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I 


Herali* 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHI 


l V 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


R 


London, Tuesday, November 11, 1997 


■* 

Judge Lets Au Pair Out of Prison 

erdict in Killing of Infant Is Reduced to Manslaughter 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


WASHINGTON — A Massachu- 
itts judge on Monday reduced the 
©cond-degree murder conviction of a 
iritish au pair to involuntary man- 
slaughter and senteoced her to 279 days 
; in- prison, the tune she has already 
served awaiting and during the trial. 

Judge Hiller Zobel said that to let the 
Maher charge stand, wife its mandatory 
lire sentence for Louise Woodward, 
Would have been unfair since the ev- 
idence reflected “confusion, fright and 
bad judgment, rather than rage or 
malice’ 1 in her care of 8 -month-old 
Matthew Eappen, who died of a brain 
injury Feb. 9. 

“Mercy does not lessen opprobri- 
um,” he said in his sentencing order. 

“I do not denigrate Matthew 
.Eappen’s death, nor his family’s grief, ” 
he said in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Bpt “it is in my judgment rime to bring 
the judicial part of this extraordinary 

matter to a compassionate conclu- 
▼ rioo.” 

. The reduction allowed Miss Wood- 
ward’s immediate release from prison, 
but the judge asked her to surrender her 
passport until die prosecution had time 
to appeal the revised sentence. The de- 
fense team agreed, although it was un- 
clear under what statute Miss Wood- 
ward could be prevented from leaving 
the United Stales if she chose to do so. 

■ “After intensive, cool, calm reflec- 
tion, I am morally certain that allowing 
this defendant on this evidence to re- 
main convicted on second-degree 
'murder would be a miscarriage of 



Louise Woodward at her triaL 
“Bad judgment,” not “malice.” 

justice,” Judge Zobel said in a 16 -page 
ruling. He underlined the wards “this,” 
in both instances, and “murder.” 

Under the original conviction. Miss 
Woodward would have had to serve at 
least 15 years in prison before becoming 
eligible for parole. The lower charge 
carried a maximum 20-year sentence 

and 00 minimum 

Asked before the sentencing if he 
would appeal the manslaughter convic- 
tion, Barry Scheck, one or Miss Wood- 
ward’s lawyers, replied, “Yes.” 

The trial of Miss Woodward. 19, in 
the death of Matthew Eappen, who died 
of a brain injury on Feb. 9, bad been 


closely followed on both sides, of the 
Atlantic. 

With most American mothers now 
working outside the home, it tapped a 
deep vein of fear about the quality of 
child care. At the same tune, a broad 
range of Americans and others saw a life 
sentence as unwarranted, providing 
grist for endless debate on talk shows, 
on newspaper editorial pages, and 
around office water coolers. 

It was only the foarth time in a long 
career that Judge Zobel had overturned 
a jury’s finding. 

He wrote that it was clear that Miss 
Woodward, while in charge of Matthew 
Eappen cm Feb. 4, bad acted out of 
“confusion, inexperience, frustration, 
immaturity and some anger, but not 
malice (in die legal sense) supporting a 
conviction for second-degree murder.” 
The prosecution had contended that Miss 
Woodward had shaken Matthew viol- 
ently and struck his head a gainst a hard 
surface, provoking his death on Feb. 9. 
The defense said that a dot formed by an 
earlier, previously undetected injury, 
had begun to bleed again. 

The judge said that the earlier guilty 
verdict for second-degree murder Y ‘was 
not against the weight of the evidence.” 
He defended his decision not to order a 
new triaL dismiss the conviction, or 
leave the jury’s finding untouched — 
his three other options. He said that the 
jury had been carefully selected, and the 
evidence “sufficed, however thinly, to 
support an indictment” on the minder 
charge.” 

There were no witnesses to the events 
See AU PAIR, Page 10 



China and Russia Make Up 



Presidents Jiang Zemin and Boris Yeltsin hugging Monday during 
the Russian leader's state visit to Beijing. C hina and Russia settled 
an old border dispute and pledged a “strategic partnership.” Page 4. 


Europe’s Economy Revives 
But Job Upswing Is Bleak 

Growth in ’98 Won’t Cut Unemployment Much 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


Iraq Rebukes U.S., but Eases Rhetoric 

Clinton Calls on Security Council to Resume the Weapons Inspections 


By Barbara Crosse tie 

New York Tunes Service 


UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
Using the international platform of the 
United Nations, Iraq’s deputy prime 
minister, Tariq Aziz, delivered a sharp 
attack on the United States Monday, 
calling Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright a liar and accusing Washington 
of turning an aims control mission into a 
tool of American policy. 

But Mr. Aziz, President Saddam Hus- 
sein's chief spokesman in die outside 
world, stopped short of further threats to 
the United States or the United Nations, 
and seemed resigned to the presence of 
Americans in Iraq if their numbers were 
reduced 

On Oct 29, Iraq said that all Amer- 
icans working for the UN Special Com- 
mission, a body charged with destroying 


prohibited Iraqi weapons and ensuring 
that it cannot develop new ones, would 
have to leave the country in a week. It 
also demanded the end of American U-2 
flights in support of the arms inspectors. 

When the U-2 flights resumed over 
Iraq on Monday, Baghdad repeated its 
threat to shoot the planes down but took 
no hostile action. 

“That’sagood thing," President Bill 
Clinton said in Washington. “But it 
does not change the larger issue, which 
is that UN weapons inspections have 
been stopped by Saddam Hussein.” 

Mr. Clinton said he was now looking 
to the UN Security Council for a strong 
statement on the urgency of resuming 
weapons inspections in Iraq. “Then we 
will go about manifesting that, demon- 
strating our determination to begin 
those inspections again," be said. 

Mr. Aziz said: “We are protecting 


ourselves against the misbehavior of 
those Americans who are working un- 
der the. hat of the United Nations but 
actually they are implementing the 
policies envisaged by the Pentagon and 
the CIA and the State Department. This 
is unacceptable.” 

But Mr. Aziz added that “we are not 
seeking a crisis, neither with the Se- 
curity Council nor with the Special 
Commission.” Mr. Aziz met Monday 
with Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine 
of France in Paris, then quickly crossed 
the Atlantic on the Concorde and met 
with the Russian and Chinese repre- 
sentatives here. He apparently did not 
pick up enough support to maintain a 
defiant position indefinitely. No UN 
officials were prepared to cut him 
slack. 

See IRAQ, Page 10 


PARIS — Europe’s major economies 
are on track for a growing economic 
rebound in 1998. with little sign of 
inflation. But for many of the Con- 
tinent’s 18 million unemployed, it will 
be a jobless recovery. 

Economists and corporate executives 
say the recovery is being built largely on 
exports, meaning it will take longer for 
European consumer spending to kick in 
and sustain the growth. 

Less reassuring, both in social and 
economic terms, is the widely held view 
that while growth may be heading to- 
ward a healthy average rate of 3 percent 
next year, from about 2.5 percent, this 
year, that alone will oot be enough to lift 
Continental Europe out of its persisting 
jobs crisis. 

Even worse, analysts say, a new wave 
of corporate layoffs is likely in craning 
months, especially in the financial ser- 
vices sector. That means Europe will 
probably launch its single-currency proj- 
ect in early 1999 with unemployment 
still averaging more than 10 percent. 

Nor is the European Union’s summit 
meeting on jobs, to be held next week in 


Luxembourg, expected to produce much 
beyond rhetoric. The last time EU leaders 


discussed unemployment, in Amsterdam 
in June, German Chancellor Helmut 
Kohi rejected proposals for public spend- 
ingprograms aimed at job creation. 

Economists and businessmen tend to 
agree with Hans Tietmeyer, the Bundes- 
bank president, who said Monday that 
growth in Continental Europe could ac- 
celerate in coming months. 

“All in all we feel that the positive 
outlook remains valid.” he said, adding 

NEWSANALYSIS 

that there were “growing signs of im- 
proving growth in a lot of countries.” 

But the experts also stress that re- 
covery alone will not spark widespread 
job creation for die following reasons: 

'•"Although manufacturing compa- 
nies have been restructuring over the 
past couple of years, one more wave of 
layoffs is expected in the service sector, 
especially at overstaffed banks and in- 
surance companies. 

• The prospect of legislation man- 
dating a 35-hour workweek in France 
and Italy is creating what one senior 
French executive called “a -negative 
psychology” that will probably spur 
layoffs and more investments outside of 

See EUROPE, Page 10 


President 
Pulls Back 
‘Fast -Track’ 

Trade Bill 

Clinton Admits Votes 
Aren't There toExpand 
His Negotiating Power 
By John F. Harris 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Seeing that an 
ardent lobbying campaign bad fallen 
short, President Bill Clinton on Monday 
asked Republican leaders to remove a 
bill aimed at expanding his authority to 
negotiate trade agreements from the 
congressional agenda rather than suffer 
an embarrassing legislative loss. 

Mr. Clinton spoke with the House 
speaker. Newt Gmgrich, Republican of 
Georgia, his Republican ally on the pro- 
posal to allow so-called fast-track trade 
agreements, at aroand 1:15 AM. on 
Monday. Aides said both men agreed 
that the measure was facing a narrow 
but virtually certain defeat 

Hours later, bleary-eyed from his 
short night, Mr. Clinton met with re- 
porters to admit that his hopes had 
crashed, although he insisted the set- 
back would be temporary. While Re- 
publican leaders had mustered close to 
170 votes for the measure. Mr. Clinton 
could bring barely more than 40 Demo- 
crats to support fast-track. 

“I think most of you know what 
happened,' ’ Mr, Clinton said. “We have 
been having a big debate in our party far 
several years on the question of trade 
and its role in our economic future.*' 

Mr. Clinton admitted that he had 
made numerous efforts to convince 
skeptical Democrats that new trade 
agreements would not set back the for- 
tunes of organized labor in this country 
or endanger workers’ rights or the en- 
vironment abroad. “We worked hard to 
overcome their objections, and we 
didn't succeed,” he said. 

[The president of the AFL-CIO, John- 
S weeney , who had led the opposition to 
fast-track, called the derision to pull the 
bill “the first bit of blue sky working 
Americans have seen in -U.5. trade 
policy in many years,” The Associated 
Press reprated. “The next generation of 
trade policies must respect people as 
well as property.”] 

With such scant Democratic support, 
fast-track supporters needed to win even 
more Republican votes. The last-minute 
bargaining focused on an unrelated 
measure — U.S. aid for family-planning 

See CLINTON, Page 10 : 


% 


WorldCom Wins Over MCI 
With New $36 Billion Bid 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


NEW YORK — With a sweetened 
offer of S36 billion, WorldCom Inc. 
brushed aside two rival bidders and 
emerged Monday as the suitor of choice 
e fra MCI Communications Crap. 

' Boards of both companies unani- 
mously approved the agreement after 
WorldCom unproved its offer by more 
than 20 percent. 

WoridCom’s bid sup ersede d a $28 
billion all-cash offer from GTE Corp. and 
beat out a revised takeover agreement of 
around $20 billion that MCI had with 
British Telecommunications PLC. 

If die deal goes through, it will be the 
largest takeover in U.S. history. The 
new company will be called MCI 
WorldCom and expects to have about 
$32 billion in revenue next year. 

; For British Telecommunications. 


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which held 20 percent of MCI’s shares 
and announced its plans to pick up the 
rest a year ago for a total of $25.5 
billion, die end of its dream of having a 
strong American leg to its international 
strategy had its consolations. 

While the rest of the shareholders in 
MCI, America’s second-largest long- 
distance phone operator, are to receive 
$51 in WorldCom stock for every share 
of MCL BT will get die equivalent 
amount in cash — a total of $6.9 billion. 
By breaking its original pledge to link 
up with BT, MCI must also pay BT a 
penalty fee of $450 million. 

“In no sense do we consider that we 
have gotten a bloody nose, here,” a 
spokesman for BT said. “I would call a 
profit on our holding of $2215 billion a 
very good return for our shareholders.” 

GTE was left with nothing. Its all- 
cash bid of $40 per MCI share has now 
been decisively topped by WorldCom’ s 
new offer, which is 20 percent higher 
than its original bid of $41 .50 a share. 

MCX's chairman, Bert Roberts Jr, 
said that '’GTE is a fine company. We 
didn't dismiss it tightly.” Nevertheless, 
he added, “MCI has made die best 
possible choice with this alignment with 
WorldCom. The two companies have 
complementary strengths. 

See DEAL, Page 10 



AGENDA 


^ Pakistani Is Convicted of 2 CIA Murders 


Ago, W«try»VAjKDcr Fmx-Prcvc 

INDONESIAN REFORMS — Finance Minister Mar’ie Muhammad 
avoiding questions Monday as he left Parliament He still plans to dose 
16 banks, including ones owned by relatives of the president Page 13. 


FAIRFAX, Virginia (Reuters) — 
Mir Aimal Kasr. a 33-year-old 
Pakistani, was convicted Monday of 
capital murder in a 1993 shooting spree 
that killed two U.S. Central Intelli- 

U.S. Gains a Berth 
In Soccer World Cup 

The U.S. national soccer team’s year- 
long pursuit of a berth in the Worid Cup 
next year came to a euphoric end with a 
3-0 victory over Canada in British 
Columbia. Roy Wegerle set up one goal 
and scored two to said Team USA to its 
third World Cup in a row. Page 21. 


gence Agency employees and 
wounded three other people outside 
CIA headquarters. He was round guilty 
of all lOcouots arising from the Jan. 25. 
1993, rampage in McLean, Virginia. 

PAGE TWO 

Yesteryear and Today ontheDMZ 

EUROPE Pages. 

British Army Battles Racist Legacy 


Books 

Crossword 

Opinion 

Sports 


Page 4. 

Page 20. 

Pages 8-9. 

Pages 20-2L 


The IHT on-line ww'.v. iht.com 


Unabomber Case: Issues of Madness and Evil Intent 


By 'William Glaberson 

New York Times Service 

SACRAMENTO. California — A 
year and a half after a recluse stepped 
out of a Montana cabin and ended one of 
the longest manhunts in FBI history, 
Theodore Kaczynski is to go on trial 
here this week on charges that he was 
the Unabomber, responsible for a string 
of bombings that began in 1978. 

In federal court here, Mr. Kaczyn- 


ski’s fight to avoid the death penalty 
will force his lawyers to contend wife a 
trove of prosecution evidence found in 
his cabin, including a carbon copy of fee 
anti-technology manifesto the Una- 
bomber had sent to news organizations, 
an unexploded bomb and detailed 
entries from his journals such as “I 
mailed that bomb.” 

And the case is likely to present fee 
picture of Mr. Kaczynski’s younger 
brother. David, taking the stand to try to 


save the life of the sibling he turned in to 
fee authorities. U was David Kaczynski 
who went to the FBI in 1996 after read- 
ing fee manifesto and told them he 
thought bis brother could be the man 
they were looking for. 

But in recent weeks, it has become 
clear that a central theme, both inside 
and outside the courtroom, will be how 
to assess individual responsibility for 
acts that seem at once meticulously 
planned and, at the same time. 


fiendishly arbitrary. The campaign that 
left three people dead and more than two 
dozen wounded was so irrational it 
could only have been the product of 
madness, say some people, including 
Mr. Kaczynski’s lawyers. 

Contending that Mr. KaczynsJd’s 
mental deterioration rendered him in- 
capable of forming tire criminal intent 
necessary to be held responsible trader 

See TRIAL, Page 10 


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To Brazil’s Rich and Poor Alike, He Provides Nip- and-Tuck Beauty 


By Anthony Faiola 

Washington Post Service 


RIO DE JANEIRO — Patient No. 1 was an 
indigent boxer who came to get a prettier ear. 
Following him was the musician’s wife, des- 
perate for firmer breasts. Next came Eliza Mara, a 
6-year-old girl with flowing copper locks who 
used one hand to cover the hairy brown growth 
stretching across her nose. 

“She’s had it since birth,” said her mother, 
Maria de Silva Nasrimenio, who traveled six hoars 
from her village to this examination room in Rio de 
Janeiro. “Everyone always tells me. ’Your daugh- 
ter is too pretty to grow up wife that thing on her 
face. Why don’t you just take her to Pitanguy?* ” 
And so, there she was on a recent afternoon, as 


I vo Pitanguy, wife 20 medical students hanging on 
his every move, leaned over to mark Eliza’s face 
with a blue pen. Dr. Pitanguy, a plastic surgeon 
who is considered a national celebrity in Brazil, is 
the Wizard of Gauze to the rich and powerful But 
at his Holy House Plastic Surgery Clini c in Rio. be 
is also fee benefactor of Brazil 's poor. 

“Ah-buh, hum,” grumbled Dr. Pitanguy, 70, 
probing fee child’s face. Finally, he uttered fee 
verdict; “Yes. We can make her beautiful”. 

Those who think plastic surgery is only for fee 
old and fee rich have never been to Brazil At his 
clinic for the poor, which performs 1,500 op- 
erations a year. Dr. Pitanguy is credited with 
starting a cultural revolution feat has legitimized 
cosmetic surgery perhaps more here than any- 
where outride Beverly Hills. 


In fee process, he has put beauty within fee 
grasp of an extraordinary number of people from 
all socioeconomic classes. “I have never believed 
that cosmetic surgery should be exclusively for • 
the rich,” Dr. Pitanguy said. “The poor have fee 
right to be beautiful, too.” 

He has turned this city, where bodily perfection 
is prized, into an international hub of the nip and 
tuck. Thanks to Dr. Pitanguy, Rio boasts more 
plastic surgeons per capita than anywhere on 
Earth, wife almost 1,000 such doctors in fee city 
of 6.3 million, according to fee local medical 
association^ Women — . and men — from around 
fee world now come to Rio on “plastic surgery 
vacations,” holing up in hotel rooms for two 
weeks to recover. 

Some hens, however, wonder if what Dr. Pit- 


anguy wrought has gone too far, if fee pressure to 
be perfect has grown too intense. Silicone breast 
injections now are being offered in Rio’s back 
alleys for as little as $25 by “witch doctors” wife 
big syringes but little medical training. Indeed, 
plastic surgery mania has swept this nation as 
prices — all but those in -Dr. Pitanguy *s private 
■ clinic — have come down to rock-bottom rates. A 
.recent cover story on plastic surgery in the na- 
tional newsmagazine Veja declared feat “fee 
only ugly Brazilians now are the ones who want to 
be ugly/’ - 

It is, Brazil watchers say, a trend started by Dr. 
Pitanguy. 

7e have cultivated beauty in Brazil like 
See LIFT, Page 10 




t 1 


■it 

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(!) 
■ l ; 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Peaceful, This Tune / Seeking Visits to Battle Sites 

A General’s New Mission to Korea 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 


P YONGYANG, North Korea — Flying 
in a helicopter across the nigged moun- 
tain range that slices through the length 
of the North Korean landscape. Kay 
Davis peered through the window and recalled 
a different rime, nearly a half-century ago, 
when he was in these mountains. What he 
remembered most was the bitter, brutal cold. 

“That campaign in that terrible weather,” 
the retired four-star Marine general said, shak- 
ing his head at the memory. “It went on for 
a bom two weeks. That unforgiving weather. 

“We suffered from thirst more than any- 
thing else,” he said. ‘ ‘We would eat snow, but 
ir wouldn't satisfy your thirst.” 

There were other Images — still vivid, still 

disturbing. There were the bodies of fallen 
Americans, frozen in grotesque positions; their 
limbs had to be broken so they could be stacked 
onto trucks. The Chinese troops they faced 
fared no better. * ‘We found Chinese frozen to 
death with tennis shoes and no socks,” Gen- 
eral Davis recalled. Some prisoners walked 
with their feet frozen into solid blocks of ice. 

General Davis won a Medal of Honor in the 
Korean War. He is one of the ‘ ‘Chosin Few,” 
survivors of the brutal battle at the Chosin (or 


Changjin) Reservoir, seen as a major Marine 
victory over a much larger enemy force. There, 
15,000 Americans, mostly Marines, were sur- 
rounded by 120,000 Chinese in blizzards and 
freezing cold. 

At the onset of die righting, in November 
1950, he was a 34-year-old battalion com- 
mander, leading 800 fresh recruits from Camp 
Pendleton, California. His unit had been dis- 
patched in a hurry, with no time to train them. 

Thor only practice came during the 16-day 
sea voyage, when they fired machine guns and 
mortars at old boxes and crates tossed over- 
board. They had only old Japanese Army maps 
— and no winter clothing. 

“The winter clothing was somewhere in the 
supply system,” the 82-vear-old Georgia na- 
tive recalled. “We still had old arctic boots, 
and you put thick pads in your boots. You had 
to change those every 12 hours, put the cold 
ones next to your body to thaw them out” 

One might think these'are memories better 
left behind. But for a few days. General Davis 
was back in NorthKorea, flying over the scene 
of that fateful campaign — and earnestly seek- 
ing permission from North Korean authorities 
for himself and other Korean War veterans to 
revisit their old battle sites. 

For many old soldiers, returning to die scene 
of battle becomes a catharthis, allowing them 


to put in perspective what, for most, was a 
pivotal time of youth. Many Vietnam veterans, 
for example, say they will never be able to 
come to terms with the internal conflicts that 
war created until they return to Vietnam, tour 
the battle sites and six down to calk wiih former 
adversaries. Various travel companies even 
specialize in battlefield tours for veterans. 

B UT the process has been more dif- 
ficult for Korean War veterans, since 
the regime in North Korea still con- 
siders the United Stales a hostile 
power, and foreign visitors to this isolated 
country — particularly American tourists — 
are few. Pyongyang recently has allowed U.S. 

to search for the remains of missing 
servicemen, but so far there have been no 
organized visits for veterans. 

General Davis flew to North Korea with 
Representative Tony Hall, Democrat of Ohio, 
seeking to open the door for veterans be thinks 
will want to make the pilgrimage. 

This was the general’s second visit here 
since the war. He came first in 1992, when he 
was allowed to travel from Pyongyang to the 
Demilitarized Zone and the southern part of 
the country. This time, be Sew by helicopter to 
Hamh nng, across the mountain range ana close 

to the Chosin Reservoir. 





He also saw for (he first tune the North 
Korean military museum and got a glimpse of 
how the regime here views what he calls “a 
war shouldn’t have happened.” What be 
got was a revisionist view sharply at odds with 
the version most Western historians accept 
There were paintings of brave North Korean 
soldiers smashin g U.S. tanks. When General 
Davis asiceri whether the soldiers depicted 
were the first units to cross the border when 
North Korea attacked the South in 1950, he 
was c or re c t e d: North Korea never crossed the 


DMZ Duty: Dangerous but Highly Prized by U.S. Soldiers 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

International Herald Tribune 


C AMP BONIFAS, South Korea — 
You are an American soldier and 
have a choice between two overseas 
tours. One is at a U.S. base in Western 
Europe. Your family accompanies you, you 
rent a house in -a neighborhood near the base 
and you enjoy the delights of Europe on the 
weekends. After the collapse of the Soviet 
Union, the likelihood of conflict is minimal. 

The other tour is in South Korea. You must 
leave your family in the United States and 
share aged barracks. Kim Jong H the un- 
predictable leader of North Korea, might at any 
minute shower South Korea with chemical, 
biological and possibly nuclear weapons. The 
two Koreas technically remain at war, and 
along the 243-kilometer (151 -mile) border 
separating them, the risk of conflict is among 
the highest in the world. 

South Korea seems an unlikely choice for 
American troops. Yet around one in three of 
the 37,500 U.S. soldiers and airmen here are on 
at least their second tours, many of them 
voluntarily. Officials and officers here say 
significant numbers turn down less dangerous 
tours to stand nose-to-nose with Pyongyang’s 
million-man army along the world’s most 
heavily armed border. 


Some develop a taste for life along the 23- 
kilometer-wide Demilitarized Zone. Others 
choose South Korea because as a top overseas 
tour it could lead to rapid promotion back home 
or because an azduoas one-year tour here could 
mean up to five years of country-dub living at 
U.S. bases. And some come here to repay what 
they consider a personal debt to die army after 
long military careers worldwide. 

Less than half a kilometer south of the DM21, 
three soldiers at Camp Bonifas ribbed each 
other as they talked or the relative merits of 
additional tours. 

One called First Lieutenant S hann on Weber 
a “sicko” for turning down a post in Hawaii 
and requesting her fourth yearlong tour in 
South Korea. “That you can see the enemy 
makes a huge difference,” said lieutenant 
Weber, 27, a military intelligence specialist 
who supervises patrols along the southern peri- 
meter of die DMZ. 

Last month. North Korean troops seized two 
Southern farmers wonting in fields near Bon- 
ifas, putting the 520 U.S. troops on high alert. 

* ‘The mission here is real ,’ 1 f said Jim Coles, 
a spokesman for the American force. “They’re 
not training fra die sake of being ready to jump 
on a plane and go somewhere. They’re training 
to be ready to stand and fight” 

* ‘There is alot of testosterone in these troops 
still” he said, “even in the older guys.” 


Until the end of the Cold War in 1992, 
defending Western Europe was Washington’; 
top foreign policy priority. Accordingly, a 
string of European tours — and especially one 
in Berlin before German reunification in 1990 
— was almost a prerequisite for a high-flying 
U.S. military career. 

These days, policy is more focused on de- 
fending South Korea from the Stalinist North. 
As a result, U.S. soldiers say, a tour here ranks 
alongside one preserving the fragile peace in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina. 

“I like it here because yon can get die jobs 
you need and want” fra promotions. Lieu- 
tenant Weber said. 

F IFTY kilometers south of the DMZ at 
Camp Red Cloud, the atmosphere is 
less tense. On die outskirts of a small 
town northeast of Seoul the camp is 
ringed by busy roads and rolling hin«, without 
land mines. Still most of the 5,000 U.S. in- 
fantry troops based here harbor no illusions — 
they remain within easy range of North Korean 
artillery. 

Sergeant Donyel Harris, 37, requested a 
second tour in South Korea after first coming 
here in 1986. 

“Korea's considered a hardship tour,” she 
said. “So by requesting it I might be able to go 
back to the States and spend three or four years 
there before my next assignment overseas.” 


Master Sergeant Karlo Aguilar, 39, asked 
for a second tour here to repay what he called a 
debt to the army before he retires next year. 

“I’m a career guy," he said. “I’ve been in 
22 years, and owe the army a couple of things. 
I'd never have completed college or acquired 
the sense of responsibility that comes from 
wearing a uniform.” 

Since his arrival this year, he has tried to 
instill a sense of urgency into young soldiers. 
Most are on their first tours overseas, have 
never been in combat and are misled by South 
Korea's affluence into thinking North Korea 
no longer represents a threat, he said. 

All the same, tours in South Korea often 
seem like jail time to many soldiers because the 
army bars bringing families, citing the risk of a 
North Korean attack and a housing shortage. 

Sergeant Aguilar left his wife, Amy, flying 
to South Korea three days after their wedding. 

“We talked about this for hours on end,” he 
said. “Neither one of us wanted to do this, bat 
it is a necessary sacrifice." 

By serving in the aimy two years longer than 
lanned. Sergeant Aguilar will also increase 
pension. 

At Camp Bonifas, Staff Sergeant Randy 
HiU, 28, counts v itamin pills to pass the time. 

41 ‘I have three bottles of vitamins, and I know 
that when they’re gone, three months have 
passed,” -he said. 4 ‘Not that I’m counting.” 


pla 

his 


Ray Davis, a retired Marine _ v 
four-star general and Medal i 

of Honor winner in Korea, is 
seeking permission from 
Pyongyang for hurtidf and 
other US veterans of the war >: 
to visit the battle sites of ? 
almost a half -century ago. _ 

butler, the guide explained. American* 
troops invaded the Korean Peninsula, and 
the North Korean Army was forced to 
repel the aggressors. . k . 

One of toe guides glared at him. Noting 
that he had fought in World War U and;-; 
Vietnam as well as Korea, she challenged ■ 
him, "If you were in three wars, then y mu 
are an aggressor, and I hate aggressors! 4 ’-.. 

General Davis responded that in World ., 
War n. the Americans were fighting 'Jap-., 
anese aggression — meaning that, tech-,, 
nically, Americans and Koreans were on,., 
toe same side. “Same way in Korea, ’ he-., 
added. *' ‘Our government sent us here to defend . ■ 
toe freedom of South Korea against toe in*.. 
vasion of the North.” as was the case in Vi- . . 
etnam. He was unable to persuade toe guide, but 
noted “a change in expression on her face.’ , • 

Nor could he persuade the North Koreans to 
open their country to tours by American vet- , 
erans — at least not yet — although be sensed , 
a softening of attitudes. “We’re getting good- ' 
vibes now,” he said. . *•: 

At first. North Korean officials seemed to 
reject General Davis’s plea outright. Unking . . 
toe question of rearming veterans to the overall, ► 
status of relations between Washington and --, 
Pyongyang. 

“In light of the present relations, it is not, 
possible/’ said Deputy foreign Minister Kim . 
Gye Gwan. “We arc in hostile relations. We... 
are in negotiations now, and your visit to the 
battlefield is linked to the negotiations.” 

He added, " ‘What about pressuring toe U.S. .. ; 
ad minis tration, which has hostile policies to- - 
ward our government, so you can accelerate , 
the day when you can see those battle sites?” . 

5 j 

B UT General Davis brought up his- ,. 
case with North Korean officials at: • 
every opportunity. And he used an 
added element besides toe need for .. 
healing: the generosity of 28 milli on American., ■? 
veterans “who will look favorably on your 
country if we can give them a full report” . 

Allowing veterans to return is not soieily & .* 
h umani tarian issue, he sakL But at a time when .. ■ 
famine-stricken North Korea is desperate for 
food aid and faces another bleak harvest, vet-. , 
erans could form a formidable lobbying group 
for more U.S. aid, he told bis hosts. 

By the end of his three-day visit, there was a - . 
noticeable shift in position. Foreign Minister „• 
Kim Yang Nam tola him, “I do think the rime . • 
will come to realize your hope.” Other of- 
ficials said they hoped he would be able to 
return soon, and they were confident he would „ 
get bade to the Chosin Reservoir. 

But General Davis said that, at his age, he . . 
hopes soon is tomorrow. “I accepted the fact - 
that I’m not going this time,” he said. 4 ‘Maybe . 
in the spring I’ll come back." 




.u! 


2 Nations Cleared on Air Safety 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Two countries that previously fell 
short now meet international aviation safety standards, the 
Federal AviatioD Administration reported. 

The U.S. agency said that Trinidad and Tobago and Mo- 
rocco were complying with standards set by the International 
Civil Aviation Organization. That means airlines from those 
countries can operate regular service to and from the United 
States. Both countries previously had conditional ratings, 
meaning their airlines could serve the United States only under 
close scrutiny by federal inspectors. 


TRAVEL UPDATE Hurricane-Damaged Mexican Coast Is Hit Again 


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Delay for New Heathrow Terminal 

LONDON (Reuters) — BAA, toe organization that op- 
erates British airports, warned Monday that long lines were 
likely to become a feature of traveling from London's Heath- 
row airport because of regulatory delays to building a giant 
fifth terminal there. 

With passenger traffic growing faster than expected, it is 
becoming harder to avoid bottlenecks in getting passengers 
through security, said BAA’s finance director, Russell Walls. 

Heathrow is the world’s busiest international airport. Pas- 
senger flow jumped 4.5 percent to just over 31 million in the 
six months to Sept. 30, which was ahead of expectations. BAA 
has already said the delays mean the new terminal, which is 
designed to increase Heathrow's current capacity by 50 per- 
cent, will not open until 2004 at the earliest, two years later 
than it had planned. 

BA to Apply a Total Smoking Ban 

LONDON (AFP) — British Airways will ban smoking on 
all flights beginning March 29, Robert Ayling, the director- 
general said Monday. 

Ninety-five percent of BA’s 7,000 flights a week are 
already nonsmoking, including domestic flights. The last few 
routes where smoking is allowed include flights to Spain, 
Latin America, China, the Philippines, Bulgaria and Pakistan. 
BA’s partners in an alliance of airlines — Qantas, Canadian 
International, Deutsche BA and Air Liberte — also plan to ban 
smoking next year. 


The Associated Press 

OAXACA, Mexico — A hurricane 
drove thousands of people from their 
homes Monday as it struck fishing vil- 
lages and tourist resorts still recovering 
from the damage caused by an earlier 
Pacific storm. 

High seas, heavy rains and winds of 
120 kilometers an hour (75 miles an 
hour) cut highways, damaged bridges 
and forced hundreds of people to flee 
their homes in toe coastal area that in- 
cludes tourist resorts such as Huatulco. 


Puerto Escondido and Puerto Angel 

There were no immediate reports of 
injuries or deaths, but news of damage 
was limited by the loss of road links and 
telephone communications with many 
small villages. 

All seaports in toe area were closed, as 
were airports at Huatulco and Puerto 
Escondido, which lost electric power. 
Local officials said thousands of people 
had been evacuated to shelters. 

The hurricane designated Rick hit the 
coast Sunday evening west-northwest of 


Puerto Escondido, a region where many 
had lost homes to the hurricane des- 
ignated Pauline only a month earlier. & 
it moved inland Monday, the hurric^e 
was downgraded to a tropical storm, v 
Pauline killed at least 230 peopled 
three states and left 300,000 home!c& 
mostly in Oaxaca state. It nearly ob- 
literated some coastal villages, and of- 
ficials have been trying to rebuild hotels 
and public buildings in the area, wherts 
few cases of cholera and other 
were reported in the storm’s wake, f 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Correction 

An index line on the front page of some editions Monday 
incorrectly characterized toe wives of North Koreans who 
were permitted to return briefly to Japan, their native land. 


port G. Camilla 


US Dollar Up or Down? 

US Dollar Policy Will Generate 
Major Currency Moves. 

These moves will directly affect (he value of 
your Portfolio. Prepare yourself fo take 
advantage of these moves by calling today. 


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Japan 0031126809 Korea 0038110243 

Medea 45 800* 7641 78 Netherlands 000220657 
Portugal 050112*32 Slnmmre 8001202501 
Spain BOO 831007 Strata. 020793158 

TheOamt 00180011*216813 USA 8009945757 


00081 1821 551 31 

Finland 080011100641 
Germany 0130828688 
Italy 167875928 
Lu x e mb ourg 08004552 

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Coofar in tho South wait 
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Rainy In tha Southeast. 


Europe 

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day. France and England 
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Wednesday, men showers 
Thursday and Friday. 
Showers n eastern Europe 


Italy and the Batans. 


Asia 

Cold serosa Mongolia, 
wMHb Beijing win be sea- 
sonably mild with soma 
sunshine Wednesday to 
Friday. Cool in Tokyo 
Wednesday, then warm 
Thursday end Friday. Ram 
£ Seoul Wednesday, then 
dry and seasonable with 
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re9i la fri store for southern 
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l 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


i 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


rentagon 

{Acts to Cut 

» 

'Personnel 

•By 28,000 

( ‘By Bradley Graham 

! Washington Post Service 

-WASHINGTON — In a 
brbad overhaul of the 
Pentagon's bureaucracy and 
business practices, Defense 
Secretary w illiam Cohen an- 
nounced Monday a one- third 
cut m his 3,000-per&o office, 




•p| • agencies ana the opening of 
V j tens of thousands of defense 
j jobs to competitive bids from 
' private firms. 

J Under the plan, many of- 
| frees will be realigned, result- 

• mg in the elimination of two 
] of the II assistant secretary 

■ positions and the slashing of 
U&000 of the 141 ,000 civilian 
[jobs in the targeted organ- 
izations. Among the groups 
{affected are the secretariats 
{for policy, acquisition, fi- 
J nance, personnel and intelli- 
gence as well as agencies re- 
j sponsible for commissaries, 

j . j security , financial accounting 
•m '{and information services. 

* Defense officials said the 
[changes were intended not 
{just to save money, but also to 

■ focus the department better on 
[such post-Cold War concerns 
jas blocking the spread of uu- 
I clear weapons and guarding 
{against terrorism in the United 
{States. ■ 

| While the restructuring 
[does not bear directly on how 
I the Pentagon prepares for ma- 
yor wars, it is meant to have a 
{wide impact on how the de- 
jfense establishment does 
[business, officials said. 

{ In addition to the job 
[changes, Mr. Cohen also has 
. {decided on measures to 
} {streamline Pentagon con- 
I true ting, travel planning and 
[the transportation of houses 

■ told goods. 

I While declining to put a 
[dollar figure on the savings 
i expected, officials said that 
{covering die future budget 
Jgap wifi require more than 
!$2.5- billion a year in addi- 

I tional savings through such 
reductions as further “fee" 


Away From 
Politics 

• Six million Americans 
turned down their employ- 
ers* health insurance plans 
last year, more than double 
the 2.6 million who did so 
in 1987, according to a 
study published in the jour- 
nal Health Affaire. ( WP) 

• Two-thirds of the esti- 
mated $57.3 billion that 
Americans spent on illegal 
drugs in 1995 went for co- 
caine, a White House Office 
of National Drug Control 
Policy report says. (AP) 

• Men who lose their cool 

_ have twice the risk of stroke 

NOT JUST SPILLED MILK — Rescue workers in Menfro, Missouri, where a truck driver. died when his ^^^SSSmen^anew 
milk tanker, lower left, hit a freight train, 'derailing 25 of the 69 railcars, including one that spilled animal fat 5tlK ty report: (Reuters) 


Texas Cultists Lose 
In Supreme Court 

Branch Davidians Opposed Judge 





■ ' . * “ x . . 


Clinton Fights Hate Crimes 

WASHINGTON — Noting a sharp rise in hate 
crimes, President Bill Clinton called Monday for 
broader laws to penalize acts of violence based on 
gender, disability or sexual orientation. 

The president began a White House Confer- 
ence on Hate Crimes by endorsing a plan by 
Senators Edward Kennedy, Democrat of Mas- 
sachusetts, and Arlen Specter, Republican of 
Pennsylvania, to make it illegal to injure someone 
because he or she is gay. disabled or a member of 
the opposite sex. 

“All Americans deserve protection from 
hate,” Mr. Clinton said. “We should make our 
current laws tougher to include all hate crimes that 
cause physical harm.'' 

The [resident announced measures that include 
allowing victims of housing-related hate crimes to 
seek monetary damages from their attackers and 
ass ig nin g up to 50 additional FBI agents and federal 
prosecutors toward enforcing hate crime laws. 

“Anybody who thinks that in the world of 
today and tomorrow that he or she can hide from 


POLITICAL NOTES 


the kind of poison that we see in various places in 
our country is living in a dream world,” Mr. 
Clinton said. 

“Whether we like it or not, our futures are 
bound together, and it is time we acted like it.” 

The conference, involving about 350 people, is 
an offshoot of the president's race relations ini- 
tiative. It was convened in part to address con- 
cerns raised by gay and lesbian activists that are 
not directly covered by the race effort. 

Participants in the conference included civil 
rights activists, educators, religious leaders and 
victims of hate crimes. (AP) 

Compromise on the Census 

WASHINGTON — The White House and 
Republican congressional leaders have put the 
finishing touches on a politically sensitive com- 
promise for conducting the 2000 census that 
would allow the administration to experiment 
with statistical sampling to achieve a more ac- 
curate count but give Republicans ample time and 
resources to challenge the technique In court 


The compromise — which could affect the 
future makeup of the House — helped clear the 
way for final passage of a $32 billion Commerce - 
Justice-State departments spending biflL 

The compromise over the census concluded 
months of wrangling between the White House 
and House Republican leaders, who have opposed 
the administration’s planned use of statistical 
sampling to supplement traditional person-by- 
person head counts. 

The administration and congressional Demo- 
crats argue that blacks and other minorities tra- 
ditionally have been undercounted in the census 
and that by using statistical sampling, under- 
counting will be reduced. (WP) 

Quote / Unquote 

Attorney General Janet Reno on steps an-, 
nounced by the president to combat violence 
caused by prejudice: “For too many commu- 
nities, hate crimes are a grim reminder of the 
challenges we face in building our American 
family.” (Reuters) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Mem- 
bra of the Branch Davidian 
cult lost a Supreme Court ap- 
peal Monday that was aimed 
at removing a federal judge in 
Texas from presiding over a 
lawsuit against the govern- 
ment stemming from the fiery 
end to their 1993 standoff. 

The court, without com- 
ment, turned down the cult 
members’ argument that 
Walter Smith Jr„ a U.S. Dis- 
trict Court judge, was biased 
against them. More than 200 
surviving Davidians, plus 
relatives of the 79 1 who died 
when fire engulfed their com- 
pound near Waco, Texas, are 
seeking hundreds of millions 
of dollars in damages from 
thegov eminent. 

The siege started Feb. 28, 
1993, when a shoot-out erup- 
ted as federal agents tried to 
arrest the leader of the cult, 
David Koresh. Four federal 
agents and six Davidians 
were killed and 16 agents 
were wounded. 

Fifty-one days later, Mr. 
Koresh and 78 followers died 
by fire or gunshots after die 
FBI started filling the com- 
pound with tear gas. 

The Davidians* suit chal- 
lenges the government’s con- 
clusion that die cult members 
themselves started the fire and 
that they shot first during the 
initial raid on the compound. 

Last February, Judge Smith 
denied the Davidians* request 
to remove himself from the 
case on grounds of bias. In 
criminal cases stemming 
from the siege, the judge has 
sentenced eight Davidians to 


prison for convictions that in- 
clude weapons violations and 
voluntary manslaughter. 

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court 
of Appeals refused to remove 
Judge Smith from the case. 

In the appeal, the Davidi- 
ans* lawyers said Judge 
Smith showed bias by saying 
in court that the Davidians 
had been led by a false proph- 
et, had ambushed and 
murdered federal agents and 
had started the April 19 fire. 

The Davidians “will not get 
a fair trial before Judge Smith 
because be will not view their 
evidence impartially." the ap- 
peal said, noting that the judge 
— not a jury — will serve as 
the fact-finder on some of the 
Davidians* claims. 

In another decision, the 
high court refused to hear the 
appeal of two Alabama 
schoolgirls who say they were 
strip-searched in second grade 
after being accused of stealing 
$7 from a classmate's purse. 
Their suit had invoked the 
constitutional right against 
unreasonable searches. 

The court also left to a fed- 
eral judge in Detroit all law- 
suits nationwide against Dow 
Coming over alleged health 
problems caused by silicone 
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Bomb Kills One and Hurts 13 in Port-au-Prince 


Reuters 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — A 
bomb exploded in central Port-au-Prince 
on Monday, killing one person and 
wounding at least 13 others, doctors and 
the police said. 

Six of the wounded were students on 
their way to school, they said. 

The bomb exploded on a sidewalk 


of the wounded were reported to be in 
serious condition. 

“At first I didn't know what it was. 
and then I beard screams and saw people 
who bad blood all over them and I 
dropped my bananas and ran,” said a 
woman who had been selling fruit on the 
corner where the bomb went off. 

A police inspector, Patrick Gu li- 


near, the General , Hospital and two laume, said witnesses had repotted see- 
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kind of device someone could make in 
(heir own home,” he said. “We don’t 
know who would do something like 
this.” 

Port-au-Prince has experienced a rash 
of street crime in recent weeks, increas- 
ing concerns about security when United 
Nations peacekeepers depart on Nov. 
30. Canadian UN peacekeepers ended 
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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER II, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


:nJ! 


t Hi 


Russia and China Seal ‘Partnership’ 


Yeltsin and Jiang Preside Over Border and Trade Agreements 


The Associated Press 

BEUING — The presidents of China 
and Russia said Monday they wanted a 
“strategic partnership" of closer eco- 
nomic and political ties but would not 
revive their formal alliance of the 
1950s. 

Jiang Zemin and Boris Yeltsin, meet- 
ing in an amiable aimosphere for their 
third summit meeting in 20 months, 
settled a decades-old border dispute and 
supervised signing of agreements on 
trade and the protection of rare Man- 
churian tigers. 

The two leaders described their re- 


lations at a joint news conference as a 
“strategic partnership,” echoing the 
statement issued by Mr. Jiang and Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton after their talks two 
weeks ago. 

But they rejected suggestions that 
Beijing and Moscow were banding to- 
gether to offset growing U.S. global 
influence and appeared intent on re- 
assuring other countries such as Japan. 

“I think die bilateral relationship is a 
strategic partnership of equality and mu- 
tual respect.’* Mr. Jiang said. "We will 
not form an alliance, and this kind of 
long-term relationship is not directed 


against another country.’ ’ 
Chinese-Soviet frarernalism in the 
1950s gave way to rivahy for the al- 
legiance of the Commnnist world. 


Beijing and Washington forged diplo- 
matic ties in the 1970s out or suspicion 


BRIEFLY 


Beijing Is Silent 
On Taiwan Claim 


Strike Stops Traffic 
In Bangladesh 


BEIJING — China avoided direct 
comment Monday on reports that 
President Lee Teng-hui of Taiwan 
had described the island as independ- 
ent, but a Beijing official repeated that 
Taiwan re mains an inseparable part of 
China. 

"There is only one China in the 
world, and Taiwan is an inseparable 
pan of China," said the Chinese For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, Tang 
Gnoqiang. 

He was asked to comment on a 
Washington Post report that quoted 
Mr. Lee as saying Taiwan was “an 
independent and sovereign coun- 
try." 

“We hope the Taiwan side," Mr. 
Tang said, will do “more things that 
will benefit the improvement and de- 
velopment of relations between the 
two sides. Our guiding principle for 
resolving the Taiwan problem is 
peaceful reunification and ‘one coun- 
try, two systems.’ ” (Reuters) 


CHITTAGONG. Bangladesh — 
Road and rail traffic in many parts of 
Bangladesh was paralyzed Monday as 
jute and textile mill workers began a 
two-day transport blockade to protest 
government-planned privatizations. 

