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INTERNATIONAL 



The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASH US^TON PQ5TT 


Paris, Wednesday, November 12, 1997 



* 


I 


Shipments 
Of Small 
Mercedes 
Skid to Halt 

Deliveries of New Car 
That Flipped in a Test 
Won't Resume Until 5 98 

By Edmund L. Andrews 

New York Times Sem ce 

FRANKFURT — Daimler-Benz AG 
announced Tuesday that it would stop 
shipments for the next three months of 
its star-crossed new four-seater, the 
Mercedes A -Cl ass, while it re-engineers 
the chassis to keep the cars from tipping 
over during sharp turns at high speeds. 

The temporary halt marirc the 
Daimler’s most dramatic move yet to 
rescue the A-Class from becoming the 
New Coke of the automobile industry. 

It remains unclear whether the A- 
Class can survive, but the stakes are 
high. Mercedes has invested almost 
$1.5 billion in the new car, its first 
attempt to descend from the lofty 
reaches of luxury cars and expand .into 
the mass market for subcompacts. 

More than 100,000 European cus- 
tomers had already placed orders for the 
A-Class before the first ones tolled off 
the assembly line one month ago, thanks 
to a barrage of advance, praise for the 
small car's innovative new design. 

But ever since test drivers for a 
Swedish car magazine overturned the 
snub-nosed, bubble-shaped subcom- 
pact three weeks ago. Daimler has found 
itself engulfed in a storm of bad pub- 
licity that has grown worse by die day: 
color magazine pictures of the A-Class 
on two wheels and overturned entirely; 
television footage of A-class accidents 
repeated over and over on German news 
programs, and a swarm of new- tests by 
car-and-driver magazines aimed at re- 
creating the grim results from Sweden. 

After initially belittling reports of any 
problem, Daimler executives were re- 
markably contrite Tuesday. 

* ’We take the published criticisms and 
above all the concerns of our customers 
very seriously, ’ ’ said Juergen Schrempp, 
Daimler’s tough and normally confident 
chief executive, in a written statement. 

See MERCEDES, Page 10 


Ganz Collection Draws $206 Million in New York Sale 


A 

■ mi. 


CHRIS' 



Egypt to Boycott 
Qatar Conference 

Cairo Snubs U.S . , Reflecting 
Arab Anger With Netanyahu 


By John Lancaster 

Pail St n iff 


Sun HtnU/AfEiu Fmr-Pirw 

Christopher Burge, chairman of Christie's, opening bidding for Picasso's “Dream," which fetched the 
highest price, $48.4 million, among 57 works sold from the collection of Victor and Sally Ganz. Page 22. 

UN Still Reluctant to Bomb Saddam 

Security Council Drops Warning to Iraq of ‘Serious Consequences 9 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 


UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
As die Security Council moved closer to 
unanimity Tuesday on a resolution that 
would punish Iraq’s leadership with a 
travel ban. it became evident that United 
Nations action alone may not be enough 
to force President Saddam Hussein to 
back down from his order expelling 
American amis inspectors. 

The 15-member council was all but 
certain to pass a resolution in the next 
two days that would demand Iraqi com- 
pliance with a UN disarmament com- 
mission overseeing the destruction of 
Baghdad’s weapons systems and the 
capacity to make them. 


Gone from an early draft, however, is 
a warning of “serious consequences” if 
Iraq ignores the demand, a concession to 
those on the council who do not want to 
consider military action. 

But behind the scenes, diplomats say 
that it may be the possibility of an 

Iraq still has the power to make wea- 
pons of mass destruction. Page 10. 

American military strike thar is pulling 
the council together to condemn Iraq 
with one voice and target Iraqi officials 
with new sanctions that were not sup- 
ported three weeks ago. 

The council is not ready to author- 
ize military action, diplomats say, and 


Russia and France are the most 
strongly opposed. Washington, 
however, has taken the position from 
the beginning of this crisis that it 
already has the authority under ex- 
isting council resolutions to use force 
if necessary. 

Iraq’s foreign minister said Tuesday 
that his country saw no alternative to its 
stand of defiance. 

The minister, Mohammed Said Sah- 
haf, offered no hint of flexibility. In- 
stead, Mr. Sahhaf said the Baghdad gov- 
ernment had been “put in a comer by 
the American-led policy that has sub- 
jected Iraq to seven years of crippling 
economic sanctions, since the end of the 

See IRAQ, Page 6 


CAIRO — President Hosni Mubarak 
announced Tuesday that Egypt would 
boy con a conference that is sponsored 
by the United Stales and is aimed at 
forging economic ties between Arab 
stales and Israel. Mr. Mubarak said that 
such contacts were meaningless be- 
cause of the deadlock in Middle East 
peace negotiations. 

The decision by Egypt, one of Wash- 
ington's closest Arab allies, was a se- 
rious diplomatic setback for the United 
States and illustrates the depth of anger 
among Arabs over what they see as die 
intransigence of Prime Minister Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu of Israel in negoti- 
ations with the Palestinians. 

Egypt's boycott also reflects the gen- 
erally sour mood of U.S.- Arab relations 
at a time when Washington is trying to 
build regional support for a strong stand 
against Iraq. ‘ 

Like other moderate Arab leaders, 
Mr. Mubarak has already declared his 
opposition to U.S. military strikes on 
Iraq as a means of resolving the current 
standoff between Baghdad and the 
United Nations on weapons inspec- 
tions. 

The announcement Tuesday ended 
weeks of speculation about whether 
Egypt would anend the conference, 
which is scheduled to begin Sunday in 
the Gulf capita] of Doha, Qatar. 

“Egypt will noi take part in the Doha 
conference and will not send a del- 
egation to attend it," Mr. Mubarak told 
members of the governing National 
Democratic Party in Cairo. 

“The aim of an economic conference 
is to build cooperation between Israel 
and the Arab community, and this is 
linked to progress toward peace.” he 
said. 

“We are concerned in the first place 
with achieving stability in the region, 


Au Pair’s Release Disturbs Jurists as an Excess of Mercy 


The Dollar 


Nw* York Tuasflwy Q4P.EA. pravtam ctose 


DM 


1.709 


1.7045 


Pound 


1.7045 


1.5975 


Yen 


125.045 


124.355 


5.7239 


5.7091 



+6.14 


7558.73 


S&P 500 


7552.59 


change Tuesday 9 A P.M. prevtaua flow 


+223 


923.36 


921.13 


By Brian Knowlton 

international Herald Tribune 


WASHINGTON — Legal experts said Tuesday 
that they supported a Massachusetts judge’s decision 
to lower a British an pair's murder conviction to 
manslaughter, but many of them criticized the sen- 
tence sharply as being surprisingly lenient and out of 
line with normal practice. 

In a ruling: that surprised jurists and the public on 
both sides of die Atlantic, Judge Hiller Zobel freed the 
au pair, Louise Woodward, 19, on Monday, saying that 
a sentence of 279 days — the time she bad already 
spent in jail — was sufficient punishment 
She had been convicted of murder in the Feb. 9 
death of 8-month-old Matthew Eappen, one of the two 


Eappen children she was caring for. The judge found 
that while she had been rough with the baby and bore 
ultimate responsibility for his death, she had acted 
without mahee. 

Miss Woodward broke her silence Tuesday to thank 
the judge and to mourn the baby she was convicted of 
killing . 

“I am enormously relieved that Judge Zobel has 
seen fit to give me back my liberty,” she said in a 
statement “I have been deeply saddened by Matthew 
Eappen’ s death. I experienced the honor of seeing him 
fail, as I testified in court, and as anyone listening to ihe 
91 1 tape can readily understand. I loved Matthew.” 

“I know that his family is unable to understand or 
believe me, because they are so convinced that I killed 
him or at least contributed to his dead). I pray thatfurther 


investigation into the scientific evidence convinces the 
Eappen family that I did their son no harm.” she said. 

Most analysts interviewed said that the involuntary 
manslaughter charge was more appropriate in the case. 

‘ ‘The unified opinion among legal folk — at least in 
the criminal bar — was that it was the right thing to do 
to reduce charges," said Bruce Lyons, a past president 
of the National Association of Criminal Defense Law- 
yers. 

John Bonistalli. a former prosecutor in the Mas- 
sachusetts attorney general's office, said that a man- 
slaughter charge was “totally appropriate,” but ad- 
ded: ‘ ‘That really begs the question as to why the judge 
didn’t give the jury that option in the first place. The 

See AU PAIR, Page 6 


Clinton Down but Not Out 
After ‘Fast-Track’ Setback 

President Retains Fearsome Economic Arsenal 


By David E. Sanger 

New Yuri Times Sen-ice 


WASHINGTON — Until Monday, 
no Congress had ever blocked a major 
American initiative toward freer trade 
since Franklin D. Roosevelt started 
slashing America’s sky-high tariffs in 
1934. Even in the depths of recession, the 
closing of steel and textile mills in the 
1970s, and the rise of Japan in the 80s, 
Congress always came to the reluctant 
conclusion that freer trade benefited, 
more American workers than it harmed. 

So what culminated Monday morn- 
ing, when President Bill Ointon angrily 
concluded that neither persuasion nor 
deal-making would attract the votes he 
needed for broad authority to negotiate 
new trade accords, markeda resoupaiag 
change. It began with die heated debate 
over the North American Free Trade 
Agreement four years ago, and gathered 
speed even in an economic boom mat 
has made the United States the world s 

sole economic superpower. . 

But in a world where trade is con- 
ducted with increasing disregard for 
government policies, does the : angry 
statement that thundered off Capitol 


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Hill change very much? Will the pres- 
ident really be hamstrung as he tries to 
negotiate trading rules with countries 
that suspect Congress will rewrite any 
. concessions he makes? 

Just as important, will other nations 
— particularly Asian countries looking 
for any excuse in their economic turmoil 
to hold off demands that they open their 
markets — use the action of Congress as 
an excuse? 

“There’s a lot we don’t yet know 
about what this will mean,” Commence 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Secretary William Daley said Monday 
as the administration was licking its 
wounds. ‘ ‘But anyone who believes this 
is just a blip may not be thinking it all the 
way through.” 

Most likely, the effects on American 
power will be subtle, and may not play 
out for years. Mr. Clinton, for all his 
protestations, will hardly find himself 
powerless in the economic arena. 

Just as the president has a huge range 
of military options available to face down 
military threats, his economic arsenal re- 
mains fearsome. He retains broad au- 
thority to declare economic sanctions, 
even closing the huge American market 
to trading partners who refuse to open 
their own. After all, even without so- 
called fast track negotiating authority, 
Mr. Clinton has struck more than 100 
trade accords since 1994, including major 
agreements with Japan and China. None, 
however, required changes in American 
laws, and thus congressional approvaL 

WbiJe the president is armed with 
plenty of sticks, however, what Ccm- 

See CLINTON, Page 6 


Clinton neglected his troops, losing 
the “fast-track" trade bill. Page 3. 


AGENDA 


Kodak to Trim 10,000 Jobs Over 2 Years 


ROCHESTER, New York — East- 
man Kodak Co. said Tuesday it would 
cut 10,000 jobs, or 10 J percent of its 
work force, as part of a plan to cut costs 
by at least SI billion and revive slug- 
gish sales and profits. 

^ The move is the latest in a series of 
overhauls at the world's biggest pho- 
tography company, which has en- 
countered fierce competition from 
Fuji Photo Film Co. of Japan. 


Kodak is also expecting to lose 
$400 million this year in its digital 
imaging business, which it is counting 
on to maintain its dominance in pho- 
tography. 

The cost cutbacks will be made in 
the course of the next two years. 
Kodak plans to set aside ar least $1 
billion during the fourth quarter to pay 
for the job cuts and other expenses of 
the restructuring. Page 13. 


EU Women Gain Affirmative Action 


PAGE TWO 

There’s No Foreplay to Lunch Anymore' 

ASlAmCIFIC Pa 9*4. 

Clearing Skies, but a Cloudy Outlook 


Books 

Crossword- 

Opinion 

Sports 


Page 9. 

Page 1L 

Pages 8-9. 

Pages 20-2 L 


7?» Intormorkot 


Pago»4, 7. 


Legislation that gives women pri- 
ority over equally qualified men for 
promotions in the public sector does 
not violate European law, the Euro- 
pean Court of Justice ruled Tuesday. 

The court rejected a claim by a Ger- 
man teacher that he had been a victim 
of sex discrimination when he was 
passed over for promotion in favor of 
an equally qualified female colleague. 

The European Union had been wait- 
ing for the ruling to clarify whai kind 
of action members can take to increase 
job prospects for women. Page 13. 



George Fisher, Kodak chairman 
and planner of a $l-bilIion rehaul. 


but so far no progress at all has been 
achieved." 

The president said that the Egyptian 
ambassador to Qatar might attend open- 
ing ceremonies of ihe conference “if he 
is invited.” and Western diplomats ex- 
pressed hope that some Egyptian busi- 
nessmen would still participate in the 
absence of on official delegation. 

But Mr. Mubarak's announcement 
nonetheless came as a major blow to 
organizers of the conference, in par- 
ticular the United Slates, which has 
sponsored four such meetings since I U94 
in an effort to promote normal relations 
between Israel and ils Arab neighbor*. 

As a symbol of the American com- 
mitment to normalization. Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright is scheduled 
to attend the conference, and U.S. of- 
ficials have crisscrossed the region in 
recent weeks to drum up Arab support. 

Even before Egypt’s decision, such 
close U.S. allies as Saudi Arabia and 
Morocco, the sponsor of the first eco- 

See BOYCOTT, Page 6 


Security Chiefs 
Are Reported 
Maneuvering to 
Succeed Arafat 

C>iif*lrdh\ OurSufFn*: Zfeyta brj 

NICOSIA — The heads of the Pal- 
estinian security services are building 
up to a battle to succeed President Yas- 
ser Arafat in case be falls ill or dies. A1 
Hayat. a London-based Arabic news- 
paper, reported Tuesday. 

The report came as concerns over Mr. 
Arafat’s health mount. The Palestinian 
leader has long concentrated power in 
his own hands, making it difficult for a 
potential successor to emerge. 

Mr. Arafat’s health and the question 
of succession have been taboo subjects 
for Palestinian officials, who have cat- 
egorically denied repeated rumors that 
the 69-year-old leader is ill. 

The rumors were fueled by several 
appearances in which Mr. Arafat 
seemed exhausted, agitated and trem- 
bling in his hands, legs and lower lip. 
Doctors have said the trembling could 
suggest Parkinson’s disease. Mr. Arafat 
himself has dismissed speculation on 
his health as "stupid rumors.” 

Al Hayat drew an ominous picture of 
competition among various wings of 
Palestinian security forces, asserting 
that a “battle for succession” has begun 
among rivals that “could explode with- 
in several months and even take the 
form of political assassination.” 

Al Hayat pointed to Jibril Rajub. head 
of the Preventive Security Services in 
the West Bank, saying that he was build- 
ing alliances and arming his followers. 
The paper said Mr. Rajub’s counterpan 
in the Gaza Strip, Mohammed Dahlan. 
was making similar moves. 

Between the two, other security 
chiefs such as the military intelligence 
head, Mussa Arafat, national security's 
Saeb Ajez and police General Ghazi 
Jabali are jockeying for influence, the 
paper said, citing sources in Mr. Ara- 
fat's Fatah faction of the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization. 

Mr. Rajub has found a chief ally in 
Gbassan Shakaa, the mayor of die West 
Bank self-ruled town of Nablus and a 
member of the PLO's executive coun- 
cil, the Fatah sources said. 

A large arms shipment valued at 
$40,000 was recently intercepted en 
route to the West Bank town of Ramal- 
lah, where it was re be distributed re 
Rajub supporters, the paper said. 

Mr. Rajub visited Washington in late 
October, a visit thar Al Hayat said the 
U.S. administration bad arranged in or- 
der to “sound out" the security chief. 

Mr. Arafat currently heads both the 
PLO, based officially in Tunis, and the 
self-rule Palestinian Authority, based in 

See PLO, Page 10 


Poland ’ 80 -’ 81 : Players Do a Surprising Postmortem 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Times Service 



WARSAW — For four years, he was one of the 
most wanted underground dissidents in Communist 
Poland, branded a counterrevolutionary by the gov- 
ernment and always on the run. eluding the police with 
a different guise every month. 

Over the weekend, in a setting that brought the past 
aljve, die former dissident, Zbigniew Bujak, had a 
chance to confront the Soviet officer who helped create 
his troubles when martial law was imposed on Poland 
in 1981, in one of the last dramas of me Cold War. 

"Marshal, did you have a wish to get to know us?” 
asked Mr. Bujak, now a well-known politician in a 
smart suit and tie, as he leaned across the table to 
engage Marshal Viktor Kulikov, 75, the former com- 


mander in chief of the Warsaw Pact forces. * ‘Did you 
know the Polish opposition was enchanted with the 
Russian opposition?* ’ he asked, adding, in a reference 
to the dissident Soviet physicist, “Did you know that 
my symbolic godfather was Sakharov?” 

The gray-haired general remained unmoved. It was 
not his job then to get to know dissidents, he said. 

In a gathering of living history, the- adversaries who 
played out the Polish crisis in the early 1980s — stolid 
Soviet military brass, their subservient Polish com- 
rades, hawkish White House officials and rebel Soli- 
darity activists — met here for three days to settle 
scores and thrash out who did what to whom. 

Were the Soviets poised to invade Poland in 1980 
and in 1981? Was General Wojciech Jaruzelski, the 
Polish leader, forced to impose martial law in Decem- 
ber 1981 to save his country from invasion, as he 


claimed at the time? Or was he the errand boy of rh« 
Soviets? 

Wiai influence did one of the CIA’s most sue 
cessful spies, Ryszard Kuklinski, an officer at the tot 
of the Polish military, have on American policy? 

i nn ayed ““““d the France hall were more thar 
iw secret government documents from Moscow 
Warsaw, Washington and former Eastern bloc court- 
roes. The chief organizers of the conference — the 
National Security Archive, a nongovernmental grout 
in Washington, and the Institute for Political Studie; 
here —- managed ro get the papers officially de- 
classified and matte public over the last three years. 

The ovnwhelniing evidence, despite denials frorr 
Marshal Kulikov, was thar in December 1980 the 

See HINDSIGHT, Page 6 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


In and Ota, Zip, Zip /Sign of Business Status in Now York and Los Angelos 


Got 20 Minutes ? Want to Do Lunch? 40? Let’s Do 2 


.By William L. Hamilton 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — In die hashed forest- 
green of the dining room at Le Bem- 
ardm in Manhattan, people are racing 
against the clock. On any weekday, at 
least five or six of the 35 tables are having the 
“Timely Lonch,” a menu introduced in May 
that promises four stars in 30 minutes or less. 

Think of it as a kind of “foot on the gas”' 
dining experience geared toward the finis h line. 
“They’re here for a purpose — business,” 
Maguy Le. Coze, Le Bezzuudin ’s owner, said of 
her midday clientele. “Eric, my chef, pushed me 
to do something faster, because we had cus- 
tomers saying, ‘We’re in a rush.’ " 

Ms. Le Coze and her 30-minute lunch bunch 
are hot die only people blowing on their soup. 
Thirty minutes would have left Kaj Rattens tein, 
fashion director of Bloomingdale’s, with 10 
minutes to kill. Mr. Ruttenstein has done busi- 
ness over lunch at 44, the Royal ton Hotel res- 
taurant, in 20 minutes — between fashion 
shows. 

His order: rare tuna. * T couldn ’t have done it if 
I’d asked for it well done,” Mr. Ruttenstein 
said. 

In the red-meat economy of 1997. the business 
lunch is executive bread-breaking at a kind of 
neck-snapping pace. For anyone who can re- 
member the three- martini lunch, meet the 0.3 
martini lunch. Hold the martini. 

“You’re basically trying to make a phone call 
with a meal,” said Jerry Della Femina, chief 
executive of the advertising agency Jerry & 
Ketdiuru. 

I F you can do lunch in half the time, you can 
also do it twice. At least Some business 
diners are double- and triple-decking their 
lunches like club sandwiches. 

“The idea of entertaining at lunch is an oxy- 
moron now,” said Sally Quinn, a journalist and 
author of “The Party: A Guide to Adventurous 
Entertaining.” 

“People don’t chink; they eat salads,” she 
added. “They want in and out.” 

If nobody has the time for lunch, nobody’s 
giving it up, either. 

The power breakfast and the early-bird, 5:30 
working dinner are not about to unseat the busi- 
ness lunch in. restaurants across town or across 
die country. But the midday time-belt cinch has 
produced odd bulges. 

“People are definitely trying to do in one hour 
what they did in two,” said Susan Lyne, ex- 
ecutive vice president of the motion picture 
group at Walt Disney Co. ‘ ‘There’s no foreplay 
to lunch any more,” she added. 

More than two dozen restaurants in mid- 



Manhattan report similar Type-A feeding be- 
havior at lunchtime, from media-industry heav- 
ies like Michael’s and the Jndson Grill to die 
Four Seasons and 57-57, both popular with die 
investment and banking communities. 

How is the double lunch done? 

“You have one lunch at 12:15,” said Matey 
Posner, an agent at die William Morris Agency. 
“You mak e your next lunch at 1 :30. It’s not hard 
to do — some people like to eat early, some 
late.” 

Ms. Posner holds the fort at her regular table at 
Michael’s. The restaurant resets it between 
guests. “It’s a finely timed thing,” Ms. Posner 
said. “But people are very understanding about 
your having a limited amount of time. Some- 
times I introduce them,” she added. 

Restaurants will also hold two tables and 
move a host between guests, when introductions 
between interested parties would be more col- 




lision than collusion. Think of it as culinary call- 
waiting. 

“The host will inform us: ‘Listen, I have two 
gays; I don’t want the one to know die other is 
here,' ” said John Sheedy. the day manager of 
57-57. “We have a very big restaurant — we 
would arrange to have the second guest at die 
other end from the first table.” 

Mr. Della Femina. a restaurateur in East 
Hampton, New York, himself, has bounced in 
and out of three restaurants for one lunch. - 

“An appetizer at die Four Seasons with one 
client, then a bowl of clams as amain course with 
another client at *21/ dessert and coffee with a 
third,” he said. “It’s not about socializing; it's 
about being able to discuss things without as- 
sociates running in and out of your office.” 

How does Mr. Della Femina effect the del- 
icate art of taking leave of his first guest? 

“Yon say, ‘I nave an appointment,’ ” he sard.' 


“The worst thing you can say to . someone is, 
‘I’m leaving yon now because Fra going to have 
lunch with someone else.’ M 

Some people run a quick defense about the 
game of musical tables and musical guests. Anna 
Wbitour, editor of Vogue, says she never double- 
lunches. She’8 still smarting from being serial- 
breakfasted by the “very famous film exec- 
utive” who stacks his guests like pancakes. She 
discovered the list next to his plate when be got 
up to go to the toilet. 

“There was someone scheduled every 15 
minutes,” she said. “I was bonified” . - 

It sh ould surprise no one, but the double lunch 
is also bicoastsL ” ’ ' ' , 

“I’ve done it ar the Grill,” said Bob Book- 
man, an agent at Creative Artists Agency, re- 
ferring to the Grill on the Alley in Beverly Hills. 
California. Mr. Bookman hutches out fonrdays a 
week and occasionally double-lunches. 

He’s up front about it with both parties. “You 
disclose what you’re domg,” he sakL “You say:’ I 
have this problem; I need to see both of you.’ 

Robert Spivak, a founding partner of the Grin, 
said, “It's much more prevalent in the last 
year.” 

Some industry folk base their lunch bookings 
'on the same yield-management that the airlines 
use: they double-bode and assume that someone 
will foil, to show. 

“It’s a crisis-motivated town, so I know I'll 
have cancellations,” said a Miramax marketing 
executive, insisting cm anonymity. 

W HY the rush? Is it only a quick cash- 
in on economic opportunities in a 
bull business market, or is it 
something subtler? If time is pre- 
cions, there are those who will try wearing it cm 
their sleeve. 

“Time is a currency now, whereby people 
maintain their status,” said John Robinson, di- 
rector of die Americans* Use of Time Project at 
the University of Maryland. “One way of demon- 
strating your power is to make your time scarce. 
Tm too busy — aJca. too important — to spend 
the whole lunch on one deal, or one meal.’ 

For now, popular business restaurants in Chica- 
go, Boston and Washington report that the rest of 
the counny seems to be holding the line at the 
single lunch, though the business hors: has been 
shrunk past a psychiatrist’s hour to 45 minutes. 

Spruce, a restaurant in Chicago popular with 
advertising and publishing executives, has an 
Executive Privileges program. Regular lunch 
guests program their visits by filling out a ques- 
tionnaire about food and service preferences. It 
helps return diem to their desk in under an hour. 

Dan Sadis, the owner, has seen no evidence of 
the serial lunch. 

“This is Chicago, not New York,” he said. 



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de BENVENISTE . 

died suddenly Saturday 
evening November 8. 
The funeral will be held on 
Friday November 14 at 10:45 
ar the American Cathedral, , 
23 avenue George V. 

The burial will follow at foe 
dmetiere de Montmartre. 


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New Storm Fades, but Mexico Was Ready 


77ir Associated Press 

PUERTO ESCONDIDO, Mexico — When 
the hurricane designated Pauline roared into a 
sleeping Mexico last month, it tore apart 
houses, washed out roads and killed 230 
people. 

This week, when the hurricane designated 
Rick swirled over the southern coast, the nation 
was prepared. The storm did little damage, 
compared with the destruction in Pauline’s 
wake, and no deaths were reported. 

Ride, a Category 1 hurricane, was not nearly 
as strong as Pauline, a Category 4 — the 
second-most severe level. But foe main factor, 
rescue workers and residents said was that 
people had 1 taken the second hurricane seri- 
ously, whereas hours before Pauline struck res- 


s- 1 . ■ ■•m . 1 

idents were skeptical that any serious damage 
would be done. 

“We picked up experience with Pauline. 
This time people weren’t caught asleep on foe 
sides of foe rivers,” said Flosdo Palomec Ant- 
onio, 37, as he made the rounds in Puerto 
Escondido selling mezcai, a harsh cactus-based 
liquor. 

when foe new storm rumbled this way Sun- 
day night, villagers bad already lied to sturdy 
houses on high ground and stocked up on water, 
food and batteries. 

Also helping preparedness this time were 
hundreds of rescue workers from across Mexico 
still deployed here to handle foe aftermath of the 
storm last month. The Red Cross has 1 30 people 
in the Puerto Escondido effort, in addition to foe 


MV’ZM 1 ' O Aim I 

20 normally based here, according to the or- 
gfimzation’s national operations director, Bern- 
ardino Heredia, who is overseeing the effort. 

On Monday, Rick was downgraded to a 
tropical storm, then to a tropical depression as it 
moved inland over Chiapas state. 

Officials in Chiapas nervously watched for 
signs of flooding along foe coast and in upland 
river valleys, already saturated by three pre- 
vious storms. In the coastal town of Arriaga, 
officials have reported uninterrupted rains since 
late Sunday. 

The hufricane season in Mexico has been 
particularly intense, which some blame on El 
Nino, a weather pattern that creates droughts in 
some areas while generating heavier- than-nor- 
mal rain in others. 


Sound Alarm 
In Asia Over 
‘Hot 9 Gems 

Retuns - 

BANGKOK — Hundreds of danger- 
ously radioactive gemstones are-circu- 
lating in Asian markets, and some have 
found their way into finished jeweby, 

. accenting to Bangkok gemologi&a. 

Tests coaductedby radiologists in the 
Thai capital showed radiation levels in 
some srones were more than 50 times 
the U.S. safety limit and could cause 
health problems including cancer. 

“It b most likely that Hw stow has 

been bombarded with neutrons in a nu- 
clear reactor/* the Center for Gemstone 
Testing in Bangkok said in a recent 

warning. ' , . 

The concerns center on batches Ora 
s e m i precious stone called a : "cat’s 
eye,” which are believed to have been 
irradiated to change their color . trona 
yellow — a color that gives them a value 
of a few hundred U,S. dollars per carat 
— to an unusual chocolate hue priced si 
thousands of dollars per carat. 

A 30-carat radioactive cat’s eye set 
with diamonds In a finished ring was 
discovered recently at a jcweliy fair In 
Hong Kong, jewelry executives said. 

“When it was placed in front of a 
Geiger counter we literally leapt back,” 
said Jon McDonald, an editor at a local 
jewelry media firm who witnessed the 
ring being tested. 

“The machine was just screeching 
every time the ring went near it.” he 
said. ..... 

Tests recently conducted by Labora- 
tories in Bangkok on one 3.5-carai stone 
showed radioactivity levels greater than 
52 nanocurics per gram. 

TTieU.S. safety limit is one nanocurie - 
per gram, and the legal limit in Asia is 
2.0 nanocuries per gram, gemofogtsts 
said. 

“This is dangerous,” said Bandhong 
Wangcharoenroong, director of the ra- 
diation measurement division at Thai- 
land’s Office of Atomic Energy for 
Peace. 

“It could make your skin cancerous 
and destroy white blood cells." 

Several hundred carats of the stones 
woe thought to be circulating in .-i 
Bangkok, but the problem was region- ' 
wide, said Ken Scarratt, director of foe 
Center for Gemstone Testing. 

“The biggest problem is in places 
like Indonesia ana Japan,” Mr. Scarratt 
said. 

“In Indonesia, a gem lab there has 
seen hundreds of these stones coming 
through." 

But an Indonesian jewelry industry , 
official in Jakarta said ho doubted his j 
country was the source of the radio- ; 
active gemstones. 

“Indonesia buys a lot of gemstones ’■ 
from-Burma, Thailand and India,” said __ 
the official, who asked not to be iden- 
tified, “but to my knowledge there are 
no labs here to treat gemstones. 1 ’ 

Meanwhile, Thai gem dealers were 
buying radiation detectors, distributors 

“Most of foe people doing business - 
in Thailand have very liule knowledge 33) From 
of foe radiation in foe stones.” said , 

Monta Chaiyabal, managing directorof £tlC S 
Duwell Intertrade Co., which sells Gei- j 
ger counters. “I hope we can help edu- F; 
cate them.” ‘ 


. »> 


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THE INTER MARK ET 




Don’t miss it. A lot happens there. 


Landmark Paris Venue to Reopen 

PARIS (AFP) — France’s most renowned music ball, the 
Olympia in Paris, is to reopen Thursday after a seven-month 
refurbishment that was faithful to foe original layout of foe 
theater, which is listed as a historical site. 

The French singer Gilbert Becaud, dubbed the “godfather” 
of the Olympia because of foe many concerts he performed 
there, was to inaugurate foe revamped music hall, which first 
opened in 1893. The decor of foe 2,000-seat music hall has 
been preserved, with its red velvet seats and curtains, black 
walls and deep blue ceiling, but the stage was enlarged- 

UN Meeting Focuses on Air Safety 

MONTREAL (AF) — Concerned by steadily rising num- 
bers of fotal plane crashes, foe United Nations civil aviation 
agency is bolding a meeting involving officials from 135 
countries to discuss new safety measures. - 

The International Civil Aviation Organization convened 
foe three-day meeting Monday because of fears that a record' 
number of fatal air crashes in 1996 was eroding public 
confidence in air travel ICAO logged a record 80 fatal civilian 
plane crashes in 1996 that killed 2336 people, with more than 
half of foe deaths occurring in foe 23 crashes that involved 
scheduled commercial flights. 


Correction 

An article in Thursday’s editions erroneously referred to the 
“late” art dealer Elie BorowskL Mr. Borowski is very much 
alive. 


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Quits cool across most of 
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day. Francs and England 
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ers Thursday end Friday. 
Dry and cool In eastern 
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day. Soaking rain la In 
store for northern Italy and 
the Bafcans Thursday. Fri- 
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northwest China, while 
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are mild with some sun- 
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turning colder Saturday. 
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PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


Democrats , Spumed by Clinton 9 Rebelled on Fast Track 9 


POLITICAL NO 


By John M. Brodw 

Netv York Times Service 


f — Since he first announced 

forthe^idencym IWl.Bill Clinton has almost 

always kept his own Democratic Party at arm's 
ISStaEE? g ambition was to rise above 

the ^m-dead politics" of both parties. To prove 

his independence from the party. Mr. Clinton stiff- 
-aimed pemocrats on welfare, crime- and the bal- 
anced budget. 

TTim he fried to do it again, this time on "fast- 
is* trade policy. He got Republicans on 

- But his staff miscalculated in drafting the bill, 
.the president insulted congressional Democrats, 
and me long-standing estrangement between the 
president and the congressional wing of his party 
became outright rebellion. 

Just after 2 AM. on Monday, his fellow Demo- 
* chewed off the arm that Mr. Clinton had used 
10 hold them off. They left him, at least for now, a 
president without a party. 

In the end. he was unable to command enough 
.loyalty or fear to win even a quarter of the votes of 
the House Democratic Caucus. Mr. Clinton’s own 
party has dealt him one of the most hu miliating 
political defeats of his presidency. 

TTie trade debate also marked the unofficial 
beginning of the 2000 presidential campaign Rep- 
resentative Richard Gephardt, the House minority 


leader and the captain of the anti-fast-track forces, 
emerged a decisive victor over Vice President AI 
Gore, who hewed to the administration line and 
will pay the price in lost labor money and or- 
ganizational support. 

The president need not look far for the roots of 
his fail ore to win so-called fast-track negotiating 

~ NEWS ANALYSIS 

authority, the power presidents since Gerald Ford 
have had to negotiate trade treaties that Congress 
can approve or reject, but not amend. 

Interviews with participants on Capitol Hill and 
senior White House staffers revealed that mistakes 
and miscalculations by the White House con- 
tributed to the defeat Some of the errors were 
tactical, some substantive and some personal. 

But the most surprising mistakes were made by 
the president, who late last week said that be would 
win the trade vote easily if it were held in secret, 
suggesting that lawmakers who opposed the mea- 
sure did so only because they feared retaliation by 
labor or environmental groups. 

He then compounded the error by asserting that 
a vote for the bill was a “no-brainer," implying 
that opponents were acting irrationally. 

Those words came back to haunt the White 
House in a bitter confrontation between Repre- 
sentative Peter DeFazio, Democrat of Oregon, and 
Erskine Bowles, the president’s chief of staff. 


Mr. DeFazio, recalling the -president's char- 
acterizations of the bill’s opponents, lashed out at 
Mr. Bowles, whose wife's family made a fortune in 
textiles in the South. Calling Mr. Clinton's ques- 
tioning of lawmakers' motives "outrageous and 
insulting," Mr. DeFazio said it was tantamount to 
his accusing Mr. Bowles of favoring fast track not 
on its merits, but to increase the value of his stock 
portfolio. Several members of the Democratic 
Caucus jeered ar Mr. DeFazio. But others ap- 
plauded — and it was their votes that cost the 
president. 

Winning the vote on fasr-track authority would 
in any event have been difficult for the president 
because the issue went to the heart of the Demo- 
cratic Party's dispate over trade and domestic 
economics. 

But the depth of Mr. DeFazio's anger made it 
abundantly clear that the president’s own dis- 
cordant words had made success impossible. 

On Monday morning, Mr. Clinton vowed to try 
again next year to pass the fast-track bill, and 
offered a partial apology for his words. 

He said that many Democrats who opposed the 
trade bill were doing so because of concerns about 
their constituents, not out of fear of labor re- 
taliation. “I did not question their integrity, ’’ the 
president said, “I questioned their judgment.” 

But Mr. Clinton s failure cm Monday morning 
was about more than a relatively arcane trade 
measure. It was a result of long estrangement 


between him and the Democrats. He declared the 
party intellectually bankrupt six years ago when he 
said he soueht a “third way" between heartless 
Republican. a m and failed liberalism. 

His missteps in his first two years in office cost 
Democrats control of Congress in 1994. His ap- 
propriation of the party apparatus to support his re- 
election drive last year left the party' under a legal 
cloud and $15 million in debt — and the Re- 
publicans still in charge of both houses of Con- 
gress. 

He allied himself on the trade issue with the 
Republican leadership — the speaker of the House. 
Newt Gingrich, and the Senate majority leader, 
Trent Loil He waited until laie — mid-September 
— to introduce his version of fast-track legis- 
lation. 

By then organized labor had been in the field for 
months, working in congressional districts across 
the country to drum up opposition. 

One fasr-track supporter and adviser to the 
White House said the failure to deal with op- 
ponents’ concerns had been fatal. "These guys 
were not driven by labor money but by their own 
constituencies." said this adviser. 

And. this adviser added, this time the president’s 
trademark procrastination cost him a in a big 
way. 

“It reminds me of how I got my term papers 
done in college." the adviser said, “but that’s no 
wav to run a country." 


Working Moms Juggle Career and Guilt 

Many Face Tots’ Tough Questions Over Why They Leave Each Morning 


By Reed Abelson 

New York Times'Snvure 


NEW YORK — Claudia Mott, a re- 
search analyst on Wall Street, spends 
most of her days answering questions 
from investors about small-company 
stocks. But on a recent morning, she 
received the most intense grilling from 
her 5-year-old son. Although she usu- 
ally leaves for her office before he gets 
up. he was already wide awake at 6 
A.M. He then threw a tantrum, insisting 
that he did not want her to go to work 
that day. "Sometimes it's just that tbey 
know it’s Monday," Ms. Mott sighed 

It is a scene that resonates with most 
mothers who work outside the home — 
and a lot of fathers, too. In what could 
well be described as the worst five 
minutes of the day. a screaming child 
demands to know why Mom cannot stay. 
Emotions tend to run highest when the 
workweek begins or the child is not 
feeling welL Whatever the reason, the 
questioning can be painful and insistent 

Last month, Hillary Rodham Clinton 
led a conference at the White House on 
the "silent crisis" of child care. But the 
8 million married working mothers in 
the United States who are still living 
with their husbands and have children 
under 6 — 63 percent of all women with 
children that age — also have to contend 
with this vety vocal issue. 

For all the talk in Washington about 
policies and priorities, many working 
parents are still wrestling with the most 
prosaic of problems: What do you tell 
the children? 

For some, the answer is plain. They 


need the money. 

But for many other families, there may 
be more choice involved and thus more 
hand-wringing over what to say. Point to 
money as the reason why mom has to 
leave and children can become fearful or 
too money-conscious . Talk about self- 
fulfillment, and she essentially comes off 
as selfish, putting herself ahead of them. 

Whatever their reasons for working, 
many mothers have mixed feelings at 
least some of the time about leaving their 
children in someone else's care. Their 
ambivalence is brought home even more 
by sensational trials like die one in- 
volving the British an pair convicted of 
killing an 8-mouth-old in Massachusetts 
whose sentence was reduced from life in 
prison to time served on Monday after 
the judge threw out the jury 's verdict and 
changed the conviction to manslaughter. 
Worse yet for them, the mother in that 
case has drawn criticism for working, 
even though she was employed only part 
time, as a doctor. 

**I don’t know anybody for whom it 
isn't difficult,' * said Iris Goldfein, a vice 
chairman of Coopers & Lybrand. Ms. 
Goldfein is a single mother who has had 
to answer herlwo children's questions 
about why she travels so much. 

To be sure, the traditional family struc- 
ture has undergone many changes die last 
few decades, with child care respon- 
sibilities shifted and shared in different 
ways. Many fathers also feel die pain 
each day at die rooming leave-taking — 
and have their own explaining to da 

Bat rightly or wrongly, child experts 
and working mothers say, it is the moth- 
ers in two-paycheck homes who are 


usually perceived as having more of a 
choice about going to work. Thai is true 
even though 63 percent of married 
women with children under 18 and 
whose sponses are present are in die 
work force, at least pan time, according 
to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And it 
is mothers who tend to face the brunt of 
a child’s protest, according to most of 
the women interviewed for this article. 

"My husband misses all of it," said 
Ms. Mott, who is married to a Wall 
Street- trader. Some women may simply 
have a different relationship with their 
children, serving as their primary sup- 
port but children also quickly pick up 
on the idea that many other mothers still 
make different choices. 

For some working women, the early- 
morning tears are soon forgotten in the 
press of the day’s events — just as most 
of the children quickly diy their eyes 
and go about their business. For others 
— and do one knows how many — the 
emotional baggage becomes too heavy 
to haul to the office, leading some to 
give up their jobs a- cut back their hours, 
often relegating themselves to the so- 
called mommy track. 

But for all women, the tears are a 
reminder of how complicated family 
life-has become — and how much of the 
balancing between home and career 
fells on their shoulders. 

Those who have the most trouble com- 
ing up with an answer are often women in 
higher-income families. Although a 
second income helps pay the bills, work- 
ing really is not about the money for 
some of these women, especially after 
higher tax rates and fee cost of child care 



The Nr* YintTu 


Ms. Mott hugging her sons, Andrew, left, and Jeremy, right The boys 
often protest when she leaves home for her job as a research analyst 


kick in. Instead, going to work becomes 
akin to an illicit pleasure. 

Most children, of course, will quickly 
outgrow their morning outbursts over 
this "infidelity," just as they will learn 
how to leave their parents for a sleep- 
over at a friend’s house and, eventually. 


go to college and live away from home. 
By the time they are 6, they may be more 
focused on seeing their friends at school 
than (Xi worrying about their mothers’ 
leaving, said Bennett Levemhal, direc- 
tor of child and adolescent psychiatry at 
the University of Chicago. 


Away From 
Politics 

•Air pollution from 
factories in Canada and 
the United States flows 
both ways across the bor- 
der and will get worse 
unless abatement efforts 
re fleer fee international 
nature of fee problem, a 
report issued by the 
Commission for Envi- 
ronmental Cooperation, 
in Montreal said. (NYT) 

• For the first time in 51 

years, there was no Vet- 
erans Day parade in Veto 
Beacb. Florida, on Tues- 
day. it has become a cas- 
ualty of the battle against 
age. Most World War C 
veterans are too old to 
walk the route of little 
more than a mile or cany 
heavy flags. (AP) 

• Drugs taken by 4 mil- 
lion Americans to lower 
cholesterol may slightly 
hamper concentration 
and dexterity, but re- 
searchers say people 
should continue to take 
them anyway. (AP) 


Latest in Blocking Nominees: A Last-Minute Ambush 


)yR 

id.St 


ana .Steven A. Holmes 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
Senate confirmation hear- 
ing of Dr. David Satcber for 
surgeon general early last 
month was so tame that it 
drew virtually no press cov- 
erage. 

