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Riot police firing tear gas and rubber bullets wounded 50 protesting sugar workers in Jiyuy Province. 

Rioting Over Jobs Shakes Argentina 


By Calvin Sims 

Ne H’ York Times Service 


BUENOS AIRES — Driven by dis- 
content over high unemployment and 
declining living standards, violent 
protests have erupted across Argen- 
tina. Riot police have clashed with tens 
of thousands of people blocking roads, 
bridges and govemment'buildmgs. 


The target of the uprisings this 
month, and of major clashes Tuesday 
and Wednesday, is the government's 
economic reforms, which have brought 
relative financial stability to a country 
once plagued by hyperinflation. But 
they have also produced record un- 
employment. as inefficient state indus- 
tries were sold off and the number of 
state employees drastically reduced. 


In the poor northwestern province of 
Jujuy, at least 50 people were hurt in 
clashes with the police Tuesday and 
Wednesday. Television footage 
showed braider police using rear gas 
and rubber bullets to disperse crowds. 
Workers fought back by throwing 
rocks at the security forces. The border 

See ARGENTINA, Page 6 


A Trans-Atlantic Air Battle 

EU Lists Objections to Boeing-McDonnell Pact 


By Tom Buerkle 

Uuernanonai Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — The stakes surround- 
ing Boeing Co.'s planned acquisition of 
McDonnell Douglas Corp. rose dramat- 
ically Thursday after the European Un- 
ion's antitrust chief gave the companies 
a lengthy list of objections to the trans- 
action and threatenai to reject it unless 
Boeing made major changes. 

The EU move. and. an immediate 
promise by Boeing to contest the case 
vigorously, raised the potential for the 
biggest trans-Atlantic trade dispute in 
years just days before President Bill 
Clinton is due to meet with leaders of the 
EU in The Hague to promote closer 
economic and political ues between the 
United States and the 15-nation Union. 

The statement of objections issued by 
the European Commission late Wed- 
nesday was not made public, but of- 
ficials at the EU’s executive agency said 
it focused on three core issues: Boeing's 
dominant share of more than 60 percent 
of the global aircraft market, including 
its monopoly on the 747 jumbo jet; its 
exclusive long-term contracts with 
American Airlines and Delta Air Lines; 
and the fear that McDonnell’s huge de- 
fense business will effectively subsidize 
further gains by Boeing on the com- 
mercial jet market. 

Commission officials said Boeing 
had until July to propose remedies to the 
antitrust concerns, and they insisted 
they had the will and the weapons to 
oppose the deal if Boeing resisted. 

The officials, who spoke on condition 
of anonymity, said EU regulations would 
permit the commission to fine Boeing as 
much as 10 percent of the combined 
companies’ sales, or nearly $5 billion, if 
it refosed to comply. They said the com- 
mission also could make h illegal for 
Boeing to do business in the EU. 


Technically, those measures would 
not prevent Boeing from completing the . 
acquisition, but they could effectively 
shut Boeing out of the European market 
Sources close to Boeing conceded that 
those measures would cripple foe com- 
pany's ability to operate in an area that 
represented roughly one-third of foe 
world market. 

In Seattle, Boeing vowed to press its 
case and expressed confidence it would 
obtain approval in foe end. It insisted that 
foe proposed acquisition would not sig- 
nificantly affect the two-horse race in 
civil aviation between itself and 
Europe’s Airbus Industrie and contended 
that, in any event. U.S. antitrust reg- 


ulators at the Federal Trade Commission 
should take the lead in the case. 

“The fact is. McDonnell Douglas's 
market share has continued to decline in 
recent years, and Airbus has become a 
stronger competitor,” Philip Condi t. 
Boeing's chief executive, said. 

Boeing will have a chance to present 
its case at closed-door hearings in Brus- 
sels on June 1 2 and 13, along with Airbus 
and major airlines. Bur foe number and 
seriousness of the commission's com- 
plaints indicated that Karel van Miert, 
the EU commissioner for competition, 
would not be content with minor 

See TRADE, Page 14 


U.S. Will Punish 3 Firms 
In Asia Over Iran Arms 

2 Companies in China and One in Hong Kong 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


Storm Signs in Indonesian Race 

Election Violence and Islam’s Appeal Mirror Discontent 


By Michael Richardson 

' ' International Herald Tribune 


JAKARTA —The growing influence of Islam in 
Indonesian politics and the sharp increase in mob 
violence leading up to the election Thursday- are 
threatening to mar the overwhelming victory expected 
by the government of President Suharto. 

As the governing Golkar party and two rival parties 
prepared for the last officially sanctioned day of 
campaigning Friday, when a five-day cool- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


mg off period was to be declared before foe voting, 
Indonesians and foreigners alike were alarmed at the 
excesses of what the government had said would be a 
“festival of democracy.” 

Analysts say that foe lawlessness and die emergence 
of foe Muslim-oriented United Development Party as a 
lighting rod for popular grievances have increased the 
likelihood of political instability over foe next few 
^years as various groups vie to influence foe succession 
to Mr. Suharto, who is 75. The grievances included 
alleged official corruption and abuse of power. 

Some analysts say the armed forces, which have a 


political role in Indonesia — to safeguard national unity 
and stability — could intervene in a crisis, especially if 
they saw any Muslim challenge to foe secular state. 

profess adherencemblam, which has been untlergoing 
a revival in recent years in reaction to the wave of 
economic development sweeping over Indonesia. 

Although official figures snow that 14 percent of the 
population lives below the poverty line, compared with 
60 percent when Mr. Suharto took power in 1967, there 
is widespread resentment at what many Indonesians 
see as collusion-between govenunent'and big business 
in land acquisition and other lucrative development 
policies, ana foe still-vast gap between rich and poor. 

Arnica Rais, bead of Muhammadiyah, Indonesia's 
second-largest Islamic welfare organization, said the 
increased appeal of the United Development Party was a 
measure of foe people’s fhistrations with Golkar. 

“Islam is being used as a symbol of protest,” be 
said, adding that the party’s rise was not- a religious 
revival but a “manifestation of the growing gap be- 
tween rich and poor.’’ 

Leaders of foe United Development Party insist they 
do not advocate a theocratic state, but their close 

See INDONESIA, Page 6 



WASHINGTON — The United 
States said Thursday that it would pun- 
ish two companies in C hina and rate in 
Hong Kong for selling chemical 
weapons technology to Iran. 

In announcing a ban on U.S. gov- 
ernment trade with foe companies for at 
least a year. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright took pains to say 
there was no clear indication that foe 
Chinese or Hong Kong governments 
had been involved. 

The U.S. move appeared to be a way 
of getting tough on the Chinese — if not 
the government in Beijing — for much- 
criticized arms and technology transfers 
just as the debate over renewing China's 
favored trade status has increased con- 
gressional pressure for administration 
firmness toward Beijing. 

The United States has repeatedly 
raised with China its concerns about 
Ir anian attemp ts to develop chemical 
weaponry. Asked about this Thursday, a 
State Department spokesman would not 
say whether officials in Beijing could 
have been unaware, despite the U.S. 
entreaties, of the activities of the compa- 
nies being sanctioned. 


“I would hope foe Chinese govern- 
ment would now take steps parallel to 
ours.” said the spokesman, who asked 
not to be identified. “We’ve already 
made some progress with the Chinese 
on this.’* 

President Bill Clinton announced 
Monday that he intended to seek a one- 
year renewal of most-favored-nation 
status for China. 

Chinese markets slide after 
crackdown • Wild West investing 
popular in Hong Kong. Page 13. 

Speaking to a Senate appropriations 
subcommittee, Mrs. Albright also de- 
scribed a new U.S. determination to 
ensure that the terms of the Dayton 
accords on Bosnia are implemented. 

. With foe Clinton administration com- 
mitted to withdraw troops in June 1998, 
foe said that the NATO-led force would 
expand its scope, while remaining 
chiefly focused on its military duties. 

Nonmilitary tasks, foe added, would 
include “helping to create a secure en- 
vironment for managed refugee returns 
and foe installation of elected officials 

See SANCTIONS, Page 6 


2 Sides of the Same Coin 
Vie for Iran’s Presidency 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Service 


taaj Ntmftrnl/Rnnm 

Supporters of Megawati Sukarnoputri giving 
the sign of her party in Jakarta on Thursday. 


Swiss Reject ‘Nazi Gold 9 Report by U.S. as One-Sided 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tunes Service 


■ BERN — Two weeks after the Clin- 
ton administration accused Switzerland 
of prolonging World War H by acting as 
a banker lo Nazi Germany, the author- 
ities here tartly rejected foe accusation 
■Thursday as * ‘unsupported” and termed 
Washington’s assessment "one- 
sided.” _ . 

• The Swiss statement, read by Foreign 

Minister Flavio Cotti, reflected an m- 


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creasingly prickly sense of embanle- 
ment since the publication May 7 of a 
200-page U.S. report. 

It was compiled with foe belp of 1 1 
government agencies under the direc- 
tion of Stuart Eizenstat, who was ap- 
pointed by President Bill Clinton last 
year to investigate what had become 
known as the “Nazi gold” affair. 

The report, the most definitive U.S. 
government account of wartime deal- 
ings between Germany and neutral 
countries, chronicled . Switzerland's 
purchases of gold from Hitler and the 
postwar refusal of Swiss commercial 


banks to offer access to deposits made 
by European Jews who later died in the 
Holocaust. 

The report, which stunned many 
Swiss, seemed all the more damning to 
.them since it followed what are viewed 
here as efforts to arone, if belatedly, for 
wartime behavior. 

While it went further than before in 
acknowledging what it termed errors, 
the Swiss government statement on 
Thursday took particular issue with foe 
foreword to foe Eizenstat report, saying 
that it reflected political and moral judg- 
ments that went beyond foe historical 


evidence. The statement said foe Swiss 
government “regards the representa- 
tion of Switzerland as the bankers to the 
Nazis as a one-sided, blanket judg- 
ment” 

“It is suggested in the foreword that 
foe neutral countries may have pro- 
longed the Third Reich’s ability to wage 
war by trading with it,” the Swiss state- 
ment continued. “At least based on the 
report's contents this comment must be 
referred to as unsupported.” 

Months of criticism of the Swiss re- 

See SWISS, Page 5 


TEHRAN — Both are turbaned cler- 
ics with well-groomed beards, strong 
revolutionary credentials and scant af- 
fection for foe West. Each describes 
himself as the natural political heir of 
Hashemi Rafsanjani, the popular out- 
going president of Iran. Both are 54. 

But there are important differences 
between Akbar Nateq Nouri and Mo- 
hammed Khatemi, the undisputed front- 
runners in the four-way presidential 
election Friday, the seventh and most 
competitive since Islamic revolution- 
aries toppled the pro-American mon- 
archy in 1979. 

Mr. Nouri. speaker of foe Parliament 
of Iran, is an arch conservative who last 
year described foe United States as a 
“blood sucking wolf’ and recently was 
forced to deny rumors that he would 
require schoolgirls to wear foe tent-like 
black robe known as the chador. 

Mr. Khatemi, a scholar and educator 
who beads foe national library, lost his 
job as Iran’s minister of culture and 
Islamic guidance several years ago be- 
cause he was seen as too permissive. 

Although Mr. Nouri was once seen as 


a shoe-in, given his close ties to Iran’s 
all-powerful religious establishment, 
foe race has tightened in recent weeks, 
generating excitement among Iranians 
fed up with foe failure of thrar clerical 
leaders to root out corruption and deliver 
on promises of jobs and prosperity. 

while a victory by Mr. Khatemi 
would be unlikely to temper Iranian 
hostility toward foe West, it almost cer- 
tainly would usheT in an era of greater 
political pluralism and social and cul- 
tural freedom, according to foreign dip- 
lomats and Iranian political analysts. 

“If Khatemi wins, things will be- 
come more interesting, partly because 
he is known to be more open-minded 
and partly because it will be seen as 
evidence that the system hasn't got 
everything its own way,” said a West- 
ern diplomat in Tehran. 

The race has been a rough-and- 
tumble one. featuring widespread van- 
dalism of campaign posters and a hearty 
dose of negative campaigning, espe- 
cially in the camp of Mr. Noun, which 
accuses of Mr. Khatemi of being a “lib- 
eral” who secretly wants wanner re- 
lations with foe United States. 

See IRAN, Page 6 


Yeltsin Berates and Fires 
Top 2 Defense Officials 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Service 


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MOSCOW — Angered over foe in- 
ability of foe military to reform Russia’s 
disintegrating armed forces. President 
Boris Yeltsin on Thursday fired his de- 
fense minister and foe chief of his gen- 
eral staff and issued a blistering attack 
on the entire military high command. 

■ “I am not just dissatisfied, I am in- 
dignant over foe stale of reforms in the 
army and the general state of foe armed 

forces.” Mr. Yeltsin said. 

The dismissal of Defense Minister 
Igor Rodionov — foe second defense 
minister Mr. Yeltsin has removed in 10 
months — and Viktor Samsanov head 
of foe general Staff, is a further blow to 
foe morale of the aimed forces, which 
are underpaid, underfed and, as they 
proved in a humiliating performance in 
Chechnya, largely unfit for battle. 

In broadening his criticism to include 


the corps of elite generals whom Mr. 
Yeltsin said “grow fatter” as “soldiers 
get thinner.” the president signaled that 
a drastic reorganization of the high com- 
mand, and severe cuts in the 1.5-mil- 
lion-strong military, may be imminent. 

Mr. Yeltsin chose an extraordinarily 
theatrical forum to launch his attack: a 
televised meeting of his defense council 
with top military and security officials 
in attendance. Mr. Rodionov, a retired 
genera] who only a year ago was seen as 
a champion of reform, sat with his head 
bowed and stared at the table, only 
occasionally daring to glance up. When 
he was addressed he jumped to atten- 
tion, then sat down again resignedly. 

“You have forgotten that in a civ- 
ilized state foe armed forces ensure the 
nation's defense from military danger, 
global, threat and local conflicts,” Mr. 
Yeltsin thundered. “The army must 

See RUSSIA, Page 5 


AGENDA 


Kabila’s Forces Take Control I 
Of Congo’s Only Seaport 

KINSHASA, Congo (Reuters) — Laurent Kabila’s 
forces seized control of Congo's only seaport, Matadi on 
foe Atlantic coast, state television said Thursday. 

It said that Matadi, near the border with Angola, fell 
without resistance but did not say when. 

Mr. Kabila was weighing what role, if any, Etienne 
Tshisekedi would play in his government. Mr. 


Seismic Activity^ May 2iana 22 



backers, who are capable of shutting down Kinshasa. But 
it was also thought unlikely that Mr. Kabila would give a 
powerful position to a man with little respect on the 
international scene, who is prone to rash actions and who 
has shown little inclination to compromise. Page 6. 


Books- — - 

Crossword — 

Opinion 

Sports - : 


Page 9. 

Page 9. 

Pages $-9. 

Pages 20-21. 



The krtemwrket 


Paged. 


The IHT on-line http:/ 


SHAKY PLANET — An earthquake in central India, 
one of many suable tremors globally, killed 38. Page 2. 








Cooks, Kooks and Politicos / 1 5 Years on the Air 


A Defender of Canadian Culture Moves On 


By Anthony DePalma 

New York Tones Service 


T ORONTO — At last count he has done some 
27,000 interviews, though he would be the 
first to admit that after all the rhubarb recipes 
(“Is there a way to make it less stringy?’’), 
Celtic musicians and Quebec separatists he has in- 
troduced, 27,000 sometimes seems too low. 

For IS years the busy interviewer, Peter Gzowski 
(pronounced ZAH-ski), has been the host of a three- 
hour daily radio program called >> Morningside ,< 
that is heard by more than 1.5 million people from 
coast to coast on the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. 

There is even an hour of highlights re-broadcast 
every night, making his old plaid bathrobe of a voice 
far more familiar, and probably more comforting, 
than any prime minister's or other public offi- 
cial's. 

With so much exposure, it is no wonder that 
Canada has been down with a bad case of national 
anxiety since Mr. Gzowski announced last fall that 
he would leave “Momingsjde'' at the end of this 
month. 

The show, which features not just cooks and 
kooks but also political panels, economic discus- 
sions and long talks about serious issues like family 
values and Canadian peacekeepers for the United 
Nations, will be replaced by a program that is being 
developed. 

“I miss him already,’' Beth Kaplan wrote in an 
essay in The Globe and Mail in February, months 
before Mr. Gzowski would do his last program. 
“How can this country survive in the morning if 
Peter Gzowski vanishes for good?” 

In a country forever in search of its own voice, 
Mr. Gzowski has become a stand-in for Canada, as 
curious as he is courteous, interested in hockey 
heroes and indigenous customs and all the forgotten 
chapters of a national history and culture that he 
constantly challenges his listeners to cherish and 
defend. 

“When I say this, it is not in the spirit of anti- 
Americanism,” Mr. Gzowski said in an interview in 
the downtown Tomato studio where he broadcasts 
“Moroingside.” “But we live next door to the 
cultural monolith and it washes over us every day 
and in every way. And the more globalized die 
world gets, die more precarious our culture gets." 

It is a culture he feels is as vivid and sprawling as 
the Canadian landscape itself, if sometimes just as 
hard to reach. Mr. Gzowski is 62 and remembers 
how as a child in southern Ontario he did not hear 
Canadian voices on the radio or read Canadian 
voices in books. 

About 40 years ago, after dropping out of the 
University of Toronto, be went in search of those 
voices, landing a job as city editor of The Moose 
Jaw Times-Herald in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. 

There he “felt the wrath of prairie thunder and, in 
its aftermath, smelled the fresh earth and beard the 
meadowlark sing,” he wrote in his latest monthly 
column in Canadian Living magazine. Out west he ' 
also brushed up against the values that separate 
Canadians from many Americans, mostly based on 



Karin .\igue/T]w V» fork Total 


Peter Gzowski communing with his vast audience, ‘We live next door to the 
cultural monolith and it washes over us every day and in every way' 


the need to act collectively to survive a harsh 
climate and vast empty spaces. 

He said the publicly supported CBC was founded 
on that same snared spirit, and he has spent most of 
his career there. When he received a Peabody 
Award this month in recognition of his work, it was 
the first time a Canadian working in Canada had 
been so honored. 


Mi 


R. GZOWSKI’S style gives “Morn- 
ing side" its wide comfort zone. He 
stutters often, and trips up oo his ques- 
, tions the way, well, most people do. His 
smoker's voice sounds rumpled, which is the way 
he looks, dressed in bulky sweater, suede loafers 
and shapeless pants. 

Listeners find "Momingside” reassuringly Ca- 
nadian, aphenomenon in these days of shock radio 
and talk -show bombast The program Tuns from 9 to 
noon, when the audience includes a mix of fanners, 
fishermen and home workers, including home- 
makers and crafts people. 

“If I had wanted to change the face of Canadian 
crafts. I could have said, ‘OJC., everybody, today 
we're working in green,' and every potter in the 
country would have said ‘Yes, Peter,’ 'cause they 
aU had ‘Momingside' on,” he said. 


Mr. Gzowski's guests are unfailingly polite, and 
at neither they nor their 


blessed with so much time that neither i 
host ever feels much pressure. 

He has interviewed former Prime Minister Rene 
Trudeau, the writer Margaret Atwood the film 


producer Norman Jewison and many lesser-known 
characters, like Clarence Asham, a Winnipeg savant 
who can instantly replay on his accordion any music 
he hears. Mr. Gzowski has interviewed him twice. 

“Time is one of the real luxuries,” he said 

But die folksy image of the program annoys some 
people, and even more offensive to them is the idea 
that somehow it holds Canada together. 

“If ‘Momingside,’ which is listened to by less 
than 15 percent ofthe entire nation each day, is all the 
due we’ve got, we might as well be hying to bind the 
Titanic with Bondfast,” Geoff Pevere and Greig 
Dymond wrote in “Mondo Canuck,” a 1996 book. 

But. there is something about “Momingside” 
that resonates in many Canadians. During the dis- 
astrous Red River flood in Manitoba last month, Mr. 
Gzowski and his staff organized a fund-raiser that 
they called the Red River Rally, with performances 
by dozens of Canadian artists. They raised almost 
$2 milli on. 

Mr. Gzowski said be would like to write a book 
when he leaves “Momingside.” but beyond that he 
has not decided what to do. But he is certain that 
even after 27,000 interviews, there are plenty more 
interesting Canadians out there to talk to. 

“Some days 1 get up and think. My God, I must 
have talked to everybody. And then the next day 1 
come in and there's someone I never heard of,” Mr. 
Gzowski said. “And he gives me a mind-boggling 
interview, just filled with breathtaking wisdom and 
pleasure and challenge, and 1 didn't blow that guy 
existed.” 


White House Demands 
Release of Palestinian 


Journalist Arrested 
On Arafat's Orders 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The Palestinian 
Authority should immediately release 
Daoud Kuttab, a Palestinian-American 
journalist detained on Yasser Arafat's 
orders, Michael McCurry, White House 
press secretary, said Thursday. 

“It’s our understanding that Mr. Kut- 
tab has not been charged with any in- 
fractions, and we are very concerned 
about the implications of his detention 
both for the rule of law and for freedom 
of the press,” Mr. McCurry said- 

re believe the Palestinian Author- 


ity should release him immediately,” 
Mr. McCurry said. 



Mr. Kuttub, persecuted first by Is- 
rael, now by the Pale stini ans. 


Washington has .raised the matter 
with senior members of the Palestinian 
Authority but not directly with Yasser 
Arafat, the Palestinian leader, who is 
traveling, Mr. McCurry said 
Mr. Kuttab was honored last fall by r 
the international Committee to Protect AS IlClllH 
Journalists for battling Israeli and Pal- 
estinian press restrictions. 


U.S. Envoy to Israel 


# 


Prior to Palestinian autonomy, Mr. 
Kuttab frequently was arrested and 
threatened by Israeli authorities. 

The U.S. consul-general in Jerusalem 
pl anne d to try to see Mr. Kuttab, ac- 
cording to Mr. McCurry. 

On Wednesday, Ahmed Kotei, 
speaker of the Palestinian Legislative 
Council, announced to legislators Mr. 
Kuttab’s detention by police and said the 
council would demand an explanation. 

Mr. Kuttab’s brother said Wednesday 
that Mr. Knrtab was summoned to 
Ramall ah by Palestinian police. 

The journalist, who lives in East Je- 
rusalem, went to the Ramallah self-rule 
enclave in the West Bank and was de- 
tained The brother said the detention 


apparently related to a dispute be- 
?n Mr. Kun 


was 

tween Mr. Kuttab, who has a private 
contract to cany live broadcasts of Pal- 
estinian Legislative Council sessions, 
and Palestinian stale -run television. 

Feras Amleh, chief of police in Ramal- 
lah, told journalists that Mr. Kuttab had 
been detained on Mr. Arafat's orders. 


Agence France-Presse 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. am- 
bassador to Israel, Martin Indyk. will 
soon leave his post, but his departure 
does not stem from the stalled Middle 
East peace process, the White House- 
announced Thursday. 

The White House spokesman, Mi- 
chael McCurry, said Mr. Indyk was 
being replaced in “a natural cycle of- 
change,*' but declined to confirm that 
his successor would be the ambassador 
to Italy. Reginald Bartholomew 

Mr. McCurry stressed that Mr. Indyk 
had been a "very effective represen- 
tative.” He also rejected suggestions 
that the envoy was leaving because the* 
peace process bad broken down. 

Palestinian officials have stepped up 
criticisms of U.S. representatives in- 
volved in the peace talks, particularly. 
Dennis Ross, the special envoy, accus- 
ing them of a bias toward Israel. 

Mr. McCurry also declined to com- 
ment on speculation that Mr. Indyk will 1 
be named undersecretary of state for* 
Near Eastern affairs. " 


Earthquake Kills 38 in India 
As Seismic Events Dot Globe 


Corrections 


• A first-quarter loss by the European 
Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 
noted in a Bloomberg News article in the 
May 22 edition, was due to an increase in 
loan loss provisions arid not to adminis- 
trative expenses, as reported. 


• News agency reports, cited in an article 
in the May 13 issue, on the relief efforts 
mounted by the International Committee of 
the Red Cross to aid the earthquake victims 
in Iran, were incorrect. The relief efforts 
were coordinated by the International Fed- 
eration of Red Cross and Red Crescent 
Societies. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Air France Strike Strands Some Travelers 





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PARIS (AP) — A pilots' strike at Air France left passengers on some 
short- and medium-haul flights stranded Thursday, though the troubled 
state-owned airline said its long distance flights were unaffected. 

At least 30 percent of Air France's short- and mid-range flights out of 
Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport near Paris were canceled, as well as 
half the airline’s flights out of Orly Airport, an airline spokesman said. 

The pilots’ unions staging the four-day strike, which is set to end 
Friday, threatened Wednesday to expand their walkouts to include Air 
France's long-haul schedule. 


Airlines should be required to carry defibrillators, the electric shock 
paddles that can revive victims of cardiac arrest, according to testimony 
before Congress. American Airlines announced last autumn it would add 
defibrillators to its international flights; the equipment is already carried 
aboard some non-U.S. airlines, including Qantas and Virgin Atlanbc.fAPJ 


Mozambique’s international airport in Maputo may have to close at 
night unless thieves can be stopped from stealing runway lights, said the 
airport director, Felismino Charas. { Reuters) 


CarpUtd br Our Sfaff Fran Oafmches 

KOSAMGHAT, India — At least 38 
people were killed and about were 1 .000 
injured when an earthquake struck cen- 
tral India, flattening houses and burying 
many victims as they slept, officials 
said. 

The quake was one of several sizable 
seismic events occurring around the 
world Thursday. 

The upheaval in India, which meas- 
ured 6.0 on the Richter scale and lasted 
about 50 seconds, hit Madhya Pradesh 
state in the heart of the subcontinent at 
4:22 AJtf., authorities in Jabalpur said. 

Officials said they did not expect the 
death toll to rise significantly but cau- 
tioned that rescuers, more than 12 hours 
after the quake, had not yet reached 
many remote villages where additional 
victims might be. The United News of 
India press agency said military forces 
had been asked to help with rescue and 
relief work. 

The event devastated Kosamghat a 
village at the quake's epicenter about 23 
kilometers 1 14 miles) south of Jabalpur. 


i - :' 


The Heat 


The village’s 160 houses, mostly mud- 
huts, wen flattened, leaving about 
1.100 citizens homeless, according to 
Mohan Lai Yadav, a village elder. 

Villagers said casualties -would have 
been worse had so many people not been 
sleeping outside because of hot weather 

Meanwhile, Vanuatu and New Cale- 
donia escaped without casualties or 
damage .Thursday from an earthquake 
measuring 6.5 on the Richter scale. And 
a moderately strong quake shook south- 
western Mexico. There were no im- 
mediate reports of casualties, Mexicari 
officials said, but the earthquake, which 
measured 5.9 on the Richter scale, 
caused some minor damage. 

Moreover, a small quake struck the 
Spanish northwestern region of Galicia 
early Thursday with a maximum in- 
tensity of 4.9 on tbe Richter scale, local 
police said. Despite being one of the 
strongest tremors to hit Spain in 1" ; 
years, it caused only moderate damage. 1 . , 

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northern Portugal and in Japan's Izu 
islands. ( Reuters , AFP, AP) 


; <7 j . 

i.i 


Athenians Choke 
From Heat and 
Air Pollution 


WEATHER 




The Associated Press 

ATHENS — People were 
warned to stay off the streets 
Thursday as temperatures 
soared to their highest level in 
nearly a decade and air pol- 
lution rose toward dangerous 
limits. 

National emergency ser- 
vices, including the capital's 
ambulance authority, also 
warned the elderly and people 
with cardiac and respiratory 
problems to avoid exerting 
themselves outdoors. 

The mercury rose to 37 de- 
grees centigrade (99 Fahren- 
heit). 

Nitrogen dioxide, emitted 
mostly by cars, approached 
danger levels in central 
Athens. 

If danger levels are ex- 
ceeded, such emergency mea- 
sures as traffic bans can take 
effect. 

. It was the highest recorded 
temperature for May since 
1988, said the National Met- 
eorological Service. 


Europe 



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Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWeathar. 


Asia 



North America 


A frontal system wll move Shorten/ and cool in Lon- Tokyo and Beijing will 
i Plains Friday to dan and Paris Friday, then enjoy a gradual warmina 


from the Plains Friday to dan and Paris Friday, than enjoy a gradual warming 
itw Great Lakes and Mid. turning dner and rudder this Irena into this weekend 
west Saturday and into the weekend. Madrid and with ai least some sun 
East Sunday. Showers and Roma win be warm with ai each day. On lha other 
thunderstorms writ accom- least partial sunshine each hand, bath Koreos, indud* 
pony (his system. Warm n day. Cool In Berlin and Ing Seoul, and March urta 
lha southern Rockies and Warsaw with sbowera pos- wffi be cool and unseated, 
southern Plains, while aible through Saturday: Very warm and sticky In 
cooler air wll move Into the turning dnar Stmcfay. CWry Hong Kong and Singapore 
northern Rockies this across Scarefinavia. with a thundershower 

weekend. around late each day. 


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Palestinian 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAI’ 23, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


RAGE 3 


an McTfeigh Defense Opens by Casting Doubt on Day of Truck Rental 



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£beir client as the 1?^ “ " ca ^ 9 °™^ to 
history. 1 171:155 murderer in U.S. 

McVeigh’s ]„d defense 

^a's dS aS “.? b ‘ edoub ' - 


into court Thursday. “We have a job to do and 
we’ll do it.’ 1 

Mr. McVeigh stayed in the Dreamland Motel 
under his own name in the week leading up to 
blast, and prosecutors say he rented the truck at a 
nearby body shop on Monday, April 17. 

Ms. King said she was certain she saw the truck 
on Easter Sunday because she brought her son an 
Easter basket filled with chocolate eggs. 


lUTOrS minds .. uuuui ui UU lomsi wuukui iicr son an 

. He beean TkaV^^ 16 Sp VCTT wient's case. Eiaster basket filled with chocolate eggs, 
nesses to iSutSe ^^ Th “ rsdaybycal,in S wit - “I saw a yellow Ryder truck sitting right 
McVeigh renred a rS D °V aT S- umer 'i that Mr. here," she said. "I could not see my son’s car 
two davs ,k^fe r ? uck to carr y *e bomb because the Ryder truck blocked the view." 

- Hera Kinp T 013 City bIasu Sources close to the case said that Mr. Jones was 

saw a RvtW - nda ,. Truon g testified they expected to call 30 to 40 witnesses to attack 

a Kyoer truck in the nartinn in, «c nninr rhm nnirammont lin<> • ' 


that rocked Oklahoma City and blasted the na- witnesses wh 
t ion's confidence that it was safe from domestic homa in the 1 
terrorism. The government's chief witness. Mi- There are i 
chael Fortier, delivered even more than expected, emmexu's cas 
telling a rapt jury that Mr. McVeigh was so intent to exploit wh 
on killing federal workers that he was prepared to TomKessi 

crash a bomb-laden truck into the front doors of was sure Mr. 
the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. second, shadi 

The defendant's sister. Jennifer McVeigh, iden- John Doe No 


witnesses who could place Mr. McVeigh in Okla- 
homa in the hours or minutes before the blast. 

There are other key discrepancies in the gov- 
ernment's case, all of which the defense was trying 
to exploit when it opened its case Thursday. 

Tom Kessinger, a Ryder employee, testified he 
was sure Mr. McVeigh was accompanied by a 


recollections from his former friends that strongly 
indicated that the 1 993 FBI raid against the Branch 
Davidian sect at Waco, Texas, was the primary 
force behind his anger against the government. But 
the coup de grace seemed to come from Mr. Fortier 
and his wife, Lori, and- government activists and 
former friends of Mr. McVeigh's. In a deal with 


The defendant’s sister. Jennifer McVeigh, iden- 
tified his handwriting on letters he had written, 
many of them railing against the government, one 
even threatening federal law enforcement officials 
with this epithet: "Die, you cowardice bastards." 

Dozens of receipts collected by FBI agents 


second, shadowy man who came to be known as the government, Mr. Fortier pleaded guilty to 


John Doe No. 2. What was his role in the bomb- 
ing? There is also Daina Bradley, a young mother 
severely injured in the bombing, who remembers 
seeing a man other than Mr. McVeigh step out of 
thepassenger side of the truck moments before it 
incinerated the front of die federal building. 


reduced charges and agreed to testifying against 
Mr. McVeigh. Mrs. Fortier was granted immunity 
from prosecution in return for her testimony. 

They separately provided the most intimate 
details of Mr. McVeigh's hatred for the gov- 
ernment and his plans to avenge the deaths of 


, Mr - Kutt U b. 
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.... 


But the government’s case was not fail-safe, on the Oklahoma City explosion were suspended 
Prosecutors skipped over the weak points, and removed from their jobs in the midst of a 


Female Pilot’s Defenders 
Miss Point, General Says 




i . .* 


By Elaine Sciolino 

J .Vw York Times Sen iV e 

. WASHINGTON — The air force 
chief of staff has sharply criticized the 
country's first female B-52 pilot, even 
as the secretary of the air force weighed 
whether to grant her an honorable dis- 
charge instead of court-martialing her 
on adulteiy. lying and other charges. 

. In testimony before the Senate Ap- 
propriations Committee. General Ron- 
ald Fogleman suggested that lawmakers 
and the public should see First Lieu- 
tenant Kelly Flinn, for what she is; guilty 
of lying and rank insubordination. 

The remarks came Wednesday when 
furor over Lieutenant Finn's case rose 
on Capitol Hill and the airforce released 
a letter from the former wife of a civilian 
with whom Lieutenant Finn is accused 
of having an affair. 

- General Fogleman, along with Air 
Force Secretary Sheila Widnall, had 
{been called to testify about the service's 
pudgeL He offered his opinion on the 
case after being berated by Senator Tom 
Harlan for overseeing what the Iowa 
Democrat said was an overly moralistic 
legal code in the air force. 

General Fogleman responded by say- 
ing die point of the case was not “the 
adultery thing" that had “spun up the 
press. " Rather, he said: “This is an issue 
about an officer entrusted ro fly nuclear 
weapons who disobeyed an Older, who 
lied. That’s what this is about,” 

* The most serious charge against Lieu- 
tenant Flinn is making a false official 
statement to investigators, which carries 
a maximum penalty of five years in pris- 


on. She is also charged with disobeying 
the air force regulation against fratern- 
ization with an enlisted man (the result of 
a two-night relationship with an airman), 
which could lead to a prison sentence of 
two years, as well as adultery with a 
married civilian and conduct unbecom- 
ing an officer, for which she could get one 
year each. She could get an additional six 
months for disobeying a lawful order. 

Lieutenant Flinn has asked the air 
force for an honorable discharge and Ms. 
Widnall is considering her request The 
air force has no precedent for granting an 
honorable discharge in such a case. 

General Fogleman argued that the 
service could not selectively enforce its 
rules. 

Ms. Widnall did not comment on the 
issue. As more lawmakers lined up pub- 
licly Wednesday behind Lieutenant 
Flinn, Mr. Harkin chastised the air force 
for the way it had handled the issue. 

“I think the air force is looking ri- 
diculous cm this," said the senator, who 
was a jet pilot in the navy for five years. 

The air force acknowledged Wed- 
nesday that it had received a letter from 
die woman whose former civilian hus- 
band had had an affair with Lieutenant 
Flinn, In the letter, the former wife 
asked the air force secretary to show no 
mercy on Lieutenant Flinn. 

The letter from the former wife. Air- 
man Gayla Zigo, dated May 17, labeled 
the pilot a calculating predator who 
stole her husband. 

“If Lieutenant Flinn gets away with 
these crimes," Airman Zigo wrote, 
“what does that say to the rest of the air 
forcepopulace?” 


\ 7, 


The Heat Over Mercury 

Senate Puts on Pressure to See Hazards Study 


By Jo Warrick 

Washington Ptof Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration is faring renewed pressure 
tb make public an overdue report on 
mercury that suggests the metal is a 
more potent and widespread health 
Lireat than is believed. 

A resolution <vas expected to be in- 
troduced in the Senate on Thursday, 
calling for the release of foe 1 ,700-page 
document, which politicians from 
northeastern states have been trying to 
shake loose from a kind of regulatory 
limbo for more than 18 months. 

Distilling the work of scores of in- 
dependent scientists worldwide, the En- 
vironmental Protection Agency report 
makes the case that mercury is toxic at 
levels lower than previously believed 
and suggests that U.S. regulations 
should be changed to reduce the amount 
of mercury being released into the en- 
vironment. 

A draft version of the report estimates 
that 85,000 American women are being 
exposed to mercury at levels hign 
enough to affect foe brain development 
of their unborn children. 

At least 37 states have issued ad- 
visories warning of possible mercury 


contamination in freshwater fish. The 
report also identifies foe major sources 
of mercury — many of which face little 
or no regulation of their emissions. 
Among foe biggest polluters are coal- 
fired electric utilities and waste incin- 
erators. which release mercury through 
the combustion of batteries, lighting fix- 
tures and medical equipment, the report 
states. 

Finally, foe report offers specific sug- 
gestions for reducing mercury pollu- 
tion, including better recycling and 
emissions controls on smokestacks. 

Ordered by lawmakers in 1990, the 
report could. form foe basis for new, 
tighter federal controls on mercury. But 
days before foe deadline for its submis- 
sion to Congress — April 1996 — ad- 
ministration officials shifted course and 
diverted foe report to a scientific panel for 
further review. The move prompted an 
outcry from environmentalists and post- 
poned any possible new regulations by 
many months, or perhaps years. 

Environmental Protection Agency 
officials said the additional step was 
necessary to steel the report against fu- 
ture legal challenges. Early drafts drew 
criticism from industries as well as law- 
makers and even scientific advisers in 
the administration. 


. y , : • ... 

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Ttaotky Qay/AfUH full Til m 

ATLAST — Robert Jones waving after being awarded the Navy Cross from Navy Secretary John Dalton in 
New York. Mr. Jones left his post as a cook to shoot down a kamikaze during the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944. 


prosecutors want Mr. McVeigh to pay with his life 
for the lives of so many they say be ruined. 

“If he had ro," Michael Fortier testified, “he 
was going to drive foe truck down foe stairs and 
crash it through the front doors. ” (AP, LAT) 


Away From 
Politics 

• An engine fire forced a Sky West 

commuter plane with 17 people 
aboard ro make on emergency landing 
at a naval base near San Diego that 
ended with the plane's brakes failing. 
No one was hurt. The aircraft was a 
Brazilian -made Embraer 120. a mod- 
el that has been involved in four major 
crashes since 1991, most recently in 
January when a Comair flight crashed 
near Detroit, killin g all 29 people 
aboard. fAPJ 

• Bullets from James Earl Ray’s 

rifle were scanned by an electron 
microscope for dues that could prove 
or disprove whether foe gun was used 
to kill foe Reverend Martin Luther 
King Jr. in 1968. The tests are to be 
completed by Friday. (AP) 

• A New York judge said he would 
accept the withdrawal of a child- 
neglect petition against the parents of 
a Danish baby who- was placed in 
foster care after she was left in a 
stroller outside a New York restaurant 
where her parents were eating. (NYT) 

• Adding diversity to its collection, 

foe Barbie doll-maker Mattel Inc. has 
introduced a doll in a wheelchair. The 
doll, called Share a Smile Becky, has 
a retail price of $ 1 9.99, bendable knee 
joints and a bright pink wheelchair. It 
became available in selected U.S. toy 
stores this week. (NYT) 


Clinton and Republicans Kill 
An Increase in Cigarette Tax 

WASHINGTON — The Senate has voted, 55 to 
45, to defeat a bipartisan proposal to use an increase 
in the cigarette tax to expand health care coverage for 
low-income children, after Republican leaders and 
President Bill Clinton warned that foe measure 
would breach the balanced budget plan. 

A bitter floor fight over foe proposal temporarily 
jeopardized Senate passage of foe five-year White 
House-Republican plan to eliminate foe deficit and 
reduce taxes by $85 billion. The House approved the 
plan, 333 to 99, Wednesday after a marathon, highly 
discordant session. 

Republican leaders and the White House had 
hoped for swift, harmonious disposal of the budget 
blueprint before foe House and Senate leave for foe 
Memorial Day recess this weekend, but foe task has 
proved to be far more contentious and problematic. 

Mr. Clinton finally intervened to defeat the effort 
primarily out of fear that the budget deal would begin 
to unravel. In response to a call from Senator Trent 
Lott, the Senate majority leader, foe president called 
Senator Thomas Daschle, foe minority leader, urging 
that he end the effort Senator Edward Kennedy had 


said that Vice President A1 Gore was ready to cast a tie- 
breaking vote if necessary to pass the amradment but 
Mr. Lott's call to Mr. Clinton essentially removed foe 
vice president as a possible ally. 

“As a free-standing matter, I think this president's 
sympathies are pretty dear on the thrust of the 
legislation," said the White House press secretary. 
Michael McCnny. “The problem is the amendment 
doesn't stand freely, it stands encumbering the bal- 
anced budget agreement that we also fought very 
hard for. The president is not about to see all that hard 
work go down the drain." (WP) 

2 Donors to Plead Guilty 

WASHINGTON — An Oklahoma couple who 
raised thousands of dollars for Democrats in recent 
years have agreed to plead guilty to arranging 
$50,000 in illegal contributions during foe 1994 
election, foe Justice Department said Wednesday. 

Under foe agreement, Eugene and Nora Lum each 
agreed to plead guilty to a single count of conspiring 
to contribute the funds illegally through interme- 
diaries described in legal papers as “straw donors." 

The intermediaries generally were provided with 
money to make the donations or were reimbursed 
afterward. In some cases, checks were written on a 
donor's behalf without his or her knowledge. 


The donations, including some contributions 
funneled through employees of the Lums' Oklahoma 
gas pipeline company. Dynamic Energy Resources 
Inc., went to foe campaigns of Senator Kennedy of 
Massachusetts and W. Stuart Price, an unsuccessful 
candidate for Congress. Mr. Kennedy later returned 
some of the contributions. 

Several law-enforcement officials said Wednes- 
day that the case represented foe first prosecution of 
foe far-reaching inquiry into campaign financing that 
has focused on how President Bill Clinton raised 
money for his re-election last year. 

But other lawyers, inside and outside foe gov- 
ernment. said foe agreement represented the rem- 
nants of foe investigation by Daniel Pearson, foe 
independent prosecutor who was looking into foe 
personal finances- of Commerce Secretary Ronald 
Brown. That inquiry was closed when Mr. Brown 
was killed in a plane crash in Croatia in 1996/AHTJ 


Quote /Unquote 


Brazil Senate Gives Presidency a Boost 


New York Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — The Senate has given 
initial approval to a constitutional amendment that 
would allow the president, state governors and 
mayors to run for second terms, handing President 
Fernando Henri que Cardoso foe most important 
victory of his presidency. 

The vote of 63 to 6 was a triumph for Mr. 
Cardoso, who reportedly set his sights on a second 
term even before he won his first three years ago. 
It came against a backdrop of charges that his 
administration had paid off legislators who voted 
in favor of foe re-election amendment In the lower 


house, foe Chamber of Deputies, in January. 

On Wednesday, in a senes of votes after the re- 
election amendment passed, the senators rejected 
changes to it that would have required its return to 
the Chamber of Deputies for another round of 
voting. The most important of foe changes would 
have subjected foe amendment to a public ref- 
erendum. It was rejected by a vote of 49 to 28. 

Hours before Wednesday night's vote, two le- 
gislators from foe western state of Acre who had 
been secretly" recorded discussing payoffs 
resigned as the Chamber of Deputies prepared to 
impeach them. 


Representative Bob Inglis, Republican co-sponsor 
of a bill overwhelmingly approved in Congress to 
protect volunteers from some lawsuits stemming 
from their charity work: “If you’re being a good 
Samaritan and there's an accident that isn't your 
fault, you shouldn ’t get sued. ' * (AP) 


This way to 


THE INTERMARKET 

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Strong growth in business 
and profit 


Increased demand for Private Banking services 
Diversification of financial and money market activities 
Leadership in the LUF capital market 

Significant increase in credit facilities to the Luxembourg economy 
Growth in securities portfolios with neutralised market risks 
Cost efficiency and critical mass in the area of fund administration through the 
EFA (European Fund Administration) joint venture with other banks 






in 1996 


Consolidated key figures fin millions of USD) 

1995 

1996 

% change 

Total assets 

27749 

30,789 

+ 11.0 

Customers' funds 

18,452 

19,881 

+ 77 

Claims on customers 

4,203 

4,694 

+ 11.7 

Claims on credit institutions 

13,546 

14,009 

+ 3.4 

Securities 

3,513 

5.412 

+ 54.0 

Own funds (1) 

1.186 

1,380 

+ 16.4 

Net profit for trie financial year 

94 

105 

+ 12.1 

Dividend per share Cin USD) (2) 

37 

43 

+ 16.9 


(1 ) in acajrdanra with statutory definition t 2 ) before withholding ta* 

The official figures, expressed m LUf; have been transtared at the ewhange rate prevailing on 31st December 1986- 
1 USD= 33.06 LUS 


Banque G£n£rale du Luxembourg 

R.C LunMfiouRG B 6481 

Banque G£n Seale do Luxembourg SA, SO, avenui I.F. Kennedy, L-2951 Luxembourg, Tel: (352) 42 42-1' 
Franctoxt, Hong Kong, Mats. Milan, Zurich 

http://www.bgf.lu 


t 



PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Opponent of Jakarta 
Chooses Not to Vote 

Abstention Seen as ‘Signal’ to Dissenters 


Agence France- Prase 

JAKARTA — In a new chal- 
lenge to the government, a key op- 
position leader, Megawati 
Sukarnoputri, said Thursday that 
she would not vote in next week’s 
parliamentary election. 

Mrs. Megawati did not, however, 
call for a boycott. Abstaining from 
voting is legal in Indonesia, but it is 
unlawful to encourage others not to 
vote. 

“I have taken the decision, as an 
individual, not to use my political 
right to vote on May 29,* ’ sbe said 
“The vote is an individual right for 
each citizen, and everyone must use 
it following their own con- 
science." 

She did say, however, that any 
vote for the Indonesian Democratic 
Party, from which she was ousted as 
leader by a government-backed fac- 
tion. would be “neither legal nor 
consti tutionai." 

The rival faction deposed Mrs. 
Megawad from the top post and 
replaced her with Suzyadi in June 


1996. A major riot erupted a month 
later when troops helped the rival 
faction evict Mrs. Megawati’s fol- 
lowers from the party headquarters. 

Suryadi's leadership has faced 
strong opposition from Megawati 
loyalists throughout the country. 
Her supporters have heckled Sury- 
adi and his followers during cam- 
paign rallies. 

Mrs. Megawati, daughter of 
Sukarno, the founder of independ- 
ent Indonesia, has been blocked 
from running for office along with 
20 of her supporters. She called on 
her backers to boycott the election 
campaign, which ends Friday. 

The Indonesian Democratic 
Party, the United Development 
Party and President Suharto's 
Golkar party are the only three 
groups allowed to contest the 425 
seats at stake in the 500-seat Par- 
liament 

The other 75 seats are allotted to 
the armed forces. 

Subagio Anam, an ally of Mrs. 
Megawati's, said that while the op- 



, . **■ 
4*:** >: - 


m- >. 


Patdck dc Somaon/Baucri 

Megawati Sukarnoputri, the deposed opposition leader, addressing supporters Thursday in Jakarta. 

position leader bad not told her sup- Bekasi, said he, too, would abstain Several of Mrs. Megawati's 
porters to abstain from voting, she from voting on polling day. “One women supporters said they were 
nevertheless had “sent them a sig- has to be stupid not to follow her “satisfied'' with her stance, one of 
nal.” lead,” he said. “I am definitely not them adding that not voting “is 

Midan. a Megawati loyalist from voting. ’ ’ exactly what my intention was. ’ ' 


voting." 


exactly what my intention was.” 


China Pledges Vote 
In Hong Kong as 
Panel Debates Rules 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING — China's foreign min- 
ister promised Thursday that Hong 
Kong would get a new legislature in a 
“democratic, fair and open” election 
after the British colony returns to 
Chinese rule July l. 

Britain contends that Hong Kong’s 
current legislature was elected fairly, 
but China says it did not approve die 
rules that governed that election. 

It plans to replace Hong Kong's 
legislature with an appointed provi- 
sional body until mid-1998, when 
China says legislative elections under 
new rules will be held. 

A committee China appointed to 
prepare for Hong Kong’s change of 
sovereignty began discussing those 
rules Thursday in Beijing. 

At the meeting. Foreign Minister 
Qiao Qichen said anyone who met 
criteria laid down by China would be 
allowed to run for election. 

“The methods for producing die first 
legislature will embody democratic, 
fair and open principles," he said. 

All eligible candidates will “have an 
equal chance to ran for office,” Mr. 
Qian said. 'T have said before that Hong 
Kong society should stress tolerance.” 


North Korea Dismisses Talk of Warmongering 


The Associated Press 

SEOUL — North Korea said Thursday 
that its food shortage has reached 4 ‘a serious 
stage* ’ but that it had no plans to wage war 
out of desperation. 

North Korea was denying what it called 
an 4 'ill-boding campaign” by foreign coun- 
tries that warn that the Communist state 
might start a war with South Korea to divert 
domestic attention from its food crisis. 

* ‘It is true that our temporary food short- 
age has reached a serious stage,” an 


unidentified spokesman for North Korea’s 
Foreign Ministry said in a statement, car- 
ried by the country's official Korean Cen- 
tral News Agency. ‘ ‘But war is not what we 
want.” 

The statement accused “bellicose ele- 
ments” of spreading false rumors to justify 
plans to Launch “preemptive” attacks on 
North Korea. 

Worries that North Korea was preparing 
for war grew after comments by North 
Korean defectors, including Hwang Jang 


China Assails Taipei Address at EU 


Compdetl br Our Sniff Ffoa Dapa>-ha 

BRUSSELS — Despite sharp protests from 
Beijing, Foreign Minister John Chang of 
Taiwan addressed a European Parliament 
committee Thursday and proposed reunifi- 
cation with the mainland on an equal footing 
after a rapprochement of their systems. 

A spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Min- 
istry in Beijing “warned the European Par- 
liament on die necessity to cease these actions 
that undermine Chinese-European relations." 
He added that the appearance by Mr. Chang 
was a “violation or sovereignty and a gross 
interference in the internal affairs of China." 

The chairman of the committee, Tom Spen- 
cer of Britain, had specified before Mr. 
Chang's speech dial it was merely part of an 


“information meeting’ ' that did not constitute 
a recognition of Taiwan. 

Restating Taipei’s policy, Mr. Chang said in 
response to a question that reunification with 
the mainland could take place if it were done on 
equal footing after a rapprochement of systems 
— an allusion to the fall of communism. 

Until that happened, though, Mr. Chang said 
Taiwan was “ready to maintain the status 
quo” and continue its efforts to be “rec- 
ognized on the international scene.” 

Beijing, which regards Taiwan as a rene- 
gade province, strongly opposes Taipei's at- 
tempts to enhance- its international status, say- 
ing they are part of plans to set up a permanent 
split The two separated at the end of acivil war 


split The two separated at the 
in 1949. 


ofacivilwar 

(AFP,AP) 


Yop, a member of the country's decision- 
making Workers Party’s Central Commit- 
tee, who arrived here in April. 

A North Korean defector said Thursday 
that rumors were widespread in the North 
that the nation's leader, Kim Jong H, might 
start a war between July and October. 

“Every day, TV screens are showing 
Kim Jong H visiting military units and ex- 
horting die nation to strengthen its mil- 
itary,’ said the defector, Kim Won Hy- 

ung. 

