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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THj^^vHfl^GTON POST 


I The World's Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Friday. May 30, 1997 


No. 35.534 


Suharto’s Landslide 
Exceeds Forecasts 

In the Early Count in Indonesia, 
83% of Vote Goes to Ruling Party 

By Seih Mvdans 

Nin Hfl r iwi , i f 

JAKARTA — Indonesia's highly ritualized parliamentary elec- 
tion system worked Thursday, with people across the country stand- 
ing in long, dutiful lines to east their votes and with the governing 
party heading tor the overwhelming victory it had predicted. 

Although this has hcen the must violent campaign in recent 
fusion. with more than ^00 people killed, election day was largely 
.peaceful. 

■ Bu: on the eve of the vote, on Wednesday, as many as 2 2 people 

ere reported killed in four attacks by separatist guerrillas in East 
Timor. « Page 4.» 

At midnight Thursday, with about 1 0 percent of the votes counted, 
the Golkar party of President Suharto was far exceeding its own 
projections, with S3. 17 percent of the total. It has won every election 
since the current system was put in place in 1971. 

The largely Muslim United Development Party, whose noisy 
rallies had become the outlet for anti-government protests and 
violenr confrontations, trailed far behind with 14.45 percent of the 
vote. 

The People’s Democratic Party, which had disintegrated into 
infighting since the government engineered the ouster last year of Us 
popular leader. Megawati Sukarnoputri, had just 2.38 percent of the 
vote. 

The government's apparent margin of victory was greater than in 

See INDONESIA. Page 4 



Ji-tai MjcDuugalL.Afaitc Fnocs-Picw 

President Suharto, his ballot in hand, leaving 
the voting booth on Thursday in Jakarta. 


Kohl Goes for Broke on Gold Ploy 

Chancellor Stakes Reputation on Maneuver to Help Create Euro 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

FRANKFURT — If there were any 
doubts left about the tortured hoops 
through which European politicians are 
prepared to squeeze themselves in the 
name of a single European currency, 
consider what just happened in Ger- 
many. 

In the space of a few hours Wed- 
nesday night. Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
drew ’the lines for a battle of titanic 

Waigel Rebuffs Critics 

Theo Waigel, Germany’s finance 
minister, tried to reassure markets that 
Europe's monetary union would go 
ahead on schedule. Page 13. 

Philippe Seguin, a possible Bench 
prime minister, said Paris would honor 
its word to join the union. Page 5. 


proportions with the Bundesbank — the 
prestigious central bank — and. in the 
process, embarked on his riskiest polit- 
ical gambit since Germany’s reunifi- 
cation in 1990 when, as now, he over- 
rode the economists' advice in the name 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

of a political vision and lived to count 
enormous costs. 

Ostensibly, the fight with the 
Bundesbank is over plans by his finance 
minister. Theo Waigel, to revalue Ger- 
many's huge gold reserves to plug a 
budget gap that yawns between die gov- 
ernment and its overwhelming desire to 
fulfill the fiscal criteria for joining the 
new European currency to be created in 
1999. 

Mr. Kohl, Europe’s leading pro- 
ponent of the currency to be called the 
euro, has staked his political reputation 


on its creation. Without Germany, the 
project would collapse. 

The Bundesbank rejected the revalu- 
ation proposals that would raise an easy 
$7 billion to narrow the budget gap. The 
government promptly told the Bundes- 
bank that it would change the law so that 
the revaluation could take place. * 
What was at stake was much more 
than economics. For in pressing to re- 
value gold reserves, the government 
was tacitly acknowledging the same 
message that is emerging from the run- 
off ballot in France’s parliamentary 
elections — that European voters do not 
want to be squeezed into the kind of 
fiscal straitjacket required by the single 
currency, and so the rules for the new 
currency or even the new currency it- 
self, must be softened. 

In other words, if politicians do not 

See GOLD, Page 7 


Blair Backs 
Clinton 9 s Call 
To Finish Joh 


By John F. Harris 

It JlJL-m.HH Pusr Ser\:if 

LONDON — President Bill Clinton 
warned Thursday thai international ef- 
forts to bring stability ro postwar Bosnia 
and rebuild its economy are behind 
schedule, and that the job may not be 
done by a June 1998 deadline for with- 
drawing NATO troops unless “we work 
like crazy in the next 13 months." 

Following his first extended meeting 
with the newly elected British prime 
minister. Tony' Blair. Mr. Clinton said 
both of them believed there had been too 
much attention paid to when troops 
would leave, and not enough to training 
a civilian peace force ana other tasks 
necessary lor long-term peace. 

"What I want to do is stop talking 
about what date we're leaving on." Mr. 
Clinton said, “and start talking about 
what were going to do on die only date 
that matters, which is tomorrow." 

“I agree with that very strongly in- 
deed." Mr. Blair said. 

His quick assent reflected a day in 
which the two leaders — who have 
similar backgrounds and even share 
some of the same political advisers — 
basked in each other’s presence and 
showered each other with praise at 
every mm. 

Mr. Clinton's statement served to de- 
fuse what could potentially be tension 
between his government and Mr. Blair’s 
over Bosnia. Robin Cook, the foreign 
minister for the new Labour Parry gov- 
ernment, recently warned that Britain 
bad no intention of keeping troops in 
Bosnia if the United States pulled out. 
"One our, all out." Mr. Cook said. 

Mr. Clinton’s answer, however, also 
implied that he would consider keeping 
the roughly 8,000 U.S. troops now sta- 
tioned in Bosnia past the current dead- 
line — a move that would surely stir 
domestic political opposition for him. 

After Mr. Clinton’s statement, his 
officials played down the prospect that 
the president might seek an extension of 
the NATO force. The White House 
deputy national security adviser. James 
Steinberg, said his boss was merely 
trying to emphasize the urgency of 
speeding up Bosnia's development, not 
floating a trial balloon about keeping 
forces there past next summer. 

Also Thursday, Mr. Clinton made his 
first public comments on this week's 


AGENDA 

U.S. Holds Line on NATO Expansion 




The Dollar 


Naw Yortt Thursday 9 A P.M. piovtoua doaa 

DM 1.6963 1-6955 

Pound 1.6403 1.B39 

Yen 116^5 115.865 

FF 5.7334 5.7285 


. '.iBlf' 

B ami 

The Dow 



mmm 

Thursday dose 

Drevtoua dose 


-23.09 

7330.18 

735357 

L jsaet 

■ • S&P 500 H 


change 

ThufBdoy B4P.M. 

previous dos* 


-3.13 

644.08 

64751 


j Books 




Crossword— 

Page 4. 




.... Pages 8-9. 

: 1.1-5 ifcF 

Sports 


Pages 20-21. 


The Intermarket 


Page 1 2. 


ThelHT on-line http://ivivw.iht.com 


SINTRA, Portugal (WP) — The 
United States signaled its desire 
Thursday to restrict the first wave of 
NATO expansion to Poland, Hungary 
and the Czech Republic. But it also 
sought to reassure the also-rans that 
the expansion process would contin- 
ue, despite Russian opposition. 

Addressing a NATO meeting here. 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
elevated the bar for NATO mem- 
bership to those countries that have 
cleared “the highest hurdles of re- 
form." U.S. officials later said the 
Clinton administration favored a 
“smaller" group of countries. 

A Ukraine-NATO charter. Page 2. 

PAGE TWO 

Turkey' s’ Fertile Crescent Is Reborn 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Oklahoma Prosecution Ends Its Case 




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CIA Memory Goes Blank 

Secret Files on Iran Destroyed Decades Ago 









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a . By Tim Weiner 

- r -- New York Tunes Senict 

WASHINGTON — The CIA. which 
has repeatedly pledged for more than 
five years to make public the files from 
its secret mission to overthrow the gov- 
ernment of Iran in 1953, now says that it 
destroyed or lost almost all the doc- 
uments decades ago. 

Two successive directors of Central 
Intelligence, Robert Gates in 1992 and 
James Woolsey Jr. in 1993, publicly 

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pledged that the Iran records would be 
made public as part of the CIA’s * ‘open- 
ness" initiatives. 

But they did not know there was 
virtually nothing left to open: almost all 
of the documents were destroyed in the 
early 1960s. 

“If anything of substantive impor- 
tance that was an only copy was des- 
*troyed at any time, this is a terrible 
breach of faith with the American 
people and their ability to understand 
their own history," Mr. Woolsey said 
Wednesday. , .. . 

"I had every reason to believe in 93 
that the full historical record, anything 
important to the historical understand- 
ing, was there and available. I had no 
notion that anything important had been 
destroyed." 

A historian who was a member of trie 
CIA staff in 1992 and 1993 said in an 
interview that the records were oblit- 
erated by "a culture of destruction'* at 
the agency. 

The historian, Nick Cullather, said he 
believed that records on other major 
Cold War covert operations had been 
burned, including those on secret mis- • 

See CIA, Page 7 








Dmd GankMa/Thr Amratal Pira 

KABILA SWORN IN — Laurent Kabila taking the presidential oath 
Thursday in a soccer stadium In Kinshasa before 50,000 people. Page 7. 


sws Goals in Bosnia 


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Seen Appkwhac/Tfcc Auodmd Pkm 

Prime Minister Tony Blair, left, accompanying President Clinton after 
a press conference Thursday in the garden at No. 10 Downing Street 


election of a moderate cleric, Mo- 
hammed Khatami, as president of Iran. 
“It’s interesting and it’s hopeful," he 
said. 

But he added that there could be no 
hope of warmer U.S. relations with the 
Islamic stare until there was demon- 
strable evidence that it had renounced 
terrorism and stopped developing 
weapons of mass destruction. 

On Northern Ireland, Mr. Clinton 
said any new progress in die peace pro- 
cess would have to await elections there 
next week. Reciting the Blair govern- 
ment’s line, Mr. Clinton said that Sinn 
Fein, the political aim of the Irish Re- 
publican Army, should not be admitted 
to peace talks unless It agreed to a 
complete cease fire. 

After their formal meetings, Mr. 


Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton 
joined Mr. Blair and his wife, Cherie, 
for a dinner. 

Mr. Clinton was to return to Wash- 
ington later Thursday evening. 

Fred Barbash of The Washington 
Post reported: 

The press here often measures the 
global stature of British public figures on 
the extern to which they achieve recog- 
nition from the United States. On a scale 
of 1 to 10, being snubbed by a president is 
traditionally an embarrasring 1; being 
treated “cordially” is a 5. Being treated 
as a pal singing from the same hymnal — 
as Mr. Blair was Thursday — is a definite 
10, Paula Jones and U.S. Supreme Court 
decisions notwithstanding. 

See ALLIES, Page 7 


Nigeria Troops Take Up 
Positions in Sierra Leone 

Lagos Hoping to Restore Elected President 


By Howard W. French 

.Vw York Timer Service 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Setting 
the stage for a possible test of military 
strength, hundreds of heavily armed Ni- 
gerian troops began taking up strategic 
positions Thursday around the Sierra 
Leonean capital, Freetown, to back de- 
mands that leaders of a military coup in 
that country restore power to the elected 
president. 

Officially, the Nigerian troops, who 
have been arriving by ship and airplane 
from neighboring Liberia, where they 
serve in a regional peacekeeping force, 
are being deployed ro help restore law 
and order. On Sunday, a junior officers' 
coup overthrew Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, 
who was elected president in March 
1996. 

West African diplomats said, 
however, that the Nigerian forces' were 
acting on a request by Mr. Kabbah, who 
has taken temporary refuge in Guinea, 
to reinstate his government. Mr. Kab- 
bah's election ended four years of rule 
by junior officers and was widely hailed 
as a breakthrough for democracy in the 
region. 

“The idea is to give these people a 
chance to do the right thing ail by them- 
selves,” said one West African dip- 
lomat who is closely monitoring the 


Nigerian troop deployment. "But the 
point that is hopefully getting through is 
that in the end, the coup leaders will be 
given no choice but to back down." 

Mr. Kabbah’s overthrow, which 
began with a predawn raid on a Free- 
town prison that liberated scores of im- 
prisoned army officers and common 
criminals, was the third military coup in 
Sierra Leone in five years. After 24 
hours of severe looting by soldiers, and 
as many as 100 deaths, the organizers of 
the coup announced that Major Johnny 
Paul Koromah bad been appointed the 
new head of state. 

In his first official act. Major 
Koromah suspended the constitution 
and banned political parties. Before the 
coup. Major Koromah had been in pris- 
on since September on a treason con- 
viction for one of several previous coup 
attempts against Mr. Kabbah. 

On Wednesday, in one of his first 
public statements, the new head of state 
tried to ease mounting fears within his 
own military of an imminent Nigerian 
military action against his government, 
which he has called the Armed Forces 
Revolutionary Council. He said that 
“our Nigerian brothers will not inter- 
fere in our internal matters.’’ 

Setting the stage for a period of stria 

See FREETOWN, Page 7 


Don’t Look Now, but It’s Raining Cosmic Snowballs 

~ By Kathy Sawyer Objects OS Huge OS HoUSeS also showering other bodies as far out as Jupiter, h 

Washi ??" m - p - ' i,Ser '“ e — Pour Water Into Atmosohere couw from a vast disc of comets tha 

BALTIMORE — Earth is bathed by a steady “cos- x uu>l " v Muwspsm e ^ve theorized is circling bevond th 


BALTIMORE — Earth is bathed by asteady “cos- 
mic rain" from previously undetected objects from 
outer space that pour huge quantities of water into the 
atmosphere, according to startling new evidence. 

The objects, 20-to-4O-ton snowballs ihe size of two- 
bedroom houses, streak into the atmosphere by the 
thousands each day, disintegrate harmlessly 600 to 
15,000 miles up and deposit large clouds of water 
vapor that eventually fall on Earth’s surface as rain, 
according to Louis Frank of the University of Iowa: He 
led the research team that has captured images of these 
objects for the first time. 

The ramifications of the discovery are potentially 
enormous, Mr. Frank and other scientists said as the 
evidence was presented Wednesday. If Mr. Frank’s 


interpretation of the evidence is confirmed, it could 
force scientists to revise beliefs about how Earth and 
the solar system evolved, how ihe building blocks of 
life first arose, how the oceans formed and whether 
fluxes in the cosmic rain could have caused ice ages 
and mass extinctions. 

Scientists might also be compelled to study the 
impact of this alien -precipitation on Earth's climate, 
the “greenhouse" effect and the "hole" in the ozone 
layer over Antarctica. 

Mr. Frank’s evidence suggests the small ice comets 
move in a stream around the sun at more than 25 miles, 
per second, slightly outpacing Earth and most likely 


also showering other bodies as far out as Jupiter, he 
said. 

They could come from a vast disc of comets that 
astronomers have theorized is circling beyond the 
planets, Mr. Frank said, but their source is basically 
huge question mark. 

The objects must be composed of something other 
than icy water, or they would never survive the sun’s 
heat as they hurtle toward the inner solar system. Mr. 
Frank has suggested they travel Through space cloaked 
in a protective mantle of carbon that functions like a 
plastic food wrap, preventing them from visibly losing 
their substance like ordinary comets with their glow- 
ing tails. 

The discovery suggests that the volume of water on 
Earth is increasing. It also las implications for the 

See COSMIC, Page 7 





From Arid to Fruitful /A Colossal Turkish Project 


Rebirth of the Fertile Crescent 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Nw York Times Sen-ice 


H 


ARRAN. Turkey — From the ruins of the 
ancient citadel that towers above this re- 
mote and dusty town, the plains of Meso- 


potamia stretch in every direction. Many 
i here, but perl 


great visionaries have reigned 
none have had grander dreams than a 40-year-old 
engineer who stood atop the windswept bluff on a 
recent afternoon and surveyed his domain. 

The engineer, Olcay Unver, heads the Southeast 
Anatolia Project, one of the most ambitious de- 
velopment projects ever attempted. His goals are 
nothing less than to transform an arid tract of land 
the size of Austria into a fertile and prosperous 
garden, to break down a feudal social structure in 
which most of its 6 million residents live in poverty, 
and to provide so much work and opportunity that 
people will flow into this region from other pans of 
Turkey rather than fleeing in despair. 

In his seventh year of running the project, Mr. 
Unver is beginning to succeed. Applying in part the 
lessons he learned while studying for his doctorate 
in engineering at the University of Texas and his 
experience as a water engineer for the Lower Col- 
orado- River Authority, he is slowly turning this 
backward and violent region into a model of rising 
expectations. 

The scale of the $32 billion project, which en- 
visions the construction of 22 dams and 19 hy- 
droelectric plants on the Tigris and Euphrates 
Rivers, is vast enough to fulfill any engineer's 
fantasies. 

Three of the dams and adjacent power plants are 
completed, including the giant Ataturk: Dam, which 
is the centerpiece of the project. Six more com- 
plexes are under construction, work on two others is 
about to begin, and the rest are being designed. 

Under Mr. Unver's direction, the project has 
broadened far beyond its original scope. It now 


includes forestry, fish farming, urban planning pro- 
grams, rural health clinics, u 


rural health clinics, literacy classes, han- 
dicraft courses, schools for farmers, and centers for 
tlie promotion of women’s rights. 

Dozens of such programs and centers ate already 
functioning and more are opening every month. “A 
lot of people have the misconception that this is an 
irrigation project or an energy project,” Mr. Unver 
said as he looked out over the blossoming Harran 
Plain. "Actually, it’s an integrated socio-economic 
development project which aims to enhance the 
standard of living in this area. Maximum yield is not 
the goal. A good yield in an equitable social context 
is a better goal.” 

The project has roots as far back as the 1930s. 
when President Kemai Ataturk, the father of mod- 
em Turkey, proposed the construction of dams to 
harness the power of the Tigris and Euphrates. The 
region through which the rivers flow, one of the 
cradles of early civilization, was once known as the 
fertile crescent, but it dried up over the centuries and 
became a miserable backwater. 

In 1989, the Turkish government decided to con- 
solidate the project within a single agency. Mr. 
Unver. then a young government planner, became the 
agency’s on-site director, and in 1991 he took over 
leadership of the program. He has survived through 
seven governments under five prime ministers. 


Olcay Unver ; standing on a hiU overlooking the 
Hamm Plain, leads the Southeast Anatolia Project, 
whose goal is to transform a barren tract of land 
the size of Austria into a prosperous region. 


.gBackSaa.j- Georgia 








0 Km 150 


TURKEY 



NYT 



Vv WVTuan 


Much of the region has been tom by civil and 
military conflict for more than a decade. Kurdish 
separatists here are fighting the Turkish army, and 
four of the nine provinces in the project area are 
under emergency rule. 

When the war was at its peak in the late 1980s and 
early '90s. guerrillas singled out the project, at- 
tacking several machine shops and killing at least 
one group of engineers. But the guerrillas are not 
known to have attacked any of the project’s con- 
struction sites in the last two years. 


S 


CORES of new factories are under con- 
struction. and scores more are already open. 
Most are producing textiles from the cotton 
thar can now be grown in irrigated local soil, 
or processing the fruits and vegetables that are 
sprouting from green fields. All are fueled by the 
cheap electric power that is becoming available. A 
surprising number of the factories are owned by 
local entrepreneurs who had until now thought it 
wiser to invest their money in other pans of the 
country. 

‘ ‘Everywhere in the region, we see a great deal of 
private investment, mostly by local people.” said 
Elizabeth Shelton, the American consul in nearby 
Adana. "I’m also struck by the amount of in- 
frastructure investment the government is putting 


in. There’s tremendous road construction under 
way. Airports are being built. We’re telling Amer- 
ican businessmen that now is the time to come into 
the southeast.” 

Guerrillas are not the project's only problem, 
though. The two countries that lie downstream in 
the Tigris-Euphrates basin, Syria and Iraq, have 
complained binerly about Turkey's plan to divert 
large amounts of the rivers’ water. 

Because of this conflict, major lenders like the 
World Bank have refused to contribute to con- 
struction of the dams or irrigation projects. Then- 
reluctance has slowed the project and forced the 
Turkish government to come up with almost all the 
money itself, fueling the country's 80 percent in- 
flation rate. 

The project is less than half finished, and its 
effects are only beginning to he felt by the local 
population. No one, not even Mr. Unver, will ven- 
ture to guess when it might be completed. For years 
to come, people in this region will probably remain 
Turkey’s poorest 

• "Development levels here are comparable to 
those in Africa.” said Mehmet Sirin Yigit, who 
beads the chamber of commerce in Diyarbakir, the 
region's largest city. “That has to change.” 

He added that what the project signifies. “we 
hope, is that the change has begun.” 


Ukraine and NATO 
Set Security Charter 


The Associated Press 

SINTRA, Portugal — NATO foreign 
ministers agreed Thursday to a sweep- 
ing new security charter with Ukraine, 
then began miks to choose which na- 
tions would be offered membership 
when the alliance expands into Eastern 
Europe. 

The final decision on which countries 
are to be admitted will be made at a 
NATO s umm it meeting in Madrid cm 
July S and 9. 

Already, Poland Hungary and the 
Czech Republic are seen as almost cer- 
tain to join. 

The U.S. secretary of state, 
Madeleine Albright, told her fellow 
ministers that the expansion of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
would “extend eastward the peace and 
prosperity that Western Europe has en- 
joyed for the last 50 years.” 

The meeting here at a baroque mon- 
astery outside this historic mil town 
follows the si gnin g of a landmark se- 
curity agreement between Russia and 
NATO in Paris on Tuesday that opens 
that way for the alliance’s expansion. 

The talks here were expected to focus 
on whether co widen the net to include 
Romania and Slovenia in the first wave 
of NATO enlargement, scheduled for 
completion by early 1999. 

France arid Italy are backing the Ro- 
manian and Slovene bids, arguing that 
bringing them into Western institutions 
would bolster stability in the volatile 


Balkan region and reinforce NATO’s 
southern flank. 

Others among the 1 6 NATO allies are 
wary of spreading NATOV security 
umbrella too wide. 

Foreign Secretary Robin Cook of Bri- 
tain said he was willing to discuss ex- 
tending membership to Slovenia and 
Romania but stressed that they had to 
make a positive contribution to the al- 
liance. . 

“Entry into NATO is not a free gift,” 
Mr. Cook said. “We have to look at the 
security implications.” He warned that 
any expansion of the alliance must 
strengthen it, not weaken it. 

The charter with Ukraine should allay. 
Kiev’s fears of being left in a dangerous 
gray area between the alliance and Rus- 
sia. It is designed to tighten political and 
military links and is broadly similar to 
the NATO -Russia accord. 

Under the charter, Ukraine can con- 
sult with NATO on perceived security 
threats, open up a permanent military 
liaison mission ai NATO headquarters 
and hold regular political talks. 

“This is a very important day for 
Ukraine,” Foreign Minister Hermady 
Udovenko said after initialing the doc- 
ument: 

The agreement with Ukraine is due to 
be formally signed by NATO leaders 
and President Leonid Kuchina at the 
Madrid summit meeting. Neither Russia 
or Ukraine - are candidates for early 
NATO membership. 


' ,, c iiti» 11 

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■■ 




Calm on the Black Sea 

Moscow and Kiev Resolve Fleet Dispute 




- TV 


tc:- - 




By Michael R. Gordon 

.Vw York Tones Service 


Cloning of Humans? Unethical, EU Panel Decides 


By Tom Buerkle 

international Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — The cloning of human 
beings is “ethically unacceptable” and 
should be prohibited by law, but genetic 
research on human embryos as well as 
research into animal cloning should be 
permitted under strict conditions, a 
European ethics panel said Thursday. 

Human cloning is objectionable on 
the grounds of eugenics, since it could 
open die door to attempts to breed a 
superior race, the European Group of 
Advisers on the Ethical implications of 
Biotechnology said. The group also said 


that the possible risk of a shortened life 
span and greater susceptibility to cancer 
or infertility made human cloning un- 
acceptable, regardless of whether it be- 
came feasible. 

“In light of these considerations, any 
attempt to produce a genetically identic- 
al human individual by nuclear sub- 
stitution from a human adult or child 
cell should be prohibited.” the group 
said in a report to the European Com- 
mission, the executive agency of the 1 5- 
oation European Union. 

The report was the first official rec- 
ommendation on cloning since a Scot- 
tish scientist announced in March that 


he had produced a sheep named Dolly, 
the first time a mammal had been cloned 
from an adult cell. 

The group’s recommendations at- 
tracted immediate interest around the 
world because many governments, con- 
cerned about science’s ability to ma- 
nipulate the reproductive process, have 
demanded similar studies. 

The European conclusions sound 
"veiy similar" to what the National 
Bioethics Advisory Commission is 
likely to recommend when it issues its 
report to President Bill Clinton next 
month, said Henrietta Hyart-Knorr, the 
commission's deputy executive direc- 


tor. The U.S. commission is scheduled 
to adopt its final report June 7. 

The European paneL which includes 
scientific, medical and legal experts 
from nine EU countries, addressed the 
distinctions between animal and human 
cloning as well as between cloning and 
genetic research on human embryos. 

On embryos, for example, the group 
said research involving the transfer of 
genetic material could have important 
therapeutic implications, such as learn- 
ing how to regenerate damaged body 
tissue. But genetically manipulated em- 
bryos should not be implanted into a 
woman's uterus, it said. 


MOSCOW — After years of frus- 
trating diplomacy, Russia and Ukraine 
have ended their tug-of-war over the 
Black Sea Fleet. 

Under the accord, Russia will be able 
to keep ics portion of the former Soviet 
fleet for 20 years at the Ukrainian port of 
Sevastopol. 

The new agreement also sets the stage 
for Boris Yeltsin's visit to Ukraine later 
this week, his first as Russia's president. 
The accord was concluded Wednesday 
night in Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, by 
Prune Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin of 
Russia and his Ukrainian counterpart, 
Pavlo Lazerenko. 

With NATO preparing to expand, 
Russia has redoubled its efforts to 
strengthen its relations with former So- 
viet republics like Ukraine. 

The strategic aim in the case of 
Ukraine is to prevent the nation from 
drifting closer to the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. The political aim 
is to make NATO expansion less ob- 
jectionable to many Russians by cre- 
ating the impression dial Moscow is also 
increasing its influence with key neigh- 
bors. Mr. Yeltsin's visit comes after six 
previous trips were postponed. 

Russia and Ukraine also have im- 
portant economic relations, as well as 
problems. Ukraine's debt to Russia is 
estimated to be at least $3.5 billion, 
much of it owed to RAO Gazprom, die 
Russian natural gas monopoly. 

Russia has also angered Ukrainians 
by imposing customs duties. 

Dmytro Markov, spokesman for 
Ukraine’s president, sazd Russia and 
Ukraine had made important progress 
on economic issues. He said they had 
“decided to lift all barriers that stand in 
the way of bilateral trade.” 


Anders Aslund. a specialist at the 
Carnegie Endowment of International 
Peace, said: “The political declaration 
of good relations is significant. The 
economic relations between Russia and 
Ukraine are important, and there have 
been serious disturbances in them.” 

Sevastopol, which was founded in 
2783 as a military fortress, has a large 
Russian population. Long a part of die 
Russian empire. Sevastopol’s defense 
during the Crimean War in the 1850s is 
still celebrated here as an example of 
Russian valor. 

Nikita Khrushchev gave the Crimea 
to Ukraine as a token of friendship in 
1954 when Ukraine was a part of the 
Soviet Union. The port’s status as part 
of Ukraine rankles many Russians, who 
believe it should be returned. 

The Russian-Ukrainian negotiations 
over the Black Sea Fleet and die use of 
the Sevastopol port have been tortuous, 
and there have been several premature 
claims about diplomatic break- 
throughs. 

The tussle over the aging fleet has 
been more of a political battle than a 
dispute over security. 

The agreement will give Russia a 
presence in the Black Sea at a time when 
Moscow has become concerned about 
Turkey’s influence and is promoting oil 
pipelines from Central Asia to a new 
Black Sea terminal. 

But the vessels are aging; the newest 
are almost 20 years old. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin signed several 
agreements in Kiev on Wednesday 
night on the division of the Black Sea 
Fleet, the location where it is to be 
stationed, and economic compensation 
for use of the Ukrainian ports, but 
neither Mr. Chernomyrdin nor his 
Ukrainian counterpan would disclose 
what compensation Ukraine received 
for access to Sevastopol. 




/ 




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Don’t miss it. A lot ha p pens there. 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Cathay Pacific Returns to Normal 


HONG KONG (AFP) — The Hong Kong carrier Cathay 
Pacific Airways said Thursday its operations were now nearly 
normal, despite the fact that its fleer of Airbus A330-300 jets 
remained grounded. 

The airline suspended 12 flights Thursday, but the number 
of suspensions will gradually decrease as chartered planes are 
arranged, said Kwan Chuk-fai. spokesman for Cathay Pa- 
cific. 

The groundings followed the discovery of a flaw in an 
engine component in the Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engine. 


• Matsapha International Airport in Mbabane, Swazi- 
land, is to be upgraded at a cost of 20 million rand ($4.5 
million) over the next three years, the Transport and Com- 
munications Ministry announced. New runways will be able 
to accommodate jetliners the size of 747s. ( AFP l 


• Britain will consider banning the use of mobile phones 
in moving cars, following recent fatal road accidents in which 
the phones were believed to play a part. (AP) 


■ Airline traffic was affected early Thursday at Berlin's 
three airports because of a three-hour strike by employees 
demanding more job security and guarantees, a spokesman for 
the airports said. (AFP l 


• Without money, passport or plane ticket, a 12-year- 
old Miami boy flew first class to Jamaica recently. Dressed in 


a T-shirt, the boy took a train and a bus to the airport, walking 

He eventually 


away from a facility for "at-risk” children, 
boarded an American Airlines to Montego Bay. Jamaica. He 
has been flown back to Miami. (AFP l 


Europe 



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Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



Jetstrpam 

North America Europe 

A low presura area Is Sunny and dry weather win 
expected to develop over prevail across die northern 
ttia mw-MIssissippi Valley tier ol Europe, tram Lon- 


Saturday, then move into don to Berfln. through the 
Die Southeast with unset- weekend. Southern Sc 


tied weather Sunday. Rain dlnavta wfll be warm and 
from this system may dry, while southeast 
reach the mid-Atlantic Europe remaina cool and 


states Monday. Warm unsettled through Monday. 
owed In 


weather wfll move Item the Turning a bit unsettled 
Rockies Inn the Plains this Spain and Italy, 
weekend. 


Asia 

Cool and damp weather 
wdt continue across 
Manchuria, while Seoul 
and B«png enjoy a moder- 
ating trend through Mon- 
day. Showers will dampen 
Seoul this weekend. Tokyo 
win have showers this 
weekend, then tuning drier 
Monday. Hat and humid m 
Singapore with a stray 
thundershower each day. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 


ra£ AMERICAS 


Prosecution Closes Its Case 
By Citing McVeigh’s Words 

Decision Going to Jury After Modest Defense 




l iir ,4«. •« tuird Ptrn 

DE.WER — Timothy McVeigh was. a 
cowardly “domestic terrorist'* who set the 
fuse tor the Oklahoma City bombing and 
could see (he toys and cribs in the federal 
building's day-care center on his way to his 
getaway car. a prosecutor said Thursday in 
closing arguments. 

“Only a wall of windows separated the 
unsuspecting children, women and men in 
that building’ ’ from the truck bomb that ex- 
ploded on April 19. 1995, killing 168 people, 
said Lany Mackey, the prosecutor, who 
called the blast a ’“crime of ghastly pro- 
portions.” 

“America stood in shock.” he said. “Who 
could do such a thing?” 

"It has fallen to you. members of the jury, 
to answer this question.” he said. “The an- 
swer is clean Tim McVeigh did it.” 

Mr. Mackey said the defense attorney, 
Stephen Jones, failed to keep the '‘bold prom- 
ise” he made to jurors at the beginning of the 
trial to prove Mr. McVeigh not guilty in the 
deadliest act of terrorism on U.S. soil. 

The prosecutor said a trail of Mr. Mc- 
Veigh’s own writings and ami-govemmeni 
literature showed he was motivated by rage 
over the 19y3 government siege at Waco. 
Texas. And he said Mr. McVeigh was fixated 
on "Tne Turner Diaries.” a racist novel that 
describes how revolutionaries could incite a 
revolution by blowing up a federal building. 

Using Mr. McVeigh's own words against 
him. the prosecutor said that his anti-gov- 
ernment hatred went “from the intellectual to 
animal” in the months before the bombing 
and that he tried to impose his beliefs an 
America “through violence and tenor.” 

Mr. Mackey cited the testimony of Helena 
Garrett, who lost heryoung son, Tevin. in the 
bombing. "He died. This bomber didn’t care. 
The only thing he cared about was bringing 
down the Murrah building on top of its oc- 
cupants.” 


Bombing survivors wept as Mr. Mackes' 
described the details of the bombing and the 
victims, and showed pictures of the bom bed - 
oui building and the streets with billowing 
smoke. 

Mr. McVeigh, wearing a plaid shirt and 
green pants, sat with his hands clasped against 
his face. 

Mr. Mackey later showed jurors a photo of 
Mr. McVeigh, and compared it with a sketch 
of John Doe 1 . based on witnesses who iden- 
tified Mr. McVeigh as the man who rented the 
bomb-carrying Ryder truck. Mr. Mackey said 
the sketch and photo of Mr. McVeigh were 
identical, but he urged jurors to look for 
themselves. 

"You decide,” Mr. Mackey told them. 
“You decide.” 

Mr. Mackey acknowledged that no case 
answers every question, and said there were 
some inconsistencies. For instance, investi- 
gators searched storage lockers and found no 
evidence of the explosive, fertilizer they con- 
tend was stored there. But he said jurors 
should be able to see through that problem. 

“That evidence hud gone up in smoke in 
Oklahoma City," Mr. Mackey said. 

Mr. McVeigh, a 29-year-old decorated 
Gulf War veteran, could get the death penalty 
if convicted in the blast. His co-defendant, , 
Terry Nichols, is to be tried later. i 

The closing arguments for the defense were 
expected to take three hours, and the seven- 
man. five-woman jury could get the case 
before the end of the day Thursday and would 
deliberate through the weekend if necessary. 

The closing arguments came a day after Mr. 
McVeigh's attorneys rested their case after 25 
witnesses in just 316 days. 

The modest defense, after a lean pros- 
ecution case that saw 137 witnesses in 18 
days, came after U.S. District Judge Richard 
Matsch refused to allow theories of a larger 
conspiracy involving foreign and domestic 
terrorists. 







’■—y -v ■ 


* ;iSsJ 









RaiEtenUtlt Irnmnl Prey. 

THE RUSH OF COMPETITION — Justin Kinkel-Schuster, left, and Sarah 
McGill yawning in unison during the opening round of the 70th annual 
National Spelling Bee in Washington, where 245 contestants are participating. 

_ _ n .... 12-inch flame shot our from Mr. Medina's 

Away From Politics head, burning his flesh. ( Reuters } 


• A 7-year-old girl was raped and killed • The crash ofan A-IO attack plane in the 
in a Nevada casino rest room while her Arizona desert has killed one of just 14 
father gambled. Jeremy Strohmeyer, 18, women flying combat jets for the Air Force, 
was arrested in connection with Sherri ce The family of Captain Amy Lynn Svoboda 
Iverson 's death a: the Primadonna Resort in said the air force confirmed that she was 
Primm, near Las Vegas. (AP) killed (Reuters) 


.* ANHALT 

AT THE HEART OF EUROPE 

SochservAnholl has always provided an environ men} encouraging the 
development cf great personalities and ideas. One need only think of Martin 
Luther. Or of Walter Gropius and the Bauhaus. And this tradition continues 
up to the present day. For this is the crossing-point of all major European 
trade routes, be it from Paris to Moscow or from Scandinavia to southern 
Europe. It is here that the nine properties far sale can offer you attractive 
locations with plenty of scope for innovative ideas. Combined as interesting 
targets for investment, in an infrastructure that is being constantly upgraded. 

With best prospects for the future. And double and triple benefits. 


DOUBLE PACK A1 395.92 ha 


Location Stendal 

Historic disrrict town in the Ahmorlc. Former WGF barracks 
"Puschkin Park”, 90.64 ha, partly built-up, use undecided. 
Near B 1 88 and B 189. Northern SachservAnhalt. 

Location Garde legen 

Picturesque township in the Allmark. Former airfield, 305.28 ha, 
8 buildings, housing construction planned on opprox. 10 ha. 

Directly on B 1 88. Northern Sachsen-Anhoit. 


DOUBLE PACK A2 692.25 ha 


Location Halberstadt 

Old cathedral town (district town] near Harz Mountains. Former WGF 
barracks Friedrich-listStr. 435.52 ha, partly buKtup, use ran be agreed. 

Convenient traffic links. 

Location Lassa 

Municipality in spa and health resort region. Former WGF garrison, 
256.73 ha, portly built-up, no general development plans. Near B 1 76. 

■_ • . Southern Sachsen-Anhalt. 


TRIPLE PACK A3 276.89 ha 


Location Wittenberg 

Luther town and historic district town. Former ARADO barracks, 
12.59 ha, partly built-up, housing construction planned. 

. Directly on B 1 87. Eastern Sachsen-Anhalt. 

Location Kapen 

Between Oronienbaum and Dessau, the Bauhaus town. Former WGF 
barracks, 170.83 ha, partly buih-gp, own rail siding, use undecided. 

Directly on B 1 85. Eastern SachservAnhalt. 

Location KJieken 

Near Rosslau in district of Anhalt-Zerbst. Former WGF garrison, 
93.47 ho, portly built-up, use undecided, own access to B 1 87. 

Eastern Sachsen-Anhalt. 



PAGE 3 


M-k:: 


FEDERAL REPUBUC OF GERMANY 

REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

AS VENDOR 

OF THE FOLLOWING PROPERTIES: 


SIXFOLD 
OPPORTUNITY IN A 

SINGLE PACKAGE WITH 
DOUBLE AND TRIPLE 
BENEFITS 


AS A SINGLE 

BIG PACK OR 

IN ATTRACTIVE 

COMBINED 

PACKAGES 


SACHSEN- 

ANHALT 


VC'- 

Vr 


MECKLENBURG- 

VORPOMMERN 


OPEN ON ALL SIDES 

Unimpeded vistas, wide horizons - such is the image of this region. 
Gateway to the Baltic, with miles of magnificent beaches. This was 
the home of Heinrich Schliemam, the discoverer of Troy. This was 
where the great sculptor, Ernst Barlach, lived and worked. Right here, 
on Germany's north-south axis, is where you can find excellent 
investment prospects. Five properties are tor sale in attractive locations 
with optimum links to westeast trade routes. Here loo we have put 
together suitable targets for investment. With scope for innovative 
ideas, and double and triple prospects of success. 


TRIPLE PACK B1 503.20 ha 


Location Ludwigslust 

Baroque district town in the southeast of the land. 

Former WGF garrison "Techentin”, 70.12 ha, partly built-up, 
planning includes commercial and industrial use. Near A 24. 

Location Schwerin 

Historic Land capital and lakeland town. Former WGF garrison 
"SchwerinGBrries*, 64.48 ha, partly buitup, use undedded. 
On A 24/241 . W^tern Mecklenburg-Vorpommern . 

Location Putnifz 

Municipality in the Baltic sea resort region. Former airfield, 
368.60 ho, partly built-up, use undecided. On B 105. 


DOUBLE PACK B2 595. 10 ha 


Location Neustrelifz 

At the heart of the Mecklenburg Lakeland. Former WGF fuel depot 
"Furstensee”, 60.50 ha, partly buildup, general development plan 
in hand. On B 96/198. 

Location Tutow 

Near the historic district town of Demmin. 

Former WGF airfield, 534.60 ha, 
partly built-up, use undedded. 

On B 1 10. At tiie centre 

of the Land. ..... . 


• . ^^-^QSTOCK GREIFSWAt^.^' Vcv ' • 


*>i * — ** 

tfWERlN 






• The Florida Supreme Court postponed 
the execution of an inmate until it hears 
arguments m September on the condition of 
the state’s 74-year-old electric chair. It is 
the second postponement following the ex- 
ecution of Pedro Medina in March, when a 


• Fears that a large number of people 
were missing, enough to nearly double the 
death toll in the twister that hit a neigh- 
borhood in Jarrell, Texas, this week, are 
groundless, authorities said after conclud- 
ing that 28 people died. (AP) . 


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From Ex - Clinton Aide, 
Just My Perceptions’ 

WASHINGTON — In his well-received 
memoir about his term as secretary of labor, 
Robert Reich recalls being grilled by the 
dreaded Republicans at a 1995 congres- 
sional hearing. 

"Where did you learn economics. Mr. 
Secretary?” demands Representative Jim 
Saxton, chairman of the Joint Economic 
Committee, who later jumps up and down in 
his chair and cries: “Evidence! Evidence!” 

Heck of a scene. Unfortunately, it never 
fc happened. Neither did several other epis- 
odes in Mr. Reich’s “Locked in the Cab- 
inet.” Jonathan Rauch writes in die on-line 
magazine Slate. 

Mr. Rauch went to the videotape and 
checked the transcript of the Saxton hear- 
ing. “Reich appears to have fabricated 
much of this episode for dramatic effect.” 
Mr. Rauch writes. 

“Saxton was in fact decorous and po- 
lite." be says, adding, ‘ ‘Reich has replaced 
a dull, earnestly wonkisb hearing with a 
Hollywood script in which a mean Re- 
publican hammers a decent Democrat.” 

The former secretary said: “It’s a mem- 
oir. It's not investigative journalism. I’m 
not a journalist. As 1 said on the first page, 
these are my perceptions. This is the way I 
experienced it.” (WP) 

Unpredictable Judge 
, ; In Paula Jones Case 

WASHINGTON — The judge presiding 
over the Paula Jones lawsuit has known Bill 
Clinton for decades, but there Is little in that 
long history to predict how she will handle 
the potentially explosive sexual harassment 


case against the president if it comes to 
trial. 

Judge Susan Webber Wright of U.S. Dis- 
trict Court in Little Rock has already 
handled several high-profile legal issues 
arising from the investigation by the in- 
dependent counsel Kenneth Starr into the 
Clintons' failed Whitewater real -estate in- 
vestment — sometimes coming down on 
the side of the president and his wife, but 
just as often ruling against them. 

Judge Wright quashed a document sub- 
poena Mr. Starr issued to the White House 
ui one matter, for example, bat agreed to his 
request that Susan McDougaJ, the Clintons' 
partner in the real estate venture, be jailed 
for refusing to Testify before a grand jury 
investigating the matter. 

Judge Wright was a student in an ad- 
miralty law course that Mr. Clinton taught at 
the University of Arkansas in the early 
1 970s, but she challenged him oyer her grade 
in the course. She got involved in Mr. Clin- 
ton's firsr political race in 1974. but it was to 
work for his opponent. Representative John 
Paul Hammersehmidt. a Republican. 

Judge .Wright, 48, is a conservative Re- 
publican. She was appointed to the federal 
bench in 1990 by President George 
Bush. (WP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Joan Chase, president of the Woman’s 
National Democratic Club, which was 
founded in 1 922, two years after women got 
the vote, on a proposal to change the name 
to the Washington National Democratic 
Club: “Pan of the reason for the change is 

that we want more male members. We don t 

have a problem with having men, but some 
of our members don’t want the change 
because we do represent a history of what 
women were trying to become, and we still 
are hying to carry that on.” (WP I 


Location Borstel 

Near Stendal in the AJtmark. Former WGF Jv 
airfield, 3 1 2.00 ha, partly built-up, plans tor 0 
commercial air use, otherwise undecided. // 

On B 1 88/1 89. Northern Sachsen-Anhalt. «/ 

Location Altengrabow r| 

In the Jeriehower Land district in eastern &[ 
Sachsen-Anhalt. Former WGF property t-a 
. "Rotes und gelbes Stodtahen", 9.40 ha, 
mostly built-up, use undecided, free tor 

housing use. Near A 2. yj 








5-ji * -/yi 


t . 







HAHWOWt^ jf . fc ■ „ 1. 




-UQlpSpSi jgEssAi 


HALLE WV 5 


S r' +1 


BIG PACK totalling 2,784.76 ha 


The properties in question are WGF properties 
used by (Former Soviet) West- Group Forces. 

This advertisement is an invitation to submit tenders, preferably for 
the "Big Pock", alternatively for one or more of the other "Packs". 
The currently valid tendering conditions ore to be found in the 
property descriptions which can be obtained in German and English 
from 

OBERFINANZDIREKTION MAGDEBURG 

Bundesvermogensableilung 

Otto-v.-Guericke-Strasse 4 , 

D-39104 Magdeburg 

For information please contact Mr Buhr - 

Tel. 0391/545-2711 

Fax 0391/545-1500 

Closing date for the submission of tenders 
is 31. Aug. 1997. 

No liability whatsoever is accepted for the content 
and accuracy of the particulars given here. 


http://www.sachsen-anhaKt.de 

This is the INTERNET address of the Economics Ministry and 
the Economic Promotion Agency oF the Land of SachservAnhalt, 
where you can access further information in various languages 
on SachsenAnhalf as a target for industrial investment. 


T4r 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


fro 




Pride a Major Obstacle 
Of Aid to North Korea 


Pyongyang Suspicious of South’s Help 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

Nmr York Ttmrs Service 


TOKYO — With a famine 
in North Korea, one of the* cent 
obstacles to getting attention and as- 
sistance has been North Korean pride, 
which is as enormous as the country's 
need. 

Huge numbers of North Korea’s 23 
million people may be starving, but the 
leadership has been reluctant to accept 
direct aid from South Korea or to allow 
journalists to visit hard-hit areas and 
publicize the suffering. 

The government of Kim Jong D, the 
longtime “Dear Leader," now elevated 
to “Great Leader," has feared that direct 
aid and wrenching news coverage of 
hungry children would be humiliating 
and would allow South Korea to score 
propaganda points. 

But this week, in a sign that greater 
openness may be in the offing, the two 
Koreas reached a major agreement that 
will allow the South to send food aid 
directly to North Korea and to mark the 
sacks so it is clear where the aid is 
coming from. The agreement also allows 
aid organizations to send food by new 
routes and to stipulate what region in 
North Korea will get the food. 

“I think this is a major break- 
through," said Lee Yoon Gu, co-chair- 
man of a South Korean coalition of 
organizations trying to send food to the 
North. “Whether or not it win work out. 


U.S. Opposes 
Use of Force 
In Asia Waters 


The Associated Press 

MANILA — The United States 
strongly opposes the use of force in 
territorial disputes in the South 
China Sea and is ready to help solve 
conflicts peacefully, the U.S. am- 
bassador said Thursday. 

Ambassador Thomas Hubbard 
also said the United States was not 
interested in new military bases in 
the Philippines in exchange for 
pledging to protect Manila in the 
contested areas, as proposed by a 
Filipino senator. 

Recent incidents between the 
Philippines and China over territ- 


orial disputes in the Spratly Islands 
and at Scar! 


-borough Shoal in the 
South China Sea have increased 
tensions in an area of some of the 
world's most important sea lanes. ■ 
Francisco Tatad, the Senate ma- 
jority leader, recently urged the 
Philippine government to consider 
granting the United States new 
bases in exchange for a renego- 
tiation of a 1951 defense pact ro 
ensure that Washington would back 
the Philippines militarily if a con- 
frontation were to breakout out over 
the contested territories. The United 
States closed its last Philippine mil- 
itary base in 1992 after the Senate 
rejected a new lease. 

China angrily protested the driv- 
ing away on April 30 of a Chinese 
vessel from Scarborough Shoal, 
about 250 kilometers (155 miles) 
off the west coast of the Philippines 
and the arrest of 21 Chinese fish- 
ermen near the area this month. 

On Thursday, Philippine officials 
charged the fishermen, now under 
police custody, with illegally en- 
tering Philippine territory. 

China . says the shoal has be- 
longed to it since ancient times, but 
Manila says it lies within its 200- 
mile exclusive economic zone. 


we’ll have to see. But I’m optimistic." 

Some others are more skeptical, and 
everyone agrees that a good deal will 
depend on how the accord — reached on 
Monday in Beijing — is put into effect. 
Even with its more flexible attitude in 
those talks . North Korea still rejected the 
idea of receiving any aid directly from 
the South at the border crossing at Pan- 
munjon. 

The North was apparently concerned 
in part that it would be demoralizing for 
its hungry soldiers to see truckloads of 
food rolling in from enemy territory. So 
die 50.000 tons of com. noodles and 
other food covered by the agreement will 
arrive on three rail lines from China and 
at two seaports — still an improvement 
from the single rail crossing and sole 
port now designated by the North to 
receive such aid. 

The new arrangement will apparently 
allow organizations in the South that 
contribute 1.000 tons of food to des- 
ignate the town in North Korea that will 
get the aid. But there will be no on-site 
monitoring, and it will still be im- 
. possible for South Koreans to send food 
directly to particular people or families. 

.“The North Koreans are very sus- 
picious of anything from the South," 
said Bernard Krisher, an American in 
Tokyo who recently delivered aid to 
North Korea. “As desperate as they may 
be. there is a lot of pride there. They 
don ’t want to look like beggars, and they 
are suspicious of South Korean 
motives." 

The United States is sending $25 mil- 
lion worth of food to North Korea, and 
die South Korean government has also 
sent a modest amount and allowed aid 
from die private sector, such as the 
50.000 tons agreed to this week. But the . 
South Korean authorities insist that they 
can send large-scale assistance only 
after the North agrees to a proposal for 
four-party peace talks involving the two 
Koreas. China and the United States. 

“The urgent problem is peace on the 
Korean Peninsula." said Moon Moo 
Hong, the assistant minister of unifi- 
cation in South Korea. Mr. Moon said 
that the fundamental obstacle is North 
Korea’s truculent attitude, and he added 
that while North Korea needs $300 mil- 
lion to buy food and avert starvation, it is 
spending billions of dollars on its mil- 
itary forces each year. 

Another South Korean official said 
that this week’s agreement was intended 
to encourage the North to be more flex- 
ible and join the four-party talks, in an 
attempt to end the state of war that 
technically still exists on the Korean 
Peninsula. 

“We've done our part, and now we 







MANHUNT — Japanese policemen stopping cars and questioning motorists Thursday in Kobe as the 
search was pressed for the killer who decapitated an 11 -year-old boy there earlier this week. Despite their 
intensive efforts, the police have been unable to come op with a suspect or a motive in the murder. 


BRIEFLY 


Burmese Opposition Leader 
Urges Rejection by ASEAN 


troops marched in without resistance. The defeat marked 
tiie first time since the Islamic army began its conquest of 
Afghanistan three years ago that it had to retreat from a city 
it captured. fAPJ 


BANGKOK — Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese 
opposition leader, has warned that the country's military 
rulers could become “even more obdurate and oppressive" 
if the country were admitted to the Association of South 
East Asian Nations. 

Speaking in a recent video interview that was made 
public Thursday, she said that Burma, under the rule of the 
State Law and Order Restoration Council, would be no 
credit to ASEAN and called on the seven-nation group to 
engage with her National League for Democracy. 

Her taped interview with the Alternative ASEAN Net- 
work on Burma, which was smuggled out of the country, 
was made public two days before an ASEAN foreign 
ministers’ meeting In Malaysia will consider when to admit 
the country along with Cambodia and Laos. 

“1 think what Burma risks, what the people of Burma 
risk, is the possibility that admission into ASEAN will 
make SLORC even more obdurate and oppressive than 
ever," Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said. (Reuters) 


5 Killed in Indian Rioting 


BHOPAL, India — At least five persons were killed and 
six wounded Thursday when the police fired on a crowd of 
protesting cement workers in the central Indian state of 
Madhya Pradesh, authorities said. 

KJC. Singh, a senior official in Satna. district, said the 
police opened fire because the mob of nearly 3.000 workers, 
demanding the arrest of the killers of a union leader, had 
gone on a rampage in the town of Mehar. 

The police later imposed an indefinite curfew on Mehar. 
about 350 kilometers (220 miles) from the state capital. 
Bhopal. (Reuters) 


Ex-Sex Slaves Protest in Manila 


Taleban Troops Counterattack- 


MAZAR-I-SHAR1F. Afghanistan — Taleban soldiers 
advanced on this regional capital Thursday, hoping to 
avenge their defeat by former allies in a fierce battle for 
northern Afghanistan that left more than 100 people dead. 

Uzbek soldiers were said to be heading south to try to 
block the advance of the Taleban army, which lost the city 
in an 18-hour battle Wednesday, four days after Taleban 


MANILA — Dozens of World War II sex slaves picketed 
the Japanese Embassy here Thursday, protesting a cam- 
paign to remove references to their wartime abuse from 
school textbooks in Japan. 

“Some Japanese are denying our existence," said 
Cristeta AJ cover, 70. “They should face the truth about 
what happened to us and admit whar happened was 
wrong." 

As many as 200.000 Asian women were forced to work 
in military-run brothels for Japanese troops during the war. 
A group of Philippine women is de manding compensation 
and an official apology from Japan. (AP) 


Unrest Surges 
In East Timor 
As Indonesia 
Holds Its Vote 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


JAKARTA — While Indonesia’s 
long-serving President Suharto ap- 
peared to have won another overwhelm- 
ing victory after election day passed 
peacefully in nearly afl parts of the coun- 
try, opposition forces warned Thursday 
that official cheating in the vote count 
could spark a further upsurge of vi- 
olence, and rebel unrest in East Timor 
drew attention to that unruly region. 

Of the country’s 27 provinces, only in 
outlying East Tumor was serious elec- 
tion-related violence reported. The po- 
lice raid that at least 14 people died there 
in a series of attacks by separatist guer- 
rillas. including a soldier killed by 
rebels -on Thursday while guarding a 
polling booth. 




. i ■ 




The were clearly designed to 


expea them to be more positive on the 
i official said. 


four-party talks." the i 

■ Tokyo Hints at Reversal on Aid 

Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto of 
Japan hinted Thursday that Japan might 
reverse its policy on food aid to North 
Korea and agree to provide help if South 
Korea formally asks it to do so, Reuters 
reported, quoting the Kyodo news 
agency. 


Singapore Leaders Win Libel Damages 


Reuters 


SINGAPORE — A Singapon 

lin is ter Goh Chok 


Japan has been refusing to give food 


aid to famine-stricken North Korea be- 
cause it says the Pyongyang government 
was behind a siring of kidnappings of 
Japanese citizens in the 1 970s and is also 
involved in drug smuggling. 

“If the South Korean government 
asks us for assistance to compatriots in 
North Korea, there is room fa the Jap- 
anese side to change its stance," Kyodo 
quoted Mr. Hashimoto as telling a group 
of visiting South Korean newspaper ed- 
itors. 

Tokyo has also demanded that Pyong- 
yang allow Japanese wives of Koreans in 
North Korea to visit their homeland. 

North Korea has denied involvement 
in the kidnappings and has not formally 
commented on the recent drug smug- 
gling case. 


>re court 

awarded Prime Minister 
Tong and senior colleagues in his gov- 
erning party Thursday a record S.08 mil- 
lion Singapore dollars in libel damages 
from a political opponent who called 
them liars. 

Justice Chao Hick Tin said Mr. Goh 
and his colleagues were justified in call- 
ing the opposition politician Tang Liang 
Hong “an anti-English education. anti- 
Christian Chinese chauvinist" who was 
a danger to racial harmony in Singa- 
pore. 

In a written judgment. Justice Chao 
said Mr. Tang had made “malicious" 
attacks on Mr. Goh, former Prime Min- 
ister Lee Kuan Yew and others, includ- 


ing calling them liars over the chau- 
vinism chi 


targe, which could have 
affected “their moral authority to gov- 
ern.” 

Mr. Goh and his People’s Action 
Party colleagues had demanded 
aggravated damages of 12.9 million 
dollars, alleging that Mr. Tang had 
continued to defame them in inter- 
views he gave after he fled Singapore. 


saying he had received death threats. 

Mr. Tang, who fled to the Malaysian 
stale of Johor after losing a general elec- 
tion in January, said he would appeal the 
damages . which are equivalent to $5.65 
million. 

“Surely I am not satisfied with this 
because to me they are not entitled to one 
cent,” Mr. Tang said from Hong Kong . 

Mr. Tang said be intended to hire a 
British lawyer to argue his case but that 
the costs of his appeal were mounting 
because he now had to deposit 5,000 
dollars for each case to cover legal 
costs. 

“This is not a legal battle, rather this is 
a test of financial strength,” he said. 
"Now I have got financial problems. I 
cannot keep on borrowing. Who would 
lend it to me like that?” 

Mr. Tang lost the libel cases in March 
by failing to appear in court to defend 
himself against charges that were 
brought following interviews he gave to 
the press from Johor, London and Hong 
Kong. 