The protesters demanded an im- 
mediate suspension of die govern- 
ment’s privatization policy and a 
higher minimum wage. (Reuters) 


Rights Group 
Assails Japanese 


New Smog Enfolds 
Parts of Indonesia 


JAKARTA — Smog from Indone- 
sian bush and forest fires covered 
large portions of the country on Mon- 
day, government officials said, but 
neighboring Singapore and Malaysia 
breathed easier. 

At least five Indonesian airports 
were closed because of poor visib- 
ility, the officials said. 

They said the smog was concen- 
trated in the provinces of Jambi. West 
Sumatra and South Sumatra on 
Sumatra island and in Kalimantan, on 
the Indonesian side of Borneo is- 
land. (Reuters) 


LONDON — ■ Foreigners detained 
in Japan are at serious risk of being 
beaten, humiliated or sexually assaul- 
ted by racist officials, Amnesty In- 
ternational said Monday. 

Calling on the Japanese govern- 
ment to ‘ ‘clean up its own backyard,” 
the human rights group said detainees 
were subjected to violence, abuse and 
humiliation by immigration officials, 
prison guards or police officers. 

Amnesty said its report high lighted 
the plight of people from China, Den- 
marie, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, South Korea, 
Nepal Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru and the 
United States. ( Reuters ) 


Tamil Rebels Down 
Sri Lanka Copter 


COLOMBO — Two Sri I-anknn 
Air Force pilots were killed when 
Tamil rebels shot down an Mi24 heli- 
copter gunship Monday with a missile 
on the northeast coast of the Indian 
Ocean island, officials said. The gun- 
ship was escorting three Mi 17 heli- 
copters carrying troops. ( Reuters ) 


made ties in the 1970s out of suspicion 
of Moscow. Now Beijing and Moscow 
are interested in finding counterbalances 
to Washington’s power. 

In a sign of U.S. concern. Deputy 
Secretary of State Strobe Talbott was 
due to hold talks Tuesday in Beijing with 
Foreign Minister Qian Qicben ana Mr. 
Qian’s top Russia expert. Mr. Yeltsin's 
meetings with Chinese leaders were on 
the agenda, said Bill Palmer, the U.S. 
Embassy spokesman. 

Mr. Yeltsin, who arrived in Beijing on 
Sunday night, said he and Mr. Jiang had 
developed a “relationship of trust/’ He 
noted mat Mr. Jiang studied in Russia 
during the 1950s and speaks Russian. 

“It’s very important for us to improve 
this kind of relationship between the two 
governments," Mr. Yeltsin said. 

Trade is a key goal of the summit 
meeting. The two sides have set an an- 
nual trade target of $20 billion by 2000, 
but this year it may not even reach the 
1996 level of $7 billion. 

Mr. Bang and Mr. Yeltsin watched as 
their two deputy prime ministers, Li 
Lanqing and Boris Nemtsov, signed 
three documents on economic and tech- 
nological cooperation and oil and gas. 

Other agreements covered coopera- 
tion on regulating trade in financial ser- 
vices, the diamond trade and protecting 
the Manchurian tiger, according to die 
Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman, 
Tang Gnoqiang. 

There are believed to be about 400 of 
the animals, also known as Amur, tigers, 
in Russia and about 20 in China. 

The Russian news agency Itar-Tass 
on Sunday quoted Mr. Nemtsov as crit- 
icizing Chinese trade rules that keep out 
Russian planes, fertilizer and ferrous 
metals. 

The border agreement, six years in the 
makings is being held up as proof of their 
new cooperation. It lays out the 4,000- 
kilometer eastern frontier, from Mon- 
golia to the Tumen River near the Sea of 
Japan, and includes territory the two 
fought over as recently as 1969. Hie 
short western border, only 50 kilometers 
long, is still under negotiation. 

"We have solved the problem which 
remained unsolved for generations," the 
Chinese quoted Mr. Yeltsin as saying. 

The agreement covers the joint use of 
islands and surrounding waters on the 
border, but it was not clear whether two 


disputed islands were included 
Mr. Jiang accorded Mr. Yel 


Mr. Jiang accorded Mr. Yeltsin the 
trappings of a major state visit. The two 
leaders stood atop a red-carpeted re- 
viewing stand outside the Great Hall of 
the People as Chinese soldiers paraded 
by. 


Southern Vietnam Protest Turns Violent 


Reuters 

HANOI — Public anger over cor- 
ruption and land-ownership issues 
boiled over last weekend in a mostly 
Roman Catholic region of southern Vi- 
etnam as thousands of people clashed 
with police, leaving several injured. 

Residents and officials in Dong Nai 
Province detailed a series of incidents 
after protests that began Friday in the 
area about 100 kilometers (60 miles) 
northeast of Ho Chi Minh City. 

The violence in Dong Nai is separate 
from the troubles in a northern province, 
Thai Binh. where thousands have pro- 
tested for months against corruption. 
One resident said the disruption in Dong 
Nai started when women converged on 
local government offices in Thong Nbat 
district. Groups unfurled banners de- 
nouncing officials for confiscating land 


from fanners. 

On Saturday, the demonstrators were 
joined by thousands of other residents, 
prompting riot police to intervene. In 
battles that followed, police vehicles 
were attacked, and several officers were 
injured by crowds wielding sticks and 
throwing stones. 

The discontent in Thai Binh. an area 
considered the cradle of Hanoi's Com- 
munist revolution, prompted concern at 
the top levels of Vietnam's leadership. 

Diplomats and analysts say the po- 
tential for volatility in southern Vietnam 
is greater than in northern parts of die 
country because of long-standing re- 
gional animosities. In addition. Cath- 
olics often are associated with the 
former U.S.-backed government in Sai- 
gon that Hanoi vanquished in 1975. 

There was no indication Monday that 


religions issues lay behind the weekend 
violence, but government restrictions on 
foreign news operations prevented jour- 
nalists from visiting the area. 

Separately, a total of 3,669 people are 
still missing after die worst storm in 
nearly a century ravaged die tip of south- 
ern Vietnam on Nov. 2, according to the 
Disaster Management Unit sponsored by 
the United Nations. A tally of figures 
from provinces put the number of dead, 
mostly fishermen who were at sea, at 546. 
Teas of thousands lost their homes. 

Four UN agencies have made pre- 
liminary pledges of aid totaling 
$255,000, ana Switzerland, South 
Korea. Norway, the Netherlands, 
France and Australia have committed a 
total of about $690,000. 

The affected provinces have estimat- 
ed the storm damage at $472 million. 


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President Nouhak Phoumsavanh of Laos, right, talking Monday through interpreters with Strobe Talbott: 


U.S. and Laos Mend an Old Fence 


Talbott Tours Vietnam War Battlefield and Talks of Trade Help j 


By Thomas Cramp ton 

International Herald Tribune 


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PLAIN OF JARS, Laos — Strobe 
Talbott, the deputy U.S. secretary of 
state, led the highest-level American 
delegation to Laos in 20 years Monday 
and toured the battlefield of a war that, 
officially at least, never was. 

Mr. Talbott said die United States 
wanted to move beyond past discord 
and grant this impoverished country 
special trade status as it began to shift 
toward a market economy. 

Even as the relationship wanned, 
however. Mr. Talbott said there were 


looking forward to develop a new re- 
lationship.’ 1 

A legacy of the heavy and steady B- 
52 raids from 1964 to 1973, U.S. bomb 
casings are so plentiful in northern 
Laos that they reive entered tire local 
culture, serving as fence posts, house 
supports and animal feeders. 

When the war ended, residents say, 
not one structure was left standing in 
the Plain of Jars, which got its name 
from geologic formations. 


According to clearance expats, up 
30 oercent of the bombs tailed to 


specific humanitarian gestures that 
Laos could make to enhance its in- 


Laos could make to enhance its in- 
ternational reputation. 

Sometimes a hideout for Hanoi’s 
leadership during die Vietnam War 
and a key part of the Ho Chi Minb 
supply trail, northern Laos became one 
of the most bombed places on Earth 
and the site of a clandestine war run by 
the Central Intelligence Agency. 

“We’re not here to look, into the old 
war,” said another U.S. delegation 
member. Jan Lodai, deputy undersec- 
retary of defense. “We’re 100 percent 


to 30 percent of the bombs railed to 
explode on impact. Still deadly, they 
now lie buried under streets, fields and 
schools, like one visited by Mr. Tal- 
bott’s delegation Monday. 

Among the most deadly weapons 
are cluster bombs the size of tennis 
balls, with a delayed fuse and enough 
ball bearings and explosives to kill at 
150 meters from point of explosion. 

Painted military green, these anti- 
personnel bombs are known locally as 
guava for their resemblance to the fruit 
and, I Dorians say, children are prone 


to play with them. 

A recent study by Handicap Inter- 
national found almost a quarter of bomb 


casualties are young boys. The 
recent finality occurred in Qctotor. 

“It is obviously a vivid and sober- 
ing image.” Mr. Talbott said, “to see; 
less than 50 feet apart unexploded’ 
ordnance being cleared and children 
playing volleyball.” 

He said he would personally lobby ‘ 
in the United States, which first started 
helping with ordnance removal last 
year, to increase its commitment to; 
clearing bombs. “We want it to be 1 ' 
volley toll everywhere.” he said. 

On the trade from, he noted ihqg 
Laos had made considerable progress* 
toward receiving most- favored nation 
status, but he was unsure when it 
would formally be granted. In August. . 
negotiations were completed for ihe 
initial bilateral trade agreements nec- 
essary before Congress can raise the 
country’s trade status. 

The U.S. delegation, which has also 
visited Australia and New Zealand, . 
flies next to China and then to Japan. 

Mr. Talbott said a theme throughout 
his visit had been environmental con- 
cerns raised by uncontrolled fires in 
Indonesia that have spread smoke 
throughout Southeast Asia. 


BOOKS 


TAKING CHARGE: The Johnson 
While House Tapes, 1963-1964 

Edited by Michael R. Beschloss. 591 
pages . $30. Simon & Schuster. 


suggest . . . that no consideration be 
given to me because I am absolutely 
unavailable.” 


Was this a ploy to force a compromise 
the convention? Probably. But his 


Reviewed by Richard J. Barnet 


at the convention? Probably. But his 
conversations just before the convention 


P RESIDENT Lyndon Johnson taped 
about 9,500 of his private conver- 


X about 9,500 of his private conver- 
sations starting the day he took the oath 
of office and ending shortly before he left 
the White House. "Taking Charge,” Ac 
first volume in a series, is based on 240 
hours of talk recorded during his first 
nine months in office. The historian Mi- 
chael Beschloss, who selected and edited 
the tapes, provides a helpful commentary 
throughout the book, identifying the cast 
of characters whose words are being 
recorded without their knowledge. 

Occasionally, he will comment on the 
truthfulness or hidden significance of 
what Johnson is saying, but in most 
cases he wisely lets die president’s 
words speak for themselves. 

The result is a fascinating portrait of an 
imposing, manipulative, driven, conflic- 
ted, and surprisingly vulnerable character 
whose political ambitions had suddenly 
been achieved under frightening circum- 
stances. Johnson’s immediate reaction to 
the assassination of John F. Kennedy was 
that it was a Soviet plot and that it might 
be followed by an all-out nuclear attack. 
But within days he was convinced that 
die Soviets were not involved. 

The great danger, as he explained to 
Senator Richard Russell, was a con- 
gressional investigation in which 
“they’re testifying mat Khrushchev and 
Castro did this and did that and kicking 
us into a war that can kill 40 million 
Americans in an hour.” 

The Warren Commission was an at- 


suggest that he was truly depressed He 
was worried whether he could stand the 


was worried whether he could stand the 
strain of four more years in the White 
House. But a compromise was reached 
on the Mississippi delegation and all talk 
of going back to Texas abruptly 
stopped. 

The second critical issue is Vietnam. 
From the first the shadow of the war 
hung over the new administrkion. 
About a week after Johnson takes office, 
William Fulbright, chairman of the Sen- 
ate Foreign Relations Committee, tells 
the president, “I just think that it is a hell 

of a situation I’ll be goddamned if I 

don’t think it’s hopeless. ’’McGeotge 
Bundy tells him that "90 percent of ihe 
people” want no part of an Asian war. 
Johnson himself does not know what to 
do. He senses die disastrous con- 


sequences of sending troops lo Vietnam, 
but he is not going to be the president 
who "lost” Southeast Asia He des- 
perately wants to postpone the tough 
decisions until after the election, but the 
North Vietnamese attack on a U.S. des- 
troyer in the Gulf of Tonkin and the 
reports of a second attack (which prob- 
ably did not take place) push him lo 
authorize a retaliatory strike on North/ 
Vietnam. ! 

There is a tragic quality to the dis- 
cussions about Vietnam. Over a critical 
nine-month period, there is much talk of 
dominoes falling and the need to demon- 
strate force. But there is no precise anal- 
ysis or even conjecture about the likely 
domestic and foreign policy con- 
sequences of waging war in Vietnam or 
of avoiding it. 


Richard J. Barnet is the author pf 
several books on U.S. foreign policy add 
a fellow of the Institute for Policy Stud- 
ies. He wrote this for The Wa shine (tin 
Post. " I 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


I N the main line of the Rubinstein 
Variation of the Nimzo- Indian De- 


- ■ — “ ^ H pi i 

fense. Black lets White get the bishop 
pair with 6 a3 Bc3 7 be because after 
7— dc 8 Bc4 c5 9 Nf3 Qc7, he has un- 
hampered mobilization possibilities for 
his pieces. 

Against Black's threat of exposing an 

attack on the white king bishop with 
i n i nn..>. ry . . r _ ... 


missed 29..Rd5! One point was that ifl 
Rd5? loses instantly to 30...Qdl 31 Rdl 
Rdl 32 Qel Rel mate. Another was that 
30 Qd5 Rd5 31 Rd5 Qb2 32 Rel g6 33 
Re8 Kg7 34 Rel Qa2! 35 Rddl d5 36 
RalQd5 yields White an easily winning 
endgame. 

After 34.. _Nd5, Black was a pawn 


ahead. White could not mix anything 
“Pjjy 35 Bb6 because 35...Nb6 36 Rd7 

\i*n n tv r% _ _ . 


tempt to ase the prestige of prominent 
Americans to forekall this and to forge a 
bipartisan consensus that would put con- 
spiracy rumors to resL. 

The story of LBJ’s relationship to 
Robert Kennedy has been told often, but 
the tapes make clear that he was ob- 
sessed with the dead president's younger 
brother. Johnson was prone to see 
Bobby's hand in any unfavorable press 
account of his administration, and he 
was convinced that the attorney general 
was plotting to snatch the Democratic 
nomination from him in 1964. Yet John- 
son was careful to avoid an open break 
with Bobby by bolding out the hope that 
he would pick him as his running mate in 
1964. 

Throughout die time covered by this 


IU— cd. White cannot just play 11 Bd3*> 
because on 1 l...cd 1 1 cd? Qc3, he has no 
move that escapes losing a piece. 

In place of 15 a4. White might have 
played 15 c4!? with the idea of an- 
swering 15,..b4 by 16 d5!, which 
threatens to overrun the black center 
with 17 e4 and 18 e5. The exchange of 
knights with 19...Nc4 20 Nc4 Rc4, in 
panng down material, prevented Black 
from getting cramped. 

Black 27...Qa4 28 ed Qc2! was 
a brilliant defense in the style of 
Emanuel Lasker, but after 29 Qe5. he 


Nd7 37 Qe7 Rc8 puts White a piede 
down. i 

White, with a wild hope of trying fora 
perpetual check with 45 Bf6. blundered 
with 44 Qe6?, which walked into the 
crushing 44..Jsie5! There Was , . 

by^Rb! because 45...Qc;?46 'Ml 5 . 
Qa^gjlaeates lethal threats of 47...841 l! ' K « : 
or 47...QI2, both of which lead lo ma|s, ^ 


EPSTEIN/BLACK 


engrossing took, LBJ is preoccupied 
with two central issues, either of which 
could have derailed his presidency. The 
first is die Gvil Rights Act, a Kennedy 
bill that had been stalled in Congress. 

The civil rights bill passes, but a crisis 
looms over the seating of the all-black 
Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. 
Johnson is convinced that seating the 
blacks will cost him the election. The 
president tells his aide Walter Jenkins 
that he is going to quit and go home and 
shows him a statement he intended to 
make: * *The times require ... a voice that 
men of all parties and sections and color 
can follow. ... I am not that voice-. . . I 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


^British Army Attacks Racism 

I force Aims to Expunge a Legacy of Abuse 


Py William Montaibano 

- Los Angela Times Service 

£ LONDON — In World 
War I, a whiskered Lord Kit- 
chener beckoned sternly from 
a. famous British Array re- 
cruiting poster. Now, the 
“Your Country Needs You” 
poster is back, but this time it 
is the Ghanaian-born captain, 
Fidelix Datson. or Warrant 
Officer Ashok Kumar 
Ghauhan, po intin g to Bri- 
tain’s military future. 

£ Stung by accusations of 
rgcism, Britain’s volunteer 
atopy is deploying public re- 
lations ana advertising cam- 
paigns to improve its image 
and increase the number of 
tifinority soldiers in its ranks. 
£*‘We are determined to 
provide genuine equality of 
opportunity for everyone ir- 
respective of their sex, mar- 
ital status, race, ethnic origin, 
cjjlor or religious belief,” 
said General Roger Wheeler, 
cfcief of the general staff. 
‘The goal is that within five 
years the army should more 
closely reflect the 7 percent of 
ethnic minorities in Britain 
overall. Right now, about 
1,100 minority soldiers serve 
in the army — around 1 per- 
cent of the 1 1 2 ,200- member 
force. In the British civil ser- 
vice. by contrast, minorities 
total around 5 percent of the 
work force. 

" "What is stopping minor- 
ities joining is that the army is 
perceived as structurally, if 
npt actively, discriminat- 
ory," Brigadier Robert Gor- 
don said. * ‘We have said mea 
culpa. We've had a policy of 
saving that the army is col- 
orblind and as a result we 
□ever did any monitoring. We 
have now learned that mis is 


not a good thing to do. ' ' 

Once in the armed forces, 
some minorities have report- 
ed racial harassment. When 
Mark Parchment enlisted in 
the Royal Marines in 1988, he 
was given a spear, not a rifle, 
and was referred to with a 
racial epithet. 

"Everyone thought it was 
a great joke, but I felt quite 
humiliated,'’ said Mr. Parch- 
ment. who went absent with- 
out leave. Caught after five 
years, he was dismissed from 
the marines because "his ser- 
vices were no longer re- 
quired.” 

Prince Charles once com- 
plained there were no black 
faces among mounted honor 
guards for the royal family. 
Richard Stokes was recruited 
by the Household Cavalry in 
1990 but resigned after hav- 
ing bananas thrown at him 
ana suffering other forms of 
racial abuse. 

Mark Campbell, the first 
black in 400 years in the royal 
household guards, en- 
countered his bed soaked in 
urine, racial taunts and a note 
saying. "There is no black in 
the Union Jack.” 

Well-documented cases of 
blatant discrimination weigh 
against the army, but Bri- 
gadier Gordon said the worst 
of them occurred in the early 
1990s. "Things have 
changed dramatically in the 
past two years.” he said. 

The Defense Ministry, 
though, is being sued by 70 
former servicemen who are 
claiming physical and sexual 
assaults during "initiations,” 
according to the Sunday 
Times. One was beaten so , 
badly he had ro have his face 
reconstructed. Others were 
rubbed raw with steel brushes 


and sprinkled with bleach. 

The cases focus mostly on 
sadism, but there were racial 
overtones as well in some of 
them. Solomon Raza, an in- 
fantry private, tried to bang 
himself after being harassed 
during a tour in Bosnia-Her- 
zegoviua. "I felt safer out in 
the field being shot at by Bos- 
nians than in my own camp,’ ’ 
he told the Sunday Times. 

Under the new policies, the 
army will attack racism and 
discrimination within its 
ranks through better educa- 
tion and tourer investiga- 
tions and discipline. Bri- 
gadier Gordon said, and it 
will establish mechanisms by 
which victims of racial or 
sexual harassment can ap- 
peal. 

Similar initiatives are in 
the works at the navy and the 
air force. Brigadier Gordon 
said, "but it is the army that 
has a fire in their house, and 
we are putting it out. ' ' 

The idea is to open the door 
to the army wider without for- 
mally favoring any group or 
groups, which is illegal here. 


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Turkey Releases 
Political Activist 




BatmOrtaia 

REMEMBERING ATATURK — A mourner outside the Ankara mausoleum of 
Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey, who died 59 years ago Monday. 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Times Service 

ISTANBUL — The gov- 
ernment has yielded to for- 
eign and domestic pressure 
and freed one of its critics, a 
blind man who began serving 
a 23-year prison term last 
month on charges of support- 
ing terrorism and spreading 
separatist propaganda. 

"I’ll start out where I left 
off." the critic, Esber Yag- 
murdereli, said after he was 
released from a raison near 
Ankara on Sunday. “The 
problems that existed when I 
went to jail 20 days ago still 
exist today. We will cany on 
doing whatever we can to re- 
solve those problems.” 

The governments of 
France. Germany and Britain 
had appealed to Turkey to 
free Mr. Yagmurdereli, and 
last week Foreign Minister Is- 
mail Cem told senior foreign 
diplomats here that he was 
seeking a way to do so. 

The government said Mr. 
Yagmurdereli had been freed 


on health grounds. The Anato- 
lian news agency said bis sen- 
tence had been "suspended 
for one year.” 

The release appeared to 
mark a successful effort by 
civilian authorities to impose 
their will over that of the mil- 
itary. Senior military officers 
bad urged that Mr. Yag- 
murdereli not be freed. 

Western governments have 
for years criticized Turkey for 
its human-rights practices, and 
the unexpectedly loud protests 
over Mr. Yagmuniereli 's 
treatment came at an espe- 
cially delicate moment 

Prime Minister Mesut Yil- 
maz is planning trips ro Ger- 
many and the United States in 
coming weeks, and the hu- 
man-rights issue was threat- 
ening to overshadow others 
he hopes to discuss. 

In addition, the European 
Union is planning a summit 
meeting in Luxembourg next 
month at which government 
leaders will decide how to 
proceed with Turkey’s appli- 
cation to join the EU. 


BRIEFLY 


$ • Basque Party Accuses Madrid 

. MADRID — Relations between the government and 
> "its former governing partner, the Basque Nationalist 
! . Party, were at a new low Monday over the disclosure of a 
draft peace plan for the Basque region. 

Javier Arzalluz. leader of the Basque party, which until 
; September supported Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar’s 
minority government in Parliament, accused Mr. Aznar’s 
■ r interior' minister. Jaime Mayor Oreja, of disclosing the 
peace proposal, to the Spanish media Iasi, week, in an . 

• 'attempt to sabotage it. . , ,”V", ’ 

The Interior Minisuy denied the accusation-' 

- - The draft-proposal by the Basque pacifist group E Henri 

- -seeks a reinterpretation of the Spanish Constitution to 

allow greater autonomy for the Basque region. (AP) 

’ ", Swiss Banks to Widen Search 

j ZURICH — Swiss banks changed course Monday and 
, ; .said they would publish a 1 1 the names of nearly 3.700 non- 
v Swiss owners of World War II-era dormant accounts. 

*■ The move brings to about 5,500 the number of for- 
i- eigners’ dormant accounts that banks have released in a 
’. .. belated effort to find their owners and to counter ac- 
, ; * cusations that banks are hoarding the wealth of Holocaust 
v ( ‘ -.victims. 

"f The reversal followed criticism that the original system 

.. i. of Finding names on the latest list, via keyword searches 
, "on an Internet site (www.donnamaccoums.ch), was too 
"opaque. f Reuters ) 

' ; Moscow Denies MiG Capability 

' " MOSCOW — Defense Minister Igor Sergeyev denied 
‘ on Monday reports that MiG-29 fighter aircraft sold re- 
cently by the former Soviet republic of Moldova to the 
United States were capable of launching nuclear missiles. 
Washington said last week that it had bought 21 
”, advanced Russian-made MiG-29C planes from Moldova 
' to keep them out of the hands of "rogue states, including 
‘Tran.” It said the single-seal aircraft were capable of 
launching nuclear weapons. 

*4- -- "The report that the MiG-29C carries apparatus that 
the plane could use to carry nuclear weapons is a dear 
lie.” Interfax news agency quoted Mr. Sergeyev as 
+- saying. He said such enabling apparatus had been re- 
. , .moved from the aircraft in 1 9S9. Mr. Sergeyev said only 
; ..6 of the 2 1 fighters were fit to fly. adding that the rest had 
, been disassembled and transported. < Reuters ) 

. ,For the Record 

. .. Antonio Di Pieiro. a former magistrate in Italy who 
! .. became a folk hero for his ami-corruption crusade in the 
f "* early 1990s. won a crushing victory in a by-election for 
. _the Senate, the upper house of Parliament, on Sunday. He 
ran as a center- left candidate in the rural constituency of | 
. Mugello. t Reuters ) 

Kohl Is Ready for Talks 
j To Cut Costs of Pensions 


Reuters 

y :v BONN — Chancellor 
kelmut Kohl said Monday 
that he was ready to meet the 
opposition Social Democrats 
to discuss bow to prevent state 
pension charges rising to their 
highest-ever level next year. 

Mr. Kohl said "it would of 
course make sense to hold 
such talks’* now that the So- 
cial Democratic Party has 
proposed them. He spoke 
after a meeting of his Chris- 
tian Democratic Union. 

Mr. Kohl did not name a 
date for such negotiations, 
and said he would consult 
with his coalition allies firsi- 
/ But he told reporters a deal 
Y could be reached quickly with 
the Social Democrats. 

In a procedural formality. 


ihe government has approved 
a rise in pension charges to a 
record 2 1 percent of wages to 
avert a funding crunch caused 
by a shrinking work force and 
growing number of retirees. 

Mr. Kohl slammed the in- 
crease as "unacceptable" 
and Christian Democratic 
leaders have welcomed a pro- 
posal by the Social Demo- 
crats to raise the value-added 
tax in April and so enable 
charges io be held steady next 
year at 20.3 percent. 

But the two other patties in 
Mr. Kohl's coalition, the Bav- 
arian Christian Social Union 
and the Free Democratic 
Party have come ont firmly 
against the Social Democrats' 
overtures, creating the chance 
of a coalition split. 






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page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


In Belgium, Leuven-Louvain Split Speaks Loud 


By Barry James 

liuentatimal HemM Tribune 


J-EUYBN, Belgium — There was the 
American who turned up for post- 
s'* 11 **® studies at the ancient Roman 
catholic university here and attended 
courses for a month before discovering 
5f was actually supposed to be at the 
I f \r " S P ea ^ B $ university of Louvain- 
ja-Neuve, 25 kilometers away across 
f»elgiuin’s invisible language frontier. 

By the tirae he discovered his mistake, 
be was happy enough with the courses In 
English and decided to remain. 

More serious was the case of the 
widow who left a bequest to the uni- 
versity here but went to a French-speak- 
ing lawyer, who sent the money to 
Louvain-la-Neuve instead. Leuven, fo 
give it its Dutch name, is still hoping to 
get the cash. 



the wrong place, only to be told they 
have to go ail the way back to Brussels 
and take another train to get where 
they’re supposed to be. 

But to Belgians, they symbolize the 
country’s drift apart into separate 
Dutch- and French-speaking language 
areas that to an increasing extent have 
little or no thin g to do with one another. 


Iran Ratifies 
Global Ban 
On Production 
Of Nerve Gas 

By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Iran, long de- 
scribed by U.S. officials as determined to 
acquire weapons of mass destruction, has 
ratified the Chemical Weapons Conven- 
tion, a new treaty banning the production 
and possession of nerve gas weapons. It 
subjects Iran, and other signatories, to 
mandatory international inspections. 

Iran’s decision to participate in an 
international arrangement barring the de- 
velopment and use of chemical weapons 
touched off speculation among arms con- 
trol specialists about Tehran's motives, 
but was hailed as a crucial development 
by the treaty's chief enforcer. 

The ratification is a major step “to- 
ward full Iranian participation in in- 
ternational life, on a basis that is ex- 
tremely positive,” said Jose Mauricio 
Bustani, director general of the Orga- 
nization for the Prohibition of Chemical 
Weapons, based in The Hague. 

So far, 104 countries have agreed to 
participate in the international control 
and inspection system established by the 
treaty, he said in a telephone interview 
from The Hague. Russia, Pakistan and 
Jordan recently ratified the accord. 

With the Russians on board other key 
countries that were hanging back have 
committed themselves to the treaty. 
“Pakistan is also in. reacting positively 
to India's earlier ratification. he said. 
“And Jordan has ratified, which means 
the group of Arab countries that always 
linked this problem to Israel's refusal to 
sign has been broken. This opens the way 
for Egypt lo reconsider its position." 

Under the treaty's terms, within 30 
days Iran must submit to Mr. Bustani’s 
organization a detailed list of any fa- 
cilities it may have for the production or 
storage of chemical weapons. Once it is 
received, inspectors will be dispatched 
to verify the declaration. 

“We welcome Iran's ratification of 
the chemical weapons convention.*' 
said the State Department spokesman. 
James Rubin. He said the United States 
would be “watching very carefully " to 
see that Iran complied 

An official speculated that once Rus- 
sia ratified, Iran bad to also lo protei t its 
chemical industry. Countries that do not 
join will gradually be excluded from 
selling conventional chemicals such as 
pesticides to member countries. 


Now. Louvain-la-Neuve, with its 
medical faculty in Brussels, has become 
a spearhead for the so-called Wallobrux 
movement, which aims to unite the 
French-speakers of Wallonia with those 
of the capital. Since Brussels is sur- 
rounded by Dutch-speakers and the 
Fle ming s stilt have their regional ad- 
ministration in the capital, this is clearly 
an issue that could tear Belgium’s com- 
munities even further apart 

Twenty-five years ago this month, the 
university of Louvain-la-Neuve opened 

its doors to students. The French-speak- 
ers pulled out of Leuven after riots in 
1968, in which Dutch-speaking Flemish 
students marched with demands of 
“Walloons go home!” 

“If we had been blacks, it would have 
been racism," said Jacqaeiine Tulkais, 
a spokeswoman for the university. 

The Flemings say the Frencb-speak- 
ers effectively banished themselves by 
arrogantly demanding that everyone 
else speak their language. 

Whatever the circumstances of the 
bitter divorce between the two sections 
of the university, there is evidence to 
show that the French-speakers had been 
planning a move long before the 1968 
outbreak of violence. 

The rector of the University at Louv- 
ain- Ia-Neuve, Marcel Crochet, has a 
document showing that in 1966 the 


town of Ottignies agreed to sell the land 
where Louvain-la-Neuve now stands. 
And Michel Woitrin. the former general 
administrator of the united university, 
who was largely responsible for the 
move to Louvain-la-Neuve, acknowl- 
edges that 1b secretly commissioned the 
Los Angeles architect, Victor Gruen, to 
draw up the blueprints for a new town 
and campus, well before the split. 

“They said ‘Walloons go home'.” 
Mr. Woitrin said. “I would never have 
dreamed of the move had the Flemings 
not put pressure on us to leave." Since 
Belgium then had a single government 
instead of widely autonomous regional 
administrations, he said, “It was better 
to go when the state would still pay for 
the move.” The Flemings ended up 
paying nearly two-thhxte the cost. 

It would undoubtedly have been 
cheaper for the French -speakers to 
move to Namur or another existing Wal- 
loon university town. Mr. Woitrin de- 
fends his decision to move to a green- 
field site, saying that the university had 
to remain in the Brussels region to main- 
tain influence and academic excellence. 
Had it moved to deeper Wallonia, be 
said, it would have become provincial. 

Mr. Woitrin today argues rhat a closer 
alliance with Brussels and its European 
institutions is needed to rescue Wallonia 
from isolation. Wallonia was once the 


economic power house of Belgium, but 
with its steel mills and coal mines aban- 
doned, ir is in serious decline. 

The shoe is now on the Flemish foot. 
When multinationals starred moving to 
Belgium in a big way in the 1950s and 
1 960s, most gravitated to Flanders. The 
reasons are obvious. Flanders had su- 
perb port facilities at Antwerp, and in- 
land Ghent The population was non- 
unionized. which meant that wages 
were lower than in Wallonia, where 
unions had long held sway. And because 
they had to speak another language re 
make their way in the world, the Flem- 
ings were readier than the Walloons to 
learn English. 

The 6 million Flemings are richer and 
double in number than the Walloons, a 
situation that can only be partly re- 
dressed by adding the French-speakers 
of Brussels to those of Wallonia. 

French-speakers may feel that 
achieving a Wallobrux merger would be 
revenge for having been driven out of 
Louvain. But such an argument plays 
into the hands of those Flemings, in- 
cluding a number of prominent politi- 
cians, who argue for the total economic 
autonomy of their region. They say it 
would be advantageous to split up the 
social security system, which runs at a 
deficit partly because of high unem- 
ployment in the south. Such a move: 



lh Uvirukll I w 

Foreign Minister David Levy, left, toasting Archbishop Andrea Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo on Monday. 

Catholic Church Gets Legal Status in Israel 


Axe in c hrame-Presse 

JERUSALEM — Israel and ihe 
Vatican signed an agreemedt Monday 
legalizing the status of the Roman 
Catholic Church and its institutions in 
the Holy Land. 

The pact was signed by Foreign 
Minister David Levy and the papal 
nuncio in Jerusalem, Archbishop An- 
drea Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo. 

“I am very happy that this agree- 
ment has been signed because it marks 
a further important step in the process 
of normalization of relations between 
the Holy See and the Slate of Israel,” 
the papal nuncio said. 

Tlie agreement, the first such pact 
between a Christ ian church in the Holy 


Land and the Jewish state, must still be 
ratified by Israel's parliament ihe 
Knesset. 

: ■ The document aHows the Vatican to 
legally register its churches and insti- 
tutions operating “in areas where Is- 
raeli legislation is in effect,” a formula 
that includes East Jerusalem, where the 
Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Chris- 
tianity's holiest site, is located. 

Israel's occupation and annexation 
of East Jerusalem in 1967 lias never 
been recognized by the Vatican. 

The effect of the agreement is. to 
grant autonomy concerning the intern- 
al affairs of church institutions op- 
erating in the Holy Land while af- 
firming Israeli legal jurisdiction over 


the church's other dealings. 

“This is the first time that the legal 
status of the Roman Catholic Church 
has-been recognized in the.Holy Land 
for 500 years,” a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said. 

Under former Ottoman and British 
administrations and then under Israel 
since 1948, the Church was recognized 
“de facto but not de jure,” he said. 

The agreement was negotiated nearly 
1 8 months ago but only approved by the 
Israeli government in September. It fol- 
lows upon the Fundamental Agreement 
reached between Israel and the Vatican 
in December 1 993 that led to the formal 
establishment of diplomatic relations in 
June 1994. 


Anne-Stine Ingstad, Archaeologist, Dies at 79 


i\Vh York Tune\ Si-r\ire 

Anne-Stine Ingstad. 79, the archae- 
ologist who sifted through the sandy soil 
above a Newfoundland beach and un- 
covered the remains of a thousand-year- 
old Viking outpost, died Thursday of 
cancer at her home in Oslo. 

Mrs. Ingstad was the wife of Helge 
Ingstad. 9N, whose discovery of the sire 
in I **61 produced the first conclusive 
e\ idence that Vikings had made a North 
American beachhead 500 years before 
Columbus. 

That Vikings sailing from the Norse 
colony in Greenland had reached the 
North American continent early in the 
1 1 th century had long been a source of 


legend, including the Icelandic sagas, 
which described the voyages in detail. 

Although few scholars doubted that 
Leif Ericsson and other Vikings had 
made such voyages, until the Ingstads 
were led by fishermen to the site known 
as L'Anse aux Meadows, there was no 
hard evidence of a Viking presence, 
only a spate of spurious artifacts. 

While there was some initial skep- 
ticism. especially about Mr Ingsrad's 
claim that the settlement was the one 
[hat Leif Ericsson called Viniund. once 
Mrs. Ingstad began digging, doubt 
began evaporating. Although Mr. Ing- 
stad is credited with finding the site, left 
it to Mrs. Ingstad to supervise the ex- 


cavation. She gradually uncovered the 
foundations of eight buildings, includ- 
ing a large house almost identical with 
Ericsson's great hall in Greenland. 

A native of Lillehammer, Mrs. Ing- 
stad, studied archaeology at the Uni- 
versity of Oslo. She soon met Mr. Ing- 
stad. an explorer and adventurer who 
had abandoned a Jaw career in 1926 to 
study the [ndians and Eskimos of north- 
ern Canada. They married in 1941. 

Alter 1966, ihe couple left further 
excavations to others, but remained 
closely associated with L’Anse aux 
Meadows and were on hand in 1980 
when Unescu designated it an official 
World Heritage Site. 



would knock out a supporting pillar of 
the Belgian state. 

Relations between Ihe two universit- 
ies are indifferent, Mr. Vos said. 

Leuven has forged links with uni- 
versities in the Netherlands, whereas 
Louvain-la-Neuve has tended to attract 
students from southern Europe through 
the Erasmus European scholarship pro- 
gram, as well as many from Africa. 


France’s Stars 
Rally to Show 
‘Solidarity’ 
With Algeria 

Age nee France-Presse 

PARIS — French film stars, human- 
itarian organizations and trade unions 
staged a “day of solidarity*' Monday 
with strife-tom Algeria. 

The actor Gerard Depardieu, the act- 
resses Isabelle Adjani and Isabelle Hup- 
pert, the singer Charles Aznavour and 
Algeria's “lung” of fai music, Khaled, 
were taking part 

Organizers of die “Day for Algeria” 
said the event would represent the 
biggest mobilization in France over Al- 
geria since unrest broke out five years 
ago in its fonner colony. 

A civil war between the Algerian 
authorities and Islamist insurgents has 
killed about 65,000 people since it 
began in 1992, when the military can- 
celed elections the now-banned Islamic 
Salvation Rout was set to win. 

Ihe- government spokeswoman, 
Catherine Tratitmann. said the solidar- 
ity' day was. “a very strong initiative 
demonstrating the emotion and the soli- 
darity of the French people toward the 
people of Algeria. ’ ' 

She said it was an opportunity “to 
express the thoughts and the expec- 
tations of all those who want to con- 
tribute to the return of peace to that 
country.” 

Participants were marching in Paris 
on Monday evening, and events were 
being staged in major provincial cities. 

■ Armed Gang Kills 27 Villagers 

An armed gang butchered or shot to 
death 27 people m a mountain village 
south of the capital that a government- 
backed militia recently seized from 
Muslim militants, according to hospital 
sources quoted by The Associated Press 
from Algiers. 

The gang of -30 men used explosives 
to blow open the doors of homes before 
they killed their victims, most of whom 
were women, children or elderly res- 
idents, overnight Saturday in Lahmalit, 
50 kilometers (30 miles) south of Al- 
giers, ambulance workers said. 

The massacre in the Chrea Moun- 
tains, just two kilometers from an army 
garrison in Blida, was the third in two 
days in Algeria, according to survivors, 
who spoke on condition of anonymity. 
Soldiers arrived three hours after the 
attack, the witnesses said. 

Eleven children, aged 3 months to 12 
yeans, were among the victims. 


InlcnuliuoaJ Herald Trihuit 

Although geographically close, the 
two universities have developed rad- 
ically different styles. Leuven is a tra- 
ditional university in a pleasant Flemish 
city full of baroque buildings, spires, 
mullioned windows and tangled streets. 
Louvain-la-Neuve, inspired by the ideal 
cities of the Renaissance, and with 
traffic out of sight underground, has a 
more Latin and cosmopolitan air. 


BRIEFLY 


Anjouan Opposes 
Military Observers 

PARIS — The secessionist Co- 
moros island of Anjouan on Monday 
rejected a decision by the Orga- 
nization of African Unity to deploy 
military observers on the island, say- 
ing it could lead to bloodshed. 

A secessionist spokesman said 
Comoros could take advantage of 
the arrival of the 25 observers to 
land troops on Anjouan. 

“Therefore, Anjouan's provi- 
sional government, while remain- 
ing open to dialogue and diplomatic 
negotiations, categorically rejects 
the OAU's proposal.” said the 
spokesman, Elie Hatem. (Reuter*) 

UN Sends Mission 
On Congo Probe 

UNITED NATIONS. New York 
— More than six months after in- 
vestigations were due to begin into 
allegations of massacres by troops 
loyal to President Laurent Kabila of 
the Congo, a three-member human 
rights team -left- for Kinshasa on 
Monday optimistic that work can 
begin this week. 

The mission was stalled by ob- 
jections from the Kabila govern- 
ment. Bill Richardson, the U.S. rep- 
resentative to the United Nations, 
obtained agreement for the inves- 
tigators to return. ( NYT ) 

Mexico Drug Arrest 

WASHINGTON — in a move 
some U.S. officials found encour- 
aging, the Mexican authorities re- 
portedly have arrested an alleged 
top lieutenant of the. Tijuana drug 
cartel whom the Justice Depart- 
ment would like' to extradite to the 
United States in connection with 
six killings in California. 

Justice Department officials said 
they had been notified of ihe arrest 
of Arturo Paez Martinez. (LAT) 

For the Record 

Children across Ontario re- 
turned to classrooms Monday after 
public high school teachers halted a 
two-week-old strike. The Ontario 
Secondary School Teachers* Fed- 
eration was the last of five unions to 
end the protest over education 
policy. (Reuters) 


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n'BUSHED WITH THE HEW KIRK TUttST Aim THE WASH ACTON POST 


Mideast Dead End 


The minister-level talk* in Wash- 
ington that Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright hoped would re- 
vive Israeii-Paiestuiian peace pros- 
pects seem to have gone nowhere. 
She’s about to try again at the s ummit 
level But barring an unexpected 
breakthrough, American diplomacy in 
the Middle East is running dry. The 
Israelis demand heightened Pales tinian 
policing of terrorists. The Palestinians 
demand Israeli political concessions. 
The American policy of staying at a 
remove from the negotiation has 
proven inadequate to the task. 

Even if Washington moves in closer, 
of course, no deal may be on. Israel’s 
hard right resists any compromise, its 
near right might prefer an indefinite 
negotiating time out, the center position 

simply hasn’t formed yet. Hamas tilts to 
its terrorist side, and Yasser Arafat’s 
Palestinian Authority flails. The Oslo 
interim agreement that was supposed m 
light the rest of die way is darkening it 

Still, it is dangerous for Americans 
to conclude that the “peace process” 
begun a quarter-century ago has run its 
course. Such a decision ignores die 
constituencies and interests on both 
sides that could yet be mobilized by a 
sound diplomatic strategy. Such a 
strategy would aim at strengthening 
Israeli security and establishing a Pal- 
estinian state. Only a strategy that of- 
fers each side a chance to attain its 
prime goal can give that side the in- 
centive to satisfy the goal of the other. 


~ « stbo 

Israelis security, but it fails to deliver 
because the Palestinians are not being 
promised the statehood that alone 
could induce them to work seriously 
for Israeli security. 

The objection is offered that some 

SSeL This is true. These people can* 
not be captured by the most generous 
Israeli policy. But their number can be 
reduced and contained by a Palestinian 
Authority rooted in the Palestinian 
mainstream, which is amenable to if 
not enthusiastic about a settlement be- 
cause it wants a life. 

True, too, such a settlement would 
leave the Israelis with imperfect se- 
curity. But it would be of a higher order 
than whal they have been able to devise 
for themselves in a half-century's striv- 
ing. Politically it would be set against 
the imperfect sovereignly that, for Is- 
rael’s benefit, the Palestinians are go- 
ingto have to accept for themselves. 

The Clinton administration so far 
shrinks from this idea. The new sec- 
retary of state is trying her hand at the 
old game. Nor is Washington eager to 
bring on what might be a bruising 
debate with Israel’s right-wing gov- 
ernment and some of Israel’s Amer- 
ican friends. With continued diploma- 
tic frustration, however, die president 
is duty-bound to explore alternatives 
to a policy that threatens him now 
with a dead end. 

— THE WASHINGTON POTT. 


Leaving Women to Die 


A woman comes into a Kabul 
hospital with bums over 80 percent of 
her body. An official of the Taleban, 
the fundamentalist group ruling most 
of Afghanistan, prohibits the doctor 
from undressing her. The doctor says 
she will die if he does not treat her. 
“Many Taleban die on die battle- 
field,” replies the official. The wom- 
an. untreated, dies. 

Since die Taleban took power a year 
ago, their decrees have narrowed the 
world for women. Women may no 
longer work or go to school. They may 
not leave dieir houses without an ap- 
proved reason. They may not talk to 
or ride in a vehicle alongside men 
who are not relatives. 

A decree issued this fall was die 
most extreme of alL It barred women 
from non emergency hospital care ax 
Kabul’s hospitals and shunted them to 
a single women’s hospital. That hos- 
pital is being rebuilt which will take 
six months to a year. Meanwhile, 
women can go only to the Central 
Polyclinic, which has no running wa- 
ter. no electricity in most rooms, no lab 
or X-ray facilities and no operating 
equipment or instruments. 

The Polyclinic’s decrepitude is only 
one obstacle to health care for women. 
No edict prohibits emergency care for 
women at other hospitals, but sane 
officials seem to be enforcing one any- 
way. frightening many doctors into 
withholding life-saving care. 

Doctors also report that because the 
religious police often stop cars, women 
delay seeking care until they are very 
sick. They must travel twice when die 
nearest hospital sends them to the 
Polyclinic. 

