled 
from Hong Kong. 

Time reported that Young Brothers 
was controlled by Ambrous Tung 
Young of Hong Kong, a former Taiwan 
naval officer who is the Asian agent for 
several aviation companies. It added 

See FUNDS, Page 6 


By Edmund L. Andrews 

New York Times Service 

FRANKFURT — A panel of the 
World Trade Organization has declared 
that the European Union's nine-year 
ban on hormone-treated beef is illegal, a 
big victory for the American cattle in- 
dustry that also blazes new trails in the 
area of national sovereignty. . 

The preliminary report, which has not 
yet been released to the public, declares 
that Europe's import ban on beef pro- 
duced with growth-enhancing hormones 
is illegal because it has no scientific 
justification, U.S. government officials 
who have seen it said Thursday. 

If it is upheld, which expats on all 
sides believe it will be, it is likely to set 
an important precedent for attacking 
scores of other trade barriers, from Jap- 
anese certification of apples to Euro- 
pean rules for poultry inspection, that 
are based on health concerns. 

But it also marks an unprecedented 
use of international trade law to overturn 
local laws drat have adamant popular 
support. Unlike many import restric- 
tions. the European ban on hormone- 
treated beef was not erected to protect 
local fanners but rather to assuage wide- 
spread popular angst among European 
consumers over chemicals in food. 

Indeed, the ban applies equally to 
European and non-European farmers. 


so it does not give domestic beef pro- 
ducers any direct protection against for- 
eign rivals. 

The ruling could also have a direct 
bearing on potential disputes in the fu- 
ture over genetically engineered crops, 
which raise some of the same political 
issues as hormone-treated beef. Amer- 
ican companies are already marketing 
genetically altered com that resists root 
worms and soybeans that are imper- 
vious to powerful pesticides, and both 
products have already generated intense 
political opposition in some European 
quarters. 

But the ruling could someday cut tire 
other way as well, forcing the United 
States to drop health or environmental 
regulations that have broad popular ap- 
peal but which do not pass scientific 
muster in an international tribunal. 

The issue before the three-member 
panel of the World Trade Organization 
was whether the ban was grounded on 
any scientific evidence that the use of 
hormones might endanger health. 
American farmers routinely use five 
hormones, including progesterone and 
testosterone, to make cattle grow faster 
and produce more milk. 

The consensus among scientific ex- 
perts was that there is no such evidence, 
and the five hormones used by Amer- 

See TRADE, Page 6 


Swiss Reject 
Overhauling 
’46 Pact on 
Nazi Loot 

Because of Holiday, 
U.S. Report Generates 
Only Muted Reaction 

By Alan Cowell 

jftjf York Times Service 

ZURICH — A day after a sweeping 
U.S. condemnation of its financial deal- 
ings with Nazi Germany, Switzerland 
ruled out on Thursday suggestions thai 
it renegotiate agreements regulating its 
responsibilities for World War II trans- 
actions and rejected Washington’s ac- 
cusation that it failed to live up to 
them. 

At the same time, Swiss Jewish 
groups issued new demands that money 
from gold bars worth about $70 million 
still held from the wartime era at the 
Federal Reserve Bank in Manhattan and 
the Bank of England be distributed 
among Holocaust survivors. 

On a holiday. Ascension Day. that 
closed businesses, newspapers and gov- 
ernment offices throughout the country, 
many Swiss had only cautious things to 
say about the long-awaited Eizenstat 
report, which was issued' Wednesday in 
Washington. 

The initial assessment of most polit- 
ical parties was that the report brought 
little new to what had already been 
published or suspected in months of 
debate here. 

“The Eizenstat report wasn't billed 
as a big happening.” said Oliver Meiler, 
a 28-year-old journalist Indeed, said 
Hermann Wanner, a World War II vet- 
eran of the Swiss Army, “These rev- 
elations are what we have become used 
to from America.” 

Speaking anonymously, a 54-year- 
old banker in Geneva said. “Sometimes 
you just have to stop and say: This is 
history.” 

Any outrage was reserved not so 
much for Washington’s accusation that 
Switzerland failed to respect agree- 
ments struck in 1946 tp hand over Nazi 
assets other titan gold as for parts of the 
report confirming that the Swiss Na- 
tional Bank bought bullion from Ger- 
many that contained gold stolen from 
individual Holocaust victims, including 
fillings from teeth. 

“1 cannot imagine how such things 
could happen," said Roland Trauffer, 
the secretary of Switzerland's Catholic 
Bishops Conference. 

“To think there were people who 
could enrich themselves this way: The 
idea fills me with revulsion." 

The 200-page report, compiled with 
help from 1 1 government agencies un- 
der the direction of Stuart Eizenstat, 
U.S. undersecretary of commerce, had 
been in the works for months. During 
that time, Switzerland squirmed under 
largely substantiated accusations from 
U.S. politicians and Jewish organiza- 
tions that it traded unscrupulously with 
Germany during World War II and, in 
the postwar era, blocked efforts by Jews 
to gain access to bank deposits left by 
victims of Nazi persecution. 

The mounting outside pressure has 

See GOLD, Page 6 



IsraeVs Legal 6 Torture 9 
Draws Growing Protests 


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By. Serge Schmemann 

Hew York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — For a 20-year-old 
Palestinian student named George, the 
ordeal began with his arrest at a check- 
point between Jerusalem and Bethle- 
hem. He was taken first to the Jerusalem 
jail known as the Russian Compound, 
and after three days- transferred to the 
interrogation . center at the Ashkelon 
prison. 

“ For the next 17 days in December 
1995, George endured what thousands 
of Palestinians have suffered at the 
hands of Israel’s secret police, what 
Israel officially terms ’‘moderate phys- 
ical pressure,” and human rights groups 
call torture. . 

He was kept sleepless in contorted 
and excruciating" positions with a foul 
smelling bag over his head, he was 



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threatened, he was beaten, and be was 
subjected to violent shaking until he 
passed ouL ■ 

' Israel, of course, is not alone among 
its neighbors in using physical coercion 
to extract information. The Palestinian 
Authority of Yasser Arafat has been 
accused of torturing several prisoners to 
death, accounts of torture are common 
in several Arab countries, including 
Syria and Iraq, and cases of police bru- 
tality are rife in every society. 

But alone among its neighbors, and in 
a departure from the Western democ- 
racieswhose values and laws it shares. 
Israel has sought to codify and legally 
justify the use of violence in interrog- 
ations, and the Israeli Supreme Court 
has regularly condoned the practice. 
Some Israelis defend this as an advance: 
an attempt to acknowledge and assert 
control over tiw more brutal forms of 
interrogation, which Israelis often argue 
are necessary and inevitable in any na- 
tion’s figbt against terror. 

But now the approach is being 
fiercely criticized by human rights 
groups in Israel and abroad. On Wed- 
nesday, in Geneva, the United Nations 
Committee Against Torture summoned 
Israel for an extraordinary hearing tp 
face accusations that its practices vi- 
' oiate the international convention 
against torture. . 

Israel’s accusers argue that regulating 
the use of torture only condones and 
encourages iL . . 

The Israeli response in Geneva, as it 

See ISRAELIS, Page 7 



AGENDA 


IkAporiMPM 

DEATH ALOFT — Karachi relief workers carrying one of six victims 
•of a fire after fuel tanks were jettisoned by a Pakistani plane. Page 4. 


Blair Stakes Out 
Legislative Agenda 

Prime Minister Tony Blair of Britain 
and his new cabinet formulated the 
first legislative package to be put to 
Parliament by a Labour government in 
18 years, including consideration of 
the country’s first “freedom of in- 
formation act,' ’ its first laws regulating 
campaign fund-raising by political 
parties and reform of the National 
Health Service. 

The 17-month legislative program 
of about 17 to 20 proposals, agreed to 
by the cabinet Thursday, will form the 
backbone of the new Labour govern- 
ment’s plan to implement its ambitious 
campaign promises. The program will 
be formally presented in a speech read 
by Queen Elizabeth H when Parlia- 
ment convenes Wednesday. Page 5. 


The Dollar 


Now York Thursday 9 4 P.M. p/avtaadoon 


DM 


1.7083 


1.719 


Pound 


1.62 


1.6137 


Yen 


123.75 


125.015 


5.7977 



+51.77 


7136.62 


S&P 500 


7084ns 


change Tiuiraday • 4 P.M. prewfauBdoM 


+4.29 


819.91 


815.62 


Books 

Crossword 

Opinion 

Sports..... 


- Paged. 

- — Page 4. 

Pages 8-9. 

Pages 20-21. 


The Intermarket 


The IHT on-line 


Page 12. 


iht.com 


Asia’s New Red Revolution? It Comes in a Wineglass 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


HONG KONG — As Filipino singers crooned 
“Love is a wonderful thing” amid a blaze of colored 
strobe lights, Edmund Wu relaxed against a large pink 
cushion on a sofa with his left hand caressing the 
shoulder of a pretty nightclub hostess and his right 
hand cupping a glass of Chateau Lafite-Rothschild. 

Club Bboss in Kowloon was filling up fast and Mr. 
Wu, a 28-year-old executive of a Hong Kong trading 
company, was waiting for two Japanese clients to 
arrive for an evening of business dealing and en- 


tertainment. 

“I used todrink Cognac, 


he said as he watched the 


next act, a group of topless British dancers. ‘ ‘But now 
I prefer red wine because it’s better for health and 
discussion. My friends prefer it, too. ' ' Especially if it is 
-a Chateau Lafite-Rothschild. which costs 2,000 Hong 
Kong dollars ($258) a bottle. 

Although the cavernous marble and mirror-lined 
nightclub remains a bastion of serious Cognac con- 
sumption — the traditional drink of Chinese banquet 
toasts and revelry in Hong Kong — wine in the 
territory and many other parts of Asia is becoming 
fashionable in a big way. 

As wealth spreads and consciousness about health 
grows, more and more Asians are drinking wine in 
restaurants, clubs, bars and at home in preference to 
local or imported spirits. 


In feet, when control over Hong Kong passes to 
Chipa from Britain at midnight June 30, many of the 
celebratory toasts in the territory and on the mainland 
will be with wine. 

Wine traders say that health concerns are driving the 
red wine revolution in Asia. 

“No race on earth pays more attention than the 
Chinese to health, in terms of what to eat and drink or 
not eat and drink,” said David Webster, director of the 
wine division at Remy China & Hong Kong Ltd., a unit 
of France’s Remy Martin group. “The Hong Konc 
Chinese have clearly come to believe that drinkine red 
wine has health benefits while drinking Cognac in 

See WINE, Page 6 


L - 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE mo 


Yearning for Glory/ A Resurrection in Lebanon 


Music Returns to Baalbek 


By Douglas Jehl 

Aim* York Times Service 


B ' AALBEK. Lebanon — There are rea- 
sons ibis place has an unsavory repu- 
tation. In the dark days of Lebanon's 
civil war, many Western hostages spent 
rime in a garrison overlooking Baalbek. The 
radical Shiite Muslim organization that held 
them. Hezbollah, strutted unchallenged in the 


town, partly because of the backing of large 
numbers of Iranian Revolutionary Guards. 


numbers of Iranian Revolutionary Guards. 

Even today, Hezbollah and its allies maintain 
bases in the surrounding Bekaa region, and from 
time to time Israel attacks them. 

Enter Mstislav Rostropovich. 

If all goes as planned, the cellist will take the 
stage here this summer in an effort to resurrect 
the image of another Baalbek, whose vast ac- 
ropolis and soaring Roman temples have at- 
tracted tourists from around the world since the 
18th century. 

The occasion will be the reopening of die 
Baalbek Festival, which from 1956 to 1974 
attracted a stunning range of artists, including 
Rudolf Nureyev, Herbert von Karajan and Ella 
Fitzgerald, but which — like so much of Leb- 
anon's gloried past — has long since faded into 
distant memory. 

In some ways, the talk of renaissance carries a 
note of self-deception. To reach Baalbek, one 
must still negotiate countless checkpoints 
manned by Syrian soldiers andplainclothesmen, 
the force that holds sway in what is sometimes 
known as Lebanon's Wild West. 


replace a rundown airport badly damaged by the 
war. a sprawling new complex is scheduled to be 
completed by the end of the year. 

By law. Americans may not visit Lebanon 
without a special waiver from the State De- 
partment, reflecting continuing concerns within 
the U.S. government about the future intentions 
of Hezbollah, held responsible not only for the 
1983 bombing that lolled 241 American ser- 
vicemen. but also for other attacks that leveled 
two U.S. embassies. 

Other Western governments long ago lifted all 
such restrictions, but most European embassies 
still advise their nationals that if would be most 
prudent to travel to Baalbek as part of an or- 
ganized group. 

Slowly, busload by busload, the visitors to 
Baalbek have begun to return in die last two 
years — french, Germans, Britons mostly — to 
marvel at the majestic mins that were rarely 
visited by tourists for more than two decades. 

“Back in England, everyone wanted to know 
whether I was packing a flak jacket and had I 
been in touch with Terry Waite,’ ' Tony Carter, a 
British tourist, said in a reference to the rep- 
resentative of die Anglican Church who tried to 
negotiate with hostage-takers and was taken 
hostage himself. “But I must say that 1 haven’t 
felt a moment of concern.” 


A GAINST a backdrop of snowcapped 
mountains and a sky of die purest blue, 
the vast acropolis is breathtaking, big- 
ger than the one at Athens and grander 
than the colonnaded streets of Palmyra, in the 
Syrian desert. The remaining six golden-brown 
columns of die Temple of Jupiter soar nearly 70 
feet, making diem the tallest in the world, while 


The shabby streets of the town, which has a 
nulation of about 50,000, remain adorned with 


population of about 50,000, remain adorned with 
posters of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the 
Iranian leader lionized by Hezbollah for his 
establishment of an Islamic state. There are also 
yellow banners whose slogans, meant to inspire 
die town’s Shiite Muslim residents, might seem a 
jarring counterpoint to an evening of fine music: 
"Martyrdom is a gift that comes from God.” 

But all across Lebanon, emblems of an old 
spirit have begun to re-emerge even amid the 
horror left by bombs, rockets and artillery 
shells. 

On the sea north of the capital, the Casino du 
Liban is back in business, replete with extra- 
vagant floor shows and legions of high-rollers. 
In Beirut, there are two Hard Rock cafes and new 
dubs and restaurants open every week. And to 



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In its heyday , the music festival at the vast acropolis in Baalbek attracted 
on array of artists , before falling victim to the 1975-90 civil war. 


the nearby Temple of Bacchus is the best-pre- 
served in the Waddle East. 


served in the Middle East 

In the fear and gloom of die 1975-90 war, even 
few Beirutis dared venture to Baalbek, a journey 
across the steep coastal mountains and through 
the lonely vineyards of the Bekaa that usually 
crossed several battle lines. 

As part of an effort to lure them and others 
back, an English-language banner was hung sev- 
eral years ago across an entrance to the complex 
that read, somewhat disconcertingly, * ‘Hezbollah 
Welcomes You. ' ' The banner has disappeared — 
a casualty of the elements, local officials say. but 
perhaps also pan of die government's quest to 
encourage Hezbollah to maintain a lower profile. 


Still, on a recent weekday morning, the grounds 
echoed with the shrieks of 450 visiting fourth- 
and fifth-graders and the murmurs of scores more 
foreign visitors, and the signs of a new hospitality 
were much .in evidence. 

“There was nobody six years ago,” said Ihab 
Raad, supervisor of the jasmine-covered 
Palmyra Hotel, a once-grand structure that in its 
120 years has housed the queen of Abyssinia and 
Charles de Gaulle but where peeling paint and 
faded, sagging furniture now bear testament to 
harder times. “At least tonight I can say that we 
will have about 25 guests.” 

For now , organizers of the revived Baalbek 
Festival concede that their ambitions remain 
relatively modest- While the last festival, in 
1 974, ran for six weeks and included a full menu 


of th eater , ballet, opera and jazz, the pageant 
being planned for this summer is to last just 
seven days. Its highlight is expected to be the 
one-night performance on July 30 by Mr. 
Rostropovich, who organizers said had inquired 
repeatedly over die years about returning to 
Baalbek, where he last performed in 1 969. 

May Carlos Arida, a Lebanese who remained 
president of the festival committee throughout 


the 23-year lull, described that performance, to 
be backed bv the Orchesrre Philhannonique de 


be backed by the Orchestra Philhannonique de 
Radio Ranee and set beneath the floodlighted 
col umns of the two great Roman temples, as a 
first step in regaining past glory. . 

“The Lebanese public was spoiled by the 
festival before the war,” she said, “and we hope 
to spoil them again.” 


Tm worried 
about the kid, 
honey!" a 


"Don'tfworry, I've got him covered!" 


Manuel Elizalde Jr., 60, Is Dead 

Filipino Official Who Discovered an Allegedly Primitive Tribe 


TRAVELUPDATE 




By Robert McG. Thomas Jr. 

New York Times Senior 


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Manuel Elizalde Jr., a wealthy Filipino official 
who caused a sensation in 1971 when he announced 
that he had discovered a tiny tribe of people who 
had lived for thousands of years in blissful Stone 
Age isolation, died Saturday at his home in Makati . 
a Manila suburb. He was 60. 

His family gave no cause of death. 

To die wave of social scientists who descended 
on Mindanao, in the southern Philippines, in the 
early 1970s. the 24 people Mr. Elizalde said he had 
found there seemed too good to be true. 

Calling themselves Tasadays. after their sacred 
mountain, they were hunter-gatherers who never 
ventured far from their cave dwellings and had 
assumed they were the only people in die world. 

Some scientists were suspicious from the be- 
ginning. For one thing, Mr. Euzalde was something 
of an iconoclast A Harvard-educated scion of one 
of the wealthiest Philippine families, he gave up his 
hard-drinking playboy ways to champion belea- 
guered minorities, first as a private citizen and later 
as a member of President Ferdinand Marcos's 
i cabinet. 

Some anthropologists had called the Tasaday 
| story implausible. Among other things, they poin- 
ted out the tribe’s caves lacked the trash heaps that 
would have been expected of peoples living there 
for centuries. 

1 Mr. Elizalde. who had been forced to leave the 
Philippines in 1983 after a falling out with Imelda 
Marcos, the president’s wife, settled on a coffee 


plantation in Costa Rica with more than a dozen 
young Filipino girls. The Costa Rican government 
expelled him in 1986, citing scandalous reports of 
goings-on inside his heavily-guarded compound. 

He returned to the Philippines in 1988, helped 
manage his family's extensive business interests, 
and tried unsuccessfully to rekindle his political 
career. A 1993 nomination to be ambassador to 
Mexico was withdrawn after it created a political 
furor over Mr. Elizalde’s ties to the Marcos ad- 
ministration and his role in whai was then widely 
perceived as the Tasaday hoax. 

The debate over the Tasadays ’ origins still rages. 
For all the reports that they were paid to fake die 
degree of their primitive status, some social sci- 
entists still say they believe the Tasadays had lived 
for a few centuries in complete isolation. 

Sydney Freed berg, 82, Art Historian 

New York Times Service 

Sydney Freed berg, 82, an an historian who 
taught for nearly three decades at Harvard and was 
chief curator of the National Gallery of Art in 
Washington, died Tuesday at his home in Wash- 
ington. 

Mr. Freed berg, who specialized in the art of the 
Italian High Renaissance, is probably best known 
for his survey tilled “Painting in Italy: 1500- 
1600." He also served as an adviser at Harvard’s 
Fogg Art Museum, at the Museum of Fine Arts in 
Boston and ar the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 
New York. Receiving the National Medal of Arts in 
1 9S8 . he remains the only art historian to have been 
so honored. 


Hong Kong Carrier 
Eases Way to Australia 


HONG KONG (AP) — Many trav- 
elers flying to Australia on the Hong 
Kong airline Cathay Pacific can now get 
visas electronically when they book 
their flight, the carrier announced 
Thursday. 

The airline said the program will ap- 
ply to citizens of all European Union 
countries except France, Spain and Por- 
tugal. and to those of. Brunei, Canada. 
Japan. Malaysia. Malta, Norway, Singa- 
pore. South Korea and the United 
States. 


MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin said Thursday that a treaty on 
Russia’s relations with NATO was 
“about 98 percent" ready and that he 
might jnin talks in Moscow next week to 
try to finalize the deal. 

. Mr. Yeltsin, who opposes NATO’s 
plans to admit former Soviet allies, ad- 
mitted that talks with the Western or- 
ganization had been tough. 

“There has probably not been such 
an acute issue between Russia and the 
U.SA. and NATO since the Cuban 
crisis," he said, referring to the standoff 
in 1962 over Soviet missile bases in the 
Caribbean. 

Moscow, painfully aware that NATO 
will not drop expansion plans because g 
of its objections, has concentrated ou " 
reeking a deal to limit changes in troop 
deployments in Europe and win a voice 
in NATO planning. 

The alliance wants an agreement with 
Russia before its July 8-9 summit meet- 
ing in Madrid, where itplaos to name its 
first new members from Central and 
Eastern Europe. Poland Hungary and 
the Czech Republic are believed to be 
the leading candidates. 

Negotiators have agreed to establish a 
council that will allow Moscow to have 
a direct voice — "but not a vote — in 
decisions made by the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. 

But differences still remain on mil- 
itary aspects of the agreement, with 
NATO saying that while it has no plans 
to move nuclear weapons or combat 
troops to the territories of new members, 
it does not rule out such a move in the 
future. 

NATO also declines to promise that it 
will not build military sites ou those 
territories. 

Mr. Yeltsin said that if Russian con-^y- 
ditions are met, he will go to Paris on 
May 27 to sign an agreement with 
NATO — a document that many Rus- 
sians feel would be only a fig leaf. 

“I think it will be quite an empty 
document, meant for use inside Rus- 
sia," to save the government's free, Mr. 
Yeltsin’s popular former chief of na- 
tional security, Alexander Lebed, has 
said (Reuters, AP) 

■ Germany Offers Balts Hope 

The German defense minister, Volk- 
er Ruebe. said Thursday that Estonia, 
Latvia and Lithuania would be admitted 
to NATO at some point, even if not in 
the first wave of new members, Reuters 
reported from Copenhagen. 

“I can only advise the Balts to co- 
operate closely so that they do not lose 
time.” he said 

“One day they will be members of 
NATO, there is no doubt.” 


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CAIRO (AP) — Egypt has reopened jjr , « t j« , 

one of its most famous archaeological HUTtS Z JOUTTKXLlStS 


CAIRO (AP) — Egypt has reopened 
one of its most famous archaeological 
sites — the Temple of Luxor — after 
renovations that involved dismantling 
and reassembling columns that are 
3,500 years old. 

The temple housed the court of King 
Amenhotep EL who ruled from 1417 to 
1379 B.C. The court, considered the 
glory of the Nile River temple, is made 
up of 46 columns, each 43 feet (13 
meters) high with crowns sculpted like 
papyrus buds. 




A German Ex-Defense Minister Dies 


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ec .im jour les realiser. 


Reiners 

AACHEN. Germany — Kai- 
Uwe von Hassel, 84. a Former 
West German defense minister 
and one-time Bundestag president, 
collapsed and died at a political 
prize ceremony Thursday. 

A spokeswoman for Aachen 


city authorities said Mr. von Has- 
sel collapsed shortly after entering 
the town hall to attend a ceremony 
in which President Roman Herzog 
of Germany was to be awarded the 
Charlemagne prize. 

Mr. von Hassel was a member 
of the Christian Democrats. 


A new highway patrol will police 
Greece's main roads, and truck traffic 
may be banned on weekends, the gov- 
ernment said, after 67 people were 
killed and 749 were injured in 475 road 
accidents during the Orthodox Easter 
holiday weekend. (API 


Eight thousand guests were on hand 
Thursday to help open one of die 
world's biggest casinos, a 500,000- 
square-meter gaming and entertainment 
complex on the banks of the Yarra river 
in Melbourne. (AFP) 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Vladimir Zhirinovsky, 
the extreme nationalist leader, attacked 
two television journalists Thursday 
after they filmed him being denied entry 
to a ceremony at the Tomb of the Un- 
known Soldier in Red Square. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky, who is known for 4 
sometimes violent behavior, erupted 
when presidential guards barred him 
from the memorial just outside the Krem- 
lin as President Boris Yeltsin was laying 
a wreath there. Apparently, trie nation- 
alist leader was late for the ceremony. 

Seeing that a Moscow Television’ 
Channel correspondent tried to film the 
incident, Mr. Zhirinovsky attacked the 
woman, grabbed her microphone, threw 
it on the ground and twisted her hand. 

He then pushed die correspondent. 
Julia Olshanskaya, into his car. where his 
guards tried to seize her documents. 

A cameraman for another channel, 
Valeri Ivanov, tried to film the violence 
and was pushed away and bruised by 
Mr. Zhirinovsky and his guards. 


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The Associated Press . 

NEW DELHI — Ten near- 
collisions between aircraft 
have been reported in Indian 
skies since November, when 
two passenger jets collided 
and killed 349 people, the 
civil aviation minister said 
Thursday. 

One of the 1 0 occurred just 
four days after the collision 
near New Delhi between jet- 
liners of Saudi Arabia Air- 
lines and Kazakstan Airlines, 
the minister. Chand Mahal 
Ibrahim, said in Parliament. 

The latest incident oc- 
curred this month. In the oth- 
ers. two collisions were aver- 
ted in April and six in 
January, the Press Trust of 
India quoted Mr. Ibrahim as 
saying. He did not give details 
or say what action the gov- 
ernment had taken. 

Mr. Ibrahim's statement 
came as a federal judge in- 
vestigating the Nov. 12 crash 
heard complaints from law- 
yers for the two airlines in- 
volved about the safety equ ip- 
ment 3t New Delhi's airport. 


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North America 

Ph Battel pwa and New York 
wkl be windy and coo! over 
the weekend, but sunny 
and warmer Monday. 
Thunderstorms will erupt 
from the central Rockies 
into the northern Plains, 
white the Southwest wit be 
hot end dry. There may be 
soaking reins through the 
Rio Grand VaRey n Texas, 


Europe 

Cool and windy with show- 
art across much of north- 
ern Europe from England 
to northern Germany and 
across Scandinavia. Scot- 
land, Norway and Sweden 
will have steadier rains. 
Sunny and nice over 
southern Spain end most 
of Italy. Sunny, warm 
weather will reach from 
Turkey to Belarus. 


Asia 

SoaMng rains wD continue 
across interior southeast- 
ern China and northern 
Myanmar. Guety thunder- 
storms wf! end me hot dry 
spell over western China, 
but Balling and the north- 
east w9 be gening warmer. 
Hoi and dry across most ol 
India with a few showers 
and thunderstorms tn the 
south. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


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Clinton Gets a Dose 
Of 2 Distinct Mexicos 

NAFTA Helps Some, but Ignores Others 


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By Molly Moore and Peter Baker 

HaJAiwjeioa Aw Sent , e 

MEXICO CITY — In the morning, 
President Bill Clinton stood in a cav- 
ernous auditorium before thousands of 
business owners and government of- 
ficials, hailing the economic wonders 
wrought by the North American Free 
Trade Agreement of 1993. 

In the. afternoon, he took a helicopter 
for 75 miles (120 kilometers) to the 
colonial town of Tlaxcala, where he was 
greeted by thousands of peasant fanners 
who make an average of $3 JO a day — 
when they can find work — and who 
were lured to a colorful rally by free 
food, sweaters and transportation. 

“There's no work in my town," said 
Viigjnio Maldonado Sanchez, a 60-y ear- 
old farm laborer who rode to Tlaxcala on 
a government bus for an hour. * ‘On days 
when I can find work, we eat. On days 1 
don’t have work, we barely eat.” 

Mr. Clinton’s day of contrasts un- 
derscored the economics and the polirics 
of NAFTA at a time when the president 
is pressing to extend lower trade barriers 
throughout Latin America. 

As indicated by statistics rattled off in 
Mr. Clinton's keynote address at the 
National Auditorium in Mexico City 
alongside President Ernesto Zedillo, it 
is not hard to find Mexicans who have 
benefited from the trade agreement 

But as his visit to Tlaxcala demon- 
strated only a few hours later, h also is 
easy to find those who have not 

Those realities are especially impor- 
tant because they will help define the 
debate as the United States and its 
neighbors try to enhance their economic 
relationships. Expanded free trade is a 
central mission of Mr. Clinton's first 
official trip to Latin America. 

In the Mexico bom of NAFTA, Mr. 
Clinton said, electronics workers have 
new jobs and better pensions, while 
hundreds of thousands of women now 
get mammograms because of Amer- 
ican-made medical equipment 
“Many people in both our countries 


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prevail,'* Mr. Clinton said in the mom- 


:h. “Well, they were wrong. 
'A is working — working for you 
and working for the American people." 

But along the newly repaired streets of 
Tlaxcala, the peasants bused to the out- 
door event described a different Mexico. 
They live in a stale where one-quarter of 
all families live on $1,042 a year, at 
most where one-fourth of the popu- 
lation lives in one-room houses, and 
where nearly one-fourth of all homes 
have no toilets. And this is one of Mex- 
ico's more economically sound states. 

“1 really hope he understands the real 
situation," said Claudia, a government 
secretary who was ordered to attend Mr. 
Clinton's speech in Mexico City and did 
not want to give her last name for fear of 
reprisals from the authorities. 

“The problem is." she added, “he 
doesn't see it because he never sees the 
poor people. He never saw that because 
the Mexican police don't let him see 
them." 

The effects of NAFTA are hard to 
pinpoint, in part because it took effect at 
the same time the Mexican peso crisis 
erupted. But some things are clear: Trade 
between the two countries has risen 
nearly 60 percent, to $130 billion last 
year, since the agreement was signed. 

That made Mexico the third-largest 
U.S. trading partner and put it fast on the 
heels of Japan, the No. 2. But the slight 
trade surplus the United States enjoyed 
with Mexico before NAFTA has turned 
into a $16 billion deficit. 

Tlaxcala provided a carefully orches- 
trated backdrop for Mr. Clinton's only 
encounter with everyday Mexicans, 
and, in his speech, he stressed that the 
partnership between the two countries 
"must be pursued in a genuine spirit of 
respect, equality and dignity." 

But die stale s governor — Jose Ant- 
onio Alvarez Lima, a member of Mr. 
Zedillo's governing party — struck at 
issues that anger many Mexicans. 

He urged Mr. Clinton to belp forge a 
U.S.-Mexican relationship as ‘ ‘between 
equals" and voiced “concern for the 
human rights of our fellow Mexican 
citizens in the United States. ‘ ’ The state- 
ment drew the only spontaneous ap- 
plause of the rally. 



POLITICAL NOTES 


LibmaflV \<mb ui^l lVnrt 


President and Mrs. Clinton trying on masks in the market at Tlaxcala. 

Central America Should Share 
In ‘Prosperity, 5 President Says 


Thf Associated Press 

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica — President 
Bill Clinton opened a summit meeting 
Thursday with Central American lead- 
ers. celebrating an era of peace after 
decades of civil wars and promising that 
they would be “not just neighbors but 
real partners'' with the United States. 

“We are here to belp our economies 
grow and ro grow closer by opening our 
markets, protecting our workers and 
sharing more fairly the benefits of 
prosperity," Mr. Clintoo said from a 
stage in front of the National Theater. 

The meeting was expected to produce 
several modest trade deals and an open- 
skies accord that should make flying 
here easier and cheaper. And the summit 


A Creepy Reason for Asthma Attacks 


By Warren E. Leary 

New York Tunes Service 


WASHINGTON — Researchers say 
a national study conclusively shows that 
an alleigic reaction to cockroaches- is a 
major cause of high levels of asthma seen 
in chfldrcnin hnKff-chy neighborhoods. 

- A five-year federally financed study 
conducted at eight medical carters in 
seven cities concluded, as experts had 
long suspected, that children are at high 
risk of asthma attacks if they are allergic 
to cockroaches and if their homes con- 
tain relatively large amounts of the in- 
sects' body parts and droppings. 

These attacks result in uncommonly 


high rates of emergency-room visits, 
hospitalizations, periods of breathing 
difficulty, missed school days and 
sleep-deprived nights, the study said. 

"Our findings provide evidence that 
exposure to Cockroach allergen has an 
important role in causing morbidity due 
to asthma among inner-city children," 
the researchers wrote, in a report pub- 
lished Thursday in the New England 
Journal of Medicine. “These results 
suggest that reducing exposure to cock- 
roach allergen should be an important 
component of plans for the management 
of asthma.’’ . 

Dr. David Rosehstreich, an allergy 
specialist at Albert Einstein College of 


Medicine in New York and the senior 
investigator in the study, said research- 
ers had known for decades. that many 
asthmatics in cities were allergic to 
cockroaches. 

"But this is the first study that sys- 
tematically shows that if a person is 
allergic and is exposed to high levels of 
the cockroach allergen, die two risk 
factors come together to increase major 
asthmatic episodes,” he said. ‘ ‘It proves 
what we suspected was really true." 

The next step, he said, is to see wheth- 
er something can be done to reduce 
exposure to cockroach allergens, which 
are proteins found in the insects’ saliva, 
feces and remains. 


meeting's trade declaration would pro- 
mote U.S. tariff reductions for more 
Central American goods, administra- 
tion officials said. 

The focus on trade was underscored 
by President Jose Figueres of Costa 
Rican, who expressed Central Amer- 
ican concerns of “being left behind by 
the vehicle of progress. ’ ’ 

He gently prodded Mr. Clinton to 
push ahead with his stalled promise to 
create a free-trade zone in the Americas 
by 2005. Mr. Figueres said the goal 
must be pursued “without hurry but 
also without pause." 

Mr. Clinton told the leaders, who 
have complained of being ignored by the 
United States: “We know that we must 
not be just neighbors, but real partners, 
working together in a sprit of friendship, 
equality and mutual respect." 

With Guatemala’s 1 996 peace treaty, 
tite entire region is at peace for the firet 
time in a generation. When President 
George Bush visited here eight years 
ago, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Gua- 
temala were fighting civil wars. 


Disaster Relief 
Held Up in Senate 

WASHINGTON — 71m Same 
has voted to make it easier to build 
roads through federal lands and 
agreed to delay cutoff of some wel- 
fare benefits to legal immigrants as 
it struggled io resolve disputes 
holding up an “emergency" dis- 
aster-relief bill. 

The bill would provide $5 J bil- 
lion in aid to victims of floods and 
other disasters in 33 states and $1.8 
billion for peacekeeping operations 
in Bosnia and the Middle East. 

The main dispute centers on a 
Republican proposal to forestall 
government shutdowns by funding 
agencies at reduced rates when 
spending bills have not been en- 
acted by the start of a new fiscal 
year. Democrats describe the pro- 
posal as a backdoor ploy to slash 
spending, and President Bill Clin- 
ton has threatened to veto the bill. 

The debate over disaster relief 
threatened to turn into a disaster for 
environmentalists. Conservation 
groups were stung by the Senate 
vote on the road-building measure, 
which increases states’ authority to 
build highways in national parks 
and wilderness areas. Environ- 
mentalists also feared a defeat in the 
House, which debated a proposal to 
grant broad exemptions from the 
Endangered Species Act for dams 
and other water-control projects. 

Opponents of the House bill said it 
would have weakened protections 
for rare animals. But Republican 
leaders withdrew the bill after the 
House narrowly approved an 


amendment that limited its impact to 
emergency situations. (WP) 

Crackdown Is Set 
On Teenage Crime 

WASHINGTON — Convinced 
that a surge in the teenage pop- 
ulation will translate into surging 
crime rates over the next few years. 
President Bill Clinton and congres- 
sional Republicans are proposing 
get-tough measures that would rad- 
ically change the way the nation's 
criminal justice system treats 
young offenders. 

Under Republican-sponsored le- 
gislation that the House began con- 
sidering Thursday, defendants as 
young as 13 could be prosecuted in 
adult courts for violent crimes and 
serious drug offenses. Juvenile 
criminal records would also be- 
come detailed, permanent and pub- 
lic under the proposed law, remov- 
ing the secrecy provisions that have 
traditionally guarded c riminal pro- 
ceedings involving minors. (WP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Senator Jesse Helms, the con- 
servative chairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee who has at- 
tended countless classified 
Pentagon briefings, on why he is 
trying to overhaul the system for 
creating and declassifying official 
secrets: “We were informed in 
great detail of everything that was 
in The New York Times and The 
Washington Post that morning. We 
couldn't talk about it — because it 
was classified.” (NYT) 


Away From 
Politics 

•A 22-year-old man who was 
convicted of murder and asked a 
court to schedule his execution was 
killed by injection in McAlester, 
Oklahoma. Scott Dawn Carpenter 
became the youngest person to be 
put to death in the state since cap- 
ital punishment was reinstated in 
1976. IAP) 

• Garry Kasparov, the world 
chess champion, and IBM's Deep 
Blue computer, remained tied at 
two points each after playing to a 
draw in the fourth game of their 
six-game series. Mr. Kasparov 
offered the draw after the computer 


made its 56th move and the ma- 
chine immediately accepted. (AP) 

• More than four years after res- 
idents of the District of Columbia 
overwhelmingly rejected a refer- 
endum that would have established 
die death penalty, a majority now 
favors capital punishment for those 
who kill police officers, according 
to a Washington Post poll. (WP) 

• Thieves who stole more than 

$13 million worth of designer 
clothes, guns and cars at Kennedy 
Airport made a fatal mistake: They 
tried to pass the goods to a gov- 
ernment sting operation. The un- 
dercover operation resulted in 
charges agamst 81 people, includ- 
ing employees of airlines and ship- 
pers. (AP) 


Sexual- Abstinence Law Stymies States 


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By Tamar Lewin 

V New York Times Service 

* NEW YORK — A little- 
noticed provision in the re- 
vision of welfare laws passed 
last year that sets aside $250 
million to teach children 
about sexual abstinence has 
■ touched off a national debate 
as states try to decide how to 
use the money or even wheth- 
er to take it. 

Jo get the money, local 
governments must agree to 
teach, among other things, 
dial sex outside of marriage 
“is likely to have harmful, 
psychological and physical 
effects.” To qualify, the pro- 
grams must teach the virtues 
of abstinence and hot the use 
of condoms or other contra- 
ceptives^ 

With only two months left 
to apply for the money, states 
are hying to figure out how to 
use it without undermining 
their efforts to teach safe sex. 


Many are wondering whether 
it is worth taking the money at 
all, as they have toput up $3 of 
their own money for every $4 
of federal help they receive. 

“The limits on what you 
can say are so restrictive that 
we decided we could not use 
the money for classroom pror 
grams or anywhere else 
where there was face-to-face 
contact,” Dora Mills, direc- 
tor of Maine’s health depart- 
ment, said. “Youths might 
raise issues you couldn’t ad- 
dress under the law." 

In Connecticut, Governor 
John Rowland, a Republican, 
did not include any of the 
money in his budget State 
Representative Mary Mush- 
insky, a Democrat who last 
year successfully pushed to 
add money for abstinence 
education to the state budget 
said she had discussed the aid 
but had decided that “we 
ought not to pursue it if hand- 
cuffs come with the bill.’’ 


To be eligible for the 
money, the law says, a pro- 
gram's “exclusive purpose" 
must be to teach the "social, 
psychological and health 
gains to be realized by ab- 
staining from sexual activ- 
ity." Such programs, ir says, 
must reach "abstinence from 
sexual activity outside mar- 
riage as the expected standard 
for alt school-age children." 

Some health officials said 
such language might make h 
difficult to respond honestly to 
all the questions that arose in a 
diverse classroom, where 
some students may be sexually 
active, some may be homo- 
sexual and some may have un- 


wed parents. In several states, 
new coalitions of sodal-sefr- 
vice organizations are lobby- 
ing to reject such language. 

"We have come out flat- 
foot and four-square: This 
money’s bad, and don’t take 
it," said Joyce Walker- 
Tyson, deputy executive di- 
rector at Advocates for 
Youth, a Washington group 
helping to coordinate the lob- 
bying efforts. 

She added: “Teen sexual 
activity has gone down 
slightly, and use of contra- 
ceptives has gone up. Why? 
Because kids make good de- 
cisions if they get good in- 
formation.” 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* FRIDAY, ALAS' 9. 199 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


U.S. Envoy’s 2d Vietnam Landing 

A Former POW Returns as Ambassador 
As Nations Seek to Overcome Suspicions 




Pete Peterson, who played a key 
role in restoring U^.-Vietnam ties. 


6 Die in Pakistan 
As Jet Releases 


Fiery Fuel T anks 


Tlic Associated Press 

KARACHI, Pakistan — Six per- 
sons, including a family of five, 
were killed Thursday when the pi- 
lot of a Pakistani Air Force jet 
dropped his burning auxiliary fuel 
tanks over a congested neighbor- 
hood in Karachi. 

Nine other persons were rushed 
to a hospital in Karachi with serious 
bum injuries. 

The Mirage jet was on a routine 
flight when both of its auxiliary fuel 
tanks caught fire, said a wing com- 
mander. Aftab Safdar. 

“In a bid to prevent the aircraft 
from crashing over a populated 
area, which would have resulted in 
a major catastrophe, the pilot had to 
jettison the tanks." an air force 
statement said. 

Four small apartment buildings 
were set afire before one burning 
tank landed on a two-story apart- 
ment building. The other landed in 
an empty lot next door. 

Of the dead, the youngest victim 
was 5 years old. said his mother, 
Mubina Yaseen. 

The jet. acquired 15 years ago, 
was returning to the Masroor air 
base outside Karachi when the ac- 
cident occurred. It landed safely. 

Each external fuel tank on a 
Mirage jet usually carries 260 gal- 
lons (980 liters) of jet fuel. 

Since the plane had been in the 
air for an hour, it was not known 
how much fuel was still in the tanks. 
Wing Commander Safdar said. 


Gjnpfti/ in Our SictfF ram Dispatches 

HANOI — A former American pilot 
who was shot down over Vietnam ’s Red 
River delta in 1966 and held for years in 
the infamous “Hanoi Hilton" prison 
arrives here Friday as the first U.S. 
ambassador to Vietnam since the war 
ended more than 22 years ago. 

Pete Peterson, whose posting was 
delayed by domestic politics ana legal 
wrangling, is to land at Noi Bai Airport. 

Bui while the event may be recorded as 
a milestone in relations between the 
former foes, the symbolism of his arrival 
is likely to go largely unnoticed outside 
government, business and media circles. 

More than half of the 77 million Vi- 
etnamese are too young to have any * 
memory of the war that tore their coun- 
try apart. 

Even the villagers who caught Mr. 
Peterson when his parachute landed him 
in a mango tree in 1966 expressed sur- 
prise at the fuss over his return. 

“The war is ended.” Nguyen Dang 
Sinh. 70, said. “The past is closed. I 
don't have much to say," 

Since ties between the United States 
and Vietnam were normalized in July 
1995. progress in relations has been 
painstakingly slow. Diplomats on both 
sides concede that their biggest casks are 
restoring confidence and overcoming 
suspicions. 

‘ ‘Peterson's arrival will definitely help 
matters." the Vietnamese ambassador to 
Washington. Le Van Bang, said this 
week as he prepared to depart to begin his 
assignment. “It's a very good thing.” 

Mr. Peterson is seen by many here os 
the ideal man to help Washington and 
Hanoi overcome their differences over 
the war. 

“With his background, he will have a 
forum whenever he chooses to speak 
either to the Americans or Viet- 
namese.” said Sesto Vecchi, an Amer- 
ican lawyer who practiced in Saigon 
during the war and returned to the city, 
renamed Ho Chi Minh City, in 1994. 

But some in Washington refuse to 
forget the war in which 3 million Vi- 
etnamese and nearly 58.000 Americans 
were killed. The bitterness caused the 
wTangling in Washington over the ap- 
pointment of an ambassador. 

Mr. Peterson played a key role in 
restoring diplomatic ties with Hanoi in 
1995. after Washington lifted an eco- 
nomic embargo on Vietnam the pre- 
vious year. 

His priority’ is furthering the efforts to 
account for the 2,124 Americans still 
listed as missing-in-action in Indochina 
from the war. 1 385 of them in Vietnam. 
The remains of downed planes and heli- 
copters have been largely destroyed by 
time and the tropical environment. 
Nonetheless, the search goes on. 


But Mr. Peterson is also expected to 
oversee new achievements in relations, 
particularly in economics and trade. 

Last month, the two countries signed 
a copyright accord, a minor step toward 
the goal of achieving a full-trade agree- 
ment, which would lead to most- 
favored-nation trading status for Hanoi. * 

But Mr. Peterson's arrival comes at a 
time of what some analysts say are 
increasing signs of a hands-on approach 
by Washington toward Asia. 

Last month, the United States an- 
nounced sanctions agains t Burma. On 
Tuesday, Rear Admiral Michael 
Haskins, commander of the U.S. Navy 
in Japan, told a defense conference in 
Singapore that one of the roles of the 
United States was to “deter the rise of 
any hegemonistic power or coalition” 
in the region. 

Mr. Peterson is expected to reside 
temporarily in the former home of the 
U.S. chargS d'affaires, Desaix Ander- 
son, who left Hanoi this week. He will 
move into a French colonial villa in the 
heart of the city when renovation work 
is completed. (Reuters. AFP) 



TOKYO — Parliament enacted 
a law on Thursday that recognizes 
the country's Ainu minority as Ja- 
pan's original inhabitants. 

“For die first time, the Ainu 
people are recognized as our coun- 
try’s indigenous race under Japan's 
legal system,” said Tatsuya HorL 
governor of Japan's northern main 
island of Hokkaido. 

The unanimous passage of the 
law by the lower house followed a 
precedent-setting court ruling in 
March favoring Ainu land rights 
and Prime Minister Ryu taro Ha- 
shimoto’s recognition of the Ainu 
as Japan's indigenous people. He 
was the first prime minister to take 
this step. 

The United Nations recognized 
the Ainu as a native people in 1992, 
but they still face job discrimina- 
tion in Japan. (AP) 




HjisKta V 

Ttae ambassador's residence undergoing renovation Thursday in Hanoi. 


Afghan Warlord Profits by Defiance 


Ageiice France-Presse 

MAZAR- 1 -SHARIF. Afghanistan — 
This northern Afghan capital is proving 
a potent symbol of defiance for the Is- 
lamic purists of the Taleban movement 

The strategic city is controlled by 
Abdul Rashid Dustam. a former general 
under the Communist regime, wbose 
large northern fiefdom has so far eluded 
capture by his southern ultra-fundamen- 
talist Islamic rivals. 

But despite the relative calm here. 
General Dus tarn's forces — in league 
with soldiers of the former government 
— are fighting a bloody war against the 
Taleban, for what officials say is more 
than just land-grabbing. 

“The only power in Afghanistan 


by the standards of the Taleban. which 
has banned films, music and pic cures of 
living creatures as parr of its vision of a 
pure Islamic state. 

Gambling in the pool halls would 
spark a Taleban crackdown, and im- 
ported beer and Russian vodka in the 
shops would meet a fate similar to Ka- 
bul's stocks — crushed under a tank late 
last year. 

