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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POM 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 





Paris, Friday, November 7, 1997 


No. .V^,672 


'S. , 

L' 


f . .. 



THE BIG MUDDY — 


7\r‘HnMM/ipt 

Spaniards in a flooded Wnage after storms lolled 31 in Spain and PortogaL Page 2. 


Trucker Talks Yield Progress 

French Strikers Win Many Demands but Stay Out 


By Barry James 

tmemnuvmt Hvtuid Trihune 



Missile Claim Revoked in TWA Crash 


The Aisun'dVf/ Press 

NEW YORK — A self-described 
investigator who wrote a rn^ with 
Pierre Salinger, a joarnaust, that 
blamed friendly fire for the crash of 
TWA Flight 800 has hocked away 
from his claim that a Navy missile 
downed the plane. 

Ian Goddard, quoted Wednesday by 
CNN, said he just wanted ‘*to give the 
government a black eye by any means 
diat looked opportune. TWA 800 was 
just a vehicle for my larger agenda." 

Mr. Salinger, a fonner oor- 
respondeni and press secretary to Pres- 
ident John Kennedy, said Wednesday 


that Mr. Goddard did not mention his 
ch^e of heart in a recent conver- 
sation. He said he still believed in the 
theory himself, but was no longer ac- 
tiveW investigating the crash. 

hu*. Goddard, who id^t^es him- 
self as a libertarian and investigator of 
cMirpofted goveniment plots, told 
CNN his TWA efforts were “reckless 
and a mistake.** 

He has been one of the prime pro- 
ponents of a theory that Fli^t 800 and 
its 230 passengers woe brought down 
by a missile on July 17, 1996. 

*T apologize to all ih^ in the Navy 
1 have wrongfiilly accused," ^b'. God- 


dard said. also apolr^ize to those 
wte believed in my efforts who are 
now upset with me fm* my change of 
imod.^* CNN arxl many oth^ news 
organizatUHis gave promineut cover- 
age to the initial rtews conferences and 
claims surrounding the missile theory. 

Mr. Goddard, ^b’. Salinger and 
Mike Sommer released a rqrort March 
6 that said there was an extensive 
cover-up after a Navy missile fait the 
I^iris-boimd flight off the .coast of 
Long Island, New York. Mr. God- 
d^tPs Internet site was one cy- 
berspace's larg^ clearing houses ^ 
firie^y ftie specnlation. 


The negotiations to end the French 
mck drivers* strike resumed Thursday 
night amid soiite optimism that the talks 
would succeed in ending the four-day 
blockade of the nation's highways and 
the huge disruption in much of Europe. 

The strikers manned about 160 to- 
ricades across the nation and continued 
to blockade oil refineries and fuel depots, 
forcing about 40 percent of French fUling 
stations u> close or restrict supplies. 

The Democratic Labor Confedera- 
tim. or CFDT, said after all-night talks 
on Wednesday that it had achieved 
nearly all of its demands, including an 
eventual 10,000 franc ($1,730) monthly 
wage for ^X) hours of work, an im- 
oiediate pay increase and the setting of a 
minimum hourly wage. It was seeing a 
fiew more conditions, including a clause 
would extend benefits to bus and 
ambul^e drivers, and tighter controls 
on working hours. 

But Marc Blondel, secretary general of 
the Workers* Fbire. or FO, union said 
that the lemis so far agreed with em- 
plwers were conhrsing and contradiciory 
and that it would be difficult to persuade 
the drivers to call off the stnke. The 
strikers “are not over the moon, far from 
it,** be said. 

Employers were considering the blest 
proposals made by union lead^ during 
a recess of the talks on Thursday night. 
The delegations did not come out of the 
Transport Minisuy building, where the>' 
were meeting, or talk to the press. 

The French transport minister, Jean- 
Cbude Gayssot, said as the talks got 
underway earlier Thursday that although 
the situation had “unquestionably 
moved forward,** there were no signs of 
an all-encompassing deal. 

He warned t^t France could not af- 
ford to keep living with “the uncer- 
tainty, the risk, the difficulties and the 
constraints' * that were causing grief both 
to France and its European partners. 


The strike has incensed France's 
European panners. w hose truckers have 
been prevented from delivering goods 
to France and neighboring counin^. 

British trucks continued to pile up in 
12-hoiir lines at Belgian pons in an 
anempi to avoid French ro^s, but on 
die other side of the channel, conditions 
were slowly returning to normal outside 
the port of Do\’er. The strike was most 
likely to be the most contentious item on 
the agenda during talks in London on 
Thursday and Friday between Prime 
Minister Tony Blair of Britain, the 
French prcsidrat, Jacques Chirac, and 
Prime Minister Lionel Jospin. 

Britain has complained about the 
damage to its trade and says its truck 
companies have not been conipen.saied 
for losses they incurred in a similar 
strike a year ago, despite French as- 
surances that claims would be met 
The British Road Haulage Association 
said it is losing £1 million <S1. 7 million} 
a day because of the strike. A Foreign 
Minbtry spokesman in Paris said France 
accepted respmibilitx' for losses caused 
on its own temiory*. but would not pay* for 
the knock-on eflecis in other countries. 
The country most badly affected by 


the strike was Spain, where about 8.1XW 
trucks that would normally be supplying 
markets in northern Europe had been 
diverted or confined to base. 

Officials ai the European Commis- 
sion. the executive body of the Eunv 
pean Union, said it was highly unlikely 
that legal action would be taken against 
France for obstructing freedom of 
movenieni in ibe £U. 

France argues (hat it has made every 
reasonable effon to inform drivers of 
the situation through phone and internet 
serx’ices, and that most of its road net- 
work has not been affected. Officials 
said disruption had been caused ni>t so 
much by the strike but by the fear of 
being stranded. 

Karel Van Mien, the EU competition 
commissioner, blunted employers for 
creating the coiklilions that pnxluced 
the strike. He said there was widespread 
flouting of rules on working hours and 
cachographs, the instruments' thar mon- 
itor hours .ind distance drixen. “It i-« 
unfortunately the drivers who sut for .ind 
have to work in very Jiflicult condi- 
tions," he said in a radio interview. 

See STRIKE, Page 10 


France’s BidforEU Bank 
Opens a Vandora’s Box’ 


By John Schmid 

InH'mattonal HcrjIJ Tnhune 


•«« 

^ South Africa Emerges as Continent’s Powerhouse 


By Lynne Duke 

Vbshingum Pott Servict 


JOHANNESBURG ^ Ever since Game Stores, a 
South African retailer, qpened a discount outlet in 
Windhoek, Namibia's capital, last year, shoppy from 
; Namibia's noitfaeni nei^bor have been arriving in 
droves. 

The Angolans travel by bus and truck more than 370 
\ miles (392 ^ometers) south from the border to pur- 
chase furoiture. t^jpUances and clothing, which ti^ 
.often take back home to seU. Cross-bOT^ shopping 
ialso baj^peos at other Game Stores outlets: In the 
'norlbern South >^can town of Pietersbuig, Zim- 
babweans are promineot buyers. 

Game Stores, which has 24 stores in South Africa 
'and two in oeighboring countries, has launched an 
aggressive expansion drive, including plans to opea25 
stores t^ughout Africa by 2006. 

“It’s becoming a naniral p rogression focus to move 
farther and farther north," said Dan Banetc. a 
nianaging director of the Durban-based ^scount 


c hain^ ^'Ycri can dooixii^ a market pretty quickly.** 
Once rejected as the eccmomic sttvm troapets of 
whitB-minority rale and rsqncions Western capit^ism. 
South African businesses are cutting a path throu^ the 
continent, highlighting tiie country’s esKigence as 
Africa’s eemonue powethouse. 

Led by the gold- and diamoDd-mining houses that 
have long been die vanguard of its economic povrer, 
tile expansion of South African bosaness ties on the 
continent has spread into a host of otiier sectors. 

Soutii A&Kan fast-food shops and clothing stores 
have been opened in Zmbabwe. South African Brew- 
eries, the country’s leadmg brewer, is established in 
ei^t Affican countries. And viewers in coontries as 
fv north as Kenya can watch tiie pst^rams of Mnl- 
tidtoice, a Sontii African cable-tolewision network. 

Soudi African sopemiarket chan» are sprouti^ in 
Zambia and Mozambique, and aD over the continent 
tiiere are Soutii African hotels, banks, restutiani chains, 
mfigfmrrinn pnmpanifts rail mad-enginamng poj- 

ects, sagarpiocessars, pq^rinanufacnirets, rmneial, oil 


and gas esqikxatiaa efforts, even auto^ervice centers. 


Since 1990, direct foreign investment by South 
Africa’s private sector has increased at least ihieefdki. 
to ^ billion in 199S. the latest year for which figures 
are avrulableL Investments in Africa account for a 
small portion of this total, but foreign-pchange re- 
quests indicate that Africa’s share increase dra- 
matically, an official of the Soutii African Reserve 
Bank said. 

In addition. African governments are clamoring for 
investmenL Kenya’s officials recently appealed for 
more South African projects, in part to help level the 
country's trade nnbuaoce with Pretoria. In Zambia, 
which has virtually rolled out the red carpet to all 
comers as part of its privatization drive, recent figum 
show that South African firms have overtaken British 
ones as the leading foreign investors. Angola was a 
Cold War enemy of Soufo Africa, yet Angolan busi- 
ness officials are ninning ads in South African news- 
pwers inviting joint-venture investors. 

^utfa Africa's push to the nortii is not without 

See RAND, Page 11 


FRANKFURT — A new round of 
political dueling erupted Thursday over 
the nomination of the chief of the future 
European central tank, prompting 
warnings that bickering and oven deal- 
making have jeopardized the credibility 
of Europe's single cuirency. 

Two days after France shattered the 
recent harmony over Europe's currency 
union by noininaiing its own central 
hank chief. Jean-CJaude Trichet: 

• Italy's treasury minister. Carlo 
Azeglio Ciampi. suggested that Italy 
might name its own candidate for 
Europe's most powerfril economic posu 

• Italy's prune minister. Romano 
Prodi. smd he would not be opposed to 
having Hans Tietmeyer, the president of 
the German central bank, lead the bonk, 
even though Mr. Tienneyer repeatedly 
has declined consideration for the job. 

"German public c^inion needs re- 
assurance in the nm-up to monetary 
union," Mr. Prodi said. “If the name 
Tietmeyer reassures them, we have 
nothing against iL" 

Because Germany won the right to 
locate the central bank in Frankfurt, the 
home of the Bundesbank, no one at the 
Gemian central bank has dared to lay 
claim to the job. 

• Italian newspapers speculated that 
Rome was prepared to back Mr. Tiet- 
m^er if Borm threw its weight behind 
Italy's pt^ible bid to propose Italy’s 
former prime minisrer, GiuUano Amato, 
as successor to the European Commis- 


dedsitm to conduct a T^ieal referendum 
on an issue that was approved by voters 
three years aga 

The Roman Catholic Church, the 
American Medical Association and 
anti-abortion groups had pressed for the 
rqieal vote. It was the first time the state 
legislature had tried to send back, un- 
changed, a law passed by citizeas. 

Barbara Combs Lee. a nurse and law- 
yer who hftaris the Compassion in Dying 
advocacy group that supported doctor- 
'thevotes 


Green Light on Suicide 

Oregon Vote a Setback to Bight-to-Life Groups 

By Williazn Claibome and 
Thomas B. Eds^ 

Wahuigton Pom 5er\-ice 

Witii Orpgon voters deciding ov«- 
whelmingly against a ballot initiative 
aimed at repealing the only U.S. law 
allowing physician-assisted sutode, 
doctors in that state can immedi ately 
begin prescribing fetal overdo^ of bar- 
biturates to terminally ill patients, ac- 
cording to state officii. 

The 60 percent to 40 percent vote to 
kem the Death With Dignity law, first 
approved in a 1994 statewide referen- 
dum but blocked since then by a c<^ 

.challeage, will give momentum to sim- 
ilar movements in other states, advo- 
cates said. ^ . 

Ken Mulligan, director of rese^n at 
the conservative Free Congress Foun- 
■ dation, acknowledged thu (Jregon s w- 

finnation of assistw suicide was amajor 
' setback to the right-lo-Ufe movement 
; • Tt definitely did get a public am^. and 
since itpas^ by 20 points, 1 think ibw 
is little doubt where this issue stands 
with the voters in Oregon.” 

The vote in Oregon against repeaimg 
the assisted-suicidie law — much wider 
than the 5 1 -49' split that passed the law 
' in the first place — reflected, in pari, a 
. backlash against the state legislature s 


assisted suicide, called 
ing point in the death 


votea “turn- 
wife dignity 

movemem nationwide. ' ’ 

“It is, now up to the citizens of each 
state to make fee choice themselves for 
control at die end of their lives," she 
sud. 

A petition signatnre dri've for an as- 
sists suicide referendum already has 
begun in ^^chigaIl, and con^nssionate 
dying wn* eifeer have been mtiodoced 
or are expected to be introduced in sev- 
eral other stales, advocates of fee mea- 
sure said. 

Ms. Lee said she did not know of any 
tenniaally ill patients in Oregon who 
were planning to request prescriptions 
fex* barbiturate overdoses immediately. 

See OREGON, Page 11 


AGENPA 


Gore Warns Saddam on Arms Inspection 


Hie United States is prepared to 
make RiUident Saddam Hussein com- 
ply fully wife United Nalicas require- 
ments that he open Ir^'s weapons 
arsenal to inspe^o. Vice President 
Al Gore said Thursday. 

"We will make sure feat he com- 
plies,'* Mr. Gore said. Mr. Saddam 
“must know feat he has so comply 
wife fee will of fee intemtiioaal com- 
mimity, as euiressed in these reso- 
lutions and enrofced those, includ- 
ing os, who are tuKterudong to ensure 
feat he complies," Mr. Om said. 

He sou^t to make it clear feat fee 
United States would not let the latest 


1 The Dollar 1 

NewYbrii 

mndBy94PJX 

pwvtaedow 

DM 

1.7227 

1.7173 

Pound 

1.691S 

1,6813 

Yon 

123.22 

123055 

FF 

5.7S8S 

5.7S35 





thfsdBrdoee 

pmiOvOfitew 

-8.33 

788124 

7692.57 

f S&P 500 

uonge 

Y>«a«d^r • 4 PJS. 

pMvieus eiew 

-A25 

838.51 

942.78 


showdown, over an Iraqi ban on 
Americans’ taking part in UN arms 
inspections, be used Yy Baghdad to 
violate fee resolutions. UN represen- 
tatives were in Baghdad trying to end 
the dispute. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright said laJer at the White House 
fear Washington was pressing for friU ' 
compliance. 

“We are not ruling any options in or 
out," she said, adding that “it's very 
important for Saddam Hussein to un- 
derstand that fee inteniational corn- 
muni^ is behind" efforts to gain full 
compliance. Page 6. 

Fears for South Korea 
Worsen on New Phmge 

South Korea's bond maricet and cur- 
rency plunged Thursday, rekindling 
fears feat its finaocial turmoil, high- 
lighted by a Siring of coqporaie insoiv- 
encies, could match those in Thailand 
and ofeex Southeast Asian economies. 

The central bank caHeri "exagger- 
ated ’ ' fears that its attempt to suppcxi the 
won through a capital squeeze threatens 
South Koi^ b anks ' survival. Page 15. 



Amk'Olcil Pmm'IWi 

SCHOLAR DIES — Sir Isaiah 
BerliiL philosopher and histo-- 
ian, b dead at age 88. Page 11. 

Books 

Page 13. 

Pose 22. 

OpinioB ...................... 


Sports 

Pages 22-n. 

Tiio Intennarket 

Pager. 

\ The IHT on-line 

vvwvv.iht.com | 


Newsstand Prices 


Andora. taOO FF Lebanon 

AnOes 12SDFF Morocco -—loW 

Cameioon..i.600CFA Qatar -lO-MOT 

Esypi £65.50 Rtonion..^... .12-SD^ 

^ -10.00 FF 

Gabon.........l.100CFA Senegal — 1.^^ 

Italy 5«)0Lire Spam—. — 

lvoiyCoaa.1250CFA Tuniga 

lisojD w 

Kuwait .700 Fte U.S. ML (Eur.).-S120 


Thai Political Free-for~All Leaves No One in Charge 


By Seth Mydans 

New Yuri Times Sen-ice 



BANGKOK — Thailand's top leadership has all- 
bui ceased to function this week, with a welter of 
Doliiical parties baBiing Thursday for power aftw 
priiw Minister Ch^alB Yongchaiyuc announced his 
resignation earlier in fee week. « ,■ i 

I^^oagement of fee ailing economy was effw ively 
put ooMd and fee stock maricet rose and feU ner- 
vously as political alliances formed and dissolved 
from one day to the next. ^ 

Oh TTiursday evening two coalitions, each led py a 


former prime minister, announced in neariy simul- 
taneous televised news conferences that they had 
enough j^uiiamentaiy votes to form a governmeoL 
>^ewer5 were left uncertain as to who was leading 


Stocks dive on knig’s vi^ to a hospitaL Plage 4. 

the country or whether elections would be held early 
next year, as Mr. Gtaovalir had promised. 

Along with often-conflicting rep^ on the political 
infighting, newspapers have tallied the country's 
growing hardships — from the rich, who are selling off 


their second cars, to the poor, who are pulling their 
children out of school i6 ^t them to woik. 

The Nation daily new^per gave vent to the frus- 
tration of many p^le in its ie^ article Thursday, 
which begw: “Mfore a perplexed and dismayed 
public. Thai politicians are staging one of the greatest 
farces ever perfonned. Tire display of greed, blind 

ambition and disregard for decent rules of fee gnmg. is _ ^ 

taking place against fee backdrro of a critically ailing finish^' preentfegfee group’i reron ' 
economy and a worried monarch. -U's a veiy positive slutement.’^id 

David Blaiwos. president of the Marv- 


sion president. Jacques Sanier. in 1999. 

• In Germany, fomier Chancellor 
Helmut Schmidt entered his own bid b> 
suggesting that the fomter French pres- 
ident. Valery Giscard d'Estaing. is the 
best man to manage Europe's new 
money. Although Mr. Schmidt no 
Ir^ef holds office, he touted Mr. d'E>- 
tatng, 71. in the latest issue of the 
weekly paper Die Zeil. if which Mr. 
Schmidt is co-publisher. 

• In Belgium, Finance Minister Phil- 
ippe Maystadt dismissed as “absurdit- 
ies" nimres that he could emerge us a 
possible compromise candidate. 

See BANK, Page 10 


Acupuncture 
Gets a Clean 
Bill of Health 
By U.S. Panel 

By Rick Weiss 

ll,aAiri)gftii AwSfOW 

WASHINGTON — A federal panel 
has concluded for the first time feat fee 
aiicienc Chinese art of acupuncture is an 
effective treatment for certain kinds of 
pain and nausea and shows promise for 
a variety of other conditions. 

The panel, convened by the National 
Institutes of Health, has no binding 
power over doctors or insurers. 

But health-policy exp^ said it 
would almost certainly increase fee 
number of patients opting for treatment 
by Atncrica’s 10,0W .acupuncturists, 
and could evennialiy lead to greater 
coverage of acupuncture by insurance 
companies and government programs 
such as Medicare and Medicaid. 

More generally, the siaiemcni rep- 
resents a landmark expression of open- 
mindedness to the possibility that med- 
ical systems completely alien to sci- 
entific conveniion — including the 
Chinese medical model, which posits 
the existence of invisible “energy me- 
ridians" in the body — may have 
something to offer Western patients. 

“It's a very difficult task to take a 
completely different system of medi- 
cine, transplant it to a system of Western 
medicine, and ask. ‘Does it work?’" 
said David Ramsay, president of the 
University of Maiyland at Baltimore 
and chairman of fee panel. "Bui we did 
decide that in a number of situations, it 
really does work." 

Specifically, the panel concluded 
there was “clear evidence" that acu- 
punciure was an effective treatment for 
nausea and vomiting caused by cancer 
chemotherapy drags, surgical anes- 
thesia or pregnancy, and for pain fol- 
lowing dental surgery. The group said 
there was weaker evidence that acu- 
puncture might be effective against oth- 
er conditions, includine menslrual 
cramK, tennis elbow, the generalized 
muscle pain known as fibromyalgia, 
dnra addiction, stroke and headache. 

Equally important, Mr. Ramsay said, 
^puncture "has fewer side effects and 
it’s less invasive than many other things 
we doctors do.” Given its good safere 
rocord and ihe fact that it is often less 
^pensive than Western medicine, "it's 
time to lake it seriously." 

Advocates of acupuncture, about 
1,(X)() of whom attended a three-dav 
meeting that concluded with a “con- 
rensus srateiiient" 'Hiesday gave the 
panel a standing ovation as Mr. Ramsay 


economy 

Thailand's nervousness was heightened by reports 


See THAILAND, Page 10 


See NEEDLES, Page 10 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNK FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


PAGE mo 


Cruise Missiles and Fishing FUes/ A President on 


——7 ,'iit 

31 Die in Spain 

AndPortu^ 




Museum Honors Bush, the Man and the Statesman in Big Storms 


By Sue Auue Pressley 

Waskingian Post Serwe 


'-s.*! • .ii:c, -Sr.'. Aitxts. 




C OLLEGE STATION, 

Texas — He wanted it 
personal ~ not just The 
President bat The Man. 

So, scattered among die mile- 
^nes at die George Bush Pres- 
idential Libraiy ana Museom — 
which includes fieiy scenes of die 
- Gulf War and a section of die Ber- 
lin Wall — is the recurring homey 
touch: a pair of large well-wom 
running shoes, a handful of feadi- 
ery fishing flies, a mena fiom 
Otto’s, his favorite Hopston bv- 
becue spot It was formerPi^ident 
Bush’s decision to include such 
ordinary details. He even inaigtiarf 
that a favorite coffee mug and cup- 
warmer be placed in the ictid- 
dnction of his Camp David office. 

* 'What we wanted the American 
people to see was George Bosh the 
human being,” said David 
Alsobrook, the mnspnin director, 

‘ ‘and also to show diem not just the 
presidency and not just ^ vice 
presidency during the Reagan 
years, but all the other diings he did Mr. Bush 
before and after.” tfieyarriv 

PresidentBiUClintotupastpro- Visitors tc 
id^is ^ other dignitaries, commemc 
gathered Thursday at Thxas A&M 
University to dedicate the SSS-million itme - 
stone, marble and glass buildi^ and to celebrate 
the acconniUshments of Mr. Bush, who is 73. 
The museum will open to the public Fri^y. 

Mri Clinton lavished praise on hfr. Bush fcu' 
ofiering help and advwe, “even diough our 
relationship began under somewhat nnntnai cii- 
cumstances.” 

Mr. Clinton thanked Mr. Bush for being avail- 
able “with wise counsel and, when he agreed, 
with public support” • 

Dk prudent said be could not ejqoess “what 
it means in a moment of difficulty to be able to 
call someooe who first of all knows exacdy what 
you’re op against and, secondly, will tell you the 
truth.” 

Mr. Bush dianked Mr. Qinton, “who fair and 
^uare saw to it tiiat I have a woudeiful private 

Ihe Bosh museum is America’s lOthfederally 
funded piesidenriaj lihraiy; every praidat since 
Herbert Hoover has one. It is rel^vely close to 
the Lyndon B. Johnsou Libraiy in Austin, 100 
miles (160 Idiomerers) away, malfing Texas the 
only stale with two president libraries. 

The memorial to Mr. Bush, who is a graduate 
of Yale Universiw, a sportsman and was a long- 
time resident of Washington, is in a collie town 
of 43,000 students in central Texas. Texas 
A&M,' America’s third-laigest university, was 







'' ' ' 






AdtcecLaOttcMi 

Mr. Bush and his vrife, BariMu^ above, waving as 
tfiey arrived for the inanguration of the museum. 
Visitors to the center posed in front of a sculpture 
commemoratiog t^ fall the Berlin WaO, r^L 

UioD lime- eager, accorrunodating and willing to do its share 
CD celebrate of fund-raising to land die poteutial tourist at- 
who is 73. .traction. The c^ege also is home to the Geo^ 

Frilly. Bush School ofGovemmeotandPublic Service, 

r. Bush kx which was dedicated in September, and lel- 
hough our aizvely close to Houston, where the Bushes live, 
inntiiai cii- A&M has built an apartment on campus for die 
couple and even provided a burial site. Mr. Bush, 
leing avail- when aslosd ^)Mt die locatimi, replied some- 
he agreed, what fad^y, “1 am a Texan.’.’ 

His voire, instandy recognizable, is heard all 
cess “what over the m^um in snippets of speeches and as 
I be able to a taped guide d> certain exhibits. And at the 
cacdy what beginning of the tour hfr. Bush can be beard 
teU you the nanaring an eight-minute refiection on his life: 

“Whra I was growing up, I guess my dad was . 
ho fair and the most ioqxxtant role model, and also my 

ful private ■ mot^.Difierentteasoas.”hesays,aspictures<d 
the rocky coast of Kennebunlqiort, Maine, where 
hfedendly he has a summer home, app^ on the screen, 
lidatsinre “My father was die msciplinarian, a strong, 
ily close to respected business leader, eventually a strong, 
Lostm, 1(X) respected political leader,” Mr. Bo^ says In die 

; Texas the rererding. ' ‘But he stood for something, and he 

ies. believed in ^ving somethin back. He was «4iat 

agraduate I would later call a true point of UgbL” 
rasaloog- A tour of the museum takes about 90 miautes, 
U^e town tracing the years from Mr. Bash’s fiisr stqis as a 
as. Texas l-year-old, captured on a 1925 family film, to his 
nity, was charity as a somewhat retired Houstoman. 


In the section covering his Worid War n 
career, an Avenger torpedo bomber, the plane Mr. 
Bush flew as a navy j^t, is suspended from the 
fjgiiing in the Gulf War sectiMi, modesis of Scud, 
Patriot and Tomaliawk missSes seem tt) hover. 


M r. BUSH recently said he bop^ the 
museum did not seem too ^otistical 
and dial he ii^ded h as a substituEe 
frtf the memoirs he had no imention 
of writing. The museum and libra^ complex 
consists of dnee Niiidings, totali^ 69,(XX) 
square fe^ (6J.00 square meters), and housing 
38 million documents and 1 millltm phoio- 
^pfas. The archive includes all of Mr. Bush’s 
vice presidential and presidennal records and 
documents from his stints as a U.S. congressman, 
U.S. chief del^ate to the United Nations, chair- 
map. of die Rqiublican National Committee, 
chief of du U.S.. Liaison Office in Beijing and 
director of ibe Central Inteliigecce Agency. 

The muieaiim also deals widi Mr. Bo^’sper- 
sonal life. Ihere is a letter to Barbara, his men- 
gbdfriend, dated Dec. 12, 1943, whm he was 
away at war, that be gins, *‘My dadingBac, I love 
you. precious, widiallmy he^” Andtbmisa 
poreait of ymmg Robin Bush, who died of leuk- 
emia in 1953 ax age 3. 

One small display, tucked aw^, is devoted to 
Mr. Bush’s vice ^KcsidenL It describes Dan 






Quayle as ”a busy vice president” and ‘*a 
youthfnl running mate” ^ and that’s about iL 
Mr. Bush’s foreign policies take up mudi more 
room in the museum than his domestic achieve- 
ments, aithnugb Mr. Alsobfook says that is no 
commenttry on )^. Bush. 

“I Imow ihe.'poblic perception is he devoted 
most of his tiine to foreign policy,” said hfr. 
Alsobrook, wfaopreviouriy served as siqier- 
visory archivist m the fimmy Carter Pnsi- 
denrial Libraiy ai^ Museum in Atlanta. But “so 
much of it just depmds on what shows up” on a 
president’s desk. 

The museum treats Mr. Bush’s defeat in 1992 
by I^. Clinton tills way: “lb 1991, President 
George Bush scored one of tiie highest approval 
ratings <^anjy president in histay, 91 pei^t,” 
reports tire display panel covering tiie re-election 
batiie. “As tirepresi^tial eampaign heated 
his of^nents omloited the dre^ that America 
was stalled. President Bush disagreed and pre- 
dicted tire economy would resume major grcwtii 
vety soon. He was correct” 

“ What I bore you come away witii is a sense of 
histoiy,” Btntii says in tire walconuog film. 
“That the great changes that took place when I 
was inivil^ed enough to be president come alive 
for you. Thm I h(^ that you countyour blessiiigs 
about democrar^, abmit freedom, and about tire 
wondcre of the United States of America.” 


iVietnam Rescues 900 Fishermen, but Typhoon Toll Mounts 


The Associated Press 

HANOI •— Army helicopters and a 
ragtag armada of ships reamed more 
thm 900 Vietnamese nshomen fear^ 
lost at sea in a typhoon, a government 
relief agency said. 

Eighty-three others w«e found by a 
rescue mission in neighboring Can^od- 
ia, but hundreds more were missing in 
the region, where the death toll rose past 
330 — and could climb by hundi^, 
even thousands. 

In Vieuiam, the authorities confirmed 


that at least 300 people had been IdUed 
by the typhoon that struck over the 
weekend, and as many as 800 other 
sailors and fishermen missing at sea 
were premmed dead. The deatii toll in 
Cambodia was at least 25, and 7 people 
were killed in Thailand. 

llie Centcal Committee for Flood aud 
Smrm Control said 2249 other Viet- 
namese were unaccounted for after the 
storm hit the southon provinces of Ca 
Mau and Kien Giang. 

About 100 people were missing in 


Cambodia, and at least 100 Thai fish- 
ermen were feared lost in the Gulf of 

Thailan d 

The search and rescue opexatiou in 
Vietnam included navy cutters. Coast 
Guard dinghies and rickety fishing 
yawls. Dozens of fishermen survived by 

clinging tngmpty plastic cfmtain grs and 

wood planks. I&y were plucked from 
the Fou^ sea by a small fleet of Ireli- 
copters d^loyed Wednesday to he^) the 
rescue effort Power was restor^ to 
parts of Ca Mau Aovince. and ctmt- 


gency tdeptmoe service was established 
in heavily hit areas, tire flood and storm 
committee said. 

Winds of more than 130 kilcxneteis 
per hour (80 miles per hour) destroyed 
tens of thousands of homes, schools and 
clinics in Ca Mau, the province’s gov- 
eroing Petrie’s Committee said. 

“The government is working out 
plans to bap tiie affected provinces to 
qnidriy overcome tire consequences of 
the typhoon,” Prime Minister Phan Van 
Ehaisaid. 


Jury Begins Jfiighing 
Trade Center Bombing 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Jurors began de- 
liberating Thursday in the World Trade 
Center bixnbmg trial, asking for a de- 
luge of evidence within minutes afrer 
they started their work. 

They asked to see pbotogrwhs and 
much of the evidoice against Eyad Is- 
tnoU, who prosecutors say played a key 
role in tiie attack on Feb. 26, 1993 by 
driving the bomb into the Trade Center 
in a van and setting it off. 


And Flooding 

B ADAJOZ. Spain Storms paddi^ 
lOO^ometer winds hit pans of Spain 
and Ponucal on *niUTsday. stamxu 
floods tbatlriUed at least 3 1 people arid 
left tfaous^o^ without phone or elec- 
trical service. . , . 

The loiown dead numbered 21 m 
Spain and 10 in Portugal after the heav- 
ittt rains in memory hit tire southwest 
comer of tire Iberian peninsula Wed- 
nttday night Rivers overQowed and 
mud poured tiuough- towns and vil- 
lages. 

Officials in both countries -said tiie 
toll could rise because at least six per- 
sons are unaccounted for. 

After tire floodwateis receded in 
Badajoz, about 400 kii«neieES (250 
miles) west of Madrid, rescuers 
sqai-piwt for bodies through mud-filled 
streets where cars were lot piled an^ 
other. Eighteen bodies were found 
inBadajoz.- , ,, , ^ 

In tire nearby town of Valverde de 
Lttanes. floodwaters rose so high — up 
to three meters (10 feet) — that two 
women drowned in a house, the state 
radio reponed. Rescuers rowed through 
tire streets in dinghies, taidng stranded 
residents aboard. 

Mudi of the flooding occurred in 
cities a^ towns, like Badajoz. lying 
alc^g the Guadiana River, which fonns 
part of the Portuguese-Spanish border 
and which overflowed 

But the stonn battered many other 
parts of botii countries, loppling trees 
onto cars and sidewalks in Seville and 
Madrid 

The winds caused scaffolding on a 
construction ^jeet in the Plaza de Es- 
pana, one of Madrid’s biggest ^narcs. 
to come crashing down. No injuries 
were rqiorted. 

The storm brought winter early to the 
rnpiintainR north of- Madrid, covering 
the Guadazrazna range with snow. 

Some 55 villages in central Sp^ 
were witiiout power after winds 
knocked down pbwer lines. 

In Portugal, niine Minister Antonio 
Guterres, who spent most of the night in 
civil d^bnse headquarters, traveled to 
the Alratejo and Algarve regions on 
Thursday to inspect damage. 

In one fatal incident, a I6-day-oid 
baby boy died after he was wrenched 
from the arms of his frither by flood- 
waters in the soutiieni Portuguese vil- 
lage of Can^erio. 

Officials were concerned about the 
risk of further flooding from the swollen 
Tagus and Guadiana rivers as Spanish 
aut^ties opened brimming reservoirs 
upstream to ease tiie pressure. 

Although the worst appeared to be 
over in Portugal, more ram was forecast 
for southern Spain. - 

Officials iboe said that at least 10 
percent of the cotton crop in Andalusia, 
the main producing area, had been 
washed away. 

Major hi^wsws in the region were 
blocked by fallen trees and power 
lines. 

The flooding disrupted rail service 
witii Cordoba. Seville and Malaga, said 
Carlos Sanchez, a spokesman for 
Spain’s rail comply. Rail service to the 
Aleatejo region in Portugal was sus- 
pended. (Renters, AP) 



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INTERNAnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAT, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


PAGES 


THE AMERICAS 


i Election Lesson: Less Is More Since Voters Are Content on Major Issues 


By Richaid L.'Berice 

_New YMc Timea Sernee 


NEW YORK — Foiget the postmcHtems 

niit n i.i* • • 


about ideoli 


Think snalL 

Hie issw that ultimately drove the gubernat- 
orial eleetioiis — automolule insuraoce rates in 
New Jersey and a state car tax ia Vir ginia — had 

ney^ before beeninthefonfront of states’ 

politics. Tliat they became such central concerns, 
according to surveys of voters leaving t^ polls. 
onderscoFN two realities about die current state 
oFU.S. politics: Voten are relatively content, so 
elections these days are not turning on huge 
issues Uhte the unraiployinent rate. 

That has left room for issues diat were seldom 
talked about even a few months before die elec- 


tion to rise to the top of the political discourse. 

The success of narrow pocketbook issues is a 
nod to the strata pofected Prudent Bill 
Clinton in last year’s election, when be seized on 
small but poweifolly symbolic issues like school 
UQifbmis. It also reflects the waning of ideol(^y 
in today's politics; it is a time when both paroes 
are struggling to come up with defining issues. 

WEWSANALYSIS 

‘ ’If the ecoaomy were In trouble, I don't think 
we’d see these issues nearly as dominant as they 
were on Tnesday," said forma R^vesentative 
Vin Weber of Minnesota, a prorninent Rqpub- 
lican conseivative. “The p^ulation is jwetty 
hai^y right now; people can aflbrd to be con- 
cerned with seconuuy issues.’’ 

Advisers to James Gilmore, the Republican 
who was elected governor of Virginia, said they 


believed he won by an unexpectedly large mar- 
gin over Lieutenant Governor Don B^er be- 
cause he sdzed on an issue that was pment with 
many Virginians: He vowed to eliminate the 
state’s u(^)opular annual tax on cars and irocks. 

In New Jersey, advisers to Governor Christie 
Whitman said Jam^ McOmv^, her Demo- 
cratic rival, came so cU^ to ousting tixe popular 
incumbent because tu also found an issue that 
incensed ordinary voters; the state’s high aoto- 
mobile insurance rates. 

Politicians and strat^ts around the county, 
Republicans and Democrats aiilre, said in in- 
terviews Wednesday that if the economy holds 
and there are no other burning new issues, the 
hunt for the small-bore issues may become a 
hallmark of next year's congressiona} and 
gubernatorial races. 

“You have to pick a particular burr under the 
saddle,” said Governor Howard Dean of Ver- 


mont, chairman of the Democratic Goveniots 
Association. “And l.tiiuik G ilmor e and Mc- 
Greevey did h very eSectively.” 

Mr. Dean said he would advise Deoxxnatic 
candidates next year to Ux^ for issues dlat touch 
voters. “It will be different in diffemu states,” 
he said. “It could be hog farm regul^oos in 
Iowa, tort reform in Arabama and the Con- 
fodei^ flag in South Carolina.” 

Governor Tommy Thampson of Wisconsin, a 
Republican who is up for re-election next year, 
t^reed that the victoiy of Mr. Gilmore in.par- 
ticularwas “a lesson for all R^Hiblic^.” 

“You’ve got to make tiie issues understandp 
able,'* Mr. Thompm said, “so they can be 
intemalizetL A family could undeistand that if 
foey voted for CHlmore tiiey were gt^ to get a 
reduction in their taxes on the car. People could 
internalize foaL" 

Another attraction of tiiese narrower issues is 


that thw have a populist cast and, far from 

. abstract, can be easUy undOTK^ by votOT. And 

» they meet tite seeds of politicians who, m 
days of fiscal austerity, ^ not dare propose m^- 
. cost measures. 

That there were hard-fou^t races over issues 

that had not been on the radar screen in Virgiaia 

and New Jers^ also underscores a idative con- 
tentment voters with the status wo. 

In places, the exit polls found, votcra 
were overv^hmogly satis&d wi& the state of 
the economy. And dreute Mrs. Whitman’s close 
rati^ bottom is in New Jersey ^nd 
Virginia in Staten Island’s special election 
fn* the House of Rqnesentatives, Republicans 
retained the seats. 

In New Jersey, the exit i»lls diowed, 
ninp. of j[Q votBcs sakl the issue of antomobuc 

inimTanfip. ^as i n i p nit ant in mwlfing dieiT clUUCe 

foe governor. 



Clinton Offers 
Workers Aid 
In Bid to Win 
Trade Battle 

By John M. Bioder 

NtwYorkTimesService 

WASHINGTON — Sctambling to 
entice Democrats to support p-ntianraH 
nade negotiating autbori^ for President 
BillClinton, die White House has offered 
programs to aid workers and commu- 
nities hurt by future trade agreements. 

White House officials swl the pack- 
age would be worth roughly $4 billion 
over the next five years and would pay 
for job training, community develop- 
ment and environmental repair. 

In fact, the initiative provides only 
about S1.S billion in proposed new 
money for trade-related assistance. The 
rest represents existing spent^ or hy- 
potoeocal expendi&ues that have not 
been pr^ntra to or approved by Con- 
gress, aides said. 

D^ite the relatively modest dimen- 
si<Mis of the program, the announcement 
brought the president a handful of con- 
verts to sup^rt so-called fast-track au- 
thority. But at the end of the day, Mr. 
Clinton was still shy of die 218 votes he 
needed to prevail in a pivotal vote Fri- 
day in the House of Rejxeseutatives. 

Under fast-track negotiating anthor- 
ity, which pmidents wielded ffom 1974 
until it expired in 1994, Congress may 
only a^^xove os disapprove trade ^cee- 
ments but not amend them. 

In an Oval Office app^ for 6U(q)Oft 
of the measure. Mr. Clinton assoted 
that presidential authority and jU-S. 
pres^ were on die tine. 

“Tbe main thing is, 1 just ask the 
American people to give roe the benefit 
of the doubt on teis,’ ' Mr. CUnion said. 
“We've got to sell more to odier people. 
There is not an <^tion. And refosiog to 
do it won't save jt^. won’t keep in- 
comes up and won't help us help other 
perale around the worid.” 

But critics were skeptical that the 
rq)ackaging of existing programs 
would be sufficient to tip the congres- 
sional balance in favor of the measure, 
which commands broad Repitolican and 
business support but has <tivided die 
Democratic Party. 


Perot Sues Both Major Parties 

SAN FRANCISCO — Continuing recent efforts to in- 
sinuate himself back into politics, the bUlionaire Ross Perot 
has sued the Republican and Democmic parties and the 
Federal Election Commission in federal court in a push for 
the rights of minor party 

The suit Muteods that large ehuntat of federal election law 
are UDCOnstitUdOimi and difteriminate a gainaf amall pf,Jirienl 
parties. It also asserts diat die commission — conqiosed of 
diree Democrats and diree RqiubUcans — does nothing to 
protect minority candidates. 

At a press conference in San Francisco, li/fo. Perot asserted 
that both parties had ignored federal restrictioiis on so-called 
soft money — which be used only for party-building 
activities socb as voter-registration dnves — during the 
• 1996 presidential campaign in tite knowledge diat they 
would not be proseented by the commission. 

Both parties “weie guihy,a^ since they own the system, 
drey bom put a gnn to one anodier's head,” said I^. Perot, 
who ran for presi^nt unsuccessfblly in 1992 and 1996. 

said to the odier, 'If you take us down, we’ll take you 
down.* •• (£AT) 

. A Chance for Bureaucrats to Star 

BmMamnvAnwMFm WASHINGTON — President Bill Qioton Bod the entire 
Ross Perot essidU.^ the F«lerol Election Coquniesion in San Froncisk.. 




The “hufonnaiuxi S upei s ta i i wi,*' a new TV diamel with a 
miMinn m kw p cameras running at die White House and 
federal agencies all over Washington, plans to start broad- 
casting next mcndi in the Washington area. Becanse it is only 
iicensed for low-powered transmission, coverage will be 
limited to the area widtin and around die Bdtway. 

if you happen to betunr^ those who dnukC-SPAN. tee 
channel whi& ^edalizes in Congress, is about as exciting 

as watehing an unplugged toaster, you might wonder What 
kud of audience coulddiere befa a TVc&onel devoted to 

covering, nnffiRxed and unedited, the daily parade of WUte 

House photo opportunities, Agriculhire Department brief- 


Aeronautics and Space Administiation? 

“There are approxizziat^ 38,000 top executives in the 
federal govennknt diat we will be leaaiittg,'* said a spok- 
ggman fo[ the Station owner, Dennis Dunba, a 46-year-old 
entreixeoeur. “And diere are over 2,200 associatirais and 
nonprofit groops in town. These will be a powerfiil audience 
for us iatne beginning.” (WP) 


Quote lUnquote 


David Kecdall, die {xesidmit's lawyer, a;^ en^loyees of 
a Little Rock, AdansB8,junltyard discovered in the trunk of 
an abandoned car a rott^ coUection of files that included a 
check for mne dian $^,000 payable to Bill Clinton from 
Madison GuarantyJSavings & Ijwb? “They may have the 
auttotidty and credibility of a newly discovoed and 
freshly wntten Elvis antobiograidiy.” (WP) 


Mail-Order Shoppers Facing First Out-of -State Sales Taxes in ’98 


By David Cay Johnston 

Ntv York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The coming holiday 
season could be the last for a cherished 
loophole that lets U.S. mail-order shop- 
pers avoid paying sales taxes on pur- 
■ chases from out-m-state comp^es. 

Under ra agreement negotiated by 
officials of the biggest states and a trade 
group for the mail-order industry, many 
merchants will be^ collecting sales 
taxes on such transactions. 

The agreement; which is eiqiected to 
be announced Friday, will cost con- 
sumers about $1.2 billion a year, rep- 
resentatives of both sides in the talks 
said Wednesday. 

Legally, such purchases axe subject to 
tbe same tax as a custooier’s trans- 
actions at the local dqwtment store. 
But tax collectors have bad no way to 
compel out-of-state merdlants to collect 
the tax on their behalf, and catalogue 
retailers and other direct marketers have 
generally shunned die tosk. 


But such big mail-order selters as 
Lands’ End and L. L. Bean have sought 
such an agreement, and the talks are 
being closely watched by other compa- 
nies mat sell through the mail, by phone 
or cable television or over the foienfei, 
including Dell Coimuter, Microware- 
house, Gateway 2000 and American 
Express. 

The companies assert that they will 
lose little io sales by ending a tax break 
th^ costomeis have long enjctyed. a£- 
coiding to Robert Levering, a vice pres- 
idem m tbe Direct Marketing Asso- . 
ciation, which represents the mad-oider 
companies in die negotiations. 

Mr. Levering said he expected the 
agreemem to be in effect in Che biggest 
states in about a year. 

Althou^ a business could preserve a 
price advantage by continuuig to refuse 
CD collect sales taxes, such a refusal 
would be an invitation to tax collectors 
in various states to audit its sales. 

StiU, retailing experts say some cat- 
egories of businesses are likely to stay 


out of the voluntary agreement, includ- 
ing companies that s(£ low-cost goods 
or products with thin profit aaargins. 

StiU. the agreemem — made possible 
by software that makes it easier for 
mail-rxder companies to calculate the 
hundreds of diffexeat sales taxes ior 
posed by states, cities and special dis- 


tricts — would help solve problems for 
states and ir«nBpHni« alike. 

State and local governments, which 
impose sales taxes of 2 percent to about 
9 peroeut, conqilain that they are losing 
sales taxes on much of the more than 
$215 billion of annual mail-order sales 
— and that the growth of sales on tbe 


Internet poaes an added threat to their 
tax base. For dieir part the mail-order 
companies are wea^ after years of lit- 
igation to maintirin the exemp- 

tion from collecting taxes, which 
the U.S. Siqneme Court has presoved 
for busiiiesses that do not have any 
physical presence in a state. 


New; with first Telecom, 
call the USA at a price shot to pieces, 



Away From Politics 


• Don’t tell Dalny Marga Valdes that 
organized labor Is hating a hard time 
s^ing up new members. The 29-year-old 
^ifomia actress has been tryira for six 
montiis to join the Screen Actors Guild. Bui 
the union says her work is not mainstream 
film entertainment. Valdes, or Dalny Marga 
on the screen, is an “adult film” actress. 
She has appeared in 70 films in three years 
with such titles as “Night Shift Dark An- 
gels” and “Hustler Lettm.” (WP) 

• A woman has reached a $10.6 million 
settlement with a hospital and two psy- 
chuurists in Chicr^o over accusations she 
was brainwashed into believtim she was a 
Satanic high priestess. Tbe setuement casts 
more doubt on tecfaniciues to help patients 


recall traumatic ei^ierieoces believed to be 
blocked frtxn their memory, her lavtyer 
said. Rush Presbyterian-St Uike’s Medical 
Center agreed to pay Patricia Buigus $3.S 
miUioo, foe lawyer said. The rest \riU be 
paid by foe foei^nsts. (AP) 

• The Manhattan district attorney said 
he would not seek the death penalty for foe 
man accused of lolling a high school teach- 
er, Jonathan Levin, son of me Time Warner 
chief, during a robbery in May. It was foe 
eighth such case that Robert Motgenfoau, 
the district attraney and an opponent of 
capital punishment, has consiaered since 
New York reinstituted capital punishment 
two years ago. In each case, he chose to seek 
a sentence of life without parole. (HYT) 


Houston Keeps AfGrnialive Action 


By Sam Howe Vertiovek 

Sew York Times Service 

HOUSTON -- Just a day 
alter the Supreme Court up- 
held California's sweeping 
ban on affirmative action 
policies, workers in Houston 
have put asurjxising brake on 
a national movement that has* 


J 1 1*1 1 • f ‘ (• J 0 


In votiim decisively to 
mamtflin affirmative action 
policies, Houstonians not 
only belied the city's conser- 
vative image, they offered a 
window on foe con^ilicated 
feelings many Americans say 
they Mve about the issue. 

Interviews with voters and 
an analysis of exit polls in- 
dicate foe proposal to ban af- 
firmative action here failed, 
for the follow^ reasons: af- 
fitmadve action supponeis 
kept opponents £mn seizing 
the rhetorical hi^ ground or 
equal opponumiy and dvil 
tights; Houston’s business 
and political establishment 
showed a united fece in favor 
of tbe program, tmd oontesH 

S ' Houston is more po- 
y and racially diverse 
foan lingetins stereotypes 
would have it. 

For example, Houston's 


mayor. Bob Lanier, a 
wealfoy, white real estate de- 
veloper, appeared all over tbe 
city and on local television, 
saying: “Let’s not turn back 
the clock to the days when 
guys like me got all foe city’s 
business.” 

TbevoteToesday followed 
tumultuous debate in the City 


voters were asked whether 
they 'Wished specffic^y to 
ban affiimative action in city 
contractu^ and hxen^. Tte 
legal effect was foe sune, but 
to foe revised question they 
answered, “No. 5S percent 
to4SpexcenL 
Many corpeuste leaders 
strenuonsly opposed the bal- 


■ I vfi Him [0 W»7t hTH 1 1^ ■ ^TsTTaTS 


than being asked, as in Cali- itirai A, on the grounds tiiat 
fomia, whether they wanted Houston’s ' efonK diversity 
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“preferential treatment,” part by affirmative action. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEBCBER 7^1997 




ASIA/PACmC 


Reports of King^s Rluess 
Rock a Shaky Thailand 

Stodis Fall as Parties Squabble Over Leadership 


By Thomas Crampton 

huemaiimul Henid TrOnme 

BANGKOK — Repom of 
the possible Ulness of King 
Bhomibol Adulyadej of Ihai- 
land sent shudders around die 
region that a country already 
beset by economic and polit- 
ical woes would be dealt an- 
other blow. 

Kizm Bhumibol went to 
Siiiraj Hospital on Thui^y 
for examination of an abnor- 
mal heartbeat The palace 
said a statement on his health 
would be relea^ Friday. 
The king has a history of heart 
problems. 

His physician had warned 
that the 69-year-old monarch 
was worried about the polit- 
ical situation in Thailand as 
bitter rivals battled to r^ilara 
Prime Minister Cluovalit 
Yongchaiyut who resigned 
as of mid^ht Thursday un- 
der criticism for failing to 
stem the country’s economic 
and political tuimoiL 


[Thailand '$ squabbling 
political parties announced 
Thursday they were forming 
two rival coalitions to replace 
Mr. Chaovalit, Agence 
France-Presse reported- from 
Ba^ok. 

[One group of four parties 
is headed by Chadchai 
Chooobavan, a fanner prime 
minister and leader of the Na- 
tional I^evelopment Pai^. 
while die other group of sevoi 
parties is donunated by tiie 
opposition Democrat Party 
h^ed by Chuan LeelqiaL] 

The political wran g lin g 
comes amid a wmseniDgeoH 
nomic crisis that fcxcedThai- 
land to lake a $17.2 billion 
bailout led by the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund. 

The INF said Ihursday 
that the countiy’s deteriorat- 
ing economic situation meant 
the recovery program needed 
to be strengmen^ by further 
spending cuts and hi ghw in- 
terest rates. 

The coincidence of die 


monarch’s illness with polit- 
ical and economic turmoil 
raised deqier concenis 
Thursday about stability. 

^The extent to which Thai 
people link the current crisis 
to the detedoration of the 
Ring’s health, his sickness is 
an extronely inqiottant de- 
velopmenu'^said Mark San- 
dberg, co-head of Asia Pa- 
cific research at Salomon 
Brothers in Hong Kong.' 

“He is an inoqportant sym- 
bol widi his unique ability to 
moderate between factions at 
times of crisis, like now. If 
he’s {diysically unable to ful- 
iill tiiat role, it raises conoeizis 
about how far the breakdown 
in leadership can unravel,” 
Mr. Sandberg said. 

In Ban^t^ die bench- 
mark SET stock index fell by 
1.8 percent Tburaday. The 
Thai baht firmed to 38.70 to 
the dollar in ooshore trading 
Thursday but remained weak 
in a^-nmirs offshore tradp 
ing at 39.30. 



Malaysia Silences 
Sports on Smog 

Gag Ordear Assailed as ‘Shocking’ 


fi 




AgVKf FrancfPt<aae 
KUALA LUMPUR — The 
govenuoent has 
f rydetwicft frtun Piak- 
ing stateoie&is on the com- 
haze problem, drswing 
warnings* 


specific issues could give a 
wonyingiBCRueandwewant ' 
to av^ the alarmist atti« 
mde," Mr. Najtb added. 

(petals have said tourists • 
were solred off by such ret 


ynaamss ftocD op- .portg,^ia«y sftwpictures 

position leaders about thraus of Malaysians wearina masks 
tofreedomofspeedL in the streets were beamed 

Education Minister MO" serosa the world. 


Fnrmcr P rinM MinLater f Tiafirhai Phonnhavan with ofhis hewcorfitibn. ^ 


yia^ftwd Najib - bin . Abdul, 
Kazak moved Thnrsday to 
clear confristmi over die 
directive from his ministiy 
dSba some local newmpeis 
quoted him as saying that the 
ban ott qpeddttg oat covered 
all “sBnimve*'l88aes. 

J*nie direclive ^ 


“Even the king just visiting 
die hosfntal is tremendously 
destabilizing,” saidJim Walk- 
er, chief economist of Credit 
Lyonnais. “If it turned out 
diere was.somediing serious, it 
would cast apall over both the 
currency ana stock maikets.” 

While King Bhumibol de- 
rives much of his power from 


tradition, be is personally ad- 
oredfbrhispnbticwDrics.Be- 
fcTOlbe showing every film 
in -Thailand, audiences 
fm die royal anthem while an 
aged newsreel shows the 

mnnamh «r »rfging dOWD a 
muddy path to oversee village 
development projects. 

“The Thai people’s devo- 


tion to tiieir king is as strong 
as that of the Japanese for 
dieir En^ierar berore World 
War n," s Westem ambas- 
sador said. “Ife is a sort of 
g^-king with little ctmstitu- 
tional* audiority, but wields 
power to influence events 
flwon^ ^ peiqde's personal 
affectum for hioL” 



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pifea t - 

Najib was quoted by the 
Beniaxna news agency as sity- 
ing. “Tody’s rraort is nus- 
iiwBno_ sivins mn iin 
sioo 
lestricticm.*^ 

Mr. Nqjib said the or- 
der was not meant to isolate 
aeftdamieg Qf reseaFchers 
fiom the media nor to de- 
mwalizetiieixL 

'Qting a rep ort tiiat quoted 
a reseaxcher as siting that 
breadiiag air during the haze 
was equivalcDt to smddim 40 
cigarettes a day, Mr. 
stud such findings that were 
“speculative in naniie” and 
not scientifically proven. 

. “Painting such a j^ture 
could give a native image 
of Ma&sia, causing a scare 
among. Malaysians and jne-. 
veiUizig foreigners from'com- 
ingtoBie country,” he said. 

Air. Nr^l) said the re- 
s e ar c he rs could still publish 
rtwir fhvBfigR, but tlK»e ro- 
lled CO die environment and 
haze would have to be sub- 
mitied to lugher autiiorities 
fbruqsovaL 

The directive was issued, 
he said, because some recent 
comments by .academios on 
, m ha» pgtobtem had been 
j mampubted by the foreim 
! inedia to mar the countxy^s 
[image. 

“Thoi^ some of them am 
in their respective 
their statements on 


. The oppositimi leader Lim 
IQc SUok described the gov- 
eninmit move as '“most 
shodddg.*' 

“The govemment IS lakiDg 
a st^ backward at a time 
when there should be grsaMr 
tranqiarency and opomm ID 
beto restore confidence in 
wue M ^ coin^'4 firihiib 
cUl crisis,** Mr. Urn saidi ' ' 

. “There seems to be a bacic- 
pedaling to clamp down on 
me free expression of di- 
versity of inews. which is 
niost unhealtity,” he added.* ' 
hfr. Lim cuM on the gov- 
ernment to cancel the ban im- 
mediately, saying it should 
instead *^seek greater exiKOB- 
slon of views and concerns 
ar^ awareness tm environ- 
mental degradatitm.*' 
Another activist. Fan Yew 
Teog. criticized the govocn- 
meac fv “treatiag our uni- 
versity {Kofessors and lecfiir- 
ere as so^ b(tys that caMittf 
be trusted.** 

Mir. Pan described the 
move as “absolutely absurd” 
and in “utter contmetion'' 
to the government’s plans to 
allow' a free flow of infor- 
matkw in an ambitious mui- 
’*siq)er corricte” 

projecL 

’^These are supposed to be 
learned findings anU seriouir 
research,” hv. Fan said. 
“What is the goverrunent 
afraid of? Instead of barring 
the academicians from .speak- 
ing. tiiey should challenge 
tiiem to prove their firt^ 



(»;ir\ 


lll'l 


^t’s another black day for 
the freedom of speech and 
freedom of research espe- 
dally when it is ap^ied to 
learmpecmle,” Mr. ran ad- 
ded 


BRIEFLY 


China invites Taiwan Official 

TAIPEI — Taipei said on Thnrsday that Beijing had 
invited a senior Taiwan i^otiator to a December seminar 
in soutiieast China. caUing the move a positive sign but 
dechniiig to say if he would accept. 

Such a visit could move the two rivab closer to ending 
a deadlock over high-level contacts that has lasted more 
than two years. 

Ta^*s Straits Exchange Foundation said its mainland 
counteipait, the Assodation for Relations Across dw 
Taiwan Str^ had invited Def^ Chairman Chiao Jen-ho 
to attend a seminar in die coastal city of Xiamen. The 
foondatiems handle ties between the two counoics in the 
absence of (MGSeial contacts. Mr. Chiao, who doubles as die 
foundation’s secretary^eneral, is die island's chief ne- 
gotiator and oversaw the semiofficial bilateral technical 
taDcs, which Beijing broke off in mid-199S. (Reuters) 

V.S.-Japan Mir Chimes Begin 

TOKYO — Warships from Japan and die United States 
started large-scale exercises in die Sea of Japan on 
'Diutsday, their first maneuvers since the announcement 
in Sqitember of a new bilateral security anangement. 