The comments for which he was sued 
included those he made in an interview 
with the Singapore newspaper The 


Straits Times. The paper reported char be 
had claimed “the suits were being used 


as a politician weapon to squeeze him 
>f tb 


out of the political area and to ’bury him 
politically and financially.’ " 

Justice Chao said it was "clear that 
the above quoted remarks constituted 
another grave attack" on Mr. Goh. Mr. 
Lee and their colleagues. He said that 
such comments justified aggravated 
damages. 

* ‘This court must show its indignation 
at the injury inflicted on the plaintiffs.” 
he said. "It cannot be dispured that in 
terms of aggravation, these 13 cases 
have no equal." 

Mr. Goh. who is a plaintiff in three of 
the lawsuits against Mr. Tang, was award- 
ed 1.4 million dollars. Mr. Lee, who is a 
plaintiff in five of the suits, was awarded 
the greatest amount, 2.3 million dollars. 

Mr. Tang was also formally charged 
last Friday with 33 counts of tax evasion. 
The court issued a warrant for his arrest 

Mr. Tang faces a fine of three times the 
amount of tax he is accused of evading — 
2 1 1,000 dollars — plus a fine of 10.000 
dollars for each charge. He could also be 
jailed for three years on each charge. 


embarrass the government and draw in- 1 
temational attention to the guerrillas’ 
de mands for self-determination in the 
former Portuguese colony, which was 
invaded by Indonesia in 1975 and an- 
nexed the following year. 

Most of the attacks occurred late 
We dne sday on the outskirts of Dili and 
in several other towns. The police said 
that they failed to disrupt voting. 

Indonesia’s takeover of East Timor 
has not been recognized by the United 
Nations. 

Military analysts said the latest op- 
erations by the guerrillas suggested that 
they were more numerous, and better 
armed and organized, than Indonesian 
security forces realized or were pre- 
pared to admit, and that, as a result, there 
could be more unrest and international 
embarrassment looming for Indonesia 
in East Timor. 

Still, the troubled territory is far from 
the country's center of power. 

Both foreign and local businessmen 
are expected to continue in vesting heav- . 
ily in Indonesia’s fast-growing econ- ■ 
omy provided there is continuing polit- 
ical and social stability. . •( 

Although the Indonesian stock mar- 
ket rose strongly Thursday — evidently - 
in relief that campaign violence had not ; 
continued on polling day, especially on • 
Java, where more than half the pop- 
ulation of 200 million lives and much of 
the economy is based — the business 
community will be watching closely to 
see if the official voting results, due on - 
Friday, are accepted without serious 
public protest. 

The Muslim-oriented United Devel- 
opment Party, seen as the main con- 
tender to the ruling Golkar Party in the 
latest elections, has said it expects to lift 
its share of the vote to at least aO percent, 
from 17 percent in 1992. with a par- 
ticularly strong showing in Jakarta and 
other parts of Java. But the party was 
only winning about 15 percent. 

The proportion of the vote gained by 
a party determines the number of seats it 
will get in Indonesia's legislature, die 
House of Representatives. 

Amien Rais, head of M uham- 
raadiyah, the country's second largest 
Muslim welfare organization, with 28 
million members, warned that "the 
people who showed their strength be- 
fore will do so again, and on an even 
larger scale." should the outcome of the 
voting prove to be unfair. 

Analysts said the campaign violence 
partly reflected popular anger, espe- 
cially in urban areas, at official attempts . . 
to handicap the United Development -jr 
Phrty and weaken the third group per- 
mitted to contest the polls, the Indone- 
sian Democratic Party. 

Megawati Sukarnoputri, who was 
ousted from the leadership of the In- 
donesian Democratic Party by a gov- 
ernment-supported faction in 1996 and 
barred from contesting Thursday’s 
polls, denounced the election as unfair. 

She said she would not vote. 




me. 






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CROSSWORD 


INDONESIA: In Early Count, Suharto Landslide Tops Forecasts 


7lj Z CHALLENGE £ 


*4- 


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a Watery 
is Do (eats on 

is Africa's 

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big as fare 


13 Gilmore of 
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82 di-dah 

23 Cynic's retort 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 


Furnished apartments, 3 months or 
more ct urtwnished, rasktential areas. 


Tel Paris: *33 ( 0 | 1 42253225 
FaxPans: 433(0)145633709 


24 Reproductive 
body 

23 She played 
Gilda in "Gil da" 
Peeples of 
"Fame" 

27 It may be dirty 

28 Chief Justice 
alter Marshall 

29 •Ditto" 

31 Dnesup 

32 Refuse help 
34 K vetch a lot 
37 Daytime TV 

ottering 

41 Like Miss 
Mullet's fare 

42 Saavedra 

(1936 Peace 
Nobelttt) 

43 In wtro items 

44 Pouch holders, 
tor short 

45 ‘V villain 

46 NO 

stay-at-home 

47 Certain photo 
order. Abbr. 

4« Palm leaf 


4sSdeof 

Tiberius’s villa 
50 Obscure stuff 
52 Release 
54 Counter- 
manded 

ss Western ravines 
sc Daggers 
57 Overseas 
assembly 


DOWN 

1 Preserves 

2 It's way out ot 


town 

3 Wrestling duo 

4 Scope 

s Jamaica sOcho 


7 isolate 

8 Recant officiary 
• So 

to Give a little 
push 

u ncker tale? 
is Vital engine 
conduit 

13 Lett over 

14 Steps fancity 
2i “Huh?" 

24 V.I.P. from 

Araby 
25 wrecks 
27 Theatrical 
2 # Points at the 

dinner table 
30 “Heavens to 
Betsy' ' 

3*"- -of the 
Year- 

33 One losing 
power, 
perhaps 

34 Puts on for a 
certain 
audience 

35 Hut style 

30 Surgical 
specialty 

31 Notoriously 
malodorous 
birds 

as Manage 

40 Least confident 
42 Big name m 
insurance 

45 French traffic 
Order 

45 Bnfish pens 
4« Big bash 

49 Shod impression, 
maybe 



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Continued from Page I 


§ /Veur York Ti mes/ Edited by If ill Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of May 29 


SI Former world 
class champion 
from Russia 


a Genes material 


S3 “Smoking or 
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the last election, in 1 992. when Golkar 
won 6S percent of the vote, the United 
Development Party won 17 percent and 
the People's Democratic Party won 15 
percent. The governing party was ex- 
ceeding its own prediction of 70.02 per- 
cent for this year’s total. 

Officials reported no incidents of vi- 
olence Thursday in this nation of 200 
million people. The calm reportedly ex- 
tended to East Timor, where a small 
rebel force has been fighting For in- 
dependence since Indonesia invaded and 
annexed the former Portuguese colony 
in 1975. 

In the small alleys of the Scncm Mar- 
ket area here in the capital, there was a 
holiday atmosphere as neighbors chatted 
around the small outdoor voting pavilion 
and children flew kites and bought 
sweetened ice from a vendor. 

People laughed and cheered as the 
manager of the voting station, wearing 
the orange cap of a polling official, sol- 
emnly examined and read out the ballots 
of the 394 voters in the neighborhood. 

The nation's 124.7 million eligible 
voters, casting their ballots for patties 
rather than candidates, were to select 
425 members of the largely ceremonial 
Parliament, who will tv joined by 75 
members of the politically influential 
military. 

The 5110-member Parliament will join 
500 delegates appointed by the gov- 
ernment early next year in a People's 
Consultative Assembly that is expected 
to endorse President Suharto for a sev- 
enth five-year term. 

In the Indonesian system of oppo- 
sition by consensus. Mr. Suharto. 75. 
who has ruled for 3 1 years, is expected to 
be the candidate of all three parties, as he 


has been in ihe past. Given the absence 
of any real opposition party, an illegal 
boycott movement has surfaced in re- 
cent months, joined last week by Mrs. 
Megawati, who announced that she 
would not vote. 

At several polling places a round 
Jakarta, spoiled ballots outnumbered the 
votes for her former party, but their 
numbers were still tiny. 

In a statement this week, an inde- 
pendent election-monitoring group ac- 
cused Golkiir of various forms of co- 
ercion and manipulation in the 
campaign. 

Earlier this month, the chairman of the 
United Development Party. Ismail Hasan 
Mctareum. said that officials in at least 
one district on the island of Sumatra had 
already determined the result they would 
deliver: an 86.29 percent vote for Golkar. 
The local officials denied die accusation. 


But political analysis said it was not so 
much fraud that contributed to the 
Golkar landslide as an overwhelming 
system of government and military con- 
trol at all levels of society. 

Major enterprises and’ all local gov- 
ernment offices are controlled 6y the 
governing party. Government connec- 
tions fuel the economy. The president 
himself appoints judges, state governors 
and the directors of state companies. 

Comments from voters suggest that 
support tor Golkar is fueled bv a mixture 
of gratitude, duty, fear and the sense that 
the system offers no real choice. 

"They have the power." explained an 
aerobics teacher after casting her vote/i' 
for Golkar. "My mother owns a com- ^ 
pany that has a government license. We 
arc grateful to the government. And if 
the government takes away her license 
she will be bankrupt." 


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Shot Fired at Hun Sen’s Car in Cambodia 


Rearm 

PHNOM PENH — Ashot was fired 
ul a car carrying Cambodia's second 
prime minister, Hun Sen. apparently 
in an assassination attempt, officials 
said Thursday. 

Mr. Hun Sen wus not hurt, but a 
member of his motorcycle escort was 
slightly wounded as the prime min- 
ister traveled through the outskirts of 
Phnom Penh on Wednesday evening, 
they said. 

Sok Plial. the Interior Ministry 
spokesman, said at least one shot was 
fired from a rifle equipped with a 
silencer at Mr. Hun Sen’s car. 

' ‘ As the car was traveling so fast the 


bullet hit the moiorcvcle escort just 
behmd it." Mr. Sok Phal said. 

The motorcycle escort was hit in the 
head but watt hoi seriously wounded, 
the police said, adding that they were 
looking for two suspects in connection 
with the attack. 

Mr. Hun Sen. who is locked in a 
bitter power struggle with his coali- 
tion parmer. First Prime Minister 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh, said 
earlier this month that there had been 
several attempts on his life, or plots to 
kill him. over recent vears. 

Mr. Ranariddh said that he knew 
nothing about Wednesday's attack, and 
he condemned any use of force. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MAY 30, 1997 


RACE .=> 


EUROPE 


Q & A / Francois Heisbourcj 


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The Outlook in France 
> If the Socialists Triumph 


Euro Wins Loyalty Pledge in France 


\ ■■ * 


If elections in /'ran n- tm Sunday pro- 
duce a Socialist government sharing 
povt er with President Jacques Chirac, 
would it change the country's inter- 
national rnie'.' Francois f/eisbourg was 
a senior defense official in a previous 
Socialist government and is cltise to 
party leaders. Currently a private-sec - 
tor aerospace executive. Mr. Heisbourg 
spoke with Joseph Fitchett of the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune about the 
.Socialists' agenda. 

Q. If the Socialist leader. Lionel 
Jospin, becomes prime minister, what 
kind uf working relations would he seek 
with President Jacques Chirac? 

A. Courteous but firm. Courteous in 
the sense of not seeking a crisis, but firm 
in the sense of not let ring the president 
enjoy a monopoly in foreign and se- 
curity policy. This practice of shared 
prerogatives in foreign affairs started 
when Edouard Balladur was a conser- 
vative prime minister under President 
Francois Mitterrand, and the trend may 
he extrapolated. 

Q. Where do Socialists stand on 
NATO, particuarly the current dispute 
about France ‘s bid’to take over NATO’s 
Southern command in Naples? 

A. Mr. Chirac took the decision to fry 
building a European defense identity 
inside NATO and not as a separate 
venture. Regardless of whether or not it 
was the right course, this initiative, if it 
had succeeded, would presumably have 
improved our relations with the United 
Stales and the Europeans. But after tak- 
ing the step back to NATO. France then 
raised issues that prevented the policy 
from coming to fruition. Now it’s an 
embarrassing deadlock. The next gov- 
ernment would be wise to let Mr. Chirac 
assume responsibility for whatever has 
to be done to get out of the comer he 
painted France into. 

• 

Q. What changes would a Socialist 
government seek on a single European 
currency? 

A. The only important nuance in the 
^Socialists' views are some conditions 
^they have spelled out — which amount 
to a more explicit presentation of the 
consensus in the mainstream French 
body politic. 

Q. Including Italy's participating 
from the outset? 

A. Absolutely. It’s goes with the idea 
of an “economic government” for 
Europe to counterbalance the future 
European central bank — in other 
words, a democratically accountable in- 


stitution at the European level similar to 
those in every European country. One 
could imagine, for example, a rein- 
forced council of finance ministers in 
the European Union. It’s not a change in 
approach. France has been pressing for 
it all along. Some people, including 
myself, would say that “economic gov- 
ernment ’’ is another way of saying 
“political union” — which 1 under- 
stand the German government has 
wanted all along. 

• 

Q. Isn't Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany leery of France's Socialists'? 

A. In fact,' it should be easy for a 
Socialist government to improve 
French-German relations after two 
yean; in wliich they have deteriorated to 
near-crisis levels, particularly in the 
realm of defense policy. When Mr. 
Chirac decided to make sweeping mil- 
itary changes just over a year ago. the 
lack of consultation with Bonn caused 
real problems. The quality and care- 
fulness of government actions have 
been conspicuously poor — and the 
Socialists would do better. 

Q. On defense policy, what are the 
Socialist priorities? 

A. There is a major concern — the 
impact of defense spending cuts on jobs 
in already depressed regions. This, 
along with good military reasons, 
provide a strong incentive to maintain 
current weapons programs — al though I 
must say that there is a strong inclin- 
ation in some quarters to cany out an 
audit of the Rafale fighter-bomber, a 
technological leader but our most costly 
program. 

Q. How would a Socialist govern- 
ment proceed with restructuring the de- 
fense industrial sector, starting with the 
privatization already under way of 
Thomson, the defense-electonics giant? 

A. The official position is that a So- 
cialist goverroent would not pursue the 
privatization of Thomson — which. 1 
remind you, the outgoing government 
promised but never managed to deliver. 
But everybody realizes — and I mean 
everybody, including unions — that we 
have to regroup our defense industries in 
the way that has occurred in Germany 
and Britain in order to confront the 
challenge of U.S. competition. 

The important thing is to make sure 
that nobody is put on the dole. That's not 
easy, but it’s possible if (he government 
mam tains procurement and if businesses 
handle any downsizing intelligently. We 
can’t afford to allow the Defense Min- 
istry to be managed as badly as it has 



By Barry James 

llt'i ir.u'l. r.i ’ tlr-'j’J T r .l".i"r 


been in the last two years. Certainly, the 
next government will seal the merger of 
Dassault and Aerospatiale. 

The oilier urgent issue is Airbus. It’s 
the single most important industrial issue 
in Europe, li’s Europe’s lop exporter. 
There has been a quiet but severe crisis in 
the last year among the Airbus partners 
that the outgoing government neglected. 
It’s the most important aerospace busi- 
ness in France and Germany, and the 
second most important in Britain. 

It's urgent to bring back cohesion 
with Germany and Britain about how to 
reconfigure the Airbus consortium to 
meet the challenge of Boeing-McDon- 
nell Douglas. There’s a deep festering 
divergence between France and Ger- 
many about what to do. It’s pan of the 
underground pollution in our relations. 
Get this one right, and you solve a lot of 
other problems down the line. 


PARIS — Philippe Seguin. a strong 
possibility to become prime minister if 
the center-right wins legislative runoff 
elections Sunday, said ~ Thursday that 
France would honor its word to join a 
common European currency. 

Although Mr. Seguin. the speaker of 
the National Assembly, has been hostile 
to monetary union, he said. “France's 
word must be respected, our signature 
must be honored, we must ensure that 
the final phase of entry into a single 
currency goes ahead, with the largest 
possible number of partners, in par- 
ticular Italy. Spain and Portugal, which 
are so close to us.” 

He said at a campaign rally that the 
next government’s top priority must be 
to reduce the 12.X unemployment rate. 

But the conservative mainstream 
could be undeimined by the far-right 
National From, whose' leader. Jean- 
Marie Le Pen. condemned the right 
more than the left on Thursday. 

“There are a certain number of can- 
didates we hope to see defeated.” he 
said in a radio interview-. ‘‘There are 
more on the right than on the left.” 

With 3.8 million votes in the first 
round, making it France's third largest 
party after the Gaul lists and the So- 
cialists. the National From holds the key 
in many districts. 

Mr. Le Pen singled out candidates he 
said had been hostile and violent toward 
his party. These included the departing 


prime minister. Alain Juppe, a conser- 
vative. and the mayor of Strasbourg. 
Catherine Trautmann, a Socialist. 

The Front has also called on its sup- 
pliers 10 defeat the mayor of Paris. Jean 
Tiberi. and die minister of justice. 
Jacques Toubon. 

Analysts said the From candidates 
could cost the mainstream conserva- 
tives at least 40 seats. 

Commentators also said Mr. Le Pen 
appeared to seeking to sow a maximum 
amount of confusion in France's elec- 
toral scene, which was turned on its head 
by the dramatic surge of the left in the 
first round of the election Iasi Sunday. 

Mr. Le Pen told supporters of the 
center-right coalition p>arties that a vote 
for the National Front would be the best 
“rampart” against the left. But he also 
made it clear in the radio interview- that 
he regarded a victory by the left as the 
lesser of two evils. 

Mr. Le Pen considers President 
Jacques Chirac to be a traitor to the 
right. He said it would be bertcr to have 
a shared government between Mr. Chir- 
ac and Lionel Jospin, the Socialist lead- 
er. than “five years of Chirac with full 
powers.” 

He accused Mr. Chirac of being a 
“criminal” whose European policies 
would lead to the disappearance of 
France. 

“The pjeople have said no to giving 
him a blank check, and ! cannot see how 
he can continue to hold that policy.” 

Although Mr. Juppe was nominally 
responsible for government policy, Mr. 


Le Pen added. Mr. Chirac wus pulling 
the strings. ‘ * He was in the front line. He 
should go.’’ the Front leader said. 

"The right has gone to the wall.” he 
continued, “because it underestimated 
the profound discontent and frustration 
of millions of French people.” 

Only 12 candidates received the 50 
percent of the vote needed for election 
in the first round. But the second round 
for the rest of the 577 National As- 
sembly seats is open to candidates who 
won at least 12.5 percent of the total 
registered electorate. 

Those qualifying included candidates 
of the National’ Front in 133 districts. 

The puny won 600.000 votes more 
than during the last legislative elections, 
in 1993. 

Mr. Le Pen said earlier that he hoped 
the parly would win up to 1 0 seats in the 
runoff, put political commentators said 
it was more likely that the party would 
enter Parliament .’for the first time, with 
two or three seats. 

Among National Front candidates 
believed likely to win seats Sunday are 
the mavor of the southern naval base of 
Toulon. Jean-Marie Chevalier, and Mr. 
Le Pen’s daughter. Marie-Carolinc Le 
Pen. who is contesting a seat in Mames- 
la-Jolie. west of Paris. 

The National Front calls for the ex- 
pulsion of millions of immigrants and 
opposes European unification. 

According to Mr. Le Pen, the election 
has produced a new political landscape 
in France in which “the National Front 
will be the pivot and the motor.” 


BRIEFLY 


Turkish Vote Is in Limbo 

ANKARA — Coalition partners in the 1s- 
lamist-led government of Prime Minister Nec- 
mettin Erbakan failed to agree on early elections 
in Turkey, a deputy leader of Foreign Minister 
Tansu Ciller’s True Path Party said Thursday. 

“We are short of reaching an agreement with 
our partners on a timetable for an early le- 
gislative election.” Cihan Pacaci said. 

A private television channel said earlier that 
Mr. Erbakan, whose aides have opposed early 
elections, unexpectedly asked True Path to agree 
to a legislative vote in October. But people close 
to Mrs. Ciller made it clear that they favored next 
year for the elections. (AFP) 

One Currency for Bosnia 

SARAJEVO — Bosnia's tripartite presidency 
has agreed on a draft law on forming a common 
central bank and common currency, after much 
bickering, the U.S. envoy to Bosnia, Robert 
Gelbard, said Thursday. 

International mediators said the document. 


agreed to late Wednesday, still must be affirmed 
at a meeting of Bosnia's Council of Ministers 
and then ratified by Parliament. (AFP j 

Ship Founders Off Italy 

CATANZARO. Italy — A Turkish-registered 
ship ran aground in rough seas off Italy's south- 
ern coast Thursday, and about 220 persons were 
detained after they jumped overboard and swam 
ashore, the police and coastal guards said. 

Most of those caught, who were expected to 
be served with expulsion orders, were Iraqi 
Kurds, the police said. Pakistanis and Indians 
also were on board. (Reuters) 

German Extremist Threat 

LUEBECK. Germany — Radical right groups 
are organizing anti-foreigner demonstrations fo- 
cused in this port city where a weekend blaze, 
apparently set by extremists, gutted a Roman 
Catholic church, police said Thursday. 

The police in Luebeck said they were seeking 
a ban on the protests, called for Saturday. (AP) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Swords Drawn Over Book on Pope 

Author Objects to Toned-Down Polish Version of ‘His Holiness’ 



rSs& 





By Doreen Carvajal 

AW- lark Tim es Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — Just days before 
Pope John Paul II visits his Polish 
homeland, the best-selling biography 
“His Holiness” has become the center 
of a rare international battle over cen- 
sorship that pits Carl Bernstein, an in- 
vestigative reporter, and his New York 
publisher against a defiant Warsaw pub- 
lishing house. 

_ ’Hie copyright duel ended up in the 
civil courts of Poland this week when 
Bantam Doubleday Dell, a subsidiary of 
Bertelsmann AG. sued to seek damages 
and the seizure of more than 14.500 
Polish copies of the biography of the 
Pope that they contend had been heavily 
edited to remove references to the 
pontiff s ill health, to Polish anti-Semit- 
ism and to criticism of the Roman Cath- 
olic Church in Poland. 

“Clearly, die Polish publishing in- 
dustry' suffers from the same kind of 
mentality that characterized the Com- 
munist era,” said Mr. Bernstein, who 
wrote the book with on Italian journalist. 
Marco Politi. 

“In this case, rather than there being 
Communist censors, there are people 
who fear some kind of imagined rep- 
robation from the church or Polish read- 
ers." added Mr. Bernstein, who is best- 


known for his reporting on Watergate. 

Ordinarily, international copyright 
violations involve companies that steal 
a book and publish copies without pay- 
ing royalties. This case is unusual, many 
publishing executives said, because 
they had never heard of a company that 
bought a book and then drastically 
changed its contents. 

The book, which was published in 
more than 10 countries without inci- 
dent. started circulating in Polish book- 
stores in early May despite Doubleday's 
orders to halt publication. The biog- 
raphy was published by Amber Pub- 
lishing Ltd. of Warsaw, which bought 
the rights to the book for more than 
SI 0.000 plus royalties, a large sum in 
Poland, where the average rights pay- 
ment is usually about S 1,000. 

Amber defended its treatment of the 
Pope in its editing of the book for sale in 
Poland, where the church continues to 
be influential and the Pope is revered. 

“We thought that these two or three 
fragments, presenting him just before he 
came to Poland as a very old, ill and 
angry man, couldn't be good for his 
reception.” said Malgorzata Cebo- 
Foniok. Amber's editor in chief. 
"These fragments, in our opinion, don't 
in any way change the whole meaning 
of the book. TThis is a wonderfully writ- 
ten book." 


Abortion Could Again Be Illegal in Poland 
After Court Rules Law Is Unconstitutional 


By Dean E. Murphy 

Las Angeles Times 

WARSAW — Major provisions of 
Poland's deeply divisive abortion- 
rights law were struck down this week 
as unconstitutional in a far-reaching de- 
cision that abortion violates the coun- 
try's nascent democratic legal order. 

The 9-to-3 ruling by the Polish Con- 
stitutional Tribunal virtually assures 
that abortion, with few exceptions, will 
once again become illegal in Poland, 
reopening one of the country's most 
painful social wounds just five months 
after the liberalized law took effect. 

"The first article of our constitution 
names Poland as a democratic state 
based on the rule of law." said the 
tribunal's president. Andrzej Zoil, in 
announcing the ruling. "The highest 
value in a democracy is human life, 
which must be protected from its be- 
ginning to the end.” 

Stunned abortion-rights supporters, 
including the chief of staff to President 
Aleksander Kwasniewski, said the un- 


expected decision moved the predom- 
inantly Roman Catholic country pre- 
cariously close to a "clerical state." 

Leading members of the Democratic 
Left Alliance, the dominant partner in 
the governing coalition of former Com- 
munists. calied for a national referen- 
dum to finally settle the matter. 

“It is very depressing that several 
years of fighting for change have been 
losr because these 12 judges think they 
know what is best for a woman's life.” 
said Wanda Nowicka. director of the 
Federation for Women and Family 
Planning in Warsaw. 

The lone woman on the tribunal voted 
with the majority'. 

Jubilant anti-abortion advocates wel- 
comed the decision and rejoiced that it 
came on the eve of Pope John Paul ITs 
arrival in Poland this weekend for an 1 1 - 
day pilgrimage. The Pope had ex- 
pressed sadness and pain that his home- 
land. in easing three-year-old abortion 
restrictions, had returned to standards of 
morality under communism, when 
abortion was freely available. 


The dispute is so thorny that pub- 
lishers from each country cannot even 
agree on how much text was changed. 
Doubleday. the division of Bantam 
Doubieday Dell that published the 
book, contended that the text had been 
reduced by almost 35 percent, as Polish 
translations are typically longer than the 
English versions. The American edition 
of the book had 538 pages: the Polish 
edition has 422 pages. 

Still. Mrs. Foniok insisted that fewer 
than four pages were actually changed 
and said material had been added in a 
supplement to the book with a warning 
note that the information was subject- 
ive. Doubleday said the supplement had 
not restored all the missing material, and 
it objecred to the warning note. 

"It's absolutely impossible.” Mrs. 
Foniok said of Doubleday's accusation 
that more than a third of the book had 
been removed or changed. "Our print is 
smaller, and the lines between the verse 
are smaller. I'm so amazed at these 
accusations because we published this 
book with the utmost respect for the 
authors." 

“His Holiness.” which was pub- 
lished in the United States in September, 
portrays the Pope as a savvy politician 
who formed a "holy alliance" during 
the 1980s with President Ronald Rea- 
gan to defeat communism in Poland. 









... k 

Boh AiMoa&i Prew 

MCDONALD’S BLAST — Policemen searching through bomb debris 
Thursday at a McDonald’s restaurant in Saint-Jean -de-Luz, south- 
western France. There were no claims of responsibility for the attack. 


BRIEFLY 


Mugabe Turns Down Mandela 

HARARE. Zimbabwe — President Robert Mugabe of 
Zimbabwe rejected pleas by President Nelson Mandela of 
South Africa for the release of five apartheid-era spies 
jailed in Zimbabwe since 1987 for murder and sabotage, 
according to a published report Thursday. 

The Financial Gazette said that Mr. Mugabe told Mr. 
Mandela during a state visit last week that the prisoners 
would not be released and that four of them were Zi- 
mbabweans who broke Zimbabwean laws. 

The Zimbabweans and a Briton were arrested in 1987 
after a car-bombing in the city of Bulawayo killed one 
person. South Africa sought their release after its first all- 
race elections in 1 994 as a gesture of goodwill ioward the 
ousted apartheid government. But Zimbabwe insisted that 
the five had been hired by apartheid-ruled South Africa to 
spy and plan arracks on exile groups. {API 

Attackers Kill 8 Near Algiers 

ALGIERS — Armed men attacked a home in a rural 
village south of the capital, slitting the throats of six men 
and two women, according to press reports Thursday. 

No group look responsibility for the killings, which 
occurred in the village of Djebabra. near Medea, on Tues- 
day. But the region is a stronghold of the Armed Islamic 


Group, the most radical organization engaged in an in- 
surgency against the military- backed government. 

The killings were the larest in a series of similar mas- 
sacres that have shaken the .Algerian countryside ahead of 
legislative elections on June 5. iAP) 


Rebels Bomb Buildings in Peru 

LIMA — Moie than 20 Peruvian guerrillas swarmed 
through an isolated village in the northern Andes and 
attacked public buildings with explosives, the police said. sup 
The bombs damaged the village hall, the local governor's 
house and a small clinic but did not injure any people in the of Q 

village of Buldibuyo. Officials said Wednesday ihey did suppo 
not know which rebel group had carried out the attack on left at 
Tuesday. (Reuters) 

Menem Condemns Roadblocks ^ 

their I 

BUENOS AIRES — President Carlos Menem of Ar- prom| 
gentina blamed tax dodgers and the country’ 's "black" ers. 
economy for roadblocks spreading through Argentine Ere 
provinces in protest of unemployment and poverty. aiy Ai 

Ten barricades have been placed on roads in the north- until 1 
western province of Jujuy and three in the central province statem 

of Cordoba. Argentine unemployment has risen to 17.3 goven 
percent from 6 percent since 19S9. (Reuters) of l0I J 


Mexico Battle 
Renews Fears 
Ahead of Vote 


By John Ward Anderson 

Washington Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — With a nation- 
wide election campaign focusing atten- 
tion on lingering grievances, a violent 
rural insurgency that had been dormant 
for six months has erupted anew, leav- 
ing at least nine people dead in two 
clashes between leftist guerrillas and 
eovernmem troops. 

The most recent and deadly battle 
occurred Tuesday, when troops on anti- 
drug patrol in the southwestern state of 
Guerrero were attacked by about 25 
men armed with automatic weapons, 
killing one soldier. 

Later, as the troops were trying to 
recover the body of their slain comrade, 
a second battle" erupted, during which 
two soldiers and two guerrillas were 
killed, an army statement said. 

Government and military officials 
would not comment on the identity of 
the attackers, but Reuters quoted a mil-, 
itary official as saying they were rnenigjf 
bers of the shadowy Popular Revolu* 
nonary Army, a self-styled Marxist 
group’ that surfaced about a year ago. 
calling for the overthrow of the gov- 
ernment and a new constitution. 

The official said 10 soldiers were 
wounded in the clashes, which occurred 
in Atoyac de Alvarez, about 65 kilo- 
meters t-40 milesl northwest of the Pa- 
cific tourist resort of Acapulco. 

The renewed violence comes as Mex- 
ico prepares for a critical midterm par- 
liamentary election on July 6. 

Polls show that Mexico's long-ruling 
Institutional Revolutionary' Party, 
known as the PRL could lose its ma- 
jority in the lower house of Congress for 
the first time in nearly seven decades. 

The election campaign also has 
prompied tense and violent standoffs 
between pro-government activists and 
supporters of the largely quiescent Za- 
patista rebel group in the southern state 
of Chiapas — where an uprising in 
support of Indian rights in January 1994 
left about 145 people dead m 10 days of 
fighting. 

Peace talks there have been stalled for 
months, and some Zapatista backers say ** 
their towns will boycott the elections, 
prompting clashes with PRI support- 
ers. 

Previously, the Popular Revolution- 
ary Army had declared a unilateral truce 
until after the elections. But a rebel 
statement earlier this month accused the 
government of prosecuting a campaign 
of torture against it, and it predicted 
more battles with the army. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDA). MAY 30, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


An 800,000-Year - Old Makes a Big Ancestral Claim 


By John Noble Wilford 

'f'u )| -ri /tmri Servh s 

NEW YORK — Spanish puieumulopists think 
that SOO.tM.ffl- year-old lussils they found in a lime- 
stone ca\e represent an entirely new species of 
human ancestor and could be the last common 
ancestor of modem humans and their extinct cous- 
ins. the Neanderthals. 

Other scientists on: not so sure. They agree that 
the fossils, whatever their species, are remains of 
the earliest known Europeans. 

As such, the fossils are critical to an under- 
standing of how Europe was first settled by htun- 
inids. the family of all human species alive and 
exiincL But scientists expressed serious reser- 
vations about assigning the Spanish fossils to a 
separate limb on the family tree. 

A Spanish team of paleontologists, led by Jose 


Kabila Takes 
Oath of Office, 
Vowing a Vote 
By April 1999 


Bermudez de Castro of the National Museum of researchers said. No hominids had been known to 


Natural Sciences and Juan Luis Arsuaga of the have developed such a modem face earlier than peared in Europe about 200,000 years ago and 
University Compluten.se. both in Madrid, based 200,000 years ago. And the primitive aspects did vanished about 28,000 years ago. Many scientists 
their case lor a new hominid species on the bones not seem to be like those of Hotnohcidetber^cr.sis. think modem Homo sapiens evolved in Africa 
of a boy with a remarkably modem face. The the so-called Heidelberg Man of 500,000 years 200,000 to 100.000 years ago and arrived in 
partial remains of the boy, about 10 or 11 years ago. which had been the earliest known hominid in Europe aboui 40.000 years ago. 
old. and five other individuals were discovered Western Europe. Science quoted Antonio Rosas, another pa- 


The robust, heavy-browed Neanderthals ap- 
peared in Europe about 200,000 years ago and 
vanished about 28,000 years ago. Many scientists 
think modem Homo sapiens evolved in Africa 


old, and five other individuals were discovered 
two years ago at the Gran Dolina cave site in the 
Atupuerca hills near Burgos, Spain. 

Everything about the boy's cranium, lower jaw 
and teeth, the researchers could see, is primitive. 
But between the brow and the jaw. the sunken 
cheeks, projecting nose and other traits suggested 
“a completely modem pattern of midfacial to- 


Accordingly, the paleontologists decided the 
fossils belonged to a separate species and pro- 
posed that it be named Homo antecessor, from the 
Latin word meaning "one who goes first." 

As if proposing a new hominid species was not 
enough to provoke impassioned debate in pa- 
leoanthropology, the Spanish team further invited 


pography." the paleontologists wrote in a report controversy h> identifying the 800.000-year-old 
being published Friday in the journal Science. species — and not HonuTheidelbergensi* or the 
This combination of modem and primitive even earlier Homo erccius — as the probable 
characteristics seemed to set the Atapuerca boy common ancestor of Neanderthals and modem 
apart from any previously recognized species, the humans. Honus sapiens. 


Science quoted Antonio Rosas, another pa- 
leontologist from the Madrid museum and mem- 
ber of the team, as saying that the boy's facial traits 
were "exactly the morphology we would imagine 
in the common ancestor of modem humans and 
Neanderthals." 

"I'm reluctant to endorse this new species." 
said Philip Rightmire. a paleoanthropologist at the 
State University of New York at Binghamton. "I 
wonder if the facial characteristics of one juvenile 
are really diagnostic. It’s tricky to compare chil- 
dren to adults and on that basis establish a new’ 
species." 


FREETOWN: 


PAGE 7 


GOLD: 

Kohl Takes a Chance 

Continued from Page 1 

wish to take the same risks as the French 
prime minister. Alain Juppe, in pressing 
the austerity measures that led to his 
resignation this week, then other. less 
stringent ways must be found to raise the 
money needed to create the financial 
discipline demanded by the new common 
currency. Like revaluing gold reserves. 

In Germany, that means an abrupt 
departure — made manifest Wednesday 
night — from the sniffy disdain with 
which Bonn has greeted attempts at what 
is called * ‘creative accounting" by other 
European countries seeking to qualify 
for the new currency with one-on. rev- 
enue-raising gimmicks. Again, like re- 
valuing gold resenres. 

The disdain with which other Euro- 
peans were treated is now coming home 
to roost, the conservative Die Well 
newspaper said. 

And that departure, in turn, means 
what some German officials see as a 
body blow to the credibility and au- 


t«t. * nrt j . thority of the financial management with 

ivi germ iroops Arrive which Germany underpins its claim to 
° 1 lead doubtful Europeans into a new cur- 






rw 


Continued from Page 1 rency regime that none of them have 

approved in elections. 

international isolation, the Sierra Leone "The government's behavior jeop- 
coup was roundly condemned ardizes our greatest need — intema- 
throughout this region, and was rapidly tional credibility," said Rudolf Scharp- 
denounced by the United Nations Se- mg of the opposition Social Democrats, 
curity Council, the United States, joining a chorus of condemnation from 
France, and the European Union, which politicians and the press of the gov- 


i <■» ftir t »m Ptyvo, ht< 

ila was sworn in as president of the Demo- 
critic Republic of Congo here Thursday, jj h . 
pledging elections in April 1999 and 
vowing to eradicate the legacy of the 
corrupt Mobutu regime he toppled Ml/ ^ 

Mr. Kabila, wearing a black safari 
suit, completed his rapid transformation 
from guerrilla leader to head of state 
when he took the presidential oath at a 
Kinshasa soccer stadium packed with 
50.000 people, including five African 

presidents. gM BBnMj 1 

Mr. Kabila, who issued a decree Wed- 
nesday giving himself almost total 
power in the Central African nation. 

outlined his timetable for institutional V-.’*' 

and electoral reform in a 25-minute 

The highlight was a pledge to hold v « Pp | 

I presidential and parliamentary elections ' MBbT* ’ ' ■ 

by April 1. 1999. "That's a promise," 

. he said. ‘ 'Rest assured that this date will A Hercules transport plane bringin 
be respected, and no foreign influence 
will change that." 

"We are nor in a hurry,” he said. rAOUHr 
"We must have order." 1 ItII 1 iZ 

The point had been illustrated earlier n . r ^ . 

when about 200 angry students made a jfiCEI7l trOm JDACG. 
mockery of heavy security surrounding * ■ 

the event, jumping onto the running Continued from Page I 

track to press their demands for edu- 
cation subsidies before Mr. Kabila's ar- evolution of other planets, like Mars, 


is a major source of aid to Sierra Leone, 
the world's second-poorest country, by 
some estimates. 

If the Western reaction to the coup was 
predictable, the reaction of Nigeria, and 


eminent s move. 

Indeed, said staie-nm ARD television, 
the government actions seem to show 
that it has "lost touch with reality." 
Even some of Mr. Kohl's supposed 


much of the rest of the region, to the Sierra party allies condemned the move, ar- 
Leone coup marks a major departure from guing that, as Kun Biedenkopf, the 
the post-independence history of West Christian Democrat prime minister of 


Africa, in which military coups have been the state of Saxony, put it, by under- 
common, and regional and international mining the independence of the Bundes- 
e Boris to reverse or condemn them rare bank, Bonn was also undermining Ger- 
and ineffectual. many's insistence that a future European 

A coup against an elected government central bank have the same indepen- 
by junior officera in Gambia in July 1994. dence to maintain the euro as a strong 
and another in Niger in January 1996, drew currency. 

little negative reaction in die region. Mr. Kohl — who does not face na- 

Nigeria's military government has tional elections until October of next 


made few public comments on its troop year — is no stranger to being told that 


deployment in Siena Leone, but one 
seniorNigerian military official said that 


economic complexities elude him. hi 
1990. against the advice of the Bundes- 


his country "sees die coup in Freetown bank, he announced that most former 


ImoI 

A Hercules transport plane bringing Nigerian troops to the airport serving the Sierra Leone capital. 


as a threat to regional peace and security 
that must be dealt with." 

Commenting on events in Siena Le- 


East German marks — then virtually 
worthless — would be swapped on a 
one-to-one basis for West Germany's 


one. meanwhile, Nigerian state radio cherished Deutsche mark. 


COSMIC: 

Rain From Space! 

Continued from Page I 


rival. 

It took stewards and Mr. Kabila's 
heavily armed former rebel soldiers an 
hour to push them back into the stands 
and restore calm. 

“L Laurent Desire Kabila, president 
of the republic, swear my faithfulness to 
the .nation and obedience to the law 
governing the transition period," Mr. 


that should be getting bathed in the same \ 
extraterrestrial, drizzle. 

“This relatively gentle cosmic rain — i 
which possibly contains organic com- j 
pounds — may well have nurtured the j 
development of life on our planet,” Mr. i 
Frank said. I 

He presented the unprecedented tin- « 


! Water From Space 

! Thousands of small comets 
: made of water ice and cosmic 
I dust hit Earth's atmosphere 
j every day, breaking up and 
j dispersing water and possibly 
• organic chemicals. 


Report Says Israel 
Will Offer Less Than 
40% of West Bank 


said Thursday of Mr. Kabbah that he "is 
the elected leader of the country, and 
Nigeria recognizes him as such." 

Diplomats said the fact that the anti- 
coup effort in Sierra Leone had been led 


Bundesbank economists told him the 
move would lead to die precipitous col- 
lapse of East German industry and mass 
unemployment — precisely what did 
happen — and the development led (fi- 


about political change in the region. 

40% of West Bank 

eludes Sierra Leone and Liberia, team- 
■ The Associated Prm ing up with Guinea, a former French 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister colony, in an effort to impose order on 
Benjamin Netanyahu plans to offer the those two turbulent countries. 


by Nigeria says as much about West reedy to a crisis on European money 
Africa's most populous nation as it does - markets. 


An incoming 


ages, w ith graphs and analysis, at a meet- ; snowball, pothaps 


Kabila said beneath a blazing afternoon -ing of the American Geophysical Un- 


On hand were the presidents of An- The evidence of snowballs from outer J 
goia, Rwanda, Uganda, Burundi and space comes from images taken at both ; 
Zambia, all strong backers of Mr. Kabila ultraviolet and visible wavelengths by • 
in his war against Mobutu Se se Seko. Mr. Frank's specially designed instru- 
Each president shook Mr. Kabila’s hand mem aboard NASA's year-old POLAR 
and embraced him after the oath was spacecraft. One shows an object streak- 
completed. ing across the sky and bursting over 

The ceremony came the day after Europe last Sept. 26. Researchers noted 
state-run television broadcast a proclara- that the snowballs disintegrate at alti- 


I 40 feet in diameter, 
j is hard to observe. 


Palestinians less than 40 percent of the 
West Bank in talks on a permanent peace 
agreement, an Israeli daily said 
Thursday. 

Mr. Netanyahu denied the report. 


Nigeria has footed most of the multi- 
billion-dollar bill for a West African 
peacekeeping force that has spent seven 
years in Liboia. And after years of dev- 


But the one-to-one swap, which en- 
riched ordinary East Germans overnight, 
was widely popular. Mr. Kohl won the 
elections that year, but Germans are still 
paying income tax surcharges to finance 
the rebuilding of Eastern Germany. 

In other words, what is important to 
Mr. Kohl is the political vision he sees 
beyond the number crunching. But that 
is where his newest gamble is so risky, 
for. in taking on the Bundesbank and 


Mr. Frank's specially designed instru- 
ment aboard NASA's year-old POLAR 
spacecraft. One shows an object streak- 
ing across the sky and bursting over 


ation giving Mr. Kabila virtually un- 
checked powers over the three branches 


tudes well above the orbits of human 
occupants aboard U.S. shuttles and the 


i The comet breaks 
j up into fragments 
when rt is 600 
miles to 15,000 
miles above Earth. 


The newspaper Ha’aretz published a uled its first democratic national elections 
front-page map of what it said the West in July, an event whose success diplomats 
Bank would look like under Mr. Net- say would boost Nigerian prestige, 
anyahu’s plan. Palestinians would con- The long civil ware in Liberia and 
trol much of the West Bank's heartland. Sierra Leone have tended to feed on each 
but have no territorial continuity between other, and allowing chaos in Sierra Le- 
the northern and southern West Bank. one could quickly undermine a fragile 


astatmg civil war, that country has sched- threatening to tinker with the gold re- 


serves, the German chancellor is pre- 
cariously navigating among his com- 
patriots' deepest fears. 

Both the independence of the Bundes- 


Sierra Leone have tended to feed on each bank and the sanctity of the gold reserves 
other, and allowing chaos in Sierra Le- are held by many Germans as their ul- 


other. and allowing chaos in Sierra Le- 
one could quickly undermine a fragile 


j.- 2 ^ of government — executive, legislative Russian space station. 


and judicial — until a new constitution is 
adopted and elections held. 

In his speech, Mr. Kabila said a coin- 
mission to begin work on the consti- 


The new evidence resurrects a theory 
widely rejected as preposterous when 
Mr. Rank first proposed iiin 1986: that I 
a strange population of stealthy, rel- j 


turion would be installed by September atively small comets made of almost 
and that its work should be completed by pure ice has been spraying water into 


and that its work should be completed by pure ice has been spraying water into 
October 1998. A referendum on the con- Earth's upper atmosphere at a suffi- 
stitution should be held by December ciently high rale over the 4.5 billion-year 
1998. followed by presidential and le- life of the planet to have created all the 
gislative elections in April 1999. Mr. oceans. 

Kabila said. This week, several of Mr. Frank’s 


Israel would keep a wide swath of democratic transition in Liberia, 
land in the West Bank’s Jordan Valley Perhaps even more urgently, however, 
along the Jordanian border and around diplomats say that Nigeria is under strong 
Jerusalem. Most of the Jewish settle- internal and international pressure to end 
meats would be in territory under Israeli a long period of corrupt military rule, 
control, but some would be in areas Restoring a democratically elected gov- 
given to the Palestinians. eminent in Sierra Leone might help ease 

Senior officials in Mr. Netanyahu's die international isolation faced by die 
office have said in the past that Israel Nigerian leader. General Sani Abacha. 
hoped to retain 60 percent of the West * ‘This may be a case where Nigeria’s 

Bank as part of a peace agreement interests and the interests of the region 
Mr. Netanyahu said Thursday that coincide neatly," said one Western dip- 
* ‘there is no basis to that report because lomat "Putting down a coup like this 


are held by many Germans as their ul- 
timate defense a gain st the nightmare of 
inflation that haunted the Weimar Re- 
public and preceded Hitler’s rise to 
power in 1933. 

Indeed, the angle overwhelming rea- 
son that a majority of German citizeos 


Restoring a democratically elected gov- remain mistrustful of the euro is that its 
eminent in Siena Leone might help ease creation would mean trading their tra- 


the international isolation faced by die 
Nigerian leader. General Sani Abacha. 

4 ‘This may be a case where Nigeria’s 
interests and the interests of the region 
coincide neatly,' ’ said one Western dip- 
lomat "Putting down a coup like this 


diuonally rock-hard mark for the kind of 
softer euro that is now being openly 
discussed in France. 

In battling the Bundesbank, Mr. Kohl 
may raise money to formally fulfill the 
budget requirements for the new cur- 


I did not show to anyone" a map "nor could be a very positive example of rency. But, in the process, he may raise 


1998. followed by presidential and le- 
gislative elections in April 1999. Mr. 
Kabila said. 


Before the ceremony began, about leading former critics said the new ev- 
500 supporters of the opposition activist idence appears solid. The scientific com- 
Etienne Tshisekedi. who was passed m unity must now confront the host of 


Etienne Tshisekedi. who was passed 
over by Mr. Kabila when he formed his 
transitional government last week, 
began chanting anti-Kabila slogans from 
a comer of the stands. 

"Kabila has sold the country!" and 
"We are not afraid!’ the protesters 
shouted. 

Mr. Kabila supporters fired back with 
their own slogans, yelling "Go to 
Togo! ’’ which is where Marshal Mobutu 
fled after Mr. Kabila’s takeover of Kin- 
shasa. 

In a reference to Mr. Tshisekedi, Mr. 
Kabila said those calling for immediate 
elections were doing so for personal 
gain, not for the good of the country. 

Underlying the tension in Kinshasa is 


m unity must now confront the host of 
extremely difficult questions the find- 
ings raise, they said. 

One puzzle, for example, is how these 
objects could have streamed through 
Earth’s history undetected by humanity 
until now. In addition, if these comets 
are raining down on Earth, they should 
also be hitting the moon, where they 
should have been detectable as seismic 
events. 

The planet's annual average precip- 
itation is just under 34 inches, and Mr. 
Frank estimates the cosmic snowballs 
contribute enough to spread one ten- 
thousandth of an inch of water over the 
Earth's surface annually. . . 

The consensus among scientists who 


Exposure to 
sunlight rapidly 
vaporizes the 
snow; the vapor 
cloud expands to 
30 miles across. 


. -ej’i V«/\ vr*»- %• 

Vapor doud flat- 
tens into pancake; 
winds disperse it 
water condenses. 


did I draw a map." Nigeria using its might responsibly. 

Asked by Israeli radio whether he had From General Abacha's perspective, the 
a map, he said: "We have a map in our prestige from that can't hurt at home or 


head. Who hasn't?" 


abroad." 


; its might responsibly, far more questions among his constitu- 
Abacha’s perspective, the ents about the cost of a currency reform 
that can't hurt at home or that will rob them of the very emblem of 
their postwar economic success. 


CIA: Agency Reports It Destroyed or Lost Secret Files on Iran 


Continued from Page 1 


He was assigned to write a warts -and - 
all account of the CIA-sponsored coup in 


sions in Indonesia in the 1950s and a Guatemala in 1954. Mr. Gates had just the Iran files. 


before he gave a speech in September 
1993 rededicating the CIA to releasing 


successful coup sponsored by the CIA in 
Guyana in the early 1960s. 

“Iran — there's nothing," Mr. 


CuLlather said. * * Indonesia — very little, invasion of Cuba. 


made his pledge of openness and prom- 
ised to make public the files on Gua- 
temala, ban and the 1961 Bay of Pigs 


Guyana — that was burned." 

Brian LatelL the CIA official who 
runs the Center for the Study of In- 
telligence at the agency, acknowledged 


Bm the CIA "quickly found there 
were no documents on Iran," Mr. 
Cullather said. 

"They had been routinely purged. 


Ed Coben, the director of information 
management at the CIA, said in an in- 
terview that strict procedures at the 
agency now insured that no valuable his- 
torical records were routinely burned. 

"The destruction process is not mind- 
less,” Mr. Cohen said. 

Historical records of secret operations 


that most of the Iran records were des-' When I left in 1993. they had rounded up are reviewed by the agency’s covert 

i.„. ik, i OAfio .k~.> oe .. ca — r Tk™ . n a ». i , i 


elections w«"^ing~ so for personal thousandth of an“ inch of water over the quantitiesof water involved over time — troyed or lost in the 1960s. about 25 or 50 pieces of paper. There 

gain, not for the good of the country. Earth’s surface annually. . . could be accepted. He said he thought ihe agency still had was almost nothing. The bulk of the 

6 Underlying the tension in Kinshasa is The consensus among scientists who The new objects are different in kind "substantial" records on its covert ac- documents on that operation were des- 

personal clash between Mr. Kabila, the have reviewed Mr. Frank's data prior to from the extraterrestrial dust, rock and tions in Indonesia, which it has promised troyed." 

' professional rebel who fought his way to its pending publication is that he has other material that is known to rain into to make public. Mr. La tell said only "a small body" 

power and Mr Tshisekedi the popular indeed discovered a population of ob- Earth’s atmosphere regularly. And they He said he could not discuss Guyana, of Iran records remained. Other officials 

politician who for more ttan a decade jects that is raining huge amounts of are different from the known large which he called an operation whose ex- said dies 

used nonviolent methods to oppose Mar- water into the Earth's atmosphere. But comets, of which water is a primary istence the CIA had never acknowl- cubic foe 

shal Mobutu. The two men have yet to several cautioned that more data would component. Comets are believed to be ttigea. . ,, , No 011 

meet, and intermediaries have failed u> be required before his interpretation of pristine remnants from the cloud of gas Dr. Cullather is correct about the Woolsey 
rtnH r, I'nmnmmiffl. (AFP. AP. NYT) the evidence — particularly as to the and dust that formed the solar system. Iran records, he said. 


operators, die CIA’s general counsel, the 
agency's inspector general and the of- 
fice of the historian, where Mr. Cullaiher 
worked. 

Mr. Cullather agreed that “there’s no 
grand conspiracy in the CIA to destroy 


find a compromise. (AFP. AP, NYT) The evidence — particularly as to the 


Staph Germ Is Resisting Antibiotics, Alarming Hospitals 


He said he could not discuss Guyana, of Iran records remained. Other officials grand conspiracy in the CIA to destroy 
which he called an operation whose ex- said the surviving files totaled about one documents. ’ ' 
istence the CIA had never acknowl- cubic foot. “What there is,” he said, "is neglect 

edged. < No one at the agency had told Mr. or negligence" and a “culture of de- 

"Dr. Cullather is correct" about the Woolsey about the records' destruction sanction," bom of secrecy. 

Iran records, he said. 

In the early 1960s. Mr. LaieJl con- ~~ 

tinued. CIA officials told the keepers of ATT I l/C* /-»*• , jy /i i li- 

the Iran records "that their safes were /lliliiTiiJa CIITItOII Jt\€n€W8 C rOalS Oft tfOSnUZ 


cubic foot. 

No one at the agency had told Mr. 
Woolsey about the records' destruction 


“What there is,” he said, "is neglect, 
or negligence" and a “culture of de- 
struction," bom of secrecy. 


The Associated Press 

ATLANTA — A staph germ that 
causes thousands of often deadly in- 
fections among hospital patients each 
year is becoming resistant to medi- 
cine's drug of last resort and could 
soon prove unstoppable. 

A new strain of staphylococcus 


surgery. The bacteria strain bad an 
"intermediate'' level of resistance to 
the antibiotic — one step away from 
becoming immune, the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention 
sa 'd. . 

"The strain is marching up the lad- 
der of resistance,” Dr. Fred Tenover, 


time. Staph bacteria are the leading 
cause of hospital infections. 

In the meantime, tbe agency and 
other experts said, hospitals need to 


other experts said, hospitals need to 
tighten their practices to prevent the 
spire ad of germs, and doctors should 
use antibiotics more sparingly. Phar- 
maceutical companies also are work- 
ing on new types of antibiotics. 

Staph bacteria are blamed for about 
13 percent of the nation's 2 million 
hospiial infections each year, accord- 


too full and they needed to clean them 
out." 

"This was tbe culture in the early 
1960s.” he said. “No such culture exists 
any longer and hasn't existed for some 
time." 

The directors in that era were Allen 
Dulles, who served from February 1953 
through November 1961, and John Me- 

. i i. j i - a 


n «««.H - T r v— rhief nf the aeencv's hos- ing on new types of antibiotics. served through April 1965. It is unclear uiair. 

aureus bactena that wasd^o ered . . warned "It is Staph bacteria are blamed for about whether either man was aware of the Mr. Blair's aides have advertised re- 

S-EI "5 *25? “rnvdn a ^buTftifa cause 13 peWent of the nation's 2 million destruction. lemiessly for the past 48 hours how 

the first time againsi ^^comy n. . ■ p hospital infections each year, accord- Mr. Cullather. now an assistant pro- President Clinton "extended his stay" 

which has been in us^mce 1 970 and IS • reached hos- ing to the agency. Overall, these 2 fessor of history at Indiana University in London, noi once but twice, in order to 

PH^pnbed when other antibiotics Tail. . . . ^ ^ health million infections kill 60,000 to 80,000 and associate editor of the Journal of “cement" their already "warm" rc- 

The 4-month-old child developed pndbn the Unned Mate, wnncami American History, came to the CIA in lationship. the president evening" 

a boil while recovering from heart experts said « was only a matter or peop.c. 1992 as a member of its history staff. far as to speak to a cabinet meting. 


Continued from Page 1 

It was, said BBC TV’s 6 O’clock 
News, “a day of mutual admiration, 
persona] warmth and shared political 
ideas." Indeed, die Downing Street 
"spin" has focused less on substance 
and more on the amount of time Mr. 


Blair. 

Mr. Blair's aides have advertised re- 
lentlessly for the past 48 hours how 
President Clinton "extended his slay" 


1992 as a member of its history staff. 


A Blair confidant noted that a lengthy, 
fully harmonious news conference such 
as that held by the two leaders Thursday 
simply could not have happened under 
Prime Minister John Major: Commen- 
tators wrote and spoke of a new "Tony 
and BUI axis." of a return to the close 
personal relationship between president 


Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan. 

Adam Boulton, chief political cor- 
respondent for Sky News, which broad- 
cast live virtually every public moment 
of the Clinton visit, noted that it was “a 
coronation of Tony Blair as a similar 
leader of the new era’* and a "very clear 
expression of joint philosophy." 














PAGE 8 


FRIDAY. MAY 30, 1997 


licralb 



INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Lifeline for North Korea 


How do you save a drowning man 
who does not appear eager for rescue, 
and who may want to take you down 
with him if he sinks? This is. in rough 
foira, the question South Korea and its 
allies lace in attempting to assist North 
Korea. By reliable accounts, milli ons 
of North Koreans are suffering from 
malnutrition and face the prospect of 
starvation, and North Korea has asked 
South Korea and just about everyone 
else for food. Yet the stifling Staiinisr 
dictatorship in North Korea also con- 
tinues to find money to support the 
world's fourth-largest standing army 
and a huge, if backward, arsenal — 
aimed largely at its would-be bene- 
factors in the South. 