Earlier this year, residents of this 
stronghold were alarmed when the Tale- 
ban opened an offensive north of Kabul, 
bm three months later the city’ appears to 
have regained its confidence. 

General Dustam blew up the S along 
highway, blocking direct access north 
from Kabul, and his Shiire Muslim allies 


moving in parallel with the evolution of ' have so far managed to block a Taleban 


the world is the northern alliance.” 
General Dustam's spokesman. Mo- 
hammed Yousif, said m an interview. 

He said General Dustam’s fiefdom 
was the last refuge for intellectual 
Afghans, hundreds of whom fled here 
from Kabul when the capital was seized 
by the Taleban in September last year. 

“The Taleban are returning to the 
Middle Ages,” Mr. Yousif said, re- 
ferring to the militia's strict imposition 
of Islamic law in the two-thirds of Af- 
ghanistan under its control. 

Alcohol is openly on sale here. Hindu 
actresses on movie fliers are "naked” 


attempt to bypass the crucial road link. 

Holding off enemy forces • in the 
northwest, and now sealed in his eco- 
nomically self-sufficienr territory. Gen- 
eral Dustam is shifting his anti-Taleban 
rhetoric to open hostility. 

"We decided that if the Taleban in- 
sist on fighting, our strategy would 


change from defensive to offensive.” 
Mr. Yousif said. 

He said the alliance was planning to 
launch a coordinated attack against the 
Taleban later this year, to push the mi- 
litia out of Kabul and “back to where 
they came from," the refugee camps of 
Pakistan. 

That is unlikely. Not only is the Tale- 
ban a potent fighting force, but General 
Dustam has succeeded in establishing a 
lucrative fiefdom here. And whether he 
is ready to risk it all for a smashed Kabul 
remains to be seen. 

Mazar-i-Sharif is thriving. Music 
stores blare popular songs from their 
doorways, and television and video 
movies are unrestricted. While the Tale- 
ban has banned women from work and 
education, women here go unfettered by 
the veil and can mix with men at offices 
and schools. General Dustam even runs 
an international airline. 

.And the city boasts more foreign dip- 
lomatic missions than Kabul; the Taleban 
has yet to recognized by a single nation as 
the government of Afghanistan. 


Gandhi Gives Lift 
To Congress Party 


NEW DELHI — Sonia Gandhi, 
the Itaiian-bora widow of the 
former prime minister, Rajiv 
Gandhi, joined his Congress (I) 
Party on Thursday, giving a boost 
to the embattled organization. 

“By becoming a primary mem- 
ber, she has joined hands with mil- 
lions of Congress workers,” die 
party’s president. Sitaram Kesri, 
said at a news conference. 

Since her husband's assassina- 
tion in 1991. Mrs. Gandhi. 50, had 
spumed repeated offers to enter 
politics. But she enrolled in late 
March and her membership was 
finalized on Thursday, paiiy of- 
ficials saicL 

Mrs. Gandhi is seen as a gal- 
vanizing force in the Congress 
Party, which has been hit by a series 
of scandals. ( Reuters I 


Hong Kong Plans 
For Tiananmen 


Pyongyang’s ‘Robust’ Military 

U.S. Suspects Generals of Obstructing Peace Process 


BOOKS 


ONLY TWICE I’VE WISHED 
FOR HEAVEN 

By Dawn Turner Trice. 304 pages. $23. 
Crown. 

Reviewed by Jabari Asim 

Y OU could say Dawn Turner Trice's 
debut novel is about a hard-working 
Chicago family that learns that upward 
mobility is seldom achieved without 
paying some kind of emotional tolL Or 
you could say it's about systematic ra- 
cism. class conflict and the death of 
innocence. Finally, you could say “Only 
Twice I've Wished for Heaven” tells the 
story of two beautiful little girls who 
want desperately to fly. 

None of those descriptions does 
justice to Trice’s story, which includes 
all of the above and much, much more. 
The novel revolves around three people: 
Jchnie Louise Goodings. Tempestt 
Saville and Valerie Nicholae. • 

Their tale begins in 1975, when Tem- 
pestt and her parents move from a mod- 
est, comfortable bungalow on Chicago's 
South Side to Lakeland, an enclosed 
high-rise community built especially for 
the Windy City’s burgeoning black 
middle class. 

Lakeland has a full-rime security 
force to guard its golf course and 
Olympic-size swimming pool. Newspa- 
per reports extol Lakeland as an idyllic 
community, but Tempesn and her moth- 
er see the development as a gilded cage 
just spitting distance from rat- infested 
tenements and lacking the warmth and 
familiariry of their former borne. 

Eleven-year-old Tempestt longs for 
the days when her cabdriver father 
moonlighted as a neighborhood activist. 


Saville from a cabdriver to a teacher, a them both credible and likable. The un- 
by-the-bootstraps striver seemingly ob-' dersize Chitlin, for example, wears an 


sessed with “proper” behavior, text- 
book English and patent leather shoes. 

Convinced she will never fit in at 
Lakeland Academy, where the robotic, 
snooty children are groomed from birth 
to attend "‘Morehouse, Spelman. Har- 
vard or Yale,” she befriends a fellow 
outcast: Valerie Nicholae. a moody, 
spirited girl who rarely attends school 
more than twice a week. 

The girls' destinies become forever 
entwined with Johnie’s when Tempestt 
wanders into O'Cala’s Food and Drag. 
Johnie's hole-in-the-wall emporium lo- 
cated on the other side of the fence that 
protects Lakeland from the surrounding 
ghetto. 

O'Cala's squats alongside 35th Street, 
a squalid, muddy rut of a road so for- 
bidding that “even the city had wanted 
to forger it was there.” 

Having gained access to 35th through 
a half-hidden. little-used gate, Tempestt 
quickly becomes fascinated with the sor- 
did scenes unfolding atop its grimy 
ground. A 59-year-old woman named 
Johnie takes an instant liking to Tem- 
pestt. Thoroughly knowledgeable of 
both the danger and allure of 35th Streer, 
Johnie resolves to protect Tempestt from 
its 1 sugar-tongued predators. “Me and 
the regulars would keep a watch over 
her. Because 1 wasn't gone let no some- 
body lay his hands on Child.” 


outdated seersucker suit, constantly 
puffs on a huge cigar and, almost com- 
pletely blind, fiddles with the knobs on 
his beloved old AM radio. The .22 he 
keeps concealed on his person “starts 
the day tucked into his pants, ‘’-Jotierta 


A genre Frcutce-Pnsse 

TOKYO — The North Korean mil- 
itary seems to have gotten a stronger 
grip on the country’, and this could ex- 
plain why the Stalinist state is refusing 


to join Korean Peninsula peace talks, a 
U.S. “ ‘ ' 


official said Thursday. 

Army officers seem to be “more in- 
fluential now.” said the official, speak- 
ing a day after talks with counterparts 
from Japan and South Korean on the 


reports, “but by late afternoon it done_ situation in the North 
slid off his puny hip down to his boot” “We know that they had a fairly ro- 
Each of these men has lived hard and bust winter training,” more so than the 


fast, but their immoral days are long 
past Now they are joined by a common 
sense of pride and an abiding love for 
Jonetta. 


previous one, the official said. “It sug- 
gests that for some reason they decided 
to return to what has been the normal 
level of spending Lhose resources on 


The object of their affections is a -military training.” The North Korean 


r jp RICE'S portrayals of Johnie and her 


‘regulars’* — a quarrel of grumpy 
old men named Hump. Chitlin. Fat 
Daddy and Judd — are brilliantly drawn. 
Her scenes inside the tiny store are 


fearless, time-tested woman whose only 
child, a girl, died minutes after being 
bom. 

Tempestt’s entrance into Johnie's life 
stirs old memories and maternal yearn- 
ings. It also triggers a series of events 
that could spell danger for Tempestt and 
Valerie, whose troubling behavior sug- 
gests the possibility of abuse. 

Jonetta's premonitions are confirmed 
when Essie, her long-dead sister, visits 
her in a dream. “A storm is coming.” 
she warns, "circling right around Valer- 
ie and that other little girl.” To reveal 
more of the story would diminish its 
devastating climax, toward which the 
plot moves at an irresistible pace. 

Often first novels are rough stones with 
just enough sparkling facets to indicate 
nascent talent. Trice's first effort, on Lhe 
other hand, is a polished gem. Occa- 
sionally she takes on Lakeland's flawed, 
ambitious denizens with too broad a 
brush and too heavy a hammer, bludgeon- 
ing when a subtle jab would be more 
effective. Viewed as a whole, though, the 
work is a genuine delight. Trice is re- 
portedly at work on a second novel. I hope 


leader, Kim Jong D, named 123 generals 
in mid-April, a move seen as paving the 
way for him to formally take power. 

But the U.S. official emphasized that 
the military's greater strength was only 
one theory and that the Clinton admin- 
istration did not know the reason for 
North Korea's reluctance to join talks 
with South Korea in which the United 
Stares and China would take part. Tt is 


not a transparent situation,” be said. 
"Time is very much running out for 
North Korea."’ 

He warned that the country was be- 
coming "volatile because of the food 
situation.” But he added that Wash- 
ington remained ready to hold talks with 
Pyongyang's representatives and was 
"hopeful'' that the North would even- 
tually join peace talks. 

North Korea held talks last month in 
New York with U.S. and South Korean 
officials on the proposal for peace talks, 
but the North refused to join. It is de- 
manding greater international food aid 
before giving a firm answer. 

Ryozo Kato. head of the Japanese 
Foreign Ministry’s Asia bureau; Yu 
Myung Hwang, head of the South 
Korean Foreign Ministry’s North 
American bureau, and Charles Kart- 
man. acting U.S. assistant secretary of 
state for Asia-Pacific affairs, took part 
in the meeting Wednesday in Tokyo. 

They all agreed that the food crisis in 
North Korea was acute. Bur Japan re- 
affirmed its reservations about increas- 
ing humanitarian aid to the North, Jap- 
anese government sources said. 


HONG KONG — Hong Kong 
activists who are planning protests 
in June to mark the anniversary of 
ibe Tiananmen Square crackdown 
in 1 989 vowed on Thursday that the 
colony's handover to China would 
not stop the commemorations. 

“We will still hold the gathering 
even if they ban it.” Szeto Wah, a 
veteran protester, said at a news 
conference. 

He said the Hong Kong Alliance 
in Support of the Patriotic Demo- 
cratic Movement in China planned 
to hold its traditional candlelight 
vigil on June 4 in memory of those 
who died when Chinese troops and 
tanks crushed the student-led 
movement around Tiananmen 
Square in Beijing eight years ago. 

China is taking over Hong Kong 
on July I. (Reuters) 


3 Taiwan Ministers 
Suddenly Resign 


TAJOPEI — Three Taiwan min- 
isters resigned on Thursday, in- 
creasing pressure on the govern- 
ment ahead of an expected cabinet 
reshuffle next week. 

Ma Ying-jeou, minister without 
portfolio. Interior Minister Lin 
Feng-cheng. and Tjiu Mau-ying. 
chairman of Taiwan's Council of 
Agriculture, handed in their resig- 
nations to Prime Minister Lien 
Chan. 

The resignations caught Mr. Li- 
en's administration by surprise. 
Next week it is expectea to an- 
nounce a cabinet reshuffle in re- 
sponse to public anger over rising 
crime. (Reuters) 


among the many that separate this urban 

distributing pamphlets and organizing fable from others and inspire adjectives porteaiyaiworico 
meetings, in the evening he returned such as “remarkable ” and "first-rate.” doest! t make us wait too long, 
home to read to his daughter from Emer- Every detail Trice provides is a telling ~ 

son, Du Bois, Merton and Tolstoy. But one, endowing her characters with at- Jabari Asim is on The staff of The 
night school has transformed Thomas tributes and idiosyncrasies that make Washington Post. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Lived it up 
io Wedge-shaped 


■ ease 


inserts 
is Too keen 
16 Srfe of two ot 
the Ancient 
Wonders 


17 Ace 
ia Stag 

19 Pul - 

20 Tore 

21 Third rock from 
the sun 

22 Toward lhe end 

24 Rap's Dr. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O NE of the rarest opening 
bids in bridge is four no- 
trump. and when it does occur 
it can easily generate a mis- 
understanding. Half a century 
ago it was used to mean a very 
powerful balanced hand, with 
perhaps 28 high-card points. 
British players then intro- 
duced the idea that the bid 
should ask partner to show an 
ace: Five clubs denies an ace, 
and other bids show the ace of 
that suit There are two mod- 
em interpretations involving 
the minor suits: Two very 
long minor suits, or one very 
long minor suit with slam in- 
terest. 

Even expert partnerships 


are liable to forget, in the heat 
of the battle, on which of 
these interpretations they 
have agreed, perhaps years 
earlier. The diagramed deal 
caused great amusement at 
the 1995 Marlboro World 
Championships in Beijing. 
Except to East- West. 

North and South were 
Daniela von Amim and 
Sabine Auken, the anchor 
partnership of the German 
women’s team, which won 
the gold medal. Auken de- 
cided that she wished to play 
seven hearts if her partner 
held the spade ace. and six 
hearts if she did not. Unfor- 
tunately, her partner had a dif- 
ferent recollection of the part- 
nership agreement. As far as 
she was concerned, the bid 


asked for a minor suit, and she 
dutifully bid five diamonds. 

Auken now placed her 
partner with the diamond ace, 
a useless card, but bid six 
hearts anyway: there seemed 
a fair chance of losing just one 
spade trick. 

Von Annin now knew that 
something had gone wrong, 
and Auken reached the same 
conclusion when the spade 
ace was led and the dummy 
appeared. 

But now the North-South 
confusion spread to West. 
What was the meaning of her 
partner’s spade jack on the 
first trick? She decided to 
play the diamond ace. since a 
diamond loser in the South 
hand might disappear on 
dummy’s spades. South hap- 


claimed her slam, and 
st. who had liked the lead, 
was deflated. 


NORTH (D) 
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Manned 


Esc. IP! I, Pans 

** Sank Roo Doe Noo' 


A Space for Thought. 


25 Marching band 
instrument 
29 Detect 9 
31 Italian count'' 
35 Actress Balm 
38 Commando's 
outmg 

37 He was Amin 
guy 

38 Crate 
component 

38 CNN parent co. 
40 Partner 
42 Spoiled rotten 

44 Hungry 

45 It's equal to 100 
ergs per gram 

46 Deeply 
personal 

so Ford s lolly? 

92 First name in 
coaching 
53 ■ Andy 

. Warhol' 1 1996 
movie) 

58 Buddha & 
birthplace 

59 Discordant 
6i Herd 

82 Mesmerized 

63 Sandburg's 
‘Tarewgll- 
Summer (lower " 
84 Called into 
question 


8 Foreign 
assembly 

9 Ontario's 

Canal 

10 Certain home 
improvers 

11 Ring dance 
is Excessive 

13 Was unkind lo 

14 Casements 

22 Shaq ’saima 
mater 

23 Really big shoe 
25 Hudson's Bay 

Company, e.g. 
28 Poorly situated 

27 Impose 

28 Roush of the 
Reds 


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alternative 

32 it may black me 
Rhein 

33 Fall sports stats 

34 “Wild Orchid' 
locale, 1990 

38 Fall from grace 

40 Author Rand 

41 Director's cry 

42 Rhoda's sister 

43 Rudder ■ 
attachment 

47 Frenzied 


PikzM byHctartlHugtMHi 

£ i\9ir Y«*rfr Times/ Edited bv Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of Mav 8 


DOWN 


1 Jolly sound 

2 Calling 
company? 

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< Field 

5 “ — ever so 
humble . . “ 

G Airline to Chile 

7 &te of the 
Temple oi 
Hephaestus 


48 Northeast 
college town 

48 Prince Of 

Darkness 


81 Sun shade 

53 About 

54 L Stops 

53 Stalk 

58 Years ego 

st Prepared to 
drive, with “up- 

88 Multinational 
business 
mits 


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INTER NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 5 


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EUROPE 


Blair Makes No Secret 
Of His Bold Program 


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LONDON — The Labour govern - 
ment signaled Thursday that it would 
move swiftly to curry out its campaign 
pledges, including consideration of he 
country s first “freedom of information 
act” and its first laws regulating cam- 
paign fund-raising by political parties. 

The legislative program of Prime 
Minister Tony Blair, scheduled for for- 
mal presentation Wednesday by the 
Queen, will include roughly 17 to 20 
proposals, officials said after the in- 
augural meeting of the Labour cabinet. 
The agenda is unusually ambitious for a 
fledgling government, or for any gov- 
ernment here in recent years. 

The program, to be carried out over 
the next 17 months, will most likely 
include a reordering of education spend- 
ing to reduce class sizes for pre-school 
ana primary education, a new “welfare 
to work" regime for recipients of stale 
benefits, a management reorganization 
i of the National Health Service, impos- 
ition of a system for setting a national 
minimum wage and machinery for ref- 
erenda on decentralization of some le- 

f islative authority from the capital to 
cotland and Wales. 


fi 


All were promised in the campaign 
aefonn chat helped Mr. Blair and the 
ibour Party win a landslide victoty in 
the May 1 general election, ending 18 
years of Conservative Party rule. 

Among the greatest changes to gov- 
ernment would be enactment of a free- 
dom of information act, creating by law 
a right of access to official documents 
comparable to the federal Freedom of 
Information Act in the United Stales. 

While no immediate legislation will 
be proposed Wednesday, according to a 
Downing Street spokesman, Mr. Blair 
will broadly outline his ideas and order a 
formal study of the scope of such an act. 
Britain' is among the most secretive of 
Western democracies — with little legal 
obligation to provide information to 
anyone on any subject and a traditional 
inclination not to. 

Similarly, any campaign finance pro- 
posals applied to Britain’s political 
parties will go beyond current law, 
which restricts spending for individual 
House of Commons candidates but 
leaves the serious campaign spenders, 
the parties, free to take any amount of 
money from any source without dis- 
closure. The new administration has said 
it favors a ban on contributions from 
foreign sources, who have tended to 



put ViccMetafncr France- Piw* 

BACK TO WORK — Cherie Blair, wife of the new prime minister, 
waving on Thursday outside London's High Court of Justice, where 
she donned wig and gown to resume her profession as a barrister. 
Mrs. Blair, 42, is a specialist in public and employment law. 


Giscard Urges New Policy 
If Right Wins Election 


make large gifts to the Conservative 
Party, and a disclosure requirement for 
contributions above £5,000 (S8 r 000). 

Because of Labour’s majority of 179 
seats in the Commons. Mr. Blair should 
encounter little difficulty passing these 
measures. The exact plans for the over- 
burdened, increasingly expensive Na- 
tional Health Service — the government 
run health-care system — are unclear. 
Before the Conservatives took power, 
the health service was operated essen- 
tially as a vast single agency. 


The Tories decentralized the health 
service, creating a system of individual 
jurisdictions that are run as if they were 
independent businesses, purchasing sup- 
plies and services on a competitive basis. 
Labour argued that the reforms resulted 
in a mass 'layoff of medical staff and a 
mass hiring of managers, swallowing 
more than S2J billion annually. Mr. Blair 
promised to eliminate the system, using 
the savings to provide medical care and 
reduce long waiting lists for many forms 
of treatment. 


Remers 

PARIS — Former President Valery 
Giscard d'Estaing has urged President 
Jacques Chirac to shift to bolder, sim- 
pler policies after the parliamentary 
election and hinted he should not re- 
appoint Prime Minister Alain Juppe. 

In ah unusually blunt interview on 
France 2 television on Wednesday 
night. Mr. Giscard d’Estaing, a centrist 
who was president from 1974 until 
1981, disclosed that he had advised Mr. 
Chirac against dissolving Parliament, 
encouraging him instead to do a better 
job of governing. 

On dissolving Parliament, Mr. Gis- 
card d’Estaing said, "He asked my 
opinion and I advised him against it.*’ 

‘‘I told him. in effect, that he was 
taking a big risk, since the debate would 
soon focus on the way in which France 
was being governed,” he said, “and 
that most of the French people were 
unhappy with the way in which they 
were being governed. 

“Under these conditions, it would 
have been more logical to first try to 
change the way they were governed.” 

With that decision now behind him, 
Mr. Chirac’s message to voters should be 
that the center-right, if kept in power, 
would shift directions and pursue simpler 
and bolder policies, Mr. Giscard d f Es- 


taing said. Mr. Chirac shook the French 

political landscape last month in calling a 

sudden rwo-round pariiamentajyetetf 10 ^ 
for May 25-June 1, 10 months ahead of 
schedule, despite his government’s huge 
majority in the National Assembly. 

Since then, polls have shown the left 
growing stronger and coming within 
striking distance of pushing the current 
government out of power. 

Mr. Juppe, who is leading the gov- 
ernment campaign, lashed out at the 
opposition Socialists on Thursday amid 
signs of unease in his coalition as the left 
scents an upset victory. 

Mr. Juppe sent the Socialist Patty 
leader. Lionel Jospin, expected to pub- 
lish an article in French newspapers on 
Friday, four questions be said everyone 
was asking about Mr. Jospin’s program. 
Hie questions concerned taxation, im- 
migration, Communist participation in 
government, and privatization. 

“How will you finance the Socialist 
program without considerably raising 
the taxes of each French person?” Mr. 
Juppe asked 

Mr. Jospin says he can avoid tax 
increases with a program that includes 
creating 700,000 jobs and cutting work- 
ing hours. He also said he would nor 
impose extra austerity if needed to meet 
budget deficit targets for the euro. 


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Death of a Tory MP May Give 
Hope to Defeated Defense Chief 

The Associated Press 
LONDON — In a new blow to the Conservative Party, one 
of its diminished band of legislators died Thursday, a week 
after the Tories were routed in the general election by the 
Labour Party. 

The death of Sir Michael Shefsby, 64, who held his west 
London suburban district of Uxbridge by just 724 yotes in the 
the prospect of more hunriJiatio 


Labour landslide, raised the prospect i 
the Tories in a by-election. Sir Michai 


Hong kong Plum 
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humiliation for 
Michael's majority had been a 
comfortable 13.179 votes in the 1992 elections. 

Uxbridge, however, could be the best chance for Michael 
Portillo, one of former Prime Minister John Major's seven 
defeated cabinet ministers; to return to the House of Com- 
mons. If be can win a seat in Parliament, Mr. Portillo would 
then be eligible to run for party leader. 

Mr. Major is stepping down from die leadership and a 
contest for his replacement is expected in July. 

. Six former cabinet ministers among the party’s 164 leg- 
islators now left in the 659-member Commons have an- 
nounced dial they are candidates. 

The cause of Sir Michael’s death was not announced. 


BRIEFLY 



Bosnian Serbs Rebuff Kinkel 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Henzrgovina — A top Bosnian 
Serb official refused to meet Thursday with the German 
J . foreign miaister, crimping his mission to speed tbe pace 
1 of reconciliatioil in postwar Bosnia and retnra' HidicuTeds '' 
of thousands of refugees. 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel had come to Sarajevo 
with representatives of the European Union to urge die 
country’s joint presidency to work harder on carrying out 
the 1995 Dayton peace accords. 

Tbe diplomatic slap in the fiace ostensibly was prompted 
by Serbian dissatisfaction with seating an-angements at a 
meeting between Mr. Kinkel andthe Serbian, Croatian and 
Bosnian Muslim members of the presidency. It demon- 
stratedthe obstacles faced by die international community 
in trying to ride herd cm the accords, which are meant to 
heal ethnic divisions in a country that is still seething with 
distrust after three and one half years of war. 

The peace accords foresee freedom of movement, but 
the realities are different Serbs, and to a lesser degree 
Croats and Muslims, continue to prevent refugees from 
returning to their homes. On Wednesday, a crowd in a 
Croatian-controlled town in western Bosnia attacked 
three Serbian refugees on a UN-organized trip to their 
hometown. . 

Alexander Ivanko, UN spokesman in Sarajevo, said the 
beatings showed “that the local authorities in Drvar are 
not trying in any way to stop the harassment of ethnic 
minorities and to stop the harassment of refugees.’ ’ (AP) 

Herzog Calls for Stronger EU 

AACHEN, Germany — President Roman Herzog of 
Germany urged Europeans on Thursday not to under- 
estimate the dangers of what he called re -emergent na- 
. tipnalism, saying it could be contained only by embracing 
European integration. . 

Mr. Herzog, who received the Charlemagne Pnze for 
promoting European, unity, said he understood the ap- 

f : . C n w w iMn T Tnfnn nhnrrt 








power to Brussels. He urged them to be “Euro-cnncs 
who recognize die problems but support integration. 

“If we want to prevent the conflict scenarios predicted 
by the ‘Euro-skeptics’ evolving into self-fulfilling proph- 
ecies, then we must not cede the field now to those 

prophets of doom,” Mr. Herzog said. • 

. ‘ ‘The specters which stalked Europe in the 1 930s have 
not been banished for all time. Everywhere they seem to 
here-emerging and we must drive them back again by all 
the means at our command.” (Reuters) 

Doubt Is Cast on Albania fbte 

TIRANA, Albania — President Sali' Berisha asserted 
l Thursday tot “rebel 





I In 


i miXiii i mi w — ’ — 

on European monitors to go and look for themselves. 

Following a meeting with Franz Vianitzky, who is an 
envoy of the Organization for Security and Cooperation 
in Europe, he said that once the monitoring group 5 
reported then all parties should declare an election date. 

Mr. Berisha’s stance appeared to be a farther obstacle 
in the way of early elections, which were approved by an 
Albanian parties in March. Mr. Vranitzky did Mt com- 
man after fae meeting with Mr. Berisha. (Reuters) 


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American Sees Mobutu 


Meeting Kabila Again 


Special Envoy Says ‘Peace Has a Chance ’ 


By Charles Trueheart 

Washington Post Service 


PARIS — Stopping in Paris to consult 
with French officials after 10 days of 
shuttle diplomacy in and around Zaire, 
the U.S. special envoy said Thursday 


that “the probability is high” that Pres- 
ident Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire and the 


ident Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire and the 
rebel leader Laurent Kabila will meet for 
a second time “sometime next week.” 

The envoy. Bill Richardson, refused 
to confirm news reports that Marshal 
Mobutu's talks with regional African 
leaders in Libreville, Gabon, on 
Thursday presaged a journey into exile, 
possibly to France, where the ailing 
leader has a Mediterranean villa. 

“I don't know his exact travel sched- 
ule,” said Mr. Richardson, the US. am- 
bassador to the United Nations. 

He said he was encouraged that 
"peace does have a chance” because of 
mediation efforts led by President Nel- 
son Mandela of South Africa and a UN 
envoy, Mohammed Sahnoun. He pre- 
dicted that they would produce “a tran- 
sitional arrangement that will lead to 
democratic elections and the creation of 
a free market economy in short order.” 

“I think the probability is high for a 
second meeting, and I'm also encour- 
aged that this second meeting will pro- 
duce a result thai does not involve a 
violent end, and that includes also an 
inclusive transitional government,” Mr. 
Richardson said. 

[In Tanzania, Deputy President Thabo 
Mbeki of South Africa said a second 
meeting between Marshal Mobutu and 
Mr. Kabila was set for next Wednesday, 
adding that the place was uncertain be- 
cause of Marshal Mobutu's health, Reu- 
ters reported.] 

Mr. Richardson described the United 
States and France as “catalysts” to the 
process, and told reporters that the two 
countries — widely portrayed in the 
news media as being at odds over the 
approach to a transition — “share the 
same goals.” 

“We're working toward the same 
solution,” he said. 

Mr. Richardson left for Washington on 
Thursday and said he had no plans to 
resume his shuttle diplomacy in the re- 
gion. despite his assertion that “the next 
few days are critical for peace in Zaire.” 

Asked for his impression of Mr. Kab- 
ila, Mr. Richardson called him “an in- 
teresting man, very street-smart, seme- 
body that I believe needs to realize that 


he has to behave responsibly if he's 
going to get the support of the inter- 
national community. 

He said Mr. Kabila had assured him 
that the United Nations and international 
humanitarian organizations would have 
“full access to refugees’’ to investigate 
reported atrocities by rebel troops. 

■ No Inkling of Flight, Paris Says 


The French Foreign Ministry said 
Thursday that it had no indication Mar- 
shal Mobutu was planning to leave Zaire 
for exile in France, Reuters reported. 

“We do not know the intentions of 
President Mobutu, so the possibility of 
exile is not a current question,” a min- 


istry spokesman said. 
He noted that the are 



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By Philip Staenon 

New York Times Service 


He noted that the president ' 'has come 
here in the past for medical treatment." 

The Zairian underwent surgery for pro- 
state cancer in Switzerland last August . 

and spent several months convalescing A Zairian rebel chasing away Rwandan refugees seeking food Thursday at a refugee camp near Kisangani. Below, 
in a villa on the Mediterranean. a woman cradled her child as she waited for help. The refugees said rebels had killed 100 of their compatriots. 


KINSHASA: Capital Can't Forget Its History of Army Pillage 


Continued from Page 1 


place about 190 kilometers (120 miles) 
east of Kinshasa as the rebels make their 
final approach to the capital. As Mr. Kab- 
ila’s troops draw closer, there is a mount- 
ing sense of nervousness over whether the 
government's notoriously ill -disciplined 
soldieis will sack Kinshasa. 

Across the river in Brazzaville, Congo. 
3.500 Western troops, including about 
1,150 Americans, stand ready to swoop 
into Kinshasa to evacuate the 350 or so 
Americans, 500 Canadians, and like 
numbers of Belgians, French and Por- 
tuguese citizens. But if past evacuations 
are any indication — and Western dip- 
lomats say nothing has changed — the 
role of any foreign troops arriving in Zaire 
be limited to rescuing Western citizens, 
rather than restoring law and order. 

To get a sense of the scale of past 
destruction in Kinshasa, one can visit the 
skeletal remains of the city's industrial 
zone, a tongue of land between the 
Congo River banks and the railroad 
tracks. Here, most factories have not 
reopened since their vehicles were all 
hot-wired and machinery ripped from 
concrete foundations. 

But the deepest scars of Kinshasa's 
riots are with the people themselves. 
Residents of the capital were robbed at 
gunpoint by Mr. Mobutu's troops, and 


raped and murdered by the hundreds. 

Souleye Guisse, 60, a Senegalese, 
businessman, twice lost everything 
when his shops here were ransacked. 
These days, he sits beneath a framed 
portrait of Marshal Mobutu, hanging 
like a talisman in his darkly lit office in 
Matonge. a smoggy working-class sec- 
tion of town, listening to two foreign 
radio stations simultaneously, hoping 
for a signal of what is to come. 

“The problem with pillaging is it 
comes by surprise,” said Mr. Guisse. 
who is the head of an association of West 
African traders here. "We all share the 
same fear, but we don't know when the 
trouble will come. If things go bad, it 
will be all of the sudden, and then only 
God can save us, because Lord knows 
the Westerners don’t care.” 

Like many Zairians. Elie Noel, who 
trades in furniture and vividly remem- 
bers the 1993 pillaging, holds Mr. 
Mobutu responsible. He looks to the 
arrival of Mr. Kabila's troops for lib- 
eration from national humiliation under a 
leader who spared himself nothing while 
driving his country into abject poverty. 

“Nowadays, we look at the prospect 
of pillaging the same way you would if 
you were sick with AIDS and given a 
medicine that could cure you, but had 
harsh side-effect, he said. “If this is the 
medicine we must swallow to get rid of 


Mobutu, we can take it. Mobutu has been 
looting this country for '32 years, but 
when he is finally gone, die people will 
still be here. 


Presidents Meet in Gabon 


Marshal Mobutu and a handful of fel- 
low French-speaking African presidents 
held a meeting in Gabon on Thursday as 
pan of the search for a peaceful end to the 
war threatening Kinshasa, news agen- 
cies reported from Libreville. 

After a failed round of peace talks 
Sunday with Mr. Kabila. Marshal 
Mobutu flew to Libreville on Wednes- 
day, for meetings with other African 
presidents. His aides insisted the trip was 
planned long ago, but many saw it as a 
way to gracefully get the ailing dictator 
out of Zaire before Mr. Kabila's forces 
reached the capital. 

Mr. Mobutu walked hand-in-hand 
Thursday with President Omar Bongo of 
Gabon down a red carpet leading to the 


presidential palace in Libreville. They 
met at there with the presidents of Chad, 
Congo, the Central African Republic 
and Equatorial Guinea. Cameroon, cur- 
rent chairman of the Organization of 
African Unity, sent its foreign minister. 

Gabonese officials gave no indications 
of the direction of die talks which by late 
Thursday had lasted more than six 
hours. 



CHARLESTON, South Carolina — 
Investigators for a White House panel 
have called on the Pentagon to. tell some 
American and British troops that they 
may have been exposed to Iraqi mustard 
gas when they examined a leaking 300- 
galion tank in a school in Kuwait several 
months after the Gulf War. 

The panel, the Presidential Advisory 
Committee on Gulf War Veterans' til- • 
nesses, said Wednesday that its inves- 
tigation showed that the detection of 
mustard gas in the metal tank in August 
1991 was “credible” and that troops 
who were nearby at the time of the leak 
should be notified of the potential health 
risks. 

This is the second time the White 
House panel has called for the noti-£ 
fi cation of troops who were in die vi- m 
trinity of a possible release of deadly 
chemical weapons after the Gulf War. 

In the other case, the Defense De- 
partment Last year notified about 20,000 
veterans that they may have been ex- 
posed to a cloud of nerve gas-after the 
demolition of an Iraqi ammunition depot 
in March 1991. 

The number of soldiers who may have 
been exposed at the girls' school near 
Kuwait City is a tiny fraction of that 
number — perhaps 20 — although an 
unknown number of other American 
troops may have been exposed to mustard 
agents when they later moved the tank 
out of the school and disposed of it. 

While the Pentagon said Wednesday 
that it did not necessarily accept, the 
panel’s finding that there was a valid 
detection of mustard gas at the school. 
Defense Department officials said they 
would probably follow through on the 
recommendation to notify the troops. 

As the Presidential Advisory Com- 
mittee ‘’has made this recommendation, 
it sounds like one we concur with,” said i 
Lieutenant General Dale Vesser, retired. 
deputy director of the Pentagon's in-fi~^ ? 
vestigation of the illnesses of Gulf War 
veterans. 

Although scientists are divided on the 
question of whether exposure to trace 
levels of chemical weapons can lead to 
chronic health problems, the Pentagon 
has encouraged all Gulf War veterans to 
have special medical checkups. 


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GOLD: 

Swiss Reject New Talks 


Continued from Page 1 


: all 



forced the usually slow-moving Swiss to set 
up two inquiries into their historical record 
and into the fate of dormant bank accounts and 
to promise two funds — a $180 million Holo- 
caust "solidarity" fund and a $4.7 billion 
humanitarian fund based on a plan to revalue 
gold reserves. 

Throughout the month of negotiation and 
frequent acrimony, little attention was paid to 
details of Switzerland's commitments under 
the 1946 Washington Agreement Under this, 
the country agreed to pay 250 million Swiss 
francs in return for the lifting of economic 
sanctions against Switzerland, which was 
neutral in the war. 




FUNDS: 

$100,000 Is Returned 


BRIEFLY 



ft* <r> 

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PI * M 


Continued from Page 1 


Gadhafi Defies UN Flight Ban 






Tta New Y«k Tana 


A World War II German ledger showing an entry for “dental gold” in a Swiss bank. 


the idea of renegotiating the agreement in- gold was more of a secondary issue," said 


si sting that Switzerland had folly complied Thomas Lyssy. spokesman for the umbrella 


with it 

The issue raises the question of whether the 


The report said Switzerland did not make Clinton administration should seek to force 
all the payments it promised and concluded Switzerland to stick to its 1946 commitments, 


that it was "most inexplicable” for Switzer- risking a backlash among many Swiss — par- 


land to protect Nazi assets other than gold for 
years after the war. 


The report added that the Swiss paid the 
Hies $28 million by 2952, far less than the 


Allies $28 million by 2952, far less than the 
agreed 50 percent of the value of German 
assets in their country at the time. 

Swiss news reports quoted Senator Al- 
phonse D'Amato, Republican of New York, 
as having urged that the Washington agree- 
ment be renegotiated. 

But Franz Egle, tiie spokesman for the 
Foreign Ministry in Bern, said it was “not the 
intention of the Swiss government to rene- 
gotiate an agreement that was concluded more 
than a half-century ago and which has been 
fulfilled and realized.” 

Foreign Minister Flavio Cotti also rejected 


ticularly the older generation — who already 
resent the idea of financing what they see as an 
unjustified admission of wartime guilt. 

Those sentiments reinforce the country’s 
principal rightist leader, Christoph B1 ocher. 
He may challenge the establishment of the 


organization grouping Swiss Jewish organi- 
zations. “Now that it has been proved the 
looted gold also included gold stolen from 
victims of the Holocaust, this has given the 
issue added weight.” 

Therefore, he said, Swiss Jewish organi- 
zations supported the idea, raised in the Eizen- 
stat report that this gold should be distributed 
not just among European central banks laying 
claim to it but also to Holocaust survivors. 


that Young Brothers’ only asset in the United 
States was an apartment in Washington. 

Late Wednesday, Mr. Nicholson said, law- 
yers for the Republican committee verified 
that die money had originated in Hong Kong. 
“We immediately returned the contribu- 
tions,” he said. 

He insisted that the Republicans' misstep 
was incomparable to the allegations against 
the Democrats, which include illegal fund- 
raising from foreigners and laundering of 
foreign donations. 

“Not only did die Democrats engage in an 
orchestrated effort to solicit illegal contri- 
butions from foreign individuals and foreign 
sources," Mr. Nicholson said, “they went so 
far as to send their own fund-raisers overseas 
to get the money.” 

Democrats lost no time Thursday in re- 
sponding. 

“Now that the RNC has admitted accepting 
illegal contributions, they should do what die 


NIAMEY, Niger — The Libyan leader. Colonel 
Moammar Gadhafi, flew to Niger on Thursday, in de- 
fiance of a United Nations ban on flights from the pariah 
state. 

Colonel Gadhafi, with a large entourage, arrived with 
four Libyan Airlines jets. “I came to bring support and 
sympathy to President Ibrahim Bare Mainassara, to die 
government and Nigerois people," Colonel Gadhafi said. 

The UN ban was slapped on Libya in 1992 over the 
Lockerbie airplane bombing in 1 988. f Reuters ) 


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Sudan Prevents Aid for South 




NAJROBI — The Sudanese government has banned 
aid workers from flying urgently needed relief supplies to 
the south of the country, where it has been losing ground 
to rebels, a United Nations agency said Thursday. 

The ban began April 23, when a Khartoum-based 
plane was refused permission to fly to government- 
con tro Lied areas in southern Sudan, said Sally Bumheim, 
a spokeswoman for Operation Lifeline Sudan. (AP) 


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k. 


humanitarian investment fond through a ref- and outrage at the report’s finding that “victim 
erendum that must be held next year because a gold’ ’ had been melted down into ingots sold 
revaluation in gold reserves requires a change to the Swiss National Bank. Mr. Lyssy said the 
in the constitution. U.S. report could not prove that Swiss banks 


revaluation in gold reserves requires a change 
in the constitution. 

Another major issue to arise from the report 
is the likely destiny of the gold bars still in 
Manhattan and London — possibly the last 
chapter in the German practice of stealing 
gold that has come to be known as the “Nazi 
gold” affair. 

“In the beginning, the question of looted 


um to it but also to Holocaust survivors. Democratic Party has already done — con- 
While many Swiss Jews expressed horror duct a thorough, internal review of all their 
d outrage at the report’s finding that “victim contributions by an independent auditor,' said 
Id' ’ had been melted down into ingots sold the national chairman, Steve Grossman, 
the Swiss National Bank. Mr. Lyssy said the The Justice Department and II congres- 
S. report could not prove that Swiss banks sional committees are looking into alleged 
knew of the prominence of victim gold. campaign fund-raising irregularities. Atror- 
An important distinction drawn here be- ney General Janet Reno has resisted heavy 
tween the report and previous disclosures political pressures to appoint an independent 


Cuban Exile Leader Is Ailing 


via 

•‘••"W* 1 


about Switzerland's dealings is that the new counsel to investigate possible abuses. 


findings also criticize postwar U.S. policy. 
“It’s not just finger-pointing at Switzerland," 
Mr. Lyssy said. 


TRADE: EU Ban on Some Meat Is Illegal Jet Crash in Chin a Kills 10 


Continued from Page 1 


ican farmers were specifically approved 
by a standards -setting body within the 

United Nations Food and Agricultural 

Organization. 

U.S. government officials who have 
seen the 60-page ruling by the trade 
panel said it firmly concludes that the 


mones, the reports have generated angry 
popular outbursts and have sometimes 
led to brief but noticeable declines in 
beef consumption. 

The issue has become even more sen- 
sitive for Europeans in the last year, 
because of the furor over British cattle 
infected with “mad cow” disease. Fear 
of contaminated beef prompted other 


EU failed to satisfy the new standard for countries in the EU to block imports of 


trade restrictions based on health. 

“From our analysis, it comes down 
squarely on our side, based on the issue _ 

ded on the basis of scientific prin- The preliminmy decision is the first WINE: Asia’s New Red Revolution? It Comes in a Glass - and It’s Considered Healthy 

ciples,” said an official, who spoke on ruling so far that is based on a three-year- _ J 

the condition that he not be identified, old trade agreement known as the Safety Continued from Page I France, the United States. Australia and a year oyer the last decade, per capita market for wine and spread the 

European experts and diplomats said and Phytosanitary Agreement This re- Italy have almost doubled to just over 3 income in 1996 was $23,200. higher about its benefits faster” Mr 

they were not at all surprised by the quires, for the first time, that restrictions quantity is now being seen as un- million nine liter cases, up from 1.5 than Australia, Britain or Canada. said 

raluig. which was delivered to both sides based on health and safety of food healthy." ■ million cases in 1994. ■ Some surveys suggest that there are But Philippe GuettaL manajtij 

early Thursday morning in Geneva. The products must be based on scientific This change has occurred in the past When Mr. Webster aimed in Hong already 240 million people in China’s rector for China-Hone Kong wim 
scientific consensus was simply too evidence that the restrictions protect hu- few years following publicity in the me- Kong in 1972, Cognacconsumpnon was urban middle class, and probably 30 at Casella Far East Ltd a unit 

clear they said man health. dia of scientific findings that grapes and about to reach 800,000 cases a year million Chinese with enough money to Pernod Ricaid group of France so 

But there is little doubt that the ban on “The trouble with the WTO agree- red wine can help to prevent hean dis- while the wine maiket absorbed just afford to buy international brand-name a note of caution He said that 
hormone-treated beef is based on power- merit is that it does not provide for any ease and may also contain a potent can- 100.000 cases. In 1997, wine consump- products, including imported wines. surplus stocks of wine had built 

fol popular suspicions across much of measures that are based on consumer cer inhibitor. non in Ae temtory is expected to be Simon Tam. chairman of the Wine Chinasinceeariy 1996, much of it 

Europe about chemical additives in food concerns,” said Stefan Tangermann. a It also helps that red is the color of close to 600 000 cases with Cognac sales Institute of Hong Kong, is so bullish French red imported by trader* 

European media are folltif stories about professor of agricultural economics at good fortune for the Chmese. at about -00,000 cases. about prospects for growth of wine con- hoped to make a quick profit bi 

the decline in male fertility rates, widi the University of Goettingen m Gcr- When doctore wahng Thailaiid s There is huge wealth ut H o ng Kong sun.pt.onm Ch.na that he plans to open little or no experience in 5 k wine 

much of the snecuJatidh focusing on many. “It only provides for measures revered King Bhunubol Achifyadej for and ifthe wine or ymtaM is prured there a branch of ;ihe institute m Guangzhou in ness. 

chemicals that people are absorbing from that are based on scientific concerns.'; se rreom- wtilbe JJd L jJSS {oor ^ l " Shan S hai , and Bei J in 8 in “Dumping a lot of poor quali: 

™ •_ c..m«on fiwic TTip* ic s>imrret certain to isone mended that he drink a couple ot ^lasses When I have been obliged to increase 1998. will havp an the. 


British meat and ignited a battle between 
Britain and the rest of Europe over 
blocking the sale of British beef across 
most of the Continent 


BEIJING — At least 1 0 people were killed and 20 
injured on Thursday when a China Southern Air- 
lines Boeing 737 crash-landed in the southern town 
of Shenzhen, officials said. 

They said it involved a scheduled flight from the 
southwestern city of Chongqing to Shenzhen. 

The cause of the crash, the first reported in China 
in nearly three years, was unclear. An airline official 
said the plane was badly positioned before the 
crash. 


Mr. Nicholson said Thursday that the Re- 
publican committee was under the impression, 
when it received four donations from Young 
Brothers totaling $102,400, that the firm was 
controlled by Americans of Asian descent. 

Young Brothers' involvement with the Re- 
publicans goes deeper. It guaranteed a $2.2 
million Joan to a nonprofit research orga- 
nization. the National Policy Forum, estab- 
lished in 1 993 by Haley Barbour, who had just 
become the Republican national chairman. 

When the National Policy Forum defaulted 
on a part of its bank loan. Young Brothers was 
left to cover $500,000 of its debt. The forum 
no longer exists. 

There is no law against a nonprofit group 
accepting foreign donations, and Republican 
officials said that money has not been re- 
turned. 


MIAMI — A Cuban exile leader, Jorge Mas Canosa, is 
suffering from the bone disorder called Paget’s Disease but 
is still "enthusiastic and energetic," a spokeswoman for 
the Cuban American National Foundation said Thursday. 

Mr. Mas Canosa, 57, is chairman of the foundation — 
the most powerful of the Florida-based Cuban exile groups 
opposed to President Fidel Castro’s government. Analysts 
say he wields great influence over U.S. policy toward Cuba 
and harbors hopes of replacing Mr. Castro. (Reuters) 






A Gripping Stop for Chretien 


EDMONTON, Canada — The police detained a man 
for several hours after he would not let go of Prime 
Minister Jean Chretien's hand at a federal election cam- 
paign stop. 

A police spokesman said the man was upset that Mr. 
Chretien had called the election despite the worst flood- 
ing in 145 years in the province of Manitoba. ( Reuters ) 


4%. 


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Peru to Try 26 Police Officers 






55!? £ ' 


LIMA — Peru’s highest military court has started 
proceedings against 26 police officers blamed for the 
security lapse that enabled Marxist rebels to seize the 
Japanese ambassador's home for four months. 

The police officers include five generals, two of whom 
were held hostage by the rebels. ' ( Reuters l 


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and Phytosanitary Agreement This re- 
quires, for the first time, that restrictions 
based on health and safety of food 
products must be based on scientific 
evidence that the restrictions protect hu- 
man health. 

“The trouble with the WTO agree- 


horraone-trealed beef is based on power- merit is that it does not provide for any 


quantity is now being seen as un- 
healthy." 

This change has occurred in the past 
few years following publicity in the me- 
dia of scientific findings that grapes and 
red wine can help to prevent heart dis- 
ease and may also contain a potent can- 


a year over the last decade, per capita 
income in 1996 was $23,200, higher 
than Australia, Britain or Canada. 