The hurdles for women also prevent 
their children from getting timely med- 
ical care. In addition, last mouth the 
Taleban announced a ban on all draw- 
ings and images of human beings. 
Health workers were forced to scrap 


their educational posters, which are the 
oily way to communicate with a 
largely illiterate public. 

Some of the Taleban's less radical 
members have opposed the health care 
ban, and humanitarian groups have in- 
dications that it may be reversed. But 
other medieval restrictions on women 
remain and more will certainly arise. 
Western governments must make it 
clear dial continued oppression will cost 
the Taleban aid and harm its bid to win 
Afghanistan’s seat at die UN, currently 
held by die previous government. 

Since die rise of the Taleban, the 
humanitarian or ganizatio ns that pro- 
vide almost all the health care and 
-social-services in Afghanistan have 
been wrestling with whether to follow 
Taleban roles or-puli out 

Most, realizing that the Taleban may 
well sacrifice all health care if any of it 
violates their views, have stayed when 
they could and tried to press the Tale- 
ban for change.. They have lobbied 
particularly hard to reverse die health ■ 
care ban. 

This was undoubtedly the best choice . 
— until now. But the harm created by 
the ban has divided the humanitarian 
community. The World Health Organ- 
ization's financing of the reconstruc- 
tion of the new women's hospital is 
particularly controversial The WHO 
has agreed to send a fact-finding group 
to review its participation. 

Humanitarian groups are increas- 
ingly facing die dilemma of what to do 
when their help provides short-term 
relief but exacerbates a long-term 
problem. The situation in Afghanistan 
is not as extreme as in Bosnia, Rwanda 
or Liberia, where groups departed be- 
cause their aid actively helped bel- 
ligerents keep shooting. But pulling 
out of health care may be the right 
thing to do if the discriminatory and 
deadly ban stays. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Mysteries of Qi 


American patients would not spend 
$500 million a year on acupuncture, 
mostly from their own pockets, unless 
they believed that it worked. Now the 
procedure has got the endorsement of a 
panel of scientists convened by the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health who judged it 
effective in controlling nausea from 
pregnancy and chemotherapy, as well 
as rain after dental surgery. 

The 2,500-year-old Chinese therapy 
involves inserting extremely fine 
needles into the body at specific points. 
It is based on the classic Chinese 
concept of regulating the flow of bod- 
ily energy, or qif pronounced chee), an 
idea unknown to Western science. Per- 
suading the mainstream medical com- 
munity to prescribe acupuncture will 
take more man showing that it works. 
There must also be explanations of 
why it works that are compatible with 
the Western biomedical understanding 
of the body. When the Chinese explain 


acupuncture as unblocking a qi chan- 
nel, it sounds like quackery. But view 
the procedure through the lens of West- 
ern science using Western terminol- 
ogy, and acupuncture can begin to 
sound as rational as acetaminophen. 

Many studies have shown that acu- 
puncture can cause biological re- 
sponses. There is conriderable evidence 
that pain-suppressing endorphins are 
released during acupuncture. Changes 
in the secretion of neurotransmitters 
and hormones have been documented. 
There is even evidence thatacupuncture 
affects immune responses. 

Why these mechanisms are 
triggered remains unexplained. But 
' studying the acupuncture phenomenon 
could lead researchers to a better un- 
derstanding of the mysteries of the 
pathways in human physiology. What 
they find, recast into modem concepts, 
the Chinese long ago named qi. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Cktiirmtn 

KATHARINE P. D ARROW, Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher A Chief Executive 
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Chipping Away at America’s Perceived Hegemony 


'^y'ASHINGTW-^gor Gaidar 

politicians remarkably clear and un- 
conventional in his thinking. So it came 
as no great surprise to hear the former 
Russian mime minister praise both the 
U.S. and Russian governments for their 
handling of NATO expansion, even 
though he still considers expansion “a 
bad, and dangerous, idea.” 

As I listened to Mr. Gaidar credibly 
extol Washington and Moscow for 
“managing this first phase of NATO 
expansion without inflicting severe 
damage to their strategic relationship,” 
this puzzle occurred to me: He sounds 
right But then why is American in- 
fluence on Russian actions declining so 
precipitously? Have the Russians swal- 
lowed the camel of NATO expansion 
only to choke on something else? 

The conversation with Mr. G ai d ar, 
Boris Yeltsin’s former economic czar 
and the architect of Russia’s first and 
most serious free market reforms, 
helped illuminate that puzzle. One an- 
swer has to do with a new organizing 
principle of world politics that is taking 
hold not only in Russia but around the 
globe. Back to that in a moment. But 
first hear out Mr. Gaidar, visiting here 
recently, on NATO expansion: 

He argues that there has been 


By Jim Hoagfand 

something for eveiyone in the way the 
Czech Republic, Hungary and. Poland 
have been cleared for NATO mem* 
bership. The three ex-Warsaw Pact na- 
tions get prestige and material help 
from the west; President Bill Clinton 
received ethnic-bloc voting support in 
1996; Russia got enhanced participa- 
tion in a reformed Group of Eight ana a 
joint NATO-Russia council, and the 
European Union ducked the burden of 
subsidizing East European agriculture 
for the time being. 

“But I doubt that you can repeat 
such rarfrirat gambits if expansion con- 
tinues” with die aim of taking in tire 
Baltic states, Ukraine or other coun- 
tries tha t were once part of the Soviet 
Union, he added. Such a move would 
make it clear “that America’s de- 
cision-makers perceive Russia as an 
enemy that is rebuilding itself, instead 
of a potential ally,” he said. - 

Choosing his words carefully, Mr. 
Gaidar, a Duma member and leader of 
Russia’s Democratic Choice party, said 
he believed the Clinton administration 
still sees Russia as a potential ally. But 
his remarks conveyed a new uncertainly 
about the future of the relationship: 


Former Soviet repuNits/_<wta^ 
have the right to decide to join NATO. 
But having that right doesn’t mean tint 
doing it would be wise. Cuba bad the 
right to join the Warsaw Pact and have 
nuclear weapons, but even the old Soviet 
leadership finally understood that ex- 
ercisingmose rights could aid in world 
war,** Mr. Gaidar said. America should 
avoid “policies that arc targeted on con- 
fronting Russia in countries that have 
j oint frontiers with Russia.'* he said. 

That should be possible. But what is 
striking in the present relationship is 
the growing distrust, despite the rel- 
atively easy clearing of the hurdle of 
NATO expansion, phase one. 

The conflicts that feed that new dis- 
trust do not hinge on Cold War issues 
like NATO and the balanceof military 
power in Europe. Instead they involve 
U.S. attempts to impose a strategic will . 
on Russia and other nations to prevent 
them from dealing with Iran, Iraq, 
Libya, Cuba and other “rogue states.’ 

Russian involvement in Iran’s nu- 
clear and missile programs “take tip far 
more time and provide much more neat 
in our meetings with State Department 
officials fb«n NATO expansion or the 
future of democracy in Russia,” says a 
senior European diplomat. “It is puz- 
zling to us. 


But such conflicts alw> reflect the 
growing determination by Russia, 
China. France and many other lartre 
and small countries to diminish or dif- 
fuse American power whenever and 
wherever they can. ... 

This is not quite mnri« by any 
government as a matter of strategy, al- 
tiiough Mr. Yeltsin and Jiang Znnun-- 
came close in their joint statement earii* v 
cr this v ear promising to work lor a -■ 
“multipolar" ’ world Bui cftipjwuway 
at die perceived American hegemon has ; 
become the new organizing principle for 
most other nations a* the old jxilmcs of ». 
the Cold War era fide. 





America the Powerful. On issues iront 
global climate change to UN reform, 
A3merica’s European aUicsmakc a point ‘ 

of taking their distance from wash- • 
ington after having docilely followed 
the U.S. lead on NATO expansion. 

America needs u> handle its over- • 
whelming strength carefully to avoid 
becoming a bully in international af- 
fairs, as critics abroad warn. But the 
United Slates also risks becoming a ‘ 
targe! because of that strength, and 
needs to keep that in mind as well. 

The Wtishingum A»w 


Ji ♦ 


Britain Must Start Planning for Monetary Union Now 


L ONDON — Britain’s La- 
bour government came to 
power earlier this year with the 
reputation that it was likely to 
be much more pro-European 
than its Conservative prede- 
cessor. But everyone knew that' 
this reputation would not be se- 
riously tested until Labour 
marie up its mind on tile key 
European question: Did it or did 
it not intend to join Europe’s 
planned single currency? 

The Labour government has 
just faced this test and has made 
a total bash of it Gordon 
Brown, the chancellor of the 
Exchequer, last month set out 
the government *s policy toward 
economic and monetary union, 
going a long way toward com- 
mitting Britain to the single cur- 
rency — in principle. 

But he pushed this commit- 
ment so far into the future, and 
hedged it with so many fuzzy 
conditions, that the effect was 
spoiled. In fact, it now seems 
more likely that Britain may 
never join tire single currency. 

Mr. Brown told the House of 
Commons that, if the single cur- 
rency worked and was success- 
ful. Britain should join. But, he 


By Ian D. Davidson 


said, by a n umb er of economic 
criteria the British economy 
was not in acondinon to join the 
single currency at its launch in 
1999, and he virtually ruled out 
membership before the next 
general election, which could 
be as late as 200Z 

In their own terms, Mr. 
Brown’s criteria were sensible. 
Would monetary union be good 
for investment in Britain? For 
the City of Loadon? For British 
jobs? And was the British econ- 
omy sufficiently flexible? The 
Treasury had many doubts. 

But his most important cri- 
terion was on the issue of eco- 
nomic convergence. Britain’s 
economic cycle was out of sync 
with the rest of Europe’s be- 
cause Britain was nearing the 
end of a boom, whereas many 
continental countries were now 
emerging from recession. Bri- 
tain bad much higher interest 
raxes than required on the Con- 
tinent, but tiie single currency 
would mean a single interest 
rate throughout the euro zone. 
Mr. Brown said he expected 
this economic divergence 


would last for some years. 

What is extraordinary about 
Labour’s polity on monetary 
union is that it is so fatalistic and 
so impoliticaL Whenever the 
British express skepticism 
about monetary union, they 
usually come up with some ver- 
sion of die proposition drat tire 
British economy is somehow 
different from those on tiie Con- 
tinent, in ways against which it 
is useless to struggle. 

Mr. Brown observes dial the 
mnrrnftntfll economies are mare 
in step with each other than with 
Britain, tat he does not ask why. 
He rather implies that tins is just 
an unfortunate fact of fate. Of 
course it is nothing of tbe sort. If 
there is more convergence on 
the Continent, there are two rea- 
sons. The first is that some of the 
small countries like the Neth- 
erlands and Austria are so in- 
terdependent with dieir big Ger- 
man neighbor that they are 
dragged in hs wake. 

But the second reason for 
convergence is that most of the 
continental countries have been 
deliberately pursuing policies iff 


monetary convergence for many 
years, and quite explicitly since 
they signed up for monetary un- 
ion in the Maastricht treaty 1 of 
1991. Specifically, they have 
pursued, and on tire whole main- 
tained, currency stability inside 
the European monetary system. 

The British have not. On the 
contrary, at Maastricht they 
demanded and got the right to 
opt out of monetary union, and 
their membership in the ex- 
change rate mechanism of the 
monetary system was ill-con- 
ceived, badly handled, trauma- 
tic and short-lived. 

Economic convergence is not 
an act of God but the result, over 
time, of deliberate acts of man. 
One essential requirement is the 
deliberate pursuit of conver- 
gence by governments. But Mr. 
Brown did not suggest that con- 
vergence would become a de- 
liberate policy objective. On the 
contrary, .he declaredjhat Bri- 
tain would not re-cnicrTtarer— 
change rate mechanism. 

Labour’s leaders have fre- 
quently .declared that their 
policy toward monetary union 
would be determined ~ exclus- 
ively on economic grounds and 


not by political considerations. * 
Yet surely everybody knows by: 
now that monetary union, like' 
every other policy advance tn : 
the history of the European Un-’ 
ion, is essentially a political un- 
dertaking dressed up in econom- 
ic clothes. Those member .states 
that join the single currency will- 
inevitably become the political ' 
inner core of the Union, Why' 
else would Italy and Spain have-, 
been making such superhuman ’ 
efforts to join monetary union in 1 • 
the first wave? 

But the British government 
prefers to treat monetary uniuri • 
as a purely technical economic ; 
problem, over which it has little • 
or no control and for which it - 
will take no risk. But joining ' 
will not be any easier in five ’ 
years, unless it’ is made an urn- 
qualified objective of govern^ 
ment. policy. But hy the next ■ 
general election, the Labour * 
government may have ex- ; 
-hausteddtoftind of popular sup- • 
port that Ls now so enormous. ! 

The writer, former foreign «/ ! 
iutr anti columnist at, the Fi- \ 
nancial link's, contributed this [ 
comment to the Herald Tribune '. 


: i 


f. 


When the Pollution Problem Is Really a People Problem 


W ASHINGTON — Ac- 
cording to the Clinton ad- 
ministration, the United States 
will miss its year 2000 green- 
house gas target by roughly 13 
percent. This overshoot alone is 
greater than the entire 1 990 car- 
bon emissions of India, a coun- 
try with 970 million people. As 
it turns out, increased U.S. per 
capita energy consumption is 
probably not the primary cul- 
prit. The most significant com- 
ponent of the U.S. failure may 
be America’s high population 
growth rate relative to other de- 
veloped countries. 

The United States population 
is increasing by 0.9 percent (2 J 
million) per year, more than 
three times the average fw the 
rest of the industrialized world. 
Between 1990 and 2000, the 


By Fred Meyerson 


U.S. population will grow from 
254. 1 million to 277.8 million, or 
93 percent, according to a UN 
projection. Population growth 
alone therefore accounts for 
more than two-thirds of die 13 
percent U.S. carbon emission in- 
crease this decade. Pat another 
way, the United States would 
need to decrease per capita emis- 
sions by nearly 10 percent this 
decade just to offset its popu- 
lation growth and hold to 1990 
emission levels, the target that 
was agreed to at the summit 
meeting in Rio de Janeiro. ■ 

In comparison, the United 
Kingdom, Germany and Russia 
— the three major developed 
countries that may be able to 
meet the Rio targets — have 


populations that are growing 
slowly or decreasing. 

Looking ahead, the popula- 
tion differences become even 
more pronounced. Between the 
years 2000 and 2025, the U.S. 
population is projected to in- 
crease from 277.8 million to 
3323 million, an increase of 
19.7 percent. In striking con- 
trast, tire rest of the developed 
world as a whole is expected to 
experience a net population de- 
crease of 2.4 percent Simply 
put, the proposed formula 
would require the United States 
to reduce per capita emissions 
by roughly 20 percent over the 
next quarter century while tire 
rest of the industrialized world 
treads water. 


A Warning for Turkey’s Generals 


I STANBUL — Since his elec- 
tion three years ago as mayor 
of Sariyer, a district of Istanbul 
bordering the Bosporus and the 
Black Sea, Y usuf Tulun has ten- 
ded to the parks, roads and 
sewage of some 400,000 con- 
stituents a good deal more ef- 
fectively than the secular politi- 
cians who preceded him. Aside 
from the copy of the Koran rest- 
ing atop his computer and a 
scarf-cloaked assistant who ap- 
peared briefly at the door during 
a recent visit, little about Mr. - 
Tulun or his office suggested a 
fervor to remake Turkey into an 
Islamic fundamentalist state. 

But in the skittish world of 
Turkish politics, Islamic politi- 
cians are considered threats to 
national stability. Their crime is 
membership in the Islamic party 
that briefly led the government 
before the country’s generals 
engineered its removal earlier 
this year. Not content with the 
decapitation of the government, 
die generals now want to outlaw 
the party itself. Chances are 
they will soon succeed. 

fr does not take a long stay in 
Turkey to see how that would be 
a mistake. The surest way to 
galvanize and radicalize Tur- 
key’s relatively benign Islamic 
political movement is to ban the 
party that represents it and that 
collected more votes in the last 
parliamentary election than any 
secular party. Even though an- 
other Islamic party would likely 
be formed, it too would face 
extinction. The country and 
people I saw seemed at the brink 
of better times. Though inflation 


By Philip Taubman 

is miming above 90 percent and 
unemployment is high, the 

economy is growing strongly 
and a middle class is developing. 
Fueled by the entrepreneurial 
energy of new businesses, small 
cities across Anatolia, the Asian 
part of Turkey, are booming. 

Istanbul, now the largest dty 
in Europe, is overcrowded and 
choked with traffic bat bursting 
with life and consumer goods. 

All this could be undermined 
if the armed forces cannot con- 
trol their compulsion to inter- 
fere in civilian affairs. Turkey is 
a military democracy, with all 
the contradictions that implies. - 

Elections are fair, tbe press is 
relatively free and tbe rule of 
law prevails to a point, as long as 
the generals permit When they 
believe Turkey’s national secu- 
rity or its secular traditions are 
threatened, no freedom is safe; 

Senior offices like to r emind 
visitors that the military has al- 
ways restored civilian rule after 
its coups, and that its motivation 
in replacing prime ministers is 
nor to exercise power but to sus- 
tain the secular Weston state 
established by Mustafa Kemal 
Atatak, the founder of the Turk- 
ish republic. That may be true, 
and Turkey, a nation of Muslims, 
need only look, across the border . 
to Iran to see a different modeL 

Yet my conversations with 
politicians, scholars, business- 
men, journalists and soldiers 
leave a strong impression that 
the generals underestimate the 


common sense of their coun- 
trymen and the durability of 
Turkey’s secular traditions. This 
society is not ready to embrace 
Islamic fundamentalism or toss 
aside its Western conventions. 

There is a difference between 
political activism and political 
insurrection, although the army 
does not seem to recognize it. 
Many Turks, disaffected with 
their country’s stale politics and 
political leaders, are looking for 
new leadership. The rising pop- 
ularity of tiie mainstream Islam- 
ic political organization, the 
Welfare Party, came in part from 
the Islamic faith fi ll, but tiie party 
also drew support from Turks 
looking for an alternative to the 
esta bl ish e d order, in Ankara. 

Welfare’s prime minister, 
Necmettm Erbakan, alarmed the 
army by proposing to build new 
mosques in traditi onally secular 
neighborhoods and to lift a ban 
on tiie wearing of bead scarves in 
government offices. It was not a 
smart strategy, tat it was hardly 
a mortal threat to the republic. 

In stead of trying to throttle 
tbe Welfare Party, tiie generals 
ongbt to see it as an outlet for 
legitimate concerns that will 
only intensify if suppressed. The 
party and tiie army actually 
share a contempt for Turkey’s 
long-standing civilian leaders. If 
the generals looked beyond their 

visceral hostility, they might see 
that Yusuf Tulun and many of 
his colleagues want to build a 
more prosperous Turkey and a 
more efficient government, not 
a fundamentalis t state. 

The New York Tates. 


These dramatic differences 
make three things clear. The first 
is that population should be a key 
variable on tiie table at climate 
talks in Kyoto, Japan, in Decem- 
ber. The second is that the notion 
of national emissions caps can- 
not be sustained in a world of 
diverse experience, especially 
with regard to population growth 
rates. Tbe third point implied by 
the first two observations, is that 
die United States could place 
itself at a serious competitive 
disadvantage if it agrees to a 
scheme of fixed national emis- 
sions caps. And if the developing 
world is included in a climate- 
protection plan, as it eventually 
must be, the wide discrepancies 
in population growth rates will 
be an even more critical issue. 

One solution would be to 
move from national emission 
caps to.]per capita emission lim- 
its. This would eliminate the 
disadvantage to the United 
States and other countries that 
open their borders to immi- 
grants. On the other hand, it 
could open Pandora’s box on 
another front — the risk of en- 
couraging population growth. 

Another approach for the 
United States would be to ex- 
amine its population trajectory 
and look for ways to reduce its 
relatively high growth rale. 
While a serious discussion of 
national population policy is a 
socially and environmentally 


sound proposition, it thus for has ; 
been politically unattainable. Of 1 
the 2.5 million-plus annual pop- ! 
ulation increase in the United ; 
States. roughly one -third \ 

(800.000) is the result of net J 
legal immigration and un nddi- • 
tional estimated 275,000 to • 
500.000 is the product of illegal *, ,i 
immigration. The 1.6 million an- 1 f 
nual difference between LLS,J 
birth and death raies accounts for 
the remainder of the populating* 
growth, although some research- 
ers also attribute part of this ip_ 
the statistically higher fertility - 
rates of recent U.S. inunigranu*! 

In the long run, U.S. pop- 
ulation growth will be a major, 
factor in America’s ability ter 
satisfy any global warming'; 
treaty that is based on national- 1 
emission caps. Population is art ' 
overlooked out critical variable 
at Kyoto. While the U.S. nejs 
gotiators have not discussed iH . 
directly, population growth ui-‘‘ J jr 
tixnately may be the factor thfir- 
makes die United States so un- , 
willing to make a firm, neat'-'* 
term emissions reduction cotti-*" 
mionent. Therefore, to seriously 1 ' 
address protection of the global-' 
climate, it may also be necessary- ‘ 
to change the political one. ■ ’• 

The writer, a lawyer, is a lcc ~ ' 
turcr in biology at Yale Urn-’ 
versify- He contributed this 
comment to The Washington 
Post. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

18^7: Trouble in Niger joyous event, though it is tingec 

with regrets. Imperfect as is the 
peace which scaled the Genres 
submission, millions of humor 
beings esteem it as better than 
no peace. More than the con- 
gratulations and the ceremonies 
that will mark the din* an 


PARIS — The present trouble in 
Ihe Niger Hinterland is due to 
the application by the French of 
a new principle of international 

law-— namely t that detachments 

of troops may occupy towns not 
Sfraoned-by the armed forces 
of another Power. This has been 
tone on several occasions by 
France in what is known as the 
bend of the Niger. This territory 
is the subject of discussion by 
the Joint Commission sitting in 
Paris, tat in view of the dematch 
of an expedition by England into 
the disputed territory and the 
presence of French troops there 
the danger of a collision must 
not be tost sight of. 

1922: Armistice Day 

an Editorial]: The commemor- 
ation to-day [Nov. 1 1] j n vari- 
ous lands of the signing of dur 
Armistice in 1918 ought to be a 


Noughts of the possible mca 
of fuller conciliation and 
more effective restoration. 

1947: Coup in Siam 

BANGKOK — An apparen 
bloodless military coup d e 
[ell Siam under cite control 
Field Marshal Phibun Sor 
kram, jne-war dictator who ] 
the 1 9.-0 revolution to overtim 
the absolute monarchy, Tiie c 
posed Premier, Thamrong Na- 
*»sa wat. was reported to have tl 
rare hiding. Phibun’s return 
power came as a dimax to wid 
spread discontent over report 
fiovcm menl corruption and ft 
towed months of repeated d 
nunds for a new cabinet. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER II, 19W, 


PAGE 9 




OPINION /LETTERS 


i 


Bashing China Is No Answer: 
6 Can One Eat Liberty ? 5 


L OS ANGELES - I ^ 
pan of a group of Chinese 
immigrants who left our na- 
tive land with minds still 
young and open to the world 
We left with great pride in our 
civilization.- with painftil un- 
derstanding of China’s humi- 
liations and failures in the 
2pth century, but without the 
intense bitterness toward the 
Chinese 


By Ying Ma 


m 


As politicians, opportun- 
ists and Hollywood celebri- 
ties make themselves sound 
noble by speaking on behalf 
of Wei Jingsheng, Tibet, 
Christians or liberty in gen- 
eral, we ask very simply, 
"Can one eat liberty?" 


one eat _ 

held by Can the actor Richard Gere’s 
njany political dissidents. ideals of human rights guar- 
Livrng in the United States, an tee that children in the 



we have recognized, albeit 

reluctantly, China’s econom- 
ic backwardness and political 
oppression. Nevertheless, 
we hold the deepest and the 
most sincere concern for 
ttye land of our origin. 

I ; The first official summit 
' meeting between President 
Bill Clinton and the Chinese 
president. Jiang Zemin, 
set off a wave of China bash- 
ing that has flooded the 
American media as journa- 
lists. elected officials, special 
interest groups and Holly- 
wood celebrities condemned 
the Chinese regime by 
demanding better treatment 
for Christians, Tibetans, 
political dissidents and for the 
Chinese people in general 

Few Americans would greet 
improvements in China’s 
political system more happily 
than we, but we find much of 
the recent China bashing re- 
pugnant and counterproduc- 
tive, and we consider it crucial 
to. point out important differ- 
ences in Chinese perceptions. 
...We find it repugnant that 
many who know little about 
China rave and rant about hu- 
man rights and Tibet but ig- 
nore the tremendous progress 
made in China's living con- 
ditions in the last IS years. 

Unimaginable to most 
Americans are the levels 
ofi. poverty, filth, crime and 
pollution that still plague 
China. Many Chinese live 
without simple things such as 
heat, modem toilet facilities, 
running water, new clothing 
and abundant food. 


Chinese countryside have 
a full stomach and that those 
in the cities grow up free 
from diseases caused by 
contaminated water? No. 

While China bashers sug- 
gest that all pro-human rights 
voices are quelled in China, 
many Chinese in fact spend 
little time thinlHng about 


Chinese government, 
the name of standing up 
to foreigners, successfully 
has found an excuse for 
postponing further reforms 
in its political system. 

American demands have 
elicited a claim of “interfer- 
ence” in Chinese internal 
affairs from the government 
and people. Resentment 
against American rhetoric has 
escalated among the Chinese 
people who refuse to swallow 
die insult of Uncle Sam dic- 
tating from Washington what 


ought to be done in the sheets 
of Sha 


Shanghai After a century 


Ideals of human 
rights cannot . 
guarantee that - 
Chinese children 
have a full 
stomach. 


Tibet or Wei Jingsheng. 
Much like us before we left 
China, they look admiringly 
at the United Stales, not 
because of its Declaration 
of Independence or revered 
constitution, but because of 
its designer jeans, ham- 
burgers and fancy discos. 

Although China faces 
many problems besides 
human rights abase, it should 
not postpone all progress 
until it reaches some spe- 
cified stage in economic 
development. After all, 
America did not emerge as a 
great world power before it 
formed a government for the 
people and by the people. 

However, as Americans 
cloud die Chinese-U.S. dia- 
logue with nothing but polit- 
ical rights demands, the 


of chaos, humiliating defeat 
and self-inflicted backward- 
ness, the Chinese have had 
very little else but their back- 
bone in the 20tb century. 

While America can help 
China move toward democ- 
racy by offering advice on 
budding a sound legal system 
or promoting human rights 
awareness in Chinese civil 
society, blanket American 
condemnations only trigger 
Chinese natio nalis t desires to 
rally around their undemo- 
cratic government and tell the 
United States to bntt out. 

As beneficiaries of Amer- 
ica's democratic system 
of governance, we hope that 
the Chinese one day can 
be sufficiently fed and 
clothed to not automatically 
consider political rights as 
a distant goal. 

We hope also that one 
day the Chinese, too, can 
move beyond their century 
of humiliation, defeat, shame 
and pain to get rid of the 
big chip on their shoulders 
and not balk instinctively 
at foreign political criticisms. 
But until that day, Americans 
will fail to move China 
with sanctimonious and ill- 
thought-out rhetoric. 


The writer, a 
associate of the 


research 
Council 
ign Relations, con- 
tributed this comment to the 
Los Angeles Times. 


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


On North Korea 


Regarding "Sran'arion or 
Not, Lei North Korea's Re- 
gime Rot " (Opinion. Nov. 4) 
by William J. Taylor and 
Glenn Back: 

.Mr. Taylor and Mr. Baek 
propose a rather harsh and 
Machiavellian means for 
fc eliminating the North Korean 
' authoritarian regime. 

.They argue that North 
Korea is one of the world’s 
most oppressive regimes, and 
therefore that it is in the 
people’s interest that the in- 
ternational community allow it 
to fall apart through the coun- 
try's starvation. This argument 
reeks of hard-core realism and 
a severe lack of morality. 

■While it is true that the pre- 
servation of this government 
does not benefit the Korean 
people, lo remain unmoved by 
the famine solely for the pur- 
pose of destabilizing a potit- 
ical regime is pushing politics 
above any conception of 
humanity. If democracy is to 
be achieved in such a callous 
manner, then it becomes void 
» of any meaning or value. Tuat 

l the means justify the end is 
a -.rather perverse way of 
promoting ideals of human 
rights and deinocracy. 

. . ERIK M. KUHONTA. 

Princeton. New Jersey. 


% 


m 


citizens implement them every 
day, however, when they take 
iblic transportation, shop at 
fanners’ markets, have coffee 
_ washable cups and yes, 
even launder diapers. 

Americans consume a 
grossly disproportionate 
share of the Earth’s resources. 
Laughing at San Francisco's 
attempt to address that reality 
won’t change it. 

MARY BETH MZRALDL 
Stone Ridge, New York. 


‘Made in USA? ? 


Regarding "US. Domi- 
nance Breeds Irritation’’ 
(Nov. 5): 


I found the quore from a 
Der Spiegel article saying 
“globalization wears a 
‘Made in USA’ label' ’ amus- 
ing. When I look at manu- 
facturers’ labels on all sorts 
of goods from clothing to 
souvenirs at stores in the 
United States, I hardly see 
any “Made in USA’’ labels. 
I find mostly "Made in 
China’ ’ — or India or Mexico 
or elsewhere. 

The view from outside may 
be of American dominance. 
From the checkout counter 
in the United States, though, 
most might disagree. 

JOSEPH URENECK. 

Boston. 


The Pollution Reality 


-A 




Regarding “in Fran- 
cisco, an Agenda for 
the City's Sustainability 
(Opinion, 'Ocl. i6)by George 
F, Wilt: 

-.Mr. Will’s column must 
have been perplexing 10 ihe 
Europeans who read it, aghast 
ns he was bv the notion that a 
city should 'ask its citizens to 
reduce pollution by cutting 
consumption. He implies that 
such practices, or attempt to 
nose consciousness about 
them, border on communism. 
Democracy-loving European 



Uuj year they seem to be bungee jumping.’ 


It 9 s Rash to Leave Child Care to an Au Pair 


L ONDON — Total dependence 
on adults renders children com- 
pletely vulnerable to adnlts. And as 
many parents know, taking care of 
babies and toddlers all day alone can 
be high-stress business. 

So why do we expect an untrained 
teenage girl to be able to manage an 
infant— just because we call her an 

au pair? 

That’s tbe question that the trial of 
Louise Woodward posed to many 
American parents. Miss Woodward, 
a 19-year-old British au pair, was 
convicted in Boston of killing 8- 
mootb-old Matthew Eappen. 

Since the trial, many parents must 
have been overwhelmed with unease 
about their own child-care arrange- 
ments, on which their work depends. 
Should parents gather up their chil- 


By Pendope Leach 


tween World War n and the upsurge 
of women’s employment in the 
1980s, it has always been so. ] 
Earlier generations of women did 
not work outside their homes, but| 
worked incredibly hard within them, i 
and not at Play-Doh. Even the less 


MEANWHILE 


privileged had servants who, like 
today's au pairs, were often little 
more than children themselves. 1 
What has changed is that more 


women work in geographically dis- 

hours, when 


dren, drop out, hibernate? 
Some dual 


-career lifestyles might 
benefit from being pruned back, but 
earning money is a necessity for 
most adults, so paid child care is the 
norm for most children. Apart from 
an eye-blink in social history be- 


tant places, for long 
babies are very young. 

Recent research finds much to 
criticize in American child care — 
both purchased and personal — but 
provides vital clues to what could be 
put right. Beyond obvious concerns 
with resources, training, career pros- 
pects for child-care workers and re- 
duced costs to parents, there are 
subtler yet important messages. 


People who truly do not want to 
care for children, or for a particular 
child, seldom do it well — even 
parents or grandmothers. 

Rice is related to tbe quality of 
care, so cut-rate care is seldom the 
best. Stay-at-home mothers find 
caring for children, especially tod- 
dlers, exhausting, isolating and stress- 
ful. Why should it be easier for people 
who are paid to do this work? 

The more research shows the risky 
eatures of child care, the clearer it 
>ecomes that using an au pair for full- 
ime child care is positively rash. 

Most au pairs have no child-care 


raining (.unlike the English nannies 
lome / 


Americans admire). Au pairs 
'ho have baby-sitting experience lis- 
d on their r£sum£s may never have 
ien solely in daytime charge of a 
i lild. In Britain, baby-sitting means 
i arching sleeping children while 
t err parents take an evening oul 
Most important, however, young 
\ amen from other countries who are 


available as au pairs want to spend 
time in the United States, not be- 
cause they want to be with children 
or even because they want a job. Au 
pairs want to explore America, make 
new friends and have a good time. 

Host families want reliable one- 
on-one child care (and sometimes 
domestic service as well) on 
the cheap. That vast gap in expec- 
tations is sometimes bridged by 
mutual respect, strengthened by 
growing affection for the children 
— but only sometimes. 

This time everyone fell into 
the chasm. Surely nobody can now 
be unaware of it. If fewer parents 
seek au pairs to take full charge 
of their babies. I hope that fewer 
parents of teenagers will allow 
them to seek au pair positions where 
such care is demanded. 


The writer, u psychologist at the 
University of London, is the author 
of " Your Baby and Child: From Birth 
to Age Five." She contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY- NOVEMBER U, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Cases of China and Iraq 
Show the Contradictions 
In Trade-Based U.S. Policy 



AU PAIR: 

Verdict Is Reduced 




-Continued from Page l 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tuna Service 


PARIS — Each in his own way, Pres- 
idents Jiang 2femin of China and Saddam 


Hussein of Iraq have thrown the root- 
light on a central contradiction of U.S. 


light on a central contradiction of u.S. 
foreign policy — a policy most notable 
for its heavy emphasis on trade. 

During Mr. Bang’s visit to the United 


charged with seeing that Iraq has nc nu- 
clear, chemical or biological weapots. 

While emissaries trial to reason with 
Mr. Saddam in Baghdad, there were 
signs that he was using the time to dove 
evidence of such weapons out of sijht of 
monitoring devices. 

Despite such cheek, (be United States 
favors staying die diplomatic couse for 
now, in part because it recognize that 


States, President Bill Clinton said China s up por t for its tongh approach, i* flag- 
was “on the wrong side of histeay^ofi' ging; 


human rights, but he resisted threatening “We are prepared to go the exta mile 


trade penalties as a way of prodding rt diplomatically if dial makes otheico un- 
toward democracy. With Iraq, try con- tries take firm action, if necssary, 
trast. Mr. Qinton’s administration in- later.” James Rubin. the State Pepart- 
sists that a trade embargo and the threat men t spokesman, said. “Bat it’s toe that 
of military force are the only way to . it’s harrier and harder to sustain upport 
force Mr. Saddam to observe the norms as memories of die Gulf War foe.” 


of civilized behavior. 

After six years of going along with 
this approach on Iraq, some of Amer- 


A case in point is France. Whit it still 
does not rule out the use of bree, it 
nevertheless sees the repeated prism of 


ica’s partners in die United Nations such Iraqi challenges and U.S.-led rmlary re- 
■ - — ■ spouses as a vicious cycle tht leads 


Kim S*laK , \*»T>rr Fnmr-tVMr 

Iraqis marching to the presidential palace in Baghdad on Monday in a show of support for the government. 


NEWS ANALYSIS nowhere over die long term. Freeh of- 

ficials say that, because sane tins iro- 
ns France and Russia are starting to ask, posed on Iraq after the Golf War ■»oold be 


IRAQ: Aziz, at UN, Attacks U.S L, but Baghdad’s Threats Subside 


if trade is the way to get China on the eased if Iraq eventually compbd fully 
road to salutary behavior, why isn’t itfor with disarmament orders, it wool be hast 


Continued from Page I ' “all that was required was for Iraq to 

undertake to comply with the obliga- 
“It is in the best interests of Iraq to tions under all relevant Security Council 
lish this Job,” Mr. Aziz said to re* resolutions.’’ 

irters after meeting die Chinese rep- “Once that was done, I expect that the 

sematrve, Qin Ruasun, the Security Security Council would in turn be will- 
juncil president this month. mg to listen to Iraq and to its griev- 

There was no indication that Mr. Aziz ances, ” Mr. Annan said that he told Mr. 
mid get the opportunity to address the Aziz. Mr. Annan defended his decision 
11 Security Council, which heard from to send a team of envoys to Baghdad 
cretary-General Kofi Annan and die against initial U.S. opposition, 
nee envoys he sent to Baghdad last “It is unusual for me to get involved 
*k — T AkhHar B rahimi of Algeria, in the Unscom operation,” Mr. Annan 
oilio Cardenas of Argentina and Jan said, using the acronym for die UN Spe- 
iasson of Sweden. The council also cial Commission. “It is a matter be- 
ard from Richard Butler, the executive tween Iraq and the Security Council. I 


Iraq and, for that matter, Iran as well? 

“The Chinese case destroys the 
American pretension to universality on 


to start talking about how to do oar now, 
rather than wait until complianc occurs. 


“It is in the best interests of Iraq to 
finish this Job,” Mr. Aziz said to re* 


The more hope we can giv&addam porters after meeting die Chinese rep- 


human rights,” Le Monde said in an Hussein dial trade sanctions miht even- resentative, Qin Huasun, the Security 


editorial after Mr. Jiang’s visit ended last 
week. “Are they less trampled on in 


Turkey or Saudi Arabia than in Iran or said. “If we 


tually be lifted, the more levrage we 
have in die long run,” a Bend official 


Cuba? The former are allies of America, 
which cajoles them; the latter are en- 
emies it is bent on p unishing .” 

As far as Baghdad is concerned, 
French officials agree with the Americans 
that it is still too early to trust the Iraqi 
president. In recent days, continuing a 
long pattern of defiance. Mr. Saddam has 
tried to exploit a developing split among 
countries that helped end the Iraqi oc- 
cupation of Kuwait in 1991, by barring 
Americans from UN inspection teams 


long run 
s refuse. 


Council president this month. 


we create growing 


resentment in die whole Iraq popula- 
tion,” he said, as the saoctioo; hurt die 


Iraqi people, not Mr. Saddam Officials 
in Russia expressed the same iew. 

Of course, both France ad Russia 


may simply be tired of being Id around 
on Gulf matters by the w aid’s lone 


of Feb- A when Miss Woodward -fl- 
Icgcdly became frustrated with a eoj. 
icfcy. crying Matthew and struck him. 

But on the question of a reduced vej. 
diet. Judge Zobel wrote that “the fects, 
as well as the law, are open to coo. ' 
sideraiion” State; law, he wi**, 

provides “a kind of safety valve wfat 

“a lesser verdict more comports with - 
justice.” In “the interests of justice/tte 
thus reduced the verdict. • i- 

“I do this.” he wrote, “in accordance 
with my discretion and my duty." Only - 
rarely does an appeals court overman ■ 
finding in which a tower-conn: judge 

invokes his discretion. _ - V- - 

“Frustrated by her inability to qufet 
the crying child,” Judge Znbcl wrote, : 

“she was ’a little rough with him; under - 

circumstances where another, perhaps 
wiser, person would have sought u> re- 
strain toe physical impulse. The rough 
ness was sufficient to start, (or restntXa 
bleeding that escalated fatally. “ • ^ 

Bnt he found no grounds to conclude 
that she acted with malice. -v 

K^5^vcn~F«*^nr~ prosecutors had portrayed Mws 
w Of support for the government. Woodward as a petulant young worn* 

6 who resented her duties in the Happen 

„ m ry i - * household and the restrictions placed da 

id s Ikreats Subside her nighttime social activities. They 

cl aim ed that she vented her frustrations 
he ram* away from the trip to Baghdad on Matthew. Defense lawyers painted 

... J m m * •* t « J 1 « (V*K(V\lmi , l IUK% 


with the sense that the Iraqis had adopted 
unrealistic expectations because of their 
extreme isolation. The country has been 
under blanket sanctions since its inva- 
sion of Kuwait in 1990 and cannot hope 


her as a good-hearted schoolgirl who 
would never have hurt Matthew or-his 
brother Brendan, now 3. 

The defense had been harshly crit- 
icized for urging the judge to deny the 


to have these lifted until certified to be jury a chance to consider a manslaughter 


would get the opportunity to address the 
full Security Council, which heard from 
Secretary-General Kofi Annan and the 


Probably more important, ley would 
like to trade with Iran and Irq about as 


Secretary-General Kofi Annan and the 
three envoys he sent to Baghdad last 
week — Lakhdar Brahimi of Algeria. 
Emilio Cardenas of Argentina and Jan 
Eliasson of Sweden. The council also 
heard from Richard Butler, the executive 
chairman of die Special Commission. 

Mr. Annan , who also met Mr. Aziz on 
Monday morning, said at a news con- 


free of weapons of mass destruction. 

The Argentine envoy also said that 
with ’‘government by terror” in Iraq, 
there were few voices speaking out for 
alternative policies. 

But Mr. Cardenas, who negotiated 
with Iraq a year ago to establish the plan 
for limited oil sales to pay for food and 
medicine, said that he was stunned by 


became involved because I thought I the real suffering he saw in Baghdad. He 


much as America likes to fade with ference later that he had not yet heard the 


President Dissolves 
Kenyan Parliament 


Cam^brOrSiiffFtvmUvaKliB 

NAIROBI — President Daniel 
arap Moi dissolved Kenya’s sev- 
enth Parliament on Monday in prep- 
aration for general elections expec- 
ted later this year. 

No date had been set for the elec- 
tions. The announcement is nor- 
mally made by the Electoral Com- 
mission. 

Mr. Moi, 73 and in power since 
1978, is viewed as the favorite by 
most political analysts and com- 
mentators to win the presidential 
race against an array of candidates 
from the divided opposition. 

But predictions are risky because 
there is no reliable opinion research 
into the intentions of Kenya's 1 1 
million registered voters. 

Hard-line opposition figures, led 
by the veteran politician Kenneth 
Matiba, are advocating a boycott 
and disruption of the polls. 

Mr. Moi won with 36 percent of 
the vote in 1992. 

The Kenya shilling remained 
firm Monday, but some dealers ex- 
pected it to weaken before -the 
vote. (AP. Reuters) 


After the Gulf War ended! 1991 with came with a long list of grievances, that 
Mr. Saddam’s army daren from 


Mr. Annan, who also met Mr. Aziz on should do whatever I can to try and 
onday morning, said at a news cot- defuse the situation, to try and de-es- 
rence later that he had not yet heard the c&late before things got out of hand.’ ’ 
issage he wanted to bear from the Mr. Annan said that if Mr. Aziz would 

iqis: that Baghdad would withdraw its not give him the answer he sought, die 
allenge to the inspection system and Iraqis would have to deal directly with 
operate with the Security Council and the Security Council, 
sarmament commission. Mr. Cardenas, a banker and former 

Mr. Annan said he told Mr. Aziz, who Argentine representative at the United 
me with a long list of grievances, that Nations, said in an interview today that 


China message he wanted to bear from the 

“No country has a fonegn policy Iraqis: that Baghdad would withdraw its 
based solely-on human right”' Foreign challenge to the inspection system and 
Minister Hubert Vedrine of ranee said cooperate with the Security Council and 
recently, and U.S. policy toward China disarmament commission, 
proves his point Mr. Annan said he told I 


said the country seemed to be “in the 
doldrums” and even in the best sections 
of the capital electricity was in short 
supply, water was precarious and san- 
itation standards were very low. 

“People are dunking daily about their 
fi ght far survival,” he said. He believes 
that when the crisis is over, the Security 
Council should look again at how to 
alleviate the hardships of average Iraqis. 


verdict earlier, gambling that a jury 
would not convict her of the more se- 
rious murder charges and send hex so 
prison for life. 

Had that option existed fin- jurors. 
Judge Zobel wrote, “they might well 
have selected it. ” ''•* 

One juror, Stephen Colwell, said he 
was “greatly relieved" by the dec is sob. 
Judge Zobel went out of nis way to tty 
that the intense publicity surroumfcr^ 
die case had had no influence on $s 
finding. 

The judge had said he would post Ms 
decision on the Internet at precisely 10 
Aid., prompting extraordinarily heady 
traffic at (he Web sites where it waste 
appear. But l minute before 10 A.M., the 
courthouse computer crashed becauseqf 
a power outage. 


Kuwait, U.S. leaders believd, or hoped, 
that a trade embargo and per restric- 
tions would quickly cause Is downfall. 
They were wrong. Franceind Russia 
now argue that because tinAmericans 
are unlikely to send an aimpack to Iraq 
to finish the job and die wad will have 
to live with Mr. Saddam ithould think 
about carrots as well as sties to get him 
to change his ways. 

Exactly what kind of carits is not yet 
clear, and France agrees wn the United 


EUROPE: Recovering Economy Holds Little Promise for the Millions Without Jobs 

Continued from Page 1 market reform, and even those reforms he acknowledged that whether corporate expected “one more round of layofft, 

we see are starting at a very slow Europe invests more “depends also on nor so much in traditional industries bat 


ush the job and die wad will have Western Europe, 
re with Mr. Saddam, ithould think • High unemployment is a problem 
r carrots as well as sties to get him that feeds on itself because the payment 
ange his ways. of generous benefits acts as a disincent- 

ive dy what kind of carits is not yet ive for the jobless to seek work, creates a 
, and France agrees wn the United cost burden, on government treasuries 


market reform, and even those reforms 
we see are starting at a very slow 
pace.” 

