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Iferalfc 


INTERNATIONAL 


UBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

L 


igation of 
ted Attack 

Netanyahu Defends Action; 

§ &0-50 Prisoners to Be Freed 
As Part^f Swap for Agents 

bf (hr Ss# Front Ditptmkes 

JERUSALEM — Israel has ordered an inquiry into 
the botched assassination attempt against a leader of 
the Islamic ^iTitnnt movement Hamas in Jordan, 
Prime Minister Benj amin Netanyahu said Monday. 

“In the cahmet meeting, the government decided to 
establish a eufrification committee to investigate the 
incident in Jordan,’ 1 Mr. Netanyahu said after chairing 
an emergency meeting of minis ters. 

The committee was set up after Israel confirmed it 
had freed the founder of Hamas, Sheikh Ahmed 
Yassin, from a life-in-prison sentence in a deal with 
Jordan following die arrest in Amman of two sus- 
pected agents of the Mossad secret service. 

I V The two men had been held since an attempt to kill 
$<■ Hamas’s political chief, Khaled Meshal, on Sept 25, 
and were retained to Israel on Monday, government 
ministers said. 

- Israel said it had also released 20 Palestinian and 
Jordanian prisoners as part of the swap, which took 
Sheikh Yassin home to Palestmian-mled Gaza on 
Monday, five days after he was pardoned and moved to 
Jordan for medical treatment 

The U.S. president, Bill Clinton, declined to com- 
ment on the events in Jordan, but noted that U.S. policy 
forbids political assassinations. 

“Since the government of Israel and the govern- 
ment of Jordan have made no comment about this; I 
think it is inappropriate for me to make any com- 
ment,” Mr. Con ton said at the White House. 

Mr. Netanyahu, under fire, declined to give details 
of the botched operation, but defended the action as 
just. “Sometimes, as in every war, we have mishaps 
i and we have failures,” he said at a news conference. 
» "The responsibility for this war is in the end mine.” 

Jordan confirmed that it had released the two Is- 
raelis in return for prisoner releases and peace pledges 
from Israel. State television said nine Jordanian pris- 
oners returned to Jordan on Monday under the deal and 
14 more were expected to be returned soon. 

“Within about two weeks, we will hand over be- 
tween 40 and 50 people,” said Ariel Sharon, Israel's 
infrastructure minister. “I want to stress again we are 
not speaking of Hamas people or terrorists with blood 
on their hands.” 

See ISRAEL, Page 12 



(tribune 



No. 35,645 


East German Files 
Lead FBI to Seize 3 

Ex-Pentagon Analyst Is Linked 
To a 20-Year Spying Operation 


By Tim Weiner 

iV<*h‘ York Times Service 


i 


Sheikh Yassin, the Hamas founder, being carried into a stadium in Palestinian-ruled Gaza, five 
days after he was released from an Israeli prison, where he had spent eight years of a life sentence. 

France and U.S. Sidestep Friction 

NATO Troubles Persist, but Forces Will Expand Cooperation 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — While NATO continues to cause friction 
between Paris and Washington, the French and U.S. 
defense minis ters said Monday dial they were hoping 
to expand military cooperation between their aimed 
forces in future alliance missions such as the current 
operation in Bosnia. 

This approach would enable France to significantly 
expand contacts between its armed forces and the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization and improve the 
capability of the Western nations to work together in 
combat situations — without requiring Paris to rejoin 
the integrated military command that is viewed in 
France as an instrument of U.S. control over Europe. 

“We are hopeful that the combined and joint task 
forces will develop in a way that enables France to 
participate in more of our work,” Defense Secretary 
w illiam Cohen said in Paris alongside his French 
counterpart, Alain Richard, after bilateral talks. 

The cask forces he cited ore a new formula for 


cooperation inside NATO that provides for a group of 
allies to undertake a military operation without ne- 
cessarily involving the whole allian ce. In particular, 
die concept is designed to enable European countries 
to undertake a mission under European command with 
the United Stales supplying logistic help but not 
ground forces. 

By publicizing their hopes for closer practical mil- 
itary ties, the two sought to limit problems arising from 
France's decision, reiterated at a NATO meeting last 
week, to freeze moves toward full reintegration. 

What remained potentially discordant amid this 
sound of harmony was the continuing frustration of 
President Jacques Chirac, who publicly endorsed anti- 
American views about European security in Moscow 
last week. Many conservative groups, and some fac- 
tions in the Socialist-led government, also oppose 
uses with Washington. 

lere are key players in Paris who could see 
advantages in raising tire stakes with NATO and 

See NATO, Page 12 


French Amass Bitter Evidence for Vichy Trial 


By Craig R- Whitney 

New York Times Service 


PARIS — Georges Gheldman was 11 when the 
French police in Dax. acting at the bidding of the 
Ge rmans then occupying southwest France, caxne for 
his mother July 16, 1942. Coming home from school 
that day, he found a handwritten note that said, simply, 
“Come quickly and meet me at the police station.” 

He went, and police kept him overnight before 
letting him go to a friend or his mother's. 

“Dear Aunt,” he wrote the next day to his mother’s 
sister, in French with a terrified child's misspellings 
and factual and grammatical mistakes, “I'm writing 



Miqi 4 ua*w uv iahmv mm* ““ ■ “ ” — ------ 

lore me away from Mama after spending the night in 


the German prison, there were 10 people and two 
children and this morning she left with other Jews to 
Merignac where they are going to consantrate them 
and then they will go to Germany.” 

Berthe Gheldman did go to Germany, on July 19 — 
then to Auschwitz, and her son never saw her again. 

But it was French police, not the Germans, who 
sent her on her way. 

And it was Maurice Papon, French prosecutors 
say, who as secretary-general of the Gironde Pre- 
fecture between May 1942 and August 1944 signed 
scores of orders to French police to satisfy German 
demands by rounding up hundreds of foreign-bom 
Jews like Mrs. Gheldman and sending them to a 
French concentration camp at Drancy, north of Paris, 
the first stop on the way to Auschwitz. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Papon, 87, will go on trial in 
Bordeaux on charges of complicity in' Nazi crimes 



t to death 

Berthe Gheldman. 

French 

police, providing one small link in a chain of 50,000 
pieces of evidence that lawyers, victims’ relatives and 
iitors have amassed. The evidence against Mr. 
i also includes arrest reports to his superiors, 
r. Papon has said he did not have direct authority 
over police and in any case did only what the 
Germans or his French superiors ordered him to do. 
He has also said he spared the lives of French Jews by 
trying to limit arrests and deportations to Jews from 
foreign countries. 

Mr. Papon is not just any defendant, and this is not 
just any trial. He will be the highest-ranking French 
official during the German occupation to go on trial 

See FRANCE, Page 12 


WASHINGTON — Three one-time 
student radicals — a former Defense 
Department official; her husband, a 
labor union leader, and their friend, a 
former Pentagon paralegal — were 
charged Monday with spying for East 
Germany for nearly 20 years. 

The Federal Bureau of Investigation 
said in a 200-page affidavit that the 
force had been trying co penetrate the 
upper echelons-of the United States gov- 
ernment, with decidedly mixed results, 
since their days as Communist sym- 
pathizers on foe campus of die Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin m Milwaukee in 
the mid-1970s. 

The FBI said it had identified the 
force — Theresa Marie Squill acote, 39, 
a Defense Department analyst until 
January; her husband, Kurt Alan Stand, 
42, a regional representative of an in- 
ternational workers’ union, and James 
Q ark, 49, now a private detective — by 
analyzing the files of the former East 
German intelligence service. 

The affidavit said they had been paid 
tens of thousands of dollars over the 
years, communicated with their East 
German handlers in foe language of 
Christian missionaries spreading the 
faith in a heathen nation, and traveled 
throughout Europe, Mexico and Canada 
to deliver information to their hand- 
lers. 

Mr. Clark persuaded an unidentified 
State Department official to give him 
secret documents on foe Soviet Union in 
foe 1980s, the affidavit said. 

But none of the information the three 
are alleged to have sold as spies seems to 
have altered the course of foe Cold War 
in foe slightest, the affidavit suggests. 

AfterEast Germany ceased to exist in 
1990, it said, foe three tried without 
much luck to work for foe Soviet Un- 
ion. „ 

The affidavit said East Germany’s 
relationship with the Stand family goes 
back to Mr. Stand's father; who re- 
cruited him as a Communist agent. 

An undercover “sting” operation foe 
FBI ran on Ms. Squillacote over the past 
year, in which an agent wearing a hid- 
den microphone posed as an ideolog- 
ically sympathetic South African of- 
ficial. recorded some potentially 
damning remarks. 

For example, the affidavit said, Ms. 
Squillacote, a lawyer, told the agent that 
she had “violated Federal 18, Tots and 
lots” in her past work with the East 
German service. 

Title 18 is the Federal Criminal 
Code. 

The affidavit depicts Ms. Squfl- 
lacote’s attempt, which can be read as 

back intefhe game of^nations” aiter 
the collapse of communism. 

In June 1995, while working at foe 
Pentagon, she sent a letter to a South 


Heated Debate Over Global Wanning 

Japan Proposes Easing Rules on ‘Greenhouse Gases 9 for Poorer Nations 


By Mary Jordan 
ana Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Service 


A" 

V, 


- TOKYO — Japan, the host of a major 
envir onme ntal conference in Decem- 
ber, announced Monday that it would 
not seek to include such developing 
nations as China, India and Brazil in a 
treaty to require reductions in carbon- 
dioxide emissions from cars, power 
plants and factories. 

Inwjri, Japan called on the United 
States, the European Union and other 
industrial nations to shoulder foe burden 
of reducing the gases that have been 
blamed for global wanning and other 
danger ous changes in world climate. 

Because foe United States is foe only 
nation insisting on including develop- 
ing nations, foe decision has set up a 
showdown between Washington and 
European and Asian nations mat could 
lead to the Kyoto conference ending 
without any agreement 

“The discussions are in danger of 
breaking down over the question of 
what deyriOpinB coupes nt*d to do.” 
Andrew Kerr, an official of the World 
Wide Fund for Nature, said in Tokyo. 

Japan's plan calls for foe industrial 


countries to agree in Kyoto to cut carbon 
dioxide, methane and other “greenhouse 
rases” by an average of S percent from 
their 1990 levels by the year 2012. 

But Japan is also proposing a flexible 
plan that allows individual countries to 
set differing targets, according to a com- 
plicated formula tied to their gross do- 
mestic product, gas emissions per capita 
or papulation growth. That means, ac- 
cording to the Japanese government, 
that Japan, the United States and other 
countries would actually have to reduce 
their emissions by only about 2J5 per- 
cent over the next 15 years. 

Leading environmentalists labeled 
Japan’s plan a "joke” and said it was so 
watered down that it weakened any 
chance that a meaningful global agree- 
ment would be reached in Kyoto. 

rihe European Union Executive 
Commission in Brussels rejected Jean’s 
for not being “ambitious enough,” 


[The EU insists on a 15 percent cm in 
emissions by 2010.] 

Greenpeace Japan said Japan’s pro- 


posal would be so ineffective in stop- 
ping global warming that it called into 

a uestion whether Japan deserved to be 
te conference host Kiko, a network of 
200 Japanese environmental groups, 
said Japan’s plan amounted to “leading 
the world to a failure.” 

The proposal is “an international dis- 
grace,” a Greenpeace official Bill 
Hare, said. But the Japanese govern- 
ment's position highlights the division 
here between business leaders, who op- 
pose the new regulations, and envir- 
onmentalists, who favor them. It shows 
how difficult it will be within two 
months for more than 150 nations com- 
ing to the Kyoto conference to agree on 
how to combat global wanning. 

Japan also says that it has already 
spent a great deal of money and effort on 
reducing the gases caused by foe hom- 
ing of coal, gasoline and oil, and it 
argues that it should not be expected to 
make as many further cats as countries 
that have made less of an effort 

See JAPAN, Page 12 



ENVIRONMENTAL WARNING — President Bill Clinton urging coun- 
tries to adopt “realistic and binding” (baits on greenhouse gases, rage 12. 


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Tories Gather Under a Blacker-Than-Ever Cloud 


By Dan Balz 

Washington Post Service 


LONDON — Five months ago, foe British Con- 
servative Party suffered its worst electoral defeat of the 
century. Since then, things have only gotten worse for 
the i 




lows : 

begin to dislodge Prime Minister rony . 
extended honeymoon, and their new leader, William 
Hague, has ratings krw enough to make Newt Gin- 
grich, speaker of foe U.S. House of Representatives, 
feel loved. 

On the eve of tbeir annual party conference in 


Blackpool, on England’s northwest coast, foe Con- 
servatives were squabbling about almost everything: 
why they list foe election, their posture toward 
Europe, foe pace of internal reforms, the capabilities of 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

their new leader — -even Mr. Hague’s decision to share 
a hotel suite this week with his fiancee. 

The party of Margaret Thatcher and Winston 
Churchill, which has dominated British politics for 
much, of foe postwar era, suddenly faces along period 
in the wilderness. Many analysts, indeed, even some 
Conservatives, already have conceded the next elec- 
tion to Mr. Blair and his New Labour Party. Others 


warn that, unless drastic changes are made quickly, the 
Conservatives face eventual extinction or near-per- 
manent minority status if Mr. Blair succeeds in re- 
structuring political alignments here. 

The most dire predictions may prove to be pre- 
mature. The Conservatives suffered a crushing defeat 
in. 1945, when the British people turned out Churchill 
and brought in ’a Labour government, but Conser- 
vatives were bade in power six years later. Still, their 
rapid descent into near-irrelevance since foe election. 
Kac be*r» stunning, 

The Tories face many of foe same problems that 
confront Republicans in the United States. “The Con- 

See TORIES, Page 17 


African government official who was a 
leader of his country’s Communist 
Party. It discussed the “horrors” of 
“bourgeois parliamentary democracy” 
and obliquely suggested opening a 
channel of communication. 

The affidavit said Ms. Sqnillacote 
ept with joy when she received a 
inly. 

ut the South African official had 
turned her letter over to his government, 
which passed it onto the United States, 
which set the FBI off on the undercover 
operation, foe affidavit said. 


W' 


"ST 


See ESPIONAGE, Page 12 


Nobel in Medicine 
Goes to American 



Kao OrfcM/na Aaodnsd fttn 

Stanley Prusiner, who dis- 
covered a protein that causes 
“mad cow” disease. Page. 7. 


AOENPA 

Prodi Seeks Fact 
To Save Budget 

ROME (AFP) — Prime Minister 
Romano Prodi began talks Monday 
with the Communist leader Fansto 
Bertinotti to try to strike a deal on a 
1998 austerity budget that could 
make or break his government 

At stake was not only foe im- 
mediate future of the center-left co- 
alition, but also Italy’s ability' to 
meet the criteria for entry into a 
single European currency at its in- 
ception in January 1999. 

Shortly before entering the 
mime minister’s official residence, 
Mr. Bertinotti, head of foe Refoun- 
ded Communist Party, confirmed 
his refusal to vote for the 1998 draft 
budget as it stands. 

Mr. Prodi has insisted he will not 
withdraw the draft budget or allow 
it to be seriously diluted. 

The Refounded C ommunis ts 
normally support the government 
but are not part of it They declared 
opposition to foe bill last week. 


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U.S. Plans Mission 
To Study Total Deal 

WASHINGTON (Realm) — 
U.S. experts will soon visit Fiance, . 
Russia and Malaysia as part of a 
U.S . probe to determine if sanetions 
should be imposed in connection 
with the $2 billion Total SA gas 
deal with Iran, foe State Depart- 
ment said Monday. Meanwhile, 
Defense Secretary William Cohen 
said that U.S .-French ties would not 
suffer because of the deal. Page 5. 


MAE TWO 

JHamu Tapes and Controversy 


AMERICAS Pm 3, 

'flu White Bouse ‘Coffee* Videos 

- Page 10, 

- Page 10, 
• Pages 8-9, 


Books. 


Crossword, — 

Opinion 

gports .......... Pages 22^23.' 


The IHT on-line vv'.vvv ihl rot 


J. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


PAGE 14 


PAGE TWO 


Invesi 


‘Hoiv Could He?’ / A Biographer Goes for Broke 


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Cashing In on Diana, the Prince and the Other Woman 

T 3 „ rw D„u " with me. But it was Got it in one; knew exactly. ‘Camilla gave you 

B&lz hot and cold, hot and those didn't she?’ He said: ‘Yes, so what s 

w **mgron Post Semes cold." She said she wrong? They’re a present from a friend.’ And 

L ONDON — Shortly after they were 
engaged. Prince Charles reached out to 
his bride-to-be, the future Diana, Prin- 
cess of Wales. “Oh.” he said as bis 


By Dan Balz 

Washington Post Service 

L ONDON — Shortly after they were 
engaged. Prince Charles reached out to 
his bride-to-be, the future Diana, Prin- 
cess of Wales. “Oh,” he said as bis 
hand found her waistline, “a bit chubby here, 
aren’t we?" By the time of their marriage, 
Diana’s waistline had shrunk from 29 inches to 
2316 inches. “I knew the bulimia started the 
week after we got engaged,” Diana said latex. 

Diana's account of the incident is included in 
a new edition of Andrew Morton's best-selling 
biography, “Diana, Her True Story — In Her 
Own words," which began arriving in London 
bookstores Friday and quickly sold out of its 
initial shipments. 

Mr. Morton insists that his revised biography of 
Diana includes no new blockbusters or shoe long 
revelations. But from the point of view pf Buck- 
ingham Palace and the princess's family, it con- 
tains far worse: 18,000 poignant and acid-tipped 
words from Diana herself describing her brief, 
miserable life as a member of the Royal Family. 

Mr. Morton long claimed that Diana was not 
involved in the preparation of the book, but last 
week he revealed that she had taken part in a 
series of taped interviews. The furor that fol- 
lowed the initial publication of Mr. Morton's 
book five years ago has, if anything, intensified. 
Then the question was, Is it true? Now it's, How 
could he? 

Diana’s family has threatened legal action, 
and Buckingham Palace has branded the au- 
thor's decision to republish the book so soon 
after Diana's death “particularly sad.' 1 Many of 
the tabloids that once pursued Diana down every 
block and across every continent have now 
turned on Mr. Morton, accusing him of cashing 
in on Diana's death with no regard for the 
feelings of her family, particularly her two sons. 
Prince William and Prince Harry. 

Meanwhile, as demand mounts for the $25 
hardback, the author remains unrepentant He 
says he is proud to have been selected by Diana 
as her biographer, boasts that he has obtained 
‘ * the scoop of the century’ * and staunchly asserts 
that the princess would “be happy” that the 
world now can read in her own words what Life 
was like in a fairy tale gone bad. 

There are many revealing nuggets in the tapes, 
which form a new from section of the book. But 
the most sensational involve Diana’s account of 
the relationship between Charles and his mis- 
tress, Camilla Parker Bowles, an affair that Di- 
ana discovered even before her marriage and that 
haunted her ever after. Some of the incidents 
have been mentioned before, but not in Diana's 
own words. 

Two weeks before her marriage in 1981, Di- 
ana recalled finding a parcel in an office at 



Camilla Parker Bowles arriving at Bighgrove, the 
country home of Prince Charles* who held a dinner party 
for her and 80 guests on her 50th birthday in July. Diana 
apparently knew of their affair before her marriage. 


Buckingham Palace. She opened it and found a 
gold chain bracelet with the letters “F” and 
“G" intertwined — for “Gladys" and “Fred," 
the names Prince Charles and Mrs. Parker 
Bowles used for one another. 

“I was devastated," Diana said to Mr. Mor- 
ton. Told the bracelet was to be delivered that 
night, Diana said her reaction was one of “rage, 
rage, rage! Why can’t he be honest with me. But 
no, he cut me absolutely dead." 

She went on: “He'd found the virgin, the 
sacrificial lamb, and in a way he was obsessed 


with me. But it was 
hot and cold, hot and 
cold." She said she 
later told her sisters 
about it: “I can’t 
many him, I can’t do 
this, this is absolutely 
unbelievable." Their 
response was, “Well, 
bad luck, your face is 
on the tea towels, so 
you're too late to 
chicken out." 

Before their wed- 
ding, Charles left on a 
long trip to Australia 
and New Zealand. 
Shortly before his de- 
parture, he and Diana 
were in his study talk- 
ing when the tele- 
phone rang. “It was 
Camilla." Diana 
quietly left the room, 
rather than cause a 
scene. “It just broke 
my heart," she told 
Mr. Morton. Later she 
was photographed 
sobbing as he depar- 
ted in lus airplane. The 
public assumed it was 
because she was sad to 
see her prince leave. 

Another time she 
overheard Charles, in 
3p his bath, talking on 
the telephone to Ca- 
milla. “Whatever 

happens I will always 

ifa AMonatni fvo love you," Diana re- 
called hearing him tell 
his mistress. 

grove, the This time she con- 

Id 'dinner party 

lay tn July. Diana said. 

er marriage. E ^ na Jb- 

_f sessed with Mrs. 

Parker Bowles. As 
she walked up the aisle at Sl Paul’s Cathedral on 
her wedding day, “I was looking for her." At 
Balmoral on her honeymoon, “I dreamt of Ca- 
milla the whole time." 

She recounted that on their honeymoon, she 
and Charles were opening their diaries to discuss 
some upcoming events. “Out come two pictures 
of Camilla/’ 

In another instance, she recalled a white tie 
dinner during their honeymoon for President 
Anwar Sadat of Egypt. “Cufflinks arrive on his 
wrists — two C's entwined like the Chanel C’s. 


wrong? They’re a present from a friend.’ And 
boy, did we have a row." 

Y EARS LATER, Diana told Mr. Mor- 
ton, she decided to confront Mrs. Park- 


TRAyELUPMEE. _____ 


Strike to Disrupt French Trains 

PARIS (Reuters) — A 36-hour strike will severely disrupt 
French trains from Tuesday evening to Thursday morning, the 
state railroad company said Monday. 

The train company said Euros tar trains between Paris and 
London via die Channel tunnel would not be affected, but that 
high-speed TGV trains on other routes would be cut by up to 
two-thirds. Long-distance traffic will also be severely dis- 
rupted, as well as suburban trains in the Paris region. 

Turkey to Help Stranded Tourists 

ANKARA (AP) — The government promised Monday 
that thousands of stranded Scandinavian, German and British 


tourists would be flown back to their countries, after a Turkish 
tour operator sunk into a financial crisis. 

“Nobody will be left suffering from this," Tourism Min- 
ister Ibrahim Gurdal said on television. 

An estimated 14,000 tourists are stranded in resorts, mostly 
on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast, a tourism official said. 

El APs Shopping Sprees to London 

TEL AVIV (Reuters) — Shopping mad Israelis will soon 
have the chance to go on one-day sprees to London. 

Israel 's El Al Airlines, seeking to nano w its losses this year 
and stimulate traffic during the low season in November, said 
Monday it would offer “Fly and Buy" round-trip tickets to 
London on Thursdays for about $330. 


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X er Bowles directly. She unexpectedly 
joined Charles in attending Mrs. Park- 
er Bowles’s 40th birthday party. Noticing late in 
the evening that her husband was missing, she 
walked downstairs to find him in conversation 
with his mistress and another man. She asked to 
have a private word with Mrs. ParkerBowles and 
told “the boys" to leave. 

“I said to Camilla, ’Would yon like to sit 
down?' So we sat down and I was terrified and I 
said, 'Camilla, I would just like you to know that 
I know exactly what is going on between you and 
Charles, I wasn’t bora yesterday.”* On the 
tapes, she said die encounter "wasn't a fight — 
calm, deathly calm, and I said to Camilla, ‘I'm 
sorry I’m in the way, I obviously am in the way 
and it must be hell for both of you, butl do know 
what is going on. Don’t treat me like an idiot. 

In the car on the way home, “my husband was 
all over me like a bad rash, and I cried like X have 
never cried before — it was anger, it was seven 
years' pent-up anger coming out I cried and 
cried and cried and 1 didn’t sleep that night. And 
the next morning when I woke up I felt a 
tremendous shift” 

Later in recounting the encounter, she said to 
Charles, “I just said I loved yon. There's nothing 
wrong in that" She said she added: “I’ve got 
nothing to hide. I'm your wife and the mother of 
your children.” 

In the tapes, Diana also talked about her 
desperate efforts to win Charles’s affection and 
her attempted suicides. One day she threw her- 
self down a flight of stairs at Balmoral, hoping 
for attention from her husband. 

“But he just said, ‘You’re crying wolf,’ ” she 
said. Another night, she said, Charles would not 
listen to her when she wanted to talk to him. "So 
I picked up his penknife off his dressing table 
and scratched myself heavily down my chest and 
both thighs. There was a lot of blood and he 
hadn *t made any reaction whatsoever. ” 

From Diana's account, her husband offered 
little comfort as she struggled with bulimia. 
“Even if I ate a lot of dinner, Charles would say. 
’Is that going to reappear later? What a waste.* ' 
In the tapes, Dianasaid of Queen Elizabeth, “I 
a dmir e her. I long to get inside her mind and talk 
to her, and I wfiL” 

Prince Andrew, she said, was “very, very noisy 
and loud," but that while he was dismissed * ‘as an 
idiot" he was actually "very shrewd and astute." 
And she said her husband was a wonderful father. 
“He loved the nursery life and couldn't wait to get 
back and do the bottle and everything.” 


WEATHER 


Christian Men| 
Buoyed, Plan 

Rallies Abroad 


By Gabriel Escobar 
and Caryle Murphy 

BWgwi Post Srmtrg 

WASHINGTON — After staguui 
what was possibly the largest religSJ 
gathering in the United States, jfc 
founder of the Promise Keepers cvbs: 
gelical movement, BUI McCartney, h** 
affirmed plans to go abroad, saying fe 
believes God "wants us to go global’* 
The ministry plans to expand its & 
teruational operations greatly, focusing 
on Africa, Asia and Latin America 
which for years have been fertile gronna 
for evangelical groups. 

This part of the operation is deemed 
so central that it has become the sob 
focus of Randy Phillips, the president of 
Promise Keepers, who has traveled 
abroad to establish what he calk 
"beachheads’* for the ministry. 

Mr. McCartney’s outlined 

a dramatic makeover for the ministry of 
born-again Christians, affecting how it 
finances its vast operation and how fc 
carries its message. He said afro 1 the 
massive rally Saturday in Washington; 
which drew perhaps half a million par- 
ticipants. that the new strategy would 
include rallies in the SO state capitals on 
Jan. 1 of the new millennium, where 
men would say. "We teach, preach, 
model and live racial recondliaficta.’ 1 _ 
The call to assemble at state capitals, ! 
along with the decision to idy almost 
entirely on voluntary, catunbutioos 
rather than admission fees to religious 
rallies, again raised questions about the 


end that Promise Keepers would avoid 
politics. Asked in a televised interview 
on Sunday whether he would run ftir 
president u he felt God was urging him 
to do so, Mr. McCartney, a Republican, 
smiled and said: “Absolutely. I’d be a 
fool not to." 

The central tenet of Promise Keepers 
— to make men better husbands and 
fathers — remains unchanged. 

For contributions, Paul Edwards, 
vice president for ministry advance- 
ment, said Promise Keepers would tap 
into what be called the “fairly large 
file" of potential donors it has amassed 
daring seven years of operation. 

Mr. Edwards also said the ministry 
would seek donations from “Christian 
corporations whose values represent 
ana are close to ours.' * 


Europe 






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ern China. Soaking rains 
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PAGES 


THE AMERICAS 


Congress Chases 
‘Coffee 5 Videos 

+ \ f 

A Hunt for Fund-Raising Tapes 


By Geoige Lardner Jr. 

Washington PeaSmir* 


WASHINGTON -As the 
jiylute House, turned over 
wdeotapes of 4 of President 
Biil Cfintoo s 'coffees with 
e^mpaign contributors, 
wurces in Congress said they 
had been told that White 
IJouse logs indicated that as 
many as 150 fund-raising 
events involving the presi- 
lt or Vice President A] 
re were also recorded by 
lite House audiovisual 
cjews. 

“r The tapes of the morning 
epffees, showing only the 
Spit of the meetings, were 
ostensibly covered by Senate 
^quests for documents rel- 
evant to campaign financing 
inquiries submitted to the 
Vyfiite House as far track as 
$$t January and again in a 
subpoena July 31. 

interest to Sen - 


{ 


ubpoena July 
, One clip or i 

ate investigators, who were 
reviewing the videos, dealt 
iyph a June 18, 1996, coffee 
with Mr. Clinton at which 
John Huang — a Democratic 
fund-raiser at the center of the 
over the 1996 campaign 
-*t- is said by one witness to 
jtjive appealed at the outset of 
Uje meeting for money to help 
re-elect the president. 

Other witnesses have said 
they did not recall hearing 
Kftr. Huang make such re- 
Tfyaifcs, but could not reject the 
possibility. 

f, A Senate investigator said 
Mjund accompanied every 
pne of the 44 breakfast meet- 
ing tapes except for the June 
1 8 get- together. A showing at 
(tie White House on Sunday 
evening for the press con- 
firmed that 

,*"We may have a Rose 


Mary Woods problem here," 
die it 


investigator said, refer- 
ring to President Richard 
Nixon's secretary, who 
claimed to have been respon- 
sible for an 1 816-minute gap 
on one of Mr. Nixon’s Wa- 
tergate tapes. "This is a miss- 
ing 60 seconds." 
j-The White House special 
counsel. Lanny Davis, said he 


had “no immediate comment 
about audio problems on that 
particular tape." 

"We are looking into it," 
be said. 

Paul Clark, spokesman for 
the Senate Governmental Af- 
fairs Committee headed by 
Fred Thompson, Republican 
of Tennessee, said that, the 
contents of the videotapes 
aside, "this is just one more 
example of the White House 
seriously delaying our inves- 
tigation." 

On Friday, Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno rejected a de- 
mand by congressional Re- 
publicans that she request the 
appointment of an independ- 
ent counsel to Investigate a 
variety of allegations against 
Mr. Clinton arid Mr. Gore, 
including bribety and misuse 
of campaign funds. 

In doing so, Ms. Reno said 
her investigators had found 
no evidence of criminal 
wrongdoing by the president 
or vice president in several of 
the most controversial as- 
pects of the 1996 re-election 
campaign. 

Mr. Davis of the White 
House said the discovery of 
the tapes was die result of "a 
good faith effort" by the 
White House to comply with 
Congress's requests. “We’ve 
said we would conduct on- 
going searches for new ma- 
terial and that's what 
happened here," he said. 

"The counsel’s office be- 
came aware of the tapes of the 
coffees on Wednesday." he 
continued. "We informed the 
Senate committee about their 
existence on Thursday and 
we met with Senate staff 
members on Friday." 

The tapes were made by the 
White House Communica- 
tions Agency, a unit of the 
Pentagon that provides a 
steno pool for White House 
events; supplies the lecterns, 
flags and seals for White 
House media functions, and 
keeps what officials said was 
a 60~day record of operator- 
assisted telephone calls 
placed by Mr. Clinton and 
Mr. Gore. 



POLITICAL 


Bi-am 


President Clinton shaking bands with Mr. Huang on one of the White House tapes. 


Away From 


Politics 


• The police in North 
Carolina are searching 
for David Scott Ghantt, 
an employee of the ar- 
mored car company 
Loomis, Fargo & Co., 
after the company dis- 
covered as much as $15 
million missing from a 
warehouse. (AP) 


• A valuable stand of 
old-growth cedars is safe 
from chainsaws, thanks to 
a swap between the U.S. 
Forest Service and a saw- 
mill owner in Idaho. But 
critics of the deal said the 
owner, Man; Brinkmeyer, 
paid less than $2 million 
for die grove in 1992 and 
obtained $8.7 million 
worth of federal land in 
exchange. (NYT) 


Votes Don’t Matter 
To The Hill’s Insiders 


In-House Winemaker 


WASHINGTON — Sandy Home, the 
star reporter of the weekly paper The Hill, is 
among a new breed of correspondents bur- 
rowing so deep inside Congress that le- 
gislation itself has become largely beside 
the point Two highly competitive news- 
papers, The Hill and Roll Call, several faxed 
newsletters and some new on-line publi- 
cations cover politics and personalities. But 
much of the resulting mountain of reportage 
both originates and is consumed on Capitol 
Hill, and some of it reads like an in-house 
message from one lawmaker to another. 

“I can spend all day on the Hill and not 
know what a single vote is about,' ' said Mr. 
Hume, the 28-year-old son of the TV jour- 
nalist Brit Hume. ‘‘Almost everything they 
vote on is irrelevant to oar mission.'' 1 

Several heavy consumers of Capitol news 
say this increased focus on not just inside- 
the-Beltway but mside-the-brrikling news 
makes lawmakers even more isolated. 

"It creates this ‘Looking Glass' world of 
mirrors reflecting more and more off one 
another and less and less of the outside 
world," said Representative Charles Sche- 
mer, Democrat of New York. 

With shortened news cycles requiring ever 
faster reactions, some legislators and staff 
members say the House in particular, which 
has never been considered a contemplative 
institution, has become even less so. But 
some readers point oat that the extensive 
coverage also makes it harder to hide pork or 
plain misbehavior. (NYT) 


WASHINGTON — Representative 
George Radanovich arrived at Two Quail 
restaurant on Capitol Hill some months 
back with a botde of wine in hand. 