The ‘ ‘Maritime Self-Defense Force Mercise ’ ’ will last 
a week and involve eight ships from the Japanese Navy, 
including the A^is-class cruise KirisUma, and 11 from 

the U.S. 7tii Fleet, led by the aircraft carriex Inde- 
pendence. The 7di fleet has its home port in JmiaiL 
In September, the United States and Japan agreed on a 



zmusweepmg and support operations in a future regional 

(liSiters) 

Former Indian Minister Freed 

N^ DELHI — The Supreme Court on Thursday 
a^iutted a former govenimeot minister. Kaipnath RaL of 
rf® crimnal.dK Press TYust 

^ Tbt court overturned a verdict Iw a special court 
^tees ^ses imda u anti-terrorist law. The special court 
«> 10,3^ in prison. He had been 

- Mr. R ai was food m^pister in the Congress Party 
2*™® Minuter RY^rasi^ 
him as a candidate, he 

Separatists Strike in Koidimir 

The M PSities Huniyat Conference, Kashmir’s main 
seMranst^aiKA called the strike after police arrested 
J^ik, chaiiman of the JainSi^ 
Kastojr Ubcratiod Front, and a dozen of his 

Srinagar streets were ^ 



were 

wjQ^s pum said, tne Jammu and 
Litotion Front offi« is located in Maisurao. 
j Kashmir Liberation Front which 

ro^***^ * against Indian security forces in 

® impendence from bodi India and 

the rest mce ote Hurr?^ 

were put under house arrest on WeSSsdav^ 
precautionary measure. 


■‘I'i 


J 






l‘"t (s .. % 


EUROPE 


^ ^ ' i U.S. Leans to Bosnia Troop Extension 


By Steven Erlanger 

■Vrw Yori Tiirur St-tru-r 


Stale Madeleine Albrighr says that 
a consensus is developing” be- 
tween the administration and Con- 
gress that U.S. troops wiU be needed 

^ mandate of the 
NATO-led force ewires in June. 

She spoke Weonesday after a 
lengthy meeUng at the White House 
on Tuesday night involving Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton, key cabinet ineni- 
bers and conoresslonal leaders. 

Administration officials said they 
were '‘pleasantly surprised” by the 
tone and comity of the long dis- 


cussion, which they said had fo- 
cused on the costs that a premature 
exit from Bosnia could have for 
American leadership, NATO and 
regional stability. 

Mrs. Albright was explicit. “A 
consensus is developing thiu there 
will be or should be some form of 
U.S. military presence” after the 
departure of the stabilization force 
now keeping the peace in Bosnia, 
she said. 

“There is a consensus that we 
need to do whatever is necessary to 
make it work.” 

WhiJe Mrs. Albright said that Mr. 
Clinton had made no final decision, 
the president attended a cabinet 


meeting on OcL 27 where officials 
reached a "bread censensus ” on the 
need to Keep U.S. troops in Bosnia 
after June, accor^g to senior of- 
ftcials. 

[Ob Tbarsday, Defense Secretary 
William Cohen said that there was 
“no consensus” yet on the need for 
U.S. troops to stay in Bosnia after 
their cinrent mission ends. 

[Mr, Cohen conceded that there 
seemed to be a "developing con- 
sensus tb^ smne fram a intema- 
tio nial siiliiaiy presence will be 
needed past June neat year. ” 

[“But there has been no decision 
nii^. no consensus established in 
terms of what form that Intema- 


titMial presence would take.” he 
said, "whether the United States 
would participate in li and what 
form: be it intelligence, logistics, 
support or military.” 

["lliai has yei' to be decided or 
de&ed, and so no such consensus 
exists,” he said.] 

White House officials, openly 
woiiied about Congress, have been 
squeamish about ty'ing Clinton 
to any serious discussion — . let 
alone decision — on extending the 
presence in Bosnia again. And even 
on Wednesday, die V^ite House 
press secretary'. Michael McCuny, 
was careful to say that Mrs. Al- 
bright's comments reflected “her 


own sense of whai — I mean, her 
analysis of the room.” 

‘*I don't think it would be fair to 
say that there is any consensus 
now,” Mr. McCuny said "I think 
what was clear at the mectins uas 
that there is the prospect the pres- 
ident could build that consensus 
with hard work.” 

His interpretation struck some of- 
ftciais who had attended the meeting 
as odd, since .Mrs. .Mbrighi did net 
say that a consensus exisFcd but that 
one was "dcseloping." 

Even so, ktr. McCuny shied 
away from e\'cn that phiusing. say- 
ing: "We clearly have to build it. 
It’s not there now.” 


1 . 



L.A WYERS OUT — Lawyers demonstrating Thursday in Montpellier, France, during a nationwide strike 
that lasted all day in some places. They say a lack of resources has caused unacceptable backlt^ in cases. | 

Hungary’s Hard Sell on Joining NATO 

From TV Sitcom to Computer Game, Ad Blitz Pushes *ies ' in Referendum 

NATO. The board essentially ruled that 
the public should know who pays for 
such programs and be exposed to other 
points of view. 

But the media board is a relatively 


By Christine Spolar 

PMt Smut 


•tiltiY 




6 U DAPEST — There is no mistaking 
bow Hunsary. a former Communist 
country whose critics say it still has 
something to learn about what s^oarates 
persuasion from propag^a, wants 
"■ people to think about NATO. 

Tune in to a top Hungnnun television 
siiuarioncorriedy;‘Tarn%Ltd.,f'andsce 
■ j: its newest character^MajorZoftanKffldos 

— whose cneation was for by the 
- government — tout the rmhtaiy alliance. 
Click on a widely popular radio so£q> 
opera aodhe^ an n^isode — alsopaidfor 
by the government — in which the actors 
gush about life after the Warsaw Pact 
Pop into a school library and test the 
newest CD-ROM game for computer 
whizzes: a free piece of slick, on- 
' abashedly pro-NATO software distrib- 
uted by the government and paid for by 
- an American miiita^ contractor vying 
for aircraft business, McDoaoeO 
E>ouglas Corp. 

What began this spring as an appar- 
ently sincere and somewhat unsop^t- 

• icaled gambit to increase public support 
for joining NATO has turned into a 

p heavily financed hard sell. 

- i f-tit Hungary, Poland and the Czech Re- 
' liii!'* public have been invited to join the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization in its 
historic first phase of expansion into 
•Eastern Europe's formerly Communist 
slates. Only the Hungarian government 

decided early in the proTCss — I^elyto 

soothe anti-NATO sentiment within the 
governing Soci^isi Party — to gauge 
public approval with a referendum. 

Now, with the critical vote set for 
Nov. 16, Hungary’s political elite has 
combined two powerful societal forces 
. — money and media — to generate pro- 
NATO sentiment and bury opposition. 

Even top-level government pro- 
ponents admit that the campaign — 
which by some estimates will pump up 
to S2 million this year into print and 
Is broadcast media for stories and pro- 
1 f grams— has woriced itself inioa state of 
. nervous agitation. _ 

The edginess, they admit, comes CTom 

• fear of failure. Government officials in 

top NATO-sensitive ministries, such as 

Foreign Affairs and Defense, are un- 
nerved by the specter of Hungarians 
' snubbing the important vote. 

Twenty-five percent of the voting 
• population must cast favorable ballots 
for membership io go forwanl And 
turnout must exceed 50 percent for tte 

•referendum to be binding: Otherwise, the 
matter would revert to Parham^— and 

serious questions would be raised about 
support for NATO. 

Indeed, a receiit Gallup Poll estimated 

ihai45 percent to 55 percent of voters are 

■J, 'likely to go to the polls, which prompted 
'■ orders to dozens of civil servants to hit 
the road to woo voteis. 


... Jl'i 




"Of course we are nervous,” said 
Mat}^ Eorsi, a political officer in the 
Foreign Ministry, which has handed the 
most money to t^ media. “It's a risk, 
it's a very big risk.” 

“And this has been very frustrating.” 
he added. ‘ 'The question is. How do 3 rou 
inform people? How do you get into the 
apartment across the street, to the person 
who won’t go to rallies, and- when we 
have a senods- pfogjam cfii - TV, ■%& 
itches it to *DaU^?’ ” 

The referendum has become a high- 
profile and pmentially embarrassing test 
as the expamioD debate heals up io the 
West, particolarly in the United States. 

"liie NATO people I talk to are very 
diplomatic,” ' said Tamas Wachsler, 
h^ of the defense committee in Par- 
liamenL “About the referendom, they 
say, 'It's your business.' But privately 

For the Nov. 16 vote, 
Hungary’s political elite 
has combined two 
powerful forces — money 
and inedia — to generate 
pro-NATO sentiment 
and bury opposition. 

they tell ine, ‘Do the best you can to 
win.’” 

In Poland, eight of every 10 citizens 
supports joining NATO. But enthusiasm 
in Hungary and the Czech Republic has 
lagged. Polls over the last two years 
found fewer than half of their citizens 
clearly suj^ited NATO. Since the al- 
liance extended invitations to the three 
fcHmer Communist countries in July, 
bacl^g has pushed past 50 percent but 
remains unpredictable. 

In Hungary, for instance, Gallup re- 
sults since July show support rose to 61 
percent, dropped to 51 percent and, most 
recently,' climbed to 58 percent Less 
mwii Mhie — and more fhistrating for 
diose NATO pre^oents looking for 
votes — are the people who do not know 
or'do not care about whai will be a 
significant — and costly — militaiy 
restructoriag. Between 20 percCTt and 
22 percent of those polled remain con- 
sistently uDCommitt^ 

Critics of Hungaiy ’s pro-NATO cam- 
paign, which even to the casual observer 
IS startling in breadth, say that what 
they’re seeing and hearing amounts to 
unfair, govenunent-financed media ma- 
nipulation. 

Alba K^n*, a peactMulvocacy group, 
has filed six complaints with the gov- 
ernment since May. The governiTKmt's 
media complaint board, 'in fact sided 
with Alba Kor in two decisions. It found 
individual television and radio programs 
had an urtfair advantage in touting 


new phenomenon in 'a country that was 


the slowest among the East European 
NATO contenders to encourage inde- 
pendent broadcasting. So it. has been 
largely ignored by offenders who con- 
tinutim operate without penalty: : *: 

F^oducers like George Gat laugh off 
the rulings. Mr. Gat created ‘’Family 
Ltd.” and has made films for the aniiy 
since the days of Communist rule. He 
has refused to run disclabnn's demandi^ 
by the media board. 

“The media board tells me one thing, 
and the Defense Ministry sends over 
advisers to help me with my program. 
What does that tell me atmut who I 
should listen to?” Mr. Gat said, shrug- 
ging his shoulders. “I give the Defense 
MinistTy good things and they help 
me,” 

“Hiat’s bow things go here,” he ad- 
ded. “Money makes the world go 
round.” 

Indeed, weeks after the ruling, Mr. 
Gat and Lieutenant ' Colonel Jozsef 
Varga of the Hungarian Army invited a 
rqroner to a taping of “Family Lid.” 
Colonel Varga watches eveiy week to 
ensure that the actor Tamas Te^ gets the 
ministry’s sentiments just righL 

Mr. Toth's character was added just 
before Hungary' wu.s invited to apply for 
NATO membership. He does not spout 
alliance doctrine, instead, his characier 
is a sweet-faced, solid son who seems to 
have the right answer for every di- 
lemma. 

Colonel Varga and Mr. Gat say they 
do not want to force-feed Hungary widi 
NATO. Instead, they want the character 
to ooze comfort and make military re- 
structuring palatable. 

“I’d lose the audience if 1 tried any- 
thing more concrete.” Mr. Gat said. 

The leader of Alba Kor, Tamas Csa- 
pody. said Mr. Gat and other producers 
were taking easy money from the gov- 
eromenL He accused the media and the 
goveinment of ‘‘playing a shell game” 
with rules and democi^. . 

“What the ministries do — by ig- 
noring the wrong — is show the whole 
weakness of Hungarian democracy,” 
Mr. Csapody said. “We have to go to 
court DOW to force them to abide by their 
own law.” 

Officials involved in the referendum 
acknowledge that money has flowed 
fteely since August in an effort to com- 
bat voter malaise. 

- But the polls also show that voters 
may be suffering from "NATO 
overkill” — a saturation of publicity 
about the vote. A survey ihis week found 
success clearly will be linked to turnout: 
Those most ukely to vote support al- 
liance membership. 


Russian Astronauts Replace Mir’s Solar Panel 


Hewen 

• KOROLYOV.Russia— .TwoRussian 

cosmonauts made a space walk 
than six hours on * 

new solar panel on the aged Mirspce 

station and incrca.se its energy st^Ui^ . 

Anatoli Solovyov.ihe flight cominana- 
er, and Pavel Viaogradov, an engineer, 
also worked on an air punfiMtion system 
and tried to mend a leaking * 5 ^ . ■ 
“We congramlate you Md you 

foryourwoA.” the flight du^or.^J- 

mir Solovyov, told them from Mission 
Control here. 


He said the new solar panel would so^ 
op twice as much energy as one dis- 
mantled by the cosmonauts dunng an- 
other long Monday. 

Mr. Solovyov. 49 , and Mr. Vinogradov, 
43 spent 47 minutes mwe than planned in 
snaceTwo sections of die solar panel 
failed at first to unfold properly, and *e 
operation had to be comply uiffluaHy. 
*^eir sortie look 6 hours 17 iM 0 t«. 

. An American astiwaai, David Wou, 
41, was backing up his colleagues msidc 
Mir during their qtace • 

The solar panel ^ delivered two years 


ago by the U.$. space shuttle Atlantis and 
had remained in its packing outside Mir. 

Solar panels are used to soak up power 
from the sun and fxovide energy for Mir. 
which has suffered repeated problems 
since il collided with a cargo craft June 25 
Ae worst accident in its 1 1 -year history. 

Mr. ^lovyov and Mr. Wolf are schra- 
uJed to make the next spac^ w<ilk on Dec. 
5 to replace several U.S. scientific devices 
placed outside Mir in experiments. 

Other (Hohlems aboard Mir have in- 
cluded nolftinctioRS in main computet 
and in energy and oxygen supplies. 


Blair Sees Britain 
As EU Reformer 


<%rSx^FiiinCii9kahn 

PARIS — Britain wants to 
be a dominant player in the 
European Union so that il can 
help reform the 15-nation 
bloc and bring it closer to the 
people. Prime Minister Tony 
Blatrsaid in an interview putv 
lished Thursday in the French 
daily Le Monde. 

In remarks before a two- 
day meeting of British and 
French leaders in London. 
Mr. Blairreaffirmed his com- 
mitment to Europe, saying it 
was in Britain's interest to be 
"a dominant pbyer” in the 
EU. 

Saying he had “veiy warm 
relations” with France's 
president. Jacques Chirac, 
and its prime minister. Lionel 
Jospin — both of whom were 
in London for the meeting — 
Mr. Blair said: "1 feel at home 
in Europe. 1 like Eurqse. I 
want Bntain to be pan of it. I 
think it is part of our des- 
tiny." 

But the Labour prime min- 
ister. who in his younger days 
lived and woiited in Paris, 
said Europe "must change” 
or face serious problems. 

"I belie\’e passionately in 
the refotm of Europe,” Mr. 
Blair said. "Its institutions 
lose a lot of time. Its unem- 
ployment rate is too high. We 
are not creating enough jobs. 


we're not stimulating bust- 1 
nesses enough and we have to { 
learn to better coi^rale to- ! 
gelber." ' 

Mr. Blair said *.ho Euro- I 
pcan Union was "not cur- I 
renily functioning to the ben- 
efit of its peoplLO' I 

"It's important that politi- ' 
cions who truly c:ue about j 
Europe be ready to effect the 
necessary change that better 
corresponds to whui they 
wish,” he said. i 

On the single European I 
currency, or euro, Mr. Blair j 
said Britain would lake . I con- 
structive uf^roach (o its in- } 
lioduction. I 

Briiuin uill hold the pres- 
idency of the European I'ltion 
in the first six months of 199S. 
a crucial lime for moitei.uy 
union. El' leaders will vote in 
May on which nations will be 
allowed to join the single cur- 
rency at its inception on Jan. 

1. 1^99. 

Mr. Blair also justified his 
government's decision not to 
take pan in the first wave of 
monetary union, reiterating 
that the economies of Britain. 
France and Germany had not 
yet converged. 

Mr. Chirac and Mr. Jospin 
were due to attend a reception 
dinner at No. 10 Downing 
Street hosted b\' Mr. Blair. 

iAFP. APi 


BRIEFLY 


‘Mod Cow' Is Ground for Feed 

BRUSSELS ■— The cow identified last week as the 
victim of Belgium’s first case of "mad cow” disease was 
ground up ai^ used in a batch of animal feed, some of 
which has been exp^ed to Poland and the Netherlands, 
the Agriculture Ministry acknowledged Thur&daji'. 

The mix-up occurred because the animal was initially 
thought to be sufTering feom rabies, a spokesman said. 

By the time laboratory tests revealed that the animal 
had been sufiering ftom bovine spongiform enceph- 
alopathy, the carcass had already been u^ for feed. 

Agriculture Minister Karel Pmxten said last week that 
the animal had been slaughtered and burned in accord- 
ance with European Union rules. {AFP} 

Britain to Reform Rape Trials 

LONDON — Britain’s home secretary. Jack Straw, 
pledged Thursday to change laws on rape trials after a 
serial rapist was allowed to interrogate his victims in court 
for five days. 

It was the second such case in the last year and Mr. 
Straw said it must never happen again. "1 am ,xs appalled 
as anyone else to read of ra^ victims being questioned in 
this way and I am determii^ they should not have to go 
through this traumatizing experience.” he wrote in the 
Daily Mirror. 

In die latest case, a43-year-old rapist aj^Kaied to do his 
utmost to humiliate his victims, a 3S-year-old widow and 
a 31-year-old neurosciemisL He made one of them read 
aloud intimate details from the statement she gave to 
police about the attack, when he held her prisoner for 10 
hours in his apartmenL 

He shoutedal the women and when they hesitated over 
his personal questions, reminded them they were under 
oath and obliged to reply. The judge reprimanded the 
rapist for his ‘ 'appalling outbursts' ' but had no power lo 
prevent him fro m cross-examining his viciims.(l?ei/rer.ti 

Ban on Human Cloning Voted 

STRASBOURG — The Council of Europe adopted 
Thursday a protocol banning human cloning, which it 
said was the first legally binding international text on ihc 
subject. 

'The document, which must now be ratified by mem- 
bers of the 40-nation organization, prohibits "any in- 
tervention seddng to create a human being genetically 
identical to another human being, whetiuir living or 
dead.” 

The council said the ban, which followed the recent 
cloning of a sheep by British scientists, was intended "to 
protect the identity of human beings." tReiiurs} 

Scientology Ruling Is Avoided 

BERLIN — Federal judges refused Thursday to rule on 
whether the Church Scientology is a religion, ordering 
a lower court to focus instead on the group's status as a 
nonprofit g^p or a money-making business. 

Tk case, concerning a Scientology branch in the state 
of Baden- Wueittemberg. alr^y h^ been bounced sev- 
eral times from court to court — reflecting the .sensitive 
namre of Scientology’s status in Germany. 

Cennan politicians contend, that die group is a money- 
making business with totalitarian aims to overthrow de- 
mocracy; The Scientologists say they are a nonp^'ofii 
religious group t^t is di^minated against in Germany. 

Judges said Thursday that Scientology's religious 
status is iixelevant to this' case, which focuses on whether 
a branch of Ae group in Baden- Wuemeniberg should be 
afforded nonprofit status. The federal judges said that 
Scientology should be considered a business only if it 
made a profit from selling educational materials to non- 
members. /AF; 


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PAGE 6 


INTERP^ONAL HERALD TRIBUTE. FRU>A1VN0\'EMBERT^19^ 


INTERNATIONAL 


IHV and Iraq Continue Sparring 

Baghdad Told to Stop Moving Equipment, a Policy It Defends 


i ' The Associated Press 

{• UNITED NATIONS, New Yoik — 
(The Security Council told on Thurs- 
jday to stop moving sensitive equipment 
;away ftom UN surveillance cameras 
{after tbe Iraqi foreign minister said it had 
•done so to protect them from possible 
{U.S. air strikes. 

: A UN spokesman, Fred Eckhard, also 
:said Tliunsday that the three-member 
jdiploinatic team that went to Baghdad to 
{tell Iraq to cooperate wi A UN inspectors 
•would leave Friday, probably without 
[meeting President Saddam Hussein. 

Mr. ^khard said that the team de- 
livered a letter from Secretaiy-General 
■^Koti Ani^ and had * * been doing a lot of 
listening*’ in more than tO hoars of 
'meetings over the last two ^ys. 

The chief UN weapons inspector, 
Richard Butler, had hoped to get his 
experts in Thursday to verify whether 
!i^ has been tampering widi surveil- 
lance cameras at suspected weapons 
• sites and removing sensitive equip- 
ment 

The inspections are meant to check 
whether Ir^ has destroyed all long- 
range missiles and weapons of mass 
'destruction, including poison gas and 
lethal biological toxins. That is die key 
requirement for lifting UN sanctions im- 


posed after invaded Kuwait in 1990, 
touching off tiie Guff War. 

But the inspections were canceled 
after Iraq — for a fourth successive day 
— refused to admit American members 
of the team to facilities the membos 
wanted to inspect. 

‘Tt looks a little bit like *ThB cat's 
away, the mice will play,’ ’* Mr. Butler 
said. He added that U-2 surveillance 
flights, which were suspended this 
week, would resume Monday. 

In a letter to the Secuiify Council, 
Iraq's foreign minister, Mohammed 
Said Sahfaaf, acknowledged That some 
equipment had been mored, but said 
Baghdad took tire action only because it 
feared a U.S. w strike was imminenL 

“Thetefore, we have taken some mea- 
sures, which are precisely to move to 
rfjgtant the eqiUpmeilt tfmt may have 

been subject to militaiy attack,*’ he said. 

He added that the eqoipmeot would be 
returned to the original focatUm and the 
UN would be allowed to inspect it once 
any threat of an air strike ends. 

* 'Westiess that these equipments will 
not be used for any {voscrit^ military 
activity during this period,’' he said. 

Mr. Sahhaf repots tiiat one surveil- 
lance camera was damaged Wednesday 
in an explosion during Iraqi military 


tests of two short-range missile engifles. 
Short-i^e missiles are not banc^ 
the United Nations. 

In a carefully crafted statement, the 
Securi^ Council said it ’’hopes that any 
recurrence” of those actions “will be 
avoided*' since they were “not in con- 
formity” with UN orders. 

The chief British delegate. John We- 
ston, said that “there was great 
concern” about the latest Iraqi actions 
and that the UN envoys should raise the 
issue witii the Iraqi government 

Britain and the United States have 
taken the strongest line against Iraq of 
any of the 15 Security Council mem- 
ber. 

Mr. Butler said tiiat he considered the 
situation “very serious” and that tiie 
Iraqis had never bef<xe tried to block 
surveillance cameras in such a maimer. 

In Washingttm, Vice President AI 
Gore said that Saddam “must know 
that be has to comply with the will of the 
intOTiational community.'' 

“We will make sure that he com- 
plies.” Mr. Gore said. 

The U.S. defease secretary, William 
Cohen, said a response “could include 
further economic measures. Th^ could 
include military as well. This is not a 
negotiable item.” 



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Q & A / Rolf Skews 


Saddam’s Attempt 
To Sow ‘Confusion’ 



Iraq[i women waitii^ outside a Red Crescent office in 
Bagdad on Thursday, hoping to get food supplies. 





In banvte U.S. v^raptms 
inspiectofs, ^ddatn Hussein 
is trying to undercut the 
United Natiims Special .Com- 
mission as the key Jt^e ef 
Iraqi compliance with the 
Wimi/iatibfi of its H'eapons qT 
mass destruction, according 
to Ro^ Ekeus, the Swedish 
diplomat who headed the 
commissidn undl July. Now 
his cdunti^'s ambassador to 
Washington. Mr. Ekeus talked 
with JosepJt Fitchett of the 
International ■ Herald 
Tribune', 


Q.Whv is Baghdad defy- 
ins the United Natiems and Mr. Ekeus sees a ror 
^y now? diplomabc ’heavy lifting. 

A. This is not atypical of , ,, , _ 

Husscin. We’vc encountered blockages, recurrently, 
and I nayself had to lead missions to Baghdad with stern 
warnings. I was certainly cwivinecd or SMunty Council 
and maybe that made me convincing. 

The gihMtion more difficult last year when the Imqis 

craiffsl systematically trying to slow down and block our wchIc. 
We had reached the conclusion that Iraq was hiding materials 
and programs, and trying to find diem led us into very sensitive 
areas. 

As ourtaiget listshaipened, it moved away from production 
ftcilities to rocus oh what we called the concealment mech- 
anism. That led us to see that the secrets tmd components of 
these promnms were held in selected brigades of the Re- 

g ubllcan Guards and actually within special sections of ^e 
iuaids handling securitv in liaison with ports of Iraqi in- 
telligence. 'These are key forces propping up the leadcmdup. m 
were we ra nkling the core of die system. Not surprisingly, the 
closer we probed, the stronger the resLslancc became. I care- 
fully briefed Security Council members about what u’e were 
going to do, and I met no objection frem any government. 

. Q. And your successor has continued this pressure? 

A. T nd ffd Butof course Iraq did, too. When Richsml Butler 
took over from me in June, Iraq tried to change the rules, but 
tire Security Council reacted handsomely, with a 15-0 con- 
— and witiitiieOccober woming. By that datc.Iraq 
was told, it had to stop trying to us from so-called 
presidential areas or face lurtber restrictions, aimed at the right 
Iraqis and not just tbe Iraqi necole. 

Unfortunately, wlren Mr. Butfer leponed that resistance w:is 
ccHitinuing. the Security Council was not ready to give him the 
harking he wug ht- In this itistancc, there seems to hiivc been 
some confusion in the council about the mixture of improi’e- 
and some majOT challenges. The United States rene- 
gotiated the terms of its initial, levied resolution, but in spite uf 
this soffening. whk^ suipri^ mwy of us, some of the 
council’s members deddeo niM to vote m favor. It wa^ the first 
time that tbe outemne was not 15-0. 

Q. Did France EUid Russia ab^ain ... 

^ and China... 

Q. ... because they thought that Iraq has been defanged und 
the commission is ^ing too punitive? 

A- Not at all The best work on poison gas and on biological 
weapons is done by French and Russian specialists on the 
commission, so France and Russia know* vuiy well that the 
chaionae would be contradicting the conclusions^ uf ihusc 
courses' top screntlsts if he said “mission uccomplishni.' ' 

• 

Q, Did Washington send tbe wrong signal by enmpro- 
misiag on the resolution? 

A- No, I chink the United Stittes did the optimum amt got a 
good, binding resolution. The other three did what ihe> 
thought was just. But the effect was to provide an opening for 
Iraq to try going further. Iraq could sharpen the argument that 
they have been making for at least a ye^. They say. wc have 
no weapons, but the'* commission says they do. So their 
problem was the credibiliQr of the commission. Thai is U'hy 
they stuped up attacks on the commission, finally saying that 
it was in the pay of the almighty CIA. The theme'\v:is (hat the 
commission was carrying out the ageiula of the United States. 
If they could ^arate out the Americans, they could neutralize 
the conunission. 

What they want to do is create an alternative mechanism 
that would make it easier for them to talk their way out of 
sanctions withoat giving up their most secret prognu'ns. 

For example, nowadays they often stop the commi.<sion's 
teams outside a sensitive facility', perhaps belongine to the 
special Republican Guards, and t^y say: “You can^ no in, 
but someone else can” — a three-nation team from the 
SecuiiQr Council, or some experts from member couniries, or 
ambassadors flom Baghdad. It’s a game tiuit's played more 
and more, trying to undercut the commission as the inKirumeni 
for carrying out UN policy, I vigorously opposed this. But this 
time th^’ve managed to get a new process going, in (he past, 
the chainnan of dx commission would have led anv UN 
mission to Baghdad like toe present one. 

• 

Q. So what is toe outlook? 

A. The three UN representatives will be told in Baghdad 
ttat Iraq has destroyed its we^ns, but that the commission 
refuses to believe it Hie Iraqis will suggest tlrat thev could 
work b«ter with somebody else. Every effort will be made to 
shake toe commission's role and su gg est other interlocutors 
“ who don’t know the dossier the way the inspectors do. 
mutably, this will add to confusion about the commission 
^ its role, which toe Iraqis will exploit in the future. But I 
don t think the United States and Britain will relent on the 
issue of compliance, no matter how many other soveminents 
seem reluctant. 

D^rmined diplomacy — more heavy lifting by the Clinton 
adnumstr^on — can restore a common front, and then 1 think 
Bagl^ will back down. What people need to understand is 
that the sooner toe council gets back to 15-0 solidariis the 
sooner Iraq will decide to come clean — and toe .<wtner 
suctioQS can be lifted. 



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^ PAGE 8 


FRIDAX, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



SfrihuM 


' Plim.lSHia> WITH THE NEW WRK TIMIB AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Stop Exaggerating 


» Six moaths ago die “dger" econo- 
, ndes of Soutbeast Asia were widely 
portrayed as miiaculcMis engines of 
r perpe^l growth. Today they are por- 
. trayed as fe^ie. Since in many cases 
r the portrayers are the very same in- 
. vestment analysts, credit raters and 
^ -other economic experts, it is fair to ask 
1 whether their dismal reviews today 
r aren't as overstated as were their raves 
' a few months back. 

Tlie economies of Southeast Asia 
■ are in varying degrees of trouble In 
^ Tluiland, where the bad news started in 
July, die difficaldes may be most se- 
, rious,'with a period of significant re- 
trenchment looming. 7^ resignation 

. of Thailand’s prime minister confir ms 

how that country dins far been 
unable to grapple whfa its difficulties. 

Singapore, which ' lad followed 
[ much sounder economic policies, re- 
mains in much better shape. But sev- 
, eralofthe tigers, paiticalarly Thailand, 
Malaysia and bdonesia, face linked 
. political and economic challenges that 
will require real, reform. As their eco- 
; Domies so rapidly, many of ^ir 

political institutions did nor keqi pace. 
The result has been comiptimi, a lack 
. of transparency, inadequate supervi- 
sion of banking and insuificient in- 
vestment in education to train the next 
generation of workers and engineers. 

But none of those shortcomings is 
new, and none prevented the Southeast 
Asian economies from progressing 
from poverty toward middl&olass suc- 
cess widi hismric swiftness. The tiger 
economies, in other words, did many 
dungs right, and continue to do many 
things right Their savings rates are 


high; their fiscal policies are respon- 
sible, They invest heavily in public 
healdi and primary education. Th^ 
opened their economies to trade and 
frneign dfrect investment ■ 

of the fhndamentals were and 
remain sound. The question now is 
bow quickly these nati o ns can cnrect 
tiieir admitt^y teal shortcomings and 
retnm to a path of growth. 

All of them, to successfully evolve 
into higher-te^ higher-income eco- 
nomies, will have to reform theirpolit- 
ical systems in ways will dis- 
comfort entrenebed ^tes. They will 
have to democratize, regulate mcxe 
evenly and openly, get serious about 
public corr upti on. But if their troubles 
are falsely exaggerated, the recovery 
could take fia* longer thm necessary. 

Some outside investors and would- 
be saviors now are callii^fbrdractmian 
treatmcait: Banks should be shuttered, 
budgets slashed, interest rates jacked 
Dp. Overdoing such remedies (xmld 
send the region into a jxolonged and 
unnecessary recessm. That would 
have mve homao costs in Asia, and it 
would hurt the U.S. economy, too. 

Jeffrey Sachs, a Harvard economist 
whose oedibility is bolstered by the 
general warnings he issued bdrne last 
July’s crash, now cautions against an 
overreactioa. ’* Asia’s long-term 
growtii prospects are real,” he said at 
an Asian D^elopment Bank confer- 
ence in Washington last week. ‘’-There 
Is work to be d^, bat no reason why ’ 
this financial crisis tuin into a 
prolonged contraction — unless mis- 
guided policies were to make it so.” 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Courage on Trade 


Bill Clinton accurately portrays Fri- 
' day’s vote in' the House of Repre- 

• sentatives on “fast-track” as crucial to 
' bis ability to maintain America’s lead- 
‘ ership in worid trade. A favorable vote 
' would provide him with the authority 

to negotiate agreements tiiat Congress 
‘ can rgect but not amend. But iixe- 

• spo^ible political forces in both 
parties stand in bis way. 

Some House Republicans who favor 
free trade reihse to hand President 
‘ Clinton a victoiy without getting 

• something in return, like an agreement 
' to weaken his plan to develop national 
> tests for students. Hostage-taking 
' would be unwortiiy if it ihr^ened a 
. policy tiiat means so much to America 

and the world — not to mention an 
issue that is wholly consistent with 
Republican economic principies. 

But it is Mr. Clinton's Democratic 
colleagues, led by the minority leader, 
Richard Gephardt, who are largely re- 
sponsible for the president's troubles. 
Many know that j^t-track is the right 
policy but are terrified of political re- 
tribution from organized labor. The 
same protectionist forces that opposed 
NAFTA are engaged in the same fear- 
mongering argument that trade 


tiireateDS American jobs. The claim 
was absurd then and remains absurd 
today, as is obvious to anyone who 
notes that the economy is operating 
near full at^lqymenL 

The purpose of trade is to fewer 
workers in low-paid industries, lilre 
textiles, and more workers in high-paid 
ones like aircraft manufacturing. That, 
along with low prices that flow from 
foreign competition, almost 

everyone bet^ off. 

The (mponents also argue that free 
trade will encourage developing eco- 
nomies to (rattle on woikeis’ rights, 
including tiie ri^t to bargain for better 
wages, and weaken their environmen- 
tal laws in order to give their products a 
conqietitive boost But the bill gives 
Mr. Ointmi authori^ to negotiate 
sanctions against countries that lower 
tiieir standi^ to attract foreign in- 
vesteis or afiect trade. 

The choice facing the House on Fri- 
day is simple but momentous. It can 
succumb to needless fears and pet^ 
politics. Or, if it can summon up the 
courage, it can give the president the 
tools be needs to maintam American 
leadership in a global eccmomy. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Help Family Pl anning 


The Republican leadership in the 
U.S. House of Representatives, in an 
. irrational effort to strike a blow against 
abortions, is continuing to back leg- 
islation that can miljr weaken inter- 
national family planning efforts. The 
. misguided crusa^ would deny federal 
family planning mon^ to any overseas 
program or organization thiU peiforms 
abc^ons or lobbies to change abr^on 
laws in foreign countries, even if the 
or^izations pay for those services 
activities frran other funding sources. 

That provision has bem incorpor- 
. aied into House versions of the fcveign 
operations appropriations bill and dbe 
State Depanment authoiizaikNi bilL 
Both bills are stuck in conference com- 
mittees where Republican Senate ne- 
' gotiators oppose including the anti- 
abortion l:^u^e in the final bills for 
fear of inviting a presideatial veto. 

Undercurrent law, no federal money 
may be used to pay for abortions 
abroad. The money may be used only to 
provide contraceptives or educational 
assistance. But anti-abortion forces in 
the House want to force overseas pro- 
grams to stop doing abortions, except 
I to save the life oftbe mother or in cases 
of rape or incest, if they want to receive 
fede^ family planning support. 

That position is self-denting. The 
surest way to rednce abortions abroad is 
to strengthen family planning m- 
gnuns, not weaken them by cutting meir 
funds. Family planning services can 


also help reduce Tmtamal Heathg due to 
pregnancy-related cocnplicatioDS. 

The Senaie should not agree to any 
compromise lai^uage tiiat would re- 
strict the use of family piAnning funds, 
and the presidmt should veto such 
restrictions. The House Rqniblican 
leaders can save him the trouble by 
instructif^ their conferees to back 
down from this ill-conceived strike 
against abortions. If they persist in this 
stalemate, they will harm millions of 
women abroad by delaying the release 
of family planning aid. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

Other Comment 

Big Challenges £» Kabila 

Congo’s progress was retarded by a 
corrupt Moontu government, acollapse 
of state functions in various areas — 
health care, education, baric infrastruc- 
ture and ranq>ant corruptioo. The new 
government has dnimpng challenges 
ahead: trying to rehabilitate a nation of 
45 million people; establishing dmo- 
cratic institations; reviidog the ectmo- 
my; req}ect for human rights; playiqg a 
stabilizmg r^onal role. Prraident 
Kabila his government have not 
had any prior govemment experience, 
so setb^ks are inevitable. 

— US. Ambassador to Ae United 

Nations BUI Richardson, quoted in ■ 
The Washington Posl 



The Case for 



N ew YORK — Jiang Zemin has 
come and g^, and Wei Jing- 
sheng and Wang Dan are still in jaison. 
Ibere are still at least 3,000 (^ler polit- 
ical prisoaers in China. People are still 
being tortured in Tibet. ReUgioas 
groqis are still being posecuted. 

So was President Jiang’s visit a de- 
feat for human rights? Absolutely noL 
Many famnan ^its advocate wme 
unh^ipy tiiat he was accorded fiin state 
honors and toasts, without his having to 
make even the smallest concessions (»i 
human rights. But his visit opened tiie 
way for several critical develoonents 
that should be immediately mqnoited, 
BUI Clinton was forced to articulate 
directly theratiraiaie for rejecting hu- 
man li^ts. It is a measure oihow i 
his human rigto record toward < 
has been that his pofomiance at a joint 
news conforonce^t week was hailed 
as a courageous show of {winciple. 

But he was just catching iqi with the 


By William K Schulz 


rest of the oonntiy. A USA Today poll 
jpnMighcd on tiie morning of Mr. Ji- 
ang's wiiite House visitmowed that 59 
percent of Americans £ivor greater 
siqjpmt for Oiinese tuiman lights, even 
ifithassomedisiitptiveef^mie- 
latioos between file two cGoniries. Mi. 
rJintftn has been far slower than the 
public to chriDpion fanum rights, l»t 
he may be staitmg to get the mes^e. 

Even if Mr. Jiang parried Mr. COn- 
.toa's Gritkaans, he was ex^sed to 
demonstrariems that wen difficult to 
ignore. In Washington. Boston and Los 
Angdes, Mr. -Jiang acknowledged 
hearing file demonstrators. And some 
believed fimhe was referring to Amer- 
ican-style democrat when he mioted a 
ChiiMWft i»oveib saying in eftect that 
seeing something once is better fiian 
zeadmg about it fOO times. 


Duriug his visit to Harvard, he ad- 
mtoed That the Qmese teariw^ip had 
iriaite ‘ Wnriffig. ” That admission ntty 
not h^ free even me pdsmier, but it 
shotmdiat he was very aware of Axnei^ 
icans' concern wifii human 

•If his visitacbompliriiednodiing else, 
it put to rest die dd saw diat standing tm 
for rights Is lUtely to -" i solate 

China rather fiiim to "engage” U. 

That aignment is not used on other 
issues. No one was afraid of isolating 
rhina when the United States objected 
to Beying's infHngmneni of inteOe^ 
tual propcriy ri|^. No one was afnid 
of I fplafing China when Mt. CIuittMl 
Ifli d down the ground rules for China's 
esmoit of nuclear tednology. 

But wfren- it has come to faunan 
rights, even the slightest objecdon has 
beenseen as a violation of construct- 
ive engagemenL” Since the frank talk 
about freedom and democracy- did not 
derailihe gnmniii meeting last week, it 


will now be impossiUe.to pose the 
options so starieW. 

Washington should seme its oppor- 
tunities away. China's entrance 
into the Qtganizatioa. the 

timing of Mr^Clintoo’sviutto Beijing, ■ 

the annual UN Huiuau Right!*. Com- 
missicxi resolution <si Chinese- viola- 
die assistance diat Ammca will 
be giving China in devetoping its iegal 
all ppvide leverage to keep 
I jmtwan ri^ts Ott file tdlle. 

No responsible observe believes 
that human rights sbouM be the oiily 
consi dfrafip n in American relations 
widi China. But. much as the Chinese 
may find the subject incoaveniem, it 

bus to be a critu^patt d the equation. 

After last wo^ China's leaders cannot 
help but understand why. 

The writer, txectttive director 
nesty Inien^onal USA, contnbuted 
dds coinntetit to The New yorfc Titites, 




One World: The Trend Is Toward Working Together 


N ew YORK — The idea of a world 
of laws has seemed a langhable 
lacpositioa. Nationalism, ethnic riva^, 
rac^ bias, religious belief, geographidil 
inqieratives, hiftiftrieal memories all 
have proved far more stuUxirn in fiieir 
hold on people than the anraction of 
joining a jnricfical global community. 

But since die coUapse of the Cold War 
there has been a rrientless march, led 
primarily by the United States, toward a 
planttary system of standards, and we 
have started to a le^ world 

society without arfnijtting it 
There still are ethnic and civil conflicts 
all over the worid that defeat ai^ sense of 
commonality — Rwanda, Somalia, Bos- 
nia, Kashmir, Tibet There are raging 
religions wars that tear asunder sooetal 
consensus, as in die Middle East, Ireland, 
Algeria and India. There are temtmial 
grudges that propel states to act in 
that rend apart gk^ unity, sndi as 
Iraq's invasion ofKuwaiL 
Messianic political leaders in Libya 
and North Kc^ are driven personal 

demons. Even m the United Stete, fixeie 
are right-wing iriilftifla fiiat aNior any 
"fbrri^” anduxity and detonate 
bombs to expeess tii^ outrage. 

Nonetheless, the trend is toward 
woridng togetea* in a lawful feshion 


By Stephen Schlesinger 

around the world. The United Natioos 
has become a qoasi-govenimental body 
that member states nsed to reatfii agree- 
ment cm a variety of measures. 

Om of practical as well as moral crai- 
siderations, Washington has wmked in 
the United Natkos fo help craft more 
than 300 intematumal treaties covaing 
such matters as eccAomic sanctions, air- 
line rotaes, nuclear oiecgy inspectiODS, 
human li^ts, pollution contTC^ Ocean- 
ic. righls, space laws, customs proce- 
dures and freedoms, all.vital tea 
wdl-functioning universal society. 

By die end of the ceoti^, we will 
have the first pennanent international 
criminal ccxnt to raosecute the most 
serious victiatirais ex humanitarian law. 
The trend seems ineinctable. 

And diis is not haroening by su{sa- 
intemational fiat bet^ lo^ decisxoiL. 
UN meofoer states fi^ codi^ inter- . 
national standards via planet-wide con- 
ferences (most Tccentiy with respect to 
nnciaar arms testing), and then rat- 

ification of die covering accords by in- 
dividual paTftripafing nations. Thls pro- 
cess often takes time, and coQ^diance is 
not dw^ assured, but at least in this 


way the conventions ate taken on vol- 
untarily by each country. 

And countries diat m^ not have par- 
ticipated in such agreements ax tbe outset 
of^ will join lat^. 

This is not to say diat treaties, 
however .well-intentioned, are always 
good simply because th^ exist. Th^ 
have to be respected and enforced. And 
this does not suiways hi^peii. 

Duxmg the early part of dus century, 
die nations of die wmid signed a nnmber 
of global pacts that made countries feel 
protected Awi secure, and all eventually 
^ apart There were die League m 
Nations, the Keliogg-Brland Act, which 
oodawed war in 1928, and die Wash- 
irigtm Conference of 1922 and the Lon- 
don Naval Treaty of 1930, bodi restcict- 
ing^naval arms races. 

But today the cort^pulstons for gk^ 
int^ration are for more potent The im- 
peratives bdi^ worldwide trade, driv- 
en by more nations switching to market 
economies, are tightening the bonds 
among nnlinn!^ 

Currency now ripple 

tfarou^ entire re^hs. A sour economy 
in the United States causes heartache 
around the ^be. Nongovemmental or- 
gnm’Tiirifing have plunged roots into 
every otnnmunity. Tte communications 


revoluticm, evidenced by the Intmet 
faxes, vi^oiapes, televirioo, movt^ 
books magarines, draws countries 
more closely into a single viU^e. 

Not ever^xxty, it must be said, shares 
in dlls bounty; more than half of the 
world's population is a two-day walk 
from a telemione, literally disconnected 
from the ^obal econooty, as President 
Bill Clinton has pointed out 

And tre signs of U.S. disintemtin the 
global legal process are go wing om- 
inoosty. ira some years. Congress has 
refused to pay America's back does to 
file Uni^ Nations. Tbe administration 
just dropped out of foe global 
againat l^nrf mine s, and it is OOW hedging 
m the global wanning treaty that wiu be 
considered next memm in Kyoto, Japan. 
The planet-wide trek toward law wm not 
advance And oiay indeed retreat widiwit 
firm U.S. backing. 

' Still, in ways that nobody would have 
predicted a few decades ago, we are 
atarting to Ksemblc 80 oxdoiy one-world 
society. T^ 1 su^iect will create new 
ways of governing nations collectively. 

The writer, director qf the World 
Po^ Institute at the New School for 
Social Research,, contributed this conh | 
ment to the Los Angeles Times. 


Give the United Nations a Fire Brigade to Stop Conflicts 


P ARIS After foe Cold War 
foe tasks of foe United Na- 
tions ej^loded in numbers. 
From bemg a forum of sterile 
debates it becrane the focus 

of woridwide cooperation and 
consensns-bmlding. 

The realizatton is spreading 
that foe world is one interde- 
pendent macro-orgaiusm, in 
uriiicb no countiy or regjon can 
turn in on itself, as the dis- 
astrous economic situation of 
North Korea demonstrates. 

But etimic conflict and civil 
war are still torturing parts of 
this gigantic body politic that is 
our pl^eL They break out time 
and Ag^n in poor, unsettled and 
underdevelraed comeis, most 
recently in Congo. 

Swift and conqjeteot action 
could often put oat bmhfiies 
before they become uncraitain- 
able firestorms ravagmg huge 
areas and buining to the ground 
ail hopes of kxig-tean efonic 
peace and reconcuiation. 


By Jack Lang 


Yet in such simatioas, as in 
Congo this year, the Unit^ Na- 
tions is overburdened and slow 
toreactUnderfundeddoetofoe- 
refusal of its lidust member to 
pay its concributicHis, hai^xsed 
in its decisioQ-makiDg in tbe 
Security Council, where eve^ 
pennanent member judges in 
terms of narrow national in- 
ter^ the United Nations is ill- 
equipped to deal with this mo- 
mentous task of roreading sta- 
bility and foe emture of non- 
violeoce throughout die world. 

Reforms are clearfy needed. 

Giv» the unwillingness of 
foe Security Council’s pestma- 
neat five (and most otiier.states) 
to give up even just slithers of 
thOT sovereignty in security- 
related affeiis, it is hardly real- 
istic to look fix' refonn on foe 
consdtu denial leveL 

A pragmatic appnxteh that 
would remove practical ob- 


stacles to swift UN action is 

more pro mising - 

In loi^ring such an ap- 
proadi, Secretaiy-General Kofi 
Annan could do worse tiian 
look at his predecessor's 
"Agoida for Pea^” in i^ltidi 
a small UN fire brigade — in 
other words, astandi^ anny — 
was proposed. 

WDat is needed to interveae 
swiftly and effectively is a 
small army of professionals 
trained to be peacekeqpeis, p(^ 
licranen, social wod^, anti- 
tezmist squads, soldiers who 
can AHminigtffT disasteT 'relief to 
crowds of T^gees and coeper- 
ate with aid <w gAniTarinn8 3 s 
well as clear mine fields and 
protect fisod convoys^ 

These ^ very particular and 
varied skniSj quite difierent 
frran those demanded of NATO 
forces dming the Cold War, or 
of coalition farces daring the 


Gulf War. Given defense cuts 
and foe nmltitude of other tasks, 
we cannot eiqiect all foe armies 
even of -all die major countries 
(let alone the smaller ones) to 
develop qiecializations along 
foe vfoole scale (tf skills from 
high-intCDSity combat to peace 
- eofoiX£mfinl;peacdceq>ingand 
peace-buildiag. 

It would make sense to leave 
a'great pjopor^ of (he latter 
ta^ to specialized forces of the 
United Nations. 

And this not only for eco- 
nomic reasons. Interventions Ity 
UN peacekeepers, obviously (k 
diSereot national And ftthnir 
backgrounds, would have nxxe 
visible l^timary than inttr- 
ventittis ^ a grotqt of states 
that have only too recently left 
thdr mark on the worid as co- 
lonial powers, and could thus all 
too easily be accused of neo- 
colonialism. 

The existence of such a UN 
standing force would mAbt it 


once the SeGurity 
founcU had decided to author- 
ize action, to act swiftly, and not 
to risk fiinfaer delays during 
vriiich various states would 
weak out whether they had 
forces available with the spe- 
cific expertise required, wheth- 
er these could be spared ftom 
caber duties, and whether it was 
truly in their narrow national 
interest to supply them. 

The idea of such a United 
Nations standing force provokes 
(foobias of wexid dictatorship in 
smne souls. But there is no con- 
ceivable logic in qiposing a 
small UN stanciing force, wl^ 
dnough its readiness and its abil- 
ity to deploy nqudty. under die t 
film control of die UN Security ^ 
OMincil, could save many lives. 

The writer is chairman of the 
French National AssenAlys 
Foreign Affmrs Committee. He 
contributed this comment to the 
IntematUmal Herald Tribime. 


Ways to Rehabilitate the UN for Present-Day Lodgers 


H elsinki — The state of' 
the United Nations brings 
to mind the sad fete of those fine 
old town houses desig^ for 
gracious living, whi^ have 
been divided ai^ redivided into 
shabby little apartments occu- 
pied by large femnifts with 
badly behaved children' and 
strange cooking habits. 

The more pro sp e ro us tenants 
have moved elsewhw^ and tbe 
owners refiise to pay for foe 
necessary r^iaiis, leaving foe 
poor janitor to take the mame 
for the feOures of an antiquated 
plumbing ^rstem. 

The rational .filing to do 
would be to tear the house down 
and build a new me beOer 
suited to preseat-day condi- 
tions. But nofinng is done, and 
the place is left to decay. . 

If foe United Nations did not 
exist, would we have to invent 
• it? Yes. The worid nee^ it for 
essential tasks that only a global 
organization can per form. 

But we should not expect too 

mncL Tbe action that has to be . 
taken to solve global problems 
is for the most part regiooal, 
narinnal OT locaL Gove rn man tw 
cooperate with each oth^ with- 
in cdncentric circles of nd^- 
bors, allies, trading partners and 
ideologic kin, and the United 
Nations is boimd to be in the 
outer circle. 

The essential tasks that onlv 
it can pdform on behalf of id 
member states can be grouped 
under duee general hfarfingg 

• Itisapennanentdipknnatic 

market for the Mohanga gf jQ_ 
formation and views; a meeting 
place fot repiBseatatives of^ 
governments; a fonim for de- 
bate, a safety valve, a wailing 
wall, aplatfbrmfiom which vu> 
tims of aggression and injustice 
to world r yiniog 


By Max Jakobsori 


canal 


• It is foe instrument by 
which govenunents seek to 
reach a consensus on guidelines 
fat common action on global 
issues. Through it, governments 
can define norms of civilized 
relations between states,- devel- 
op public intetnational law and 
prooiote observance of ooiver- 

. sal joinciples of hnman limits. 

• It provides file member 
states with impor^t services 
for. mAintainitig international 
peace and security as well for 
ofoer common purposes such as 
humanitarian - Ai^ftanr;^ for' 
refugees and victims of natural 

man-made disasters. 

Given foe dianges in the m- 
temational system in SO years, it 
is only natural fiiat foe United 

NalioPS LA-in pgii- anriqnatoH 

in need of modeiliiization. Ad- 
ministrative, reform has beo. 
initiated 1^ Secretary-General 
Kofi Annmi, and this its nec- 
essary to save mmiey and per- 
suade tbe United States to pay 
back at least part of its dAt, but 
it is not enou^ Stroctnral re- 
form is neoess^. 

Yet any revision of the UN 
Charier is bound to be a enm- 
bersome process. 

The charter was adopted at a . 
momoQt in history when soli-, 
darity \rilluD the alliance that 
had wtm Worid War n was at ite 
hei^L Only two or diree years 
later it would have been to 
agree on sntfo a texL 

Any amendment must heap- 
(ooved by all five pennanent 
members of file Seconty Coun- 
cil, as until as by two-foirds of 
all member statK. 

Refcam of the Security Coujk-' 
dl is a case in point It is gen- 
erally agreed that the compos- 
ition of die council shmild be 


brought up to Hgw» Japan and 
Gennai^ ought to be permanent 
members. But tiie Third World 
demands tiiat some of Its mem- 
bers, like India or Brazil, also be 
admitted. A Jong process ne- 
gotiation will be needed. 

In file meantime, the United 
Nations should adtqx its pro- 
cedures to meet chang in g do- 
' mands without formally rewrit- 
ing foe charter. This has been 
done before. Peaoticeroxi^, an 
activity not tnentioned in foe 
chaito', is an «»ampii» 

. Tbe General Assembly 

should makfi an effort to restore 
its authority'. Year after year the 
same items retq^iear on its 
agenda like dudes m a shooting 
galleay. More than 300 reso- 
lutu^ are adopted during each 
session, most contpoaM in a 

S almost inenmpre be nfr- 

tfae public. The w orld has 

lea rned to pay no flitention'- 
The Goiaal Assembly as 
constituted is a misguided 
tramqilant of a democratic par- 
humentaiy organ onto an in- 
(eigovemmeatal organizatipn 
of sovereign states. The lat± of 
pcwerencouiages iirespionsibte 
use of language. . . 

The sensible- thing .would be 
to cooceotrate the agwwTa on a 
manageable a'uinber of impto'- 
tant questions. But this would 
require unusual s^-disd^tiine 
among die del^tOes. 

More important, (he ma-mKffr 
sttfies could achieve a'qualitative 
iinptovementinUN fimetio ning 
wifooifi qiending oxae mowy 
or revising tiie charier, gimniy 

^showing greater lespM to 
Article 100 of tfae.charter.whidi 

fiubids iiDiao^ deatogs be- 
tween Seetkanat members and ' 


The original mtention was to 
make the Secretariat an inde- 
pendent intematiooal service 
representing die common in- 
toest of the membershq) as a 
whole. As Dag WAmmaTiflrj nil^^ 
once pot it, die secretaxy-geau- 
eral,snoald be "a detached el e - 
meat’ ’ in international life, able 
to take bos own initiatives in 
light of his intopretation of the 
common interest. 

For a brief moment in his- 
tory, Mr. Ifemmarskjold did 
suoroed in mniring hi« office an 
autonomo^ influence in wrxld 
ilitics. His w^ a h^ic ef^ 
to fiulure. Tbe major 


powers were prepared to sup- 
port him only so long as bofo ^ 
sides of the Cold War could 
benefit from what he did. 

Yet the myfo created by Mr. 
Hammarskjiw's virtuoso per- 
fonnance Uves on, feeding on 
foe yearning to an impartial 
authority standing above die 
narrow rivalries between na- 
tional governments and able to 
resolve conflicts in a spirit of 
rationality and fAim^s s 

TTie writer, a former Finnish 
UN ambassador, contributed . 
this comment to the interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Not Diplomatic 

— (The Herald says in an 
EdiioiiaL'] It is to be regretted 
diat Mr. Ifennis T^to, frnmer 
U.S. Minister laxmiative in 
Madrid, should have found the 
oppotunity to stir up bad feel- 
ings m Sp^ against the United 
States. All the new^ia- 
poa are Wtedemning him for his 

dmiorable lack of tacL The Her- 
ald has disetedhed his g*At^ 
ments. No one in (he United 
States endeavors to excuse him 
to lus disdosutes about diplo- 
matic nidations, the secret 
whidi should belou only to die 
Statehei 


1922: Fascist Problem 

ROME — Signor Muss olini, 
foe Fascist Premier, aprarently 
intends tonmeehimseuMithe 
si^ of foe p^'ce and the con- 
stituted farces erf order Againat- 
his own followers, in foe event 
that foey continue tiieir Afta/^ r g 


against newspapers or others 
wise get out of hand. This has 
greatly stimulated foe hope that ; 
foe "Black Shirt’* leatto .will 
be able to cope suceessfoUy . 
with to tough^ problem be- 
fm him: namely, the con^ of 
his 300,000 atmMi followers. 

1947; Paris Strike 

Paris — Employees of the 
Paris water supply system went 
on a slow^Iown strike yesterday 
[Nov. €] in sympathy with the 
municipal sanitation wodoos 
who reused to collect garbage 

or sweep foe streets to to third 
conserative day. Public health 
antiionties uigM housekeepers 
to bum their garbage and not 
dump new tefuM into foe over- 
flomng pails that line to city's 
street curbs. This slow-down 
strto may have serious con- t, 
se^ences in case of fires, be- ' 
cause ttydrants' and hoses can- 
not function properly under the 
reduced joessure. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIRUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPimON/LETTERS 


Fed Up With Saddam? 
Then Call His Bluff 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


■WASHINGTON— Whenyou 
TV tfimk about how the United 
States should respo^ to Saddam 
Hussein's latest atten^ to evade 
. Nations 
this in m in d : Gniise miaptag 
the only way to deal with him. 

_ Saddm is up to sometiiing se- 
rious dlls tune. He has apparently 
(wncludfid— from U.S. ^orts to 
tighten the sanctions around hnw , 
from recent denunciations of 
by Madeleine Altxigbt, and from 
the fact that the new chief of the 
ON weapofs inspection team in 
Iraq is turning out to be just as 
tough as his predecessor — that 
the UN sanctions on Iraq are not 
going to be lifted, whetoei Sad- 
dam is a good boy or a bad boy. 

Whatever be does, toe United 
States intends to find a way to kcCT 
die UN sanctions noose around his 
neck until one of his gaiMM-ais or 
one of his relatives tennuuUes him 
with extreme prejudice. 