Mr. Fels forecast no significant im- 
provement on the jobs front until at least 


the psychological environment, and there 
die 35-hour working week is a factor.’ ' 
Rolf Krebs, vice chairman of the Ger- 


S tales that now is not the one to offer that limits spending elsewhere and makes 
them. But, its officials a*ue, a trade consumers reluctant to go out and buy. 


2000 and said even then the unemploy- man pharmaceuticals maker Boehringer 
ment rate would.still be at an average of Ingemeim, said be was confident of 
10 percent, vriih.a. decisive drop not- European recovery next year. But he also 


it can be one 


; at ist. they say, 
: in; strategy to 


• Politicians in such big economies as 
Germany, France and Italy have prom- 


en courage moderation amfengagement ised major tax and social security 


with the West, in both IrEuand Iran. 

Clearly, feelings agaimeifoer coun- 
try do not run as stronglyu Europe as 
they do in Washington, hi Iran, one 


1 U percent, voto.a. decisive drop not 
likely “until early in the next decade.’*: 

Just a few days ago. as he discussed 
the 1 1 .8 percent German unemployment 
rate, Bernhard Jagoda, head of the Fed- 
eral Labor Office, offered a sobering 


noted that “the recovery is mainly on the 
export side” and blamed high German 
unemployment for the lack of any real 
growth in domestic consumption. 

Mr. Krebs said the biggest obstacle to 


but have so far been unable to deliver in a view of the prospects for the country’s job creation next year would be Europe's 

nmi rnrmmM m. uii. ^ ^ i;,-: ii i_ L:.v 1.1 


meaningful way. Corporate tax bills can 
add up to between 40 percent and 50 
percent on the Continent, while social 


reason for this is Americai' memory of security and other employer contribu- 


the 444-day-long hostage nndoff at the 
U.S. Embassy in Tehran at started 18 
years ago this month. 

In 1995. Europeans preaxed to main- 
tain a “critical dialogu ’ with Iran 
rather than join die Unfed States in 
-imposing- trade -smetiotfover 'foe Is- 
lamic regime’s support fr terrorism. 


tions can add 45 percent to 60 percent to 
the wage bill for a single worker. 

“The cycle in itself." said Joachim 


4.4 million jobless. “Realistically, we do high labor costs, 
not expect unemployment to see a trend * ‘The costs are causing more employ- 
change in the coming years.” he said. ee layoffs, and this creates a lack of 
Even though economic growth is ex- consumption, which in turn causes 
peered to notch upward, the present re- companies to downsize their opera- 
covery is not yet broadly based. tions,” he said. “It is this cycle that the 

Andre Levy- Lang, chief executive of politicians have to break, and I don’t see 
; French banking giant Paribas, said in any sign of diem doing so.” 

interview that while “3 percent . The jobless rate wiU also stay high 
awth in 1998 is possible, it is still very next year if. as expected, a combination 
port dependent” He said he did not of merger activity and corporate reslruc- 
int to comment on unemployment, but hiring proceeds apace. Mr. Fels said he 


Fels, a senior economist in Frankfurt for the French banking giant Paribas, said in 
Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, “will do an interview that while “3 percent 

]:~ 1 ~ .. u l : ' - .v ■ ',nna - i i _ - 5 ,i 


very little to solve the problems in the growth in 1998 is possible, it is still very 


labor market. What you really need is tax export dependent” He said he did not 


reform, social security reform and labor want to c omm ent on unemployment, but 


in the service sector, and among white- 
collar employees in the banking and 
insurance industries, where there wilftbe ' 
a massive consolidation, and therefore a 
repeat of what you had in the United } 
States some years ago. * * 

On Nov. 21. at the Luxembourg em- 
ployment conference, some government!; 
are expected to push for a Maastricht- 
style target for unemployment, but Prime 
Minister Jean-Claude Juncker of Lux- 
embourg, who will be host of the meet- 
ing. rejected such a move Monday. 

Mr. Juncker, who held talks Sunday 
with Chancellor Kohl in preparation for 
the conference, rejected fixing any for- 
mal target for reducing the EU’s l hi 
percent jobless rate. 

Instead, be contended that it might be 
possible to promote job creation policies - 
through “peer pressure” at the EU levil f 
and spoke of the need to set up a “mui- r~- 
rilateral surveillance” system on the em- 
ployment issue. il 


LIFT: To Rich and Poor, He Offers leauty 


Continued from Page 1 


nowhere else — we have achieved a mix 
of (he Portuguese blood with the black 
slaves to create a physical harmony,” 
said Farid Hakme, president of foe 
Brazilian Association of Plastic Sur- 
geons. “And what Pitanguy told us 
Brazilians is that those who were not 
bom with natural beauty, or those who 
want to reclaim it, have a chance to 
obtain what others have.” 

For those with means, Mir. Pitanguy *s 
fountain of youth carries a high price. A 
face-lift at his elegant private clinic can 
run up to $15,000; nose jobs can cost 
$10,000, sources close to bis business 
say. (Dr. Pitanguy never discusses such 
things.) 

People are willing to pay high prices, 
associates and peers say, because Dr. 
Pitanguy has developed an international 
reputation for his techniques. He is par- 
ticularly known for a trademark breast 
reduction surgery and for face-lifts “that 
are brilliantly imperfect,” said Carlos 
Pescakrdo, a Buenos Aires plastic sur- 
geon. 

"He has away of making the race look 
as if it is younger, but without seeming 
too perfect Phangay’s faces don’t have 
that stretched look that advertises to 
everyone: ‘I've had plastic surgery.’ ** 

And for foe poor, there is foe waiting 
room at Holy House. “We get middle- 
class people who try to sneak in.” said 
Joan Canos Grados Nave, a medical 
resident at the clinic. “We don’t throw 
them out If they’re willing to wait like 
everyone else, we’U eventually get 
around to them.” 

The clinic for the poor, founded in 
1960, Is in a ward of one of foe oldest 
hospitals in foe Americas. 

Dr. Pitanguy, son of a general surgeon 
from foe inland city of Belo Horizonte, 
persuaded foe government to grant him 
seed money to open foe clinic after he 
served as a doctor in foe Brazilian Army 
in World War H and finished 10 years of 
medical residency in the United States, 
England and France. ‘T saw soldiers in 
horrible physical conditions, but I also 
saw the emotional scars of their 
wounds,” he said. “Restoration of foe 
body b e ca me important to me there.” 

Every year. Dr. Pitanguy accepts 
about 20 international plastic surgery 


residents from 150 appliaits to learn his 
techniques at Holy Hoje and at his 
private clinic. 

Patients at Holy Houscange from foe 
severely deformed to lose who are 
merely glamour seeker Most of the 
time, patients must pay >r only the cost 
of materials, such as stifles, medicines 
and gauze. For the ors who cannot 
afford even that, the fees waived. 

Tte waiting list is ofti years long and 
patients with, for exance, severe burns 




TRIAL: Unabomber Case Raises Issues of Madness and Evil 


Continued from Page 1 



and birth defects are .eneraliy given 
preference. But foe cccept of purely 
cosmetic surgery on tbCheap has lured 
thousands from povert-strieken neigh- 
borhoods who want took as good in a 
bikini on Copacaban beach as foe 
wealthy women who jy thousands for 
foe same techniques apwn. 



His trial starts Wednesday. 


the law, they say foe death penalty would 
compound foe irrationality. 

But others, including David Gel- 
erater, a Yale University computer-sci- 
ence professor who may be foe Una- 
bomber’s best-known victim, have 
begun to maintain in public that foe 
Unabomber is the personification of un- 
repentant evil and that only a weak na- 
tion would shrink from imposing foe 
ultimate penalty. 

Mr. Kaczynski’s lawyers have 
signaled that they may aigue that be was 
a paranoid schizophrenic. The prose- 
cutors have asked foe judge to bar that 
effort because Mr. Kaczynski refused 
last month to be examined by govern- 
ment psychiatrists. 


In the case before U.S. District Court 
Judge Garland Burrell Jr.. Mr. Kaczyn- 
ski, 55. faces charges as a result of the 
deaths of two Sacramento men, Hugh 
Scrutton, who ran a computer store, in 
1985 and Gilbert Murray, president of 
the California Forestry Association, in 
1995. 

He also is accused of mailing two 
bombs from Sacramento that wounded 
Mr. Gelemter at Yale in New Haven, 
Connecticut, m 1993 and Charles Ep- 
stein, a geneticist at foe University of 
California at San Francisco, in 1993. 

Because the new federal death penalty 
was not in force at foe time of Mr. 
Scrutton’ s deash, Mr. Kaczynski will 
face foe death penalty only if he is con- 
victed in foe 1995 killing of Mr. Mur- 
ray. 


After the current trial, Mr. Kaczynskf - 
will face die death penalty again when he _ 
is to be tried in federal court in New" 
Jersey for a 1994 bombing that killed 
Thomas Mosser. 

Mr. Mosser was an advertising exi 
ecutive who was killed at his home in*. 
North Caldwell, New Jersey, when he 
opened a package. 

After jury selection, which is.expecfl 
ted to take as long as a month, foe triatt 
will begin with a so-called guilt phase iS 
which foe prosecutors will be required t® 
prove that Mr. Kaczynski not only cortS 
mined each of the bomb attacks but ft is® 
intended to injure bis victims. ® 


M i" 


»w 




If Mr. Kaczynski is found guilty, 
second phase of foe trial would be cot 
ducted to determine whether he woul 
be sentenced to death. 


CLEVTON President Admits Defeat on Trade Bill DEAL: MCI Accepts a Better Offer From WorldCom 

A1 M 4! J C n •* A.1* . 1 « I . TX ■ V 



Continue from Page I 


efforts overseas — bon foe end foe White House 
would not yield to fyublican demands to scale 
back these programs. 

Mr. Clinton and faarack supporters in the House 
said they planned to tag up the bill fora vote later. 
They did not specify ^len. but several aides said the 
most likely time was : the first half of next year. 

In foe meantime, riTninist ratinn officials said 
Mr. Clinton’s seconderm goal of striking several 
new trade agreement in particular with Qiile, has 
been dealt a serious aback. 

So was his potitul goal of refashioning the 
Democratic Party armd his buoyant vision of a 
world in which mosAmericans prosper from an 
increasingly inteniataalized economy. At least 
among House De moats, it is clear that foe party’s 
historic protectionisttrains remain dominant 

Fast-track an than would allow presidents to 
negotiate trade agreeents and then present them to 
Congress for a simp up or down vote, with no 
changes permitted ding die legislative process. 
Mr. Clinton had aqed that other nations would 
have no incentive toteec at the bargaining table if 
whatever agreements reached with an admin- 
istration was subject) later changes by Congress. 

In foe past, festade authority has not been 
especially controversy and all U.S. presidents sioce 
Gould Ford in die Id-19705 have exercised foe 
power. Bat Mr- Ginn, sensing trouble in his own 
party, let his fesMra* authority lapse in 1994. 

A White House suor adviser, Rahm Emanuel. 


argued that Mr. Clinton has brought Democrats to 
his brand of political centrism — foe same philo- 
sophy foal Prime Minister Tony Blair of Britain 
espoused in his election last spring — on such 
issues as fighting crime and balancing foe budget. 
But he noted that the trade issue was becoming 
more divisive in both parties. 

In 1991, 97 percent of House Republicans, who 
were then the minority party, backed President 
George Bush's successful effort to renew fast-track 
authority. This time the Republicans are in t he 
majority, but only about 75 percent of House Re- 
publicans backed the proposal. 

White House aides acknowledged they were 
fearful the setback would signal a waning of Mr. 
Clinton’s power over domestic policy, and lead 
people in both parties to the conclusion that foe 
lame-duck phase of his presidency had begun. As 
an antidote to this perception, they are considering 
announcing several domestic initiatives through his 
State of the Union Address in January. 

Bert Rochman, a presidential scholar at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, cautioned against drawing 
larger lessons from foe fast-track vote. Free trade 
is not a central part of the Democratic agenda, to 
begin with, he said. * ‘It's a Republican issue.” 
,J^rlierin the fight over fast-track, administration 
officials had stated that the political realities were 
such that fast-track had to pass in 1 997, since it was 
too controversial to pass m 1998, a congressional 
election year. But die administration has aban- 
doned that line, saying they still think Mr. Clinton 
can command a majority in the future. 


Continued from Page 1 


MCTs stock price was up $4.6875, at $41.5625. 
WorldCom s stock, meanwhile, dropped $2. 1 25, or 
6 percent, to $31. 


• .■^P^ r * can depositary receipts representing Brit- 
ish Telecom shares rose $2.6875, to $79.6875 GTE 
rose $1.1875, to $44.8125. 

Some analysts pointed out foat the mostly stock 

deal still depended on. foe volatile market. But Tod 
Jacobs, an analyst with Sanford Bernstein, said the 
deal announced Monday “really does push foe 
needle decisively in favor of WorldCom.” 

With regulatory approvals and legal work ex- 
pected to keep MCI and WorldCom apart for six to 
rnne months many analysts said that it was too early 
to c lose the file on MCL What we have learned with 
foese very large transactions is that you cannot say 
it s over until they have had their celebratory deal- 
closing dinner, said Tom Bumett, an analyst with 
Moger Insight, an institutional research service. 

WorldCom is renowned on Wall Street as the 
telecommunications firm that has made investors 
more money than any other over the last decade 
Most observers reckon foat even at $51 a share, 
MCI represents a |ood buy. What has changed, 
however, since WorldCom made its bid Oct 1 is the 
markets themselves. 

The boundless, anything-is-possible optimism 
that characterized the stock market before last 
month’s sell-off in stocks has been replaced by a 
more cautious atmosphere, and a sense that what 
could go wrong might indeed go wrong. 


WorldCom’s share price permitting, someti 
next summer a new company called MCI- Wot 
Com with 70,000 employees and 25 percent of ! 
u.5. long-distance marker, second behind A’ 
Lorp. 

With an.nlv.ctc nlrr-lrln rni.r... tl. 


M muting the new compel 

£ ™ r™*? 10 bei “' lhe wi ‘ 
pe on GTE, which had hoped to break out to 


toe ^ amc u rh « is weighing 

Kasssa” *=*>- — s *■ 

Mike Armstrong, the new chief executive of Amer- 

AT&TCom & tU! hrscsl long-distance carrier. 
AT&T Carp. Some even suggest that room at foe 

b RT my y l‘ h? fomci fw clfh richB™ “ A 

firmiv Its Iwenwutonal bets are all placed 

SdtowTnaT^ * h0Se *«***& ^ 

snut ailowmg a new partner to enter. 

we have a,teraa ^ e for MCI emeret*. 

~x,™ss' s .te',“3 

expertise aikl stJonelj «”!“ °^- tS 

Having felted St^div « ng busi ! w ?; 

busings off the AT&T m Sr 

son of tioup wiS°BT as ,<X * M 


til 





o' u&/> 


“PAGE 11 ’ 


*« 



■ v* ;<■'•** 


•tav-v (-■ — **. » 

~ ?**/* 

s> *• 



Zen Dressing: Spirituality in New York Sportswear 






■ ; r.: 


-u 



By Suzy Menkes 

Inirrnmonal Herald Tribune 


tj 

vii 


pv YORK - — American design 
“ 5 reached a new age. Make that 
New Age. For sen dressing — 
* v-: oody- wraps, shoestring ties, filmy 

fabrics and plays on light and shade — is the 
story for spring. 

’iiiwew Y ork fashion used to be about no-fuss 
^sportswear. but spirituality has taken over 
sfitom practicality in the summer Season. Al- 
though simple separates and easy dresses still 
: ;jiommate the runways, designers are giving 
.•them a new fragility and complexity. Scnlp- 

■ shapes or light layers have hand-sewn 
.touches of ruches, puckers and tucks. 

-■ai The effect is often elusive, relying more on 
■^-fcpoetic mood than a design direction. Put it 
: -another way: the New York season did not 
oner a crisp American point of view. 
vbiiCalvin Klein's sportswear remix, using 
ultralight fabrics, took his line forward. 

■ Showing m a gritty venue — an empty 

■ i -Gbelsea warehouse with the audience on steel 
.'.benches — the designer still gave the col- 
r lection a fe minin e spin. 

✓?.-;* Tm moving to something that's pretty 
.and healthy-looking, even romantic.” said 
riliein. “We’ve had the edgy look — in New 
.York it’s called downtown — that is part of 
7 me. But I want clothes to flow and be soft.” 

That meant athletic shapes — shirts with 
-roiled sleeves, track pants, skirts with elastic 
'doists and drawstring hems — but in flut- 
‘ Wring fabrics like parachute silk. As the mod- 
. e .els walked out in judo slippers, subtle de tails 

■ came into focus: a hem doubled on the back of 
. a knee-length skirt; a single pouch-pocket; a 

bodice smocked above a billowing dress, 
r.r As die long, soft dresses took over at night, 
I*he fabric was deliberately crushed, or color 
introduced in narrow computer-graphic lines, 
-n Modem romantic dresses with tucks and 
..lies have long been on offer from Japanese 
. designers. Maybe Klein can make them go 
^•mainstream. Bur the best of h is show was its 
. sporty side, especially the wool-voile shirts 
tucked into pants as summer-in-the-city tai- 
^ Wring and die airy athletic pieces. 

0 i Significantly, fledgling designer Daiyl K 
•look a similar sports theme. Her drawstrings 
. .were tiny and colorful, yellow or pink piped 
.on to a silk twill track-jacket or drawing in a 
■jersey dress at the hips. More funky was a 
membrane print traced on a stretch dress. The 

^ sporty effects, delicate in detail on fine faL- 
1 ' fits, made the show both upscale and cool. 
Donna Karan is the cult leader of spir- 
ituality on Seventh Avenue. Her collection, 
inspired by the luminous waters of an ocean 
.bay, featured fabrics that ran liquid across the 
■body or glimmered like sun on water. The 
-result was beautiful — yet otherworldly. 

LIRE there were outfits for work — 
jackets and pants in the gray.of an 
angry <?c can or the dark blue of a night 

sky, worn with hosiery-weight tops. 

Rut far more; typical were wafting organza 
coats or dresses caging jersey underslips. 

! is about creating illusions with fabrics, 
-.organic shapes, volumes of sculpture and 
layers of weightlessness,” Karan said. 

-i; -The show was like the ocean: serene, tran- 
quil. with a hint of drama in the verdigris 
mohair and mile that suggested a oereid 
,'etnerging from the sea. These were clothes for 
- women yearning for femininity and romance 
•-i- but not always for the real world. 

When Isaac Mizrahi sent out invitations to 
a. Show on Wall Street, it looked like a change 
.•of pace from a designer with a theatrical bent 
;Rut the massive piUars in an imposing empty 
| bank were a metaphor for the neoclassical 
.r- Out came clothes, inspired by ancient 
Greece, bound with wraps and ties: asym- 
metric jackets with thin ribbons at the waist; 

, "dresses closed with apron strings; roomy pa- 

1 jama pants, wrapped askew. 

| The show seemed to be about using fabric 

■ loosely and then making it snug. Corsets, 
i crushed to the chest, worn under jackets or 


over dresses, were one way of bringing the 
voluminous shapes back to the body. 

But the collection just seemed to be dis- 
parate pieces — some of them striking, like a 
sloppy pantsuit in imperial purple or tuxedo 
trousers with an openwork stripe. And so 
much, including the tied jackets that echoed 
Ann Demeulemeester. seemed to reverberate 
from other runways. Even the drop-stitch 
sweater labeled “Mistake” seemed like a 
take on Comme des Gar cons. 

Mizrahi has his own quirky fashion style, 
but he needs to focus on his strength in bold 
wear and on what he stands for as a 
igner. 

Rifat Ozbek is a fashion nomad, skilled at 
icking up ethnic references from his native 
urkey to the streets of his adoptive London. 
Showing his collection in London, Milan, Par- 
is and now New York is part of his style, and 
the move to the Big Apple was refreshing. 


sports* 

design* 


¥ 



A BOARDWALK runway, with a 
string of colored lightbulbs and a 
surrounding sea of blue sequins, 
introduced voodoo magic — a col- 
lection inspired by Haiti, but focused on 
simple Caribbean clothing like white cotton, 
edged with ruffles, as well as more dramatic 
skull prints and native headgear. 

It made a juicy mix of leggy, playful pieces, 
in imaginative fabrics and prints: a graphic 
pattern of Caribbean flags; a print of sea- 
spray and blue sky, a patchwork in stretch. 
Using the apron, in white leather or trompe 
1'oeii in madras, Ozbek treated the wrap-and- 
tie look in a fresh and modem way. 

Geoffrey Beene's mastery of technique 
and sureness of touch means that special 
effects are effortless. You want an asym- 
metric jacket? Here’s one that swallow-dives 
across the chest alighting on a button on the 
left rib. Wraps and ties? A skinny transparent 
belt circles the waist where complex seaming 
turns a jersey dress into a soft sculpture. 

The ovation that Beene received was a 
recognition of his inventiveness, attention to 
detail and his personal vision. Within the 
boundaries of a fragile, feminine silhouette, 
he draws dainty detachable cuffs, or insinu- 
ates a lace back on a jersey dress. Or suspends 
the red, blue and black striped jersey from a 
strap curling around one shoulder blade. 

Beene has always believed in the now-so- 
fashionable dress, bat by lengthening the 
silhouette and making it fluid, the designer 
gave a yoathful spin to bis style. He also likes 
tight fabrics, and two layers of chiffon printed 
with different dots had a vivacious modernity. 
He can also be playful with circns-printed 
jackets & la Schiaparelli and Plexiglas flowers 
cinching the skinny belts. 

But Beene is, above all creative. And 
among bland New York designers, that puts 
him in a class apart 


p 

An Uptown Romance 



■ Mnaicntama 

,flower-emhroidered sweater, at left, and Blass's pinstriped cardigan. 

, „ .| Tribunf hand-painted flowers to orobnS chiffon or tie- 

"vnEK ~ Tte indomitable dyed j£sey, always in afluid shapes that look 

,ke Astor. ^BlasT dedicated his collection to "The 

thaitnmmedwitn . Woman” and gave her a jaunty elegance with 

tear de DRenta 5 sho .^ut he ^ favorile pinstripes on curvy knits or bright 

• inTfrJnf row Jackets in grass green, yellow and coral, worn 

ocahte front row. Wrapping meant a lilac 

SEEKS 


t a su- 

yas brisk double-.--- 

,SS S 3 K 

Renta to create light but 

iD g wear from dresses with 


cardigan lapped au a aunvuw. w’«v »w,- 
vets created patterns of richly colored 
flowers. And Blass’s take on asymmetry was 
, : ""'k "'eats set into 

Uiaguum — r- -o —7- e *P e:neDCS 

often scores aver Fashion MgMgattfc. 

—SUZY MENKES 



Clockwise from top left: Beene’s graphic boleros on jumpsuits; Mizrahi's wrap-and-tie classic-inspired dress .Karan's gauzy dress caging 
an underslip; Klein's billowing dress wish a drawstring hem on an athletic theme; Ozbek's voodoo-inspired skull -print shirr. 



A] Buftau Palace Inter-Conlincnla! Muscat 


No matter wliere you are in tke world, 
you’ll never feel like a stranger. 


One World. One Hotel. 
Uniquely Inter-Continental. 

M 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 

HOTELS AND RESORTS 
www.interconti.com 


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VICTORIA FALLS 
-rORL'M IliJTFL 








PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


NYSE 


Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The Z600 most traded stocks of Itedoy. 
Ntrtfcnwiite prias not reflecting late trades elsewhere. 


h9IW 


Steefc Drr Yld PE I 


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a IB CenSgWrtl.7« BJ 18 4647 21 20, 20% +V» 

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28, 26 CHBCprB 2J6-8J _ 83 27b 27b 27b _ 

36Va 29W CflnHud £14 40 12 

29 24ft GanLAEI 1-54 58 13 

I3W.10 CtMPw SO 47 16 

J4I IJ 23 
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13?* 10, CV1P5 
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46ft 28b CirtyTl 
49b 29b CendJan 
23ft 13ft ChmpE 
66b 41, Cham In 
9ft 4b ainrau 
24, 10b ChcBis 


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17k. 8't A«W1 _ II 3735 17, 12ft 12, _ 

29v.2lb Arts n - - 1010 29V. 289. 28ft - 

721) 54V* AvTKrt JO IJ3 15 1702 64b 63 63, -ft 

78 56b Aran 1.26 241 2410909 63% *1 % 62 +Vt 

Bto 6b Azhr - 11 1272 7% 7 7% +V. 

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58, 3 T* BB&T Cp 1J4 £3 2B 915 54, 538, 53% A, 


22 


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_ 612 8% 8% Bto . _ 

- 80 9, 9, 9, +ft 

27 966 6 5to 5, -V. 

43 4986*90*11 8814 88%+% 

886 29, 29V. 29, +, 
439 32b 314,31% A. 
155 25% 25% 25% _ 
236 33, 33% 33U -U 

342 IT**. 17, 17% +, 

203 27b 27h 27ft 

229 8, Bfe 8v. +*a 

343 10, 10% 10ft +b 

181 25% 25% 25% +l, 
243 10 W. 4% A* 

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1-64 6J 18 2446 27ft 27% 27% -% 

59, 39 ) BoncOne 1J2 10 2112493 52fe 50, Slfe -fe 

XU I6ft BcoBJVsJOe 1.1 26 99 Mfe VPtm 26*. +% 

38b 22ft BtKoFm JOr £5 11 3445 259, 24, 24, -ft 

42b 24, BGanodreTJMlJ _ 150 31V* 38ft 38ft _ 

_ 264 2314 23 Z3 

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11 177 41b 41b 41V* -b| 

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TO* 2SU Bcp&srm J8> £3 18 23« 38% X, 37, -% 

27, 19, Bandec - 13 709 25 24% 24% •% 

541* 45 Bandog IJ» £0 IS 180 50ft 50% 507* +h 

10, fi BoogH .10 _ _ 156 S, 5ft S<% „ 

2lft in* BkTakya fSta J — 141412b 12, 12% ♦% 

52% 3 Hi BUfY 1JW £2 18 5392 48, 47% 47ft % 

36ft 25ft BkNYpfBZIS 84 _ 82 25, TSfe 25b +'-. 

81ft 461* BaidtAfflS IJ2 IJ 1715054 74% 71% X -I, 
100ft 90, BkAmpfB 6JB 6J _ 2337 KB, 100b 100b -ft 
2S%24 BkArti pfZl.94 75 _ 83 25% 25, 2SU -V. 

16% 8, HMMJ .131 3 12 476 13% 13% l3%+% 
91'.* 60, Bkficul £04 £5 15 5117 85, 82ft 82-fe-IV. 
133, 74 BanKTr AW 14 IS 3768119 117 117 -19. 
lift 6b BanrAer - 21 114 9ft 9 7 

26% 24ft BorB pf 100 7 J - 427 Mfe 24, M, - 

39 25, Ban! 72 2-4 21 2027 279* 27J* 27, +Mi 

Bft 12, BrenNW* _ 35 1722 27, TO, 26ft 
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n%37b Bwrwti IJ4 IJ 23 3884 71U 69, 69% -1% 
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*b 19, BanSo .161 J _ 7930 19% 19W 19% -% 


XV) 22 BCE g > 1.36 _ 
8, 71* BEfistco Jl 8 5 
10V. 8b BEA Shot J7a BJ 
6b 3 b BECGp 
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39 28 BOC 60S 1.17# 3J5 
18, 15 BP Pro Z Odell S 
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13 6?* BT OR 

26, 24b BTPCpfA 203 7 A 
11, 6 Bcamoa JO £1 
21, lift BahrF 
49, 37, fiak/Hu 
31, 71, Balder 
36V< 23ft Bal 
25 lift Baiard 
28ft 24>. BaflGE 


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28,21 BeoSonti nl J7 o 7J 
7b 4, BcDMfireeJMo 1.1 
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402 26, 25b 26, +u 

481 139, 13% 13, +W 

751 47k, 66% 67b +116 

645*41 59% 61% +9, 

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6S7 42, 42% 42, +Y* 

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— — 202 7% 7 7% _ 

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34+ 24) Qiart»«le.l6 s 13 369 34 33k* 34 +» 

1269aUb OwM £48 2J 13236441UblU 114% -3, 

aftNJi QoePCpf ZJJ3 7J _ 303 76 25, 23%+% 

31, 22, ChoteouC 172 58 31 103 29U 29, 29k, -% 

2, b Chous _ _ 2516 11* 1 1 -to 

26ft (to OMKXpnl Jl .1 19 846 16% 15b 15b -to 

, 30 : OMSU £M 65 Z3 405 39, 38ft 38% •% 

31 owned £1» 5J 14 296 41, 409, 40, -% 
38b ?0b OwjHn .40 IS 2 378 26, MU 26U -M 

36ft 27V. Chsph X 2-5 41 248 X, 32% 32, ♦» 

^ 6% ChesEng id .7 leioaw 11% HHe ion +, 
Chfwn 2J2 £8 1? 7950 84, 82, B3U +V6 

J 414 Ode By _ _ 109 7% 7, 7b -M 

23,16b ChJcB&J n J4 IS _ 33* 169* I6U 16, -% 


27b 19b ChBeFd 1.12* SJ 
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K 361 S3, 51 U 53% + Ikkf 

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1.16 1 J 15 3150 66fe 65% 65, -b 
-48 1 6 23 163 29b 29U 29b +U 


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*;» 22 CIBER , _ 56 439 44, 43% 434*+4* 

43ft 35b Olcaro £46 tB 19 SO 42ft 42% ATM -U 
33, 23k, GnnBeti j 40 1^ 19 XZ7 27ft 26ft 27 +% 

»U 17, GnMD +48 IJ is 820 28fe Mb »%+% 
2% 1U CkieOd _ _ 1719 1, 1% 1% _ 

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37, 71 Chan _ 20 4333 23, 22% XU -fe 

145% 97, atlcxp 2.10 IJ lBZ96lBinbl25H 125b -2ft 
28 2S%aicp Al £12 78 - 95 27% 27 27%+% 

12, 7, an Lift .79 „ _ jtw> iop* iou 10% _ 
Xb 18ft GWC -44 IJ 19 343 30% 30ft SOU _ 
24 11, CttroiSlr .12 S 33 3503 23% 23% 239, +fe 

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82 20, aifbDfS _X 2778 80 77U 779W+19* 

75% 48, OoRBS 1J8 IJ 28 2290 mt 70% 70, -to 

35% 24b ConcftUS _ - 24 212 W% 299. 29%+% 

30, 15, Caacnman JO 1 0 M SJ 20U 20ft 20fe +fe 

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65% 43b Coaslal 40 3 17 1123 599* 584*58% Afc 
26b 25, CoaSflpf £13 SJ - 270 36 2Sb 25, +fe 

5 b CsdPhn - - 485 1ft lb IS* A* 

75, 46b Cocoa S6 IJ 3430768 57% Sto 55ft -1ft 

31, 14b CaeoCE i .10 J 57 1305 29% XU 289*+% 

59*> 24b CCFeima J7e 6 45 1952 48, 45ft 45, -Tfe 

18, 9k* Caevr _ _ 2958 10% 9b IOU +fe 

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45, 28 Gognfenl .12 J V 2083 AZto 41b 41%+, 

48ft 73U Cole Natl _ .. 1701 36fe 34ft X -1, 


38, 17U DaBreGs .16 
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38 17, DonutdOk _ 

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MU in: DnfoBW like 144 _ X 21% 21% 21b ♦, 

55, 29ft Draddsn -36 3 26 508 51 ft 49, 51 +1% 

78% 32, DonU JO J 12 478 73, 72, 72% -b 

„ - - 1089 14b 13ft 13% -fe 

JO £4 21 1801 34, X, 33%*% 

361 1.1 19 1664 68% 66, 66% -1 

32 1-6 T9 90 20, 30 20 -% 

348 18 II 6628 71ft 70% 90% +b 

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361 IJ 25 4588 43, 42U 42U -l* 

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l|b Ducorara _ 18 298 32% Jl, X 
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lift 15 DufPTF M 40 _ 101 16, 16% 16b _ 

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51% 41, DrtkeEn gy £20 46 18 8668 4BU 47% 48, +14 

2S 17b MortMi 1 JBf 5J 24 8TO 23 XU 22% _ 

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26h Mfe DooCraP/ZW 82 _ 83 25b 25% 25b +%. 

21 1359 21 b 20b 21, +fe 
12 595 12% Ub 11, -fe 

20 ™as% 34% 35, +, 

10 993 14 13b 13, -b 

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56 £8 32 1808 20% 19% 19b +U 
- X 9S4* 55, 53b 54% -lfe 


17ft 8b DKWn 
41, 29b Donfiey 
73, 47, Dover 
23, 16b OoverO 
95%75U DovrCh 
51%32, Dowjrts 
14, 8ft Drava 
46, 27ft Drnssr 
10ft 9ft DrySW 
109, 9U DreSM 
40% 79ft 


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lfl* 5b Dyanbg J4 J 
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in 12ft DvnraCiljaf 9 9 
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9, 3% ECCtart 
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220,16, Eostanrs U6I 63 11 

65, 50ft ESchm 1J6 3J 14 2471 59 
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J5* 4«* Grace -58 J 30 788 70% 69b 69V* -fe 
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lift 6ft GihrnFt _ _ 

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26% 23b EqlRD/G 1 Jl 73 - 

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7ft 4ft HedaM 
20_ 12, HdiliO 


64fe36b Eul 

28ft 14b EridaQr J8 

71 U uw ErtSlayA - _ _ 

07ft 44, Exxon ) 144 2J 1826367 6TU rail « SJ* f 
” 2010 30k, 30* 


32 

8b 5, FAC ROy 
40, 32 FBLFn 
91% 59b FMC 


M l5 14 MaS +* 

, i 3f SS SS*? w* ??u -in 


53b 42, FPL GO 1.92 34 TS 46S? Sfe ra , S w 

S3h“ii fc * fScb - if im to? ISm m** 

21b 13U FahnVta J4 i3 in ™ % 


21b lift FahnVh 
47%29, Fotalsc 
78k,llb FrtirCp 
46, 13, FaliCms 
42%15h FaknDrs 


-24 IJ 

•04 .1 


,2| IJ** 18% 189. _ 

183 flk* 42fe 42, 

?S “2 S* 24% +b 
TX flft 43% flfe _ 


i-owior* _ _ S07& x ■rric Zilr ,r 
16 I2U fttanPd .14 .9 17 m IS, 


495,35ft Hotas 1 J6f £6 49 3306 48b 47% 47U .ft 
9Tb 41b HrtmP JS2 A 33 1121 83ft 81, 81%+fe 

54b 37ft HdCBb 1JM £2 U 3863 46, 45ft 46, tfe 

2fl* 19, VMtPpneZOO &2 - 313 23%2fl) t, 

59%flb Hereby J» 14 28 1022 55% £«fe 54% 

TO* 27b HeftZR JO 4 _ 712 35, 34, Sb +J 
72%flb HwnMiPk 56 .9 21219Z7 62b 60% ^ -lfe 
XU 15, Hncrt _ _ 180 28, 28ft 28U 

19% Ub HBbm J4f £1 18 2798 1 7, 17 1 7V. A. 

flk Sft HU rico * 94 _ 378 6U eb 6ft 

6, 6b Hlnefl 43a 93 _ 417 6% 6b A, 

KopnS 9J I 927 12% 12% 17% " 

A.% SSL ^ 

M Kft (MnntP £04 6.1 Jl 

48, 33ft MmU 46 14 X 

7b 2, HBsSIn: _ - 

P%24 HI Hon J2 1 J X 12160 32b X 3111 .ft 

32ft 23 /ffltonp/PlQO BJ _ Mil 30 29M 29ft +fe 

117, 73 HdOChi 33a 13 18 60 72% d Jib 71%-lfe 
4S , %3WaHaechs!n.82i £0 17 1669 4F% 40b 40%+fe 
14, 8b Hoffingtr AO 34 13 902 13, 13% 13ft +% 

13 9b Haling p/PJS 7J - 77 12ft 12b 12ft +u 

58%Xb HraeOepsJO A 371S5Z7 56% 55% 55ft -lb 
28V. jo, HrwPrp 140/ 6.7 34 *371 27% 26b 27%+% 
ub 5b Homman - - 6065 8, »■ 8% Av 
27b 13b Home5den _ 17 1481 »27fe 27 27% +fe 

lfl* 11b rt«*e JO IJ - 6492 11% 11, 11, .. 

75, 50b Honda J9a J X 137 64% 63% 63% -fe 
80ft 63, Honrwd 1.12/ 14 M 3228 70, 69% 69% 

26, 15k* HK trt .99# 5A 16 3851 189. 18U 18, +b 

59% 36ft HarMn 44 .9 19 439 57, 56ft 57% +Vt 

20b 10 HartmGp lAOlOJ - 725 13b 12ft 12% -fe 
37ft Xb Henta 62 £0 25 2311 30ft 29% 30, +Tb 

3 ife Horaa. - - mo ib 1% ib ~ 

38% 26k* HmpFT 2AM 63 16 299 36, 35b 36b +% 


9£ 26b 25, 26, +% 
» 33% X 339* +fe 
209 44, 44% 44b +, 
556 3% 3ft 3% + , 



589 17b 16b 17 +fe 
263 3 3% 3 +fe 

254 13k a 12%13fe+kh 
124 25b 2Sb X, -% 
475 Zflft 35 25 li 

- 864 36b 36k* 361) 

19 9229 13U 131) 13»1 +'i 
_ 443 SWi 571, 57-Va + k, 
1? 220 451. 44'.) *5 -V* 

Id 741 34, 341* 341) .1. 
M 2544 I2ka 111, ll'Va .fe 
IS 142 348, 34 34 

- 86 33b 331* 331* .’h 

3*6 5'* 5 5 -V. 

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Ml 5, Moran/ 1 
18% 13 M5Mrtra l.toe «.7 . 

131* 7, M5 Alio Jie 3.4 

56, XU MSDVTO* Jd 1.1 . 

19b M Wort Em J0» 58 1003 14+, I3to 
ISb lift VISE »0 ljb 92 . ■+*- 

To - * TO* MSFn90D £25 8J . 

17, 12, 4UGI0H Ulo 94 .. 

15% 1 3U MrgSKY 1J3 B7 . 

14% 7% MS HidBa - 
41 ft I7>: MS RUM 146 6 
IX'feas’i Morgan £52 £1 
19ft 12k* MomaHR X 4B 
14, 8, ManKmid 
UV 3b NarKa «fl 
Sb 31, MannRst Jfj 
35%77ft MorMntn AB 
25', 14 MormRrt 
16ft 5ft Motiime 
28 'l 6ft MatavoPar 
90U 48)1 MOKPOM 48 8 

501* 36 MurtMtfnd 
14b 12b MiMart Js 6j 
m* MimAM 
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- 17 1156 15% 14% 14% -la 

- X 2613 3Sfe XU 34V* -b 
-7 17 1915 68 66ft 67%+% 


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1J0 £7 , 

47, Keyajra 1.68 £7 17 2783 62% 61% 61% 

34U 26b KeySpon 1A6 at m 51931b 31 in, +•> 

28, 22 KJknyRn 1JH 6.0 72S 26ft 25ft 2S% -, 

56, 43V. KknKKl .96 1.9 21 9040 Sift 50ft, Sit -ft 

36k, 28k* Wroco 1.H SJ 20 390 33 32 - , 32^«tfe 

7Vi 2b Wnwdn _ _ 126 6k, 4 6!i +fe 

£IU 12b KMMEslOQ 5J 31 336 3Sft 34H 34*. Att 

501,34 Kingvvd 2J0o 4.1 13 X18 49% 49 49 +<v. 

21b 16, Ktatty .. 18 593 19% 18% 18% J* 

9b BV. KBAust .78o 9J ,. 307 8b 8b Bto 
57b 35ft KntgMR JO 14 14 2223 50% 49k. 49*. Aa 
- - 769 29*» 28k* 28b +b 

8 

10 


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63 AJ 
S7 64 
54 64 
.63 63 
546 6J 

£63 
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.. .. . J« .98 64 

15U IS NhHMMY n 10p . 
149.12ft Munltf2 89 64 
M 12b MmtilFd JO 6J 
15b 13ft MuCA7 190 S.9 
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15% 13b Menm 90a 6l 
16b M*l MunNY .95 a 60 
15b 12k» MuNY? 86 60 
14, llto MiatOly M 6J 
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15 MufHHkt .20 .7 

M r 

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17% 7, NLlnd 
41to 3 NS Grp 
24<felBft NUI 98T 4.1 
26% 24b NVPCapf £05 BJ 
29*1.17, NYMAGC 40 1 J 


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15 724611)'-* U4k.II47n -Vl 
1? 117 17- P IT 

20 736 10, ion into 

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X 246 dfe »v« 61 

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14 96 4 71. 47. » A’l* 

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. US 9% 9ft, 9b .16 

.. 262 8% Sb 8b .. 

.. IU B> ■ Bto O'* 

HO VI, 9-fe 9'i.+ <* 
.. IK 9V. 9fe 9 - . 

.„ JOI m. 91* 9-, .9, 

258 131. n 15 /i 

~ 432 9ft 9»* 

. 41’ 1I*.« Ufe ll-a ’( 
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. in is*, is), is - . 

- 230 Mi. 13, 14 .1* 

87 13). 13— 13b • > 

. Ill 15*. 15 II** »b 

177 li'.i M Ib 


78 8 
100 25 


08 5 

2.1 


34% 17b Knal n 
74U 36ft Kahn 
20, IIK* Kafenar 

MU 16b Koor 

X, 7% KnreoElc jQe £6 
7ft 3% KoteaEqf 
17, 7% Korea 
9 4ft Kareolm 
20, 14U Krone 1.9210A 
34%21U Krogars 
38, 17 Kuhfai 
171 107 Kyocer 1.02 b 
2ft 9a LA Gear 
as, is. La ran 

2Sb 21U LG6E 1.191 5J 
5, 4ft LLERy .66aT12 
27, 23'VuLNRPrn .05 J 
46A 18, LSI Log 


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540 in* 171: 17% +Va 
178 20% 20\: Wfe-k, 

- 9254 8li 8 8*a n. 

.. 1939 3% 3, »• _ 

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_ 426 4% 4% 41, _ 

2S 149 TBTi 18V: 18V: 

. - 33 7108 (Mb 34ft 346a tbl 
AO IJ 32 406 35U 33>VaTOt+l% 
■9 _ 76112 109ft III -l* 

- - IBIS % % ** _ 

V 7237 27% 261* 27fe +% 
14 a«7 21’* 219a X% +ft 
10 188 5b 5 5 -fe 

- 2S» 23V. 22, 27b A* 
2011509 234, 22>i 22ft, -b 


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42% 34V) Natan 
16.) 9 1 : Nashua 
81 ft S3 Li NIAinl lJ4o 4 7 

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... 131 lfl* Mb 14’. .li 

. 222 U-w 14M u:, 

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_ 1139 71. Jto 7, -. 

26 717 TOa 28% 59% «, 
X 6888 54'.: Xl.n'a.k. 

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18S JSU TO* U - !. 

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3* U? 18 ■ 18ft. 19b ' 

15 1927 44 431.44 

- 312 lob 14'. 16-a • • 

30 20X 22 - 75V. £81, 

14 197 14, Jlto 

. 298 75 1 + TO* JS'? 

11 148 7«b TO, 


JO 1.6 X 3174 43b 


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149* ID LTV .12 1 J 38 1505 UVi 12 12fe _ 


24, 16 UQiiliW] .07 
40 29, LoZBoy J4 £1 

TO, 24 LaSane p/£i9 BJ 
32, 16ft LabChde 58* £7 
4 2U LnbCp 
36% 20ft LodGai 1 JO 5.4 
34k. 18, Lafarge A8f Ia 
5% 1, LnidlawE 
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flj* 32ft LaktfidP 112 7J 14 
.8k* 6 LaaiSes _ 37 

35ft 21ft UrntfsE _ TB 

38b 27W LaSalMP n _ _ 
14, 9ft Lasmo IJSe 9A 
37^ 25, Lasmapt £50 94 
IS** 32S. iJiiAgr 1J0BUA 
19 12%LalAEqt -lie IJ 
IX* 9, LdGnAGr .156 1 J 
»b lift LatAOb 2J0»13J 
21 14 LalAbiv J4e IA 

Mb 10, Looter 

X%16ft UiyrUB 


511,31ft LearCarp 
20b 5b LaamCo 


19 4435 19ft 18V. IBfta _ 
16 194 39% 39% J»%+fe 

- 161 25U Ufe 25, V. 

- 1069 21% 21, 21, -, 

.. 960 2, 216 2% _ 

13 JS 2414 24V, +U 

‘3 m 30f* 30% 33H: ♦% 
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859 43, 42, 43 -ft 
197 6% 6k* 6, A, 
236 M X, TO* A* 
344 37% 7714 371* -fe 
161 U 139* 13% -fe 
4837 26U 26, 26, _ 

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« ,?% 9% 9% -fe 
732 1 5% 15 ISfe 
„ 515 15% 14ft 14% A. 

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JO J 8 160 30V. 29% 29% -% 


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1.70 3J 1? 31 .T ill', 60», -0*. 

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fll: HWHL 2 ,6 71 13 171 TO. 38% 33b 

111: 4to N Media __ _ 877 cfe c M t; „ 

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M* « '* '28 47- 41’* 41'. 

,SJ* t'SE™ , - 19 643 9% 9l* V. 