By evening’s end, be had persuaded the 
chef and management to add die label to its 
list 

For the two-term California Republican, 
it was just another day of toil in the vine- 
yard. 

Since 1985, he has grown and pressed 
grapes for his Radanovich Winery, which 
now produces about 4,000 cases a year. 

In a Congress rife with lawyers and ca- 
reer pols, Mr. Radanovich is Capitol Hill's 
only full-time winemaker, not to mention 
the first vintner in California's Mariposa 
County in the Strain Nevada foothills. 

His wines are available nationwide, but 


his output is a drop in the cask compared 
‘ ~ Val fcs 


with the Napa Valley mega-vineyards. 

* ‘Gallo produces about 380 million cases 
to my 4,000,” he said. “I am amons the 
smallest of the small." 


among the 
(WP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Alan Simpson, 

at reform of fund-raisi 


a former senator, on at- 
j legislation: 

lost of the people in the Senate these 
days think the word ‘compromise' means 
wimp, and that’s why they don't legislate. 
It’s worse in the House. It' s like a slave ship 
over there, where the Republicans came out 
of the hold after 40 years down there and 
slaughtered everyone on deck.” (NYT) 


Clinton Issues First Big Line-Item Vetoes 


By Eric Pianin 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON -- President Bill 
Clinton made the first extensive use of 
his new line-item veto authority Mon- 
day by striking funding for 38 projects 
worth $287 million from a $9.2 bil- 
lion military construction bill that he 
signed last week. 

"These were difficult decisions,” 
said Mr. Clinton’s press secretary, 
Michael McCurry, "because some of 
the projects were certainly worthy but 
they don’t meet the criteria" estab- 
lished by die White House. 

The action is certain to touch off an 
angry bipartisan response on Capitol 
Hill because the president is going 
after "pork-barrel" projects that 
were sponsored by Republicans and 
Democrats alike. White House of- 
ficials contacted legislators Monday 
morning, before die announcement of 


details, to advise them that their pro- 
jects would be vetoed. 

The administration signaled last 
week that it would make liberal use of 
the line-item veto authority and could 
strike hundreds of pork-barrel pro- 
jects from a handful of 1 998 spending 
bills — including energy ana water, 
defease and military construction. 

White House officials have com- 
plained that die military construction 
bill contains 129 projects the Pentagon 
did not seek; they were added by House 
or Senate Appropriations committees 
or by conferees who met last month to 
work out differences in the two cham- 
bers' bills. The projects include Na- 
tional Guard and Reserve centers, run- 
way upgrades, barracks construction 
and child-care centers in 44 states. 

Senior White House officials said 
they had devised criteria to target 
projects across the board to avoid 
being criticized for punishing Repub- 


licans while sparing Democrats' pro- 
jects. Moreover, they said, while de- 
termined to make extensive use of the 
veto to weed out undeserving projects 
and discourage future efforts at pork- 
barrel spending, Mir. Clinton and his 
advisers tried to be sensitive to con- 
gressional prerogatives. 

"We took the approach." said 
Gene Sperling, the top White House 
economics adviser, "mat if we vetoed 
all the projects that weren't requested 
by the administration,’' it "would be 
viewed as using the line-item veto to 
deny Congress an appropriate role in 
determining military projects." 

Nonetheless, he said, the president 
and his top aides decided late last 
week to "bite the buffer" and make 
wide-ranging cuts in military con- 
struction projects to demonstrate their 
co mmit ment to controlling current 
and future spending. 

The line-item veto legislation that 


took effect this summer is the result of 
a conservative movement on Capitol 
Hill to balance the budget and end 
wasteful spending. But many of the 


appropriators responsible for writing 
tne 13 annual 


spending bills charge 
lightly 


that the administration is taking lightly 
Congress's power of the purse. 

list summer, Mr. Clinton used the 
authority for die first time to strike 
three relatively obscure provisions 
from the tax legislation accompanying 
the balanced budget package. Many 
projects now being targeted are backed 


by powerful leaders in Congress. 
While 


the administration expects 
an angry response from Congress, it 
will get some political cover from 
Senator John McCain. The Arizona 
Republican, who is waging a cam- 
paign against pork-barrel spending, 
has urged Mr. Clinton to kill scores of 
construction projects in the spending 
bills emerging from Congress. 


In a year's time 


it will be a Rolex. 


* - 


Every single Rolex begins its life as a solid ingot of 18ct. gold, 
platinum, or stainless steel. Then, while the massively strong Oyster 
case is being sculpted from the solid metal, the self-winding movement 


*f ! 



that beats within is painstakingly constructed. Every single part of 


the movement is tested, inspected, and cleaned ultrasonically over and 
over again. In all, it takes a whole year to create a Rolex. Not such a • 
long time, perhaps, for a watch that is engineered to last a lifetime. 



f 


* 


ROLEX 

. of Geneva 


!li 


I ■'! 


i r* 










PAGE 4 


’AGE 14 


8000 

720Qp^o/l 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY OCTOBER 7, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


For Malaysia, Can One \ National Card’ Do It All? 



By Thomas Fuller 

International Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — If the Malaysian 
government has its way, every person over 12 
years old in this country of 20 million will 
soon have a piece of silicon in his pocket . 

Bidding is under way for a project that will 
produce the ultimate “national card’’ — a 
card with identification, driver’s license, 
medical information and immigration status 
all crammed onto one computer chip. The 
card will also feature an electronic purse, 
replacing cash for small purchases. 

Similar plans for national cards exist in 
other countries — Singapore is working on a 
national card project, and South Korea is 
considering using chips in driver’s licenses. 

But the people involved in Malaysia's one- 
citizen, one-chip project say it is the most 
ambitious plan by any country to combine 
government services on one card. 

Planners bill the project — part of the 
country's drive into the global multimedia 
industry — as a practical way to make gov- 
ernment more efficient. The immig ration 
portion of the chip will speed up border 
formalities, they say, and the health card will 
store medical information to improve dia- 
gnosis and emergency care. The electronic 
purse will eliminate the need for cash when 
buying things like a newspaper or a cup of 
coffee. 

The project, estimated to cost at least $800 


million to launch, is being pushed by Prime "Politely, I wc 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad, who at age challenge,” said . 
7 1 has his own World Wide Web page (http:/ temational, anoth 
/www.smpke.jpm.my/jaring/pm/pm.html). role in the project 
For years, officials in Malaysia — where Tests are schedi 
citizens over age 12 already cany a paper residents of metre 
national identity card — have been studying due to be issued tl 
plans to streamline and harmonize govern- But already the 
mem services, and now the effort seems em- climb down fron 
bodied in the card 
project. The plan will, * 

for example, require On-one piece of silicon; 
the police, doctors and i , , 

newsstand vendors to Identification, a drivers 

have compatible chip- license, medical information 
reading equipment, _ \ c r re 

but each would have and c&sn tor a cop ot coffee, 

the ability to access 
only certain potions 


“Politely, I would say it’s going to be a 
challenge," said Alex Tan of Hypercom In- 
ternational, another company bidding for a 
role in the project 

Tests are scheduled to begin next year, and 
residents of metropolitan Kuala Lumpur are 
due to be issued their cards before 2000. 

But already die card’s planners have had to 
climb down from initial plans to include 
credit and debit card 


he has a car. And he’s not at home, so we can Taleban Extends Photo Ban 


of the chip. The police will be able to store 
such data as traffic infractions on the card, 
and a newspaper vendor will be able to debit 
the card for the cost of a magazine. 

The project, if successful, would offer 
Malaysia the opportunity to export the system 
to other countries. "It’s just going to put 
Malaysia so far ahead of the other countries 
that they're going to broker that into an 
intellectual-services industry,” said Bob 
Hepple a smart-card specialist at Visa In- 
ternational, one of the bidders in the project. 

But given die scope of the plan, and the 
country's current financial situation, the "if' 
in the project looms large. 


facilities in the first 
r silicon: phase of die project, 

. , which would have 

a drivers created what one in- 

I information ana & st «u«! 

a Chase Manhattan 
Cup of coffee. driver’s license.” 

Kuala Lumpur 

now plans to follow 
what is euphemistically called a “two-card 
approach.'' The government card would even- 
tually be merged with a national payment card 
— a plan that skeptics say may never happen. 

Of more immediate concern to planners is 
the security of the card- Mr. Hepple of Visa 
offered this scenario: A person parks his car 
in the middle of Kuala Lumpur and pays the 
parking fee with the electronic purse function 
of his card. 

"Are people going to be comfortable that 
their nam e and address are available to that 
parking meter?” Mr. Hepple asked. "Is that 
parking meter going to break the law, decide 
that, ‘OJC, this guy is obviously rich because 


Under the Haze, Illness Rises 


CoupOtd by Oar From Dap&iaa 

KUALA LUMPUR — Haze from smoky 
fires in Indonesia has caused substantial in- 
creases in the numbers of people in Malaysia 
suffering from respiratory ailments and eye 
infections, officials reported Monday. 

The deputy health minister. Siti Zaharah 
Sulaiman, told members of Parliament there 
had been a 65 percent increase in asthma 
cases among adults recently and a 66 percent 
rise among children. 

She said the increase in upper-respiratory 
tract infections was 22 percent for adults and 


1 1 percent for children. 
Conjunctivitis cases 


Conjunctivitis cases rose by 61 percent 
among adults and 44 percent among children, 
she added. 

The deputy minister did not give figures for 
the number of people actually affected by the 
fires that began in midsummer, but health 
officials estimated two weeks ago that more 
than 15.000 Malaysians had been admitted to 
hospitals and eludes with respiratory ill- 
nesses. 

A medical report from Singapore said 
acute respiratory tract infections rose by 
nearly 1 .200, to 10,378 cases, in the last week 
of September from the previous week, the 
Straits Times reported. 

Asthma cases rose by more than 200 in the 


week, to 1,228, the newspaper’s repent said. 
Although there were fewer complaints of 
- acute bronchitis and skin allergies at clinics, 
there were more cases of conjunctivitis, runny 
noses and allergic r hinitis - 

Meanwhile, the Air Pollutant Index, which 
monitors the level of harmful pollutants in the 
air in Malaysia, shot back up Monday after 
several days’ respite caused by heavy rains. 

The index in six areas, including Kuala 
Lumpur, was in the “unhealthy” range. 

A Meteorological Department spokesman 
said the increase was due to southeasterly 
winds carrying smoke caused by the forest 
fires in Indonesia. 

Meteorologists said again Monday that 
monsoon rains might wash away the haze 
problem soon, and the environment minister 
in Indonesia warned that setting fires to clear 
land for farming could threaten survival. 

"Look, if we don’t change our ways, we 
won’t survive as a nation, all right?” Sar- 
wono Kusumaatmadja told reporters. "I hope 
by this time it’s clear to everybody.” 

The warning came after a prediction that 
monsoon rains would start this month. 

Normally, heavy seasonal rains keep the 
fires in check, but this year, monsoons have 
been delayed by El Nino, an abno rmal weath- 
er pattern over the Pacific. (AP, Reuters ) 


go and burgle his house?' ” 

Chip designers and card manufacturers say 
there is always a technical answer to security 
concerns. "Data are put in separate com- 
partments and guarded by secret keys,” said 
Raphael Auphan, general manager in Malay- 
sia for Gemplus, a leading smart-card com- 
pany based in France. "Only certain devices 
can access the different compartments.” 

Bat experts say they also wonder whether 
patting that much data on one piece of silicon 
is a good idea. 

"This would never go over in Germany or 
the U.S. or the Scandinavian countries.' ' said 
a Malaysian official involved in the project. 
“In Malaysia, it's different. The minute 
we’re born we already have a number. That’s 
where the cultural differences come into 
play.” 

Even with the Western countries seem- 
ingly out of die picture, the official said he 
was little concerned about room for growth 
outside of Malaysia, noting that expansion of 
the card system into the nine-member As- 
sociation of South East Asian Nations, or 
ASEAN, might be the next step. 

“We are thinking about whether we should 
have an ASEAN-wide standard so that die 
card that is issued in Malaysia or Singapore or 
Indonesia can be used region-wide,” the of- 
ficial said. 

“But we have to prove that it can work first 
in Malaysia.” 


JSSQjgsgF*. 


KABUL — The Taleban army has ordered all pictures 
of people and animals destroyed, declaring them of. 
fensive to Islam. Taleban officials said Monday. 

Until now the Taleban had forbidden, photography un- 
people but it did not outlaw pictures of oofl-Musumsor 
animals. Few Afghans have cameras or pictures of thcj£ 
ancestors. _ ' . "*■ 



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An Indonesian soldier maneuvering Monday through burned-out tropical forest. 


takeover one year ago, fitness centers have displayed •! 
pictures of bodybuilders. 

It was not yet known what the punishment, would be 
but minor offenses usually carry a beating. (AP) 

Work Resumes on Korea Plant -■ 

SEOUL — Construction of two nuclear reaetots in- 
North Korea resumed Monday, five days after the Com- 
munist country accused South Korean workers of defiling"- 
a newspaper carrying the picture of its leader Kim Jong 
officials here said. .*:< 

Work on the Western-provided reactors was baited last’ j 
W ednesday after North Korea demanded an apology and 
a promise to prevent die recurrence of similar incidents. 

South Korean officials rejected the North Korean de-L 
mand, arguing that the alleged ripping of the newspaper,** 
found in a trash bin, was not intentional. They pomtedcwt r 
that it’s common LnSouth Korea for old newspapers to be 
.thrown away. (APty 

m 

Queen Keeps India Trip Plans 

LONDON — Queen Elizabeth II on Tuesday begins a 
12-day state visit to Pakistan and India to nunc the 50th 
anniversary of the two countries' independence, which 
officials hope will not be marred when she visits the 
Indian city of Amritsar. 

Intense security will surround the visit by the queen and ' : 
Prince Philip to Amritsar on OcL 14, with an estimated' 

5.000 police on duty. 

British forces massacred hundreds of civilians In Am-' ! 
ritsarin 1919. _ ■ 

The Indian government originally advised against m- J 1 
eluding Amritsar in die queen’s itinerary, but the trip now.' 
has the full support of both the Punjab government and- 
New Delhi. The queen has said she would not apologize’ 
for the massacre during the visit. (ArPj^ 

Flood of Cambodian Refugees: 

BANGKOK — The number of Cambodians seeking"' 
refuge in Thailand has risen to nearly 50,000 in recent, 
days as more people flee their homes, Thai officials said 
Monday. • ■; 

Provincial officials in eastern T hailan d said 6,000 to' 

7.000 Cambodian refugees had entered the country over^ 
the weekend. 

Cambodian government forces under Second Prime.;' 
Minister Hun Sen have been fighting a Khmer Rouge ' 
guerrilla faction allied with the ousted first mime min- 
ister, Prince Norodom Ranariddh, near the Thai border 1 
since August "We haven’t heard so much fighting but', 
they seem to be scared of something,” one Thai official! 
on the border said. (Reuters) 


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185 Dead After Tamils 
Attack Military Base 

The Associated Press 

COLOMBO — Several hundred Tamil Tiger rebels 
stormed a military base in northern Sri Lanka, provoking a 
three- hour battle that left at least 185 people dead and 262 
injured, the government said Monday. 

Thirty-four soldiers and at least 150 rebels were lulled in the 
clash, a military spokesman, Kumara Dewage. said. Sixty-two 
soldiers and 200 guerrillas were injured, he added. 

The separatist Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam had no 
immediate comment on the clash, which took place in the 
Muliaittivu district, 260 kilometers (160 miles) north of 
Colombo. The government’s casualty figures could not be 
verified; journalists have been barred from the war zone. 

The camp housed some of the estimated 20,000 government 
troops who have fought for five months to capture a 70- 
kilometer stretch of rebel-controlled road leading to the north- 
ern city of Jaffna. Jaffna, a former guerrilla stronghold, is now 
under government control, but the overland access route to the 
city remains under Tamil control. 

Sunday's attack was the biggest clash between the two sides 
since July 30, when 67 soldiers and 200 rebels were killed in 
fighting after guerrillas a t t ack e d military positions in nearby 
Omantai. The rebels have been fighting for an independent 
Tamil homeland since 1983. The war has claimed nearly 
50.000 lives. The government offensive that began May 13 
has gained barely one-fourth of its territorial objective and has 
been repeatedly slowed by rebel counterattacks. 


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PAGE 5 




EUROPE 



f-Freuch Ties Won’t Suffer Over Iran Oil Deal, Cohen Says 


Whitney 

■ ^ fobTbnesSmilcr 


y -S* defense secre- 
S meeting 

JEJS?* .cP^terpait Monday 
Jhat whaiever.acjQn the United States 
took against, a French oil company’s 

“ »v«t $2 billion in Iran 
;would not undermine close U.S.-French 
[relations. 

' statement came after several 
[houn of taUcshere between Mr. Cohen 
*** French defense minister, Alain 
^Richard, and apparently reflected a de- 
jcision. ^Washington not to seek a show- 
down with the French over a decision by 
jTotai S A* a privately owned French oU 

[Company, to nut £2. hi Him. inm Amlni- 
itation of an. 


it $2 billion into exploi- 
'"“““ w an. uanian natural gas field, 
Russian, and Malaysian partners. 
to We beligve that t ransac tion will 
^pubstantially;, enhance Iran’s ability to 
iac^uire the revenues necessary to ac- 
|quire misSfle technology and weapons 
iof mass destruction,” Mr. Cohen said 


Monday. “What action will flow from 
that re mains to be determined, but we 
Intend to maintain a close relationship 
with a very good ally.” 

“We both want to see Iran end state- 
sponsored terrorism and end its efforts to 
acquire missile technology and weapons 
of mass destruction,” be added. 

Mr. Richard said that all IS European 
Union countries had withdrawn their 
ambassadors from Tehran after a Ger- 
man court finding that banian leaders 
had ordered the assassination of three 
Iranian Kurdish dissidents in a Berlin 
cafe in 1992. 

* ‘When there is a terrorist action that 
is proven, we will draw the con- 
sequences,” Mr. Richard stud. 

But he declined to say whether 
French intelligence agreed with Amer- 
ican assessments that ban was trying to 
acquire die technology to build nuclear 
weapons, and missiles to carry them, 
from Russian. and other experts. 

Mr. Richard said the French gov- 
ernment had told officials of Total that 


there was no reason, in international or 
French law, for them not to go ahead 
with the investment in ban. 

A U.S. law, the lran-Libya Sanctions 
Act, commonly called the “D ’Amato 
law” after its Senate sponsor, Senator 
Alfonse O' Amato, Republican of New 
York, authorizes the Clinton adminis- 
tration to take sanctions against Amer- 
ican subsidiaries of any company that 
invests more than S20 million in Iran. 

Reports from Washington over the 
weekend said that the Clinton admin- 
istration might waive sanctions if the 
European Union stepped up pressure on 
Iran to end support of terrorism. 

"'Hie United States has not decided 
what action to take, but will enforce the 
law,” Mr. Cohen said. 

Later, replying to a question, he said: 
“I understand the position the French 
have taken. It is my hope that Minister 
Richard understands the position the 
United States government has taken.” 

Unlike Prime Minister Lionel Jospin, 
who went out of his way last week to say 


that he personally “rejoiced” in Total’s 
decision, Mr. Richard also appeared de- 
termined to play down rather than high- 
light differences between Washington 
and Paris over the step. 

“We stand very vigilant over Iran,” 
he said. “We observe with interest the 
ongoing changes in I ranian domestic 
politics, with the hope that they will 
someday yield resolve to build a more 
peaceful relationship with neighboring 
states.” 

Mr. Cohen, apparently responding to 
French concern, said that his order Last 
week sending the U.S. aircraft carrier 
Nimitz to the Gulf five days ahead of 
schedule was primarily aimed not 
against Iran,' which allegedly carried out 
air strikes in southern Iraq last month, 
but against Iraq’s president, Saddam 
Hussein, for unilaterally violating 
United Nations orders barring Iraqi 
flights in the area. 

■ Total Expects Record Profits 

Total expects full-year 1997 profit to 


reach a record level, the company's 
chairman, Thierry Desmarest, said in an 
interview with La Tribune on Monday, 
Reuters reported. 

In a favorable economic environ- 
ment, and “thanks to die steps we have 
taken fra* growth and productivity gains. 
Total's first-half results reached a re- 
cord,” he was quoted as saying. 

“And we should also reach a record 
for the full year, with the last record 
dating back to 199 1 with net earnings of 
5.8 billion francs,” or $981.1 million, 
he said. 

He said that growth in demand for 
petroleum products should be 1 .5 percent 
to 2 percent annually, so refinery margins 
“should continue in the future a bit better 
than they were in 1993-1995.” 

The crude oil price is slightly above 
expectations, he said, but Total is cau- 
tious and wants a satisfactory return on 
its projects with crude at around $15 per 
barrel, “even if we feel we are in a 
dynamic system where the price of $18 
a barrel can hold.” 


[Clinton Aides Confident 
|0n Eve of NATO Debate 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 




PARIS ■ — Clinton administration of- 
ficials said Monday they were confident 
iof winning what promises to be a dif- 
jficult debate in the Senate over NATO 


Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright will testify Tuesday at die start of 


ion 


! “Lots of things have changed and 
[eliminated earlier worries raised about 
enlargement,” according to a Stale De- 
[partment spokesman, James Rubin. 

1 Speaking in a telephone interview, 
iMr. Rubin singled out die earlier fears 
[that NATO expansion would alienate 
■Moscow, jeopardize nuclear arms con- 
trol and slow reform in Russia. 

■ “We've shown that we can walk and 
. ichew gum at the same time,” he added. 
u' -saying that Moscow and Washington 
\ ‘continue to have problems over NATO 
enlargement but now handle them in 
[what he called “a constructive, prob- 
■Jem-solving way that contributes to 
[European security.” - 
; Reassurance about Russia will help 
twin Democratic votes in the Senate, 
■where the Republican majority earlier 
[voted two nonbinding resolutions in fa- 
[vor of fast NATO enlargement So, he 
[said, “we're starting wife a comfortable 


base of support.” Other officials agreed, 
saying that questions about enlargement 
— including costs and problems m Bos- 
nia — often come not from critics but 
from supporters of enlargement. 

“Now we’re starting to really scrub 
those issues, and the tone of discussion 
in closed sessions with Congress shows 
that people are ready for answers — and 
we've got them,' ’ said an official in the 
Office of NATO Enlargement at the 
State Department. 

Asked about a public letter from the 
Foreign Relations Committee chair- 
man, Jesse Helms, Republican of North 
Carolina, placing conditions on his sup- 
port, a State Department official called 
die message “forward leaning and wel- 
come because we're confident that 
we're going to do all the things he says 
he wants in enlargement.” 

The Senate debate is likely to provide 
the only public cross-examination of 
Western officials about NATO's inten- 
tions because the European countries 
appear set to ratify expansion with little 
or no discussioa 

Both in Europe and the United States, 
the salient issue seems likely to be cost. 
The Clinton administration has called 
for $2 billion in U.S. spending over the 
next 13 years for enlargement, while 
existing European allies would be asked 
for $10 billion more — and the new 
allies $15 billion. 



^rnf FrUkr-h 

William Cohen, the Pentagon chief, left, inspecting an honor guard with Mr. Richard in Paris on Monday. 


“The thing that the European allies 
can do most to help us win ratification is 
to say that they recognize there will be 
costs and they are going to meet them,” 
Mr. Rubin said, using the phrase ac- 
cepted by alliance leaders in their sum- 
mit meeting in Madrid last summer. 
"We have got to have a realistic ca- 
pability of reinforcement.” he said. 

fa practice, the U.S. figures remain 
partly a numbers game, which will not 
be settled until NATO's member coun- 
tries all agree on what extra spending 
will be needed. 

Several officials predicted that the 
NATO numbers will allow allies such as 
Britain, France and Germany to count 


many existing p rogram s as part of the 
effort to develop more mobility required 
by enlargement 

Higher spending will be needed in 
Poland, Hungary and the- Czech Re- 
public, but those governments need to 
modernize their armed services any- 
way, so NATO’s bill may cheaper than 
the cost of doing so alone. 

Even the Czech Republic, usually 
cited as the most reticent to burden its 
economy with a bigger military budget, 
has just repledged a 1.1 growth in de- 
fense spending in real terms. 

That rate would satisfy the U.S. cri- 
teria. 

Another contentious problem with 


enlargement, known in Washington as 
“the train wreck” between Bosnia and 
NATO, also has receded as a threat to 
ratification, according to State Depart- 
ment officials. 

“It’s a problem — it could be a deal 
breaker if something goes horribly 
wrong in Bosnia that turns into a trans- 
Atlantic blowup.” one of them said. 

But he played down the scenario of a 
political stalemate in which Congress 
balked at enlarging NATO — and deep- 
ening the U.S. engagement in Europe — 
because of a quarrel with the allies over 
whether or not they could stay behind to 
enforce peace in Bosnia if U.S. troops 
leave on schedule next summer. 


10 Croats 
Give Up for 
Hague Trial 


The Associated Press 

THE HAGUE — The top Bos- 
nian Croat war-crimes suspect and 
nine other Bosnian Croats were 
tamed over Monday to the inter- 
national tribunal here to be tried for 
atrocities committed during the 
Bosnian war. 

The war-crimes tribunal placed 
the lOsuspects in custody after they 
surrendered in exchange for assur- 
ances of a speedy trial. 

They joined 10 other suspects in 
die tribunal's special maximum-se- 
curity holding cell in Schevenin- 
gen, a seaside town just north of 
The Hague. 

The surrender of the Bosnian 
Croat, Dario Kordic, charged with 
com mandin g troops who murdered 
Muslims in central Bosnia, was a 
:rory for the United States and its 


vie: 



among Bosnian Croats, to turn over 
die suspects. 

The surrender of the 10 suspects 
also gave the tribunal a big boost. 
Few suspects are in custody, and 
the trials of those who are have 
dragged on for months. 

In Split, Croatia, where the 10 
men were put on board a Dutch 
military plane, the U.S. envoy to 
Bosnia, Robert Gel bard, called 
their surrender “a significant step 
forward” for the Dayton peace 
agreement of 1995 that halted the 
fighting in Bosnia. 

“Those who surrendered today 
will be assured a fair trial and due 
process,” said Mr. Gelbard, who 
negotiated the surrender with Mr. 
Tudjman. 

“Those indictees still at large 
who choose not to surrender must 
know that the United States re- 
mains committed to keeping open 
ail possible options for making 
them available to the tribunal for 
prosecution.” he said. 

A total of 77 war-crimes sus- 
pects, most of them Serbs, have 
been publicly indicted. There also 
have been secret indictments. The 
Bosnian Croats who surrendered 
say they are innocent but want to 
dear their names. They had been 
trying to negotiate their surrender 
for months in return for assurances 
that they would get quick trials. 


BRIEFLY 


# 


\ Trial of 23 Basques Is Delayed 

MADRID — The trial of 23 leaders of the Basque 
guerrillas' political wing was postponed Monday for a 
week after defense attorneys demanded that a Supreme 
Court judge be removed from the case because of bias. 

The controversial case against the radical politicians, 
who are charged with collaborating with ETA the initials 
of Basque Homeland and Liberty, was delayed at the last 
minute when the defense team asked that the judge be 
disqualified, officials said. 

A group of Supreme Court justices took only five hoots 
to reject toe defense motion, and rescheduled toe trial to 

* ' ' "ges. 

iatasuna, 
in toe Basque language, 
are accused of spreading ETA propaganda and acting in 
“defense of terrorism.” If convicted, they face up to eight 
years in prison. ( Reuters ) 

E U Critical of Slovakia Move 


begin Monday with the same 
The leaders of toe separatist party. Hem 
which means “Popular Unity” ii 


BRUSSELS— The Euro 
Slovakia’s commitment to 


Union said Monday that 
was cast into doubt 


by Parliament's defiance of a court order to reinstate an 
‘elected member. ' . 

The Slovak lawmakers voted last week voted to ignore 
a Constitutional Court ruling that ordered toe reinstaxe- 
“ment of Frantisek Gaulieder, who was stripped of his 
■mandate after he quit the ruling Movement for a Demo- 

, cratic Slovakia last year. 

I “TTje European Union expresses regret at the Slovak 
* Parliament’s decision of Sept. 30,” said a statement 
released by the EU presidency on behalf of the 15-nation 
b/oc Luxembourg holds toe current presidency. 

Slov akia was one of five former Communist countries 
ruled outofeariy talks in July on joining toe EU. Bulgaria, 
Romania, Lithuania and Latvia missed out on mainly 
economic grounds. The EU said Slovakia had failed to 
implement political reforms. (Reuters) 

Cyprus Probes Cruise Ship Fire 

NICOSIA — Fire services continued to douse a bum- 

through Ml investigation, bat we should not lose sightof 

was superb,”he told 


. 

Bomb Kills Official in Minsk 

MINSK 


_ a. ooveronient official who was a personal 
rfPnsMrat Alexander Lukishenko’s was killed 
- ar his ftoartmeot buildinc that 


. ““7 "f TWaj/W Alexander- s *meu 

M^ay ■£* “P"” 601 bUadinS 

’ al v SC 23 S ^ SSofaBty. of *e Belarusian State 

• Yevg^ ^ m ^ eastern Mogilyov 

° V ^ rtig hldh^Smtoni off by the explosion and was 
ag^JSlSSto stomach. He died at a hospital 

emergency Parliament. 


SP Mr^*o^^^ OVVn fOF ^ measures ***** 

tnok responsibility for toe attack. President 


Yeltsin and Communist 
Try to Settle Budget Rift 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — President 
Boris Yeltsin held crisis talks 
Monday with the speaker of 
Rossias Communist-domi- 
nated Parliament, and toe two 
showed signs of compromise 
in a dispute over economic 
reforms. 

Gennadi Seleznyov, who is 
speaker of the State Duma, 
the lower- house, quoted Mr. 
Yeltsin as saying he did not 
want to dissolve the legisla- 
ture. He added that the pres- 
ident had warmed to a Com- 
munist proposal to hold a 
roundtable. 

The Kremlin gave a dif- 
ferent account of the meeting, 
saying Mr. Yeltsin had un- 
derlined toe need for toe gov- 
ernment’s 1998 budget to be 
approved by the Duma but 
had also signaled that differ- 
ences could be overcome. 

President Yeltsin, angry 
over the Duma 's reluctance to 
approve reform laws, hinted 
in an address broadcast na- 
tionwide last week that he 
might dissolve toe chamber. 

“The meeting was neces- 


sitated by toe tensions be- 
tween the president and the 
State Duma.” Mr. Seleznyov 
said. “We had to talk face to 
face rather than exchange 
statements on television.” 

“The president told me im- 
mediately at the start of the 
meeting that he did not favor 
the dissolution of toe Duma,” 
he told reporters. 

The Kremlin kepi up pres- 
sure on the Duma over one of 
the government's most im- 
portant draft laws, the budget, 
while at the same time saying 
it was ready to cooperate on 
problems. 

“The meeting focused 
above all on the issue of ef- 
fective cooperation by all toe 
branches of power, toe de- 
velopment of mechanisms to 
make this easier.” the Krem- 
lin said. 

“The president of toe Rus- 
sian Federation, in part, un- 
derlined toe need for a rrji- 
siructive approach to the 
government’s draft state 
budget for 1998. for its ap- 
proval within the necessary 
time limit.” 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PAGE 7 


American Biologist Is Awarded Nobel Prize in Medicine 


/ 


BRIEFLY 



^ fhc University of 
San Francisco, received 


Dr. 

Califomia 

tbe raize ~ ««**i*cu 

to fead 

disease* dementia-related 

uiiv'affo^was cited for his discovery 
an entirely new genre of 



Yugoslavia 


Serbia andMontenegro 
Facing New Elections 

C mfkdbOnSiaffFrimDupacka 

BELGRADE — Elections for the 
presidents of the two Yugoslav repub- 
%jy lies ended inconclusively Monday, 
leaving Slobodan Milosevic in control 
of the conntry — at least fra the time 
being. 

Neither supporters nor bitter foes of 
the Yugoslav president were able to 
clinch victory in either race. 

In Serbia, the dominant republic, the 
election commission said that with 85 
percent of the vote counted, an extreme 
nationalist, Vqjislav Seselj, led Zoran 
Lilic, a Milosevic protSgd, 49.68 per- 
cent to 46.99 percent. 

But it said turnout was about 49 per- 
cent, just shy of the 50 percent threshold 
needed fora valid election. 

To the south in Montenegro, the elec- 
tion commission reported that die in- 
, cumbent, Momir Bulatovic. led Milo 
Mp I' Djukanovic by about 2,000 votes with 
99.7 percent counted. 

But the presence of six minor can- 
didates prevented either from getting a 


ma 


yonty. 

Backer 


lackers of Mr. Djukanovic, a re- 
former and avowed foe of Mr. Milo- 
sevic's, rejected these figures, claiming 
victory. 

If turnout is less than 50 percent in 
Serbia, elections will have to be rerun in 
two months. With no winner in 
Montenegro, a runoff will beheld in two 
weeks. 

Mr. Seselj, who had earlier declared 
the turnout would reach the 50 percent 
minimum, effectively conceded he 
would not gain the presidency this time, 
but he said he was confident of winning 
the runoff. 

He told die independent Radio In- 
deks: "Nowhere in the world is a 50 
percent turnout needed in a second 
round of elections. But we are satisfied 
with the results and we believe we will 
do even better in new elections." 