Some surveys suggest that there are 
already 240 million people in China’s 
urban middle class, and probably 30 
million Chinese with enough money to 
afford to buy international brand-name 


Europe about chemical additives in food, concerns, said Stefan Tangermann. a 
European media are folltif stories about professor of agricultural economics at 
the decline in male fertility nates, with the University of Goettingen m Ger- 


at about 200,000 cases. 


about prospects for growth of wine con- 


market for wine and spread the word 
about its benefits faster,” Mr. Tam 
said 

But Philippe Guettat, managing di- 
rector for China-Hong Kong wine sales 
at Casella Far East Ltd, a unit of the 
Pernod Ricard group of France, sounded 
a note of caution. He said that large 
surplus stocks of wine had built up in 
China since early 1996, much ofit cheap 
French red imported by traders who 
hoped to make a quick profit but had 


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much of the speculation focusin g on 
chemicals that people are absorbing from 
their environment. European foods 
routinely use fewer preservatives than 
American foods. 

And when news reports periodically 
surface that cattle fanners in one country 


many. "It only provides for measures 
that are based on scientific concerns." 

The decision is almost certain to ignite 
a backlash among consumer groups and 
political leaders in much of Europe. The 
United States and the EU both have one 
month to review the report and press for 


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of red wine a day, it triggered a red wine some Bordeaux prices by 30-40 percent The institute, which aims to promote 


or another have been ill sgally using hor- changes. 


boom in Thailand in place of whisky. 

In the last three yearn, imports of wine 
into Hong Kong, Thailand, Singapore, 
Taiwan and Malaysia mainly from 


thinking that this will slow demand, die wine consumption and awareness. 


consumer hardly blinks, 
in Hong Kong, where the economy 
has expanded by an average of 6 percent 


makes money from wine consultancy 
services. 


“Reunification will open a larger cleared. 


Dumping a lot of poor quality reJ 
will have an adverse effect on the rep# 
tation of wine in China,” Mr. Guetta 
said. "Bui in the longer term, we believe 
there will be strong growth in the Chins 
market after the oversupply has been 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 7 



INTERNAHOML 


ISRAELIS: Rights Groups Criticize ‘Torture 

Continued from Page 1 


V 


tour. 


is to all the arracks, is that the 
government has no option but 
to take extraordinary mea- 
sures against the Arab mil- 
itants who imperil Israel. 

“The need to combat the 
plague of terrorism is a matter 
vital to this discussion and 
cannot be ignored,” Nili 
Arad, director-general of the 
Justice Ministry, told the UN 
committee. 

• The ministry asserts that 
the General Security Service, 
the secret police better known 
•as Sbabak or Shin Bet, has 
foiled 90 planned attacks over 
-the last two years, although 

i the secrecy surrounding the 
interrogations has left it un- 
clear what role coerced in- 
formation played in those 
cases. 

But at die hearing, Israeli 
•officials said a bombing was 
averted in recent weeks by 
'information obtained from a 
suspected militant who has 
complained of being tor- 
« lured. 

i At the same time, Ms. Arad 

maintained Israel's stand that 
the permitted methods of 
-“moderate physical pres- 
‘sure*’ are not torture. 

Members of the UN com- 
mittee' — like Amnesty In- 
ternational, the International 
Committee of the Red Cross 
and various Israeli human 
rights organizations — insist 
'that the Shin Bet's methods 
•are indisputably torture as 
‘defined in international law. 

• And the conventions pro- 
hibiting it, they argue, exist 
precisely to protect detainees 
in extraordinary times, even 
in war. 

*. “Israel is the only Western 
country thai openly uses tor- 
ture," said LeaTsemel, a vet- 
'eran defense lawyer and a 
founder of the Public Com- 
mittee Against Torture in Is- 
rael. “This is not some brute 

-in the secret services beating 

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Imation by a high-ranking 
commission and government 
ministers.” 

* George, a tall, handsome 
■and soft-spoken man who 
said he was studying to be a 
'Certified' public accountant, 
described the ordeal at his 
house while his parents and 
younger brothers listened 
anxiously. 

» He said he was crested in 
December 1995. shortly be- 
fore Israeli faces were to 
^withdraw from Bethlehem, 
Jus home. According to hu- 
man rights monitore, waves 
iof detentions and interroga- 
tions preceded each Israeli 
withdrawal, possibly to 
■gamer what information Is- 
rael could before pulling out 
•: George told how several 
[times during the interroga- 
ition. a big. muscular Israeli 
•who gave his name as “Major 
!ltai” and who spoke fluent 
-Arabic with an Iraqi accent, 
[seized him and violently 
rattled him back and forth, so 
[that his head flopped uncon- 
trollably, inflicting .terrible 
[pain to his spine ana neck. 

[ After two minutes, Major 
^Itai would pause, then re- 
“sume. After each session of 


Major Itai hung him from a 
bar in the wall by his shackled 
hands, causing enormous 
pain. He said he screamed, 
while Major Itai laughed and 
cursed, yelling: * 'You will die 
here!” 

The questions were about 
George's piuponed contacts 
in the Popular Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine, a 
Marxist guerrilla organiza- 
tion that rejects peace with 
Israel and has headquarters in 
Syria; about the group's 
plans; about people he knew, 
and about unsolved militant 
attacks. George was not 
charged with membership in 
the group, which is illegal in 
Israel. Then, as now, George 
denied he had any such in- 
formation or affiliation. 

When he was not in in- 
terrogation. George said, he 
was held either in a dark room 
the size of a closet or shackled 
to a low chair tilted forward in 
the position known in 
Hebrew as “ shabeh which 
induces considerable pain to 
the back and does not allow 
more than snatches of sleep, 
with a foul smelling sack over 
his head and music blaring at 
top volume. Three times a 
day. he was given five 
minutes to eat and use the 
toilet, and once a week he was 
taken to a shower. 

George said that he was 
visited by a Red Cross worker 
after 13 days, and saw a law- 
yer after 20 days. 

The duration of the ill- 
treatment and its extent may 
differ, but the experiences re- 
counted by George have been 
described by hundreds of oth- 
er Palestinians in interviews 
and affidavits, and endured 
by many thousands. The ex- 
act number is not known, 
since the Israeli government 
does not give information on 
the number of Palestinian de- 
tainees subjected to formal 
interrogation by Shin Bet, and 
only a relative handful of 
cases have reached the 
courts. 

Human rights organiza- 
tions have estimated that 
about 5.000 Palestinians a 
year were subjected to some 
combination of ill-treatment 
a- violent methods in the 
years before tiie signing of the 
peace agreements between Is- 
rael and tiie Palestine liber- 
ation Organization 1993. By 
all accounts, die practice has 
continued unabated since. 

But the domestic debate is 
not over die number, nor even 
the fact, of the practices, 
which the Israelicovemment 
acknowledges. The dispute, 
rather, is over die fact that the 
entire Israeli security, legal, 
and legislative establishment 
— the secret services, the 
army, die Parliament and the 
courts — has effectively in- 
stitutionalized the use of vi- 
olence in questioning Pales- 
tinians. 

The legal basis for die 
methods is. the report of a 
commission appointed in 
1987 to investigate assertions 
of tortnre by the secret ser- 
vices. That panel, the Landau 
Commission, came up with 
the revelation, stunning at the 
time, that the Shin Bet had for 
years used violent methods in 


AIM Jiiannii Him .* . ^V-: gutfhst 'shaking, of which he recalled questioning Palestinians, m- 
Hfcla swHlW ii Sudan j, [seven, he was taken to a doc- eluding “criminal assault, 

^ l ?■' -"»* A t?*l: T a «> m WarLmail fltl/f filTMIfC 9 flnff 

header Is -^ i n r 

leader, ' 

fcaluKdberder %%»..*•- — --v * L® ft 

wiener^' - ^ ' ^ 

firWaxfc* ■na 

■ overl • .ff.-a'tP 
ne Sir Co-o 



■tor, an Ethiopian Jew, to see 
[whether he could take more. 
He remembo^ passing out 
[three rimes, and once he had 
•to be carried to the doctor. On 
'that occasion, he said, the 
■doctor gave him a Tylenol 
■tablet. 

[ Five days into the inter- 
Togation, George said that 


blackmail, and threats,'’ and 
then had routinely lied about 
h to. military courts. . . 

But instead of banning 
such practices outright, the 
commission proposed legal- 
izing * ‘a moderate measure.of 
physical pressure” in inter- 
rogations, and spelled out 
permissible techniques. The 



mu te , m g Mr 

Stop fordid 

~Tterer.-':- r ^ of w 


LASER: End of Dental Drill? 


__ he tsoulti P 1 ’’ 

ko's hand a a 


-sec 


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at 


said the bus , 
Itellfvnn^ ,3f Nl ** i 






.R?* : 


26 Police Qff 1 ^ 

ice ;:-. 0 


> Continued from Page 1 

Studies sponsored by the 
mannfacturer of the system, 
. [Premier Laser Systems Inc-, 
■were begun in 1993. They 
[showed that the laser was as 
•safe and effective as a high- 
speed drill, die food and drug 
[agency said, and that it re- 
duced the number of patients 
[requiring anesthetic for pain. 


Mara* 


•tn 


'or roughening enamel 
for bonding 


’tteMK fa 
tetedefor cesi^ 3 *- 
letefN- 


flff 



d HeaW 


f« wuv 

benefit 


-.d & 
Nlf- 




But 


' - of cosier- . j 

Of WiP- f 

■iHfi®- 1 ,fefs 



it demonstrate that the 
laser poses no risk to the lar- 
ger sensitive interior of a 
child’s tooth. 

The feature that sets Premi- 
er's laser apart from others, 
Ms. Cozean said, is that it 
operates at a wavelength that 
allows it to penetrate the tooth 
and slice away decay with ex- 
treme precision, preserving 
more of the healthy tooth. 

Robert Pick, a Chicago 
dentist and spokesman for the 
American Dental Associ- 
ation, said die new laser sys- 
Plemier will begin market- tan -was one of a soriMrf 
ing its laser systems imroe- advancesm ^ 
diately and could have them that had thrust dentistry ahead 

in dentists’ hands within 90 by“quantum leaps. 

Those include dental im- 
plants that have replaced full 
dentures, the regeneration of 
diseased gum and booejtissue, 
high-technology plastics for 
bonding and, most recently, 
genetic testing to det ermi ne 
whether a person is predis- 
posed to periodontal disease. 

Ms^ Cozean said the com- 
pany had submitted data on 
more than 1300 Focedmes 
to fbe Food and Drug Aa- 
ministrahon. Only three of 
had needed pain 
and that was 


days, although there will be 
‘Some delay as dentists under- 
# go tranting, Colette Cozean, 
Premier's chairman and chief 
•executive, said. 

The biggest obstacle to 
-rapid use of the product may 

-says it rail cost $39,0CW, 
"about 10 times, what a drill 
■might cost Pieimer plans to 
"offer leasing and financing 
-deals to dentists. Some of the 

•doctors in the studies charged 







- after the *** 


-approved tmly for adults. JThe 
’company hopes that cleaij 
moTfbr persons 18 and 
younger will come as soon as 


also hopes 

later be cleared 

for other applications, suefaas 
root-canal surgery mid the 
cutting and shaping of bone. 


details have remained clas- 
sified. on the ground that de- 
tainees should not know what 
they face, even though 
pamphlets about the methods 
are readily available from hu- 
man rights organizations. 

Official Israeli justifica- 
tions come on several levels. 
The first is that violent shak- 
ing, sleep deprivation, and the 
other techniques are not tor- 
ture. Human rights organiza- 
tions counter that the 1984 
UN Convention Against Tor- 
ture, which Israel ratified in 
1991, defines torture as "any 
act by which severe pain or 
suffering, whether physical or 
mental, is intentionally inflic- 
ted on a person'' to obtain 
information or a confession. 

The next justification is 
that Israel faces a unique 
threat of terrorism, and there- 
fore cannot be gentle with a 
detainee who may know of a 
“ticking bomb," Israeli 
shorthand for a violent mil- 
itant act about to be commit- 
ted. 

“We are in a terror situ- 
ation, bombs explode around 
us, we have to use force, and 
for this decision we pay a big 
price,” Shai Nitzan, an as- 
sistant attorney general who 
represents the Shut Bet, said. 



U.S. Envoy Has Talks 
With Mideast Leaders 


Cf-g Vlifinosa-h'-JV Vjxtf-olni IVm 

An Israeli honor guard getting set Thursday for the U.S. envoy's arrival. 


Reuters 

JERUSALEM — The U3. 
Middle East envoy, Dennis Ross, 
held high-level talks Thursday in 
Gaza and Jerusalem on reviving 
Israel-PLO peace negotiations but 
appeared to make little headway in 
his rescue mission. 

The issue that plunged the peace 
process into crisis, Jewish settle- 
ment on land claimed by the Pal- 
estinians, took center stage as set- 
tlers occupied a newly acquired 
house in Arab East Jerusalem in a 
move coinciding with Mr. Ross's 
visit. 

Making his second trip to the 
region in a month, Mr. Ross met 
Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian 
leader, in Gaza and later held talks 
in Jerusalem with Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu. “I cannot 
tell you thar I am optimistic,” Mr. 
Netanyahu said to reporters before 
meeting the envoy. 

Israel demands that Mr. Arafat 
crack down on Muslim militants 
blamed for bombings before re- 
suming talks, a move Mr. Netan- 
yahu said “would help the peace 
process.” 

Mr. Arafat's spokesman. Mar- 
wan Kanafani, said the Palestinian 


leader stressed to Mr. Ross die 
need to stop all settlement activity 
before peace talks could resume. 
Mr. Netanyahu's aide. David Bar- 
Tllan, said the work would con- 
tinue. 

“There are difficult problems 
that have to be overcome, but we 
all realize the importance of trying 
to find ways to move forward,” 
Mr. Ross told reporters in Gaza 
after meeting Mr. Arafat. Mr. Ross 
said he would hold talks again with 
Mr. Arafat on Friday. 

Peace negotiations between Is- 
rael and the Palestine Liberation 
Organization broke down two 
months ago after Mr. Netanyahu 
gave the final go-ahead to build 
6.500 houses for Jews on a West 
Bank hilltop Israel captured in the 
1967 Middle East war. 

On Jerusalem 's Mount of Olives 
on Thursday. Jewish settlers 
moved into a house acquired for a 
Jewish religious seminary from a 
church. 

"We don’t negare the right of 
Arabs to live in Jerusalem but Jews 
have a right to live in all of the 
city,” said Chaim Silberstein, the 
school's director. “As a yeshiva, 
we are not political.” 


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«fea 


PAGE 8 


FRIDAS, MAY 9, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Keralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



niusHED with the mew yokk times and the washincttin post 


?B!l unc CIA ’s ‘Zipless Coup ’ in Iraq Is a Matchless Flop 

frnrr, White House to engage in 


Pe‘ 





Unfinished Business 


The honest excavation of history can 
bring sobering discoveries, as the 
American government has now found 
in an examination of Nazi Germany’s 
stolen gold and its redistribution after 
the war. No nation emerges unscathed 
from this investigation, including the 
United States, and many are disgraced. 
It is saddening but nor altogether sur- 
prising to team dial morality and 
justice, especially the international ob- 
ligation to look after the survivors of 
the Holocaust were swiftly sacrificed 
to expediency when the gold was div- 
vied up after the war. Remedying this 
failure, as the report rightly notes, is the 
unfinished business of World War H 

The extraordinary inquiry, which in- 
volved the declassification of nearly 
one million pages of documents, was 
initiated by President Bill Clinton after 
Switzerland coldly rebuffed Jews 
seeking to recover gold and other as- 
sets their families had deposited in- 
Swiss b anks before the war. Under the 
determined direction of Stuart Eizen- 
stat, the new undersecretary of State 
for economic affairs, and William 
Slany, a State Department historian, it 
touches on wartime economic collab- 
oration with Germany but deals mainly 
with the anemic postwar effort ro re- 
store gold and other valuables to the 
nations and peoples from which they 
had been stolen. 

Sweden, Portugal, Spain, Turkey 
and Argentina will want to take notice. 
The extent of their economic cooper- 
ation with the Nazis has been slowly 
unfolding in recent years, but Mr. 
Eizenstat makes clear they profited 
from their neutrality. Even as the threat 
of German invasion waned in the last 
years of the war, Sweden sold Germany 
iron ore and ball bearings, Portugal 
provided tungsten for ste elmakin g, 
Spain traded goods and raw materials 
and Turkey shipped chrome. Argentina 
defied efforts to prevent the transfer of 
German funds there from Europe. 

Switzerland is properly singled oul 
Though helpful to the Allies as a base 
for spying, it served as Nazi banker, 
gold keeper and financial broker. 
Switzerland provided Germany with 
arms, ammunition, aluminum and ag- 
ricultural products. 

These countries made only a fitful 
effort after the war to return the looted 
gold and other assets they received in 
payments from Germany during the 
war. Here America bears considerable 
responsibility. It ted die postwar effort 
to recover and distribute the gold. Yet 


Meetings in Mexico 


What the United States wants from 
Mexico is not just agreements on dis- 
ruptive issues involving trade, finance, 
drugs and immigration, although these 
are essential national priorities on both 
sides. The real purpose is to add a 
useful continuing, if modest, incre- 
ment to Mexico’s own capacity to gov- 
ern. That government’s powers are an- 
tiquated. unresponsive and severely 
burdened by the problems of the coun- 
try. Whether President Bill Clinton 
provided this sort of help on the Mex- 
ican stop of his hemispheric trip is hard 
to measure. But in worn and gesture, he 
made an earnest effort to set a positive 
tone for the Mexican-American rela- 
tionship, and his host, Resident Er- 
nesto Zedillo, did his share, too. 

Mr. Ginton's approach to the ex- 
plosive drug issue was typical. His goal 
was to move it from confrontation to 
partnership in order to spur a tougher 
assault on supply and transit by Mex- 
ico and on consumption by the United 


son that will promote openness and 
accountability is best nailed into place 
not by reform from the top but by 


political competition from below. 

This was the message intended by 
Mr. Clinton’s calls on the opposition. 
This is not a presidential year in Mex- 
ico. Thanks to President Zedillo, 
however, voters in the capital will be 
having their first crack at electing their 
mayor — the country’s second most 
important political post. If It is 
Cuauhtemoc Cardenas. . Sol6rzano of 
the opposition PRD, currently the 
leading contender, he will be making 
history. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


^ Hope for Ulster 


States. Hence his call for a joint drug- 
threat assessment and his admission of 


threat assessment and his admission of 
the American responsibility for gen- 
erating high drug demand. It is charged 
that Washington has hesitated to in- 
voke the full rigors of the one-sided 
certification process against a country 
whose cooperation and goodwill are 
needed across a range of difficult is- 
sues. The charge is accurate, but there 
was good reason for the U.S. gov- 
ernment to hesitate. Now it falls to the 
two governments to improve the anti- 
drug results. 

Of Mr. Clinton's symbolic affirm- 
ations in Mexico, none was more im- 
portant than his calls — an American 
president’s first — on the political op- 
position to the PRL the party that has 
ruled for 68 years. The PRI’s immob- 
ilism and corruption are legend. Mr. 
Zedillo is at once its creature and its 
would-be reformer. He is coming up to 
Mexico’s midterm elections on July 6 
as the champion of change in the polit- 
ical culture. But serious change of the 


Britain’s newly elected Labour gov- 
ernment has moved quickly on the 
Northern Ireland question, raising cau- 
tious hopes that the stalled peace pro- 
cess will be resumed. The new North- 
ern Ireland secretary, Marjorie (Mo) 
Mowlam, already has ordered a series 
of measures intended to restore con- 
fidence in the process, wounded by 
hardball politics and die violent op- 
position of the Irish Republican Army. 

She has committed the government 
to reform the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary, the police department of what re- 
mains a British province. Her aim is to 
ensure fair treatment for all- citizens. 
Catholic and Protestant. Another prom- 


ising sign is Tony Blair’s strong Labour 
majority in Parliament, an advantage 


majority in Parliament, an advantage 
that should provide him the maneu- 
vering room needed. On the Irish Re- 
publican side. Gerry Adams and his 
Sinn Fein party came out of the election 
slightly fortified. The question is wheth- 
er the vote for Sinn Fein was a vote for 
peace and against IRA violence. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


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W ASHINGTON — The Central 
Intelligence Agency has spent 


YY Intelligence Agency has spent 
six years and $110 million trying to 


By Jim Hoagland 


Kina H u s ain is known to feel badly from the White House to engage 
burned by die INA fiasco. The agency , 


Bv FMV 


SSSbPifS Tto feetog was mmfo^dwto 

pressurcu fXr »he annual funding was cut to $20 million 


only a small portion of the $580 mil- 



lion in gold stolen from conquered 
governments, worth some $5.6 billion 


governments, worth some $5.6 billion 
today, was ever recovered. Even less 
of the millions of dollars in gold and 
other assets taken from individuals 
was returned. 

Switzerland was aggressively un- 
helpful, resisting accounting and re- 
covery efforts for years and not hon- 
oring agreements to liquidate German 
assets held in Switzerland. The Amer- 
ican report estimates that as much as 
$400 million in German-looted gold 
remained in the Swiss National Bank at 
the end of the war, but no more than 
S58 million was returned. 

The task of tracing and apportioning 
the gold and other assets was daunting, 
but American officials tolerated in- 
transigence by other nations and ac- 
cepted pitiful restitution agreements in 
the name of Cold War solidarity. Eager 
to obtain access to an Azores air base in 
the 1950s. Washington let Portugal 
surrender only about one-tenth of the 
German gold it held at the end of the 
war. Spain eventually returned just 
$1 14,000 in looted gold from a stock- 
pile of $30 million. 

Turkey, which held $44 milli on in 
Nazi assets and $5 million in looted 
gold, made no restitution. Only 
Sweden paid up. 

The victims of this dismal record 
were the survivors of the Holocaust, 
and others left homeless and stateless 
by the war. Assets that could have been 
used to help them were never returned 
to the countries plundered by Ger- 
many. Worse still, gold and other valu- 
ables found in Germany that had been 
seized from millions of individuals and 
households across Europe were know- 
ingly mingled with assets stolen from 
European governments by the Nazis. 
As a result, gold that should have gone 
to help individuals through relief and 
compensation programs ended up in 
European and American government 
vaults, where some remains today. 

These matters remained too long ob- 
scured from public view, shielded by 
excessive secrecy and national pride. It 
is late to redress the wrongs, but every 
effort should now be made to return 
gold and other assets to those with a 
legitimate claim. Switzerland, after 
long delay, is finally making an effort 
to trace and return assets deposited 
before the war. Mr. Eizenstat and Mr. 
Slany have performed a high public 
service by digging for the truth. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


history. Iraq is the Bay of Pigs in un- 
ending free tall, with fresh humiliation 
looming around the comer. 

The agency could not stop throwing 
money at the Saddam problem if it 
wanted to. Refusing to admit defeat, the 
White House orders this international 
embarrassment prolonged. The current 
covert operation, which will cost about 
$5 million this year, has dwindled into 
an ineffective propaganda effort car- 
ried out by two Arabic- language radio 
stations in Jordan .and Kuwait 

Senators who normally line up to rail 
at executive agencies for wasting tax- 
payer money have kept quiet on the 
CIA debacle in Iraq. The Senate In- 
telligence Committee passed up a 
golden opportunity to educate itself- 
and tire American public on Tuesday 
when it failed to probe the CIA Di- 
rector-designate George J. Tenet about 
Iraq and cost-effectiveness in Mr. Ten- 
et's confirmation bearings. 

It is now up to Mr. Tenet, all but 
assured confirmation as America's top 
spy, to decide what to do about this 
continuing failure, in which he played a 
not insi gnif icant role as a member of 
President Bill Clinton’s National Se- 
curity Council staff and then as deputy 
director of the CIA. 

The story he could assemble would 


Iraqi dissidents and foreign intelligence then left the Jordanians to suffer fee 

sources provide new insights into this political consequences. 

colossal exercise in self-deception and The king’s shutting down the station 


factionalism within the agency. 

Some Americans who worked in 
Iraq covertly now wonder whether the 
agency was a victim of an elaborate 
sting perpetrated by Mr- Saddam, who 
watched with a benign eye as the CIA 
funneled money and Iraqi military de- 
fectors into a Jordan-based exile group 
for two years before be effortlessly 
rolled up that organization and exposed 
its American roots last summer. 

“The guys in Amman were prom- 
ising us a zipless coup, telling us they 
had the silver bullet that would change 
Iraq.’* said an American who worked 
on the Iraq covert program. “They 
were put out of business. in an af- 
ternoon. and a big U.S. investment 
just went up in smoke.” 

Despite that failure, the agency is set 
to provide S4.8 milli on in covert funds 
to thar group — the Iraqi National 
Accord, or INA — again this year, 
according to my sources. But it will be 
less than that if Jordan’s King Hussein- 
yields to Mr. Saddam's increasingly 
insistent demands to shut down the 
agency-financed, INA-rnn radio studio 
and transmitter, which broadcasts 
as Voice of the Future. 


woold be a final humiliation for the 
agency in au effort that was conceived 
and pursued in halfhearted fashion 
after George Bush and his generals 
declined to use military might to re- 
move Mr. Saddam in 1991. 

President Bush put up S4Q million as 
a down payment on Mr. Saddam’s re- 
moval when he secretly ordered the 
agency to create the conditions for Mr. 
Saddam's downfall in 1991. Much of 
thar money went to buy and move a 
cland estine radio transmitter from 
Croatia and to finance a London-based 
propaganda operation that turned out 
fake Baghdad newspapers, television 
films and radio broadcasts. 

About 15 American contract em- 
ployees worked in London to prodace 
the expensive propaganda. At one 
point, the agency used an unmanned 
air craft based in northern Iraq to drop 
anti-Saddam leaflets across Iraq on the 
dictator's birthday. 

Within the agency, the Iraq operation 


White House and adopted Mr. Bush s 
program in a memorandum of noti- 
fication to Congress. Ambitious junior 
officers targeted the money on flashy 
projects that led nowhere but allowed 
the White House to pretend something 
was happening. 

The agency has been used as the 
last resort of failed policy” in Iraq by 
two administrations. Mr. Tenet used 
those words on Tuesday to describe 
something that he said would never 
happen to the CIA on his watch. He did 
not mention Iraq, but agency veterans 
knew what he had in mind. 

It still is unclear how deep and how 
self-critical Mr. Tenet’s assessment of 
tire Iraq failure runs. He enthusias- 
tically backed the INA * ‘zipless coup * ' 


3**4 - • 

Jun k) 

: , 


■Jtd L-J36 


r an when be became deputy director 
the CIA, according to agency 


was seen by some — including frank 
Anderson, former head of the Middle 


Anderson, former head of the Middle 
East department — as a can of worms. 
These officers knew they would never 
get enough money or political support 


of the CIA, according to agency 
sources. If there was a Saddam sting, he 
was one of its principal victims. 

The Senate is on the verge of giving 
Mr. Tenet one of life's rare chances to 
clean up a mess he helped make. If he 
does not take it and shape a coven 
program capable of producing change 
in Iraq, Congress should step in swiftly 
wife its own investigation of a national 
humiliation. 

The Washington Post. 






A European Voice in the Debate Over Humanitarian Aid 


B RUSSELS — The dilem- 
mas facing those of us re- 
thinking the issue of human- 
itarian aid look different 
depending on fee side of fee 
Atlantic we are on. 

Allow me to contribute a 
European point of view to the 
healthy, much-needed debate 
launched in these columns by J. 
Brian Atwood and Leonard Ro- 
gers of fee U.S. Agency for 
International Development 
(IHT, March 12 and 13). 

They write that the world 
will not reply to crises in peri- 
pheral states without U.S. lead- 
ership. Really? I do not believe 
Europe's humanitarian re- 
sponse to recent crises was 
delayed in anticipation of a lead 
from Washington. 

But if by “reply ” fee authors 
mean “seek solutions,” that is 
a different ball game, to use 
an American expression. It is 
a game I do not believe hu- 
manitarian actors should be 
playing. 

Today, conflict rages in East- 
ern Zaire and elsewhere in the 
Great Lakes region of Africa. 
North Korea is starving, and the 
fate of Afghanistan as a nation- 
state grows increasingly uncer- 
tain. These are but some of the 
issues - on our agenda. 

Should we feed Rwandan 
refugees now deep in Zaire who 
took part in genocide in their 
country — or should we view 
their current predicament as 
rough justice for their horrible 
crimes? Is it wise for us to re- 
lieve North Korea’s govera- 


By Emm a Bonino 

The writer is European commissioner for humanitarian affairs. 


ment of responsibility for feed- 
ing its own people, even though 
that may enable Pyongyang to 
concentrate on military spend- 
ing? Is it right to help the people 
of Kabul, disregarding the Tale- 
ban ’s record of gross violations 
of human rights, especially 
women's rights? Should the 
Italian government open fee 
gates to all those fleeing unrest 
in Albania, despite hard evi- 
dence fear fee exodus of 
asylum-seekers is being man- 
aged by organized crime? 
w These questions reflect the 
growing complexity of issues 
that are testing fee humanitarian 
community. Such issues are un- 
derstandably confusing to fee 
public. Doubts and uncertain- 
ties are beginning to erode sup- 
port for humanitarian aid, 
which is why I wholeheartedly 
welcome a debate. 

Yes, the world has changed 
— though not for fee better. 
Yes, I agree the international 
community looks set to face a 
proliferation of micro-conflicts 
at regional and subregional 
levels. The root causes of such 
crises may be ethnic, religious, 
political, tribal. Unlike Cold 
War-era crises, these tend to 
develop unchecked unless and 
until they become a threat to 
global security or to major eco- 
nomic interests, or until they 
sufficiently rouse the public's 
conscience. 


And yes, I agree fee United 
States is fee sole remaining su- 
perpower, and the only nation 
with truly global reach — 
though I find this frustrating. 
Whar I regret, as a federalist 
European, is die fact feat Euro- 
pean capitals seem to be 
resigned to life as a mere bunch 
of lesser military allies, and that 
fee European Union is too hes- 
itant about asserting itself as a 
partner on a par wife the United 
States in the political and eco- 
nomic spheres. 

Does U.S. global reach also 
entail global responsibility? 
That is what the Atwood/Ro- 
gers approach seems to imply. 
Bur the United Stales is and wjJJ 
remain a nation-state, however 
big and powerful. It will le- 
gitimately pursue its own na- 
tional interests, values and geo- 
political agenda before all else. 
Goals and priorities are bound 


Reagan, we may recall, vetoed 
sanctions legislation but was 
overruled by Congress. That is 
now history. Then came fee 
containment of Islamic radic- 
alism, which implied backing 
new leaderships in Eritrea. 
Ethiopia and elsewhere. 

Now there are new priorities. 
These include containing cor- 
rupt postcolonial regimes and 
fostermg market economies. 


evaluating fee new U.S. ap- 
proach to humanitarian aid: 

• U.S. foreign policy prior- 


Aid is about 
people, not 
governments, and 
should never be 
considered a part 
. of any nation's 
foreign policy. 


to change depending on the 
government of fee day. 


government of fee day. 

Africa, traditionally peri- 
pheral in U.S. foreign policy, is 


For me, the new generation of 
African leaders represents a 
positive change in a political 
landscape that is sometimes 
disheartening. 

However, there are some 
things about them that are mak- 


an excellent example of a pat- 
tern of moving goalposts. The 


ing me lose sleep. Many in this 
group of very articulate, re- 


tem of moving goalposts. The 
United States used to be mo- 
tivated by the containment of 
socialist ideology cm the con- 
tinent This warranted backing 
fee Mobutus and Savimbis, as 
well as keeping a cool distance 
from the socialist-inclined Af- 
rican National Congress of Nel- 
son Mandela. President Ronald 


group of very articulate, re- 
formist leaders — soon to be 
joined by Laurent Kabila — are 
allergic to multiparty democ- 
racy (with the exception of fee 
Ethiopians). They seem to think 
respect for human rights is op- 
tional. and they resort to war- 
fare with disturbing ease. 

Africa illustrates my two 
main conclusions, crucial in 


cepnon or where U.b. national 
interests lie at any point iq 

rime ; 

• Washington’s priorities 
may not always coincide with, 
or be representative of, fee pre- 
vailing analysis of the interna- 
tional community at large. 

This is why I do not tnmk it is Jp 
ap p r o p riate to focus the argu- ** 
ment on prescriptive guideline$ 
for U.S. h umani tarian interven- 
tion. Humanitari an aid should 
never be devised as a part of any 
country's foreign policy. I would 
certainly oppose the idea if Eurth 
pean Union governments or in- 
stitutions were to suggest iL 
I agree feat someone needs to 
find solutions for the fonda; 
mental causes of complex emeri 
gencies. But this should be fee 
job of oriier actors, nor those 
directly involved in humani- 
tarian aid. Humanitarian aid i§ 
about people, not governments* 

As for us, we must make sure 
relief reaches the hungry child 
whose only sin was to have been 
born in Sudan, in Cuba or in a 
refugee camp in Zaire. We must 
work hard to preserve what is lefi. 
of the impartiality innate in the 
concept of humanitarian aid. ' 

We must keep such aid avail- 
able as a last resort for all hu;- 
man beings in need, wherever 
they are, whatever passport 
they hold. I 

International Herald Tribune. • 










New Hong Kong Boss Asks the West to Quit Rubbernecking 





H ONG KONG — When 
Tung Chee-hwa, fee new 
boss of Hong Kong, settled his 




By Tom Plate 


bearish body into his office sofa 
last Friday night for a long chat, 
he hadn't met wife many West- 
ern journalists. But with appre- 
hension about his true intentions 
growing both inside and outside 
Hong Kong, that reclusiveness 
looks finally to be ending. 

His handlers seem now to 
accept feat this 60-year-old 
shipping tycoon cannot, no 
matter how much Beijing might 
wish it, play peekaboo wife fee 
public and fee media forever. 
So finally this jowly, animated, 
successful businessman, whose 
job is to bring fee world’s feisti- 
est and most entrepreneurial 
circus under the dour “special 
administrative” tent of fee 
People's Republic of China, is 
starting to step out. 

Mr. Tung needs fee world’s 
understanding: be clearly is on a 
tightrope, with fee 6.3 million 
people here praying he doesn’t 
lose his balance. His recent pro- 
posals to modify statutory polit- 
ical rights, presumably put forth 


at China’s behest, have put the 
news media, if not the average 
Hong Konger, on red alert — 
and the rest of the world on fee 
edge of its seat 

Mr. Tung emphatically in- 
sists that there is less to the new 
proposals than meets fee eye 
and that their restrictions on 
political . parties and street 
demonstrations may nor even go 
into effect as currently written. 
Maybe, but despite Mr. Tung’s 
warm style and unquestioned 
affection for Hong Kong, the 
truth is thar the gap on human 
rights and press freedom issues 
between East and West is vast. 

“I am not saying freedom is 
not important,” he said. “It is. 
But the West just doesn’t un- 
derstand Chinese culture. It's 
time to reaffirm who we are. 
Individual rights are not as im- 
portant as order in a society. 
That is what we are, and we will 
be what we are. We will be 
Hong Kong, and we must find 
our own way.” 

Mr. Tung clearly warned to 


leave the impression feat we in 
fee West have got to stop staring 
at this place like it's some 
Tiananmen Square disaster in 
the making. We’re rubberneck- 
ing on the freeway of iniema- 
tional relations, he suggests, try- 


si onately feat there are no truly 
major strategic fault lines be- 
tween America and China, he 


deplores the commonplace 
Western view feat all you need 


ing to catch a glimpse of some 
blood-and-gore collision at the 


An Overlooked Dissident in China 


F OR NEARLY 20 years, the 
Chinese government has 


JL Chinese government has 
sought to silence one of fee 
world’s most important polit- 


ical prisoners, Wei Jingsheng. 

Once an electrician in the 
Beijing Zoo. Mr. Wei is the 
strongest voice of China's de- 
mocracy movement He has 
spent all but six months of the 
last 18 years in prisons and labor 
camps, most in solitary confine- 
ment in conditions that would 
have killed a less stubborn man 
long ago and may soon kill Mr. 
Wei, who is 46 and very ill 


Now serving a second long 
rue nee. he is watched around 


Scie nce, he is watched around 
the clock by nonpolitical crim- 
inal prisoners who ensure he 
does not put pen to paper. But 
during his first imprisonment he 
was permitted to write letters to 


his family, prison authorities and 
China's leaders. Most were nev- 
er sent. But they have now been 
translated and published as “The 
Courage to Stand Alone.” 

The moral force of Mr. Wei's 
writing recalls the prison letters 
of other famous dissidents, such 
as Martin Luther King Jr., Adam 
Michnik and Vaclav HaveL But 
those dissidents had widespread 
support they knew people all 
over fee world were looking out 
for them and their governments 
were under pressure to free them, 
treat them well and heed their 
cause. This security is as im- 
portant to a political prisoner’s 
survival as food and water, and 
Mr. Wei and his fellow Chinese 
dissidents do not have iL 
— Tina Rosenberg, writing 
in The New York Times. 


blood-and-gore collision at the 
Hong Kong interchange. He has 
a point, but what’s certain is feat 
we do have to stop expecting 
Mr. Tung to act ana sound like 
Thomas Jefferson (which he 
sure as heck isn't). Face the 
reality, folks: Hong Kong is 
soon to be China's. And if fee 
West wishes to work wife Mr. 
Tung, it must understand feat on 
many issues, he will not just 
agree with Beijing because he 
bos to but because, in his heart 
he sees things feat way. 

To whar extent then, will he 
tolerate political street demon- 
strations, much less the pesky 
press? The question gets under 
his skin. Raising his voice, he 
dismisses the British, who. he 
charges, only got religion about 
individual rights recently, when 
the world spotlight began to fo- 
cus on their long colonial stew- 
ardship over Hong Kong. 

“The British? They’re anti- 
Chinese and they have a total 
mistrust of China," Mr. Tung 
said. “So now I have to work 
very hard and prove to the 
world feat we are going to be 
fine.” 

But if Hong Kongers aren't 
to have ail the freedoms of 
Americans, will they at least 
have more than fee Chinese? He 


to know about the Chinese polit- 
ical system is what you saw on 
CNN broadcasts from Tianan- 
men Square on June 4, 1989. 

“Americans need to realize 
that it’s really quite unbeliev- 
able what is happening in 
China. The changes are just 
astounding.” The Tiananmen 
massacre, he said, “is not going 
to happen again." 

That surely would be a bless- 
ing for all concerned, especially 
for those taking orders from 
Beijing. I'm told that when Mr. 
Tung telephones China, either 
fee president or the foreign min- 
ister picks up. Interesting, but 
when fee bosses of Beijing an- 
swer, do they listen as well as 


give orders? For in order for this 
historic giveback to actually 
work out well for everyone in- 
volved, at least two things must 
happen. Yes, the West must 
give Mr. Tung a chance to 
breathe; but. of equal impor-. 
tance, Beijing must give Mr. 
Tung a chance to be a Hong 
Konger and chart a path sep^ 
arate from the mainland’s. 1 
Obliquely referring to that 
other “special administrative 
district” — Taiwan — feat 
China would wish to gaiher un; 
tier its untested “one country* 
two systems” formula, hfc 
Tung noted sagely: “A success^ 
fid Hong Kong is very important 
to Chink It will make furthex 
unifications an easier job. It is in 
China’s national interest to make 
Hong Kong work." No one 
could have put h any better. “ 
0 Los Angeles Times Syndicate. « 







Jcvrv.ir-:-.-. 






JF' 

* f 

M- J 




IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO : 


1897: Sound in Court 


thought hard, then answered: 
"In Hong Kong, we have a cul- 


"In Hong Kong, we have a cul- 
ture. To demonstrate is part of 
our culture, and so people 
demonstrate. We are Hong 
Kong, we are not Beijing. Of 
course there will be freedom.” 

Mr. Tung implies feat his job 
as chief executive could become 
impossible if America and 
China constantly are at e a c h 
other's throats. Arguing pas- 


PARIS — The use of a grapho- 

f phone as evidence in a court of 
aw has not yet been estab- 
lished, although -an effort was 
made in the U.S. Supreme 
Court. Anthony Sauer is suing 
the New York and Harlem Rail- 
road Company because of the 
noise caused by the trains. The 
lawyers employed an expert 
who used three cylinders to get 
impressions of the sound 
caused by the running of trains 
on the graphophone. However, 
the judge said feat the cylinders 
could not be used in evidence, 
as nothing had been introduced 
to show exaedy what noises 
might come from them. 


cording to former Secretary ^ 
State Robert Lansing. Accord- 
teg to him, the establishment of 
peace and prosperity in fee Rel 
public and the blocking of Gei* 
man designs of aggression! 
which threatened fee United 
States and fee Monroe Doc- 
trine, were fee motives which 
caused fee United States to act 
in island affairs. Z 


Isfe V- 

mm. > 




At. M 



1947: A Labor Defeat* 


1922: German Greed 


WASHINGTON — It was Ger- 
man greed for a Caribbean nav- 
al base which caused fee United 
States to take over the man- 
agement of affairs in Haiti, ao 


PARIS — Nation-wide elec" 
dons to name administrators of 
fee new French Social Security 
plan showed feat the Commu- 
nist-dominated General Confed- 
eration of Labor suffered an imS 
portant political defeat, whereas 
the newly formed Committee of 
Middle Class Liaison and A£l 
tion surprisingly attracted 12 pBJ 
cent of fee voters. The Figaro 
predict ed tha t fee middle classes 
would from now on maintain 
feeir own social interest through 
increasing organization. 




■ r Q i.. *' 


■V. 


L 


' ■ 'r, - - 


-ra ... 

.4 -i,. 


I 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 9 




Zi% 


OPINION/LETTERS 


wmm 

after Bin Sf. n toSis .“C 

HoiisJ VlfSr, NC 


The Famous and Rich 
Get Taken for a Ride 


The Joys and Revolting Chores of Motherhood 


By Philip Bowring 


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TTONG KONG - Great 
XX hoaxes say more about the 
hoaxed than the hoaxer. 

The Bre-X fool’s gold find in 
Indonesia ranks among the great 
scams of modem times: the Great 
Salad Oil Scandal of the late 
1950s, when U.S. banks were 
duped into making huge loans se- 
cured on empty tanks of vegetable 
oil; the Investors Overseas Ser- 
vices debacle of the late 1960s. 
when thousands of mutual fund 
investors were taken for a costly 
ride; or, more recently, the Bank 
of Credit and Commerce Inter- 
national’s multibillion-dollar de- 
ception of banks around the 
world. 

The fascination in the Bre-X 
case is not so much with 
whichever previously obscure 
persons in Canada. Indonesia or 
the Philippines concocted and sold 
the tale of the world’s richest gold 
deposit. Nor is it with the mech- 
anics of how the drill cores were 
“crushed and salted. It is fascination 
with the not-so-obscure names 
who bought the Bre-X story. 

Gullibility and greed are two 
sides of the same coin now as 
when medieval alchemists were 

Gullibility and 
greed: two sides of 
the same coin. 


selling similar tales of miraculous 
means of changing dross into 
gold. 

By insisting on an independent 
report and finding out the truth 
about the Busang “gold' ’ deposit 
in Indonesia, the American com- 
pany Freeport McMoRan Copper 
& Gold has done a service. 

But one question remains un- 
answered* How did so many big 
names become so deeply involved 
in the episode before the reality' 
was revealed? There obviously 
k .was fraud. Blit it is not as though 
urge mining companies are not 
aware how difficult it is to find 
gold in suitable quantities any- 
where. They know only too well 
how much tedious and costly 
drilling is needed over months or 
years to confirm and define even a 
modest deposit. Even die richest 
seams are variable in shape and 
gold content That is why gold is 
worth the price of gold. 




PC WOI K 


work a 


ware trom 
Ob&u* 


China wi\ 
der its jt 
no «> :i 


ip Chtju- 


Cruna sr: 


ISA SPj jQVSig 

cording K ** 

. Sate Rosen 






Yet the belief that tiny Bre-X 
had found the “world's richest 
deposit" in Indonesia took hold 
not only among Canadian punters 
in penny mining stocks who are 
used to the often inflated claims of 
small exploration companies. 
What made Bre-X into a global 
story was the seemingly uncritical 
acceptance of the claims by big- 
name companies and some influ- 
ential individuals. Their zeal to 
get pan of the action gave Bre-X 
credibility. 

At first this was the fairly harm- 
less Bre-X recruitment of Pres- 
ident Suharto's eldest son, Sigit 
Harjojudamo. as consultant to 
clear the way for the grant of a 
mining permit. 

But before the permit was is- 
sued, two North American mining 
giants, Barrick Gold Corp. ana 
Placer Dome Inc., were trying to 
muscle in on the project. Barrick 
joined forces with the president’s 
elder daughter. Siti Hardijanti 
Rukmana (better known as Tutut), 
and wheeled in former President 
George Bush of the United States 
and former Prime Minister Brian 
Mulroney of Canada to support its 
case. 

In Jakarta, ministries, ministers 
and courtiers battled for pieces of 
the action. Eventually die situ- 
ation became so messy that Pres- 
ident Suharto intervened. The 
solution brought in Freeport and 
Mr. Suharto's close business as- 
sociate. Bob Hasan. Barrick, Pla- 
cer and others were left in the 
cold. 

Now, everyone is in the cold, 
not knowing which to regret 
more, the greed or the gullibility. 
Hie mining companies will need a 
while to live down this ignomini- 
ous tale, which is bound to make 
mining in Indonesia (and perhaps 
elsewhere) more difficult, and ex- 
ploration harder to finance. The 
bigger question, however, is its 
impact in Indonesia, facing an 
election in the short term and a 
succession in the longer term. 

Will Busang be seen as a scam 
of no lasting significance? Or be 
taken as an example of victim- 
ization of the nation by unscru- 
pulous Westerners? 

Or will it be viewed as evidence 
that the unbridled acquisitiveness- 
of some well-connected Indone- 
sians can bring the nation, as well 
as its leadership, into disrepute? 

International Herald Tribune. 


By Elizabeth Ann Hnlick 

P ARIS — One of the most 
challenging jobs any woman 
can volunteer for is that of a 
mother. If you happen to work 
outside the home as well, you get 
the doubly most challenging job. 

At home, you come last. In the 
morning, your toddler will dog 
your steps, position himself lit- 
erally underfoot, and accompany 
you to the toilet, to the shower, to 
the dressing room. You eat after 
him. if there is still time to eat, 

MEANWHILE 

and you get yourself ready in 
under 15 minutes, even if you 
allow yourself two hours before 
you have to leave for work in the 
morning. The rest of the morning 
race is devoted to your child's 
eating, diapering, dressing and 
distraction. 

Your personal grooming gets 
pared down to the essentials: col- 
or-coordinated clothes that you 
can grab and put on fast. A 
friend, mother of five, mentions 
the endless possibilities of black 
and white. We dress like nuns, 
minus the headgear. 