22 ,18b NatProp 210 97 . Ml 21‘) 71+- ’! • -- 

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43 * 20b NiSoail 481794S 3Sfe X*'+ 

^ HSS3 1-20 17 19 ,0SJ u '* -L, ' s ' «ft ♦% 

211: 7b Mad SB _ 5 1136 It 1 * IS’* lSt.-'-h 

2Wl 23V NRWSA 1.97 7./ 155 

Wto {jn*a PJB £19 85 .. 100 25ft 75, TSto • 
8.4 7ft Natm,«03 S6 65 .. 293 B«. B‘: 8 *a*'« 

■J? . 1 NotnGrtW J9 6 8 „ 294 8°.. 8, B"-.- - . 

g:'-^ 5 1415786 il". JW- 59’, .1*1 

33 a 23, Nn/NFSn J.e .7 .. 815 X 37to Kft +, 

156 6.9 16 1092 23, 2Ji+ Mft +A 

- X 1867 7?‘ Xt 2I». to 

„ - 26 1309 J3% X X’a+fe 

.16 IA 18 737 12 11, lift 

14 620 16% totals" a -% 
14 562 21, 21 fe 21% 4H» 
- 1715 S, 5b r» 


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36ft X, NetanM 
15ft 8b NfdUiT 
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36, rn» Lauctut J5 .7 29 532 3S(* 34, 34»» ,1k 

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3? 14, 99CreiM 
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J - 172 JO'-a 39 39b -Ife 

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■? 6655 kOt 86t« 87 


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332 18b 18 18b * 

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Continued on Page is 




* £> Ia 




R 


XmlfcSSnlranc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary ■ 

Don’t Confu se (Germany 
Mud France With Europe 

ft s the Smaller States Leading the Recovery 


By Reginald Dale 

fniermirianal Herald Tribune 



'ASHENGTON — For 
many Americans, it has 
long been an obvious fact 
i * °f international life that 

E Asia is the world's most dynamic re- 
gion, while sclerotic old Europe is deep 
in hopeless and possibly terminal de- 
cline. 

■ . Suddenly, Asia is looking much less 
dynamic and Europe less of a mess. Bat 
while most Americans can clearly see 
the spreading economic and financial 
crisis in Asia, their eyes are much less 
well attuned to the encoura gin g signs 
from Europe. 

■ The current American blind spot on 
Europe has two main causes. The first is 
excessive and often ill-informed pes- 
simism about the European Union’s 
plans for a single currency — some of 
which stems from wishful thinking. 

But equally important has been the 
tendency of many Americans, and of 
plenty of others, to form their impres- 
sion of Europe by looking only at 
France and Germany. It is only too easy 
to depict those two countries, with their 
rigid labor markets and overblown wel- 
fare states, as symbols of aU that is 
wrong with the whole Continent. 

.But while it is true thar France and. 
Germany are the Continent's dominant 
economies and the arbiters of future 
European integration, they also happen 
to be in far worse shape than virtually all 
of their West European partners, 


A 


S economic recovery finally 
gets under way, it is die smal- 
ler states like Ireland, Den- 
.mark, the Netherlands, Nor- 
way, Spain and Portugal that are leading 
the pack, while France and Germany lag 
behind. 

' Europe’s two other major economies, 
Britain and Italy, are both exceptions. 
Italy is split in two. with the North 
booming and South still deeply trou- 
bled; Britain is far ahead of the rest both 
in the tuning of its recovery and in die 
breadth and success of its economic 
reforms. 

But the free-market policies intro- 
duced to Britain under Margaret 
Thatcher jn.jhs 1980s have not been 
widely accepted as a model for change 


on the Continent Today it is the smaller 
continental countries, such as the Neth- 
erlands. Sweden and Denmark, that are 
pioneering the kind of reforms that 
France arid Germany might one day be 
inclined to accept. 

Those three small countries have 
pruned their welfare states, opened their 
labor markets, reduced unemployment, 
held back wages and bolstered inter- 
national competitiveness — all without 
abandoning their cherished social con- 
sensus. 

To the south, Spain and Portugal have 
shown a different kind of success in 
moving from backward to modem in- 
dustrial economies. Although Spain still 
suffers from huge unemployment, it has 
made big strides in labor market and 
social reform. 

T hroughout the continent, 
in anticipation of economic and 
monetary union, European 
business is plunging into a new 
wave of rationalization that may dwarf 
any that has gone before. European 
companies, which do much less busi- 
ness than American corporations in 
Asia, look far less vulnerable to the 
turmoil there. 

Europe today could be in a similar 
position to the United States in the late 
1980s, when pessimists were warning 
of American decline, while the drastic 
reorganization of American business, 
and the transformation of the U.S. econ- 
omy, were already under way. 

And the advent of the single cur- 
rency is more likely to force gov- 
ernments to make their economies 
more competitive, as Europeans pre- 
dict, than to delay needed changes, as 
Americans fear. 

It is too early to conclude that 
Europe’s troubles are over. There is a 
big risk that economic recovery will 
reduce the pressure for further reform of 
blocked labor markets and burdensome 
social welfare systems, especially in 
France and Germany. 

Fortunately-, however, France and 
Germany are not representative of most 
of today’s Europe. They are the two big 
black spots on a brightening landscape. 
The Continent's two traditional leaders 
must now. muster the willpower to fol- 
low the example of their smaller neigh- 
bors. 


Jakarta Spurns Suharto’s Son Over Banks 


By Seth Mydans 

New York. Tunes Service 


JAKARTA — The government sent 
a strong signal Monday that it was 
serious about making the painful eco- 
nomic reforms that economists say 
could begin to brake the spreading 
downturn in Asian economies. 

With the evident backing of Pres- 
ident Suharto, Finance Minister Mar’ie 
Muhammad stood up before Parlia- 
ment on Monday and turned back a 
challenge by a son of the president who 
last week angrily protested the forced 
closure at the start of this month of an 
ailing bank of which he is pan owner. 

"The government will implement the 

decision taken on Nov. 1, 1997, and will 
take all consequences thereupon," Mr. 
Mar’ie said, referring to the Hoainga of 
16 banks, including three that are partly 
owned by relatives of Mr. Suharto. Any- 
one who disagrees can make his case in 
court, Mr. Mar’ie said. 

Analysts said the rebuke to the pres- 
ident’s sod, Bambang Trihatmojo, was 
extraordinary. It indicated that Mr. 
Suharto might be prepared to trim his 
family’s wide-ranging business in- 


terests to implement needed austerity 

measures. 

But they said many battles against 
the country's vested interests soil lay 
ahead and warned of "backsliding" as 
Indonesia faced what Michel Camdes- 
sus, managing director of the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund, called ' ‘a cul- 
ture shock of die greatest violence." 

Last month, the high-riding Indone- 
sian economy fell victim to the fiscal 
crisis that has swept through Southeast 
Asia, with its currency and stock market 
plummeting and its growth prospects 
suddenly called into question. Inter- 
national agencies and various countries 
quickly came to the rescue with prom- 
ises of nearly $40 billion in assistance in 
an effort to halt the collapse that has 
spread from one nation to another since 
Thailand let its currency fall in July. 

Analysts said one of the telling chal- 
lenges for Mr. Suharto would be ac- 
cepting the need ro reduce the eco- 
nomic interests of his family and 
friends, whose huge and pervasive 
holdings are one of the key weaknesses 
in the economy. 

"On balance, things are looking 
quite positive." said Daragh Maher, an 


economist at ING Barings in Singapore. 
"The govemmeni seems very much 
committed to the reform package, and 1 
think things should move along." 

So far, there has been less movement 
in die region's other hard-hit econ- 
omies: Thailand, Malaysia and, to a 
lesser extent, the Philippines. 

Thailand was the first to call for help 
from the IMF, which provided a S17 
billion package in August. But polit- 
ical infighting has prevented Thailand 
from taking the painful steps needed to 
halt its slide — though a new gov- 
ernment that was confirmed over the 
weekend has announced its intention to 
move aggressively. 

Malaysia continues;, in the words of 
some critics, to be "in denial,” blam- 
ing external forces for the drops in its 
currency and stock market. A new 
budget announced last month envisions 
only a mild slowdown, contrary to the 
predictions of most independent econ- 
omists. Economists say all the affected 
nations must address core economic 
problems if they are to recover soon. 

Mr. Maher of ING Barings warned 
that in Indonesia, there w'ould be “some 
business as usual." Early this month. 


Mr. Suharto sent a questionable signal. 

reinstating 15 infrastructure projects out 
of more than 150 that were suspended 
six weeks earlier in an austerity move. 
Several of the 15 are owned by relatives 
and friends of Mr. Suhano. 

When Mr. Mar'ie. the finance min- 
ister. announced the closure of the 16 
banks at the stun of the month, Mr. 
Bambang Tnhatmojo protested pub- 
licly. accusing the minister of “an at- 
tempt to sully our family name and 
indirectly to disgrace my father." The 
accusation was a surprise because Mr. 
Mar'ie could not have been acting 
without Mr. Suharto's consent. 

The president's half-brother. Pro- 
bosuicdjo. who owns part of another of 
the closed banks, also protested, and 
both brought suit against the govern- 
ment. On Friday, Murdiono. a spokes- 
man for the president, indicated that Mr. 
Suhano would stand firm, defending the 
hank closures as "wholly and merely 
intended lo improve the economy.” 

"This is unprecedented." one In- 
donesian businessman said. "In the 
past, the son would have won. Here, he 
has been humiliated in puhlic. and the 
finance minister is not backing down." 


Big Business 
Finds Labour 
Easy to Like 


By Tom Bueikle 

International Herald Tribune 

BIRMINGHAM. England — Here in 
the heart of the British Midlands, home 
of the country’s engineering and auto- 
motive industries, the Labour Party has 
long been regarded as a defender of the 
working classes and an enemy of big 
business. 

But when the Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry opened its annual confer- 
ence here Monday, the biggest issue was 
whether Labour was ready to supplant 
the Conservatives as the party of busi- 
ness. 

The faetthattbe question can be raised 
at all provides striking testimony to the 
revolutionary changes Prime Minister 
Tony Blair has imposed on Labour. 

By abandoning the party's traditional 
socialist policies like nationalization. 

See LABOUR, Rage 15 


Cyber-Slugfests Netscape vs. Microsoft 


By Steve Lohr 

Nc*' York Times Service 


MOUNTAIN VIEW, California — 
ound Netscape's corporate campus 
re in Silicon Valley, the company’s 
i rival to the north is sometimes re- 
ined to as the "Chinese Army” — an 
versary with seemingly limitless 
tops. 

In terms of money and manpower, 
ad-to-head comparisons of Netscape 
mununi cat ions Corp. and Microsoft 
irp. are a misnomer. "Our nose is 
mly pressed against Microsoft’s 
in," one Netscape executive says. 
Until recently, the company that 
tied the Internet revolution appeared 
be in decline, withering under Mi- 
isoft’s assault 

Netscape's share of the mantel for 
emel browser software was falling 
d experts predicted further sharp 
;ses to Microsoft. 

Business magazines from Fortune to 
id Herring questioned Netscape’s 
ility to compete, if not survive. In 
igust, the Aberdeen Group, a research 
m. published a report with a tide that 
prured the consensus of industry opin- 
i: "Netscape's Diminishing Role as 
internet Superstar.” . 

But the company’s star has regained 
me of its luster, prompting a reas- 
ssment of the outlook for the company 
en before Washington's decision last 
>nth to enter the browser war. 

The Justice Department is seeking a 
urt order to stop Microsoft from for- 



MiLr TScilmfflrulm 

James Barksdale, chief of Netscape. 

ring computer makers that use its Win- 
dows operating system to also use its 
Internet Explorer browsing program. A 
federal court will probably not rule on 
the matter for months, yet the impact of 
the Justice move, if any, may be to slow 
Microsoft's advance in the browser 
market 

Yet even without Washington's help, 
Netscape has recently shown more stay- 
ing power than the industry skeptics 
thought possible. 

Last month, for example, it reported 
strong third-quarter financial results, 
with both revenues and profit rising 50 
percent, silencing worries that the com- 


pany’s growth might be stalling. 

"Netscape has held up remarkably 
well, better than a lot of people ex- 
pected, myself included,” says David 
Smith, an Internet software specialist at 
the Gartner Group, a research firm. 

Still, life is always risky for an upstart 
leader in a young market that the Mi- 
crosoft mothership in Redmond, Wash- 
ington, is determined to rule. 

Many other companies, to be sure, are 
up against Microsoft in segments of the 
Internet software market, including Sun 
Microsystems Inc., Oracle Corp., IBM 
Corp. and Novell Inc. They are all part- 
ners with Netscape in various ways in an 
informal * 1 any body-but-Microsoft ’ ’ 
camp. But Microsoft's other major 
competitors are older, bigger and di- 
versified, benefiting from the ballast of 
other businesses. 

As a pure Internet company. Net- 
scape does not enjoy those advantages. 
That is why the fast-growing, profitable 
three-year-old has seen its stock price 
fall by nearly 40 percent in the last 
year. 

The person principally responsible 
for charting a course that enables Net- 
scape to survive, even thrive, in the 
shadow of Microsoft is its president and 
chief executive, James Barksdale. And 
Mr. Barksdale, by all accounts, deserves 
much of the credit for Netscape's re- 
silience to date. He has brought strategic 
directum and management discipline to 
the young company, according to in- 

See NETSCAPE, Page 15 . 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Nov. id Ubld-LJbor Rates 


Nov. 10 


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353 

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SeereeReuiea . 



A KISS-OFF FOR THE WON? — A Seoul office worker ignoring a bank's enticements Monday as 
market soared but a sell-off by foreigners left the country’s currency at another record low. 


the stock 
Page 15. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 



merica 


■ *■■■■■ ..V^| ^ ^ V 


30-Year T-Bond Yietd 


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Source: Btoomberg, Renters 

intamrirmi Haekl Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Technology Issues Drag Down Wall Street 



CempiMby Our Sniff freer Agnate 

NEW YORK — Stocks were 
lower Monday as computer makers 
such as Dell Computer fell amid 
concern that their growth would 
weaken as Southeast Asia econo- 
mies slowed. 

The losses in computer shares 
offset a rally in telephone stocks 
sparked by MCI Comm uni cations ’ 
agreement to be acquired by World- 
Com Inc., possibly bringing an end 
to a three-way takeover battle. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
fell 28.73 points to 7.552J9. 

The Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index lost 6 38 points, to 92 1 . 13, and 
the Nasdaq composite index, laden 
with computer-related companies, 
dropped 11.68 points, to 1.590.72. 

“I don’t see us moving dramat- 
ically higher from this point in the 
near torn,” said James Solioway, a 
manager at Barnett Capital Advisers 
Inc. in Jacksonville, Florida. “We're 


still going to have some impact from 
what’s going on in Southeast Asia 
and Latin America." 

Traders also expect slow trading 


Hewlett-Packard also fell. 

While investors are selling stocks 
of companies seen as vulnerable to a 
slowdown in Asia, they also see a 


on Tuesday, when the bond market growing U.S. economy that bodes 
will be closed for Veterans Day and well for profits at home. 


OS. STOCKS 


money managers will be looking 
forward to the meeting of Federal 
Reserve Board policymakers Wed- 
nesday. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond rose 2/32 to 99 22/32. The 


“The view is that the economy 
and earnings are just fine, and 
there’s not much chance that in- 


expected earnings for the current 
quarter to-be below analysts’ es- 
timates because, of weak demand 
and pricing pressure on its older 
products. Toe disk-drive maker 
Western Digital made a similar 
statement last week. Read-Rite. 
Western Digital, Quantum and 
Seagate Technology declined. 


flation is going to be a problem,” . Applied Materials dropped 2 13/. 

'airman of' 16 to 32% after some of the semi- 


said Hugh Johnson, chairman 
Fust Albany Asset Management, re- 
faring to the U.S. economy. 


conductor maker’s clients cut or 
postponed capital-spending plans. 


yield was 6.15 percent, unchanged 
from Friday. 

“There is zero chance 
tral bank will increase 

costs this week, said Robot 
a manager at Society Asset Man- 
agement Inc. in Cleveland. 

In the technology sector, Dell de- 
clined 2 15/16 to 75%, and Inter- 
national Business Machines and 


Mr7 Johnson said he expected . CKS Group shares blunged after 
more fallout from the problems in the company said its fourth-quarter 
Asia; so First Albany Asset Man- . earnings would be far below fore- 
agemeni recently sold shares of casts because sales to its largest cus- 
the cen- Chase Manhattan, which has what it tomers were less than expected. 


called “meaningful exposure” to 
Southeast Asian economies, and 
bought Fleet Financial Group, 
which (foes not. Chase Manhattan 
and Fleet Financial declined. 

Disk-drive makers fell for a 
sectond day after Read-Rite said ft 


‘Medicos Systems rose-after Qua- 
draMed agreed to acquire it. 

Laser Industries sained after ESC 
Medical Systems offered to buy the 
company for stock valued at $31.50 
a share, or a total of $270 million. 
ESC fell. (Bloomberg. AP ) 


.i f 

Dollar Turns Lower Except Against the Yen 


• Apple Computer Inc. announced it would sell its products 
to consumers over the Internet. The company also said it 
would build computers to order. 

• Hilton Hote ls Corp. said it would not raise its $80-a-share 
offer for ITT Corp., setting the stage for a showdown Wed- 
nesday with a rival suitor, Starwood Lodging Trust. Star- 
wood raised its offer Friday to $85 a share in cash and stock. 

• AMR Corp.’s American Airlines unit said it had ordered 
eight Boeing Co. aircraft — four 777s and'four 767s— valued 
at about $930 million, exercising some of the options 1 it took in 
a contract with the Seattle-based plane maker last year. 

• Saputo Group Inc. said it had agreed to bay Stella Foods 
Inc. nomSpedalty Foods Corp. for $405 million to expand its 


Ccrapfet by Otr Sag Pram DTrpmdtes 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
lower against most other major cur- 
rencies Monday bat gained slightly 
against the yen in calm trading 
ahead of a federal holiday Tuesday 
for Veterans Day. 

The dollar rose Friday against the 
yen, fanning concern that Japanese 
authorities might sell dollars for yen 
if the U.S. currency kept climbing. 

“Fundamentally, the dollar 
should be strengthening against the 
yea,” said Kosuke Hanao, head of 
foreign-exchange trading at Indus- 
trial Bank of J apan , 

The dollar gained slightly to 


124.355 yen in late trading from 
1 24.305 yen Friday, but it slipped to 
1 .7048 Deutsche marks from 1.7075 
DM 

The dollar was also at 13878 
Swiss francs, down from 13912 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

francs, and at 5.7091 French francs, 
down from 5.7150 francs. 

The pound was at $1.6975, up 
from $1.6892. 

Last week, Eisuke Sakakibara. 
Japan’s deputy finance minister for 
international affairs, said the coun- 
try’s foreign-exchange policy was 


unchanged. Traders cook the remark, 
as a reference to earlier suggestions 
that the dollar’s two-year climb 
against the yen from a postwar low 
in the spring of 1995 was over. 

The yen’s weakness has helped 
Japan’s economy by lowering the 
cost of exports. Still, it can exacer- 
bate unde tension between the two 
countries. 

The dollar could soon resume its 
climb as the yen is dragged down by 
declining Japanese stocks, concern 
over the country's debt-saddled 
banking system and currency tur- 
moil in Southeast Asia. 

“The yen’s going to continue to 


suffer,” said Rick Porter, manager 
of foreign exchange at Krediet- 
bank. 

In other trading, the pound rose 
after the chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, Gordon Brown, suggested 
that he was not concerned by the 
pound's strength.. 

Capping the pound’s rise is not 
sufficient reason for Britain to join 
Europe’s planned monetary union, 
Mr. Brown said. 

Many analysts say sterling would 
weaken if Britain were to join mon- 
etary union and its single currency, 
or euro. (AFP, Bloomberg) 


Browning-Ferris 
To Sell Overseas 
Units to Suez 


BhmmFnjrBews 

HOUSTON — Browning* 
Ferris Industries Inc. agreed 
Monday to sell its overseas op- 
erations to a unit of Suez Ly- 
onnaisc des Eaux SA for $145 
billion, dropping its oncc-ag- 
rcssive international plans to 
focus on North America. - 
' The Houston-based waste- 
collection company said it 
would receives I billion in cash 
and .a 20 percent slake in Sita. 
the Suez unit, which will be- 
come the world's third- largest 
trash hauler. Sita is 64 percent 
owned by Paris-based Lyon- 
naisc des Eaux. 

The sate represents a signif- 
icant retreat by Browning-Fer- 
ris, the second* largest US. 
trash hauler after Waste Man- 
agement Inc., which only three 
years ago won a battle to ac- 
quire Attwoods PLC of Britain 
for $610 million. 

“They have not been able to 



seas, 

analyst with Donaldson Lufkin 
& Jenrettc. "They paid top dol- 
lar to enter certain markets 
which- historically arc very 
competitive.” ■ 

Browning-Ferris said it 
would use the cash to buy back 
shares and reduce debt. The 
company announced plans to 
buy back 51 billion of its stock 
in September and acquired $585 
million of the stock Oct. t . • 


share of the North American market for mozzarella cheese. 

• Brazil unveiled a “rigorous" $18 billion budget-cutting Softbank to Realign U.S. Units 

plan designed to assure world markets that Latin America’s J ^ 

largest nation would be fit to defend its currency. 

• Prudential Securities Inc.’s chief investment strategist, 

Greg Smith, advised clients to reduce their stock holdings for 
the second time in two weeks. AP. Bloomberg, Reuters 


Weekend Box Office 


Corrpttai by Oar Staff From Dirpatcha 

TOKYO — Softbank Corp. announced Monday a re- 
alignment of its U3. computer exhibition units and other 
measures to simplify its management structure. 

Three wholly owned U.S. affiliates — Ziff-Davis Inc. 
Softbank Comdex Inc. and Softbank Forums Inc. — would be 
merged in 1998 and 1999 to manage them more effectively, 
the company said. 

“The merger would make it possible to offer compre- 


Tke Associated Press 

M i^ AN?E ^^‘‘ S ‘ a ^L Tr00 ^’ d T nated hensive services to clients whUe strengthening the company’: 

North American box office over the weekend, with a gross of 5usiness ^ ^ United Stated «■** -«^3L 

$22 million. Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on founder of the company. 

QoluirlivV enW on/l pctfmutarl mIao fnr Qimr4<t«r 1 at. n v _ A <i 


said Masayoshi Son, 





jr. * 
l—l 6. 

1-Sknjhip Troopers 

aibtart - - r,-Tj 

522 ndOon 

2. Bean 

(PolfGmm) 

'S13mflSan 

3J KhwMMMuOUtflfSUnrer 

(Columbia) 

5*6 mffion 

*DwiTc Advocate 

(Warner BmsJ 

SSJSmfilaa 

SRedCoriv 

MeMkUmMtM 

SSmOon 

6AAadQly 

(Warner BrosJ 

S47mBkn 

7Aoagfe Nights 

(New Line Gnema} 

S*1 mfefon 

8. Eve's Bayou 

(Trimark} 

QJnttn 

9. Kbs the Girls 

(ParamunO 

S2JmHon 

lOSemi Years in Tibet 

fTrfetad 

xzjmHoa 


Mr. Son also said that Softbank produced “sufficient 
profits in the quarter ending in September, despite weakness in 
the personal computer market. 

Concern about Softbank’s ability to service its debt load and 
manage its global empire has fueled a sharp decline in 
Softbank's share price over the past 19 months. Softbank 
share price fell 390 yen to a record low of 2,930 yen ($3. 14) on 
Monday in Tokyo. (Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


n;r *>i ,<-n- 




n .;C!TreR]XATIdNAL F 



s 


“ ? 


Nov. 10, 1997 

High Low Latest ctige optnf 

Grains 

CORMCCBOT) 

iOOO bu ntataium- cents par bushel 
Dec 97 285ft 275 275* -814 171J91 

MOT9B 295 28S 2B» -8 107,022 

MOV9B 3001* 291 292 -7U 31,429 

-Id 98 304l« 295 *i 2954 -7 41305 

Sep 96 2919? 209 209V -5 

Dec 98 293 2B8U 3 W* -57* 21511 

Jd 99 301 298% XI -3 255 

Est. soles TOJXX) Fits rates 52. 756 
Frts open Id 387.447. Off IMS 

SOYBEAN MEAL CCBOT) 

100 tons- dotan per ton 

Dec 97 24SJ0 23100 2354)0 -10L00 41810 
Jon 98 23720 227 JQ 228.80 480 2*018 
Nto98 234 40 223-00 224.® -8.10 21.255 

Mot 98 moo 219.70 221 JO -7JO 17,922 
Jd 98 2274)0 230410 221 JO -fUW 124*7 

Aug 98 227-50 2204)0 Z2OJ0 ■/■JD IMS 
Ed. srtex 3*000 FITS sates 27427 
Rft Open W 129,811 up 1890 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

64UIOO Bn- cents nor Bi 

Dec 97 26.14 25.46 2&A3 -0.15 47,952 

J«j 98 26.02 2564 2583 -0.14 3M26 

Altai 90 26-23 25.90 964M -0.14 17.369 

AAoyffl 2632 26410 26.19 -0.16 9,657 

Jut 98 2438 26.T0 2*30 -0.13 &491 

Aug 98 2*10 2*10 2*10 4L15 920 

Est soles 204)00 Frit sales 1*451 
Fit* open Ml 1*226. up L748 

SOYBEANS tCBtm 

4000 bo mtaknurn- cents par bushel 

Nov 97 744(6 719 721V -1716 10402 

JaiH 74114 7181* 72114 -18 72AS9 

Mor 98 74316 721 W 724 -19ft 2*758 

MOT « 741 726 727M -17ft 1*543 

Jd 98 753 729 731b -1716 17,505 

Est. rates 77J)OOFfftula 60457 

Frii open tat 152J09, up 3.1 17 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

54W0 bu mWmuin- cents per bushel 
Doc 97 — — — 

Mar 98 


Wgli Low Latest Cbge OpM 

ORANCE JUKE (ItCTH) 

14000 Kn.- cents parte. 

Jon 98 782)0 7530 77.90 +175 201069 

Mar 98 81.00 78 JO 80.90 -<-230 11,946 

MOY98 84.00 8140 8*00 +*50 i!33 

Jul 98 874)0 8S4» 87-00 +44)0 1,226 

Est sates NJL Frt»sdas0515 
F^ra opwo Jrw 

Metals 

6DUDOKM3Q 
100 boy oz.- dotes per troy oz. 


Nor 97 310 JU 

Dec 97 31100 30960 311.10 
Jen 98 31120 

Feb 98 31330 31100 31140 
Apr 98 31530 3144)0 31430 
Jim 98 31730 316-40 31*40 
Aug 98 318.50 

Oct 98 321-00 32040 32060 
Dec 98 32150 322-3) 32170 
EsL sdra 30000 Fits soles 4*351 
Firs open Id 1B&457. off 33341 

HI GRADE COPPER CNCMX) 
2*000 Us.- cents per lb. 

NO» 97 91 JO 9035 

Dec 97 9100 8930 

Jai9B 9130 8930 

Feb 98 9130 90.00 

Mir 98 9110 8940 

fi£y« 9130 9015 

Jan 98 9140 90.90 

Jut 98 9130 9030 

Est. rates NJL Frfs solas *694 
Firs Open Id 61951 afl 1358 

SILVER (NCMX) 


-0.10 1 

■0.10 111.143 
-0.10 2 

-030 3*024 
-030 7,444 

-030 11309 
-030 4306 

-030 L496 

-030 11348 


9030 +1-50 
9035. +135 
90.90 +135 
90.90 +130 
90.90 +135 
9090 +140 
91410 +135 
9090 +135 
9090 +135 


34)19 

30839 

1329 

1383 

10.100 

1380 

1560 

1332 

2341 


19 


High Low Latest atge Optat 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJPPE) 

m. 200 noon - pu at 100 ad 

Dec 97 11131 11130 11137 -0.13 112342 
Mw98 11130 11145 11145 -0.10 1879 
Jun9B N.T. N.T. 11145 -0.10 11*321 
Est sales: 17,236. Piwu. sales: 4&036 
Prw. open tat: 11*321 off 1,902 

ubori-mohuucmer) • 

S3 ndUan- pH of 100 pd 

Ho»97 9*33 9*31 9431 -04*1 SUM 

Dee 97 9*15 9*13 9*14 -04)3 17,708 

Jan 98 9428 9*27 9*28 -Q4H 4325 

Est rates 1306 Fits sales *469 

FITS open tat 57472* up 141 


EURODOLLARS ICMER} 
SlmtHofHrtsonOOpct 
No* 97 9*19 9*18 9*19 

OiC 97 9*19 9*16 9*18 
Mar 98 9*14 9*13 9*14 

Jun9B 9*09 944)7 9*08 
Sep 98 944)3 9*01 9*02 

Dec 98 93.93 9190 93.93 

Mol 99 93.92 9339 9192 

Jon 99 9388 9385 9388 

Sep 99 9284 9381 9384 

Est sales 182,162 Frfs soles 712415 
HTs open tnt 282042* up 21492 

BRITISH POUND CCMER) 


sir 


357 

347 

350 

■8 

4*715 

3731* 

361 

345ft 

-flft 

2*741 

380 

370 

372ft 

-»ft 

4350 

384ft 

175 

377 

-7ft 

14404 


EsL sales 2Z2XB Fits sates 1*702 
FiTsapantal 10*709. off 2 


Livestock 

CATTLE {CM EM 
404)00 lbs.- Oenls Mr lb. 

Dee 97 67.15 6640 6*67 4120 3*264 

Feb 98 6930 6885 69.10 -0.13 30309 

Apr 98 7280 7237 7247 -0.10 1*740 

Jul 98 7045 7035 70J7 +0.12 11.193 

Aug 98 HUD 7045 19-50 +04*5 1883 

Od 98 72-55 7285 72.15 +0415 1,197 

Est. sdes 1*915 Fits sates 1*636 
Fits open UP 97487. off 222 

FEEDER CATTLE CCMER) 

50000 BS.- cards parte. 

No* 97 78.15 7780 7085 +020 *637 

J» 98 8020 7940 8007 +4)47 7J20 

Mar 96 804)0 7940 7982 +042 2853 

Apr 91 79.95 7940 7925 +085 1J13 

May 98 8040 79.9® 00.40 +045 934 

Aug 98 82-05 81-70 824)0 +022 381 

Est. sales 3090 Frfs sales 1908 
Fits span Id 1*231 offlM 

HOCS-Una CCMER) 

40000 tes^ cants per ta. 

Dec 97 6180 6045 

Feb 98 02.10 4145 

Apr 98 58.72 5840 

Jon 98 6545 6545 

JUI98 6*30 6*05 

EsL seSas *000 Fits rates 7.730 
Frfl open M 39.998 up 208 

PORK BELLIES KMER) 

AIDQ tab- certs per b, 

Feb 98 61.95 6080 61415 -0.10 *976 

Mar 98 61.17 6080 6032 -4UJ2 9W 

May 98 6180 6QJ0 6892 +805 297 

Est sales 2201 Frts soles 1498 
Fits open bit 733* up 29 


Nor 97 4B4.90 +140 

Doc 97 48890 48280 40630 +130 5L773 

Jdi 98 48810 +L30 27 

Mar 98 49*00 49080 49180 +L20 27315 

May9B 49480 +0-9C 2.7SS 

Jd9B 497.10 +OJO 3.793 

Sep 98 49980 +080 642 

Dec 90 5054)0 S03J0 50330 +020 8699 

Est. sales MOO HTs sales 18322 
Fite open Id 90393. alf *333 

PLATINUM (NMEQ 
60 bay <Bj- dohns per tray a* 

Jan 98 39280 386.10 38740 -140 10561 

Apr 98 389.00 3824)0 38280 -140 MIS 

Jd 93 38*00 379.90 37980 -140 36 

Eat sales NA. Fits sales 3896 
Fite open H 1*062, o« 409 

dose ftwtous 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

DoNats pernwMc Ian 
SUiwIsee (WdiDrKH 
Spat T596JU 15974)0 157316 1594W 

F u w ill it 16294)0 16264X) 1621.00 16224)0 
rCattnaes Uflgb dale) 

197816 197916 1953.00 195*00 

199*00 19954)0 177000 17714)0 


592M 


5814)0 

S9300 


57180 

582.00 


5724)0 

58300 


Spot 61954)0 670*00 618*00 61954)0 

Fdvani 638080 <23580 62704)0 6004X1 

Tin 

Spat 565300 565580 568980 5595-00 

Farwanl 56304)0 564080 56A00 56S04U 

zinc (spKUHtab crane) 

Spot 116BM 1169ft 117480 117*00 

Forward 11921+ 119100 11764)0 119780 

High Low Oose Ope Optat 


4182 23,942 
-082 53*706 
■040 430824 
-04D 34*509 
■040 261,715 
-082 222315 
-082 157813 
-081 132826 
-082 109825 


Dec 77 14990 18770 14928+08024 50822 

Mar 98 14390 14690 1 4858+00024 623 

Jim 90 14780+04024 74 

Est eotes *213 Fits Idas *389 
Fifs open Id 51319, up 580 

CANADIAN DOLLAR CCMER) 

10*000 dam 3 par Ctti. dtr 

Dee 97 3132 -7105 .7124+08018 74930 

Mar 98 J163 .7148 3155+08019 *408 

Jon 98 J1H7 7177 -7180+08021 772 

EsL sdes *498 Hfs sates 11314 

Firs open bit 7*597, up 967 

GERMAN MARK CCMER) 

12*000 marie* S per mark 

Dec 97 -5875 -5827 4860-40006 77413 

MorTfl -5901 3855 3094-04)006 1155 

Jun 98 3921-08006 Z659 

Est sdes 1*416 Fit* rate* 31186 

nn open H 8*74* UR *005 

JAPANESE YEN CCMER) 

123 mOBonyen, Spar 100 ym 

Dec 97 4118 JM7E 4080414012 127,799 

Mar9S 4225 8187 8139-04)012 1360 

Jun 98 8340 8300 4300-04)012 264 

EsL sates 9,453 Rfs sdns 3*393 

Fit* open Id 12882* up *736 

SWISS FRANC CCMER) 

12*000 francs, S per Irene 

Dae 97 .7735 3149 .7225+08005 51302 

Mar98 3295 -7235 .7290+00009 2837 

Junto .7354+0.0005 267 

Ed. sales 1 U89 ATS sales ZL1 83 

Frts open Id 5*522, up *925 

MEXICAN PESO (CMEIQ 

50*600 peso* 5 per peso 

Doe 97 .11970 .11770 .11835+80674 18844 

Mar 98 .11500 .11300 .mSD+4n<3S 1O250 

Jun 98 .11080 .10930 .10960 +4)0638 2835 

E«t u!*s *834 Frfs total &710 

Fits open bd 3*64* up 295 


HI# Law Latest Cbge Optat 

HEATING OIL CN ME R) 

4*000 gal eeds per gd 
Dec 97 5*80 5780 5788 -OJ1 5*099 

Jan 78 5934 5*00 58.12 -042 2*300 

Feb 98 99.10 5880 5882 -CUD 11903 

Mar 90 58-70 5737 5737 -042 *425 

Apr 98 57.10 5*12 5*12 -082 *534 

Mar 98 5*1« 5*77 5*77 -083 1743 

Jun 78 5535 5*27 5*27 -082 *995 

Est. soles NJL Fits sates 27897 
Pits open tat 12639* up VI 28 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE OfMER) 

1 jho BbL- doftns per bbL 
Dec 97 21.10 2085 2040 037 8*310 

Jan 90 2185 2035 3060 034 70344 

Feb 98 2180 2058 2032 032 3*545 

Mar 98 20.95 2057 2057 030 22725 

Apr 98 2035 2049 2049 029 1*596 

May 98 2055 2040 3040 039 1*265 

Est sates NA Frfs sites 130354 
Fits open Id 409341 op 10025 

NATURAL GAS (KMER) 

10000 nan MUX Spermip Hu 
" “ " ±290 33* +0193 53.963 


3450 

1430 

1060 

1690 

2875 

1285 


1305 

34N0 

*660 

2845 

2860 


Dec 97 
Jon 98 
Fab 98 
Mar 98 

SCyM 

Ed. sates NA Fits sdes 47855 
Fits open W 2331427, off L592 

UNLEADED GASOLINE CNMER) 
4*000 got cents per gaj 
Dec 77 6055 97.00 


3420+0166 3*036 
34)50 +0090 2*292 
2-475 +O4M0 17835 
3850+0010 10664 
2845 +04)10 0618 


<040 

6020 


99.1 

5985 

59-55 


99.18 

5985 

5940 

6012 

6*54 


-077 3*239 
-087 1*514 
-083 10705 
-078 *182 

151 6527 

*278 
*715 
*408 


Jon 98 
Feb 98 
Mar 91 

Apr 98 6250 6254 

May 98 6*55 6284 6*24 -076 

Jun 58 «2J» 6154 6154 -076 

Jul 78 6188 6059 6069 -076 

Est sates NA FHs sates 3*518 
Fits open tat 9*680 up T573 

GASOIL OPE) 

U-5. doom per mebtc tea - tots at 100 tons 
NOU 97 18173 17850 17950 —185 21854 

Dec 97 18385 17985 180-00 —150 27,714 

J<Bl98 18375 TESTS 18059 —175 1*237 

Feb 98 18275 18000 18075 -150 9,173 

Mar 78 178-25 17873 1784)0 —150 

r j 175-50 17550 17*50 -185 

N 17150 17385 17385 —185 

Est sate: 2*691. Prau. soles 80361 
Piev.apen Inu 100440 up*975 

BRENT OIL OPE) 

U5. ddtars per band - Mi at 14)00 bands 
Dec 97 2008 1954 1955 -034 4*791 

Jon 78 20.10 1949 1952 -031 60613 

Fob 76 204)1 1956 1946 -031 27.158 

Mar 98 1950 1934 1984 -030 *623 

Apr 98 . 1974 19.17 198) -089 *472 

May ft NX N.T. 194)7 -039 &T55 

Ed..«itar4*000. Prev. sates : 42576 
Pie*, open int:169.137 Op 436 


*201 

1447 

1709 


61.15 +017 18390 
61.80 4.10 11,441 
5855 +082 *801 

6552 +OIO ' 
6*20 +015 


3537 

1751 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 

10 mettle tons, S per ton 
Dec 97 1617 1605 1511 

Mar 98 1665 1633 1H9 

May 98 1692 15B0 1586 

Jd99 1715 1705 17W 

Sap 98 1722 1724 1730 

Dec 91 I74f 1797 1749 

EsL sales NA Frfs sota 12785 
Frts open bd 107719, Dp *006 

COFFEE CCNCSE) 

37500 R«.- cents per tb. 

Dec 97 15800 15050 15685 

Ms 98 14*50 141 JO 14*85 

May 98 141.15 13885 141.15 

M98 13715 13S4W 13715 

54P 99 13375 13*75 13373 

Est. sates NA Fits sates 7796 
Fits open tat 3*81 9. off 1 JOB 

SUGARWORU) 11 (NCSE) 

11*000 b*- cents per*. 

Mar 98 1*27 1*16 1118 -0417 1U650 

May98 1282 1*15 T2.M -*01 £2° 

Jd98 11.95 11.91 1112 -Ml 

Od 98 1180 1173 1176 -Ml 2U8* 

EsL sate na Fits sales 1*978 
Frts open int 2K758. afl 1841 


+10 

18.240 

+9 


+9 

1454* 

+9 

*046 

+13 

AM 

+11 

*914 

+7JJJ 

0797 

+4-00 

8,958 

+365 

*966 

+4JM 

7M 

+355 

1JJ79 


Financial 

US T BILLS CCMER) 

SI mWon-utj of IOOjjcL 
Dec 97 9656 9*93 9*94 M3 *708 

Mar 98 9JLD2 954)1 9*01 -M4 *002 

Jun 98 9*94 9*93 9*93 -004 S36 

S«p 98 9455 DiKtt 23 

EsL saies 742 Fits sates 818 

FifsepfliH 10269, Up 276 

3 YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

siotMoopitn- pis 8,64ms anoo pd 

Dec 97 10 Mb 107-52 10600 - 03 2XTMS 

Est. bBbs *000 Fifs satar62J28 

Fits com M 24U68. off 155 

IflYR TREASURY CCflOTl 

SIOAOOO pita- ate & 32llib of 100 pet 

Dec 97 111-11 111410 111-11 -01 370330 

Mar 98 111-02 110-27 111412 -01 3*066 

Jui 98 110-30 -01 109 

EsL safes 190000 Fits sdes 13*202 

Frts open H60&50& off 303 

US TREASURY BONDS (C80T1 
(8 pd-S 1004 HO-ptS & 32 ndS OflOO pd) 

Doe 97 117-31 117-14 117-30 - 01 609781 

Mar 98 117-21 1174)6 117-21 -01 117,918 

Jun 98 1174)9 1174)0 1174)9 - 01 11452 

ScpSV 11671 116-24 11671 -01 24X6 

EsL sdes 38796 Fits sales 782716 
Fits open fad 74*38* up 3*621 

LONG SILT CUFFS 

ESOfQOQ - pta * 22nd* otlOO pd 

Dec 97 118-14 7184J7 118-11 UndL 1SL421 

Marts ■ 118*30 118-27 118-38 UndL 35951 

Jun 98 N.T. N.T. 118-22 UndL 180372 

EsL sates: 21J49. Preu.stte: 7X784 

Pm. open bit: 118772 off 1477 

GERMAN GOV. BUND CUFFS 

§S SFZSHRfimm UndL 251612 
Mar 98 101^6 10141.10171 Un*. 14738 
Etf.scdes: 3974 £ Ptuv.mIm: 187^52 
Pmbapentati 26B3S0 up 1796 


3-MONTH 9TERUNG CUFFE) 
tSOQJXO • Ptl of 100 pd 
Doc 97 9*43 9*38 

Mar 98 9*33 9*36 

Jun 98 9*34 9*27 

Sep 98 9*46 9138 

Dec 98 - 9164 9159 
Mor99 9182 9178 
Jun 99 9*97 92JQ 

EsL safes: 67X21 Prav. safes: 14*735 
Prew. open tat: 72*676 up 7,425 

MAOKTH EUROMARK CUFFS 
DM1 mffion - ah of 100 pd 
Ne*97 N.T. N.T- 9*26 — 4MH *039 
Dee 97 9*19 9*17 9*18 -001 297^76 
Jan 98 N.T. NT. ■“ 

Mor 98 9595 9390 

Jon 98 9*69 9*65 

Sep 98 9549 9546 

Dec 98 9530 9527 

Mar 99 9515 9511 

Jun 99 9501 9496 

Sep 99 9*85 9*83 

EsL setae 84,308. Pias-wdet! 32*456 
Prey, open bit; 1^11487 op im 

3-MONTH EUROLIRA (UFPB) 

ITL1 bGRou - phot 100 pd 
Doe 97 9347 95*2 

Mar 98 «J6 9*33 
Jun 98 9*84 9483 

Sap 98 9*99 9*97 

Dec 98 9501 9*97 

Mar 99 9*93 9*89 

Est sates 1*317. Prev. sates: 4*061 
Prev. span tat: 505179 up 3^05 


9138 —081 14*168 
9*26 -005 12*0*0 
9*27 -087 9*264 
9*39 -4)87 7*742 
9*58 -086 65,222 
9178 -084 £5480 
9*93 -083 47804 


9*12 -082 *250 
9591 —083 31 1663 
9386 — OJB 285861 
9547 -083 205884 
9528 -OJB 181,250 
9512 -084 193831 
9*97 -084 9*985 
9483 -003 7*305 


Stack Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX CCMER) 

2S0x Index 

Dec 97 94*50 93*30 92520 *6.10 387.483 
Mar 98 95080 935*0 93680 -*20 15084 
Jan 98 9SL5D 94*50 945-50 -i20 *087 

Ext rate NA Fite sates 12*006 
Frts open tat 407,95* up 5768 

FTSEIHCUFFB) 


Dec 97 48408 47850 4088 +398 6*845 
Mar 96 48*5 48578 48508 +398 7J20 
Ell. sales: 9871. Prev. sates 2*848 
PitatapanM.- 7*165 off 

Ti» MATIF unite was dosed Monday for a 
DOUBT. 


Commodity Indexes 

Ctosa Pruritus 
Moody** 1,515.20 1^1680 

Roulm U1580 IJiuu 

OJ. Futures 14*00 idm 

CRB 241.11 241 J5 

AnodaMPtas. London 

ftassSs? 6 **™*'”" 


9*62 -083 101346 
9*34 -081 109.958 
9*84 -4U1 111,156 
9*99 —081 65806 
9*99 —081 57,405 
9481 -082 31864 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 CNCITO 
£0000 in.- cents per Bj. 
Dec 97 7180 69A5 
Mar 98 7123 71 JO 

May 98 7*20 7*41 
Jut 98 7*30 73*5 

Od 98 7585 7*63 


6983 -114 45943 
7187 -189 198*8 
7286 -185 15604 
7*45 -1J6 154V8 
7483 -0.73 829 


Est. sates NA Fits sates 1*743 
Rft open tat 91987, off 94 


Arts&Ajvtiqmes 

Appears nwry Saturday. 
To advertise ronlai-t 
Sarah 'Wershuf 
in oar London offirr: 
Tel.: +44 l 71 420 0326 
Fax: + 44 1 71 420 0338 

or year nearest IHT offic 

or representative. 


AMEX 


Monday’s 4 P JL Close 

Tl» 300 roost traded docks of he day, 
up to the dosing on Vfafi Street 
The Assoa&cd Pass. 



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INIEpmfflUI. HER AID TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1997 


PAGE 15 


INTERNATIONAL 



e, but Won Falls as Foreigners Flee 


B&Vetisarios Kattoolas 

Jxiemmional Herald Tribmne A 


s now time for consolida ti on.” 