At a nationally televised news confer- 
ence, he said Kim Jong D might risk armed 
provocations after the third anniversary in 
July of the death of his father, President 
Kim II Sung. 

Since his father's death, the younger Kim 
has been ruling North Korea as head of its 
1.1 million-member army. 

Kim Won Hyung and seven relatives, 
along with six members of a friend’s fam- 
ily, arrived in South Korea last week by 
boaL 

Red Cross officials from the North and 
South were to meet Friday in Beijing to 
discuss food aid. Last time they met, talks 
broke down after two days. The South 
Korean Red Cross demanded a more ef- 
ficient aid distribution system. The North 
Korean Red Cross called the demand pre- 
mature until South Korea could specify how 
much aid it would deliver and when. 

On Wednesday, the South Korean Red 
Cross said it would offer 1 ,000 metric tons 
of flour to the North at the meeting Friday. 


BRIEFLY 


Manila Says Talks With China 
Over Disputed Shoal Are Set rf.- 

HONG KONG — President Fidel Ramos of the Phil- 
ippines sought Thursday to cool a dispute with Beijing 

over a South China Sea reef that has led to fresh Chinese 

protests that the Philippines broke international law. 

Mr. Ramos said that negotiations over Scarborough 
shoal, Huangyan in Chinese, will start in the next 10 days, 
and he wanted the issue resolved “peacefully and dip- 
lomatically.” ; . - 

He was commenting during a half-day visit to Hong 
Kong on China’s warning that his government’s claim 
over the reef was “absolutely unacceptable to the 
Chinese government and people.” 

“We’ve established our position,” he said at a news 
conference. “They've established their position. We are 
working on a mechanism to discuss the subject’ ’ ( AP ) 

Burmese Make Fresh Arrests 

RANGOON — Undaunted by the arrest of scores of 
her supporters. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, pro-democracy 
leader in Burma, is determined to go ahead with a political 
congress this month, an aide said Thursday. 

Scores of members of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s 
political party have been arrested in two of Burma's 14 
provinces as the military regime begins a nationwide 
sweep to prevent the meeting, the aide said, speaking ony 
condition of anonymity. ' ■ ™ 

The May 27 meeting is meant to commemorate the 
1 990 national election in which Daw Aung San Sun Kyi's 
National League for Democracy won 82 percent of the 
seats in a Parliament that the military refused to con- 
vene. 

Party members were detained in the Mandalay and 
Irrawaddy districts of northern Burma, and the arrest total 
was sure to rise, the aide said. (AP) 

Asians Urge AIDS Prevention 

BANGKOK — Delegates from Asian countries called 
on their governments Thursday to give priority to the 
prevention of AIDS and the virus that causes it before the 
disease reaches epidemic proportions. 

Representatives from China, Cambodia, Indonesia, 
Malay sia, Burma, T hailan d and Vietnam who partic- 
ipated in a United Nations workshop in Bangkok urged 
their governments to give priority to preventing the 
disease. 

“What we accomplished is for the countries in Asia to 
know about the successes of Thailand,” Werasit Sittifrai, 
coordinator of policy strategy and research for Unaids, 
told reporters 

He said that there were about 3 million people with 
HIV — the virus that causes AIDS — in Asia, and that this 
would increase by between 1 and 2 million by the year ^ 
2000. Without prevention the figure would be 2 to 5 P 
milli on higher, he said. (Reusers) 

Taleban Tries to Calm Fears 

KABUL — The Taleban reassured neighboring coun- 
tries Thursday that recent gains against the opposition 
alliance in the north of Afghanistan posed no threat to the 
region but warned against interference. 

A statement from the Foreign Ministry in Kabul said 
that Afghanistan “respects aU international norms of 
independence, national sovereignty and territorial in- 
tegrity.” 

Former Soviet republics to the north of the country fear 
a huge influx of refugees and the possibility that the 
Taleban might be tempted to export then rniHtantbrand of 
purist Islam to the shaky new nations of Central Asia, 
with their predominantly Muslim populations. (Reuters) 




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EUROPE 


French Turn to Internet 
> To Find Forbidden Poll 

Before Voting, Results Are Banned 


By Charles Truehean 

_ Hashingiun P.,st i,. n lf r 




■? SWISS: Report Is ‘ One-Sided ’ RUSSIA: Yeltsin Fires Top 2 Defense Officials for Not Carrying Out Reforms 


9 


HASS 


ta?/i2? S ™“ A * banner headlines go. it 
js^t very sexy: Type www.edicom.ch/ 

Bui the frontpage challenge in the 
Popular daily ftance-Soir was an in- 

Se Ew IO breakmS ’ ° r at Ieast sorting. 

P 3 ^ 1- is advocating in the 
closing days of a Ughtly contend na- 
tional election campaign is a way around 

Hi^ ye ^"° d Fre . nch st| tute banning the 
dissemination of political poll results 
one week before voting. 

Sunday*™ ° f lW ° rounds win *» held 

The nearly daily publication of public 
opinion polls foT the first four weeks of 
me campaign came to a hall last weekend. 
Jnat legal curtain left French voters either 
bereft or relieved, but in any case without 
oendit of the latest snapshots of how the 
randidates and the parties might fare in 
the first round of voting for 577 legis- 
lative seats in the National Assembly? 

The law does not ban the poll-taking 
itself, which continues with abandon? 
just the dissemination of what it finds to 
the general public. Violators can be fined 
as much as 500,000 francs ($87,700). 

To meet the hunger of political 
junkies, bond traders, candidates and 
journalists for the latest numbers, the 
Swiss newspaper La Tribune de Geneve 


and the Daily Telegraph in London are 
publishing the banned information, col- 
lected by French polling firms, and of- 
fering it on their Internet web sites — 
with France -Soir merrily urging its read- 
ers to partake of the forbidden fruit. 

“It’s as good as Radio London under 
the Occupation or a whiskey during Pro- 
hibition/’ the paper said. 

France’ spoil -takers share the outrage. 
4 ‘From a commercial point of view, I 
love the law.” said Roland Cayrol, di- 
rector of the CSA polling firm. “I have 
subscriptions from the candidates, the 
parties, financial firms. But as a citizen, 
I think it’s harmful and absurd and ar- 
chaic. It creates all kinds of false rumors. 
It restricts polls to those who can pay for 
them.” 

The French law, bom of a zeal to 
protect ostensibly impressionable voters 
as they ponder their electoral choices, 
mirrors legislation in some other coun- 
tries as well as laws occasionally pro- 
posed by reform-minded American 
groups. 

In Italy, the blackout on poll results 
begins 15 days before elections. In Bel- 
gium, there is a law of this kind, but ever 
since a publication called Knock ignored 
it in 1991 without penalty, other news 
media have followed suit, and the law is 
honored now only in the breach. The 
Netherlands, Germany, and Britain 
labor under no such restrictions. 

“It’s a good example of the French 



Oaiaoyhc ErnTTbe Mwcokd Pmi 

ROSY OUTLOOK — Lionel Jospin, the French Socialist leader, 
jumping back after a barman knocked over a vase with a rose, the 
party's symbol, during campai gn in g Thursday in' southwestern France. 


trying to control destiny,” said Marc 
Chavannes, Paris-based correspondent 
of the Dutch daily NRC Handelsblad. 
“The politicians try to influence the 
voters by speaking to them from their 
high thrones, but they don’t want the 
voters to talk to themselves.” 

Calling the French law ‘'pointless, 
foolish and unenforceable,” the Daily 


Blair Opts for 6 Constructive Abstention 9 on Some EU Proposals 


Af(ence Franee-Presse 

LONDON — Prime Minister Tony Blair is prepared to 
accept the principle of ‘‘constructive abstention” on a 
common foreign and security policy at an informal Euro- 
pean Union summit conference in the Netherlands, British 
officials said Thursday. 

“There may be a case in flexibility in intergovernmental 
areas, such as the use of constructive abstention,” die officials 


said ahead of the one-day meeting in Noordwijk cm Friday. 

The meeting paves the way for the EU summit talks in 
Amsterdam next month, which is to seal a new treaty on EU 

institutions. 

The principle of “constructive abstention” would allow 
an EU member to disassociate itself from a measure or 
action in the foreign policy domain without preventing its 
partners from undertaking or signing on to it 


Telegraph’s Paris correspondent, Susan- 
nah Herbert, said Thursday she had filed 
a story for Friday's paper sharing the 
results of the latest French poll con- 
ducted by the IPSOS organization for Le 
Point magazine, which she said she ob- 
tained from a banking firm in London. 

Miss Herbert said the information will 
be posted on the Telegraph web site 
(www.telegraph.co.uk) Friday night 

“It would be different if the poll 
showed a crashing left victory, but it 
doesn't show anything different from 
what we were publishing last week,” 
she said. 

“I wouldn't bother mentioning it at all 
if it weren't for a certain samizdat value 
to this information.” 

France, Mr. Cayrol said, “is the last 
country that believes in the magic of 
polls, that pollsters are gtmis.” 

“But this law is living its last hours.” 


Ulster Parlies 
Protest Timing 
Of IRA Talks 


The Associated Press 

BELFAST — As ballots were coun- 
ted Thursday. Protestant leaders accused 
the British government of giving Irish 
Republican Army supporters an edge in 
elections for Northern Ireland's local 
councils. ■ 

Sinn Fein, the political arm of the 
IRA, appeared to be gaining a bigger 
share of the vote than usual in virtually 
every predominantly Catholic district. 

The Democratic Unionist Party led by 
the Reverend Ian Paisley, which is res- 
olutely opposed to any negotiations with 
Sinn Fein, appeared also to be gaining. 

The province's two main parties — 
the Ulster Unionists on the Protestant 
side and the Social Democratic and 
Labor Party on the Catholic side — 
defended their top positions. 

Seeking a new truce, the British gov- 
ernment held its first talks in 15 months 
with Sinn Fein on Wednesday, when 
British broadcasters normally offer no 
platforms to any politicians. 

“The government offered Siim Fein a 
huge publicity platform on the very day 
that people were casting their ballots. It 
was a gross and deliberate interven- 
tion,” said Peter Robinson, deputy lead- 
er of the Democratic Unionists. 

With only the first stage of votes 
counted, the Ulster Unionists had 29 

B urent and 45 seats, the Democratic 
nionists 16 percent and 20 seats, the 
Social Democrats 19 percent and 32 
seals and Sinn Fein 13 percent and 24 
seats. Those figures did not include 
votes from west Belfast, a Sinn Fein 
stronghold that will be counted Friday. 

Under a complex system of propor- 
tional representation, final results for 
how many seats each party wins on 
Northern Ireland’s 26 councils will not 
be known until Friday. 

Turnout was often below 50 percent in 
predominantly Protestant areas while 
the rate was above 70 percent in most 
Catholic areas, revealing the dogged 
competition between the moderate So- 
cial Democrats and militant Sinn Fein. 


BRIEFLY 


Continued from Page ! 

cord, led largely by Senator 
Alfonse D 'Amato, Republi- 
can of New York, and the 
World Jewish Congress, have 
inspired a profound identity 
crisis here, with some Swiss 
battling to reconcile the dis- 
closures about their trading 
with Nazi Germany against a 
national myth of wartime re- 
sistance xofasedsm. ... 

The debate has split the 
small nation between young 
and old and between those 
who see their professed neut- 
rality as a justifiable defease 
of wartime sovereignty and 
survival and those who see 
their behavior as little more 
Than collaboration covered up 
by postwar propaganda. 

The Swiss statement ac- 
knowledged that there had 
been “questionable deals 
which did not affect the sur- 
vival of Switzerland” be- 
tween Swiss business in- 
terests and the Nazis. 

But, turning to the most 
contentious part of the Eizen- 
stat report, it renewed the 
government's argument that 
Swiss survival outweighed 
risking an invasion. 

“That Switzerland traded 
with the Axis powers as well 
as the Allies was a question of 
national political and eco- 
nomic. survivaL” the Swiss 
response said- “Only hypoth- 
eses are possible to question 
whether Switzerland in 1 943- 
1944 would have been in a 
situation to break off business 
ties' with the Axis powers 
without provoking the risk of 
an invasion.” 

The U.S. report also ac- 
cused the Swiss authorities of 
reneging on a 1946 accord — 
the Washington Agreement 
— about the liquidation of 
hundreds of millions of dollars 
of German assets wanted by 
the United States and its allies 
to finance war reparations. 

The agreement committed 
Switzerland to liquidating 
millions in German-owned 


assets, depicted in Washing- 
ton as Nazi loot but said by 
Swiss historians and officials 
to include prewar assets of 
German citizens, including 
some German Jews. Accord- 
ing to die Eizenstat report, 
Switzerland never respected 
the agreement 

Referring to that accusa- 
tion, tire Swiss statement 
seemed more conciliatory. 

*.*Wemustjudge more crit- 
ically from today's outlook 
die liquidation of German as- 
sets,’ ’ it said. “When reading 
the report, die impression 
arises of a country which 
could not or would not em- 
pathize with the needs of a 
war-tom Europe.” 

It said, however, that only 


Continued from Page 1 

also feel that it is operating in a 
reformed country.” 

But a number of analysts, not 
limited to Mr. Yeltsin's political 
adversaries, noted that the pres- 
ident shared the blame for the mil- 
itary’s state and in particular for its 
failure to launch any meaningful 
cuts or reforms. 

“Yeltsin has made the Russian 
high command responsible, for the 
failures of a reform program whose 
roots are as much political as mil- 
itary,” said John Erickson, an ex- 
pert at the University of Edinburgh 
on the Russian military. “It’satried 
and true Yeltsin technique — b lam- 
others for his own failures." 


iy militaiy specialists and 
career officers in Russia and the 
historians would be able to West agree that any serious reform 
judge whether the Swiss re- program would involve enormous 

expense. Mr. Yeltsin, while de- 
manding reform, has slashed mil- 
itary spending drastically. 

Mr. Rodionov, whose perspect- 
ives are supported by his officer 
corps and some American analysts. 


fusal to comply with the 
agreement reflected “an all- 
zoo ‘ narrow legalistic ap- 
proach or if it was based on 
comprehensible difficulties 
and national and international 
legal principles.” ' 

The underlying theme of 
the U.S. accusations is that 
Switzerland’s vaunted neut- 
rality cloaked an amorality 
not only in financial affairs 
but also in such decisions as 
the one in 1942 to tum back 
tens of thousands of Jewish 
refugees at its frontiers. 

* ‘Viewed in all, neutrality 
led to a difficult tightrope walk 
between adaptation and resis- 
tance,” the statement said. 

"Today we know that this 
also led to mistakes. The 
fainthearted refugee policy 
concerning Jews was inex- 
cusable. In the business and 
financial sector, concessions 
were sometimes made to the 
Axis powers which are very 
hard to comprehend today in 
view of the inner convictions 
of the population and meas- 
ured by absolute necessity." 

The statement recalled, 
however, that “it must not be 
forgotten that Switzerland’s 
neutral stance also served Al- 
lied interests.” 


has aigued that it is impossible to 
begin a modernization program at a 
time when military spading is half 
what die Defense Ministry reques- 
ted and less than 80 percent of what 
was budgeted. 

Mr. Yeltsin has been unsym- 
pathetic to that view. He has sided 
with the chief of his defense coun- 
cil, Yuri Baturin, a civilian econ- 
omist, who has pressed for deep 
cuts in manpower, programs and 
bureaucracy to foster a smaller but 
more professional force. 

Russia's young liberal re- 
formers. whom Mr. Yeltsin has ap- 
pointed to key positions in the past 
few months, back Mr. Baturin's 
positions. 

“The only realistic strategy is to 
cany out reforms by using hidden 
reserves,” Yegor Gaidar, the 
former prime minister who has in- 
fluence among the reformers at the 
■helm of the government, told In- 
terfax. Among potential savings, 
be mentioned trimming the 1.2- 
million- strong defense bureaucra- 
cy, tightening lax financial con- 
trols, getting a grip on overpay- 


ments for purchases of weapons 
and other goods and modernizing 
an outdated system of military edu- 
cation. 

The military relies entirely on 
conscription. Draft-dodging is rife, 
and die 1.5 million men who do 
serve under arms are often treated 
terribly. Their salaries, when they 
are paid at all, are a pittance. Food 


in implementing army reforms.” 

Mr. Rodionov, who was head of 
the military academy of the general 
staff, was named defense minister 
last summer at the urging of Al- 
exander Lebed, a retired, paratroop- 
er general who then ran the national 
security council. But Mr. Lebed 
was fired last fall, and Mr. Ro- 
dionov, who complained cease- 


is so scarce that there have been . lessly about cuts in spending and 


instances of recruits starving to 
.death, and severe malnutrition is 
not uncommon. Brutality is report- 
ed to cause hundreds of deaths a 
year. 

A bloated officer corps has 
earned the disdain of enlisto) men 
and the public alike for allegedly 
enriching itself by selling off mil- 
itary materiel. 

“We have reached the- point 
where we are short of spoons and 
plates but the number of service- 
men and the number of generals is 
stubbornly not being cot," Mr. 
Yeltsin said. “Generals are not in- 
terested in reorga n izi n g the army 
because they may lose their priv- 
ileges. They are the main obstacle 


their effect on military readiness, 
has been in a tenuous position ever 
since. Mr. Rodionov had written 
extensively about military reform 
in his previous post but felt himself 
unable to implement it once in of- 
fice. 

Alexei Arbatov, deputy chair- 
man of Parliament’s defense com- 
mittee. said that Mr. Yeltsin had 
promised for three years to assume 
control of reforming the military. 
That nothing has been done, he. 
said, that “it is still in the same 

S * % is not Rodionov's fault or the 
of his predecessor.” 

"To a great extent,” he con- 
tinued, “it is the fault of the pres- 
ident himself.” 


UN Monitor on Iraq 
Now Envoy to US. 

STOCKHOLM — Rolf Ekeus. 
who has led the United Nations' 
tense and complex program to in- 
spect Iraqi weapons, will become 
Sweden's ambassador to the United 
States, the government announced 
Thursday. 

Mr. Ekeus has spent six years 
leading the inspectors who are mon- 
itoring whether Iraq bas eliminated 
its weapons of mass destruction. The 
UN imposed economic sanctions on 
Iraq after it invaded Kuwait in 1990 
and says it will not lift them until the 
inspection team certifies that Iraq 
has gotten rid of the weapons. 

He repeatedly has accused Iraq of 
misleading his inspectors and of 
hiding information. Iraq, in turn, 
long has accused Mr. Ekeus of be- 
ing in league with the United States 
in trying to keep the UN sanctions in 
place. 

Mr. Ekeus, 62. is a veteran dip- 
lomat whose posts have included 
ambassador to the Netherlands and 
chief of the Swedish delegation at 
the Geneva disarmament talks. He 
replaces Henrik Liljegren as am- 
bassador. ^ (API 

Lyon Ex-Mayor Put 
Under New Inquiry 

LYON — Michel Noir, a former 
mayor of Lyon, is being investigated 
again for corruption in a case in 
whicb he received a suspended 18- 
month prison term last year. French 
justice sources said Thursday. 

Mr. Noir, a former centrist mem- 
ber of Parliament and trade minister 
once regarded as a possible pres- 
idential candidate; was formally 
placed under investigation Wednes- 
day on suspicion of having received 
misappropriated company funds, 
the sources said. 

Judge Gilbert Emery questioned 
Mr. Noir for five hours concerning 
10 million francs ($1.75 million) de- 
posited by three business executives 
— wbo are also under investigation 
— into Swiss bank accounts held by 
his son-in-law Pierre Bottom 

Mr. Noir has been convicted of 
diverting 8 million francs of Lyon's 
municipal funds to finance political 
campaigns and personal expenses. 
He was given a 12-month suspen- 
ded sentence in that case. (Reuters) 

Accord in Albania 

TIRANA, Albania — Albania's 
second-largest political grouping, 
the Socialist Party, said Thursday 
that it had decided to run in the June 
29 elections,. lifting a planned boy- 
cott that threatened to block the 
voting. 

The elections are regarded as vi- 
tal to stop Albania from plunging 
back into violence and anarchy. 

The Socialists’ agreement is 
likely to be followed by decisions 
by other parties to run. 

They threatened to boycott over 
election rules that they said favored 
President Sali Berisha and his 
Democratic Party. The Socialists, 
the main rival to Mr. Berisha, pulled 
out of the previous election in May 
1996, accusing the Democrats of 
rigging the vote. ( Reuters ) 









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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 









INTERNATIONAL 


In Return for Aid in Fight, What Do the Rebels Owe? 


By James C. McKinley Jr. 

New York Times Service 


LUBUMBASH3, Congo — When 
Laurent Kabila's rebels captured this 
country's capital over the weekend and 
catapulted him into the presidency, they 
did not do it alone. 

From the onset of the war last au tumn 


troops even crossed the border to fight 
alongside the rebels. 

And thousands of Tutsi volunteers 
from Uganda and Rwanda joined the 
rebellion in sympathy with their Tutsi 
kinsmen here. 

The foreign support for the rebellion 
is almost certain to complicate Mr. Kab- 
ila's efforts to govern this fractious 


Uganda and Angola were both tired of 
Marshal Mobntu's harboring guerrilla 


tty. “Zairians didn't win 


on anonym- 
le war. The 


groups on their borders. The entire re- Rwandans won the war for diem. We 


gion was being dragged down by Zaire’s don’t 1 know how they will be paid 


abysmal economic performance under back." 


Marshal Mobutu’s corrupt leaderahi 
Because the foreign military aid 


Last October and November, Uganda 
and Rwanda played an active military 


until the fall of Kinshasa on Saturday, country of more than 200 tribes, since it that has produced anew goi 
Mr. Kabila’s forces received heavy sup- has essentially brought to power the a new name, Congo, for 


been completely covert, the extent of the role. On occasion both countries sent 
foreign interference in the civil conflict troops across the border to help secure a 


ovemment and 
ar the country 


troops across the border to help secure a arid ram thehenenues in Zaire. That done, 
strip of the eastern part of the country, they began to withdraw support 


port from several neighboring countries Tutsi, who in Congo are a minor ethnic Marshal Mobutu called Zaire, may never 


with an interest in toppling die longtime 
dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko. diplomats 
and U.S. officials said. 

The military aid came in many forms 
from Rwanda, Uganda. Zambia and An- 
gola — all of whom have denied in- 
volvement. It ranged from military ad- 
visers to training to air transport to 
supplies. In a few instances, foreign 


■"SKJ 


with strong ties to Rwanda. 


wmie Tutsi have lived in Congo for But diplomats and u; 
more than 200 years, they are still seen Congo's neighbors have 


be made public. 

But diplomats and U.S. officials say 


by many Congolese as foreigners. roles in bringing Mr. Kabila to power. 
The motives of Mr. Kabila’s backers especially the Angolans and the Tutsi-led 
vary widely. Many Tutsi in Rwanda government in Rwanda. It remains to be 
wanted revenge on the Hutu militants seen what debts Mr. Kabila owes them, 
who fled to Zaire after participating in the "The rebel alliance has a guilty 


1994 massacres of Tutsi in Rwanda. secret," one Western diplomat in 


strip of the eastern part ot the country, 
U.S. government officials say. 

For the Ugandan president, Yoweri 
Museveni, the insurrection in this coun- 
try was an opportunity to remove two 
rebel groups that had been mounting 
raids into Uganda. 

To that end, in November and Decem- 
ber, several thousand Ugandan soldiers, 
backed with tanks, participated in con- 


quering the entire northeastern comer of not fight," a French diplomat said, 
the country next to the Sudan. As the rebel troops began to r 


Kabila Weighs 
A Role for Foe 
Of Mobutu 


The Associated Press 

KINSHASA, Congo — Five days 
after proclaiming himself president. 
Laurent Kabila was in the difficult po- 
sition Thursday of trying to satisfy the 
country's main opposition figure! 

Hundreds of supporters of Etienne 
Tshisekedi, a militant opponent of the 
ousted dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, held 
a daylong vigil outside his Kinshasa 
home to support his bid to be prime 
minister in the new government prom- 
ised by Mr. Kabila. 

"We're happy Mr. Kabila drove out 
the regime of Mr. Mobutu, but we don't 
want to replace one dictatorship with 
another," said a Tshisekedi supporter, 
Oscar Kaboza-Bodika. 

Mr. Kabila can ill-afford to anger Mr. 
Tshisekedi’ s supporters, who under 
Marshal Mobutu's regime proved their 
strength by calling strikes that crippled 
the capital and marches that led to fierce 
clashes between protesters and Marshal 
Mobutu’s soldiers. 

It was also doubtful that he would 
want to give too powerful aposition to a 
man with little international respect, 
who is prone to rash moves and who has 
shown little inclination to compro- 
mise. 

Many of those outside Mr. Tshise- 
kedi ’s house warned that Mr. Kabila 
would face the same opposition as Mar- 
shal Mobutu if he faued to give their 
candidate the prime minister’s post. 

“It will prove he’s a dictator just like 
Mobutu if he ignores the people's 
wishes," said Wamulumba Mulumba, 
standing before a portrait of Mr. 



me country next to fee Sudan. 

The Ugandans were heavily involved 
in taking towns like Watsa, Butembo, 
Bunin and Beni, diplomats and U.S. of- 
ficials said. 

Officials say the Ugandan troops nev- 


As the rebel troops began to move 
farther and farther west, the Angolan 
government entered the fray, U.S. of- 
ficials said. The government in the An- 
golan cap ital , Luanda, provided political 
support and training, but also contrib- 


er penetrated deeper than about SO Id- uted commandos, money, airplanes and 
lometers and withdrew by late January, arms, diplomats said. 

D f~' f V.L TV : T. .. I a«.u. Cohnram 


Rwanda's motive for aiding Mr. Kab- 
ila's forces was a desire to close refugee 
camps on the bolder that had become 
bases for Hutu guerrilla groups attacking 
Rwanda’s Ttitsi-led government 


During January and early February, 
for example, several giant Russian-built 
cargo planes registered in Angola were 
seen flying soldiers and arms from Lu- 
anda to the Rwandan capital of Kigali, 


Revenge was also a factor. Many U.S. officials said this week. 


Hum militants in the camps had been 
involved in the 1994 genocide in 
Rwanda, and some began stirring up 
anti-T utsi feeling in Zaire as well, which 


The officials said that as many as six 
battalions of men were flown into 
Rwanda and trucked into Zaire during this 
period, but stressed it was unclear if the 


led to the massacres of thousands of soldiers were Angolan troops or members 


Tutsi in Zaire. Tens of thousands of 
other Tbtsi fled into Rwanda for safety. 
Then in September, the governor of 


of the Katanganese G uards, Zairian rebels 
who have lived in Angola for years. 

But Angolan troops did participate in 


South Kjvu announced that all Zairian the final push on Kinshasa last week, U.S. 


Tutsi would be expelled from the country, officials said. Between 2,000 and 3,000 
The policy ignited a revolt among Tutsi, Angolan soldiers in well-organized units 
and within weeks Mr. Kabila’s small rev- fought in the battle for Kenge, 200 ki- 
olutionary party, which is based in the lometers east of Kinshasa, in the last 
province, bad joined the rebellion, along major battle before the fall of the capital, 
wife two other rebel groups. an American intelligence officer said. 

Paul Kagame, fee Rwandan leader, “They were playing a critical role," 


has consistently denied that his troops the officer said 


fought in Zaire at the beginning of the Angola had a st 
war, though he says Rwanda supports ing the rebels. For 
the rebellion in spirit. He has acknowl- eminent, helping 1 
edged only that some Rwandan regular dennining Jonas 
troops crossed the border into Zaire dur- UNITA rebel grou 
ing fee battles for fee towns of Goma and By removing N 

Bukavu. after shells were lobbed across power, Angola' 
fee border. Eduardo dos Santo 

But a senior Rwandan defense official, away from Mr. Si 


Angola had a strong motive for help- 
ing the rebels. For Angola's central gov- 
ernment, helping Mr. Kabila meant un- 
denzrining Jonas Savimbi and the 


UNITA rebel group. 

By removing Marshal Mobutu from 
power, Angola's president, Jose 
Eduardo dos Santos, aimed to take bases 
away from Mr. Savimbi. For three de- 


speaking on condition of anonymity, said cades. Marshal Mobutu had allowed Mr. 


Rwandan military advisers bad operated 
in Congo since then, helping Mr. Kabila's 
commanders with strategy. 

“The advisers are there.’ ' the official 


Savimbi to use this country as a haven 
and as a route for diamonds smuggled 
from northern Angola. 

U.S. officials say Mr. Savimbi's 


Dmd Gttta&ua/rtac Anodised pr** said. “We helped them morally, finan- troops also fought at Kenge — on Mar- 


A Congolese rebel, wearing a leopard skin cap taken from the barracks of dally and militarily as well." 


the Presidential Guard, commanding his troops Thursday in Kinshasa. 


Tshisekedi propped against the hedge 
surrounding his house. 

Others said they thought it important 
feat Mr. Kabila include others, if only to 


foreigners who apparently backed Mr. 
Kabila's fight 

“We want an autonomous Zaire,” 
said Endi Dede, using the name Mr. 


demonstrate his independence from the Kabila discarded in favor of Congo. 


In addition U.S. government officials 
have said that most of the arms for fee 
rebellion were shipped through Uganda 
and Rwanda. 

The recruits were mostly Tutsi from 
eastern Zaire who had been driven into 
Rwanda a year ago after persecution by 


shal Mobutu's side, but were defeated. 

Zambia’s aid to the rebels was more 
limited The Zambian government, 
which has long complained of lawless- 
ness on its border wife Zaire, allowed 
rebel troops to move through its terriroiy 


on their way to capture Lubumbashi, fee 
capital of fee southern Shaba Province. 


IRAN: 

2 Sides of One Coin 


Continued from Page 1 


But Mr. Khatami has been drawing 
large and frenzied crowds, particularly 
in Tehran where he is 
popular among students and poor 
people. On Wednesday evening, an ex- 
uberant mob of more than 5,000 turned 
out to hear Mr. Khatemi speak at a 
mosque in east Tehran, waving placards 
and creating such a ruckus that plate- 
glass windows shattered 
“He’s a moderate and he's going to 
develop fee country toward the West,” 
Moshallah Zadeh, a 25-year-old uni- 
versity student, shouted above fee din. 
“He ’s going to guarantee that we TI have 
freedom of thought” 

Iranian democracy has its limits. Can- 
didates are screened for ideological pur- 
ify by fee Council of Guardians, a con- 
servative clerical body, which also has 
fee power to cancel election results wi th- 
orn explanation. This year, the council 
rejected all but four of 238 presidential 
candidates. Besides Mr. Noun and Mr. 
Khatemi, the other two candidates are 
Mohammed Reyshari, a hard-line 
former intelligence minister, and Reza 
Zavarei, deputy head of fee judiciary, fee 
only noncleric in the race. 

Mr. Nouri enjoys fee open support of 
key government ministers and state-run 
broadcast media and is widely believed 
to have fee backing of Iran's supreme 
leader, Ayatollah AU Khameini. 

If Mr. Khatemi does pull off a victory 
in the first round — a possibility that is 

analysts hens — ^he will st® be sub- 



INDONESIA: Campaign Warning Signs 


Continued from Page 1 He said most people did not expect the 

elections to change anything, while lead- 
i Islam sets them apart from ersoftwo parties that sought to introduce 
be only other officially ap- different political ideas but were not 
sition party, fee Indonesian officially recognized by fee government 
Party. The latter has been were in jaiL accused of subversion, 
ened following the removal Mr. Budiman said fee government 
ts popular leader, Megawati discouraged political tolerance in In- 


identity with Islam sets them apart from 
Golkar and fee only other officially ap- 


greatly weakened following the removal 
last year of its popular leader, Megawati 


Sukarnoputri, and her replacement by a donesia. ‘ ‘What prevails is fee pressure 


government-backed faction. She is 
barred from contesting fee elections. 

Golkar has been hying to offset the 
United Development Party's influence 
by courting Muslim intellectuals and 
lavishly funding mosques and schools 
for fee Islamic community. 

“What worries me is that the political 
contest 'is becoming very Islamic," a 


rtion. She is of uniformity in order to cement unity of 
le elections. this country," he said. "People Have 
ig to offset the learned feat if you want to play politics, 
ny's influence you have to use power and violence, not 
tellectuals and intellectual arguments.” 


He predicted feat Golkar would win 
out 70 percent of fee vote. 


about 70 percent of fee vote. 

In a recent report, Indonesia's Center 
for Strategic and International Studies 


Western businessman wife extensive ex- said that as a result of tight government 


perience in Indonesia said. “The United 
Development Party is the only viable 
opposition group just when people are 
really looking for one.” 

Since fee campaign began April 27, 
more than 60 people have died in elec- 
tion-related violence, nearly all in traffic 
accidents caused by street rallies and 
motorcades feat have taken place even 
though they are banned. 

Yogie Memed, fee home affairs min- 


control over fee election process, in- 
cluding the vote count and final tab- 
ulation. fee 1 997 election for 425 seats in 
the House of Representatives “does not 
give a ray of hope" for political reform. 

“It is not surprising therefore feat 
many people consider fee general elec- 
tion is a mere formality and a waste of 
money,’’ the center said. 



Marshal Mobutu's government. During 
the early weeks of the war, witnesses 
said they saw truckloads of soldiers 
coining inm this country from Rwanda. 

Several diplomats say Uganda and 
Rwanda never expected the rebellion to 
be so successful or move so quickly. The 
objective had been to secure a buffer zone 

.... • • t - 


Algeria Car Bomb 
Kills at Least 12 


But Mr. Kabila's movement had 
ranghr fire wife a population tired of 
Marshal Mobutu’s corrupt regime. The 
government army crumbled, fleeing city 
after city before fee rebels arrived. 

“We never thought fee Zairian Army, 
wife officers trained in France and the 
United Stales, even though cut off from 
arms supplies since 1993, would simply 


ALGIERS — A car bomb killed 
at least 12 people and wounded 31 
Thursday in northern Algeria, two. 
weeks before the nation's first le- 
gislative elections in five years, se- 
curity services said. The blast oc- 
curred in Boufarik. 25 kilometers 
south of Algiers, and the casualty 
toll was expected to rise further. . 

The attack came midway through 
campai gning for fee June 5 vote, fee 
first such elections since a civil war 
with Islamic extremists broke out in 
1992 following the government’s 
annulment of polls that Islamic Sal- 
vation Front was poised to win. 
Western estimates 60,000 people 
have died in the fighting. (AFP) 


Kurds End Protest 
At UN in Geneva 


GENEVA — Kurdish demon- 
strators ended an occupation of the 
European headquarters of the 
United Nations on Thursday after 
winning a fresh UN condemnation 
of Turkey's incursion into Iraq. 

The 200 Kurds, whose demands 
included Security Council action 
against, Ankara, held three hours of 
negotiations wife UN officials' in 
Geneva before leaving the premises ' 
peacefully, police and UN officials 
said. UN officials defused the crisis 
by reissuing a statement by the sec- 
retary general, Kofi Annan, in 


which be urged Turkish troops to 
withdraw “as soon as possible” 


withdraw “as soon as possible 
and called on other governments to 
pressure Ankara to pull back. 

Some 10,000 Turkish troops 
moved into Iraq last week in pursuit 
of Kurdish Workers Party separat- 
ists who use fee area as a base to 
launch raids into Turkey. (Reuters) 


Iraq- Syria Road 
To Be Reopened 


BAGHDAD — The main road 
linking Iraq and Syria will be re- 


opened soon to handle Iraqi imports 
under its oil-for-food -deal with the 


under its oil-for-food ‘deal with the 
United Nations, a senior Syrian of- 
ficial said in a report Thursday. 

Rateb Shallah, chairman of fee 
Syrian Chamber of Commerce & 
Industry, told the Arab Ba’afh So- 
cialist Party newspaper feat the 
opening of fee land link would be in 
die interest of both coon tries. The 
UN deal, which went into effect in 
December, allows Iraq to sell $2 
billion worth of oil over six months 
co buy food and medicine. 

He also said he had discussed 
reviving other trade and industrial 
ties wife Iraq, all of which were" 
severed during the 1980s, when 
Damascus sided with Iran in its war 
against Iraq. (Reuters) 


Haiti Postpones 
Senate Runoffs 


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 
Bowing to international pressure, 
Haiti has postponed Senate elec- 
tions that were slated for Sunday. 
Instead, the voting will take place 
next month. 

Alexandre Lavaud, secretary- 
general of fee electoral council, did 
not explain Wednesday’s decision, 
but a pro-government party, the 
Lav alas Political Organization, had 
threatened to boycott the vote after 
irregularities surfaced during fee 
first round of balloting April 6. The 
party claimed that election officials 
were rigging the process in favor of 
fonner President Jean-Bertrand Ar- 
istide ’s Laval as Family party. 

Observers from the Organization 
of American States also said elec- 
tion officials had tampered wife the 
first-round results. The runoff elec- 
tions will be held June 15 or Jone 22. 
Mr. Lavaud said. (AP) 


ister, said recently feat the street rallies A A ■ a j. n it* 

were taking place “not because we tol- .rAAXvJAVI. T A Ai JtiTOteSterS UemarUi JOOS 
crate them, but because we lack the 

security guards to stop them.” Continued from Page I Bolivia, was occunied bv thousands 


Tehran residents passing a billboard featuring Ayatollah Ali Khameini, 
who as supreme leader will preside over the winner of the presidential 
election Friday. The late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini is also shown. 


More troubling to many observers Df 
the campaign has been fee spate of 
clashes in Jakarta and other cities on 
Java between young supporters of the 
three contesting parties, and frequent 
attacks by those supporters on by stand- 


guards broke up a roadblock set up by 200 
sugar workers and their families, who are 
demanding new jobs after 4,000 layoffs 
by die company there in recent years. 

More than 70 people were arrested 


Bolivia, was occupied by thousands of 
protesters seeking jobs in fee neighbor- 
ing province of Salta last week. There 
have been violent demonstrations in six 
other provinces this month. 

Unemployment has risen sharply since * 
the government of President Carlos Saul 


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darn of the Prophet Mohammed, he has nocrats” such as Faezeh Hashemi, ers and vehicles that do not show the Tuesday night in La Plata, capital of Menem took office in 1989 and 


arid 
PahkT 
killed 1 



ordinate to Ayatollah Khameini and, for dress codes and a government ban on 
t hat matter, Mr. Rafsaniani, who will take satellite television. His support is 


that matter, Mr. Rafsanjani, who will take satellite television. His support is 
over as head of a newly expanded con- strongest among intellectuals, the urban 
sultarive body called the Assembly for poor and students — a vital constituency 
Diagnosing the Interests of the Regime, in a country where the voting age is 15. 

For those and other reasons, the race Mr. Khatemi also has won fee en- 
has failed to generate much enthusiasm dorsement of pragmatists and “tech- 
among liberal critics of the regime such — — 

as Dariush Foruhar, a lawyer and former 

labor minister, who now heads fee out- O A T\Tf' ,r I r r/Y]\rC # T7 C 
lawed but tolerated National Party of OxAJ. x V j-I. JLVrl i»J* 

Tran. “I do not see any difference be- 
tween them.” Mr. Foruhar said recendy Continued from Page I 

while drinking a nonalcoholic beer. 

“The whole problem is the religion- in targeted areas and specific economic 


hinted at doubts about strict women's daughter of fee outgoing president, and 
dress codes and a government ban on an outspoken advocate of women's 
satellite television. His support is rights who holds a seat in Parliament. 


same political affiliation. 


Buenos Aires Province, after fee police 


Arief Budiman, one of Indonesia's fired tear gas and rubber bullets at h un- 


leading sociologists and political cora- 


“If we have only one line ruling over the mentaiors, said that the campaign had 
country, then the country will race stag- . been notable for the lack of tolerance of 
nation,” Miss Hashemi told journalists, political differences and the degree to 


nation. Miss Hashemi told journalists. 
“There is a direct line between freedom 
and moderation.” 


which violence had become “the lan- 
guage of politics.” 


dreds of protesters. Most were students 
and street vendors, who refused to dis- 
perse and began throwing stones and 
setting up barricades. 

The blocked road in Jujuy Province, a 
main artery between Argentina and 


free-market reforms. The latest unem- • 
ployment figures show feat 17 percent of r 
fee country’s workers cannot find jobs. * 
The unrest comes at the worst possible 
time for Mr. Menem’ s Peronist Party, ' 

niVll^h 1C frVkilinn TI _ _ _ « # 




, ^ h c 


7, 


which is trailing in polls as it prepares for Jf- ^ oj f :i 

congressional elections in Ormiw 7> - v. ■ ... 


SANCTIONS: U.S . to Punish 3 Asian Firms for Selling Weapons Technology to Iran 


Continued from Page 1 


oriented status of the government. 


reconstruction projects.” including 


But within fee narrow context of Ira- restoring communications and civil ac- 


tions on the three companies, some crit- chemical weapons program.” Compa- 
res in and our of Congress, including the nies in other countries — Australia, Aus- 
House speaker, Newt Gingrich, Repub- tria, Germany, Italy and Thailand — 
lican of Georgia, immediately called on have been punished for similar viola- 
Mr. Clinton to do more to influence tions. 


nian politics, the distinction between fee 
two front-runners seems clear. 

Although Mr. Nouri has tempered his 
views somewhat since entering fee pres- 
idential race, his tenure as parliamentary 
speaker has been marked by hard-line 

■ ' i valdHmnr n/ith 


ation. Mrs. Albright called on the in- 
ternational community to “re-energize 
its commitment to implement 
Dayton.” 

Under the new U.S. initiative, only 
those cities in Bosnia that allow dis- 


views ofl social issues and relations wife placed persons to return home would be 
»)u> Wact Pp hnc ctmocr cuDDort in rural eligible for international aid. 


Chinese behavior in several areas, in- 
cluding human rights, arms sales to the 
Mideast and trade disputes. 

“The administration has to show feat 
it is prepared to be tough with China,” 
said James Przystup, director of the 


The Chinese companies cited were 
the Nanjing Chemical Industries Group 
and the Jiangsu Yongli Chemical En- 
gineering and Technology Import/Ex- 
port Corp. The Hong Kong company 
was identified as Cheong Yee Limited. 


— the economy's become so complex. I 
don 't think, in any case, feat this went up 
to a Politburo-level decision.'* 

Secretary Albright was asked by a 
member of the Senate subcommittee, 
Robert Bennett, Republican of Utah, 
about naval intelligence reports that 
China was providing Iran land-based C- 
802 cruise missiles capable of attacking 
U.S. ships in the Gulf. 

We share your deep concern,’ * Mrs. 


congressional elections in October. 

The administration initially sought to 
portray fee unrest as fee work of extreme 
Leftist groups bent on overthrowing the 
government, but it abandoned that line ” 
after the violence spread so quickly and ■ 
opposition parties accused Mr. Menem 
of "inventing the resurgence of sub- " 
version” as a political ploy. ■; 

Juan Pablo Bay lac, a congressman 
with the opposition Radical Party, said - 
feat the protests reflected widespread dis- ' * 
enchantment with the current economic •* 
policies and feat fee violence could get” 
worse unless the government does more j 
to create jobs and help fee poor. *’ 

“Argentina’s economic iransforma- ' 
tion is now hitting the lower middle-class 


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by 


Asian Studies Center at die Heritage Five Chinese citizens were also named. Albright said. “We have expressed our sector, which had so C* 3 

Foundation. He said he was unsure The sanctions can be lifted alter a concerns to China.” Mr Rsvhvcaid “twT oeeo s PP rea r « v « 


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wealthy merchants whose prosperity de- 
pends on import and export licenses 
granted by fee government. 

Mr. Khatemi, by contrast, is con- 
sidered something of a liberal by Iranian 


plans to visit fee Balkans next week. She 
also announced Thursday that she would 
visit Vietnam and Cambodia on her way 
to Hong Kong for ceremonies marking 
the han dover of fee colony from British 


STuSitawi die black to Chinese rule on July L 


After her announcement of die sane- 


Foundation. He said he was unsure 
whether gestures like that announced 
Thursday could convince Congress feat 
there was a new toughness, but added, 
“It’ll sure be marketed feat way.” 

The State Department said that fee 
companies were being sanctioned under 
tiie 1991 Chemical and Biological 
Weapons Control Act for “knowingly 
and materially contributing to Iran's 


The State Department spokesman 
sidestepped the question of whether 
Chinese companies could be selling dan- 
gerous substances to Iran without fee 
knowledge of their government 


But she did not directly confinn re- 
ports of the missile sales. 

The United States has been attempt- 
ing to improve relations with China on a 
series of fronts, even while remaining 
critical of its alleged transfers to Iran and 


_ ,CSr. K of fee rZ 

Mr. Baylac said. “These are people who “ N 
had conndence in the future and who were . Jin 

accustomed to a certain level of comfort. - . he 

But it is feu new poor who do not adapt 
easily to this new economic situation.'’ IS?-' b\ ^ e\irad«- 
The government, which has said it i 1 ant 

hopes to reduce unemployment by 2 or 3 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23. 1997 


PAGE 7 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Q& A/ Richard Lugar 


f Russia and NATO: 
Voice but ‘No Veto’ 


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hftk 0 * l0ken ° leadin H role 

Ovlr% e A™-* in ? VS **,«<■ 
f./ NATO -s plans to c.xpand 

its membership: he led a re- 
cent Council of Foreign Re- 
lations taskforce on enlarge- 

Rrinn K r ' h Ugar 5 P° kt * to 

Brian Kntm lton of the Inter- 
nationa Herald Tribune 
about the recent NATO-Rus- 
sta agreement and the pro- 
gress of enlargement plans. 

Q- How important is the 
new NATO-Russia agree- 
ment? ^ 

T he expansion of 
NATO is extremely impor- 
tant for our security and the 
stability of Europe, as well as 
for our friends in Europe, but 
we have an equal interest in 
the ability of Russia to be- 
come a democratic state, a 
nonthreatening partner, and 
we've invested a lot in that. 
The NATO-Russia charter is 
a part of that investment. 

Q. Will it give Russia loo 
large a voice in NATO af- 
fairs? 


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A. We're discussing with 
the Russians some problems 
that are legitimate for them to 
raise, but doing so in a way 
that says they will not have a 
veto over new members, over 
any policy of NATO, that the 
members can meet separately 
from the Russians. Yet a con- 
sultative mechanism has been 
set up which we believe is a 
‘ ‘win" situation for Russia as 
well as for the stability of the 
igemenL 


^rran 


Q. Boris Yeltsin talks as if 
the Russians bad a blocking 
ability. 

A. My interpretation is 
they don't — no veto — but 

we add in the report of the task 

force 1 chaired that the par- istration has been stalwart, is 
allel development of Russia is to say that any member of the 


sd. don't finish the Conven- 
tional Forces in Europe 
agree me mumil NATO en- 
largement is settled. 

Q. Some concern has been 
voiced about Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's assurances to 
Russians that Germany will 
watch out for their interests 
within NATO. 

A. His relationship is prob- 
ably a constructive one in 
temis of our joint quest to 
bring stability to Russia. I 
don’t see that anything’s been 
lost by this. 

• 

Q. The likely new mem- 
bers are concerned that now 
Russia will have a voice in 
NATO, and not necessarily a 
friendly one, before they ac- 
tually become members. 

A. None of the new mem- 
bers ought to be given a status 
that is less favorable than 
Russia 's during this period. In 
no way should they ever be in 
an unfavorable position. 

Q. Are concrete steps 
needed? 

A. We just have to keep 
saying, there will be no 
second-class citizens, if 
you're a member, this means 
the protection of Article V [of 
the NATO Charter] is avail- 
able to you. that Russia has no 
veto. Russia cannot stop us. 

• 

Q. What about other coun- 
tries seeking membership — 
the Baltic countries, Ro- 
mania. Slovenia — that worry 
the next roundof enlargement 
won’t come soon enough? . 

A. Some distinguished 
American statesmen have said 
that after we get through this 
first thing, we ought to pause 
and see. Others have sugges- 
ted that this ought to be tire 
end. Well, that does bring 
great anxiety to die Baltics and 
to Ukraine. My own advocacy, 
and this is where the admin- 


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tentially a member of NATO. 
We remain open to name new 
members at any time. 

• 

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very important to NATO. 

Q. One Russian official 
was quoted as saying that the 
NATO agreement would 
make it extremely difficult to 

get the Duma. Russia's Par- Q. What do you expect 
liament, to ratify the START- when the question of enlarge- 
2 treaty. ment comes to the Senate for 

A. Well, they’ve bera say- ratification? 

A. The final result will be 
ratification of the treaty, about 
a year from now. However, it 
will be -a vigorous debate. 
Many in the Senate will say, 
why rock the boat? The 16have 
worked well, there is no threat 
to anybody. Some would say 
beyond dial, dial if you add 1, 
2, 3 members — heaven help 
us, 5, even 10 — this remark- 
able alliance is going to dis- 
appear in terms of its formi- 
dable qualities of cohesion and 
consensus. Still others would 
say, it is going to cost the 


ing that for a long time. This is 
just another reason for delay. 

Q. Some critics say die re- 
cent agreement merely papers 
over the real problems. 

A. It’s not a treaty, and it’s 
not a binding agreement — 
maybe the language or the 
interpretations by the two 
sides lead to some ambiguity. 
Maybe that was deliberate in 
away. 


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Q. Does this create a two- 
spwd NATO, with die new 

\ nember states — almost „ — „ - 

w*- urely Poland, Hungary and United States a- lot more 

Czech Republic — having money. A great and 

rower levels of protection? ' 


A. We have to make sure 
that there are no second-class 
citizens, that in die very be- 
ginning, each of the new 
members clearly has the abil- 
ity to defend itself and we 
have the ability, by shifting of 
forces, to come to their aid. 
That is one reason we coun- 


monu- 

mental bargaining will go an. 

From time to time Russian 
statesmen will make state- 
ments dial, everything not- 
withstanding. will strongly 
imply that they plan to veto 
what NATO is going to do, or 
intrude very gready. We could 
have forks in the road 'where 
one Parliament or another of 


Virgilio Barco Is Dead; 
Colombia Ex-President 






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The Associated Press 

Virgilio Banco, 75. former 
president of Colombia whose 
dream of combating poverty 
with land reform and other 
social measures was side- 
tracked by a war against drag 
barons, died of cancer Tues- 
day in Bogota. 

When be took office on 
Aug. 7, 1986, one-third of his 
vjjanon’s 28 million people 
S&rre living below the poverty 
line and an array of well- 
armed leftist guerrilla bands 
were carrying out attacks and 
demanding reform. 

Mr. Barco made a valiant 
effort to cany out his eco- 
nomic and social reforms, but 
he was soon sidetracked by 
U.S. demands for the arrest 
and. extradition of more than 
100 drug traffickers, a de- 
mand that set off a wave of 
bombings, kidnappings- and 
assassinations by the en- 
trenched leaders of the na- 
tion’s cocaine cartels. 

After a wave of assassin- 
ations of public officials, he 
declared a state of siege m 
1988. reimposed an extradi- 
treaty by decree and 

i a full-scale war against 


□on 



III H1 X 

fickers and extraditing a num- 
ber of them to die United 

St When he left office in 1 990 
the war was still raging, and 
although the most powerful 


and notorious trafficker, 
Pablo Escobar Gaviria, was 
killed in 1993, the power of 
the cartels was demonstrated 
in 1991, when the Colombian 
Congress overturned the ex- 
tradition treaty. 

Drawn into politics shortly 
after he received his degree 
from the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology in 1943. 
Mr. Barco ran the Ministry of 
Communications and later 
served in both houses of Con- 
gress. . . . 

He became minister of 
public works and then of ag- 
riculture. acting minister of 
finance and ambassador to 
Britain before being appoin- 
ted to a term as mayor of 
Bogota. 

