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INTERNATIONAL 




O 




(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World's Daily Newspaper 


London, Tuesday, May 20, 1997 




No. 35,525 


r s am 


r s on 


With Dad Downsized, 
A Job for Every Grad 


Clinton Backs China Trade Privilege 

Call for One-Year Renewal Is Likely to Provoke Sharp Debate 


By Peter Applebome 

Neti- Yurk Times Service 

BLOOMINGTON, Indiana — At 
colleges and universities across the 
United States, the class of ’97 is 
graduating this spring into the most 
auspicious job marker in memory, a 
^product of today’s soaring economy 
•fand, m many ways, the large-scale 
layoffs that cut a swath through their 
parents' generation. 

from huge state universities like 
the University of Indiana to high-end 
private schools like Williams College 
' in Massachusetts, from brand-name 
institutions like Dartmouth College to 
Red Rock Community College in 
Colorado, colleges, universities and 
professional schools are reporting re- 
cord numbers of recruiters on cam- 

■ pus, often offering more jobs than 
they can fill 

“I did eight interviews and got four 
offers, but I could have had more — I 

■ ruled out two of them early on,” said 
- Vijay Bhagavan, a 2 1 -year-old ac- 
counting graduate who got a $35,000 
starting position as an auditor with 
Price Waterhouse in Chicago. “I’d 
say 90 percent of my friends have 
jobs, and most had them relatively 
early.” 

The current job market reflects the 
upswing in the overall economy with 
unemployment now below 5 percent 
; and the go-getter predilections of a 
1 generation of students who have 


made junior- or sophomore-year in- 
ternships as big a growth area as full- 
time jobs for graduates. And Internet 
job searches, now the rale on most 
campuses, have made the process of 
finding employment much more ef- • 
ficient. 

But, in an odd rwist, the surge also 
reflects the years of layoffs for which 
many companies are frantically trying 
to compensate. Many experts believe 
that companies laid off too many em- 
ployees in the early 1990s and now 
that business has boomed beyond ex- 
pectations, they are recruiting college 
students for sales, managerial, tech- 
nical and support positions. 

“Corporations downsized too 
much,” said Maury Hanigan. the 
chief executive of Hanigan Consult- 
ing Corp., which advises Fortune 500 
companies on how to recruit college 
students. * ‘They laid off people with a 
lot of experience and they also laid off 
their bench strength so that they had 
appropriate staffing for the amount of 
business they were doing in. say, 
1991, but hadn't anticipated how 
much it would grow. Now they need 
college graduates to replace all those 
people who were laid off." 

The National Association of Col- 
leges and Employers says the best 
opportunities are in high-technology 
industries, especially in hardware and 
software development and computer 

See JOBS, Page 6 


By Brian Knowlton 

Iruernanarvd Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton an- 
nounced Monday that he intended to renew China’s 
most-favored-nation trade status for a year, and the 
decision, though expected, appeared certain to launch 
the sharpest debate on the matter in years. 

“We're more likely to have a positive influence on 
China by engaging them than we are by trying to 
isolate them,” the president said. “I think it's a simple 
judgment.” 

Secretary of Stare Madeleine Albright added at an 
appearance in Wilmington, Delaware: “The admin- 
istration's view is that our long-term interests are best 
served by a strategic dialogue with the Chinese leaders 
on a full range of issues. China with or without MFN 
status will be a rising force in world affairs.” 

The annual debate over extending favorable tariff 
terms to China has often been heated, but passage was 


almost always assured. This year, however, it is over- 
shadowed by a raft of emotional issues with foreign 
and domestic ramifications. They include not only 
human-rights questions and criticism of Chinese arms 
sales but allegations that Beijing has tried to influence 
U.S. politics by making political donations. 

Overhanging all other issues is the reversion of 
Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty on July 1. 

“Hong Kong really is to a great extent driving the 
China debate this year,” said Mike Jendrzejczyk, 
Washington director of Human Rights Watch, “it's 
clear that for many members of Congress, this is a key 
litmus test of whether China can and will abide by 
many of its most important commitments.” 

Some longtime supporters of the favorable trade 
status for China are now opposing it or clearly waver- 
ing. 

Dick Armey of Texas, the leader of the Republican 
majority in the House of Representatives, has always 
voted for renewal. But now, a spokesman said 


For the Losers in Zaire, a Time to Repent and Suffer 


Bans on Racial Preferences 
Cut Minority Admissions 


m "->• 
.*■ 

* V.O- 


By Rene Sanchez 
and Sue Anne Pressley . 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Two of the 
largest and most presngiousU.S. pub- 
lic u ni ver s ities are reporting a sub- 
stantial decline in the number of 
minorities they are admitting in the 
first classes after the schools were 
barred from using race as a factor in 
selecting students. 

At both the University of Califor- 
nia and tiie University of Texas, the 
effect of landmark new prohibitions 
on racial preferences has been swift 
and dramatic, and it is raising alarm 
on campuses nationwide about the 
consequences of losing affirmative 
action. 

At UCLA’s law school, 21 black 
students have been selected for next 
fall's class — an 80 percent drop from 
last year and the lowest number of 
African Americans offered admission 
■ since about 1970. At the UC-Berke- 
r ley law school. 14 blacks have been 
accepted in a class of 792, down from 
75 last year. The decline among His- 

- panic students at each law school is 
similar. Graduate programs at the 
University of California were the first 

- to be affected by the new race-neutral 
policy ordered by university regents. 

The same patterns also are emerg- 
ing at the University of Texas’s flag- 
ship campus m Austin, where gradu- 


ate and undergraduate programs were 
subject to new policies this year. Ten 
black students — compared with 65- 
last year — have been admitted for 
the rail to the law school, and nearly 
400 fewer black and Hispanic stu- 
dents have been offered admission as 
undergraduates, a 20 percent decline. 
Meanwhile, the number of white and 
Asian American students being ad- 
mitted at campuses in each state has 
risen sharply inis spring. 

“We’re very distressed. It’s a huge 
drop,” said Michael Rappaport, the 
dean of admissions at UCLA's law 
school. “And it's even worse than it 
appears because we’ll be lucky to get 
even half of those students to come to 
the campuses.” 

Critics of affirmative action, 
however, called fee new declines a 
sign of how much colleges have relied 
on double standards to increase 
minority enrollment. “This should be 
a wake-up call for all schools,” said 
Abigail Themstrom, a senior fellow 
at the Manhattan Institute, a conser- 
vative research organization. “These 
numbers tell us that with affirmative 
action policies, too many minority 
students who are not meeting stan- 
dards are still being admitted.” 

Across the nation, university lead- 
ers are closely watching enrollment 
trends in California and Texas be- 

See BIAS, Page 6 



jercent decline. A member of the alliance insurgents abusing one of two young men, suspected of being soldiers, Monday at 
er of white and the Mobutu campin Kinshasa. Meanwhile, the former elite was learning to coexist with the rebels. Page 6. 

tents being ad- 

i each state has 

ag- 

Is NATO’s Southern Flank Exposed? 

a worse than it 

ients tocometD As Regional Tensions Mount, U.S. Admiral Argues for Redeployment 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

NAPLES — As he gazes at a map of 
NATO’s southern rim on the wall of his 
spacious office overlooking the serene 
blue waters of the Mediterranean Sea, 
Admiral Joseph Lopez sees nothing but 
the potential for tremble. 

An arc of social tension spawned by 
poverty, soaring birthrates and religious 
extremism sweeps across North Africa. 
In the Middle East, where nearly half the 
world’s arms exports end up, at least 
eight nations are squabbling over water 
rights at a time of serious shortage. 

In the Balkans, a NATO-led peace- 
keeping force has prevented the re- 


sumption of war in Bosnia but has done 
little to heal ethnic hatred among Serbs, 
Croats and Muslims. In the Aegean Sea, 
Turkey and Greece have clashed over 
the sovereignty of several islands. In the 
Transcaucasia region, where nationalist 
rivalries erupted after the collapse of the 
Soviet Union, armed conflict spills 
across contested borders. 

For nearly half a century, the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization devoted 
the bulk of its troops and resources to 
thwarting a feared Soviet-led invasion 
of Western Europe. Now, as the alliance 
prepares to expand into Eastern Europe, 
defense planners say the gravest risks of 
future military conflict spring from 
myriad forces of instability along 


NATO's southern flank. 

As a result of these threats, pressure is 
building for dramatic changes in the 
U.S. defense posture in Europe. Instead 
of the hundreds of thousands of troops 
based in Germany who served as a bul- 
wark against a Soviet onslaught, the 
front line of U.S. commitment to Euro- 
pean security is shifting to the Medi- 
terranean and beyond — with growing 
demands to project air and sea superi- 
ority and thus defuse my future crises 
before they endanger vital Western in- 
terests. 

“Instability is a difficult enemy to 
deal with,” said Admiral Lopez, who as 

See NATO, Page 6 


Monday, “he is having second thoughts and won- 
dering if it’s time to send a message to Beijing.” 

Those second thoughts focused on concerns about 
Hong Kong, leadership changes in Beijing and “ru- 
mors of religious oppression," the spokesman said. 

Mr. Clinton's announcement came ahead of the 
June 3 deadline for informing Congress about any such 
plans on China's trade status. The Congress now has 
30 days in which to act on his recommendation or seek 
to overturn iL The president has said he would veto a 
rejection by Congress, and it appears the votes to 
override a veto axe lacking. 

The debate could reach a climax just days before tbe 
return of Hong Kong to Chinese control. The vote this 
year is expected to be closer than in previous years, 
though few Congress-watchers have ventured a guess 
as to how close. Last year, the House voted 286 to 141 
to support renewal. 

See MFN, Page 4 


China Faces 
Decision on 
Free Flow of 
Finance Data 


By Seth Faison 

' New York Times Service 

SHANGHAI — When Alan Green- 
span, the Federal Reserve Board chair- 
man, met with China's senior leaders 
last week, he delivered what was es- 
sentially a primer on fundamental char- 
acteristics of a market economy, a topic 
of endless fascination for the engineers 
of this nation’s half-achieved shift from 
a state-run to a market system. 

One of the elements Mr. Greenspan 
raised, U.S. officials said afterward, was 
tbe critical importance of free-flowing 
financial information for the develop- 
ment of capital markets, which China is 
in fee midst of starting up. 

Mr. Greenspan specifically warned 
about the damage drat could be caused 
by China's plans, not yet implemented, 
to control the distribution of financial 
information by international news or- 
ganizations. His Chinese hosts listened 
carefully, but apparently did not re- 
spond in detail. 

Information flow in China has fol- 
lowed economic and hade growth — 
sharply upward — over the last decade, 
so the Xinhua press agency stunned 
news organizations when it announced 
in January 1996 that it would assume 
new powers to supervise the content and 
sales of international news organiza- 
tions that offer financial information 
here. 

Now, after 1 6 months of negotiations, 
the issue is at a critical stage. Xinhua 
recently demanded that news organi- 
zations agree to its restrictions or lose 
the right to sign up new customers. 

Tbe issue of access to financial in- 
formation cuts to the root of concerns 
among leaders of developing nations, 
who are interested in the benefits of the 
market but afraid of its limits on the role 
of government. 

Chinese leaders seem especially per- 
plexed by this. They seem to be en- 

See CHINA, Page 4 


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Car Exports Lead Surge 
In Japan’s Trade Surplus 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

I nternational Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Japan’s trade surplus 
went into overdrive in Apnl, soaring 
163.7 percent in its second-largest nse on 
record, the government said Monday. 

• Booming car exports coincided with 
■ a slowdown in consumer imports as inew 
Jaxes slowed demand at home, the Min- 
istry of Finance reported. 

Japan’s overall customs-cleared 
trade surplus jumped to 83L48 bdbon 
yen ($7.23 billion) in April from 315.3 
billion yen a year earlier, the mimsny 
said. The rise was the biggest since 
January 1992, when it surged a record. 
283.4 percent. 

■With the United States, Japan s con- 
tentious. surplus grew for the seventh 
month in a row, leaping 174.1 percent, 
to 468.97 billion yen. 

“Because -the U.S. economy is so 

Newsstand Prices Z 

Bahrain 1 .000 Din Malta £5 c- 

Cyprus C. E 1.00 Nigeria -.125.00 Naira 

Denmark ...14.00 D.Kr. Oman 1 550 fflate 

Finland— 12-00 FM Qatar lO* 

Gibraltar £0JBS Bap.Iretand-.IR£/M» 

Great Britain .~£ 0.90 Saudi Arat».10X)0R 

Egypt .EE 5.50 S. Africa -R12 + VAT 

jJorian —1.250 JDUAE. -—.1 0.00 Drift 
TiSSlTl K SH. 160 UA MB. (Eur.) ^ 1-» 

| SST1-..700Bs Zimbabwe.-. ZmJ830-00 


9 "77 02 94* 8U 5025 


strong, 1 there is not likely to be much 
friction wife Japan over trade this 
year,” Hidetoshi Tanaka, chief econ- 
omist at fee Sanwa Research Institute, 
said. 

“But Japan is walking along a dan- 
gerous path, and unless it embraces fee 
kind of deregulation needed to boost 
domestic demand and imports, there 
will be serious trade friction again at 
some time in the future.” 

Coming after almost three years of 
declines, the new upturn in Japan’s trade 
surplus has angered U.S. manufactur- 
ers. It has also prompted Washington to 
urge Tokyo repeatedly to stimulate de- 
mand at home and not rely on exports to 
bolster Japan's slumping economy. 

Economists said Japan’s trade sur- 
plus would probably continue to climb 
for fee rest of fee year. But many in- 
sisted feat its rate of growth was likely to 


imposed in April. . . , , , 

At fee same time, a use m the value of 
fee yen against fee dollar should cut fee 
competitiveness of Japanese exports 
and temper U.S. criticism, fee econ- 
omists said. The yen reached a four- 
month high Friday as fee 
114.63 yen, compared wife 127 JO yen 

0,1 “The surplus will probably continue 
to grow, but not at fee pace we saw in 
AonL" said Mamoru Yamazaki, senior 
economist at Paribas Capital Miukets m 
Tokyo. “And as long as the U.S. econ- 

See TRADE, Page 4 



Eric Cantona, holding Man- 
chester United's Premier League 
championship trophy on May 11. 


MwiYIortt 

DM 

Pound 

Yon 

FF 


The Dollar 


Monday 04PJH. 
1.7085 
1.6395 
115.75 
5.756 


The Do'.v 


preWousctosa 

1.6931 

1.6365 

115.625 

5.6995 

prav fawdQM 
7187.14 


danga Monday O 4 P.M. previous cfc>» 
*338 83327 629.89 


Cantona: Britain’s Hero, France’s Grief 


By John Vinocur 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — In England, Eric Cantona was a genius, a poet, 
a philosopher, a cock-of-the-walk, insufferable at the edges, 
but a wizard who lit up the sky. In France, he was mainly 
grid 

Two countries wife often contradictory instincts, France 
and England found in this French soccer player who retired 
Sunday at age 30 from Manchester United the perfect 
repository for all their rivalry and admiration, mutual mys- 
tification and mild contempt 

Tbe English saw Cantona as sublime excess, Daliesque in 
his arch babbling about Rimbaud and seagulls, and a surreal 
master in the extraordinary d r a ft s m anship of his on-field 
vision and sense of space. He embarrassed their devotion 
publicly by chasing into the stands after a heckler, but 
beguiled them at fee same time by pounding his tormentor 
with a kung-fu kick out of a Bruce Lee movie. 


They loved his imperial stmt, his tumed-up shirt collar, 
the wisp of Mussolim in his jaw-jutting, the filigree of his 
passes. They loved that be won, and in a way, if un- 
articulated, they loved that all this irritated the French. 

Tbe French looked at Cantona and saw a boor and a bit of 

~ AGENDA 


tbe con man, a very skilled player but an uppity working- 
class kid, a poseur wife a Marseille accent of vaudeville 
vulgarity. 

As well as he got along wife fans, he nibbed fee soccer 
bosses and sports reporters fee wrong way, moving as 
incorrigible brat from team to team (Anxerre, Marseille, 
Nimes, Bordeaux, Marti gues) until his good-riddance and 
virtual banishment to England in 1991. Not so very gen- 
erously. his enormous success across the channel, with six 
championships, vast popularity and rich promotional con- 
tracts, galled fee French. 

First, because Cantona succeeded exactly on his own 
terms, without any diminution of the pers onali ty that, by 
French description, could not be integrated into efforts 
needed for championships. He played and Talked tbe same 
game he had at home, tbe geomancer's passes turning empty 
space into goals, metaphysical mournings tum bling after- 
ward onto extended microphones. 

But more, there was the unacknowledged but embittered 
sense feat fee French had trussed something, fear French 
soccer’s self-satisfied vision of the world was blind to Eric 
Cantona’s innovation, feat France could not deal wife a 

See CANTONA, Page 18 


Cyclone Lashes the Bangladesh Coast 


Five people were killed and at least 
100 were injured when a cyclone 
struck the coast of Bangladesh and the 
port city of Chittagong on Monday. 

Doctors at Chittagong Medical Col- 
lege Hospital said they feared fee death 
toll would rise as morcieportscame in. 
"This was a major devastation and we 
think many more casualties will fol- 
low,” one doctor said. 

Officials at the Information Ministry 

said one million people had been evac- 


uated from, the path of the cyclone 
before it lashed the southeast coast 
Officials in the port of Chittagong 
said that thousands of houses were 
demolished and that uprooted trees and 
power poles jammed roads. Power 
supplies and communications were cut 
in many areas. 

' “We fear more severe damage in 
Cox’s Bazar and Teknaf areas along 
the southeastern coast,” an official 
said. Page A 


MQETWO 

fyrdict Axccdted in Mc Libel Case 

EUJIOI^ p^.8. 

labour Reads to Corruption Charge 

BUSMESSmNANCE Pagettt. 

Economy Plays Top R ole bi IranMrto 

Books Page IQ. 

Crossword Page 5. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports — Pages 18-19. 


The IHT on-line h ftp : //. ■ v w w. ihf.com 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


David vs. Goliath /The Sequel Netanyahu 

British Activists Bear Up Under Ferocious Big Mac Attack Xrade Blame 




By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


I T WAS the biggest food-fight in Britain's 
legal history, a trial that ground on far 3Z3 
days in London's High Court. The verdict in 
the marathon case is expected soon. Mc- 
Donald's Corp. sued Dave Morris and Helen 


Steel for libel after they refused to apologize for 
distributing a leaflet titled ‘ ‘What's Wrong With 
McDonald’s?” 

The leaflet accused McDonald’s of selling 
unhealthy food, exploiting and underpaying 
staff, creating mountains of waste, being cruel to 
animals and contributing to the destruction of 
rainforests. 

The company said the accusations were 
whoppers and served libel writs on five cam- 
paigners, three of whom backed down and apo- 
logized. But Mr. Morris, who said he didn't like 
being bullied, and Ms. Steel chose to defend 
themselves in court, and later countersued, con- 
tending that they had been libeled by being 
branded liars. 

Mr. Morris, 43, an unemployed former postal 
worker and single parent, and Ms. Steel, 31, a 
part-time bartender, reckon that if they lost it 
would take several hundred years of their com- 
bined annual earnings of £7,500 (512,000) to 
meet McDonald's demand for up to £120,000 in 
damages, on top of legal costs estimated to run 
into millions. 

“It's all a bit academic,” Ms. Steel said. 

McDonald’s said the allegations made in the 
leaflet were “not true and highly damaging.'' It 
said it had gone to court as a “last resort” to stem 
false information, and denied that it sought to 
stifle free speech. The company declined further 
comment on the libel trial until the verdict was 
delivered. 

The case has turned into a public relations 
quagmire for McDonald's. Millions of copies of 
the leaflet have been distributed in Britain alone 
since the trial began almost three years ago. 

In the most striking example of how the 
Internet can make a company a public target for 
its enemies, the issue has reached a global audi- 
ence through tiie world wide web (www.mc- 
spotlight.org). 

The so-called McLibel Support Campaign, 
which is not directly connected with the de- 
fendants, has posted the transcript of the trial, 
McDonald's 500-page summing-up, accompa- 
nying documentation and a deconstruction of die 
corporation's own web site (wwwjncdon- 
akis.com). 

A vast amount of data about McDonald's — 



Although they had not five minutes of legal 
training between them, die defendants have now 
spent more rime speaking in court than some 
professional barristers. 

So-called liti gants in person get no help or 
guidance, but Dan Mills, a lawyer who is co- 
ordinating the McLibel campaign, said the 
dressed -down defendants put up an effective 
opposition to McDonald’s bewigged and gown- 
wearing counsel. 


For Deadlock 


.>■ .-..^4 '•+/ i v- <"*' 

-* 





-'cvr 




Dave Morris and Helen Steel arriving at London's High Court for the start 
of final submissions in the libel case brought against them by McDonald's . 


unearthed through questioning and contributed 
by expert witnesses — has beat placed on the 
public record. Evidence introduced in court can 
be quoted, and die defendants' accusations have 
amplified through the media, which invariably 
depicts the case in David vs. Goliath terms. Last 
weekend, C hann el 4 television broadcast a two- 
pan documentary based oa a reconstruction of 
trial highlights. 


U NDER Britain’s strict libel laws, the 
onus was on the defendants to prove 
their innocence rather than for Mc- 
Donald's to prove their guilt (Of 
course, in the coimtersuit, McDonald’s must 
grove its contention that the pair deliberately 

The McLibel 2, as they are known, contend 
that every assertion in their leaflet has been 
backed up by evidence. The law required the 
defendants to substantiate every statement from 
primary sources, such as witnesses or official 
documents. 

At one point, where Ms. Steel said she thought 
that the. truth was a sufficient argument, the 


judge told her. “No, I am sorry, life is not quite 
as simple as that.'' 

Mr. Morris said the case could never have 
been brought in the United States, where debate 
about, say, the nutritional value of a cheese- 
burger would be considered to be in the public 
interest A senior McDonald's executive ac- 
knowledged in court that the alleged defama- 
tions “are in the public domain in America to 
some extent” 

Public comment posted on the me spotlight 
Web site is running overwhelmingly against 
McDonald's, although a few people criticize the 
campaigners. 

“Let’s face facts,” wrote one, “you are all a 
bunch of vegan Commie whiners. Go move to 
Red China and eat rice for all I care, but leave my 
Big Mac the hell alone.” 

Mr. Morris and Ms. Steel had to represent 
themselves in the trial because they could not 
afford a lawyer, and legal aid is not available for 
libel cases. McDonald's, which has 21 ,000 stores 
in 101 countries and reported earnings of $32 
billion in 1996, hired a legal team headed by 
Richard Rampton, who specializes in libel cases. 


M R. MILLS said Ms. Steel was meth- 
odical and came to court most days 
with a list of carefully prepared 
questions, w hile Mr. Moms tended 
to move around and cut loose with unexpected 
lines of attack. In all, they questioned 130 wit- 
nesses, and the two sides obtained written sub- 
missions from 50 more witnesses. 

“It was a unique opportunity to cross-ex- 
amine top executives,” Ms. Steel said. “Nor- 
mally, campaigners get turned away at the gates 
or they get a line from a public relations person. 
But in this situation, McDonald's executives 
couldn’t walk away.” 

The trial has attracted the attention of a wide 
range of campaigners, from vegetarians and 
trade unionists to animal liberationists and eco- 
logists. Sympathizers contributed about £35,000 
to the defense funds. The money was spent on 
bringing defense witnesses to the trial, paying 
for court transcripts and administrative matters. 

Win or lose, the case is not over yet. The 
defendants said they were determined to take it 
to the European Court of Human Rights to argue 
that they had been deprived of justice because 
the judge had refused to allow the issue to be 
heard before a jury. 

The decision followed McDonald's conten- 
tion that the issue of a purported link between 
diet and cancer was too complex to be assessed 
by a jury. 

“We believe That because we have been 
denied a jury the world's public are the real 
jury,” Mr. Morris said. “It is the public that 
should be deciding what the problems are and 
what kind of society they want to live in, not 
judges, not governments not multinationals.” 

Mr. Moms and Ms. Steel also said that if they 
lost, they would seek damages from the private 
detectives McDonald’s hired to infiltrate their 
London Greenpeace group, since they had 
helped distribute some of the anti-McDonald’s 
leaflets as part of their undercover work. 

One of the investigators defected to the de- 
fense. saying she did not think there was any- 
thing wrong with what the group was doing. 


Reuters 

JERUSALEM — Israelii and PalC 
es rinians blamed each other Monday for.' 
what a U.S. official described as‘ a- 
breakdown in the core issues of their* 
peace accord 

Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian leader 
said that Washing ton’s refusal to pres- 
sure Israel had doomed U.S. efforts Jo 
revive the Middle East peace talkg. 
which have been deadlocked sim£ 
March. 

But Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu of Israel, who took office a yeaf 




blamed Mr. Arafat for the crisis. — 
“If there is no forthcoming position 
on the part of the Palestinians to keep the 
agreement, that is to fight terrorism anxf 
to follow through on the other co'q* r 
ditions, I think it’s very hard to pt|L-‘ 
ceed,” Mr. Netanyahu said. f. 

Martin lndyk, the U.S. ambassador u£ 
Israel, was telling the two sides wiyjr 
they knew when he said Sunday th# 3 
Israel’s building of settlements plus Pal- 1 ; 
estmian violence had shattered the £^-': 
gile trust between them. r’ 

But his comments appeared to strike V 
nerve. "*’• 

In Gaza, Mr. Arafat explained the* 
breakdown by saying: “There is 'no, 
American pressure to save the peage 
process.” ^ 

Palestinians have urged Washington,' 
Israel's closest ally, to press Mr. Net-' 
anyahu to stop building settlements oe^ 
West Bank land that has been occupied 
by Israel since the Arab-Israeli war in 
1967. •' 

The special U.S. peace envoy, Denies, 
Ross, who has logged hundreds of m&l 
diation hours, failed to revive peace; 
talks in a nine-day mission that eDdgtf, 
last week. 



- J-* 4 


•r 








■ 2d Pales tinian Is Slain 

A Palestinian accused of selling laijjt 
to Israelis has been found slain m ffiei 
West Bank, in the second such kiUipjfP, 
since the Palestinian Authority an-;? 
noimoed this month that it would Uo-' 
pose a death sentence on Arabs wljjS 1 
sold land to Jews, The New York Tunes 1 ' 


ji-7" 




■■SEP* 




Iflk * J 

. - - 
v- -t r*tr 

■ ■ vfi* 

;• .••• i 


Hong Kong and China Start Direct Rail Service 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


reported from Jerusalem. 

the victim was identified as Harin' 


jt.tiT.. 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — China and Hong 
Kong inaugurated direct rail service 
Monday, just weeks before the British 
colony returns to Chinese rude. 

The new service between Hong Kong 
and Beijing, a distance of 2350 kilo- 
meters (1,410 miles), takes 29 hours. 

An adult ticket for a deluxe berth costs 
1,191 Hong Kong dollars ($154). Tickets 
for a second-class berth are 943 dollars. 

On Tuesday, die first direct service 
between Hong Kong and Shanghai will 
begin. 


Hong Kong inaugurated the air-condi- 
tioned train service at the Hung Horn 


While many passengers were euphor- 


ic about making die inaugural journey. 

Konebusii 


railroad station on the Kowloon Pen- Lam Jun-cheng, a Hong Kong business- 


insula. 

“It symbolizes not only the close co- 
operation between the Kowloon -Canton 


man arriving on the first train from 
Beijing on Monday, complained dial the 
customs check at Changping, in China's 


Railway Corporation and the Ministry of Guangdong Province, before crossing 
Railways but also the strengthening of the border to Hong Kong was incon- 


ties between Hong Kong and China, 
which so many people have been long- 


venienL He said passengers had to drag 
their bags out of the train for inspection 


ing for," Mr. Tsang told hundreds of and then reload them. 


ersatthe station. 


But Mr. Lam added that the long 


Hong Kong, a British colony since journey was a bargain. “If it is urgent. 


nnancial Secretary Donald Tsang of on June 30. 


1842, reverts to Chinese rule at midnight 


I’ll fly,” he said. “If not, I prefer taking 
the train. The train is much cheaper.” 


6 Foreigners 
Beheaded in 
Saudi Arabia 


French Trains Running 

PARIS (AFP) —France's SNCFraU- 
road said Monday that traffic was 
slowly returning to normal after con- 
ductors in most cities voted to end a 
five-day strike that disrupted long-dis- 
tance and inter-city trains. But air trans- 
port was expected to be disrupted Tues- 
day when pilots at Air France plan to 
begin a four-day strike. 

Air France pledged Monday to main- 
tain national and international flights 
but said there was “arisk of disruption" 
and urged passengers to check avail- 
ability of flights before traveling. 

On the rail front, problems were ex- 
pected Monday on some high-speed 
TGV lines, with three out of four TGV 
trains running on northern and south- 
western lines and two out of three TGVs 
running to Toulouse and the southeast 


a 48-hour nationwide train strike that 
was set to start Monday evening. 

Union leaders representing station- 
masters and engine ers have called for a 
strike to start at 9 PM. to protest delays in 
contract renewaL Minimum service will 
be guaranteed, the stale railroad said. 

Palestinian Airlines announced it 
would begin its first scheduled inter- 
national flights next month with twice- 
weekly trips to Jordan. ( Reuters ) 


Air pollution in Athens approached 
warning levels as temperatures reached 
32 degrees centigrade (90 degrees 
Fahrenheit). (AP) 


Croire efuies jc$ves 

et-^n * es realiser. 


Italy Rail-Strike Threat 


Collection 'ALHAMBRA' 
a partir dc 4 900 FF. 






mi 





The Associated Press 

JIDDA — Five Nigerians 
convicted of aimed robbery 
and an Afghan man found 
guilty of drug smuggling 
were beheaded Monday in 
Saudi Arabia, the Interior 
Ministry said. 

The ministry said the five 
Nigerians were executed in 
the port city of Jidda. It iden- 
tified them as Ali Mohammed 
Abdulaziz, Adam Issa Sulei- 
man, Youssef Othman ibn 
Gay an, Aii Issa Mohammed 


ROME ( AP) — The Italian Transport 
Ministry summoned union leaders to a 
last-minute meeting in an effort to avoid 


The UJ5. national parks, in the next 
several years, will introduce a reser- 
vation system to enter the parks, the 
interior secretary, Bruce Babbitt, pre- 
dicted. ( Reuters ) 

Plans for a rail link to Dulles In- 
ternational Airport from Washington 
were submitted by five of the largest 
U.S. engineering companies to finance, 
build and operate the $1 billion, 23-mile 
(37-kilometer) line. • ( WP ) 


Abu Sara, 60, a building contractor from* 
the village of Ain Yabrud. ;>* 

Palestinians said that his body bSff 
been found Saturday in the town of, ■ 
Ramallah, which is governed by Pal- 1 
es rinians , and that he bad been shoriin! 
die bead. j 

His death was reported Sunday by' 
Palestinian security officials, who! 
denied that they had been involved^;- 
die killing. • • 

Palestinians from the Ramallah area! 
said that Mr. Abu Sara was knownjo; 
have sold land to Israelis and had been' 
questioned about his business dealings! 
by the Palestinian police shortly after; 
they took control of Ramallah in! 
December 1995. Mr. Abu Sara’s son! 
denied the accusations against his fa-* 
then ! 

The killing was reported more than a| 
week after Farid Bashiti, an Arab real; 
estate dealer from Jerusalem who was! 
also accused of selling land to Jews, was| 
found slain in Ramallah. 

The Israeli police have arrested an! 
Arab man and woman in the slaying,' 
identifying the man as a Palestinian! 
police officer and accusing die Paler-i* 
ti ni n n Authority of involvement in tr- ' 
case. - ; 


POLITICAL 


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WEATHER 


Europe 


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Amsterdam 

Ankara 


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The five were found guilty 
of holding up a money ex- 
change in Jidda, locking up its 
employees and escaping in a 
stolen car, the ministry said. It 
did not say when die crime 
took place. 

The Afghan, Abdul-Karim 
Mawlawi Khan, was executed 
in the capital, Riyadh. He was 
found guilty of smuggling 
heroin, me ministry said. 

The executions raise to 38 
the number of people be- 
headed this year in Saudi Ara- 
bia; last year, it was 71. 

Courts in the kingdom im- 
pose beheading as a punish- 
ment under Islamic law for 
rape, murder, drug trafficking 
and crimes that endanger the 
public. Western human rights 
groups have criticized the ex- 
ecutions, saying defendants 
often are denied fair trials. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


PAGES 


THE AMERICAS 


Pentagon Unveils Limited Cutbacks 


The Associated Press 

? WASHINGTON - Declaring the 

nnbtax^ must shed more weight.-' De- 
fuse Secretary William CcWunveiled 
a Pentagon blueprint Monday designed 
tocid costs without weakening tbe mil- 
itary s punch. 6 

The 69-page Quadrennial Defense 
Review leaves intact the core military 
fo/xx of 10 active array divisions, a 
dOMn airci^ carrier battle groups and 
20atr force fighter wings — enough, the 
Pentagon says, to win two regional wars 
almost simultaneously. 


But with budget pressures weighing 
heavily, the review also recommends 
trimming major weapons modernization 
programs, holding at least two major 
rounds of base closings and thinning the 
military’s support systems. 

'‘The path we have chosen strikes a 
balance between the present and the 
future, recognizing that our interests and 
responsibilities in the world do not per- 
mit us to choose between tbe two,” Mr. 
Cohen said in a message accompanying 
the report. 

By largely sparing front-line forces 


and canceling no major new weapons 
programs, the defense review represents 
at least a partial victory for senior of- 
ficers at the Pentagon. General John 
Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, said the recommended 
reductions “can be ac c omplished with 
minimal impact on the combat force.” 

The plan maintains the U.S. commit- 
ment to defending South Korea and the 
Gulf. It also foresees * 'the possible emer- 
gence, after 2010-201S, of a regional 
power or glohal peer competitor,’* a 
phrase usually taken to mean China. 


on the pjn of the 
a S J ee raeni, :h ai 

Mr. ... Ver y hanu>. 


Illegal Aliens in U.S. Are ‘ Home Free 

Reduced Internal Enforcement Allows Fraud Schemes to Blossom 


~JBy W illiam B ran j gin 

»i*' Washington Poa Service 


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^WASHINGTON — As the 
I Spied States has focused on 
tightening control of its bor- 
ders, illegal aliens have taken 
advantage of reduced internal 
enforcement to initiate fraud 
schemes that will allow them 
to‘ ^settle indefinitely in the 
United States and receive fed- 
eral immigration benefits, ac- 
cording to UJ3. officials and 
internal documents. 

Ttoost of those who engage 
ih^fnmigration fraud come to 
the United States to work and 
improve their living standard. 
Bpt some are terrorists and 
criminals, notably members 
of Russian and Chinese crime 
syndicates, government doc- 
uments show. 

.Unless more effort is de- 
voted to detecting and stop- 
ptngfraod, VS. officials say, 
attempts to control illegal im- 
nfigradon will fail. 

Once illegal immigrants 
enter the United States, the 
sources say, a lack of domes- 
tic .'enforcement capability by 
. Immigration and Natur- 
aljizatiou Service and the easy 
availability of fraudulent doc- 
uments ensure that, in most 
<^ses, they are “home free.*' 
The issue was Id be tiie sub- 
ject of a hearing Tuesday be- 


fore the House Judiciary sub- 
committee on immigration led 
by Representative Lamar 
Smith, Republican of Texas. 

Of greatest concern to U.S. 
authorities is a sharp increase 
in what is known as "benefit 
application fraud,” which in- 
volves obtaining legal immi- 
gration status through fraud- 
ulent means. 

This is in contrast to doc- 
ument fraud, in which fake 
passports, visas, birth certi- 
ficates, Social Security cards, 
work permits and other doc- 
uments are used to enter or 
function in tbe United States. 

Often, document fraud 
leads to benefit fraud, result- 
ing in the issuance of various 
types of U.S. visas, political 
asylum, permanent residence 
and even U.S. citizenship. 

After an ineligible applic- 
ant receives a valid, govern- 
ment-issued document, such 
as alien registration card, or 

ir^^^ain status, the frawfte 
“unlikely to be detected 
thereafter,” the immigration 
service report said. “In ad- 
dition to the wide range of 
INS programs affected,” it 
adds, “the sheer volume of 
fraudulent applications relat- 
ing to. a single- benefit fraud 
scheme can be enormous, and 
the structure of the criminal 



POLITICAL V O TE 


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Rules to Live By in Washington 

, WASHINGXQN — Beleaguered voters, seem ' con,- 
-ufiised and .often outraged at the way Washington conducts 
.^business; That’s beCTnse people on Ihe outside do not. 
understand how the game is played: But floating around 
.-•G&pitol Hill, appare ntl y for use as a training tool for new 
• ,£taff members, is a one-page grade entitled “Washington 
.••Rules” giving the basic rules that are the keys to effective 
•iplay in Congress and throughout government: 

• If it’s worth fighting for,, it's worth fighting dirty for. 

• Don't lie, cheat or steal unnecessarily. 

m There is always one more son of a bitch than you 
-counted on. 

• An honest answer can get you info a lot of trouble. 

• The facts, altiiough interesting, are irrelevant 
, • rhicken Little only has to be right trace. 

, • “No” is only an interim response. 

• You can’t kill a bad idea. 

• If at first you don’t succeed, destroy all evidence that 
_-T,you ever tried. 

‘ a - • The truth is a variable. • — 

.. . • a porcupine with his quills down is just another frit 

Wpdent- uvi.*- . 

vt • • You can agree with any concept or notional frame 
option, in principle, but fight implementation every step 
of the way. 

• A promise is not a guarantee. 

« If you can ’t counter the argument; leave the meeting. 

Democrats’ Debts Mushroom 

WASHINGTON — Burdened by mounting legal Mils, 
o fficials of the Democratic National Committee have aban- 


-•** ' 
. ?e 





■"*£%*** 



ion to prevent the financial crisis 
?irom overwhehning the onganuatioo. 