TOKYO — The Sooth Korean 
stock market soared nearly 6 percent 
Monday, but its currency ptsnged 
anew to a record low as foreign 
investors dumped the woa md sold 
their shares. 

Afresh pledge by d» gove rn men t 
to help flie financial sector audits 
assurances that the ecooaijay is 


South Korean stocks in two weeks 
as domestic investors pBed ia*> bay 


After falling 11 percent, in the. 
previous three sessions, the corn- 
index rose 29.62 points, or 
percent, to 525.32, ds biggest 
since Oct 22. ■ 
was accounted for 

domestic investors 
and felted to mask the second-tnggest 
foreign seU-off of South Korean 
stocks ever, as oversea^ investors 
sold a net 96.7 billion ,-wen^<$98.7 
milEon) of stocks MoodayJ^ \ . . 

The sell-off of ttefttfeaty and 
stocks by foreigners highlighted the 


left banks with bUliohs of dollars in 
bad debts, drove other borr ow er s 
into default and shook investor con- 
fidence. in the financial Systran. 

were fem^ucrer&arbm^^CTan^ 
ded repayments from diem to offset 

toseronaomed loans. 

Mr. Poan said be expected the 
South Koxean economy to grow by 
5.5 percent in 1997 and 4 percent in 
1998, or less than half the growth 
rale earlier tins decade. Seoul has 
forecast growth of around 6 percent 
far 1997 and 1998. 

Since Friday, foreigners have 


sold nearly 200 billion won of South 
Korean shares. Those sales have ad- 
ded pressure on the won as foreign 
investors have switched the pro- 
ceeds from their share sales Wo 
dollars. 

Partly as a result of foreigners’ 
sales of shares, die (foliar rose to a 
record 998.70 won from 979.80 won 
Friday. Only concerted government 
intervention in the foreign-ex- 
change market prevented the dollar 
from breaching (he 1,000-won level 
that the government has vowed to 
defend. 

Since die dollar exceeded 900 
won three months ago, the won has 
set record lows almost weekly. In die 


week, it has done so almost 
ly. Despite repeated government 
intervention in the foreign-exchange 
market, many analysts expect the 
won to weaken by as much as an- 
other 20 percent befcae stabilizing. It 
has already fallen 19 percent against 
the dollar since die start of the year. 

For its pan, the government has 
insisted dot the economy is robust 
and that the won is fairly valued. 

“By any economic measure, it is 
hard to argne that the Korean won is 
significantly overvalued,” Kim ] D, 
senior counselor to Finance Min- 
ister Kang Kyong Shik, wrote in an 
open letter published Monday in the 
International Herald Tribune, coun- 


tering a news report and an 
column dial had bft 


m 


the 


been publi 

e newspaper. 

In Seoul, the English-language 
Korea Herald reported that govern- 


ment policymakers were “incrcas- 
losing patience with foreign 


ingiy 

news organizations, which have in- 
tensively run negative articles on 
Korea’s financial market.” 

It said the Finance Ministry had 
sent “letters of refutation” against 
“distorted views” that it said were 
“largely responsible for the ongo- 
inefmancial market tunnoiL” 

The ministry “intends to take 
other strong action*.’ ’ (he article ad- 
ded without elaborating. 


NETSCAPE: Internet Firm Braces for Extended Showdown With Microsoft 

Continued from Page 13 


how much longer South Korea 
can weather the steam in itsfinanctal . 
markets. - 

Despite government assurances 
feat everyt hi ng will be well, -many 
foreign investors say 5eoul will 
have to let- its currency depreciate 
’ jjty and dose many of ns debt- 
led financial tnafitwrimiB 
Foreign investees are selling, 
stocks, converting their money into 
dollars and getting out;” Brian Hnn- 
saker, an analyst at Kleinwort Ben- 
son Ltd. in Seoul, told The Axso- 

ciaiedPress. 

In the past few years, the Korean 
economy has overexpanded,” said 
Franklin Poon of me brokerage 


dnstry executives and analysts, and 
he has proved to be a skillful sales- 
man who can persuade button-down 

corporate America to buy from an 
Internet pioneer. 

In some ways, Nfa. Barksdale is an 
unlikely software executive. At 54, 
be is twice the age of many of his 
employees. A Southerner, bora and 
nused in Jackson, Mississippi, he is 
fond of homespun one-liners pop- 
ulated by snakes, dogs, chickens and 
country porches — known as Barks- 
daleisms at Netscape. 

Mr. Barksdale, however, has 
spent most of his career on the sober 
side ofthe software business — buy- 


ing it instead of selling it, using it 
giLHeisi 


HSBC James Capel in Hoag Kong. 


instead of creating iL 
best known for his 13 years at 
eral Express Carp, where he rose to 
become chief operating officer, 
serving as the principal architect of 
the computerized tracking and de- 
livery system so critical to the com- 


pany’s success. 

In a leadership gesture not lost on 
his team, Mr. Barksdale cut his own 
salary to $1 thi s y ftMr , wtp lainmg th a t 
the company could do better things 
with the money. 

Mr. Barksdale, of course, is also 
an intense, relentless competitor. To 
his rivals at Microsoft, the clearest 
evidence of his no-holds-baned ap- 
proach is Netscape's legal strategy. 
He constantly leUs his workers that 
the company must rely only on its 
success in the marketplace, but be 
has prodded Washington to take an- 
titrust action against Microsoft 

The Netscape campaign, says 
Nathan Myhrvold, chief technology 
officer of Microsoft, resembles a 
“NIxon-era dirty tricks team.” 

“Don’t believe this notion that 
Barksdale is some gracious South- 
ern gentleman,” Mr. Myhrvold ad- 
ded. “That’s nonsense.” 

Mr. Barksdale unders tandably 
takes a different view of his com- 
pany's antitrust appeals. “Mi- 


crosoft is a great company,” he 
says, “and it would be even better if 
it did it legally.” 

An antitrust ruling against Mi- 
crosoft could slow it down, but will 
not stop its inarch in the Internet 
market. The Chinese Army is indeed 
coming. Since April 1996, Mi- 
crosoft's share of the browser mar- 
ket has increased to 36 percent from 
4 percent, estimates Zona Research, 
a market research firm. Over the 
same span, Netscape's browser 
share has slipped to 62 percent, from 
87 percent. . 

Microsoft brings not only muscle 
aod marketing dollars to the contest, 
but, increasingly, technical excel- 
lence as well. In several product 
reviews in computer magazines and 
newspapers, the new version of Mi- 
crosoft’s Internet Explorer browser 
has bear out 'Netscape's Navigator in 
terms of ease of use and features. 

Mr. Barksdale and the Netscape 
team say that the browser has been a 
vehicle to become noticed. But Net- 


scape's business, they say, more and 
more depends on selling the back- 
end network software and services 
to help companies use the Intranet as 
a rich, low-cost communications 
tool to streamline the way they pro- 
duce, sell and service products. 

So if Microsoft's browser share 
crosses the SO percent mark in a year 
or 18 months, as most analysts ex- 
pect, that is not a problem, Mr. 
Barksdale maintains, as long as Net- 
scape is able to keep extending its 
reach in the broader Internet soft- 
ware market. 

The Internet, Mr. Barksdale says, 
will not evolve as did the operating- 
system business — ■ a winner-tabo- 
all market that Microsoft dominates. 
As long as the software of different 
companies contains a core of in- 
dustry standards, Netscape should 
be able to hold its own, he adds. 

“Our bet is that the Intranet will 
not be a winner-take-all market and 


that Netscape will be a big winner in 
this world,” he says. 



GOVERNO DO ESTADO 
DESAO PAULO 


' SAo Paulo State Government 
ELHTROPAULO - ELETRICHMDE DE SAO PAULO S A. 
C.G.C 61 £95227/0001 -83 

EXTENSION OF TTEBDDMQ NOTICE FOR PURCHASING 
OF ELECTRIC POWER FROM NATURAL OAS-FRED 
THERMAL POWER PLANT 
SAO PAULO I AND fl 

ELETROPAULO - Etetriddade da SAo Paulo S A Worms that 
the doafogdatB of this bkfdtog document sate was deferred 
from 11/13/97 to 11/16/97, so the bids are not due by 11 Z28/97 
but 12/06/97, at the same address and time schedule priorty 
mentioned. The (Mae were changed due to the attention of 
thte biddrhg document text 

From today on (1 1/04/97), the mentioned attentions 'of the 
bkidtag>4Jo^^ temjigtote for those interested ^ the 
‘Recepgflo de Jternecedoree” at Avenida Alfredo Egfcflo de 
Souza Aranha 100, Ground Floor, SAo Paido-SP, Brazil, 
between 830 rod 1130 AM and 200 rod 4:00 PM. 

Presidency 


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ELETROPAULO 



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LABOUR: Friend to Business 


Continued from Page 13 
adopting die free-market changes wrought by Margaret 


Thatcher and openly courting the support of industry, Mr. 

olitical model that has 


Blair has shattered the class-based pol 
reigned in Britain for nearly a century. 

“British politics have changed,” said Adair Turner, the 
director-general of the Confederation of British Industry. 
“They are like the Democrats and the Republicans” in the 
United States. 

Hans-Olaf Henkel, chairman of the Federation of German 
Industry, told the conference that “your government's 
gram is more liberal, more pro-business than our 
conservative government’s one.” 

Even more important, though, die recent decision by the 
Conservatives to harden their opposition to British partic- 
ipation in die single European currency has provoked an open 


split between die party and many senior business executives 
“ ‘ ’ of the day. 


on the biggest economic issue i 
The dogmatic Tory stance contrasts sharply with the gov- 
ernment’s recent announcement to support participation in 
principle. 

That was put onopen display here when Gordon Brown, 
chancellor of tin 


die Exchequer, told executives that the gov- 


ernment would help ^business prepare for the euro, while 

ive leader, warned that mon- 


William Hague, the Conservative 
etary union risked economic and political disaster and likened 
its supporters to lemmings. 

While Mr. Hague received an ovation, many industrialists 
here, and the CBI itself, broadly support the government’s 
line. 


RWE - successful start of the 100th business year. 

Report on the business development from July through September 1997 


l- 


Net sales 

In the first quarter of the 
1997/98 business year, 
external net sales of the Group 
increased by 4.4%. Apart from 
a general broadening of our 
Group's activities, this growth 
is attributable to pieasing 
business trends especially in 
the Petroleum and Chemicals 
Division as well as In the 
printing press subdivision of 
Mechanical and Plant 
Engineering. The. Hungarian 
companies ELMU, EMASZ and 
MATRA, additional companies 
of’ the Waste Management 



margins. The up-front losses in 
telecommunications grew as 
expected in the first three 
months. The profit from the 
sale of TALK LINE will be used 
to fund the continuing rise in 
up-front expenditure. Overall, 
we are confident that we will 
once again close the anni- 
versary year with a higher 
net income. 


RW E-Group 
Development in 

1st quarter 1997/98 


Change 

% 

Consolidated net 

income without 
minority interests 

9 - - 

+ 10.0 

External net sales 

Energy 

fpl 

+ 6.6 

Mining and Raw 
Materials 

lpll| : ,85 

- gj 

Petroleum and 
Chemicals 

|H| 4 W4 

+ 9.8 

Waste Management 

399 

+ 15.3 

Mechanical and Plant 
Engineering 


+ 28J 

Telecommunications 


- 78.8 

Construction and 

Civil Engineering 

fpH 1530 

- 3SJ 

Others 


+ 9.1 

Consolidated external 
net sales total 

3£ 45< 

+ 4.4 


Division as well /Linotype- Hell 
were consolidated for the 
first time. Output in the 
Construction and- Civil 
Engineering Division was" up 
4.7% owing, jn particular, 
to a favourable trend abroad; 
sales fell back only for account 
settlement reasons. ■. 

As expected, the structural 
changes in the fuel market in 

eastern Germany were 

reflected in the Mining and 
Raw Materials Division as well 
as the sale of the TALKL1N E 
group effective July l; 1?97, 

In telecommunications. 


Net income 

At ..DM 198 million, the 
Group's net income (without 
minority interests) was up 
10% In the first quarter. The 
ongoing cost-cutting measures 
taken on a Group-wide basis, 
primarily in the Energy as well 
"as Mining and Raw Materials 
Divisions, are Increasingly 
bearing fruit 

The Petroleum and Chemicals 
Division benefited- from 
unusually stable refinery 


Capital expenditure 

At DM 928 million, the 
Group's capital expenditure 
was down 9 % from the 
corresponding year-earlier 
level. For the business year as 
a whole, we will also remain 
below last year's volume which 
was unusually high due to the 
investment in telecommuni- 
cations. In September, o.tei.o 
increased Its share in 
E-Plus from 30.125% to 
60.25%, 'thus broadening its 
business scope significantly. 
Our investment total does not 


include the share accounted 
for by us because it was 
financed from the funds which 
we already contributed 
to o.tei.o the year before. 


Workforce 

In the first quarter, the 
number of employees grew by 
7,4% to 146 242 as a result of 
the companies consolidated for 
the first time. When adjusted 
for this effect, the number of 
employees dropped by 1.3%. 


RWE Aktiengesellschaft 
Opernpfatz 1 
D-45128 Essen 
Phone + + 49 201/12-00 


Internet: 

http://www.rwe.de 


Essen, November 1997 
The Board of Management 


RWE Energle, Rheinbr’aun, RWE-DEA, RWE Entsorgung, LAH MEYER, RWE Teliiance, HOCHTIEF RWE The Group That Knows How. 






i 



PAGE 16 


. . ,._E~ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, TUESDAY NOVEMBERil, 1997 


EUROPE 


After 8 Years 9 East Germans Still Hold Out Against Glitz 


Reusers 

BERLIN — There was no need for ad- 
vertising in Communist Ease Germany, where 
choice was a foreign concept 
In November 1989, the Berlin Wall fell, 
and East Germans were soon introduced to the 
consumer society iherr Western cousins had 
had for decades. But after eightyears, tastes in 
advertising remain different in the Eas t 
“Pretty pictures and hollow slogans just do 
not work in the East to the degree they do in 
the West,” said Ingrid Joswiakowsky, man- 
aging director ofSalffner & Partner, a public- 
relations agency in Berlin. 

“Easterners expect more information in 
their ads, particularly when they are about 
services or products they are less familiar 
with, ’ ’ Ms. Joswiakowsky said. As examples, 
she cited some kinds of insurance products 


‘Hollow Slogans’ Fall Flat, Advertisers Find 


and electronic goods. Factual explanations 
often take companies farther in the East than a 
glitzy campaign does because there, advert- 
isers cannot count on consumers' life ex- 
perience to fill in the information gaps. 

“Leasing, for example, is a concept which 
is still not widely understood in the East,” 
said Frank Thienel, managing director of 
Tbienel & Partner, a Beilin ad 3gency. “Ad 
agencies need to explain it point by point” 

While companies selling moderately priced 
Western-matte goods can make headway in 
the East high-end brand names and luxury 
items are a tougher sell there than in the 
West 

In 1996, only 23 percent of East German 


households had more than 4.000 Deutsche 
marks ($2,330) in monthly disposable in- 
come, compared with 45 percent of house- 
holds in Western Germany. The unemploy- 
ment rate in the Eastern sates hovers around 
20 percent, nearly double the Western rate. 

“After the wall fell, they said there were 17 
million consumers to be had,” said Sebastian 
Turner, managing director of Scholz .& 
Friends ad agency. “But although East Ger- 
many represents ore-fourth of the population, 
they are not yet one-fourth of the consumer 
market.” 

Most regions of East Germany had access to 
some Western media, particularly West Ger- 
man television, under cotranunism. 


“The most effective ads may have been 
those from multinational companies before 
the wall fell,” said JuergcnMib h alski . service 
director, of tire TBWA ad agency in Berlin. . 

“People saw the ads. for example for Ba- 
cardi nan, bat because they couldn’t have 
those products, it made those brands that 
much more powerful,” Mr. Michalski said. 

But despite the differences that persist be- 
tween consumers in the East and West, an- 
other problem, Mr. Turner said, is tint some 
companies have insulted Eastemers by treat- 
ingmem. as a unique target group. 

• “Some Easton companies made die mis- 
take of saying, 'Hey we're from the East, so 
you should buy this out of some sort of 
solidarity/” he said. “Quality and price are 
die top deciding factors with a product, and 
the hometown effect is a distant third.” 


G-10 Bankers Cite 
Positive Side of 
Market Volatility 

Bloomberg News 

BASEL, Switzerland — The 
Group of 10 central bank gov- 
ernors believe that the recent 
volatility in Asian stock markets 
could help world economies by 
prompting investors to value 
stocks more realistically, the 
president of the Bundesbank, 
Hans Tietmeyer, said Monday. 

Speaking fpr the G-10 gov- 
ernors after their monthly meet- 
ing. Mr. Tietmeyer said the tur- 
moil could be “beneficial” in 
the long run. 

“Now, there is more solid 
ground on finHtirial markets, 
and we hope that die worst is 
over,” he said. But that 
“doesn’t mean one can expect 
chat equity markets will be very 
stable/’ he added. “There is 
always some fluctuation.” 

Mr. Tietmeyer said any neg- 
ative effects on Asian growth 
from the volatility would be 
small. ‘ ‘One should, first of all, 
not overlook or underestimate 
the underlying strength of these 
countries,” Ire said. 

Alison Cottrell, an econo- 
mist at PaineWebber Interna- 
tional in London, said. “It's 
sort of nice that they said it, but 
people were expecting some re- 
assurance anyway.” 

The Group of 10 comprises 
Belgium, Canada. France, Ger- 
many. Italy, Japan. Nether- 
lands, Sweden, Britain and the 
United States. The central bank 
governor of the host country, 
Switzerland, also takes part 


Germany to Disclose a New Revenue Shortfall 


By John Schmid 

Intcmatumal Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The govern- 
ment is expected to wain Tuesday of 
another sharp drop in tax revenue 
this year and next despite an ex- 
panding economy and a nationwide 
crackdown on tax evasion. 

With European Union nations 
needing unprecedented fiscal dex- 
terity to meet the EU’s rigid deficit- 
shrinking criteria for joining die 
planned single currency, die euro, in 
1999, the tax report is expected to 
confirm that German budget control 
remains elusive and that the national 
tax base effectively is shrinking, rip- 


ping holes in Bonn’s budget, econ- 
omists said. 

Germany's overall tax receipts 
have been felling short of govern- 
ment projections for two years. This 
time, some government officials 
said Monday, the 1997 shortfall will 
cause a budget hole equal to 1 per- 
cent of gross domestic product, 
compared with government tax es- 
timates made a year ago. 

Because of that . Germany's ability 
to meet the single-currency target of 
cutting its deficit to 3 percent of gross 
domestic product, an ability that 
economists have long held in doubt, 
will be “put at severe risk,” Hblger 
Schmreding, senior economist at 


Merrill Lynch in Frankfurt, said. Ger- 
many, which has demanded a strict 
reading of EU budget yardsticks, is 
expected to join die angle EU cur- 
rency with a deficit of about 3.2 per- 
cent of GDP. Mr. Scfanricdingsaad 

Using Bonn’s last official half- 
yearly tax forecast, taken in May, as 
a benchmark, Bonn can expect a 
shortfall of 16 billion Deutsche 
marks ($939 billion), said Klaus- 
Peter Fox, a director in the Saarland 
state Finance Ministry and a mem- 
ber of the federal Finance Ministry’s 
committee of tax experts that is 
drafting the numbers. 

Joachim Poss, fiscal spokesman 
in Parliament for the opposition So- 


Rival Brushes Off French Bank Candidate 


CaafUnt bvOurSKffFnm IJbpZdk a 

LONDON — Jockeying to re- 
main die front-runner for the pres- 
ident of the future European central 
bank, Wim Duisenberg, the head of 
the European Monetary Institute, 
said Monday that the unexpected 
candidacy of die Bank of France’s 
governor “cannot be on the agenda 
yet" 

In television interviews. Mr. 
Duisenberg said Jean-Claude 
Trichet, who was put forward by 
France last week, would not be con- 
sidered until more important busi- 
ness was conducted Drat 

Referring to economic union, Mr. 
Duisenberg said: “First, we have to 
pick the countries that will partic- 
ipate. Then it is up to the ministers of 
finance to come forward with can- 
didates” for the central bank pres- 
idency. 


Mr. Duisenberg said he still 
hoped to be president of the Euro- 
pean central bank. 

Meanwhile, Foreign Minister 
Hans van Mierlo of the Netherlands 
lobbied for support among his Euro- 
pean Union colleagues for Mr. Duis- 
enberg. 

He said be found broad backing 
for him and saw no reason yet to 
raise an early Dutch veto threat 
against Mr. Trichet. 

“The moment may come when 
we have to harden our position, but 
that time is not now,” Mr. van 
Mierlo told reporters. 

“I have spoken with my col- 
leagues here and see no reason for 
concern about their stance.” 

The French-Dutch standoff has 
led to speculation that the Dutch 
would veto Mr. Trichet. 

That might cause a tit-for-tat 


French veto of Mr. Duisenberg, 
meaning the central bank job would 
pass the Dutch by. 

Mr. van Mierlo said his govern- 
ment was willing to entertain “a 
reasonable compromise” wife 
France, but would not elaborate. 

Mr. Duisenberg 's views on mon- 
etary discipline have won him praise 
in Germany, which wants strong 
central bank leadership. 

In Bir mingham England Mr. 
Duisenberg said, “More than half the 
EU will qualify’’ for monetary union. 
He said, “It could include Italy.” . 

Many assumed feat the issue of 
who will head fee central bank was 
settled in July when Mr. Duisenberg 
took over the top job at the European 
Monetary Institute, a prototype cen- 
tral bank operating in Frankfurt to 
prepare for the single currency. 

(AFX. AP. Reuters) 


rial Democratic Party, estimated fee 
shortfall would be 18 billion DM. 

For next year, falling tax revenue 
could hurt fee budget even more, 

showing an acceleration of the trend. 
Sources in Boon said die committee 
expected a tax shortfall for 1998 of 
20 billion DM to 25 billion DM. 

The figures could open Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl’s government to 
new criticism, both at home and. 
elsewhere in Europe. 

At an appearance in Munich. Fi- 
nance Minis ter Theo Waigel ap- 
peared to hedge on Bonn’s ability to 
meet the single-currency targets. 

“We will roughly stick to the *97 
deficit goal,” Mr- Waigel said. 

Vickers Wants 
Suitor to Confirm 

Reuters 

LONDON — Vickers PLC 
called on Mayflower Coup. 
Monday to end the “muddle” 
over whether it will launch a 
hostile bid for fee British de- 
fense company. 

Mayflower, a vehicle-com- 
ponents manufacturer half fee 
size of Vickers, signaled interest 
in the company last week but 
has refused to say whether it will 
make a full-scale offer or bid for 
selected parts of Vickers. 

“We are considering our op- 
tions.” a Mayflower spokes- 
man said, refusing to comment 
further. Vickers, which wants to 
sell its Rolls-Royce Motor Cars 
unit, is believed to have spoken 
to gov ernment regulators about 
the continuing uncertainty- 



. I’lm* 


t . - 


Source: Totottm 


♦4781 +0.1*^ 

gjgggr 

■**^*!3M 

Ta 077T 

l0Krtutu'»d BcnU fiiWyr > m 


Very brieflyr 


h' lfl - 


thin 


• R ussia ’s central hank, vowing to shore up the rubl e and tfte 
economy against any Asiaib-sty le financial or currency crises. - 
raised its key refinancing rate to 28 percent Irwn 2 1 percent. 

• BAA PLC, fee operator of seven British airports, said profit. , : 
rose 4.8 percent before, one-time items, to £24.1 kmilliun. 
($408.4 million), in the six months that ended Sept: 30 as^ 
growth in air travel offset fe stronger pound that cur retail sale* 
to overseas visitors. 

• Cable &. Wireless Communications PI # C. Britain’s dom-'t 
inan t cable operator, said first-half operating profil rose 62 •' * 
percent, to£123 million, in the period that ended Sept. 30 as iw - 
teievision and telephone sales increased. 

• France TelecomSA will cut the cost of telephone calls by 9^ 
percent in both 1997 and 1998 and 43 percent a year in 1 

and 2000 as it girds up for the deregulation uf fee European - 
telecommunications market m l 998. 

• Union Bank of Norway, the country's biggest saving./ 

bank, plans to merge with Fokus Bank. ASA to try to remauf- - 
competitive in fee Norwegian bonking market.. p .... 

• LM Ericsson AB will establish two design centers in i&I 
United States to try to shorten introduction cycles for neu 
products and tailor them to U.S. requirements. 

• Bank Bangcrt Pontier NV. a Dutch investment bank, said 

throe of its dnectorshad stepped down from their posts whiles 
government agencies conducted ah inquiry to see whether - 
bank played a role in a suspected web of money laundering/ 
insider trading and fraud involving various banks: I 

• Bombardier Inc. plans to buy the German rail-car maker * i 

Deutsche Waggon ban AG for an undetermined price, ac- t 
coding to Waggonbau. ; 1 

• The European Commission said it was hopeful of averting - 
a ban on imports of U.S. pharmaceutical goods that ha^ 
threatened to spark a trans-Atlantic trade war next tear. 

• OPEC’s production reached 28.03 million barrels a day in. 

October. 3 million barrels over its ceiling, largely because of. 
an increase in Iranian output, the Middle East Economic. 
Survey said. tthnwib, r*. Nt w Mr UX 




! i v A 


11 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Monday, Now. 10 

Prices In local currencies. 
Tetekvrs 

High Law daw Pm. 

Amsterdam uatuea rKiM 

PmfoBKMr.17 


ABN-AMR0 

Aegon 

Ahold 

AkzoNoM 

Boon Co. 

BotsWesscw 

CSMon 

DonRsdwPet 

MM 

Ebovier 

FortkAmev 

Genomes 

G-Braccm 

Hngemeyer 

HeTnetoi 

Hoogowmoro 

Hunt Oai^as 

ING Group 

KLM 

KNPBT 

ICPU 

OoeGfMen 

PNBpsBee 

RoXodHdg 
Rofaccn 


Rdnoo 


Herat Dutdi 

Unlever oro 
VemtaWl 
VNU 

UUtonKlon 


3850 37 JO 
15520 1S250 
5030 49.20 
327 JO 32*10 
135 

30.70 29,90 
88 87 A0 
103 JO 10050 
177 JO 17450 

31.10 3050 

7440 75 

69*0 6820 
sun am 
8130 81-50 

322 330 

89 JO B7JO 
8130 80 

82 JO 80-50 
72*0 49.90 
4530 4450 
74 7230 
5440 55 

5410 55.10 
22050 714 

151 JO 148J0 
10480 KM 
79 JO 78 
179.70 17420 

57.10 5440 
13250 171 JO 
11430 117.90 

102 100.10 

110JQ 108 

102.10 100JQ 
4410 4120 
34410 739-30 


37 JO 3750 
15440 151 JO 
4940 48.90 

325.10 32490 

139 138 

3050 29.90 

87.90 88 

10150 100.70 
17480 175 

30J0 3050 
7520 75 

49.40 6870 
S0J0 50 
8250 81 

32120 320 

8850 37 JO 
82JQ 81-40 
81 80S) 

49.90 7220 
45L50 4440 

74 72X 
5ft 5470 
5550 56 

214 218 

149 JO ISO 

105.10 105 
79 77 JO 

177 JO 177 JO 
5480 5480 
13150 17X50 
118 117-30 
10150 9950 
10940 10480 
102 10050 
4550 45 

242 24050 


High LOW Oaae Pm. 
BMW 12S 1220 1215 1220 

CKAGGotanta 144 141 144 14150 

Cananerzbcnk 41.90 4035 «05D 40 

Daimler Benz lllJO 11030 11050 11130 

Dequssa 7BJ0 77 77.10 78 

DeubdieBarfc 111.70 110.10 110-40 10855 

Deal Telekom 3230 32*0 3230 3250 

DresdnerBonk 71 7U40 70.40 70 

fiesentas 2® 785 226 780 

FreseniusMfid 12250 121 121 11950 

Fried. Krapp 38? 382 38850 37950 

Gthe 95 94 95 9450 

HeWefijgZmt 140 138 13? 136 

HerfeetpM 9170 97.70 9330 9020 

HEW M.T. N.T. N.T. 460 

Hochtief 74 7150 71 JO 7120 

Hoedrct 4955 4850 6940 47.75 

Knrttjdt 57250 Sa8 549 57250 

Lrtnwyer 7459 7455 7659 77 

Unde 1070 1051 1051 1020 

Lufthansa R 3050 3050 3020 3050 

MAN 526 519.10 520 515 

Mamennann 78850 781 786 761 

MHoflgaePschaH 34.90 3450 3450 3430 

Metro 77 7450 75 JO 7550 


liar 

Jcfiraries Jndl 
liberty Hcfgs 
Liberty Life 
LLMJft Start 
hmuarea 
Nonpak 
Nedatr 

RembromUGp 

Rtlraion! 

SA Breweries 
Samancor 
Sasd 
SBtC 

TigaOcrts 


Hlgti 

Low 

Ciosa 

Pm. 


High 

Lara 

dose 

to* 

252 

2*5 

2*0 

2*0 

Smltti Nephew 

1J8 

1-74 

134 

1.77 

5AM 

54 

54*0 

S3 

SnutbKSW 

5*0 

526 

536 

£38 

330 

327 

330 

327 

Sarahs Ind 

854 

835 

8*7 

8*1 

126 

124 

126 

124 

SHtem Elec 

4*0 

431 

454 

454 

1630 

1X75 

16 

1X30 

Stagecoach 

7*2 

755 

757 

755 

89*0 

87 

8940 

88 

Stand Charter 

6*5 

623 

634 

639 

16 

1X10 

1X55 

1X15 

Tote&uie 

*65 

4*0 

4*5 

4*1 

106*0 

K» 

106 

IDS 


435 

*53 

4*5 

4*6 

41*0 

40*0 

4U.V5 

4135 

Thames Water 

8J2 

8*0 

8*0 

859 

5X70 

5*10 

XX 10 

54 

3J Group 

*78 

4*5 

4*9 

4*2 

125 

120 

I2X 

119*0 


5*2 

X15 

£35 

£38 

34 

3175 

3d 

3125 

Tomkins 

107 

2.95 

3 

297 

59 

SB 

5830 

58 

Unterer 

4*2 

4*7 

4*1 

451 

213 210*0 

213 210*0 

Uld Assurance 

5 

*95 

*97 

*95 

70 

66 

6730 

6X20 

UUNeaS 

7*5 

720 

7-26 

734 


High Law aaw Pm, 


MundtRueckR 

509 

502 

503 

500 

Pnwssag 

462 

4X950 

461 

44950 

RWE 

7X45 

75 

7X5X 

74 

SAPpft) 

so? 

492 

508 49450 

Sdrertog 

SGL Carton 

17230 

239 

169 

232 

170 

231 

17150 

239 

Stamens 

10530 1O4J0 

10*65 

10420 

Springer |A»n 

13* 

13* 

13* 

1360 

Suedzuctor 

aw 

BK) 

880 

89B 

Br 

429 

420 42850 41X50 

9730 

97 20 

97*0 

9X15 

VEW 

560 

XXtl 

X65 

564 

VfrSrekqea 

855 84*50 84950 
WO 985 99750 

84X 

990 


Kuala Lumpur ctmpaaitozmsi 

r PnnoKWm 

AMMB Htfgs 
Gentmg 
MdBcnkng 
Md Inti Ship F 
PertonosGos 
Proton 
PubfcBk 
Ronona 
Resorts World 
Rattmons PM 
Skw Darby 
- kora Mat 


Telekom I 

Teona 
UM Engineers 
YTL 


5.95 

555 

5*0 

5.95 

955 

930 

930 

9*0 

1X60 

1330 

11*0 

1330 

635 

*15 

63S 

6*0 

9.30 

9 

9J0 

9*5 

735 

7*5 

7.80 

735 

235 

2.19 

235 

234 

304 

199 

3 

336 

S.9Q 

X75 

5.75 

530 

27.75 

27 

2735 

27 

5 

432 

436 

5 

955 

9.10 

955 

9*0 

73S 

7*0 

7*5 

8.15 

8-05 

730 

735 

820 

410 

196 

198 

420 


UttUWttes 
VendomeLx ifte 
Vodoftne 

Wajams Hdas 
wotsetay 
WPPGiwp 
Zeneca 


722 

140 

334 

8 

140 

520 

193 

1188 


6.90 

354 

323 

7-80 

350 

4.94 

2J9 

1750 


7.13 7.10 

35B 358 

332 330 
7-94 738 

157 157 

5.16 5JS 
192 190 

1104 17.9ft 


Oslo 


- OBX Mac 0924 


Prerioess 69X84 

Aker A 

121 

179 

119 

120 

BemeseapyA 

OofiftantaBk 

*17 

2730 

215 

2630 

217 

27 

213 

27 

DennorskeBk 

31.10 

3030 

3030 

31 

Eflcem 

109 

107 

107 

10450 

HafstandA 

41 

41 

41 

4050 

KvoermAsa 

364 

340 

360 

3S6 

Naak Hydro 
NankrangA 

386-50 

384 38550 

30 

224 

221 

223 

218 

NycnatedA 

183 

182 

182 

- 182 

OridaAsa A 

625 

615 

619 

615 

PBtn GeoSic 

530 

518 

571 

518 

tSMS"* 

140 

no 

137 

130 

139 

130 

135 

131 


*0 

400 

*0 

405 

StarebrondAaa 

5150 

51 

51 

50 


High Im. 

" 773 • ' “285 293 2B730 

SKFB 11150 17V 179 INI 

Spmto ike nA 17750 17450 177 17S50 

Stem A KQ 98 101 9850 

S* HandefcsA 25050 24150 24950 243 

VMoB 19ft 192 19S 19050 


Madrid 


oka Mac 551 J3 
Proiieesc 55U4 


ACESA 
AguasBmcefton 


Bangkok 

AdvInfoSvc 
Bn^okBkF 
Krais TMBk 
PTT&olor 
SkroiCemmtF 
Stan Coro 8k F 
Tatasnodo 
Thrft AJnnors 
Thrri Farm F 
UMCmna 


SET Man 41754 
PmhRitRM 

24ft 212 220 Z» 

177 149 lftS 171 

2035 1950 19J5 1850 


412 

400 

400 

4Bd 

s 

400 

*2 

400 

93 

93 

96 

24 

23 

2350 

22 

55 

52 

52 

52 

138 

123 

126 

132 

67 

64 

67 

6350 


Helsinki 

BuaA 

HoMamaUI 

Knairo 

toko 

MrrtnA 

MdroB 

Metso- Serin B 

Neste 

HofcjcA 

Orion-YMymao 

aolokumpoA 

URMKjfmmene 

VOfeoei 


HEXGcmr* Mac M83J3 
Pravtan: 342552 


48.10 

48.10 

48.10 

4850 

216 

215 

215 

216 

54 

53 

54 

53*0 

7X70 

72 

73 

7X50 

2620 

26 

2420 

26.10 

138 

136 

136 

13/ 

4620 

4XX0 

46 

4X.M 

126 

I7J 

174 

174 

466 

4S1 

460 

446 

20350 20X10 

203 

201 

7B 

7750 

7750 

It 

11850 117J0 118.10 

11750 


78 78 


London 

Abbey Hart 
Aifeo Domeca 
AogBanWUer 

A rrin 

Asda Group 
Assoc Br Foods 
BAA 
Barclays 

BATlnd 
BankScolMd 
8 k* Cade 
BOC Group 

Boob 

BPBlnd 
Brfl Aerosp 
Br? Almcys 
BG 

Brfl Load 

BrttPrtm 


FT-SE V0C: 4804JS 
PimtaiK 476130 


Bril! 
ErttTdeoom 
BTR 


9J8 

497 

7.77 
455 
1.61 
410 
530 
1520 
832 
445 
4.95 
174 
9.85 
449 
328 

1734 

6XO 

1M 

440 

8J0 

427 

152 

4.77 
228 


Bomtxiy 

BatafAuto 
HnawLeaer 
HMostPcflra 
lad Dev Bk 
ITC 

rTel 


rBk India 
SM Authority 
Tata Eng Loco 


ss 

480 

97.§ 

1425 

340 


mi as 
374732 

563 56425 56950 
1321 133935133550 
477 4S0 48050 

9ft 9425 9725 
55850 5M35 56125 
m aw <n vn w 
17*50 17*75 17825 
254 25750 259 

1350 14 14 

33S 33650 344 


Hong Kong 

Amgr Praps 
Bk East Asia 
CaftayPodSc 

t-K. tpnasmia 
China Utat 
CTcPaaBc 


Haag Stag: 9992J4 
Prwrtan: 1010*50 


Brussels 

Ataanq - 

Bam hid 

BBL 

CBR 

Coiroyt 

(MhabeUan 

Betaiiwt 

Etedratto 

Forth AG 

GflHert 

G8L 

GanBanquo 

Medtabcuk 

t'uuusa 

Rovrerfin 

SSfSS 

5oNay 

Tradebd 

UCB 


mtaOM m/m m m 

HoaaSeng 

Herumon 


BEL-391 

Prmkws: 2247.13 


1520 1490 
4850 4710 

9030 B940 

3095 3035 
18X0 17775 
1735 1495 

8000 7900 

3270 3180 
6430 4550 

1448 1430 

5400 5200 
13950 13575 
13850 13575 
13225 13000 
5100 5010 
9400 9200 
3195 3130 
2135 2075 
3060 3040 
120100 117600 


1498 1492 
4780 4730 

9000 8750 

3080 3070 
18275 17B75 
1725 1480 
7990 7890 
3245 3235 
6610 6570 

1430 1430 
5320 5220 
13450 13575 
13700 13550 
13200 13075 
5010 5050 
9358 9340 
3130 3155 
2085 2110 
3045 3040 
118950 120000 


Inv 


HK Electric 
HKTefeamm 
HapeweBHdgt 
KSBCHdgs 
Huldksw) Wb 
HysanDev 
Jdmson EIHde 
Kerry Props 
NnrWWdDw 

Oriental Press 
Peart Orient* 
SHK Props. 
Stnm TmTlMgs 

5(no Land Ca 
S8i China Post 
SutrePceA 
Wharf Kdgs 
Wlwekck ■ 


6*0 

6 

620 

630 

1X90 

1X8X 

1X95 

1639 

755 

/JO 

750 

/*X 

51 

4X50 

49.10 

5050 

1730 

16.70 

17 JO 

17*0 

36J0 

35 

36*0 

3580 

32J0 

3)*0 

31.90 

3110 

1820 

17 JO 

18.10 

1X30 

5-70 

£14 

£35 

X3X 

10*5 

10 

10*0 

1050 

4X.75 

62JX 

64J5 

65 

6J0 

X80 

635 

6 

3830 

37 

3120 

3UQ 

IX4X 

1110 

IJJO 

1155 

2XJ0 

2*30 

2X 

24*0 

I4JX 

1130 

14 

13 A 

2.10 

13? 

232 

2.10 

176 

170 

174 

175*0 

XI 

4840 

49.10 

XQ75 

16 

iwo 

15*5 

1550 

2125 

70 

70 

■ 21 

I4.lt) 

1160 

MM) 

1*10 

2X20 

2VN 

24JX 

7A 

137 

1.90 

150 

1.97 

053 

0*8 

051 

053 

5*75 

51 

53.25 

54 

7*0 

2*2 

258 

252 

4.H 

AM 

450 

455 

535 

3910 

3$ 

555 

38*0 

560 

38 

1*90 

14 

14J5 

1470 

8*0 

8 

835 

8*5 


BunaatiOnM 10.10 
1J0 
*66 
S.92 
*83 
R25 
*59 
223 
7.18 


CndbwySctrw 
CorltanCaronr 
Carml Unioa 

toon s 

Bedracaruprmajts *52 
EMI Group S 

Energy Group 620 

ErrierortKOfi 452 

Fern Cotoolat 1^3 

Gent AcdrienJ 1020 

GEC 3.90 

GKM 1322 

GtaroWMoBW 1185 

CnnotaGp 8J0 

GW Met 

GRE 

GteeoaSsGp 
GtHmwss 
CITS 

HS&Wdgs 
Kl 

Impl Tobacco 

TUB! 


Copenhagen r**-*™? 


BGBonk 


425 412 420 425 

345 335 335 346 
Codon F«5 931 930 931 930 

Danlsa) 359 350 3S0 355 

D/SSww&roB 400000 387000 400000383000 
M 1912 B 277800 270000 277000 275000 

ftSIndB !« 1*5 IS 

KohLllffnmB 802 790 790 790 

NwNanfSkB 731 715 JBj 715 

SOdmsBerB 1020 1000 1010 990 

Y*DmnkB 389J7 OT 380 CT 

TngBaHm 410 399 399 400 

BA <70 448 470 448 


Jakarta 

Astra IdI 

BftlFtfUndm 

BkNogtn 

GudmgCann 


lodofood 

IfflJOMf 

SoropoentaHM 

5ftnHnCras8( 

TetekomunftiMl 


CarepnVe tatac 46169 
PICiMe 466.12 

2500 2291 2275 2500 
m 780 775 750 

750 700 700 7S0 

9500 9300 9500 9650 
1800 1775 1775 1825 

3000 2800 2900 2850 

8300 8000 8273 8100 
5825 5600 5650 549) 
3750 3575 3625 3700 
3125 2900 3050 3025 


Johannesburg 


Frankfurt 

AMBB ID 

AAhS 252-50 

AButzHdo 3819 

Alton ”2# 

lilr* 1 S3 

a 

Bnog 40.10 


DA%3mi3 

PmMs: 349919 

154 154 156 

29) 2529 2489 
3869 388 3779 

124 124 12120 

419 419 419 
5745 5745 5620 
73 7345 739 
100 10020 999 
599 5940 5825 
749 759 75 

399 3920 399 


ABSA Group 
AngJotaiCual 

ssssas 

AnsfoAm Ind 
AnStoAMPlat 

avmin 
toitoo 
CG. Smith 
De Beets 

DtWWtetn 

FSINaSBk 

Ganar 

GFSA 

Imperial Hdgt 
(ngmCoal 


299 

263 

205 

216 

14*40 

789 

835 

49 

2275 

1109 

3240 

41 

99 

78 

61 

209 


29 

263 

202 

214 

136 

7740 

8 

4TJ5 

2 \% 

3125 

”1 

9 


29 JO 29 

363 29 

203 2029 
214 216 

144 136 

7820 7820 
020 B 

48 47.90 
22 21.90 
10940 109 

31 JS 3240 
J1 3920 
94S 940 

77 78 

9 589 
70 209 


SM 
3.17 

39 
155 

4.90 
725 

1*15 
9.65 
178 
84) 
237 
9S9 
29 
5.07 
79 
110 
529 
524 
13 

2.91 
59 
89 
79 
39 
243 

6.97 
828 
127 
495 
49 
455 
9.70 
155 
497 
335 

5.98 
220 
442 
105 
7 JO 
9J0 
220 
465 

5.99 
195 

Sdnstary *98 

Unactais 17.10 

ScdMewairiJe 644 

Scat Power 440 

5awriO» 241 

Severn Trent 8*6 

SneBTronspR *12 

Skbe 1145 


Land Sec 

Legal Getd Grp 
fJo^JSSGp 
LuctoVortW 
Maries Spmaer 
MFPC 

Mercury AsseJ 
Haiianal Grid 
Natt Power 
HatWest 
Ned 

NaraMi Union 
Orange 
PSO 
Peanon 

PaJuwtwt 
PmoerGen 
Premier Fans* 
FtaKteoSol 
RaamdcGp 
Ran* Grro 
RMfcaiCota 
Rediand 
Reed ms 
RmttaM Inltal 
Reuters Hdgs 
Rea m 
RTZieg 
RMC Group 

SSKr 

RorolXSwiAU 
Safeway 


99 947 

428 *81 

745 725 

647 451 

155 140 

*86 5.02 

5.12 5L19 

15 1A06 

IM 824 

523 541 

*80 *90 

324 340 

949 9 JO 
828 842 

125 327 

1643 1621 
528 590 

29 242 

430 ■ 452 
827 833 

4.12 *23 

148 19 

*51 *44 

2 2JJ1 
9.95 HUD 
128 12? 
*60 *87 

SS3 S.9Q 
*46 *81 

8 825 

*57 *53 

7-78 2.91 

7 79 

*41 *45 

449 J 
419 621 

443 646 

141 142 

99 925 

178 3J8 

1287 111? 
1245 1174 
825 824 

527 542 

328 114 

341 157 

539 4<2 

646 *82 

707 723 

1321 >165 
040 820 

170 174 

8.1 S 125 
241 222 

921 9.92 

2JD 2.72 
*81 *93 

728 745 


2 

541 


227 

520 


*52 520 

.1185 12.89 
2.76 187 

*85 524 

843 8-5* 

730 733 

155 160 

226 242 

*78 *83 
749 7.95 

134 135 

*70 *90 

440 445 

*38 *40 

935 947 

13s 39 

828 845 
328 331 

SJS 530 

227 242 

*29 637 

238 238 

742 740 

835 925 

7.10 2.13 

640 648 

545 &71 

3.78 195 

*82 439 

1641 17 

641 *64 

420 *25 

222 2.77 

830 842 

4 *12 

1125 1140 


942 

*83 

7J0 

644 

147 

*92 

522 

1434 

837 

540 

438 

345 
929 
843 
326 
1645 
5.97 
29 
626 
826 
*16 
141 
*54 
201 

10 

129 
*73 
*92 
*90 
828 
648 
136 
7.12 
449 
432 
*27 
641 
141 
9J8 
338 

13 

1164 

799 

528 

328 

347 

528 

626 

736 

1325 

839 

171 

820 

346 
-939 

248 

*83 

720 

106 

546 

123 

13-04 

231 

522 

1S3 

744 

157 

130 
*83 
7.73 
126 
6J6 

’ 49 
*43 
949 
343 
842 
324 
540 
225 
■647 
104 
79 
934 
2.16 
*43 
54S 
336 
*90 
1*70 
*50 
*26 
2J4 
89 
*04 
1T45 


BE . 