Gordon Wies Reed, 97, 
who for 22 years was chair- 
man of Texas Gulf Producing 
Co., an independent oil and 
gas concern, died Saturday in 
Greenwich, Connecticut, 
after a brief illness, said his 
son, Thomas, a former sec- 
retary of the air force. 

Bernard Louis Gladieux, 
90 a former federal official 
who helped mobilize the 
United Stktes for World War 
II went on to advise a suc- 
cession of cabinet secretaries 
and later helped build me 
Ford Foundation into a major 
global benefactor, died 
Sunday in Oberlin. Ohio. 



Clinton’s Motives Behind Alliance 6 Vision ’ 


By John F. Harris 

Mashui^tan Pea Sen ice 


* *> Lmi^fThr Wuhuipim fvw 


the 16 has questions. And we 
have a bloc of senators who 
are very suspicious of treaties 
— any treaty. They would say 
this is going to overextend the 
United States. And it could be 
that we’ll be having the debate 
in the Senate not too distant 
from the withdrawal from 
Bosnia. Now what if we reach 
that moment and our allies are 
saying, you come out. we'll 
all come out. And some 
people will say. well, then, 
what is NATO all about? 

This is a fairly hard sell. 
We’re going to have a mo- 
numental debate. Thank 
goodness, we don’t have a 
deadline for ratification. 


WASHINGTON — There was an 
ethnic war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, a 
refugee exodus in Haiti, a currency 
crash in Mexico. 

For most of his first term. President 
Bill Clinton’s foreign policy was 
defined by crisis. 

Next week, however, marks a new 
chapter in Mr. Ginion’s presidency. 
Ii will be his most prominent effort so 
far to convince allies in Europe and 
the public at home that his approach to 
the world is driven by a strategic 
vision, rather than by' episodic re- 
sponses to emergencies. 

The vision, in this case, is Mr. 
Clinton’s belief that die expansion of 
the NATO alliance to include the 
former Warsaw Pact nations of East- 
ern Europe is the way to ensure the 
long-term peace and stability on 
ground where two world wars were 
fought. 

Starting Monday, Mr. Clinton will 
embark on a series of carefully staged 
appearances in Europe and the United 
Stales to make his case. 

On Tuesday, he will join 15 Euro- 
pean leaders at the Elysee Palace in 
Paris to sign an agreement with Rus- 
sia that is aimed at calming Moscow's 
fears of NATO expansion. 

The next day, he will be in The 


Hague with about 40 other European 
leaders ro celebrate rite 50th an- 
niversary of the Marshall Plan that 
rebuilt Europe after World War IL 

After a stop in London to meet 
Tony Blair, the new prime minisrer of 
Britain, Mr. Clinton will deliver the 
commencement address at the U.S. 
Military Academy. It will be at West 
Point, his aides said, that Mr. Clinton 
intends to make his case to a domestic 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

audience, in a more sustained way 
than he Iras so far, thai taking on new 
military obligations in Europe is 
worth the cost. 

NATO expansion, an issue that has 
mostly been debated only in elite for- 
eign policy circles, will not go for- 
ward unless it wins passage in the 
Senate by a two-thirds vote, and ad- 
ministration officials acknowledge 
that they have a considerable sales 
campaign before them. 

Next week Mr. Qinton u ill be cast- 
ing hi* place in the world in decidedly 
grandiose terms. He will assert, ac- 
cording to his aides, that the expan- 
sion of the North Atlantic Treaty' Or- 
ganization is an achievement on the 
scale of what the Marshall Plan ac- 
complished five decades ago in lifting 
European economies out of the rubble 
of war. 


Where one plan saved Western 
Europe from collapse, administration 
officials said, the other will help erase 
die line that divided the Continent dur- 
ing the Cold War — “a sweeping, 
broad, historic, strategic objective." as 
Mr. Clinton's national security adviser. 
Samuel Berger, put it this week. 

That boast is hyperbole in the eyes 
of some foreign policy analysts, who 
said that the expansion of NATO 
could just as easily spark a new season 
of hostility with Russia as stabilize 
Europe. Top officials in Moscow 
have already warned that the price of 
NATO expansion may be Russian 
failure to ratify the START-2 arms 
control treaty and make promised cuts 
in its nuclear arsenal. 

But even skeptics of NATO ex- 
pansion said Mr. Clinton could plau- 
sibly claim that the idea bears his 
signature, more so than with other 
things the White House has listed as 
successes. 

"I think the administration is veiy 
eager to have a foreign policy ini- 
tiative that it can call its own." said 
Ronald Steel, an analyst on the faculty 
at the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia. and a skeptic of expansion. "I 
think they were looking for some- 
thing, so they came up with some- 
thing." 

John Lewis Gaddis, a foreign 
policy historian at Ohio University. 


said Mr. Clinton embraced die idea 
less from a thoughtful strategic as- 
sessment than as a response to do- 
mestic political pressures — blocs of 
ethnic East European voters in Mid- 
west states who were clamoring to 
have their ancestral lands placed un- 
der NATO’s umbrella. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Berger and 
Strobe Talbot, deputy secretary of 
stare,- vigorously denied chat domestic 
politics was the driving force behind 
the administration's support for NA- 
TO expansion. But there is no dis- 
puting that domestic politics are fig- 
uring in die effort to project Mr. 
Clinton’s foreign policy in the best 
light at home. 

Such White House aides as Rahm 
Emanuel, a senior adviser, and Donald 
Baer, communications strategist, are 
intimately involved in planning Mr. 
Clinton's appearances next week and 
in a second foreign trip in July, when 
the NATO nations will gather in Mad- 
rid to extend raembersmp formally to 
the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland 
and possibly other nations. 

James Steinberg, deputy national 
security adviser, described Mr. Clin- 
ton’s motives in lofty terms. "Given 
this relatively tranquil moment in his- 
tory." he said, the question that drove 
expansion was: "How do you create 
the structures that will allow this to 
continue for the next generation." 



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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINCTCN POST 


The Fed Will Watch 


Wall Street is supposed to reart with 
horror when the Federal Reserve 
Board cowers from raising interest 
rates in the face of a raging economy. 
But on Tuesday, when the Fed an- 
nounced that it would keep interest 
rates steady, stocks soared and interest 
rates fell, a tribute to the market’s faith 
in Chairman Alan Greenspan. 

Under Mr. Greenspan, the Fed has 
presided over nearly uninterrupted 
growth with steadily failing inflation. 
His record now gives him the leeway to 
sit back and let die American economy 
grow without having to prove his anti- 
inflationary credentials by prema- 
turely jacking up rates and slowing the 
economy down. 

A year or so ago. economists de- 
bated whether the economy could op- 
erate at unemployment rates below 6 
percent without driving up wages, then 
prices. Today unemployment hovers 
below 5 percent, while inflation stays 
below 3 percent. This good news puts 
die Fed in a policy predicament. It 
knows that its interest rate increases 
take a year or more to cool off an 
economy. If it waits until inflation vis- 
ibly rises, it risks having to throw the 


economy into a tail spin to wring out 
the inflationary momentum. But by 
stamping out inflation before it ap- 
pears, the Fed would forgo learning 
whether the modem economy can op- 
erate at permanently lower unemploy- 
ment rates than in die past. 

The Fed has decided to see how 
good the economy can be, allowing die 
unemployment rate to drop to the low- 
est rate in 23 years. 4.9 percent. But it 
could not have done so had Mr. Green- 
span not firmly established his cred- 
ibility as an inflation tighter by pre- 
emptively raising interest raxes in 1994 
to ward off an inflationary burst that he 
feared but that had not yet appeared. 

Had bond traders feared inflation, 
they would have greeted Tuesday's 
nonaction by driving up long-term in- 
terest rates, which the Fed does not 
control. They did not. The economy 
now reaps die benefit of the Fed's 
record. At an unemployment rate of 5 
rather than 6 percent, the economy is 
already operating with an extra 1 mil- 
lion jobs. The Fed has now said, in 
effect, that it is prepared to test how 
low the rate can go. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Palestinian Despotism 


The Palestinian Authority has found 
many ways to harm its own cause dur- 
ing its brief existence, but few more 
damaging than Wednesday's arrest of 
Palestinian-American journalist Daoud 
Kuttab. Mr. Kuttab is a U.S. citizen 
running a U.S.-funded television sta- 
tion on the West Bank. His detention, 
and the authority' s jamming of his net- 
work's broadcasts, are certain to put 
Yasser Arafat's increasing despotism 


squarely in the American public eye. 

TVistryingto 


Mr. Kuttab ’s A1 Quds 
be a kind of Palestinian C-SPAN, 
broadcasting unedited debates from 
the Palestinian Authority’s Parliament 
— hardly seditious stuff, you might 
think. But some legislators there give 
speeches critical of Mr. Arafat; the 
official Palestinian Broadcasting Cor- 
poration never shows those, giving air 
time only to Mr. Arafat himself. Re- 
cently Mr. Kuttab discovered that the 
official television company was jam- 
ming his broadcasts. When be reported 
this discovery to Washington Post cor- 


respondent Barton Gellman, he was 
arrested — and Mr. Arafat kept right 
on blocking the broadcasts. 

That Mr. Kuttab is a U.S. citizen of 
course does not make his arrest any 
more repugnant titan the authority's 
jailing and torturing of other journa- 
lists. intellectuals and free thinkers. 
Fourteen Palestinians have died under 
torture by Palestinian Authority police. 
This march toward a police state is 
doubly sad because it is so unnecessary. 
Mr. Arafat assumed office with a pop- 
ular mandate, broad international sup- 
port and an opportunity to prove that 
Arab democracy is not an oxymoron. 

But Mr. Kurtab's arrest, if not mor- 
ally worse, is certainly more tactically 
stupid than many of the authority’s 
otter moves. At a time when political 
smarts would suggest that Mr. Arafat 
should be playing the role of spumed 
negotiating partner, he chooses instead 
to revive and exacerbate all the old 
questions about himself. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Post-Dolly Prudence 


With commencement speech season 
in full swing. President Bill Clinton has 
been using campuses as a place to talk 
about the ethical challenges posed by 
scientific and technological break- 


life better for all citizens rather than for 
just a chosen few; their application ■ 
should not interfere with basic prin- 


ciples of equal treatment and equality 
ie law; 


throughs. At Morgan State University 
in Baltmu 


ltimore on Sunday, he predicted 
that the next half-century would be an 
"age of biology" whose medical and 
reproductive wonders, from Dolly the 
sheep to a cure for diabetes, will bring 
unheard-of benefits along with in- 
creasingly perplexing moral debates. 

Nothing could illustrate the point 
better than last weekend’s reports of 
heavy weather at the National Bio- 
ethics Advisory Commission, whose 
members, in the wake of Dolly’s sur- 
prise appearance on the world scene, 
are trying to come up with recom- 
mendations for scientists on whether to 
ban experiments in human cloning. 

The 18 commission members, strug- 
gling to meet a May 27 deadline, are 
reported to be moving toward con- 
sensus not on the large moral question 
— whether research on the cloning of 
humans should be encouraged as life- 
giving progress or banned as a 
cheapening of human identity — but, 
rather, on the narrower pragmatic 
judgment that experimenting with hu- 
man cloning at this stage of the tech- 
nology may carry an unacceptably 
high danger of producing severely 
malformed fetuses. This, a panel mem- 
ber told The New York Times, could 
provide the basis for asking private 
clinics to join voluntarily in the pres- 
ident's previously announced ban on 
human cloning experiments. It also 
would clear the way for recommending 
that the ban be continued on federal 
funding for such experiments. 

President Clinton, at Morgan State, 
proposed four principles for evaluating 
how new technologies and their uses 
stack up against already agreed-upon 
common values — principles for, as he 
put it, making sure that the sciences 
"continue to serve humanity, not the 
other way around.” 

About new technologies, he sugges- 
ted. we should ask whether they make 


before the law; they should not help 
break down the privacy and autonomy 
of tiie individual citizen: and they 
should not be .treated as if scientific 
answers alone could trump deeper con- 
victions about what is valuable in life. 

These are not bad starting points for 
a debate which, as the members of the 
president's bioethics panel no doubt 
would tell him, gets a lot more difficult 
the moment you get to examples. 

Viewed in that light, the idea of 
proceeding modestly and basing one’s 
recommendation on a straightforward 
safety question, not on an overarching 
moral principle, looks like an intel- 
ligent way to go. Nobody knows what. 


if anything, will come of post-Do lly-cra 
ling. It 


cloning. It would be scientifically and 
morally reckless to pretend otherwise. 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Japan Still Isn’t Ready 


This spring, 150 lawmakers, includ- 
ing two cabinet ministers, visited the 
Yasukuni shrine. Asians are rightly 
uncomfortable when Japanese leaders 
visit a site that honors executed World 
War II war criminals. 

Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimo- 
to’s predecessor tried to exorcise the 
war era demon from Japan's soul, but 
the apology was half-hearted and not 
followed up by any concrete action, 
such as getting Japanese textbooks to 
stop whitewashing Japan's wartime 
atrocities in China. 

The irony of Japan’s revisionism is 
that at a time when the region is ripe for 
Japanese leadership, it sows suspicion 
among neighbors about Japanese 
motives and thus renders itself an in- 
effectual player on the world field. 

— Far Eastern Economic Review 
(Hong Kong). 


JfcralbSi^rtbunc 


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Help to Make This the End of an Era for Africa 

* _ i • « nrac hu nfl rDPJUlS 


H ARARE, Zimbabwe — The fall of 
Mobutu Sese Seko, and die arrival 
of a new regime in what has once again 
become the Congo, have wide implic- 
ations in Africa. 

Government leaders and business- 
men gathered here for the World Eco- 
nomic Forum’s Southern Africa Eco- 
nomic Summit are cautiously discussing 
the lessons, for their own countries but 
also for the Western states which helped 
keep the monumentally greedy dictator 
in power for 32 long years. 

Those have been very bad years for 
most of Africa, left further and further 
behind while other parts of the world 
have prospered. More and more aware- 
ness is spreading that bad governance 
must bear the bulk of the blame. 

Political leaders remain loath to crit- 
icize each other, for fear it will boom- 
erang. But those without official titles 
are increasingly outspoken. Dictators, 
they say. have to realize that if they 
don’t step down in good rime, they will 
be thrown out. 

Far from complaining about out- 
siders mixing in their sovereign in- 
dependence in domestic affairs, the 
complaint is that democratic developed 
countries did not intervene enough in 
favor of the people. 

There is not much talk about the 
“African way" now — more about the 
need for responsible democracy, not 


By Flora Lewis 


only honest elections but development 
of a solid constitutional framework and 
the rule of law. 

Trevor Noube, the independent- 



go halfway, 
the Internet, read around the world." He 
calls for classic Western-style demo- 
cratic institutions, including separation 
of powers, civil rights and a judiciary 
free to guarantee them, and he wears a 
Western-style suit with shirt and tie. 

"I'm proud of it all. I’m for universal 
values. Claiming some kind of special 
African exception is just an excuse for 
those determined to cling to power." 

Mr. Noube is pan of a rising gen- 
eration, people in their 20s and early 
30s who have quite different ideas from 
many of their olders. There is a network 
of them in the countries of the region, 
and they argue for liberalization of the 
economics as well as the politics, ur- 
ging enterprise and denouncing cor- 
ruption that has proved so costly and 
demeaning. 

They would like help from the in- 
dustrialized countries, not only invest- 
ment and skill s, including manage- 
ment, but also anti-corruption rules. 

An American businessman here says 


he is grateful for tbe U.S. law which 
makes ir a federal crime to pay bribes 
anywhere, and finds that the locals 
respect him for it. 

It would make a big difference if 
other major countries adopted the same 
kind of national laws, instead of en- 
couraging bribery by considering it a 
tax deductible business expense. This 
is something that the World Trade Or- 
ganization ought to take up as unfair 
competition. 

President Nelson Mandela of South 
Africa, who is everybody's hero in this 
part of the world now. welcomed the 
change iaex-Zaire. although he did not 
say anything about repatriating the hid- 
den billions of narional wealth dial Mr. 


Mr. Mobutu was by no means the 
last of Africa's dictators. Indeed, 
nobody pretends to know whai kind of 
nile Laurent KabDa is likely to provide. 
But the fell of Mobutu, as one of the 
outrageously worst, is considered en- 
couragingly symbolic, and it does fi- 
nally pur an end to an era. 

"'it's like the end of the Berlin 
Wall." said one Western diplomat 
"He was the last major African figure 
left from the Cold War and our ob- 
session with fighting communism 
above all else on this continent Now 
we ran get on and pay attention to the 
needs of the people here." 

But will? 

There is a gradual change of atmo- 


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ucu urnunu ui uiuuuu fwuui — — , ~ . _ 

Mobutu stashed abroad. Nobody be- sphere, no breakthrough yet by along 


"- 1 


Iieves the contention of Swiss banks 
that they have none of the money. _ 

It wifi be up primarily to the United 
States, France and Belgium, which 
played a big role in enabling him to 
steal the money, to track it down now. 
But other African governments should 
also bring wbar pressure they can. 

Congo is potentially a very rich 
country. Bur it has been totally ruined, 
and wiD have to create an adminis- 
tration and infrastructure from scratch. 
That will take a lot of funds. If the 
cotmtry begins to succeed, it can have 
an important impact on development in 
the whole of the region. 


wavs but a growing demand for busi- 
ness, for investment, for economic 
growth that will improve living stan- 
dards, and a growing understanding that 
economic growth is the condition for 
political stability and also that it de- 
pends on peace and political freedom. 

The tendency to write Africa off as 
hopeless has always been dangerous. J 
The best buttress is the insistence of a 10, 
new, educated generation on promot- 1 
ing their opportunities and vibrant so- 
cieties — no longer looking for foreign 
culprits to blame, but seeking respon- 
sibility for themselves. 

© Flora Lewis. 


infant 


l Viiiraltlf 


Pacific Asia Has a Distance to Go Before It Leads the World 


rv 


H ong kong — with 

Hong Kong in the last few 
weeks of British rule, there is a 
new mantra doing the rounds. It 
suggests that the handover to 
China symbolizes the baton 
passing from the Atlantic world 
to Pacific Asia. 

Yet it is far from clear that the 
baton will pass smoothly. And 
to whom will it pass, anyway? 

There can be little doubt that 
Pacific Asia is the most dy- 
namic part of the global eco- 
nomy and is likely to retain that 
status for at least for the next 
five to 10 years. But who in the 
region is accruing the power 
that is supposed to follow sus- 
tained economic growth and 
□sing prosperity? 

The answer used to be Japan. 
When it began taking a more 
active role in international eco- 
nomic institutions in die 1980s, 
it seemed obvious to have a Tri- 
lateral Commission or a Group 
of Seven industrialized nations 
with Japan. as the Asian mem- 


By Gerald Segal 


her. But since the Japanese eco- 
nomic bubble burst, it has be- 
come clear that Japan is merely 
a normal power with normal 
problems in sustaining growth 
in a postindustrial society. 

Now that China has grown 
faster than any country before, 
the talk is of the baton passing to 
China and ethnic Chinese in 
other countries in Pacific Asia 
— an extended Greater China. 
Yet the ethnic Chinese are far 
from monolithic, and China is a 
long way from being a Japan- 
like. status quo economic power 
committed to open multilater- 
alism. That is why some people 
worry about an unregulated 
Chinese bull in the World Trade 
Organization shop. 

Neither is it clear how mil- 


breakup of the Soviet Union. 
Only China seems capable of 
becoming a peer competitor. 

Yet as the revolution in mil- 
itary technology gathers pace, 
the' gap between China and 
Western powers appears to be 
growing, not shrinking. If C hina 
does become a peer competitor 
of the United States, it will en- 
sure that Pacific Asia divides in- 


to pro- and anti-Chinese camps. 
In pc 


iiary power may be passing to 
Pacific Asia. The relative pre- 


dominance of the United States 
in the region has increased since 
the end of the Cold War after the 


political terms, the fading 
of the hype concerning Asian 
values suggests that Asians real- 
ize they have no inherently cul- 
tural answers to the problems of 
modernity. The rising crime and 
divorce fates that accompany 
the transition to the postmdus- 
trial world cannot be avoided in 
Pacific Asia, just as there seems 
to be an inevitable link between 
growing political liberalism and 
economic prosperity. 

Pacific Asia’s ability to com- 
pere in a knowledge-based 


world would be more convin- 
cing if some countries in the 
region were faster at moving 
into the world of information 
technology* and others were less 
inclined to try to regulate the 
media. So long as the key in- 
novators and brokers of the 
software revolution continue to 
be bom in the United States and 
Europe, it is hard to feel con- 
fident that Asians are rising to 
the challenge of mastering in- 
formation technology. 

As new international ar- 
rangements are being made in 
this field, for example to agree 
on a system of Internet names 
and rules of the superhighway. 
Asian countries and companies 
are liule more than bit players. 

Asians may complain that the 
Arlantic world has set the rules 
of die old international order, 
but when they have a chance to 
shape the new order, the people 
of Pacific Asia are nowhere to 
be seen. 

Will Asian countries com- 


plain in 10 years' time that the 
world of global information 
was shaped by Westerners 
without their con 


without their consent? If so, 
they have only themselves to 
blame. To compete, they need 
liberal and open societies. 

Another major reason why 
Pacific Asia is unable to shape 
the new structures of global 
power is its failure to get or- 
ganized. There is no equivalent 
m the region of the United 
States or the European Union 
that can speak for a strong, co-Jt 
hesive political bloc. r 

Should China take change, 
tiie region will be divided. 
Without China in charge, it will 
remain divided. So where does 
the baton fall after Hong 
Kong's handover? 




-7t: 


The writer, a senior fellow or 
the International Institute for 
Strategic Studies and director of 
Britain's Pacific Asia Program, 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


A Brutal Letdown for Palestinians Who Expected Freedom 


W ASHINGTON — We 
were wrong. We Palestin- 
ians were wrong about Yasser 
Arafat and the "national author- 
ity” that he has foisted on the 
autonomous zones he controls 
in the West Bank and Gaza. 


By Fawaz Turki 


Not quite four years ago we 
matched 


watenea this man on the White 
House lawn as he signed the 
Oslo agreement and shook 
hands effusively all around. 
The overwhelming majority of 
Palestinians rejoiced at the 
spectacle. This was to be our 
first step toward statehood, our 
chance, at last, to be the de- 
termining force in our destiny. 

These activists among us, 
democrats and patriots all, 
looked forward to building a 
community of laws and insti- 
tutions, governed by a social 
contract between ruler and 
ruled, checks and balances, ac- 


countability. We had fought for 
independence, and lived 
through unspeakable suffering 
too long to settle for anything 
less. To end up creating yet an- 
other dreary dawla , or Arab 
state, known dismissively in 
Palestinian idiom as istiqlal (a 
term connoting frivolity, nepot- 
ism, coercion and violence) 
would have been a cruel ter- 
minus to our struggle. 

We had no illusions about 
Yasser Arafat himself, this man 
of dubious background who had 
not read a half-dozen decent 
books in his life, nor grown with 
his job. We often cringed at his 
lack of 6 lan. his vaudevillian 
ways and his penchanr for one- 
man rule, just as we were scan- 
dalized by the excesses of his 
officials in die old glory days of 


the PLO, who bad made a fetish 
of traveling on the Concorde 
with Samsonitcs foil of cash. 

But we believed that once the 
institutional machinery for 
statehood was in gear, the ag- 
gregate of popular culture would 
lead to stability and, finally, 
meaningful independence. 

- We were dead wrong. No one 
could prophesy the true mea- 
sure of tiie dissolution of civil 
society, of civilized norms, of 
human hope, that was to come. 

Yasser Arafat arrived in Ga- 
za in 1994 with a group of men 
carrying not shovels but guns. 
He created nine intelligence 
services and police force of 
well over 30,000 men, presum- 
ably more policemen per capita 
than any country in the world. 

The Palestinian Authority’s 


Swiss Neutrality Was a Fraud 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


government report 
how the Swiss aided me 1* 


EW YORK — The U.S. 

on 
Nazis 


in laundering looted gold dur- 
War IT contains 


ing World 
many useful lessons. The most 
important is about "neutral- 
ity." and how the Swiss ver- 
sion was a moral fraud. 

The cynical form of neut- 
rality is to stay out of a war but 
do business with all sides to 
enrich yourself. That was the 
Swiss in World War H It is all 
contained in the impressive 
U.S. study on Nazi gold as- 
sembled by Undersecretary of 
Commerce Stuart Eizenstat 
and the State Department his- 
torian. William Slany. 

The Nazi theft of gold from 
the central banks of countries 
they occupied, and from the 
teeth of Jews they butchered, 
was a concerted strategy. Be- 
cause Nazi currency was use- 
less elsewhere in Europe, die 
central way the Germans could 
buy war materials was by tak- 
ing looted gold and selling it to 
Swiss banks. Those banks 
gave tiie Nazis Swiss francs, 
which they could use to buy 

f oods in Spain. Portugal, 
witzerland or Turkey. 
Willingness to turn Nazi 
under into Swiss francs 
elped prolong the war and 
make Switzerland the richest 
country in Europe by 1945. 
right ' 

Swis 


£ 


One might be able to un- 
derstand Swiss laundering of 


Nazi gold at the start of the 
war, when German tanks 
could easily have overrun 
them. But they continued long 
after the Nazis were a threat. 

After the war, the Swiss 
denied having received any 
looted Nazi gold. Finally they 
agreed to return S58 million of 
the roughly S275 million in 
gold ( worth $2.5 billion today) 
that the Swiss National Bank 
had obtained from the Nazis. 

In 1949. when the Swiss 
were still stiffing the Allies, 
they did allow the Polish gov- 
ernment to recover assets in 
Swiss banks of heirless Poles 
murdered by the Nazis. Why? 
So the Poles could use the 
cash to pay back the Swiss for 
money lost when Poland na- 
tionalized a few Swiss compa- 
nies during the war. 

The Swiss promised to liq- 
uidate the German assets they 
held and hand them over to 
Holocaust survivors and to a 
fund for rebuilding Europe. 
But they argued over exchange 
rates, raised one obstacle after 
another, and then refused to 
make an exception for the as- 
sets of murdered German 
Jews, insisting that their assets 
in Swiss banks had to be liq- 
uidated as well. 

Eventually, in 1952, the 
Swiss turned over S28 million 
in German assets out of what 
may have been S750 million. 

The current generation ar- 


gues that it is unfair to judge it 
by the acts of its elders. That is 
right. This Swiss generation 
should be judged by whether it 
does the right thing now. 

They have a chance to meet 
history again. The government 
is planning to ask the Swiss 
people to vote on the creation 
of a fund for war survivors. 
The people need to back that 
fund — and with more money 
than is now being proposed. 

The three largest private 
Swiss banks, and the Swiss 
National Bank, have set up a 
SI 80 million fond for Holo- 
caust survivors. That sum. 
too. is embarrassingly low 
considering how much Swiss 
banks and companies profited 
from the war. Also, there are 
hundreds of other Swiss banks 
still refusing to pay a dime. 

Most importantly, one hopes 
that the Swiss will rewrite their 
history. That means acknow- 
ledging that the Nazis used the 
Swiss to launder stolen gold, 
and that the Swiss used the 
diplomatic concept of "neut- 
rality*’ to launder themselves. 

We would always like to be- 
lieve that in a polarized world 
there is one safe haven — 
above the fray, neutral and fair, 
reliable as a cuckoo clock. We 
thought that was Switzerland. 
But Swiss neutrality was a 
fraud, pure and simple. 

Swiss neutrality has no 
past. Only this generation can 
determine if it has a future. 

The New York Times. 


first order of business was to 
pursue those figures regarded 
by any civilized society as cen- 
tral to the health of the body 
politic. The heretical editor was 
silenced, the human rights ac- 
tivist was hounded, the recal-. 
citranr labor unionist was jailed, 
and the innovative intellectual 
was harassed and beaten. 

Those others, who represent- 
ed through their literary effu- 
sions the adversarial current in 
the community, individuals 
whose necessary role in social 
life is to seek an articulation for 
the fragile plurality' of human 
nature and conduct, have had 
their heads hit when they were 
lifted and their voices silenced 
when they were raised. 

To date, 14 Palestinians have 
died under torture at tiie hands 
of thugs (no other word will do 
here) from the dreaded intel- 
ligence services. 

Although the Palestinian Au- 
thority has scant respect for ihe 
life of the mind or for the value 
of dissent, its fear of them 
knows no bounds. 

There is a perversity in ail of 
this that goes beyond one’s re- 
pugnance at the use of repres- 
sion to stifle the public debate. 
It tells us something about the 
semi-literate oafs who make up 
Yasser Arafat’s ruling elite. 

With the Oslo agreement, we 
were at last to free ourselves, if 
progressively, from foreign oc- 
cupation, not because we had 
represented a military threat to 
Israel — truth be told, the PLO 


was as dangerous to Israel’s ex- 
istence as secondhand smoke 
— but because the international 
community, including the 
United States, had to come 
round to that recognition. 

For Palestinians, expecta- 
tions of progress, of personal 
and social enfranchisement, 
moved closer. Independence 
took on the urgent drama of 
concreteness, of a dizzying 
sense of total possibility. 

That was four years ago. 

Now the United States, no- v 
torious over the years for ur<£ 
derwritmg the survival of two- 
bit dictators around the world, 
has latched on to yet another 
one of these in the person of 
Yasser Arafat, whose woeful 
disregard for the human rights 
of his own people Washington 
continues not only io wink at 
but to urge on him, presumably 
in the name of stability in the 
territories. 

One thing is plain: Yasser 
Arafat has unleased destructive 
forces, dug up from the depths 
of the coercive tradition, that are 
destined to stifle our dream for 
living as free men and women. 

After our costly intifada 
against those who had occupied 
our homeland, it now appears 
that we have to wage another 
intifada against those who oc- 
cupy our home. 


K - 


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XT’- 






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r*-. 






**oss 

'>•4. 


'£ — . 


r : ;>'^=«5 3? 


Fawaz Turki. a Palestinian 
writer living in the United 
Slates, contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


v jT - t 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGOf 


1897: Cure Stirs Hope 


PARIS — Serotherapia has giv- 
en the most unbounded hopes. 
Already diphtheria and ihe 
plague have been throttled by it: 
andthe day is doubtless not dis- 
tant when cholera, yellow fever, 
typhoid fever and perhaps even 
tuberculosis will no longer resist 
its action. A feverish ardor an- 
imates those on the trail, and the 
gloom of the laboratory alone 
hides the patient and captivatin'* 
researches which will result in 
the production of the cures of 
the ills that decimate our race. 


tions made by the United States 
Minister. The insurgents insisted 
that they were friends of the 
United States and that tbeir aim 
was only to bring about the dis- 
missal of the president and the 
constitution of a new cabinet. 





r . . . 




1947: White Rule 


1922: Managua Taken 

WASHINGTON — American 
marines have taken possession 
of the fortress of Managua. 
Nicaragua, which had been 
seized by insurgents who were 
seeking to overthrow President 
Chamorro. The insurgents 
turned over the fortress to the 
marines following representa- 


GREENVILLE, S.C. — All 
twenty-eight defendants in the 
Greenville lynching trial were 
acquitted. The men were ac- 
cused of lynching a Negro, after 
he allegedly stabbed to death a 
white taxicab driver. The judge 
had charged the jury not to let 
race prejudice color their de- 
liberations. nor to let the lynch 
victim s own act of stabbing t*^, 
death a white man excuse th? : 
lynching crime. There was 
ample evidence that the verdict 
w as construed as m eaning die 
upholding of the ancient un- 
written law of the South — that 
no white man shall be punished 
for lynching a Negro. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1W 


PAGE 9 




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OPINION/LETTERS 


^ Jokey Scoop So Scummy It Isn’t Funny 


W^»os--n,. mind of 


column! si' ;jl ‘ . , ‘ t ‘ mina ® r By 'Richard Cohen 

tumble cycle sJr.r . J ,n * e 
of them siron^lv h!*irt 0 °P ln,ons * a ^ "Hie time has come, I think, to the Globe paid a woman to have sex 
astonishing d eirJl ■ ■ true lo 311 concede that this whole affair is per- with a public figure so that he could 

other for jfteniion r.T.T*? on , e an ' seated with the clucking sound of be exposed for the presumed benefit 
deal with an iss,„. .h-«V l0da > 1 W|11 chickens coming home to roost. of the paper’s circulation numbers, 
stuck in mv mu-1 "as frankly. For many inexplicable years. Mr. then we have hit a new low both in 
tification of FrmbV-;ff. P !J b,lc mor " Gifford’s wife, the sanctimoniously journalism and in American life. 

>*nk Gtffurd. cloying Kaihie Lee Gifford, has been 

talking on her television show. 


J!£’ Giffortirihe^Mi sports- 


wim a woman not his wife — a 
Former fltght attendant named Suzen 
Johnson. He reportedly save her his 
fwf ,C ph »P ne num "hcr. and after 

Hotef rN^r “ 

J L e u a t v t e h m0sf o f 'he details to oth- 

l£ht M i K e tWO 1 wan « «° hich- 
Karlfe, i°^ SOn> m - v colleague 
Howard Kurtz has revealed, was mid 

a: least S75.0G0 by the Globe to do 
whatever she did with Mr. Gifford, 
and have n all videotaped. There is 
no evidence that Mr. Gifford was 
ever intimate with the woman before 
Aaniyst on April 30. or that she was 
m the room for any other reason than 
to make some easy monev. 


on 

’’Live With Regis and Kaihie Lee.” 
about the stupendous wonderfulness 
of her marriage. She has. she has 
asserted, the best two kids in the 
world. Cody and Cassidy, and the 
best two family dogs. Chardonnay 
and Chablis. 

As for the Gifford marriage itself, 
it’s right off a Hallmark card. It is so 
perfect a union that die couple has 
appeared in an infomercial called 
“Growing in Love.” Their sex is 
always sublime, their partnership 
just swell and their Christmases, I 
assume, always while. 

Needless to say. they both take a 
dim view of adultery. Not in her 
marriage. Kathie Lee has vowed. 

Yes. I understand. How delicious. 
But also how outrageous. If, indeed. 


And yet. in both the press and on 
the radio this whole episode has been 
treated as just a stitch. 1 heard a Globe 
staffer interviewed on a Washington 
radio station, and people were just 
laughing themselves sick. 

Bui what, I ask you. is the dif- 
ference between what Ms. Johnson 
allegedly did and what your average 
hooker does on a routine basis? The 
New York district attorney’s office 
tells me that “a person is guilty of 
prostitution when such a person en- 
gages or agrees or offers to engage in 
sexual conduct with another person 
in rerum for a fee.” 

When I talked to the district at- 
torney's office, I got the distinct im- 
pression that it thought it hod better 
things to do. So be it But if the tacky 
press in the United States is going to 
emulate its British cousins, then pub- 


lic life will suffer even more than it 
already has. Who is going to warn to 
go into politics if fee ride of public 
ridicule ts great and the reward is the 
honor of running up legal bills on the 
scale of a Mafia don? 

I know, 1 know. Do tbe right thing, 
and you won’t have to worry. But 
some things, while wrong, are nev- 
ertheless private matters — deeply 
personal and totally unrelated to the 
job at hand. Aging men may be fools, 
but they are not a public menace. 

Journalism is not a science. It is a 
craft ruled bv the iron law of “It 


Depends. ” Sometimes you run a sto- 
don't. and the 


ry and sometimes you i 
reason depends on many factors. But 
when a newspaper pays a woman to 
entrap a man. that is not journalism at 
all. It is scummy, not funny, and 
indistinguishable from pandering. 

Late in his career, Mr. Gifford was 
grievously fouled, and the joke was 
supposed to be on his wife. Next time 
it will be someone else, maybe an 
honored politician — and then, when 


public life is degraded, the joke will 


on us ail. 

Th * Washington Pint. 


When Zaire Didn’t Seem to Make 
The Really Worst Big Leagues 


By John Vinocur 


P ARIS — There once was a special box on 
the journalistic checklist for southern re- 


gimes run by men of dark reputation. It was 
the did-you-know-that-fee-wife-of-an-Amer- 
ican-diplomat-was-just-raped-near-the-ten- 
nis-club test, and it held that This Awfiil Place 
(Kinshasa, Managua. Asuncion, etc.) could 
not be ranked in the really bad big leagues, its 
regime a candidate for total vituperation, un- 
less the story was heard and the box checked 
within 36 hours of a hack's arrival. 

Bottom line: The expectation of evil, or its 
presumption, has often obliterated all else in 
reporting from places with phosphorescent 
slues and mean governance. 

I got to Paraguay under Alfredo Stroessner 
at midmoming. its capital smelling magically 


raous, rich and still far from being robbed 
blind by Mobutu Sese Seko. 

The rest of Africa tuned into Kinshasa’s 
radio stations ai night because its music was 
the best. Two casinos, staffed by croupiers 
from London, embraced diamond traders in 
for a toot from Lubumbashi. and Air Zaire’s 
747s headed for Brussels or Paris almost 
every day. Outside my hotel, rows of young 
women for hours sang songs of praise to 
Marshal Mobutu. This seemed crazy but nor 
yet obscene, because he ran Zaire, this country 
whose potential was more real than wishful, 
an immense brass ring with maybe a handhold 


for just about everybody. 
Purrir 


MEANWHILE 


of orange blossoms, and heard the rape story 
•iuu 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Leads the World 


Swiss and Neutrality 


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The U.S. government re- 
port by Stuart Eizenstau the 
undersecretary of commerce, 
on German assets has been 
. generally praised in Switzer- 
„ land, although it seems to 
.. have omitted too many as- 
, peers of the situation. 

- But what is most objeccion- 
i, able about the report is Mr. 

Eizenstat’s personal com- 
, ments. The report implies that 

0 neutrality is moral weakness, 

1 but it fails to mention that 
. the vast majority of Swiss 
.. people were deeply hostile 
i, to Nazi 


States. It has nothing to fear 
from Switzerland, and cer- 
tainly not any foolish act that 
might lead to war. Is this rea- 
son enough to lash out at us? 

ANDRE MAILLARD. 

Cologny. Switzerland. 


The writer is a former 
Swiss ambassador to Turkey. 


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\j w Nazism and determined to 

- defend themselves should 
Ap they be attacked. 

™ Dominant countries tend to 
•_ identify their views and in- 
i terests with morality, while 
” neutrality has often been 
>• equated with moral indiffer- 

- ence. But neutrality is not a 
" moral position; it is just an 

abstention from war, for rea- 
sons connected to national 
.. survival or vital interests. 
v Neutrality is the only feas- 
! ible policy for a country such 


The Swiss were not neutral 
during World War H, but they 
did not favor the Nazis — 
they favored the Americans 
and the British. That Switzer- 
land did business with Ger- 
many was not a question of 
sympathy, but of survivaL 
The Swiss have no feeling 
of guilt. They made no illegal 
gains and did not steal any 
assets. Therefore, they are in 
favor of any examination of 
the past, expecting that it 
would be done fairly. 

The threat of sanctions, 
however, will not make the 
Swiss more open, but rather 
will have the opposite effect. 

HANS U. BOHL 
Bilrglen. Switzerland. 


Flatow is advocating is as old 
as Adam and Eve. “Moderate 
physical pressure” is nothing 
other than a technique of tor- 
ture that Israel uses on Pal- 
estinian detainees to extract 
information. It is a violation 
of human rights regardless of 
the circumstances. 

The argument that it is 
missible to violate indivii 
human rights when this is 
done to save lives is based on 
a tenuous assumption. How 
can one be sure beforehand 
that the suspected terrorists 
and political detainees who 
are subjected to torture have, 
in fact any critical informa- 
tion to provide? 

Rather than seek justific- 
ation for human rights vio- 
lations in Israel, free thinkers 
should uphold the basic prin- 
ciples of h uman rights and 
demand compliance in Israel 
and throughout the world. 

S.A.SHER1F. 

Montreux, Switzerland. 


under its agreement with 
the Palestinians themselves, 
and under its many explicit 
commitments to the United 
States. Instead of trying to 
justify the unjustifiable, Mr. 
Flatow would be better ad- 
vised to encourage the Israel- 
is to do just that. 

J. C. DIXON. 

Paris. 


Policy on the Caspian 


as Switzerland, made up of Torture Is Unjustified 
various cultures and neli- - J 


epected Freedom 


reli- 
gions. It saved Switzerland 
during World War n. 

Passing judgment on for- 
eign countries, especially 
after over 50 years, is not good 
foreign policy for the United 


Regarding “ Interrogation 
Methods in Israel Are Jus- 
tified" (Opinion, May 20) by 
Stephen Flatow: 

The theory that the end jus- 
tifies the means that Mr. 


Mr. Flaiow seeks to justify 
Israel's torture of Palestinian 
prisoners on the grounds of 
the country's security. The 
plain fact is that Israel is sub- 
ject to no external threat Tbe 
only threat is what ii calls acts 
of terrorism. 

Thai threat Israel can elim- 
inate at any time by simply 
living up to its obligations 



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Regarding “Caspian Ac- 
cess Is Crucial for the West" 
(Opinion, May 10) by Caspar 
W. Weinberger and Peter 
Schweizer: 

Mr. Weinberger and Mr. 
Schweizer hit the nail on the 
head by pointing out the 
shortcomings of a U.S. for- 
eign policy that has failed 
to recognize the importance 
of an evenhanded approach 
to the conflict between Ar- 
menia and Azerbaijan. More 
importantly, they address 
what is at stake in Washing- 
ton's failure to recognize its 
strategic and economic in- 
terests in the Caspian area. 

While Americans can be 
jubilant over the enlargement 
of NATO, they may be about 
to lose in the Caspian arena by 
allowing Iran and Russia to 
have free rein over this stra- 
tegic area. Congress should 
put American and Western in- 
terests ahead of the Armenian 
ethnic lobby interests. 

JOHN ROBERT ALPAY. 

Hassi-Messaoud, Algeria. 


seems to suggest that she is a 
victim, and that die air force 
leadership is wrong to hold her 
accountable for her actions. 1 
don’t blame the air force for 
believing it can no longer trust 
her with serious responsibil- 
ities, especially associated 
with nuclear weapons. 

Responsible reporting 
would begin with an ac- 
knowledgment that Lieuten- 
ant Flinn’s illicit relationship 
came to the attention of the air 
force’s legal system in a way 
that it could not be ignored, 
and that an investigation had 
to be conducted. 

The media should stop fo- 
cusing on the adulterous re- 
lationship and trying to paint 
the U.S. Air Force as a miso- 
gynous.or puritanical institu- 
tion. We all wish Lieutenant 
FI inn wasn't in this predic- 
ament. But her own actions 
and poor judgment got her 
there. Tbe oily question is; 
Will she get a general dis- 
charge like everyone else in 
her situation, or will the air 
force be pressured into giving 
her special treatment? 

MARK A. BUCKNAM. 

Northwood. England. 


before lunch was over. In Zaire, the first time, 
with the air more coated with sewage than 
with the fragrance of fruit trees, there were 
scheduling problems; the ritual waited all day 
till an embassy reception at dusk. 

Repugnant as it may be, the stories that go 
down the best, in both human nature and the 
papers, are often the ones that confirm the 
most people’s prejudices. I can't offer that 
stuff here, not about Kinshasa. 1 lived there for 
seven weeks in 1974, covering the heavy- 
weight championship fight between 
Muhammad Ali and George Foreman. 

The then recently renamed Mobutu Sese 
Seko was in power, and the then recently 
renamed Zaire River flowed tirelessly, lily 
pads and clumps of hyacinths bobbing on its 
brown wavelets. I quite loved tbe place. 

These past weeks, there has been an un- 
expected confluence of events concerning the 
banks of the Congo, renamed one more tune. 
Marsha] Mobutu's downfall has coincided 
with the opening to rave reviews in Europe of 
“When We Were Kings.” winner of the 
Oscar this year for documentary films, which 
tells brilliantly about the fight, and a bit less so 
about Zaire back then. 

1 do not want to be put in the position of tbe 
guy who describes Kinshasa *74 as a great 
sports moment in the manner of the 1936 
Olympics in Berlin, the barbed wire cam- 
ouflaged by the swastikas, and I certainly do 
not want to give a jot of assent to the idea that 
Mobutu was a kind of pre-democratic African 
unifier holding together the West’s impossible 


itting up the money to stage the fight, and 
showing it could be televised to the world from 
the heart of Africa at four in morning seemed, 
on reflection, a better PR investment for 
Mobutu than sponsoring Evel Knievel’s leap 
across the Grand Canyon on a motorcycle. 

The esteemed Norman Mailer, in narrating 
die film, recounted that Mobutu's police had 
prepared for the big event by rounding up a 
thousand of Kinshasa’s best known thieves 
and miscreants, herding them into cells under 
the stadium, and then executing one out of 10 
so as to set an example of decorum before the 
arrival of fans from abroad. 

Tbe film version represented a departure 
from the numbers in Mr. Mailer’s excellent 
book “The Fight” — it had 300 arrested and 
50 offed, and even (with a straight face) a 
diplomat ‘s-wife-jusi-raped account 
Under the vows of diligence then required 
by my employer. The Associated Press, I tried 
hard to back up the story which Norman, like 



colonial legacy in tire face of people with 

ban his own. 


agendas more corrupt and cruel than 

But things didn't really happen the way the 
movie suggests — B.B. King and James 
Brown riffing nightly for the brothers, boomlay 
boomlay boomlay, while dark farces left tire 
stadium floor soaked with sacrificial blood 
Kinshasa in 1974 was riding a boom in 
copper prices, and the city jerked and bounced 
and sweat all day, caught up in a noisy op- 
timism that it was the capital of the country 
emerging as Africa’s natural leader, enor- 


vouch for this one. And I was there. 

Being there, I got to superimpose Mobutu's 
personality on AJi’s, ana the marshal could 
claim none of the boxer's sense of humor or 
distance from himself. 

Mobutu in those days had concocted an 
ideological campaign called Authenticity, 
whose centerpiece was the abacos (from d bas 
le costume, or down with suits), a Mao/Nehru 
jacket meant to de- Westernize the wearer and 
turn him into tbe new African man. When I 
asked him how this was going to work in a 
place where so many people lived in rags, I did 
not get an answer, or even a glower. 

Ali. on the other hand, ranted deliciously, 
but it always seemed to me there was 
something slyly self-deprecating about his 
most manic bragging. 

I got back to Kinshasa in 1983 and it had 
turned bad Copper prices had gone through 
tbe floor, and memories of the fight had exited 
with them. When I wanted to go out for an 
evening walk. I was told by the concierge at 
my hotel that I would neol a guard. I was 
assigned a small man. in shorts, with a stick. 
We walked around the block. When we got 
back he asked for a tip. 

International Herald TYibunc. 


BOOKS 


Beyond Adultery 


The case concerning First 
Lieutenant Kelly Flinu is not 
about adultery. It’s about 
dealing with an air force 
officer entrusted with great 
responsibility, who proved 
repeatedly that she could not 
be trusted. 

Breaking the law on adul- 
tery was bad enough, but 
Lieutenant Flinn might have 
been forgiven had she not lied 
about her actions and dis- 
obeyed an order to stay away 
from the married man. 

Lieutenant Flinn was edu- 
cated at taxpayer expense at 
the U.S. Air Force Academy, 
trained to fly, and vested with 
a trust that she violated. 

Now the media coverage 


NAKED TO THE BONE: Medical 
Imaging in the 20th Century 

By Bettyann Holcmann Kevles. 
Illustrated. 378 pages. $35 $5. Rutgers 
University Press. 

Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 


of the hardest challenges of 


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understanding tbe past is imagining 
whai life was like before some rev- 
olutionary innovation occurred: how 
American prose read before Heming- 
way, for instance: what European stage- 
acting was like before Chekhov and 
Stanislavsky, or the view of matter be- 
fore nuclear physics.' 

In her arresting new history, “Naked 
to the Bone: Medical Imaging in tbe 20th 
Century,'' Bettyann Holtzmann Kevles 
has evoked what tbe world was like be- 
fore Nov. 8, 1895. when the German- 
Dutch physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roent- 
gen (1845-1923) discovered X-rays. 

'■ 'Looking back, it is hard to understand 
how deeply opaque the world, and the 
human body, seemed to everyone before 
1896.” she writes. “This was a world 
where men and women wore several lay- 
ers of clothing in all seasons and entered 
the ocean to swim covered from neck to 
knee. Clothes concealed the skin, and tbe 
skin concealed fee secrets of (be heart” 

She concludes, ' ‘It is a historical irony 
feat fee discovery of rays that could 
penetrate clothing and skin and leave an 
image of living bones appeared in fee 
most inhibited period in western history, 
an era whose name, Victorian, has be- 
come synonymous with extreme sexual 
repression and bodily shame.” With 
Roentgen’s discovery, fee world was 
changed. Tbe extent of feat change — in 
every realm from medicine to literature 
to art — is Kevles 's fascinating subject. 

Many themes are explored in 
Kevles s intricate, if occasionally plod- 
ding, narrative. Essentially, her history 


is technological. In the first of fee two 
parts of her book, she recounts how X- 
ray technology was developed from a 
state in which fee pictures it offered was 
sometimes so unclear that one practi- 
tioner compared them to a painting by 
Tinner. 

. But even ar their best. X-rays could 
not see past bone. So more sophisticated 
technologies had to be developed and in 
Part 2. Kevles tells fee stories of CT or 
computerized tomography scanning, 
formerly called CAT scanning; of M RI 
or magnetic resonance imaging; PET or 
positron emission tomography, of ul- 
trasound and mammography. 

Unlike X-rays, these technologies 
were not stumbled upon serendipitously, 
but instead conceived of and worked at 
simultaneously by inventors all over fee 
world who only needed powerful 
enough computers and sufficient money 
to realize feeir theories. Curiously 
enough, a major breakthrough occurred 
when the British company EMI (Elec- 
trical and Musical Industries Limited), 
flush with earnings from its recordings 
of the Beatles, decided to back a mav- 
erick engineer and in 1972 produced the 
first commercial CT scanner. 


lped x 
oodie 


Y ET if Kevles, a science writer 
whose previous book was “Fe- 
males of the Species: Sex and Survival in 
fee Animal Kingdom.” has been suc- 
cessful in making technological history 
absorbing, she brings other perspectives 
to medical imaging. At one extreme she 
tells her story through attempted as- 
sassinations, from the deaths of Pres- 
idents James A. Garfield and William 
McKinley because doctors could not 
find fee bullets lodged in feeir bodies, 
through the survival of Ronald Reagan 
partly because with fee help of X-rays 
the bullet in him was quickly found and 
removed. 

At other extremes fee tells her story 
from a feminist perspective, noting how 


control over feeir bodies, and from a 
forensic point of view, noting how 
quickly fee results of imaging came to be 
depended upon as evidence in court. 
And running through the heart of her 
narrative is fee gradual shift from a trust 
in medical technology to a suspicion of 
its wonders. Kevles notes how long it 
took medicine to realize feat exposure to 
X-rays could be physically damaging. 

Still, for all Kevles ’s narrative skills, 
fee most exciting chapter of her book 
concents how X-rays revolutionized fee 
way people saw reality. In “X-Rays in 
tbe Imagination: The Avant-Garde 
Through Surrealism,” she notes how the 
discovery influenced works of literature 
like “The Invisible Man” (1897), by 
H.G. Wells, and “Tbe Magic Moun- 
tain” (1924), by Thomas Mann. But it is 
Kevles 's pointing out tbe X-ray’s effect 
on Cubist and Surrealist painting that 
makes you see most vividly how fee 
perception of reality was fragmented by 
the discovery. 