While you are hastily applying 
your makeup in the morning, 
your child is emptying the bath- 
room cupboards all over the floor 
and is amusing himself by at- 
tempting to ingest some sham- 
poo. He must, has to. brush his 
teeth, even before he has many 
teeth. You must, have to, brush 
your teeth at the same time. The 
toothpaste must be replaced in 
the drawer, the drawer firmly 


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shut, before the brushing can 
proceed. Together. He howls if 
you do not follow suit precisely. 
His soggy toothbrush gets left in 
the hallway. 

You are careful about where 
you walk at home, because there 
is a haphazard trail of toys 
throughout the bouse — no mat- 
ter how many hundreds of times 
you pick them up, reassemble the 
pans and tuck, them away in the 
toy chest. 

You notice the phone is off the 
hook and you look to see your 
child laughing and babbling into 


the cordless. Did he just dial 
Buenos Aires? 

The garbage bin fills daily, 
mostly with wadded-up dispos- 
ables, because babies have this 
infernal tendency to do the big 
duty in a new- diaper. You delve 
over and over into bodily func- 
tions of the most horrid, enough- 
to-take-your-breath-away, foul- 
ness. You are thrown up upon. 
You reach into the mouth of your 
toddler and extract saliva- 
covered half-chewed undesir- 
ables. You become, astonish- 
ingly, unfazed by all this. 


Your child, even at 16 months, 
understands your weak points 
and learns, better than any other 
near and dear one. bow to push 
your buttons. He filters the food 
in his mouth and pushes the lar- 
ger chunks out and onto die floor. 
Or spews straight out in your 
direction, laughing with glee. He 
fetches his shoes and is pointing 
for his coat before you have 
found die keys he has hidden. 

The evenings after work are 
dinner, bath, books and bed. For 
him. You get whatever time that 
is left after that. Your biggest 


ambition in life becomes watch- 
ing a little television before go- 
ing to bed. Or just going to bed. 
You come to accept these am- 
bitions as noble. 

The night before, you were 
shaken out of a deep sleep at one 
or two or three in the morning. 
You didn't bother to check die 
time. It was quiet, it was dark, it 
was not supposed to be time to 
get up yeL You were jolted into 
action by his wailingly desperate 
cries for ... a drink. 

He couldn’t say it. but be was 
thirsty. You gave him his drink 
and he settled back to sleep, cozy 
in his bed, content. You went 
back to bed, heart racing from the 
lights, the zing of the microwave 
bell, the chili of die floors on 
your bare feet, your mind wide 
awake. 

On the weekend, while he 
naps, you do the dishes and then 
you grab a nap too, fallin g into a 
stupor while supplicating the 
gods regarding your child: Let 
him not wake up yet. Just one 
hour of silence. Please. 

Don't misconstrue. You rise to 
the occasion over and over again. 
Your child is helpless, and thank- 
fully, amazingly, charming, 
when charming. He is your child, 
your beloved, the tiny existence 
for whom you are responsible. 
He wants you first, likes you 
best, needs you most You find 
him endlessly fascin ating , end- 
lessly entertaining, even while he 
is endlessly needy and endlessly 
demanding, until he is able some 
day to let go. He is also endlessly 
lovable. You leant that a big part 
of loving is giving. 

International Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Sanctions on Burma v 

The editorial “Sanctions on 
Burma ’ 1 (March 25) misses the 
point of many of those opposed to 
sanctions and the resulting lack of 
engagement with Burma’s gov- 
ernment. The U.S. government 
has two equally important issues 
with Burma — h uman rights and 
narcotics trafficking. Burma is 
one of the world's leading pro- 
ducers of opium, which arrives in 
the United States as heroin. 

Human rights advocates have 
undermined every attempt by the 
U.S. government to work with the 


Burmese on opium production 
and trafficking, arguing that any 
cooperation would appear to en- 
dorse the military regime. 

While the editorial is correct in 
saying that “sanctions would cost 
American business little,*’ it fails 
to note that sanctions will cost the 
taxpayers a lot: They are the ones 
who will have to deal with the 
increased amount of heroin that 
will end up on city streets. 

THOMAS C BRAMAN. 

Brussels. 

Is the human rights record of 
Burma, a nonentity in internation- 


al trade and home to only modest 
American investment, really more 
odious than that of Nigeria, a ma- 
jor oil supplier and home to sig- 
nificant American investment and 
profits? 

GERALD DIXON. 

Geneva. 

This editorial says that Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi “would be 
Burma’s elected leader had the 
government not annulled 1990 
elections.” 

However, because of her mar- 
riage to a British subject. Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi is not eligible 


for public office under the 1947 
electoral code. 

DAW MYA THEIN. 

Manila. 

Rowdiness in the Air 

Regarding “Abuse at 35,000 
Feet: Airlines Take Aim at Rowdy 
Passengers" (May 2): 

The most telling phrase in this 
article described “passengers 
herded into cramped seats, lub- 
ricated with too many drinks and 
denied die freedom to smoke." 

When you add intentional over- 
booking. failure to enforce rules 


limiting carry-on baggage and in- 
different service, it's a wonder 
there aren't more problems. 

Better service mid more atten- 
tion to quality of flight issues may 
be more effective than printed 
warnings and handcuffs in pre- 
venting rowdy behavior. 

ROCCO TOMANELLL 
Lens, Belgium. 

As a passenger. I say that if we 
are treated like animals, then we 
have the right to behave like an- 
imals! 

ADRIAN KUNZLE. 

New York. 


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The Superbowl, a Western-style mall and amusement arcade near Ho Chi Mink City, left; young shoppers, above right and below , who are the driving force behind the current consumer merchandising boom in Vietnam. 


Vietnam’s Superbowl Pits Old Guard Against Consumerism 


By Carey Zesiger 


H O CHI MINH CITY — An alien 
spacecraft has come to rest on a va- 
cant lot near Tan Son Nhat airport. 
The saucer-shape and sleek, modem 
design have made it a monument of the New 
Saigon. Not everyone knows quite what to make 
of this Unidentified Foreign Object, but for Vi- 
etnam’s young and restless, the Superbowl is the 
hottest game in town. 

A state-of-the-art bowling alley, fast food em- 

g orium and shopping mall rolled into one. the 
upeibowl is a temple of consumerism trans- 
planted to this bastion of socialism. It has been a 
huge hit with the public, but was not an easy sell 
to the government. 

Most government officials “didn’t really un- 
derstand,’’ said Arthur Tay. chairman of Singa- 
pore’s SUTL Leisure. Aside from those Viet- 


namese who had traveled abroad and witnessed 
bowling's popularity in other countries, few knew 
what to make of Tay’s project or this peculiar 
sport. To show them, his company organized a 
special trip to Singapore so ms partners in the 
Ministry of Defense could bowl a few frames and 
see for themselves. 

Even then, it took some persuading. To the 
country’s authorities, bent on development and 
industrialization, Tay’s idea of a good time may 
have seemed, well, a bit frivolous. After all. what 
could be more alien to Vietnam's state planners 
and old-guard revolutionaries than a Western- 
style mall and amusement arcade? 

phenomenal Tay bad to overcome govern- 
ment concerns about gambling and “social 
evils’’ to win approval for the project, but his 
success has repaid him handsomely for his trou- 
bles. In a city where there were few entertainment 
options on a Saturday night, the bowling alley's 


popularity has been little short of pbenomenaL 
“What else can you do?’’ Tay asked, “Sing 
karaoke or watch TV.” 

Forget marketing. In its first nine months, the 
Superbowl’s main headache was crowd-control. 
Families, couples, and businessmen lined up or 
called days in advance to book lanes — paying 
about $4 a head to bowl. Others wandered into the 
center's boutiques and fast-food restaurants. 

And this is just the tip of the iceberg, says 
Michael Porter of MBL (Market Behavior Lim- 
ited), a London-based market research firm. He 
believes the S upeibowl is riding a grounds well of 
urban spending on lifestyle and luxuries. “In 
many ways the success of the Superbowl has 
tapped a huge pent-up desire." he says, “It really 
highlights that' they ve been starved for con- 
sumerism." 

Nearly 4,000 people pass through the doors on a 
daily basis, counting attendance for die disco and 
karaoke. Less than a third of these will put on 


bowling shoes and hurl balls down the lanes, but 
this still adds up to about $250,000 to $300,000 a 
month. The rest of the visitors drop a few dollars on 
video games, snooker, soft drinks or ice cream. 

But not everyone is thrilled by this conspicuous 
consumption. The Superbowl’s blend of fun and' 
fancy shops has brought charges of exploitation 
from the local scale-run media. At the press con- 
ference for the mall's opening, Tay was fenced to 
defend himself against charges that he was out to 
cater to the rich and “make Vietnamese poor.” 
Such reports miss the mark, he says. 

T HE government views the new wave of 
consumerism with a certain amount of mis- 
trust. 

• “I think the government is quite frightened by 
it,” Porter said. “Coming out of a very austere 
economy and a centrally planned way of life, the 
masses can become very materialistic, very fast. 

I think they are very worried by iL” 


Such fears are reflected in the government’s 
continuing campaign against “social evils,” 
which encompasses everything from sex, drugs 
and rock ’n’ roll to gambling. And while the stated 
purpose of the campaign is to protect Vietnamese 
culture and morals, a bias against all things for- 
eign sometimes creeps into the rhetoric. 

Meanwhile, the generation gap between 
youths and their war-generation parents con- 
tinues to widen. It is the teens and twenty some- 
things whose tastes and preferences are driving 
much of the current spending boom, a devel- 
opment Porter likens to die growth of American 
consumer society between the Great Depression 
and the 1960s, only much faster. 

“It is similar to Hong Kong where they are 
very brand conscious.” be said. “The Viet- 
namese will follow that path." 

Carey Zesiger is a free-lance writer who lives 
in Vietnam. 


In London, the Casinos of Mayfair Are bn a Roll 


By David Spanier 


L ONDON — In the spirit of swinging 
London, the casinos of Mayfair are on a 
roll. Drinking hours have been extended 
from 11 P.M. to 3 A.M. and, as everyone 
knows, alcohol has a wonderfully loosening ef- 
fect on gamblers’ self-control. Even better for 
visitors to London who fancy a flutter, the two- 
day waiting period for players to join a casino has 
been cut to just 24 hours. 

The changes are the first in an extensive pro- 
cess of government “deregulation" of casinos 
after a long period of strict, and some would say. 
excessive control. Tony Blair's new government 
is committed to liberalization of the regulations. 
Still to come is a move to install slot machines in 
large numbers, bringing London into line with the 
rest of Europe. In the bigger casinos, new elec- 
tronically linked machines will pay out jackpots 
as high as £1 million ($1.6 million), competing 
with the runaway National Lottery. 

THE bkitish snag The British are a nation of 
gamblers. The only snag, as casino owner John 
Aspinall noted years ago. is that the British ar- 
istocracy. who used to set the pace, don ’t have any 
money left 


Today the big players come mainly from the 
Orient with Malaysia, Indonesia and other Pa- 
cific Rim countries predominating, plus a sig- 
nificant component from the traditional region of 
casino cash, the Middle East 

London is the only capital city in the world with 
serious gambling. Its 21 casinos recorded a 
“drop,” or money gambled, of £1.7 billion last 
year, of which the casino take was well over £300 

milli on. 

Pretty nice going for a business whose op- 
eration is based, not on manufacturing or provid- 
ing an essential service, but on supplying green 
baize and plastic chips. 

But like a secret society, the casinos' treasure is 
hidden from public gaze. A visitor might walk day 
and night around Mayfair, where the high rollers 
play, without spotting Les Ambassadeurs on Park 
Lane, Crock ford’s and Aspinaii’s on Curzon 
Street, or the Ritz Club and the Colony around the 
comer. Only their habitues know where they are. 
The reason is that British gaming law prohibits 
casinos from advertising or promoting them- 
selves in any way. This, too, is slated to change 
under deregulation. 

In the popular imagination, colored by tele- 
vision images of nerveless gamblers and slinky 
bimbos, casinos are seen as places of high ex- 
citement. Not necessarily so. Instead of whooping 


it up at the dice table, as in the movie “Casino.” 
no one shouts or even raises a voice in the salons 
of Mayfair. (Bad form, old chap.) The players 
merely murmur. The excitement is all intern- 
alized. 

For what the high rollers want, and what the 
casinos pride themselves on giving, is discretion. 
What's more,. the highest of these high rollers, 
men with millions to win or lose, do not rub 
shoulders with the regular clientele. They play in 
luxurious rooms set apart from the main gaming 
area, with their own gaming tables — roulette, 
blackjack , punto banco (as baccarat is known) — 
and (heir own dining facilities. Some of these 
players will spend 12 or 14 hours at a stretch in 
such private gambling rooms. 

W HAT chance do they have, with the 
odds stacked against them , playing 
hour after hour? Wroog question. Such 
players, who will bet up to £2,000 on a single 
number at roulette as well as bets on all the 
adjoining numbers, or up to £50,000 on a hand at 
blackjack, are not there to win in the vulgar sense 
that ordinary gamblers play. They are there to 
indulge a deeper fantasy, of “deep play," or 
gambling for gambling's sake. 

Such players are usually accompanied by their 
retinue, perhaps 40 strong. Family supporters 


who like to gamble make their own lower-level 
bets but, dutifully, always on the same side as the 
leader. The gambler in chief may pick up a check 
fora couple of million at the end of a lucky night. 
But if he enjoys the experience enough to come 
back, which is every casino's intent, he is unlikely 
to hang on -to his winnings very long. 


Rival Bids 

In the intense competition to attract high 
rollers, London Clubs International, the most 
glittery casino group, has bid for the properties of 
Capital Corporation, its main rival. The outcome 
is now on bold, pending a ruling by the Mono- 
polies and Mergers Commission. If successful, 
London Clubs International would control almost 
the entire high-roller market in London, like a 
private game, and confirm its place as the biggest 
player in Europe. It is stilt possible for another 
bidder to step in. 

In any case, it looks as if the winning streak for 
Mayfair’s casinos will continue. The capital is 
buzzing with visitors ahead of the summer sea- 
son. And swinging London is in the mood to 
celebrate. 


David Spanier is a free-lance journalist based 
in London. 



Nmllac A-vuVIHT 


Return of a Paris Fish Bistro 


By Patricia Wells 

Inltrnaticnai H erald Tribune 

P ARIS — When the burly Gerard 
Allemandou opened his tiny fish 
bistro on the Rue Daguerre in 1 980, 
it was one of the hottest tickets in 
town. Much like the famed Minchelii broth- 
ers of Le Due and the brother-sister team of 
Gilbert and Maguy Le Coze of Le Bemardin, 
Allemandou wowed us with fish and shell- 
fish so sparkling fresh we believed we were 
at ocean's edge, not steps from a Left Bank 
metro. What's more, his dogmatic “do- the - 
least-possible” style of cuisine brought us 
out of the hollandaise-sole rneuniere-friture 
syndrome. Soon, La Cagouille, which re- 
sembled a seedy comer care, had a Michehn 
star and diners fought for each table. 

La Cagouille moved on to modem quar- 
ters in 1988 and for several years held its 
own, still astonishing us with modesty and 
simplicity, as we burned our fingers on the 
chefs moules hrule-doigis , mussels grilled 
directly on the stove top. We devoured 
freshly fried whole anchovies, raved over the 
grilled mackerel with mustard sauce and 
pan-seared scallops bathed in a warm vinai- 
grette. . 

Then the decline began: Service became 
nonexistent, the owner was often absent. 


prices soared and the restaurant's freshness 
seemed to have withered. Even Michelin 
had bad enough and yanked the star. 

Several recent visits suggest that Alle- 
mandou and his staff are back in form, 
serving delicately smoked eel from France's 
southwest, giant fresh gambas from Africa 
and tiny Breton turbot grilled with aplomb. 

Allemandou’s appetite for wine is as se- 
rious as his passion for food, and so you're 
likely to find wines such as the seldom-seen 
white Chignin Bergeron from Raymond 
Quenard in the Savoie, well-priced at 1 00 
francs. Today’s meal prices also are easier 
to digest: The 250-franc menu includes half 
a bottle of wine. 

focus OH THE FOOD On sunny days, a table 
on the terrace overlooking the modem apart- 
ment block designed by Ricardo Bofill is a 
pleasant place to sit The bistro’s sterile interior 
remains as simple and unadorned (and frankly 
unappealing] as ever. Keep your mind on the 
food and you shouldn't be disappointed- 
ly Cagouille. 10112 Place Brancusi. 
Paris 14: id: 01 43 22 09 01: fax: 01 45 38 
57 29. Open daily. Credit card: Visa and 
American Express. Menus at 150 (not in- 
cluding wine i and 250 francs ( including 
wine.) A la carte. 245 to 300 francs, in- 
cluding service but no l wine. 


50TH CANNES FESTIVAL 


Glitter as Usual, but Please Hold the Diamonds 


By Janet Maslin 

iVrH’ York Times Service 

C ANNES, France — Metal detectors at 
screenings and “I Survived the 50th Fes- 
tival" T-shirts are new items here this year. 
And forget the diamonds, darling. The ac- 
cessory of choice is tile speedboat for escaping 
Croisette traffic jams. Thar was how Bruce WiiiLs 
and the rest of the delegation from "The Fifth 
Element" the splashy, kinky-looking sci-fi ad- 
venture that opened the Cannes International Film 
Festival on Wednesday, made an exit from the chilly 
press conference that greeted their film's arrival. 

The extravagant “Fifth Element” unfolds in 
high comic book style, and the crowd doubtless has 
something different in mind. 

“I'll tell you what 1 really wanted to say to 
them,” said one of the seafaring passengers, Gary 
Oldman, who plays a villain with a futuristic Hitler 
hairdo and a Ross Perot accent. Oldman also dir- 
ected his own film, “Nil by Mouth,” which was 
shown in competition on Thursday. 

Question and Answer ” 

Oh, well: Questions at the session were the sort 
for which this event is justly famous. Willis was 
asked when he planned to do Shakespeare (hmm), 
whether he expected the film to be successful 


(guess) and whether he enjoyed kissing his leading 
ladies (oh, came on). 

Gamely, and for lack of better prompting, he 
joked about the differences between doughnuts and 
scones on American and English movie sets. And 
this despite the fact that he had hoped to explain 
how and why his “Fifth Element" character saves 
the world. “Ask us about the film, come on!” he 
urged the crowd. No dice. 

Milia Jovovieh, who spends much of the film in 
a white outfit that has been nicknamed the Band- 
Aid, sat beside Jean Paul Gaultier (whose neo- 
. bondage costumes are among (he film’s garish 
selling points) and managed to describe her role as 
“an inspiration for not just me but every single 
person in rhe world." Jovovieh showed off a silver 
Galliano gown that was not remoiely out of place 
on a white Riviera motorboat. She later showed up 
in the equivafem of another Band-Aid for the gala 
opening night screening. 

Willis kept his considerable cool wiih an audi- 
ence that seemed to forget what a really unfortunate 
Cannes opening (e.g. "City of Lost Children,” the 
grim sci-fi spectacle two years ago) can be like. 

“Look, it’s just a way of getting a little ink on 
what the picture’s really about," he said en route 
back to his hotel. 

But were there dangers in facing ihe huge, car- 
nivorous. restless press contingent that has as- 
sembled in honor of this festival’s birthday cel- 


ebration? ‘ ‘You know what’s a risk?” Willis asked. 
*Tt’s walking across the street in New York City# 
That’s a risk. This is just movies." 

Movies and then some, during this publicity-mad 
anniversary festival: In addition to a contingent of 
the world s great filmmakers, the Spice Girls.and a 
6-foot-lonj* fanged condom (courtesy of “Killer 
Condom,’ the latest brainstorm from happy, bot- 
tom-feeding Troma Entertainment) are among the 
extras expected here soon. And in terms of di- 
versity. viewers here can find anything from a 40- 
minute film. “Ghosts.” starring Michael Jackson 
to dramas about Queen Victoria, Siegfried Sassoon 
and Pnmo Levi. Random, unofficial selections! 
from the marketplace screenings include ■ 
“Gummo" and “American Beer." 

C ANNES S 50th also features a special fire- • 
works display, a concert performance of! 
movie theme music and a perfectly era-; 
blematic new event: the “Golf and Cinema” tour- ; 
nament. This is, according to the festival’s pres- 
ident. Pierre Viot, “an attractive idea because 1 
meetings around the green can be as productive a&v 
m a palace hotel or .at the Palais de$ Festivals." W. 
Anractive and peaceful, since it will be held welK 
out of town. With or without speedboats, Cannes >- 
itself has begun at full throttle, ready to celebrate its [ 
birthday in high, glittering style while it reminds - 
visitors that melee is indeed a French word. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FREDA!’, MAY 9, 1997 


RAGE 11 



THE CAR COLUMN 


GOOD TRAVEL 


AIR CHINA Britain to 

Hong Kong 

A j R i‘ * ; •; - : . ; . ■ - . : 

First- and business-class round-trip fares of £2.022 and £1 299 ($3270 and 
$2,100). Economy teres from £625. New route over northern China cuts 
flight times on weekly Boeing 747-400 flights by 90 minutes. Free regional 
connecting flights with British Midland to London. Air China, tel: (44-171) 
630 7792. 

AIR UK/EVA AIR Britain to Dubai 

Round-trip fare of £224 ($360) from London City Airport to Amsterdam on 
Air UK, connecting with Eva Air to Dubai. Six- to 30-day validity. Travel must 
start by June 13. Traltffnders, tel: (44-171) 938-3939. 

BRITISH AIRWAYS France to United 

States and Canada 

Round-trip “Billet Doux" teres for departures from Paris, Bordeaux, Lyon, 
Marseille, Montpellier, Nice or Toulouse cost 2,750 francs ($470) to New 
York or Chicago; 3,610 francs to Miami and 3,460 francs to Montreal or 
Toronto. Certain conditions apply. 


EL AL 


France to Israel 


Weekend break In Tel Aviv for 3.200 francs (S550) per person for two people 
traveling together includes round-trip flight from Paris, two nights with 
breakfast at the Tei Aviv Sheraton. From May 1 9 to June 1 8. Tickets must be 
paid for by May 18. 



JAPAN AIRLINES 


Europe to Japan 


Mileage Bank members in Europe, Middle East and Africa can earn 50 
percent bonus miles in any dass. Until June 30. 




CHELSEA HOTEL 


London 


“London Event Package" for £85 ($137) per person for a one-night stay in 
double room indudes English breakfast, two-course evening meal and taxi 
to your choice of event in the West End. Until Aug. 31 . 


GARDEN BEACH 
HOTEL 


Juan-les-Plns, 

France 


“Jazz a Juan” package for 3,600 francs ($620) for two people for two nights 
indudes buffet breakfast, entry to Jazz Festival and chili con came In the 
early hours. July 1 5 to July 31 . 


SHANGRI-LA 

HOTELS 


Asia -Pacific 


Added-value deal for guests paying the published rate Includes limo 
transfers to airport, American breakfast, unlimited dry deaning and laundry, • 
free local calls, fax and long-distance calls at cost checkout until 6 P.M. 


SHANGRI-LA 

HOTELS 


Asla-Padfic 


Summer promotion offers up to 40 percent off regular room rates at 35 
Shangri-La and Traders hotels in 11 countries. Until Aug. 31, Sept 30 or Oct 
31 . depending on the property. 


yfymerthundisiKz h x , n . ir ^ 


Till HOTELS f Paris Two-night package for two people at choice of 21 hotels in central Paris for 

1,000 francs ($170) indudes buffet breakfasts; one-day passes to 60 
! museums and monuments; two-day Metro and SNCF passes for travel in 

i Paris and near suburbs. June 22 to Aug. 31 . 

Altftougn tho IHT caralufly checks thus offais. piun t» bxswamM that nrw travol manta may ba irawsre erf item, or unabfa to book them. 


17. 5 iLflJ* j 
nd -hli-icai " 
Vsagj 
illl'issa 



THE FREQUENT TRAVEL! 


Voila! Carry-On Haute Cuisine 


By Roger Collis 

International Herald Tribune 


ETURNING from 
London to Nice on 
the last flight of the 
day with British 
Airways was a painful expe- 


rience in both the physical 
and financial sense. Not only 
was I squeezed into an er- 
gometrically challenged seat 
for slightly more than the cost 
of a round-trip to New York, 
but this was supper time; I 
was hungry and there was 
nothing edible to eaL 

Having suffered this fate 
the week before, I refused the 
derisory collation, grabbed a 
drink, and ostentatiously en- 
joyed the smoked salmon 
sandwiches I’d just bought at 
Heathrow. 

We ail have views on air- 
line food. But it invariably 
fails to match the promise of 
the glossy ads or the eloquent 
menus, expensively printed 
and endorsed by designer 
i. chefs, even in first or business 
*class. I’ve often thought 
about packing a picnic on 
long-haul flights in the back 
of the plane, but never quite 
managed to summon suffi- 
cient chutzpah. 

Why doesn’t some entre- 
preneur institutionalize the 
Idea by marketing executive 
lunch pails in departure 
lounges? 




grilled vegetables^ cheese, 
roasted olives, marinated 
mushrooms, and savory 
salads; southern fried chick- 
en. homestyle cabbage cole 
slaw and sweet com relish; a 
selection of Maki sushi rolls, 
sesame and soy sauces; tea- 
smoked duck salad, minted 
-Asian .vegetable sIrw apfr 
chili-garlic vinaigrette.” 

There are several menus 
that cost from $9 to $25 and 
desserts around $8 JO. 

“These are all items I 


International in Chicago, 
says: “Airline food has along 
way to go. Some airlines — 
especially long-haul. Asia to 
the U.S. or Europe — now 
realize that a lot of travelers 
just want something simple: a 
pot of noodles; snacks, sand- 
wiches. fruit and so on. I think 
it can be much better done,” 


food is served on regional air- 
lines, especially those oper- 


ating s mall sing le-cabin air- 
craft out of London City 


ACutAbovk 


would enjoy on a flight,” 
says Carrie Nahabedian, ex- 


says Carrie Nahabedian, ex- 
ecutive chef at the Four Sea- 
sons in Beverly Hills. 

The night before check- 
out, guests phone in their or- 
der to room service and their 
“meal to go” will be waiting 


for them on departure, along 
with the rest of their luggage. 


with the rest of their luggage. 
The Four Seasons’ initiative 
has given at least one other 
hotel chaio food for thought. 

Frank AnseL vice president 
food and beverage for Hyatt 


Victor Grove, the customer 
service manager for Privat- 
Air, a charter airline, which 
prides itself as being “the 
world’s most discreet and ex- 
clusive operator, 1 " in Geneva, 
says: ‘ ‘One of our regular cli- 
ents, a European business ty- 
coon, usually just wants a 
cheese board and a bottle of 
red wine. We also go out of 
out way for unusual meals. If 
an Arab prince asks for a 
whole nce-stuffed lamb, 
we’ll certainly serve it to him 
and his guests.” 

Some of the best inflight 


craft out of London City 
Airport to destinations in 
maml and Europe. 

AirJet. which flies the B Ae 
146 "whisper jet” to Paris, 
regales “nigh-yield” busi- 
ness travelers with chilled 
soup of shellfish and spring 
vegetables with a dash of cutis 
vert, and foie gras de canard 
en gelee. VLM, with services 
to Antwerp and Rotterdam; 
serves sandwich fillings such 
as salmon and chicken curry. 
And Crossair, which flies to 
67 cities in Europe, is 
renowned for its inflight 
cuisine. 

Moritz Suter. Crossair’s 
president, is very much be- 
hind the sandwich philo- 
sophy. We are thinking of re- 
placing hot and cold meals 
with a selection of sand- 
wiches. 

Which is roughly where we 
came in. 



m 


mm 


■ -Wr 

yl* 


-monds 


NEW options No sooner 
had I thought of this than I am 
overtaken by events. For here 
comes Four Seasons Hotels '& 
Resorts with . "Gourmet 
Meals To Go” for departing ! 
guests "to replace the limited j 
options of airline dining." 

The program was initiated ! 
in November 1996 at tbe Four 1 
Seasons Los Angeles ^ in 
Beverly Hills in response to 
“repeated requests : from 
guests wanting to take pop^ 
ulari terns along .with them.” 
The service is now available 
at Four Seasons properties in 
Bali, Dallas, Houston. New 


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The Beverly Hills menus 
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garlic-basil aioli; antipasto of - 
Italian cured smoked meats, , 



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7m 


A Creative Urge: The Boxster 


By Gavin Green 


M OST one-hit wonders don’t 
last- long. But Porsche, 
which had its first (and 
only) hit as a carmaker back 
in 1964, is not only still here, but prosper- 
ing. And it’s all due to the 911. which is 


33 years old and still going strong. 
On numerous occasions, the Ger 


On numerous occasions, the German 
company has tried to replace it, fearing 
its time had finally come. But each time 
— most notably when it launched the 
92S in 1978 — buyers have spurned the 
newcomer, preferring the more char- 
acterful if less conventional charms of 
die old-timer. 

The new Boxster is an obvious fol- 
low-up to the 911. It comes at a time 
when sales of affordable convertible 
sports cars are booming. The marvelous 
Mazda Miata, known as the MX-5 in 
Europe, proved the market existed. Now 
the German sporty big three (BMW, 
Mercedes and Porsche) are all in there, 
exchanging punches. Even the British 
maker MG. which virtually invented toe 
affordable roadster market, is back. 




The Old and tnb New 


The Boxster carries over many 911 
styling cues — its buglike roundness, its 
curvaceous fenders and its lowness. But 
mechanically it's all new. The engine may 
be a flat-six, but this motor is diffe r e n t. 
It's smaller and less powerful than toe 
91 l’s engine, true to the Boxster’s lower 
price and more mass-market aspirations. 
In keeping with its clean-sheet approach, 
toe engine is sited in the middle or the car 

— between toe cabin and toe rear wheels 

— rather than out the back, keeping the 
rear bumper company. A mid-engine con- 
figuration is much better for handling. 

It is a fabulous car to drive, the Box- 
ster, the best in toe class. It’s brisker and 
sharper than the rival Mercedes SLK, 


merrier and faster than toe BMW 23. 
The engine has thai same marvelous 
bellow that characterizes the 91 1 : Hit the 
accelerator pedal and the motor trumpets 
like a bull elephant. The handling Is 
almost hyperactively sensitive — toe car 
wends its way down winding roads like a 
snake speeding through long grass — 
and the fabulous brakes and steering just 
add to the dynamic ensemble. The drop- 
down roof, fully electric apart from 
some manual work lo tether it to toe 
windshield, just adds to toe thrills and to 
the raw sensations that are part of the 
character of toe best sports cars. 


T HE cabin design is the biggest 
disappointment. The plastics are 
not of especially good quality and 
the switches are sited across the dash 
with all the ergonomic planning of shot 
fired from a blunderbuss. As with the 
911, you buy a Boxster for the way the 


outside looks and for toe way it drives, 
not for any particular enjoyment to be 
had from toe cabin ambience. 

Porsche's recent creative rush, inci- 
dentally. isn’t over yet. The one-hit won- 
ders from Stuttgart are set to revamp the 
911 at toe end of toe year, further up- 
grading toe old-timer. After all, if toe 
unexpected happens and toe market 
turns against toe new Boxster, then at 
least there’s toe 91 1 to fall back on. 

• Porsche Boxster. About S50,000. 
Flat-six engine, 2,480cc, 204 BHP ax 
6,000 rpm. Five-speed manual gearbox, 
five-speed automatic "Tiptronic” trans- 
mission optionaL Top speed: 240 kph 
(149 mph). Acceleration: 0-100 kph in 
6.9 seconds. Average fuel consumption: 
10.2 liters/100 km. 

Next: The Audi A6 


Gavin Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine. 


ARTS GUIDE 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Musee d’Art An den, tel: (2) 508- 
3211, dosed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/ To July 27: “Paul Delvaux, 
1097-1994." 


and Concept (Duchamp, Warhol, 
Beuys); Spirituality and Abstrac- 
tion (Kandinsky, Mondrian, 
Fontana} and Dream and Myth 
(Dali, Balthus, Twombly). 


Baroness Carmen Thyssen- 
Bomemteza. 


UNITED STATES 


BRITA 


London 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (171 ) 
494-5615, open dally. Continu- 
ing/ To June 8: “The Berlin of 
George Grosz: Drawings, Water- 
colours and Prints, 1912-1930/' 


PRANCE 


Bonn 

Kurwt- und Aussteltungshalle 
der Bundesrepubllk Deutsch- 
land, tel: (228) 9171-200, closed 
Mondays. To Aug. 24: “German 
Photography: The Impact of a Me- 
dium, 1870-1970.“ The history of 
German photography documented 
with 300 pictures by 150 photo- 
graphers horn the fields of archi- 
tecture, art, photojournalism, fash- 
ion, design and advertising. 


New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, let 
(212) 570-3791, dosed Mondays. 
To July 13: “Prints In the Age of 
Albrecht Du rerand Lucas van Ley- 
den." More than 150 engravings, 
etchings, woodcuts and illustrated 
books by Renaissance masters Al- 
brecht Durer, Lucas van Leyden 
and their contemporaries. 


CLOSING SOON 


Paris 

Grand Palais, tel: 01-44-13-17- 
17, dosed Tuesdays. Continuing/ 
To July T4: “Paris/Bruxelles — 
Bruxelles/Paris." 


ITALY 


Versailles 

Musee National du Chateau, tel: 
01-30-84-74-00, dosed Mondays. 
To July 13: “Versailles: Trols 
Siedes de Pastel." Portraits In 
pastel from the 17th, 18th and 19th 
centuries. Including works by La 
Tour and Elisabeth Vlgee-Lebrun. 




Venice 

Peggy Guggenheim Collection, 
tel. (41) 520-6288, closed Tues- 
days. To May 18: “George Grosz: 
The Berlin Years." Paintings, 
works on paper pamphlets, books 
and photographs focus on the Ger- 
man sadrist’s ait and political act- 
ivism during his early years In Ber- 
Dn before hefted Nazi Germany for 
America in 1933. 

Palazzo Grass], tel: (41) 522- 
1375, open dally. Continuing/ To 1 
July 13: “Arte del *900: La Pfttura > 
Fiamminga e Olandese." , 


May 11 : “Tiepolo und Die Zelchen- 
kunst Venedigs im 18. 
Jahrundert" Wallraf-RIchartz 
Museum, Cologne. 

May 11: Tetsugoro Yorozu." Na- 


tional Museum of Modem Art, 
Tokyo. 

May 11 : “Exiles and Emigres: The 
Right of European Artists from 
Hitler." County Museum of Art, 
Los Angeles. 

May 11: “Encounters with Modem 
Art Works from the Rothschild 
Family Collections." Philadelphia 
Museum of Art, Philadelphia. 
May 11: "The Victorians: British 
Painting in the Reign of Queen Vic- 
toria. 1837-1901.” National Gal- 
lery of Art, Washington. 

May 11: “Adolph Menzel, ISIS- 
1905: Das Labyrinth der Wlrkficb- 
kett." Alte National galerte, Berlin. 
May 11 : “Georges de La Tour and 
His World." Kimbetl Art Museum, 
Fort Worth, Texas. 

May 11: “Violeta Parra: Hom- 
maga." Musee des Arts Decor- 
atlfs, Paris. 





m 


cofftcr 

j’ , -i // cT 

Lew Lfuatroncmt* 


Berlin 

Martm-Gropiua-Bau, let (30) 
324-50-78, open daily. To July 27: 
"The Age of Modernism: Art in the 
20th Century." Features 350 works 
by more than 100 artists that rep- 
resent four facets of modernism: 
Reality and Distortion (Picasso. 
Matisse, Beckmann, Giacometti, 
Bacon and Baselitz); Language 


SPAIN 


Bilbao 

Museo de Bellas Artes, tel: (94) 
424-27-99. dosed Mondays. To i 
June 30: “Del Vedutismo a las j 
Primeras Avanguardias.” A selec- 
tion of 40 paintings and 4 Rodin 1 
sculptures from the collection of 


ENDEZ-VOUS WITH A VINTNER 

Cooking demonstration and wine tasting 
C roz.es -Hermitage, Jaboulet-Aine 
Tuesday, May 20: 7:00-10:00 p.m. 

For reservations, telephone : 01 43 16.50 50 


THE INTERMARKET 2 




i — — — 





HOLIDAYS 


HoMays and Travel 


Caribbean 


TRAVEL FOR KNOWLEDGE 


SAFARKB0RE MTSMATIONAL USA 
Pareto. natore, adventure tours & sites 
n Afro, Latin America, Asia, indochra. 
Website : htjp^wnvjafarteentrerom 
Tot 310-54*4411 Far 3KW464188 
E-mail rtoe8atetoantJB.com. 


ST. BARTWELEBY, F.WJ_ OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS ■ beach- 
from to Itteide wtt pods. Our agate 
tew inspected aS vfflas personalty. For 
reservations on Sl Bats, SL Matin. An- 

a Sartadoi Msfcu, the Vtopn Is- 
... CaB W1MCWSBARTH • U.S. 
(401 1849-801 2/fax 847-6290. from 
FRANCE 05 90 16 20 • ENGLAND 0 
-80088-8318 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East of BeirnL 
5 star deluxe. Exceptional beaten, secu- 
rity, comfort fine amine, convertors, 
business services, wtei&fe TV. 18 min 


JAOBEL, HATH - Etoaodnay. More 
tause by see hi hrrefy uanquB town. 
Lcng/short term, inexpensive). TM/fau 
*33 (0)143458996 or Tel *1 2129791240 


French Provinces 


transfer bom eiraott Ires. UTELL Fax: 
(+1) 2184781391/ (*33) (0)147200007 


Holiday Rentals Wanted 


FRENCH PROVENCE. CLASSICAL 
MANOR with sinning pool, rear med- 
eval vSaoe rath el tews. B baboons. 
5 baths. Meld and gairiener infcdsd. 


9 ★ MtlSIC ★ ' 

ART * HISTORY ★ TRAVEL 

Perform in and Explore Historic Cities of Central Europe 
July 14 to Aug. 16 
$2£4D facilities, meals, classes. 

Instruments, singers, composers, conductors. Early Music. 
Jazz, Art History students, and travelers of all ages. 
International faculty of performer-teachers. 

Special air package from U.S. to Vienna 
Summer Arts Sessions International - 
800-585-7487 954-723-0026 

9360 NW I Bdi Drive. Fort Lauderdale FL 33322 
k Svoradova 13, 81 1,03 Bnrisfava, Slovak Republic J 

tubam fb@aoi.com www.gsni.cofn/JuYTrtuslc mSB 


MARTINIQUE WEST HOES 34 Weeks 
Jitiy - August Lame house, mtatnum e 
bedrooms + staff. Fax U.K. 44 (0) 156 
678 3568 


Mhmum 15 Says rental July-August 
FF15.0MMI Juns-SspL: FFlSflfflWt 
Tet +32.7187.7027 or +32.7544.7085. 


Housing Exchange 


PROVENCE I AVIGNON - Ctomrinn 
Provida! Via. psaceW, orchartfs, pool 
15 ntin Avignon, tram, airport. FuBy 
eqjpped, sleeps 15. dirty 1-81 (Awyon 
FoSSn. F35,00fl/nto. net Tel: +33 
t0)1 44508017 day • (0)1 45518490 eras 


LA GARDE FRE1NET-GRMAUD. Pro- 
vencal Vila, 4 bedrooms ensmts baths 
and pnvSB terraces, salon, drting raonL 
terery-TV, fully equipped kitchen. Large 
overflow pool in 13,000 sq.m, gardoi, 
beautiful vfn. qiiet and mchstve set- 
ting, 12 tan from «e ■ SL Traps. Mati 
Semite, 15th of Jura uti 3ia of August 
FF23JW0 per week. Tel: owner Gamany 
004948-745449. 


TUSCAN FARMHOUSES betfrow 
baths, Gorgeous Rental Siparb 
CsEFae 13031 975-1316 USA. 


Paris & Suburbs 


JULY 20tti TO AUG. 10th. 

Swap ParisNwr EinglanUJSA. 
in Itisawc Parts, tes&ly tatisted 
mxJem aarinenL Stfi far wd* 
qf Canal St Matin, fence- 
garden, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 

5 seats car end garage. 

Look to swap to 3W hectare house 
or apanment & tat. 

Tei +33(0)140407422 Fir (0)153199068 


PROVENCE I COTES DU RHONE - 
Spaoous modepzad farrtxua. 5 beds, 
i bate. Fabulous v®as. Tet wra 
433(0)475883177. 444 (0)1712624®. 


NICE-LUXURY CONDO, FURNISHED 
110 sqjn, 2 bettors. 2 bafts. 2 ter- 
races, Mediterranean vr**, sow to 
bead). Aval able after Jdy 1. Dr. Susset 
Fat 1-401-331-7429 Tflt MOMBl-lOS 


CHATEAU - FOR SUMS) RENTALS. 
June - October. Can steep 12 & more, 
beautiful funustings, modem laches, 
staff avabbte, 60 acres park, near air- 
port. tennis, conveniently situated 25 
rotes NW Park Wi tie to; Mms team 
1 Oral VotaG. 75007 Paris, Frsn>. 


ISft, IMPLEX WITH TERRACE, 4 bed- 
rooms, 2 trite, exciting uHe*. From 
1 or 15 Uy to 1 September or abater. 
Hofiand M +31 70 3$ 28 28 


French Riviera 


LA CRODC-VAUER . 15 tan tom San 
Tropez, visa on beach, aB comforts, 
8 roans. 12 baft, hue Garden terns 


Holiday Rentals 


Austria 


FF15. 000 neefc Prtra» 

+33(0)4 90629925 Fat 0 4 90650356 


SARDINIA - CAPO CODA CAVALL0 
Beatiil 600 sqm via, 75>bn sot* d 
Porto Ceno (Costa fforalda), 50 ton 
south ol Poro Rotondo. modem dwan. 
My fumteftfld, on eandy teach. 9 tow 
bedrooms, B bathrooms, erasable May, 
June, Jiriy, September. Teh *39 335 
473405. ft* +33 2 90571117 atm Mar- 


MONTPARNASSE, My - August, Sraom 
teUrtyeotipped, steeps 1 FFB000Ano 
* deposl Tat +33(0)1 43 22 05 £& 


^ •soBBtaifmcp — 
Spedal heating for Hofcfey ratals 

isatw 

For mere detds twtec 


VIENNA SUBLET JULY A AUGUST, 
Large beaubhri 34«trMm apftrtnwrt, 
r Rutfcer House. USS2jM0 per mortfi 
TEL USA: 908-3500716. 


JunAhMAiguat 3 mr beech, 10 n*» 
Uonaco/Nfcs, buft by raydty. mortitain 
MteviflwB. pMMfoL GantefL 
pooL 6 toxuy sales. Vs/t Teh +SS{0H 
MW 78 08, wwr +44(0171} 4837484 


P0RT0RN0, exclusive villa, iBixpra 
view, privets access seaside, 6 bed- 
rooms. 5 beftrooms. Mortify rat Phone 
39 2 783542. Far 39 2 782095 office 
how. 


•naHATnRAnsSriwjffi 

IM mw Ctariee da GhjIb 

Tel: (DJI 41 4383S te4f 43 83 70 




















Il 


TTST5 




•*i» 


The Crescent H Ranch 


JACKSON HOLE, WY 

Consisting of approximately 1 £00 acres, I ocatcd in world 
renowned Jackson Hole, Wfyomin^. Featuring 1 mile of Snake River 
frontage and 7 miles of blue ribbon spring creeks for unparalleled 
trout fishing. The ranch has 15 miles of common boundary with the 
Bridger-Teton National Forest. The guest ranch centers around a his- 
toric remodeled 1920s lodge and 10 guest cabins. Portions of the 
ranch are suitable for development and sale as top end homesltes. 

The ranch is offered by the Chapter 11 Trustee of fOvermeadowe Associates, ltd. Case 
#95-20322- U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Vfyoming. The Bankruptcy Court's 
final hearing for approval of the sale is scheduled for June 11. 12. & 13. 1997 at which time 
a Court-supervised auction will be conducted. The trustee entered Into a contract with 
Countryside LLC to purchase the property which was authorized by the Bankruptcy Court. 
Under the Courts order approving the Countryside contract, the Court established proce- 
dures for a Court supervised auction. These Include a minimum bid of $34.450000 in 
ps s <1 for the Ranch property, and Countryside has the first right of refusal to match any 
bid. Each bidder must pre-qualHy to bid at the sale hearing & have on deposit with the 
trustee an earnest money deposit of $5.000.000 bv June 6. 1997. and must execute & 
deliver a contract identical with the Countryside contract, except the price may be left 
blank. Bv June 6.1997. each bidder must satisfy the Trustee that such bidder has the 
funds available to close the transaction Immediately after the sale hearing concludes and 
closing cannot be subjec t to a financing conting enc y . Each bidder must complete due dffi- 
nence prior to the sale hearing, and the sale cannot b e conditioned on obtaining any regu- 
latory or planning approvals. No bidder wlU receive any reimbursement for costs and 
expenses under Bankruptcy Code section 503 or otherwise. 

Contact: Bland Hoke at Jackson Hole Realty 

300 443-9453 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Manhattan-5th Ave-Trump Tower 


BREATHTAKING 

High Floor Gracious Living, Triple Exposure Central Park. 
Sih Ave &. City skyline views. Oversized living room, 
formal dining room (convertible to third bedroom) 2 bedrooms. 
2.5 marble baths offered at $4 f 425,000 (unfurnished).' 


Cad: George Bookis 1-914-395-0170 (USA) 
Licensed N.Y. Real Estate Broker 


new GOLF 27h 

1W. FRANCE 

Potential 

for holiday resort 

T+ Fax: 433 (0) 555 023252 


Caribbean 


Cayman Islands 


French Provinces 


SAINT MAARTEN, Netherlands Antfles. 
Waterfront Ham an Oysterpanl 4 bat 
4 b£h. pool boat dock rift 2 m, depth. 
3000+ sq m. land, direct ocean access: 
USS6»m fa I561J 272-5101 USA 


DREAM HOUSE 3300 SQ.FL, n the 
mat famous hgh luxury condmirtoni of 
etond. bead) located, op amertaes - lo- 
cation - semcas. Office-use aHowed 
USS 1.3991m. - other urate si sold at 
USS I 7*m». Owners finanong available. 


M ush accepted. 24 hr. Iff 
(417389/Fax: 009713628004. 


DINING OUT 


BOURGOGNE - ESTATE • 90 MINS 
Iran PARIS. 2 ha. park rift river. 16 th 
century square twwr. 18ft century deal- 
ing. Superb vww.650 apt Mng space: 
3 fvng rooms, 2 kitchens, pantries. 6 
bedrooms (1 of 80 sqm) writ their own 
bathrooms. Fireplaces. Guest house, 
caretaker's house. 3 garages. Rare afetr. 
Industw negerfiabb price: FF 3J00.000. 
Tel 433 (01386412514. Fax (0)386410216 


SURROUNDED BY MOUNTAINS. 5 
miles Iran FOX France, owner sgfts typ- 


ical furnished house, 110 sqm * 500 
sam Barden. Lam arttoue tirateas + 



PAtOS7ih 


p Am 4th 


BREAD, WINE, CHEESE 

Geese **b r. radari.fcnd* 

3, n* G«*tw rAngevm (4*1 
TeLOl 4274 07 52 lam) day. daw only) 


PASS 6th 


LE BI1BOQUET 

A jazz wnple boob PW 
wt»di Vw tw greawr pranm 


SpaocAtw d he SautvVfetf Canft it amend 
& caiMulel au conht dr canard Air 
conditioned Open every day. 79 rue 
Si-Dofniniqirt Tel.. 01.A7W4Q75 Near 

hntdn Iffimaid. 