Boneslo 
Banklntar 
Bco Centro Hhp 
Bco Popular 
BcoSaTOanrler 
CEPSA 

CanfcnenJe 

iSS**’ 

FECSA 
Gas Maturol 


Prycn 
fiepsol 

SevtBana Bee 
Tobacalero 
Tekforico 
Union Fenosa 
Vatenc CCrnant 


30680 

1895 

5790 

87X 

3885 

1325 

700 

2S95 

8660 

3905 

4295 

7750 

6760 

2*30 

1120 

6570 

1770 

223 

6200 

1335 

10700 

4025 

1400 

2850 


20330 

1130 

5620 

8660 

3785 

1300 

6710 

2535 

8420 

3835 

4200 

2655 

6620 

2605 

1100 

6770 

1735 

2135 

6160 

1300 

10300 

3970 

1390 

2790 


20S30 20450 
IMS 1840 
5780 5690 

8710 879 

3815 3890 
1310 1310 

6870 6970 

259 2610 

'8550 8680 
3880 3905 

4275 *300 
2745 2700 
6620 6670 
2620 2425 

1105 1110 

6290 6420 

T755 1740 

22® 2305 

6190 619 

1305 1305 

10630 10640 
3995 4015 
1395 1390 

2840 2840 


Market Closed 

The Paris stock market was 
closed Monday for a holi- 
day. 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBWng 

BHP 

Barol 

Bmnbteslnd. 

CBA 

LCAncH . 
Coles Myer 
ComaJCD 
CSR 

Fasten Brew 

GonrfcTxra Rd 

KJAudraBo 

Lend Lerse 

MIMHtte 

NatAnrJark 

NatMuhirdHdo 

News Carp 

Podftctot*sp 

F5aneertntl 

PubBroodcnst 

(SaTTnto 


s * oP “"° “TiiSSKS SSSSW ,t8 


BrodoscoPH 

BrotraPfd 

OroiaPW 

C£5PP« 

Copd 

EWrobras 

NotaoixoPfd 

UgWServido* 


Manila 


PSEtadOC 185137 


PietoHE 109X61 

AptaB 

N.T. 

I1T 

N.T. 

14 

BpPtiBpfei 

1175 

97 

1325 

9650 

M 

1150 

9750 

OP Homes 

250 

2-38 

2*0 

2*8 

Motto Sec A 

66 

65 

6550 

66 

Metro Bonk 

265 

755 

260 

765 

Pehort 

160 

3*5 

150 

3*0 

PClBonk 

146 

133 

136 

133 

PhflLrogDtst 

SonMtaudB 

845 

51 

815 

48 

A 

050 

sa 

SMPrSSeHdg 

420 

530 

£90 

430 


iPM 

F'aaSsta Laz 
SM Ptadanal 
Sam Ola 
TeMxmPM 
TelenriB 
Tded 
TetespPfcl 
UniwncD 
Usiminas PH 
CVRD PM 


8.10 7*5 

69000 67530 
4*00 429 
7X00 6*00 
119 1058 
49003 47X00 
48000 46000 
37000 35000 
302JB 289 9) 
233.01 WM) 
132JX 12X00 
3730 359 
9J0 89 

11*00 1079 
1169. TT*01 
1039 9*00 
2959 2629 
309 29.90 
620 79 

229 209 


79 729 

66X00 6709 
439 439 
709 719 

1058 1130 
4829 4659 
47X00 4709 
•man 36000 
2909 2W9 
2299 2209 
1279 1279 
379 379 
830 839 

1099 1079 
11*9 1139 
9799 979 
2649 2719 
2950 2939 
797 7JS 
2030 2021 


A3 OrdtoorieE 2STU0 
Pmtaat; 2513*0 

636 *77 *33 *96 

9.79 9*3 9*9 938 

1*90 1334 1*78 1*27 
39 170 330 330 

279 269 2725 27 JO 
1735 1*70 1*32 17.10 
11*0 1138 1125 11*8 
726 7.05 7.13 725 

635 539 6 *05 

436 *61 *76 *76 

236 2*9 235 174 

227 2.16 225 220 

1035 10.63 1020 109 
289 2X05 28*0 2835 
126 121 125 125 

21.10 1935 2070 209 
2*2 225 229 2J5 

72S 735 725 7.17 

3-13 30*. 19 110 

183 39 376 3-76 

165 820 *59 8*8 

1722 1*73 1735 17 

89 840 89 871 

556 XT3 5X4 525 

89 8*0 8.77 8*0 

11JS 11*5 1120 11*5 
*78 4*7 *78 *60 


TheTribtndttx r , 

Jm 7. JSB?« tOO ■ U VM 


- Pocoi&ctJOC’Pl* MVWiiiv 

Changt X> change 


World Index 


Asia/Psdfk: 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 
induetiW Mum 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
MisceBangous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
umes 


163.32 

93 . 01 - 

185.15 
202 J 7 
135.61 

206.88 

192.96 

193.79 

114.15 
158.67 
167.71 
160-54 
157.12 


+ 0.38 

■ 2.08 

+ 1.40 

+ 0.90 

+ 1.82 

- 0.35 

+ 0.81 

+ 1.68 

- 0.50 

+ 0.30 

+ 1.53 

+ 0.83 

+ 1.97 


+023 

-2 19 
+ 0.76 
+ 0.45 
+ 1 36 

-0 17 
+ 0.42 
+ 0.87 
-0 44 
+0 19 
+0 92 
+ 0.52 
+ 1.27 


year lo data 
% change 

*9 51 


-34 65 
♦ 14 .SH*' 
*24 99 
+ 18.51 


■i iiia 
-liilllir 


-■s 


04 
♦19 54 
*13 52 
-1 98 
-1 92 
4 37 
06 91 
+3 52 




2* bMrnaikei al HeM d T«rane WWW SMJ. M0o\ & tracks ;.it> U S ooi*r va**s * 
MOtumiuecnabr ewuetaue stocks from as countries Fer mce tne 

gooPe f wa tMteWe by t wang to Trie Tnb tnOex. 181 Avenue Chanes A* Gauiv 
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Taipei 


CrfhoyUfoIni 
Owhi H»a Bk 
Oiloo Tung Bk 
QBna De+etprnl 
Chino Sleet 
FtaBaik 
Forcnosa Pksftc 
HuoNoriBk 
trill Comm Bit 
Nan Ya Rasta 

tS&S&f' 

Tafcroa 

UM Woo Bee 
Utd World Oita 


Stack MrotaMndacTTO.U 
Provtansi 747021 

739-52 J 31 137 1369 

9X50 92-50 96 959 

70 67 6X50 71 

« 90J0 93.50 96_S) 
239 2X50 2X60 2420 
98 94 9SJS0 97 

53 50 S3 SI 

106 99-103 102JP 

5X50 53 55 55 

54 51 S3 S3 

123 1 6X50 *9 899 

126 118 126 126 
3*-«> 309 3X50 31*0 

‘ • S’ “ asa 

5? 57 57 S9 


Mssan Molar 
NKK 

NamuraSoc 

NTT 

NJT Data 

(Qcoh 

Rohm 

SWaaoBk 

Sreikyo 

Sonvro Bonk 
Sanyo Blec 
Sean 
SrtwRwy 
*4 Oban 


Mexico 

AUoA 

BanocdB 

CemerCPO 

CBroC 

EropModeroa 
GpoGaaoAl 
GfJQ F 

GpoRn Inburso 
febOcrtMe* 
TOMsaCPO 
TeiMexL 


6X50 

179 

3100 

1*9 

41.95 

5*50 

331 

30-10 

3*75 

14110 

189 


S4M7J2 
Pltvto*- 466*49 

40*0 60*0 6120 
1*00 1*50 1*96 

3130 31*0 329 
139 1430 1*60 
4020 4030 4195 
5130 529 5330 
XB0 X» 196 
299 2930 3035 
3*30 3A5S 3*50 
141.10 141.10 14*00 
17.54 17J6 189 


Seoul 

Oacarn 

Daewoo Hany 

KoreoBRor 
Korea ExdiBk 
LGSandcan 
Parians Iron St 
Samsung Cfaiay 

SKTeicaani 


5990 53900 

1^ ,» 
7400 6920 
14300 13300 
4520 4000 

22300 19600 
46000 41000 
35400 32B00 
45800 42600 
7400 6660 

355000 311000 


Prtsrta* 49X70 Tokyo 


59400 58900 
609 5700 

15600 15200 
7«0 7150 

14300 14400 
4450 4290 

22300 21200 
45000 44500 
35400 35600 
48700 46300 
7390 729 

345000 363500 


Milan 


Ben Cora* Ikil 
BcoHdauron 
Bears Romo 


GwltottaSono 

Edban 

ENI 

Rot 

GemdAatc 

Ml 

INA 

Wot 

MeSnd 


Mortrttsori 

OSrotf 

Parmalat 

Plidfl 

RAS 

Roto Banco 
s Prado' Torino 
Telecom Itafla 
TIM 


MIBTelHooSco: H8I74W 
Piwtaw: 1479138 
14S9S 14145 14440 14650 
4775 4640 4450 4730 
6950 6775 68W 6810 

J545 W90 1500 1509 

25200 24650 24650 24500 
£75 *100 4320 4360 

8865 8695 8805 8695 
9645 9660 9795 9SBS 
5240 5040 5050 5150 

38 00 37650 37650 37700 
’SIS 15950 1*15 

1905 2SQQ 2875 2830 
6640 £520 6605 6600 
6160 8010 809) 8QZQ 
11570 11280 11280 11450 
1362 1345 1346 1348 
99B 978 984 990 

2385 2335 2365 2315 
44 W ,4260 4760 4380 
14750 14555 14740 14555 
21900 22200 21600 
1W# 12M 12590 12515 
'9S? I® 0 IfcOO 10630 
6485 6395 6400 6375 


Singapore 

Ado PW Brew 
toebosPoc 
CSy Devtts 

DB5 ^3* 

Fiwar&Nemt 

HKLand* 

Jcnl Mtfhesn" 

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S3M, 

OX Union StF 
Partway Hd$s 

SJngljnd 

SiHlPreaF 

g5T«fthsl 

SkHTateanm 

Tat Lie Bank 
Lfta ftuSustriat 
UWOSeoBkF 
WtagTWHdrp 

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smstsrrare® 1663*9 
PreriOB* 167123 


N.T. 

M.T. 

N.T. 

*74 

4*4 

474 

725 

400 

7.10 

7JH 

490 

7 

035 

033 

035 

15 

14*0 

1430 

196 

2J9 

236 

8.10 

735 

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126 

230 

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535 

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122 

114 

116 

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2-73 

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173 

4*8 

4*0 

448 

2*3 

235 

138 

9J0 

m 

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£15 

5*0 

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4IU 

5J0 

s 

530 

11J0 

11*0 

1150 

AM 

438 

AM 

2130 

19-50 

2010 

W 

235 

109 

2*3 

258 

2*3 

162 

156 

159 

0-77 

075 

0J4 

9*0 

930 

9*5 

2J2 

m 

2.11 


SwSanAta 

Arovroy 

ASaWBor* 

AooNQwn 

BrifflS" 

Canon 

ChuboEJec 

Dcriw House 
DedwaSec 
DDt 
Denso 

Faroe 
IBank 
iPhote 


Stockholm 


Montreal 

BcoMobCran 
C* Tire A 

CdnUSA 

CTRulSuc 
Gaz Metro 
G+WestLBeca 
Imasco 
Investors Grp 
LoOtowCos 
Notl Bk Canada 
Pone- Carp 
Power Fw 
duebeearB 
Ropes CoramB 
Royal BkCda 


I SduHrids Met 332*35 
Pmtarac 3*19*9 

4 i'? 4400 ri41C 
28M 29 

_40 3930 a 39*5 
47.05 46U mu 4&U 

’US 18 ^ 1® 1® 

34 3*10 33^ 

44.10 AW t5. w 4£ 
48 48 48 47K 

,®ft 2044 20*0 

Z1 ’5 20.95 21.Q5 
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45*5 IA 45 44 *0 
*2$ 2% SJ0 *9.10 

7 W0 8J5 8J5 B25 

IUS n» 75V4 75k 


AGAB 

AB8A 

AsstOoann 

AsfeaA 

ASa&CapcaA 

Ataolrir 

EborohaB 

EricwtaB 

H eroes B 

taeadfeeA 

UWHlwB 

MoOoB 

Nordbroken 

SSmS* 0 **” 

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Scrota B 
SCAB 

S*EBankai A 
StandbFon 


96 

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310 

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22S53 
3Q2 
624 
34330 
31 930 
654 
3S6 
21830 
260 
241 
235 
182 
164 
8230 
35*50 


SX 16 tatac 315X57 
Pmtani 311636 

9630 » 91*50 

85 - 85 85^3 
201 305 20* 

1» 11 8J0 117M 

223JD m 223 

29? 30130 39830 
610 613 615 

338 » 338 

315 315 316 

650 650 632 

35030 XV 333 

273 Z16 211 

15830 25930 257 

234 237 23530 

33130 232.50 22930 
176 10030 176 

160 164 I a 

81 8130 81 

352 35150 348 


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m 

riodtu 

Japan Tobacco 

Si 

SS* IB ' 

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MtaubfaMOl 

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SK - * 17 ' 

MffSUi Fudosn 

MtaiTlM 

MundoMta 

KEC 

Mkdendo 

MpponSW 


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noitanc 1583424 

’ffi ’SSS ’SH 

»g SIS 597 sao 
2^ 2B5D 
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SM 502 510 

.760 728 760 760 

«*» WJ 1510 1540 

449 403 425 455 

gM 2440 2490 1530 

2340 2760 2780 2890 

2040 2000 XX 2030 

1£0 1890 ino 19» 

2330 2320 2360 2380 

542 535 539 5S) 

950 .193 719 940 

367 324 340 3E2 

1tg> 1050 1130 
645 630 645 655 

3 SS 3 ££s 37600 4020a 
2260 2090 2260 2160 

57MO 5680a 5700i 

1630 1600 1610 1650 
<840 '4750 4830 4860 

»* 834 845 915 

4250 4130 4)80 4220 
1350 1290 1310 1310 

IMg nw 1130 1120 
. 898 877 B9& 896 

4050 3950 4050 4000 

USD 992 KUO 1080 


High Low doM 
635 60V 635 

155 150 150 

1320 1280 1280 

10206 9620o 9700a 
57800 54706 5500b 
570 SI 553 

273 266 268 

1580 1 520 1540 

12200 12000 12100 
456 415 415 

3900 3850 3880 

1050 987 995 

7280 7130 7130 

f tojjtfjjhra ^*44 ^91? ^926 

Sekfeul House 1020 998 1010 

S«en- Eleven 86)0 8410 8590 

S^orp 899 864 872 

ShantaHPw 1920 1890 1920 

497 4B2 482 

2990 2900 2920 

1680 1630 1670 

1130 1050 1100 

3120 2910 2930 

10200 9920 ID100 

830 792 800 

1160 1100 1130 

428 413 425 

1650 1620 1630 

242 248 

736 685 700 

31” »» 3070 

3470 3390 3470 

10800 10000 10200 
1950 1890 1930 

601 577 580 

1080 1040 1080 

2290 2260 2280 

63TO 6M0 6090 
282 275 

516 497 

867 848 w 

1580 1540 1570 

637 605 619 

527 510 527 

1460 1420 1450 

750 715 777 

MID 3380 
2990 2940 2970 


Slltartzu 
SWrvetsuCh 
Shfcekto 

ISmiSS 6 * 

Saw 

SuBifforno 

Sumitomo Bk 

Sumft Otent 
Somaanto Ebc 
Sane Mow 
Sumlt Trust 
lagraPhonn 
TgjM.Cto. 

ToUo Marine 

rSSliX, 

Tokyo Gas 
TokyuGotp- 

Tanen 

Tropon Print 

SB* 1 

Tosten 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 
YanonowM 
KX 10* to X MOO 


280 

SI* 

862 


Pro*. 

634 

154 

1330 

10506 

5880b 

590 

770 

1540 

12500 

452 

3930 

1050 

370 

7450 

4890 

948 

1020 

8610 

BBS 

1900 

500 

7950 

1650 

1140 

3320 

10300 

822 

nso 

418 

1650 

250 

751 

E10 

3490 

10800 

19X 

600 

1150 

2260 

6570 

282 

510 

858 

1570 

£34 

506 

1460 

770 

3270 

2980 


Nwa 

Onex 

PancrtaPottm 
PctroCda 
Placer Dome 
PwroPrttm 
Potash Sesk 
RenMoancc 
Rio Algoro 
Rogers C ontd B 
Sea groin Co 
ShefcoaA 
Suncer 
TaOsman Eny 
TeckB 
Triegtobe 
Total 
Ttwraon 
TarDant Bank 
TrarooBu 
TrartsCda Pipe 
Trtmarir FM 

JwmT 

ssr 6 "' 


High 

Low 

CJose 

1170 

13'j 

13'-. 

3*’^ 

34 

3*20 

2330 

2355 

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2920 

2910 

2910 

20 

1955 

1755 

1330 

1360 

13*5 

13025 

119' i 

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3110 

3255 

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2«»'“ 

2X05 

7430 

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1885 

4/30 

4655 

46 70 

27 95 

2765 

27.9X 

52*5 

5160 

5235 

48 

4655 

47.05 

224 

22N 

22>X 

45.10 

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U* 

3030 

30.60 

30 JO 

IS 60 

3X35 

3X60 

5190 

5105 

5330 

1930 

1965 


27.80 

27*5 

27JO 

74*5 

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3Sta 

3*95 

3S- 

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S65 

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3070 

30J5 

30 IS 

m 

99 

107 


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PAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


i^GM’s Thai Project Suddenly Seems Like a Bad Idea 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Service 


RA/ONO. Thailand — The bad 
news for Ronald Frizzell. president 
of. General Motors Corp.’s Thailand 
subsidiaiy, canie during a vacation in 
ihe Scottish highlands in early July 
when he got a message requiring his 

immediate return to Thailand 

Thailand had been forced to de- 
value its currency, the baht, plunging 
the country into financial turmoil As 
the Thai crisis spread to neighboring 
countries, Mr. Frizzell and his su- 
periors in Detroit began facing a 
crisis of their own: They are building 
a $500 million factory here io supply 
what they thought would be an end- 
lessly booming Asian market 
; In the annals of poorly timed cor- 
porate investments. GM’s history in 
Thailand looks at tbe moment like a 
•fcdoozy. Along with other U.S. auto- 
^makers, GM withdrew from Thai- 
land and other Southeast Asian mar- 
kets in the late 1970s. leaving the 
field to Japanese competitors who 
gained control of 90 percent of the 


market and reaped handsome profits 
as Asia's economic rise generated the 
world’s fastest growth in auto sales. 

General Motors’ rush back into 
the market comes just as auto sales 
are shrinking in response to the eco- 
nomic crunch gripping the region. 
The company's woes illustrate how 
Asia's problems are setting bade the 
hopes of U.S. corporations that have 
bet on the region's dynamic econ- 
omies for sales and profit growth. 

GM. which says its Thai factory 
will go into production as scheduled 
in early 1999, is hardly alone among 
big companies that have seen pros- 
pects for Asian sales and profits 
diminished or deferred. 

All across the region, foreign, 
companies are adjusting to forecasts 
that growth will slow substantially 
for at least one or two years, and quite 
possibly longer, in the so-called tiger 
economies mat for much of the past 
decade have grown at annual rates of 
8 percent and more. That is par- 
ticularly true for companies operating 
in Thailand, which is widely believed 
to be slipping into outright recession 


because of the sudden flight of funds 
by investors concerned drat the coun- 
try is laden with unproductive real 
estate and overly ambitious industrial 
investments. Thai car sales in August 
and September were 75 percent be- 
low year-earlier levels. 

Ford Motor Co. is in a situation 


For automaker a dasac 
case of poor timing. 


similar to GM’s as it neats com- 
pletion of a light-truck factory in the 
same industrial park as GM’s Thai 
factory. 

Toyota Motor Carp., which con- 
trols 30 percent of the Thai market, 
announced last week that it would 
shut its two Thai factories until at 
least the end of the year. 

Elsewhere in Asia, high-tech U.S. 

mnlfinatiftfiats . including Intel 

Corp- and Hewlett-Packard Co., are 
reporting that while sales continue 
to grow in the region, the pace is 


slackening. Hardest hit of all, per- 
haps, are companies in the business 
of building big infrastructure proj- 
ects, which many Asian countries 
can no longer afford to build as 
rapidly as they had planned Indone- 
sia has postponed a 500-megawatt 
power-generation project in which 
Enron Corp. of Houston was to be a 
partner. Tbe giant Swiss- Swedish 
conglomerate ABB Asea Brown 
Boveri Ltd said last month that it 
would cut 10,000 jobs in Western 
Europe and the United States,partly 
because of Malaysia's decision to 
postpone construction of a $5 billion 
dam that ABB was to build. 

Just what all this means for the 
U.S. economy is unclear, since 
nobody is sure yet whether die fi- 
nancial crisis has run its course or 
whether, as some analysts fear, it 
will explode with new force in Japan. 
Still, many U.S. economists have 
mark ed down their forecasts for U.S. 
grow t h next year by between a 
quarter and a half of a percentage 
point because of the anticipated 
slowdown in exports to Asia. 


Such problems seemed like re- 
mote possibilities when GM planned 
its Thai factory as pan of a broader 
goal of winning 10 percent of the 
Asian market outside Japan by early 
next century. The Asian aoto market 
looked to be headed nowhere but up. 
with car sales in Thailand growing by 
more than 60 percent over five years, 
to nearly 600,000 vehicles in 1996. 

GM settled on Thailand as the 
best place for a factory to serve the 
region because it offered a fairly 
well developed infrastructure and a 
wide-open policy for foreign auto- 
makers, unlike neighboring Malay- 
sia and Indonesia, which are de- 
veloping “national car** projects. 

The company’s plan all along was 
to export the bulk of the factory’s 
production to other Asian countries 
and perhaps Australia as well, de- 
pending on demand. For that reason, 
the devaluation of the baht in July 
looked as if it would work to the 
advantage of the plant’s economics 
in certain respects, because the fac- 
tory’s vehicles could be sold more 
cheaply in foreign markets. 


Investor’s Asia 


Singapore ■ 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 



7000 j'j A S O N 
1907 


1400 ‘j j a s o n' 14W J J A S O N‘ 


1997 


1997 


Exchange. 

Hong Kong 

index 

Hang Sang 

Monday . 
Oosa 

. ..PlW. % 

dose .Change 

ID, 104.50 -1.11 

.Singapore 

Straits Times 

1,663.69 


•0.45 

Sydney 

AHOnSnarlBS 

2421.60 

£518.40 

■&J33 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

15,697420 15^3656 -088 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 


707.45 ' ' 

-Z53 

Bangkok • 

SET- 

487 JM 

493.04 

-1.03 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

525.32 

435.70 

+5.98 

Taipei 

Slock Market Index 7,767.14 

7,670.76 

+1.26 

Manila. 

PSE 

1,851.97 

1,893,61 

-250 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

462.69 

486.12 

-0.74 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2,419.12 

2,485-50 

•257 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

3,721 jOS 

3,74752 

-0.70 


Source: Teiekurs 


Inemutiinal HcnU TntKHfc: 


Hong Kong Bank Affirms Solvency Despite Run 

0*tpMbrOvrSutfFnmiDap*fa 

"HONG KONG — Depositors rushed 
to* branches of a Hong Kong bank Mon- 
day to withdraw money, prompting the 
government to deny that any banks were 
experiencing financial troubles. 

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority, 
the territory’s de facto central bank, said 
ii was aware of rumors that “certain 
banks' ’ were having problems, but it said 
the reports were “without foundation.” 

Hong Kong’s financial secretary, Don- 
ald. Tsang, said the territory’s banking 
system was sound. 

Customers formed lines outside of- 
fices of International Bank of Asia, a 
subsidiary of Arab Banking Corp-, 


Very briefly: 


which is based in Bahrain and is 20 
percent owned by China Everbright- 
IHD Pacific Ltd. 

Michael Murad, the bank's deputy 
chairman, said withdrawals were heavier 
than normal. “It is a minor ran, and we 
have not computed tbe exact numbers,” 
he said. “The rumors have been spread- 
ing for no reason,” he added. “Tbe fun- 
damentals of rhk institution are strong, 
and we’ll continue to be strong.” 

He said the bank had 5.6 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($724.5 million) in cash. 
The bank had a capital base of 28.3 
billion dollars at the end of June. 

Mr. Murad said the bank's 28 
branches would remain open well after 


their usual closing time to accommodate 
customers. 

“When I went shoppin g, I saw many 
people lining up in front of the bank,” 
one woman waiting in line said. ‘T did 
not know what was happening, but since 
1 have a savings account in this bank, I 
lined up too.” 

Arab Banking Cotp. announced its full 
backing for its subsidiary, saying Inter- 
national Bank of Asia “is folly capable of 
mating all of its obligations” and that 
the' parent company would provide ad- 
ditional support to reassure depositors. 

Analysts said tbe fundamentals of the 
sector were sound and that most banks 
were well capitalized. (AP, AFX ) 


• Prince Walid ibn Talal of Saudi Arabia bought a 3 percent 
stake in the common stock of tbe Malaysian carmaker Proton 
Bbd. for $46 million. 

• International Business Machines Corp. plans to make 
Tokyo the sole headquarters for its personal-computer mar- 
keting and sales operations in die Asia-Pacific region and will 
transfer some management functions there from Sydney. 

• Nissan Motor Co. said its parent-company current profit for 
the six months that ended Sept 30 jumped 47 percent, to 45.36 
billion yen ($364.9 million), as die weak yen bolstered exports, 
offsetting a slump in domestic sales. Revenue rose to 1.78 
trillion yen from 1.74 trillion yen. 

■ Singapore Aircraft Leasing Enterprise, a unit of Singa- 
pore Airlines LtcL, said two new investors. Temasek Hold- 
ings Pte. and Government of Singapore Investment Corp_ 
would each pay $62.5 million for stakes of 14.5 percent each 
in Singapore Aircraft Leasing. 


• Mondex, an electronic-cash venture led by MasterCard 
International Inc. , made its commercial debut in Hong Kong. 
The venture distributes an international debit card for use in 
small transactions such as those at newsstands. 

• Australis Media Ltd. is Likely to begin insolvency pro- 
ceedings by Dec. 1 . The pay-television company, which had 
been seeking to merge with a rival, Foxtel Ltd., trad losses of 
735 million Australian dollars ($510.8 million) as of March. 

• General Motors Corp. plans to sell its Opel Corsa in India. 
GM already sells its larger Opel Astra car in India through its 
50-50 joint venture with the C.K. Birla group of companies, 
which owns India’s oldest carmaker. Hindustan Motors Ltd. 

• Indonesia’s 1998 coffee production will be sharply below 
normal, traders said, because of a drought linked to the El Nino 
weather pattern. Some said a bumper crop in Vietnam could 
push that country past Indonesia as the world’s third- largest 
producer, after Brazil and Colombia. Bloomberg. ap. Reuters 


Territory’s Luxury Retailers Feeling the Pinch 


Bloomberg News 

1HONG KONG — In a city where 
stocks and shopping for designer-1 
clothes arc considered on a par with breathing. 
.Asia's economic turmoil is choking Hong 
Kong retailers. Few are counting on a merry 
Christmas shopping season or a lucrative 
. Chinese New Year. 

Rising interest rales — triggered by the 
government's attempts to defend the Hong 
Kong dollar against currency speculators — 
mean people are losing their savings in the 
stock market and paying more on their mort- 
gages. That leaves them with less money for 
shopping — terrible news in this territory, 
where consumer spending accounts for 3bout 
i wo- thirds of the local economy. 

Al is even -tougher for luxury retailers. 


whose sales have already been hurt by a sharp 
decline in tourism, particularly in big-spend- 
ing visitors from Japan. 

Businesses like Dickson Concepts (Inter- 
national) Ltd., which barely two months ago 
cemented a $322 million buyout of Barney’s 
Inc. in New York City, are starting to play it 
safe. Most recently, the company’s chairman, 
Dickson Poon, passed up the opportunity to 
add Paloma Picasso and Vereace Classic to his 
company's stable of brand names. 

Mr. Poon cited an expecied downturn to 
explain his decision against acquiring Shia- 
mas Lid., which is based in Hong Kong and 
which distributes the two labels. 

“There's no question the retail environ- 
ment has been seriously affected by recent 
-evenis.”.he said_ - 


Coca-Cola 
Buys Bottler 
In Korea 

i '.r^d.tlhv Owr SteS Fnmt Pupa* bn 

: SEOUL — Coca-Cola Co. 
said Monday it would acquire 
the soft drink bottling assets 
tof Doosan Beverage Co. for 
’432.2 billion won ($441.1 
million), giving it control 
over bottling, distribution and 
idles of Coca-Cola products 
tliroughout South Korea. 

The deal capped Coca- 
Cola's drive to set up a direct 
disrribution and bottling net- 
work in South Korea since 
March. The company ac- 
quired two other Korean bot- 
tlers. Honam Foods Co. and 
Woosung Food Co., as part of 
the campaign. 

Tbe drive prompted a law- 
suit by one local bottler. Bum 
A ang Food Co., which said it 
F shpuid have been given more 
time to move from Coca-Cola 
to other business. 

Bum Yang won the law- 
suit. which was followed by a 
ruling in August from South 
Korea's Fair Trade Commis- 
sion that ordered Coca-Cola 
to. resume supplies of concen- 
trate to the Korean company 
until the end of the year. 

The dispute has been fol- 
lowed closely because it 
could set a precedent for cases 
involving other foreign 
companies thar hope to take 
advantage of liberalization in 
South Korea to acquire more 
control over their businesses. 

.Oriental Brewery. 

Doosan s flagship, said its 

deal with Coca-Cola would 

help it raise funds for a re- 
structuring program. Doosan 
is Korea's 14th-largest indus- 
trial group, with interests in 
brewing, soft drinks, con- 
struction and machinery. 

Coca-Cola has about 59 
percent of Korea’s $1 bilhon 
soft drink market, according 
to Beverage Digest, an in- 
dustry publication. PepsiCo 
Inc. has 12.3 percent. 

"By bringing all of the 
country under the direct man- 
agement of the Coca-Cola 
system, we will now be able 
ii> farther strengthen ourbusi- 
ncss throughout Korea, «u« 
Douglas Daft, president or toe 
company's Middle and Far 
East division. 

All Doosan employees 
who had been working in the 
Coca-Cola bouling busmess 
are being offend jobs at 
Coca-Cola Korea Bottling- 

I AFP. Bloomberg) 


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PAGE 20 


OTTTOWnMUL 


Sports 


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER II, 1#7 


World Roundup 


Grand Prix Teams 

Face Accusations 

formula one The International 
Automobile Federation on Monday 
summoned the Williams and 
McLaren to its council meeting 
over allegations that the two British 
Formula One teams colluded in last 
month's European Grand Prix. 

The federation said the teams 
would attend the meeting in England 
on Tuesday at which Michael Schu- 
macher will be questioned about his 
collision with Jacques Villeneuve in 
the last race of the season. 

British newspapers have report- 
ed that Schumacher's defense will 
refer to claims that McLaren and 
Williams colluded during the race. 
Hie newspapers reported that after 
Schumacher crashed, the McLar- 
en’s drivers — MikJca Hakkinen 
and David Coulthard — prevented 
the second Ferrari driver. Eddie 
Irvine, from catching Villeneuve 
and that, in return. Villeneuve al- 
lowed the McLarens to overtake 
him on the last lap. ( Reuters ) 

New Zealand Chases 319 

cricket Australia declared its 
second innings closed at 294 runs for 
six wickets Monday in the first test 
in Brisbane, setting New Zealand a 
target of 319 runs to win. At the 
dose. New Zealand had scored four 
without losing a wicket (Reuters) 

Davenport Climbs 

TENNIS Lindsay Davenport beat 
Nathalie Tauziat of France. 6-0, 7- 
5, in the Ameritech Cup final in 
Chicago on Sunday to jump from 
No. 5 to No. 3 in the world rank- 
ings. (AP) 

Konstantinov Released 

ICE HOCKEY Vladimir Kon- 
stantinov, the Detroit Red Wings 
defenseman, was released from the 
hospital Sunday, nearly five 
months after a limousine crash that 
left him comatose. (AP) 

Hawaii Is Perfect for Love 

GOLF Davis Love won the Final 
Kapalua 'International in Hawaii, 
closing witK’a'£urider 68 Sunday to 
beat David Toms by three strokes. 
After a one-year break, Kapalua 
will be the site of the season-open- 
ing Mercedes Championships. 

• Mark Calcavecchia shot a 1- 
under 71 Sunday for a three-stroke 
victory over Lee Westwood of Eng- 
land in the Sarazen World Open at 
Braselton, Florida. Calcavecchia 
birdied four of his fust six holes to 
take a 10-stroke lead. (AP) 



Bilk S Le. Aik A«-.i4aJ heii 

Mark Calcavecchia celebrat- 
ing victory on the 18th green. 


Raiders Hit Bottom 
As the Saints March 

Hapless Colts (0-10) Lose to Bengals; 
Redskins Handily Tame Lions, 30-7 


The Associated Press 

The Oakland Raiders' season hit a 
new low when they fell to the New 
Orleans Saints, a team that was blanked 
in its last two games. 

'The‘ Raiders lost, 13-10, on Sunday 
and their record for the season slid'to 3- 
7, the same as that of the Saints. 

‘'There's not a real good feeling right 
now," said Joe Bugel, the Oakland 
coach. "We feel bad. We feel awful. 
Every loss is just bitter." 

The Raiders, whose motto is "com- 
mitment to excellence," like to boast 
about their record over the decades. 

NFL Roundup 

But this season only winless Indiana- 
polis has won fewer games in the 
AFC! 

The Raiders had the worst defense in 
the league heading into the weekend, 
and holding New Orleans to just 13 
points was not any great feat: the Saints 
have scored only 130 all season, the 
fewest in the league. 

But New Orleans did rally from a 10- 
0 deficit. Ray Zellars tied the game with 
a 1-yard touchdown run on the first play 
of the fourth period, and Doug Brien 
made a 44-yam Field goal with 2:57 to 
go to hand Oakland its third consecutive 
defeat 

“It was a struggle for us all game 
offensively," said Jeff George, the Oak- 
land. quarterback. The Raiders gained 
only 221 yards in total offense, just 32 on 
the ground "We have to go out there and 
play for pride and get this thing rolling — 
you hate to say it — for next year." 

Bengal* 28, Colts ia Another team 
anxious for next year is Indianapolis, 
which became the First NFL club since 
1993 1 Wlosd its first 10 games when it 
fell to Cincinnati. The Bengals were 0- 
10 in 1993, then won Game 11. The 
Colts aren't likely to do that because 
they play the Super Bowl champion 
Green Bay Packers this week. Indiana- 
polis's third-string quarterback, Kelly 
Holcomb, was jacked ^^timesand 
mteroeptedj two of which 

led to touchdowns by the B&hgals. 

Redskins 30, Lions 7 The Detroit 
Lions have lost every game they have 
ever played against the Redskins in 
Washington, and Sunday was no ex- 
ception. 

But Detroit’s Barry Sanders became 


land broke a three-game losing streak. 

Host Buffalo could do little right of- 
fensively. Its quarterback, Alex Van 
Pelt, was 3 -for- 12 for 38 ytirds and had 
three interceptions before he was 
benched at the start of the second half. 

Dolphins 24, dsts 17 Even with a sore 
ankle, Dan Marino showed his mastery 
of the Jets. The Dolphins have won 
seven straight meetings with New York 
when Marino has started He threw for 
1S6 yards and one score, while Karim 
Abdul-Jabbar ran for two TDs in 

Miami . 

The Jets were hurt by a controversial 
call late in the game, when Wayne 
Chrebet was ruled to have dropped a 
pass when he hit the ground The re- 
ception would have gained a first down 
for the Jets deep in Dolphins’ territory. 
On replays, it appeared that Chrebet 
legally caught the pass. 

Steflion 37, Romms o Pittsburgh in- 
tercepted three of Vinny Testaverde’s 
passes in the first quarter ami then in- 
tercepted three more off Testaverde’s 
replacement, Eric Zeier. 

Jerome Bettis finished with 114 
yards, his second 100-yard game 
against the Ravens this season and His 
seventh in the S teeters’ 10 games. 

Jaguars 24, chiefs 10 The Jaguars, 
although plagued with injuries, still 
overwhelmed the Chiefs. Jacksonville's 
star tackle, Tony Boselli, did not play, 
and the Jags’ quarterback, Mark 
BruneU, and one of their defensive 
tackles, Don Davey. were lost during 
the game. 

Jacksonville won its Uth straight 
borne game, picking off two passes by 
Rich Gannon, who was replacing the 
injured Elvis Grbac. Gannon lost three 
fumbles and was sacked six times. 

Broncos 34, Pant! w»i o Denver's de- 
fense and special teams manhandle d the 
visiting Panthers, who were shutout for 
die first time in their three-year ex- 
istence. Darrien Gordon returned two 
punts (82 and 75 yards) for touch- 
downs. 

[Tyrone ^Braxton returned an intaf^ 

lone touchdown by the Denver offense 
on a 20-yard pass to Rod Smith. 

Soahawfcs 37, Chargors 31 In San 
Diego, Warren Moon of the Seahawks, 
who will be 41 on Nov. 18, threw for 
295 yards and two touchdowns, includ- 



3 ittsburgh in- scvranw/riiWi 

Testaverde’s Jerome Bettis of the Steelers, center, powering over the goal line for a 1-yard touchdown burst in the fiftk 
ami then in- quarter against the Ravens. Bettis finished with 114 yards as Pittsburgh soundly trounced Baltimore, 37^0 
Testaverde’s U 

d with 114 

1-yard game ; I -’P 

ST These Hurricanes Can’t Whip Up Fan& 

injuries. still M. ■ M. ■ 


jttyjrftsstjilayer inNFLhistoiy torushfo^.. 7T ug a 40-yarder to Joey Galloway with 
1.000 yards for nine consecutive sea- 2:20 left- 


sons with his second carry of the game. 
Sanders also overtook Tony Dorseit for 
thud place on the league's career rush- 
ing list, with a 10-yard run off right 
tackle. Sanders, in his ninth season, 
went into the game needing 17 yards to 
pass Dorset!, who had 12,739 yards in 
12 seasons. Sanders now trails only 
Walter Payton ( 16,726) and Eric Dick- 
erson 113^59). 

09wi 10 , Giants 8 Before 26,744 at 
the Liberty BowL Eddie George ran for 
113 yards, and a touchdown, and Ten- 
nessee sacked Danny Kane 11 three 
times, ending New York's five-game 
winning streak. 

An Oilers’ safety, Marcus Robertson, 
ended the Giants last chance when be 
picked off a Kanell pass with 1 :46 left 

patriots 31, Buis io Derrick CuLlors's 
86-yard -kickoff runback for a touch- 
down got the Patriots going, and a line- 
backer, Chris Slade, deflected a pass to 
himself for another score as New Eng- 


ln games reported in late editions. 
Monday: 

packers 17, Rams 7 Green Bay won 
its 21st straight regular-season home 
game as Antonio Freeman caught seven 
passes for 160 yards and a touchdown. 

VBdngs 29, Boars 22 In Minneapolis, 
Leroy Hoard’s 1-yard run with 54 
seconds left rallied Minnesota to its 
sixth straight victory. 

Ptt ccanti ri 31, Falcons 10 Tampa 
Bay moved within a victory of its first 
non-losing season since 1982, as Brad 
Culpepper had three sacks and Trent 
Differ threw two TD passes. 

Cowboys 24, Cardinals 6 The Cow- 
boys evened their record at 5-S with a 
victory over the visiting Arizona Car- 
dinals. They fashioned it with nine 
sacks, two rare rushing touchdowns and 
another big play by Herschel Walker. 
Walker beat linebacker Jamir Miller on 
an 1 1-yard touchdown pass from Troy 
Aikman with 1:04 left in the half. 


The Associated Press 

Fans seared in the upper level could 
hear die players talking to each other 
down on the ice. Some of the loudest 
noises came as the doors slammed on 
the players' benches during line 
changes. . • 

Welcome to the Greensboro Coli- 
seum, temporary home of the NHL’s 
Carolina Hurricanes, where there are 
plenty of good seats available. While 
the franchise waits for a new arena to 
be built 75 miles (120 kilometers) 
away in Raleigh, the Hurricanes are 
playing in Greensboro, where the fans 
clearly aren't interested in supporting 
a team that's going to move in two 

JyigLrs:'/ ; t i ; col 

. .Carolina, s 4-1 victory overJbtttawa-.. 
' orr Sunday* n%ht drew 5,551jffefipld?” 
the smallest crowd in the NHL this 
season. The previous low was a gath- 
ering of 6,083 — last month in Greens- 
boro. 

Club officials are trying to attract 
more people to the 20,800-seat fa- 
cility. They’ve even given every sea- 
son ticket holder one extra seat in an 
attempt to expose more people to the 
Hurricanes. Tne team is doing its part, 
too. Sunday's victory was Carolina’s 
third in its past four home games. 

The Hurricanes overpowered the 
Ottawa goaltender, Ron Tugnutt, who 
came in with a league-best average of 
1 -54 goals. Carolina scored three times 
against Tugnutt, including power-play 
goals in the second and third periods. 


Keith Primean had two goals and an 
assist to help the Hurricanes end Ot- 
tawa’s three-game road winning 
streak. 

Carolina's goaltender, Sean Burke, 
played for the first time since being 
jailed one week earlier for allegedly 
beating his wife, Leslie. He sat on the 
bench for the first two periods but 
played the entire third after a groin pull 

NHL Roundup 

sidelined Trevor Kidd. Burke stopped 
all 12 shots he faced, including seven 


to Buffalo on Nov. 4. Washington* 
played without the forward Chris Sr 1 * 
moo, who was suspended by. 
league for allegedly using a racial slu^ 
against Edmonton’s Mike Grier duig 
ing Saturday night's game Sr 
Landover. Simon is out indefinite!^ § 
pending a hearing by the league. ** * 

Simon, an American Indian, made,, 
the remark to Grier at the end of the 
game Saturday, some players and two 
on-ice officials said. 

‘'That’s what was strange to mrt*; 
that it was someone who has his bac^ 
ground and his race,” Grier said Sun** 


during a power play when the Senators day. “I didn’t expect it to come fropij£ 
had a two-man »3 vantage. • . anotherminoriry. It’s jusu tittle more 


another minority, it’s just a little i 


w u^his « 

9f&r the gamfe’ that he bad grabbed his Tribe heritage with' long hair andi*u 

...r. i l,:. i i_„_ r — i . i 


wife, pulled her hair and thrown heron 
a couch during an argument 

4 ‘It should nave never got as for as it 
did, and I regret it terribly that it 
happened that way,” be said. “It’snot 
samething that I'm proud of." 

Panther* 3, Capitals 2 In Miami, it 
was a day of comebacks and suspen- 
sions as Florida beat Washington on 
Rob Niedennayer’s goal with 29 
seconds left. It was the first time that 
the Panthers had won back-to-back 
games this season. 

Florida’s coach, Doug MacLean, 
was making his return to the bench 
after’ being suspended for two games 
by the NHL for harassing an official 
following the Panthers’ overtime loss 


tattoo, had no comment on the issud^ 
The Oilers’ coach, Ron Low, said: "Li. 
definitely heard a racial slur from MfT" 
Simon. I thought with his jace and 
proud background that he wouldn't do 
that” C: 

R«d wfngs«,Fionws3 Brendan ShamG 
nahan and Igor Larionov each hai(£i 
three points* as Detroit beat visiting,'- 
Calgary. 

Shanahan hod two goals and an as- , 
sist, while Larionov tad one goal an£r 
two assists. CaJe Hulse had two goajjs'j 
for the Flames. ks 

Detroit, which outshot Calgary 3^ , 
27, got goals from Jamie Pusher, Doug " 
Brown and Shanahan for a 3-0 firsts 
period lead. • : 


O’Neal’s Formula for Victory: Win 


3 


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The Associated Press 

Shaquille O'Neal has a simple for- 
mula for the Los Angeles Lakers to 
follow this season. 

“Win all of our home games, beat the * 
teams we’re supposed ro beat, and stay 
above JOO on the road," O’Neal said 
after a dominating performance against 
the Golden State Warriors on Sunday. 
"If we can do that, then we should have 
a pretty good record, and a pretty good 
standing going into the playoffs." 

O’Neal, who has returned from a 
strained abdominal muscle, scored 27 
points and pulled down 19 rebounds as 
the Lakers raised their record to 4-0 with 
a 132-97 victory over Golden State. 

The Lakers, who led from start to 
finish, are off to their best start since the 
1 987-88 season. The Atlanta Hawks (&- 
0) are the only other unbeaten team. 


O’Neal, who has missed two games 
this season, came out of the game with 
1:59 left in the' third quarter and the 
Lakers leading, 88-61. 