Subsequent developments in imaging 
did not have nearly as powerful an effect 
on fee popular imagination, as Kevles is 
fee first to admit, so her concluding 
chapter, “The Transparent Body in Late 
20th-Century Culture,” is anticlimactic 
compared wife her discussion of the X- 
ray's impact After all. as she writes, 
pnor to Roentgen’s discovery, “19fe- 
century American physicians (unlike 
their colleagues in France) did not ex- 
amine their female patients with fee re- 
latively newly invented vaginal spec- 
ulum because it. was held to be 
'unjustifiable on the grounds of pro- 
priety and morality' for a physician to 
look at a woman's genitalia.” 

X-rays changed that outlook. They 
posited a world in which fee most hidden 
secrets could be penetrated. 


Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Trascott 


Mali ay Marti 


<£>Neu> York Times/Edited by WiU Shorts. 


'HE Cavendish Club 
Manhattan, home 


Town 'Club. 9 East 86fe 
Street, at 6 P.M. 

In a Calcutta in January, 
when fee pool was S3 1,625, 


many world-famous flayers. 


Solution to Puzzle of May 22 


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{1937 hit) 

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letters 

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died six years ago, but fee 
name lived on in tbe Cav- 
endish Pairs and Cavendish 
Teams. This year these mi- 
grated to Las Vegas, Nevada, 
where they were played re- 
cently. The Calcutta pool in 
fee pairs amounted to 
$1,288,500, by far the biggest 
in the history of bridge. 

The Calcutta will not dis- 
appear from Manhattan, for 
similar, smaller events are 
held in several clubs. The 


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biggest, organized by Lapr 
Chan and Jesus Anas, at- 
tracts many of fee best players 
in the New York area. The 


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next will be on June 14 at fee west led die bean queen. 


Mark Paltrowitz of Manhat- 
tan, one of the city’s most 
talented young stars, shone in 
the play of fee diagramed 
deal. 

In three no-trump, after a 
heart lead, most declarers 
worked on diamonds and 
went down to defeat when' 
West’s hearts were estab- 
lished. 

Paltrowitz followed a dif- 
ferent course. He won the first 
trick with the heart king in his 
hand and led a club to 
dummy’s jack. East took fee 
ace and led a spade to his 
partner’s ace, and West 
played a second heart to 
dummy’s ace. South cashed 
fee spade queen and the club 
queen, then took fee marked 
club finesse. The two black 
kings followed, and the end- 
ing is shown at right: 


Now fee lead of the heart 
nine endplayed West and 
brought home fee contract. 

This demonstrates why a 
ducking play at the first trick, 
made by other declarers, 
would have been an error. It 
would have killed the even- 
tual endplay. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, MAT 23, 1997 




The Changing Face 
Of Times Square 

X-Rated Area Goes for Family Values 


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By Peter Marks 

New York Tunes Service 



EW YORK — The Times Square of 
my youth was neither the romantic 
crossroads of a great city nor a glitzy 
entertainment destination. It was a 
scary place of decay that you walked through 
quickly to get to someplace else, and always with 
55 stuffed in your shoe. 

My grandfather Sam, who never left his apart- 
ment in Flatbush without checking twice to see if 
the oven was turned off, insisted on the footwear 
security measure for those weekends in die late 
1 960s when I took the bus from New Jersey with 
my friend Neil Muhlberger to see a Broadway 
play or musical. Ir was the only one of his urban 
anxieties that I found contagious. 

Sometimes I find it hard to reconcile my 
memory of the menacing neighborhood I cau- 
tiously traversed on ray way to “Promises, 
Promises’" and "Butterflies Are Free" with the 
new Times Square, a district rapidly metamor- 
p hizin g into a family-friendly amusement zone. 


Square with a ticket already in hand. But with no 
show to see. the streets became my theater. I 
wandered the district, browsing and tasting and 
pausing to absorb the human energy. The side- 
walks of Times Square are nearly always 
jammed; it may be the part of town where natives 
and visitors vie for space most regularly. The 
crush is worst before and after the ipatinees on 
Wednesdays, when reservations in die area's 
restaurants can be impossible to get; on week- 
ends, and on Tuesday through Saturday even- 
ings, when most shows have performances. 

So when you come to Times Square, expect a 
few elbows to- your midsection and a few 
briefcases sideswiping your shopping bags. 
Also, expect to wait, whether it’s in line at die 
TKTS booth, where many Broadway shows of- 
fer tickets for 50 percent off on the day of 
performance, or for a table in one of the theater 
district's growing array of restaurants, from new 
and post-theater hot spots like Firebird and 







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or Chinese; 


Where I once scampered, I now saunter, and 
it feels safer.’ 


not merely because it feels safer. With the arrival 
of each new shop and restaurant and 
playhouse — the capstone being the 
reopening of die Walt Disney Co.'s 
encnamingly restored New Amster- 
dam Theatre on 42d Street near Sev- 
enth Avenue — I'm ever more in- 
trigued and astounded by the changes 


in the area's fortunes. It is the pan of 
midiown Manhattan that I would have 


voted Least Likely to Succeed. 

But now that it is making such a 
visible comeback — cranes tower over 
the southern end of the theater district, em- 
blematic of all the new construction (including 
the Conde Nasi building and the Ford Center for 
the Performing Ails) — there is a whole new 
Times Square to become acquainted with. Even 
more change is imminent: a Madame Tussaud’s 
wax museum, a 25-screen movie palace and a 
magic-themed restaurant owned by David Cop- 
perfield. the illusionist, are planned for the area. 



establishments as OUie’s (for Chinese soups and 
dumplings) and Virgil's (for ribs), to showbiz 
standbys like Sam’s, Orso, Caffe Un Deux Trois 
and Osteria al Doge. 

For example, I went on a Friday at 
lunchtime to the All-Star Cafe, a 
sports fan's multimedia fantasy of a 
burger and pizza palace (a merchan- 
dise order form arrives at your table 
even before the menu). It took more 
than an hour from the placing of my 
name on a waiting list at die first of 
two reception desks, to the arrival at 
our table of a saucer-sized cheese- 


burger and gooey pizza topped with 
ja chicken. 


polyglot patch They will join the various 
megastores, themed and tony restaurants, hotels, 
fast-food outlets, arcades, coffee bars and brand- 
name boutiques that are springing up all over 
Times Square. In fact, each bill board! that goes 
up along Broadway, the district's spiritual Main 
Street, helps to illuminate a resurgent, polyglot 
patch of New York that has always seemed at its 
most beguiling when its riot of neon is flick- 
ering. 

Although I spend an inordinate amount of time 
in die 35 legitimate theaters of the Broadway 
district I had little more than a glancing re- 
lationship with many of the new neighbors. So 
over the course of several days in late April, I 
abandoned my normal routine of visits to tra- 
ditional theater haunts like the Drama Bookshop 
(the comprehensive theater bookstore at 48th 
Street and Seventh Avenue), the Caffe Edison (the 
diner of choice for Broadway's old guard, in the 
Edison Hotel on West 47th Street) and Joe Allen (a 
restaurant and hangout for journalists and theater 
folk on West 46th) and went looking for this new 
Times Square, which is coming into being with all 
the subtlety of the Oklahoma Land Rush. 

First, a little orientation. Times Square tech- 
nically refers to a tiny bowtie of concrete just 
north of 42d Street where Broadway and Sev- 
enth Avenue converge. "Hie square is occupied 
by a skyscraper. One Times Square, once the 
headquarters of The New York Times and on 
which hangs two giant television screens, the 


broccoli anc 

At the corner of 45th Street and Seventh 
Avenue, the All-Star is a paradigm of the new 
order in Tunes Square. The building’s exterior is 
emblazoned with die faces of the celebrity ath- 
letes — among them, Andre Agassi, Wayne 
Gretzky and Joe Montana — who own the caffe. 
What do these guys have in common with theater 
stars who have more of a claim on the area, 
people like Andrew Lloyd Webber and Wendy 
Wasserstein? Not much. But that’s totally in 
keeping with the hodgepodge mercantile spirit 
of Times Square, where hole-in-the-wall sou- 
venir and electronics shops can share a sidewalk 
with a Virgin megastore, where a boutique cof- 
fee bar can rent space down die block from Tad 's 
Steaks, that old-line chain of low-priced sirloin 
emporiums at which they still grill the filets in 
the window. 

Tad's, as far as I know, has yet to offer a line 
of apparel. The All-Star Caffe, of course, has not 
overlooked this aspect of fine dining. My fa- 
vorite T-shirt in all of Greater Times Squareland, 
though, was one with the likeness of the “Hello 
Deli” counterman made famous by David Let- 
tennan in skits on his late-night talk show, on 
sale in the CBS Store just beyond the theater 
district on West 53d Street. 




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The Times Square area is making a visible comeback, rapidly metamorphizing into a family-friendly amusement zone . 


Explorer i 


Hidden Treasures of Los Angeles 


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By Todd S. Purdurn 

New York Times Service 


a friend and I 


NOTHER weekday, 
headed to Hansen's Times Square Brew- 


A 

^^^mery Restaurant, a recent addition that 
fronts die narrow block of 42d Street between 
Broadway and Seventh Avenue. (You can’t miss 
it: It's the building with the half-size mockup of 
a British Airways Concorde on the roof.) 
Hansen's has a street-level bar, a restaurant on 
the second floor, and an expanse of window that 
directly overlooks Times Square’s metamorph- 
osis. Actually, Hansen's is an example of just 
how quickly die area is reinventing itself: the 
restaurant is eventually to be tom down and 


L OS ANGELES — From Universal Stu- 
dios in the north to Disneyland in the 
south, from the beaches of Santa Monica 
on the west to the San Gabriel Mountains 
on the east, the marquee attractions of greater 
Los Angeles are as plain as the points of the 
compass. No one needs a road map to find the 
Magic Kingdom of Mickey and Minnie; just 
follow the crowds. 

But the City of Angels is also home to a whole 
atlas fall of hidden treasures, tucked away be- 
neath the palm trees and perpetual sun, a source 
of endless exploration and inspiration for visitors 
and residents alike. And most of them are easy 
enough to get to that they can easily be sand- 
wiched into even a short stay. 

Movie fans in search of the theme park thrill 
rides and back-lot tram trips through the most 
popular studio tour head straight ro Universal 
City, just across the Hollywood Hills in the San 
Fernando Valley. But for a more low-key, his- 
tory-oriented walk around the only studio still 
active in the heart of old Hollywood there is the 
Paramount Studios tour. 


world-famous news ripper (now being replaced) 
and, on New Year's Eve, the ball that descends at 


replaced by another office building. 
We got ti 


midnight. Times Square, however, has also be- 
come synonymous with the entire theater dis- 
trict, which is bordered by West 41st Street on 
the south. West 5 2d on the north. Eighth Avenue 
on the west and the Avenue of the Americas (or 
Sixth Avenue) on the east 


Tourist Landmarks 


The area includes such tourist landmarks as 
the TKTS discount tickets booth in Duffy Square 
and the Marriott Marquis Hotel; at the south- 
eastern edge, 42d Street and Avenue of the 
Americas, is the rehabilitated and charming Bry- 
ant Park, the New York Public Library’s back- 
yard, with a greensward, lawn furnishings and 
flora so evocative of Paris it could be renamed 
Bois de Bryant 

Many people make their first foray into limes 


got there early for lunch and secured a 
window table. (Lunch for two. including a de- 
cent burger, Caesar salad, watercress soup and 
shared dessert and tip, cost $37.) From there, I 
could look all rbe way up Broadway to the Coca- 
Cola sign above 47th Street and if I craned my 
neck to left, I got a glimpse of the most radical 
redevelopment of all. 

On the southern side of 42d Street is a new 
Disney Store and just behind it the New Am- 
sterdam, an 1,800-seat gem with one of the most 
ornate theater interiors in town. The restored 
outer lobby, festooned with friezes of scenes 
from Shakespearean drama and German opera, 
is itself worth a quick look. Across die street 
from the New Amsterdam is tbejewelbox of the 
New Victory, restored Last year as a children’s 
theater, and on the adjacent corner is Ferrara, a 
new Italian coffee house where you can sip a 
cappuccino at a window seat and people-watch. 
You might even spot an actor or two. 


virst fiatum Paramount, the longtime pro- 
fessional home of Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, 
Billy Wilder and Cecil B. De Mille, is die last of 
a string of studios that once lined the corridor 
Gower Street and Melrose Avenue in the 


along 


then semi-suburban enclave of Hollywood, and 
is a big part of where the industry began. In 1914 
De Mule and Jesse L. Lasky teamed up to create 
"The Squaw Man,” Hollywood’s first fall- 
length feature. 

The $15 walking tours, led by cheery young 
blue-blazered guides, include not only stops at 
such icons of filmdom as the studio's Bronson 
Avenue Gate — the curving Spanish-style stucco 
and wrought-iron arch that was immortalized in 
“Sunset Boulevard,” and, the story goes, gave a 
rookie rough-guy actor named Charles a new last 
name — but visits to the sets of current Para- 
mount television programs, like the tabloid 
“Hard Copy” and “Entertainment Tonight.” 
Depending on production schedules, you may 
get a peek at taprngs of these or other shows, and 





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Taking the (Vichy) Waters in Catalonia 


By Al Goodman 


C ALDES DE MALA VELLA, Spain — 
When Dr. Modest Furesr considered 
bottling mineral water from the local 
hot springs last century and building a 
luxury spa to treat his sore-jointed patients, be 
thought of Vichy. France. He dubbed his water 
Vichy Catalan and named his spa the Balneario 
Vichy Catalan, using the worn "Catalan" in 
homage to his home region of Catalonia. 

His successors now operate the Vichy 


connect.” said Pedro Delemus, the spa's di- 
rector. * ‘The idea here is to get a tune-up once 
in a while.” 

No car is necessary. The spa is a five-minute 
walk from foe train station, a one-hour train 
ride north of Barcelona for 845 pesetas ($6). 

fa a garden setting, foe two-story Art Nou- 
veau spa building, adorned with mosque-like 
arches on the veranda, is an intriguing call to 


Catala n bottling plant and health spa on Dr. 
Furest Avenue in this village near Barcelona, 


and they fought off an attempt a few years ago 
to prevent the use of foe name Vichy. 


arches on foe veranda, is an intriguing call to 
pleasure. Once inside, foe visitor quickly faces 
foe Vichy Catalan dilemma: whether to lose 
weight in a hard-core health regimen and skip 
the sumptuous meals, or to concede that hot 
baths and massages need not be enemies of 
seafood paella and Catalan wines. 


double occupancy) includes only the use of the 
exercise room and the large heated swimming 
pool, which is filled with normal tap water. 

The coed hot mineral pool, measuring 4 by 3 
meters ( 1 3 by. 10 feet), is a good value at 1 .605 
pesetas, especially when foe staff loosely en- 
forces the 30-minute time limit. Heated to 35 
degrees centigrade (95 degrees Fahrenheit), foe 
pool's powerful jets dig into the skin like a 
deep-finger massage. 

Hot and cold showers are just steps away, 
arid next to them are waiting rooms to cool 
down before walking upstairs to a massage 
appointment If 3.530 pesetas seems expensive 
for a half-hour massage, it may be time to meet 


The French argued it was trademark infitinge- 
- ^ — * — •- T »— vers countered 


Bung Part of thi Picturi 


Alex, a bicycling enthusiast who has been 
ack rubs f< 


ment But Vichy Catalan's lawyers countered 
that Dr. Furest registered his trademark m lew, 
several years before the French registered 
theirs. So the name stuck, replacing foe simpler 
“Quality Water.” which Roman bathers called 

foe local water two millennia ago. 

Die town had numerous spas and bat-bath 
houses in foe last century and still has two spas 
and several bottling plants run by different 
firms. Vichy Catalan has staked a claim to foe 
high-end trade for its naturally carbonated, 
chilled water in the bottle. and for warm 
bubbly stuff in the hot tub. . 

"You have to take a break in life and dis- 


While checking into the 82-room spa hotel, a 
color video at foe reception desk shows footage 
of massages, hot baths, and pressure-massage 
showers. Once upstairs in one of the spacious 


giving back rubs for 30 years. 

ide a hose-pressurized 


rooms (request one facing foe quiet patio, not 
foe road), Channel 10 on foe television offers 


more 

instead 


_ video.” One soon realizes that 
merely watching, it’s bener to be- 
come part of foe picture. Don the white cotton 
robe and stroll down the hallway to foe spa, 
where each soothing service can hurt the 
budget because it is billed separately. 

The room and board (23,375 pesetas or 
about $94 a person in high season, based on 


Other services indue 
shower, for 1.820 pesetas; sauna.' for 2.140 
pesetas or facial treatments from 6,630 pesetas. 

The spa’s clients range from parents with 
young children to senior citizens, testimony to 
Vichy Catalan’s decision to break with the 
mold of many Spanish spas which rely heavily 
on state-subsidized visits of senior citizens. 

Hotel Balneario Vichy Catalan. 32 Avenida 
Dr. Furest, tel: (34-72) 470-000 and fax: (34- 
72) 472-299. 


Al Goodman, who writes for The New York 
Times from Spain, wrote this for the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


at foe very least, you will thread your way among 
the banging lights and ganglia of cavernous 
sound stages that have echoed with the voices of 
everyone from Astaire and Rogers to "Laveme 
and Shirley” to foe friendly gang at "Cheers.” 

The tour is actually a twofer, because foe 
Paramount lot also encompasses the old ad- 
joining studios of RKO, home of foe Fred and 
Ginger musicals of foe Depression era, and later 
of Desilu, the production company formed by 
Lucille Ball and Desi Amaz. Ball sold the Desilu 
stages to Paramount in the 1960s, and now those 
beige-printed buildings blend seamlessly into 
the other Paramount stages. 

The tour is a font of movie and TV lore, from 
the silent film star Theda Bara to "The Brady 
Bunch.” A visitor is impressed that, then and 
now, the studios wasted not an inch of space: 
Chariton Heston parted foe Red Sea in a blue 
concrete basin that doubles as an employee park- 
ing lot, and the company infirmary, squeezed in 
an airless alley, was dolled up to pass — with tight 
camera angles — as the beach house where Tom 
Cruise courted Kelly McGillis in “Top Gun.” 

If you’re looking for lunch, head a few blocks 
north to Musso and Frank's Grill at 6667 Hol- 


fified with a rushing waterfall and a baby grand 
piano. There are separate spas for men and 
Women, each featuring a giant tiled pool filled 
with foe piping boi water, a cool pool ro calm 
down in, a steam room perfumed with fresh-cut 
eucalyptus branches and a dry sauna. Men and 
women, on request, are given a disposable razor 
and invited to shave, sitting on little stone stools 
in front of chest-high shower spigots. 

For lunch, head one block west to Western 
Avenue and then south toward Wiishire 
Boulevard to Woo Lae Oak, a venerable Korean 
barbecue restaurant where every table contains a 
brazier on which paper-thin slices of beef, fresh 
scallops and other delicacies are sauteed by 
diners. 


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lywood Boulevard, which dates from 1919 and is 
theoldi 


: oldest restaurant in Hollywood, once a haunt 
of Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Faulkner and now 
a collection of red leather banquettes, cantan- 
kerous writers and a vintage menu that features 
ice cold martinis. Or, to sample the food of one of 
the hottest chefs in town, try Joachim SptichaJ’s 
Pinot Hollywood, a branch of his burgeoning 
family of hearty French bistros, on North Gower 
Street at Sunset Boulevard. 


Hor Springs 


Just a few blocks distant but a world away is 
the Beverly Hot Springs, a spa fed by the city’s 
only natural alkaline mineral hot springs, which 

a c .JTT i. 


j^ushes^its soothing flow from an artesian well 


2,220 feet (675 meters) below ground. Around 
the turn of the century, an oil wildcatter dug a 
well on the site. but. disappointed at finding only 
hot water, capped the pipe and left, fa 1931 . foe 
well was rediscovered and for several years its 
flow was marketed at 10 cents a gallon as Won- 
der Water, a line of drink mixers whose healing 
powers were said to combat ‘ * acidity and kindred 
troubles,” according to an old promotional flier 
displayed in foe lobby. 

After timung their cars over to the inevitable 
valet parking attendant, visitors enter a vestibule 


F OR something completely different, hop 
on foe Glendale Freeway (No. 2l going 
north from downtown Los Angeles, and 
head for the verdant splendors of the Descanso 
Gardens, a county-owned park nestled on 165 
acres in the San Rafael Hills in La-Can ada 
Flintridge. Once pan of a 36.000-acre Spanish* 
rancho, foe gardens were stoned in the late 1930T- 
by E. Manchester Boddy. foe publisher of foe 
Los Angeles Drily News and an amateur earden- 
er, who imported exotic camellias from "around 
the worfd to create a preserve on his estate. 

Now 100.000 camellias in 600 varieties fill 
winding walkways under a grove of ancient 
California live oaks. The flowers are at their peak 
in rebruary and March, but something is always 
blooming at Descanso. the Spanish word for 
daffodils and lilacs in spring, mums in 
me tall. A five-acre "international rosarium" is 
nome to hundreds of varieties of richly fragrant 
roses, and is a popular spot for earlv evening 
weddings. There is a canyon filled with ferns, a 

^4 bu lP bs 1 rva ? on Slari0n frequented by 
field trips from local schools and a blue-tiled 
Japanese teahouse which serves tea and cookies 
on weekends. 

The gardens special charm is thai visitors see 
not only foe profusion of botanical wonders foal 
fonve m Criifomia s climate, thanks to foe won- 

IpJ?-. "T 8all0 9- but also 100 acres of 

i^ an ?J haparral ^ has P re ‘ r 

nriin - It s . Scried and shaggv mesquite and 
labeled. A natural spring m 
sraoSnnte § em,e . cascades into the land- 
K°° Is ' * eir banks brightened 
$lJS^, and ? e Imv Iilies - Tram tours. 

extend™ Io £ e! m overview of foe 

extensive grounds for later exploring on foot- 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 


PAGE 11 


LEISURE 


The Guidebooks That Make the Planet a Little Less Lonely 




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•wd with a freshly earned 

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ol( f ^ 3 . h ‘ s ^ fe : Maureen, bouchr an 
SHSTJ "Jj * ov « 11 alone the so-called 
hippie trad through Europe and the 
!Jld d f "^““‘an^ere they 

Svele/hL K Smaj, profil - they 
fraveled by bus. train and hitchhikjne 

and Sout hea.st Asia to BoIl 
A fter crewing on a New Zealand vaeht 

Sst rn ’7cini h Z ended Up in S >’ dne ' r Vlilh 

cents between them. 

Th f lr . P}^ w as to work for three 
SSrSj- Au^rraJia. save enough money 
and fly back to their native Britain. 

^. Ut "r e d had such fu n in those six 
months of traveling.” Wheeler recalled 
Me other day. "h was a season in heaven 
•Od our eyes were opened up to all sons 
ot things. 

So die return to Britain with its pros- 
pect of humdrum working life was put 
ott for two more years — the first for 
saving money, rhe second for traveling. 
„ r J el ■ th 31 plan changed too. and the 
Wheelers took a path that led them to 
create Lonely Planet Publications, a 
Met bourne- based company controlled 
by the Wheeler family that has become 


one of the largest travel publishers 
in the world, with more than 250 
titles, mainly travel guides. With 
the publication of a guide to Ant- 
arctica in November, they now cov- 
er virtually the whole globe. 

The guides have helped encour- 
age the wave of footloose inde- 
pendent travelers from the West 
that has increased hugely since the 
early 1980s. with growing afflu- 
ence. cheap long-distance air travel 
and official promotion of tourism in 
many developing countries. 

Now the company is capitalizing 
on the reverse tourist wave, mainly 
from newly rich travelers from Asia 
and Latin America to Europe, the 
United States, Canada, Australia 
and New Zealand. 

Lonely Planet printed about 2 
million guidebooks in English. 
French and other languages in 1 996 
and expects that figure to pass 2.5 
million in 1997. with sales worth 
more than 25 million -Australian 
dollars ($19.3 million). To 

The Wheelers* initial step into 
publishing hardly betokened a future 
empire. In response to many questions 
they had received about the trip to Aus- 
tralia. they decided to write a book about 
their experiences. They called it 
■‘Across Asia on the Cheap.” 

” We wrote it together on the kitchen 
table of our basement flat in Sydney." 
Wheeler said. “We got the pages printed 
cheaply. We put them together, then 
stapled and trimmed them ourselves. I 
took a day off work and took them 



tributing the guides were tough for and practical travel advice like ‘When 
the Wheelers. But by 1979, with you come out of the train station, turn 
16 titles to their credit. Lonely right and there's a nice hotel, turn left 
Planer was making money in a and you get mugged,' ” Wheeler said, 
small way. The turning point came 4 ‘It should also educare readers about the 
in 1982 when a guide to India places they are visiting. If you know a bit 


in 1982 when a guide to India places they are visiting. If you know a bit 
written by Tony Wheeler and two about local history and culture, you en- 
others won the Thomas Cook joy yourself more.’* 

Travel Guidebook Award. *‘I often get asked whether I have 


Cit£ Hr — — aatf Cl n tw.>.l 

Tony Wheeler in his office surrounded by Lonely Planet publications. 


around the shops. Much to our surprise, 
we sold the loi. all 1.500 copies, in the 
First week. So we printed another 3.500 
and sold all those as well. Another print 
run of 3.500 followed and we thought, 
maybe we could make a living out of 
this.” 

After a year of traveling together 
through Southeast Asia on a motorbike 
in 1974. they produced their first book 
printed to professional standards. 
“South-East Asia on a Shoestring.” 


They also chose the company's New 
Age-sounding name after mishearing a 
line from the song “Space Captain" by 
Joe Cocker and Leon Russell: ”Once”l 
was traveling across the sky / And this 
Lovely Planet caught my eye." 

“I got the name wrong," Tony 
Wheeler said. "But Lonely Planet 
sounded nice so it stuck.'' 


Travel Guidebook Award. 

Winning the award brought 
critical acclaim to Lonely Planet. 
“It took us to another level," he 
said. “It really opened doors and 
made a huge difference for us.** 
There have been other awards 
for Lonely Planet publications 
since then. The main appeal of the 
company's first guides to Asia 
was thai nothing else like them 
was available. 

“But we hit on a style that 
people liked,” he said. “They 
were a bit irreverent and humor- 
ous, but practical and had good 
__ r information because they were 
thoroughly researched by people 
who had really been on the 
ground.' 

Some of the “irreverence" brings its 
own share of criticism. For example, the 
description of places like Nottingham 
and Margate in the Lonely Planet guide 
to Britain published in 1995 — “Look- 
ing at Margate, God got so depressed he 
created Torremolinos” — aroused a 


1 often get asked whether l nave 
twinges of conscience about encour- 
aging the growth of mass tourism. But 
we are a relatively minor factor and in 
our guides we try to tell people how they 
can be more considerate and conser- 
vation-minded. That helps reduce the 
impact,” 


I N addition to 1 1 Shoestring guides 
for low budget travel in Asia. Africa, 
the Middle East, Europe and Amer- 


ica. Lonely Planet publishes 1 13 Travel 
Survival Kit guides to individual coun- 
tries. small groups of countries or re- 
gions within large countries. 

The latter provide information on 
where to go. what ro do and see, and 
where to sleep and eat that will be useful 
to well-heeled baby boomers as well as 
to backpackers. 

Lonely Planet also publishes walking 
guides, city guides, travel atlases and 
language phrase books. 

One of its latest ventures is a site on 
the Internet that contains an abbreviated 
version of the printed guides with reports 


howl of aggrieved anguish from parts of from the authors, maps, pictures and 


THE TURNINO point The first few 
years of writing, publishing and dis- 


the British press and tourist industry, 
although overall the book painted an 
attractive portrait of the country. 
“Guidebooks should give accurate 


readers’ letters that provide even more 
up-to-date travel information — in short, 
a kind of condensed guide to the whole 
world in cyberspace. 


The Price of Success 

Mileage Plans Losing Their Luster 


MOVIE GUIDE 


Kissed 


Directed by Lynne Stopke- 
wich. Canada. 


By Roger Collis 

tniemarional Herald Tribune 


REQUENT-FLIEK programs are 
probably one of the most successful 
marketing ideas of all time. Since 
r American Airlines introduced AAd- 
vantage 16 years ago, mileage counting has 
become an addiction with 1 50 million travelers 
(including 40 million Americans) signed up 
worldwide. According to the 
OAG Business Lifestyle Sur- 


vey 1997 of 5,000 frequent The Frequent Traveler Mike PIan,directorofcom- 
travelers in the United States. # _ mercial affairs at Hogg Robin - 

Britain, France. Germany. Italy, Singapore, son Travel in London, says: “A major threat to 
Hong Kong, Japan and Australia, 9 out of 10 FFPs is the airlines themselves. Airlines are 


British Airways; Passages FFP in Asia; and 
LatinPass across the whole of South America. 

“Airlines are trying to reduce the high cost 
of running these shemes by concentrating on 
high value travelers — how much you pay is 
beginning to be more important than how 
many miles you fly — and offering fewer 
benefits to less frequent travelers. They are 
also bringing in more nonairline partners such 
as credit card, retail goods and phone compa- 
^ nies to help pay for the 
schemes." 


business travelers are FFP members — the 
mare they travel, the more plans they belong to. 
more than three different programs on average. 


M any A mericans belong to five or more. 
FFPs are hugely influential when it c< 


FFPs are hugely influential when it comes 
to choosing an airline. More than three-quar- 
ters of all, business travelers say that FFP 
■membership influences their choice of carrier 
on a given route, often in defiance of corporate 


now calling into question just how necessary it 
is to spend at least three percent of the value of 
a ticket in funding FFPs at a time when there is 
enormous pressure on them to reduce dis- 
tribution costs. Especially when corporations 
are doing more and more deals with airlines, 
such as route discounts or business class up- 
grades for some executives, and dictating to 
their travelers which airline they must fly. As 


Lynne Stopkewich's confid- 
ent first feature focuses on 
Sandra Larson (the entran- 
cing Molly Parker), a spook- 
iiy angelic beauty who is 
sexually aroused by death. 
Adapted from Barbara 
Gowdy's erotic short story 
“We So Seldom Lode on 
Love." it is a surprisingly 
subdued, spiritual treatment 
of a potentially lurid subject. 
Sandra also happens to be an 
especially appealing and ar- 
ticulate necrophiliac whose 
primary attraction is rooted 
in compassion for the dead 
and a curiosity about the 
hereafter. One afternoon af- 
ter an embalming class at the 
local university. Sandra 
catches the eye of Man 
(Peter Outerbridge). an in- 
tense medical student who’d 
be just her type if only he 
were dead. Nevertheless, 


Sandra falls for Matt, who is 
initially tolerant of her other 
love interests, but it becomes 
obvious that living happily 
ever after is out of the ques- 
tion. “Kissed” sus tains a 
dark wit and noir magicality 
similar to David Lynch's 
"Twin Peaks,” where 
Sandra, Matt and the gang 
could pass for just plain 
folks. (Rita Kempley, WP) 


(Jnaoi 

Directed by. Shohei Ima- 
mura. Japan. 


This is Imam ura’s first film 
since “Black Rain,” eight 
years ago. Though it is not to 
be compared to such mas- 
terpieces as “The Insect 
Wpman” and “Unholy De- 
sire," it is nonetheless filled 
with its own Imamura-like 
integrity. A man kills his un- 
faithful wife, goes to. prison, 
and when he comes out in- 
advertantly saves the life of a 
woman who much resembles 


her. She goes to thank him 
and stays. He, however, has 
gotten out of the human 
habit. In jail his only com- 
panion was a large eel (the 
unagi of the title), to which 
he sometimes talks and 
which he now keeps in a 
home aquarium, lake the 
carp in “The Pomograph- 
ers” and the leaping fish in 
“Black Rain,” the eel is 
very much there, yet it is also 
symbolic. It wUl survive. 
The question is, will he. The 
answer is yes. hi the drama- 
filled finale the eel gets loose 
and they are left gingerly 
contemplating happiness. 

(Donald Richie. IHT) 


Truth or Conse- 
quences, N.M. 

Directed by Kiefer Suther- 
land. US. 


This flimsy “Bonnie and 
Clyde” clone contributes no 
new ideas to this genre be- 
yond its unconvincing sug- 


gestion that in the breast of 
every mild-mannered yup- 
pie beats the heart of a 
would-be killer. Ray (Vin- 
cent Gallo), a sensitive ex- 
convict. and his absurdly 
trusting girlfriend, Addy 
(Kim Dickens), collaborate 
with Curtis (Kiefer Suther- 
land), a trigger-happy psy- 
chopath, and his sidekick, 
Marcus (Mykelti William- 
son), in a botched drug heist. 
Fleeing, they hijack the mo- 
bile home of a yuppie couple 
and hold them hostage. Gor- 
don becomes so infatuated 
with his captors that be be- 
gins parroting Curtis’s in- 
sane rants about how life is 
just a game of the good guys 
versus the bad. Sutherland, 
in red sunglasses that set off 
the Mephistophelean glow 
of his reddish hair, is so glee- 
fully monstrous you almost 
expect him to sprout devil's 
horns. The film aspires to be 
an all-American romantic 
tragedy, but the only emo- 


■tion you feel for its doomed 
lovers is contempt for their 
smpidiiy in teaming up with 
an obvious nut case. 

(Stephen Holden, NYT ) 


Sprung 


Directed by Rusrv Cimdieff. 
US. 


All humans, the movie in- 
structs, can be divided into 
two subspecies: players and 
feelers. Initially constructed 
as a cautionary tale that con- 
trasts a player couple (she 
wants a rich guy; he wants 
booty) with a feeler couple, 
die movie eventually gets 
away from the rigidity of its 
own concept and becomes a 
more conventional comedy. 
It’s a fundamentally healthy 
movie, which ultimately 
urges its audience away from 
the games that are played 
between guys and dolls and 
toward something sweeter, 
and meaningful. 

(Stephen Hunter. WP) 


iicy. Americans and Australians are the main travel decisions move more towards 


most likely to succumb to the lure of FFPs. 
Japanese appear to be the least susceptible, 
although six out of seven Japanese travelers 
admit to being swayed by membership in a 
plan. 

; The very success of FFPs may lead to their 
demise — at least in their current form. FFPs 
are under threat from all sides. Press ure is 
mounting from governments who view FFPs 


the corporation than the traveler, airlines are 
asking whether they still need to incentivize 
the individual traveler. Why should the airline 
pay twice?" 


ARTS GUIDE 


complete profiles “I agree that FFPs are 
a cost to airlines, but I don’t think any carrier 
would want to do away with them — at least 
not unilaterally — because they are such a 


BRITAIN 


as inimical ro fair competition, especially in brilliant marketing tool." says Betty Low, 


!view of the concentration of airlines in major t 
■alliances. Leading corporations argue that, i 
while FFP perks make life on the road more < 
•comfortable for travelers, awards should be- < 

‘long to the company not the individual. Some i 
.■ dfirms say rhar the plans inflate fares and en- i 
Courage employees to make unnecessary trips 1 
— often at the highest fares. Airlines, which 
now owe travelers about two trillion miles, are 1 
'placing more and more restrictions on earning i 
miles and award redemptions, including set- 1 
ting expiration dates and 
blackout periods, and exer- . ? S-/ 

rising “capacity control, 
whereby only a few seats are (JM/Ottrara* 
available on each flight for . vSX //TsaS^-I 
‘award travel. Upgrades— one 
of the most sought-after ben- £ ( ) FR£Oc^S 
efits — are only given to full- 
fare passenger s. Ta x author- 
ides who view FFPs as * ’ben- ■ : \ *t 

efits in kind'* are looking for j 
wavs to tax individuals and 
restrict allowances that 
companies can claim against 
air travel if they allow ex- // 

ecurives to keep FFP miles 

earned while traveling at com- JxQj&l — 

pany expense. And travelers 
themselves have seen the 
value of their mileage dimin- 
ished substantially within the . f 


editor of Business Travel World, a trade 
magazine. “It's more than brand loyalty, it’s 
data-base marketing. The personal name re- 
cords that these programs have generated are 


magic — a complete fix on the the profile of 
travelers using them and the opportunity to 
build a direct relationship with travelers. 

“I think you have to make a distinction 
between the 'managed* traveler and the ‘un- 
man aged' traveler. If you’re an airline which 
has signed a route deal contract with a cor- 
poration, you want to do 
'V everything you can to make 
'A'W ; sure that everyone obeys cor- 

S porate travel policy; if you 
don’t have a contract, you 
want people to subvert travel 
policy and fly with you.” 

Although tiie majority of 
airlines do not give FFP miles 
to corporations, a few do, no- 
tably Virgin Atlantic, Asian a, 
Turkish Airlines and China 
Airline s. Lu fthansa has a cor- 
porate FFP program for the 
United States but not else- 
where. 

On the tax front, Swedish 
travelers are liable for tax on 
awards earned on company 
.^.hht business and later redeemed 
for personal travel. Swedish 


Glasgow 

McLellan Galleries, tel: (141 ) 353- 
0809, open daily. To Sept 7: “The 
Birth of Impressionism: From Con- 
stable to Monet." From the Influ- 
ence of the 19th-century classical 
tradition to the landscapes of Millet 
and Narcissa Vlrglle Diaz and to 
the final flowering of Impression- 
ism on the banks of the Seine. 


26, closed Mondays. To June 15: 
“Frank Horvat Schwa rzweiss-Fo- 
tografien 1952-1964 und Vraies 
Semblances." More than 80 black- 
and-white photographs created 
from 1952 to 1964. inducing por- 
traits of Coco Chanel. Josephine 
Baker and Edith Plaf, as well as 
scenes photographed in Parisian 
streets, bars and striptease dubs. 


Malson Cartier In 1647. Also, to 
July 6: “The Glory of Byzantium." 
The influence of Byzantine culture 
on Islamic states and Christian 
kingdoms from the 9th to the 13th 
centuries. 


Washmoton 

National Gallery of Art, teU (202) 
737-421 5, open dally. Continuing/ 
To July 27: “Picasso: The Eariy 
Years, 1 892-1 908." Works created 
betweentheageofli and 25. 




>;■* ■ 


-mm 






London 

British Museum, tel: (171) 323- 
8525, open daily, lb SepL 14: 
"Prtntmaking In Pans: Picasso and 
His Contemporaries." In the first 
half of the 20th century, Parte at- 
tracted artists who were encour- 
aged to work In its numerous print 
shops. Features Picasso and Ma- 
tisse's earliest prints, Surrealist 
engravings, the political prints of 
Miro, and abstract prints by Har- 
tung, Soulages and Dubuffet. 


Levzig 

Museum der Bildenden Kunste, 
tot (341) 21-69-90, dosed 

Mondays. To July 13: “Paul Klee; 
Relsen In den Suden." More than 
100 paintings, drawings and wa- 
terocilors document the Swiss 
palmer’s journeys to southern 
Europe, Egypt. Tunisia and Africa 
In the 1910s, 20s and ’30s, and 
their Impact on his work. 


San Francisco 
M.H. de Young Memorial Mu- 
seum, tel: (415) 863-3330. closed 
Mondays and Tuesdays. To Aug. 
10: “The Spirit of Andent Pern." 
From a Lima museum, a selection 
of 175 items of Peruvian pre-His- 
panic art. Including pottery, silver 
and gold regalia, textiles and 
carvings that date back to pre-Inca 
civilizations 2,000 years ago. 


CLOSING SOPN 


May 25: “VrttoriaCotonna: Dchterm 
und Muse Michelangelos.” Kun- 
8thtetoriBches Museum, Vienna. 
May 25: “Henan der Mesne: 
Meister der Kunst - Das Holiandls- 
che Seebild Im 17. Jahrhundert." 
Bodemuseum, Berlin. 

May 25: "L’Art de CoiJectionner: 
Les Musses Neeriandais et L’Art 


du 20e Siede.” Palais des Beaux- 
Arts, Brussels. 

May 25: “Edvard Munch: Prints 
From the Vivian and David Camp- 
bell Collection." Art Gallery of 
Ontario, Toronto. 

May 25: “Men and Gods; New Dis- 
coveries from Ancient China." 
Louisiana Museum of Modem 
Art, Humlebaek, Denmark. 

May 25: "Du Greco a Mondrian." 
Fondatfon de I’Hermltage, 
Lausanne. 

May 26: Angkoret Dix Siecles d*Art 
Khmer." Grand Palais, Paris. 

May 26: “Modem Art in Britain, 
1910-1914." Barbican Art Gal- 
lery, London. 


DIN MAR K 


wm 

m 


Nnbc AtcnVIKT 


Copenhagen 

National Museum of Denmark, 
tel: 33-13-44-11, dosed Mondays. 
To Sept 7: "Nimrod and Nineveh: 
Treasures From Assyria in the Brit- 
ish Museum." A selection of sculp- 
tures from the 9th to the 7th centu ry 
B.C. They were parts of the panels 
that decorated the Assyrian kings' 
palaces in ancient Mesopotamia. 
The exhibition also indudes 
carved ivories, bronze bowls, 
seals and cuneiform documents. 


Venice 

Palazzo Grass l, tel; (41) 522- 
1375, open dally. Continuing/ To 
July 13: “Arte del ‘900: La Pittura 
Flamminga e Olandese." A selec- 
tion of works by 20th-century Bel- 
gian and Dutch painters, including 
van Gogh, Ensor, Magritte. 
Dehraux and Mondrian. 


NETHERLANDS 


FLY BIMRN S 
KEY CITIES 
NETWORK 


w^im^Tf“v i eSrs V, Gl'vCT the complexity of employees must infoSTthe company of any 
Jast eouple of yeas. ^ maze 0 f mileage FFP award: ihe company then informx the tax 


FRANCE 


Rotterdam 

KunstHal, tel: (10) 440-0301. 
dosed Mondays. Contfnulng/To 
June 8: “The Earty Mondrian." 
More than 140 paintings, drawings 
and watercofors by the Dutch 
painter (1872-1944). 


frustrated, as 8< . cm . nnn- Mr.M*rfinp a value of 2.400 Deutsche marks 


me benefits, according to the ed to this by offering ro pay me rax a 

Prison Wagonlit business travel sur- sum for its Miles & More members, 
latest Carlson w agouti _ Airhm.oh nritoin no immediate dans tc 


latest Carlson ' 
vey conducted fc 
‘the British Ain 
sidered to offer 


best va * i-n^use tiieir FFP mdes.” says don. But the rules could change under the 
business travelers use uresident' of Labour government. 


.business traveici»»~ president' of Labour government. , . 

.Richard . Lo «U. executn e _ pre® pfps become a taxable benefit, the 


lucnitiu : n I /-* n d 0 n If rhPS become a ^ 

Carlson Wagonht Trav el m Lo bubb]e wm quickly burst,” says Kevin Watts, 

t„_ wheeler mar- secretary of of die Business Travel Li aison 
very little DIFWOMCB lan ■ . Group in London, which represents 25 cor- 

keting di^tw. Himo^Mid^ ^ poranons spending aroundlsCK) million 

Africa for OAG, says, rrr* (S800 million) a year on air tickets. ^ 

‘ burrhe ™ 7 a year or so Stclios Haji-Ioannou, chairman oftherap- 

to join FFPs isn t as high bn i e idly expanding no-frills aniine HasyJet m Lon- 

ago. Travelers arc findmg &ere s veiy time wy gainst FFPs as being 

difference betwanfTOgra^.And its ery Spt and distorting the mar- 

h-jtri m keen track of who flies whae ana now inffiaht magazine tames a 


Rams 

Fondatkm Dina VIemy, tel: 01- 
42-22-59-58, dosed Tuesdays. To 
SepL 29: “Jean-MIchel Basqulat 
Oeuvres sur Papier." Works on pa- 
per by the New York painter (1 960- 
1988) who first started with graffilis 
on wails. 

Institut du Monde Arabs, tel: 01- 
40-5T-38-38, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To Aug. 31: “Soudan: 
Royaumes sur le Nil." Items from 
archaeological sites in Sudan. 
Muaee d'Art Modems eta la Vllle 
de Paris, te fc 01-40-70-11-10, 
dosed Mondays. Prolonged/ To 
June 8: “Les Annees Trante en 
Europe." European art In the 
1930s. 

Musee National des Ails 
d'Afrique et d’Oceanfe, tel: 01- 
44-74-85-00, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Aug. 18: “Arts du Nigeria." Mora 
than 250 Hems document the his- 
tory of the area that became Ni- 
geria at the end of the 19th cen- 
tury. 


Barcelona 

Museu Picasso, tel: (3) 31 9-631 0, 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
June 29: “Andre Derain, 1904- 
1 912." Works by the French Fauv- 
ist painter that reflect Picasso's in- 
fluence. 




SWITZERLAND 



Geneva 

Musee d'Art et d'Histoire, tel: 
(22) 418-2600, dosed Mondays. 
Contlnulng/To Sept 28: ‘'L’Art 
d'lmHer Falsifications, Manipula- 
tions. Pastiches." A selection of 
pastiches ot paintings from the 
Italian Quattrocento that were cre- 
ated at the turn of the century. 



u N ITIPI TATES 


jrarion. People ^ ■ n0 rf jShL ?udT as ihe collection of FFP miles ^ ex ^^ 
tfaciors.ii* their choice of UWS* ‘ ‘Low-cost airlines cannot afford to give FFPs 

convenience, schedule and ^ _ that's why we are low cost, Haji-Ioannou 
“The growth offline J^. FEft ^ JBabrfteiy system and hke :any 

vnu have* huge portfolio of airiineson which says. convince people to 

re^m miles, reducing wouldn't otherwise have 

of schemes around *e w0 ^®J^ des e ^ done. Air fares could be reduced by at least 10 
KS3S3CSK5KS*»-d percent if FFPs d,d n« exist. 


GERMANY 


Berlin 

Martfn-Gropius-B&u, tel: (30) 
324-50-78, open daily, Contlnu- 
Ing/To July 27: “The Age of Mod- 
ernism: Art in the 20th Century." 
Features 350 works by more titan 
100 artists from Picasso to Cy 
TVrombly. 


Houston 

Museum of Fine Arts, tel: (713) 
839-7300, dosed Mondays. To Ju- 
ly 20: “Jewels of the .Romanovs: 
Treasures of the Russian Imperial 
Court.” Jewels, costumes, paint- 
ings, icons and religious artifacts 
display the opulence of the Ro- 
manov dynasty from the 1 8th cen- 
tury to Its demise in 1917. 


Biman Bangladesh Airlines offers convenient connections 
to 26 major cities worldwide - from North America 
to South Asia, from the Far East to the Middle 
East, from Europe to the Himalayas. Right on 
top of the world - at down to earth prices!. 


Frankfurt 

Fotografte Forum, tel: (69) 23-17- 


New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3791. dosed Mondays. 
Continuing To Aug. 3: “Cartier 
1900-1939." Traces the evolution 
of styles since the creation of the 


ft Biman 

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“re nreusaei US5i3.EQO.DOO 
CnMeen . USS 1500.000 


For idonnatian contact 
Sytvata Lewie. CA 
7881 Decale BbtL Ste. 200 
Montreal (Quebec) H4P 2H2 CANADA 
Tet (514) 735-7881 
Fsc (514) 342-3023 


OF SAINT TROPEZ 

Owed racer. House n dwtex. (unshed. 
de cora ted . 105 sq.m. - terrace - Smai 
Provencal vfla® or ribde. 3 tons Iran 
die sea P m Grmaud. 5 ha. pdrk. large 
swrnmrg ccd. games, calm. caretaker. 
FF1.450.QGfl. Tet +33 (OX 93 71 00 44 
or hone +33 (0)4 93 37 10 95. 


CANADA 

CLASSY HIGH FOSE BUILDING 

L:cse-: t. c:srr.* ; :c:4ar Urinal i22 
unis it su^es Al' concrete wto 2 
LTdergrourd teds c! parking. Merer 

ssnrzrs ssci. Sara es 


CAP D* ANTIBES. Unique panoramic 
mew. wateifrcrt. 30 mn. 4w turn Nee 
Affpcn. supert reuse nth a srfece ana 
c * 170 sqm. cmpoeJy renovated. am* 
pnsmg 5 bedlams, swimming pool. 
1153 sqm. 12nd. surrounded with old 
Tees heal to second resxfe rtal house 
Pnce USS U M. negotiable. Contact 
Foma Pivsrs. Tet UK U (0/17? 437 
31 EE Fax. <4 IC|171 287 5679 


ray^ested: USS 200.000 
Gastaow. U3Si.E0.0M 


For frtonre&oa contact 
Sylvan Urate. CA 
7B81 Dearie BM, Ste. 200 
MortmM (Quebec) H4P 2H2 CANADA 
Tel: (514) 735-7881 
Fax: (514) 34WQZ8 


HEART OF CAP FBI RAT 
208 sqm. ardtfed's vtfa, FF&BM 
Cramtng 5 besfrxms via. FF65U 
IXagnifcenl sea vow vSa, FF8M 
Sea-front vfc-Pnvate beach FF10M 
HAUSSHANT Group 
Wk +33 W) 4 92 DO 49 49 
Fax +33 n) 4 S3 89 40 88 


WHO WANTS TO OPT OUT? Resort n 
5mish Columbia (Cantcor 3.000 feet 
laKefrcrt apprcxmEtefy 75 acres. 5 
reams. 3 cabre, residence 14.400 sqlLl; 
sama on the lake, fish/smoketause. 60 
it dick, lots of mventaiy. land hr 
cattefiorses. Asking CarS1.5W.QQQ - 
srtd by osnet. Phone - 1250.1 397-2070, 
Fax (2501 337-2284. 


GOLF CAM4ES-MOU8NS - SPLENDID 
vib. Provencal s^le (160 sqm.): 3 bed- 
roc ms. kvmg 150 sqjn.j + mazranna 
wth open Ere. fuKy aqupped Uchea 
rathrocm. 2 independent totes + apart- 
ment weh separate entrance (32 sqm.). 
Pmate 2250 sqm. land, big svnmming 
poof Absolute privacy. Tel /Fax: Omar 
*33 (0)4 82 32 11 45 (ewnngs). . 


Cayman Islands 


DREAM HOUSE 3300 SO. FT., n the 
masi famous high luxury condonbiun d 
dareL beach locateq top amentes ■ lo- 
cation - services. Office-use allowed. 
USS 1.39 Mb. ■ other unto all sold at 
US5 1 7,Tik. Owners hnencmg avatefite. 
Physical cash accepted. 24 hr. Tat. 
00971 5064 17388/Fex: 009713628004. 


PERPIGNAN - ST. CYPHEN-PLAGE. 
For sale by owner, auto apartment 22 
sqm. wrtJi parking and basement For 
hrtier detafe canted A. Victoria. 

46 rue Am*® Bain. 66000 Perpignan. 
Tel+33 (0)4 6154.73.79. 


FACING OLD MOUGIK. sea view, top 
Ml, receptor. 4 bedrooms & baths, 2 
levels. 2500 sqm. landscaped garden, 
lame swimming pool, FF3M. Reay: Iff. 
Bax 291. 82521 Neuly cedex. France. 


French Provinces 


GOLF DE LA BRETESCHE 

Wssdtec. Lone ASarfcaje 
fn the middle tower of the CHATEAU, 
tackig die lake. *iy charming 00 Bqm 
apararenL Lnng room on 2nd floor, 
bathroom & 2 bedrooms on 3rd floor. 

Parking place. Fuirtshed. eojpped. 

For sale Tel: owner in Pans +33 
(0)1 43 T7 9^ OB or (0)1 47 53 73 82. 


MENTON, in hlstoncal part of town, 
charming renovated house, 95sq.nu 2 
bedrooms. 2 baths, sea view, near 
beaches. FF940K. Ad«on posable, Ta 
+33 (0)143223549. ntx^ardSimaglnettr 


NEAR CANNES, kinmoift apmtmenL 2 
rooms, terare - loggia, see wen, on pte 
vale estate, high security. Price 
FF750.00Q. Tet +» (OK 92 12 90 89 


Greece 


Unique location hlstoncal ate. 160 sqm. 
living space. Landscaped garden. Pool. 
For Petals feet owner +33(0)442263214. 