PASS 17th 


AI GOtDENBERG 


A jazz wnple linoa 1P47 
v«t»dilio* tie graorw pctwi 
AI t* heart oi ScmlGennaiHjBiPrtj 
brctnMrcradrM. 

Gaflroncmcd menu ala "Mscnafate pnee 
13. rue Saintflawi T. 01 45 Jfi 81 84 


Mtth hrings - Fariami ■ Cream cheetn bagel 
and kaharanade- Che«» a&e&d tm tod 
Jewish »ec O^Av de Wognm. 

Tel 01 4227 3*7® Every day up to midnight. 


0 yugaraj 

Hailed as the best Indian restaurant 
in France by the leading guides 
(air conditionned). 

14, rue Dauphine. T: 01 43 26 44 91 


KERVANSARAY 


TiriahS W1^add6m.fab*rbn. 
bet) aabod nekurani, I d Rear. MaWenfr 9 
Tol 5I28B43 Ajcnrefcanod 80m. Opera 
Noon-3 p m. 4. 5 p ir.-1a.rn., except Sunday 
Open hoklayL 


sqm garden Lam antique fireplaces + 
antique over, modem comfort. Contact 
Portal. La Mas RtB de la Boteskera, 
34380 Argefere. TaL ( Fax France +33 
(0)4 67 55 68 78 


TOURS (LOI RE VALIEV). Classic es- 
tate. iBth century house, large garden. 
Preshgjous location n old Touts. 6 acres 
- 62 ca. Price FF 25M negotiable. Tat 
France +33 (0)2 47 20 46 40, (0)1 
43354562, New York 212 243 9157 


BRETAGNE PRETTY, renovated 15th 
century water mfl and manor house. 
Ckse to tala. 26 ha. it forest 200 sqm 
qrattmera. Close to mam road. TGV. (er- 
nes. ahporL FF3SM.Tet +33 (0)2 88 78 
72 61 Fax (0)2 86 67 19 81 


HENERBBS LlfBERON 
Unique bcalm Historical ste, 160 sqm 
Swig space. Landscaped garden. Pool. 
For detata fax oww +33(0)442263214. 


DEAUVILLE BeauWuL Normandy Style 
house, near center 6 beach, calm area. 
Garden, all comforts, 5 bedrooms. 2 
lovely fireplacBS. large terrace, garage. 
FF4.3M. Tet Pam +33 (0)1 4722 7898. 


PROVENCE / COTES DU RHONE - 
Huge spacious modernized farmhouse. 
ALL modem commences. 5 bedrooms, 
4 baftrooms. Stunning mews. By owner 
Tab Lmttai +44 (0)171 262 4039. 


PROVENCE - HAS - Neat renovation. 
Vaulted rooms. Multan windows, vrefl. 
112 acre tex woed Tel *33(0)475714117 


RECRUITMENT 


2 raid 3 bedrooms a pre-cost prices 
Mid $200 jJOO's to Mid SmOOTs. 

Breath taking Views 
ForhrihrrtyomailoK 
Cafl:SftmW474 Far.- 904^24-0734 


PAR K 

•^^■innwiw 


AGENCE 


French Riviera 


AGENCE tlAimO ' 

76 Avenue Deris Serrate 
06230 SANT JEAN CAP FHWAT 
Tet +33 (DM 93 70 52 00 
Fat +33 (QM S3 76 52 01 


SAINT JEAN CAP FERRAT 

' VELA: abas 145 sqm 
an 2 buffs. Possasty 2 separate 
apartments. Panoramic view on 
VMehmtS&sur-Mer Btay. 


' 5-raom APART1EHT: in restdance win 
sumring pod. 145 sqm 
taring space plus map-aroutd 
Oatennes. Panoramic view on 
ssa and mounters. Garage. 


1 VELA: about 780 sqm, "ptedS 
dans reaf. garden Panataric 
view. Private moonn g tar boat 


* Exceptional VELA: atari 400 sqm. 
+ caretaker's house. Panorarnc vte*. 
BL500 sqm Sat land 


BEAUUEU SUR HER 

■ Rustic HOUSE to be renovated, 
110 sqm. In the rrwkle ol ofive 
trees. Budding permt lor 240 sqm 
fiwig space. About 1.100 sqm lend. 
Panorarie view. 


CANNES 

GAUFORNE 

Townhouse, 6 bedrooms. 6 bathrooms. 

2 living rooms, 1 dmmg room, terrace, 
summing pool View on see, ah 
candftnng. garage, maids room 
5 mins ftirt Canto Urgent 
hanbert Teh +33 (0)6 09 54 11 7E 
Fat +33 (0)4 S3 GB M 89. 


BETWEEN NICE AND CANNES 

Private domain, luxurious, new via. 
150 sqm + outbuildings. Sea view, 
south-west exposure. Garden. Swirraimg 
pool. Reduced lees. Direct owner: 
FF55M. Fate +33 (0)4 92 13 18 32. 


HEART OF CAP FBI RAT 
200 sqm aichitecfs via, FF5.8M 
Chaimmg 5 bedrooms vie. FF6.au 
Magnncant saa view vie, FFBM 
Sea-front yfeftivate beach, FriOM 
HAUSSKANT Group 
Tel: +33 (0) 4 92 00 49 49 
FU +33 >0 4 93 m 40 n 


BEAUTffVL SMBECT VILLA, orr IfatJMBQ 
sqm. tend, calm countryside-. 20 rw to 
airports, Nice. Games. Grasse. Great 
view, pool FF6U. Tet +377 93 30 02. 
70. 


IENT0N: In hlsloncal part at town, 
channng renovated house. 95sq.m.. 2 
betk o oms. 2 bafts, see vow. central y® 
quiet, near beaches. FF1M. Tel +33 
(0)143228543, rtnagard®xnagineLfr 


CAP FERRAT Waterfront • Cetabnty 
sells or rents hateaway. Beach/jetty. 
Sleeps 8. JriteSejt 2*4 weeks. McCrea 
Tel +377 93505831. Fax +377 33507197 


COTE D'AZUR - ynafrvicto jut Mar. 
Magnificent 3 rooms, terrace, sunny, 
view bay St Jean Cap Ferret, refined 
decoration Tet +33(0)4 93 80 60 10 


Greece 


ATHENS new HILTON, quiet open 
view. TWEE ROOM PENTHOUSE ptos 
tatchen. 70 sqm ptua terrace & baleary 


(25 sqm.). Air condtioned. SFrflO, 
Please Heptane +301 779 2289 


AMALFI COAST, 40 sq-m- house, 
ureque view, private access to beech. 
500 sqm. lemon grow. 4000 sqm Med- 
iterranean brushwood, own spnng 
S 200 . 000 . TeWax 39 E 6861206 


VENICE - CANAREGIO APARTMENT 
280 sqm. tascos TIB’OLO 1000 sqm. 
garden. USS2 mfifion. Fax 3941-719975 


London 


LONDON - Belgravia. Superb house. 
350 sqm- urtumfehad. tor sale or rem. fi 
bedrooms, 5 bafts, 3 reception rooms. 
Serous inquiries only. Fax Athens 
+301.008677] - Tet 8016765 or mot* 
+3033267546. 


Vou will find below a selection of employment offers published in last Mondays Internationa] Herald Tribune 
For a copy of last Monday's paper, please contact Kimberly Guerrand-Betrancourt on Paris (O) I 41 43 94 76 


. COMPANY ... 

- corner 

Karachi International 

Mr. Graham Thomas 

Container 

Nicholson International 

Terminal Ltd 

Search & Selection Consultants 


P.O.Box 29458 


Dubai UAE. 


Counb-v Manager - Italy 


Thermo Ecotek 


Thermo Ecotek 

Human Resources - Dept FTH 5/5 
245 Winter Street 
Waltham, MA 02154 - LSA 


Intellectual Property - Switzerland 
Head of Department -Spain 
Employment/ HR Counsel - Germany 
European General Counsel - 
Munich, Paris or Amsterdam 
European Counsel - 
International Patent Attorney - UJL 



Laurence Simons 
International Legal Recruitment 
Craven House 


.121 Kingsway 
London WC2B 6 PA - I K 


Orcnlation Sales Director International Herald Tribune 

Switzerland 


International Herald Tribune 
Didier Brun, Circulation Director 
181, av. Charles-de-Gaulle 
92521 NeuiUy Cedes - France 


LePHkPMicc 

25 srenn do ta Cooti 

UC 98000 Honta Cato 

Td (3771 93 25 16 00 ' 

FR m ” a » 33 


MONTE CARLO, 

388 aqm, 3 bedrooms. 31 h bffiw. 
mo W b artmnee, tansy, 3 indoor parking 
spaces, 3 ceBare, tea tenaces. 
(etuous view of medtananean and 
Monaco. Has not been Bvedmance 
USS12M renovaton. For sata by owner. 
Tet +33 (0)6 OB 37 03 04. 


Morocco 


TANGIER . Attractive Vfla, me floor, 
featured m House 6 Garden October 
1993 Fumshad wth anSques, nneq.et 
Two logs receptions. 2 beds, bathroom, 
kitchen, servants' quarters, preay pata 
garden. flSOflQQ. Tet 2123 934 9» 


Paris and Suburbs 


7m, ECOLE MttJTAlRE, 80 sqm. 5th 
Boor rift van of fnvefcfes Dono. entry, 
taring, tfrxnq 2 bedrooms, award+maig 
hfly Btppped dostgrer ktehen, American 
baft, fift approved, parquel 3 fireplaces, 
matings, smel terrace, mad’s room. ceL 
lare, calm and siimy, shopping and 
transport m immediate area. Photos 
avabbte FF 2.450AX) or USS 450000. 
Owner Tet -33(0)1 47 05 32 30 


VERSAILLES AREA 

LA CELLE ST CLOUD. 300 rram house 
teeing south. Tread 850 sqm. garden. 
FF3£M. Tef 8 Fax +33 (011 33 <940 5Z 


HE DE SAINT LOUIS - 2/3 ROOMS. 
58 sqm. channng 4ft floor apartment 
Lgte. spacious, wefl disposed. Eastern 
condition. FFl .950.000. Tel: +33 
10)1 4295 3786 or Ftoc (0)1 4HJ3 3891 


7th, UNNERSITE, SAINT GERMAIN, 
Z75 sq.m, trpte recepnon. 3 bedrooms. 
2 bafts, maid’s shaft. Pairing. Rdned 
decoration. Tet -33 (0)1 45 04 20 48. 


78 • FBJCHEROLLES - 15 rmns Pans 
La Offense. 17th century house. Lstel 
By owner USS700 000. Tel: USA +1 
407-676-8480. Far -1 407-8764431. 


14 KMS FONTAINEBLEAU, rare 7 bed- 
room house on park. FF2.BM. Tet +33 
(0)8)9854821 Tetto +32 2-73Z7065 


40 KM PARE (M2). 70 yar old house. 
200 sqm, 1 hr tarpons. FF9HL0M. Cal 
♦33 t0)2 5472 0635 Of (0)1 3090 1997. 


4th - 3 WHS POMPIDOU MUSEUM. 
95 sq.m.. 2nd Door, bright, work to be 
done. FFl.750.00a +33 (0)1 42840665. 


GENERAL 


Personals 


MAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be adored, glorified, loved and preserved 
throughout the world, now ana forever. 
Sxisti Heart at Jesus, pray fcr us. Ssjrt 
Jude, worker of mi redes, pray tor us. 
Saint Jude, hatter oi the hopeless, pray 
tor us. Amen. Say tfxs prayer nine tones 
a day. by the ninth day. yrar prayer wi 
be answered. It has never been known 
to tei PiMcaftn must be promised. UK 


THANK YOU SACRED HEART ol Jesus 
and Saint Jude for prayers answered. 
AJ4 


Announcements 


BAREHE AS 24 

AU 09 MA1 1997 
Prtx Hors TVA err devise locale 
(traduction tfisportale sur demands) 
Ftotatece tos tnrames antednra 


FRANK lame C) en FFri - TVA 2a6% 
GO: 172 FOD*: 2^4 

SC97. 5,40 SCSP: 521 


UK m 4 -TVA 17 JIL (fad Drib] 

GO. 05229 FOT- 03476 


ALLEMAGHE (zone 0 DM/I ■ TVA 15% 
ZOKI-G: 


GO: 1,06 

ZONEK-I: 

GO: 1,03 

ZONEtt-F: 

GO: 140 
ZONE IV- F: 

SCSP: 1.40 
ZONE IV- G: 
GO-. 1.04 


SCSP: 1.41 


SCSP: 1,41 


FOO. 0JS1 


BELGIQUE en FBI -TVA 21% 

GO. 22.07 FOD: 10.48 
SOT 3322 SCSP: 3124 


HOLLANDE (znte2) NLGfl - TVA 17,1ft 
GO: 1240 FOD: 0,795 
SOT: 1.7B7 SCSP: 1,745 


LUXEMBOURG en LUH -TVA 15% 
GO 22J0 


ESPAGNE (zone A) en FTASHVA 16% 
GO. 8197 

SOT: 10135 SCSP 1 102.41 


OUR NEXT SPECIAL 

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IN & AROUND PARIS 


(Sates and Renata) 
nrii be appeamg on 
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For more details (tease amt 


MTBfflATONALffiRALDTflfflUK 
PARIS Tet +33 (0)1 41 43 93 85 
or Fax: +33 (0)1 41 43 93 70 

tmat ctewBedMffiuom 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DERGI FRANCE 
WEEKEND: FFS00. 7 DAYS: FFISOfl. 
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PARIS 1M. rare ww ri Ba ad 2S 
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elevator, east west axpoara, Ewnny, 
rain, near 2 metres. FFI.ZFOJRE. 7£ t 
rtoc 33 (OP 44 62 28 03 

LATIN QUARTER, 105 sqra^ radon, 
rare, double exposer, tetoy. 
effm. living total, 2 fcadrocn 2 bafts. 
am T a t 33 ( 0)1 41 13 73 79 

PARS 6th - Charming 2 tetaers. tag 
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87 52 91 


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mat snsraritg'XJgcaictat- 


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SPAM: spacious SOUTHERN villa USA Commercial & Industrial 


Unique teeter: rift SB) degree raw d 
the Medtorran e a n See. rxuPtans ad 
dams at the top cl a while esastai 
nfiiaoe at the t ep ria m aimtain. Psc:. 
garden, some fureshmjs. 


Owned by same tsnaJy tor 2E years. 
Extensive renovators 1533. Can use 
some wort and raw is the Sroe snfi 
dote; strong Our tote to leave. Ycur 
opportunity. S1291C30. Ffexile ~ type 
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penort Phone: (B19) 4827703 UW 
Fas (919) 482-7801 USA 
PA Bn 968, Edanton, NC 27932 USA 


Switzerland 


ILAKEGBBA&ALPS 


b Enforced 
since 1975 


Afttative propa tes, cwtatag views 
t to 5 bedrocna. Iron 3f 200.C-G0. 


1 to 5 bedroom taro Sr 200.C-G0. 
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52. UuntbrStat CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
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LAKE L UGANO - Exdusve rasdssa 
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country etyta, supers wft 
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necessary rapte! stesftxe. 
please write ro aerate Ti±a®. 

Bex 271 52521 tern Sy Cedex, Frarse 


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CF tounobSoe 

anraroes the cprstadm d a 
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6 bedrooms vrfti cr.-ate caftrocrrs, 
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For information on tfistributan terms 
please contact 

The Magneto Group Inc. - 
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TeL +813 SS7D-1Q22 
Fax +813 3582-1664 
The Maywtizflr Group, Inc 
[PenrEylvana, US.A) 

Fax +1 215-766-7320 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
1UHIGRATWASSP0RTS 


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Aston Corporate Trustees 

19 M Road, DouglU, We ol Mai 
Tel: +44 (U 1624 626591 
Fax +44 (0) 1624 625126 


London 

Tet +44 (6) 171 233 1302 
Far +44 ffl) 233 1519 


E MaD: astonfienterpris&net 


JOINT VENTURE IN PHHJPPINES for 
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18,141 sq.ro. ft Pasig: 9.842 sq m m 
Csm 2110 - 4,128 - 15535 sqm. r 
vaienruaia and Puerto Gatora with 18 
hd Tet (632) 525-59SI523-4902 


OFFSHORE COMP AWES. For hen bro- 
chure or advice Tet London 44 101 741 
1224 Fax: 44 igi 74B 6558/6338 

■WMppteton.au* 


ATTRACTIVE ROROA 
SHOPPING CENTER 
wft maw food Sere * groat secure 
investment ’ private seller. CaD or fcax 
Nancy tor brochure and oeafc. 
TelSSI-994-2233 FEorSEI -995-9T T7 US 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


GREAT BRITAIN 


TO LET 


WESTMINSTER BHXDCE 
LUXURY APAKTMBIvrs 
Fnm JOSO P.W. 

- starting torn • r«muW+l 


COUNTY HALL 
Lrrmi: col 


Holland 


RENTHOUS KTERNATIONAL 
No 1 ai Holland 

tor (Sri) tunshed housas/flte. 
Tet 31^5449751 Far 31-206465909 
Ntaven 19-21. 1083 Am Amsterdam 


KOHEF1NDERS INTI Herengracht 14 
1015 % Amsterdam Tel *3ii0Effl22S 
Fare 6392262 E-rraLMcnseted©ftjii 


Paris Area Furnished 


15lh - Magnficent Rat. view on Pans & 
aiff Tower, fisring UNESCO, 100 sqm, 
2 bedrooms, ttfg 40 sqm reception. 7ft 
Boor, newly tornsnedrequbied. J^corfe. 
caretaker. Parking m buSamg. Tet +33 
(0)1 <5664638 (from 60 m on 12ft). 


Telecommunications 


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Where Standanls as Set, not Met) 

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■raJafibadura)) 


Business Services 


Lowest Inf 


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France ....50.32 

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Sweden ... J025 

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25% Commission 
Agents Welcome! 


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Tel: H07-777-4222 Fax. 1-407-777-5411 
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Bond Street - Mail. Phone. Fax, Trier 
Tel: 44 171 <99 9192 Fax T7I 499 7517 


Business Travel 


ictJBintneet Ctase Franen Travelers 
Wtadinde. Up n 50% d No coupons, 
no rashfatons. imperial Canada Tel: 
1-514-341-7227 Fax: I -514-34! -7598. 
a-mall address' imperial O login. nat 

httpsB'nimioglnjiteflnipaflBi 


seei ft tamoue house roagazm. S8000. 
Steovfftoofdrgfhe&meS 
5 bntQas, 2 10 3 bedrooms. 
Parquet floor. FFr,000 
Senrtm dl your RarMNeadt .. 
Tet +Sip427B®0 FWffl1C7883« ' 


ROYAL APARTJBfiT opposfle Masm’s 
16ft centay faretmart apstinent ft can- 
ter of Pans, lunar courtyard, qdat, very 
sunny, 260 sqfa (2800 Hpiara feet), 

larae reception areas, tw bedrooms, two 
bams. 18 toot offings, ongmr panels. 
Fufiy fumshad to tegfi standard. Prorate 
partonc in courtyard. SMEOOhno, up to 
12 timhs. Tet Pans +^0)144698669 


NATION, near R5L 60 aqm. flat am/. 
calm, i^jper lewL rsmpteteiy redone. 2 
bedrooms, terrace, carpark. BflOO off: 
month Tri Pads -33 (0)1 43 47 36 85 
or ritar Sat: Morocco +212 775 8535. ' 


St MANDE. cJcse to metro Nation, 
bright, charming llet, 2 rooms. fuMy 
furnshed Daly, weekty. or monthly. rant.. 
Tet *33 (0)1 43 96 30 02, 


3fffi - MARAIS - EXCEPTIONAL -. _ 
3 bedrooms, 85 sqm, charming, rano- 
vated, tofiy furrished, waefwr-drw, TV. 
firfftiaca FtZOOO. Tri +33 (0)147883132. 


Bth, ODEON, high class stuift in . ter 
house, fuOy equftpfld. 13,500 rat Tel 
evanmg I weekend 1-46 99 B3 67. ■ ; 


Paris Am Unfurnished 


LE VESWET. 10 m from RER. Nka 
apartment large living room, 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 bafts, IIOeqiL, large bafco^r, 
near intemffnriBL schools. No agency. 
Tel +33(0)134806784 Fax (0)130533734 


VAUQIESSON, charming house, 150 
sq.m., 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 
equipped kitchen, garden, garage, near 
rtenratnnal schools. Jute 1st FT 16,200. 
fibegences. Tet +33 (0)1 47 41 40 48 


PORTE D-Ofi LEANS, stuift. kitchen, 
balcony, view, sunny. FF 1200/mo + 
charges. Tet +33 (0)3.22 52 32 37 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURWSHED apart- 
merts. Fran saabs (0 A bedrooms. Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 FSx +41 22 7362671 


BOSTON NORTH SHORE,. 16 rties to 
downtown. 4-bedroom colonial available 
lor company rental from Sept 1. Own 
swimming pool and tennis court USS 
2750/monft. Tet +3120.6761563 Fax: 
+31.235868752 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week to 1 year, Great Locations. Call 
PaChlqu: 212-4480223. Fax: 212- 
4480226 E-Mat aftonetwoQaol.cBm. 


Financial Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


tor 

SOLUTIONS 

Contact 


BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


vantees to secure funding 
■ ratee projects: 


¥ Prot l{ .i nrf - 




^* 4 . Mmr 




■ V : 

■.irrsm. • friam 

vesir Pbrt 
"+ rW» Anil 

: -ntm a 


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V % M 

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Tatis' 

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’■ S-fvK . 

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>-rr- 'rtteT. 
■v.-Txvrt. 

■*??;*[ 

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--■* a.-: 


I^NATIONUtti 

ilettinjj on B 


■•.‘-.y.-r it.: • 
•- .« i v • 

v 

■ ■. ■SC. ' 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
EGU/TY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 


te. 


■ A 


Long term collateral 
Supported GrraantaM 


!. W‘-- ’ 


Fteu (632) 810-9284 
Tet (832) 894-5358 


1 , :•» -. - 


(Commission earned only upon FirtSng) 
Bnsfcers ttormsswi Assured 


PRIME BANK 


GUARANTEES 

Vereire Capnet Finance Avaiable 
tor Govammam Projects and 
Government Corrieries . 
that are for srie. 

Large Prqeas our ^leoafily 
Also, Long Tern Finance tor 
Large and Sral Coropaias 
No crunrussicn Urn! Funded 


\hzZ' 7 y- 

1 '■%*• . ■ ’ 

- 

■ asV : ’ 

7.V..7 -Jr-.. 

v,;r V; 


■Afc. 


REPRESBfTATtVE 
Needed to ad as liaison 
Please reply m Engksh 


VENTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
investment tenters 
16311 Venture Bhd, Suite 999 
Endno, CaWorffa 91436 ILSA 
Fdx No.: (818] SOS-1698 
TeL: (818) 78M422 


■"•Cl' ~ 

V. .« 1 

: r ^\\- 


■ ; . ■*- 


Employment 


General Positions Wanted 


S.:: 




SWISS GENTLEMAN, 45. tree to traveL 
tradWinguaJ. loyaL discrael. professoral 
in tourism. PA to VIP, PS to business- 
men. seeks chaHengirra position as 
PA/PR/PS or In H0TEUT0URJST 
TRADE worldwide. Excetetf references 
Please send fax to ZurJch-Sv&zsriand 
Fax no. 004M-281 63 41. 


...Tiff 


FRENCH CAPTAIN wth 20 ware ol eb- 
panence. safe work. Fufiy fiesrued. 42 
years old. Contact: RMS Tri Francs 
+33(0)493450033 ' .33 0600072781 




International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 






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FRIDAY MAY 9, 1997 


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Ford Says 
Cost Cuts 
Exceed Goal 

Chief Executive Also 
Sees Profit for Europe 

Bbornbem A'm 

WINDSOR, Ontario — Ford Motor 
Co. shares rose Thursday after the car- 
maker's chief executive said the com- 
pany would cut costs by “substan- 
tially” more than its goal of SI billion. 

The executive, Alex Trotman. also 
said lie expected Ford's European op- 
erations to return to profit this year. Ford 
struggled with slow-selling models and 
overcapacity in Europe last year as it 
faced fierce competition. 

At Ford’s annua] meeting in Windsor, 
across the border from Detroit, Mr. Trot- 
man also predicted 1 998 vehicle sales for 
the U^. auto industry of 15.25 million to 
15.5 million, little changed from the 
range of 15 million to 15.5 million that 
many analysts and the three U.S.-based 
automakers have forecast for 1 997 sales. 
Mr. Trotman also said growth in U.S. 
gross domestic product would probably 
be 3 percent in 1998, with inflation re- 
maining “low/’ Overall, he said he was 
“confident” about the U.S. economy. 

• Ford shares closed 75 cents higher, at 
$35,875. 

Also on Thursday, Ford sold $500 
million of 100-year bonds to take ad- 
vantage of what the company called 
“attractive” market conditions. 

The bonds were priced to yield 7.81 
percent, or about nine-tenths of a per- 
centage point more than the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond. Proceeds from 
die sale will be used to replace bonds 
that are maturing this quarter. Chris 
Vinyard, a Ford spokesman, said. 

This is the first time Ford, the No. 2 
U.S. automaker behind General Motors 



Tfsgvfbnd Mlf" TfttiV 7T > f a—* 11 " ' 

A NEW APPLE, IBM AT CORE — Dealers and journalists trying out an Apple notebook computer 
made by International Business Machines Corp. at a preview in Tokyo on Thursday. Page 17. 

Strong Sales and Weak Yen Propel Sony 


? r , . Corp., has sold 100 - year bonds. 

■ -- T Chrysler Coni., the No. 3 U.S. car- 

j .. maker, sol.d $500 million of 100-year 


i:irsr. 


bonds in February. 

Bonds with 100-year maturities have 
become popular among U.S. companies 
m recent years in response to the healthy 
economy. Borrowers are taking a 
chance to lock in interest rates that, in 
historical terms, are relatively low. 

Ford's bonds are rated A1 by 
Moody’s Investors Service Inc. and A- 
plus by Standard & Poor’s Corp. . 


By Andrew Pollack 

Ne w Hint Timet Servin' 

TOKYO — Sony Corp. said 
Thursday that its earnings more than 
doubled to record levels in its latest year, 
helped by the weak yen and strong sales 
of its PlayStation video game as well as 
of other consumer-electronics products. 

Sony’s results are among the first of 
many earnings reports over the next two 
weeks that are expected to -show that 
Japan's export-oriented electronics and 
automobile companies have largely re- 
covered from the slump of the last few 
years, thanks partly to their own re- 
structuring and partly to the weakening 
of the yen. which makes Japanese 
products more competitive overseas. 

Sony said its consolidated net income 
for the year dial ended March 31 rose to 


139.5 billion yen ($1.12 billion), a gain 
of 157 percent from the previous year 
and better than its peak earnings in the 
early 1990s. Sales rose 23 3 percent, to 
5.66 trillion yen. 

Some of Japan's strongest compa- 
nies, such as Toyota Motor Corp.. 
Honda Motor Co., Canon Inc. and TDK 
Corp., are also expected to report record 
earnings or otherwise extremely pos- 
itive results. 

Even troubled companies should do 
better, with Nissan Motor Co. expecting 
to report its first consolidated profit in 
five years and Mazda Motor Corp. hop- 
ing to break even. 

Japan’s consumer-electronics in- 
dustry as a whole are expected to report 
growth of 82 percent in operating profit 
for-the year, almost entirely because of 
the weaker yen, according to estimates 


INTERNATIONAL STOCKS 


j Fjan* j> :» 




Betting on Bangkok’s Bottoming Out 

BloombergNewg After falling 1231 points Thursday Signs of a turnaround remain elu- 

B ANGKOK — Eric Sandluod to close at 614.06, the index is at its sive. The government said Wednesday 
started buying Thai stocks six lowest point in six and a half years. that tax revenue was below its pro- 
months ago. arguing the Down about 23 percent this year jections, adding that the country was in 
worst-performing stock mar- alone, the index is shaping up to be the danger of running its first budget def- 


BloombergNews After falling 1231 points Thursday Signs of a turnaround remain elu- 

ANGKOK — Eric Sandluod to close at 614.06, the index is at its sive. The government said Wednesday 
started buying Thai stocks six lowest point in six and a half years. that tax revenue was below its pro- 
months ago, arguing the Down about 23 percent this year jections. adding that the country was in 
worst-performing stock mar- alone, the index is shaping up to be the danger of running its first budget def- 


Down about 23 percent this year jections. adding that the country was in 


ket of 1996 was too cheap to pass up. world's worst performer for a second 
Today, Thai stocks, shaken _ by year in a row. Few are as brave as Mr. 



BANCOR 


— .-mi 


5£A. 


sjejis saw 

VA=AVT£ : 


mounting bad debts, a four-year prop- 
erty slump and the slowest economy in 
a decade, are about a third cheaper still. 
But the managing director of Pruden- 
tial Portfolio Managers (Asia) Ltd is 
not relenting. 

“I’m tired of defending Thailand,” 
Mr. Sandlund said. “We’re not writing 
off the Thai economy, and any way you 
value it, this market is cheaper than it's 
been since the 1 980s." 

Mark Mobius, who manages the 
New York Stock Exchange-listed 
Templet Mi Emerging Market Fund, 
said in March that for all their troubles, 
Thai stocks looked attractive. Yet the 
economy, he said, probably would not 
recover for at least a year. 

But few agree with Mr. Sandlund, 
whose firm manages more than $3 bil- 
lion, and Mr. Mobius. 

During the past year, fund managers 
have cut the percentage of Thai stocks 
in their Asian portfolios to about 3 
percent from more than 13 percent a 
year ago. industry executives said, as a 
slowing economy hammered corporate 
profits. 

Those who remained watched the 
benchmark SET Index fall by more 
than half and the market lose about $32 
billion of its value. 


world’s worst performer for a second icit in a decade. A shortfall would 
year in a row. Few are as brave as Mr. disrupt efforts to cut interest rates and 
Sandlund, who says the Thai economy might prompt officials to cut projected 
— and stocks — are ready for a re- spending for a second time in three 
Covery. months. 

Thai stocks are certainly cheaper “The cut will curb economic 

growth,” said Kittiyarn Mangkomdin. 

n ) an analyst at Ocean Securities & Fi- 

1 nance Co. “Then everybody’s profits 
1 will be slashed — not good news, 

I A developer. Natural Park PCL, said 

this week that one of its units had 
| stopped paying interest and principal 
I on some of its debt. 

| The announcement followed plans 
| publicized last month by Land & 

! Houses PCL, one of the country's 
j biggest developers, to raise 5 billion 

‘96 : ’97 "H baht ($191.7 million) by selling equity 

and debt, showing that even the biggest 
1 real estate companies are strapped for 

K . .r . : J . V . . r 

Source: Bleombeig niT ca -’ n - 

In March, the stock exchange took 
than they were a year ago: They trade at th e unprecedented step of briefly sus- 
about 12 times tfieir earnings per share, pending trading in all banks and fi- 
down from a price-earnings ratio of 1 7 aance companies, and the central bank 


tsszr.-4-.~i 


•‘96 


Sawra Bkxvnborq 


a year ago. 


ordered the companies to increase their 


But for many investors, the ques- reserves against bad loans by as much 
tions remain when and how quickly the as 50 percent Many of these com pa- 
country’s property market and ecbn- pies reported shrinking profits or 
omy .will recover and how long it will widening losses. 


take for that recovery to shore up cor- 
porate profits. 


See STOCKS, Page IS 


serf* & 

ijr: 

E w 


Empiq y5^< 

*•***£*& 

■sj if' t^- . 5 *- 

: r :v r-jJ 

-■$* t- 1 "’- ‘ _ •’J’,.,';* 

mat***.':.*** 

- ***? Y ;2-‘ 


«po*> ,A V 

tors 1; 


s 1 isnv 

..An 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


May a - May 7 Libid-Libor Rates 


■amuB 

Fr onM u rt 
LwAMb) 
NMrU . 

Mm, - 

NewYMO) 


s. Si '& Sir - a- s s' s B 
s.js a ss --s s- ss a- 

iRui - s «i f ig a- s »*• 

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Key Money Rates 


of 4 PM and Tonm nmol 3 PM- 
or To bur adept**};* To bay one dotkx ‘Units of W MO. 


Other Dollar Values 


Curancv Per* 

-MWOtiWM O.W86 
Australians 12S67 
AasHansdL 1Z0B7 
BrazHicaf 1 -&WB 
CMMuyaan 8J23B 
QnAkraa 3041 - 
DflHimkme t-Sd&S 
Egypt pound 1390 
Pta.BMiittn S.14S7 . • 

forward Rates 

Cunracf . 1** 

■ Pound Storfog 141: 
CflMHBaMar . 1J7 

DeatKlwmcrt: 1-70 


Cantncy P«r* 
Greek drac. mS3 
Honp Kang* 7.7450 
Nung-MM 182.26 
I maea rupee lifl5 
|pdo.rapiati 2«29J5 
lriU£ 04641 
is rarfriu* L«d7 
KowtUnar tL3041 
MomyriDg. 15075 


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14170 14162 


Conwiey Par* 
Max. peso 7.917 
N.ZedadS 14596 
H on*, krone 7496 
pWLpesa 26J6 

poStn*wy 3-1* 
purtascirao 171.99 
RiasraHo 575740 
Saw* itpd 3.75 
gag.* 14435 


Japanese yea 
Swi» franc 


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S. Air. nob 

S.Kor.won 

sawLim* 

Tahraa* 

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UnHed States 
Dbcowtnm 
Prime rate 
Federal foods 
WMtoy CDs deepen, 
180-4ay CP deafen 
3 month Treasury SB 
1-yaarTraamyM 
>year Treasury Ml 
5-yeor Treasury note 
7-fear Treasury Bt0e 
10-year Treasory note 
30-yeaf Treasury boad 
Merrfll LjnXli 3JMtoy RA 


Oast Prw 
5.00 540 

SU BM 
' .SV • 5ta 

5.73 SJ2 
SJ2 549 

547 548 

548 541 

634 634 

648 643 

643 . 648 

-6J1 675 

691 696 

4.97 4.97 




TuiMshUra 136055. Japan 
IfAEdlraara 34705 DKcouat rate 
Veaez-boliv. 48040 cafl money 

mnaatt taferinak 

JhwjoMi IntertwnM 

i^naotti interbank 

10 -yeaHSovtbMul 

my u-Oaf wtoy Ocrmony 
19 12241 12248 Lamport ra» 

s '•«” ,J “ 5 sssu. 

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10-ynr Bund 


440 440 
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- xn 

~ 3J5 

- SJ4 


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Bank base role M M 

CaSneaey 6V* 616 

l-mnOi tetertraifc ‘ 6Yta 6V» 

3*ua!lii*!et1>U* 6»a 69» 

6-montb tatertUB* 6h 

lOyavCRf 747 7.11 

France- 

IntemattM rate 3.10 3.10 

Co* money m 0*6 3W* 

innoath tatertmak - 316 

j^mmiti tntertmnft - 350 

Mertak - 3 Vi 

lOyearOAT - 547 

Source*: Boolenfc^flkwortwt Mem 
ir, icn, Bonk of Tokyo-Mlhublsbl. 
ComnmabanlCM»Lypimats. 

AM. PM. arpe 

Zurich Ooua 

Ionian 342 M 343J5 +245 

New York 34240 34470 +2J0 

U.S. Man per ounce. London official 


PAGE 13 


U S Airways Reduces 
Service to Trim Costs 

Cutbacks Seen as Signal to Unions 


by ING Baring Securities. 

But overall, analysts say, with Japan's 
years of rapid growth behind it, not all 
companies will be able to prosper. The 
Japanese business world is dividing into 
winners — mainly internationally com- 
petitive companies — and losers, with 
stock prices diverging accordingly. 

For Sony, which obtains about 70 
percent of its revenue outside Japan, die 
yen’s 15 percent decline against die 
dollar year over year provided a major 
boost 

Had currency rates not changed, the 
company said, its sales would have been 
the yen equivalent of $4.2 billion less 
than they woe, and its operating income 
would have dropped 6.9 percent rather 
than rising 57.4 percent. 

But Sony has been helped in addition 
by its PlayStation video game. Sales of 
video-game hardware and software 
reached abQUt 400 billion yen last year. 
Joseph Oshau a Tokyo-based analyst for 
Merrill Lynch, said. 

Sony's revenue in Japan, where it is 
not- helped by the weakening yen, still 
rose 1x3 percenL 

The company's movie business re- 
gistered an increase in sales of 37.8 
percent, to 438.5 billion yen, partly be- 
cause of currency rates. 

Sony’s earnings in the United States 
were dragged down by a substantial loss 
at Materials Research Corp., a company 
based in Orangeburg. New York, that 
Sony acquired in 1989 for about $60 
million. 

Materials Research, which makes 
equipment used to manufacture semi- 
conductors, appears to have lost more 
than $100 million, and Sony said it 
might sell it 

At the close of trading Thursday, 
Sony's shares were up 90 yen at 9.720 
yen on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. 

Fuji to Expand 
Its Plant in U.S. 

CumpSed by Oar SktfFnBi DJjp&rtm 

ELMSFORD, New York — Intensi- 
fying its battle with Eastman Kodak Co., 
Fuji Photo Rim Co„ which already has 
U.S. operations that manufacture cam- 
eras and provide photo-finishing ser- 
vices, now plans to make film in the 
United States. 

The Japanese company said 
Thursday it would spend $200 million 
to expand its plant in Greenwood, South 
Carolina, to make 35mm film. The ex- 
pansion will also increase Fuji's ca- 
pacity to make color photographic pa- 
per 100 jobs will be created. The latest 
venture will bring Fuji’s investment in 
South Carolina to more than Si billion. 

Fuji’s announcement comes as Kodak 
continues to press its claim that the U.S.- 
based company has been blocked from 
competing in the Japanese market. The 
trade dispute has gone to the World Trade 
Organization settlement panel in Geneva, 
and a decision is expected by October. 

Executives at Kodak declined to 
comment on Fuji’s plans. 

Fuji said the expansion would allow it 
to shorten shipping times and improve 
customer service. 

(NYT, AP. Bloomberg) 


C.mrdrJtn Out Staff fn * a Dupoahn 

NEW YORK — US Airways Inc. 
made good on recent warnings that it 
might start shrinking the airline by an- 
nouncing Thursday that it would cease 
flying on many routes, close some un- 
needed facilities and ground 22 planes. 

The airline, which is hamstrung by 
the highest cost structure in the industry, 
said that it would halt jet service in 
September to nine cities, thereby re- 
ducing its schedule by 65 percent 
against that of last year. 

U S Airways said the steps were pan 
Of an “efficiency program,” adding 
that they were needed regardless of 
whether ongoing negotiations with 
labor unions lead to a lower cost struc- 
ture. If it reaches such a deal, the com- 
pany has said it plans to grow. 

Tbe moves, however, sent a signal to 
labor leaders. In meetings with employ- 
ees in recent weeks. Chief Executive 
Stephen Wolf has said that without a 
lower cost structure, be has no choice but 
to start cutting unprofitable operations. 

The moves also suggested that there 
were considerable areas for easy sav- 
ings — the airline, for example, has long 
operated maintenance bases and reser- 
vation offices in close proximity. 

Airline executives would not say 
Thursday how many jobs would be 
eliminated. But in a message to mem- 
bers, the U S Airways pilots union said 
it had been notified that 1 03 of the 5,000 
pilots would be laid off. 

The airline said it would halt jet ser- 
vice to Cincinnati; San Antonio. Texas; 
Albuquerque, New Mexico; Austin, 
Texas; Bangor, Maine; Daytona Beach, 
Florida; Islrp, New York; Melbourne, 
Florida, and Newburgh. New York. 

The company also plans to close its 
Los Angeles pilot and flight attendant 
crew base by February, with affected 
employees being transferred to other 
bases. 

The airline also said maintenance fa- 
cilities in Roanoke, Virginia, and 
Greensboro and Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina, would be phased out by the 
end of next year except for the Winston- 
Salem landing gear shop, which will 
remain open. Reservations centers in 
Nashville, Tennessee, and Utica, New 
York, will be closed by Oct. 1. 

Warren Buffett, chief executive of 
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., which owns 
358,000 shares of U S Airways’ con- 
vertible preferred stock, said he agreed 
with the moves. 

“If the labor groups have the will,” 


he said, “I know management has the 
ability to make this airline into the glob- 
al competitor everyone wants it to be.” 

US Airways' shares closed $2.75 
higher at $34.50. 

Labor makes up about 40 percent of 
U S Airways’ total operating costs, the 
highest ratio in toe industry, said Vivian 
Lee of Bankers Trust New York Corp., 
compared with about 3 1 percent at Con- 
tinental Airlines Inc. 

Ms. Lee said the recent onslaught of 
low-fare airlines in Eastern markets 
made it imperative that labor costs come 
down. In toe last year, Southwest Air- 
lines Inc., ValuJet Inc. and Delta Air 
Lines Inc.’s Delta Express have added 
flights on nearly 400 routes that directly 
compete with US Airways. 

“Every time an airline comes in and 
warns to take a nibble off their route 
structure, US Airways can’t compete 
because they can't meet their fares,” 
she said. “It's not enough just to lower 
cost a little bit Their entire cost struc- 
ture must come down.” 

The airline has had trouble convin- 
cing toe Air Litre Pilots Association of 
its competitive dilemma, especially 
since reporting record first-quarter earn- 
ings last month. 

“Make no mistake, we remain com- 
mitted and hopeful that our labor dis- 
cussions ultimately will enable us to put 
in place a competitive cost structure.” 
Mr. Wolf said. {NYT. AP, Bloomberg ) 

■ Senator Seeks to Warn EU 

A U.S. senator urged President Bill 
Clinton to ensure thatBoeing Co.’s pro- 
posed takeover of McDonnell Douglas 
Corp. would receive an “impartial” 
antitrust review by the European Union, 
AFX News reported from Washington. 

“We are deeply concerned by recent 
public statements'’ by the European 
commissioner on competition, Karel 
Van Mien, Senator Slade Gorton said. 

Mr. Van Miert said last month that he 
had “extremely deep concerns” about 
the consolidation and that it “ remains to 
be seen" if a solution could be worked 
out, the Republican from Washington 
state said. 

“Mr. Van Mien’s public statements - 
to audiences in Europe and the U.S. 
about his negative views of the pro- 
posed transaction are inappropriate, 
prejudicial and do grave harm to toe due 
process that is the legal right of the 
involved parties,” Mr. Gorton and the_ 
other senator from Washington, Patty 
Murray, wrote to Mr. Clinton. 


New McCaw Venture 
Lures 3 From AT&T 


ConytUrd by Our Sufi Fnm Dilfxitchei 

NEW YORK— AT&T Corp. said 
Thursday that three executives at its 
mobile-phone business were quitting 
to join a new venture aimed at help? 
mg companies compete in local- 
phone markets. 

The new venture, called 
OneComm LLC, is being formed by 
Craig McCaw and will provide man- 
agement and strategic advice to 
companies seeking to offer local- 
phone service. Mr. McCaw built the 
largest U.S. cellular company, Mc- 
Caw Cellular Communications Inc., 
before selling it to AT&T Corp. for 
$1 1.5 billion in 1994. 

The departing AT&T executives 
are Steve Hooper, president and chief 
executive or AT&T Wireless; 
Wayne Peny, vice chairman of 
AT&T Wireless, and Gerald Sa- 
lemme, toe mobile-phone com- 
pany's vice president for federal- 
government affairs. 

AT&T promoted Daniel Hesse. 
43, a business-development execu- 
tive, to succeed Mr. Hooper as chief 
of the wireless division. 

AT&T, the dominant long-dis- 
tance phone company in the United 
Stares, said it would work with 
OneComm as it expanded into local- 
phone service. 

But the resignations of the wireless 
unit’s senior team dealr a setback to 
AT&T's mobile-phone ambitions. 
While its wireless business is Amer- 
ica’s largest, with more than 7 mil- 
lion customers, it faces growing 
competition from smaller entrants as 
well as established competitors. 

• ‘There is a negative aspect’ ’ to the 
departures, said Mark Lowenstein, 


an analyst at Yankee Group, a mar- 
ket-research concern in Boston. The 
executives, he said, were “experi- 
enced people” who led AT&T Wire- 
less through its “growth stage." 

AT&T shares closed 12J5 cents 
lower, at $32.50. 

The executives said they had left 
AT&T to return to a start-up com- 
pany. “We’re entrepreneurs at heart, 
and we believe that opening up toe 
local markets to competition is toe 
most important effort m telecommu- 
nications today," Mr. Perry said. 

While OneComm does not cur- 
rently own any local-phone net- 
works, Mr. McCaw owns a majority 
of Nextlink, a local-phone company 
based in Bellevue, Washington. In 
toe first quarter, Nex dink's sales rose 
87 percent from a year earlier, to 
$10.1 million. Nextunk has 11 jOO 
phone lines. 

The resignations also came just 
two months after the AT&T unveiled 
a wireless technology that could save 
it billions of dollars in fees to the so- 
called Baby Bells each year to com- 
plete calls. 

William Death crag e. an analyst at 
Bear, Stearns & Co., said AT&T 
could license the new wireless tech- 
nology to OneComm in toe future. 

He said he could foresee 
OneComm and the three departing 
executives “ working with AT&T 
and being part of the wireless local- 
loop effort at AT&T." 

The local loop is the part of the 
phone network that connects a phone 
company’s central office, which con- 
tains switching equipment, to the 
customer's home or business. 

(Bloomberg. API 


ami dosing prices New Ww* ( 
tMme J 

Sower Reatm 


Repobfic of Lebanon 

Ministry of Stale for Administrative Reform 
Couadlfor Development md Reconstruction 
Invitation for Bidi 

1- The Ldwawae Government has rtcrived a Loan from toe Intenariopal Bank for Reconrtruction mi PCTdtopnmtf toward* th«- 
coat of the A d minbln u U ve Rehabilitation Project. It ii intended that part of the proceeds of thb Loan nM he appbd to efivihle 
payments imder the contract! fi>r procuring Office Technology Products for vartsu ministries and agencies. 

2- The Mhditiy of State far Admiiihtratfrc Reform Mid the Coancfl tor Pevdoiwnent and Reconstraction (CDR), 

Lebanese Government, now invite scakd Mds from efigttde mppflen for the supply of Personal Computers, Servers, 
License for Microsoft Software, Printers and U-P-S 1 *- 

3- Interested digiUr sappBen may obtain further Information and examine the bidting docmenti sst the headquarters of: The 

Coond) for Development and Reconstraction - TaHet H Serafl - Beirut Central District - Facsimile : (01) 864494 - 647947 - Tha, 
(961-1) 643980/1/10 - Beirut - Lebanon ** 

Ar Starting 8th May 1 997 a cmnpietc set of btddiag documents may be purchased apoa payment of « nocuntaalabk fee of USS 4 
In the form ofa banker’s certified checkin the name ofthe CDR. 