Two weeks later, the 
hearing of Bill Lann Lee for 
the nation’s top civil rights 
job was so tranquil that Sen- 
ator Patrick Leahy, a Ver- 
mont Democrat, told him, 
"There won’t be so many 
good things said about you 
again until your funeral." 

So it is all the more stun- 
ning that President Bill 
Clinton is struggling to res- 
cue the no mina tions of both 
Dr. Satcher and Mr. Lee. 
But ft may be too late. 

For years, the unwritten 
rule seemed to be that nom- 
inees who survived their 
confirmation hearings would 
be unstoppable. By design or 
not, conservative opponents 


of some of fee president's 
appointments are trying a 
new tactic: Build your case 
quietly, then pounce when 
the White House seems least 
suspecting. 

The Satcher and Lee epis- 
odes underscore the deep 
conservatism of the Repub- 
licans who control fee Sen- 
ate and the influence of fee 
party's core interest groups. 
Dr. Satcber’ s nomination is 
being held up largely over 
questions about his stand on 
late-term abortion, and Mr. 
Lee is embroiled in ques- 
tions over his position on 
affirmative action. 

Senator John Ashcroft, 
Republican of Missouri, 
blamed Mr. Clinton for 
causing conservatives to be 
less willing to go along with 
appointments. When Repub- 
licans criticized Mr. Clin- 
ton’s nominations during the 
presidential campaign last 
year, he noted, fee president 
retorted that many of those 
same Republicans fed voted 
to confirm his choices. 


"In this last election, fee 
president said, ‘If you don’t 
like those appointments, it’s 
your fault because you voted 
to confirm. ’ ’’ Mr. Ashcroft 
said. "If the president wants 
us to take a more substantive 
role, then we’re going to 
have to become more care- 
fill and less deferential." 

Complicating fee con- 
firmations of Dr. Satcher 
and Mr. Lee is that both jobs 
have histories of bitter con- 
firmation battles. It has al- 
most reached the point, 
people on both sides said, 
that no one can be nomin- 
ated as surgeon general or 
assistant attorney general for 
civil rights without a bruis- 
ing, if not losing, battle. 

"In each case you have 
fee right wing in fee Re- 
publican Party who are try- 
ing to hold these nominees 
to an ideological right-wing 
litmus test," said Rahm 
Emanuel, a senior adviser to 
Mr. Clinton. 

In the case of Dr. Satcher, 
Trent Lott of Mississippi, fee 


leader of fee majority Re- 
publicans in fee Senate, an- 
nounced Sunday that he was 
holding up confirmation at 
least until next year. Though 
Dr. Satcher, who is director 
of the federal Centers for 
Disease Control and Preven- 
tion, glided through his con- 
firmation hearing, some 
conservative senators have 
since complained about his 
written responses to their 
questions, saying he had not 
sufficiendy opposed certain 
types of late-torn abortion. 

Mr. Lee has worked for 
the Legal Defense and Edu- 
cational Fund of the Nation- 
al Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored 
People, which has often 
been on the forefront in ar- 
guing for affirmative action 
that involved racial or 
gender preferences. But at 
first, he was seen as the ideal 
candidate: a well -qualified, 
level-headed litigator, not a 
legal theorist. 

As the nomination moved 
toward a hearing on Ocl 22, 


White House officials heard 
no major reservations from 
Republicans on the Judiciary 
Committee. “Even those 
you would expect generally 
to be concerned were at least 
polite," said Charles Ruff, 
the White House counsel, 
adding feat fee nomination 
seemed to be "going as well 
as you thought it could go." 

Bui many Republicans ac- 
knowledge that their oppo- 
sition to Mr. Clinton's latest 
appointees is retribution for 


fee rough lime Democrats 
gave to Reagan and Bush 
administration nominees. 

Last week, as the Judi- 
ciaiy Committee was debat- 
ing how nominees had been 
treated when Democrats 
controlled the panel. Sen- 
ator Dianne Feinstein, 
Democrat of California, 
said: "Gentlemen, how long 
are you going to fight this 
battle? For those of* us that 
are newcomers, it looks ri- 
diculous.'’ 


Clinton Aide Fined 
For Stock Offense 

WASHINGTON — Samuel 
iSundy) Berger. President Bill 
Clinton's national security adviser, 
has agreed to pay 523.043 for fail- 
ing to sell Amoco Corp. stock for 
15 months after government attor- 
neys advised him to do so. 

In papers settling a civil conflict- 
of-interest suit brought against him 
by fee Justice Department. Mr. Ber- 
ger said that he forgot about the 
instructions to sell the 1.300 
Amoco shares, held in four trusts 
for his wife and three children, and 
thus did not knowingly take parr in 
decisions in which he had a fi- 
nancial interest. 

As part of the settlement, Mr. 
Berger acknowledged matters 
that may have affected Amoco 
came before him during the 15- 
mcmih period — from March 16, 

1 994. until June 1 9. 1 995 — when 
he was deputy national security* 
adviser. 

But there was no evidence that 
Mr. Berger considered any effect 
his actions would have had on his 
family’s financial interest. 

Justice Department attorneys 
said that lacking evidence of Mr. 
Berger’s intent to violate the con- 
flict-of-interest law. they would not 
bring criminal charges against 
him. iHTi 

Try , Try Again: 

The Dollar Coin 

WASHINGTON — Change is 
coming to Americans' change. 

Legislation calling for a new 
gold-colored dollar coin and for 
quarters commemorating the 50 
states cleared the Senate and ap- 
pears headed for final congression- 
al approval this week. 

"We're going to push hard for 
passage of the Senate btU Wed- 
nesday or Thursday.” said Rep- 
resentative Michael Castle. Repub- 
lican of Delaware, chairman of the 
House Banking monetary subcom- 
mittee. 

"You're going to have a new 
look for the quarter and a very 
different look for the dollar coin,' * 
he said. ‘ 'These are very significant 
changes." 

The Senate, in passing the leg- 
islation by voice vote, sidestepped 
a controversy over who or what 
should replace suffragist Susan B. 
Anthony on the face of fee dollar 
coin. 

Mr. Castle and the Senate Bank- 
ing Committee chairman, Alfonse 
D ’Amato. Republican of New 
York, pushed for the Statue of 
Liberty. But Senators Barbara Box- 
er, Democrat of California: Carol 
Moseley-Braun. Democrat of 
Illinois’ and Lauch Fairclofe. Re- 
publican of North Carolina, wanted 
a real woman or women of historic 
importance. 

As passed by the Senate, the leg- 
islation leaves the design up to the 
secretary of fee Treasury. A Treas- 
ury Department spokeswoman said 
fee department did not intend to 
speculate on a design before the 
legislation is passed. ( AP} 

Quote /Unquote 

Joe.Moakley, Democrat of Mas- 
sachusetts. when, after nine post- 
ponements. a meeting of the House 
Rules Committee was gaveled to 
order at 10:19 P.M. Sunday for the 
cun announcement that "ihe rules 
meeting on fast track is going to be 
delayed" because of “some tech- 
nical glitch": "Yeah. It’s called 
not enough votes.” fWP) 


Accused Bomber Sought ‘Revenge on Society 5 


By William Glaberson 

New York Tones Service 


iAMENTO. California — The attacks 
dore Kaczynski were part of a "plan tor 
on society." and when his bombs railed, 
lals show him to have been disappointed, 
ig to prosecutors who are to start present- 
case against him this week, 
uimal and other writings paint a picture or 

who could be bias* about tallmg 
when his bombs failed or whoa bomb 

ittoomuch. “Damn." prosecutors sayhe 
<nm ot th*» I Tniversitvof Utah 


desire to kill as early as 1966," the prosecutors 
said in a legal brief, "and that this desire remained 
unabated to the day of his arrest." 

Though he lived the life of a hermit, the jour- 
nals reveal a man who kept careful track through 
newspaper accounts of what happened when 
bombs arrived at their destinations. One entry 




uu anyone- — C1 . r. 

Tilings, contained m papers filed 1^ 
>rs over the past sc^weeks,represort 
detailed dissemination so far or fee 
f evidence mvestigatore say tteyfouiul 
iczynski's mountain cabin in 1W&. 
tpers were pan of Jhe prosecution ma- 
Hnpreparation for Mr. smA 

iurv selection is to start Wednesday. 

EteSbed Mr. KMjmdt.-* ™h- 
wmaJs. letters and notations asfee heart 
ase "The government will draw upon 
&ni’s writings to prove that he formed a 


like scrap of lumber behind RenTech compute 
store in Sacramento. According to San Francisco 
Examiner, Dec. 20, the ‘operator’ (owner? man- 
ager?) of fee store was killed, ‘blown to bits,’ " 

Prosecutors say the reference was to fee 1985 
bombing death of Hugh Campbell Scrutton. 38, 
the owner of a store drat was in a strip mall here, 
RenTech Computer Rental. The bombing that 
led to Mr. Scrotton’s death is one of four for 
which Mr. Kaczynski faces trial here. 

His careful calculations of the cost of materials 
and transportation show feat Mr. Kaczynski had 
a cold-blooded disregard for the victims of fee 16 
bombings over 18 years attributed to the person 
known as fee "Unabomber,” prosecutors are 
expected to argue. That assertion would be cen- 
tral to their case because fee defense has said feat 
Mr. Kaczynski was mentally ill and incapable of 


forming the intent necessary to be held criminally 
responsible, something the defense is expected to 
say that Mr. Kaczynski 's journals prove. 

In one journal entry, after a bomb caused a fire 
on an American Airlines flight from Chicago to 
Washington in 1979 and left 18 people suffering 
from smoke inhalation, the journal showed little 
more than frustration. “In some of my notes I 
mentioned a plan for revenge on society," an 
entry written a month later begins. ‘‘Plan was to 
blow up one airliner in flight Late summer and 
early autumn I constructed device. Much ex- 
pense, because had to go to Gr. Falls to buy 
materials, including barometer and many boxes 
cartridges for fee powder." 

On rare occasions in fee materials described by 
the prosecutors, the writer showed flashes erf 
emotion. One such case was after two - bombs 
mailed from Sacramento on the same- day in 1993 
maimed bat did not kill two professors on opposite 
coasts, Charles Epstein, a geneticist at the Uni- 
versity of California at San Francisco, and David 
Gelemrer, a computer scientist at Yale University 
in New Haven, Connecticut. Prosecutors say fee 
Unabomber mailed a letter to Mr. Gelemter two 
years later, taunting him for being “dumb enough 
to open an unexpected package." 



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PAGE 4 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


i 


Yeltsin Shifts 
His Emphasis 
In China Visit 


I# -PIP' H : sS W~ 

vT YV v'<w; f * "HCv ' »-«4wn ■ .. 


To Economics 


GvnpOrd tn- the- Sniff frotn DapatcSts 


HARBIN, China — President Boris 
Yeltsin of Russia visited Harbin, a 
Chinese city with strong Russian links, 
on Tuesday and appeared upbeat about 
the prospects for stronger economic co- 
operation with China. 

“I'm very happy that oar countries’ 
economic ties are getting better now," 
Mr. Yeltsin said during a visit to a 
World War U monument to Soviet sol- 
diers in this northeastern city. 

A day after reaffirming Russia's and 
China's "strategic partnership'’ with 
President Jiang Zemin, Mr. Yeltsin fo- 
cused Tuesday on business. Moscow 
views economic ties as crucial for its 
new friendship with Beijing. 

Mr. Yeltsin laid a wreath at a me- 
morial for Soviet troops killed in Man- 
churia in the last days of World War 12. 
Two dozen ethnic Russians, many the 
offspring of people who fled the Soviet 
revolution, cheered and waved at Mr. 
Yeltsin. 

On Monday, during his official visit 
to Beijing, Mr. Yeltsin and Mr. Jiang 
signed a declaration that ended disputes 
over the demarcation of the Chinese- 
Russtan border and ontlined areas in 
which the countries would develop eco- 
nomic relations. 

A separate intergovernmental memo- 
randum aimed at renewing economic 
ties was also signed. 

(Reuters, AP) 



Mr. Yeltsin talking Tuesday with ethnic Russians who live in Harbin. 


Beijing Assails U.S. Bills 
That It Calls Anti-China 5 


I Moscow Press Bewails Trade 


Russian newspapers printed pictures 
of Mr. Yeltsin hugging Mr. Jiang but 
said the presidents' personal rapport 
could not hide the poor state of trade 
between the two giant neighbors, Reu- 
ters reported from Moscow. 

"A Day of Sad Smiles in Beijing,” 
read a headline Nezavisimaya Gazeta. 

“It is difficult to deny that today 
relations between Beijing and Moscow 
are characterized by mutual understand- 
ing and warmth,” the daily said in a 
front-page article. "At the current time, 
there are some 200 agreements signed 
by the two countries, but by no means all 
of them are being carried out This fact 
introduced a certain note of sadness into 
the official smiles." 

The expected total Russian-Chinese 
trade volume this year of $7 billion is 
regarded in Moscow as miserably in- 
adequate. By contrast, China's trade 
reached $60 billion last year with Japan 
and $43 billion with the United States, 
according to Chinese figures. 


Gxffided bv Our Staff Front Dupacka 

BEUING — Beijing criticized a 
series of ‘ ‘anti-China” proposals before 
the U.S. Congress on Tuesday as gross 
interference in its internal affairs as a 
senior American envoy held talks here 
on security issues. 

The Foreign Ministry spokesman, 
Shen Gnofang. said at a news briefing, 
“We have taken notice that in recent 
days the U.S. House of Representatives 
has passed a series of proposals with 
anti-Chinese content.’’ 

“This is gross interference in China’s 
internal affairs,” Mr. Shen said. "We 
express our strong dissatisfaction and 
resolute opposition to this.” 

Last Friday, Congress voted to re- 
quire die Central Intelligence Agency 
and the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
to report annually on Chinese econom- 
ic, political and military espionage in 
the United States. 

It was one of a package of 1 1 bills 
under consideration that were intended 
to punish China for what lawmakers 
said was aggressive behavior and hu- 
man rights abuses. 

The China bills, in part the work of a 
special congressional task force, were 
written before President Jiang Zemin’s 
state visit to the United States last 
week. 

But Mr. Shen suggested the moves 
were a backlash against Mr. Jiang's 
eight-day visit, which ended Nov. 2. 



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. i'll®*' 

• - 


Asian Skies Clear . 

J j • * i | 

Indonesian Reforms Called Vital to Prevent Recurrence of Haze ' .*( *' 



Michael Richardson 

inrnumtmri Nctjld Tribune 


MSS Crisis-' V,. *- 


SINGAPORE — Clear skies have 
returned, at least temporarily, to Singa- 
pore and Malaysia, following rain and a 
change in the direction of the wind that 
for much of the last few months was 
blowing dense smoke from fires in In- 
donesia across the region. 

But scientists, environmentalists and 
other critics warn that unless major re- 
forms in fire and land management are 
applied by Indonesian authorities, the 
blanket of smoke that quickly turned to 


responsible for the fires bad little im- 
pact.’* 

Indonesia's forestry lobby, led by 
Bob Hasan, a close associate of Mr. 
Suharto’s, had sought to “play down the 
significance of the fires, which have 
damaged agriculture, driven away tour- 
ists and angered Indonesia's neigh- 
bors,” the consultancy added. 

H. S. Dillon, a former assistant to the 

Indonesian agriculture minister, said 
that although El Nino disturbances in 
weather patterns had caused the pro- 


nest up to three meters (10 feet) 

About 20 percent of Kalimm; 
which covers about two-thirds or the* 
world’s largesr island, Borneo, is peat 
Swampy under normal conditions, this 
coal-like substance is now dry in many 



heavy rain can ex- 


smog when mixed with industrial and longed drought, “that this is now in- 
nniinhnn unit rw*i,r in iiw i»«xt . ffictmg severe hardships on both us ana 


transport pollution will recur in the next ■ flictmg severe hardships on douj us anu 
drought, with even more serious eco- our neighbors is due more to unbrialw 
nomic and public health consequences. "** — - 


lfc»<d RnwMVTV Vwriivd JW 


"There are always people in Con- 
gress who oppose improvements in 
China-U.S. relations,” the spokesman 
said. “Every time relations gel better, 
they will go out of their way to create 
obstacles, but history will show this to 
be ftitile.” 

The Foreign Ministry condemnation 
came as Deputy Secretary of State 
Strobe Talbott held talks here with se- 
nior Chinese officials. 

Mr. Shen said ralks during Mr. Tal- 
bot’s visit were focused on “national 
security,” adding that the U.S. official 
had met with Deputy Foreign Minister 
Zhang Deguang. 

• Mr. Talbott, who arrived in Beijing 
late Monday, met later Tuesday with 
Foreign Minister Qian Qichen, the of- 
ficial Xinhua press agency reported. 

On Sunday, the House of Represen- 
tatives voted to authorize a $50 million 
budget for Radio Free Asia and Voice of 
America aimed at increasing their Man- 
darin-language broadcasts to 24 hours a 
day. 

It was' just one of nearly a dozen 
measures taken up by the House fol- 
lowing Mr. Jiang's visit which take aim 
at China 's human-rights record, family 
planning and other policies. 

The toughest would deny visas to 
most Chinese officials seen as involved 
in persecuting religious minorities and 
to officials from government-sanc- 
tioned religious groups. (AFP, Reuters) 


Indonesian officials say that the fires, 
which are still burning on Kalimantan 
and Sumatra, have so far razed more 
than 220/100 hectares 1540,000 acres) 
of forest and bush. 

But Neil Byron, assistant director- 
general of the Center for International 
Forestry Research in Bogor, near 
Jakarta,” said Tuesday that the area af- 
fected could total between 800,000 and 
1 milli on hectares. 

Underlying this environmental dis- 
aster, researchers say. is commercial 
l ogging in Indonesia — home of the 
second largest tropical forest in the 
world, after Brazil — and the rapid 
expansion of mainly privately owned 
p lantatio ns and government- sponsored 

“transmigration” programs. These 
settle people from densely populated 
mins of Indonesia, such as Java and 
Bali, on Kalimantan, Sumatra and other 
islands where land is abundant 

The center said in a recent report on 
the fires that much of the burning was 
deliberate, motivated by die desire to 
take advantage of exceptionally dry con- 
ditions to clear land for agricultural use. 

14 We are seeing a scramble for land at 
the forest frontier,” it said. “The gov- 
ernment has licensed and stimulated 
many companies to develop new in- 
dustrial plantations of rubber, oil-palm 
and pulpwood, as well as transmigration 
sites. These activities require the clear- 
ing of hundreds of thousands of hectares 
of land, and fires are their cheapest 
option.” 

The center said that extinguishing 
large fires was costly and inefficient; the 
best solution was prevention — by adopt- 
ing policies and regulations to improve 
land stewardship standards and fire man- 
agement so that fires raging out of control 
do not recur in the next drought. 

But analysts said that effective reform 
would be difficult in a country as large 
as Indonesia, where government rules 
are often laxly applied or not enforced at 
all, especially in remote areas. 

In its latest report on Indonesia, Polit- 
ical & Economic Risk Consultancy Ltd. 
in Hong Kong said that the uncontrolled 
fires “illustrate the extent to which vest- 
ed interests can combine with bureau- 
cratic inertia to frustrate policy imple- 
mentation.” 

The official Indonesian response to 
the fires was slow and largely the result 


greed on the part of fug plantation in- 
terests and the complacency of our ag- 
ricultural leadership.” 

Analysis said dial many of the logging, 
plantation and fand development licenses 
were awarded to companies or individu- 
als on the basis of their close political 
connections to the Suharto government 
“The cancerous growth of planta- 
tions, timber estates and mining op- 
erations in primary forest land indicates 
the extent of nepotism and its effect on 
Indonesia’s economy and ecology,” 


said George Adirjondro, an Indonesian 
who teaches in the 


department of so- 
ciology and anthropology at the Uni- 
versity of Newcastle in Australia. 

Of major concern to scientists is the 
fact that much of the area worst affected 


Only prol 
tinoirixh peat fires 

“These peat deposits have accumu- ; 
laced over the last 5,000 10 1 0,00 0 ycar v ; 
and represent a huge store of carbon'; 
which is significant at a global level, 
the center said in its report. “Burning * 
peat contributes to the buildup of green- 
house gases in the atmosphere and also'; 
releases particulate matter and sulfur 
and nitrous oxides, which wake the haze 

a greater threat to human health. 

Some of the most intense burning of - j. 
peat is occurring in parts of a l-militon- 
hectare project in central Kal imantan ■ 
that was commissioned by Mr. Suharto ; 
in 1995 to convert the forest into a new . 

rice bowl for Indonesia. 

But some agricultural experts have 
questioned the viability of the plan, say- . 
mp that peat swamps are difficult tn 
convert to sustainable agriculture. 

The center said in its report that there 
were “enormous problems” in main- 
taining soil fertility in pear-land areas 
and in many cases “the best long-tenn . 
economic use will be some form of 
forestry." 


I 


BRIEFLY 


of diplomatic pressure from Malaysia 
and Sic 


imgapore, which were blanketed in 
choking haze, die consultancy said. 

“On SepL 9, when President Suharto 
announced an indefinite ban on the 
clearing of land by fire, some firms 
actually stepped up the burning so that 
they could meet their business targets,’ ’ 
it said "A later announcement by the 


China Asks Taiwan 
To Come to Table 


BEUING — China on Tuesday 
tried to woo Taiwan to the negotiating 
table to end nearly 50 years of hos- 
tility. The Taiwan authorities 
“should hold formal talks as soon as 
possible to end the state of hostility,” 
said Shen Guofang, the Chinese For- 
eign Ministry spokesman. 

Taipei said last week that Beijing 
had invited a senior Taiwan nego- 
tiator to a seminar in China in Decem- 
ber. Taipei effectively spumed the 
invitation and urged Beijing to accept 
a mission by Taipei "s top cross-straits 
envoy. Initial indications in Taipei 
were that China was unwilling to 
comply. (Reuters) 


The delegation, the first such Jap- 
anese group to visit North Korea smee 
1994, was invited by the Workers’ 
Party of Korea as a preliminary to 
resumption of formal talks on nor- 
malization of relations. (Reuters) 


China- Japan Accord 


Talks in Pyongyang 

TOKYO — A delegation from Ja- 


TOKYO — Prime Minister Li Peng 
of China and his Japanese counterpart. 
Ryu taro Hashimoto, met Tuesday to 
smooth over relations strained by a 
territorial dispute, China-Taiwan ten- 
sions Japan’s strengthened de- 
fense pact with die United States. 

Foreign Ministry officials said the 
two leaders oversaw the signing of a 
fishing accord that shelves a dispute 
in the South China Sea. Mr. Li was 
especially pleased by a Japanese 
pledge of support for China’s attempt 
to join the World Trade Organization, 
the officials said. (AP) 


pan’s governing coalition held talks 
T&« 


Hanoi Probes Unrest 


iesday in Pyongyang with a senior 
aide to the North Korean leader, Kim 
Jong IL, Japanese news reports said. 

The delegation, headed by Yoshiro 
Mori, chairman of the general ‘affairs 
council of Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto’s Liberal Democratic 
Party, took a chartered flight to Pyong- 
yang, the Kyodo news agency said. 

The official North Korean press 
agency, KCNA, said the talks be- 
tween the Japanese delegation and 


KimYong Sun, secretary of the Cen- 
of the Workers’ Party 


HANOI — Communist Party- of- 
ficials said Tuesday that the govern- 
ment had ordered a detailed report on 
the situation in southern Dong Nai 
Province, where several thousand 
people have been involved in clashes 
with the police. 

The unrest reportedly broke out 
Friday after women gathered outside 
government offices to protest con- 
fiscation of land and alleged corrup- 


traJ Committee of the 
of Korea, had been conducted in a 
“good atmosphere.” 


don. People in Dong Nai said that 
1 00 protesters were outside the 


about 

offices Tuesday and that the situation 
remained highly charged. [Reuters] 




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.^^NewChief 
^ Of Ireland 
Seeks ‘Gift 5 
Of Peace 

Reuters 

DUBLIN — Mary 
McAJeese was sworn in 
Tuesday as president of the 
Republic of Ireland and 
\ pledged to work for a "mil- 
■ . Jennium gift'* of peace in the 
. divided island. 

• ■ Mrs. McAleese, 46, a Ro- 

■ man Catholic and nationalise, 

. .. is the eighth president of Ire- 
... land and the first from the 
■!-. British-ruled province of 
. Northern Ireland. She was 
•* able to run for the post because 
ushe holds an Irish passport. 

> She said she would do ail 
v , she could to help peace- 
• • makers who are seeking a 
lasting resolution to the 
Northern Ireland conflict, in 
which more than 3,200 
.. people have been killed in 28 
‘ years of strife between Prot- 
estants and Catholics. 

“We hope and pray, indeed 
' we insist that we have seen 
the last of violence, ’ 1 she said. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


PACE 5 


EUROPE 


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Mary McAleese Inspecting an honor guard at her inauguration Tuesday In Dublin as Ireland's eighth president. 


After Talks, Holbrooke 
Ends Visit to Cyprus 

NICOSIA — Richard Holbrooke, the 
U.S. presidential envoy, wound up his first 
mission to Cypnis on Tuesday with a four- 
hour meeting with the leaders of the Greek- 
and Turkish-Cypriot sides on the divided 
island. 

Mr. Holbrooke said after talks with Pres- 
ident Glavkos Klerides and Rauf Denktash. 
the Turkish -Cypriot leader, that he was 
going to Ankara to meet with Prime Min- 
isterMesui Yilmaz and Foreign Minister 
Ismail Cem. “We did not expect a break- 
through from these discussions/' he said. 
“We just want the process to keep going. 
We will work in close conjunction with the 
UN whose special envoy is coming in the 
next days.” (AFP) 


Italy Arrests an Israeli 
In Onassis Inquiry 


“We demand the right to 
solve our problems by dia- 
logue and the noble pursuit of 
consensus." But she ac- 
knowledged that mistrust ran 
deep and that to speak of re- 
conciliation was to “raise a 
nervous query" in those in 
Northern Ireland who support 



:• ! 


Serb Hard-Liners 
Lose Police Station 

NATO Peacekeepers Act Before Vote 

By Lee Hocks tader 

Washington Post Service 

In.' SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herzegovina — NATO-led peace- 
keeping troops have seized a Bosnian Serb special police 
station in a move intended to punish hard-line Serb na- 
. tionaJists on the eve of important local elections. 

The special police, who act as bodyguards and paramilitary 
' troops, put up no resistance to the 50 or so Danish troops who 
entered the five-story building Monday in Doboj, 120 ki- 
lometers (75 miles) north of Sarajevo in the Serb-controlled 
part of Bosnia. In the course of the day. the Danes, backed by 
. it least 200 other peacekeeping troops stationed nearby — 
Finns. Swedes and Poles — stripped 66 Serb police officers of 
their badges and confiscated their weapons, ammunition, 
vehicles, radio equipment and files. 

The Stabilization Force for Bosnia has repeatedly de- 
manded an explanation as to why the commander of the Doboj 
special police unit and four of his men were involved in a clash 
with a rival political (action two months ago in the western city 
of Banja Luka. It was the failure to respond to those demands 
that prompted the seizure Monday. NATO spokesmen said. 

I Moreover, the Doboj special police are loyal to hard-liners 
l grouped around the Bosnian Serb Republic's fonner pres- 
ident. Radovan Karadzic, and are bitterly opposedto fee U.S.- 
brokered peace process in Bosnia. Since police arc one of fee 
key levers of power in fee Balkans, the peacekeepers* move 
appeared designed to loosen fee hard-liners’ grip on Doboj, 
one of Bosnia’s largest Serb-held cities. 

It may also have the effect of strengthening fee hand of Mr. 
Karadzic’s successor and political rival, fee Bosnian Serb 
president, Biljana Plavsic. Mrs. Plavsic, although also an 
ardent nationalist, enjoys Western support in her struggle wife 
Mr. Karadzic because she publicly acknowledges a need to 
abide by fee Dayton peace agreement that ended the 1992-95 
conflict in Bosnia. 

Parliamentary elections in the Serb-controlled half of Bos- 
nia are scheduled for Nov. 22-23, and two of fee main parties 
battling wife each other for voter support are loyal to Mrs. 
(Plavsic and Mr. Karadzic. 

T Based in Banja Luka. Mrs. Plavsic and her allies openly 
covet control of Doboj and other key Bosnian Serb towns and 
cities farther east Last month, they sent a large police con- 
^ttingent to try to seize a rival police headquarters just north of 
■Doboj in fee town of Derventa. The group was stopped on the 
Hhighway by police loyal to Mr. Karadzic, and the two sides 
■were locked in a tense predawn standoff for hours. 

^ Some Western military officials cautioned th?t fee peace- 
keepers’ move against fee hard-liners in Doboj was risky, not 
least because it could leave a power vacuum in fee city that 
Mrs. Plavsic may try to fill wife her own police. 

^ m One source said he believed Western officials had warned 
Plavsic not to try to send her own men to replace the 
Doboj special police for fear it would spark a bloodbath. 

• ' The special police are a holdover from the prewar era in 
communist Yugoslavia, when they were often referred to as 
toolioeal police and used to suppress and intimidate dissidents. 

The Stabilization Force commander. Lieutenant General 
, Eric Shinseki of the U.S. Army, said three months ago that the 
Bosnian Serb special police would have to disband or face 

arrest. That announcement was treated as a significant pobey 
shift, but it was oot until the Doboj seizure that NATO forces 

took forceful action against the units. 

The peacekeeping force requires that any Bosnian military 
or special police movements be cleared NATO com- 
manders in advance. The five special police officers mDoboj 
failed to report their travel to. Banja Luka in September. 


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British rule. Her victory on 
OcL 30 aroused mixed emo- 
tions among Protestant parties 
in Northern Ireland who op- 
pose links wife Dublin. 

“No side has a monopoly 
cm pain." she said. “Each has 
suffered intensely.’’ 

Although the presidency is 


largely a ceremonial role, it 
was transformed into a cru- 
sading post by Mrs. 
McAleese’s predecessor. 
Mary Robinson, who 
resigned just before the end of 
her seven-year term to be- 
come UN High Commission- 
er for Human Rights. 


A law professor and deputy 
chancellor of Queen's Uni- 
versity in Belfast. Mrs. 
McAleese was the candidate 
of the governing coalition 
made up of Fianna Fail and 
fee Progressive Democratic 
Party. SHe won nearly 60 per- 
cent of fee vote. 


rested an Israeli man on Swiss suspicions 
that he was involved in a plot to kidnap the 
heiress of fee Onassis shipping fortune. 

Folco Galli. spokesman for the Swiss 
Justice Ministry 1 , said Tuesday feat Ronen 
Balulu. 28. was picked up Monday in Milan 
on a Swiss international arrest warrant. Mr. 


Balulu is an actor in a drama concerning 
Athena Roussel. 12. the granddaughter of 
Aristotle Onassis. fee former Greek ship- 
ping magnate, her father and trustees ol her 
vast fortune. 

A Swiss investigating judge. Jacques De- 
lieutraz, suspects feat Mr. Balulu and six 
other Israelis wanted to kidnap the girl in 
February in fee ski resort of Si. Moritz. 

On Friday, Mr. Dclieuiraz issued an ar- 
rest warrant against Mr. Balulu on charges 
of plans for forcible confinement and kid- 
napping and membership in a criminal or- 
ganization. I-A/ 3 i 

Turks Hear Islamic Suit 

ANKARA — Turkey’s chief prosecutor 
argued in fee Supreme Court on Tuesday 
that a political party should be banned to 
prevent fee country from becoming an Is- 
lamic state. 

“No other party has deserved being shut 
down by a court here or any w here else in the 
world as much as the Welfare Parry does." 
the proseculor, Vural Savas. told the court. 
“If what Welfare aims to do becomes real- 
ity. Turkey will be a country run by re- 
ligious principles. “ 

Necmeuin Erbakan, the party leader who 
resigned as prime minister in June under 
pressure from the pro- secular military, then 
went before fee court and asked for jjD d.iy 
delay. The 1 1 justices granted hurt j week, 
pony sources said. I .A/’ « 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Brazil Bets Big to Restore Confidence in Economy and Avoid Asia’s Fate 


i 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil has em- 
barked on a bold political gamble that 
the currency, the real, can be defended 
against the same pressures from inter- 
national investors that sank Asian cur- 
rencies over the past few months. 

' Battered by turmoil on world finan- 
cial markets, Brazil is seeking to restore 
international confidence in its currency 
and economy with a drastic program of 
tax increases and spending cuts aimed at 
slashing its budget deficit 

The measures were approved in emer- 
gency government meetings over the 
weekend and announced Monday, after 
the Sao Paulo stock market’s main index 
plunged more than 6 percent Friday. It 
rose 1.96 percent to 9,006.07 points but 
was quoted late Tuesday with a loss of 
1.6S percent at 8,855.21. 

There was no immediate sign of a 
renewal of the speculative attacks on the 


real that have led the country’s central 
bank to spend an estimated $8 billion in 
reserves in defending die currency in the 
past few weeks. The government is bet- 
ting that Brazilians will accept belt- 
tightening and even recession as long as 
the inflation that a devaluation would 
usher in does not return. 

“We are absolutely determined to de- 
fend the real,' ' Gustavo Franco, the gov- 
emorof the central bank, said. “For that, 
sacrifices were needed, and I think we 
have now shown we are ready to make 
them.” 

Winston Fritsch, chief executive of 
Dresdner Kleinwort Benson here, said 
Monday: •‘Brazil needed to stop die 
hemorrhaging, and after the loss of re- 
serves arid the hike in interest rates, 
today’s measures woe most welcome. 
They should gradually take the burden 
off monetary policy and allow an easing 
of interest rates by the end of the year.” 

High interest rates tend to make 
investments in the real attractive and 


deter speculation against the currency. 

But some economists said they be- 
lieved chat the government had waited 
too long to cut thedeficit and may find its 
measures counterproductive because 
they will lead to increased tax evasion 
and a fall in tax revenue from struggling 
businesses. These economists argue that 
a devaluation of the real, which has been 
pegged to the dollar, may be inevitable. 

Mr. Franco, the central bank gov- 
ernor, estimated that the measures would 
cut tihe budget deficit next year from 
close to 5 percent of gross national 
product this year “to something begin- 
ning with the number 2 or 3.” The 
government estimated that the plan 
would save a total of about $18 billion. 

Among the taxes raised Monday were 
those on gasoline, airline travel and 
drinks. Personal income tax also will go 
up, by about 10 percent for most tax- 
payers, and tax deductions will be more 
strictly controlled. 

In an effort to cut spending, the gov- 


ernment said it would dismiss about 
33.000 federal employees bolding tem- 
porary jobs, slash costs and planned in- 
vestments at state industries, and freeze 
the salaries of government workers in 
1998. Coming after a decision to double 
annual interest rates to more than 40 
percent on Ocl 30, these measures 
seemed likely to slam the brakes on what 
had been a booming Brazilian economy, 
one that attracted more foreign invest- 
ment in the last year than any other 
country except China. 

“The government has adopted a re- 
cessionary fiscal package, and there is no 
immediate sign of interest rates coming 
down,’ ' said Roberto Nicolau, a director 
of the Sao Paulo industrial federation. 

“No economy can live for long with 
these interest rates.” 

But the government of President 
Fernando Henrique Cardoso, which 
faces a presidential election next year, 
has clearly decided that even tough aus- 
terity measures are preferable to a de- 


valuation of the real, the currency that 
was introduced in 1994 and is now a 
symbol of what has been a successful 
fight against inflation. 

A devaluation would inevitably mean 
renewed inflation, and that could be dev- 
astating to Mr. Cardoso'spopularity. The 
president recently describai tire econom- 
ic crisis hoe as “a tell that dropped on us 
from Asia.’ ’ He added, “We are good at 
soccer, and we plan to send the ball back 
so it falls on somebody else, or preferably 
in the middle of the Atlantic.” 

The virtual elimination of inflation. 
Brazil’s scourge throughout the 1980s 
and at frequent intervals before that, has 
provided the bedrock of Mr. Cardoso’s 


In adopting measures Monday that 
mainly affect the middle class — taxing 
gasoline, cars and air travel — the gov- 
ernment clearly hopes its support from 
the poorer people will not be lost even if 
there is no economic growth next year: 


Tens of milli ons of poor people whose 
purchasing power had been eroded by 
inflation now find themselves with the 
means to buy basic household appli- 
ances. Of Brazil’s 160 million citizens, 
about half are classified as poor by so- 
ciologists. 


i nternational investors in the past montit 
to cover losses in Asia by taking profits in 
Latin Ameri ca, the real and the Brazilian 
stock market also fell on concent that the 
economy was being undermined by 
growing budget and trade deficits. 

By cutting public spending, slowing 
the economy and providing various in- 
centives to exporters that were included 
in the measures announced Monday, the 
government apparently intends to re- 
duce both deficits and to bolster in- 
ternational confidence. 

“The trade deficit was about $10 bil- 
lion for the last 10 months,” Mr. Franco 
said. “It’s going to be much lower, and 
we will have a major change in our f 
balance of payments.” 


IRAQ: UN Is Reluctant to Bomb Saddam Remembering the End of the Great War CLINTON: President Retains Policy Tools 


Continued from Page 1 

Gulf War, with no sign of respite and that 
his government was acting in the view 
that “there is no hope.” 

“A shock now is a necessity,” Mr. 
Sahhaf said in Baghdad, “a necessity so 
that the Security Council, a very re- 
sponsible international body, should 
listen. ” He appeared to be referring both 
to his government’s decision to prevent 
Americans from talcing part m UN 
weapons inspections and to its vow to 
expel American inspectors unless di- 
plomacy now under way in New York 
produces a satisfactory outcome. 

While tile Clinton a dminis tration con- 
tinues to insist that strong Security 
Council action is preferred and that a 
U.S. military response is still a pos- 
sibility, the Iraqis are making the situ- 
ation less certain by their unwillingness 
to bodge from positions adopted since 
Oct 29, when they ordered Americans 
on the aims investigation team out 

They continue to insist on an almost 
immediate, easing of sanctions and a 
smaller American presence among in- 
vestigators. On Tuesday, they blocked 
for the eighth time in nine days efforts by 
the monitors to enter suspect Iraqi sites 
because U.S. citizens were among the 


Saddam Hussein to fully comply with 
the inspections regime.” 

The United States sent its strongest 
signal yet that it may be preparing for 
military action in Iraq when Mr. Cohen 
and General Henry Shelton, chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, canceled trips 
to Asia. 

For now, though, the United States 
was pursuing the coarse of diplomacy 
and along with Britain called on tire 
Security Council to impose new sanc^ 
tions on Iraq. 

The Iraqi deputy prime minister, 
Tariq Aziz, put the confrontation suc- 
cinctly when he left a meeting Tuesday 
withQinHuasun, China's representative 




inspection teams. 

As days pass, it is a matter of concent 
that Iraq will take advantage of the lack 
of oversight. Secretary of Defense Wil- 
liam Cohen, addressed this fear Tues- 
day. 

“Iraq would not be able to recon- 
stitute a serious weapons program in a 
matter of days,” be said. *‘lf the delay 
were to cany on for months, then that 
would be a different situation. That's 
why time is of the essence here to get 


BOYCOTT: 

Egypt Snubs US. 

Continued from Page I 

nomic summit conference in Casablanca 
in 1994, had announced plans to boycott 
the meeting. 

The decision by the most populous 
and arguably most influential Arab 
country virtually guarantees a low 
turnout. Besides Israel and Qatar, 
Jordan, Yemen and Kuwait are the only 
nations in the region that have have said 
they will send delegations to Doha. 

“If you start to dismantle and move 
back on these aspects of engagement, 
you're destroying, in effect, this whole 
skein of relationships between Israel and 
the Arab world,’ ’ said a frustrated West- 
ern diplomat. “The bridge between the 
Arabs and the Israelis is just falling in 
front of our eyes,” 

The deterioration in the Middle East 
peace process has also complicated 
Washington’s efforts to build support 
among Arab allies for a tough stand 
against Iraq. Even before the latest con- 
frontation between Washington and 
Baghdad, Arabs were increasingly angry 
over what they regard as U.S. indif- 
ference to the suffering of ordinary 
Iraqis under international trade sanc- 
tions. 

Now many are asking why they 
should support tough action against 
President Saddam Hussein of Iraq when, 
in their view, Washington has failed to 
put any serious pressure on the man they 
consider far more dangerous to regional 
stability, Mr. Netanyahu. 

That attitude has shown up even in 
official statements from Egypt, which 
played a critical role in rallying Arab 
support for the U.S.-led coalition that 
ousted Iraqi forces from Kuwait in the 
Gulf War in 1991. 


at the United Nations and mis month's 
Security Council president Mr. Qin told 
Mr. Aziz that Iraq would have to comply 
with the rules before it got a hearing on 
any substantive issue. 

“I have not been given any concrete 
promise that there will be a change in the 
position of the council.” Mr. Aziz said, 
“and I on my part did not give a concrete 
promise for change. If you do not have a 
change on the part of the Security Coun- 
cil, you cannot expect a change in Iraq.” . 

Richard Butler, executive chairman of 
die UN Special Commission, the body 
that is disarming Iraq, challenged Mr. 
Aziz to face the facts about the dis- 
armament mission. 

. He said that, contrary to Iraqi as- 
sertions. the United States did not fill 
more than 30 percent of commission 
jobs at its three centos in New York, 
Bahrain and Ba ghdad. 