The situation is much worse than was expected earher 

-this year. Party officials are in the final stages of de- 
Zveloping a long-term debt restructuring plan that would 
provide a stretched-out schedule for payments. 

Asked whether foe party would ehmmate its debt by the 
iead of 1998, a year later than initially projected, Steve 

; Grossman, tbe Democratic ^ ?09R ” 

'fondest hope is that we could do it by the end of 1998- 

Others familiar with the party’s finances said a t»uld 
-take years to retire the debt. The party reported a debt of 
i ’$14.4 million at the end of the first quartta-, and foe national 
[jeonintittee has about $1 million m cash on hand. (WP) 

\Quote /Unquote: 

Representative W.J. (Billy) Tauzin, RepubUran of 
^CoS^and chairman of the HouseOrannCTDeai^ 
[^committee on telecommunications, trade and co “^imer 
L^^ction, as 300 families from Peona. Illinois, 

the television indusoy s ce-^ pa^ 

“We’ve heard from members of Congress 
; ^mdl^b^sts in Washington on this issue; ij’s time 
from dae American public. *- r * wr * 


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conspiracy complex.” 

In one case detailed in the 
report, nearly half of 22,000 
applications filed by one im- 
migration consulting firm on 
behalf of illegal aliens seek- 
ing amnesty were proved or 
suspected to be fraudulent. 


and 54 people who had col- 
lected more than $9 million in 
fees were prosecuted 
More worrisome, the re- 
port says, is that “alien crim- 
inals and terrorists manipu- 
late the benefit application 
process to facilitate expan- 
sion of their illegal activities, 
such as crimes of violence, 
narcotics trafficking, terror- 
ism and entitlement fraud” 
For example, it said Mir 
Aim a) Kansi, a Pakistani ter- 
rorist wanted fen- fatally shoot- 


ing two CIA employees out- 
side the agency's headquarters 
in 1993, had obtained two 
green cards, one through & 
political asylum application 
and the other through the am- 
nesty program. 

Among cases under inves- 
tigation are some in which 
Russian and Chinese organ- 
ized crime figures, smugglers, 
money-launderets, prostitutes, 
restaurant workers and low- 
wage laborers have gained 
entry as executives of phony 
businesses through a notori- 
ously porous nonimmigrant 
visa category known as L-1A. 
The L-IA visas are meant to 
ease “intracompany trans- 
fers’’ of foreign businessmen 
to set up or manage U.S. sub- 
sidiaries. 





Away From Politics 1 

• A second-story wooden balcony 
ho lding spectators who had gathered 
for a good view of the University of 
Vir gini a’s commencement collapsed 
just minutes before the ceremony, 
kilting (Hie person and injuring 18 oth- 
ers in Charlottesville. University of- 
ficials said 4 to 10 people were stand- 



Ln&OWThrA* 


Workers propping up a section of the balcony after the collapse. 


>ave way. Parts of the balcony rained 
down on spectators. (WP) 

Joan Kroc, widow of tbe founder of 
McDonald’s, has been identified as 
the donor of $15 million to flood vic- 
tims in Grand Forks, North Dakota. 
She requested anonymity when she 
asked officials to distribute $2,000 to 
each family that had suffered. But Sen- 
ator Byron Dorgan of North Dakota 
confirmed she was the donor after the 
Grand Forks Herald newspaper found 
that her jet had refilled at the city 
airport. (AP) 

• The Army National Guard has 

been banned from shooting practice 
on Cape Cod because its spent bullets 
could pollute groundwater. Environ- 
mentalists asserted that chemicals 
from shells and lead from bullets 
threatened public health. (AP) 

• A 16-year-old boy was shot in the 

back by a motorist who threatened 
revenge after his car was splashed by 
teenagers who were having a friendly 
water fight, the police in Oakland, 
California said. (AP) 

• A train derailed near Denali Na- 
tional Park in Alaska, leaving 380 
passengers stranded in a remote area 
for several hours. No one was injured 
in the accident, which occurred about 
170 miles north of Anchorage. (AP) 


U.S. Opens New Assault on Drug Cartel Money-Laundering 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
adminis tration has devised 
new rules in an effort to make 
■it far more diffi cult for drug 
cartels to move their profits 
from the United States to 
Colombia and other drug cen- 


Tabloid Takes 
Flak in Luring 
Sportscaster 


ters in Latin America, building 
on a successful experiment in 
New York City, officials fa- 
miliar with tbe pfan say. 

Undo- the new rales, street- 
comer check-cashing ser- 
vices and large money-trans- 
mitters like Western Union 
and American Express would 
be required to report to the 
Treasury wire transfers of 
more than $750 outside of the 
United States. Until now, 
only transfers of more than activities, w 
$10,000 required the filing of though they nmst still file re- 
a government form that in- ports of international transac- 
ts udes basic information tions of more than $10,000. 


about the sender. The regu- 
lations, which would go into 
effect after a 90-day comment 
period, were to be announced 
by Treasury Secretary Robert 
Rubin and Raymond Kelly, 
the former New York City 
police commissioner who is 
head of the Treasury's en- 
forcement division. 

Ordinary banks, which op- 
erate under separate rules re- 
quiring reports of suspicious 
activities, will be exempted. 


The new rules grew out of a 
federal and state crackdown 
on money-laundering that 
began in New York City in 
August. Using the Treasury’s 
emergency powers under the 
Bank Secrecy Act, Mr. Kelly 
required cash transmitters in 
New York City — chiefly 
storefront shops in Queens 
and northern Manhattan that 
immigrants often use to wire 
money home — to report 
transactions of more than 
$750 or face large penalties. 

Intelligence reports sug- 
gested that the New York 


transmitters moved more than 
$1 billion in drug money a 
year to Latin America, chiefly 
to Colombia, in increments 
just under $10,000, to avoid 
the government reporting re- 
quirements. Law-enforce- 
ment o'ffidals, presumably 
after eavesdropping on the 
drug operations, said the $750 
limit virtually dried up the 
cartel’s money-wiring busi- 
ness In the city, because the 
burden of dividing up a re- 
mittance of, say, a $500,000 
payment to Colombia in such 
increments was significant 


“It was more successful 
than we could have ima- 
gined,” said a senior admin- 
istration official deeply in- 
volved in the crackdown. “It 
didn’t cut the money off, but it 

required the cartels to move a 
lot more in cash. And that is 
dangerous for them.” 

During the six-month ex- 
periment cash seizures at 
Kennedy and Newark Inter- 
national A irport s and T ngim 
International Airport in Bos- 
ton rose to $50 million, a four- 
fold increase over foe previous 
year. Treasury officials said. 


By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Past Service 


WASHINGTON — It 
looks like a typical tabloid ex- 
pos& Intimate photos ofFrank 
Gifford, foe football sports- 
caster and former New York 
Giants star, embracing a 
blonde who is not Katirie Lee 
Gifford, Ins wife and the co- 
host of the talk show “Live 
With Regis and Kathie Lee.” 

But foe Globe did more 
than just publish foe pictures: 
The supermarket tabloid paid 
a framer flight attendant, Su- 
zen Johnson, $75,000 to entice 
Mr. Gifford into a New York 
hotel room where a video 
camera was hidden, people fa- 
mSiar with foe article say. 

“There’s a difference be- 
tween reporting foe news and 
creating foe news,” said 
Steve Coz, editor of foe rival 
National Enquirer. “It’s one 
thing to catch & celebrity 
cheating and another to in- 
duce or entrap them,” adding, 
“This is way over the top-” 

The Globe’s editorial di- 
rector, Dan Schwartz, said, 
“The issue is not what we did, 
the issue is what Frank Gif- 
ford (fid.” 


UNITED SOOTS 
BANKRUPTCY COURT 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT 

OF NEW YORK 


In re 

GC TECH, INC 
Debtor. 


Cteptortt 

Cats No. 97 B 
IfJHG) 


Couftiooin 


PLEASE WE NOTICE rime fay 
onto- dated May f. 1997 (dw 
“Scheddflrg Order*), dm Ibnknmr 
Court tax scheduled! hearing far June 
16, 1997 at 930 am before rim 
Honorable Jolty H. GaSet; Uniud 

Court tor dw 
So uth ern Ditoid of Now tfa* 
On. Bow&n* Green. New York. NY 
10004, on me Dabnrfa morion Mm 

“Morion") to Wprwe the sale (die 

“SaJelo/ swdeSGC Tech SA fSA") 
and Globe Onflne Uri*. two of the 
Ddxorfa subridhrittand ifi oUprions 
owed to the Debtor by SA, and si 
(feints, Rabdries, and causes of action 
retting m (he Sale of rim fc reg to g 
(cofleahek the “Assets"), free and dear 

of Ben^dunt and cnoinbranees. tor 

the highest and best offer as may be 

recdvH br rim Debtw far the AiseoL 
PUEASE TAKE HJKTHBV NCfnCE. 

rfmr a copy of rimSdwdofine Order and 
"the Motion my be obsaS&edat any tone 

counsel for tee Debtor. Attw 

dephom nn «M- 
flMftnfle (ptti C 6 . 



TAKE FURTHER NOTICE 

that any ofer for the Assets name be 
node in a ccordance with the Hddng 

procedures approred by rife Coin In 

the SdwUfrN Oder, and that al 
dUeetioac to me Safe nut be nrnoe h 
ojnfcnnfiyvrtdi the ScheduSrg Order 



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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


ASIA/PACmC 


On the Edges of China’s Prosperity 

For Oyster Shuckers, Growth Brings Long Hours and Low Fay 


By Seth Faison 

New York Tunes Service 


BEHAI, China — At the far end of a 
sharefrout littered with broken shells, 
where sea salt flavors the warm spring 
air, a handful of small women in cone- 
shaped straw hais waded into the water, 
empty baskets in hand. 

Two fishermen on a flatbed skiff drif- 
ted in to unload their oysters, each shell 
smothered in dark green algae and 
bulkier than a brick. Loading up a basket 
made a heavy burden, at 75 pounds 


(33.75 kilograms) or more, but over die 
shoulder they went, a trail of muted 
grunting in their wake. 

Up an shore, Fu Chun was already 
banging open a heavy oyster shell when 
her mother arrived with a basketful more, 
dumping a pile of gnaried shells onto the 
small mountain that was already there. 

Just 14, Fu Chun wielded a wooden 
club like an old pro, whacking an oyster 
so hard that the shell popped open at first 
hit. In one smooth motion, mirrored by 
the two dozen women working along- 
side her, she scooped out the oyster flesh 


Cyclone Off the Bay of Bengal 
Lashes the Bangladesh Coast 


Reuters 

CHITTAGONG, Bangladesh — Five 
people were killed and at least 100 were 
injured when a cyclone struck the coast 
of Bangladesh and the port city of Chit- 
tagong on Monday. 

Doctors at Chittagong Medical Col- 
lege Hospital said they feared the death 
toil would rise as more reports came in. 
“This was a major devastation and we 
think many more casualties will fol- 
low/’ one doctor said. 

Newspaper reporters said more than 
than 350 people had died on three is- 


Ex-Co mmunis t 


Wins Presidential 


Race in Mongolia 


The Associated Press 

ULAAN BATAAR, Mongolia 
— A former hard-line Communist 
has won Mongolia’s presidential 
election by a landslide, according 
to results Monday, in a vote seen as 
a rejection of die rapid pace of free- 
market reforms. 

N. Bagabandi, chairman of the 
Mongolian People's Revolutionary 
Party, had promised to slow Mon- 
golia’s transition from a centralized 
Communist economy to capitalism. 

Mr. Bagabandi received 61 per- 
cent of the ballot Sunday to 30 
percent for President P. Ochirbat, 
the Election Commission said. 

Mr. Bagabandi is expected to use 
his largely ceremonial post to veto 
legislation that the governing co- 
alition believes is needed to com- 
plete Mongolia’s transition to a free 
market by 2000. 

The governing party still controls 
the Parliament But it has barely the 
two-thirds majority it will need to 
override such vetoes. It also con- 
trols the prime ministership. 

About 85 percent of Mongolia’s 
l.l -million eligible voters cast bal- 
lots, the Election Commission said. 

The result was a setback for the 
forces that brought democracy to 
this remote nation seven years ago. 


Calm After the Storm in Jakarta, 


But More Election Clashes Feared 


Reuters 

JAKARTA — Indonesia was calm 
Monday after two days of pre-election 
violence, but the ipobce said they would be 
on the alert for fresh clashes when large- 
scale campaigning resumed Tuesday. 

* ‘From the view of the national police. 
It's safe and under control," a police 
spokesman said, adding that heightened 
security would remain in place for the 
last few days of the campaign, which 
ends Friday for the May 29 election. 

1 'The police are facing crowds which 
spontaneously arise in large numbers," 
the spokesman said “If we act harshly, 
we will receive a response which will 
cause police or the community to suf- 
fer." 

Thousands of supporters of the minor- 
ity, Muslim-based United Development 
Party hurled stones at partisans of the 
governing Golkar party and fought se- 
curity forces in Jakarta and other cities 
on the island of Java on Sunday, but no 
injuries or arrests were reported 

The police fired tear gas and rubber 
bullets, later firing live ammunition into 


the air to disperse mobs in Jakarta. They 
also charged protesters in the ancient 
city of Yogyakarta and the nearby town 
of Bantul, witnesses said 

On Saturday, police fired into the air 
to disperse a mob of United Develop- 
ment Party supporters who said they had 
been blocked from entering a street in 
eastern Jakarta where Golkar partisans 
had campaigned earlier. 

The third party in the contest, the 
Indonesian Democratic Party, has drawn 
few crowds to its rallies. Its campaigning 
on Java on Monday took place without 
incident 

The three political parties have said 
they will not hold any street rallies in 
Jakarta for the rest of the campaign 
because of the threat of violence, but 
observers said it remained to be seen 
whether their supporters would honor 
these pledges. 

Political analysts said the Golkar 
party, in power for 30 years under Pres- 
ident Suharto’s rule, was unlikely to be 
seriously challenged in the legislative 
election. 


TRADE: Car Exports Drive Japan Surplus 


Continued from Page 1 


omy and employment remain firm, I 
thirik it’s unlikely there will be sig- 
nificant tension between Washington 
and Tokyo over trade this year.” 

Japan's surplus with Asia grew 34.1 
percent, to 536.6 billion yen- With the 
European Union, the sinplus widened 
1 513 percent, to 230.9 billion yen. The 
April trade-surplus data, which are not 
adjusted for seasonal factors, are based 
on a dollar-yen rate of 12435. compared 
with a rate of 107.19 yen to the dollar in 


the previous year. 

The dollar fell as low as 1 14.85 yen in 
Tokyo trading after the release of the 
trade figures. A higher surplus means 
more dollars in the hands of Japanese 
exporters to convert to yen for profits. 

But the dollar recovered as the focus 
turned to whether the Federal Reserve 
would raise U.S. interest rates Tuesday- 
Higher rates would make it more at - 
tractive to hold dollar -denominated fi- 
nancial assets and thus would raise the 

dollar’s value. . _ 

Economists blamed the jump in Ja- 


pan's trade surplus on resurgent car ex- 
ports and on slower growth in imports. 

In April, car exports rose 32.1 percent 
from a year earlier by value and 20.1 
percent in volume, the Finance Ministry 
said. 

Japanese carmakers spent the first 
fhree months of die year feeding the 
domestic market, buoyed by strong de- 
mand ahead of a sales-tax increase to 5 
percent from 3 percent on April 1. But 
economists said data for the April -June 
quarter would show carmakers shifting 
their focus abroad, in response to strong 
growth in the U.S. economy and weak- 
ness in Japan. 


are going to start flying/’ 
an economist at SBC War- 


Brian Rose, an economist at SBC War- 
burg Japan, told Bloomberg News. 
“The car companies said they were so 
busy building cars for domestic sale that 
they didn’t have time to build for export. 
From April, that’s going to change. 

By contrast, demand at home for big- 
ticket items will slip between April and 
June because, in addition to raising die 
sales tax, the government ended two 
years of income-tax rebates and raised 


lands just offshore and in the Cox’s 
Bazar district, but there was no im- 
mediate official confirmation. 

Officials at the Information Ministry 
said one million people had been evac- 
uated from (be path of the cyclone be- 
fore it lashed the southeast coast. Of- 
ficials in this port said that thousands of 
bouses were demolished and that up- 
rooted trees and power poles jammed 
roads. Power supplies and communi- 
cations were cut in many areas. 

“We fear more severe rfamagw in 
Cox's Bazar and Teknaf areas along the 
southeastern coast,’’ an official said. 

Two opposition legislators said more 
than 100,000 houses were damaged on 
the outskirts of Chittagong city alone. 

Port officials said fee cyclone's 200 
kilometer an hour (125 mile an hour) 
winds broke one ship off its anchor, 
damaged another vessel and sent a large 
crane crashing onto a jetty. 

Prime Minister Hasina Waxed can- 
celed a trip abroad and said she hoped 
Bangladeshis would face fee crisis wife 
courage. She assured them feat there 
would be no dearth of relief materials - 

The storm roared in from the Bay of 
Bengal and lashed the coast Monday 
afternoon, sweeping the Cox’s Bazar 
and Teknaf areas, officials said. 

The district administrator of Cox's 
Bazar, Ali Imam . Majumder, said: 
“Vast areas have been affected, wife 
electricity supply and telecommunica- 
tions disrupted. Many houses have been 
destroyed and we can see sheets of tin 
from roof tops flying like tree leaves.’’ 

Weather officials said they feared the 
cyclone could trigger a tidal surge of up 
to five meters (15 feet), which would 
inundate widespread areas. 

Communications wife Teknaf and 
Cox’s Bazar had been cut, and Red 
Crescent officials said Teknaf may have 
suffered major damage. 

Saint Martin's island near Teknaf 
was under two meters of water. Several 
other islands had been battered by fee 
cyclone and could be inundated. Red 
Crescent said, quoting their field vol- 
unteers. 

The authorities now fear feat the high 
seas will flood large low-lying areas of 
the country. 

Bangladesh's worst cyclone, in 1991, 
killed at least 138,000 people and left 
millions homeless. 


and dropped it into aplastic bucket. 

“I used to follow my mother here 
every day and beg her to let me work.” 
said Fn Chun, her shirt stained by spots 
of mud. “Back then, she said I was too 
small. Now I see it's not so much fun, 
but she says I have to work.” 

The oyster-shucking women of Bel- 
ter, a small port on the southern coast of 
China, look like people who live a time- 
less life of hard labor.Yet they represent 
a simple instan ce of fee far-reaching 
economic and social change under way 

tn China 

In coastal areas, fast economic 
growth means that ordinary people now 
nave chances aplenty to earn a modest 
amount of money. But within such op- 
portunities lurk other, more difficult 
choices, like forcing your child to work 
instead of going to schooL 

Fu Chim, talking on a Saturday af- 
ternoon, said at first feat she worked 
only on weekends and went to school 
during fee week. But *hf*. latw acknowl- 
edged that her mother often insisted that 
she work during fee week as well, be- 
cause the family was saving money in 
hope of buying a new television set 
I want to finish high school, but my 
teacher says it may be hard if I keep 
skipping school,” she said. 

Fu Chun and her mother, like the 
other women here, earn money accord- 
ing to how much they produce. Their 
boss pays 5 cents for every pound of 
oyster, without shell. He then turns 
around and sells the oysters to a canning 
company for 75 cents a pound. 

On a good day, meaning dawn till 
dusk with scant interruption. Fu Chun 
and her mother take home about $2.50. 



BRIEFLY 


Seoul Opposition ~ 
Picks Candidate - 


SEOUL — South Korea's.) 
largest opposition party cm Monday 
nominated its leader, Kim Da&e 
Jung, as its candidate for president i 
rial elections in December. ->v 
The nomination opened fee wayl 
for fee 72-year-old chief of fee Na-ti 
tiooal Congress for New Politics tot! 
run for president for the fourth j 
time. 

Mr. Kim was nominated wife the? 
overwh elming support of moreii 
than 4,100 delegates at a nationals 
convention. ->b 

“We have a golden opportunity.; 
to win a transfer of power in this / 
year’s election,” Mr. Kim said i»q 
his acceptance speech. (API* 


'*&?>■ r - v ' 

’ -s • - • 


Rebel Troops Kill 
An Afghan Leader 




7*. 


v| 


Seth Fum/Thr New Yak Tones 

Fu Chun, 14, shucking oysters by the shore in Beihai on China’s southern 
coast A good day’s work, from dawn to dusk, yields about $L50. 


“I want her to go to school, really/’ 
said fee girl’s mother, WangZhenna, a 
chunky woman with a worn T-shirt car- 
rying the logo “Real Fashion.” “Rijjht 


now we don’t have enough money.’ 
She glanced down at the bucket of 


She glanced down at the bucket of 
shucked oysters and figured aloud that 
they were only halfway to the day’s 
goal, then hurried back down to the 
water for another load. 

Several other women chattered away 
as they shucked their oysters, and one 
said Fu Chun and otter teenage girls 
complained about the hard nature of 
oyster-shucking only because they did 
not know dial it was better than fishing 


or farming, two of fee main occupations 
in this area. 

“We’re going to set you up wife one 
of those fishermen,” another woman 
teased Fu Chun. “You live out on the sea, 
and then you’ll wish you were back.” 

“I’m never going to marry a fish- 
erman,” Fu Chun muttered, alm ost to 
herself. 

“We’ll never find a man for you/’ a 


second woman interjected, as fee other 
women laughed- “Your hands are too 


women laughed. “Your hands are too 
rough.” 

Most of the women here work all day. 
every day. Only when a heavy storm 
scares off the fishermen, or when a 
broken truck keeps away the oyster buy- 
ers, one woman said, do they take a 
rest. 

Oyster fishing has been around longer 
than anyone can remember, but its scale 


has grown sharply in recent years, with a 
grouting market for canned oysters in 
China's cities. Hence the need for more 
hands, young or old, to shuck. 

The foreman of this operation, Zhao 
Minfeng, said he hired only adult wom- 
en to haul and shuck oysters. 

‘ 'If they want to bring their daughters 
to help, that’s feeir business." he said. 

Mr. Zhao agreed feat fee women were 
able to earn only a modest income at the 
prices he pays, but he pointed out that it 
was more than most of them had made 
when they worked in fee fields as farm- 
ers. 

“I was a farmer, too,” Mr. Zhao said. 
“It’s really rough. Some years you 
make a little more and some years a little 
less, but fee work is always hard.” 

He looked out at fee sea. 

“It’s better being here by file ocean.” 


ISLAMABAD. Pakistan — : 
Troops rebelling against a warlord** 
in northern Afghanistan ambushed# 
and killed a provincial governor and 
15 of his guards Monday, Pakistani 
and Afghan officials said. . _ 

An uprising against General Ab- 
dul Rashid Dustam could weaken,, 
fee alliance battling fee Talebanf 
religious army. 

Maulvi Abdul Qaddus, governor 1 ' 
of Samangan Province, ana his men 
were ambushed by troops loyal tq • 
Malik Pahlawan, the leader of th£ 
rebellion against General Dustam, 
Pakistani intelligence sources and 
Afghan officials said. (APH 


Afghan officials said. (AP)^ 

Sri Lankan Army - 
Hits Tamil Targets _ 


Via Bahamas, Taipei Sends Diplomatic Warning 


COLOMBO — The Sri Lankan . 
military attacked T amil Tiger tar-/ 
gets from the air on Monday while/ 
ground troops consolidated norths 
em areas captured from the rebels JJ 
after fierce fighting last week, fee!' 
Defense Ministry said. 

“Air and artillery fire was dir- t 
ected at given likely enemy target^ 
in the area.” a statement said. *j / 
Artillery was being fired from 1 ' 
the villages of Omanthai and? 
Nedunkem, which troops captured^ 
from the Liberation Tigers ofTamif' 1 
Eelam last week, a military spokes- . 
man said. (Reuters) / 


For the Record 


CtMfi&aill} Our Serf From Dispatcher 

TAIPEI — Taiwan struggled 
Monday to limit the damage from the 
lossof another diplomatic friend, telling 
its allies they risk economic punishment 
if they switch recognition to Beijing. 

In a surprise announcement late 
Sunday, Taipei said it was ending links 
wife the Bahamas after learning that the 
Caribbean nation was preparing to es- 
tablish ties wife Beijing. 

Rather than waiting for Nassau to act, 
Taipei announced that all treaties wife 
the Bahamas were suspended and re- 
called its ambassador. 

Foreign Minister John Chang said 
Taipei’s move was intended as a signal 
to otter allies that they had much to lose 


if they, too, recognized Communist 
China. "One of the reasons we did this 
was to prevent a domino effect from 
tuqipeiiing/ y Mr. Chang said. 

Concern by fee Bahamian govern- 
ment that it would be forced to dose a 
newly opened $80 million container 
port — run by Hong Kong-based 
Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. — is believed 
to have driven its decision to favor 
China. Hong Kong reverts to Chinese 
role on July 1, at which time all Hong 
Kong-based companies will come un- 
der Chinese jurisdiction. 

After fee Bahamian shift, Taiwan 
will have ties with only 30 states, most 
of them poor and heavily dependent on 
Taipei’s financial largesse. The number 


will soon fall to 29, after South Africa 
said it would switch ties in 1997. 

Analysts said Taipei’s response to- 
ward the Bahamas may reflect a shift 
away from 'its “silver dollar” diplo- 
macy — doling out cash to ensure re- 
lations — at a time when Beijing is 
squeezing Taiwan’s allies politically. 

A National Taiwan University ana- 
lyst, Chang Lin-cheng. said that 
Taiwan, despite its vast wealth, was 
discovering that it was no longer a 
match for an economically resurgent 
China. “It’s worth pondering whether 
we should continue to spend a huge 
amount of money in securing ties with 
some allies which intend to switch ties 
to Beijing," she said. (Reuters. AP) 


A Hong Kong judge ordered a n 
former senior U.S. immigration o£,«. 
fleer jailed Monday for three^ 
months for passport fraud. Jerry 
Wolf Stuchiner was first jailed lasi;>. 
August when he pleaded guilty to/, 
possessing five false Honduran e 
passports. At the time of Ms arras;,, 
he was head of the U.S. Immi-.^ 
gration and Naturalization Service 
in Honduras. 


A Thai court ordered the ex /7 
tradition of Li Yun-chung to the * 
United States on Monday. He was. M 
accused of a role in smuggling fee 
biggest shipment of heroin ever h 
seized in fee United States. (APtz 



CHINA: Decision Due on Access to Data 


Continued from Page 1 


thralled wife fee way capital markets 
raise money, but are nervous feat fee 
free-flowing information that comes 
with markets might undermine the 
party’s control. ■ 

In recent years, however, the amount 
of available news and financial infor- 
mation has risen exponentially. There has 
not been the challenge to fee legitimacy 


of fee Communist Party that many old- 
school leaders feared, but its authority 


school leaders feared, but its authority 
over the day-to-day lives of ordinary 
people is gradually diminishing. 


By early 1996. Reuters and Dow 
>nes Markets, a unit of Dow Jones & 


Thom RmuHPtesK 

CALL FOR DEMOCRACY — The Chinese dissident Chai Ling, a 
leader of 1989 democracy protests, greeting backers Monday in Hong 
Kong. She said its people would have to struggle to keep freedoms. 


Jones Markets, a unit of Dow Jones & 
Co., already had several hundred cus- 
tomers each, mainly Chinese banks and 
financial institutions that trade on in- 
ternational commodity, currency and 
other markets. 

Executives at these news companies 
woe shocked at the way Xinhua was 
trying to become both a regulator and a 
competitor — last year it started its own 
financial news service. New China Fi- 
nancial Information — in an era when 
China's leaders continually proclaim 
their determination to separate govern- 
ment from business. The agency's of- 


ficials apparently won approval from file 
government to expand their role by por-^ 
traying themselves as a necessary life', 
guard at fee swelling pool of clectvoQiw 
information available in China. / 

But during subsequent negotiations, 
foreign executives said, agency officials 
seemed most interested in learning aboqt 
the commercial and technological op- 
erations, apparently for use at New 
China Financial. 

In addition to wanting to learn who 
exactly fee customers were and ho# 
much they paid, and how software and 
hardware operated, fee press agency alse 
asked Reuters and Dow Jones to pay a 
large percentage of their revenues -in 
China. 


Unfortunately for Xinhua, Chinijs 
leaders are intent on joining the World 


MFN: Clinton Opens Battle Over China 


• iJtipgnsui’jjojDBionc&i ■. ■- 


Continued from Page 1 






A > tv ? : ' •;* r 


>4 *■ 


Sources: Bloomberg 


medical-insurance premiums in April. 
Economists expect that development to 
slow the economy by as much as 1 
percent in the quarter and force Japanese 
. companies to look overseas for buyers. 


Economists surveyed by Bloomberg 
edicted Japan’s trade surplus would 


predicted Japan’s trade surplus would 
expand 36 percent in the April -June 
quarter from file same period last year. 
For the year, economists forecast a rise 
in fee surplus of 1S.6 percent. 


Several members of Congress, includ- 
ing some who have favored renewing 
China’s trade status in the past, have 
expressed grave misgivings about the 
vote this year. 

Newt Gingrich, fee speaker of the 
House, said recently feat he expected a 
“weaker vote” for renewal this year. 

He had suggested limiting renewal to 
three or six months while Congress mon- 
itored the reversion of Hong Kong. But 
be moved away from that stance after 
Hong Kong leaders, including Governor 
Chris Patten and Martin Lee, the leader 
of fee Democratic Party, said such a 
limit would hurt Hong Kong's econ- 
omy. 

Representative Bill Paxon, a New 
York Republican and Gingrich ally, re- 
cently dropped his support for renewal, 
citing concerns about human rights and 
China’s arms sales to Iran and Pakistan 
and piracy of copyright material. 

Mr. Clinton's administration has con- 
ceded that China still has a poor record on 
human rights but has contended feat 


denying trade benefits will not help mat- 
ters. The administration also maintains 
feat a favorable trade status for China will 
help maintain stability in Hong Kong. 

In recent months, a somewhat un- 
likely coalition has emerged in oppo- 
sition to renewal of China's trade status. 
It unites human-rights activists, religious 
conservatives upset with China’s birth- 
control policies and labor activists who 


appose Chinese use of prison labor. 

Reports of a possible Chinese con- 
nection to Democratic campaign fund- 
raising have added further uncertainty to 
the congressional debate. 

That, along wife continuing criticism 
of China's reportedly heavy-handed si- 
lencing of political dissent and rising 
criticism over oppression of religious 
minorities, will give this year's debate a 
new dimension and add uncertainty to the 
outcome, according to many observers. 

Asked about fee chances of passage, 
one analyst said: “Given all the vari- 
ables^ at work, it's very difficult to say. 
But I'd be surprised if there were enough 
votes to overturn a veto, if it came to 
that.” 


leaders are intent on joining the World 
Trade Organization, and the agency’s 
desire to restrict rather than tree tte 
operations of international companies 
seems to go against WTO principles. 

By late last year, foreign executives 
believed their negotiations with Xinh ua 
would effectively be postponed during 
China’s efforts to gain access to fee 
WTO this year. " 

But last month, agency officials in- 
formed Reuters and Dow Jones that they 
would have to accept the agency’s new 
regulations or they would be allowed no 
new customers. 

* ,This ^ue is now larger than Xmh'iif 
and few foreign information compa- 
nies, said James McGregor, chief rep- 
resentative for Dow Jones in Chifra. 
‘It s a WTO issue. We don’t want to do 
anything feat would hurt China's 
chances of getting into the WTO." ~ ’• 

Mr. McGregor said he and Reuters 
executives accepted fee desire 'of 
China’s leaders to check the information 
that foreign companies bring into fee 
nation. But he held that Xinhua’s doubfe 
role as a regulator and a competitor gties 
against every principle of fair business 
competition. 

Xinhua has modified its stance, drop- 
ping its original demand to be paid 3 
percentage of each news agency's retf- 
enue in China. Their initial request of 40 
percent dropped to 15 percent, and lat# 
to 7 percent, and last month was dropped 
altogether. . 

It is even questionable whether fe't, 
central government would again ap - 
prove fee news agency’s request for tm 
expanded role if fee decision were to fcfc 
made today a measure of how fee polit- 
ical and technological atmosphere has 
changed in China over the last 16 
months. 



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drudging Around Dublin to Seek Votes and Keep the Sky From Falling 


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i By James FTciarity 

\* lVfw ' K”* TWjt J f n 7t y 

■ ci^rSX^ 0 ^' - The an- 

:SS? l S£l a b ?- e ? nd ferocious tribe 
! 5 «iISi 3 1 J ,0 * l,lcal differences with 
, axes and bludgeons, are said in legend to 

y or ? e . fean dial the sky 
.wwdd fall on their heads. Frances 
Fitzgerald, a member of the Irish Par- 
; lament campaigning to hold her seat in 
. the national election on June 6 . knows 
. the feeling. 

; As she urged voters to support her 
Saturday rooming in this suburban vil- 
lage on the south edge of Dublin, she had 
\ tu *^ *® stroll on Sandymount Strand, 
‘ ^ c sc py c ° hy James Joyce as “at the 
•lacefnnge of the ude." Not enough 
• voters there, and Ms. Fitzgerald and her 
.party. Fine Gael, are desperate for 
' voters. 

j Polls show that if the election were 
.held now, the coalition government 

■ headed by Prime Minister John Bruton 
of Fine Gael, cobbled together with the 
Labour and Democratic Left parties in 

; 1994 after the previous government col- 

■ wsed and never popularly elected, 

, >ould lose. 

. The winners would be a coalition led 
.by Hanna Fail. Ireland's largest party. 


headed by Bertie Ahem, and the fiscally 
conservative Progressive Democrats, 
headed by Maty Harney. 

Ms. Fitzgerald's seat, including both 
upper-middle-class areas like Sandy- 
mount and depressed working-class 
areas like Ringsend, has long been con- 
sidered safe for Fine GaeL 
If the party lost here, it would be as if 
the political heavens had snuffed it 
‘'We have got to take this seat again,’* 
Ms. Fitzgerald said, as she began ringing 
doorbells, handing out leaflets and 
listening to voters talk about the main 
issues of the campaign: crime, taxes; the 
environment and peace and war in Brit- 
ish-ruled Northern Ireland 
There are seven candidates for the 
four members of Parliament to be elect- 
ed in the district 

“We have to run against everybody,* * 
she said. “The Greens axe strong against 
us here.” 

Ms. Fitzgerald, 46, the former head of 
the National Women's Council, an in- 
dependent umtaeDa organization, hopes 
that she will be helped by Ireland’s 
highly complicated system of propor- 
tional representation, a process slightly 
clearer to most voters than the provisions 
of the Schleswig-Holstein accord. 

Under PR, as it is called, voters in- 


dicate their preferences in numerical or- 
der, and parliamentary seats are given to 
any candidates whose first-place votes 
meet a quota of votes cast. 

Seats that remain open after the first- 
round of ballot-counting are filled by 
transferring second-, third- or lower- 
place votes. 

To make it clear that she needs first- 
place votes, Ms. Fitzgerald has her cam- 
paign workers wear bright-blue T-shirts 
lettered “Fitzgerald. No 1.” 


mount. We don’t even have our posters 
up. And we’ve none up in Ranelagh or 
Ringsend. You’ve just got to gei them 
up/' 

For Jane McCarthy, a 27 -year-old 
computer salesman who lives in a neat 
brick house on Sandymount C as lie 
Road, the prime issues are crime and 
education. 

“Especially education.” she added. 
‘ ‘Some kids are totally disadvantaged, in 
families that have had no work for three 


Fine Gael candidates ‘have to run agains t everbody. The 
Greens are strong against us here. 9 


Suddenly, a huge bus covered with 
Labour Party signs arrived at the village 
green, bearing the Labour candidate, fi- 
nance Minister Ruairi Quinn, a coalition 
ally. 

“Hi, Ruairi,” shouted Ms. Fitzger- 
ald. 

“We’ll save some transfers for you, ’ ’ 
he called back smiling, meaning that he 
would tell voters to vote for him in first 
place and for her in second or third. 

Later, in her car, Ms. Fitzgerald said 
on a mobile phone to her headquarters: 
“Ruairi Quinn has a huge bus in Sandy- 


generations.” Ms. Fitzgerald said her 
coalition was using the revenue pro- 
duced by the improved economy — 
which politicians rail the Celtic Tiger — 
to establish 1 .000 jobs a week. 

A few doors away, Finola McCarthy, 
no relation to Jane, said: “I think John 
Bruton is doing O.K. And this gov- 
ernment is doing well on the North. 

“But ir doesn't really matter which 
Irish government is in power. It all de- 
pends on Blair,” the new British prime 
minister who, on Friday, offered a new 
chance to enter peace talks to Sinn Fein, 


the political wing of the Irish Republican 
Army. 

Christine O’Neill, who grew up in 
Zurich, said she would vote for the 
Green Party and possibly give Ms. 
Fitzgerald a second or third preference 
vote. 

Ms. O’Neill gestured in the direction 
of Dublin Bay. 

“The dirt going into the sea is ap- 
palling,” she said. “And people swim in 
»L” 

Joe Jeffers, 39, a biochemist, said his 
apartment building had been burglarized 
10 times m the last three years by drug 
addicts arriving in Sandymount on trains 
of the Dublin Area Rapid Transit, or 
DART. 

“They come in on the DART, burgle 
us. and go back on the DART.” he 
said. 

Ms. Fitzgerald added: ‘ ‘They come to 
grab handbags for drug money.” 

She said the government was provid- 
ing more treatment facilities for drug 
aodiefs, that the waiting list for treatment 
was down to 2 , 000 . 

In Ringsend, the drab working-class 
area a few miles up the coast where there 
are pockets of long-term unemployment 
as high as 75 percent, a dozen people 
waited on Bridge Street for the No. 3 Bus 


Labour Reacts Quickly 
To Corruption Allegation 

Party Orders Probe of Campaign Bribe Charge 


to downtown Dublin. For many of them, 
the Celtic Tiger is as much use as a three- 
legged dog. 