GREEK ISLAND OF EVtt. Lovely, reno- 
vated 3-bedroom rustic house. 227 
sq a, 150 years old. completely fur- 
nished. Very lama balcony wfth specta- 
cUal ww. 4 mte tram Bandy beach. 2 
firs from Athens. USS 150,000. Tet 
+49-89-332701. Fax +4&49-36101064 


RECRUITMENT 


HALUDW: QuaSty vacation homos. 
Prices start at 100 KECU for a 3-bed- 
room via with swirmrtng pool Ifrtato 


a ccuse under creation wltrtn 3 Ion. 

en location, ocefert view lo the aea. 
Cd tor tree brochure +3094.368798 or 
Fax: +3031260808 


Ireland 


260 YEAR OID FARMHOUSE by a trout 
take n Donegal Ml 3 beds, 1 A a haf 


taka si Donegal Hft. 3 beds, 1 A a haf 
baths, beams, stone Rrepteca. central 
hestiig. stone outbiftKngs. springwater 
1 hecteia. stunning news. Irish SO.OOO 
Tet 00 353 74 31311. 


FLOROCE AND OUNTL 
We have spianfid wltes overiookmg 
Florence with pmm gaitfens, cowry 
period vlas w* own vtnayerds and ohve 
groves and beautiful Cotantcas In 
stnung iocafions h ChtenM M very good 
prices. Please contact Colections (mm. 
Phone: 055 237 4487 fee 055 237 4625 


ROME-COUSEUM. Apartment with ex- 
ceptional end imp* wew on Gdaewn. 
Antique bufldnq Living room, (fining 
mom. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, eftea Ucfr- 
en. Ranetied and (tecarated by famous 
arctitect Fax +33(0)1 47 04 42 61 


London 


L0M)0N - Bdgravft Superb house. 
350 sqm. iriumaheq tv sale or rata. B 
bedrooms. 5 baths. 3 reception rooms. 
Serious nquines only. Fair Athens 
+301.8066771 - Tet 8016765 or mooto 
+3093267546. 


Monaco 


PUCE DU CASINO 

Mattoq exefustra biAfeig w® 
indoor saimnwg pod, 154 sqm. 
aparbnera, two bedrooms, sgsdous 


terrace overtorttn the Cesfno and 
the see. Crfar and garage Muded. 


La Pak Pataca 
25 avenua <ta h Cbste 
MC 98000 Monte Carlo 
Tal (377) 93 £ 15 00 
Fax (377) 93 25 S5 33 
vnrejiBntecariqmc te dBf pa rk agence 


MONTE CARLO, 

uiu 3 bedroomi, 31/2 ! 


3® sqm. 3 bedrooms, 3V2 teats, 
matte entrance, ixary . 3 indoor periwig 
steeps. 3 celais, tege tairaces. 
tabites wwr of meftenanean and 
Monaco. Has not been ived in wee 
USS12M ranovaSorL For sale by owner. 
Tet +33 (0)6 OB 37 03 01 


Paris and Suburbs 


LEYESMET 

Rare. Top floor. LARGE 5 rooms, hnh 
ceArgs + 63 sqm. tenaea very bsrtmd 
western view. Near cense town & RSI 
Ready Oct *97. FF135M + paring. 
Tat +33 (0)1 39 76 59 55 


RUE DE BEAUNE 
Rare end marvelbua. 5 roans 
+ Bras. View on Seine, extremely 
smy. ToL +33 (0)1 42 96 59 52. 


luxurious 290 squn, smnj. Garage. 
Tet +33 mi 47 66 97 23 


HEAR CONCORDE, motor honaboat 
Luxuriously planned, about 100 9qm. 
FF33 M. Cal office boras: 

+33 (0)1 « 51 87 84 


1LE DE SAINT LOUIS - 2f3 ROOMS, 
58 sqm, charrrtng 4th floor apartment. 
Ugrt, sadous. wen rtspased. ExcsDert 
condition. FFl,950,0flfl. Tet +33 
tU)1 42 96 37 66 or (0)1 39 67 04 50. 


5ft, LATH QUARTER near Pantheon 
and Sorborns, charming “pad a tern' 
large Ovrg room + mezzaro. Bathroom 
and'Mchen hAy equjpped FF1.100J300. 
7ef +33 (011 4783 6205/ (0)4 672978® 


40 XM PARS (A13). 70 ynaro M house, 
200 sqnu 1 hr. miports. FF900.000. Cal 
+33 (OK 5472 0835 or (0)1 3090 1997. 


9ft, 2 ROOMS, REDONE, 47 sqm. 5th 
floor. ML cellar, rtstoncal building 
FI .111. Tat +33 10)1 46 37 08 75 


LE ST. LOUS. Reception + hmq room, 
bedroom. 4M high ceifinga • IB sqm. 
FF$#)0,000. Teh *33 (0)1 43 25 48 82. 


HEAR ARC TRIOMPHE, deluxe apart- 
ment, 4fsqm, 2 rooms, sunny, excegart 
bwessnart FgoO.00Q.T4 +33 146225483 


VALUE DE CHEVREUSE (7® HOSE 
ExcepdcnaL h tep c oraBoa Isterical A 
oucofie she (Port Royal). 25 ton Paris 
canter. 10 ton Versailles. IS ton Sari 
German Inti seta* near gad I asport 
250 son. 8 man rooms, trig heated pod. 
pocWausafBBQ, 2300 sqm landscaped 
S waled rproen. 5+zr garage + 90 sqm 
enters sterfioAuem. Ready to movwi. 
5800000 (S = FF5.70) nr S5#Qfrnontti 
rent. Mr. Getxgee NoeL 4 rue Vaxiuter, 
78470 SL Lambert das Bctt. Tet +33 
(0)1 3844 128D. +33 (0)1 3944 1268 


MEUDOH*BELLEV1£ tor sale, apart- 
meM with excepted view of Paris. 105 
sqnu touth floor of a rafttence sbatad 
In a large park, beside Meudon forest 
Completely private, three bedrooms. 2 
bathe, double tying (38 sqm.), fitly 
equipped khetwn. csBar, two garage 
spaces. Behvue statan 5 nteu don to 
international sdiocl at Savras. F1J&0M. 
7et +33 {B1 45 34 94 38 (homq) or (OH 
40 57 66 55 (office) 


RARE. PLACE VENOOME (NEAR). 
Prestigious location tor eteoart tarn rocm 
apartmenL 58 sqm F1.4&UXX). Owner 
Tb +33 (0)1 42GQ 3932 (answering ma- 
dteto) or +33 (0)6 6043 6180 (mobile). 


PLACE DES VOSGES. 30 sqm. detoxa 
furnished, 2 rooms, quM, bright, foe- 
pteoa. baffato. Own or. +33(0)1 42408262 


Portugal 


VLLA II SHERATON ESTATE ta Pine 
CMte. AlgarrefatugaL 3 bette ‘Ensufla 1 , 
dWng, kxnge, (fireplace), axjy, large 
certral hfl, garden, swimming pod Ten- 


nis, gal private beach 2 rakxflre. Pnce 
US 5730ft Tel: 506-564-3039 USA or 
Si 89 501706 Portugal 


MAORD. Superb nd Urtiqua 
BeeutfU JfKfl century^toce. 6.000 
sqjn. plus 70,000 sqm. ot land. 
Fax: +34 1 319 21 86 


Switzerland 


GOT3U 


FOR SALE DIRECTLY BY OWI0 


MP0RTANT PRIVATE ESTATE 

WEST SWTT2ERLAM) 

25 KMS NORTH LAUSANNE 
Near highway, consisting of 3 buittngs 
totaling ow 20 norm wflh large 
receptions. 7 berfcooms. 9 la. (25 acres) 
meadow A woods. For (ratter Mometon 
Far +33 - 5 58 67 78 37 


ILAKEfflCW&ALPS' 


authorized 
inoa 1875 


Atoactire properties, overtxfckig views 
1 to 5 bednx m . from Sfr 200,000. 
BEVAC SLA. 

52. Monflxflam CH-1211 (SEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 


ROUGBIONT I GSTAAD VALLEY 
CF bnorMtare 

announces tin coretnictian of a 
LUXURY CHALET 
6 bedrooms with private btihoni 
3 reception rooms, ttcheh. sama. 


tour-car Indoor paten. 
TeL 141) 26 82S 92 TO 


JeL (41) 26 925 92 73 
Fax. (41) 28 925 92 75 


LES DIABLBIETS. ChaiM apartment ca. 
200 sqjtu. targe fivmgAflnmf roam wift 
(replace, betainy. 5 bertooms, 5 beds! 
showas, mortem ktidim. View ol otecier 
and tflsge. QuW and army pcsSon 5 
mki from vftge on taL 1 1M car hours 
from Geneva and 1/4 how to Vtere Golf. 
From Ural owner. SFr. 550,000. Tel: 
+4124 4951002. 


USA General 


MOUNT AH RESORT Income Property, 
large parcel, prime location, Cafitomla- 
Nevada border, zoned tourist continental 
South Late Tahoe, Cafcmia. Tel USA: 
916-5444704 or 916-5445174. 


USA Residential 


wam SL E. Promenade Condo 


JUNIOR 2 BEDROOM S340K 
S/W oqxjsurea. ifner New 2 BedroonYiS 
martHe battyjacuzatehower. The finest 
Spa & Pool at 38ih ft. 360 degree NYC 
views. Opai K Mtetight 

liradc Suzitia 212491-7659 


DOUGLAS ELUMAN 


NEW YORK, Park Avenue. Began 1 
bedroom, high floor. Fd service bttfng 
with conaeroe eslran S235K. Leave 
message (or Ms. Shapiro 212407-0607 
Of 212458-7693 or Fax 212-9350614. 


LONGBOAT KEY, R: An (stand para- 
dise. Luxury residences. & Oper, Ron 
Baldwin 8 Assoc, TetiFar 941-367-7199 
(USA). E4Mt LBK76junxcon 


You will Cud below a selection of employment oflfere published in last Monday's International Herald Tribune 
For a copy of last Monday's paper, please contact Kimberly Guerrand-Betran court on Paris (O) 1 41 43 94 76 



CWfiFACT 


WFP 

Ref: MS-97- I7AD 
Human Resources 
Via Cristoforo 
Colombo. 426.00145 
Rome - Italy 


Apparel Qualify 
Control Specialist 


Columbia 

Sportswear Company 


Columbia Sportswear 
Co. Human Resources, 
Dept MFGQCS, 
P.O. Box 83239 
Portland, OR 97283 


Cash Auction Privatization 

Specialists: 


Lc Ann Hager 
(Llaanbaatar - Mongolia) 


Lc Ann Hager 
Development Alternative 
7250 Woodmont Ave. 
Suite 200 

Bethesda MD 20814 


Depofy Director/ 
Field Activities 


lnt Riblic Health 
Consulting Firm 


Family Planning 
Logistics Management Project, 
John Snow Inc. 

1616 North Fort Mver Drive, 
11th floor 

Arlingto, Virgina 22208, LISA. 


49 St EAJNPteza 10 Rooms 

Huge 10 Room Duplex 4 Views 

Ovar 5000 H. XXX mmJ hams wth 
p an or amic river and coy VIEW5 from aB 
rooms. Hugs uvmg Room atfi fireplace, 
5 Bedroom + ftoraw. Fomaf Dvraig 
Room. 5.5 baths. S2.SW. 

Jo Ann Staten 
21 2-691 -7031 1i21 2-570-201 2 


DOUGLAS ELUMAN 

raqjitawj jftnan com 



Real Estate 
for Rent 


AT HOME IN PARIS 


Belgium 


PARIS PROHO 

Aparrmera to ran bmsftad cr r- 
Sate & Property l.tais^mera Sst-css. 
25 Av Hctffi lacs^rts Fxui-45611020 


BratSSlES • !»T OR BUY taBrtment 
or ma. Beatnce Sptinqai Real Eteate 
AganL TWac -322573 62 90 


Tel: 433 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


French Provinces 


LUBERON, rtanreng old hams. ware. 
peoL 3 acre. Tet +33 (OH 90364305 
Fax: -33 (0)4 30208950 


VENDOME (NTERNATXWAL 
BASTtLE: tasted: tircoraslITw-KT. 
sear m lams rcree vz; azrx. SE.X5 
5fc3W^<prt;i>eSeTel 
5 bndcas 2 = 3 tedrorre. 
Psrre 5:r. FIT CH 
Serving at your (kotal Needs 
Tet +33(0)142788330 Fn0))V&78834Q 


Holland 


RBITHOUS INTERNATIONAL 
NoInHotod 

lor (sent) fumtshed hoises/ffias. 
Tet 31-2D6448751 Fax: 31-20446S9CS 
. Nhoven 1921, 1083 Am ArreteTOarr. 


NEAR PARK UONCEAU • Vrv S”?.. 
sunny, luxur-o^s. From 1st Jarte .ro 
lot. November. ’15 sqm. snarer: 
Lr.mg rasm - nnirg rcr^ ♦ berrorr. 
lags esrroarr i Ir^g taster. F35K 
per irqiqr Lxiu^ng ?rges Fafc6y 

a rat asrege: Fr300 per Tcron. Tec 
-33(011 42 =7 02 22. 


HOUEFIMDERS INTL Harmqt acht 141 
1015 BH ArretErdam Tef +3120KB2252 
Fax: S3922S2 E-niaiwxreeiect66prt 


FLORENCE rerov^d fla - 2 bstiooms 
- fully fumstiad weekty .' montmv. 
TefFax: 39 43B 9896S. 


HOUSEBOAT tr res. S: Cr.1 to; 
Bos 3e BatBya*. Str- ins ~ A r: 
‘33. F-roiscfi. steess 5. sq- 
FT.Wirra reL Te: -23 i3r* +6C2H4e 


Poland 


CHATELcT Cnaren; rrsi+tp. Seeps 
4. F5C03.T3 Of 2.CTO-=^l ^5 
c kw. "et Mrs Jrrer ’3t(52 21132 


RATS M WARSAW? We to* foray- 
ere locate suabta fiats Write Edebess 
Agency. UL. Pretora 28134. m83, War- 
saw. Marat TelFax -48 22-628 36 C8 


Rond-Point des Champs Byseea-25 

s=.n.. assfjy Lsiwred. a>' ersr c« 
FFT.axJm Tel rax -33:0iUK:‘3=T 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


Paris Area Furnished 


ffTN-LUXURY DUPLEX, oft Avenue 
Montaigne New. tearaifuitv funistred 
bring room, dining arae. i bedreom. 
1 1/2 marble baths, modem custom 
toteWfl. literts'dishes. guard ren. 3 
mo nths to 1 yr. Tet 01-4189 44.09 


BOUGIVAL 

•u wESCAFsn ?;=< ■ =ccl 


3RD - MARAIS • EXCEPTIONAL 
3 bedrooms. 85 sanu chamcng. reno- 
vated. fu% hxnshed. wsher-dryer. TV. 
Breptaca. F12OT. Tet -33 (0)K^83132 


lift, NEAR BASTILLE end Marais. 3 
room eparimerl qxeL sunny. 59i fico'. 
lift. Fim rtL TeL *33((i>1432l8c53 


245 sq.m. 

plus tensa V? pre-- 
'sp 5C sq i\ Jr; - ^rr, 
.■idh rtrei aa =r.i r.zx xt-" 
3 berm-Ts atn 3Ss 
<,iten. ce-ta: 2^5 
FF if.::: ■■rarps 

SQTHAGJU 
fO) 1 40 71 71 21 
iO) 1 40 71 71 41 


HOLIDAYS 


YACHTS 




The concept. design and die decoration in 1930 Art Deco style 
of this cruising casino-yacht is cut of die ordinary and is 
designed by David Ruimy.The 700 sq.m, cf antique leaded glass 
windows end the ancient lead setting bordering and inlaying 
cne mirrors, will make this luxurious and refined yacht die 
-THE ORIENT EXPRESS OF THE 7 SEAS". 

The quality facings cn board, renvnd cne of the golden years 
0 ? which only France holds the secret. Equipec with 72 pas- 
senger cabins, including 7 Suites and I Royal Suite. A large 
gastronomic restaurant, exclusively French, followed by a large 
Bar-Brasserie decorated in 1 930 style. A vast 600 sq.m. Casino 
with jack pot machines will give the pleasure to cne passen- 
gers. I large cabaret-spectacle with a discotheque. I swimmlng- 
000 i. i solarium. I sports ro cm, I sauna and i iacuzzi. The 
Duty-tree luxury boutiques will represent the most well- 
known French brands. 

200 passengers and 36 crew members will fine an agreeable 
environment under exceptions! cruising conditions in this truly 
floating palace ****★. The launching ceremony of The 
Casino Royai cruising is sec for the enc of the 
cento, "/-December 99. 

Saie by Time share to private individuals, cruising included 
stares at $ : 9.000 per week hr a cabin for 2-4 people -‘or a 
per cd of 30 years. 


P'c.-i -,;y ~:c." :r;: :r P. -cr-'s 05- 4- - 

Spot City International '^ ,na,iora ' Traae F ' n ”“ B '' ,c0 

33. avonae tics Chomcs-Eiysecs Paasfieuvcl+vcg IS 


“5003 Paris - France 
Tel. - 33 10) 1 42 25 03 03 


1 1 OS EE Amsterdam - Holland 
Tef - 31 (O' 20 4C O 13 02 



Boats/Yachts 


Lebanon 


MM YACHT FOR RENT 
on a 'Bed A Breakfast” taste 
«i 0« Prat of Cames (near Beariwsj. 
spawus ston. aMecti and Ry-bndge 
4 douUe cattns ter 4-6 persons ll baMV 
3 ^towere) For start or long stays. 
CALL US YACHTS 
TEL +33(0)493980351 FAX(0)4B33942S7 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East of Bert*. 
5 star delure Exceptional location, secu- 
my. camtarL fine custie. cowentrons. 
business services, satellite TV t8 mm 
transfer from axport free UTELL. Fax: 
1-1) 212-4781391 .' (+33) (0)1-47200007 


Holiday Rentals 


Residence Hotels 


French Provinces 


CLUUDGE CHfiMPS ELYSES 


Kgh dess rooms 4 writes 
Ctasy, oe&t* S more*/ raas. Pans 
Tel+33 (0)1-44133333. FaxIOtl 4230488 


FRENCH PROVENCE. CLASSICAL 
MANOR mV) swimming pod. near medi- 
eval visage w*n an taoaes, 6 bectooms, 
5 fistto Maid and gardener mduded. 
Uroiun 15 days rental Stfl avaSabte r 
August FFlS.OOQ'ivK. 15th to 30m Sect 
FP 1 Z.OOC,**. TeL -33 I0H 57 56 50. 


881 - Metro SI Augostm«ft»wa; 

tea! tx tagp caraaq. Vay beausftri 
i roca=. tZ3 szo- class tongs. 
eoaoed ictsfi en. 3 twtoms ♦ rang 
nan. ce&igs. mokfin®, gas beat- 
■rj tstfreem. sriooffl-. cellar, parting, 
csretae:. Has a te seen. FF15224 ret 
5OTCJA Tft J3 ffffl 45 22 S 8E. 


HADflD. Luovy apartment. 12ft floor, 
great views. Wv bxrietied. very ««S to- 
rated, 3 bedrooms. 3 tarns, en eontfi- 
•xzmg private o®kxig. TA 34490*430 


LE VESttCT. 10 mr from R6L Nate 
aastraert. ietge Lvmq 3 tiedrooms, 2 
tstra. 110 sam. tage bata»f. nesr ■> 
s*aSs ffc agency TeL *33 
(Olf 34'SJ67« . Fax (DJI 30 53 3734 


PORTE D'ORLEANS. studio. Irocben. 
Jatomy. vim. sumy. FF 3200«ra + 
-sges. Tet +33 (00 22 52 32 37 


NYC FURMSHED APARTMENTS. 1 
weft to f year Great Locations. Cal 
PAChgir 212-4&9223. Fax: 212- 
446-9226 E-Mai. athwnetwSaoLconi. 


Switzerland 


NYC-FIFTH AVE. UOURY 1 bedroom. 
Pudabte Ju» 1 5-Sat. 15ft. SKBt Cal: 
2i2eMBffi leave message. 


SB-F-COHTADED STTJOJO m Zurtcti 
Q jet tocabon. goad pubfie flansport. 
racEtiy ficrafted mew) sapafata ttdwi 
S400 per weet Tet +41-1-371 88 86, 
Fax: -a”, -1-371 15 ffi orwrtfi to HTC. 
p.Q. Be* 449. CH604E Zurich. 


SAN FRANCISCO BAY AHEA. pnma 
locatran. Staitiong term. W Executive 
Resais TelfFax: 415-563-3551 


GB4EVA, LOXDRY FURMSHB) spart- 
JSH35. From statu to 4 bertrooi iB- Td : 
*41 22 735 S32Q Fax +41 22 73E671 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 4 


DINING OUT 



PARtSnh 


THOUMSUX 

RBCAUXANT 


THOUMIHJX 



Spectffiai of ft* 5aulh-W«r. 

Confil de canard S cauoultf au conhl to 
caad. Air ca-Ktlenad. Open wylo y 79me 
SDomraque. TaL: oFCM&JS. 

Near bncMuTKiAiat 


PARIS 9th 


~Z , FPCLY-J Jn\ 

tesS 11 ! 

gacanmerded fcy ferrous gananemc guides. 


Ngwoda&tEaea fat kadi. Pmctadring mcaa 
T>. mOi-AGa*. Nady T. 01^2443 36 
471. c. S«fi»Pc»7h.T 01A7.8127.il 


£f~\L NEW 
BALAL 


PARIS Ath 


BREAD, WINE, CHEESE 


tncBai & Mixa* keflauant 
‘buner dor. MamiM d’ot* 
rroammendad by praifcgioui Guide* 
Nccr Ctoero. Air tnnd Oo nnad 
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■* •■’ ^NOCAt-FOCUSES cwmm'u ■> ;; • ■: 

UNOCAJL® More than any other big American oil 
company, Unocal has staked its future on 
investments abroad, mainfy in Asia, even as 
it disposes of its American refineries and gas stations. 


FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 


.. OPPOSITION f$ GROWING AT HOME 


FREE SURMA! 


Capital Expenditures 


isuamft!' 

i oi£s. ! 


1995 

UNITED STATES FOREIGN 
««> 40% 


i-. 


1997 projected 



UNITED STATES 
32% 


FOREIGN 

68 % 




total- SI billion 






Revenues From Operations 

UNITED STATES FOREIGN 



Source: Unocal Corporation 


& omion 

TJ'L W-I3TF. HMV.E 


■If. • :h--j -:r in 

TOTAL 

/.-WrraifNT BY THa PRFFIPENT 

$4J3 billion 

iwijrii'i: i:. Et—a. 

$5 J bUlion 

sro**v.iOff r»V u- ir^ 

?.|LS«. 


-r is 5-.471 in fosowu-i r--. i ■ 


HUMAN RIGHTS GROUPS 

Using the Internet and 
more traditional forums, 
grass-roots protesters 
have accused Unocal and 
its partners of collaborat- 
ing with Burma's 
oppressive regime. 


LABOR UNIONS The 
threat of job losses from 
Unocal's sale of its 
domestic operations has 
prompted the Oil, 

Chemical and Atomic 
Workers union to join 
protests like this one in 
Denver last month against 
Unocal and its partners 
in Burma. 

Washington President 
Clinton said last month he 
would impose sanctions 
an new investment by 
American companies in 
Burma Unocal's exist- 
ing project is exempt, but 
it remains unclear 
whether the company can 
expand its presence. 

The New Ymk Tunes 


Oil and Sanctions: Unocal Hangs On in Burma 


By Agis Saipukas 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Ever on the 
hunt for rich discoveries 
abroad, American oil compa- 
nies have long had to factor in 
fears about the unstable nature of for- 
eign governments when considering 
huge investments in capital and equip- 
ment. But now the companies are find- 
ing that politics back home is the new 
focus of risk. 

The threat of unilateral economic 
sanctions, typically directed by Wash- 
ington at governments accused of hu- 
man-rights violations, has become big 
enough to cast a shadow over invest- 
ment decisions stretching from South- 
east Asia to West Africa to the Caspian 
Sea, oil executives and other industry 


experts say. 

No company has exposed itself more 
to tbe new unknowns than Unocal Carp. 

investment focus afft£ore[ Unocal has 
staked more of its future cm overseas 
projects than anyone else, concentrating 
on Asia. Last November, it sold its 
refineries, gas stations and other assets 
an the West Coast of fee United States to 
fine up capital to invest in fee region. 

It has placed its biggest bet so farm 
Burma, where it is part of an inter- 
national consortium, including Total SA 
of Fiance, feat is investing $1 2. trillion to 
develop fee Yadana natural gas field. 

Aon while fee field will not start 
operatmgunti] next year, Unocal's pres- 
ence in Burma has already become a 


case study in fee politics and pressures 
feat are increasingly affecting fee en- 
ergy industry. Last month, fee Clinton 
administration approved the use of 
sanctions against Burma under legis- 
lation that the president signed last fall. 

The sanctions, which went into ef- 
fect Wednesday, prohibit American 
companies from making new invest- 
ments in fee country, winch is ruled by 
a military dictatorship that human- 
rights groups have called (me of fee 
most repressive regimes in fee world. 

But the Yadana project, as well as 
lesser ventures involving Texaco Inc. 
and Atlantic Richfield Co., known as 
ARCO, are shielded from fee sanctions 
by a compromise in fee legislation that 
exempts existing investments. 

Unocal helped win feat compromise 
through intense lobbying. But Unocal's 
experience has exposed just how many 
problems sanctions can create and un- 
derscored bow readily constituencies 
can rise up to pose obstacles to projects 
thousands of miles away. 

While it is hanging on to its project, 
Unocal is also stuck wife its critics, 
risking a legacy of bad publicity along 
wife any proms. Just last month, the 
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers 
International Union joined the forces 
opposing the company, upset feat Un- 
ocal's concentre t«i move abroad was 
unnecessarily costing American jobs. 

And Unocal’s victory is only partial 
and may not be permanent. Its op- 
ponents are backing new legislation to 
force fee company out of Burma. . 

“In the oil and gas business, you 


continually have to reinvest as you 
draw down reserves.'* said John Licht- 
blau, chairman of the Petroleum In- 
dustry Research Foundation. “This is 
an ongoing process and not just a one- 
time thing.*' 

The result is a war for public opinion 
— and lawmakers’ votes — that is still 
being waged in the halls of Congress, in 
letter-writing campaigns and on the In- 
ternet. 

What seems clear is that what is 
happening, to Unocal will happen to 
other American oil companies. 

For example, in fee Caspian Sea area, 
which has become one of die hottest 
regions for new development, “Amer- 
ican companies are already feeling some 

INTERNATIONAL MANAGER* 

reluctance to go into partnerships be- 
cause of die sanctions that have already 
been applied and might be applied in 
die future,” Mr. Lichtblau said. 

Julia Nanay, a director of the Pet- 
roleum Finance Co., a consulting firm 
in Washington, added: “It's devast- 
ating for the U.S. oil industry. There is 
an increasing list of countries that are 
potential targets. It's having a terrible 
effect” Potential flashpoints include 
Nigeria and Indonesia, experts say. 

Still, whatever the headaches and fee 
complications, the industry has little 
choice butto pursue most projects over- 
seas because that is where the oil is and 
because American consumers show no 
signs of trimming their demand. 

Indeed, Unocal went into Burma in 


1993 knowing there were troubles 
ahead, but saw the potential rewards as 
justifying tire risks. 

Company executives recognized 
that they were in for a long battle wife 
rights groups, Unocal's president. John 
hole Jr., recalled, but they were de- 
termined to see it through. ‘This proj- 
ect is going to happen — there is no 
way they are going to stop it,” he 
quoted Unocal executives as saying. 

. The critics were not long in coming. 
Grassroots groups of students and im- 
migrants, linked through the Free 
Burma Coalition, spread reports of 
rights abuses by the military regime, 
known as fee State Law arid Order 
Restoration Council 

The critics accused Unocal of 
everything from condoning the laun- 
dering of drug money — Burma is fee 
world's biggest producer of heroin — 
to using slave labor. Through demon- 
strations and the Internet, the groups 
picked up support, including backing 
from American student groups. 

By last year, two senators, Mitch 
McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, 
and Daniel Patrick Moymhan, Demo- 
crat of New York, were pushing for an 
immediate ban on investments, includ- 
ing existing projects. 

Unocal fought back, denying the 
critics* charges and noting Washing- 
ton’s inconsistency when pressing for 
democratic reforms abroad. 

Top Unocal executives made the 
rounds in Washington, arguing feat if 

See RISK, Page 17 


PAGE 13 


Beijing-Linked Exchanges 
Embark on a Bumpy Ride 


Wild West Investing 
Infects HongKong 9 
To Regulators 7 Dismay 

Bloomberg; News 

HONG KONG — When Chow Yei- 
ching was accused of insider trading for 
selling 28 million shares of Chevalier 
(OA) International Ltd., his lawyer 
offered a simple defense: Mr. Chow, fee 
company chairman, had not realized 
Chevalier was about to report a big loss. 

Ignorance is a popular excuse in Hong 
Kong, where a half-dozen companies 
issue statements every day saying they 
are at a loss to explain gains of as much 
as 90 percent a day. More often than not, 
fee same companies announce major re- 
structurings or purchases within days. 

Little more than a month before Hong 
Kong reverts to Chinese rule, there are 
eerie signs that fee stock market has 
begun to resemble its smaller cousins in 
Shanghai and Shenzhen, where regu- 
lators seem powerless to persuade in- 
vestors feat trading shares is anything 
more than a lottery. 

Things are getting so out of hand in 
Hong Kong feat regulators issued a 
statement Wednesday saying feat some 
recent gains “have no relation to fee 
assets, profitability or prospects of fee 
companies concerned.** 

“Hong Kong investors are buying 
stocks just like they’re betting on horses 
or going to Macau ^casinos, said Sunny 
Chan, head trader at fee brokerage 
Seapower Securities Ltd. 

He should know. Seapower Resources 
International Ltd., a sister company of 
die brokerage, is t one of many China- 
connected companies targeted by in- 
vestors ibis year as likely targets of asset 
injections by their Chinese parents. 

Thursday, for example, Seapower Re- 
sources surged 41 percent. The reason? 
Speculation that China Resources En- 
terprise LicL. another leading mainl and 
company, is about to buy a stake in the 
company. Both companies denied this. 

A Securities and Futures Commission 
spokesman said his office had received 
complaints about market manipulation, 
and fee announcement Wednesday was 
aimed at protecting investors. 


Chinese Markets Slide 
After State Restricts 
Short-Term Trading 

C*> Otr SitfFnm Dupaabr* 

SHANGHAI — Regulators banned 
state-owned and listed companies from 
trading shares for short-term profits 
Thursday, the biggest step in a six- 
month campaign to rein in fee booming 
stock market. 

The moves caused share prices to 
plunge on China’s two stock exchanges. 
The Shanghai Stock Exchange’s com- 
posite index closed down 1 1 9.66 points, 
or 8.8 percent, at 1 .258.05. In Shenzhen, 
fee composite index slumped 453.72 
points, or 8.6 percent, to 4,788.88 
points. 

Analysts said the decline was fee 
sharpest this year, adding that they ex- 
pected prices to continue to fall Fnday. 

The restrictions, the latest in a series 
of government actions first announced 
in December and aimed at cooling 
China’s markets, were the harshest 
since China opened stock exchanges 
seven years ago, analysts said. 

The ban seemed to put an end to a 
market boom in anticipation of Hong 
Kong's return to Chinese sovereignty 
July 1, a prospect that had pushed Shang- 
hai shares up 47 percent this year. 

But analysts said the moves were not 
likely to counter fee economic forces that 
had driven feat rally. China's savings, 
inflation and growth rates made it likely 
that shares would bounce back, they 
said. 

In addition, the impact of fee an- 
nouncement mig ht be limited because 
authorities would probably find the re- 
strictions difficult to enforce, they said. 

According to the new regulations, 
state-owned and listed companies will 
not be allowed to purchase shares unless 
they are held as long-term investments. 
The companies will also be barred from 
using funds raised through stock sales 
and bank loans to buy shares. 

Raymond Chan, manager of the 
Barclays ASF China Fund in Hong 
Kong, said he believed China's goal was 
to cool speculation, not to send share 
prices down. (Bloomberg, AP, Reuters) 


Hashimoto Faults Bureaucrats 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto, angered by a string of busi- 
ness scandals, lashed out Thursday at 
the Finance Ministry for failing to bead 
off at least one of them. 

The wave of scandals has broken in 
the middle of a campaign by Mr. Ha- 
shim oto’s government to clean up Ja- 
pan's business ethics before fee dereg- 
ulation of financial markets to make 
them globally competitive. 

In an unusual public rebuke to the 
country’s most powerful bureaucrats, 
Mr. Hashimoto faulted them for not 
knowing that Japan's third -largest com- 


mercial bank, Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank 
Ltd., might have played a role in ques- 
tionable loans to a racketeer in a scandal 
also involving Nomura Securities Co. 

“It’s not only a matter of Dai-Ichi 
Kangyo Bank,” fee prime minister said. 
“There must have been inspections by 
the Finance Ministry.” 

He also did not spare the bank's top 
executives from scrutiny. 

“It's sneaky to step down to take fee 
blame,” Mr. Hashimoto said, referring 
to reports feat the executives planned to 
quit. “Their resigning does not settle the 
problem. They should face up to fee case 
until investigations make headway. ” 


In a Broad Asian Survey, American Blue Chips Pull Down the Highest Marks 


i ivnR-v 


— * . _ .nlS S’ "" 



By Philip Segal 

Special to the International Herald Tribune 

~ HONG KONG — Coca-Cola, IBM, 
- Citibank, Motorola, AIG and other 
blue-chip U.S. companies were ranked 
\ as the most successful foreign finns 
*■ operating in Asia in a survey of ex- 
patriate business executives in the re- 
*- gion made public Thursday. 

U.S. companies generally bested Jap- 
K. anese and other rivals in their respective 
sectors and industries when respondents 
were asked which company was fee 
most successful and why. Tbe survey 
" was conducted by fee Hong Kong-based 
political and Economic Risk con- 
sultancy. .. 

“Americans formed only a minority 
of the survey sampling, so fee strong 
reputation of certain U.S. companies is 


shared by Americans and non-Amer- 
icans alike,” tbe survey said. 

Tire winning names read like a Who's 
Who of blue-chip America. Internation- 
al Business Machines Carp, received 
the second-largest number of endorse- 
ments in fee survey after Coca-Cola 
Co., scoring especially well in Japan. 

American International Group Inc. 
led the insurance field. This was perhaps 
not surprising, given the company's tre- 
mendous lead on all other foreign in- 


ular destination for foreign direct 
investment last year. 

AIG earns 52 percent of its profit 
outside the United States and is the 
largest life insurer in Southeast Asia, 
o per ating in 15 different countries or 
territories wife more than 100.000 
agents. In 1992, it was granted tire first 


foreign insurance license in 40 years by 
the Chinese government, and in three 
years grabbed an estimated 20 percent 
of tire group and individual life insur- 
ance market in Shanghai. Two years 
ago, it was given permission to sell life 
insurance in fee souibem Chinese city 
of Guangzhou, when almost all of its 
peers were still trying to get their first 
licenses to sell in Shan ghai. 

Among high-technology companies. 
Motorola Inc. topped fee rankings by 
executives, who were surveyed in 
China, Hong Kong, South Korea and 
Singapore. That, too, is not a shock, 
given Motorola’s huge investments in 
mtemal human resources training pro- 
grams. Respondents to the survey often 
cited “people skills" as a reason to rate 
companies highly. For firms operating 
in China, for example, human resources 


S oblems are often cited as the single 
ggest barrier to success because of the 
acute shortage of skilled managers in 
China and a dearth of good expatriate 
managers who speak Chinese. 

Robin Sears, vice president in Hong 
Kong of Korn Ferry International, tbe 
executive search firm, said last year that 
very few companies operating in China 
bad what he considered a successful 
human resources policy. Among his top 
picks were Motorola, AT&T Corp., 
IBM and Proctor & Gamble Co- 
America's Citibank was fee top-rated 
foreign financial institution in Asia by 
far, with comments from executives cit- 
ing the bank's “staying power through 
problems,” “global infrastructure" 
and “innovative products." Hongkong 
& Shanghai Bank, whose parent HSBC 
Holdings has its headquarters in Britain, 


was fee only other bank to receive a 
significant number of mentions. 

Only a few Japanese companies made 
fee list, including Toyota Motor Corp., 
which got high marks for its operations 
in Indonesia and Thailand. 

Volkswagen AG of Germany was fee 
hands-down winner in China, the op- 
erator of what has been by far the most 
successful automobile joint venture 
there to date. 

“Apparently, the collective image of 
Japan Inc. is still stronger than the image 
conjured up by individual companies,” 
tbe Political and Economic Risk Con- 
sultancy said. 

The pattern of U.S. dominance was 
broken ui the energy sector, where Roy- 
al Dutch/Sbell Group, the Anglo-Dutch 
oil firm, won higher ratings than did 
Exxon Corp. or CaJtex Petroleum Corp.. 


a joint venture of two U.S. oil compa- 
nies, Chevron Corp. and Texaco Inc. 

“It would seem there is no single 
magic formula behind the success of 
these companies,” the. report said. 
While a good product or technology was 
critical, “it could be more significant 
that most of fee companies on the list are 
able to back up this product or tech- 
nology wife extreme focus.” 

Take Coca-Cola, which employs 
about one-third of its bottling personnel 
in China in the area of distribution, 
keeping control over its product all fee 
way from plant to store shelf. PepsiCo 
Inc. has linked up with several bottlers 
that were all but broke, according to a 
report by the Economist Intelligence 
Unit on multinationals in China. But 
with only minority stakes in its bottlers, 
it often lost control over distribution. 


CURRENCY 8t INTEREST RATES 





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180-day CP dealers 550 

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Sowoeasiriw. 


REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 

THE MINISTRY OF HYDRAULIC AND ELECTRIC RESOURCES 
COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 
NATIONAL EMERGENCY RECOVERY PROGRAMME 
WATER SUPPLY AND WASTEWATER SECTORS 
Invitation for Tarim N° 1865 

Fi liriMBfatiM lira! i TfrnrimT nrMrtn PI will Tfnnrlr FI Water Sopply and Met* md Cboaf Watte Water System* 

The Comcfl for Development ad Recoutradkin (CDR) has received a loan from the litte r nat io nal Bank for Bemn ripiet ^ 
Devdopment (IBRD) toyyar^s the cost of tbe National Emergency Recr»atractioxi Programme, 2nd and 3rd year (ooteide Betrnt } , «nd itig 
that ■artofthenroceedaoftlaai loan ytM be amsBed to eUgflile paymeata mder the contract for the r eh a M B t al in ii — 

Meta El and Baronk El Water Snpply and Meta and Cboaf Waste Water Sj-stems- 

The Coancfl for Development ami Reemaatrnctkn fandtes tenders from efigMe tenderera as defined in the (ZBRD) Galddte for 
Procurement to ejteate the foBtmtng : 

■ hutafland commisiriog cMorinatfon equipment at five sttes. 

■ Contract, eqnip and coamrin d oa three net? booater pump stations. 

• Pnv**~ 1 **y ”** ****4P-9 tfl wwaWI™ nfvrimM jfaja from5flnmtn40n mm i fhnirtM- 

• Omta nct or rehabilitate 20 No. concrete reaervolrs of variona sires m? to2D0m3 capaeftr 5fe 12 No. op to 4000 m3 rapfWy - 

• Procnre , biy or rehabilitate and teat 13CL5 km of dbtributiofi pipeHnes of afctes from 50mm to SOOtnra diameter. 

■ p A uUBtej tnn B? 1 *" ‘ Jtmm *im m nd n lnn piptllnf r nf Ttrinm irfm 1 frrpi Tfflhmn hi Iflftmai fo iWamrf rr 

■ Construction aad rehabAMation freptacement of 125 bm of semen and rising mams ranging in site from 150mm to 400mm aad 
cowtroctkm ofa snlanadble pnpfog afatton. 

Tenderers may obtaia fortber fatforamtioe from , and exaatbw and acquire tbe tender docaraeirti at, tbe ofllce of the Employer starting 
Monday 26 of May 1 997 from the headquarters of : The Council .for Development aid Reconstruction -TaKet □ Serafl -Beirut Central 
Dhtfjyt, Lebanon- Fa cManle : (961-1) 86 44 94 -.(961-1) 64 79 47-Tlpfc ;(961-1) 643980/1/2/3 - Beirut - Lebanon 

Tender doemnenfai may be pnrthaacd by htererted tenderer! on appficatkm to the above office, md upon payment ofa ^ 

ofUSS 1000. 

A1 tenders mast be accompanied by a security ofUSS 660,000. and must be delivered to the address given above at or before 12KH) noon 

on Monday 28 of Joly 1997. Tenders wfS be opened at 12:00 noon of the same date in the presence of tenderer’s representatives ufo 

choose to attend. 

A pre-tender meeting w£B be held hi the offices of CDR at 10:00 boars on Tuesday 10th Jane 1997 daring which a. she vbhstS be 

otpabti 




PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year T -Bond Yield 



in Deutsche marks H Dollar m Yen 


1.70 

1« - - jT 


130 

120 


v/ 

« D J 
1996 

F M A M 
1997 

110 D J 
1996 

\ 

F M A M 
1997 

Exchange 

NYSE 

index" • " ; 

Thebow 

Thursday 

mm . 

725B.13 

Prev.l % ' 

Close Change 
7290.es: ' +0,45 

NYSE 

S&P500 

835JB6 

83R3» -OM 

NYSE 

S&P100 .■ 

.. lOGRti 

B&2& -0+68 

NYSE . 

Con^ioahft 

■ 43*86 

436J21 ..-0 J3S 

NLSL : 

ftedaqCSaty>oefie.1372-58 

1373.75' 

Atec -. . 

MatioMVBiue 

SB&73 

592-08 - NOL28 

Tofoato 

TSElmtex 

633&OB 

B30430 - : -NX5D 

SftoPattio 

Bovespa 

1074523 

lomias +0^8 

M«dco City 

Bofcsa - . 

3999LS9 

3973.15 +OjB7 

| Buenos AiresMetval 

7SSJ2. 

78354 ' '*025 

Santiega 

IPSAGenecat- ' 

5441.78 

5401.11 A&75 

CtrBCBB 

Ce?jSalGena« 

NA 

GGB28T ■ 

Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


intenuuooal Herald Tribune 


Clinton Retreats on Bank Rules 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

Nr*' York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In introdu- 
cing its long-awaited plan to re- 
vamp the U.S. financial services 
industry, the Clinton administra- 
tion has retreated from its most 
ambitious idea: allowing banks to 
own manufacturers or other non- 
Fmancial companies. 

For more than a decade, re- 
peated attempts to overhaul bank- 
ing legislation have collapsed 
from intense industry in-fighting. 
In deciding not to press for au- 
thority for banks to engage in vir- 
tually any business — a proposal 
that has drawn sharp criticism — 
the administration has provided 
the framework, analysts said, for a 
bill with solid prospects of en- 
actment. 

On Thursday, Alan Greenspan, 
the chairman of the Federal Re- 
serve Board, urged Congress not to 


allow even a limited mingling of 
banking and commercial business 
until it has first acted to break 
down walls Oat still separate the 
banking, securities and insurance 
industries. 

The Fed chairman backed away 
from past statements in which be 
suggested a step-by-step approach 
to allowing affiliations between 
banks and commercial businesses, 
which axe now effectively prohib- 
ited by U.S. law. 

The plan, outlined Wednesday 
by Treasury Secretary Robert Ru- 
bin, is an attempt to reflect the 
de regulatory changes that have 
already swept through the mar- 
ketplace, paced by the efforts of 
federal regulators that have al- 
lowed banks and Wall Street to 
move onto each other’s turf. 

“The old lines that separated 
insurance, securities and banking 
industries have increasingly 
blurred as new financial services 


and products have appeared/ ' Mr. 
Rubin said Wednesday. 

The administration did not pro- 
pose any banking legislation last 
year, when Congress tried and 
failed to pass a bill repealing the 
Glass -Steagall Act, the 1933 law 
that separates the banking and se- 
curities businesses. 

Even though Mr. Rubin 
signaled a retreat from the con- 
troversial proposal to allow banks 
to venture into a wide range of 
businesses, be did not abandon h 
altogether. The administration's 
plan offers such ownership as one 
of two alternatives. 

Mr. Rubin suggested that per- 
mission for banks be linked to a 
specified limi t on nonfinancial 
activity, expressed in terms of total 
domestic revenue. He also said 
that Congress might want to bar 
affiliation between a bank and any 
of the nation's 1 ,000 biggest non- 
financial companies. 


Rising Rond Yields 
Weigh on Wall Street 


Very briefly: 


US Airways Moves to Shrink Its Service 


Johnson & Johnson to Buy Biopsys 

NEW BRUNSWICK, New Jersey (Bloorobeig) — Johnson 
& Johnson agreed Thursday to buy Biopsys Medical Inc. in a 
stock, swap valued at $310 million, giving the health-products 
giant a device that diagnoses breast cancer without surgery. 

Johnson & Johnson has been acquiring companies for their 
promising technologies and using its global distribution to sell 
them. The agreement moves Johnson & Johnson into com- 
petition with U.S. Surgical Corp. in the emerging market for 
breast-biopsy procedures. 

Triarc Cancels Spin-Off and EPO 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Triarc Cos. said Thursday it 
had completed its $300 million acquisition of Snapple Bever- 
age Corp. from Quaker Oats Co., but the company said it 
would not proceed with its plan to create a separate company 
for its beverage and restaurant businesses through an initial 
public offering and spin-off to shareholders. 

• The Toronto Stock Exchange was named in the latest 
class-action lawsuit over Bre-X Minerals Ltd„ which col- 
lapsed after a finding that its Busang property in Indonesia 
contained no significant gold reserves. 

• The National Association of Securities Dealers' chair- 
man, Frank Zarb called on investigators to emphasize or- 
ganized-crime activity on Wall Street. 

•McCormick & Co. said it was under investigation by the 
Federal Trade Commission over the way it sold spices. 

• Barnes & Noble Inc. reported a loss for its first quarter of $3.9 
million, against a loss of $5.4 million a year earlier, as sales rose 
17 percent to $595.7 million. 

• U-S. Office Products Co. has agreed to buy Mall Boxes 
Etc. in a stock swap valued at $276.9 million. 

• DuPont Co. agreed to sell its graphics film and offset- 
printing plates business to Bayer AG's Agfa-Gevaert 

Bloomberg, NYT, Reuters 


By Frank Swoboda 
and Don Phillips 

Washington Post Service 


PHILADELPHIA — US Air- 
ways Inc. has told its shareholders 
that in the absence of an agreement 
with its unions to cut labor costs, the 
company has begun diverting mil- 
lions of dollars intended for global 
expansion into other investments. 

The chairman of US Airways, 
Stephen Wolf, told the annual share- 
holders meeting Wednesday that the 
carrier was talking with manufac- 
turers of small regional jets about 
replacing turboprops on its com- 
muter subsidiaries. The money for 
the planes would come from cash 


the airline has set aside to buy wide- 
bodied jets for overseas flights. Mr. 
Wolf said that the airline already 
had diverted $126 million to buy 
back stock from British Airways 
PLC to raise the value of its shares. 

British Airways said late Wed- 
nesday it had sold its remaining stake 
in US Airways for $500 million . 

Telling shareholders that “wo 
simply have not made any progress 
whatsoever 1 ' in efforts to reduce the 
company's labor costs, Mr. Wolf 
said management, with the backing 
of the board of directors, has begun 
the process of downsizing the air- 
line. 

“In the coining months our fleet 
will starr shrinkin g again," he said. 


Mr. Wolf said the airline had built 
its cash reserves to finance plans for 
global expansion, but the lack of 
contract concessions had halted the 
process. 

‘ 'We’ve been stopped from doing 
that and now we've started using the 
money for alternative sources to in- 
crease shareholder value," he said. 

The airline is seeking conces- 
sions in the labor contracts with its 
three major unions: the Air Line 
Pilots Association, the International 
Association of Machinists and the 
Association of Flight Attendants. In 
the absence of new contract agree- 
ments, Mr. Wolf said, the board 
would shrink the airline into a ‘ 'su- 
perior regional carrier." 


CmynMi? Oar Daptartm 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Thursday as concerns about infla- 
tion lifted Treasury bond yields 
close to 7 percent, a level that tempts 
some stock investors to buy bonds. 

* ‘The market’s just flat-out over- 
valued, and bonds are pretty’ at- 
tractive," said Arthur Michel eto, 
chief investment strategist at Bail- 
aid Biehl & Kaiser. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 32,56 points lower ai 
7.258.13. The Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index dropped 3.69 
points to 835.66, with computer- 
chip companies declining most. 
The -Nasdaq composite index fell 
1.16 points to 1,37259. 

The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond fell 9/32 to 95 17/32 for a 
yield of 6.98 percent, up from 6.97 
percent Wednesday. 

Although the Federal Reserve 
Board left interest races unchanged at 
its meeting Tuesday, investors were 
not convinced the economy was 
slowing enough to avoid future rate 
increases. 

“It’s a question of when, not 
whether” the Fed raises rates to 
curb the economy and quell infla- 
tion, even though the central bank 
refrained from doing so this week, 
said Jay Mueller of Strong Capital 
in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin. A 
government report released 


Thursday showed the number of 
Americans applying for state un- 
employment benefits hovering at a 
level that led analysis to expect con- 
tinued healthy job creation in May. 
First-time jobless claims rose just 

5.000 to a seasonally adjusted 

322.000 last week, the Labor De- 
partment said. 

Philip Morris was flat at 4454 
after the Senate rejected an amend- 
ment to raise the tobacco tax and a 

U,S. STOCKS 

Maryland court dismissed some- 
counts in a state tobacco suit to 
recover costs of treating smoking- 
related illnesses. 

Ford Motor fell % to 37 after the 
carmaker said it was comfortable 
with analysts’ average earnings es- 
timate of $1.70 a share for the 
second quarter, even as sales have 
declined in recent months. 

Hartford Life shares rose dosed 
3 % higher at 32(4 in the insurance 
company’s first day of trading after 
an initial public offering of 23 mil- 
lion shares. 

Liz Claiborne rose 1 to 4614 as 
the Needletrades, Industrial and 
Textile Employees Union said the 
women's clothing retailer had 
reached a tentative contract with the 
union effective June 1 . Terms were 
not disclosed. (Bloomberg, AP) 


TRADE: EU Contests Boeing Merger 


Tokyo Officials Talk the Dollar Back Up 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the yen and other major cur- 
rencies Thursday after Finance Min- 
istry officials m Japan suggested 
that the U.S. currency had fallen far 
enough and that Japanese interest 
rates would not rise soon. 

Tokyo is trying to prevent the 
dollar from falling further just 
weeks after sending it into a tailspin 
by saying it was getting too strong, 
traders saidJn 4 PJM. trading, the 
dollar was quoted at 116. 150yen, up 


from 114345 yen Wednesday. 