Therefore Saddam is no doubt 
asking himself; “Ifmydidcesare 
sanctions with constant UN 
wttpoos inmections or sanctions 
without the uN wee^ons inspec- 
tions, let's have sa^mns uutiiout 
them. Let's predpitace a crisis toat 
will eitiier undemnne the UN in- 
qieclions regime or force the U.S. 
into lecaliating gainst me, so I can 
kick toe UN inmectors out alto- 
getoer. At least men Fll be able to 
hold onto the pcdson gas. Scuds 
and antinax weqxHis that 1*^ been 
hiding all ova- tte couoliy and toat 
the UN is now closing in on." 

But that is not toe only reascm 
Saddam precipitated a crisis now 
by blodii^ ai^ fuxther UN 
weapons inspections in Iraq un- 
less toe U.S. members of the in- 
spection team are removed. He 
also sfiieiis where the wind is 
blowing in the Middle East — in 
America's frice. 

Powerful magnetic forces are 
puUbg Iraq out of its isolation. 
Syria would like to get closor to 
li^ in Older to counter [xessure on 
Damascus from Turicey and Israel. 
Egypt would like to see Iraq back 
in the Arab fold to counter Irm and 
put more leverage on Israel. Die 
European oil companies, sensing 
that ^ U.S. sanctiCHOS on Iran are 
collapsing, want to use this mo- 
ment to end toe blockade of Ii^. 

Moreover, precipitating a con- 
frontation b^een Iraq and the 
United Stares, just before the 
Middle East economic conference 


in Doha, Qatar, on Nov. 1 6 and the 
Islamic conference in Tehran on 
Dec. 9. is like a two-fetr-ozK sale 
for Saddam. 

America's Arab allies are 
already wary about going to toe 
Doha jneetiug with Isra^ and a 
fracas between the United States, 
and Iraq in the Gulf right now 
would loake the Arabs evoi more 
w^. At the same time, any U.S. 
military actioo in toe Gulf would 
embarrass toe new Iranian gov- 
ernment in Tdbran, which has 
been probing, eva so delicately, 
for on improvement in retetions 
with toe United States. 

When you add it ^ im, you can 
only coodude that Saddam Hus- 
sein has powerful reasons to try to 
push thore UN inspectors ouL 
Therefore, one m three things is 
goiira to happen, and 1 hope it is 
toe mird. Tte first is that Saddam 
will now bade dowp, sa^ed toat 
be has drawn toe attention of the 
Arab world and the Eurc^Nans — 
and maybe even won sym- 
pathy — to the fact that the United 
Stares imends, to keep the sanc- 
tions on him whether he misbe- 
haves or not 

The second possibiliQr is that 
tile United States will back down 
and remove its inspectors from the 
UN team, as Saddam is demandr 
ing. This would allow the UN 
inspections to continue, but only 
unu toe Irt^i leader predpitates 
another crisis. 

The third (^cxi is that Wash- 
ington will call his blnfF. But if the 
United States does take military 
action against Iraq again, it cannot 
be just to obliterate toose sites, 
whm be is still hiding weapons 
— although that is important. The 
United States has to to destroy 
him, too. Because die worst of aU 
worlds would be destruction of his 
we^QS but he survives and 
throws out the UN inspectors. He 
would then be able to rearm wito- 
DUt anyone watching inside Iraq. 
And he will tty to realm. 

Given toe natiire of world pol- 
itics today, and given America's 
feckless allies, toe United States 
will get only one good military 
shot at Sadd^ before everyone at 
toe United Nations starts tut-m^ 
tii^ and rushing to his defense. So 
if and when Saddam putoes be- 
yond toe brink, and the United 
States gets that one good shot 
make sure it's a head 

TkeiVfwyariTSws. 



B* PUlLinV DFXESTHr ia L-^l (b^piiUiaui Fnorv). 


The French prime minister in a traffic jam. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Don’t Futhioii Bosnia 

Regmding "Since ■ Dayton fs 
Doomed. Get On With the Par- 
titionof Bosnia" (Opinion.Oci.S) 
by Jofm J. Mearsheimer: 

Mr. Mearsheimer suggests that 
die Clinton administration move 
to ^'organize the peacetol parti- 
tion'’ of Bosnia to avoid a '‘dis- 
aster" after U.S. forces leave. He 
believes the goal of the Dayton 
apeement a united Bosnia, is not 
feasible. 

The ''Dayton is dead” argu- 
ment is a favorite of nationalists 
on all sides of tiie conflicL They 
all support the partition of Bosnia- 
Heizegovina. Mr. Mearsheimer 
plays toeir game. 

He advises us to look at the 
"facts on toe ground.” But he 
overlooks many of toe positive 
changes that Dayton has brought. 

The latest munidpal elections 
demonstrate that the nationalist 
parties do not dominate the polit- 
ical scene as they did in the pre- 
vious elections. An agreement 
on the Mosiar binational police 
force has been achieved. It Is true 
that Biljana Plavsic is a nation- 
alist, but Radovan Karadzic has 
been forced to give up power. 
Refugees — adirnttedly a small 


group — are returning to tiieir 
homes. Some war criminals have 
been handed over to The Hague 
tribunal. A partitiou of Bosnia 
would wipe out all tiu^ small 
victories. 

HEI NZ GAR TNER and 
HENRIETTE RIEGLER. 

Vienoa. 

Prince’s Views 

Regarding “W/iat the Prince 
Said" fLener to the Editor, 
Nov.5): 

Crown Prince Hassan's press 
secretary refers iu his commeats 
to a quotation I used in my article 
"Political Assassinatioos: What 
Do They Change?” (Opinion. 
Oct. 291. 1 quoted verbatim from a 
dispatch in The Washington Post 
(IHT. Oct. 13). 

I greatly aj^reciate Ayman 
Sofadi's clarif^g IMnce Has- 
san's views on toe subject. 

I also note torn the prince and I 
share feelings of iocomprehen- 
ston at toe Israeli government's 
authorization to act against the 
Hamas leader Kh^ed Meshal in 
Jordan. 1 stated my view in this 
regard clearly in my article. 

GIDEON RAFAEL 
Jemsalem. 


Despite Life’s Outrages. 
Struggle Through 


By Flora Lewis 


American ^irituality 

Regarding "Don't Let Conser- 
I'otives Appropriate Spirituality" 
(Meanw^e, Oa. 29) by William 
Raspberry: 

If conservatives are "ap{xo- 
priating spirituality," it is only 
because liboals have aban- 
doned America's spiritual . heri- 
taffl. Not only have they rejected 
b^ic values tbuod in virtual- 
ly all religious traditions but 
toey have actively opposed and 
ridiculed them. (Just try stand- 
ing up for some of these values in 
a t^ical collide phik^ophy 
class.) 

literals have been promoting 
a "new spirituality” that is with- 
out truth because it deiues tte; 
existence of absolute truths. 
They can give no guidance on 
personal moral choices because, 
accord^ to them, people make 
up their own rules. Morality is- 
in toe eye of the beholder, says 
toe libei^. 

It is no wonder that Americans 
reject such nonsense and prefer a 
spirituality that has roots in an- 
cient wisdom and has been tested 
over the centuries. 

SCOTT PETERSEN. 

Massy. France. 


M iami — Three generations 
of my family utiiered here 
last weekoad from nve cities in 
four (tiffeient countries to cele- 
brate a milestone birthday of my 
oldest daughter, who lives in 
MiamL She is one of toose baby 
boomers who once liked toe taunt 
that you can't trust anybody over 
30, and now she is 50. 

It startles us dl. And yet, her 
ideas and altitudes haven’t 

MEANVBmLE 

chaiged so much, altoongh her 
life changed sudi^y and dra- 
matically 23 years tgo because of 
a terrible injury. It wasn't an ac- 
cident, it was a mindless crime. 
Somehow she survived, but she 
was weakened, bound to a wheel- 
chair and for a number of years 
often dqnessed and dispirit^. 

We all have our own problems, 
but she has been a focus of family 
coocem ever since. Since we are 
so dispensed, it is rare ttet we can 
aU manage to gather around her at 
the same time and exchange toe 
old j(^s and teases, reach the 
youngest the funny songs that en- 
livened long Joint exclusions. 
There was sometiiing trinnqihant 
about iL We’ve all crane torongh, 
and we're going on. 

But she couldn’t resist taking a 
few hours out on a weekend morn- 
ing to fulfill her commitment to 
teach some newcomers how to 
sail small crafr at Shake-a-Leg. a 
program that sqiart from her job 
has become toe center of her life, 
ft gives her activity out of doors, a 
sense of compe^ce and pride, a 
new circle of friends, a fe^g of 
being helpfiil to others and, as she 
says, of teing."m comraand, not 
just helpless.!’ 

The program was founded in 
1982 1^ Ha^ R. Hoigan of New- 
port, Itoode Island, who was para- 
lyzed after an accident and found 
mat tile ptoysically disabled needed 
a way to enjoy ite benefits of sport 
and to support each other with 
teamwork. Drey leave their wheel- 
chairs on the dock along with the 
feeling of handicap. 

My daughter h^ a shelf foil of 
troftoies toe has woo at regat- 
tas sponsored by Shake-a-Leg 
around toe United Slates. She par- 
ticipated in toe 1996 Paralympics, 
and there is always an event to 
look forward to. It's not the worid 
she expected to belong to when 


she was a young woman whose 
wra'ldcollap^ on hex, but thanks 
to ton of otoeis, 

she has made a good life of it 

One evening during the rauuon 
we were diking about the ne^. 
President Jiang 'rpm\n of China 
was touring America, and the ex- 
- traordioaiy way the Chinese world 
has changed since the Culcural 
Revolution was mentioned. Die 
}teungest about to be 11, asked 
what that waS. It was hard to ex- 
plain tire unmensity and tire horror. 

but even harder to fathom toe mys- 
teiy of how a nation of 1.2 bilUrai 
people coi^ be lodced in such 
deluriraiary self-destruction. 

Individually, people can be 
hearti)R»kiqg1y good and they can 
be tenifyingly But is it pos- 
sible that whole societies cad be 

taken over by iDonstm who induce 

ortonaiy people to suspend whai 1 
am convinced is a natural sense of 
decency and to voluntarily, even 
eagerly, cranmit tire worst humi- 
liations and atrocities? 

This isn’t even the scourge of 
war wito a defined alien enemy. 
People tnm on thw neighbors aiu 
at tinrea their own frunilies. TUs 
isn'tamatter of history orprimiti^ 

raraitality. It happened in toepast. it 
also h^pen^ yesterday in Bost^ 

and is happening totoiy in Algjeria. 

Nor 0 ^ toe slogan about 
bigotry from toepost-World War 
n musical "South I^ific’' realty 
answer tire question. It went: 
"Yrai’ve got to be taught, before 
it's too late, before yon are six. or 
seven or eight, to hate all toe 
people your relatives hate, you 've 
got to be carefully taughL' * 

Diere is a kiixl of mass para- 
noia ttet can come without toat 
mutto hating, even witoout that 
much teachmg. If anytiiiiig it may 
come from roo much believing, 
from a conviction that one has a 
' monopoly on tmdu frxxn "know- 
. ing" what is good and how to rid 
toe worid of eWl. 

Every generation seems to face 
toe menace somewhere, and some 
have to face toe consequences. 
We Think we have'learned, but it 
won't stay put behind us. 

' There is goo4 and there could 
be.more. thrae is bad, and it could 
be more restiained. It is always a 
struggle. So long as life goes on, 
and thank heaven it does, the 
struggle is well worto the effon. 
That unites the generatirais. 

&Fhira Lewis 



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PAGE 10 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR1BUNE» FRIDAy, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 




1 ■ 

Mexican Drug Traffic Now Roaring Into the US. Heartland 


By Roberto Sino 

Wtahingim h)st Servke 


i WASHINGTDN — To his neighbors 
^ ft middle-class, predomioaotly 
panic, section of Houstoo, Qiano Rojas 
jseemed a quiet fiunily man who lived in 
a small house with his wife and step- 
daughter. 

; The S3-year-oId Nfr. Rqjas set off 
most days for die old dodtside nei^ 
borbood of Magnolia, which has wel- 


Ihe best jobs went to men who would 
drive a car to Qiic^o, Washington or 
another city. Mr. Rojas >vould tell them 
to take their families, obey die speed 
limit and drop the car at a specified 
address. Sometimes he had as many as a 
dozen people working for him. 

Mr. Rojas is now serving a 30-year 
federal prison sentence for drug craf- 
&ldng.L[ivestigators found nearly 120 
pounds (55 kOi^ranis) of cocaine — 


help^closethecase. ^'It'sihatabilityto beginning to have a potentially {mifound foot soldiers. All that has helped 
fade into the woodwork of a big Latino ef&t chi MexicanrAmerican cmnmu- Mexicans gain dominance very quiduy^ 
neighbcHhood that makes Mexican deal- nicies in cities around the United States, and it also makes them^much more dan* 
eis so elusive and so dangerous.** Mexicandrugsyndicatesexploirthefact gaousinthelongnin.'* ' , 

The burgeoning dreg traffic from that their country is by far the largest Although ihe number erf indiw^ls 
Mexico has graerated corruption, vio- source of new immigrants to the United with any cmoeeiion to the drug trade ts 
lence and a kind of low-intensity war Slates. They hide in the neighborhoods only a tiny fraction of the nearly 7 mu- 


more than $1 million worth at wholesale 
'corned Mexican immigrants as a point of prices — in his warehouse and more than 
first arrival for nearly a century. Ther^ SI miUton in cash st^ed into aclosetat 
he was known as a (me^nan employment hcxne. 


agency. He would i»y men cash to work 
)a few hours nnifMfliqg trucks or singly 
■U) stand on a nearby street corner and 
watch for anybody who was not aneigh- 
boihood r^vlar. 


**Yon would have never figured 
Chano Rojas as a major league coke 
dealer because everytl^ he did blen- 
ded into the community around him.'* 
said a Houston police detective who 


■intensity 

along the border between Mexira and the 
Uni^ States. But mounting ev^ience 
from many sources — the Rojas case, a 
courtroom in Des Moines, wiretaps in 
Los Angeles, drug seizures in New Jer- 
sey — confirms £at the problems have 
spread deep into the U.S. heanlaod. 

Mexican trafnekers have established 
distribution networks capable of deliv- 
ering marijuana, cocaine, heroin and 
ii»&amphetainioe to local r^ailers in 
most pam of die country. 

Along the way, the traffickers are 


that other Mmucans have established in 
every major city and they itcniit fi- 
uancially straj^Ted newcomers as 
drivers, couriers and lookouts — the 
cannon fodder of their operations. 

“Often we are desili^ widi people 
who know how to operate here because 
dtey have spent time in the United 


lion pet^le born in Mexico but now 
living in the United States, the growing 
prominence of the drag operations 
threatens to taint the whole of die Mex- 
ican immigrant experience, just ^ dw- 
Mafia cast a stignk that Italian inuni- 


^ ..Jexican immigrants and their chUdren 

$ta^,** s^aWniorDnigEnforcement . bore in die United Stattt constinne the 
Admznisintkxt official based in Texas. - . w i « — 

“They know how to gain access to busi- 
nesses, services, v^cles, and they have 
access to a virtually unlimited supply of 



;on’s Entreaties 
Fail to Move Arabs to Join 
Israelis for Business Talks 


By John Lancaster 

WaskiHgtom Pon Servict 


CAIRO — Despite vigorous lobbying 
by the Clinton administration, most Arab 
nations remain stridendy oj^osed to an 
lArab-lsraeli business confereoce planned 
•for diis month, s^ing they will boycott 
Ihe meeting widxMit clear signs of pto- 
igress in Palestinian-Jsraeli peace «n« 

' (^y two Arab slates — Yemen and 
Jordan — have publicly coimnined to 
genriing delegates to the confenBoce, 
scheduled for Nov. 16-18 in die Golf 
•oqiital of Doha, ^itar. The United 
States is sponsoring die annual Middle 
East economic conference, the fourth 
such gt^ieiing since 1994. in an effort to 
-proimitenon^rdaticHis between Israel 
,and its Arab neighbors. 

• To Wa^iingtoa*s dismay, if not to its 
'surprise, the meeting diis year has be- 


BANK: 

Flurry of Candidates 

i • Continued from Page 1 


1 Odier candidates whose names have 
arisen include the governor of Spain's 
.central bank, Lois Angel Roga. 

- A Gennangovenunoit spokesman re- 
fosed to be drawn inKi the debate: “In 
.^tnationssuchas diese and onuses like 
'this, it's not aOTUopiiate to spcCTfaue.** 

. But MhitinKohihaasscn, diainnan of 
tCommeizbank AG, called for a qui^ 
"dedsion on die issue, saying that ^lit- 


-ical infighting could jroafoice public 

Isin^cur- 


skqitidsm about the planned i 


•re^, ^ euro. 
: The 


JRreneb pr^sal rankled leaders 
-in Germany and omer European Union 
gantries diat have ardendy suppoited 
^die former Dutdi central bank leader, 
’^fim Duisenbeig, die current bead of the 


.European Monetae Ihstitute. The EMI 
tunnerrrftl 


: is the forerunner rrfthe European central 
liank, and so far, Nfr. Duisenbetg has 
been the only declared candidate to head 
^bank. 

I Although Mr. Duisenberg would 
bring a reputation of hard-money or- 
Aodoxy to the job, ectmomists say, he 
can no longer assume he is the automatic 
:heir to the post 

' The unexpected public jock^ing “is 
jhe worst tli^ diat could have 
JiappenedL** sauT Adolf Rosenstock. 
xhia econcMnist for Germany in Frank- 
furt at the Indnstiial Bank of Japan. As a 
result, the “poww plays** andpolitical 
maifthinatiom will dominate Butope's 
•-cuireii^ dtiiate and *Teave a bad taste*’ 
^for tte citizens, Mr. Rosenstock said. 


come a lightning rod for widespread 
anger among Ar^ over what th^ re- 
gs^ as die mlure (rf the ri^tist {Hime 
minister of Israel, BenjaminNetanyahu, 
to abide by the terms (rfits peace aorards 
with the raestiniaos. 

Among the critics are somd of Amer- 
ica's closest Arab allies, including Saudi 
Arabia, which has already announced 
that it will not attend, and Egypt, which 
has conditioned its appearance on the 
outcome of Pulestiiiian-Israeli talks un- 
der way in Washington. President Hosni 
Mubarak of Egypt recentiy told r^iort- 
ers that he “cannot see any meaning" to 
holding the corrference in the current 
rfifnatift of hostility. 

“The peace pFOcessetRDes before any 
kind of ecmiomic cooperation,'* Ahmed 
Benhelli, secretazy of the Arab 

League for Arab affairs, said in an in- 
terview diis week. “Ai^ nations be- 
lieve that the entrance of Israel into die 
econoouc arena most occur after peace 
has been achieved. You can't have eco- 
nomic coc^ieration widi Israql when you 
have a political crisis.*' 

Even in die absence of ahreakdnough 
in die Waslungton talks, Egypt and odier 
moderate Arab states may altimately de- 
cide to attend the meeting in order to 
avoid straining ties widi die United 
States. In di^ case, diplomats s^, Oxy 
are likely to find ways to sigoal dieir 

displeasure, such as Hispairhing relative- 
ly Inw- ranlrin g delegations and spuniing 
contacts wMi the Israeli del^ation led by 
Foteigu hCnister DaVid Levy. 

“Either we won’t go, or we*ll go and 
not do anything,'* a ranking Egyptian 
economic official said. “We’ie good at 
thaL’* 

&iger to maintain the feint pulse of 
Middle East peace efforts, U.S. officials 
have crisscrossed the legioa in recent 
weeks to promote die conference on 
economic, rather than political, gtoonds. 
The Doha confeience is “not a fevor to 
anybody,** said 'Martin Indjdc, die new 
U.S. assistant secretary of state for Near 
East affairs, duing a stop in Kuwait this 
week. “Its purpose is to advance die 
economic development of the region.'* 

But most Arab governments have de- 
clared di^ opposition to aiiy form of 
“notmalizatiom* widi the Jewish state 
in fee absence of a conqirehensive pe^ 
settlement satisfectory to fee PUMStin- 
ians. 

Among pro-Westem Arab states, fee 
United Arab Emirates and Moiooco 
have joined Saudi Arabia in announdiig 
their xatentirai to slop fee meeting. 



• *• 
















only laxge. s^ment of dte U.S. pop- 
‘ukooh tfeii is growing rapidly. 

**The American people could nai on 
Mexico ve^ quicldy and make it fee 
scap^oat ^ their ditig consumption 
problems, ite same way they heaped 
blame in the past on fee Colomtean 
cart^tf the Mafia,’* raidRodolfodela 
Garza, a professor of government at fee 
Universiiy ^ Texas in Austin. 

Currently, most Americans distin- 
guish b^een the mainly poor Mexican 
immigrants they see living on the U.S. 
side of the bordor and fee rich Mexican 
drag traffickers they perceive as living 
and operating in Mexico, said Mr. de la . 
Garza, who has. condocted extensive 
opiiuon teseffidi on attitudes toward 
Latinos and in Latino communities. 

. “The distinction between good Mex- 
ican workers and bad Mexican drug 
kingpins could break down* however, 
ancTpcoduce a much more widespread 
demonization of Mexicans in this coun- 
Dy.V he said. “And if the Americans 
turn on Mtedco, it is the Mexican-Amer- 
leanit who will get caught in the 
middle.** 

Thomas Goldsbuxy, a teacher and 
coenmuni^ activist in a predominantly 
Latino nei^borhood in Houston, put it 
this way: *T see parents who are scared 
to deafe at wi^ is baiq>eiiing to their 
kids but they are scared to death to adnut 
it*’ 

Mr. Goldsbiiiy said he had watched 
local leenuge gnngs go from mischief to 
felomes larg^ as a result of their in- 
volvem^ wife drag trafficking. 

^‘Dnigs are the easiest form of inceme 
for a teenage boy who doesn’t have any 
sidUs and who doesn't speak much Eng- 
lish,' * said Mr. Goldsbuiy, who lives and 
works in area of southwest Houston 
crowded with large hnmigrant femilies 


and identified the police as a 
recruiting grou^ for Mexict 


• -.-Tt 
. »■: 

*• • 

‘.Itv.' 






A trucker rabbing bis eyes at a campfire Thorsday near Belgium. ' 


STRIKE: Trudeer Talks Yield Progress 


Continued from P^e I 


the 


‘y 

and a 200-hour limit on fee hours they 
have to work each montii, including 
waiting, loading nnirwHing time. 

The fact that all sides have agreed R> 
keep fee talks going was taken as a sign 
of optinustEL But if negotiators were to 
reach a draft agreement in the latest 
round of talks, it would fees have U) go to 
fee strikeis fora vote, makizm itui^ely 
feat baxriers would be lifted befne the 
weekend. 

The talks in PXiis also involved a third 
union, fee Communist-led Generai 
Labor Confederation, or CGT, wltich 
wants any agreement to be exteoded to 
other categories of workers. It raid its 


members had “massively rejected 
first draft erf the agreement 

The Democratic Labor Federation 
was the only onion to have reached an 
agreement last weekend wife the smaller 
of two oiganizatioos representing fee 
trucking craipaoies. Since then, Nfr. 
Jospin has said be would try K> impose an 
a^eement on fee entire indnsby. even if 
it is not endorsed by all tbeparties. 

The eiroloyers were divided, with 
gmiili aoa medium-sized cn m p miiHK 
more anxious to sHtle, and large trncldiig 
firms taking a more intransigent line. 

De^tt fee disruptions, fee ecouom- 
tes minister, Denzunique Sbauss-Kahn. 
repeated his assertion that the strike was 
not having a noticeable intact on t^ 
economy. 


(exican inffidc- 
eis sedemg driven and lodcouts. It is 
increasingly an area w here drugs are 
sold and consumed. 

“The parents we fee weakest link in 
the whole chain because they are usually 
working nvo jobs and th^ siicply don't 
find out what their Idds are doi^ until it 
is too late,” Mr. Goldsbuiy said “You 
arc talkiiig about newcomers who do not 
feel like they bdoog here ^t and who 
ate still struggling to survive. All that 
makes them and their dxildrea very, very 
vulnerable." 

The impact of the rise of the Mexican 
drag traffickers reaches far bt^ood bor- 
der cities like San Dit^ or El Paso, and 
beyond other cities with traditionally 
l^e Mexican-Ameiican communities 
like Houston or Chicago. It readies de^ 
into fee heaitlaod, toot^g unlikely 
places — like Judge Carol Egly*’ 
courtroom in Des Moines. 

hi the summer and fall (rf 1995, young 
hfexicans began appearing beSon Ms. 
Egfy as defendants. They had no cred- 
ible identiQr papers and ruely mke any 
English. Th^ sebined poor but were 
carrying thousands of dollars wmh of 
drags, Dsna^ metiiaizipbelainiAe, a 

highly addictive gtmmlanfr 

“We didn't know who they were, 
wbeae tl^ had come from or what they 
were doing," Ms. Edy said recently. 

About tiiat time, ^ also started sc 
ing young lowans who atrivnl 


Body of Doctor 
Lhdred to Kingpin 
Found in Mexico 


By Maiy Becfa Sheridan 

. r4tt.i«cr/n7iMi^SmM.v 


MEXICO CrrY ,— 0« of fee 
doctxm believed to have operated 
on the Mducan drag lord Aimdo 
Can^ Fuemes just hours before 
his reported desin has beeu found 
snifm into a concrete-filled barrel, 

. ite aufeorities sakL 

The anfeorities said Wednesday 
feat fee remaihs of Jaime Oodoy 
were cfiscovered with two other 
bodies Monday inside oil. drums 
along die Mexico City-AcapulM 
h^hway. In aaign Qf4 mobhit. their-, 
frngornails had been yanked out and 
their bofees were burned and blind- . 
folded. Two had been strangled and 
one' had been sh(M. ' 

The identification of Dr. Godo>''s 
body solved one of fee nray mys- 
teries sozTCNinding fee bizarre re- 
ports oftbedeafemMexico’s No. 1 
feug trafficker last July, allegedly 
following plastic surge^. 

The fenx doctors believed to 
have perfomied the operation had 
all disappeared. News cep(^ sp^ 
fee oOm two tortured bcidies 
might also belong to fee medicai 
team supDOsed to have operated on 
Mr. CamiiOr but feeTB wos no coo- 
firmation- 

The authorities were unable to 
point a finger Wednesday at who 
might have killed ^ doctor and fas 
companions. Mexico’s former antir 
drag czai, Francisco Molina, raid 
»mea of the drug lord may have 
been re^ionsible. 

“In feese thir^, they don't risk 
leaving any witness alive," he 
said. 

But vengeance also could have 
been a motive. Mr. Catrillo re- 
portedly died shortly after his sur- 
geiy when someone fflve him an 
mappropriate dose erf Dormicuin. a 
sleramg medication. The authorit- 
ies have never established who ad- 
ministered the drag, nor whether the 
deafe was intentional. 

Mr. Carrillo, 4 1 * known as “ Lord 
of the Skies" because of his habit of 
tnnqiorting cocaine in jets, was 
blamed for M«dmg K)nS Of Cotom- 
bian cocaine into the Unit^ States. 
He apparemly sought plastic sur- 
gery to change his appratance and 
more easily evade the authorities. 


in 


w 




... ^ i.*+niiri 


•.M « 


frenzy. “Th^ were literally climbing 
the walls." she said. “Severa times a 
day we*d have people too incoherent to 
be arraigned, too noisy and lunatic to 
handle in a couitrooin." Some had oom- 
nutted bizarre crimes, like the young 
man vriio pistol-whipped his grandpar- 
ents or die woman who went on a ch^k- 
frxging.spree in her sister's name. 

After several bad been referred for 
psychiatric treatment, jail officials dis- 
covered feese suspects were 
mefeampbeiainine users. 

It took Ms. Egly a while to realize that 
she was seei^ two small pieces of a 


. I k d 


Udm 


. '-1 


much bigger puzzle — the rwid ex- 
tion of fee Mexican traffickers’ 


see- 
in a 


THAILAND: 


JOT me dozens, mr. AOsensiocK saio. n I j * jij 

iThe aSur has “opened a Pandora's irOltuCOX M^Se^tOr^All 
■box,” he added. ^ 


Joachim Fels, an economist at Morgan 
Stanley in Lorulon, said: “The feet diaz 
Jhm is such a debate in itself is likely to 
'undermine ctediblty. The problem now 
js that die genie is out of tite bottle." 

The dis^te.direatens to create an un- 
^welcome precedent foe other politically 
^sensitive posts at the European bank, Mr. 
'Pels said. The new cenra bank must 
. ^Isoappointavicepresidenta^asmany 
-as four other directors on its executive 
Tioard, suggesting that new arguments 
•could erupt just as soon as fee di^te 
-over die pfcadeot is settled, he said, 
r disc(»d renews a sense of inner 
tension between France and Germany 
rWidtin the most ambitious project in 
•European integration. 

' The Bonn governmeni this week was 
foi^ to deny French assertions that 
Bonn and Paris secredy agreed in 1993 
■to install a Fr e nchm an at fee head of fee 
•central bank in return for locating fee 
.bank in Frankfurt 

' Evenwiththedenial,thepopularityof 
the euro could suffer in Belgium, Austria 
and the Netherlands, which have never 
felt comfmable with the dominance of 
fee BU’s two biggest countries — 
Bance and Germany. 


Continued from Pi^ 1 


that its revered constitutional monarch, 
King Bhumibol Adulyadej underwent 
tests Thursday for an inegular heartbeaL 
The tests followed an unusual statement 
Wednesday by one of lus doctors, PrSdU 
Charoonthaitawee, who said: “His 
faealfe is not good at fee moment 
This is due to his concerns over die crisis 
die country is undergoing and die luud- 
shm his people have been feeing.” 

Thou^ fee king does not exercise 
TOlituad power, he is often describe as 
the glue that has held die country together 
as weak fractious gov ernm ents have 
feUen over die years fee militaiy has 
sta^ more thm a dozen coups. 

One of fee alliances feat stmped fex- 
ward Thursday, led by Mr. Ctetovalit's 
antagonistic coalitirai paitaer, f^atirhai 
Choonhavan, would preserve power for 
fee major pUyeis in the unptipular 1 1- 
monfe government 

The other U beaded by an opposition 
leader, Qiuan Leelq^ whose party is 
more popular amongTIteilanid's business 


ccHnmunity and financial maikets. But it 



~ ^ member Jogging past fighter planes on the flight deck (TfoTGram 
Washuigton on Thursday, as the U.S. aircraft carrier made a weefclons port call in Haifa ¥«»? 


pansion 

learii. These oiganizations had grown 

large enough and extensive enough fo \ i > 

become the primary impetus for an epi- f \|)* i . . || 

demicofmethainifeetanune use that was fit 

swe^ing the lowest 

"All of a sudden we are look ing at a 
very laige and efficient drug-dealing op- 
eration dial seems to have popped up out 

of nowhere and that bra made a real ... 

change in the life of this community," . 

sbesaid. _ 

“How did that happen? I drink we - 
tiiouldknow.” 

A few recent law-enforcement op- ‘ 

eradons illustrate thig widening impact: 

Seven tons ofcocaine were seizra and - 

35 people arrested in an investigation 

last sunuxteT that uncovered Mexican - ■ x---. 

traffickecs tolerating in New Yoric Gty, 
which has long bera ron a irf^ re<j a 
stronghold of the Colombian cartris. 

The cocaine acrived from the border area 
in tractor-trailers wife false compart- 
ments or hidden in hollowed-out 
(rf plywood, aito much of the operation 
was run from headquarters in -Los 
Angeles. 

Anoth er Iteucan drug orgaxuzotitHi 
discovered this year (oierated with dis- 
tribution cells in New Yoik. Phil- 
adelphia, Chicago and fee border xe- 
gi(xi. . . 

The police seizM nearly two tons of 
cocaine hidden in a 30-ton shipment of 
carrots that was on its way fr«n Mc- 

^cn, Texas, to wholesalers on fee East 
Coast 

Miko thtui so individuals have been 
prosMuted fre running a network that 
h oked drag suppliers in Mexico and 
djstnbutors in rural areas and small 
towns in eas^ Kentucky. 

*^o families domhiated the netwotic. 
which federal officials allege is respon- 
sible for importing more than 1 1 towof 
manjuana suice 1992. 



■ French Bid Unlikely to Succeed 

France’s bid to have a Frenchman put 
in phflf ge of the European central bank is 
unlikely to succe^ but it may well 
ensure that Mr. Duisenberg is denied fee 
job he has long been favorite to claim, 
diplomats in BnisseU told Agence 
France-Presse on Thursday. 

After a meeting of EU finance min- 
isters Wedfiesday evening, officials said 
a majoriw of EU governments wanted to 
see Mr. Duisenb^ appo'mted president 
of the future European central bank. 

But by publicly proposing Mr. 
Trichet, France has ensured that this can 
now only haf^ien if other EU govern- 
ments, particularly Germany, are pre- 
pared to deliver what would be a major 
snub to Paris. 


%» Acupuncture Can Be Effective Treatment for Some Ailments 

Continued from Page 1 


• f *. f 1, 


continuing bad economic news, includ- 
ing plans 1^ fee two leading car man- 
ufectureis, Toyota and Isuzu, to halt lo- 
cal production until the end (if the year. 

During fee past decade. Thailand has 
become fee top j^ucer of automobtles 
in Swfeeasc Asia. A feutdown of fee 


plants adds to a growing trend of l^ffr 
feat some economists say could af^ 


feet 2 

million jobs or more in the coming year. 
Mr. (Wivalit's government has been 


sovenunenti 

f^feilinstol 


widely condemned, forfeiling to take 


tioi of the slump'ing econ(^ it inherited. 
foicM to * ' 


In July it was forced to devalue the cur- 
rency. which has since lost 40 percent of 
its valud The stock market has plunged, 
and some economists now predict a re- 
cession in what was recently oik of fee 
world's festest-giowing economics. 


land Acupuncture Society. “I think it 
will open a lot of doors.” 

Critics bristled at the r^ioit, however. 
“What the proponents present as ev- 
idence is in feet delusion, and if fee 
reviewing body is incapable of sepa- 
rating fee two then shame on them,” 
said Victor Herbert a professor of mefe- 
cine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
in New York and a long-standing critic 
of alternative medicine. Mr. Herbert 
traveled to China several years ago to 
investigate what he calls “quackuSme- 
ture’' and concluded feat it was laruelva 


introduced to the West until 1971. 

Pnicdtioaers insert needles that are as 
fine as a human hair into qiedfic points 
on fee body, feen twirl feem and leave 
them there for 20 to 30 minutes. 

The art is essentiallyempirical, mean- 
ing U is the rerah of centuitos of seeing 
what worked. TYaditioosl practitioners 
believe that illness results mmi -imbal- 
ances of bodily energy, called (pro-' 
Qounced “ctira”). which can be cor- 
rected by using needles to open hidden 
chancels, or meridians, in fee body. 

Acupimcture has grown in pt^larity 
in fee United States in recent years. In 
1993, the Food and Drug Administration 


trs estimate that up to 15 million Amer- 
icans have tried acupuncture at least oiice. 
Treatmmts jypic^y cost about $100, 
^Despite lingering questions about its' 
effica^, acupuncture has gra^l^ 
entered fee m^cal mainstream in the 
United States. Many states have accred- 
ited licensing programs and some in- 
surance cranpames already pay for treat- 
ments. Moreover, more than 3,000 


medical doctors now use acupuncture in 

i,oooai 


theirpmctices,aiid up to 1,000 C1.S. drag 
addiction treatment facilities offer acu- 


s^tics, epidemiology and other sci- 
disciplines. The pan- 
rasearch on 

awpuncture wasofpoorqualii>- and feat 
no^c knew how tt might work. 

But It found well-conducted studies 
todicating feat acppunchire could cut by 
and severity of 
of nausea in surgical patimts 

• iP o*‘.J*uffcring from 


cancer 

morning 


puncture as pan of tbeir programs. In rh#. . 

Disturbed by tbe gap between acu- study, those who rc- 

stration puncture's popularity and proof tint it 
determined feat more. than 1 million works, the mstitute’s Office^ Altem- 




M— . ...w u.«..u.c s Vince or Airem- mmnu....r . .. 

Acupuncturelm been used in China Americans were spending a total of about ative Medicine organized tbe panel of rn gj^I- 
for al lea.si 2J)00 years, but was not $500 rniJlion a ySToh the practice. Oih- experte m medicir^Tanthro^lt!^. bio- 




i 


r-on«. ‘*'*'*^‘ treated' with 

conventional drugs. 









INTERNATIONAL 


j Sir Isaiah Berlin Dies, Scholar and Historian of Ideas 


BRIEFLY 


By Marilyn Berger 

M'w Trmri Service 


Sir Berlin, 88. the philoso- 
pher and historian of ideas revered 

forhis inldlect and cherished for his 

wii and his gift for friendship, died 
Wednesday night in Oxford. Eng- 
land, after a proiracied illness,^, 
ford Umversity said Thursday.' 

Family friends said he had been in 

and out of the hospital since July. 

Sir defied classification. 
Ow of the leading scholars of the 
20d^ento, he was a bon vivani, a 
sought-after conversationalist, a se- 
rious opera lajff and an ardent Zion- 
i.st. He shattered the popular concept 
of the Oxford don surrounded by 
dusty books and dry tutorials. 

Sir Isaiah seemed to know almost 
everyone worth knowing in this cen- 
tury, among them Winston Churchill 
Sigmund Freud. Jawaharial Nehru' 
Igor Stravinsky, Boris Paslemak] 
T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden. Chaim 
Weizmann, Virginia Woolf. Edmund 
Wilson, Aldous Huxley, Bertrand 
Russell and Felix Frankfaner. 

A staunch advocate of pluralism 
in a century in which totalitarians 
and Utopians claimed title to the one, 
single truth. Sir Issuah considered 
the very notion that there could be 
one fiiistl answer to organizing hu- 
man society a dangerous illusion 
that would lead lo nothin g but 
bloodshed, coercion and depriva- 
tion of liberty. 

_ His reputation rested securely on 
his lectures and essays — a cor- 
nucopia of Western philosophical 
and political thought involving in- 
quiries into the nature of liberty, the 
search for Utopia, the misconcep- 
tions of the Enlightenment, the in- 
nate human yearning for a home- 
land. the roots of nationalism, the 
underpinnings of fascism. 

His best-known essay in the 
Linited Slates, “The Hedgehog and 


the Fox." -a 1953 study of Tolstoy's 
view of history as embodi^ in 
"War and Peace" is regarded as a 
classic of polfdcai inquiry and lit- 
erary criticism. Taking his dde frmn 
the Greek poet Archilochus ("The 
fox knows many things, but the 
hedgehog knows one Wg thing"). 
Sir Isaiah’s essay was a study of the 
mind and the work of Tolsftty, but 
went beyond that to explore his own 
central themes about theplace of the 
individual in the historical process 
and the strode between 'monism 
and pluralism. 

In this essay, he drew a distinction 
between two human types: those, 
like the fox. who pursue many en^, 
often unrelated, even contradictory, 
and those, like the hedgehog, who 
relate everything to a single organ- 
izing principle. He saw Tolstoy as a 
fox who wanted to be a hedgehog. 
He considered Aristotle, Goethe, 
Pushkin, Balzac, . Joyce and 
Turgenev lo be foxes. Plato, JDante, 
Pascal, Proust and Dosmyevslty 
were among the hedgehogs. 

Sir Isaiah's I9S9 essay, “TWo 
. Concepts of Libe^," is considered 
a major contribution to political the- 
ory. In it, he made a distinctioD 


between neg^ve liberty, which the 
individual must be allowed to »joy 
without state interference, and pos- 
itive liberty, which the state permits 
by imposing regulations that, ^ ne- 
cessity, limit some freedoms in the 
name of greater lib^ fw all. He 
argued drat both kinds of liberty 
were retjuired for a just society. 

For Sir Isaiah ideas could not be 
divorced from pec^le and their psy- 
chological and cultural milieu. If 
thiniring thoughts was his chosen 
line of work, people were what he 
called bis "sceneiy." 

At each stage of his life, whether 
young or old, acquaintances remem- 
ber him as having the look of "in- 
detemunale middle age." bespec- 
tacl^ baldiah, of medium hei^u In 
his conversation as in his writing — . 
which he mainly dictated so it car- 
ried the frill flavor of his voice — Sir 
Isaiah's sentences were constructs of 
daggling erudition, built clause upon 
clause, wisdom intermixed with an- 
ecdote, quotations, historical po^- 
lels and flashes of wit. When nime 
Minister Harold MacMillan nomin- 
ated him in 1 957 for the Queen 's list 
he noted that the knighdiood should 
be bestowed "for taking." 


Nor evinyone understood wfaat he 
was talking about, for he spoke with 
extraordinary rapidity, his tongue 
barely able to keep up with his 
thou^ts. His Eng^o bore the traces 
of his native Russian, and, in his 
later years, he suffered from a para- 
lyzed voc^ cord that did not slow 
him up but rendered some woi^ 
indistinct. But even before this af- 
fliction, when he met Harold Ross of 
The New Yorker, Mr. Ross toldhim. 
"1 don't understand a word you've 
said, but if you have somedung to 
publish. I'll publish it." 

As for his writing, much of it 
might have been left in the basement 
of Headington House, his elegant 
Queen Anne residence in Oxford, 
had an enterprising graduate student 
not come along to gather it together. 
His lectures were often not pub- 
lished and his essays were scattered 
in many magazines and journals. 

Henry Hardy, the graduate stu- 
dent, set out to collect it in four 
volumes that became ftve: "Russian 
Tliinkers’’( 1978); "Concepts and 
Categories" (1978); “Against the 
Curreni” (1979); "Per^aJ Im- 
messions" (19^) and “The 
crooked limber of Histiwy.’' 


George Chambers, Trinidad’s Ex-Leader 


T/ie Associated Press 

PORT-OF-SPAJN. Trinidad — 
George Chambers. 69, a former 
prime minister of Trinidad and To- 
bago whose insistence that it di- 
versiiy out of oil cost his party its- 
30-year hold in Parliament, died 
Tuesday. He had been suffering 
from prostate cancer. 

Mr. Chambers, a former finance 
minister, was appointed to the post 
after Prime Minister ^^iams 
died in office in March 1981. Mr. 
Chambers led his party, the People’s 
National Movement, to a resound- 


ing victory later that year, but 
suffered a landslide defeat in 1986 
afiitf suggesting the counby seek aid 
from die Intemauonal Monetary 
Fond to diversiiy the economy. 

TWO years later, his successor se- 
cured loans from the IMF for more 
than $200 tnillioa. By Chen, the price 
of oil bad plummeted and the coun- 
try was de^ly in debt. 

Robert Bleiberg, 73, 
Longtime Barron’s Editor 

NEW YORK (NYTl — Roben 
Bleibeig, 73, who retired in 1991 


after long service as editor, pub- 
lisher and editorial director of Bar- 
ron's, the weekly business and fi- 
nancial newspaper, died here of 
ieukemia Monday. 

Mr. Bleiberg joined Barron's in 
1946, after serving in die infantry in 
World War U and being wounded in 
Okinawa. He was named editor in 
1954 and held the posidon through 
1981. In 1980, he was given ad- 
ditional responsibility as vice pres- 
ident of the Dow Jones magazine 
group, and later that year he was 
named publisher of Barron's. 


(1990). He also wrote "Karl 
Marx,"( 19391, "The Age of En- 
lightenment" ( 19S6>. “Four Essays 
on Liberty "( 19691, “Vico and 
Herder" ( 1976) and “The Magus 
of die North: J,G. Hamann and the 
Origins of Modem Irrarionalism" 
(1995). 

Until the publication of the Hardy 
collections. Sir Isaiah bad been 
known as a man who talked much 
but wrote little and had, in fact, been 
taken to task for not producing a 
major opus, a failing aiiribuied to his 
reluctance to sit at a desk in front of 
a blank piece of paper. 

But Sir Isaiah said he gave no 
thought to leaving a legacy and in- 
sisted that he had no imerest what- 
soever either in his reputation or in 
what people would say about him 
after he tued. Sitting iii his London 
flat for an interview during his S7th 
year, he said: “I really am veiy 
unambitious. I'm underambitious, if 
anything. I've ne\'er, never aimed at 
anything. 1 didn’t shape my life. 1 
did simply one thing after another. 
When opportunities arose I took 
them. Jr's an unplanned life essen- 
tially." When it was suggested that 
he was known as a man who took 
great pleasure in intellectual life, he 
said, “I take pleasure in pleasure." 

Among the opportunities that he 
grasped which an^orded him many 
pleasures were assignments in 
Washington during World War 1 1 , 
Moscow Just after the war, and a 
long association with Oxford. 

Isaiah Berlin was bom in Riga, 
Latvia, on June 6, 1909, die son of a 
successful timber merchant and 
landowner and the grandson, on hi.'t 
mother’s side, of a Hasidic rabbi of 
the ecstatic Lubavitch tradition. 

His family moved lo St. Peters- 
burg where he was a witness to the 
two Russian re\'oiutions. The family 
then immigrated in 1921 to London, 
where it had business interests. 


Latpyer Seeks Castro Clemency _ 

MIAMI — An attorney for an .•\merican charged in 
Cuba with plotting to overthrow the government will seek 
a meeting with President Fidel Castro in an aiiempl to 
protect his client's life. 

T^ attorney. Dominick Salfi. was the only member of 
a U.S. legal team that Havana allowed to attend the trial of 
Waller Van dcr Veer, who could become the first .Amer- 
ican since the 196()s to face execution in Cuba. 

The trial in Havana began Thursday, with a gov- 
emmeni attorney representing the Miami resident. He 
was arrested in .August 1996 and charged^ u'iih crimes 
against state security: gathering materials for firehombs 
and plotting attacks agunsi the" police and tourists. (.AP> 


7 Israelis Soughi in Kidnap Plot 

GENEVA — A Geneva judge said Thursday that he 
had issued international arrest warrants for seven Israelis ■ 
in connection with an alleged plot to kidnap Aihinu_ 
Roussel, the sole surviving heir to the Greek shipping" 
tycoon .Aristotle Onassis. 

Judge Jacque-s Delieuiraz called the sikspcci.s, •>everal of 7 
whom are former Israeli .Army officers, “agents" who 
had done the "dirty work" of ^paring the abduction by 
photographing the ! 2-year-old and her security entourage . 
in Switzerland. ^ 

Nurses ’ Saudi Term Reported . 

LONDON — Tu’o Brjii.sh nurses imprisoned in Saudi \ 
Arabia for murder will escape pivssihie Ivlieading or 
public lashing, instead receiving a four-year jail temt. the 
Scottish newspaper Record reported Thursiby. 

Deborah F^any. .39. and Lucille McLauchlan. .^2. have 
been in prison in the eastern cit.v of Domntum since 
December, accused of killing .in .Australian colleague. 
Yvonne Gilford. 

Ms. Parry could have been beheaJcil for the crime - 
while Ms. McLauchlan faced 5(10 lashes. t Reuters i ‘ 

Ambassador Slain in Jamaica 

KINGSTON, Jamaica — The Venezuelan amha-ssadiv ' 
to Jamaica. Alfredo Varga.s. was shot and killed in his 
apartment early Thursday, the police saiii \keuUTsl 


New Giants on World Stage 

South AJHcan Companies Show Their Global Might 


By Lynne Duke 

Wii’khiiiKh'n Pi'st Seniee 


JOHANNESBURG — With the listing of 
BUlitoD PLC on the London Stock Exchange 
this year, the accelerating entry of South 
rican capital into the glob^al economy entered 
a new phase. 

Constrained in raising international financ- 
ing. Gencor Ltd., South Africa’s second- 
largest mining house, split off its nonprecious 
metals portfolio lo create Billiton and listed 
the new company on the London market. 

With assets of S5.4 billion; Billiton now 
controls Genedr's aluminum, forroalloy, coal 
and titanium assets and wUl be able to raise 
significant capital for further development 
both here and abroad. 

“We wanted to register in London so we 
could capture the investment funds inherent in 
a large intematitmal capital market," said 
Mick Davis. Billiton’s -executive Erector. 
"South Africa captures only emerging-mar- 
ket fond managers. We wanted to be in an 
emerged market so we could have all ftind 
managers looking at us." 


Such global moves would have been un- 
thinkable less than a decade ago. While South 
Africa was under wUte-minority rule, its min- 
erals-based industrial economy and the world- 
class mining booses that underpinned it 
thrived isolation. They exploited che 2 u> 
black labor and bought everyilting in tiieir pam 
to conqxiDsate for their inability to ex^md 
jtiiroad because of international sanctions. 

But with Soutii Africa's emergence fol- 
lowing the end of apartheid in 1994, some of 
the largest South African firms have stq:^)ed 
into the inremational mazfret as major players. 
"Soutii African Breweries has become the 
fourih-laigest brewer in the world, the com- 
pany says. It owns or controls breweries not 
only around Africa — in Botswana. Swazi- 
land, Lesotho. Tanzania, Mozambique, Zam- 
bia and Ethiopia — but also in Hungary. 
Poland, Romania and Sp^ 

Sappi Lid., a South African paper giant, has 
become a global player in the production of 
high-quality paper. It acmiired that status in 
19^ when it purchased $.D. Wanen Co., the 
largest pr^ucer of snch paper in the United 
States. 


• BRADFORD • BRISTOL • CARDIFF • CHEPSTOW • CHESHUNT • CHICHESTER - DERBY • EDINBURGH • GLASGOW • HEATHROW • LEEDS • LONDON • MAIDSTONE • MANCHESTER |1998> > 
S 
< 


■ ■ -'i • •' 


It 'A' t ' 



• *. !• . -fNM 





RAJND: Aggressive Businesses Looking North 


Continued from Page 1 

ompiications. Although some governments 
ave adopted investor-friendly policies such 
s easing restrictions on foreign ownership 
□d offering incentives for business devel- 
pment. red tape is an obstacle — as are 
jspicions that some governments harbor 
bout the giant to their south. 

On the South African side there are draw- 
acks as well. Apart from the country’s min- 
ig houses and other large corporations. South 
ifrican business is not accustomed to dealing 
'ilh the outside world after years of isols^on 
rought about by international sanctions 
;med at ending apartheid. 

• if we make a success here economically, 
len the rest of Africa will cenainly benefit,'’ 
lid Erich Leismer. a research fellow at the 
frica Instiniie. The South African invest- 
lent trend has been growing since 1993, 
hen the passage of an interim constitution 
gnaled the death knell of apanheid and 
rought an end to sanctions. _ 

The formal introduction of nonraciai de- 
locracv the following year led to the gradual 
Fling of South African currency controls thar 
roUbited foreign investment, which in turn 
ought the opening of the country ’seeonomy 

I the world. . ^ 

Under a demotratic. black-led government, 
[>uih African companies are far more wel- 
)me on the continent than they were when its 
isiness establishment symbolized jxist 
lie .Although bic business in South Amca 
mains largely white, on a continent m des- 


perate need of economic development after 
years of stagnation, it is the color of money 
that speaks more loudly. 

South Africa’s economy is four times lar- 
ger than those of its southern African neigh- 
bors combined. While most of Africa com- 
prises developing countries. South Africa 
straddles the Tnird World and the FirsL It is an 
emerging market with dera socioeconomic 
ne^s, but with sectors that already have 
emeiged into the global economy. 

. Analysts say it is important for Soutii 
Affica to invest in Africa, especially southern 
Affica, to strengtiien its ei^rt maritets. In 
addition, some South African businesses have 
outgrown their domesticTnarkets and need to 
expand to remain vi^le. 

To encourage regional development, the 
South Affican Reserve Bank has allowed 
companies to move into foreign direct in- 
vestment the equivalent of S103 million for 
each new projecL 

Some Afri^ countries resent the inherently 
unequ^ nature of ira^ witii tiie economic 
giant. South Africa’s exports to its neighbors 
are six times greater than its inqx>ns from those 
countries. Though some of Soim Africa’s trad- 
ing partners have reduced their tariffs sub- 
stantially, Soutii Afoca has been reluctant to 
make it too easy for imports to get in. 

“There's a certain amount of fear north of 
South Africa that South African business will 
come in and just roll over their local bosiness, 
which is a valid fear, ’ ’ said Game Stores' Mr. 
Barrett. “But at tiie end of the day, you can't 
hold back the world.” 


OREGON: Voters Uphold Assisted-Suicide Law 


Continued from Page 1 

said. “This is an enormously private 
wnal choice and someihmg *ax will 
ce within the confines of con- 
paiieni-physician relant^hip. 
Gordon, a surgeon and former ptw- 
the Oregon Medical AswcialiOT wlro 
; assisted suicide, said inai be 
, “ven- small group’ of patients to 
r lives' under the law. but that otheis 
k for overdose prcscnptions w have 
>n available" in case their suffering 

unbearahie* . _ rA.,_ 

se ihe 9!h U.S. Cir^t Court^A^ 
San Francisco on Oct. -7 for^> 
994 lower-coun injunction biocKing 
suicide - although with^t 
iciion — doctors have been we for 
ui a week to legally 
barbiturates to patients who have 1^ 
months 10 live. But tii^un s acUM 
known to doctors m Oregon 

state anorncy gen^ s office 


announced Tuesday evening diat the mailed 
notice of the injuacnon’s withdrawal had 
reached the trial court in Eugene last Friday. 

Katrina Hedberg, deputy state epidemiolo- 
gist for the Oregon Health Division, said that 
adniinistrative regulations governing assisted 
suicide have been ready since the measure 
was in 1994 and vdll be filed with the 
secretary of state "within the next couple of 
days.'-' The forms doctors will be required to 
submit when prescribing fatal overdid will 
be distrihuted then, Ms. Hedberg said. But she 
said doctors "could start today" the 15-day 
waiting period between a request for suicide 
assistance and the issuance or a (description. 

opponents of the law indicated they would 
renew their legal challenge on a case-by-case 
basis, if necessary. James Bopp Jr., aa at- 
torney for the National Right to Life Com- 

minee whichfUedtheoriginalchalleage,said 
that if someone informed him that a relative 
was terminally ill and suicidal and he felt the 
patient needed protection from the new law. 
he would consider representing the patient. 



Will youv business Frip lv\ Europe ov VWe Mi^^^le E^vsf be U^^ssle -tVee? If will i-P you sf^iy 
^ Ks»ivTrioH- Uofel. yoiJiW -Peel peirPecfly cowt^orf^ible. bec^»ius€ iweVe cot\vvecVe<A fo 
AlSr firrm's giobeii coMwiuvvicTtfiHovi uehwovk, you'll «lso -Peel ^ loV dosev fo l^owe. 

WUe‘\ you've com'Povf<?ib)e/ you Ao owyVUlvvg. 


To make reservations at any of our hotels in the UK, Europe and Middle East call toll free: 


Austria 0660 6703 
France 0800 9083 33 
Germany 0130 854422 
Greece 00800 4412 7686 


Hungary 00800 1 1 998 

Italy 1678 76022 

Netherlands 06 022 0122 
Poland 00800 4411205 


Spain 900 994422 

Switzerland 0800 550 122 
UK 0800 221 222 

Egypt 02 510 0200* 


HOTELS’ RESORTS-5UITE3 


Jordan 06 697 756° 

. Lebanon 01 426 801* 

Saudi Arabia 1 80010* 
UAE 800 121* 


*lntemationa( Toil Free service via AT&T Direct Dial the access number and then dial 800 43 26626. °Local call 


r 


NEWCASTLE •^PORIJI 





INTERNATIOrCAL HEBATn IBIBUNE 
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 




The Delights of Perth, 
Australia’s Windy City 

A Nugget of Civilization at Land’s End 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

■ New YoHcTimes Service 

ERIH, Australia — Enriched dis- 
coveries of gold and HiamnnHs anH 
tucked betw^ expanses of treeless 
plains and an even vaster tnrfian ocean, 
Perth is a bright nugget of civUizadoa amid 
much emptiness. Fartherfiom Sydney tf>an from 
Jakarta, Perth is one of the world’s most isolated 
major cities, and while it’s smaller than Sydney 
and Melbourne, it’s growing faster dian either. It 
is the coital of the gaigantuan state of Western 
Australia. Most of die state’s 2 millinn inhab- 
itants live in and around the city. 

In 1962 Perth achieved global renown as a 
beacon for tbe astronaut John Glenn: To help 
him get his. bearings while in orbit, citizens 
switched on every li^L He called h die City of 
Lights. Perth is also a city of white bo^ bladt 
swans, magnificent beaches alot^ the Sunset 
Coast of the Indian Ocean and 8,000 spedes of 
wildflowers — &om orchids and everlastings to 
kangaroo paws. And now that spring has come to 
the Sontbem Hemisphere, tb^ are in bloom. 
Kings Paik, a leisurely walk from Perth ’s center, 
is one place to see them, but because of die Los 
Angeles-like climate, everybody’s garden 
blazes with flowers all year. Sjviiig teaqjttutares 
are balmy — in the 70s and 80$ — but Perdi 
rivals Chic^o when it comes to wind. 

FOR mmiRK LOVERS The area is a nature- 
lover’s paradise, with cycling and walking padis 
along shores speckled with pelicans, ibises, cor- 
morants, terns and parrots. Most aftenioons 
Perdi pulses with the flap of sails, against a 
backdrop of iridescent towera. Ihe but beadies 
aienorthof the port city of Fremantle, 10 miles 
to the southwest 

The coast firom Perth to the nordi osed to be 
known as New Holland, after ^ Dutch nav- 
igates who were die first to erqilore it back in tbe 
^y 1600s. Miodfiilofthose connections, the Aft 



Roben Sor follK Nr« YodiTlwi 

Parasailing off Rottnest Island. 

Gallery of Western Australia, (61-8) 9492-6600, 
will have the ’‘Golden of I^tch Art” 
through JaiL 1 1. The riiow includes 40 wodcs <xi 
loan fiom die Rijksmuseum of Amsterdam, one a 
Rembrandt The gallery's permanent cdlection of 
Aboriginal an is one of the world’s best Ad- 
misslei and tours are fiee, but die Dutch show has 
an admission charge of $8 and $5 for duldren. 