"Neither candidate at this point has 
met the conditions for election as pres- 
• ident of the republic," said Nebojisa 
' Radic, an election commission spokes- 
man. 

The commission expected to issue 
final official results on Thursday even- 
ing. 

Earlier, leading members of Mr. Ses- 
elj ’s Radical Party accused. Mr. Mi- 
losevic's Socialists of lying about the 
result and of trying to rig it. 

The atmosphere in Socialist cam- 
paign headquarters, facing the threat of 
a first national defeat in 50 years, was 
gloomy as party leaders contemplated 
the poor showing by their candidate. 

"Who do we field at the next elec- 
tions when Lilic, whom we thought was 
the most charismatic, failed to win,” a 
l... senior official said. 

fa Sep temb er, the Socialists lost their 
majority in the Serbian Parliament. 

Th« party’s poor performance sup- 
ported the view that much of its pop- 
ularity hinged on Mr. Milosevic, who 
was barred from a third term as Serbian 
president by the constitution. 

Mr. Milosevic took his power and 
influence with him when he switched 
from the Serbian presidency to the 
Yugoslav federal presidency in the sum- 
mer. But political sources said he would 
still find it hard to accept Mr. Seselj as 
his successor as Serbian president. 

Mr. Seselj, a former paramilitary 
l eade r and ultranationalist with close 
ties to counterparts such as Vladimir 
Zhirinovsky in Russia and Jean-Marie 
' Le Pen in France, is fiercely opposed to 
the Dayton peace process in Bosnia. 

He also opposes a rapprochement 
with Croatia, the handing over of al- 
»V leged war criminals and any arrange- 
meni with the pro-autonomy ethnic Al- 
banian majority in Serbia’s southern 
province of Kosovo. 

He pro mis ed a policy of confron- 
tation with the West, telling reporters 
after voting on Sunday; "The Radical 
Party's victory would rule out any pos- 
sibility of kneeling to any Western 
force." 

Serbia, he saxL “won’t be anyone s 
servant-" 

Mr. Milosevic's hope of bolstering 
his position would now seem to rest on 
leading Yugoslavia out of economic and 
political isolation by making conces- 
sions to the West and gening an outer 
wall of sanctions lifted. But any move to 
do That would be blocked by Mr. Seselj, 

diplomats and political sources say. 

In Montenegro, a Bulatovic victory in 
the second round would reinforce Mr. 
„ Milosevic's power, since his Serbian 
\ Socialists and allied Montenegrin depu- 

would command a majority in the 
< fc.Ranr,) 


The Nobel citation said he had "ad- 
ded prions to the list of well-known 
infectious agents, including bacteria, 
viruses, fungi and parasites/’ 

The finding was controversial be- 
cause prions, unlike other germs, con- 
tain no genetic material; they are simply 
proteins. All known prion diseases are 
invariably fatal. 

Prions are believed to cause a group 
of degenerative brain diseases, includ- 
ing “mad cow" disease and scrapie, a 
disease in sheep first documented in the 
18th century. 

The raize winner, who gets 7 3 million 
Swedish kronor ($1 million), was chosen 
by Sweden's Karolinska Ins titute. 

Dr. Prusiner began his work in 1972 


after one of his patients died of 
Creutzfeldt-Jokob disease, a brain dis- 
ease similar to “mad cow” disease. 

Ten years later, his team identified an 
infectious agent in brain diseases that 
they named a prion, from die term "pro- 
teinaceous infectious particle.” 

Ignoring the skepticism of the sci- 
entific community. Dr. Prusiner con- 
tinued his research. 

"There are still people who don’t 
believe that a protein can cause these 
diseases, but we believe it,” said Lars 
Edstroem, professor of neurology at the 
Karolinska Institute. 

Raff Petersson. a molecular biology 
professor at Karolinska, said the dis- 
covery of prions "gives us a base for 


finding medicines that will stop foe 
transformation of a normal prion to a 
pathological prion." 

Prions exist normally as innocuous 
cellular proteins but can convert their 
structures in a way dial ultimately results 
in harmful particles, foe citation said. 

Prion diseases cause regions within 
the brain to become porous and 


spongy. 

"The 


"The prion has nothing to do with 
Alzheimer's disease, but (here may be 
other proteins linked to Alzheimer's 
disease, and, Pa rkins on’s, and ibis re- 
search co edd open the door to finding 
those proteins, Mr. Edstroem said 
Last year, the British government 
warned that cattle with so-called mad 



VaSfrlUmllMn 

A PROMISE — Some of the thousands of women in Dhaka, the Bangladesh capital, who beard Prime 
Minister Hasina Waxed on Monday reaffirm her government’s pledge not to evict them from their homes. 

Otto Remer Dies; Foiled Coup Against Hitler 


Reuters 

BONN — Otto Ernst Remer, 85, the 
Nazi general who foiled a coup attempt 
against Hitler that would have changed 
the course of history, died Saturday in 
Spain. Mr. Remer had been Living in 
exile in foe Andalusian resort of Mar- 
bella since 1994. He fled Germany after 
being sentenced to a 22-month prison 
term fra inciting racism and publicly 
denying that Jews had been killed in 
Nazi death camps. 

Mr. Remer was Hitler's security chief 
at the time of a failed assassination at- 
tempt led by Count Clans von Stauffen- 
berg on Hitter in July 1944 that was 
intended to bring World War n to an 
end. Just after the attempt on Hitler’s 
life, Mr. Remer received an order from a 
higher-ranking military officer to seal 
off the Berlin government quarter and 
arrest the prqpaganda.minister. Joseph 
Goebbels. But Mr. Remer, a committed 
National Socialist, became suspicious 
and went instead to the Propaganda Min- 
istry, where he was put on the phone 
wife Hitler, who instructed him to lead 
resistance to foe military coup attempt. 

Mr. Remer managed to prevent fur- 
ther German soldiers from joining the 


coup while its leaders, including Count 
Stanffenberg and a number or senior 
generals and field mars hals , were 
rounded up and executed. 

A.L. Rowse, 93, Oxford Scholar 
And Authority on Shakespeare 

New York Tunes Service 

AJL Rowse, 93, the brilliant authority 
on Shakespeare and Elizabethan Eng- 
land whose grandiose opinions of his 
own scholarship were not always shared 
by rival historians he invariably dis- 
missed as third-rate, died Friday at his 
home in Cornwall. He was brat known 
fra his confident identification of "the 
Dark Lady" of Shakespeare's sonnets. 

During a career in which he turned 
out some 90 books — among them a 
four-volume study of foe Elizabethan 
age, two biographies of Shakespeare 
and an exhaustively annotated edition of 
Shakespeare’s complete works — Mr. 
Rowse awed reviewers with both the 
brilliance of his writing and the sheer 
scope his scholarship. 

Even before the publication of his 
1964 book "William Shakespeare: A 
Biography,” for instance, Mr. Rowse 
made headlines on both sides of foe 


Atlantic — and created a run on book- 
stores — by announcing that he had 
solved all but one of the problems of foe 
sonnets, including their dates (1592-95) 
and the identity of the poet’s unnamed 
rival (Christopher Marlowe). 

A decade later, just before foe 1973 
publication of his second biography, 
"Shakespeare the Man," Mr. Rowse 
won a new round of headlines by an- 
nouncing that he had solved the last 
mystery of foe sonnets: the identity of 
Shakespeare’s mistress known as foe 
Dark Lady. Drawing on circumstantial 
evidence, he identified her as one Emilia 
Bassano Lanier, the daughter of an Itali- 
an court musician. 

His life as an Oxford don ensconced in 
foe academic splendor of All Souls col- 
lege seemed to belie his own upbringing. 
The son of a china clay miner, Mr. 
Rowse, whose parents were barely lit- 
erate, was a brilliant student who won a 
scholarship to Oxford- 

As soon as he got to Christ Church 
College, Mr. Rowse knew that he had 
found his spiritual home at Oxford, but 
he remained fiercely loyal to his native 
Cornwall and wrote extensively about 
Cornwall and Cornish culture. 


cow disease were the most likely cause 
of a variant of Grentzfeldt- Jakob disease 
in people. The cattle were believed to 
have eaten contaminated sheep offaL 

The prize, sometimes awarded fra 
work in physiology rather than strictly 
defined medicine, will be followedFri- 
day by the annourceanem of foe peace 
prize in Oslo. 

The economics prize is to be an- 
nounced next Tuesday, and the physics 
and chemistry prize winners will be 
named foe following day. 

The prizes will be presented Dec. 10, 

die anniversary of the death of Alfred 
Nobel, theindustrialist and inventor of 
dynamite whose will established the 
prizes. 


54 More Die 
As Carnage 
Grips Algeria 


The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — Fifty-four more people 
have been killed in Algeria as assailants 
slaughtered 48 adults and six dukhen in 
three separate attacks, witnesses and 
hospital sources said Monday. 

On Saturday night in three villages 
south of Algiers, assailants slit their 
victims’ throats and burned foe bodies, 
foe witnesses said. 

There was no immediate claim of 
responsibility for the attacks, but they 
appeared characteristic of the Aimed 
Islamic Group, the nation’s most violent 
insurgent faction, which has ignored a 
cease-fire called Sept. 24 by its weaker 
rival, the Islamic Salvation Army, foe 
militar y wing of the Islamic Salvation 
Front 

A group of 50 armed men with a list 
of their intended targets killed 10 mem- 
bos of a civilian self-defense group in 
Ouled Sidi Y ahia, 150 kilometers (90 
miles) south of Algiers, witnesses said. 
The self-defense groups were set op by 
foe government to fight the rebels. 

In Draa T’mar, about 100 kilometers 
sonth of the capital, 13 members of one 
family were killed, including six chil- 
dren, said witnesses and hospital 
sources who spoke on condition of an- 
onymity out of fear of reprisal. 

Thirty people were killed at about the 
same time in Bouangood, 50 kilometers 
south of Algiers, and a hettUman was 
killed in an attack blamed on militants in 
the noon of Tleaicen, near the border 
with Morocco. 

In addition, 16 schoolchildren and 
their driver were killed Sunday in an 
ambush near Algiers. 

The killing s came on the heels of 
further slaughter Friday, when about 90 
people were slain in separate attacks 
around foe conntry. 

When the trace was called, it was by no 
means dear it would stop,raeyen reduce, 
the bloodshed. The power of the Islamic 
Salvation Front has ebbed since its vic- 
tory in parliamentary elections led the 
anny to cancel a second round of voting 
in 1992, ushering in the civil war. 

Several Islamic guerrilla movements, 
including tbe Armed Islamic Group, 
operate beyond the party’s control. 

The civil war has lot an estimated 
75,000 people dead since 1992, hundreds 
of them in foe latest wave of violence, 
and many of them women and children. 


UN Court to Wkigh 
Lockerbie Case 

THE HAGUE — The World 
Court on Monday agreed to hear a 
dispute next week that pits Libya 
against foe United States and Bri- 
tain over the bombing of Pan Am 
Flight 103 above Lockerbie, Scot- 
land, in 1988. 

The case centers on an inter- 
national campaign for the surrender 
and prosecution of two Libyans 
who nave been implicated in the 
bombing, which killed 270 
people. 

The hearings before the UN 
court will begin OcL 13 and con- 
tinue for eight days, focusing on its 
jurisdiction and foe admissibility of 
claims made by both sides, not the 
merits of foe case. 

Britain and tbe United States 
have demanded that Libya turn 
over foe two suspects for trial, but 
Libya contends foe men cannot be 
guaranteed a fair trial in Britain or 
the United States. (AP) 

Saudis Are Asked 
To Halt Executions 

NEW YORK — A U.S. human 
rights organization Monday called 
on Saudi Arabia, which has pub- 
licly beheaded 1 15 people this year, 
to halt all executions immediately. 

Human Rights Watch said that 
the kingdom's legal system did not 
provide basic guarantees for a fair 
trial and that the judiciary allowed 
die royal family and other well- 
connected indi viduals to manipu- 
late the system to their advantage. 

Foreign workers in Saudi Arabia 
were especially vulnerable to se- 
rious abuses, foe group contended, 
inclu ding arrest and p unishmen t on 
spurious charges brought by em- 
ployers attempting to force them to 
relinquish legitimate claims for 
compensation. 

At least 76 of the 115 people 
beheaded so far tins year were for- 
eigners. 

"The great majority of those ex- 
ecuted have been foreigners; in 
some cases there was ample ev- 
idence to support foe victim’s 
c laims of innocence,” Human 
Rights Watch said. (Reuters) 

Hunted Prosecutor 
Returns to Mexico 

MEXICO CITY — The former 
prosecutor accused, of tampering 
with evidence in one of Mexico’s 
most sensitive murder cases has 
returned to Mexico City after being 
extradited from Spain. 

Pablo Chapa Bezanilla fled 
Mexico after an arrest order was 
issued against him in early 1997 fra 
his alleged role in planting human 
remains on a ranch belonging to 
Raul Salinas, the brother of former 
President Carlos Salinas, to frame 
him in a 1994 assassination case. 

He apparently agreed last week 
tb return to face questioning in 
Mexico rather than appeal foe ex- 
tradition order. 

Pretrial hearings were to be held 
within two days. (AP) 


Kenyans Hold Breath as Reform Debate Starts 

Hopes Rise for a Peaceful Election, but Government Good Fatih Will Be Tested 


By James C. McKinley Jr. 

New York Times Service 

NAIROBI — Tbe political stalemate that has 
led to violence here over the last six months has 
been broken, after President Daniel arap Moi 
agreed with opposition Leaders on reforms that 
would level the playing field somewhat before 
tbe coming election. 

Opposition leaders and diplomats said it 
remained to be seen, if the governing party 
would cany out tbe reforms as promised, or if 
the police and local officials would follow the 
laws once they were enacted. 

But as debate began on tbe bills in Par- 
liament, hopes for a peaceful election began 
rising here in the capital as 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

well as in foe port city of Mombasa, where 
more than 50 people have been killed in ethnic 
clashes since August 

"It looks like a big breakthrough,” a dip- 
lomat said, insisting on anonymity. "The big 
question is: Will tbe reforms be implemented in 
sufficiently good faith?” 

Diplomats said foe proposed reforms are not 
mere window dressing, a passed, they would 
mark significant concessions by Mr. Moi, who 
only three months ago vowed that he would 
allow no political changes before the general 
election, which must be held by the end of this 
year. 

Mr. Moi, 73, has been in power since 1979 
and is a product of the one-party system erected 
by JomoKenyatta, foe country’s first president 
He resisted multiparty democracy until 1992, 
when domestic and international pressure fi- 
nally forced foe government to change. 

But for the first free election, in 1992, Mr. 
Moi’s party, foe Kenya African National Un- 
ion, used the machinery of the slate to undercut 
challengers. He garnered foe lamest block of 
votes, about 38 percent, because foe i 
splintered along tribal lines and > 
behind a single candidate. 

This year, the major opposition leaders vowed 
they would not take part in the election unless the 
rules were changed to give challengers a better 
chance and unless civil liberties were expanded. 
More than a dozen people were killed in pro- 
democracy demonstrations over the summer. 

Tbe unrest undermined Kenya's tourist in- 


dustry and battered its currency. With tbe econ- 
omy reeling, Mr. Moi and his cabinet appeared 
to be in trouble just a month ago. Kenya was not 
only facing international condemnation for vi- 
olently breaking up demonstrations, but also 
fending off threats from the World Bank and 
the International Monetary Fund to suspend aid 
because of official corruption. 

Over the last three weeks, however, mod- 
erate backbenchers from tbe governing party 
reached out to moderate opposition leaders in 
Parliament and found some common ground, 
politicians and diplomats said. 

The reformers ' umbrella coalition, known as 


the National Convention Executive Council, 
called off strikes scheduled for Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

Among other things, the bills would do away 
with sedition laws that give the government the 
right to hold people without trial for political 
reasons, and would grant greater freedom of 
assembly. They also would make the police 


and make it a felony for the police to harass or 
jail people on political grounds. 

In addition, the reforms would expand the 
electoral commission to give opposition parties 
10 more seats. 



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PAGE8 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Ttcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


FUBUSBSD WITH THE NEW TOftS TIMES AIM THE WaSHWCKM POST 


eribune jj ie Globalization Debate in America Is a Mess 


Soft on War Crimes 


In a recent speech to the United 
Nations, President Bill Clinton re- 
stated his commitment to die prose- 
cution of those guilty of war crimes. 
But his administration's record in sup- 
porting international tribunals to in- 
vestigate and adjudicate war crimes 
:has been mixed. As on other human 
•rights issues, its actions have lagged 
^behind its rhetoric if a tribunal might 
show the slightest possibility of af- 
fecting Americans. 

j Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright has given the issue of war crimes 
high priority with the appointment of 
; David Scheffer to the new post of 
. ambassador at large for war crimes 
'issues. Mr. Scheffer worked with Mrs. 
Albright when she was Washington’s 
■chief delegate to the United Nations. 
They can be justifiably pond of their 
role in establishing tribunals to pro- 
secute war crimes in Bosnia and 
Rwanda. These are the first attempts 
since the Nuremberg and Tokyo 
'tribunals after World War II to punish 
‘genocide, war crimes and crimes 
against humanity, which are con- 
sidered international offenses. 

The Clinton administration has been 
crucial in achieving acceptance of die 
'tribunals. Washington, moreover, has 
‘paid the salaries of some of die 
tribunals’ best attorneys. At one point 
[there were 22 American-paid experts 
working for the Bosnia tribunal Some 
; governments are now trying to restrict 
'these positions, complaining that the 
'practice circumvents normal UN hir- 
ing procedures. Their pettiness would 
deprive the tribunal of important staff 
members at a time when it lacks the 
money to hire them. 

At the moment, the tribunals require 
two things that they are not getting 
from Washington — a greater effort to 
have those who are indicted handed 


back UN dues. While in 1995 the Bos- 
nia tribunal in The Hague was carrying 
ont 25 criminal investigations, now 


there are only three, in part because of 
Washington’s arrears. 

Washington's contribution to the 
tribunals stands in contrast to the 
hurdles it is putting in the way of the 
creation of a permanent international 
c riminal court The court would pro- 
secute inte r nati onal crimes when na- 
tional legal systems are unwilling or 
unable to do so. A diplomatic con- 
ference scheduled for next June would 
draw up the final plans, which would 
then be ratified nation by nation. 

Unfortunately, while the United 
States endorses a court in principle, the 
ground rules it proposes would make 
the court politicized and virtually 
powerless. Largely at the urging of the 
Pentagon, which bolds exaggerated 
fears about the possible prosecution of 
American soldiers, the Clinton admin- 
istration is pushing for a court whose 
actions would be easily blocked by the 
big powers. Before a prosecutor could 
even begin investigations in most con- 
flict zones, the UN Security Council 
would have to give its approval for 
such inquiries. This would award the 
United States, Russia, C hina, France 
and Britain a veto over indictments of 
their own or their allies’ actions. 

Mr. Scheffer and other U.S. officials 
have also raised the question of whether 
the court should respect some of the 
amnesties that dictators win for them- 
selves. This is a terrible idea. Nations 
usually agree to such amnesties only 
because the dictators are threatening to 
use more violence or stay in power 
unless exempted from prosecution for 
their crimes. If the court respected an 
amnesty for someone who committed 
crimes against humanity, it would be 
failing its obligations under internation- 
al law. The whole point of the court is to 
fight the impunity that powerful crim- 
inals enjoy in then* home countries. 

Unfortunately, foe Clinto n admin- 
istration seems committed to this ideal 
only in selected cases. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Better Late Than Never 


Institutions, like people, rarely 
come to terms with a painful past by a 
simple series of logical steps. France’s 
effort to deal with its World War H 
legacy of behavior toward Jews has 
been no exception, any more than that 
of other countries struggling with the 
same challenge. 

There have been hesitation, dis- 
agreement and soul-searching, plus 
firm steps forward that show up all the 
more clearly against the background of 
-embarrassment'and euphemism. The 
declaration on Sept 30 by a group of 
(French bishops- foal church leadership 
under Vichy had remained silent in the 
face of anti-Semitic persecution of 
Jews, and that that silence constituted 
“a fault,” is just such a solid step 
forward into clarity, worth noting for 
the guideposts it may offer other na- 
tions still trying to untangle the same 
snarl of conflicting memories. 

The clarity is not fogged by the 
faintly awkward exchanges that have 
followed it — including Pope John 
Paul ff’s refusal, when asked by re- 
porters. to predict whether the church 
as a whole would follow suit with a 
formal apology for silence. 

What can yet another statement 
about genocide and culpability add to a 
crowded field — especially now, with 
so many newly history-minded gov- 
ernments in former East bloc countries 
struggling to come to some coherent 
reckoning with the' last half century as 
well? The answer has less to do with 
conceptual breakthroughs than with 
the slow cumulative filling in of what 
has proved to be an extremely complex 
picture, with the details of different 
nations' dilemmas and postwar jour- 
neys helping do shape endless vari- 


ations on the themes of responsibility, 
complicity and resistance. 

The French government itself, until 
foe election of cuzrent President 
Jacques Chirac, had declined to ex- 
press responsibility or to apologize for 
acts committed by the Vichy regime, 
saying that there was no connection 
between that French government and 
the postwar one — a stance that has 
become harder to maintain as assorted 


prominent figures, including foe late 
Francois Mitterrand, have craved to 


Francois Mitterrand, have proved to 
have had small or large Vichy episodes 
in their careers. 

Against this confused backdrop, the 
bishops’ declaration contributes some 
ideas that could prove more broadly 
useful. It notes that the chinch under 
Vichy, concerned first and foremost 
with protecting its faithful and safe- 
guarding the practice of their religion, 
was not wrong in doing so — only in 
letting “the absolute priority attached to 
these objectives, in themselves legit- 
imate ... obscure the biblical imperative 
of respect for every human being cre- 
ated in the image of God.” Similarly, 
they succeed in recognizing and prais- 
ing many individual voices and acts of 
heroism from within the church hier- 
archy, while lamenting that foe more 
significant power of the institution itself 
— which, ironically, considered itself 
helpless — was not brought to bear 
where it could have helped. 

These are not earth-shattering in- 
sights. But in the still muddled and 
lately rather tense landscape where 
die memory of the Holocaust contin- 
ues to be negotiated, such elements 
of common sense are blocks on which 
to build 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 

A Challenge for Indonesia imposes draconian ] 

o noma tho mvimnnv 


The fires that caused what may have 
been the most pernicious man-made 
smog in history have been burning 
almost every summer in Indonesia for 
foe past 15 years. The smog affects 
people in several countries. Many can 
expect to suffer deteriorating health for 
years as a result of foe disaster. 

At least some Indonesian ministers 
now admit that i m p ro per and often 
illegal logging and tree clearance have 
been largely responsible for foe fires. 
Indonesia has laws designed to stop foe 
burning of forest land and supposedly 


imposes draconian penalties for dam- 
aging the environment But foe trouble 
is enforcement 

Southeast Asia, is only just begin- 
ning to pay the bill for foe smog. 
Among the items on it will be general 
cleaning up. debilitated land, fleeing 
tourists and extra spending on emer- 
gency services and health care. 


in particular, needs to put 
rder. It is bad enough that 


its house in order. It is bad enough that 
foe smog should have emanated from 
its jurisdiction but worse still that 
much of it actually came from gov- 
ernment land 

— The Economist (London). 


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W ASHINGTON — I am starting a 
new political movement. It is 
called “Americans Against Voice 
MaiL” Why? Because the main reason 
so many Americans have lost jobs, 
been forced to change jobs, or been 
able to upgrade their jobs in tire last 
tumultuous decade is not a lowering of 
U.S. trade barriers. It is technology. 

A Mexican working at 75 cents an 
hour did not take foe job of our office 
receptionist; a microchip did — the one 
that operates foe voice-mail device in 
all our office phones. 

A Chinese making 75 cents an hour 
did not take that autoworker's job; a 
robot did A Brazilian making 7 5 cents 
did not take your neighbor’s grocery 
job; a supermarket scanner did 

So I want you to get up now, unplug 
the phone, go to foe window, throw the 
phone out and shout “I’m not going to 
take it anymore! Ban voice mail? 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


Potato chips, yes. Microchips, no!” 
Sounds crazy. I know. But it’s n 


Sounds crazy. I know. But it’s not 
half as crazy as the Mad Hatter’s tea 
party going on in Congress today. 


where lawmakers are telling Americ- 
ans to throw foe Mexicans. Chinese and 


ans to thro w foe Mexicans, Chinese and 
Brazilians out foe window instead. 
They are doing that even though 


every serious economic study indicates 
that the bulk of job loss (and creation) is 
produced by technological change and 
deregulation, and only 20 percent can 
be attributed to freer trade. 

Rm ra iTrng against microchips won’t 
get you elected; railing against Mex- 
icans wilL And that is why despite the 
passage of NAFTA and foe GATT 
global trade accord, and despite foe fact 
that the U5>. economy is the envy of the 
world. Congress is on foe verge of 
denying the president the “fast-track” 
authority he needs to sign-free trade 
agreements with the rest of South 
America — on the argument that free 
trade is responsible for lolling jobs. 

This is really sad. And it is all BQ1 
Clinton’s fault. 

He began his presidency by declar- 
ing that health care refrain was the 
critical issue for America today. 
Wrong. The critical issue fra America 
is that we have entered tins period of 
incredibly rapid change, in which foe 
technology revolution and the integra- 
tion of global markets are combining to 
t ransfo rm everyone’s workplace, mar- 


ket and community — eliminating dd 
jobs and churning new ones. 

And for the United States to thrive in 
this world it needs a new, integrated 
approach to health care, welfare, edu- 
cation, job mining and free trade. 

Mr. Clinton talked about each of 
these individually, a but never put them 
into a comprehensible framework. As a 
result, says ihe Harvard economist Dani 
Rodrik, “foe connections and comple- 
mentarities in all these areas got lost .in 
foe public debate and it allowed ideo- 
logues and extremists to gain the upper 
hand in each of these areas,” . 

Mir. Clinton thought it was enough to 
just be right about foe economics off free 
trade. h*s not. Even if trade accounts for 
only a small part of job-churning in foe 
economy, politically and psychologic- 
ally it looms much larger. 

If Mr. Clinton had been smalt; he 
would have defused this anti-trade 
angst by accompanying his fast-track 

bill with a Rapid Change Adjustment 
Acs. It could have included projects for 
public employment for displaced work- 
ers, tax breaks for severance pay, and an 
extension of foe Kassebaum-Kennedy 
act so that laid-off workers could keep 
their health insurance longer. Plus $2 


billion in U.S. assistance tofoeAtiaai 
African and Latin American develop, 
rnent banks to promote training of 
women, anti-chiw-labor programs and 
environmental cleanup. 

If President Clinton’s fast-track re- , 
quest bad been combined with such 


defined for people foe reyohitfoa foat^ 
we are going through rigfc now. ifoJ 
opponents would be having a much :* 
harder time. -i 

He could have satisfied those who ' 
really care about the labor and en- 
vironmental strains that accompany - 
rapid change, while margmaHaang foe : 
Neanderthals in Congress who just 
want to build walls of protection or J 
pander to trade unions. . 

The frustrating fomg about President ' 
Clinton is Thai lie really geo it He 
understands foe information economy ; 
and trade, and the nctd to cushion than 1 
with training, safety nets and com- 
munity-preserving pro gram s. - 
He has all foe pieces, bat he never * 
puts them all together in a Sustained 
way. So there is a hole in die heart of 
Clintonism, and Dick Gephardt is driv- : 
ing a truck right through it . j 

The New York Tones. . : \ 


Welcome to New-Style Afghanistan — and Don’t Come Back; 


L ONDON — ErnmaBonmo. 
the European Union’s 


JL/the European Union’s 
forceful commissioner fra hu- 
manitarian affairs, visited Af- 
ghanistan last week to examine 
some of the projects financed 
by foe EU — which has given 
the country $200 million in foe 
last two years — and judge for 
herself foe excesses of the Tale- 
ban government. 

With her on the tour was a 
small group of reporters includ- 


By William Shawcross 


ing Chnstiane Amanpour, 
CNN’s celebrated foreign cor- 


CNN’s celebrated foreign era- 
respondent, who has instant ac- 
cess to the airwaves of the 
world. (I was also among the 


reporters on foe crip.) 

How did foe Taleban treat 


these honored guests? By arrest- 
ing them, threatening them wife 


Kalashnikovs and beating up 
members of their entourage. It 


members of their entourage. It 
was a brief taste of the tenor that 


the Taleban have employed in 
foepast year Co pacify Kabul. 

They have issued a string of 
extraordinary edicts. Television 
and music are outlawed; all men 
must now wear untrimmed 
beards; women are no longer 
allowed to work andean venture 
out of their homes only accom- 
panied and if covered from top 
to toe in a burifoa, a heavy, 
ten dike garment that has only a 
grill for their eyes; grits can no 
longer go to school Such edicts 
are often brutally enforced by 
bearded Taleban thugs. 

One of the most outrageous 
new edicts is that Kabul's main, 
hospitals can no longer take 
women patients. Sick women 
are to be treated in only one 
hospital and only by women. 

Female patients have been 


moved into aclinic where water, 
electricity and surgical facilities 
are either inadequate or nonex- 
istent. Mrs. Bonino, who arrived 
in Afghanistan on Sept. 28, de- 
cided to visit this facility. 

In a concession to Taleban 
demands, Mrs. Bomno, as she 
did throughout the trip, was 
wearing a large, dark-blue head 
scarf emblazoned with the Euro- 
pean Union logo. But as women 
patients entered the clinic, they 
threw off their burkhas with re- 
lief, revealing weh-made-op 
faces and delightful smiles 
when they saw us. The director 
seemed to panic when foe saw 
the camera crews. 

Mrs. Bonino ordered foe film- 
ing stopped. Too late — the di- 
rector dialed the police. Mrs. 
Bonino immediately said we 


would leave of our own accord. 
But the gate, had already been 
shut to stop us. 

Real trouble began when a red 

T^baifr^wi into the yard. It 
was not pleasant as they ram- 
paged around, aiming their guns 
at us or using them as clubs. The 
CNN cameraman, Mark Phil- 
lips, was hit about the head until 
he surrendered his camera — 
which he had left running. 

The energetic, outspoken and 
apparently fearless Mrs. Bo- 
ruoo . was threatened with a 
Kalashnik ov when she refused 
to hand over her bag. A Euro- 
pean aid worker who had noth- 
ing to do with the filming was 
beaten in foe bade with & 
Kalashnikov. 

We were then forced to drive 
in convoy to the No. 1 district 
police station. There in a court 


yard littered with old metal bed* 
steads, broken chairs and sofas! 
we sat under the shforfof a tree , 
and waited for the next threS 
hours as Taleban came and 
went and talked and sat and 
telephoned undo 1 another tied 
about 10 meters away. • * 


to speak to one of our Afghan 
interpreters. We cottid hear li 
few words drifting over. One of 
foe more disagreeable IdtmotT 
ivs was one of Tsteb&n rod 
muttering loudly that CNN’s 
Ms. Amanpour was an Iraniari 
spy. They would draw fodrfW 


gers ominously across foci? 
throats as they looked at her. ; 


Finally help arrived. Thf 
puty health minister, Moflafi 


In Poland, Ordinary Politics Sidelines the Poets 


W ARSAW — In hindsight, 
it is not surprising that 


VVit is not surprising that 
eight years after triggering a 
revolution. Solidarity would 
represent foe politics ra reaction 
in Poland. But the former Soli- 
darity strategist Bronislaw 
Geremek never expected it to 
turn out that way. 

All through the 1980s, from 
the August 1980 diipyard strike 
that gave birth to Solidarity -to 
die June 1989 election that saw 
it triumph over communism, 
Mr. Geremek, an elfin, bearded 
medieval historian, was at foe 
center of foe txain trust around 
Lech Walesa. Along with foe 
indefatigable dissidents Adam 
Michnik and Jacek Kuron and 
foe Catholic intellectual Tad- 
eusz Mazowiedti, Mr. Geremek 
authored the union’s nonviolent 
strategy of resistance and 
brokered the 1989 accord with 
the Communist leadership that 
allowed for foe first free elec- 
tions in the Soviet bloc. 

After Solidarity’s victory in 
those elections and the collapse 
of the Berlin Wall five monms 
latex, Mr. Geremek believed foat 
Poland had entered the uncertain 
world of post-communism with 
several big advantages over its 
neighbors. One was its private 
formers, who, unlike those else- 
where in the Soviet bloc, had 
never been collectivized. 

Another was the Catholic 
Church, a powerful force in the 
lives of Poles, which, unlike 
churches in other Communist 
stales, had preserved its inde- 
pendence and helped lead foe 
battle against communism. 

I heard Mr. Geremek make 
those predictions in 1989 in his 
cramped, book-stuffed study in 
Warsaw’s Old Town, where I 
often visited him. Last month, 
as I silently marveled at the 
spacious office and leather-up- 
holstered armchair he now oc- 
cupies as a parliamentary com- 
mittee chairman, my old source 
ruefully conceded that be had 
been wrong. “What I thought 
were our privileges,” he sad, 
“turned out over the last eight 
years to be our most dangerous 
and difficult problems.” 

Indeed, foe central constitu- 
encies of the old Solidarity 
movement have suffered foe 
most from Poland’s transition 
to capitalism, and they stand to 
lose me most from the co on try's 
further integration into Europe. 