Mr. Butler told a news conference that 
the top six nationalities represented on 
the 180-member commission were the 
Chileans, with 22 percent (operating 
helicopters): Americans at 14 percent; 
Britons with 11 percent; New Zeal- 
anders with 9 percent; Iraqis with 6 
percent, and Australians at 5 percent. 

Mr. Aziz said afterwards that the 
Iraqis were all low-level empktyees. 
Americans, be said, still held a dispro- 
portionate number of sensitive jobs. 

“So this is a falsification of the situ- 
ation,” he said of Mr. Butler’s* account 

Mr. Butier called the accusations of 
Iraq “wrong on all counts and distaste- 
fill/’ He noted that some of the Amer- 
icans were in New York, doing “some 
of our really dangerous work, like book-, 
keeping.” 







hilVkaB/Atnataic^lnc 

Veterans of two world wars at the Cenotaph in London memori- 
alizing their fallen comrades Tuesday during a two-minute silence as 
Big Ben struck 11 o’clock. Traffic came to a halt as the city stopped 
to commemorate the anniversary of World War f’s end in 1918. 




AU YAJRl Judged Decision to Free Briton Disturbs Many Jurists World War I Shell 

Continued from Page 1 now in private practice in Massachu- possibility of parole before 15 years. Till US Up ill Paris 

filiH he hart MnA-tMl a vnrpnrw nf Me that annMtwl X 


Continued from Page 1 

judge made an incredible error." 

Ms. Woodward was convicted on Oct- 
30 of shaking Matthew and slamming 
his head against a hard surface. 

Many jurists were disturbed by the 
sentence by Judge Zobel, which imme- 
diately freed Miss Woodward. She was 
required, however, to remain in Mas- 
sachusetts during appeals, which both 
sides have said they will file. Prosecutors 
are to seek more jail time, and the de- 
fense will ask that Miss Woodward be 
exonerated. 

“I was very surprised by the sen- 
tence,” said Rose Zoltek-Jick, a law 
professor at Northeastern University in 
Boston. “There are people sitting in 
Massachusetts jails right now serving 6 
to 15 years for shaking a baby in which 
death did not result. The question is, why 
did Louise Woodward get 279 days for 
killing a baby?” 

Walter Prince, a former prosecutor 


now in private practice in Massachu- 
setts, said he had expected a sentence of 
3. to 5 years. 

“In Massachusetts, if you accident- 
ally kill someone with a motor vehicle, 
you get a year,” he said. “Other cases 
involving deaths of children in the hands 
of others have resulted in lengthy in- 
carceration. This is unusuaL" 

But legal specialists were in unan- 
imous agreement that an appeal prob- 
ably has little chance of succeeding. 

“It is very rare that a judge reduces a 
sentence to begin with/' said Mr. 
Bonistalli. “It is equally rare in instances 
where he does so dial a higher court will 
interfere with his jurisprudence.” 

Several lawyers said that the most 
likely appeal would be based on die 
judge's decision to lower the charge 
from second-degree murder to invol- 
untary manslaughter. If accepted by the 
Massachusetts Appeals Court, that 
would mean . reinstating Miss Wood- 
ward’s mandatory life sentence, with no 


possibility of parole before 15 years. 

Ms. Zbitek-Jick said that appeared 
extremely unlikely. But she said she 
believed an argument could be made that 
the lowered sentence should be rejected 
because Judge Zobel, in his ruling, had 
“crafted a whole new scenario — that 
there was an old injury, that she was 
rough, and it started to bleed or 
rebleed. ” 

* ‘The judge certainly has the power to 
consider a new verdict,” she said. “The 
ouest ion is whether be can go even fur- 
ther and basically fashion a whole new 
case that was not argued to this jury.” 

Nonetheless, for the prosecution to 
persuade an appellate court “that the 
judge abused his discretion/’ she said,* 
“is a very high standard to meet. It 
would be an uphill battle.” 

She predicted the appeals process 
would be expedited and last three to six 
months. During that period. Miss Wood- 
ward would be free to move within Mas- 
sachusetts, but not to leave it. 


Agettce Fnmce-PmSe 
PARIS — A World War I mortar 
shell was discovered by a baggage 
handler at Charles de Gaulle In- 
ternational Airport in Paris at the 
bottom of a container used by foe 
U.S. earner Delta Air lines, airport 
officials said Tuesday. 

The empty container used by the 
airline to transport baggage had ar- 
rived on a flight from Atlanta and 
was to be used fora flight from Paris 
to New York when a baggage hand- 
ler discovered the motor wrapped 
in a plastic bag, the police said 
They said it was likely that the 
container had been used for other 
flights without anyone noticing the 
shell. An investigation was under- 
way to determine the origin .of the 
mortar and how it ended up in the 
container. 


Continued from Page 1 

gress denied him this weekend was any 
carrots. And in the next few years, hie 
may need plenty. 

The art of trade negotiating these days 
has less to do with one-on-one confron- 
tations with other countries — die talks 
that get most of the headlines — than with 

the nnmhinpW complex talks that involve 
scores of nations at a time. Those are the 
accords that, in the past year, have greatly 
eased the barriers around the world to 
trade in computers, chips and telecom- 
munications equipment, areas where the 
United States is the competitive cham- 
pion. A foil agenda of impending ne- 
gotiations, in bard-fought areas that range 
titan agriculture to- computer services, 
will be starting in the next two years. 

*Td like to think we can still move 
ahead with an ambitious trade agenda,” 
Charlene Barshefsky, the U.S. trade rep- 
resentative, said Monday, trying to pot 
the best face on things- But Ms. Barshef- 
sky is a realist, and she knows that she 
cannot credibly promise changes in 
American laws if Congress has the power 
to reopen whatever deal she strikes. 

In short, without fast-back authority, 
one of Ms. Barshefsky’s former deputies 
noted, she cannot utter this sentence: “If 
all of yon do A, B and C, here's what the 
United States can do for you in return.” 
And Ms. Barshefrky herself, arguing her 
case in the balls of Congress for the past 
few months, insisted that unless Amer- 
ican negotiators held the power of 
dangling incentives, “many other coun- 
tries will not negotiate with os/ ’ 

In many eases, that may be true. But in 
others, economic Realpolitik will take 
over. Congress or no Congress) -America 
remains the world's biggest market, and 
the one where every Indian entrepre- 
neur, Italian designer and Malaysian 
automaker wants to sell his goods. 

“There will still be progress, because 
there are companies around the world 
that share an interest in getting rid of the 
political obstacles to doing business,” 
said Mickey Kan tor, the former trade 
representative and a. veteran of scores of 
negotiations. “The only question is 
whether those deals will be struck with 
us, or around us. The Canadians un- 
derstand that The Europeans understand 
it It's only Congress that is having trou- 
ble with it” 


Congress’s message, though, is that 
America’s trade priorities are skewed — 
that its members favor designing agree- 
ments that equalize the terms of com- 
petition between workers in the United 
States and other countries, rather than 
simply opening markets to benefit 
companies. 

While Congress and the White House 
argue over priorities, however, the risk is 
that other nations will use Washington's y 
stalemate for their own purposes. And 7 
often those purposes are to hold off ‘ 
pressure for mem to open up. 

“You’ll see a lot of interesting re- 
actions in the next few days/' predicted 
Robert Pastor, a political scientist at 
Emory University in Atlanta who is an 
expert on relations with Latin America. 
“Publicly, a lot of countries will express 
disappointment. But privately there will 
be relief, especially in countries like 
Brazil, which was not ready to move 
quickly to a free-trade area of the Amer- 
icas. And Congress has just given them 
the excuse/' . 

The first test may come later this 
month, when Mr. Clinton meets Asian 
leaders at thmr annual summit meeting, 
in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

The first of those meetings, in 1993, i 
was brimming over with optimism. Asia r 
was booming, and talking about creating 
a regional free-trade zone. Mr. Clinton 
was fresh from his victory in Congress 
for NAFTA and preaching die need for a 


spreading the tentacles of trade. 

The mood this year will be very dif- 
ferent Battered by currency devalu- 
ations, stock market crashes and failing 
banks, the Asian nations are not in a hurry 
to let in a lot of new competition. Arid Mr. 
Clinton is not exactly in good shape to 
give speeches about how America is 
leading foe way. He could have foe same 
problem in the spring, at a Latin Amer- 
ican meeting in Santiago, Chile, where he 
is supposed to follow up on a com- 
mitment to extend NAFTA throughout 
Latin America. “It could be a pretty 
hollow summit,” Mr. Pastor said. 

If so, Mr. Clinton has learned, his own 
inattention to the domestic repercus- - 
sions of NAFTA may be to blame. Many 
of the measures the administration 
promised to ease foe pain of free trade 
were put on die back burner. Members of £ 
Congress felt betrayed, and said so. “ 


HINDSIGHT: Poland 1980-81 in Review 


Mrtad Desme Ns* YiafcThm 

Chatting at the Warsaw conference, from left: Wojciech Jaruzelski, Poland’s last Communist leader; a fellow 
Pole, Florian Siwicki, and the Russians Viktor Kulikov, a former Warsaw Pact chief, and Anatoli Gribkov. 


Continued from Page 1 

Soviets were ready to roll into Poland. 

Bot a year later, when General 
Jaruzelski squashed Solidarity and 
rounded up most of its leaders, it seemed 
clear chat foe Soviets no longer had die 
stomach for an invasion ami, instead, 
had urged the Polish general to do their 
bidding. 

The two leading American partic- 
ipants in foe Polish drama were Zbig- 
niew Brzezinski, the Carter administra- 
tion's national security adviser, and 
Professor Richard Pipes, foe Reagan ad- 
ministration's Soviet affairs adviser. For 
them the new revelations meant that 
General Jaruzelski should have stood up 
to the Soviets. 

“Before this session,” Mr. Bjzgz- 
inski said, alluding to 1981, “I thought 
the Russians were still likely to come 
in.” He added: “ft’s now coming out 
from documents that they were not This 
raises foe fascinating question, was mar- 
tial law necessary? 1 think Jaruzelski 
could have said, ’How we ran Poland is 
our business/ ” 

With remarkable candor, foe Polish 
Communist Party* general secretary of 
that time, Stanislaw Kama, described 
how close a call a Soviet invasion was in 
1980. 

Summoned to Moscow in December, 
he was shown a map of die route that 
“masses of troops’* would take into 
Poland. He told of being ushered into foe 
Inner sanctum of the Soviet leader, Le- 
onid Brezhnev, and virtually begging die 
Soviets to stay out 

“I said that if there was such an in- 
tervention then there would have been a 
national uprising, 7 ' Mr. Kania said. 
“Even if angets entered Poland, they 
would be treated as bloodthirsty vam- 
pires and the socialist ideas would be 
swimming in blood.” 

According to Mr. Kania, Mr. Brezh- 
nev replied; “ ‘All right, we will not go 
in. Without you, we won't go in.’ ” 

Mr. Brezhnev, it turned out, had prob- 
ably softened in pari because of the work 
of Colonel Kuklinski, the CIA agent. 
Unknown to Mr. Kania, the colonel, on 
General Jaruzelski ’s staff; had alerted 
Washington to an imminent invasion. 


came, bureaucratic infighting in the Re- 
agan administration resulted in Colonel 
Kiiklinski’s information having little 
impact, Mr. Pipes said. 

Moreover, foe CIA never told foe 
White House foal it had the complete 
plans for martial law from Colonel Kuk- 
UnskL, Mr. Pipes said. “It was a tre- 
mendous intelligence coup, but had no 
effect on the course of events because it 
was so tightly beW.” y 

And dining the conference, Mr. Pipes Ji 
well known for having advocated a hard 
line against foe Soviets, said he was 
shocked to learn of another raiscue at foe 
White House. He listened as General 
Jaruzelski said remarks made at the time 
by Vice President George. Bush were 
interpreted by Poland as a green light for 
martial law. 

General Jaruzelski described sending 
foe deputy-chief of foe Polish general 
staff, Eugeniusz Molczyk, to Washing- 
ton, where he was told by Mr. Bush tbit 
martial law was a better option than 
Soviet intervention. 

“We took that as a sort of signal /’the 
general said: “*Do it yourselves, or 
there will be the most feared option.’ ” 

Mr. Pipes said that Mr. Bush had held 
rather “dovish” views on Poland and 
that furthermore the Reagan White 
House foreign policy apparatus was in 
disarray at foe time of me Polish crisis. - 

General Jaruzelski seemed to be onel 
of the most troubled figures at the gatiw 
ering. He sat at the conference tahle, still 
ramrod straight at 74, but taking notes 
with a shaking hand. His attempts to 
punt himself as a patriotic Pole were 
constantly deflated by the Russian gen- 
eral seated two chairs away, who kept 
lavishing praise on turn. 

In June 1981, foe Russian said, the 
Kremlin pushed for General Jaruzelski 
as the new leader of Poland’s Com- 
munist Party after becoming disen- ' 
chanted with Mr. Kania. 

As for Mr. Bujak. the former dis- 
sident, he may have got short shrift from 
Marshal Kulikov at the conference pro- 
ceedings, bnt later, in the corridor, the 
Russian approached him to say how sad 
he was that Poland had moved out of 
Russia’s orbit.- 

“He kept telling me what a bad idea it 


{ d fMc? 



was consequently warned on the hoi line moused Mr. Bujak, taking note that foe 
of Ihc “gravest consequences" if Mos Russian 1 military brass had changed linle 
cow wen! ahead. in ihcir imperial manner or attitude. “He 

But a year later, when martial law look ii almost as treason.” 







**•**•!■ ..w~ 


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iij \ • 

. % 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIDUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


pace 7 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


r 


Getting as Mad as Hell 
At Tabloid TV News 


By Frank Rich 


N EW YORK — It was 21 
years ago that Howard Beale, 
a silver-haired anchorman of 
the Cronkite-Brinkley school, 
decided to protest his network’s 
tabloidization of the news by 
pexfonning the ultimate ratings 
stunt: He threatened to blow 
his brains out on the air. 

Howard Beale wasn't a real 
person, of course. He was the hero 
(played by Peter Finch! of the 
movie “Network," a dark satire 
by Paddy Chayefsky that in 1976 
was considered wildly hyperbol- 
ic. In Mr. Chayefsky’s scenario, a 
huge conglomerate swallowed up 
a network and turned TV news 
into just another sex-and- violence 
entertainment product driven 
solely by the bottom line. 

"I’m mad as hell, and I’m not 
going to take this anymore!” 
howled Mr. Beale from his anchor 
desk. But not even his suicide 
threat could reverse the slide. 

Nor did "Network.” What was 
far-fetched satire in 1976 pales 
next to the reality of TV news 
post-O. J. If the trashing of broad- 
cast news is ever to be slowed, let 
alone reversed, it's going to take 
an army of Howard Beales — 
from industry gadflies like Don 
Hewitt of “60 Minutes" to cour- 
ageous souls like Carol Marin, 
who this year quit as anchor at 
Chicago's NBC station rather 
than put up with the hiring of Jeny 
Springer, a tabloid talk-show host, 
as a news commentator. 

Last Friday a new Howard 
Beale stepped forward, Hugh 
Downs, the network TV veteran, 
took the night off rather than sit in 
his co-anchor's seat at ABC's sig- 
nature news magazine, “20/20." 
while his partner, Barbara Walters, 
interviewed Marv Albert, the 
sportscaster who pleaded guilty to 
assault in a lurid sex case. Mr. 
Downs made the right call. 

TTie ”20/20" segment was an 
excruciating exercise in recycling 
dirty underwear. Such entertain- 
ment has its place on TV. but 
journalism it's not. Mr. Albert's 
"20/20" appearance was merely 
the ritualistic opening gambit 
in his carefully plotted public- 
relations effort to rehabilitate 
his reputation. 

Mr. Downs’s principled gesture 
is in striking contrast to that of his 
colleague Peter Jennings, who last 


month reassured a Waldorf-Astor- 
ia ballroom full of journalists that 
they had “no reason" to fear that 
ABC’s new owner. Disney, would 
compromise its news operation. 
Perhaps Mr. Jennings was suffer- 
ing from temporary amnesia that 
night, given dial his own broad- 
cast, “World News Tonight,” had 
been used (along with "20/20" 
and "PrimeTime Live”) to air 
“news” tic-ins to hype a Disney 
product, the sitcom “Ellen," less 
than eight months earlier. 

Mr. Jennings made his remarks 
by way of introducing his boss. 
Michael Eisner of Disney, at the 
annual benefit for the Committee 
to Protect Journalists — the or- 
ganization that fights on behalf of 
journalists who face arrest, vio- 
lence and death threats when re- 
porting on repressive regimes. 

When Mr. Eisner, the chairman 
of the dinner, followed Mr. Jen- 
nings. he seconded his anchor's 
sunny prognosis for ABC News: 
“It is an opportunity to go either 
on the low road or the high road. 
And 1 ... feel that going the high 
road is the way to go,” Well, 
the high road came to a dead 
end less than two weeks later, 
in Mr. Albert’s hair weave. 

At the same banquet, another 
ABC newsman. Ted Koppel, 
spoke, too — as the recipient ot an 
annual award given in honor of 
Burton Benjamin, a legendary 
CBS News producer. Mr. Koppel’ s 
urgent speech cuts through the 
disingenuous fog and sets the re- 
cord straight with a dramatic ven- 
geance worthy of “Network.” 

Mr. Koppel spoke bleakly of 
the “insidious" dangers to Amer- 
ican journalism, among them 
“the vertical integration of 
communications empires" and 
"the fading lines between tele- 
vision news and entertainment." 
Referring to the jailed and tor- 
tured journalists championed by 
the Committee to Protect Jour- 
nalists. Mr. Koppel said: "We 
celebrate their courage even as we 
exhibit increasingly little of our 
own. It is not death or torture or 
imprisonment that threatens us as 
American journalists, it is the 
trivialization of our industry." 

Where are the other Howard 
Beales who are as mad as bell and 
won't take it anymore? 

The New Yvrl Times 



The nerd that ate America, 


Kennedy’s Private Life? 
It’s Only an Asterisk 


By Richard Cohen 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


South Korea's Economy 

A recurring yet groundless 
theme in the International Herald 
Tribune lately has been the as- 
sertion that South Korea, like sev- 
eral Southeast Asian countries, 
may need to turn to the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund or other 
outside sources for emergency 
credit. A 60 percent probability 
that the South Korean government 
would resort to IMF intervention 
was cited by one source ( "Korea 
Hovers on Brink iis Slocks Plum- 
met 7%." Finance. Nov. Si, while 
another gave Sequl two weeks be- 
fore it requested support. 

Another recurring theme is the 
concern for South Korea's foreign 
reserves. The aforementioned ar- 
ticle cites an economist as saying, 
“It’s quite probable South Korea's 
effective reserves have fallen to 
less than$10 billion.” Without any 
solid foundation, such estimates 
only increase the uneasiness in the 
markets, making matters worse. 

It is the position of Michel Cam- 
dessus, managing director of the 
IMF, that the South Korean econ- 
omy is fundamentally sound de- 
spite the current difficulties and is 
in no need of an IMF bailout Korea 
is capable of overcoming, and will 
overcome, the current problems 
without outside intervention. 


1 find it negligent of the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune to cir- 
culate unfounded reports, given 
the sensitive nature of a market that 
often reacts to the latest news. 

A number of reform bills are 
presently being deliberated in 
South Korea's National Assembly 
to deal with the country's eco- 
nomic difficulties. I am confident 
the new measures will put to rest 
the uncertainty being experienced 
in the financial markets. 

Finally, it was disappointing to 
read that “many economists and 
traders familiar with South Korea 
declined to comment on the situ- 
ation, fearing that South Korean 
authorities might accuse them of 
making inflammatory statements. '' 
This wrongly leaves a negative 
impression of the government 
JUNILKIM. 

Seoul. 

The writer is senior counselor 
to South Korea's deputy prime 
minister and minister of finance 
and economy. 

An Iraqi Perspective 

President Bill Clinton is being 
disingenuous when he says if Pres- 
ident Saddam Hussein “has noth- 
ing to hide ... then he shouldn’t 
care whether Americans or anyone 


else are on the inspection team" 

{ “Iraq Tugs at GulfWar Alliance, " 
Nov. 6). Surely Mr. Clinton is 
aware that Mr. Saddam knows that 
the United States has bean actively 
engaged for years in attempts to 
overthrow the Iraqi regime. 

U.S. officials are also not 
telling the truth when they say that 
all it takes for the lifting of sanc- 
tions is for Iraq to comply with 
UN Security Council resolutions. 
Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright has “indicated that U.S. 
insistence on tough sanctions and 
other punishment agains t Iraq 
would Dot change” as long as Mr. 
Saddam remained in power (“No 
Change on Iraq. Albright Con- 
firms," March 27). 

In fact, the United States is tar- 
geting not only the present regime 
in Baghdad but also the Iraqi 
people. Iraq has shown that there 
are Arabs who refuse to bow to 
' American bullying. It has chal- 
lenged a Zionist- American diktat 
by trying to achieve the forbidden 
strategic balance that would en- 
able Arabs to resist Israeli aggres- 
sion. The “liberation of Kuwait” 
was a pretext for the destruction of 
Iraq and its potential. 

.. w. alzahawje. 

Rome. 

The writer is ambassador of 
Iraq to the Holy See. 


W ASHINGTON — Thanks to 
Seymour Hersh and his new 
book, “The Dark Side of Cam- 
elot,” we know again what we 
have already known for some time 
— that John F. Kennedy was a 
compulsive womanizer whose 
path to the presidency was greased 
by his old man’s money. If, be- 
cause of Mr. Harsh, history will 
now have to be revised, it will not 

MEANWHILE 

be its assessment of Mr. Kennedy 
but of the 1950s. There was far 
more sex in that supposedly pur- 
itanical decade than we once sup- 
posed — only, of course, Mr. 
Kennedy was having most of it. 

Oh, the girls! — as they were 
called then. They were met in 
hotel rooms and the White House 
swimming pool. They were pros, 
semi pros and downright amateurs 
— society swells and gum- 
cracking tarts. Mr. Kennedy, it 
seems, was a true democrat 
All very interesting, even en- 
grossing. But so what? In Time 
magazine, the historian Alan 
Brinkley cites Mr. Hersh’s asser- 
tion that "Kennedy’s private life 
and personal obsession — his 
character — affected the affairs of 
the nation and its foreign policy 
far more than has been known.” 
Not so. Mr. Brinkley rejoins. 
"Hersh’s book fails most con- 
spicuously on that point” 

That has to be tough news for 
those Americans, and they are le- 
gion, who would love to believe 
otherwise. It means that a person 
can really be conventionally im- 
moral in his personal life and at 
the same time be just a swell per- 
son in his public life. In other 
words, it may just be irrelevant to 
history what precisely Mr. 
Kennedy did after he concluded 
work. It's the work that matters. 

In some ways, John Kennedy is 
the functional equivalent of Ron- 
ald Reagan. Just as some people 
cannot deal with the fact that Mr. 
Kennedy might have been a pretty 
lousy husband but a pretty good 
president, others could not accept 
the fact that Mr. Reagan could be a 
pretty good president while being 
intellectually lazy. In other words, 
it was hard to accept that he might 
have been right on a few big 
things — the state of the Soviet 


Union, the pemiciousness of the 
welfare state — while being so 
wrong about so many others. ; 

In Mr. Kennedy’s case, his per- 
sonal morality seems not to have 
affected his presidency at all. His 
approval ratings were astronom- 
ical — his 79 percent was higher 
than Eisenhower ever reached .t— 
and he did imbue the nation with 
the now-odd notion that govern- 
ment service was both wonderful 
and noble. He had, in other words, 
innate leadership qualities. 

Mr. Reagan, too, had innafe 
leadership abilities. Like Mr. 
Kennedy’s, they were rooted in a 
personal charisma that was part 
physical and part ideological. Mr. 
Reagan was a famously passive 
person who had no firewall at all 
between what he had seen in the 
movies and real life. Thus he was 
capable of telling Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Shanzir of Israel that, he 
had been present at the liberation 
of a German death camp when in 
fact he had only seen the films. • 

At the same time, though, Mr. 
Reagan knew — or maybe just 
sensed — that the Soviet Union 
was not a lean, mean totalitarian 
machine but a crumpling, sagging 
empire. He was going to give it 
the push needed to topple it, and 
he did. Mr. Reagan was right 
about the state of the Soviet Union 
while many others were not- 
In Isaiah Berlin's famous formu- 
lation. Mr. Reagan was a hedge- 
hog. He knew one big thing. 

Mr. Kennedy, of course, was a 
fox. He knew many things. But 
whatever they were, both Mr. Re- 
agan's and Mr. Kennedy’s careers 
suggest that we make too much of 
both intellectual brilliance and 
private morality. What matters 
most is leaderehip ability — that 
certain something, learned or in- 
nate, that silences a room when 
that person enters. 

Mr. Hersh undoubtedly has got- 
ten a piece of Mr. Kennedy. But 
there is another, and I realized it 
one day while talking to a col- 
league. He had wanted to come to 
Washington, my friend said, be- 
cause of John Kennedy: to do good, 
to at least do something. Mr. 
Kennedy had that quality, the abil- 
ity to inspire. It remains a pan of the 
historical record. All the rest, and it 
is engrossing indeed, is asterisk. 

The Wushingion Post 


BOOKS 




VAPORETTO 13 

By Robert Girardi. 197 pages. 
S/9.95. Delacortc. 

Reviewed by David Guy 

A SCATHING indictment 
of our society and its val- 
ues. “Vaporetto l.V* is told in 
the form of a ghost story. Jack 
Squire is a trader in interna- 
tional currencies at Capitol 
Guaranty in Washington. He 
has all (he right credentials, 
even a fiancee who "jogged 
and played tennis and had been 
on the varsity women 's crew at 
Michigan." But he is going to 
have to postpone his wedding 
because his bank is "planning 
a big push on the lira" before 
the coming elections in Italy 
and wants Jack to check out 
the political scene. 

It has a man in Milan. It has 
one in Rome. It is sending Jack 
— is this a tad unlikely? — to 
Venice. The problem is that 
before he leaves. Jack has to 
kill a cat. Elizabeth is old and 
diabetic, certainly can’t make 
the trip, and it would be pro- 
hibitively expensive to board 
her. The hysterical reaction of 
the veterinarian's assistant t " I 
take my cat in twice a week for 
kidney dialysis and she just 
turned twenty") conceals a 


real truth: "You're murdering 
your cat because she’s an in- 
convenience." Furthermore, 
Elizabeth originally belonged 
to Jack's mother, who died in a 
car accident when he was 14. 
His decision to kill her is. at 
the very least, a bad omen. 

Bui it is more than that. It is 
a simple detail that reveals a 
man’s w hole system of val- 
ues. It is like the market watch 
— a device resembling a 
beeper — that Jack carries 
with him wherever he goes. 
When it goes off. it is re- 
porting a message that will 
affect exchange rates, and he 
is expected to drop whatever 
he is doing and give his at- 
tention to it. It goes off when 
he is putting his cat to sleep, 
and it is all he can do not to 
take it out and look. 

Robert Girardi, a Wasliing- 
ton writer, is a skillful stylist 
who tells his story with rapid 
ease against a backdrop of 
high finance, attractive and 
successful people and lavish 
luxury. Before we know it. 
however, we have moved to a 
city that is rotting before our 
very eyes, where the history 
from centuries before is as 
present as if if had just 
happened, and where Jack — 
with his fiancee back in Wash- 


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ington — begins to fall for a 
woman whose skin "glowed 
with the sort of unnatural 
whiteness that used to be the 
result of bathing in arsenic." 

It doesn't even seem heavy- 
handed that Jack has been led 
to this woman by ... a cat. He 
has become a chronic insom- 
niac in Venice, wandering the 
deserted streets late at nighL 
discovering that the city is 
populated by hundreds of stray 
cats. Tltey congregate in a par- 
ticular square and are fed by a 
worn: in named Caterina Ven- 
dramin, who also lias trouble 
sleeping, who wears striking 
clothes but always goes bare- 
foot. who will not tell Jack 
anything about her life except 
that she lives with her father, 
and whose friends dress in out- 
dated garb and speak of people 
from centuries past as if they 
u ere casual acquaintances. 

It isn't just because we no- 
tice that Girardi's first novel 
was tilled "Madeleine’s 
Ghost" that we suspect 
something is up. His details 
are subtle and tantalizing but 
not overly obscure. He is us- 
ing a literary genre to deliver 
an age-old message: We are 
dying even as we live, and 
furthermore our struggles to 
secure wealth cause us to miss 
out on much of our Jives. The 
first time Jack's market watch 
goes off, Caterina calls it a 
demon. The second time, she 
throws it into a canal. 

When Jack suddenly ac- 
quires the ability to see what 
disease people are dying of, 
lie is really just seeing a 
simple trutii: Every body, 
however young and attract- 
ive. conceals a skeleton. The 
reports he sends back to the 
kink, though they seem 
worthless, are really what the 
bankers need to hear: Venice 
is sinking, and someday 
Washington will erumble, 
too. And the fact that Jack's 
career is Tailing down around 
him is all to the good. He has 
discovered something far 
more important. 

Jack's trip to Arizona to 
visit his father does seem soap 
opera-ish: his father doesn't 
have to be that bad to make 
Girardi's point. And Jack's 
colleagues seem almost in- 
credibly crass, though per- 
haps that is because the author 
is a bold realist. He has writ- 
ten a slick, fast-paced and 
subtly erotic novel to tell an 
ancient truth: it is not until a 
man makes love with death 
fruit he discovers his soul. 


David Guy, the author of 
four novels, the most recent of 
which is “The Autobiography 
of My Body." wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WED.NESD.4i; NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


U.S. Fears Saddam’s Hidden Materiel Could Make a Destructive Arsenal 




» 


; By Tim Weiner 

Ncte York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — A seven-year game of 
hide-and-seek has .allowed President Saddam 
Hussein to preserve his power to make chemical^ 
biological and -nuclear . weapons, capable - of 
killing millions, UN and U.S. officials say. • 
While only about two dozen missiles are be- 
lieved to be at his disposal today, if political and 
economic sanctions are lifted, the Iraqi leader 
could put together a destructive arsenal with the 
materiel and expertise he has hidden from 
weapons inspectors, U.S. officials say. 

Mr. Saddam's military and intelligence of- 
ficers have used everything from paper shredders 
to preposterous excuses to keep me inspectors at 
bay. In the last six months, Iraq has presented the 
inspectors with a series of “cock-and-bull sto- 
ries,” as one UN official put it. 

A UN report issued Last month contained a 
laundry list of lies. Iraq delivered a report on its 
biological warfare program that was six years 
late and patently false, Hie UN document said: it 
lied about its destruction of missile launchers. It 


failed to account for missile warheads and en- ing arms of mass destruction, die sources say. back of a truck, were destroyed in riots at a 
gines. It tried to conceal its program to produce “His. production capability has been pm on hospital or were tossed out with the trash by a 

nan.a ’ A.J jI.iLIa... k&Ud ,k. CiiKU/w /Vm MilkAllin 4 hmiei>L>n>nor 


nerve agents. And it produced highly dubious 
figures on its biological warfare program. 

This is so despite the cease-fire resolution that 
Iraq signed in 1991 at the end of the Gulf War. 
The resolution gave UN inspectors the right to 
travel anywhere in Iraq to ensure that weapons of 
mass destruction were not being 
made and to destroy them if 
found. 

As a consequence of this con- 
tinuing deception, Mr. Saddam 
still has' tons of material for 
making nerve gas and germ 
weapons, and his government 
keeps working on ways to put diem into roughly 
25 medium-range Scud missiles he has squirreled 
away, U.S. military and intelligence officers 
say. 

The Iraqi leader has rebuilt his most important 
military assembly lines, including a missile plant, 
U.S. military and intelligence sources said His 
nuclear brain trust re mains intact and he has the 
equipment and expertise he needs to resume mak- 


hold” since the Gulf War, said Gary Milhbllin. a 
leading private analyst of weapons proliferation. 
“But his research effort has gone forward. We 
have to assume his scientists have progressed in 
understanding how to mate better weapons of 
mass destruction.” 


In a tale that has mythic status, Iraqi officials said one 
set of military: records had been burned in a medical file 
cabinet by a defective X-ray machine. 


The Iraqis have conducted covest operations 

and deception schemes to hide from the UN . 

inspectors. In September, they emptied chemical chemical and biological weapons, and possibly 


housekeeper. 

In a tale that gained mythic status among the 
UN team, Iraqi officials said one set of military 
records had been burned in a medical file cabinet 
by a defective X-ray machine. 

The Iraqi campaign of concealment began 
days after the Gulf War ended. 
“Iraq decided, in April 1991. to 
divide its missile force into two 
parts,” said a report dated Oct. 
6 issued by the UN Specia} 
Commission overseeing Iraqi 
weapons. “It would present one 
part to the commission for de- 
struction and illegally retain the second part” 
Ever since. Iraq ‘ ‘ has continued to cry to develop 


ana biological weapons sites of incriminating 
evidence out the rear door of a building and kept 
inspectors waiting at the front door. 

m the past, Iraqi officials have asserted that 
weapons-related documents and equipment 
were accidentally lost when they fell off the 


even acquire nuclear materials,” while “playing a 
hide- an d-seek game” with the United Nations, 
Defense Secretary William Cohen said Monday. 

In the beginning, UN inspectors focused on 
Iraq’s nuclear weapons programs. They were 
able to find and destroy its technically advanced 


imnorted equipment for enriching uranium to be 
used in nuclear warheads. "But they have not 
found the overall database for his nuclear 
weapons program,” Mr. Milhollin said, which 
lets one scientist build on the work of another. 
You can't destroy weapons research and de- 
velopment unless you kill people. And we know 
he has not disbanded any of his ballistic missile, 
nuclear weapons and chemical-biological work- 

^fprotect those working groups, three elite 
services — the Iraqi Intelligence Servwe. the 
'•Special Security Organization and the Repub- 
lican Guard — run an amply financed, highly 
'sophisticated program to secretly imp?* 
weapons equipment and to undermine UN in- 

S * 3 Fot S ample, in September a UN ream on a 10- 
day inspection tour of suspected chemical and 
biological weapons plants ' 'recorded evidence of 
the removal or movement of documents and 
records and the destruction of documents’ at 
three sites, the Oct. 6 report said. The documents 
were hidden and destroyed * ‘while the team was 
waiting to be allowed to enter. 1 ' 


Isolating Iran and Iraq: Policy in Tatters 


By Stevea JErlanger 

Nr*' York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — For six years, the 
United States has tried to rein in and 
isolate Iran and Iraq at the same time. 
The current confrontation with Iraq 
shows how much harder it gets, year by 
year, to keep President Saddam Hussein 
under control. And perhaps more om- 
inously, it comes as Iran is moving on its 
Own toward breaking free of American- 
led restraints. 

On Iraq, the American-led coalition is 
merely fraying, because Mr. Saddam's 
crude challenges to the United Nations 
and the international system are creating 
temporary, collective unity against him. 
But a spokesman for President Boris 
Yeltsin of Russia said Tuesday that Mos- 
cow was adamantly opposed to any UN- 
ordered military strikes against Iraq, 
adding that Beijing backed that pos- 
ition. 

The parallel effort by the United 
States to contain Iran through economic 
sanctions is falling apart. 

While the world's attention is on Iraq, 
where Mr. Saddam is preventing UN 
inspectors from monitoring what re- 
mains of his weapons program, senior 
American officials say they think the 
situation in Iran is much more dangerous 
in the long run. The United Nations has 
no comparable international monitoring 
of Iran's efforts to develop weapons of 
mass destruction and missiles capable of 
hitting Israel, Saudi Arabia and Europe, 
these officials said. 

Yet Washington’s efforts to impose 
on the rest of the world its policy of 
isolating Iran is causing deep rifts with 
its closest allies in Europe and Canada, 
as well as with Russia. The rift focuses 
on American efforts to impose sanctions 
on foreign companies that trade with 
Iran. 

. As Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright struggled last week with Iraq and 
tried to make some progress on the stag- 
nant Israeli-Palestinian talks, other se- 
nior American officials were engaged in 
quiet, top-level discussions with the 
Europeans and Russians about Iran and 
bow to avoid a situation in which the 
United States would actually impose 
punishment on foreign companies that 
do business there. 

When it was formulated, the policy of 
trying to control both Iran and Iraq 
quickly acquired the label "dual con- 
tainment.” Now seven years after the 


Allies Say Attempt 
Hurts Washington 

Gulf War, it appears to be in tatters. 

"On dual containment, coalition co- 
hesion is fraying, and it worries people 
like me.” said Phebe Man, a semor 
fellow at the National Defense Uni- 
versity. “But it is much less frayed on 
Iraq than on Iran.” 

Richard Murphy, a former assistant 
secretary of state for Near East affairs, 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~~ 

said: * ‘We have let our policy get frozen. 
It was sufficient to say ‘dual contain- 
ment' But that's not a way our gov- 
ernment can afford to act.” 

Today, almost all of America's allies 
think that the policy as it applies to Iranis 
not working. “A reassessment of Iran 
policy is long overdue,” a senior Euro- 
pean diplomat said. "The United States 
is isolating itself more successfully than 
it is isolating Iran.” 

A senior British diplomat says the 
American effort to punish foreign 
companies for doing business in Iran is 
wholly unacceptable. “It throws us on 
die other side of the debate.” he said.- 

The 1996 law requires sanctions 
against companies (hat invest more than 
$20 million in Iran’s energy industry, 
but does allow, die sanctions to be 
delayed or waived in the national interest 
if the countries involved show move- 
ment toward deterring terrorism from 
Iran. 

Under the act, the United States is 
currently investigating five foreign en- 
ergy companies that have announced 
two large deals with Iran. Those deals 
were interpreted as a direct challenge to 
American policy. 

The most attention has been paid to a 
French oil company. Total S A, which on 
Sept. 28 signed a $2-biIIion contract to 
explore for gas in Iran. In fact. Total is 
the largest shareholder, with 40 percent 
of the deal, while 30 percent is held by 
Petronas, a Malaysian company, and an- 
other 30 percent by Gazprom, the huge 
Russian company that used to be the 
Soviet Ministry of Natural Gas and was 
run by the current prune minister, Viktor 
Chernomyrdin. The Russian govern- 
ment itself still owns 40 percent of 
Gazprom. 

The Americans are also investigating 
a $180 million deal to develop an off- 


shore Iranian oilfield called Balal signed 
by the Canadian company. Bow Valley 
Energy Ltd, and its Indonesian partner, 
Bakne Minarak. 

Stuart Eizenstat, the undersecretary 
of state- for economic affairs, is in 
Europe working on these cases. Frank 
Wisner, a Clinton special envoy, is in 
Moscow on a mission to get Russia 
and its newly privatized companies to 
stop helping Iran develop missiles that 
can cany nuclear, chemical or bio- 
logical weapons. 

The latter issue has become a hot topic 
in Congress, with hundreds of legislators 
supporting draft legislation to punish 
Russian and other companies proven to 
be helping Iran's miss ile- program. 

Semor European diplomats say that 
U.S. officials have told them they are 
looking for reasons to waive the sanc- 
tions against the five energy companies 
in the Iran energy deals. But Mr. Eizen- 
stat says that the law is being followed 
with vigor. ■ 

“We are not looking for an excuse to 
exercise a waiver,” Mr. Eizenstat said. 
“We are pursuing this investigation 
with alacrity, and sanctions are a very 
real, live option.” 

Bat other senior U.S. officials em- 
phasize that the point of the 1996 leg- 
islation is to change Iranian behavior and 
make it harder for Tehran to develop 
missiles and other weapons, and to sup- 
port terrorism. They admit that Euro- 
pean nations are not important to such 
programs in Iran. Russia, -China and 
North Korea are involved in such illicit 
weapons development but the Chinese 
have now promised to stop any nuclear 
cooperation with Iran. ' 

The Europeans say the Americans are 
asking them to tighten existing restric- 
tions on aiding Iran in developing 
weapons or missiles. This might allow 
the Clinton administration to win 
waiver of sanctions from Congress. 

While the Clinton administration stiU 
argues that economic pressure works 
against Iran, a senior British diplomat 
says that while sanctions have hurt the 
Iranian economy, “it has not made a jot 
of difference to Iran’s aspirations to de- 
velop weapons of mass destruction, or to 
its work on those weapons, or to its 
support for terrorism.”- 

"U.S. policy on Iran has sounded 
good but has not worked,” he added. 
“This is asituation where the American 
system forces the United States to act 
against its own interests.-” 


Algerian Unions MERCEDES: A- Class Shipments Halted 
Condemn Plan 
For Major Strike 


Agcnce Frunce-Presse 

ALGIERS — Algeria’s union con- 
federation dealt a blow to opposition- 
plans for a general strike Wednesday to 
protest the results of local elections held 
last month. 

In a statement Tuesday, the confed- 
eration condemned the strike and ap- 
pealed for "respect for republican or- 
der” during the planned demonstration 
against the elections, which the oppo- 
sition claims were a “massivefrana.” 

- Protests in France on Monday to show 
solidarity with the people of Algeria 
against the strife in their country drew 
criticism from the Algerian daily Le 
Matin, while the rest of the Algerian 
press ignored foe event. 

Le Matin warned of the “risk of ma- 
nipulation” arising from the demonstra- 
tion, which Paris police said drew 
25,000 marchers in the French capital. 
The newspaper warned that the demon- 
stration could help push Algeria “into 
fundamentalist hands.” 

But organizers in Paris of the “Day 
for Algeria” said the event represented 
the biggest mobilization of its kind in 
France since unrest broke out in its 
former colony five years ago. 

A civil war between the Algerian au- 
thorities and Islamist insurgents has 
taken tens of thousands of lives since 
1992, when the military canceled elec-, 
tions the Islamic Salvation Front was 
expected to win and banned the group. 

TTie local elections last month, which 
appeared to show wide support - for the 
military regime, were hailed by -Pres- 
ident Liamine Zeroual as a “historic 
event.” Six opposition parties accused 
die government of vote-rigging, setting 
Off protests against the results. 