The dollar began rising after 
Deputy Finance Minister Tadashi 
Ogawa said concerns about the 
yen's “excessive weakness" had 
“completely disappeared." 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE^ 

He also said excessive yen gains 
against the dollar were as undesir- 
able as excessive declines. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsu- 
zuka then said he supported the cen- 


tral bank's low-interest-rale policy 
as a way to spur economic growth. 
Low interest rales can weaken a cur- 
rency by making deposits and bends 
denominated in it less attractive. 

The dollar also rose slightly 
against the Deutsche mark, to 
1.6945 DM from 1.6940 DM. 

Against other currencies, the dol- 
lar was at 1.4120 Swiss francs, up 
from 1.4080 francs, and ai 5.7072 
French francs, up from 5.705S 
francs. The pound dropped sharply, 
to $1.6249 from $1.6447. 


Continued from Page 1 

changes and may well reject the deal 
if Boeing refuses to negotiate before 
a July 3 1 deadline. 

A rejection could trigger an un- 
precedented antitrust clash between 
Europe and the United States, par- 
ticularly if the Federal Trade Com- 
mission approves the deal as part of 
the sweeping restructuring of the 
U.S. defense industry, as most 
American analysts expect U.S. and 
EU antitrust authorities share in- 
formation under a 1991 agreement 
and have intervened on each other's 
territory. 

The EU commission required 
Kimberiev-Clark and Scott Paper to 
get rid of some European operations 
after their merger, and U.S. author- 
ities imposed conditions before al- 
lowing the Swiss companies Ciba- 
Geigy and Sandoz to join forces as 
Novartis. But EU and U_S. authorities 
have never before reached different 
verdicts about a large transaction in- 
volving trans-Atlantic businesses. 


As President Jacques Chirac of 
France demonstrated last week ' 
when he crowned a trip to China by 
winning $13 billion in orders for 
Airbus jets, the aircraft business is a 
highly political global game in- 
volving huge amounts of trade, jobs 
and national prestige. 

Boeing is America’s largest 
single exporter, while Airbus is 
Europe's flagship high-technology 
combine. 

Seven U.S. senators complained 
recently that the EU investigation 
was a biased attempt to help Airbus 
through *e guise of merger reg- 
ulations, and Vice President AI Gore 
promised to take action if Mr. van 
Miert tried to impose onerous con- 
ditions. 

EU officials also recently deman- 
ded to reopen a 1992 agreement on 
aircraft subsidies, claiming that 
Boeing and other U.S. companies 
were exceeding die accord's limits 
on indirect aid via the Pentagon and 
the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 P.II. Close 

71w top 300 most oefire stares, 
up to the dosing on Wdl Street. 

The Ataocknd Press. 

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soih Mgn iim um me Indexes 


Most Actives 
NYSE 



May 22, 1997 

HWi Low Latest Chge Op&U 


Grains 

CDRN(CBOT) 

MOB bu mWmum- cento per bulhd 
-MW 277* Z73 273V- -3ft 124344 

Sep 97 2 65% 241 VS 2SM -1 28,90 

Dec 77 2CW 25916 — 1VA 112X58 

Mrft 249 246% 246ft —1 12X57 

May 78 271ft 263 ■ um —1ft Ult 

MR 275 273ft 274ft -1ft 2,957 

DscR 263ft 242 262ft 3274 

EsLsctes NA WetTl safes 54,125 
Wed's Open M 284,194 off M> 

SOYBEAN MEAL (fflOTJ 
100 tons- ifcAn pw ion 

All 77 288J3Q 2BU0S 28180 -1X0 51485 
Aug 97 27100 26&00 260X0 -1.40 15X61 

Sen 97 25400 24900 249.00 -140 M2 

Oc397 734.00 233X0 23100 -U0 10-461 

Dec 97 22AM 223JM 22190 — MO 19.711 

Jan 98 22150 22000 2000 -iffl 1.710 

Est. softs *A Wed's, sales 26 ,744 
Wed's open M 110742 off 331 

SOYBEAN Ol. ICHOn 
IMHAt-WaparB 

JU97 217J 2198 2163 4-0.18 S1J1B 

Aug 97 23.92 2372 210 *0.14 14212 

Sep 97 2405 2187 2139 +0JD 0500 

0097 244ft 2172 2401 +0.18 1,920 

QPC 97 2425 2(08 243} +0J0 17.885 

Jan 98 2440 2(27 2(36 +OJO 1X73 

Estates NA Wed's. sates 25,148 
Wed's open int 110261 off 15(9 

SOYBEANS (CB077 

5X00 bu minimum. cent* pc*- butte 
Jut 97 859 845 846ft -ft 95X08 

Auo97 830 815 816 —1ft 2X412 

Sen 97 739ft 730ft 731ft -2ft 9.230 

Nov 97 OSVt 688ft it 9 -7ft 49J7P 

Jen 98 699 . 892ft 492ft -1ft 5X10 

Estates NA Wed’s.sates 63.717 
Wed’s open ini 184J92 up 572 

wheat Kaon 

1X00 bu mtrHmum- cent* par bucMM 
Alt 97 3 Mft 374ft 377ft -5 49.486 

Sep 97 m 384ft 384ft —5- 73X14 

Dec 97 403ft 396 397 -4ft 17,214 

MarH 405 398 398ft -4ft 1411 

Estates NA Vtaf*. sates 14.554 
Wed'S open Inf 11J09 off 892 


Livestock 

CATTLE (GMER) 

40X00 ns.- cants nern. 

Jun 97 6550 65X5 6532 +0.10 20,967 

Aug 77 6570 6512 6545 +0.15 37454 

Oct 77 69.12 6167 68.97 +0.12 18X84 

Dec 97 7137 7X91 7137 +832 9471 

Piet) 98 7142 71X0 71.15 + 030 5100 

Apr 98 7325 72X5 73.12 *037 1X76 

Esl. sales 0.9*6 Wed's, sates 10X13 
Wed's open m, 181.147 off 113 

FEEDS? CATTLE (CMBR) 

SUM) On.- ants uerti. 

Mcy97 75J0 7632 7637 -840 1147 

man 7i» 77 jo nua +037 m.ra 

Sep 97 7810 7735 78X5 +850 2X78 

Oct 97 7812 7740 7810 +045 3383 

NOT97 7945 7830 79.45 +0X5 1X91 

JOT 98 79.90 794) 79X5 *030 415 

Estates W7I Wed's. soles 1.954 
Wed’s open ini 20X26 up SI 

HOGS-LaalCMER) 

<CX00 to*.- cents par to. 

JOT 97 8112 8135 8137 -037 I13D9 

JUI97 8U5 81.90 82X5 -852 10X79 

Aug 97 88S 79X2 7977 -845 7X11 

Od 97 7330 7241 7247 -865 5X64 

Dec 97 7TX0 7830 7S40 -035 3X34 

Estates 9,172 Wed's. utes 13X97 
Wed's open w a 1.183 off 95? 

PORK BE1IJ75 (C16ER) 

4BX0S lb*.- etnlk oer b. 

MOV *7 9335 92X0 9375 +132 197 

Jul97 94.75 92X5 94.15 +810 44H 

Aug 97 91X5 9175 9315 ‘075 1.174 

Esi. sales 43*0 Weds, sales 3341 
Wed's open M 8X71 up 23 


Food 


COCOA (NCSE3 

10 metric tans- SPtv Km 



Stock TatHes Exptafned 

Sites Agues me unamdoL Yeartf highs and lows reBW «« pimtous EweiBa phis the cunent 
wedto but n a iilielole M liad t nBday-WlietegspWorstecklMdendanounangloiSpeiBerttor mane 
Ins been pdd, 8w hW+tow mnaecawi dividend one shown lorihe new sknteonir. Uitess 

o- dividend also eidn) Cs}- b - anmwl rale ol dftfctend ptes dock dMd end. c ■ Bqutdoilnfl 
dividend, tc- PE exceeds 99xM - cafled. d - new yenift low. dd - lass ta the tasil2 months. 
• - dividend declared or pold.in pnoeOng 12 monm*. I - annual rote. Increased on last 
ttedoipdoa g-divitlend in Conoid funds, subjeqal^ nOT-resIda^ to. i- d ividend 
dedarad after 5pflHniorsloOidM<tenAi-dMdaia gold I hb year, oin Bled. deferred, or no 
action token at latest dividend meeting, fc - dMdend d«2 awd or paM M ils Year, m 

accumulative issue with dividends in arrears, m- annual rate, leducedon krst declaration. 

a ■ new Issue in ftrepastH weeta. TBe high-low range Begins srtfifttestatrftaafing. 
Bd-neiddigdeilveiY.B-inlteldivWend,i)nn»ratn»ui* nnwrwP/E -imte-«gning8niHo. 
B-Oosed-CTd muted tent r-iflvMcnddedaiedwi^ to preasfin^2nwnffiMliisflBck 
dMdend. s - slack soft Dhrtderto beglrw itote d sptttste-sales. t -dvtdaidp«dd h 

stock in preceding 12 months- estimated easBudue on ex-dftrtdendorex-tfefttailiijn date. 

a-newvwrtytdgh.y-lnidtoghafleilirt-hBflnttvpitrorracelwraMpybetnBieBrgontied 

underttteBonknmtwAaorsecurfllraossuoied^suCTComnorifc'^wtienfflatBliuted. 

wi - when Issued? snr - wtm warrants, x - e*-<JMd«nd J* »«ehts. )». - es+dWribuiion. 
xw - witlteut wortonis. e*-dhridend nnd sate* m ML fU • y*Md. 1 - sales in hft 

< 


Jul 97 

MM 

14*0 

1463 

-23 

32X17 

Sep 97 


1490 

1493 

-Jf 

13X05 

Dec 97 

1SS2 


1526 

-10 

IBJ86 

Mm 98 

1577 

1550 

1551 

—18 

287H 

Mov 98 



1573 

-18 

8531 

Jul «8 



1593 

-18 

507 


— 6317 WWTiateS *47* 

WetfsopenM 96389 up 1435 


Higli Low Latest Qige OpM 
ORANGE JUKEMCTN) 

15X00 Ik.- cento per B>. 

All 97 8470 80X0 1070 +035 16325 

Sep 97 8670 8100 8445 +815 7,196 

Nov 97 8865 EL25 8730 +845 3427 

Jot 98 S®55 K00 8975 +075 1X87 

Ed. sites NA Wed's, soles 1,730 
Wed'S OpenH 29764 off 287 


Metals 

GOLD (NCMX) 

100 nov at- ObUcn pertravts. 

MOV 97 34Z8Q -830 1 

Jun 97 34(20 34270 36U0 -850 54379 

JUI97 34A5Q -850 

Aug 97 346X0 345X0 34570 -0X0 27404 

Oct 97 34800 34820 34850 -860 6.960 

Dec 97 352X0 35IJB 351J0 -860 22446 

Feb 90 25(00 35300 354X0 -860 6418 

Apt 98 356X0 -060 3X33 

JOT 98 359X0 -860 

Esl. sites 43X00 Wed's, soles 21,187 
Wetfs open W 1»4H off 42 

M GRADE COPPBl OKMX) 

23X00 lbs.- certs peril. 

May 97 12820 11820 119X0 +875 

An 97 119X0 HITS IWJK +075 

Jut 97 11970 117X0 11895 +875 

Aug 97 117X0 10770 11825 +0X5 

Sep 97 11470 113X0 113X5 +820 

OCT97 112X0 11TJB0 111.95 +805 

Nov 97 111X0 11815 11815 

Dec 77 109X0 70865 108X5 -0X5 

Jan 98 107X0 106X5 106X5 -0X5 

Esl. sides NA Wed's, soles 6X01 
Wed'S open M 61X46 off 249 

SAVER QKMX} 

MOO trey az.- ants per tow at. 

MOV 97 469X0 465J0 465X0 -1X0 69 

Jun 97 465J8J — 1J0 2 

Ju/97 470X9 446X9 467X0 -179 <0X53 

Sep 97 47450 472X0 47270 -1X0 6JBB 

Dec 97 481.00 47850 479.90 —1X0 7X03 

JOT 98 4)2X0 -1X0 17 

MOT 99 487X0 «6J» 487X0 -1X0 7.964 

AtovW 492X9 —1.70 2709 

Esl. sales 7X00 Wed's, sates 6X31 
Wed's open ed 90X75 up 307 

FUITBIUM {NMES1 

<P My ez. - daHm par Mw ez. 

JUI77 XiMB 386X0 389X0 -3.10 14X68 

OcT97 391X0 386X0 387X0 -440 4J80 

Jan 98 388X0 -440 1X00 

Esl. sales NA Wed's, sales 1X11 
Wed's open irt 20X66 off 265 


Close 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
DoOwspermelrlcrDn 
Atentewra CW ^Gtoted 


Previous 




1629X0 1635ft 1636ft 

1639ft 1640X0 1650ft 1651 ft 
Calked** (Higb Grade) 

2619ft 2621ft 2586ft 2588ft 
2522ft 2523ft 2507X0 250800 


636ft 629X0 630X0 
644ft 64800 641X0 


Soot 635ft 
Forward 644X0 


Tie 


7525X0 7535X0 7465X0 7475X0 
7635X0 764800 7580X0 7505X0 


Spot 5715X0 5725X0 5725X0 5735X0 
Forward 5765.0Q 5770X0 577800 5780X0 
High Grade) 


Soot 1347ft 1348ft 133314 »3SP4 

Forward 13*6X0 1368ft 1354X0 1355X0 

High Low Close Chge Opint 


■ECUKSE) 

“kU^BIOO MOJO 
23UD 22625 229.95 
202.15 197X0 199X5 
188X0 WJ» 18135 
177X0 1 75X0 17545 
18220 Wed'S, sates 
nirt 38217 Off 97 


*7 JO 15.157 

♦ 4.90 7^4 
*170 ite 

♦ 0J5 1.982 

+246 410 

18756 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 <NCSE) 
litpaaen.- cenWDvrta _ 

Julf? 1121 1894 11.06 —0X9 78657 

aan nx* lVl J8*7 -xos o.ns 

Mar 98 1890 1875 10JB -8M 24.794 

Mtov90 10X0 1070 107J -0X2 6X41 

Esl sates 71X39 Wed's, sates Pi 
Wed's opened 152X28 UP 332} 


Financial 

US T. BOLLS (WEB) 

SI i+VOIon-ptaol ipopd. 

Jun 97 KM MX2 94X3 -0X1 SX73 

Sep 97 MJB «C£5 MSS MSS 

Dee 97 9440 S47 

Ed. soles NA Wed’s, sale* 1.150 
WedTsapenM 9.931 off 173 

5 YR- TREASURY (CBOTl 
SieO.OOQnfrxptsB.MttH of IDO «* 

Jun 97 105-25 1QS-1S 105-17 — 07 302.573 

Seo97 IK-10 105-02 10S-W —06 »X45 

Dec 97 104-50 —07 277 

Ed. Mies NA Wed's, soles 70.725 
MteftooenM 227X95 up 3509 

IB YR. TREASURY (CBOD 
iiHMoto-ttssniaei ipoki 
Jun 97 IQ7 -07 106-30 107-01 — M 290471 

5eo97 104-23 104-14 106-17 —05 64.945 

DtoCf7 106-00 104-0* 104-04 —OS 1X54 

Ed.M les NA wed's, sites 1 03X47 
wwrsgpenirt 341481 up 231* 

US TREASURY BONOS (CBOT] 

iBpct-SIOtUm-pHe. Xtrataat IHpctJ 

Jun 97 109-11 106-30 109-02 -07 432,149 

SBPW 108-31 1IB-1B 108-22 —06 785*9 

Dec97 IDS-16 108-06 IIB-Oe -07 2SX44 

Mor9| 107-30 —07 2X88 

B^Jtes NA Wed’S, sain 528504 
Wed's open tfv 537 JI3 off |JM8 

LIBOH T-MOKTTfICMB?) 

SlmflfrDn- ah et too pet. 

JotW *430 94J9 94.79 

Jld97 0(22 0420 

AllO 97 9416 9414 9(15 

Ed. sates NA Wed's, sate 28644 
wetfsapenirt 28400 off 20640 
LONG GILT CLIFFE) 
esagoo As&Bndie(100pci 
JU tm 112-30 111-21 llKM - im mm 
Sep«7 113X3 111-30 112-S -lS 3 l52D 
E* stesr 158M9. Prev. sate: us in 
Ptev open let-- 206X27 OH 23.273 


tflgh Law Latest Chge Opint 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFEt 
DM250X00- ptsof lOOacl 
Jua97 101X5 inia 100J3 -850 244.940 
sep97 100X3 99X7 101.15 -852 31X56 
Esl sales: 34&I0& Prev. sales 320X94 
Ptev. open Int: 276466 off 11178 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LIFFE) 

ITL 200 ralBon- pis of lotted 
JOT97 I2SU3 12930 129X5 -1X0 97X82 
5«p97 13094 13000 129X5 -1.04 H714 

EsLMtes 79204 Prev.sdes 95260 
Piev.npenltA 11229* off 4739 

18- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF] 
FRSOaOOO-ptsaflOOpcf 
Jun 97 129X0 1287H 12&B4 — QJ4159.104 
Sep 97 127X0 127X8 12726—874 14,620 
Dec 97 97.12 97.12 96X6 —074 0 

Est. volume: 231.779 . Open bitj 171724 off 
4737. 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 


High Law Luted Chge OpM 

JTO98 93X2 9102 93XZ —810 

Seff98 9X89 93X0 93X0 —810 

EsLsafeK 4(599. Prev. sate 49X02 
Prev. DpenlnL.- 321X48 up 1.937 

Industrials 
COTTON 2 (NCTH) 
nX00 •».- cents pert). 

Jul97 72X0 73X2 72X1 +849 36X77 

0072 7425 73X5 74.IJ +841 3X75 

Dec 97 75JQ0 7(7S 74XS +a3 25X52 

Mar 98 74.15 76X5 7L18 +835 3X74 

MW 98 74X5 74X0 74JB +0JS 928 

Ed. soles NA Wed's, sites 5X87 
Wed's open W 73X85 up 4M 


6.995 

Jun 97 

94.1a 

9(16 

9417 

445.173 


JW97 

9409 

94X8 

MOB 

11095 


Sep 97 

9196 

9191 

9195 

468.184 


Dec 97 

9173 

93X7 

9171 

—0X2 358313 


MorW 

9162 

9356 

9199 

—802 263X19 

1X0 

3X97 

33,725 

1,770 

6510 

1X70 

1.171 

8734 

507 

JOT 98 

93-51 

914S 

9148 

—0X3 227,716 

Sep 98 

914) 

913* 

9139 

—0X2 171,756 

Dec 98 

93JD 

9125 

9328 

-0X2 124X24 

Mm 99 

9328 

9123 

9126 

— OJH 96X31 

JOT 99 

9323 

9119 

9121 

-802 98847 

5®9? 

9111 

9114 

9116 

HUB 66X30 

Dec» 

mo 

not 

93X9 

-0X2 48767 

Ed. softs NA 

Wed's, sales 

445X56 

Wed's open fait 

2X93X05 UP 

6940 


BRITISH FOUND (CMER) 

63JOaoojntf. t par mum 
All 97 1X476 1X220 1X226 42X51 

Sep 97 1X380 1X190 1X200 6X69 

Doc 97 1X172 lit 

Ed. sites NA Wed's, softs 18760 
Wed's open fa* 49X36 up JIM 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBR) 

100X00 dollars. S per Cite. Or 
Jun 97 J327 7296 7301 57J39 

Sep 97 7362 7340 7345 7X87 

Dec 97 7396 7380 7383 1X44 

Ed. sites NA Wed's, sales 8736 
Wed's open M 67X47 off 1123 

GBIMANMARK (CMER) 

125X00 marta, I per morh 
JOT 97 X936 -5888 X914 76X30 

S«P 97 J774 SMS X9S3 4X47 

Dec 97 X993 519 

Ed. sales NA wed's, sates 25,230 
Wed's open ml BUOB off 1221 

JAPANESE YEN (CMS?) 

114 monemven. S per lODvcn 
Jun 97 X8t0 J627 X654 85X74 

SQP97 X8R0 JJSj 5M4 

Dec 97 XB95 X878 X884 790 

Eststfes NA Wecrs.sates 31.235 
Wed's open M 9U39 off 2984 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 VSXOO trend. Spec (rone 

JOT 97 71 a 7059 7099 47,382 

Sot 97 7219 .7140 7176 4X31 

Dec 97 7274 7274 72S5 442 

Ed. soles NA Wed's, soles 71,126 

Wed's open fan 52X07 up 1981 

MEXICAN PE50 (CMER) 

SBOXDO posps. f per psan 
Jim 97 .12610 .12575 .12600 I6X?6 

Sep W .121® .72710 .17}-® J8.2SS 

Dec 97 .11710 .11*77 .11697 8731 

Ed. sites Na Wed's, sate 6X77 
Wed’s open ire 35X57 off 1ST 

ShMOHTH STERLING ttJPFEJ 
CSOOOOQ-lteonOOpd 

9342 9143 -801 117.675 

9115 9117-0X110030 

93X1 92.96 9197 — 0X3 98689 


HEATMGOB- (NMBZ) 

4IX00*oL cants per od 
Jun 97 58JB 57JS 9X0 +825 
M92 5815 9X0 9X5 +817 

AU097 58X0 58.15 5830 +817 

Sep97 59JU 58S0 5890 +817 
CW97 S9Q 9? JO 59X5 +817 
Not 97 6860 59.75 6828 +817 
Dec97 61.10 M30 6825 +817 

■S" 98 61X0 61X5 61X5 +817 
Fte98 6890 6860 68i +ai7 
Esr.stej NA Wed's sate, 27X84 
WM-saomiie 135X61 Off 829 

UGHT SWST CRUDE (NMQQ 
1X00 ML- donors ner bbL 
XH97 22X8 2)76 21X3 

AW97 22X8 2176 21 XS 

toW 21X0 21X8 2374 
pan 2173 21X9 21X4 

Nw97 21X6 Z1>G 21X6 
Dec97 21X6 2131 2131 

toW 2133 2130 2132 
FeDW 21.23 21.12 2133 

MOT9I 21.14 21X7 21.10 

Apr98 21X3 11X0 21X0 
Esl. sites NA Wed's, sales 84X96 
Wed's mot H 84X96 off 31996B 

NATURAL GAS (NMBU 

lMHimi Mu's. Spar mm Mu 
X«97 2350 2.185 2.196 
Jul97 2JOB 7-71 D 2324 
Aug97 >ten £235 
Sea 97 2340 7m >+»■: 

CM 77 J365 1225 2335 

Now 97 2350 2320 2320 

0« 97 2X70 2X43 2X4$ 

Mar* 2370 Z2S5 2255 

NA Wed's. sates 38150 
Wed's opened 30BX17 up 597 

UNLEADED GASQUNE (NMER) 
njxo oat aen+j per aal 
JOT 97 6730 64.15 6693 

-M97 65X0 64X5 65.10 

Auo 97 6UD 63X5 6884 

to97 63.10 62X9 625* 

OU97 mo 6447 £0.-® 

Now 97 59X0 59X4 »X4 

Dec 97 2930 — «„ 

Ey .wtes HA Wed’s sales 33,731 
Wed's wen W 92326 w 480 

GASOILAPE3 

Li X. dollan per metrician - lots of 100 tan 
Jun97 179X0 17735 179X0 +2.75 Ji 1 
JUI97 1 0035 1 78X0 179X0 +2X0 1^ 
Aun 97 181.50 180X0 18135 +235 U 
Say 183X0 182X0 182.75 +2X0 S 
M97 184X0 183X0 184X0 +2X0 4J 
NOT 97 N.T. N.T. 18535 +2X0 1J 
Dec 97 186X0 18535 18635 +135 7; 
Ed. soles; 14778. Open fadj 67X74 va ; 
BRENT OIL OPE1 

^ 23"°” per h® 1 * 1 ■ *** °* 1X00 bam 


21X59 

36X53 

17,974 

9X81 

8195 

7371 

18445 

8001 

3X04 


—0X3 1183 
-8X2 46X 
-002 29,91 
i7x; 
+0X4 16X1 
—009 37X1 
+0X2 

+0X1 731 
— 804 4X1 
—006 811 


1W 


+0x0 303: 

+031 33,71 
+0.12 10X3 
+007 4X1 

— 0X7 173 
-888 14! 
-0.10 IR 


JimW 

Dac97 

MOTH 

Jup 98 

Sep98 

DecM 

M*99 

Jud 99 


S E -aos «'*«• 

74 92.20 9231 —806 4XI4S 

9230 92X2 9163 -0J» J1JJS 

W n» 5? -aio 2ie^ 

92X5 9256 92X0 —.811 18X00 

92X4 92X3 92X4 -811 lljS 

Esl. sales: 90X05. Prev. sales: 88*54 
Prev.epentefj 529X57 off 2746 

3-MONTH EUROMABK (LIFFE) 
DMinOlOT'WiOflOflBcl 

9678 9680 UiWl 232757 


July 97 
Aug 97 
S«P7 
Oa 97 
Nov97 
Dec97 
Jan98 
FftWB 


20.08 20.18 +0X5 811 
M32 20.10 2817 +805 343 

S TS +a03 w 

M34 »XS 2812 +0X2 74 

onl? SHU 2100 +0-02 60 

22-13 19.98 20X1 +0X2 111 
19.93 19.91 UnctL £1: 
79X9 79X9 19X0 -A0Z 


Am97 

JM«7 

Align 

5eo« 

De<97 

Mam 

Junes 

ScpOB 

Decte 


14X86 

7X83 

3XW 


«T - ut' &£ UnaL lX4C 
N.T. N.T. 96.77 UnctL 0 
9674 9431 9&.7J — 0X1 20889 1 

9660 9654 9657 — n in tk m, 

*645 9640 9642 —8IQ 218055 

K 94-28 9622 *623 —005 154X69 

9600 frup 

95.74 +537 -a£ M3K 

Estates: 232.736 Prn. soles: 16877S 714 * 3 
Prev.epmlnL: 1X50X33 up lMJB 

3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF) 

PF5 mUton - pts of 100 pel 
Jun 97 96X1 9645 9647 — 0.04 46735 
Sep 97 96X1 9a.45 9647 — 805 56*267 
Dec 97 94X8 96.43 96X3 -oSSot 
Mot 98 96X0 9634 96X4— 0X7 28X82 
Jim 98 9627 9621 9622 — 0X7 26489 
S«P 98 «.ll 96.06 96X6 - 0X7 2UWS 
Dec 98 95.90 95X6 95X4 - 0X9 15X86 
Mar 99 95x7 95X0 9SX0-0J0 M4? 
Jun 99 95X7 9SX0 9SX0 - 0X9 7M1 

X&l* 1 ' n - am ‘ °** n * n1 ' 761.769 up 

3-MOM TH BUROURA (UFFE? 

ITU mUm-pbaMOOpd 
JOT9J WxO 9134 9135 —0X3 101167 

SfpW W.77 9164 91X4 — 806 9fi,9J2 

Dec97 WJU 9177 9177 -8W nm 

MnrW 93.93 918J 9U2 -am 34® 


Est sales: 31,755 Open lnt:l67X47up 7,51 

Stock Indexes 

SSFGCMMP. INDEX (CMER) 

Jun 97 84640 83540 837X0 — 410 1*61, 
to W 8S2X. 84620 Bg| =S ’ft* 

S2SJP 

m ElOOftJFFQ 
E2S pw Index poW 

Jun97 46^0 46160 46610 + 80 781 

nS« iSS-S ■£«LS +9X if 

D9IS7 47480 47480 474«j) + 10X 5 

Estates; 12X16 Prev. soles: 18X48 
Prev. open lot: 76X79 up 1X88 
CAC40 (MATIF) 

Jun 

siss seta** 

& Vt V P£ awx- 46X0 11.9: 

£w u N - T - 274J X- 46X0 4J 

Mar 98 H.T. N.T. 27645-46X0 7,91 

Z577, M V0,Ume 3ZCaX 0pen lnf - 7S.WS I 


Commodity Indexes 




■jt 

J8 


Moody's 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures 
CRB 

. SauKaeMatn. 


One 

1X11.60 

NA 

16147 

251.94 


PmW« 

1x06X0 

•SB 

25137 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAX MAY 23, 1997 


RAGE 15 


Czech Currency Slumps 
Oh Economic Concerns 

tJ Centra l Bank Moves to Defend Koruna 


EUROPE 


Prague' — ^ 

J^CzeCN^S^ 
speculators escalarM 

<k* koruna ^pping 
“|»al trading amid widening con- 
cenis about a government reshuffle 
anda worsening economy. 

an J^L k< i2 na f u U the dollar 

^r^K De t UlSChe msuk befo« the 
cenORl bank stepped in to buy the 
^ency and pushed it back up. In 
late trading in New York the dollar 

25,*™** 30.36 koriiny! down 
from 30.43 koruny Wednesday. 

It s a real war.*’ said Petr Kor- 

? f ^ corporate bond desk 

?c^ k ^ ovenska Obchodni Banka 
aj» in Prague. 

dowru although the decline also has 
been fueled by Czech citizens with- 
drawing koruna savings to buy hard 

Panel Urges 
Kremlin to Kill 
Spending Cuts 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — The budget 
committee of the lower house 
of Russia's Parliament asked 
the government Thursday to 
withdraw its draconian plan to 
cut spending by more than 100 
trillion rubles (SI 738 billion) 
and said deputies should con- 
sider other ideas. 

The Itar-Tass news agency 
quoted Duma deputies as urging 
the chamber, which is domi- 
nated by Communists, to con- 
sider an alternative put forward 
by a group of deputies when it 
debates the issue Friday. 

It was not clear whar altern- 
atives the budget committee was 
f talking about, but many deputies 
are attracted by tbe idea of doub- 
ling the money supply, viewing 
it as a way to pay off wage i 
arrears and ease the finan cial 
pains of die population. ( 

Ministers and central bank i 

officials say this would only i 

rekindle inflation. 1 


s to Defend Koruna 

currency, Mr. Korous said. The min- 
i ister of industry and trade, Vladimir 
Dlouhy, blamed the koruna's fall on 
1 Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus's fail- 
; ure to * ‘provide a clear signal’ ’ that 
■ the government was in control of the 
: situation. 

Mr. Dlouhy. who belongs to a 
• party other than Mr. Klaus’s within 
‘ the ruling coalition, said investors 
had a negative image of the Czech 
i economy because wages had grown 
' faster than productivity, contribut- 
ing to the nation’s ballooning trade 
deficit and creating “criminality 
and bribeiy.” 

Mr. Klaus said he would discuss 
with the central bank governor, Josef 
Tosovsky. “symbolic” actions that 
could be taken to help the currency. 

Mr. Klaus was scheduled to meet 
with the government's three coali- 
tion parties to discuss a cabinet re- 
shuffle. Traders said a change in the 
government would have little effect 
on the currency. 

“The volatility is so high right 
now. you can even name Mickey 
Mouse as minister of finance and 
simply keep up the fight with the 
central bank.” Mr. Korous said. 

The koruna's decline continued 
even after the Czech National Bank 
last week raised the Lombard rate, 
which acts as a ceiling on interest 
rates, to 50 percent from 14 percent. 
Since then, overnight rates have 
climbed as high as 690 percent. They 
averaged 197.5 percent Thursday. 

Local traders and investors have 
made forecasts of devaluations 
ranging from 15 percent by year-end 
to as much as 20 percent by the end 
of June. Central bank officials have 
said they remain committed to a 
strong and stable koruna. 

But foreign investors, mean- 
while. are seeking to get out of 
Czech equity and fixed-income po- 
sitions, analysts said. 

“In the short term, investors are 
caught between the devil and the 
deep blue sea.” said James Oates, 
director of Eastern and Central 
European equities at Union Bank of 
Switzerland. “Either the Czech 
crown devalues, and so their in- 
vestment falls by that amount, or it 
doesn't devalue but interest rates 
stay very high, and the performance 
of their equity holdings is likely to 
be very pom:." 

( Bloomberg , Reuters) 


Bonn Seals 
Jobs Pact 
To Bolster 
The East 


C Tlr Suff Fi.ua 

BERLIN — Faced with high 
unemployment in Eastern Ger- 
many despite heavy government 
spending. Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl unveiled a plan Thursday to 
encourage investment and create 
100,000 jobs a year in the region. 

The plan, which involves gov- 
ernment. labor and business, will 
include tax breaks and subsidies of 
S18 billion over the next six years 
for companies that invest in the 
former Communist East Germany. 

Unions have agreed to grant 
struggling Eastern companies 
more flexibility in applying wage 
contracts, which are negotiated on 
a national level, and West German 
companies are to double their pur- 
chases of goods made in the East. 
The plan also provides fora special 
forum to deal with financing and 
otherproblems. 

“The concrete goal is to 
strengthen the growth dynamic in 
the new states, ’ ’ Mr. Kohl said. The 
investment and jobs pact came as 
two economic institutes published 
reports of survey spredicting further 
economic stagnation in the East. 

The German Economics Insti- 
tute, based in Cologne, said compa- 
nies in Eastern Germany, partic- 
ularly in the building sector, aid not 
expect improvements in growth, 
employment or investment The Ifo 


Investor’s Europe 






Frankfurt 

DAX 

3300 

3500 



O J F MAM 
1996 1997 


London 
FTSE 10 0 

4800 

4600 

4400 

4200 -Jf 
4000 W— — - 
3300 r. nr 


Parts 

Index CAC 40 

3000 



fibrin. Bm-rtv Rnom 


Dieter Schulte, left, making a point Thursday to Dieter Hundt. 


economic research institute in Mu- 
nich, meanwhile, said companies 
in tbe East were less optimistic in 
April than in March. 

Unemploymeni in all of Ger- 
many has reached record levels 
this year, but the rate in the East is 
nearly twice that of the West: 173 
percent in April, compared with 
9.8 percent in the West and a na- 
tional figure of 1 1.3 percent. 

Mr. Kob! acknowledged that the 
plan would require sacrifices by 
companies in the West but saia 
they were necessary, and he chas- 
tised Westerners who continued to 
complain about the price they have 
had to pay to absorb their former 
Communist rival. 

Mr. Kohl said that if the pro- 
gram worked, segments of it could 
be extended to the rest of the coun- 
try, which is struggling to meet the 
challenges of the global economy. 

Since unification in 1990, Bonn 


has invested about S90 billion a 
year in subsidies, tax breaks and 
support payments in (be East, hop- 
ing to spur investment and raise 
living standards there. 

In reaction to the plan. Dieter 
Hundt, bead of the federal um- 
brella group for employers’ as- 
sociations, spoke of the need for 
lower labor costs, while his coun- 
terpan on the union side. Dieter 
Schulte, insisted there would be no 
wage freeze. {AP. Reuters, AFP ) 

■ VW Workers Want a Raise 

Volkswagen AG 's chief labor 
negotiator said Gentian workers 
would seek a wage increase greater 
than the 1.8 percent recommended 
by their national union when talks 
resumed next month. Bloomberg 
News reported from Brussels. The 
1 .8 percent level was set out in a pilot 
agreement between the auto compa- 
nies and the IG Metall union. 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Srusaela 

Frankfurt 

Copenhagen 

Helsinki 

Qato 

London 

Madrid 

MBan 

Paris 

Stockholm, 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Source: Telekurs 


AEX 

BEL-20 

DAX 

Stock Market 
HEX General 
OBX 

FTSE 100 
Stock Exchange 
M1BTEL 
CAC 40 

sx te 

ATX 

SPI 


MAM 6-uu D J F M A M- 
1997 1996 1997 

Thursday Prev.' %■ 
Close Close Change 

80084 60aS3 . -0.38 : 

2£4&54 2,247.83 -O.10 
3,579.42 3,596.09 -0-46 

577.22 581.24 ‘ -0-69 

.3,092.12 3.097.71 -0.48 
627.05 623^i • +0-60 

4,651.80 4,642.00 -*0£f 
556.10 560.10. -071 

12,41000 12527 -0.93 

2,741.85 2,788.35 .-1.80 
3,03506 3,028.93 40£1 
1,287.19 1,290.11 -0.23 
3^66.80 3,258.35. -005 

liucnunonal Herald Tnbune 


Italy’s Senate Clears TV and Phone Rules 


Bloomberg News 

ROME — The Senate has ap- 
proved a television and telecom- 
munications bill that sets up anti- 
trust rules for television and die sale 
of the government’s stake in Tele- 
com Italia SpA. 

The legislation would force Me- 
diaset SpA, owned by former Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s Finin- 
vest SpA, and RAL the state-owned 
television network, each to cut the 
number of terrestrial channels they 
own to two from three. But it also 


offers incentives for them to enter the 
satellite-television market. RAI and 
Mediaset account for about 90 per- 
cent of Italy's television audience. 

The bill, which must still pass die 
Chamber of Deputies, ends months 
of wrangling between the center-left 
government and the opposition led 
by Mr. Berlusconi. 

One of the main components of 
the legislation is the creation of an 
independent regulatory authority to 
oversee the phone market, which is 
dominated by the state monopoly. 


Telecom Italia. The government 
cannot sell its stake in Telecom until 
such a body is established. 

The law calls for Telecom Italia to 
make its network available to rivals 
seeking to provide basic phone ser- 
vices, bringing Italy into line with a 
European Union directive that ab- 
olishes national telecommunications 
monopolies as of Jan. 1. 

Passage of the bill lifted Media- 
set’s shares, which closed up 50 lire 
at 7,700 i$4.64). Telecom Italia 
shares fell 65 to 4,625. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday, May 22 

Prices In load currencies. . 

TetBkws 

High Low dost Piw. 


Amsterdam ae xmrmij 

PmkvKDUl 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Akzo Nobel 
Boon Co. 

Bote Wesscvo 

CSMcva 

DonflschePef 

OSM 

EtaUr 

Forth Amw 

Gotranlcs 

G-Bracaa 

Hopemejw 

Htfneken 

Hoomwenscw 

Hunt Doughs 

INC Group 

KLM . 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NedlltwdGp 

Nutrida 

WtoGrtnten 

JpUBEhC 

itarXwHdfl 

Robeco 

KoaamcD 

RoUdcd 
R oranto 
Raw! Dutch 
Unwvercm 
Vendor Intf 
VNU 

waters KJ era 

Bangkok 

Adv into Svc 
Bangkok BkF 
Kjuixj Thai Bk 
PTTExplor _ 
Stan Cement F 
Stain Com BkF 
IWaavnuia 
T Id Airways 
Thai Farm BkF 

ura cemai 

Bombay 

BoW Auto 
Hlndust Lwer 1 
Hlndust Prttm 
tod Dev BB 
ITC 

MotanngarTel 
Rdfamcelnd 
State Bk India 
Steel Authority 
Tato Eng Loco 

Brussels 

AknanQ 

S arto tod 
BL 
GBR 
Cotoiyt 
DeOKdzeUon 


3i20 15-60 
14440 14240 
148JB0 14490 
243.90 24190 
1T740 11390 
3490 3490 
10490 10130 
3B2 37150 
19433 194^0 
33JD -~WJQ 
71 

4320 42 

44 6*M 
9050 8890 
33050 32630 
9790 92J0 
149 147.10 
8490 8430 

59.10 57 JO 

41.10 -ffi-20 


4790 4690 
29730 295 

241 23990 
11220 li-i-ffl 

97.90 9590 

194.90 188 

17220 171 

4020 40.10 
175*) 17520 
110/50 110.40 
370 347 

38220 37920 
M 103 
44 4230 
23890 23330 


3590 3590 
142.® 14390 
14790 V4730 
34290 
114.10 11290 
3470 3480 
10110 104 

380 379 

19430 19450 
3290 3320 
7890 7890 
4110 6230 
4490 6530 
8930 89 JO 
32430 329.90 
9790 93 

149 148.10 
B4J0 8490 
SB 5990 
4S2Q 40.90 
69-40 6890 
47 JO 4820 
294 294 

24040 23990 
109.90 111.10 
9490 9740 
109 191.90 
171 JO 171 JO 
6020 60.10 
17520 17520 
11040 11020 
34730 34490 
380 381 JO 
10620 10320 
4150 4420 
235 23840 


High 

Deutsche Bonk 9998 

DeHtTekeknm 3925 

Dtcsdner Bank 6320 

Fresentus 356 

FresenlusMed 149 

Fried. Krapp 32090 

Gate 121 

HMetogZiffl 170 

HentadpU 9940 

HEW 487 

Hochflet 77.50 

Haechst 6790 

KntEtndt STB 

Latuneyer 76 

Unde 1245 

Urttnansa 29 

MAN 513 

Monnesmann 724 

Mela«gese«9(lMitl374a 
Metro 173 

MundlRuackR 44S3 

Pieussog m 

RWE 76.10 

SAPgW 32QJD 

Scherfng 17440 

SGLCorbon 2es 

Siemens 9990 

sprtogerCAnO 1500 

Suertzucto 920 

Tlmsen 39450 

vena 10020 

VEW 510 

Vtag 7K7J5S 

VoCtwagen 1142 


Law Close Prev. 
9635 9435 9B.75 
3991 3990 3935 
41 JO 4190 4295 
348 151 357 

14640 148 145.90 

319 320 322 

120 12020 120 
165 145 168 

98 99 97 

487 487 487 

77 7730 7790 
4640 6640 6525 
"86 589 574 

75 751© 7690 
1232 1232 1245 
2720 27.90 2925 
50SJ0 505 JO 51330 
715 714 71230 

3795 3790 36.98 
17190 17190 169 

4335 4350 4375 

46430 464 447 30 

7590 7SJ0 75.10 
314 31430 318.10 
17420 ire.10 17730 
234 240 235 

98.15 9845 9925 
1500 1500 1500 


387 38850 39190 
99.70 9990 99.70 
505 505 505 

770 77330 786 

1124 1127114450 


High Lew dose prev. 


SA Breweries 12925 125 127.75 130 

Soma new 47 47 47 4725 

SasoJ 54 5525 5530 5525 

SBIC 21439 214 214 214 

Tig® arts 7525 75 75 7530 


Kuala Lumpur c erepaiitK iwijj 

mvtotfK 105B32 


High Law Close Prev. 


AMMBHdgs 
Genflng 
Mid Banking 
Mai Inti Ship F 
Peeoro» Gas 
Proton 
PaWlcM 


15J0 15JD 
1290 1190 
2490 2525 


Helsinki hex Me® wim 

R EMBU&. JUT/ -71 


GBL 

GenBanque 

Kredelbaak 

Petroflno 


Royide Beige 
5ocGenB% 

Sotvay , 
Tnaebel 
UCB 


SET Mas 58199 
Prevtoow 896.19 

178 174 174 175 

216 212 212 214 

33 29.75 30 

335 326 320 330 

574 558 564 574 

U4 135 135 144 

3325 3125 31 JS 3175 
3930 3825 M 

129 121 123 126 

125 115 116 TH 

Sees* M Wee 37 »jB 

Prevtoas 373591 

H55J5 840 848J5 ,845 

1062J5 1055 105525 10B 

423 42025 421 424J3 

93J0 9030 9075 93 

42025 42425 41930 
28125 27925 281 2S 935 

OT 287 289.75 291J5 
307 303 305 305J5 

205 2GM 2075 MB 
39630 38B 25 391 39150 

“‘SSESSS 
,J " S 'SM ™ 
SS SSS,1 

14200 144®! 14508 

17W 17» JS 

8300 8270 8300 82B0 

3550 3520 3520 3550 

6640 6510 6598 6540 

2990 ss IS MS 

,-Biu 14075 1«K 14175 

'I 

5070 51 OS M80 

W ^ SS So 0 

s s 

WOOD 95500 96800 5SM0 


EasoA 

Huhtantakl I 

Kendra 

Kesko 

Merita A 

Metro B 

Metiro-SmloB 

Neste 

Nokia A 

Oiton-yittynwe 

OutofcumouA 

UPMKymmene 

Vatmet 


4790 4630 
231 229 

5020 4990 
7430 7390 
IB 1790 
14230 140 

4390 4220 
138 137 

348 346 

210 20330 
104 103 

12490 124 

9090 90 


47 4798 
231 232 

50 49-8® 
74 74 

1790 1790 
142 140 

4290 4320 
137 13830 
348 348 

m 20450 
103 IBS 
124 12420 
9090 89.90 


Hong Kong 

K Prope 
at Asia 
Cathay Pacific 


CK Inftnstroct 
Chino Ught 
atfcPndfic 
DaoHenaB 
FtetPoanc 
Hang Lung Dev 
Hang Seng Bk 
Henderson liw 
Henderson Ld 
HKOihteGas 
UK Electric 
HKTWcaora 


Hutchison 
Hyson DW 
Johnson El Hdg 


Peart Oriental 
SHK Props 
ShunTekHdgs 
SktaLandCn. 

Sth CtomPotf 


Hong Sea* 14Z1 290 
PnW« M23J32 

895 BJO 895 
2735 27.60 2095 
1195 1195 1190 
7675 77 7BJ0 

22J0 2395 2295 
3&S0 3720 37 

4390 4430 4410 
39 39^0 40.10 
995 9.70 9JS 

14J0 14M 1475 
8925 8990 8925 
890 895 8.75 

73.75 7450 7525 
\2M 1230 1235 

27.10 27.15 2795 

1590 16 16 

405 405 4 

219 2K 220 

63 4325 4325 
2450 2595 2470 
2240 2230 22.90 
18.90 19 1B.9S 

49.10 4920 4930 

2-45 295 293 

238 3 320 

9390 §3J5 9450 
/« 4JS 488 
O 845 B-40 

7 7 7.10 

4390 44 64 

3230 3330 32 

19 1930 W.10 


Copenhagen s *j£5SES?5 

ill, 312 314 

S '.Bank _ 
rtshegB 
dan Fob 


I | | | 

W5I912B 10M 1«J 

715 70535 71394 JO 

SSSK S g Bf SS 

S8S> “S-«M S 

- Baffle? . g §5 352 35594 


Market Closed 

The Jakarta stock market 
was closed Thursday for a 
holiday. 


Johannesburg if 


Resorts World 
RotnmunsPM 
Shoe Dotty 
TetekoetMal 


London 

Abbey Nan 9-48 

Ailed DontKa 444 

Anglian Water 6.93 

Atgas 6.15 

AsaaGrmro 120 

Assoc Brftods 594 

BAA 532 

Barclays 1113 

Bass BJ)7 

BATInd 5.90 

Ba‘: Scotland 408 

Blue aide 417 

BOC Group 10234 

Boats 7.17 

BPBInd 390 

BiRAoroep 1235 

Brit Always 730 

BG 2 

Bril Land 6.10 

BritPettn 737 

BStyB 597 

Brit Steel 1J2 

Brit Telecom 5 

BTR 223 

Buiroah Castro! 1025 

Button Gp 134 

Coble Wireless 5.05 

Cndbuiy Schw 533 

Cartton Canun 524 

Coroml Union 736 

Coin pass Gp 497 

CourteuWt 338 

Dbtons 484 

Etodrocoroponents 199 
EMI Group 1235 

Energy Group 592 

Enterprise 08 454 

Fam&donlal 192 

GenlAaldeni 994 

GEC 336 

GKN 997 

GKnoo Welcome 1237 

Granada Gp 9.17 

Grand Met 5J7 

GRE 396 

GreenallsGp <97 

Gubiness 5J7 

GUS 492 

Kays 595 

HSBCHIdgS 1738 

Kl 797 

Imp! Tobacco W 

Klngftiher 720 

Umoroka 228 

Umd See 892 

Lasmo 234 

Legal Genl Grp 495 

UoydsTSBGp 420 

LuatoVUty 111 

Maria Spencer 593 

MEPC 5.10 

MeraHV Asset 1377 

National Grid 238 

Nat) Power 5-47 

IWWest 7.90 

Next 791 

Omnge 2.15 

& S 

RaltrackPP 440 


5JS 

555 

560 

560 

685 

645 

670 

670 

12.10 

11.10 

12 

II 

440 

4J4 

454 

430 

X46 

624 

■jxo 

320 

860 

645 

655 

650 

25 

2420 

25 

25 

640 

605 

640 

Q 

1738 

1650 

1720 

T7JU 

11-10 

n 

1120 

11 

1690 

18 

1680 

1610 

955 

9-45 

950 

955 




Frankfurt 

■ ur a 1305 

ASM 

CaMBHdg 34430 

fif 5 " si 

BBU* »H 

13 

DflhnlwBenz IgW 

Degusse 8110 


DAX: 357992 
Pnvieas: 359497 

1290 1295 1»0 
184J0 18890 184 

357.70 35B M 

1550 1540 1530 

S3 S5 Eg 
■B §JS SS 

isS 6590 4jM0 

» 90 

41 . 41 4120 

1344 1370 13® 

'SS’SS 

1 SS 1 fiS 


AmolgamW Bits 
anjlaAmCod 

SOffl" 1 " 1 

Bartow 

S G. Smith 
iBem. 


UnperWHdgs 

WweCoal 

Johnnies imB 

yteriyHdgs 

lAertyUfc 

yBUte Strtrt 

Minorco 

Monpak 

MBdgir 

RemfanmdlGti 
RWwnwrt 
Rust Ptoflnvm 


30 2990 
300 29430 
248 244 

383JD 30135 
19830 18? 

1430 1425 
4695 46 

2S30 25 

iSS 159^ 

40 39 

3330 32J5 

1930 19-15 
114 11325 
57.75 57 

2995 2995 
397 i ® 

«-73 ® 

350 347^ 
13030 129 

17 17 

ioi ioaa 
17 JO 1730 
90 B9J5 
S90 <695 
63 62X 
7290 71 


30 2990 

rJ iS 

46 .-2 
25 2590 
159J0 14025 

££ 
3290 3390 
19.15 1920 
11325 11390 

57 » 
2995 

105 3.03 

58 59 
34790 

130 131 

17 J7 
loojs mso 
U35 1790 
89.75 » 

*45 

6275 4325 
71 nsa 


R«ri« H <tos 
Rexam U7 

BS 5S £3 

iS 

sad Newcastle 7.12 

Sort Power 396 

Securiew LM 

sevetnTnmt 7J2 

SheBTianspR 1197 

Stobe 992 

Sadtti Nephew 1J2 

SriShKIOte IJ-g 

SmBfts Ind 793 

InSnElK 4.1| 

ehnecotitfl &63 

K 14 * W4 

Thrones Water 49J 


uneewr 

Utd Assurance 4jy 

0WNP« 7 M 

UMUfflWes 595 


FT-SE 100:445190 
Pievtous: 444290 

998 9.18 934 

44B 435 433 

6.8U 499 693 

iM 610 610 

1.18 1.19 130 

594 544 597 

530 591 5-44 

J1.1I UX» 12.13 
792 602 799 

538 537 539 

4 403 4.05 

490 4.15 All 

990 9.91 9.94 

794 7.14 793 

136 338 137 

12.15 1233 12.19 
737 797 

197 1.99 7.99 

597 695 599 

737 732 737 

5J6 595 592 

130 132 131 

14 CHI 450 

2.15 2.14 230 

10.10 1612 1033 

133 134 134 

452 454 5J1 

i38 532 5-42 

5.13 532 518 

733 7-45 737 

458 645 641 

331 333 130 

477 477 495 

194 397 398 

1293 1110 1235 
5-47 535 530 

492 493 682 

142 142 142 

935 940 939 

334 393 155 

9J1 995 9.73 

1116 1230 1235 

9.10 9.12 9.15 

532 530 541 

237 391 MS 

491 493 493 

539 5.70 662 

652 654 494 

540 541 544 

1734 17-44 1731 

7JB 796 790 

491 492 493 

795 7.17 7J37 

140 147 142 

BJ2 894 8J3 

2-48 2J0 149 

445 441 494 

595 614 609 

199 2.83 MS 

494 4.99 695 

591 599 5 

1345 13J0 13J3 
237 238 sth 

5.17 140 546 

7 JO 790 7.92 

7.13 7.16 7.12 

112 113 115 

6 637 634 

792 7.15 796 

131 135 131 

690 692 694 

495 494 490 

642 648 444 

*35 436 4-40 

436 444 440 

838 8J5 642 

110 332 123 

5.95 608 624 

gjU 232 235 

494 677 644 

290 192 293 

9.15 9.14 9.18 

244 149 145 

492 612 610 

1RSS 10J7 1658 

494 499 497 

357 398 390 

358 392 392 

1730 1733 1738 

793 796 798 

392 354 395 

192 293 194 

792 792 773 

I1J8 1136 1191 
945 945 949 

197 1J1. 198 

1041 1052 1054 
740 752 740 

456 All 4.10 
640 440 491 

1602 1612 1619 
450 4JBJ 4JS 
171 174 392 

674 678 493 

4.98 UQ &01 
UB 549 £30 

177 277 2J9 - 

1645 1493 1649 

493 *92 495 

7 JS 790 793 

673 NU 677 


Vodafone 
Whitt rood 
WlDaiMHtlg 
Wotseley 
WPP Group 
Zeneca 


Madrid 

Acerinox 

ACESA 

Aguos Borceton 

Araentorto 

BBV 

Banestn 

BonktiUer 

Bca Centra Htap 

Beo Popular 

Bco Santander 

CEPSA 

Conttnente 

CorpMoptie 

FEC5A 

GasNnhnol 

Ibentroki 

Piyco 

Repsol 

SevUanaEkc 
Tabaariefo 
Tetefonlai 
Untan Fbneso 
Vn lone Cement 


Manila 

AyntoB 
Ayala Land 
Bk Ptifflp Isl 
CiP Homes 
ManflaEkcA 
Metro Bank 
Petron 
POBarik 
Phi Long DM 
San Miguel B 
SM Prime Hdg 

Mexico 

Alfa A 
Bonocd B 
CemeeCPO 
OfraC 


520 

£06 

565 

£1B 


17/ 

610 

2J3 

750 

zn 

610 

2J6 

7.94 

Paris 

112 

105 

11(1 

111 


4/2 

468 

4/1 

470 

Accor 

2X8 

2X2 

2X3 

2X7 

AGF. 