The Gdansk shipyard where 
Solidarity was bam as die East 
bloc’s first free trade union is 
bankrupt The steelworks and 
mines whose workers led foe 
strikes of the 1980s must make 
huge cutbacks in employment if 
forty are to survive. 

Private formers, whose small 
family plots, horse-drawn carts 
and thatehed-roof villages are a 
living embodiment of Poland’s 
19th century culture, have been 

ket, and hundreds of thousands 
of them will be forced off the 
Land if foe reforms continue. 


By Jackson Diehl 

This is the second of two articles. 


The Catholic- Church, for 
centuries foe seat of nationalism 
and an overweening influence 
on the authoritarian govern- 
ments of Poland before World 
War H, has seat its popularity 
radically decline since 1989. Its 
attempt to ban abortion was re- 
jected by the last Parliament 

"There is a gross, if nec- 
essary, historical injustice in 
what has happened,” said Kon- 
stanty Gebert, a political writer 
for Poland’s largest under- 
ground newspaper in the 1980s 
who now edits a monthly on 
Jewish affairs. 

“The people who won foe 
war with communism were foe 
coal miners, the shipyard and 
steelworkers, and now they are 


* Poland's history 
is getting harder 
to predict than 
its future . 9 


the ones being punished in the 
new Poland. Meanwhile, the 
people who lost foe war are the 
new European elites.” 

Unlike the Co mmu nists of 
Russia, who clung to their old- 
ideology, Poland's Commu- 
nists executed a deft turn- 
around. After foe first post- 
Communist government, led by 
Tadeusz Mazowiecki and the 
economist JLeszek Baloerowicz, 
had created foe foundation for a 
new capitalist Poland with a 
radical and painful program of 
“shock therapy,” foe re- 
christened Social Democratic 
Party won a majority in Par- 
liament by campaigning against 
foe policy — only to adopt it 
wholesale once in office. 

Since 1993, the ex-Comnra- 
nists have reaped foe benefits of 
Mr. Balcerowicz’s radical re- 
form, including jQve consecut- 
ive years of robust growth, 
while championing a liberal 
agenda of free market econom- 
ics and Polish membership in 
NATO and foe EU. 

The old patty apparat has 
taken over choice positions in 
privatized stale companies and 
foe civil service, while foe 
party’s popular leader, Alexan- 
der Kwasniewski, won election 
as president two years ago. 

Solidarity meanwhile splin- 
tered. The old intellectual lead- 
ership — Geremek, Mazo- 
wiedti, Kuron and Michnik — 
are now concentrated in a patty 
called Freedom Union, which, 
thanks in part to foe initial pain of 
the reform program, has only a 
small following. It was happy to 
win 13 peroeatof foe vote m this 
month’s elections. 

After several years of infight- 
ing, most remaining elements 
of the old coalition — industrial 
workers, farmers and ardent na- 


tioaalists aad-Cathotics— co- 
alesced in the current party, led 
by Marian Krzaklewski, an en- 
gineer from southern Poland 
who played no significant role 
in foe Solidarity of the 1980s. 

Mr. Krzaklewski talks more 
aboni foe past than foe present, 
and his account is radically re- 
visionist In his speeches and 
interviews he lambastes the 
1989 accord that ended com- 
munism, and the free market 
reforms that followed, implying 
that a “pink” opposition elite 
sold out the Polish people to the 
Communist “reds.” 

The new Solidarity, he sug- 
gests, will finally cany ont anal 
revolution against communism 
in Poland, somehow restoring 
the jobs and tike dignity of in- 
dustrial workers along foe way. 

This real Polish revolution 
will be Catholic. Mr. Krza- 
klewski has declared that Jesus 
Christ should be “crowned 
king” of Poland, and has im- 
plied that Christian scripture, as 
interpreted by the Pope, should 
supersede Polish law. Just be- 
hind some of his language is the 
suggestion — easily decoded 
byPoles — that Jews among foe 
old Solidarity leadership some- 
how betrayed the cause. 

“Poland’s history is getting 
harder to predict than its fu- 
ture,” quipped Mr. Michnik, 
the son of a Jew and (me of the 
main targets of Mr. Krza- 
ktewski’s attacks. 

Mr. Michnik can afford to 
laugh: A decade ago he was a 
recently released political pris- 
oner so short on resources that 
he would visit my apartment in 
Warsaw on cold winter nights, 
just to get warm. Now he is 
editor of Gazeta. Wyborcza, the 
largest and most commercially 
successful newspaper in the 
former Soviet bloc. 

Although he still dresses in 
dissident jeans, he knows 
Mr. Krzaklewski will never 
send him back to foe jails where 
he spent most of the early 
1980s. Democracy is now too . 
well entrenched for tiiati 

My friends of the new pro- 
fessional class wince and groan 
when they speak of Mr. Krza- 
klewski. A number planned to 
vote for Solidarity, but foey 
seem to feel embarrassed by its 
new leader and by what he has 
done to foe great movement that 
changed their lives. 

In some ways be embodies 
what has happened to Polish 
politics in foe past decade. The 
dissident historians and poets 
have been shoved aside, re- 
placed by flic ordinary pols who 
thrive in ordinary democracies. 

For a ramming correspon- 
dent, .Polish politics is a lot 
drearier than it was a decade ago. 

Mr. Geremek and Mr. Michnik 
are still mound, but most of the 
protagonists no longer have 
minds that sparkle- and inspire. 


Above all, democracy re- 
quires compromise. To form a 

S imment with a majority in 
ament in- foe coming 
weeks. Solidarity will have to 
create a coalition with one or 
more smaller parties. 

For now, it looks as if Mr. 
Krzaklewski may end up strik- 
ing a deal with Mr. Geremek, 
Mr. Balcerowicz and foe ocher 
Freedom Union leaders he has 
been vilifying. The ex-So&dar- 
ity brain (rust will insist, in ex- 
change for its support, that foe 
new government stick to foe 
free market program. 

Perhaps, as Mr. Mtehnrk sug- 
gested, the reason Poles can 
dwell so deeply and bitterly on 
tire past is that everyone seems 
sure of the future. “When the 
former Communists won the 
election four years ago, there 
was panic,” he said. “But in 
reality their government took a 
tremendously important step — 
by continuing the economic re- 
form program, they made it clear 
to everyone that there could be 
no return to the old system. 

“In the same way now, a 
Solidarity government also has 
tremendous potential. Because 
only foey can make clear to 
everyone that there is no al- 
ternative to integration with 
Europe.” That may happen. 


deputy health minister, MuHafi 
Rabbani, apologized profuse^ 
to Mrs. Bonino for me “nrisj 
understanding.” He tried to put 
the blame on die aid workers? 
but she insisted that she took full 
responsibility. She also said shfi 
would not leave unless every* 
one — television crews and ari 
workers — left with her. * 

It was now becoming more 
absurd than frightening. Mr? 
Rabbani had to negotiate with 
the Taleban men for our release. 
It cook another 90 minutes,- - 

He said we must sign a letter 
of apology. Mrs. Bonino re- 
fused, but did allow one of her 
staff to negotiate the text of a 
neutral letter in which the 
staffer expressed his regrets 
over foe events of die morning. 
The mood began to lighten. 

The Taleban who had arres- 
ted us now realized that they 
had made a feux pas. Cans of 
Pepsi were distributed. The 
man who had rifle-butted die 
aid worker unctuously asked for 
his forgiveness. 

About three and a half hours 
after our arrest, we were re- 
leased. Mrs. Bonino went to the 
Foreign Ministry to receive 
more apologies; she warned the 
government against any repris- 
als against foe aid groups. 

The rest of us drove to foe UN 
compound. Wi thin minutes Ms. 
Amanpour was using CNN’s 
portable satellite link to tell the. 
world what had happened. 
Shortly afterward CNN was 
broadcasting film of Our cap- 
ture, with Taleban staring into 
the camera as they cuffed the 
cameraman. / 

.Mrs. Bonino herself told 
CNN, “This is an example of 


Or maybe, as some of my - how people live here, in a situ- 
frieuds think, Poland’s political ation of random terror.” She 


transition will really end only 
when foe children are old 
enough to vote. “None of this 
will mean anything to them,” 
said we. “But we will never 
forget how it was.” 


said she was determined to 
make foe world try to do 
something about the continuing 
disaster of Afghanistan. That is 
necessary, but not easy. 


The writer, now The Wash- 
ington . Post's assistant man- 
aging editor for foreign news, 
was the paper’s Warsaw bureau 
chief from 1985 to J989. 


The writer is preparing a 
book about the United Nations 
and failed states. This comment 
has been adapted by . the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune 
from Newsweek. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Home Rule 


adornment, have considered that 


MADRID — At the meeting of 
the Cabin e t the Ministers def- 
initely decided that a system of 
autonomy, to be established on 
foe broadest basis, shall be chaf- 
fed for Cuba and Porto Rico. 
The Minister of foe Colonies 
will submit decrees giving prac- - 
deal effect to dm decision, in 
accordance with the pledges 
given in foe Queen Regent's 
Proclamation of 1896. 


matters of taste practically in- 
fallible. A course in church ait 
shall be provided in theological 
seminaries, so that the clergy 
may have a foundation of as- 
sured knowledge to go .upon 
when called upon to accept or to 
reject offerings of this nature. 


1947: ' Common Front;, 


1922: Church Art 


PARIS — At the general Con- 
vention of the Episcopal Church 
of America was presented the 
report of a commission on ec- 
clesiastical art An indictment 
was brought against much of foe 
church architecture. The public 
has been afflicted by this pre- 


sumptuous dictation on the part was formed at a con- 

of persons who, because foey ferenceheldin Poland at the eod 


PARIS — Communist news- 
papers and otgans' ali over 
Europe devoted their fro® 1 
pages to a communique which 
announced foe formation of an 
organization to coordinate foe 
activities of Communist parties 
In Europe. The communique 
called for union of “the demo- 
cratic and anti- imperialist 
camp” against the “plan of im- 
perialist aggression. ’ The or- 


gave certain sums to be expen- trf September and would have 
ded in church construction or its headquarters ioBelgrade. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


* Reno Delivers a Lecture 
I On Use of Criminal Law 

! By Anthony Lewis 

B while a c^ nCC vo L a SI! ?. ustice Depanmeat was aware of 
through the di n 0 f Washing m D ° ^J? deace whatsoever" that 
and recalls us t 0 our ser»**f £ 5^ ton had sought or, re- 

happened last week, when Ann? 061 P™ gw> 

Cy General JanetR^.!f^ , or " exchange for official action. ” She 

™l^; Hyde ' s * 

bent of an independent enSSL ™ re *?? , s P e ? ulatlon “ news- 


»»<* Bad 


Uflwif ^ ''Hor- 
ry Oreneral Janet Reno in large 

part rejected demands for appoint- 
jnentof an independent counsel to 
jnvesngate how money was raised 
for President Bill Clinton’s 1996 

jampaign. 

» MS- Reno wrote to the chairman 
Judiciary Commit- 
Hyde, who with other 
is on the committee had 

in independent counsel 

■er was much more than 
ply. It offered all of us a 
ihe difference between 
d law — and between 
and law. 

tn in the fund-raising 

g ry, tor example, has been the 
that some large donors were 
■ed to spend die night in the 
le House. Mr. Hyde and his 
fcolleagues suggested that this vi- 
olated various laws. 

“Merely entertaining his sup- 
porters in the White House,” the 
attorney general wrote, did not 
amount to an illegal solicitation 
by a president. And she had no 
evidence, from Mr. Hyde or any- 
one else, that the president had 
asked for contributions on those 
occasions. 

T The next law cited by Mr. Hyde 
find others makes it a crime to 
promise, in return for political ac- 
tivity, federal “compensation, 
pon tract, appointment or other 
benefit” Broad as that prohib- 
ition was. Ms. Reno said, it did not 
90 vcr mere access: “Visiting the 
president m the White House is 
pot a federal program ‘benefit.’ " 

, Then Mr. Hyde’s letter sugges- 
ted that it violated the law against 
conversion of government prop- 
erty when Mr. Clinton put the 
White House to his “private use.” 
To this Ms. Reno replied: “The 
White House is the personal res- 


paper articles based on the fact 
that certain government actions 
favorable to a contributor fol- 
lowed or preceded a contribu- 
tion” — which could not justify a 
criminal investigation. 

Finally, there was a charge that 
Vice President Al Gore had “ex- 
torted” campaign funds from con- 
tributors. The attorney general 
said Mr. Hyde had cited only press 
reports “in which anonymous in- 
dividuals allegedly stated that they 
‘felt pressure’ ” from Mr. Gore, 
and mat was not evidence. “The 
vice president is an elected public 
official,” Ms. Reno wrote, “and is 
entitled to seek the financial sap- 
port of the public. A mere request 
by him for the assistance of po- 
tential donors is not extortion.” 

The letter had the stamp of legal 
professionalism that is the Justice 
Department at its best. 

It also had the distinctive voice 
of Janet Reno: straightforward, 
flat, cutting through all fee sanc- 
timony we have had on the subject 
of fund-raising. What she said Is 
common sense. 

We do not want tire cr iminal 
law to be governed by be ne- 
cessarily less meticulous stan- 
dards of politics and journalism. 
We do not want criminal inves- 
tigations to be launched on the 
basis of speculation or anonym- 
ous charges in the press. We do 
not want to make giving access to 
political contributors a crime. 
Would Republicans put them- 
selves in the dock for giving ac- 
cess to tobacco and other industry 
lobbyists? 

The larger lesson is that we 
have been focusing too much on 
the independent counsel statute as 

.. I 1* 


W Uiw pUAJltai UK UHKpCUUWIU (U 

idence of the president, provided the answer to political problems, 
to him for his ‘private use’ during It is entirely right for the press and 
his term in office. The mere oc- politicians to publicize and crit- 
cupancy of the space that has been icize fund-raising tactics. It is 


provided to him as his home is not 
a criminal theft or conversion of 
government property.” 

: Another charge raised by Mr. 
Hyde was bribery of the president. 
Some contributions had been 
made, he suggested, in return for 
actions by Mr. Clinton. 

Ms. Reno replied that the 


icize fund-raising tactics. It is 
wrong to use the criminal law for 
fact-finding. 

There has been loose talk of 
impeaching Janet Reno if she does 
not ask for an independent coun- 
sel 1 have been critical of heron 
civil liberties questions. On this 
issue she is the voice of reason. 

The New York Tunes. 


Cakes With a British Farmer in County Fermanagh 


By Bernadette Kehoe 

L ONDON — Stepping into the farm- 
house kitchen was, for me, like step- 
ping back in time. I was in County Fer- 
managh at a house about half an hour's 
drive from Northern Ireland's bonder with 
the Irish Republic. The warmth of the 
welcome-fiom the elderly farmer and his 
wife reminded me of when my Irish 
grandparents greeted me on their doorstep 
as a child, after I’d traveled from my home 
in England to spend my summer holidays 
in the Republic. 

The surroundings were familiar, too — 
a remote, tranquil setting, a dog on the 
front path harking excitedly at the 

MEANWHILE 

stranger, rusted farm machinery dotted 
around the yard. And inside, linoleum on 
the floor, simple fumitore, an open tire on a 
wann day and,for fee visitor, the best china 
teacups and far mare calces than one could 
■eat in a week, let alone an afternoon. 

Butene tiring was very different. On the 
sofa lay the local newspaper, the red, white 
and blue union flag on its front page. This 
was Northern Ireland, the fanner and his 
wifi: were Protest an ts, and there was a 
fawfanwniai difference in identity and 
political allegiance between them and my 
late Catholic grandparents who had lived a 
similar life on the sxrrvs is land. For these 
people, the last tiling they want is to be 
ruled from Dublin. For them the Republic 
is a distant place — not geographically but 
in the realms of their consciousness. 
“What do they think of cs down 


there?.” I was asked, when I revealed my 
Irish background. 

Yet for this couple, the proximity of the 
Republic has had a profound impact. They 
ased to live on the border, one field sep- 
arated them from the South. In the early 
1970s, the border became too close for 
comfort. One night this farmer, his wife 
and their five children packed their bags 
and fled after a Protestant friend was 
killed by the IRA, which was conducting 
.frequent attacks from across the border. 
Witii the outbreak of the Troubles, many 
Protestant farmers had become part-time 
members of the British security forces and 
thus targets. 

Now, a number of displaced Protestant 
families in Fennanagh have organized and 
are seeking financial support to return to 
their former houses. A visit to my host’s 
homestead revealed the difficulty. As we 
wound our way through the beautiful coun- 
tryside. my host talked of the pain of seeing 
his childhood home in ruins. We picked 
our way along a muddy track and entered 
the tutted shell through an open door. 
Plaster from the ceiling crackled under- 
foot. Evidence of the hurried departure 25 
years ago was visible in the scattered rem- 
nants of dust-covered furniture. 

Amid this chaos lay hopes of a new life. 
Bat that depends on whether peace can 
take root and whether the politicians can 
agree. This farmer, along with the majority 
of other Protestants I met, believed the 
only solution was a negotiated settlement 
that would allow Protestants to retain their 
British identity and Catholics to feel thai 
their Mshness is endorsed. What London 
and Dublin have proposed are cross-border 
bodies that will let Northern Iceland con- 


LAN 






timie but also give anew Irish dimension to 
tiie way the province is governed — thus 
going some way to resolving the conflict of 
identity that has plagued the province. 

On that afternoon in the farmhouse kit- 
chen, the conflict became very real for me. 
Here were two people who had lived all 
their lives on the island of Ireland, spoke 
with Irish accents and were very clear about 
their British identity — with me a person 


fa 

By ARCADIO Id L» (San tot CoS* Kiev. CSW Syndcaie. 

who has always lived in England, has an 
English accent and yet professes to be Irish. 
Embracing these notions of conflicting 
identity is just one part of the chal leng e for 
the politicians in the weeks ahead. 

This comment has been adapted from 
the BBC World Service program " From 
Our Own Correspondent" by the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The U.S.- China Summit 

Regarding “US. -China Sum- 
mit: Just How Much Fudge Will 
Clinton Eat? ( Opinion . Oct. 4) by 
Jim Hoagland: 

The article focuses on the trivi- 
al, citing speculation that President 
Jiang Zemin dyes his hair, while 
ignoring strategic realities. The re- 
visionist attacks on Henry Kis- 


Laiers intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed ** Letters 
to the Editor ” and contain the 
writer’s signature, name and fidl 
address. Leuers should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


singer and Richard Nixon's 
“Sinophilia* ' ignore the long-term 
requirement to avoid war in Asia. 
High-handed hostility is no way to 
advance America’s position in 
China or in Aria. It is a provoc- 
ative, counterproductive way to 
treat an already powerful and in- 
evitably more powerful nation. 

With the world economy stead- 
ily globalizing, one cannot facilely 
dismiss economic and business in- 
terests. Nor will carping over 
Clairol help us influence r*hina on 
such important matters as trade in 
nnriwr material European leaders 
understand this. With less moral 
indignation titan Mr. Hoagland 
would like, but far more sophis- 
tication aboor China's progress and 
tire challenges it confronts, they 
long ago put T iananm en behind. 


Fortunately, Beijing — with all 
its faults — still admires and seeks 
good relations with the United 
States — with all its faults. That is 
good, as is President BUI Clin- 
ton’s decision to invite Mr. Jiang 
to Washington. 

WILLIAM F. ROPE 
Shanghai. 

The writer is a former director 
of the US. State Department's Of- 
fice of Chinese and Mongolian 
Affairs. 

About Taiwan’s Future 

I wish to clarify the remarks 
attributed to me by Don Ober- 
dorfer in the article entitled * ‘In the 
Taiwan Strait, a Confluence of 
Dangerous Currents” (Opinion. 
Sept. 24). He quoted me as saying: 


“We should establish a new and 
independent Republic of Taiwan. 
Taiwan is not part of mainland 
China.” What I did say is that with 
regard to the future of Taiwan, the 
platform of the Democratic Pro- 
gressive Party stales that to es- 
tablish a Republic on Taiwan that 
enjoys independent sovereignty is 
the fundamental principle, and this 
derision must be and only can be 
reached by the 21 million residents 
on Taiwan through a plebiscite. 

CHEN SHUI-BIAN. 

Taipei. 

The writer is mayor of Taipei. 

Call for an Amnesty 

Regarding “ A Bosnia Exit 
Strategy Opinion. Sept. 26: 

Contrary to what tiie editorial 


says, everyone does not want a 
unifi ed Bosnia. The Bosnian 
Croats would prefer to join their 
land to Croatia, and die Bosnian 
Serbs would prefer to reintegrate 
their territory with Yugoslavia. 

Bringing war crimes suspects 
to trial will not improve die situ- 
ation. It will only increase tension 
in the region. Secret indictments 
and “snatch squads” will make 
the return of refugees to their 
homes more difficult. All parties 
should agree to a general amnesty 
for crimes committed in the recent 
conflict and during World War IL 
Only then will Bosnia’s Croats, 
Muslims and Serbs be able focus 
on rebuilding their shattered lives 
rather than settling old scores. 

NEVENLEZAIC 

London. 


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From left, Ferragamo’s jacket and cargo pants; Naomi Campbell and Donatella Versace (top), and Angela Missoni and mother, Rosita; Dolce & Gabbana’s butterfly dresses, and Narciso Rodriguez's sparkle top withftuidjacket. 

Mi lan Designers Are Adding a New-Generation Sparkle 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — When Angela 
Missoni walked alone, bat 
confidently, down the rim- 
way Monday, she symbol- 
ized what is happening in current fash- 
ion. By force or by choice, designers are 
passing the flame. 

In tragic circumstances, Donatella 
Versace made her fir st app earance alone 
on the Milan runway after the killing of 
her brother Gianni in July, as she presen- 
ted her Versus line. And for the first time 
Giorgio Armani shared the limelight 
with his niece Silvana, who had worked 
with him on die Emporio line. 

Laura Biagiotti's daughter Lavinia 
also came out on the runway tp present a 
basket of flowers at the end of Mon- 
day’s parade of pale, delicate, womanly 
knitwear. 


A FLOATING LIFE: 

The Adventures of Li Po 

By Simon Elegant . 312 pages. $23. Ecco 
Press . 

Reviewed by John Derbyshire 

T HE Chinese of olden times believed 
that immortals who misbehaved in 
heaven were banished co live out a hu- 
man life on Earth, where they might be 
encountered as wild, eccentric persons 
of extraordinary gifts. The best known 
of these ’’banished immortals’* was the 
poet Li Po, who lived AJD. 701-762. 
Li's poems have been popular with 
translators. “Thoughts on a Quiet 
Night" turns up all over the place — it 
was recently spotted in one of Patrick 
O' Brian's sea romances. 

“A Floating Life" is a mock auto- 
biography of Li, supposedly dictated by 
the poet himself to a young provincial 
scholar as they travel up the Yangtse 
River by boat in 758-759. U is on the 
way to exile in far Yunnan Province, 
punishment for his part in a royal 
prince's act of treachery two years be- 
fore. It is a comfortable journey. Li is 
under guard, but has servants to attend 
him and is treated as a celebrity at the 
various places they stop — his poetry 
was famous in his own lifetime. At the 
book’s end, his stray told, and the boat 
by now deep in die Yangtse gorges, Li 
hears that he has been pardoned. Bid- 
ding farewell to his amanu ens is, he sails 
back downriver and out of the book. 

The novel therefore consists mainly 
of Li Po talking about his own life, 
pausing now and then fra exchanges 
with the young scribe who is taking it all 
down. As well as providing a frame for 
the main narrative, these latter interludes 
are used to give brief sketches of Li’s 
character, and some geographical color. 
In the most striking of them, li takes the 
boy on a brat excursion into some 
lakeside caves hung with stalactites, 
where he recites the song of the river- 
merchant’s wife familiar to us from Ezra 
Pound’s translation. At this point the 
boy urges Li Po to speak of his time at 
the Imperial court Li at first demurs, but 
allows himself to be persuaded: 

“ ‘Very well then,* he says, settling 
back into die cushioned prow, T will tell 
you what happened at court. But first we 
must row out mto the sunlight For this is 
not a story to be told in the dark.’” From 
here on we are swept up in the great and 
tragic events surrounding die An Lush- 
an rebellion of 755, which brought die 
T’ang dynasty crashing to ruin from the 
very summit of its glory. 

In attempting to reconstruct Li’s life 
and personality, Simon Elegant has 
faced two problems: The life was dull 
and the personality elusive. Apart from a 
two-year stint at court doing literary 
drudge work — supplying vers if oc- 
casion and “polishing" Imperial doc- 
uments — Li never had ajob. Poetry did 
not then; any more than now, offer much 
of a living. He seems to have survived 
mainly by sponging off relatives and 
admirers, traveling constantly — prob- 
ably to avoid overstaying his welcome. 
In outward personality he was the more 


The fo unding mothers and fathers of 
Italian fashion want to put a new-gen- 
eration sparkle into the spring-summer 
season. And that chimes with the fash- 
ion message, which is about adding a 
metallic gleam to fabrics or a glitter- 
dust of embroidery to enliven simple 
clothes. 

Angela Missoni called her first solo 
show a “gold mine" of technique and 
research, and that was exactly the effect 
of her carefully crafted clothes, where 
flame stitches licked at knit dresses and 
geometric patterns gave diem a mod* . 
ernist spin. 

To the burnished, metallic colors 
were added a smoldering sexiness, as 
filaments like scarf-fringing revealed 
bared flesh, or when the subtle mix of 
prints was used for close- to-the- body 
shapes. Sweaters warn over taut leather 
jackets had a fresh. feeL . 

“I can, respect the. tradition, of Mis- 


BOOKS 


tiresome sort of bohemian: vain and 
untrustworthy, an irresponsible citizen, 
a careless friend (once die conventional 
pieties of “friendship verse” have been 
discounted), an indifferent husband, and 
a terrible drunk. 

Elegant has tackled these problems 
very resourcefully. He has freshed out 
die life with some picaresque adven- 
tures. During Li’s spell at court Elegant 
has him involved with Yang Guifei, the 
concubine popularly blamed for dis- 
tracting the math Tang emperor from 
his duties and thus bringing on the ca- 
tastrophe of 755. This is anhistoricak Li 
left the capital fra good late in 744, while 
Lady Yang did not show herself openly 
at court until fall of 745. But Elegant has 
been no mare unscrupulous on this point 
than legions of Chinese storytellers — 


soni, but I put my vision in it,” said 
Missoni of her new role as artistic di- 
rector of the family firm, "and I think 
my mother is happy that she has a strong 
daughter.” 

For Dolce & Gabbana the reverse 
situation applies. Fra 10 years the 
design duo nave been seen as Italian 
fashion’s new generation. But in their 
show Sunday, they proved that they 
have matured. Instead of relying on 
signature looks — like their corsets and 
animal- prints — they pushed forward, 
adding a feminine prettiness to curva- 
ceous tailoring, ana showed a new fin- 
esse in decoration and detaiL 

“Southern Italy goes pop," said 
Stefono Gabbana to describe theFeDini- 
esque mix of wheat-ear embroidered 
socks, sober pinstripes as cropped Capri 
pants, tiny for shoulder capes and 
crochet knits. They came down the rose- 
entwined staircase in the gilded Mfl- 


no more, indeed, than Li Po himself, 
whose statements about his own life are 
deeply unreliable. If 40 generations of 
Chinese readers have not minded Li 
Po’s meeting Lady Yang, I do not think 
Americans should be vexed by it. 

The personality presents more of a 
challenge. It was a contradiction. For all 
his faults, Li Po seems to have been one 
of those people — like Wiliam Blake — 
whose genius shines from their eyes. 
This kind of charisma is hard to capture, 
especially across cultures, but Elegant 
has made a very creditable job of it, 
deploying his own translations of Li’s 
poems to great effect 

John Derbyshire, the author of ''See- 
ing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream , " wrote 
this for The Washington Post. 


anese mansion like the religious-fes- 
tival parade that had inspired the show. 

“I love the softness and the sim- 
plicity," said Demi Moore, applauding 
stretch gauze dresses, fluttenng with 
organza butterflies, that made a strong 
finale to a fine show. 

The flash of sequins now comes well 
before sundown. Narciso Rodriguez, 
36, has that modem outlook, and his 
debut show was well judged in its mix of 
fabrics and in its intricate cutting to 
make the simple seem special. 

ffis theme was glitter .out it was never 
trashy. Rodriguez mixed a sparkling 
front with a wool jersey back, as in a 


man's vest, and teamed it with a slender 
skirt scored with bias-cut seams. The 
same jigsaw-puzzle cuts bn plain 
dresses createda sleek line. It was a cool 
and assured debut of appealing 
clothes. 

Alessandro dell’Acqua’s cute knit 
dresses edged with sequins and sly takes 
on sportswear (think black leather 
cropped jogging pants) got lost in the 
ultra-dramatic spotlighted presentation. 
Antonio Fusco also md its light under a 
bushel, by showing the sequined sweat- 
ers and sheer looks pioneered by Prada. 
Occasionally a class item in die house’s 
signature luxurious tailoring made it 


down the runway. MaxMara tried hard 
to look like Jil Sander, but offered its 
loyal fans good wearable pieces, based 
on the dress, which is emerging as the 

season’s star. 

Ferragamo came up with sportswear: 
de luxe — all cargo pants and sweat- 
shirt knits in superb fabrics and on a 
mainly white palette. It made a good foil 
for the inimitable bags and shoes, but 
with couture style on other runways, 
sports wear seems to have been and gone 
in high fashion. But hey, with a new 
generation coming up, Ferragamo may 
be first past the post with this particular 
back-to-the- 1 980s trend. 


Lolita Chic: Nasty Fashion-Speak 


By. Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — Her 
body is slim and 
straight; her lips 
are rosebud 
sweet; her dress is short and 
cute as she totters down the 
runway in mom’s high heels. 

Enter die new Italian lode of 
die season: Lolita chic. 

At Mra Min, the junior line 
of Prada, puff-sleeved dresses, 
lace-up bodices, zigzag braid 
and naive prints of hands and 
hearts suggested clothes run 
up at home for a costume party 
on a Heidi theme. Its heroine 
was the company’s new baby- 
faced mascot: 16-year-old 
Audrey Mamay. 

Others told the same un- 
settling nursery stray. At Blu- 
marine, pastel tailoring, left 
open over budding breasts, 

and slip-dresses patterned Haatfnuna 

with lilies of the valley were Armani dress andcardigan, left; Miu Mius party frock. 




CHESS 


I 


By Robert Byrne 


A N example of errors creeping in is 
the game between Viswanathan 
Anand and Boris Gelfand. After vicis- 
situdes had obscured the outcome, Gel- 
fand overlooked a brilliant move and 
was destroyed. 

Against 6 Be3 in the Najdorf Vari- 
ation of the Sicilian Defense, those who 
don’t care for the trench warfare of 
6...e57Nb3Be68f3Nbd79Qd2b5 10 
a4 b4 11 Nd5 Bd5 12 ed Nb6 13 Bb6 
Qb6 14 a5 Qb7 15Bc4Be7 16Ra4Rb8 
choose the more open, scrappy game 
that comes from 6„„Ng4 7 BgSh6 8 Bh4 
g5 9 Bg3 Bg7. Black’s kingside pawn 
formation is loose, but he has his kin g 
bishop on an active dia gonal 
After 12..JBf5, a positional game 
would result from 13 Bd3 Qd7 14 0-0 
0-0. But Anand, full of aggression, 
chose 13 h4! Qd7 14 O-O-O!, prevent- 
ing Gelfand from castling kingside, and 
also tempting; him to attack the white 
king, as he did with 14..Nb4. 

After Gelfancfs 17...Qa4!? t Anand 
. could not play 18 ab because of 18._Qal 
mate, nor 18 cb because 18...Qa3 19 Kbl 
gh 20 Bh4Bd4 21 Qd4 Qb3 22 Qb2 Bc2 
23 Kcl Qb2 24 Kb2 Bdl 25 Ba6 ba 26 


GSJFANDOIACK 



Rdl gives Black a pawn-ahead ending. 

After 19,-iig, it is not clear why Anand 
did not play 20 N£5! Bc3 21 Qc3 Nc3 22 
Rh8 Kd7 23 Rd4 Qa5 24 Nd6! ed 25 Rd6 
Ke7 26 Rh7 Ke8 27 Re6 Kf8 (or 27.. JCdS 
28 Bc7) 28 Bd6 Kg8 29 Rb7 Ndl 30 Kcl 
Qa4 32 Bc4 KhS 33 rh6 Nh6 34 Be5 
mate. The alternative defense, 22._Kf7 
does not hold up against 23 Rd3! Nh5 24 
Rb8, which yields White two rooks and a 
bishop fra the black queen. 

Probably Anand thought that his 20 
QgS Bd4 21 Rh8 Bh8 22 Qh5! Kd8 23 
QhS Kd7 24 Rd2 would be easier, yet 
after 24.. JSTgfiS 25 c4 Nc3 !, Gelfand was 
still fighting gamely. If 26 Kc37, then 
25._Qa3 26 Kd4 Qc5 27 Kc3 ne4 28 
Kb2 Qb4 is decisive. 

Anand ’s 26 D? would have been 
proven inadequate, if, after 26.. .Ndl 1 27 
Kcl Ne3 28 Bd61, Gelfand hnH dis- 
covered 28._edl, when 29 Qf6 Qa3 30 
Kbl Qb4 31 Kcl, starts a draw by 
perpetual check. Perhaps Anand could 
nave kept some advantage with 26 
Bd3!7 Nce4 27 Bf4, yet the position is 
still not clarified. 