After some initial hesitations, and a 
certain amount of bad blood between 
friends. South Korea and the United 
States have come to a reasonable po- 
sition. They have agreed to provide 
some food — not as much as North 
Korea needs, but enough, if properly 
handled, to stave off the worst part of 
the current crisis among at least some 
of North Korea's most vulnerable res- ■ 
idents, and to keep open a channel of 
communication. But they have also 
made clear that they cannot save all of 
North Korea from what is certain to be 
a constant, or at least recurring, short- 
age as long as North Korea refuses to 
reform its own failed system. 

Floods leading to a bad harvest are 


the immediate cause of North Korea's 
troubles. But its economy has been 
slipping at least since 1991. when the 
Soviet Union and its generous sub- 
sidies disappeared. It can no longer 
afford to buy fertilizer or fuel for tract- 
ors. Desperate peasants have defor- 
ested whole hillsides, guaranteeing 
more floods in the future. North 
Korea’s secretive regime refuses, de- 
spite prodding from Beijing, to attempt 
any China-like economic reforms. As 
long as it refuses to give any space to 
individual initiative, it will not climb 
out of the hole it has dug for itself. 

South Korea, the European Union, 
China and the United States are right to 
give food without conditions, and oth- 
er countries should pitch in; Americans 
have never allowed politics to stand in 
the way of helping starving people. But 
the South Koreans also are correct 
when they argue that no amount of 
charity can compensate for North 
Korea's structural problem. South 
Korea and its allies can try to coax 
North Korea into a more conciliatory 
position, and they can restate the ob- 
vious: that even a slight shift toward 
reform and away from bellicosity 
could open the gates to private in- 
vestment worth more than govern- 
ments will ever deliver In free com or 
rice. But only North Korea can decide 
whether it wants that lifeline. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


De Klerk Retreats 


When he served as South Africa's 
last white president. F. W. de Klerk 
could be a man of vision and prag- 
matism. He saw that apartheid was 
collapsing, and recognized that a ne- 
gotiated transition was the only way to 
salvage some power for whites. He 
freed Nelson Mandela and managed a 
transition to majority rule. This month, 
however, Mr. tie Klerk seems to have 
put his blinders back on. In dealing with 
his nation's Truth and Reconciliation 
Commission and with the future of his 
own National Party, he has retreated to 
narrow and unrealistic decisions. He is 
damaging his reputation, die fortunes 
of his party and the chance that South 
Africans can live together in peace. 

This month. Mr. de Klerk disbanded 
a National Party task force charged 
with redesigning the party. It was led 
by Roelf Meyer, leader of the party's 
young generation and once his most 
trusted lieutenant. Mr. Meyer won the 
respect of many black South Africans 
when he and Cyril Ramaphosa of the 
African National Congress led the 
teams negotiating the details of the 
transitional constitution. Mr. de Klerk 
set up tite task force to help make the 
party into a conservative alternative to 
the ANC for voters of all races. 

Mr. Meyer feels that the party, which 
now enjoys the support of only 14 
percent of South Africans, is doomed 
unless it is reconstituted with a mostly 
black leadership. He is certainly right, 
but the party hard-liners did not ap- 
preciate this view. They persuaded Mr. 
de Klerk to close down the task force. 
Mr. Meyer then resigned from the party 
to start a new political movement 

Also this month, Mr. de Klerk an- 
nounced that his party would no longer 
cooperate with the country's Truth 


Commission. His statement came after 
commission leaders questioned his 
testimony that he knew nothing about 
apartheid-era atrocities. Archbishop 
Desmond Turn, who heads the com- 
mission, said he himself came to Mr. 
de Klerk when he was president with 
information about police brutality. 

The National Party’s withdrawal 
will probably not block the commis- 
sion's quest to uncover the truth about 
apartheid-era crimes. The commission 
retains subpoena power, and those who 
have applied for amnesty for their 
crimes cannot turn back. The change 
will mean that the National Party will 
no longer participate in party testi- 
mony, where it had provided little of 
value anyway. But die withdrawal will 
hurt the commission symbolically, 
fueling the erroneous but widespread 
feeling among whites that it is tar- 
geting the apartheid-era governments. 

Mr. de Klerk's derisions show that 
he has not yet come to grips with the 
consequences of the process he set in 
motion. His father was one of 
apartheid's architects, and he appar- 
ently cannot bring himself to admit that 
its top leaders knew of the crimes that 
were necessary to prop up minority 
rule. People who know him say he is 
bitter, feeling that blacks and partic- 
ularly Mr. Mandela owe him gratitude 
that he is not receiving. 

South Africa needs a full accounting 
of the past, and a political system In 
which parties are divided by ideology, 
not race. Mr. de Klerk's siege men- 
tality is a setback to both goals. He 
would do his country a service if he 
either returned to the leadership qual- 
ities that marked his presidency or got 
out of politics altogether. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Tamagotchi Fever 


Knowing that novelty fades, game 
companies generally market new ver- 
sions of their electronic toys long be- 
fore children lose interest in the first 
one. The makers of a Japanese cyber- 
game called Tamagotchi have taken the 
strong-arm approach, however, with a 
dictatorial little toy that threatens to die 
if the child stops playing with it. 

The game shows a baby chick that 
hatches from an egg on a liquid-crystal 
screen the size of a watch face. The pet 
“ sleeps" at night. But it requires con- 
stant attention during the day — beep- 
ing when it wants to be played with, 
fra, or given medicine for its illnesses. 
A happiness meter on the device rates 
the owner's parenting skills. 

The pet expires if left unattended for 
more than five or six hours. The Jap- 
anese version of the toy marks the pet 1 s 
demise with a gravestone and a cross. 
The American version announces 
death with angel wings. The toy can be 
reset to grow a new pet, bur the first one 
is gone forever. 

Children enlist their parents to help 
during the day. or take the toy to school 
and hover over it A New York stare 


school has banned the toy after third 
graders taking a nest started putting 
down their pencils to “feed” it. 

Sensing the backlash, manufactur- 
ers say next fall’s Tamagotchi will 
feature — what else? — a pause but- 
ton. Parents who have suffered through 
the first version will doubtless prefer 
this one. With any luck, the kids will 
lose interest in a pet that no longer 
requires their constant attention. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

Other Comment 

Immigrants Fay OR 

Immigrants in New York work 
about 10 percent more often than 
people who are citizens of the United 
States and the city. They are net con- 
tributors in fairly significant amounts 
to the economy of the city. When I see 
immigrants coming in, by and large 
1 see people who are going to work, 
people who are going to establish jobs 
for other people. 

— Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, 
quoted in The Washington Post. 


•hum, tin im ,iu nol, 

ESTABLISHED I8S7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen ■ 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, \ Ke Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher 4 Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER. Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS. Managing Editor • PAUL HORVTTZ Deputy Managing Editor 
» KATHERINE KNORR and CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Deputy Editors • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWIRTZ. Associate Editors • ROBERT J. DONAHUE Editor of the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Finance Editor 
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! *' LondiwC2- W.’t 171 1 836-1802. Fax: 1 171 1240-225-1 

*■"■3 ^gmnQOF RCSHtSm B 732021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61 337 


This Time the West Can Get It Right in Congo 

knu varrines. SUDpor 


, Mr* 

• r 

s t>rioii 


war 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — 
The United States, France, Bel- 
gium, the International Monetary Fund 
and the World Bank helped create the 
disaster of Mobutu Sese Seko's Zaire. 
Today the West has a moral duty to 
help rebuild the country, even if the 
new leader isn't making the task easy. 

So far, Laurent Kabila has shown 
little interest in sharing power with the 
opposition. It seems likely that he will 
rely more on direct military support 
from Uganda, Rwanda and Angola to 
consolidate his rule than on the al- 
legiance of his countrymen. 

Yet. all uncertainty about Mr. Kabila 
aside, this is the moment when well- 
directed Western efforts can have the 
greatest effect in nudging the new gov- 
ernment toward observing basic human 
rights, stabilizing the economy and re- 
starting rudimentary public services. 

Western goodwill should be demon- 
strated first; we can hope that Mr. Kab- 
ila's can follow. 

How do we ensure that we aren't 
creating another Mobutu? All aid 
should be provided step by step, con- 
ditional on the gradual development of 


By Jeffrey D. Sachs and Robert L Rotberg 

economic order, political freedom and eted much of the $10 billion in loans he 
die rule of law. received over the years. Western gov- 

Rrst, die United States should aban- eraments, needing a Cold War ally, 
don its calls for early elections. These looked the other way. 
will have to wait. Now the- West can seize and sell ms 

The experience of neighboring real estate holdings in Europe and 

Uganda is instructive. Since Yoweri Africa, while European countries must 

x Luseveni came to power in 1986, It has step up efforts to freeze his bank ac- 


recovered from the most harrowing 
depths of violence and economic col- 
lapse to become one of Africa's fastest- 
growing countries, while improving its 
human rights record. 

Restonng basic public order — de- 
militarizing, inoculating against infec- 
tious disease, resettling refugees, re- 
building roads and power plants — is a 
surer underpinning of peace and future 
political reconciliation than holding 
elections in the midst of chaos. 

This- gradual approach has also 
worked for Mozambique, which was 
locked in civil war until 1992 and held 
free elections two years later. 

The West must also work with the 
new government to recover the Mobutu 
clan’s stolen loot. Mr. Mobutu pock- 


counts. Any money recovered should 
go to the government of Congo, as the 
country has been renamed. 

• The least of Congo's worries should 
be the servicing 1 of Mr. Mobutu’s debts. 
In the short team, the country should be 
given legal protection to avoid har- 
assment by creditors and the seizure of 
its assets abroad In the longer ran, 
Congo needs assurances that the West 
will cancel most or all of its $14 billion 
in debt (almost three times its GNP). 

Debt relief in such cases is vitaL In 
the early 1990s, Poland, for example, 
was destitute, so Western governments 
and banks forgave about $15 billion in 
outstanding loans. Last year Poland 
had Europe's highest growth race. 

Congo also needs money to pay the 


police, buy vaccines, support 
refugees and rebuild roads. 

The government has no taxation sys- 
tem and inflation has rendered the 
currency worthless. Tt* World Bank 
and especially the Eittopeans, histor- 
ically the biggest meddlers Zaire s 
affairs, should provide feebu Ik of the 
hard currency of about $900 million in 

^Forits^part, the United States should - 
provide some money as well as food 
and medicine. It can also do more to 

help relief agencies figbt disease. 

There can be no illusions of quick 
progress in Congo. Its wealth has been 
pillaged for decades. 

Today the Western nations, once 
agents of despair in Zaire, can help to 
stan the rebuilding of one of the most 
troubled parts of the world. 

Mr. Sachs . who has athised Poland 
and other countries on economic 
polirt. directs the Harvard Institute for 
International Development. Mr. Rot- 
berg coordinates the institute s wu™- 
em Africa programs. They contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 




Southern Africa 9 s Beacon State Has Made a Good Start 


J OHANNESBURG — South 
Africa has become the pro- 
verbial glass, how close to full 
or empty depending on how 
you look at it. The great eu- 
phoria released by equal-rights 
elections and majority rale in 
1994 has gone now, and, ex- 
pectably, people complain that 
improvement in their lives is 
coming too slowly. 

Deputy President Thabo 
Mbeki, who effectively runs 
the country now while Pres- 
ident Nelson Mandela remains 
fee grand arbiter and idol, told 
a world Economic Forum 
meeting in Zimbabwe last 
week feat the difference in 
needs between urban and rural 
poor must be kept in mind in 
assessing progress. 

He told proudly of attending 
a recent celebration of the de- 
livery of clean water for fee 
first time to fee one millio nth 
villager. ‘ This is a tremendous 
change," he said. “Always be- 
fore they had to walk for miles 
every day to get water, fee 
bucket on fee head" 

Soweto, fee black township 
putside Johannesburg and now 


By Flora Lewis 


home to 3 million, has mostly 
paved streets where there were 
only muddy lanes. And while 
there are still dense areas of tin 
and pasteboard shanties, there 
are also Lots of near, attractively 
designed brick houses, but not 
yet enough shops. 

* ‘We only buy here when we 
forget to bring something from 
fee city,” a resident said “It's 
a lot more expensive.” 

Blacks as well as whites 
complain bitterly about fee tre- 
mendous rise of crime and fee 
incompetence and corruption 
of police. 

Many consider the center of 
Johannesburg, wife its sky- 
scrapers and formerly fashion- 
able hotels and shops, too un- 
safe to frequent. Elegance has 
moved out to suburban centers, 
but people are wary there, too. 

Still, there is an air of op- 
timism and pride. Things aren’t 
moving fast enough to suit 
hardly anyone, but they are 
moving. 

"We are going from the 
leadership of a prophet to fee 


leadership of a manager. 
Mbeki is a manager, and that is 
to fee good” said Harald 
Pakendorf, an Afrikaner editor 
who lost his job before the big 
sea change for criticizing 
apartheid 

He observes that much feat 
had seemed impossible less 
than 10 years ago is now so 
taken for granted that no one 
comments. “We have an elect- 
ed president, and he will step 
down and be succeeded by an- 
other elected president.” 

The multiracial democratic 
institutions are being consol- 
idated, fee legislature and fee 
judiciaiy are challenging fee 
executive, the press is lively 
and criticaL 

The major political parties 
are at the beginning of what is 
bound to be a broad restruc- 
turing, wife shifting constitu- 
encies and a different kind of 
ethnic clash. 

So is South Africa well 
launched on its way to being 
the beacon for fee "renais- 
sance.” as everyone here puts 


it, of a bedeviled continent at 
last achieving an era of peace 
and decent living? 

It is still far from clear, and 
South Africans are tom within 
themselves about whether they 
want the burdens that go with 
the leadership that no other 
state is in a position to offer. 

After crime, the biggest pub- 
lic complaint is immigration. 
Young white professionals are 
still leaving, not massively but 
at a steady, draining rate, and 
other Africans are pouring in, 
mostly illegally. Estimates of 
their numbers so far vary from 
2.5 to 7 25 million. They are 
visible and resented. 

One report said one in five 
residents of a large section of 
Johannesburg speaks French at 
home, arrivals from Franco- 
phone Africa. Nigerians are 
particularly .disliked and 
blamed for rising drug trade. 

The Southern Africa Devel- 
opment Community, organized 
against South Africa under fee 
old regime, now looks to South 
Africa to be fee engine to haul 
fee whole region toward 
prosperity. South Africa alone 


has 78 percent of fee GDP of 
fee 14-state area. That evokes 
fears among fee others feat it 
will overwhelm them and swal- 
low them up if they liberalize 
trade and join in seeking in- 
vestments as they have been 
told to do. 

Jeffrey Sachs, fee Harvard 
economist who specializes in 
advising reforms, believes that 
there is good potential for south- 
ern Africa to take off on East 
Asian tiger-style growth if ir fol- 
lows the right policies. Certainly 
the resources are there, and in- 
creasingly fee conviction feat 
there is nothing inherently 
wrong wife African societies to 
prevent them from doing it 

But the politics don't encour- 
age it South Africa did finally 
move in an attempt to mediate 
the transition in ex-Zaire, but 
wife considerable reluctance. It 
isn't looking to be fee contin- 
ental referee. It hasn't fee con- 
fidence, apart from the means. 

Still, it likes the idea of being 
a role model and it has made a 
good starL A lot depends on its 
success. 

© Flora Lewis 


- *«r 








The Resolute NATO and EU Goal Is Security for All of Europe 


B onn — in 1997 , nato 

and fee European Union 
will open their doors to Central 
and East European countries. 
These countries are coming 
home to Europe. 

Our aim is to bolster their 
democratic and economic re- 
form processes. The European 
Union is striving to weave an 
ever closer network of econom- 
ic and political ties and to in- 
tegrate new members. The 
common EU and NATO aspir- 
ation is to spread stability, 
peace and prosperity in a grow- 
ing and more open Europe. 

NATO’s opening is a process 
that must evolve step by step 
and wife circumspection. Not 
all states wishing to join can be 
taken in immediately. 

It will be instrumental to the 
overall success of the under- 
taking feat we offer all of these 
countries a viable perspective. 
We have demonstrate that the 


By Klaus Kinkel 

The writer is the German foreign minister. 


Euro-Atlantic community re- 
mains open to them. 

Therefore we need what we 
in Germany call a “Begleit- 
straiegie." a parallel strategy 
paving fee way into this com- 
munity of values for those part- 
ners who will not join NATO in 
fee first round of enlargement 

I am speaking of a compre- 
hensive, orchestrated approach 
that exploits fee full range of 
our political instruments: 
NATO and EU, WEU and 
OSCE, regional and bilateral 
cooperation. There must be no 
new divisions in Europe. Se- 
curity, stability and prosperity 
will be fostered and consolid- 
ated on the whole continent. 

In this spirit, by fee NATO- 
Russia Founding Act on Tues- 
day in Paris we created a dur- 


able basis for our security part- 
nership with Russia. A charter 
with Ukraine is on its way. 

But what can NATO do for 
those countries that would like 
to join but are not yet able to do 
so? First, in Madrid in July the 
alliance will reaffirm its pledge 
that fee door will remain open to 
further candidates. NATO is 
not a closed shop. 

Second, a package of far- 
reaching measures under the 
Partnership for Peace program 
will further intensify anti deep- 
en practical cooperation. 

Third, fee new Euro-Atlantic 
Partnership Council will place 
political cooperation on a high- 
er plane, lend it a new quality. 

However, bilateral security 
guarantees, too, are sometimes 
discussed. I don't find this a 


veiy attractive proposition. Bi- 
lateral guarantees would not 
live up to fee challenges of 
today’s Europe, which is 
defined by post-Cold War mul- 
tinational security structures. 

We must develop these far- 
ther and not revive instruments 
of security policy feat would 
risk leading us back into fee 
past We must not re-create 
zones of national influence and 
dependency. 

Neither do we want a special 
status, say, for the Baltic states. 
The Baltic states themselves do 
not want a special status, but 
rather expect a clear message 
from the alliance that will serve 
to enhance their security, sov- 
ereignty and independence. I 
am committed to work such a 
signal from fee alliance. 

At the summit in Madrid, fee 
heads of state and government 
could declare that NATO's se- 
curity is inextricably linked to 


that of the whole of Europe; that 
fee consolidation of democratic 
and free societies on fee entire 
continent in accordance wife 
OSCE principles is therefore of 
direct and material concern to 
the alliance; feat it shall be 
NATO's policy to support free 
nations which share fee values 
of fee alliance; and that among 
those sharing these values are 
the members of fee European 
Union as well as fee candidates 
for EU membership, including 
the Baltic states. 

A formula enshrining these 
principles could effectively meet 
the concerns of those who fear 
being left in a security “limbo.” - 
These fears are understandable^ 
from a psychological and his- . 
torical point of view. By address- 
ing them, we will be helping to 
consolidate a comprehensive, 
cooperative security structure for 
all of Europe. 

International Herald Tribune. 


China Woos Burma 


By Peter W. Rodman 

W ASHINGTON — Burma, as the West isolates it, is 
rapidly developing closer ties wife China. Political, 
economic, military and intelligence links are expanding. 

China is wooing Burma. Beijing’s likely aim is achieving 
naval access to the Bay of Bengal and fee Indian Ocean — a 
quantum leap in China's strategic position in Asia. 

In June 1994. Japanese sources reported that China had 
completed construction of radar bases on two Burmese islands 
in the Indian Ocean, Great Coco and Little Coco, which are on 
lease to China. Work was about to begin on a port. 

In January 1996, the head of the Rangoon junta. General Than 
Shwe. visited Beijing, where he and Chinese President Jiang 
7e . min had “warm and friendly” talks reflecting “extensive 
consensus on major regional and international issues.” 

In April 1996. General Zhang Wanman, a vice chairman of 
China’s Central Military Commission, paid a six-day visit to 
Burma and hailed “good-neighborly friendship.” 

In October 1996. General Zhang invited General Maung 
Aye. the junta's No. 2 figure, for a return visit to Beijing. 
Prime Minister Li Peng received him and praised fee ex- 
pansion of military exchanges between China and Burma. 

The Far Eastern Economic Review reported early this year 
that General Mating Aye's October visit produced a concrete 
agreement to expand military cooperation. China is to train 300 
Burmese air force and naval officers and provide additional 
staff places in Chinese staff colleges. The two sides pledged to 
exchange intelligence on threats to their respective countries. 
China is also to provide "fiscal assistance” to Burma, which 
could mean weapons supplies at “friendship prices." 

All this is one big reason why America’s friends in the 
Association of South East Asian Nations disagree with the 
U.S. policy of isolating Burma and are eager to bring it into 
their group — to counter fee Chinese attempt to embrace it 
The West’s sanctions on Burma are thus a great strategic 
boon to China. The law of unintended consequences is at work 
here, as in so many other instances where Americans seek moral 
ends without all that much care as to fee practical effects. 

The writer, a former White House and Slate Department 
official, is director of national security programs at the Nixon 
Center for Peace and Freedom and a senior editor of National 
Review. He contributed this comment to The Washington Post. 


Afraid of Independence for the Baltics? 


T HE unwillingness of 
NATO members to deal 
firmly wife Russia during prep- 
arations for the Madrid summit, 
when what is inside and what is 
outside of Europe is being 
defined, leaves us balancing 
precariously. 

To decide not to decide, for 
the time being, on what to do 
wife the Baltics demonstrates a 
lack of courage more than care- 
ful consideration. Pondering 
and hesitation can sometimes 
save fee day, but this is not such 
an occasion. NATO member 
states know what is right, they 
have the power, it is hard to 
explain such diffidence. 

Some of fee countries aspir- 
ing to NATO membership have 
histories in which the right to 
choose their own destiny, to en- 
joy European and American 
values, was brutally denied by 
foreign forces of occupation. 
Such experiences are not easily 
forgotten, especially if fee for- 
eign power starts to replay im- 
perialistic tunes. 

Has anyone in Moscow 
asked himself why states in fee 
proximity of Russia are racing 
one another to become mem- 
bers of NATO? History books 
(but perhaps not Soviet ones) 
reveal one aspect of our mo- 
tivation for joining NATO. 

In fee Baltic States. Western 
refusal to recognize our incor- 
poration by violent force into 
the Soviet Union led us to un- 
derstand feat our wish to be free 
was supported. That was an en- 
couragement for us to hold our 
ground and stand up for our 
culture and values. 

Many have thought that fee 


battle for independence of fee 
Baltic states was won in 1991 at 
fee barricades when Soviet mil- 
itary units backed away from 
unarmed Latvians, Lithuanians 
and Estonians standing up for 
their national heritage ana hu- 
man rights. Now, in 1 997 . a new 
confrontation may be emerging 
between an imperial wish to 
dominate and fee fundamental 
right of nations to shape freely 
their own destiny irrespective 
of their geopolitical situation. 


This time fee battle for the 
Baltics will have nothing to do 
with barricades. It will be 
fought out in closed conference 
rooms. Will our friends remem- 
ber fee principles of simple men 
in their own histories who stood 
up against foreign domination? 
Such principles will never be 
forgotten by Latvians. 

— Valdis Krastins, Lanian 
ambassador in Prague, 
commenting for the 
International Herald Tribune. 



,-^'tRMARKET 

J fe;ii 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 




1897: Baldness Germ 

PARIS — Heigho! It is to a 
germ, to a microbe, it seems, 
feat baldness must be set down! 
The loss of hair between fee age 
of twenty-five and thirty no 
longer seems to be due to fee 
existence of arthritic diathesis; 
but is fee result, purely and 
simply, of an infection of the 
pileous follicle. And do not jibe 
at fee conclusions at which a 
Parisian dermatologist has ar- 
rived. The etiological notion is 
of fee highest importance from 
fee point of view of the pro- 
phylaxis of ordinary baldness 
and even of its cure. 


1922: 


Rail Wages Cut 


NEW YORK — The Railway 
Labor Board has announced a 
cut of $48,000,000 in the wages 
of 400.000 railway employes, 
affecting mostly maintenance 
and way workers. If similar cuts 
are extended in other pending 


in- 
decisions, that will add at leasi 
Si 00,000.000 to savings. The 
labor members of fee Board dis- 
sented from fee announcement. 
They intimate feat the cut con- 
stitutes an attack on the living- 
wage principle. 

1947; Frankfurt Plans 

FRANKFURT — Positive 
steps were taken here today 
[May 29] to build Frankfurt into 
the capital of Western Ger- 
many. A series of conferences 
was held here between Amer- 
ican and British officials on the 
basic problems of accommo- 
dating both Allied and German 
staffs of the bi -zonal agencies to 
be brought here about October 
I. This development, coincident 
wife fee formation of an ecofi 
nomic council for the rehabili- 
tation of Western Germany, re- 
veals feat fee Allies have taken 
positive measures to meet a situ- 
ation created by a lack of a four- 
power accord on Germany. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBIWE, FRIDAY. MAY 30. 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


A US. Message to Bibi and Yasser: 
Get Serious or Don’t Count on Us 


W ASHINGTON — As the 
Arabs- Israeli peace process 
continues sliding downhill. 
American olticials say they may 
soon have io opt ior one of two 
extremes: either “The Plan" or 
"The Phone Number." 

Either the president lays down, 
publicly, exactly what steps ihe 
United Stales believes Israelis and 
Palestinians must take to get die 
process back on track, or he gives 
them both the White House phone 
number. 202-456-1414. ana tells 
them to call when they're serious. 
As one top White House official 
put it: "Either we step forward or 
we step backward, but where we 
are now is nor working." 

The temptation to w alk is great, 
h would leave Yasser Arafat and 
Benjamin Netanyahu both stand- 
ing stark naked before their own 
publics, without any U.S. medi- 
ators to hide behind or blame. But 
such strategic neglect would 
come at a price that the United 
Stales- may not want to pay. 

Mr. Arafat is not and has never 
been a democrat. He is at heart a 
typical Arab autocrat, for whom 
corruption, censorship and abuse 
of political opponents comes nat- 
urally. Yet as a result of the Oslo 
process he has also presided over 
the creation of a Palestinian Par- 
liament. in the freest election 
ever in the Arab world. 
Palestinian elites were hopeful 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

that as Mr. Arafat shifted die 
basis of his authority from leader 
of an armed struggle to leader of 
a peace process bringing Pales- 
tinians land and prosperity, he 
would be willing to — indeed 
would have 10 — tolerate more 
democracy within Palestinian 
life. In Jordan. King Hussein 
began fostering a freely elected 
Parliament and a freer press to 
broaden his legitimacy for tnuk- 

“flPJi ere we are now 
is not working/' a 
White House 
official says . 

ing peace with Israel and reform- 
ing Jordan’s economy. 

With the collapse of the Oslo 
process, these baby steps toward 
democratization " are being 
quashed, and Mr. Arafat and King 
Hussein are reverting to form. 

This is in part because both 
men had made huge bets on 
Oslo. As it crumbles, they fed 
increasingly politically exposed. 
Their critics are now out in full 
force, declaring, "I told you this 
would never work. * ‘And so their 
natural inclination is to silence 


all critics before they become 
a serious political challenge. 

Mr. Arafat’s outrageous arrest 
of one of the finest" Palestinian 
journalists, Daoud Kuttab, was a 
good example. Mr. Kuttab’s sin 
was that his infant Palestinian 
educational television station, a 
direct outgrowth of the peace pro- 
cess and the only real competitor 
to Mr. Arafat's’ official station, 
was broadcasting debates of the 
Palestinian legislature, another 
outgrowth of the peace process. 

Ihe Palestinian legislators of- 
ten criticize Mr. Arafat's rule. 
When things were going well he 
was ready 10 ignore much of h, 
but with his peace strategy in 
shambles he sees this son of crit- 
icism as a more serious threat, and 
so he arrests Mr. Kuttab. (He re- 
leased him on Tuesday.) In 
Jordan. King Hussein, also feel- 
ing besieged, has been clamping 
down on the press and tightening 
rules for who can run for office. 

Mr. Netanyahu loves 10 lec- 
ture the Arab states about how 
they mast become democracies, 
but he is just trying to score pro- 
paganda points. He is utterly 
blind to the relationship between 
the peace process and the process 
of internal change in the Arab 
world. 

Yitzhak Rabin chose not to 
build in Jerusalem because King 
Hussein wrote him and said such 



a move would badly undercut the 
king at home. With Mr. Net- 
anyahu. King Has sc in comes to 
Israel, asks him not to build in 
Jerusalem and the Israeli an- 
nounces — at a joint news con- 
ference with the king — that he is 
going ahead anyway. Hello? 

It would be absurd to suggest 
that the peace process is a cure- 
all for .Arab politics. Democrat- 
ization will come to the Arab 
world only after fundamental 
changes in Arab political culture. 
But tne peace process helps pro- 
mote internal changes, opens 
Arab societies and business 10 
more outside contacts and puts 
some pow er in the hands of Arab 


democrats, like Daoud Kuttab. 

Thai is exactly why Syria's 
Hafez Assad fears it. and why 
fledgling Arab democrats in Pal- 
estine or Jordan will be much 
worse off without it. Which is 
also why. as much as I would 
love to stick Mr. Arafat and Mr. 
Netanyahu with the phone num- 
ber. that would be loo easy on 
them. They might never call. 

The United States needs to 
come up with a clear-cut plan 
that engages every Israeli and 
Palestinian, presents them with 
some real choices and, ideally, 
enlists their pressure to move 
forward. 

The .Xew York Times 


On America’s Open Road, 
Much Unseen Is There 


By Kyle Jarrard 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


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Rule Britannia 

Regarding “ Labour Pam: A 
Model for French Left (and 
Righi)" (May 2): 

The suggestion that Britain's 
Labour Party is a model for 
-Prance has much to commend it. It 
% highlights the existence of new 
ideas both social and fiscal that 
France — as well much of Europe 
— needs so badly. 

Many people in France know 
there are serious problems, with 
unemployment at almost 13 per- 
cent one clear sign. Yet they are 
-naturally concerned about going 
'to a complete market-oriented 
economy like that of the United 
States, as they rightly assume it 
would jeopardize their basic so- 
cialist- infrastructure. However, 
no new ideas were proposed in the 
French election. 

France's Socialists still cling to 
their power-of-the-state mantra 
despite their complete failure be- 
tween 1981 and 1983 and their 


forced reversion to exactly those 
fiscal policies that Britain's La- 
bour Party now supports. 

The right proposes the correct 
fiscal policies but gives no thought 
10 the social consequences. And it 
has been unable to carry out most 
of its proposed reforms. 

What is needed in France, and 
in Europe generally, is a socially 
aware policy with an understand- 
ing of the fiscal effects of glob- 
alization — that is, exactly what 
the Labour Party is proposing. 

Western Europe must do 
something soon or serious social 
and financial havoc will follow. 
We need a new way of working. 
We cannot just copy the Amer- 
icans but neither can we ignore the 
way that they have changed the 
world. Today there is only, one 
party in Europe that is melding the 
old, socialist values with the new, 
financial realities, and that is the 
Labour Part/ of Britain. 

ALASTAIR ARMSTRONG. 

Ribeauville. France. 


Regarding ‘‘A Modem Britain. 
With America and in Europe" 
(Opinion. May 21) by Robin 
Cooke: 

It is misleading for Britain's 
foreign secretary to suggest that 
Britain, or any other European 
country, has the means to defend 
the rule of international law. - 

We live in a world in which only 
one country is capable of enfor- 
cing the rule of international law 
and maintaining some semblance 
of world order the United States. 

Unfortunately, it is the U.S. 
taxpayer who has to bear the brunt 
of the cost while EU citizens 
(among others) enjoy the fruits — 
as well as the benefits of their 
costly welfare programs. 

TIM STEVENS. 

Shanghai. 

WHO Achievements 

Regarding "Good Riddance" 
( Editorial . May 3): 

The editorial attacked the out- 


going director-general of the 
World Health Organization. Dr. 
Hiroshi Nakajima. saying be bad 
brought the agency notoriety for 
bad management and a deterior- 
ation of its programs. 

However, since his tenure 
began in 1988. WHO-led pro- 
grams have reduced new cases of 
polio by 90 percent, guinea worm 
disease by 96 percent and leprosy 
by 82 percent. 

These plus measles, neonatal 
tetanus, lymphatic filariasis. 
Chagas disease and river blind- 
ness are on the verge of being 
wiped out globally. 

In 1990, for the firsr time 80 
percent of the world's children 
were vaccinated against six major 
childhood diseases, and this level 
has been maintained or improved 
every year since then. 

Between 1980 and 1995, life 
expectancy worldwide increased 
by almost five years. 

It was a WHO team that ex- 
tinguished the frightening out- 


break of Ebola fever in Zaire in 
1995. WHO develop^ the DOTS 
therapy for tuberculosis, which is 
beginning 10 roll back this recru- 
desced disease, shamefully neg- 
lected in the 1980s. 

These and other WHO achieve- 
ments are documented in the 1997 
World Health Report and on the 
WHO Internet home page. 

MARTHA DeWITT. 

Geneva. 


Correction 

An editorial (IHT. May 27) cit- 
ing Continental Airlines’ disclos- 
ure that a passenger flight illegally 
carried oxygen generators said the 
cargo hold lacked smoke detec- 
tion or fire-suppressants. But the 
illegal shipment, which Contin- 
ental reported to the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration upon dis- 
covery. was in a cargo hold that 
had detection and suppressant 
equipment. ■ 


/ believe that much unseen is 
also here. — "Song of the Open 
Road," by Walt Whitman. 

P ARIS — To speak about an 
entire nation perhaps one 
needs the poem, or the photograph 
or song. Ptose hardly scratches the 
surface of America, especially in 
these sound-bite days of eiiant 
groups shedding their containers 
to fly to the passing comet. It is as 
if the country is too vast an entity’ 

MEANWHILE 

with too many layers. How to lake 
the pulse of such a beast as it lies 
there in all its Whitmanesque 
openness? 

A lot would remain unsung, un- 
spoken. But there would be clear 
signals, darkly joyous ones even, 
as you head down the open road 
from Austin, that revolutionary 
citadel gone yuppieland. into the 
wilds of East Texas. Things of the 
ranching sort seem well enough 
along here. Oaks reach out over 
the road mile after mile, and then 
you’re in the little 10 wn of Lex- 
ington. There's a funeral going on. 
and the sheriff is pacing around in 
the rain in a dark slicker. Trucks 
and cars line the streets. It had to 
have been someone everybody 
knew, and somehow it is not sad at 
all but an affirmation of continuity 
and endurance. 

On down the highway, in Cald- 
well, the old boys playing 25 -cent 
video slots at the convenience 
store look you over. A nod or two 
get exchanged, that’s all. You're 
not from here, but that’s O.KL Go- 
ing through Madisonville. the 
Methodist Church sign proclaims: 
‘ ‘When you throw mud, you’re the 
one losing ground." 

Then you’re in pine country, 
die Davy Crocket: National 
Forest. You look into the dense 
growth. Hell, he’s out there some- 
where. in the mist, true American 
frontier man. The American in- 
dividual, the saving grace of a 
nation caught up in a maniacal 
sense of wanting to belong to any- 
thing just so long as one is not 
alone. Whai would Crockett have 
to say to that? I put Whitman out 
there with him in the brush and 
shadows chanting. Afoot and 
light-hearted. I take to the open 
road. They would plunge ahead 
into the green, not look back upon 
our neurotic concerns. 

You cruise into Lufkin, where 
there’s not a lot to do except shoot 
the breeze with a buddy at a caf£ 
and listen to some old boy rattle 
about that cigar-chomping bas- 
tard down in Cuba. Hell, he’s 
really pro-Castro, my friend says 


later. It's easy to imagine things 
here staying the way they are a 
while longer. Here, the nation is 
just fine, indeed. 

And. no. you wouldn’t know 
anything's wrong with America 
even if you went all the way up to 
Leawood, Kansas, either. Where, 
if you're an urban planner and a 
marriage counselor in your 40s, 
with two brilliant, healthy chil- 
dren, you 're cozy and safe on the 
outskirts of Kansas City. It helps 
very much that you're white, 
well-educated. It also helps that 
you tell your kids about intol- 
erance. racism, bigotry, colors. 
Here, the trees took a beating from 
a freak snowstorm last autumn, 
before the leaves had a chance to 
fall. But they still stand tall. They 
seem to have been winning the 
game against nature a long time, 
like the people who will sit in their 
shade this summer and rock and 
drink iced tea. 

And yet there is no denying the 
black turns in the byway, the 
pockets of blight and suffering. 
You see there's something wrong 
with the nation when the homeless 
and insane curse you just for 
w alkin g down their sidewalk in 
Berkeley, California. No one 
cares about these people anymore, 
but they are not going to go 
away. 

You also know something ter- 
rible is afoot when a friend tells 
about visiting a gun show in 
Topeka. Kansas, and seeing a lot 
of regular-looking people buying 
weapons and stuffing them into 
their tinted-window vans. Maybe 
it's those militia people, some say. 
Hell, no, it's just scared Amer- 
icans protecting themselves, oth- 
ers say back. From what? From 
everything. 

Whole areas are no-go now, 
fenced off by ideology and hatred. 
This, too, is the United States in 
all its madness, a fevered thing 
that seems to relish its woes. 

And yet there remains the echo 
of Whitman's songs coming up 
through the body: Will you come 
travel with me? Shall we stick by 
each other as long as we live? 

Come, then, when winter is not 
quite over up in the Northwest, 
and bravely be the only one to 
drive way out of the way up to the 
gate of Mount Rainier National 
Park even though you know it’ll 
be closed. Just to see the trees, 
imagine that prestigious mountain 
lost m the clouds and marvel at all 
that undisturbed snow. And then 
turn around and drive all the way 
back where you came from. You 
saw something of the heart of your 
country, and you keep it. 

I ni emotional Herald Tribune. 


tHODHt X 


E 


i •§ THE INTERMARKET 


•3 +44 171420 0348 




irV: -.*1 WilS --v./r.sr*::-: x-„t. , 




GENERAL 


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international herald tribune 

FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 


-%ei&w € & 




PAGE 10 


A* . 


Sunshine 
And Snow 
In Sicily 

Wildflowers 
Lost in Fog 


By Jason Goodwin 

C EFALU, Italy — “Ah!" cried 
the judge, gathering up the 
scene with a sweep of his arm. 
“Sicily!" Dutifully we peered 
after him, through the swirling snow, 
into the fog, and laughed. Sixteen of us 
had chosen the Alternative Travel 
Group walking tour across a remote 
region of Sicily, the Madonie Moun- 
tains, part of which is a national park. 
And of course we were lured by the 
prospect of wandering an unspoiled up- 
land, carpeted with cyclamen and as- 
phodel, borage and wild orchids. 

By the third day, the truth had 
dawned, bleak as the sky itself, or as the 
ragged limestone crowning the Ma- 
donie ridges. An unseasonable cold 
front had moved in, and we abandoned 
our dreams of balmy airs and wild fra- 
grance underfoot for snow down the 
back of the neck and sodden feet, for 
stiffish climbs in a frozen wind and the 
prospect of clambering to mountain 
passes we could hardly see. Our group, 
ably led by a guide, Tim Neal, with a 
manager, Carmelina Ricciardello, took 
it very well — with what some call a 
British stiff upper lip, and what the 
British refer to as a sense of humor. 

Sicily was tossed down through the 
centuries, from ancient Greeks to im- 
perial Romans, to Byzantines and Sara- 
cens, until it was seized in the 11 th 
century by Norman adventurers. Under 
die Norman kings, all the crosscurrents 
of the Mediterranean world, aU the 
strands of its own diverse history, were 
fused into an efflorescence of cultural 
brilliance. For two centuries the island 
flourished, free from the racial and re- 
ligious bigotry that gnawed medieval 
Europe; but the Muslims slowly died 
away, attitudes hardened a gains t the 
Jews, and when, at last, the Normans 
succumbed to exhaustion and decay, 
Sicily subsided into relative insignific- 
ance, under the sleepy rule of Spanish 
kings. 

Mjuuc or Tin Past 

Such a past has left its mark. A 
strange Good Friday ceremony had con- 
vulsed the old hill town of Enna, in the 
heart of Sicily, where our walk began: 
Eerie hooded figures marched in the 
streets (although I saw some reassuring 
spectacles glinting through the eye- 
holes); drums beat; lavish catafalques 
were maneuvered up the cathedral steps 
by ranks of bearers. And when I began 
to ask among the good-natured crowd 
for an explanation of this midnight 
torchlighled scene, I was told that it was 
a Spanish thing. 

The region we walked across, from 
Enna to Cefalu, 60 miles (100 kilo- 
meters) away on foe northern coast, is an 
unspoiled upland that goatherds share 
with wildflowers, foxes, deer and birds 
of prey — even wolves, supposedly. 
Towns and villages are rare, yet while 
the drums and flares of recorded history 
could seem remote, almost every view 
disclosed the remains of a castle, and 


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Balancing the Old 
And New in Prague 

Including a Touch of Disney 






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Cefalu, on the north side of Sicily, where the 60-mile walk across the Madonie Mountains ended at the sea . 


occasional mountain towns were 
warrens of narrow streets and con- 
cealed courtyards, where even foe 
ubiquitous laundry, strung across 
foe lanes, resembled camouflage. 


waiting TO erupt Insciutable is 
Etna, only waiting to erupt; it does 
so massively every hundred years. 
Burrow deep enough into an old 
Sicilian farmhouse, and you gen- 
erally arrive at a cave from which 
foe entire edifice has grown, century 
after century. Enna and Gangi, an- 
other medieval hilltop town, stand 
unwelcomingjy high upon their 
peaks; but Cefalu, where our walk 
ended at the sea, is crouched be- 
neath a gigantic boulder, from 
whose fortified heights you are 
hideously drawn to leap down into 
foe cathedral square. 

Sicily's society remained feudal 
well into this century, and by and 
large its people have been poor, too. 
They have developed — along with 
a certain reasonable scorn for their A 
rulers — a knack of making their 
own arrangements. Money which pours 
down here from Rome and Brussels — 
for foe poverty seems not to go away — 
frequently slips into unintended chan- 
nels; while foe island's most notorious 
export, foe mafia, has its roots both in 
the mountain terrain that engendered foe 
code of honor, and in the poverty that 
encouraged emigration. 

Typical Sicilian cooking, so Car- 
melina explained, uses the best ingredi- 
ents but is spartan; they call it cucina 
poverina, and at least one of its mani- 
festations — spaghetti dressed with gar- 
lic and bread crumbs — was a favorite 
with foe group. People are still appar- 
ently leaving the countryside for the 
towns, and the coastal resorts are 
thronged in summer with visitors from 
northern Europe; but still up on foe 
Madonie you can hear sheep bells, and 
foe deeper clang of cowbells. 

The villages we walked through did 
not seem beautiful — made of service- 
able concrete, mostly, with sheds and 
chicken coops built from any soaps that 
came to hand. But a deep rustic culture 
has survived: in a vineyard, say, pain- 
fully worked over with a hoe, or in a row 


h . 7pr -' "" -Wv-'V 4 ' 

^ f... 

r l v? ■ v i'-iv::- ' 

k*i, 

■ 

» Vn •- v «rn i * ■ 


day, in reasonable weather, we 
trekked 1 8 miles overrough ground, 
and more than half decided to call it 
a day at lunch. But this was foe 
longest of the four major hikes that 
week, interspersed with three rest 
days; it was sheer bad luck that the 
weather turned against ns later oo. 


Armerina, site of famed Roman mosaics. 

rs of figs, their trunks limed white against 

— ant attacks. like thoroughbreds’ fet- 

— locks. 


T HERE are water tanks in every 
garden, and gnarled olives, care- 
fully pruned; though I could never 
quite learn to like the prickly pears that 
grow, lobe upon lobe, very well in this 
island’s dry heat. They looked like a 
crowd of faces, smoothed dumb and 
blind. But their grim and tasteless fruit, 
with bread, fed poor Sicilians for years, 
while their roots broke up lava beds, 
allowing farmers to plant almond trees 
that yielded in turn to slender-rooted 
crops. 

Our free days were taken up with 
excursions — to a midnight Mass in 
Gangi, to foe great Norman cathedral of 
Monreale or the unrivaled Roman mo- 
saics of Piazza Armerina. We would 
picnic under some gnarled old holm oak 
or in a eucalyptus glade when foe weath- 
er was finer; in a cafe commandeered 
for the group when it hailed or 
snowed. 

Most of us were weekend ramblers, 
with grown-up children. On foe first 


snow AND poo One morning the 
party divides. Some ride in die mini- 
bus freshly fined with snow chains, 
some walk along the road; four of us 
go. leaping through a treescape 
veiled and bewitched by the firmest 
snow I have ever seen. We see stags, 
mistletoe and twisted oaks, but at 
length a blanketing fog descends, 
and we arrive at the hotel in weather 
that — but for the doughty euphor- 
bia, (or spurge) poking through the 
snow — skiers would call a 
whiteout. 

The unseasonable weather 
r MBBfepknr proves the wisdom of walking in a 
wsaics. group. The route has been chosen to 

provide scenery and hotels at proper 
gainst intervals. If anything excites the long- 
' fet- distance hiker more than wildflowers or 
birds or spectacular scenery, it is the 
prospect of something like Canneiina’s 
every hearty picnics. Tim carried a mobile 
care- telephone for emergencies (hidden, to 
never thwart workaholics), as well as water 
rs that aud candy and guides to the island’s 
n this flora and fauna. 

““ * On our own. none of us would have 
moved an inch. Benighted in some 
1 truit ’ lonely hotel in the interior I would have 
moldered until my week was out, or fled 
, ™~’ to the coast and abandoned all thought 
ted of walking. Even in good weather I 
could never have ventured so far off foe 
beaten track. Tim knew die route, even 
^ ^ in snow and fog. So foe walking was 
Ijaj 0 f always good. And when the sun came 
l mo- out 31 ,asT ’ we saw the orchids and foe 
vould carpets of asphodels and a huge, wild 
n oak peony, and — through a gap in the hills 
leafo- ahead — the sea, blue and Homeric, just 
cored as we had imagined iu 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Times Service 

P RAGUE — Seven years into a 
tourist boom, Prague is no 
longer the hidden jewel of 
Central Europe. But. even 
with foe crowds, hawkers and pick- 
pockets, jewel it still is. And more 
scrubbed than it used to be. Palaces are 
p ainte d, statues patched with loving 
care, courtyards and passageways swept 
to a sparkle. Some of the renovation 
efforts that have gone a bit far — a 
lollipop-pink facade here, sunflower- 
yellow trim there — suggest a touch of 
Disney. 

The Culture Ministry has kept fairly 
strict guidelines for the restoration of 
foe that have begun to crumble 

from neglect, pollution and, sadly, the 
vandalism of tou ris ts . It is not unusual to 
see men in overalls — bucket and spat- 
ula in hand — fixing chins, noses and 
toes on weathered sandstone sculp- 
tures. 

With the tourists have come all the 
trappings ofWestem consumerism. Fast- 
food signs jostle for prominence among 
foe 19th-century buildings of 
Wenceslas Square. But here, 
too, there is discussion abour 
how to restore a semblance of 
past grandeur. The square, 
where vast demonstrations in 
1989 helped end Communist 
rule, can oe harrowing for the 
unsuspecting. Pickpockets are 
common, and taxi stands are 
manned by drivers who fre- 
quently gouge passengers. At 
night, pro sti t u t e s abound. There 
are moves afoot to close foe 
square to most cars, plant trees 
and encourage cafes. 


Rudolf's treasures Many 
of the paintings, sculptures and 
gold drat were at the heart of the 
collection of Emperor Rudolf 
n, and made especially in 
Prague for the great art patron, 
will be on display at an ex- 
hibition titled “Rudolf II and 
Prague.” The pieces, including 
precious items of high crafts- 
manship, such as foe table sun- 
dial by the creator of astronom- 
ical instruments. Erasmus 


“Kolya," directed by Jan Sverak, won 
this year. The Karlovy Vary International 
Film Festival, 75 miles west of Prague, 
where "Kolya" was shown before its 
international acclaim, runs from July 4 to 
12. A special East of West section will 
show old films from the former Soviet 
bloc. Tickets, $ 1 - 50 , are available only at 
foe Hotel Thermal in Kariovy Vary, foe 
festival headquarters. Buses leave hourly 
from the main bus terminal in Prague for . 
the two-hour ride to Karlovy Vary. For 
program details, call (42-2) 24235412. 
The Prague State Opera, 4 Wilsonoya, 
performs most nights through June, with 
a ballet season in July and a Verdi Fes- 
tival in August. Rossini’s “I tal ia n a in 
Algeri,” Verdi’s “Nabucco” and Don- 
izetti’s “Elisfr d’Amore’’ are among foe . 
offerings through June. Tickets, $7.70 to W 
$24, can be booked by phone 24227832 
or fax 21612126. 

The National Museum, the imposing 
neo- Renaissance structure with a gilded 
dome at the top of Wenceslas Square, is 
an expression of Bohemian traditions 
and dreams. The grand interior of foe 
building, completed in 1890, is 
brightened by a vast skylight and its 


D'T'j-v 

ter-' 

* 






-..■nricti 


Jn S^I/AnanafteriBr far The New Y«k Urns 

Gehry's “Fred and Ginger" building. 


Jason Goodwin , the author of “On 
Foot to the Golden Horn ” (Holt), m rote 
this for The New York Times. 


Habermei, will be hung in the splendid 
settings of Prague Castle and foe Riding 
Hall of foe Wallenstein Palace. 

Rudolf, who died in 1612, was a 
patron of music, too, so period com- 
positions will be performed at small 
concerts around the castle on Tuesdays. 
Thursdays and Sundays from 10 AM. 
to 6 PM. (8 PM. Sundays) from June 1 
to Sept. 2. Tickets: $7.70; $1130 for a 
family ticket, calculated at 26 Czech 
crowns to the dollar. 

Another grand opening for Prague 
this season, after a three-year face-lift, is 
the Municipal House (Obecni Dum). Its 
Art Nouveau restaurant, salons and 
halls — including the- magnificent 
Smetana Hall and the Lord Mayor's 
Salon, with murals by Alphonse Mucba 
showing Czech historical and allegor- 
ical figures — now look much as they 
did in 1912. Even foe smallest details: 
light fixtures, grillwork, wall tiles, are 
gems of foe period Open 10 AM to 6 
P.M. 

The Czechs are abuzz about the Oscar, 
for foe best foreign language film that 


three floors are studded with cream 
marble pillars, ornate banisters and - 
globular light fixtures. Its chief artrac- ' 
tion is the sculptural pantheon of 60 
national heroes gazing down from the 
staircase and plinths. An exhibit from - 
June through August focuses on 1,000 
years of religious art in Bohemia and 
Moravia. Open daily 9 A.M. to 6 PJVL; 
closed the first Tuesday of every month. . 
Admission $1 30. 

Prague is rich in Jewish history, and v 
the major sights are concentrated in foe 
old Jewish Town, not far from the Old „ 
Town Square and directly off foe now 
fashionable Parizksa Street. The narrow 
streets are often thronged with tourists, 
but with an early start you can find - 
yourself alone in foe Jewish Cemetery. .. 
Here, more than 20,000 headstones are - 
jammed into a tiny space, founded at foe ; 
beginning of the 15th century and in use 
until 1787. The jumble of gray and - 



to ST a I A 




From Rooftop to Kitchen Garden, France Is in Bloom 


until 1787. The jumble of gray and - 
blackened stones — chipped, tilted, " 
sunk Into the earth, some just plain, ( 
others inscribed — leaves an indelible 
impression. At its edge on Siroka Street 
is the Pinkas Synagogue built in foe 
early 15th century. After World War E, 
the synagogue was turned into a me- 
morial to foe 77.297 Czechoslovak Jews - 
killed in the Holocaust. 


W. jl|nu IM - 
lain, 

lible fg* 
treet ’ - 


Cc-r'jm*. . 

■ - •' 
V ' 

- d ; 

* . 


By Jean Rafferty 

P ARIS — The Gallic garden 
boom, which has swept the 
chateau set, has now come to 
town where fashionable 
Parisians have embraced nature in win- 
dow boxes, on terraces and balconies, 
and even by renting vegetable plots 
originally designated as workers’ al- 
lotments on the city’s outskirts. 

Not surprisingly. Parisian haute hor- 
ticulture is often designer greenery. The 
young landscape artist Jasmina Bel- 
mont is working on five rooftop oases 
where her English-style plantings fea- 
ture an abundance of roses, “always in 
pastels to go with foe Paris sky and 
light,” gray and yellow foliage, jas- 


urday) to spread the flow. 
This year. 400 exhibitors 
and sponsors have empha- 
sized botanical rarities along 
with the latest in garden wear 
and garden tools, decorative 
accessories and furniture. 
Along with the chic new 
forest-green and beige ap- 
rons, waistcoats and match- 
ing totes, you’ll find an un- 
usual three-headed Tasma- 
nian fern, a rare Breton-bred 
baby coconut tree and a se- 
lection of 500 varieties of 
fuchsia. 

Saint-Cloud's 30 model 
gardens are incubators of 
ideas. One intriguing de- 
sign, dedicated to the wines 


imne-scented creepers and a form of of Anjou and Saumur, is 

<• .1 .... - . '.L 


olive tree that grows m pots. 

Status gardeners keep abreast of bu- 
colic trends at a host of horticultural 
fairs. More than 800 garden-related 
events are held in France each year, but 
certain stars stand out Now in its 1 5th 
year, the twice-yearfy fete of the Chat- 
eau de Courson, south of Paris near 
Dourdan. attracts more than 200 ex- 
hibitors and 24,000 aficionados. 

This spring's show in mid-May fea- 
tured Russian lilacs, rare Chinese pe- 
on ies and Siberian iris along with edible 
bamboo plants that came with recipes. 

Green in the City 

As a measure of the burgeoning urb- 
an boom, L’ Art du Jardin fair, held over 
12 acres (about 5 hectares) of the Parc 
de Saint-Cloud on the western edge of 
Paris, expects a record 80,000 enthu- 
siasts for foe Fourth annual show, which 
runs from Friday through Monday. Last 
year’s caused such a traffic snarl that 
organizers decided to add nocturnal 
openings (until 10 P.M. Friday and Sat- 


planted with strawberries 
and cherries, tobacco, pines 
and roses in an uncanny echo 
of the wine-speak colors and 
flavors one encounters at a 
tasting. The fashion house 
Cacharel celebrates its fem- 
inine image with the wan- 
ning entry of its competition 
for women landscapers: So- The inte 
nia Laage’s elongated petal- 
shaped plot is sculptured with generous 
curves and spirals of 5,000 flowers, 
including petunias and lilies, climbing 
roses and carnations. 

In Olivier Riols’s secret garden over- 
flowing with wisteria, jasmine and 
roses for the couturier Lolita Lempicka, 
one follows a serpentinepafo to a poetic 
pergola of the perfume fairy. 

There is, of course, an example of foe 
ubiquitous potager, or kitchen garden, a 
trend that has spread to Parisian parks. 
At the Bagatelle park in the Bois de 


Boulogne blowsy cabbages and feath- example of cutung-edge French garden 
ery cariot tops of the year-old vegetable design and one of foe 134 new Parisian 
patch now compere for attention with gardens to open in the last few years. 


trooped to the international 
garden festival at the Chat- 
eau de Chau mom in the 
Loire Valley. The sixth edi- 
tion, from June 14 to Oct. 
19, is focused on 30 land- 
scaped settings on a water- 
garden theme. They will 
vary from a plant-filled 
Noah's Ark. a rice paddy 
and a Zen sea of sand to . . . 
a floating potager. At 
Reignac-sur-Indre between 
Tours and Loches, Isabelle 
de Beaufort's ephemeral 
maze, carved from a 10 - 
acre cornfield, was such a 
lut last year that a new ver- 
sion three times larger will 
be embellished with maze 
satellites. Open from July 5 
to Sept. 14, the labyrinths 
will be peopled by cos- 
tumed actors adapting 
scenes from “The Wizard 
of Oz’’ and can be viewed 
from a i 30-foot tower. 