* ‘Carmen,’ ’ featuring Roxane Hislop, will be 
performed at 7:30 P.M. Nov. 1 1 thnMi^ 22 by 
the West Australian Opera Company ax His 
MajesQr’s Theater, a gracious, newW restored 
Edwardian structure.Tickets $35 «> »6 during 
tbe week, ^7 to $74 Sundays; (61-8) 9484- 
1 133, fax (61-8) 9221-2241. 

liie biadilon is a new Olympic sport, and 
hopefuls for the 2000 Sydney Sommer Chunes 
will participate in a quailing roond in Perdi on 
Nov. 16. ’They will swim in the Swan River, 
cycle through the ciQr and around Kings Paxfc, 
then run uong the riverbank to finish at 
Esplanade Park. Infotmation: (61-8) 9220-1788, 
fax (61-8) 9221-3007. 

From Jan. 4 to 10, Perth will be the scene of a 
major international tennis tournament, the Hy- 
unA*i Hopman Cup, a warm-up foi' tbe Australian 
Open in Melbourne. The site is the Burswood 
Dome, Ausualia's largest enclosed qiorts arena 
(seating 8^00 for diis event), in the Burswood 
Hotel and Casino conqilex at die eastern edge of 
thff city. Hckets fiom $1 16 to $163 for all ses- 
sions, $12 to $43 for individual sessions; (61-8) 
9380-4000, fax (61-8) 9388-1436. 


oners' artwcxk on cell walls is especially moving 
Open daily 10 A.M. to 6 P,M.; tours every han- 
hoor lasting <xie to two boors. Candlelight tours 
Wednesday and Rrklay ax 7:30 by leservatkm. 
CaU (61-8) 9430-7177, fax (61-8) 9430-7188. 
Guides fnrlfiAft r e tir ed wardens ex-inmates. 
Admission: $ 8 , seniors $ 6 , diildren $4. 

Nine^-ei^t years afier its openi^ die Perth 
Mint in EasOte^ (til- 8 ) 9421-727^ cmtinnes 
malcing moo^. You can see mldbeing poored, 
handle a $155, OCX) ingot and make yoor own 
mgAillinns Weekdays 9 A.M. to 4 P.N1, week- 
ends 9 AJ4. to 1 PJ^ Admissi<m $4. 

Numerous wineries ate within aday's drive of 
the dty, bot die most mellowing way to see them 
is a wine croise op tibe Swan River to Houghirai 
orSandalfixd vineyards. The fare, $58 a person, 
includes unlimited wine tasting on board and at 
the winery, a visit to the restored 1880s Wood- 
bridge mansion and full buffet at Mulberry 
Farms. Crew members entertain. Almost seven, 
hours long, die cruise leaves at 9:15 A.M daily 
from die Baiiadx Street Jetty, Old Perth Port; 
(til- 8 ) 9221-5844. 

R OTIKEST Island was misnamed by 
Dutch ermlotexs who misfocdx die quKdx- 
kas, the dbcUe marsupials that live mete, 
for huge rats. Nine miles square, it became, a 
priscm fw Aborigine^ wbo called it Wadjemup 
— a place where qiirits of die dead are borne 17 
the whad fiom die mainland Now it’s Perth’s 
playground, easily readied by ferry fiom Perth. 
Fremantle or Hillarys ($22 to round dm) ; (ti 1 - 

8 ) 9221-5844, fiu (til- 8 ) 9325-3717. Recteation- 
al possflniities mctode hikii^g, bicyclix^, bird 
watching, swanming fiom san^ coves, diving or 
stioifcelmg, esqploting historic buildi^ and light- 
houses, or taking an undersea viewing boat Al- 
though yon can see Rottnest in a day, rooms are 
avai&ile at die beachfionx Rottnest Hotel, (til- 8 ) 
9292-5011, fax (til-S) 9292-5188, $120 with 
breakfast, or Rottnest Loc^ (til- 8 ) 9292-5161, 
fax (til- 8 ) 9292-5158. $l()0to $1 Iti. Moimation: 
Rottnest AndioriQr, (til' 8 ) 9432-9111. 

•RiATViiwi Among die delights of eating out 
ate plenty of fiesh seafood, numerous eSinic 
restaurants and dining rooms widi great views. 

'Vi^dow’s is die Bursw ood Hotel's top res^ 
taurant, (til-S) 9362-7777, widi a quiet elegance, 
thick caroets and comfortifole armchairs. Gulls 
constant^ skim die lagoon for their own meals, 
agaii^ dit badcdrop of die Perth airline. A 
special^; hapuka (a grouper) fillet filled with 
onion, capsicum, tomato and snow-pea 
sprouts and envelcmed by bacon. Meal for two 
with modest wine: $108. 

From Fraser's, on Fraser Avenue near die 
Botanic Gardens in Kings Park, (61-8) 9481- 
7100, you can enjoy a shinning panorama of die 
city and river while eatii^ frnnly shucked Pa- 
ci& oysters, asparagus risotto or fish chowder. 
Meal for two: $93. 

HiB Matilda B 7 f ga^aiiraiit, 3 Hackett Drive in 
Ciawity, (6 1 * 8 ) 93^5425, ON^xlodcs the river and 
a niarina fuU of saflbotts as well as die fedi 
skyline. Diners look as if diey have just dodceddieir 
bc^Maiiyhave.Apopulardishissearedsword- 
eacnisted with mus^ and sesame seeds with 
a qii^ scallop salad Meal for two: $93. 


PAGE 12 







hfost events in die Woiid Swimmiag Cham- 
pionriiqis, Jan. 8 to 18, will be at the Challenge 
Stadinm in Claremont; (61-8) 9284-1998, fox 
(61-8) 9284-1122. Ihe exception will be the, 
long-distance swim in the Indian Ocean. 

Australian flora and fetwa are unique, and 
Zoo is roleodid — tritii walk-dnough 
aviaries and habitats that offer face-to-foce en- 
counteis wifh kangtuoos, wallabies, koalas, edi- 

iHnae anH Tagmaniflif devils. Rare CrealUtes IHm 

the numbat, diaditc^ wopOkara and djoongari 
ate piait of the zoo’s troe^g programs, which 
restore near-extinct spedes to the wQd. Let a 
butteifiy land on yoor shoulder in die lush But- 
tecQy House or strdce a blue-tongued sldnk in die 
Reptile House. New sections of die Australian 
Walkabout are about to opoi: the Bushwalk mid- 
November, and the We^ds mid-December. 

At most crocodile^M^ you lodE down fiom a 
distance at diose gn m^ing jaws: By eariy 1998 
you’U be able to eyeball a croc here dnoogh a 
glass partition. A matveloas playground is ad- 
apted for children with special needs. Opien 9 
A.M. to 5 P34. all year. *lDe feny fiom Barrack 
Street pier lets passengers off near the 200 ; or 
take tee N 0 .IIO bos. AdmissioD $8, seniors $5, 
childten older than 4 , $4; (61-8) 9367-7988. 

. Kings Park also offen acres of native flora wite 
isnmft finna jn the Botauical Gardens and natural 
boshland overlooking tee wide Swan River. 
There are for cycling, strolling and fansb- 
walking. picDic areas, and a cafe and restanranL A 
fiee bos. pnckops along St Geofge's To*- 
laoe, conned die park wite tee city center. 

j^emantle Prison, a maxicnum-security prison 
until 1991, was boilx fiom limestone qnaii^ on 
she by convicts shqipied fiom Biitain starting in 
1850, when even petty criminals were transported 
to do time. Accoding to a fbnner warden, an owl 
flew in on the eve of every hanging; if it was gone 
by tnnming, a paidon would be granted. Pris- 







b*-, 

, ' «!ff 



Wwwlek 
straitoin-' 

upoi^von 


XN6UND< 


’"FI 

WMWKKawe. 

Broadway. ' . r’ . 

- r 

Chkipfng Carapdan-^ 

LgiparSwair “ COTSWOLDS r “ 

OStOMMtHh^Woid aUCNWGNMStfME 

'’^Lawar Swell 

Bourtbn-ofMtw-WMsr Ayleal^ 

flURMQSmE 5 

oxhrt. 

taHhM RvyniWTlK New Y«dt TlncK NYT iiu(« 


Clockwise from l^: Hartwell House guest room; courtyard of the Lygon Arms: map: foyer of the Lygon Arms. 

Where the Famous Once Slept 


By Charles Com 

ROADWAY, England — 
The bounteous summers 
of tee English CO ontryside 
have altr^ted me since 
my days as a yonte-hostskr on a 
bicycle, so I have returned to tee 
Cotswolds and Midlands twice in 
recent years — once two summers 
ago and again in the spring this 
year, on short trips from Lraidon. 

On bote occasions, my compan- 
ion, Rosalie, and I visiied two very 
different but equally classic coon- 
oy hotels: the vicaragel^ Lygon 
Aims, in die heart of the Cotswolds 
village of Broadway, and the pala- 
tial Hartwell House, about 20 mile* 
nordmst of Oxford in tee rollxng 
hfidlands of Bncldnghamshiie. 

Tbe Lygon Arms, an ancjent 
coaching inn owned since 1986 by 
tbe Savoy Groim of London, has 
been a luven travelers since 
1532, during Henry vni’s reign. 
When we first eotet^ its fo^, we 
were greeted by crackling open 
fires to dispel tee dan^, beneath 
mantels bearing collections of old 
piewter and pxroelain. Between that 
visit and cor next, two years later, 
tee only variables were tee weather 
and ^ wondeifolly evolving 
cuisine of tbe chef, Ro^ Narben. 

Pteiraits of jieriwigged ancestors 
fiom MUten’s day gazed dovm 
fiom dark, oak-paneled walls, 
while ancient clocks sounded the 
hour. A legend over an interior 
p(M read: “Now good digestion 
wite an atipetite and health or 
bote.” 

Hisioiy seemed etched into tbe 
inn’s every beam. The inn has en- 
tertained a succession of distin-' 
gushed travels, firm the age of 
Elizabeth I and Raleigh, t h rong tbe 
great Civil War wite hs fierce an- 
tagonists Quudes 1 and Cromwell 
(tee latter stayed Iraie before the 
Battle of Worcester, while at an- 
other time tbe king met his Cavalier 
suppxraters at the inn). 

A HWNTINCTRADffnM 

By the 1830s General Lygon, 
who had served under Wellington 
at Waterloo, lad acquired teepr^ 
'erty and given it his family (Beau- 
chanm) coat of arms, which greets 
travelers on the sign hanging oat_ 
side the entrance roday. Toward die 
end of Queen Vtctoiia’s reign die 
spiortsman Charies Dr^ estab- 
lished tee Lygon Arms as tee ral- 
tying point for tee Norte Cotswold 
Rant, a tradition that remains. 


Our room — actually a small 
suite feamring a fabric-draped fonr- 
poster — was cozily and quiedy 
situated on tbe seco^ floor over- 
lo(^g tbe intaior courtyard, well 
off the road. 

When we went down to tee sofoy 
lifted dxni^ room, we saw ^ 
how eniesprisingly ^ owners had 
used cleveriy cfisguised mnovatioa 
to preserve tee traditiooal anno- 
sphe^ Known as die Great Hi^ the 
^ladoDS area is an obkaig affiuEr wite 
a 17te-centuty nunsnel's gallery and 
wails adorned wite stag h eads and 
heraldic hwiMth a dramaiic 

but airy bacrel-vanlled ceiling, fiom 
w hirh rhanriplim; ftoBTpnri at 
end of the room. A blaring fire lends 
intimacy ID the eiqiaasive q»ce. 

LAM* AN* pncKUN* There was 
a dioice of aroetizecs, fiom whidi 
we had a balfottine of chicken wite 
fine gi^, served wite mushrooms, 
pistadbio and a green leaf salad wite 
nazdnut dresang, and a pbyllo 
mstry. filled wite Indian-spiced 
cormsb crab, coriander and filled 
scallops. For our main courses, we 
selectro tee local lamb wiapp e d in 
zncchini wite a confit of onion and 
p^talo and a bome^smoked duck- 
ling wite a p:^ sauce and red cur- 
rants. The wine list was admirably 
teocouglL with choice bottles fiom 
theContinenL 

Afier dessert and a selection of 
cheeses, we visited die room where 
Cromwell slrot, and under his pxir- 
trait’s watchfnl gaze we looked at 
the Elizabethan fir^lace, tee or- 
nately detailed 17te-centaty cdling 
and fiieze, and tee splendid fin- 
niuixe wottey of tee LoroProtector. 
Oar sense of fiumess then led us to 
die chamber where Charles I bad 
gateered wite his Cavalier retinue, 
and where his portmt is now sus- 
piended fiom tee raiginal 17te-ceD- 
tnry oak paneling. 

By day we e^loced the Cob- 
wolds and teeir villages, wite 
names like Stow-on-die-Wold, 
Chipping Campden, tee Slan^teis, 
tee Swells, and Bourton-on-the- 
Water, usually stojipnng for a lunch 
of shepiberd’s pie or Dover sole 
wite apint of bitter or lager atoned 
die hamlet jiubs. 

I take great pleasure in reading 
England's histo^ not oily m the 
stones of rural inns in» the Lygon 
Arms but also in tee surviving p^le 
booses. These great residences, 
ahered and sometimes used un- 
Irindly by laser geneiatioDS, gtfu 
stand as ounnimeDis to a fierce 
grandeur of visian and enteiprise. 


when Renaissance trade broug^ a 
new wave of wealte swe^ing across 
a barbaric island nation, spMmdi:^ a 
manift for OStBUtation in htiiMing. 
Happity, some of these houses have 
been leincamatBd as country hotels. 

Hartwell House near Cfaatd is 
one of these. The struenne 
stands amid acres ofpaik divided 
by catefiilly placed clnmpis of 
woods and a pieacefiil stretch of wa- 
ter plied Ity waterfowl and sp»iu^ 
by a grac^ stone bridge, legacies 
oftbar g matmastg rofEn g lMi land- 
scBpiing, Cfqobility Brown. 

'Theproperty ‘ineatiODed in the 
llth-cectnry Doomsday Book as 
hfelrwigiT^ to W illiam Peverel, nat- 
ural son of William, the Conqueror 
X- reaches back neady 1,000 years 
to the reign of Edward die Cem- 
fessQT. Hartwell House ilsdf, with 
bote Jacobean and Geogian 
fecades ctowned by a orola, was 
bnilt for tee Heiiqida andLee fam- 
ilies (ancestors of General Robert 
E. Lre) dnring tee 17te and 18te 
centuries, and has evolved through 
changing seasons of taste. 

The (3teat Hall, whidi dates fiom 
1740, is an impiosing rec^tion area 
in tee Baroque style, die work of 
James Gibbs, andit features detailed 
pJasterworic and pieriod p^tings. 
Toreacb our bedioo^ we clinteed a 
magnificently hybrid staircase, at 
once Jacobeu and modem, wite a 
grotesque carved figure a^ each 
bahister Czncluding G. K. Cnester- 
ton and Wmston Churchill). We 
were ushered into an elongated 
chamber reaching post the twin b^ 
to bow windows overlocAang the 
drive and entrance bdow. 

D inner was served down- 
stairs in the Soane Dining 
Room, done .in the style of 
the earty 19te-centuiy archh^ Sir 
John Soane, Yriiose hraise in Lendon 
is a delightfiil museum. The warm 
po^-hn^ rocro under IS-foot 
cexlings’was ccanpleted in 1988. but 
it blends seamlessly wite die rest of 
tbe bouse. As at tbe Lygon Anns, tee 
nseou and wine list were enticing. 

In the morning, we introduced 
ourselves to Jonatean Thooqison, 
director and general number of tee 
estate. A heritable and witty man 
he told tbe story of Hartwell Honse 
and the socoessive efforts at “mod- 
emization.” The pnblic rooms as' 
well as tee 33 gu^ rooms in tee 
main boose have been brought to 
life in a variety of pieriods and styles 
that allow guests to savor the prop- 
erty’s diverse history. 

In die paneled bar adjoining the 


Great Hall, canvases by an itBieraut 
Spanish artist,Baltha^Nebot, de- 
pict HartwelTs gardens bordered 
by the house's faouie as it appeared 
in the mid-18te century. The 
pomegranoxe-colored ^ morning 
room — wite its luscious plaster 
ceiling carved in the rococo styhif 
depicting the four seasmis as well as*, 
the four elements — the drawing 
room and the library all were Geor- 
gian additions around 1760. 

1HE COOK coNMIcnOH After be- 
ing occupied by a series of mem- 
orable leaseholders, the house 
passed fiom tee Lee family and its 
contents were sold at auction, while 
tbe buildings themselves were 
saved fiom tee wrecker’s ball by 
tee philanteropist Ernest Cooi^ 
granoson of tee great Victorian 
travel mogul Thomas Co(^ In 
1937 the property became a girls’ ” 
boarding school and suffered a fire 
in 1963. Historic House Hotels ac- 
quired tbe property in 1983 and 
undertook a major restoration and 
conversion before the hotel’s open- 
ing in 1989. President Bill Clinton 
wasaguestteerein 1994 during hh 
D-Day visit to Britain. 

But tee most pKominent chtptcr 
in Hartwell House's past occuM 
when tee propierty was leased .uf 
1809 to tbe eiwed Louis ^ 

France, wbo as King of Hartwdl 
held his court of dmigr^ here in'a . 
quintessentially English setting. 
Today’s guest can imagine die up- 
wards of ISO destitute aristocriMs 
billeted here, minding their onpi 
shops on die grounds and raising 
vegetables, chickens and ralteits oi 
a sh^tered roof terrace. , 

“Why wouldst dx)u leave calm 
Hartwell's green abode . . . Apicipi 
table and Horatian Ode?” wrote 
Lord Byron of Louis X>hQ’s d^ 
parture for France in 1814 to as- 
sume his throne, two years ai^ 
Napioleon's retreat from Moscoii^ 
The question still hangs in the aiw ; 
Why leave such a place? 

The Lygon Aims, tel. (44-1386) 
852-255; fax (44-1386) 858-611. 
ranges fiom about $272 for a double 
room to aboutS579 fix- a large suite, 
plus VAT of 17.5 per cent. 

'Ihe Hartwell House, teL (44- 
1296) 747-444; lax (44-1296) 747- 
450, ranges from alrout $315 fot’i 
double room to $877 for a suite. 

Charles Corn's new book, ''The 
5ce/icr of Eden: A Narrative ef the 
^ice Trade," will be published li>’ 
Kodansha in February. He wrote 
this for The New York runes. 




KIDS 


Fun for the Whole Family Under One Chelsea Roof 


By Barbara Rosen 

L ondon — bo you get head- 
aches in toy-craiomed hyper* 
markets? Does your blood pres* 
sure rise when salespeiple send 
tee latest plaything buzzing around yoor 
ears? Here’s one alternative: a derart- 
ment stene that aims to put evcryuiing 
for Idds aged 0 to 10 ondex.one, fim-for* 
te^wbole-family roof. 

Tbe tHUinchild of Urn Waterstone, 
whose hiowser-fileadly bookshops re- 
volutionized British book retailing in 
tee 1980s, Daisy & Tom is positively 
pleasant 'There’s enough room to piush a 
stroller between tee toy shelves. Tbe 
' background music is as likely to be Ella 
Fitzgerald as nurseiy riiymes. A pier- 
fbrming clock graces tee well-stocked, 
book (fepartmenL The minnscule hair 
salon is stocked wite toys and videos. 


Cranlty kids can be appeas^ wite a 
ride on a hand-carved carousel in tee toy 
depaitmffiL They can watch marionettes 
piafonning “Pete and tee Wolf’ while 
their folks shop fat dotees and shoes. 
Waitecs juggle in tee soda bar, which 
of^ smoked salmon and Sauvignon 
blanc as well as hot dop and hot radge. 

It's dear if only by its location in 
Oielsea’s npmaiket IQng’s Road: This 
sh(» is ainiM at paieois, gnuuharents 
anci goefoarents wite good-sized pock- 
etbooks^Hairents start at£10 (abont$17) 
however young tee a milkshake 
goes for u, and the ^tees come wite 
litre f arimhri and Petit Batean. 

But while Daisy & Tom’s ^ces 't 
discount tei^ aren't sttatos{Uieric eiteer. 
Angel Princess Barine costs £17 S9 here, 
comratred to £16.99 at Toys ’R* Us and 
£10M at Hamlib^ in R^eot Street 
Hitching a Thomas tee Tank EngiK to 

your Brio train will cost&.99 heie, about 


tee same as at tee “never ioiowingly 
undersold’' John Lewis department 
Store, and £2 less than ar Wamlty c 
In fact, says Wateistone, “the whole 
teing was aimed at my tee tele- 
vision producei/diiectQr Rosie Alison, 
uho qienc weekends dragging teeir two 
youDgstm fiom toy store to dotbes shop 
to cBpjoinL The Mra was to create “ finwie - 

wbere where she’dUke to take her diildrefl 

on Saturd^ afiemoon,” be says. 

The teeme was already there: Alison 
bad planned a series of books based on 
teeir now 3-year-old daa^ter, Daisy 
and Tom, tee son of a friend who be- 
came a backer. The store opened July 

31, there are already two books and rag 

dolls, and teere’s talk of putting Daisv 
& Tom on television. * ^ 

Wateretone knows what he’s tahting 
about when it comes to pleasina both 

pa^ts a^<b: He has a toSl^ eight 

children fix)m his teree marriages. He 


also knows what be likes. Tbe store 
features lots of B^ai and Tintin ^ 
’’teat’s just me inclosing nty own 
taste,” ie sm. He even envisaged, 
however bde^, a childrea’s store wite 
lots of Scandinavian woodm toys but 
not a sin^ Baftne dolL 

*T did,” he admits, “for about two 
and a half minutes. ... It was raih er 
|xetentious of me.” (The selection now 
indudes tee Bartm Loves Elvis col- 
lector edition gift set, {siced at £85.) 

Of tbe Debussy-meets-Disn^ sound 
system: “Children should be lutening 
to good music,” Waterstone declares. 
In tee bo^ department, any tomes 
above a 10-year-old*s reading level are 
likely to be classics. “I don’t really 
believe in teen fiction,” he says. 

The Chelsea store is set to get a new 
floor, selling sports equipment and 
beds, ato Christmas. A swond Daisy 
& Tom is scheduled to open this monte 


in Mandiester, it will be basically the 
same but bigger, incorporating a su- 
pervised (pay) pkv area. Two more 
stores are plannM for Scotland and tbe 
north of ^gland next year, and teere’s 
talk of crossing tee Channel 

Meanwhile, wite Daisy & Tom duly 
launched, tee wm some destiibe as “a 
visionary retailer” proposed to revamp 
his fixmer enqdqyer, tee ret^ group 
W.H. Smite, which he left in 1981 aS 
to whom he later sold tee Wateratone’s 
bookstores. His recipe included in- 
creased amounts of Waterstone and even 

a dollop of Dai^ A Tom. But W. H. 
Smite's board rejected tee plan, though 
teey’ve apparentiy acoqrted some of^ 
advice it emtained, announcing mi OcL 
16teat they want to qnn off tee Wa- 
tostone’s bookstore chain 

Barbara Rosen is a Jne-Umce Jour- 
nalist living in London, 

























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


the frequent traveler 


PAGE 13 


MOVIE GUIDE 




at- Tti'v--- 


w I ^Wiring Up for the Millennium 




By Roger Corns 

Inienuihrul HeraU Tn lmne 

HE notion Of the hotel room as a 
command center” from which 
you can manage your business 


airlines to po gram panners — such as because th^ 
hotel, car rental firm and credit-card aAs its passi 
companies — to give away to their cus- beforescbed 
tomers as inducements subject to a them away 
percent ta:c, which airlines will collect minutes late, 
on behalf of die tax authorities, llie tax. In die Uni 


because th^ were late at the gate. Cathay 
aaice its pflMrtng ft w 10 Strive 20 Ttunutes 
before scheduled depainue but only lums 
them away if di^ are more than 10 


Red Corner 

Directed by Jon Avnei. U.S. 

Hie war with China continues. I refer to 
kichanl G^'s running battle with the 
political death star that has overrun the 
Buddhists of Tib^ the progressive stu- 
dents of Hananmen Square and other 
dissidents. ”Red Comer,” in which 
Gere plays an American businessman 
wioo^y imprUcned by Beijing author- 


grade the dramatic level Ultimately, a 
timeless, originally constructed film 
about state-l^el injustice — that just 
happens to be about China — would 


hattan.” has regained his fbotii^ with 
“Critical Care.” Most of the perfixinanc- 
es are juicy and inieUigeoL “Oitical 
Core” sboiUd probably be av'oided 


have been the most lasting statement of anyone who is about to go to a hospital or 
all. (Desson Howe. WP) who has recently been dischaiged from 

one. [Stephen Holden. NYT) 


. j WIX Llgilflll yi UIP aUUJUIlUOa^ i OC UUU 

clients which came into effect on Oct. 2, is 


In die United States, where a missed Jties, is a gloves-off bash at Chinese 
connection have a domino effect on intractability and totalitarianism. Jack 
domestic flights, United Airlines isi- Moore (Gere) is on the verge of signing 




8 ^®*^ magazine in Colorado Springs, 
™ saylr^I think the U.S. 

■ . — possibly in the world emment is afraid to tax tiavelers 


. L. r--* ▼vwsaw CViliAJCUL la ouaiu LU iOA UaVCKCI? 

j^ofierbusmesstravelersdirecthigh- directly for FFP awards because 
spera acc^s to the Internet and video of the possibility of a backlash, 
.conferencing their rooms. Hie What may hap^ is that air- 
■hotel h« rewired ewh room on the sixth lines will pay the tax on behalf 
jlooT With nber-optic cable that links die of partners and then charge an' 
room to w Internet provider thus avoid- deeming an award a **redemptii 
1 \ swichboard and rip-off Peterses reckons that 40 pe 

, ■wlepbone rates. Guests can access the miles earned by the average frequent 
^lOTet ins^tly through a traditional fUercomefromFFPpartneis — growing 
dial-up modem that you find in most to about 57 percent over the n 
hotel rooms. V ou plug your laptop into a years. Airlines around the work 
special socket, like you would a hair ahout SIJS htllinn hv selltno i 


west Airlines estimates that late 
arrivals cost it around $36 mil- 
lion in lost revenue a y ear due to 
late-aiiiving passei^ers re- 
booking on rival carriers. 


the biggest telecommunications deal 
ever made between a Western company 
and the Chinese govemmeoL He goes to 
a bar to celebrate. A beautiful woman 
catches his eye. He takes her back to his 
place. Hi^ have a wild, passionate 


Critical Care 

Directed by Sidney Lumet. L'.S. 

Meet Dr. Butz. the natty. Scotch-swilling 
chief resident at a major metropolitan 
hospital Pbyed with a gruff avuncularity 
by a gray-haired, almost unrecognizable 
Albert Brooks in “Cridcal Care,” Sidney 
Lump’s bracingly funnv' satire of the 
medical establishment, Butz is the smug, 
genial persmiificalion of modem mcdicm 
greed, incompetence and amorality. Su^ 
fering from chronic short-term memory 
loss becauseof his drinking, Butz doesnH 


Vive la Republique! 

Directed by Eric Rochani. France. 

bunch of jobless strays — a single 
father, divorced mother, communist mil- 
itant — decide to make their own polit- 
ical party without any real platform or 
ideolog}'. Hie result is a sort of lonely 
heans'club. with lots of loose phik^ 
sophizing, and banter One woman si- 
multaneously bed.s a Jew and an Arab, 
which makes her feel, she says, like the 
Holy Land. This joshing with racism and 


of the possibility of a backlash. \ I y f/A booking on rival carriers. night. He wakes up. he's covered in lossbecauseofhisdrinking,Butzdoesn’i Holy Land. This joshing with racism and 

What may happen is that air- I Japan Airlines seems to take a blood and Ciliinese cops are shouting at recall summoning Dr. Werner Ernst social issues is meant to keep the vehicle 

lines pay the tax oti behalf more rekuted view. ‘*We don't him. Hiere might as well be a banner (James Spader), a talented second-year afloau but what exactly is being con- 

of partners and then charge anyone ro- seedusasainaj<tfpFOblem.wedon'thave credit across the screen that says “SET resident, into his office, but once the veyed here? Apart from ihe ac^ — 
deeming an atwairi a **r wd#^prifin fiM > " an ytiTql deadline ** imytB Kaiw Tumer^ a UP!” Accusedof murderinghisonetime voong physician has plopped himself Hippolyte Ginudot, Atnien Kelif, Gad 
Peterses reckons that 40 percent of JALspOkeswmnan in London. “If people lover, Moore finds himself imprisoned tJown, Butz turns him into a captive audi- Elnialeb. Roschdy ^m — who do won- 

miles earned by the average frequent seem like being late, our staff will go in a eouniry with a conviction rate of 99 ence for his creepy Darwinian screeds, ders with a thin script, there is no basic 


seem like being late, our staff vw go in a country with a conviction rate of 99 
looking for th^ — Japanese will be percent and which — to add insult to 


that you find in most to abont 57 percent over the next two sb<mmg; Brits will be in the pub — mjuiy — will charge hk family the cost 
It plug your laptop into a years. Ai rti w-g am iind thg. world earned havmo located their hagg ready to off-load of the bullet that will kill him. Moore is 

like VOU would a hair ahnut S:i hfllinn hu c<k11fno m.lM if wrwi’t thA niane. alcn forced 40 accent the services of 9 


(frier, to send and receive e-mails, con- 
nect to the Internet or (he company “in- 
tranel” back at the office. 

; Paul Slijer, marketing director at (be 
Britannia, says: “What we've 
done is bypass the m ode m by ^ 
installing a 'pure cable net- jir> 
work’ within the hotel that goes 
straight out to the Web a 
server in the basement This rJ ' 
gives an unparalleled high- 
speed link behveen your room 
and yew office. Whiro you send an e- 
& mail it's instantaneous, no dialin g gp, 
? youjusthittheseodkey.Wehaveafixed 
charge of £50 [$84] per stay, which 


you would a hair about $U hillinn by selling miles to if necessary. We won’t delay the plane, also forced to acc^ the services of a 


various partners. “We can expect to see 


partners reducing the number of airline mintire. As long as tiie doors are still 
pBOgrams to which t^ belcmg, basic- open!” 
ally to ent their tax liability, ” Pe tersen P-, 

says. “I still think will 1-1 

p grow by about 12 percent in A survey of more than 100 travel 

terms of memb^hip in managers atreoding tire Ammican £jc- 
1998.” Dress TYavel Forum in Frankfurt in Oc- 


But we will throw people in at tire last court-^pointed defuse lawyer. Faced 
mintire. As long as ^ doors are still with certain death, no ri^ts. horrible jail 
onen!*' conditions and Uroited visitation with his 


Mileage junkies are familiar 
with the doom-laden terms 


A survey of more than 100 travel 
managers atreoding tire Ammican Ex- 
press lYavel Forum in Frankfurt in Oc- 
tober revealed: 

• 73 percent forecast an increase in 
the number of business trips ceeex the 
next five years; 


lawyer. Moore begins the long and pain- 
ful (SDcess of scratching his way back to 
fr^om and life. That means uncov- 
ering a conspiracy and getting a gov- 


down, Butz turns him into a captive audi- 
ence for his creepy Darwinian screeds. 
Even when Werner is desperately needed 
in the hospital's intensive care unit, Butz 
won 't let him go until he has made sure the 
patient in need of care is fiiUy insured. 
Butz is one of many amusin^y creepy' 
medical caricatures who inhabit this high- 
piich^ social satire, whose scathing hu- 
mor recalls “Network,” the direnor's 
brickhit assault on television. Werner, 
who absorbs these grimly funny lessras. 
evolves into the film's unlikelv moral 


eminent couit to accept it as grounds for center. Bm ncx content simply to satirize 


acquittal. In real life, this guy's dead 
ali^y. In “Red Comer.” he has — 
how can 1 put this? — a fighting chance. 
Gere makes a believable victim-hero, a 


"Eimiration Dates,” “Capacity Con- • 62 percent eiqiect the cost of travel red-blooded American who leams to 


'Blackout Periods” when it to increase too; 


comes to redeeming miles fm- fugitive 
awards. More t^itimistic is miles and 


gives you unlimited use: yciu can stay . money, which enables travelers short of 
on-line for six hours at a time if you miles for an award to top diem up with a 

'vwt.” special low-cost fare. *75 percent believe tlret “i 

“Business travelers face the chai- United Aiilines, for exanmle, offeis working” — doing the job back 
lenge of trying to use a powerful l^tc^ Mileage Plus members a mamA-trip from office as well as on the rotui — ’ 
with advanced graphics and multimedia Paris to New York fv 20,(XK) miles (in- ctuctal to corporaie produptivi^. 
applications with a slow 2SK standard of the rvinna] 50,000 miles) plus p. 

modem on standard phone lines.” says 1,175 francs (about $200); 2,000 fraiics to ^ 

James Smith, Europ^ director of net- Vegas; 2,900 francs to Hawaii for Travelers who consider hotel 
works at Intel in London. “The problem travel until I d an d from Jan. 10 to bars (along with hotel ptume ch^. 
is the time it takes to download complex MarchSl.TWA’si^niembeiscancash a legalized rorra hi 

files at rip-off hotel prices. As the rich- in 15,000 miles phis $299 for a robbery (SIO for a sm^ 

ness of ue data you need to transfer round-trip award from the United 
increases, a big file becomes faor- States to curopeuntil March 15. I if 
rendously long — you <an get into « ^Wr 


r fugitive '• 80 percent believe video cooferen- 
niles and cing will coiqilanent business travel: 

*8 short of *50 percent wilt be adopting interactive 

up wiA a technology over the next 10 years, and 

• 75 percent believe tiret “rat^ile 
lie, offeis working” — doing the job back in the 
1 -trip from office as well as on the rotui — will be 


fight for freedom in the starkest of spots. 
But if it’s appealing to many poUtic^Iy, 
it's also dramatically thin. If movies 
such as “Red Comer” are to direct our 
attention to injustice, they need to up- 


hours. Plus the problem of keeping a 
•solid connection.] get about 100 e-mails 
Va day: some are short messages: otiters 
are in the megabyte size. Ima^e down- 
loading for one and half hours, which is 
what happens, you ‘ve nearly got the file, 
then there's a ^tch on tire line and 
you've lost it ail. The Britannia gives 


The Britannia gives 


■you a g(xid clear lOQ-roegabit d^tal 
connection like you 'd have at the office. 
4t's the first hotel 1 know to offer any- 
thing like this.” 


. Travelers are unhappy about a new 
-provision in U.S. tax law that makes 
'Frequent Flier lYogram miles sold by 


T.ALES OF H.P. LOVECRAFT 

Selected and introduced by Joyce Carol 
Oates. 329 pages. S23, The Ecco Press. 

THE ANNOTATED H.P. 

lo\t:craft 

^diied hv S.T. Joshi. 360 pages. SI 2.95. 
^Deil. 

Reviewed by Douglas E. Winter 

F ear luiks in the shadows of Amer- 
ican letters, its pleasures plebeian 
and guilty. The "genre” fiction of hor- 


round-trip award from tire United 
States toEuropeuntil March 15. J'Ji 

□ 

Laie-depaiting fliglus can be f |( 
tire fault of latfi-arriving pas^- f 1 
gets. In a bid to improve on-time 
p^onnance, more airlines are drying 
boarding to passengers who tnm tm late 
at tire gate after having checked in. unir- 
ates airline has introduced a lO-minute 
rule. After checking in. passengers must 
be ready to board no later tiian lOminutes 
before departure or risk being left behind. 


Travelers who consider hotel mini- 
bars (along with hotel ptume charges) as 
a legalized rorra of highway 
robbery (SIO for a sm^ bottle 

of miii^ water, Orea Cola or 

local beer, $20 for a quarter- 
bottle of wine or $15 for a 
'7^ miniature Scotch) will wel- 
2^ /] come a decision by Shangri- 
^ I U La, the Asian hotel ^oop, to 
replace minitars at its -Lstai 
Traders hotels {roperties with refriger- 
ators stocked with whatever the guest 
wants — at ''retail prices.” 

Joanne Watkins, group director of 
communications at Shon^-La in Hong 
Kong, says: **At check-in, for example, 
if a guest wants beer, mineral water, a 


This is possible tw a new “b^gage sports drink or whiskey, we buy and 

reoxiciliation system^' which enables charge at tiie retail price. We save by not 


bags already loaded to be tracked and 
({□ickly removed from the hold. Cathay 
Pacific draied boarding Co ],3]3 pas- 
sengers in tire first three montiis of 1997 


BOOKS 


ingly, Edgar Allan Poe cast a moihid 
shadow over his first mature story, ' "The 
Tomb*' (1917),andtiieaptiy titled "The 
Outsider” (1921), an atmospheric 


cha^ at tiie retail price. We save by not 
having to stock, control and replenish 
the mini-bar. We see this as an added- 
value sendee,- part of (he room cost, not a 
profit-center.” 


"Tales of R P. Loveciaft,” selected 
and mttoduced by Joyce Carol Oates, 
presents 10 stories othowise available 
in paperback uid Arkham House hard- 


the .American health core system. “Crii- 
jea] Care” recklessly snimbles from social 
criticism into the spiritual realm b>' ha\'ing 
comical agents from heaven and hell ap- 
pear ai the bedsides of the dying. ‘ ‘Critical 
Care," like “Netwotk.” is an extremely 
tal^' nrev'ie that goes all over the place but 
takes a giddy pride in its \'erbosii>'. LumcL 
who stumbl^ badly with his last film, the 
miscasL overacted “Night Falls on'NIan- 


ARTS GUIDE 


■ AUSTRIA 

VlBNMA 

Jftwish Muamim, tel; (1) 535- 
0431, dosed Saturdays. To Jan. 

18: “Max Liebennann, 1847- 
1935." Documents the German 
painter and etcher's output be- 
tween 1900 and 1914. when 
Uebermann (ocused on scenes 
from the bourgeoiae. The exhib- 
ition also features a selection of the 
artsi's collection of Impressionist 
paintings shown together for the 
first time since they were confis- 
cated by the Nazis. 

B BRITAIN 

London 

National GaH^, tat; (171) 747- 
2885, Open daily. To Feb. 1 ; “Mak- 
ing ^ Meaning: Hoib6in'& Am- 
bassadors." The exhibition ex- 
piotes the personal and polilicaJ 
background to the commissioning 
Of this pfeture of two French rep- ^ : . rv > t j- 

fusentativBs a( the court Of Henry Beckmanns The [Sight on e.xhibtUon in Dussetaorf. 


Elnialtfb. Roschdy Zem — who do won- 
ders with a thin script, there is no basic 
direction in the driver's seat Colitie Ser- 
rault made ^orp social comedy in 
“Trois hommes et un couffin" and “La 
crise” because she came from a political 
age and point of view, with th^s to say 
at^ut se.xual and social differences. 
Rochani, who started hU career with 'Un 
monde sfins pitie." seems still (o be 
wandering in the 'SOs, with his heart in 
the right place, but without focus. You 
never grasp what these characters are 
after in their endless reunions that look 
like an ad for the United Colors of Be- 
netron. Or why the women, played b>' 
.Aure .Alika, the Holy Land heroine. 
Rorence Pemel. an ex-communist who 
has lost nothing of her rigidity, and Math- 
ilde Scigner. who describes herself as an 
“idiot. ” lake secondary roles lo feckless 
men. Without edge or destination, the 
comedy runs in circles, aimless, and fi- 
nally, frustrating. [Joan Dupont. IHTl 



M NETHERLANDS 
AuSTBIDiMi 

Stedeliik Museum, tel: (20) 5732- 
91 1 , Open daily. To Dec. 1 4: "Gab- 
nel Orozco: Recordings and Draw- 
ings." In films which he calls re- 
cordings. the Mexican artist (bom 
1962) scans daily life in the big 
cities or unusual combinattons ol 
objects and situations. Similarly, 
his photographs are observations 
of accidental sculptural situations. 

m S wT I T Z E R L A ifp^ 

MARTIfiNV 

Fondation Pierre Gianadda. tel: 
(26) 22-39-78, open daily. Con- 
tinuing/To Nov. 1 1 : “Joan Miro." A 
retrospective of paintings, gou- 
aches and watercoiors. sculptures 
and cerarriics by the Spanish paint- 
er (1893-1983). 

■ uiTited states 


Vlil by the IBth-century German 

artist. Also on display are manuscripts, prints ings by La Tour U 
and astronomical instruments. InstitutduMbnc 

TUte Gallecy, tel: (171) 6B7-60(X), open daily, closed Mondays. 
Continuing^ To Jan. 4: "The Age of Rossetti, de la Reine de S 
Bume-dones and Walls: Symbolism in Britain, history, culture ar 
1B60-1910." Works by the British artists and 3,000 years B.C. 
thefr European contemporaries. 


ings by La Tour that have Oisappeared. 
Institut du Monde Arabe, tel; 01-40-51 -38-38. 
closed Mondays. To Feb. 28: “Ydmen: Au Pays 
de la Reine de Saba.” An exploration into the 


Metropolitan Museum of Art tel; 
(212) 570-3791. dosed Mondays. To Feb. 22: 
“Richard Pousette-Dart, 1916-1992.“ Paint- 
ings and woilis on paper by the American Ab- 
stract Expressionist. The exhibition follows his 


jeremiad in which the narrator's home- covers. Hie choices are not .saiTTming: 
coniingismetwitiitberevelatiQDthathe Lovecraft's -canon is small and iocoo- 


is a walking corpse. 

For the next zO years Loveciaft me- 
tuidored wiA the sad nobility of the 
intrepid amateur. His prose was in- 


sistent, and tile short list is vijuialiy 
inevitable. The significance here is 
Oates's imprimatur, and her welcome 
insights place Loveciaft firmly vritiiin an 


tensely self-conscions. With his fey and Ame r ican Oothir rrariition, us ing “gotii- 


feverish narrators, imaginaiy texts and 
histories, and tfaesaurus-baiting adject- 
ives. Loveciaft was a master of affect- 


k” in an honest axuUyticai sense and nor 
as mere sugar to make the bad medicine 
of horror go down. Hie collection is a 


ror and the supernatural is Cain to tire ation. With his msis^t viuon starting point for newcomers and 

Abel of literary fiction, maligned and cnation — whether familial or, m to doubting academics, 
maverick, unill time heals its wounds finer moments, cosirac Lovecran s Aiuiotated H.P. Ixnrecraft'' is 

and makes it classic, if not literature. appeal (particularly to ado lescent read- edited and introduced by tire pre-em- 
' Consider, if you will, ihe facts in the ers) was, and remains, proiouno. Lovecraft scholar. S.T. Joshi. 

case of the “Gentleman from Provid- ^though he tolera^ winmeraa] jg genuinely obsess^ with Lovc- 

•ence.” the haunted savant known as mpjats, uicludiog a stun gl^twnung craft’s life and work, and to fonnidable 
H.P. Lovect^l 1890-1937). for Harry Houdini . Lovecrw s apologia suffers only from the heft <rf its 

Bom to Rhode Island gentry, Howard w aI His book offers an informative 

Phillips Lo'.’ecrafi suffered through a fideoce about (if not disdain ror) tit and four well-known sttnies; 

toildhood that reads like a recipe for the “Hie Rats in the Walls,” ”H« Color 

%iakinaofa horror writer. Before Love- , Outof Space,” "The DunwichHorior” 

craft’s eighth birthday, to father “f® T Lov^iaft’s masterpiece, "At the 

died,app^ntiyofsyphilis,aftery^m Mountains of Madness.” 

a menSl hospital. His emooon^y un- nes “ 5^ The fear that Lovecraft pursued, and 

staWeino£her:wliowcMiIddieinthesanie ^ celebrated, was intensely ^bmi. Vi- 

asylum, h" ^ ^!S^i™,y^fhis^OTlifc^asthatftU '>>““■ bloodshed and death 

“hideous, and he was piagueo oy re ^ ^ mundane events that rarely ccmcemed 

tuTTent nightmares and dubious, pro^ -^look him; it was the dire prospect of know- 

ably psychosomatic, His stories were oublished in nee- brought to characters 4o the 

rffA^-rbSesr^CTsS^aiid liable media; amate^jonmals and the brink of madn^ and beyrad. Science 
grandfathers busmess reveres a™ maoayin« includine tire now- was to be feared — nor, as u most tales 

death e\-icied mother and son leS«5arv*^t then-ephem^ Weird of tenor, for its Promethean impulses. 

family marision. Lovecraft succumbed to kgendar^ tat tat forte “deadly liehu" which would 


tScs. After a critical nadir in 1945, 

* Ws^orld^Soonihis LovecrafI haunted the underworld rf 

_Dr«^ulbS?JlMnded yoongman was cult fichoil unnl a second ^eranon of 
■f amaterniSs move- readeis.bronghthnnjenewed^^mp; 


was abandoned in favor of rectoion. 

Words became his world. Soon this 
.precocious but wounded young man was 
caught up in the amateur move- 

mem, and his pen evoked the ^e-novel 

tales of the dark fantastic that had m- 
•'' ' trigued him in his teens. Not surpns- 


enanoD — wnciner lanuiiai or, in ms rfnnhring academics, 
finer moments, cosmic — Lovecraft s ..jjjg Annotated H.P. Lovecraft” is 
appeal (particularly to adolescent read- and uitroduced by tire pre-em- 

ers) was, and remains, pirfound. Lovecraft scholar. S.T. Joshi. 

Although be tolera^ commeraal jogj^ jg genuinely obsess^ with Lovc- 
^jects, including a stun ghOTtwniing ^.3 ^ ^ his fonnidable 

lor Harry Houdini. s uigOTt appi^gja suffer only from the heft of its 

^ ra vrae W^ by^s dt SSaaTHis book offcR au bifonualive 

fidence about (rf not disdain for) the ^ weU-kuown stories; 

« -lev.,,,, "Hie Rats in the Walls,” ”H« Color 

Heaita<£mw^ca^,aloM^ Outof Space,” "Hie DunwichHorior” 

““ “t^M pursued, and 

centralironyofhisshonlifewasthaiihis olenw, bloodshed and death ww 
qointesseonW bookish man never saw events that rarely ccmccmed 

fiis fiction in a book. ^ ‘“T 

His stories were published in neg- brought bis c^ierero the 

liable media; amateur journals and the bnnk of madn^ and beyond. Science 
“pulp" magazines, includiiig the now- w** ® be fcar^ 
legTndaiyrbut then-ephemena. Weird of tetror. far its Prornet^ impulses 
tScs. Aei a critical nadir in 1945, tat for its “deadly light, 'which would 
when Edmond Wilson panned his “bad reveal our tnie and quite trivial place in 
taste and bad art” in The New Yorker, the scheme of things. 

Loveciaft haunted the underworld of Ifis fear, like his fiction, is ours, 
cult fiction until a second generation of 

readers brought him renewed popularity Douglas E. Winter, a Washington law- 
and ai last, a cautious venerauon that is yer, writes frequently about honor fic- 
□nderscaed by these two recent cel- don and film. He wrote this for The 


He (Ued of iritestinal cancer, alone and 
impoverished, in 1937, having written 
only a few. but highly memorable, sto- 
ries in the final decade of his life. “From 
even the greatest of horron.' ’ Lovecraft 
wrote, “irony is seldom absent” The 
central irony ofbis shortlife was that this 
quintessentially bookish man never saw 
his fiction in a book. 

His stories were published in neg- 
ligible media: amateur journals and the 
“pulp” magazines, includuig the now- 
legendaxy, but then-ephemeral. Weird 


■ PBMMARK 

CONBMHACEN 

OrtkvpgBRj MuMum, tel: 39-64-11-83, 
dosed Mondays. To Jan. 4; “Frida Kahto." 20 
paintings by the Mexican a/tist (1910-1954). 
Crippled by an accident, Kahlo, the wife of 
muralisl Diego Rivera, usta her suffering body 
as the main theme of her works. 


MansEiLLE 

Uueee Centini, tel: 04-91-54-77-75. dosed 
Mondays. To Jan. 16: “Chajlss Camoin; Re- 
trospective, 1679-1965.’' Paintings, pastels 
and drawings showing the French painter's 
contribution to the development of Fauvism, 
and his reiecllon of Cubism and abstraction. 
LarKfscapes, portraits and still fifes. 

Runs 

Bfbliotheque Nationale de France - Tolbiac, 
tel; 01-53-79-59-59, closed Mondays. To May 
17; “L’Aventure des Ecrituies.’’ An initiation to 
the birth end development of writing: from 
cuneiform to Chitiese ideograms, Arab calli- 
graphy and modem letters. 

Grand Paials, tel; 01-44-13-17-17, dosed 
Tuesdays. Continuing To Jan. 26: “Georges 
de La Tour, 1 593-1 652.” A survey of the French 
painter's works. Also features copies of paint- 


hi^ry.cultureandarlofVbmen.datingbackto evolution from Cubism to mylhic and totemic 
3.000 years B.C. imager/. 

Washinbton 

OBRMAMY Netional Gallery of Ait, tel: (202) 737-4215. 

open daily. To March 1: “Lorenzo Lotto.” A 
Berlin retrospective of the works of the Venetian 

Deutsche Guggenheim, tel: (30) 3^7-4134. Renaissance master (c. 1480-1556). The ex- 


open daily. To Jan. 4: "Visions of Pans: Robert hibition presents 50 paintings in most oi the 
Delaunay's Series. The exhibition fooises on genres in which Lotto worked, such as de- 
vfewsof the St Sevenn church, the Bffel tower votlonal works, altarpieces and portraits. The 


and the rools of Paris seen from the French 
amsfa window. These multiple representations 
of a dngle subject reflect an Impressionist tend- 
ency while hinting at abstraction. 

Dusseldorf 

Kunetsammiung Nonirhein-Westfalen. tel: 
(211) B381-0, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 30: 
"Max Beckmann: Die Nacht." Paintings, draw- 
ings and lithographs by the German painter, 
lithographer and woodcut artist (1B84.1950). 
They are regrouped aieund "Die Nacht," a 
1916-19 canvas that depicts the abduction, 
rape and murder of a family. The war years 
marked Beckmann's fransrtion from Impres- 
sionism to Expressionism. 

■ITALY 

Venice 

PalaBo Grassi, tel: (4 1 ) 522- 1375. open daily. 
Continuingf To Jan. 11; "Expressiontsmo Te- 
desco: Arte e Societa, 1909-1923." Works by 
German Expressionists, including Beckmann, 
Grosz, Kokoschka, Kirchner and Pechstein. 


exhibition will travel to Bergamo, Italy and to 
Paris. 

^"iUROPBAM TOUR 

Orchestre de Paris. Under Semyon Bychkov, 
the Orchestre de Pans performs in Poland 
(Warsaw. Nov. 12 and Poznan, Nov. 13) and 
Germany (Kassef, Nov. 17; Hamburg, Nov. 18; 
Frankfurt, Nov. 20; Freiburg, Nov. 21; Munich, 
Nov. 22 and Stuitoah. Nov. 23). Leon Fteisher, 
piano, and Viktoria Mullova, violin, are the so- 
loists. The program includes works by Berfioz. 
Ravel. Mendelssohn, Shostakovich, Schnittke 
and Strauss. 

ClOSiNC SOON 

Nov. 9: LVIl Venice Biennal. Venice. 

Nov. 9: “Picasso." Scottish National (Sallery 
of Modem Ait, Edinburgh. 

Nov. 9; “Whistler en Holland." Rijksrnuseum, 
Amsterdam. 

Nov. 12; "Alfons Mucha, I'Espnt de i'Art Nou- 
veau." Hotel de Villa, Brussels. 


OPERA SEASON 


ebratoiy voluines. 


Washington Post. 


bridge 


By Alan Truscott 

H AMMAMET. Tunisia, 
—The world 
bridge championships ended 
Sativday wioi the presenta- 


In their final, they defeated 
Oiina by 60. Hie hro^ 
gjedals were won by. another 
Ainericaa team, headed hy 
yathie Wei-Sender. 

The Transnational Op« 
Teams attracted an eniiy of 74 


short of an opening bid. 

Mouiel for France was isL- 
spir^ to lead a club, which 
prepared for a niff that could 
not be prevented. Hiere was 
nothing Hamman (reuld do, 
and he chose to lead the atre 
and another tnis^. West 


. daiuroay wiui u». and was Won py ana anouicr uuu^, tvcbi 

. tion of trophies. Fra^, Bnraav Dano de won, <»rf*ed the diamond ace 

resented by Pa^Oie^ S ^Sii of and shifted to a epade, H» 

Michd Perron. Frank Mill- ftero ^ defense was now sure to setae. 

. - ion. Alain Levy. l^^KSvaSi^ofPo- a spade nick before Souih 

Mouiel and Chrisnan Man, ^Kr^fszKtfM couGmaneuver a discard on 

.'-’won the Bermuda Bowl ftff ^“S-..,-9j.^ere crucial the diamond king. 

. . OpenTeams. Inthefin^ytl^ „„^S^toincliidS In the replay, shown in the 
. '•‘.plaved brilUan^- m wmmM 


defeose. East's club shift was 
won in durnsiy and a heart 
finesse disposed of the king. 
Bairee gained 12 imps. 

NORTH (O) 

*AJ 

V984 

Opr 

«K1»9742 


WEST 
*q963 
f K 2 
«A953 
*«63 


EAST 

*K!0873 
OQ103 
» J1084 


A sampling of the produc- 
tions for the J997-8 season at 
some qf the world's majoropera ' 
houses. 

Aittweiw am Ghent 
Oe Vlaames Opera, tel: (32-3) 
233-66-85 (Antwerp) and (32-9) 
225-24-25 (Ghent). Attemaiing 
parformancee in bPtb dlies, De 
VlBBinee Opera feaUires new pro- 
ductions of “La Clemenza di Tito" 
and “Rigofeno.” Co-preductions 
With other European houses in- 
clude 'Tristan und Isolde" as well 
as Handel's "Semele’’ and 
Massenet's “Cendritlon,'' both dir- 
ected by Robert Carssn and con- 
du^ by Man: Minkowski. The 
season concludes with Turan- 
dot.” 

Bonn 

Oper Bonn, tel; [49-228} 77-36- 
6S.''D8S Rhefngoid" has Max Wlt- 
tges as Wotan and Hans^eorg 
Moser as Fafnen "Le Nozze dl 
Rgaro”: '‘Madama Butterfly,'' vnih 
Leona Mitchell and Ybko 
Watanabe attamaiing in the rote of 
Clo-Cf>Seri: Bernstein’s "West 
Side Story," conducted by Andress 
Kowatewtte: Shoeiakovich's “Lady 
Macbeth of Mtsenek" and verdfs 
“Falstaff." New productions fea- 


and Wotan ("Die Walkuere"), and 
Thomas Moser ine tlile role in “Lo- 
hengrin." 

Lausanne 

IML Opera Lausanne, lel: (Al- 
ai) 310-16-00. Season Opens with 
Beethoven’s “Leonore." Also on 
the program. ''L'Bisir d'Amore" 
and Cimarosa's “11 MatriinoniQ Se- 
graU}" conducted by Jonathan 
Darlington: '’Idomeneo," conduc- 
ted by Evelino Pido and directed by 

Jonathan Miller. 

Lille 

Opera de Lille, lel: (33) 03-20-55. 
4^61. Humperdinck's “Hansel 
und Gretel" (Febniary)'. The Ry- 
ing Dutchman." conducted by An- 
dreas Welser with David Pittman- 
Jennings as the Dutchman (April); 
Kurt Weill's "Mahagonny,” con- 
ducted by Marcello Panni (June). 

Munich 

Bayertsche Staatsoper, tel: (49- 
89)21'65-19^. New productions 
this season Indude “Elektra," con- 
ducted by Peter Schneider; “Die 
Redermaus," conducted by Si- 
mone Young with Cheryl Stoder; 
Michael Tlppeu's "The Midsum- 
mer Marriage, '' directed by Mark 
Eida-. 'Yites ihr Wolir has been 
commissicnned from Manfred Tro- 


uberfioete" and "Die Fleder- 
maus." 

Seville 

Teatro de la Mae^ranza, tel: (34- 
95) 422-6573. WSmer Herzog di- 
rects a production of ‘Tannhauser" 
(November); Predenck Burchinal. 
Sylvie Valayre and Ferrudo Pur- 
lanetto appear in “Nabucco," con- 
dueled by Maurizio Arena (Decem- 
ber). Performances of Rossini's 
“L'ltaliana in Algeri" .and “11 Bar- 
biere" are planned in February. 


Iietie"; Mirella Freni and llaria Gal- 
gani alternate in the role of Tatyana 
in “Eugene Onegin.” and Fran- 
coise fillet sings the titte role in 
Strauss's “Ariadne au( Naxos." 

ZUWGH 

Opemhaus Zurich, tel: (41-1) 
266-66-66. “Cosi Fan Tutte," “The 
Ma^c Rule" and “Carmen" are 
direcled by Jean-Pierre Poneile; 
Schuben's “Aiionso und Estrella," 
and Offenbach's “La Perichole" 
conducted by Nikolaus Hamon- 


Mardi and April, and Alain Lorn- court; Verdi's “Emani," conducted 


bard ccnducte Turandot” (May), by Nelio Santi with Neil ShicoH, 

Ruggiero Raimondi and Giorgio 
Turin ^tneanaro; Rafael Frubeck de 

Teatro Regio Torino, tel; (39-11) Burgos conducts Ermanrto Wolf- 
548-000. [jeonard Bernstein's Ferran's “Sly," The season ends 
“Candide" is conducted by John with Puedni's "La Fanoulla del 
Maucerl and directed by Robert, West," directed by David Pount- 


Fonune; Giuseppe Sabbatinl and 
Naney Gustafson sing the title 


roles in Gounod's "Romeo ei Ju-. Renato Bruton. 


ney, conducted by Riccardo 
Cf^lfy, with Stephanie Friede and 





i '.playedbrilUantlj'in w™^ He bidMng diagram, foe was sim- 

■ byiTimpsogainstiheU^ Bob Ham- ilar. with foe Dmty ^ven- 

States squad led by Nick North and South respec- iionagammuse.ButtotiTO 
NicleelI.^oiway won the die M was a spa*. ^ 

, bronze medals. . ^s^uural as it ap- Levy, tetolarer.wM able to 


coaveo* 
rhifi rime 


SOUTH 
OS4 
7A J873 
OK76 
6AQ5 


tore 'Ihe Magic Rule," “Nabucco" jahn end Claus Henneberg. Zubin 


and HumperdnctCs "Hansel und 
Gnstei." 