" Three pro-govemment representa- 
tives elected last month were assassin- 
ated in a roadblock ambush southeast of 
Aimers, and, since Sunday, armed gangs 
are reported to have massacred at least 
48 people near Blida. south of Algiers, 
and near Tlemcen in the west.- 


Continued from Page I 

He acknowledged that 1 percent to 2 
percent of the orders for the car had been 
canceled since the tests. 

"Nobody regrets more than we do 
that the A-Class demonstrates a weak- 
ness in extreme circumstances,' ’ he said. 
“Our engineers have worked tirelessly 
day and night searching for an optimal 
solution. We have found it” 

Daimler said it would fine-tune foe 
new car's chassis, lowering foe position 
of the engine- In a fairly radical departure 
from standard car design, the A-Class’s 
engine is housed directly beneath the 
driver, allowing it to offer much more 
interior space than other subcompacts bur 
also giving it a higher center of gravity. 

The announcement Tuesday came 
nearly two weeks after Daimler tersely 
conceded that foe A -Class had a "weak- 
ness ” that did indeed make it vulnerable 
to tipping over when taking sharp turns 
at high speeds. 

In the Swedish test Oct. 21, the car 
tipped over and injured its drivers as they 


PLO: 

Arafat Successor 

Continued from Page 1 

Gaza. Under self-rule laws, his interim 
successor as president of the authority 
would be the head of foe legislative 
council, Ahmed Qories, who would ar- 
range for new elections after 60 days. 

But A1 Hayat speculated that the 
“more logical candidate with a greater 
chance” was Mahmoud Abbas, secre- 
tary-general of the PLO executive. 

Mr. Abbas, also known as Abu Mazin, 
would be “a weak president, dependent 
on foe security services arid under the 
influence of Mohammed Dahlan and 
Mr. Arafat’s top economic adviser, 
Khaled Salam,” the paper said. 

A1 Hayat accused Israel of feeding the 
succession battle to provoke a civil war 
which would give it a -pretext to re- 
occupy self-rule areas in foe West Bank 
and Gaza Strip. (AFP , AP ) 


made a sharp turn at 61 kilometers (38 
miles) an hour. Test drivers in Denmark 
reported that their A-Class went up on two 
wheels Sept 23, but did not overturn. 

Daimler said Tuesday that foe A- 
Class problem could be solved by rel- 
atively inexpensive adjustments to foe 
chassis. To- make the changes, D aiml er 
said it would immediately stop shipping 
any cars for the rest of foe year ana 
resume in mid-February. The 2,600 cus- 
tomers who have already received cars 
will be allowed to take, them to special 
service centers and borrow a replace- 
ment car until foe . repairs are made. 

: -As recently as last week, Daimler 
executives said they were on foe verge of 
solving foeproblem and would not need 
to halt shipments in order to make 
changes. Daimler said Tuesday that it 
would continue plans to install its so- 
called Electronic Balancing System in 
foe new four-seater, along with better 
tires. The balancing system is currently 
installed only .in Mercedes’s high-end 
sedans and limousines. ‘ 

The cost of redesigaingthe car will cut 
operating profit by 100 million Deutsche 
marks {$58.3 million) this year and 200 
million DM next year, Daimler raid. - 

Chief Financial Officer Manfred 
Gentz said foe car would still break even 
in foe middle of its life cycle. The A- 
Class was designed to compete against 
such cars as Volkswagen AG's Golf. 

Clarence Ditlow, head of the Wash- 
ington-based Center for Automobile 
Safety, .a consumer advocacy' group, said 
moves like Daimler’s were “virtually 
unheard of,” adding: VAs a consumer 
group, we would applaud Daimler for 
their decision. They did the right tiling.’! 

Daimler shares finished up 70 pfennig 
at 11120 DM. 

■ Daimler Defends Smart Car 

Analysts asked the Daimler chief 
about 'foe rtew'Smart car, which is to be 
available next year, Reuters reported 
from Frankfurt The model looks like a 
smaller version of foe A-Class and some 
have wondered if it too. will suffer from 
a stability problem. 

“The tests have gone very well,” Mr. 
Schrempp said of the Smart car. “We 
have not found any reason to change it” 



K 



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Clearly you arc. You tell us in our 
1996 Reader Survey that collectively 
you take over 5 million air trips in 
a year and that individually you 
average eleven on business. 

You're obviously very worldly 
people, and you choose to spend an 
illuminating half hour or your day 
staying that way via the IHT. 

For summaries of the surveys from 
which these facts are taken, please call, 
in Europe. James McLeod on (33) 1 
41 43 93 81: in Asia. Andrew Thomas 
on (651 223 M78: in tire Americas. 
Richard Lynch on (2 1 2) 752 3K9U 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12. 1997 


PAGE 11 




INTERNATIONAL 


Some Angolan Rebels Find Peace in Luanda 


By Lynne Duke 

Washington Pom Svn ,cf 


UANDA, Angola — From his 
stinghold in the central highlands. Jo- 

ff. S r„H w once ,. Ihe ^ Vore d pawn of 
U.. Cold War policy in Africa, looms 

oromous reminder of the havoc his 
UITA rebel movement could create 
fothis southwest African nation. 

Despite agreeing three years ago to a 
pice accord with Angola's govem- 
mit. Mr. Savunbi has continued to 
re-m and to keep thousands of troops 
' “ rCT J“5““ nantL That is the histone 
fa; of UN1TA. the face of the warrior 

f ,i u i?TSJ!V^ n ! ola ' s ra P itaI - 

ia - or UNIT A has emerged: the 70 
mnbers in Parliament, four cabinet 
musters and seven deputies sworn in as 
pa of a new unity government in ApriL 
■Wale Mr. Savimbi practices brinkman- 
sb in Angola’s armed mice, the 
jLHTA members here have ensconced 
ftmselves quite comfortably as the of- 


A UNITA Contingent Drifts From Savimbi 

ficial political opposition, as required is growing, analysts say. Which one will 

with their 


by the peace accord. They sup w 
old foes from the ruling party and try to 
keep a safe distance from Mr. Savimbi 
and his perpetual threat of renewed war, 
observers say. 

Though the Luanda wing of the Na- 
tional Union for the Total Independence 
of Angola has nor split overtly from the 
movement, which is known by its Por- 
tuguese acronym, analysts say it is in- 
creasingly clear that the two feces of 
UNITA are looking in different direc- 
tions: one toward conflict, the other to- 
ward reconciliation. Under the 1994 ac- 
cord, which ended a 19-year civil war, the 
rebel movement that was among Africa's 
most persistent fighting forces is slowly, 
grudgingly being stripped of its bite and 
transformed into a political party. 

In the process, the political distance 
between the two wings of the movement 


hold sway over the Angolan peace pro- 
cess is the question that continues to 
define political life here in the capital, 
where war-weary people still use the 
phrase “when the war is over.” despite 
the fact that, officially, the war ended 
three years ago. Such is the legacy of 
two decades of civil war. preceded by a 
decade of guerrilla war against Por- 
tuguese colonialists: People here feel 
that conflict is never far away. 

UNITA had pledged peace once be- 
fore. in 1991. During most of the 16 years 
of fi ghting before then, the sides served as 
Cold War proxies, with UNITA backed 
by the United States and South Africa and 
the then-Marxist government supported 
by the Soviet Union and Cuba. 

But the next year, after his forces lost 
elections supervised by the United Na- 
tions, Mr. Savimbi rejected the results as 


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fraudulent. The country plunged into a 
round of war that was even more pun- 
ishing than before. Thfe overaU toll of the 
two-decade conflict includes hundreds of 
thousands of people killed, about 70.000 
maimed by land mines that remain a peril, 
and more than 1 million dispbeed- 

When the two sides came together 
again to sign the 1994 accord, UNITA 
controlled much of the Angolan interi- 
or. including the northeastern diamond 
territories, which provided it with at 
least $500 million in annual revenue and 
still are contested. 

But signs of normalization between 
the rebels and the government arc ever- 
present. 

Last week, as Mr. Savimbi presided 
over a meeting of his “political com- 
mission*' in his hometown of Andulo to 
decide how to react to new UN sanc- 
tions, which limit foreign flights in an 
effort to halt arms deliveries to his 
movement, commission members in 
Luanda did not attend. 

“I am here to lead in Parliament.'' 
said Abel Chivukuvuku, the UNITA 
parliamentary leader, when asked why 
he had not gone. 

Jorge Valentim. the new minister of 
commerce and tourism and a longtime 
UNITA member who was a key ne- 
gotiator of the 1 994 accord, said the role 
of movement ministers is to serve the 
nation. “I cannot put the party above the 
government." he said. 

Whether these men were called to the 
Andulo meeting is unclear. Under the 
1 994 accord, members in the unity gov- 
ernment “have to relinquish their tasks 
in the party," said lsaias Samakuva. 
head of UNITA's delegation to the UN- 
sponsored panel presiding over the 
peace process. 

But a diplomat here who watches 
UNITA closely said that the Luanda 
members could have attended. It “was 
the first time they made it clear they 
weren't going to follow Bailundo," the 
diplomat said, referring to the central 
town that is Mr. Savimbi 's stronghold. 
“I think it was a quiet rebellion." 

Mr. Samakuva said that while the 
movement is not split, there are different 
points of view within it. When the polit- 
ical commission's assessment of the 
sanctions led to debate about UNITA's 
fate in the peace process, he said, no one 
advocated pulling our of the peace — 
which would have meant, in effect, a 



The UNITA delegation being sworn in as members of Parliament in 
April. Its leaders did not attend a meeting last week with Mr. Savimbi. 


return to war. 

"People are asking. ‘Where are we 
going with this peace process?* " he 
said, “not, ‘Let us pull out.' " 

UNITA decided to stay in the peace 
process, which means it will continue to 
demobilize its fighters and to hand over 
territory for administration by a new 
unity government at the central and pro- 
vincial levels. At some stage, which has 
yet to be determined. Mr. Savimbi is 
expected to actually move to Luanda — 
a city where he has not set foot since his 


BRIEFLY 


1992 electoral loss. AH this will happen, 
as mandated by the peace accord. Mr. 
Samakuva said, because "nobod> has 
another solution. “ 

But UNITA in transition is filled w iih 
contradictions. Despite having members 
in Parliament and the cabinet it has not 
been officially declared a legal political 
party. Under the constitution, parties 
cannot have armed forces, and despite 
having demobilized about 34.000 
troops, Mr. Savimbi is believed to com- 
mand at least 15.000 fighters still. 


Israeli Secret Agents to End Use 
Of Forged Canadian Passports 

JERUSALEM — Israel promised Tuesday to stop the 
use of forged Canadian passports by its intelligence agents 
conducting secret operations, Canada's foreign minister, 
Lloyd Axworthy. said 

Mr. Axworthy said he brought up the subject during talks 
with David Levy, his Israeli counterpart, after two Israeli 
agents caught in a botched assassination attempt against a 
Palestinian militant in Jordan in September were found to 
be carrying fake Canadian passports. 

“We received from the minister the clear undertaking 
that direct orders have been given to all the appropriate 
authorities and agencies so that it will not happen again," 
said Mr. Axworthy. who was making a one-day stopover in 
Israel amid a tour of the Middle East. iAFP) 

Teachers’ Strike Ends in Ontario 

TORONTO — Ontario students returned to class this 
week after a two-week teachers’ strike failed to force die 
province’s government to scrap an education restructuring 
plan. 

In what they dubbed a political protest but the gov- 
ernment considered an illegal strike, most of the province's 
126.000 teachers walked off the job Oct. 27, shutting down 
schools and giving more than 2 million students an un- 
expected vacation. 

Their goal was to persuade the Progressive Conservative 
Party government of Ontario’s premier, Mike Harris, not to 
enact legislation that would transfer control of school 
funding and regulations from locally elected school boards 
to the provincial government The government said the bill 


would let the schools save about a half-billion dollars 
without sacrificing classroom budgets — a contention the 
teachers rejected. ~ ftt'Fi 

Albright to Meet Arafat in Bern 

BERN — A meeting between Madeleine Albright, the 
U.S. secretary of state, and the president of the Palestinian 
Authority, Yasser Arafat, on Saturday, will take place in 
Bern and not Geneva, a spokesman for the Foreign Affairs 
Ministry said Tuesday. 

The time and place of Mrs. Albright's meeting with Mr. 
Arafat, aimed at reviving the Middle East peace process, 
have not been confirmed. 

Mrs. Albright and Mr. Arafat will also have separate 
talks with Swiss government officials, the spokesman 
said (AFP) 

Morocco Calls on Citizens to Vote 

RABAT — Morocco on Tuesday called for a huge 
turnout for legislative elections on Nov. 14. saying the vote 
would ensure the country's progress, development and 
prosperity. 

“The National Electoral Commission exhorts all voters 
to pick up their cards and head massively to voting offices 
on election day." the official news agency. MAP. quoted 
the national body as saying. 

Campaigning for the elections, in which 16 parties will 
compete in 325 parliamentary constituencies, began Nov. 
1. More than 3.000 men and 69 women are running for 
office. 

Six opposition parties are taking pan in the elections, 
including the old-guard lstiqlal and Socialist Union of 
Peoples 'Forces parties . < Reuters i 


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INTERNATIONAL herald tribune, 
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 
PAGE 12 


‘Tongue of a Bird’: Predictable Prose 


By Sheridan Morley 

ImemniMut llcruU Tribune 

L ondon — EUen 

McLaughlin, who 
starred in all die 
Broadway versions 
of “Angels,*' now comes up 
with a play of her own at 
Hampstead. 

"Tongue of a Bird” is the 
story of a young aviatrix 
whose specialty seems to be 
locating missing people in the 
wilds of North America. This 
she does, we come eventually 
to understand, because her 
own mother has disappeared in 
mysterious circumstances and 
it is just possible, alone there 
amid the clouds, that some of 
the secrets of her death will 
become visible. 

Meanwhile, there is a miss- 
ing child who has been ab- 
ducted, conceivably assaul- 
ted, and taken from her 
playmates to another possible 
death. 

A strangely distant, uncar- 
ing mother — the play seems 
to have about three of them in 
a cast of only five — joins in 
the search, while way down 
on the ground Miriam Karlin. 


in her wonderfully irritable 
old crone mode, starts to fill in 
some of the pieces of a com- 
plex family jigsaw. 

McLaughlin writes like a 
poet, and quotes two of them 
(Sylvia Plath and Emily 
Dickinson) extensively in her 
program notes alongside 
Amelia Earhart, so we get an 
instant map of her chosen ter- 


ritory: feminist, precious, and 
pioneering. 

Soon it also becomes in- 
credibly formulaic: 

As it happens, a mother 
loses a daughter, a daughter 
loses a mother, and an old 
lady tells them alt just how it 
happened in prose — which 
contrasts sharply and nicely 
with the more high-flown 



ll JU hviki 


Miriam Karlin and Deborah Findlay in “Tongue. ' 


duologues of the play's aerial 
sequences. Peter Gill directs. 

Up at the Haymarket 
Leicester, Paul Kerry son’s 
fifth consecutive Sondheim 
revival i$ a triumphant stag- 
ing of his “1987 Into the 
Woods." the one about the 
fairy-tale characters who plan 
to live happily ever after, until 
they discover in a chilling and 
killing way that ever after 
comes with no guarantee of 
happiness at any time or in 
any place. 

Every character, from 
Cinderella to the Baker’s Wife 
and Little Red Riding Hood, 
now comes up to us face-to- 
face with his or her awful di- 
lemmas. Sondheim and his 
librettist. James Goldman, 
have realized that Grimm is 
worse than grim. 

“Into the Woods'* is “The 
Wizard of Oz” rewritten in 
blood and acid and martinis. 
The witch is revealed to be a 
cabaret star in shimmering 
ball gowns, but she is still a 
witch. Nobody really does the 
right thing here, and it takes 
decimation before those few 
who survive can even start to 
think of building a better 


world. Yet from “Children 
Will Listen" to “No One Is 
Alone” this is one of the most 
heart-rending of all Sond- 
heim’s scores. 

Kerryson has assembled a 
dazzling female team ( Linzi 
Hateiey, Kathryn Evans, Kate 
Norraington, Liza Hull) and if 
the men are nowhere near as 
good, it has to be said that 
neither are their roles. 

Back in London, to the 
handsomely refurbished Bar- 
bican comes the RSC with the 
firsr of the company's short- 
stay visits, this one offering 
“Henry V” for three weeks 
before it scurries back to 
Stratford and the road. The 
cast is weak even by usual 
current standards, largely be- 
cause the present company 
has to be kept as a unit where 
cross-casting in other roles 
might have encouraged a 
slightly higher level of talent, 
one usually now denied to the 
company by artists who have 
no aesire to spend a year on 
tour in only one play, far from 
town and other work. Thus for 
Michael Sheen’s callow but 
charismatic king the only 
really adequate support 


comes from Norman Rodway 
in about seven roles, and the 
usually expert Ron Daniels 
has managed a staging of such 
confusion that while the Brit- 
ish Army races around Agin- 
court brandishing Chicago- 
gangster pistols, the French 
seem to think they are in a 
revival of “Equus" and camp 
about on steely steeds. 

In a week when half a 
dozen of London’s best fringe 
theaters have had their core 
funding slashed, and when the 
government has ignomini- 
ously proposed kicking the 
English National Opera out of 
the Coliseum so it can bed 
down at Covent Garden with 
the Royal Opera and Ballet, I 
have a third suggestion of no 
less logic or practicality: Kick 
the RSC out of the Barbican 
altogether, since it is still not 
doing much good to anyone 
there, and hand it over to Peter 
Hall, whose company, home- 
less as of next week when they 
sell the Old Vic. could con- 
tinue the repertory work in 
classic and modem plays that 
has made his past season the 
best we have had in London 
for years. 


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The New Yi*k Tr| 

Margaret Colin in “ Jackie : An American Life . " 

"Jackie’: Cartoor| 
Of the Sphinx 

Not Meant for Broadivai 


By Ben Brantley. 

New K wk Times Service 


N ew york — 

“Just because you 
know some details 
about a person's 
life doesn’t mean you know 
the person.” That’s Jac- 
queline Kennedy Onassis 
speaking, or at least the simu- 
lacrum of her that is now ad- 
dressing Broadway audiences 
in Gip Hoppe's sketchbook of 
a show, “Jackie: An Amer- 
ican Life.” which opened this 
week at the Belasco Theatre. 

Actually, this is something 
that Onassis might indeed 
have said. This, after all. was a 
woman who had the best of all 
vantage points for pondering 
the gap between the cardboard 
construct of celebrity and die 
private self behind it And she 
is reported to have observed 
not long before her death three 
years ago, “When you get 
written about a lot. you just 
think of it as a little cartoon that 
runs along the bottom of your 
life, but one that doesn’t have 
much to do with your life.” 

Hoppe, who both wrote 
and directed “Jackie,” is 
smart enough to acknowledge 
that difference and cautious 
enough to avoid plunging into 
speculations on the real 
secrets of America's favorite 
sphinx. Instead, what he de- 
livers is that “little cartoon” 
of which Onassis spoke: the 
tabloid-genenued comic strip 
that, despite its creators’ re- 
lentless efforts, never got be- 
yond two dimensions. 

It's no accident that the 
most salient characteristic of 
“Jackie,” aside from its lead- 
ing lady — who is played with 
improbable success by Mar- 
garet Colin — is David 
Gallo's furiously inventive 
scenery, which blurs the lines 
between human effigies (card- 
board cutouts, giant puppets 
from the Big Naas Studio) and 
real people. It is obviously 
Hoppe’s point that the inquir- 
ing minds of die public tend to 
flatten and depersonalize their 
objects of curiosity. 

Point taken. So where do 
we go from here? The answer 
is not very’ far. If “Jackie" is 
a comic strip, it is one that 
most Americans have read 
many times before and prob- 
ably even memorized. 
Presenting chapters from 
Onassis’s life that could be 
found in any supermarket bi- 
ography as a series of lam- 
poon ish vignettes, this over- 
extended evening most often 
suggests an anthology of 
“Saturday Night Live” 
sketches from both its peak 
and its lame seasons. 

"Jackie,” which de- 
veloped a cult following in its 
earlier run at (appropriately.) 
the Hasty Pudding Theatre in 
Cambridge. Massachusetts, 
establishes its patterns of 
lows and relative highs in its 
opening minutes. The pro- 
duction begins with the 
fabled Sotheby’s auction of 
Onassis's possessions, an 
event portrayed in strokes of 
lead. (The bids reach into the ■ 
millions for things like dish- 
washing detergent, and the 


bidders bleat like sheep wtv fa 
they leave the stage. ) - • 

What immediately follow 
however, is startling. Gallo 
set opens up into an ethere 
vista of receding classical pA 
ticos and there, at the top of 
staircase, is Colin as Onassn 
Swathed in an aura that mix 
reserve, rebuke and cond 
tioned graciousness. Col 
makes her way down the stal 
to confront her audience. 

“What do you want froi 
me?’ ’ she asks, in a voice th 
finds the steel in the mdc 
imitated little-girl breathles: 
ness. "What is it that you fln 
so fascinating?” 

Colin has the gently rt 
proachfu! presence and ih 
imitative precision to gel yo 
feeling at least a little fool is! 
and perhaps a little guilty, ft 
even being there. The rflr 
ment is a beautifully rendere 
exercise in intentionally mafc 
ing an audience uncomfr. st- 
able. Ct 

Hoppe has filled his sbto\ 
with preemptive strikes, self 
consciously anticipating crit 
icism. So in the same seem 
he has Onassis say wearih 
“It must all be so familiar t 
you. Yet here you are dying i 
hear it all again.” Yet surely 
you think, this is merely cal 
dilating false modesty, th: 
there are revelatory insight 
in store. «. 

Despite moments, particu 
lariy from Colin, that give 
glimmer of subterranean sub 
stance, mosr of what occup 
on stage is little more 
goofball satire. The quick 
change ingenuity of the on 
semble, in an astonishing 
multitude of roles, ani 
Gallo's willfully silly sets ar< 
finally only minor diver 
sions. 


G ALLO and the 

Naze Studio hav 
created a cornu 
copia of sight gafgsj 
(The patriarch, Joseph 
Kennedy, is presented as 
giant talking head of a pupf&d 
the redecoration of the whit] 
House is rendered in a flasj 
by a whole army of idemicJ 
Jackies.) But the show fails tj 
find fresh lakes on such frej 
quently shot-at targets as & 
shallowness of Hamptons " 
ciety and East Coast boarduf . 
schools, die sports- 1 ovp\ 
rambunctiousness of ?h 
Kennedy clan, the vulgani 
of Aristotle Onassis. or (h 
image-fixated superficialit 
of the Nixon-Kennedy dt 
bates. 

Only occasionally doc 
Hoppe push the familiar int 
other realms, as he does in ih 
scene where the former fir- 
lady’s legendary televisfc 
tour of die White Hous 
subtly turns into the cri 
coeur of a woman who 5i 
come to see herself as a pfc 
oner. * 

Actually, "Jackie’’' is.- 
strangely respectful wot! 
even to its disadvantage: A 
though Colin’s performa* ■ 
hints at a more complex cha^ . 
actec, t Hoppe has allowe 
Onassis to emerge with ht 
mask intact. At least give hii 
credit for gallantry. 


m 







KYOCERA shoots 


Tf 4 V INTERN tfH) YU. M • 4 

ltcralo^a^,eribune 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 



CONTAXKTSl 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


PAGE 13 



Kodak Cuts 10,000 Jobs 
As Profit Loses Ground 


“You can t successfully market books like hamburgers,” says Norman Spin rad, author of more than 30 books, decrying “conglomerization.” 

Author’s Protest: U.S. Book Rights Go on Sale for $1 


Canf&ulh Our Safi Fipmlha&KhB 

ROCHESTER, New York — East- 
man Kodak Co. said Tuesday it would 
cut 10,000 jobs, or 10,5 percent of its 
work force, as part of a plan to cut costs 
by ax least SI billion and revive sluggish 
sales and profits. 

The move is the latest in a series of 
overhauls since 1983 at Kodak, the 
world’s biggest photography company, 
which has encountered fierce competi- 
tion from Fnji Photo Film Co. of Japan. 

Kodak also expects to lose $400 mil- 
lion this year in its digital imaging busi- 
ness, which it is counting on to maintain 
its dominance in photography. 

The actions are the most aggressive to 
date by the chairman, George Fisher, 
who is facing his toughest challenge 
since taking over four years ago. Kodak 
is trying to beat back competition from 
Fuji, Hewlett-Packard Co. and others 
while its film sales stagnate and losses 
from new products, including its Ad- 
vanced Photo System, mount. 

“One of the problems I created was 
an expectation of continued growth," 
Mr. Fisher told analysts at a meeting in 
New York. “We are collectively em- 
barrassed by this year.'* 

Kodak's shares fell $4. 1 25 to close at 
S62.125. The stock has fallen nearly 22 
percent this year. 

Wall Street’s response appeared to 
reflect the lack of detail disclosed by 


Kodak. “It kind of reads like they[re 
grasping at straws,” a trader said. "I 
think with so many layoffs especially, 
investors are deciding to wait and see 
how this works." 

Kodak also said it would reduce re- 
search and development spending by as 
much as $150 million next year and 
wonld consider hiring other companies 
to make more of its products. The com- 
pany’s overall research spending in 
1996 was about 51 billion. 

- The cost cuts are to be made over the 
next two years, at least half of them by 
the end of 1 998. Kodak plans to set aside 
at least $ 1 billion in the fourth quarter to 
pay for the job cuts and other expenses 
of the restructuring. 

The layoffs among Kodak's 95.000- 
strong labor force worldwide will ac- 
count for only about half of the savir 
executives said. They said Kodak 
would cut its sales force, hire other 
companies to do more of its manu- 
facturing and look for more joint ven- 
tures and partnerships. 

The job cuts will be nude on a unit-by- 
unit basis, and employees are expected to 
be notified by Dec. 1 . 

The company reported last month 
that its third-quarter net earnings fell to 
$232 million from $410 million a year 
earlier and that revenue was S5.79 bil- 
lion, down from $4.15 billion. 

{AP, Bloomberg. Reuters i 


By Brad Spurgeon 

International Herald Tribune 


P 


ARIS — Norman Spinrad is offering U.S. 
rights to his next novel for an advance of SI. 
This might be passed off as a.silly stunt by a 
frustrated writer, except that Mr. Spinrad is 
sne of the world’s premier science-fiction writers, part 
if the “new wave" of the late 1960s when he wrote 
“Bag Jack Barron," a novel that anticipated the days 
when presidential elections would be decided entirely 
by television. 

Mr. Spinrad has published more than 30 books, is 
translated throughout the world and is respected in 
France, where he has lived nearly a decade. While the 
Larousse Dictionary of Writers calls two novels he 
wrote in die early 1980s “arguably his best science- 
fiction works," he thinks the $1 book is his best 
“I hereby offer,” he writes on his Internet home 
page at h tip V/oarworld-Cxunfm serve.com/homepages/ 


normanspinrad, “to sell the American volume rights 
to my completed novel “He Walked Among Us" for 
an advance of SI to the publisher who persuades me 
that they will publish it properly.” 

The offer is his way of saying that the publishing 
industry, dominated as it is by conglomerates, is doing 

MEDIA MARKETS 

bad business by putting the bottom-line value of books 
above their literary value. By offering the rights for S 1 , 
he says he is trying to show that the literary value 
should come first. He is also telling prospective pub- 
lishers to use the money he might have been paid in 
advance to promote the book. 

The book was written under contract to Bantam 
Books Inc., part of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing 
Group Inc., where Mr. Spinrad has published since 
1985. He received a $50,000 advance fra it and another 
book for which he has written only an outline. After 


poor sales of his previous boot “Pictures at 1 1," and 
after the outlined book was rejected, he fought for the 
rights to “He Walked Among Us." He blamed poor 
promotion for the poor sales of “Pictures at 1 1" and 
said he did not want a recurrence of that failing. 

As part of the deal to regain those rights, Mr. 
Spinrad was asked to repay his advance once he sold 
the book elsewhere. 

Mr. Spinrad, 57, said the current publishing crisis 
was tied to the “conglomeratization’’ of the industry. 

“Yoo can’t successfully market bodes like ham- 
burgers," he said, “because they're each individual 
items. It don't work! They downsize, they blame writers. 
When they've done everything and find that they're still 
losing money, they might suddenly realize that they're 
losing money because they’re publishing crap." 

He started his Internet pitch as a serious attempt to 
sell his book rights. But he has received so many letters 

See BOOKS, Page 18 


EU Women Gain Priority 
In Some Job Promotions 


Ctm/alnl tn Our Stuff Firm DupdLin 

LUXEMBOURG — Legislation that 
gives women priority over equally qual- 
ified men for promotions in the public 
sector does not violate European law, 
the European Court of Justice ruled 
Tuesday. 

The court rejected a claim by Hellmut 
MarschaU, a German teacher, that he had 
been a victim of sex discrimination when 
he was passed over for promotion in 
favor of an equally qualified female col- 
league. The European Union had been 
waiting for the ruling to clarify what kind 
of action its 15 members can take to 


increase job prospects for women. The 
German state oi North Rhine-Wesl- 
phalia. where the case originated, said the 
ruling had vindicated its decision to help 
women move up the career ladder. 

The decision “finally draws a line 
under years of legal wrangling which 
has been to the detriment of women." 
said Use Ridder-Melchers. the state's 
minister for sexual equality. 

The National Council of German 
Women's Organizations also welcomed 
the verdict, saying it had put measures to 

See JOBS, Page 14 


Asian Turmoil Even Eclipses Greenspan 

With Few Expecting a Rate Increase , Fed Meeting Recedes to Background 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


. NEW YORK — When America's 
central bankers meet to set monetary 
policy, financial markets around the 
world customarily hold their breath. But 
not this time. 

“This tune, the meeting is not on 
uybody’s radar screen,' 1 said John 
.yding, chief economist at Bear Steams 
in New York. 

Even more remarkable is what does 
loom large on those radar screens. From 
Washington to Wall Street, attention is 
riveted on Asia. 

: “I used to think that Hang Seng was 
some son of California surfing term,” 
David Whyss, chief economist at Stan- 
dard & Poor's DKI, said of Hong Kong’s 
benchmark stock index. “Now,- what 
happens on the Hang Seng leads the 
news in the morning.” 

Even more remarkably, what happens 
in Asia is now among the key concerns 
Chairman Alan Greenspan and his 
Colleagues at the Federal Reserve Board, 
which is scheduled to meet Wednesday. 
Gone are the days when the slightest hint 
of inflation prompted fears of an im- 
mediate increase in interest rates. 

“We are no longer masters of our own 
economic fate," said Mr. Whyss. He 
and other analysts say the meltdown or 
currencies and financial markets that 
began in Thailand in July and has now 
spread to Hong Kong. Smith Korea and 
beyond has become a situation m wrnen 
the tail has begun to wag the dog. 

If it were not for concerns over the 


fragility of markets and economies in 
• Asia, said Gerard Lyons, chief econ- 
omist at DKB International, a bank in 
London, “then I think that chances are 
the Fed would hike tomorrow.” 

As it is, the expectation is that the Fed 
will refrain from any action. 

Currency traders point out that by 
raising interest rates and making it more 
attractive for investors to hold assets 
denominated in dollars, such a move 
would only bring fresh downward pres- 
sure to bear on Asia's already swooning 
currencies. “When a key section of the 
world economy is going down a plug 
hole everyone has to be concerned,” 
said Mr. Lyons. 

In Hong Kong, the epicenter of Last 
month *s sell-off in stock markets around 
the globe, there was once a corps of Fed- 
watchers — men and women who scru- 
tinized the Fed’s every move in the 
certainty that the American central bank 
exerted a powerful influence over every- 
one’s economy, including their own. 

Now, some say. Mr. Greenspan’s 
name does not even come up in con- 
versation anymore in Hong Kong. In a 
place where interest rates now regularly 
swing several percentage points in a day, 
the possibility of the Fed nndging interest 
rates upward a quarter of a point has 
suddenly lost its drama. 

Instead, it is now the turn of Mr. 
Greenspan and of Wall Street to do a bit 
of watching and reacting. It is an un- 
accustomed role. “As a domestic econ- 
omist, Southeast Asian economies were 
never on my radar screen before," said 
Rosearme Cahn, chief markets economist 


for Credit Suisse First Boston. Now, Ms. 
Cahn finds herself having daily conver- 
sations with her colleagues overseas, and 
doing a fair bii of the listening as welL 

Others see signs of that new focus for 
American analysts in the U.S. market’s 
erratic behavior of late. In spire of such 
inflationary signals as an ^employment 
rate that has now sunk to 4.7 percent of 
the work force, a level where wages 
usually begin to rise sharply, the big 
concern in American financial markets 
has shifted to deflation. In the past two 
weeks, articles have appeared in many 
prominent magazines and newspapers 
discussing the danger of the sort of de- 
flation seen in Southeast Asia spreading 
round die world. 

Many economists, however, agree 
with Mr. Greenspan's statement last 
month that Asia’s problems would have 
scant impact on America’s economic 
prospects. Most private-sector econo- 
mists forecast that the turmoil in Asia 
would shave anywhere from one-quarter 
to one-half of a percentage point from 
America’s growth rate next year. 

On the other hand, Mr. Whyss says 
the decline in U.S. interest rates that has 
resulted from the flood of money into 
America in search of a haven will spur 
the economy by a quarter of a point 

The Achilles' heel of those argu- 
ments of American economic insularity 
is something economists call the “trans- 
mission mechanism.” If Asia’s prob- 
lems trigger a chain reaction of loan 
defaults and bank closings, then all bets 
about the impact on America’s econ- 
omy will be off. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Nov. 11 

nu pf Ua DlH Sf. Sft ftd • Q Ptsifc 

* 1 uu* — WAS- l-M* 1-Mt' 1-S* ,as * 

Amtentao IJBS 1.®] DMA 

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at e PM. and Toronto rafts et 3 PM. ... — , ur>- ^ nuaksi- net maBobte. 

a To buy one pound be To buy one i 



Other Dollar Values 


Cwtaacy FcrS 
AipMLpMO 09986 
AastrafanV 1-033 
Antrim sell. 12-013 
Brazil ml 1.1MB 
CHneuywa 8J113 
Cudikoraa 32.79 
Dantahtom WM2 
Egypt, poems 2401S 
HA-anUm 5.1369 


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Sraebdwt 
Hang Kong S 
Heog-toriot 
Indian rup» 
|pdo. roptod 

IrMC 

tan*#***- 

Kvwdinw 

Matoy.rtog. 


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267-66 

7.73 

19423 

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6.969 

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3.75 

IJM6 


S.Afr.md 
S.Knr.«m 
Sued, krone 
TOMBS 
Thai baht 
Turkish Bni 
UAEOrtran 
VMM?. Ml*. 


Pars 

4B124 

989,90 

74703 

30.99 

3745 

1B469S. 

1671 

-499JS 


Libid-Libor Rates Nov. 11 

Subs French 

Dollar D-Mark Fnmc staffing Franc Yen ECU 
1-nontti SaV-55* 3W-3V4 1M-TV* 79k-7Va 3*. 39* 

Imamu 5V. -554 3nta-3>* 1WU-2V* M- 7* 39»-3¥b 49»-4*lr 

6-month W*-5*> 3M-3V* 7V«- 7V4 3>4-3Wta 43*-4V» 

1-yeor 59k-5Vb 2¥k-3 V* 7M-7W <Vu*M ft-tti M-44H 

Soumne tbNrim UndsBmk. 

Rates appucable e ktfeMt# deposits of si mWm mbUmm (orequbutm)- 


Key Money Rates 
United Stote» 

Dtaauotrrta 
Print rate 

CtAffuCc' 

rcflVaw iw nw 
M-day CDs draton 
l M-day CP desben 
3-nortti Treasury MB 
l-yaarTiettwyMI 
2f*or Treason bffl 
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7-jMrTmmymh 
HHmr Treasury aato 
30-year Trentwy bend 
MtffflljKli 38-day RA 


9MV ***ry 

12460 12405 12350 
{Sri 1-2909 129M 


Forward Rates 

tend iHepy PnW 

SSSSSr 38 ss JS 

seotas: MG Bank 


DtaGDMtrak 
CaU money 
l-aaatb kiln tuuk 
3meani interbank 
OmsaOi interbank 
10-year Govt band 

Bemnmr 

Lombard rat* 


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550 

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US 

£20 

tAyMrCn 

666 

658 

— 

5.17 




- 

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Franc 



— 

552 

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350 

130 

■ — 

557 

CoOnMiny 

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3M 

— 

550 

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350 34S 
354 353 

3J2 3.73 

186 3.85 

657 558 


US. button per ounce. London omeM 
ifraiDK Zurich ana Hew rot* ap ering 
tout dosing prices dew Yoikumex 
tDeCj 

Sauce: Reuters. 


Global Private Banking 


REPUBLIC, MANAGING 


YOUR ASSETS IS A DIALOGUE, 
NOT A MONOLOGUE. 



/ lensJxfuaHarm of K*ppu Wv 
iVjfnuw/ Munir of A'rtr York 
iSiriwJ at ij.'lkTil. 


In fact, we consider asset management 
a team effort, with you as the hey member of 
that team. Your particular financial needs, your 
objectives, help us determine the winning strategy. 
Our fundamental goal: to protect your capital 
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It is a simple principle upon which we base 
our brand of financial conservatism: private 
banting built upon rigor, discipline and prudence. This 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, has created 
a global’ private banb of exceptional stability, capable 
of weathering tbe roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, 
on a risb adjusted basis, is hvo times as great 
as that required by the world's international 
hanking regulators. 

To our way of thinking, it is security as 
well as return that we must ensure each day. 

And in the process, to provide a unique quality 
of service, understanding and discretion. 



VnrlJ 

Siynf/i, .Vufnrim/ /tout- af 
Xvtr Vnri- In ,\Vir York. 


Ill Republic National Bank of New York" 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A lt.nL • Y. Jr • O*.*,- * ‘ H*.»l ' 1 1 ill. ■ Ain, • 1.UJ. * C.^n^vn * O, traitor 

wm^ i."", ki.., ( luiwru u .wfc- \- u 'r'h” e ' NU,VK y Ci 'y ■ ■ xul.. * c»i,. ■ M.«.un-x., 

Miuttrvdl M.nvtw NdMWH * l\»rn. ■ I .-rlh I iml.i Ji-I U*U* Ki.. Ji- J-in.-ir.. • VanlM^it * Siifdr«irt' • SwJiwy • TjijK-i • T..L.. • T.-rvnCv ■ Ziiri.-li 

. *'luiwUk X4.wl linl-.U |(r<‘. 


t 




X ;J2g 


PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 'WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1997 



■vw4i?a : ' ■ tiff.' 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond .Yieid 


r'Vv is'vtu : 


Dollar in Dei/tsche marks 


m /V i ■ i 

175 H ! , V X W i 

: 1 (ft J <«fl I 4 


J J A S 0 N 5 

1997 * 


J J A S O N 
1997 


W.-Wv Xi w h ,, iyrf*fti 

t!: 


" ■ > " ■ -'• -" ■^■■^ » W- 

Source; Effoomberg. Reuters Intemaiioitel Herald Tribune 

Very brief ys 

• Walt Disney Co. and its former studio chief, Jeffrey Katzen- 
berg, reached a settlement in Mr. Kaizen berg’s $250 million 
lawsuit, but further negotiations are planned to determine the 
amount of compensation Mr. Katzenberg will receive. 

• Fruit of the Loom Inc. plans to lay off at least 2J200 
workers and close a factory in Louisiana as h seeks to cut costs 
by shifting production to overseas plants. 

• Mexico’s economy will expand 5.2 percent with 12 percent 
inflation in 1998 after 65 percent growth this year. Finance 
Minister Guillermo Ortiz said. Mr. Ortiz ruled out any cut in 
the nation’s 15 percent sales tax or its top 34 percent rate on 
corporate and personal income. 

• Wal-Mart Stores Inc.’s third-quarter earnings rose 16 
percent from a year earlier on higher sales. Net income rose to 
$792 million, or 35 cents a share, and revenue rose 12 percent 
to $29.12 billion for the period, which ended Oct 31. 

• Union Pacific Resources Group Inc. said it would call off 
its $6.4 billion offer for Pennzoil Co. unless the oil company 
entered into “good-faith** merger discussions. 

• Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay, which form a 

free-trade area, could raise duties on goods from other coun- 
tries by three percentage points, to 17 percent. President Carlos 
Saul Menem of Argentina said. ntt.ap. Bloomberg. Rouen 


InteRKiiiooal Herald Tribune 


GM to Take a $2 Billion Charge 

Bloomberg News 

DETROIT — General Motors Coxp. has told financial 
analysts it will take a fourth-quarter charge of $2 billion to $3 
billion, or $2.85 to $427 a share, related to its cost-cutting 
efforts in Europe and North America. But the charge will be 
offset by a previously disclosed pretax gain of about $4 billion 
from the sale of GM’s Hughes defense unit to Raytheon Co. 

GM also said economic problems in Brazil and in Southeast 
Asia and incentive costs in North America would hurt profit 


Caterpillar 
And Kodak 
Hold Back 
Blue Chips 

Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Stocks closed 
mixed Tuesday as declines in East- 
man Kodak and CatopiilaroSset op- 
timism that a strong economy would 
prevent a repeat of last month's 7 
percent drop in the stock market 
"The economy's doing very well 
and still not showing any measurable 
signs of excesses," said Joseph Har- 
rison, chief investment officer at 
Roulston & Co. With the Standard & 
Poor's 500-stock index still up 25 
percent for the year, he said, "I can’t 
rule out having some more downside, 
but I'm not too concerned about it" 
The Dow Jones industrial average 
rose 6.14 points to end at 7,558.73, 

U.S, STOCKS ~ 

but declining issues outnumbered 
advancing ones on the New York 


Caterpillar and Kodak, both Dow 
components, fell sharply. 