In playing 2&.J > tfl?, Gelfand over- 
looked Anand ’s devastating 29 Qf8! and 
after 29..Nd5 30 Be7! Nd2 31 Qd8, the 
blade long was caught in a mating net 

After 37 Q£5, there could have fol- 
lowed 37...Nc3 38 Qf$ Kd5 39 Qd6Ko4 
40 Qc5 mate. Gelfand gave up. 


worn with trashy high heels. 

Emporio Armani too was girlish, 
rather than sporty, although even side- 
slit miniskirts, pants cut into a V at the 
navel, some Gucci-style spike heels and 
transparent dresses-and-jackets in sea- 
green colors seemed in impeccable taste 
— as you would expect from Armani . 
This playful collection offered pretty 
clothes for that elusive uptown gjfi. 

What makes one collection seem 
fresh and young — and another un- 
comfortably raunchy when shown on 


teenage girls? It is partly the models. 
In V-Zone from Valentino, broderie- 
anglaise openwork dresses over col- 
orful under-layers seemed a cute take 
when shown in a still-life presenta- 
tion. 

The metallic knits and leathers and 
the shimmering silver dresses at Philo- 
sophy, from Alberta Ferretti, were also 
graceful and discreet, in spite of bib- 
front bodices baring the backs of ultra- 
young models. 


CROSSWORD 


“I wanted to propose a 
new face — something dif-. 
ftrent from the main rate,"; 
explained Ferretti. 

To the sophisticated fash- . 
ion crowd, foe message is 
easy to read: designers need a 
fresher, younger look for 
their lower-priced secondary- 
lines. But for a wider public 
— and the message is 
beamed oat in current Lolita-1 
style campaigns fra Miu Miu,- 
Krizia and Versus — it wilt 
look Like baby-faced innof 
cents following so-calfetj 
heroin chic or nihilistic teetkj 
age angst as the essence qtt 
cooL • ‘ J 

Has the film remake of Nm’ 
bokov’s novel by tee directs 
Adrian Lyne "inspired" tin 
pouting new look? 

"I wasn’t thinking, of Lot 
ita — they look like that be 
cause they are so young/ 
**mm**u* said Miuccia Prada back 
y frock, stage, covered in tlipstic 
kisses and looking like a dei 
mother as she was surrounded by th 
girls wearing shiny satin party . frocks i 
sour colors. J 

No harm may be intended, bat thert 
something disturbing about ;fashuw 
careless endorsement of a Lolita look3 
and extraordinary that women designer 
should be even half encouraging iL' r - ^ 
One of Monday’s press rdCascsd 
scribed “Lolita’s timeless cham.**!? 
time to pat an early end to &jeh dart 
gerous and subversive fashiobi%peak. 




m-. 



ANAKD/WHfTE 

Position after 28 . . . NO 


White 

Anand 

1 e4 

2 NO 
3<n 

4 Nd4 

5 Nc3 

6 Be3 

7 BgS 

8 Hb4 
8 Bg3 

10 Qd2 

11 Nb3 

12 ef 

13 h4 

14 0-0-0 

15 Nd4 
18 a3 

17 be 

18 KM 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 

Mack White 

c rffand Anand 

c5 » bg 

S 285 

NfB g-Qg 

as 23 Qh8 

Ng4 ?4 Rd2 


White 

Anand 

19 bg 

20 QgS 

22 

ffl c? 2 
280 

27 Kcl 

28 BdS 

29 Q» 

30 Be7 

31 Qd8 

32 cd5 

33 one 

34 Qc5 

35 qm 

36 Qf4 

37 6/5 


ACROSS 

i Kind of layer 
• Applaud 
id Locking device 
14 Of neap and 
ebb 

ia Overconfident 
racer ol table 
l« Charles Lamb 
pseudonym 
17 Raise 

ia Quickly, quickly 
ie Charitable 
donation 

ao Start ola Darnel 
Webster quote 
ax 'Act now!' 

23 New England’s 

Cape 

tu Generally 
xt Turn to cinders 
» Sentry's cry 


as Prevent from 
acting 

>3 Chicken 

34 Syrup brand 
is Radical college 
org- 

as Middle of the 
quota 

41 California's Fort 

«s Cover (ora 
diamond 

44 Theater sign • 
46 BSve's place 

45 Janet of Justice 
44 Latin love 

so Whom Reagan 
beat in 1964 

manner’s tub 
S4 Tweed, for one 
si Grid of the 
quote 

•i Related - 


flplfwt 


Solution to Puzzle of Oct 6 


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nsEisn ana □□ana 
□BBaananaansana 
nnnans Baaaana 
□SHE GJQGIQE 

□Baa □□□na 

□□□Baaaansaaaaa 
asHsoo BausaaaB 
qgiqsq tuano 

□□ana aaazi 
qqoqqbq aannaa 
□GiaaiaanaQaaaaaa 
□□□an □□□ aaaaa 
□0QDQ aos □□□3H 


■I Andes land 
ea Sporty Toyota 
MRudnerof 
comedy 

a* Protection: Var. 
•• Diet guru Jenny 
■7 Hang onto 
« Gusto 
oeRefugea, 
old-style 


i Roman emperor 
afterGatba 

a Utah national 
park 

s Garfield's foil 

4 Racing org. 

s Singer John 

e Honolulu- based 
detective 

7 Survive 

a Noah’s landfafl 

• English diarist 

- Samuel 

in Whiplash 
preventer 

ii Total 

m Cousin ofa 
metaphor 

i* Scrapbook user 

*i “ me, 

viUalnr 

29 Total 

X* Navy noncom 

■TSwaette 


salt's swung in 
forests 

xe* tonga, vita 

brevis" 

si Singer Lanya 
34‘M*A*S*H' 
setting 

••Endeavored 

37 Sudden arrival 
of Ml weather 

aa Author Fleming, 
•e Belief 
40 Spanish gold 
-41 Negative joiner 
4S Set sail 

4e Gingersnap, 
e-fl. 

47 Kind of 
inspection 

43 Go beck on a 

promise 

4B Rose oils 

Si "Hi Had a 
Hammer 1 
singer 

is Pec protection 
org. 

It Goddess of 
discord 

■7 Problem for 
Sneozy? 

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discipline 



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PAGE 11 



niTCDN4TinK4i turn Ai.n TRIMINE. TUESDAY. OCTOBER 7. 1997 




















?AGE 14 


PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Clinton Boldly Sounds Loud Alarm on the Environment 


8000 — i 
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By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton on Monday entered the biggest 
environmental battle of bis presidency, 
calling on all countries to agree to ’’real- 
istic and binding" limits on emissions of 
so-called greenhouse gases when they 
meet in Japan in December. 

He offered no numerical targets. But 
he made it clear that the economic im- 
,pact of any limits, which have generated 
a stormy debate here, would remain a 
principal concern of the administration 
as it prepares for the United Nations- 
sponsored conference. 

In approaching the Kyoto summit 
talks , however, the Clinton administra- 
tion has been tom between pro-envir- 
onment forces, which want Mr. Clinton 
to push for stria limits on greenhouse- 
gas emissions, and pro- industry forces, 
which fear crippling competition if in- 


dustrial countries are held to much 
stricter standards than developing coun- 
tries. 

Thomas Donohue, president of the 
American Chamber of Commerce, 
warned Monday that ‘‘America’s jobs 
and economy are being held hostage to 
the' environmental political agenda of 
the United Nations. 

Mr. Clinton spoke Monday at a con- 
ference on global change called by the 
White House, on a day which, as the 
president noted wryly, appeared likely to 
become the wannest Oct. 6 in Wash- 
ington’s recorded history, with a high 
near 90 Fahrenheit (32 Celsius). 

But while acknowledging scientific 
debate on the extent to winch gases from 
cars and factories are affecting the global 
climate, Mr. Clinton said the threat was 
too serions to ignore. "It would clearly 
be a grave mistake," he said, "to bury 
our heads in the sand and pretend the 
issue will go away." 


A U.S. Split on Colombia 

Anti-Drug Talks With Samper Are Opposed 


By Douglas Far ah 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration’s top anti-drug official, 
Barry McCaffrey, will meet with Pres- 
ident Ernesto Samper of Colombia this 
month to discuss the fight against in- 
ternational drag tr affickin g, a decision 


Mir’s Controllers 
Unable to Release 
Stuck Supply Ship 

Agence France- Prase 

MOSCOW — The trouble-prone 
Russian space station Mir hit an- 
other snag Monday, as ground con- 
trollers were unable to undock a 
cargo craft to make way fora newly 
launched ship to unload supplies, 
space officials said. 

Flight controllers at the Russian 
space center north of Moscow had 
no idea why foe cargo craft had 
failed to undock, according to a 
spokeswoman, Rufina Amosova. 

The separation maneuver was 
planned to make way for a vessel 
loaded with food, oxygen contain- 
ers, scientific* gear andJdfoenequ^ ■ 
ment for Mstv :ni - > • 

The lo ading operation now may 
* have to be put back a day. 

Space officials initially planned 
to make a second attempt Monday 
to uncouple foe supply ship from 
Mir when it was in the right area to 
receive radio signals directly from 
ground control. 

But they later decided to wait 
until they had pinpointed foe reason 
for the first failure to undock, the 
spokeswoman said. 

If it is not completed in time, foe 
docking of the cargo craft with Mir, 
scheduled for Tuesday at 1642 
GMT, will be put back to Wednes- 
day, Viktor Blagov, deputy director 
of space control, said. 

The problem was a fresh setback 
to Russia’s beleaguered space pro- 
gram, which has been hit by a series 
of technical problems, tarnishing its 
reputation and raising doubts about 
Mir in the United States, which has 
one of its astronauts on board the 
spacecraft 


FRANCE: Bitter Evidence for Vichy Trial 


Continued from Page 1 

on charges of complicity in crimes 
against humanity, and only foe second 
French citizen to be tried on those 
grounds since World War II. 

Paul Touvier, chief In Lyons of afoug- 
gish organization modeled on the Nazi 
SS, was convicted in 1994 of ordering foe 
execution of seven Jews and got a life 
sentence. He died in prison last year. 

But Mr. Papon also claimed to have 
beea a member of the Resistance, and the 
French authorities recognized his claim 
after foe war. He served as prefect of 
police and later budget minister in Paris', 
until his past came to light in 1981. 

“I was secretary-general of a prefec- 
ture, with above me a deputy prefect and 
above him a regional prefect,’* he told foe 
French daily Liberation last year, in one of 
his few public statements on foe charges 
against him. "It was a very secondary 
post, very obscure, an administrative post. 
Why is a secretary-general on a secondary 
level singled out this way? Because after 
the war he had an extraordinary career he 
has not been forgiven for.” 

France did not come easily to will- 
ingness to go through with his trial, 
which examines a subject that was long 
taboo — crimes committed in the name 
of France not just by egregious col- 
laborators and disgraced Vichy leaders 
convicted of treason like Marshal Henri 
Philippe Petain, who died in prison, and 
Prime Minister Pierre Laval, who was 
executed, but by anonymous civil ser- 
vants and other French functionaries 
who stayed at their jobs. 

Many did terrible things that were later 
enfolded by a collective loss of memory in 
a nation all too eager to forger. For most of 
the last half-century the French, encour- 
aged by the Resistance leader. General 
Charles de Gaulle, president of France 
from 1958 to 1969, and other postwar 
leaders, cherished die belief that the ul- 
timate responsibility of foe Nazi occu- 
piers and foe illegitimacy of the Vichy 
government absolved France from com- 
plicity in the crimes of foe Holocaust 


That has clearly changed, as the bish- 
ops of die Roman Catholic Church in 
France showed last week in a statement of 
contrition asking forgiveness from foe 
Jews of France for (he church’s silence on 
measures taken against them during the 
war. 

For much of foe last 50 years, people 
told themselves that civil service func- 
tionaries who kept foe country r unning 
during foe war had done the best they 
could, sparing French Jews from even 
worse excesses, mollifying occupiers 
whose plans for eliminating all the Jews 
of Europe they had no inkling of. 

No, they comforted themselves, most 
French officials must have done what 
they were told only when they had no 
choice, while courageous men and wom- 
en in the Resistance and elsewhere 
salvaged the honor of their country by 
combating or sabotaging foe orders of 
the jackbooted occupiers. 

"Auschwitz, we didn’t know about 
— Drancy, we knew,*’ Mr. Papon told 
Liberation. “If you want to put Vichy on 
trial, 1 have nothing against that 1 just 
don’t want the trial to take place on my 
back." 

His trial on charges connected with 
Nazi war crimes, expected to involve 
1 15 witnesses, historians and French of- 
ficials who knew him, is to last until Dec. 
23. Because it is taking place so long 
after those events, it wilt almost cer- 
tainly be foe last of its kind. 

Vichy, foe seat of government in 
France after the Germans defeated the 
French Army in 194G and occupied half 
the country, had much to answer for 
even before foe Nazis occupied foe rest 
of France in 1942. 

Before foe Germans demanded mea- 
sures against Jews, Vichy excluded them 
from public office and certain profes- 
sions even in foe unoccupied zone in 
October 1940. Later, to meet German 
demands, the Vichy authorities deprived 
foreign-bom Jews in foe occupied zone 
of French citizenship if acquired after 
1933 and of the righi to hold property or 
own businesses, extending the ban on 


Mr. Clinton issued a fervent appeal 
for action before global wanning leads, 
as many scientists fear, to widespread 
coastal flooding and weather extremes. 
The world’s democracies, Mr. Clinton 
said, must "take a moderate but dis- 


ofa train coming down foe back to avoid 
leaving our children and out grandchil- 
dren with a catastrophe." 

His tone of urgency was welcomed by 
partisans of tighter controls on gas emis- 
sions. "He recognizes this is the en- 
vironmental t ha r his adminis tration 

will be judged on 50 years from now," 
said Alden Meyer, director of govern- 
mental relations for foe Union of Con- 
cerned Scientists. 

It is also an issue that might help or hurt 
Vice President AI Gore, a presidential 
hopeful in foe year 2000. Mr. Gere, who 
told foe conference that climate disrup- 
tion "represents one of the single greatest 
threats to our future,’* has written a book 


ViV-ltlT 

® * -* *. > -I-V . .* t 4 

•+ UW. i*., w. '■* 

- J_. »>•* Vi V, v I . j. 

. /_ .. . ...... *1*c-*-' 


on the subject But business and indnsny 
groups are spending an estimated $15 
million in a vigorous campaign against an 
eventnal treaty. ■ 

On Monday, a group called foe Co- 
alition for Vehicle Choke ran a three- 
page advertisement in The Washington 
Post, subtitled “The Global Climate 
Treaty Doesn’t Make Sense for America 
— or foe World.’* Environmental 
groups have countered with their own 
campaigns. 

Both sides are waiting for the United 
States to offer specific no men cal targets 
before foe conference. It is expected to 
do that at b»ik? in Bonn on Oct. 20. 

Japan ealTaH Monday for indus trial 
countries to agree to reduce carbon di- 
oxide, methane and other greenhouse 
gases by 5 percent from their 1990 levels 
by 2012. The European Union has called 
for a 15-percent reduction. 

Japan also said it would not attempt to 
include big developing nations such as 


that has set off a sharp dispute within the 
administration. 

The meeting is strongly opposed by 
the State and Justice departments, 
sources said, for fear that it wOl send the 
wrong signal to Mr. Samper and Colom- 
bians. According to U.S. officials, Mr. 
Samper is strongly suspected of taking 
millio ns of dollars from Colombian drug 
leaders to finance his 1994 presidential 
campaign. His visa for tiie United States 
was revoked in July 1996 for what the 
U.S. government said were “narcotics- 
related reasons.” 

Since foe alle gations against Mr. 
Samper became public three years ago, 
foe Clinton administration has tried to 
cany out a dual policy of supporting 
Colombian police in foe fight against 
drag trafficking while iso lating and at- 
tacking Mr. Samper. Mr. McCaffrey’s 
decision to seek a meeting with Mr. 
Samper was the first break in efforts to 
quarantine the president, who has been 
treated as a virtual pariah. 

For the past two years, foe Clinton 

Mdrnmig fr ahon had “dBP wtrjTflrl ’ Tnlfu n- 

bia, accusing Mr. Samper of being an 
unreliable ally in the counter-drag effor t 
Contact with Mr. Samper was carried out 
almost exclusively, and only sporadic- 
ally, by the U.S. ambassador, Myles 
Frechette, not cabinet-level officers. 

A senior administration official «aiH 
the rationale for changing this practice 
was that the Colombian government was 
increasingly under- siege from Marxist- 1 
led -insurgents -who 1 have •doGe^tiesr-to 1 
drag traffickers. 

“All the trends in Colombia are neg- 
ative, the insurgents are gaining and the 
government is losing ground,’’ foe of- 
ficial said. "Yon can’t beat foe drug 
trafficking until you bear the insurgents. 
If you go out of your way to snub a 
president whose cooperation you are 
seeking, maybe you get some psychic 
satisfaction, but you could reinforce un- 
cooperative elements of that society." 

In a telephone interview, Mr. McCaf- 
frey acknowledged that there was debate 
w ithin the administration about the trip, 
scheduled for Oct 19 to 21, but said "all 
foe • principal officers’’ endorsed foe 
meeting. 

"This frip represents no change in 
U.S. policy/’ Mr. McCaffrey said. "We 
are adamant in our view dial die counter- 
drug a genda is dominant ” 

A spokesman for the Colombian Em- 
bassy said that the Samper government 
was "very pleased" with Mr. McCaf- 
frey's decision to visit and that the trip 
was viewed as "a strong gesture of 




U.S. Supreme Court Back at Work 

Spectators waiting to enter foe Supreme Court as it reconvened on Monday for 
its 1997-98 session. In initial ridings, the court rejected two constitutional 
attacks on a federal law that makes it a crime to own or sell a machine gun. 


support for Colombia's struggle against 
drug trafficking." 

But some senior U.S. officials said foe 
move would wrongly signal to Colom- 
bia that the administration was now pre- 
pared to tolerate Mr. Samper and work 
with him. 

They added that Mr. McCaffrey was 
badly embarrassed this year when he 
embraced and praised his Mexican 
counterpart, General Jesus Gutierrez Rc- 
bollo, a few days before the Mexican 
general was arrested for taking money 
from drag traffickers. 



■ Samper Calls 'War Council 1 

President Samper summoned a "war 
council’ ’ of Colombia’s military leaders 
Monday after 28 policemen, soldiers and 
judicial officials were killed within 24 
horns in separate attacks by leftist rebels 
and rightist gunmen, Reuters reported 
from Bogota. 

Air ami ground operations foiled to 
find either foe paramilitary squad or the 
Marxist rebels responsible far the 
killings, one of foe highest death tolls 
since 30 soldiers died in fighting in July. 


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Mift 



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Mr. Papon, facing the camera, at an October 1944 speech by de Gaulle in 
Bordeaux. His trial on complicity in deporting Jews opens Wednesday. 


business ownership to the unoccupied 
zone in 1941. 

Some Jews escaped, through their own 
efforts, luck or help from French neigh- 
bors. One of them was Felix Rohatyn, 
now U.S. ambassa d or to France, whose 
family came from Vienna to Biarritz in 
1940 hoping to get through to neutral 
Portugal. They failed but managed to 
reach unoccupied southern Ranee that 
year, and from there on to Casablanca. 

The Vichy police made French Jews 
wear foe yellow star in the occupied 
zone, and they carried out deportation 
orders on 74,721 of foe 330,000 Jews' 
who were living in the country before the 
war. Nearly all of those deported died. 

It was not until two years ago that a 
French president, Jacques Chirac, could 
bring himself to acknowledge that when 
foe Vichy police, at Nazi instigation, 
rounded up thousands of Jews in the 
Velodrome d’Hiver stadium in Paris on 
July 16 and 17, 1942, it was not jnst 
Vichy but France itself that had com- 
mitted foe unpardonable. 

Previous leaders, from de Gaulle to 
Francois Mitterrand, foe first postwar 


Socialist president, ' had insisted that 
Vichy was not France. 

Among the foreign-bom Jews swept 
into the Velodrome d’Hiver that July 
was Sral Gheldman, Berthe’s husband, 
who went with ha on the fatal transport 
to Auschwitz. . 

“I was bom French and have lived in 
France all my life," their son, who 
worked for Air France before he retired, 
said the other day in his apartment in a 
western suburb of Paris. "I reel as French 
as Mr. Tout-le-Monde. But I will never 
understand how French people could do 
what they did to my parents, even with the 
Germans breathing down their necks." 

Reluctance to ask that question, let 
alone answer it, may explain why it took 
so long to bring Mr. Papon to trial after 
Michel Slitinsky, foe son of another de- 

S se from Bordeaux, and the lawyers 
■fi and Amo fGarsfeld first published 
ence against him. 

He was indicted in 1983, and then 
again in 1984, but foe investigation was 
annulled for technical reasons in 1987. A 
second investigation procedure led to an 
order early this year to go to iriaL 


China and India in a treaty. But the 
United Stales has insisted that those na- 
tions be included in the treaty. Mr. Clin- 
ton repeated that Monday: “We must 
expect all nations, both industrialized 
and developing, to participate in ^ this 
process, in a way that is fair to alL" 
The Senate, in a 95-0 vote, passed a 
resolution this summer saying it would 
not ratify any climate treaty that did not 
include developing nations. 

A Republican senator closely in- 
volved in the issue. Chuck Hagd of 
Nebraska, predicted Monday that a 
treaty would not pass. 

"Labor unions, American business, 
industry, consumer unions, have all 
come together opposing this," he said. 
He predicted that a treaty, could cost 
millio n* of American jobs. 

Alden Meyer of tiie Union of Con- 
cerned Scientists look strong exception, 
saying, "It’s frankly just garbage based 
on flawed research." 


ISRAEL: 

Inquiry Into Attack 

Continued from Page 1 

A series of telephone calls between 
King Hussein of Jordan and Mr. Net- 
anyahu resulted in tiie developments 
Monday, which began with Sheikh 
Yassin’s return to Gaza. 

Sheikh Yassin is foe founder of 
Hamas, o n e of tiie most radical Pal- 
estinian movements that has often called 
far Israel’s destruction and has carried 
out more than a dozen suicide bombings 
in Israel since 1994. He had spent eight 
years in an Israeli prison. 

Jordan has said that Israel released 
Sheikh Yassin as a humanitarian ges- 
ture, but Israeli media suggested the 
release was aimed at hehringKing Hus- 
sein appease Muslim militan ts who were 
enraged tty foe Israeli assassination at- 
tempt cxi Mr. MeshaL 

Avigdor Kahalani, Israel’s security 
minister, said foe international firestorm 
over tiie attack cm Jordanian soil would 
not deter Israel from future assassination 
bids against guerrilla leaders ‘ ‘wherever 
they are.” 

Asked by Israel Radio’s EngUsh-Ian- 
guage service if the wheelchair-bound 
Sheakh Yassin, 61 , was freed in order to 
ensure foe return to Israel of the two 
agents, Mr. Kahalani said: 

"Yes. This was part of the agree- 
ment." He added: “We are happy to see 
oar two guys back in Israel. This is a 
solution, this part of the agreement” 

He also said he was "happy" to see 
Sheikh Yassin out of prison. He said be 
had backed his release in the past to head 
off foe possibility of severe Palestinian 
backlash if foe paralyzed cleric were to ■ 
die in custody. 

"It was my recommendation to re- 
lease him a year ago, and a half year agp, 
and at that time I tried to convince foe 
prime minister to do it,” he said. 

In foe wake of foe attack, Canada 
recalled its ambassador to the Jewish 
state — the Israelis arrested in Jordan 
had forged Canadian passports — and 
Israel’s ties with Jordan, until recently 
its closest Arab peace partner, were 
shaken to the foundations. 

Meanwhile, foe U.S. envoy to the 
Middle East, Dermis Ross, met Mr. Net- 
anyahu and the Palestinian leader, Yas- 
ser Arafat, in separate talks Monday 
before reopening Israeli-Palestiman 
peace talks. " We have had a good dis- 
cussion, covered a lot of issues related to 
foe peace process and how to push things 
forward, ,r Mr. Ross said. 

Tbe U.S. envoy arrived from tiie 
United States earlier Monday, then re- 
turned to Jerusalem, where he was to 
meet Israeli and Palestinian officials. 

(Reuters, AP, AFP) 


JAPAN: * 

Debate on Warming 

Continued from Page 1 ^ 

President Bill Clinton’s adminisaa^ 
non is still deep in the throes of deciding; 
the positions it will take, balancing foe 
desire to reduce greenhouse gases 
against fears that newanti-poUutEU reg- 
ulations on industry amid hurt the U.S, 
economy. ButAmericanaffrnabsaythe 
U.S. position will call for developing 

nations to be included in any treaty. 

China had no immediate reaction to 
Japan's proposal, but it has been vehe- 
ment in its opposition to being included 
in foe treaty. China says it is not fair to 
hold a country straggling to get on its 
feet to the same standard as those who 
for decades have been developing un- 
hindered by costly regulations. 

Sugandhy, an assistant minister in the 
Indonesian Ministry of' Environment, jL 
said by telephone from Jakarta that In- ▼/ 
do&esia supported efforts to reduce glob- 
al wanning oat that his government was 
opposed to being included in any legally 
binding targets tar emissren reductions. 

"At Kyoto, there should be & com-} 
mitment” by the industrialized coun- 
tries, he said, "then later on, maybe after 
25 or 50 years, we can make some com- 
mitment too.” 

Mr. Kerr and other critics say foe 
United States is letting "dirty politics” 

g it in tire way of environmental policy, 
e said American industrial leaders [ 
were trying to use the deveknuns-nation | 



■jniiii'r 

wri' 1 ”' 


; . _* • 

: --‘V 


issue to paralyze the Kyoto conxereace. ( 

"If the U.S. insists on developing’ 
countries taking on new responsibilities • £ . 
for reductions, then developing coun-1 “ • 
tries will walk away from the confer- 
ence,” Mr. Ketr said in an interview. I 
An American official in Tokyo, who J 
is involved m preparations for foe cos-j 
ference, said the united Slates was not; 
looking to torpedo foe confe ren ce but 
felt that the developing nations had to 
play some role. 

"The developing-counoy issue will 
clearly be die major issue at this con- 
ference,” tiie official said. “We don’t - r 
expect the developing countries to act at 
foe same level, bur we expect them to do 
something." 

Several officials involved in foe con- 
ference said that backroom negotiations 
had already begun totry to get China and 
other nations to agree inKyoto to setting ... ’ 
a future date when they would agree to p 
greenhouse gas reductions. 

They said initial signs showed that 
China might be open to compromise — 
particularly if it was enticed with offers 
of new technology to help clean up its j 
industry. 

"If foe Chinese can get some good 
technology transfer and foreign aid, they 
may be more willing to listen to this 
argument," one official said. "But until 
duty see foe money on the table, they’re 
going to be very' conservative o vttrav** -• • 

Kiyotaka Akasaka, an- officiaf iti J&- 
pan’s Foreign Ministry involved 1 in the 
conference,' said, “We believe in : foe t - - 

long ran foe participation of the de- 
veloping nations will be vital.” '■ 

But hie said climate control negoti- 
ators decided in a pre-Kyoto meeting in j 
Berlin in 1995 not to seek new com- 
mitments from developing nations. I -j 

Matty officials say they believe diati 

trying to get developing nations to agre^ 
to gas reductions will only delay foe start 
of richer nations' efforts to work on the 
problem. Japanese officials were scram- ^ 

bling Monday night to defend tbeir pro- 
posals in tbe face of outraged reaction^ i ■ 
including front-page articles in the evenj^ * 
ing newspapers assailing the proposal L l ^ 

for having '’no meat” 

Japanese government spokesmen said . 

that even a 2^ percent cut from 1990_ 
levels would be painful. That require- -—i' 
ment, they said, could require the gov/ T j 
eminent to build 20 nuclear-power \f . 
plants and require the public to put up jy ; 
with colder homes in tiie wittier and 'f ‘ 
hotter homes in tiie summer. Kl 


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NATO: France-U.S. Cooperation to ExpanS 


Continued from Page 1 

rejecting anything that could be con- 
strued as getting the French into NATO 
via foe backdoor and then ignoring their 
complaints,” a British official sard. 

But foe marked pragmatism signaled 
by foe two defense ministers seemed to 
reflect a realization in Paris that Paris has 
become foe odd man out in foe dispute 
over U.S. control of NATO’s southern 
command in Naples. 

Mr. Chirac’shandling of foe Naples 
dispute has aroused resentment in Wash- 
ington and even in Germany, where De- 
fense Minister Volker Ruche, in an un- 
usual public outburst against France last 
week, took foe French .to task fix Ham - 


closer European defense cooperation by 
refusing to compromise in tiie command 
dispute. 

As if in response, Mr. Richard included 
in his comments Monday an acknowl- 
edgment that NATO had made changes 
that went some way to meeting French 
views — afoot not enough to justify 
French demands fra - greater European re- 
sponsibility and authority in tiie «Ui»iw 

While Mr. Cohen stopped well short 
of saying that foe two countries have 
agreed to disagree, he was also con- 
ciliatory in holding open tbe door for 
wider cooperation; 

Sims that the position was shared by 
foe Clinton administration came from 
foe State Department spokesman Jamie 
Rubin, who said from Washington that 
despite foe political dispute, "there are a 
lot of other things foal we can do to- 
gether anyway.” 

Both defense ministers also seemed to 
foreshadow a possible new modus 
vivendi between France and the United 
States that might be described as a geo- 
graphical division of labor. Asked about 
French military ambitions in Asia, Mr. 
Richard said that he expected to be able 
to count cm friends to look after French 
interests there — just as France had. 
rescued U.S. citizens recently from 
Congo, Brazzaville. 


Earlier Mr. Cohen said that oppor Ji x- : 
trinities for cooperation existed in mamP *7 - 

parts of the world. The French, he said! 5 • ; _T ' 

have always had a long-tom interest ii£ ; 
Africa. “We haven’t,” he noted. . 

Asked about French fears that Wash- ; ; v ‘. - 

ington was trying to supplant Paris iiH « 4 ’'. ‘ 
Africa, Mr. Cohen said: ”1 can assur?' . *• 

you that’s not our interest” ^ Z/f - 

ESPIONAGE: > S 

•Q ■■ 1 . 

3 Americans Seized -fj ^ ■ ;/ 

• ■ m 1 m 

Continued from Page 1 1,1 ' 

When talking to the FBI officer whon^ . 

she thought was a sympathetic Souti^ 

African, Ms. Sqoillacote discussed how 
she hated her job at foe Pentagon, how 
she felt “like tire weight of me whole- 
five-side building is oo me,” how he®* * v 

husband had always resented having had PLW 

his relationship with the East Germans* ^ 
“force-fed to him, as a teenager.” J ^ , 

She also implied that, on behalf of bei/ v < 

husband and their ideological forebears)*} }■. 
she wanted something useful to rame olj , 4 ' 
their work. “I kind of want them to knows ^ 

that their life wasn’t worthless/’ \ 

said, according to foe affidavit *5 ? * , 

She later gave tho undercover agenj; 
four sensitive CIA and Pentagon do<> i 
umeuts, the affidavit said. - - 

All three were charged with conspir* ' > . . ' 


a ’■ 

ti 

v„ 

s> a « 

S' : 


CU| ouncy 


acy to commit espionage on behalf or. 
East Germany , foe Soviet Union, Rnas»I 
and South Africa. If convicted, 
would free a maximum senteflce of lift* 
in prison and a $250,000 fine. * 
If certain statutory criteria- are 
they also could face tbe death panfJNS 
A criminal complaint charges map 
they gave four secret Defease Depart* 
mem and CIA documents to* person 
they believed was a South African m« 
telhgence officer. ...... '■ o 


maximum penalty for 
charges axe 10 years in prison and * 
$250,000 fine. . 


t 



I — 


Bid for 

■Worms? 

C 

Agnelliand Insurer 
Have d ‘Good Grip 9 

Bloomberg News 

f PARIS 7 — The Agnelli family nf 
£jy and Assurances Generates de 
France SA, an insurance company 
. offered 459.40 francs (S7Z60) a 
_ share Monday for the holding com- 
1 ^anm & CSe^ exceeding a 

- rival offer by the French financier 
Francois PinanlL 

i The stock- and-cash offer values 
* the French sugar, paper, insurance 
. and shipping company at 31.7 bil- 

- lion francs. 

i- The offer was 4,7 percent higher 
than Friday's closing share price of 
5 438.8 francs and was 12 percent 
■ c more than the Pinanlt offer of 410 
. francs a share. 

- Worms, which rejected the Pin- 
anlt bid, raid die Agnelli- AGF bid 

c was “in the in Orests” of Worms 
-shareholders. 

; The Pads Bourse halted trading 
? in Worms and AGF. It said AGF 
r shares would resume trading Tues- 
day, but no date was set for Worms 
I shares to start tra ding again. 

. Ifil SpA, AGF and the Worms 
] family already own 49 percent of 
} Worms, meaning they would al- 
r most certainly be able to block the 
P inanl t bid, analysts gaid- 
_ The bid would give Ifil, die hold- 
,ing company of the Agnelli family, 

£ control of Worms through a hold- 
x. ing company that also would hold 
( fill’s other Breach investments. 