“It’s probably going to take me about 
two more practices ana two more games 

to be at 100 percent,’’ he said. “Right 
now I’m about 88.725221 “ 

O’Neal scored seven points during a 
12-0 run to start the second half, which 
gave the Lakers a 73-46 lead. 

The Warriors (0-6) were never in 
contention after the Lakers blitzed them 
at the start of the third period. 

Kobe Bryant came off the bench to 
score a career-high 25 points for. the 
Lakers before -leaving with a sprained 
right ankle with 2:41 remaining 


CROSSWORD 


SufrarSonica 112 , 76ws 105 In Phil- 
adelphia, Vin Baker had 25rpoints and 
12 rebounds as Seattle won its fourth 
straight. Hersey Hawkins scored +20 

C ts for the Sorties, while Gary Payfon 
16 points. Allen Iverson led Pail-,- 
adelphia with 33 points and 10 assisjs. f. 

Kings 8«, Knicks 7a In Sacramerfto, 
Michael Stewart, a Kings roouie, 
sparked a rally with eight points apd 
eight rebounds in the fourth period as. the 
Kings won then first game of the seastjn. 
Milch Richmond scored 23 points. } 
Grizzlies 104, Pistons 96. In- Van- 
couver, British Columbia, Blue Edwards 
scored eight of his 16 points in overtfyie 
as the Grizzlies banded Detroit its fourth 
straight loss. Shareef Abdur-Rahim had 
22 points and 1 1 rebounds, and Bryant 
Reeves finished with 22 jpoints and 10 
rebounds for the Grizzlies. 


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park} 

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32 It comes after 
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37 Midgame 
broadcasts 
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44 Part of an 
academic yr. 

45 Sicilian epouter 


Solution to Puzzle of Nov.10 


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48 Dance version 
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5 2 ‘Comprende?' 

53 Clump 

54 Make sense, 

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Whopper, 
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sa Waters: Fr. 

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22 Homes 
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39 Artificially made 
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49 Trounced, in 
sports 

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•Shorts. 


* — * 
































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER II, 1997 PlAGE 21 

SPORTS 




■ U.S. Is En Route to Paris, 
But Jamaica Must Wait 


Americans Beat Canada to Clinch World Cup Berth 


By Steven Goff 

Washington Past Service 




-OL 

% 


.i % Vv^-4 


* ; BURNABY, British Columbia — The U.$, 
national soccer team’s year-long pursuit of a 
■berth in the 1998 World Cup came to a 
; euphoric end with a 3-0 victory over 
at tiny S wangard Stadium here. 

Roy Wegerie, a 33-year-old forward whose 
■international career appeared to have come to 
an end, played brilliantly on one of the biggest 
. ! days in U.S. soccer history. He set up Claudio 

World Soccer 

r 

Reyna s early goal and scored two of his own 
/'in the closing minutes to send Team USA to 
. the World Cop for die third consecutive time, 
;a U.S. first since the tournament began in 
1930. 

a* a “It’s not the end. It is just the beginning,” 

% l ' said Steve Sampson, the coach. “This r** m is 
‘ - -only going to get better. There were some 
games we know we could have played better. 

■ But next summer we will represent the United 
: States not only in name, but in style.” 

The U.S. squad was. able toclinch one of the 
; three berths from the region made up of North 
| and Central America and die Caribbean be- 
; cause everything worked out perfectly: The 
Americans won, Costa Rica only managed a 
3^3 tie against unbeaten Mexico and El Sal- 
vador and Jamaica played to a 2-2 draw. 

. Mexico secured a spot last week. The final 

? [berth will be determined next weekend. El 
Salvador needs to beat the United States in 
Foxboro, Massachusetts, and hopes Jamaica 
loses at borne to the Mexicans. 

With about 10 minutes remaining and the 
U.S. team clinging to a 1 -0 lead, the news came 
though of the result in San Salvador. Word 
quickly spread to the players on die field. 

Less than a minute later, Wegerie clinched 
| ■ victory, getting tree in the penalty area and 
1 beating the goalkeeper Paul Dolan for a 2-0 
. lead. He added another in the final seconds. 

“Once we heard the El Salvador score, we 
1 wanted to get our game over with,’ * Wegerie 
; said. “It was a long few minutes.” 


In other soccer , news agencies reported: 

E) Salvador 2, j a wo i ra 2 Walter Guerra 
scored with three minutes left to salvage a tie 
for El Salvador. Brazilian-born Nildeosos 
Silva de Mello gave El Salvador a 47th-minute 
lead. Deon Burton headed Jamaica’s equalizer 
four minutes later and Donaldo Stewart put 
Jamaica in front with 12 minutes left. 

Mexico 3, C otta Me* 3 In Mexico City, 
Costa Rica stormed back from a 3-1 deficit to 

far^the finals- Paulo Cesar Wanchope^con^ 
nected from the right with about three minutes 
remaining to tie the seme. Mexico played 
several second-stringers. 

Bora Mflutinovic. the Mexican coach, was 
again booed by fans. Even though he has led 
Mexico to die World Cop finals his future is to 
be reviewed by die Mexican soccer federation 
later this month. 

Spain Struggling Valladolid ended Bar- 
celona’s unbeaten start to the league season 
with a 2-1 victory in Barcelona on Sunday 
night Eusebio, a former Barcelona player, 
scored early in die first half. Alen Petemak, a 
Croatian striker, put the visitors two goals 
ahead at the start of the second half. Juan 
Pizzi, a substitute, scored in injury time for 
Barcelona. 

France Olympique Marseille won at Paris 
St. Germain, 2-1, to earn a share of first place 
in the French first division. Olympique is 
level with PSG — which had not been beaten 
ar home this season — and Metz. It is the first 
time the fonner European champion has been 
top in the standings since it was relegated in 
1994 for match-rigging. 

Xavier Ora v ela m e put Marseille ahead in 
the 14th minute. Jerome Leroy, who came on 
after only 10 minutes when Florian Maurice 
twisted an ankle, equalized in die 35th. 

Laurent Blanc won the match with a 64th- 
min nte penalty after Fabrizio Ravanelli had 
fallen in the penalty area. Replays showed 
Ravanelli tripped over his own legs. 

' ‘He’s a cheat, ’ ’ said Claude Le Roy, PSG’s 
sports director. “We lost because of a cheat” 

“I was fouled,” Ravanelli said. “There's 
no doubt about it What can a coach see from 


Thomas Dooley, the U.S. captain, sliding in to tackle Jason Bent of Canada. 


the bench,” he said. After the match, PSG fans 
angry with the result started a small fire in the 
stands and confronted riot police. One officer 
was hurt and carried out on a stretcher. 

■ Yugoslavs Pick Strongest Squad 

Slobodan Santrac, the Yugoslav national 
coach, ignored pressure from Spain and 
named his strongest squad Monday for Sat- 
urday’s World Cup play-off with Hungary, 


even though Yugoslavia leads, 7-1, from the 
first leg in Budapest. Reuters reported from 
Belgrade. 

The Spanish league has one round of 
matches Wednesday and another over the 
weekend. Spanish clubs had asked the 
Yugoslav Football Federation to release sev- 
en players based in Spain. The Federation said 
it will free the players for matches on Wed- 
nesday but not for the weekend. 


‘IlMago’Is Gone , 
His Style Remains 


By Rob Hughes 

Intertutionui Hetjld Tribune 

The death in Venice on 
Sunday of Helenio Herrera 
ends the life, but not the in- 
fluence. of a soccer coach 
whose style and salary were 
ahead of their time. Indeed, as 
Italy's players prepare for a 
World Cup eliminator against 
Russia this weekend, their 
training focuses on the etern- 
ally copied HeiTera catenae- 
do method of swift counter- 
attack out of dour defense. 

Herrera died of heart fail- 
ure at the age of 8 1 . Though 
not born Italian, he devised 
the safety-first credo of 
stifling the opposition before 
striking — a style that fits the 
Italian character like a cloak. 
None of Italy’s present gen- 
eration of players was alive 
when Herrera’s great days 
with Intemazionale of Milan 
ended, but their fathers were, 
and one of those, Cesare 
Maldini, the national coach, 
has restored to his squad the 
strategy that begins with a de- 
fensive sweeper. 

H-H was bom in Buenos 
Aires in 1916 of Spanish par- 
ents. His father, a carpenter, 
look the family to Casablanca 
when Helenio was 3. Street 
soccer in a poor Moroccan 
quarter led to Herrera's next 
move, to Club Francois in Par- 
is. A fullback, wily rather than 
especially gifted, he took 
French citizenship, did his 
military service, married and 
fathered four children, before 
leaving them to marry again in 
Spain where he initially joined 
Valladolid. 

He coached Atletico Mad- 
rid to the Spanish league title 
in 1950 and 1951. Dedicated 


and dogmatic, he established 
prematch rituals that required 
players to touch the ball and 
chant: "The European Cup! 
We shall have it! We shall ! 
We shall!'' 

He created turbulence in 

the boardrooms, and in 
nightclubs. He was fired, and 
passed through Malaga, Co- 
runa, then Seville, where he 
insulted a director and was 
banished to Portugal. Bar- 
celona gave him the budget to 
build a team of Hungarians 
(Kocsis, Czibor. Kubalnb a 
Brazilian. Paraguayan. Ur- 
uguayan and. the best in 
Spain. Luis Suarez. He drove 
up transfer prices and the 
manager's salary, drove some 
good players out with his re- 
gimentation. 

Barcelona won the Spanish 
championship in N59 and 
1960. Then, leaving behind 
family No. 2, he wed an Itali- 
an journalist and began his 
crowning period, cajoling 
Inter to three Serie A tri- 
umphs, two European Cups 
and two World Club Cups in 
1964 and 1965. Players who 
could take his weekend ritiri 
were enriched, but none more 
so than Herrera, soccer’s first 
SlOO.OOO-a-year employee. 

He was by then emulated 
worldwide. Herrera and Mi- 
lan flourished until Angelo 
Morarti. an oil baron and fa- 
ther of Inter's present owner. 
Massimo, was ousted as pres- 
ident. Herrera went south to 
A.S. Roma, onward and up- 
ward in salary terms, but his 
personal heyday was over. // 
Mago. the Magician, is no 
more, but his disciples are 
everywhere. 

Roh Hughes is on the staff 
of The Times of London 


Scoreboard 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


ATLANTIC DMBION 



W 

L 

Pd 

G8 

New Jersey 

4 

1 

JDO 

— 

Miami 

4 

2 

467 

Vi 

New York 

3 

3 

300 

IVi 

Oricmdo 

3 

3 

-500 

IVi 

Washington 

2 

4 

333 

2VS 

Boston 

1 

5 

.167 

3V4 

PhSodetphia 0 5 

CENTRAL DIVtoKM 

jOOO 

4 

Altoato 

6 

0 

IjOOO 

— 

Milwaukee 

4 

1 

.BOO 

114 

ChartotTe 

4 

2 

467 

2 

Chicago 


2 

467 

2 

Clevetand 

2 

3 

400 

314 

Detraff 

2 

4 

.333 

4 

Indiana 


4 

J33 

4 

Toronto 

1 

4 

.200 

4V4 

WHTnNcoffmMci 

MDWEST DtVISJON 



W 

L 

Pd 

GB 


4 

1 

-800 

— 

San Antordo 

4 

1 

-BOO 

— 

Date 

3 

2 

400 

1 

Houston 

3 

2 

400 

1 

Utah 

2 

4 

333 

2V4 

Vancouver 

2 

4 

333 

2V4 

Denver 

0 4 

PAOFto DIVISION 

JK0 

314 

LA Inkers 

4 

0 

uno 

— 

Seattle 

S 

1 

333 

— 

Portland 

4 

1 

300 

14 

Phoenix 

3 

1 

JS0 

1 

LA. CBppers 

1 

4 

200 

3V4 

Soaomanto 

1 

4 

200 

314 

Golden State 

0 

6 

.000 

5 

saHDWtnnm 


Seattle 

24 

34 

30 24-m 

PMtodtopWa 

26 

31 

28 38-105 


51 (Baker i2>. PNadeipNa 47 
(Weathenpoan 13). Assists— Seattle 29 
(Payton 14), PhtadeipMa 26 (tenon IQ. 
New York 29 17 21 11— 78 

Saaamato 21 22 20 23-86 

NX: Ewing 10-19 1-22L Oiflds 7-93-4 177 
5: Richmond 5-18 11-1I2Z WTAmbm 8-18 
2-218. Robamdt— New Ymfc 43 (OokJeyTCO, 
Sacramento 64 (WBSomsoa Stewat 10). 
Assists — New York 23 (Wbid 6), Sacramento 
20(Pcfyrtae5). 

GoUMSMo 26 20 22 29- 97 

UL Lahore 29 32 31 40-132 

GS_-Sm0h 10-21 60 20, Marshall 4-1244 
1Z LA: ONeal 10-177-1227. Biyantll-181- 
2 24 Fax 6-10 8-9 22. RWwands-Gotoen 
State 58 (Matchal 9), Los =Angefes 72 
(OtieaO. teste— Golden State 26 (Cotas. 
Bogues). lia Angela 35 (Rsfier 10). 

21 24 18 25 8 — M 
23 27 17 21 16— 184 
D: Hunter 10- 26 2-22Z Scaly 7-125-5 2ft V: 
AMar-Rahbn 6-14 10-14 22. Reeves 9-134-7 
22. Rs b a um H D etroit 40 (MB 10), 
Vancouver 59 (AbduF-Rahbn 11). 
Asstete— Oefioll 21 (HU 14), Vancouver 25 
(Peeler, Mayberry 6). 3). 


FOOTBALL 


NFL Standums 


Eitenan 10-16 24 21 Coleman 6-10 56 17. 
Stockhouse 8-14 0-1 17. RtbetmrH-Serrttte 



W 

L T 

pa 

PF 

PA 

Miami 

6 

4 

0 

400 

206 

W 

New England 

6 

4 

0 

400 

254 

165 

N-Y.Jets 

6 

4 

0 

400 

237 

196 

Buffalo 

5 

5 

0 

-500 

170 

225 

Intfia nopals 

010 0 
CENTRAL 

.000 

164 

258 

JacksomilBe 

7 

3 

a 

J00 

262 

202 

Pittsburgh 

7 

3 

0 

.700 

241 

200 

Tennessee 

5 

5 

0 

400 

217 

197 

Baltimore 

4 

6 

0 

400 

210 

231 

OndraiaJI 

3 

7 

0 

300 

191 

263 


Denver 

9 1 0 

400 

302 

160 

1 HOCKEY 



Kansas Qty 

7 3 0 

300 

204 

167 





^■1 

Seattle 

6 4 0 

400 

233 

238 

NHL Standings 


San Diego 

4 6 0 

400 

202 

251 




- 


Ooldaid 

3 7 0 

300 

237 

2 69 

umBHcownuM 

1 


NATIONAL CONTI 

BW 

a 


ATLANTIC OlVISfON 




EAST 





W L T 

Pta 

GF 

.«A 


W L T 

Pet 

PF 

PA 

PModeipNo 

ID 5 3 

23 

58 

45 

N.Y. Giants 

6 4 0 

400 

192 

190 

New Jersey 

10 5 0 

20 

47 

28 

Washington 

6 4 0 

400 

203 

152 

Washington 

9 7 2 

20 

50 

43 

Data 

5 5 0 

400 

212 

154 

N.Y. Isfcmdets 

7 6 3 

17 

49 

43 

PMarMpMo 

4 5 0 

444 

158 

190 

N.Y. Rangers 

4 6 7 

15 

42 

45 

Arizona 

2 8 0 

300 

170 

230 

Florida 

5 8 3 

13 

37 

50 


CENTRAL 




Tampa Bay 

2.12 2 

6 

78 

56 

Green Bay 

8 2 0 

300 

233 

176 

NORTHEAST KVJS*ON 



MbmaEOto 

.1.2 0 

400 

238 

201 


W L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

Tampa Boy 

7 3 0 

J00 

208 

172 

Montreal 

1.1 4 2 

24 

.56 

36 

DetroB : . 

4 6 0 

400 

197 305 

Boston 

10 6 1 

21 

43 

37 

CUcogo 

1 9 0 

.100 

167 

392 • 

Ottawa 

9 6 3 

21 

55 

45 


wear 




Pittsburgh 

8 7 4 

20 

52 

52 

San Francisco 

8 1 0 

489 

227 

108 

CaroSna 

6 9 3 

15 

47 

52 

Carolina 

5 5 0 

400 

166 

187 

Buffo lo 

5 8 3 

13 

39 

51 

NewOrteora 

3 7 0 

300 

131 

208 

wuiiui comma 


Aflrartn 

2 8 0 

300 

189 

271 

CENTRAL DrinmOM 



SL Louis 

2 8 0 

300 

171 

238 


W L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

MB 

SAZ'SHMin 



DaboR 

12 3 3 

27 

64 

40 

Ddkis 24. Arizona 6 




St Louis 

IT 5 2 

24 

S3 

40 

Minneaota 29, Chkago 22 




Date 

10 5 3 

23 

57 

44 

Qndmnfl2ft bxSartopofis 13 



Phoenix 

7 7 2 

16 

47 

44 

WasWngton 3ft DutroB 7 




Chicago 

7 10 0 

14 

33 

44 

Jodoonvflle 24, Kansas CBy 10 



Toronto 

4 B 3 

11 

29 

4S 

Miami 24. New^ York Jete 17 




RMCteC DIVISION 



Green Bay 17, St Louis 7 





W L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

Tampa Bay 31, Arionta 10 




Colorado 

8 3 6 

22 

55 

43 

Denver 34 Caraitaa 0 




Anoheint 

8 5 4 

20 

44 

42 

New England 31, Buffalo 10 




Las Angeles 

7 7 4 

18 

57 

50 

New (Means lft Oakland 10 



Erhnonton 

5 9 3 

13 

36 

55 

TemesMe 1ft New Yoik Oants 6 



San Jose 

5 11 1 

11 

40 

51 

Scathe 37, San Diego 31 




Cafgory 

3 12 3 

9 

48 

64 

Pfttobuigh 37, BaHhoare 0 




Vancouver 

3 12 2 

8 

39 

60 


Ntatermayer 3 (MeBonby. Sven la) Shots on 
goal: W 13-6-11—30. F- 4-7-13-24. Cedes: 
W-Ranford. F-Vanblesbrouc*. 

Calgary 0 3 8-3 

Detroit 3 2 1-4 

Flrat Perite D-Pushor I (Mattby, Draper) Z 
D- Brown 6 IGfchrtst Pvshor) X D- 
Sh an ahan 7 (Eriksson. Larionov) Second 
Period: C-HuHe I (Iglnla, Hoglund) ft C- 
Ftoury 6 (Mdrnifc) 6. C-Hutse 2 (Ffeury) (sh). 
7, D-Shanahan 8 (Larionov, Yzerraan) (pp). 
ft D-Lo1onw3 (Shanahan Yzeiman) Third 
Period: D- Draper 4 (WanO Shots an goal: C- 
7-10-10-27. D- 8-17-8-33. GoaGes: C- 
Tabaraori. D-Osgood. 

Ottawa .0 10-1 

(Man 1-12-4- 

Hrst Period: UMeffl 2 (Leach. Hate) 
Second Period: O-KravOruk 2 (YasNn 
Daigle) Z C-Lesdryshyn 1 (Roberta, 
Prtmeau) (pp). Third Period: C-Prtmeoo 4 
(CtikBson Brawn) (pp). & C-Prtmeau 5, 
Shots on god: O- 68-12-26. C- 9-8-5-22. 
: O-Tirgnutt. C-KJdi Burke. 


CRICKET 


Plantation Couroo 
Bey Cowee in Hawaii 
Davis Love III 
David Toms 
0ln Browne 
John Cook 
Mike Hulberi 
Bob Estes 

iOrk Triplett 
Chris Smith 
Jim McGovern 
BlBy Mayfair 


and ft531-yard. par-71 

67-6667-68-268 

63- 7067-71—271 

64- 726769— 277 
69-70-7164—274 

66- 71-7067-274 
69606968-274 
7065-71 68-Z74 
716966-70-276 
696968-70—776 

67- 7166-72-276 


VVolfsbuig 17; TSV I860 Munich 1ft Cologne 
lft- Bonrsslo Dortmund 15. Armlnta BtefefeJd 
15. KnrtsruheSC lft Hertha Berlin IS, Warder 
Bremen 15: VfL Bochum 11 


CFL Playoffs 


MTMON NHASS 


Toronto 37. Montreal 30 

WESTDtVIStON 

Saskatchewan 31. Edmonton 30 


1 • 1— 2 
1 I 2-3 
first Period: W-Berabe 3 (Hunter) Z F-. 
Whitney 1 (Laos) Sacend Period: None. 
TIM Period: W-Bondra 8 (Cota Oates) ft F- 
SveNo 1 (Meflooby. Niedermayer) ft F- 


FWtST TEST. FOURTH DAY 
MONDAY, M BRISBANE. AUSTRALIA 
Australia 1st Innings; 373 
New Zealand 1st tarings: 349 
Australia 2d innings 2946 declared 
(overnight 25-1) 

New Zeatond 2d Innings 4 for no toss 


KAWftLUA INTERNATIONAL 

Leading fl nalBCorue from the SI JlmODon 
Kapaluo IraamadonaL piayed an dw 
Kapriua Rasorfs 7.263-yard, per- 73 


S abazen World Open 

Learfing final eeorea Scnday at the S2 
mIBtan Sarazan Worid Open on die 7.000- 
yard, par-72 The Leganda at Chateau Ban 
cotaaa to Bt as ebon. fi a o r gl a r 
Marik Colarrectfito 6267-71-71— Z7i 

Lae Westwood 7165-7668-774 

Mark McNulty 7466-7069-279 

VBay Singh 6969-70-71-279 

SarttHoch 696969-74-281 

Peter DMa8ey 7066-74-72-282 

David Duval 7168-70-73-282 

Steve Jones 6968-74-73—284 

Frank NoWlo 716969-75-284 

Arden Knot) 72-70-71-72-285 


FRKNCM FIRST DIVISION 

Prats St Germafo.l Otympiaue Marseille 2 
Monacal Nantes 2 

sruawusi PSG 30 potnta Metz 30, Mar- 
seille 3ft Bonteoitt 2ft Monaco 2ft Lens 2& 
Auxerre 21 Bastta 21 Montpeflier 2ft Lyon 
2ft Toulouse 2ft Nantes lft Gulngamp 15, 
Cheteauraax l& Strasbourg 14 Le Havre 11 
Rennes lft Cannes 1 1 . 


Tenerife 1. Cello 3 
Barcelona 1, VolladaBd 2 
STANDINGS: FC Barcelona 25 points; Red 
Madrid 21. Cello 21; AHettco Madrid 7ft Red 
Sodedod 2ft Molorco 19. Espanyol lft Ath- 
letic Bilbao lft Oviedo 14 Beth 11 Zaragoza 
II, Merida n, Tenerife II; Comparieta lft 
Roctog lft Deporilvo ft Valencia & Valladolid 
ft- Salamanca ft- Spoiling 1. 

WORID CUD QUAUFTtMO 
COMCACAP.RKALS 

Conada ft United Statu 3 
El SafvadarZ Jamaica 2 
Mexico 3. Costa Rica 3 


TENNIS 


IN SANTIAGO. CHILE 
FINAL 

JuGan Alonso (4), Spain, del Morale Rios 
(U.ChOn 6-Z6-1. 


Leman. RHP Carlos Reyes. RHP AiUkc 
RossiterondC Creighton Gubanich on I -year 
Contracts. 

RASKETMLL 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
ATLANTA— Signed G Randy Livingston. Re- 
leased G Donald Whiteside. 

boston — Put F Danfoe Janes and F John 
Thomas on InhJied list. AOnrotCd G Tyus Ed- 
ney and F Greg Minor. 

CHARLOTTE HORNETS— Traded G Muggsy 
Bogues and G Tony Ddk to Golden Stale G 
BJ. Armstrong. Ad (voted F Travis Wflboms 
from injured list. 

CHtCAOO— Put C Bit Wendngion an the 
inlirred list. Adhnned F Keith Booth. 

COLDEH STATE— Put F Dickey Simpkms an 
injured 1st Activated G Bnon Shaw. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
green bay— Signed SS Leroy Butler lo 5- 
year contract extension. 

pnTSBURGH— Deactivated LB Carlos Em- 
mons. DB Lemon F Lowers. WR Corey Hol- 
Dday, and OT Paul Wiggins. 

TENNEnES— 5)gned WR isaoc Byrd. 


IN CHICAGO 
FINAL 

Undsay Davenport, lift. <31 del Nathalie 
Touztat. France. 641 7-5. 


TRANSITIONS 


l/fL Bochum ft VfB Stuttgart 2 
nANDONW Kahersfouleni 33 pokita 
B oyem Munich 2ft Sdialke 04 2ft* VfB 
Shrttgort 2Z Bayer Leveriunen 22 Hama 
Rostock 21; MSV Duisburg 2ft Hamburg SV 
lft Bonnsta Mecnchengtadboch lft VfL 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

fittsburch— A greed to terms with RHP 
FrandsCD Cordow on 3-year amt met 

ST. LOUK-Dedined to exercise 1998 option 
on 3B Scott Livingston. 

SAN dieco— Aoread to terms with OF 
Derek G. Lee. OF Charles Poe and RHP Bob 
Wolff. Agreed lo Terms wtth RHP Archie 
Corbin. RHP Scotl Davison RHP Kevin 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
nhl- S uspended Washington F Chris Si- 
mon mdefmftety for alleged racial remarks 
made during game on Nov. 8. 

BOSTON— Assigned LW P.C. Drauin and C 
BUI McCauley to Chariot!*. ECHL 
Carolina— Recalled G Pot Jabtonskl from 
Ctavatand. JHL. Assigned G Mike Fountain to 
New Haven, AHL Assigned G Jeff Jeil hi 
Chorioffe. ECHU 

DALLAS— Assigned F Juho Lind lo MOH- 
gan IHL. 

edmonton— W aived LW Ray Whitney and 
RWDervks Bowie. 

FLORIDA— Cfolmad RW Roy Whrtney off 
woteis tram Edmonton. 

uu Angelas — A ssigned c OKI Jolunen to 
IFK Helsinki of Finnish ERte League. Signed 
RW Russ Courtnoll to 1 -year cont ract . 

n. y. range RS-Asslgnea LW Pierre Se- 
vigny. RW Johor Lindbora and RW Vladimir 
VoroblEv to Horttaid. AHL. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



I A— BASSO MOUNT BW» 

V**** wI«(wiXtaWitar^'Rte*ljDBMa* , i 

HSra-TOLOa-BU^ 

attention 
ENGLISH TEACHERSI 

rrJjrX. 

-Timing Technology: 
Teaching English for Futraw , 
Paris, Nov. 7 & a. 

* FordataSs: H 

Tel/Fax: g3-1)4frg1 -7S -ff or 
e-mail: hRsoMrancaewItfr 











PAGE 22 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER II, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Playing the Game 



Bucfawald 


T17 ASHINGTON — It’s 
VV not only the Democrats 
who are selling their services 
for big bocks to the electorate 
— the Republicans are play- 
ing the same game. 

The GOP is offering do- 
nors briefing sessions with all 
the leaders of 
the House and 
the Senate. Pre- 
sumably the in- 
formation giv- 
en out at these 
events is hot 
stuff, unavail- 
able to the av- 
erage Americ- 
an who, as 
Trent Lott said recently, is 
“sitting on his wallet." 

Zachary Tombstone was 
furious. When he was called 
by a Republican fund-raiser 
and asked to contribute 
$100,000 for exclusive face- 
to-face meetings with GOP 
leaders, Zach said, “Why 
should someone be expected 
to give $100,000 to have 
cocktails and dinner with 
members of the Senate?" 

The fund-raiser said, * “This 
is a unique opportunity to 
hear what your political lead- 
ers are going to do about clean 
air, dirty water and prayer in 
schools." 

“I don't think that I should 
have to pay extra to find out 
what my elected officials are 
thinking.” 

“Don’t you care about 
your country?” 


“Listen, I pay diem a hefty 
sum in salary to tell me what's 
on their minds. I have no in- 
tention of shelling out 
$ 100,000 to hear it out of both 
sides of their mouths.” 

“You're not just getting the 
opportunity to find out what 
they’re thinking. Yon are also 
entitled to a photo opportunity 
with Republican leaders. 
We'll present you with a color 
photo of yourself shaking 
hands with Trent Lott.” 

“Who the hell is Trent 
Loti?*’ 

**He is the most charis matic 
member of the Senate. You 
bang a picture like that on the 
wall, and people will be break- 
ing down your door. We also 
give you a choice of having 
your photograph taken with 
three other Republicans: Sen- 
ator Jesse Helms of North Car- 
olina, Senator Jim Inbofe of 
Oklahoma and Senator Strom 
Thurmond of South Carolina 
are the pick of the litter." 


□ 


“It still seems tike a lot of 


money. 

“O.K., there's an altern- 
ative. If you give us $50,000, 
yon can get a secret briefing 
from Senator Alfonse D’Am- 
ato of New York in the steam 
room of the Hilton.” 

“I don’t think my account- 
ant would consider that a 
worthwhile expenditure.'' 

The fund-raiser wasn’t 


about to give up. “Look, what 
in this briefing, as 


Venice Biennale 
Drew 170,000 


VENICE — The 47th 
Venice Biennale closed after 
a five-month run that drew 
170,000 visitors. The show, 
which featured 190 artists 
from 58 countries, generated 
300 million lire (about 
$180,000) in enhance fees 
since opening on June 15. 


you'll hear i 
well as at the cocktail party, 
could make a difference to 
your tax assessment for the 
next 20 years. Our legislators 
are sworn to secrecy when it 
comes to what laws they will 
vote for or a gains t, but they 
will reveal this information to 
you, providing you join the 
club." 

“Can I ask any question I 
want?” 

"Of course, it’s a free 
country." 


‘Requiem’ for War Photographers in Indochina 


By Elizabeth Kastor 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — They found Sam 
Castan’s film on the body of a dead 
North Vietnamese. Developed and minted, 
the pictures of that day in 1966 show 22 
soldiers just before the attack in which 18 
of them — and the Look magazine editor 
and photographer — would die. 

In the last frame of color film Robert 
Capa shot on May 25. 1954, anonymous 
soldiers in brown walk through a vast field 
of tall green and yellow grass that seems to 
go on forever. Some time later that day, . 
colleagues oearby heard a mine explode, 
and the legendary photographer was 
dead. 

An elegantly dressed woman crouches 
on a chaotic street, her dying child in her 
arms. She sobs for help as Phnom Penh 
lulls in 1975. The man who took the pic- 
ture, die Associated Press photographer 
Sou Vicbito, a Cambodian, was last seen 


fields. He bas not been heard from since. 

To view the moment of death is to 
intrude on the ultimate intimacy. To see, 
preserved on film, the harsh world as ob- 
served by someone just before that moment is profoundly 
unnerving — - we walk with Capa, but unlike him, know die 
mine is waiting. We see what he saw, but of course we know 
nothing about what he experienced that day. 

“Requiem” is a book commemorating 135 photograph- 
ers from all sides who died in the French war in Indochina 
and the Vietnam War. It includes essays by David Hal- 
berstam, Neil Sheehan, Peter Arnett and others who wrote 
about the war. An exhibit of pictures from the book is now 
showing at the Newseum in Rosslyn, Virginia, and more 
than 300 family members and friends gathered there re- 
cently for a symposium and reception. 

‘This book is not a book about dead people and Vi- 
etnam,” the co-editor and Associated Press veteran pho- 
tographer Horst Fans said. “It’s mainly, to me, a book on an 
important chapter of journalism in which everyone who was 
involved could be proud of.” 

Bat whatever Faas’s intention, the book is also about what 
happens to a person’s work and memory after the person is 
gone. And, tike all photography, it is about looking: The 
desire to see and document what the bloody, exhausted, 
furious, roaring center of war looked like. 

Some of the photographs will be vaguely familiar to 
anyone old enough to remember the war and its coverage, 
and some of the photographers’ names are well known. The 
film shot by many others waited in attics and archives here 
and in Vietnam until Faas and Tim Page, another pho- 
tographer, began to look. 

book begins before (he Southeast Asia of body bags 



graphers, and a new project presented 
self. Prin 


Prints in hand, he approached his* 
friend Faas, AP photo editor in Saigon 
from 1962 to 1973 ami now AP’s sOHQftj 
photo editor based Itt London, The ttwf. 
began wuskial99L -b 

page and Faas had names, dates oC 
deaths, but in many cases not much mon£ 
than that. Young Western photographers 
wandered in and out of Vietnam, drawn 


the excitement and the opportunity to. take 
career-making pictures. Sonietiira 


# jmetinws they 

died before anyone got to know them. And 
many of the North Vietnamese had simply 
vanished. . . . \ . 

The North Vietnamese photographer* 
considered themselves soldiers firs t, pho- 
tographers second. Their photographs 
were taken to be used as propaganda and r 
axe, as Faas said, ’‘strangely void of her : 
ror.“ The wretched exhaustion, the angqf. 
the fear on the faces in American and: 



The shadow of photographer The Dinh looms over an artillery position 


and na palm that most Americans remember, with a series of 
pictures that a U.S. government photographer and freelancer 
named Evexette Dixie Reese took in (he 1 950s. The sun sifts 
through monsoon clouds onto mountains and plains. On the 
terrace of a temple of Angkor Wat, a monk stands timeless. 
But within the calm of Reese's work, the future was stirring 
and tlie photographer saw it Cambodian peasants carve 
wooden dummy rifles for the local French-controlled mi- 
litia. A man in a loincloth holds a bow and arrow: The 
tribespeople from his hi ghlan d region of Vietnam fought as' 
guerrillas from 1946 to 1975. 

Reese was killed when a plane he was riding in was shot 
down over Saigon in 1955. 


Their 

same intimacy as ours." Huge said, "be- 
cause they didn’t wx the war the way wt 
do. They were going to die for thdr country; 
— theirs was a glorious role.” They also ■ 
were censored — forbidden to show dead and wounded 
communist soldiers. , . 

Passe and Faas believe deeply m (he power of photographs to 
tell (he truth. Because Western photographers were not cen- 
sored in Vietnam, they feel their pictures changed history 


Yet in their book and exhibit, they seem to be saying tfctl 
free photographer seeking truth- 


Beyond his mother’s stories, Alan Reese had no memor- 
ies of his fa 


; his father or even a tangible sense of what he had lost. 
“The pictures,” he said. “That’s what 1 have.” 

The book and exhibit had their genesis years ago in Page’s 
attempts to memorialize a friend, photographer Sean Flynn. 
The son of actor Errol Flynn, he vanished on a road in 
Cambodia in 1970 along with another photographer, Dana 
Stone. 

Page spent years tracking the fate of Flynn and Stone, 
discovering that they were captured and held by the Khmer 
Rouge for more than a year. Their story, he believes, ended 
in a killing field outside a small village. 

In the process of working the Vietnamese bureaucracy on 
behalf ox the monument he wanted to build for all the 
photographers who died in the war. Page found himself in an 
archive of pictures taken by North Vietnamese photo- 


the difference between the free . ...... 

and ihe censored one working for a political end is irrelevant 
in this context. Some viewers may sense a blurring of moral 
lines, both political and journalistic. Bui for Page and Faas, 
the photographers — like the soldiers and the civilians so 
heartbreaking! y depicted in these photos — were caught up 
in something vast and cruel. 

The experience of suffering, of looking at war and com- 
mitting it to film — and either living through it or dying in 
the process — bridged the gulf of philosophy. 

Mon* than once, neoolc asked the Life in; 


More than once, people asked the Life magazine pho> 
tographer Larry Burrows if he had a death wish. How else to; 
explain the decade spent, on and off. taking pictures m 
Vietnam? And once he had died there, the assumption that 
Burrows had somehow been seeking that end only grew. ; 

“I think he dismissed it as ridiculous,” says., Russell 
Burrows, whose father died when his helicopter was shot 
down over Laos in 1971. 

“To someone sitting at home in their living room, just- 
being there was foolhardy.” he says, but for his father, “the 
combination of being in love wirh the place and the fact that 
it was such an important story is what lied him so thoroughly, 
to Vietnam." 


» - 'i* 

\e- - ■* 





SATIRE 


PEOPLE 


Taking Aim at Apartheid and Other Injustices 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

New York Times Service 


D ARLING, South Africa — This is 
such a cute little town — its three 
caf£ are the Darling, Dinky’s and the 
Small Fry — that one Is prompted to ask 
Pieter-Dirk Uys how he keeps his in- 
sanity. 

“Ten minutes a day looking in the 
mirror," he answers. 

After 17 years as South Africa’s most 
famous satirist, does he feel cut off here, 
in a place just north of Cape Town that, 
before he painted its railroad station pink 
and turned it into a bit of Weimar in 
dairy land, was famous only for its 
flower festival and its butter? 

“No! Not at all! I have a satellite dish ! 
And besides, the world comes to 
Darling! The press comes! The politi- 
cians come!” And they do — bearing 
gifts. Themselves. 

This very day, for example, Piet 
Koomhof is in the first row of tables in 
Uys’s cabaret. At die height of apartheid, 
Koomhof was one of its most powerful 
figures, the minister for black affairs, in 


He addresses his audience with one of 
his standard questions. “Who here ad- 
mits to having ever voted for the National- 
Party?” The party imposed and then dis- 
mantled apartheid, before losing power to 
toe ANC, or African National Congress. 
No one in toe audience raises a hand. In 
toe new South Africa, no one ever does. 

Evita pauses. Her sideways glance at 
Koomhof under her long lashes is part 
coquette, part strict Afrikaner aunt. He 
sheepishly raises his hand. She begins 
cooing over the twins, side by side in 
bassinets: “Such darlings! Ah, but Piet 
doesn’t practice what he preached, 
neh?” The audience howls. “Look, 
their ears aren't so big. And they have no 
teeth! But, of course, they’re colored — 
they never will.’’ 

This is a little close to the edge. Be- 
cause of poverty, alcoholism, a taste for 
sweets and tod dental care, many 


charge of shipping people to independ- 
ere bU 


ent ban tus tans where blacks were for- 
cibly resettled. Koomhof was later am- 
bassador to the United States, where, 
Uys has joked, he studied Indian re- 
servations for inspiration. 

But after be left office, the aging 
Koomhof left his wife for a young 
"colored" woman. Photos of them to- 
gether on a flouncy pink bed titi Hated the 
nation. Today they are here, together 
with their twin tobies. He has also bad 
surgery to pin back his famous ears. 

On the stage, Uys is dressed as his 
best-loved character. Evita Bezuidea- 
hout. wife of a National Party leader and 
foimer ambassador to the fictional 
bantustan of Bapetikosweti. 

Uys is taking several of his characters, 
including Evita. to the Next Wave Fes- 
tival at toe Brooklyn Academy of Music, 
where he will perform Thursday through 
Saturday and Nov. 18-22 at the Hillman 
Attic Studio in the Opera House. The 
one-man show is called “You ANC 
Nothing Yet” 


As Evita Bezuidenbout, 
Pieter-Dirk Uys says 
things to Sonth African 
audiences no one else can. 


i have no teeth. 


colored people in die Cape haveni 
But even Mrs. Koomhof laughs. 

As Evita Bezuidenhout, Uys is as fa- 
mous here as Lucille Ball ever was in 
America. 

Evita says things no one else can — 
and said them all through toe dark 1 980s, 
lacerating the stupidities of apartheid, 
like checking the pubic hair of people to 
see what race they were. The man under 
her wig suspects two thing s may have 
kept him safe back then: one, he plays 
Evita so sincerely, without any vamping, 
that many people forget she is he; and 
two, Koomhof, who was a fan for years, 
despite regular abuse by the satirist 
“I think they used to think about 
arresting me,” Uys said, “and he’d say, 
‘Ach, man, he’s only having a joke.' ” 
Uys tells stories about being 
threatened by rightist policemen who 
stormed off saying, “But hell, man, 
you’ve got nice legs.” His pets were 


poisoned once. But the night someone 
sabotaged his car by loosening the wheel 
nuts, someone else called him anon- 
ymously to mutter, “Check your car.” 

Rewriting for an American audience, 
he knows his funniest imitations, like the 
finger-wagging former Prime Minis ter 
P. W. Botha and a former policeman 
rethinking his pre-election motto, “one 
man, one volt,” may draw b lank stares 
in the United Stales. He can do President 
Nelson Mandela’s almost Chinese ac- 
cent perfectly, as well as Bishop Des- 
mond Tutu's singsong, but he likes them 
too much. IBs talent is for skewering, 
accompanied by a girlish giggle. Bill 
Clinton and Madeleine Albright should 
be warned. He is practicing. 

Three years ago, Uys fretted that the 
death of apartheid would kill his ma- 
terial So he gave the new government a 
year’s honeymoon. But Uys is no fooL 
That year’s grace period was also. a 
chance for the government to write new 
material for him. 

They did not disappoint As he points 
out the higher politicians climb, the 
more their backsides become visible. 
Scandals abound now. 

Winnie Mandela, whom Uys once sat- 
irized singing “Come On, Baby, Light 
My Tire,” his been questioned in con- 
nection with several murders, but is still 
angling to run for deputy president of the 
ANC. 

The nation’s chief health minister en- 
dorsed government support for a skin 
patch that supposedly cured AIDS but 
turned out to contain a poisonous solvent 
Crime has soared to such an extent that an 
automatic teller machine was stolen from 
toe fourth floor of a police headquarters. 
So now Uys can target anyone. 

That is in keeping with his artistic 
background. He beg. n as a dramatist: his 
play “God’s Forgotten” was performed 
at La Mama in New York in 1978. But hi* 
scripts were banned so often there that he 
tamed to one-man shows in 1980. 

It will be interesting to see whether 
Uys can offend audiences in the United 
States — which he regards as a bantustan 
of political correctness — or sim pl y 
entertain them. 


F RANCE’S highest liter- 
ary honor, the Prix Gon- 
court, went to Patrick Ram - 
baud on Monday for his 
novel “La Bataille" (The 
Battle), toe saga of one of 
Napoleon’s greatest military 
defeats near toe Austrian vil- 
lage of Ess ling. Rambaud, 51, 
also received the Academic 
Francaise’s highest award for 
toe book two weeks ago. An- 
other major award, the 
Renaudot Prize, went to Pas- 
cal Bruckner for “Les Vo- 
leurs de Beaute” (Beauty 
Thieves), a novel about farm- 
ers holding girls captive until 
their beauty wilts. Bruckner, 
48, won toe Medicis award in 
1995 for “La Ten ration de 
1’ Innocence” (The Tempta- 
tion to Innocence). 


□ 


The White House has des- 
ignated Deputy Labor Secre- 
tary Kathryn Higgins to head 
the National Endowment for 
ihe Arts until a permanent 
successor to actress Jane Al- 
exander is selected. Alexan- 
der resigned last month after four years 
as head of toe endowment to concentrate 
on her acting career. 

□ 

A dress created by Gianni Versace 
for his last collection and chosen by 
Diana, Princess of Wales weeks before 
her death has been sold at auction for 80 
million lire ($47,000). The name of toe 
buyer was not disclosed. Proceeds from 
the auction in Milan went to the Italian 
Association for Cancer Research. Ver- 
sace’s press office said toe black evening 
gown trimmed with white silk was one 
of the six dresses Diana chose from toe 
slain designer’s last collection, shown in 
Paris July 6. The other five outfits will be 
auctioned later. 



Patrick Rambaud, left, and Pascal Bruckner toasting their literary prizes Monday 


the five Spice Girls have each made an 
estimated £14.5 million ($24.5 million) 
. . . Soon Queen Elizabeth will get to 
meet toe Girls. They are among showbiz 
personalities chosen to perform at the 
Royal Variety Show in London next 


authenticated by two experts. 

□ 

Seven years later, pop singer Pan! 


Seven years later, pop singer Pan! 
Simon has completed his Broadway mu- 
sical. "The Caperaan," which is sched* 



and Shirley Bassey also will be per- 
forming. 


□ 


of Salvador Agron, a teenage Pu<itC 
Rican gang member convicted in l95fi 
of slaying two boys in New "York. . p 


1 

®ti»n Dm 
‘ l ast- 


A long-lost story for children by 
Mary Shelley, the 19th-century British 
author of “Frankenstein," has been dis- 
covered in Italy, The Times of London 
reported. Consisting of 39 pages in the 

nurhnr’e han/fnrritinn rha J 


□ 


•2 


□ 


author’s handwriting, toe unpublished 

Dazzi and 


The Spice Girls have sacked the man, 
ager who took them to fame and fortune. 
Geri HailrweO ("Ginger Spice”) was 
said by the Sun newspaper to have or- 
chestrated toe split with Simon Fuller. 
Since Fuller began managing the group. 


story was found by Cristina 

her husband, Andrea, in a chest at their 
home in Tuscany. Dazzi is descended 
from a member of toe circle of friends of 
Mary Shelley and her husband, toe poet 
Percy Bysshe Shelley, when they lived 
in Italy. The paper said the manuscript of 
“Maurice, or the Fisher’s Cot" has been 


In the sea of black leather and shiny 
chrome. Jay Leno led the way. The “To 
night Show" host was toe grand marshfc 
for 25,000 Harley-Davidson motorcycle 
riders revving their engines for charity v 
toe 1 4th annual Love Ride over the week- 
end. Leno led the convoy 50 miles fiwf 
Glendale, California, to Cmtinw? Lake' 
where a barbecue; trade show andconcer 
featuring the Doobie Brothers and Jin' 
Bel us hi & The Sacred Hearts awoitec 


I* . • 

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them. The ride was expected to raist 
$1.25 million. 



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