P erhaps the most 
revolutionary devel- 
opment is that Paris 
park promenaders are now 

its prize-winning roses. On foe Seine in When it’s completed this fall, a con- actually allowed to walk on the long- 
eastern Paris at the brand new Parc de temporary orangery and a “house of • forbidden grass. "Lawns Liberated 
Berey, the lure is box-bordered beds of gardening” with a greenhouse, where This Morning,” trumpeted a Figaro 
a sophisticated selection of herbs children will be given botanical ini- headline on May 6 , Despite the work of 
(hyssop to horseradish) along with such tiation courses, will share space with a a commission sent to pry the secret of 
plantings as garlic and asparagus, fava trellised rose garden, a budding orchard sturdy English grass from the British, 
beans aid dwarf peas, gooseberries and and a vineyard. the French lawn liberation comes with 

rhubarb. There seems no end to potager pas- some restrictions. The happy smiiinc- 

sion. The Ministry of Culture and the face sign welcoming you on to the 
the cumNtt edge Incorporating the National Council of Culinary Arts have green will alternate with a sleepy head 
cobblestone paths of foe former wine launched a competition for the most informing that you ihe lawn is having a 
warehouses with new red-brick walks, remarkable kitchen gardens; foe winner rest. 

walls and structures, Bercy is a stunning will be announced during the Week of — 

example of cutting-edge French garden Taste in October. . -Wi Raffcrn- i s u Puns-hascd iunr- 

design and one of foe 134 new Parisian Summer promises more horticultural nalist who specializes tit deifan un,i 
gardens to open in the last few years, highlights. Last year 1 20.000 visitors lifestyle. 


A FEW minutes’ walk from the v -x 

cemetery is foe house where .V ** . 

Kafka was bora, at 5 U Radnice. ? ^ ;r " ’ 

It is one of the few authentic, intact ~ & 

Kaflca memorials. A brief but full ex- 

hibit illustrates Kafka’s life, family and '"stituie, teu" 

loves. Open 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.; 75 I*/- eauy To 

cents. - V**;:*^^* Recem 

Visitors do not go to Prague for foe ’ n 5S- ’ A se- 

cuisine. The beer is wonderful; foe local * ■•'' rks 

wines barely passable. Czech food is ' = tor:r, ‘ 

traditionally meat, brown sauce and red - v- 

cabbage. >1 

U Tri Zlatych Hvezd is a new wave - ji 7 ;j 323 - 

Prague restaurant, with smiling service, 1 J - l Y 20: ‘■An? 

rather than foe dour manner frequently Pcrtrarts 

encountered in the city, big windows ; An exnib£on 

and wall murals. Toumedos served with • attached = 

garlicky fresh cheese and Prague ham as 1 anciert 

an appetizer are specialities. Wine by 1 ^ 

foe glass is $130. Meal for two with a - l excavaiTin 

glass of wine: about $3 1 . Malo-stranske ■ S , ^ 

Nam 8/263; 539660. // . ^ * ^"don. : e >- n 7 v 

The service is also friendly at UN- t. B >Sd Mondays. Te 
Pnnce, which overlooks foe Old Town '! j fashion: The 

Square. 'Die large room, with plenty of ' h'M cf 

light. ischeerfully decorated with p^tty . I :» 1736 ‘ 
u ? lecl0 * s - aad- apple - » 

stotoel are foe staples. In addition to the ’ i ^ her ear ?s£ 
regular menu, there are special three- 1 Jsofi? r s,gnec ?J 
course menus at $6 and $9.5! Meal for ! S ! ,h£ - Wily » 
two with a glass of wine, about $30.85. 1 .,'*** of J^hion nans in 

Staromestske Nam 29; 24213404. j ** j%- The exhib-- 

r „ Mu UniCu , Iar . u P Pellin Hill takes you - ■ **£**%* dresses; 

w Nebozizek. m Petrinky Park near - ■ bon- 

Prague Castle, with wonderful views of ’ : . 

the 2 !t T0Wn - The ■ decor ** modem and . -Jjo jjg®; Comfou; 

‘ntenumonal; Chateaubriand ’ . S g* » The 5^ 

($23. for two) is a high point otter - = . 5a, id p n ' ^^v/ings Water! 

s^cialte are wild bSr‘S,tes°S : | f j- " ni3 ' 

^toonds. Meal for two ! t — 

about $54. Pemnske Sady 411 ; 537905. -■ 

™S the . a S^ ofCTOhcu “ i n- • S"*SS E 5i 

1 1 pJrlI? ale ff Cst atmosphere, ^ . 

U Patrona offers perhaps the bestcook- 

mg in Prague. Fish is flown in daily — 4 SeiJ Ua ^ine'& E 
“J V!S,t dwre was remarkable ^ 

tuna. Specials often include veal, salads • ^an 200 pairn! 

are fresh and desserts ram>e fmm Mm,. -> 1 . a nd vidpne 


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^fanoert ^ 
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ta r* er excavated in. 


eastern Paris at the brand new Parc de 
Bercy, the lure is box-bordered beds of 
a sophisticated selection of herbs 
(hyssop to horseradish) along with such 
plantings as garlic and asparagus, fava 
beans aid dwarf peas, gooseberries and 
rhubarb. 

the cutting edge Incorporating the 
cobblestone paths of foe former wine 
warehouses with new red-brick walks, 
walls and structures, Bercy is a stunning 


This Morning / 1 trumpeted a Figaro 
headline on May 6 , Despite the work of 
a commission sent to pry foe secret of 
S i Ur JL English S^ass from foe British, 
foe French lawn liberation comes with 


— _ -- — m ncdu 

informing that you ihe lawn is having a 
rest. ® 

Jean Rafferty is a Paris-based jour- 
nal, st who specializes in design and 
njestyie. 


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LMERNATION.-IL HERALD TRIBIATE, FRED.Ai. MAY 30. 1997 


PAGE 11 


MOVIE GUIDE 


Thi Lost World: 
Jurassic Park 

Dircvlt'ti b\ Steven Spiel- 
berg. IS. 

Il isn'i giant, carnivorous di- 
nosaurs thundering through 
the jungle and pulling people 
apart like spaghetti that 
provide the scariest chills in 
"The Lost World: Jurassic 
Park.'* It is their adorable 
miniature relatives known as 
compies (ProcompsognatU- 
us rriassicusi who scamper 
through the underbrush like 
a gang of famished street 
urchins playing cute, 
bloodthirsty games of hide- 
and-seek and follnw-rhe- 
leader with their prey, 
Nobody is more adept than 
Steven Spielberg, who dir- 
ected this sequel to the S9fl0 
million -grossing * ' Jurassic 
Park.” at teasing a movie 
audience by finding the grot- 
esque in the cute and the cute 
in the grotesque. E.T.'s ugli- 
ness made him more plaint- 
ively lovable, but it also kept 
him slightly scary. “The 
Lost World.” unlike "Ju- 
rassic Park.” humanizes its 
monsters in a way that E.T. 
would understand. But the 
. new movie's endowing of its 
• prehistoric monsters with 
feelings cuts borh ways. 
While it yields some emo- 
tional di\ idends. it compro- 
mises the original film's no- 
tion of an unbridgeable, 
mystical gap between the 
modem world and Earth as it 
existed 65 million years ago. 
But “The Lost World.” 
while terrifically entertain- 
ing. is also structurally out of 
kilter. Shortly after the two- 



Ihinl limn 

A scene from “The Lost World: Jurassic Park.” 


thirds point, the movie 
comes to a complete halt. 
.Vid once it revs up its en- 
gines again, it never regains 
full power. "The Lost 
World” never lakes itself 
too senously. Yes. it can be 
seen as a fiendish millennial 
fantasy of our prehistoric 
past catching up with us. But 
it doesn ‘t pretend to be much 
more than a messy, full- 
blooded adventure yam with 
cardboard characters and a 
story that doesn't track. 

\ Stephen Ho/ Jen. ATT; 

Romy & Michele's 
High School 
Reunion 

Directed h\ Diivitl Mirkin. 
US. 

Girl power drives "Romy 
and Michele's High School 
Reunion” and drives il 
good. Like, ! know' 
"good’s” an adjective, 
’kay? We’re talking about 
Romy tMiru SorvinoJ and 


Michele fLisa Kudrow), two 
adorable, Versace-adoring 
dingalings who are the 
Rodeo Drive equivalent of 
Beavis and Bun-head. I 
don't mean these gals de 
SoCal are dirty -minded im- 
beciles. but their concerns 
are just as low-achievement. 
And they high-heel it 
through a delicious comedy 
about bitchiness, one-up wo- 
m an ship and those emotion- 
al scars left from high- 
school days. Romy' 's a cash- 
ier with chutzpah, lots of 
ideas and no boyfriend. 
Michele's the pretty, unem- 
ployed one — also sans lov- 
er. Bui no maner. For them, 
life’s about good dance 
clubs, great hair and excel- 
lent nails. When they get 
word of their 10th high- 
school reunion, a! Sagebrush 
High in Tucson, their idyllic 
existence is put into sobering 
pentpective. The reunion 
questionnaire, which asks 


them to list all their 
* ‘achievements,' ' throw s 
them into despair. What are 
they going to brag about to 
that erstw hile group of social 
snoots? It's time to borrow a 
.sports car. dress to the nines 
and lie through their teeth. 
Romy and Michele leant the 
hard way that, no matter how- 
low you fall in the social 
order there's always 
someone lower and more 
miserable than you. The 
movie finds the hilarious un- 
derbelly to everything, no 
matter how painful the sub- 
ject maner. 

fDesson How. U7*i 

Onibi 

Directed by Roknru Much- 
izuki. Japan. 

Just out of jail, a hit man 
decides to go straight. This 
is hard to do. whar with the 
blandishments of the gang 
on one hand, and the dif- 
ficulties of finding a job on 
the other. He has a~girlfriend 
who wants to help him but 
she too has a past she is 
trying to escape. The plot 
may sound familiar, bur the 
director, Rokuro Mochizuki 
(whose 1987 "Skinless 
Night” was a memorable 
debut), keeps things fresh 
with a concerned attention 
to surface detail, an avoid- 
ance of gratuitous violence, 
highly original characteriz- 
ations (Yoshiyuki Morioka 
w rote the script i and a beau- 
tiful performance by Yoshio 
Haraaa as the ordinary guy 
hying to be better and fall- 
ing fiat on his face. 

f Donald Richie. IHTi 


RECORDINGS 


KEITH JARRETT “La Scala” (ECM): 
Keith Jamett was having lunch on the 
sunny terrace of a major jazz festival's 
hotel headquarters last summer. Cross- 
table conversation between musical 
people was animated and friendly. 
Walking through on his way from his 
room to a sound check, a smiling Herbie 
Hancock stopped to say hello to people 

Gthe knew at one table after another. 

^Diners stood up to chat with him. With 
Jarre tu who remained seated however, 
he had to bow down to be heard. Apart 
from evidence of that same sort of in- 
sensitivity. Jarre tt’s recording of an im- 
provised solo concert at La Scala in 
Milan is a masterpiece. 


BERNARD PURDIE “Soul to Jazz” 
(Act): Act. a “we try harder” inde- 
pendent small German label, presents 
exciting performances of an intelli- 
gently sequenced wide range of material 
by the ace studio drummer “Preny” 
Purdie leading the fine German WDR 
big band. From "Sidewinder” to 
“When a Man Loves a Woman.” Guest 
solos by the Brecker Brothers and the 
late Eddie Harris. 

GARLAND JEFFREYS “Wildlife Dic- 
tionary" (BMG): People ask, “What- 
ever happened to Garland Jeffreys?" 
He’s still happening, that's what, better 
than ever. His voice, tunes and lyrics 


over an often reggae shaded rock beat 
trip the light fantastic. “Afrodiziak” is 
a great name for a love song. 

DOC CHEATHAM tk NICHOLAS 

payton (Verve): There are 68 years 
between these two trumpeters, but if you 
had not been warned you’d never know it. 
Cheatham. 91. and Payton. 23, affirm 
the continuity of the jazz spectrum to- 
gether. It’s not like one is playing 
"young” or the other is trying to be 
“experienced” — it all just fits. 
“Jada,” “Stardust." "Black and 
Blue" . . . 

Mike Zwerin/IHT 


ARTS GUIDE 


AUSTRI A 


Krems 

Kunsthalle, tei: (43) 2732-62669. 
closed Mondays. To Aug. 24: 
“AmuK Rainer: Abgmndtiefe, Per- 
speWiefe." 50 years ol works by 
the Austrian artist (bom 1929), in- 
cluding hallucinatory drawings 
created when he was experiment- 
ing with LSD in the 1960s, over- 
painted photographs and works in 
which religious motifs resurface. 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Musee d’Art Anclen, tel: (2) 508- 
3211, dosed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/ To July 27: “Paul Delvaux, 
1897-1994.” Paintings and works 
on paper by a leaefing member of 
the Belgian Surrealist movement 


B RITA I 


-gpDIHBUBQH 

Royal Museum of Scotland, tel: 
(131) 225-7534, open daily. To 
Oct. 1: "Shi bate Zeshln: Master- 
pieces of Japanese Lacquer from 
the KhaJIII Collection." The works 
ot the 19th-century lacquer crafts- 
man have been sought by Western 
connoisseurs since the Meijl era In 
the turn of the centuiy. Writing 
boxes, sake cups, inros and dec- 
orative panels are on show. 

Leeds 

The Henry Moore Institute, tel: 
(0113) 234-3158, open dally. To 
Aug. 24: "Robert Morris: Recent 
Fell Pieces and Drawings.” A se- 
lection ot 15 laige felt works by the 
American Minimalist artist (bom 
1931). 

London 

British Museum, tel: (171) 323- 
8525. open dally. To July 20: “An- 
cient Faces: Mummy Portraits 
from Roman Egypt.” An exhibition 
of painted portraits found attached 
to the mummified bodies of ancient 
Egypt Painted at the Ume of the 
Roman colonization, most of the 
portraits have been excavated in 
the Fayum area. 

Museum of London, tel: (171) 
600-3699, closed Mondays. To 
jjov, 23: "In Royal Fashion: The 
Gfothes of Princess Charlotte of 
Vrales and Queen Victoria, 1796- 
1901." Dresses and accessories 
of two royal cousins (Princess 
Charlotte died In her early 20s, 
Queen Victoria reigned for more 
than 60 years) that lestHy to their 
lives and rotes as fashion Icons in 
the media of the day. The exhib- 
ition includes wedding dresses, 
coronation robes, blouses, bon- 
nets, shawls and shoes. 

Royal Academy of Arts, tat (171) 
494-5615. open dalty. Continu- 
ing/ To June 8: The Berlin ot 
George Grosz: Drawings. Water- 
colors and Prints. 1912-1930." 



Front top: Maric-Berthe Aurenche with husband Max 
Ernst. Lee Miller. Man Ray's assistant and mistress, 
and the photographer, in a Surrealism show in Paris. 


FRANCE 


p DENMARK 

HUMLEBAEK 

Louisiana Museum of Modem 
Art, tei: 42-19-07-19, open dally. 
To Sept 7: “Sunshine & Noin Art in 

Los Angeles, 1960-1997." Fifty 
sts exhibit more than 200 pelnt- 
ns, installations and videos doo- 

v*.nen ting the evolution of art forms 

from Sam Francis, Ed Kienholz 
and Devkl Hockney in the early 
1960s to the international break- 
through in the 1990s with MikeKet 
ley and Charles Ray. The exhto- 
ition will travel to Germany, Italy 
and Los Angeles. 


Bordeaux 

Musee des Beaux- Arts de Bor- 
deaux, tel: 05-56-10-17-18. 
dosed Tuesdays. To Aug. 29: 
"Rosa Bonheur. 1822-1 899." After 
she was allowed by the authorities 
to wear men's clothes. Rosa Bon- 
heur was able to vlsri markets, 
slaughterhouses and fairs and 
study the animals she would later 
depict In her works. The exhibition 
brings together 84 paintings, 49 
drawings and watercolors and 9 
sculptures and will travel to Bar- 
biz on. near Parts and New York. 

Paths 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01 -44- 78- 12-33 .dosed Tuesdays, 
lb Sept. 29: "Fernand Lager." 
Highlighting the artist'a affinity with 
architecture, his work for the ballet 
cinema end literature, and his 
strong political commitment, the 
exhibition features 220 paintings 
and drawings by the French artist 
(1881-1955). The exhibition will 
travel to Madrid end New York. 
Pavfllon des Arts, tel: 01-42-33- 
82-50, dosed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/ To June 18: “Le Surrealisme 
et r Amour.” 150 paintings, sculp- 
tures, objects, drawings, collages 
and photographs by Breton, Dan. 
Duchamp, Ernst. Alberto Giac- 
ometti, Magritte, Miro. Picabla and 
other members of the Surrealist 
movement. Also features books, 
pamphlets and magazines. 

| HQM 6 KOHC I 

Homo Kong 

Grand Theatre, Hong Kong Cul- 
tural Centre, tek 2573-9553. 
World premiere of “The Last Em- 
peror," a ballet based on the life of 
Pu Yl. the last Marwhu Emperor, 


produced for the Hong Kong Ballet 
by choreographer Wayne EagIJng. 
June 5-8- 

B», ELAND 
Dubun 

The Irish Museum of Modem 
Art, tel: (1) 671-8666, closed 
Mondays. To June 4: "Joseph 
Kosuttv. New Installation and Sur- 
vey, 1965-1997." Installations by 
the American Conceptual artist 
(bom 1 945) who was Influenced by 
Ludwig Wittgenstein’s flngufstlc 
and epistemological theories. 

■ ITALY 
Florinck 

Palazzo Medici Rtecardl, tel: (55) 
27601. dosed Wednesdays. To 
early July: "Modemfsmo In Por- 
togeiro." Works by Portuguese 
artists of the first 30 years of this 
century, who were closely asso- 
ciated with the literary drdes of 
thdrtime, including poet Fernando 
Pessoa. 

Genoa 

Palazzo Ducale, tel: (DIO) 562- 
440, dosed Mondays. To July 13: 
“\fen Dyck In Genoa." Portraits 
commissioned by the Genovese 
oligarchs, such as the Grim aids, 
the Spinotas and the Dorias, while 
the Flemish portraitist (1599-1641) 
was in Genoa In the 1820s. 

■ SPAIN 

Madrid 

Museo Thyssen-Bomemisza, 
tel; (1) 420-39-44, dosed 

Mondays, To Sept 14: “George 
Grosz: The Berlin Years." The Ger- 
man satirist (1893-1959) trans- 
lated political activism into an be- 
fore he fled Nazi Germany for 


America in 1933. Features paint- 
ings, works on paper and a se- 
lection of pamphlets, books and 
photographs. 

B~I W I T X E R L A N D 
Basel 

Kunstmuseum, tel: (61) 271- 
0445, dosed Mondays. May 1. 
Continulng/To Aug. 24: "Durer, 
Hofodn, Grunewald: OW Master 
Drawings of the German Renais- 
sance from Berlin and Basel." An 
insight Into German draftsmanship 
of the 1 5th and 1 Qth centuries. The 
exhibition brings togther 1 80 works 
by Durer (1471-1528), Hans Hol- 
bein the Younger (1497- 1 543) and 
Mathias Grunewald (1475-1528). 

Luoano 

Museo d'Arte Modems, tel: (91) 
994-4370, dosed Mondays. Con- 
tinuing/ To June 22: "Georges 
Rouault, 1871-1958: Retrospect- 
ive." More than 120 works by the 
French Catholic painter. 

M UNITED STATES 

Boston 

Museum of Fine Arts, tel: (617) 
267-93-00, open dalty. To July 20: 
Tales from the Land of Dragons: 
1000 Years of Chinese Painting." 
Mora than 150 handspralls, 
hanging scrolls and album leaves 
from the Tang (618-906), Song 
(960-1279). and Yuan (1279-1368) 
dynasties that embody Chinese 
history and legends. 

Houston 

Museum of Fine Arts, tel: (713) 
639-7300, closed Mondays. To Ju- 
ly 13: “Matisse. Picasso and 
Friends: Masterworks on Paper 
From the Cone Collection." Ad- 
vised by Gertrude Stein, these pi- 
oneering collectors assembled 
Post-Impressionist and modernist 
paintings, sculpture, and works on 
paper by artists of the first halt of 
the century. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art, lei: (212) 
708-9480. dosed Wednesdays. 
Continuing/ To Sept. 2: “Objects 
of Desire: The Modem Still Life." A 
survey erf 20th-century still life that 
demonstrates how this genre can 
be developed. 

CLOSINO SOON 

June 1: “Empire of the Sultans: 
Ottoman Art from the Collection of 
Nassar D. Khallti." The Israel Mu- • 
saum, Jerusalem. 

June 1: "William Turner: A Ret- 
rospective." Bank Austria Kurv 
stforum, Vienna. 

June 1: “Jasper Johns: Father of 
Pop Art in Cologne." Museum 
Ludwig, Cologne. 

June 1: “Giovanni Giacometti." 
Musee des Baaux-Arta, 
Lausanne. 


THE car column 


Audi Is Making Room at the Top 


Bv Gavin Green 


A UDI, the one-isme poor re- 
lation of Germany’s upper- 
class car family, has suddenly 
struck ii rich.' N'oi only are 
sales growing strongly but. just as im- 
portant, Audi's image has blossomed 
from struggling pretender in the BMW- 
Mercedes league to that of serious con- 
tender. 

Once the builder of posh Volkswa- 
gens — same cars, different emblem, 
higher prices — Audi nou. makes cars 
that are distinctive to look at. make 
strong technological statements and are 
good to drive. Whereas Mercedes cars 
ate stilt often stodgy, and BMW’s are 
sometimes a touch~vuIgar. Audi has a 
high-tech, advanced sporty '90s image. 
And although the marketing boys have 
done their bit to pump up rhe brand, the 
designers deserve most of the credit. 

We must go back to the four-wheel- 
drive Quaitro sports car. of 1980. to see 
the early signs of Audi breaking free of 
its overbearing parent. V\V. and taking 
on the prestige kings. The Quanro, the 
first 4x4 sports car — excluding the 
tiny- volume British Jensen FF — won 
rallies and won over drivers with its 
amazing responsiveness and usable 
high performance. 

'll was a big jump forward. So was the 
subsequent Audi 100/200 sedan, loved 
in Europe if not in America, where it 
was a big jump forward only in that it 
appeared to suffer from a phenomenon 
called "unintended acceleration.” No 
maner that Audi was subsequently ex- 
onerated. U.S. sales shriveled like a 
prune in the Arizona sun. 

Brief Deceleration 

The quality of Audi's cars suffered 
from a bout of unintended deceleration 
soon after, when the company seemed to 
be losing its way. But over the past 
several years — since the promotion of 
Audi's former boss, Ferdinand Piech, 
into the top job at Volkswagen — Audi 
has been on a roll. 

Two cars have recently consummated 
Audi'sposition at the top of the sedan 
class. First, there was the Audi AS, the 
loveliest big four-door car of recent 
years, and one of the best to drive. And 



then there was the A4, which has stolen 
the BMW 3-series crown in the small 
executive class. 

Now. there is the new A6. 

What a task it has! BMW and Mer- 
cedes have just launched new cars in the 
class, and both have been widely lauded 
by the press and buyers. The A 6 ’not only 
competes strongly against the new 5 
series and the E-class but. in many ways, 
edges ahead of them. 

Once more, here is a distinctive Audi, 
quite different from all rivals. There is a 
typically taut-skinned body (ail steel 
apart from the aluminum hood) which 
gives the impression of latent muscu- 
larity. The front and rear lights are cut at 
angles, the better to cap the comers of the 
car. The roof is gently arched, not flat, 
which gives the car a pleasing roundness. 
It also helps make for deep windows and 
the feeling of a light and airy cockpiL The 
impression is of a handsome, efficient 
car. with the attractive stark sculpturing 
that epitomizes the best German indus- 
trial design. 

As with the outside design, there is an 
attractive efficiency and harmony about 
the cockpiu There is also a tremendous 
thoughtfulness about the siting of the 
controls. The quality of the materials — 
the plastics, the cloth, the leather — is 
also superb. Overall, this is the best 
driving environment in motoring. And 
the trunk is big and square, and very 
practical. 

Unlike the new BMW and Mercedes, 
the A6 has front-wheel drive. One of the 


upshots is that the steering locks the 
linearity and fluidity of its best rear- 
drive rivals. The car doesn’t quite mm 
and handle and grip with the same flaw- 
less magic as Germany's best, partly a 
result of shared suspension components 
with the mass-made VW Passat. Nor is 
the Audi's V6 engine as refined or as 
gutsy as the six-cylinder engines from 
Mercedes or BMW. Under the skin, the 
Audi's common VW roots do occa- 
sionally reveal themselves 

P ERHAPS Audi still trails its wo 
big-name rivals in the depth of 
quality of the major mechanicals, 
such as engines and suspension. Often 
the driving experience is not quite as 
rich, either. Instead. Audi compensates 
by offering more style, more “new 
wave” engineering and more attractive 
cabins. This is neither a better approach, 
nor a worse one. It is merely different. It 
is also clearly an approach that many 
customers like. 

• Audi A6. About $45,000. 2.S V6 
engine, 30-valves, 277 lee. 193 BHP at 
6.000 rpm. Front-wheel drive, five- 
speed manual gearbox (five-speed 
Tiptronic automatic transmission op- 
tional). Maximum speed: 225 kph (140 
mph). Acceleration: 0-100 kph in 93 
seconds. Average fuel consumption: 
10.2 liters/ 100km. 

Next: The Chrysler Voyager 

Gai'in Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine 


BOOKS 


THE COURAGE TO STAND 
ALONE: Letters From Prison 
and Other Writings 
By Wei Jingsheng. Edited and translated 
by Kristina M. Torgeson. Illustrated. 286 
pages. $23.95. Mking. 

Reviewed by Richard Bernstein 

I N July 1987, more than eight years 
after his arrest and imprisonment, 
Wei Jingsheng, China's most famous 
political dissident, wrote a letter to his 
country's most powerful leader, Deng 
Xiaoping, that is a remarkable docu- 
ment After all those years in jail, under 
constant pressure to yield to the “re- 
education” that is the aim of China’s 
prison system, Wei might understand- 
ably have attempted to flatter the man 
who had the literal power to let him go or 
keep him in prison. Bur the letter shows 
that Wei is not the kind of person to beg 
for favors. 

“You might not be able to remember 
a person you wronged, buz it isn't easy 
for me to forget the one who wronged 
me.” Wei begins. He recalls that Deng, 
twice purged and twice rehabilitated in 
his own turbulent career, had himself 
been “accused of unwarranted charges 
but strangely does not hesitate to use 
“unwarranted charges to blatantly 
slander and persecute others.” 

“Your weakness,” Wei says, “is that 
you have great ambition, but you’re 
umalemed and small-minded.” 

The statement and its style are typical 
of Wei, who has been viewed as China’s 
leading imprisoned dissident since he 
was arrested in 1979. He has spent all 
but six months of the 18 intervening 
years in various detention centers, pris- 
ons and labor camps, much of the time in 
solitary confinement or surrounded by 
‘ L trustees 1 ' assigned to make him miser- 
able. 


Now Wei’s letters to Deng, who died 
in February, to other Chinese leaders 
and to members of his family, along 
with the key documents from his pre- 
prison period, have been published in an 
important and aptly titled book, “The 
Courage to Stand Alone.” 

Edited and translated by Kristina M. 
Torgeson, the book is probably the most 
impressive dissenting document to 
emerge from China since the Commu- 
nist revolution of 1949. It is a work that 
promises to take its place among the 
classics of the 20th-century literature of 
dissenL alongside the writings of figures 
like Vaclav Havel. Vladimir Bukovsky 
and Adam Michnik. 

It is a remarkable testament, a polit- 
ical and culrural evenL Wei would be 
important as a symbol of China’s con- 
tinuing human rights violations even if 
he were not an impressive thinker or a 
particularly courageous man. But “The 
Courage ro Stand Alone” shows him to 
be not just a victimized brave man buz a 
thoughtful and intelligent one as well. 

The main feature of his writing is not 
eloquence or passion but rather 
calmness and precision. His letters and 
essays are manced by a steadfast appeal 
to a sort of Lockean rationality spiced 
here and there by bursts of anger and 
sarcasm against the Chinese leaders 
who,. in Wei's opinion, refused to get 
straight the elementary distinction be- 
tween truth and power. 

“I’ve long known tbaz you are pre- 
cisely the kind of idiot to do something 
foolish like this," Wei writes to Deng 
after the massacre of student demon- 
strators in Beijing in 19S9, “just as 
you've long known that I am precisely 
the kind of idiot who will remain stub- 
born to the end and take blows with his 
head up.” 

Another reason is that the book comes 
along at a time when world attention has 
focused ever more on China as, ar- 


guably, the world's worst violator of 
human rights. If there is a consistent 
theme demonstrated by Wei’s collected 
writings, it-is the primacy of the rule of 
law and China's cynical use of law to 
justify repression. Liu Qing, a former 
democracy advocate in China who now 
lives in New York City, has spoken of 
“the infinite flexibility of the dictat- 
orship of the proletariaL’ ’ Wei, in one of 
the essays in “The Courage to Stand 
Alone,” similarly speaks of law in 
China as “merely a ‘legal weapon’ that 
anyone in power can wield against his 
enemies." 

That too was the main idea of one of 
the most remarkable of the essays in 
“The Courage to Stand Alone,” the 
statement thar Wei made in his own 
defense ar his first trial, in 1979. By that 
time Wei was generally recognized as 
the intellectual leader of die short-lived 
Democracy Wail movement 

W EI was the editor of Explora- 
tions, one of the many such 
magazines published in China at the 
time. He was also the author of what 
became the movement's most important 
statement, an article called "The Fifth 
Modernization: Democracy,” referring 
to the official call for China to achieve 
the “Four Modernizations” in agricul- 
ture. industry, science and technology, 
and defense. 

But Wei was also the author of an- 
other article, “Do We Want Democracy 
or New Autocracy?.” which criticized 
Deng by name. Within days of its pub- 
lication, he was arrested and put on trial. 
His defense statement dismantled the 
prosecution’s case by demonstrating 
that while his activities were all legal, 
the government’s prosecution of him 
was against the law. 

Richard Bernstein is on rhe staff of 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

EW York's most pres- 
tigious evenL the Rei- 
singer Knockout Team 
Championship, has been de- 
clining steadily for many 
years. Thirty years ago, 74 
teams were entered, and the 
winning squad included three 
world-famous players: Os- 
wald Jacoby. John Crawford 
and Tobias Stone. 

This time, only 14 teams 
competed, and some of the 
best players in the metropol- 
itan area were missing from 
the ranks. 

The diagramed deal, on 
which both teams reached six 
spades, played a vital role in 
the semifinal victory over the 
top-seeded team by a group led 
by Lapt Chan of Forest Hills, 


Queens. - He was the declarer 
after a transfer auction, and the 
reader should cover the East- 
West cards and plan the play 


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after an opening heart lead. In 
practice. South won with the 
ace in dummy and cashed the 
king and queen of spades. 
Finding the bad split, he fin- 
essed fee diamond queen and 
cashed the ace. Then be cashed 
the king-queen of hearts, 
throwing a diamond from the 
dummy, and reached the po- 
sition. shown at right. 

The heart five was led, and 
West erred by throwing a dia- 
mond. South ruffed in 
dummy, cashed bis club win- 
ners, and played his last club. 
Ibis gave him two trump 
tricks and his slam . for if West 
ruffed the diamond loser 
could be discarded. 

If West had discarded a 
club in fee diagramed pos- 
ition, he would have beaten 
fee slam and, as it turned out, 
won the match. 


But South could have im- 
proved his plan and succeeded 
against any defense. If be 
draws two rounds of trumps 
with the Icing and ace, pre- 
serving the queen as an entry, 
he can then cash side-suit win- 
ners, ending in his hand, and 
score all dummy’s trumps. 

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THE WORLD'S PAIIO’ NEWSPAPER 










PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 


tllM 2 l §« THE INTERMARKET 




BELGIUM 


Brussels, Avenue Louise 346 

Hfitd Max Hallet, attributed to Victor Horta 

Carnage entrance, period staircase, marvellous entrance 
hall, reception rooms, winter garden, basement and two-car 
garage. Ground surface: 6a 9Ctea - 1 181 sq.m habitable. 

All in very grand style and well maintained 
Mixed zone usable for habitation / offices 
Listed building (A.R. 16/10/1975) 

Vacant occupation 

Authorization to visit may be obtained from the notaries. 

Final auction: Friday, June 20th 1997 at 230 pm, in 
room EH - 

Ventes par Notaries, Brussels, Rue de la Montagne 30 - 32 
The bid stands at: 54 millions BEF 
Bank garantee of 20 millions to provide in order to be 
allowed to bid 


Notary V. Dechamps: 
Notary L. Beds: 


SPAIN 


02/216 88 33 
02/53747 21 


NEW ZEALAND 



SWITZERLAND 


— Center of Montreux, - 
Switzerland 

Offintapumai far ok, 109 sqm, 1 1.173 <q fii 
AH Marian amenmoes 
Excefiem position «4nL basses s/ptfdjKne. 

Far Jamil canatr 

Mayo A»eckxe SA 

Tefc *11 22 136 Sm - Fib *H 22 7M 8W3 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Canada 


WHO WANTS TO OPT OUT? Resort n 
Bii&sti CoUimta |Cat»oj. 3.000 feel 
laketrom apprDumaiflijf 75' actes. 5 
rooms. 3 cabins, readence (4400 sail: 
sauna on the lake. flstvsmofcetoiGS, 60 
ft dock, lots of inventory. land for 
carteftorsas Asking CanSI 560.000 - 
sold by owier. Phone: 12501 397-2070. 
Fax: (250) 337-2284. 


Cayman Islands 


DREAM HOUSE 3300 SOFT., in the 
most tamos high luxury amtominium ol 
istand beach located, lop amentias • lo- 
cal on - services Offtce-u&e attained. 
USS 1. 398/m • other unrts all sokl at 
US5 Owners tarring evafebte. 
Physical cash accepted 24 hT Teh 
0097150641738&'FaK 003713028004 


HOLIDAYS 


BARRETT ASSOCIATES 

Property Conaiimrti 

We are a professional residential piopern 
search co specialising in Central London 
and pm ide a tajUi le''el of sen ice mill 
efficiency and discretion 
Tefc 0171 Ml 8882 - Fax: 0171 381 2669 


French Provinces 


SURROUNDED BY MOUNTAINS. 5 
rifles tran FOR France, owner seis typ- 
ical furnished house. lit) sqm + 500 
ayn gattten Large antique fireplaces + 
antique even, modem contort. Contact- 
Portal. Le Mas Rte de la Boissiere. 
34380 Amefiers Tel & Fax France *33 
«M Si H 68 78 


FRANCE-PROVENCE (Vaucluse) Land 
and homes m vfirious pnce ranges are 
noH available in ths beautiful land of 
Van Gogh English spoken ask for Ms 
Wagner. Agence Auquisr 842i0 St Di- 
tto Fiance Tel- *33 KM 90 66 07 S3 
Fax *33 10(4 SO 66 12 35 


SOUTH OF FRANCE • LANGUEDOC. 
Long established French builder seeks. 
partneoTnvesior to an all year raimd 
Vflage Vacance Genre n the AUBRAC 
ream Tet vaiene Boudet or Mke Wars 
*8 IW 6796 4232 Rax (0)4-6744 1372 


. PROVENCE, CAMARGUE. SAWTES 
MARIE DE LA MER. sell construct**? 
land. ID 300 sqm. water, efectricity 
Price- FF1. 503.000 Tel: Pans *33 
(011 42 32 59 89 or toil 54 04 32 


MENERBES LUBCTON 
Unique bcaMor. FWoncai sue. 160 sqm 
Irving space Landscaped garden. Pod. 
For fctafc fax. owner ,33(0(442263214 


NORMANDY VILLA IN DEAUVILLE, 
ctese twacfuaano. 3 roams. 1T0 sjjil 
anal garden TeffFax +33(0)143061360 


PROVENCE - HAS - Needs renovation. 
Vaulted rooms, Million windows, wed. 
1(2 BOO tor tmod Tel -33(0)475714117 


French Riviera 


ST JEAN CAP FERHAT 

in a modem buMng mtti pratete swim- 
ming pool. 140 sqm apartment. three 
bedrooms, large terraces cwrming the 
sea. Celar and tw garages included 


PARK AGENCE 


Le PB/fc Rate* 

25 nunn de ia Costa 
MC 96000 Manta Carlo 
Td 077) S3 25 15 00 
Fax (377) 93 25 35 33 
WWW morttcarto mdeatertpark agence 


DOMINATE TNE GULF 

OF SAINT TR0PEZ 
Died owner. House n duplex, furnished, 
decorated. 105 sqm + terrace - Small 
Provencal viage on hfede, 3 tans from 
the sea >' Port Grmaud. 5 ha park, largo 
swimtog pooL games, calm, caretaker. 
FF1.45OOO0 Tel: +33 (0)4 S3 71 00 44 
or horns +33 {0)4 93 37 10 95. 


CAP D'ANTTBES. Unique panoramic 
vfw, waurfrom. 30 mta. drive tom Mce 
AvporL siperb houas wifi a surface area 
ol 170 aqjm, comptoafy renovated, com- 
prising 5 bedrooms, swtmmlng pooL 
1153 sqm. land, surrounded with od 
trees. Ideal to second restdentiai house. 
Pnce USS 1 9 M. negotiable. Contact 
Roma Parsons. Tef: UK 44 171 437 
9165. Fac 44 171 287 5679 


GOLF CANNE&MOUGWS - SPLENDID 
vfla. Provencal 9yte n® sqm.). 3 bed- 
rooms. Rvfng (50 sq.m.1 + mezzanine 
•nth open lire, hfly equipped kfttta. 
bathroom. 2 Mependert titts + apart 
men rtft separate enhance 132 sqm/. 
Private 2J50 sq.m land, big muring 
pooL AbsoUe privacy. Tel /Fax: Owner 
+33 (0)4 92 92 11 45 (evettogs). 


FACING OLD MOUGINS. see view. k» 
ha reception, 4 bedrooms 8 baths, 2 
levels, 2500 sq.m, landscaped garden 
large swtnmng poof. FF3M. Reply: HT, 
Bax 291. 92521 NaMy cede*. Fiance. 


MENTON In historical pad of town, 
riorning renovated house. 95sq.m., 2 
bedrooms. 2 baths, saa view, near 
beadies FF940K. Adcfurei posstoe, Tel 
+33 (0)143228549, rrivagaidfflimagneUr 


NEAR CANNES, luxurious apartment. 2 
rooms, terrace - loggia, sea view, on pri- 
vate estate, hlqh security. Pnce 
FF700.000 Tet +S3W|6W3«275 


Great Britain 


RICHMOND UPON THAMES, Four 
toft® baSwms. Ouet Vfctaian proper- 
ty tor sale or possiXe rent 22.300 per 
month (1/BD7). 3 mm walk to British 
Rail. Undergound. shopping FacNtres. 
Smafl tore and near ganun wifi nape 
mnes Bax 30i. IHT S3 Long Acre. 
London WC2E SJH. 


Greece 


GREEK BLAND OF EVIA. Lovely, reno- 
vated 3 -bedroom rustic house. 227 
sq m., 150 years okL compietety fur- 
nished. Very large balcony with spectac- 
ular vow. 4 rates Iran sandy beach. 2 
hre tom Athens. USS 150.000 Tel 
+49-89-332701 Fax +49-89-36101064 


VHEYARDS in premier DOC locatiofis 
in South Ptedmorj, near AM) and Aba, 
between 3.75 and 18 arees. 

Bair with period tomfnse. 

Tel: + 44 rt» 1344 24096 
BmtXb ppHsmtogdutonoiifOutk 
http: /fimjiriBigdxdwionmnk 


London ‘ 


LONDON • Belgravia. Superb house, 
360 sqm uitonfetod. fa - sate or rert 6 
bedrooms. 5 baths. 3 reception rorens. 
Serious inq does orty. ‘Fax. Athens 
+3018066771 - Tet 8016765 or mobile 
+3083267546. 


HOLLAND PARK Exquisite 45 beds. 3 
beds apanmert & gsden. Separabte l 
bed apatroenl. FreefioWShare £735.000. 
Tet 44 (0)171 221 9044 


Monaco 


MONTE CARLO. 

388 sqjju, 3 bedrooms, m bans, 
marble araarea. Kray. 3 Indoor peridng 
spaces. 3 cetan. large lerracas 
toxtous view d msdterransan and 
Monaco. Has not been tad in sire 
IBS12M renovation. For sate by owner. 
Tet +33 [0)6 06 37 03 M. 


Paris and Suburbs 


KEUDON-BELLEVUE for sate, apart- 
ment with exceptional tow of Paris. 105 
sqm., fourth flow of a residence stoated 
In a large park, beside Ueudon forest. 
Compterefy private, three bedrooms. 2 
baths, double living (X sq.m), luffy 
equipped kitchen, cellar, two garage 
spaces. Beltane station 5 ran. cose to 
mtonafiona/ school 31 Sevres FJ850M. 
Tel +33 1011 45 34 94 38 (home) or 10)1 
40 57 66 55 (office) 


EXPATRIATE SELLS 1907 steak Dutii 
Iran barge fkvlng|. Excepuonal 30 m. 
Pertaa to Wng and toumg. Renovated 
in 1990. Mato deigned win contort, 
quatty. air and happiness m rand. Moor- 
ing 50 km west a Pans / Ptxt da Otari 
USS 295^1 Tel +33 (0)1 34 77 56 38 


LESABfT LOUIS 
Fii view re the Setae, facing soreh. 
2 bedrooms 2 baths 140 sqm. 
tegh ceSngs. USS1 ,700^00. Tel 
+33 toil tw 4507 / 10)6 6W5 4091 


8th, FBG ST HONORE, in a 'mews', 
charming piad-a-lene. paneled. 
55sq.m.+smail mdependerri room, ter- 
race. silence. FF1.070M. Tel/Fax 
+33(0)145010226 Ol {0)144033932 


OF BASTILLE, owner seta 72 sq.m, 
apartment 2nd Boor, parted contfibon. 
mmr cninml. qua art swr? Cm- 
mooal lease posable. FF1.3BOOOO Tei 
(0)1 43 58 21 33 Fax 10)1 47 00 77 10 


5th, LATH QUARTER near Pantheon 
and Sotbonne, chaining 'pied a terre' 
large Mig room + mezzanine Batooom 
and total Uy equpped. FF1. 100,000. 
Tel +33 10|1 4783 6206 / <0/4 6729 7866 


16th, BETWEEN VICTOR HUGO A Bate 
de Buttogna 230 sqm., 6th floor, suz, 
beaudii receptm 4 bedrooms. 2 park- 
tags, mad's room tel (0)1 42 22 43 20 


KST PART OF 16ft. 50 m tom Sere, 
gardens. Eiffai tower, quiet 3-room Hat. 
3rd floor., on garden, parking, cellar. 
FF24 U Tel ( 0)1 4527 2317 ater 8{xn 


FLORENCE - Prestigious comfortabla 
PENTHOUSE n historic certral Florence 
twerioolong the besutfti rooftops and fe- 
rrous Duomo. 2 bedrooms. Jacuzzi, ter- 
rsce. fireplace and more. Cab. Arcadia 
Agency Tei' 39-55-5BT488 Fax: 39 55 


TOME-COLISEUM Apartment with ex- 
cephonai and unique view on Ciflaeum 
Antique building. Living room, dining 
room. 2 bedrooms, 2 oaths, office, kitch- 
en. Furnished and decorated by famous 
arctifted. Fax +3310)1 47 04 42 61 


9th, 2 ROOMS, RSKJNE, 47 sqm . 5th 
floor. Ifft. cellar. Historical building 
FF1.1M T* +33 (0)1 46 37 06 75 


BUY OR RENT LUXURY APARTMENTS 
ta resdenfa! dstricts. Paris and Matey 
Tel / Fax: +33 1011 39 65 76 98 


NEAR ARC TRIOMPHE. deluxe apart- 
mert 4isqm. 2 rooms, suiiy, excellent 
tavestmenL F900.000.Tel +33 148225483 


ST GERMAN DES PRES top floor ftt 
16th cent, house, ideal cou ple. 3/4 
rooms, calm, view. Tef +33 (0)143293757 



YACHTS 


NORTH AMERICAN 
RANCH VACATIONS 


SAFARIS 


n 


e 



scs 


The concept. des : gn arc the deccration in. 1930 Art Deco style 
o? this cruising casino-yacht : s cut of the ordinary and is 
dcs-gned by David RinmyThe 700 sq.n. of antique leaded glass 
windows and the ancient iead setting bordering and inlaying 
the mirrors, wi! 1 make this luxurious and refined yacht the 
"THE ORIENT EXPRESS OF THE 7 SEAS” 

The quality fittings on board, remind one of the golden years 
of which only France holds the secret. Equiped with 72 pas- 
senger cabins, including 7 Suites and 1 Royal Suite. A large 
gastronomic restaurant, exclusively French, followed by a large 
Bar- Brasserie decorated rn 1930 style. A vast 600 sq.m. Casino 
with Jack doc machines w ;l ! give the pleasure to the passen- 
gers. ! large cabaret-spectacle w.tn a discotheque. I swimming- 
poo!. ! sc-Anum. i sports room, I sauna and I Jacuzzi. The 
Duty-free luxury bourques will represent the most well- 
known French brands. 

200 passengers and 36 crow members will find an agreeable 
environment under exceptional cruising conditions in this truly 
floating palace ★****, The Launching ceremony of The 
Cas ; no Royal cruising is set for the end of the 
ccntury-Decembcr 99. 

Eaie by Time share to private individuals, cruising included 
scams at SI 9.000 c-er week for a cabin for 2-4 peopie for a 
oo"ic-d of 30 years. 

, Intfrnaticnal Trade Finance Hivico 

Spot City International B v 

33. avenue des Champs -Ely sees Paasheuvelweo T5 
750D2 Pans - France 1 105 Be Amsterdam - Holland 

To! - '3 (n; 1 J2 25 03 03 Tc! - 51 (O) 20 -4C0 13 02 

Fax: - 33 101 1 43 59 34 56 Fax: - 31 (0) 20 691 19 02. 



The American West 

Grapevine Canyen finest Ranch 

Coma to itia legsnda^ wbsi and relax 
h [he •arm sunsbXM Rida Via Dais the 
ApachascalM hona. Lwm to rope at - 
our cowboy crtmci. aargaza indw crystal 
Osoi Arizona afctos. Enjoy our logaidary 
wMHrn baapxaKy 

E5SSI Call 520-826-3185 
■—» Fax 520-826-3636 
■c£| Rse color Mochm 

RO- Bo« 302IPo mce, AZ 
I5S^SS9 mndieadMiaxsni 


Holiday Rentals 


Caribbean 

ST. BARTHELEMY, F-Wi- 0VB1 300 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS ■ beach- 
front to mate tori pools. Our agents 
haw inspected rei njfes parsaafly Fpi 
resevafiore on Si Baits. St Maw, An- 
gida Bartsrios Uusnque. the Vrgn Is- 
lands Call MMCO-'/SlBARTH - US' 
(401|849-fi012.1ax 847-62M. tram 
FRANCE 05 00 16 a ■ fflGLAND 0 

■exwfflie 

JACMEL, HAITI - ExteanSnarr. Kstoric 
house by sea ta br.&fy tranquil torn. 
Longishon lenr. inopensrre'. TeWax 
+33 10(143158996 (X Tel ‘1 2123791240 


Indonesia 


BALT OCEANFFHJHT WLLA 

New 4 bedrooms. 4 bams - Kute Beach. 

Luavy private vNa as cwfiforeng . 
iacuzzi pool limb. 10 staff UKSWay. 
FAX: (65)738 6099 


PAKAREA - SntaB quel nause. nee 
view Rertffig: July & August Tei Pans 
+33 (0}I 4355 6443 Fax (®1 4357 7437 




SAFARICENTRE 
EVTERNATIONAI USA 

CLlssk-. nature, athtroiure tours ci 
satins m Atria. Latin America. 
Asa. Irtviiichinu 

W«iv hnp-. si^wjarancemrectmi 
Td: 31'F‘«0-Hn - Fax 3t'T-^51«» 
E-nuiL- tnfo8sjfaricvnm.‘.i:ura 


TUSCAN FARMHOUSE 3 bedrooms. 2 
baths. Gorgeous Rental Superb site 
■Sep an classes Gafl/Fa* (303) 
975-1316 USA or 39570755194 tely 


NEW YORK Cm SOHO 

Furnished Sublei S6K per Month 2-3 
months 2 BOO Sq. FL LotL Beauntd & 
peaceful! Ten lane wmdaas wifi greal 
views and light 1 Ttes is a cell Uxmn 
photographers pnmary NYC residence 
Very privae & secure. Q uetfsd sv^ls or 
cixrie only. Ftexita avatatter/ Cat 
Chsrtotte Edmondson 
Halstead Property Co. 212-2S3-9300 
extension 111 hue 212-614-0656 


HIGH SEASON IN SOUTHAMPTON NY! 
B eaahi 3 bedroom 3 bath, pool F Jy 
turn shirt. Quirt enclave Waienwre. 
Ten ranutes to ocean. Avaitabte Augusi 
1 B-Sepen*w 2 (Labor Day). S9B0 US 
pitxs [dries Rstoences required Photos 
avatebte. Tel 212-861-7006. 

NYOHFTH AVE. LUXURY 1 bedroom 
A vMUte June 15-S«s 15th S3 K. Cal 
212 - 828-^66 leave message 

SOtmtAU>TON BY THE ocean! 
Gracious 4 bedroom home Gardens, 
pool, vsrandas. itey. ccoks toefien 

Henl lor tit/ or August S25K. Also to 
sate Contact. ughuaoaJaol am far 
51M97-3587: B 212-861 -eSuS USA 

SAN FRANCISCO Charm*? & qroi 1 
bedroom SplemM - new JuV-*u;uS1 
SBayewk-siasttiro (4is> 326-3722 
E-ffla9 Oaude8FS5'. , «g 

SOUTHAMPTON NY June 27-Juty 2a 
Estate sectai 4 Kdrcoms. healed pod 
beautiful garden, ver house i fernsh- 
xigB. Tet 2lZ-3»-ix3l USA 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN L0DGWGS, NYC. Short 
stay lucrey appnmetes. superior B & B 
regioify, nrany locations 
Tst 212475-S190 Far. 312-4774120 


Lebanon 

hotel AL BUSTAN. East ol Band. 
S stflf deftae. Exwptonai iocatoi secu- 
rity. comfort, fine ctrisme. conventions, 
business services, sateirte TV 13 nto 
i raider from anpon toe UTELL .Fax. 

' r*w. •ni+..:” v y-w 


Don’t miss oar special 

LUXURY REAL ESTATE 

appearing on 

FRIDAY 6 JUNE, 1997 


VALLEE DE CHEVREUSE (78) HOUSE 
Excaptxonal. m top anttaa Nstota! & 
bucokc site (Port M, 25 km Pans 
center, 10 Xm Versalles. 15 km Sami 
Gsnnata tol school near go# t airpon 
250 sqm. 8 main rooms, btg healed pore. 
pooHnusefflO. 2300 sqm landscaped 
& waked garden 5-ca: garage ♦ 90 sqm 
ottsTs studofueau Ready io nure-tn 
5900,000 (S = FP5.70) or S5300uronfli 
ran Mr. GBorgs Noel 4 rue Vaumurier. 
78470 St Lambert d« Bos TeL --33 
toil 3944 1260 F» *33 (0)1 3944 1266 


SCEAUX - 5km south PARIS TRIPLEX 
ReademiaL Direct owner. 115 sqm - 6 
rooms double Wing, kitchen, fireplace 
bate shower room gaz central hearing 
5 mins RER. center lawn, schools. 
uWHSities. FFi.75G.000. Tel +33 (0)1 
4660 0117 Fk VIM +33 (0)1 44777606 


OLD PECO, WEST PARIS ISnVtt Rffl 
goraeous property 300 sq.m restored 
3.0W sq m. garden. 4 bedrooms huge 
living, mne ceflar Direct access shops. 
Owner U5S1 M +33 tty 1 34 51 67 00 


PARIS 16th - ALMA - 200 sqm dimlex 
apatnert, freestone, token*, htft floor. 
PANORAMC VIEW OVER PARIS Tel 
(0) 1 40 54 89 31 


RARE. PLACE VENDOME (NEAR). 
Prestigious botion to elegant tw rant 
apartment. 58 sqm FH .<90,000. Omar 
Tel +33 10)1 4260 3932 (answering ma- 
chine) or +33 m 6043 6180 Imttfe). 


TROCADERO - PRESTIGE Beautihn 
lawn house, abote 460 sq.m. Garden * 
pafio. Tel (0)1 47 04 44 S 


BUSWESSMAfTS SPANISH RETREAT, 
Magntfcerti 500 sq.m vita wflti com- 
mantftnp view over Bay of Javea, Crete 
Stance & sal it 4000 sqm grands wto 
heated pari Sophalcaled security sys- 
tore Hxea toephOK fines & REUTERS 
screen for worfotvide comm un taboos. 
Easy access Afeaite and Valencia air- 
ports. Private sate: 15 mfton DM. Fufl 
delate Tel- London 44 (0)171 289 8764 


COSTA BRAVA 
FIRST LME SEA FRONT 
Sale by owner, brand neer exclusive via 
Absotale top location between Tossa and 
lloret de Mar site stunning sea mens. 

SpterafcJ hhjsb ot very toEta quaisy 
standard Rare opportunity. Pnce- 
USS980000 Fax: (852) 2553-9110 


ParitAwraa T Bedroom 

LOCATION, CHARM, PREWAR 

1000 sf consisting: 1 Bedroom.. 
15 barths. Living Root. Dong Room. 
Ktetan. WWsw to way room. OosL 
pleasant. Idea) pied-a-tare. 

Ma Camacho 212-891-7033 

DOUGLAS EL UUH 

MipAnnrtetoaacOT 


NAPLES, FLORIDA. 
tUXUHY HIGWfiSE ON BEACW 
3800 sq.ft . 3 bedrooms.3 5 fcahs m«5a 
room, pmraK dubs- SsiLyacn* towns 
USS 4qU 

Teny Warren (Uownlng-Frye Realty) 
Tel: 841-434-8049 Fax: MI-434-7324. 


NEW YORK CITY dose to central park, 
beautiful penthouse apanmera vras of 
Hutton river and cfy teige mapa rou nd 
terrace Sving. dims room 2 bed rooms. 
2 bathrooms, jecuzzi end Krttmg fire- 
place. Full service buiidrg. Asking 
UK 975000 Tte 212 66= 92 22 z; 
+33-1 42 28 73 17 


Boats & Yachts 


FOR SALE 

Wauqtder 4711 sating vacM bus! S9 hr^ig 
Beettei air Mer very sefl -ajuipped. 
JONGSTT 22CHi72ta sating yacht trite 
83 lyng Ronda. eflmmety nei equipped 
■ and r, excetea ravtoi 
Berths tor safe 

Palma de Uattwca CM) de War i5na5m 
Beaulieu sur Wer i2iracZ.3r 
WUC LhL Fax (0)1 207 763 4364 USA 


Switzerland 


I U\KE GENEVA & ALPS 


sauthonaed 
sfnes 1975. 