The S&P 500 index rose 2.65 
points to 923.78. But the Nasdaq 
composite index fell 5.86 to 1,584.86, 
dragged down by WorldCom and 
MG, which agreed Monday to 
merge. The Treasury bond market 
was closed for the Veterans Day hol- 
iday. 

Investors are waiting to see 
whether the Federal Reserve 
Board’s policy-setting Open Market 
Committee will acton interest rates 
at its meeting Wednesday, but the 
consensus expectation is dial the Fed 
will leave its overnight bank lending 
target unchanged at 5.50 percent 


Caterpillar shares dropped 2% to 
47 9/16 after an analyst at CIBC 
Oppenheimer cut bis rating on the 
maker of farm and construction ma- 
chinery to "underperform” from 
“hold.” The analyst, Charles Har- 
ris, cited concerns that events in 
Brazil and Asia would hurt die com- 
pany’s overseas business. 

Glofaalstar shares dropped 2 to 
46% after the company said the start 
of its satellite-based communications 
services may be delayed because the 
launching of its first satellites had 
been postponed for farther testing. 

Kansas City Power & Li ght fell 
1 14 to 27 13/16 on reports that West- 
ern Resources may try to renegotiate 
its $2 billion purchase of the utility. 

Stock in the on-line brokerage 
E*Trade Group fell 2% to 26 after 
Quick & Reilly Group slashed its 
prices for on-line trading. 


THE AMERICAS 


Apple’s Jobs , Short on News, Holds Attention 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Service 

CUPERTINO, California — 
Steve Jobs fell significantly short 
of announcing any of the jolting 
deals that had been rumored fra: 
weeks as he announced that Apple 
Comparer Inc. would begin selling 
by way of the Internet and building 
computers to order in its factories. 

Mr. Jobs, who has taken the 
reins at the company he founded 
while the struggling computer 
maker searches for a new chief 
executive, spoke Monday at a col- 
lege auditorium packed with more 
than 2,000 Apple Computer em- 
ployees, journalists and analysts. 

It is a measure of Mr. Jobs’s 
charisma and leadership prowess 
that despite the lack of a rumored 
network computer deal with Oracle 
Corp. that bad been predicted by a 
number of publications, analysts 
gave the company's co-founder 
and acting chief executive positive 
marks in his bid to restore Apple to 
stability. 

“I was disappointed that there 
wasn't a cure-all, but that's not 
Apple's fault" said Charles Wolf, 
an analyst at First Boston Corp. 
The move to sell by way of the 
Internet be added, “will mean as 
much as $500 million in the next 
six months and 5 percent higher 
gross margin for their Web 
sales.” 

Apple stock had rallied in recent 
days on rumors about deals with 
partners ranging from Oracle to 
Lucent Technologies. On T uesday. 


its stock fell 37.5 cents to dose at. 
SIS.3125. 

Despite the disappointment over 
the lack of electrifying news, sev- 
eral analysts said that if the com- 
pany can build and ship large num- 
bers of the new and faster machines 
tint were also introduced Monday, 
it stands a chance in the current 
quarter of at least temporarily stop- 
ping the losses that have ravaged 
the company. 

: *ITie event at Apple’s home base 


was clearly designed to build mo- 
mentum for the computer maker 


mentum for the computer maker 
going into the crucial Christmas 
selling season. 

Mr. Jobs, with a full beard and 
wearing a sweater vest, took some 
glee in showing Apple's newest . 
computers ou tracing computers 
based on Intel's Pentium Q pro- 
cessor. 


He said the new PowerPC G3 
chip, the latest from the alliance 
Apple formed with Motorola Corp. 
and International Business Ma- 
chines CorpM would continue to 
give Applepetfbrmance leadership 
in both desktop and portable com- 
-puters.- - 

“This was intended to rally the 
troops.” said Tim Bajarin, pres- 
ident of Creative Strategies, a con- 
sulting firm based in San Jose, 
California. 

. Apple announced last week that 
it had formed a partnership with 
■ CompUSA, the largest U.S. com- 
puter retailer, under which the 
c hain is building custom Apple 

Stores inside all its outlets. Fifty- 

four of the stores will be opened by 
Thanksgiving. 

“WeTre real excited about our 
partnership with Apple,” Harold 


Browser Strategy Is Nothing New 9 Microsoft Argues in Court 


C<Mp*4hfOm-S*fFrrmDiipax*ri " 

WASHINGTON — Arguing 
that the government is objecting to 
a practice it has known about for 
years, Microsoft Coip. has asked a 
judge to dis mi ss a suit accusing (he 
software giant of Dying to comer 
the market for Internet browsers. 

In a response to a Justice De- 
partment sort, Microsoft lawyers ar- 
gued that the government had 
known since before Windows 95 
went on sale in 1995 that the com- 
pany intended to make Internet soft- 
ware a part of the operating system. 
The response was filed Monday 


night in U.S. District Court here. 

“As the DQJ knows, the tech- 
nologies in question have been a 
central thrust of Microsoft’s op- 
erating systems development ef- 
forts ror more than three years,” 
lawyers for the Redmond. Wash- 
ington, company wrote. 

The case centers on Justice’s ar- 
gument that Internet Explorer has 
been marketed as aseparaie product 
from Windows 95. By forcing com- 
puter makers to install both on their 
machines, it said in its suit last 
month, Microsoft is violating a pro- 
vision in a 1995 antitrust settle- 


Japan’s Sluggish Outlook Lifts Dollar 


n.iti-1 1 1 


Compton, chief operating officer 
of "and that hasn’t 

always been the case;" • 

Mr. Jobs also used the stage to 
give his audience a quick cyber- 
■ space tour of the new world wide 
Wfcb site for Apple Store. The site 
permits customers to order com- 
puters directly from' Apple and re- 
• ccive them by way of United Parcel 
Service or Airborne Express, 
While the company willrdwrac 
list prices for machines bought air 
redly, it will permit customers to 
quickly configure systems to their 
individual specifications and then 
have them immediately manufac- 
tured in an Apple factory. 

In his dcoKKStratioa. Mr. Jobs 
placed orders on a large screen for 
two high-end desktops and two 
ha ndheld . computers totaling 
$16,000. 


Ihi 


f 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
above 125 yen for the first time in 
six months Tuesday amid expec- 
tations that Japan’s economy would 
not improve enough in toe fore- 
seeable future to trigger a rate in- 
crease by tbe Bank of Japan. 

That perception was reinforced 
after Taka Yamasaki, head of a re- 
search council for the governing 
Liberal Democratic Party, said Ja- 
pan's economy was stagnating. 

Tbe yen has also been undermined 
by expectations dial an economic 
stimulus plan to be released Friday 
by the governing Liberal Democrat- 
ic party would prove ineffective. 

“The situation in Japan has taken 
a turn for the worse/ said Francis 
B reden, currency economist at Leh- 


man Brothers International. 

In 4 PM. trading, die dollar was 
at 125.045 yen, up from 124 .355 yen 
a day earlier. The U.S. currency also 
was quoted at 1.7090 Deutsche 
marks, up from 1.7048 DM. 

The dollar’s climb against the yen 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

has been restrained by concern that 
Japanese and U.S. officials do not 
want a weaker yen because that 
could widen the politically sensitive 
trade gap between die two countries, 
analysts said. 

While many analysts expect U.S. 
interest rates to hold steady this 
month, the strong employment pic- 
ture in the United States led to some 
speculation that tbe Federal Reserve 


Board's Open Market Committee 
could decide to raise its benchmark 
rate when it met Wednesday. 

. “There are a few people looking 
for die Fed to do something,” Chris 
Day, a trader at Commonwealth 
Bank of Australia, said. 

The pound rose amid expecta- 
tions that accelerating inflation 
would prompt the Bank °f England 
to raise interest rates again. 

In London trading, the pound rose 
to 2.9159 DM from 2.8875 DM at 
the close Tuesday. In New York, the 
pound was quoted at $1.7045, up 
from $1.6975. 

Against other European curren- 
cies, the dollar rose to 5.7239 
French francs from 5.7091 francs 
and to 1.3895 Swiss francs from 
13878 francs. 


mem. That provision prohibits Mi- 
crosoft from requiring computer 
makers to install separate programs 
as a condition for getting the dom- 
inant Windows operating system. 

Microsoft’s defense has centered 
on its argument that the settlement 
permits n to develop "integrated" 

95 are made to work together as a 
single program but also says it has 
the freedom to incorporatc ony kind 
of function into Windows 95 with- 
out violating the 1995 agreement 
(AP. Bloomberg) 


JOBS: 

Priority for Women 

Continued from Page 13 

encourage foe promotion of women 
on a firm legal Wis. 

The EU court rejected die opinion 
of a senior adviser who recommen- 
ded that foe state's law be over- 
turned. Advocate General Francis 
Jacobs said in May that any rule that- 
granted women “absolute and un- a 
conditional priority” for jobs vi- j 
olared EU raws against discrimi- 
nation and went beyond EU rules on 
promoting equal opportunity. 

.. But the court decided that the law 
in question was not unfair to men 
because, while it gave women can- 
didates priority, it did not give them * 
automatic, unconditional prefer-. j 
ence. (AFP. Reuters i j 


j % 1 fit ft M ^ H 


* ! 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONA!: FUTURES 


Tuesday’s 4 P.ML dose 

The 300 most traded stocks of the day# 
up to the dosing on Wall Sheet 
7 }h Associated Ptassi 

lack Star Mgk Ue Lfltat One 


w W m item arm Indexes 


Most Actives 


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% Dow Jones 

3 w w w> cm 

# Indus 757445 7599-74 751121 755173 +4.14 

TlWB 314119 315449 3140l( 314157 +ii* 

ft UN 24349 245.11 2433)0 24444 +1-53 

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Industrtab 1090^81072571073^3 
Transp. 66951 663S7 66165 

Utttttas 206J9 205.19 206JJ6 

Ftance m.97'109J5 109Z4 
SP 500 935.90 92026 921.13 

SP100 893J8 87657 B7756 


487J9 483J7 48544 
411.15 40595 60837 
453J6 +51X1 45pJ 
301-94 2B9M 30L94 
44184 45U1 45792 


1394.11 150073 158484 

m m 

178044 174933 1777.19 
226773 225547 7240JM 
107154 106476 IDO 


48124 479.12 410X3 

Dow Jones Bond 


Nasdaq 


Nasdaq 


Quantum 

gSB* 

SonMics 

Mkndli 

McMoHd 

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CMoniHI 


W* HH 

74147 42ft 
44417 PM 
48814 4911 
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3MI4 P 
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32370 TO* 
31805 27M 
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30ft 30ft 
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lift T9 4 lft 
71 _71 -S 

47V* 47ft +ft 
44ft 45V* -+S 

46ft 44ft -ft 


20 Bands 
lOUKBira 
10 Industrials 


10X38 +0.17 

102.06 +0JM 

106J1 • +0J1 


_ Trading Activity 


yndnund 

TamuEia 

SSSBffi 

Dividends 

Company 


Nasdaq 


Market Sales 


NY5E 

Ann 

NcEdaq 

tnmBSom. 


Per Amt Rec Par Campair 


IRREGULAR 

BrttTeteentnm ' _IJBS5 .1-5 2-24 
hmsooGlab -2A47 11-18 12-19 

UbCftyA8-S , M 11-21 1-5 

LAartyAB-S . J2 11-21 1-5 

STOCK SPUT 
Blount Inti A&B 2 for 1 spnb 
Varco tnU2fbrl splk. 

Vkiam Group 3 far 2 split 

INCREASED 

Blount InU A. Q .1X25 12-15 1-2 

BJourflntlA Q. 13X2 12-15 1-2 

SPECIAL 

Gann Inc _ XO 11-30 11-28 


AMkmeeCorp 

EatefiV 

EatanVa 

EatanVan 

ForitaSea 

■Hnnfngton FdGrp 

Holtenn IncnSca 

Nation GM 
NuveenJaluiCo 
Prechdon Caotpait 
Regis Cap 
Tim tan CO 


1950 ISM 
MSI 5741 
54 97 

84 81 


415X4 56754 

2037 31.17 

50009 589J4 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


1 12-10 1-2 
1 11-17 11-21 
! 11-10 11-17 
1 11-17 11-28 
I M*25 12-15 
Hl-14 11-26 
ill-17 11-28 
111-17 11-27 
I 12-1 12-15 
i 12-5 1-2 

! 11-17 12-2 

1 11-21 12-8 


iManlMfe iMippsodnmte ammint per 
slMrt/Apift g -pupdift jg CttVCdhni hwdw 
BunoaOO/; q-qpnftrty , « wn n a mui oir. 


Stock Tables Explained 


Sates figures are unofficial. Yc 
current week, but not the latest 


highs and lows reflect Hie previous 52 weeks plus the 

ng day. Wherea splfiarstedc dvktend anrnumtm fa25 


slate only. Unless otherwise natal rates of dnii 
ttw latest ttedaratiofi. 

a -tfivWend also extra {«. p 


are annual (fisbwsements based an 


p - initial dividend annual rate unknown. 


b - tmnual rate of ifivWmid plus stods (Sv- WE- price-earnings ratio. 


Wend 

c - liquidating dividend. 

cc- PE exceeds 99. 

dd -called. 

d -new yearly lew. 

dd • loss In the last 12 months. 


q - dosed-end mutual fund 

W P° W in « 

months, phis stock dividend 

DMdend begins wHti date of 

spin. 

sli- sales. 


e- dividend dedared or paid In preceding 12 f-dTvfdend paid in stock in preceding 12 
months. months estimated cash value on a-dhr- 

f - annual rate. Increased on tost d«do- Wend arex-dEsfifevnon date, 
ratten. u- new yearty high. 

■g - (Svidend in Canmfian funds, subfect to v- trading halted. 

or re<riveBmp or being 

1-tMdmdedoredafterspm-uporstoek raorgarwed under the BanJuupicv Act a 
dividend securities nssinwri , 11 ^ 


i-djvidgiWpBMIl teyw 

noacfionkAendtatestiMdendmeefinB. wl-wTwnteued/ 

k ■ dividend dsdaed or pmd life yean 01 ww-wttti warrants. 
oocumulathK issue with dMdendsbimiean. x-ex-avIdandwex-riaWs. 

in - annual rate, reduced on last deCtera- xda-ex-disjrfbufion. 

Won. xw-wfthovTwatnntts. 

n-new Issue In the ml52 weeks. The high- y- w-divldttAd and sales la fun. 
tow rangehegbis whh llw start of IreUirvfl. yld -yield, 

nd- nest day defivsry. z-sales infuU. 


29ft **• 

30ft 3lK .13 

§ ss 

73ft 74ft. +*S 
sev* BOV* -IVs 

SIR *«* 

42 -lft 

mm 4* 

721* H + JM 

24V* 24ft 4ft 


92Vn 92ft +ft 
42V* 43ft -TVs 


How. 11, 1997 

Wall low Lteea Chge Optat 

Grains 

CORNCCBVn 

SOOO In nAdnnn- anti per tetoW 
D*c97 279% 275U 276ft 41*164573 

Mar 98 289T4 285Vi 206ft *1*110027 

May 98 295 291ft 292ft +ft 301X1 

MH 299 295 2M» +* 44300 

544)96 290ft 288W W** 4ft 4121 

Dec 98 290 288ft 2391* ondL 2&613 

JW99 302ft 299 299ft -lft 259 

EsL softs 711000 Mam laks 10US4 
Mon-s open tal384492, off 1,955 

SOYBEAN MEAUC80T1 
100 tons- doeanpw ton 

Dtc 97 24500 23U0 241 JO -490 41 JIB 
Jon 98 23800 22890 235L30 +6J0 2&247 
Mar 98 23440 22480 229.90 +530 22554 
MOV 98 229 JO 221 JO 22470 -520 17.933 
JW9B 229J0 22200 22470 +520 12058 
Aug98 22850 22200 22400 +550 IBM 
EsL «Ms 24000 Man Mrias 34814 
Mans open MU&949, off M3 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

40000 Ita- ants per tb 

Dec 97 2415 2554 2409 +<L46 44989 

JtW 98 2632 2575 2424 +4L43 31070 

Mw98 2652 2593 24X7 +041 14245 

Mar9B 26X0 2605 2452 +033 W29 

JalW 2445 2412 2454 +026 &492 

Aug 98 2445 2598 3635 +025 920 

Ext sales 14000 Mam iotas 1&5I1 
Mam open M 117,374 up 1,150 

'SOYBEANS KBOT7 
5000 Du mtomm- cent* perbusM 
No* 97 748 720ft 7371* +16 A5B4 

Jon 98 MB 721ft 737ft +1614 71,9X2 

Mar 98 749ft 724ft 739ft +15ft 25260 

Mn^fl 752 727ft 743ft +16 19,178 

J<d 98 753 731 745 +13ft 1U6I 

Eet sd esim o Mows aatau <31918 
Mam apwi biri5L991, off 91 8 

WHEAT ICBOT) 

5000 Da mtetonim- cents per biBhul 
Do* 97 3S3ft 349 349ft -ft 47X138 

Mar 98 368ft 3*5 SASH -ft 30245 

May98 376 371ft 373H +ft 4319 

JW98 379ft 374 377ft +ft 16754 

EsL tans 1&000 Mom sata 33.964 
Mom ep« taf 100453. off 54 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40000 l»^anU per lb. 

Due 97 67-00 6445 6457 -OLIO 34329 

PA 98 4900 66X2 6830 -0X0 31.101 

Apr98 7X47 72.15 7X25 -032 15876 

JwiSB 70X5 70.17 THUD -027 11J40 

Aug 90 70X5 70X0 70X5 -005 3X51 

00 91 7X30 7X10 7X10 -005 E20Q 

EsLsatas 11X02 Mam bum 101539 . 

Mm open M 97X01, ep 1 U 

FEEDEO CATTLE (CMER) 

91003 1)4- cents pw to. 

No* 97 783)0 77X0 77.77 4L27 3X70 

Jan 90 . 80X2 79X5 79X0 -027 7.123 

Mar 98 79.95 79X9 79X0 022 1875 

APT 98 79A5 79X2 77X0 -025 UB7 

May 98 80X5 8000 9015 -025 950 

A»g9S 8125 8125 8125 -025 412 

EsL sales 2297 Mom satas 3365 
Mom open WU975 off 257 

KOGS-LMa (CMER} 

XOONfes.- ants pern*, 

OK 97 4127 4082 61. H) 4UB 17X51 

Fob 91 61X0 61X0 61 JO -030 TL62V 

Apr 98 5BX5 58.17 5625 4J0 M19 

Jun 96 1465 65.10 ASXS 4MI7 3X50 

JIIJ98 6450 6392 64.10 -010 1255 

Eet ealeo 5X76 Mam sates 3890 
Mem open ha 39X09, on 404 

PORK BELLIES (CMER] 
ggroottn cwft per ft. 

Feb 98 61 .95 40J7 41.70 +045 4088 

Mar 98 4140 4010 4077 +0X5 942 

May 98 61.90 6140 41X0 +0X7 380 

Est sales 2213Man vm US 
Man open ltd 7420 op 85 


Food 

cocoa mesa 

10 ■»«»*** tan- s perm 

Dec 97 1434 1412 1431 +10 Ifni 

Mar 98 1477 1642 1446 +7 4X895 

May 98 1TO 1489 M92 +6 14447 

MW 1722 1717 1712 +4 fWO 

Sep 98 1737 1732 1732 +2 5X05 

DbcM 1759 1749- 1751 +2 3914 

Eel solas 17,700 Mam sates 1X074 
Mam open lot lOWd off 3809 

comscwsE) 

37 JIM ln> CEnbper fc. _ 

DeC 97 15023 1J1J0 15625 -040 7X73 

Mar 98 147.00 U2J» 146X5 +1-40 3Mf 
May vs lam isbjo i4X45 +ijo sms 
MW 13920 13050 138.90 +1 j 45 2M1 
Sep 98 10445 13150 13X45 +1.90 W4 

Esl Me* 8229 Man safes 10367 
Mom open tot 23874 off 943 

WGARWORLOli INCSE] 

UXOOO R».- cents per to. 

Mar 98 1224 1X19 1225 +117 1»35J 

mov « s ix» ixii 1222 +ai4 mm 

mw ixo5 1191 lira +an a«6 

Od 9B 1TW 1126 11-83 +0.07 . 22X23 

Esl. sates 14893 Mom «d«14Ji2 
Mom open W 30X851. np 993 


Low latest Cttg* Optat 

ORANCE JUICE CNCTN} 

153XM lbs.- cents per to. 

Jen 98 81X0 TJX 8125 +135 23185 
Mar 98 8420 80.90 8420 +320 11.927 

May 98 8720 8420 8720 +300 3225 

MW 9020 8725 9020 +320 1246 

Est salei NJL Mam Mbs 4505 
Mom open M 3X443 up 149 

- Metals 

COLD (NCMX] 

1 00 tray at- doOon par tow ex 
tor 97 31150 30920 30920 4120 1 

Dec 97 31X70 31050 31060 -050 107.937 

Jan 98 311.70 45 M 2 

FUiW 31470 31120 311.90 -050 34793 

Apr 98 31820 31380 31390 -0X0 7X64 

Jun 98 32050 31620 31620 4U0 11264 

Aug 98 32050 31X10 31X10 -0X0 4608 

OcfW 32020 4120 1X97 

D*c98 32350 32150 32X50 4U0 11249 

Eto. Rtes 44000 Mam toes 24747 
Mam open Hit 21X693 up 33236 

Ml GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

2&000 bx^ cents oar to. 
to* 97 9020 8920 89.10 -120 3180 

Dec 97 9125 89J0Q 89X0 -125 29221 

Jan W 9125 8775 8975 -1.T5 1218 

Feb 98 91X0 8920 8920 -1.10 128i 

Mar 98 9120 89X0 89.90 -12S 30555 

AprW 91X0 8920 8920 -1.10 1283 

May 98 9120 9010 9010 -090 3579 

Ml 98 91X0 9005 9005 -085 1234 

MW 91X0 9005 9025 -085 2X37 

EsL sates 8X00 Mam salea 1X919 
Mam open tot 65290 up 1X38 

SILVER (NCMX) 

3000 Iwy aeLr-caab par troy ar. 

Na*97 489.10 +4J0 19 

Dec 97 5(0X0 48450 .49020 +420 50X83 

Ml 98 49220 49050 49X30 +420 Z7 

Mar 98 307X0 «1J» 496.00 +410 28295 

MayM 509X0 49870 49820 +370 2,781 

MW 511X0 499X0 50050 +140 3793 

S«p 98 50250 +310 642 

Dec 98 50920 50420 50620 +420 3773 

EaL scles 19X00 Mom sates 7298 
Mem open U 94374 up 4021 

PLATINUM CNMER) 

50 toy ct- dtotan per irar oe. 

Jan 98 391X0 388X0 38920 +1.90 1X167 
AprW 388X0 38500 38520 +X90 1X19- 

M 98 38X80 +220 86 

EsL sates NJV. Mam sates 1.729 
Mam open H 11X71 off 390 

□bh Previous 

LONDON METALS OJAE) 

Daltart per mtortc Ian 
Ataw te w u (HtaCnnta) 

Spol 1 im, 1611ft 1596X0 1597X0 

Forward 1637X0 1639X0 1625X0 142400 

Copper Cathodes Oflgl Grade) 

Spot 1971ft 1972ft 1978ft 1979ft 

Farad 1990ft 1991X0 1994X0 1995X0 


577ft 578ft 580X0 

590ft 591X0 592ft 


Spa) 6275X0 6285X0 6195X0' , 

toman! 6355X0 6360X0 6280X0 , 

*»f 564020 5670X0 5650X0 

Rmmd 5636X0 5640X0 5630X0 

Zinc BpecM HM Grade) 

Spot 1178X0 1179X0 1148ft 

toward 120220 1203X0 1193ft 

High Lew date Chge 


5660X0 5670X0 5650X0 
5636X0 5640X0 5630X0 


Financial 

US T BILLS (CMER) 

81 mBbn-ptsoflOOpd. 

JtecW 9494 undt 4716 

M»W JLOl undL 3074 

Aj)W 9493 undi. 53} 

SWW «4W each. 23 

EsL sates NA Mem scriw 590 
Urn open tot 1 3345. up 76 

3 YR TREASURY CC80T) 

sioaooo wm- ms & ««tB nfioo pd 

Dec 97 10840 With. 229,237 

EsL sates NA. Mam tates 21,195 
Mom open M 244539. up 1171 

M YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

MQOJOO pito- pis & 32nds oflOOpd 
22S 33J-11 undi. 3«M9 

Ill'S “"*■ 3&3&7 

JttoW I WOO uncli. 109 

EsL sales N.& Mam total 2&X35 
Mom apw M 404126, off 379 

U5 TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

MpOEIO&QOQ-pts&SBwbeflOQKfi 

117-30 undi. 595203 
552 J’7-21 UMh. 120356 

JunW 1174» aneh. 10597 

116-31 Midi. 2X07 
EsL wdesNA Mows sates I5B412 
Mom ana bit 734688. off 11X94 

LXtKj GILT (UPFE) 

«MOO • pis & 32nds af TOO pd 

3I M3 "M* ”7-20 -0-23 1SX4U 
M»W 118-29 118-07 1184)7 -0-21 35.703 
ftoW N.T. N.T. 1104n -0-21 1BM71 
glsalei: %5B4. Piwr. nates; 24420 
Prav.opanint_- 189,171 up 799 

gERMWJCOV. BUND OJFFE) 

DMmooo-ptsaMoopd 

222 ISS ,0Lsa -°A3 349X00 

Mar?8 101.93 10150 101X9 -0X2 '1*732 
f* 3J176. Pro. solas.- 44190 
P**v. open InL: 2*3.732 ofl 4611 


Mgh Low Lotas] Chg* OpH 

ITAUAN GOVERNMENT BOW) OJFFE) 
m. 200 aMan - pts ollOO pd 
Dec 97 111X7 111-44 11453 +0X6 110943 
Mar 98 111 JO 111.68 11132 +0.07 4261 
Jun 98 N.T, N.T. 111J2 +0X7110203 

EsL sates: 11,713. Pm. sates: 17,711 
Prw. open tot.- lliZD off 118 

LIBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

SSmBtan- pis of 100 pd. 

Nor 97 9430 9431 MldL 3LS98 

Dec 97 9415 9414 undL 17229 

Jen W 9426 9428 and*. 4488 

EsL sates NA Mom sates 2477 
Mom open M 57X14 off 408 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 
SI n4Hon-pts aflOO pcL 


Nov 97 

Dec 97 9418 

MarW 9415 
Jun 98 9409 

Sep 98 940Z 

Dec 98 93.93 

Jan 99 
Sep 99 
Dec 99 
Mar 00 
JunOO 


9419 unch. 
9411 undi. , 
9414 undi.. 
9408 undL : 
*4(0 unch.: 
93.93 unch. : 
93X8 unch. 
93X4 undL 
9378 undL 
93-79 unch. 
9176 undL 


Est. sates NJL Mam sates 21141 1 
Mom open M 2X31,976. up 11X52 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

6&500 pound* 8 per pound 

DeeW 17060 14928 unch. 5*065 

MarW 1X858 unch. 627 

Jun 98 1-6780 undL 74 

EsL scdesKA. Mom sates 0839 

Morn Span Inf 54766, up 1247 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

lOftOOO doUen, iper C*L tor 

0*2 JI37 712* MldL 64437 

MnrW 7165 7155 undL 4529 

J»*W TIM unch. 806 

EsL sates NA. Mam sates 9X37 

Mam open tot 72745. oil 4352 

BERMAN MARX (CMER) 

1 24000 roorta. S per awrii 
DkW - 5912 -5841 undL 70780 

Mnr W -5896 undL 1299 

1 XmW JV21 mch. 2X59 

NA Mima sales 21770 
Mam open M84850 up T.115 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

‘ 5? Bon JEi S par 100 yen 

D*c97 X067 XOBO unch. 132.192 

-SJ2S vnOL ' x3f> 

Jan 98 4300 and*. 768 

Ed. sales NA. Mam sates 11808 
Mem open toll 31900 up 5X80 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

JSMt® tone* # par franc 
fcS -5“ andL 52,117 

‘ 72W u** 01 1715 

Jun91 .7354 undL 267 

“Jftes NA Mom sales 11.975 
Mom open tot 55310 Up 493 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

“i“"P“SS!fP«ri»so 

MW90 J,, “ DnCfl 1W46 

JU,IW . -10960 unch. 2X3S 

EsL sates NA Mom sate SMS 
Mam upon W3S3J2. up 741 

WJSJ™ STEIpJNO (UFFE) 

OOQC&l-mof lOOpd 

Dk97 9139 9Z3® 92J] -0X7 13»9to 

5S?W « 17 -ajW 

S2S S* S-K W.I5 -0.12 1013M 

JtoW 9279 92.22 92J5 — 4L14 75JSI 

ftec98 92J7 92.37 92J0 ^018 ItinS 

*f»W 92JB 92X7 n» ^ a tciS 

w” 9174 SS 

rnwr^uw' 4 ’ 7 

&W Jii i ^12 -?■««» 


High Law Latest Chga Opus 

SepW 9496 9492 9495 -0.03 44594 
DiCW 94.97 9492 9495 -004 57.779.' . 
Mar 99 9490 9447 9449 -0X3 21,238- 
Ed. latei! 41232. ton. sates; 10378 
Prw. open Iff: 505.273 up M 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (HCTN1 
50X00 Bis.- canto pern. 

Dec 97 7038 70.12 70.31 -040 39X02,, 

Mar 90 71.95 71.67 71X9 +032 3L5U 

MarW 7105 7370 7100 +044 1 1.503 

JdW 7400 7170 7175 *030 1QXM 

OdW 75X3 7490 75X3 +040 833 

Ed. sates N A Mam odes 34917 
Mom open Iff 9485* up 869 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

42X00 gat cents per gal If 

Dec 97 5015 57 JO 5742 <054 53799 

Jan 98 5095 5005 5060 -048 24BM 1% 

FabW 59.05 5060 5080 +048 11867' 

M«W 5873 57 JQ 5010 ,0X3 9.4SL 

AprW 56X5 5630 5645 +043 W95 

May 98 5575 55.10 5520 + 0.10 1851- - 

JunW 5470 5460 5470 + 0X3 2.939- 

Ed. sates NA Mam sates 31402 
Mom open Id 124492. off 204 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) ' 

1X00 bM.- OaOuts per bbL 
Det97 20X3 2036 2041 +ail 7473T 

Jan98 20X1 20X8 2071 +011 72.184 

R*w aara 20 x 3 20.72 +010 34720- 

MwW 20.73 20X7 2045 +008 22X14 

fpW VOM 30X0 30.55 +006 WX«’ , 

Mayw 20X7 20X0 20X6 +0X6 19,277' 

EsL safes NA Mom ides 18,650 1 

Mem apaa M 400345, ofl 9,098 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) - ^ 

HUHO m Mtrs, s per mai blu 
2^2 2-51® 1345 1X00 +0.067 51789. 

SiS J 340 3X»+00S» 

1015 1X80+0027 24666' 

MarW II 50 2X50 2690 +0005 17J14 

AprW 2370 1335 2J60 undi IL 122 

May W 2770 2740 2780 + 0 X 10 Wilt 
EsL UtasNA Mam sates 54X79 . . 

Mte« open M 235X16. up 1109 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

43X00 gob cents par gal 

S ' 65 WW -0.12 32447 

Jan 98 5970 58.90 5972 - 01 ) 14352 

Ml* 98 60J0 59.90 60.05 -007 4l5te 

Apr 98 6245 62X0 62X5 + 0 X 1 6 J« 

6130 +0.06 5X60 

•NM* 61.70 +106 4665 

■"98 6075 +0.06 3413 

Ed. sates NA Mam sates 1 SL 349 
Mom open Iff 93X39, off 1441 

GASOIL UPE) 

■ W* WWO »tw 

NW97 179X0 17853 17900 -gjn 20322 

elfa? Sf* 32^? 18000 lh * h - 31301 

321-SS 35S 35 ,B0 - 50 Unclv , 4■ 34, ' 

toh9B 18000 179.75 180 00 <125 10X37 ''v. 

MarW 177.73 177X0 17775 -iS 426T' V 

WO 17575 17100 1B7S US 1643 17 

May 98 17125 172.75 17275 -«0 LW ; 
Ed. sates: 3R733 Pff* sates : 240W J 

Pn*. open tov .103X99 up 34S9 ' j 

,ra. M P,NlgS^*« ' 

250 strides 

S**™ X®- 80 W 3 40 936X0 1 070 3)91422 
M«W Ml 40 93370 933X0 -)X0 1*711* 

945.70 undi 4I22 v 

Ed. »te» n A Mens ten 103,444 

Mam Qoav Ini 400835. off 7,11V . - j 

Ptt*18U(UFM| ISi- 

mperMMDdiii ■* I 

M^es 2^S 1K2-S *M0 44147- K 

MAT98 48710 48710 48650 1 145 7.170 
Ed. utas 4554 Pipy m, DJQ+ ; 

Prev.apenini 21537 pH an 1 ! 




SI IS IS SSr«««*«ctamttota> ta o 


jib as oc» ■*» i, « zr-r: su'sr: 

95X5 -0X1 282311 
“0X1 202398 

MOT99 9113 95X9 «?l ^01 1WX3? 

g?".. 0483 MJQ UndL 77.330 

jfl J\ML Pm. ■wfr 97,776 

Paw. open InL; 1794519 ofl lya 

m*i !G3JU? u S? uaiA tUPPE) 

m.lni«lan.piioM 00 pei 


Commodliy Indaxw 


Moody's 
Reuters 
D.J. Futures 
CRB 


1.51430 IJL\» -» 

1-811.7*1 1X15X? . 


iJSEES ^ 4 WnOOW/ , !rr«i Lnatu. 


For INVESTMENT INFORMATION 
Read THE MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday in the 








0| i As British Inflation Rises, Blair Warns of EMU Risk 


C.<*r<Ml*ntor SL # hniltlDufvb ^ 

LONDON — Inflation rose 10 a 
wo-yar high ,n Britain in October, 
the Office for Nations] Statistics 
said Tuesday sparking new debate 
on whether the central bank will 
again raise interest rates. 

Prime Minister Tony Blair 
meanwhile, said Britain would risk a 
1 urther bout of inflation followed bv 
a long recession if it joined the Euro- 
pean common currency at its 
planned Jan. 1, 1999. outset. 

In a speech to business leaders. 
Mr. Blair said early entry into the 


common currency, the euro, would 
* ‘imply a massive monetary relax- 
ation" and entail a risk of setting off 
"a short-lived inflationary boom 
that would then require a long peri- 
od of recession to overcome.” 

The prime minister was referring 
to the fact that the key German in- 
terest rate, the benchmark rate on the 
Continent, is 3.30 percent, while the 
corresponding rale in Britain is 7.25 
percent. British rates would have to 
fall sharply if the pound were to ester 
a European monetary union in 1999. 

Mr. Blair also said Loudon would 


push for changes in the European 
labor market. 

“We must become Europe’s re- 
formers.” he said. 

The statistics office said retail 
prices edged up 0.1 percent in Oc- 
tober. raising the 12-month inflation 
rate to 3.7 percent, the highest since 
September 1995. 

Underlying inflation, which ex- 
cludes home-mongage payments, 
reached a 2.8 percent annual rare, up 
from a 2.7 percent rate in September. 
The government has set a target for 
underlying inflation of 2.5 percent. 


The Bank of England raised its 
key interest rate a quarter of a per- 
centage point last week, saying in- 
flation otherwise would remain 
above acceptable levels. 

The October inflation repun dis- 
mayed financial markets, as many 
traders said rates would have to rise 
again. Gavyn Davies, chief econ- 
omist at Goldman, Sachs & Co., 
said base rates might have to rise as 
high as 8 percent for the govern- 
ment’s inflation target to be met 
But some economists said the Oc- 
tober data were not necessarily so 


4 


Prodi Throws a Punch in Fight Over Head ofEU Bank 


<'** t 1 *" Pa PM hr, 

ROME — Prime Minister Ro- 
mano Prodi expressed clear hos- 
tility to the candidacy of Wim 
Duisenberg as the first head of the 
iuture European central bank on 
Tuesday and added that he pre- 
ferred Hans Tietmeyer. president 
of the Bundesbank. For the posL 

Condemning what he termed ob- 
jectionable remarks by Mr. Duis- 
eoberg about Italy's economic per- 
formance, Mr. Prodi told the daily 
newspaper II Messagero that Italy 
had “been right” to oppose him as 
a candidate for head of the new 
central bank. Mr. Duisenberg is 
head of the European Monetary 


Institute, the forerunner of the cen- 
tral bank. 

Mr. Prodi 's comments were the 
latest volley in a widening dispute 
over who should preside over the 
European central bank and oversee 
the introduction of the single Euro- 
pean currency, the euro, in 1999. 
The post will be awarded in May, 
around the time die countries that 
will join the euro at its inception 
will be chosen. 

France caused an uproar last 
week by putting forward the gov- 
ernor of France's central bank, 
Jean-CIaude Trichet. Until then 
Mr. Duisenberg, a Dutch banker 
who was believed to have die back- 


ing of Germany and broad support 
from leaders of European Union 
countries, was seen as almost cer- 
tain to be appointed. 

The Dutch foreign minister. 
Hans van Mierlo. was quoted Tues- 
day as saying his government was 
willing to compromise with France 
over who should head die bank 

* ‘One should not reject compro- 
mise, provided it is rational,” the 
newspaper Het Financieeie 
Dagblad quoted him as saying. 

Italy’s treasury minister. Carlo 
AzegUo Ciampi. said over the 
weekend that Mr. Tietmeyer, head 
of Germany’s central bank, would 
be an “optimal choice.” 


Mr. Prodi said he would “cer- 
tainly ” prefer to see Mr. Tietmeyer 
in the new job, adding, “We did 
absolutely the right thing in block- 
ing the path to Duisenberg.” 

He said that Mr. Duisenberg 
“lacks style” and had expressed 
“unacceptable, derogatory judg- 
ments” of the Italian economy, in 
contrast to Mr. Tietmeyer. 

“There was a time when lop 
bankers were severe in their judg- 
ment of Italy.” Mr. Prodi said. 

* ‘Tietmeyer expressed concern but 
in a well-argued fashion. Duisen- 
berg preferred to be derogatory, 
and this is not acceptable.” 

(AFP. Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


grim, given declines of 0.2 percent 
in prices of household goods and 
clothing and footwear. 

“The numbers arc disappointing 
but no! disastrous/ ’ Jonathan 
Loynes of HSBC Markets said. 

“In particular, the fall in clothing 
and footwear inflation will ease any 
fears that consumers are becoming 
less sensitive to price.” 

The benchmark FT-SE 100 stock 
index Finished down 13.10 points at 
4.793.70. Concerns over higher in- 
terest rates sent bonds sharply lower, 
raising the yield on the benchmark 
1 0-year government gilt to 6.66 per- 
cent from 6.5S percent Monday. 

Despite concerns about inflation. 
Mr. Blair said. “It is important for 
Britain that the single cuirency suc- 
ceeds, whether we are in or out.” 

He reiterated the government's 
policy that joining the single cur- 
rency during the five-year term of 
the current Parliament was unreal- 
istic because of the associated eco- 
nomic risks, arguing that the British 
economy was too near the peak of its 
cycle to take risks. 

“If the economic benefits are 
clear and unambiguous in favor of 
going in, we want Britain to be pan 
of a successful single currency.” he 
told executives at the Confederation 
of British Industry's annual con- 
ference in Birmingham. England, 
via a video link, “and we warn busi- 
ness to prepare for that eventuality 
and make a practical reality' of it as 
only business can.” 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Gazprom Postpones 
Bond Issue Until '98 

Reuters 

t MOSCOW — The Russian nat- 
' urai gas monopoly Gazprom said 
Tuesday that h would delay until the 
first quarter of next year a bond issue 
worth S 1 billion to $3 billion planned 
for this month. 

■ ‘The delay is due to instability on 
international financial markets,” 
Gazprom said, adding that it expected 
an international audit of its gas re- 
serves to be finished by year’s end. 


U.K. Watchdog Turns Aside Complaints Over ‘Girl Power’ Ads 


Reuters 

LONDON — An advertising-in- 
dustry watchdog agency warned 
Tuesday against suggestive images 
invoking violence, saying the rise of 
so-called Girl Power had sparked a 
spate of commercials showing men 
being demeaned by women. 

The Advertising Standards Au- 
thority cited three recent ads in the 
“Girl Power” genre that it had said 
drawn complaints for being offen- 
sive. sexist, sadistic and Seely to 
condone violence. But the agency's 


report rejected the complaints 
against the two ads it had inves- 
tigated and said it did not find that 
they had violated any codes. 

“When the next generation of 
historians reflects on the buzzwords 
of the 1 990s, it is safe to assume that 
’Girl Power' will feature prominent- 
ly in the hit list,” the agency said in 
its monthly report. 

“Inevitably, some advertisers 
seem to have tried to capture the 
essence of this phenomenon either 
by portraying men being demeaned 


by women or by portraying women 
playing on their desirability to, and 
power over, men,” the agency said. 

A poster ad for Lee jeans titled 
“Put the Boot In'* showed a woman 
wearing stiletto heels with her toe 
resting on the buttocks of a nude 
man. The authority' said the ad had 
drawn 77 complaints calling it of- 
fensive or saying it appeared to con- 
done violence. 

Another poster, for the Nissan Mi- 
cra car, featured a picture of a man 
holding his crotch. The advertise- 


ment, which drew 14 complaints, 
had the text: “The Micro. Ask before 
you borrow it." 

The agency said the humor in the 
ads was largely “slapstick” and 
was “unlikely to cause serious or 
widespread offense or be seen to 
condone violence.” 