5> Beds must be defivered to the CDR headquarters on or before 12:00 hrs local time on Wednesday 25th Jane 1997. 

6- BhhnrH be opened hi a pabfic session at 12 hrs load thne on 15th June 1997 at the CDR headquarters. 






PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAT 9, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


The Dov; 





; n I Blue Chips Advance, 

Static Over New Telephone Rates g ut g a jjy j g Trimmed 

. /<• m • • wv ■ m 1 i 1 -m m 1* n 11 » 


Critics Say Commission Hasn’t Tackled Subsidies Problem 


■ » <■ m 


Dollar in Deutsche marks ■ Dotfar in Yen 


By Mark handler 

Nr*- York Times Service 



D J F M' A M 


D J F M A M 
1996 1997 


Exchange fnctex. v 


I NYSE 
NYSE 
NYSE 
NYSE 
US. 
AMEX 
Toronto 


TheDow 

S&P5Q0 

s&paoo 

, Composite 


Thursday Prev. •' 

®4PM Close Change: 

7136.62 7085.65 t0.72 : 

81 SSI 8T5.62 +0.5S; 

BB2J5G 7S8.8S . 4050.: 
42*63 484.85 '''' V+toWf \ 


AMEX Market Value 
Toronto TSS Index 
Sao Paulo Bovespa 

Mexico City Botea 

Buenos Aires Merval 
San tiago IP5A General 
Caracas CapftaJGener 

Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Nas^ Compcete 18306? ; : : 13g£32 ... *0.59 , 
Market Value 57185 57050 ^*024\ 

TSE fnctex 6I71J90 811250 +OS7^ 

Bovespa 1G436J23 10179165' +2.52 j 

Botea 381751 3775.02 + 1.13 

Merval 72750 . 724.11 +04&i 

IPSA General 5369JS2 535153 .40.35; 

Carftal General 649657 6498.08 -0.02 I 


NEW YORK — The Federal 
Communications Commission’s 
steps to reshuffle billions of dol- 
lars of telephone rates — raising 
prices for some services and 
lowering diem for others — was 
the most sweeping effort yet to set 
the ground rules for a coming 
battle in telecommunications in 
the United States. 

The new rules, which were ap- 
proved unanimously Wednesday, 
will generally keep a lid on local 
phone rates for consumers while 
lifting rates for businesses. Long- 
distance rates for all customers 
will decline by 5 percent to IS 
percent, under a related agreement 
between the commission and 


decades of subsidies out of the na- 
tion’s telephone industry and move 
it closer to a free-markei model. 

“Hie commission is doing less, 
and postponing it longer, than 
people ever expected," said Scott 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


AT&T Corp.. the nation's dom- 
inant long-distance provider. 


inaru long-distance provider. 

But some lawmaker and in- 
dustry experts said the commission. 


Intents tonal Herald Tribune 


in trying to appease all potential 
opponents of die plan, had fallen 


Very briefly: 


ipohents of die plan, had fallen 
ort of its staled mission: to strip 


Qeland, an analyst with Schwab 
Washington Research Group, an 
investment advisory firm. 

The commission's chairman, 
Reed Hundt, said Wednesday that 
the new rules would deregulate the 
industry even as they promoted a 
cherished goal of the Clinton ad- 
ministration: connecting the 
United States’ schools and librar- 
ies to the Internet. 

However, Mr. Cleland said the 
commission had tackled only a 
fraction of the 523 billion in sub- 
sidies that support the industry. 

Still, Wednesday's rules were a 
historic step in unraveling six de- 
cades of government regulation. 
And they elicited a generally ap- 
proving response from consumer 


advocates and industry leaders. 

“Our great fear was that as you 
opened telephone markets, there 
would be a big rate increase," said 
Gene Kimmelman, the co-director 
of Consumers Union, a lobbying 
group in Washington. “This sends 
the righi message that we want to 
put downward pressure on rates.” 

Robert Allen, the chief exec- 
utive of AT&T, said: “The FCC 
has crafted a good compromise 
that will result in tangible benefits 
for American consumers.” 

The commission's plan will: 

• Cut the charges that long-dis- 
tance carriers pay to local phone 
companies for access to their cus- 
tomers by $1.7 billion in 1997 and 
$1 S_5 billion over five years. 

• Establish a fund to equip 
schools and libraries with high- 
speed connections ro the Internet. 

•Impose an additional fixed 
charge of $1.50 a month on second 
residential phone lines, and an extra 
$3 fixed charge on business lines to 
help die local companies recoup tbe 
lost access revenue. 


Bre-X Claims It Was Defrauded GdlCOr Links Up U^lth. BrflzOlflU Miner SfroSiS 

rAi nARY ranarfa Th*» r*hnir_ * -A surprisingly high number o 


CALGARY. Canada {Combined Dispatches) — The chair- 
man of Bre-X Minerals Ltd. filed a formal complaint with 
police alleging that his company was the victim of a massive 
fraud, police said Thursday, and the Toronto Stock Exchange 
has delisted the company. 

David Walsh, chairman of tbe company that claimed to 
have discovered the world's richest gold deposit in the In- 
donesian section of the island of Borneo before the find was 
exposed as a hoax, did not name any alleged perpetrator of the 
fraud, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said. 

The police and the Alberta and Ontario securities com- 
missions have begun investigations that could lead to criminal 
prosecutions. . (AFP. AP) 


Cmptied by Otr Staff Fnm Dnptacka 

JOHANNESBURG — Gencor 
Ltd., one of South Africa’s top three 
mining companies, said Thursday it 
had signed a memorandum of un- 
derstanding with die new owners of 
Compagnia Vale do Rio Doce to 
develop die Brazilian company's 
vast natural resources. 

The Brazilian government sold a 
41 .73 percent voting stake in CVRD 
on Wednesday for 3.34 billion reals 


($3.1 billion) to a group led by Com- 
pagnia Siderurgica National, 
Brazil's biggest steelmaker, which 
was sold by the government in 
1992. 

CVRD is the world's largest iron 
ore exporter, Latin America's 
biggest gold producer, and the own- 
er of vast mining, forestry and trans- 
portation assets. 

Gencor said it planned to com- 
plete details of an alliance “aimed at 


benefiting tbe shareholders of all 
parties and of CVRD.” 

“In the process,” it said, “we 
will explore whether it makes sense 
for us to participate directly in the 
company." The agreement signed 
by Gencor “followed extensive dis- 
cussions in the weeks leading up to 
die auction in which it became dear 
that there were many areas of mu- 
tual interest," the company said. 

( Bloomberg , Reuters ) 


CimpSeilfr. Oar &®7™n 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose 
Thursday, but a late round of sell 
orders wiped out two-thirds of a 
rally in blue-chip issues. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 50.97 points higher at 
7.136.62, but late program trading 
shaved 100 points off an earlier 
rally The broader Standard & 
Poor’s 500-share index finished up 
4.29 at 819.91. 

Gaining issues outnumbered los- 
ing ones by a 7-to-ti ratio on the 
New York Stock exchange. 

The market was supported by 
lower Treasury bond yields and op- 
timism about corporate profits. 

“We think in {he next 12 months, 
the economy lodes healthy, and cor- 
porate profits look healthy.” said 
Rick Jandrain, director of equities at 
BancOne Investment Advisors 
Gorp. Of the recent volatility in share 
prices, he s nid, “One minute the 
market’s euphoric; the next minute, 
it's on its way to its funeral-' ' 

Just as Treasury braids took die 
blame for Wednesday's decline, 
bonds led stocks higher Thursday. 
Tbe price of die benchmark 30-year 
issue rose 12/32 point, to 96 6/32, 
taking tbe yield down to 6.93 per- 
cent from 6.96 percent Wednesday. 

A surprisingly high number of 
unemployment claims last week 
suggested die economy was slowing 
enough to keep inflation at bay. 

The Labor Department said the 
number of American workers ap- 
plying for state jobless benefits held 
steady at a seasonally adjusted 
347,000 last week, the highest since 
early January. 

“Today's rally is as perplexing 
as yesterday's sell-off,” said 
Joseph Balapaglia. chief invest- 
ment officer at Grunral & Co. * ‘We 


are in a bullish environment for 
stocks based on good news in the 

« . i ri-L . c 


economy and the availability of 
monev for investment.” 


^ . bTR MX 
L^>' . '* VanJlf d 


money for investment.” 

Analysts said investors also were 
cheered by the prospects for a cur in 
the capital -gains tax. After the stock 
marker closed Wednesday, the Re- 
publican chairmen of the congres- 
sional tax-writing committees 


iV r. 


?*•:**. /■■■; 
‘ ■ i. ■ 


; - ‘ r.ixAf * • 

* 

, ’Jfcw 
V--:- ’ rr;-?V. »y item 


US. STOCKS 


sai d they would propose setting that 
day as die effective date for the 
gains -tax reduction. - 

Technology stocks were again a 
market leader. The Nasdaq com- 
posite index, a haven for computer 
companies, rose 7.88 points to 
1330.79. 

“Fundamentally the group is 
very solid,” said Ray Hirsch, tech- 
nology group director for American 
Express Financial Advisors. He 
said renewed confidence in com- 


i: 


ix 




■%tv nd# 

LCttdJb*'. 

■■ 

jn» 

a rwrtfcca 4f- 


puter-related companies stems from 
last week’s technology conference 
sponsored by Hambrecht & Quist, a 
San Francisco investment bank. 

“That’s what came through at 
the H&Q conference last week.” 
Mr. Hirsch said. “Business was 
very solid in April. Tbe trend of 
February and March continued in 
April. People came away feeling 
the first quarter wasn’t a fluke.” . 

Cisco Systems was the most ac- 
tively traded U.S. stock, rising 2% 
to 61%, its second straight gain after 
reporting earnings met analysts' ex- 
pectations. Top chipmaker Intel 
closed up 3 at 158%, and Microsoft, 
tiie world’s largest software writer, 
added % to 116V4. 

IBM surged 5% to 167% a day 
after giving its annual review and 
outlook to investors and analysts. 
Louis Gerstner, IBM's chairman, 
said product demand remained 
strong and that he was committed to 
increasing earnings. 

Among weaker issues, Petsmait 
fell % to 10% in active trading after 
the pet supply company said mis- 
management of its inventory and 
slower sales of its flea and tick 
products would hold first-quarter 
earnings below analysts’ estimates. 

Philip Environmental' fell 2% to 
12% on concern that the Canadian 
solid-waste and metal recycling 
company would have difficulty 
combining its recently announced 
acquisitions of Ailwaste and Serv- 
Tech businesses. 

Wal-Mart Stores rose % to 19% 
after it said same-store sales rose 
about 6 percent in April from a year 
earlier. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


• The Washington Post and The New York Times reported 
drops in circulation. Daily circulation at the Post fell 15.000. 
to 818331 in the six months ended March 31, according to the 
Audit Bureau of Circulation. The Times's circulation was 
down 50,000, to 1.107.168. 

• International Business Machines Corp. is to buy the 30 
percent of the Advantis network services business it does not 
.already own from Sears Roebuck & Co. for $450 million. 


Words From Japan 9 s ‘Mr. Yen 9 Push the Dollar Lower 


• PNC Bank Corp. is holding talks to acquire the securities 
company Oppenheimer & Co. for about $500 million. 


company Oppenheimer & Co. for about $500 million. 

• Giddings & Lewis Inc.*s board voted unanimously to spurn 


Harnischfeger Industries Inc-'s $631 million, or $19-a- 
5 hare, takeover offer as inadequate. 

• Novellus Systems Inc. is to pay S 1 50 million for Thin Film 
Systems, a unit of Varian Associates Inc., to try to increase 
its share of the market for semiconductor-making devices. 

• Exel Ltd. agreed to buy a rival Bermuda-based property and 


casualty insurer, GCR Holdings LtcL, for $637 million, or 
S27 a share. WP. Bloomberg. AFP 


ConpUed by Oa SttfFmn Dapatcbn 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against other major currencies, par- 
ticularly the yen, Thursday after 
comments from the official known 
as “Mr. Yen” stirred up fears of 
central bank intervention. 

Eisuke Sakakibara, a Finance 
Ministry official widely referred to as 
Mr. Yen, said the past year's move- 
ments raised the chance the Japanese 
currency could strengthen, with die 
dollar falling as low as 103 yen. 

That comment stoked fears that 
the Bank of Japan might buy yen to 
send the currency in that direction. 


The dollar slid to 123.750 yen in 4 
P.M. trading from 125.015 yen at 
the end of the day Wednesday. 

“People are on tenterhooks about 
whether we will actually see any 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


intervention,” Nigel Richardson, an 
economist at Yamaichi Securities, 
said. “People are aware there’s a 
chance of some kind of intervention 
if they're really serious.” 

Japan's deputy finance minister. 
Tadashi Ogawa, also said he was 
concerned about the yen’s ‘ ‘excess- 


ive” fall against the dollar this year. 
But he said Mr. Sakakibara ’s com- 
ments had not been meant to “pre- 
dict die direction of foreign-ex- 
change rates.” 

The dollar’s slide a geing the yen 
also dragged it lower a gains t Euro- 
pean currencies, although the move- 
ment was exaggerated because many 
European markets were closed for the 
Ascension Day holiday, traders said. 

Tbe dollar also dropped to 1 .7083 
Deutsche marks from 1.7187 DM, 
to 5.7630 French francs from 5.7977 
francs and to 1.4450 Swiss francs 
from 1.4585 francs. The pound ad- 


vanced to $1.6200 from $1.6137. 

“With markets in Europe closed, 
the dollar was subject to violent 
moves,” said John Hazelton, chief 
currency trader at Manufacturers & 
Traders Trust Co. “If yon had an ax 
to grind, you could have your way in 
This market.” 

The dollar has been on die de- 
fensive all week because of concern 
that the Bank of Japan, perhaps to- 
gether with the U.S. and German 
central banks, will jointly act to stem 
its rise. A surge in Tokyo stocks 
early this week also gave the yen a 
boost (Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


N h VoMt fi 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

T]» top 300 mosl odive shores, 
up to the dosing on Wad Street. 

The Associated Press. 


swa im or* indexes 


Most Actives 


May 8, 1997 


Lam Latest Oboe OpM 


Higb Low Latest Chfle Qpkit 


Moll Law Latest cmn» Opftir 


-■ iVi*- I A 


Sola tfgh Low urm Or> 


314 

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Op«i Hte Uw Law 


MU 7D73Jfl 771129 7Q5&.7S 713642 +5097 
Tram 2599 JH 2638.19 249119 26J7J23 +2UI 
Utl 22261 Z2L54 2ZL40 703* 

Camp 22lZZ» 2256.11 221229 223466 +1424 


VM. MU low LoW 

sis us 3 ae 

53645 15W 12V* 12* 

30214 Wt 2811 2W 


law Latest Cbge Oplit 


Standard & Poors 


163V* 167V* 


N* L 

14V (Ilk 
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15V* 15 

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13V 194 

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Hi* law on 4PJ4- 

IndusOlob 97ZB6 95X62 9S9JB3 96456 

Tramp. svasa 59ui 592.15 svtm 

Utmtiei 19407 19259 19274 19208 

Fkmnca 9444 91^8 91 JA 9228 

SP 500 82776 81470 81542 80208 


47596 160* 163V* 167V* 

4SBE Si In m 

43963 Sik 36V* 37t* 

St & 

gna S3lk 5PH 

yCT 36V 254 SJ 

36956 S' 119 1^ 


CORN ICBOrn 

4000 bu nMnum- cants mr tawM 
Moy97 mV* 264 2ffl 11706 

Jul97 265% 282% 284% 131451 

S«P 97 270 268 VP* -V* 25.523 

Dec 97 269V* 2664 26W — >4 104349 

MO-18 276V, 2731* 273M —Vi 1U71 

May 98 278 2765* 277% — 1% IfiO 

jut 98 7X2 290 282 2567 


ORANGE JUICE OtCnO 

MOV 97 7450 7175 7440 +0* 4K 

jm*7 7SOO 74^0 74JBS +818 17006 

S«P 97 77J0 772S 77JS -020 6J5D 

NWS7 MUD 8000 tUS -030 1033 

EsLsaa NLA. Wtefs-SAk* um 
WetfsopwiW 30,157 up 166 


Estate NA. Wed's. ate 6401 
WKftownW BUM off SOS 


.«* -v, 

IS* « 


Nasdaq 


39405 

£& 


22 as 

MR rtis 


U39B4 16? 

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67171 11M 


sen 61% +2W 

9*k IPVh -V* 


£ * 
TIM -*v 


Nasdaq 

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113702 131622 133039 
1«946 105405 i3S>7 
1 ©46 141632 142238 


us 

88807 X%J9 883.99 +207 


36» 3BV* +1«t 
48 498* +1M 
I1SW 114V* +1 

4ZV* 4Jlk *lk 
M* Wk -IV, 
S* 31 J* +V* 
P J *» 
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440 46V* .IV* 

S Vk S3V» +P6 
v* i» -r, 
zste I7V* *49k 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CaOTl 
100 lone- dates per twt 
May 57 301 JO 296.10 30138 -0160 9,936 

JU97 29150 29900 59U0 -1.10 5U31 

Aw 97 27850 27600 277J0 -1JD IS092 

58P97 2900 25700 2900 8873 

Oct 97 22850 23100 22120 +490 9472 

Dec 97 226.00 22100 22520 +890 17,781 

Estate NA. Wed’s. site 31446 
Wed's open irt 117286 ofl 2C 


GOLD (NCMX) 
lnMrtb-drtmnriwte 
Marff 35470 3GJD XUO *2 60 7 

JU097 36860 34240 34408 +Z« 75,165 

Jut 97 36870 +24) 

Aw 97 34950 3*570 347 JO +240 18852 

0097 3H.W 349JB 3SL20 +243 8380 

Dec 97 35550 35120 3SJ.10 +240 21A31 

Feb 96 35700 35800 35800 +240 4687 

Acr 98 35140 *2 * VM 

Juntt 36148 +240 4749 

Estate 354100 Wad'S, site 17,918 
Wed's open ht 168948 oil 1186 


mUJAN GOVRRHM ENT BOND OJFEE) 

m. 2 D 0 qJBon - P*s Otioo pc* ■ 

Jam rsss 12871 Ta9B -825112576 
SW97 129 JO 129JJ9 12927 - 023 47R1 

Est rates W38J Prev. sates: 60441 
Prac-aprataL: 119277 up 2.737 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) - 
SI nOknsWtOf lOOca. 

Mor97 9229 +0JQ2 525 

MOV 97 *414 fill *413 41,173 

Jun97 *405 *482 9405 472462 

JJ97 93J8 9355 9327 7^71 

5o>97 9186 9320 9184 438390 

Dec 97 9141 9155 9162 +081 316477 

Mar 98 1053 1042 9151 +O0323U3I 

JU198 9341 9320 RUB +083 228882 

Sep 98 9133 9322 9131 +003162430 

Dec 18 1322 HJ2 9320 +02312490* 

Mur 99 9321 9111 9328 +003 95485 

Am 99 9117 9308 91M +083 7X602 

Est ate NA Wtefs. ten 402499 
Wed's open Inf 2428.137 «p 23*09 


Jan 98 2880 7925 2880 +829 14825 

Feb 98 2000 1942 1040 +029 8,140 

MCT9B 1*21 WJO 19.90 +021 4242 

EsLstte NA Wetfsjote 392249 
Wed's open Irt 7447* ofl 318033 


-• bir 


MATWAL6AS MMER} 
laawnwn Uu% s per mm Hu 
Jun97 2J6S 22K 2273 


Jut 97 2J80 2275 32BB 
AW 97 2240 2270 2381 


Sep 97 2230 220 2271 
Oct 77 2240 2270 2270 


’rjtr. ’ 


Nov 97 2435 23» 23» 
Dec 97 2550 2480 2400 


JtnPB 2600 2530 2530 

R*>« 22» 2435 24« 


Mar 98 2370 2310 2JH 
Estate NA Wed’s. ate <7234 
Wecfs open irt 210275 up 5574 


.v 7 -.-ra» 


BRUSH FOUND (CLER) 


179. 17 
151a 151* 

J5V* 7SH 

2m 28V* 
rn 7H 


TV* 671 

2 m m 

IN IVi 
1*« IV 
15V* 15V* 

sw m 
121. 121* 


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Mt Mr 
ti* Hi 
27b 17+. 

in* uvt 

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2*V» 29. 

lav* 16 


17b 17** 

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*9, 8b 

«k m 
lb lb 
IFV 1»* 
job i»v* 
ib in 
11 lib 
in 6** 

44b 4W 
15V, 14A 

19b 19b 

M 3*a 

4V. 4b 

9 8b 
IN 1*. 
3b 3h 


raw u* u- cm- AMEX 

57486 SUM 570.97 +047 


SOYBEAN Of. (CBOT1 
MOPOte-egnlipvte 

May 97 2455 2*21 3*46 -406 1,151 

Jut 97 2417 2453 2*24 -0.10 52377 

AW 97 2499 2473 2490 -005 13JJ80 

5SP97 2110 24.90 2582 -403 8,120 

0093 2i» 34» 2LJF tOJB 7M3 

Dec 97 2135 25.13 2137 +0J» 18,942 

Estate NA Wed's. ate 19J50 
We^s open irt 102432 up 1068 


M6RADEOOPFER WCMX) 


Dow Jones Bond 


1316 -b 

28V* «l 


20 Bonds 
lOUmmea 
10 IrKteWats 


Paten TWav • 

ow Bran 

10148 I0I.W 

98^3 9466 goyaQ u. 

1053)9 10123 5E« Ai 


28633 O7o 81 V» 82VW +%W 

1224V VW m W. +'*■ 

12035 6W4 5A% SV. +V» 

8101 H b b J/a 

7B62 29**. 28b 2W* -X* 


44b Oft <3b -V* 

249k tmm +4i 
m w 1 * •* 

TV* 6N TV* +U 

7b 7 7*» *W* 


SOYBEANS (taon 

SMkunMrun-CBnpwbuM 

MOV97 BMW 883 B57>j -IW 4390 

Jut 97 881 S78 88* -I 106J81 

Aw 97 B62V4 BS1 B5«* -7% 19487 

5W97 765% 759H 7TO* -2% L500 

Now 97 711 703 701*9 +1 48408 

Estate NA Wed's, site 60,954 
WwfsopenM 191431 off 519 


Mar 97 11290 11045 112.15 +1JH 340* 

AM 97 1 12-50 111 JO 11145 +SJ0 2JW 

AH 97 112J0 11080 11145 +180 24327 

Auo 97 10960 10940 109J55 +495 1J85 

Sep 97 WJO 10680 10BJD +080 5177 

OU97 10665 +140 1JXQ 

NCW 97 10545 +045 1,159 

Dec 97 10580 10130 IIK40 +040 6429 

Jon 90 10240 *425 495 

Estate 10800 Wed's. soles 7,155 
wafsepenirt 5B8SD off tu 


JW97 14300 14876 14212 38413 

Sen 97 14200 14100 14186 1866 

DOCW 14180 14980 14160 109 

Estate NA Wars. ste 17487 
Wars open irt 39488 off 457 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (OMER) 

100808 dBfeTR, t per COB. dr 
Jun97 TUB 77733 J 2 H 64749 

Sep 97 J300 7288 7284 6.171 

Dec 97 8335 8318 7321 1409 

Estate NA Wed’s. Ste 6882 
Wed's oven Ini 76480 is> 298 


UNEADB2CAS0UHE INNER) 
42000 art, cMmpvonf 
Am 97 6290 6UD 6288 +188 

Jut 97 4185 5985 6180 +L13 

Aw 97 KLSO 59.10 4040 +180 

Sep 97 59J0 57.90 5980 +745 

OdV7 57.10 56.15 57X0 +1X0 

NW97 5641 56J0 5640 +7.18 

D«C 97 5575 5575 5385 +075 

Estate NA Waftste 294© 
Wad' s open int 91885 up 2471 


4,174 
21 885 
8.978 
15M 
7J5I 
1819 4 




TrwEng Activity 


ISb 17V. 

IV, IV. 

2«b 74b 

lib Wk 
5b S 
24 23b 

n 76. 

HW Mb 
n« 6b 
M 39k 


Nasdaq 


3M 20b 

4V, 4*. 


u m* 

4b at 
4W* J*. 


31b 20b 

2b 3 
.1 »*. 

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6 5b 


lb 

2Ai Jt 
17b +VU 
Sb 

24 »b 

101* *£ 

6b ■» 

je» -n 
7 +b 

v* r. 
7V| 

Ub -b 
4b +b 
3b +w 
ut* . 1 * 
15b -M 


Advanced 
Dected 
UiKhanged 
Total Ioub 
NewHtSU 
New Lows 


1438 854 

'IE 

3347 3363 

110 97 

14 16 


WHEAT (CBOn 

6000 bu irMnium- cores per DusM 
MW97 C2 393% 400 + 5 310 

JUJ97 412 401b 409 +4*6 5L480 

Sep 97 418 ax 414b +4 13,102 

Dec 97 49 411b 425*6 +4 I&3J0 

Estate NA Wed's. sate 15857 
Wed^openM 16627 off 988 


ALVERmakUO 

9>oa bev PL- cents per kav ra. 

Mar 97 482.18 47U0 C2.10 +KL40 384 

JUn97 48140 +M70 t 

Mt7 moo 47600 *47X3 +1020 57797 

SIP 97 492JD am «0.90 +IO20 5886 

DttW 500X30 ©100 ©880 +1080 7836 

Jtm« 50060 +1080 M 

Ma-18 50400 505X30 50LM +1080 7846 

Morn 511.10 +1080 2710 

Estate 128OO Md'ste 4,282 
Wed'S open int 86807 up 215 


6BRMANMARX IQIBQ 
i2SOOBni»tcs,s per mm 

-Si 4S *”3* 

Sep 97 8923 8890 J909 3JW 

Dec 97 8950 341 

Estate NA We<rs.Mte 1 6888 
Wed'S open Irt 17702 up 1199 


GASOIL OPE) 

US. dooms per mettle ton ■ Jqte of 100 torn 
IJtay*7 177J00 167X30 169i)0 +2J30 15*704 
Jin 97 16775165^16780 +180 2L436 
JUI97 169X30 16680 16875 +)8S 
Aug 51 IS^ 0 16e -2S 17D80 +175 7859 




>URKt 


f* 7 m-g 171. 2 ]72» +1X0 3.240 
19 L ,7Z5 ° UA0 ° +<t75 1645 

97 175X0 17485 1758S +075 1X03 
97 17680 174.75 176X0 +CL7S 7JB 

Est«Re*21800. OpMtati7&n5up 




No* 97 175X0 1748S 1758S +075 1X03 
Dec 97 17680 174.75 176X0 +075 77» 


Market Sales 


Livestock 


PUTWUM (MHER) 

SO nnv at- dobras ptr nw az. 

Art 97 379 80 374X0 379 JO +680 12.79* 

00 97 3RL98 37600 380.99 +680 2,992 
Jw9» 38110 +660 1,100 

Estate NA Waftsrtas 1832 
Wed's open irt 17X80 up I 


JAPANESE YEN (CMBQ 
lUmBlon yen. S per irayen 
An 97 8142 8020 X1Z7 77JS2 

5 eofr 8240 8200 8237 1.957 

D«C 97 8351 8332 8351 720 

Estate NA Wen's. sate VJ3n 
Wed's open irt 01239 off 7898 


BRENT OIL aPE) 
U8. doUon per barrel 
Jupe97 1878 18.11 
Juty97 18.79 1874 

OSS 1834 

Sep57 1079 7885 


266 2S6 

271 745 

179 192 

716 713 

‘j 'l 


NYSE 

Arae* 

Nasdaq 

InmSkns. 


527.19 61186 

2051 61071 

58158 24X1 


CATTLE (CMER) 
40000 Is.- cents per fe. 
Jim 97 6UD 64JJ 
AW 97 6573 6&15 

C«T7 0XJ7 U S 
Dec 97 7090 7042 

Peb98 7185 7080 


6412 —080 36699 
6130 -021 2L348 
4670 — 627 16396 

7047 -022 0574 
7082 —037 5X36 


Oora Previous 

LO NDO N ME TAt StLMP J-MONTIf STENtTIIG ttiFFEl 

Dp fcns pe rmetriclon . CSaaoW-pOot lOOpcJ 

AAetew (H >96 Grade) Jord7 9385 9381 9384 +0X2111335 

Spd 1647X0 1640X0 1614b 1615% Sep97 9123 93.16 9130 +0X1101041 

Footed 1666X0 1669X0 16<2XO 1643X0 55! 5!* 93X2+0X1 85295 

‘ abodes CHlqh Grade) 55 555 S” ♦ wn 

24SBX0 2460X0 2408X0 2410X0 tfS! 5“ 5" ♦ fM O.T3 

2396X0 2397X0 2351X0 2354X0 gg" 355 «86 KJ3 :2S 

620b 621b 612X0 614X0 &tTote: KTO Vm tJeYillm* 

<32X0 633X0 <2100 625X0 Si.IJSlrfcte.W^iSe* 


SWISS FRANC (CMBO 

IKXOBfrmcs. saer franc 

JunW X9n 8070 8141 43.913 

Sep 97 7041 8984 JB11 2J& 

Dec 97 J105 JB72 JOBS <38 

Ettsoles NA Wen's. sate 15822 

Wem open irt 4600 off 495 


18X0 1152 
18.70 18X7 


97 18.70 18X7 

Oec97 18X0 18X0 

Jan9B 1880 18X0 

3^1. Ste; 59X60. 


Ms of 1X00 barrels 
18X9 +0X3 39X40 
18X4 +0X2 71X16 
8X9 +035 18849 
1875 +029 10351 
1879 +0L24 4933 

UL80 +023 8.624 

1873 +0.19 1190 

18X9 +0.1S 1X41 
Open Mj 174X67 off 


&> 3 




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Mk 2M 
69* 6*1 


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Wb 9V> 


12b Ub 
4b *b 


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2b 2b 


sv. n 
7* 7b 
12b Ub 
3 7b 
A V« 
71b 20911 

2M 24b 
4SM JM* 
UH 13b 
2b. 2b 
Ilk 11« 
14b !2b 


SV» .4 
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12b ab 
2b 
1 

7lb »lb> 


Dividends 

Compamr Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRKE6ULAR 

Nyoomed ASA 8X393 5-13 6-10 


Apr 98 7197 7160 7167 -042 1X36 

Estate 14,191 Wed's, srtes 11,971 
Wed's open irt 96691 u» 5SS 


_ CFG Inc 2 fori spM. 


Enerov ventwos 2 tor 1 jp« 
KC5Enefw2forl3>m. 
Phnppine Lg DM2 tor 1 ipBL 


Mb 9b 
I5U IS 
ion ww 
7V. 7 


Syfees Entnprtses3tor29p8L 


REVERSE SPLIT 
Amx Tech 2 tor l iwene spfit 


Corapony 
HBon Hates 
UtJI Flavor 
InvCfdMunl 
Lo-Z-Boy 
Maora Corp Ltd 
Motorola Inc 
New Am HI Inca 
■Overseas Ship 
Podflc Cap Snaj 
FeocteEneray 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
QAM 6-20 
Q .36 6-27 7-11 


PrtastiCeraS 
Pf Income RJ 
PfincoMnomrd 
Pf inaiO p pon 
ttuokerdiem 
Regis Con 
Rockwell loti 
SeUgmmQlty 
Tluinoi Betts 
Traru Loosing 
Ttwdcolnc 

Urban Shop 

Uancorp United 
VW Stans 
Vitim Crap 
Wynns Inti 


4b 4V« 
Sb 34V* 


HA 11'v 

n 


4b 4», 
Sb 22U 
b V* 
lb IVi 


14V. 
12b lit 


!** lb 
41* 29b 


17 16b 

21k m 

4b 48 
W» llvk 

ab> m 1 
m i2b 
It* IV. 
1b lb 

n* tv* 

IM I7b 
37b 27 

Ik b 
4b 4b 
new iib 
m in 

1 3b 13b 

as* SW 

[4b IM 
£fc 5>b 
um tab 


UN *M 
17. *W 


lb 1*4 
IW. 11b 
a* Kb 
IT* 37V, 
41* Sb 


9b 9W 
Ub an 


ib -b 

7b *b 

U -b 

37V* -IW 

« 

4b -b 

lib -r» 

IW -b 

12b *b 

2Sb -14 

IM -b 

SW ,W 

«b ,b 

Ok 
8b 
W+ 

Ub b 

2V ilk 


INCREASED 

Safeco Corp O 22 7-11 7-28 

Simon deBaitolo O X0S 5-16 5-23 

THmmfc'mcf g 0 AS 6-24 7-9 

WestorwGeorgo 5 Q JS 6-15 7-1 


Botferirtl 

CnitsleCos 

GrarArerafcg 

OnrtweORe 

Daniel Indust 

EnranOB 

FLRoOi 

FefflWtynwTr 

HertJoqe US Gv 


REGULAR 

QX825 6-11 7-1 

Q.1225 5-19 6-2 

0 X375 5-23 6X 
0 X4 5-20 6-3 

0 X45 6-13 MO 
Q X3 7-15 7-31 
S 25 6-13 7-1 

Q X2 6-25 7-15 
M X87 5-16 522 


M X 75 51S 5-30 
0 XI 523 6-10 
Q .235 6-6 7-2 

0 .12 6-16 7-15 
M JU 516 530 
Q .15 5-19 5-30 
Q .165 6-16 M0 
0 X7 6-M 7-15 
Q M 7-25 8-15 
M XB7 522 530 
M XB7 522 530 
M X73 522 530 

0 .175 7-18 7-30 
D X2 519 6-3 

Q 29 519 52 

M X782 516 528 
0 M 513 7-1 

Q X3 512 526 
0 X4 57 54 

O JOTS 520 55 

0 X4 522 512 
0 X4 513 524 
S JUS 512 530 
0 X8 56 530 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMBI) 

50X00 1»- ceres per b. 

MOV 97 701 71» 7195 -037 3,986 

AW 97 7682 7635 76X1 -058 8.939 

54P97 7660 7615 7625 -040 T.7B2 

0097 74X0 7625 7637 -0X1 1948 

Nov 97 7835 78X5 78.15 -&15 1X48 

JH1« 79X8 7BJ0 7692 -817 359 

Estate L3*9 WeffLSrtK 2,184 
Wed 1 i open irt Hfil* off 6 


Slade Indexes 


2396X0 2397X0 2353X0 2354X0 


62DW 621 <6 612X0 614X0 
<32X0 <33X0 <23X0 625X0 


Estate: 9S773. Prtv.i 
Prev.open InL- 499,165 


StPOMP.IHOEX (CMER) 
n>lnda 

XmW 83120 B1CL60 830X0 +1255186104 

52^ gn - 5C * 3? - 40 +,JJ ° 

Dec 97 BStai 831 X0 04X0 +1150 3X27 

^«te NA Wed's. ate 83,175 
btefsopenM 196777 Off 518 


750 -050 6939 5P°* 7700X0 7445X0 7455X0 

rue -Am 1X83 5™°™ TmM 7800X0 7560X0 7565X0 
7637 -040 J.948 


N0S54XW (CMBU 
40J80 Ik.- can per a. 

Jun97 B5XZ BtOO B6BS +0X7 17X03 

JU097 8650 &U0 8612 +0.72 7X0 

Aug 97 83.97 82.95 SU9 * 832 6X72 

0097 761S 7&X0 7600 *652 6221 

Dec 97 7110 7215 72X5 — llS7 1143 

Ed. ate 11614 Wed's, sete 10X13 
WetfitaenW 41X41 up M3 


Spot 5855X0 S86SX0 5735X0 5745X0 * 37 
wneoid 5890.00 5900X0 5770X0 5780X0 *497 
CUHU Grade) s«97 

1302X0 1303X0 12S5H 12S6M 9&L 
1323X0 1324X0 1277X0 1278X0 


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NT. N' 


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*67* *6* 9679 + LOV 229 J97 

NT. NT. 9678 +0X1 L«2 

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rtp l ““ a “ e “se OPW Ssi 9688 95X3 9587 + QX1 7W45 

9664 + 0X1 66 VBA 


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MU 91X5 9037 9137 +032 6747 

Aw 97 9130 0930 9037 +0X7 l^B 

Est. soles 2XM WetfLsote 3.M6 
Wed's traen irt 9JSJ off 25 


Financial 

US T. BILLS (CMBQ 
Si mraoivDnot roeiw. 

Jun97 94i7 K45 

»pw FU5 KWI 8MJ 

Dec 97 0141 

a. to te NA. WHfS.Mte 534 
wrafsoxeBBt 9333 Off ns 


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te W 1 0S-Q7 104-49 185-0} . 10 

Dec 97 104.51 .jj 

£?■*** 5U— Wnfs.wles 473*8 
wed’s open rt Z3O301 up 440 


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HJg 9324 -001 1)0989 

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HU IF 0 2t »s 

5epN 9X64 9X4} 9164 —001 7310 

E&srtex 48357. Pm, artes; 30495 
Pm. open Mj 311X70 up 2 W 


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Moody's 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures 
CRB 


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Sate fcurei rae unoffieiaL veatV togta raid tows raflea the pRktaus 52 iwefes plus Rie cunera 
weetabrtrrttelcle5tftai5nqdgr.Whefeqspto ra aoQtd M dendgiiouanBiD2Sponjrtornwre 
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dividend, cc- PE exasdsttcM - arted. i - newyearty low. dd - toss in me last 1 2 mwmiL 
e - dMdend decJarad or paid in precedino 12 months. * - orawrt rata tooet&xd on test 
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dactned offer spBi-up or stock OMiSenA. I ■ rfivWend pokJ Bift jaw wimted, defeneiL or no 
action taken at west dMdend raeeWig. k - OMeri 

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nd - nrart dov deB»«y. P * toltlol dwtdewl nnraiol rate unknown- P/E -pntMOTneiBs ratio. 

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10 merrtc lam- f par nn 
Mar 97 1412 1410 1412 -U 

Jut 97 1424 1412 1422 —6 

5*97 14S3 1440 14S2 -I 

0X37 imt U70 I4B — 3 

Mu 98 1504 1500 1504 -3 

May 98 1524 1 518 1524 -3 

Est ate NA Wed's, ate SAM 
Wacfsooenirt 93X74 off 532 


» TR. TREASURY 10011 

AtoWW^j 106-17 107X1 »07 

5£S97 '04-21 104-05 104-19 +88 

DK97I0MJ7 1 06-® 104-00 , go 

Estate 80X00 bbfffcate 7tx*0 

“W'smeninr 343,3*5 « 14M 


* £ *6576 Atojj 7505 
*2 368M /.ICY 98 


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SMnik^anBMiL 
Art 97 7245 71X5 72.12 +0JB 40474 

Qd«7 7170 7130 73X5 +612 3X22 

Dec 97 7475 74X0 7654 +618 2X539 

Mar 98 TUS 7&70 7545 +830 3X65 

Mcv98 7617 —634 751 

Estate HA WeffLHte 19*4 
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JX97 21950 2095D 11690 + 550 15.IN 

5*0 97 19645 1BJB 19450 +115 TXJ 

Dec 97 17445 1 0X0 17110 +U0 6742 

Mar 98 160X0 157X0 160X0 »1JS I.9M 

Est ate NA WetTs. sate 9527 
Wad's open irt 30X82 ofl 77 


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Art 97 5670 5133 5660 +141 

Auo 77 55X0 5180 55X0 +1,M 

Sep 97 5570 5665 SSJO +1X1 

0877 5645 5540 S6fi +IJH 

Now 97 5749 5640 57 JD *105 

Ok 97 57X5 5693 57X5 +1JH 

Jan9S 5I4S 5740 5625 +1X9 

Feb 91 57.75 5700 57X5 +106 

EsLvte NA Weffs-ste 26424 
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MV9B 1664 1658 HL63 +802 

MOV98 1639 10X6 1639 1 0-02 

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M97 2638 1941 26JJ 

Aw 97 2629 19 JS 2044 

S 97 2610 It J4 2610 

97 2615 1975 2615 

NovTT 2618 19.72 2610 


+670 86141 
+OJI 57,461 
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+636 16412 
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to subscribe and save. 

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at 0800 1 7538 

Kfralb^Sribunc 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 15 


EUROPE 





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ted & 
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Another Profit Alert 
Damages BTR Stock 


w. 

»* •■ • 


CdOfxW fc> ft, Sutffnn a^uif An 

. LONDON — BTR PLC shares 
fell 14 percent Thursday after die 
company said the strong pound and 
sluggish growth in Germany and 
Australia were leading to a drop in 
its first-half operating profit. 

- BTR, which makes products 
ranging from formica tabletops to 
conveyor belts, said those factors 
would cut operating profit by about 
£35 million (S57.3 million) and 
sales by £300 million, compared 
with the first half of 1996. 

Germany and Australia account 
for 30 percent of the company’s 
revenue. 

Other British businesses, includ- 
ing Reed International PLC and Reu- 
ters Holdings PLC, also have said 
that the expensive pound, which has 
risen 20 percent against a basket of 



:occ 'niDaiii e . 

. “That's ^ 2?"$ 
the H&Q con£L Can * Na 
Mr. 

«£■ solid i„ Apri| *«W»* 
February and 
April. Peon]- Co ^. 
_ thefirsiquiTer^'^Sk 


velv traded r I s . 


priace; 


lively 

*o6lSi. its second 

reporting eaminc^Sp 1 ^ 
peciaifoas. Top .^w* 954 
dosed up ? ai IS 

she world's larges: 

added 




peciatiaas.Top *2??* * 

^«p 3 «i&%aa?k 

she world's 
added : a »o 
IBM s u 
after gi-.in 

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Lai» fa,:- iBu'f «R 
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ieli Nt zn i 
the pet 
marugeme 
slower c' 


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J.r/.etidmj. 

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earning heiow T 

Phi::p Hr.', in r.nwnui tel] 

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cucopar. 

C QUIZ'S. 
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12 -4 on "-■■‘-.■•I iia ~.t i»g 
soiid-wjs^ and t.sb! itrcfc 
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rv/. "v * 

Wal-Mjrr S:::;.- rosj '.ajc, 
After -r N*:d ^t.c- »»»•.« a 
aK-vS*;*’--^! : n -.rrlrr.c 
ear'icr. r’.. r.-.-; vis. 


Charge Hits 
Profit at 
Body Shop 

Curfdtd by Our Staff From Dtspcacha 

LONDON — Body Shop In- 
ternational PLC said Thursday 
its pretax profit fell 3 percent in 
the year ended March ! as it 
took a charge for problems at its 
French operations. 

Without the charge of £6.5 
million ($10.6 million), the re- 
tailer, which sells what it calls 
environmentally friendly cos- 
metics, would have posted a 17 
percent rise in profit as revenue 
from new stores offset slow 
growth at existing stores. 
Pretax profit after the charge 
was £31.7 million, down from 
£32.7 milli on a year earlier. 

Stuart Rose, the managing 
director, said the company was 
looking for a French retailer to 
take over operations in France. 
He said French sales suffered 
from a terro rist bombing cam- 
paign in 1995 and bad never 
recovered. Overall, sales rose 8 
percent, to £6223 million, but 
sales at stores that had been 
open at least a year were flaL 
. Body Shop’s shares fell 2 
pence to close at 1883. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters ) 


other currencies since August, would 
slash their earnings by reducing die 
value of overseas income when it is 
convened into pounds. 

* ‘This is not (he first profit warn- 
ing'’ over British currency fluctu- 
ations, said John Hatherly, head of 
research at M&G Group PLC, “and 
it's not going to be the last. The 
reaction is more the surprise." 

BTR’s stock fell 37 pence to dose 

at 229. 

BTR’s profit warning is the latest 
of several such alerts that have den- 
ted investor confidence in the con- 
glomerate. 

In September 1994, the company 
said profit margins had come under 
pressure because of overcapacity in 
its markets. In December 1995, it 
said a weak Australian housing mar- 
ket and sluggishness in U.S. and 
European car manufacturing would 
dent profit. 

Last May, BTR blamed poor per- 
formance at its Polymer TaJ wan unit 
for a weak profit outlook. 

But some analysts said they ex- 
pected that a yearlong reorganiz- 
ation program would eventually 
bring returns at the company. 

“The market always expects 
things to happen overnight,” said 
Grant Cullens, fund manager with 
Hill Samuel Bank Ltd. “I think there 
is at least another 18 months to go.” 

“This is an overreaction," said 
Janet Lear at Credit Lyonnais Se- 
curities. “This highlighted the fact 
that there is more economic impact 
than people thought We’re still very 
keen on BTR.” 

BTR also restated its earnings for 
1996 to account for a disposal and 
acquisition program. It said oper- 
ating profit in the first half of 1996 
was £690 million, compared with a 
previously reported £496 million. 
Sales for the first half were set at 
£4.19 billion. 

The company aims to sell off 
about £23 billion of assets by the 
end of this year. It had sold £1.8 
billion by March. 

Separately, BTR said it had 
agreed to buy the Parvex unit of 
GEC Alsifaom and to sell its Mirr- 
less Blackstone unit to that joint- 
venture company. 

BTR said Parvex would enhance 
its Brook Hansen industrial motors 
and gear drives unit, while the Mirr- 
less sale completed its exit from 
diesel engine manufacturing. 

Financial terms of the deal were 
not disclosed. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


Boeing Lands a Czech Deal 

It and McDonnell Plan to Take Stake in Aircraft Maker 


Bloomberg ,\Ws 

PRAGUE — The government 
plans to sell a minority stoke in the 
Czech Republic ’s biggest maker of 
military aircraft. Aero Vodochody . 
to a group led by Boeing Co. and 
McDonnell Douglas Corp. 

The contract, announced late 
Wednesday, should be signed by 
the end of September, Prime Min- 
ister Vaclav Klaus said. The price 
was not disclosed. 

The Czech airline CSA joined 
Boeing and McDonnell to form the 
consortium. 

The sale comes as McDonnell 
Douglas is competing to sell fight- 
er jets to the Czech military ana to 
other East European countries. 

Boeing and its partners plan to 


use Aero Vodochody to make parts 
for Boeing's commercial carriers 
and assemble McDonnell’s fighter 
jets, using some local suppliers. 

The Czech government opened 
bidding in January for a stake of 
between 34 percent and 40 percent 
of the heavily indebted aircra ft 
maker. The minimum price was set 
at 950 million koruna ($30.8 mil- 
lion). Boeing and McDonnell 
Douglas's cooperation on die proj- 
ect is independent of Boeing’s plan 
to buy McDonnell, and the two will 
remain partners in the Czech Re- 
public even if regulators block 
Boeing's $13.65 billion purchase 
of its rival, Boeing said. The merger 
is expected to close this summer. 