Joan Nolan said that one of her sons, 
after a long time on welfare, recently 
found a job as a maintenance worker for 
the equivalent of about $5 an hour. 

But social welfare officials told him 
he would have to repay part of the public 
assistance he had been collecting. 

“A tax on unemployment,'* she said. 
“There's nothing here for youth 
today.” 

Ms. Fitzgerald responded that her 
government, if re-elected, plans to elim- 
inate taxes for thousands of low-income 
people. 

Agnes and Willie Galvin, a retired 
couple in their 70s, said that the No. 3 
bus came only once every 45 minutes. 
Ms. Fitzgerald said she had been fight- 
ing for better service. 

Mr. Galvin was asked what he thought 
of the scandal surrounding recent dis- 
closures that politicians from the major 
parties had been taking huge sums of 
money from Dunnes, the largest chain of 
department stores in the country. 

He looked around him, as if be 
thought a party informer might be listen- 
ing, smiled, and whispered: “Wouldn’t 
they all be on the fiddle, now?” 


BRIEFLY 


By Warren Hoge 

. New York Times Service 

. LONDON — Faced with its first test 
of crisis management, Britain’s Labour 
! government reacted swiftly to charges 
' that a newly elected member of Par- 
| liament may have tried to bribe three 
1 opposing candidates to withdraw from 
: actively campaigning against him. 

Aides to Tony Blair, the new prime 
•► minister, summoned the lawmaker. Mo- 
Yhammed Sarwar, from Glasgow to No. 
1 10 Downing Street and announced after 
; meeting /with him that they were or- 
; dering an “immediate and rigorous” 

: police investigation of the charges. 

'They sought to contrast their re- 
1 sponse to what they have called the 
: dithering reaction of Mr. Blair's pre- 
; decessor. John Major, to episodes of sex 

■ and money corruption that recurred dur- 
ing his years in office. Mr. Blair 

; hammered Mr. Majorrepeatedly during 

► the campaign for tolerating such epis- 
; odes in public life. 

; ; “We made it clear before the election 

> that we take such matters very seriously 
J indeed,” 'said Jack Straw, the home 
; secretary, * ‘and serious actions will fol- 
low if these allegations are found to be 
; substantiated.” 

-Alex S almond, head of the Scottish 
1 Nationalist Party, which came in second 
against Mr. Sarwar, said, “In the last 
• Parliament, Mr. Blair gave a strong line 
,'aBout financial sleaze because of Ma- 
jor’s prevarication.” 

He said be expected “prompt and 
! decisive” action, using the same words 
< Mr. Blair did in attacking Mr. Major for 

■ not having dumped a Conservative can- 
didate, Neil Hamilton, who was accused 
of taking payoffs in a rase that dom- 
inated the early weeks of the national 
campaign in April. 

‘ The bribery claims produced the first 
‘Vjoud over the government, which has" 
’ stirred its backers and silenced its po- 
tential critics with a display of energy 
and decision-making in its first 18 days 
uf office , 

•* Mr. Sarwar, a rags-to-nches 
P akistani immigrant businessman, was 
accH sed of having paid Islam Badar, an 
Independent Labor candidate, £5,000 
($8,150) as compensation for having 
deliberately conducted a listless cam- 
paign. He was also accused of having 


offered J amil Abbassi, an Independent 
Conservative, and Peter Patent, a Scot- 
tish Labor Unofficial candidate in the 
10 -man field, a total of more than 
£50,000 to pull out of the race. 

Mr. Abbassi and Mr. Paton aired their 
allegations Monday. The first charge 
appeared in the News of the World 
Sunday tabloid. Mr. Sarwar denied aU 
the accusations and said in Glasgow that 
he would sue the newspaper for tibeL 

Mr. Sarwar, 44, built up a multi- 
million-dollar wholesale grocery busi- 
ness from a modest comer shop and egg 
distributorship be started when he ar- 
rived in Scotland 20 years ago. The area 
be represents, Govan, has a large Asian 
population and be is the first Muslim to 
be elected to die British Parliament. In 
his swearing-in last Wednesday he sub- 
stituted the Koran for the Bible. 

“It’s hard to know whether he has 
fallen foul of Labour’s rhetoric or 
whether this is just a witch-hunt," said 
Simon Woolley, coordinator of Oper- 
ation Black Vote, an organization that 
seeks to expand Afro-Caribbean and 
Asian voting. 

These minorities make up 5.5 percent 
of the population but less than 3 percem 
of the electorate. 

Mr. Sarwar has been dogged by con- 
troversy since he entered politics 10 
years ago. “I know I am a man with 
many enemies,” be said during the 
weekend. 

In 1995, when he ran successfully for 
the local council, he was accused of 
financial irregularities, but a police in- 
quiry cleared him. Last July, he lost his 
effort to be the parliamentary candidate 
for the new Govan district by one vote to 
Mike Watson, a former Labour member 
of Parliament from central Glasgow. 

Mr. Sarwar convinced Labour lead- 
ers that 51 postal votes had been im- 
properly excluded because of die am- 
biguity of Asian names, and a recount 
was held. He won by 82 votes. 

During the selection process, Mr. 
Sarwar attracted national attention by 
going to Pakistan and bringing back to 
Glasgow two girls who he claimed were 
being farced into arranged marriages by 
their father. 

In die May 1 election bis winning 
margin was 2,914 votes over Nicola 
Sturgeon, die Scottish National Party 
candidate. 



In W*ldWRaacn 


OBJECTION — Gerry Adams, foreground, Sinn Fein’s leader, and Martin McGtiinness, 
right, its deputy leader, arriving Monday at the House of Commons to try to overturn a 
ban on parliamentary facilities after they refused to swear allegiance to the crown. 


Catalonia Leader Gives Aznar Time 


The Asso ci a te d Press 

MADRID — Looking to ease political tensions 
in Spain, die regional leader Jonh Pujol pledged 
Monday to continue supplying critical support for 
the conservative government until next year’s 
deadline for determining who will join the planned 
European monetary union. 

But he warned that after that, his coalition’s 
position was uncertain. 

“Until Jan. 1 or May 1, 1998, discipline must be 
maintained,’’ said Mr. Pujol, leader of the Con- 
vergence and Union coalition in the Catalonia re- 
gion of northeastern Spain. He was referring to the 
dates around which it will be decided which Euro- 
pean Union members qualify for monetary union. 

Mr. Pujol, who is also the president of the 
regional government in Catalonjia, said that after 


the decision on monetary union was made, some 
arrangement for supporting the government would 
still be necessary. But he added that the current 
situation would be difficult#) maintain “if there is 
no confidence or if tilings are things axe done in a 
patchy manner.” 

Mr. Pujol's coalition provides 1 6 of the 20 seats 
that Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar’ s Popular 
Party needs for a majority in Parliament. 

Mr. Aznar and Mr. Pujol met Friday to discuss 
the causes of rising political tension in recent 
months. Mr. Pujol requested the meeting after 
allegations that an Aznar aide had used an au- 
thoritarian -sty 1 e threat of jail against a media ex- 
ecutive and accusations by the Socialist opposition 
that the government was blocking freedom of 
expression and free trade. 


Sofia’s New Chief Picks Team 

SOFIA — The prime minister-designate. Ivan Rostov, 
who has pledged to undertake market reforms, presented 
his cabinet Monday to the Bulgarian president and out- 
lined his economic program. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Kostov will introduce his cabinet to 
the 240-seat Parliament. His two-party coalition, the United 
Democratic Forces, won 137 seats in the April 19 vote. 
Parliament is expected to vote Thursday on the cabinet. 

Mr. Kostov has stud his goals are to establish a currency 
board to restore financial discipline and reduce inflation. 
He also has pledged to fight organized crime and cor- 
ruption, open secret police files, and pursue membership 
in the European Union and NATO. (AP) 

A Chernobyl Reactor Mystery 

KIEV — Officials at the Chernobyl nuclear-power 
plant were trying Monday to determine why a transformer 
had turned itself off without warning, shutting down the 
station’s only working reactor. 

An automatic safety system took the No. 3 reactor off 
line Sunday, when the transformer powering it shut off 
without warning. The transformer shut off 20 seconds 
after the completion of a procedure to rechannel elec- 
tricity to the reactor, but a spokesman for the station said 
it was unclear why the transformer had stopped. (APJ 

Space Station Unit Is Finished 

MOSCOW — Russian engineers have finished build- 
ing die first module of the Alpha space station, but its 
launch has been postponed because of delays in Russian 
funding for the project. 

“The module has passed electric tests and is ready for 
launching,” Sergei Shayevich. who leads the project at 
Khrunicbev Co., Russia’s leading space-rocket producer, 
said Monday. The module, financed by the U.S. space 
agency, NASA, is to be the core of the Alpha international 
space station. Called the Functional Energy Block, it will 
serve as the base for assembling the station in orbi L(AP) 

Irish President for Rights Post? 

UNITED NATIONS, New York — President Mary 
Robinson of Ireland has become the leading candidate for 
the position of UN high commissioner for human rights, 
diplomats and rights groups said. 

The appointment of Mrs. Robinson, who appears to 
have strong U.S. support, would raise tire stature of the 
office, which was created in 1993 despite criticism try 
nations opposed to the expansion of UN activities in this 
area. The first high commissioner for human rights, Jose 
Ayala Lasso, resigned in March to return to Ecuador as 
foreign minister. The UN secretary-general, Kofi Annan, 
has been urged to replace him with a more outspoken 
advocate. [NYT] 

For the Record 

An Islamist deputy quit Turkey’s Welfare Party on 
Monday to join the main opposition party, which has 
submitted a censure motion against the Islamist-con- 
servative coalition. The deputy, Mahmut Sonmez, did not 
give a reason for moving to the Motherland Party. (AP) 


For EU, a Battle of North and South? 

-Spain’s Protest Shows Potential for Rich-Poor Gashes Over Expansion 

Reuters imbalances, the Netherlands, home to refocused to' combat unemployment in 

- ' BRUSSELS A fight is looming the consumer-goods giants Philips and big cities, not just to help regional de- 

tetween the European Union’s rich Unilever, has much more to gam from velopment. 

ST.,, iL ooorermembers in the the bloc’s research minanves than its “It’s all right to use money to fight 
Xrnt rhcfrSeet needed to run the southern partners, which do not have unemployment,” a Spanish diplomat 
2SS5T tile turn industries with comparably large i*. said." What. is wrong is to thmk up- 
tuoc as ii«4«uuo search and development departments. employment is concentrated m big cit- 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Utters 
■ Military plana 
acronym 
iBDesertUke 
M Wyoming 
neighbor 
is Striped critter 


IS Hurting 
17 State ot 
financial 
independence 

ie CAT 

is Singer Lopez 
ziKettofold 


staee for months of “Research programs are the struts- ies," because then you help mainly the 
Spainsetftestag funds of the rich countries,” a rich countries where the big cities are. 

southern Emopean diplomat said. The EU has been struggling with high (JVWVtyO 


■■ „ Tact u/f*>k DV K- UlI 8 l ran as oi me nui UMmiw, tt iiuiwuuuhjw rruwnufcwgwuwwv. 

bndgemiy ^mgm^ _^blodring southern European diplomat said. The EU has been struggling with high 

-i^ii^^^Eurc^’s nmTmSS StroctJlftS* represent atom 30 t^ploymentforaboutlOyeais. partly 
•ap? hefore it sees what percent of the EU’s annual spending of because of industrial decline. 

^^^S^Sw^bTavailable after Srethan 80 billion European currency With 1 8 3 milhon people out ofwofK a 

overall resources ($92 Million). Spain receives about large cumber of them m France and Ger- 

^Swin'fears that by then it will no 27 percent of the total, while Germany manysentime nt i s growing fan prionDes 
ftiiw^reoeive asmuch as it does now in gets 23 percent, but it is Ireland that should be dnfted and scarce resources 
funds — grants from benefits the most when compared with used where they are most needed. 
so-called ^, t ^h it® nnnulation. Much anger has also been generated 

l h ^i ,he ^ ^ P Sain says its share is threatened by by companies that have closed oper- 

^'nSUS^dhanoei) because the Un- bg|£5ons that the funds should be atic^fo county orreponsnotetipble 
„ That could nappeo uc ^^ Eastern for funds, only to reopen or expand 

ion's expected erU 3 rgc ™f” demands facilities in subsidized areas. That was 

Europe will place i evm demands 1 • A ll )j)n :n . the case with Renault and foe U.S. med- 

fjn foe funds, yet the ncher co^tnes wh y Mlett 111 AlDailia, ical equipment company Boston Sci- 
be anxious to keep their payme entific, whose decisions to leave Bel- 

'iwaget Vlore Fears Revenge of on** 

flings after 1999 will r 00 t_s ™i^ E^Ieadeis agreed in tbe early 1990s 

later this year, but Spain uM to keep central spending below 1 .3 per- 

Thursday foal it was not too early to state VLORE, Albania — ^ centofthe bloc’s^Smestic product 

its case. _ , Monday that nine people hadbeen killed of the century. 

Z An irate Hans Wijers, the Dulch ^' in Albania in 24 hours and that tension 7 ^ commission will present a pro- 
noniic affairs m i n ister whose wtmtty remained high ra southern port of posal near the mxI of the year on the new 
currently holds the roann^ bu pre - vlore- . „ budget ceiling, which must cater to the 

JKjency, said of Spain s deasionto neup Near-anarchy following the collapse fir^ wave of new EU members — pos- 

tbe research program: I don t turns ^ investment funds has claimed more sibly the Czech Republic, Hungary and 

is, acceptable, quite frankly. than 7 qq Eves, many accidentally, since Poland at foe beginning of foe century. 

y-Mr. Wijers’s anger seented torev«J ajsenflis looted in February and It will also include proposals 10 re- 


, 'Mr. Wijers s anger »»»» ' aisenfl ] s were looted in reoroaiy ana « win also mciuoe proposals to re- 
more to just the normal trustranon ^ ^ victims included a form the structural funds. That is when 

wealth deputy gang leader, d** Monday. the real fight isexpected to begin. 


Est. 1911, Paris 
"Sank Roo Doe Noo’ 


ical equipment company Boston Sci- 
entific, whose decisions to leave Bel- 
gium prompted accusations of unfair 
competition. 

EU leaders agreed in the early 1990s 


A Space for Thought. 


21 Little guitars 
•a Singer Cara 
as Guard 
zilt'saslilcti! 
is Mint and sage 
32 Stadium 
sounds 

as Basketball hoop 
site, often 
av Acorn, in 20207 

40 ■Surfin’ " 

(Beach Boys 

hit) 

41 Gandhi’s title 

43 Ryan's ‘Love 
Story* costar 

«3 Russian space 
station 

44 Puzzle 
484:1, e-g. 

48 Mubarak's 

predecessor 
48 Recipe 
direction 
ssSonte 
Broadway 
shows 

84 Overhead shot 
57 Last name in 
spydom 

8> There ought to 

be J" 

81 Suggest Itself 

(to) 

83 Thrift shop 
stipulation 

84 The Birdcage" 
co-saar 

ea Possess 

87 Whitney 
Houston's ‘Ail 
the Man That 

■ 

88 Verve 
88 Parrots 

70 Chooses actors 

71 Email 
command 


1 Winter bird food 

2 video arcade 
name 


3 Arafat of the 
P.LO. 

4 Wallflower’s 
characteristic 

8 Much- 
publicized drug 
8 Existed 

7 Helps fn dirty 
deeds 

8 El Greco's 
birthplace 

s Underworld 
figure 

10 Guarantee 

11 Ice cream parlor 
order 

12 “Dies * 

13 TV rooms 

18 qua non 

141991 Tony 

winner Daisy 

a* Take 

Train* 

xi When repeated, 

0 fish 

30 Like a worn tire 

31 T-bar sights 

33 Jamaican exports 

33 Pacific Rim 
region 

34 Computer part 
as JopHn piece 
3724-hr. 

conveniences 
as Certain exams, 
for short 
41 Prefix with 
physical 

45 The Scriptures 

47 Gets up 

48 ‘ Fire" 

(Springsteen hit) 

■1 Wired, so to speak 
sz The George* 
——Show" 
(former talk show) 
S3 Fills up 
as Union rate 

88 Chinese 
province 
87 Jokert gibe 
s> Rush job 

notation 



to Stimulate 

82 Rip apart 
88 Want 


©Neie York Times /Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of May 19 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAX, MAY 20, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Despot or Democrat? Friends and Foes Illuminate the Faces of Kabild 


By Cindy Shiner 

Washington Pott Service 

KIGOMA, Tanzania — friends of the vic- 
torious Zairian rebel leader, who recall his toil 
decades ago in the ranks of African revolu- 
tionaries, describe Laurent Kabila as a principled 
man of strong character. 

But among the Bembe people of eastern Zaire 
— whom Mr. Kabila armed and lived with for 
nearly 20 years in bis own fiefdom — there are 
those who contend that he is a brutal and greedy 
authoritarian who has about as much intention of 
bringing democracy to Zaire as did die van- 
quished Mobutu Sese Seko. 

In numerous interviews in Zaire. T anzania and 
Uganda, the picture of Mr. KabQa that emerges is 
of a man of several faces; 

• His revolutionary roots reach to the 1 950s, yet 
questions are invariably raised about how pivotal 
a player he was in Zaire's many upheavals. 

• His political philosophy was unabashedly 
Marxist for several decades, yet he now espouses 
free markets and democracy for Zaire. 

• He is accused of having been a heavy-handed 
authoritarian as the head of a political party and the 
leader of a small enclave, yet he has received high 
marks for dealing fairly with Zairians in die areas 
his troops have captured in the Last seven months. 

Bom into the Luba tribe 56 years ago in the 
restive Katanga region — now called Shaba 
Province — Mr. Kabila jumped into politics 


when what was then die Belgian Congo gained 
independence. He was a youth leader in a party 
allied with Patrice Lumumba, who became the 
country's first prime minister in 1960. After Mr. 
Lumumba's overthrow and assassination, Mr. 
Kabila joined Mr. Lumumba’s followers in an 
uprising against the country’s government and its 
military leader. Mar shal Mobutu. 

Mr. Kabila participated in the Lumumbists’ 
1963-64 uprising at Stanleyville — now called 
Kisangani — where he was described as a 
second-echelon operative. Marshal Mobutu 

‘He’s shown himself to be 
a person of principle. He has 
a very strong character.’ 

crushed the rebellion — mainly with die help of 
foreign mercenaries — and Mr. Kabila faded 
finom view. 

He eventually emerged as the bead of a Marxist 
organization, the People's Revolutionary Party, 
and established an enclave in die far eastern Kivu 
Province that encompassed the area around the 
to wns o f Fizi and Baraka. There, along the shores 

lived and g<^m^ouisi<k the rules oflvSarshal 
Mobutu’s rigid state. A Zairian writer described 
him then as "a typical African warlord.” 


But while some Zairians hail him as their 
liberator, many Bembe interviewed here in this 
Tanzanian town — where they have come to 
escape die turmoil — resent the way be ruled 
diem from 1964 until the early '80s through a 
system of power games and terror. A group has 
been formed of Mr. Kabila’s opponents among 
die Bembe, called die Council ofResistance and 
National Liberation, and many Bembe hope it 
will topple Mr. Kabila. 

“He’s not a liberator. He’s a dictator — worse 
than Mobutu,” said a Bembe intellectual who 
requested anonymity. 

Id Kigoma, across Lake Tanganyika but within 
sight of tbe hills of Mr. Kabila’s former enclave, 
numerous Bembe recalled how Mr. Kabila lived 
off their labor, exploiting their region's gold. 
Several people cited allegations that he used ex- 
treme tactics to cling to power, including having 
enemies and rivals burned at the stake. Their 
accounts, while consistent, could not be verified. 

“It is die worst memory that the Bembe hold in 
their minds about Kabila — that he burned people 
alive,” said a former ally of Mr. Kabila's who 
asked not to be identified. 

But despite the allegations about Mr. Kabila's 
regime, people stayed with him. “The Bembe 
respected him a lot,” said Lubunga Lwa Ngabo, 
spokesman for the Council of Resistance and 
National Liberation. “He was the chief. You have 
to respect him. You have to do what he says. 

“we understood that it was within the scopeof 


the revolution, and to make order you have to rule 
like that,” Mr. Ngabo said. 

In the cap ital of Tanzania. Dar es S a l aam , 
where Mr. Kabila spent most of the last decade, 
his former neighbors said they suspected him of 
being an agent for the Tanzanian government 
because of his wealth and what they called du- 
plicitous behavior. He has been known not only as 
Laurent Kabilft , but as Raul Kabila. Mzee Mt- 
wale. Co llins Mtwale and Christopher Mtwale. 
according to Tanzanian newspaper reports. 

But Mr. Kabila's friends depict him as a 

Several of his enemies cite 
allegations that he used extreme 
tactics to cling to power: 

private man who stuck with his vision to oust 
Marshal Mobutu. 

“He’s shown himself to be a person of prin- 
ciple,” said a politician friend in Kampala, the 
capital of Uganda “He has a very strong char- 
acter. Many people would have given up; many 
people would have degenerated and succumbed 
to bribes. There is also the other side where 
people can say, ‘Oh, this is a very rigid man.' ” 

Mr. Kabila, however, did not need to seek the 
kind of bribes that Marshal Mobutu and his 
lieutenants routinely employed to co-opt op- 


ponents. He had his own thriving business selling 
gold mined in his region under the pretense df 
fina ncing his struggle, some Bembe said. Mr. 
Kabila made enough money to keep two large 
homes in Dar es Salaam and another in Uganda. 

In fact, some said they believed Marshal 
Mobutu allowed Mr. Kabila to go his own way 
because the president calculated that it was better 
to let him. ha ve a little gold than to expel him from 
Zaire and trigger retaliation. ’ 

But while the Bembe cited Mr. Kabila's asses 
as proof of thievery and extravagance, others said 
it was merely evidence of prudent behavior and 
sound business sense, qualities that could mate 
Mr. Kabila the right man to head one of Africans 
largest and potentially richest countries. ? 

“He always took himself as a leader,” the 
Ugandan politician said. “He didn't behave asa 
normal, ordinary person. He would have his own 
aide. He always had an organizational aspect 
about him, not personal. When he saw leaders df 
other political groups or governments, he sa^y 
them as a leader, not as an individual. *’ «. 

' Mr. Kabila’s reign in Bembe country was 
largely unremarkable. It is unclear just how his 
mini-state came to an end. Some of those in- 
terviewed said the Bembe chased him out because 
he took the region’s gold and gave nothing in 
return. Others said he simply gave up on hia 
rebellion in the 1980s. Whatever tbe reason, h# 
then spent most of his time in Tanzania but con- 
tinued to sell gold extracted from eastern Zaire." 



Ex-Elite Learns to Live With Rebels 


By Howard W. French 

New York Times Service 

KINSHASA Zaire — Tbe defeated cream 
of Zaire's past and the confident crust of this 
country's future eyed each other warily 
Monday across patios and plushiy up- 
holstered hotel lounges. 

Since the first delegation of Zaire's new 
governing alliance arrived here Saturday, tins 
city’s Intercontinental Hotel has — nervously 
at times — had to house them both. 

There they were, the families of defeated 
generals, the mistresses and their children 
left behind by a fleeing elite, and bag men for 
tbe deposed dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko. At 
the next table, down the ball, or sometimes in 
the very next room, meanwhile, were the 
new commissars of a country whose leaders 
say they will have it called tbe Congo: a 
security chief, a “secretary for strategy,” 
and scores of others of advance men for the 
new president, Laurent Kabila. 

What first brought tbe two together were 
practical questions about things Oke money, 
security, and commerce. And what cut most of 
tbe tension in the air was tbe message given. 


however sternly, by Mr. Kabila’s cadres that 
the fruit of the new Congo will make room for 
the remnants of the old Zaire. 

“Yon don’t have any choice: We are 
obliged to work together,” said Babi Mayi, 
the official responsible for planning in Mr. 
Kabila’s Alliance of Democratic Forces for 
the Liberation of the Congo. 

“We are a forgiving government,'' he 
said, “and there will be no witch-hunts. 
Everyone will be able to work here.” 

Mr. Babi’s comments, given in one of the 
hotel’s glacially air-conamoned halls went 
over big with an assembled crowd of sober 
suited bankers and business people, and with- 
in minutes of the remarks, as word spread 
through tbe Intercontinental, one could almost 
feel the ice breaking among the guests. 

“We have had heard that they were setting 
up a socialist economy,” said one of Zaire’s 
most powerful businessmen, an airline ex- 
ecutive who refused to flee a takeover by the 
rebel alliance that began Saturday. 

“We had heard they were going to set up 
pop ular trib unals, ” he added, “ and that there 
would be firing squads. Many people told me 
I was foolish not to go, and now I can say they 


were foolish not to stay.” International radio 
reports reaching here were passed on by 
word of mouth all day long and eagerly 
commented on by alL Marshal Mobutu re- 
mained Monday on Togo, seemingly unab le 
to arrange the kind of quick and comfortable 
exile that many bad expected him to take up 
in Morocco, or in a seemingly embarrassed 
France. 

(hie radio report heard by a crowd said that 
die former president would be heading to 
Liechtenstein. 

“ 1 ieehtenstem, huh, ” said Kami in 
Mukanza, who laughed in mockery. “We’D 
have to search hard for that on a map. It is 
almost poetic: Africa’s biggest dictator in one 
of the world’s smallest countries.” 

Marshal Mobutu’s 27-year-old son, 
Kongulu, remained stuck Monday in neigh- 
boring Congo, two days after be fled ami d 
widespread suspicions of his involvement in 
a series of killin gs that coincided with his 
father's overthrow. Even Gabon, a neigh- 
boring African country ruled by a dictator 
who has been in power almost as long as 
Marshal Mobutu, reportedly refused him ac- 
cess. 



Helping Africa Go the Why of Reforms 


Corinne DuflWIfouUti J 

A rebel walking Monday on confiscated weapons that belonged to tbe elite Presidential Guard. ‘ j 


NATO: Is Alliance s South Flank Exposed t j 


The dramatic political events unfold- 
ing in Zaire have focused the world's 
attention on a continent that is often 
ignored. J. Brian Atwood, administrator 
of the UJS. Agency for International De- 
velopment, is at the center of the Clinton 
administration's effort to use aid re- 
sources to promote economic reform 
throughout Africa. He discussed Wash- 
ington's plan to press for a new Africa 
initiative at the coming Group of Seven 
summit meeting in Denver with Alan 


Q&A/i. Brian Atwood 


omies like Zaire, Nigeria and Sudan 
producing negative growth. 

Q. But specifically what do you have 
in mind at the U.S. and G-7 level? 

A We are doing a lot of work on 
economic reform, and the idea is to help 


will come up with the resources needed 
for Africa. 

Q. How much is your agency spend- 
ing on Africa right now? 

A. We are spending about $1.4 bil- 
lion, half of it humanitarian assistance 


governments to deregulate their econ- and the other half development assist- 


omies. The major thrust of our G-7 ini- 


Friedman of the International Herald dative is to gain the cooperation of tbe 
Tribune. International Monetary Fund, tbe World 


ance. That is out of a total AID budget of 
$6.6 billion. 

Q. What else is the U.S. doing uni- 


Q. When people think of Africa tbese and other financial institutions in order 
days they think of the horrors of to invest resources at a time when Af- 
R wanda’s refugees or the turmoil in rican nations will be undergoing a cer- 


B ank, the African Development Bank laterally for Africa right now? 

and other finan cial institutions in order A. We are hoping to open UJS. mar- 

to invest resources at a time when Af- kets to more African imports, we are 


Zaire. Whar are U.S.. aid priorities in 
Africa? 


tain amount of pain because of the re- 
form process. It is a matter of the African 


A. They are twofold: One is crisis nations accepting the need for reform. 


prevention or crisis mitigation, and die going through two or three years of pain we axe looking at providing greater deb 
other is to then take advantage of the as (hey deregulate, as they leave un- relief far countries willing to embraa 
tremendous opportunities that result protected some of their internal pro- reform. 

from new African leadership, from new ductive capacity. Q. Which are the best models in Africj 

experiments with democracy and from These are tbe same things we have today that are embracing reform? 
better economic growth in some coun- been watching closely in Central A. I think Uganda and Botswana an 
tries. We want to move countries like Europe, and they cannot be avoided. The probably the best Uganda has beei 
Zaire into a transition period and we question is if the international commu- highly disciplined in its economic re 
want to promote economic reform. nity, in the spirit of tbe Marshall Plan, form over tie last five years. They havi 
Q. But what are you doing in the crisis 

region, in Rwanda and Burundi, for ex- " 

A. We are trying to intervene and stop JOBS: Plenty Out There for the Class of’97 

tie cycle of civil conflict, drought and " / J ** 

famine. We are trying to encourage a Continued from Page 1 die University of Indiana School o: 


kets to more African imports, we are 
looking at creating more incentives for 
U.S. companies to invest in Africa by 
increasing risk insurance through tie 
Overseas Private Investment Corp„ and 
we are looking at providing greater debt 
relief far countries willing to embrace 
reform. 

Q. Which are tie best models in Africa 
today that are embracing reform? 

A. I think Uganda and Botswana are 
probably the best. Uganda has been 
highly disciplined in its economic re- 
form over tie last five years. They have 



Continued from Page 1 

commander of allied forces in Southern 
Europe is responsible for an area stretch- 
ing from Gibraltar to tie Caspian Sea. 
The zone encompasses two-thirds of all 
territory that NATO allies are sworn to 
protect — a much greater scope tian the 
two other allied commands in the Cen- 
tral Europe and Atlantic regions. 

‘ ‘The next war could grow out of any 
number of explosive factors: economic 
difficulties, water shortages, religious 
fanaticism, immigration, you name it 
There are many different forces of in- 


devoting too many precious resources to * 
tbe politically inspired goal of expansion * 
while shortchanging investments in the \ 
south, where future military engage- ; 
malts are likely to occur. i. \ 

Brigadier General Robert Glace#, { 
head of long-term defense planning at * 
the alliance's headquarters in MonS, ! 
Belgium, acknowledged that NATO J 
concentrates too many troops and equip- > 
ment in the Central European regioti. \ 
where the old threat has vanished. Even ‘ 
if Russia wanted to resurrect a military ! 
challenge to the West, analysts say, jt j 
would take Moscow many years to r^- J. 


_ stability, and they all seem to be pre- build its rapidly deteriorating forces. - 

voIatI f in hkp rvwrirvn * v PaJ DM As- >L - P. ■ . _ 


mg and electrical engineering. But course. 


famine. We are trying to encourage a Continued from Page 1 die Universi 

food security policy, with enhanced local Business hen 

production of food and more open trade, consulting, which are hiring new gradu- this is one o! 
We are also providing Internet for for- aces in computer science, computer in- have gradual 
eign and development ministers so they formation systems, computer engineer- For many 
can communicate more with each other, ing and electrical engineering. But course, tie jc 
Q. Looking beyond the immediate accounting, business administration, tering as fo 
crises, what is the substance of tbe trade economics, finance and marketing gradu- graduates or 
and investment initiative that Washing- ales are also in extraordinary demand. And for s 
ton plans to launch at tie next Group of “There shouldn’t be a senior in Amer- mood is tenq 

Seven summit? ica who wants a job that doesn’t get one of tie econoi 

A. We are hoping to interest tie rest of this year,” said Jim Greeley, director of ia the early I 
the industrial world in moving Africa career services at Merrimack College in John Wan 
into the global trading system. We are North Andover, Massachusetts. work in sales 

moving into an era of free trade, sup- The stories from campuses around the Indianapolis, 


tie University of Indiana School of 
Business here. “In terms of getting ajob, 
this is one of the premier years ever io 
have graduated from college.’ ' 

For many liberal arts graduates, of 


opened up their economy, they have 
created an enabling environment that 
gives investors confidence by working 
to establish a good banking system and 
having a government that doesn’t in- 
tervene in tbe economy. They are en- 
couraging tie private sector. And they 
have doubled the percentage of foreign 
investment as a percentage of their gross 
national product, from 7 to 16 percent. 
Botswana, meanwhile, is a very stable 
democracy and very fast-growing. 


63 Reported Killed 
In Burundi Camps 


accounting, business administration, 
economics, finance and marketing gradu- 
ates are also in extraordinary demand. 
“There shouldn’t be a senior in Amer- 


: are not as glit- 


tering as for newly minted business 
graduates or MBAs. 

And for some students, the upbeat 
mood is tempered by tie ups and downs 


valent in the southern region,” Admiral 
Lopez said. 

“We won the Cold War by forward 
engagement across tie line,” be added. 
“We need tbe same approach in the 
south, although the threat is far more 
unpredictable. The lesson in preventing 
conflict is to be there early. If you can 
stop a war, it’s a bell of a Jot cheaper than 
fighting one.” 

But with tens of billions of dollars 
earmarked to bolster the military ca- 
pabilities of new eastern members, some 
analysts say NATO countries may be 


tion force in nearby mountains, had 
overrun offices of the Turkish Kurdish 
Workers Party in the city of Arbil. 

The spokesman said that fighting in 
Arbil, tie Iraqi Kurdish capital, left 53 
Kurdistan Democratic Party- fighters 
dead, while 58 Kurdish Workers Party 
guerrillas had been killed. (Reuters) 


ica who wants ajob that doesn’t get one of tie economy and the wave of layoffs 
this year,” said Jim Greeley, director of in tie early 1990s. 


into the global trading system. We are 
moving into an era of free trade, sup- 


ported by tie World Trade Organization, country are uniformly upbeat: 
and we would like to see a concentrated • At Lehigh University in Bethlehem, 

effort at bringing African nations into Pennsylvania, 366 companies conduc- 
tiat system. This is not a simple matter ted interviews on campus, compared 
of saying “trade, not aid” but of provid- with 292 at the same time last year. The 
ing aid that stimulates trade and in- number has doubled since 1992-93. 
vestment • At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Q. But most people think it could take in Troy;, New York, more than 500 
50 years before much of Africa truly companies recruited, up almost 40 per- 
emerges in economic and market terms, cent over last year. 

How much can be done realistically? • At Caldwell College in New Jersey, 
A. I don’t doubt that it will take a 20 recruiters visited the campus. Lasi year 
generation to exploit tie great potential tie college had one. United Parcel Ser- 
of Africa. It took about that long in Asia vice, offering mostly part-time positions, 
and t America, and we are now • At tie University of Michigan in 
owing the benefits of investments made Ann Arbor, the starting salaries of this 
30 years ago. Africa has seen an enor- year's MBA graduates at invest ment 
mous increase in growth in recent years banking firms jumped to $75,000, from 
and yet Africa still attracts only 1.2 $61,000 last year, 
percent of $200 billion of annual global • At Columbia University in Man- 

private investment. hattan. companies that usually finish re- 

Witi tie opening of the South African cnriting by January were still posting 
economy, there should be more growth new jobs in May. Also showing up were 
in tie southern region, and then there are some businesses that have not recruited 
pockets of rapid growth in places such as in years: public relations, communica- 
Uganda, Ghana and Botswana. Tbese tioas, advertising, city government and 


John Wamcke, 23, who is going to 
work in sales for Ikon Office Solutions in 
Indianapolis, Indiana, at a starting salary 
of $30,000. was able to choose among 
four offers. But he remembers that when 
be was a junior in high school, his lather 
was laid off from his job as a plant man- 
ager, and be keeps in mind that tbe work 
world will not always look so sunny. 

“Fear drives you,” Mr. Wameke 


BUJUMBURA. Burundi — Sixty- ^ 

three people were killed end 12 Pgg cr ? l FJS"r 

wounded when ermed Rwenden Hu- 

tus attacked camps in two communes ® uem las had been lolled- iRcutei 
in Burundi's northwestern Cibitoke c * i • * 47 * 

Province, the Burundi state radio said tjlayiJlgS Ml Algeria 
Monday. ° 

There was no independent confirm- ^ 7-year-old girl , 

ation of tie report. 70-year-old man and two members 

More than 150,000 people have iheu- famUy were tortmed and kill 
been killed in Burundi in massacres on -, a f fan V of by 2 

and civil war since 1993 when its first sa, _l anlswho lh “ 5™* *** 
freely elected Hutu president was *h 

killed in an attempted coup by Tutsi V,ct,r 

trnnvK /P^^rr j — kllled b y sharp-edged weapons - 

“^P 8 - ( Reuters ) 


in Troy;, New York, more than 500 said. “I’m motivated by tie idea that 
companies recruited, up almost 40 per- nothing is secure, that you’d better pro- 
cent over last year. duce or you could be gone. In fact, when 

• At Caldwell College in New Jersey, I was talking with companies, I was 
20 recruiters visited the campus. Last year always keeping in mind where they 
tie college had one. United Parcel Ser- might be 5 or 10 years down the line. I 
vice, offering mostly part-time positions, think you’ve got to keep that fear, be- 

• At tie University of Michigan in cause it's when you get in a comfort 
Ann Arbor, the starting salaries of this zone, that you lose your competitive 


year’s MBA graduates at investment advantage.” 

banking firms jumped to $75,000, from _ 

$61,000 last year. 

• At Columbia University in Man- DT A C 
hattan, companies that usually finish re- UitlDi 
cnriting by January were still posting 
new jobs in May. Also showing up were Conti] 

some businesses that have not recruited 


Heavy Kurdish Toll 

ANKARA — More than 100 
people died in fighting over tie week- 
end between rival Kurdish groups in a 
northern Iraqi city, and Iraqi oppo- 
sition group said Monday. 

A spokesman for the Iraqi National 
Congress said that fighters of the Iraqi 
Kurdistan Democratic Party, which is 
cooperating with a Turkish interveo- 


ALGIERS — A 7-year-old girt, a 
70-year-old man and two members of 
their family were tortured and killed 
on a farm south of Algiers by as- 
sailants who then burned their bodies, 
a newspaper said Monday. 

The charred bodies of the victims 
— killed by sharp-edged weapons — 
were found among the burned ruins of 
their farm, outside tie village of Sidi 
Moussa. 25 kilometers (15 miles) 
south of the capital, the daily Liberte 
reported. 