But it warned that “the objections 
do serve as a reminder that sugges- 
tions of violence in advertisements 
tend not to find favor with the public, 
whatever the ‘victim’s* gender and 
however humorous the intention." 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 



J J A 
1997 


Paris 

Index CAC40 

3250 
3100 
2350 
2500 
r 650 
SOD 



Exchange 

Amsterdam A EX 


SON 

Tuesday 

Close 

855.74 


j J A SON 

1997 

Prev. % 
Close Change] 

857.04 -Q.t5 


Brvsseb 

BEL-20 

Closed 

2,200.80 

Unch, 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3,731.08 

3.752.33 

-0.57 

Copenhagen 

Slock Marke t 

612.99 

611.05 

+0.32 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

3,437.10 

3.483.73 

-1.34 

O&io 

OBX 

68&53 

690.74 

-0.32 

London 

FTSE 100 

4,793.70 

4,806.80 

-0.27 


Stock Exchange 

547.16 

551.83 

-0^5 

Milan 

MJBTEL 

14817 

14817 

Uncti. 

Paris 

CAC40 


2.699.71 

Unch. 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

3,124.41 

3.155.57 

-0.99 

Vienna 

ATX 

1^58.63 

1^73.60 

-1.18 

Zurich 

SR 

3,478.71 

3,467.31 

+0.33 


Source: Tetekurs 


InU'nuli'Mul H.'i4kl fnKmc 


Very briefly: 


• Germany’s tax revenue will fail 17.3 billion Deutsche 
marks (S 1 0. 1 5 billion) short of the figure officially forecast for 
this year. Finance Minister Theo Waigel said. But Bonn will 
still be able to limit its deficit to 3 percent of gross domestic 
product this year, he said. 

• Allied Domecq PLC’s net profit for the year ended Aug. 3 1 
rose 18 percent, to £406 million (S684.9 million 1 . The com- 
pany said it was looking at combinations with other liquor 
companies to counter the merger of Guinness PLC with 
Grand Metropolitan PLC, but it declined to comment on 
speculation that it was talking with Seagram Co.. 

• Union Bank of Norway, the country's ihird-lareest bank, 
said it would not bid for Fokus Bank ASA because a group of 
savings banks said it would refuse to sell its Fokus shares. 

• Airbus Industrie hopes to sell 60 planes valued at S2.7 
billion to Brazilian airlines in the next five years as part of a 
plan to bolster its business in Latin America. 

• Dallah Real Estate & Tourism Co.. Saudi Arabia's biggest 
private company, plans to invest 5 billion rivals ($1 .33 billion) 
in tourist and residential projects in the kingdom, according to 
Arab News. 

• Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Israel’s largest 

dnigmaker. said third-quarter net income was S35.8 million, 
up 50 percent from a year earlier, driven by sales of generic 
drags in the United Slates. Biotmbcrf;. Reuters. afp. afx 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Tuesday, Nov. 11 

Prices in local currencies. 
Tetekurs 



High 

Low 

auM 

Prev. 

Amsterdam 

AEXtadacBSS.74 



Previous: 857.84 

ABN-AMRO 

37 JO 

37 JO 

37 J0 

3730 

Aegon 

1SSJ0 

15X10 

I54J0 

15640 

Ahold 

49 JO 

4830 

4960 

4960 

AkroNotet 

32730 

32130 

327 JO 

325.10 

Bofa Weiscva 

3060 

30 

3030 

3860 

CSMcva 

88.40 

87J0 

8810 

87.V0 

Cwdfcche Pel 

101.10 

9960 

100.10 

10130 

DSM 

ITS. 70 

17X80 

17620 

17430 

Elsevier 

XLBQ 

3060 

3060 

MJ0 

Fartrs Amev 

76 

7430 

7560 

7SJ0 


49 JO 

68.70 

6960 

6960 


5LB0 

40.70 

4X70 


Hooerneyer 

8X20 

319.90 

80.80 

317 

82 

31860 

HcoarvetBcva 
-1 uni Douglas 

8960 

82 

87.90 
79 JO 

8880 

7930 

8850 

8230 

NG Group 

B160 

8020 

8130 

HI 

aM 

7260 

7030 

7130 

69.90 

iNPBT 

45 JO 

45 

44J0 

4530 

:PN 

7640 

7X20 

7X60 

74 


56 JO 

Si40 

5630 

46 


S5JW 

5680 

5560 

5430 


217 

71X40 

21360 

216 

’hlipr Elec 

I4L30 

144J0 

14830 

149 JO 

■olya ram 

109 

105.10 

10730 

105.10 

ri?J0 

7730 

78 

79 


177.10 

17460 

177.10 

1/7.70 


57 

S630 

47 

4630 


171 JO 

171.10 

171.10 

I723U 

brenta 
fcyal Duteh 

1 IB 

Ktijo 

110 

11730 
99 JO 
10840 

118 
100 JO 
10960 

118 

10160 

10960 


102.10 

101 

10160 

102 

TIU 

44 30 

44J0 

46.10 

4530 

taden Klora 

340.90 

23860 

23830 

242 


Bangkok 

dvIntoSvc 

oiMjkr* Bk F 
rang Thai Bk 
TT Exptor 
ton Ccmonl F 
wnComBkF 
deemnosa 
iMl Airways 
hoi Form Bk F 
Id Comm 


SET ME 467 JM 
Preview: 487 J4 

220 
165 
16.75 
400 
407 
93 
2150 
52 
126 
67 


218 

. 208 

208 

163 

144 

146 

19.25 

18 

18 

402 

402 

402 

398 

382 

382 

93 

8550 

86 

23J5 

21 J5 

2135 

52 

49.75 

4975 

119 

9830 

9930 

66 

63 

65 


iombay 

oto Auto 
imwsl Lever 
tndvsl PcSVn 
KlDevBk 

tc 

rahanogorTei 
cfconcelnd 
•ale Bn Indio 
eel Authority 
ita Eng Loco 


Se««3#ta*scJ7»AB 
Pmwom: 3721 AS 

574 564 56425 564.75 

1355 1338 1339J5 133925 
480 473 47SJS *0 

99 95.75 97 96.75 

569.50 S62J0 564 561.25 

234 224J5 231 30 22150 
17715 17430 17430 17473 
7t3 257 J® 259 257.50 
1425 1130 13.75 14 

34150 B5J0 337.25 33450 


Markets Closed 

The stock markets in B nis- 
eis and Paris were closed 
'uesday for a holiday. 



rankfurt 


YIBB 

154 

thorn 

25030 

kaiu Hdg 

38730 

tana 

128 

■ Benin 

4130 

ASF 

57 

jyor HrpoBk 

7330 

n.Vncmsboi* 10160 

JW 

5930 

wdort 

7530 

-•wag 

3960 

Y1\V 

1208 

LAGCokma 

147 

anmciibunk 

4030 

amtof Beni 

111.60 

ewtsa 

77 30 

eutsclieBanh 

11230 

ruMeickom 

32.75 

resdnet Bonk 

70 30 

ramus 

283 

e sen me Med 

121 

Rd Frapp 

J90 

.he 

95 

ndrlbg Imt 

139 

..raker pta 

9530 

EVY 

NT 

SCWJH 

73 


69 

irsnoi 

563 

atmorcr 

7630 

ndf 

1055 

•fltona p 

3030 

.AN 

520 

arvtntnmn 

783 

etaOuFseHschBR 3645 

•4m 

jftjfl 

ITCH Rueck R 

408 50 

■iv.sag 

461 

«E 

7530 


DA* £31 -M 

Previous: 375U3 

150 1® »*£ 

249.50 29180 252.® 

385 38730 388 

125 1 26J0 124 

A 70 40.80 4IA0 
5dJ0 5650 5745 
wS 72.95 7145 
100 70 10090 10UO 
5H.95 St 59-* 
n n 7150 
39 39.10 39.10 
II* 1200 1215 

141.50 147 144 

60.20 6030 6JL50 

llS* 111 JO 11050 
76JO 7650 77.10 
HMD 1 11*0 11060 

S3 x 

in 

V120 9470 95 

n 72 ai ti.bo 

68 £SJ0 

543 5S9 

7130 76 99 
it to 1055 1051 
3010 3050 30® 
51 5 S, 4 4? ™ 

770 771 «6 

3JW 

7150 76J0 
504 50780 503 

458 458 _ 

74 to 75 7535 


9310 

N.T. 


555 

75 

1035 


SAP pfd 
Schertnu 
SGL Carbon 


Springer (Axed 

Suedzudwr 

T h|fS4 eq 

VEW 

vSswn 


High 

Low 

dose 

Prev. 


508 50880 

508 

17130 

16800 

17030 

170 

23X20 

273 

228 

232 

10190 

10260 

102.90 10465 

1340 

1340 

1320 

1340 

870 

865 

866 

880 

430 42633 

427 42830 

9630 

9630 

9690 

9760 

563 

555 

563 

565 


Sank Scotland 
Bkiedrde 
BOC Group 
Boob 
BPS Ind 
BrtAaosp 
Brfl Airways 
SG 

Bril Land 
BritPeffm 


843 831 JO 838.50 849.50 
980 966 969 JO 997 JO 


Bril 
BrS Telecom 
BTR 

Burraoh Cartel 
Burton Gp 


Helsinki 

Enar A 
Hutitaroaki I 


HEX GeaciU Ms 307.10 
Previous: M8X73 


Kesko 
MertoA 
Metro B 
Mebo-5efta B 

N«*J 
Nokia A 
Orion- Yblymoe 
Outokumpu A 
U PM Kyiri merer 
VrWnri 


48 47 JO 
216 212 
5350 5250 
7250 71 

7A3Q 2550 
136 131 

4440 46 

123 

445 

205 20X30 
7750 7660 
119 115L5S 
78 7550 


125 

452 


47.00 48.10 
212 ZIS 
5250 54 

7250 73 

2620 2520 
136 136 

44.10 * 46 
123 124 

448 460 

20750 203 

76.60 77 JO 
118L30 118.10 
7550 78 


CodbMySdw 

Carton Cram 
Cdfluri Union 


Hong Kong 

Amoy Praps * 465 

Bk East Asia 1620 

Cathay Pacific 755 

Cheung Kong SOTS 

CKInfrostrua 17T5 

Odno Light 37 JO 

CfflcPocifc 3170 

OaaHena Bk 1L3S 

FWPoafic 5J0 

Hang Lung Dev 10.60 

HawSengBk 65J0 

Henderson Inv 435 

Henderson Ld 39 JO 

HKChtaaGas ' 
HK Electric 
HK Telecomm 


Hot Seng: 10004J2 
Provisos: 9992J4 


Hoomve* Hdgs 
HSBC Hd 


1345 
26X0 
1460 
2JJ8 

... . Idgs 178J0 
HutctocnWh 5075 
Hyson Dev 15J0 
Johnson El Hdg 20.10 

tewlffloev 2S40 
Oriental Press 1.96 
Peari Oriental 0LS3 
SHKPrcn*. ,53 

Shim Tax Hdgs 2.73 
Stno Land Co. 4J5 
SttiChJnoPnsI 560 
5wirePacA 39.30 
Wharf Hdgs 1565 
WheetadT 8.45 


630 660 

1610 1620 
735 735 

4860 4830 
1720 17 JO 
3530 3670 
3160 32 

1760 18.10 
460 697 

1060 I860 
4250 6175 
610 610 
3760 38.10 
1105 1305 
2615 2530 
1605 1635 
7 202 

174 1765P 
4850 4950 
1540 1560 
19.90 19.90 
1360 13J0 
7195 2615 
1.90 1.95 


069 

50L50 

260 

462 

645 

3850 

1435 

610 


0J1 

51 

2.70 

650 

560 

39 

15 

830 


630 

1695 

750 

49.10 
1730 
3640 
3130 

18.10 
635 
1040 
6435 

605 

3830 

1330 

25 

14 

2JJ2 

174 

49.10 

164S 

TD 

1360 

2435 

1.90 

051 

5125 

258. 

650 

655 

3860 

1675 

8.05 


II Group 

Energy Group 
Enterprise OB 
Fom Colonial 
GcrftAcdderd 
GEC 
GKN 

GksBWeflante 

GronadaGp 
Grand Mel 
GEE 

GteenafaGp 

Gr*vw*s 

GUS 

Hors 

HSBC HUBS 

K3 

ImpJ Tobacco 
WSfcher 
Urdbroke 
Land Sac 
Lnsmo 

Legrt GerdGrp 
UoydsTSBGp 
Lucas Verity 

Mercury Asset 
NtfaralGrid 
No* Ptnwr 

Nfltwesi 

Ned 

Navrtdi Union 
Orange 
P&O 


PBdnqta 

PcwerGco 

Premier Farnefl 

Prudential 

RatoacfcGp 

Ronk Group 

ReddffCdo 


Jakarta 

Asha Ml 
Bk Infl hidan 
Bk Negara 
among Grom 
bidocameat 
tadofood 
inddsat 

SampoemaHM 
Semen Groslk 
Telekom unftasi 


Composite ladto: 448.16 
FMwttlf 


725 

700 


2350 

2175 

2225 

750 

700 

700 

725 

700 

725 

9300 

8325 

B400 

1750 

1650 

1650 

2900 

2650 

Z700 

8150 

8050 

8125 

5650 

5350 

5350 

3675 

3625 

3650 

3075 

2975 

2975 


Johannesburg *^*32*2^1 


ABSA Group . 

AngtoAmCool 

S3S8SSS 

sssssa 

AVMIN 
Boriow 
CG. Smith 
Be Beers 

Dftetonteln 

FstNoHBk 

Genenr 

GFSA 

Imperial Hto 

IngvroCod 

Iscor 

Johmtobd 

LibeftyHdgs 

MlnmcD 

Nampok 

Neddor 

RembrariOIGp 

Richemont. 

SA Breweries 
Samancor 
Sosol 
5fiJC 

Tiger Dots 


3160 2935 31.30 29J0 
270 264 770 263 

204 20230 203 203 

212 218 214 

145 145 144 

7BJD 7760 78 78-20 

831 836 83S 830 

4830 4755 47.75 48 

2230 21 JO 21 » D 
111 10930 10960 10960 
31 3135 313S 

41 41 41 

«. 9 935 965 

78 7670 7670 77 

6130 M II « 
2035 20 20.10 20 

164 LSI 2J9 2J0 

58 55 57 5460 

335 335 335 330 

12760 12640 12560 124 

1060 16 1610 M 

91 8930 90 8960 

1610 1635 16 1655 

109 10640 10860 IN 
42 4)50 41.60 40.95 
5650 5470 55 5610 

12660 JM IM 125 
34 33J0 33 34 

5930 5730 57 W 5830 
216 21120 216 213 

7DJD 67-80 49 4760 


215 

14620 


31 JO 
43 
960 


ReadtnS 

RzntaUMSel 

Reuters Hdgs 

R®nm 

RTZrog 

RMC&oup 

Rafts Royce 

Royal Bk Scat 

RajolS Sun A0 

SCOTWDT 

Satasbury 

Schradere 

SajINewarsSe 

Sort P —r 

Searrtcor 

Severn Trent 

ShefTranspR 

Slefce 

Smith Nephew 
5mlH(Bne 
Smiths Ind 
Sttm Eke 
Stoflecooch 
Stand ante 
Tute&Lyle 
Tesco 

Thmnes Wrier 

3) Grow 

TIGraua 

Tomkins 

Unlever 

UtdAssaana 

UldNewx 

UtdUtOries 

Vendamv Lxuts 

Vodafone 

Whitbread 

wnfams Hdgs 


WPP Group 
Zeneca 


High 

Low 

Oow 

Prev. 

438 

676 

431 

498 

362 

363 

352 

160 

935 

968 

,9.79 

938 

860 

850 

836 

862 

X29 

125 

338 

137 

17iU 

1655 

1639 

.1681 

5.96 

883 

5JM 

490 

263 

260 

262 

262 

ArfZl 

666 

652 

452 

838 

824 

832 

833 

4JB 

414 

427 

433 

12 

146 

168 

150 

467 

454 

455 

464 

2JS 

1.98 

ZOl 

231 

10J0 

9.77 

9.91 

1033 

133 

130 

132 

139 

691 

420 

434 

432 

SL99 

535 

5.93 

5J0 

480 

465 

476 

4X1 

827 

8 

807 

335 

657 

&JD- 

454 

653 

197 

238 

192 

191 

734 

630 

630 

738 

rats 643 

433 

434 

465 

X 15 

692 

511 

5 

622 

615 

621 

621 

653 

634 

635 

446 

133 

139 

160 

162 

. 937 

962 

9.72 

935 

XJ1 

177 

337 

IBB 

1107 

1192 

1106 

1119 

1X75 

1X2S 

1235 

1X74 

823 

8 

Lll 

824 

560 

562 

537 

542 

110 

3 

X05 

114 

171 

157 

161 

157 

360 

561 

567 

542 

699 

660 

681 

682 

730 

7.11 

7JB 

733 

1618 

1X25 

1X34 

1165 

839 

165 

868 

130 

178 

X76 

174 

374 

B3S 

811 

832 

835 

272 

269 

171 

272 

10 

920 

9.91 

932 

278 

X72 

276 

172 

693 

631 

687 

493 

734 

730 

730 

745 

204 

1J9 

101 

107 

574 

531 

569 

570 

534 

5.18 

511 

530 

1198 

1X28 

1237 

1X89 

X92 

234 

1W 

237 

525 

536 

516 

504 

L75 

828 

L7S 

854 

760 

730 

7J7 

7J3 

164 

339 

360 

360 

267 

260 

265 

142 

697 

678 

695 

483 

732 

77t 

7X1 

735 

136 

133 

tJ6 

1JS 

7.18 

635 

7.15 

650 

643 

430 

636 

445 

655 

632 

449 

640 

9J5 

928 

9.40 

947 

169 

336 

343 

150 

865 

815 

839 

845 

337 

129 

332 

331 

590- 

575 

534 

580 

266 

133 

137 

262 

639 

621 

65 

637 

US 

195 

■ .1 

2J8 

771 

735 

Ez3 

760 

9.02 

696 

897 

905 

231 

X12 

219 

XU 

665 

660 

633 

638 

5.73 

565 

563 

571 

4 

183 

X92 

195 

69S 

684 

434 

439 

17.14 

1470 

1490 

17 

667 

658 

662 

664 

442 

405 

605 

635 

188 

232 

187 

177 

870 

830 

850 

862 

413 

353 

405 

412 

1130 

11 

1131 

1140 

1.75 

173 

1.74 

174 

564 

488 

531 

634 

846 

822 

830 

867 

470 

650 

4S2 

654 

762 

7J3 

760 

7J7 

645 

621 

428 

636 

465 

462 

464 

465 

' 6B 

464 

448 

465 

871 

827 

857 

860 

672 

465 

468 

469 

562 

615 

829 

535 

X04 

193 

331 

3 

664 

433 

43 

461 

4tt 

490 

438 

497 

733 

7.17 

735 

736 

XIV 

732 

7.15 

7.13 

3J9 

151 

151 

158 

143 

X32 

142 

3J2 

803 

7J0 

7.91 

7J4 

165 

ISO 

161 

157 

620 

490 

5 

516 

Z9> 

238 

2.90 

232 

1814 

1776 

1738 

1834 


Wgh Law dose Prev. 


High Law Close Prev. 


High Lew Close Prev. 


Kuala Lumpur 


Cfltnp»sfl«:CTi« 

pieman: 48932 


AMMBHdgs 

Genttng 

Mcdlnfl 5tnpF 
PetronasGas 
Prrton , 
PubScBk 

Resells Vltortd 

Rothmans PM 

5hneDartnr. 

Tetekort/W 

TenMO 

liMEngmven 

YTL 


London 

Ah bay Natl 
Akea Domecq 
AtSban Water 

Sx 

BAA 
Bodays 
Bos* ^ 

BAT tad 


670 

9.25 

I1B0 

660 

9.65 

735 

124 

106 

695 

28 

686 

975 

615 

7.90 

198 


655 
9.10 
1110 
625 
9J0 
735 
232 
3 
535 
27 JO 
674 

9J0 

730 

730 

388 


565 560 
9.T5 930 

1110 11® 

630 635 

960 930 

785 780 

2 32 125 

l 

585 675 

78 2735 
676 486 

9 JO 9J5 
8 7.65 

730 785 

19? 198 


Madrid 

Acerimi 

ACESA 

A jMOsBnc qton 

ArgenJorio 

88V 

Banedo 

BankMer 

Bco Cento Hfep 

Bco Fopukr. 

Bco Saramider 

CEPSA 

CaCtoiento 

Cc^j Mapfre 

Endesa 

FKSA 

GasNafunk 

Ibenfrolo 

ftyca 

Repsol 

SevflanaElec 
Tobaaitora 
Tefefomco 
UnonFraosa 
Valenc Cemeri 


otaaiwki:547Jt 

Pimfe»5SU3 


20500 20000 
1875 1825 
2800 5610 
8740 8430 

3792 3700 
1310 1280 
4900 6750 
2550 2495 
85W 8070 
3940 3800 

4275 450 
2485 2640 
6650 6430 
2435 2595 
1120 1095 
4370 4050 

17*5 1730 
2195 2105 
6170 6130 
1310 1290 
10750 10330 
3955 3830 

1390 1370 
2835 2810 


20190 20530 
1855 1845 
5730 5780 
86U 8710 
3745 3815 
128S 1310 
4810 4870 
2530 2540 
8300 USD 
3940 3880 

4275 4275 
8480 2745 
6«0 4430 

2630 2420 
1120 11115 
6100 4280 
1745 ITS 
2125 2205 
4170 6180 
1300 1305 
10480 10630 
3900 3985 
1385 1395 
2835 2M 


FT-SE 100: <793.70 
pievkn; 488680 

»tt 9J8 981 967 

60S 4W 507 681 

7 n 763 7.o2 7.75 

*id 650 4.40 651 

m 140 IS 

513 608 S.17 602 

S75 502 514 5.19 

1531 1690 ISM 15» 

gy> 602 838 834 

IS i£s 5J5 5.41 


Manila 


Ayota 

awn 

CAP Homes 
MonrioEkcA 
Metro Bonk 
Perron 
PCI Bonk 
Phil Long ftsf 
Son ASiguelB 
SM Prime Hdg 



PSEHn-114238 


Previous: 18S137 

1X75 

1175 

122S 

13.50 

1150 

13 

1335 

1150 

96 

9430 

9S 

96JO 

230 

24! 

244 

260 

6650 

6550 

6650 

6530 

26S 

260 26230 

260 

15S 

143 

350 

150 

146 

134 

140 

136 

ITS 

8S0 

850 

815 

SO 

4830 

50 

4850 

620 

6 

620 

530 


Mexico 


A0O A 
BanacdB 
CemsaCPO 
ChraC 

Etnp Modema 
Ggo Corse Al 
GpoFBcoroer 
Gao Fta Inborai 
KKsbOatMex 
TeievtaaCPD . 
TelMnL 


61 JO 
1640 
3160 
1630 
4130 
52.70 
Z96 
3030 
35J0 
I38J0 
17.94 


Boko tedac 452046 
PmhwWUt 

4030 4030 4080 
14.16 <620 1620 
3030 3080 31 J5 
1600 1410 1610 

4060 4040 4130 
5160 51 JO 5270 
289 289 284 

3030 3030 3030 
3610 36K 35.00 
13BJ0 138J0 141.10 
1760 1784 1760 


jPfd 
‘Pfd 
Copel 

Elefrobros ’ 
ItautancoPfd 

UgT4 Strvrckr. 


Milan 


. .iPM 

PoulstaLvt 
SUNadonoi 
Souza Cruz 
TefebraPM 

Teiwnlg 

Tetol 

TetepPId 

UnCxmco 

UstmtaasPM 

CVRD PM 


4600 
7280 
11.10 
49080 
48080 
34080 
29600 
23480 
127.00 
3780 
980 
11080 
12380 
99 JO 
27600 
2980 
8.11 
2180 


41 JO 
6980 
1060 
47980 
45580 
35780 
28080 
22380 
11880 
3680 
865 
10580 
11680 
9600 
25080 
29.00 
735 
2180 


42J0 4601 
4980 7080 
11.10 10.98 
479.00 48380 
■i fcpQ 48080 
35780 35280 
m00 29600 
22381 22980 
11800 12600 
3680 3780 
865 680 

IQSJD 1098V 
11600 11600 
9400 97.99 
25600 24380 
2980 79.90 
780 885 

2160 2080 


SkomkaB 
5KFB 


293J0 287 29250 

179 175 175 


SpartxrnkeriA 177 JO 17650 
Sfcra A 101 99 


293 

179 


Sv Handels A 
VatvoB 


174 177 

100 101 
253 247 250J0 249 JO 

19SJ0 192 194 195 


MIB Trlruhnv 14SI7J8 
Provtaas; 1481780 


Ateretzn Asdc 

14540 

14350 

14470 


4710 

4570 

4645 

Bco FWeuroro 

6900 

6785 

6900 

Bco (8 Romo 

1610 

154? 

1604 

Beaefion 

25050 

24750 

74VID 

CredBo Itafiana 

4320 

42SS 

4260 

Edison 

9075 

8820 

904) 

ENI 

9800 

9685 

9725 

Hat 

5100 

4995 

6050 

General Assic 

38000 

37700 

37950 

IMl 

16250 

16050 

16750 

INA 

2960 

2860 

2955 

togas 

Moda&et 

6620 

82X 

6560 

7950 

6600 

mas 

Merfcbanca 

11505 

11350 

11490 


1364 

1350 

1361 

OPvetS 

985 

975 

984 


2390 

HSJ 

7JID 

Pfcefl 

4370 

4230 


RAS 

14745 

14635 

14700 


Seoul 

Dacam 

Daewoo Heavy 

KSS 6 * 


: 52111 
Pintani OS 72 


Korea El Pwr 
Korea Exch Bk 
LGSemican 
Pahang hen St 
Samsung Ofcskry 
Samsung Elec 

SWnrianEark 
SK Telecom 


61400 54000 
6130 5700 
15800 14800 
7400 7350 
15200 13700 
4530 4220 

23800 21300 
'44000 43400 
36500 33100 
«7D0 46100 
7450 7000 
359000 325000 


59400 59400 
gym ano 
14800 15400 
7350 7400 

14000 14300 
*350 4450 

225D0 22300 
4A00D 45DOO 
35600 35400 
44800 48700 
7100 7390 
340000 345000 


Singapore 


Units roes: 14B6I0 
PlCVtHB: 144369 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBkmq 

BHP 

Bond 

Bramble* bid. 
CBA 

CCAmoli 
Cotes Myer 
Comalco 
C5R 

Fosters Brew 
Goodwin Fid 
)C1 Australia 
Lend Lease 
MIMHito 
NrriAus) Bank 
Mat Mutual Hdg 
News Crop 
Pacific Dunlop 
Pioneer mn 
Pub Broadcast 
(SoTinio 
SI George Bank 
WMC 


AltMwries: 252480 
Previous: 252160 


Asia Poe Brew 670 670 670 670 Btoahrerths 


890 

873 

630 

883 

931 

934 

9JS 

9.49 

1806 

1433 

1890 

1878 

330 

3J4 

177 

3-B0 

27 JD 

27 

2745 

2732 

1730 

1891 

17.10 

1892 

1130 

11.10 

11.15 

1135 

7.17 

7.10 

7.15 

7.13 

805 

890 

6 

6 

438 

872 

887 

876 

233 

X7B 

178 

235 

236 

232 

232 

225 

10.90 

1030 

1030 

10.70 

2830 

2730 

28 

2840 

137 

135 

136 

135 

21 

2040 

2071 

20.70 

X41 

X36 

239 

2J9 

7 JO 

731 

737 

735 

ill 

107 

109 

108 

X32 

X76 

331 

176 

856 

830 

833 

839 

17.10 

1731 

17X7 

17XS 

840 

840 

845 

830 

870 

857 

546 

834 

878 

865 

868 

877 

1130 

1135 • 

1137 

1130 

477 

445 

446 

878 



KfaiRKje s eteciftcttymarKets are 




letition. 







VI AG. Creating enduring value. 


Pwriom:33CJl 


Rato Banco 22450 22150 22200 22200 

S Paata Torino 1248S 12410 12573 12390 

Tefeanllafo 10620 10450 TQ505 10550 

TIM 6440 4340 5340 6400 


Montreal 

BceMobCom 44ta 
C4i Tie A 78* 
CdnUlflA 40 1« 
CTFMStc 47.95 
Gm Metro 19 

Gt-WestUMro 3180 
Imcs® 65.95 

InvesloisGrp 46<4 
LoUQwCos 20.70 
Noll Bk Cano* 21 
PowwCorp 4695 

rWCT I ail ■■ 

OoetecorB 29.45 
hwr Gomel B 8.15 
RoyriBkCda 74ta 


44*. 441* 

2860 2830 
40.10 40.10 
47H 47.95 
1880 1885 
TP* 3280 
4565 45.95 
*Vl 46ft 
2065 20.70 
2085 21 

44U 4655 
4US 44 
2855 2SJS 
LI 5 LIS 
7615 7615 


44ft 

2BU 

4DJ5 

47 

1L90 

34 

4565 

48 
20ft 

20.90 

4460 

4610 

2960 

835 

74ft 


Oslo 


OBX iadro: 68853 


Preview: 69874 

AkerA 

12030 

iie 

H8 

119 

BergroenDrA 

218 

215 21730 

71/ 

2890 

2670 

28/0 

27 


51 

XX 

3030 

3030 

Elm 

no 

10/ 

10730 

107 

HefstondA 

42 

42 

47 

41 


360 

3S5 

360 

360 

Norsk Hydro 
Henke SkogA 

387 

384 38430 38530 

223 

220 

223 

223 

NycnraedA 

193 

1B2J0 

18230 

187 

Orkla Asa A 

627 

505 

610 

61V 

PeNnGeoSvc 

521 

515 

518 

521 


138 

137 

137 

139 

ScMfated 

129 

177 

178 

no 

Transocean Off 

420 

413 

415 

410 

Storebrand Asa 

51 

so 

5030 

51 


CerebasPoc 

ChyDnta 

uory ham ms 
DBStaRtai 
DBS Lend 

FrmwfcNeaw 
HKLand* 
JudMaBiesa* 
Jord anrieglc * 
KawdA 

KqtafilFels 

KeppHLond 

OCflCfarcjan 

OSUntonBkF 

Ptslcwoy Hdgs 
SemboHong 
Sing Air tonto 
Sing Lmd 
SoqPMkF 
Sing Tech Ind 
Sing Tdeconua 
TotUeBai* 
VM Industrial 
UMOSeaBkF 
WtagTalHdgs 

■.iiU^oWtars. 


880 

870 

876 

874 

740 

735 

7-15 

7.10 

7.10 

890 

7 

7 

.036 

0X5 

036 

035 

1830 

1830 

15.10 

1880 

236 

23S 

19] 

236 

855 

810 

840 

8 

X2D 

111 

XI4 

2X2 

810 

6 

80S 

6 

120 

3.14 

116 

116 

5JS 

S 

LIS 

5 

7.73 

7M 

Z73 

173 

840 

846 

440 

448 

234 

243 

250 

238 

9X5 

9.10 

9.10 

935 

530 

S3S 

530 

540 

817 

802 

806 

804 

540 

SJO 

535 

SJO 

1140 

llJD 

11 JO 

1130 

838 

812 

830 

812 

» 

19 JO 

194) 

20-10 

237 

1.99 

102 

209 

248 

240 

146 

242 

241 

X5B 

X6I 

159 

0l77 

0.75 

0J5 

0.76 

9 30 

9J0 

9 JO 

945 

XI6 

XII 

X15 

Xll 


Fax +49-39-12 54-44 91 

VI AC 

Aktienjcssi’schaft 


TaiDel stock MOW todex: 77111* 
Prerian: 7747.14 


CUaaTungBk 
Orina DeveipDii 
Chfew Steel 
M Bank 
Foraasa PlasSc 
KuaNonBk 
Inti Comm Bk 
Non Yc Plashes 
Shin tong Lde 
TaMm Semi 
Taturw 

Uld Micro Bee 

UtdWoridChki 


Tokyo naiei225c 1586733 

y Pravtoos: 1549730 


13930 

1X5 

13550 

137 

911 

95 

9550 

96 

69 30 

68 

68 

AH W 

95 

9X50 

9250 

9330 

2340 

7340 

7340 

3'IAO 

98 

95 JD 

9850 

9550 

5250 

5150 

5150 

53 

10550 

107 

107 

103 

56 

Si 

54 

55 

5X50 

S7 

52 

51 

91 JD 

88 

8H 

89 

176 

171 

175 

126 

3240 

3130 

31.90 

31 JO 

67 

65 

66 

6750 

58 

5650 

57 

S7 


SSoPaul ° 


BmdexoPM 

BnrtwoPfd 


7.70 7.150 720 760 

70080 67980 70080 48580 


Stockholm 

SX 16 tadeto 812841 



Previous: 31 S5J7 

AGAB 

95JD 

93 

91850 

96 

ABBA 

8630 

85 

85 

85 

Assfltomon 

284 

195 

202 

205 

Astra A 

12050 

11730 

IX 

IIBJ0 

Atlas Copco A 

223 

718 

718 

724 

AiM* 

303 

299 

303 

38130 

EJeehtteB 

612 

405 

408 

613 

Ericsson B 

33S 50 

326 

3Z7 

338 

HeenesB 

31730 

314 

31650 

315 

huentrteA 

652 

649 

650 

650 

Investor B 

30 

3430 

349 50 

351 

MaOoB 

217 

213 

71 430 

216 

Haidbwtoi 

7WJ0 

Z5B 

259 

25930 

PtomOtatatw 

SareMkB 

23530 
ns B> 

233 

no 

23850 

230 

237 

73X50 

SamiaB 

161 

17850 

178 

18030 

SCAB 

166 

161 JO 

165 

164 

S-E Ban tan A 

8230 

B1 

81 JO 

8130 

Sknndta Fan 

363 

30 

36030 

35X30 


Ainomoto 

AI Nepal AH 

1110 

400 

1060 

585 

1110 

600 

1080 

597 

Arewav 

AsddBank 

2550 

529 

2440 

510 

2480 

529 

2450 

« 

Asohi Chets 

515 

502 

514 

502 

Aids Glass 

800 

7B0 

792 

760 

Bk Tokyo Mltsu 

16X 

1540 

16X 

1510 

Bk Yokohama 

424 

412 

424 

425 

Bndgestane 

2580 

2510 

25M 

2490 

Canon 

2880 

2780 

2850 

2780 

QtuDu Elec 

2060 

X30 

2010 

2030 

OwgokoElec 
Da Nep Print 

1930 

1910 

1930 

1990 

2370 

2310 

2350 

2360 

DWd 

545 

536 

547 

530 

Da-tcttKang 

952 

922 

939 

919 

DohvaBre* 

345 

378 

340 

3d0 

DarwaHeote 

1090 

1050 

1050 

1050 

DahroSoc 

657 

639 

652 

645 

DD1 

3810a 

3720a 

3180a 

3760a 

Denso 

2260 

2200 

2210 

2240 

East Japan Ry 

5730a 

5590a 

5M0a 

5680a 

Enat 

1630 

1600 

16X 

1610 

Funuc 

4850 

4780 

4840 

4830 

Fop Bark 

916 

875 

914 

845 

FuS Photo 

Fuftsu 

4380 

47X 

4380 

4180 

1330 

1300 

1310 

1310 

HaehtamiBk 

1140 

H20 

1140 

1130 


The Trib Index 

Prices as C JxV F.V New Yen* nme. 

Jan. 1. 1992=100 

Level 

Change 

•i change 

year to date 



•« change 

World Index 

163.20 

-0.12 

-0.07 

+9.43 

Reg ional Indexes 

Asm/Pactfic 

94.57 

♦ 1.56 

+ 1.68 

-23.38 

Europe 

184.51 

-0.64 

-0.35 

♦14.46 

N. America 

201.789 

-0.58 

-009 

+24.63 

S. America 

133.70 

-1.91 

-1.41 

+16.84 

Industrial tndaxwi 





Capital goods 

205.84 

-1.04 

-0.50 

♦20.43 

Consumer goods 

192.60 

-0.38 

-0.20 

+19.31 

Energy 

193.06 

-0.73 

-038 

+13.09 

Finance 

114.89 

+0.74 

+065 

-1.35 

Miscellaneous 

157.90 

-0.77 

-049 

-2.40 

Raw Materials 

168.70 

+0.99 

+0.59 

-3.81 

Service 

160.00 

-0.54 

-0.34 

+16.52 

Utilities 

156.29 

-0.83 

-003 

♦8.94 

The International Herald Tribune World Stock Irtda * 9 tracks tivU.S. dollar i -Okies of 

280 MomaaonaBy owestaMo stocks Imm 25 countries Fc» more mtormatton a tree 
bockla rs avaiabte by writing to 77» Tnb Index. W Avenue diaries da Gaulle. 

92521 Net aBy Cede*. Franca 


Compted by Bloomberg News | 

High 

Low Ouse Prev. 


High Low 

dote Prev. 


Hitachi 

Honda Mitor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

tto-Ycfcarto 

jal 

Japan Tobacco 
Jusco 
Kajkna 
KansdElec 

Kao 

Kawasaki Hw 
Kowa Steel 
HnMMppRy 
Kirin Brewery 
Kobe Slew 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
k^ushu Elec 

Wtaratey 

Mond 

Matsu Comm 
Malsu Elec Ind 

Matsu Elec Wk 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsubishi Qi 
MbsubtertEI 
Mitsubishi EsJ 
Mdsuoishi Hw 
Mitsubishi Ma 
Mitsubishi Tr 
Mitsui 

MhsulFudasn 
Mitsui Trust 
MuiataMfg 
NEC 

Mdu>5ec 

Whan 

Nintendo 

KKEsr 


898 

41» 

1050 

266 

419 

5740 

412 


880 

4H0 

1010 

240 

406 

5610 

404 


898 898 

4130 4050 
1040 1010 


262 

415 


240 

399 


5730 5810 

409 409 


Dofosco 

Domtar 

Donohue A 

DuPanJCdoA 

EdperBrascait 

EuroNevMng 

Foirto* FW 


2640 

10ft 

26.90 

3460 

25.15 

21ft 

350 


2385 

>0.70 

26'j 

34 

2680 

21.15 


23.90 2620 
10.70 10.65 
26J5 26ft 
3610 34 

2685 74ft 
21 35 21ft 


Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 
O* Paper 
Osaka Gas 
tact* 

Rohm 
So Kara Bk 
Sonfcyo 
Sanwa Bank 
Sanyo EtoC 
Socorn 
SetauRwy 
SetosulChem 
SeUsui House 
Seven- Eleven 
Sharp 

Slrikoku El Pwr 

Shimizu 

StWi-etauCh 

Shtseido 

SMruoka Bk 

Softbank 

Sony 

Suralwno 

SumlomoBk 
Sumil Chem 
Sorattaroa Elec 
Suntt Mehri 
Sunil Trosl 
TuhhoPhaim 
Tokado Chem 
TDK 

Tsiioku El Pwr 
Taka Bcnk 
Tokb Marine 
Tokyo El Pw 
Tokyo EJedron 
TOtyoGos 
TdtyuCorp. 
Toner 

Tappan Prod 
Tore? Ind 
ToshBxi 
Tostem 
Taya Trosl 
Toyota Motor 
Yonanoudil 
a.* mb:* 1.000 


9680a 

9480a 

9600a 

93Ba 


19J5 

18.95 

19 

19ft 

2W0 

22*0 

2280 

2360 

Fletcher Chall A 

21 

7V» 

20-55 

20.15 

WO 

508 

516 

511 


3240 

37ft 

37 45 

37 JO 

2140 

7050 

2141) 

7100 

GuttCdnRes 

11.90 

1140 

IMl 

1135 

1740 

1190 

1740 

1700 

imperial 08 

90ft 

89.B5 

VUJO 

89ft 

»4 

285 

m 

Ml 


27.10 

7540 

26+5 

26.80 

212 

207 

211 

207 




56 


689 

683 

6«V 

683 

LofflcwB 

19 


1835 

1835 

m 

974 

m 

980 


3685 

35*1 

36+0 

35 35 

138 

135 

138 

lb 

MoarWFBMI 

IL7D 

17.90 

18 

18 

64V 

67V 

62V 

61? 

Moqna Infl A 

89 JO 

88ft 

BVJ5 

88 

425 

410 

425 

418 

Metvmes 

13' i 

13 

1110 

13 

6770 

6550 

6740 

6800 

Moore 

22J5 

21.85 

21.90 

7135 

TOMt 

IVW 

200(1 

1980 

Newbridge Nel 

62.45 

61.70 

6220 

61ft 

320 

305 

318 

308 

Nora ndo me 

2440 

34 

24 

2195 

364 

3J0 

364 

354 

Nacen Energy 

31 JO 

31ft 

31+0 

31 ..35 

71Q0 

I9MI 

21100 

2010 

Ntftero Tetacom 

130ft 

17835 

12880 

129') 

3420 

3320 

3320 

3440 


1140 

1115 

13ft 

13V*- 

20110 

1940 

IW 

TOW) 

Onex 

JJI; 

3415 

3115 

34.30 

1120 

1090 

mo 

1080 

Panccto Pertm 

7Tj 

lira 

23ft 

23ft 

VA0 

90? 

VJO 

«4 

PftroCdo 

78J5 

78ft 

784 

28.W 

267 

157 

760 

259 


19 95 


1940 


3V1 

37V 

387 

38V 

PncoPettm 

1170 

13ft 

1153 

1330 

1380 

1350 

1370 

1360 

Potash Sask 

120ft 


120 

170J0 

555 

545 

550 

550 

Renaissance 

37.60 

32 

37 XS 

32ft 

418 

405 

418 

413 

Rjo Ataorn 

26ft 

26ft 

26JS 

76J0 

1 180 

1140 

118(1 

1130 

Rogers Conte! B 

19.60 

iHft 

1865 

ILLS 

VOS 

HV4 

904 

919 

SeoqramCa 

46 JS 

46.10 

46J0 

46ft 

1280 

1220 

1770 

1200 

StMCda A 

28 40 

2730 

29 J0 

27ft 

347 

. 327 

345 

330 


5240 

5135 

51.90 

52ft 

4790 

47VO 

4790 

4940 

TaRsmanEny 

47ft 

47 

47 JO 

47 

1330 

1290 

1310 

1370 

TeckB 

7X60 

72 ft 

7J.II) 

72ft 

1510 

1460 

1500 

1480 

Teiegtobe 

45'. 