Attralve properties mertootoffl vws 
1 to 5 bedrooms, tom SFr ZjOOOj. 
REVACSJL 

52. MorttHUant CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 



USA General 


MARTHA’S VINEYARD 
CHLMARK 

Fvsl time offered Farrfly Trust setr.ng 
Pnme Ocean Vie« parcel -anh ABamc 
Ocean Beach Pmate and seduded 
Inqubc Owners Agent 
Box 661. CWknark, MA 02535 USA 
Tek (508) 645-3533 


MOUNTAIN RESORT Income Property, 
large parcel, pnme location. Cafloma- 
Nevada border, zoned touret cormercteL 
South Lake Tahoe. Cafloma Tel USA. 
916-544H704 Or 916544-5174 


USA Residential 


49 St EUN Plaza 10 Rooms 

Huge ID Room Duplex + Views 

Over 5000 ft. »x mint home with 
panorama met and cty VIEWS from afl 
rooms Huge Uvtag Roan wti fireplace. 
5 Bedrooms + library Formal Dnng 
Roam 55 baths 52iM 

JoA/r Sftatam 
212-891 -703im2l S-S70291 2 

DOUGUS ELUMAN 

Wftj /■xw eiman com 


Holland 


RENTKOUSE INTERNATIONAL 

Me 1 ■' retard 
to (semi toiished 'ss 
Sl-Z!W«4s75l Fzx 
tfheven 15-2:. 1G; At. ftrs te iam 


HOMEFINDEHS INTL HmMC 141 
1015 EH Ajrsleroam Ten ^ii:-.532S2 
Hr 5232252 c-t7aSTKnsEKtSra--a 


Monaco 


MONTE CARLO, MONACO. r* tot- 
ter of Draco ?-'= rent 2 to: 2 =rt I* 
rocs apanmer: sir a - : :as,-c 
vwit. R+iU ps . 1 +ei- Cr=«: - . 
Can -51 75 421 £1 -te 


Poland 


FUTS IN WARSAW? We tst Iragn- 
ers to re suaaoe fiss wme Sstjws 
A gency. UL ?.wta 2: S-J mS j. V-ar- 
sav. Pdand T«=a> -J5 Z.-Z? X CS 


Paris Area Furnished 


8TH-LUXURY DUPLEX, off Avroua 
Moitiigne Nsn-. snj‘<Vh- ImtsteC 
Irving room, dmmg aree. * »~orr 
1 1/2 marble baths, medem custom 
kHchen. linens danes. suaroian. 3 
months D 1 yr. Tet. 01-42 8? «cs 


15th • TOWER RIVE GAUCHE, 3th 
floor, race)/ funfihed iHsqm aji^ped 
kitchen, VIC. baforoom - shBter wth 
WC FiO.nZ na Tel -23tC-H426M936 


CLOSE LOUVRE fofcequwed stufia 
bnghl and spotless FTOK- dafly Much 
kwrer lone term rates Tel osfier -33 
(0)1 42 96 3? 67 Fax 10.-1 42 61 47 24 


15th. TRIPLEX WITH TERRACE 4 bed- 
rooms. 2 baths 2 pariangs From 1 ar 15 
Jiriy io 1 Sept or sinner TeJ- HuHano 
*31 70 3552626 or -33 (0|1 4419 0=20 


6th. ODEON, high flass stuSo n tc.-m 
house, charmeig quto hrily equipped 
F5.5QG na. Tet- +03 10/1 46 99 04 60 


7TH. 1 block Irom Eillel Towr 
Luxurious 4 bedroom tufty equipped, 
short lenr ok Tel 3KM52-2290 USA 


PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

★★★★ 

13. rue D'Aguesseau, 75008 Paris 
Just off tin :• Faubourg Saint-Honor* and The Elysee Palace 

A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 

Very exclusive, located in one of the mow prestigious neigh- 
bourhoods: Faubourg Saint- Honors and Champs Elysees. 
Thirteen personalized large apartments up to 1200 sq. feet 
completely restored in 1992 with fully equipped kitchens, liv- 
ing-dining rooms, as well as one or two bedrooms, one or two 
marble bathrooms and some with studies. 

Ideal for both family holidays and business trips, a perfect 
“pied-iWenr’*. 

All hotel services. Daily maid service. Air conditionning. 
Underground parking. Complete security. 

For more information or reservations, please fax directly in: 
+33 <Ol 1 42 66 35 70 or call +33 (0)1 44 51 ]6 35 


French Provinces 

FRENCH PROVENCE. CLASSICAL 
MANOR ntifi somw*) cool near me* 
era! vfeoe suh d lao&tta. 6 betooms 
5 baihs ' Mart anti garoener nd tided. 
Mtatiium 15 da-/; rental. SU avatiaw ta 
Auguti. FF15.(X»A l5rti M 30th Sept 
FPtem trt. T& -33 (M 9 4 57 5650. 

FAYENCE VAR Rert vilte it comforts, 
to 4 persons on ganfen level sJh cw 
wed terrace optional wintawid pool 
Steps & Wsure nearby 3 «n Gannes 
1 Ftsita. ID tots St. Cassren rake 
rr+-3»'A Tel +j3 10)4 94 7g 15 17 

LOIRE VALLEY ffl4-room SBefy Home. 
Franwi highest asfc 1620. Louis i3th 
resided here Unqw eppertuniy to Sflv 
m mew laaorol suites FF25CP--nW« 
Tfll <32 «Ti241912Sl. lax |0^41912o60 

BRITTANY - BELLE ILE EN MER ■ 
Afchflecms villa, 4 bedrooms. 2 bates 
AH equipped Exceptional new From 
June to to Jtri 1 ; 1-fth and Seplember. 

”-| •■'•i' "’I* l»" 


PROVENCE: LARGE LUXURY VILLA • 2 
acre private gardens snurt pujl'pool 
house 3 bedronns.lrathriX'iK al amen- 
1165 2 satellite TVs Let Sepi ; 0cl. 
• Ty'Rsx Owner +33 ( o>4 w 737950 

VAR. 6 km from LUC EN PROVENCE. 

country house. 5 na, oA. pnvafc tefirsi 
5 bedrooms. 3 bafts, a* comfons. step) 
T1 Near ocdT For rent June-Od . Fii> 
l4Khik Tel IO.rt 4 fi 994 Jl 7 -( 0 )l 433303 ig 

VAR PROVENCE, 1 hour tea g| fifcg 
Reft July ' Augusi lovely proverirot 
Ita-jafe heme on I Me consisting 1 peo- 
tooms 2 bathrooms AD anwue: Piyj 
C. 1 I owwr * 33 (014 94 73 J 9 93 , 

SOUTH WEST FRANCE ■ 2 amtotaUe 
how®, each 4 beds 1 bath genius 
calm wllma large pool Tei .33 
WS 55 >5 J? 5? Far io* 53 >; 32 75 " 

SOUTHWEST FRANCE, Fumiahed 

twxeo 2 triwwns. sofa siecpw. t bah 

nfoh J'Ctej.irf _9t-.ro irom neean AjjiL 


m 


^ +44171 420 0348 


Ideal acettramodaion. stuStrf Omrwtb 
iiinti ti- and service assured 
READY TO MOVE IN 
Tsl +3310)1 4312SS00. Fax 10)1 *3129808 


AT HOME H PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

.ApanmertE to rent tunsta or not. 
Sates & Property Managemart Sayiw. 
S A* Hcch?75008 Paris ftrOI-45611020 


IUDRIIX Luxray apartment I2fh floor, 
mat vla*s. My IwnishBd, »oy wbII to 
rated 3 bottoms. 3 bafts, atf confr 


BARCELONA. LUXURY APARTMENT 
Cenjw. Nice vwks. USSSOra day. 
Tet +34-3-458 69 33 


Tel: +33 (0)1 45 63 25 60 | Switzerland 


Real Estate 
for Rent 

mmmm \ 

1 


__ 1 


Belgium 


aausstES - sent oa buy axitmt 
cr vffia Seabce Sdij®- Pea; Estate 
Aqai TOPax +32267; 32 95 


ROYAL APAHTMENT opposne Uaxmis 
iffli cenftBY landmart ^aftnera in cen- 
ter of Pans, inner coalyard. ifiS. very 
sunny 260 sq m (2200 squara feet), 
large receptor areK, na bedrooms, tw 
baths 12 foot Mfirns. origraf paw®- 
Fitiy furnished to hgi standard Private 
parang n courimi. SI 1.000/mo, Lp to 
12 months. TeL Paris +33W1I44WK69 


VENDOME MTERNATUTNAL 
BASTLE: tasiehrily daMraiediTOsqm- 
seen m tamws house magazrra. Stooo 
afn ovEftooktag be Setae 8 
5 bndges. 2 to 3 bedrooms. 

Panqua floor. FF17JXW 
Sanring aB your Retrial Mwds 
Tab +33(0)142788330 Fax(t))1 42788340 


Bond-Point das Champs Etysres-35 
saa, ustoufly furasnad. all aroenffles. 
F=750Cmn TeVFax -33l0j'.<3Q6l380 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


SELMOffTAHlED STUDIO ft Zfefc b. 
Quiet location, good pubtrc transport, 
horned fumtawd (new) separate Meta. 
S400 per week. Tat: +41-1-371 88 M, 
Fac +41-1-371 15 88 or arte to HTG. 
P.O. Box 449. CH-8048 25ritt. • 




1 ! 





NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week n 1 year. Great Locations. Caff 
PaHOiqx 212-448-9223, Rax: 213- 
4488226 -E-Mat aBnmstooWaolbaa 


SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, prime 
location. Shortitotq term WY Executive 
Rentals Tel/Fax- 415-563*3651 


SUMMER IN LOS ANGELES. Began 
house near ths beach. Jtriy and August 
Si 71X5 per month. 370-390-2434. 


n Haussmannten bufldng 
dupleix 270sqm. S rooms 
Pmate gamer, FBigCO - cha 
PREBAL 433(0)1 40 16 38 


7th, 83 AYE BOSQUET. NEW From 
shrio to 7 rooms, terraces. Visa Ham - 
Tom or (0) 1 43 06 41 05 


DINING OUT 




RESTAURANT 
SgwriaSiias of lha Comm. 

AUhaui Cz4- de coxsd T%e da «cou. 
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Music companies are proflting from new ethnically styled artists such as Joey Boy, left, and Modern Dog. 

Ethnic Music Is Blowing Its Horn 


By Richard Covington 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Amelina, the 18- 
vear-oJd self-proclaimed “queen of 
dangdut," has sold more than 500,000 
records in Malaysia, far more than the 
Spice Girls, the most popular Western 
group across Asia, and has made the 
Warner label one of the most suc- 
cessful in the country. 

Yet as popular as Amelina and 
dangdut are in Malaysia and Indone- 
sia, where this insistently percussive 
dance music ori ginated, only a handful 
of fans outside these two markets have 
caught the dangdut fever. So far. 

Major record labels such as Warner, 
BMG, Universal -MCA and Singa- 
pore-based Pony Canyon have all 
signed dangdut acts and are betting 
that this form of Indonesian “dirty 
dancing” is infectious enough to 
spread across dance floors from Hong 
Kong to London. 

Dangdut, Islamic religious songs, 
Australian aboriginal music, Bengali 
haul and Anglo-Indian bhangra are 
among traditional Asian musical 
styles gaining widespread audiences 
within the region and aiming to cross 
over into Europe and the United 
States. 

A rising number of Western bands 
are experimenting with traditional 
Asian musical sources, following the 
lead of Fundamental, which drew on 


devotional baul melodies in its latest 
release, and Enigma, which freely lif- 
ted folk tunes from the Amis, 
Taiwan's principal indigenous ethnic 
tribe. 

World-music festivals such as 
Womad in San Francisco and its sister 
festival to be held in Britain this July 
draw tens of thousands of fans hungry 
for alternatives to mass-market hits 
packaged in London, New York and 
Los Angeles. 

“Music in the West is becoming 
stale and needs input from else- 
where," said Andy Grainge, director 
of business administration for Sony 
Music (Asia) Inc. Mr. Grainge was 
among several thousand record ex- 
ecutives, producers and performers 
who gathered in Hong Kong this 
month for Midem Asia, an annual mar- 
ket and festival promoting music in the 
region. 

Sony, Warner/ Chappell, BMG En- 
tertainment, EMI Group PLC and oth- 
er music publishers are eagerly seek- 
ing out Asian songwriters to generate 
local repertoire, some of it derived 
from traditional musical styles. 

Revenue in Asia accounts for $9 
billion, or around 23 percent, of the 
world's $39.8 billion in annual sales of 
recorded music, according to figures 
compiled by the International Feder- 
ation of the Phonographic Industry, a 
London-based organization that tracks 
global record sales. 


In the 12 countries of the Asian 
region, domestically produced music 
far outstrips international repertoire in 
popularity, with 70 percent of sales 
generated by local artists, according to 
industry figures. 

The countries to watch for pop- 
ularizing traditional music styles are 
Japan, Malaysia and the Philippines, 
according to Xavier Roy, chief ex- 
ecutive of the Paris-based Reed 
Midem Organization, die trade-fair 
group that stages music markets in 
Hong Kong. Cannes and Miami. 

“Mixed with modern styles, these 
old-fashioned forms are undergoing a 
revival among the generation from 15 
to 24 years old and are being dis- 
seminated across the Internet to broad- 
er audiences in the West," Mr. Roy 
said. 

Warner/ Chappell publishing is cur- 
rently negotiating with the film di- 
rector Wayne Wang for the use of 
songs that blend traditional Chinese 
folk melodies with ambient Western 
styles as part of the soundtrack for Mr. 
Wang's upcoming film “Chinese 
Box,” which stars Jeremy Irons and 
Gong Li. 

“Film soundtracks are vitally im- 
portant for introducing indigenous 
music to wider audiences,” said Vic- 
tor Coppersmith-Heaven, a Britain- 
based music producer specializing in 

See ETHNIC, Page 17 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


French Politicians Aim at False Target 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — Despite 
the remarkable economic 
success of America, and to 
a considerable extent of 
^Britain, in the 1990s, the evils of 
'“Anglo-Saxon capitalism” are still a 
’ favorite target of French politicians, es- 
* pecially at election time. 

Lionel Jospin, the Socialist leader, 
who may soon be France's prime min- 
ister after his party fared surprisingly 
- well in the first round of parliamentary 
elections Sunday, has made an assault 
on trie ‘ 'socially ferocious'* Anglo-Sax- 
on economic model a prominent feature 
of his campaign. 

Elsewhere in Europe, the surge in 
support for the French Socialists has 
been widely interpreted as a rebuff of 
American -style free-maiket policies in 
favor of the more * ‘humane European 
welfare state. 

But Anglo-Saxon capitalism is not 
among the choices currently on offer to 
French voters, nor has it ever been. It has 
certainly not been espoused by the em- 
battled center-right government coali- 
tion led by Prime Minister Alain Juppe, 
who has now been forced to resign. 

Ifh bad been, France’s shocking 12.8 


’ 0 


i ■‘■■iHLSr-- ■ 




**^*5 jj • v, *v;*j 


percent unemployment rate — a main 
issue in the current campaign — would 
probably be considerably lower. 
Whatever the other defects of Anglo- 
Saxon capitalism, it creates more jobs 
than the European welfare state. 

The unfortunate achievement of Mr. 
Juppe and his boss. President Jacques 
Chirac, has been to discredit economic 
liberalism without ever practicing it. 
Their stumbling attempts at economic 
reform have attracted the usual odium 
attached tofree-maiket policies in France 
without securing any of the benefits, in 
terms of more jobs and foster growth. 

On the contrary, Mr. Chirac's failure 
both to fulfill his campaign pledge of 
two years ago ro reduce unemployment 
and to articulate the need for more thor- 
oughgoing reforms has left the way 
open for the left to claim, by default, that 
the only alternative is a return to so- 
cialist policies. 

Neither Mr. Chirac nor his allies have 
dared suggest that there is another, as 
yet untried, alternative — real economic 
liberalism. 

That need not mean embracing every 
aspect of the dreaded Anglo-Saxon mod- 
el. It would, however, mean seriously 
attacking government spending, which 
now accounts for nearly 55 percent of 
French gross domestic product, the 






CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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--m 

• • • • . • -*- 41 


V 

jyg t - S '' 

r r 


... ”^,4 








■ Cross Rates 

S I . DHL W. Um BA IF. » *■ ® ***■ 

i^Amstenkun UII lia 1JW tm .VXST — U5I* UW5 1JMB UBS IM 

Brussels B.T8 5771 SUMS 4311 Utt* 1135 — 3«0S MOB 34M5 

1.097 — 220 MW USUI 1UQ5 57087 13112 198.1541 2309 235*491 

Madrid U4.142 23414 BUR BAM 154* 75352 4.101 1BUB ~ 

' MBan 1040 274510 9020$ BUB — DUO 47* IBM 

NewYffftlU — 'A* 3 " MB 5733/1 MUI *-9W 1527 UKW 11425 12W 144* 

5251 9422 1179 — 03471* 10U MSP UM3 49497 * 43731 MB' 

I15J0 mil 4U5 20.14 UP 047 12981 IU1 — E72 0*1 

Tnrwitfl 12805 23» MIC 0347 Mar 0723 03BS* 09791 11173* — W*' 

-£££ L4H5 13177 MM 0240 0004* 07384 40K2* — UJJI- U2J MW 

1.142 92015 19559 44* W374 22109 42795 Iffil 13JS24 JUS IttM 

JfSll 12908 M512 23787 7990 HA 25436 489417 IS® 142314 19254 298412 

Ogglogs In AnatenteiL London MMb/i, Paris and Zuiteti,MitsnioBiereenleaiNeiuyori ate 

' flbfcc -Unes of ioa N.a.-nottmotfa> njumUavoSoiM. 


Ubid-Ubor Rates May 29 

Swiss nrenck 

Dolor D-Murt Franc Staflos Fnoc Ytt ECU 

SMi - 504. 2^ - 3V. Vb-IK. ffta-STm 3M-3V4 H-tte 4-4 Vt 

3-month 5*14. -S 1 ^ 3-3U 1W.-1V* 4M-6U 314-34* »-4* 4V.- 4V. 

6- month 59k - 4 3V. - 3V. Ilk-14* 6*m-6V» 34k-3W V.- v» 4kk-41l 

1-yeor Mk-Wt 3V» - 3»W lVk-lV. 6<V. - 7V. 3>V5* ■ 3"V. >V.-«k 4VH-4V. 

Sowrxs iteuters, Uoyds Bank. __ . , . . 

Hates appBcotde to MMaaft deposits of SI mBSan mMmun for eQoMeal}. 






•Vv..: ’• t 


Other Dollar Values 

Currency l*wS Ciareney 

Ament. peM 0.9916 SteekOrae. 

AnstraBonS 1 2W8 hob) Kona S • 

Aostrtoa sch. 11.969 Hong-farinT 

Brad) real IwUao rupee 

Cbteeuyuao 0224 I wlo. mptah 

Czech konrafl 3X04 Wrt£ 

DanUbtanae 6^83 IsraeBfiMk. 

ewpt, sr rt Eft. 

Fin. nrarkha 5.1333 Makqi. nop. 


Comnef 

Max. peso 

ILZeotaodS 

Narw.knoe 

Phfl. peso 

PglshzMy 

Pwlfscode 

HussraUe 

Saudriyot 

Srad* 


„ ; :^l 

•!' 5- 

-*•; •* •’ .*.> 

^r'c. : r ‘ 


^Forward Rates 

Currency ***• n ’ 4 * 1 QKnl * V 

uw ft. 1«72 1 j6361 1-4350 Jtymaav** 

CnoodlradMor 15755 12725 13698 Swh»fr»e 

DHKtMMrt 1-49*8 1.6948 14S9« 


QiowKy 
5.Afr. rmtd 
S. Kor. woo 
SwcAkroao 
TdmoS 
Thai baht 
TDftajJtUni 
UAEtOraom 

VeacLboSkL 


30409 4Moy fOHhqr 
115^3 11538 U4J9 

14)95 1407 13986 


Sources ING Bonk WoWMfcmt 

(MBani: Btmque de France (Parish- Bank of Tc-sro-Mlfsutr^' ri ‘7° i 


Key Money Rates 


Dlsawmt ratv 
Prime rale 
Federal food* 

9Mor CDs deoMn 
18040k CP dealen 
3 mooth Traosunr Hi 

1- yev Treosunr HH 

2- year Treasury Ml 

5- yoar Tnosorr ooto 
7-year Treasury sole 
10-yeor Treasury note 

JO^reor Treasury bawl 
Menu Lyodi 30-tfay RA 
Jopoo 

Dbcouatrata 
CoNmeney 
l-moafli toterhaob 

3- mocai leki Hmfc 
t eioolli l otorh oeh 
10-ywr Covl bsad 

Ctratowr 
UHttertraio 
■ CaloHwqr 
1-mootb intetiaok 
3-moon bitortaah 

6- moaliiIoferiHmk 
IHwBhmI 


Cafionoer 
1-fHrthioMftaaO 
3HnHMlft Wtartmnli 


Praoee 

iHeneoflearato 
CoUrmuy 
l-mooth krUrtoali 
3 mootmtertmoO 
Osoontli Mshaok 

10-year OAT 


6U 6ta 
6» 6* 
6H 6H 
69. 

M 61* 
7J3 735 


110 X10 

3Vk 3V. 
3 Th 3f* 
34% 34% 

3Vo 3V» 
535 536 


Sourest: Reuters. Btaombera, Morrill 
Lrnefl. Boo* oi To*yo-Mir>uoiihl, 
Conmatioanli* Cicdn Lyonnais. 


am, pm a Fpe 

Zoricb 34165 344J0 +230 

Lomtao 3*5-70 34.90 +1.10 

New York 34530 34190 +060 

US. dUAns per ounce. London oHkU 


and dosing pikas; Mew y«*< 
Uunej 

Source: RhObs. 


Brawl in Bonn Clouds Fate of Euro 

Jfhigel Rejects Call to Resign Deadlock on Currency Market 
For Proposing Gold Strategy Can Europe’s Vision Survive? 


By John Schmid 

/wnumnal Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — Finance Minister Thco WaigeJ rejected 
calls Thursday to resign and anempted to assure financial 
markets that Europe's monetary uiuon would go ahead on 
schedule after a sudden and bitter standoff between the 
government and the Bundesbank — and between the nation's 
two most powerful men, Helmut Kohl and Hans Tietmeyer. 

But the dispute, over deploying the gold reserves of Mr. 
Tietmeyer 's Bundesbank, appeared to have thrown Europe's 
single-currency project into the deepest doubt yet, according 
to analysts and commentators across Europe, even as it etched 
new divisions between the prospective members of monetary 
union. 

The Bundesbank on Wednesday stridently rejected the 
government's plans to revalue Germany's gold reserves to 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

meet requirements for monetary union, but the government 
has vowed to press on with the move. 

“The German Bundesbank has thrown up a solid and 
perhaps impenetrable roadblock on the route to a European 
single currency,” said David Marsh, a specialist on the 
Bundesbank at Robert Fleming Securities in London. “The 
defiant message last night from the German central bank was 
that They shall not pass.’ ” 

Mr. WaigeL, the architect of the disputed gold revaluation, 
rejected calls from the opposition in Parliament for his 
resignation. 

Mr. Waigel. backed by Mr. Kohl, defied the Bundesbank's 
warnings over the gold plan and announced he would go 
ahead and seek a transfer of funds into the government’s 
accounts after the revaluation. 

The revaluation requires a change in German law, and Mr. 
Waigel is expected to submit draft legislation to Parliament as 
soon as next Thursday. 

In an unusually forceful statement, the Bundesbank late 
Wednesday warned that a revaluation of the gold reserves, 
accompanied by a transfer of foe book profits into foe gov- 
ernment’s accounts, risked “a loss in trust in foe stability of 
the future European currency.’ ’ The Bundesbank also warned 
that the action violated foe spirit of the Maastricht treaty on ‘ 
European union and infringed cm foe independence of the 
Bundesbank. 

“The single European currency suffered a near-fatal blow 
last night when Germany's Bundesbank went to war with the 
Kohl government over foe desperate race to qualify for foe 
euro this year,” foe British daily The Guardian wrote. 

Treasury Minister Carlo Azeglio Gampi of Italy, who has 
orchestrated his government’s campaign to qualify for a 


highest among foe major industrial coun- 
tries, and unblocking die labor market. 

Sadly, that kind of solution will be 
even less attainable after the second 
round of foe elections Sunday. 

There seems to be no chance of a 
government ready to take the necessary 
action to tackle structural unemploy- 
ment, which includes slashing the social- 
security costs associated with hiring new 
employees, making it easier to fire old 
ones and reducing the minimum wage. 
Until such steps are taken, French em- 
ployers will continue to prefer to invest 
m machines rather than people. 

Unfortunately, that approach smacks 
of the American “hire and fire” men- 
tality that foe French find so brutal — 
even though it has helped to reduce XJ.S. 
unemployment to levels that Fiance can 
only drtfam of. It would be better for 
France if Mr. Jospin and others stopped 
distorting Anglo-Saxon capitalism, u is 
simply untrue that Americanas become a 
nation of poorly paid hamburger-flippers, 
as so many Europeans seem to think. 

Among the striking features of 
today's U.S. economy are how many 
well-paid jobs it is creating and foe way 
people are bettering themselves by 
working up from hamburger-flipping. It 
would make more sense to learn from it 
than to caricature it- 


single currency with the first wave of members in 1999, said, 
“We are no longer the black sheep of Europe.' 1 

No other institution could undermine the Bonn govern- 
ment's credibility as much as the Bundesbank, which has 
lobbied for years against one-time accounting methods to fill 
budget gaps. Otmar Issing, the Bundesbank’s chief econ- 
omist, called Mr. Waigel ’s plan “an extreme form of creative 
accounting” foot went further than any such measures pro- 
posed by other countries. 

Moving to sustain trust in the project, Yves Thibault de 
Silguy , the economics commissioner of foe European Union, 
said Germany could overcome its internal political rift and 
meet foe single-currency benchmarks. 

“For me there is no risk with monetary union,” he said. “I 
am confident that the German government will be ready on 
time.” • 

Doubts over the project loom because an open conflict 
between the government and foe Bundesbank threatens to 
diminish acceptance of monetary union among foe German 
population, political and economic analysts said. 


Because currency union has never had much support 
among ordinary Germans, any further weakening of public 

See GERMANY, Page 15 


Air France Sees Profit 
After 7 Years of Losses 

Cost- Cutting and State Aid Lift Earnings 

By Bany James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Air France said Thursday it would post a profit of 1 
211 million francs (S36.7 million) for foe year through March, 
ending seven years of losses. 

Although foe profit was relatively slim, it was a dramatic 
turnaround from 1993, when the stale-owned airline lost a 
record 8 billion francs. Air Ranee attributed the profit to a 10 
percent increase in passenger and baggage revenue and to 
government aid, which lowered the company’s finance costs. 

Profit for the entire Air France group, which includes travel 
and catering services, was 394 million francs, the company 
said. Airline operations account for 90 percent of its sales. 

But the former domestic carrier. Air Inter, which now forms 
Ah France’s European division, reported a loss of 488 million 
francs. It reports its results separately because its merger with 
Air France does not take effect until September. 

Denis Olivetmes, Air France’s deputy chairman, said the 
financial results indicated that the economic foundations of 
the airline had been restored but that modernization had yet to 
be fully accomplished. 

Cost-cutting, combined with 20 billion francs in gov- 
eminent recapitalization and a healthy increase in traffic — 
with a 13.3 percent increase in revenue from passenger 
operations — helped Air Fiance make a profit. 

Air France said it would post another profit this year but 
that it would be less than expected because of a pilots strike 
last week that forced the cancellation of many flights. Al- 
though the strike cost the company an estimated 200 million 
francs, the chairman, Christian Blanc, predicted Air France 
would make a 500 million-franc profit tor the year ending in 
March 1998 and a 2 billion-franc profit two years later. 

On Wednesday, Air France pilots threatened to resume 
their strike, protesting the introduction of a lowerpay scale for 
newly hired cockpit crew. Ground staff and cabin attendants 
accepted the arrangement and a salary freeze as part of a 
restructuring plan in 1994. 

Air France s takeover of the domestic carrier Air Inter, now 
called Air France Europe, has exacerbated the discontent of 
die pilots. The better-paid Air Inter crews fear they will lose 
their benefits. The pilots also object to the company's plan to 
hire 450 pilots at salaries 50 percent lower than the current 
minimum pay. 

However, the company signed an agreement with two unions 
that, if adopted by all the pilots, would effectively delay die' 
introduction of the two-tier wage system for several years. 

The return to profit was a personal success for Mr. Blanc. 
54, whose feat in turning around the perennial loss-maker, 
whose losses totaled 2 1 .6 billion francs in seven years, has put 
his name on the list of potential prime ministers, according to 
several French publications. France mil hold a second round 
of legislative elections Sunday, and if the center-right co- 
alition is returned to power. Air - France Is expected to be 
privatized. A victory by the left which has promised to halt 
privatizations, would leave the airline in state hands. 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — The currency markets found themselves 
forced Thursday to choose between two opposing versions of 
Europe's monetary future. 

“The prospects for a wide EMU and for no EMU at all are 
both rising at foe same time,* 1 said Jim O’Neill, chief currency 
strategist for Goldman Sachs. 

What has vanished, analysts and traders say, is the middle 
ground, or any hope of a smooth transition to Europe’s 
planned single currency, the euro. 

They pinned the blame for the hardening of altitudes on the 
rebuke delivered by French voters to their government this 
week and the Bundesbank's blunt rejection Wednesday of its 
government's attempts to fudge Germany's EMU entrance 
exam by revaluing the nation's gold reserves. 

The question is: What do those developments presage? For 
David Bloom, a currency economist at HSBC Markets, the 
mood of Thursday’s markets was a carbon copy of the 
atmosphere in his firm's trading room Wednesday night after 
the news of foe Bundesbank’s opposition to its government's 
plans came oul. “Everyone was screaming,” be said. “But 
half of them were screaming 'Buy the Deutsche mark!* and 
half of them were screaming 'Sell the Deutsche mark!' ” 

Fresh doubts over the shape of Europe's planned economic 
and monetary union fueled strong speculation but little actual 
price movement Thursday, reflecting what traders say is a 
potentially volatile new polarization of sentiment within the 
currency markets. 

Analysts and traders, at pains to explain the fact that the dollar 
barely budged against foe mark in foe face of some of the most 
dramatic developments in months, insisted that foe markets had 
not slept through foe news of foe past few days. Instead, they 
said the seeming inactivity was foie to a clash between con- 
vinced buyers of the mark and convinced sellers of foe currency, 
whose trades canceled each other out. 

For die markets, a wider EMU includes countries with 
histories of higher inflation such as Italy and therefore is a 
weaker euro. No EMU at all, on the other hand, is seen as 
b ullish for foe mark and foe currencies of some other major 
European countries, which would get a freer hand to pursue 
strict monetary policies. 

“Right now foe market is trading on political comments, not 
hard data, and one comment can cancel out another in a matter 
of minutes,’ ’ said Jesper Dannesboe, analyst at ABN-AMRO. 

Those who return to a focus on the fundamentals that 
supposedly underpin a currency ’s^ value risk instant irrelevance. 
Some analysts have been so unnerved by foe failure of foe dollar 
to draw strength from its traditional role as a safe-haven 
currency that they have come up with a surprising answer Even 
a soft euro coaid be a bouncy, upwardly mobile currency. 

The German government’s preference for balancing its 
books with smoke and mirrors, rather than spending cuts and 
tax rises, could indicate that the era of government belt- 
tightening has ended, some analysts said. 

If true, that would mean that interest rates on European 
bonds could be hiding up ; making Europe’s currencies more 
attractive to hold. That argument could help to tip foe balance 
in favor of the European currencies. 


TENDER NOTICE = 

ETHIOPIAN CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY 

Addis Ababa international airport 

DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 

Works Package II 
Construction of terminal building 

AND ASSOCIATED WORKS 
PR EQUA L! FI CATION OF CONTRA CTORS 

[u] The Government of the Federal Democratic Republc of EtMopta 
has received Loans from the Kuwait Find for Arab Economic 
Development (KFAED). the Arab Bank for Economic 
Development In African (BADEA), and the Organization of 
Petroleum Export Countries Fund tor Economic Development. 
COTEC), In various currencies towards the cost of the Addb 
Ababa International Airport Development Project, Works 
Package B. and JtlB Intended Ihat part of the prooeefo of these 
loans wO be qpptod to elgble payments under the contract for 
which Ihb Invitation to praquoKy is Issued 

[u) The ETHIOPIAN CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY Intends to prequatfy 
contractors for ihe toflowfng works: 

The project Is located at Adds Ababa International Akport. 5 
kilometers South of the etty of Addle Ababa. The project 
prkidpoly comprises of txAJng woria, but dso hcJudes ping, 
the erection of structural steelworks and cM engineering woria. 
The principal elements of the woria ae as (blows: 

■ Construction of a new International passenger terminal 
bufidJng with a floor area of approximately 40JX3Q square 
metea. 

■ The supply and Installation of five airbridge*, baggage 
handling equipment, and flight information and public 
addess systems. 

■ Construction ot a new aWde cAoratt apron corrprtslnQ bath 1 
asphaltic concrete and pavement quality concrete 
pavements. 

■ Construction of kmddde access roads, pedestrian way? end 
car pairing tadMes. 

■ Construction of new landslde water supply, FJre-flghtlng, 
sewerage and storm drainage facSWes. 

■ MfeeeBcneous works such as street fighting end kndscoplng. 

0 Interested contractors may obtain further Information and 
Inspect prec^jafflcatton documents at the foBowkig offices K 
addHfonal Information b required: 

1. PROJECT COORCHNAnON OFFICE 
Ethiopian CtvS Aviation Authority. 

Adds Ababa international Airport. 

P.O. Bar 978, Adds Ababa, Ethiopia 

Tel: 251-T-6TQ277 - Fax: 25T-T-612535 - Tlx: 2T T62 OVAR FT 

2. GIBB LTD. 

Gfcb House. London Road. Rearing. 

Berkshire RGA 1BL England. 

Tel: 44-1 18-963-5000- Fax 44-1 1M3S-2516 

3. KUWAIT CONSULTING ft INVESTMENT CO. 

P.O. Box 24326. Safat 13104. Kuwait. 

Tel: 965-2424729 - Fax: 965-2424752. 

[l3 Prequcriflcatlon Is subject to the Procuement Condtlons of the 
Fundng Agencies. 

fisi A complete set of prequatifleation questionnaire may be 
purchased by any interested oppBccnt on the submission of a 
written cppicatton to the above addresses and upon payment 
of a non-ref undo bie fee of US Dollars FIFTY ONLY or In Birr 
equivalent. Requests submitted by mall should include a 
certified cheque In the amount and currency Indicated above 
In favour of Ethiopian CM Aviation Authority. Please be advised 
that the payment of ffly doBas (UB. S5Q) Shad be either in cash 
or by telegraphic transfer to CAA. A/C No. 402 Commercial 
Bank of Ethiopia (CUE), Airport Branch Addb Ababa - kvthfe 
case Ihe Ethiopian CM Aviation Authority wfl promptly dspafch 
the documents by registered airmail, but under no 
cirexiristances ccti It be held responrible for late deSvery or Ioa 
of the documents so mated to the applicants. 

Hal The prequdMcaflon documents must be duty completed aid 
returned to: 

THE GENERAL MANAG®, 

ETHIOPIAN CIVH. AVIATION AUTHORITY, 

ADDIS ABABA INTERNATIONAL AKPORT, 

P.O. BOX 976,- 
TEL: 25T -1-61-36-43 
FAX: 25 1-1-6 1-25-33 
TLX: 21162 CtVAIR ET 

Where they must be received before 11:00 am. on the 11th Judy 
1997. Documents which ere received later than this time wi not be 
conridered end w® be returned unopened to the applcants. 


4 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 





































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 


RAGE 15 


Investor’s America 


- ■ 30-Year T-BomJ Yield 



The Dow 




133 

120 



11C D J 

F M 

A M 

1996 


i9S7 ; 

Thursday 

Prev. 

% 

@4 PM 

Qfoso 

Changs 

7330.18 

7357^3 

-0.37 1 


; NYSE 

S&P500 

844 JOB 

847.21 

-0.37 

{ NYSE 

sap 100 

82732 

631.30 

-0.48 

NYSE 

Composite 

438.86 

439.66 

-0.18 

U.S. 

Nasdaq Composite 1403.11 

1410.1 B 

-0.50 

AMEX 

Market Value 

603.12 

600.79 

+0.39 

Toronto 

TSE Index 

6368JB0 

6388^0 

-0.31 

Sio Paulo 

Sovespa 

Cfossd 

11300^5 

* 

Mexico City 

Balsa 

3929JI7 

3898.94 

~+0?79 

| Buenos Aires Mervjl 

787.83 

759.69 

+1.05 

| Santiago 

IPSA General 

5561,65 

5558.50 

+0.06 

j Caracas 

Capital General 

6857.81 

6894.82 

-034 


S^rce 3a?.'rcrtv j j. Rcuicm 


IwrriulR+uJ Herald Tntnnte 




Very briefly: 


AMR Bids for a Northeast Shuttle 

FORT WORTH. Texas i Bloomberg) — AMR Corp.’s 
American Airlines nude a bid Thursday for the shuttle service 
connecting Wvx York with Washington and Boston that now 
is operated by US Airways. 

It' successful, the move would put American in direct 
competition with Delia Air Lines Lnc., which flies similar 
shuttle routes at half-hour intervals. 

US Airways holds a 47 percent stake in Shuttle Inc., which 
nw n.s the operation. Under its management contract to nm the 
■shuttle. US Airways has an option to buy Shuttle at fair market 
value or to match AMR's bid. US Airways and the lenders who 
control Shuttle must first determine the fair market value. 

• Novell Inc. had a second-quarter loss of $ 14.6 million, after 
S55.4 million a year earlier; analysts had expected the net- 
working software maker to report a substantial profit. 

• Trans World Airlines Inc. will focus on improving its 
service and facilities at New York's Kennedy Airport as part 
of a plan to save the airline from a third bankruptcy, Gerald 
Gitner. TWA’s chairman and chief executive, sard. 

• A rcher Daniels Midland Co. agreed to purchase 45 percent 
of United Grain Growers in a series of transactions totaling 

qgy 113 million Canadian dollars ($81 .7 million). 

• Seagram Co. disclosed that it had sold more than half of its 
stock in Time Warner lnc. for SI 39 billion. It said it would 
use the proceeds to pay down debt and buy back its stock. 

• ABC Inc. named Preston Padden its president. He joins the 
television network less than a month after leaving News 
Corpn where he was head of American Sky Broadcasting. He 
succeeds David Westin. now president of ABC News. 

• CUC International Inc.’s earnings for the quarter that 
ended April 30 rose 35 percent, to $703 million, as more 
customers used its direct marketing services. 

Bloomberg. LAT. Reuters 


THE AMERICAS 


Is AT&T Betting the Farm? 

Failure to Close SBC Deal Could Leave It Rudderless 


By Mark Landler 

•• ¥ 'rl. h mrs Sen im" 


NEW YORK — AT&T Corp.'s, chairman, Robert 
Allen, has not hesitated to roll the dice in his nine years 
at the helm of the largest U.S. telephone company. 

But even by his standards, talking about merging 
AT&T with SBC Communications Inc. — com- 
bining America's biggest long-distance telephone 
company with its biggest pro- 
vider of local service — is a 
breathtaking gamble. 

If be does not engineer a deal 
in the next few weeks, some 
analysts said. AT&T could be 
left with neither a strategy nor a 
viable leader to enact it. 

That is because Mr. Allen has 
already made two tacit admissions, according to 
people familiar with the talks: that AT&T need* a 
local telepltone partner to compete in a deregulated 
market and that his designated heir. John Waiter, 
need not run the combined company. 

Were Mr. Allen to call off the talks now, these 
people said, both AT&T and Mr. Walter would 
emerge as damaged goods. 

Executives involved in the talks said Wednesday 
thar AT&T and SBC still had to resolve knotty issues 
regarding the financial structure and management of a 
combined company. A merger would rank as the 
largest deal in history . creating an $K0 billion behemoth 
with a stronghold inSBC’s territories in California and 
Texas and the national reach of AT&T. 

The disclosure of the talks Tuesday could farther 
complicate the negotiations, these people said, be- 
cause it spotlighted the steep legal and regulatory 
hurdles to such a combination. 

Some analysts say a merger would be more fa- 
vorable to SBC than to AT&T. 

For starters, people with knowledge of the talks 
said, the chairman of SBC, Edward Whilacre, would 
probably emerge as chief executive of the combined 


company. That would deprive Mr. Walter of a shot at 
the top job. which Mr. Allen recruited him to fill only 
last November. Mr. Allen. 62. plans to step down as 
chief executive of AT&T in May 1998. 

The catch is that, if the deal fell through, Mr. Allen 
would be left with an heir who he has implicitly 
conceded is not his first choice to run AT&T. 

Mr. Allen has been busy grooming a new gen- 
eration of leaders, including AT&T's general coun- 
sel. John D. Zeglis. and the 
chiefs of the company's con- 
sumer and business long-dis- 
tance units, Gail McGovern 
and Jeffrey Weitzen. But ana- 
lysts said that if Mr. Walter 
were to leave. AT&T would be 
plunged back into a distracting 
executive search just when it 
needed to focus its energies on the newly deregulated 
market. 

The risks of on aborted deal for AT&T extend 
beyond the executive suite. Daniel Reingold, an 
analyst at Merrill Lynch & Co., said AT&T probably 
would not compete for local phone customers in 
SBC's territory while trying to engineer a merger. 

That process might rake two yean, given that the 
Justice Department and other regulators would put an 
AT&T-SBC merger under unprecedented scrutiny. 
Thus, for two years SBC would effectively neutralize 
its biggest potential rival, while AT &T would deprive 
itself of access to the lucrative California market. 

Executives say u merger would spur local com- 
petition in the 43 states SBC does not serve. To- 
gether. AT&T and SBC would have the capital and 
expertise to go head to head with the regional Bell 
companies, offering a bundle of local and long- 
distance service. 

Just the prospect of a combined AT&T-SBC may 
be enough to drive other long-distance and local 
carriers into one another's arms. Analysis predict 
there will be other major deals involving local and 
Long-distance companies this year. 


Some analysts say 
AT&T’s plan gives 
important advantages to 
its smaller partner. 


Dollar Rises Amid Doubt Over Euro 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against most other major currencies 
Thursday amid speculation that 
Europe’s planned single currency 
would be weak. 

The speculation stemmed from 
the German government's decision 
to revalue its gold and foreign cur- 
rency reserves — despite objections 
by tiie Bundesbank — to meet 
budget deficit and debt limits needed 
to join European monetary union. 

“The news about the govern- 
ment’s insistence on a revaluation of 
gold reserves made people appre- 
hensive about the mark." said Albert 
Soria, head of foreign exchange at 
Generate Bank. * ‘The only thing sup- 


porting the mark are jitters that EMU 
could be delayed or collapse." 

Signs of delay in the union, which 
envisions a single currency known 
as the euro, often help the Deutsche 
mark because it will remain 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


Europe’s primary currency until the 
euro is introduced. Still, a delay or 
collapse would ultimately hurt die 
mark, Mr. Soria said: "People 
would want to avoid Europe, and the 
dollar would be a safe haven." 

The dollar rose to 1 .6963 DM in 4 
PM. trading from 1.6955 DM the 
day before and to 1 16350 yen from 
1 15.865 yen. The dollar was also at 


1.4104 Swiss francs, down from 
1 .41 1 0 francs, but at 5.7334 French 
francs, up from 5.7295 francs. The 
pound rose to SI. 6403 from 
$1.6390. 

The yen suffered after Japan re- 
ported an unexpected 0.4 percent 
drop in industrial production for 
April, quelling talk that the Bank of 
Japan would raise interest rates soon. 
Higher rates would help the yen by 
making bank deposits and bonds de- 
nominated in it relatively attractive. 

“That number is certainly another 
reason to keep the yen weak," said 
Tom Benfer, director of foreign ex- 
change ai Bank of Montreal. “There 
is no chance of a rate hike soon. We 
don’t expea one until next year." 


Outlook for Earnings 
Weighs on Wall Street ; 


l'. w-r V f *>1 |'<U- Si.f t ra I «, iru:. hrs 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Thursday as companies such as 
Nike and Southwest Airlines 
warned of disappointing earnings. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed 27.05 points lower at 
7.330. IS. The Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index fell 3.13 to S44.0S. 
and the Nasdaq composite index de- 
clined 7.08 to 1.403.10. 

Bond prices edged higher after 
the Labor Department reported that 
the number of American workers 
filing first- time claims for jobless 
benefits was unchanged last week at 
322.000. a level analysts say is con- 
sistent with modest job growth. 

The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond rose 19/32 to 95 19/32, 
taking the yield down to 6.9S per- 
cent from 7.03 percent. 

"We're paving very close atten- 
tion to the earnings," said Guy Tru- 
icko. a money manager at Unity 
Management lnc. "The market's 
very unforgiving, as you can clearly 
see’with Nike." 

Nike shares tumbled 8 7 A to 55'/* 
after the world's largest maker of 
sports shoes and apparel said its 
revenue and profit would not live up 
to analysis' expectations. 

On Wednesday. Nike surged on 
speculation that' Berkshire Hath- 
away’s Warren Buffett was acquir- 
ing shares. Rival shoemakers de- 


clined after Nike s warning. 
Reebok International fell 116 to 
39-14. Fila International’s American 
depositary receipts fell % to 4214, 
and Converse slid I to 2014. 

Southwest Airlines fell % to 25% 
after its chief executive, Herbert 
Kelleher, said the company would 


US. STOCKS 

have trouble topping its record earn- 
ings from the second quarter of 
1996. 

Seagram rose 14 to 39% after 
selling 30 million shares of Time 
Warner shares, more than half of its 
stake, for SI. 39 billion, just days 
after the stock reached a record 
high. Time Warner fell. 

Donna Karan International rose 
-lli to 11% after saying it would cut 
costs by trimming its U.S. work 
force 4 percent and reducing its 
annual number of runway fashion 
shows to lift declining profit 

Novell dropped 7/32 to 7 27/32 as 
the maker of networking equipment 
reported a second-quarter loss and 
said it planned to cut staff. 

General Motors fell % to 56% 
after Jack Smith, its chairman and 
chief executive, said the automaker 
would not reach its goal of lifting its 
share of the U.S. car market to 33 
percent in 1997 because of strikes. 

(Bloomberg. AP) 


GERMANY: Waigel Rebuffs Critics 


Continued from Page 13 

trust raises the specter that the gov- 
ernment will be unable to muster 
support for monetary union and 
raises new doubts about the viability 
of the entire project. By contrast 
Germany’s economic and political 
establishment avidly favors cur- 
rency union. 

"We have long thought that the 
one thing that could derail this train 
is reluctance within Germany it- 
self." said Richard Reid, chief 
European economist at UBS Ltd. 

By telling the Germans that the 
single currency could lack credib- 
ility. the Bundesbank reinforced tiie 
notion that die euro will not be as 
strong and inflation-free as the 
Deutsche mark, analysts said. 

Germany’s rejection of the proj- 
ect automatically would lead to its 
failure, analysts said. Because Ger- 
many is Europe's biggest economy, 
the Deutsche mark is considered an 
“anchor* ' currency that other Euro- 
pean nations use as a benchmark for 


exchange rates and interest rates. 

“There is a general election in 
Germany next year, and the gov- 
ernment must ask itself if it can go 
ahead with a megaproject that goes 
against the wishes of the majority of 
the voters,” said Guenther Thur- 
mann, a former aide in Mr. Kohl’s 
economics ministry and now an 
economist at Salomon Brothers. 

The Bundesbank made clear that 
it wanted to thrust the issue into the 
German court of public opinion. 
Ernst Welteke, a Bundesbank coun- 
cil member, warned Mr. Kohl that 
the central bank would command 
more ^public sympathy than the 
politicians in the dispute. 

“The. last 24 hours have been a 
warning to anyone inclined to doubt 
the power of the Bundesbank’s pub- 
lic relations skills,’ ’ said Alison Cot- 
trell. economist at PaineWebber. 

Bundesbank officials often have 
been out several- times a day giving 
speeches on monetary union to cul- 
tivate ties to Germans in a way that 
is unusual for central bankers. 


AMEX U.S. STOCK MARKET DIARY INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 



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16 

5317 

5 *». 

54 ft 

SM 

145 

5 ft 

6 ft 

8 ft 

2753 

9 >* 

99 * 

96 * 

US 

17 ft 

17 ft 

lift 

91 

U’V* 

149 ft 

Wft 

336 

46 

lift 

4 *h 

XI 

* 3 ft 

flto* 

41 

169 

2 ft 

2 

2 

m 

irt 

Dft 

1719 

94 

Eft 

a 

6 ft 

IK 

Taft 

Uft 

la* 

1 X 0 

Ift 

rv. 

7 ft 

2319 

W 

0 

9 

lit 

36*1 

26 ft 

2*69 

365 

ift 

*65 

6 ft 

'200 

M 

lift 

la 

1561 

on 

Xft 

46*4 

911 

D*ft 

327 * 

n:* 

114 

If- 

17 

17 * 

MS 

13 

lift 

12 ft 

11*5 

Hi 

3 >« 

19 * 

210 

1+4 

1 ft 

15 * 

795 

8 

• 7 ft 

1 

361 

6 * 

ft 

ft 

70 S 

lift 

77 H 

12 ft 

533 

*ft 

4 ft 

41 * 

81 

ty* 

81 * 

89 * 

763 

*ft 

41 * 

4 kl 

1*89 

a-. 

74*1 

2 ** 

m 

8 ft 

7 ft 

8 H 

33 t 

9 ft 

I’k 

9 

25*1 

33 * 

*417 

'1 


ft 

*U 

* 9 * 

4 * 

nos 

»-1 

2 *. 

28 * 

*55 

3 *. 

3 ft 

r. 

917 

1 %. 

19 . 

1 ** 

196 ) 

P. 

Hi 

. If. 

375 

M 

«l 

7 l« 

3 t 3 

IF* 

Hft 

17 a 

736 

n. 

215 * 

23 

IX 

y. 

8 ft 

9 

90 

4 ft 

4 ft 

<ft 

C 3 

IP* 

f*. 

Hi. 

9 * 

25 I 

25 ft 

25 ft 

04 ] 

4 T -1 

47 i 

47 ft 

Efl 

’« 

A 

-i 

735 

i'. 

Si 

5 H 

716 


a 1 -* 

6 -» 

Kl 


ft 

■a 

m 

i»*r 

12 >i 

13 *. 

at 

70 ' l 

IW, 

»' ■ 

u< 


Ift 

7*1 


Hill 

Pt 

if 


SBSfc 


ScnnyT d 
S emico 
SMUMd 
SJko 

sss 

Sfaflfa 

SotBaM 


Mb High Uv loKfl 

IN m 
» IN 
1JH 15V. 

3L sr 

lot uvt 
J» 5 

ssft m 
IM IM 
1W» 

a* » 

2N IN 
<N t*v» 
a z» 
in m 

5ft SN 

S a- 

n in 


Indexes 


Most Actives 


May 29, 1997 


2 £ 


2Ste. 

29* 

I 

7ft 

!W 

to 

76* 

4ft 

-to 

to 

3ft 

» 

IS 

Uft 

54* 

n* 

V* 

ft 

1ft 


19ft 

1715 

Til 

7ft 

9* 

Ift 

6H 

•5* 

76* 

6ft 

3ft 

3H 

«* 

Jft 

ft 

6* 

12ft 

211* 

M* 

M* 

Uft 

369* 

126* 

•2ft 

I** 

2ft 

in 

156* 

V* 

H 

,6ft 

ift 

in* 

U 

N 

3 

Mft 

14ft 

Hi 

1ft 

141* 

in* 

n* 

7 

1** 

111 

to 

to 

14 

13ft 

W 

5ft 

9* 

1* 

85ft 

84ft 

5*96. 

53ft 

Ift 

Ift. 

1* 

Oft 

V*» 

1ft 

Ito. 

ift 

Ill* 

lift 

n* 

7 

17ft 

179* 

9ft 

tv. 

m 

a 

56* 

5ft 

16* 

Ift 

171* 

176* 

1411 

Uft 

26* 

lift 

99* 

9*1 

2ft 

n 

Uft 

W*k 

351* 

34ft 

•ft 

W* 

mt 

141* 

Uft 

Uft 


TB 


m 

im 


ft *16 

A Aft 

iS» i5 

IN 10ft 


IS fa 

17ft. 17ft 

H * 

4. ft 

Aft Aft 

5*1 Aft 

7ft jft 

VJN 

in B4< 

US Ur 

5$? Sol!, 

IV. 14 

T‘ 

i n 
Uft IM 
l» 04* 
lift. M « 

lift 

toy. 

ll». 14*4 

!5» Uft 

IP* lit* 
lift 17W. 
lift* UN 


|R‘ 


Dow Jones 

Om, hU Lam lea q. 
79K.M 730UI 7MJ3 QV.18 -37 JB 
MOIM ZABUU 2A5A3A 2a77-M +71 J3 
HOSt. 220.44 219J1 281W +<LU 
22B04& mSJ9 227 09 70077 +-1 J00 


Jndut 

Turn* 

U« 

Comp 


+n Standard & Poors 


rmn 

A PM. 

Intfustrials 1004.41 977^4100240 99fla5 


Transp. 

UtOlHes 

Rrwnca 

SPS00 

SP100 

NYSE 

CorvihIK 

ipdinMoft 

Tanga. 

s. 

rminvar 

Nasdaq 

Capsiaril* 


Flaanra 

Trantp. 


618j03 611JS7 41X20 417456 
19X49 190.71 191-72 191.85 
94.13 92.92 9X38 92JB7 

050.95 84X21 847J21 BAA .06 
83457 82&A7 831 JO 70737 


4BL42 438.15 43LB4 

MR 557.70 55880 

403.77 4no«o mias 

U\M 270J7 MTLKJ 420 

3MJ0 391X5 99LU -1Z2 


HUH Lou 


113088 1127.05 llg-75 
147447 UA7JW 147264 +323 

1521-71 151X45 13075 +4J0 

t7WJ5 177*56 12589 -lift 

931.91 92X12 929.08 -0.91 


v»t Mftp* 

194728 54U 
105508 AM 
72392 aW* 

ss 

am w 

547AA 34U 
522® 24ft 
46998 314 

SRK 

40119 im 
39100 74ft 


£ * 

2ft 2^S 

AM 4911 

ss & 

24ft 2M 


S5 US 

43 44ft 


-9 

■4ft 

+U 

•ft 

■2ft 

-2ft 

A 

* 



+7J0 4S.T3A 
♦7^0 14,868 
+X20 10,174 


AMEX 

Htea 

Law 

Lori Cbf. 

AMEX 

1 fall 

403.12 

«00J9 

A03L12 +Z33 

SPPR 

12360 

Dow Jones Bond 



10220 


On 

Ob. 


6343 

20 Bonds 

ioi sn 

-DJ» 

Cwaj 

5805 

lOUIfflltes 

98J3 

-0.15 

FtaM 

AUAlBE 


10 Industrials 

105.10 

+0.08 

m 


IN* 

47ft 

72 V* 

££> 

69ft 


a a 

Hft 9ft +ft 


9ft 18 

3 


Aft 60* +N 


High Low Lnfiftt dine Opbd 


Grains 

COmiCBOT} 

SAWlIw mfeitniKn- awMMriiiahW 
JU197 274ft 246ft 269ft —ft 1W.994 

Sep 97 a»ft 2H 255ft -Ift 3X486 

Dbc» 7 258ft 253 253ft -3 11ZASB 

Mu 98 2M 258ft 259 -2ft 1X695 

MOV 98 267 267ft 263 -2 U£2 

Jut 98 271 2(7 267 -2 1359 

Sen 98 258 1 

BO. me) NLA IWocfs. sales 767,122 
WwTtoponW 283JM OCT 1411 

SOYBEAN MEM. KBim 
IDO tans- etaaen per kn 
JU97 29030 2813D SOTO 

Aug 97 271 JA 261 J£ 26LM 
Sop 97 24X50 24X00 34670 

Od 97 23X00 22650 23U0 +3J0 XL562 

Dee 97 22X00 21X80 222J0 +X70 20JS2 

Jan 91 2303X1 2I4J0 21931) +X5D 2.171 

Estsate* NA Wed'S- sates S6966 
Wed's open W nojM up 195 

SOYBEAN 0L(a»n 
HLOOOibS' cams par to 

Jut 97 2X27 2U7 ZL8B — <LD9 50,174 

A0097 3X45 2198 24j05 -0M 15J0A 

Sep 77 2455 24319 24.17 -0.W 9J62 

Od97 24J5 2112 24.U -3317 9JJ99 

Dec 97 2670 2120 202 -0.13 17.928 

JOII 98 2472 2443 2143 -022 1J89 

EsL sales HA. Wttf*. sates 21313 
Witfs open inf 10X440 UP 25 

SOYBfMHS (CBOT) 

MM M minimum- cwrt o«r buM 
Jut 97 BJ9ft 852 B69ft tJO 

Aon 97 ON 810 + 16ft 

Sh* 97 737 717 727ft +14ft 

Nov 97 689ft 674 682ft +12ft 

Jan 98 690 677 6Mft +10Vj 

Esr.sales NA WetTixOs 62,773 
WMfsapnU 105,340 UP 1916 


92J17 

24305 


50374 

U31 


Tratfing Activity 
NYSE 


WHEAT {CB0TJ 
MOD Ini rnMnum- arts per burnt 


Nasdaq 


SS CS& 

AMEX 


1460 

llM 

3376 

187 

7 




Julta 

374W 

358 

258ft 

—8ft 

47,176 



Septa 

381 

366 

366ft 

-W. 