The government did not confirm the 
reported killings and there was no 
immediate claim of responsibility for 
the attack. 

But suspicion fell on Islamic mil- 
itants. whose five-year insurgency has 
left more than 60,000 people dead 
around the country. (APi 


Carl Bildt. the Swedish former prince J 
minister who is responsible for super- | 
vising tie civilian aspects of tie Bosnian . 
peace agreement, says the United States | 
should reassess its “strategic reserve 1 ' • 
concept, under which it keeps 84,0flD.4L 
troops in Germany, and consider moving “ - ' 
most of these forces to the southern i 
region. I 

“A lot of challenges and tensions are J 
now down in southeastern Europe,” Mr. ’ 
Bildt said. “We have a fundamental ! 
interest in preventing conflict in this part J 
of Europe. I think Europeans and Amer- I 
icons alike have learned that sparks here ! 
can have far wider consequences. ” • 

Clinton administration officials say 5 
they are confident that under NATO’s ! 
new military doctrine emphasizing flex- j 
ible, mobile fighting units, the allies can ! 
project sufficient firepower to cope with • 
any foreseeable security challenges. ■ • 

“Sometimes I wonder whether tie • 
alliance would find a consensus to tatre ■ 
military action against an enemy who ■ 
was blocking tie Strait of Hormuz or life j 
Suez Canal to choke off our vital oil ; 
supplies," a senior U.S. official said. ■ 

As NATO grows, it will become even i 
more difficult to reach agreement on tie j 

gravity of any threat. That’s why you are • 
likely to see more coalitions of the will- t 
ing, as in tie Gulf War, rather tian tips j 
one-for-all, all-for-one attitude we main- * 

tamed against the Warsaw Pact” . j 

For both the United States anti ) 
Europe, many common strategic in- s 
terests are at stake along NATO’s south A 
em flank. The Mediterranean region ■ 
supports tie world's busiest shipping « 
lanes, which keep oil flowing and coni- ! 
mercial goods moving among the West- 1 
em economies. Any conflict in tie re- t 
gion, whether triggered by territorial ! 
disputes, political revolutions or ethnic ? 
rivalries, would have serious con- k 
sequences for the NATO allies. " ! 

“We can’t be omnipresent, but we ; 
need to be in places where we have => 
important political, economic and sS- ! 
cunty interests,” said Admiral Lopez, i ; 






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BIAS: New Prohibitions Are Having a Swift Effect on the Number of Minority Students 


Uganda, Ghana and Botswana. These 
ate some of tie fastest-growing econ- 
omies in the world, with rates of 7 to 8 
percent. Although they come from a low 
starting point, this is an indication of the 


not-for-profit organizations. 

“I’ve been here 30 years and without 
a doubt there’s been more interviewing 
activity on campus, more job offers and 
more companies than I can ever re- 


Continued from Page 1 expanding minority outreach programs 

to try to maintain student diversity even if 

cause public campuses there are the first forced to stop using racial preferences, 
sites under orders to dismantle affirm- In a study just released. The American 
ative action policies that have been in Council on Education, which represents 
place far decades. Recent attempts in' more than 1300 colleges and universities, 
other states to enact si mil ar bans have reports that even with affirmative action, 
been blocked, but the issue has become minority enrollment on campuses nation- 


Texas and California are in unique school barren n .ihi;~ 1 

positions. In 1995. die University of Tfr'om^n,Slri' C „ *" e6es “ tbaI • 
California system's board of regents ^ ^ of 


'^auiumia system s ooara or regents 

voted to drop race as a factor in ad- u * me rest or me nation ™.ki i 
missions The new policy takes effect versifies still adhere to 
with graduate students Itus autumn and Court decision that iii rau J Su P 
with undergraduate students the follow- affirmative ^ action Tn 1 - l ° ^ r- 

ing one. Las, year, the 5th U.S. Coun of STm ^ntectrcungf 


spective students. r ■ 

In the rest of the nation, public uni- 1 


cnrtfno nninr this is an infuomon or uic activity uu want**,, ™ occu — ^ nuuumy wuummutt uu u. B one. ULV year, tne Din u.a. i_ourt oi stances in admi«inne 'T c- ■ 

SS^TS’ofsufr^^nAfrica ex- more Companies than I can ever re- one of tie most contentious in higher ally ^ not growing as much asildid earher Appeals, ruling in a case brought by a campaigns to «od 

SSSa^ffite^tirSiof member,” Mid C. Randall Powell, as- education. Alreajr,. some universities tiis decade. &^le« than 3per^ubst few white students denied wgo wire erences^^ ciSSS' »tSL P S 

3?pment de^tebig econ- sistznt dean and director of placement at are revamping admission policies and year, compared with 7 percent tn 1992. entry to the University of Texas law tionwide. P ^ 





INTERN ATKIN A I nvoii n TRIBUNE. TlrtrSnAV MAY 20. 1007 


PAGE 7 
























































































































PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


iteratit 





FlJfiLlSHKb WITH THE NEW Vo*k TIMES AT® THE WASHINGTON POST 


Chirac in China 


Suffering From Deception: Secrecy’s High Cost 


For some rime now, a debate has 
raged about the efficacy of Unking 
trade and politics in relations with 
China. Some say you can use one to 
achieve results in the other; others ar- 
gue that business is business and let’s 
keep human rights out of it. An event in 
Beijing on Thursday should settle the 
matter You can use trade to influence 
political relationships. 

Unfortunately, the example at hand 
involves China’s using trade to get its 
way, not the other way around. A 
month ago. France helped make sure 
that the United Nations Human Rights 
Commission wouldn't even discuss 
China's dismal human rights record, 
even as the other nations were con- 
sidering and condemning the behavior 
of smaller and less powerful countries. 
Only a few nations — notably, Den- 
mark — dared stand up to China; 
Chinese officials responded by liken- 
ing De nmar k to a little bird whose bead 
would get smashed by a rock. On 
Thursday, President Jacques Chirac of 
France was in Beijing, where be 
marked a $1.5 billion Chinese pur- 
chase of Airbus Industrie planes. “On 
the subject of arms sales to Taiwan and 


human rights, China notes France has 
made a wise decision,” President Ji- 
ang Zemin said, according to a spokes- 
man. Of course, there’s no need for 
Americans to get too high and mighty 
about such French behavior. America, 
too. has made its opportunistic deals. 

Nevertheless, we were reading 
about Mr. Chirac’s salute to China — 
which “will be chic of the top nations 
of the world,” and which "‘must be (me 
of our main partners'' — at the same 
time we happened to be reading about 
Wei Jingsheng. Mr. Wei is a brave 
dissident, one of thousands in Chinese 
jails for peacefully expressing views 


comrades. He spent 14 years in the 
Chinese gulag, was briefly released 
when Beijing was trying to become 
host of the Olympic games and then 
promptly thrown back in jail once the 
games were awarded elsewhere. Mr. 
Wei's contention, when he was per- 
mitted to express it. was that China 
would never be a truly great country — 
a “top nation” — until it became 
democratic. He is nearer the truth than 
Mr. Chirac. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Welfare and Work 


President Bill Clinton was right to 
order that welfare recipients pin to 
work under the terms of last year's 
welfare bill be paid the minimum wage. 
The objecting governors and other crit- 
ics are likewise right when they say that 
his decision will throw the bill even 
further out of whack than it already 
was. What the president basically 
proved in doing the right thing on the 
wage was how great a mistake he made 
in caving in to election-year pressures, 
some of them of his own making, and 
signing the bill to begin with. 

The problem with the welfare part of 
this legislation — as distinct from the 
gratuitous cuts that it also imposed in 
other programs for the poor — is the 
mismatch that exists between its com- 
mands and the resources it provides to 
carry them ouL The basic command is 
that welfare recipients work, but that's 
not something that can be achieved by a 
snap of the fingers or the waving of a 
wand or it would have happened long 
ago. A lot of welfare recipients aren't 
capable of holding down jobs whhoui 
an enormous amount of support Nor, in 
many cases, are there jobs enough in die 
private sector to accommodate diem 
even if they could hold them down. 

The cost to the states of putting to 
work as many recipients as the bill 
requires was already going to be greater 
over time than the fixed funding in the 
bill. The minimum wage decision will 
only add to the cost; hence the squawk 
from the governors. But it’s not the 
decision that was wrong. Welfare re- 
cipients put to work are no less entitled 
to the protections of the wage and hour 
laws than other workers. To pay them 


less would also be to undercut the 
wages of other workers with whom they 
will now compete for low-paying jobs. 
That was a major part of the argument 
organized labor uskl in pushing for the 
order. Wages in that part of the econ- 
omy are already too low to support a 
family, and income inequality in the 
country generally is too great. 

The law requires that increasing per- 
centages of welfare recipients work 
each year. States that fail to meet the 
targets risk loss ofsome of their federal 
funds. The number of hours a recipient 
must work to qualify also increases. 
Twenty hours a week will be enough at 
first, but eventually that will rise to 30. 
For now, the way the president’s order 
is written, most states will be able to 
put recipients to work themselves, or 
pay private employers to do so, for 
about the amount of a monthly welfare 
check. But over time that will cease to 
be true; a welfare check that will pay 
for 20 hours at the minimum wage 
won't cover 30. 

The state will have to come up with 
the difference. Or it will have to start 
lopping people off the rolls far other 
reasons. The bill gives states power to 
do that, too, and that's what welfare 
advocacy groups fear may happen in 
states whose low benefits won’t cover 
all the hours the bill requires. 

Back to the mismatch: The bill re- 
quires more than it pays for. As with the 
other flaws in this misbegotten legis- 
lation, sooner or later this one needs to 
be fixed, or a lot of vulnerable people 
including children badly in needofhelp 
are going to end up harmed instead. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Because It’s There 


Mount Everest is an entity that ac- 
cumulates numbers, but which num- 
bers can scarcely appraise. Its peak lies 
29,028 feet above sea level on the 
border of Tibet and Nepal — the 
highest spot on earth. . 

The first ascent took place 44 years 
ago this month. Since then, according 
to Jon Krakauer's new book, “Into 
Thin Air,” Everest has been climbed 
more than 630 times. Since 1921, when 
the first British expedition reached the 
base of the mountain. 150 climbers 
have died on its slopes, including the 
five who have died so far this season. 

The top of Everest is high enough to 
penetrate the jet stream, and the summit 
can be gained only when the jet stream 
has been diverted northward, during a 
rare interval of good weather before the 


imminent death — and each step car- 
ries a price in fatigue that is almost 
unimaginable. 

Even with extra oxygen, the mind's 
ability to function is profoundly im- 
paired. George Mallory, who died on 
Everest, had said that he wanted to 
climb it because it was there. But 
climbers who have reached the summit 
report that there is no there there — 
only exhaustion and the numbness of 
one's attenuated presence. 

So why go? The early British ex- 
peditions carried, with them a sense of 
national honor of the kind that Robert 
Falcon Scott bore to Antarctica, where 
he died. But even on those expeditions, 
public and private motives mixed. 

Wilfrid Noyce belonged to the suc- 
cessful 1953 assault in which the New 


Bay of Bengal. What kills climbers is 
almost never the technical difficulty of 
the most familiar route, which is not 
extreme. It is the weather — abruptly, 
unexpectedly fouling the mountain, as 
it did last year, when eight climbers died 
in the aftermath of a sudden storm. 

What climbers describe when they 
talk about surmounting Everest always 
sounds like a kind of high -altitude spe- 
lunking in a cave of dimming con- 
sciousness. 

After several days spent above 
20,000 feet, climbers are dehydrated, 
sleeping badly and barely able to eat 
They usually climb with the aid of 
supplemental oxygen — the altern- 
ative for most climbers is hypoxia and 


zing Norgay, the Sherpa guide, reached 
die summit, an event heralded world- 
wide as a broadly human achievement 
But the conquest of Everest Mr. Noyce 
wrote in his account of the expedition, 
“suggests to me nothing but the con- 
quest of rebellious bits of myself.” 

It is hard not to wonder where the 
honor lies in being the 640th or 650th 
person to climb Everest on a day in May 
when a long line of climbers is moving 
toward the top. But one of the reasons 
for trying to scale this peak is surely the 
same as it ever was: to climb beyond all 
help and see what remains of yourself 
when, despite the proximity of so many 
other climbers, there is only solitude. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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P RINCETON, New Jersey — It is 
my conviction, based on some 70 
years of experience, first as a gov- 
ernment official and then in the past 45 
years as a historian, that the neea by the 
U.S. government for secret intelligence 
about affairs elsewhere in the world has 
been vastly overrated. 

I would say that something upward 
of 95 percent of what we Americans 
need to know could be very well ob- 
tained by the careful and competent 
study of perfectly legitimate sources of 
information open ana available to us in 
the rich library and archival holdings of 
the United States. Much of tire re- 
mainder, if it could not be found here 
(and there is very little of it that could 
not), could easily be nonsecretively 
elicited from similar sources abroad. 

In Russia, in Stalin's time and partly 
thereafter, the almost psychotic pre- 
occupation. of the Communist regime 
with secrecy appeared to many, not 
unnaturally, to place a special premium 
on efforts to penetrate that curtain by 
secretive methods of our own. This led, 
of course, to the creation here of a vast 
bureaucracy dedicated to this particular 
purpose; and this latter, after the fash- 
ion of all great bureaucratic structures, 
has endured to this day long aftermost 
of the reasons for it have disappeared. 


By George JE Kerman 

Even in the Soviet time, much of it 
was superfluous. A lot of what we went 
to such elaborate and dangerous means 
to obtain secretly would have been here 
for the having, given the requisite quiet 
and scholarly analysis of what already 
lay before us. 

The attempt to elicit information by 
secret means has another very serious 
negative effect that is seldom noted. The 
development of clandestine sources in 
another country involves, of course, the 
placing and exploitation of secret agents 
in that country. This naturally incites the 
mounting of a substantial effort of coun- 
terintelligence on the part of the re- 
spective country’s government 

This, in turn, causes us to respond 
with an equally vigorous effort of coun- 
terintelligence in order to maintain the 
integrity of our espionage effort. 

This competition in counterintelli- 
gence efforts tends to grow into di- 
mensions that wholly overshadow the 
original effort of positive intelligence 
procurement that gave rise to it in the 
first place. It takes on aspects which 
cause it to be viewed as a game, played 
in its own rights. 

Unfortunately, it is a game requiring 


such lurid and dramatic character that it 
dominates the attention both of those 
who practice hand of those in the press 
who exploit iL Such is the fascination it 
exerts that it tends wholly to obscure, 
even for the general public, the original 
reasons for iL 

It would be interesting to know what 
proportion of the energies and ex- 
penses and bureaucratic involvement 
of the CIA is addressed to this con- 
suming competition, and whether one 
ever stacks this up against the value of 
its almost forgotten original purposes. 

Do people ever reflect, one wonders, 
that the best way to protect against the 


taught us that the more terrible the 
weapons available, the more suicidal 
becomes any conceivable actraJ use of 
them. With the recognition of the im- 
plications of this simple fact would go ep- 
large part of the motivation far our 
frantic efforts of secret intelligence. 

In this respect, too. this is really ar, 
new age. It is time we recognized it anti., 
drew the inescapable conclusions. 

There may still be areas, very small ; 
areas really, in which there is a real 
need to penetrate someone else's cur-, 
tain of secrecy. All right — but then . 
please, without the erection of false-, 
pretenses and elaborate efforts to de^ 


penetration of one’s secrets by others is. ceive, and without, to the extent pos- . 
to have die minim um of secrets to sible, the attempt to maintain “spies”- 
conceal? on the adversary’s territory. 

One more poinL At the bottom of the We easily become, ourselves, the., 
whole great effort of secret military in- sufferers from these methods of 6&- 
telligence, which has played so nefar- ception. For they inculcate in their au- r 
ious a part in the entire history of great- thors, as well as their intended victims,; 
power relati onshi ps in this passing cen- unlimited cynicism, causing them to 
tury, there has usually lain the assurnp- lose all realistic understanding of the, 
non by each party that if it did not engage interrelationship, in what they are do-, 
to the limi t in that exercise, the .other ing, of ends and means. 

party, working in secret, might develop a — 

weapon so devastating that it could coo- The writer, a former ambass ado r tot^ 

front all others with the demand that they the Soviet Union , is professor emeritus ' 
submit to its wfll “or else.” of historical studies at the Institute forp 

But this son of anxiety is now greatly Advanced Study. He contributed thiiu 
outdated. The nuclear competition has comment to The New York Times. a 


China’s ‘Immigration Card’ Is a Potent Psychological Weapon 


H ONOLULU — The recent 
meeting between President 
Jiang Zemin of China and Pres- 
ident Boris Yeltsin of Russia 
heralded a new “strategic part- 
nership” between the two na- 
tions. Vet only a Sew days after 
Mr. Bang’s visit to Moscow, of- 
ficials from Russia's Interior 
Ministry reiterated that the 
growing influx of illegal Qiinese 
immigrants into Russia was a 
threat to national security. 

Although the announcement 
appeared to be diplomatically 
iu-timed, it clearly reflected a 
fear that runs deep throughout 
Russian society and, indeed, 
throughout much of East Asia. 

As China’s population in- 
creases by about 13 milli on per 
year — in contrast to the con- 
tinued demographic decline of 
ethnic Russians — many se- 
curity and immigration special- 
ists in Russia are warning of the 
political and social implications 
of illegal Chinese entry into 
their country, particularly into 
sparsely inhabited regions of 
the Russian Far East 
Russia first characterized 
Chinese immi gration as a na- 
tional security threat in 1995, 
when tbea-Defense Minister 
Pavel Grachev warned that 


By Paul J. Smith 


“people of Chinese nationality 
are trying to peacefully conquer 
die Russian Far East” Since 
then. Russian warnings of 
Chinese illegal immigration 
have sounded increasingly dire 
and ominous. 

For Chinese leaders, illegal 
Chinese immigration to Russia 
and elsewhere reflects a much 
larger problem: As die scale of 

illegal migration and h uman 

smuggling from China grows, it 
is becoming a political priority 
in China's foreign policy. The 
issue is complicating the coun- 
try's relations with its neigh- 
bors and trading partners. 

Since the mid-1980s, tens of 
thousands of Chinese nationals 
have immigrated illegally to 
such places as Japan, Taiwan. 
Australia, Western Europe and 
North America. With human 
smugglers organizing much of 
this traffic, many receiving na- 
tions fear that the tide brings with 
it organized crime and violence. 

Perhaps no country is more 
sensitive about both crime and 
Chinese immigration than Ja- 
pan. Responding to an unprece- 
dented influx of clandestine 
Chinese arrivals in the first three 


months of 1997, Japan called for 
high-level diplomatic talks in the 
hope of convincing Beijing to 
halt illegal immigration. Beijing 
agreed to help and subsequently 
launched several campaigns to 
stop the flow. Yet Japanese of- 
ficials admit privately that the 
problem is far from solved. 

Many other neighbors of 
C hina are feeling the brunt of 
illegal Chinese immigration. 
South Korea, like Japan, is also 
alarmed by a recent increase in 
the smuggling of Chinese into 
its territory. Cambodian offi- 
cials are concerned at growing 
evidence that their country has 
become a staging post for smug- 
gling Chinese to other nations. 

But the threat of Chinese im- 
migrants and refugees is not just 
a liability for Beijing. It can also 
bean asset 

As China’s ruling Commu- 
nist Party seeks to maintain and 
strengthen its legitimacy in the 
post-Deng era. it may find that 
the “immigration card” almost 
guarantees it political support 
from many other countries. This 
is because of a prevailing belief 
in East Asia that any economic 
crisis in China or open divisions 


w ithin the Communist leader- 
ship will almost inevitably lead 
to an exodus of millions of 
refugees. As a result, the threat 
of Qiinese migration has be- 
come a kind of political insur- 
ance policy for Beijing. 

Moreover, the migration card 
can also influence Western 
countries that insist on bringing 
China to book for its human 
rights record. In 1994. Lee 
Kuan Yew, Singapore's senior 
minister, warned that continued 
Western pressure on . China 
about human rights could lead 
to a breakdown in order that 
might drive tens of millions of 
Chinese to seek refuge over- 
seas. 

Fear of such an exodus may 
help to explain why U.S. cri- 
ticisms of China over human 
rights abuses, while vociferous, 
have rarely been backed by se- 
rious economic sanctions. The 
United States has consistently 
refused to deny most-favored- 
nation, or MFN. trading status 
for China. 

But there are other consid- 
erations: Some U.S. officials 
are afraid that revoking China's 
MFN trade privileges might 
harm their efforts to enlist 
Beijing in the fight against il- 


NATO Expansion, or the Whitewater of Clinton Foreign Policy 


W ASHINGTON — Does 
Ken Stair do diplomacy? 
I ask because it's now clear 
that NATO expansion is the 
Whitewater of the Clinton for- 
eign policy. Like Whitewater, 
NATO expansion began with a 
poorly financed, poorly con- 
ceived real estate deal, sold to 
President Bill Clinton by fast- 
talking policy hucksters. Po- 
land, Hungary and the Czech 
Republic, he was told, would be 
brought into NATO, it would 
cost him (and America) virtu- 
ally nothing and when the deal 
was over President Clinton's 
place in history would be ele- 
vated, NATO would be 
stronger, Europe more secure 
and Russia more pliable. 

The president thought about 
NATO expansion about as long 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


As the president began to dis- 
cover the real costs of his NATO 
land deal, instead of walking 
away, he adopted die Whitewa- 
ter strategy: Try to cover up the 
costs with dubious Rube Gold- 
berg diplomatic contraptions 
and tell everyone something a 
little bit different. Like White- 
water, the cover-up is worse 
than the original deal, and the 
ultimate costs far greater than if 
he had just walked away. 

The latest chapter in this saga 
is the NATO-Russia charter 
completed last week. It provides 
us with the worst of all worlds: 
The Kremlin, trying to make the 
best of having NATO forced on 
it, is proclaiming that the charter 
gives Russia implicit veto 


plunked down his money and cisions. Or as Boris Yeltsin ex- 
has been paying ever since. plained: “Jusi as (he document 


says, decisions are to be made 
only by consensus. If Russia is 
against any decision, this de- 
cision does not go through." 

Clinton officials say the 
charter gives Russia no such 
veto. 

Russian parliamentarians, 
hearing this, say if that’s how 
we’re being treated, we won’t 
ratify the START-2 treaty, 
which slashes the number of 
Russian nuclear missiles aimed 
at America. Meanwhile, Central 
Europeans, hearing Mr. Yelt- 
sin's interpretation, feel as if 
Russia is getting into NATO be- 
fore they are. So the influential 
Polish paper, Rzeczpospolita, 
complained last week: “Mos- 
cow will get a say practically 

mnnl In thflfnfWdTfl mumlwR 


Will it not limit the cohesion of 
the alliance?” 


The Crucial U.S. Role in Bosnia 


W ASHINGTON — The 
United Stales wanes no 
part of a quagmire in Bosnia. 
Clinton administration officials 
have proclaimed loud and clear 
that they expect U.S. troops to 
leave Bosnia on schedule, at the 
end of the current mandate in 
mid- 1998. This is also the view 
in Congress. In fact, some in 
Congress have proposed cutting 
off funding for U.S. troops in 
Bosnia beyond Sept. 30. 
Though unlikely to pass, this 
idea creates additional pressure 
to leave Bosnia early next year. 

This is the wrong signal to 
sard at the wrong time. Estab- 
lishing a sustainable peace in 
Bosnia will take a long time — 
not simply 15 more months. 
Putting a date on a U.S. with- 
drawal just plays into the hands 
of hard-line opponents of peace, 
who believe they bave only to 
wait us out before resuming the 
war. If we Americans have any 
hope of achieving our objective 
— a unified Bosnia — we 
should not rule out staying be- 
yond next June as part of a new, 
smaller NATO force, although 
preferably not with ground 
troops. At the very least, the 
administration should tone 
down its rhetoric and dampen 
expectations of a quick pullout 
While Bosnia may be off the 
frontpage, America has become 
the central player in tire peace 
effort. U.S. officials hold most 


By Lee H. Hamilton 

of the key positions in the peace 
implementation process. We are 
leading the effort to sort out the 
stalemate in the pivotal city of 
Brcko. We are the driving force 
behind the organization of local 
elections, scheduled for Sept- 
ember. We are the most visible 
presence in Sarajevo. We are the 
lead advocate of the Muslim- 
Croat federation on whose be- 
half we are carrying out a con- 
gressionally mandated, half-bil- 
li on-doll ax effort to train and 
equip its armed forces. 

By most accounts, America 
is the only party in the region 
respected by all three sides, and 
therefore the key to stability. 
The Europeans cannot and will 
not do the job themselves. 

Yet the task is far from fin- 
ished. There is a general con- 
sensus that reconstruction in 
Bosnia will be a long-term pro- 
cess. For example, significant 
numbers of refugees will not 
return to “ethnically cleansed” 
areas before the end of the cur- 
rent NATO mandate. Local of- 
ficials to be elected in Septem- 
ber will by early 1998 just be 
starting to return to govern 
areas from which they were 
forced out in 1992. 

It is incomprehensible to our 
allies and to the people of Bos- 
nia that with these key tasks 


unfinished and with most key 
decisions in U.S. hands, the 
United Slates would leave next 
year. Yet that is U.S. policy, and 
it is creating unrealistic pres- 
sure to show as much progress 
as possible by mid- 1998. It also 
has created tensions with our 
allies, who take a long-term and 
more realistic approach to the 
problems of implementing the 
Dayton agreement. 

If we are serious about getting 
our troops out in mid- 1998, then 
we should scale back our polit- 
ical involvement and lower our 
expectations. This means ac- 
cepting. at best, a drift toward 
partition of Bosnia, and at worst, 
a possible resumption of war. 

But if the Clinton adminis- 
tration does not want partition 
or war, it should change its exit 
strategy. We need to consider 
scenarios for a post- 1998 U.S. 
presence that would be accept- 
able to U.S. allies, who do not 
want to stay behind in Bosnia if 
America leaves. This could 
mean a limited, continued U.S. 
participation. America could 
continue to provide logistical 
and intelligence support in Bos- 
nia and maintain a backup, rap- 
id-reaction force in Hungary. 

, The writer, the ranking 
Democrat on the House Inter- 
national Relations Committee, 
contributed this comment to the 
Los Angeles Times. 


In other words, to make 
NATO expansion acceptable, 
the Clintonites are telling the 
Russians they will have a voice 
but no veto, while the Russians 
are telling themselves they will 
have a voice and a veto. The 
Clintonites are telling them- 
selves that NATO expansion is 
not anti-Russian, just an effort to 
stabilize Central Europe, while 
the Poles and Czechs are com- 
plaining that the only reason they 
want to be in NATO is because it 
is anti-Russian and now the 
United States is letting Russia in 
first and diluting the alliance. 
The Clintonites are telling the 
Baltics they will join NATO 
soon, while the Russians have 
told the United States and Ger- 
many that Moscow is only 
agreeing to the charter on the 

qcrimmhnn ritnf Dnli^ * 


u,Ml Ul ^ WOiW \OJKU 

any former Soviet republics) 
will never be in NATO. 

NATO's skillful chief, Javier 
Solana Madariaga, has done a 
masterful job juggling these 
contradictions. It’s a shame the 
Clintonites never let him ex- 
plore the real alternative to ex- 
pansion: Keep NATO at its cur- 
rent 16 democracies, focused on 
NATO's primary role — to de- 
ter nuclear war in Europe. Then 
use the Partnership for Peace, 
which contains virtually every 
country in Europe not already in 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Social Climbers viet War Commissar said: “laf 

da ore . . not believe in the conference v? 

takerPhere ’ S P enoa - Place y our confidence 

taken here in the forthcoming m your bayonets. We have no 

L SatuS? 

n “ o ^° ui 

, R o^ s ^^ led 1” 
yet been reached. The former P power * 

is 18.023 feet in height, while i 

Logan has an altitude of : A Groom at 94 

19,500 feet. On reaching New bar'frcpici r> ^ .... - 

York, the prince will go at once California 

to San Francisco, so as to catch n -^f wn f ston 
the steamer to Sitka, the cap- ^ 

ital of Alaska. ^ groom, explained that the sec- 

ret of constant youth inspired 
him to take a new bride. Mrs- 
Jennie Grant, seventy-four, 
whom he met for the first tiiw'- 
on Thursday [May 15]. "YCr ; 
got to team to live today as 
though you expected to live for 
ever, ’ the Spanish- American 
war veteran advised. 


1922: Trotsky Speech 

WARSAW — In a speech to 
candidates for the Communist 
military school, Trotsky has de- 
livered a violent attack against 
the Genoa conference. The So- 


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legal Chinese migration andtfii- 
man smuggling. Some also be- 
lieve that economic sanctions 
might eventually worsen unem- 
ployment in China, undermin- 
ing social stability and unleash- 
ing even larger waves "(of 
migration, both internal abd 
external. 

Immigration concents are'in- 
creasingly influencing the way 
in which the United States 3pd 
other countries deal with Chijja. 
As China's population growth 
continues to singe, the powerof 
Beijing's immigration cant 'is 
likely to grow dramatically. 

Chinese leaders may hSye 
discovered that they possess & 
weapon more psychological# i 
potent than all of their recently 
purchased fighter planes, war- 
ships, submarines and missiles 
put together. 

The writer, editor of the forth- 
coming book “ Human Smug- 
gling: Chinese Migrant Traffick- 
ing and the Challenge ‘-to 
Americas Immigration Tradi- 
tion is an adjunct fellow vfith 
Pacific ForumlCS/S, a research 
institute affiliated with the Cen- 
ter for Strategic and Internation- 
al Studies. He contributed this • 
comment to the Herald Tribune. 








: • 







NATO (including Russia), as a 
junior NATO. The Partnership 
would be the collective security 
system that fills the void in Cen- 
tral Europe, resolves disputes 
and provides troops for NATO- 
Jedjpeacekeeping. 

Finally, you have NATO 
work, with Russia to stabilize 
conflicts along Russia's frontiers 
and you focus U.S. diplomacy 
on doing eveiything possible to 
help Russia ratify START-J^ 
This way, NATO’s core wou^y' 
remain solid, Europe would have 
a stable securfy structure with- 
out being redivided or alienating 
Russia and our real priority, get- 
ting rid of Russia's heavy mikes, 
would be in reach. 

Instead, the Clintonites, 
looking to make a fast political 
buck (Polish -American votes in 


*oi. cnose inaiu expansion. 
As a result, they have diluted 
NATO, devalued the Partner- 
ship and created a permanent 
source of friction with Russia. 
One bad real estate decision — 
a lifetime of regrets. 

I suspect before this is over 
Bill Clinton and the American 
people will feel about NATO 
expansion much the way they 
feel about James McDougal and 
that miserable plot of land 
called Whitewater. They will 
wish they'd never heard of it 
The Nm York Times. 















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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION /LETTERS 


‘Nazi Gold 5 Pact of 1946 
Was Badly Implemented 


By Seymour J. Rubin 

; «£ HINGTON — U.S. 

: ggJ^TwBK.SjS 

i SS 5 ° n L y aboat d* S'viss. but 

■ about the Allies. 

: Specifically, did the Washine- 

• to n Agreement of May 194 I 
| which liquidated Geraun ec5 
. nomic power in Switzerland and 

applied the proceeds to repara- 
' eI d** 5 Swis s off easy? 

i Shoidd the U.S. delegation, of 
which I was deputy head, have 
: held out for better? 

The three Allies at the nego- 

• hating table had similar but not 
: identical interests. 

T) e British were desperate to 
- rebuild their battered economy, 
and would not even consider ex- 

■ tending the list of economic sanc- 
tions on the affluent Swiss. The 

^ French were eager to restore a 
^portion of their lost gold reserves. 

->We Americans faced a clamor 
' from business and Congress to 
: eliminate wartime economic and 
■—financial controls, including our 
principal instruments of pressure 
on the Swiss — the asset-freezing 
^controls and black list. 

— v The option of getting better 
terms by imposing or threatening 
. new sanctions cm the Swiss was 
not available. Nor could it be 
^overlooked that the Allies were 
‘making new law. For example, we 
defined gold taken from central 
^banks as “loot," while others 
considered it a legitimate act of an 
«. occupying power. That law was 
' the very foundation of our claim 
_ ai lo German assets in Switzerland. 

The accord, though known then 
■;^md now to be less than perfect, 

‘ was a good one, and should have 
■been accepted as it was. The fault 
• r lies not with the accord, but with 
7; its implementation. 

The current charges suggest a 
^ split between hard-line Treasury 
and soft-headed State. No such 
yl). split existed. As the U.S. govem- 
.. meat report indicates. Randolph 
. Paul, head of delegation, and I 
.7 consulted at length with Senator 
Harley Kilgore, chairman of die 
war mobilization subcommittee. 

Mr. Kilgore said he feltthe “se- 
. . curity aspects of the agreement;” 

. tiuunely the elimination of German 
^economic jxiwer in Switzeriand, 

. ■were “die more important” He 
.‘,said the accord “bad done as well 


as could be done with response to 
theproblem of security.” 

The fact is that the report, in 
casting doubt cm the accord and its 
negotiation, detracts from the 
more important findings: a woe- 
ful. if not willful, lack of cooper- 
ation in Swiss implementation. 

The Swiss banks destroyed the 
right of heirs and survivors to 
claim their prope r ty, by raising a 
series of obstacles. Claimants 
were required to produce death 
certificates from the concentra- 
tion camps. Claimants were re- 
quired to produce proof of inher- 
itance, which was often destroyed 
and usually lost. Claimants were 
denied assistance in locating de- 
posits made by parents who had 
whispered information to them on 
their way to the gas chambers. - 

The accord clearly contem- 
plated that assets of “Germans in 
Germany” would be liquidated 
for reparation purposes. Jews, 
who had been stripped of then- 
rights as German citizens, were 
exempted. The Swiss, and others, 
argued that it would be discrim- 
inatory to exempt the property of a 
German Jew just because his last 
address had been Bergen-Belsen. 

The sad tale goes on. The 
“sympathetic consideration” 
promised with respect to heiriess 
assets — dormant accounts — did 
not materialize, although after 
years of bounding by the Amer- 
ican Legation in Bern and by Jew- 
ish organizations, a sum of $32 
million was discovered in such 
accounts, die existence of which 
had been previously denied. 
Though heiriess assets were al- 
legedly un traceable for the Jewish 
successor organizations, they be- 
came traceable when die Swiss 
were concluding a trade arrange- 
ment with Poland. 

It is difficult to understand what 
happened to die Washington Ac- 
cord. It is unpleasant to know now, 
on the basis of recent Swiss dis- 
closures, that Walter Stuclri, the 
Swiss negotiator, expressed anti- 
Semitic sentiments to his delega- 
tion. Even less pleasant is to reflect 
that he was for years in charge of 
im pleme ntation of the accord. 



Interrogation Methods 
In Israel Are Justified 


By Stephen Flatow 


W EST ORANGE. New Jer- 
sey — On Aug. 21, 1995. 
Sufiyon Jabarin. a 26-year-old 
Palestinian member of the terror- 
ist organization Hamas, blew 


rgatu: 

himself up on a bus in the heart of 
Jerusalem, taking the lives of four 
people — three Israelis and an 
American — with him. 

I followed the story of the 
bombing on Bus 26 quite closely; 
my 20-year-old daughter, Alisa, 


its and regulates the use of force 
and allows detainees to petition 
the highest courr to stop possibly 
illegal measures. 

Critics say Israel has flouted a 
UN convention it ratified in 1991 
barring the use of torture. But 
Israeli officials note that there is a 
difference between torture and 
moderate physical pressure, 
which can include shaking detain- 
ees, using painful restraints and 


MEANWHILE 


depriving them of sleep. 

1 have always cherished Amer- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


NATO Enlargement 


The writer was deputy head of 
the US. delegation at the Allied- 
Swiss negotiations of 1946. He 
contributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


Regarding “ Expand NATO? 
The Senate Should Just Say No” 
( Opinion , April 29) by Thomas L. 
Friedman: 

The expansion of NATO in 
Central Europe is a well-con- 
sidered and correct policy. NATO 
enlargement was not, as Mr. 
Friedman said, “driven largely by 
a Clinton desire to attract East 
European ethnic votes in the *96 
election.” Rather, it is a policy 
that has been discussed at length 
since at least 1993. 

Both die Republicans and the 
Democrats have ■ repeatedly 
shown their support for extending 
NATO. Millions of Americans, 
whatever their heritage, share the 
same position. 

It is in the best interest of the 
United States to rescue Europe 
from its present security vacuum. 
The last time America failed to do 
tins, the result was the Cold War. 
Before that, the Western powers' 
neglect of Central Europe’s le- 
gitimate security concerns paved 
the way to World War IL Ex- 
panding NATO is our insurance 
policy against such disasters. 

BETTY JOHNSON. 

Bucharest 


time, which placed Poland, Hun- 
gary and Czechoslovakia within 
the sphere of interest of the USSR, 
thereby condemning them to com- 
munism for 50 years. 

It would be a grave mistake 
now, when there is the opportu- 
nity, to let down these democ- 
racies in Central Europe in then- 
quest to establish long-term se- 
curity within the family of NATO. 
Not only are these countries geo- 
graphically, historically and cul- 
turally allied with Western 
Europe, but also U.S. promises 
were central in their efforts to en- 
dure the many economic sacrifices 
imposed upon them as a result of 
tire transition to democracy. 

JULIAN THOMKA-O AZDK. 

Geneva. 


Deep Blue Is Just a Tool 


It is amatter of opinion whether 
the world is safe. It is never too 
late to correct Yalta and the pre- 
vailing U.S. foreign policy at the 


The question we ought to 
ask ourselves: Does NATO 
expansion make the world more 
secure for our children and 
grandchildren? My answer is a 
resounding “no.” 

FOr deep historical reasons, 
NATO expansion toward the Rus- 
sian border is perceived by Rus- 
sians as a threat It will make the 
effort to dismantle Russia's nu- 
clear arsenal almost impossible. 
Above all h will weaken the 
fl edgling democracy there and 
give more arguments to anti- 
Western forces. 