44ft 

45 


603 

390 

397 

400 

Telus 

3030 

30J5 

3035 

30ft 

11500 

11100 

11500 

11200 

Thomson 

35.60 

35J0 

‘15,35 

3530 

669 


668 

650 




5X20 


468 


464 

459 


1935 

19.65 

1980 

19.70 

746 


7*5 

247 

TraraCflo Pipe 

27 H 

27441 

27ft 

2765 

665 


665 

635 




73 A5 


158 


152 

ISO 

TnzEC Hahn 

3495 

34ft 

3433 

35 

1320 

1270 

1320 

1280 

TVXGOtd 

535 

545 

545 

535 

9960a 

9720a 

V880O 

9700a 


3040 

30.05 

JD.I0 

30)0 

5560b 

5420b 

5500b 

5500b 

Weston 

107 

104 

104 

10105 


596 540 

279 766 

1570 1540 

12000 12000 
441 421 

3900 3810 
1040 1000 


381 

7300 

5210 

951 

1010 

B6SD 

879 

1940 

499 

2930 

1(80 

1120 

3100 

10200 

819 

1220 

442 

1630 

257 

760 

3120 

3540 


341 
7130 
51 DO 
929 
982 
8410 
864 
1920 
482 
2830 
1630 
1070 
2920 
9950 
Hi 
USD 
433 
1630 
247 
719 
mo 
3470 


598 553 

274 268 

1570 1540 

12000 12100 
430 415 

3&3 3890 

imo 995 
370 380 

7130 7130 

5180 5100 

943 9J» 

999 1010 

8500 8S«0 
875 872 

1920 1920 

489 m 
2860 292(1 

1640 1670 

1120 1100 
3070 29X 

10100 10100 
813 HO 

1220 1130 
610 425 

1640 1630 

255 748 

738 700 

3040 3070 

33)0 3470 


Vienna 

Boehiet-Uddeh 
CredB ansi Ptd 
E A -General! 
EVN 

Fluahnten Wien 
OMV 

Oesl Etoktriz 
VA Stahl 
VA Tech 
WieneibCfq Bov 


ATX todBL- 125863 
Prevtaus: 127260 

869.90 832.10 840 865 

652 630 652 618 

2877.3) 2810 282ft 2880 

1479 *1453 1468 1460 

507-50 49910 501 JO 503*0 
1730 1694 1700 1726 

982 961 962 977 

506 490 490 500.10 

2037 1940 JO 1975 2035 

2375 7349 2359 2J7J 


10600 

9870 

10500 

10200 

1950 

I91D 

1950 

1930 

608 

581 

tOl 

.580 

1150 

MOD 

1150 

1080 

2X16 

7280 

2320 

2780 

6320 

6000 

6170 

MW) 

791 

780 

2911 

280 

578 

513 

570 

.916 

8V3 

863 

HV0 

86? 

1580 

1560 

1580 

1570 

615 

601 

407 

619 

670 

513 

520 

577 

1450 

1440 

1450 

145(1 

760 

W 

754 

777 

3330 

3790 

3330 

7?an 

J040 

7988 

3010 

2970 


Wellington 

AirNZealdB 
Briefly lain 
Carter HoBord 
Finch Ch Bhta 
FfcichOiEnr 
Ftckh Ch Font 
Fletdi Oi Paper 
Lion Nathan 
Te ta com N2 
Wfcan Henan 


NZSE-40 Indue 243174 
Prevfemi 2419.12 


133 

327 

130 

135 

1J1 

1.19 

1JI 

1J0 

730 

2 .72 

230 

173 

5JO 

5.15 

SJO 

5.18 

735 

7J9 

7 30 

715 

1J9 

136 

138 

137 

237 

238 

153 

IS) 

399 

195 

199 

4 

830 

BJ5 

L47 

830 

11 

11 

11 

11 


Toronto 

AUttblCm 
Alberta Energy 
Altai Alum 
Ande rson Eg ri 
Bk Montreal 
BkNava Sarin 
BamekGald 
BCE 

BCTefcaton 
Buxton Ptvnn 
BambortlerB 
Cameaj 
Cl E1C 

Cdn Nan Rail 
CdnNal Res 
CdnOcddPet 
Cdn Pacific 
UMWlOO 


TSE IWtalMfe (8B5 J9 
Pipvlow: 6819313 

>2 « 1965 

5- 15 3105 

39 ft 39 JS 3940 

IMS ,S -W >5.10 1135 

8660 6415 6460 6680 

»,S? 61,5 

5-2? S'? 17,0 n.is 

flitt 40X5 40.95 40.95 

■>?« 36W 37J0 ** 

3510 £.10 34ft 
77-70 27 27.05 27JO 

54J0 MJ5 54J0 566S 
44 4170 4380 0.95 
«ft 73 7130 7680 
37ft 37.90 3885 
3590 35 ft 3SJU Kft 

iVS JfSi 41.90 

27 JO 27.10 2720 27 J0 


Zurich 

ABB B 
AdCcco B 
AIujutueR 
ArovScrano B 
Akrtft 
Boer Hdg B 
Boltae Hdg R 
BKVteuw 
Ciba Spec Chem 
CtarHWR 
OrdSubseGpR 
EteUrowottB 
Ems-Ctonie 
ESECHdg 
HatOertiank B 
LkxMenst LB B 
NestfeR 
NovarlhR 
OefiknBuehR 
PaigcsaHldB 
PlHumVisn B 
Rtbemurt A 
PhetaPC 
Sod* Hdg Pc 

SBC R 

Schuller PC 
SG5B 
SMHB 
SuUwR 
Safas Rems P 
SAv Group R 
UBS B 
WntolhurR 
1 until Assiu R 



SPlMRi347L7l 
PrwtoOL J467J1 

1739 

1705 

1731 

1719 

44/ 

439 

439 

44X50 

1758 

1272 

1750 

1260 

2SJ0 

2450 

7450 

7539 

8J6 

836 

834 

871 

2105 

2075 

:wt 

7125 

7.540 

7490 

7499 

7498 

1725 

1714 

1220 

1772 

1*30 

14230 

14V 

14330 

1058 

1047 

1046 

1050 

21)650 

199. VO 

70V SO 

700 75 

541 

539 

541 

54) 

ms 

6860 

aw 

6910 

4190 

4025 

4150 

4125 

1136 

1113 

1116 

1117 

540 

539 

539 

SIS 

vino 

l«6l 

2000 

1970 

2159 

2)23 

7114 

7146 

18/ 

187 

187 

185 

1795 

1760 

1795 

1760 

877 

81? 

877 

877 

1670 

1575 

16» 

1600 

300 

39530 

300 

300 

12380 

12250 

12.W0 

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I 



Mahathir Sees a Solution 
For Malaysia: More Exports 


Return 

: KUALA LUMPUR — Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin M ohamad 
said Tuesday that die answer to 
Malaysia's current-account “prob- 
lem” was to increase expons and 
reduce imports, not to cut economic 
growth. . 

. The prime minister made the 
statement in a speech at die un- 
veiling of Malaysia’s new national 
track. 

' The country’s current-account 
deficit in 1996 was 12.25 billion 
ringgit ($3.7 billion), or 5.2 percent 
of its gross national product The 
government expects the shortfall to 
rise to 13.08 billion ringgit this year, 
which it estimates would equal 5 
percent of GNP. 

Malaysia's currency, the ringgit, 
has fallen sharply against the dollar 
since a financial crisis erupted in 
Thailand in July. The weaker ringgit 
has raised fears of rising inflatio n. 

- Malaysia’s central bank governor 
said Friday that there was a need to 
keep interest rates firm because of 
the currency turmoil in the region 
and inflationary pressures. 

But the deputy finance minister, 
Affifaddin Omar, said Monday that 


the central bank. Bank Negara, 
would not want to raise interest rates 
because that could compromise eco- 
nomic growth. 

He said high rates would raise 
corporate operating costs and deter 
investments and coaid eventually 
cause the economy to stagnate. 

Last week, several Malaysian 
banks raised base lending rates to 
more than 10 percent for the first 
time in a decade. The increases fol- 
lowed arise in the base lending-rale 
ceiling, set by Bank Negara, to 
10.10 percent from 9.57 percent 

Mr. Affifuddin said die recent in- 
creases .in base lending rates were 
the result of market forces, reflect- 
ing a higher cost of funds, rather 
than a policy intervention. 

The move by the central bank led 
to a widespread belief that rates 
would be allowed to rise to combat 
strong loan growth. Bank Negara 
has said that rapid credit growth this 
year was of particular concern. 

On another issue, Mr. Mahathir 
reiterated that he had no intention of 
ling down as prime minis ter, 
there is anyone here from 
Tune and Newsweek, please convey 
to them that I am more firmly in my 



Ufli I 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad sitting in Malaysia’s 
national truck, the Perkasa, after its unvefling in Kuala Lumpur. 
Hie project aims to produce 10,000 vehicles in its first year. 


steppir 


seat as a result of their suggestion for 
me to step down,” he said, referring 
to recent reports, in two U.S. news- 
magazines. 

Mr. Mahathir also said that any 
U.S. sanctions designed to punish 
Malaysia for a gas deal with Iran 
should also be applied to France and 
Russia. 

“If they want to stop us, they 
must stop die French and die Rus- 
sians also,” he said. 

“It cannot be just because we are 
weak that we will be stopped, bat the 
strong people can go on. That is not 


justice, and I believe the U.S. be- 
lieves in justice for all,’* he said 

The U.S. undersecretary of state 
for economic rffairs, Stuart Eizen- 
stat, said in Rome on Friday dial 
U.S. officials woe investigating the 
Malaysian state oil company Pet- 
ronas and four other companies to 
see whether their business dealings 
with Iran violated UJS. law. 

France’s Total SA signed a $2 
billion deal with Petronas and Rus- 
sia’s Gazprom in September to de- 
velop die South Pais offshore gas 
fidoinlran. 


Turmoil Poses 
Global Bisk, 
S&P Warns 

CmfMbyOio'StrfFramDtspxbrf 

SINGAPORE — The economic 
turbulence in Asia is causing many 
bank loans to sour, and the risk may 
spread to other regions. Standard & 
Poor’s Corp. said in a report re- 
leased Tuesday. 

While Thai banks bore the brunt 
of the pain, Indonesia is next in line, 
and Latin America is at risk as well, 
die rating concern said in its Cred- 
itWeek report. It also warned that 
the Asian turmoil was taking a toll 
on some global financial institu- 
tions. 

“The biggest shot-term impact 
on hanks is the battering their bor- 
rowing customers are taking,” Ro- 
ger Taillon, a senior executive at 
S&P, said He cited falling curren- 
cies, rising short-term interest rates, 
declining property values and gyr- 
ating stock markets. 

The outlook for all Thai bank 
credit ratings is negative, S&P said 
Indonesian banks are the next most 
vulnerable, it said, with nonper- 
fonning loans expected to “increase 
substantially from already high 
levels.” (AFP. Bridge News) 


Very briefly: 

• International Bank of Asia said it had withstood a run after 
withdrawals of \J5 billion Hong Kong dollars ($194 million} 
since Monday at branches of the unit erf Arab BankiogCori*, 
which is 20 percent owned by China Everbright-IHD fticifk 
Ltd Hong Kong had pledged to use its huge foreign-exchange 
reserves to support the bank if needed 

• Japan ended a shipping dispute with the United States after 
Washington decidetito stop imposing fines on three Japanese 
shipping companies. The U.S. move was a response to a 
Japanese announcement that it would attempt to make changes 
in Japanese port practices sought by die United States. 

• Japanese domestic shipments of color televisions and 
videocassette recorders rose in September for the first tune 
since May; industry figures showed, a sign consumer spend- 
ing may be recovering from a sales tax increase in April. 

• Mitsubishi Electric Corp. and Toshiba Corp. were raided 
by Japanese police as a scandal over paying hush money to 
gangsters widened 

■ Kokusai Denshin Denwa Co. is considering a merger with 
a Toyota Motor Corp. affiliate. Teleway Japan Corfu to 
gain a foothold in the home telecommunications market. 

• Bridgestone Corp. bought the principal assets of 
"#c.ofth 


Thompson Aerospace Inc. 
not disclosed 


t the United States: the price was 



official said. 

• In Bangladesh, a blockade by jute and textile workers 
opposed to government privatization plans disrupted road and 
rail traffic for a second day, witnesses said 
•PT Gudang Gajram's cigarette factory in Kediri on the 
Indonesian island of Java was struck by workers for a second 
day, as more than 4,000 employees walked out to reinforce 
their call for higher wages. Aft Rruen. BhumlH Tg. M x 


The IHT Desk Diary 
For the time of your life. 



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inscribed on the pages of your desk diary. Yet 
when you travel or go to meetings, most desk 
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Please send me. 


1998 ffiTT Desk Diaries. 


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BOOKS: In Protest, Author Offers Rights for $1 


Continued from Page 13 

from writers in a similar po- 
sition that he says he feels like 
a spokesman for downtrod- 
den authors. 

“People write me and ask 
me what I’m going to do 
about it,” he said. 

Mr. Spinrad, a past pres-, 
ident of the Science Fiction 
Writers of America, also says 
publishers are trying to sell 
books through marketing tie- 
ins such as movies, television 
and CD-ROMs. He said these 
media were doing a better job 
of providing mindless enter- 
tainment than books do, so 
people were no longer buying 
the bodes. 

He likens the crisis to the 
one encountered by painting 
when photography came 
along. 1 

“Painting was there to 
mimic- reality, to present it,” 
he said. “Photography did 
that better, so painting had to 
do the new things that pho- 
tography couldn’t There are 
things that literature can do 
that movies and CD-ROMs 
can’t and it’s fruitless to 
compete for the popular, 
simple entertainment that 
these other thing s do better.” 

“He Walked Among Us” 
is partly about these issues. 

‘ ‘It’s about the interplay of 
the things of the spirit and the 
tilings of rationality,” Mr. 
Spinrad said. “You have to 
do a synthesis of these tilings. 
If you have the complete ra- 
tionalist viewpoint, you have, 
for example, the crisis in the 
publishing industry. When 
the spirit goes out of 
something like that, the busi- 


ness doesn’t work either. And 
ultimately if the business 
goes belly-up, then the 
writers stop writing, and the 
spirit goes out of it too.”- 

While Mr. Spinrad ’s pre- 
vious books were published 
under Bantam's Spectra sci- 
ence-fiction imprint, “Pic- 
tures at 11” came out as a 
mainstream novel. It got ex- 
cellent reviews and is under a 
film option, but Mr. Spinrad 
says its disappointing sales 
were due to a small print run 
and a lack ofpromotion. 

Bad sales figures on even a 
single book these days can 
ruin careers, he said, when 
chain stores order based on 
sales statistics rather' than 
book content. Some publish- 
ers now decide a book's print 
ran according to these chain- 
store statistics. 

“Publishing doesn’t work 
on this scale, either oa a mar- 
keting end or an acquisition 
end,’ ’ he said. “You need ed- 
itorial judgment to buy the 
books. And you need people 
who know about the books 
and care about the books on a 
local bookstore level.” be 
said, referring to independent 
bookstore owners. 

He suggested selling the 
chain stores as franchises so 
that the owners could buy the 
books they wanted rather than 
using centralized computer 
statistics. 

“This is the heart and soul 
of the country,” he said. 
“You can't have a country 
without literature.” 

Bantam officials could not 
be reached for comment. Peter 
Mayer, the publisher who 
bought “Bug Jack Barron” 


for Avon in 1968, said he re- 
membered Mr, Spinrad as be- 
ing unhappy with his sales 
then, too. 

“Mr. Spinrad, understand- 
ably as the good writer that he 
is, wants people to read his 
books,” he said. “But you 
can’t make people do that” 

Mr. Mayer, who over the 
past 20 years rose to chairman 
of Penguin Books USA Inc. 
before deciding six months 
ago to run his family's small 
company. Overlook Press, 
said publishing was a com- 
plicated business in which it 
was easy to find villains, but 
that no one can predict what 
will sell. He agreed, however, 
that the giant companies were 
trying to produce books they 
way they do hamburgers. 

“They have to show 
profits,” he said “They arc 
not the Salvation Array. But 
there are unknown writers 
who do become famous de- 
spite the world of conglom- 
erates, and some of them are 
excellent writers. ’ ' 

“Many years ago there 
was a book published called 
‘Jonathan Livingston 
Seagull,' which had a first 
printing of, I think, 3,00 O««k 
res.’ he said “If anybody 
were to say, ‘Let's get rid o - f 
the mid-list books an our list.' 
that would have been one of 
the books killed. It went on to 
sell 2 million hardcovers in 
tile year it was published awl 
9 million paperbacks the year 
afterwards.*' 

‘‘Book buying in the pub- 
lishing business is an art,” 
Mr. Spinrad said, “not a sci- 
ence. It was someone's hunch* 
to buy that book,” 




f 


m 

i. 


Style, Sounds, 
Dining, Arts. 

Hemlines, jazz, restaurants and art - the past year’s 

articles from the IHT can be found on our site on 
the World Wide Web. Slte on 


http://www.iht.com 


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PAGE 20 




McGrath, facing camera, cel- 
ebrating with Ricky Pondng. 

McGrath Routs 
New Zealanders 

cmcKET Glenn McGrath, an 
Australian fast bowler, broke New 
Zealand's resistance Tuesday on 
the final day of the first test in 
Brisbane. McGrath took five wick- 
ets in New Zealand’s second in- 
nings as Australia bowled the tour- 
ists om for 132 to win by 186 runs. 

McGrath took four wickets in of 
22 balls before lunch on the fifth day. 
After the match, he said he had a 
groin injury that might prevent him 
from playing in the second test start- 
ing Nov. 20. (Reuters) 

Twin Loss for Springboks 

rugby union South Africa, 
suffered a double blow Tuesday, 
when it not only lost 40-22 to the 
French Barbarians in Biarritz bat 
also had Toks van der Unde sent off 
and then banned for stamping. 

Van der Unde, a prop forward, 
was sent off just before halftime 
when be stamped on the head of 
David Dandacq during a ruck. He 
was banned for 60 days. 

Thomas Uevremont scored two 
of the Barbarians* five tries. 
Waisale Serevi, the Fijian who plays 
for Leicester in En gland, kicked 15 - 
points for them. . (Reuters) 

Women’s NBA Grows 

basketball The Women’s 
NBA expanded to 10 teams Tues- 
day with die approval of franchises 
in Detroit and Washington for next 
season. The WNBA’s operating 
committee said it would recom- 
mend two more expansion cities for 
the 1999 season by June 1 . . f AP) 

Sharks Barred from Meet 

Swimming FIN A, the governing 
body of world swimming, has 
ordered spotter planes and aimed 
scuba divers to protect competitors 
in the ocean events at tbe world 
championships in Perth after a 
spate of shark attacks off Western 
Australia. 

“Each competitor will have their 
own support boat, and there will 
also be backup crews with lifeboats 
and rubber duckies [dinghies] as 
well as officials’ boats and media 
helicopters,” Kevin Hofrom, the 
race organizer, said. “The infor- 
mation we have is that our pre- 
cautions are more than enough and 
that no self-respecting shade would 
want to come near ah that.” 

The offshore races at the cham- 
pionships in January will be 5 kilo- 
meters (3.1 miles.) and 25 kilome- 
ters for men and women, (Reuters) 


TB. (V INTEB%nWVtt,riteft t 4 

gm* Heralb ^fe fcnbunc 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


Schumacher Gets Spanked, Not Suspended, for Crash 


International HeraldTribune 

C OLNBROOK, England — A 
jury, not the kind selected ran- 
domly off the street, found Mi- 
chael Schumacher -guilty Tuesday of 
deliberately causing a crash. That was 
the easy part The whole world realized 
he was guilty. His punishment was the 
only question. 

In the end, they decided that his run- 
ner-up standing in this year’s Formula 
One champiooship would be erased 
from tbe records as punishment for de- 
liberately trying to knock Jacques Vil- 
leneuve off the track at Jerez, Spain, in 
the climactic European Grand Prix last 
month. 

Mare notable in this sentence was tbe 
absence of a suspension from races next 
year, which was obviously not in the 
best business interests of Formula 
One. 

Nor was Schumacher fined. A fine 
along the lines of $2 million had been 
expected (roughly 4 percent of his 1997 
income), but why upset Formula One’s 
leading actor? 

“If we banned him for next season, it 
would not be a deterrent,” said Max 
Mosley, president of the International 
Autombife Federation. 

To ban Schumacher next year would 
not have been useful — that would have 
been a more accurate explanation. 

The 24-man World Motorsport 
Council ruled that Schumacher’s crash 
was deliberate but not premeditated. 


Vantage Point / Ian Thomsen 


Fair enough. He had been leading VQ- 
Jeneuve by one point in the championship 
standings when the Canadian attempted 
to pass him on the Dry Sack curve at 
Jerez. Hie miniature television camera 
implanted in Schumacher's ■ Ferrari, a 
device that has helped make Formula 
One $0 attractive to audiences around die 
world, showed Schumacher jerking his 
wheel to ram Villeneuve’s Williams. 

The collision knocked Schumacher 
out of the race while Villeoeuve con- 
tinued on to win the championship. 

“It was an instinctive reacdqn.” 
Mosley said “If we thought it 'was 
premeditated, then we would have had 
to take a very serious view. It’s still a 
very serious matter, and it's a major 
penalty we have imposed. 

"In this particular instance both Vtt- 
leneuve and Schumacher were under 
enormous pressure. They had one point 
between them, they had people shouting 
in their ear, ‘He is just one second 
behind’ The pressure under those cir- 
cumstances is enormous. 

“Schumacher did tbe wrong thing, 
obviously, although all the evidence 
points to him reacting instinctively. Had 
be thought about it for one second he 
would have allowed Villeneuve 
through. Schumacher is a human being 
and every now and then he will make a 
mistake. He admitted he did it delib- 



IlnntoC'Urlw/TV Ui hnl IV» 


The Associated Press 

HANOVER, Germany — Pete 
Sampras, tbe defending champion and 
the world No. 1 , played erratically Tues- 
day as he lost, 3-6, 7-6 (7-4), 2-6 to 
Carlos Moya in the opening match of 
the ATP Tour World Championship. 

"It was a tough day,” Sampras said 
“It’s not the start I wanted, but I’m not 
outofiL” 


“He made a lot of mistakes,” said 
Moya. “But that’s because I made him 
fight for every point.” 

The opening round of the tournament 
is played in two four-man groups. 
Sampras must still play Patrick Rafter 
and Greg Rusedski, who are both ranked 
higher than No. 7 Moya. On Tuesday, 
Rafter, Tanked No. 3. beat the big- 
serving Rusedski, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. 


erately but instinctively and it was the 
wrong thing to do.” Mosley contended 
that Schumacher does not make a habit 
of crashing into rivals, even though he 
did the same thing at Adelaide in 1994 
when Damon Hill was on the verge of 
taking tbe championship away. 

“Tbe accident Schumacher had with 
Hill was a different type of accident and 
there was not even enough evidence to 
suggest having an inquiry,” Mosley 
said. 

The punishment announced Tuesday 
elevated Heinz Harald Frenzeo, Vil- 
leneuve’s Williams teammate, from 
third to second in the championship. 

S chumacher, twice a world cham- 
pion, asked for understanding at a 
news conference. 

The international federation also con- 
tinued its investigation into the collu- 
sion following the collision. 

Quite a lot happened in this race, and 
□one of it had anything to do with the 
skills of driving. On the final lap, Vil- 
leneuve steered widfe to allow the 
McLarens of Mika Halddnen and David 
Coulthard to overtake him. The McLar- 
ens were apparently being rewarded for 
their role in helping W illiams beat Fer- 
rari earlier in die race. 

According to transcripts published in 
English and Italian newspapers, a Wil- 



Johnaf Egptt/ApTKT Fmn-ftv 

Michael Schumacher after hearing. 

liaras engineer ordered Villeoeuve to 
yield the Lead to the McLarens. 

“Be aware,” Jock Clear, a Williams 
engineer, was quoted as telling VU- 
leueuve by radio. “Hakkmen is now in 
position two. Probably wants, to win. 
Very helpful.” 

“Hakkmen immediately behind 
you," the engineer went on. “Keep 
concentrating Jacques. Hakkinen has 


been very helpful. Don't let me down, 
Jacques. We discussed this " 

The business instincts of Formula 
One were made obvious this month 
when it lobbied and threatened Britain 
to win a unilateral exemption from die 
European Union's proposed ban on to- 
bacco advertising in sports. 

On Monday. Britain’s public stan- 
dards .watchdog ordered tbe Labour 
government to return a donation made ; 
in January by Bemie Ecclestone, pres- 
ident of Foramla (hie. The Labour Party 
said Tuesday that the donation was £1 
million ($ 1 ./ million), or more than 6 
percent of the party's 1996 income. 

Before Tuesday's hearing, Jackie 
Stewart, a former world champion 
driver who now heads his own Formula 
One team, called for Schumacher to be 
suspended. 

“Michael Schumacher in my mind is 
the best and most talented racing driver 
in the world,” Stewart said. 

“But if he is sera to behave in a 
manner that may not be correct, then a 
lot of the other drivers in all the other 
formulas are seeing an example which 
they believe they can then follow. 

‘ ‘I think that's very dangerous for our 
sport.” 

Instead of being fined or suspended, 
Schumacher was ordered to participate 
in a road safety campaign with die in- 
ternational federation and the European 
Commission. That was a bit too trans- 
parent even by Formula One standards. 


Glasgow’s Obsolete Ethnic Rivalries 

Rangers and Celtic Don’t Cleave to Stereotypes, Though Fans Do 


Pete Sampras serving Tuesday to Carlos Moya, who won in straight sets. 

Moya Upsets Sampras in Hanover 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Tribune 

G LASGOW — Can you change 
the culture, die lifelong habits, 
of a true sporting city? Would 
ycu want to? 

Glasgow, the home of Scottish soccer, 
has lived and breathed a rivalry between 
two clubs. Rangers and Celtic, for 109 
years. The rivalry is intense, woven into 
the fabric of everyday life, and judging 
by die actions of many among 50,085 of 
its most committed citizens last Saturday 
h remains laced with a virulent bigotry 
that no amount of modernity can cure. 

The Rangers stadium, Ibrox. is a bas- 
tion of new wealth. Builtand rebuilt next 
to Govan shipyards, which have slipped 
into history, it retains the original red- 
brick Victorian frontage. Behind that 
isan all-seat palace fashioned with every 
comfort money can buy. Giant screens 
in the comers of the stadium relentlessly 
bombard customers with advertising: 

Buy this Laudmp Video. Buy this 
Gascoigne Video. Every peony of profit 
guaranteed to help Rangers FootballClub 
■ maintain its all-powerful bold on Scottish 
soccer, and to build towards the dream of 
conquering Europe. Brian Laudmp and 
Paul Gascoigne are tbe two most popular 
players in the Rangers team. 

So good are foe acoustics, so im- 
pressive the atmosphere, that we could 
be sitting in a mammoth outdoor cinema; 
indeed foe screens beseech Glaswegians 
to spend £35 ($ 59 ) per head on an Elton 
John-Billy Joel doubleheader concert at 
foe stadium next June. 

It is astonishing what faith can do for 
a once down-at-heel club. Remarkable, 
too, how tbe divisiveness of religious 
faith can both sustain and yet threaten 
the peace and foe joy of it. 

The Rangers take foe field- Union 
Jacks flutter furiously, a chorus of Tina 
■Rimer's “Simply foe Best” is belted 
out triumphantly, “Rule Britannia” fol- 
lows. There are growls of dissent from 
behind one goal where half foe 14,000 
Celtic followers are placed. 

When foe Celtic team, the Bhoys in 
green and white hoops, emerge from the 
tunnel, hundreds or tanners, the Irish 
tricolor, are waived in defiance. The 
language, the cursing, foe lewd gestures 


have nothing to do with sport, and 
everything to do with sectarianism. 

It serais so incongruous, so ignorant 
of the change that is overtaking these 
people before their very eyes. The abuse 
that is shouted, without respect for foe 
women and children in the crowd, belies 
the fact that, for foe first time in history, 
there are more Catholic players wearing 
Rangers blue than Celtic green. 

There is a compelling reason for this. 
Following the Bosman ruling, granting 
European players free movement, foe 
“Old Firm’ ’ as Scotland's big twoclubs 
are known, have been at the forefront of 
international recruitment Men of se- 
riously rich means are investing in the 
increased profitability from the golden 

Kubopram Soccir 

triangle of sports, sponsorship and tele- 
vision. The thirst for victory appears 
stronger titan foe desire to pander to the 
bigotry that Protestant Rangers, in par-* 
ticular, perpetuated. 

New shareholders are not interested 
in religion. They are prejudiced toward 
players who are winners. Consequently, 
the Rangers and Celtic line-ups Sat- 
urday contained eight nationalities, and 
Scots, never mind their denomination, 
were in the minority. 

Each side fielded only four Scottish ‘ 
players. And though it would be irre- 
sponsible to go around asking foe religion ' 
of soccer players, it is pretty obvious that 
if you hire Italians, they are more likely to 
be Roman Catholics. Rangers field three 
Italians — Sergio Porrini, Rino Gattuso 
and the current goal god of Ibrox fanatics, 

Marco Negri. 

Now, it baffles me how the fans can 
revere these individuals while chanting 
sectarian obscenities over tire players’ 
heads at rival supporters. But they do it, 
relentlessly. 

Any gifted player is welcome, 
provided he wears the right color, but 
breaking old rites od foe field is not 
cause to bury old customs among foe 
fans. Thus we get 22 sportsmen — every 
one a white man 'incidentally — who are 
all allowed to cross themselves before 
taking foe field while the Old Firm fans 
remain as divided as ever. It appears that 
you can sit a Scotsman on his prej- 


udices, but you cannot shut his month. 

The game? Ah. yes, soccer. There, 
too, there has been a huge change- Celt- 
ic, by tradition, plays a cavalier game, its 
players running and passing by instinct, 
it followers intoxicated by quixotic, if 
not always winning flair. No longer. 
Exasperated by Rangers’ nine consec- 
utive Scottish championships, foe Celtic 
club hired Wim Jansen, a Dutch coach, 
to instill order and collective unity. 


O N SATURDAY, Jansen's team 
stifled the game. It kept a tight 
rein on adventure, defended 
with nine men behind foe ball, suc- 
cumbed to one miserly goal from 
Richard Gough, a Scottish defender re- 
patriated from semi-retirement in foe 
United States. 

You can see where Jansen -is taking 
Celtic, see foe discipline, foe European- 
ization. On Nov. 19, tire rivals meet 
again — this time in foe equally proud 
Celtic Park rebuilt as a monument to the 
green half of die city. 

Three miles (4.8 kilometers), and 109 
years of enmity, separate Glasgow’s Old 
Firm. The new businessmen appreciate 
that this rivalry is good for business. 
One of Rangers biggest backers is. 
hedging his bets. Joe Lewis, a Bahamas- ’ 
based currency trader said to be worth 
£3 billion, has bought a £40 million 
stake in Rangers. He is a speculator 
rather than a ran, and the Rangers match 
. program on Saturday proclaimed Lewis 
as foe owner, through his company EN- 
IC, of three clubs — AEK Athens, Vi- 
cenza in Italy and Slavia Prague. • 
Lewis obviously trusts tbe soccer 
business. But while his cash helps the 
Rangers to ignore old intolerances, his 
other three clubs head for. a conflict of 
interest All three are in foe European 
Cup Winners’ Cup, and should they be 
drawn against one another who is to 
guard against arranged results? That is a 
question for UEFA, foe governing body 
of European soccer. 

Soccer, I submit, can live with prej- 
udice, but foe faith of the followers in 
tbe -integrity of competition must be 
safeguarded at all costs. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


Scoreboard 


NBA Standings 


Atlantic omskm 
W L 
4 1 

4 2 

3 3 

3 3 

7 4 


New tenet 

Miami 

NrwYbrfc 

Ortstdo 

Washington 

Boston 

Ptwladetphio 

Atlanta 

Milwaukee 

ChaiMfc 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Indiana 

Detroit 

Toronto 


SanArdaato 5 1 J83 

Minnesota 4 ] J00 

Daltos 3 2 M 

Houston 3 * 

U» \ * 

Vancouver 3 4 333 

Denver 0 4 aw 

PftOFlCDIVBWN 

LA. Lakes 4 0 1.000 


The AP Top 25 . 

Tbp 25 foams In A asmUat ad Plots' 1907- 
90 pro— won cn itgt ba al cettiaH pod. rtth 
Srn-piaca volts to paranfliasee. 1BB6-B7 
record*. total point* band on 25 potato lor 
tiretpteoa wet through ana palm ror25«v 
ptaco vote. and flnsl ranking: 


L 

Pd 

GB 


Recent 

Pts 

Pvs 

1 

JH0 

— 

■.Arizona (30) 

2M 

urn 

IS 

2 

447 

V, 

2. Kansas (?B) 

34-2 

1.484 

1 

3 

-5W 

1-6 

3. Duke (8) 

24-9 

1601 

8 

3 

500 

rn 

4.NerihCaraflna<4) 

28-7 

L582 

4 

4 

333 

2W 

Xaemson 

23-10 

U23 

14 

5 

.167 

J.! 

6. UCLA 

248 

1J19 

7 

5 

m 

4 

7.SouthCara8na 

248 

1.257 

6 

stem 


ftKetoucky 

35-5 

US4 

5 

0 

i.a» 



9. Purdue 

18-12 

U46 

— 

I 

M0 

114 

10. Xavier, Ohio 

236 

un 

13 

2 

Ml 

2 

II. New Mexico 

25-3 

14)15 

If 

2 

M3 

2 

IX Coanediait 

18-15 

813 

— 

3 

M0 

3V, 

IX Fresno SL 

20-12 

740 

— 

4 

Jin 

4 

14. Stanford 

22-8 

720 

21 

5 

JB6 

A'ti 

li Iowa 

22-10 

434 

— 

5 

.167 

5 

16. Utah 

29-4 

5» 

2 

ana 


j7.lmfkmo 

22-11 

525 


BON 


l&tLCanitotto 

22-9 

512 

— 

L 

Pet 

GB 

19. Georgia 

249 

345 

17 

1 

£33 


20. OMahomo 

19-11 

310 

— 

1 

am 

'<1 

21. Rhode tend 

20-10 

278 

— 

2 

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111 

22. Texas 

18-12 

248 

— 

t 

MO 

154 

2XMBSfesJpj» 

2D-9 

235 


4 

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3 

34. Temple 

20-11 

204 

— 

4 

333 

3 

2S.Lautevl0e 

26-9 

203 

23 

4 

J0D0 

4 

Others receiving 

votes: Michigan 

19ft 


StoMa 5 1 -833 — 

mL i \ m - 

LAtJppeis l 4 J00 3% 

Sacramento ' 1 52 ?" 

Golden Stata ° S OM 5 

MONMnumif 
Son Antoni* U » 2* J-1M 

Toronto 31 B B II— 98 

SA: Robinson 13-178-11 32, EH0lt6-71*2 
17 ! T:5toudranh* 8-192-3 2ft Jones 6-163-5 
is. (Hbotrad*— Scm Antonio 56 (Duncon B). 
Toronto 4< (Janes 12. 

33 (Johnson in. Toronto 24 (Stoudanhn 
131. 

Octroi V 30 19 3ft— O 

ItorrtMd 20 IS 35 N-U 

D: HH6-199-I021, B.WMamsft-171-2 1ft 
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» HtboenOs— Ortolt 54 Wo** 11). 
Portend 52 (Sabonta 1 1 J. 

(HM 71. Portend 17 (Andenon l U- 


NY. Jets 

Buffalo 

liKttanapalb 

JadLSoavSfe 

Pittsburgh 

Tennessee 

BuUmoie 

Ctndnmdl 

Denver 
Kansas City 
Seattle 
San Diego 
Oakland 


6 4 

0 

600 

237 

196 

IX Washington 

7-2 

898 

6 

S 5 

0 

600 

170 

225 

14. Wmhtagton SL 

8-1 

873 

16 

a 10 

0 

-DOO 

154 

258 

15. Arizona SL 

7-2 

866 

15 

C&fTRAL 




16. Auburn 

7-2 

615 

17 

7 3 

0 

J00 

262 202 

1 7. Mtesbstppl St. 

6-2 

473 

19 

7 3 

0 

J00 

241 

200 

18. Tans ASM 

7-2 

418 

21 

5 5 

0 

M0 

217 

197 

19.Pradae 

7-2 

404 

23 

4 6 

0 

JOO 

210 

231 

lie. Virginia Tech 

7-2 

404 

20 

3 7 

0 

-300 

191 

263 

21. Syracuse 

7-3 

372 

22 

WEST 




2Xhwa 

4-3 

289 

12 

9 1 

0 

.900 

302 

160 

2X Wisconsin 

8-2 

288 

— 

7 3 

a 

J00 

204 

167 

24,OWohomaSL 

7-2 

254 

25 

4 4 

0 

400 

233 238 

25. Missouri 

6-4 

115 

— 


4 4 0 .400 301 251 
3 7 0 .300 237 30 


EAST 

W L T PcL 
N.Y. Giants 6 4 0 MO 192 190 

WraWngton 4 4 0 .600 703 152 

Data 5 5 0 jOQ 712 154 

PtlBmMpNg 4 6 0 400 170 214 

Ariiono 2 8 0 J00 17t> 230 

CENTRAL 

Green Bay B 2 0 Ml 233 176 

Minnesota 8 2 0 JO0 238 20! 

Tempo Bay 7 3 0 MO 208 172 

Detroit 4 6 0 .400 197 305 

Chicago 1 9 0 .100 147 292 

WEST 

Sen Fromfeco 9 1 0 .900 251 130 

Canflna 5 5 0 M 166 187 

Novatoans 3 7 0 ,300 131 208 

Atarta 2 8 0 ,200 169 271 

SL Louis 2 8 0 200 171 238 

MOMMY'S KISVIff 
Son Francisco 24, Ptaiadetohia 12 

The AP Top 25 

■ftp Twenty Rv* toon in As e ochma 
Prow col toga feoffesl pefl. with finreptae* 
voiea In panrahatoc. record* through Now. 
A Wat po/nm bawd an 39 poMs-tor An 
place me through om point lor 2Sth ptaee 
vote and previous rvnUng; 

Record Pts Pt 
l.MkMoan{44) 9-0 1.723 4 


Mraytand tBLOncmwiU 175,114x4*51.173. 
Arkansas 115, SI. John* 9a UNLV 79, 
Minnesota 74, Florida SL 71. Syracuse 49, 
Wtdw Ftaestda loim St 45. NMsHadRWdts 
39, WlKensan 38. IBnais 27, Hawai 21 Terns 
Christian 23, St. Josephs 22. George 
Washington 201 ViBanowj 20. MtasbXppI 5t 
1& Long bland U. 17, E. Mkft&to 14, 
VhgMa 12, N.CrmBnaSL 1 1, New Mode* St 
1 l, Marquette ift Tennessee 9, WestVbglnta 
9, Nebraska & Pacific 8. South Alabama & 
Washington 4. Princeton S. Cafliornia 4 
CatadaSLXSWMiHouiiSLXGraHgetown 
Z CopptaSL l.N. Anww 1. OWtotamoSLl. 


HU STANMNOto 

AMRKAH CMtrntMCI 
EAST 

W L T PC*. PF PA 
Mfand 6 4 0 400 204 1U 

New England 6 4 0 M0 2S4 145 


).MkMgnn{44) 

2. Florida & (23) 

3. NabresknO} 

4. OtttoSt 

5. TenoesMe 
4. Penn St. 
7.Ge«ata 

& North Caroflna 

9. UCLA 

10. Karan St 

11. L5U 

12. Florida 


Often reeeMng vales: West Vkgfnto 88, 
Colorado St 82. Vlivtoki 24 Southern Mbs. 
22, LovMm Tech 14 Toledo 14 Air Force 
IX Mississippi 9. Tolene X Cbutson X 
Manhol Z MtomiOtaoX MkNgan St 1, 
Oregonl, Southern Call. 