LSJBI 

nm 


Decta 

39ZH 

377 

377ft 

—Jft 

17,134 



Mar 98 

392 

380 

380 

—1 

UW 

5*74 


EsL sales NA 

wed's, sates 

27,563 


k 

(Mart wan bit 

SUM 

up 586 



Market Sales 


E3 

Norlnn 


n? 26* 

2S3 rn NYSE 
1« rn Amex 

7 £ Nasdaq 
6 9 HtmBBans. 


TMay pnw, 

AM EM 

46*38 595.18 

1971 2X57 

58X74 646X4 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMCSa 
40000 ta-ants per b. 

Jun97 6572 6572 6535 

Aug 97 6575 6115 65.17 

00 97 6X75 6B35 6L37 

Dec 97 71J0 7075 7&J7 

POP 98 71 JO 71.15 71.17 

Apr 98 7125 7275 ^72J7 

Esc sales 1X901 Weis's, sues 
Wed's open int 102709 off 60 


—0315 243329 
-0-25 4U54 
-075 19,228 
— <130 10766 
-0.10 5,109 

— 0JJ2 2X04 
1X597 


Dividends 

Conaway 


CATTLE (CMBt) 


Par Amt Rn Pay Company 


IRREGULAR 

Coition Comm JO 6-13 6-16 

STOCK SPLIT 

Pst BanUia SE GA 5 for 4 spiff. 
PfWDvneNtl3for2spiii. 

Home Depot 3 for 2 spBf. 

More* indust 4 fdrl «8L 
Sunrise Educe 3075 6-1 600 
e- payable In oommon ihm«S3 

INCREASED 


Fsr Virginia Bks 

Q 39 

6-30 

7-21 

OffUtta Find 

Q .10 

6-10 

6-30 

United Fire. 

Q .16 

6-1 

6-15 

WorfMngtan Ind 

O .13 

6-13 

6-25 

YEAREND 



NewHotlond 

. JSi 

6-4 

6-16 

INITIAL 



Herttege Bncp n 

. .13 

6-13 

6-30 

TeSronlncn 

. 35 

6-13 

7-1 

REGULAR 



ACM Gv Oppartim 

M OS25 

6-6 

6-20 


Allant Commun 
Alpbomw Inc 
AnpeHcoCeip 
CaMetCo 
ChemFhsiinC 
Elnftni Syas Bk 
FstFedFkiKY, 
FsJ FlnCp Indiana 
Fst Indiana Com 
GiL Ready 
Hancock PatClb 
Invest Co Amer 
Lawson Prod 
IFedB 
I Sups 
Portland Gon 
Teche Holding 
Carp 

union PoaflcCp 
Unionbancol Cam 
Western Res 
wntmeyHldg 
WHgley.Wm 


a-annuat b-appnndcnate amoaot per 
tbort/ADRt p- pu yoble Bi Canadian tondsr 
BHMidfiiy; B-quUrtr* t ram i im oo nl 


Maryland I 
Medford Si 


Per Amt Rtc 

Pay 

Q 

.16 

6-24 

7-10 

Q 

£45 

7-11 

7-25 

Q 

3A 

6-16 

7-1 

Q 

.10 

6-17 

7-1 

O 

.10 

6-12 

6-27 

O 

.16 

6-13 

6-27 

Q 

.13 

6-15 

7-1 

5 

.35 

6-17 

7-1 

a 

.12 

6-5 

6-17 

a 

J6 

640 

7-15 

M 

0875 

6-6 

6-30 

Q 

.12 

6-6 

6-9 

Q 

.13 

7-3 

7-17 

Q 

30 

6-6 

6-20 

a 

.18 

6-13 

7-15 

a 

33 

64 

6-18 

a 

.125 

6-16 

6-30 

Q 

A3 

640 

7-15 

Q 

A3 

6-11 

7-1 

Q 

-35 

64 

7-3 

O 

405 

64 

H 

a 

OB 

6-16 

7-1 

0 

.19 

7-15 

8-1 


May 97 


7437 1JB2 

Aug 97 79315 7X07 70332 -0.12 10.936 

Sep 97 7040 7700 77.95 -0.15 2JB5 

0097 7840 7775 7835 -XS7 Mil 

Nov 97 7975 79.10 79312 -OB2 1,938 

Jan 98 SOLDO 7935 7990 +X15 472 

ED. sates 1.907 Waffs. Stes 3480 
Wed's open Int 1X929 uo 22 

H0GS43BW (CMBU 
40000 ibs- cents per tt. 

JunT7 BL2D 7942 8035 +030 9JB3 

Jul17 BM7 7930 80312 +037 HL64S 

AP097 7177 7730 7X65 +080 7383 

0097 70.95 69 JO 7075 +030 5325 

Dec 97 6X35 6740 6X35 +040 3314 

Est. soles 11.189 Wtefs-soles 14456 
Wed'S open ini 40409 off 574 

PORK BELUES <CMBU 
mooOttx- corns Perm. 

4497 8745 15.90 BXH -4B0 6360 

Aw 97 1730 Ii50 635 -237 1333 

Feb 90 7530 7435 - 7190 + 030 4U 

Est.sefes 4112 Weffxsoles 1763 
Wed's open irt 8339 op 65 


Food 


i, 

1h 1++ 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sdles Agues am unofficJel Yendy hWw wO kwo refled Ihe piefau* S2 wets (Bus ffw anrert 
neefc but nalffiel u le a ko dl no day. WlieiM sp »orsIo d cdMderkfnmou<ilfciBfc2Span»dor mare 
m ben pakL 8ie ywm MgMaw naige and Arldend am sho«m lor Ihe new stoda eiffy. U Mess 
i4tiaivdje nolea rates of Addends are nnuairisbuisemerts based anihetatetdedarAon. 
a - dteMend obo extra (s). a ■ annual rul&ofdMdendpHif slock dMdaid.c-BQiddotlng 
dividend, ec^ - PE sands 99jM - coffed. i ■ new yeaily low. dd - loss In me lostn monttx 
e- dMdend declared or paid ki preceding 12 months. I -annual role, hoewedi mi iwd 
dec la ration, g - dividend In Canadian funds, subject la 15% non-residence fax.! -dividend 
doctored after spBt-up or stofle dMdemL | - dMdend paw mis year, omMetl deferred, or no 
action taken el West dMdend meeting, k - dMdend declared or paWJite ye« an 
KQmwIethm Issue wMh dlvldands In orrwrx. b - annual refer rediwd on last deefa ration, 
n - new Issue Fn the |«sl 52 weeks. The Mgff-taw range begli w eWi the start of^ finding. 

nd ■ nod day deivery. p - InWtol iWdeifft annual rale unknowft WE ■ prtHH8fniff^ roBo. 

a -closed-end mutual fund, r- dMdend declared or paid in precetong lUnonBn plus stack 
dMrtend. s * stock spill. Dividond begins uriffi date of split, sh - satex t - dWidead paid In 
stock i" preceding 12 manins. esflmoted cash valuoon es-divldend or BHfisMMittoa data, 
u - newyearfy Wgn. v-frmang halted, vi- in bankruptcy or receivership or being rwqjjanliod 
under tbe Bon tovprcy Act. or securities assumed bysuctiannpa iries .iwd- whe n dtotrifa uted. 
wl - wf»n issued/ ww - wftti wamnns. * - ex-dMdend or er-rfgtits. xdfci - ex-rfifidbuffon. 
m * - wWwuf tterranls-y- w-dMdend and sales In ful yU - yield, r - sates tafuX 


COCOA mCSB 
10 mMrlc km- s win 


Julta 

1502 

1467 

1498 

♦32 

2X935 

Septa 

1637 

1498 


♦ 32 

13,916 

Decta 

1364 

1630 

1543 

+34 

1X«1 

Mct-90 

1590 

1551 

1585 

+X 

20,999 

Mavra 

1406 

1589 

MLZM 

+27 

8U34 

Jd9B 

16S 

1598 

1623 

+ 27 

523 


EH. sate 14536 Wtaft-Hda X788 
Weffjopenirt 9340 oH 1155 

OOPPteECOWSE) 

vjggu^MiMru 

JuJ 97 31X00 30200 3MB0 +1935 14862 

Sep 97 27730 22X80 27180 *17.10 736S 

Dec 97 22X80 22055 22X80 +1435 U22 

Marta 20580 201.55 2B58D +UL25 1141 

MarN IMM +1280 440 

EH. gates nm mat-sate* 13337 
WOfTsaptelM 30484 UP 144 

SUGUUt-WORLOII (NCSB 
liunxgt-carviisarli. 

JUI97 1132 11.15 IT7I >UI 76300 

0397 11JQ 1035 11JH +086 44375 

Mtr 91 HL96 10J9 «.95 +035 7SSM 

thrift UL87 1080 1087 + 0.07 6JH 

EH. sales 17462 ftWi- wtes I3JJ9 

wemapenH iss .128 off i 8 S 2 


High 

Low 

Late* 

Chgo 

OpW 

ORANGE JUICE CNCTN) 



15,000 Ba.-canMfwr tt. 




Julta 78JD 

WJ3 

77 JO 

— 1JK 

1X917 

Sep 97 8X80 

79 JO 

79A5 

—MS 

7J15 

NOVta 83J0 

B2JB 

82J5 

-ass 

1547 

jonra am 

8520 

85J5 

-475 

1J79 

EsL sates NA 

Wed's. U*» 

lie 


WKrt open Int 

29,748 

off 59 




Metals 


GOLDINCMX) 
lBiwn- 
Jun97 31X50 
Mf7 

AW 97 34930 
OcT97 351 JO 
Dec 97 35430 
Feb 98 
Apr 98 
Jun98 
AW 98 

EH. sates MA. 

Wed’s open mi 

MGBADECOPPBi (NCMX) 

2X000 cents ssrtr. 

Jun97 11950 11X10 11X90 -X1D 
' 11935 HBJO 11935 >030 


_ urom 
34330 345.90 + 040 
34730 +0lbB 
34X50 34040 +1J3 
349 JO 351 30 +0J0 
35200 35X90 +030 
35640 +090 
35930 +OS0 
361 JO +080 
36430 +080 
wed's, sdtes 19384 
162J50 up 3239 


JUI97 

Aug 97 11630 • 115J0 11X05 
Sep 97 11530 11430 11485 


+030 

+D3D 


Od 97 lliOO 11275 11275 -050 


NOV 97 
Dec 97 11030 
Jon » 

FW90. 


17 .au 

61483 

7,167 

26329 

7J92 

3333 

7J31 

742 


3328 

34632 

1.947 

X933 

MBt 

1,171 

5.941 

513 

481 


11095 +0-50 
109.95 +1J» 

10730 +0.U 
M438 +040 

Estsdtes NA wed’s, sates 9,m 
Wed's open IrV 61.106 up U57 

SILVER (NCMX) 

UNO tw ofc- cents par trw at 
JUT 77 40130 +1090 4 

Jd97 48430 47130 4B3J0 +H180 9,720 

Sep 97 48830 47630 48B30 +1040 6392 

Dec ?7 49X10 4030 49X10 +1000 7 ATI 

Jan 90 49730 +9 JO 17 

MtVta 50230 49230 50230 +M 7,903 

MaV78 49930 U11 

JU9B 511J0 +930 2JB4 

EH. sates NA Wed's, soles 13,939 
Wed's open irt foju up 1134 

PLATWUM (NMBQ 
5D ftW (Mara par tror oz. 

Jul97 42030 40630 41030 -030 14333 

Dd 97 4HL7D 397 J*J 473.80 +2 JO 4300 

Jan 91 405JB 39X30 39X30 +2J0 1319 

Est sides NA Wad's, sates 5383 
WKft Open Off 2X672 UP 999 

Oase Previous 

LONDON METALS (LMB 
Dollara per metric ton 

1623ft 1626ft 
toward 1626A0 1627JM \mM 144000 
~ “ ‘ lIHUGnM 
259X00 2597J» 2602JX1 2604.00 
252X00 252X00 252X00 253X00 



teal 7160JJ0 717X00 71S5JU 
toward 727X00 727X00 729X00 

Spot S52QJ0 5530JI0 563X00 
Forward 557X00 5580.00 56804)0 
Zinc (Spacwmigb Grade) 

Spot 1323.00 1324.00 134100 
toward 134X00 134X00 136400 

Higb Low Oase Qige op bit 

Financial 
1ST. CULLS CCMBU 
*1 fnNbn- Ms of IM net. 

Jun97 9430 9483 9489 + 085 4375 

Seo97 9457 9455 9*54 +083 5506 

Dec 17 9X48 847 

EH. sates NA Wed's, safes 773 
WetTSOPWlM 9,901 Up UO 

5 m TREASURY ta»T) 

*100800 Prtn- ets X «*ms<4 impel 
Jun97 105-15 105-01 105-13 +09 15X521 

5ep97 105-00 104-55 HU-63 + 00 71J96 

Dec 97 104-44 101-39 HM-*4 +09 479 

EsL sates KA. Wed's, sates 89816 
wwrsopenim 227 jw up 6058 
18YIX TREASURY (CBOT) 

S1008Warin- Ws A XMs at 100 pd 
Jon 97 107-01 106-25 107-00 +07 743300 

Sep 97 104-18 106-10 H6-16 tiff 11X134 

Dec 97 106-85 106-00 106-05 + 07 1,920 

EH. sates NA Wed's, sates 1453*9 
Vte ffs openW 35X354 up 3294 

U5 TREASURY BOOS (CBOn 

II BCM1 £M0B-f4B A XbKttaf 100 MU) 

-tonW Ute-11 106-23 109-10 + 19 33X548 

teP97igM0 100-11 100-30 + 19 16X903 

Dec 97 106-17 108-02 MS-17 • SO 2X806 

Mortal*-® 108-03 H8-07 +» 2886 

EH sates na wed's. sc*es 54X361 
Wed'S open ini SJI873 up 22346 

LSM 1-M0NTH (OMBI) 

UmUSon-pHaf 10QPO, 

Jan 97 SO) 9X29 9X29 14475 

Jul97 9*22 I4J1 9432 HUM 

Aug 97 HU 94.14 9X1S +6JA Xrtk 

EH. sates na werfLides XM 
WecT5 opened 32431 up 2762 

UDN0 OLTOIFFE) 


Jung? 11H511S-a4 112-06-0-04130399 
Sep 97 112-25112-14 112-16 - 0-04 100.739 
EH. soles.' 117,061. Prdv. sales: 191.384 
Prev. open faiL: 231.138 up 2*456 


HiflTi Law Latest Chge opbn 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE) 

DM2SX0W - ptaoMOOpd 
Jun 97 100841003310088—08322X748 
Sep 97 9982 9982 9985 -033 47,378 
Est. sales: 197866. Prev. sates: 284895 
Prev. open Inf- 271,126 up 2860 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONDOJFFE) 

ITL200mB8on- ptsoMOOpa 

Jun 97 129J8 12X70 128J2 -041 8X385 

Sep 97 12935 129.25 129.21 —046 27.283 

Est. sales: 82*96. Prev. sales: 102J13 

Prev. open hit- 11X668 up 1,195 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BOND5 (MAT IF) 

FROOMO -pCsof 100 od 

Jun 97 12X24 127 JO 12X14 —002173,112 

Sep 97 1268612680 12X58 -OJQ 28449 

Est sates: 252471 . open bru 201,161 up 

2X658. 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI milksMriiaf HOpd. 

JU197 94.18 94.16 94.17 42X243 

-tel 97 9400 94.0? 94AB +081 13869 

Auo 97 94JI1 91Sfl 9401 1.75* 

Sep 97 93L95 9197 9X95 +OLOI 471810 

Dec 97 93JD 9X65 93J0 +004 373.79J 

Mar 93 9357 9151 9X56 +004 269,933 

Jun 98 9X45 9X* 9X44 + 0JD 231.973 

Sean 9X35 9X31 9134 +003 17X345 

Dec 98 9X24 911? 9X21 +1X03 12X939 

MV99 9123 9X18 9122 +0.00 9XB65 

Junta 9X18 9114 9X17 +053 HUM 

5e>99 9X14 9X0 9 9X13 +X04 67839 

BlsdB NA Wed's, soles 490690 
Wed's apgn int 2719J44 up 5534 
BRITISH POI00 (CMBl) 

*2808 oeunas. t DST vogna 
Junta U49 1.633# 18386 

Sep 97 14390 14340 1435* 

Dec 97 1A324 

EH. sates NA wed's sates 9851 
Wed's open irfl 4183 up 74 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

IDAOOO wm. S per CUn. Ptr 
Junta J270 .7239 .7355 50833 

S8P97 J316 7290 7300 1874 

Dec 97 Jm -7335 733? 1806 

Est sales NA Wftfs.sates 9821 
WeffsaoenH 69861 up 108 

GERMAN MARK (04SD 

12MOO mails, t per nM 

Jun 97 -591* 5965 8898 7X107 

Septa JM7 jm 5936 5884 

Dec 97 am 533 

EH. sales HA Wed's, sates 27.153 

Wed's open inf mm Off 292 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1Z3 mitten yen. s per l DO ran 
Junta M92 AUO 8615 76,167 

Sep 97 8790 8720 JD30 S8M 

Dec 97 884* 89 

Esr.sales NA Wed’s. sates 16710 
Wed's open irt 84.716 off 398 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12X000 mines. S P® imne 
Junta 7123 7045 7099 14846 

Septa 7206 7133 Till X945 

Dec 97 7265 4*3 

EH.sdes NA Wed's. sales 17442 
Wed's open int 51486 off 1247 

MEXICAN PESO (CMBU 
500800 nem, S per peso 
Junta .12575 .12558 .12565 

Septa .12102 .12000 .12095 

Dec 97 .11*50 .116*2 .11650 

ESLsateS NA Wed's. sates X432 
Wed’s open rt 36829 off 761 


3X909 

4752 

117 


1649* 

10487 

7,1X1 


Septa 
Dec 97 
Mnrta 
Junta 
Sep 96 
Decta 


3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

£500000 - pis of 100 pd 
Junta 9346 9344 9345 Unch. 111,122 
Septa 93.16 9X11 9X14 + 041100489 
Decta 92.97 9243 92.96 + 0JJ3 96846 
Marta 9244 9179 9242 +003 60788 
Jun 98 92.74 9289 9172 +003 4X752 
Sep 98 9287 9263 9165 + 043 32490 
Decta 9X83 9158 9180 + 042 26474 
Esff. sales: 35,079. Prev. sates: 02839 
Prev.openbtf^ 534863 up 13*4 
3-MONTH EU ROMARK (UFFE) 

DM1 million - pis oMOO pd 
Junta 9640 9X79 9X80—001224.943 
Julta N.T. N.T. 9X78 OncO 1897 

Aug 97 N.T. N.T. 9X76—041 101 

' “ 9X73 9X72 9X72 —002215805 
9X59 9X57 9X5P — 041 23X482 
9X44 9X41 9X43 — 042211,990 
9X25 9X22 9X24 - 042 15X660 
9X03 9640 3642—002125495 
__ 9577 9573 9576 - 042 8X093 
Mor99 9540 9X47 9X49—003 82821 
EsL sates 8X571. Prev. sides: 11X311 
Prev. open IM4 1871,066 up 9,196 
S-MONTH PI BOR CMATIR 

FF5mnnon - pisoMoo pd 

Junta 9X29 9X22 9X28 +005 63882 

S<P?7 9X31 9X24 903! +045 62477 

S“2 «as 9X33 +0.0* 3X796 

“Wj* 9X28 9X24 9627 + OJQ 29458 

Jun*! 9X17 9X14 9X17 +003 21102 

Sees sm 2 s-2 +002 21882 

O0C98 W41 95.79 9541 +0J» 1X794 

Mar99 9547 9545 95-57 ♦ 0J» 11676 

^Mtes: 75,937. Open tab 28X973 up 

MSpNTH EUROURA OJFFEJ 

Junta W.lB P ®Jfl°9S?2 -OOim219 
9344 9132 9139-041 91869 
9382 9388 9346—001 51006 

9389 9157 9385 + 041 37885 

«.» 9387 + 0.03 2X263 

9389 9358 9386 + 043 1932 

EM. sales 81781 Prev. sates 71,1+5 
Prev. open Int: 325.607 off 1438 


Sep 97 
Decta 
Mar 98 
■ Jun 98 
Septa 


High Low Latest Cbge Oplni 

Industrials 
COTTON 2 (NCTJO 

5VOOOBM.-CMttMrb. 

JUI97 7385 7105 71SS +035 35421 

Odta 7X20 7485 7481 +027 0230 

DecW 7585 7525 7581 +029 2X008 

MorH 7X90 7X5D 7683 +030 34U 

MoyW 7780 7780 7780 +0.15 W 

Est sates NA Wed's, sates 7,915 
Wed's open tel 7389 up 301 


11321 
3X834 
10409 
9845 
07 S 
7,951 
12812 
0343 
1863 


104845 

51,151 

30JM 

19.124 

17425 

35833 

17850 

7477 

4823 

0241 


HEATHS OIL OKMBt) 
aumeal cents per aal 
Junta 5LS5 54J0 5X95 +086 

-WW 5620 54J0 5X95 +064 

AUBta 57.15 5X30 5680 +024 

Septa 5788 5685 57 JO +029 

(WW 5X60 5725 57 JO +064 

Nov 97 59.00 57.95 »J» +144 

Decta 59J5 5880 »J5 +1.14 

Jon 90 MXB 5980 6880 +U4 

Feb 90 60^0 5X59 6020 +189 

^satos NA Weffs.«4e* 2W» 

Wart open W 131454 off 20s 

LTSHT SWEET OHJOE (NMBI) 

1800 MX- doflort p» bbL 
Julta 2188 2057 20J7 +118 

Augta 2145 2023 7147 +0.17 

S» 97 7IJ9 2022 2145 +117 

Offta 21.19 2020 2DJ0 +0.17 

Nov 97 21.10 2083 2090 +0.17 

Decta 2143 2X50 2043 +X19 

Jonra 3X97 2055 7076 +018 

Feb 98 2080 2020 2070 +O10 

Mre9g 3025 ®85 7084 +018 

Aar 90 2086 2080 2058 +OU 

Estsole* NA Wed's. sates 8XB29 
wed's open VM 4B64Z7 UP 4599 

NATURAL 8A5 (NMER) 

1X000 mm Wirt. Soar mm Dtu 
Julta' L3U U40 2J3# 41812 

AUBta 2J05 2245 2251 22,385 

Septa 2J80 2J2D 2J30 17,949 

00 97 2275 2230 2230 19868 

Nmrta 2JB0 Z345 2-345 1.175 

Decta 24W 2850 2850 12297 

JW19B 2525 2890 2890 11.771 

Feb 98 2805 2JB5 2JB5 0315 

Mar 98 2253 2235 2435 6465 

Aorta 2120 2100 2100 3810 

toretei na Wed's. sdas 77474 
WBmaoenW 201477 off H71 

UNLEADS QASOUNE INMBR) 

42000 pm. cam per ow 

Junta 6X50 64J0 6X15 —085 16404 

-MW 64.10 6225 6375 +021 3MJ6 

Augta 6220 61.10 040 +X31 10803 

SBPta 6180 6038 6X90 +081 LK9 

OU97 59 JC suo 5940 +086 2275 

Novta J8J5 5828 5X20 +086 1768 

Decta 57 JO 5775 5775 +085 2.0m 

EH.nles NA Wedvsda 33473 
Wed's open irt (4427 off 4050 
GASOIL (1PE) 

U.S.dallare per metric ton -lots of loo tons 

JM97 17X50 17175 17445 +175 
Julta 17545 17225 T7X25 +200 11947 
Augta 177.00 17825 17740 +200 2700 

Sapta 17X75 17X00 17875 +173 <47* 
«3ata 17940 17840 180-50 +175 4.932 
Nov 97 N.T. N.T. 1B173 +175 1879 
Dec 97 1B2J0 18040 18250 +175 7408 
EsL sates; 12396. Open Int: 67,334 off 50 
BRENT OIL (1PE) 

U4. donors per barrel - late of MOO barrels 
Julyta 1983 19.10 1988 +024 69,707 

Augta 1973 1973 1977 +0.19 39822 

^ta 19.78 197* 1986 +0.18 11,198 

Odta 1941 1980 1989 +WB X47C 

Novta 19.70 1970 1948 +0.16 X230 

Decta 1949 1977 1944 +0.16 11,967 

Jan98 1942 1978 1946 +0-14 8793 

Feb98 N.T. N.T. 1989 +0.14 4460 

EsL sales: 3X500 Open Inti 6060 off 1004 

Stock Indexes 

SAP COMP. INDEX (CMER) 

SBxHtt 

Junta 85180 B44JH 84470 —545 1723® 
Septa 8940 SSU0 B54.15 —545 17779 
Decta B6X2S 16240 B6240 -680 3780 
Est sales NA Wed’xiaias 697H 
Wed's open ini 195700 up 1440 

FTSE 100U1PPE) 

£25 par index palnr 

Junta 4705jfa680J) 46807 —84 6X172 
Sep 97 473444711447136 —84 7715 
DOC 97 N.T N.T47620 -84 522 

Esr.sales: 1X620. Prev. sates: 12222 
Prev. open InL: 7X909 up 1433 

CAC40 (MAT1F) 

FF200per Inda jnlnt 

May 97^25425664 25754 —440 1X902 
Junta 2601425406 25500 -440 32470 
Julta 25844255X0 25496 -440 2826 
Septa 260X02561625646 —440 lxO«5 
Marta 2626426174 26084 —400 7899 
EM. sales 6X571 Open InU 7X038011 
3. 353 


Commodity Indexes 

Close Prevtous 
Moodirt NA 1699 JO 

ReyteS 242380 240060 

CLL Futures 16X48 164J5 

CRB 25442 2527* 

Sem^MonAssodoiedPmsa, London 
Mi l=tnm cj a7 Futu res Exchange, ton 
Petmuum cKChonpc. 


i 
























































































































INTERN VtttlNAL HERALD TRIBl NE, FRIDAY, MAY SO, 1907 


PAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




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Shaking Up Sony 

Innovative Chief Brings Profit 


By Sandra Sugawara 

/’•■If Srrs l«-|- 



TOKYO — II was only two years 
ago rhai Nobuyuki Idol, a Sony Corp. 
executive w ho was a relative unknown 
in the clubby Japanese business world 
and even in Sony itself, took over the 
demoralized consumer-electronics 
company. 

Soon, skeptics everywhere were 
taunting hint to "show me the money** 
— to steal a line from "Jerry 
Maguire/* a film from Sony's Hol- 
lywood studio. 

Mr. fdei. 59, has done just that. 

Sony recently reported record profit 
and sales. Sony’s sales soared 23 per- 
cent to S45.7 billion in the year ended 
March 3 1 . and its profit hit S 1 . 1 billion, 
a rise of 157 percent. Part of that was 
due to the weak yen. which made Jap- 
anese products 'cheaper for foreign 
buyers. But pan of it v as due to Sony’s 
own innovations. 

Many analysts credit the strong 
earnings performance in large pan to 
Mr. Idei’s action-packed style, which 
contrasts sharply with the deliberate, 
rule-by-consensus approach of con- 
ventional Japanese management. 

Mr. Jdci has combined a series of 
restructurings with a stream of new and 
successful consumer-clectronics 
products. He has reined in the U.S. 
operation, panicularly Sony Pictures 
Entertainment, a movie company that 
had run up billions of dollars in debt. 

At home, he has revamped the board 
of directors, producing a smaller. West- 
ern-style board. He says he intends to 
increase the number of outside direc- 
tors. who presumably would provide 
tougher supervision. 

Now. be is plunging the company 
into potentially risky businesses — 
satellite television broadcasting, advert- 
ising and personal computers. 

Taken together, the steps have re- 
stored Sony in many analysts' minds to 
its status as a trail blazer for corporate 
Japan and the consumer-electronics 


world. "1 believe Ilia! Sony is the first 
truly glnhui company to be "able to offer 
hardware electronic.s. software content 
and distribution services," Mr. Idei 
said. 

Y ou would have to go back a decade 
to find Sony so strong. Back then. Sony 
personified everything that was power- 
ful and threatening about corporate Ja- 
pan. Its products — Walkmans, 
Trinitron televisions, camcorders — 
were everywhere. It seemed to be buy- 
ing up Hollywood. It was run by an 
inspiring entrepreneur. Akio Mori to. 

But then, cheaper Asian competitors 
Wasted onto the scene. TIu? strength- 
ening yen made Japanese exports more 
expensive. The company appeared un- 
able to handle Columbia Pictures, 
which was coming out with a series of 
duds. As the studio drained Sony's re- 
sources, the consumer-elect rin lies di- 
vision failed for several years to pro- 
duce a new hit. 

In 1 993, Mr. Morita suffered a stroke, 
and the next year he retired. That same 
year. Sony took a stunning $3,2 billion 
write-off for its movie operations. 

After Mr. Morita ’s stroke, a long- 
time Sony manager. Norio Ohga, rati 
the company, and the seeds of many of 
today's successful projects wen? sown. 
But analysts say he lacked the drive to 
push the company through the major 
transition it needed at the speed that 
modem technology demanded. In 
April 1995, in a move in line with 
Sony's reputation for breaking the 
mold, the company reached down into 
the ranks to put Mr. Idei in charge. 

Mr. Idei focused Sony's attention 
and resources on a digital future in 
which traditional consumer electronics 
would converge with computers and 
communications technology. 

Mr. Idei sought advice on the com- 
puter business from Intel's chief ex- 
ecutive, Andrew Grove; on the movie 
business from Rupert Murdoch; and on 
the digital world from Masayoshi Son, 
head of Softbank Corp.. a rapidly 
growing lapanese Internet company. 



-.1. . 

Sony’s president, Nohuyuki Idei. 

He has since done major deals with ail 
three — getting Intel's help in entering 
the personal-computer business and 
joining Mr. Murdoch and Mr. Son in a 
satellite broadcast service in Japan. 

Perhaps the biggest surprise has 
been Sony's success in the video- game 
market, once the domain of Nintendo 
C'o. and Sega Enterprises Ltd. After 
only two and a half years in the busi- 
ness, Sony's PlayStation game ma- 
chine is No. I. Fur (he year (hat ended 
March 31 . Sony sold 9.2 million video- 
game players worldwide, compared 
with Nintendo's 6.1 million ami Sega 's 
4.6 million. 

Sony still faces problems, though. 
Although Sony Pictures was the top 
U.S. movie company in terms of box- 
office receipts for the first five months 
of this year, it is unclear whether it con 
keep up that pace. 

Some skeptics wonder whether 
Sony should he foiling off into new 
highly competitive areas, such as satel- 
lite broadexsting, so soon after the Hol- 
lywood debacle. But Mr. Idei said he 
saw little risk in the satellite broad- 
casting venture. 

“From Sony's point of view, en- 
tering the field of digital satellite 
broadcasting will add the distribution 
element to our global strategy of sup- 
plying hardware electronics and soft- 
ware content," he said. 


‘Red-Chip’ IPO 

Triples in Debut 


C "7 .’I- I'w (‘.if./’j i 

HONG KONG — Shares 
in Beijing Enterprises Hold- 
ings Ltd. more than tripled 
Thursday on their first day of 
trading after being the most 
oversubscribed issue in Hong 
Kong's history. 

Beijing Enterprises, the 
holding company of the 
Chinese capital's govern- 
ment. closed at 41 Hong 
Kong dollars (S5.29 j, up from 
its initial public offering price 
of (2.48. after having traded 
as high as 45. 

The frenzy in Hong Kong to 
buy shares of Beijing Enter- 
prises demonstrates the grow- 
ing importance of political 
connections in China as the 
July 1 handover of Hong Kong 
from British to Chinese con- 
trol approaches. This is espe- 
cially true of so-called red- 
chip shares such as Beijing En- 
terprises and other companies 
listed in Hong Kong that are 
controlled by mainland gov- 
ernment entities or Chinese 
state-owned enterprises. 

Beijing Enterprises owns 
several high-prof lie assets — 
including China's biggest 
brewery," a share of the ticket 
concessions for the Great 
Wall and a stake in Beijing's 
30 McDonald's Corp. fast- 
food outlets — and it has 
promised to buy more. 

"Red chips are a great ba- 
rometer," said William 
Kaye, senior managing direc- 
tor of Pacific Alliance Group. 
‘ ‘These are companies that, in 
most cases, have very little in 
the way of existing busi- 
nesses. so they are a very 
good barometer of excessive 
optimism in the marketplace 
right now. Eventually, that 
bubble will burst." 

Investors who saw Beijing 


Enterprises as a sure route to 
profit made its share sale the 
most popular in the two-de- 
cade history of the Hong 
Kong Stock' Exchange. They 
applied for 1 ,276 times the 15 
million shares the company 
offered them, submitting 
about $28 billion in bids for 
ihe $24.2 million in stock. 

Only investors who bid at 
least S*l. I million for 700,000 
shares w ere guaranteed a min- 
imum lot of 2.000 shares. 

Another Chinese company 
that is attracting considerable 
attention is First Tractor Co., 
which was set up by China’s 
Communist government after 
it took power in 1949. The 
company hopes to raise 1.2 
billion dollars. First Tractor’s 
300 million shares, will sell at 
3.12 to 3.97 dollars each, ac- 
cording to Peregrine Capital 
Ltd. tAFP. Blnomlvrg. \VP) 

■ Shares Fall Sharply 

Hong Kong stocks fell 
sharp!/ as property shares 
tumbled amid concern that 
the government might limit 
banks' mortgage lending to 
cool property speculation. 
Bloomberg News reported. 

The benchmark Hang Seng 
Index fell 139.91 points, or 
almost 1 percent, to close at 
I4.416_57. its biggest drop 
since April 14. 

Developers such as Sun 
Hung Kai Properties Ltd. and 
Henderson Land Develop- 
ment Ltd. accounted for al- 
most half of the index’s de- 
cline. 

"Many people feel there 
may be measures planned to 
restrict mortgage lending, and 
that’s affecting the market," 
said Miles Remington, head 
of sales at SocGen Crosby 
Securities (H.K.j Ltd. 


| Investor’s Asia |] 

Hong Kong 

angapenw 

Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


14500 

J 230 Ah 

22K3 


14X0 

/ 2200 V 

2132* 


135CC. lnll/U 

/ 2153 

V EvS\ 


13033 \ 

j 2100 

\f\>™ \jl 

r 

125® 

f 2000 

7 IS5?3 WVI 

V 

,2Efi) D J F M 

AM »0 J F 

MAM D J F M A M 1 

1996 

1997 1996 

1997 1996 

1997 

Exchange 

index 

Thursday Prev 

% 



Close Close Change) 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

14,416.57 14,556.48 

-0.96 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2,067.17 2,064.36 

+0 14 

Sydney 

AUOdmanes 

2^90^0 2,58520 

+0.21 

Tokyo 

NHOcel 225 

20^t12J0 20,351.34 

■0.19 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,105.62 1.096 33 

+Q.85 

Bangkok 

SET 

558.17 562.83 

-0.83 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

74250 738.12 

+0.59 

Tafpef 

Slock Market Index 7,997.85 6.058.46 

-0.75 

Manila 

PSE 

2,758^1 2.72 3.67 

+1.32 

Jakarta 

Composite index 

68950 672.50 

+2.53 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2^&33 2,332.87 

+0.2S 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

3,724.11 3,685.31 

+1.05 

Source. Telekurs 


1 iitb*niJ>i> nji Ilru 

J Tnt»m.- 

Very briefly: 


Japan Industrial Output Slumped in April After a Tax Increase 


■ 31 1 !■ 1 - 
. , - “ -L - M ■> 

■ cw:fc; 


>«■ -4M- 




Bidombcm Sews 
TOKYO — Japan's indus- 
trial output, an important 
measure of manufacturing 
strength, unexpectedly fell an 
adjusted 0.4 percent in April 
from a month ago, as compa- 
nies slashed production after 
taxes were increased at the 
beginning of the month, the 
government said Thursday. 

Bonds rose after the report, 
and the dollar strengthened 
against the yen, because the 
weak output numbers make it 


unlikely the central bank will 
raise interest rates anytime 
soon, economists said. 

It was the third straight de- 
cline. Most economists had 
predicted a 1.1 parent rise. 
The decline came as domestic 
demand soured under the 
weight of new taxes imposed 
April 1. 

"Production was so high at 
the beginning of the year, it 
was_ .bound to slide since 
then," said Hideo Nakanishi 
of the Ministry of International 


Trade and Industry. "Compa- 
nies couldn't keep up that 
pace, but the overall trend is 
gradually improving." 

The ministry said produc- 
tion fell largely because the 
government increased the 
consumption tax to 5 percent 
from 3 percent on April 1. 

The April decline in pro- 
duction will not alter the gov- 
ernment’s view that the econ- 
omy is improving, said 
Tsutomu Makino. the trade 
ministry deputy minister. 


The government sees the 
economy growing 1 .9 percent 
in the year ending in March 
1998. 

Forecasts of manufacturers 
compiled by the ministry show 
that production will rise 2.7 
percent in May and decline 1 .9 
percent June. White exports of 
machinery, automobiles and 
electronics are rising on the 
back of a weaker yen. they 
failed to compensate for tlx 
slowdown that followed the 
tax increase, economists said. 


"Exports make up only 15 
percent of the economy, so 
they aren’t enough to offset 
the weakness in domestic de- 
mand." said Akio Yoshino, 
an economist at Credit Suisse 
Asset Management. 

The dollar's 8.9 percent rise 
against the yen through April 


helped expon-oriented manu- 
facturers, yet domestic de- 
mand will "inevitably" slack- 
en in the April-September 
half, the Bank of Japan said. 
Economists expect growth to 
slow 0.7 percent in the April- 
June quarter, and industrial 
production to slide 2 percent. 


• Hitachi Ltd. expects to post a group operating profit of 335 
billion yen (S2.89 billion) in the current financial year ending 
March 31 , 199S, up 13 percent, because of an expected revival 
of the chip market. 

• Bandai Co. will replace its president and six of 1 3 board 
members after the cancellation of the toy maker’s planned 
merger w*ith Sega Enterprises Ltd. 

• China’s Finance Ministry uncovered more than 22 billion 
yuan ($2.6 billion) in illegal funds during an annual audit of 
tax and financial accounts, the official Xinhua news agency 
reported. The records of more than 5 million companies and 
individuals were searched between November and March, and 
about a fifth of the total were punished for rule violations. 

• All Nippon Airways Co. appointed Senior Managing Di- 
rector Kichisaburo Nomura as the company's president 
Thursday as three top executives resigned from the board, a 
spokesman said. 

• The Island of Penang in Malaysia plans a series of in- 
frastructure projects to retain its attraction for multinational 
electronics firms and foreign tourists. 

• Mitsubishi Motors Corp/s profit plunged 26.4 percent to 
IS billion yen, after the automaker wrote down losses on its 
U.S. sales unit 

• The Philippines’ economic growth slowed in this year’s 
first quarter to 6.1 percent from 6.9 percent last year as 
manufacturing and mining weakened. Bloomberg. Reuters, ap.afp 


Seoul’s Current- Account Gap Falls 

Bloomberg A fn-s 

SEOUL — The current-account deficit shrank 28 percent 
last month from a year earlier, the central bank said Thursday, 
as surging steel and petrochemicals exports offset slumping 
tourism and freight revenue. 

It was the fourth consecutive monthly decline in the deficit, 
which eased to $1.71 billion from $236 billion, signaling an 
export recovery that is vital to South Korean companies. 


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Australian Leader 
Hedges on Media Law 

CitnpdrJ Our Stjff Fnm DtqkJtcim 

SYDNEY — Prime Minister John Howard played 
down reports Thursday that his government planned to 
allow Rupert Murdoch and Kerry Packer to tighten their 
grip on the Australian media industry. 

"Some of the reports in the papers this morning were 
hairy, but others were a little closer to the mark in terms of 
options," he said, adding that the government was ex- 
amining a range of options on media-ownership rules. 

The reports said die government would relax limits on 
foreign and cross-media ownership, clearing die way for 
a major reshuffle in the industry. Such a plan' would lift 
the limit on individual foreign stakes in media companies 
to 25 percent from 15 percent. Mr. Murdoch, a native of 
Australia but a naturalized American citizen, owns 15 
percent of Seven Network Ltd. 

They also said consideration was being given to lifting 
the limit on total foreign ownership to 35 percent from 30 
percent for print media and to 20 percent for television 
networks. Mr. Howard declined to confirm those figures. 

Laws that prohibit individuals from controlling a tele- 
vision network and a newspaper in the same market also 
would be eased, the reports said, enabling Mr. Packer to 
take over the Fairfax companies while keeping control of 
Nine Network Ltd. Mr. Packer currently is limited to 
owning 17 percent of Fairfax. (AFP, Bloomberg) 


ETHNIC: Taking Note of Music 




1: f - 
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S’ 


5 Continued from Page 13 

I recording; Indonesian 

j gamelan orchestras and rap- 

j id-fire choruses known as 

: "monkey chants." 

World music has proved so 
1 popular at the Tokyo branch 

of the retailer Tower Records 

• fehat Keith Cahoon. Tower’s 

• Managing director for the Far 

| Hast, has split the section in 

I two. One is devoted to East-, 

i West fusion styles like those 

recorded by DaDaWa, Colo- 
' nial Cousins, and Asia Beat 

The other is for purist, tra- 
ditional genres like the dron- 
ing Korean pansori and hyp- 
notic dogri love songs from 
India’s Jammu hills. 

Despite the^suige in in- 
terest in blending indigenous 
music with contemporary 
Western forms, some produ- 
cers warn against the hit-and- 
run mentality that exploits the 
sound yet ignores the spirit of 
ethnic music. 

"Using these ancient 
Styles as sound effects only is 
a very superficial approach to 
^jphe music." said Sam Mills, 
an American who co-pro- 
duced the . rock-laced album 
"Real Sugar" with the 
Bengali singer Paban Das 
Baul for Britain-based Real 


World Records. 

Others argue for the purist 
approach, "if we do not re- 
tain undiluted indigenous 
forms, they will eventually be 
blended out of existence," 
said Anil Seghal, a consultant 
for India’s Zee Music. Mr. 
Seghal said that the record 
label would soon be broad- 
casting pure indigenous mu- 
sic like Jammu's dogri and 
tribal chants from Uttar Pra- 
desh state over Zee’s televi- 
sion network, with coverage 
in Britain, South Africa and 
much of Asia. 

Blekbala Mujik is an Aus- 
tralian aboriginal group that 
draws on both traditional in- 
struments like the digeridoo, 
with its Iow-pitcbed whine, 
and wooden clap sticks as 
well as the electric guitar and 
electronic synthesizer. 

Other popular performers 
whose styles include ele- 
ments of ethnic music include 
Modem Dog and Joey Boy- 

"Sometimes people com- 
plain about aborigines play- 
ing rock, but the last thing we 
want to do is to sit In the dirt 
and play nothing but the old 
songs," said Richard Mic- 
allef, head of music for the 
Central Australian Aboriginal 
Media Association. 


SCONT1NVEST EQUITY FUND 

Fends commun de placement luxembourgeois 
a compartments ittukipfes 
Sodete de Gestion: 

Scontinvesf Equity Fund Management Company kA. 
18, Boulevard Royal, L-2449 Luxembourg 


INFORMATION ET AVIS AUX P0RTEURS DE PARTS 


AVEVA1NT IN' 0 1 At REGLEMEYT DE GESTION Dt 3112/ 1995 


Aitidr 5. “So nn e rip don de pyte dn Fondt" a dwten 
“If Conseil f Adrainistratiun dc b Socitfr de Gestion Ml latonrf a proerder 
a b division des parts de chaque pomportimenr. 

Luxembourg, le 7 mai 1997. 

La Sodete tie Gentian La Banque Deposilaire 

SrsMlinmf Equity Fund Maangymcni Crmipnny S.4. AhimU MiuiJr S. I. 


DIVISION PAR DR DES PARTS DES COMPARTMENTS : 
i) .scouvmvEirt EQum nw - nosth- vheru-* Ept tty 
S) SCOIVTEWEST EOtHTV FVND - “ElKO\ EUROPEAN EQITTY 


Lore de n t&we dn 29 mai 1997 , le Conseil d’Admwtntinn de Seurtimeu 


lEqniiy 


b Equity l 


i Equity Fund ■ 


"EurovaT European Equity. Cette mention aon jmu effet de mnhiptkr par 
de parts en rirenhuon et de db'ver par dix la vatror nette 
i de e*s eorapanknenl& 


dix le sombre 

tTmveolairepar^ ^ 

Le* certifieais mot cchangeables a partir do 30 mai 1 W snores dr Dweouol 
Rank SA, 18, Book-vard Rural, L 2-U9 Luxembourg. 

I* division sera effective le 30 mai 1997. 

Le Conseil <T Administration 


NOTICE OF WORKS CONCESSION 

(Directive 93/37/CEE) 


1 ■ CONTRACTING AUTHOWTY 

Chancre de Commerce et dMunrie NiceJ Cfite <f Amr 
20. Boiievard Carabard - 06000 - NICE (France) 

Tet (33} 04 93 13 75 05 Fac (33J « 93 13 75 00 

2A - LOCATION OF WORKS PBIFOMUMCC 
NICE ■ COTE D'AZUR AIRPORT - NICE - 06200 - FRANCE 
2B- PURPOSE Or TRE CONCESSION OF WORKS, 

NATURE AND SCOPE OF SERVICES: 

Reference of ihe project XEL 

Purpax of die conceoion of woris: AppoMmenc o( the boufidary of an apeeraenc 
of temporary occupation of a govmvrtent-o*ned bid wrth«n (he aoport area. The 
benrfetary ** ** responslWe for flnandi^. bu&Ung and operating a real estate 
complex w 50,000 squve maters ntended to aooommodace trade ahowi x me hke 
Cto if Aatr Airport and i parting of 253100 stjeare meters. 

3A - DEADLINE TO SUBMTT APPLICATIONS: June S6, 1987 at 4 PJA 
38 . ADDRESS TO FORWARD APPLICATIONS: 

Refer to I above - DireaJan des Grands Projeu tf&^uoement* 

Reference to indcate on die envelope. “A.CL - Appel h a n d f m a V* 

3C - LANGUAGE IN WHICH THE APPLICATIONS MUST BE DRAFTED 
French 

4 -PERSONAL, TECHNICAL AND mANClAL CONDITIONS 
TO BE MET BY THE CANDIDATES 

The enuSdm. which an suhmff their ap nft ap ani t&her atone or w a ffvup. m> 
have to esobiuti due (her hive bnancul capabilities as wefl as economic and 
e o mmer d al opgatte capahiWes. 

The Ibandal capabnty of die cantidatc wal have to be csrabihhed by submttring 
relevant baric references, balance sheets and corporate accounts of the hsi three 
yeart or any other ewrfwierfl: document as y*rO as a a* of simdar cransactxxts. n the 
esabUshmm of wHdi the candidate was Involved. 

The o co ad ne capaWky vril have to be aobtVwd by Bibncdng refenmoes in the 
area of opetaoons of showrooms or trade shows. 

Theta references will have co be as precise as potdfcie. They must jnefitaxe and 
describe addevemenc and prefects Pom a conanerool and economic viewpomc. 

The eamfcta must be in order withta tax. a* rebted and social seorhy obitadore. 
The candidates which do not meet the condUom mentioned n Arodes 24 a), b). cj. 
e). f) md 4 of Direaxe no. 93/37 ICE could be exduded from parnopiting in the 
setatan pracedvs. 

5 > CONTRACT AWARD CRTOBtlA: 

The selection irocedtres with respea to camidate* to be (Iikbi vrif be carried out 
at two phases. First, the shortfatw phase icconfcig te ytadi the fat of eaafcte 
amtomd to submit a tends- wfl be approv ed Second, the Snaf selection phase wdi 
repedto the raiders sufamicxed by the eandaJites Kepeed. 

Sdecdcn ffheria of the candidates Arfng the shortBscs^g phase 

► tedmial value (kiwwhow and refcrencs) 

► feanaa] ^arancees 

Sefccdw cntala of the tenders ifar die icantnet award 

► technial and comraerdal value of the tender 

► finanoal condtions o( the ofler 

6 - OTHER JWCTWATION: . . 

BEtt sngigSDSnjtt 

infantadon riven to dai mace. , . ^ 

atttes menti o ned in 3 above. — - - 



i ■ M 


\ /.«• \hruiicn 2 ^ 




MERIDIEN 


HOTELS ft RESORTS 


j ' / 


vm 

rs.‘ . 


hr. hniiiny ^ 


OVER 80 HOTELS WORLDWIDE INCLUDING ABU DHABI - ALGARVE • AL KHOB.XR 
AMMAN - AMSTERDAM ■ ATHENS - BAHIA - BAHRAIN - BALI • BANGKOK ■ BARCELONA 
BERMUDA - BOSTON ■ BRAZZAVILLE ■ BRUSSELS - CAIRO ■ CASABLANCA ■ COLOGNE 
CYPRUS - DAKAR ■ DALLAS ■ DAMASCUS ■ DELHI ■ DOUALA - DUBAI • DUBLIN 
FlUGCi - FRANCEVILLE ■ FRANKFURT - GENEVA ■ GOLDEN TRIANGLE 
GUADELOUPE- GUYANA ■ HAMBURG ■ HHDESHHM ■ HURGHADA • JAKARTA -JAMAICA 
JEDDAH ■ KOHSAMUI -KUWAIT -U3TXKZA - LIBREVILLE ■ LISBON -LONDON - LUANDA 
LYON -MADRID ■ MALTA ■ MARTINIQUE - MAURITIUS ■ MELBOURNE • MILAN • MONTE 
CARLO - MOSCOW ■ NEW ORLEANS • NEW TORK - NICE • NILE CRUISE ■ NOUMEA 
NUREMBERG - OPORTO - PARIS • PHUKET ■ PORT CENTO. ■ RIO DE JANEIRO • ROME 
SAINT MARTIN - SAN DIECO ■ SARDINIA ■ SEYCHELLES ■ SINGAPORE - TASHKENT 
TOKYO ■ TORONTO ■ TUNIS • TURIN ■ VANUATU ■ WARSAW • WASHINGTON 

TRAVEL COMPANION OF AIR FRANCE 







PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1997 

EUROPE 


m 



LVMH Signals Will 
To Battle Guinness 


Bloemfvrg News 

PARIS — The chairman of 
LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuit- 
lon SA said Thursday he would 
press ahead with his plan to buy 
Guinness PLC's stakes in his com- 
pany's beverage units, saying the 
deal would raise shareholder value. 

Bernard Arnault said Wednesday 
that LVMH would exercise an op- 
tion to buy Guinness's stake in 
LVMH's beverage-distribution 
businesses and the brewer’s 34 per- 
cent of Moet Hennessy, LVMH’s 
cognac and champagne unit. 

The move could derail Guinness’s 


Czech Bank 
Warns on Pay 

C.wnpAU to iTwSuFFmmOispcackn 

PRAGUE — Stock prices 
tumbled as the central bank 
warned Thursday that it might 
have to tighten monetary policy 
if the government and labor un- 
ions did not agree on efforts to 
curb wage growth. 

The central bank's statement 
came a day after the government 
unveiled measures to help cut 
the Czech Republic's trade and 
current-account deficits, includ- 
ing additional budget cuts and a 
freeze on wages in the govern- 
ment and at state-owned 
companies. Benchmark stocks 
fell 2.5 percent, with the wain 
market index losing 12.40 
points to close at 490.10. 

The Czech koruna has 
dropped 7.5 percent since 
Monday, when the central bank 
expanded the currency’s fluc- 
tuation band and opened the 
way to a possible devaluation. 
Fears that the currency would 
fall further sent consumers into 
a buying panic, and retailers 
reacted by raising prices of im- 
ported goods by as much as 20 
percentT ( Bloomberg . API 


planned $20 billion merger with 
Grand Metropolitan PLC, which 
LVMH opposes. 

Guinness and Grand Met contend 
that LVMH cannot legally exercise 
its right to repurchase Guinness’s 
stake in the beverage units, and ana- 
lysts have predicted a protracted le- 
gal battle. 

[A Guinness spokesman said the 
company had no plans to meet with 
Mr. Arnault to discuss the legality of 
the buyback plan. AFX News re- 
ported from London.] 

Mr. Arnault told shareholders a 
wholly owned beverage operation 
would raise LVMH's earnings, as 
would his original plan to merge the 
three companies' drinks businesses 
into the world’s largest liquor com- 
pany. That proposal, which was re- 
buffed, remains open, he said. 

“If we oppose this merger, it's 
because it would lead to a conglom- 
erate that regroups wine and spirit 
activities, fast food and packaged 
food, which have no coherence,” he 
said. “We’ve made a proposal to 
combine wine and spirits, creating a 
world leader. It seems the best way 
to unleash shareholder value.” 

Mr. Arnault would lose his ex- 
ecutive board seat if the two British 
companies combined, and LVMH's 
14.2 percent stake in Guinness would 
be reduced to 6.6 percent of the pro- 
posed combined company, GMG 
Brands. 

Analysts have seen the growing 
rift with Guinness as a sign that 
LVMH could sell its stake in GMG 
and its 66 percent of Moet Hen- 
nessy. where sales are lagging. 

Mr. Arnault also said dial 
LVMH’s duty-free unit, DFS, of 
which it bought 58 percent for $2.47 
billion in October, would have a 
positive effect on operating earnings 
this year. In January. LVMH said 
the DFS purchase would have a neg- 
ative effect on net income. 

LVMH shares closed unchanged 
at 1.389 francs ($242.43) in Paris, 
while GrandMet shares closed in 
London at 573 pence ($939), down 
2, and Guinness eased 1 to 579. 


Trading Pulp Electronically 

Sweden’s Futures Exchange Operator Moves In on London 


By Erik Ipsen 

huenurional Herald Tribune 


LONDON — There was no ribbon-cutting, there 
were no traders in colorful coats shouting and ges- 
ticulating. Instead, at 2 P.M. Thursday. Pulpex, a 
futures market for wood 
pulp, flickered noiselessly 
to life on computer screens 
across Europe. 

Its silent awakening, 
analysts said, marked an 

important step forward for 

electronic exchanges trying 

to gain ground against traditional systems based on 

trading floors. 

Per Larsson said he regretted that Thursday’s open- 
ing had produced no glossy photographs of traders in 
bnght garb grouped beneath a Pulpex sign. “Our 
system is a lot less visual than that.” said Mr. Larsson. 
the chief executive of OM Gruppen AB. the operator 
of Sweden's options market and Pulpex 's founder. 

Pulpex will give buyers and sellers of the main 
ingredient for paper a second market in which to 
manage the risk of price fluctuation. Finland’s Fu- 
tures and Options Exchange began trading pulp fu- 
tures four months ago. 

OM Gruppen operates exchanges and clearing or- 
ganizations. and offers information and network ser- 
vices. What the company lacks in presence it makes up 
for in momentum. In the 12 years since the company 
sprang to life as the world’s first for-profit financial 


exchange company, its market value has soared to 5 
billion Swedish kronor ($650.9 million). 

“Potentially the market for their technology is 
enormous,' ’ said Johan Trocme, an analyst for Union 
Bank of Switzerland in London. “You have only to 
look at how many exchanges still rely on people 
wearing funny pink and 
" puiple jackets and making 

Financial deregulation should strange hand signals for a 
° , ... . living to see it.” 

bung new opportunities to in i* competition with 

create markets worldwide. traditional exchanges, ana- 

■ • lysts say OM has two ad- 

vantages — its technolo- 


gical expertise and its status as a publicly traded 
corporation instead of a member-owned exchange. 

“OM is not a conservative cartel designed to 
protect its members' interests,” Per Afrell of SBC 
Warburg in Stockholm said. “Instead of waiting for 
new members, it went out and recruited them in a way 
no one had ever heard of doing before.” 

It also avoided the common condition of a market 
dominated by a few large players by throwing the 
door open to small brokers at the outset. 

OM ranks as Europe’s third-1 argest options ex- 
change. behind only the options markets in Switzerland 
and Holland. Last year it made 326 million kronor in 
operating income on revenue of 610 million kronor. 

Next year, OM will be working on its biggest 
contract yet — a 200 million-kronor deal that will link 
500 buyers and sellers of electricity in California, in 
the first deregulated U.S. market for electric power. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 
FTSE 100 Index 


Paris 

CAC40 



Fraakftirt' DftX ‘ ' 

C openhagen .StockMartet 
\.:HSC General 


574S6 


Oslo 
London 


OBX 

.FFSEH30 


4,67230 


576.99 -0-35 

40.16 

e4b.io 

4,677.50 


Madrid:. .* Slock Exchange '' 556.14 


man 


MJSTSi 

! CAd4Q. 


12238. 


-0.15 


SJC 16. 