ALEXANDRE BLUMSTEIN. 

Chelmsford, Maine. 


Regarding “ No Computer Can 
Write a Column Like This ” (Opin- 
ion, May 14) by Richard Cohen: 

The point that has been uni- 
versally missed about the chess 
games between Garry Kasparov 
and Deep Blue is that Mr. Kas- 
parov has not been playing a com- 
puter at all. He has been playing 
a team of people — the people 
who wrote Deep Blue’s program. 
Hie cleverness of the program 
that the team has written has 
escaped notice. 

One thing must be made dear: 
The computer is only the enabler 
of the team's ideas. A car designer 
cannot travel at 100 miles an hour 
without tiie car, but it is never- 
theless tiie designer who does the 
flunking. 

NORMAN SANDERS. 

Ipswich. England. 


I find the man - agflins f- muchine 

debate since Deep Blue's victory 
over Mr. Kasparov to be com- 
pletely irrelevant The computer 
is only a tool, not a hammer 

or a screwdriver. 

The Kasparov-Deep Blue event 
was not a man-against-machine 
contest but a match between 
the best human player and players 
of lesser stature with an additional 
tooL 

VICTOR N.OSCODAR. 

Anglet, France. 


had been killed by an Islamic Ji- 
had suicide bomber on a bus in 
Israel four months earlier. 

A few days after the Aug. 
21 attack, Israeli and American 
newspapers reported that the 
man who masterminded it, Abdel 
Nasser Issa, had been in Israeli 
custody two days before the 
bombing. 

Israeli authorities had arrested 
Mr. Issa on suspicion of terrorist 
activity, and had questioned 
him the same way they would 
have questioned anyone else: 
posing questions and waiting 
for answers. 

Mr. Issa revealed nothing un- 
usual to his interviewers. It was 
only after the bus bombing that 
Karmi Gilon, then chief of the 
Israeli internal secret service, the 
Shin Bet, authorized the use of 
“moderate physical force.” 

The next morning, Mr. Issa, who 
was still in custody and had not 
been told of the bombing of Bus 26 
lhe day before, told tiie Israelis 
about his plan for that attack. 

He also provided information 
that led to the arrests of 37 Hamas 
militants who had been planning 
additional bombings. 

Mr. Gilon told reporters thatthe 
blood of the next victims of ter- 
rorism would have been on his 
hands if physical pressure had not 
been used in the interrogation of 
Mr. Issa. Yitzhak Rabin, then 
: minister of Israel, said that 
ie Shin Bet applied such 
pressure earlier, tiie attack on Bus 

minlit 


26 might have been prevented. 

In the last two years, the Shin 
Bet has averted 90 planned ter- 
rorist attacks. 

Yet the United Nations Com- 
mittee Against Torture Iasi week 
condemned Israel's methods of 
questioning suspected terrorists 
as torture, even though Israel tun- 


ica's unparalleled standards of in- 
dividual and human rights. But 
the Middle East is different from 
the United States. 

Israel lives in what Prime Min- 
ister Benjamin Netanyahu has 
called “a very rough neighbor- 
hood.” Indeed, more than 200 Is- 
raelis have been killed in terrorist 
attacks during the past four years. 

The most important obligation 
of any country is protecting the 
lives of its citizens. 

To hold individual human 
rights as an absolute rule when 
occasional exceptions to that rule 
can prevent the random murder of 
civilians seems to me morally 
unjustifiable. 

Moreover. Israel’s use of Lim- 
ited physical pressure during in- 
terrogations, a practice that is reg- 
ulated and regularly reviewed, 
cannot be compared with the un- 
controlled torture of suspects em- 
ployed by some of Israel ’s neigh- 
bors, like Syria. 

international human rights 
groups recently reported that 11 
Palestinians have died as a result 
of torture in prisons run by Yasser 
Arafat’s Palestinian Authority. 

I cannot consider the individual 
rights of a Palestinian detainee 
in an Israeli jail as a separate 
issue from protecting the lives 
of bus passengers. Nor do I have 
the luxury of examining this 
question from an abstract moral 
perspective. 

If applying limited physical 
pressure to a suspected teirorist 
can spare even one parent the pain 
of losing a son or a daughter, 1 am 
all for it In the meantime, I pray 
that the conditions that give rise to 
the need 'for such methods will 
speedily come to an end. 


The writer, a lawyer, contrib- 
uted this comment to The New 
York Times. 


- \ Vi 




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T> 


PAGE 10 

STYLE 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


A Touch of Marrakech in Chelsea 


By Suzy Menkes 

Unemotional Herald Tribune 


L ondon — The vivid blue 
makes a dramatic splash like a 
Matisse painting. And that's 
just the wails and the mosaic 
dies in Yves Saint Laurent’s Marrakech 
garden at the Chelsea Flower show. 

Add to that Catherine Deneuve (fresh 
from the Cannes film festival) posing by 
the fountain in a nectarine pantsuit Dab 
an impression of coral for a climbing 
bougainvillea. And shade in the furry 
spikes of varigated green cacti. 

The Saint Lament clan, including 
Pierre Berge and Loulou de la Falaise. 
turned out Monday to show off Saint 
Laurent's luxuriant creation for Eng- 
land's royal flower show, which was 
freshening up its gorgeous blooms for 
the horticultural walkabout by Queen 
Elizabeth II. 

Those peeking through the fretted 


arches and exclaiming over Saint 
Laurent's dramatic colors, included Sir 
Bob Geldof, Sir Roy Strong, gardening 
writer, aesthete and author of ascerbic 
memoires, and David Hockney, whose 
flower paintings are currently on show 
in London. “All gardens are artificial, 
and I like the green of nature against the 
strong blue — but it needs sun and 
shadows," said Hockney, whose straw 
panama was keeping off drizzling rain. 

"It's the most exciting thing I have 
ever done — and I'm proud to be the 
first American designer to show at 
Chelsea," said Madison Cox, the 
garden’s creator. "The idea was to do 
something different — I can't compete 
with those English cottage gardens. 7 ' 



Saint 
Morocco 

palms, papyrus and exotic plants, cre- 
ated in the 1920s by the artist painter 
Jacques Majorelle and lovingly restored 


over 10 years by Berge and Saint 
Laurent 

“To me. it represents a truly indi- 
vidual garden, with plants brought from 
all over the world but incorporating 
Islamic elements," said Cox. 

Berge described himself as emotional 
at seeing Marrakech brought to life, 
while Deneuve picked cactus flowers 
but claimed that irises, old roses and 
peonies were her favorites. 

De la Falaise. whose last visit to 
Chelsea was as a child, exclaimed over 
the banks of exquisite flowers or more 
whimsical miniature landscapes. 

Even on a gray day. the garden cap- 
tured the feeling of languorous heal, 
filtered by greenery, with the central 
pool a cool refuge, while geraniums, 
bougainvillea and yellow lan tan as and 
an orange tree provided fiery borders. 
The ming ling of scents was deliberately 
designed to recall Saint Laurent's 
flowery fragrances. 


SHOPWATCH 


Calvin Klein: Minimalist in Paris 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — The facade 
is typically french, 
with its noble vaulted 
windows and fancy 
wrought-iron railings. But in- 
side. Calvin Klein 's new store 
on Avenue Montaigne has 
joined the minimalis t revo- 
lution. The walls are white, 
the decor spare and panels of 
sandblasted glass filter the 
light of modern day. 

“My philosophy remains 
the same — it's about purity 
and simplicty." said Klein, 
who jetted in for 24 hours to 
Launch his flagship store in 
theplaie-glass heart of Paris. 

Change is sweeping this 
city where women Get’s call 
them ladies) really do still go 
out shopping with their 
pooches, and where elegance 
starts with the piles of tissue 
paper and satin gift-wrap rib- 
bons behind the counter. 

Avenue Montaigne is be- 
ing transformed, with the 
house of Dior currently un- 
dergoing surgery to fix a well- 
loved face that has been 
around for 50 years. The ar- 
chitect Peter Marino is mak- 
ing over the Empire-style in- 
teriors to give them a modem 
look for entering the new mil- 
lennium. 

Jil Sander's minimalist 
temple was the first to chal- 
lenge the more familiar 
pampered prettiness of Par- 
is’s most famous shopping 
avenue. Now the diggers and 



Calvin Klein in front of his new Paris store. 


hantLuxHmt 


“I’m struck more by the 
similarities between people 
than by our cultural differ- 
ences,' ' said Klein, who at his 
opening party greeted high- 
profile fashionable folk, from 
the actress Fanny Ardant 
through grande dame Jac- 
queline de Ribes. 

Since Klein is known in 
France mainly for the sexu- 
ally charged men's under- 
wear and jeans, and for the 
louche advertising for his hip 
young fragrances, the store 
surprised some guests. 

Those expecting minimal- 
ist sportswear found gauzT 
layered dresses with fishtail 
hems in vivid Yves Klein blue 
and egg-yolk yellow, or 
graphic litres etched on stark 
dresses. 

The store has a full range of 
women’s clothes and ac- 
cessories. But there is only a 
token display of menswear in 
the 6, 000- square-foot (560- 
square-meter) space, punctu- 
ated with glass screens and by 
Donald Judd's elemental fur- 
niture. 

HE upper floor dis- 
plays Calvin Klein 
homewares, new to 
Europe, like deep- 
pile towels and cotton sheets 
In shades of (you guessed it) 

' beiges ft also has a stone tub 
'-'Riled with rose -petals and- a 
table where seedlings 
sprouted (until Klein re- 
moved them in order to show 



decorators are out aU over town, with Louis Vuitton slated to 
open a new store on Avenue des Champs-Elysees and already 
installed on the Left Bank. The cluster of modernist stores at 
Saint-Gennain-des-Pres will soon include Giorgio Armani's 
new emporium (currently stalled by the tough Parisian plan- 
ning laws). 

Colette, at 213 Rue Saint-Honore (south of Place 
Vendome), is yet another sign of changing times. The spa- 
cious and airy store has a lifestyle mix of objects for the home 
— like tactile steel flower vases — a magazine area for 
browsing and a high tech caf£ that is pulling a hip crowd into 
its cell-like basement It also has clothes (but not so many) 
folded flat or laid out in glass cases like objets d’art Funky 
purses from Pucci through young British designers have a 
fashionable allure. 

Klein’s store is more typical of the globalization of fashion 
that is bringing the same few international designer names to 
London's Bond Street, New York’s Madison Avenue and 
Avenue Montaigne. 


off plates and flatware). 

“It is not monastic — there are visual surprises and 
differences in materials and textures, and it reflects Calvin's 
sensibility, which is close to mine," said Claudio Silvestrin, 
the Italian-torn, London-based architect who created the 
store. 

Although Ralph Lauren has had a store in Paris for 11 years, 
Klein’s Avenue Montaigne location is a first for an American 
designer and puts him in the international big league. Further 
plans for global growth include stores in London and in other 
European capitals, as well as shops for the lower-priced CK 
line, like the one recently opened in Milan. 

“I can’t believe we're doing this," said Klein, looking out 
at the Parisian avenue. “I’m really proud to be able to open a 
shop in Paris — it’s the most important city in Europe to show 
the world what you do." 

Suzy Menkes 


BOOKS 


THE UNIVERSE BELOW: 
Discovering the Secrets of the 
Deep Sea 

By William J. Broad. Illustrated. 432 
pages. $30. Simon & Schuster. 
Reviewed by David Quammen 
'T’HE most extraordinary moments re- 

L counted in “The Universe Below," 
William J. Broad’s densely informative 
survey of deep-sea exploration and re- 
search, came in October 1993. when the 
author took an 8, 000-foot plunge into 
the northeastern Pacific. 

Having followed the subject as a sci- 
ence reporter for The New York Times, 
Broad was invited by the leaders of a 
major govemme nt-and-university- spon- 
sored expedition to get an eyewitness 
glimpse of his beat. 

Would he care to cram himself into a 
little deep-diving vehicle known as Alv- 
in, aocompanyinga pilot and a scientist to 
the ocean floor? Their destination would 

be the Juan deFuca Ridge, off the Oregon 

coast, more than 6,000 feet down and 
recently disrupted by volcanic action. 
Rom the newly reconfigured sea bottom 
might come new insights about crustal 
geology and deep-ocean biology. 

It was an enviable opportunity for a 
journalist, but also a scary onc - Ask 
yourself which would be worse: to be 
crushed by stupendous pressures, like a 
mouse in a trampled beer can, if Alvin s 
structure failed, or to die slowly of suf- 
focation and despair, if the sub somehow 
got itself merely stuck? This sort of press 
junket is not for the claustrophobic. 

Broad and die two others climbed into 
Alvin at sunrise, on a blustery Sunday, 
and sealed the hatch. “May the force be 
with you." said a wry voice on the radio 
link from the support ship. Then . . . blip. 
“We fell for an hour through a sea of 
lumin ous creatures," Broad writes. “Of 
die thousands we passed, many 
shimmered and pulsated with light, es- 
pecially when startled by the passage of 
our tiny submersible. Out of my ob- 
servation port I sometimes saw a bright 


flash as we sped downward or watched a 
lengthy blur of radiance curl into a smal- 
ler shape." 

But they were looking for something 
far more unusual, he notes, than those 
mid-depth jellyfish and crustaceans with 
luminescent organs. They were looking 
for what he nicely calls the Dark Food 
Chain. This is life in the zone of abyssal 
blackness, that bottommost realm once 
thought to be sterile, now known to be 
teeming with predators and prey. It's 
where deep-ocean vents spewing tot wa- 
ter and chemical compounds support an 
alternate ecosystem, an “alien world’’ of 
sulfur-loving microbes, red-lipped tube 
worms, giant clams and other strange 
species mat live almost entirely isolated 
from the light Food Chain. 

Unknown to science until 20 years 
ago. those deep-vent communities of the 

The chess column will resume next 
week. 

Dark Food Chain are among the gaudiest 
— and maybe, the most significant — 
biological discoveries of the late 20th 
century. One line of speculation suggests 
that they might be where life on Earth got 
its start. But whether aboriginal mall life 
or not, they are spectacular and creepy, 
and will no doubt prove vastly important 
to the biological sciences. So deep-vent 
biology and its investigation by modem 
technological means — manned sub- 
mersibles, deep-diving robots, various 
sorts of remote sensors — offer rich, 
vivid material fora book. 

Tightly packed and far-reaching, this 
is a small encyclopedia of deep-ocean 
research and lore. There's a chapter 
devoted to military submarine history, 
including accounts of the Thresher 
tragedy and of a mysterious spy sub 
called the Halibut, so secret that not 
even Admiral Hyman Rickover knew 
whar it did. There’s a chapter on wreck 
salvage enterprises conducted for fun, 
archeology and profit, with an update on 
the scuffle over the Titanic. There’s an 


intriguing chapter on robotic research in 
the near-shore waters of Monterey Bay, 
(which are exceptionally deep, because 
of a huge undersea gash called 
Monterey Canyon) as financed by the 
computer billionaire David Packard. 
There are chapters an the commercial 
extraction of resources, and on the prob- 
lems of ocean pollution. There are 
enough facts, dates, people, boats, 
beasts, gizmos and acronyms to make 
you feel as if you’re swimming through 
a cloud of plankton. There is even a 
Retook tennis shoe, sighted a mile and a 
half down sitting upright in the sed- 
iment, about which Bread offers no ex- 
planation and little comment. 

Bounteous and amusing as it is, 
though, the book lacks the cohesive feel 
of a single story told through many 
particulars. It lacks vivid characters and 
a forceful theme. Broad's reporting is 
intelligent, lucid and thorough, but his 
prose never metamorphoses into po- 
etry. 

His voice, the voice of a fastidious 
reporter who wouldn’t dream of com- 
mitting irony, is amiable but ordinary. 
His scenes and his explanations blur 
together without climax or deft tran- 
sition. The ocean deeps and their ex- 
ploration are a magical subject, but 
“The Universe Below" never shim- 
mers or pulsates with any magical lu- 
minosity of its own. The case of the sea- 
bottom Reebok is symptomatic. To a 
more reckless writer, that jarring hem 
would have presented an irresistible oc- 
casion for synecdoche — for a flight of 
fact-grounded metaphor that might have 
been wonderfully telling, or maybe 
silly, or maybe strained. To Broad, the 
scrupulous reporter, it is exactly and 
only a wet shoe. 

David Quammen’s most recent book. 
‘The Song of the Dodo." received the 
1997 Burroughs Medal for nature writ- 
ing and the New York Public Library’s 
Helen Bernstein Book Award for Jour- 
nalism. He wrote this for The New York 
Times. 



Catherine Deneuve and the American garden designer Madison Cox at the Chelsea flower show. 




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ITI^Ai^MAYM 'lMT^ TRIBlCT1E ’ 
PAGE 11 





Insect World Metamorphoses Into Fashion Statement 

By Suzy Menkes hordes destroying choice blooms, de- mortal combat of fearsome beetles. In butterfly was a frequent motif of the 

li tnternuuvu j j/rr^/j r rthune signers make the insects seem magical the documentary, filmed over three years summer collections, but instead of em- 

-w- ONnnM and’alluring. with their eerie colors and by Claude Nuidsany and Marie Peren- phasizing its fragile beauty, there were 

■ < ^„ UUN 7 - . *V, IS should be the gauzy wings. But while fashion has nou, the cast of a thousand legs and suggestions of entrapment and death. 

’■ fuhw 1 ° f ,us ** ^ reener J' ^ decided that bugs are beautiful, it has wings surely provided the inspiration for Alexander McQueen closed his London 

. ■■ ^ UH-Dtown roses — not just at uprooted the traditional flower. the current design invasion. show with a dominftxrix holding a trans- 




tauhr Ch*!\ ea 



By Suzy Menkes 

ItcrdlJ Tribune 

L ONDON — This should be the 
se^ion of lush greenery and 
full-blown roses — not just at 
I - d, ^ flower shows, but in fash- 
■ • ?“■ Bui w]) ? 1 s dtis scrabbling across 
| crown of a hat? A black beetle! 

How has that ladybird pattern landed 

I un a simple sweater? Why are butterfly 

and dragonfly pins Hitting across a dre« 

. bodice? And whoever would buy a shirt 
, invaded by a print of ants? 

■Summer dressing focuses on 
• ^yerything m the garden that is uely 
j Make that slugly. For bugs. ants, caier- 
I P^ars. greenflies, spiders and snails all 
i seem to have found a place in fashion's 
, scheme of things. 

i Rather than envisioning marauding 


hordes destroying choice blooms, de- 
signers make the insects seem magical 
and'alluring. with their eerie colors and 
gauzy wings. But while fashion has 
decided that bugs arc beautiful, it has 
uprooted the traditional flower. 

Prints tiiis season either seem faded 
and droopy, or alarmingly distorted — 
oversize, computer-generated florals. 
Their are what Baudelaire so poetically 
described as “Les Fleurs du Mai.” or 
flowers of evil. Significantly, the only 
insistent pattern of greenery for summer 
1997 is the leaf of the strangling ivy. 

It is not hard to guess where insect 
mania has sprouted from. “Microcos- 
mos.” the lyrical film about life at the 
grassy roots of a French meadow, was 
the talk of Paris when it opened last year. 
People stood in line to watch the 
squeichy, slimy mating of snails and the 


mortal combat of fearsome beetles. In 
the documentary, filmed over three years 
by Claude Nuidsany and Marie Pteren- 
nou. the cast of a thousand legs and 
wings surely provided the inspiration for 
the current design invasion. 

The French designer Thierry Mugler 
admitted his fascination with the movie, 
dedicating his summer couture collec- 
tion to the world of creepy-crawlies. His 
extraordinary show included six models 
in a carapace of black scurrying down 
ihe runway like ants. He showed an- 
tennae bats, fly-shaped sunglasses and 
dresses with panels of yellow and black 
stripes that gave new meaning to the 
term “wasp waist." 

In the Moschino show, which was on 
a garden theme, dresses were smothered 
in appliques of flowers and insects, like 
perambulating herbaceous borders. The 


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LnptlVS DAtLY NEWSPAPER 


butterfly was a frequent motif of the 
summer collections, but instead of em- 
phasizing its fragile beauty, there were 
suggestions of entrapment and death. 
Alexander McQueen closed his London 
show with a dominatrix bolding a trans- 
parent plastic cage around her head, 
while inside real butterflies fluttered 
and beat frustrated wings. 

The lady bug effects at W&LT’s show 
were also slightly scary, with the de- 
signer Walter Van Bierendonck's bead- 
hugging hats with insect antennae above 
dresses app liquid with scissored leaves, 
or ladybugs like giant roaches used as 
dress patterns or knitted into sweaters. 

Jean Paul Gaultier's bug jewelry was 
funky, with a metallic scarab brooch 
looking like an extraterrestial and a pin 
as a hybrid of beetle body and butterfly 
wings. Some bugs are beautiful, like 
Christian Lacroix's graceful dragonfly 
pin alighting on the shoulder of a dress. 


T HERE is nothing so new about 
fashion embracing bugs. 
Scarabs have been part of eth- 
nic jewelry in many cultures, 
and the “Treasures of Thailand" ex- 
hibition in Paris showed the iridescent 
blues and greens of beetle wings used in 
basketwork and for embroidery. 

Insects have even been used to turn 
fashion into art, for the recent Biennale 
of Art and Fashion in Florence (and at 
the SoHo Guggenheim in New York), 
included sculpted dresses, with their sur- 
faces covered in scarabs. 

The most fantastic and imaginative 
examples of bug ait are the jewels of 
Rene Lalique. whose decorative pieces 
of 100 years ago are symbolic of Art 
Nouveau. 

To reflect the translucence of insect 
wings, Lalique used horn for a fern- 
branch hair comb decorated with scav- 
enging beetles; or he had Eve black and 
gold enamel wasps sucking at an opal 
pin. Capturing nature on fie wing, he 
made a necklace of damselflies hov- 
ering over an aquamarine pendant, like 
insects over water. The materials seem 
deliquescent and their organic subjects 
decaying, with leaves withered and 
flowers overblown. The result is jew- 
elry with a decadent tum-of-the-century 
beauty. 

One of Lalique’s most striking and 
memorable jewels was the corsage or- 
nament of a dragonfly woman — a 
hybrid of erotic female body with mem- 
brane-like open-backed enamel wings. 
That suggests why insect images are so 
fascinating and why they might be ap- 
propriate to current times. 

The essence of bugs is metamorpho- 
sis. Right now, as in Lalique’s lime, the 
old century is about to morph — this time 
into a hew millennium. In fashion, anew 
woman seems to beemeigmg, yet she has 
not quite broken ootof her chrysalis. 

Or maybe designers are drawn to 
bugs for another compelling reason: Be- 
cause fashion, like the insect world, has 
an intense existence — and dies when it 
has had its brief day. 




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Clockwise from top: The current insect and flower mama designs, include Philip Treacy's caterpillar hat ■ 
Moschino’s flower and butterfly dress; Treacy's black beetle and dragonfly creation; Versace’s ivy-patterned 
evening gown; W&LT’s scissored-leaf dress with head-hugging insect hat, and Mugler’s wasp-stripe dress 





PAGE 12 


Monday's 4 P.M. Close 

Nafiomride prices not reflect tote tales elsewt^ 
neAssxUedPnss. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAT 20, 1997 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


Be ) 

Redisco* 

/ond Development: 

/ering Nature's Wisdom 

The 200: 

5 World Exposition, Japan 


TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


PAGE 13 


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GM Plans 
A Plunge 
Into Brazil 

It WiU Build Small Car 
• For Latin Americans 

Maombrrg News 

„ SAO 5 A JJ Lo — CSeneral Motors 

■ ^ Monday that it planned to 
build a small car in Brazil that would be 
.the most affordable model yet aimed at 
tfreairging South American car market. 

- The one-liter engine model, the Blue 
Macaw, would be targeted at consumers 
•in Argentina and Brazil, where annual 

■ sales have more than doubled in five 
ir^ks a k° U * ^ ^Hion cars and light 

Marie Hogan, general manager of the 
, small-car division, said GM aimed to 
sell the Chevrolet model for $9,000 or 
less, undercutting Fiat SpA’s Uno. now 
.Brazil’s cheapest car. with a sticker 

- price of about $10,500. 

The car would be exported to Ar- 
gentina. where lower inflation has made 
..consumer credit more available. 

‘ ‘Both Argentina and Brazil will pass 
Germany in the next five years in car 
sales,” Mr. Hogan said. "This is a 

■ major market for GM.’ ’ 

.: GM hopes to begin production in late 
1999, Mr. Hogan said, at a plant under 
.construction at Gravatai, in Rio Grande 
do SuL Brazil’s southernmost state. 

Latin America is one of GM’s most 
profitable regions, Mr. Hogan said, and 
most of its growth in the region comes 
from Brazil. He said GM planned to 
invest $3 billion in Brazil through 2002 
to raise production. 

Ninety percent of the car will be made 
."with Brazilian parts at a plant that will be 
“one of the most productive in the 
'world,” Mr. Hogan said. He declined to 
Ipy how many cars would be produced. 

“Hie demand for this kind of vehicle 
is very high,” said Rene Abdalah, a 
-specialist on die Latin American auto 
industry and market with DRI/McGraw- 
Hili in Lexington, Massachusetts. 

Honda Motor Co., Renault, Mercedes 
AG Holding, Asia Motors Co. of Sooth 
Korea and Chrysler Corp. have built 
plants in Brazil, and Ford Motor Co., 
Volkswagen AG and Rat SpA are 
building additional plants. 

^ Sales in Brazil so far this year are up 
20 percent from a year ago. 



Huge Banking Merger 
Being Mapped in Italy 

Cariplo to Start Talks With Ambroveneto 


ManHaiWHarok'Bnitm 

Nissan’s president, Yoshjkazu Hanawa, unveiling a new model. Such firms are stiff coasting on the weak yen. 

Not Even Japan Fears a Soaring Yen 


By Sheiyl WuDunn 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — What is surprising, as 
the yen shoots up once more against 
the dollar, is that no one in Japan is 
screaming. 

The yen strengthened against the 
dollar toy 8 percent in nine days re- 
cently, moving from 125 yen per dol- 
lar on May 7 to 1 15 yen on May 16. (It 
finished in Tokyo on Monday at 1 1 5.9 
yen.) The last time markets experi- 
enced such a ferocious ascent was in 
the spring of 1995, when the yen hit a 
record high of 79.75 yen to the dol- 
lar. 

At that time, the mightier yen — 
which makes imports less expensive in 
terms of the Japanese currency and 
exports more expensive in terms of 
other currencies — delighted a few 
Japanese consumers who relish Amer- 
ican imports. But it provoked fear 
throughout much of corporate Japan, 
which was worried about exports* 


There is none of that fear this time 
around, and in fact, the strengthening 
of the yen seems welcome all around. 
Exporters, for example, may not mind 
the currency moves this time partly 
because they are still sated from a rush 
of profits arising from the cheapened 
yen. 


"The Sonys and Toyotas of the 
world are so profitable from the wind- 
fall gams of the weak yen that any 
further depreciation to them is redund- 
ant,” said Mineko Sasaki -Smith, an 
economist at Credit Suisse First Bos- 
ton Securities (Japan) Ltd. 

Foreigners may have an image of all 
Japanese as exporters lobbying for a 
weak yen, but the Japanese economy 
has m many ways become more in- 
ternational so that at certain levels, a 
weak yen hurts more than a stronger 
one. 

Certainly, as the yen weakened over 
the months, the increasing number of 
Japanese who have become fond of 
L.L. Bean clothes and American jeeps 
grew miffed with the yen at 125. And 
domestic companies that import 
products watched woefully as the 
weakening yen brought down their 
stock prices at the same time that stock 
prices of exporters soared. 

The yen was boosted this time al- 
most solely by verbal intervention 
from ministry officials, notably 
Eisuke Sakakibara, director of the Fi- 
nance Ministry’s Internati onal Bu- 
reau. Mr. Sakakibara, who has been 
called “Mr. Yen” because of both his 
penchant and his ability to move cur- 
rency markets, told Parliament on May 
8 that for the last decade, the yen has 
appreciated an average by 23 yen per 


S t 


; Tliinking Ahead /Commentary 

n Polifl EU’s 6 3 %’ Obsession Is Worth Zero 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


r-* - ; 


f 4 





4- £■ ■* 

h k ' 



L ONDON — European gov- 
ernments are losing all sense 
of proportion over a single 
statistic that they have allowed 
to become the main determinant of 
membership in die European single 
currency, the euro — a load that the 
largely arbitrary figure was never 
meant to bear. 

The overburdened yardstick is the 
notorious limit of 3 percent of gross 
domestic product for budget deficits 
prescribed in the European Union’s 
Maastricht Treaty, the blueprint for 
constructing the euro by Jan. 1, 1999. 

Almost entirely at Germany’s insist- 
ence, the EU has become as obsessed 
with enforcing die limit as the medieval 
theologians who recommended excom- 
munication for even the slig htest de- 
viation from orthodox doctrine. 

It has reached die point at which a 
European Commission estimate that 
Italy may miss the target by a fraction 
of a percentage point is grounds for a 
major international political incident, 
and usually level-headed analysts are 
discussing the si gn i fi cance of die 
treaty’s specification of 3 percent, 
rather than 3.0 percent— even though 
they know that such marginal con- 
siderations are economically meaning- 
less. - 

Theo WaigeL die Goman finance 
minister, has repeatedly demanded ex- 
act adherence to the limit m language 


reminiscent of Martin Luther’s famous 
refusal — “Herelam,andherelstay” 
— to back down on his religions prin- 
ciples. “Three is three, and that is bow 
it is staying.” Mr. WaigeJ said last 
month. 

His dogmatism has now boomer- 
anged against his own government. He 
unexpectedly finds himself obliged to 
suggest dubious stratagems, such as 
revaluing Germany’s gold reserves, to 
fulfill die 3 percent requirement — 
even though nobody doubts dial in die 
real worid, Germany is amply qualified 
to be the co rn ers to ne of the euro, 
whether or not it hits the precise 
budgetary target 

Mr. Waigel’s window dressing, 
which has undermined Germany’s 
moral authority as die guardian of 
Europe’s financial rectitude, would 
have been unnecessary if he had not 
given the 3 percent criterion a sig- 
nificance . far beyond what the 
Maastricht authors intended — iron- 
ically, to reassure the same Gorman 
voters he now risks a lie n ating. 

Three percent was chosen almost at 
random because El) officials thought 
that some figure was needed to define 
“excessive” deficits. It might have 
been 2 percent or 4 percent instead. 

The figure is anyway not in the 
treaty itself, but in a protocol, and was 
intended to be only erne of a series of 
“reference values, 1 ’ not a sine qua non 
for euro membership. Conversely, 
achievement ofthe 3 percent target was 
never meant to confer the “right” to 


join the euro, as some countries, such 
as Spain and Italy, now contend. 

Selectioo of the euro’s founder 
members is not supposed to be a 
“bookkeeping decision,” in the words 
of European monetary officials. The 
treaty's criteria are meant to contribute 
to a much broader assessment of 
whether European economies have 
converged sufficiently to make the 
euro a viable currency. 

In fact, die treaty specifically states 
that a country need only “come close 
to the reference value” if its budget 
deficit Has declined “substantially and 
continuously.” That is a provision that 
every EU member except Greece can 
be said to have fulfilled since the 
trough of the last recession in 1993. 

Michel Camdessus, managing direc- 
tor of the International Monetary Fund, 
a normally strict monitor of interna- 
tional behavior, has said that die con- 
ditions for the euro's successful start 
are already in place and that Germany 
has largely succeeded in exporting its 
“culture of stability” to the other 
member states. 

The 3 percent target has helped to 
make that happen. But it has become a 
political, not an economic, symbol. 
Continuing efforts will be needed to 
keep deficits under control, now and 
after the euro is introduced. 

The EU’s fixation with 3 percent is 
obscuring the remarkable convergence 
of European economies, and of eco- 
nomic policies, that has already taken 
place. 


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year, and that it could hit 103 yen by 
next year. 

The market seemed to boomerang 
as it debated over whether 103 was a 
target or just a projection. 

“What’s important is whether 
we’re looking at another huge swing, 
let’s say past 100,” said Robert Alan 
Feldman, economist at Salomon 
Brothers Asia Ltd. “The answer is 
probably, no. Enough people under- 
stand that buying dollars at 100 would 
be the smart tiring to do.” 

Part of the reason for buying back 
the dollar, economists say, is that a 
level of i 00 yen against the dollar does 
not seem to be supported by economic 
conditions, such as the difference in 
local interest rates and the relative 
strengths of the economy. 

Scnme economists say a rate of about 
120 yen to the dollar property reflects 
the gap in long-term interest rales — 
which widened to 4.6 percent this 
spring — and other economic factors, 
such as trends in inflation and the 
relative strengths of the two countries’ 
surpluses in trade. 

Now for some, the quest is to pin 
down the most optimal or equitable 
range for the economy as a whole, the 
point where everyone in this relatively 
egalitarian society is relatively happy. 

See YEN, Page 16 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Cariplo, Italy’s leading 
savings bank, agreed Monday to begin 
merger talks with Banco Ambroveneto 
that are likely to result in the biggest 
privatization deal in Italian banking his- 
tory and the creation of the largest bank 
in the country. 

The combined bank would have more 
than 1,800 branches and total assets of 
251 trillion lire (SI50 billion), ranking it 
as a European financial powerhouse. 

The Milan-based Banco Ambrosiano 
Veneto (Ambroveneto), which is Italy's 
most profitable private-sector bank, has 
offered to pay 8 trillion lire for 100 
percent of Cariplo, according to a 
banker close to the talks. 

The deal that is to be discussed, said 
an executive involved in the talks, could 
see Cariplo buying 28 percent of the 
combined group for 2 trillion lire in a 
second stage, making it the second- 
largest shareholder, after Credit Agri- 
cole of France, which owns 30 percent 
of Ambroveneto. 

Cariplo is a wealthy savings bank that 
is currently in die public sector because it 
is owned by local and regional author- 
ities. 

The Italian government has been ur- 
ging a merger that would both serve as a 
major privatization and help rationalize 
Italy’s crowded banking system. 

The decision by the board of the 
Cariplo foundation, which owns the 
bank, marked the latest setback for Me- 
diobanca, the powerful Milan merchant 


bank that had been hoping to engineer a 
takeover of Cariplo by Banca Com- 
merciale Italians, a commercial bank 
that Mediobanca effectively controls. 

Although Ambroveneto had been 
pushing its proposal for the last few 
months. Banca Commeiciale Italians 
made a surprise offer just a few days 
ago, fueling speculation that Me- 
diobanca wanted to bring Cariplo into 
its sphere of influence. 

The privatization of Banca Comraer- 
ciale three years ago caused much con- 
troversy in Italy and much frustration for 
Prime Minister Romano Prodi, who was 
then chairman of the IRJ state holding 
group, which sold Banca Commerce ale. 

Mr. Prodi waiched helplessly as En- 
rico Cuccia. the honorary chairman of 
Mediobanca, won control of the bank by 
putting together a group of shareholder 
allies who were able to acquire Banca 
Commercial without paying any ma- 
jority premium. 

By deciding to open merger talks 
with Ambroveneto rather than Banca 
Commerciale. the board of Cariplo 
thwarted what some Milan analysts saw 
as a Mediobanca power play. 

This month, Mediobanca was de- 
feated in its hopes of engineering a 
merger that would have created a con- 
glomerate consisting of the Maizotto 
textile and fashion group and foe 
Rizzoli-Corriere della Sera newspaper 
and book publishing business. 

Giuseppe Guzzetti, chairman of foe 
foundation that controls Cariplo, said the 
board had vexed unanimously to accept 
Banco Ambrosiano Veneto's offer. 


Banks to Rescue Korean Retailer 


Ccn^Ord bj Our From DoptMcha 

SEOUL — Banks agreed Monday to 
bail out Dainong Group, a retailing and 
textile company, to prevent a major 
bankruptcy. 

SeoulBank. the conglomerate’s ma- 
jor creditor, said it would bail out four of 
the company’s units: Dainong Corp., 
Midopa Department Store. Dainong 
Heavy Industries Inc. and Metro 
Product Co., which foe bank said ac- 
counted for 83 percent of the group’s 
assets and 86 percent of its debt 


PRIVATE BANKING 


‘ ‘We have decided to bail out the four 
companies in view of foe impact their 
failure would have on society and the 
economy." SeoulBank’ s executive di- 
rector. Lee Dong Man, said. 

Dainong was struggling under 1.84 
trillion won ($2.06 billion) in debt as of 
the end of 1996. compared with total 
assets of 1 .79 trillion won, SeoulBank 
said. The bailout decision is to be rat- 
ified at a meeting May 28 meeting of 23 
creditor banks. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP) 


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THE AMERICAS 


vestor’s America il 

amtaaBsymms* 



First Class? A Lofty Shakeout 


Stocks Climb Gently 
Before Fed Meeting 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Very briefly; 

• I'iT Corp. said it had agreed to sell five Sheraton hotels to 
FelCor Suite Hotels Inc. for $200 mil li nn as part of a lo ng - term 
alliance with FelCor. 

• Oracle Systems Corp. and Netscape Communications 
Corp. confirmed they had signed a definitive agreement to 
merge two affiliates, Network Computer Inc. and Navio 
Communications, into a software development company. 
They did not disclose financial details of the agreement, which 
is subject to government approval. 

• Toys ’R’ Us said strong sales of video-game systems and 
action figures tied to the re-release of the * ‘Star Wars ' ' movies 
helped it increase first-quarter earnings 57 percent from a year 
earlier. The toy retailer earned $29.4 million, or 10 cents a 
share in the quarter ended May 3, as its sales rose 19 percent, 
to SI. 9 billion. 