Under terms of the offer, Worms 
j would sell its Athena insurance unit 
. to AGF for 12 billion francs as soon 
f as the acquisition was complete. 

, “They have a pretty good grip 
now,” said Thierry Bergeron, who 
{_ helps manage more than $200 mil- 
ilion in assets at CAP Finance. “I 

- think we have entered the final 
I phase.” 

j. He said his fund had not yet 
"deqf^jWhatto^owiththe HSfotws,-, 
_ glares ril-jOwmed. . »• * 

The,offeocomes amid a flurry. of . 
.bidding activity in Paris as resis- 
l tance to takeovers wanes. 

Promodes SA and Rallye S A are 
. batting to buy Casino SA, Ranee's 
f third-laigest supermarket chain, 

. and Adidas AG last month bought 
the ski maker Salomon SA. 


INTERNATIONAL 




— j-'l» '<r~ - 


ribunc 


w-i '• 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY OCTOBER 7, 1997 


A Computer in Every Dashboard 


Car navigation systems, which locate one's vehicle on a map, are now becoming communications tools as 
well. The Vehicle Information and Communication System (VICS) transmits, via radio waves and right 
beacons, information on the latest traffic conditions. That information is then displayed on the navigator 
screen in one of three ways. 


A Dashboard Display 


• ' v 

tjf,. . -* 


O Maps 

Congested roads 
in the area are 
highlighted on a 
map showing 
the location of the 



Line 

showing a 
traffic jam. 

Dot 

showing 
the car. 


Source: Vehicle Infamtalion and Communication System Center 





o '■ \c . 


I*} 

- 

-- BSt?- 5 3Cvq - 


Textual information on the estimated 
travel time between two points is 
sent by VICS. 



0 Graphics 
Soma roadway 
schematics show 
congested 
segments in red 
Others estimate 
how long it will take 
to travel from one 
place to another. 


The New Ycni Tara 


Know-It-All Box Helps Lost Drivers 


By Andrew Pollack 

Nr*- York Tunes Service 

TOKYO — Kaoru Hinata’s car nav- 
igation system can plot a course and 
guide him to his destination, telling him 
when to turn left or righL 
If he's hungry or low on fuel, it can 
show him the location of the nearest 
test-food outlet or gasoline station. 

And it can even receive the latest 
traffic information and tell Mr. Hinata 
which roads are congested and which 
parking lots still have space. 

Given all these whiz-bang features, 
how does the 32-year-old produce-mar- 
ket wockcr4ise ,hi$ $3.0p0 oar.navig-^ 

atort,-. F. , r» 

One way is to watch television on the 
navigator's screen, helping to pass the 
time while he’s stuck in traffic jams. 

The car navigation system, in which a 
computerized map showing the car’s 
location is displayed on a dashboard- 
mounted screen, is usually advertised as 
a tool to help drivers find their way. 
saving time and fuel. ■ 


But in Japan, where such systems are 
in more widespread use than anywhere 
in the world, the navigator is also be- 
coming the hob of car information and 
entertainment, delivering television, 
data, video games, and other comforts 
of home to one’s home on wheels. 

The experience in Japan could be a 
prelude to what will happen in the 
United Stales, where car navigation sys- 
tems are starting to be offered to con- 
sumers and provided in rental cars. 

In gadget-happy Japan, about 
780,000 systems were shipped last year, 
an increase of 51.5 percent from 1995. 

In the first half of this year, sales were 
up 9.4- percent, according to the Elec- 
tronic Industries Association of Japan. 

Car navigators, most of which sell for 
about $2,000, are essentially computers 
with a small liquid crystal display 
screen and a player for die CD-ROMs 
teat contain tee digital maps and a data 
base of addresses. 

The car’s location — determined 
mainly using Global Positioning Sys- 
tem satellites developed by tee U.S. 


PACE 13 


Asian Currencies Drop 
As Debt Fears Increase 

Rupiah Recovers as Indonesia Intervenes 


military during the Cold War — is dis- 
played (m tee map and adjusted ac- 
cordingly as the car moves. 

But having a screen, and with tee 
addition of a television tuner and two 
small antennas on the roof of the car, the 
navigator can serve as a television set 

The navigators can also be used to 
play compact disks and, in some cases, 
to sing karaoke or play games. 

So now, there is a rush in Japan 
toward what is being called car mul- 
timedia. 

Already dozens of software titles, 
sold on CD-ROMs, have been de- 
veloped far car navigators. 

Golf programs provide tips oa tee 

See NAVIGATE, Page 17 


Combed tj OarSkff F«m Dtspatete 

SINGAPORE — Southeast Asian 
currencies foil Monday on concerns 
over the fate of companies that are 
saddled with dollar-based loans. ° 

The Indonesian central bank inter- 
vened for the first time in months to stem 
the rupiah’s dive to a historic low. 

The dollar rose to 3,660 rupiah Moo- 
day, against 3,640 on Friday, after hit- 
ting a high of 3,870. 

Dealers said tee steep slide was cur- 
tailed by Bank Indonesia intervention. 

The bank’s action came after most of 
tee central banks in the region had aban- 
doned attempts to salvage their cur- 
rencies from tee marauding madcetS. 

The rupiah's steep fall led President 
Suharto to call an emergency meeting 
with his top economic ministers and the 
central bank chief. 

After the meeting, State Secretariat 
Minister Murdiono stud Lumpur 
would announce within tee next few 
days steps to ease pressure on the cur- 
rency. 

“What you have seen here,” said 
Mans Bhaskaran of SocGen Crosby, 
“is really tee debt factor coming into 
play as corporates try to hedge their way 
out of foreign debts they’ve got them- 
selves into. So it appears this exerted a 
downward pressure on tee rupiah.” 

Mr. Bhaskaran said tee pressures 
would continue for a while before tee 
rupiah could stabilize. 

“A little bit of intervention could 
actually move the currency up because 
of tee thin market,” he gain “But I 
suspect there are a lot of people waiting 
on me sidelines to sell as welL So, in tee 
longer term, this intervention may not 

“The name of the game right now is 
policy credibility,” he added, calling on 
the government to give more informa- 
tion on the state of me economy. 

Dealers said fears in Indonesia that 
key companies would default on their 
doiiar-denominated loans spread to the 
Philippines and Malaysia, pushing 
down those countries' currencies and 
stocks as well as those of Singapore. 

The dollar rose to 34.90 Philippine 
pesos from 34.50 on Friday amid ru- 
mors of mare companies defaulting oo : 
bank- loans. and a, tight, liquidity situ- 
ation. 


PRIVATE BANKING 


The Bankers’ Association of foe Phil- 
ippines imposed a 2 percent volatility 
band on trading in the peso as of Tues- 
day, the group's president said. 

Foreign-exchange trading will be 
suspended for 30 minutes if the peso 
rises or foils by 2 percent from the 
previous day's weighted average, Deo- 
gracias Vistan said, allowing traders to 
assess fluctuations. 

“This is aimed at stabilizing the ex- 
change rate,” Mr. Vistan said. 

The Malaysian ringgit retrenched, 
with the dollar easing to 33585 ringgit 
from 33720 on Friday. The ringgit fell 
to a record low last week, when the 
dollar hit 3.4080. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Moha- 
mad said Malaysia would manage its 
economic crisis and recover oo its own 
without asking for foreign help. 

“Thereisaway of handling this thing 
no matter what they do,” he said. ‘Tm 
sure we will overcome this on our own. 
We will tty and manage. There is a way 
of managing. Other countries have gone 
through worse. We shouldn’t panic.” 

(AP, AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


To Onr Readers 

In ardor to present the New York 
Stock Exchange tables more 
legibly, the IHT today beginspub- 
lishing a redesigned list of NYSE 
share pikes. (Page 16) 

The type size has been enlarged 
and tee space between lmcs 
widened. This has been achieved 
by eliminating shares that seldom 
trade and by dropping shares not 
available to most investors. In lim- 
iting the list to the 2,600 most 
traded shares, tee new table none- 
theless represents about 99 percent 
of all NYSE market value daily. 

This is the first in a series of 
revisions aimed at making tee share 
prices in all of our U3. market 
tables more readable. We invite 
yoor comments and suggestions (o- 
mail to iht@ iht.com). Full daily 
U.S. share-price information re- 
mains available at the UTFs site on 
tee Internet: wwwaht.com 



■m. 


m 


1 Thinking Ahead /Commentary 

* Prescribing Facts to Cure ‘‘Globaphobia’ 


By Reginald Dale 

hutrmnkuud Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — Econo- 
mists at tee venerable 
Brookings Institution, a 
Washington public-policy 
organization, have come up with a new 
word: “globaphobia.” It means the ir- 
rational tear of economic globalization 
teat seems to haunt tee popular psyche 
tqese days in most industrial countries, 
it is a horrible mongrel of a word, but 
, it serves a useful purpose. It suggests, 
Ci' correctly, that opposition to globaliz- 
A ation is often based on emotion and 
wrong intuitiv e assumptions, rather 
than on reasoned analysis. 

The strength of that opposition has 
come as something of a shock to Amer- 
ican supporters of a menu open world 
economy, many of whom now realize 
they have foiled to make tee free-trade 
case effectively enough. 

Whh President Bill Clinton’s request 
for new “fait track” authority to ne- 
gotiate trade agreements under heavy 
foe in Congress, there is increasing re- 
cognition among “giobaphiles ” that the 

time has come for a counteroffensive. , 
This is not just an American debate. 
fr/fany Europeans, too, see the whole 


idea of freer trade — especially with 
developing countries — as a threat to 
jobs and wages and a cause of widening 
income inequality. The dismantling of 
economic barriers is often taken to mean 
teat high-paid workers in the rich coun- 
tries must now compete directly with an 
almost limitless pool of cheap labor in 
tee developing world. 

There are widespread suspicions 
among “globaphobes’ ’ teal employers 
in the industrial nations are using an often 
unspoken threat to move operations to 
lower-cost countries to keep wages and 
benefits down. Such theories seem su- 
perficially plausible. But, as an increas- 
ing number of economists are pointing 
out, coundess studies have unearthed 
tittle or no evidence to support them. On 
tee contrary, tee research suggests that 
trade plays only a minor role in de- 
pressing wages in the richer countries. 

In fact, argue Robert Lawrence and 
Robert Litan of Brookings, roost U.S. 
trade is with high-wage countries, such 
as Japan and Germany, and American 
wages are relatively low when com- 
pared with wages in those countries. 

Anyway, employers are not inter- 
ested in wage rates per se but in labor 
costs per unit of output. Workers in poor 
countries are much less productive than 


their rivals in the industrial countries, 
and once they start producing more, 
their wages begin to rise. 

It is true that wages of unskilled 
workers have fallen further behind those 
of skilled workers in tee industrial coun- 
tries, but teat is largely because tech- 
nological progress has reduced the de- 
mand for unskilled Labor. 

A century and a half ago, Paul King- 
man of Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology writes in Foreign Affairs 
magazine, most Americans were fann- 
ers, and textiles dominated manufac- 
turing. Today, tiny fractions of the labor 
force are engaged in those activities. 

If you had told an economist in tee 
1840s what share of workers would be 
in agriculture and textiles 150 years 
later and asked what everyone else 
would do for a living, be could not have 
given a very good answer. But he could 
with justice have argued on general 
principles teal the economy would find 
something useful for teem to do. 

None of this means there are no vic- 
tims of globalization. It does mean that 
trying to stop globalization is not the 
best way to help them. The facts should 
be an antidote to globaphobia — tee 
problem will be getting the globaphobes 
to believe teem. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


tiroes Bates ° ct6 

l S I DHL Bf. U« tw U. IP. Y« Q PM 

- DCS BO LQM UE UMT — MSB* UM 14 X 3 * U 4 S UBS* 

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WMae *W> *■ »■ *0= not: pmM- MA.- nrfoirifaMi 


Libid-Ubor Rates Oct 6 

$MK French 

Mtar D-Mut Frooc SMi) Franc You ECO 

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SeuKBK Ream Uayas Bunk. 

Ratos appPcable to hmrtKM Ospadts of SJ mISoa n^nlmain ArOfUtaftMt 


Other Dollar Values 

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jmh&pho 099*6 Gnokrirac. 277.73 
£K£s TAB 7 JW 0 

JUnfrionodh 12355 tta*faiW 

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90S.S 


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IMMtf 

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VCW.HK. 


# A 


Forward Rates 


Key Money Rates 

UQBW5I0I0* CM* 

UitOOOOtlBli SJD0 

Prim* ret* aw 

Mtrdftreds 5W 

MrCPiMM SM 

lBMqrCPMOf* $JS 

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7-yoar Tresianr ovta 5X8 

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MonttUncftSMirUI &SS 

KKorntreto 050 

cminoMr ail 

tHHoidta MotSaok 047 

iwwM iiBmtwt oa 

HotthMaA osi 

lfl-yo« Govi hend 100 


tak base rate 
CoBhomt 

1 -aonth tatobaoh 

3-owott toMrtaik 
MMAhtmtaak 
lOfovSHl 

Freno 

latonwMrelo 
OBreenoV 
1-reoitt talnbonk 
3 reorthWoiboab 
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110 110 
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3V. 314 

314 354 

3ft 3* 
5M 5J38 


'■ IT1 ,, a „ U 1 M 14 W JmiM 121 X 3 12095 13039 

1JS57 TjsM j** Htaw 1 X 483 14466 

EJSSm? ijSTs USA 1 JS 10 


f^gOUMreamaP' dafmsa (Pamir Bontar nEMUMVi mdrab 


Looted ralo 
CoflomMT 
1-oteh krt ortonh 
3-owoft fahrtert! 

• IUWIIII BlfllVHC 

18-reor Bond 


JLM. FJW. Ofgt 

Zortdl HA. SOJS +OJ5 

Mote 334.15 33250 +OflQ 

NOW Yortt 33040 334W0 -230 

_UA dtatoForoBBgo Laedoa afBeu 


You’ve got the vision. 
We’ve got the know-how. 


You see things for what they 
are. And also for what they 
could be. 

It’s the kind of vision that 
ignites and fuels the entrepre- 
neurial spirit 

We at Credit Lyonnais Private 
Banking share this vision. 
And, equally Important, we 
have the knowledge, special- 
ized products and services 
to help you get where you 
want to go. 



llJI 

ii.-im.:- — oi-w 


Our Geneva subsidiary, specafae d 
in Privets Banking since 1876. 


We’ve gained unrivaled, in- 
depth experience from our 
group’s worldwide presence. 
Even in the most out- of- the - 
way countries. 

But there is yet another 
key dimension to Credit 4 
Lyonnais Private fj 

Banking strength, 

From the time /f 
we opened our 
first office in 
Switzerland, 

120 years 
ago, our 

history has revolved around 
durable, personal relation- 
ships, based on dialogue and 
attention to detail. 

We listen firsthand then 
respond with speed, efficiency 
and a total commitment to 
providing the precise solution 
lor your demands. From trade 
financing and international 
logistical support to portfolio 


management financial instru- 
ments and precious metals. 
Whether you are a private, 
corporate or institutional client 
you’ll find Credit Lyonnais 


Private Banking can anticipate 
and serve your needs through 
close partnerships buitt on 
trust and vast resources. 
Together, these two .dimen- 
sions create something 
unique in Credit Lyonnais 
Private Banking. 

Let’s talk. 


end dtstno price 
ritecj 

5om& aware. 


CREDIT LYONNAIS 


m. wwit Hwnunu roi wwk 

Switzerland: Geneva tel. 41 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 
Basle tel. 41 61/28422 22 • Zurich tel 41 1/21786 86- Lugano tel. 4i 91/923 51 65 
Pxristel 33 1/42 95 03 05 • Luxembourg tel. 332/476 83 1 442 « London tel 44 171/49991 46 
Monaco tel. 377/93 15 73 34 - Vienna TEL 431/531 50 120 • Montevidbotel. 598 2/95 08 67 • Miami tel l TGvvk . 

Hono Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 -Singapore m. 65/535 9477 375 U 


5^ 


I 




PAGE 14 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


a 


THE AMERICAS 


* A SO' 110 1 M 1 J 1 J A S 0 
1997 



: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Intereatkaul Herald Triboae 


Very briefly; 


• H-F. Ahmanson & Co. agreed to buy Coast Savings Fi- 
nancial Inc. for $901 milli on in stock, as the parent company 
of Home Savings of America seeks to become the No. 3 thrift 

ia Cali fornia 


Occidental Buys Oil Field 


CcmfdtdbyOkrSr^Frrmaspixrtia 

LOS ANGELES — Occidental 
Petroleum Corp. won an auction to 
buy the government's share of the 
U.S. Naval Petroleum Reserve for 
$3.65 billion, and the company 
said Monday it would sell its Mid- 
Con natural-gas subsidiary to help 
finance the purchase. 

Occidental said it expected to 
receive at least $3 billion from the 
sale of MidCon, which operates a 
natural-gas pipeline serving the 
upper Midwest from the Gulf of 
Mexico. 

In addition, Occidental said it 
considered its stock undervalued 
and that it planned to repurchase as 
many as 40 million shares for about 
$1 billion, to be financed initially 
with short-term debt. Occidental's 
shares rose $2.8125 to close at 
$29,625 in New York trading. 

The government’s sale of its 78 
percent interest in the Elk Hills oil 
ndd in California is the largest 
sale ever of a government asset, 
the Department of Energy said. 
Occidental, which bear ont 22 oth- 
er bids, said the purchase would 
increase its worldwide oil and nat- 


ural gas reserves by about 75 per- 
cent, to the equivalent of 2.3 bil r 
lion barrels of oil. 

Chevron Corp., based in San 
Francisco, owns the other 22 per- 
cent interest in the Elk Hills 
Field. 

Separately, Occidental said it 
expected to take a charge of 16 
cents a share against third-quarter 
earnings after it revamped its ex- 
ecutive pay to make the program 
performance- based. 

The company said it had paid 
Chairman Ray Irani $95 million 
and President Dale Laurance $17 
million to reflect the value of elim- 
inated retirement benefits ami oth- 
er contractual rights. 

After the charge, Occidental 
said it expected to report net in- 
come of about 40 cents a share, 
compared with analysts' estimates 
averaging about 41 cents a share. 

For last year's third quarter, the 
company reported net income of 
$194 million, or 53 cents a share. 

The Elk Hills Field, near 
Bakersfield, California, encom- 
passes more than 47,000 acres 
09,000 hectares) and includes 


more than 1,000 wells,a47-mega- 
watr power plant and two units that 
process gas. 

The federal government’s share 
in the field is estimated to hold 
reserves equal to 1 billion barrels 
of oil. Occidental said. 

Occidental said the acquisition 
would immediately increase its net 
U.S. production by 46,000 barrels 
of oil and 93 million cubic feet of 
gas a day. With Occidental as the 
operator, the company's share of 
the Elk Hills net production is ex- 
pected to rise to more than 80,000. 
barrels of oil and 300 million cubic 
feet of gas a day, fee company 
said. 

The purchase is subject to con- 
gressional review and is expected 
to be concluded in February. 

The sale of the government’s 
interest to Occidental will com- 
plete a two-year program to sell 
government assets mandated by 
Congress in the 1996 National De- 
fense Authorization Act. The 
country's emergency oil supplies 
are now held m other facilities 
known as the Strategic Petroleum 
Reserve. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Bullish Profit Outlook*; 

■ » 

Fuels Gains in Stocks ; 


court 
to buy 


• We stern Pacific Airlines Inc. filed for bankruptcy 
protection from creditors, a week after scrapping plans I 
fee rival Colorado carrier Frontier Airlines Inc. 

• General Motors Corp. has cut its fourth-quarter North 
American production estimate by 3,000 cars, to 1,442,000, 
mostly because of lower demand for its Chevrolet Metro 
models that are made in 

• Marriott International Inc.*s third-quarter net profit rose 
16 percent, to $67 million, including a $5 million charge 
related to fee $1 billion purchase of Renaissance Group Nv, 
on robust demand for hotel rooms and revenue from new 
properties, especially Renaissance. 

• Bear Stearns Cos. paid its top five executives a total of $87 
million for the investment bank’s latest year, sources said, which 
makes them among the best-paid Wall Street executives. 

• Peru's economy grew at a 6.7 percent annual rate in August, 

led by construction and retail activity. Bloomberg 


Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Kiss fee Girls" dominated die U.S. box 
office over the weekend, wife a gross of $13.4 millio n. Fol- 
lowing are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Saturday's ticket 
sales and estimated safes for Sunday. 


FedEx to Buy Trucking Company 


CmptlaibyOurSxigPnmCHipatdra 

AKRON, Ohio — Federal Ex- 
press Corp. said Monday it would 
buy fee trucking company Caliber 
System Inc. for about $2.4 billion in 
stock, expanding Federal’s ability to 
compete wife package delivery 
rivals like United Parcel Service of 
America Inc. 

Federal Express said it would cre- 
ate a new bolding company, FDX 
Corp., to oversee Federal Express 
and Caliber’s various subsidiaries. 


including RPS Inc., the fourth- 
largest U.S. package delivery car- 
rier; two trucking companies; a dis- 
tribution and inventory control 
company and a transportation in- 
formation provider. 

The deal comes as UPS is still 
feeling some effects from a strike this 
summ er by the Teamsters union. 

While Federal Express dominates 
the air package-delivery business, it 
is a distant second to UPS for 
ground deliveries. Federal Ex- 


press's acquisition of RPS and the 
two Caliber trucking companies. 
Viking Freight and Robots Ex- 
press, should strengthen its ground 
business. 

The Federal-Caliber combination 
would generate $15 billion a year in 
revenue. 

The agreement calls for Caliber 
stockholders to receive 0.8 share of 
FDX Corp. for each Caliber share in 
a tax-free transaction valued at $63 a 
share. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Correal by Oie From Dtiparba 

NEW YORK — Stocks 
Monday on optimism feat ix 
would stay few enough to let in- 
terest rates fell further, helping cor- 
porate profits' expand. 

After a? permit slide in August, 
stocks have resumed their climb 
amid expectations feat third-quarter 
earnings will top forecasts. 

“We expect a nice round of earn- 
ings this month, and that will send 
stocks higher,” said John Gardner, 
chief investment strategist at Van 
Licw Capital in Providence, Rhode 
Island. 

David Mead, chief investment' 
officer at Harris Bank in Chicago, 
said, “Unless you see a major 
downturn in earnings, fee stock 
market doesn’t have a 1 whole lot of 
vulnerability.” 

The Dow Jones Industrial Av- 
erage closed 61.64 points higher at 
8,100.22. 

Among broad market measures, 
the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index climbed 7.66 points to 
972.69. The S&P 500 reached re- 
cords Thursday and Friday for the 
first time since.early August 

The Nasdaq composite index 
jumped 6.04 points to 1,721.91. 

Stocks rose as the yield on fee 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 
dropped four basis points to 6.26 
percent The bond was priced at 101 
18/32, up 15/32. 

"You do have a stronger bond 
market today, and recent economic 
data have shown fee economy is 
generating very little inflation,” 
said Tim Anderson, managing di- 
rector of equity trading at NatWest 
Securities m New York. 

Adding to that sentiment were 
comments from W illiam Mc- 
Donough, president of the Federal 
Reserve Bank of New Yarik, who 
said the economy was growing at a 


Currency Traders Await German Jobs Data 


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SIXmUkxi 


CeapOrd by Ckr Staff FnmDapadm 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
mixed against other major curren- 
cies Monday as the market awaited 
the announcement of German un- 
employment figures Tuesday. 

The September unemployment 
data "are likely to show a tog in- 
crease and therefore run counter to a 
tightening of German interest rates," 
said David Thwaites, an analyst at 
Credit Lyonnais Capital Markets. 

The dollar was at 1.7580 
Deutsche marks in 4 PJM. trading. 


up from 1 .7560 DM on Friday. 

It was also unchanged at 1.4475 
Swiss francs and down to 5.9011 
French francs from 5.9030 francs. 
The pound was at $1.6155, down 
from $1.6160. 

The dollar fell to 121.950 yen 
from 122.095 yen. 

The yen was strengthened after 
Eisuke SakaJtibara, Japan's deputy 
finance minister for international af- 
fairs, said the nation's economy 
would rebound. ■ 

. .' Mr. Sakakibara saidSaturday feat 


the Japanese benchmark 10-year 
government bond yield’s decline to 
a record low of 1.745 percent Friday 
was “crazy" and warned that in- 
vestors would “get hurt" if they 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

continued buying bonds. Hiroshi 
Sakuma, a trader wife Barclays 
Bank PLC, said Mr. Sakakibara’s 
"optimistic” view on fee Japanese 
economy had driven traders to sell 
.dollars. ;h- 


The pound gave up some gains 
against fee mark after an official at 
France's Finance Ministry said Bri- 
tain was considering joining 
Europe’s planned single currency 
from its start in 1999. 

The chancellor of fee Exchequer, 
Gordon Brown, was discussing fee 
issue when he met with his French 
counterpart. Finance Minister 
Dominique Stnuiss-Kahn, fee offi- 
cial said. Joining the currency would 
entail loweE UdKrinterest-rates.-ana— 
lysts havesaid, - -{AFP, Bloomberg) 


robust pace without much inflation,, 
"We seem to have fee best of all; 
worlds,” Mr. McDonough said, i 
He said that inflation had not yeC 
picked up, even though unemploy-j 
ment rates had fallen below levels* 
thar many economists said would! 
pushprices higher. ; 

“Tne likelihood is, people are; 
swapping job security for being les^ 
de manding 0 n wages and bene- 
fits,” be said. 

The gain in brads helped finan-J 
rial shares advance. B ank A merica) 
dimbed 2 1/16 tt) 80Vi Travelers, 

US. STOCKS ■ j 

Group jumped 2 to 73 11/16, Chaseg 
Manhattan rose 21£ to 125 1/16. All-f 
state rose % to 83, and Fannie Mae) 
climbed Vi to 48 1/16. j 

PepsiCo rose after it said it had? 
raised $5 5 billion by spinning offj| 
KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell intO| 
Tricon Global Restaurants and leay-; 
ing fee restaurant business to gain ; 
cash to pay off most of its short-temii 
debt and expand its stock buyback.’ 

The maker of Pepsi soft drinks and| 
Friio-Lay snacks said it had received) 
$4.5 bflfion from the Tricon spin-off? 
completed Monday. It also sold its; 
PepsiCo Food Systems restaurant-* 
supply unit in July to Ameri Serve! 
Food Distribution Inc. for about] 
$830 million. In addition, it sold five^ 
small restaurant chains and com-| 
pleted an initial public offering of xtsj 
New Zealand restaurant business, j 
Kulicke & Sofia Industries fell} 
after fee maker of semiconductor! 
components and equipment said it; 
expected results for its first quarter, 
ending Dec. 31 to frill short of the> 
previous quarter's because of ship- 
meats being delayed for delivery 
later in fee winter. In the year-earii- 
er first quarter, the company had net 
income of 2 cents a share. 

Silicon Graphics fell 8 15/16 to 
17 15/16 after fee computer maker! 
warned feat it would post a 
viously unexpected loss for its 
quarter. Silicon Graphics said its 
server business had a disappointing 
quarter, especially in the United 
States. 

Boeing closed 9/16 higher at 52 
9/16. The U.S. jetmaker is expected 
to get a $2 billion order from China 
on Thursday, according to a West- 
ern diplomat familiar wife the trans- 
action. Such a deal would be Boe- 
ing’s biggest Chinese order since_ai 
$4 billion contract in 1991 and 
would extend the company’s dom-" 
inance of the world’s rastest- growl- 
ing aircraft market — 

... (Bloomberg, AP) 




f 


i ■ 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday's 4 P.M. Close 

Tte 300 roust boded stocks of foe day, 
up Id Hie dosing on Wd Shed. 
ThBAssodaod Press. 

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— <58183 69402 

— 207 M 20(138 

— 1 15-40 116.94 

— 965XC vru/) 

— 92830 93460 


H*h loo * — * ag. 
Simla 50569 509 JD +461 
63862 63567 63850 +436 

46783 46330 46687 +177 

30755 30487 30764 +177 

48965 46494 4060 +536 


172165 171680 172152 +465 

139655 1391J4 139472 +337 

192880 191151 192678 +173* 
186565 183824 186561 +2517 
231121 22JUJ1 231121 +2M9 
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20179 

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19918 


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214 1* 1 tom 

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Oct. 6, 1997 

High Lorn LMwf CJw OpM 

Grains 

OORNIPKIT) 

5000 b« mWmum- coals par busM 
Doc 97 268* 761* 267* +3 200067 

Mar 98 277* 271 276* +3 65874 

May 98 282* 276* 282* +3* 17660 

Jul 98 187 280* 286* +4 291912 

Sep 98 279 273* 278* +3* 2.145 

Doc 98 278 270 177* +3* 18617 

Jul 99 290 285 290 +6 144 

EH. sale* N A Frfm sales 7IU38 
Film open W334172.au 11 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTl 

100 tons- doltan per Ian 

Od 97 208J0 205X0 20&00 +1130 11«3 

Dec 97 20430 20ai0 20360 +0.90 46106 

Jsi 98 20380 19930 2D2J0 +0.70 17XM7 

Mar 98 201J0 19730 200-10 +1JD 14200 

May 98 199 JO 19730 199J0 +1J0 14660 

XU 98 702-00 199.10 20230 +1-50 8613 

ESL Mrias HA. Frfl utes 27306 
Film open Ml 1 7,794 up 2637 

SOYBEAN OILKBOT} 

60000 to- CMIS per lb 

Ocl 97 2434 2176 240 +116 1141 

Dec 97 2436 2AM 2434 +021 54822 

Jan 98 24JS 2428 2458 +OJ5 184)14 

Mar 98 2495 2447 2477 +028 10175 

Marffl 25.00 2465 2431 +023 7316 

M 98 2505 7472 2486 +022 6695 

EiL tatos NA Frfs sates 18375 
Firs apex IM 1 0161 1. up 1368 

SOYBEANS (C80T) 

4000 im Dhkmm- cents per bwhel 


hflgh Law Latest Oipe OpM 

ORANGE JUICE (NCnt) 

ls.ino too- cento perb 

Nov 97 7460 7160 74S +005 17.743 

Jon 98 77x50 7470 7730 +030 10934 

Mar 98 8030 7960 B06S +060 7.126 

May 98 8330 8230 8320 +060 1.723 

Ed. talas KA Fits sales 4694 

film open U 38609, up 270 


Haitian 

CdnOCdg 


13Z76 ^ 

lias 
6977 


ko *o 


■* 9* +1* 

19s m +k 
45 42* 44* +3 

M* 6* 6* ♦* 

19* 27* 29* +nm 


& 


5* 

7* 

■H -Is 

5H +Vk 


urn 


»'-m 


m rm 

2W J» 
141k 1H 
1* 19k 

4 nm 

2W H 
II M 
II* 10* 
• * 
5* 5 

51. S* 
* * 
226 21* 
II* 11* 
2*k 2H 
U* 13* 
14* IM 
9* 9 

18* 10* 
2* 7? 

3Ai 2» 
14* 14 

7 6* 

friAi 96*U 
16* 4504, 

■to »k 
21* 11 
2* M 
IN I 
HN Wk 
Ml 5V. 
13* IM 
3i* m 
«Ml 64* 

6 5* 
19* 11* 

I6W 16ft 

a in* 

M 9* 

3 2* 

* T 

II 17* 
3M 27* 
Ik I* 

19k 1* 

tor * 

% % 
41* 40* 

4* M 
Ilk N 

n* Si 
Sm SkL 

74 69* 

T Jfc 

9* 11 Vk 

S4m n* 


141k 
SVk -* 

Hr -* 

Itk +H 
m +«k 
m +9k 
14* +tk 
l* 4m 
7* 4k 


12* *U 
II* »U 
M 

17* -ft 
Mm +** 
9 +* 

KM -* 
29. +* 

2* 

14* •* 

4* 47. 

97* ++*. 

IM +* 
ar-s -to 
71* Ji 
V» -im 

fkk +»k 

m +m 
tto +k 

i] *n 

9* 

4»m +* 

5tok 

U* 4m 
KA -*m 
27* +N 


IN 
119k 
ZTk 

29k 41 

Ilk +Vk 
* 

M -im 
n* +* 

30* +114 

um 4k 

m -* 

m +ltok 
mm ♦ *, 


Trading Activity 







NYSE 


Am. 

Nasdaq 


NM 

Prw. 


1124 

1137 

AdmcM 


2127 

MS 

Drasnad 

1108 

475 

3407 

1095 

m 

3425 

SSSS&d 

TaUBsues 

fist S3? 


ISM 

IS 

1792 

1473 

5718 

NswHioni 

New Low* 

t 

4 


39 

28 

AMEX 



Market Sales 

iwre 



Ckw 

Pm, 



Pt«k 

AOmmad 

a 

340 

253 

NYSE 

4991.94 


cam. 

73X22 

HawHIaos 

Now LOWS 

760 

758 

92 

l 

Ana 

Nasdaq 

InmSBora. 

3170 

64672 


41X8 

76574 


Dividends 

Company 


Par Aim Ree Pay caaBHuy 

TwfnatyBncpn 


IRREGULAR 

Banco U> ADS b .1274 10-10 10-21 

FWtessSMsmoCD . JB IM 10-6 
FM Export Fa - Z32 10-3 10-6 

OceTEV. ADS b AS 10-14 11-19 

STOCK SPLIT 
GuU Mand Fabric 2 tar I spit 

STOCK 

Commerce Bestirs . 5% 11-28 12-12 
REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Piwepf Iik 1 tar 7mane spSt. 