Vienna 


■ ATX 


2^79^4 2,583.17 
3.01&4 8 • 3,043.15 -0-9? 


Zorich 


•SPf. 


3J24S.BD 3JS50J3S -0-OS, 


Source: Telekurs 


Iniurrulioruil Herald Tribune 


— £ 


EU Telecom Competition: A Mixed Card 


C**pdedtnOurSB#Fnm> Ddpotchea 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission said Thursday that it 
expected to receive more com- 
plaints from telephone companies 
and multinational customers be- 
cause few countries are ready to 
meet its January 1998 deadline for 
full telecommunications competi- 
tion. 

Britain. Sweden, Finland and 
Denmark are the only countries in 
the 15-nation European Union 
whose telecommunications markets 
are frilly competitive, according to 
the Union’s executive agency. 

The remaining 1 1 have promised 
to meet either that deadline or al- 


ternative timetables agreed to in- 
dividually with the commission. 

While saying “satisfactory pro- 
gress" had been made across 
Europe, Karel van Miert, the EU’s 
competition commissioner, said the 
European Commission was “ex- 
pecting more complaints to come 
over the coining months.' ’ 

Telecommunications Commis- 
sioner Martin Bangetnann said only 
Britain and the three Scandinavian 
members were are already in the 
“Champions' League,” a reference 
to the European soccer competition. 
He said Germany, France and the 
Netherlands were in the “first di- 
vision,” while Ireland, Italy, Lux- 


at 


etnbourg and Austria were 
“second division” level. 

The remaining countries — Bel- 
gium, Greece, Spain and Portugal 
— are so far behind in implementing 
telecommunications legislation that 
Mr. Bangemann rated them as 
“nonleague” players. 

The commission said the com- 
plaints it had received so far related 
particularly to terms set by dom- 
inant telephone companies for rival 
operators to connect calls to their 
networks. 

“The interconnection terms are 
absolutely vital to get the market 
working.” Mr. Van Mien said. 

( Bloomberg , AP) 


Very briefly: 

• Britain's trade deficit fell to a lower-than-expected £671 
million ($1.1 billion) in March from a revised figure of £771 
million in February, according to official figures. 

• ING Groep NV, a Dutch bank and insurer, said first -quarter 
net profit rose 21.1 percent, to 891 million guilders ($467.1 
million), as strong financial markets and the acquisition of 
Barings PLC raised banking earnings. 

• Eurotunnel Group, the debt-burdened operator of the 
Channel Tunnel, said it could make a net profit in 2005 and 
pay its first dividend in 2006 if investors backed an £8.5 billion 
debt reorganization. The company said it expected to post a 
loss of 2.18 billion French francs ($379.3 million) in 1997, 
compared with 6.01 billion francs last year. 

• Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. will invest $75 million in its 
Polish unit. Key C. Debica SA, and move some production 
there from its Reach and German operations. 

• Zurich Group will join a group of Investors, including J.P. 
Morgan and Co. and Swedbank AB, to acquire a stake of 24 
percent to 29.9 percent in Poland's Bank Handlowy. 

• SGS-Thomson Microelectronics NV, Europe's second- 
largest semiconductor company, bought a majority-stake in 
Metaflow Technologies Inc~, an American developer of 
microchips for an undisclosed amount. 

• Royal Copenhagen A/S’s first-half pretax profit rose 143 
percent, to 963 milli on kroner ($14.9 million), as sales of its 
glass and porcelain products increased. AFP. Bloomberg. Reuters 




WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Oow Prev. 


High Law Close Pm. 


High Law Close Prev. 


High Low dose Pm. 


Thursday, May 29 

Prices in local currencies. 
Telekurs 



High 

LOW 

Close 

Prev. 

Amsterdam 

A EX Indec 004X2 



PrevtoOE 80*95 

ABN-A/8RG 

36X0 

35.70 

36 

3620 

Aegon 

14120 

140.10 

1*210 142X0 

Ahold 

144.90 

14SJ0 

146X0 

1*5X0 

AKzoNctel 

269X0 

265.10 

26BX0 

266 

Bean Co. 

U&X0 

115X0 

115X0 118X0 


37.10 

36X0 

3670 

3720 

CS” c*a 

101 

98 

100.10 

101 JO 

Doreteche Pet 

388.90 

30/ 

388 388X0 

D3.V. 

1**70 

193 

194 

194 


33.10 

32X0 

32X0 

XL6U 

Partis Amev 

92J0 

79X0 

80X0 

B2JQ 


68 

A/JII 

67 JO 

67.90 

G-Brocara 

&5J0 

6*60 

6*90 

65 


95.40 

92X0 

9450 

92.10 

Hemeken 

328 

33 

326X0 327 JO 

HDO^OWfS CTO 

9720 

96X0 

96X0 

9720 

Hunt Douglas 

171 

167X0 

170X0 16970 

iNG Group 

89-20 

H6JU 

86.90 

8820 

KLM 

56J0 

55.10 

55X0 

5560 

KNPBT 

39.90 

39>8l 

3970 

39.90 

KPN 

68X0 

67.10 

6830 

6/XO 

NedHoydGp 

47X0 

46X0 

47X0 

4/J0 

Nutnaa 

302 

296.10 

300 

298 

OceGrmten 

257 

249.10 

256 250X0 

Phi Kps Elec 

108.90 

HI/ 

10890 

108 


94X0 

92J0 

93X0 

93 

Randslad Hdg 

191X0 

193 

193X0 194X0 

Rabeca 

173X0 

1/260 

173X0 

174 

RodamcD 

61 JO 

60X0 

61 

61 .10 


17X70 

176X0 

176X0 

1/7 


110.10 

no 

11810 

1)810 


376X0 

373X0 

37*30 375X0 


378.70 

3/6 

376X0 

379 

Vendexlnfl 

no 

109 

109 JO 

109.90 

VNU 

43.60 

42J0 

43X0 

43 

WaRetsKJeva 

236X0 

<BJ 

23*90 Z35XD 



High 

Law 

Oose 

Prev. 

Hong Kong 

Haag Seng: 1441657 
Platans: 14556X0 

Amoy Props 

8X5 

865 

870 

8X5 

Bk East Asia 

28JQ 

27X0 

27X5 


Cathay Pacific 

1175 

11X5 

1170 

1165 

Cheung Kang 

79X0 

77X0 

78 

7875 


2480 

24JU 

24 £8 

24X0 

CNna Ugh! 
□BcPadflc 

3870 

37.70 

3810 

3860 

45 

*3X0 

43X0 

4*90 

DaoHengBk 
First Padflc 

40 

3970 

39X0 

4020 

1025 

10.05 

10.15 

1020 

Hanq Lana Dev 

1*80 

1*60 

1470 

1*85 

Hang Seng Bk 

91.75 

90 

90X0 

92 

Henderson Inv 

8X5 

875 

800 

8X5 

Henderson Ld 

73.75 

72 

73 

7*25 

HK CWna Gas 

13.10 

1275 

1110 

1185 

HK Electric 

2/XO 

2/X0 

27X5 

2/XU 

HKTetecornin 

1690 

16X0 

1670 

17 

Hocwefl Hdgs 

4X0 

420 

*33 

*23 

HSBC Hdgs 

229 

226 

227 

229 

Hutchison Wh 

63X0 

6250 

6325 


Hyson Dev 
Johnson El Hdg 

25/5 

25 

25JQ 

26/5 

22X0 

21.90 

22X0 

21.90 

Kerry Praps 

New World Dev 

19X0 

4870 

19X0 

*760 

19X0 

48X0 

20 

49.10 


270 

263 

165 

265 

Peart Oriental 

2X5 

175 

278 

183 

SHK Praps 

9*25 

9125 

9150 

9*75 

515 

505 

4.10 

520 

StoaLandCO. 

8X0 

625 

625 

07 

Slh China Past 

135 

/.ID 

725 

7.10 

Swire Poc A 

63-75 

63 

6375 

6375 

Wharf Hdgs 

3*50 

33.70 

3190 

3*50 

WheetoQ. 

19 

1865 

18X5 

19.10 


Enterprise OB 
FomCotonW 
Gent Acddenr 
GEC 
GKN 

Gian Welcome 
Granada Go 
Grand Met 
ORE 

GraenaDsGp 

Guinness 

GUS 


Bangkok 


SET tadau S5617 
Previous: 562X2 

AdvIntaSvc 

170 

169 

170 

172 

Bangfcon Bk F 

214 

204 

208 

2t4 

Kivng Thai Bk 
PTT Explor 

2650 

2760 

2825 

2825 

320 

306 

306 

31 4 


526 

514 

516 

52B 


130 

126 

130 

190 


29 

JH.50 

2V 

2875 

Thai Airways 

Thai Farm Bk F 

39 

37 

3825 

3775 

123 

IIV 

122 

122 

Utd Comm 

114 

108 

108 

115 


Jakarta 

Astro Inti 
Bklnribxton 
Bk Negara 
Guaanfj Gorm 

Indocemerd 

Indofooa 

Indosct 

SompoemoHM 
Semen Gres* 
TeMumunlkasI 


C4 w p Mthi Indec 689X0 
Prevtoas: 672X0 

4425 6400 6575 6375 
1975 1925 1975 1925 
1600 1550 1600 1575 

10*00 10000 10400 9975 

3075 3025 3000 3050 

5400 5100 5350 5075 

7125 7000 7125 7000 

9600 9075 9550 9325 

5925 5600 5900 5525 

4075 3725 4050 3900 


Johannesburg uMaMk nuM 

WWKHBS /WWl 


Bombay 

S Auta 
i«i Lever 
Hindus! Peflm 
Ind Dev Bk 
1TC 

MomHwgcrTel 
Reliance ltd 
State Bh India 
Steel Authority 
Tata Eng Loco 


SHHm3tUnderJ724.il 
Pmtws: 3605X1 

855 B46 851.25 B50J5 

109150 1055 1 0901 WO. 75 

426 42250 426 426 

93 9150 7250 9350 
432 426 431 427.25 

285 27750 285 28350 

29655 2B1 29625 283 

305.75 29175 30550 30075 
1850 17JS 1850 18.75 
39450 391 3*5 3*555 


Brussels 

Almanfl 

Barca Ind 

BBL 

CBR 

Cotrayi 

Detnaire Lion 

Elearabel 

Electro Una 

Farfis AG 

Gevaen 

GAL 

Gen Banc tie 

Krecfielbcnk 

Petrafiao 

Power*! 

ftoyale Beige 

SocGenBeig 

Soti/ny 

TrocKt** 

UCB 


BEL-20 indec 2257.78 
Previous: 2250.12 


16150 

6380 

6470 

3340 

14500 

1750 

7920 

3575 

7040 

3220 

5650 

14250 

14550 

12500 

5000 

10050 

3280 

21700 

15525 

77050 


15925 

6310 

9360 

3265 

14275 

1710 

7860 

3530 

6860 

3170 

5600 

14100 

14400 

1232S 

4*60 

7950 

3250 

214JS 

15425 

95600 


15975 16125 
6340 
9470 9440 

3290 3355 

14275 14350 
1740 1720 

7910 7900 

3575 3570 

6950 6980 
31711 3200 

5640 5630 

U100 14250 
14525 14475 
124)0 12350 
4990 4975 
10000 9990 

3270 3355 

21500 21625 
15525 15425 
95600 95700 


AmalgamU Bks 
AngtoAm Coal 
AngtoAntCOfp 
Anglo Am GoW 
AnqtoAmM 
AVMIti 
Barlow 
CG. Smith 
De Beers 
Drietoirtetn 
Fat Natl 8k 
Gencur 
GFSA 

Imperial Hdgs 
Inawe Cool 
tecor 

Jahwdes Intll 
Liberty Hdgs 
Liberty LHe 
LJbUfe Slnrf 
Minorca 
Nampa* 

Heritor 

Rembrandt Go 
Richemont 
Rust Platinum 
SA Breweri es 
Sant ancor 
SohW 
SBIC 

Tiger Oats 


■BJ 

2775 

2720 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

262 

360X0 

362 

304 

302 

302 

mjo 

187 

m 

16.15 

1610 

1610 

4/25 

46*5 

4/24 

25X5 

24X0 

3*70 

15725 

156X0 

15/ 

38X5 

38X0 

38X0 

34X5 

3275 

3*75 

20 

19X0 

19.90 

114X0 

114 

114 

5675 

5625 

5625 

3(120 

30.10 

30.10 

9X3 

3 

3X2 

5/.2J 

5650 

5/25 

350 

34650 

349 

127X0 

13675 

127X0 

16X5 

1645 

168U 

103 

10025 

101X0 

1/60 

17X0 

1/X0 

81.7b 

87X0 

8/74 

46 

4574 

46 

6225 

61X0 

61.75 

15 

72 

74X0 

117 

12625 

127 

4850 

47 JO 

48X0 

56 

5525 

55/5 

20825 

204 


76X0 

75X0 

7650 


28 

295 


HSBC HUBS 
ia 

Iropl Tobacco 
Wngfisher 
Ladbrofce 
Land Sec 
Lama 

Legal Gent Grp 
UaydsTSBGp 
LucasVartty 
Marts Spencer 
MERC 

Mercury Asset 

National Grid 

Natl Power 

Noiwest 

Ned 

Orange 

P&O 

Pearson 

POUngfon 

rOWOWIl 

Premier Fame! 

Prvdenffai 

RHBrxx* 

Rank Group 

RecXBt Coton 
Red land 
Read Ind 
Renfefcfi Initial 
Reuters Hdgs 
Rexam 
RMC Group 

RoIsRoyce 
Item Bit Seal 
RTZrog 
Royoi&S onAll 
Safeway 
Sa trainin' 

Schraders 
Sad Newcastle 
scot Poorer 
Sea; dear 
Severn Trent 
Sited TronspR 
Siete 

Smith Nephew 
smmuame 
Smiths Ind 
SthemEtac 
Stagecoach 
Stand Charter 
70*? £ LHe 
Tosco 

Thames Water 
31 Group 
Tl Group 
Tomklra 
UnBever 
Utd Assurance 
u Id News 
utd mamas 
vendome Lx ws 
Vodafone 
Whitbread 
WDBare Hdgs 
Watsefey 
WPP Group 
Zeneca 


675 

663 

663 

685 

1X4 

1X3 

1X3 

1X4 

9X0 

9.16 

923 

9X0 

3X5 

3X0 

153 

3X6 

10X5 

1020 

10X5 

1014 

12X5 

1224 

12X2 

1226 

890 

875 

8X5 

8X4 

600 

673 

573 

685 

3 

7.90 

278 

2.93 

4X0 

473 

473 

47/ 

681 

574 

5.78 

57? 

662 

649 

659 

6S4 

SX9 

5X2 

4X9 

4X4 

1682 

17.96 

IIU19 

1610 

846 

8X9 

816 

814 

3X7 

3X2 

386 

194 

723 

7.14 

/J1 

7 24 

2X2 

233 

226 

947 

927 

9X5 

922 

9X8 

2X0 

2X5 

146 

7.49 

473 

*60 

*61 

*76 

640 

625 

642 

641 

2 

1.95 

1.97 

1.99 

618 

605 

614 

509 

617 

607 

614 

612 

1473 

1*20 

1*65 

14X0 

2J0 

226 

228 

226 

5X8 

633 

5X8 

5X0 

7X2 

7X4 

7X9 

7X2 

7X2 

7J1 

748 

133 

209 

2X7 

2X9 

3X8 

6X7 

630 

639 

637 

728 

721 

72/ 

733 

128 

125 

128 

124 

7X1 

690 

698 

6S7 

477 

471 

*74 

*77 

634 

620 

638 

638 

639 

623 

631 

636 

441 

*33 

*36 

*34 

873 

8X3 

8X5 

ax4 

325 

118 

323 

322 

617 

6 

607 

607 

227 

133 

236 

223 

697 

685 

694 

691 

3X3 

270 

2J0 

3 

9.17 

9 

9.16 

9X8 

2X2 

2X0 

2X3 

2X5 

627 

615 

615 

633 

107? 

10X8 

10X0 

10.73 

*72 

4X2 

4X4 

*7/ 

163 

150 

3X1 

3X4 

152 

3X5 

3X9 

3X7 

17X4 

1725 

1/27 

172/ 

7X2 

691 

/XI 

694 

195 

161 

3.91 

3X6 

292 

290 

2.90 

2.91 

778 

7X8 

723 

773 

12 22 

12X0 

12.15 

12.15 

9X6 

9X0 

9X6 

9X2 

179 

ITS 

179 

175 

10X2 

10X2 

10.72 

10X7 

7.90 

771 

/X0 

/M 

*13 

*07 

*08 

410 

664 

651 

655 

6X6 

9.98 

978 

VX? 

10X2 

*52 

*48 

440 

*» 

3X1 

372 

37B 

l/l 

6B3 

673 

674 

6XU 

608 

5X2 

605 

508 

5X7 

654 

4X2 

65/ 

270 

2X2 

9X4 

2X7 

1*80 

16M 

1445 

14/9 

*92 

4X5 

*88 

*94 

7.9? 

776 

7.95 

77B 

7.10 

690 

/.10 

7.10 

607 

*96 

*96 

SX6 

273 

2X8 

27? 

2.70 

60S 

793 

8X1 

7.94 

3.10 

106 

3X9 

3X9 

*75 

*70 

*73 

*71 

2X2 

2J8 

249 

7X1 

1892 

I860 

1875 

1863 



29200 

28900 

78950 

28900 


375X0 

367.10 

375 

368 

Norrtbanken 

240 337X0 

340 

M0 .SO 

IMI 

15135 

14940 

15120 

15100 

Pernod Rkard 


279 

283 

284 

Ptiarm/UjijatHi 

763X0 

261 

262 

263 

INA 

2415 

2380 

2415 

2400 


600 

573 

W. 

593 

207 

203 

203 

705 

ttalgas 

Mediaset 

5320 


5295 

5270 

Ptnautt-Prtnt 

2377 

2323 

7325 

2342 


218 212X0 21250 

718 

7375 

7265 

7285 

7395 


2030 

1950 

7005 

1983 

SCAB 

167 163X0 

164 

m SO 


9900 

9680 

9680 

9825 


135X0 

128X0 

12970 

133.10 

S-E BcrtumA 

81 JO 

80X0 

80X0 

R? 


1050 

1037 

1043 

1043 

Real 

1575 

1531 

1560 

1540 

Skanr&o Fare 

380 

274 

278 

275 

OfiveJtt 

505 

495 

495 

500 

RWtoulencA 

191 

18*20 

187 JO 

185L50 

StarataS 

311 

305 

311 

319 


2475 

7405 

2410 

2415 

Scmcfi 

519 

507 

512 

506 

SKFB 

182X0 

190 JO 

1BI 

184 

PtreiC 

3655 

3600 

363.5 

3605 

Schneider 

3970 

280.70 

283 

723JC 

SpcrtianfcOT A 

150 

147 

149X0 

150 

RAS 

13390 

13100 

13155 

13380 

SEB 

1015 

996 

1005 

990 

Sradshypotek A 

191 

190 

190 

190 


17700 

17400 

17400 

17650 

SG5 Thomson 

485 

47850 48*90 

480 

Warn A 

116X0 

115 

115 

115.50 


1064S 

10630 

10645 

10645 

Ste Generate 

638 

<16 

630 

613 

Sv Handles A 

208 

204 

206 

707 

Stel 

868S 

85 60 

8615 


Sodexho 

2720 

3650 

265 0 

2656 

VotvoB 

213 215X0 

276 

216 


4720 

4640 

4700 

4680 

SIGobaln 

809 

786 

800 

790 






TIM 

5080 

5005 

50«5 

5025 

Suez 

29820 

295.10 

296X0 

296 







Montreal 

iBdastrials tadtac 321 7X1 



PlUtaU* 3224X9 

Bee Mob Com 

43.10 

43.10 

4110 

4140 

Cdn The A 

25.15 

75.15 

25.15 

25U. 

Cdn USA 

35JS 

35.15 

35.15 

3530 

CTHrrtSvc 

3515 

35Vt 

3515 

3SVj 


17X5 

17X5 

1 7X5 

1715 

Gt-WeStLKecn 

27X5 

27Vi 

27X5 

27 JO 


39to 

38.55 

3&X5 

19.15 

Investors Grp 

2814 

28 

28X5 

2BX5 


19X5 

19 

19X5 

1890 

Natl Bk Canada 

1615 

16 

16X5 

16X5 

Power Corp 

32 

31X0 

32 

31X0 

Power Hrt! 

29X5 

29X0 

29X5 

29to 

Quebecer B 

2570 

25X0 

2570 

25*9 

Rogers Comm B 

715 

7.10 

7V5 

730 

Royal Bk Cda 

60.95 

59X0 

60X5 

603* 


Synlhefcibo 
Thomson CSF 
Told B 
<Mtor 
vroea 


689 677 689 

171.8a 16120 168 

S50 530 536 

88.90 87.25 S7JS 

326.50 335 


685 

167 

52* 

S8J0 

339 


Seoul 


COnpasltonideK: 74250 

Previous 738.12 


Oslo 

AfcsrA 

Benesen D»A 
ChrtttantaBX 
Dot nafSkeBk 
Elkem 
Hafstund A 
Kvaemer Asa 


a HX index: <38X1 
Pintet 648.18 


Doom 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
IGo Motors 
Karoo El Pwr 
Korea EtchBk 
Korea Mob Tet 
LG Sen Icon 
Potato In* SI 
Samsung DMay 
Samsung Else 
Shintiai Bank 


99900 

7990 

20500 

16800 

27400 

6000 

300000 

37900 

59900 

46500 

68900 

10800 


96000 

7500 

19600 

15800 

26400 

5800 

370000 

35400 

58000 

44500 

64500 

10500 


96000 97800 
. 7500 7850 
20100 19600 
16200 16000 
27000 26100 
5650 5680 
376000 360000 
37900 35100 
58600 58600 
45500 44500 
67300 64500 
10600 10400 


Svdnev ABOrttaarfas: 25*0X0 

7 7 Previous: 7555.20 

Amcor 
ANZBMng 
BHP 
Bond 

Brambles ind. 

CBA 

CCAraofll 
Coles Myer 
CamaicD 
CRA 
CSR 

Fasten Brow 
Goodman FW 
I Cl Australia 
Lend Lease 
AIIM HdfiQ 
l utf Bank 


130 126X0 

130 

167 

165 

166 

2*60 

2*50 

2*50 

2830 

78 

28 

144 

142 

142X0 

44 

44 

44 

418 

413 

413 


JS Singapore 


Strutts Times; 2*67.1 7 
Prevfew 20606 


28 2870 Asia Poc Brew 650 6X5 6X0 6X0 

143 CerebasPOC 150 840 M) UO 

44 QtyDevttS 1120 12X0 1330 1110 

417 Cycle Carriage 1450 1*30 1450 14X0 



850 

8X1 

850 

8X7 

8X1 

an 

873 

875 

1860 

18J5 

iaxo 

1839 

*10 

4 

4X9 

*04 

2169 

2155 

23XB 

2168 

14X6 

1*28 

1*38 

1*50 

15X0 

1535 

15X6 

UJO 

6J7 

5X6 

6X7 

6J0 

7J5 

736 

738 

736 

31X0 

21X5 

21X0 

21X0 

479 

*68 

*78 

*70 

2X5 

2X1 

2X5 

2X1 

170 

1X7 

1X9 

1X7 

1111 

11X9 

1111 

11.96 

26.05 

25X0 

26 

2SX0 

1.95 

1X1 

J.W 

1.9J 

18X5 

18X5 

1855 

1846 

1.96 

1X4 

1X6 

1.97 

573 

5X6 

570 

5X7 

366 

3X0 

165 

165 

*47 

4X3 

4X4 

*40 

475 

6X7 

6J8 

6X3 

8X2 

7X8 

a 

axi 

8X2 

8X2 

8X2 

8X7 

731 

7X9 

7.12 

730 

11.28 

11.15 

1133 

11.18 

4X8 

*03 

*05 

*09 


The Trib Index 

Prices as of 3.00 P.M Hew York time. 

Jan. 1. 1902=100. 

Level 

Chang* 

% change 

year to date 
% change 

World Index 

166.51 

-0.67 

-0.40 

♦11.65 

Regional Indexes 

Asm/Paafic 

124.39 

-0.78 

-0.62 • 

+0.78 

Europe 

174.48 

-0.53 

-0.30 

+824 

N America 

192.05 

-0.89 

-0.46 

+18.62 

S. America 

Industrial todexes 

156.45 

-0.05 

-0.03 

+36.72 

Capital goods 

204.28 

-1.08 

-0.53 

♦19.51 

Consumer goods 

186.75 

-0.95 

-0.51 

+15.68 

Energy 

195.98 

*0.05 

+003 

♦ 14.80 

Finance 

124J24 

-0.46 

-037 

+6.68 

Miscellaneous 

168.39 

-0.27 

-0.16 

+4.09 

Raw Materials 

184.42 

-0.61 

-0.33 

+5.15 

Sendee 

157.64 

-0.77 

-0.49 

+14.60 

Utilities 

143.18 

-0.76 

-0.53 

-0.20 

The Memaeonal Haald Trtoune World Stock Index © tracks the U.S. tktUa r values d 
ZiOiniamaOcralyimBstabie stocks from 25 countries. For mors tafoemsbon. a free 
booklet is BvaBabb by writing toTheTrtotndax.181 Avenue Claries da GauBe. I 

92521 Neuay Cedex. France. Compiled bv Bloomberg fiewa. 

High Law 

Oose 

Prev. 

High Low 

Oose 1 Prev. 


Copenhagen ****£f&« 


BGBenk 
Cartetrerg b 
C odon For* 
Dani sco 
Den Daitske Bk 
Q’SSwndbrgB 
CVS 1*12 B 
FLSliWB 
Ka8 Lutihawie 
Nw Nortlsk B 
Soohus BerB 
Tele DanrrL B 
Tryg BaittCO 
Unktanmart A 


306 Ml 30531 305 

391 390 391 38972 

910 899 900 915 

400 396 396 3*9 

621 615 618 618 

34Q000 340000 34DOOO 345000 

235000 233000 234000 235000 

1060 1048.95 104695 105668 
721 709 715 709 

«tS0 695 701 700 

891 886 889 888.11 

326 319 377J2 334 

364 357 358 361 

344 34Q 340 344 


Kuala Lumpur cwpgiKiiB** 

PniwiS HWMi 

AMMBHdgs 
Genttng 
Mai Banking 
Malum ShmF 
PeJrtniffsCos 
Proion 
Public Bk 
Renong 
Resorts World 
Rothmans PM 
S&ne Darby 
Tetekom Mai 


Tmaga 
Utd Engl 


news 


1630 

15.90 

1890 

16J0 

13X0 

1130 

1140 

13X0 

2635 

25J0 

2625 

26 

185 

5.75 

5X0 

5X0 

&95 

075 

895 

870 

1130 

12.90 

1110 

1190 

*10 

178 

*02 

193 

158 

3X8 

158 

3X6 

865 

BJS 

830 

8X0 

2675 

2575 

2650 

26 

8X0 

810 

840 

815 

19 

1110 

1880 

1810 

11X0 

11J0 

11X0 

11X0 

21 

19X0 

20X0 

2810 

9 

8.90 

895 

895 


Madrid 

Acerinox 

ACESA 

A gues B are earn 

4/genftjrfe 

BBV 

Bonestn 

Bortrirter 

Bee Centro Hlsp 

Ben Popular 

Ben Santander 

CEPSA 

Coottoente 

Carp Mapfre 

Endesa 

FECSA 

Gas Natural 

Iberdrola 

Pryco 

Repsai 

SevUcnaElec 
7abocnlera 
Tetefanien 
Union Fenosa 
vaienc Cement 


25300 

1875 

5950 

7450 

10190 

1605 

2525a 

4925 

32500 

13880 

4950 

2840 

7740 

11750 

1300 

MM 
1850 
2920 
61 Sfl 
1420 
75B0 

flB 

2125 


Balsa index: 55614 
Prevteas; 56686 
24810 25300 25180 
1015 ISM 1860 
5831 5880 5900 

77K 7790 7400 

10080 10100 10200 
1535 1570 1595 

24480 24960 25340 
4790 4790 *940 

31200 31300 37180 
12500 12640 12640 
4860 *880 4980 

2760 7780 2805 

7780 7850 7940 

11300 11370 11650 
1260 1275 1290 

28700 28790 29300 
1780 1785 1B60 

2305 2910 2360 

6060 6110 6070 

1390 1395 1405 

7200 7X0 7470 

4290 4290 4430 

1285 1300 1310 

2050 2090 2110 



Markets Closed 

The Frankfurt. Sao Paulo 
and Vienna stock markets 
were closed Thursday for a 
holiday. 


Helsinki 

EnsoA 
Huhtanujki i 
Keitbro 
Kesko 
Meato A 
Metro B 
MPiu-Serla B 
NMie 
Nokia A 
Onori-vniynure 
Outokumpu A 
UPMKymmenc 
valmet 


HEX General index: 307104 
Previous; 306634 

4650 
327 
51 JO 
7350 
1760 
[4S 
40 JO 
115 
346 
204 
102 
IP 
9251 


4AJ0 

4650 

46X0 

22S 

225 

227 

51.20 

SQX0 

MJO 

7150 

73 

73 

1780 

17 JO 

17.70 

146 

MS 

1*5X0 

41 

40 JO 

40X0 

13/50 

134X0 

137 

349 

344 JO 

34850 

704 

201 

203X0 

702 .20 

101.10 

102 

120 

117X0 

11830 

9140 

92X0 

93 JO 


London 

Abbey Hart 
Afiied Daneca 
Angd on Water 
Argo; 

AsdaG 
assoc Brl 
BAA 
Barclays 
Bass 
BAT Ind 
BankScoOamf 
Blue Circle 
BOCGnuO 
Boots 
BPB Ind 
BrttAertKp 
Brft Atom* 
BG 

Bnl Land 
Brit Petlm 
BSkyB 
Brit Steel 
Bril Tetacam 
BTP 


FT-SE 100:467230 
Preriaas: *677 Ja 


9 JS 
4J1 
682 
615 
1J0 
5.71 
637 
1150 
R07 
167 
602 
630 
1630 
73 
3X9 
12J5 
7.19 
107 
602 
7.93 
i 
IS* 

4.50 

7SP 


Burmah Castrol 10.70 


Burton Gp 
Cable Wireless 
CodewrSenw 
Cartian Comm 
Comm! Urean 
Compass Ga 
Courioulds 

Divans „ 

Efccttotoinponents *0J 
EMI Group 11.98 

Energy Group SAO 


.38 

5JM 

552 

S3* 

7.02 

682 

143 

4JB 


9 

644 

677 

60B 

1.18 

5X5 

U8 

1115 

7.95 
5JS 
3.92 
J 33 
10.10 
733 
3X3 
1Z27 
7.09 
201 
5.91 
702 
509 
1J2 
640 

1.95 

1004 

US 

690 

544 

106 

630 

672 

3J5 

672 
601 
II JO 
5X7 


9.13 9X1 

4X5 4X5 

682 6.79 
609 610 

1.19 1.19 

671 668 

5J2 5.29 

1202 1155 
B07 801 

5.60 659 

198 60) 

630 629 

1030 10.16 
7J7 733 

3X8 3X5 

1155 1127 
7.18 7.10 

204 101 

6 5.93 

70S 737 

692 6*2 

1J4 U3 
4X8 648 

1.97 MS 
1664 1035 
1.37 136 

5 6*6 

5.50 5.49 

622 S08 

692 7.12 

6.80 6.73 

33B 338 

674 4 75 

604 404 

1104 1176 
533 538 


Manila 


PSE tottas: 2758X1 



Preriws: 2722X7 

Ayala B 

19 

10 

1875 

102* 


20 

1935 

20 

19 JS 

BkPbffioisi 

160 

IS* 

160 

156 

C8P Homes 

10 

v/o 

9X0 

960 


93JO 

91 

93 

91 

Metro Bor* 

600 

■Wi 

585 

595 


7.40 

7 

739 

7.10 

PClBoi* 

260 257X0 

7SS 

260 

Ph» Longest 

TO 

765 

IN 

765 

San Miguel B 

80 

« 

79X0 

80 

SM Prime H4g 

7X0 

7.30 

7X0 

7 JO 


5630a 
2300 
4230 
1510 
4660 
1400 
1100 
1240 
3S20 
1410 
450 
A17 
6620 
520 
8950a 
3970 
665 
2260 
1560 
516 

349 
700 

1150 
221 
887 
545 
8060 
2030 
380 
515 
2180 
3620 
2190 
1200 
1360 
366 
A7S 
7590 
860 
088 
1660 
1020 
1450 
863 
4510 
1630 
1910 
606 
8*40 
911 
586 

350 
780 
240 

1430 
1100b 1050b 
<H0b *2806 
710 697 

312 3P9 

1510 1480 

11800 11700 
737 716 

3730 3630 

1530 1460 

50* SB 
8320 »0d 

6170 6050 

1220 1210 
1200 11*0 
8500 8470 

1540 1570 

2020 19*0 

69* 675 

2900 2780 


567DQ 

2360 

4300 

1560 

4750 

1*20 

1120 

1280 

3580 

1450 

463 

625 

6770 

529 
B9*0a 

4130 

678 

7300 

1SB0 

530 
364 
706 

1170 

226 

900 

553 

8300 

2040 

386 

521 

2230 

3700 

2240 

1290 

1380 

373 

6BS 

1620 

867 

910 

mo 

1040 

1470 

905 

4540 

1660 

7020 

710 

*010 

914 

603 

356 

7*6 

248 

1490 


5650a 5680a 
2360 2350 
4300 4270 

1550 1520 
4670 4690 
1420 1400 

1100 1100 
1280 1260 
3540 3590 

1430 1400 

454 465 

620 625 

6710 6710 

520 529 

8*70o 89*0a 
4000 4110 

673 669 

2270 2300 
1580 1560 


517 

352 

702 


535 

360 

701 


1170 1160 

221 227 


B90 

553 


896 

555 


8300 8060 

2040 2850 


380 

518 


382 

51* 


Blochem Pham 
Bombardier B 
BrascnnA 
Craneco 
CiBC 

can Man Ran 
Cdn NatRes 
CdnOcdd Pet 
Cdn Pacific 
Comlnco 
Dafusai 
Dam tar 
Donohue A 
Du PonICdaA 
Edper Group 
EuroNevMng 
Fairfax FJnl 
Ftrican bridge 
Fletcher Chan A 
Franco Nevada 
GuKCda Res 
Imperial on 
In co 

IPL Energy 
LoMlaw B 
Laewen Group 
MacmtUBIdt 
InflA 


Magna li 
Mentone 


Norsk. KYOTO 
NonkCSkOgA 
NytamedA 
Orida Asa A 
Petlm GroSvc 
SogoPettmA 
SOHWed 
Tronsooean OH 
Storebrand Asa 


366 

2 a 

99 
605 
305 
143 
13*50 

H.T 

47 JO 47.28 47J0 47 JO 


361 

361 JO 

366 

259 

762 

262 

77X0 

98 

98 

62* 

•631 

626 

XI 

304 

30b 

I3H 

143 142XD 

133 

133X0 

133 

N.T. 

N.T. 

495 


Mexico 

Alfa A 
BanocdB 
Cemex CPO 
OhaC 

ErnpMadema 

GpoCmoAl 

GpoFScamcr 

GpoRitlnnna 

RM dart Mw 

Televisa CPO 

TelMexL 


*6M 

17.16 

28J8 

12X0 

39X0 

45X5 

IJ2 

27.00 

28.10 

11300 

1734 


Bebatades 3924X8 
PiatoS 390635 

<60 e . 95 46X0 
17.10 17.14 1698 
7150 28X5 28X0 
1226 12X0 1220 
39.00 39.00 39.60 
4500 45J» 45X5 
13 1 133 132 

27 JO 27 J# 27J0 
27 £5 27X5 030 
109.90 11100 109X0 
17.18 17J4 17.18 


Milan 


Afeanm Assre 

Bra Comm Hal 

BcaFMeurom 

BcadiRgma 

Benetton 

Croon iMkmo 

Ed bon 

ENI 

Fial 


MIB Tet fH Xtft ai. 12238X0 
Previous: 12242X0 

11100 10900 10900 10970 
3445 SSSfi 337fl 3«0 
4515 *430 4*50 4430 

1245 1227 1227 1229 

23650 2ZM0 23*58 2 3100 
2550 2505 2545 OT 

8100 nn> 7970 8030 
8750 8650 8740 8690 

5660 S590 5630 5605 


Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

AifUduide 

Alcatel AUth 

AaM/AP 

BaKdre 

BK 

BNP 

Canal Plus 

Caiefmr 

Casino 

CCF 

CSefem 

Christian Dior 

CLP -Data Finn 

Credit Agnes 
Dretaoe 
EB-AauOoine 
EridadaBS 


CAC-40.2579J4 
Prevtan; 2583.17 


Euroun 
Gen.Eam 
Havas 
ImeM 
Lotage 
Le^wid 
LDreal 
LVMH 
Lyon. Eaut 
MicneSnB 


815 
174J8 
910 
636 
358X0 
663 
898 
238 
1025 
3765 
266.90 
255 
630 
892 
528 
1270 
885 
591 
838 
9X0 
6J5 
744 
408J0 
789 
3 77 
944 
2055 
1441 
572 
32*30 


809 

170 


004 
147X0 
875 880 

614 69Q 

34520 347 

6*0 647 

843 852 

231 233X0 
996 1005 

3664 3689 

Z58J0 264 

2*4 2*590 
620 638 


870 

513 


1262 1262 
866 863 


563 

817 


576 

831 


9X5 V-30 

0.40 6.45 

706 712 

395.10 39510 

772 777 

368.10 377 

919 924 

1997 2038 

1384 138* 

566 5 69 

31 2 JO 31630 


804 

175 

893 

631 

355 

6S7 

850 

Z33 

996 

3706 

363 

2*790 

627 

876 

525 

1362 

070 

578 

817 

9J0 

6.40 

735 

402.90 

709 

37*50 

91B 

1981 

1389 

567 

325 


Dairy Farm lot ■ 
DBStorelqn 
DBS Land 
FflKer&NMve 
HKLand ' 

Jard Mathesn" 
Jaid Stortegt • 
Kepad 
Keppef Bank 
KeppelFels 
Keapel Land 
OCBC foreign 
DSUntatBkF 
Partway Hdgs 

Serobawang 

Sing Air loragn 
Sing Land 
Sing Press F 
Sing Tech Ind 
5 tog T&ecemm 
Tal Lee Bank 
Utd Industrial 

UldDSeaBkF 
Wing Tol Hdgs 

r fn US rtutos 


073 

872 

872 

873 

I860 

1810 

I8J0 

1880 

*94 

*86 

4X6 

*86 

11X0 

1130 

11X0 

11.40 

170 

2X8 

2X9 

233 

690 

675 

675 

690 

174 

172 

172 

178 

670 

6X5 

6X5 

6X5 

3X0 

178 

ISO 

1* 

4X2 

4X2 

*B2 

*84 

*2* 

*16 

*2* 

*20 

1830 

17.70 

17X0 

18X0 

9X5 

970 

9XS 

9X5 

670 

6X5 

670 

6X0 

7.05 

6X5 

7 

7 

12X0 

12.10 

12^1 

1230 

7 JO 

735 

735 

735 

29X0 

20X0 

29.40 

19X0 

19B 

3X6 

198 

196 

153 

2X0 

2X3 

2X2 

138 

136 

136 

133 

1.15 

1.13 

1.1* 

l.l* 

15,10 

1*70 

15 

15.10 

436 

430 

430 

*26 







Smsetao 

1750 

1730 

Taipei 

Stack Mamet Index: 7997X5 
Previous: BBSOxi 

Stomata ax 
StrfTOcrn* 

SwnBorno 

1100 

eo» 

9920 

1160 

7710 

«7W 


149 

148 



1030 

1010 

Chong Hwa Bk 

117X0 

M4 

11*50 

117 

SumPorao BK 

1660 

1*70 

Chto Tung Bk 

6850 

67X0 

68 

67X0 

SumHChem 

497 

492 


116X0 

US 

115 

116 

Stmt tomo Elec 

1880 

1850 

China Sleet 

29X0 

2930 



sumB Metro 

317 

308 


116 

114 11*50 USX0 

SuhiB Trust 

1060 

1070 

Formosa PtosJle 

73 

70 

70 


TobhaPhami 

3100 

3050 

Huo Nan Bk 

115.50 

111 

112 

115 

TokeoaCnem 

3010 

7970 

Inll Comm BV 

66 JO 

6S 

65 


TDK 

9050 

8800 

Non Yo Ptolics 

77 

74X0 

7*50 

74 50 

TonofcuEIPwr 

TtUO 

7010 

Shin Kong Life 

09X0 

88 

89X0 

8850 

Total Bar* 

1020 


Tehran Saul 

127 

116 

117 


ToMa Marine 

1A» 


Tatuna 

56X0 

55.50 

56 

55X0 

Tokyo 61 Pwr 

2290 

7230 

Uld MKiaElrc 

77 

74 

74 

73 

Tokyo Electron 

S?50 

5300 

UldWorMCtwi 

68 

6/ 

68 

67X0 

Tokyo Gas 

315 

310 






Tokyu Coro. 
Tonen 

690 

680 



Tokyo 

AOnamela 
Aft Wp pun *ir 


Stockholm 


AGAB 
ABBA 
Assl Demon 
Awn A 
Alta Copco A 
Aursflv 
ElectrotuxB 
ErKssonB 
HennesB 
tnceidfwA 
investor B 
MoOuB 


103 
I06JO 
213 
129 
216 
299 
467 
37*50 
26S 
700 
391 JO 
247 


SX U Indec 301MI 
Prcvfens 3*41)5 

107 102X0 10150 
10150 10650 109 

310 211 2» 

172X0 127 129 

207.50 20750 2»3 

29550 29S^ 30150 
460 46150 4*7 

272 273 274 

358 26050 260 

693 69S 698 

386 3B7JO 291 
240 241 2*1X 


Asa hi Bonk 

AsoMChem 

AMWGtai 

Bk Tokyo MIRu 

Bk Yokohamn 

BridgKrlw 

Canon 

OiubuElec 

ChuqakuElK 

Da, Nipp Prior 

DaW 

Dot-icniKanq 
Danra Bwik 
Dawa House 
DarwaScc 
DDf 

DCIBO 


MHM225:Z83IU3 
Prevtflffs: 28351 J4 

1210 
771 


B05 

689 


1210 

1190 

1210 

777 

757 

765 

4*40 

4390 

4400 

813 

795 

797 

687 

675 

684 

1160 

1140 

U«0 

2110 

2070 

7080 

574 

567 

574 

2710 

2650 

2680 

3000 

79« 

7990 

7130 

2100 

7110 

2080 

2050 

2070 

2*10 

2380 

2*00 

785 

765 

776 

1*30 

1400 

1410 

460 

446 

460 

1380 

137Q 

1380 

MX 

851 

86/ 

67 He 

8*408 

8640a 

3730 

2890 

?™ 


Toppan Print 
Toiay ind 
Toshiba 
Tosrem 
Taya Trust 
Toyota Motor 
Yomongucbi 

a t IfiQ 0. 1 / aw 


1620 

BOO 

w 

1200 

K7S 

3520 

2910 


1600 

791 

713 

3130 

795 

3440 

2870 


2180 2240 

3650 3620 

2210 2230 
1280 1300 

1360 1390 

371 368 

682 686 
1610 1600 
B65 860 

894 910 

16*0 1650 

1030 ID2D 
1470 1460 

88b 860 

4540 4450 
1650 1640 

2020 1900 

698 705 

89*0 8930 

*12 *17 

588 603 

353 3SS 
780 78* 

2*2 246 

1440 1490 

1080b 1080b 
4370b 4300b 
709 703 

30* 31| 

1510 1490 

11800 11500 
723 716 

3730 3680 

1520 1460 

508 506 

8320 8260 
6100 6180 
1720 1720 

1200 1710 

8480 8560 
1520 1560 

1990 70Qo 
690 704 

20*0 2760 

1730 1 730 
1160 1170 

8000 79 So 
9840 «■*» 

1010 1020 
1650 1640 

493 «9B 

I860 1880 

3J1 320 

1050 1030 

3080 Xso 
2*80 3000 
9050 0790 
2030 30« 

9*4 *01 

1430 1430 

2750 2290 

5710 5270 
313 315 

«5 690 

1*30 1470 
1670 1610 

F»S 791 
>15 7J7 

3200 3140 
810 785 

3450 3530 

2090 2*30 


Moore 
Newbridge Net 
Nora rtdq Inc 
Norcen Energy 
Nthero Telecom 
NOW 
Onex 

Pancdn Petlm 
Petra Cda 
Placer Dome 
Paco Petlm 
Potash 5ask 
Renaissance 
RioAlgom 
Rogers Cartel B 
Seagram Co 
Shift Cda A 
Stone Consotd 
S uncar 
Talisman Eny 

TeckB 
Tetogtabe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TarOom Bank 
Transalta 
TnntsCdc Pipe 
Trimark FM 
Trftec Katui 
TVXGold 
Westeoos! Eny 
Wesran 


33 R: 33 
2B11 27.90 
35 34.40 
5215 51X5 
3390 3190 
SB 57X5 
36X5 36’ff 

31X5 31 

36X5 36X0 
39J5 39 J0 
25X0 25.15 
1120 ltt90 
30 29X0 
33 33 

2065 2340 

40.90 40J0 

344 338 

31.05 301* 

23’i 23 

7330 72to 
1140 1220 
66.10 65X0 
45% 45.10 
43X0 43H 

18.80 1855 
4SN 4*35 

20.05 19X0 
7415 74X5 

1135 12fe 

30.90 30U 
57to 55.10 

31.65 31.10 
33V: 321* 

117X5 116 

11X5 UJO 
2640 26’u 

3035 X 
2316 22X0 
25 JO 2*M 
15 14X5 
113X5 11120 
43 42'9 

36.70 36X5 

25 24'i 

55 JO 5*15 
58 57V* 

25 JO 24X5 
3*70 33X5 

45.70 4*65 
30’1 2*X0 
*2U 41X5 

24X0 24 

30V, 29.65 
4110 41.20 
15X0 15.60 

26.70 26.45 

5140 51 

29X5 29.70 

9 8*t 

25.10 24V. 

84 81 


33V4 33J0 . 

28X5 27.90 
34fe 35 
SW 51X0 ‘ 

3195 3170 

57.90 5730 

36X0 3670 
31.40 31X0 
36X0 361* 

39 JO 39X5 • 

25.15 25JD • 

11 UJO • 

29X0 30 

33 33 . 

23’« 231* 

4015 40 R: 

338 342 2rL 

30V: 31.10 
23.10 23 .> 

7230 7330 
1130 12** . 

65.95 6615 . 

45.15 45X0 
43Mi 4TC • 

1BJ0 1W 
45X5 441* • 

19.95 20.10 
74J0 74J0 . 

1235 1135 . 

30X0 3» 

59* 57.10 

31.15 31X0 

3330 33V: 

11620 117.10 
1140 11X0 
26X) 26-70 

30‘i 30’.i 

m 22J* 

25 JO 2*90 
1*70 15 

113X5 113X5 

42.90 42^40 . 

36X5 36X5 ■' 

25 24*6 

55 5*10 
57J5 SB 
25 JO 24X0 
34-i 33X5 
4X 70 44X5 

29.95 29.70 
4? 41 J5 

7iJ0 24 
30J0 29.70 
41 JO 41.95 
1SJ, 16X5 
26X5 26X5 
52.05 53^ 

29X0 29X0 
9 EL80 
24X5 25.10 - 
84 01 




795 

1400 

453 

IjTfl 

B60 


Toronto 

AWHbl Pnce 
ASrorta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Anderson E*pt 
Bk Manireal 
Bk Rova Scoria 
BankkGahl 
BCE 

BC Teiecomm 


TS6 industrials: 6367J4 
Prcvim: 6389X3 

25.15 24 40 25.15 2JS0 
33'V 33J0 13 JO 3S. 
49 V, 48x0 49 si 

16.20 1BJ0 18.M1 
52.15 52.15 53J0 
58JO 56*0 S7.10 58.15 
JS'i 34X5 35' i 

37.40 36.U 36X5 3^ 

11* 31.20 31 JO 31 


Wellington 

AirNZeoIdB 

Briertr imt 
Carter Hall am 
Fletch Cti BMg 
Finch Cti Eny 
FtotOi Ch Farsi 
Ftotch Ch Paper 
OonNaaron 
Telecom N2 
Wilson Hortort 


Zurich 

ABB B 
Adecco B 
AkisuisseR 
AiK-SeranoB 
AieiR 
Baer Hog S 
Baknse Hdq P 
BK Vision 
Cftotaec Otero 
OarianlR 
Od Suisse Go R 
Eleknoumtl B 
Ems-Oiemle 
ESEC Hdg 
HcwerbankB 
IjecWenstLBB 
NesfleR 
Nutrarils R 
'Seri.kn Bueh R 
Pnigrsa Hid B 
PnarmVIsnB 
Richemont a 
PedliPC 

ROOTffHdgPC 

m irK 

SMH B 
Sul:er R 
SwMRetmR 
Swnsair R 
UBS 3 
WinimiurR 
Zurich tos Ur r 




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Previous: 2332X7 

4 JO 


4.30 

428 

*30 

IJ4 

1-23 

1J3 

3X1 

134 

3X0 

*05 

*00 

*04 

*65 

*57 

*45 

1.93 

1.90 

1.92 

328 

3.22 

378 

3X1 

in 

181 

6.97 

6.94 

6.94 

11.70 

11.65 

11X5 


4-» JL-. • 

> 34^' *v • 


SPI Indec 3246X0 
Previous: 3250J9 


f sv 


i 53 


.u 


7004 

1976 

1987 

2015 

‘■ySy 

539 

572 

539 

530 


1370 

1358 

136« 

1380 


1970 

1960 

1965 

1965 

v- ; - 

980 

880 

880 

880 


1970., 

I960 

1966 

1980 


3700 

1160 

3170 

3300 

v 

loss 

1074 

1080 

1080 

.* i , 

143 136.25 140X0 

1*4 


919 

.983 

91* 

920 

y+J i'-’i 

18*75 

.TO 

183 

184 


539 

538 

539 

539 


6335 

62*5 

6300 

6320 

>^v. 

*550 

4*50 

4475 

4500 


1259 

122* 

1240 

1227 



: ' m 


T' 


483 433 483 *03 

1799 1 772 1797 1786 

1*58 1939 1951 1«6 
169 160.25 186X0 161X0 
1815 1798 1875 »SW 
BOO T79 797 795 

1970 19S0 1969 1*60 
238 735J5 338 2^75 

12930 17660 12780 ltf» 
349J0 341 J4SX0 343 

1850 *“"* 

3230 

879 
1165 
1949 
U73 
1573 
1168 
S28 


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3160 3190 3170 
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1152 1160 Utf 
1923 1935 1WJ 
1453 1 470 Mg 

1540 1571 lf« 

1151 1167 11« 

513 519 52« 


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imofAimu 


PAGE 20 


Yankees Sign Irabu 


IMW ALL Hideki Irabu and the 
New York Yankees finally agreed 
to terms Thursday, settling on a 
S12.8 million, four-year contract. 

The sides were still working out 
final details. The agreement was to 
be announced at a news conference 
Friday. 

The 27-year-old right-hander- 
will receive the largest contract 
ever for a major league rookie, a 
deal that includes an $8.5 million 
signing bonus and averages $2.7 
million a season. Irabu will very 
will be assigned to the minors for a 
week to a month. (AP ) 


Tonkov Holds off Leblanc 


cycling Pavel Tonkov, the Giro 
leader d'ltalia, held off a series of 
challenges Thursday on a moun- 
tainous stage into Varezze. 

Giuseppe di Grande, an Italian 
who rides in Tonkov'B Saeco team, 
won the 214-kilometer stage from 
La Spezia that crossed two moun- 
tain passes and ended with a heart- 
stopping descent to the Ligurian 
seaside town. 

Tonkov, and his chief rival, Luc 
Leblanc, finished. 12 seconds after 
di Grande's group. The Russian is 
42 seconds ahead of Leblanc. 

Several riders crashed into 
hedges and tangled with a TV mo- 
torcycle. (Reuters) 



Tonkov, the Giro leader, climb- 
ing near Varezze on Thursday. 


Ronaldo Changes Mind 


soccer Hours after his agents 
had appeared to accept a contract 
with Barcelona, Ronaldo, die 
Brazilian striker, told Spanish jour- 
nalists that he would leave the dub 
and blamed the club president, Jose 
Luis Nunez. 

“Everything Nunez has said is a 
lie, and we no longer need to ne- 
gotiate with them,” Ronaldo said 
in an interview published Thursday 
in the Spanish sports daily Marca. 

The interview came afrcrahectic 
24 hours of talks, in which Ron- 
aldo's agents had appeared to ac- 
cept, ana then pull out of, a deal to 
improve his contract. One of die 
sticking points was whether a bo- 
nus payment of 2 billion pesetas 
($14 million) should be paid in 
Spain or in a tax haven. (Reuters) 

• Mohamed al Fayed, the owner 
of Harrods, die luxury London de- 
partment store, has agreed to be- 
come the major shareholder in an 
English second division soccer club, 
Fulham, Harrods said Thursday. 

Al Fayed, an Egyptian-born 
businessman, will become dub 
chairman as pan of the deal while 
the club has reacquired the freehold 
to its Craven Cottage stadium on 
the banks of the Thames in west 
London. (Reuters) 


Rroadhurst Leads 


GOLF Paul Broadhurst of Eng- 
land took the first-round lead 
Thursday in the European Tour- 
nament Players' championship in 
Hamburg. He made a four-under- 

g it 68 on a cold windy day. Alberto 
inaghi of Italy, Miguel Angel 
Martin of Spain and Barry Lane of 
England were all a shot back on 
69. ( Reuters ) 


Sports 


World Roundup 










A Cup Final Worthy of the Hype 


International Herald Tribune 

M UNICH — For once die Euro- 
pean Cup final matched the 
hype piled around it. AU to 
often tiie match — the climax of 
Europe's top club competition — is a 
deeply dreary and defensive spectacle. 

On a balmy summer evening Wed- 
nesday in the tree-shadowed bowl of 
Munich's Olympic Stadium, the match 
for once lived up to the overamplified, 
glitzy, showbiz staging. 

Borussia Dortmund of Germany up- 
set Juventus of Turin, the reigning Euro- 
pean champion, 3-1. 

There is no reason why great oc- 
casions should produce great games. 
This is not a problem restricted to soccer. 
The Super Bowl — from which the 
European Cup Final has stolen the half- 
time show and the giant video screen 
with its specially commissioned films — 
frequently fails to live up to its hype. 
The European Cup has one advantage 
over the Super Bowl: a blowout is an 
acceptable result. If soccer fans cannot 
have a great contest they will settle for 
the coronation of a great team. Great 
teams do rise to the occasion. Two of the 
best finals of the last 20 years were AC 
Milan 's two 4-0 victories. In 1 989, Ruud 
Gullit and Marco van Basten reduced 
Steau Bucharest to a team of helpless 
schoolboys. In 1994 Milan exposed the 
defensive limitations of Ronald Koeman 
and Barcelona with a cruel brilliance. 

Until Wednesday, those two routs 
were the only finals in 19 years to pro- 
duce as many as four goals. This year’s 

S also had the bonus of two quite 
ing scores, a pleasant change from 
the years when even one bad goal 
seemed a bonus. Fourteen of the pre- 
vious 19 finals had ended 0-0 or 1-0. 
Last year’s final was relative a goal- 
feast: Ajax and Juventus tied 1-1, (after 
30 minutes extra time) and Juventus 
then won the penalty shoot-out. 

On Wednesday , Juventus started with 
confidence. In a refreshing break with 


Vantage Point / Piter Berlin 


tradition, it went for Dortmund from the 
kickoff. Zinedine Zidane tumbled mys- 
teriously in the penalty area. Behind him 
Stefan Reuter, a Dortmund defender, 
tried to look surprised. Sandor Puhl, the 
referee, declined to award a penalty. 
Then, Christian Vjeri, in the clear, shot 
wide of die Dortmund goal. 

Dortmund was also quick to attack, 
but for the first half hour it struggled to 
penetrate the hard-working, hard-tack- 
ling Juventus defense. Suddenly the 
German team, was two goals up. The 
goals came in the 30th and 34th minutes 
and were very similar. Two crosses — 
one from die left, one from the right — 
floated over the mass of Juventus de- 
fenders to the far post where Karlheinz 
Riedle, Dortmund’s deadliest striker, 
waited unmarked. He beat Angelo Per- 
uzzi first with a slashing shot and then 
with a stinging header. 