Hahbuhg 

Hambur^che Stasteoper, tel: 


Bod] itdes were vubenble. The (49^} 35-15<55. The season 


bidding; 


ens Tean 
American 


rMiwncan «ao». «***^.— u/ax usine me unuy -r : — --y 

Breed. Tobi Sdkolow, Lisa It a andledaspadetohispartetfs 

Berkowiiz. Marinesa Letiaa, in JJdng. Hiai was the end of the 

RttfuJi Montin and Jill Meyers, strong raise m, ncanA. 


North 

E&si 

South 

West 

Paxs 

Pass 

1 9 

Pan 

a* 

Pass 

39 

Pass 

39 

Peas 

49 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led the spttie three, 

r 


runs to June 1998. Ingo Metz- 
ms^er conducts new productions 
of Vsrdl’e “Macbeth," Paul Du- 
kas's “Arlane et Barbe-Bteue,” 
“Lohengrin" and Britten's "Peter 
Grimes/' Simon Estes sings the 
title role in "The Plying Dutchman" 


Mehta conducts 'Tristan und 
teoide," with Waltraud Meier, 
Sie^rted Jerusalem and Kurt 
Moil. 

Oslo 

Den Norsks Opera, tel: (47) 22- 
42-94-75. At the Oslo Konsert- 
hauB, Afrung-Whun Chung con- 
ducts “Don ^ilos." The season 
also features “ll Barbiere di 
SIvfglle." Turandot." “Satorne,” 
“Un Balio In Maschera," "Die Za^ 


^iccfyter 
C' l \ c“ “ 

tcviK' or- \ja.\frrmomu' r.tfm 


ggjlENDEZ-VOUS wrm A VINTNER 

Cooking denum^tration and wine lading 
Vina ^Aidaee, Hagel eS PiLf 

Tbedday, September J6: 7:00-10.-00 p.m. 350FP 
Par raservatiotu, Ul^bone 1 014326 30 50 

! if 



PAGE 14 














































































I 





sponsored SEf TKJN 


INTERNATEONAJL HERALD TRIBim, FRIDAS^ NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


SPONSORED iJECnO.N 


' TUNISIA 



'DOW 

RnislaMoajiiora 
pmponasaadk&Hacb 
fMmClockwIselhimtop 
lefbaOferinnseii, 
consoHatf TMsia’s Amm 
irngBS, equal oppmtunity 
in <fte ctassTDom amf tte 
fSlyoFScleaGas. 



Building Solidly for the Future 

The last decade has seen economic growth and social evolution under President Ben AIL 


I t was 10 years ago today 
that President Zine El 
Abidioe Ben Ali began 
leading this Arab nation of 9 
million people in a Uberal 
direction, which significant- 
ly transformed the entire 
spectrum of Tunica's social, 
economic and political struc- 
ture. 

Elected to office in 1989 
and again in 1994 after he 
took over from ailing nation- 
al founding father Habib 
Bouiguiba in 1987, Mr. Ben 
Ali has not only taken steps 
to bring Tunisia increasin^y 
into the European economic 
sphere, but also to prepare it 
for the competitive global 
economic mmkcts of tomor- 
row. 

The president's progranu 
^have created economic 


growth, reduced iziftation 
and encouraged a fiee-mar- 
ket economy while elevating 
to national priorities healtii 
care, education, employ- 
ment, regional de^lqiment, 
women's rights and the erad- 
ication of poverty. 

Ongoing transitioi) 

It is ceit^y not tiie first 
transition since the countty 
gained indq>endence in 
1956, when Bouiguiba 
became Tunisia’s first pres- 
ident 

''Thnista has successfully 
and pHsacefiiily surmounted a 
number of changes dining 
the past 40 years without 
bloodshed or economic col- 
lapse,” says Faouzi Bel 
Kahia, president of the 
Banque de Tunisie, who has 
bem active as a government 


minister and business exec- 
utive during past 25 
years. “We have witnessed 
collective socialism in the 
1 960s, an ovemi^t switch to 
a c^Halist econoiny in the 
’70s, the peaceful change- 
over ftom the country’s mst 
presideDt in the '80s and a 
radical economic program 
married to social progress in 
the ’90s.” 

The country, sandwiched 
between Libya and Algeria 
on the Mediterranean Sea, is 
one of the most We^emized 
and progressive in North 
Aftica. Seventy perc^t of 
the peculation is considered 
mi(^ class, over 80 percem 
of the population own tiieir 
own homes aoid the number 
of people living in poverty 
has declined ficim 13 percent. 


in 1 980 to 6 percent today. Its 
social services are among the 
best in the r^on. 

’’Human rights, social ser- 
vices and personal dignity 
are not just slo^im in con- 
temporary Tunisia,” says 
Minister of Finance Mo- 
hammed Jerl “They affect 
everyone, from working 
women in the capital to tiie 
unemployed In remote vil- 
lages. And they go hand in 
witii our economic pro- 
gress.” 

Mr. Ben Ali’s broad 
powers — which allow him 
to appoint the prime min- 
ister, the chiefs of the armed 
forces and the cabinet, 
which he reshuffled last 
montii — and popular man- 
date have envied him to 
proceed with little opposi- 


Tunisia in Figures 

POPUATKM 

9 million 

Population growth rate 
1.6 percent 

Per CAPTTA INCOME 

2,070 dinars 
Economic GROWTH 
6.9 percent (1996) 

Average economic growth, 1987-96 
4.5 percent 


tioiL In fact, his Constitu- 
tional Democratic Rally 
party won 144 of 163 par- 
Uamentaiy seats in 1994, 
witii die remainder shared 
by four opposition parties. 

Electoral refonns have 
bem announced to enable the 
opposition to gain more seats 
in bofo p^amentaiy and lo- 
cal elections. Though flte 
president faces vixtu^y no 


effective political opposition, 
he must still confiront a num- 
ber of social and economic 
challenges. 

These include increased 
awareness of human rights, 
job creation for }raunger 
workers and the retraining of 
die workforce to cope with 
the modernization arid inter- 
nationalization of the econ- 
omy. • . 


4 


Historical Influences, Contemporary Ties 


The remains of the great cityetate of 
earths^, founded by Qu^ Dido in 814 BC 
and today one of Tunisia's most visited 
historical tourist attractions, are more tl^ 
just the vestiges of a bygone civilization 
along the Mediterranean Sea. The archae- 
ologlcai promenade ^rfsltors take here today 
also symbolizes the manner In which Tunisi- 
ans have long Interacted with other cultures 
and peoples. 

When Carthage fell in the second century 
BC, the Romans began ailingthis part of the 
Meditenanean. Later, they were traced 
Vandals, B^ntines and Turks, whose Ot- 
tomwT beys @)vemed TXinisla in the 16th 
century, when it became the first Arab coun- 
try with a constitution. . 

One of the most momentous evente in 
Tunisian hlstoiy was foe introdoc^ ons- 
lam in foe seventh century when Carfoap 
was captured by Hassan Ibn NoomaneJI^ 
city of Kalrouan became foe center of re- 
ligious life and foe site of one of Islam s 
most ancient and holiest mo^uM. 

The foreign Influences, indudirig tte «- 
pension of Islam and foe construction of foe 


Zitouna Mosque in Tbnis In the e^hth and 
ninth centuries, contiruied when France de- 
clared foe country a protectorate in 1881 
and ended only when foe country gained 
independence on March 20, 1956. It was 
proclaimed a republic a year later. 

The import and impact of these external 
relationships Is often celebrated today. This 
year, for example, Tunisia is obseiving the 
200th year of its diplotneitic relationship 
with foe United States, which began when 
the two countries signed a treaty in August 
1797. “U.S.-Tunislan ties continue to flour- 
ish under foe leadership of PresiderTt Ben 
Ali,” said U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright during an observance of the bi- 
centennial in Vlfoshington last month. “Our 
militaiies work closely together to preserve 
promote regiorrai stability in a very dan- 
gerous neighborhood, and U.S. businesses 
seek opportunities for investment in the 
Tunisian markeL” 

One of foe numerous Tunisian Web sites 
on foe Internet Is 'Tunisia and foe UrAed 
States: 200 Years of Diplomatic Relations” 
(www.tLin'isiaonl[ne.corn/blcentennia!). • 


Industry Shifts Gears 

A modernization program will make companies more competitive. 


I n late 1995, the government launched a 
pi x?g i ‘ am to. promote industrial modern- 
ization and increase foe competitiveness 
of Tunisian companies as foey prepare to 
meetfoe c^lenge office trade with Europe. 
Ibe cost of the piog i am was estimated at 
S2.5 billion. 

The program, known as mise a niveau de 
I'industrie, or “bringing industry up to 
speexl” affect ^loiit 2,000 manufoc- 
turing companies between 19^ and 2001. 

The overall approach is to improve pro- 
ductivity, product quality and marketing 
tiirou^ beoer management. Conqranies 
have also co mmission ed consultants to draw 
up plans to modernize their rnana^menL 
tecimology and financial structure. 

' Twenty percent offoe investment is being 
supplied by a special fund created by tire state 
forough foe contributions of sp^ific indus- 
tries, with foe remainder provided by tire 
affected companies. 

“We have sufficient time to modernize 
virtually every conqrany in the country,” 
says Minister of Industry Ben Abdallah, not- 
ing that S430 million been spent on die 


program during the past IS months. “The 
ultimate challenge will be to improve foe 
quality of prcxlucts and form numerous in- 
ternational partnerships.” 

Support from the World Bank 
The World Bank reiterated its support for foe 
Tunisian development progr^ in Hong 
Kong last September in talks with Minister of 
International Cooperation and Foreign In- 
vestment Mohan^ Ghannouchi. He was 
told tire bank would continue financing proj- 
ects and programs aimed at impro\ing the 
economy's conqietitiveness by backing re- 
forms, reinforcing infiastructure and d^el- 
oping human resources. 

- The gradual decline of import tariffs, 
which have been a key source of revenue, 
will test the success of the program. 

In addiripn. the government will be chal- 
lenged to maintain social programs — in- 
cluding foe development of personnel to 
promote health care, education and training 

— which will require 62 percent of the tot^ 
management expenditures of foe 1998 
budget • 






, - .u. nf international cooperation and forage investment, has been an active force in the Ben Ali government diuing the 

^ the impact of You somedmes face criticism Jhm relatively painless tnamer. We be- alization cannot be introduced 

an/social outsiders regarding some of your lieve in a consensus approach that overaight,butatfoisrf^foeyarean 
Tumsmi political positions. requires frequent debate but then re- irreversible process. We can afford to 

of Tunisia We have opted, as a nation, for a suhs in substantial pubUc support It go relatively ^lowly berause of foe 
T^epartiaio^ iiKJdelofsocietylhatistoleraitt. open has worked in fiscal, educational and health of our econonjyjhisc^md 

The rates of and oriented toward progress. We financial spheres, and now it is gov- progressive approach has enabled us 
have in- promote political pluralism, but we eming our global economic ap- to attract foreign mvestment and 
??!Si Se orc®^ do not want to put our overall eco- proach. 

focre’s a foriving nomic and democratic direction into Even though we want to be eco- 
debt has aecim^w^ -ennomv is question. We also prefer a gradual noimcally competitive, we are more 
tounsrn business md^ e<^y IS ^^gy^j^tionaiy approach to radical coiKterned abort foe social, enviion- 

on a steady • chanae mental and cultural aspects of our 

though some critics contend choices Hov^. foe 

social advances, wnicoiw^- y^rms are not mov- change has been considerable during 

entire comyy m quickly *e past dec^a amreared to mmy 

and created a middJe c ^ ^ere are fiequent criticisms con- other countries in this part of foe 

dudes 70 percent of . . 


Cooparsflbn and Are^ 

IrnesImetiMotimed 

GbannouchL 


SdS^to'^'ointhispro^ cem^ourapi^h.&raefthikit world. 

I®*" «u« nnon rtllT TWaT- 


too slow, some think it too ri^. We 


we must to ]iave decided to move progressively at which you are privatizing i 

j^gtsandlibaap^''®"^^ * ^fo jgjjjgrdian opt for solutions that may companies and liberalizing die 

ous accords. be disruptive. Hiis enables us to ad- o/m? 

the European Ltoon 9^, manage social change in a 

enable us w do tilts. ^ 


our global economic _ .. 

achieve popular backing for privat- 
ization. 

Privatization will be accelerated 
when larger companies, like foe ce- 
ment Eims, are sold to foe private 
sector in the near future. 

What impact have your economic 
measures had on jbragn invest- 
ment? 

The role of foreign firms will con- 

Wittt can you sorv about the pace tinue to increase forough participa- 
privadzing fniblic tion in foe privatization effort, where 
econ- we are locricing for associations with 
^ strong industiial groups and in direct 

Privati^on and economic liber- investment • 




f' Bizerte 1' of 

JJunis. \ 

/ Hammamet 
^ Gulf (d Hammamet 
Sousse •^Monastir 
^rouan ^^Mahcfia 


Sfaxji 

“^'Kerkeimahk. 

iMofGabds ■ 

(Djerba 




Ramada • 

I El Borma ; 

: ,■•• • • 



Marketplace 
Moves Toward 
Liberalization 


The gp\>emment 5 fiscal policies aim to encourage 
competition and lower trade barriers. 


J ust over a decade ago, 
the Tunisian economy 
was almost completely 
based on government control 
of companies and business. 
That monopolistic trend 
began with independence in 
1956, when state-run, highly 
bureaucratic and protection- 
ist programs dominated foe 
economy. It was able to con- 
tinue primarily due to rev- 
enues provided by oil and gas 
exports. 

Since die collapse of oil 
prices in 1986 and a change 
of government in 1987, 
however, foe government's 
choice to create an economy 
based on market principles 
has gained foe si^rport of foe 
International Monetary 
Fund, foe World Bank, the 
Eurc^sean Union and other 
international forums. 

The Ben Ali government 
has utilized common but ef- 
fective measures to liberalize 
its markets. These have in- 
cluded structural policies 


ofless than 2.4 percent of the 
GDP. It calls for greater eco- 
nomic liberalization, refonn 
of the financial and fiscal 
systems, promotion of the 
private sector and the con- 
tinued modernization of 
2.000 industrial companies. 

It also aims for grouih in 
exports, productivity, and 
foreign and domestic invest- 
ment The plan will involve 
foreign inx'cstments of al- 
most $10 billion, including 
more foan $4 billion in com- 
mercial credits. 

The countiy has obtained a 
solid international reputation 
because of its responsible fis- 
cal policy. The central gov- 
ernment deficit has aveia^ 
abort 3 peitrent of GDP dur- 
ing foe past six years, and foe 
government expects to re- 
duce the deficit in foe future 
by limiting expenditure 
growth. 

Tunisia has little trouble 
finding funding because of 
its reputation in international 



PreetderaZheBAbklineBenAIL 


aimed at mcreasing compe- 
tition by lowering trade bar- 
riers. r^ucing investment re- 
strictions. deregulating 
prices, eliminating sifosidies 
and lowering taxes. There 
has also been an ongoing re- 
structuring of public enter- 
prises and financid sectois. 

Steady growth 
A growth rate of 4 percent 
during the period 1991-95 
underlined foe success of foe 
movement toward an <^>en 
and free maikeL Real g^s 
domestic product growfo. 
which reached 6.9 percent in 
1 996, is predicted to be in the 
S penrent to 6 percent range 
this year, with cinrent growfo 
estimates of 4.3 percent in 
agriculture. 6.9 percent in 
manufacturing, 4.6 percent in 
nonmanufacturing industry 
and 7 percent in services. In- 
flation has declined fiom 10 
percent in foe early 1980s to 
abort 4 percent 
The ambitious ninfo na- 
tional plan, which runs fiom 
1997 to 2001, forecasts an 
average 6 percent annual 
growth rate, inflation of 4.1 
percent and a budget deficit 


financial circles, where it was 
given a BBB- rating by Stan- 
dard & Poor's and a B.AA3 
by Moody's Investors Ser-' 
vice. 

Bond issue 

in September, foe Central 
Bank of Tunisia issued S400 
minion in bonds and notes in 
m’o pans. The sale offoe 30- 
year and 10-year debt was 
managed by Merrill Lynch & 
Co. with Goldman Sachs & 
Co. and Morgan Stanley . 
Dean Witter. 

“Tunisia has taken a con- 
servative appr^h to its ex- 
ternal borrowing, with the 
explicit goal of lowering ex- 
ternal debt as a percent of 
GDP and exports," said a 
Merrill Lynch report on the 
coimtry. “Based on the thi^ 
main external debt indicators, 
Tunisia compares fovoiably 
to its regional neighbors as 
well as other low investment 
grade or ^lit rated emerging 
market economies.... The Re- 
public has never rescheduled 
external debL and we believe 
this is highly unlikely to oc- 
cur over foe near to medium 
term.” • 


“Tiinisu” 

was pmduced in its entirety In’ the .Advertising Depanment 
the Iniemationai Herald Tribitre. 

It was sponsored by FIFA, API and CE.MPEX. 
Writer: Joel Strane^McClure is a business writer 


based in the South of France. 
Program Director: Bill MahJer. ^ 


I 

} 


I 

I 

I 


£ 











n 


INTERNATIONAL HTnftAT.n TRIBUNE, FRIDAi; NOV'EMBER 7, 1997 


SPONSORED SEC r I ON 


SPONSOIvKD SE( HON 




Steering a Course T hrough Privatization 


in privatizing industry. Tunisia's objeo 
tive is to improve corporate perfor- 
mance and create more dynamic fi- 
nancial markets. 

"We welcome privatization, because 
it will put all Tunisian companies on an 
equai footing and help make us all 
become more competitive through joint 
ventures with foreign partners." says 
Hedi Djilanl, president of the Tunisian 
Association of Industrialists and 
Traders. 

The Tunisian approach to privatiza- 
tion was given a boost when the gov^ 
emment reached a $130 million agree- 
ment with the World Bank to support a 
program engineered to obtain fairvalue 
for state companies without radically 
disrupting'their level of employment. 


Closely watched area 

Privatization, being watched closely by 
foreign observers measuring Tunisia's 
efforts to open the economy, has pro- 
ceeded more slowly than some re- 
forms. The World Bank and Interna- 
tional Monetary .Fund recently urged 
the government to step up the pace. 

"Gradualism characterizes Tuni- 
sia's approach to most economic and 
social issues," say one longtime for- 
eign diplomat in Tunis. "But while the 
Tunisians go at their own pace, they 
usually accomplish theirgoals. and pri- 
vatization Is a government priority." 

Today, some 40 percent of GDP 
comes i^m the public sector, and “the 


state's role in the economy has di- 
minished relatively little in the past 10 
years," according to Moody's' In- 
vestors Service. Through 1996. some 
85 companies producing rnarketable 
goods and services in the transport, 
food processing and tourism sectors 
have been privatized or opened to out- 
side capital. 

"The privatization process is on a 
chartered course, and companies with 
28,000 employees, or 18 percent of 
the public workforce, were privatized 
through 1996," says Mohamed Ghan- 
nouchi. the minister of international 
cooperation and foreign investmenL 

The main economic sectors affected 
by the move toward privatization to 
date are tourism and transport. Al- 
though most sales have involved small 
and medium-sized companies, 20 per- 
cent of Tunis Air, the currently prof- 
itable national airtine. was sold. Total 
receipts from the sales to date, 
however, have totaled only about $350 
million. 

But government officials contend 
that more than $1.4 billion in assets 
will be sold over the next five years In 
sectors ranging from cement factories 
to chemicals, transport and tourism 
businesses, including the sale of the 
state-owned Hilton and Meridien-Africa 
hotels in Tunis. This year, the govern- 
ment hopes to privatize 62 companies, 
compared with 32 in 1996 and 15 in 
1995. • 


Developing an International Banking Sector 


New regulations are enabling Tunisia to bring its financial sector into line with global norms. 


R ecently bidlt bank 
headquarters donri- 
nate wide avenues 
in downtown Tunis. The 
building housing thC'Cential 
Bank of Tunisia is one of the 
most attractive stEUctures in 
the capital, while a new 
Amen Bank headquarters is 
rising on Avenue Mo- 
hammed V, near the 
headquarters of Banque Na- 
donale Agricole and Society 
Tunisienne de Banque. 

Tunisia is making an effitrt 
to bring Hs banks — which 
include deposit, investment 
and ofl^txe banks wifii 
nearly 750 offices or 
branches tfarou^out the 
country — into bne with in- 
ternational norms by passing 
legislation intended to iro- 
mote competition and im- 
prove efficiency. 

The laws have enabled the 
counby’s banks to assume 
commercial, development 
and otlshore functions while 
simuHaneously introducing 
ti^t standards, such as set- 
ting aside at least 50 percent 
of profits to cover bad 
debts. 

b addition, the Central 
Bank of Tunisia has shifted 
its focus from active man- 
agement of the financial sec- 
tor to a sufiervisoiy and i^- 
ulatoiy role. It 
maintained tight control over 



TftegfcanftgnewheadiquarileraflffteagnfrafBanfrcfTifffci^iitfifehfe 


liquidity in the banking ^s- 
te^ wbch has kept inflation 
low. 


Preparii^ for competition 
These efffiits are necessary 
because foreign banks will be 


able to operate in the country 
in three years due to agree- 
ments wiflx bodi the Euro- 
pean Union and the World 
Trade Oiganization. 

A study by Moody's In- 
vestors Service called 




4" ■'j 


[Tu 


I 




the Future is here tod@y 








*'Bankmg. System Outiooks: 
Tunisia** publi^ted earlier 
tills year stated that 
banking system still has 
some way to go in building 
up appropriate levels of cap- 
ita] md provisions, but in 
both respMts the banking 
^stcm is much sounder than 
it was a few years ago.*’ 

About two-tiiirds of flic 
bantdng sector — as well as 
two of the four largest banks 
— is still under state control. 
The government says it will 
soon privatize some con- 
cerns, however. 

“Our hope is to privatize 
two public banks, Banque du 
Sud and Union Interna- 
tionale de Basques, and cre- 
ate an even divisnon between 
public and private institu- 
tions in die near term,** ex- 
plains Mohamed Ghannou- 
chi, the minister of 
intematiemd coc^teration and 
fotei^ investment “There 
will be a competitive envir- 
onment, and public banks 
will be compel under the 


same rules as their private 
counterparts.*' 

Most bankets welcome 
die cha^. “The banking 
sector will be in only a\ cnigo 
shape until the government 
accepts that there should be 
more priv*atizaticin,'' saw 
Faouzi Bel Kahia, piesideni 
of flic Banque do Tunisie. 
"O^rwisc, I'm not sum 
how we will be able to 
congtete and si^iport eco- 
nomic growA in the liiture. 
Person^y, I want foreign 
partners on my board who 
will pull me toward the in- 
ternational markciplucc." 

Private banks arc obvi- 
ously attempting to encour- 
age more intcmational par- 
ticipation. Five European 
bai^ hold one-third of the 
c;^ital of the Banque dc 
Tunisie, and two other banloc 
~ Amen Bank and the 
Banque International Arabc 
dc Turasie — are expected to 
start trading global depository 
receipts on the London Stock 
Exchange this month. • 


European Firms 
Lead Investment 




Ihe country's strategic location attracts investors. 










\'V. * 





T he pr^ence of mote than 1.700 foreign company 
with direct investments or joint ventures in Tunisia is 
immediately evident during a drive into town ih^ die 
Tunis Carthage airport, which passes offices of companies 
like Nokia, Bull ai^ Citibank. 

Beyond tiiese obvious signs, tiiere are a number of major 
projects under way involving foreign companies. France's 
Alcatel won a S20 million contract to construct the first GSM 
mobile tel^hone network; Hyundai Construction is building 
a S141 milhon stadium; Spanish hotel companies are in- 
creasing their presence in tiie tourism sector: and Community 
Energy Alternative of the United States will build, ovm and 
j oper^ a power plant near Tunis. International contractors 
i have been invited to bid for the construction oftwo dams arid 
' take stakes in the country’s soon-to-be-privatized cement 
coiiqranies. 












- 1 1 , II If, 















' ' i 









tunisiaonline.com 

investintunisia.tn 

tourismtunisia.com 

tunisie.com 

radiotunis.com 


Site situation 

Foreign companies are attracted to Tunisia because of 
strategic proximity to Europe, Africa and the Middle East 
well as an investment poli^r that not only offere tax i 
customs concessions to foreign investors but also fecilita 
, project approval. “We certainly have a very open s 
' productiire business relationship with the Tunisian m 
CTurnmt,” says Cameron Crawford, operations manager 
Br^h Gas, the largest foreign investor in ^ country. 

The govemrnent hopes to attract about $450 million 
I annual foreign Divestment, almost half of it in eneigy-rcla 
I niaintarn growth and boost employment 

' "Foreign investment outside the eneigy sector shoi 
.,7? 0*“* * 00 million a year to an aven 

of S^O rnimon a year during the next five years.’* prcdi 
Mohamed Ghaimouchi, the minister of international . 
operation foreign investment “We want to attr 
I fransfer technology and create exports. ^ 

E^pe ^ growth diu to our increasing integration w 

There is no U of interest A business forum oiganized 
Conmission m September attracted S50 r 
350 Tunisian compani 
Maipaiiei^at, as the event was called, is one ^ i 
imoa^ d^Ioped by the European Union to ^muli 
coOT^on between small and medium-sized businesses 
^ countries and the EU 

Withm titeitext 10 years, I foresee TunUiabccominao 

says Pieire 

management consullan 
m who attended Medpanenariat. "It 
cenMy located at an nmortant supplier and trans-shinni 
po^ to die /Scan airiMiddle EaSkcT 

Europe - «^ch purchases 80 percent 
d^caude oi miiwals, rcanuftd^ 

g».) »1 o.i’Ki.fSiSS'S 


French investments total mote than SSOO million nnc 
TWim ™ioycis- organization signed sTS™ 
promoto Geitnan investment and jomt^m™^ 
“The European eczHiomic hlocSiS^ 

rapairiing Its maiket in our direction to oke 

low wages, monetary stability, social safetv^Sj^^® ?• 

^^..ysFaouziBelWl^^S^enroflt^^ 










J tly* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBtTNE, FRIDAi; NOVE»IBER 7. 1997 


m 


S1*0-NS0REI> SECTION 




An AcnvE Role for Women in Tunisian Society 


The role of women in Tunisian societvis 
remarkable in the region. 

J^slation was passed in Tunisia 
begnning m 1956 to promote the prin- 
ciple of legal equality between men and 
women in both the workplace and the 
family. Indeed. President Ben AJi has 
J^iuently repeated ' that vmmen’s 
ngtts are an integral part of human 
rights. 

‘‘Human rights cannot thrive in a 
^iety wh»e the status of women is 
inferior to that of men," says the pres- 
idertt, who passed additional legisla- 
tion pertainingto equality between men 
and women in 1992. "Women's gains 
must be strengthened, their potential 
fully tapped, or we will have failed in our 
attempt to achieve overall efPewtive 
char^." 

Key government positions 

Women now occupy key positions in 
thegOMsmment, induding posts as am- 
bassadors in Oslo and Warsaw. The 
Secretariat of State for Women and the 
Family, created In 1992, is a full- 
fledged minisby that develops govern- 
ment policy in the field. 


Today, there are women in evay 
walk Gf Tunisian life ^ from file Cham- 
ber of Deputies (6.7 percent) to mu- 
nicipal councils (16 pensnt), and edu- ' 
cation (50 percent}. The percentage cf 
women in the worMrg population has 
risen from 6 percent In 1966 to 23 
percent in 1994. 

Otiier tangible results can be seen in 
the ansa of education. Almost 99 per- 
cent of young girts are now enrolled in 
elementary school, and the number of 
women attending institutes of higher 
education increased to 43.7 percent in 
199596, from 25.8 percent in 1975- 
76. 

There are also a number of women's 
rights organizations, like the National 
Union of Tunisian Women, which was 
created in 1956 and has 120,000 
members. It works to promote ad- 
vancement in ail sectors, apprise wom- 
en of their rights, eliminate all forms of 
discrimination and set up development 
strategies that consider the trituration 
of women as a main component. 

. "Our m^or chedlenge today Is to 
create complete economic indepen- 
dence for women in the workplace." 


says Faiza Kefl, the union's president 
since 1992. "Salaries for men and 
women doing the same job are, by law, 
equal, but women must be able to ^ 
higher qualifications and move away 
from jobs in trklitional female sectors, 
like textiles and ser^^ces.'' 

Evolvbig mindsets 

Ms. Kefl, to illustrate the status of 
Tunisian vtom^, discusses their lib- 
eration in terms cf past customs. "It 
has been 40 years since a man could 
separate from his wife by saying ‘I 
divorce you' tivee times, and it has 
long been illegal to arranga a marri^ 
without a woman's consent," she 
says. "But it is still veiy difficult to 
convinoe many families to let their 
daighta's leave home to attend uni- 
versity in another town." 

The years of the Ben Ali president 
have, she says, helped the women's 
movement esp^lty regarding l^ls- 
lation to protect women in the work- 
place. "The president has continued 
opening doors in every area and gone 
for beyond embolic gestures," she 
says. • 



satarfes/brmenaridwDiTimcfofngtfiesame/abtfGequsflyJaiK •• 



RefOnnsofiheeckKeSondsyslemhaveledtoarise'nOierateofsdKKriem^nan. 

Education for the Modern World 

Twenty percent of the annual national budget goes to education, where ivlbiws me bearingjhiii. 


E ducation was made universally 
available in Tunisia during the 
fiist years of irKiq)endence. and 
schooling has been mandatory since 
1991." ^ucation is our means of com- 
bating some of the ne^tive vestiges of 
die past and maintaining our pace as 
playm in the modem world." says 
Minister of Education Ridha Ferchiou. 
who has a Ph.D. from Michigan State 
University. “The progress we have 
made parallels and complements the 
movement in the economic and social 
spheres." 

Languages and literacy 
One of the priorities in Ae last national 
plan was the creation of basic instruc- 
tion tiiFDu^iit flie educational system, 
which is to for all children of school 
age. In addition, the 20QJOOO students 
who enter the school system each year 


are now required to take six years of 
English and 1 1 of French. Tunisia has 
also launched a national program to 
eradicate illiteracy in the 1 5-to^5-ycar 
age groiq) by 2006. 

Today, university is attended by 1 2.8 
percent of young people between the 
ages of 20 and 24, and the figure is 
expected to rise to 1 5 i^ent by 200 1 . 
The country's universities — four in 
Tunis, one in Sousse and one in — 
now have 120.000 students, and two 
new universities will be created in 
Jendouba and Gaf^ 

"Universities were first created here 
in the 1960s,” recalls Mr. Ferchiou. 
"But the real changes occurred in 1988, 
when the education system, still in the 
same shape as it was 30 yeans earlier, 
was completely reorganized, restruc- 
tured and modernized." 

The reforms, which affected both the 


organizuiion of the educational sysichi 
and its tcuchmu metliLHls. were swceji- 
ing when ouilined in 1^88 and put into 
law in 1991. Education moved iroin 
rote learning to interactive leaching, 
more schools were opened in rural 
areas, a new statULs was dcrined for 
universit>’ teachers, and the improved 
curricula emphasized .sciences, voca- 
tional training and tlie introduction of 
courses on human rights and toler- 
ance. 

"We began teaching the frill scope of 
religious smdies. rather than just Islant. 
and rehabilitated studies in philosopl^'. 
history and geography that are free from 
any outside political or religious in- 
fluences." says Mr. Ferchiou. "Todajp's 
studeiits get an education that acknowl- 
edges our Arabic. Islamic and national 
heritage, but basically trains them how 
to use their own minds.'* • 





Mining, Oil and Gas: 
Rich Natural Resources 


The efiei-gy sector accounts for over half of foreign investment in Tunisia. 


T here were almost 50 
oil exploration permits 
in operation in Tunisia 
at the begriming of this y^ 
— issued to companies hko 
Pluspefrol of .Aigentriia, 
Agip of Italy and Canaife s 

Eurogas Corp- 
investments total about SI 00 
million. 

"Our energy balance 
will remain positive at least 
until 2001 , but our objeenve 
now is to encourage mwe 
prospecting for oil and gas by 
providing new incentives, 
acknowledges one 
ment official familiaf 
the energy sector. “Tn^ 
will also be a new code tor 

mining introduced ne.xt year 

to promote that acrivit)’. 


Its Miskar gas field in the 
Gulf of Gab&s came on- 
stream rii 1 996. and will both 
make Tunisia self-sufficient 
in natural gas and maintain 
its positive energy trade bal- 
ance until at least 2000. 

Last year, the energy sec- 
tor accounted for well over 
halfofthe foreign investment 
in the country. British Gas 
spent $650 million at the 
Miskar operation and could 
invest over $300 million at 
the Hasdrabul-3 weD, about 
1 00 kilometers (60 miles) off 
the eastern coast. 

"We are very positive 
about the natural gas poten- 
tial in Tunisia, and our aim k 
to meet incrc^ing domestic 
demand and investigate ex- 
port potential," says Carner- 
on Crawribri operations 
manager of British Gas. 

An oil field in El Borma m 
the south has been the mmn- 
stay of the country’s oil m- 
dustry. There is another la^e 
field at Ashtart in the Gulf of 

V 


Gab^ and new fields have 
come onsueam in Sidi Kil- 
ani, Ezzaouia. Belli and Ccr- 
cina. 

Mineral assets 
The country is also one of the 
world's largest sources of 
phosphates; production in- 
crea^ from 5.6 million tons 
to 63 million tons between 
1994 and 1995. In addition, 
lead and zinc oufoul ^uld 
rise substantially followirig 
the reopening of foe private 
Bougrine mine, which pro- 
duces in El Kef concentrates 
for export to West European 
smeltet^. 

One industry growing out 
of foe natural resources activ- 
ity is Tunisia’s budding 
chemicals business, which 
represents about 2.3 percent 
of GDP. The sector, dom- 
inated by the state-owned 
Tunisian Chemical Group, 
has becii growing by an an- 
ni^ average of 13 percent 
since 1991. • 


Creating a New Workforce for the International Economic Marketplace 


The government is concentrating on training as a 
means of readying Tunisia's economy for an in- 
crea^rigty global marketplace. 

Moncer Rouissi. the minister for employment 
and tralnir^, goes to the computer in his office and 
b^ins showing a visitor the nationwide database 
that matches job searchers with employers. He 
moves to another terminal and hits on an Internet 
site describing the country's professional training 
fodlities, which are meant to complement foe 
educational system and feed trained employees 
into the workforce. 

“Our ^at is to train 60,(XX} qualified em- 
plt^ees each year to enter foe Tunisian work- 
force," says Mr. Rouissi. "We are driven by the 
demands of the market, and we work in tandem 


with business to determine whi^ sectors will 
require skilled workers. Then we train them using 
the latest techniques and technologes.” 

The goal of Mr. Rouissi's ministry is to train 
Tunisians to think beyond foe former protected 
economy and focus on foe (^len, competitive and 
international economic marketplace of the future. 
Everyone undertaking training is required to com- 
plete basic courses in English, computing, social 
i^slation, health and security In the workplace, 
and prefect management. 

Apprentice programs 

There are hundreds of centers throughout the 
country offering training in some 170 different job 
fields. In addition, businesses have their own 


training focilities and are stressing practical and 
theoretical apprenticeship programs. 

"We try to anticipate the free market, and we T 
want to be ready to compete with Europe," says - 
Mr. Rouissi, noting that industrial maintenance. 
telecommunications and foe chemicals business - 
areamongthekeytrainingsectors.''Weareable ! 
to do this by increasirig partnerships with man- ; 
ufacturing and industry to ensure that our training 
programs are moving in the right direction. We are ; 
also putting eggressive measures in place to deal -- 
with future unemplc^ment by retraining people ; 
vfoo lose tfieir jobs." 

He adds: "Trying to get quantitatively and qual- ' 
itatively prepared for the free market fr^ is one of * 
the key challenges in our histoiy." • 


Textiles: Solid Backbone of Export Trade 

Textiles, clothing and leather gpods account for a whopping 45 percent of Tunisia s total export trade. 



T he textiles industry 
employs a workforce 
in excess of 220.000 
people, half of all employees 
in Tunisia's manuiacti^g 
sector. The business has been 
growing by an annual av- 


erage of 8.6 percent in real 
terms since 1991 and ac- 
counts for 7 percent of GDP. 

"We must now ensure that 
we improve the quality of our 
textile output and produce 
more middle- and uppter- 


range textile products.’' says 
Minister of Indus^ Ben Ab- 
dallah. "In addition, J fully 
expect foat we will take ad- 
vantage of our proximity to 
Europe to meet specific mar- 
ket demand in a much quick- 


er and more timely fashion 
than our competitors. In facL 
an order made by a European 
company to aTunisian textile 
firm now arrives within five 
days. That's hard to beat!” 

The European market is 


knpromgqusOy bene €4 the ksy focuses hdevehpktg Titty's texOeindusty. 


alreadv' open to the Tunisian 
textile industry, which pro- 
ducc.s garments for major 
brands: numerous foreign 
companies locate here 1^- 
oause wages are substantially 
lower than those in Europe^ 
countric.v. In addition, labor 
is plentiful, there arc estab- 
lished contracts with the un- 
ions. and companies 
ing at least SO percent ofmeir 
products are given ar\ advaot- 
ageous offshore status. 

Local capabflities 
Textile preiducers, of courre. 
have foeir own preoccupa- 
tions. "The industi>- here vnll 
suffer in the long term if Wc 
^ not create local capabil- 
ities and produce our own 
fabrics and cloth rather thw 
import this material,” says 
Hciii Djilani. who licenses 
Lee Cooper products an 
Tunisia and is a shareholder 
in foe parent company In 
London. "If we do develop 
more local production, we 
could double or triple ex- 
ports.” ! 

Says Mr. Djilani, who ob- 
tains the raw material for his 
Lee Cooper products frt^ a 
local Canadian-Tunisian 
company: "We're still v^- 
for from reaching our total 
export potential, we will 
grow b^use of productiv'^’ 
increases and our low labor 
costs, which are a fraction of 
those in Italy and Fiance. ’'!• 










IV 

INTERNAXIONAL HERALD TBIBIjNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


1 SPONSORED SEC TION 


SPONSORED stX IION 


TUNISIA 

Tourism Industry; 
Moving Upmarket 
And Diversifying 

Tunisia attracted more than 4 million visitors last 
yean earning the country $1.47 billion. 


T unisia ofiers destina- 
tions as diverse as 
beautiful beaches on 
1 300 kilometers (800 miles) 
of coasdine to lush oases, salt 

lakes and wadis in die Salma 
Desert bi addrtioo, it has nu- 
merous historical Sites, 
mosques and medinas, mas- 
terpieces of Arab-lslarnic ar- 
chitecture, and Punic and Ro- 
man archaeological remains. 

“The beaches will always 
be a major tourist attraction 
and will remain popular be- 
cause we are continuing to 
improve die 'product’ by 
modernizing the infiastmc- 
ture,** says Tourism Minister 
Slaheddme Mafioui, noting 
that 68 percent of tourists vis- 
iting Tunisia (his year come 
from Europe. “But the only 
way we will be able to attract 
Americans and some other 
nationalities to Tunisia is by 
capitalizing on the wealth of 
our historic patrimony.” 

Roman temples 
In addition to well-known 
destinations like Caidiage, 
other historic sites include a 
second-century Roman 
temple in Dougga, the 
Phoenician port of Utica, 
Sbeitia’s Roman temples and 
arches, El Jem'& Coliseum 
and Bulla Regia's Roman 
villas and ampUtheateis. 

“I would not leave IVinisia 
witiiout visiting Cardiage 
and the Baido Museum in 
Tunis,” the minister counsels 
die prospective vishoc 'T 
would alk) take a cultural 
tour in the northwestern part 
of the countiy and fly to the 
Sahara for a day to visit the 
oases, which is the type of 
trip undertaken by 50 pOTent 
of tourists visiting Tunisia.” 
He also suggests that a 


tourist not leave without 
picking up textiles, orafrs, 
ceramics, leather, caigraved 
cooper, wood, silver ai^ gold 
jewelry and oth» lorally 
made products. 

Tourism earnings have 
been increasing st^dily — 
from S1.06 billion in 1992 to 
S1.47 billion last year — and 
the sector is directly and in- 
directly req>onsibIe for about 
300,000 jobs. Tourism also 
accounts for about 10 percent 
of thegross domestic product 
and is, of course, a major 
earner of foreign exchange. 

The first ei^t months of 
1997 pixxluced a 10 percrat 
increase in earnings due to 
the increased presence of 
German, English, French and 
Scandinavian visitors. In ad- 
dition, there has been a r^id 
increase in visitors from Rus- 
sia. 

“We expect annual 
growth continue at about 6 
percent," explains Mr. 
Maaoui, noting that the iMisi- 
ness tourism and incentive 
market remains largely un- 
tapped, which is why the 
Tunisian Convention Bureau 
was created last year. “But it 
will be more than that if we 
succeed in tapping the Jap- 
anese and North American 
markets dirough innovations 
like the new tourism office 
we hope to open in New York 
next year.” 

There is currently a move- 
ment to develop more en- 
tertainment activities in tour- 
ist zones and further boost 
cultural tourism, golf (there 
are currently ei^t courses), 
hunting and thalassotfaer^jy 
(sbi new ^ projects are un- 
der way). The international 
bridge toumaraent in 
Hammamet. which is linked 





..... . 


-f . - H. ' 


- .v:' 



... V.. 


witfi Thnis by a hi^way teat 
is up to the standards foi^ in 
France or Germany, reflects 
the new trends. 

There are more tean 600 
hotels in tee country today, 
including the recently con- 
structed and elegant La 
Maison Blanche, opened by 
the fbmier Tunisian ambas- 
sa^r to Washington, in 
downtown Tunis. The Res- 
idence Hotel at the Carteage 
Coasts resort is tee first hotel 
in Tunisia to be Usred among 
“llie Leading Hotels of the 
Worid.” 

New boteb and resorts 
New botek are constantly 
being built in resorts like 
Harmnamet, Djerba island. 
Port El I^taoui, Douz, 
Monastir and Mahd^ where 
the 303-room Mabtea Palace 
opened earlier teis year. Ihe 
Hammamet South resort 
conplex bemg constructed 
on 680 acres (154 hectares') 
will include a marina, shop- 
ping mall, residential corn- 
pie^ 40 hotels and a casino. 
Ft will cost more tean S750 
milKon. 

“lliis development will 


assure quality tourism in 
Tunisia weU into tee next 
centuzy,” says Me Ma£ouj. 
“Everything aboia it wiR be 
of tee hig^wst quali^, tee 
marina alone will cost SlOO 
millinn,** 

Government officials say 
they learned about tee im- 
portance of planned tourism 
developm^ and protection 
of the enviroiiment from tee 
exanple of oteer countries 
teat have oveibuitt “We've 
always had platmed manago- 
moit and <^elopment, and 
we try to limit ^wte to 
7,000 new beds po* year,” 
says Mr. Maioui. “Tourism 
h^ inspired ourenviroomeo- 
tal movement because His in 
evetyrxie's mter^ to beau- 
tify tee country and re^>ect 
the surrcKindiDgs teat make 
our resorts so attractive.” 

Tunisia is a two-bour 
ffig)it from Paris and 50 
minutes from Rome; H has 
six international aii ports and 
seven pasengers ports. 

For additional i^onsaiion 
regarding tourism in Tuni^ 
consult the Travel to Tunisia 
Web site at http:/Avww.tour- 
ismtunishuconi. • 


‘4--' ' 

•- . - ' 




Today’s Tunis: 
Mediterranean 

Cultural Capital if 

Cultu/v is playing an important role in enab/ihg ■ 

Tunisia to maie the leap into the European sphere. ■ ^ 

O ur irres'etsible blending vrite Europe is hjjaoric, but 

psychologically wc luve been piepanng for yeai^ 

^is Minister of Culture Abdelbaki Hcnnawi, who 

was educated at the University of California at Berxclg in 

the late 1 960s and rctumcd.to Tunkia in 1 980 to^n to 
participate "in tee birth of my nation.” He adds: arc 

uSne culture — tec concctivc tnenwiy* of our aiun^^ 

reinforce our own identities and bridge the ©ip with Ei^ 

Dean countries without creatinga national identity 
^The minister holds up a CD by a popular Ttoisian 

recoxding artist die lute player Anouar Brahenv wh^ latet/ 

Salbum, "Khomsa," has been favorably rc\'iew^ in W 
i United Slates and Britain. “This music, and all the popular 

I Tunisian rnov-ies and theater, are as important to our cuhi^ 

g identity today as tec 26,000 historical and arehacoUiguja) 
i sites and the 3,000 years of history,” he says. 

Mr Hermassi, who became cultural minister last year, was 
die Tunisian representative to tec United Nations Education. 

Scientific and Cultural Oiganization (UNESCO) between 

1992 and '95. Tunis, a city of just over a million inhabitants, 

was named diis year's cultural capital by UNESCO. • ~ ■ 

“We considered this event an opportunity to dissemmate 
our >ralues, publicize our culture and make known our 
historical gains and present achievements,” says President 
Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. “It 

illustrates diat our country -irr r ■■■■ Tiiniin^ 

wiUT«nainacradlcofleam- Mlafaarteenoalc 

ing. modernity and creativ- midsodal J 

oMMlNDbatfonta 


Festival calendar bnm^cidbirmiQUf 

throughout the year as part of fMlauMraalfy 

the cultural capital event dif- ^ ^ ^ 

feientcmintrieshavebrou^t ffvms 

their own cultural exports to UmUfynadM^ 

tee c^i^ — an opera from 

Italy, painting from France, aisiaanrn 

an e^ibitioD of Arab archi- 
tecture by the Aga Khan , . 

Foundation. Books have been published concerning exi^ng 
prehistoric sites in the country, and there have been Kininars 
along tee lines of tee .“Role of the Arab Maghreb in 
&mching International Culture,” 

■ “The cultural year has been for us. because it brought^ 

- allofthecountry^artiststogetherand enabled us to celebrate^ 
our cultural output, both past and present,” says Mr. Hcr- 
roassL 

It is also enabling Tunisia to evaluate its future. Lata 

- monte, an international colloquium led by Mr. Hermassi 
brou^t togeteer a gamut of experts — includh^ historians, 
urban plamiers, museum curators,. archaeologists and sci- 
entists to discuss tee promotion of this diverse national 
heriiagcnnd collective cultural identity. 

But even when tee cultural year is ended, a visitor will find 

- a-wealtefif museumsand cuhi^ institiuions in Tunis. These « 
mclu^ tee Baido Museum,, which contains the world's 
largest collection ofmosaics, the renowned gem “Viigii and V 

j tee Muses” and the Art and Folk Traditions Mi^um. New 
i bidldings in the oqiital like the blue-and-white National ’ 
Archives and the pmk-maible city hall illustrate tec con- . 
timiation of traditional architecture. 

“All of our economic and social modernization has 
brought cultiire to tee Ibrefront, because that is whut really 
gives us our value, identity and self-assurance,” says Mr. 
Hermassi. He b(^>es that tee cultural year can be us^ as q 
sprin^oard to develop cultural tourism, which was the 
tbeme of a UNESeX) conference in Tunis last month. 

For more information consult the “Tunis; Cultural Cap- 
ital” Web site (www.tunisiaonline.convTuni597/in-.^ 
dex.html). • ^ I 


Top: Data, near SteSalmn: above: tie Salbum mosquEL 


Wide-Ranging 
Green Programs 

The environment is an important priority. 


Agriculture: More Investiment for Economic tiNCHitN " ‘ 


O ne of tee planks 

in President Ben 
Ali's platfbrm during 
tee past decade has been an 
improvement in Tunisia's 
environment Government 
efforts range from tee con- 
struction of sewage networks 
■ and water treatment plants to 
educational programs for 
children in primary school. 

“We've set about stream- 
lining our development effort 
to strike a balance between a 
healthy environment and 
maintaining grcwth,” tee 
president has said. 

The government also con- 
siders tee environment an 
important aspect of its in- 
tegrated information net- 
work on sustain^le devel- 
opment, Environment 21. 
lliis autumn. Prime Minister 


Hamed Karoui again under- 
lined tee inqxiitance of pre- 
serving the equilibrium oftfae 
ecosystem and marrying de- 
velopment to environmental 
concerns. 

Multiple programs 
Indeed, six iitterministerial 
environmental programs are 
under way in areas that in- 
clude urban development, 
transport and land d^lop- 
ment; tee sea and coas^ 
zones: climatic change; geo- 
gr^ical data; biodiversity; 
and improved use of the 
desert 

“The environment is cen- 
tral to many of our devel- 
opment plans today.” says 
Moharaed Ghannou^, min- 
ister of international cooper- 
ation and foreign investment 


Agriculture occupies over onetekd of 
Tunisia’s wortdorce and cormibutes 14 
percent to Its GDP. 

It takes just a few minutes in a Tunisi- 
an market — r^Hete with olivss from the 
Sahel in the east cereal fromfertile giw 
plains in the northwest and dates, citrus 
fhjits. sugar beets and other products — 
to.understand that agticulture is shU a 
mainstay of the Tunisian economy. 

About oneteird of cultivated land is 
devoted to cereal crops, mostly hard 
wheat while aiother third is planted 
with more than 55 million olive trees, 
which enables Tunisia to rank among 
the largest producers of oTive oil in the 
world. 

Agricultural output increased more 
than 20 percent last year because of 


favorable weather; overall agricuttural 
exporte nose 1^93 percerrt reflecting a 
record cereal harv^ and a surge of 
dive oil exports. This year, cereal pro- 
duction is expected to dedirw, white the 
dive harvest should dramatical in- 
crease, with exports rising sharply. Over- 
ail growth is predictsd to be about 4 
peto^ 

A^icuitore will remain a key facet of 
Tunisia's future. "TTre government is 
concentrating rm creating industries 
that will inspire trade and growth ” says 
one fbre^ diplomat, “but they are con- 
tinuing Investments In brlgstion 
schemes and water projects that will 
add value to agricultural actMbr and 
maintain itasan importantaspectofthe 
econorry." 


Adds Mohamed Ghannouchl, tee 
minister of International cooperation 
foreign tevestment “We must pur- 
sue our tradrtionai stren^hs in %iicul- 
hire by implementing new techndogies, 
Kke soil presenratfon and irrigation 
schemes, and maintaining a balanced 
trade account” 

TTie Institute of Arid Zones in Medan- 
ine. which canfes out research on 
Tunisian agriculture, is part of a national 
program to restructure scientific re- 
search. “We seek to bring researchers 
and their work closer to farmers and ' 
producers, who are Keen to adopt new 
techniques that Improve productMty 
and the quall^ of their product," says 
Mon© Safra, secretary of state for sci- 
entific reseEsch and t^nok)^. • 


“especially ia areas like tour- 
ism. where we have canceled 
some projects because of tee 
enviioamental in^iact We 
prize our natural resources 
and are extremely active in 
preventing the degradation of 
the environment Eveiy ac- 


tion today is accmipaaied by 
an environmeQfel-iznpact 
study.” 

Ihe Ministiy of tirc En- 
vnonmeat and Land Devel- 
opment which publishes an 
aWial “stare of tee envir- 
onment” T^xirt has created 


Ministftre de la Cooperation Internationale 
et de riDvestissement Ex^rieur 
119, avenue de la Liberte 
Tunis 

Tel.: (216 1) 796 522, 795 971; fax: (216 1 ) 570 383 

MinisteFe de I’lndostrie 
37, avenue EGieireddine Pacha 
Tunis 

TeL: (216 1) 781 919, fax: 782 742 

Minisiere du Commerce 
37, avenue Kherieddine Pacha 
Tunis 

Tcl.: (216 1) 890 963, 893 313; fox: (216 1) 782 742 
Ministere des Aflhires Etrangires 
Place du Govprnement 
La Kasba — 1008 Tunis 

Tel. (216 1) 560 531. 261 324, fax: (216 1) 568 050 

Ministere du Tourisme et de TArtisanat 

I , avenue Mohamed V 

Tunis 

Tel.: (216 1) 341 077, 341 176, fax: (216 1) 341 357 

Secretariat d'Etat k rinformation 
2, rue d' Alger 
1000 Tunis 

TeL: (216 1) 335 066, fax: (216 1) 349 900 

Mimsto des Fmances 
Place du Govem^^ 

La Kasba — • 1008 Tunis 
Tel. (216 1) 560 186, fax: 563 959 

Minist^ de rEnvironneineot 
et de rAm ^ag ement do Ibrritoire 
Centre Uibain Nord 
El Menzah — 1004 Tunis 
Tel. (216 1)704000,703 075, 
fax: (216 1) 703 286. 345 040 


Agence de Promotion de Plndustrie 
6,TuedeSyrie — 1002 Tunis 
Tel. (216 1) 792 144, fox: (216 1) 782 482 

Centre de Promotion des Exportations 
28, rue Gandhi 
1000 Tunis 

Td. (216 1) 350 043, 350 344, fox: (216 1) 353 683 

Bourse des Valeurs Mobfliires 
19 bis, rue Kamel Ataturk 
. 1000 Tunis 

'IbL'(216 1) 259 148, fox: ai6 1) 347 256 
Banqae de Develo(^iement Econonikpie de Ibnisie 
34, me 7050 (ancieone route de la Soukza) 
10807\inis 

Tel. (216 1) 718 000, 719 999; fox; aifr D 713 744 
Agence de Promotion de Plnvestissement Extern* 
(FIFA) 

63, rue de Syrie — 1002 *nxni8 
Tel.; (216 1) 792 144, fox: (216 1) 782 971 
Banque Nationale de D^vdoppement Tomistique 
Avenue Mobanred V 
Cite Monplaisir — 1002 Tunis 
TeL: (216 1) 785 322, fox: (216 1) 784 788 

A^ce National de Protection de PEnvironnenient 
Outre Uibain Nord 
El Menzah ^ 1 004 Tunis 
Tel.: (216 1) 707 122, fox: (216 1) 708 230 

Office da Commerce de Ibnisie 
65, me de Syrie — 10(X2 Tunis 
TeL (216. 1) 892 857, 785 854, 738 974, fox: (216 I) 794 491 

Institut National de la Normalisation 
et la Propri£t6 Indnstridle 
Citi6 El Khadra 
1003.1111118 — Bclv6d&re 

TeL: (216 1) 781 613, 785 929, fox: (216 1) 781 564 


an observatory to momtor 
and control environmeDtal 
activity, and it r^ularty pub- 
lishes indicators r^nling 
p^cular aspects of tee en- 
vironment ’ 

Last year, an International 
Crater of Enviromneinal 
Technologies c^jened in 
Tunis to serve as a national 
and r^onal envzronmental 
focal point in tee Mediter- 
ranean and enhance Tunisia’s 
capacity to develop appro- 
priate ravironmeotal 
nologies. In addition, a num- 
ber of agencies have been 
established by tee ministry Id 
protect the raviionment in 
conjunction with nongovem- 
roenta] organizations and en- 
vironmental associations. 

"We are more fortunate 
than many developed coun- 
ties, because we lave less 
established industry and in- 
frastructure causing eoviroo- 
mental'damage,” says Fayez 
Ayed at the Mmistry of En- 
vironment and Land Devel- 
opmrat "In .addition, we 
comply wite international 
environmental agreements 
and ooims, which enable us 
to better manage our envi- 
ronmental future.” 

Protecting desert and sea 
Tunisia ^ecific prob- 
lems that range from tee pro- 
tection of tee coastal zone, 
where there are sow some 3() 
water treatment plants, to pre- 
vent pollution of tee se^ to 
the onslaught of deserti^ 
ation. Range land, fores ts and 
agricultural terrain cover 
more than half of tee coun- 
try's land surface, but teere 
are annual losses of 20,000 
hectares (50,000 acres) due 
to erosioiu desert encioarii- 
ment, salinization, flooding 


and urbanizatioa. Today, a 
number of programs are at- 
temp^g to reverse teat 
tcei^ "We have begun chas- 
ing tee desert inst^ of let- 
ting tee desert chase us,” ex- 
plains Ml Ayed as he 
outlines a number of inno- 
vative solutions to deserti- 
fication. 

Id addition, many large 
q>ecies of mammals are con- 
sidered to be endangered, 
and 12 very rare bird ^>ecies 
are on tee verge bfbecommg 
extinct To preserve Tunisia's 
ecologi^ and natural her- 
itage, ei^t national parks 
and one natiraal arcbaieolo- 
gical park have been created 
siixte 1977. There are also 19 
nature reserves, some home 
to migratory European birds 
in the winter 

There is also an ongoing 
. effort to create “gre en 
zqnes" in urban areas, with 
tee ultitnafp goal of creating 
1 0 square meters ( 1 08 square 
foet) of green zone per in- 
habitant by 2000. A more 
67q»iisive foiesby project 
aims to plant more tean 
25,000 hectares of trees, de- 
velop eristing fijrests, im- 
prove highway land and 
manage nation^ parks. 