INmAL 

. j03 10-17 10-31 


P«r Amt Ree Pay 
- .10 10-15 10-30 


Cbesopeal 

GhnMterl 


ir PH, 

HBtanbnind Indus 
Lakeland Fnd 
LeaRanal Inc . 
Lacent Teehs 
MaCommunk: 
Nations oaWB 
NaHonaco3B04 
OpfMfitmr Wrld 


REGULAR 
Ike UK a 345 
O .173 
0 -ldS 

8 :!§ 

a mss 

5 4H5 

m Mm 

M M94 
M 056 


12-12 1-5 

10-10 11-1 
10-24 ll-Zfl 
10-10 10-24 
10-20 Tl-10 

10- 31 12-1 

11- 14 IM 
10-13 10-30 
10-13 1030 

10-10 10-24 


HochoCoA 


a-annuaLb-twrolmilk nmmmt per 
fbon/ADRr 9-paynMe to CBBaMlfM^ 
nmientatf; iMWMtartyrs-swkaaual 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sate figure are unofficial. Yearly Mgits and lowi rcfted ttiu i 



Livestock 
CATTLE CCMER3 
4Q4XD Ibi- eon* par lb. 

Od 97 &650 65.95 6&40 undv. 

Doc 97 6687 6637 6667 +0.10 

FebM 69 AS 6960 6932 +Oj07 

Apr 98 73-87 7355 7242 4L15 

Jun98 69A2 69-55 69J7 -0.17 

Aeg98 6960 69.00 89.15 unch. 

BLmfflk 14629 Fits sties 14172 
film oponM 93034 Up 307 

FKEDBR CATTLE (CMBR) 

54000 Bn.- eonti par to. 

Oct 97 77 JO MBS 7702 unch. 

Noe 97 77.90 7730 17.71 +435 

Jen 98 7935 78.70 78.97 +0.07 

Mar 98 79.15 7860 7085 +0.10 

Apr 99 7965 79A5 7930 +0.10 

May 98 BOAS 7965 7960 +6.15 

E9L JMU 2^19 fits R4as &361 
Fits apwi H 17.B9& up 809 

HOGS-Lean (CMER) 

44000 t«s^ cents par Rl 
0d 97 68.70 6835 6047 +032 

Dec 97 SIM 4172 63JSJ 467 

•F*b98 4175 4200 6265 +0.05 

Apr 98 5965 59A0 59J7 +0.12 

Jun98 6560 65.10 45.17 4232 

Est. mas 1091 Film Uriel 6937 
fits open W 34946, up 60 k 

PORK BELUES (CMER) 

4&M0 bk- can* ptr lb. 

Feb 98 6435 6140 6197 -1.00 

Mar 98 6400 6235 4297 -132 

May 98 6435 4430 4480 -8J0 

Ed. sate 2333 Fits arias L425 
fits qan Id 4732 art 89 


K 


A 


l«k Iflb 
7* nk 
71k t* 
14 IM 
nm n 
inm is* 

llkk U* 

» k 

7* 7* 

pm Ik 
* * 


2 * & 
» .* 

'S ** 

nvk ■* 

% A 

im -tm 

l*k +* 

W •* 


IWk +* 
15km 4m 
19 .*k 

UVi +9k 

m 

Ik* tVi 


a - Addend Mso «M (8). 
b - annual iota of dMdend plus stock tfiv- 
Idond. 

c ■ nguMaflng dhddead. 
cc-PE amends 99. 

+<• dd- coiled. 

.j d- now yearly taw. 

Ivm dd -loss in IlH last 12 months. 

-i4 e- d M de nd d ec l ared or potd to preeedUifl 12 
rnonltis. 

f - annual raft, increased on last decla- 
ration. 

9 - dMdend In CanuSan fund* subject to 
15% MA-midenCe tax. 

I - dMdend dectared oftar spflt-up or stock 
Addend. 

i-ttoddand paid iris yeacorntoecLdeteiraL or 
noadlon town at totesktoMend meettno- 
k - dMdend declared or paid tab yean an 
acHiwloBM bun wflh dMdertds to anesre. 
n - annual ret* reduced an last deflora- 
tion. 

a-aewtosue In the past 52 weeks. The hlgli* 


- Initial dvktand annual rate unknown. 


n - iniMf dMdma annua 
WE - pdee-eantiiMS ratio, 
q ■ dosed-end nrnnial fundL 
r- dMdend dedaied er paid in precedtag 1 2 
monlhSi plus slock dMdend. 
s -flock spSt. DMdend begins wttti date of 
split 

sre -salts. 

t - dWWaid to otoflt in preceding 12 
monttis; osttmated cosh value on em-dlv- 
Wsnd am-distrtautfen dole. 

v-mwBig iXniwL 

if - In bankruptcy or rccetafstilp or behig 
itarwriMd under Hie Bantaupky Ad, or 


* M- 


wd-wtnn dbnflsu 
wt-wfMHi Issued/ 
ww- wttti warrants. 
x-«-dMdend or ex-rig bis. 
xdh-ex-dMrlbuflaii. 

XW -wRtiaut warrants. 

y. BHlMdaad and sate In fuiL 

ej&m 




Apr 98 
Jun98 
198 
198 




+8100807 
•71k 21670 
+9U 15651 
+8* 12326 
+7* 11387 


No* 97 052 636 647* 

Jan 98 05+ 038Vi UN 

Morn 640 443* 454* 

May 98 665 651* 662* 

Jul 98 <71 658 668U 

EsL sate RA. Fits ratal 7a90S 
Ffts open lot 22559, Off 151649 

WHEAT KBOT) 

5600 bu mlnknum- can* par binM 

DSC 97 359* 353 355* -3* 6&069 

Mar 90 377* 366* 368* -3* 24KB 

May 90 379 374* 376* -3 2264 

Jul 96 380* 376* 378* -2 1VS99 

Esl sate rcA. Frfi talas 12362 

Fits cpsn Inf 1 1 CLE7, up 389 


Metals 

GOLD tNCMX) 

100 boy co.- donors portray at, 

Ocl 97 3347)0 3XU0 33230 -230 

Nov 97 . 33210 -230 

Dec 97 33490 334.10 33460 -230 

Feb 98 337 JO 33130 33190 -230 

~~ 33940 337 JO 33760 -240 

36210 338-70 339-+0 -240 

341 JO 341 JO 342 JO -240 

3+3JO -2_48 

Dec 98 345.90 344JD0 34120 -150 

EsL stria 11000 Frfs sate 37,994 
firs open Nd 1824T& up 2774 

HI GRADE COPPER (HCMX) 

2SfflW tok.- cart* per to. 

0097 9450 9220 9235 +OA5 

Nor 97 95.10 9ZB0 9345 +0L5S 

D« 97 95-80 9210 94J0 +045 

Jal98 9AJ00 9X80 WJ0 +OJS 

Fab 90 YS20 94J0 9220 +040 

Mar 98 96J0 9440 95.15 +ai5 

Aar 98 95.70 95.00 95.15 undk 

May 98 9630 9470 95.15 uncti. 

Jul 98 95.90 9205 9535 -AID 

EsL solas 7400 Fits sate 4740 
Frts open M 51487, up 939 

SILVER CNCMX3 


166 

1 

97J4S 

21792 

2910 

2917 

4467 

484 

2503 


U18 
2385 
28452 
1474 
1.126 
2050 
963 
2539 
92 9 


Oct 97 
Nov 97 


1 

1 

71979 

22 

17330 

1201 

2645 

628 


12253 

42760 

17317 

12123 

7.187 

2531 


4188 

4199 

1841 

2031 

764 

789 


1541 

liras 

&B4I 

2019 

1426 


2864 

615 

128 


51 7 60 516.70 Si 670 -9 JO 

51190 -9 60 
Dec 97 531 AO 519.00 SEL70 -9M 

JOI98 52210 521.00 52210 -960 

Mur 98 53250 52540 52760 -970 

May98 S38JOO 529JH 53020 -9J0 

Jul 98 54500 533-50 53360 -9 JO 

Sep 98 536-90 -9.90 

Est. sate 9A00 Frfs sate 24306 
Fits open bit 102964 up 2604 

PLATINUM WMER} 

50 trmr et- datons per kny ca. 

Od 97 424J0 471J0 42X20 -480 675 

Jan 98 43060 421-50 42X20 -430 12296 

Apr 98 41400 41250 41570 4J0 809 

Jul 98 41170 -430 4 

EsL sate NJL Frfs sate L362 
Fifk open bd 1X782 up 120 

dose Previous 

LONDON METALS O-ME) 

Dotes par Metric ton 
-■ ■ latUGradto 

1451* 1653* 1656X0 1657X0 

1659X0 1660X0 165BX0 1659X0 
Modes DU GnHh} 

208X00 506400 2048X0 2049X0 
2109X0 2110X0 2075X0 1076X0 


Uph Law Latesl Chge OpM 

18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATtF) 

FFSJaOOQ.ptSoMOOpct 

Dec 97 10062 100.18 10074 -072 IS&713 

Mar 98 9966 9960 9964 —072.4270 

Est. Brian 92547. 

Open M-- 199,983 up 14996. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE3 
ITL xn mRBen - PM of 1 00 pd 
Dec 97 11X03 11246 11253 -036 125737 

Mar 96 NT. NT. 11268 -076 2326 

Est. soIbe 42841. Piw.HJte: 72037 
Pmv. open Ini.: 127X63 up 5404 

UBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

S3nMan-BtsoMOO«L 

Ocl 97 0438 9477 9477 unch. 22858 

Nov 97 9437 9436 9*36 unch. 31138 

Dec 97 9424 9423 9423 +0X1 963* 

Est sateKA. Frfs sate 11,183 

Frfs Open Pit 726*4 art 1653 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

Si mBoiHPtaotioopcL 
Old 97 9478 9427 

NOV 97 9426 9425 

Dec 97 9475 9474 

Mar 98 9474 9421 

Jur 98 9419 9416 

Sep 98 9413 9407 

Dec 98 9402 9X99 

Mar 99 9400 9X97 

Ain 99 9X96 9X93 

Sep 99 9X91 9X88 

Dec 99 93X4 9X81 

MorOO 9184 9X81 

Est salee HA fits sate 1X04935 
Fits open lilt 2834321, up 7X109 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62500 pound* s per pound 
■ — 16056 16096 -OJQU1B 2X365 


Hum Law Latest age Optra 

Sep 90 9577 95.19 9570 -0.04 5XOS2 

Dec 98 9575 9X16 9X18 -OQ5 45*7 

Mar 99 9X12 *5X5 9SXS -0X6 27J6T 

EsL sate: 5039. Piwr. sales: 87X16 
Piev.apeaM.- 445640 up 2704 

- Industrials - ?" 

COTTON 3 WCTN3 


9477 unch. 2X186 
9475 undk 12326 
9414 +O.01 394471 
9474 +OX44C4719 
9418 +0X5 326699 
9411 *0X6 261651 
9400 +OX6 239.148 
9X98 +4X6 15X081 
9194 +0X6 120350 
9970 +OX6 100238 
93X3 +0X6 85885 
9183 +006 72X80 


Ocl 97 

48X9 

6X60 

.68X0 

-078 

ar 

Dec 97 

71X4 

71X0 

7173 

-an 

5*258" 

Mar 98 

7370 

7240 

7241 

-0X6 

i siffe 

May 96 
JU 98 

73X3 

73X6 

7376 

-044 

7X92 

7444 

74X7 

74X8 

■OX3 

L7 Ku. 

Era sate N A Frfs sreei *056 
Fits Open tat 89,184, up 297 


:4 

HEATING OILWMBU 


. ; 

4*000 oaL ceres psr gal 
Nov 97 6*60 5970 

S9A 9 

-372 

52.304 

DSC 97 

6X35 

6070 

60X8 

-2.12 

U3S7 

Jwi98 

6175 

61X0 

41.13 

-2X7 

22.90ft, 

Feb 98 

63.10 

61X0 

6173 

-1.92 

'3® 

Mar 98 

6100 

60X0 

60.13 

-1X2 


59X0 

5BX3 

58X3 

-1X7 


5870 

5671 

5678 

-1J7 



Dec 97 16140 
Mar 98 16080 16010 16028-0X018 
Jun« 1-5966-0X020 

Eri. sate NJL Frfs sales 9X39 
fits open Ini 2X632 up 734 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 



5B5H 

609X0 


596* 

610X0 


612X0 

627.00 


458500 6995X0 4605X0 
6690X0 6700X0 670X00 


TU 

Spot 5745X0 5755X0 5755X0 
Foment 5780X0 5790X0 5790X0 
Dec (Special Kfce Grade) 

Soot 1293X0 1295X8 1336X0 
Forwora 1307X0 1309X0 1347X0 


61X00 

628X0 


6010X0 

6710X0 


5K5X0 

5BQQX0 


1337X0 

1348X0 


Food - 

CD00A (NCSE) 

10 mflric Ians- S per bn 
D«97 16?S 1680 1693 +16 44176 

Marei 1724 1711 1722 +16 24247 

May 98 1742 1730 1738 +13 '12160 

JAM 1760 1754 1750 +16 2627 

Sap 98 1774 1760 1774 +18 4633 

Dec 98 1798 1790 1790 +17 *940 

Est SfllBI 1620 Frfs SUM 7,1 25 
Frfs open Ini 10*96* op 610 

COFPEECmcSQ 
37X00 DM., amts per to. 

Dec 97 171 JO 10X0 169.95 +8X0 12564 
Mar98 156X0 151X0 1 5595 +5X5 6X71 
May 98 15QJB 14675 150X0 +475 2X39 
JU9B 14450 14150 14450 +410 2174 
Sep 91 139X0 13800 139X0 +3X0 617 

Est late 4999 fits sain 41 60 
fifs span tor H655. on 647 

5USARW0RLD IIOKSE} 

11*000 to*.- omtsperlb. 

Mares 11X2 1174 11X1 -0X9 9X679 

Mav98 11X9 11X0 11X2 -8X6 -22717 

Jm« 1173 11X7 11-0 -0X6 17,971 

Od 98 11X7 1163 1163 -0.05 14*23 

Era. sate 1*745 fits sate 19708 
fill open tot 15214* art 17*7 


High Law dOM Chge OpM 


RiunctAl 

UST BILLS (CMER) 

SI aSon- pfc aflOQ pd 

Dec 97 WX9 95-08 95X8 +0X1 *306 

Mar 98 9113 9110 9113 +0X5 3.922 

Jun98 95X9 +0X3 152 

EsL sales NJL Frfs sola 277 

FrtS open hit 978* up 66 

SYR TREASURY (CBOT) 

SI 0*000 prtn- pH* 64101 of 100 pd 

Dec 97 100-10 10740 1084)2 +13 2K119 

Era. sate HA. Firs sales 89708 

fitb open W 234194 up 4689 

W YR TREASURY (OOD 

SlOftOM prin- pis & 32ndt d in pd 

Dec 97 111-10 111-00 111-0* +10 399,112 

Mar 98 11*30 110-23 110-24 + 10 1*2n 

Jlin98 11*23 110-19 110*19 +11 22 

Ea tote HA. Frfs sales 21 6X98 

fits open H41 4415 up 1&54Z 

US TREASURY BONDS (C8(m 
a ptwnoaoooNits i mm anoo pen 
Dec 97 117*16 116.28 1174)6 +17 664307 

Mar 98 117X7 116-22 116X9 + 17 4*326 

Jun9S 116-17 +17 5326 

Sep 98 1164)4 +16 1X69 

era. Kdst N A. fits sate 1X71,167 
fits open tot 73*702 up 2*205 

LONG GILT QJVFE) 

X5SX00 • Ms & 32mta of 100 pet 
Dee 97 121-10 120-20 120*27 -0-15 197X97 
Mar 98 12*26 12003 12005 -4104 25 

Eto.nriec 77X18 Pmv.tdec 16*899 
Pnr.apsnHe 197X22 op 1*3*6 

GERMAN GOV. BUND OJFtoO 

DM25*000-teaflMpd 

Dee 97 M378 103X2 103X4 +4)78 316X08 

Mar 98 10290 102X3 102X7 -036 *910 

Estate! T509S. Pm. rate! 231.919 

Pm.OpentaL: 32&318 v 12JE1. 


241 

27 


Dec 97 .7326 .7315 731741X006 52.974 

Morn 7359 7346 7350-0X005 1,975 

Jim 98 7387 7374 7374 4.0003 519 

Est. sate HA. Fits rate 14717 
fits open Ini 5*744, up *803 

GERMAN MARX (CMER) 

1 25X00 mocks. S per mctoc 

S2P -5714+0X002 60569 
Mar 9* 7745 X724 J744+0.0001 Z3M 

JUH98 7771-0X001 2X16 

Era. rales N A Frfs sote 29,173 
Frts open M 6*64* up 40X9 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1 2A mNfcn n s per 100 yea 

Dec 97 JB03 -RZ75 X282+0X009 79X32 

Mar 98 XklO X388 X392+0X009 028 

Am 98 A510 ASM X504+OX009 162 

Est rate HA. Frfs ate 2*023 

Frfs open tot BOXZL up 235 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12*000 banes,* per base 

Doc 77 .mu X930 J965+OX007 3*979 

Mar 98 TOM 7006 7034+0X007 1X05 

Jan 98 *7101+0X007 263 

Era sate HA. fifm ate 14592 

fits open M 37.951 up 900 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

Dec97 ^ P nSo°.t2SB3+X0262 24X36 
Mar 98 .12165 .12150 .1216S+X0Z4 9X64 
. Am 96 .11800 .11787 .11800+X0284 2X79 
EM Hries HA. Fit* rate 11X11 
Frfs flpWI W 27,194, up 572 

3-MONTH STERLING OIFPE3 

csoaooo-ptoefiooKi 

Doc 77 92JS 9258 —0X2 12*862 

Mar 98 92-® 92X5 9256 -*» 10*416 

JM98 92X1 92X6 9258 -0X4 V9 91 

Sep 98 9234 92X9 

D« 98 92X1 92X6 

Mar 99 9113 9105 

Jun 97 93X2 9375 

Sep 00 93L87 93X6 9*86 —006 

era sales: 34829. Pm sate: 87X16 
Pre». cpentoL- 44S660 op 1.704 

3-MONTH EUROMARK (UFPS 

DMlndnon-ptsatloOpd 

Otf 97 96J8 965B 9658 -0X2 1*172 

Kw97 HT. HT, 9650 -0X2 745 

Dec 97 9446 9*0 - 

Mar 98 9674 96.19 

Ji»98 9400 95.95 

Sap 98 9SX2 9577 
Dec 98 95X2 9557 

Mar 99 96X5 95X1 

AM 99 95X2 95X7 

Sep 99 95.17 9*13 9£|6 -OX8 6*739 

jra-wries: 54839. Prey, rate: 87X16 
Pn*. open We 44*660 up *704 

'S-MOHTH P1BOR (MATIF) 
FHadlon-pltarioo - 
Dec 97 9446 96, 

Mar 98 9*23 9* 

Jun98 
te 98 
Dec 98 
Est id 

Open tat: ZD>549 up l *232. 

3460NTH euinuiU OJFFE) 
m. 1 reHkm - pb of 100 pel 

S ub o!iS "<6)7106X97 
Mar 98 WX9 94J9 9460 —0X3 MU99 
Afflfi 95X1 95X8 9*10 — ®jss 8*579 


EsL sate NA. Frfs rate 47.978 -- .1 

fils open 6814432* up 699 

»•' 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE MMER) ■*»:" 

IXOObbL-daOatspwHiL "■ 

NOV 97 21X3 71X5 2173 41X3 102.748' 

Dec 97 22X5 21X0 21X4 -071 87,0*2 

Jan 98 22-55 21 JO 21X5 -0.6S 4*SB< 

Feb 98 2275 21XO 21X5 -OX1 74X38 

Mre98 21.99 2170 2177 -OX7 13763 

Apr 98 2174 21X0 21X9 -054 ll,2?3 

Era sate NA Fits sate 19*318 
Frfs open W 43480* up 3X22 

NATURAL GAS WMER) . *■: . 

laooomn bKri, I per mm bfb *t._ 

Nor 97 3.120 1970 2579 -0146 S3XT#I 

Dec 97 3700 3X70 3074 4J.130 33.04J” 

Jon 98 *160 3X20 3X33 -0.120 27X501 

Feb 98 2X00 2700 2717 -OX®? 1*953 

Mar 98 2X70 2X78 2J80 -0X70 12XWT 

Apr 98 Z35S 2770 2770 -0X65 TJWT 

Era rate NA Frfs sate 31X48 - 1 ’ 

Frfs open W231XS7, up 1X45 

UNLEADED GASOU HE WMER) ~~~ < 


OK 97 
Jon 98 
Fdl9e 
Mar 98 
Apr 96 
May 98 
JWI98 


63X0 *?« 6170 -1X9 4MI5 

6110 6075 6094 -1X4 142W 

6275 4070 40X4 -1X7 14787“ 

6275 4094 4094 -1X2 +835 

63X0 41JB 6179 -1.71 4761. 

4570 43X9 43X9 -1X6 l£Or 

65X0 6*34 6374 -1X6 2XMP 

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Ed solas HA Frfs sate 29754 
Frfs open W94X4* art 244 ' 

GASOIL a PE) 7 *j 

US. daBare par meMc Ml - lot* oMOO Ions 
Od 97 191X0 18373 1BSX0 —275 1*235 

HorfT 192X0 105X0 T86XO -7M 28.283- 

DOC 97 194X0 1847S 188X0 —273 17,309: 

Jon 98 195X0 18775 18975 -2X0 T4T32- 

Feb 98 194X0 10873 189X0 —225 77 

Mix 98 191X0 190X0 186X0 —2X0 

AprfB HT. N.T. 18275 —2X0 

Mis 
•*+r 


Era rate SX8S. Pm. nte : 
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WJ1. -006 7*109 
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93X7 -0X9 5504B 
9377 — <L11 3*751 
*651 


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9671 —0X4 297X93 
*576 —OXS 25*511 
**7» —OX5 19*359 
95X9 -OXS 161,774. 
95X1 -0X5173447 
*329 -0X5 78,143 


BRENT OIL OPE) 

UA doflon par bate- tats of 1X00 bomb -?c- 

NO«97 21 JS SttS9 20X4 +097 41,300 ( 

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MV98 2095 20X0 20X0 +073 

Apr •• 20 l ta 20X0 19X0 +073 

Era SC4W 59431. Pres, rate : 9*400 A 1 

Preu. open tot: 172701 up 1*844 *J 

Stock Indaxos oC? 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

SUxbtdex - - H 

0k 97 98170 976X5 981X0 +5J5 1S772I-, 
Mor 98 994X0 989X0 *91X0 +5X0 *064 

-tan 90 1004X0 998X5100*00 +570 aSOfT 

Era MtasNA Fits sate 74,982 :>*• 

Frfs open tot ll^rf* off 179X22 

FTSE 100 OJFFE) ?.'1 

OSpertodexpaH 3i.« 

DOC 77 538*0 33400 5371.0 —1*0 69-H74-.. 1 
Mar 90 N.T N.T 5«9X -2AX 1.98TV:. - 
Est sate *369. Prev.iate: 14X71 *-l 

Piw. opm tot: 71X42 up 006 

CAC 40 (MATIF) 


9643— (UH 4*740 

9670—0X1 3*535 

*5X0 KM 9*95 —0X2 27435 
^79 9*76 9570 —0X2 
95X3 9540 95X1 -0X2 
36X89. 


Oct 97 31180 30740 30780 -25X 3*243 
Nov 97 312*0 30I&X 30864-2*0 7,17? 
Dec 97 ' 3121J 30934 30934 —254 U.97T' 
Mar 90 N.T. N.T. 311*0-250 lag*’ 
EiL SMS; 1*621. „ . 

open tot: B14SI up 1798. -r. 


3*3 


MoodYS . 

Reuters 


A 


*^5 


■■if 


Commocfity Indexes 

Close Piwvtob^ « 
.1425X0 14377& 

148070 XW- 

146X9 MS® 

24*10 26M0n 



PAGE IS 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


EUROPE 




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Arbitrators 
To Rule on 
: Guinness 
Merger 

RLmmbcrg Sens 

PA1US — LVMH Moet Hen- 
>^ssy Louis Vuiiton SA and 

■ Guinness PLC chose binding ar- 
bitration Monday to resolve a 

..dispute involving the British 
I * planned merger with 

.* i Grand Metropolitan PLC. 

— The arbitrators will decide 
whether Guinness’s planned 
' BKgpwithGiMidMet to form 
LtGMG Brands triggers a “con- 
c^ent * allowing the French 
•Juxury-goods maker to pur- 
chase its joint distribution net- 
• 4 work with Guinness. LVMH 
f us&id the arbitration would be 
■rcomplcted within 12 months. 

■ . LV MH wonts to buy out die 
^distribution ventures as a way of 
-.Mocking the merger. The 
..french company, controlled by 
! ^Bernard Ar n ault, wants to 
Li-merge its own liquor brands 
V.whh those of the two British 
^co m pa n ies, forming a separate 
. company to be called Drinksco. 
,.v Depriving Guinness of the dis- 
. utribuoon outlets would. lessen the 

k -j .appeal of the merger by givin g 
TTnLvMH distribution rights to most 
Lr£uinness products in the United 
States, France and Asia. An ar- 
i -la nation victory also would en- 
able LVMH to buy back its 34 
: percent stake in the champagne 
•■and cognac maker Moet Hen- 
.nessy from Guinness. LVMH has 
■said the purchase would be made 
at a discount and that the cost of 
buying the distribution network 
.•-would be negligible. 

LVMH says a Gumnsss- 
GrandMct linkup would spaik a 
.-"control event because it rep- 
pfsents a change in Guinness’s 
ownership. Bui Guinness dis- 
putes that, saying the deal would 
be a “merger of equals.” 

• LVMH 'shares fell 6 francs 
tSl.Ofl) to close at 1,272. In 
London. Guinness finished at 
582 pence i$9.38), up 5, while 
,iGrandMci rose 1 1 to 589. 

The International Chamber of 
Commerce in Paris will oegan- 
: fee the arbitration proceedings. 


France Telecom’s Per-Share Price Set at $32 


FwmMpaKha 

— The government said 
Monday it would sell shares in 
wance Telecom SA at 187 francs 
a share, raising 42 billion 
biggest initia 1 

The price chosen was near die top 
° government’s range of 
170 to 190 francs a share, reflec ting 
strong demand from both individual 
and institutional investors. Indi- 
vidual investors win pay 182 francs 
a share, 5 francs leas than insti- 
tutional investors, in a move inten- 
ded to encourage investment in the 

Stock miirifrf 

The sale of almost a fourth of 
fence Telecom, Europe’s second- 
biggest telephone company, will 
help France reduce its borrowing, a 
requirement to qualify for die Euro- 
pean Union single currency. The 
sale is also intended to help France 
Telecom better compete interna- 


tionally by allowing it to raise cap- 
ital on die markets and swap shares 
with key partners. 

“There’s almost no risk of losing 
mc&ey on this,” said Brnno Catoire, 
a fund manager at Cholet-Dupont 
Gestian, which manages about $1 
billion. He said he expected the 
shares to rise lOpeaccotto 15 percent 
in the first days of trading because of 
strong demand for the stock. 

Already the price of the shares as 
indicated by when-issued trading, 
an unofficial market for sha res be- 
fore they are issued, was at 200 to 
2Z0 francs, traders said. 

More state-controlled companies 
will be available for public purchase 
in die future. The privatization of the 
French insurance company GAN 
and its banking Subsi diar y GTC 
could begin “in a few weeks,” Fi- 
nance Minister Do miniq ue Stranss- 
Kahn said Monday. 

“The government will probably 


start with dC,” Mr. Stranss-Kahn 
told a mess conference. 

The French sale will come amid a 
plethora of about $40 billioQ in tele- 
communications offerings as gov- 
ernments move to sell state mono- 
polies and as European companies 
themselves prepare for the opening 
of national markets next year. On 
Sunday, the Italian government an- 
nounced it would raise an estimated 
165 trillion lire ($9.7 billion) with 
the sale of its remaining 32.8 percent 
of Telecom Italia SpA. 

The French government said it 
would sell 1 25 million France Tele- 
com shares to institutional in- 
vestors, raising 21 5 billion francs. It 
will sell 94 million shares to in- 
dividuals for 17.1 billion francs. 
Employees win be able to buy 23.2 
million shares at a discount of as 
much as 20 percent to other in- 
dividual investors. 

The government has die option to 


sell a further 16 million shares to 
institutional investors after shares 
start trading in Paris and New York 
on Oct 20. The existing allotment 
for institutions was more than 16 
times oversubscribed, totaling 350 
billion francs, the government said. 

Demand for shares will be driven 
in part by France Telecom’s guar- 
anteed heavy weighting in the coun- 
try’s benchmark CAC 40 Index, in- 
vestors said. When the company is 
inserted in the index Nov. 12, it is 
expected to be among the top five, 
even though oily about a fourth of 
the company will be traded- The oil 
company Elf Aquitaine SA is the 
most heavily weighted stock, with a 
market capitalization of 222.2 bil- 
lion francs. 

Interest from French people want- 
ing to buy part of a household name 
is strong. More than 25 million 
people have reserved shares, the gov- 
ernment said. (Bloomberg, AFP) 


4500 3850 — 

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1007 ^ 1997 • ”7 







Landmark Russian Restructuring 


Compaq by OarStf From Dispaidta 

MOSCOW — Russian officials 
and representatives of the London 
Club of commercial banks signed a 
long-awaited agreement Monday to 
restructure more than $30 billion of 
debt owed by die former Soviet Un- 
ion to foreign banters. 

The landmark deal, the biggest 
ever restructuring of debt to com- 
mercial banks, came after a similar 
deal with die Paris Qnb of gov- 
ernment creditors last year and 
paved the way for Russia to regain a 
reputation as a reliable borrower on 
world markets. 

Vnes h ek o rio mh5mir J the Russian 


state’s agent on foreign debt, and 
officials of the London Club signed 
the agreement ataformal ceremony. 
It laid out a payment schedule for 
$33 billion in debt Russia inherited 
from the former Soviet Union. 

“What we have just signed can 
easily be described as one of the 
largest financial transactions of its 
kind.” said Tessen Bemdt von Hey- 
debreck, a Deutsche Bank AG board 
member. “Russia has returned to 
the international markets as a re- 
liable creditor.” 

The agreement has raised expec- 
tations that bond -rating companies 
such as Standard & Poor *s Coip. and 


Moody’s Investors Service Inc. 
might soon consider raising their 
ratings onRossia’s debt. The ratings 
those companies give are important 
— the higher the grade, the lower 
die borrowing cost for a company or 
a country. 

Russia now has speculative rat- 
ings of BB-minus from S&P and 
Ba2 from Moody’s. 

Tbe deal will also allow Russia to 
reach deals with uninsured commer- 
cial creditors owed money by vari- 
ous commercial enterprises of the 
former Soviet Union, First Deputy 
Prime Minister Antoli Chubais 
said. (Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


Saudi Prince to Buy Moevenpick Stake 


Reuters 

DUBAI — Prince WalidibnTalal 
of Saudi Arabia said Monday that he 
was expanding his international 
portfolio in hotels with an agree- 
ment to purchase a 30 percent stake 
in Moevenpick Hotels and Resorts. 

The Riyadh office of the billion- 
aire prince said he would also forge 
an alliance with Zurich-based Mo- 
evenpick Holding, which owns the 
remaining 70 percent of die hotel 
unit Moevenpick said its joint ven- 


ture with tiie prince would help it 
raise its number of new hotel and 
resort openings from three or four a 
year to between six and eight a year. 

Moevenpick said the goal of the 
alliance was “to increase the market 
presence of the Moevenpick hotel 
group by developing new locations. 
The focus of the planned cooper- 
ation is in the Middle East and 
Africa.” 

Moevenpick said the legal require- 
ments for implementing the deal 


would be in place by early 1998. 

Neither foe prince nor Moeven- 
pick put a value to the deal, the latest 
in a string of international acqui- 
sitions by foe 40-year-old mince, 
whose net worth was put by rorbes 
magazine in July at $1 1 billion. 

Moevenpick Hotels and Resorts 
operates nearly 40 hotels with more 
than 7,000 rooms in 10 countries. It 
plans to expand its presence in Ger- 
many, the Middle East, tbe Far East 
and North Africa. 


Dassault 
Considers 
Private Jet 

AFX News 

PARIS — Dassault Aviation 
said Monday it was considering 
building a supersonic business 
jet. 

The company said it would 
give itself between six months 
and a year to complete an initial 
commercial review and 10 
years to complete foe project. 
Dassault added that it would 
also seek partners to share de- 
velopment and finan cial costs. 

The company said it had the 
technological ability to develop 
such a jet but that it wanted to 
ensure that the price would not 
exceed foe costs of existing 
subsonic aircraft 

Prices for top-of- the -line 
business jets range from $35 
mill inn to $45 million. 

“There’s no question of 
building at a higher cost,” a 
Dassault source said. * ‘We want 
to save time with more speed at 
foe same price. Above all, we 
don’t want to repeat the com- 
mercial failure of Concorde.” 

The government is trying to 
persuade Dassault to accept a 
merger with Aerospatiale. 