“He said he had a dream before the 
match that he would score one with his 
left foot and another with his head. It is 
unbelievable, I know,’’ Reuter said. 

"When the first one went in with my 
left foot, I couldn't believe it,” said 
Riedle. “So I thought ‘Well, I’d better 
just keep on dreaming.’ ” 

. Marcello Lippi, die Juventus coach, 
brought on Alessandro del Piero, the 
young star whose form had deserted 
him. After 65 minutes he rediscovered 
his touch. A crisp, clever buildup fin- 
ished with AlenBoksic crossing low into 
die goalmouth where del Piero finished 
with a circus flick, volleying the ball left- 
footed behind his own right leg and past 
Stefan BQos, the Dortmund keeper. 

Ottmar Hitzfeld, the Dortmund 


quite a way off his line. But it felt like a 
film afterwards. I couldn't believe it.” 


coach, replaced attacker Stephane 
Chapuisat with midfielder Lars Ricken 


Chapuisat with midfielder Lars Ricken 
— a defensive move. Yet with his first 
touch Ricken effectively ended the 
match. He received die ball 30 meters 
from the Juventus goal and hit an in- 


Munich Owes Dortmund One 



Kal PbffeabacWRtuttn 

Paulo Sousa of Borussia Dortmund 
carrying cup out of the stadium. 


International Herald Tribune 

Dortmund’s victory in die European 
Cup Final was good news for Munich 
but bad news for Turkey. 

With one round of German Budesliga 
games to go. Dortmund can finish no 
higher than third. If it had lost Wed- 
nesday, it would have played in next 
season’s UEFA Cup. Instead, as reigning 
European Cup Champion it will be al- 
lowed to defend its crown and will be one 
of the eight seeded teams, as will Bayern 
Munich, the German champion. 

The eight seeded teams advance di- 
rectly to fee Champions League stage of 
the competition. 

Juventus had already secured a top- 
eight seeding as Italian champion. If it 
had won Wednesday, it would have 
opened a seeded place for the champion 
of the eighth-ranked country in Europe: 
GaJaiasaray of Turkey. 

Instead GaJatasaray will have to com- 


pete in fee enlarged qualifying .round, 
which will be played July 23 and 30. 

That round will also include fee 
second-place teams from Europe's 
biggest leagues, which are being ad- 
mitted for fee first time. They include 
Bayer Leverkusen of Germany. 

Germany will have nine teams in 
Europe's three cups next season. 

It has five places in fee UEFA Cup. 
One belongs to Schalke, which won that 




FRIDAY, MAY’ 30, 1997 . 


IT 


*4 


Being No. 1 Counts, 
Martina Hingis Finds 




1 tW ' 7 

i Mr 


Her Foe, Near Victory, Blows It 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


Jwjor* Umwithnfl/.Vgtflf* t-raiHT-Pwor 

Martina Hingis reaching for one during her second-round French Open match against Gloria Pizzichini. 


stant, arcing, floating shot that caught 
Peruzzi five meters off his goal line, 
sailed out of reach above his head and 
then dipped just under the crossbar. 

“To score with my first touch of the 
match is just madness,” Ricken said. “I 
had noticed throughout that he stood 


m afterwards. I couldn't believe it.” 
It was a great goal but it deflated a 
ten ti ally great game, draining fee last 
l minutes of any suspense. 


J uventus managed 13 strikes on tar- 
get, Dortmund only three, each one a 
goal. Yet in the end, Juventus was 
well beaten and its claim to greatness 
exposed Its attackers are slow, its de- 
fenders erratic and too many of its play- 
ers did not rise to the great occasion. 
Riedle was the best striker on fee field; 
Andreas Moller, who had a foot in all 
three goals, the best midfield player; and 
Matthias Sammer, crisp and decisive, fee 
best defender. All three have struggled 
wife injuries, but on Wednesday they 
showed familiar world class form. Most 
Juventus players fell far shod of their 
level 

This is why fee fans, the viewers, the 
sponsors, broadcasters and advertisers 
put up with one dreary, defensive final 
after another. In a world of manufac- 
tured entertainment, those dull spec- 
tacles are proof of fee integrity of fee 
sporting event. Sport offers an uncertain 
outcome and fee possibility of watching 
spontaneous genius as it happens. 

On Wednesday night, as Sammer, the 
Dortmund captain, hoisted the cup, and 
that greatest of modern stadium honors. 
Queen's "We Are The Champions” 
drowned the joyous reaction of fee Bor- 
ussia fans, fireworks filled the sky. For 
once the soccer itself had offered some 
fireworks. That will be enough to keep 
soccer fans tuning in again next year. 


PARIS — Martina Hingis made it 
through, barely; 

Her Trail an opponent was behaving 
tike a security guard, stubbornly refus- 
ing to let Hingis into the French Open’s 
fend round. The 16-year-old Hingis 
tried everything to prove she belonged 
there. She waved her groundstrokes 
around, imploring the guard to i m ag ine 
the disaster fee French Open final would 
be if it were to go on without forehands 
tike these — and how about this two- 
handed backhand? Huh? So how about 
it? But fee guard was not impressed (and 
neither was the audience). 

A stronger champion would have 
tried to push her way through wife 
serves and volleys, but Hingia doesn't 
have that in her. She was just five points 
away from it being too late when, mys- 
tifyingly, as it sometimes goes with 
doormen and bouncers, her opponent 
suddenly seemed to get it. "You mean, 
you're the No. 1 player in the world?" 
Gloria Pizzichini, seemed to say. 

Pizzichini double-faulted, away her 
crucial game point, then just as quickly, 
almost apologetically, gave away the 
next two points to allow Hingis to draw 
even in the second set. “If you’re No. I. 
you can’t be wasting your time out here 
with a player tike meT And Pizzichini, 
No. 75 in the world, proceeded to lose 
eight games in a row to help lead Hingis 
through the gate where the stars go — at 
3-6, 6-4, 6-1 — while Pizzichini stayed 
behind, as if at her post 

She just had to hold her ground and 
there woaldn ’£ have been anything Hin- 
gis could have done about it. 

“It means feat I was too afraid to win 
fee match ," Pizzichini said afterward. 


three months. Unlike Hingis, Graf is 
entirely used to such difficulties. In re- 
cent years Graf, 27, has probably won . 
more major titles while injured than ; 

while healthy. . 

But no one at fee top is safe No. 3 - 
Monica Seles advanced with a 6-3, 7-5 __ 
victory over Sarah Pitkowski of Prance. ■ 


anri then complained about a recent heel . , 
iniurv restrictme her movement She also 


Hingispressed her hands together and 
rid, "She made fee double fault and I 


was like. ‘Thank God.’ It helps some- 
times if you're No. 1 in fee world.” 

The next time Hingis is frustrated, her 
title might not do her as much good. 
Hingis said she was afraid to run hard 
because of a knee injury, which required 


injury restricting her movement .>nc aw 
miss es her father and coach, Karolj . 
Seles, at home in Florida undergoing ■ 
treatment for cancer. ■ 

“It’s really hard just in terms of p»y- 
ing, practicing; just also having it on __ 
your mind,” said Seles, 23. "If I m *. 
feeling I’m struggling, I always call my . ■ 
daddy. Hie saw my first match, told n>ri ' 
fee things I need to work on. ‘ ' ■ 

Hingis’s next opponent will be fee ' 
youngest entrant, 15-year-oid Anna 
Kounukova of Russia, who has yet to 
lose a set in her first French Open. * 
Hingis has beaten her twice in junior 
matches, including a victory at Wimble- 
doo, when she didn’t yield a game. 

The other 16-year-old. a 6-foot- 1 1 
American, Venus Williams, was 
knocked out of her debut Grand Slam * 
tournament by 29-year-old Nathalie** 
Tauziat of France, 5-7.- 6-3, 7-5. Wil- 
liams was 3 years old when Tamriat was ■ 1 
made her own first appearance at Ro- 
land Garros. The end came on center 1 
court in front of a full house when 1 
Williams double faulted for the 13th 
time in die match. 

"Clay isn’t, l guess, my favorite sur- 1 • 
face, but I bad fun,” Williams said. “I 
mean, I never slid like this before in my 
life, sliding into bails. I would hit fee--' 
ball, then slide: I would never slide the 
right way. This is the first time I ever 
slid the right way, so it's a good thing. I - ■ 
was having fun sliding around. But all ' • 
my sliding is over. Somebody put an end^ 
to h.m have to slide next year.” «*! 


X,.n* 

v-' 


Larsson Plucks 
Another Seed 


arthroscopic surgery after she was 
thrown off a friend’s horse five weeks 


ago. 

"I have a little fear,” she said. 

After winning her opening singles 
match easily, she said her confidence 
was hurt by a poor doubles performance 
Wednesday. 

"Because 1 dldnTptay seven Weeks,' 
I don’t have the eye right now to see 
where die balls are going, so that’s 
maybe my little problem,” die said. "I 
don't have the anticipation. ' ’ 

ft is also possible that Hingis will 
improve as fee two weeks wear on, and 
be back near her best in time for fee 
semifinal. She has now won 33 con- 
secutive matches, the fifth longest 
streak in women's tennis since 1968. 

Nonetheless, the women’s tide on 
Thursday became Steffi Grafs to lose. 
The defending champion at Roland Gar- 
ros for the last two years, winner overall 


by Otr Strifes** Dopadtcs 

The only seeded player to fall in 
either the men’s or women’s draw 
Thursday was Felix Mantilla of 
Spain, the latest victim of Sweden 's 
Magnus Larsson. 

Larsson, who defeated Jim Cour- 
ier. a former champion, in fee first 
round, beat Mantilla, fee 10th seed. 
6-2, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, and could yet be a 
threat to Michael Chang, who is in 
die same quarter of the draw. 

Chang, seeded second, moved 
into the third round with a victory 
over Jerome Goimard of France, 6- 
2, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2. The Dutchman 
Richard Krajicek, seeded sixth, 
beat Bohdan Utihrach of the Czech 


Republic, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. 
Wayne Ferreira, of South J 


of five French Opens and 21 Grand 
Slam titles, Graf herself is recovering 


Slam titles, Graf herself is recovering 
from a knee injury that sidelined her for 


Wayne Ferreira, of South Africa, 
seeded 13th, and a semifinalist last 
year, beat Roberto Carretero of 
Spain, 7-6 (7-4), 4-6. 6-1. 2-6, 6-4. 

(Reuters, AFP) 








YS'. 1 * 

Sr 5 *-* ■ - . 


ftl STHL 



cup last week and qualifies as holder. 
Before Wednesday .Stuttgart and Bo- 


Before W ednesday ,5 tu ttgart and Bo- 
chum, had made sure of fourth and fifth 
place in the Bundesliga and two UEFA 
Cup places. 

Dortmund's promotion to the Cham- 
pions Cup freed another UEFA Cup 
place. 

ft meant that Munich 1860, sixth in 
the Bundesliga, was a certain European 
entry. That leaves Karlsruher and Wer- 
der Bremen to contest fee last place. 






. -• 


LW1 : 


. . ~U !!•,; ; • 7 ...V .’/• ii / ; ..^1 

>: r c 

;. 'b, 4. 


V,.- •• '-V ■ • 


■Hi. it-V"' 


mm 


vi- -a 




ftH&ppc fttytSf/Reuian 

Monica Seles serving to Sarah Pitkowski in the French Open Thursday. 


Scoreboard 



BASEBALL 


Major Leaour Stardoms 


EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

BoMmore 

34 

15 

494 

— 

Mew York 

27 

24 

.529 

8 

Taranto 

25 

23 

.521 

8*4 

Detroit 

23 

27 

MO 

1114 

Boston 

21 

27 

438 

1214 


- esmuu. onnsuN 


OewlMd 77 22 -551 — 

MKwuukee 22 25 MB A 

CMcagu 22 26 -4SB 4V4 

Kansas dry 22 27 MS 5 

Minnesota 22 29 .431 « 

WEST DIVISION 

Teas 37 22 .55] — 

Ana hoim 24 23 S31 1 

Seattle 27 24 1 

Oakland 21 32 JM 8 

HMIOKU LUAVK 
CASTomstaN 

W L Pd. GB 
AltsntQ 35 is TUt — 

FtoWo M » £ 

mWYw* M 23 -54? Th 

Montreal 27 23 -540 8 

PMtaWphla 19 32 313 16’A 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

Houston 2S M - 

Pittsburgh 25 M ^90 ~ 

SL units 21 28 -428 3 

Chicago 19 31 J® S'b 

pndmoB J9 32 JV3 * 

WESrOtVHUOW 

San Frond*® » ® ■J® " 

Colorado 27 B J«0 W 

Los Angeles 24 23 XU 3 

Sot Diego 20 29 J08 9 


AltsntQ 
Florida 
NOW Ye* 

Monfrwl 

PMtaMpWa 


VDHaUriLMKOHS 

AWnCAHLEAOUe 

CMcogo 1D9 101 000-3 6 0 

MM 000 130 10K— 5 5 0 

Alvarez. C Casfllta 16). McElray (7), Kar- 
Chnor (7), T. CasJItla O) artd Ponce Sele. Wt»- 
dln (72, Stocumb TO and HasaMaa W— Sera. 
6-3- L — Alvarez. 3-6. Sv— Stoamib (4). 
HRs-CWcaga F. Thoatas (in. Belt* {ID. 
Bantmre 24* llo ooo-t 10 e 

DRntt 001 0OO 000-1 T 2 

Key, BosMe (7) and Webstm MoeMer. J. 
Cummings (21. Mice* (4), Brecon (8). M. 
Myers (9) trad 8. Johnson. W— Key, 9-1. 
L— Moehter, 3-4. Sv-flaskfa 01. 
HRs— Baltimore. ByjmJ6fS0nt4LR.Atomor 
U3. FLPaknalra 00). 

MIMUttM 001 000 900-1 6 0 

MtaMSrtO 000 in 2M— 3 7 0 

Kofi, FOttors C7J ond. Levis; ftttee, 
Guardado (fl. AouBera (9J o«l SWnbodi. 
W-Rodto 4-4. L— Kart 2-6. S9-A0oflera 
HO). HRs— Minnesota, Owner (4L 
Dr Jackson R). 

NWYM 000 320 010-6 6 0 

Toronto 004 000 000-4 5 1 

D.Wetfj, M. Rivera (B) ond Posad® 
Cusnan. Plesoc m, QuontilB (B), TknBn (9) 
ond Santiago, w— a wens, 5-1 L—Gunttan, 
M. Sv-M. RNera (1SJ. HRs-New Yd*. T. 
Martinez (19). Toronto, Carter (5). 

Oewtad 010 1M 170—10 14 1 

KaosAOly 000 0W 6 1 

Ogeo, AssenmoelKr ff), PUP* W* *■ 
Jackson {9]..and 5. Atanar. B ddier,Co yn 
<81 ond.AftadWBne. W-Assenmocher. If 
L-BddmGB-HR-Oevelonrt JusBce (15). 
Teras^ 000 000 000—0 4 0 

Seattle ' 1 «• BM 000 «*-»/» 
D.OHnr, WhSeskle tTL Gunderson ond 
I. Rodriguez; RoJqhnsOft Ayota W ond 
Do. Wilson. w-RoJormson, M- a. 
OflvwM. _ ..... 

Awdreire 140 OH 405-14 M 9 


Oakkml 300 210 130-10 15 2 

DaortRger, P- Harts (73, Janes (Bl, Hottz 
m, Pmtol OO and Leyrttz; Karwr, C Reyes 
(7). Marker CD. D. Johnson (9) and 
GaWHams. W— PerdvaL2.z L— Mower, o- 
8. HRs—Anahrim, Erstod (51, HoBhs IB. 
Oakland, GfamW («. McGwire 2 H9). 

SheWonai. 

MAT1QNAL LEAQUB 

Odcogo ho on ioo-i t i 

Pi t tsb urgh 100 030 00*-4 8 1 

MoDnaund, BottmSOd («. R. Tans (8) 
and Servtrts; Cook* Rincon <BL lobelia (9) 
on d KfcndOL W-Coolift 44. L— Mutfwttmd, 
4-4. HR— PRtstMTQlv E. Brown O). 
NtwVerk OH 520 000-7 10 I 

M retreat OOO 001 000-0 « J 

BJJones and Hundley; PJAkartinez, 
Toms (6) and FWcher. W— & J Jones, 9-2. 
L-P. JJttartkVH. 8-1. HR-New York, 
Baergan). 

PNkRWpMa OH 000 000-0 8 2 

CktdnaB 018 OH ldx— 2 7 0 

Stephenson BaiMbt (8) and Parent 
Ueberthol (7); Mercker. Carrasco {7}, 
RomKnger 09, Straw (VI ond J. Ottver. 

w -MmOier. 2-S. L-Stepherwon M. 
Sv— Show (75. 


HansMn 1 Oumtchu 

McancuuUkui 
W L T Pt± GB 
SeBHi 26 16 — .619 — 

on* 19 18 — SU 45 

DoM 22 22 — SK Si) 

lone i9 27 1 A7S 6JO 

MpOOn Hom 20 23 — ^65 63 

Kintetsu 18 24 1 .429 a.0 


CYCLING 


Kopuz Gtreco 1, Hazrt Busuvnoo 


Giro o’ I talia 


Ararat Yerevan 1, Punk Yerevan 0 


TOURS DAY'S RKHKTS 

Mel 5, Nippon Ham 2 
nwetsu X Lotte 2 no kmtogBl 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Play-offs 


JjLPATttSR LCAOUZS 
cnttuuMw " 


COHnpUBMSFMAIA 

[EteSTOF-SEVEH) 
WIDHRSDAY'S R8SULT 
Mtad 19 31 15 22— 87 

Olcago 33 31 16 20— 1H 

MtHaidawor 7- 199-977. MasnOuni 7-146- 
7 22, C: Jordan TI -31 5-4 28; Longley 6-B 2-4 
14, Harper 4-9 1-2 14. Rebouetb— Miami 41 
(Momnlng ff), Cltlcogo <0 iRoomcn 13). 
AssMs-Mlaml 13 (Hurdmray. Lenad 51, 
adcago24 (Kutac 7}. 

(CMragowaaswdet4-U 


Leading pkxtngs m 214-tan 12tn stage « 
Giro d'fMHa from La Speiia to VUieEtu an 
Thursday: 

l.dl Grenda tL. Mopel 5 h.47 m. and 14U 
2. Serrano, Sp- Kelmo;3.Shelef, Km. Aslcs 4. 
Merdx Balg, Patlt 1 Ptepod It, Ceramfche 
Refci dl s.t- 6. BeA n. Bresdatot al 12 SJ 7. 
Guertm n. PofffeL Leftkmc Ft. Ponte. GoWL 

«. Sueear ;a Tonkov, Rus- Mapvt oB sj. 

ovbmjlu l.Tot*ov55H.22m.ord*s,-2. 
Uttane at 4t SJ 3. CM 1 517; 4. Hod It- AS*s 
l^e-,5. Plepo52J7;6. Shefer2«9; 7.5owldelll 
It- RostoUa 251; 8. «* Grande 33S 9. Stmort, 
r. Megliflck) MG 356i t0.Gwrlni 


TENNIS 


FRENCH OPEN 


SOCCER 



* 

L 

T 

m 

GB 

Yotarit 

28 

18 

— 

.591 

— 

Hiroshima 

21 

20 

— 

512 

115 

QtunWhl 

22 

21 

— 

ait 

615 

Yokohama 

19 

20 

— 

457 

45 

HonsMn 

20 

23 

— 

MS AS 

YomM 

18 

24 

- 

A 9 

7J3 


CRICKET 


THURSDAY'S RHBUr* 

Yokohama 7, Yakull 5 
Yomiurt 1 HkosWma 1 


AUSTRALIA TOO 

ODAV WATCH. RHAL DAT 

GtouetSTTwntme vs. austraua 
THURSOAV.M BRISTOL 
Austraian 249 all out and 35 «m dedored 
GtaueestmMro: 350 all out. 

Match ended in draw. 


WEDNESDAY. IH HUMICH 

Borussia Dortmund 1 Juventus 1 

KONOAHAM atAMMMMW 

FINAL STAMOIHaSi MTK 55 W lrt9f 
Ubest 76; Ferenevoras 74: Vasas 44; Do- 
brccen 52; BV5C49; K*S00S» «& Vtdeolwi 4 Z 
Gyor 42; H ala das 40; Voc 4ft Sktfck at Is- 
kwgaruog 40; Bekescsaba 34; HI, W- TVE 
35; Stadler 28: Pecs 26; Cscpd » 
COPAUSSnADOtO 

QUAtmOWNALS. BETUPWL^ 

Colo Colo, ChUe. 1 UnW catofica Cl*> ■ 
CdoCoioodwmcesonA-SaggregMe. 

Sporting Crtstot Peru, i Boftwt BoBvh,' 0 
Crtstol advances an 4-2 aggrtofl* 

Racing. Aigontlna, 1, Pmwrol Urepift- > 
Aggregate OJt Racing oovoneM M afl 
penalties. 


SECOND ROUND 
WOMlH'S StHOtlS 

Van Roost, BcWum. del. GagtlardL SwBz. 6- 
2,641. 

tesfud, Pr. det Crtstea Bom. 4^1 6^. 
Sanctiez Vtcrakt («, sp. del. Sugtyama, Jap. 
6-3. 6-1. 

Farkn, t>. deL Begerow, Ger. 4^ 6-Z 
2verevUi BOL del. Lomorrc, Ft. 6 4. 7-5. 
Bemandn (12). del. Glass. Germany 6- 
1,6-0. 

SekB I3i, g S. del. PltkawsicL R t-X 7-5, 
Poutus (l«, Aus. def. Wang, Talw. 6-2, 6-2. 
Ituono-PascuaL Sp. def. Codteten. Fr. 6-4, 
6-Z 

Pa. US* dot. YckMOo. Jap. 6-1 6-0. 

Hingis (i). Switzer, del. Pizzichini il 34,6-4, 
4-1. 

KourallumL Rus. dot. CeectitnL it. 6-2, 6-2. 

Semdtz-McCamry(U),Netti,def. LatHLAn. 

4-6,7-6(7-51,6-4 

PerfeW H- del. GhlronS-Rubbl ft. 6-4, a-j. 
Raymond UAdcf-Tanosugore, rftaBand.6- 
1,4-1. 

Tauzkrt. Ft. def. Wtlltons. U5. 5-7. 6-1 7-S 
Pierce (10), Fr. def. Ny-Boutels. Cm. 4-1, 6-1 

■M'tMUUs 

MamWUSwe. deL Poes, lnd.6-3, 6-2, 3-4. 4-3. 
Bruguera (16). Sp. def. von Schcpplngcn, 
Haiti. 6-2, 6*3* 6-1 

Horde. Czech, def. c«w. Spain, 6-3. 7-S. m. 
Corfu (111. Sp. ad. PgweL Rom. ti. A* tw. 
6-16-4. 

Btoncft 5p, del. Gustobsm Si*c. 6-4. 4* *. 


4.7-6 (7-U- 

Woodbrds, AusH. def. Vrtiav, Rus. 7-6 (7-S), 
4-3. 7-5. 

Chang (2). VI -S4lef. GaknaitL Fr. 6-Z 6-3. 34, 
6 - 2 . 

Norman. Bokj. def. SioHe. Ausfl. S-7. 6-1. 7-6 
(7*3). 6-3. 

RoBer. AusH. def. Farming, Fr. 6-1 6-^ 63. 
ArezL Mor. Oaf. waodhiMge. Australia. 6-4, 7. 
5,6-2. 

Baatulv ft. def. Ondrusko. sai. 6-3. 6-z 6-1 
S Union. Fr. def. Kreeska, Hung. 6-1 6-3. 7^ 
(7-31. 

FArnrtra (13). S Ai. oof. Canctera. sp. 7-6 (7- 
4), 4-d 4-1. 2-6, 6-4, 

Lnrtwn. Sure, def. Mantilla (101. sn.6-2.fHi. 
3-663. 

WoodniH, U.S. def. Lo petal I, Ecus. 6-1, 5.7,3- 
46-4,4-1. 

Hrepcek (6), Noth. def. ustirach, rw>, 6.9. 
3-4 trL 6-3. 


Woodard. Sent LHP Bruce Ruffin to New' 
Haven. EL an rehobllttation assig nm ent. 

Uts amgeles— A nnounced OF Wayne KLV 
7 cleared v/dvers and accepted outright aF 
sHwmeffl to Albuquerque. PCL ■' 

J** D,EG o— Acfhraipd 3B Ken CnmloM 
fiwn 15-day disabled H=t. Sent INF Terry- 
^numperr outrlgfif to i Vegas, PCL- 

S»N FHAHCisco-Aastgned C Danyl" 
Kennedy fa Phoenix, PCL and CJotemy Bess 
to Shreveport, tl. 




MJTr 



• - 


L --^5 




TRANSITIONS 


BAtOAU 

AHER1CAN league 

Cleveland— R ecailod RHP Bartoto Colon 
fttira Buffaia AA. Optioned INF Trenidoa 
Hubbard to Buffalo. 

Omatw, AA. RecaHcd C Sal Fasonofrom Wl- 
cMo,TL 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Chicago— R ccaked RHP Jeremi Grmzaiez 
from iowa aa. 

Cincinnati— R ecoied INF Jeff Branson 
from lndonopcll& AA. Op Honed rhp Qmrt 
Tomka to Intf u napotls. 

counADa-Shmea LHP Jasn KaBnav«w, 
RHP Steve lannacone. RHP Jake Kidd, rhp 
R yan Price, RHP Thn scan and rhp Brad 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCMT1CW . 
MBA— Fined Chicago F Dennis Rodman 
and Miami C Alonzo Mourning 55,000 each ' 
to ah-aunner ottercojkm In Mondays play- ' 
off gome. 

boston— N amed Crete WaOace general ! 
manager. 

FOOTBALL 

National football league 
® u ffalo— R e-SIflned WR Steve Tasker. 
JA«Sonvllle -S igned CB Mike Logon,, 
LB James Hamfttan. DT Setti Payne, FB 
Daimon Shettan and LB Jon Heae. 
new WLEANs-Reicased vyr Mldnel 

HHL ' vni? Andre ^184 m Randal- 
HHL CB Mickey Washington and C Jwry 
F»»l«wf on J-yoareamracjs. 

EtteL V ° BK e “ NT *-- sl 0n«I DE Charies ;i 

Washington— S lpn«i wr Ajbert Canned- 
ond OB Keitti TWbaoeam. 

Hftaanr 

NATIONAL HOCKEY uueuc 

** Per J °han ArateM" 

re 2-vaar contract. • • 

f'JTsbursh— S hjned & jeoreSebraflai 
^“^Annourered they deefined to p«* up 

iw affirm on pCroJg Muni. . . 



Oi 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MAY 30. 1997 


RAGE 21 


SPORTS 


Bulls’ Balance Sends 
# Heat to the Showers 

Chicago to Face Utah or Houston 
In Quest for 5th Title in 7 Years 


By Michael Wilbon 

Uu>JiiR£r<-i: ftjji Service 


CHICAGO — To borrow a thought 
from Tiger Woods, the Bulls finally 
stopped ” winning with their C-pIus 
game. 

Okay, it wasn't one of their vintage 
performances, but Chicago finally put 
forth the kind of collective team effort it 
had spoiled us with through four cham- 
pionship seasons. From Michael Jordan 
through the I lih man. Jud Buechler, the 

NBAPutomi 

Bulls got contributions from everywhere 
imaginable to beat the Miami Heat. 100- 
SjZ|On Wednesday night to win the series 
■Jw- Tht Bulls are now in the NBA finals 
for the fifth time in seven years. 

The Bulls proved once again that 
when angered or challenged, they are 
still the league’s best team. 

Jordan said before the game that this 
was personal, and without being spe- 
cific. it was obvious his w/ords were 
directed largely at Alonzo Mourning. A 
persona] duel,' as so many have found 
out since 1985. isn't something you 
want to engage in with Jordan. 

It's not that Jordan had one of h is 
celestial scoring games: he made only 1 1 
of 31 shots and said he was “too hyped" 
for the game. Still, he set the angry tone, 
and his teammates picked up on it. The 
loser was Mourning, the Heat’s center, 
who for the second time this series had 
one field goal in only four attempts. 

“He did it to himself," Jordan said. 
“We didn ’ t do anything. He talked him- 
self out of the game." 

Actually, the Bulls did quite a bit to 
negate Mourning. Luc Longley and Bri- 
an Williams combined for 24 points, 
nine rebounds and eight blocked shots, 
and the Bulls attacked Mourning with a 
%Nib]e-team defense whenever he 
caught an entry pass or as soon as he 
rook one dribble. The result: He com- 
mitted seven of Miami's 14 turnovers. 

Two things the Bulls' championship 
reams have frequently lacked are scor- 
ing from the. center arid scoring from the 
reserves. But in finishing off Miami, the 
Bulls got 33 points from their substi- 
tutes. It was a good thing, because Scot- 
tie Pippen sprained his foot seven 
minutes into the game, w’hich didn't hurt 
the Bulls on Wednesday night but cer- 
tainly looms as a pre-finals subplot. 

Asked whether the Bulls could beat 
Houston or Utah — who are seeking the 
other final berth in a series in which 
Utah leads three games to two — with- 
out Pippen. Jordan said. “Yeah, but 1 
would prefer if we didn’t have to go that 
route.* 

This is why you never, ever take a 
game for granted in the playoffs. Instead 
of closing out their series after taking a 
3-1 lead, the New York Knicks goofed 
around and not only lost Game 5 to the 
Heat but got into the now-infamous 
bench-wandering wrestling match that 
led to New York losing a series it had 
well in hand. 

The Bulls now find themselves faced 
with a similar problem. Pippen 
shouidn 't ha ve been injured in this game 
because the Bulls shouldn’t have been 
playing this game. A focused, full-force 
l^ori from the start of Game 4 in Miami 


on Monday would have been enough to 
get Chicago a sweep and a rest. But 
noooo: The Bulls had to golf and party 
and fire up victory cigars after Game 3. 
blow Game 4 and play an unnecessary 
Game 5. The irony is that the Bulls came 
out Wednesday and played the kind of 
game the basketball public expects to 
see from them. 

Is it fair to expect the Bulls not only to 
win but also to win artistically, to dom- 
inate teams that clearly are less tal- 
ented? Maybe not, but 'that’s sporting 
reality. We’re not satisfied with seeing 
Roger Clemens win; we want double- 
digit strikeouts. We don't want to see 
Mike Tyson win a [2-round decision; 
we want a knockout. Do you want to see 
Junior Griffey bloop a single or hit one 
into the upper deck? 

Lots of us. maybe most of us. want to 
see the all-time greats be great. We want 
to see their A-plus game, at least now 
and then — like the May. 1 99 1 afternoon 
in Detroit when the Bulls not only 
brought the Pistons’ championship 
reign to an end but beat them by 21 
points in Detroit to sweep the Eastern 
Conference finals. Or like the three- 
game set in Los Angeles a couple of 
weeks later that the Bulls swept to close 
our the Lakers for their — and Jordan’s 
— first championship. 

Or that 33-point victory over Portland 
in Game 1 of the '92 finals when Jordan 
lit up old Chicago Stadium with six 
three-pointers in the first half. Or the 22- 
point dismantling of the Sonics in Seattle 
to take Game 3 of last year’s finals. 

The Bulls aren’t popular just because 
they’re champions. The Pistons were 
two-time champs and never enjoyed die 
kind of adulation the Bulls do. That’s 
because of Jordan, of course, bur also 
because they play the most beautiful 
passing, cutting, driving, shooting, re- 
bounding. defending game of ball since 
the old Celtics — maybe even better. 

That’s why it's a little difficult to get 
fired up over Jordan shooting 1 1 percent 



J-H H»imr.Vri>’ i Iwni-lW* 

P. J. Brown of the Miami Heat, right, reaching in on the Bulls' Dennis Rodman during Chicago's 100-87 victory. 

Reds Sink Phillies to an Equal Depth 



looking 

minor-league refugee instead of the 
multitalented threat that he can be. 

Jordan admitted afterward: "I'd like 
to see us play Bulls basketball. If we 
don't play the type of basketball we’re 
capable of ... all summer it’s going to 
be talked about." 

Ah. but if they win a fifth cham- 
pionship. Pat Riley, the Miami coach. 
said he did not foresee Houston or Utah 
beating the Bulls. "I don’t think any- 
body's going to win again until Michael 
retires," he said. Then he added. “The 
dilemma for a lot of teams, and this 
includes the Knicks. is that sometimes 
you can build a team, a championship- 
caliber team, but have die misfortune of 
being bom at the same rime Jordan had 
his run." 

Then Jordan had a final compliment 
for Riley. We]], sort of. “You know his 
team is going to give you 1 10 percent," 
Jordan said, adding: “He’s presented a 
challenge to Michael Jordan, to Phil 
Jackson, to the Chicago Bulls every- 
where he’s been. He’s a fierce com- 
petitor; he’s not going to walk away 
from a challenge. And it gives me great 
pleasure each time to see that he’s 
denied." 


TAi’ Associated Press 

The Cincinnati Reds, who have the 
worst record in the major leagues, have 
dragged the Philadelphia Phillies down 
to their level. 

The Reds beat the visiting Phillies, 2- 
0, on Wednesday to leave both teams 
tied for the worst record at 19-32. It also 
moved the Reds within six games of 

Basin all Roundup 

first place in the National League Central, 
where every team has a losing record. 

“We dug a big hole, but it’s not too big 
in this division to get out of it." said the 
Reds’ manager, Ray Knight. “Forget die 
won-loss record We're just six games 
back. You can make that up in a week's 
lime." 

The Reds were clearly upbeat after 
they won for the first time behind starter 
Kent Mercker (2-5), who got his only 
previous victory in relief. 7??e Reds had 
lost all of his seven starts. 

The left-hander gave up four hits in 
six innings before leaving because of a 
twinge in his hamstring. Three relievers 
completed the eight-hitter, only Cin- 
cinnati's second shutout of the season. 

The Phillies have the misfortune of 
playing in die same division with At- 
lanta. Instead of trailing the first-place 
team by six games like Cincinnati, they 
are 16Vi games behind the Braves with 
the identical record. 

Mats 7, Expos o Bobby Jones out- 
dueled the previously unbeaten Pedro 
Martinez to become the league’s first 
nine-game winner as New York won at 
Montreal. 

Jones (9-2) pitched a four-hitter. 


matched a season-high with seven 
strikeouts and retired 13 successive bat- 
ters over one stretch. 

Carlos Baerga homered and drove in 
four runs for the Meis, who won for the 
12th time in 17 games and moved a half- 
game ahead of Montreal into third place 
in the NL East. 

Martinez (8- 1 ) was charged with seven 
runs — two earned — in five innings and 
saw his earned run average rise to 136. 

Pirate* 4, Cuba i In Pittsburgh, the 
Pirates’ manager. Gene Lamont. altered 
his lineup against Terry Mulholland. a 
left-hander, and it worked. 

Emil Brown, one of four rookie 
starters in an all-right-handed lineup, hit 
his first major-league homer and Joe 
Randa had three doubles as the Pirates 
moved into a first-place tie with Hous- 
ton in the NL Central. 

Mulholland (4-4) was 4-0 with a 2.01 
ERA in his six previous starts. His 
streak ended in part because of his oivn 
poor fielding — he mishandled a bunt to 
set up a rally — and in part because 
Steve Cooke pitched better. Cooke al- 
lowed one run and five hits in seven 
innings. 

In American league games : ■ 

Mariners 5. Rangers o Randy Johnson 
struck out 15 Texas Rangers in eight 
innings to set the major league high for 
strikeouts in a game this season, topping 
the 13 by Toronto’s Roger Clemens 
against Minnesota on May 10. 

Johnson, malting his 1 1th start since 
back surgery last September, allowed 
four hits as Seattle bear Texas. It was the 
most strikeouts for Johnson since he 
fanned 15 Oakland Athletics on Sept- 
23. 1995. He struck out 15 or more for 


the 10th time in his career. 

tonic*** 6, Blue' Jays 4 Tino Martinez 
hit his 19th home run as New York 
overcame a4-0 deficit at Toronto to win 
for just the second time in nine games. 

Joe Carter passed Joe DiMaggio on 
the career home run list, hitting a three- 
run homer in a four-run third. Carter, 
who has 362 homers, moved into sole 
possession of 41st place. 

Indian* 10, Royal* 3 David Justice's 
three-run homer capped a seven-run 
eighth inning as visiting Cleveland won 
for the ninth time in 1 1 games. • 

Paul Assenmacher ( 1-0) won for the 
first time since last Sept.10 by throwing 
one pitch and retiring Joe Vitiello, 
pinch-hitting, in the seventh. 

Mol** 8, Tig*r* i Roberto Alomar, 
Brady Anderson and Rafael Palmeiro 
each hit two-run homers as visiting Bal- 
timore continued rolling, winning for 
the ninth time in 1 1 games. 

Jimmy Key (9-1 ) allowed one run and 
six hits in six innings, stopping Detroit’s 
three-game winning streak. 

Angal* 14, Athtetics lO GeroniftO 
Berroa dropped a routine two-out fly 
ball in right field, helping visiting Ana- 
heim to a five-run ninth inning. Mark 
McGwire homered twice for Oakland, 
raising his total to 19. 

Rod Sox 5, Whit* Sox 3 Mike Stanley 
delivered toe game-winning hit for toe 
second consecutive night as Boston sur- 
vived home runs from Frank Thomas 
and Albert Belle. 

Twin* 3, Brower* 1 Ron Coomer and 
Danin Jackson homered in toe seventh 
in Minneapolis and Brad Radke (4-4) 
allowed one runs and six hits in eight- 
plus innings for the Twins. 


RedWings 
And Flyers: 
One to End 
Cup Drought 

Bv Jason Diamos 

AVu- y^ri Tunes Service 

It has been 22 yeans since toe Phil- 
adelphia Flyers won toe Stanley Cup. 
One of the Flyers’ forwards, John Le- 
Clair. said it would be nice to win toe 
cup this year because his city is 
’ ’starving for a championship. ’ * 

Imagine, then, how toe stomachs of 
toe fans in Detroit, which bills itself as 
Hockeyroun, USA, must feel. 

The Red Wings, who face toe Flyers 
in this year’s Stanley Cup finals. last 

won toe sport's silver chalice in 1955 — 
long before many of their present-day 
fans were bom — and have endured the 
longest current title drought in toe Na- 
tional Hockey League. 

“We haven’t heard about it as much 
as we did a couple of years ago, when it 
was at 40 years." toe Detroit coach, 
Scotty Bowman, said." But I think a lor 
of our players are conscious of the fact. ’ 1 
Bowman, who has coached six Stanley 
Cup winners, was referring to Detroit's 
last appearance in the finals, in 1995. 
when toe Red Wings were swept in four 
games by toe New Jersey Devils. 

But he also pointed outthat it has been 
30 years since Toronto won its last cup, 
and 36 years for Chicago. “You've got a 
lot of teams in toe 20s and 30s," Bow- 
man said, without mentioning toe Fly- 
ers. “Unfommaiely. we're in the 40s." 

Game 1 of toe four-of-seven-game 
series is Saturday at the Core States 
Center in Philadelphia. 

Both coaches and two key players — 
LeCIair and Detroit's goal tender, Mike 
Vernon — have stressed toe similarities 
of toe teams. 

“They are a bit like us." Bowman 
said. 

Both coaches said they would not 
change styles for this series. Hie Phil- 
adelphia coach. Terry Murray, said he 
would emphasize strong forechecking 
and his team's size up from to try to 
counteract Detroit's defensive tactics in 
toe neutral zone. 

Bowman said he would like his team 
to maintain its emotional level from toe 
decisive Game 6 of the Western Con- 
ference finals against Colorado, in 
which Detroit dictated toe pace. 

The Flyers don't want to trade scor- 
ing chances with the Wings, who are led 
by toe freewheeling forwards Sergei 
Fedorov and Slava Kozlov. 

The Wings, who traded for bigger 
players during toe regular season, 
would like to neutralize the remade Le- 
gion of Doom line that features Eric 
Lindros, LeCIair and toe rookie right 
winger Dainius Zubrus. 

Both teams are big, offensive minded 
and comiDg off disappointing post- 
seasons last year. Both have had goal- 
tender controversies. Both coaches have 
been under fire. 

"There is no question we’ve grown 
from last year,” Murray said, referring 
to his highly favored Flyers’ early 
second-round exit at toe hands of toe 
upstart Florida Panthers in last season's 
tournament- The same could be said of 
the Red Wings, who were bounced in 
six games by underdog Colorado in the 
Western Conference finals last spring. 


wNNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



YE5.MAAM..I KNOW 
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STUDENT OF THE YEAR- 
I KNOW I DIDN'T U»N.„ 



BUT WHAT I NEED 
TO KNOW 15, PIP I 
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ill 


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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 30, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Turn Down the Noise 


PAl — 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — An en- 
raged hom-blower wel- 
comes us to New York. He is 
on our rear fender at the Hol- 
land Tunnel and furious be- 
cause we are trying to escape 
a traffic lane bearing us in- 
exorably to Boston or Asbury 
Park, depending on which 
sign you believe. 

This horn hates us for try- 
ing to reach midtown Man- 
hattan, and we hate ir back, 
though not without fear. Mo- 
torized gun-toters are much in 
the news these days. 

Though we shake him, the 
shriek of thousands of other 
car horns continues- all the 
way to 42d Street- It is as bad 
as Paris in die old days when 
every driver honked bis way 
through every intersection, 
even at 3 AM. This ended 
only after Genera] de Gaulle, 
who wanted to get some 
sleep, decreed that anyone 
blowing a car horn would go 
straight to the guitiotine. 

Monsieur Giuliani, alas, is 
no de Gaulle. This is why they 
call New York “the city that 
never sleeps.” 

□ 

Ears ringing, we go to 
Broadway to see “The Life.” 

I We believe “The Life" has 
a wonderful musical score. 
That's because the music is 
by Cy Coleman, who writes 
wonderful music. The singers 
and musicians, however, are 
miked as loud as heavy-metal 
rockers blasting 100.000 fans 
in Central Park. 

Not content with making 
the lyrics unintelligible, the 
amplifiers threaten to blow us 
all the way out of the theater 
and into 46th Street. Cy. 
baby, didn’t Ethel Merman 
used to do this work with 
nothing but lungs? 

Through screaming horns 


and sirens we go to eat Sit 
men at a restaurant table are 
shouting jovialities to each 
other. Drinks occur. Their 
table becomes a cone of jolly 
uproar. It is hard to imagine 
what could happen to normal 
ears trapped at that table. 

We assume these men are 
blooded New Yorkers for 
whom intolerable noise is a 
comfortable way of life. A 
local man. however, believes 
they are moneymakers ’from 
Wall Street who naturally be- 
come overwrought by a daily 
routine of praying the market 
will never again decline. 

Such Wall Street diners are 
said to infest the city at sun- 
down. filling restaurants with 
the happy roars of people 
whose idea of a good time is a 
bigday in pork bellies. 

Travel through screaming 
horns and sirens, incidentally, 
introduces the traveler to the 
culture of Islam, which pro- 
vides the city’s cab drivers, 
some of whom know a little 
English. 

We ride with a variety of 
these surprisingly dynamic 
people from faraway places. 
On one trip our destiny is in 
the hands of a man who ap- 
pears to have learned driving 
in a place where his was the 
only car in the entire country. 
For him, going up Eighth Av- 
enue at SO miles an hour, it is 
nothing to cut across three 
lanes of traffic in a single 
swerve, while listening to a 
shrieking radio voice talking 
at 100,000 words a second in. 
the driver says, Egyptian. 

As in nearly all New York, 
taxis, we are pinned inescap- 
ably in a tiny back seat cre- 
ated by a prize-winning de- 
signer of torture devices. 

StilL with $10 million to 
buy an apartment, we would 
never live anyplace else, you 
hear? You hear? Do we have 
to shout? 

New York Tunes Service 


The Power and the Music: Conlon’s First Season 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 


P ARIS — Close to completing his 
first season as principal conductor 
of the Paris National Opera, James Con- 
Ion has fulfilled die first requirement of 
a high-risk job in an environment in- 
famous for political intrigue, labor trou- 
bles, power struggles and quick-to- 
heckle music lovers: He has survived. 

Conlon, the first American to hold 
the top musical post at the Paris Opera, 
has done more than that. Arriving with a 
solid reputation among professionals 
but a modest public profile, the 47 -year- 
old New Yorker has quickly earned the 
respect of French critics and audiences 
alike for his interpretation of operas by 
Puccini, Verdi. Wagner and Debussy. 

Yet musical talent alone is clearly not 
enough to provide job security here, as 
Conlon’s immediate predecessors, 
Daniel Barenboim and Myung-Wbun 
Chung, learned to their cost. Both were 
victims of political change, summarily 
dismiss ed when new governments re- 
placed the management teams that had 
originally named them. 

All too aware of the risks involved 
when he accepted the job in March 1995, 
Conlon is still stoic about them. “Any- 
one who makes a prediction of how long 
he’s going to stay at the Paris Opera is a fool,” 
be said with a laugh. “If it lasts until the end 
of my contract in 2001, 1 will be happy. If it 
stops before then, I will have expected it" 
For the moment be looks safe, not least 
because he continues to please the man who 
hired him, Hugues Gall, the tough theater 
administrator who in 1995 officially took 
over the Paris Opera. Gall's mandate was to 
bring order to the troubled institution, which 
runs both the Palais Gamier, die city's 19th- 
century opera house, and the new Bastille 
Opera. 

“I had known James Conlon for many 
years.” said Gall,' who came to Paris after 15 
years as bead of the Geneva Opera. “He has 
great experience of opera; he speaks very 
good French; he loves France; he wanted to 
come to Ranee. I said to him; "Let’s try. We 
are friends. Maybe we will remain friends.’ 
Now I am convinced it was one of the best 
decisions I have taken.' ’ 

Rom the start, the rules of the game were 
clear. With his calendar filled by prior en- 
gagements, Conlon served as music adviser. 


and conducted only “La Boheme' ' in Paris, 
during the 1995-96 season. 

Then, in August last year, he began a five- 
year contract as principal conductor — and 
not. it was emphasized, as music director, the 
title held by Barenboim and Chung. 

“We all know that the one thing that 
doesn’t work in Paris is when two people 
have different views on how to run things," 


said Conlon, a stocky, mop-haired graduate alists, it has continued to improve. “Tbes 
of the Juilliard School. “I give Mr. Gall all days. France’s No. 1 orchestra is to be found i 
the advice he wants, bur he doesn’t, have to 
listen to it He has all the power, he takes all 
the decisions. He wants to be the boss, and he 
is the boss.” 

This suits Conlon fine. “I’m not inter- 
ested in power,” he said over lunch at a 
restaurant beside the Bastille Opera. “Any- 
way, the only real power you have as a 
conductor or a musician is the power to move 
people with your music.” 

So, despite the labor troubles that can still 
cause headaches (this season, strikes have 
forced four operas to be presented in concert 
and one to be canceled), Conlon has focused 


“American orchestras are con- 
sidered the most technically proficient 
and disciplined in the world.” he said 
“The English are also very fast and 
professional. They have to be because 
there is no government largesse. They 
have to live by their wits. Things go 
more slowly in Germany. They want to 
know ‘why’ ail the time. I may know 
the answer by instinct — why there is a 
dot. not a dash, in the score — but they 

want it explained. 

“French musicians are. well. French 
— bright, fast, moody. They want it right 
the second or third time. They get bored 
easily. You can feel their quick mer- 
airial spirit. I have enjoyed every minute 
of working here. It’s a very bright very 
gifted orchestra. Some of ray colleagues 
say, • You must be crazy / It may not be 
for everyone, but I love it ’ 

It probably helps that it is not in his 
character to be authoritarian, but he also 
believes that the era of the maestro- 
dictator is over. “In Anglo-Saxon 
countries, it is a given that everyone 
plays as a team.” he said. “In Latin 
countries, you can’t be authoritarian 
because they're not interested in au- 
thority. They’re interested in fantasy 
and imagination and pleasure. If you 
can invoke pleasure for them, you’ll get 
great results.” 

Still, if Conlon is happy with what is*s 
happening in the pit, he is often less en- 
thusiastic when he raises his eyes toward the 
stage and the opera production that he is 
accompanying. Time and again, in Paris and 
other European cities, audiences cheer so- 
loists. chorus, orchestra and conductor — 
and then heartily boo director and designer. 

“I am- very open about cheater; I like in- 
novation; I Idee interesting things." he said. 
“But unfortunately what I see too much of 
th ese days is directors using operas as vehicles 
for their own vanity, appropriating the works 
for their own career or feeling the works aren’t 
strong enough on their own and must be made 
relevant to modem audiences. For me, the 
dramatist is the composer.” 

I ndee d, as if trying to rescue operas from 
directors, Conlon frequently performed op- 
eras in concert in Cologne. In Paris, though, 
became general music director for the city of this occurs only when stagehands go on strike. 
Cologne and chief conductor of the Cologne ‘ ‘My premiere of ‘Lohengrin’ was like that. 
Opera. He remains general music director in Conlon said, “and I was very happy dial there 
Cologne and music director of die Cincinnati was a big public at the end screaming its heads 
May Festival. off. As a musician, that reassured me." 



Iw-Vur duikWIV V» lofk Tin** 

New Yorker James Conlon is making his mark as conductor of the Paris Opera. 


his energies on music, not only on con- 
ducting Debussy’s “Pelleas et Melisande,” 
Wagner’s “Lohengrin" and Verdi’s “Rigo- 
letto,” but also on working with the Paris 
Opera orchestra and chorus. 

In 1989, the orchestra was widely con- 
rideredm be medicare. Chimg began iB trans- 
formation, bringing in fresh blood. And under 
Conlon, who has added 20 new instrument- 

These 


m 

the pit at die Bastille." Richard Faiiman. a 
music critic of The Financial Times of Lon- 
don, wrote recently. 

Conlon could not be happier with his or- 
chestra. And he is well placed to make com- 
parisons. After spending die 1970s as a guest 
conductor in Europe and the United States, he 
served as music director of the Rotterdam 
Philharmonic from 1983 to 1991. la 1989 he 


Dylan Has Acute Chest Illness 


The Associated Press 

N EW YORK — Bob Dylan is be- 
ing treated for a chest infection 
that forced him to cancel an forth- 
coming European tour. 

* ‘His condition has been diagnosed 
as histoplasmosis, a potentially fatal 
infection which creates a swelling of 
die sac which surrounds the heart." 
Colombia Records said in a state- 
ment 

Dylan, who turned 56 on Saturday, 
was admitted to an undisclosed hos- 
pital over the weekend with severe 
chest pains, the statement said. 

Dr. Jeffrey Gold, chairman of die 
cardiothoracic surgery department at 
Montefiore-Einstein Medical Center 
in the Bronx, said histoplasmosis car- 
ries “pneumonia-like symptoms” 
and people can be infected for “20 or 
30 years before it causes trouble." 
“Sometimes it just heals itself," oth- 
er times antibiotics are required, and 
in advanced stages, surgery or drain- 
ing the pericardium — die sac around 
the heart — is necessary. Gold said. 



Stciia RouarauM^im fanc Hfr o* 


Dylan canceled European tour. 


PEOPLE 


rpHE Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist 
JL Jules Feiffer. whose 40 years of 
work in The Village Voice helped define 
the alternative weekly, has quit the paper 
over a salary dispute with die new editor, 
Donald Forst “It's not that I’ve 
slipped,” said Feiffer, 68. “It ’s that I'm 
too expensive." Feiffer, who made 
$75,000 a year at The Voice, was told by 
Forst that the paper wanted to discontinue 
Feiffer’s fee but still run his syndicated 
column, paying Universal Press Syndic- 
ate $200 a week. The New York Times 
reported. Feiffer rejected die offer, and 
also turned down a counterproposal for a 
Voice staff position with a salary of 
$20,000 and benefits. Foret, who has let 
go the humor columnist Cynthia Heimel 
and Stopped asing cartoonists Matt 
Greening and Lynda Barry, said his 
decision on Feiffer was only logical. “I 
had a lot of things I wanted to do when I 

f ot here, and tins is one of them," said 
orst, who took over in October. “The 
list is far from being all ticked off. ' ’ 

□ 

For the fifth time this year, Michael 


Aris stepped up to a podium to receive 
an honorary degree on behalf of his 
wife, the Burmese opposition leader. 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. She was 
among recipients of awards from The 
American University of Paris. Although 
formally released from house arrest, the 
Nobel Peace Prize winner is still under 
tight surveillance by Burma's military 
regime and reported ro fear that if she 
left the county she would not be allowed 
back in. The American University also 
honored the novelist Carlos Fuentes. 
the filmmaker Marcel Ophuls, the law- 
yer Joseph S. Iseraan and the former 
president of CBS News, Van Gordon 
Sauter, who delivered the commence- 
ment address. 

□ 

Former employees at Michael Jack- 
son’s Neverland Ranch in California 
who unsuccessfully sued the pop star 
were ordered to pay $1.4 million in 
costs. The ex-employees sued Jackson 
and five staffers, claiming they were 
forced out for cooperating in a child 
molestation probe, among other rea- 


sons. In March, a jury rejected the 
former employees’ suit and awarded 
Jackson $60,000 in damages in a coun- 
tersuit. and now a judge has ordered 
them to pay attorney fees and costs, 
including those for filings, jury fees, 
depositions, witnesses ana transcripts. 

□ 

Peter Osnos. a former vice president 
of Random House’s Adult Trade Books 
and former publisher of Times Books, 
will become publisher and chief exec- 
utive of a new nonfiction publishing 
company. Public Affairs. The new house 
will specialize in books by public figures, 
journalists, historians and social critics. 

□ 

Senator Robert Byrd of West Vir- 
ginia never had a honeymoon when he 
wed Erma Ora James, a coal miner’s 
daughter and his high school sweet- 
heart, on May 29, 1937. They just 
couldn't afford it. And so on their 60th 
anniversary Thursday, where did Byrd 
squire his beloved? To the dedication of 
the new Criminal Justice Information 


Services Division, Main Facility, in 
Clarksburg, West Virginia. But don’t 
laugh. The couple will also spend a few 
days at a resort 

□ 

William Styron has donated the 
manuscript of his latest book. “A Tide- 
water Morning: Three Tales from 
Youth.” ro Duke University, his alma 
mater. He also gave letters with cor- 
respondents including John Updike, 
Eudora Welty, Ralph Ellison and Lil- 
lian Heilman, awards, aid photo- 
graphs. Styron graduated from Duke in 

□ 

The comedian Tim Allen was charged 
with drunken driving after being caught 
speeding in Bloomfield Township. 
Michigan. The “Home Improvement" 
star appeared unsteady when he was 
stopped and failed sobriety tests, ac- 
cording to newspapers citing a police 
report. Allen, who has a home in sub- 
urban Detroit, served about two years in 
prison on cocaine charges in the 1970s. 



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makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T .Access Number for the countiy 
you're calling from and we’ll take it from there. And 
be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T Calling 
Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone charges 
on your hotel bill and save you up to WV.? Low rates 
and the fastest, dearest connections home 24 hours 
a day. Rain or shine. That's AT&T Direct : Service. 
Please check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 




AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to folftnr for easy *8 
l. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the countiy you 
are calling from. 

i Dial tile phone number you're calling. 

3. Dial die calling raid number listed above your name. 



EUROPE 

Austria «o .. . . OZZ-MJ-fill 

Belgium* MOB-1 00-1 0 

Czech Republic* - (HH2-WM01 

France MHW9-OT11 • 

Germany .0130-0010 

Greece* 00-800-1311 

Ireland . 

Italy* 172-1011 

Netherlands* 0800-022-9111 

Russia •*[Mosmw}t 755*3042 

Spain ....900-59-80-11 


Sweden .020-785-611 

Switzerland* 0800-89-8011 

United Kingdom * 0500-69-0011 

0800-89-0011 

HIPPIE EUST __ 

EgyTrt*(Celro)» 510-0200 

Israel 177-100-2727 

Saadj Arable* 1-80040 

____ arnica 

Ghana . . ... 0191 

Kenya*. 0-8QQ-10 

SmWAMH M0B-9M123 


Can't find die AT&T Access Number for die country you're calling from? Just ask any operator for 
AT&T Direct ■ Service, or ilsli cur Web sie at. http^/w^Tvjttwmftraveier 



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