A number of environmen- 
tal programs, like tee Indus- 
trial Pollution Fui^ which 
helps crtablished industries 
modemize their focilities 
along environmentally 
friendly lines, have been Gre- 
at^ “Our fijturo challenge 
will be to eliminate existing 
industrial pollution, r^lace 
older plants with clean tech- 
nologies and tackle deserti- 
fication using a miv of tech- 
nological and . traditional 
approaches,” concludes Ml 
A yed. • 


A Willingness 
To Support the 
Common Cause 

Two Tunisian institutions reflect the importance of, 
social and economic solidaritv. 

t- 

T he quality of life in many remote towns and villages ' 
throughout Tunisia has been improved by a fund 
financed prunarily by voluntary donations that have 
exceeded $300 million during tee past four years. “Dccem-! 
ber 8 is National Solidarity Day, and last year on that single 
day, more than a milliqn people donated money to the fund.”! 
says Kamel Ffodj^ Sassi, the secretary of state in charge of the 
Natioi^ Solidarity Fund. “In addition, we receive funding 
from tee government, companies, private associations and 
European counties like Luxembourg.” i 

The National Solidarity Fund, which was created in 1993 
by the presidency, has undertaken some 
JOOO projec^ chosen by development agencies in regiorus 
throughout the country. These range from electricity, water 
and r^ ^ddmg schemes to the constmetion of houses, ' 
schools and di^rensaries. ^ 

“There is a culture of solidarity in Tunisia, and tec fond Ls 

AndlsaaoeassfuftecaiMfl»afMyii(JlMasM9 f- 

^moaaygo^bmckio1bmp9oiil9^ 

STO the money going 

?74 mSl Me W noting the fund wm d^jcnsc 

^4 m^on this year. “That credibilitj- creates a sena' of 

enftiBiasra and gratitude by cveiyoneinvo™-?" 

last™™* sonini solidarity occumd 

^ monte With tee launching of the Banque Tunisienne de 

looking for this type™S!5^ '‘™""*'^‘“ ' 

This type of bank is on example of tec avant-iiardc 
SiSwI m Tunisia, which enable the pubheto 

I^I^mecoIwmlcgrowtealulprospcrirt^'^^^^^^ 

ister of Finance Mohammed Jeri. . ) 

economic reforms are tied to social welfare that involve tee 

Fuad can be found at Solidarity 


iSTRCnWAfC 















% 

.\r 







Al R CANADA 

A Bkeath Of FmsH Aim 


fc- ivrnrvtnov.u. 


biisines$/finance 



FR1DA3C, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


PAGE 15 


AIR CANADA 

A Bmath op.Frich Air 


^^\\Plunge of Won Sends 
Shivers Across Region 

Soiith Korean Bonds (^t a P iiTnfnftling 


Kids Prefer Briincfttes 


nfijnn 

SEOUL — SoQth Korea sank deeper 
■ into a finoncia{ crisis Tltiinday as its 
. currency tumbled to a record low 
. against the U.S. dollar, Amber rattline 
Southeast Asian markets. 

Soudi Korean bonds, die most widely 
; held Asiaii debt, also tumbled as in- 
vestors moved their mon^ elsewhere. 

The won plunged to a record low ai 
close or 974.80 to the dollar Aom 
Wednesday's close of 969J0. The 
. weakness wu felt across the remon. 

, with the Tliai baht and Inrtpnftgian nipi- 
ah falling. 

, The drop rekindled fears that Sooth 
Korea’s financial turmoil, hi ghiightprf 
' by a string of corporate ins^veodes, 

.. ooAJd znatdh tiitt in Thailand and other 
; Southeast Asian economies. , 

‘ A costly — and so far fhtfle at- 

■ . terrqrt to keep die won from wedcening- 
< through central bank intervention is put- 
• <. ting pressure on the nation’s hanw 
Many lenders say th^ are already bav- 
ing trouble raising money. 

The capita] squeeze is growing so 
severe that the very survival of 
jLbanks may be in doubL Muy are likely 
curb lending, threatening to tip the 
world's 1 Itb-lazgest economy into ro- 
cession. 

market fears that Soudi Korea 
^ may not have enough arnTnimtriftn to 
defend the won, prevrat die collapse of 
^ some of its shaky banks and check the ^ . - 

mountain of sbort-tenn debt largely de- by snme foreigners," he ‘^Soudi 
Dominared in foreign currencies,** a Kurea is not like Soudieast Asia, we will 


ong, direct^-goieral of the ministry's . 
fu^cial eodperadon division, ‘‘we. 
have no plan torequest emergency loans 
fiom the IMF.'* 

Mirfiftl ram/tflcene Hio managing Hi- 

rector of die IMF, a^eed widi that as- 
sessmenL Speakhig in Paris after sign- 
ing emetgency aklrar Indonesia, he said 
steps taken by the Soudi Koreari gov- 
ernment bad created a "desirable re- 
ducdcKi in external imbalances.'* 

He called the Bank of Korea's efforts 
10 stop companies from boarding dollars 
"conrageous.” 

But bond investOTs wm not dteered 
^ these expressions of confidence. 
Korea Developmeot Bank's 10-year 
. global hood, a bendimatk for the naticMi, 
took one of the tuggest hit& The gap, or • 
spread, between its yield and a com- 
wable U.S. Treasury bond widened 
Thursd^ to as much as 350 basis pmnts 
~moie than double ihespread on Wed- 
nesday. 

"Korea appears to be in a state of 
denial," saio Daniel Hemmant, who 
manaffis about S4S nuOSonof bmidsat 
Guinness Flight Asia lid. 

Mr. Yoon of the central bank said that 
in November 6 or 7 tcillion more won 
would be released die cemial bank to 
stabilize the money market and Ining 
down interest rates. 

"As loc^ as the govemmentiemains 
stroo^y committed the won will not. 
drop as radically as has beoa 


European bank dealer in Singapcm 
*■*0 said. 

But the Bank of Korea, the countcy 's 
central bank, asserted that the fears were 
"exaggerate** It indicated the won 

■ could reach 1 ,000 to the dollar but said 
that South Korea's economy was fun- 
damentally different from diose in 
Southeast Asia. 

"Our fundamentals are still relatively 
mood," said Yoon Yang Shik, currency 
manager at the Bank cn Korea. "If we 
solve the problems in the banks we can 
see our economy going up again." ' 

A Bnance Muustiy omc^ said the 
country would have no reason to seek 
' emergency loans fiom other countries 
' " or .the Intemadonal Monetary I^d; as 
- Thailand and Indonesia ^d. 

"Our financial, markets are not in 

■ serious danger." said Cbot Jooi% Ky=- 


be able to control the turtulence." 

Mr. Camdessus said be did not dimk 
"die Kraean situatitMi is as- alarming as 
it was in Indonesia a coc^' of weeks 
agoi.?’ ■ 

-Indonesia received $23 biDicm in as- 
sistance from fbe IMF and odicr ageai- 
cies after its currency ^i^ed tfar^- 
ening defaults by coirqianiies on foreign 
loans. 

Economists say that Sooth Korea 
must reslmcnire its ailing financial sec- 
tor through meigers and alliances. 

"Otherwise, an ensuing financial . 
crisis coold develop into an uncontrol- 
lable situ^on," sairi Lee Phil Sang, a 
inofessor at Kcnea Univenify. 

Analysts estnuate diat to^ nonpcr- 
fcnning loans in the filnandal system 
could exceed 20 trillinL wcm by the end 
of (his year. (AFP, Bloomberg) 





Bwbie has riskd aO and changed into a brunette. And diUdren seem 
to like ho* new hairdo. More than 100,000 doUs, wiudi retail at about 
$35, were sold in the first few days on sale a month F^e 16. 


Bank of En gland Lifts 
Rates to 5 - Year High 

Quarter-Point Rise Aims to Stem Inflation 


By Tom Buericle 

Imanadoivl HeruU THhoif 


LONDON — The Bank of Ri^lanH 
raised its short-term interest rate to 
the highest level in five yean Thursday to 
tcy'to slow Britain's booming economy 
ara to contain isfhaionaiy ixessures. 

The move was also seen as a ctear 
sign that nonnalcy is retnniing to West- 
.em financial markets after the recent 
turmoil emanating fioiii Asia. 

The ()uaiter-point nue rise to 7.23 per- 
cent in ibe bass leoding rate — die lof^t 
rate at whidi the ceimal hank leitds to 
connneRial banks — surprised many 
financial analysts. Th^ hadesqiected the 
central bank to ^ away film an m- 
crease now to avoid die risk of quoiting a 
sdl-off in a volatile stock marl^ 
Instea^ the bank indicated by its ac- 
tion that h was far more concent about 
the hoEoe-^own fuel behind Britain’s 
nearly 4 percent growth rate dian it was 
about the prospect tiiat Asia's woes 
might reveroerate around (he globe. 

**A rate wire was fully justified" 
because Britain's economy continues to 
at a pace that threatens price sta- 
lulity, said Paul Me gg yesi. a currency 
analyst at Deutsche Morgan GrenfelL 
Tbe move suggests that ceot^ banks 
in the United States and Continental 
Eurufte are likely to foe] less restrained 
die recent Asian market turmoil, now 
Western markets have stabilize 
analysts said. 

"Many central bankers remember 
that after the 1987 crash, when diere was 
a i^er market decline, it proved to bea 
mis&e'to ease monet^ policy." said 
Kim Scboenbolz, chief economist at 
Salomon Brothers. 

The Federal Reserve Board and die 
Bundesbank are unlikely to follow suit 
and raise their rates any time soon, 
thon^ he said, because ^rice pressures 
re main subdued in the United States and 
Germany. The Bundesbank central 
council met Thursday but held rates 
steady as expected. 

The rate rise, the fifth this year, along 
witii Britain's cobust economic growth, 
underlines Ae huge difference b^eei 
' its economy and that of the Contineat, a 
difference that has persuaded Ae L^ 
hour goveiument to stay oat of mon- 
etary union until at least 2001 or 2002. 


"We're close to a period of mu- 
imum divogeDce," Mr. Merest said, 
"but that's not to say they wul begin to 
converge any time soon." 

In its announcement, dw Bank of 
land’s Monetary Policy Comrainee 
toe economy was continuing to 
growatan "unsu^ainablerate" despite 
four earlier quaxter-poini increases over 
the summer. 

Consumer demand remains buoyant 
at home, and rmorts are growing of a 
shortage of skilted labor, which could 
put upward pressure oo wages, it said- 

The pound’s recent stren^ has not 
dqires^ exports or moderated infla- 
tion, which at 2.7 percent is ninning 
above the government's target of 2.5 
percent, it added. 

Most major British commercial 
banks followed Ae move by raising 
their base lending rate by 25 ba^ points 
to 7i2S percenL That should quickly 
translate into higher b(»rowing costs for 
industry and homeowners because most 
British debt is floating-raie. 

The big question was whether Ac 
latest increase would be Ae last for this 
business cycle. While some analysts 
were xnclmed to Aink it would be the 
last, Meg gy esi preActed rates 
would need to nse to as high as 8 percent 
to slow the economy to a more sus- 
tainable growA rate of 2.5 percent. 

Stock prices fell oo news of Ae rate 
rise, with Ae Hnancial Times-Stock 
Exch^e lOO-share index dropping 30 
points immeAately. The index clos^ at 
4,863.80, down 44.5 pomts. 

The pound jumped to $ 1 .69 1 S in Lon- 
don from $1.6755 on Wednesday. The 
pound also rose to 29109 Deutsche 
marics from 2.8872. Prices of govern- 
ment bonds fell driving up Ae yield on 
the b enchmar k lO-yeOT ISSUe to 6.63 
percent from 6.38 per ce nt Wednesday. 

■ Lenders Ponder Rate Move 

Nationwide Building Society and 
Bradford & Bindley Building S^iely, 
Britain’s two big^t nxingage lendezs, 
said th^ would not follow the central 
l»nk am would not raise their mterest 
rates until Bloombog News le- 
pCMted. "We've decided not to pass 
Aese rate rises on to our customeis at 
least unA frext year." a spoilsman for 
Nationwule said 


WALL SIREET WAKH 


Real-Estate ‘Vultures’ Widen Search 

With More Money Ouxsing Fewer Pirf^kertie^ bwes^arsLookFardwrj^idd 


By Leslie Eaton 

Nei» Ytirk Tuna Serrtet 




i tfv 

i i *♦ 


» \- 


fN EW YORK — In Ae world 
of profossional real-estate in- 
vesting, no one is flying 
hi gher tiian Wall Street’s 
vulture ftin^whidi in the early lS190s 
swoc^pedm to buy distressed properties 
whose values have since soared as die 
economy has recovered. 

And no one is feeling mcne on top of 
Ae world than Blackstooe Oioui). fit 
just flve years, tibe firm has' raised' 
millions of dollars to buy real estate, 
produced eye-popping retains of more 
A^ 50 percent a year. ^ 

Blackstone has been so successful 
that big investors are. flocking to the 
firm, which anTV>*'"*^^ ’niuxsday tiiat 

it had raised $l . 1 billion to form a new 
investment frind, one of the laige^ 
pools of money ever raised targeting 
ccanmeicial prq)eities. 

WiA so mnch money at its disposal, 
Blackstone, which jokingly calls itself 
a g t*?hh investor because oi its low 
public profile in real estate, j^ Ae 
ranks of such Wall Street giantt as 
Colony Cmital, Morgan Stanley and 
Gokfanaa, Sachs. . . 

But for all of these firms, the arr is 
increasingly turbulent. Tlie rdiound m 

almost all lands of real estate, aUovv 

Ae United States, means that there is 
far less carrion for Ae vultures to de- 
vour. 


Mean^riiile, there, is more cooqie- 
tition for pix 9 estiesw Iifhmey has been 
pouring into real estate, boA. through 
the private funds and tiinm^ Ae pnb^ 
iic-iaoper^ conquoies cali^ real-es- 
tate investmeiit trusts, or RETI^. 

All of vrinriiisiaQmptiiigsomemar- 
ket watdwrs to worry that real estate 
may overheat eyen £b^ than usual in 
whri tra^tionally has been a boom- 
and-bnit busmess. AlAou^ the funds 
are a rdatively small iiocce in the tdl- 
lioDrdollar U.S. real-estate market, 
Aey are a potent one, often serving as 
the ca^yst that prooopte other in- 
vestors to move into apaxlicnlari^fon 
or kind of investmeoL 
Iherecovoy mreal.estateis forcii^ 
Ae funds to adopt new stratifies in 
their efforts to sustain Ae annual re- 
turns of 20 percent ex' nibre that Aeir 
mvestois have come to etqiecL Not 
only are the funds branching ODt into 
opMating companies. hucDcy hotels 
and mmm theriers, they are also ven- 
turing even farther afirid by starting to 
develop new projects fiom scratch. 

And the vidtares are g^hring a taste 
for 'everything from escargots to en- 
chiladas as A^ search die globe for 
their traditional fore — pnmeitEes (or 
pro p er ly owners) wiA prowms. 

^nPbe way the business is moving 
now, yon re^y have to lem to wnf Ae 
wave,** said StqAen Sfchwaizman, < 
president ^BlacksteneL 

To be- sure, the ftind operators —- 


who call Airir vehicles '^oppartuDify 
fun^," rather than vutear viutiires — 
say ihi^ are w^ aware of die 
cyclical nature trfieal estate and agree, 
sometinies leliictaiicly, Aat iavesfois 
nuBt scale back dieir etmectatimis fte 
pEofits.Andevenifaoq^d^arede- 
vrioping vaeant land and butldizig new 
projects, the ftmds assot, t^ wiQ 
av(wl the excesses that led to disuter in 
the late 1980s. 

"Because we all remember what 
overhoildmg Sid, we are carefully 
momtering amply and demand," said 
Ti*"*g| Neidich, chairman cf Ae' in- 
vestment coamiittee of (joldman, 
'Sachs’s Whitehall real-estate ftmds. 

moDey available for develop- 
ment today is much more focused and 
cautidus than m Ae Irie 80s." 

Stilt foods are now paying for iiiare 
forbuildiiigs dian affic^fBtaiedjnsta 
few years ago. And a decade ago, when 
vahite were similar to today’s levels, 
aeconfiag to the data ftmn the National 
Council of Real Estate Investment Fi- 
dudacies, American real estate was 
beadmg for disaster. 

. Much of Ae most roecnlativeprapi 
exiy pordiased in ttie 1980s endedup m 
the hands of the savings and loans that 
bad it; emee A^ went bust, 

the mps^a^ moved to Resolution 
Tnist '-Coip., the govemmient bocly 
diaiged with clearing up tiie mess. 

See REAL ESTATE, Page 21 


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The Dow 


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ESTERiNATIONAL HERALD TRIBL^~E; FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 7, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

When Toys Are Dyeing to Please 

Barbie Goes Brunette as Fight for Kids’ Hearts Heats Up 


SOurca: B/OOnHjefg. Reuteis iMCimiioiHl HoalU Tribune 


Very briefly: 

• World'mde semiconductor sales rose 14.7 per^at, to 
SI 1.8 billion in September the year-earlier period, the 
hipest total in 19 months, according to die Semiconductor 
• Industry Association. The data show continued strong growth 
in the second half and higher sales in three of the four major 
'chip mailcets. 

• Interoational Buaness Machines Corp. introduced its 
first personal computer for underS 1 ,000, the Aptiva E16, after 
admitting it had migudged bow the marl^ for low-priced PCs 
caught on with consumers. IBM’s rivals have had low-priced 
PCs on the market for months. 

• Patriot American Hospitality Inc. agreed to buy 95 per- 
cent of the Buena Vista Palace Resort & Spa at Walt Disn^ 
World Village in Orlando, Florida, for about $148 million in 
cash, assum^ debt and oAer consideration. 

• Hilton Hotels Corp. ended takeover tallK with ITT Corp. 
but said it would continue to pursue its $9.3 billion attenmt to 
buy the hotel and gai^g conqiany. ITT's board met Wed- 
nesday to weigh the Hilton bid against its existing agreement 
to be bought 1^ Starwood Lodging Trust for $9.8 billion. 

• Republic Industries Inc, the conglomerate run by Wayne 

Huizenga. agreed to acquire four car dealerships in Houston 
for $75 million in stock. Bloomberg, Reuters 


Profit and Sales Climb at Thomson 

Bloomberg NenfS 

TORONTO — Thomson Coip. said Hiursday its third- 
quarter profit climbed 14percent on higher sales and margins 
at its electronic-infonnation services, publishing, newspaper 
and travel divisions. 

Thomson said net earnings rose to $342 million ftxKn $301 
a year ago. as revenue rose 10 percent, to $2.7 billion. The 
figures are in dollars. The results from the year-ago period 
included a one-time gain of $S9 railUon foxn the sale of some 
of the company's newspapers. 

AMEX 


By Dana Canedy 

New York Tunes Senice 

NEW YORK — Barney, a 
purple dinosaur, has teamed up 
with Bill Gates to go interactive. 
Holiday Barbie has a dye job — she 
is a brunette for the first time. And 
youngsters are bonding in a big 
way with cyberpeis. 

An unusually wide range of hot 
toys is on the market this y^, 
including some updated classics 
and several newcomers. 

Action figures tied to blodrbuster 
movies like die le-released ’’Star 
Wars" series and the ’’Batman and 
Robin" sequel are already vanish- 
ing ftom $«xe shelves. Plush n^s 
have made a crandxick, hdped by 
tire popnlariQr of Beanie Babies and 
lari y^'s Ut, lickle Me Elmo. 

“There are a lot of new thii^ 
happening in die toy business, in- 
cluding die move toward inttr- 
activity, ^riiich is creating a re- 
newed sense of interest/’ said 
Martin Romm, an analyst ^o fol- 
lows the toy industry ftx Credit 
Suisse First BostoiL A^ widi more 
fcM* consumers to choose from, toy 
merchants h(^ to do better than 
the measly pnmts that have marred 
some previous fourth quarters, 
when th^ do more than then- 
business. That would also help re- 
duce the number of costly post- 
holiday matkdowns of duds. 

The Toy Manufacoireis of 
America, which measures the 
value of toys shipped, said it ex- 
pats to exceed lari year’s $14.5 
billion by at least 5 percent David 
Miller, president of the trade group, 
said if toy retailers’ sales k^ up 
dielr performance so far this year, 
the would be higher. 

VGchael Goldstein, the chief ex- 
ecutive of Toys “R" Us, said, 
“This is the &st year in several 
years we have had a lot of hot 
items for Christinas." Parents are 
already lining up for Holiday Bar- 
bie, from Mattel Inc., arid the 
newly interactive Barney, frxhn 
^crosoftCoip. 

The 16-incn Barney moves its 
arms and legs, croons 17 songs and 
plrws games 1^ peek-a-boo. But at 
$ 100, it is not cheap. For $65 more, 
buyers get a transmitter that allows 
Baro^ to interact with Barney 
television episodes or videot^ies. 
Additional software and videos can 
push the price higher. 

"One concern is the price 
point," said Jim Silver, publisher 
of the Toy Book, an mdiistiy pub- 
lication. ^’If you buy all of the 
pieces with it, you can end up 
spending $250, and that’s not the 


Qrpc ( 

ford.” 


of item everyone can af- 


Despite the price, Mr. Goldstein 
said, “My ja^iction is it will be 
sold out 1^ mid-December." 

Of course, toy stores are selling 
as many stuffed animals thri tickle, 
wiggle and giggle as they can, h(^ 
ing to recreate last year’s Elxm 
frenzy. One popular item featuring 
an El^ pal, Smg and Snore Ernie, 
from Tyco Toys hic., alrearfy has 
parents scouring toy stores. 

Anyone who has not heard of 
cyberpets must be living in a vir- 
tual world. Parents want to kill the 
things. Teachera have banned them 
from classrorans. And a comply 
in Massachusetts is even oSeiing 
free day care for them. The cy- 
berpets, which live in plastic eggs 
and cost about $15 each, are 
Tamagotchi, manufactnred by 
Bandai Co. Ltd., Giga Pets, made 
by Tiger Electronics, and Nano 
Pets, n^de by Playmat^ Toys. The 
cieamres require almost as much 
care as the youngsters who cannot 
seem to get enough of theiiL 


The appeal of the less than warm 
and fuz^ devices? "There is the 
instinct to nunure," Mr. Miller 
Mid ‘’And while a round com- 
puter chip is not a nurturing device 
itself, it is an intellecnial idnd of 
nurmring. It's a nice marrii^ of 
technolo^ and the 20th-cenniiy 
version of hugging." 

Hie craze is such that Bandai has 
installed a pause fetiure on the pets 

to keep thCT from creating dead- 
beat parents out of youths whose 
devices die while th^ are in math 
class. 

As for Holiday Barbie, which 
sells for about $35, consumers^ 
paientiy lite her new haiitfo. "The 
Holiday Barbie rells every year, 
and 1 ihinic they just wanted to do 
gftfnAthing ififferenL" Mr. Silver 
said. 

"In the first weekend they sold 

over 100,000 pieces alone, and that Barney, a high-tech dinosaur. ' 
. was over a montii aga" 

Not all toy categories are hot Gratiu a spokesman for Hasbro 
Board games remain a tough selL Inc., said, "^ey are losing ground 

And radfo-controlled cars are to the CD-ROM or hot movie- 
not big this time around. Toni Me- property-type purchases." 



Mexico Central Brink Intervenes to Shore Up Currency 


Gp^pSallv Our Miurkn 

. MEXICO CITY — Mexico’s central bank sold 
$200 million on the fbreigD exchange markets 
Thursday in an efibh to shore up tiie sagging peso. 
It was the third time in less than two weeks the Bank 
of Mexico intervened to support its current^. 

B ut tte intervention was than succesriuk the 
dollar rose to 8.19 pesos Thursday fimn 8. 16 pesos 
Wednesday, '^e peso has feUen about 5 perc^ in 
the past two wedcs. 


Banco de Mexico sold the dollars at an average 
price of 8338 pesos to L2biddeES.Womes about the 
cutiency weighed on the stock market Thursday. 

The beochmadc'Bolsa index closed down 37.10 
points at 4,786.58. 

. "We will see a lot of volatility until tilings calm 
. down and people scan focusing on fundamentals 
again,’’ said lliomas TuU, a manager of Latin 
American stodcs to Golfstream Global Investors 
Ltd. {Bloomberg. Bridge News) 


Dollar Underpinned by Rate Outlook 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the Deutsche mark and )[eo 
Thursday on expectations for in- 
terest rales in diose countries to 
remain lower than U.S. rates. 

New orders to Gennan manu- 
fectmeis fell 1.8 percent in Sqitem- 
ber from August That data, cran-. 
billed with figures Wednesday 
showing a suiixise slunqi in 
September indostiial ouipot and a 
rise in Gennan unoxqiloyinent 
quelled expectatkxi Goman in- 
terest rates may rise any time soon. 

“Germany can’t afford to raise 
rates," said Thomas I.jq)in.ski, 
chief cnnency trader at MTB 
Bank. “The Bundesbank may not 
have to react by raising rates b^ore 


the end of the year." 

The c^tral bank last raised its 
securities rqmichase rate Oct 9 to 
330 percent from an all-time low 
of 3 percent 

The yen was dogged by Japan’s 
weak ecoQCuny, which 1$ expected 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

to ka^ rates tiiere at record lows. 

Sha^ in Jrqianese banks 
plummeted to thdr lowest level in 
ei^ years Thursday on concern 
thri ^ recent coU^’se of Saiqm 
Securities Co. is a harbinger of 
friri^ hank weakness in J^»il 

The weaker the banking industry , 
tiie less likely Japan will boost its 
discount rate from an all-time low 


of 03 percent, analysts say. 

Still, traders hesitate to lift the 
dollar too far against the yen, be- 
cause its strength helps widen the 
U.S. trade witii Japan and could 
sp^ renewed trade tension. 

The dollar rose to 1 .7227 
Deutsche marks from 1.7173 DM 
Wednesd^, and to 123.220 yen 
from 123.(o5 yen. It rose to 5.7685 
Frendi francs from 5.7S3S francs 
and to MUS Swiss franca from 
L.404S francs. 

But the dollar fell against die 
pound after tiie Bank of England 
raised interest rates to a five-year 
lugh in a bid to keep inflation con- 
tained. 

That hefoed lift the pound to 
S1.691SfromS1.6813. 


I* < 

Asian Jitters 
And Pending 
Data Send 
Stocks Sliding 

I S" tV.VW* f ** 

NEW YORK— Stocks fell Thursday 
on.ner\'ousncss about U.S. cmplojTnew 
data due Friday continued 
about losses in Asian tnarkcis. 

Tto Dow Jones industnal uvurage 
closed- down 9.33 points ai 7,68334, 
while losing issues outpaced gatnxi^ 
ones by a 4-to-3 ratio on the New Yoik 
Stock Exchange. . 

The Standard Poor s 500-sharc in- 
dent ended down 4.25 points at 9383 1 . 

"We’re sort of in limbo here," said 

Charies Payne of Wall Street Stratcgicf 


|.;xeet 


UA STOCKS 

"Nobody’s building positions. There’s 
not any significant money coming into 
tiie mdreet to stay." 

A drop in Hong Ktms stocks priimpted 

more concern that Asia’s econom ic jTOb- 
lemsmayhujttheprofiisofU.S.cuii^- 

nies like Intel. 1 m chipmaker ended ■ 
down 1 at 73Vi The stock ha.s lost more 
than 19 points in the past nwnth. 

“Generally we look to the Intels of 
the world.’’ Mr. Payne said. “Intel's 
still a little shaky.” 

Investozs also were reluctant to buy 
before the Labor Depanment relies 

employment data forOciober on Frittoy. 

The report is expreted to show a tight 
labra* maricet. which could lead to iii-. v 
nation throu^ higher wages. 

“A strong employment report would 
give the maiket quite a shMk," said 
Murray Gunn at Guinness Mahon & Cn. 
inLondoa 

But if the report shows stable em- 
ployment costs, analysts say the Federal 
Reserve Bo^ is likely to keep rates 
steady when they meet next week. 

An initial public offering by Amer- 
ican Sktiira was the most actively traded 
issue on me Big Board. The ski-rcsort 
operator sold 14.8 millitxi shares at 1 8, 
and they finish down 1. 

Centocor rose 2 lt/16 to 52'A after 
U.S. r^ulat^ approved its heart drug 
to two new uses. 

Retailing slocks were strong after 
several store chains reported strong 
s^es to October. Wal-Mart rose tc^ 
3613/16andDayton-HudsonTOse.3Vita ^ 
68 %. 

In the Treasuiy bond market, the 
price of the benchmark 30-year issue 
rose 10/32point,to 102 14/32. The yield 
fell to 6.20 percent from 6.24 percent 
Wednesday. 

Prices were lifted by strong demand , 
for new issues sold by the TYeasury in its 
quarteriy refunding 

(AP.Retaers, Bloomberg I 


.Jiiiiiriii » 


: mhi k 


;^ 7 . a., r. 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


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2M rk 

MM IS4k 


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JM 3 
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21 27M 

7M 74k 
U4k t47k 
7M TVk 
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|V| IM 
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2IM 21k 
SM SM 
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14V) IM 
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VfB flM 
SHh 421k 
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7*4 24h 

B»k a 
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4M 4)k 
3M 3k 
304 2»M 
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13M I2M 
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47M 4tM 

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4M «l 
7M 74 
104k U4k 
SM JIM 
I2M IM 
SOM 3PM 
31 3Dlk 

'1 *k 

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144 IS4 
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n -M ?i '4 
104 4 m 
I’V 74 
44k T4k 
II lOM 
10% ll»k 
llvk 104k 
71 74 

04 Tkk 
ir-k 144 


Dow Jones 

opM HM Lm M a*. 

Indus • latm rravu tmois 7<e3J4 ex 
Tmni jaoM SiaTi 3i».2i 3211.00 +402 
UH 243k6 244^ 24142 2^ -IJI 
Chh> 2S07JM 25ISJB 249SJi SOUO -iM 

Standard & Poors 

mMkPl 1k^ 

wn um cMw 0 ojt. 
indiRMals 1T06J2I001S5I09&36 1093.13 
TnaiSp. d78J5 671.42 674Si 673J79 

UflMes aOBJI 207.14 207^4 206.10 

Rnm 11194 11131 11117 I12J8 

SPSOO 9149^ 938.16 942J6 93151 

SPlOO 904.66 89409 99739 993J5 


^ ^ ^ ^ 

Tma 4SI5I 4575S 4SIUi 

MW 30IJI 29046 299JB 

&anoe 47252 46954 47I.M 


IMMHIUac 

SSlSSi' 


lA in 

46 454 
14k IVk 
OCVk 07 
look 102M 
ZS*k 25k 
454 4S 
29 Vk 29Mk 

41 4IM 

SO 241k 
TOM 794* 
•711 roSk 
13M 13Mk 


Nosdoq 


2Z77V7 74«k 
129*30 4M 
112057 38M 
103302 251* 
94417 0411 


Nasdaq 


MM* IM iMl 
1438.14 1422.42 142353 
1313.19 U03.99 130451 
194S52 193551 1941M 
179450 178057 174355 
22*652 2289.10 2S454 
11IS52 110754 11019 


6909 4050 4050 


sma sh 

47954 41k 


2941 S*k 
ISM >32)% 
354k 3S4t 
304* 414k 


4) Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 

lOUnMcs 

lOMooMds 


10433 kDiO? 
10101 -OJU 
I0&66 ■*■022 


Trading Activtty 


Nosdoq 


•a ink 25M 3M .1 

n« 4544 4« 45 -M 

nd M 7«k 14k +4k 

^ 1: ^ 

sa 4k‘ fk 4k _ 

4ra 141 14* IM +M 


1400 2299 

200 loss 

lOil 100 


wgll Low LoM Cbgo OpW 

Grains 

CORNKSOn 

SHOO tw nMiWOV- ofOs par IkhM 
Dec0 283M 378H 383 +4)4180589 

Mor9B '393M 28744 2921* 95M 104444 

lWnr98 298)6 294 2984* +4 31562 

MM 302W 298 302 934) 4156) 

Seo9B 294 29044 29S4I +l» 8506 

Dk98 293 3894) 2934) +{) 0.933 

M99 .304)* 3R 3041) 93 255 

Eat aTOes 6M00 VMS (olo* 80093 
VMS Open M 392.301. Off 1384 

SOYBEAN SAEAL (CBOT1 
100 Ions- doom per ton 

Osc0 24150 23750 2415D 9250 41111. 
JonOe 23450 23050 23A10 +150 2350 
JMorn 22950 22550 22850 +150 10936 
M0798 22550 22100 22550 +150 17581 
JHl$8 22550 22250 22S50 +090 11583 
Aug98 23650 22150 22450 +150 17SS 
E0. adas 31000 WMi nM 4UI0 
Vfttfa open H 1 21921 up 572 

SOYBEAN OIL RBOT) 
saooo Da- CHdi par Bi 

Dk0 2559 2556 2553 +005 41931 

Jan90 2&7D 2551 2162 +058 211N 

Sllar98 2153 3573 2556 +002 71761 

M«n 2655 2S0 3655 +002 03K 

Mta 3115 2198 2658 -008 0448 

Aup9f 3185 2655 210 +002 01 

Ed.ai8HlU4.WMl9Qies202S3- 
VMk epMl UP 1 1 1991 IS 566 

SOYBEANS RBOT) 

1000 bu mlnlnwm-eenb per bwM 
NorW 737N 7171) 46 1150 

Jan9l 731 718 7261) 9246 7L3S5 

M«9B 733H 722 72946 +21) 2A906 

MovW 737 7271* 73W) +2 17556 

JMW 7394) 721 73746 +1)) 11117 

Eat ades 60000 VMi sotos 0.04 
VMdk upan M 15I5M up 769 

WHEAY(CMT7 

lODOta mMnian. oat) par bioM 


3581) 

352 

358 

+2W 

50413 

373 

347 

372 

+1)* 

27.7a 

on 

375 

379to 

+M 

&375 

384 

98 

3B3H 

+7K 

1&7S4 


Eat adw 11000 VMS aoM 1A35I 
VMk open W 101577. dl 40 


LivdSloek 


AnsKkd 

Oedned 

^\SgS 


Dividends 

Conponr 


Market Soles 


NYSE 

Amm 

■ — 

fttWfWnl 

AtaMbRi 




CATTLE (CMEn 
48000 bsr owOf e*r to. 






6645 

67.17 

Iktor 


Fkbto 

670 

600 


MO 

emmm 

Anrto 

7252 

7112 


55841 

68176 

Junto 

700 

690 

7847 

210 

3257 


700 

TOM 


55841 

6950 

720 

7110 

7110 


Per Amt Rec Pop Coiwr 


iRREOULAR 

B un cpCedHI - 501 11-19 11^ 

GBionlAnliw _ 19511-14 liS 

MovanSAAOS . 516 11-7 _ 

SobtaeRaynSr -.103611-17 11-28 

WnCoqISooillGa H 5m 11-14 11-98 

STOCK SPLIT 
OigUMicnmnvelfarl o^. 

HuLunJi ineS lor4ai)W 


STOCK 

. 3« 12-1 1-2 


Ji BlockOnigA 


REVERra STOCK SPUT 
ARI Nctweiklta’dievenesplll 

INCREASED 

Adorns Resoo A .10 1M IMS 

MR«dd Q 5411-16 11-35 

iMiDiugA. 0 515 IM 1-3 

Q 5311-31 IMO 
Q .15511-30 13-15 


Thomson Corp 


McDonald ICo 
Iiwn 


INITUU. 

Men . 5511-12 11-26 
:o -562511-12 11-31 


Comrer Per Amr Rk Pv 

■EXTRA 

WriBlOYWh) - 53 126 12-15 

REGULAR ' 

ASAHddb^ Q .10 13-1 IMS 

Ahmo won .. 0 5311-11 im 

AmerHoltnoeLr Q 50 1-12 1-23 

® J151M7 IM 
BMREfcSMTim M 5395 11-14 11-28 

Cq BoncorpInc O .1811-14 IM 

gTECcip Q 5711-21 M 

MnAmbnok Q 52 1M9 ij9 

M W-Aiw er Redly Q 5211-13 11-26 

0 .1213-15 1-16 
Mlttsw, _ .1111.17 11-34 

NewT^KBnen .M 5425 11-14 n-TB 

PMIfiE^W fl Q ,11 12.1 IMS 

gwbolgdwCp Q 5011-21 \h)9 

SPSfJoftW . Q 57S11-2S 12-9 

PwwMfc™ Q 5912-lS 1-6 

ghwaTigB 0 .1511-20 12-19 

WdlOl^ Q JK IM ].3 

g5*felpft 0 .1212-31 1-lS 

RoseoKhlnc Q 57 I3.l 1.3 

SacvrCdPMPoc e59SlM2 11-26 
- -nmml- ti minniliinili lll■ll■|| m 1 

5SS!SfSSSL«^ 


S!SiSfi£^ 

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NewAmerKUncn 

Piunkldf 

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OvUc&i^ 


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"-DiirfnlfliBiinnr 


Slock Tobies Expiahied 

Sdes Agues on DiidBeU. YOady dd IMB ifRodthe previm s wedQ Dhis ftecumd 

;^MnerilielimtlrBfiMtloi4WlMroosp»0StodidMdendannui*igto2SH^wnne 

hwboaip^nwiiBQ B Wgj^ ra nge dd dw^dBdia wifariipiiewatodBonloUBloae 

wieiiiistwwaiBW8ofcwoBngftQwginuBi^Bwis0fnefd5nnMdoniifth^^iijf|Mi^ 

0 • fMdend dso extra (s). b • annual rate d AMend plus stock dividuid. e - Eoiiidafirto 
Addend. GC>PEeiceeds99jcld-cdled.d'new)(eailylOH,dd.|asBbi7ho tad 
e . iMdend dedoied 0 pou in pnoedMg 13 iTionmi f . onnwl.rati 

Mraifon. g - dvMend in OmocSni Itinds. subjoct to 15% 

dwtored dter $pm^ 0 stock fiddroid- i - dMdond paid this yeas omiltecL defured. 0 no 

odion taRen at lotost dMdend meefing. k - Aridend ded^ or ^ 

occunHilolliie bsiw wRi dividends h oneon. m • anmrel rati reduced niM deddtrtioR. 

etoeklnprecB^ 12 mamis. iMM^value m eHlividend0ex.«feSimdato 
ifi . whM isiuedr m • 4dm wBiroiNs. X • exHiividend orc»!^^7XSSr 

xw - iniheui iranwrts. ex-dividMd and Hies in fid. yU - yidl z- Mlw InhA 


EaL adn 14694 weds aolm 1 ld9l 
Wads opan M 96,176. up 1560 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

No«0 7855 ^JO 7852 9465 4269 

iPS 25 SS TM5 +152 7591 

MreM 7952 78.20 7855 +080 1878 

Aar98 79.10 7150 79.10 +050 150 

”■“ -TW® ■►W5 816 

Angoa 8150 8055 I1.7S +a«S 318 

EaL sdee 2.916 Wtrik aulea 1242 
VMS opm M 16)772, OR 311 

HOOS-LaouKMER) 

Dac0 6117 6152 6255 555 19570 

Fab9e 6160 6157 6155 -OJO 10410 

A098 5950 5157 5950 -040 ASU 

Jun«. 66.« 6567 6112 -030 IIM 

Juin 643S 6450 6469 -052 1,140 

Brf. 8^ MSe WW« add is« 

wstfl 6 pM M 3iai£ up BM 


M98 6252 6050 61.13 -162 1148 

M0»8 6150 60.15 6057 -15S 939 

Mpy98 050 6050 6057 -152 220 

EsL ndes UnYtode sdek 1.971 
Vfedsapenint7511ap339 


Food 

COGOAUKSE) 

10 ueMc ken* S pu bn 
DaeW 1625 1599 1604 5 SAM 

M098 1667 1640 160 -7 3M36 

MnyOa 1409 1670 1675 -6 I&326 

Jul«8 1704 1690 1695 -5 .4020 

Sh98 1735 1715 1715 ■* &26i 

Dk90 1745 1736 1736 -4 B89S 

EsI. sdas T155D VMS adn 16540 

Wedsopen M lOMza (0 m 


COFFEECQiaE} 

0500 El- eants p 0 10 . 

OecW 1513S 14100 14650 335 10002 
JMr98 14350 13150 139.15 -4i6 0407 
May 98 12955 13650 13650 '-4^ 1046 
M98 13650 13175 13125 -450 L973 
13350 13055 13050 555 1564 
Ed. adre 75N Vbdk fdOS 11497 
VMS OpM M 31100 OU 80 

SUEARWOftL0 11 (MSE) 

I 1 UD 0 bs.- cenbpuR- 

M098 1130 1122 1155 -057 12140 

Maf90 1119 1114 1117 4.04 20630 

Jinn n.93 1157 11.0 undl. 71,8«. 

OdW 11.78 115$ 11.77 4UB 21085 

EsL tdes 1A665 VMi *dn 14456 
VMS open MOOLiei up 1518 


Hipii Low Lolaal oige OpM 
0RAN6E JUKE OtCTN) 

11000 !».- cods pwBL 

Ncw97 71.10 69JS 69105 -140 853 

Join 7455 7110 7U0 -150 2010 

AtarN 055 7650 7650 -US 11,779 

May90 0150 79U0 7955 -140 1940 

Eat adm N A Weds antes 1905 

Vtetfs open M 3M0S, off 1403 


Htoh Loav Ldaat Qige OpM 


Mgh Low Latea CPge OpM ^ 


eoLDOiaiuo 

100 tny doAon putrey a. 

NuvfT 31140 -150 I 

DeeW 31450 0150 3IU0 -1.30100229 
Jdin 0450 -140 3 

FtebM 31550 0350 0450 -150 31365 

A00 31750 0650 0 6 JO -150 75H 

Jui98 0940 0750 0060 .150 11400 

Anew 32070 .150 4514 

OdOO 32100 -150 1574 

DeeTC 32150 32100 32550 -140 11520 

BsL Odea 31000 VtedS sales 2010 
Vtetfsopsn M0OO64 off 1573 

HI MADE COFFER (NCMX) 

21000 feM-eeds parte. 

N0W97 9090 8070 0095 -1.0 1441 

Dec 0 9080 8850 8010 -155 3000 

Jn0 9000 09.10 8940 -155 1.297 

Fan 90 9050 050 8950 -1.15 1550 

M0W 9150 0.10 8950 -150 9543 

A0n 9035 050 050 -155 150 

6^90 9058 050 0950 -150 3410 

AfflM 9050 040 040 -150 150 

JdOt 9050 8940 0940 -150 V " ? 

EsL aotaa 1 lom WUda sales 0397 
Wads open H 664SI, up 50 

SILVER mCMX) 

SLOW buy ce.- ads par tray K 
Not0 4M.10 +170 2 

Dk0 49450 40250 40950 +10 5000 

Jan 0 0150 49050 49150 +240 0 

MorM SB050 0850 0140 +240 2180 

Morn soojo 0650 4M5d +10 170 

A49I 50150 +240 178* 

SepW S045D +250 645 

OrW S0850 SG250 50B50‘+160 109 

Eat. aatee 11000 VMS sdea 130 
VtedS opM M 94501 up 40 

PLA0NUM(NMEID 
0 tray <&. doivi per tray K. 

Jan98 0150 39450 39550 450 11,10 
AprM 39650 39050 39050 -950 1400 

Jri90 39S50 3050 2050 450 0 

Bd. ados NJL VtedS aotei 80 
VMS open M 12591 01794 

Qoaa Prevlaua 

UHDON METAIS {LMS 
OoHonparasaMetoo 
eiwikisau OB 0 Uiida) 

Spot 1MW 104W 1406)) 1407)) 

Rnirad 14050 1621M 163100 163400 

Capper CdfeHM ou fimte) 

SM 1P05Oni4UO I97S50 197750 
M«nd 196650 19*750 199050 199150 
Lead 

SM 57750 9850 S8850 5050 

Banwij n) 500 STOiOO 4000 MI0 

W 60410 6QSS50 60900 610050 

nramil 0300 61310 6100 eiein 

Til 

Spd 55650 55750 SSO10 ,9* 040 

nim 556100 557050 5SN5D 552550 

ZtocupeddHUOraoro 

IPOI ' IIOTEO 11920 1070 10S0 

Fteiwod 1020 1030 12370 1 *^ 

Low doH ai 0 OpM 


Financl 0 

UOTBIUSfCMER) 

simlltoHptsollHpa 

DeeW Run 910 910 453 1)53 

Morto 9108 KUU roUff u^ ^ 

M98 VSJS +00 495 

000 9455 +102 23 

EsL eoko 14B VtedS soleo 9S 
VtedS spn H 10461 oil 20 

SYR TREASURY (C907) 
rorouno prill- Ob 1 64ma of 10 pd 

Ok0 iOMO 1047 10047 + I 3 

Ed sdn 110 VtedS ados 31547 
Vteff) open M 261.361 off 1410 

If YB TREASURY (CBOT) 
roOHjOpo piM pis A32nds of 10 pet 

Dk0 111-16 111-02 111.14 +11 361828 

Mer 0 11T0 11036 1110 +11 KB 6 
Junto 11141 11141 11141 +10 110 

Eat ados 61326 Wen adas 71780 
VtedS open M 39R0A up 320 

US TREASURY BONDS (Caorn 

d pMioaaoo4is isonds dm pd) 

Dec 0 11843 117-10 11840 +20 6006 
Mv98 II7-26 100 1)70 + 0 ^ 7 ^ 
JonOe 117;iniO-0 1)7-11 +0 IIM 
^to 11741 .,20 2506 

^ letes 29000 VtedS utes XI7.J06 
Vten epee M 7DUU 19 7449 

L0N6CILT<UPre) 
QOm-plsa.33ndad10pd 
Ok0 TI 8 U 1I7-1S 11^ -0-17 140657 
Marto 11836 11844 II 8 I 3 ~-M 3 SS v 
Junto KT. M.T. 1180 ^13 
Eft solas: 90971. Pm.sdes: 63253 
PieiepnM.: 19400 on i,9U 

uRRman gov. bund OJFFE) 

DM 2 SOO 0 -plsdl 0 pci 

DK0 10156 la.19nr«0 HL14 290615 

*Au98 101.78 1010 1015) — aia ‘iffM 

EftaoteK 10431 Praisdes: 1446U 

Fim. span ML 261430 OR 194$^^ 


18YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONOS IMATIto Junto 9454 9454 940 -410 1080)7 

FFSIIOO 0 -Pltari 0 pd Sapn 00 9896 9197 -40 66 . 0*6 

Dec 0 9878 9BS0 9854—810)01419 DKto 950 94.0 910 -80 0,9|2 

S6ar98 9822 980* 9812-818 9.937 ASsto 910 940 9459 -80 3LQ,-3 

Junto 00 970 00—810 0 EiLMUa: 55J1& Prav.adn: 31091 


E*l adea; 110582 
Open tot; 11^^01,70 

ITAUAN GOVERMAENT BOHD (UPFE) 
ITL 20 Rtoon • A d I0jptf 
' Dec0 ni.0 ni0 I1U4 -037 I113H 
Marto 1110 1110 1110 -056 1024 
Junto H.T. N.T. 111.49 -836 

Ed. adw 41257. Am. soteK 0.10 
Pne.opentot.; I1137B «p 150 

LIBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 
0ndBan-ptsdl0pd. 

Nw0 940 9454 9454 URb. 31365 
ttoc0 940 94.18 91)9 unc8 11909 
Junto 9132 940 9451 undl 170 
Eat. adas 160 Wen 101011684 
wan toM M 0.514. dl L823 

EURODOLLAR (CME0 
SladOen-ptodWOpeL 
Ne»0 940 940 940 undk 20910 
Dee0 9454 9121 940 undk 531525 
Marto 9121 94.17 9419 +801 0L994 
Junto 9415 9411 9414 +00 341454 
SepM 940 940 9407 +80 01509 
DHto 910 93.93 9196 +00 21030 
Mar99 096 910 9195 *40 15100 
Junto 700 9187 090 *40 131527 
5099 9188 9184 9187 +40100877 

DfCto 9181 910 9351 *454 8490 

Md0 930 910 9182 +054 6050 

Junto 9179 07S 93J9 +804 58363 

Eft sates 357502 wen Mtos 299563 
wen upon tat 2582.07. Off I16QS 

BRmSH POUND (CMER) 

A^jBM aeaM Arfre. epi^ asfiiia Ml 

DK97^L% 15001^4+05016 40747 

Marto 1580 15770 1580+05076 SS2 

JORto 1570*4500 74 

EaL aotea 0394 Vten adn 7.206 
Wan epan In* 50571 up 241 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

1 0000 ddtan, S per Uik dr 
Oaeto .7174 .7144 .050+45004 78246 

Marto .720 Jin JISB+05004 3549 

Mnto .707 J20 701+05004 70 

Eft adas 650 Wen Mbs &04S 
Wan open M 7104 up 150 

GERS6AH MARK (CME0 

12100 ipaUft Spar nnfc 

Ok0 .5M 5794 014-05022 6810 

Mdto 5850 58« 584245022 170 

Amto 58674502 2457 

Eft)dea17.to1 Vten«deal75to 

Wan open M TUOl up 1927 

JAPANESE YEN (CMEm 
1^ S!""'X"V * Pto 1 M m 
gtoto -SS! -SI^S 5161-0501011759 

l^to 53M 5240 520-05010 LI74 

•Mto 501-4010 232 

a.,adea 1S5B Vten aotoa 31521 
VtedS open M 1 18548 up KMSV 

. swm FRANC (CMEm 
12100 (rano, s per bane 

-Sfl rmtuna 64,s7D 

Marto .7213 .068 7174-00044 lltf 

Jim 9ft a7S394M45 

» jotes 1 1.04 Vten Sdo) I807S 
9MS open M 49597 , off 04 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 
mm pm Spar peso 
Decto .11)47 .11)0 .11023-5069 
AMto .1140 .1100 : W-50» lom 
Junto .11010 .1000 .10)90-5DM 1B» 

Ed. Mtes 8217 VtedS tolH EDI I 
vren men tot 056401^ ' 

S-MONTH STERUNE (UFFE) 

gmwo.Dhditolid ’ 

Dae 0 ^5) 9259 9139 ^L20 13810S 

11492 

JwiM 92.57 9252 9253 —823 781B 

r£!E ^M4 ^450 62M 

Dk 9B 92t76 93*59 92,aS Si ftffT 

jSi^OO Sm 2*2 

JWI99 9101 93.» 92.94 -457 4LlSi 

antes; 328587 Pm satea: 
tooy.opanMj 661545 0 2,307 

ajONIHEUWSeARKCUFFEl 
OMIintowi.iitocI 10 pd 
^97 960 9*58 0658 +801 19.I+ 

“®jll 304514 

JMto 9814 96.14 9814 -451 Hm 

noth. 31400 

Junto 9870 9S5S 950 Unch. 298)2 

K gJt sjs 

86P99 MM *40 eS SS: 

toted 348907. PieihMtea: 107536 

Pie*, open Ml: 1511.10 up 12*;^ 


^NTHPIBORUHATIF) 
FFSm^.Mdltopd 
gKW •^1’ 9652 -001 SUM 

Marto 9S.92 eS0 0S.yB Uneh. 

Junto 95.67 9S0 9S56-on 

to.49 ^ mSy-Sm lifS 

DKto 9834 9637 9551 -00 M 

Eft sotes: 49,226. 

OponlnLi 201.955014)8. 

34MNra EUROURA OIFFE} 
ITLIinOton-jtidmpcl 

Ok 97 93.70 9364 934$ -*** — .— 

Marto 9464 943S 94ul40m^ 


F)s«.a|WnlM.: 508283 off 1.99S 


Industrials 
COTTON 2 (Ncno 
5800 tea.- cants per te. 

Dk97 720 710 720 40 ASM 

MvM 716) 7125 730 451 IU3B 

MwTC 7440 7415 7420 -051 HLSiS 

JdW 780 747D 740 -054 HU43 

Odto 750 750 760 +00 

Eft SdesNA Wen sotea 6.358 ft 

Vte«apanM94631aiii,464 

HEATING OILCNMER) 


OK9r 00 570 57.43 *82S 54J31 

Jdltt 580 0H) 5859 +8S 26099 

Fehto 00 5840 00 +822 11*0 

Mldto 5845 570 0.99 +80 RU? 

Aprto 00 5654 S654 *057 Uf» 

May99 550 015 5554 +052 17» 

Junto 00 S40 5459 +80 24IS 

Eft adee NJL Wen aotas 31137 
Wan open Id I2&234 up 1164 

UGHT StVEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1.00 bd.- donois per bbL 
DK97 300 030 00 +00 8MM 

Jnto 200 300 3860 +00 0156 

FabN 2051 2859 2045 *80 38S0S 

Merto 2873 200 061 *00 21I10 

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INTERNAIIONiX HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 17 





Philips Executive Held ia Fraud Inquiry 


^ ^ widening criminal in- 
y““8a*»on mto sospe^ insider tratog, tax 
f™? money laundering throud dte Am- 

wfS?**®® extended to a directs 
of 0^ oi the NeAerlands* biggest conx^ate 

pension funds on TbirSw, 

A ^pcOcesman forPhilips Electronics NV con- 

jjumed ,ka« A 



X. BLJI. ’ uuii S ai;- 

Phil4» were not being investigated. 

It B purely private concerning this diStor 

It has notfOng to do with the fimd. I cannot say 
what he has been accused of precisely ” said 
Ben Gecrts, a spokesman for P hilip; 

^ About 1^,000 past and present Philips cm- 
pl^(^ belong to the Philips Pension^had, 

27 billion guilders 

(S 1 3.89 biUion) m assets. 

A spo&^oman for the Amstenlam pros- 
ecutor said a top coiponrte pmision-fund man- 
agCT, whom she identified as F JL, was 
and has confessed to tax hand and fdageiy. No 
other details were (Usclosed. 

The spokeswoman, however, wididiew an 


earlier statement that there had been **$everal** 
arrests over the past five days. There had been 
only two aire^ bringing to six die number of 
people held since the scandal erupted Oct. 7A\ 
when about-200 police officers reided four 
Iffiokei^es and die Amsterdam stock eschar^, 
seardung for ^dence of tax evasion, money 
laun&ring and fiaud. 

Authonties in Britain, Switzerland and the 
Dutch island of Curacao in the Caiibt^ staged 
simultaneous raids. 

Dutch media repoired that du latest azresr 
came after fraud officers maniwed to crack a 
code protectiiig seven of about BO anonymous 
acconnts, some of whidi dat^ back to 198S. 

' The Foundadon for Coiporaie Pension Fiidds 
said it netted diat one of its members had 
come under susnidon. 

Mr. Geerts declined to. nama die director: 
“He is a director, not a managing direct9r,** Mr. 
Geerts said. cannot say what he has been 
accused of precisely.” 

A spokesman' for the Axnsterdm stock ex- 
change said the bourse backed ^ invesdgatioo 
and wanted ton^ier controls to be hitrodiced. 

The exchange has been at pains'tb' distance 


iisdf foiiD ibe scandal, stressing that it had b^n 
used as an instjument. 

On Thmsday, die directs of a small Dutch 
bank resigned from the exchange's SD^ervisoiy 
board in a bid to ward off bad publicity. Hans 
Poatier of Bank Baagert-Pontier said his de- 
cision followed repeals in^licating a elie^ 

“Mr. PoDtier wants to avoid any association 
between diis question and Amsterdam ex- 
changes,** die bank said. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 

■ Electronics Units Set for Streamlining 

Philj]S said it would streamliae hs elec- 
tronics di^ions to b^er coordinate marketing 
of hi^-volome consumer products and busi- 


ness equipment, Bioombeig News reporred 
Emdooven. 


from 


The compimy said it would brihg more busi- 
neas-electronics products, such as foxes and 
communications eqidpmt^ into a new divi- 
sion. “Weean now pot one foee to die market,** 
8^ Angeliqoe Panlusseo-Hoogakker, a 
spokeswoman, for Philips. 

The r ealignmen t is not a c«t-saviqg effort 
and should not be confhsed with a stiai^c plan 
to be presented euiy next year, she added. 


Buyers Slam 
Brakes After 
A- Class Flips 


CuofdtV Sier^irai ikifMAn 


Scandinavians Phones Go Unplugged 


- 


Bloomberg News 

STOCKHOLM — ^ When Lars 
Oestiund bought a summer house in 
Tyresoe, on the oaggy archq)dago 
outside of Stockholin, he unhooked 
the phooe — but not because he 
wanted peace and quiet 

Ddng the same mobile phone at 
work and play, the 35-year-old jour- 
nalist was moving with die toes in 
Sweden, where there is one mobile 
^one for. every thr^ people, 
rrance,. by cratrast has fewer tfian 
one in 14, and f^ina one in 30. 

With so many fduMies, and oedy so 
many potential custemers, Swedish 
netwmk opaators like Telia AB, 
NetCom Systems AB and Enrt^xd- 
itan AB are making inroads to marr 
kets diat had been drmtinated by 
fixed phones. 

‘Teople are using tbdr mobile 
phones more ofren and there are 
more ways yon can use foem,** said 
Peter Edw^ vrtio owns NetCom 
stock ^j^rt of the 12 bOlion kronor 
($1.6 billkm) in Nordic etoties be 
manages at Odin Fonder. ^Chages 
could come down dramatically and 
people may start to use mobik 
phones more in the home.** 

The lion’s mobile-phone 
makers, LM Ericsson AB cd Sweden 
and Nokia ^ of Hnland, which 



come true elsewhere. 

The invmtment house Salomon 
Brodiers said in axeceot r^iorttot 
the number of mobOe-pbooe snb- 
scribets worldwide woiudrise to 1.6 
tnllion in 2003, or 20 percem ^ the 
worid*s pc^nl^OD, mm 200 mil- 
liOQ year. 

If grawdi is slowing anywhere, it 
should be in Scandinavia, but that 
just is not haj^ienii^ fnxed-line 
subscni^ons rose OJ percent to 6 
million in Sweden last year, u^le 
the nimtiier of mobilo-itone users 
rose ^ percent to 2.7 miUidn. 