• E.W. Scripps Co. said it had agreed to buy Harte-Hanks 

Communications lnc.'s newspaper and broadcasting oper- 
ations for $605 million to $625 million in stock and assumed 
debt- Bloomberg, AFX, AP 


Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “The Fifth Element” dominated the 
U-S. box office over the weekend, with a gross of $1 1.6 nulUoo. 
Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday’s 
ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


By David J. Morrow 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Roger Enrico, 
chief executive of PepsiCo Inc., 
can do it anytime he wants. Ann 
McLaughlin, a former U.S. sec- 
retary of labor, not only does it, 
she occasionally has General 
Motors Corp. pay for it. Chris 
Evert won't say whether die 
does it. And at IBM, managers 
can do it only if they are going to 
do it for a long time. 

So what’s this deadly sin? 

Flying first class. 

With companies dashing travel 
budgets in recent years, some ex- 
ecutives who once flew first class 
are now routinely sequestered in 
the rear df the aircraft 

The exodus has made die firsr- 
dass ticket one of die last per- 
quisites of oaposaie success, 

' ‘‘Being able to sit up front is 
die last sign of achieving high 
rank in the company,” said a 
director in Amdahl Corp.'s 
London office. “It's a form of 
segregation, really. Your boss is 
in front, and you’re in the back. It 
causes a lot of frustration. Some 
executives in our company, when 
they hear they can't fly first class, 
get so annoyed they won’t even 
take the trip." 

Such fragile egos may have 


cause to be upset. Restrictions on 
first-class air travel not only have 
been swift; they have even lassoed 
chief executives and their board- 
room colleagues. In 1988, accord- 
ing to a survey by Runzheimer 


was just as severe, hi 1988, 59 per- 
cent of top officers ar companies in 
the survey had travel benefits that 
included first-class tickets and rooms 
st luxury hotels. Only 48 percent had 



Inte rnational, a consulting firm, 
only 23 percent of American 
companies that allowed employ- 
ees to fly first class placed limits 
on which employees could do so. 
By last year, that number had 
clim bed to 41 percent. 


This cutback is part of a drive 
by corporate boards to bolster 
their companies’ stock prices. 
The idea is to slash expenses, 
giving a lift to gaming s and im- 
pressing Wall Street’s fickle 
analysts. The strategy has 
worked: Many companies have 
beat notching record earnings, 
and the bull market in stocks has 
roared ahead. 

“Our executives only fly first 
class on rare occasions,’' said 
John Hioey, vice president of 
Sylvan Learning Systems, an edu- 
cation-services company. “We 
don’t wait our shareholders to be 
unhappy with us. First-class air 
fare, country-dub memberships 
— those thin gs sound really ex- 
travagant. There are better dungs 
we can invest our money in.” 

The move hasn't emptied out 
airlines' first-class cabins, but it 
has had an impact First-class travel 
accounted for 10.8 percent of all 
international tickets sold in 1993 to 
corporate clients but only 63 per- 
cent last year, according to Topaz 


NEW YORK — U.S. stocks rose 
Monday, the day before Federal Re- 
serve Board policymakers were 
scheduled to meet on interest rates, 
led by in beverage, tobacco 
and oil companies. 

Procter & Gamble and other con- 
sumer companies, which tend to do 
best when the economy slows, also 
gave the stock index a boost. 

Hie Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 34.21 points higher at 
7,228.88. The Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index rose 332 points to 
833.27. The Nasdaq composite in- 
dex rose 0.52 point to 1341.25. 

Bonds were little changed as 
many bond investors apparently ex- 


The carnage in the executive suite Enterprises, a travel auditing firm. 


Sun to Sell Russian Encryption Software 


Bloomberg News 

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California 
— Sun Microsystems Inc. said 
Monday it would sell advanced data- 
encry prion software created by a 
Russian company to international 
customers, amove likely to get close 
attention from the U.S. government 
Sun will distribute the software 
from Elvis+ Co- a company created 


by former Soviet scientists in which 
Sun has a 10 percent stake. 

The software will contain so- 
called encryption keys that are as 
much as 128 bits long. U.S. law limits 
the export of encryption technology 
based on keys that are more than 40 


Sun would not be breaking the 
law, because it would not be ex- 
porting the technology from tire 
United States, analysts said. The 
technology was developed from 
Sun’s own software, and it is being 
distributed by its SunSoft distribu- 


bits long, to prevent the export of don urriL Sun said the technology 


technology that could help terrorists 
gain access to confidential codes. 


was “one of the most secure pro- 
tocols available.” 


The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond fell 4/32 to 96 12/32, with 
the yield at 6.91 percent, unchanged 
from Friday 

“Some people are under the im- 
pression that no matter what the Fed 

does, die market is going to come 
mirier pressure,” said Tony Cres- 
cenzi, bead trader at Miller, Tabak, 
Hirsch & Co. 

Trading in stocks was light on the 
day before Fed Chairman Alan 
Greenspan and central bank policy- 
makers were scheduled to decide 
whether the economy was slowing 
enough to postpone a rise in rates. 

“No matter what happens tomor- 
row, we're in a period when the Fed 
is raising rates,” said Barbara Mar- 
cin, a money manager at Citibank 
Global Asset Management “I 
don't see much upside for stocks.” 

The Fed raised the overnight 
bank raze to 530 percent ou March 
25 to ease inflati on pressures by 
increasing the cost of borrowing, 
which can slow expansion. 

Philip Morris, the world’s largest 
cigarette maker, gained 14 to 42% 
after tobacco opponents agreed to 
limit to S4 billion a year the amount 


smokers could collect in lawsuits, r 
The accord paves the way for.aft 
landmark agreement within two® 
weeks, according to participants ia* 
the talks. Any money left over 
would go toward smokmg-preven-* 
lion efforts such as arm-smoking* 
classes, the participants said. < - 

“Eighty percent of the deal iy 
done,” said Russ Herman, an at- 
torney from New Orleans who rep- 
resented smokers siting cigarette 
makers in the negotiations. -, 3 > 

RJR Nabisco Holdings, whiqj£_ 
owns RJ. Reynolds tobacco com- 
pany, ended higher. - Vri, 

Mobil gained 2% to 136%, aqj&-, 


VS. STOCKS 

,r L 

Amoco advanced 2% to 87% amid; c 


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Dollar Rises as Investors Get Ready for Fed Decision 


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Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against most other major currencies 
Monday as traders who sold dollars 
in recent days bought some back in 
case Federal Reserve Board poli- 
cymakers raise interest rates at their 
meeting Tuesday. 

“We had customers buying dol- 
lars today who had sold” last week, 
said Ricardo Gomes, managing di- 
rector of foreign exchange at Re- 


public National B ank. "People are 
hedging their bets on what the Fed 
will do.” Fed policymakers will 


Friday. It also rose to 1.7085 
Deutsche marks from 1.6931 DM, 
to 1.4265 Swiss francs from 1.4203 


meet Tuesday to consider raising francs and to 5.7560 French francs 
lending rates for the second time this from 5.6995 francs. The pound was 


year to slow the economy and ward 
off inflation. 

The dollar stood at 1 15.750 yen in 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

4 P.M. trading, up from 1 15.625 yen 


at $1.6395, up from $1.6368. 

The mark was under pressure 
against the dollar and the yen on 
concern that Germany plans to use 
quick fixes to reduce its budget def- 
icit and debt to qualify for Europe's 
planned monetary union. ‘ ‘The 


plans are certainly weakening die 
mark,” said Richard Giihooly, glob- 
al market strategist at Paribas Cap- 
ital Markets. “It's seen as the Gor- 
mans fudging on EMU criteria.” 

Meanwhile, the yen benefited 
from news that Japan’s merchandise 
trade surplus had soared in April 


refining, service-station and lubrig-^ 
imts businesses outside Europe, «• 
Computer disk-drive maters fcflg 
on concern that inventories cou}dj_ 
pile up. Seagate Technology fell 3^ 
to 45%, Quantum dropped4J4 to 4flfr 
1 1/16, and Western Digital slid 4jfi| 
to 61%. 

Personal-computer stocks were 
mixed after Hewlett-Packard 
which reported disappointing ean^ 
ings Friday, announced cuts ip/; 
prices of as much as 13 percent 
Dell Computer rose VA to 9715,-J 
but Intel fell % to 154%. { jj 

Netscape Communications rose 
% to 30 after the Internet software; 
publisher said it would merge 
subsidiary with an affiliate of C&y 
acle, freeing np cash at Netscape 
battling Microsoft Oracle edgecQ 
down Vb to 44%, and Microsoft- 
eased to 115’A, down 5fl6. ^ 

Westell Technologies shares rose ‘ 
after a published report said BeU$> 
Atlantic would announce a foufrr 
year contract wife the maker of high-y 
speed Internet-access equipment, 
and DSC Communications. 

DSC shares also gained, but Pair-)- 
Gain Technologies, a rival to Wej£j£ 
ell, slumped. v * 

While stocks have recovered wj 
the past five weeks from the 
percent drop triggered by concern., 
over rising interest rates earlier thi^_ 
year, investors are concerned th#t ' 
stocks could resume their slide 
the Fed moved again. . 

‘ ‘The consensus on the Fed is no£^ 
as evenly split as I would hav^. 
thought,” said Richard Cripps, gJ 
market analyst at Legg Mason 
Baltimore, “About two-thirds of 




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PAGE 15 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




Philippines 
Gets Vote of 




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ence 


■3 foody s Lifts Rating 
0nlt$ Foreign Debt 

■ -. Bloomberg News 

-MANILA — Moody’s Investors 
Soyice Inc. on Monday raised its 
raeuig on Philippine foreign debt to a 
step beiow investment grade, giving 
the countiy’s economy a vote of 
confidence as its financial markets 
straggle. 

The rating agency said the coun- 
ty® financial reforms, budget sur- 
pBfces, and openness to foreign in- 
vestment boded well for its economy 
ana ability to repay creditors. 

The rating upgrade to Bal from 
Big paves the way for Philippine 
companies and die government to 
benefit from lower borrowing costs. 
Thg Philippines were saddled with 
$4*3 billion of foreign debt at the 
end of ~ 

w] 

said 


dof September. 
•‘■‘Moody’s 


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ly’s did the right thing,” 
Michael Moorman, general 
manager of ABN-AMRO Bank 
N¥’s Manila office. “What's hap- 
pening in financial markets is not 
indicative of what’s happening in 
the country. ” 

Th vest or concern that the Phil- 
ippines might be next in line to 
sdffer a Thailand -style financial 
crfiSs has led to an attack on the 
peso, shoved overnight borrowing 
rages to 20 percent and pummeled 
the' stock market to a 17-month 
low. 

^“The administration of President 
Ramos has placed the Philipp ine on 
the- path of sustainable growth an A 
ha£ substantially reducedsources of 
political instability,'* Moody's said. 

The Philippines’ gross domestic 
pfdduct grew 5.5 percent in 1996, its 
fastest pace in seven years. 

Moody's also lifted ratings for 1 1 
PfijJJippioe banks and National 
PbwerCorp^ the state utility that is 
taff* countiy’s largest generator of 
eSctridty. 

'Moody’s had placed the nation's 
rating on review for a possible up- 
grade in January. Monday’s action 
fallowed Standard & Poor’s Crap, ’s 
mbVe in February to raise die coun- 
tr$ ’s rating to BB+, also one step 
away from investment grade. 


6 Headway 9 on South Korean Reform 


Seung Soo Han . an economist 
who is a former South Korean 
deputy prime minister and has 
been a proponent of structural re- 
forms in his country’s economy, 
recently visited the United States 
and Europe to confer privately on 
matters ranging pom Korean re- 
unification to economic and trade 
policy. In Paris. Mr. Han, who is 
now a national legislator, talked 
with Jonatlum Gage and Joseph 
Fitchett of the International Her- 
ald Tribune. 

Q. South Korea has seen a series 
of spectacular financial failures 
lately; are you worried that this is a 
danger signal of larger problems 
for your economy? 

A. Some people do think we’re 
in crisis, and indeed our economy 
does have some problems, both in 
this cycle and in structural terms. 
But we’re making headway on 
some of these issues — for ex- 
ample, the labor laws passed in 
March — and with arrangements to 
provide bridging finance for any 
bank that gets into trouble because 
of a shortage of liquidity. So in the 
short run, I don’t think we’ll have 
any insurmountable problem. 

• 

Q. When will Korean reunifi- 
cation come, and what are you do- 
ing to prepare for it? 

A. No one can say when, but the 
burden will be so enormous that we 
hope the international community 
will come to our assistance to 
smooth the process. 1 talked about 
this in Washington, and Michel 
Camdessus, the head of the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund, said 
the IMF will be there to help. Com- 
pared with Germany, our burden 
will be heavier. To feed every new 
German coming from the East, 
there were four West Germans. 
There are only two South Koreans 
for every North Korean. The dis- 


Q & A /Seung Soo Han 


parities between national incomes 
was 5 to 1 between the two Ger- 
manys; it’s 10 to 1 between us and 
the North. 

• 

Q. Maybe South Koreans don't 
want reunification at such high 
cost? 

A. I don't know where you could 
have got that idea. It is a deep 
national aspiration, perhaps even 
stronger between Koreans than it 
was in Germany. 

Q. How has 
Daewoo taken its 
rebuff in France, 
where the author- 
ities withdrew ap- 
proval for a 
takeover of 
Thomson Multi- 
media? Was it a 
big blow for Dae- 
woo? 

A. Well, the 
head of Daewoo 
Electronics said 
the other day that 
Daewoo’s sales in 
Europe have risen 
30 percent in the 
last six months, apparently because 
the publicity helped in making the 
company slightly famous. But it 
was a cold shower because we 
thought it was private deal, so we 
were surprised when public opin- 
ion turned against Daewoo. 

I don't quite know what 
happened, but we wondered 
whether the same thing would have 
happened in the case of an Amer- 
ican or British company. 

A cabinet minister told me here 
in Paris that certain sections of 
society turned against it but that the 
French government wasn't behind 
die cancellation, even though it 


was done by an official commit- 
tee. 

Q. What happens next? 

A. We would like to go on with 
our good relations with France, es- 
pecially buying high-tech products 
such as the Airbus and the TGV 
train. But I told the French gov- 
ernment’s special representative 
when he visited Korea that in glob- 
alized society, many Korean 
companies are anxious to invest 
abroad and that I hope that they will 
not be deterred 
from investing in 
France by this 
episode. 

I think that 
there will be a 
next stage of ne- 
gotiations be- 
tween Daewoo 
and Thomson, 
but I don't think 
it can happen be- 
fore the French 
elections and 
perhaps not until 
next spring. 

Q. South 
Korea itself bas 
raised some questions about pos- 
sible protectionist actions with its 
“frugality campaign” to dampen 
consumer spending. Will that hurt 
imports? 

A. The situation is no longer like 
the old days when the government 
could tell everybody what to do. 
Now it’s very difficult to influence 
private-sector activities, especially 
consumption; our society is very 
different from even a year ago. 

Some Westerners, even some 
experts, still think that the Korean 
government can get behind a 
movement of this sort and make it 
work. But what happened was that 




public opinion saw our growth 
slowing and our trade gap widen- 
ing, so private-sector organizations 
came out with the idea of a frugal- 
ity campaign to meet this worry. 
The government is not behind tins 
campaign at all. 

There are some stories about 
customs officials raising some 
technicalities with some imported 
! to do with 
And I 
of movement 
will affect the total size of our trade 
at all. 

• 

Q. You don’t think the frugality 
campaign will affect the ability of 
foreign companies to enter the 
Korean market? 

A. Not at alL Our trade deficit 
doubled in the first quarter this 
year. And to quote the head of 
Daewoo again, he said the other 
day that our imports of Champagne 
have increased substantially in the 
last few months. 

Q. What are the connotations in 
Korea of the word “globaliza- 
tion?” 

A. In Western terminology, it 
may not mean much because of 
what you’ve already done — 
opened to the world, I mean. You 
participate in a global energy mar- 
ket, you travel globally. But for a 
country like Korea, “globaliza- 
tion” means you are becoming part 
of the world. In the process of 
opening, some people get grazed, 
in our country, too. 

But we simply have to tell our 
educated people that history 
shows, since World War IL that 
you gain more prosperity in the 
long run, even though it is a strain, 
than by dosing doors with pro- 
tectionism. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Sang 
15000 
14400 
13800 
13200^1 


D J F 
1996 


Singapore * 
Straits Tiroes 



Exchange .- 

•.index . - ■ 

Monday. - ■' Ptev. :■ [ <$$? 
Gtase- * - Close 

Hong Kong 

Hanging- 

- t«M08JS2 14,05247:4*^ 

Singapore 

Straite Thnea- : 

. 2,05034 2.06O5Q ^.46 

Sydney 


2,531.00 

.Tokyo ' * 

t'8kke»22& \ 

. 20^75 2riJ3Zi.TSi..*$8$ 

| Kuato Lumpur Compoalte ' 

1441.39 

Bangkok 

SET - ' 

577,10 .. 561.19- . 7^4 

Stood 

Oamposfte index 

721.20' 6^53'^f^i 

TWP** ■ •.. . 

Stock Market Index 8,107.54 a 8.081.78 . f&32] 

ManSa . 

F*SE : , 

2 40946 ' ■ 24^13’ w •«J5& 

Jmans ■ 

Composite index. 

65SL55 ■ •'€57.07 . 7 ^# 

WelBngfon 

NZSE-ttf., * 

2,307456- - '241444 ■-04J' 

Bombay 


3^7041 3,768.6*-. ■■■■^4 

Source- Tefekurs 


iiawninnml Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Analysts See Thailand’s Bet on Credit Curbs Paying Off 




CanfStdbj OirSkfFaw Oapadvt 

SINGAPORE — Last 
week’s move by the Bank of 
Thailand to curb speculation 
against the baht showed that 

, „ w the region’s central banks 

$tiU, fund managers said it would ‘ were * wining to change the 
take more titan Moody’s to change * rules of the game on capital 
feixieign investors’ perceptions. 

£fany analysts say the Philips 
pines’ widening trade deficit, its 
overheated property market and a 
surge in dollar-denominated loans 
are reasons for concern. 


flows even at the risk of scar- 
ing away investors; analysts 
and economists said it was 
-probably a good bet. 


the central bank to look after 
the economy,” said Angus 
Armstrong, an economist at 
Deutsche Morgan Grenfell. 
“Most people will accept 
this as an unusual move in an 
unusual circumstance.” 

After its currency plunged 
to an 1 1-year low against (he 
dollar Wednesday. Thailand 
asked the country's banks to 
limit the supply of baht loons 


^ ‘0£cpurse it\notfair,to. to offshore my estops,, making 
investors, but it’s the : job of it- prohibitively expensive fra 


investors to bet against the 
bahL The moves sent the baht 
rallying to its biggest one-day 
gain in more than two years. 
On Monday, the central bank 
said tire measures would re- 
main in effect indefinitely. 

The Thai stock market's 
main index rose 2.8 percent 
Monday, to577. 10 points, in 
response to the financial au- 
thorities* efforts to restore 
confidence. 

The Thai baht, which fell 


as low as 26.50 to the dollar 
in the middle of last week, 
bringing concerted interven- 
tion by Southeast Asian cen- 
tral banks, closed Monday, 
in Bangkok at 2536 to the 
dollar. 

Separately, Thai exports 
rose 4.8 percent year-on-year 
in March, and export growth 
for the fast four months of 
the year was estimated ai 4.4 


Marakanond, said. The com- 
merce minister, Naroogchai 
Akrasanee, said die trade 
deficit shrank 23 percent in 
the first three months of the 
year, compared with a year 
earlier, to 86.76 billion baht 
($3.42 billion). 

Thailand's exports in the 
first quarter rose 3 percent, 
to 365.42 billion baht, while 
imports fell 3,4 percent, to 


ipoi 

percent, .the Bank, of Thqi- „453.18 bilfion.bght. he said, 
land’s governor, Remgchai " (Bloomberg, AFP) 


• Telekom Malaysia Bhd. is holding talks with Samart Corp. 
about investing in the Thai telecommunications company, but 
it declined to confirm a report that it planned to buy a 20 percent 
stake in S amar t for $200 million. 

• Singapore Airlines’ regional subsidiary, SilkAir, ordered 
eight narrow-body planes worth an estimated $350 million 
from Europe’s Airbus Industrie. The carrier also took options 
to buy 10 more planes for $470 million. 

• Beijing Enterprises Holdings LtcL’s initial public offering 
was oversubscribed more than 50 times. The 150 milli on 
shares in the investment arm of Beijing’s city government 
were priced at 12.48 Hong Kong dollars (S1.6I) each, about 
one-third more than the initial price target. 

• Nikon Coip.'s parent-company pretax profit dropped 122 
percent, ro 16.5 billion yen ($141.1 million), in the year that 
ended in March because of higher operating costs. 

• China launched a nationwide clam pd own on the illegal use 
of its rapidly dwindling supply of arable land for construction 
projects, major state dailies reported, quoting a notice from the 
State Council. 

• The Association of South East Asian Nations plans to 
establish a so-called open investment area by the end of next 
year as part of the region's free-trade plan, a Malaysian official 

Said. Bloomberg. AFP 


‘B’ Shares Bounce Back in China 

Bloomberg News 

SHANGHAI — Stock prices rebounded Monday amid 
doubts that a high-profile government campaign to dampen 
prices and crack down on industry abuses would be effective. 

“Nothing has really happened, so investors aren’t so 
nervous,” Li Ting, an analyst at Shenyin & Wanguo Se- 
curities, said. Shanghai’s B share index, which tracks shares 
available to foreign investors, rose 0.6 percent, to 84.95 points. 
Shenzhen’s B share index climbed 4.9 percent, to 166.85. 

Four, companies offering A shares, or those available to 
domestic investors, resumed trading after being suspending 
last week as part of an inquiry into market manipulation. 



Foreign Investment in Chin a Shows First Slowdown in 7 Years 


Bloomberg News 

BEUING — Foreign investment in 
China slowed in the first quarter far the 
first time in seven years, a sign that 
suffer tax laws are deterring some in- 
vestors, the State Statistics Bureau said 
Moaday. 

In the first three months of 1997, 


actual investment by foreign-funded en- 
terprises dropped “about 5 percent” 
from a year earlier, said Zheng Jingping, 
deputy director of the State Statistics 
Bureau's department of integrated stat- 
istics. Foreign investment jumped ten- 
fold in the past six years, making China 
the world's second-biggest recipient of 


foreign funds, after the United States. 

The drop reflected China’s decision 
to end some tax breaks for foreign- 
funded enterprises April 1, Mr. Zheng 
said. It may also indicate that China’s 
combination of rising costs, slowing 
growth and low returns is dampening 
foreign interest. 


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Foe 325 0842. 

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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 

EUROPE 



Strong Sales Help BA 
Post a Record Profit 


Carded b* Otr Staff Firm D u pach a 

LONDON — British Airways 
PLC said Monday that pretax profit 
rose 9.4 percent in die year ended in 
March, to a record £640 million 
($1.05 billion), as growth in air travel 
and cost cuts offset an increase in fuel 
prices and strength in the pound. 

It was die second consecutive year 
of record profit for the airline, which 
attracted more higher- marg in busi- 
ness-class and first-class passengers 
as world air travel increased. 

The carrier’s sales rose 7.7 per- 
cent, to £8.36 billion. 

BA, however, did not remove the 


Bundesbank 
WbmsEU 
Over ‘Tricks’ 


CarytdnJ bj Oar StrffFron Dapaac/ta 

FRANKFURT — A 
Bundesbank official 
European Union countries 
Monday not to rely on “ac- 
counting tricks” to satisfy the 
budgetary criteria for joining 
the single European currency 
and said greater political inte- 
gration was necessary to make 
the monetary union a success. 

“Short-term measures to 
massage the financial situation 
or accounting tricks which de- 
fer some of the deficit to the 
future will not only lead to a 
loss of confidence in the fi- 
nancial markets but will be- 
come obvious shortly after die 
beginning,’ ' Edgar Meister said 
in remarks prepared for the AD- 
EBA association of Argentine 

hanks . 

Last week, the government 
said it would seek legislation to 
allow a revaluation of the 
Bundesbank's gold and cur- 
rency reserves. Thar is expected 
to produce a bookkeeping profit 
and help die government cut 
debt to 60 percent of GDP, as 
stipulated in the Maastricht 
ueaty. (AFX, Bloomberg) 


uncertainty hanging over its planned 
alliance with American Airlines 
Ino, the second-biggest U.S. carrier, 
which is still awaiting regulatory ap- 
proval on both sides of the Atlantic. 

BA’s chairman. Sir Colin Mar- 
shall. said that the tie-up had been 
held up by “excessive scrutiny” in 
Brussels, Washington and London. 

He called for die allian ce to be 
given approval following the for- 
mation last week of a five-airline 
alliance, bringing United Airlines 
Inc. and Lufthansa AG, together 
with Scandinavian Airlines, Air 
Canada and Thai International. 

' “We must be allowed to compete 
on an equal basis,” Sir Colin said. 
The BA-American alliance was an- 
nounced last June and was sched- 
uled to begin in April. 

In a statement. Sir Colin said that 
the 17 percent increase in the value of 
the pound since August would hurt 
profit this year but would be offset by 
a decrease in fuel prices and by fur- 
ther improvements in efficiency. 

“Economic conditions in British 
Airways’ major markets are expec- 
ted to produce continuing growth in 
demand for air travel during the next 
12 months with the UJC. and U.S. 
economies still strong,” he said. 

The British airline said that a 20 
percent rise in fuel prices had cost 
the company £142 milli on during 
the year. An exceptional charge of 
£127 million was also incurred to 
cover restructuring costs associated 
with BA's ongoing rationalization 
program. 

But the company registered a sur- 
plus of£125 milli on by re-evaluating 
its bolding in US Airways Inc. — 
reversing a 50 percent write-down 
— pending the sale of the stake. 

Separately, Boeing Co. has not 
offered BA an exclusive airplane- 
purchasing agreement like those 
signed by some of its rivals, ac- 
cording to the airline's top exec- 
utives. 

The pacts, which give airlines a 
discount in return for buying all of 
their planes from Boeing, have 
raised concern among European 
Union regulators as they weigh 
whether to approve Boeing's 
Lanned acquisition of McDonnell 
mglas Corp. (AFP. Bloomberg ) 


In Iran, Too, It’s the Economy 

Rising Prices and Jobs Are Big Issues in Presidential Vote 


Reuters 

TEHRAN — Iranian voters 
who will go the polls Friday to 
chose a new president have a clear 
message for the four candidates 
seeking election: Deal with the 
economy. 

Rising prices and unemploy- 
ment, especially 
among Iran's large 
youth population, are 
common complaints of 
Tehran residents, who 
* will play a key role in 

choosing a successor 

to President Akbar 
Hashemi Rafsanjani after his two 
four-year terms. 

Such social issues as education 
and strict dress codes for women, 
as well as Iran's ties with the out- 
side world, also are on some 
voters' minds. But for the majority 
of people, these matters remain 
secondary to the everyday woiry 
of high prices. 

“Inflation has put heavy pres- 
sure on people who have fixed 
salaries,” a bank worker said. 
“Prices for housing, food and 
transport keep on going up. My 
salary does not** 

Inflation, based on an index of 


commodities and services, was 
tamed to an official figure of 
around 25 percent in the lest year, 
compared with 50 percent in other 
recent years. 

Unemployment officially 
stands at 10 percent in this country 
of 60 milljon people. But this dis- 


All four candidates have woven 
remedies into their speeches. But 
will they have room for maneuver? 


guises underemployment and ig- 
nores the fact that some people 
take on second and third jobs to 
keep up with price increase, ana- 
lysts said. 

All four candidates in this 
week’s election have woven eco- 
nomic remedies into their public 
speeches and articles. But given 
that Iran is in the third year of a 
five-year economic plan that runs 
until 2000, it is unclear how much 
room they will have for maneuver 
or what they will do with the coun- 
try’s annual oil earnings of $18 
billion. 

Tehran's large working class 


and its growing middle class, 
many of whom are on salaries or 
pensions fixed by die state, will be 
watching Mr. Rafsanjani 's suc- 
cessor to see how he can help battle 
the high cost of living. 

A retired health worker s aid h is 
pension was 230,000 rials ($77) a 
month. “Ten years 
™ ago, half of this was 
enough,” he said, “but 
now, even if it was 
doubled it would not 
cover my basic 
heeds.” 

Inflation also has 
ravaged Tehran's housing and of- 
fice-space markets, making it one 
of the world’s most expensive cit- 
ies for those with little hard foreign 
currency. 

For men conscripted into mil- 
itary service and paid 20,000 rials 
a month, high prices mean that 
entertainment while on leave from 
the barracks is likely to be limited 
to strolling through parks. 

One conscript who wanted to 
travel to his hometown, which was 
hit by a big earthquake last week, 
said be could not afford to do so: 
the cost, he said, would eat up 
three-quarters of his monthly pay. 


Investor’s Europe 


4800— 3000- 







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Source: Tefekurs 


lam — i anl Utnldl^oK 


Very briefly; 


Boots and BASF Sued for $8 Billion 


pla 

Do 


CcepUatbj Om Staff Fn* n Dkpaxha 

LONDON — Shares ofBoots Co. 
fell Monday after it was disclosed 
that the company, along with BASF 
AG and a U.S. subsidiary, faced an 
$8.5 billion lawsuit alleging that 
they suppressed a report questioning 
the effectiveness of a thyroid drug. 

The lawsuit alleges that Boots, 
BASF and Knoll Pharmaceutical 
Co. concealed a seven-year uni- 
versity study that concluded that 
their thyroid drug, Synthroid, was 
no better than cheaper generic 
brands at treating people suffering 
from hypothyroidism . 

The lawsuit, which was filed in 
U.S. District Court in San Francisco, 
sent shares of the British drugstore 
chain down as much as 2.8 percent. 


The shares closed down 23 pence 
(38 cents) at 707 pence in London. 

Martin Wakeling, a Boots spokes- 
man, dismissed die case as “totally 
fanciful” and added, “We have 
dealt with that issue entirely.” 

He referred further calls to die 
BASF unit. Knoll Pharmaceutical, 
in New Jersey. Executives there 
were not available for comment 
A Knoll spokeswoman, Hilary 
V aughan -Thomas , has said that the 
University of California report 
“contained such serious flaws drat it 
did not support its conclusions." 

A BASF representative said the 
suit was unfounded and the amount 
of damages sought “grotesquely ex- 
cessive." He declined to comment 
further. 


BASF shares did not trade 
Monday because of a public holiday 
in Germany. 

An estimated 8 million Amer- 
icans suffer from hypothyroidism, a 
condition caused by an underactive 
thyroid gland. The gland, located in 
the neck, produces a hormone called 
thyroxine that regulates the body's 
metabolism. People with hypo- 
thyroidism must receive thyroxine 
to survive. The vast majority of 
people with hypothyroidism take 
Synthroid. Boots’s pharmaceutical 
drvision, which developed Syn- 
throid, was sold to Knoll in 1995. 
Knoll controls 84 percent of the 
$600 million levothyroxme market 
in the United States, die suit said. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters) 


• Britain’s revenue exceeded its spending by £36 million 
(S58.9 million) in April, countering expectations of a £J.5 
billion deficit, as corporate and value-added tax receipts 
bolstered public finances. 

•National Westminster Bank PLC said the NalWest Tower, 
the fraiiftsf building in London's financ ial district, would-be 
renamed and leas ed out as small units under flexible leases. 

• Isuzu Motors Ltd. of Japan agreed to invest 200 million 

Deutsche marks ($117.4 million) by mid- 1999 to builiLan 
engine factory in southern Poland. !; 

• Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. said it had agreed to biny 
controlling stakes in two units of Sava Group of Slovenia: a 
60 percent interest in Sava’s tire business and a 75 percent 
stake in its engineered-products business. 

•Skoda Plzen AS. the Czech Republic’s largest engineering 
company, said it had signed a 1.5 billion koruny ($48.9 
million) contract to supply a power and heating unit for 
Plzenska Teplarenska AS, a regional Czech heating utility. 

• Spain cut its 1997 inflation target to 2J2 percent from a 

previously stated 2.6 percent . ~~ 

• General Electric Co. of die United States said it had signed an 
agreement with South Africa to generate 2 billion rand ($44&8 
milli on) in benefits to the country’s economy throuj ' 
such as direct investment and purchases of local gc 

• Russia said it would sell state holdings in six oil c ompa nies: 
VostSibNeftgaz, Vostoshnaya, Sibur, TNK. KomfFEK and 

Noisi-OiL Bloomberg. Reuters, AFX 


1 


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n 


At Center Stage in Cannes: Marketing and ‘Hype’ 


YEN: Not Even Japan Fears Currency’s Ride 


By Richard Covington 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

CANNES — Didier Benoit may not 
have been one of the movie stars mount- 
ing the steps of the Palais des Festivals 
here, but the 50th anniversary of the 
Cannes film festival still gave him cause 
to rejoice. 

As the president of the local union of 
hotel owners, Mr. Benoit saw demand 
for hotel rooms shoot up 30 percent 
compared with last year's festival In the 
12 days of the festival that ended 
Sunday, the members of the union real- 
ized 12 percent to 15 percent of their 
yearly revenue, an amount totaling 10 
million francs ($1.75 million), he said. 

Altogether, die festival pumped some 
600 million francs into the local econ- 
omy, according to the festival’s pres- 
ident, Pierre Viot, 

Hits come and flops go, but in Cannes 
at festival time, marketing is forever. 
Co mmem orative books, magazines. 


CD-ROMs, teddy bears and “Casab- 
lanca 1 ’-style hats were just die tip of the 
mountain of promotional spin-offs from 
the festival. 

“Hype is die most important product 
at Cannes,” said William Roedy, pres- 
ident of MTV Europe. MTV threw a 
$100,000 bash to promote “Beavis and 
Butt-head Do America,” a film that 
opened in December in the United 
States but was not even shown during 
the festival. 

There were three on-line sites de- 
voted to the festival. Canal Plus SA, the 
French pay-TV network and one of the 
largest film producers in France, created 
a television channel devoted to die 
Cannes extravaganza, injecting 30 mil- 
lion francs’ worth of television cov- 
erage, and sponsored the opening and 
closing ceremonies and other events. 

Other corporate partners jockeyed for 
exposure in what one commentator 
called “France's Super Bowl,” leading 
their limousines, jewelry, portable 


phones and couture creations, pouring 
their champagne and serving snack 
foods in sometimes discreet, sometimes 
brazen grabs for the publicity limelight. 

Intel Corp. got in on the act with a 
demonstration of an interactive person- 
al-computer theater that the computer- 
chip maker billed as the wave of the 
future for home-entertainment centers. 

Then there were the parties. One party 
alone — the beachsiae bash aboard a 
replica of a floating spaceship to pro- 
mote the French director Luc Besson's 
science-fiction epic “The Fifth Ele- 
ment" — cost Gaumont SA, the film's 
producer, well in excess of $500,000, a 
figure that Nicholas Seydoux, the film 
company's chief executive, described as 
a promotional bargain. 

Another intimate dinner for 650 stars, 
directors and other film folk, along with 
a solid-gold award for die director Ing- 
mar Bergman and half of the bill for the 
evening's performance spectacular, cost 
die jeweler Cartier 2 million francs. 


according to a company representative. 

While the festival splashily traded in 
glamour and cinematic artistry, around 

4.000 film buyers, producers and sales 
agents — orabitmorethanatenthofthe 

35.000 participants — eagerly flocked 
to a separate film market to pursue die 
deals that drive die industry. Negoti- 
ating terms of projects that ranged from 
little more than two-page synopses to 
finished films, executives signed deals 
worth 3 billion to 5 billion francs, ac- 
cording to Jerome PaiHard, managing 
director for the film market. 

More difficult to measure than party 
expenses and hotel charges are the fi- 
nancial benefits of winning a major fes- 
tival award. Unlike the Academy 
Awards, which honor movies already in 
release, films in competition at Cannes 
are being publicly screened for the first 
time and have no box-office figures. 

“Any attempt to say drat winning an 
award at Cannes multiplies a film's revenue 
is pure guesswork." Mr. Seydoux said 


Continued from Page 13 

The Finance Ministry says it does not 
use such an optimal range for policy- 
making purposes, and its economists 
refrain from researching such topics. 

Kenji Yumoto, an economist with the 
Japan Research Institute, says that die 
most optimum range of the yea for 
Japan's manufacturing is from 1 10 yea 
to 123 yea to the dollar. Based on a 
complex econometric model, he dis- 
covered drat when the yen starts de- 
preciating beyond 1 23 to die dollar, the 
prices of imported parts and materials 
used in domestic and export manufac- 
turing take a toll on the industry. 

At 137 yen to the dollar, he adds, the 
industry is worse off than when the yea 
is at 110. Thus, the current level of about 
116 would still be advantageous for 
export manufacturing. 

In fact, exporters surveyed earl ier this 
year by the Economic Planning Agency 
say that they have been able to cut costs 
and refine their operations so that they 
can make money even as the yen 


strengthens. Thus, with die yen weak- 
ening over die past few months, tfre 
biggest injury has been to importers, 
consumers who like foreign brands, and 
domestic companies like supermarkets 
that use imported goods. Though such 
companies usually hedge their exposure 
to cunency risk, protracted weakness 
bites into prices sooner or later. 

“Supermarkets usually buy futures 
contracts six months forward, and if die 
125 yen range persisted, the unitprice of 
imports would have gone up signif- 
icantly,” said Masaei Kasahara, an of- 
ficial at Japan Chain Store Association. 
“As it was, it was going to begin show- 
ing up in sales prices six months from 
now." 1 

“If the rate stayed at a weak level,’ it 
would have been a big blow to us,"fre 
added. "But the problem is that when 
the yen appreciated rapidly, the gov- 
ernment pressures us to do ’high-yen' 
sales to bring in benefits to consumers. 
On the other hand, they don’t tell os to 
raise our prices when die yen swint^ 
toward weakness. ” ' 


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WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Ctose Pm 


Monday, May 19 

Prices in local OHrcndea. 

TeMcvrs 

High Low dose Prw. 

Markets Closed 

Most stock markets in 
Europe and Canada were 
closed Monday for a holi- 
day. 