Aero already makes parts for 


Boeing 747s and 757s. Analysis 
said the companies may have 
agreed to the deal to improve their 
chances of selling military aircraft 
to Prague. 

“Ultimately, one has to be able 
to provide offsets and jobs, and 1 
think this is really part of the offset 
issue," John Modzelewski, an 
analyst at Paine Webber, said. 

Companies that win contracts 
from governments often sign so- 
called offset deals to make parts in 
the country or use local subcon- 
tractors. 

Aero Vodochody produces 
training aircraft and is one of the 
Czech Republic's largest export- 
ers of military equipment, mainly 
parts for its planes. 


BSkyB’s Plan Gains Ally and Rival 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 
DAX . 


London 
FFSE KX> Index 


GAQ 40; 



J"F MAM JF 


1996 


1996 


MAM 

1997 



Amsterdam AEX :■ 


Closed. 77 S#»' s -/Vr.y 


CawpcW/iv OtrSuffFma Dupaxitrs 

LONDON — British Sky Broad- 
casting Group PLC’s planned satel- 
lite-television venture drew a com- 
petitor and a collaborator Thursday. 

British Digital Broadcasting, a 
consortium bidding for rights to offer 
digital terrestrial-television services, 
said it was discussing woridng with 
British Interactive Broadcasting, the 
satellite group led by BSkyB. 

But United News & Media PLC 
said it had framed an alliance with 
NTL Inc. to bid for a license for 
digital-televirion services that would 
compete with the BSkyB venture. 

BSkyB announced the formation 
of British Interactive on Wednes- 


day. The venture, which is to 
provide such services as home shop- 
ping and banking along with about 
200 satellite channels, also includes 
British Telecommunications PLC, 
Midland Bank PLC and Matsushita 
Electric Industrial Co. 

British Digital, formed by Carl- 
ton Communications PLC and Gra- 
nada Group PLC, already has ap- 
plied with BSkyB for three digital 
tenestrial-television licenses. Tbe 
director of British Digital. Nigel 
Walmsley, welcomed the creation 
of British Interactive, saying it 
would accelerate his company’s 
prospects of offering a wider range 
of interactive services. “BDB and 


BIB are in active discussions about 
collaboration between tbe parties to 
enhance tbe interactive opportuni- 
ties afforded by BDB’s plans for 
digital terrestrial television." Mr. 
Walmsley said. 

United News said it would pay 
£120 million (S196.4 million) over 
four years for 30 percent of die cap- 
ital of Digital Television Network 
Ltd., a venture owned by NTL. NTL 
was formed after the acquisition of 
International CableTel Inc., a U.S.- 
owned British cable company, by 
National Transcomtmmi cations 
Ltd., which previously ran a com- 
mercial-television transmitter net- 
work. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Brands 

BEL -20 

Closed -JgatJ&i- :jit 

Frankfurt - 

DAX 

dosed ~:ajswm y:: yi 

Copenh^jen 

Stock Marita*. 

Ctosotf- 

Helsinki 

HEXOanena 

i Closed • 3 JW 2 .S 4 ■ frb 

Oslo 

OBX 

Closed ' =S»JS 7 -. 35 

London 

FTSE 100 

4^8040 4 ,S 37 itl; : i 48 S. 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

525^5 _ 524.12 

Milan ■ 

MfBTEL 

■ 12872 ■ 12326 

Pools 

CAG 40 : 

Closed ■ 2 jS 434 t 

Stockholm 

SX 1 B 

CIO fled 2 . 909.40 .* 

Vienna 

ATX ' ■” . 

. dosed • 1 , 227 . 2 ! 

Zurich 

SPI 

Ctatod: 

Source: Telekurs 


/maiatmos} Hrra/iJ Tnbunc 

Very briefly: 


Toyota Plans New Model for Europe 


Bloomberg News 

BRUSSELS — Toyota Motor 
Corp. said it was developing a ‘ ‘com- 
pletely new kind of small car for the 
European market,” and that it might 
build the car at a new plant some- 
where on the Continent. 

Toyota's president, Hiroshi Ok- 
uda, said the automaker had not yet 
made a decision on whether to build 
a new plant in Europe. 

“I have not brought a shovel,” 
said Mr. Oku da, who was in Brus- 
sels on Wednesday for meetings 


with Toyota sales and manufactur- 
ing representatives. "We are not 
ready yet to go to work on any new 
plants, and I don^ ’t expect a decision 
More next year about any addi- 
tional production in Europe." 

He said the new model, intended 
to compete with Volkswagen AG's 
Polo, Ford Motor Co.'s Ka and Fiat 
SpA*s Punto, would not be sold in 
Japan but would be designed there 
with input from the Toyota design 
center in Brussels. 

Conceptual models of the new car, 


which does not yet have a name, will 
be shown at the Frankfurt auto show 
in September, Mr. Okuda said. 

Toyota hopes to increase sales in 
Europe to 600,000 vehicles a year 
by the turn of the century from about 
400,000 last year. The European 
Union has a one million car-per-year 
limit on Japanese auto imports. 

Toyota said it would shift pro- 
duction of its Corolla model from 
Japan to its Bumaston, England, 
plant next year to make room for 
production of the new car. 


• Abbas GokaL chairman of the Gulf Group shipping and 
trading concern, was sentenced to 14 years in prison for his 
cemral role in a $ 1 .2 billion web of corrupt loans involving top 
executives of Bank of Credit & Commerce InternationaL 
He was also fined almost $5 million. 

• Lonrtao PLC sold Lonrho Sugar Corp., an African sub- 
sidiary, to Illovo Sugar Ltd. of South Africa for 1.62 billion 
rand ($3633 million). 

• Alfred McAlpine PLC agreed to buy another bom e-build- 
er, Raine PLC, for about £443 million ($723 million) in 
stock and the assumption of £40 million in debt. 

• Spain's unemployment fell to 13.61 percent in April from 
13.89 percent in March, the Labor Ministry said. The min- 
istry's figures, which reflect unemployment-insurance claims, 
differ from those of tbe National Statistics Institute, which are 
based on a telephone survey; the institute estimated un- 
employment at 21 .8 percent in the fourth quarter. 

• Empresa Nacional de Electricidad SA said lower elec- 
tricity rates and a revaluation of its assets led to an 8 percent 
decline in first-quarter ok profit, to 393 billion pesetas 
($2703 million). 

• Telepizza SA's first-quarter net profit rose 41 percent, to 
482 million pesetas, as the Spanish pizza-delivery company 
increased sales both to individual buyers and to franchisees. 

• Italy’s Treasury Ministry said it would fine former senior 
administrators and members of the board of Banco di Napoli 
SpA 135 billion lire ($733,000) for supervisory failures. 

• Olivetti SpA forecast that it would report a first-half loss of 
264.2 billion lire, with tbe loss for the second quarter totaling 
93 billion lire. 

• Teva Pharmaceutical Industries LtrL’s first-quarter net 

profit rase 68 percent, to $313 million, on increased revenue 
from the Israeli pharmaceutical company's generic drugs. 
•BezeqUd. lost its appeal to the Jerusalem District Court of 
die Antitrust Authority's declaration that the state-owned 
phone company was a monopoly. Bloomberg. AFP, AFX 


-SXOCKS l A^Most Fhe tlie-Baagkok Market, Some-Still Insist That a Rebound Is Near 






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Continued from Page 13 

The government is already trying to 
bail oat troubled property mid finance 
companies. 

It inaugurated a 50 billion-baht bor- 
rowing program Wednesday, after a 
five-day delay from its scheduled start, 
to shore up the industries. 

About 40 percent of the 900 trillion 
baht of loans made to developers in tbe 
1990s are in default. 

The run of problems steins from a 
frenzy of building and speculation in the 
i«n% 1980s is coming back to haunt 
. developers and the financial institutions 
that lent them money. 

Thailand's current-account deficit 


has compounded the real-estate crash. 

At almost 8 percent of economic out- 
put, the shortfall is one of the world's 
highest and has prompted comparisons 
with Mexico, which devalued its cur- 
rency in 1994 after running up a com- 
parable imbalance. 

Tbe deficit has forced die central 
bank to keep overnight lending rases at 
about 93 percent, leaving inflation-ad- 
justed interest rates near theft highest 
this decade. 

With aO that bad news already re- 
flected in stocks. Mr. Sandlund said he 
saw no reason to sell now. Tbe moment 
every analyst, journalist or salesman 
seems to be forecasting doom, he said, is 
often the very moment to buy. 


“I’d prefer to be buying into a col- 
lapsing market," Mr. Sandlund said, but 
“when you can find a guy who can call 
the bottom of this market or any market, 
let nre know and I'll hire hun." 

■ Central Bank Defends Itself 

The Bank of Thailand reaffirmed its 
independence Thursday from Thai pol- 
itics in carrying out its job of main- 
taining monetary stability, Reuters re- 
ported from Bangkok. 

Remgchai Marakanond, the centra] 
bank’s governor, said he had followed a 
tradition observed by bis predecessors 
in coordinating with tbe government on 
monetary policy. 

“The central bank has consistently 


adhered to the principle of being in- 
dependent in carrying out its respon- 
sibility,” Mr. Remgchai said 

“But being independent does not en- 
tail any vocal conflict with the gov- 
ernment." 

Mr. Rerngchai's statement was a re- 
sponse to recent local press criticism 
that he had been submissive to politi- 
cians during his 10-month tenure. 

Tbe governor credited the central 
bank’s success in defending die baht 
against several rounds of sporadic mar- 
ket attacks early this year to his mo- 
bilizing the central bank's staff to work 
as a team. 


Will Labour Aid Eurotunnel? 


PARIS — France has asked Bri- 
tain’s new Labour government to re- 
verse its Conservative predecessor by 
agreeing to an extension of Eurotun- 
nel SA’s 65-year concession to op- 
erate the Channel Tunnel. 

Eurotunnel’s creditor banks have 
agreed to swap some of its £9 billion 
($14.7 million) in debt for a 453 
percent equity stake. But that plan 
requires approval from individual 
shareholders, who currently hold 90 
percent of tbe struggling company's 
equity. Shareholder activists have 
said they would try to block the debt 
restructuring plan if the British and 
French governments do not allow 


Eurotunnel to keep tbe concession be- 
yond 2052. giving tbe company more 
time to di g itself out of its predic- 
ament 

Shareholders are due to meet July 
10 to vote on the plan. 

Paris backs tbe extension, but Bri- 
tain’s previous Conservative govern- 
ment, ousted by Labour in general elec- 
tions May 1, was unwilling to agree. 

Separately. Eurotunnel said car and 
bus traffic on its Le Shuttle service fell 
3 percent to 143,902 in April from 
March, while passenger numbers on 
tbe Eurostar rail service between Lon- 
don, Paris and Brussels fell to 486359 
from 500,899. (AFP. AFX) 


If ii f WORLD STOCK MARKETS 

u iwi v - •V= s rv 

rnoc-.s* ~ { ‘ • 






r- ■ 

3 3 - 
ar** 


Thursday; May 8 

prices to toad cuneodes. 
TeteXurs 



;g;g ;g | U 


Bangkok 

AdvHoSK 
Bangkok BkF 
KnmgTWBk 

PTTExpIcr 
StomCeiMftf F 

Stem Cora B*F 

Tdacamasia 

ntfAlnm 
Thd Fans BK F 
liM Conun 


15 B 

238 

29 

306 

652 

JO 

35 J 5 

37 J 5 

150 

150 


5 ETMK 614 J 6 
Pratoao: 626 J 7 

150 154 157 

230 230 238 

2730 7/JS 2 B. 7 S 

2*8 304 304 

640 648 652 

139 143 149 

34 J 5 3535 35 J» 

36 37 37 JO 

145 145 154 

142 145 ISO 


JWundes Indl 

UbalrMP 

IMyUfe 
Lib Life Shut 
Minorca 
Nanpak 
JtoJcor 

Rembrandt Gp 
Rldtemora 
Rust PMbwo 
SA Breweries 
Saraancor 
S«d 
SB 1 C 

Tiger dots 


High Law 

60 J 8 59.75 
337 335 

12450 123 

1 U 0 1625 
100 99 JO 
19 18 J 0 
91 9025 
4650 45 L 75 
6 S 25 64 

7425 7325 
134 13225 
47 JO 47 

5625 553® 
210 20525 
7675 7675 


CkM Pm. 
60 60 JQ 
335 337 

124 125 

1630 1655 
100 100 
19 19.05 
9075 92 

4620 4610 
65 64 J 0 
7320 7220 
134 13 Z 25 
4726 4650 
56 56 

210 20920 
7675 7625 


PrudentU 
RoBtmckPP 
Rmi Group 

KeckBiCobn 

HedkMiit 

tattakO biMal 

ReufenHdgs 

Pnom 
RMC Group 
RoflsRnvce 
Rani Bk Scot 
RTZrag 
ai 65 ixi AO 



Markets Closed 

Most European and some 
Asian markets were closed 
Thursday for a holiday. 


fc'-r 


.:ii i 

»- - a}; 





Hong Kong 

SSS& 



Hoag 5«r 1374020 
PratfMK: 136 B 5 J 1 

jjjg} ft W ■ 

M S3 S3 

72 7150 7350 

S3 33 £8 

S3 33 £3 

iSdS 1 

820 US 825 

85 35 -S3 
BS *3 H 

HooewdHdas 458 193 4JK3 193 

B3T d 4 g _s 

2120 
1855 


||ri 

ME 8 





- • aso 

_iBHdg '21>B 
Kerry ■ lt» 
MwWofWOev 
OrtenM Press 
Peon {Mental . 

SHK Praps 
Shun Tak Hdgs 
StaoLonOCa 

SthCUnaPeti 

SwfcePoeA. 
wiwfjwgs 
Wteetadi 


49 

188 

108 

9025 

4.93 

8J0 

685 

6250 

3020 

1755 


2120 

1820 

47 

320 

1» 

8950 

420 

725 

675 

61 

30.10 

17 


61 
7355 
21 JO 
1820 


4850 4720 
m 225 
103 1 U 
90JS 9075 
420 

825 820 
420 625 
4250 4225 
3 -L 70 . 30 » 
1750 1720 


Johannesburg 


AngnAMura 
AngtoAH^COrp 
APgtaAiB Cota 


\ ]»**#** 
a jo# 


SfiS’lS-S-i’H 

S-a 

1425 16 1 * 1055 

49 4850 49 69 

24 -UTS 2550 « 

’S’- 3 ’S-S ’2-S WJ5 
3850 3750 3030 37 -“ 
«« 31.40 3125 3120 
1 U 0 1040 1075 1050 
1 M 187 108 1 ® 

g« aw 5925 59 

2910 2 SJ 3 " SSJfl 2 BM 
117 - 11 * 320 


? CG.Sra 8 h 
DeBMfS 
OriekMMn 
FstHotl JK . 
Genov 
GFSA 

UnrastaTHMs 

tngwCad' 

tsora 


London 

Abbey Natl 690 

AKea Doaiacq 440 

'jcBrSads £51 

£39 
1112 

030 

BAT Ind . 

BonkSoolfcind 4 .M 

BtueOtta 4 a 

BQC Group ?&> 

Boot* 727 

BPBInd , 3 ^ 

BiBAerasp 13 * 

Bril Airways 6 » 

BG 125 

BrffLand 5 .M 

BrBP^ra 7 J 2 

| 

BrffTeiecam 429 

BmViCasM 1028 

Hi 

CodbraySdw 523 

Cratton Comm 640 

OnnnllMon 7 a 

CbmpnaGp tJ3 

COurtauM* 326 

OtOTB £*J 7 

Ejediacampoaent* 401 

isfe l 

Fomffiw 155 

gs**** 9 S. 

GKN ' ,’ 4 f 

GhnoWdcvne 1222 
GronadaGp 9 a 

Grand Met - 

GroenoBsGp 
Gukmess 
GUS 

HsScHMgs 

ta 

hnpl Tobacco 

Khuftsher 
Lfldbroke 
Land Sec 

Lnsno — - 

Legal Geal Grp 461 

UBpCKTCSGo 6W 

Lucas Vartty 

Maas Spencer 

ME PC 
NaS Power 


. 530 

2.90 

£07 

521 

£66 

529 

1726 

727 

410 

720 

225 

652 

235 


NatWest 

Nad 

Orange 

P &0 

Peonon 

Ptftlnpton 

PowerGen 


1.93 

526 

496 

1075 

224 

636 

727 

620 

221 

6.17 
7 .H 

1.17 

447 


FT-SE lOO 45 VL 46 

PmfeaK 453750 

824 823 827 

433 437 437 

628 659 623 

420 625 627 

1.17 1.19 1.17 

£45 £51 £44 

523 £36 533 

1126 1220 12 L 04 

621 OB. 

£16 621 SB 
194 410 327 

m 426 427 

920 954 »-« 

7.16 7 a 722 
13 124 325 

1223 1194 1179 
624 625 £97 

173 126 124 

525 520 £97 

7.16 724 726 

526 £94 £09 

126 123 127 

448 4 » 450 

116 129 IM 

1015 1019 1025 
152 154 154 

491 Sin 498 

£19 £27 521 

524 520 528 

7 JJS 732 7 .W 

£40 £68 £72 

115 118 ja 

£» *3t> £» 
3 SB 35 B 651 
1 H« 1|26 1 W 9 

cm £07 £04 

£12 £19 £15 
157 15 

MS 9-32 »a 
166 ' 168 3 JQ 
953 *55 955 
1150 Tim ll |0 
ft 08 928 ?■« 
£10 £13 5 .J 3 
282 256 
jfl 5 J 07 £05 

£10 £14 £15 

£57 £58 659 

522 £65 572 

1628 17.14 1 £» 
753 750 756 

4 AS 428 4 W 
751 7.15 7.05 

131 244 238 

832 650 8 » 

226 133 227 

4 S 1 

£J 7 £02 £75 
LM 150 151 

5 £06 £04 

473 494 

1165 lig 1^1 
223 233 253 


Satabray 
Sdundeis 
Scttf NeMcnsUe 
Scot Power 
Secular 
Sworn TreV 
SheSTnanpR 
Stebe 

Smbti Nephew 
SnMiKOne 
SrattHlnd 
SOwRiElec 

Stand Charter 
Tale & Lyle 
Tosco 

Tteames Wrier 

31 Group 

Tl Group 

Taranm 

(JnBenr 1 

UU Assurance 

UM News 

UtdUflBta 

VendomeUruts 

VOda&HW 

Whfflwod 

WUknrwKdgs 

Wnbtiey 

WPP Group 

Zrenea 


Hlgb 1 

Low 1 

dote 

Pm 

£44 

£30 

£35 

£33 

488 

435 

487 

425 













414 




KE -1 




111 

3 



■ T 1 




I 




■Tvl 




10 




£14 




■n 








ir r i 




£92 




383 




















136 




ln '1 




iri 




Brl 








901 




f l 




ESI 




£75 




£25 












i?.yj 




490 












111 




W il 




Ka .1 




118 




493 








1935 

1£95 

1935 

19.15 


High Low Ctose Pm. 


High law Chsa Pnv. 


Hl^i Low Ctese Pm 


Aba A 
Banned B 
ComaCPO 
d/m C 

ErapModemo 
GpoCanoAl 
GpoFBcoraer 
Gpo Rnmbwso 
KnbOaiL Men 
TrievheCPO 

TeiMoL 


4660 

1674 

2760 

1216 

41 JO 
4490 
IJB 
2660 

3110 

9750 

1653 


4550 

1662 

2£B0 

1200 

4160 

4420 

132 

2630 

2960 

9 S 70 

1656 


4660 46.10 
1670 1650 
2760 2685 

1212 1210 

4170 4175 
4490 4415 
1-02 152 

24 -SS 2670 

3005 2970 

9750 9£10 

1620 1634 


KnreaSPwr 
Koran Eiecfl B*l 
K orea Mob Tel 
LSSemfcon 
PnbanglimS) 
Samsung OisJkqr 
SantsuaaEtac 

Sbfedian Barit 


26300 25900 26000 26100 
5380 5160 5200 5360 

414000 390000 393000 412(100 

28300 27400 Z 79 SS 27 WB 

51300 50000 50500 51000 
41300 40200 41200 41000 

60900 59300 S 9300 £1000 

10600 10200 10300 10400 


Milan 


Sinaanore straits n«m: 2*59 j« 

PTntoss 2068.13 


s 1227100 

Preefouss 1232650 


ISSS 1 

BCD dl Roma 


CreSfca itaaraw 
Efflson 

Rat 

1 MI 

INA 




RA 5 


S Paolo Torino 
Stet 

TetacaonaBa 

TIM 







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A 5 taPocBmr 
CerebosPac 
atyDevfts 
QaeOntaae 
Dotty Fonn Ini ■ 
DBS forctan 
DBS Land 
Frasa-ANenve 
UK Land’ 
JudMflBMsn* 
Jard Strategic' 
Keppel 
KeppdBank 

KeppriFds. 


02 Unkxi Bit F 

RartMayHdgs 


17425 

10940 


Madrid 

Aeednm 

ACE 5 A 

AgoatBOKUOfl 


rim fedee 525.11 
Pnvtaas: 52412 


Bl 

Bunesta 
BuneMte- 
Bat Centra H2sp 
to Popular 
Bgo Santander 
CEPSA 
CMrinanfe 
CoraMapte 
Endesa 
FECSA 
Gets Natural 
Ibenfario 
Pryco 


SevBnmElec 
Tabaadem 
Teletaaico 
Union Fenon 
Vritne Oraent 


22500 

1720 

5730 

7270 

10050 

1460 

22790 

4500 

32500 

11220 

472 S 

2480 

7740 

10670 

1215 

30590 

1690 

2615 

6020 

1300 

7480 

3880 

1250 

1900 


21520 

1685 

5580 

7020 

9870 

1400 

22300 

4425 

31700 

11040 

4605 

2460 

7610 

10390 

1180 

30000 

1660 

2585 

5920 

1275 

7140 

3830 

1235 

1820 


22500 21810 
1720 1700 
5720 5660 
7270 7120 
10050 9990 

■ 1455 1450 

2J780 

4490 4495 
32500 32000 

11220 11200 

4680 4650 
2480 2470 
7700 7780 
10670 10560 

1215 1205 
30150 30770 
1605 1695 
2605 2615 
5960 6040 
1295 1280 
7188 7440 
3880 3845 

1245 1255 
1900 1880 




1' F " 


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Stag Land 
StagPrassF 
Sing Tech Ind 
Sing TeWcranm 
Tat Lee Bank 

UU IndMMri 

UMDSeaBkF 

WtagTalHOgs 

U 2 . Obflars. 


N. T. 
9 

1220 

rs 

O. 74 
18.10 
£10 

1120 

245 

£10 

328 

£70 

180 

458 

416 

18 

iaio 

6 

£75 

1U0 

7.10 

2780 

384 

222 

£36 

1.15 

15 

420 


NT. 

MS 

1140 
1430 
074 
1770 
498 
11.10 
2 39 
£75 
322 
625 
£78 
456 
408 
1720 
10 
£90 
680 
1280 
7 

2720 

£76 

288 

£34 

1.13 

1460 

412 


N.T. £60 

9 9 
1220 12-70 

15 75 

074 074 

1788 1&30 

5 £05 

1180 1180 
143 136 

£10 £75 

320 323 

625 £65 

£00 £80 
428 460 

488 422 

1780 1 BJ 0 

10 1020 

5M 5M 
£70 670 

1170 1190 

7 720 

2780 28.10 
£84 384 

149 152 

£34 134 

1.14 1.15 

1480 1529 
418 418 


Tokyo 

ABnomato 
A 8 Nippon Air 
Amway 
AsaMBonk 
AsuNCheni 
AsabiGtaas 
BA Tokyo MAw 
Bk Yokntrama 
Bndgesfcn# 
Conn 
OlubuBeC 
Ox»otaj Etec 
Dai HUp Prinl 

Dahl 

Dat-tchtRang 

DrdwaBank 

Dahra House 

DalwaScc 

DDI 

Denso 

EariJmianRy 
Etsal 
Fame 
IBank 
IPtMD 

Bk 


mtel 225 : 28051 81 


Hacnquid 

HDadtl 


Honda Malar 
IBJ 


1150 1130 

7 B 5 . 777 

3900 3830 

too 7 B 4 
709 694 

1178 1140 

2090 2060 

535 530 

2830 2760 

3250 3190 

2070 2050 

2 B 30 2010 

2420 2380 

696 60 

1470 1430 

426 420 

1370 1350 

892 873 

84500 B 33 £n 
3120 3000 
530 (ta 5200 a 
2370 234 

4270 41 « 

1490 1470 

5110 4970 

1400 1380 
1150 1130 

1290 1260 

4100 4130 

1340 1310 


usd 

7 B 4 

3880 

793 

7 D 3 

1170 

2070 

531 

2800 

3210 

2070 

2038 

2418 

694 

U7D 

425 

T 370 

876 

2250 a 

3030 

S 240 u 

2360 

4270 

1490 

5030 

1390 

1130 

1280 

4150 


1130 

777 

■awn 

787 

714 

1180 

2110 

527 

2860 

3260 

2070 

2030 

2400 

652 

1470 

427 

1360 

900 

8450 a 

3130 

5370 a 

2370 

4160 

1500 

5110 

1400 

1130 

1280 

38 


[The Trib Index 

Prices as at 3V0 PM. New York time. 

Jen. 1. 1932 => TOO. 

Level 

Ctianga 

% chwigs 

yoartortato 
% ctianga 
+ 7.48 

World Index 

16030 

+ 0.97 

+O.B 1 

Regkxiad Indwft 

Asta/Padbc 

118.52 

+ 0.54 

+ 0.46 

- 3.88 

Europe 

167.93 

+ 1.00 

+060 

+4.17 

N. America 

18633 

+ 0.82 

+ 0.44 

+ 15-21 

S. America 

tmluairtal Indeous 

149.05 

+ 2.78 

+ 1 J 90 

+3025 

Capital goods 

195.84 

+037 

+ 0.19 

+ 14^8 

Consumer goods 

133.22 

+ 0.98 

+ 0 j 54 

+ 13.50 

Energy 

188.19 

+ 1.19 

+ 0.64 

+ 10.24 

Finance 

117.40 

+ 0.64 

+OJ 55 

+ 0^1 

Miscellaneous 

161.89 

+ 1.77 

+ 1.11 

+ 0.07 

Raw Materials 

184.07 

+ 0.73 

+ 0.40 

+495 

Service 

148^6 

+ 1.66 

+ 1.13 

+ 8.48 

Limes 

137.33 

+ 1.39 

+ 1.02 

-437 

Tte International Herald Tribune World Stock Index O trades tha US. doSor values o( 
ZOO ntematfcnaBy knvstable mocha from 25 countries. For man wrfonrMkm. a tree 
booMot is OMritaUB by writing to The Trib Index. 1B1 Avenue Charles da Gauds. 

92SS1 New0y Codex. Fiance. CompOedbyaoondmigNewe. 

High 

Law Close 

Prew. 

HI# Law 

ante Pm 


Sao Paulo 


BmdeaoPM 
Brahma PM 
CerataPM 
CESFPH 
Capri 
Elrimbm 
Hantaan PW 
Light Sentdos 


Manila 

AlOMB 

MOM Land 

upmptsi 
CAP Homes 
MooBaEtacA 
Metro Bank 


£06 £06 
728 784 


681 

2.16 


£26 
— 7.66 
£86 4X3 


pSSiForaeU *-72 


UB 2.JJ 

£08 £13 £13 

*1 7M 7.M 
1.13 114 1.14 
£25 £47 £5 

483 484 470 


PCtBnnk 
PM Lang Dig 
SanMJguriB 
SMPdmeHdg 


1785 

1915 

151 

1 IL 75 

87 

595 

£70 

30720 

770 

66 

7 


PSEfmtac 2612 .il 

PreriSOE 269 UI 

1685 17 17^5 

19 19 19 

144 146 

1135 10 L 2 S. 

BUD >7 
590 

£20 

300 ... 

750 755 

63 63 

£90 7 


152 
» 
87 
590 
£50 £30 
305 310 

745 
68 
7 


PauUstaLuz 

SUNadonof 

SouraCnn 
TeBbrmPfd 
Triendg 
Tetal 
Tries* Pid 
Untaanco 
UstarinasPfd 
CVRD PM 


£95 £80 

73080 72980 
47 JO 4 £S 0 
5130 5680 
1£00 1688 
49180 *280 
57780 57380 

47100470.990 

33680 33489 

23180 22520 

16880 16880 

37 JO 3680 

980 987 

SM 

16720 16180 

31989 31180 

3980 3989 

124 121 

2£50 2 £ 4 S 


£87 £90 

73000 72980 
47 JO 4630 
5430 S6JB0 
1680 1680 

48980 48480 

57480 57780 

47380 47180 

TWnq 33480 

229 JO 22780 

16&80 16780 

3680 3780 

9 J» 4 JO 
13190 12680 
158.99 16380 

16680 166 JO 

31980 30880 

3980 3980 

124 122 

2680 2525 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBUng 

BHP 

Bond 

Brambles hid. 
CBA 

CCAanffi 
Cafes Mycr 

CflflMlOQ 

CRA 

CSR 

Posies Brew 
GoodmaaBd 
ICI Avsfndki 
Lend Lease 
MIMHdm 
Net Auri Bunk 

NatMohroiHdg 

NtmCwp 
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PAGE 16 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, .MAY 9, 1997 


RAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


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B'vV-^S-r or 


NEC Venture 
To Improve 
China’s Chip 
Technology 

Ciffplnffe Our StffFumtDupittln 

TOKYO — NEC Crap.. Japan’s 

largest semiconductor producer said 
Thursday it had reached a prelim- 
inary agreement to set up a chip- 
making venture in China as pan ora 
SI billion state-backed plan to bolster 
China's semiconductor technology. 

NEC expects to provide Shanghai 
Huahong Microelectronics Co. with 
technology used to etch lines from 
0.35 to 0.50 microns in width on 8- 
inch wafers, an NEC spokesman said. 
A final agreement would be a break- 
through for China, which currently 
only produces chips at a wider. less 
advanced 1 to 2 microns on 4- to 5- 
ineh wafers, the China Daily said. 

The venture plans to start pro- 
ducing 20,000 chips a month by 
1998. the spokesman said. It will be' 
capitalized at about $700 million, and 
NEC will hold a 30 percent stake. 

1 China used 6.78 billion imegrar- 
ed-circuit chips last year, of which 
more than 80 percent were impor- 
ted, the China Daily said. Domestic 
production in 1996 totaled 1.15 bil- 
lion chips but is projected to rise to 
25 billion a year by 2000. 

China plans to create four or five 
chip producers, a dozen specialized 
chip plants and 20 research and 
design centers, the China Daily said. 

NEC has another Chinese chip- 
making venture, set up in 1991 with 
a Beijing-based partner. The com- 
pany has invested $468 million in 
China, the China Daily said. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


Asians Ready for U.S. -Vietnam Pact 


IfltHutlh-rx News 

HANOI — RJ. Gurley expects 
more factories to fill up his in- 
dustrial park outside Hanoi if the 
United States grants most-favored- 
naiion trading status to Vietnam. 

But the factories probably will 
not be American, according to Mr. 
Gurley. They will be run by 
Taiwan and South Korean compa- 
nies that export sneakers and T- 
shirrs to the United States, getting 
the lower tariffs most- favored-na- 
tion status confers. 

“Many Taiwanese and South 
Korean and Hong Kong companies 
say as soon as Vietnam has MFN. 
they'll get over here and start man- 
ufacturing right away." said the 
American, who is in charge of mar- 
keting the Thai industrial park. 
"American companies don't sav 
that." 

Asian companies in Vietnam 
will benefit more from the bene- 
ficial U.S. trade designation be- 
cause their factories mostly pro- 
duce goods for export, and there 
are more of them here. The Amer- 
icans usually build factories to sell 
to the local market. 

Hanoi and Washington, seeking 
to put behind them the enmity of 
the Vietnam War, have haggled for 
more than ayearovefa trade treaty. 
But both sides say they hope ne- 
gotiations will speed up with the 
arrival Friday of the first U.S. am- 
bassador to Hanoi, the former pris- 
oner of war Pete Peterson. 

Of the seven biggest investors in 
Taiwan, six are Asian: Singapore, 
Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Hong 
Kong and Malaysia. The seventh is 
the British Virgin Islands, a tax 
haven that in many cases is merely 
a front for an Asian company. 



IV IT M.iRuir> Rpwn 

A Hanoi street stall selling American-style baseball caps Thursday. 


The United States is ninth, and 
its ranking may fall following the 
decision by Chrysler Corp. to aban- 
don plans for a $190 million car- 
assembly plant in Vietnam. 

Most of the American invest- 
ment. from Ford Motor Co.'s S103 
million amo- assembly plant to Mo- 
torola Inc.'s aggressive marketing 
of telephones, pagers and radio 
products to Coca-Cola Co. and 
PepsiCo Inc.’s joint ventures, looks 
forward to when the 77 million 
Vietnamese are no longer among 
the world's poorest people. 

Instead, many of the Asian in- 


vestors. especially those from 
Taiwan, are in Vietnam simply be- 
cause labor is cheap. 

The better-known American 
companies arrive with big public- 
relations machines to crack the Vi- 
etnamese market. Pou Chen Corp., 
Pang Rim Spinning Co. and the 
others quietly build factories and 
begun exporting garments, shoes 
ana textiles. 

"We will be very happy to have 
Mr. Peterson here.’* said CJ. Hsu, 
director of economics at the Taipei 
Economic and Cultural Office in 
Hanoi, in effect Taiwan's embassy. 


"We foresee good tiroes between 
the United States and Vietnam, and 
therefore for Taiwanese companies 
as well.” 

The Americans, meanwhile, are 
having a tough time trying to sell 
inside Vietnam. Because Viet- 
nam's trade deficit is soaring, the 
Communist government prefers its 
foreign investors to export The def- 
icit. S4 billion last year, equals 
almost a fifth of gross domestic 
product. 

Foreigners selling to the Viet- 
namese market also compete 
against state-owned companies, 
many of which are already in dire 
straits. 

■ Hyundai Expects Approval 

Hyundai Motor Co. said 
Thursday that it expected to finally 
win approval to build a joint ven- 
ture plant in Vietnam by July. Reu- 
ters reporred from Seoul. 

"The possibility to get the li- 
cense in the first half is signif- 
icantly over 50 percent from an 
earlier 50-50 percent chance,” said 
a Hyundai spokesman. Min Kyong 
Hwan. "The Vietnamese govern- 
ment is starting to favor Hy- 
undai.” 

Hyundai Motor, a flagship af- 
filiate of South Korea's largest 
conglomerate, said it would invest 
about S220 million in the plant, in 
which the company is expected to 
hold a 65 percent stake. 

The plant, which will be located 
near Ho Chi Minh City, will be able 
to make 10,000 vehicles a year. 

If Hyundai wins the license, Mr. 
Min said, the company would in- 
crease local production of auto 
components by extending techni- 
cal tie-ups. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

14000- 

1300(1 

13000- 


2150 


52500 

2050 

=!£ z: W-- 


■ 2000 


,IJUU D J F M A M D J F 

1996 1997 * 1996 

Exchange Index 

Hons Kong Hang Seng * 

MAM 17D00 D J F MAM 
1997 1998 1997 

Thursday ' ■ Piw. '■ 
dose . Ctosa- . change 

13,74050 13505.91+Oi® 

Singapore 

Straits Times * 

2,0594)8 

2,088.13 

Sydney * 

AH Ordinaries 

2504.70 2517.60 *0^1 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

20*61.81 2Q,Q4jB,8Q‘+1.06 

[ Kuala Lumpur Composite 

Closed 

1,107.14 

Bangkok • - 

SET 

614,06 

626 SI -2.00 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

€84£9 

689.10 . . -064 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 8549.85 

6*27.07 -0.02 

Manila. 

PSE . 

2,682.1 Q 

2^94.40 -0.46 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

Closed - 

66664 

Wellington 

NZSE-4Q - 

%321.11 

2,328.37 -0.31 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

. dosed 

3,75350 

Source; Tstekurs 


bn cnunoiul Hnald Tribune 

Very briefly! 


‘Star Wars’ Bolsters News Corp. Profit New Apple Notebook: An ibm 

■ Tlitf A Prvirff 


Ctxnprkd iff Oar Sttgf Firm Dopoicha 

SYDNEY — The Force was with 
Rupert Murdoch last quarter, but dis- 
aster may be about to strike, analysts 
Said Thursday. 

News Corp. 's net profit surged to 330 
million Australian dollars ($256 million) 
in its third quarter to March 31. from 77 
million dollars a year ago, fueled by the 
success of the re-release of its “Star 
Wars” trilogy and purchase of New 
World Communications Group Inc. 

But the expense of filming two dis- 
aster movies — "Volcano” and "Ti- 
tanic” — Is likely to slash film revenue 
this quarter and next "Volcano” re- 


portedly cost about $100 million to make 
out had a gross of only $27 million at the 
box office through May 5. 

The release of “Titanic.” reputedly 
the roost expensive movie ever made, 
has been pushed back past the traditional 
U.S. opening date of July 4. 

“Titanic won’t affect them this year, 
but Volcano will be a loss-maker,” a 
Melbourne analyst said. 

News Corp. shares fell 5 cents to close 
at $6.01. 

But News Corp. was optimistic about 
the fourth quarter, and some analysts 
said the company was on track to exceed 
its promised 20 percent growth in full- 


year earnings. News Corp.’s revenue for 
the quarter rose 23 percent, to 3.7 billion 
Australian dollars. 

The company's 20th Century Fox 
film unit drove the earnings higher dur- 
ing the quarter as operating profit rose 
36 percent after the strong box office 
performance of the “Star Wars" trilogy, 
which generated $249 million in rev- 
enue in two months. 

A decline in newsprint prices also 
buttressed the results. Earnings from 
newspapers in Britain rose 47 percent as 
advertising revenue rose at each of the 
company’s four newspaper tides. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Apple. Computer Inc. said Thursday it would 
start selling' a smaller, limiter version of its PowerRook 
notebook computer manufactured by its former rival. IBM 
Corp. 

The PowerBook 2400c. which weighs 4.4 pounds, is the 
. first computer with Apple's Macintosh operating system to be 
made by IBM. 

The new model will be released in Japan later this month 
and in die United States by the end of July. It is expected to sell 
for about $3500. 

IBM is part of a consortium with Apple and Motorola Inc. 
that designed and makes the PowerPC microprocessor at the 
heart of all current Apple Macintosh models. 

As part of that arrangement, IBM has a license to use the 
Macintosh operating system, but so far has not released any 
Mac clones under its own name. 


• Hong Kong Telecommunications Ltd.'s shares rose 6 per- 
cent, to close at 15 Hong Kong dollars (Sl.94), after the 
company reported a 125 percent nse in profir for the year that 
ended in March, to 1 1.18 billion dollars; the stock has risen 14 
percent this week on speculation that its parent company. Cable 
& Wireless PLC, would sell a controlling stake to mainland 
Chinese interests. 

• China posted a 12 percent rise in industrial output in April 
from a year earlier, to 1 74 J billion yuan ($20.94 billion). State 
companies managed growth of just 6 percent, while collective 
enterprises’ output gained 14.3 percent, and industrial pro- 
duction in the private sector rose 14.6 percent. 

• Guangzhou city officials are considering Honda Motor 
Co- General Motors Oorp.’s Adam Opel AG, Hyundai 
Motors Co. and Bayerische Motoren Werke AG to replace 
PSA Peugeot Citroen, which withdrew from a joint auto- 
making venture with the city. 

• Japan took a key step toward allowing companies to offer 
stock options as incentives to employees; the lower house of 
Parliament passed a law allowing companies to buy. back 10 
percent of their own shares for stock-option plans. 

• Yamaichi Securities Co. is considering closing its Osaka- 
based Ogawa Securities Co. or merging the troubled unit 
with another affiliate, a move that set off a period of con- 
solidation in Japan's securities industry 

• Monte de Piedad & Savings Bank, the Philippine bank 
partly owned by the local Catholic Church that had to shut down 
last mouth to stop a run of withdrawals, reopened after being 
rescued by Singapore’s Keppel group of companies. 

• Taiwan's centra] bank expects the economy to grow 6.2 
percent this year and sees no reason to change monetary 
policy, its governor said. The Taiwan economy grew 5.71 
percent in 1996, its slowest growth in six years, amid tension 
with China and lower (vices for industrial materials. 

• Kobe Steel Ltd. plans over the nextthree years to spend 220 

billion yen ($1 .76 billion) on product development and to cut 
costs by 30 billion yen. AFP, Bloomberg. Reuters 


hi i* il % 

sr rZ •>* : 



Tokyo Group Proposes Buyers’ Cartel 

Reuters 

TOKYO — An Asian OPEC? Well, not exactly. 

But an influential Japanese business group is pushing for 
an Asian oil-buyers' cartel that would oversee the coun- 
try’s negotiations with oLL 

The idea is that such a cartel could use the collective 
buying power of Asia's booming economies to secure 
better terms from the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries and other oil-sellers. 

"In essence, the cartel would serve as a countermeasure 
to big producers, an organization in the image of OPEC that 
would serve Aria’s oil-consuming countries.” a repre- 
sentative of the Japan Association of Corporate Executives 
said. The business group, which proposed the idea in a 
report submitted last month to Japan s Foreign Ministry 
and its Ministry of International Trade and Industry, is still 
awaiting a response to the proposal. 

The report said the cartel should operaie under the 
auspices of the 18-member Asia-Pacific Economic Co- 
operation forum and should be based inTokyo. It said the 
huge growth in oil demand in Asia meant that countries 
should hold talks aimed at coordinating their oil-buying 

^Analysts said the idea reflected the changing balance of 
power among Asia's major oil importers. 

"There’s a lot more competition on the demand side in 
Aria than there was 10 years ago," said Paul Horsnell, 
chief of Aria-Middle East studies at the Oxford Institute 
of Energy Economics in England. 

Mr. Horsnell said some APEC members, such as the 
United States, would be against such a cartel but that it 
would benefit Aria's so-called tiger economies as well as 
Japan, the region’s largest importer. 


In this Saturday’s 



M& A 


H 


ow have the stocks 
& bonds of compa- 
nies making major 
acquisitions fared? 


INTERNATIONAL 



TVflUaED *TT» HO. «f*l WU TOM M TtS WUHIWUTO*. TOST 

THE WORLD’S DAIIY NEWSPAPER 


- .«u? 









PepsiCo Plans 
Public Offering 
In New Zealand 

CtmpW by Our SuiffFnreDapatcha 

AUCKLAND — PepsiCo 
ic. said Thursday it would 
>in off its Kentucky Fried 
Jiicken and Pizza Hut res- 
taurants in New Zealand with 
an international public offer- 
ing in a new company called 
Restaurant Brands N2 Ltd. 

PepsiCo is divesting its 
restaurant units worldwide to 
concentrate on franchising 
and brand development 
Restaurant Brands is to of- 
fer 85 million shares, repre- 
senting 100 percent of the 
company; for between 1.80 
and 5^0 New Zealand dollars 
($103 and $1.5P) each, tf the 
price is ai the high end of that 
range. Restaurant Brands 
would be among New Zea- 
land’s top 40 companies by 
market capitalization. 

. Restaurant Brands will run 
-4fre 122 fast-food restaurants 
tinder, long-term franchise 

agreements. Jim Collier of 
PepsiCo is to be chief ex- 
ecutive of the new company. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Daily nevus from the 
Dutch business weekly 
The Netherlander? 

'WWTV.netherlander.com 

(Dutch business news in brief on internet) 



The Jt Netherlander 


ROCK-SOLID AND U N I Q V t 



By maintaining a far-flung network of news-gathering resources, the World's Daily 
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COUNTBY/CIAKENCY 

2 MONTHS 
NEWSSTAND 
PRICE 

2 MONTHS 
OFFSl 
PRICE 

DISCOUNT 

OFF 

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1/56 

650 

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BELGIUM . 

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1450 

60% 

DENMARK 

DKX 

780 

360 

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FW 

624 

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210 

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182 

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47 

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m 

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LUXEMBOURG 

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MG 

195 

78 

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NORWAY 

NOK 

832 

390 

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PORTUGAL 

ESC 

11,960 

5400 

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11,700 

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832 

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PAGE 18 












































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


Advertisement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS May 6 , 1997 

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PAGE 20 


Sports 


FRIDAY, MAX 9. 1992 


World Roundup 


Muster, the Master, 
Is Crushed on Dust 


tennis Thomas Muster, the No. 
1 seed, suffered one of his most 
lopsided defeats on his best surface, 
red clay, 6-1, 6-2 to Hicham Arazi 
in the third round of the $2.3 mil- 
lion German Open on Thursday. 

Arazi. a 23 -year-old Moroccan 
who is based in France, outplayed 
Musterat the Austrian’s own game, 
winning the long rallies and hitting 
powerful winners from all over the 
court. Arazi will play I2th-seeded 
Felix Mantilla, who beat Boris 
Becker, 7-6 (8-6), 6-2. Yevgeni 
Kafelnikov beat Slava Dosedel, 6- 
2, 6-1. to reach his first quarterfinal 
of the year. 

Albert Costa, one of several 
players who had to play twice on 
Thursday, first beat Sjeng 
Schalken, then beat Alex Corretja, 
6-3. 6-4, to reach the quarterfinals. 

• The Italian Open women’s 
tournament was hit by rain 
Thursday. After a five hour delay, 
Conchita Martinez, the third seed 
and winner at the Foro Italico day 
court tournament for four succes- 
sive seasons, took on Elena Lik- 
hov tsev a and built a 6-2. 2-0 lead 
before rain interrupted play again. 

• Martina Hingis, who injured 

her knee falling off a horse last 
month, says she expects to be fit for 
the French Open. (AP) 


Chiappucci Suspended 


CYCLING Claudio Chiappucci, a 
leading Italian rider , was forced out 
of the Tour of Romandie on 
Thursday after failing a blood test. 
He was suspended for IS days and 
will miss the Giro d’Italia.f/teu/ro) 


Yankees Anger League 


baseball George Steinbrenner 
faces suspension from baseball’s 
ruling executive council for suing 
the sport over the Yankees' Adidas 
deal, two baseball officials, who 
did not wish to be identified, said 
Wednesday. The council could also 
start an investigation that could 
lead to the owner’s third suspension 
from control of (ris team. (AP) 


Denny McLain Jailed 


baseball Denny McLain, the 
last pitcher to win 30 games in a 
season, was sentenced to eight years 
in prison and ordered to pay $2.5 
million Wednesday for stealing from 
die pension plan of a meat packing 
company that went bankrupt 18 
months after he bought it (AP) 


Draft Pick Arrested 


FOOTBALL James Darling, a 
second-round draft choice of the 
Philadelphia Eagles, was arrested 
for assault and burglary this week 
on the Washington State campus, 
his fourth arrest in the past two 
years: 

A deputy prosecutor said the 
former Washington State lineback- 
er had been drinking and was trying 
to find a person be planned to beat 
up in a dispute over a woman.(APJ 


Riley Wins 3d Award 


basketball Pat Riley, who 
guided the Miami Heat to the At- 
lantic Division title, was chosen 
NBA Coach of the Year for the 
third time Thursday — with a third 
different team. 