GpoCanoAl 

GpaFBcoroer 

GpoHnlnbutsa 

KMCIaritMex 

TWevtoaCPO 

TeiMexL 


AienmflAssfc 

g Cjarmnltnl 
Fktouram 
dlfiama 


ENI 

FW 

GeneraflAasic 

IMI 

INA 


Medlabanca 

MonledUon 

OOwtifl 

PuiiwJat 

PMH 

RAS 

Rato Banco 
S Panto Torino 
Shrt 

Tetearoinofc 

TIM 


Montreal 

BCD Mob Com 
CdnTbeA 


1698 1670 1672 1697 


Balia todne5S6IB 
Provtans: 54610 

24550 24850 25200 
1835 1835 1340 
5710 5740 S??8 

7250 7300 7270 
loaeo loom 10340 
1570 1585 1490 
24750 24740 25200 
5000 5810 5)00 
33050 33270 33700 
12150 12260 12200 
4990 4990 5100 

2450 2675 2495 
7740 7790 7800 

11210 11210 11340 
1230 1230 1240 

27800 27890 27260 
1805 1820 1705 
2705 2765 Z740 

6100 6J.® 4320 

1395 1405 1390 
7250 74)0 7300 

4235 4270 4220 
1350 1305 1318 
1990 2010 2010 


PSE Index: 258649 
Preview: 253697 

16J5 1795 T675 

17J5 1675 IB 

139 147 139 

640 830 9.10 

87 88 8430 

545 540 550 

6.90 7 7 

a M mi 

725 750 735 

68 7130 47 

670 690 670 


Beta tadee 399794 

Printout: 397442 

4590 4640 4655 
1794 1790 17.98 
am) 2995 29J8D 
1112 12J6 12J0 
3935 3930 3930 
■<HM 47.95 ^.9S 
JJS 1.62 190 

2BJ0 28.90 2070 
2795 2795 2690 
naira iuaa 109.00 
17-44 17.48 17-44 


MIB TWenotlca: 1241090 
Preview: 1252790 
745 11388 11435 11770 
1400 3525 3525 3595 
i&« 4505 4510 457 5 

325 1214 1325 1223 

1750 23200 23500 232SB 
•545 2515 2535 2570 

1390 8270 B3Q5 8375 

•010 8930 8940 9(00 

610 5495 5510 5410 

850 29408 294fffl 29800 
740 15520 15530 15B50 
•405 2375 2405 2395 

500 5385 5385 5480 

790 7650 7700 7450 

400 10120 10130 103S0 
100 1072 107B lie 
530 S37 507 518 

470 9f.vi 7435 

770 3475 3475 3770 

870 13580 13400 13725 
300 17550 17700 1S1D0 
790 10550 10890 10450 
675 8520 8525 0470 

735 4425 4425 4490 

310 5225 5225 5295 


Air Uqulde 
Alaitw AKDi 
AXB4JAP 
Boncnire 
BIC 
BNP 

Canal Plus 
Cairetour 

Casino 

CCF 

CeteJent 

auMtonDtor 

CLF-Daxto Fran 

Credit Agricole 

Danone 

ar-Aqultalne 

Ertdanla B5 

EurodMwv 

Eurotunnel 

GeruEaux 

Haras 

tmMal 

Lafarge 

KT 

LVMH 

LyarcEaux 

MiChetlnB 

Pori has A 

Pernod Rknrd 

PeuBeata 

ptnauM-Print 

Pramodes 

Renault 

Reel 

Rlt-PoidancA 

Sonofl 

g - * 

SGS Thomson 

SteGenerote 

Sodexho 

StGabaln 

Sub 

Sjmthetaba 
Tnojiuon CSF 
Total B 

Us&ror 

Valeo 


High Law Close prev. 


CAW&274U5 
Preview: 278635 

900 8M 084 902 

194 191 JO 194 19430 
925 900 903 925 

704 688 489 701 

381.90 77530 375J0 38130 

730 711 719 732 

910 883 910 918 

262.90 25680 24030 24330 

107B 1052 1052 1073 

2879 3800 3805 3880 

282 275L60 27B 277 

2e4 241.10 24230 24670 
450 430 430 448 

920 093 B93 919 

547 534 543 533 

1302 1302 1302 1300 

929 911 911 925 

425 603 613 59B 

894 879 881 89B 

9 JO 675 675 9 JO 

645 6J0 6*1 645 

BIS 807 BID 814 

438 425.88 428 439 

807 782 7B3 BIB 

395-40 379 382 39470 

975 952 952 971 

2194 2129 2132 2197 

1445 1418 1420 1449 

5B6 575 581 584 

350.90 33330 33330 349 


Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
Hemes B 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
M0D0B 
Noidbcnken 
Phann/Upfohn 
SancMkB 
5conki B 
SCAB 

S-E Banket A 
Skantfta Faro 
SkeisluB 
5KFB 

Sparbonken A 

Sfe iJ t li ypotBkA 
Worn A 
Sv Handles A 
VohoB 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBWng 

BMP 

sarai 

Brambles ImL 
CBA 

CC AmatB 


High Lew Close Prw. 

474 463 470 444 

27930 27330 27730 27350 

244 250 254 248 

675 440 470 443 

385 380 38130 383J0 

250 248 248 250 

248 241 243 244 

263 25630 257 243 

205 204 20430 205 

21930 217 218 22030 

172 170 17030 171 

85 8233 83 84 

25) 24430 251 247 

333 330 331 333 

18030 179 JO 17930 180 

149 147 14730 149 

19» 190 198 190 


1169) 119 

216 220 


AH Onflnariec 2M7.90 
Previous 254620 


640 635 

623 8.13 

1926 19J51 
3J4 3J0 

2180 23JD 
14.12 1183 
14.91 14JB 
699 £93 


639 634 

618 619 
19JIS 19.15 
181 183 

2174 2175 
MB? 1183 
14.91 1683 
£95 6 


Very briefly; 

• Elf Aquitaine SA's shares rose 2 J percent to close at 613 
French francs (S107.83). a company record, after the oil 
concern bought back 0.9 percent of its shares from the 
automaker Renault, raising expectations that it would buy 
back more shares eventually. 

• Britain ordered an antitrust investigation of National Ex- 
press PLC*s acquisition of two regional passenger railways, 
pushing the bus and rail company's shares down S percent. 

• A Bundesbank council member, Oiaf Sievert, said Ger- 
many would manage to cur its deficit enough to meet the 
European Union’s single-currency standards. 

• IfU SpA, the Italian holding company owned by the Agnelli 
family, said its 1 996 net consolidated income rose 17 percent, 
to 338.6 billion lire (S203.8 million). 

• Tbe Netherlands said its unemployment rate fell to 6 
percent, a four-year low, in the three months ended April 30. 

Bloomberg, AP 

VEBA’s ‘Globalization’ Purse 

Caafikd by Our Stiff FmttDapatches 

DUSSELDORF — VEBA AG, a chemicals and energy 
concern, said Thursday it planned to invest 12.4 billion 
Deutsche marks ($7.37 billion) abroad between now and 
2001. 

“Globalization is a must for VEBA,” Ulrich Hartmann, die 
co mpan y’s chairman, said. 

VEBA said Wednesday it had bought a 36.4 percent stake in 
Degussa AG, a chemicals and metals maker, for 2.9 billion 
DM. Separately, Mr. Hartmann said VEBA was talking with 
five telecommunications companies that wanted stakes in its 
joint venture with RWE AG, called O.tel.o. (AFP, AFX) 


flip Xf f b Index pnc&s as at SM> pm Now Voric Una. 

Jan. 1. 1992 = 100. Laval Chang* %cftanga ftartodata 

% change 

World Index 165.59 -0-94 -0.56 4-11.03 

Regional Marne 

Asta/Padbc 122.44 -1.46 -1.18 -0.80 

Europe 174.85 -1.25 -0.71 48.47 

N. America 191.01 -0.43 -0.22 +17.97 

S. America 153.32 +0.75 +0.49 1 +33.99 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 203.36 - 2.12 -1.03 +18.98 

Consumer goods 186.83 -1-90 -1.01 +15.73 

Energy 105.41 -0-36 -0.18 +14.47 

Finance 122.66 -0.51 -0.41 +5.32 

MbceHeneous 168.62 +0.33 +0-20 +4-23 

Raw Materials 184.36 -0.63 • -0.45 +5.12 

Sendee 155.49 -0.09 -0.06 +13£3 

UtMas 142.72 +0.27 +0.19 -0.52 

The mtamaaond Hernia TVtoune World stock IndaxC tracks the U.S. doBarwtiuoe of 
WO ntemat/cnafy mt&aoto stocks Aren 2S countries. Forman tatomuutoa a tna 
hook** to avaBabi* Oy *rVng fvTheTrib Into*. IB1 Avanua Chariee da QaoBe. 

02521 NeuayCedax. Franco. CompSed by Bloomberg News. 


401 39120 397 39960 

30920 30150 30550 30950 

Comrtco 

CRA 

754 

2150 

7.15 

2166 

7.19 

21.10 

730 

21.12 


High 

LOW 

dose 

Prev. 


High 

Low 

ana 

445 

626 

429 

647 

CSR 

452 

4X4 

449 

4X8 

Mitsui Furiosi 

1400 

1410 

1450 

1450 

AMoie 

3DW 

2950 

301* 

2539 

2453 

2490 

2547 

FosJeroBimii 

264 

264 

265 

267 

Mitsui Trust 

822 

BIO 

818 

B19 

Newbridge Net 

53 

4965 

5265 

2145 

2034 

2098 

2134 

Good iruar Fid 
rClAusrroHa 
Lena Lease 

1J2 

JJ1 

1J2. 

1J1 


4310 

4100 

4100 

4340 

3250 

32.10 

32.15 

154 

145 14760 

15450 

12.10 

11.99 

1159 

11.97 

NEC 

1550 

1520 

1530 

1550 

Narcen Energy 

3260 

32X0 

3260 

IAID 

1590 

1400 

1595 

2451 

2445 

2445 

24X9 

Nikon 

1800 

1770 

1770 

1800 

MhemTEtaconi 

115 11265 11365 

19430 

194 

19470 

19760 

MIM Haw 

IM AusBank 

166 

161 

151 

165 

NlktaSec 

709 

491 

70S 

491 

ftoa 

1150 

1165 

114* 

545 

544 

548 

545 

18X8 

1868 

18X5 

1618 

Nintendo 

8430 

8420 

8420 

8490 

Ottsx 

25V 

2£30 

25% 


322 310.10 31020 32120 
1DW 994 998 1005 

443 445 445 443 

495 6B1 481 688 

2815 2743 2744 2010 

BAS 814 816 840 

30930 305.10 30730 30930 


714 

699 

700 

713 

193 78560 

187 

193 

572 

555 

558 

542 


94.10 9110 933t 9170 
371 JO 341 36230 34620 


Not Mutual Hdg 
Havre Crop 
Podfic Donlog 
Ptorewf Inn 
piro BroroJcoM 
St George Bank 
WMC 

WeslpocBkhg 

Wtxxhkto Pet 
Woohrarttro 


161 

169 

169 

168 

562 

5J4 

£76 

563 

352 

3X4 

3X9 

332 

430 

425 

429 

427 

455 

452 

434 

655 

767 

760 

760 

7.93 

857 

610 

633 

617 

759 

7.10 

754 

7.17 

1158 

1690 

1158 

1065 

364 

365 

364 

696 


Sao Paulo Bevenatadwciimso Taipei 

PitHrat: 1071430 


BndescoPfd 
BronmoPfd 
OwitaPto 
CESPPfd 
Copd 
Eletrabras 
ItoubancoPM 
Light Servldos 


nsi 

m 


»p « 

Unibonco 
CVRD PW 


Seoul 


Docam 

Daewoo Heavy 

X rM Eng. 

Mann 
Korea El Rwr 
Korea ExrtiBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LGSenton 
Penang iron Si 
Samsung DNuy 
Samsung Elec 
SWnlwn Bw* 


644 650 

777 JM 78030 
47.2B 47J6 
55.00 5420 
15JD ISjSO 

481.00 48330 

557.00 557.00 
51729 53O0C 
34530 34830 
24030 24B3D 
14530 14530 

3530 

9 JO 9J1 
135J0 TO>i 

14930 15030 

154.99 1403(1 

347.99 35030 
3430 3730 

1.18 1.19 

2434 24J5 


CenposBe Iniiac 77L38 
Previous: 737 J1 

183500 99000 103000 95900 
8270 7410 7610 8270 

19800 19200 19400 19700 
16500- 14000 14500 14400 
24900 243W 24400 27000 
5480 5300 5400 5400 

380000 373000 37BOOO 380000 
34000 33300 33700 34000 
58000 54500 57000 58000 
45200 44100 44100 45100 
43700 61000 42500 43500 
10500 10000 10100 10300 


FUSBanfc 
Formosa Pteflc 
Hua Nan Bk 
Inll Comm Bk 
Nan YoPtasOtt 
SWn Kona LBe 
TahweiSi 

urchvfiaa Elec 
Utd World Chin 


Stock MB rt e tk m n a 815644 
Preview: 802239 

154 151 152 152 

121 119 120 119 

7230 71 72 72 

117 11S50 11430 11550 
3) 3640 3030 3610 

119 11730 liajO 117 
49 45 *a4n #4 . 5 0 

1650 11630 11730 116 

7130 7B 7030 7030 
7250 4930 7130 49 

94 93 93 93 

108 105 104 105 

57 55 54 5530 

7030 &8 7039 4750 

4950 4850 49 4650 


CdnUfliA 
CTFW5VC 
Gaz (Metro 
G+MMUfeco 
imaia 
liwwtamGfp 
LobtowCos 
NaH Bk Canada 
Power Cttp 
power FM 
QwbeoorB 
Rogers Comm B 
Royal BkCdn 




AkerA 

SSSaV 

DennorckeBk 
Etam 
HafskmdA 
KvoemorAia 
Noaki 
Wtroko — , 
NyaxnedA 
OrktoAnA 
- PflHGaoSve 
sagaPanraA. 
scniuM 
TtansoceanOff 
Storebrand Ami 


IwfertMatolMtae 317132 
Preview. 319751 

-90 4350 4190 4450 
6Vi 2420 24 k> 2655 

5U 3105 35.15 35W 

414 34.10 34 Vi 34V. 

50 17.10 1720 1755 
55 271* 2755 277* 

50 39 JB 39 JO 391* 
50 27 JD 27 JO 2755 
50 1690 1690 1850 
AS 1440 1655 16X1 
55 3155 3155 31 Vi 

JO 29M 2950 2925 
JD 25X1 2SJ0 2545 
55 725 725 7V* 

.10 59M 40 5950 


OBX Me*: 42755 
Prevtoas: 42131 

I 13050 132 13IJ0 

i 159 159 158 

1 2350 M 2180 
I 2750 2750 2750 
! 1385 0 139 13750 

44 44 4550 

369 *00 393 

. 340 36i» ( 340 

24550 24550 244 

97 97 98 

400 420 404 

294 298 29S 

135 134 137 

13550 136 133 

448 475 448 

45 JO 45J0 44 


Singapore 

Alia Ftoc Brew 
Cvro&wPac 
cmr.DeMts 


DBS 

Ffoser&Neave 
HK Land" 
jartMalWsn 
jrod Stmtegto 

^JESfd 

PartnvayHagi 
Sembowmg 
Sing Air foreign 
SMflLroid 

StogfrassF 

S*igT»etMnS 
StnoTetecomni 
Tat Lee Bank 
Utd IndulMaJ 
UtdOSeoBkF 

wing Tai Hags 

* in us. doom. 


Straus Tines: 206121 

Prevtoas: 205259 


660 

460 

660 

659 

690 

8JS 

BJS 

860 

12.90 

1250 

1260 

1170 

1490 

1450 

1470 

1440 

078 

0J3 

674 

67/ 

IV 

1830 

I860 

19 

5 

484 

488 

S 

11.40 

11.10 

1150 

11X0 

179 

265 

2.45 

269 

7 

460 

£9i 

665 

368 

164 

364 

144 

495 

460 

469 

£90 

178 

144 

144 

176 

464 

480 

460 

460 

41U 

364 

198 

404 

1620 

1760 

18 

1850 

1050 

9LP5 

96S 

9.90 

670 

£45 

465 

6X5 

£90 

£70 

690 

£tt 

1270 

1140 

12X0 

12.40 

7.15 

7JK 

769 

7.09 

29 

2axo 

29 

2B 

194 

184 

196 

190 

2.53 

248 

752 

2.94 

134 

134 

134 

134 

111 

1.10 

110 

1.11 

1560 

14V0 

1110 

1550 


Stockholm 


AGA8 
ABBA 
AsalOomrei 
Astro A 
ABO* Copco A 
AutoOv 


10350 10230 10150 103 

108 104 107 10550 

230 214 215 220 

344 34050 34250 344 

214 214 215 2T3 

30350 298 299 30050 


Tokyo 

Adnornoto 

AJlNtopMAk 

SU 

AfotiiOrent 
asomgiws 
Bk Tokyo MBsu 
BkVbkohama 
Bridgestone 
Oman 
Oiubu Elec 
□nigolui Elec 
DssSspPrWI 

DcM 

Dd-ldil Kang 

DtrieaBank 

Boi*a House 

DalwaSec 

DDI 

Demo 

East Japan Rjr 
EM 
Fonuc 
Fal Bank 
FuJPnaa 

Hoe^unlBk 

HltocM 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itadiu 

Ito'Yofeado 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jlbco 

Xa|bna 

KoftHlElec 

Kao 

Kovrasna Hvy 
Knwata 
KlnUNippRy 
Kirin Brewery 
Kobe Start 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 

KrauwEl&c 

LTCB 

Manibenl 

Moral 

Matsu Canai 

Mata Elec tad 

Mata Elec Wk 

Mitsubishi 

MRSUMsHOi 

MrtSUMMEI 

MltaUsMEw 


NRM 225: 1917729 
Prevtoas: 1964258 


1200 1100 
775 745 

4390 4t£0 

m 791 

499 487 

1180 1150 

2100 2070 

S79 550 

2440 2570 

2720 2470 
2149 2100 

2040 2030 

2480 2440 

7B9 738 

1380 1330 

440 435 

1400 1380 
834 822 

8730a 8600a 
2850 2750 
5400a 5530a 
2290 2240 
4060 4010 
1480 1430 

4480 4330 

1340 1320 

1130 1110 
1230 1200 
3400 3300 

1400 1380 

493 — 

4820 4440 
544 535 

8900a 8800a 
4250 4170 
444 455 

2290 2210 
1540 1540 
534 523 

158 Mi 


892 882 
579 557 
7720 7400 
2050 2010 
3B3 370 
512 497 
2220 2140 
3340 3250 


1190 1180 

770 779 

4250 4400 

811 791 

699 497 

1170 11« 
2090 2080 

548 555 

2630 2580 

271® 2700 
2140 2100 

2050 2020 

2470 2«ffl 
769 790 

1340 1320 

440 435 

1400 1390 

828 830 

8720a 8470a 
2770 2840 
5590a 5520a 
2250 2250 
«1@ 4040 

1480 1458 

4370 4310 
1330 1350 
1130 1110 
1200 1250 
3310 3480 
T390 1400 

490 
410 430 

4810 4700 
543 535 

0830a 8000a 
4190 4150 
457 446 

22X 2210 
1540 1540 
531 530 

354 354 

701 701 

1170 1180 
224 226 

882 889 

574 
7600 7440 
2030 3000 
379 347 

510 504 

2150 2190 
3310 3230 


K&EJ.’ET* 

Nippon Oil 
Nippon Start 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Nomura 5ec 
NTT 1070b 

NTT Data 4230b 

OT Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Ricoh 

Rflhm 10200 

SaktiTD Bk 
Scnkyo 
sroiwa Bank 
Sonya Etoc 
5ecom 
Sefcu Rwy 
SaktalOrem 
Seklsal House 12*0 

Seven-Eleven 8740 

Sharp 1590 

Shikoku El Pwr 2000 

SNnrizu 
Shln-eta Ch 2540 

sntoetao . 1690 

SMnrofcaBk 1140 

Softbank 7950 

Sony 8385 

SumBorm 1020 

Sumitomo Bk 1500 

Sun* Chem 482 

Sumitomo Elec 1B40 

SumO Metal 299 

SuraB Trust logo 

ToteSwPtwrar mo 

Takeda Client 2970 

TDK 0400 

Tohoku El Pwr 2040 

Total Bank 948 

T0U0 Marine 7470 

Tokyo El Pwr 2290 

Tokyo Electron 4810 

Tokyo Gw 
TokyuCorp. 

Tonen 1420 

Insprai Print 1650 

Tornyind 
Totafoa 
Tostaffl 3200 

Toya Trust 
Toyota Motor 3340 

YUnanoucH 2830 

icxiottteeum 


1040b 1060b 
4220b 4190b 
.720 732 


PoncdnPrttm 
Petra Cda 
Placer Dome 
PocoPrttm 
Potash Sack 
Renabsana 
taoAiaom 
Rogers Cartel B 

ssra^ 

Stone COnsoid 

Suncor 

TaltsmanEmr 

TeckB 

Teiegtobe 

Telus 

Thomson 

Tor Oom B ank 

TransaRa 

TransCda Pipe 

Trimark FW 

TrizecHaftn 

TVXGold 

wwtcoaaEny 

Weston 


30-45 3014 30-15 

2420 2» 24JSS 

2W 25 2S!» 

13.90 IS 1£05 
116 11S40 11S55 

43.95 4ZJ0 431* 

36.90 3650 3650 

25b 25 25 

5420 53.1 i 5420 
571* 57W 571* 

24.15 23.90 2415 
35-45 35.10 35*6 

47 4640 46J0 
30U 3030 3040 
4190 43U 4190 

2410 2330 2350 
3060 30 30.15 

41JS 41JJ5 41J5 
1630 14.10 1630 
24-45 26 26.40 

521* 5220 S2ft 
3035 291* 2935 
645 8J5 B-« 

2440 24 2440 

76J0 741* 76JD 


Vienna aw wem 1217.19 

Preview: 1290.11 

Boehtar-UtMeh 927 894 90520 927 

CretJttanst Ptd 517 510 51430 516 

EA-GeneraB 3Q50 3001 3021 3045 

EVN 16921659.70 14421449.10 

Ftantxrian Wton 512J0 500 50410 Slo 

OMV 1577 1548156750157430 

OwtElefcMz 840 858.90 840 061 

VA Stott 552 54S.10 552 548 

VATedl 2M67S 20453SSBJ5 2055 

Wtooerberg Bau 2450242230 2444 2425 


EA-GenaraB 

EVN 

FkjnhafanWV 


So Wellington H2SE£Mac23Kj4 

Previous: 229420 

Air N Zeal dB 432 432 432 422 

Briefly Invt 135 134 us U4 

Carter Holt onl 3J» ass 3J0 sjs 

FWchQi Btafl 197 M M W 

FtaKhOtEoy 457 4« 450 436 

FfeiCh Ch Fad 1.95 1.92 1.94 152 

Fteicti Cb Paper 118 116 117 116 


MBsertsblTr 

Mitsui 


2120 

2080 

2100 

2150 

1320 

1280 

1320 

1270 

1420 

1370 

1400 

1340 

390 

379 

472 

-385 

387 

487 

480 

487 

1410 

1500 

1400 

1610 

861 

8» 

857 

847 

e» 

BBS 

890 

894 

1570 

1530 

1540 

1530 

1020 

995 

1020 

985 



L 



Toronto 

AbOBri Price 
Alberto Energy 

AJcrei Alum 
Anderson Expi 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nova Scotia 
BanfokGoU 


Btochem Plurm 
BorobonSerB 
BrascanA 
Cameco 

aec 
Cdn NatlRflU 
CdnNat Rm 
C dnOcddPet 
Cdn Podfc 
Comlnco 
Dofosca 
Domkr 

ME*,. 

E riper Group 
EuroNwMng 
Fairta Hnt 

Fatoonbridge 
FtatcberOwflA 
Franco Nevada 
Guv Cda Res 
Imperial 01 
Inw 

IPL Enemy 
LoUtowB 
Loewen Group 
MdCffllBBIdl 
ModiBlnttA 
man» 


TSElPdUStrtnH- 613033 
Previous: U07 .13 

2415 2330 24 2335 

33)1 3245 33*6 3140 

49.15 481* 49 A90 

19 18N 101* 19.10 

51« 53J0 5180 5190 
57 56J0 56.95 5411 

3140 3135 mi 3335 
36J0 3550 3670 34 

31 3040 31 31 

314k 3135 314k 31M 

28» 27-45 27*i 28H 

3535 35J0 35 JO 35-40 
5014 4914 501* 49U 

3190 3335 3180 3180 
5555 55.70 5370 5SW 
341* 34b 36** 3640 

3150 3040 3D4 30.15 

UM 34 34 MJ8 

40U 40 4055 40 

25* 25.10 2540 2510 
1U0 11.15 11.15 111 * 

30.10 29 JS 30 2955 
351* 35)1 35K 3516 

2355 rntK wan 231* 
41-40 4690 4690 41.10 
338 334 335 330 

30.95 30M SOM 3055 
231* 23W 23-40 23* 

7640 60H 7040 4V* 

12JH 1150 12 1155 

4550 45 4£20 64.70 

4535 44Jt 4510 45 

*195 4170 4250 4R50 
191* 19 1955 19.15 

431* 422 43 4216 

2055 2620 2665 20J0 
75 74 74.10 74 

1120 1110 1110 1110 


UonNatnon 

TetaQtmNZ 


163 352 363 362 
.680 £72 450 4J2 


WHSOn Horton 1150 1150 1150 1150 


Zurich 

ABB B 
Adeem B 

Ajta^B 

EXp 

ClartantR 

R 

ESECHrig 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 


PAGE 17 


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Thai Central Banker 
Rules Out Rate Cuts 

Official Rejects Finance Chiefs Plea 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Bloomberg .Vnrr ( . , 

BANGKOK — a bahi to an 11 -year low against the 

cessftilly fendine off ^ !? er suc ’ doIlarlast week. 

rency traders’ a&ickl on^iSE' ^?" ly by curtin ? off ** su P£ ly of 

Thailand’s cpntr-.ii k ? n l " c baht * baht to overseas investors and get- 
Remgchai mSSbSISi governor : *“8 some help from the region’s 
Thurs<jay to i. m ? ved central banks was Mr. Rerngchai 

b ^^ IU iwSm l Sn C ^ to attraSng 

=.^ ffid “ glhe 


I r-i _ '-^h i 


i uaiiaiKi s central bank governor’ 
SS®?" Marakanond, moved 


25S?w * 

oenind his own lines. 

In an aonarenr 


Japanese-educated 


economist The finance minister, Amnuay 

speculation i" 3 ™- cutting rates now. 


__ ‘^ntina "Wk 

ACXU.CJZ* 

ge\e\- lQ 


speculation that rhp Kant- n vjravan - urges cutting rates now. 

cmSterest rates m ^ set IO To ° companies will die with- 

^TOr„„“r° S “ outjower rates, hesays- .. 



A Chaebol 
Denies It’s 
In Danger 
Of Collapse 


Hong Kong- 
Hang Song 

14500 — 

14000 

^1™% 1 

13000 if- • 

12500 V 

12000 K-i-rrJir 


■ Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


Hi sen nTm ^ n » eT. . The Bank of Thailand’s gov- 

lemma facinp Th^? e J ine ? - !he emor - however, says, “Not so fast." 

— . n ? Thailand and its six- He is more interested in nrotectine 


\ , . ^ > 
i*’ k ra:t;^~rri-.>7' ^ Ur, iish h_, j 

i 


partv eoverntno «v^rv *1* s “" He “ more interested in protecting 

^currency and fighting the in- 


ftrS'Z *****££**«* I 

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bai * out hundreds flation that’ would result from a 
S^2L^T pa ? iesortokee P r! «es weaker baht, 
land’s current S [ ° P rolect ^h 3 *- Some economists say Mr. Remg- 
“TwT?’ ... , ■ chai will have to bend. They forecast 

tween the K JLE?K^ be- the economy will grow about 3 per- 

; Ntoustry md the cent this year. l«Ss than half last 
ti™ b® 1 ?^ said Prasen Patrad- year’s 7 nercent rate 

of D^CT Finance & “ LowSr interest rales have to take 

S'T nent ^ P rccedence right now. that’s clear,” 
. owned by the ministry, said Seema Desai, chief regional 
^Remgchai is bymg to protect the economist for Schrodere Securities 


® JLm V-ii/ Vt» - 1 rinn-IVw 

Qantas's James Strong announcing a planned fleet renovation. 


Qantas Proposes Airborne Poker 


hifok, president of IFCT Finance & 
Securities PCL, an investment bank 


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cuiiency, while the government is try- 
ing to reduce rates because the compa- 
nies can’t withstand the pressure." 

In response to earlier reports that 
the central bank would cut the rate at 
which it lends to commercial banks 
for the first time in more than two 
years, Mr. Rerngchai said Wednes- 
day that no reduction was imminent. 
The reports forecast a cut of one 
percentage point in the discount 
rate, to 9.5 percent 

While there is virtual unanimity 
that Thailand needs to cut interest 
rates to generate an economic turn- 
around, disagreement centers on 
which of the country’s litany of woes 
the government should tackle first. 

The slowest economic growth in 
11 years, slumping exports and a 
mountain of bad real-estate debt 
have hammered banks’ and other 
companies ' profits. Thailand’s chief 
^stock-market index has lost more 
$ian half its value the past 18 
months, making it the worlcTs worst 
performer. 

Reversing the slump and helping 
lenders would require a rate cut. 

On the other hand, one of the 
widest current-account deficits in 
die world has made Thailand’s cur- 
rency vulnerable to traders betting 
that the baht, which is basically 
pegged to the U.S. dollar, should be 
devalued. These traders drove the 


in Singapore. 1 ’The Bank of Thailand 
probably doesn’t want to locdc like a 
political puppet, but rates must come 
down for a recovery to occur.” 


Agcnre Fruncr-Pressc 

SYDNEY — Qantas Airways Ltd. said Thursday that it might offer 
in-flight gambling as pan of a 550 million Australian dollar ($427.7 
million) fleet renovation planned for the next three years. 

James Strong, the airline's chief executive, said the casino facility 
could be offered through a 320 million dollar interactive personal- 
video system that would put a screen in front of every passenger. 

Qantas said the projected revenue from gambling could help offset 
the expense of the renovation and the video system. Any gaming 
facility would be subject to approval by the Australian government. 


Reuters 

SEOUL — New Core Group, the 
25th-Iargest South Korean conglom- 
erate. denied Thursday a local report 
that it was in serious financial trouble 
and said its discussions with creditors 
involved normal business loans. 

New Core, a distribution and re- 
tailing chaebol, or conglomerate, has 
18 affiliates, none of which is listed. 

New Core’s finance manager said 
the company had been seeking 90 
billion won (S101 million) from 
several banks over the past two 
months, but he insisted that New 
Core was not in danger of defaulting 
on its debt payments, although he 
said the banks had not yet extended 
any of the requested loans. 

The Chosun II bo newspaper re- 
ported that New Core was seeking 
160 billion won to ease pressures 
caused by excessive expansion. 

Concern over the possible col- 
lapse of another major set of compa- 


D j F M A M 
1996 1907 


ZA 

2150 

2100 - - - 

2050- 

2000 

MBw-re- 


D JF MAM 


22000 

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1996 1997 


Exchange 


Thursday Rrav. 
Close Close 


, Hong Kong Hang Song 
: Singapore • 'Steaits Times = 
Sydney ' \ AgOnSnarios ■. 
Tokyo Mkke*3gS, - • 

Kuala tmnpm Composite . u ' 
Bangkok “ SET 
Seoul Composite tnctoc 

Taipei . Stook Market lnd€ 


144212.00 14.235.52 -0.17 
2,05358 +0.38 
2^54750 £54320 +0.18 
19377.39 ' 1854158 +0.-^8 
157153 1,05832 +1.17 
58159 ■ 596.19 -Z4B 
72438 . 737.71 -1<8t 


Bangkok - SET . 581.39 596.19 -2J48 

Seoul ■ , Composite fexSaac 72438 . 737.71 : -1<81 

Taipei . Stook Market Index 8,150.66 8.022.89 +1.58 
HaeaB*”'' ■ -PSE" V 2,53897 +1^8 

Jakarta Ccsnpflsite Max CtoMd 65409 
^ 2^05.74 2^9420 

Bombay ' : SanstiSve Indteot 3,730-78 3,735.01 -0.11 

Source: Tetekurs imenurio™i iimi,! Tnb™ 


Closed 65409 
2,305.74 2^96^0 +0.42 
3^3078 3,735.01 -0.1,1 


Intcnuncmal Herald Tnbone 


Very briefly: 


nies came as South Korea’s chief 
prosecutor said eight politicians, in- 
cluding the mayor of Pusan, would 
be charged with bribery in connec- 
tion with the failure of Hanbo Steel 
& General Construction Co. 


•Japanese steel companies generally reported weak earnings 
for the year that ended in March. Kawasaki Steel Corp. said the 
weak yen offset falling steel prices to raise consolidated pretax 
profit 108 permit from a year earlier, but net profit fell 66 
percent, to 8 billion yen (S703 million). Kobe Steel Ltd. said 
lower microchip prices dragged down consolidated pretax profit 
64 percent, to 21 billion yenVNippon Steel Corpus consolidated 
pretax profit fell 21 percent, to 80.8 billion yen. 


Electronics Companies Pace Earnings in Japan 


• Hyundai Corp. of South Korea plans to invest S250 million 
in Pakistan, the conglomerate’s vice president said. 


Cortpdrd by Otr Buff From Hups drx 

TOKYO — Many Japanese companies re- 
leased their earnings Thursday for die financial 
year ended March 31. with leading electronics 
manufacturers announcing profit increases amid 
strong demand. Tdeaxnmunkations -equipment 
companies and utilities posted disappointing re- 
sults for the year, as prices came under severe 
pressure. 

• Sharp Corp. said its consolidated pretax 


sales, the weaker yen and lower costs. Revenue 
rose 13 percent to a record 7.676 trillion yen. 

• Sanyo Electric Co. said a strong overseas 
performance helped offset “severe" conditions 


at home as it posted a consolidated pretax profit 
of 41.5 billion yen. Annual revenue was 1.793 


of 41 J billion yen. Annual revenue was 1 .793 
trillion yen. Net profit was 17.7 billion yen forthe 
period. 

In the telecommunications sector: 

• Kokusai Dens bin Denwa Co. said con- 


142.5 billion yen. The world’s largest private 
electric power company said revenue in the peri- 
od declined 0.4 penrent to 5,012.6 billion yen. 

But net profit surged 60.9 percent to 77.4 
billion yen. 

• Kansai Electric Power Co. said high fuel 
costs caused a 5.5 percent drop in parent pretax 
profit from a year earlier to 1 15.4 billion yen. The 
second largest power company in Japan said 
revenue increased 13 percent to 2346.7 billion 


profit rose 2 percent from a year earlier to 88.6 solidated pretax profit declined 14.4 percent to yen. Net profit declined 8.7 


billion yen ($7783 million), as revenue rose 
neatly 9 percent to 1.791 trillion yen. 

• Pioneer Electronic Corp. said a weaker yen 
and cost-cutting measures resulted in a con- 
solidated pretax profit of 1.63 billion yen com- 
pared with a 14.76 billion yen loss a year earlier. 
Revenue rose 9 percent to 552.58 billion yen. Net 
profit was 231 billion yen, compared with a net 
loss of 9.99 billion yen a year earlier. 

• Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. report- 
ed a net profit of 1 37.85 billion yen for the year, 
compared with a loss of 56.87 billion yen the 
previous year. Matsushita, one of the world's 


29.4 billion yen. The international telecommu- 
nications carrier said revenue rose 39.7 percent to 


percent 

billion yen. For the year to March 1998. the 
company forecast a parent pretax profit of 120 


to 43.8 


401.2 billion yen. Net profit fell 6.7 percent to billion yen on revenue of 2,660 billion yen and 
12.9 billion yen. net profit of 60 billion yen. 

• NEC Corp. said falling prices for memory • Kyushu Electric Co. was hardest hit, with 


said consolidated revenue rose 1 2.5 percent in the 
period to 4.948 trillion yen. Net profit increased 
18.7 percent to 91.6 billion yen. 

In the utilities sector: 

• Tokyo Electric Power Co. said lower de- 
mand for electricity drove down consolidated 


net profit or 00 billion yen. 

•Kyushu Electric Co. was hardest hit, with 
parent current profit falling by 25 percent to 
61.09 billion yen.- 

• Tokyo Gas Co. said an increase in gas prices 
eroded unconsolidated pretax profit by 1 8.5 per- 
cent from a year earlier to 28.4 billion yen. The 


• Australian companies’ first-quarter profits before income 
tax. net interest paid and depreciation fell an adjusted 3.4 
percent, to 11.49 billion Australian dollars ($8.94 billion), 
according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. 

• Marubeni Corp. and Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. 
acquired concessions for oil fields off the coast Of Ireland and 
in Pakistan and Peru from Occidental Petroleum Corp. The 
companies will invest as much as 5 billion yen in the next two 
years to explore the fields. 

• Japan’s leading automakers increased their domestic pro- 
duction and exports in April. Domestic production at Toyota 
Motor Corp. rose 8.1 percent, to 290,675 vehicles, while 
Nissan Motor Co.’s output climbed 1 8 percent, to 1 35,542, and 
Honda Motor Co.'s rose 23 percent, to 107,771. Mitsubishi 
Motors Corp.’s production rose 15 percent, to 93,742 vehicles, 
and Mazda Motor Corp.’s output rose 12 percent, to 70.022. 

• China’s economic growth in 1997 will be about 10 percent, 
with inflation around 5 percent, die official Xinhua news 
agency said, quoting Qiu Xiaohua. chief economist of the 
State Statistical Bureau. 


• Bangladesh uraed South Korean investors to purchase the 
country’s unprofitable state-owned enterprises, which it said 
were hampering its economy. 

• Taiwan’s approvals of applications by local companies to 
invest in China fell 26 percent in April, to 112.9 million 
Taiwan dollars ($4.1 million), the Ministry of Economic 

Affairs Said. Bridge News. Reuters, AFP, AP. AFX 


largest of Japan’s city gas companies, Tokyo Gas 
said revenue rose 3.7 percent to 862.6 billion yen. 
Net profit declined 4.7 percent to 153 billion 
yen. (Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP, AP) 


leading electronics makers, credited stronger pretax profit 14.9 percent from a year earlier to 


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Korean Woes for Amway 


Growth Slows 
In South Korea 


OmfUatbrChrSt^FumiOispautiei 


Haiti Postpones 
Senate Runoffs 


Consumer Groups Boycott Direct-Sales Company SEOUL — The economy 


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Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Park Su Jin thought selling 
cosmetics would make her rich. Instead, she 
lost her friends and a small fortune. 

Now, die 32-year-old accountant has 
joined a Korean boycott of Amway Corp., 
the Michigan-based direct-sales network 
she holds responsible for her losses. 

Miss Park was one of 425 people who filed 
a co m plain t against Amway ’s South Korean 
operation with the National Council of Con- 
sumer Protection Organizations last year. 
1 The complaints reflect both the risks of di- 
’ r red- marketing schemes and a growing hos- 
Tfjiiiy toward foreign companies that make 
inroads into Korea’s long-protected market. 

This week, a coalition of 82 consumer and 
religious groups agreed to boycott Amway 
products, alleging it had violated laws bar- 
ring comparisons between products. The co- 
alition said it also planned to complain about 
Amway to the Fair Trade Commission. 

At first. Miss Park was an Amway de- 
votee. In the first three months, she sold 10 
million won ($11325) of products, quickly 
becoming a top-level distributor and recruit- 
ing friends and family for her sales force. 

This gave her friends a chance to make 
money and brought her big commissions. 

Five months later, Miss Park’s Amway 
business failed with debts of 10 million won 


after her sales network collapsed. Miss 
Park’s salespeople grew tired of the direct- 


grew at its lowest rate in nearly 
four years in the first quarter. 


lions of won in unsold Amway products. 

Amway Korea, based in Seoul, is South 
Korea’s biggest multilevel direct-sales 
business with 60 percent of the local market 
and 140,000 independent distributors. The 
six-year-old company, with 800 employ- 
ees, saw its sales rise 156 percent last year, 
to 277 billion won. 

The consumer group asserted that Am- 
way Korea distributors used misleading 
tactics to lure new recruits and supplied 
distributors with rigged demonstration kits 
for its best-selling dish-washing liquid. The 
group also claimed that advertising for Am- 
way ’s detergent, “Dish Drops," calling it 
environmentally friendly; was false. 

Amway officials said they were prepar- 
ing to fight the boycott campaigns. Amway, 
with about $6.8 billion in sales for the year 
ended Aug. 31, manages more than 23 
mini on distributors in shout 75 countries. 

“We can’t help it if a few of our dis- 
tributors decided to compare products at 
demos, although it is against our policy,” 
said Lee YongHak, a spokesman at Amway 
Korea. “In a way, we are unfairly being 
made a victim of Korea’s anti-import 
drive,” he said. 


four years in the first quarter, 
amid depressed investment 
and consumption, the Bank of 
Korea said Thursday. 

Gross domestic product in 
the three months grew at a 5.4 
percent annual rate, down 
from a 7.8 percent rate in the 
first quarter of 1996, the cen- 
tral bank said. But it said the 
economy would rebound in 
the third quarter. (AFP, AP) 


How could you 


snap up 1,000 


ADIWISEMENT 


AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY 

(CDRs) 


Canadian lobsters 


The undersigned announces that as 
from 30 May 1997 ai Kas-Assoetalie 
N.V„ Spuistrut 172, Amsterdam, div. 
cpn. no. SI of the <3UTa American 
Express Company each repr. 5 
share* will be payable with DO*. UBS 
net (div. per rrnlalf 02X4.97; grow 
S 0425 p. eIl) after deduction of I5*fc 
USA-tax = S 0J6875 = Dfla. 0# per 
CDR. Div. cp*. belonging to non- 
lendenls of The Netherlands viD he 
paid after deduction of an additional 
USA-tm <= S 0J6875 = Dfla. *32 
j with Dfl*. 1£3 net). 


in Cairo? 


AMSIQtDAM DGPOSTCARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam, 20 May, 199.7 


S, 

■'■'.v-S'i** 

“ ■ ■_ ii 


RISK: Unocal’s Bet in Burma 


on> ^ 4 Continued from Page 13 


ir.gS t 

■'V-T-VTV^ 

^ ..Mf-jr-J*- 


die company were forced to 
quit the gas project, it would 
be replaced by another big 
foreign company, just not an 
American one. What’s more. 


the company saichits , 
fe nri 1 ! was helping the 35,OW 
rSfople who live near the proj- 
area, where Unocal and 
Total are spending $6 mflhon 
on education, medical care 
and other improvements. 

Without any direct interest 
in Burma, most oil companies 
kept a low profile m thed^ 
pute. One senior executive, 
wbo asked that his name not 
be used, said that tbey saw 
hole chance to sway pubhc 
opinion in a debate that P 1 *^ 
economic interests against 
human rights. 

The breakttaough.for Un- 
ocal, which is based in El Se- 

eundo, California, occurred 
last summer, when it per- 
suaded one of its home stele 
senators. Dianne Feinstem,a 
Democrat, that any sanctions 
jfcould be prospective m 
’Snjre. In an interview W«L 
r^day, Ms. Feinsrem raid she 
was concerned 
companies vould have 

stepped in if Unocal had b^i 

fSkto divest last summer. 


& 


'Zs*'* 








{ji’v ' .• • 

*' 5 ? 


"There’s constantly the 
problem with these things — 
that we can shoot ourselves in 
the foot and not accomplish 
what we hope to accom- 
plish,” she said. 

Ms. Feinstein and William 
Cohen, Republican of Maine, 
co-sponsored legislation that 
limi ted sanctions to future in- 
vestments and then only if the 
Burmese regime committed 
further rights abuses, a judg- 
ment that would be left to 
president Bill Clinton. 

Ms. Feinstein said she 
wanted the legislation to 
provide some flexibility, in- 
cluding time to see if the re- 


In this Saturday’s 






Turn to 


Boats 


THE INTERMARKET 


pfme in Burma would open a ( 
dialogue wife dissidents. “I j 




wanted to create an opportu- 
nity for leverage,” she said. 

The legislation became 
jaw in the fell. In January. 
Unocal signed a contract wife 
fee stale-owned Myanma Oil 
& Gas Enterprise to expand 
its operations. Texaco and 
ARCO also signed deals m 
the wake of the legislation. 

In April Mr. Clinton, under 

renewed pressure from rights 
groups, activated fee sanenoo 
Provisions. The Treasury De- 
partment is expected to issue 
rules for implementation m ( 
the next two weeks. 


C 


raise line/shipping 
stocks. Seafood 
investments. 


Wherever you are in the world, buying or selling, importing or exporting, there’s 
business to be done at the ffiTT’s IntermariceL 

Featuring two pages of classified advertising the Intmnarket appears every 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. Pop along. 


Can +44 171420 0348 


INTERNATIONAL M * 


THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 








PAGE 18 


Thursday’s^ P.M. ] w"S? <** » « re 

The 1/000 most-traded NottonoJ Mortet secujffles 
fn terns of doUormJue, uptfatedtofa a yarn 

The Assoaa&t Press. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 















































































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Advertisement 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


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May 22 , 1997 


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For kdonnauon on how to itet your funn, fax Katy Hourl at (33-1) 41 43 92 1 2 or E-fnafl : funds® Buxom m iml/ | — 

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PAGE 19 


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PAGE 20 


^ HcralbSeribune 

Sports 



FRIDAS, MAY 23, 1997 


World Roundup 


Russian Still First 
In the Giro d’ltalia 

LANCIANO, Italy — Roberto 
Sgambeliuri pulled away over the 
closing kilometer on Thursday to 
capture the sixth stage of die Giro 
d ’Italia, but Pavel Tonkov of Rus- 
sia kept his overall lead of 41 
seconds intact. 

Tonkov and his chief rival, Luc 
Leblanc of France, finished in the 
pack that chased home 16 seconds 
behind Sgambeliuri, who snatched 
his first professional victory and 
gave Italy its fourth stage triumph. 

Sgambeliuri, who rides for Bres- 
cia] at, averaged 40.652 kph 
(25.204 mph) over the hilly, 210- 
kilometer (130-mile} course from 
Rieti to Lanciano. (AP) 

Sitch Won’t Play in Paris 

tennis Michael Stich, last 
year's surprise finalist, said 
Thursday that he was withdrawing 
from the french Open, which starts 
Monday in Paris. 

Stich made the announcement 
after losing, 6-1, 6-3, to Albert 
Costa of Spain at the World Team 
Cup in Dusseldorf. He said a nag- 
ging shoulder injury bad worsened 
to the point where his serve was 
nearly ineffective. ( Reuters ) 

Victory for England 

cricket Adam Hollioake and 
Graham Thorpe rescued England 
after a shaky start on Thursday to 
give the home side a six-wicket 
victory over Australia in die first 
one-day international at 
Headingley in Leeds 

Hollioake, who was named man- 
of-the-match, ended the game with 
a mighty six over square-leg to fin- 
ish with an unbeaten 66. 

Thorpe scored 75 as England, set 
171 to win, reached their target in 
40.1 of their 50 overs. (Reuters) 



Pat Burns, who has a history 
of improving teams quickly. 

Brains Turn to Burns 

hockey The Boston Brains 
made Pat Burns their new head 
coach, trusting the two-time coach 
of die year with Toronto and 
Montreal to restore another tradi- 
tional Nardonal Hockey League 
franchise. Bums, 45, becomes only 
the second man to coach three of the 
league’s "Original Six" teams, and 
the first since Dick Irvin joined die 
Canadiens in 1940 after coaching 
die Blackhawks and Maple Leafs. 

Bums took Montreal to the finals 
and made it to the conference finals 
twice with Toronto. But the Maple 
Leafs fired him near the end off the 
1996 season during a losing streak. 

New Zealand Stallion Dies 

horse racing Sir Tristram, one 
of Australasia's great stallions, was 
buried on Thursday after being put 
down following a fall at New Zea- 
land’s Cambridge Stud. 

Cambridge's owner, Patrick 
Hogan, told national radio in New 
Zealand that the 26-year-old horse, 
whose 620 progeny included 42 
Group One winners, broke his leg 
on Wednesday in a paddock. 

Sir Tristram was Cambridge's 
leading sire, with progeny which 
included die big mare Empire Rose, 
winner of the 1 987 Melbourne Cup, 
as well as more than 40 offspring 
now themselves at stud. 



The Associated Press 

It was no surprise that Greg Maddux 
won again. What was surprising was the 
way he won. 

Maddux notched bis fifth successive 
victory Wednesday when Keith Lock- 
hart, pinch-hitting, cracked a two-run 
homer in die bottom of the ninth to give 
Atlanta a 3-2 victory over Montreal 

It was the first homer of the season for 
Lockhart, a 32-year-old utility infielder 
who entered the year with only 15 career 

NL Roundup 

homers. "I hit a grand slam once, but 
I’ve never hit one like that to win a 
game," he said." 

After Javy Lopez singled and moved 
to second on a sacrifice, Lockhart pinch 
hit for Maddux (5-1) and sent a 1-0 pitch 
from Ugueth Urbina (2-3) over the 
right-field fence to give the Braves their 
sixth straight victory. 