“It feeds on itself,** said John 
Jensen of Salomoo Brothers, who 
has a “hold” cm Europolitan after 
its stock more than doubled in a 
year. *'As more people becooie 
users, the cost of not owning a mo- 
bile phone U going op and the cost of 
owning one is going down.** 

It was S we^* s early ad<^oa of 
competition and new tecfoiology 
diat put the nation in the vanguard, 
rather than anything in the Nonfic 
soul, analysts say. **lt*8 signaUng 
die way diat othv European conn- 
tries will go,** said Jeremy Alon- 
Jooes of Lehman Brodiers. 


That way invedves die 

market to users other tfam bn^ess* 
men andyi^ipies. NetCom’s mobile 
{diooe busm^, Comviq, in May 
started selling prqiaid cards, wid^ 
out phones or snbscriptioos. That 
alk)^^ teenagers with no credit to- 
boy snbsctibti^ for nse with their 
parents* old mobile phones. Within 
a mondi, NetCcm bad sold 100,000 
oftheeards. 

**We now sell at gas stations, 
newspaper kiosks, foM steres, so 
we are very close to etuI-^Bera,*' 
said Chief Executive Anders Bjo- 
, erkm^ NetCom is cmitrolled 1^ 

' Swedish investor Jan Steabeck 
Mobile phcxies are also fining in 
die worirouce. Etmmlitan sig^ 
hs first ‘^wireless office*' omoract 
last month to provide some 800 em- 
ployees at &icsson's microwave 
^sterns office, near Gothenburg 


wid) mobile phones. As long as calls 
are made wjtiiin 



\a<Mtkaaii/nir \iMiMnihn» 


A Pleasmg Profit 


r^atrman Martin Kohlhaus- 
seo reporting that Commenbank 
AG*s tfaiid-quaner pretax profit 
rose 52 per^t to 2S4 billion 
Deutsche marks ($1.47 billion). 


STUTTGART — Mercedes- 
Benz AC said Thursday that 1,000 
cusiomen bad canceled orders for 
its new subconqiact A-class mo^ 
in the past five days after the car 
tipi^ while makhig a tight turn 
dunng a test drive. 

But'die carmaker also reported 

1.000 new ordeis and said that it had 

100.000 mders for die model 

The launch of the A-Class 

faltered last month when a Swedish 
journalist rolled the subcompact in a 
test drive to see whober it qualified 
to be “Car of the Year.'* SuIk 
sequent Gennan and Swedish re- 
ports have said die car tipped over at 
speeds as low as 60 kilonieters (36. 
miles) an hour. 

Daimler-Benz AC, parent com- 
pany of Metcede^ said it would add 
dfictronic balancing eqni^nesit and 
change tires on swne cars at a cost of 
about 100 minion Deutsdie marics 
($57.8 million) a 3^. 

The modijBcaticni inverfves in- 
stalling a bdancing system alieuiy 
available in some mcKe expensive 
Mercedes models. The system is 




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Very briefly: 


made by Robert Bosch GmbH, the 
It German < 


Sest German car-paits maker. 
A-cIass, whidi costs about 
30,500 DM, competes against 
Volkswagen AG*s Golf and the new 
Citroen Xsara of PSA Peugeot Qt- 
roen SA in the European market. 
Mercedes plans to sell about 28,000 
models this year, with sales rising to 
about 1 80,000 next yetf as produc- 
tion reaches foil capaci^. 



ixoduce about 2300 Mercedes E- 
200 m 


models each year. Most of the 
cars, which sell for $100,000, will be 
sold in ^ypt, said Ifandum Riwzi, 
head of mvestment Authoi^ of 


alocal zone, such as 
a headquarters or finan cial district, 
they are charged at rates conqiarable 
to fixed-line charges. 

“We believe die- wireless solu-^ 
don can be cooqietitive widi the 
ffited,** said Devin Brou^iam,chtef 
finanrial officer of EoTopolitan. 


Enrapotiian is 51 percent owned by 
AiiTonc 


[onefa Commonic^ioDS lac. 


But as mobile phones become 
less of a luxury and other companies 
ant^r the miAnt, CMOpetition and 
new, lower-cost products will al- 
most certa^y cause per-call 
charges to come down an 
margins tO shrinlc. Mr. Alun-] 
sees Eun>poiitan*s avenge revenue 
per sabsenber falling to ^3 amoDih 
by 20^, from $70 a mcuith now. 


60,000-sqDare-metef 
(660,000-square-fbot) factory will 
employ 207 workers, while feeder 
industries are expect^ to generate 
1,100 jobs. 

The factory was built by the Egyp- 
tian-German Automotive Co., wmch 
was foimed in 1996. Daimler-Benz 
AG has a 26 percem stake in the joint 
venture, v^e National Aotomotive 
Co. ^ Egypt has a ^ percent stake. 
National lateroational Trade, anoth- 
er Egyptian company, owns the 
rest (Blownberg. AFF, AF) 


• Royal Dutdi/Shell Grmip said refining results had lifted 
third-quarter profit by 5 percent to £1.17 billioo ($1.97 
biUi(xi\ despite lower oil pnees. 

■ Fokiis Bank ASA and Union Bank of Norway have 
broadened th^ recent cooperation talks to merger 
tiations. The banks* boards are expected to make a decision 
this weekend and issue a statement on Monday. 

• The European Union's economic confidence index rose to 
103JmOctobtf,asevett-y€arltigh,from 102.8 in September, 
as consumers benefited firtmi an export-led recovery. 

• German industrial orders slipped 1 .8 perrcnt in September 
from August, but economists said the preUmina^ figu^ were 
erratic and would not push them to overturn optimistic growth 
forecasts. 

• The EU*s annual inflation rate was unchanged at 1 .8 percent 
in September, boldirig below 2 percent for the seventh month. 
•Mercury Asset Man^emeot Group, Britain's biggest 
food manner, said strong global market performance and new 
bosiness in Britain and abroad lifted first-half profit 9.6 
percent to £61.9 million 

• Boots COb's first-half profit fell 87 percent to £23fi million 
as a £173.9 million one-time charge to sell an unf^fitable 
home-improvement subskiiaiy offret gains to its British drugs 
and other retail businesses. 

• The French govenunent plans to announce a 
bucket this month to match nnbudgeted expenditure with 
savings to ensure that the public deficit fits tiie plan for die 
single currency. 

• Nokia Oy said a Sqitember shipment of digital phones for 

the U.S. market had a softumv problem. The Finnish mobile 
^one maker does not plan to recall the phones, which were 
based on code division multiple access technology, but will fix 
the problem with new software. AFP, Bluemhetji, Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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177 


130 14 1405 

ISAS 2545 250 
14 140 
117 20 
179 M20 

S2JB 5550 

mS 150 1565 
310 310 320 
1575 140 
2STS 3505 250 
2 2 20 
0J9 00 00 

«ai st 57 
143 143 155 

40-60 dJ7 
50 50 >g 
3M0 40.10 410 
15.15 150 1^ 

845 US MS 


ENUGraw 

isfflsra. 

PomCaimW 

cgdAomd 

eoN 

ClffiOliMlOTB 
. BmodaGp 

is?**- 

GUS 


' IQ 

iiwiaaKEs 

lOngMHr 

LwBmn 

MSk 

Lbmo 

logNGoniQp 

U kim V lmU t 

jsr**-*^ 




IGdd 

NdPoMr 


Jakarta 


Copenhagen 


SSS. *1 s 

““““ i J I s 

.70 333331 


AitmM 

BkOdtlodon 

UNtgqa 

Gliding Com 

fe ii ccaniitf 

indoM 

MOfeO uu 

SONPO WMH W 

SediMfiK^ 

mefcOTunlaiN 


PWefeMrSOW 

2175 2775 2075 00 

m w » S 
i(S leSi 10m 

^ ^ us IS 

SOS 3050 00 SS 

tas 010 ^ MOO 
^ ^ 
g IS £1 » 


Ned 
KonidiUiiiw 
Oiwiot 
pao 


PRolerFmcl 


RdnodiCo 


RU GlBW 
~ soim 


ReddBi 
Rated 
RaedI ~ 



IS m m W 

^ Ho 40 

A 40.0 466 460 ^ 


RnfenHdgt 

, 

Johannesburg 

“ -• 

SUKMIF 

Sofetey 


Frankfurt 


AMO 8 159 

Adte 23U0 

MIOMNdO 3910 

AMaeo 100 

MBHto 46 

BASF 00 



•760 
, BMW' 1310 

tSSSt^ 


DAX:30W 

DRteiMa?HC4otf 

1270 I» JE 

SS SiS ^ 
Hi ^ SS 

400 6047 .6145 
700 7170 ri 

m WiSa 

'S ig >3 

69 n 025 610 

.85 


{Sss^ 

»NonBk 

Geatar 

OFSA 

feipteHdO* 

fegweCBa 

jSSvitesfedl 


NofflCnk 

itedeof 

ntadnawW O 

RKDaiMBd' 


31-“ S *92 

UA M w ±5 

S Sf ® J 
’ll ’IS If "il 
oS ag 

'Is 3^ '^2^ 
as “IS. 4 ^ 
ss 3 ^ ^ 

1550 150 160 

?S “ ss 

JS ’£18 eft 0g 

^ 010 57.10 570 


10 

16. 

96 

16 

107 


Scot Rawer 
Seontaf . 
SOVHIiTM^ 
SMTnnpR 
SMe 

SmBiJfepbew 

SffilbKKna 

SnOlBfed 

sihanElBc 

SlQoecsadi 

SStfoSw 

IWeilTla 

Tosco 

TtaaaoVWw 
XGiBup 
Tifinup :• 
Temktoi 
UiWnar 
UidAlM 
ufeNm 


90 90 
50 40 
70 70 

60 60 
10 10 
598 50 

50 U7 
1531 150 
137 115 
50 526 
112 590 
30 30 
lojo lo: 

9 '153 
129 324 
17 140 
60 50? 

169 244 

7 60 

1» 347 
535 411 

10 10 
566 451 

112 107 

100 100 
10 10 
590 574 

401 592 
40 575 

173 151 
551 60 

ITS 370 
7J3 70 
557 .40 
50 501 
60 507 

587 50 

10 10 
100 90 

IN 30 
1154 1131 
190 1104 
10 117 
544 50 

114 10 

942 10 
141 50 

70 7 

7.10 70 

1513 11B 
90 US 
172 34S 

147 10 

172 165 

1007 90 

ITS 246 
515 573 
70 70 

111 109 

187 571 

&» &30 
U37 130 
IN U1 

115 595 

110 US 
70 70 

US U) 
19 127 

70 5N 
70 70 
10 10 
5M 676 
459 553 

59 643 
90 90 
10 30 
IB 10 

335 30 

60 50 

19 20 
566 599 
120 110 
70 70 

9.U in 

336 in 
10 641 

J ST6 
190 313 
&00 459 

170 I6JI 

410 40 
546 4J0 
175 170 

.178 • 

530 40 

110 110 
1J9 177 

SJ2 50 
187 80 
551 548 

70 70 
515 652 
566 559 

40 570 

80 157 

40 576 

^ IS 

5S 417 
US . 5 
70 70. 


.90 90 
593 50 
70 70 
59 647 
10 10 


141 144 

1517 UJI 
10 190 

lit 50 
4N 5J2 
10 166 
1017 1039 

069 U9 
126 127 

14N 159 
■40 £95 
245 247 

6J0 578 

151 10 
40 40 

10 10 
40 456 

10 112 
110 100 
10 10 
5N 579 
IN 6 
576 5n 
19 167 
■ 151 60 

ITS ITS 

70 7.12 

59 59 

5N 5n 
40 60 

567 51) 

10 10 

1017 1031 
30 30 

130 1341 
mi 1181 

•0 US 
50 50 
110 30 

19 IS 
547 50 
745 70 
70 70 
1197 159 
094 196 

19 30 
034 046 

19 ' 170 
90 - M 
170 IN 
50 40 
70 791 
113 - 110 
50 5J4 

131 5J4 


BcrtHer 

BoiCMnite 

BoaPsiMier 

@SA 

Oadfete 

USST" 

PECSA 

GaNBfeiW 

ifc— Liifci 

PiTCD 

fete 

SntewBK 

ToOeadea 

Tfeteko 

UtePeoeu 

fedncCBanf 



Manila 


AiafeB 


jPMfeW 

CiPNem 

MteEfecA 

McOoBoN 

fete 

POBwO 

PbOL9«OW 

SeaMteB 

SMPitovHdg 



PS 

fedmlMK 


Pnite 70167 

14 

073 

14 

14 

160 

1175 

14 

14 

trx 

87 

879 

87 

160 

19 

29 

160 

66 

619 

159 

619 

3670 

39 3670 

29 

IN 

10 

IS 

60 

137 

19 

10 

131 

885 

BS 

05 

80 

n 

■u 

9 

45 

19 

6N 

19 

19 


Mmtico 


iOB>id»gN0 
Fiillwil. null 




6S0 

356 

3159 

6» 

352 

215 

265 

345 

33UD 

104 

109 

O 

362 

07 

IK 

1719 

10 

2609 

1909 


635 69 

365 39 

90 03 

69 69 

357 39 

01 019 
20 20 
341 30 

20 336 

109 10 

19 1619 
809 119 
39 39 

111 06 
19 Wfi 
177 178 

N9 1009 

366 2U 
1959 1959 


69 

3549 

30 

69. 

39 

01 

2649 

3419 

1849 

10 

0 

39 

3n 

1809 

1719 

109 

2S 

3009 



09 61N 6500 
1110 TIU 1156 
329 3UD 3U0 
159 UM 149 
41TS 429 4U0 
540 549 549 
347 lie 119 
09 09 09 
;u 3S9 
14U0 190 1449 
110 119 1U4 


Sfid Paulo laia mfete .N610 

PieWMKI 


sfNur 


BradateaPW 

BratraoPId 

CendoPM 


CegoPn 
CESfpW 
dPel. 


MilEin 


WBTfenWIeB 10B2M 
PntecUHUO 



■wbmoPW 

UgarSwvfdM 

^96 

tate Lk 

SMItadaiK 

SmrbOvi 

TtefBiPM 

Tafenlg 

TSpPM 


108 

70UO 

90 

130 

130 

0UO 


•0 

7N0 

4510 

Tin 

1175 

4900 

5019 


MfeitanPM 

CVROPM 


3400 

2400 

1500 

00 

99 

1100 

12511 

1110 

3300 

320 




32U0 

2200 

1309 

350 

90 

in. 1 ) 

1170 

lOUO 

3020 

K0 

89 

2110 


049 00 
7000 7000 
470 90 
000 01 « 
1179 119 
5000 5)70 
cynn siB0 
37001 400 

Ham Wiig 

23)9 34U7 
190 140 
370 300 
79 79 

)n0 mn 

12015 131.10 
1000 1150 
3060 S20 
320 90 

OS on 

2330 369 


Sydney 

MDitetn.0710 

Pnteii.«t0 


70 

6K 

79 

7 

ANZBMbb 

1047 

100 

109 

100 

BHP 

140 

169 

160 

169 


39 

373 

19 

39 

BeenMaalnd. 

09 

369 

270 

309 

CBA 

170 

170 

170 

179 

CCAtel 

179 

17.10 

13.11 

13J7 

CafetMTW 

747 

733 

70 

79 


10 

19 

50 

IN 

CSR 

5 

69 

60 


Faahnfeaw 

10 

7JT 

70 

OctewiHd 

*n 

118 

330 

IN 

IQAtelO 

110 

119 

119 

11 


3BN 

K10 

3173 

a.9 

MIMHdB 

NedABsTte 

19 

09 

10 

7) 

10 

710 

19 

317! 

NatMaMHdg 

Zil 

29 

134 

39 

NemCen 

70 

70 

79 



UO 

110 

118 


175 

39 

173 



670 

19 

69 

noTfeto 

179 

179 

179 

170 

StGmBeOarti 

173 

19 

147 

170 

VIWIC 

SM 

50 

5.14 

10 


U8 

TIM 

•0 

179 

10 

17.10 

176 

179 

VAiulwarttg. 

4X1 

670 

675 

673 

TUpm 

8lMt 

MofedfedBC 89177 
pmite 386122 


19 

19 

1439 

143 


10 

74 

88 1019 
70 719 

0 
70 sn 

CMnDnefeml 1Di9 

W 

199 

85 

CbfeaSted 

2670 

3610 

MX 

U9 

mom 

10 

9 

in 

809 

FennewnsOe 

09 

54 

569 

569 

HuaNnS 

109 

10 

IK 

106 

MQteM 

JM 

57 

9 

9 

teYOPfeam 

569 

S 

9 

S69 

Sldn Kan Life 
lUmnSni 

0 83 819 85 

1319 1349 1369 1119 

laiuH 

WdMoeElec 

319 

.1130 

319 

319 

749 

719 

749 

70 

indWaridOda 

a 

9 

609 

9 


The Trib Index 


PhBK 06 orare P.M ite raM ifeift 


AM. 1 , rse* 100. 

LAwal 

CMnga 

%clnnga 

pmriedMa 

Wctega 

Worfel hdetc 
Ifeghnl bKfens 

188^ 

-2.14 

-1.27 

+1143 

Asta/PacSlD 

99.78 

■0.51 

-0.61 

-19.16 

Europe 

186.38 

-2.10 

-1.11 

+15.62 

N. America 

20a87 

‘-308 

-149 

+2542 

S-Aimrica 

hidHifeW todnaea 

142.95 

-5.11 

-345 

+2442 

CBpRalgooda 

209.4 1 

-3.85 

-141 

+2242 

Cpnsunargooris 

195.52 

-1.74 

-048 

•»21.12 

Btetgy 

195l65 

-3.65 

-143 

+14.73 

FtnancB. 

iiazs 

•1A8 

-1.19 

+144 

MfeoateBDufi 

162.08 

•325 

-1.97 

+0.19 

HawMatBrials 

17024 

-2.55 

-1.48 

-243 

Service 

iee.74 

-1.25 

-0.76 

+1641 

UffiDies 

180.73 

-3.02 

. -144 

+1244 


TJte asBumtiom/HmaUTribuw WteSteMKrCoitetfiaUn OfetarMfewdor 
080 MamatfenoAr tmoaMe KDCko tel 0 eeinota ^ men Mtoondtton, « Am 
bpakferfeMite7^wnfeVlaT7)r7rfeJMB5lB7 Awnut tete ofe GoiAfe 
5697 Nwe Cwm fewm CcnyteiO'BeembdipNoia. 


MIMFudan 

MteTiwr 

MarafeMlg 

NEC 

NOifcoSfc 
Mkn 
Nbdende 
Nfepr, 

KISSSU 

Ntei Merer 
NKK 

NeomScc 

NH 

NTT Mb 

8 L^ 

Osaka Gas 
Ricsli 
Rabm 
Steott 
Sate 
SviwaBonk 
SonoEhc 
Seeem 


SeBwfew 
wiaem 


Steui . 
S6iiMmae 
Seean- El wBi 

Shorp 

ShBdwQPwr 

Skfeitar 

ShtoteCa 

ShfeeldD 

SldwokaK 

SaAbonk 


Tokyo 


NidM21feMS3U7 

Pntekl66«S 


Seoul 


Abmeto 

ADl6fepBn< 


sssur 


187 

11s 106 

159 in 

70 70 

1S7 156 
U> 39 
597 59S 

70 79 
10 19 

in sjo 

5SS 557 
657 69 
79 9J3 
343 39 

89 171 
39 129 
196 60 
39 ZS7 

59 657 
110 119 
70 70 

90 9.13 

221 m 

4jO 69 

101 50 

XM 117 
5 50 
T79 T70 

60 in 


m« 

^decanMa 


{ten 6450 

DaaMcHtavf 6300 
HnitfBlEag. 16800 
Aten 7S0 
UmB^ 1630 
KsnaEdiOk 90 
LCSanhxn fiooo 
mote» 5050 
SMawngDHar 37M 
hiiluia aEfec 5130 
SMoinM tW 
•KTafeam 4)000 



6000 

610 

1630 

740 

US0 

450 

2310 

4m 


Singapore 


5tea Hew 19053 
PfMfeBK 170002 


INfepenAt 
Abnot 
AhNOoiI 
Asm Own 
AiWOGfeB 
UTefeeMilsv 

DtTOnflflVB 

Blfd0E6tOM 

0nai_ 

ClHfesSK 

dankoEfec 

DriNbpfeait 

M^CMKoag 

OfeiiaBank 

MWB l ICIM 

OteSee 

DDI 

Dame 

EstJoponRy 


119 

4M 

31N 

564 

531 

07 

169 

40 

350 

3000' 

100 

340 


Montreal 


bbiun 

PiateaeOusJI 


ANiPKBinr 
)P« 



jSn 

196bwCM 

juTnCenata ^10 
PawerCfen 659 
PowerFW 4UQ 
OMbacwO 91k 

RasnCamaB W 
^SttCN 71N 


6145 61J0 AJS 
TtX VX 99 
910 99 9.10 
47.15 47JS 469 
lUO 710 710 
33 3m 33 
469 469 469 
Cl 9 4L35 
20L3S SL3S IDfe 
09 1) 2070 

469 65» 4S 
649 450 449 
X aOLU 9X 
IK 7 7J5 
TM 710 TIN 


173 VS 
89 I2S 
516 528 
1156. 1129 

1J0 IJ1 

174 59 

173 IN 
59 45) 
743 745 

69 69 
563 49 
573 579 

19 89 
427 ' 40 
&47 544 

107 105 

59 56 

5 102 
727 723 


Osk) 


-MXfeteTOlM 

Pmmsr0f24 


33SSX 

Can unfee Bfc 
Eton 
HtenfeA 
KnanarAao 


NmfeHte 

aSiSiA 


Nanfeal 

SS%*A 

PetaGaNre 

" lA 


DaecceanGIf 

SfenbreadAM 


124 

216 

279 

310 

10 

419 

371 

m 

2310 

IB 

635 

S9 

1399 

137 

90 

a 


121 121 133 

. . S9 716 3T0 

Z7.ie 279 27.10 
319 319 319 

m atm ?m 

419 419 419 
K5 3659 .360 
388 30 -99 

219 ai9 223 

183 15150 
62 624 

m 537 

1B9"t389 
US 136 

90 90 



154 111 

99 99 
ITD 5J5 
49 59 
178 115 
11.N 119 
59 562 

223 226 
162 U1 
245 186 
ON ON 
99 99 

116 131 



KflOBdElec 

KkdDjteRT 

KbfeBiete 

KebeSfeel 


0 


183 

635 

SN 

19 

136 

sn 


Stocldiolm ■ ’ s x.mtes BWAB 

FlIifHSsSSM? 


a S19 


ACAB 

ABBA 

AntOonon 

AOsA 

406 teevA 

auidOv 


97 96 969 9 

91 80 09 9 

313 307 2010 2U 


1219 1199 1309 ^ 


29T 318 3299 

305 91 382 303 



50 

149 

m 


1110 119 
80 404 

300 300 

50 535 

91 531 

00 807 

150 169 
48) 96 

359 2S70 

ana ana 
• am 300 
mo 199 
2358 3390 
59 575 

991 993 

395 98 

119 119 

m 03 

4040 4130 
230 330 
5790 5800 
179 179 

409 4B0 
9N 9» 

«2D 439 
130 139 
119 119 
995 050 

4110 4)70 
tin 1170 
20 266 
4M 409 
500 609 
49 444 

0560 9660 

240 2sao 
an 99 
2090 200 
1470 190 
293 297 

112 ZI5 
69 184 

997 109 
U7 19 
6M 632 

410 426 

•DO 6910 
1960 199 
325 325 

36) 364 

. 2DM 219 
350 3S0 
200 2070 
110 1110 
NO m 
30 269 

40 416 

159 isn 
577 m 
m 50 
130 130 
919 923 


119 

60 

310 

584 

50 

04 

169 

491 

290 

200 

199 

S9 

50 

109 

410 

119 

709 

3600 

579b 

1790 

489 

109 
439 
UW 

110 
03 
419 
1)90 
272 
40 
600 
49 

960 

250 

529 

an 

169 

203 

215 

684 

996 

141 

69 

mo 

mo 

30 

361 


SaaribneBk 

SiBoBOiegi 

SwBlaawEfee 

SsntMte 

OiMdlTMt 

IbWePDon 

lahedBaMi 

TDK 

TchohiEIPwr 

TMolBonk 

TefetoMeifew 

TteOlPwr 

TckysEledan 

ToboGcb 

TteOoip. 

Teom 

TaopMfefel 

TcRyBMl 

Toma 

Tiolan 

TfewTroW 

ToteMkfer 

YBawBaudd 


we 

149 
305 

530 

139 

150 
443 

1170 

655 

40 

2S 

664 

199 

1410 

1000 

5940 

5K 

278 

169 

13in 

495 

910 

1310 

395 

769 

510 

965 

100 

9050 

955 

199 

531 

am 

1690 

120 

350 

1120 

075 

120 


169 

257 

•25 

329 
350 

1150 

1970 

670 

120 

330 
609 

29 

5)3 

MS 

Tsn 

69 

54 

159 

•25 

339 

300 


Lew Close 
130 149 
95 36 

00 530 
130 1370 
150 159 
49 434 

1)50 1170 
69 644 

471 479 

20 254 

60 663 

15 156 

130 1410 
1050 1070 
5840 5060 
588 590 

271 275 

150 160 
1200 1300 
92 473 

390 400 

119 110 

386 394 

759 750 

499 509 
99 99 

109 109 
•90 099 

90 -99 
199 199 
516 524 

310 00 
160 160 

120 139 
330 340 
1090 1100 

OK 075 
1210 120 
40 437 

160 169 

353 2S 

10 on- 

00 320 
340 359 
1110 1110 
190 1970 
633 60 

110 110 
2270 2390 
650 600 

27S 276 

510 513 

•0 on 

150 150 

618 69 

532 535 

140 150 
787 80 

3300 3330 
300 309 


100 

30 

510 

1350 

189 

4S 

1U0 

69 

477 

255 

646 

10 

1410 

1090 

5890 

587 

372 

160 

1290 

90 

3970 

1210 

30 

779 

400 

937 

100 

070 

99 

199 

SK 

300 

160 

1350 

350 

1070 


NawbrtdaeM 

NanadelK 


NW 


Naosw) EiitiDr 
NDwniTctoan 
NOM 
Onn 

fenednPefea 

PehaCda 

PtaowDane 

PacBPefen 

PaiBsiiSeak 

RtaohiMff 

ISeAfean 

RegmCoidelB 

SaoBmCa 

SMCdoA 

S unaa 

TWiBQai Eiv 

IBcAB 

sr* 

Theowan 

TariTenBodi 

Tnssoita 

TnnsCdaPfea 

TrinwifefM 

TitaecHfea 

TVXGafe 

WateofeEar 

WesfeM 


HUB 

66A5 

84N 

321k 

133N 

14 

3611 

23 

29N 

21.15 

11N 

13IA5 

33D 

3670 

22 

47A0 

29 

S2fe 

SO 

26 

46 

301 

3570 

560 

3030 

2110 

77K 

K 

IN 

SOW 

0JO 


41M 

369 

»A5 

13)40 

110 

36N 

3170 

2170 

am 

110 

)79H 

3115 

3516 

21K 


2135 

5115 

49W 

2316 

4590 

3Dta 

34W 

5370 

19.0 

27J0 

74 

350 

19 

3110 

030 


CfeM Pm 
6435 6640 
340 360 
BAS 31N 
10 1360 
1170 1135 
351) 3645 
2230 2165 
930 2BN 
2DAS 2116 
110 110 
MPM UIM 
0 3216 
3616 MW 
21W 22U 
47V6 47J0 
3845 301 
5145 S3H 
9A5 
210 

4535 ^ 

auo son 

3SS 
560 

30AS 

JU 2730 
7714 710 
3SN 3115 
530 195 
3040 30J05 
00 WO 


404 

24 

46 


34 

Si 

301k 


Vienna 


120 

49 

1610 

252 

90 

300 

350 

1170 

i«n 

677 

110 

320 

660 

278 

517 

•70 

150 

619 

se 

140 

025 

330 

190 


A TXfedM ;T30N 

Praile«:1R70 


BeaMer-UdiWi 

CnSnfePSr 

EAteeraO 

EVN 

iWeo 


mtefenl 

OKV 


OestElaldriz 

VASIoM 

VATseh 

WfeMtteOaa 


88195 

6410 

380 

1493 

StXSB 

189 

95125 

533 

3127 


06110 0030 80 

<a>N 6^ 

300 300 sm 
140 1470 1493 

506 5)0 50 

170 100 102 
M7.I0 954 06 

533 523.10 535 

3005 3115 210 
3405 3430 296 


Wellington 


ins r9 l te. 398L75 
Pravieili; 30660 


aswnxuioo 


Toronto 


TSEIidOlMOl!!6971N 
Pmfeoe 48769 


ATNZetMB 

BiIi^IihI 

Carter KeO era 

nteaBMs 

FMAaEoy 

HWcOCa Fatal 

FMUlChPm 

LlanNallMn 

Tefeom NZ 

WhanHwlBn 


345 345 34S 167 
135 Ml 131 135 

10 183 2N IM 

U &10 lao 110 
7M 741 740 745 
143 IS 1A1 \M 

in 168 to 2N 

616 4 6)4 4D3 

10 IS 830 10 

11 11 11 11.10 




AbiWC6Bl 

AlbwtaEnaiw 

AlaRAhnn 

AndennnEari 

BkMaidnal 

Bk Non tea 

SwifekGaM 

BCS 

BCTfeeeeein 

BtadtaPhann 

B Mi OottforB 


n» 

999 

367 

401' 

150 

575 

4M 

140 

90 


OBC 

CtfeNoNRoil 

CdaNoIRn 

CdnOccMfed 

CdnPBcWc 

CeiataD 

Dofem 

EteDr 

DonadwA 

DaPantCdoA 

BdperBaeaa 

EtmNoMoa 

FNtaFW 
FntaidiildBe 
fedteoSlA 
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E^TTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


SKIING IN AMERICA 


RAGE 19 


SPONSORED PAGE 



Themis teen 0 AnMnlcar7«li]brs: ilu^^sflS^octfan^ 


Good Looks, Gpueat Fun and El Nino 


Fun is fashionable again, and El Nino may have actually helped the ski industry. 




vciybody interested in 
skiing in the United 
States or Canada this 
winter is speaking Spanish 
— or, at least, a couple of 
words of Spanish. 

“Everyone's talking about 
El Niho," says Katie Odell, 
director of communications 
for the Lake Placid (New 
York) Visitors Bureau. She 
notes, however, that no one. 
including meteorologists, 
can really predict the enccts 
of El Nito. die centuries<old 
name for the massive weath- 
er system tliat in some past 
years has blown extreme 
stoims across parts of North 
America. 

“Some people diink El 
Nino means it 's going to be a 


warm winter, and there won't 
be much snow,” says Ms. 
Odell, “Other people say El 
Nino means we're really go- 
ing to get dumped on.” 

Changes in attitude 
One d^g that is certain is the 
way diat skiing is changing in 
Nc^ AmericaL Not so long 
ago, it was all about how you 
looked: how trendy your out- 
fit was, how new your skis 
were, how elegant your 
carved turns. Now, it's more 
about Am, and not just for the 
hard-core skieis. 

'“Now, especially in. ski 
areas near urban maiicets, it’s 
about people just getting out 
and playing in the snow,” 
sa^ Kathe Oilimann, exec- 




I 


A Guide roa Aitiletes 

Here is the gender of participants in downhill skiing, snow^ 
boarding and cross-country skiing, as well as the average 
prices for equipment paid by consumers at speciany ski 
stores in 1996, according to Snowsports Industries Amer- 
ica, a trade association of more than 800 ski equipment 
and clothing companies In the United States aid Canada. 

Dowitfffl Skieis: 

Cost of equipment: $747 (sWs $320, boots $248. 
bindings $142, poles $37). 

Male: 60 percent. 

Female: 40 pereent. 

Snowtmardeis: 

Cost of equipment; $603 (snowboard $309, 
boots $162. bindings $132). 

Mate: 73.5 percent. 

Female: 26.5 percent. 

CrossAfounby SWefs: 

Cost of equipment $250 (skis $112, boots $78, 
bindings $36, poles $24). 

Male: 53.7 percent. 

Female; 46.3 percent 


“Skiing IN America" 
vdiicvt/in its^tuvO,'byiiieAd\vrtismgDepartn^ 
the Intematioi^ Herald THbune. 
iter: TmiiKhv Harper is an intemaUonal travel and 
iLKiness nriitr bated at limharperi^f^^ 
PrOCK.\M director: Bill Mahder 


utive director of Mountains 
of Distinction, a marketing 
association of eigbt upscale 
winter resoris in the eastern 
United States. 

That change in attitude 
pears to be good for the 
indusby in North America, 
which in recent years has 
seen litfie or no growth. Both 
die number of skieis in the 
United States and Canada 
(about 12 mijUion downhill 
skiets, 4 million snow- 
board^ and 4 million cross- 
country skiers) and the num- 
ber of visits to ski areas each 
year (about five per person) 
have been stagnant, 1^ (here 
are signs of growth for this 
season. 

“All of us have seen an 
increase in bookings fois 
year," says Marcie Hawks, 
vTcepresidentofthe Ski Tour 
Operators Association 
(SKITOI^), an alliance of2S 
xnq'or resorts in the 
Umted States and Canada. 
“We’re pretty much sold out 
for a lot of the holiday sea- 
soa The good economy 
helps, and the foct that there 
was a lot of snow out West 
last year has. a lot of people 
interested in skiing diis 
year.” 

Less harm than good 
In the American Rockies, 
some resorts report fiiat El 
Nino is helping rather than 
hurting advance bookings. 
“£1 Nino has piqued the in- 
terest of a lot of people," says 
Barb Jennings, a spokes- 
woman for Coloracfo Ski 
Countiy USA which r^ire- 
sents 24 major resorts in Col- 
orado. She says resorts are 
hopmg for a blast of winter ' 
weadier from El Nifio; 
“Good, early season snow 
raises awareness.” 

A self-described “weather 
geek,” Ms. Jenni^ says sbe 
has tracked El NiSo patterns 
in past decades and found 
that it brings wetter and cool- 
er weather to the Cok»ado 
Rockies during the first half 
of file season, which means 


lots of good snow early. El 
Nino typically brings wann- 
er weather during the second 
half of the season, she says, 
and diat means long weeks of 
die kind of classic ^ng ski- 
ing that skiers traditionally 
love. She says the areas most 
likely to have less snowfall 
Hiis season include the north- 
ern Rockies. 

No worries about snow 
Scott Johnson, marketing di- 
rector for the Big Sky ski 
resort in Mcmtana, says 
eaiiy-scasoo bookings are 
veiy strong, and he is not 
worried about snow. He says 
diat even if El Nifio blows 
warm and dry this winter, 
advances in snowmaking 
equipment mean that most 
majorCanadian and northern 
U.S. resorts open their sea- 
sons with a solid base of 
man-made snow. Besides, he 
says, with an average annual 
snowfiill of 4(X) inches 
(1.016 centimeters). Big Sky 
would still have great skiing 
even if it only received half 
the usual snowfall. 

Stroi^ interest in Canada 
Tour operators and resort 
manageis in Canada also say 
dicy are getting strong book- 
ings from both Nordi Amer- 
icans and skiers from Europe 
and Japan, pardy because ex- 
change rates are favorable. 
“A fow years ago, we didn't 
have any foreign skiers. Now 
they're the hipest growth 
part of our business,” says 
Ted Allsopp, owner of 
Downhill Ri^rs Ski and 
Travel Co. in Edmonton, Al- 
berta. 

Many skiers who have va- 
cationed in leading resorts in 
the United States and Europe 
are looking to Canada for 
“new” ski destinations — 
from Newfoundland's 
Marble Mountain, hailed fay 
regulars for the best spring 
skiing east of the Rockies and 
home of the Canada 1999 
WintcT Games, to British 
Columbia’s Whistler, which 


A Skier’s Guide to Surhng 

Many skiers are turning to the Internet for the latest 
information about resorts, snow conditions, clothing, 
equipment and events. Here are a few World Wide VVeb 
sites for skiers who want to do a little surfing first: 

Winter Sports Foundation. A nonprofit or^nization that 
encourages skiing and oth^ winter sports, www.wfnter- 
sports.org 

(ao Ski. Details on resorts and ski areas throughout 
North Amen'ca. www.^ki.com 

Ski Travel Online. Information on ski trip packsges. 
www.skito.com 

Ski Tour Operators Association, (nformation on resorts 
and packages, www.skitop5.com 

Snowsports Industries America. Research and reports 
on the latest In ski equipment and clothir^. www.snow- 
link.com 


Snowboarders Vs. Skiers 


The tension overthepastfewyeara between snowboarders 
vtd skiers has reached a detente, partly because ski areas 
have created separate eireas for boarders and partly be- 
cause more sktera have tried snowboarding. 

“The tension is diminished, but it’s still there scHne- 
times," says Scott Johnson, marketing director at Big Sky 
ski resort in Montana. 

The age aspects of the tension — Generation X snow- 
boarders versus Baly Boomers on skis — has eased as the 
Gen’Xers have gotten older and as more Boomers have 
tried boarding and dedded they liked it 

A big part of the appeal of snowboarding for skiers and 
wouldbe skiers is that many Instructors believe snow- 
boardingisactuallyeasiertoleamtean skiing, “tthelpsihat 
most people can become an intermediate snowboarder 
quicker than they can become an intemiediate skier,” Mr. 
Johnson says. 

Many resorts have established “snowboard only” and 
“ski oniy" areas, or clearly marked areas where boardeis 
and stuers can mingle. And some resorts charge additional 
foes, typically $5 to $10 more per day, for lift tickets for 
boarders. 


offers a charming alpine vil- 
lage, a vertical nse of 5,000 
foet. (1,520 meters), nearly 
7,000 miles ( 1 1 200 kilome- 
ters) of stdable terrain, 200 
marked trails and 12 moun- 
tain bowls. 

Both in the United States 
and Canada, many resorts are 
also trying to counter skiing's 
relatively exclusive image — 
only S percent of adults con- 
sider th^selves skiers — by 
making the sport more af- 
fordable. To that end, many 
resorts have begun offering 


Ride, Slide, Glide: 
Whatever Gets 
Y ou Downhill 

A look at the latest ski and snowboard eguipment. 

T he rise of snowboarding in recent years has broken 
down some of the exclusivity — and snd>beiy — of 
both ski resorts and skieis. 

Snowboarding, together witii newer ridc-slidc-glide al- 
ternative ways of getting down a snow-coi’cred hiU, hav 
shown tour operators that there arc other ways to make 
money and demonstrated to skiers that there arc other wa>’5 to 
have fim. 

In the 1 990s, according to industry insiders, the number of 
skiers in North America has remained relatively flat but 
snow'boarding has been growing at 20 peroont a year. 

Consequently, snowboarding has made resorts and ski^ 
equipment manu^tureis wake up to the possibilities of 
other alternatives on the slopes: sledding, tobogganing, snou 
tubing and skiing wifo new high-tccli parabolic, side-cut 
designs that make it easier for anyone and e\'cr>'onc to get 
down the hill hi one piece. As a resulL one reason more 
people are intenested in skiing this year is that it means more 
than ^ing. 

Free spirits 

“There's a much more fiire-spiritcd attitude in skiing 
nowadays,” says Barb Jennings of Colorado Ski Country 
USA. which r^resents28majorColorado ski resorts. “W'hat 
we're selling is uphill transportation. How you get dow'n the 
hill is ^ to you." 

Besides traditional long, straight skis and snowboards, 
more and more people are choosing to come down on new 
“shjqjed" skis, also called “hoinglass" or “parabolic” or 
“side-cut” skis for the way they narrow at the center and then 
widen at the tip and tail. 

M^ Jo Tarallo, ^okeswoman for Snowsports Industries 
Q America, says shaped skis, typically shorter than traditional 
I straight skis, allow skiers to leam more quickly and easily to 
carve better turns while maintaining control and stability'. “Ii 
accelerates the learning process,*' she says. 

The new ski designs are not just for beginners. “The 
shaped skis are easier to maneuver,” she says. “You'll see 
lots of experienced skiers going without poles and swooping 
around the slopes this year. Instead of keeping your upper 
body pointed down the hill, with the severe side-cuts you can 
leverage around a turn and go almost parallel lo the snow.” 

Ballroom daocii^ on the slopes 

Ms. Tarallo, whose trade association represents several hun- 
dred U.S. and Canadian ski equipment and clothing compa- 
nies. sayrs another cutting-ec^e trend on the slopes this year 
will be small skis, sometimes barely longer than the foot that 
have clips instead of bindings. Some look like little skis, 
(^eis liire little snowboards, and they offordie equivalent of 
in-line skating on snow. 

Ms. Tarallo says that these small skis, called snow skates or 
ski boards, allow the kind of maneuverability that lets 
couples “ballroom dance” fiieir way down the slopes. 

Sne says ski clothing for this season will relflect a similar 
“anything goes” spirit “It'sacross-overlool(.”shesays. “It 
used to be tiiat snowboarders had the ba^. boxy look, 
instead of foe sledk look of skiers. Now ski attire is looser, and 
boanhng attire is getting tighter.” This year's new outfit for 
foe slopes often offor “a layering efibet, almost like street 
clofoes.” 

Many people are wearing fleece under a shell or jack^ on 
the slopes, and then wearing the same clothes to go grocery 
shopping or to a ni^t^t “Separate but matching vests, 
jackets and pants give flexibility not just fiom a fashion 
standpoint, but also from a weather standpoint,” Ms. Tarallo 
says. • 


All IN THE Family, 
All on the Slopes 

Many resorts cater to parents and their kids. 


lifr-ticket packages, some- 
times for resorts 1,000 miles 
away from each other, some- 
times for regional slopes 
within a couple hours’ 
drive. 

An example is foe 
Michigan Ski Industries As- 
sociation “White Gold 
CanJ” program, which 
provides a ski tune-up and a 
lift ticket at 22 differeot 
Michigan ski areas for $149, 
compared with foe S640 cost 
of purchasing a lift ticker at 
each of foe 22 slopes. • 


S kiing has always been 
a family activity, even 
when Mom and Dad 
didn't do much more than sit 
in front of foe fire and pay foe 
bills. These days, however, 
many resorts ofi^ a wider 
range of activities that Baby 
Boomer parents can do to- 
gether with foeir children. 

“To bring larrulies to you. 
you have to offor more things 
to do.” says Katie Odell, di- 
rectorof communications for 
foe Lake Placid Visitors Bu- 
reau in New York. 

“Most families have no more 
than a couple .of die-hard ski- 
ers who are cranking down 
the hill seven hours a day. ” 
She says foat Lake Placid 
resorts have banded togefocr 
to offer lodging and activity 
packages drat begin at S174 
forthi^ days and include not 

only downhill skiing, but 

also cross-country, ice bat- 


ing, admission to foe winter 
sports museum, a tour of foe 
ski-jump where the U.S. na- 
tional team is training and a 
bobsled ride down the run 
foat was used in foe 1 932 and 
1980 Winter Olympics. 

Ms. Odell says foat a num- 
ber of other alternative snow 
sports are booming, includ- 
ing snow^inobilmg. icc bik- 
ing. back-country skiing, icc 
climbing, snowshoeing. 
horse-drawn sleigh rides and 
ski-joring — a revival of a 
tum-of-the-century sport in 
which skiers are tow'll by a 
rope tied to a horse. • 




Luxury to moderate. 
Ski-in/ouL 
8 miles to Aspen 
1-970823-3636 
Beiail: 

I snownas&temweia flb gtpairfj^ 













PACE 20 



NYSE 

Thursday’s 4 P.Mi Close 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 199 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


^An Overbuilt Region Braces for Threat of Deflation 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Wia/iiiWMf, Pua Sen-ir ^ 

financial crisis That is 
sweeping Asia is leaving a serious problem in 
Its w^e: overcapacity that throaieiS to iSd ro 
a deflationary economy. w»uiu 

^erbuilding smA overinvestment afflict a 

wide rarge of ^usines ^ semiconductore. 

cars, bigb-nse office buildings, among others 
- and analysts predict that plant closmgs and 
halted projects wll rock tfie region’s^n- 
omies for some ume. 

Toyota Motor Corp. said Wedn^v it 
• would stop production at its two plants in 
Thailand at least until the end of 19^ * 

“If yw look at the two key industries for 
Asia, which are cars and consumer electron- 
ics, demand used to rise by between 8 to 10 

n^rpont*' nrr VAnr eai.4 _ . 


in Tokyo for J. P. Morgan & Co. 

“It is now stagnant if you’re lucky. With 
that kind of shock on the demand side, you*ro 
Ming to see more production cutbacks, moih- 
^lling of factories, and fiirt^ stoppase of 
production.” 

In the long tern, the trend threatens to bring 
on a deflanonary economy that stubbornly 
spirals downward. As business at factories 
and office towers falls, those properties d^ 


cline in value, placing pressure on banks that 
made loans with the factories or buildings as 
coUaleial. Tlie companies lay off people, who 
therefore cannot buy goods, creating more 
pressure on other companies. 

About the only go^ to come it is that 
some prices fall, which means that people 
who have money can get condos, food ai^ 
consumer goods for less. 

Off and on, Japan has faced this threat since 
. itsinaiketspeakedml990.1!liaitbecouniryis 
still unable to rev up its econonw illustrates 
the difficulties of clmbing out of die pit. 

Althon^ the oversupply situation is be- 
coming dearer' by tiie day, countries and 
cofi^ianies in Southeast Asia tend to del^ 
cutbacks, homng that anodier company will 
close hs faciuty nrst and remove the need. 

Dongbu Croup, a South Korean conglom- 


iim-tiiywinrTiTg 


Inc. He predicted that other industries would 
tiy to survi^re by just cutting back. 

“But if the crisis in Asia continues to 
develop, tiw other industries will go the same 
way. and this is a big worry, especially for 
Japanese compame$,*^be sa>d 
Starting in the late 1980s. when the steady 
rise of the yen niade e.Kpom irom factories in 
Japan too upMsive, n^y Japanese compa- 
nies began moving their plants to Southeast 
Asia to take advantage of lower labor and 
other production costs them. 

Thailand, with its rising middle class of 
potential buy<ui, attracted a large number of 
auto companies — incloding Toyota, which 
built two plants there. 

Bui diis ^ar, the economic turmoil 
ehflwged tile equation. Toyota sold just 3300 
cars in Thailand in this September, compared 


KTT I J . 


jf I iivTJr.j (r ui*:- 1 


ductOT plant, even though South Korea 
already has tiiree major chip suppliers. 

Likeivise, Indonesia is continuing with its 
national Timor car piFQgtam, even as foreign 
car companies are building or operating plants 
all over the region. 

biitially the auto indnstiy is likely to be hit 
the hardest, with production suspensions and 
possibly ontri^t dosures, said Russell Jones, 
an economist m TOlQro with Lehman Brothers 




vious year. With inventories building, T(^ta 
deeidM to suspend production, although it did 
not Isy off any employees. R will decide later 
wbedwr to reopen in January. 

With oirerall automobile sales in Thailand 
down 72 percent is September from the pre- 
vious September, Honda, Nissan and Nfit- 
snltistu Motors have cut b^k production, and 
most have laid off temporary workers, coo- 
tribnting to a growing unemployment pro^ 


I Investor’s Asia 


lem in Thailand. 

[Mitsubishi said Wednesday the baht’s 
plunge caused if to rack up 34 billion yen 
($278.7 million) in foreign exchange losses 
on money it borrowed to fund expansion in 
Thailand. Bloomberg News reported. 

[The loss means that Japan's fourth-largesi 
carmaker will post a loss of 40 billion yen for 
the year to March.] 

ILno Motors Ltd., which produces trucks, 
said its sales target this year in Thailand is 
now 4,700 trucks, compai^ witii 14,000 sold 
last year. Ir also has suspended production in 
Thailand. Hino’s Thai troubles will reduce 
grating profit by about S20 million this 
^anciaTyear, a spoke^an said. 

Meanwhile, burdened with huge invent- 
ories of cars, Japanese companies say they are 
looking to export some of this surplus from 


would normally be a natural place. But sales 
of passenger cars dropped 14 percent in Japan 
in Octobff, according to the Japan Auto- 
mobile Dealers Association. 

With the Japanese auto market in a slump, 
“that may well mean Japanese auto compa- 
nies will try to sell more in the United States, 
which would clearly be poliiicallv incorrect,” 
said Mr. Jones, referring to U.^. complaints 
about Japan’s enonnous trade surplus. 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

ITDOO ij 

lSKBy/\ 
13000 * 

11000 

7000 ... e 


Singepore 
Straiie Times 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 


J J A SON 
1997 


J J A SON 
1997 


Exchange 


Hong Kong HahgSeng 


Sktgapoffr SfratteTanes 


Sydiey Aft Ordinaries 


^ s v 

S 0 N JASON 

1997 

Thursday Prev. S 
OosB Ctosa 
10A1SLS6 10.681.75 -2.52 


1 


zjsn. 


Tttlpei 

■Stock Maikst Index 8,076.77 

7.864.22 

+2.70 

UanSa 

PSE 

1^06 

1.90a67 

-0.4D 

Maatn 

ConvK>site Index 

47a91 

'mw"' 


VMtngton 

NZSE-40 

2,498.75 

^474.60 

•eO.98 

Bombay 

Sanative In^ 

3,76338 

3,7ro'.^ 



Source: Tefskuis 


InhlRIJIliOVll H.I 1 U TlllHil 


Property Owners Take 
A Hit in Hong Kong 

i;^Slumping Prices Cause ^Collective Funk* 


BffhHtUicrjt News 

HONG KONG — * Joanne Cbeuk 
thought she had made a one-way bet 
when she bought a home in Hong 
Kong, where land is so scarce that 
prices — already three times tiiose 
in New York — seemed like they 
would rise forever. 

Almost before her new paint 
could dry, tunnoil swept Asia’s fr- 
nancial markets, and the bottom fell 
out of the bousing market The 32- 
year old investment banker watched 
iter 4.5 million Hong Kong-doUar 
($582,000) apartment lose a fl^ of 
its value within six months. 

“1 was completely freaked out.” 
Ms. Cheuk saio. Thousands just like 

r r are also under water. 

In a city where prc^ierty agents 
outnumber grocers, the sudden slide 
in die real-estate maitet has t^wn 
residents into a collective funk. Taxi 


The government said Tfanisday it 
would try to set la^ prices at market 
levels when h auctions two resid- 
ential development sites frymth 

“The govenunent will not witii- 
hold the sale of a lot only because it 
fails to reach a certain price, nnl^gg 
the offers are ridiculous,” said Bob 
Pope, govenunent director of lands. 

Mr. Tung said the govenunent 
had not altered its land-allocatioo 
poli^ to account for the stock-mar- 
ket slump and predictions of falling 
property prices. 

If unchecked, Hong Kong's high 
property prices may tarnish the ci^’s 
reputation as one of Asia’s business 
aad frnandal hubs. Companies will 
go where rents are ebaper, espe- 
dally as weakening correnc^ 
across Southeast Asia give diem 
more bang for their back dsewhere. 

“Hong Kong has become less and 


Australia Can 
Absorb Crisis, 
Bank States 

niiiitfi rf Irr rr T-tf rmii r ir - h r 

SYDNEY — Ctuieocy troubles 
in Southeast Asia pose the biggest 
single uncertainty for Australia’s 
economy over the next two years, 
the country’s central bank said 
Thursday. 

StiU, die country is in good 
shape to withstand any fuout 
from slower growfo in the region, 
the bank said in its twice-yearly 
statement on interest rate policy. 

“In tile long run. I’m ^1 very 
optimistic aboat Asian growth 



drivers, shoe salesmen, purveyors of less cost-competitive in relation to its 
Havana cigars — just about every- Asian neighb^” said Martin Ta- 


one — says busing will suffer. ~ con, an analyst at Credic Suisse Hrst 

Home prices, down IS percent Bostm (Hong K(»g) Ltd. “It’s be- 
sinceJune.maykeepfrdlingttuongh come a nmeb more eiqieiisive place 
the end of the year because of rising to do business.” 
mongage rates. Banks were forced . _ 

to act after speculative attacks on the 

.HongKongdoUardrovebanks’own 'D'l? AT l?GTPAT^Ifi 
borrowing costs as high as 300 per- fUCixiLLi JlfCT J.x!LX Ju 
cent last month. 

In part, Hong Kong's case of tiie Continued fixun Pi^e 15 
nerves is pure psychology. After aU, 

the city's richest executives — Lee That is where Wall Street first 
Shau Kee Henderson Land De- came in. Investment bankers started 
veiopment Co. and Li Ka-shmg of buying Resolution Trust loans in 


Bank of Aostralia. The big un- 
known is whether foe crises will be 
contained in foe four countries first 
affected — Malaysia, Thailand, counoles.” 
the Philippines and Indonesia. The four countries initially 
“While the acute difficulties caught up in foe turmoil lake about 
were likely to be contained to foe 10 percent of Australia’s exports, 
four countries initially hit the Another 20 percent go to Norfoeast 
turbulence, the implications for Asia, the bank said. 

Aostralia were likely to be rea- “Recenteventsaielikelytore- 
soo^iiycaataiaed,”^ bank said, suit in a marked slowing in growfo 
‘ ’The denffT now is that financial in some of Australia’s Asian trad- 
fr agility , and/or tight financial ing partners, with consequent loss 
policies io the wake of die market of export sal^ and reduc^ income 


volatility of recent months may flows from foreign operations of 
retard growth in a broader group of Australian firms,” foe bank said. 


Some companies are already 
bearing the bnmt of investor con- 
cem. (^>03-0013 Amatil Ltd., which 
earlier this year took control of the 
soda bottling operation of San 
Miguel (Yxp. in the Philippines, has 
seen as much as 40 percent stripped 
from ics share price since July 30. 
amid concern foe falling peso will 
reduce the company’s eanungs. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


REAL ESTATE: Investment ^hdtures’ Scour the Globe for Property Bargains 

Continued finm Pi^e 15 nandal assets,” said Kurt Smith, farthest afield in toms of foe lands Blackstone, for example, this yea 


That is where Wall Street first Fiank Rnssell Ca, which advises 
came iiLfovestmem bankers started peusioo plans. 


nandal assets,” said Kurt Smith, farthest afield in toms of foe lands 
director ofreal-estatecoiuuliing for of investments it makes. “Wecon- 
Fiank Rnssdl Ca, which advises centrate a lot on businesses foat use 
peusioo plans. real estate, not real-estate busi- 


Cbeung Kong (Holdings) Ltd., bulk for relatively little money, 
among them — nutde their billions breaking up die blocte, restructur- 
by investing in and devdqping ing the loans and selling them off. 
properly. Even the sale of a few Pension funds were attracted by 
apartments is scratiobsed by local foe retonis Wall Street was getting, 
newspapers for clues about what but that was not foe only rea son fo ^ 
.these folk heroes are up to. favored -tiie funds tiiat investment 

*9 Yet foe economic consequences banks started to raise. State and cor- 
tne real Half of Hong Kong's 63 poiate retirement plans had tr^- 

■ ■■■ a .m • 1 .. S- — A 


But the amount of nuHwy moving nesses.” said Tbonoas Barrack, 
into the funds and into real estate in ebairtoao of Colony Capital, ex- 
genaral is making Mr. Smith and plainingwbyhisfinnbou^tachain 


ing the loans and selling them off. adviseis like him a little cautious. of movie foeatera in En^and, a race 
Pension fuub were amazed by The IhstitntionalR^ Estate Let- track iu California, and a stake in 
foe retonis Wall Street was gening, ter reported tiiis summer foal eight some duty-free shops in ai^ns. 
but that was not foe only reason fo^ funds were trying to raise $23 International investing is where 

favored tiie funds tiiat investment lion from investors, and, all toki, many of the funds are pinning their 
hanks started to raise. State and cor- o{^xirtnmty funds had $83 billion hopK, even though, as Richard 
poiate retirement plans had tr^- on hand, wUch, with boaowing, . Guntbel, senior managing director 
tionally bought bmldings dhectiy, wotdd allow tiiem to buy S34billi<m of Banl^ Trust/Al^ Biowo, a 
or through managen who were paid ofproperty — more than the $29.8 unit of Bankers Rusi New Yofk 
no malter how successful — or un- biltion of office-building purchases ootes, a number of U.S. firms that 


million people own their homes, the 
biggest store of many peode's per- 
sonal wealfo. Judging by foe eoopty 
tables at restaurants around town, 
many peqile are feeling less expans- 
ive foan they were Just months ago. 

If consumers pull back and 
many economists say fo^ will — 
the entire economy will suiTer. Con- 
sumer spending accounts for about 
iwo-thirds of the economy. 

“Property is such a huge com- 
ponent of foe Hong Ko^ market, 
vou can’t avoid ii.” said Chariw 
Schmin. a director at MBf Unit 
'.^st Managers Ltd. “There’sgoing 
to be some pain in the short term. 

Granted, a decline in Hong Kong 
home prices is nor all had- 'fte new 
government of this former British 
colony vowed 10 make homes more 
affordable when foe lerritwy. re- 
turned to Chinese sovereignty July 
1. For Tung Chee-hwa. Hong 
Kong's firsi Chinese leadCT, housing 
affo^biliiy is a big political issue. 


Blackstone, for example, this year 
bought De^artes Tower in Paris, 
IBM’s Europe^ headquarters. 

Latin America is proving pop- 
ular, and funds have just star^ dip- 
ping their toes into foe de^ly trou- 
bled real-estate market in Japan, 
where Goldman. Sachs recently 
bought a Joan ponfolio from a 
bank. 

And just when all foe easy pick- 


or throu^ managen who were paid 
no matter how successful — or un- 


successful — die investment turned in the first nine months. 


out to be. 

For many retirement plans, this 
strategy has beta a bomb. 