Riley, who also won the honor 
with the Los Angeles Lakers in 
1990 and the New York Knicks in 
1993, received 69 votes of a pos- 
sible 1 15 from sports writers. Char- 
lotte’s Dave Cowens finished 
second with 22 votes. (AP) 


Knicks Look Good, 
Maybe Unstoppable 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washington Post Service 


MIAMI — Granted, it’s early. Still, 
there’s one team that looks better than all 
the rest so for in these NBA playoffs. 

The New York Knicks. 

They’ve recorded four impressive 
victories in four games to this point, not 
a nail-bitter or last-second thriller in the 
bunch. 

The New York Knicks are definitely 
the best team in the East right now — 
yes, better than the Chicago Bulls. 

Don’t let New York’s 88-79 victory 
over Miami on Wednesday fool you. It 
wasn’t that dose. Granted, once again, it 
was only Game 1, but to a lot of us it 
looked as if the Knicks delivered such a 
first-round haymaker, this series might, 
not be as contentious as we thought. 

Yes, the Knick teams we've seen over 
die years were always capable of un- 
doing. anything positive. But as John 
Starks said. “This team is different. 
We're a very strong team. We’ve got 
more balance, especially on the offen- 
sive end. Normally, if I have an off 
shooting night, we're in trouble. Now, 
even if two guys are off, we’ve got 
enough talent to win ballgames.’* 

Sweeping Charlotte was impressive 
for starters. But the Knicks were even 
more precise, more thorough, more alert, 
more disciplined and mentally tougher 
in beating Miami here in Game 1. 

You want an indication of how 
iocked-in the Knicks were? They hit 30 
of 32 free throws. 

Starks missed 7 of his 8 shots, Patrick 
Ewing missed 15 of 23 and starting 
point guard Chris Childs sank one bas- 
ket the entire game, but the Knicks 
rolled right along, which they simply 
couldn’t do in previous playoff games 
against worthy teams. 

It's almost amazing that die Knicks 
could look so sorry and no-account in the 
final 10 days of the regular season. then 
find such a fine stride m almost no time. 

Larry Johnson, who three weeks ago 
seemed completely lost, scored 14 
points and kept the Knicks even early. 
Allan Houston, who was hearing boos in 
Madison Square Garden only acouple of 
weeks ago, scored a game-high 27 and 
led a 16-0 surge in the third quarter that 
buried Mi ami. Charlie Ward, the backup 


ble, grabbed only sax rebounds and was 
taken to school by Ewing, who grabbed 
16 rebounds and blocked five shots. 

Voshon Lenard. Jamal Mashbum and 
PJ. Brown, all playing in their first mean- 


ingful playoff games, were dreadful 
It’s funny hi 


ly how quickly the pendulum 
can swing. Only a week ago, Miami 
pounded Orlando and looked positively 
ferocious. But two Penny Hardaway 
eruptions sucked all die confidence out 
of the Heat and they can’t seem to get it 
back. 

The Knicks, nearly left for dead, won 
a regular season finale at Chicago and 
instantly convinced themselves that 
they are world-beaters. 

“Certain games bring you together,” 
Statics said. “The last game of the sea- 
son. at Chicago, was one of them. The 
other game at Chicago, even though we 
lost, was another. We were down, I 
think, 17 and came back when in die 
past, I can mil you, we would have given 
up and gotten blown out.” 

Over in the other comer of the locker 
room, Charles Oakley talked about the 
metamorphosis. It was Oakley, after 
Madison Square Carden losses to New 
Jersey, Cleveland and Orlando, who 
said his team had never played so poorly 
late in the season. 

“Nobody got mad at me. I don’t 
think,' ’ Oakley said. “We'd just lost too 
many games we shouldn't have. We had 
too much talent” 

It seemed the Knicks of the Ewing era 
bad never had tins much talent It 
seemed they didn’t know quite how to 
fit Johnson, Houston and Childs in with 


point guard Pat Riley just wooldnUplay 


when he was bead coach in New 
came off the bench and directed a con- 
certo in 18 tenacious minutes. 

There was no hint whatsoever that 
Miami won 61 games during the regular 
season to claim the No. 2 seed in the 
Eastern Conference. 

While the Knicks got meaningful 
contributions from seven players, only 
three guys showed up for Miami. And 
while Alonzo Mourning scored 20 
points, he got himself in early foul trou- 


Sonics Get Revenge on Rockets 


The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — Shawn Kemp had 22 
points and 1 5 rebounds, and Sam Perkins 
battled Hakeem Olajuwon to a standoff 
as the Seattle SuperSonics built a big 
halftime lead and then held on for a 106- 
101 victory over the Houston Rockets 
that evened their Western Conference 
semifinal series at one game each. 

“We put pressure on them and tried 
to get good shots on every possession.” 
Perkins said. 

“The game was decided by our ag- 
gressiveness on defense.” 

Perkins, who got a rare start at center, 
scored 18 points, only one fewer than 
Olajuwon. 

“I tried to take away what he likes,” 
said Perkins, who started only four 
games in the regular season. He made 
four 3-pointers, including a crucial one 
with 3:45 left after the Rockets had 
pulled within two points. 

Hersey Hawkins added 21 points for 


Seattle, which led by 18 at halftime be- 
fore Houston rallied in the second half. 

The SuperSonics, who lost the series 
opener 112-102, went on a 31-8 nm in 
the second quarter to take a 65-47 half- 
time lead. 

But the Rockets stormed back in the 
second half, scoring nine straight points 
to cut Seattle’s lead to 90-88 with 4:04 
left The spurt featured a three-point 
play by Olajuwon, a 3 -pointer by Clyde 
Drexler, a tip-in by Olajuwon and a free 
throw by Mario Elie. 

Perkins then hit a 3-pointer to put the 
Sonics up 93-88, and they held on be- 
hind the scoring of Kemp and Detlef 
Schrempf. Kemp scored seven points, 
and Schrempf made four free throws 
down the stretch. Seattle was 31 of 33 
from the line. 

Drexler led the Rockets with 25 
points and eight assists. Charles Barkley 
finished with 2 1 points, including a pair 
of 3-pointers in the final minute. 


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Ewing, Oakley and Starks. “There’s no 
easy answer." Starks said. “1 think it 


was a case of continuing to work at it It 
takes time, and sometimes you can't 
project how much time.” 

Sometimes you can't see it coining, it 
just locks in almost all at once. It 
happened to the Bulls at about this point 
of the 1991 playoffs when they needed 
only five games to dismiss the 76ers. 


The Knicks had that championship look 
, Miami. 


when they went 16-0 on 

You expect the New York defense to 
be stingy, and it was, but the Knicks had 
better ball movement, spacing and jump 
shooting than they’ve had at any time 
since — well — 1973. 

It doesn’t seem like such a stretch if 
you consider that while these Knicks 
have wot four successive playoff 
games, Pat Riley’s Knicks (including 
the team that got to the 1994 finals) 
never once swept a series. The Ewing - 
era Knicks have never played this well 
over four consecutive playoff games. 

And now, Miami isn’t down just one 
game. Miami is down. 

If it doesn’t ret the Knicks on Friday 
here in Game 2, it’s going to be tough 
not only for the Heat but for anybody 
else to stop the Knicks. 




. risrs 
++-. - . . 
r-iv- • - ...... »- . 



I 



Scoreboard 


Patrick Ewing of the Knicks shooting over Alonzo Mourning and PJ. Brown of the Heat early in the playoff game. / 


BASEBAti 


JUjmLu:.tS*a»c. 


Expos Give Giants a 19-3 Pounding 

Lansing Hits 2 Home Runs in Montreal’s 13-Run 6th Inning 


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The Montreal Expos set the 


tone for a high-scoring day in 
laT I 


the National League with a 
1 3-run, 13-hit, half-hour long 
sixth inning in an afternoon 
game in San Francisco. 

Mike Lansing hit two 
home runs in the inning as the 
Expos, who scored 18 runs in 
the fifth and sixth 'innings, 
pounded the Giants 19-3 
Wednesday. 

Henry Rodriguez hit a 
grand slam to highlight a five- 
run fifth inning. Then the real 
fireworks started. 

With the Expos leading 6- 
3. Mark Grudzielanek opened 
the sixth with a single off 


Baseball Rob mb op 


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reliever Joe Roa_ Lansing fol- 
lowed with his third bonier of 
the season. 

Rondel! White singled, and 
David Segui doubled, knock- 
ing out Roa. With Tun Poole 
pitching. F.P. Santangelo and 
Vladimir Guerrero had RBI 
singles. Doug Strange singled 
and Chris Widger had a two- 
run single to make it 12-3. 

Jeff Juden then struck out, 
but (he hitting immediately 
resumed. Grudzielanek 
singled, and Lansing hit a 
three-run homer off Julian 
Tavarez, giving him five runs 
batted in For the inning. 

After White grounded out 
for the second out, Segui 
singled and Santangelo 
doubled. Guerrero was hit by 
a pitch to load the bases, and 
Strange followed with a 
three-run double. 

Widger grounded to first to 
end the inning. 

Lansing became the I8th 
NL player to hit two homers 
in an inning. The previous 
one was Chicago's Sammy 
Sosa on May 16. 1996. 

“ft was pretty much a dis- 
aster, but it’s something you 
have to deal with in base- 
ball," said Jeff Kent of San 
Francisco. “It's disappoint- 
ing because we were in this 
game." 

The Expos, who trailed, 3- 
I, in the fifth inning, batted 
for 30 minutes in their half of 
the sixth against three Giants 
relievers. 

“It was a crazy inning. No 
matter who we sent in. it was 
like throwing gasoline on the 
fire.” said Dusty Baker, the 
Giants manager. 

The 13 runs were on NL 
record for a sixth inning. The 
18 runs in consecutive in- 
nings broke the post- 1900 NL 
record of 17 set by the New 
York Giants against the' Bos- 


ton Braves on Sept 3. 1926 
— when they scored five in 
the fourth and 12 in the fifth. 

The AL record for runs in 
consecutive innings is 19. The 
pre-1900 NL record is 21. 

Cardinals 14, Ph Wes 7 In 
Sl Louis, Ray Lankford hit a 
grand slam to cap a nine -run 
seventh inning as St Louis 
beat Philadelphia. 

Ron Gant hit a two-run 
homer for the second straight 
night and Gary Gaetti broke a 
1 -for- 1 5 slump with a three- 
run in the seventh-inning out- 
burst 

Pirates 14, Rockies 3 

Light-hitting Pittsburgh 
slugged five home runs in 
Denver to beat Colorado. 

The Pirates, who came into 
the game tied for the fewest 
home runs in the majors ( 14), 
hit five homers for the first 
time since June 20, 1987. 

AI Martin, Jason Kendall. 
Kevin Elster. Jose Guillen 
and Joe Randa all reached the 
seals for the Pirates. 

Andres Galarraga had two 
solo home runs for the Rock- 


ies. 


4, Astros i Pinch-hit- 
ter Butch Huskey’s two-run 
homer in the ninth inning 
helped visiting New York 
win at Houston. 

Dodgers 4, Reds 2 Ramon 

Martinez won his ninth 
straight regular-season start 
against Cincinnati by pitch- 
ing eight strong innings for 
host Los Angeles. 

Martinez struck out six and 
walked three to end a three- 
game winless streak. 

Padres 6, Cub* 3 John Fla- 
herty drove in three runs on 
three hits, including a home 


run. as host San Diego beat 
Chicago. 

In American League 
games: 

Yankees 5, Rangers 2 Tino 

Martinez, the Yankees’ first 
baseman, put the finishing 
touch on New York’s victory 
over visiting Texas night with 
his 14th home nm of the sea- 
son. 

Martinez has 13 hits in his 
last 23 at-bats. He moved into 
a tie with Seattle’s Ken Grif- 
fey Jr. for the major-league 
lead with 14 hornets and 
knocked in his major-league 
leading 43d ran. 

Texas led 1-0 in the first 
inning, but New York made it 
4-1 in the second. 

Will Clark’s run-scoring 
double in the third inning cut 
the lead to 4-2 before Mar- 
tinez hit a borne run in the 
bottom of the inning off John 
Burkett (1-2). 

Martinez is more than 
halfway to his 1 996 home run 
total of 25. 

“We made one mistake to 
him. and he didn't miss it." 
Texas manager Johnny Oates 
said. 

Brewers 1, Athletics O In 

the longest 1-0, nine-inning 
game in major-league history 
— 3 hours. 20 minutes — Jeff 
Cirilio's seventh-inning run- 
scoring single was the dif- 
ference as Oakland's Scon 
Brosius was thrown out at the 
plate for the game's final out 
m Milwaukee. 

With two outs in the ninth, 
pinch-hitter Matt Stairs 
singled, but right fielder 
Jerojny Bumitz threw out 
Brosius on a close play. 

Brosius and manager Art 


Howe were ejected by plate 
umpire Dale Ford for arguing 
the call even though the game 
was over. 

Replays were inconclus- 
ive. 

Previously, the longest 1-0, 
nine-inning game was May 
1 7, 1988, when the Mets beat 
the Padres in 3 hours. 7 
minutes. 

Indians 7, Blue Jays 1 In 

Cleveland, the Indians hit 
four more homers, giving 
them a major-league leading 
59. 

Tony Fernandez and Jim 
Thome hit consecutive 
homers in the first inning. In qjfe. 
four-run fifth. Grissom led" 
off with a home run. and Dav- 
id Justice capped the inning 
with a three-run shot — his 
10th home run of the year. 

Red Sox 1 1, Twins 3 At Fen- 
way Park, Scott Hatteberg 
and Reggie Jefferson each hit 
two homers and drove in four 
runs as Boston snapped a 
four-game losing streak. 

For Hatteberg, who has be- 
come the personal catcher for 
Aaron Sele (4-1), the homers 
were the first two of his ca- 
reer. 

Orioles 3, Angels o In Bal- 
timore, Jimmy Key (6-0) won 
his sixth game with six sco- 
reless innings and lowered his 
earned ran average to 1.93. 
Randy Myers picked up his 
1 3th save. 

Tigers 12, Royals 3 In De- 
troit. the Tigers broke out of a 
scoring slump with homers 
by Tony Clark. Travis Fry- 
man and Bobby Higginson. 

• The Seattle Mariners-; 
Chicago White Sox game was 
rained out. ^ 

9 


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Burrtitz of the Milwaukee Brewers sliding safely past the^OaWtond 
Athletics catcher (.eorge Williams. Burnitz scored on a singieby Jeff Cirillo. 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 21 



SPORTS 


Oilers Narrow Series to 2-1 
With Victory Over Avalanche 



j . . The Associated Prrss 

“ Kelly Buchberger scored 
twice, including the tying 
goal late in the third periotC 
and Ryan Smyth added the 
winner 2:18 later as the Ed- 
monton Oilers beat the Col- 
orado Avalanche, 4-3. 

' The victory in front of a 
delirious sellout crowd in JEd- 
rtionton on Wednesday night 
out Colorado's lead in the 
best-of-seven Western Con- 
ference semifinal series to 2- 
h with Game 4 to be played 
Hriday night in Edmonton. 

* Tbs victory gave the Oilers 
itew life after it appeared they 
were headed for a 3-0 series 
deficit to the defending Stan- 
ley Cup champions. 

- Edmonton was trailing, 3- 
X, with less than seven 
minutes left in regulation. Bur 
Buchberger — the only Oiler 
remaining from the club's 
Stanley Cup years in the late 
J980s and 1990 — scored his 
jRfih goal of the playoffs on a 
rebound to pull Edmonton 
even. 

; With 3:45 left, Smyth 
scored on a disputed play as he 
converted a centering pass past 
Colorado’s goal tender, Patrick 
Roy. The Avalanche claimed 
Smyth was in the crease, but 
die goal was allowed follow- 
ing a video review. 

- The Avalancb&had looked 
secure as they took a 3-2 lead 
into the final period on the 
strength of a six-point outing 
from the line of Peter Fors- 
berg, Claude Lemieux and 
Valery Kamensky, each get- 
ting a goal and an assist 

But the line of Buchberger. 
Smyth and center Jason 
f • Amott outdid one of the most 

explosive units in hockey, 
finishing with eight points. 
Amott who has been criti- 
cized for lackadaisical play, 
had a goal and two assists. 
,-.y* Forsberg left the game mid- 


way through the third period 
after being upended by one of 
the Oilers’ defenseman. Bry- 
an Muir, and falling head- 
oyer-heels to the ice. He was 
diagnosed with a minor con- 
cussion and did not return. 

The Avalanche's coach, 
Marc Crawford, complained 
about the winning goal and 

NHL Roundup 

about the check that knocked 
Forsberg out of the game. But 
he said his club lost because it 
weakened defensively. 

“Peter was playing well at 
the time, but we still should 
have been able to persevere 
and continue through," be 
said. ' ‘They did a good job of 
pouring the puck to the net, 
they were insistent on getting 
there, and we were a little soft 
in our coverage and didn't 
play with a great deal of con- 
fidence in the last seven or 
eight minutes." 

On Buchberger’ s first- 
period goal, the Oilers' wing- 
er scored from near the boards 
into an unguarded net after 
Smyth bumped an Avalanche 
defenseman, Jon Klemm, into 
Roy, who fell hopelessly out 
of position. 

Ffywm 4, Safam i In Phil- 
adelphia, Paul Coffey sym- 
bolically established the Phil- 
adelphia Flyers' dominance 
before the game, then con- 
firmed it with his play in the 
first period. 

After a pregame show- 
down with Buffalo's enfor- 
cer, Matthew Bamaby, Cof- 
fey assisted on three first- 
period goals as tbe Flyers 
cruised to victory over the 
Sabres in Game 3. Phil- 
adelphia can sweep the series 
with a victory in Game 4 on 
Friday. 

The smaller Sabres have 
attempted to stand up to the 


Byers — a big team that plays 
a physically intimidating 
game — even in such seem- 
ingly insignificant matters as 
the pregame skate. The teams 
almost went at it before the 
game, when Bamaby and 
Coffey battled over Coffey's 
continued trespassing onto 
Buffalo's half of the ice. 

"He said. ‘Cross the red 
line one more time,' so what 
do you think I did? 1 crossed 
the red line," Coffey said. 

Bamaby. an agitator who 
had 249 penalty minutes this 
season, had enough. 

“He came skating over the 
red line a few times, so I took 
a swack at him," Bamaby 
said. “He came over again 
and 1 took it on myself to slash 
him. I tried to break his ankle. 
It didn't work." 

It certainly didn't Eight 
minutes into the game, while 
the Flyers were on the power 
play, Coffey lofted a pass 
from near the blue line to Eric 
Lindros standing alone in 
front of the Buffalo net. 

Lindros grabbedthe chest- 
high pass, dropped tbe puck 
to the ice, then spun for a 
turnaround shot that beat the 
goalie, Steve Shields, be- 
tween the Jegs. 

Coffey's second big play 
came about four minutes 
later, when Buffalo once 
again had somebody in the 
penalty box. Coffey zipped a 
pass up from near his blue line 
to Dale Hawenchuk streaking 
down the left wing. 

Ha werch uk’s slap shot 
whistled past Shields, and tbe 
Flyers were up 2-0. 

Coffey and Ha werch uk 
also teamed to set up Rod 
Brind 'Amour's goal, which 
came after Darryl Shannon's 
power-play goal bad cut the 
Philadelphia lead to 2-1 with 
five minutes to play in the 
first period: 



. X\- . > * • - 

Enc CihuufAtou FhoctPlcuc 

DRIVE IN THE SUN — Johnny Herbert negotiating the Loews curve 
Thursday in practice for Sunday's Monaco Grand Prix. Herbert, in a Sauber 
powered by a Petronas-Ferrari engine, recorded the fastest qualifying time. 


Schalke Has Edge 
In Dreary Final 


Reiners 

A spectacular goal from 
Marc Wiimots of Belgium 
gave Schalke of Germany a 1- 
0 victory over Inter Milan in 
Gelsenkirchen in the first leg 
of the UEFA Cup final. 

Just as a dismal game 
seemed to be heading toward 


IUP 


a goalless draw Wednesday. 


ilmots picked up the ball in 
the middle of the Inter half in 
the 70th minute, took a few 
strides forward and fired the 
ball low into the goal. 

Apart from tnat. Schalke 
did not produce any scoring 
chances. 

Inter, which was .missing 
Jocelyn Angioma, Youn 
Djorkaeff and Paul Ince be- 
cause of suspension, also 
struggled and managed just 
one dangerous shot on goal. 

NETHERLANDS Roda JC 


Kerkrade beat Heerenveen, 4- 
2. in the Dutch Cup final in 
Rotterdam on Thursday. 

The game opened with three 

goals in 16 minutes. Gerald 
Sibon put Roda ahead. Igor 
Korneev leveled but Genie 
Senden restored the lead. Eric 
van de Luer and Maarten 
Schops put Roda ahead, 4- 1 . in 
die second half. 

SOUTH AMERICA River 
Plate of Argentina, the de- 
fending champion, tumbled 
out of the South American 
Libertadores Cup on Wed- 
nesday, losing ou penalties to 
Racing Club. 

Enzo Francescoli was hero 
and villain for River, scoring 
his team's goal in a 1-1 draw 
but missing its first penalty of 
the shoot-out. 

Scotland Brian Laudrup 
scored the only goal as 
Rangers beat Dundee United. 
1-0, to clinch the Premier 
League title. 


Japan’s Soccer League 
Suffers Drop in Crowds 


Sweden Reaches Ice Hockey Final 


The Associated Press 

HELSINKI — Jorgen Jon- 
sson scored a late goal, and 
goalie Tommy Salo made 
several stunning saves 
Thursday as Sweden beat the 
Czech Republic, 1-0, to ad- 
vance to the final of the World 


Hockey Championships. 
The other finalist wil 


will be 


determined in Friday's match 
when Canada faces Russia. 

The only goal came at 
11:44 of the final period when 
Jonsson fired a rocket be- 
tween the pads of Czech 
goalie Roman Cechraanek. 

Earlier, Swedish goalie Salo 
made a series of saves, in- 
cluding two final period one- 


on-one breaks by Jiri Dopita. 

“I can't believe the saves 
Salo made," Dopita said. 

Tbe Czechs played without 
Vladimir Vujtek, who 
suffered mild concussion dur- 
ing tbe brawl at the end of 
Wednesday's game with 
Canada in which he scored a 
hat-trick. 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan’s pro- 
fessional soccer League, bom 
on a wave of optimism five 
years ago. is going through 
hard times. 

A record low crowd of only 
2,245 turned up on Wednes- 
day night for a match between 
JEF United and Sanfrecce 
Hiroshima at Ichihara stadi- 
um reflecting the game's 
stmggle to bold onto the 
fans. 

The latest setback for a sport 
that was hoping to latch onto 
the coattails of the 2002 World 
Cup comes despite the con- 
tinued inflow of foreign play- 


ers. The J-League’s overall at- 
tendance target for this season 
is 5 million, or an average of 
15,000, compared with the 
goal of 6 million, which was 
easily reached in 1995. 

This year crowds are av- 
eraging between 10,000 and 

12.000 — compared with 

17.000 in the first four years. 

"We're not really con- 
cerned," said Mitsunori Fu- 
jiguchi. the deputy-secretary 
of the J-League. “In some 
ways tbe temporary fashion 
of the J-League is being 
stripped away and that's al- 
lowing the core support to 
come out clearly." 


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San Otago 020 003 011-4 12 0 

F.Casfllla, Patterson (4), Battenfleid (73, 
Casks) (8) and MJfubbaid; Bergman, 
cunnaiw (51 Scott (7), Hoffman (9) and 
nahefy. W— Cunnane. 1-1. L— F. Castilla. 1- 
5. Sv— Hoffman (53. HRs— Chicago M. 
Hubbard Cl). San Dlega, Ftahesty (3). 
Japanese Leaqurs 

CEMYIUU UMMM 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

VafcuH 

18 

11 

_ 

521 

— 

Hiroshima 

14 

12 

— 

538 

25 

Hanshtn 

14 

14 

— 

500 

35 

Chuntehl 

13 

15 

— 

A44 

45 

Yokohama 

12 

15 

— 

444 

55 

Yanriarl 

12 

16 

— 

429 

55 

THOUDAVS BSSW3B 


Yakult B, Yomlurl 2 1 eight tarings, rate) 


BASKETBALL 


HBA Pl-AYOFFS 

nco N B eootep 

(BESPOf-SEVEN) 

WNUNT'SHMin 

Mew York 23 14 29 22- H 

Miami 23 14 14 24- » 

N.YJ Houston 8-19 4-7 27, Ewing 0-23 B-8 
24; M: Hardaway 7-17 40 21 .Mourning 7-14 
5-1320Jtebouaits N a w Ytok57 (Ewing 14), 
Mhjml S3 (Brawn 123- Assist*— New York 14 
(Johnson, Word 5). Moral 19 (Hardaway 43. 
(New York leads series l-« 

Saattta 32 33 17 34-106 

Hoastaa 30 17 23 31—101 

St Kemp 7-12 49 22. Havridns 4-1344 21; 
H; Drader 10-74 2-3 2RBmWw 4-J4 74 21. 
Rebouwta— Seattle 45 (Kemp 15), Houston 
52 (Otoluwan 12). Assists— Seattle 21 
(Payton 9), Houston 25 (DretdarB). 

(series Bed 1-1) 


Hansbto 4, Chuntabl T 
HbosWma vs. Yohohama, rained out 


* 

w 

■MM 

L 

T 

■ 

Pet 

GB 

Sdbu 

16 

12 

— 

571 

— 

Orta 

13 

12 

— 

520 

15 

Dotal 

14 

13 

— 

519 

15 

Nippon Han 

14 

14 

— 

500 

U 

Lotte 

12 

13 

1 

480 

25 

Kintetsu 

10 

15 

1 

400 

45 


HOCKEY 


NHL Playoffs 


Buffalo 


SaBw 2, DaMlOO innings) 

Nippon Ham A Ktntetiu 1 

Lotte vs. Ortz postponed sfrong wind* 


(BEST-OF-SEVEN) 
f'BJ 

10 0—1 
3 0 1-4 
Rret Period: P-Undras 4 (Coffey, 
KawerefwH (pp>. I P-Hawerdiuk 1 (Coffey, 
Sami (pp). 3. B-5lian non 2 (HoUttger. 
Plante) (pp). 4, P-BriiKTAmour 6 


(HawerdnA, Coffey) Second period: None. 
Tkbil Period: P-Desjnnfcw 1, fen). Shots a« 
goal: B- 8-44-16. P- 15-7-14-38. GoNes: 
B-Stiields. P-Snaw. 

(POBadefebia Mads series 34U 
Catenate 1 2 0—3 

Edutonloa 2 0 2—4 

nst Period: C- Forsberg S (Kamensky. 
Ozafewh) (pp). Z E- Buchberger 4 (deVries, 
Arnotf) X E-Amott 2 (Smyth, Buchberger) 
Second Period: C-Kamensky 7 (Laminin, 
OraOnsJi) (pp). & C -Lemieux B (Forsberg, 
OzoSjtSh) TMnt Parted: E- Buchberger 5 
(Mironov) 7. E-Smyth 4 (McGJms. Amott) 
Shots on goal: G- 7-12-5-24 E- 144-14— 38. 
Coafles: C-Roy. E- Joseph. 

(Cotorada leads series 2-1) 

Wrolp Championship 

MEDAL GROUP. K HELSPKI 

Sweden 5, Hnkmd 2 
Sweden 1, Czech Republic 0 
inwaunai Sweden 8 pakris Russia 5; 
Czech RepubBc 4; Canada 4t Untied Stales X 
mandZ 

RELECMItON GBOUP. M TAMPERE 
Italy & Germany 2 
Italy .4 Slovakia a 


WOOL *OF QUIAUNN 

Ukraine l.Amtenkil 

mxNDwoti Ukraine 13 points; Ger- 
many 11; Portugal?: Northern Ireland 7; Ar- 
menia Si ABianla l. 


DWTCHHROT DnrmOH 

Sparta R o tterdam 1, PSV Eindhoven 3 
Groningen 1 . Ajax Amstantam 1 
nrmPMQTL P5V Ebidhown 48 pateN 
Feyanomd 44e Twento Enschede Sts Npx Sz 
Vttesse Amhem 51; Heemmnn set Roda JC 
Kakrade49; Graafsctiq) Doeflnchem 39; NAC 
Breda 39: Groningen 3 S Utredd 32z Spatkt 
Rotterdam 32: Forivna SHkud 32 wmera II 
TBburg 31; Vdmdam 31; NEC NQmegen 2 & 
RKC WMiwVc 2S AZ ABanaar22. 


Leicester' 1, Sheffield Wednesday 0 
ii s wiaii Manchester United 71 
points Liverpool 473 Areenal tBs Newcastle 
44. Aston VHIa 5fb Chelsea 5& SheffMd 
Wednesday S6t Wimbledon S3; Tottenham 
44; Derby 44; Leeds 4S Lefcsster 44- West 
Ham 42 Ever! on 42 Blackburn 41; 
Southampton 41; Sunderland 4Q; Coventry 3fc 
Mkkflesfarough 37s Nottingham Forest 34. 


FC Copenhagen 2 DutslO 


Roda JC Kerkrade 4, Heerenv e en 2 


ITOTteS 

Schalke Vtntomazlonale 0 


Batata* 3. Vaduz Z alter extra time 
(90 mins 1-1) 

uHnueoHsav 

. tm ROUND, IWBT LEO 

Nadonal Eandoc, 1, Cntzebn BrazB, 0 

NodanoL Uruguay, 1, Cola Cola, ChB& 3 
MD ROUND. RETURN LEG 
River Plate ArjL, 1, Radng Club, Aig. 1, 
Aggregate score 4-4 Radng dub win 5-3 
on penalties. 

Gremkv Brazfl, Z Guorony, Paraguay. 1 
Aggregate sane: 3-3. Gremto win 2-1 on 
penalties. 

Penan*. Uruguay, 3 Mlllonarios, Cotombta, 1 
Aggregate sane: w. Pen anti win 3-2 an. 
penalties. 


TRANSITIONS 


BANNIMII. 

NXIIONAL BASKETBALL ASGOCIAIION 

Boston— Announced thot MX. Corr. dtrec- 
tor of basketball aperattons, has resigned and 
wB become ereartiw vke president tor cor- 
porate d e vel o pment Fked Rick WeHzman, 
head scout and Jan Jenrfngs. dhedar of 
baskeibal devetopmarrt. Mamed Jim CTBrien 
aid Winston Bennett assistant coaches. 

Philadelphia— Named Mark Turgeon 
assistant coach. 

raoiHu 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Arizona— S igned DLMork Smith to 2-year 
contract. 

crKaNNAn —Waived QB Kerry Joseph, K 
Aaron Kannerand OL Trent Patent. 

detrott— W aived FB Tracy Johnson. 

Jacksonville— R e-signed rb Randy Jor- 
don. 

Kansas cmr— Signed RB June Henley ta 3- 
ytttrconbnd. 

' neworleahs— Reigned LB RtohaidHa^ 
««y and OL Ed King. Signed G Darren Reese. 
Wblved CB Eric Carter, WR Jahnnte Bames. 

■new YORK cuum— signed G Cayttara 
Castro. 

TAMPA BAY— Signed WR Chris Campbell 
and C B Hoyd Young to 2-year contracts. 

washinoton— Re-signed DT WDBam 
Gaines. Signed G Brad Badger. 

WORLD LEAGUE 

Amsterdam Signed OB John Sacco and 
T Andre Hewttt Waived QB Perry Klein and G 
Kenneth McDardeL 

BARCELONA— Put CB Dante DePaoki on 
htiurad reserve. 

FHAincFURT— Activated g Jon Heldem- 
fch. mama C Joe Corolla. 

LONDON— Activated LB Kail BaVaitL 


Dennis the menace peanuts 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




■ 4 C ■ J 






... 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1997 


PAGE 22 


OBSERVER 


How Times Change! 


By Russeii Baker 

N EW YORK — I went to 
Baltimore for a college 
reunion. Checked into a hoteL 
Pretty good hotel. You could 
open a window, get some fresh 
an-. In a lot of hotels nowadays 
it's breathe that old second- 
hand, used air or do without. 

The bellboy said did I want 
some ice. Bellboys always 
say that I always say yes, 
bring some ice. Don’t know 
what to do with the ice when it 
comes. 

I have this room for three 
days. Cost for three days is 
more than a whole year’s tu- 
ition when I first went to this 
college. And that’s with the 
special reduced rate for old 
grads. Otherwise, a two-day 
stay would cost more than tu- 
ition for a whole year cost back 
then. How times do change! 

Back then there was no 
watching a movie in hotel 
rooms — no TV — which I 
decided to do. Checked list of 
movies, special attention to 
X-raters, always called dirty 
movies back then. In all Bal- 
timore there wasn’i one diny- 
movie house back then. Just 
the Gayety burlesque. Margie 
Hart, Evelyn West and Her 
Treasure Chest Now, right 
here in this room, seven or 
eight spicy flicks. 

□ 

Decided I'd better not Al- 
ways decide I'd bener not 
when staying in hotels. Of- 
ficials — FBI. CIA, local 
cops, militant feminists — 
probably recording room 
numbers of all X- rated view- 
ers. This hotel says no records 
are kept of what you’re 
watching. Still — could be a 
lie. Way to trap the saps. 

So instead I watched Barbra 
Streisand. She marries this cal- 
culus teacher because he hates 
carnal relations. Or some- 


£ 


Is k comedy or beart- 
Bafbra? You’ve got to 
decide these things if you're 
; to make movies, 
it cost, on top of the 
room rate. That would, have 
bought 85 streetcar rides to 
this college back then. How 
times do change! No wonder 
it costs $4 million to send a 
kid to college these days. 

What’s tins! A red light on 
the phone. I have a message, 
says the ghastly voice-mail 
voice. “Call your office.’* 

□ 

So I punched 25 numbers. 
“Not good enough,” said the 
one. Of course it wasn’t 

rapidly, I'd failed to start by 
punching 9 for calls outside 
the hotel. 

So I punched 26 numbers. 
The phone made nasty sounds. 
A voice asked wixai I thought I 
was doing. This phone wasn't 
licensed to transmit calls via 
AT&T, you dope. 

She stud why not use your 
persona] card. “Stuff it," I 
thought, but didn’t say, 
hanging up and delving into 
my wallet for the ancient 
piece of paper on which I had 
several hundred other num- 
bers for such emergencies. 

What’s tins! Lost my wal- 
let? No. It turned, up 30 
minutes later bitting under the 
ice bucket. I punched 31 num- 
bers. Got a real-estate agent in 
Manhattan. 

How times do change! 

Figured some reunion 
activity would clear my mind. 
After getting back from the 
reunion dinner I’d probably be 
able to tackle all 31 numbers 
with more zest for the test. 

That’s what I figured. So 
what I did was repeat the 31 
numbers over and over at din- 
ner, which nobody noticed 
because everybody else was 
saying, “How times do 
change!” 

New York Times Service 


White House to Roadhouse: Ahmet Ertegun 


By Mike Zwerin 

Intenutuital Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Ahmet Ertegun al- 
ways had a feel for what people 
wanted to listen to. hi his early 
twenties, he was spending a lot of 
time in record stores and it was 
obvious to him that the major re- 
cording companies were missing a 
whole segment of the market 
Atlantic Records, which Ertegun 
Co-founded in 1948 through a 
$10,000 loan from his dentist, be- 
came, along with Motown, one of 
the most successful black music 
labels. Built by Ertegun, his brother 
Nesuhi and the producer Jerry 
Wexler, the company played a 
large part in introducing rhythm 
and blues acts like LaVem Baker, 
Big Joe Tinner, Ruth Brown and 
The Coasters to die white audience. 
Then Ray Charles crossed over for 
them, followed by, after Columbia 
made a fool of itself miscasting her 
as a pop singer. Aretha Fr anklin . It 
was said that Wexler “put Aretha 
where she belonged: in church.” 

Although Ertegun likes to think 
he stays in touch, at the age of 72, 
keeping that feel is “no longer so 
easy.” He loves the singer-song- 
writer Sheryl Crow and the band 
Stone Temple Pilots, but he admits 
that the only way he can listen to 
much of the new rock and roll is 
“drunk.” 

His father was the Turkish am- 
bassador to Paris, London and then 
Washington. Ertegun is comfort- 
able chatting in French with ar- 
chitects (h is wife. Mica, is an in- 
terior designer), chansonniera 
(Charles Aznavour) and sports 
stars (Michel Platini). The Ertegun 
brothers founded and funded what 
Ertegun proudly calls “the best 
soccer club in the world”: the New 
York Cosmos, with Pele and Franz 
Beckenbauer. 

In his book “Mansion on the 
Hill.' ' Fred Goodman describes Er- 
tegun: “like no one else, he was as 
at home in the White House as in a 
roadhouse.” One three-day busi- 
ness trip took him to Paris for the 
opening of a Picasso exhibition at 


the Pompidou Center as the guest 
of President and Madame Pomp- 
idou, to London for an aperitif with 
Eric Clapton and then to Cleveland 
for a meeting with an influential 


disk jockey. 
Some 20 


Some 20 years after founding 
Atlantic, he sold it to Warner Seven 
Arts, which merged with Warner 
Communications Inc., and then in 
turn it became the music division of 


kids too. It’s derived from the blues 
and music derived from the blues 
has become the music of the 
world.’’ 

Members of committees defend- 
ing children from pornography 
have "come to see us about the so- 
called dirty words and violence in 
rap lyrics. ’ ' Atlantic puts ‘ ‘parental 
guidance” stickers on certain al- 
bums, butErtegun believes that to a 


ure. Paintings bv Picasso hang on 
the walls of -his apartment. His 
i deas are raten seriously: “I drink 
that the two most significant people 
in the arts in our century are Pablo 
Picasso and Louis Armstrong. 
Armstrong redefined musical 
phrasing. When I say ‘phrasing,’ I 
mean that he invented die concept 
of swing. 

“Louis changed not only the 



QmKUB Row 

Ertegun was a co-founder of Atlantic Records, one of the most successful black music labels. 


Time Warner, one of the most 
powerful multimedia, multination- 
al companies. He remains co-chair- 
man and co-CEO of what he calls 
the “Atlantic Group.” It has 10 
percent of the American market for 
sound recordings. 

Ertegun wants to be sure to go on 
record .that he loves the music 
called rap: “Rap is not Dew and it’s 
not a fad. It's not going to dis- 
appear. Like R&B, it reaches white 


large extent rap is just another ex- 
ample of the older generation not 
understanding what their grand- 
children are listening to: “The lyr- 
ical content of rap will change 
when living conditions of urban 
people in American cities change.” 
ms grandparents did not approve 
of swing music. 

Jaunty, boldly cultured, carrying 
an elegant walking stick, be is an 
imposing and widely respected fig- 


way people play but the way they 
sing; Ella Fitzgerald, for example. 
There were other people who 
played and san^ well but they never 
developed die influence Louis had 
on other people. Just like other tal- 
ented painters around Picasso’s 
time were not influential." 

On the jazz side, Nesuhi. who 
died in 1989; signed the Modem 
Jazz Quartet and Ornette Coleman 
to Atlantic. The company became 


increasingly attracted to white rock 

Crosby, Stills. Nash and Young, 

Cream. Led Zeppelin, Tbs Rolling 
Stones. 

After the Iasi nightcap, when 
everybody else goes home. Ertegun 
is often just getting started. Wining 
and dining Mick Jagger helped him 
sign the Stones when they were 
looking for a new label In his book 
“Hit Men,” Frederic Dannen 
quotes Ertegun: “I think Jagger 
would have liked to be on Excello 
[a small funk label]. We were the 
closest he could get to Excello and 
still get $5 miUion” 

It’s better now, but in the old 
days the people who handled the 
money somehow got ro keep most 
of it, Ertegun cites the shabby treat- 
ment suffered by the early black 
performers, including low. royalty 
rates and creative bookkeeping. 
Trying to begin to redress the bal- 
ance, Atlantic Records has con- 
tributed $1.3 milli on in seed money 
to the Rhythm and Blues Foun- 
dation. which, Ertegun explains, 
“takes care of indigent R&B sing- 
ers and players. And we -forgave 
debit balances. 

“Some of our competitors did 
not even have bookkeeping depart- 
ments. They just said, ‘Here’s a 
Cadillac,’ instead of sending state- 
ments and paying royalties. At- 
lantic never did any of that stuff but 
I’m the last person from that era 
left, so I guess I bear the brunt of 
everybody eise’s sins.” 

For example, in his newsletter, 
Rock and Rap Confidential, the 
critic Dave Marsh writes: “Erte- 
gun showed up at the annual R&B 
Foundation self-congratulatory 
spectacle in a regal limousine, 
wearing handmade shoes.” 

He recently ran into the retired 
producer (“sing along with”) 
Mitch Miller, who said: “See how 
the business has changed? We used 
to have two-page contracts. Now 
they got 200 pages. We used to 
make a record in three hours. Now 
it’s three months. I couldn't stand 
being in the record business any 
more. Could you?” 

“I’m in it," Ertegun replied. 


PEOPLE 


r T' , HE former Washington Redskins' owner 
J. Jack Kent Cooke has left the bulk of his 
S825 million fortune to charity — and nothing 
to Suzanne Elizabeth Martin, the mother of 
his 9-year-old daughter. Jacqueline. Cooke 
died last month of heart disease at 84. In the 
will, he left his son, John Kent Cooke. $10 
million outright and put $15 million in a trust 
for him and his wife and also set up a 55 
million trust fund for his daughter. Each of his 
five grandchildren received a $1 million trust 
fund. Executors of the estate have filed a 
lawsuit to determine what the estate's re- 
sponsibilities are to Cooke’s widow, Mar- 
lena. The document also instructed die ex- 
ecutors to create the Jack Kent Cooke 
Foundation, which may award scholarships to 
young men and women who have shown 
unusual intelligence and character, and also 
may create and operate schools for under- 
privileged children. 

□ 

The new owner of a 90'year-old teddy bear 
paid 277 200 kroner ($44,700) for it. The toy, 
which belonged to the late King Frederik IX 
of Denmark, the father of Queen Margrethe, 
was sold at auction to an unidentified buyer. 


The yellow bear with a red scarf made by the 
German toymaker Steiff had been expected to 
fetch 30,000 to 40,000 kroner. The bear was 
found last year in the attic of a royal castle. 

.□ 

Oprah Winfrey, the talk-show queen, is 
the target of a $ 1 million lawsuit by a pho- 
tographer, Paul Natkio, who accuses her of 
using his photos in her best-selling book 
“Make the Connection.' ’ Nation also charged 
that Winfrey had not returned negatives of 
several thousand photographs he took as a 
free-lance photographer for Winfrey’s tele- 
vision show Winfrey and Danny Glover. 

who starred together 12 years ago in “The 
Color Purple,” will be reunited in the movie 
version of “Beloved,” Toni Morrison's 
Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. The movie will 
be directed by Jonathan Demme and filmed 
in Philadelphia. 

□ 

David Duchovny, the hunky investigator 
of Fox's hit television series “The X-Files,” 
has married Tea Leoni, the bright light of the 
NBC comedy * ‘The Naked Truth,’ ' according 
to the New York Daily News. The couple 


exchanged vows at Grace Church School in 
Greenwich Village, where Duchovny went to 
school and where his mother still teaches. I( is 
his first marriage and Leoni ’s second. 

□ 

The Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis 
has been released from an Athens hospital 
after three days of tests. Theodorakis. 71, who 
went into the hospital after suffering res- 
piratory problems Sunday during a concert in 
Berlin says he will take a six-month break 
from work. 

□ 

With the 20th anniversary of Elvis Pres- 
ley’s death drawing near, the Memphis-based 
firm managing his estate is putting the fin- 
ishing touches to a dazzling memorial bash. 
“You'll think he’s back,” said Todd Mor- 
gan. a spokesman for the Graceland museum 
and entertainment complex. The nine-day 
event from Aug. 9 to 1 7 will end with a special 
concert in which the late rock star will be 
reunited via video technology with 30 to 40 
musicians and associates who worked with 
him on stage through the years. RCA will 
mark the anniversary by issuing 77 unreleased 


Elvis recordings. The four-CD set will include 
aPresley version of Bob Dylan’s “Blowin* in 
the Wind” and songs recorded when the late 
rock star was serving with the army in Ger- 
many. 

□ 

Two photographers who boxed in Arnold 
Schwarzenegger and his wife, Maria 
Shriver, while they were driving their chil- 
dren to school, have turned themselves in to 
police. The photographers could be charged 
with hit and run and reckless driving — they 
bumped Schwarzenegger's car — but they 
were set free since their misdemeanors did not 
warrant an arrest, the police said. 

□ 

Singer Toni Braxton poses with only a 
strategically placed sheet on the cover ofthe 
latest Vibe magazine and talks, sex inside. “I 
was 20 years old when I lost my virginity.” 
Braxton, 29, said in the interview, the 
Grammy winner readily agreed to pose for the 
cover, said Vibe’s art director, Lee Ellen 
Fanning, and said Braxton suggested a “Vic- 
toria’s Secret theme’ ’ to complement her new 
album, “Secrets.” 



Lwraa RfbonrVITie Atioducd ftn* 


CANNES FESTIVAL — Jeanne Moreau hugging the 
director Michelangelo Antonioni, who received a re- 
placement Palme d’Or. The one he won In 1967 for 
“Blow Up” was stolen. (More Cannes news. Page 10.) 



stays mainly in the plain. 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home and to other countries really easy 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 
you’re coiling from and well take it from there. And 
be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T Calling 
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# 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to folio* for easy calliag woihfaide 

1. Just dial the AT&T Access .Number for the counuy you 
are calling from. 

2 . Dial the phone number you're calling 

3. Dial the calling card number listed above your name. 




Autrfa*o “ 

BbJdJbiji* 

Czech Republic* 

Pnnw 

Germany 

flrwee* 

Ireland . . .. 


EUROPE 


022-503-011 

WM-IOO-ID 

. 00-42-000-101 

0-800-99-0011 

01 30- MHO 
w-aw-wii 

1-MO-550-M0 


838 OOtf WMMtiV sg 

.s57Sria 


Italy* 172-1011 

Netbarfands*.. 0BM -022-91 11 

Rsttl«**{HMCW?» 753-5042 

Spain . . .. * 900-99-00-11 


Swedes 

Switzerland* 

Ualtad tOngt/om* 

020-795-611 

. . 0800-89-0011 
.6500-58-0011 
0800-89-0011 

MIDDLE EAST 

EWpl*(CflttQ)* 

510-0200 

tareal 

.. 177-105-2727 

Site] Arabia o 

1 -800-10 

AFRICA 

Ghana 

0191 





Kenya* 0-800-KJ 

Soofi MrlN 0-800-98-0123 

Can't find die AT&T Acce^ Number for the country you're calling from? Jua ask any operator for 
AT&T Direct” Service, or tth our Weft site at http-y/^wwjttxom/traTeJer 


f