Pirates 3 V Cardinals 2 At St. Louis, 
Marie Johnson's bloop double broke an 
eighth-inning tie as Pittsburgh snapped 
a four-game losing streak in a game that 
featured three ejections. The Pirates’ 
pitching coach, Pete Vuckovich, was 
tossed out in the second inning for ar- 
guing a late strikeout call to Jason Kend- 


up as a double play, and 
fyntinak catc h e r i 


all that ended 
Johnson and fyntinak catcher Mike 
Difelice were ejected after their col- 
lision on die final out in the top of the 
eighth led to both benches clearing. 

Cuba 7, PfulifM o At Chicago, Kevin 
Foster allowed three hits over seven 


Braves’ Glavine 
Best-Paid Pitcher 

The Associated Press 
ATLANTA — Tom Glavine of 
the Atlanta Braves signed a four- 
year contract extension Thursday 
for $34 million, making him base- 
ball's highest-paid pitcher. 

He is m the final year of a five- 
year contract and is earning $5 mil- 
lion this year. The new agreement 

f ives him an average of $8.5 mil- 
on a year, exceeding the $8.25 
million Roger Clemens is aver- 
aging under his three-year contract 
with the Toronto Blue Jays. 

Glavine, 31, is baseball’s win- 
ningest pitcher since 1991, with 
111 victories. 


Venue 1: Heavyweight Rivalry 

Nebiolo’s Demand for Bigger Cut of Revenue Is on Hold 

The IAAF, placed in a special cat- 
egory, received the biggest single share 
— $6.5 million. That angered some of 
the other federations, whose share var- 
ied from $2.5 million to $500,000. 

But the agreement was only valid for 
the Atlanta games, and Nebiolo marie it 
known he wanted a bigger share for 
track and field for Sydney. 

Nebiolo said Tbureday that he wanted 
to wait until the situation became ‘ ‘tran- 
quil’’ before pursuing his goal, pointing 
out that the Olympic committee pres- 
ident, Juan Antonio Samaranch, was up 
for re-election in September in 
Lausanne, Switzerland, where members 
will also decide which city will hold die 
2004 Summer Olympics. 

■ Refunds From Atlanta Games 


The Associated Press 

MONTE CARLO — It has been a 
week of unusual setbacks for Primo 
Nebiolo, the president of the Interna- 
tional Amateur Athletic Federation. 

First, his re-election as head of the 
Association' of Summer Olympic In- 
ternational Federations did not go as 
smoothly as planned. Rather than being 
voted in by acclamation, members 

asked for a secret ballot While 21 sup- 
ported Nebiolo, seven did not with three 
votes against and four abstentions. 

Then, on Thursday, Nebiolo was 
forced to back down from a confron- 
tation with the International Olympic 
Committee over the distribution of 
Olympic revenues. He was also turned 
down in his request for free tickets for 
events at the Sydney Games in 2000. 

Nebiolo had been expected to renew 
his demand for a bigger share of tele- 
vision and marketing revenues from the 
Sydney games in the Summer Olympics 
federation’s meeting with the Olympic 
committee's executive board. But he 
decided to put off his requests. 

Two years ago, the Olympic com- 
mittee agreed to give die federations 
$86.6 million in revenues from the 19% 
Atlanta Games — a 136 percent increase 
over die $37.6 million they received 
from the 1992 Barcelona Games. 


The Atlanta Committee for the 
Olympic Games has settled a class ac- 
tion suit brought by about 5,100 ticket 
buyers who said they were overcharged 
for tickets to the 1996 games. The As- 
sociated Press reported from Atlanta. 

Hie lawsuit accused the games' or- 
ganizers of scalping when it sold season 
tickets to an event The season tickets 
combined cost more than tickets to each 
event bought one at a time. 

While the disparity was small for 
some events, season tickets for swim- 
ming cost $2,500. or $836 more than the 
cost of individual tickets to all swimming 
events, a lawyer for the plaintiffs said. 


Is He Forgiven? 
ZoeUer Gets Warm 
Colonial Welcome 

The Associated Press 

FORT WORTH, Texas — He 
was the man the golf fans came to 
see. and they couldn't get enough of 
him. They packed the gallery trail- 
ing him, hollered encouraging 
words and cheered every move. 

But if wasn’t Tiger Woods the 
masses at Colonial were after. 

This time, it was Fuzzy ZoeUer 
getting the Woodsian treatment The 
scene Wednesday came a month 
after ZoeUer apologized for insens- 
itive statements he made about 
Woods andy after the two met for 
the first time since the controversy. 

ZoeUer has been off the PGA 
Tour since the Masters, where he 
called Woods ‘‘that little boy” and 
urged him not to request fried 
chicken or collard greens for the 
Champions Dinner next year at Au- 
gusta National. During his layoff, 
he has lost a sponsorship deal with 
Kmart and says he has received 
letters calling him racist. 

The way he was received at 
Wednesday's pro-am proved that 
ZoeUer is stiU a fan favorite. After 
his round, he conceded be hadn't 
expected such a welcome. “I’ve 
had a tough couple of weeks,” he 
said, “so I enjoyed watching smil- 
ing faces having fun.” 


Clemens Buries Yanks, 
Seizing 200th Victory 

8-Inning Show of Power and Precision 


By Jack Cuny 

Nev York Times Service 


HnStsbUeimc/EtaiMi 

A double exposure of the Blue Jays’ Roger Clemens winding up in the seventh inning at Yankee Stadium. 

In a Pinch, Maddux Still Finds a Way to Win 


innings, and Mark Grace extended his 
hitting streak to 15 games. 

RocUm id, aiants 7 At San Fran- 
cisco, Kevin Ritz pitched seven strong 
innings and Ellis Burks had a three-run 
homer and four RBIs. Ritz (4-4) allowed 
three runs on five hits in seven-plus 
innings to become the first Rockies 
starter to win in 14 games. 

Mate 2 , Marlin* 1 At Miami, Marie 
Clark allowed seven hits in eight in- 
nings and Edgardo Alfonzo and Bernard 
Gilkey homered as the New York Mets 
snapped the Florida Martins’ eight- 
game winning streak. Greg McMichael 
worked the ninth for his second save as 
the Mets prevented the Marlins from 
matching their franchise record for 
longest winning streak. 

Padm 5, Dodgers 4 At San Diego, 
Quilvio Veras ’s high chopper to second 
base drove in Chris Gomez from third 
with the winning ran in the I Ith inning 
as the Padres won their season-high 
third successive game. 

Autrom 4. Reds 3 At Houston, Luis 
Gonzalez’s RBI single in the 14th inning 
scared Jeff BagweU with the winning run 
from second. With two outs, BagweU 
was intentionally walked by Scott Sul- 
livan (0-1). BagweU stole second without 
a throw, and Gonzalez hit to left field. 


NEW YORK — From rhe moment 
Roger Clemens emerged from the third- 
base dugout with his usual sw agge r and 
his intense glare , he was determined to 
Arm die g ame mm his game, turn the 

evening into his evening and turn Yankee 

S tadium into his home away from home 
for a few hours. He was determined to 
secure his 200th career victory. 

With power, precision and panache, 
Clemens succeeded on all counts in 
ushering the Blue Jays to a resounding 
4-1 victory over the Yankees. Three 
runs does not qualify as a rout, but 

Clemens was so dominant that the Yan- 
kees hardly threatened against a pitcher 
who struck out 1 2 and then scooped up a 
handf ul of dirt from the mound after the 
game was over. 

So Clemens became the 94th pitcher 
in major league history to win 200 
games and improved to a gaudy 8-0. 
which ties tire former Yankee Jimmy 
Key, who is with the Orioles, for the 
finest record in the American League. 

“To have the opportunity to win 200 
games definitely puts a smile on my 
face," Clemens said before the start 
“To do it here in a stadium rich with 
tradition and with all the players who 
have come through here magnifies ft 
even more.” 

Clemens and Key have been tire 
premier pitchers in the league and, last 
night tee 34-year-old right-hander 
looked like the Clemens of old. He 
squel ched the Yankees on four hits over 
eight glistening innings. He jumped 
ahead of hitters with a fastball in the 
mid-90s and buried the Yankees when 
be was ahead in the count by buzzing 
nasty forkballs in the high 80s that 
doomed New York to its third straight 
loss and fourth in five games. 

In other games. The Associated Press 
reported: 

Brewers 5, Twins 4 At Milwaukee, 
Ben McDonald survived another shaky 
stan as the Brewers snapped a seven- 
game losing streak. McDonald (5-3) 
won despite failing to get out of the sixth 
inning for the fifth time in his last six 
starts. Scott Aldred (2-6) gave up five 
runs on seven hits. 

OriolM Z, Tigers o At Baltimore, Scott 
Erickson got his eighth victory and Ra- 
fael Palmeiro hit a two-run homer as 
Baltimore won its fifth straight. 

Erickson (8-1) allowed four hits and 
five walks before leaving with runners ■ 


on the corners with two outs in tee 
eighth. Jesse Orosco teen picked Dami- ^ 
on Easley off first base and Randy My- ‘ 
ers worked tee ninth for his 15th save, 

Indians 1. Royals 0 At Cleveland, tee . 
I ndfan c won without hitting a home run • 
for the first time this season and denied ' 
Kevin Appier his 100th career victory. . 
Orel Hershiser (4-2) had his best outing 
of the season, allowing five hits in 7!o - 
innings. Appier (4-3) was even better, 
allowing only two hits in eight inn ings, 1 
but was plagued by eight walks. 

Whit« Sox io. Rod sox 5 At Chicago, ; 
Frank Thomas homered twice and drove • 
in five runs as tee White Sox won their ; 
sixth in a row. Thomas and Albert BelJ^ 
hit back-to-back homers in a five-rmF' 
second inning. * 

Athkrtiea 7, Ranger* 3 Dave - 

Telgheder got his first victory since ’. 
September, and Geronimo Berroa ■ 
homered and drove in three runs as ' 
visiting Oakland snapped a four-game ■ 
losing streak. 

Angels IB, Mariner* 3 Gary DiSarcina ! 
went 4-fbr-5 and drove in four runs as 
tee Angels completed a 9-1 home stand. 
Seattle starter Dennis Martinez gave up ■ 
seven runs in 1% innings, probably end- ‘ 
mg the 42-year-old right-hander's stint ■ 
with the Mariners and possibly signal- ; 
mg tee end of his 20-year career. 


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Exiled! Banished! 
AUfor a Plastic Cup 

The Associated Press 
BOCA RATON, Florida — As 
tee starting catcher for the Boca 
Raton Youth League Dodgers, 
Melissa Raglin, 12, is used to deal- 
ing with bad calls from umpires. 

But last week’s call at the start of 
tee second inning was the worst. - 
“When the ump asked me if I 
was wearing a cup,” Melissa said, 
“I took my helmet off and said, 
‘I’m a girl/ ’’ It didn’t matter. 

Babe Ruth League rules mandate 
that all catchers wear plastic cups to 
protect them from groin injuries. 
When she refused to comply, 
Melissa was banished to tee out- 
field and told she would stay there 
until she suited up correctly. 

The rule is being ridiculed by 
some, who say tee cups are primarily 
needed to {noted male genitals and 
are not necessary for women. But the 
league insists gnis can suffer groin 
injuries and must play by the rides. 


i: 


A 


By Matthew L. Wald 

New York Times Service 


Albert’s Accuser Faces Charge 

Woman Had Threatened to Kill Her Former Boyfriend 

her to his hotel room. A police spokes- 
man said tee woman “had 10 or 12 
severe bite marks oq her back, big red 
welts.” 

On March 29, the woman was ar- 
rested near the apartment of her former 
boyfriend and charged with making 1 
threats. The court papers indicate that at- 
test time she had been unemployed for 
about a monte, after having worked five 
years as a night hotel manager. She was 
released on her own recognizance after 
promising to stay away from the former 
boyfriend. 

According to the former boyfriend, 
the woman called and told him teat 
“they are going to find four bodies, you, 
your girlfriend, your dog and me.” She 
was upset by tee breakup and because 
the man was not taking her with him on 
vacation, tee police report says. 

■ Announcer to Work Saturday 

Albert wiU broadcast the NBA play- 
off game between the Chicago BuUs and 
tee Miami Heat on Saturday as sched- 
uled. despite his indictment. The As- 
sociated Press reported. 

NBC said in a statement Thursday 
that Albert had “vehemently" denied 
charges that he forced a woman to per- 
form oral sex in a Virginia hotel room. 

Albert ‘ ‘at no time was ever afforded 
any opportunity to discuss the facts with 
police or prosecuting attorneys, ’’ NBC 
said. 


- .-.-is. - ; 


WASHINGTON — The woman who 
accused Marv Albert, tee NBC Sports 
announcer, of assault and battery and 
forcing her to perform oral sex is facing 
a criminal charge herself. 

Police and superior court records in 
the District of Columbia indicate that on 
three occasions tee woman, whose 
name is being withheld because of the 
nature of her charges against Albert, 
called a former boyfriend who lives here 
and threatened to kill him, his cuirent 
girlfriend, his dog and then herself. 

The charges were first reported by 
WRC-TV, an NBC affiliate here, which 
made tee court records available to The 
New York Times. The woman, 42 and a 
resident of nearby Arlington. Virginia, 
made the calls on March 13. according 
to a police report that quotes the former 
boyfriend. 

The woman has accused Albert of 
assaulting her in a hotel room in Ar- 
lington on Feb. 1 2. Albert has denied the 
allegations, and in a statement issue 
Tuesday he said that he was confident of 
exoneration. 

Albert. 53, was indicted Monday by a 
grand jury, after a police detective test- 
ified that the woman had told the police 
that Albert threw her on a bed in an 
Arlington Hotel and forced her to com- 
mit sodomy. She said Albert had invited 


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tigwYotk 2S 70 JS6 

Toronto 23 19 SAB 

Detrelf 19 25 A32 

Boflon u&vrafti ■ 38 ’ 


Major League Stanmnos 


GB 

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VA 

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VA 

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A'A 

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Oewtond 
Milwaukee 
Chicago 
Kansas Gty 
Minnesota 

Teas 

Anaheim 

Seattle 

Oakland 


Atlanta 
Florida 
Montreal 
New York 
Philadelphia 

Houston 
Pittsburgh 
St. Loins 
Chicago 
Cincinnati 


central. L 

22 20 .524 

20 21 MB 

20 22 .476 

20 22 A76 

IB 27 MO 

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2« 18 sn 

23 20 335 

24 21 333 

CAST DIVISOR 

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27 
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CSTTRAL DlVtSMM 


24 

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13 .711 
17 AU 

19 358 

21 333 

27 MS 

stan 
72 327 

22 300 
26 

28 

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WESTKVtSKW 

Son Francisco 25 18 381 

Colorado 2d 30 - 545 


.535 2 

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LEAGUE 

Minnesota 010 083 080—4 8 0 

MBwottkae 040 010 00»— 5 7 1 

Aldred, Jarvis (5] and G. Myers: 
McDonald. Wlckman (61. DoJanes (9) and 
Motherly. W— McDonald, 5-3. L— Aldred, 2- 
6. Sv—Oo Jones (10). HRs— Minnesota G. 
Myers (1). Caomer (3). 

Detroit bob aoo ooo-o 5 0 

Bdtaon 200 BOB 00O-2 5 1 

Thompson and Casanova' Erickson, 
Orosco (8). Myers (9) and Wbbsler. 
W— Erickson. 8-1. L— Thompsoa 4-1 Sv — 
Myers (15). NR — Baltimore. Poimelro (7). 
Tomato 004 BOO 000—4 9 ■ 

New York 000 008 010-1 4 0 

Qemens, PieSOC (9), Thnlhi 19) and 
Saratoga Ktl Rogers. Boefi ringer (Bj and 
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Kansas ary aas ooo goo— < 6 0 

oevrtand 080 ISO B»-l 2 0 

Appier and Spew, M. Sweeney (71; 
Hershber, Mormon (8), Shuey (8). M. 
Jackson (9) and S. Alomar. W— HerehKer, 4- 
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Baste* 010 *220 000-5 11 1 

Chicago 250 010 11a— TO If 0 

Hammond, Wa«*i (5), Stocumb 18) and 
Hattetoera Drofeek. McElroy (6), Simas (8). 
R. Hernandez TO and Korianrfce. 
W— Drobefc 3-3. L-Hammcnd. 1-3. 
HRs— Boston. Jefferson ( 61 . CMcoga F. 
ThomM 2 W, Belle 

211 020 teo— 7 9 a 

000 010 020-3 9 1 


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Co.wnois Soriana Alberta (5) raid |. 
Rodriguez. W— Telgheder, 1-2. L— Soriana 
2-1. HR-Oafcland, Berraa (6). • • . 

Seattle «TO 101 000-3 10 3 

AltaMa 140 23S IQ*— IS 21 0 

DeJWtottaeo Hoteeraer (2), S. Sanders (4), 
B. Wells (6), ManzanVo (7). Chariton (B) and 
DaWBsoa Mariano (7)j CJ=Hey, 
Hesagowo J8) ondLeyrtlr. W— C Filler, 2*31 
L— DaJWarHnez. 1-5. HRs— Seattle. Buhner 
(8). Anaheim, Grebeck (11. Edmonds 00), 

NATIONAL L£AGUE 

Motored 080 800 200-2 8 1 

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P. Cordova. Ruebel (7), Lofeede (9) mid 
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Chicago 120 OOT 30*— 7 10 0 

E. Ramos. BtoSer C&J, Ryan (7). 
Pfantenbent (81 end Parent Faster, 
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HR— CMcaga Soso (101. 

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RIO, Dtpato CB), Holmes (8), S. Reed t9l 
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— LA. Kotos (S). San Diem Cr Janes (41. 

Japanese Leaques 

aMUHHNI 

THBKBAY’SRZSQlTS 

Hiroshima 2. Ycfcuiro 
ChuMchl 2 Hanshln 1 
YomJvri Z ’I'of' Oriental 


nmHri mmis 

Sefeg&Dtoel5 

(11 Innings) Mppon Ham l Orix 2 
(12 innings! Lottei raraetsu < 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Playoffs 


(BEST-CF-5EVEH) 
wramtuY's umr 

Haastaa 23 19 24 24- 92 

Writ 25 23 35 21—104 

H: Otalirwan 12-22 6-9 M. BarUay 5-12 6-10 
IS U: Stockton 7-14 12-1226. Malone 9-21 6- 
10 24. RebonaiH Hixrrenn 45 (Bartdey 12). 
Utah 67 (Motane 15). Assists— Houston 13 
(Drexfer4), Utah 2T (Stockton IZ). 

(Utn loads series 24) 


CYCLING 


Giro d'Italxa 

Lending ptoclnga In the 210 km»6ri> stage 
to the Qba tTBaHn hwn Pled to Lenctonb: 

). SgcnMhsl it. Bresdotot 5 hows 9 min. 
OTd 57 sec.- 2. Frigo. It. Soeco; X CnppofBo. 
IL, MogSfiUo MG- 4. stefn houscc, Gcr. Ce- 
romicM R.SJL.-5- BOdofo, It. MagfiRtio MG 
aM6 &; 6. Wu* Gee, Pesftw 7. Kanyshe*. 
Res. AastoUctJL BeH tf. SresdoJdt 9. Morol- 
tl. II. Kiass 10. Gen 131 It. Canflna Telia s.l. 

OvniAALi : 1 . Tanknv. Rin. Map. 23 Il 43 
ol 2 SJ X Lebtanc Pr. Poltt at 41 3. GtotL 

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Pmm ft. Meraotorw U. id J; t. Ncto', IL 
A£c* 1:43; 7. CoppoRto 1 tffc X S»olde«l, II. 
RosWta 2 :« 9. P*poR H. CeramlcW R- 
2:49: 10. Shefer. KolOk. Asics 3.05. 


CRICKET 


AUSTRALIA TOlll 
1ST T-OAT INTERNATIONAL 
ENOLANO VS. AUSTRALIA 
THURSDAY. M LEEDS. EtNHJWO 
England: 175-4 teal oven). 

AustrnSn: 1 70-8 (50 avets) 

England non by sh wkftets. 


WORLD C*F QUALIFIER 

EUROPEAN ZONE. GROUPS 
JretonoX Liechtenstein a 
S TAwnn soa . Romania ib painty Ireland 
10; Macedanfa life LJrtnjanla 9; Iceland Z 
LtehfensRHn a 


TENNIS 




FMALS. RETURN LEG 

Inlemazlonale MHan. Ilaly 1. Sctwke da 
GelsenUichea Germany, 0 
SctioBu! 04 wan 4-1 an penalties offer 1-1 
aggregate. 

COPR UURADOUS 

QUARTERFINALS, FIRST LEG 

Bollwr, BaBvIa Z Sporting CristaL Pent 1 
PWWtaL Uruguay. 1. Roctog OuIl ArgpntL 0 
Utorers. CoteCeft Oilte Z Cato Cob, Chite I 

Hokoart cop final 

IN BUDAHST, 1ST LEG 
MTK6. BV5C0 


THURSOAT. IN MADRS 
QUARTERFINALS 

Motoeo Seles O), U.S. del. Virginia Ruana 
Spalrv 6-2, 5-1 . 

Arantxa Soneher VTcarfa (jj. Spain, def. Ann 
GrassmatL U5. 6-1, 6-1. 

Rorenda LabaL Argentina, def. Irlnta Splr- 
iea, Romania (4). trZ 7-5. 

Jmia Nowrino (2), Czech Republic def. Gala 
Lnon, Spton. vXM. 

STRASBOURG ONN 
THURSOAT. IN STRASBOURO. FRANCE 

quan 1 erfhuls 

Amanda Caeher (3). South AMco def. Naaka 

KqimuTa. Japan. 6-2. 6-1 

Steffi Grot (l), Germany, del. Sandrtne Tes- 

tud. France. 3^ 6-2. 6-1. 

JutflTti Wtesner (4). Austria def. Sabine Ap- 
pehnans (6) Belgium 6-1 b-4. 

Mhtana Ludc Croatia dot. Natasha Zvere- 
va Belarus 7-5, 6-3. 

n^aanii grghg MX 

THURSDAY. M ST POELTEN. AUSTRIA 
OUAHTERnNALS 

DomlnA Hibaty. Slovakia def. Karim Aland. 
Morocco. 6-1 6-2. 

Maroelo RBprtnl Unigutiy, def. Tamm Ny- 
dohL Sweden, 7-56-1. 

PoTridi Rotter (7), Australia, def. Thomas 
Muster (ij, Austria 6-3 7-6 (7-0) . 

Sleng Schalkm, Netherlands and Magnus 
Norman, Sweden. 6-1 1-6. rain Interrupted. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Chicago— B ought contract at INF Scolt 
itous si.Poulnu sera him to Nastntie. AA. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Atlanta— Agreed to terms vrith LHP Tam 
Gtavlne to 4-year contract. 

CHICAGO— Optioned OF Brooks U- 
eschnlch la Iona AA. Called up INF-OF 
Brora Brown from Iowa 

Florida— O ptioned INF Ralph MIBordto 
Charlotte, 1L 

Pittsburgh— O ptioned rhp Ramon 
Ntaret la Calgary, pcl. Activated LHP Matt 
Ruebel from 15-day disabled Bsf. 

*7. uruts — Purchased contract of LHP 
Riga Beltran from LoutevOe, AA. Optioned 
RHp Brody Raggta to Louisville. 

S«h 01 ego— R eassigned RHP Bill Andto- 
son to Mobile, SL 

feAHlTBAU 

national basketball association 

WASHINGTON- fi rad afford Ray ossis- 
toro coach. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

SHEEN bay— Agreed to terms with L£ 
Wayne Simmons on l-year controa. 

SAN die go— S ign TE Freddie Jones to > 
year antiact and T MDw Wtttiytnmoe. 


■NTTh? 


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national hockey league 
boston— N amed P« Bums coach- 
CALOA Rv— Re-signed LW Todd HhBhiO 
® 3-year contract. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDA*. MAY 23. 1997 


PAGE 21 


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SPORTS 


Schalke Downs Inter Milan to Win UEFA Cup 


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ai me end of the second-leg final. 

ZamftranA^ Chi,ean striker. Ivan 

Zaraorano, with six minutes left in the 
regular 9° minutes, evened Schalke’s 

ar'rvi^ ¥ e S ? me score in the first-leg 
at Gelsenkirchen two weeks ago 

Zamorano, who had revived Inter's fad- 
ing hopes with his late goal, missed the 
first penalty for the home team. 

Inter s Dutch midfielder. Aron 
conven another while 
the German players kicked in all four 


penalties for the winning side. 

Schalke, which had entered the two- 
leg final of the European competition as 
the underdog, became the fifth German 
team to win the UEFA Cup. while Inter 
failed in its attempt to win it for the third 
time in six years. 

Thousands of Schalke fans in the 
club's hometown of Gelsenkirchen, in 
the Ruhr Valley industrial heartland, 
celebrated throughout the nigh! after 
their team's victory. 

It was the first European trophy in 
Schalke's 93-year history and its first 
title of any kind in 25 years. 

Although die victory came on pen- 
alties. it was well deserved. The visitors 
outplayed Inter and had more scoring 
chances during the regular time. 

Zamorano ’s goal in the 84th minute 
appeared to be a lucky strike after 
Inter's goalie, Gianluca Pagliuca, made 
at least four sensational saves. 

Inter played the last half hour with 1 0 


men after one of its defenders, Salvatore 
Fresi. was sent off in the 90th minute 
after his second booking of the match. 
After Fresi was ejected. Intel played 
with more purpose and came close to 
scoring on several occasions. 

Maurizio Ganz hit the underside of 
the crossbar late in the second half of 

Ei»«o»«ah Socc«» 

extra time and felt he was robbed of a 
penalty in the first period, but Schalke 
held on. 

Inter's hopes of a third UEFA Cup in 
a decade evaporated in the shoor-out 
when Schalke's goalkeeper, Jens 
Lehmann, saved Zamorano s opening 
shot with a dive. 

Aron Winter then sidefooted his spot- 
kick wide of the goal, leaving Marc 
Wilmots — scorer of the goal in the first 
leg — to slot home for the Schalke 
victory. 


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' y Improbable Triumph: Thank the Laptop 


Reuters 

GELSENKIRCHEN, Germany 

A laptop computer filled with the pen- 
alty-kicking habits of Inter Milan's 
high-pnced stars helped underdogs 
Schalke to their improbable UEFA 
Cupcriumph. 

The Schalke goalkeeper. Jens 
Lehmann, and captain, Olaf Thon, re- 
vealed Thursday that the team had 
studied the computer records prepared 
by coach Huub Stevens, scouring the 
data for useful clues on who kicks 
where under what conditions. 

The data helped Lehmann stop 
Inter's crucial first penalty kick by 
Ivan Zamorano and paved the way for 
the 4-1 penalty shoot-out victory on 
Wednesday. 


“I had checked with the laptop and 
whenever Zamorano took a long run 
up he always kicked it to the left.” 
Lehmann said. "And that's exactly 
what he did.” 

Lehmann's diving save of Zamor- 
ano’s shot put immense pressure on 
Inter, whose fate was then sealed mo- 
ments later when Aron Winter side- 
footed his spot-kick wide of the goal. 

Schalke scored all four of their pen- 
alties for the victory, which touched 
off an all-njghtcelebradon in the Ruhr 
Valley city of Gelsenkirchen. 

A crowd of 60.000 met the team for 
another celebration at the town hall 
early Thursday early afternoon. 

* ‘It will take a while for it to sink in 
that we have achieved the greatest win 


in club history," said Thon. 

Undeterred by steady rain, about 
50,000 Schalke fans watched the 
match on a giant videoscreen at the 
team's Park Stadium. The city streets 
were almost deserted during the 
match. 

“You simply 
the success of i 
whole region,’ 


f cannot imagine what 
Schalke means for this 
said Andre Mueller, a 
local priest. “Schalke is a whole way 
of life for everyone here. A lot of 
people say they feel like second-class 
Germans. This has elevated their self- 
wordi to an astonishing degree.” 

It was the first European trophy in 
Schalke's 93-year history. Schalke 
captured its last major trophy in 1972. 
when it won the German Clip. 


”1 think that when you get to pen- 
alties ir is no longer a question of mer- 
it." said Inter's departing coach. Roy 
Hodgson, after complimenting the 
Schalke coach, Huub Stevens. 

The trophy was Schalke’s first since 
capturing the German Cup in 1972. 

‘ ‘We knew that we would have a good 
chance on penalties,” Stevens said. “It 
is going to take me a couple of hours to 
realize what we have date." 

For much of the match. Schalke 
looked like the hungrier team and de- 
fended well against a desperate bur 
strangely disjointed filter team that nev- 
er seemed to find its flow. 

Javier Zanetri played his heart out in 
midfield, but the pace seemed too 
frantic and the strikers were repeatedly 
frustrated. Zanetti was substituted in the 
dying seconds of extra time by Nicola 
Bern, prompting a furious response 
from the Argentine, who appeared to 
lash out at Hodgson and had to be re- 
strained by teammaies on the bench. 

“I’m disappointed that a player on 
the team cannot give up 30 seconds of 
his time for a teammate," said Hodg- 
son. denying that a punch had been 
thrown. He said Zanetti does not make 
penalty kicks — “Berti does." 

The Spanish referee booked a total of 
10 players, five from each side, as tem- 
pers began to fray. One was the com- 
pletely innocent Schalke captain, Olof 
Them, who was booked after Michael 
Bus kens felled Zanetti as the Argentine 
was running on goal. 

Wilmots was treated for a head 
wound late in the second half and 
snuggled to get back into the game. 

The Italian team began the season 
with high hopes, thanks to the free- 
spending ways of its owner. Massimo 
Moratti, an oil industrialist. 

But the final Wednesday night was 
Inter’s last chance to claim' a crown. It 
has already been eliminated from title 
contention in league play, and was a 
semifinal loser in the Italian Cup. 



lurT-nL^v‘ii>iri Kriun 

Youri Mulder of Schalke celebrating with hometown fans on Thursday. 


In third place with two games left on 
the calendar, Inter still has a shot at 
catching No. 2 AC Parma in the Serie A 
standings. Second place will award a 
berth in next season's Champions 
League. Europe's most lucrative and 
prestigious competition for clubs. 

. “We learned a good lesson out 
there,’ ' Moratti said after his team went 
down. “Getting spanked every so often 
is good for you. It helps you grow 
up. (Reuters. AP ) 

■ Aston Villa and Galaxy Draw 

Stan Collymore spoiled Kevin Hart- 
man's shutout bid in the 75th minute as 
Aston Villa of England's Premier 


League tied the Los Angeles Galaxy of 
U.S. Major League Soccer. 1-1, in an 
exhibition match at the Rose Bowl. The 
Associated Press reported from Pas- 
adena. California. 

In his debut Wednesday night with 
Aston Villa after being transferred from 
Liverpool for £7 million ($1 1.4 million) 
last week, Collymore headed in Mark 
Draper's pass from about five yards out 
on Aston Villa's only shot on goal in the 
second half. 

Welton had given Los Angeles a 1-0 
lead, scoring in the 59th minute. He 
fanned on his first shot attempt, but 
maintained possession and fired die ball 
into the net. 


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2 Games Up, Rollicking Jazz Head to Houston 


By Tom Friend 

New York Times Service 


,'^arl Malone of Utah sticking like glue to Charles Barkley of Houston. 


SALT LAKE CITY — Hall of 
Famers grow on trees in these Western 
Conference finals, but neophytes are 
people, too. 

Two anonymous players changed the 
course of Wednesday night’s 104-92 
victory by the Utah Jazz during a rauc- 
ous third -quarter scoring spree, and 
John Stockton took it from there. 

By night’s end, Stockton nearly had a 
quadruple double (26 points, 12 assists. 
8 rebounds, 8 moving screens), and the 
Houston Rockets decided if' they 
couldn’t beat him, they would beat him 
up. 

Stockton set a late, leaning pick on 
die wrong person. Charles Barkley, and 
Barkley went for Stockton’s jugular, 
literally. As flagrant fouls go, it was an 
1 1 on a scale of 10, and Barkley did not 
help him up, either. 

* ‘Obviously, the refs are not going to 
do their job; they’re going to let him set 
moving picks,’ ’ Barkley said. "Sol was 
trying to separate a shoulder or break a 
rib. I was serious." 

So one minute the Rockets are acting 
sophomoric, the other they are acting 
their age — ancient They shot 36 per- 
cent were outrebounded by 56 to 37 and 
turned the no-names Greg Foster and 
Howard Eisley into scoring machines. 
The Rockets trail this four-of-seven- 


game series; 2-0. have not had a fast- 
break basket in days and need an of- 
fensive alternative to Hakeem Olaju- 
won. 

“We've got to win Friday.’ ’ Barkley 
said, referring to Game 3 in Houston. 
“We’ve got to win Friday. You can 
come back from 3 to 1, but not 3- 
zero.” 

The rebounds are Barkley's depart- 
ment the scoring is Olajuwon's de- 
partment and the tempo is point guard 
Matt Maloney's department — and one 
out of three isn’t good. Olajuwon rang 

' MBA Playoff* 

up his usual 30 points, but Barkley’s 
numbers (16 points. 12 rebounds and 6 
fouls, following, his mere 12 points in 
Game 1 ) sounded better on paper, while 
Maloney is looking more like a Con- 
tinental Basketball Association player 
every day. 

The Rockets had a whole two fast- 
break points, and Barkley had separate 
two-footers returned to sender by 
Foster, a reserve center. 

Asked about all the rebounds he 
failed to swallow whole. Barkley said: 
“I guess I’ve got to get some more, ray 
brother. I’ve just got to get them.” 

Utah, meanwhile, has now swept 21 
straight home games, is 33-3 over all 
since March 1 and won Wednesday 
night with a one-handed power forward. 


Karl Malone's right palm is the color 
purple since he landed hand-first in a 
Game 1 tumble, and he was shooting 
finger rolls Wednesday night when he is 
usually dunking. He has a gory lacer- 
ation the size of a quarter, yet he still 
finished with 24 points and 15 rebounds. 
But he has a bench to congratulate. 

The Utah lead was a tenuous 68-66 
with 3 minutes 44 seconds remaining in 
the third quarter, when the Rockets 
coach, Rudy Tomjanovich, gave his of- 
fense — Olajuwon — a quick rest. As 
substitutions go, it was a bomb, because 
Foster and Eisley fueled a 15-2 run to 
end the quarter, and essentially the 
game. 

“No sooner did the big fellow go out, 
and boom.” Rocket guard Mario Elie 
said. 

There were 2 points by off guard Jeff 
Homacek, 7 from reserve point guard 
Eisley and 4 from Foster, who had re- 
placed Greg Ostenag. who had missed 
two dunks. 

Stockton then had 10 points, 3 assists 
and the elbow of the evening in the 
fourth quarter. Maloney was the re- 
cipient of the latter — straight to his 
upper teeth — and Elie called it “bor- 
derline dirty” and suspected it was on 
purpose by the way Stockton eyed 
Maloney unsympathetically. 

Naturally, this struck a chord with the 
Rockets, who insist the Jazz are the 
dirtiest team on earth. Specifically, for- 


ward Eddie Johnson said they are “the 
most hated team in the league,” and 
Olajuwon seconded that. 

"They’re a dirty team,” Olajuwon 
said. * ‘They want to appear like they're 
good guys. They want the world to call 
them good guys. But they are not They 
are bad guys, the way they play the 
game.” 

The Utah fans are not popular with 
the Rockets, either. In the first half, a 
fogfiom had to be confiscated from a 
comtside spectator who had been blow- 
ing it in the faces of Houston free throw 
shooters, and Barkley went one row up 
to talk to another. 

“They’ve got foghorns.” Johnson 
said, “and they heckle. It's derogatory 
stuff a lot of fans will say in other cities, 
but they've got a lot of them here. In 
New Jersey, they’ve got four or five in a 
group, and in D.C. you’ve got Robin 
Picker. But in Utah, baseline to baseline, 
sideline to sideline, you’ve got hecklers. 
They think they’re cute, but ir hurts their 
team. It’s gotten us fired up, and I know 
it fires Jordan up.” 

Obviously, that and the moving 
screens fired Barkley up, too — hence 
his steamroll of Stockton — but the 1 75- 
pound Stockton didn't even flinch. 

“That’s a dumb foul," Foster said of 
Barkley. "Obviously, he was trying to 
make a statement, but will Stockton stop 
setting picks now? 

"I doubt it” 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


HOW ON EARTH 
DO '(00 00 


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Education 

Appears every Monday 
in The lnternwrkeL 
I To advertise contact 
lumberh Guerrand-Betnmeourt 

1 TeL: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 

Fax: + 33 ( 0)1 41 43 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
• or representative. 











PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 


OBSERVER 


People Are Mad 


At Covent Garden, the Opera Turns Soapy 


By Russel] Baker 


N EW YORK — American 
politics is dead. Govem- 


J.N politics is dead. Govem- 
ment is scarcely breathing. 

Washington media people 
worth hundreds of millions of 
dollars are withering away for 
lack of news from the Po- 
tomac shore. Desperate 
columnists sob and say. 
“There is no news.” 

No news? Nonsense. Of 
course there is news. This is a 
country with 230 million 
people who don't want any 
news from Washington and, 
even if they did. wouldn't ex- 
pect any news from Wash- 
ington because they don't 
think Washington could pom- 
stale beer out of a boot if the 
instructions were printed on 
the heel. 


Bilko barking all the way! 
Ditto on the return trip. ” 

This is just one example of 
the entire society’s determi- 
nation to entertain you wheth- 
er you like it or not. S be lists 
other examples: 

“Was regaled with light 
hillbilly music while strapped 
into an M.R.L machine at 
N.Y.U. Medical Center — 


By Alan Riding 

JVfu- York Times Service 


L ONDON — Viewed in isola- 
tion. Genista McIntosh's resie- 


my preference not soli- 
cited.” 


These people are mad. as 
, “I'm maa as hell and I'm 


in, “I’m mad as hell and I'm 
not going to take it any- 
more." As in "Network,” 
the movie that gave us that 
line, these people, expecting 
nothing of consequence from 


any government, can only go 
to the window and scream. Or 


to the window and scream. Or 
write to a convenient news- 
paper columnist. 


Here is John M. of Queens, 
New York, and he is mad 
about car alarms. Inspired by 
the president’s recent dog- 
and-pony show about volun- 
reerism, he wants “to donate 
crowbars and wire cutters to 
open the hood of cars whose 
alarms blare outside my win- 
dow at all hours.” 

Here is a New York, wom- 
an. Phyllis H.. mad about “a 
bus ride from hell” — pre- 
sumably New York — to 
Philadelphia: 

"On the 9 A.M. bus, a 
mandatory movie! VCR 
screens, the sound track loud 
and clear through the P.A. 
speaker at each ear, Sergeant 


“Telephone ‘holds’ con- 
nected to load rock music 

Doctors’ and clinic waiting 
rooms with canned music 
keyed to the lowest common 
denominator.” 

If politics were not dead, if 
government were about any- 
thing any more, something 
would be done to stop this 
wanton and brutal entertain- 
ment with which inhuman 
agencies infest the world, pre- 
sumably to distract us from 
the temptation to think. 

For dudgeon at its highest, 
however, our award goes to 
Steve V. of Pomona, Taxi- 
fomia. as he styles, I assume, 
the Golden State. 

This irate Taxifomian has 
been reading news stories 
about how Franklin D. Roo- 
sevelt statues should pose the 
late president in his new 
monument. He has some sug- 
gested poses of his own: 

“F.D.R. with his hand 
stuck firmly in the taxpayer’s 
pocker. 

“F.D.R. torching the Ninth 
and Tenth Amendments. 

“F.D.R. prolonging the 
Depression by eight long ag- 
onizing years, thanks to tus 
idiot economic notions. 

“F.D.R. creating the bank- 
rupting pyramid scheme 
laughingly called Social Se- 
curity.’*’ 

Mr. V. identifies himself as 


"President of the League to 
Tear Down Any D — Monu- 


Tear Down Any D — Mo 
mem to D — Politicians.” 

Se m York Times Service 


JL/tion, Genista McIntosh's resig- 
nation as chief executive of die 
Royal Opera House at Covent 
Garden last week hardly merited 
much public attention. She was 
hardly a household name, she had 
been in the post only four months 
and she was promptly replaced by 
an experienced arts administrator. 
Mary Allen. 

Yet in the process of stepping 
down. McIntosh. Si. won more 
than her designated few minutes of 
fame. She said she was leaving 
because of ill health, but the time is 
long past when pronouncements by 
the Royal Opera House were taken 
at face value. Smelling intrigue and 
eager to trace a plot. British news- 
papers insisted she had been ousted 
and demanded to know why. 

The timing of the shake-up could 
not have been worse. On July 14, the 
mid- 19th-century theater will close 
for two and a half years for a $350 
million expansion and moderniz- 
ation. leaving 280 of its 800 per- 
manent employees out of work and 
its two companies, the Royal Opera 
and the Royal Ballet, wandering 
London through December 1999. 

Further, with morale in the house 
plummeting, stagehands are threat- 
ening to strike this month for the 
first time since 1991. Failure to 
senle the dispute over payments 
during tours would lead to can- 
cellation of many productions, 
deepening the theater's budget 
problems. "A strike would 
threaten the very future of the 
house," Lord Chadlington, chair- 
man of the Royal Opera House, 
said in an interview. 

But none of this would have 
caused much stir were it nor pan of a 
continuing melodrama that has re- 
peatedly thrust Covent Garden into 
the headlines over the last four years. 
Its travails in the 1993-94 season 
were even captured in a six-part 
BBC documentary, “The Royal Op- 
era House.*' now being broadcast m 
the United States by PBS. 


There has always been simmer- 
ing resentment that taxpayers' 
money — a S30 million annual 
grant from the Arts Council of Eng- 
land — is used to subsidize the 
lyrical amusement of an elite 
minority. But. this bubbled to the 
surface only in 1995 when Covent 
Garden won a $125 million gram 
from the profits of a new National 
Lottery to help pay for its refur- 
bishment 

Suddenly London tabloids 
began comparing the needs of op- 
era “toffs’ * and hard-pressed char- 
ities, and the Royal Opera House 
was thrown on tire defensive, strug- 
gling to justify itself by saying it 
received less public money than 
any other opera house in Europe 
and by promising to lower its seat 
prices to become more accessible. 

The BBC documentary put the 
Royal Opera House even more in 
the public eye. Covent Garden was 
courageous — or foolhardy — in 
• allowing a BBC crew full access to 
its corridors, offices and stage for a 
year, and the programs showed 
management squabbles, power 
struggles and divas' tiffs in an al- 
mosFVictorian setting. 

Still more problems lay ahead. 
Despite Covent Garden's success 
in winning money for its redevel- 
opment (it has also raised about 60 
percent of its goal of SI 60 million 
in donations), it had the headache 
of finding somewhere for the Royal 
Opera ana the Royal Ballet to per- 
form for seasons. Whether through 
misfortune or mismanagement, re- 
peated attempts to find a new home 
for the companies fell through. 

By the time McIntosh took over 
from Jeremy Isaacs as the house's 
chief executive on Jan. 1 this year, 
with construction well under way 
and barely six months to go before 
the theater was to be tom apart, the 
companies had nowhere to go. 
Lord Gowrie, the chairman of the 
Arts Council, called the situation a 
shambles. Isaacs sniped back that 
the .Arts Council’s failure to protea 
public financing of die arts was 
"not a pretty sight.” 

But McIntosh was able to 


-is 



fallen out with either Lord Chad- 
lington or Vivien Duffield, the no 
less powerful chairman of the Roy- 
al Opera House Trust, which is 
responsible for fund-raising. There 
was also speculation that she had 
been given the title but not the 
power to run the house, that she 
was overwhelmed by the complex- 
ity of running two companies and 
ihat she wanted to return to her 
former post as general manager at 
the Royal National Theatre. 

Royal Opera officials closed 
ranks. In a letter to The Tunes of 
London, McIntosh said the official 
statement "tells all there is to tell.” 
Lord Chadlington called McIntosh 
“an absolutely fabulous' ’ manager 
and said her departure was a * ‘bnge 
loss” to Covent Garden. Lord 
Gowrie praised the choice of Allen, 
until now secretary general of the 
Arts Council, as the chief exec- 





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Mary Allen, new chief of the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. 


present the complex wanderings of 
the Royal Opera and the Royal 
Ballet over the next two seasons as 
a triumph for democracy. The 
companies will appear in Jess ex- 
clusive districts of London and of- 
fer quality culture at reduced 
prices. “It is a powerful oppor- 
tunity to challenge preconceptions, 
extend boundaries and make new 
friends,” she said, announcing the 
program. 

For the 1 997-98 season, the Roy- 
al Opera will present full opera 
productions at the Barbican 
Theatre, the Shaftesbury and Royal 
Albert Hall and concert versions at 
Royal Festival Hall, Barbican Hall 
and again Albert Hall. The Royal 
Ballet will be more settled in the 
Laban's Apollo in Hammersmith 
and Festival Hall. For the 1998-99 
season, most productions should be 


concentrated in the newly refur- 
bished Sadler's Wells Theatre. 

Keith Cooper, Covent Garden's 
director of corporate affairs, said 
the house had begxm discussing 
programming after die Royal Op- 
era reopens the house with Verdi’s 
“Falstaff" and the Royal Ballet 
reopens with “The Nutcracker” 
Suite. Commenting on future pri- 
cing policy, he said. “We were 
looking at how to reconcile public 
funding, donations, sponsors, ac- 
cessibility etc.” 

Then, out of the blue, McIntosh 
announced her resignation on May 
13. “It was quite a shock," Cooper 

said, conceding that he had seen no 

• _ _ • ■ ■ ^ 


signs that the departing chief ex- 
ecutive was unwell. 


ecutive was unwell. 

Soon the rumor mill was work- 


ing overtime. Many newspapers 
favored the version that she had 


utive. 

Duffield said she was saddened 
that McIntosh, was unwell and ex- 
pressed amazement at what she had 
read of the case in the press. 

Despite everything, she said 
raising money for the new Covent 
Garden was going well. ‘ T am rais- 
ing money on the basis of what is i 
on stage and not of what is written 1 
about us, most of which is untrue,” 
she said in a telephone interview. 

Indeed, in all the heated political 
debate about the Royal Opera 
House, little heed is paid to the fact 
that ballet and opera productions 
remain at the highest level, as if this 
could be taken for granted For 
British newspapers, however, it is 
the soap opera that has been taking 
place inside the house that con- 
tinues to provide the most enter- 
tainment. 

Under a headline reading, “Cov- 
ent Garden Stages Its Own Plot of 
Rivalry and Revenge,” The Times 
commenced in an editorial that after 
the house reopened “there might’ 
be a surprise finale if the present 
cast showed any sign of being able 
to run a professional opera house as 
easily as they can arrange a royal 
gala performance or a fracas in a 
Crush Bar.” 






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Harriman Sale Nets $ 8 . 7 Million 



I T’S going to be a 50th birthday 
party “fit for a queen.” The Sun 


L party “fit for a queen.” The Sun 
reported Thursday. The paper said 
Prince Charles has invited 150 
guests to an $80,000 banquet on July 
17 at Highgrove, his home in 
Gloucestershire, to celebrate the an- 
niversary of his longtime companion 
Camilla Parker Bowles. The bash 
will be a move toward establishing 
public acceptance for Parker Bowles, 
who has been treated roughly in the 
press since Charles admitted their 
affair, while still married to Princess 
Diana, in a television interview. 


show for the fourth consecutive year. 
It was the 26th Emmy for die show 
since it began more than a decade 
ago. Lucci was nominated for the 
17th time as best actress in a soap 


opera for her role on “All My Chil- 
dren.” For the 17th time, she lost, to 


dren." For the 17th time, she lost, to 
first-time nominee Jess Walton of 
“The Young and the Restless." 


million for what it called the greatest 
single-owner wine collection ever 
put on the block. One lot of 30 cases 
of Chateau Cheval Blanc and Chat- 
eau Mouton Rothschild both 1982, 
made £ 121,000 pounds. 


By Carol Vogel 

Sew York fines Ser.ice 


N EW YORK — The two-dav sale of the 
contents of the late Pamela Harriman’s 
homes in Paris, Washington and Middle- 
burg, Virginia, ended with barely a teacup 
unsold. 

The Sotheby's auction, which took six 
sessions, totaled SS.7 million. weD above its 
high estimate of S5.9 million. Of the 1,1 1 3 
objects offered only 28 failed to selL The 
results did not compare to the frenzied 
three-day sale of the estate of Jacqueline 
Kennedy Onassis, which made S34.5 mil- 
lion. But as celebrity sales go, this was a 
strong success. 

The proceeds from die sale go to Mrs. 
Harriman’s only child, Winston Churchill, 
grandson of the British prime minister, and 
his estranged wife, Mary. 

Being offered was an assortment of such 
items as sofas, coffee tables, side chairs and 
china, as well as decorative objects like 
cigarette cases -and candlesticks. There was 
also some art, although Harriman, who was 
ambassador to France at her death in Feb- 


Talk show divas Oprah Winfrey 
and Rosie O’Donnell were both win- 


ners in the 24th annual Daytim 
Emmy Awards ceremony, and Susai 


Satan Wihh/Tbc AJiOclKrt Pmi 

EN POINTE — Chelsea Clinton at 


Emmy Awards ceremony, and Susan 
Luca prolonged her already long 
losing streak. Tears streamed down 
Rosie's face as she accepted the 
award for best talk show host, while 
Oprah didn't even bother to come on 


the dedication of a new wing of stage when "The Oprah Winfrey 
the Washington School of Ballet. Show" was named outstanding talk 


The celebrity auction season con- 
tinues. In Beverly Hills, Sotheby’s 
pulled in $206,892 for the estate of 
fella Fitzgerald, including $74,000 
for her 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300D 
cabriolet and $900 for a set of fake 
eyelashes. Charlton Heston's loin- 
dothi from “Ben Hur” fetched a 
measly $1350. less than one-tenth 
the estimate, while a pair of Mr. 
Ed’s horseshoes made $8 ,625. ... In 
London, the two-day auction of fine 
wines from the cellar of the com- 
poser Andrew Lloyd Webber 
brought a total of £3.69 million ($5 .9 
million). Sotheby's said the total ex- 
ceeded the expected amount of £2.7 


Paul McCartney says he has a 
notebook of never-recorded songs 
that he composed with John Len- 
non. "There are probably five or 
six’ ’ songs, the former Beetle said in 
a statement issued by his New York 
publicist. “I wrote them in my 
school exercise book. It's got 'Love 
Me Do’ in it and four others that were 
never recorded." 


Roman Polanski says he will 
make a stage musical-out of his 1967 
film farce "The Fearless Vampire 
Killers,” with the premiere planned 
for Vienna in October. The show will 
necessarily have more dialogue than 
the film, which gave priority to 
frantic action, the director said. 


ruaiy, had given Christie's her best works to 
sell two years ago. Those works — a Pi- 
casso, a Renoir and a Matisse — brought 
$18.6 million. 

But a major draw in the current sale was 
historic memorabilia relatingto Harriman 's 
one-time father-in-law. Sir Winston Chur- 
chiiL 

“The objects that fetched the greatest 


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multiples were those things that had a won- 
derful histooy,” Diana Brooks. Sotheby's 
chief executive, said after the sale. “There 
was definitely a provenance faaor at 
work.” 

A few celebrities showed up, and went 
home with a bit of the mystique. 

The singer Aretha Franklin dropped 
$8,395 Wednesday on three silver cigarette 
boxes and three contemporary brass-and- 
lucite occasional tables. 

On the first night of the sale, the actress 
Whoopi Goldberg sat in the third row and 
bid on a number of items, ending up with a 
leather-covered figure of a donkey for 
$1,495 and a set of 12 silver-metal coasters 
for $2,875. (Prices include the auction 
house’s commission.) 


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