But Wall Street set up its real- 


What ^d of properly? Luxury 
hotels have become ^polar of late; 
Blackstone recratly bou^t four 
Swissotels, includi^ tbe Drake on 


many of the funds are pinning their ings seamed to be disappearing, new 
hopK, even though, as Richard oppormnities may be about to open 
Guntbel, senior managing director up from an unex^led quaner. 
of Banl^ Trust/Al^ Biowo, a The receut fiiuncial problems in 
unit of Bankers Rusi New Yofk ifaecounlriesof5oufoea5tA5ia,pv- 
Dotes, a number of U.S. firms that ticulariy in Thailand and Malaysia, 
have tried it have failed. look IDrely to provide foe vultures 

But others have succeeded; wifo some of their traditional fare. 


estate funds the same way it stnic- Park Avenue in mkhown New Ytvk. ^ 
tured funds that bought stocks or wb^e Colony owns both the Stan- , 
private companies. The investmeot hope, at Fiitii Avenue and 8ist ; 
finirg had to put up some of ttidr Street, and a stake in tiie company 
own money — so they were at risk, tiiat runs foe exotic Aman resorts in | 
IQQ — and they hit pay only if foe Far East 


the investment'was very snccessftil. Suburban office ixiildings have 
They tymcally take 20pereeat of the faUeo out of favor, bur towers inj 
prmt off foe top and a pro rata share downtowns remain attractive, 
of foe file's gains. So foe interests dally if they have some sort 
of die managers and the invesrois oancial or c^iating problen 
are ontdated-faemties or big vaca 

More recently, foe huge nm-up in In tiie past tiie congianies 

the stock ma^ — and its recent usually in trouble, but toda) 


downtowns remain attractive, em- ' 
ciallv if they have some sort 01 fi- { 


oancial or cmiating problem, like 
ontdated'facmties or big vacancies. 

Id tiie past tiie congianies were ; 
usually in trouble, but today foey 


volatility — have also helped fuel may be faealfoy firms kiokiiig to 

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Yen’s Weakness Powers Profit 
At Toyota Despite Drop in Sales 

svrmrtc of 1.4 million. 


LfwyWMhtOtf exports of 1.4 million. 

TOKYO — A weak yen avin^ Bank 

and successful cosi-cumng 


c -r.. ill uiw J — ! 17 ven for tne nnaociai 

^ Sept. .30 despite a drtm « closed in 

in alM. Uk company said „„ Th„alay at 123.20 

Thursday. mate 

. Toyota said net profit SjLjg's products more com- 
jum^d to 187..56 W Woi^n 

tSl.54 billion), while oper- P®,*. .—'c ga ming s an- 
jjUng proni rose .39 percent to J OJ after 

285.25 billion yen. Sales fell 

^percent, to 3.80 trillion yen. me i J foccompany 
The resulis were for the par- cl<^. 
ent company only and did not enwa p - j ^ auiomoi- j 
include To>-oia ive^S^ysi'^at Nomura Swu- : 

Toy«a revised down Its Toyota’s expecta- 

mcMic sales outlook for the - siighUy hightf yen, , 

run >-ear in the face of Jap- &sUc | 

unevf consumers lo5.s of^- and sales efforts ; 

pwiie for luxuiy swx*-'- ™ S^,\ely expensive,' 

company now expects to sell . f frugal- 

- 0.5 million cars for ihe ft* 

nanclal >-car, compared with ^Ipos,/’ he said, I 

^carIiercMimalcof2.24mi|- PJ ^hai the company s 
pw. Bui Ihe company said it , fnr gp average dofl^ 

^pected expons 10 surge 16 full 

perccni for the full year, to ®[,,| year was “quite 
1 32 million vehicles. In May. “ MP. Rc/m’rfJ 

ihecompany forecast full-year conscr 


Hofmann is proud to announce the opening of its office in 
Geneva. Mr Charles Nehme and his colleagues 
mil take great pleasure in ofTermg a full range of 
private banking services to our international 
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bankHOFI^/IANN 


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Head iilTitH': 

Itiiiik linriiianii Mi 
■ral.KlniJc4i* 27 

ni-xoiil /.tincli/SuiiAi'rlaiul 
Ti‘(opiuifi<* (NItl i 217 T( i( 
'IViiTax (N) M I 211 7i(M 


• Hie Tokyo District Public Prosecutors Office aircsreJ 
four more current and former executives of Duiwa Securities 
Co. on suspicion foe)’ paid off a gangster, bringing to more 
than 60 the number of executives arrest^ at Japan’s four 
biggest brokerages, and at Dai-Ichi Kang>'u Bank Ltd. and 
Mitsubishi Motors Corp. 

• News Corp. reported a 1 7 percent rise in profit after one- 
time gains, to 331 million Australian dollars ($232.7 million), 
lifted by improved earnings in most of its key operations. 

• China will reduce fees on stock and future.^ transactions in 
an effort to attract more investment. Fees for transactions on 
the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges will be cut by 20 
percent as of Jan. I, while fees on fijiures exchanges will be 
reduced by SO percent, slate television reported. 

• Prudential Securities Inc. could buy units of Thailand's 
Nftva Finance & Securities PCL, including the company'.s 
retail stock business and research operations in Hong Kong 
and Singapore, a person familiar with foe negotiations said. 

• U,S. Treasury and Federal Reser\'e orficiuls met senior 
Thai officials to discuss financial-indutiir}' reforms and ihe 
possibiliiy of U.S. aid for Thailand's ailing economy, a Thai 
ceniral bank official said. 

• Compaq Computer Corp. said it could double its S20 
million investment in India by 2002 if its currem operations 
there achieved 30 percent growth. 

• Osaka’s securities exchange will on Dec. 8 become the firsi 
stock exchange in Japan to move entirely to system trading in 
an attempt to increase its competitiveness. 

• The International Monetary Fund’s managing director. 
Michel Camdessus, said that Asia needed a regional forum 
where “peer pressure” would play a crucial role in monitoring 
the region's economies. Separately, foe IMF approved a S 1 0. 1 4 
billion credit to help Indonesia out of its economic crisis 

• Ford Motor Co. opened a S102-minion assembly plant in 

Vietnam in a joint-venture with Song Cong Diesel, a state- 
owned company. Bbkmhfry:. Rrutery Af 


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World Roundup 


Brewers Will Move 
To National League 

MSEBMJ. The Milwaukee 
Brewers, as enected, are moving 
to the National League. 

Major Le^e Baseball’s exec- 
utive council mafia tfiat move of- 
ficial Wednesday, a high-iankiiig 
official of another t«»m said, by 
voting unanimously to die 
Brewers the Nadooal League's 
16di team for die 1998 season. No 
announcement was maHa, but die 
council informed the clubs (rf its 
action. 

It was the first time in Major 
League history diat owners had 
voted to move a team from one 
league R> the other. 

llie Brewers, who have played 
in the American L ^ ag u ff since 
1 970, will become the sixth team in 
die NL Centra! Division, joining 
Houston, Pittsburgh, St Louis, 
Cincinnati and Chicago. The West 
and East divisions each have 
five teams. 

The Brewers' move will trigger 
two other changes: the Detroit Ti- 
geis going from the AL East to the 
AL Cean^ takiag die Brewers* 


^ BcralhS^nbunc 

Sports 


For PSG, a Victory by the Rules 




I 


canon 


i;com.sg 


PAGE 22 


FRIDAY, 

NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


Devil Rays from the AL West to die 
ALEast 

Milwaukee was once a National 
League city. The Braves, between 
Boston and Adacua, played diere 
from 1953 through 19fr5. While 
mey were there, the Braves- went to 
the World Series in two successive 
seasons, beat^ the New York 
Yankees in 19S7and losing to them 
in 1958. (NYT) 


Albert Calls Tstimony 
A ‘Con^lete Fabrication’ 

Marv Albert, in his first inter- 
view since pleading gnilty to as- 
sault in a lurid sex case, showed 
little remorse and said bodi his 
former iover and a second accnser 
were liars. 

"What opened, what she did 
to me, is just unbelievably" die 
well-laiowD ^rtscaster said in an 
ioteiview with ABC’s Barbara 
Walters to be broadcast in the 
United States on Friday night 

The 56-year-old Alb^ cut short 
his trial two mondis ago, (deading 
gnil^ and receiving- a year of pro- 
batioiL NBC fired him shratly ^er 
he made his plea. 

A longtime lover, Vanessa Per- 
hach, had accu^ Albeit of faitiiig 
her on the back more than a dozen 
times and forcii^ her to perform 
oral sex in a Viigiim hotel rocnn laA 
February. She said he was ang^^ 
when she wooldn't agree to bring in 
another man fw thiee-way sex. Al- 
bert said he never tried to force oral 
sex on Peihach and diat she had 
asked him to bite her on die back. 

Albert also called the accusation 
of another woman, Patricia Masten, 
who said he nude a pass at her in a 
Dallas hotel room while he was 
exposed and wearing women’s un- 
derwear, "a conqilete fabrica- 
tion." (AP) 

Korda Wins in Moscow 

TEHim Second-seeded Petr 
Knda of the Czech Republic beat 
Alex O’Brien of tiieUniM States 7- 
5, 6-3, on Thursdiw to advance to die 
semifinals of the $1,125,000 Krem- 
lin Cup in Moscow. Kcncda will face 
Wayne Black of Zimbabwe, 
defmted Daniel Vacek of tiie Czech 
Republic 6-1, 6-2, in Thursday's 
otiier quarterfinal matth. (AP) 


By Peter Berlin 

Intnmtignel HmM TrUmne 

PARIS — If you like writing rules, 
then there is probably a position for you 
in one of the governing bodies of world 
sport Indeed, the booming Europym 
soccer indusoy seems to be generating 
regulations, and cash, at the same break- 
neck 

In this season's Chainpioos League, 
Bayern Munich and Paris-Saint Ger- 
main fell afoul of the lulesmakers’ a^ 
tendon to detail Bayern and PSG, like 
Soarta Prague (the Czech entry in the 
champions League) and AC Milan (a 
team that used to play in the Champions 
league) are sponsored by Opel, a unit of 
tbe U.S. automaker General Motors. 
But U^A, die govenung body of Euro- 
pean soccer, frars that it would look 
suq}icious if two competing teams took 
die field wearing the same monsor’s 
name, so it pa^ra a rule to forbid it 
When tte two teams met in Munich last 
montii in Champions League Group E, 
PSG, the visiting team took the field 
with old-fashioned unsponspted shirts. 

This rule is niR to be confused with 
be one that made liveipool play ui 
unspoostted shirts when it visitra PSG 
in w Cup Winners Cup last season. 
Liverpool which is sponsored by 
Carslb^, tbe Danish brewer, feU afoul 
of another set of legislator the Frenctii 
goveniment, trfiich forbids tobacco or 
alcohol qxxisorship of qx»ts clubs. 

Of course, the bl^ space on diePSG 
shirts in Munich had not prevented the 
Opel name, plainly visible on Bajo^*^ 
shirts, from appearing in jmctically 
every camera snot But die PSG players 
lool^ fairly odd to fans so accustemed 
to seeing sponsor-emblazoned jerseys. 

Bayern clearly gave this some 

tiioi^t for in its match in Paris on 
Wecme^y ni^t — when PSG, as tte 


home team, wore its ^1 shirts — tbe 
GeimBU team decotatea its jerseys witii 
a slogan saying that sportsmen sup- 
ported organ doncffs. Tbe club presented 
this as a daritablo action. 

Cynics, however, might suspect it 
was a calculated insult aimed at PSG, 
which over the last few years has ofreu 
looked like a team that needed a heart 
trai^lanL Its failure to win the French 
national league over the past three sea 

THlCHAMPIOHakiRRMa 

sons has been largely die result of a 
tendency to surrender withwt a fight 
gainst less talented teams in k^ 
matches. 

Its 5-1 mauling in Munich in'October 
had the smell « another PSG capit- 
ulation. But, Ricardo, die club's second- 
year manager, has said he likes die 
character cf the players he now has. 
Moreover, as agaii^ AEK Athens in the 
Cup Winners Cup last spnz^ and Stean 
Bucharest in the Chanmions league 
qoalifymgxoundtiiisfBllPSGFespc^- 
ed to a disastrous first march with a fiery 


The player imst responsible was Rai, 
die Brazilian who is supposed to provide 
PSG's brains. But he was also its hean- 
b^ on Wednesday, at die center of 
alnmt every good attacking move. 

The club no longer has a Youri Djodt- 
aeff or a Leonardo to take die creative 
load off Rai’-s shoulders. The team is also 
lacking its two best strikers, Patrice Ldto 
and bunco Simone, two men who can 
up for failu^ elsewhere with a 
moment of inspiration in front of goal 
Inkead, the statuesque Rai was sur- 
rounded by eager smurfs, ^lait from 


I9-year-old Edouard Cisse, who played 
a ddfensive role in midfield, all die ouier 
fniHfiriH and attarlring PSG playCtS 810 


Hurricanes Blow Hot 

Kgqfonen^s 2 C^otds Shoot Dtnon Red Wings 


The Associated Press 

Sami Kspaata scored Mro goals in 
the final 3:55 as the Carolina Hur- 
ricanes (Meated tbe defending Stan- 
ley Cup champion Detroit Red 
Wings, 3-1. 

The Red Wings, 6-0 on die road 
before the loss, ^ one vicmty shcnt 
of matching Tcuonto’s S7-year-old 
NHL record of sevoi straight road 
triiu^^s to start a season. 

K^ianen scored his team-leading 
sixth goal of the season on Wed- 
nesday night just 1:28 after Kris 

MHk KORWPPF 

Dnqxsr bad tied the score at I. Jeff 
Brown fed Kiqianen with a pei^t 
on a 2-on-l break and die right 
wing b^ Chris Osgood up high. 

Kapanen and Brown teained up 
a^ain widi 1:58 left fv the game- 
dincher. Kapanm tipped in Brown’s 
shot from tire point. 

■tvm B, PMiRulm 2 Jo hTieuwendyk 
had his fint hat trick in more than two 
years, leading the stceakiiu Dallas 
over host Pittsburgh. Tbe Stars im- 
proved to 5-1-1 in their last seven 
games and concluded a 3-1-1 road 
trip. 

P«vRs4,Panlhara2lh Miami, Scott 
Niedermayer scored two goals and 
Randy McKay had a goal and an 
assist to lead New Jersey past slunqi- 
ing Florida. 

^di New Jers^ leading 3-2, John 
MacLean added an open-net goal 
wife 30 seconds left ror his 7iX)fe 
career point (347 goals, 353 assists). 

lalandMv 4, «Im 4 Travis Green 
ciqiped a tiiree-goal comd)ackat4:50 


of the tiiird period, givipg the host 
Islanders a tie wife foe Oiii^ 

CmmcBmw 4, Coyotoe 2 In 
Montreal Shayne Corson had a goal 
and an assist as the Canadieas beat the 
Cc^otts for feeir feird straight vic- 
toiy. 

Valeri Bure and Vladimir Malak- 
hov also semed wife tbe man ad- 
vantage. Martin Rucinsl^ had the 
other goal frv Montreal which ended 
a five-game homestand at 4^1. 

nanOM* 4, Avatanelw 2 Wayne 
Gr^zky and Niklas Sundstrom each 
extoided their point streaks to six 
games as fee Rangers handed Col- 
orado its first home loss tiiis season. 

Sundstrom’s fifth goal ctf the sea- 
son bnrite a 1-1 'tie 1:16 into fee 
second period. Gretz^ sco^ an 
onpty-nec goal wife 29 seconds re- 
tnflining. Gictzky aiiw had two as- 
sists. 

Hiality Diicka S, Light nin a 2 Teenui 
Selannescoredtwiceinthetiiirdperi- 
^ to extend his goal-scoring streak to 
e^ht games as host Ana&un beat 
Tampa Bay. 

Tra Drury scored twice in a 47- 
second qnn (rf die second period to tie 
fee game and Ttmas Saodrirom added 
a tifed-period goal helping fee Ducks 
extend Thmpa Bay’s winl^ streak to 
a clnlHecord 10 games (0-9^1). 

Mepi* LMife4, FlaniM 3 In C^ajy , 
WendeL Claric scored the tiehreaking 
goal at 5:28 of fee third period te give 
Toronto its tiiird victory of fee season 
over the Flames. 

Mats Sondin sc<»ed twice, giving 
the Leafe leads of 2-1 and 3-2 in ^ . 
second period. Matt Schneider added 
his first of fee season forToronto. 


Eseorli A feiMto 


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much shorter than fee 1.90’ineter (6- 
fo^ 2-iQch) Rai. hi additicn to Ixnins, 
tbe Braziliw also bad to provide fee 
anacking brawn and he fulfiUed his du- 
ties wife tireless verve. 

Before the match, Jim Latham, man- 
ager of GM’s public relations for sports 
in Europe, had spoken riiout how well 
fee ima^ of Bayem and Opel cotn- 
plemeotM each omer. Bayem, he said, 
had an image as a rich, ^iied, glam- 
orous, star-studded team, while Opel 
was a down-to-earth brand. 

On Wednesda^y ai£^ Bayou looked 
a bit Ulre a plod^g gas gaoler, big and 
stFoi^ — with, in soccer pariance, good 
engines — but lacking acceleration and 
maneuverability. Until Mario Basler, a 
(joman intenuational midfielder, ^ 
peaied as a second-half substitute, Bay- 
ern's passing was obvious and imima- 
ginative. Most suEprisxDgly, in tiiat h was 
quite unTticg most fierman teams, it was 
Bayem diat lost heart when tilings went 
wrong. Giovanni TIrapanoiio, the club’s 
It^an coach, admitted as mudh when he 
said feat PSG’s second goal after 73 
minutes, "undertnined" ms team. 

PSG rook fee lead after 18 minutes. 
Rai been his defooder iad an^ed a 
fiendish low cross into fee Bay em goal- 
mouth. Florien Afourice missed the ball, 
but Franck Gava, behind him, did not 
and scored. Bayem found its^ level 
when, after an ugly and confused 
scramble in front of raC’s goal, Cisse 
put tbe ball into his own neL 

^uiice gave PSG tiie lead again 
after another goaimoufe scramble, and 
PSC} finished fee scoring two minutes 
later when a pass by Rai 1^ Jnome 
Lcfot one-on-one against Olivier Kahn, 
fire Bayem goalkeeper. 

Tbe. game ended wife tire . crowd 
singing "Brazil Brazil.’* Rai had pro- 
duced more ball tricb tiian tbe whole 
Bayem team had managed all evening. 


Franck Gava of Pazis-Saint Germain celebrating after scoring his ' 
team’s first goal against Bgyem Munich. PSG rollM to a 3*1 victory. 








The AssodatedPress reported: 

FayMooial 1, BtacbMtar UnitMl 3 

The Fngiish ctrenmioo.took control of 
its Group 6 match in Rotterdam wife a 
hat-trick by Andy Cole. Igor Kenmeev 
scored for Feyenowd wife two minutes 
left to play in ^ mateh. 


jiwMitHs a, Koaie* t Juvenpis kept, 
mree wife Manchester United in Group 
B wife a nerve-wracking victory over', 
the group’s bottom team in TuriiL . 
Alessandro Del Piero and substitutes. 
Nicola Amoruso and Duiiel Fcmseca • 
gave Juventus a 3-0 lead. 


Johnson^Managerof the Year, Quits 


By Murray Cbass 

New YMiTlmes Service 

In a bizarre development unprece- 
dented in baseball bistoiy, Davey Jedm- 
son resigned as manager of trc Bal- 
timore CMoles ju^ as be was about to be 
named tiie Andean League manager 
of Che year for guiding the team to the 
league's best record. 

Johnson’s decision to away 
from die last year of his tiiree-year, 
$Z25 miULon crmoact was not a com- 
plete surprise. Peter Angelos, the Ori- 
oles' owner, ejqnessed dissatisfaction 
last week wife the way Johnson had 
handled $10,500 in fines against 
Roberto Alomar, tbe second basoonan. 
in July. Johnson directed AJomar m pay 
the fines to a foundation of which Jotm- 
son’s wife is managing director. 

In a letter that was sent to An^os by 


fax about noon Wednesday, Johnson 
said he did not believe his actiou was 
improper, but crmceded that it could 
"create the appeanmee of imi»opri- 
ety.*’ la the leoec, Johnson ofihred to 
resign as lonig as Angelos did not block 
his efforts to get aa^er manayng job 
for next season. 

In a n^ly less than three hours later. 
Angelos accq^ Johnson’s resi^- 
tiofl and told him he was free to nure a 
job elsewhere. 

Johnson, who alki had controversial 
dismissals after wirming seasons with 
tire Mets and tiie Gncinnati Reds, in- 
siantiy became a leading candidate for 
fee Toronto Blue Jays’ vacan^. He 
could also be considered for tire Chica- 
go White Sox job. Gord Ash. general 
manager of the Blue Jays, said he tried 
to reach Jefenson Wednes^y. 

"I have not coniacted him, but I 





_ _ . . *■ j, ■ C a^iweffhe A iwriww l P ibw 

Dav^ Johnson, with his wife, Susan, meetiiig tbe press in Orlando, 
Florida, to announce his resignatimi as of the Baltimore Orioles. 

CROSSWORD 


will*’ Ash said by telephone frot|jJ 
Toronto. ■ -Jfj 

The leading candidate for the Oriotet*^ 
suditen opmiing is Ray Miller, the pitdhfig 
ing coach, whom Angelos hired lasT 
wmter after telHng Jouiscki he had n . 

Pat Dobsoo from that tx»ition. 
But even promotiiK Miller could trigger 
furfeer fire in the Orioles’ family. 

lire general manager, Pat Gillick, and ! 
his assistant, Kevin h^one, are be- 
lieved to favor Rick Down. ^ team’s 
hitting coach, who is one of tbe finalists . 
for fee manager's job wife the expan- 
sion Tampa Bay D^il Rays. 

By fee time Angelos actxqited John- 
son's resignation. Jack O'Connell, sec- 
retazy-treasuFCr of the Baseball Writers.'. 
Assoctatkm of America, had informed 
Johnson of the manager of the year 
balloting. Johnson, who led the Onolte 
*K> 98 victories and fee East Division 
. championship and had the team in fust 
place every day of the season, received 
10 fiist-pl^ votes and 88 points. 

Buddy Bell of Detroit was secoai 
wife 50 points and Phil Gamer of Mil- 
waukee third wife 42. The panel of 28 
writers, two from each league city, gavLlf^ 
Garner five first-place votes, four each . 
to Bell and Teny Collins of Anaheim, • 
three to Lou Piniella of Seattie and two • 
to Mike Hargrove of Cleveland in vot- 
ing conducted before postseason play. * 
The coincidence m the timing of tte ' 
announcement and Johnson’s offer lo^ , 
resign was not lost on Ange^. 

"Certainly feere is strong indication* 
the timing was being consi&r^" An- , 
gelos said by tel^hone from Baltimore. 
"The timing not be accident. 
But that’s his prerogative. This cham 
is over. 1 wish him welL" 

Johnson, _S4, said he did not rime his 
rerignation bffisr to coincide wife they., 
award, which he C£q>tured for fee first 
time. 

'’The letter vras sent out {hiot to the' 
call,” he told reporters. "No slap at fee ; 
awarcl but the most urqxxtant tfting on 
my mind was eitirer wmking it out wife- f 
fee Orioles, getting support, or letting 

him makeachange if he wanted tomake I 
a change. Whetto I was manager of the . 
yearldon'tthinkwasgoingtoaffecthxsi h 
decision." i 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAT, NOVEMBER 7, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 23 





*■ 4' 7 --c: :■ 


•r.'.T.J. -4 

'f ,n>* 1 - 1 . .. 


Celtics Wilt 
AsMashbum 
Fuels the Heat 

The Aisocimtd Press 

Jamd Mashbum scored 32 points, 
including 10 in a row in the rounti 
quarter, as the Miami Heat beat the 
Boston Celtics, 90-74. 

. Tun Hardaway had 14 points and 10 
assists for Miami on Wednesday night. 
Antoine Walker had 20 points and 13 
rebounds to lead host Boston, but was 
only 8-of-24 from the field. 

The Celtics have lost three consec- 
utive games since their upset of the de- 
fending NBA champioo Chicago Bulls 
on opening night 

Hawks 93, Tears SB Dikembe 
Mutombo had 20 points. 16 rebounds 
and eight blocks as visiting Atlanta re- 

NBA Roundup 

mained undefeated in the first regoiar- 
season game for one of the NBA’s two 
female officials. Dee Kantner. 

Steve Smith 22 points, and Chris- 
tian Laettner scored 20 as the Hawks 
improved to 4-0. 

Allen Iverson had 21 points and 11 
assists for the 76ers. who remained win- 
less in three games. . 

Homsts 110 , Mavarieks 103 Glen 
Rice scored 28 points, and Dell Ctmy 
added 23 as host Charlotte defeated 
Dallas. Khalid Reeves scc^ 24, and 
Michael Finl^ had 20 for Dallas. 

Paeaia99,Pistona87 Rik SmitS scored 
1 2 of his 2S points in die fourth quarter to 
Jead Indiana over host DetroiL 

Grant Hill had 29 points, eight assists 
and eight rebounds for the Kstons. 

Nats 1 1 2, Mtafriors 96 The New Jersey 
Nets unproved to 3-0 for the first time in 
iranchiM history by beating visiting 
Golden State behind a balanc^ attack 

The Warriors fell to 0^ under new 
coach PJ. Carlesimo, matching the 
team's worst start ever. 

Chris Gatling had 21 points, and Sam 
Cassell added 19 for the Nets, who won 
only 26 games last year in John Cali- 
pari’s first season as coach. 

Buns 94, Magic 81 In Chicago. Mi-' 
chael Jord^ had 29 points and 17 re- 
bounds as the Bulls continued their mas- 



tery of the Magic. Including a sweep in 
the 1996 Eastern Coafaence fiiials, 
Chicago has beaten Orlando 11 con- 
secutive tunes by an average score of 
104-88. 

Tbe two-time defending NBA cham- 
pion Bulls, who will be without injured 
Lottie nppen for about two more 
months, are 3-0 since bong stunned at 
Boston in die season opener. 

Joe Kleine of the Bulls led afl scorers 
with 34 points. 

Spurs 87, Grixtfsa 79 David RobiD- 
sott had 22 points and 17 rebounds as 
host San Antonio held off Vancouver. 

Tim Duncan added 19 points for the 


Spars, who didn’t clinch the victory 
Jaren Jackson stole an inbounds 
pass and drove for a layup that put them 
up 83-78 with 213 seconds left 

Roekais 194, Cfippa^i 110 Clyde 
Drexler scored 19 of his 43 points in the 
first quarter as visiting Houston took 
control early and crui^ past the Los 
Angeles Clippers. 

C^les Barkley, (fomiiuitiDg inside 
while Diexler was poppbg mm the 
outside, had 21 rdioun^ and 13 5 X>mts 
foe tbe Rockets. 

Mario Elie scoted 20 points forHous- 
ton. which improved to 3- 1 . Brent Barry 
scored 24 points for the Clippers (0-3). 


Formula One^s Tobacco Addiction 


LiCetO/Afner Pfaaa.Aea« 

Rony Sefltaly, the Orlnndo Marc's center, shootzng a jumper over 
Chicago’s Joe Kleine, who led the Bulls to victory scoring 34 points. 


IfaemaUuial Herald Tribme 

L ondon — Europeans, at least 
those who notice, have been 
watching aghast in recent years as 
American sports teams have moved 
irom one city to the next 
For example, the Los Angeles Rams 
picked up and moved to St Louis, tbe 
Cleveland Browns abandoned their 
lifelong fans by moving to Baltimcne for 
more money, and both the Minnesota 
Tvrins and Minnesota Vikings are 
threatening to leave town unless Min- 
neapolis builds them more profitable 
staainms. 

Europe's top soccer clubs have yet to 
hold tb^ cities hostage. Can yon mar- 
ine Manchester United leaving 
Manchester? FC Barcelona leaving the 
Nou Camp? 

' But Formula One auto racing, tbe 
biggest single franchise of them all. has 
succeeded in putting an economic gun 
to tiie head of Britain, saying: '‘Allow 
QS TO accept advertising from cigarette 
companies or else." 

Or else? Or else Formula One will 
pack up and leave Britain,' where seven 
racing teams are based year-roond. Four 
of them — this year's Formula One 
champion Williams, plus McLaren, Be- 
neRon and Jordan — rely to varying 
extents on tobarso sponsorship. By out- 
lawing tobacco advertising, the country 
would risk losing 30,000 jobs in For- 
mula One, plus 150,000 p^-time jobs. 
Exports worth SI j million annually 
might vanish. 

European Union health ministers 
were set to agree next month to a ban on 
tobacco advertising. In a broader re- 
sponse. Formula One has been threat- 
ening to move its races out of the EU to 
more welcoming r^imes in Eastern 
Europe and Asia. In Asia, however, 
Fonnala One was soon going to face 
anti-tobacco legislation as weU. 

So. Formula One attacked the most 
vulnerable link in the European dir- 
ective against tobacco advertising, a ban 
seven years in the making. 

liie new Labour government had 
promised in its election manifesto to ban 
tobacco advertising. But o&ce it took 
office, it didn't want to lose an im- 
portant, glamorous industry — Formula 
One — whose depaittm would have 
bttQ like movie studios abandoning 


Vantage Point/lM Thowskw 


Hollywood, (a the Yankees leaving 
NewYoik 

Britain thus decided unilaterally this 
week that Fonnula One should te ex- 
empted from the Eiiropean Union ban 
on tobacco advertising, llie result may 
be no advertising ban whatsoever on 
cigarette companies across the Contin- 
ent 

"The new U JC. position could signal 
an end to the dirMtive," a European 
Commission spokeswoman said. "It 
will be very difficult to get other mem- 
ber states to agree to an exemption." 

Let's say that the directive goes 

Formula One lias put an 
ectmomic gun to Ae head 
of Britain. 


through with a special provision for 
Formula One. a prominent media law- 
yer in London mused on Thursday. 
Then, other professional sports like vol- 
leyball and basketball would apply to 
tbe European Commission or European 
(^uitfor the right to be treated under the 
same laws that apply to Fonnula One. In 
tUs scenario, the b^y that tried to out- 
law cigaietie advertising w'ould find it- 
self inevitably and ironically aiYinning 
the rights of all sports to promote the use 
of to^co. 

Fonnula Ooe was never going to walk 
away from its tobacco advertisers with- 
out a hard political fight. In return for 
embroidering or painting their adver- 
tisements on the uniforms drivers and 
their crews, the cars, the background 
sideboards and even the beautiful wom- 
en who award the trophies, the cigarette 
companies provide Formula One with 
between $200 mdllion and $330 million 
in sponsorships annually, according to 
Max Mosley, president of the Inter- 
nationa] Automobile Federation, or 
FIA, motor racing's ruling body. 

Perhaps no other sport in Europe is as 
sophisticated in its marketing as For- 
mula One. Sports Marketing Surveys, a 
consulting firm, claims that 57 percent of 
European men between 18 and SS years 


of age watch FonnuJa One. Its races visit 
eveiy continent but Africa. Even the 
Saturday qualtiSdng sessions have drawn 
TV viewers around the world. 

All of this makes hash-browned pota- 
toes of the Oakland Raiders’ hippety- 
hoppety moves to Los Angeles and back 
to Oakland again. Itisonethingforacity' 
to lose its NFL franchise. It is another 
thing for a country to lose an industry, or 
for a continent to lose an entire sport, as 
Fonnula One>has threatened. 

I used to think that Art Model!, who 
self-indulgently turned the Cleveland 
Browns into the Baltimore Ravens, tvas 
the worst kind of ogre, a man who would 
deprive his loyal customers of their 
team. Without the NFL in town, there is 
an emptiness in Cleveland this time of 
year (not that there, isn't always an 
emptiness to Cleveland). 

My disgust was thickened upon real- 
izing that European soccer clubs belong 
to communities, not in the sense of 
ownership, but because they would lose 
their value by going anywhere else. 

But now 1 come To find that Modell is 
a two-bit player. It turns out that Amer- 
ican spons owners don't know the first 
thing about pointing a gun to the head of 
govemmenL Why stop at holding the 
city of Cleveland hostage to Che de- 
mands of a single football team? Wliy 
not instead thr^ten to mox'e the whole 
National Football League to Japan? 

T he NFL .AND BASEB.ALL can’t 
leave .America, obviously, be- 
Ctiuse they have nowhere else to 
. go. But let's see how the NB.A does with 
its plans for globalizing its version of 
basketball-as-enieriainmenL If other 
markets are created internationally: if. 
say. Asia and Europe somehow became 
hungry for the game, then suddenly the 
NBA itself becomes a franchise with the 
ability to move elsewhere. It can go to 
the White House and say. give us what 
we want or we’re going to move the 
Boston Celtics to Berlin, the Los 
Angeles Lakers to Tok >'0 .and the New' 
Yoik Knickerbockers to Milan. 

I'm not saying it's going to hap^n. 
But for our younger readers, check back 
in 50 vears. 


‘Scoreboard 




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CRICKET 


Jubilee TouRWumiEin- ' 

HMMI Anieil VO. Ml uuou 

niRDsomr M uunoE. nuBTAM 
Sowli AMm: 31 14 hi 50 overs 
Sri LonlOEMS^iASOmeis. 

Seofli AMoo won by 66 runs. 

South AMco meels Sit Uoiln Initie final on 
Saturday. 


SOCCER 


Chboowowb* Leacue 

OMUPA 

BeruolD Doitaibnd Z Poimo 0 
Gatatosniuy Z SprnlD Prague 0 
imuiDiiUHb Boruieia Dortmund 9 
putnts Pvina 7t Spuito Prague 4* 
Gotefpsoniyl 

GROUP B 

r eyuneurdl.Mi s i ch eoterUnttBdS 

JuVHirUBZKHiOUZ 

GTANPMiO fc AtaKhesler United 12 
pubitw J urnituK 9b Feyeneerd 1’ Kesicu 9 
GROUP c 

BoKOlono a Dynamo K)rv4 
Newcastle UnOed a P5V EfiiBraven 2 
WTANDiwaG. Dynamo Kiev 10 points 
P5V EtnAoven 7) NewcBSlIe Untad 4- 
Boiatomil. 

GROUPD 

PertD 1. Rounbuig 1 
Olymphdces 9 Real Madrid 0 


•TUUHMBWe Real Madrid 10 points Ro- 
scnboig Trandtieim 7; Otympiokos 4 Porte 1 . 
CROUPE 

|PK Golhenbuig Z Besiklns 1 
PorNSt CemriDlnl Boyem Mimkh I 
■TAMNNOSe Bayern Munich 9 points 
Besbeta 4‘ Paris SI Germaht 4- IFK GoHien- 
BingX 

CROUP P 

Uerseft Monacal 

Boyer LevBfcusM 4 Sporting Lisbon 1 
■TJuiDiiiM: Monaco ft Boyv Lew 
erfcusoi ft Sporting Lbbon 4: Uene 1 . 

UEFAOui* 

SECOND ROWB. RETUmt LEO 
AndertecH Befg. 1. SdnlkeOL GenrnuM 2 
SctwIkelMMonZI on aggregate. 

Bodwia Gemuinv, 4 Oub Bragew Belg. 1 
VfL Bochum wen 4-2 on nggie gu lc 

SouTw America Supercup 

•EMnUL,RRfrLEO 
River Plate Z AIMId Nedenal 0 

World Cui» 

MUNXONl 

omuPA 

Saudi Arabta 1. China 1 


TRANSITIONS 


AIEiaCM LEAOUE 

MLTiMORE— Announced leslgnaiion of 
Dovoy Jolnseiv manager. 

BefrsN-Agreed to temu nfRi RHP Tim 
WMefieW on Zyev usdiud end OF Jason 
Graham en l-yeorcentrert. 

MILWAUKEE— Agreed to terms wMb IB 
John John on 1 -fear cuntracL 

TEKA^ Announced ofnietMn egreement 
with Sovonnolk SAL. 


NAUOMAL LAACOE 

ciHaMMAn-^nnounced OF Delon 
Sendeis dedined his 1998 opiien. Named 
Harry Dunlop 3d bose cmch. 

LM AHCElES-Pmnioted Glenn Gregsoa 
mlnorJeogue CMudinatDr h> mtcMng anrtk 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



N0.MAAM..I UJaL.I HAD TO 
OIoWt 6ET MY FHEP MY D06, AND 
tmEUiOKKQOHE TAKE WM FOR A 

7, ^ WAU<,ANPTHEN 

9 RgADTOHiM.. 


YES, MA'AM, ^ANDINSVER 
IREAPTOMY ASK HIM TO 


DOeeVBKY 

N16HT.. 


lOR/TE A 
BOOK REPORT 


SORRY, MA'AM.. 

? THAT JUST SORT 
? OFSLtFFSQOUr.. 



SHEMOKi&UFOKMEL' 


s>. ^ 


MATIONAL BABKErBAlL ASBOewnOH 

SAN AHTemo-Pul G Vlnny Dei Negro en 
tojuiedBsL 

FOmtAU. 

MAHONAL F001BAU. LfAOUE 

CMICACO-Suspended DE Alonn Spe9 
man indefinllely wHhoirt pay tor lefvalng to 
undergo nnhnMoplc sutgery. 

JACxsonviLLE-Put DT KeMn PitldMrt on 
■duied reserve. Signed DT Esem Tiraeto. 

KANSAS cnr-SIgned QB Blly Joe TuBver. 

SAR POAMCSCD-SIgned DT Atoerr Reese. 

TCHHESKE-ReleasedWR NnleSlfialelon 
and TE James McKeehon. Signed CB Roger 
Jones. 

NOOtlT 

NATIONAL ROCKET LEAOUE 

CDLSiUDe-Receaed 0 Wade Belok ond 
RW OitfsHon AlMte from Hetsltey, AHL 

PALlAS-Pot D Shown Chambers on in- 
lured reserve. Recalled D Don Keezmer fram 
Mlchhoiv IHL 

PHIUDELPNIA-Sent G NeB LiHle to 
PhilodelphiGAHL 

PHOENIX— Realled RW Scott Lertra from 
Sprtngfleldr AHL 

PiTTSBUieH-RecoOed G Peter Skudm 
tram Heusteiv IHL 

SAN joSE-RecoUed LW NUdos Anderssen 
tnm Kentudiy. AHL 

TanoNTO-Sent D David Cooper to SL 
John AHL 

VANCOiiVE*-Fired Pat Quina gerwRil 
mmeger ond president. Assigned 0 Chris 
tricAHIsler to Syracuse AHL 

COUBOB 

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PAGE 24 


INTERNATIOim HER.\LD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY: NOVEMBER 7, 1997 


POSTCARD 


Leadville Needs Help 


By James Brooke 

Hew Yvrk Tamy Service 

T EADVILLE, Colorado 
i-/ — Guggenheim Berlin, 
Guggenheim Bilbao, Gug- 
poheim New York, Guggeo- 
neim Venice. Why not aGug- 
genheim Leadville? 

Leadville, as ttie name im- 
plies, is not chic. Perched at 
10,152 feet (3,094 meteis), it 
is a haid-knoclss minmg 
town, claimi^ a little fame as 
the highest incoiporated city 
in No^ America. 

! Af^ 13S years of a “get 
rich ^ get out*’ mining e^- 
ic, the population has dwin- 
dled to one-tenth of-its size in 
the 1880s. 

Some holes that environ- 
mental engineers are plug- 
ging today produced the 
cornerstone of tti& Guggen- 
heim fortune a centoiy ^ — 
silver and lead wof± $268 
million in 1997 dollars. 

* ‘The Guggenheim fortune 
was started nght here in Lead- 
ville.*' said Carl Miller, a 
third-generation resident who 
represents the area in die State 
Assembly. “It sure would be 
nice if tb^ looked back at this 
community, which is strug- 
gling duough die hardest 
times in its hutoiy." 

In 1989, MiUfir wai^Ied 
the only Guggenheim dona- 
tion seen here in modem 


tunes, $25,000 to the Nation- 
al Mining Hall of Fame and' 
Museam. 

For their part, officers and 
^okesmen for the four Gug- 
genheim foundatioDS, w 
based in New York, said few 
projects in Leadville would 
meet the criteria siipvlated by 
the bylaws of their fou^- 
dofls. One {somotes modem 
art, a second ^ants mid-ca- 
reer f^ows&ps, ‘ anodier 
studies criminal justice, and 
die last supports research on 
violence and aggression. 

Another defense might be 
diat everyone else did il 

□ 

Since 1 860, mines in Lead- 
ville and elsewhere in Lake . 
County have disgmged, at 
presrat-day prices, $12J bil- 
lion in gold, silver, lead, cop' 
per, zinc and molybdomm, 
according to the Colorado 
Geologi<^ Survey, a state 
^ency. All of this in a county 
d^ now has a total assessed 
real estate value of $53 mil- 
lion. 

“Nobody who made their 
money here did anything for 
this place,” Municipal Judge 
Ntil V. Reynolds said with a 
view behtdi^ his status as a 
fifth-generation resident 
“Mimng is a commoni^ of 
occupa&m, not a community 
of place, like ferming.” 


.39 Million for Jade Necklace 

InumarioHal Herald Tribune 

TT ONG KONG— A world record for any jade jewel was set 
-jr].Thar»hiy when a neckhtoe of 27 be^ of translucent 
emerald green j^eitB sold at Christie's for 72.62 million Hong 
Kong dollars (^.39 million). The price was more than double 
the M million estimate and the $ 4.27 milli on previous record 
set in Ocmber 19^ in Hong Kong. 

After the sale, Edmond Chfo, Christie’s eiqteit in gems 
^d diat they had just sold die biggest block of roogb jade 
“ever cut in the world." Tbe eiqien praised the intensity of 
green and luminosi^ of the beads, which vary fiom 15.Ci9 to 
15.8 millimeters in diameter and are mgieccably matehed in 
color. — SOUREN MELQQAN 


The Plot Thickens for Royal Opera’s 



By Sarah Lyall 

New KtI: Tntin Serrkv 


L ondon — it has been a vezy bad year 
for the Royal Opera, currently wandering 
listlessly arou^ London as its home in Cov- 
ent Garden undergoes a $358 millirai re- 
constructioii. It has had three chief executives 
in the last year. It is teetering on the brink of 
insolvency. And it has become tiie country’s 
latest political punching b^. forced to 
squirm in silence as members of Parliament 
hnrl unflattering adjectives at it (“shambol- 
ic* ’ comes up quite a lot). 

To add injury to insult, Britain's culture 
secretary, Chris Smith, prc^iosed earlier diis 
week thu the Royal Opera should share its 
home with its sometime competitw, the Eng- 
lish N ational Opera, when it retnms to Coveot 
Gardoiin 1999. The pioposaL a radical sug- 
gestion in London's entieriched operatic 
wQrid, would close down the IxMidw Coli- 
seum, where the national opasi is based, and 
pat three of Londcm's most important per- 
forming arts companies — the two opera 
comparues and the Royal Ballet, which alr^y 
uses Covent Garden — under the same roof. 

Smith, testifying before die parliamentary 
committee set up to eKamine the opera 
house's multitude of troubles, said that his 
st^estion was just a suggestion. A group led 
by Sir Richard Eyre, who zecentiy stepp^ 
dov/n as the national theater's artistic di- 
rector. is to study the situation and report back 
in May. he said. “I would like to e^hasize 
that it is a proposal for consideration," he told the com- 
mittee. “It IS not a diktat of any kind." 

But that did not stifle the vociferous wail that sounded 
throughout London's operatic and dance worlds, as various 
figures pushed each other out of the way in an efion to 
denounce the proposal. Their objections feU into three broad 
cat^ories: that the plan would ruin the individuality of the 
two opera conq»aies; that it would mean the end of London 
as 

die isiii of the 

position as a leading city 'for die arts," said Sir Jeremy 
Isaacs, who was geiural director of the Royal Opera until 
earlier this year, rolnting out that mo^ European capitals 
have two or more national opera companies, he added, ‘ 'Tlie 
government wants more people to have access to opera, so 
how can it justify closing down one opera house?" 

Writing in The Times of London, Sunon J enkins said that 



I'Diiml IVigiM II-,*: 'itt\ lihbmyrnD-nfVw U'mi 

Sir Richard Eyre, fcmiier artistic director; Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. 

ng 

if it were forced into Covent Garden. 


Smith's bold suggestioo comes at a time 
when nothing has gone right for the Rwal 
Opera. Just before the opera house closed for 
n^ations in Juw the planned stage p^ 
duction of "Macbeth” was shelved and giv- 
en in concert form instead wten the new 
moduction proved to complicaNd too handle 
m the existing time frame. 

The plan to have its opera ana ball« 
perfonn in diffitpeni venues white 
the opera bouse is being refurbished has had 
little su«ess: Ticket sates have been mi^- 
ahle. and fee ballet alone has already lost 
some $1.3 mUlioa this season in appowwts 
at a hall usually used for rock concerts. . - . 

Such dismaying news has priwcdtetil out*, 
tage from Gerald Kaufman, chairman of die 
pariterneatary committee investigating the 

Royal C^. . 

“It is a shand)les, isn t it? he a.sked 
rhetoricuUy of Mary Alien, the Royal Opera 
House’s chief executive, before acetwing the 
opera and ballet of “wanderiug around Loo- 
dM like die Bying Dutchman.” 

On Ticsday. vwwsc was to come when, the 
opera house's chairman. Lord Chadling^ 
' sak} that disastcrwould befall the house if h 
didn't come up with some emer^ncy cash. 
*«lf we don't get funds in the opera house in'a 
very short time, then the probability, is that 
the house will bectmie insedvent." he said. 
By March, ^ house expects to be funning a 
d^icii of tome $11.8 milUon. di^ite an 
emergency infusion of$3.4 million last suin* 
mer, raised from mvate donor^ who in 

no mood for a second mission of mercy. 

The English National Op^ has had problems of its own; 


course, EMiish-Ianguage productions — would be destroyed 
“Ii^TiSqu^rdaiioiiship with its audience and the 

mmonity it serves," he said. “You can't shoehorn it into a cumulative deficit of sortw 54.2 miUiM^ut with 
ing used by 'a company that xeixesents entirely emmeni grants to it and die Ro^ ^ 

It things, and inu^ine diat you are going to preserve five years at $20 ir^on and ^.4 

-:I7T^ ^ ^ ® K nnriftnflinoefa_ttvi.siifirnstohaveUttIehopcofpayingplTits 



conunornty 
a building 

i.ati<i.iroeaa:too, seems lohaveUltlehope. 

But in a leaer asking Sir Richard to lead the new advisory debts anytime soon. .j 

committee. Smith said that the government, faced with a But critics of Snu* s proposals said 
near-catastrophe, had little choice but to propose a radical solve thecompames financial problems, rorone inii^uwy 
solution. ^ ^ say. louring an opera or ballet company IS a very expulsive 

“For many years, funding problems have bedeviled the proposition, far more so than keraii^ the con^my at home, 
companies,” he said. “Ibefieve it is right to ask hard It mi^t also be increasingly haratopersua«pnvalc donors 
questiotu about value for mmiey.” to give money to opera companies that have eltectively 

Speakiiig to reporters. Smith warned that “if we cany on meiged under one roof. .... ■ , j- 

at present making do and mending, we mi^t end up losing And diere are myriad practical {mAIems, incluoing wtei to 

bom our m^orcxiera companies." Saying that he wanted to do about the backstage workers, oiuhcitffl|>crfoiToers ,^cito f- 
inanift fhi* r niwpaniwe ' finanriai a rahiii iy, see thenn increase uses and the like at each Opera house. Qu^ clearly, there s 
the F-ngiUh National Opera was “being told to drink hem- public access by undertaking more tours and educational no point in havii^ two technical or box-^ice or muiketing' 
lock." And Dennis Marks, who recently resigned as the |ffograms and allow them to maintain their high artistic staffs,” Marks said. “It’s going to bedifncult to argue tot 
company's general director (it is currently looking for a standards, he added: “My initial view is that these joint you should have iwo separate orchestras and chorwes. The . 
leplacement), said that its role as the “pec^le’s opera” — objectives iiri^t be achieved tiirough a radical reassessment moment you start say^ that you have one rervuig bom,yw 
with cheaper seats, a more populist atmosphere and, of of the use of the Covent Garden site." lose die unique identities of the comparues. 






.in 

Pimuitnrn. 

‘ yiuiflum 


NEW YORK FASHION 


PEOPLE 


Focus on Femininity Engenders a Fresh, New Sensuality 


By SiL^ Meiikes 

l/uenutianal Herald Tribune 


N ew YORK — WhUe the rest of 
America struggles to come to 
terms with the postfemmist era, one 
man has solved the woman question: 
Ralph Lauren. 

It may be mere fashion, but the 
designer's confident steering of his 
line throng a minefield of gender has 
been politically astute. Ova the last 
few seasons, l^uren's fresh-skiimed, 
shiny-haired models have switched 
from mannish sportswear to womanly 
dressing. Yet die change has been as 
smooth as the silky leaders and flow- 
ing satins in Lauren’s Sf^ing-summer 
show. 

In genial, this feminized New 
York fatoion season is witnessing a 
reversal of fortune for pwts, which 
are softening up or shiiiudng to mid- 
calf, while the focus has moved to 
dresses and back to the recently de- 
spised skirt. 

“The proportion has changed," 
said Lauren, to explain how he had re- 
cut jackets small and tight, their 
curving seams emphasized with over- 
stitching diat ran throu^ the show 
and expressed its salon refinement — 
and tills from a designer whose sig- 
nature lo(A was once rooted in coun- 
try-style blazers and tweed jackets. 
Even leather had melted to a buttery 
consistency as a shirt and skirt stroked 
the body, port of a new sensualify 
from LaureiL 

His womanly touch came from 
cutting the entire collection on the 
bias, from the cream pin-striped tail- 
oring that opened the show to gauzy 
sweaters and skins and dresses where 
CFOSs-cutiing gave a flirty flip. The 
ladylike el^ance includto show^ 
everything with high-heeled sling 
(nimps. 

Decoration was also delicately 
feminine: tiny embroidered pearls 
tracmg the hips of a sweater above 
liquid satin pants or an open- 
work pattern on knite. It v/as a sur- 
prise to see a ‘sequined skin from 
Lauren, but the designer seems to be 


using eveniiig wear, as 
Giorgio Armani has, to 
misfa the boundaries of 
his style. 

It was good to see the 
designer moving fc^ward 
in 1]^ own elemeat, but 
Lauren insisted diat noth- 
ing had changed. 

“It’s always my take 
on women — beautifuL’ ’ 
he said. 

When a hip designer 
focuses on multicultural 
symbols of femiaLnity 
like sarong skirts, sari 
fabrics and flower prints, 
you kiKiw tiiat fashion’s 
mood has swui^. 

Anna Sui inade her 
models look womanly 
and cute — a rare com- 
bination tiiat she 
achieved in an upbeat 
collection filled with . 
fizzy color and boldprinL 
That never overwhelmed 
the short sinqile dresses 
or brief bra tops and csqni 
pants. 

Sui's style is rooted in 
toe 1970s, widi refer- 
ences to flower power 
hats, tiny Liberty floral 
prints and to the edinic 
tc^ But she made it all 
seem fresh and modem, 
giving a contemporary 
spin to the caftan by split- 
ting it over pants and us- 
ing crochetto knits with 
dash. 

There was even a flash 
of the 1980s, with metal- 
mesh dresses, but even- 
ing wear was on a Poly- 
nesian theme; sarong skirts, Gauguin 
prints and earrings like mini flower- 
ieis danglii^ to the waist The col- 
lection had a sunny spirit that made 
the downbeat, downtown collections 
on other runways seem like last year's 
trend. 

But as downtown looks go, Donna 
Karan’s wanna-be-cool D-line did its 



IlMR-niaiiia* 

Ralph Lauren’s pearls with lacy and satin pants. 

job well. The designer, who shows 
her signature collection Friday, let 
her d^ign team experiment wito 
dresses, making them in modm 
shiny materials, dark, or with a touch 
of turquoise, and layered in see- 
through stretch. Inventive effects 
included braiing dresses ^ the midriff 
or suspending them fosm shoulder 


straps that were transpar- 
enyttestic wires. 

Gening wear — never 
much of a New Ywk 
design thmg — has come 
to ±e fore with the focus 
on femininity. 

Michael Kors had a 
smart take on signaoue 
American spmtwear: He 
made it all in loxurious 
evening fabrics but k^t 
the bre^ freshness of tte 
ocean, witii a crash of 
waves on the soundtiack 
and models striding oot 
with hands tiirust in die 
pock^ of b^gy pants. 
What initially seemed like 
r^Iar summer casual 
wear, in feet featured 
khaki chinos that were in 
glove-soft leatiier and 
TC^led-sleeved white shirts 
in silk taffeta. 

Occasiot^y the sports- 
wear theme seemed 
forced, as la^ sudmsuils 
witii geometric cutouts 
grew into stmeh dresses 
wife racing-backs. But fee 
luxurious ease kxdrad 
fresh. 

If gender is the ques- 
tion, surely crystal beads 
carmot be tte answer? 
The New Yoik runways 
are awash wife sequins 
and nowhere more thickly 
scattered than at Malstoo. 
Designer Randolph Duke 
has been gfyen the brief to 
revive with evening wear 
fee. house of fee late 
foimdii^ fafeto of Amer- 
ican minimaiism. So out 
came silk Jersey dresses sliced wife 
vicious cut-outs and braced wife 
plexiglass accessories; slinky dresses 
wife lumps of ctys^ huggii^ die 
rear, and wings of" diiffoa veiling 
bugle-beaded sheaths. It was sexy, 
steamy and a long way from (he del- 
icate el^ance of modem woman- 
hood. 


A PARIS appeal court has 
ordered fe^ fee body of 
die French singer-actor Yves 
Montand be exhumed for ge- 
netic tests to decide a patem- 
ify lawsuit Aurore Drossard 
claims tiiat Montand, who 
died in Noveniber 199 1 at age 
70. was her fathw, and has 
tal^ her case to court An 
expert arointed by the court 
said earlier this year tiiat he 
could not rule on the case 
until he had a sample of 
Montand's DNA. Montand 
repeatedly refused to under^ 
tests to establish the veracity 
of Drossard's claim, but a 
court ruled m 1994 ti^ toe 
was his child based on testi- 
mony and the physical re- 
semblance between the two. 

Carole Amiel, fee mofeer of 
Montand’s son Valentin, 
now 9, said she was “ex- 
tremely shocked” by fee 
latest court niliiig. “rmveiysadbecauseheis 
not being left to rest in peace," she smd. “I 
don’t understand why they have decided 
something so unspeakable." 

□ 

Back in Britain, Prince Charies got high 
marks from the ixiedia on his eight-^y trip 
toSouth Africa. “Chiuies tour a an-iasb hit," 
was fee tabloid Mirror's verdict, edioed by 
The Egress, which said fee prince was now 
“baskii^ in his new unage." ihe Times said 
that dnring die trip, on which he was ac- 
companied by his son Prince Harry, 13, 
Charles was - 



TRIBUTE — A restored 
statue of humorist Will 
R<^rs unveiled this week 
in Fort Worth, Texas. 


“City of Joy," said “lam 
indeto hapw today to fulfill 
my dream." The boat, funded 
by the author and a Dutch 
appliance manufacturer, U 
equiiped wife an X-ray ma- 
chine. a laboratory and doc- 
tors' offices. 

□ 

The 1997 Tanning Prue. 
given by the Acadmy of 
American Poets for lifetime 
achievement, was awarded to 
Anthony Hedit. Worth 
$100,000, the prize is one of- 
tite richest in the field of let- 
ters. Hecht lives in Wa.toing- 
ton and was a longtime pro- 
fessOT at Georgetown 
University. The award was es- 
tablished three years ago with 
a $2 miiUoD endowment the 
painter Dorothea Tanning. 

□ 

Another U.S. government official is de- L 
Douncing television's Murphy Brown as ar 
poor example for children. The Drug Enfcuce- 
ment Agency administrator, Thomas C<w- 
stantine, is upset that CBS's fictioual reporter 
turns to marijuana to relieve nausea cau^ Iw 
chenaotiienpy. In a statement issued before this 
week's qiisode, Constantine said CBS and the* ^ 
show's creators were “drang a great disser- 
vice" by “tzTvializiag dru^ abuse." 

□ i 

Hillary Rodham Clinton says an exhib- 
ition of American Indian sculpture at die 


■ ■ . f 
.1 


i'l;; iln' I. 


Varies WM more willmg to aMommodatc, White House has the abiUty to “honor the past 
fee TOs than at any time during the past and im^e the future, "-nie 12 statues, inost 

of which will remain in fee Jacmieline 


□ 

As a tribnte to “the action of the princess on 
behalf of disadvantaged children,^* a centez 
for probtem chUdiea in Paris is to be 
after Diana, Princess of Wales, a spokesman 
at Paris's city hall said. D iana died in the 
French cafntai in a car crash Aug. 31. 

□ . 


remain in the JacqueUnCiSl. 
Kennedy Garden until nextfall.reflectarange^. 
of styles tnarkiiig Native American workfroin 
this ceotufy. Each sculpture “tells a story of 
how traditions are pass^fr^ one genefatim ' 
to the next," she said at a White House ' 
ceremony. 

□ 

^ter starring in 34 films that sold more than 
a million tickets eachin 30 years on the screen. 
Gerard Depardieu is Fnmcc's box-office 


Villagers claj^ied and shouted “long live 
bi^CT Dbn^ue" as the French writer champion, according ro the 
E^nique Laiuerre launched a floating FrantSis. DepmSS to^id of 

PhiUppeNoifSxalherin^Mii^r^ 

fover delta of j^tern hidia. Lapier^ author the list of actresses, having starred in 14 

that sold more dian a miUion tickets. 


of a novel on Calcutta’s street children titled 



in the springtime. 


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