Bangkok 

Ait* Info Svc 
Bangkok BkF 
KrangThalBk 
PTTExpta 
Stan Carnot F 
Stan Com BkF 
THecocncSfci 
mat Atman 
Thai FOnn BkF 
Utd Comm 


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Hyson Dev 
JwmsaiEIHdg 
Kerry Props 
New World Dev 
Oriental Press 

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SPi China Past 

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Anglian Water 

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Assoc Br Foods 
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1.18 

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415 

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Carlton Comm 523 

Corranl Union JM 

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572 
455 
1370 

272 

550 

755 

775 
215 

674 

776 
1.13 

675 
475 
659 
475 
438 
B52 
373 

6.16 
279 
654 
272 
9.11 
256 
672 
1055 

479 
156 
353 

1753 

7 

353 

253 

770 

1150 

954 

172 

10.16 


444 457 

652 655 

6.15 614 

1.19 171 

557 552 

5l31 577 

1255 1276 
RIB R14 

554 553 

414 417 

410 415 

954 10.18 
77B 770 

371 273 

1252 1278 
776 759 

157 1.91 

5.84 6 

7.19 773 

574 578 

158 158 

451 456 

271 271 

1022 1078 

174 150 

sm 5JJ3 

573 572 

5JJ7 525 
773 774 

659 654 

117 118 

496 497 
198 359 

1274 12.70 

574 573 

679 682 

151 152 

954 958 

ISO 353 
959 955 

1252 13-91 

970 977 

£50 SJ1 
256 259 

451 495 

550 570 

651 655 

555 575 
1726 1778 

773 751 

407 407 

7JJ7 738, 
255 259 

859 687 

254 279 

450 449 

616 62® 
2 2 

509 507 

457 5 

1357 1370 
275 27S 

563 556 

7.98 807 

709 7.18 

118 119 

677 658 

707 771 

1.15 1.17 

&9fi 607 
484 475 

651 667 

478 471 

441 458 

696 9.16 

126 375 

624 671 

134 279 

664 675 

27S 275 

9.14 9M 
258 257 

677 635 

1008 1055 

490 507 

159 378 

167 377 

1758 1744 
70 S 703 
304 371 

194 275 

700 771 

97! 906 

172 1.77 

1070 1054 


SmDtisind 
SatemEJec 
Stogecoach 
Staid Charter 
Tate I, Lyle 
Testa 

Thames Water 

31 Group 

Tl Group 

TrnnWns 

UnQew 

Utd Assurance 

UMNews 

Utd unities 

VtadatneLxute 

Vodafone 

Whitbread 

WHfcrasHdgs 

Wofeeley 

WPP Group 

Zeneca 


Hite 

Law 

dose 

Prev. 

1 

I 

One 

Prev. 

761 

763 

766 

7.70 




■Wl 

■■1 

475 

405 

410 

431 


J 


B 1 . » 1 

9 l , 1 ).l 

663 

435 

639 

632 

Bcadt Roma 

■Tt.1 

HhT • j 

P^[ "" I 

BjTrj 

1820 

9.92 

1808 

968 



p.'vj 

p i', <| 


463 

45H 

460 

465 

Credtta Itafkmo 

2570 

2470 

2555 

7610 

4 

190 

192 

193 

Edison 

8140 

8005 

8D50 

7980 

660 

4.45 

673 

662 

ENI 

9060 

0990 

9075 

9030 

5 

493 

4JW 

562 

Hat 

5645 

5515 

5645 

5505 

5J7 

5.73 

5J5 

534 


30700 

30400 

30500 


278 

273 

2.76 

273 

IMI 

15960 

15455 

15750 

I62M 

17 

16.75 

1679 

16.98 

INA 

2345 



3345 

566 

498 

5JM 

563 

itnlpas 

5685 

5570 

5590 

5740 

772 

764 

768 

7J7 

Mafiaset 

7500 

7KS 

7465 

7670 

660 


667 

662 


10300 

10165 

10165 

10465 

SJ1 

573 

578 

5J2 

Monledbon 

1095 

1074 

1008 

1064 

277 

271 

2.73 

276 

OBvettl 

480 

461 

476 47250 

767 

7.78 

765 

8 


2700 

2650 

2685 

2705 

115 

111 

114 

114 

Ptroll 

3770 

3790 

3725 

3850 

468 

463 

464 

471 

RAS 

14050 

13810 

13810 

13950 

2J1 

26/ 

269 

261 



17900 

17900 

16640 

1962 

1969 

1977 

1970 

SPooio Torino 

10050 

10610 

10610 

11170 





Stet 

8575 

B340 

8495 

■751 





Tefcootr SJaBa 

4655 

4525 

4620 

4725 





TIM 

5250 

5075 

5)80 

5125 


IB0i Law Close Pm. 


5erebawra(B 675 
Sing AJr taeigr 1200 


Stag Lite 
Sing Press F 
SfcigTodilnd 
StagTeteamni 
Tat Lea Bails 
Utd Industrial 
UtdCTSeaBkF 1530 
Wing Tal Hdgs 410 

TlObUL 


7 

29 

374 

275 

336 

1.16 


645 645 

1270 1170 
&J3 7 

2850 2850 
370 374 

147 147 

334 334 

1.10 1.13 

1460 15 
378 408 


650 

1330 

695 

2870 

190 

274 

336 

1.12 

1470 

408 


Madrid 


Botsaladeie5«UM 


Prateas: 543J1 

Acertranr 

24340 

239M 

24300 

242M 

ACE5A 

1770 

1740 

1750 

1756 

Aguas Bartetan 

5700 

5600 

5640 

5770 

Araenhuta 

BBw 


6990 

7DM 

7130 

10320 

10220 

10280 

10390 

Banesto 

1685 

1640 

1665 

IA/5 

Brrtdnta 

23150 

l- l 

23100 

23250 


4965 


4950 

mo 

BcoPopMiar 

33290 


33IM 

33110 

Rm JbirAmHpr 

11740 

11460 

11/30 

11760 

CEPSA 

5170 

4950 

4960 

6050 

Crmtaerde 

2640 

2605 

2640 

2640 


7790 

HIM 

7640 

10920 

7680 

HIM 

7730 

11050 

FECSA 

1215 

1190 

1190 

1215 

Gosltetwcfl 

27960 

27300 

77950 

27650 

Ibcrdrakr 

1700 

1680 

1680 

1705 

Pryca 

2700 

2670 

2700 

2695 

iSepsot 

6010 

5970 

5990 

6000 


1350 

1320 

1350 

lWl 


7100 

7010 

7100 

7150 

Teietanfca 

4035 

3995 

4020 

4040 

UntaiFenosu 

1260 

1245 

1260 

1265 

votene Cement 

2005 

1990 

2000 

2005 

Manila 


PSetatae25DM6 


Prateas: 2576.13 

AyolaB 

16 

15JS 

16 

16 

AMteLond 

BkPhEpisl 

1875 

1850 

1850 

1850 

142 

140 

141 

141 

C&P Homes 

1825 

9.90 

10 

10 

Manila Elec A 

8650 

83 

jn«i 

0650 

Mem Bank 

560 

545 

555 

S55 

PHran 

750 

7.10 

7 J0 

7 JO 

Pa Bank 

275 

260 

260 

275 

PMLongDbt 

740 

725 

730 

735 

SrmMiBMiB 

68 

6150 

6150 

69 

SM Prime Hdg 

640 

610 

620 

670 

Mexico 






ABa A 

47 JO 

47JU 

47,00 


Bosmed B 


1/' ■ 

■t/: ■ 


CentesCPO 

29 J5 

K' ;: l 

Efel 

rri 

atrac 

T2J4 

1134 

1136 

12.34 

BtiDMademo 

39.15 

39.10 

39.15 

39.15 


4695 

46J0 

4685 



1JI 

1J9 

1J9 

1J0 


2810 

29.10 

538 

2810 

28?0 

m 

TetaiisoCPO 



Lv/X 


TetMexL 

17.14 

17M 

17.12 

17.12 


Sao Paulo 


BnodestoPfd 
Brahma Pfd 


&P 


ag® 


5M Notional 

Souza Cruz 

TetefunsPM 

Tetania 

Tetal 

TetespPfd 


UttainosPfd 
CVRD PM 


870 

77100 

4650 

5570 

1550 

47500 

57101 

48770 

333.80 

If 

13410 

15400 

14971 

33608 

3770 

120 

2445 


850 

77000 

4600 

53.12 

1550 

47000 

56970 

48500 

3X100 

238410 

1604)0 

3490 

929 

13280 

14920 

14870 

33000 

3750 

1.19 

234)0 


104997* 

884 870 

77400 77820 
4615 4620 
5X15 7400 
1550 1570 

475.00 47020 

569410 57200 

«74M «64» 

tiVq q tb jii 

mm 24099 

1614)0 16000 
354)0 3600 
930 935 

13X30 13230 
1524)6 148.10 
14690 14970 

3354X) 3314)0 

3750 3770 
130 130 

2445 2420 


Seoul 


Doran 

Daewoo Heavy 

assist 

Karas Mob Tel 


Composite Men 72! Ji 
PravtoaK69«33 
92000 BOON B9500 91100 
7200 6600 7100 6*90 

18400 17000 18400 17200 

16400 15800 16300 16100 

26200 25700 25800 25700 
5720 5250 5720 5250 

370000 346000 360000 367000 
33100 30500 33000 32000 

57200 54500 57200 54300 

44000 42300 43200 42300 

63500 61 BOO 63300 63000 
10500 10000 10400 9950 


Sydney 


AfiOlriteUlJ. 253158 
Prestons: 253810 

Amcor 

848 

840 

851 

850 

MiZ BUng 

828 

802 

837 

833 

BHP 

19 JO 

1851 

1953 

1849 

Bond 

191 

383 

DM 

352 

Brambtelral 

2195 

2350 

23.95 

wmi 

CBA 

1199 

1345 

1376 

1412 

CCAmatfl 

14.90 

1476 

1450 

1450 

Cotes Myer 

617 

611 

615 

614 

Conufco 

7.11 

695 

7.10 

752 

CRA 

21 

2841 

-20JB5 

2841 

CSR 

440 

448 

450 

460 

Fasten Brew 

247 

250 

256 

243 

GaadnmRd 

US 

171 

172 

172 

KlAustrafie 

11.90 

1174 

1150 

1150 

Lend Lease 

2450 

2435 

2450 

2455 

MJM Hdgs 

Nat Alta Bank 

157 

1-82 

153 

182 

1757 

1755 

1770 

1755 

Nat Aflufetd Hdg 

158 

156 

1.90 

1.90 

News Corp 

577 

544 

5.71 

576 

PoUflc Dunlop 

15S 

349 

353 


PfeossrlntT 

433 

439 

439 

4.14 

PubBreadata 

654 

648 

654 

658 

StGeagnBre* 

751 

778 

752 

752 

WMC 

839 

BOA 

824 

948 


7.18 

1135 

759 

11.10 

7.11 

11.10 

734 

WOohrarths 

408 

4 

454 

405 

Taipei 

Stock Maraw tam 810754 


Preteus: 808179 


159 

155 

155 

158 


129 

7250 

123 

7050 

125 

7150 

126 


119 

1650 

1)7 11750 

CMna Sted 

3840 

29.70 



FbstBank 

12650 

12150 

2250 


Formosa Plastic 

6550 

6158 

6450 


Hoa Nan Bk. 

12150 

119 

170 


Infl Comm Bk 

7450 

70 



NanvaPtasrics 

6950 

68 



SMitongLflb 
Taiwan Semi 

97 

104 

M 

99 

9450 

9650 

Tatung 

Utd Micro Elec 

5650 

4750 

5550 

6450 

56 

56 

UId WOridCMn 

71 

69 

6950 

7850 


I The Trib Index 

PncoB asof3V0P.M. New Yotlt time. 

■ J, 

; 

Jm. 1, 1903=100. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 

• 


World Index 

165.17 

+0.12 

+0.07 

% change 

+10.75- 

V-?. 


Regional btdexaa 







AstofPadfic 

124.96 

+0.77 

+0.62 

+154; 



Europe 

173.37 

-1.58 

-0.90 

+7J5- 

■ : Z.~ 


N. America 

189.86 

+1.41 

+0.75 ' 

+1756 

*>•_. 

- r 

S. America 

150.55 

+1.42 

+0.95 

+31 ST 



Industrial bMtam 







Capital goods 

200.45 

+0.20 

+0.10 

+1 7.28 : 



Consumer goods 

188.41 

+0.43 

+0.23 

+16.71. 

: •! ' 


Energy 

192.93 

+0.77 

+0.40 

+1^02 

!c'3?+ 


Finance 

123.02 

■034 

-058 

+5.63' 


' 

MisceSaneous 

164.91 

■0.40 

-0.24 

+1:93 

.•Zjt. 


Raw Materials 

184.23 

-0.43 

-033 

+5.05 

‘i 

■- 

Service 

154.35 

+0.28 

+0.18 

+12.40 



Utilities 

140.27 

-0.10 

-0.07 

-7 2? 



7he international Horgkl Tribune World Stock Index C tracks the U.S. 




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Fttf Bank 1560 1530 

FSPhdte 4600 4500 

Fufitai 1390 1366 


•*• 9*1 Low aos* Pm 


Singapore 

Asia Poc Brew 

8&S2TS. 

DBS foreign 
DBS Land 
Fraser 4 Nenve 

JteMMlian* 

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Milan 


ABeoran AS3IC 12130 11730 11740 1)950 


MIB TetaHftefc 120771 

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KewdLtte 

&SFf 

PnrttwyHdos 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

655 

850 

878 

875 

875 

1250 

12J0 

1250 

12.70 

1440 

1430 

1450 

1440 

075 

873 

873 

9JS 

1640 

17.90 

1840 

1810 

408 

4B0 

486 

488 

1150 

1130 

1M 

1150 

250 

257 

147 

259 

6l4S 

625 

635 

630 

342 

156 

156 

162 

690 

675 

6» 

695 

178 

3J4 

374 

176 

476 

474 

4» 

474 

196 

190 

190 

194 

1750 

1750 

1750 

1770 

1810 

9JB 

9.95 

10 

6J5 

630 

635 

635 


Tokyo 

AIlnamalD 
Afl Nipp on Air 
Araway 
AsahlBank 

Asmoieni 

Asafd Glass 
Bk Tokyo mbw 
B k Yokotwno 
Brldpestea 
canon 
Chuhu Etec 
aiugokjElec 
DdNiep Print 
Data 

Dtd4cU Kang 
□ten Bark 
Oaten Home 

OalHScc 

DOI 

Dense 

Japan Ry 

Ftewc 


1240 

7114 

4340 

H9 

715 

1190 

2150 

585 

2770 

2910 

2000 

2030 

2520 

750 

ISM 

450 

1410 

872 

B4S0a 

2960 

5660a 

2320 

4240 


NWnd 775: 204*9.75 
Proteus: 2013472 

1200 1240 1200 

770 784 779 

«8 a 4300 4350 
7W 005 795 

.699 703 702 

1160 1170 1170 

2100 2130 2110 

534 585 534 

26M 2750 2670 
2840 2BM 2920 
»60 

2020 2030 2020 

2450 2500 2470 
,725 734 724 

1460 1470 1520 

,22 .***• 437 

13W 1400 1390 

„ W 865 

8?8ta 8450a 8570a 

r2S? 2900 
S*50a 5490a 5520a 
2280 2300 2280 
4130 4170 4170 


Hochflanl Bk 

IKMata 

IBJ 

[Hi 

na-Yokado 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jusco 

Kafima 

Ksnsraaec 

too 

KswrasaWHvy 

Kovrasms 

KbddNIppRy 

Kirin Brewery 

Kobe Steel 

Komatsu 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

Kyushu Elec 
LTCB 
Marubeni 
Mend 

MarsuCaani 
Matsa BKind 

Matsu Bee Wk 

MBsnMshl 

MOsuMsMCh 

MltsubtsWB 

Mitsubishi Esl 

MnsrtasMHvy 

MRsubbHAAM 

Mitsubishi Tr 

MRsul 

Mitsui Fudoso 
Mhswl Trust 

MinaloMig 

NEC 

NBan 

MktaSec 

NMenda 

NteErmn 

NtppreiOfi 

Nktpon Steel 
Nissan Meta 
NKK 

NanumSec 

NTT 

NTT Date 

09 Paper 

OsoiaiGm 

U 

Rote 

SakuaBk 


1390 

1140 

1250 

3810 

1430 

510 

654 

6830 

536 

9020a 

4570 

699 

2230 

1600 

540 

369 

716 

1200 

230 

897 

591 

7740 

1W> 

389 

ST2 

2270 

3350 

2220 

1210 

1420 

403 

703 

1670 

862 

910 

1690 

1010 

1500 

850 

4B90 

1610 

1930 

732 

B860 

959 

646 

366 

753 

261 

1460 

1090b 

4350b 

770 

303 

1490 

10400 

732 


1560 
4590 
1360 1380 

1130 1130 

1230 1250 

3600 3750 

1400 142ft 

558 510 

632 653 

6690 6760 
526 535 

8800a 8990a 
4370 4S7» 

685 694 

7160 2200 

1560 1600 

535 540 

363 369 

708 710 

1180 1200 
224 228 

M7 895 
576 587 

7410 7660 

1970 1980 
330 387 

J® 511 

2200 2230 

3220 3280 

3170 2200 
1300 1300 

>5* 1420 

392 402 

696 697 

1640 1660 

854 858 

,096 905 

1610 1690 

992 1000 

1400 1500 

84) 845 

4890 4890 
1SB0 1600 
1£D 1890 
714 71| 

*700 8810 

946 955 

614 635 

3«3 364 

736 753 

.758 260 

1400 1440 

1050b 1000b 

4250b 4250b 
75/ 769 

M 302 

1460 1460 

9M0 10100 
700 Too 


1530 

4600 

1360 

1140 

1238 

3650 

1420 

500 

635 

6710 

528 

8730a 

4430 

704 

2170 

1570 

542 

369 

709 

1200 

230 

885 

582 

7390 

1990 

372 

508 

2190 

3240 

2190 

1310 

1390 

403 

701 

1650 

857 

90S 

1620 

990 

1470 

845 

4890 

1600 

IBM 

734 

8850 

949 

613 

369 

746 

263 

1420 

1070b 

4288b 

760 

302 

1490 

10)00 

715 


Simkyo 

StswaBank 

Sanya Bee 

Secant 

SebuRwy 

SekhiriChem 

Sektaii House 

Seven-Eleven 

Sharp 

StftokuEIPwr 

Shfanlzu 

ShtaetsuOi 

SfcteeMo 

ShhuakaBk 

5ofltoik 

Sony 

Surariomo 
Sumltano Bk 
SanRChein 
Sumitomo Elec 
Sum It Mata 
Sumb Trust 

TotshoPhami 

TteedaChan 

TDK 

TohotaEIPwr 
Total Bank 
ToMo Marine 
Tokyo BPwr 
Two Etectran 
Tokyo Gas 
TokyuCorp. 
Tanen 

Toppan Print 

BSP 

Tostem 
Toya Trust 
Toyota Mota 
YamcnouOU 




3680 

1520 

503 

8250 

6340 

1220 

1291 

9000 

16r% 

1990 

706 

3SH) 

1740 

1160 

8330 

9860 

965 

1630 

493 

IKS 

310 

1090 

3220 

2960 

9140 

2010 

997 

1460 

2220 

5050 

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7!2 

1450 

1750 

795 

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2970 

897 

3690 

2860 


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3660 

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1060 

1090 

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3150 

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2900 

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WTEBIWnONiU. 


PAGE 18 


Sports 


irk 


! 


TUESDAY, MAY 20, 199J 


World Roundup 


Tonkov Turns Pink 

cycling Pavel Tonkov took the 
overall leader's pink jersey after 
winning the third stage of the Giro 
d'ltalia on Monday. 

Tonkov, who races for the Mapei 
team, won the Giro last year. He 
holds a one-second lead over fellow 
Russian Yevgeny Berzin of the 
Batik team, who finished second, 
22 seconds behind Tonkov, in an 
18-kilometer (11-mile) mountain 
time trial into San Marino. 

Berzin, who won the 1994 Giro, 
started the day 20 seconds ahead of 
Tonkov but struggled on the major 
climbs. (Reuters) 

HBeekei^WiifMjss Paris 

tennis Boris Becker withdrew 
Monday from nest week's French 
Open, the only Grand Slam crown 
Ik has not won. Organizers said 
Becker was injured. (Reuters) 

Johnson Wins Major 

GOLF Orris Johnson made an 8- 
foot par putt on the second playoff 
hole to beat LetaJLindley and win the 
LPGA Championship. Both finished 
four rounds at 3-under par 281 in 
Rockland, Delaware, on Sunday. It 
was Johnson's first Grand Slam title. 
Annika Sorenstam was the only oth- 
-a player under , par for the tour- 
nament (Reuters) 

A Whole- World Record 

sailing Olivier de Kersanson 
set a round-the-world sailing record 
when he arrived in Brest France, on 
Monday. The French sailor circled 
the globe in 71 days, 14 hours, 18 
minutes and 8 seconds in his Sport- 
Elec trimaran. 

The previous record, set by New 
Zealander Sir Peter Blake three 
years ago, was 74 days. 22 hours 
and 17 minutes. (Reuters) 

Belarussians Test Positive 

weight lifting Five Belarus- 
sian weightlifters have tested pos- 
itive for banned drugs, throwing 
into doubt the entire squad's par- 
ticipation in this week's European 
championships in Croatia, Belarus 
Weightlifting Federation sources 
said Monday. (Reuters) 


Woods Wins Again 
But Not at His Best 


0 


By Dave Anderson 

New York Times Service 


IRVING, Texas — At the Masters, 
Tiger Woods had what he calls his “A 
game," and he won. 

At his next tournament, the Byron 
Nelson Classic last weekend, he had a 2- 
stroke lead at 15-under par after a 3- 
under-par 67 in the third round Sat- 
urday. But he knew his golf game de- 
served a lower mark. 

“It was in between a B and a C,” he 
said. 

Even when he won Sunday with a 2- 
under-par 68 for a 17-tmder-par total of 
263. be did it with a golf game he 
marked as C-plus. 

"Winning like this means a lot," he 
said. “It shows if you think well and 
have a good short game, you can win." 

He wasn’t trying to be humble or 
demean those who finished behind him. 
Winning without your A game is what 
has separated all the great golfers from 
the grinders. 

On his arrival here last week, the 21- 
year-old golfer said simply, “I came 
here to win." And he did — as much 
with his min d as with his muscle. 

“I know what I’m doing wrong," he 
said after Saturday's round. “It’s caus- 
ing a position on the downswing in 
which I get stuck. Certain faults will 
stick with you for the rest of your life. 
And tins is one of them for me.” 

Before the final round Sunday, 
Woods's swing doctor. Butch Hannon, 
who had been watching him on tele- 


vision in Houston, drove up to get him 
unstuck. 

“I had seen some, things,” Hannon 
said after his patient had hit two trig 
buckets of balls on the practice tee. “His 
posture got very bad. X told him to get tall 
and stay talL And be has die courage to 
take tills right to the first tee.” In his 
earlier rounds. Woods teed off with a 3- 
wood on the 385-yard (350-meter) first 
hole. 

On Sunday, with wind gusts of 20 
miles an hour (30 kilometers) behind 
him, he took the tiger-striped orange 
head cover off his dnver. 

There were 100,000 people in his 
galloping gallery Sunday, and this was 
what the thousands around the first tee 
had hoped to see: Woods trying to drive 
the first green. After waving to those on 
the right side of the fairway to get down, 
he hit a soaring tee shot. 

“It hit a spectator; but he was all 
right," Woods said. “If it hadn't, it 
would’ve been pin high or past the 
green.” 

His ball had sailed about 360 yards, 
some 25 yards short of the green. Aftera 
par there, he bogeyed the thnd hole after 
splashing his tee shot, then trailed Larry 
Rinker by two strokes. 

But with a birdie at the 12th, he 
shared the lead and his birdie at the 554- 
yard 16th assured iL 

On the 16th he hit a driver off the tee, 
then another off the fairway. As he 
cbed die green, he basked in the 
And somebody among the 
100,000 yelled, “Don’t ever change.” 



EYES ON THE BALL — Mark Philippoussis hitting a backhand Monday to Pete Sampras in the WorldP, 
Team Cup tournament at Duessddorf. Philippoussis won when Sampras, the World No. 1, retired with a- 
strain in his left thigh. Sampras was leading 6-4 4-6 1-0. Sampras is due to play again Wednesday, but said , 
he did not know if he would be fit. This is the last event before the French Open, which starts Monday..! 


■ American Express Signs Woods 

American Express said Monday it had 
enlisted Woods as a worldwide spokes- 
man, Reuters reported from New York. 

Terms for the multiyear deal were not 
disclosed, but reports are putting the fee 
as high as $30 million for five years to 
feature Woods in advertisements for 
American Express products, including 
its financial services and credit cards. 


CANTONA: Britain’s Hero, France’s Grief 


U.K. Targets Tobacco Sponsorships 


CanpdoJ hy Otr Stuff Fraa Dispatches 

LONDON — Britain's Labour gov- 
ernment announced Monday that it 
would ban sponsorship of sporting 
events by tobacco companies. 

Anti-smoking campaigners wel- 
comed the plan, but tobacco companies 
said they were disappointed because 
they did not believe such a move would 
lower tobacco consumption. 

Cigarette companies spend milli ons 
of pounds sponsoring sports in Britain, 
particularly cricket, golf, darts, rugby 
league, show-jumping and Formula 
One. motor racing. 


Health Secretary Frank Dobson said 
that the government’s draft bill would 
“cover afi forms of tobacco advertising, 
including sponsorship.” 

“We recognize that some sports are 
heavily dependent on tobacco sponsor- 
ship,” he said in a speech to the Con- 
gress of the Royal College of Nursing. 
“We do not wish to harm these sports. 
We will therefore give them time and 
help to reduce their dependency cm to- 
bacco and replace ’it with sponsorship 
from more benign sources.” 

Dobson said that sports authorities 
need to recognize that by helping to 


promote tobacco sales they were harm- 
ing the health of many fans. 

Among high-profile recipients of to- 
bacco industry sponsorship are British- 
based Formula One motor racing teams. 
These include Williams. Benetton, 
Jordan, Tyrell and McLaren. 

“Ifacaris running in the Grand Prix 
here it won’t be carrying tobacco ad- 
vertising,” Dobson said. 

Paul Sadler, a spokesman for Im- 
perial Tobacco, whose Embassy cig- 
arettes sponsor snooker and darts com- 
petitions. said his company was “very 
disappointed.” - (AFP, Reuters) 


Continued from Page 1 

home-grown genius who did not fit its 
wora-out mold. 

The French soccer establishment nev- 
er learned to come to terms with Can- 
tona’s success, although marketing man- 
agers fastened onto his popularity among 
younger fans. Writers said that his style 
rather luckily suited English soccer, and . 
that probably nowhere else could he ’ 
have found a setting artless enough so as 
to appear b rilliant in contrast 

L’Equipe, the French sports news- 
paper, said that Nike, Cantona's spon- 
sor, was able to turn his image into that 
of a mysterious rebel who had nothing 
to do with his real and declining wrath 
as a player. Aime Jacquet the coach of 
the French national team, decided in 
1995 when Cantona was voted English 
footballer of the year that he could do 
without him for the European Cham- 
pionship. and this year again left him off 
the squad that is to prepare for the World 
Cup to be played in France in 1998. 

Clearly, Cantona was too big, too 
unique and too interesting for the team 
and its view of itself. The English, hosts 
to the European Championship, mocked . 


this French pettiness: the racy French'- 
could not handle Cantona's unpredict- 
ability and fled the excitement that w#s- 
his special promise. ' 

what the English had embraced, tfifcf 
French suggested, was an' opraa J 
sounded much better in translation. The" 
French establishment that loved and lfc- 
onized Jerry Lewis when Americans^ 
thought his comedy crude and infantile^ 
essentially refused to say it was wrongs 
about Cantona, denying its affection for* 
a man who could be described as t&e . 
most brilliant over-the-top public pdiv* 
sonality produced in France in years.' ££ 
On Monday, while the Times of LoiJ^ 
don was reporting Cantona’s retirement* 
at the top of page one and the rest 
England's newspapers were usings 
words like art poetry and genius to 1 
describe the Frenchman, Le Figaro, with 1 * 
a completely different vocabulary 
called the retirement announcement in? 
its back-page headline. “Cantona's lasT 
fake-out.” The article concluded with'a 
reference to Bernard Tapie, the jailecf' 
former cabinet minister and soccer-teaftri 
owner, asking whether Cantona, 

Tapie. who once hired him at Marseille, 
wouldn’t be thinking of a movie career. 





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W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Batttraare 

28 

13 

583 

— 

New York 

25 

18 

581 

4 

Taranto 

21 

19 

525 

6’A 

Detroit 

19 

23 

A52 

914 

Boston 

16 

24 

M0 

1114 


CENTRAL HVISKm 



Kansas aty 

20 

20 

500 

— 

Cleveland 

20 

20 

500 

— 

Milwaukee 

19 

20 

-437 

V4 

Chicago 

18 

22 

MO 

2 

Mtonesata 

17 

26 

■395 



WESTOMSKW 



Te»QS 

23 

17 

575 

— 

Seattle 

23 

39 

548 

1 

Anaheim 

21 

19 

525 

2 

Oakland 

17 

Z7 

-386 

8 


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8 0 

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W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

AUartta 

29 

13 

590 

— 

Florida 

26 

16 

619 

3 

Montreal 

23 

17 

575 

5 

New York 

22 

20 

524 

7 

PMaddpMa 

16 

25 

590 

12% 

CENTRAL DtVHBCM 



Houston 

22 

21 

512 

— 

Pittsburgh 

Z1 

21 

500 

V> 

St. Louis 

17 

24 

615 

4 

CNcngo 

14 

27 

541 

7 

Ondnnatf 

13 

28 

517 

8 


WEST DIVISION 



San Francisco 

24 

16 

500 

— 


Lob Angeles 
Colorado 
San Diego 

SUMMIT'S 

AIIERKAN USQUE 
232 

Ml IN 380—6 
Ogea, Mormon O). Plunk 
Assenmadur (8), M. Jackson (B) and 
SAanm Carpenter, Quanta® (33, Crabtree 
(7), Spofartc (8) end Santiago. W— Ogea, 4- 
3. L— Carpenter, o-l 5v— M_ Jackson H. 
HRs— Oevetond, S. Alomar (V), Thome C9J» 
Mfl-WlBoms 2 03). Toronto Sprague (7), 
Merced (4). 

202 ON IN— 5 8 2 

382 BOO Ota-7 11 3 

Sato WtasrBn £33, Lacy (6) and Hasetman, 
Hatteberg (B); Robertson, TromWey (7). 
Swfndefl (81, NauJty (0), Guardado (8), 
AmAera (9) and G. Myers. W— Robertson, 4- 
2. 1 — Sole, 4-1 Sv— AQuBera (7). 

HR — Minnesota sttiovtak CD. 

Detroit 010 020 300-6 15 1 

KraasCtty N1 3M 100-5 6 0 

Lira, J- Cummings (S3. TaJonss (7), M. 
Mytss On and EL Johnson; Belcher, R. Veres 
(7), J. Walker (93, J. Montgomery (9) and 
MLSweeney. W— J. Cummings, 2-8. 

L— Belcher, 5-4. Sv— M. Myers (1). 
HRs— Kansas CBy, MLSaMney 2 (4), 
Oflerraan CD. 

New YOrk 010 010 000-2 9 1 

Tores 300 NO 10R-4 8 1 

Cone and Posada; D-Oflver, X. Her na ndez 
(6), wenetand (9) and IJlodrlguezL W— D. 
OBver, 2-4. L— Cone, 5-1 Sv— Wnttetond D01. 
HRs — Hew York. Hayes 123. Team 
Ju.Gonzotoz (5). 


MflwoDkee 101 IN 010-4 7 1 

AnaMn 202 NT Ota-5 6 1 

J .Mercedes. DoJones (S3 and Matheny, 
Levb 173; DJprtnger, Hots (73, DeLuda 00, 
James (93 and Kreuter. w— O. Springer, 2-1. 
L— J. Mercedes, 1-1. Sv— James (6). 
HRs — Milwaukee. John (9), Nilsson (S3. 
Ancdwinb ECbnands 2 (93. 

Ckfcaga 000 202 420-10 12 2 

Oakland M0 002 820—4 6 8 

Baldwin. Levine (83. C CasflHa W and 
KaricovtCEr Mahler. AJSmrdl (63, OquW (73, 
Taylor (9) and GaWHDams. w— Baldwin, 2-5. 
L— Mahler; 06, HR-OakfanA Canseco (93. 
Bemnsre 100 031 102-8 8 1 

Seattle 201 121 000-7 12 0 

Mussina Rhodes (6), Br.VtfiHams (7), 
Orosco (83. RaMyera (91. A. Benitez (9) and 
Webster, Hotel (8); RaJohnswv Ayala (63, 
ManzaalDo (73. Charltcm (83 and Da-WHsoa 
W— Orosca 1-flL L— Charlton. 2-1 Sv— A. 
BenBaz (5). HRs— Baltimore, Hammonds 
CD, Holies (73. Seottto Griffey Jr. (19J, 
Sorrento M, A. Rodriguez (7). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Houston 008 001 011-3 9 0 

PHadelpUa 023 000 00 *-5 8 1 

Hampton R. Garda (6), Lima (8) and 
Ausmus; Stephen son spradUn (83, 
PVmtenberg (83, Baftafico (93 and Parent. 
W— Stephenson, 1-0. L— Hampton, 2-4. 
sv— Baflafloo (10). HRs— PhfiadelpMa 
Dauttan (51. Rolen (41. 

LosAagefes 100 100 200-4 8 1 
Montreal 201 803 Ole-7 14 0 

Aslado, Camflattl (6). Guthrie (7), Hall 
(8) and Piazza; PJHortlnez, Tetford (83, 
Urbina (81 and Fletcher, W— P. Martinez, 
7-0. L— Astacta. 3-2. Sv— Urbina 153. 
HRs — Los Angeles, Karros (43, Zelle (5). 


Montreal, Fletcher (6), Lansing (53. 
Florida 002 MS 061 2— 5 12 2 

Pfffehargta 100 000 002 8-3 8 8 

(10 mat mu) 

Sounder* Helling (53, Nen (93, Stanffer 
(10) and C Johnson, Zaun (10); Schmidt 
Rincon (8), Lofe efl e (10) and KBndalL 
W— Nen, 3-1. L— LoiseSe, 3-1. Sv— Stonlfer 
O). HR— Pittsburgh, M. Cummings 03. 
CMarada 001 000 210—4 0 0 

New Yarn 000 200 Bta-10 9 1 

BJMJones, McCurry (6). DIPato (7), S. 
Reed IB), M. Munoz (8), BJZufflu (8), DeJean 
(8), Holmes <83 and Manwarlng, JeJleed (B); 
MHdd, Trlicek (7), Kashlwasa (7), Ltdte (9) 
and A. Casttto Hurxfler (W- W-Knshlnoda 
1-<L L — B. RvfHa 0-1. HRs — Colorado, 
Grriarraga 19), Castilla 01). 

SanFrandsao 000 002 IPO— 3 7 1 

Chicago 300 000 2b— 5 13 0 

Estes. Raa (2) r Tavorez 173, Poole (73 and 
R. Wilkins MufttaUand, Wendell (73, 
Paitersan (83. T. Adams (9) and M. Hubbard, 
Servote (83. W— Wendelt 2-2L L— Tavarez, 0- 
2. Sv— T. Adams a). HRs— San Frandsea 
AuriDa (1). Ortcagcs Sosa 2 (9). 

San Diego 888 800 000-0 9 2 

Gadnutf 821 000 llw — 5 9 0 

VOfenzueto Bergman (4), Long (7) and 
Flaherty; Burin BeRMa (7). Shaw (7), 
Brantley (9) and J. other. W — Burba 4-4. 
L— Valenzuela, 1-4. 

St Leals 000 100 BOO— 1 7 8 

Allauto 100 000 31v — 5 8 8 

AJtaies, Fossas (8), Fraxatme IB1 and 
LampUn; Gktvlne and JJLapez. W-€kivfn6 5- 
2. L— A-Benes. 5-2. HR— St. Louis, Gam (7). 


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England 13; NY-NJ 10. ntostorn Canton 
anca— Dallas la Caiarado 10, Kansas CHy 
la- San Jose &- Los Angeles 4 . 