NHL Standings 


ATLANTIC OIVGMOH 
W L T PtS 


PhDatMpNa 
New Jersey 
Washington 
N.Y. tenders 
N.Y. Rangers 
Florida 
Tran pa Bay 


Montreal 

Boston 

Ottawa 

Pittsburgh 

CaroRna 

Buffalo 


la 10 5 3 23 

r 11 5 0 22 

n 9 7 2 20 

ters 7 7 3 17 

rrs 4 4 7 15 

5 8 3 13 

I 2 12 2 6 

N«mCA8TDmSWN 

W L T Pts 
n 4 2 24 
10 6 1 21 
9 6 3 21 
8 7 4 20 

6 9 3 IS 
5 0 4 14 


CENTRAL DIVISION 


941 1,723 4 

9*0 1.693 3 

8- 0 1423 1 

9- 1 1.496 7 

7-1 1,477 8 

7-1 U43 3 

7-1 U14 9 

6- 1 U48 5 

7- 2 1J0O 10 

6- 1 1,125 11 

7- 2 995 14 

7-2 964 13 



W 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Detroit 

12 

3 

3 

27 

64 

40 

SL Loutl 

12 

5 

2 

26 

60 

41 

Deltas 

10 

6 

3 

23 

58 

51 

Phoenix 

7 

7 

2 

16 

47 

44 

Chicago 

7 

10 

I 

15 

34 

45 

Toronto 

4 

B 

3 

11 

29 

45 


Coferodo 
Anaheim 
Los Angelas 
Edmonton 
Son Jose 


pftcote nvmQM 
W L T Pts 
8 3 6 22 
8 4 4 20 
7 7 4 18 


Calgary. 3 12 * 10 49 65 

Vancouver 3 12 2 8 39 40 

SUNDAY'S HOtKH 

Edmonton 3 0 19-4 

Buffalo 0 3 19-4 

FH Parted: E-Smyth 4 (McAmmond. 
AmotB OPPl-Z E-Grier I (Deveteand X E- 
Miranev 4 ( M radt en t Bucttbergeri Second 
PMod: B-Dawe 9 (Rasmussen. SmeMk) X 
B-Dawe ID (May, Shannon] 4 B-Dawe 11 
(May) Third Moth B-Ptant* 3 (ZhfinK. 
Bwritfge] X E-McGUfe 3 (McAmmaod. 
WriphOOfe i l ioi fei None. Shots on goefcE-9- 

7-B-l— 25. B- 9-13-17-1— 4ft Cmrtts: E- 
Joseph. B-Hawt, ShMds- 
New Jersey 1 l 1—3 

N.Y. Wanders 1 0 0-1 

First Pntod; New Yarii, Jonsson 4 (Prtlfy, 
Nemdonov] 2, NJ.-Zekputin 2 tSyhora, 
Gdmourl Penally— Betord, NY (cross- 
checking) Secead Period: NJ.-Elas 8, 
P en a lty O erat a NY (sfaaMng) Third 
Period: NJ.-Carpefitar 4 (Gimour) ten). 
Penatttas— MneLena NJ (hooking); McKay. 
NJ (hooking); McCabe, NY (hooking) Shots 
rejsrtKJr 10-11-7-28, ItorMW 
13—29. Power-play Opporton*H»-NJ.- 0 of 
X NewYorkOof 2. Grades: NJ.-BrodewlO- 

3- d (29 shots-29 saves). New Ytart, Sato 5-5-1 
0745). 

Cdgtoy 0 0 1 0—1 

ados# 10 0 0-1 

FUst Parted: Chkngu-Suter 1 (Johnson 
Krt-wkrasov) Second Period: None. TWrd 
Parted: Cdgonr-COsseb 3 (Mdnnis) 
Overtime: None. Shots on ge«fc C- 10-9-7- 

4- 30. C- 6-4-7-2—19. G etdes:C-Botoson.C- 
Hochett. 

St Lotos 1 4 1-7 

Dallas 9 1 0-^ 

Hist Pariod-SJL-Modnnis L (sid.Secead 
Period: SJL-Hufl 9 (Modimta. Dudnsne) 
(pp). X D-Retd 4 (Caranuraro, Ludwig) *• 
SL* Peflerin 4 (Pronger) <M). X S.U- 
Defflttm 6 (Him, Crantrort) 6, S J_-Dem»ra 7 
CHuL Prong eri Third Period: S.L-CMM XX 
S.L-> Courtmto7(Hiin Shotted geek SLr 6- 
7-7-20. D- 4-11-11-26. Gedet: Si_- 
McUnnoTL D^Mtoub Turefc. 

Sen Jose 12 3-6 

Aotoiefta 3 l 9-4 

Hret Period: A-Selanne 16 (CuDen. 
Drtgneanlt). X Sj^NIdwfc 1 (Storm. GUI 
(pp). X A-, Sotamo 17 (Pronger. Port) 4. A- 
Selanne 18 (Mtoiam Cullen) Second Period: 
SJ .-Donovan 2 (Ran*:. Skalde) 6. A- 
MOfthaS 1 (Drury, Ask) 7, Sj.-fttosan 6 
(Hraildeb Notart (pp). ThW Period: SJI- 
Brenram 1 (HouWec Mdhofls) (pp). 9. SJ.- 
Fttesen 7 (Nohn Craven) IX SJ^, Nofcm3 


(Moulder, Vernon) (stten). Shots on grad: 
SJ.- 4-I4-10-32. A- IXX9-3X Goofies: 
SJ. -Vernon. A-HeterL 


H W Ttl ST . WFTH PAY 
TUESDAY MBfOSSAME 
AostroUo: 373 and 2M tor slit dednred 
NnTZradoncf:349andl32. 

Austnlto won by ISA im 

WIST INBin TOUR 

ABDUL CADGER KHAN » VX WEST DIDIE9 
4-DAY HATCH. 1ST DAT 
TWBOAY IH TtAWALPWDI. PAKISTAN 
West Indies; 2654 


I. Greg Norman, AvstroBa, 12,00 potato 
Z Tiger WoodbU^w 1X58 

I Ernie Els. South Africa, 9.53 

4. Nlefc Price, Zbnbabwx 9J0 

5. Masdshi Ozakl Japan. U8 

6. Doris Lorn III U&.X85 
T.CaHnMradgomerteiBrttahuBJl ' 
X PM) Mickebwt UJ- X22 

9. Moth OWooia U S, X2D 
IX Tran Lehman. U-S. TS3 
1 1 . Justin Leonard, IL5. 6.98 
1Z Salt HOAU 5.6^2 

II Dnvtd Dwol U J- 6JB 
14 Brad Faxon. Ui,d57 
IS. Nkfc Fddn Britain. 645 


TUC30AV H BJAJWnt NtANCe 

French Batuitons «L Sotita Afttco 22 


Leicester XWMMedl 
sweDBUk Manchester Ui^ed2&^ 
sonaV Btadthuni 27J Chelsea 25; Leeds 2X 
UvorpoolLefcesterTlDertj* 2ft Wimbledon 
lft Newaostte 1ft Coventry 17: Crystal 
Potato. Soufhmptotv west Ham i* Aston 
VBo 15: Tottenham IX Evcrim Ehritoit. 
Sheffield Wednesday l2> Baffisiay IX 


TUEBUAT M HANOVBL OBHIMIV 

. RED GROUP 

C«ta6 Moya Spabi'def. Pete Sampras UA 
4-3, 6-7 (4-71, 6-2. 

Patrick Bathe. AusbtHa deL Grog Rosed- 
aid Britufiv 4-i 6-X 6-4. 


AHERICM LEAOUE 

Baltimore - Hired Ray MiDts pBdeng 
coocs tor Botffanons os dittos tmswger. 

■Ewya«c— traded tb Qrorite Hayes to 
San Frandseo ter OF Chris Singtoton and 
LHP Alberto Casno. 

tcxas— P ronwtM Manny Battehi to Larin 
American scouring coordinator, 

NNnONAl LEAGUE 

. cteONHAn-Troded RHP Jaft BmnOey to 


the SL Louts ter 1 B Dmftrl Yoong. 

Colorado— A imoanoad SS WoB Wofa* de- 
dtaed to oxerdae Ittei 999 option. 


1 . Maifina Hmgtfc SwHzericmd. 6,158 potato 
X Jana Novotna Cxedi Repubdc X699 

3. LAtasay Davenport U.5» 31449 

4. Anaida COetzec South Africa X31 6 
5 Mortar Sotos. UA.X161 

6. Ivo MafoX Crootta 1068 

7. Mray Pierce. Ftonoe. 2J30 
B. Irina Splriea Romania X244 

9. Jlitwtxo Saidiez Vlaata, Spata X226 

10. CMdilla Marlfnest, Spain. ZB78 

11. MoryJoeFgmQn dra .UA, 1^43 
11 Ante Hubec Germany, 1409 
IX Sandrine Teslua France. W87 

14. NaflMt Touztat Franca 1,730 . 

15. 5le«3 GnA Camnr, US63 

januuaams 
1 , Ptoe Sampras. U A. 191 9 potato 
X MWwel Chang, U5.X130 
1 Patrich Rafter. Australia XI W 
4. Jonas Btaricmm. Sweden. 2^80 
SLGrag RosedsU Britton. X6I7 

6. ^ Yevgeny KafWnBwn Russia 2J9fl 

7. Caries Maya, Soda 1391 
X Segl Bniguera. SpaJtv X367 
9, Thomas Mustat Austria 1353 
IftMorcato raovChlft X317 

11. ESdtard Krafia*, Ndtherianib. 2J99 
1Z Ales Correria Spain, 2375 
IXPetr Knda Oeeh RepobOc X261 
R Gustavo Kuerten. 8mzB. 2J61 

15, Goran hranberic, Crofltia 1176 


NcriCMAL BASKETBALL ASSOCWKM 

SAotAMEMTO-PutF Michael Smith and G 
Bobby Hurley on toured Est. Adhntad G-F 
Tariq AbdnLWOhod and C Kevin Sataxtotf 
fmnlnturedBst. 

san antdn to-Acflwted F Owe* Person 
from Stored Rst. 

IKMIBfS NATIONAL BAfflSTBAU. 

ASSOCIATION 

wnba— Expanded to 10 teams With op- ' 
pram to franchises in Detroit and Wash- ' 
ington lor n«t season. The league also plans 
to add two more teams tor the 1 999 season. 

MOIM1JL 

NXnOHAL FOOTBALL LEAOUE 
Indianapolis— 5tanedQB Gina Tonetta 1 f 
1992 Heismon Trophy winner. 

MIAMI— Sloned FB Roeuvelt Potts to 1- 
ytwr contract. Waived DE Dunston Ander- 
son. 


HAMONAL HOCKET LEAOUE 
calcaky— R ecoOed D Jamie Amsen from 
StdntJohrvAHL , 

COLatAOO-Recafled LW Yves Sarauit 
from Henhey, AHL 

DALLAS-Adtvated RW Jeri imatn. Jte- . 
called D Sergey Gusev from Mkhtooa ihl 
R eassigned D Dan Ketzmerto MtcNgan. 

new JERScr-RecaOed RWSasbo Udwrtc 
Ann Albany, AHL Assigned LW Joy Pan- 
daitatoAbcny. 

omwA-Sfgned RW Alexandre Daigle to 
1 -year contrail ateralon. 

PMAGNDC— Recalled O Seat Goonort and * 
RW Stone Doan ftwr Sprfngfiadt AHL Ho- 
dsaigned DDeronQWnt and C Scott Levtmto 
Springfield. 

PtTTSBVtoSH— Recrted D Tountas Gran- 
rean hum Syroana AHL 

tampa bay— R ecalled LW Brent Patenon 
ttaroMOwaukealHL 
’™®°n'To— A ssigned G Morod Coastaeou 

on lean to Sf. John, AHL 

VM,eattVK i*^teilgnodDBertlliftrafsjBii 

and C LuhoteVbk to Syracuse. AHL 

wasHHcmis-Rotoined LW Andrew 

, Brunette an lean to Portand, AHL 














J fJ &£> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12. 1997 


PAGE 21 




SPORTS 




' i<M ( 49ers Romp 

And Close In 
On a Tide 


By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Past Server 

• PfflLADELPHJA _ The Phil- 
adelphia Eagles were bombarded by 

. . boos, as well as by the San Francisco 
49ers defense in a game that was ugly 
' ^ *e home team right from the start. 
The 49ers won their ninth straight 
game Monday night by converting three 

■ Philadelphia turnovers and a 73-yard 
; ' punt return by Chuck Levy into 24 firsi- 

•half points and a 24- 12 victory. 

Their unimaginative offense was 

■ -■ mostly dreadful and their special teams 
. were worse. Their defense did a decent 

; job of containing Steve Young, the 49er 
quarterback . for most of the night, but it 

• *• wasn't enough to keep the 49ers from 

- •• adding to the best record in the National 
• Football Conference. If they can beat 
• . Carolina next week at home, the 49ers 

will clinch the NFC West title. 

.The Eagles were penalized 10 yards 
. for an illegal block on the opening kick- 
• : off return, Ty Detmer’s first two passes 

- were overthrown and, on their fourth 
- ••■•play from scrimmage, a 49er linebacker, 

Lee Woodall, bashed the h all out of 
Ricky Wanera’s hands. 

San Francisco's free safety, Merton 

^^Hanks, playing with a broken left hand, 
scooped up the ball and dashed 38 yards 
I i untouched for a touchdown. 

! 4 f] by 7-6 early in the second 

u ' * ! f [[quarter, the 49ers were forced to punt. 
But Philadelphia’s Freddie Solomon 
. muffed a short kick after the 49ers’ 
ii-tlF ■ ui.Cmim Buckley made a heads-up play. 
^ pushing Solomon's teammate. Tim Mc- 
Tyer, into his own man, knocking the " 
ball to the ground. 

Buckley recovered at the Phil- 
adelphia 26 on a play that was greeted 
with a cascade of boos directed toward 
the officials. Solomon had indeed 
signaled for a fair catch, but officials 
ruled that because he muffed the catch. 


fr ftmilrj 



Tom MQulrU \pm.r rmwht 

49ers ? Merton Hanks, center, and Tim McDonald hitting Charlie Gamer. 


he and the ball were fair game. 

Three plays later, there was more 
controversy. On third and four from the 
Philadelphia 20, Young found J.J. 
Stokes open up the middle. Stokes was 
hit by Michael Zordich at the goal line 
and let go of die ball, and it was re- 
covered in the end zone by Philadelphia. 
But the officials ruled that Stokes was 
down at the 1 , prompting more boos. 

The 49ers had first and goal, and 
Garrison Heaist ran around right end to 
give San Francisco a 14-6 lead. 

Eagles special teams got burned 
again late in the second quarter when 
Levy returned a line drive 5 1 -yard punt 


73 yards straight up the middle before 
veering to his left at midfield to avoid 
the pan ter, Tom Hutton, and racing un- 
touched into the end zone. 

Four plays after a pass interception by 
Darnell Walker, Gary Anderson kicked 
a 31 -yard field goal with four seconds 
remaining that stretched the San Ban- 
cisco lead to 24-6 ar intermission. 

The Eagles put their third-team quar- 
terback. Bobby Hoying, in in the fourth 
quarter. tfle threw a short touchdown pass 
with 1:14 left, and coach Ray Rhodes 
said he would start the second-year pro 
next week at Baltimore, leapfrogging 
both Detmer and Rodney Peete. 


Selanne’s 3 Goals Don’t Save Anaheim 


The Associated Press 

Teemu Selanne continued his scoring 
spree with three goals in the first period^ 
but still finished on the losing team after 
San Jose's Richard Brennan and Jeff 
Friesen scored the goals that decided die 
game 12 seconds apart in the third, peri- 
od as the Sharks beat Anaheim, 6-4. 

Selanne has scored 17 goals in an 11- 
game streak after managing only one 

MHfc Rounpop ^ 

during his first seven games while he 
adjusted to the absence of Paul Kariya, 
his linemate, who is holding out 

Selanne scored three goals in the first 
13 minutes of the first period Monday as 
the Ducks built a 3-1 lead. Brennan tied 
the game with a screen shot on a power 
play at 7:10 of the third. Friesen then 
scored the game- winner on a rebound. 

Dmrite 3, islands rs i Martin Brodeur. 
the New Jersey goalie, stopped 28 shots 
in New York — including 13 in the third 
period. 

Patrick Elias broke a 1-1 tie with a 
goal in the second period as the Devils 


won for the eighth time in 10 games. 

Blues 7 , stars i PavoJ Demitra scored 
twice and Brett Hull added a goal and 
three assists as Sl Louis won in Dal- 
las. 

A1 Madnnis and Scott Pellerin 
scored short-handed goals and Hull con- 
nected on die power play for his first 
goal since Oct. 25. 

Flames f, Blackhawks 1 Calgary 
pulled its goalie, Dwayne Roloson, for a 
sixth skater and tied it on Andrew Cas- 
sels' tip-in with 55 seconds remaining at 
Chicago. 

The goal spoiled a shutout bid by the 
Hawks' Jeff Hacked, who played fertile 
first time since Oct. 4. 

The tie snapped Chicago's five-game 
winning streak and enabled the Flames 
to end a four-game losing streak. Cal- 
gary is winless in its last six (0-4-2). 

Hacked, who stopped 29 shots, bad 
not played since suffering a sprained 
right ankl e in Chicago’s second game. 

Otters 4, Sabres 4 In Buffalo, Jason 
Dawe scored three goals in a 6-minute- 
18-second span of the second period to 
rally the Sabres from, three goals 


down. 

Mike Grier scored his first goal of the 
season for Edmonton. 

Dan McGillis's goal with 4:24 re- 
maining, a floater from the blue line 
over the shoulder of Buffalo’s goalie, 
Steve Shields, tied it. at 4r4.. ..... 

■ Apology Over Racial Insult 

Chris Simon, the Washington Cap- 
itals wing, flew to Toronto on Monday 
night to apologize for a racial insult he 
bad directed at Mike Grier of the Ed- 
monton Oilers, The Associated Press 
reported. 

“I feel very saddened about what’s 
happened," Simon, an Ojiba Indian 
from Wawa, Ontartio, told the Toronto 
Star. "I did say what they said I said, 
and I just wanted to apologize to 
Mike." 

Grier, who is black, said Simon bad 
used a racial epithet during a melee at 
the end of the game on Saturday. 

The two players met face to face at an 
airport hotel in Toronto, where the Oilers 
were staying after their 4-4 tie in Buffalo. 
Grier sard he had accepted the apology. 


Clemens Wins Record 4th Cy Young 


By Murray Chass 

New frri Times Sen-ice 


After Roger Clemens gained his 20th 
victory of the season for Toronto on Aug. 
22, he remarked, “Not bad for the twi- 
light." The distinction be gained Mon- 
day isn’t bad for the twilight either. 

Clemens, whom the Boston Red Sox 
deemed a year ago to be in the twilight 
of his career, won the American League 
Cy Young award for an unprecedented 
fourth time. He joined National Lea- 
guers Steve Carlton and Greg Maddux 
as the only pitchers to win the Cy Young 
award four times, but in one way he beat 
Carlton in longevity. 

Ten years elapsed between Carlton’s 
first and fourth awards. Clemens picked 
up his first award 1 1 years ago. 

Clemens, who left the Red Sox as a 
free agent after 13 years, exceeded 
whatever expectations the Blue Jays had 
when they gave him $24.75 milli on for 
three years. That’s why they won’t mind 
throwing in an extra $100,000 as his 
bonus for winning the award. 

The 35-year-old right-hander re- 
ceived 25 first-place votes and a total of 
134 points from the panel of 28 mem- 
bers of the Baseball Writers Association 
of America, two from each league city. 
Randy Johnson of Seattle, who missed 
four late-season starts because of an 
ailing finger, finished second with 77 
points. He received two votes for first, 
and Randy Myers, the closer for Bal- 
timore, had the other first-place vote, 
finishing fourth with 14 points. 

Brad Radke of Minnesota was third 


with 17, Andy Pettine of the Yankees 
was fifth with 9 and Mike Mussina of 
Baltimore was sixth with 1. 

Clemens led the league in victories 
(21), earned run average (2.05) and 
strikeouts (a career-high 2921. He tied 
his teammate Pat Hentgen for most in- 
nings pitched (264). complete games (9) 
and shutouts (3). 

Speaking from Hawaii after learning 
that he had won the award. Clemens 
credited Hentgen, the winner last year, 
with providing him with an edge each 
time he pitched. 

“It was a great deal of fun to pitch 
behind Pat," said Clemens, who fol- 
lowed Hentgen in the rotation. 

He also acknowledged that Johnson's 
four missed starts helped him. 

"I think Randy would have been 
right there," he said of the left-handed 
Johnson, who had a 20-4 record, a 2.28 
ERA and 291 strikeouts. 

When Clemens won the award the 
fust time, in 1986. he had a 24-4 record 
and a 2.48 ERA. The next year he won at 
20-9 and 2.97. He tied Jim Palmer for 
most AL awards when he won in 1991 
with an IS- 20 record and a 2.62 ERA. 

Asked about being in the twilight of 
his career, Clemens laughed and said: 
"I don 't look at it like that. That was one 
guy's assessment of my baseball ability. 
That's one guy I don’t want assessing 
my baseball ability, especially sitting in 
front of a computer." 

He was referring to Don Duquette, the 
Red Sox general manager. But he 
denied that Duquette's treatment of him 
motivated him in 1997. 


“I don't need any other motivation," 
he said. "I'm pretty self-motivated." 

I Pitching Coach to Lead Orioles 

Rav Miller, the pitching coach for the 
Baltimore Orioles, was hired as the 
club's manager Tuesday. He replaces 
Davev Johnson, the American League 
manager of the year who quit last week 
in a dispute with the team’s owner. The 
Associated Press reported from Bal- 
timore. 

It will be Miller's second stint as a 
major- league manager. He managed the 
Minnesota Twins in 1985-S6 ana had a 
1 09- 130 record. 

Miller's familiarity with the ream and 
his long-term association with the fran- 
chise — he was the Orioles’ pitching 
coach from 1978 to 1985 — made him 
the top candidate to be Baltimore's 
fourth manager in five years. 

Peter .Angelos, the owner of the team, 
hired Miller last season to improve a 
pitching staff that had a miserable 5.14 
ERA in 1996. Under Miller, the Orioles 
compiled die best ERA in the American 

League and had three 15-game winners 
for ihe first time in 24 seasons. 

Miller has expressed confidence that 
he will be able to get along with An- 
gelos. who fired Johnny Oates and Phil 
Regan before butting heads with John- 
son in a stormy two-year relationship 
that deteriorated after the Orioles lost in 
the AL championship series for the 
second time in two years. 

Mike Flanagan, who was the Onoles' 
pitching coach in 2995. is expected to 
fill Miller's place. 


NBA Doubling TV Income: $2.4 Billion 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — NBC and Turner 
Sports are prepared to double the 
amount they pay to broadcast National 
Basketball Association games on their 
television networks, according to in- 
dustry sources. 

The broadcasters have agreed to pay 
the league more than $2.4 billion over 
four years, the sources said. The NBA 
informed owners of the deals during a 
dinner Monday night in New York. 

The sources said NBC would pay 
more than $1.6 billion and Turner 
Sports more than $850 million. Under 
the current four-year contracts, which 
expire after this season, NBC paid $750 
million and Turner paid $350 million. 

Neither NBC nor Turner would com- 
ment on the reports. 

■ The NBA was looking for a sizable 
increase to keep up with foe exponential 
growth in player salaries. That fueled 
speculation foe league might add a third 
partner on foe cable or broadcast side. 

With NBC’s and Turner’s exclusive 
negotiating period set to expire Sunday, 
□either network wanted to risk com- 
peting with another bidder. 

“A substantial part of foe increase is 
attributable to foe desire by distributors 
to retain exclusivity in regards to broad- 
cast and cable rights." said Neal Piison. 
former president of CBS Sports and now 
foe head of a sports consulting firm. 

The NBA is foe No. 2 television 
sport, trailing only foe National Football 
League, which earns $4.4 billion over 
four years in a deal that expires after this 
season. 

NBC is entering its eighth season 
broadcasting the NBA. Turner, which 
shows games on the TBS and TNT 
c hannels , is in its 14th season. 

One factor that has propelled foe 
NBA's popularity is that its marquee 
event is played when there is little com- 


petition for viewers. The NBA Finals, 
which used to be played in May. now 
fall in June, when there are few other 
major sports events. 

The league also attracts a younger 
audience than other sports, making it 
more attractive to advertisers and. in 
turn, to foe networks. 


NBCs ratings for foe NBA. powered 
by the popularity of superstar players 
such as Michael Jordan, have avoided 
the downward (rend afflicting other 
sports. The last two finals, which gen- 
erated a 16.7 and 16.8 rating, respec- 
tively. were foe second- and third- 
highest ruled finals in historv. 


On a Roll, Trailblazers Hand 
The Pistons 5th Straight Loss 


The Asstviaied Press 

The Portland Trailblazers staged an- 
other fourth-quarter rally to extend their 
winning streak to five. 

When Portland beat Detroit, 86-82. 
on Monday night, it was foe third time in 
four tries that foe Blazers had won a 
game in which they trailed entering foe 
final quarter. 

"Character, man," said Kenny An- 
derson, who scored 15 of his 29 points in 

NBA Bouhbup 

foe fourth quarter. “It feels great when 
you win games like that.” 

The Pjstons are at foe other end of foe 
scale. They have lost five in a row, their 
longest skid since Doug Collins became 
coach. 

Even though they were coming off a 
deflating Iflf-96 overtime loss to Van- 
couver on Sunday night, the Pistons 
started strongly, shooting ahead by 13-3 
and leading by as many as 15 points in 
foe second quarter. 

Detroit led, 47-35, at halftime, and 
foe Blazers' offense was awful. 

Then, foe Portland guards revved up. 
.Anderson stepped up foe tempo, the 


Blazers tightened their defense and Isai- 
ah Rider broke loose from a first-half 
slump to score nine third-quarter 
points. 

Anderson scored Portland's first sev- 
en points in foe fourth quarter, then 
clinched foe •victory by going 7-of-S 
from foe free-throw line down foe 
stretch. He also had 1 1 assists. 

Grant Hill scored 21 for Detroit, but 
was just 6- for- 29 from the field and had 
just four points and three turnovers in 
the fourth quarter, when he was houn- 
ded by Portland's Siacey Augmon. 

"He was tired," Augmon. an ex- 
Piston, said of HilL "They played Iasi 
night. 1 wouldn't want to take on Grant 
HUI when he wasn't playing back-to- 
back nights because he is awesome." 

“It seems like the guys we get rid of 
come back to haunt us," Hill said. “We 
probably never would have gotten rid of 
him if he’d played that well for us." 

Spun ioo, Rapton 98 San Antonio 
rallied from a 15-point first-half deficit 
as David Robinson scored 32 points at 
Toronto. 

Robinson made 12 of 17 shots from 
the field, and foe Spurs made up for 28 
turnovers by shooting 63.1 percent 



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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1997 


OBSERVER 


One-Upping George 


By Russell Baker 


_ . aerjonnsonass 

XkT ASHINGTON — The charge of pitch 
YY most ludicrous news usual for a base 


story of the mouth was the 
filing of the Baltimore Ori- 
oles’ manager, Davey John- 
son, on the day he was voted 
baseball’s “manager of the 
year.’’ Johnson was handed 
the pink slip by Peter An- 
gelos, a one-man law firm, 
multimillionaire and owner 
of the company that operates 
the Orioles. 

We are told by the 
sportswriters that Angelos 
simply dislikes Johnson. The 
reasons are not altogether 
clear. It is suggested that 
Johnson has been too cheeky 
for Angelos’s taste. 

Or that Angelos has 
George-Steinbrenner envy 
and wants to show fellow 
baseball tycoons that he can 
sloughoff managers with even 
more insouciance ' than the 
Lord of the Bronx. Steinbren- 
ner, for all his great record at 
firing managers, has never 
fired a manager on the day said 
manager was officially certi- 
fied “manager of the year.” 

□ 

Of course, Steinbrenner's 
total-of managers fired far ex- 
ceeds Angeles's. This may be 
because Angelos is a new- 
comer to the national pastime, 
having owned the Orioles a 
mere four years. In that time 
he has now fired three man- 
agers, a rate that suggests he 
plans to set a heated pace 
which may force Steinbren- 
ner to look to his laurels. 

It is already being noted 
that Steinbrenner failed to fire 
Joe Torre as manager of the 
Yankees after the team won 
the World Series in 1996. ‘ 
People are asking, “Is Stein- 
brenner gening soft?" 

At this writing Angelos is 
said to be on the verge of 


hiring another manager, one 
Ray Miller, who worked un- 
der Johnson as submanager in 
charge of pitchers. It is un- 
usual for a baseball tycoon to 
hire a new manager so soon 
after firing die previous man- 
ager. It is considered just a bit 
unseemly, like Hamlet's 
mother’s remarrying before 
the funeral meats had cooled. 

Defenders -of Angelos 
praise the rigorous decorum 
that led him to fire the man- 
ager of the year. 

□ 

The story has it that John- 
son had fined one of his play- 
ers, Roberto (The Spitter) 
Alomar, a relatively negli- 
gible sum of money for in- 
fractions of discipline and 
had wanted it paid to a charity 
for which Mrs. Johnson 
works. Although the fine has 
not yet been paid, Angelos is 
said to be appalled by John- 
son’s behavior. 

• Angelos’s defenders say he 
is an ardent admirer of Ab- 
raham Lincoln and seeks al- 
ways to do what Lincoln 
would have done in critical 
situations. The firing of John- 
son, they say, had its origins 
not in Steinbrenner envy but 
in the famous incident when 
Lincoln passed judgment on 
Ulysses S. Grant. 

Lincoln’s generals had reg- 
ularly been finishing in the 
second division against 
Robert E. Lee until Gram 
took over. Then people came 
to Lincoln asking if ne knew 
that Grant was drinking. 
Drinking — yes. Mr. Pres- 
ident — whisky. 

On hearing this. Lincoln 
was so appalled that he did 
what he thought Peter An- 
gelos would do in the same 
situation: He fired Grant 

That’s why we now live in 
the Confederate States of 
America. 

New York Tunes Service 


Bruce Willis Takes a Chance at Being a Bad Guy 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Tunes Service 


L OS ANGELES — - Even Bruce Willis says that Bruce 
Willis is an unlikely movie star. “When I was coming 
up, there were guys like Robert Redford and Paul Newman 
and Warren Beatty — those were movie stars,” he said. "I 
never imagined — " His voice trailed off. “It all got handed 
to me pretty quickly." 

Willis was speaking on one of the final days of filming for 
a new action drama, “Mercury Rising,’ ’ in which he plays a 
federal agent protecting an autistic boy who has deciphered 
some volatile classified information. 

A week or so later. Willis plunged into making a mega- 
budget action film, “Armageddon, 1 ’ directed by Michael Bey. 
In dim movie he plays an oil driller who is sent via space shuttle 
to drill a hole in a giant meteor that's hurtling toward the Earth 
and destroy it with a nuclear device. ("It's big, it's fun, it's a 
laiger-than-life thing," the actor said with a laugh.) 

In the meantime, his newest finished film, “The Jackal," 
based loosely on the 1973 movie ‘ ‘The Day of the Jackal, 1 ’ 
will open Friday. 

“I try not to go bock to back, but who's complaining?" 
said Willis, who usually earns $15 million to $20 million a 
film and knows that any complaints would sound ludicrous. 
“My dad was a mechanic, a pipe fitter, he worked around the 
calendar every year and took two weeks off every year. Am 
I complaining?" 

Blunt, en gaging and a bit irascible, Willis, at 42, seems at 
the pinnacle of an unpredictable career that has been char- 
acterized by some surprisingly shrewd choices and per- 
formances. In “The Jackal," which was directed by Michael 
Caton-Jones, Willis plays the v illain - a mysterious assassin 
who has been hired to eliminate a top government official. 
Seeking to foil him is an imprisoned member of the Irish 
Republican Army {Richard Gere), who has a history with the 
Jackal, and the FBI's deputy director (Sidney Poitier). 

Except for his part in Alan Rudolph’s “Mortal 
Thoughts," a modest 1991 movie that also starred his wife, 
Demi Moore, and is one of his favorites, Willis has never 
played a bad guy. 

“I've been wanting to do it for a long time," be said, 
“because I always noticed that the bad guys just had more 
fun. Sure, you don’t get the girl at the end — you generally 
get killed — but just as an actor, it seemed so much more 
freeing. I just wanted to take some chances." 

Caton-Jones, a British director who also made “Rob 
Roy,” ‘This Boy’s Life" and “Scandal" said that Willis’s 
intensity and involvement had surprised him. 

“There are two sides to Bruce — the savvy businessman 
who knows you have to play certain heroes, and then there’s 
the artistic side, screaming to get out," said the director. “Of 
all these- action-movie stars, Bruce has the most acting 
chops." 

Over the years. Willis has had a reputation as a bad boy on 
the set He insisted that this was a dated notion, and Caton- 
Jones said the actor behaved like few movie stars. “He 
would suggest cutting scenes if it moved thin gs along.' ’ the 



£BR«*d 


Willis as an assassin in his new film, “The JackaL” 

director recalled. ‘ ‘He doesn't have the kind of tunnel vision 
that most movie stars have. He's sensitive to people on die 
set; he realizes if they’re good, he’s good. He’s constantly 
trying to break down die barriers that his celebrity erec- 
ted." 

Seated on the set of "Mercury Rising,” which will be 
released in the spring, Willis was asked if it was weird being 
a movie star. He broke into laughter. “It is weird; it's very 
weird,” he said. 

“Anything singular is weird. Yoa have no thin g to com- 
pare it to. It's a strange existence. It’ snot just die money; it’s 
all of it.” 

Weird existence or not, Willis has deftly handled his 
movie-star career, and unlike his contemporaries in die 
action genre, like Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwar- 
zenegger, he shows no sign of hitting a wall as he gets older. 
Sure, he starred in the hugely successful “Die Hard" films, 
but when it was suggested that he was known primarily as an 
action hero, Willis interrupted immediately. 

“What does that mean?" he said, eyes flashing. “Let’s 
examine that What does that mean? I’m known as an action 
hero because those movies madealot of dough, but I've done 
all kinds of movies, all kinds, romances, comedies, dra- 
mas." 


Actually, what has separated Willis from his rivals is not 
so much die typos of films he has appeared in but his ironic 
style, his working-class persona and, perhaps most im- 
irtant, his New York theatrical training, which has helped 
■n avoid being frozen into an acting mold. 

He played a haunted Vietnam veteran in the 1989 film ‘ ‘In 
Country”; then, in the early 90s, he played a gangster in 
“Billy Bathgate," a spoof of himself in “The Player." a 
meek bespectacled physician in “Death Becomes Her,’ a 
forlorn boxer in “Palp Fiction” and a philandering con- 
tractor in Robert Beaton's * ‘Nobody’s Fool." More recently 
he starred in two science-fiction movies: Terry Gilliam's 
“ 12 Monkeys” and Luc Besson’s “Fifth Element” 

He has also been in an array of poorly received films, 
including ‘ ‘The Bonfire of the Vanities,' ' “Hudson Hawk.’ 
“The Last Bey Scout” and “Striking Distance.” but he has 
always seemed to emerge from these relatively unscathed. 

Willis was especially criticized in magazine articles for 
seif-indulgence after the 1991 capex “Hudson Hawk”: he 
was a co-writer of the stray and die title song. Willis said that 
tfy. witin'gm of that film riirin *t rankl e him, but mention of the 

movie touched a nerve. “Did it hurt me?” Willis said. ‘ ‘ It's 
in profit Nobody’s interested in that” 

Like many people in Hollywood, even the most powerful,- 
Willis contends that he’s not thin-skinned, but criticism 
clearly stays with him. “The gift 1 got from ‘Hudson 
Hawk,’ ” he said, “was that I don’t expect another good 
review. If would be great if I got the nice press that some 
actors get without trying, but I don’t need iL" 

Willis's bursts of candor, coupled with his average-guy 
appearance, have somehow enhanced his persona on screen. 
In many ways he's a throwback to movie actors who worked 
successfully in fee studio system, churning out one film after 
another. 

Asked to describe the roles he prefers, Willis, paused and 
said: “For whatever reason. I'm attracted to guys who are 
trying to work thin g s out, guys, who have problems, guys 
who are trying to overcome obstacles. Maybe that comes 
from a blue-collar background; I just don’t know." 

-In fact Willis seems to cling to his blue-collar background, 
despite his wealth, his marriage to a high-profile -movie 
actress and a life that has taken him far from his hometown. 
Peons Grove, New Jersey. He worked after high school at the 
nearby Du Pont chemical plant, like his father, then quit to 
study acting at Montclair State College. 

“I had whai alcoholics call fee moment of clarity.” he 
recalled. 

“1 looked at those guys working in die plant, walking in 
fee same steps every day, and I said, ‘Not me.’ As soon as I 
began acting in college. I felt blessed. I found a home." 

These days, when they are not working, Willis and Moore 
spend most of their time wife their three young daughters at 
a sprawling ranch in Hailey, Idaho, a town whose Main 
Street has virtually been renovated by fee couple. 

“I don’t live in L.A. because it’s a pretty weird town, 
weird place, and I don’t want to raise my kids here,” he said. 

‘ ‘Living in a small town keeps me a lot more grounded, gives 
me a much better perspective on what I do for a living.” 




NEW YORK AUCTIONS 


PEOPLE 


Beyond Picasso, the Seductiveness of Modern Art 


By Souren Melikian 

Inierwtioiuil Herald Tribune 


N EW YORK — In a sale lasting 
just under two hours, 57 of the 58 
paintings and prints by leading avant- 
garde masters of the 20th century 
from the previously little-known col- 
lection of fee late Victor and Sally 
Ganz sold for $206 million. This ex- 
ceeded fee $125 million Christie's 
presale estimate by more than 60 per- 
cent. 

A large group of paintings by Pi- 
casso — including “Dream,” an ag- 
gressive portrait of the artist's com- 
panion Marie-Therese Walter, which 
rose to $48.4 million courtesy of a 
telephone bidder — guaranteed that 
the collection would be focused on by 
the entire art world involved in mod- 
em paintings. 

But fee high prices paid right from 
the beginning for fee New York 
school pictures and drawings ex- 
ecuted from fee 1950s through fee 
1980s proved that fee phenomenal 
success of the sale largely exceeded 
the fascination wife Picasso’s name. 
When Richard Tuttle’s “Blue Pole.” 
a pale blue bar painted on a shaped 
panel, shot up to $266,500 and Brice 
Marden’s black rectangle wife thin 
white lines, drawn around 1964-1965, 
sold for S420.500, insiders knew feat 
the sale was on track. 

From then on, it proceeded as if no 
one had ever heard of glitches on the 
stock exchange, confirming what the 
sales of Far Eastern jewelry conduc- 
ted in Hong Kong the week before at 
Christie's already suggested: The will 
to buy among those who buy out of 
desire is unaffected by what goes on 
in fee financial markets right now. 

The sale held Monday indeed con- 
solidated the position of the New 
York school as seldom before. It was 
not just works carrying household 
names such as Robert Rauschen- 
berg’s 56.38 million “Red Interior” 
that soared sky high. Lesser names 
sometimes performed even better 
proportionately, as if buyers with 
more limited capital were looking to 




Picasso’s “Dream,” the most expensive of the sale, at $48.4 million. 


artists in the second financial division 
to satisfy their itch to collect Eva 
Hesse’s "Unfinished, Untitled, or 
Not Yet.” a title feat describes fishnet 
bags containing polyethelene, paper, 
sand and cotton, is a greater surprise at 
$2.2 million, almost triple fee high 
estimate, than many pictures wife 
great signatures. 

These, however, naturally attracted 
fee highest prices, wife Picasso lead- 


ing far and away. The "Femmes 
d ’Alger" series painted in 1954 and 
1955, in a style retaining the geo- 
metrical tines of his much earlier Cu- 
bist phase and adding the contrasted 
colors of early 20th-century Fauvism, 
triumphed as expected — but at a 
price level that few thought could be 
attained. The most expensive, “Les 
Femmes d’Alger" (version “O”), 
was also fee most striking image, like 


A 14-carat gold pendant, 
given to Marlene Diet- 
rich by one of ber lovers, the 
French actor Jean Gabin, 
was bought by fee American 
TV star Ellen DeGeoeres 
and her companion, the act- 
ress Anne Hecbe. According 
to People magazine, fee two 
paid $2.8 million for fee 
pendant at a recent Sotheby’s 
auction in Beverly Hills. 

The pop artist Peter Max 
acknowledged in a Manhat- 
tan courtroom that he con- 
cealed from tax authorities 
more than $1 million in sales 
from his artwork between 
1986 and 1992. Max faces a 
maximum sentence of ten 
years in prison and a fine of 
up to $500,000. 

□ 

The supermodel Karra 
Mulder is giving up the cat- 
walk to concentrate on parallel 
acting and singing careers, a 
Dutch newspaper reported. 

□ 

George Clooney was 
crowned “fee sexiest man” 



George Clooney, whiner of the * ‘sexiest man” title. 


“Vinkulum I” (detail), by Eva 
Hesse, was sold for $1.2 million. 

some poster of the quintessential Pi- 
casso of later years. This too made 
nearly triple the estimate at $31.9 
milli on. 

A carefully devised strategy, from 
fee fat, deluxe museum-style sale 
catalogue to a string of exhibition- 
style viewings all over fee world, was 
a key factor in fee success. It re- 
minded one of 'fee propaganda tech- 
niques used in die political arena, wife 
its mix of sloganeering and tips 
adroitly fed to fee media. That too will 
remain as one of the elements that 
made the Ganz sale a historic event in 
terms of our modem culture. 


of the year by People magazine. The “Bat- 
man" actor was followed by Denzel Wash- 
ington and Brad Pitt, the 1995 and 1996 
winners of this award, which has been given 
each year since 1985. 


□ 


Donald Trump is 
which in (nm promotes 


his book, 
p and his recovery 
sfirly se 
effort,' 


Donald to the dumps. In his new effort. Trump 
makes a rare admission: His financial woes 
were his own fault “Trump: The Art of the 
Comeback,”, is the tale of his return from near- 
bankruptcy to a personal net worth esti mated at 
$1.4 billion by Forbes magazine. 

□ 

"Perfect Circle," a film directed by the 
Sarajevo native Ademlr Kenovic about life 
after die loss of one’s family, and “Beyond 
Silence,” a German film directed by Car- 
oline Link about a girl raised by deaf parents 
who decides to become a clarinet player, 


shared fee top prize at the 10th Tokyo In- 
ternational Rim Festival. 

□ 

With fee customary pomp, crime writer 
Ruth Ren dell has taken her seat in Britain's 
House of Lords as Baroness Rendell of 
Babergh. Rendell, fee creator of the Inspector l 
Wexford series who is known for her fine* 
plotting, was appointed a life peer in July by 7 
Prime Minister Tony Blair. 

□ 

A felony vandalism charge has been 
dropped against an art student accused of 
damaging a painting by Yoko Ono. Jason 
Platt, 22, who was accused of using a red 
marker to deface “PartPainting/A Circle" on 
OcL 16, said there was a placard at the Cin- 
cinnati exhibition inviting others to partic- 
ipate in fee art “I know I wasn’t doing 
anything wrong to begin wife. I didn't mean to 
hurt anyone. I am glad it came to a peaceful 
solution.” 




4 




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