Byron Nelson Classic 


Leading Onel ecorea and money wtrmlnm 
Sunday art (he sis aitaon Byron NeUon 

Oaeak: an HiB6A99-yard. par-70 TPC at Lae 
CattnM ml exdfrywd. par-70 CMttmwood 
Wbr&C; 

654349-68-265 
6546^9-67—207 
67-64-66-70 — 247 
69-65-68-66—268 
66^5-69-68—268 
6567-66- 70 — 368 

64- 6568-70—268 

65- 47-66-70 — 268 

66- 63 -68-71 — 268 
63-67-67-71 — 26B 
48-48-66-67-269 


ATP RANKINGS 


9, Thomas Enqvtst Sweden Z148 
lft Carlos Moya, Spain, 2,119 

11, Fe8* ManttOa, Spain 1.841 

12, Barts Becker, Germany, 1,819 
UAftertCasto Spain 1^04 

14, ABierlo Berasategut, Spain 1JB03 

15, Wayne Fend ra. South Africa, 1^47 

16, Tadd Marlin UJS, 1,641 

17, Tbn Henman Britain 1,565 

IB Marc Rosset SwBzerfand, 1,531 
19, Sergl Bruguera, Spain 1.513 
21 Andrei Medvedev, Ukraine 1,503 ■ 




■V. 1 


( BEST-OF- SEVEW) 

N.Y.Raagen 3 2 0-5 

PNknWpIlkl 1 3 8-4 

Rral Period: P-LeOafr 6 (Desiprdlns. 
NSnlmoa) (ppj. z N.Y.-Lkts ter 1 (Eastwood) 
31 N.Y.-Gretzky 7 (Tlckanen. Leetch) (ppl.4. 
N.Y.-Gretzky 8 (RobltaHle, Messier) (pp). 
Second Pwtorfc P-Goffey T fBrtncf Amour, 
Renbag) a P-Bilnrr Amour 5, 7, N.Y.-Gretzky 
9 (Messier. Driver) & N.Y.-Masster 3 
(Beukeboom) 9, P-Padeta A (Otto) Third 
Period: None. Surfs an goat New York 7-7- 
8—22. P- 35-6-8—29. GoaOes: N.Y.-RIctrter. 
P-Snaw. HextalL 

(Series ites Ml 


•nUHXH HUT PtVWOM 

Extremadura 1, Aitoekc BIbao 2 
Heal Madrid I. VtWfcrdaM 0 
DepBltvn Coruna a Sporting Gffan 0 
Hercules a Valencia 2 
Raya Va Kecaiio 1, LogranesO 
Oviedo 1 Campadela 2 
E span yd 1, Tenerife 0 
Racing Santander 1, Zaragoza 2 
Real Sodedad 1, Altetfco Madrid 1 
stamp Mas: Real Madrid M points 
Barcelona 78; Deporflvo Coruna 74 Real 
Beds 73; Aifertoo Madrid 67; valladoBd 5&- 
AtWetlc BIbao 55, Real Sodedad 54 Va- 
lencia 52; Tenerife 51; Racing Santander 47; 
Zoragoza 46.- Espanyol 45; Compostela 44 
Certa Vigo 43. Oviedo 4% Rayo Vallccano 42: 
Spoiling Glfen 40. Extremadura 40: Hercules 
3i SevKo 34 Log rows 31. 


Tiger Woods 
Lae Rinker 
Tom Watson 
□an Fore m an 
Bob Twav 
Andrew Magee 
Outs Perry 
Paul SlankowsM 
Brad Bryant 


Uwdlng renUnge feauad by >he Alp Taur 

a Monday: 

1, Pete Sampras, U ins points 

2, Mktnel Chang, Ui. 3.704 

L Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Russia, 1008 
4 Goran Ivanteevto Oaatio, Z8\7 
L Thomas Muster, Austria 1798 
L RMhard Krajicek, NeftKrianfe ZSTi 
1. Morceto Rfea, cWfc, azyg 
L Alex Corraija, Spain, 2.162 


I FOOTBALL 



woBsuaetn 


1. 

SATUROATS RESULTS 



Rhein 21, Frankfurt 20 

- f 

i 

London 9, Barcelona 7 


SUNDAY'S RESULT 


Scolland lft Amsterdam 6 


CYCLING 


■ 

Guiod'Itaua 




al the Ora (Thalia cycle race, a 18 km ttaKC 
trtai trom Be nto c a iigrdu. 1, Pavel TonkaoT 
Russia Mapet 31 minutes 42 seconds X. 
Yevgeny Berzin, Russia Batfk. 21 seconds, 
behind; 3. Roberto Petlto Italy. Soeca 32f toS 
Luc Leblanc, France. Potti. 37; 5, PWrUgpiJ 
mov, Russia Rostorta53;6. Ivan Gam, Itaty, 1 
Soeca 55s 7, Gabriele Colombo, ttaty, BaSk.' 
IrtR; & Andrea Noe', Italy, Astcs IslSrW* 
Giuseppe GoetliU Italy, Paift 1:14 la Juon: 
Cartas Dominguez, Spain Kelrna 122. l 

OVERALL STANOMOS, 1, TontoT> 

hours 20 minutes 5 seconds: Z Berzin 1 sec* 
«id behind; 3, Petlto 12: 4 Leblanc 373 5.' 
Cotombo 42; & Ugrumov 54 7, Gartl 55. 6,' 
Noe* 1:11 9, Enrico Zafaia Italy, AsIcs. Ulfc 
la Guerin! sJ. 


AUERICAN LEAGUE ■ 

AHAHCiH-Adhated RHP Troy Perdvat 
tram 1 5-day dba Med Qst Optioned RHP Dar- 
rell May to Vancouver, PCl_ 

chicaco— T raded OF Tony Phillips and C 
Chad Kreuter to Anaheim tor LHP Chuck 
McElroy tmdC Jorge Fabregas. 

CLEve lamp— S igned RHP Jamto Bra^i 

and assigned Mm to BurSngtoaAL 

oty— B ought contract al RW* 1 
Mere WUOaras from Omaha AA. Designated' 
U1P Jim Converse for assignment dahreW 
LHP Cray Whitten off waivers from dewt 
tondand assigned Mm to Omaha.- Trans-i 
rened RHP Rfck Huisman from 15-day to 
day disabled list. 

wrwEMrA-Acflvmed ib Scan stohowrfe' 
irom fflsahled list. Cofled up OF Darrin Jack- 
son from Sat! Lake. PCL. 

OAKLAAD-Opnoned RHP sieve Mont-; 
gomay and SS Tony Ballsta to Edmonton,' 
rei- Reoriled RHP Mike Oqulst andSS Stott 
Sheldon from Edmonton. 

Seattle — O ptioned RHP Bab Wtofcatna, 
Tocoma. pcl and recoiled LHP Mark Hobe-1 
mer Dam Tacoma. Designated RHP Tim 1 
Hariktala lor tBrigncnenL Assigned RHP 1 
Matt A pa no to Lancaster. CL an rahottff* 
ration assfgnmem. •- ; 

natkjnahjeacue ; 

oucaoo— sent 3B Kevin Orie to Ortamto, 
SLanarehabietattonasslgnmettt. 1 

CqrV Sheffield on 15^tay 
tat reiioacltve to May 14. Recaiied 
OF BIKy McMillan from Charlotte, I L. 

"ouSTDh-Pu 1 OF Derek BaS an 15+taf 
retreaaive to May 14. Bought, 
oon tract of OF Ken Romas irom New OricaSS 

AA. 

H.V. METS— Named Kevin McCarthy sto^. 
*Jrn manager. 

Philadelphia— A nnounced RHP Bobby 
Munazdeared walvBrs and was sard ouhlghi 
toScrnnton WBkes-Barre, IL Oplfarad LHP 
""Owa MImbs to Scranton Wtaes-Banc. 
wauled RHP Ran B lazier from Saanton 
™«»«orreAciivo»ed RHP Edgar Ramos 

to*" 15-day disabled asL 

Pitts Burch- P ur of Jematoe 

"ttawortti on ISrftay rfisaMed flat, 
a^. 1 *- 1660 tori eosed RHP Tim Scott- P* 
RHP Dorto Veras on IS-rtay «sdNd Bst 
RHP Joey Hamilton from infer 
disabled bs. 




NATIONAL BASKETBALL ABSOeUZKW 
NBA-Fined Houston Rockets F Kevin 
WMs SIDJ300 and seottfe SuperSorto F 
shown Kemp s&aoo fer ttnlrocttansduifep 
G^SMWesteraConfertrwasemMoofeon 

wy 15. 


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Netan yall 

Trade Bla«, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1997 


PAGE 19 


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p j i. \r;r.:u.“ officials, she 

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fcj(. e y.r:| .f : u: :.-r-.*h- and had tea 
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u4*e 


SPORTS 


A Hat Trick 
For Gretzky 
Ms Flyers Fall 


By George Vecsev 

Netv York Times Service 


ifinLADELPHIA _ Four measly 
capS '.L , ^ entire ourpo urine of 

cg^that landed on the ice when Wayne 
&etzky completed his hat trick Sunday 
against the Flyers. Wayne Gretzky, the 
forward, that is. 

* “I ,m no Gordie Howe over there ** 
Gretzky insisted, referring to the er^ax 

fr^TN N o°-4 wastheinsp ™ on 

: Howe was a forward all his career 
while Gretzky is the great fluid genius’ 
of a center, who moved to left wine 
Sunday alongside his old pal Mark 
Messier to score three goals, as the New 
York Rangers beat the Philadelphia Fly- 
ejs, 5-4, in the National Hockey 
Leagite $ Eastern Conference final to 
even the series at 1-1. 

; poly four caps came out of the stands 
be<4use the Flyers' fans were not about 
to celebrate yet another stunning per- 
formance by Gretzky, while Rangers’ 
fans were not about to call attention to 
themselves in this town. 

; Gretzky played on the same line with 
Messier because of injuries to four key 
forwards. He scored once on a power 
play without Messier, once on a power 
play with Messier and once at even 
strength with Messier, and then he was 

the decoy as Messier scored the fifth and 

ultimately game- winning goal. 

*-‘Even though we didn't play a lot 
together, we’re pretty comfortable to- 
gether,’ ’ Gretzky said afterward, talking 
about Messier, who is a close friend. 

Gretzky made a lot of his own luck 
Sunday. His first goal came on a power 
play as he skated into the Flyers’ area 
anti tiie puck kicked off die boards at a 
strange angle, and headed to Gretzky’s 
skates. He controlled the puck with his 
right skate, slowing it down, and then 
flicked the puck backward, into the left 
corner of the goal. 

-Jlaving put die Rangers ahead, Gretz- 
ky made one of his patented shots right 
f of miniature golf — where you bank 
uS hall off the lighthouse, through the 
windmill and into the cave. On a power 
p%, Gretzky took possession of the 
puck in (he pleasant little corner of the 
world known as Wayne’s Office — be- 
hind the goal — caught die Flyers’ goal- 
tender. Garth Snow, at the edge of die 
goal and banked the pack offadefender’s 
skates, and the Rangers had a 3-1 lead. 

. Gretzky made it a hat trick in the 
second period when he fired a long shot 
past Snow to make the score 4-3. It was 
the-lOth hat trick of Gretzky’s career. 
Joe Lapointe reported : 

‘ Adam-Graves, usually Messier’s left . 
wing, centered a checking line that held 
Philadelphia’s superstar, Eric lindros, 
without a goal or an assist and. limited 
him to one shot on goal. 

Responding to the rough tactics of 
Lindros in Game 1, the Rangers poun- 
ded Big 88 at every opportunity, la the 
final minu tes, Lindros was gang-tackled 
by die Rangers. He wasn’t happy with 
the treatment. 

“When you’ve got the pack and the 
chance to score with a couple seconds 
left and someone with their two hands 
wrapped around your bead, it makes it 
somewhat diffi cult to score,” Lindros 
saCL ‘ ‘Thai would frustrate you, too.” 
-■More frustrating for the Flyers was 
the play of Snow, who gave up three 
goals on four shots, four goals on nine 
shots and five goals on 10 shots before 
t |jng replaced by Ron HextaQ. 



Knicks Melt Under Heat Barrage 

Miami Advances With Win Over Stumbling New York 


By Marie Heisler 

Los Angeles Times 


JcfirryBWltoA* 


Patrick Ewing of New York driving against Miami’s Isaac Austin. 


MIAMI — Li the Bible, the peace- 
makers may be blessed, but in the Na- 
tional Basketball Association, they’re 
going home. The Miami Heat blasted 
the New York Knicks into submission 
and summer, 101-90. 

The Heat, in winning Game 7 on 
Sunday, became the sixrh NBA team to 
rally from a 3-1 playoff-series deficit 
and a decided underdog in the Eastern 
Conference finals unless the NBA sus- 
pends a Chicago Bull fan each game — 
and even that wouldn't make much dif- 
ference as long as it wasn’t Michael 
Jordan. 

For the Knicks, everything went 
wrong. After a brawl in Game 5, key 
players were suspended, including 
Patrick Ewing in Game 6; and key play- 
ers returned rusty , like Allan Houston in 
Game 7. 

Ewing might as well have been alone 
in the first half, when the Knick guards, 
Houston and Chris Childs, combined to 
shoot 2-for- 1 3 with seven turnovers. 

Miami was 17 points ahead by then, 
and nothing — including a long rest in 
the third period by the human loose-ball 
foul, Alonzo Mourning — could unseat 
the HeaL 

“This is just an incredible oppor- 


tunity for us,” said a gracious Pat Riley, 
the Heat’s coach, “in a short two years 
to get to this level. I also know it was 
very disconcerting for the Knicks. 1 
don’t blame them. What happened 
turned this whole thing around and up- 
side down,” 

He added: “It doesn't take away from 
us. We wanted to advance. That’s what 
this is about, surviving and advancing.” 

Riley said be had made a proposal lo 
Rod Thom, the NBA's operations chief. 
“The other day when 1 bad my discussion 
with Rod Thom, I said, ‘Why don’t you 
just sort of wipe everything clean and 
let’s just play it straight up?' ” 

Instead, the league barred Miami's 
PJ. Brown from Games 6 and 7, along 
with Ewing, Houston and Charlie Ward 
for Game 6 and Lany Johnson and John 
Statics for Game 7. 

Of course, before that, the Knicks had 
been presented with a perfect oppor- 
tunity to close out the series, a 35-point 
Miami first half in that tumultuous 
Game 5, but they let the Heat off the 
book — something else they’ll lament in 
the long, cruel summer awaiting them. 

In Game 6. although the Knicks in- 
sisted they had enough players to play, 
they didn’t have enough to score, and 
die Heat ground them down in the fourth 
quarter to win, 95-90. 

In Game 7, even without the mer- 


curial Starks, the Knicks did have 
enough players. They just didn't play. 

Leading early. 6-2, they let the Heat 
go 1 8-0 in a horrid span of 5:03, starting 
with six possessions in which they 
turned the ball over five times (two each 
‘ by Childs and Houston) and missed a 
lay-up (rookie John Wallace, starting in 
place of Johnson). 

Nothing improved for the Knicks 
after that. Tim Hardaway, who went 13 
for 49 in Games 3.4 and 5. scored 38 in 
Game 7. With Mourning out in the third 
quarter, Hardaway scored a blazing 1 1 
points in the last 3:1 1, including three 3- 
point baskets, one of which looked like it 
came from the vicinity of Fort Laud- 
erdale. Miami had an 1 1 -point lead when 
Mourning left with 8:58 left in the period 
and a 17-point lead when it ended. 

Ewing, gallant in this one-sided de- 
feat with 37 points, laid his heart on the 
podium. “In a way, I feel like I was 
robbed,” he said, “bur that's life. I 
believed in my teammates. 1 thought we 
had a great team. The chemistry was 
great. Everything was great We played 
extremely well, but it just didn’t hap- 
pen.” 

He added: “Especially the way it 
came down. 1 thought if I lost it on the 
court — I thought what the NBA did 
was, I feel they robbed us. They robbed 
us of a great opportunity.” 


Leyland and Marlins Return to Sweep Pirates 


The Associated Press 

The last time Tim Leyland left 
Pittsburgh, he had tears in his eyes. 
Now, be was all smiles. 

Leyland ’s new team, the Florida 
Marlrns, completed a three-game 
sweep of his old team, the Pirates, 
with a 5-3 victory Sunday on 
Gregg Zaun’s go-ahead, pinch-hit 
single in the 1 0th inning. 

“It’s special to come back to 
Pittsburgh, where I had the kind of 
relationship with die fans I’D never 
have again,” said Leyland. who 
managed the Pirates for 11 seasons 
before resigning to manage the 
Marlins. “But there’s nothing spe- 
cial about beating the Pirates.” 

The Marlins have won seven 
straight, nine of their last 10 and 
swept a road trip for the first time in 
their five-year history — with two 
victories against the Atlanta Braves 
before their visit to Pittsburgh. 

Expos 7, Dodgsrs 4 In Montreal, 
Pedro Martinez (7-0) picked up the 
victory with seven solid innings, 
but his earoed-run average jumped 
from. 0.79 to 1.20 after allowing 
three earned runs for the first time 
in 14 starts, dating to last Aug. 24. 

Mike I jinsing provided the of- 
fense with a career-high five hits, 
including a home run, and Darrin 
Fletcher chipped in with a two-run 
homer. 

■Sotsio.itockiosOlnNew York, 
Colorado pitchers walked five 
straight batters — three with the 
bases loaded — as the Mets scored 
eight runs in the eighth inning. 

The Rockies led, 4-2, entering 
the eighth, but Mike Munoz, Bruce 
Ruffin and Mike DeJean threw 20 
balls in 22 pitches to five batters. 
Bernard Gilkey capped the inning 
with a two-run single. 

nod* s, Mm o Barry Larkin 
had a season-high three hits, in- 
cluding a bases-loaded single, and 


the Reds stole seven bases to win for 
the second time in eight games. 

Dave Burba allowed seven hits 
in six innings as the Reds pitched 
their first shutout of the season. 
Three relievers held the Padres to 
two hits in the final three innin gs. 

Cubs 5, Giants 3 In Chicago, the 
Beanie Babies toy giveaway day 
drew a sellout crowd of 37.958, 

BasebahKopiipip 

and the fans went home happy 
after Sammy Sosa hit two home 
runs — the second breaking a 3-3 
tie in the seventh innin g. 

Braves5, Cardinals 1 1n Atlanta, 
Tom Glavine, who missed his last 
start because of a sore hand, 
pitched a seven-hitter. 

Jeff Blauser’s two-out, two-run 
double snapped a 1-1 tie in the 
seventh. Before that Andy Benes 
had retired 1 9 in a row after giving 
up a first-inning run. 

Whits Sox 10, Athletics 4 Albert 
Belle threw an elbow into the face 
of Oakland’s catcher, George Wil- 
liams, as he scored in Chicago’s 
victory. Williams was waiting for 
the throw, which was not nearly in 
time, when Belle clipped him. 

“The throw was off to the left 
side,” Williams said after the game 
Sunday. “I was just going for it and 
all of a sudden, I got smoked in the 
face. I thought it was very unpro- 
fessional be had to do that.” 

Williams stared at Belle after 
the incident. In his next at-bat. 
Belle spoke to WilKams — and 
then was hit in the leg fay a pitch 
from Aaron Small. 

“He was trying to apologize 
that he hit me and stuff,” Williams 
said. “I just said, ‘Yeah.’ I wasn’t 
happy with him after what he had 
done. He knew he'd done 
something wrong.” 


Belle, suspended far two games 
last yearfor flattening Milwaukee’s 
second baseman, Fernando Vina, 
with a forearm to the face, declined 
to comment. The White Sox 's man- 
ager, Terry Bevington. said be saw 
nothing wrong with the play. 

“In baseball, when a guy gets in 
the way, you basically just have to 
shove him out of the way and he did 
it as gentle as possible,” Bevington 
said. “It was notiiing really. I don’t 
even call that an incident.” 

Belle extended his hitting streak 
to 15 games, although Frank 
Thomas was the big star for the 
White Sox at Oakland. Thomas 
went 4-for-4 with a walk. He is 
batting .696 (16-for-23) against 
the A’s tills season. 

Tigers 0, Royals 5 Bip Roberts 
couldn't get out of the baler’s box 
in Kansas City. The Royals’ hitter 
spent 14minutesat!hep]atein one 
at-bat the first inning. He saw 18 
pitches, fouling off 14, mid stood 
around while Detroit’s pitcher, Fe- 
lipe Lira, made nine pickoff 
throws to first base. 

“It wore me out,” Roberts said. 
“I was so lazy the rest of the day. I 
was just trying to put the ball in 
play, but they kepi going fouL” 

Roberts fait 13 fouls with two 
strikes. Finally, he grounded out 
on a 2-2 pitch. 

“I’ve never seen anything like 
it,” said Buddy Bel], the Detroit 
manager. “It seemed like 
everything he hit was in the same 
spot.” 

Roberts came up again in the 
ninth jr m »n g with the bases loaded, 
but grounded out. 

Ange la b, B mw w 4 Jim Ed- 
monds homered twice and Ana- 
heim won its seventh in a row, 
sending visiting Milwaukee to its 
sixth straight loss. 

Before the game, the Angels ac- 


quired outfielder Tony Phillips 
and catcher Chad Kreuter from the 
White Sox in a trade for reliever 
Chuck McElroy and catcher Jorge 
Fabregas. 

Both new players were in the 
lineup, with Phillips scoring a run 
and Kreuter doing a nice job catch- 
ing the knuckleballer Dennis 
Springer. 

nn y ri 4, Y kn k — a John 

Wetteland, facing his former team 
for the first time this season, struck 
out Cecil Fielder with two runners 
on base for Texas’s victory over 
visiting New York. 

Wetteland, who earned 43 saves 
for the Yankees and was the World 
Series most valuable player, put 
himself in trouble in the ninth in- 
ning and then escaped for his 10th 
save in 11 chances. 

Orioles a. H on o rs 7 Rafael Pal- 
meiro hit a two-out, two-run single 
in die ninth inning that gave Bal- 
timore its first three-game sweep at 
the Seattle Kingdome since 1989. 

Ken Griffey hit his 19th homer, 
the most in the majors, but Seattle 
still lost its' fourth m a row. 

Twins 7, Rod Sox s Minnesota 
scored five runs in the first inning 
as Matt Lawton doubled and Greg 
Myers tripled. Both hits came 
when Boston outfielders lost fly 
balls against the Minneapolis 
Metrodome’s cream-colored roof. 

In games reported in later edi- 
tions, Monday: 

Indoins B, Btua Joys B Mail Wil- 
liams hit two home runs, and Sandy 
Alomar and Jim Thome also con- 
nected for Cleveland in Toronto. 

PMMas 5, Astros 3 In Phil- 
adelphia, Scott Rolen’s third 
homer in as many days, a two-run 
shot in the third, gave the Phillies a 
4-0 lead, and Garrett Stephenson 
allowed an unearned run on six 
hits over seven innings. 


First Pick in NBA 
Goes to San Antonio 


The Associated Press 

SECAUCUS, New Jersey — The San Antonio Spurs 
won the National Basketball Association’s draft lottery 
Sunday, setting up the possibility of a front court fea- 
turing David Robinson and Tim Duncan of Wake Forest, 
the player expected to be the top choice. 

The leading players after Duncan are Keith Van Horn 
of Utah. Ron Mercer of Kentucky or, possibly, Tony 
Battie of Texas Tech. 

Robinson spent most of last season injured and San 
Antonio finished the season, 20-62. the third worst record 
in the NBA behind the Boston Celtics and the Vancouver 
Grizzlies. 

* Tm sure Tim Duncan is the man we are going to look 
at.” said Peter Holt the Spurs' chairman. 

Boston and its new coach, Rick Pitino, had the best 
chance at winning the lottery, which determines the order 
of selection for (be first 13 picks of the 1997 draft The 
draw is weighted so that the worse a team's record the 
more chance it has of winning the first pick. Only teams 
that failed to make the playoffs qualify for the lotteiy. 

Boston already bad its own first-place pick — as a result 
of having the worst record — and one it acquired from 
Dallas in a trade for Eric Montross. That gave the Celtics 
a 363 percent chance of winning, but it wasn’t enough. 

The Spurs came into the lottery with the third-best 
chance of getting the No. 1 pick. 

'Pitino said he called the Spurs five minutes after San 
Antonio won the lottery, to say be was interested should 
they consider trading the top pick. The Celtics finished 
with the third and sixth picks. 

*Tve already communicated with San Antonio. There 
is a possibility I will trade the two draft picks,” Pitino 
said. “We’re going to get as creative as possible. But 
you’re going to have to offer them one heck of a deal to get 
them to trade Tim Duncan.” 

Philadelphia, which won last year's lotteiy and chose 
guard Allen Iverson, got the second pick, moving up from 
No. 5 in the predraft order. Vancouver, which was not 
eligible for the top sick under its expansion agreement, 
dropped to fourth. None of its 250 assigned chances was 
drawn in the lotteiy for the top three spots. 

Denver, which had the fourth worst record, will pick fifth 
in the June 25 draft After that, the order stayed as stat- 
istically expected. Boston got the sixth pick with its Dallas 
pick. New Jersey is seventh, followed by Golden State, 
Toronto, Milwaukee, Sacramento, Indiana and Cleveland. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 













PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 


ART BUCHWALD 


6 Titanic 9 Sinks Again 


Abbas Kiarostami: Parables, Not Protests 


W ASHINGTON — I 
went to see the Broad- 
way musical “Titanic” the 
otter night- I accompanied 
two ladies. At intermission 
they excused themselves to 
go to die powder room. Ash- 
ley returned in 10 minutes; 
Stockard was 
nowhere to be 


seen. 

“Where is 
Stockard?” I in- 
quired. 

“She’s stand- 
ing in li r e wait- 
ing to gp to the 


powder room.” „ . 

“How come Buchwald 


you went at the same time she 
did and you're back and she 
isn’t?" I asked. 

“I went to the men’s room. 
I crashed in and said, ’Sorry, 
boys, I can ’t wait in the ladies’ 
line. Watching the Titanic go- 
ing down is much tougher on 
a person’s kidneys than ‘The 
Phantom of the Opera.' ” 

"Weren’t you afraid that by 
using another sex’s facilities 
you would be arrested?" 

"What for? I didn’t steal 
anything. You don't realize 
what a man's world this is 
until you have to stand in line 
with 65 other women waiting 
to powder your nose.” 


"What did Stockard say to 
you?” 

“She said if the Titanic 
went down to save a place in a 
lifeboat for her/’ 

“It sounds as if she was 
taking it well,” I said. 

“Except for standing on 
one fool and then die other, 
she was in good shape.” 

“When she saw you going 
into the men's room, why 
didn’t she follow you?” 

“She said she didn't have 
the nerve. She was afraid she 
would wind up as a headline 
in the New York Post: De- 
butante Crashes Men's Room 
— Male Theatergoers De- 
mand Their Money Back.” 

I said “I hope she gets 
back before the owners of 
Macy’s go down." 

“Stockard told me if she 
doesn't make it back before 
the Titanic sinks, to meet us in 
the parking lot and bring a 
piece of ice.” 

"Well, Ashley, I must say 
you did the right thing. There 
is no sense going to the theat- 
er and behaving like a lady. 
What is interesting, though, is 
that in the second act the or- 
chestra is not playing “Near- 
er My God to Thee.’ ’* 

“They're playing outside 
the ladies' room.” 


By Joan Dupont 

International NeraidTrUtune 


i ANNES — At the end of this 50th 
• anniversary competition, Abbas Ki- 


arostami turned up, an unexpected visit from 
a Persian poet, to win the Palme d'Or. (The 
other winner, Shohei Imam lira, had returned 
to Japan). The jury, headed by Isabelle Ad- 
jani. made a bold move, rewarding Kiaro- 
stami's “Taste of Cherry,” a small film from 
a poor country, over gunplay and gore titles, 
and warning labels like “Assassin(s)” and 
“Nil by Mouth.” 

“I heard that the films in competition 
were about violence,” the Iranian director 
said. “I'm happy that on this 50th an- 


50TH CANNES FESTIVAL 


Met Gets 11 Chinese Masterpieces 


New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Eleven 
major Chinese paintines 


galleries for Chinese art on 
Thursday. With it the Met- 


-LN major Chinese paintings 
from the renowned C.C. Wang 
Family Collection, including 
Dong Yuan’s “The River- 
bank,” the earnest of the thrte 
rarest and most important 
early monumental landscape 
paintings in the world, have 
been promised as a gift to die 
Metropolitan Museum of Art 
The gift comes chi the eve 
of the unveiling of the mu- 
seum's renovated permanent 


Thursday. With it the Met- 
ropolitan can lay claim to 
having the most comprehen- 
sive collection of Chinese 
paintings outside China. Six 
of the works in the gift will go 
on display immediately in the 
galleries, whose expansion 
was a two-year, S14 million 
project. 

The gift is being made by 
Oscar Tang, a private invest- 
ment manager who is a trustee 
of the Metropolitan. 


niversary my film is not I’m against spec- 
tacular violence and believe that directors 
shouldn't get audiences used to it; cinema 
should take a moral stand.” 

Getting * ‘Taste of Cherry,” banned by the 
authorities, out of Iran, was the kind of drama 
the festival had not known since 1 982, when 
Yimaz Guney’s “ Yol," a film on prison life 
was banned in Turkey and came to Cannes to 
win the Golden P alm. 

“The subject of suicide in my film dis- 
turbed the authorities,” Kiarostami says, 
“the subject of a man taking destiny into his 
own hands. They wondered why the festival 
wanted this film so much. Once they had 
time to see the film and analyze it, there was 
no problem-" 

A contemplative drive through the in- 
dustrial outskirts of Tehran by a man seeking 
to commit suicide, ‘ ‘Taste of Cheny” is not 
the most upbeat of Kiarostami's works, nor 
is it likely to win a “Fifth Element” kind of 
audience. “But the subject of snicide is a 
pretext,” die director said, “the real subject 
is life." 

The story came to him after reading a 1989 
interview in Newsweek with the Romanian- 
born writer E. M. Cioran, who said, “With- 
out die possibility of suicide, I would have 
killed myself long ago." In Iran, Kiarostami 
says, the number of suicides have increased: 
“In Japan, it’s the oldest people in the pop- 
ulation diat kill themselves.” he says, “in 
Iran, it's the youngest.” 

The director, 54, spins philosophical par- 
ables with slender means; the car with a 
solitary driver is his vehicle, a cheap way of 
getting close up to isolated lives in hills and 



Abbas Kiarostami (right) with his Golden Palm. With him is the actor Koji 
Yakusho, who accepted the Palm for Shohei Imam ura, the absent co- winner. 


villages. His movies have no stars, no special 
effects; he produces, writes, and edits. His 
trilogy, “Where is the House of My 
Friend?" "And Life Goes On,” and 
“Through the Olive Trees,” represented 
quiet probes into simple lives, shattered by 
an earthquake. ‘ ‘In my two last films, death 
hovers, but the characters resist” 

He took two years to make “Taste of 
Cherry,” working with his son, Bahman Ki- 
arostami, 19: “It started when he was 8. but he 
wasn’t aware of being used. Later, I realized 
that he had really participated And 10 years 
ago, when I mark* ‘Where is My Friend's 
House?* he worked with the children. We 
dialogued together, I was the adult, be was the 
child, and those were die dialogues I wrote.” 

In “Taste of Cherry,” a nameless man in 
his 50s, (Homayoun Ershadi) alone on the 
dusty road, has dug his grave and is looking 
for somebody who will bury him. In a land 
with men hungry to work, he is willing to 


pay. He tries to persuade a series of people — 
Afghans. Kurds. Turks, prisoners of the 


desert, a soldier, a seminaiy student, a mu- 
seum employee, to help him . With each 
encounter, the man repeals his request, stub- 
born, closed to argument; but argument en- 
sues: each character resists him, finds a story 
to tell, a metaphor or joke. The museum 
employee talks about blackberries, and the 
tasteof cherries. 

The dialogues sound simple, a repetition 
of questions and answers, but die director, 
who started with documentaries, is a master 
at eking out extraordinary responses. “I use 
repetition," he says, “the way in Literature, 
you would put a sentence in quotes or use 
bold face. This is impossible in cinema: The 
actor would have to shout to emphasize.” 

The film ends with die man lying in his 
grave, facing die stars; then there is another 
shot, the same scene filmed from a distance, 
in video, showing the green countryside. 
This was only a movie after all. You see the 
crew, and young soldiers lolling in the coun- 
tryside. You hear the trumpet music of “Sl 
J ames Infirmary.” 


“We need dial break to give distance and 
to separate us from the subject of suicjcte. 
The film took, two years to make because of 
that last scene: My son and I came back to 
film in springtime and it was extraordinary, a 
beautiful landscape after the rain — a cel- . 
ebration. le sucre du printemps. 

Of course, although this is not an issue he 
relishes, Kiarostami’s films reflect on life in 
T ran “What director is not influenced by his 
country and society? I make my movie and 
then I ask why I made it After 1 8 years of the 
regime, we no longer know if we are cen- 
sored, or if we censor ourselves. This is not 
an issue that counts for me; I would work the 
same way without censorship.” 

Unlike Egyptian (Erector Youssef Chahine, 
who won the special 50tb -anniversary prize. 
Kiarostami did not denounce his country's 
regime: “I don’t feel it’s necessary. In our 
country too, there are radical religious move- 
ments and sometimes they cause problems. 
You have to talk with people to resolve the 
problems. I think that Iran's internal problems 
are better resolved from inside the country, 
rather than from the outside. 

“As Isay in this film, life is not fate; it’s a 
matter of choice- I chose to live in Iran; I 
could leave, but I don't; despite the prob- 
lems, I feel at home. In our neighborhood, we 
don’t see any violence.” 

When be went to the Locarno festival, the 
director got a big dose of western moviJR 
“thousands of people in an open air theater 
booed, and the next night, they came back for 
another violent American film. This is 
something I discuss with my son at home: why 
do people who hate violence go to see these 
films ? And why do the others sell so badly?” 


reave. Rat* 
fjBchaiiiied 


- iPriir> fr t 'jrrr 


In dll 


The French company Ciby 2000 brought 
faste of Cherry' ' to Cannes at short notice. 


“Taste of Cherry" to Cannes at short notice. 
Gilles Jacob had announced the film, then 
was told it was being held back; tire first day 
of the festival, news came that the original 
print would make it 

Pierre Rissient. consultant to Gilles Jacob 
and to Ciby, gave the director moral support, 
“but not the money. Had they given money 
before, people could have said that they 
wanted to protect their investment Elat the 
value is bigger because this was sheer sup- 
port We heeded the enormous energy on this 
side — the invitation. That was important 
Both sides worked hard: we pushed, and 
here, they pulled. 

“So this is a real P alm. In the last film, I 
had olives from the olive trees, and now, with 
the cherries, I got the Palm.” 


*.1 

:.V I®* 

• r#r 


1* 

• •'* 


• j.- 



PEOPLE 


R OMANCE has been blossoming for the last 
four months between Britain’s Prince An- 


XV four months between Britain’s Prince An- 
drew and a 29-year-old brunette who is a re- 
searcher for the BBC. the British press reported 
Monday. Henriette Peace, die daughter of a wine 
seller, met the Duke of York. 37, at a reception to 
which she was invited because she bad worked in 
the offices of Andrew’s brother Prince Charles, 
the heir to die throne, the Daily Express said. 


portedly leaving the Dorchester by separate exits, 
the couple traveled to Blenheim Palace in Ox- 
fordshire, the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill, 
where the Great Hall was set for dinner for 14. 


bie, best choreography for Ann Reinking, and best 
li ghtin g design. The Drama Desk is an organization 
of New York theater critics and journalists. 


RnoffOj Yosgnt/T)K> Associated Prae 

MOTORCYCLE CAPER — Pierce Brosnan and Michelle Yeoh show how mo- 
torcycle action scenes are done during fuming of a new James Bond movie in Bangkok. 


Did Sylvester Stallone secretly many his girl- 
friend, Jennifer Flavin, on the roof of a London 
hotel? The star of “Rambo” and “Rocky" and the 
former model aren’t saying, but Britain's tabloids 
were sure. “Rocky's Rooftop Bride,” headlined 
the News of The World. “Stallone Weds at Hotel 
... On the Sly,” said the Sunday Mirror. Ac- 
cording to the newspapers, the couple exchanged 
vows at the Dorchester Hotel in a rooftop civil 
ceremony Saturday. A small group of friends at- 
tended “They have indeed been married,” the 
Mail on Sunday quoted an unidentified official of 
the local registry that conducts civil weddings as 
saying. The News of the World published photos of 
Flavin, 28, in a short white sleeveless dress, holding 
the couple’s 8-month-old daughter Sophia, and of 
Stallone, 50, raising a glass in a toast. After re- 


A new musical about sex in Tunes Square and a 
revival of a Bob Fosse classic ran away with 
several Drama Desk Awards. “Chicago.” the hit 
Broadway revival of the Fosse musical, received 
six awards, including best revival of a musical and 
best actress in a musical for its star, Bebe 
Neuwirth. “The Life.” a musical celebrating the 
sleaze and sex of the old Tunes Square, won three 
awards, including best new musical, best music for 
Cy Coleman, ana best featured actress in a musical 
for Lillias White. “How I Learned to Drive,” by 
Paula Vogel, was chosen outstanding new play. 
Mark Brokaw won for best director, and David 
Morse shared best actor honors with Christopher 
Plummer, the star of "Banymore.” Henrik Ib- 
sen’s “A Doll’s House" won for outstanding re- 
vival of a play and Janet McTeer, who plays Nora, 
got the nod as best actress. Robert Cuctioll was 
picked best actor in a musical for his double role in 
"Jekyll & Hyde." “Chicago's” other awards in- 
cluded best featured actor in a musical for Joel 
Grey, best direction in a musical for Walter Bob- 


Paul McCartney could make history, if he 
hangs on long enough, by becoming possibly the 
world’s most questioned man. The former Beatle 
made a brave start on a list of more than 3 million 
questions put to him ot the Internet- It would take 
an estimated six years for McCartney to get through 
the questions, being broadcast on a live television 
program on the VH1 pop channel in Britain, Ger- ' 
many and the United States. 


‘rr.TrJfr: 

.• : 

* 

■ •• 


The Black Panther Party founder, Bobby Seale, 
lost a legal fight against makers of the 1995 film 
“Panther,” which he said depicted him unfairly 
and downplayed his commitment to nonviolence. 
U.S. District Judge Raymond Broderick denied 
Seale’s claim for monetary damages against 
Gramercy Pictures and others involved with the 
movie. The judge agreed that one movie scene 
portrayed Seale in a false light, but be ruled that 
Seale had failed to prove actual malice — a re- 
quirement in such cases brought by well-known 
public figures. 


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836 


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Belgium* 

Czech flapubficA . .. , 

France 

6annaoy 

GlMC 8 * 

Ireland 

Italy* 

NeUnnlaads* 

Roots* A(l*osetrwi> 
Spain 


822-833-011 

MW-103-1B 

.. 06-42 -008-1 01 

0-M8-M-W11 

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.80-880-1311 

1-8M-550-0M 

172-1*11 

0888-022-9111 

755-5842 

988-99-08*11 


Sweden 

Switzerland* 

United Kingdom a... 


Egypi*(Cairo)t... 

brafll 

Saudi Are bis ^ . 


HIPPIE EAST 


023 - 795-011 

.0300-89-0811 

0500-89-0011 

0880-89-8011 


■■ 510-0208 

177-100-2727 

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Kenya* 

Sooth Alitea ... . 


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