_ 


&A3&- • 1,464.94J,H^ 

Source: T&eKurs lairnununnl Herald Tritame 

Very briefly; 

• Promodes SA, which is bidding for the supermarket com- 
pany Casino Guicbard-Perracbon SA, has asked French 
authorities to prevent a rival bidder, RaJlye SA, from cashing 
in warrants for shares in Casino. The warrants could give 
Rallye enough voting rights to block Promedes’s bid. The 
stock market authority said foe bids must close Nov. 7. 

• Martin Bouygues, president of Bouygues SA, France’s 
largest building company, has been charged with abuse of 
corporate assets following allegations that he used company 
money to pay for work on his home, judicial sources said. 

• Russia has postponed indefinitely a special auction of 45.45 
percent of Norsi Oil, one of the country’s largest refiners. The 
auction was to have started Tuesday. 

• Barclays PLC’s British banking anions have called one- 
day strikes for Friday and Monday to protest a pay deal that 
they say freezes the wages of many employees. The unions 
also criticized big payments being given to executives as 
Barclays breaks up its investment banking operations. 

• Britain’s manufacturing output foil 0.1 percent in August 
from July but grew by 1.9 percent from August 1 996. Industrial 
production, which includes output from utilities, fell 0.4 per- 
cent month -on-month but rose 2.8 percent from a year ago. 

• Ford Motor Co.’s British unit has halted production of 
Fiesta cars and vans at its Dagenham plant in tssex for the 
second day following a walkout by workers. 

• Orders placed with German industry increased by 1.7 
percent in volume in August from foe figure for July, pro- 
visional figures showed. Orders from abroad rose 7. 1 percent, 
but domestic orders fell by 1 .9 percent 

• Saentis Holding AG, a Swiss cheese maker, is acquiring 
three other medium-sized cheese companies: Roth Group, 
Peter Buerki AG and Cheesex AG. The combined company 
will have annual sales of 180 million Swiss francs C$124.0 
million). Terms were not disclosed. AFP. Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


1 Monday, Oct. 6 
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2S 

10J4 

n.n 

1036 

1006 

190 

2 x 2 

2S5 

236 

xn 

4J4 

493 

A37 

902 

756 

its 

XU 

241 

237 

ZM 

7J 1 

645 

X50 

4X5 

4X4 

5* 

5M 

544 

536 

1150 

nv 

13* 

1X33 

3M 

2JI 

239 

783 

548 

557 

5X3 

5X6 

9.96 

*75 

9M 

935 

733 

7.17 

736 

736 

343 

306 

339 

341 

X37 

126 

231 

238 

X93 

471 

6J5 

479 

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7X0 

7M 

736 

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L56 

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759 

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758 

7X0 

5* 

533 

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538 

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635 

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906 

165 

137 

157 

3X4 

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950 

PS 

IS 

243 

247 

250 

5V 

SS 

538 

S38 

24) 

25* 

259 

254 

735 

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7 M 

7S 

138 

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133 

137 

10 

9X5 

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958 

930 

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243 

238 

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556 

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347 

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13B 

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nv 

452 

455 

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19 JO 

19V 

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490 

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277 

277 

2X4 

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M2 

PS 

9V 

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435 

CUB 

482 

092 

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133 

159 

150 

151 

XV 

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US 

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950 

473 

424 

476 

XXI 

43* 

676 

477 

US 

427 

US 

$37 

458 

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49 

4 * 

437 

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456 

111 

435 

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535 

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671 

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6J8 

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1X55 

1X75 

1X74 

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498 

7M 

4V 

750 



Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

AkUqutde 

Ak^Ahth 

Axo-UAP 

Bana*» 

bk: 

BNP 

CondPTuJ 

Candour 

Carta 

CCF 

Ctielea _ 

CtaWton Dior 

CLF-DdaPkn 

Oadfl AgrioBti 

Dcwcne 

HMcuHntae 

EridcaVBS 


CAC 4 Q: 307724 
Piation: 309401 


Gee-Eou* 

Hovos 


Lnfarga 

w 

LVMH 

NUdKSaB 

PnrtbaA 

Pernod RScort 

PattgeotCB 

PtaOBB-Prtrt 


1129 1101 
23490 233V 
1024 1006 

an ill 

ay -ai 60050 
753 73? 

44220 451 

311V 30110 
1063 10(7 
3771 3716 
361 358 

365* 355 

680 666 
813 B05 

574 560 

1320 1311 

960 965 

B19 799 

917 903 

6.10 8JB 
655 625 

739 725 

42070 411.10 
761 750 

446 4(2 

12V 1251 
2M9 2435 
1278 1261 
373 362 


Manila 

AtntaB 

tirdnUssd 

BtPt*pW 

CSPHonai 
Mania BecA 
MtiroBanic 
Petal 


iWlJH 

PMIHI 2*2*47 


RtvPoutencA 
Sanofi 


PM Lang OW 
SaaMignd B 
SMPiteHdg 


1X2S 

13 

13 

13X0 

1625 

1575 

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101 

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275 

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135 

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240 

242 

275 

440 

415 

420 

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145 

910 

X95 

895 

920 

55 

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630 

640 

6JD 


SEB 
SGS Thomson 
HeGanerofc 
Sodofcy 
aGobain 
SoezfOt), 
[Lias Ease 


CSF 


ToWB 

Udaor 

VWoo 


295 289 JO 
806 780 

2824 2765 
2290 2261 

1B6S0 1>J 

1693 1678 
265 25X10 
574 555 

379.10 371 

832 860 

544 527 

889 873 

30B5 3037 
*46 926 

16V 14V 
667 60 

701 695 

190.90 18720 
708 691 

12470 121V 
40470 397.10 


1104 1124 
23X40 238V 
1016 1017 
BU 825 
V440 402.90 
740 766 

451 463J0 
310J0 312.10 
1050 1061 

3730 3786 

36OJ0 359 

365J0 360 

675 680 

809 810 

571 575 

1320 1311 

973 978 

800 805 

917 917 

8JK 8.10 
6J5 6 JO 

731 722 

414 411V 
759 758 

4I4J0 446J0 
1251 1276 
2457 2477 

1263 1269 
37X90 36450 
44X50 447V 
292J0 297V 
791 795 

2800 2820 
2262 2294 

18490 1 8410 
1690 1695 

265 260 JO 
560 575 

372.90 381.90 
872 880 

530 527 

BB1 B82 
3065 3049 
TO 936 
16V 16J0 
658 456 

698 699 

190 18730 
692 702 

123 124V 
403 40030 



High 

Low 

Oiraa 

Prev. 

EleteoluxB 

658 

■ 630 

656 

635 

Ericsson B 

371V 

366 

368 

371V 

HertnesB 

331 

324 

326 

329V 

IncmfiwA 

700 

491 

697 

693 

bwestarB 

413 

406 

<10 

<12 

M 0 D 0 B 

274 

369 

270 

272V 

NonflrcrXen 

273 

268 

272 

271 

PhonVlIplatio 

SandvkB 

265V 252V 
270 265 

254 

270 

246V 

268V 

Sarnia B 

229 

225 

227 

228V 

SCAB 

190 

163 

184 

189 

S^BankenA 

96V 

94V 

95 

96V 

Sknndta Fort 

382V 

374 

375 

375 

SknnsfcnB 

379V 

325 

327V 

329V 

SKFB 

226 

224 224V 

224V 

SpartwrianA 
Shxo A 

193 190 191V 

•1»V 126V 1» 

194 

129 

S« HandeisA 

275 

270 

275 

272 

Vorio B 

220 216V 219V 

219 


Sydney 

Aaicor 

ANZBkrtQ 

Bond 

Bnsnldaind 

CBA 

CCAmaa 

CoiaMyer 

Coraato 

CSR 

FojtereBfwa 
GaadmaiRd 
iciahsJtMo 
L end Loose 
MIMHda 
Nat Auffumk 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
PodfcOwdop 
Pioneer W1 
Pl*> Brtrxfcnj) 
(So TWo _ 

V George Bank 
WMC 


AIOrAariEu2769JO 
Pnvfoas: 274116 


Pet 

Woataarihs 


871 

8X6 

8X6 

&7I 

1144 

US 

1143 

1141 

1X27 

1X16 

163S 

16.18 

4X5 

430 

A35 

435 

2750 

7735 

7736 

2730 

1738 

17.17 

17 36 

17S 

1X10 

14M 

1495 

15.10 

6X0 

6X2 

6.53 

XS5 

X79 

X66 

439 

6X0 

S34 

539 

534 

5X1 

2_90 

2X5 

2X9 

2.90 

237 

230 

221 

227 

12X1 

12X5 

1265 

1280 

3X42 

3110 

T1 90 

33* 

IV 

IV 

1X7 

IV 

21X6 

21V 

2134 

21V 

233 

235 

237 

235 

657 

6XS 

X96 

605 

352 

3X6 

3X9 

292 

4X0 

454 

458 

454 

8LP6 

8X7 

8X7 

&96 

21.05 

20.93 

21 

21V 

830 

8X5 

8X9 

832 

630 

6X2 

X6B 

6X5 

8X2 

X52 

8X0 

854 

1X12 

1X02 

1108 

13V 

440 

4X 

440 

435 


The Trib Index 

Prices as of 3.-00 P.M Ngw York time 

Jan 1. 7992= 100 

Lwte ' 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
. % change 

World Index 

182.14 

+0.78 

+6.43 

+22.13 

Regional imtem 

- 

• - i -js-.l “■ “ '-**.r 


Asia/Padtic 

121.18 

+0.41 

+0.34 

-1.82 

Europe 

201.22 

-0.54 

-027 

+24.83 

N. America 

212.76 

+225 

+126 

+31.41 

S- America 

Industrial IndexM 

179^1 

+1.39 

+0.78 

+56.61 

Capital goods 

229T35 

+2.1E 

+0.98 

+34.19 

Consumer goods 

200.50 

+128 

+O.B4 

+2426 

Energy 

213.77 

+1.07 

.+0.50 

+2522 

Finance 

13620 

+0.43 

+0.32 

+16.95 

MlsceBaneous 

191.83 

-1.37 

-0.71 

+18.57 

Raw Materials 

18943 

+022 

+0.17 

+8.01 

Service 

172.03 

+O.07 

+0.04 

+25.28 

UtSries 

175.68 

-028 

-0.16 

+22.46 

7J» tntemutkmU HorakS TttUme WoM Stock indaxG trucks the U.S. dotar values of 
280 namationaBy tmestsble stocks from 25 cvmriss. For mas information, a free 
booUat raroaXaOta by wring to Tito Trib Man 181 Avnrwe Chartas cfpGurae. 

32521 NeieSy Cedgx. France CcmpBod tty Bloomberg News 

High Low 

dose Prav. 


High Low 

Close Prav. 


Mitsui Fudasa 
AUsui Trust 

Mn fn%i M* 

NEC 

NftkoSec 
Nfcon 
NWendo 
t OPPT 
Nippon < 


Meadco 


MtaA 


3 Jo 


ObsC 
Bap Modena 
GgoCoaoAl 
GpaF8aww 
Goo Bo taberja 
BWiOorkfcta 
TekataeCPO 
TdMML 


7400 
2X30 
39V 
177B 
4L6 0 
6120 
2M 
3X55 
41V 
152.10 


Pterions: 5H4J I S§Q Pauk> Bwa ifaladas: 1M90.iD 


Taipei stodmaWiaHcmfl 

H Pmtoas: 8537.18 


72V 72V 75V 
22V 22J0 22J5 
3X60 39.10 39 JO 
16V 16.90 17V 
41V 41.03 41V 
62V 6Z70 62J0 
137 2JB 142 
3150 3X50 3X50 
40l» 4095 4080 
15U0 151V 1S2J0 
2045 2045 2035 


BndescoPfd 
Brahma PU 
CemlgPW 
CESPPU 
Cupel 


S33L 


MUan 


MIBTatoaotta-mav 



16535 

16010 

16010 

162® 


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47® 

4730 

4830 


7310 

TOO 

70® 

7230 


1780 

TO 

T7C 

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291V 27800 

mao 

28430 

Oraflto Oaten 

4500 

4375 

4375 

4390 

Edtara 

9200 

8960 

9035 

91® 

EM 

MB20 

10510 

1030 

10605 

Ftit 

63S 

6000 

MOU 

6110 


391® 

mat 

37100 

38050 

IMI 

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171V 

l/iw 

1/610 

IMA 

2695 

7640 

K45 

2650 

Itega 

6335 

6110 

6225 

62® 

Medoset 

90W 

8650 

16V 

B9® 

MedtobgpOB 

13340 

139® 

139® 

131® 

MateSwa 

1360 

137/ 

132/ 

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0MI 

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954 

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Ponaotat 

2900 

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3835 

Pjrat 

5158 

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4960 

5030 

RAS 

154* 

14970 

14970 

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255 « 

2400 

245® 

24450 


13635 

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Tefcran itafia 

112*5 

10945 

1IUI0 

108*0 

TIM 

78® 

6805 

6X20 

6850 


PoaSstoUa 

SklHodortU 

SouzoCna 

TeWjtmPtt 

Tetadg 


UsfaknsPtd 

okdpu 


12V 11V 11.90 12V 
34200 840V 8(000 842V 
62V S9V 61V 60V 
9930 9700 9030 97 V 
1X00 17V 17V 17J8 
631V 62X00 624V 615V 
745V 73SV 738V 7 W 
494V 490V 49QV 4*400 
425V 412JJ1 413V 471 V 
PM 32X00 319V 321V 331.01 
202V 196V 19X00 196V 
4UV 4X80 4X80 42V 
1090 10J0 10V 1099 
159V 155V 157V 15X30 
1S7V 18X02185820 18X00 
148V 163V 167V 165V 
38000 375V 379.99 371V 
4X80 42V 4X70 4L50 
12V 11J0 11V UJtl 
27J8 27 40 2749 27.10 


Colhay.LIelM 
Chang H»o Bk 
ChtaoTungBIc 
□dna Deveipmt 
China Sted 
FMBmk 
Fdmonj PIcsSc 
Hua Nan Bk 
tall Comm Bk 
NanYc Ftefia 
5Un tow Life 
Taiwan Serai 


Wd Micro Bee 
UUWBMCNn 


124 120 

96V 93V 
72 68 

99V 95 

ii m 24V 
97 94 

•x sn 
103 99 

53V S2 
63V 41 

77V 75 

1A50 142 

SS JIJO 
86 80 
S7V 56 


121 124V 
*450 96V 
70 71 

97V 98V 
2490 25J0 
95 99 

5450 56 

99V 104 

S3 53V 
62 64 

76V 78 

142 14SV 
32V 33 

81 9! 

56 a 


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Nonwra5ec 
NTT 
NTT Dart 
OR Paper 
Osaka Gib 
R icoh 
Rohm 
SakmaBk 
Sankyo 
Soma Bank 
SaiyoElec 
Seccm 
SdbuRwr 
Setosui Chert 
Setisol House 
Seven- EJeren 

Sharp 
ShAokuElPwr 1930 


1V0 

610 

15® 

585 

1580 

605 

15® 

6® 

Newbridoe Net 
Ncrondafnc 

5330 

5211) 

5370 

53® 

Narcen Energy 

lftiflj 

1480 

1510 

14® 


1940 

1890 

1940 

1930 

Nora 

527 

516 

521 

506 


T2IU1 

I1H® 

1300(1 

119® 

Panoir, Pettm 

68b 

671 

6® 

692 

Petra Ota 

SXI 

513 

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513 

Placer Ddok 

37V 

366 

778 

269 

Paco Pettm 

738 

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175 

165 

173 

165 

RenasKBiCe 

1630 

1590 

1630 

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HfoAlaom 

113® 

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111® 

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6070b 

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587® 

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She flCdaA 

600 

584 

588 

570 


2*5 277 280 280 

1830 1790 1820 1790 

14800 14700 14700 14500 
583 555 566 555 

4100 4D0D 4020 4110 

1530 1450 1 530 1440 

385 376 381 378 

87V 8630 8630 8680 

4770 4630 47V 4570 

B76 850 B65 B90 

1110 1090 1100 1100 

9100 8970 9060 8960 

1110 1070 1110 1080 


Tafisnra Enr 

H» 

Tetos 
Thatraon 
lorDom Bank 

Traraathr 

TrensCda Pipe 
Trimark Fbrf 
TrtrocHaiai 
TVXGoW 
Wesfcaast Eny 
Weston 


Seoul 

Doom 820V 

DoewooHcmr 7300 

HfuncWEag. 18900 
Ki Motors 7460 
Korea B Par 196 00 
Knrac fcrcfl Bk 5000 
LGSeafcMi 32400 
pDtangbnnSt 56»0 
SomsuvWor 4400 
SarasungEtoe 68000 
gartioflWB t 


SKTctoeon 


■7780 

470000 


[<4421 
PrariHa: <3X45 
76100 78000 76500 
6900 7000 6950 
mu 18400 18200 
6910 7460 6400 
19000 19000 19500 
4760 4S30 4810 

30500 32000 31000 
54300 55200 55000 
42300 43500 43700 
649Q0 66300 65400 
— 1 7560 7530 
640000 432000 


Montreal 


■■■■1439V 
PM>toas3ML7l 



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QuoOocnrB 
RogsaCaonB 
andSkCds 


Singapore 

AHaRKBiew 
CntesPoe 
OhrDnBi 


HJCLond* 
JaOMdSttsn’ 
Jomsntogic* 
KeppriA 
KeppdBank 
KeppetMs 
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StrottsTtam.-lOWS 
PnvtaHB 1982M 



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Pmtoas: 722V 


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xio 

5A5 

5X5 

£20 

£ 

5 

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8V 

890 

XV 

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1X1 

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0.98 

1530 

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3X0 

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US 

MS 

120 

238 

136 

536 

820 

8 

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196 

398 

590 

5X5 

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xie 

116 

118 

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452 

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148 

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9X5 

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6X5 

6X0 

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535 

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6.10 

6.10 

11V 

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6X3 

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650 

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730 

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134 

2* 

239 

178 

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AtoioiBoto 

Al Nippon Air 

Anwmv 

AsotUBonk 

AsaWOiem 

Ascdii Gtoss 

Bk Tokyo Mttv 

Bk'Ajkctuau 

Brktgesrtne 

Omoo_ 

Qwba Eto 
OnrookuEtoc 

Didliiip Print 

DoH 

DohfcWKaig 
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Dates House 
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HIM 225: 1782X78 
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KWaBrearery 

Kobe Stool 

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121 no no i 2 a» 
mv 109 110 iwv 

259 250 25X50 257V 

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260 257 2V M 

321 320V 32 1 32 S 


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LTCB . 
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MtVDi 

M^suComm 
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Matsu EtocWk 

MlsubWOi 
INMW El 
M&uogriK 
MflsutwH H*y 
MKsubisiil Mol 
MteSteWTr 
Mifsoi 


10* 

10® 

10® 

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625 

618 

421 

619 

3*0 

34® 

34® 

jinn 

757 

735 

747 

735 

5* 

516 

517 

5* 

940 

906 

925 

916 

2330 

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2300 

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470 

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36V 

3570 

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20® 

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2010 

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2400 

2620 

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655 

649 

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1300 

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535 

543 

1190 

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7® 

787 

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53400 

5270a 

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2770 

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5720o 

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5680O 

5670a 

2250 

2230 

22* 

2250 

46® 

4510 

4510 

45V 

1330 

13® 

1320 

1290 

4970 

49® 

49V 

4910 

1590 

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1530 

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1190 

1210 

11® 

1170 

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1160 

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4470 

4370 

4430 

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14® 

14* 

14® 

293 

289 

289 

285 

4* 

430 

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4* 

6690 

65 40 

6690 

45* 

418 

406 

415 

409 

9850a 

9760a 

9850a 

9760a 

3010 

27V 

27V 

2930 

517 

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512 

X96 

2090 

2050 

2070 

Z100 

MSP 

1460 

1640 

1660 

376 

369 

374 

3 » 

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205 

213 

225 

6» 

676 

679 

600 

1020 

1010 

1010 

1010 

1X5 

1* 

143 

1* 

650 

633 

650 

613 

434 

4® 

424 

425 

7920- 

78® 

78W 

7710 

1940 

19* 

19V 

1970 

5® 

■ 9 

573 

577 

375 

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366 

3® 

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20® 

2070 

2000 

S2 

3870 

22® 

38® 

2230 

3910 

2210 

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11V 

11® 

1170 

mo 

1090 

11® 

1110 

273 

245 

267 

265 

465 

444 

464 

444 

1840 

1760 

IB* 

1770 

666 

651 

660 

653 

678 

616 

616 

629 

1890 

18® 

18® 

18V 

9*. 

937 

945 

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Shimizu 
Sfao^tsu Ql 
ShkeUo 
Shizuoka Bk 
Satrtank 

SwStomo 
SunOotno Bk 
SumiJChem 
SunNkmEtoc 
S until Metal 
Strain Trost 
Talsho Phono 
TakafaChem 
TDK 

TahokuEIPwr 
TokolBonk 
TakioMartae 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Corp. 
Toncn 

Tappon Print 

Toraylnd 

Tosmbo 

Tostom 

ToyoTrusl 

Toyota Motor 

Yoman ou tM 

asmbrxUOO 


520 

3540 

1960 

1290 

4810 

121 V 

860 

I860 

4ZB 

1790 

266 

1240 

3170 

3610 

119 V 

1930 

979 

1490 

2290 

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286 

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1920 

985 

3720 

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1890 1890 

509 5 T 0 

3490 3500 

1940 1960 

1270 1280 

4730 473 D 

11800 120 V 
f »0 850 

18 V 1860 

421 423 

17 V 1770 

257 263 

1170 1230 

3120 3120 
3580 3610 


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510 

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1930 

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4710 

11800 

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1185 
11185 
36 « 
29 V 

24 

4X40 

2 Sfc 

51 K 

S 3 tt 

27.10 
5 tU 0 
28 J 0 
34 J 0 

51.10 
19 V 

27 

80 
37 JO 
BJ 5 
2935 
in 


87 JS 87.15 

26.90 26 . 9 S 
33 VS 3 X 90 

146 to 147 X 5 
HAS 111ft 
361 ft 361 ft 

2465 24 to 
2 X 60 2640 
2520 25 Hr 
1 X 40 1 X 70 

into 111.85 
35.05 35 V 
29 V 29 V 
24 34 

47.90 4 X 10 
2495 25 V 
SOTO 51 to 
51 V 5 X 15 

261 4 261 ft 
50 50 J 0 
281 * 2 X 35 
3 X 60 3430 
49 V 51 

1 XM 19 V 
26 K 27 

781 ft BO 

37.15 37-55 
BU 805 
29 M 2935 
106 J 5 106.05 


8680 

2785 

331 ft 

1474 

1140 

361ft 

2490 

2J.S5 

26 

llffl 

111 

35 jOS 

29 V 

24 

V 
2495 
50.85 
51 V 
27.10 

V 
28to 

3170 

48.70 

1885 

27 

7 X 55 

3 X 35 

865 

2916 

IV 


11400 11600 114 V 
19 V 1920 1910 

9 S 5 Ml 989 

1460 1470 1480 

2260 2280 2270 

8010 6030 8070 

278 JfiJ 277 

. SB SI 555 

1030 1050 1070 
1660 1680 1670 

675 686 675 

584 600 574 

1860 1910 1880 
969 984 974 

3670 370 0 3700 
30 V 3060 3050 


Vienna a TOadse 14442 s 

PiMtaaa: 1464M 
BoeWer^Jddeh 1094V 1067V 1084 1095 

CmfitansIPfd 663 650 m 655.70 

EA-General 33V 3335 3370 3365 

EVN 16V 1577 1600 1603 

RtfwfWl Wien 534 515.10 522 52115 

19441912V 1933 19V 
889 JO 884 889.90 892V 
609 JS 590V 602 611 

. - 2M0 2608 2628 2650 

Wieneitag Bau 267526217S 767s 2670 


Rirahobnl 

□MV 

Oesi Etotirtz 
VAStaH 
VATedi 


Toronto 

AMU bras. 
Aibeno Energy 

Afenn Atom 
AndenonExpl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Now Scotia 

Bart* Gold 
BCE 

BC Tehama 
Btachem Phram 
BanborttefB 
Caniea 
QBC 

CdnNaURflB 

Un Not Res 

CdnOatiPto 

CdnPodBc 

Conran 

Detests 

Dante 

DonobueA 

DuParSCdaA 

Edpofftnaan 

EuroHevMng 

FuktaHto 

FaiawMctoe 

FtSdwMA 

HwcoNeirado 

Gulf Ota Res 

Imperial 08 

toon 

BIST 

Lsewn Group 
Means Bid 


Mm 


T5E [Bdnsbfab: 713197 
Prwioos: 7091V 

231ft 2UD 
33W 321ft 
46J5 46.10 

17.15 1X95 
60fl0 59V 
67V 66 Sft 

«« UK 

4X05 41V 
3565 35.10 
43 43 

2755 27V| 

506 541ft 
40V 40.10 
71 7060 
a 19 mx 
MJO 371ft 
40to 403 
„ 34 33V, 

2X40 2M 
12 11J95 
311* 3M 
341ft 34 

2X10 25JD 
2430 23V 
381 377to 
.2X60 24V 
23V 2X10 
32to 32 
1P4 12V 
8X55 82. 55 
34« 3X85 
saw 5405 
21.10 2QV 
3BH 38V 

IS® SF 

991* 9X10 

12.15 12 
2535 3SSS 


Wellington N 2 SE^etodac 26 M.i 9 
Pravtoat; S93J8 

AirNZeoW B ft 407 4 AM A 

jfety.liwt * IV 1J7 1^9 1 J 9 

CateHoBetd o X41 3J5 3JB 1S5 

FWdTajBldg? 5.15 Jf? gf £l2 

RMOi a&iy X95 X87 X9Q X85 

§352; Poret 1J3 l.» 1.91 1.90 

FtediCbPoper 133 128 3J9 IM 

LtanNatta. P " M2 XW tZ Hi 

TetaOftiNZ 8.1B 8.14 8.17 X10 

WtoonHaton 11V llV UV 11.35 


2130 2» 

33J05 32V 
4X20 4X70 
17.15 17 

MV 6045 
67.10 67V 
£70 33V 
42X5 41V 
3SH 3514 
43 431* 

27V 27V 
55V 54% 

40V <0415 
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<L2S 4X95 
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4065 MM 
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261* 2X48 
12 12 
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34 34,70 
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. 24 2435 
?W* 381 

L15 25V 
no 2110 

3X10 3X13 
1265 1X55 
83» BL73 
2195 34V 
5405 54 

_21 2080 
3845 35a 

19V 19V 
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1205 12 

2SJ0 25to 


Zurich 

ABB B 
Adecco B 
AfesutssoR 
Afcs-SeronoB 
Aid R 


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BK vision 
CBn Spec Oram 
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WdlttiffR 

ZttidlAaswR 


2248 

582 

1437 

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2385 

2420 

'1300 

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1219 

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535 

TOO 

3999 

1409 

577 

ffii 

19X73 

1915 

910 

1910 

340 

13550 

413 

1770 

3645 

934 

1187 

22S4 

2000 

1757 

7587 

649 


SPIIftdBc 37feJ 
PiwnOOfc 377X1 

2207 2229 222 
574 577 9 

MM 1414 143 

2M0 2840 290 
870 890 87 

7336 2375 234 
2390 2401 243 
1280 1300 129 
143 147.25 1415 
7307 1204 IS 
21X25 21X5 
533 534 S3 

6960 7000 702 
3W0 3W0 397 

1 2S 139 

570 570 57 

£06 209 

2295 2314 233 
188V 191J5 18 

W % S ^ 

133«o J359 
40X50 410 M 

I7» 1755 1» 
2600 2605 «3 
911 929 9? 

SIS 11* 118 

225 2245 m 

IS IS w 

1720 1742 173 
tS7D Ifl 
*36 636 M 




PAGE 14 






******39 


Source: Bto 


Very 

Raytl 

WAS! 
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approval 
ing the cc 
largest d< 
Raytfai 
business^ 
for a coi 
settlema 
of any o 

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Ford 

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said Thu 
in south 

cosur frt 

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The t 
opto 




PAGE 16 


Monday’s 4 PJH. Close 

TT»2^most6aWitoctetrflfledoy. 
NotonwWe prices oat Rftedtng tote trades efeewtiae. 
TheAsmHMP** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


NYSE 


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19W 13U AJL 144 9.0 _ 258 IM 15* 15% -% 

48% 34k AKSrnl -80 IS 9 446 45* 42 42* _ 

Z4H 2N AMU Rt 1.72 7.1 JO 770 Mft 23* 24% +% 

118H 7BM AMR - 12 4838 DM 1I1%T16U +i% 

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son *5® ARcocn iso £» i9 m m jth am tin 

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279, 19* AR»|ta Jtt 1A 15 560 2519 254* 2S*k+4k 


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13* 1219 ADArnTn l.CR 7 A - 203 13* ]» 13* +V, 
314* 2519 ABoBmy 1^2 57 16 930 m» 3W9 3Wk -4k 

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17* 13* MM iS 87 - §3 m* 17W 174* +H 
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49 40* AITcJl _ 21 253 444k 64 64* -49 

S3* 25* ABadGps 48 14 II 547 48 43* 49 +lk 

26 15* AOedAS* .14 4 16 1W 75 24k 244k - 

4719 31 AM5«s -52 17 22dm4 «Tk 41* 42 -Ik 
47V. 79* AlfwFo JO 4 16 12078471k £6Vm 47Vk+lk 
8319 SO* Wft .3! 1 J is TOW WJ9 P Mlk +n 


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27% fiU CBLAk 67 17 W Sk ^ 76Vk+Vk 


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200*122 g 

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CCB Fn in 2.1 18 246 IP 879k 

CS _ 21 250 37* 3719 


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5419 DEMS 44a J _ 355 BUI 
TIP ijS-Tlk _ _ 447 14* 

17* Doisilm 74 J 29 983Mk 

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44 7 23 6260599 5Vk 549 +5* 


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1.10 34 17 2731 3£Vk 36Hi 3699 +9k 
BO .18 4 _ 957 2319 22>V»23 +9k 

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140 17 2511690 81* 7919 a« 4* 
581- 24 6332 2BU 2619 ©fi -99 
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28 CNBBahjat 2.1 22 150*4419 441k 4499 +9k 

4599 !» CNFTnm M 3 25 6667 45V9 4419 4419 +19 

629k 41* 144 17 U 3151 609k 59% 59*9 +9k 

ZPVW20U C TC Rta 1-52 SJ 16 1174 «J4 25* 2»k+9k 

97*k3»9 CT5 72 7 30 434iHM 77% IM +3 
321* 19* CUCtaS _ 7512499 31* 30)9 309k +1* 

14 11* CVREI 1.16 88 11 98 131* 131k 139W -Vk 

60 3699 CVS Core J& M - 6623 57 5499 5599 -19k 

3l.liiSBV.ii 
Si^dSST iBi^S 

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2& A 1? " 

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S 17 Cabsol .40 17 54 312 24 239k 23m 4k 

nm»l 5% c3pm . _ 17 137 21 20* 20* -U 

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3199 251* CmdnP 1.96 4J 33 IM 30gk 3» 30% +^ 

5K9 3*2 77 15 S 5 519k SOM* SlJh^k 

iftS&BIr 3 i =££§*1:8*^ 

19kk 999 Cnwdo 331 U - CO 19* mt 19* +4k 
4699 3099 OpOlM 32 7 19 46M 46*9 4619 469W+lk 
61VW38* OvRa JB S 15 696(£M 619k 619* +U 
3619 2219 COpMAC JB 7 19 1110 32% 32* 3»k +K 

2&SIS5 ap>, 94 it , §£&£££* +ti 

741k 5119 CaitMH 8 .10 .1 44 2682 731k 72Vk 73)9 +Vk 
45 2N Cmffinri,. , « 70 515 4iy» fm M . .-* 

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s® it 

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7 7* Sinn _ _ 560 10* mvi 10* +19 

9* 111* CuTWd -16 14 29 523 161k 169k 14* +49 
7VW15* SdU .94 S3 IB 123 17VW 164* 16kk -Vk 
7119 45* CmoCp JO J 14 1819 6749 6J» 6449 +1K 
1* 619 LmhAa 45 3 18 523 1119 1019 11 

^’inggs : = ^IK+tS 

60 2549 ColMU _ 38 497 51* 509k 50* -TVk 

Sltkln Srius - _ 1227(22 2119 Zl* -W 

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4899 34* CKMV 2.564 525 16 151 44Rk 46* 44* -Vk 

s* s* sswrtij 74 laciB&i 


39 22* AI 

6* 3* Ai 
25* 21* AI 
47Vk39* AI 


( J6 J8 17 7740 (4V. 4«k 460k +1* 
I 140 47 _ 514 234*23* 23Hk+Vk 
JA 27 12 295 25* 2#lk 25Vk +W 
40 14 30 1814 62hk 61 Ik 6Hk +» 
( _ -11951 77V. 75* 779k +2* 

_ - 1434 15 |4* 14* +* 

I _ _ 145 5* 519 5* -Vk 

l 44 17 16 2220 370k 37* 37* ■*» 

_ 23 m> sr» ok «w _ 

JO U 17 1Z32S* 25 25%+Vk 

240 57 15 T72Q 46% 46Vk 461k _ 

r ay ss^stisig+a 

32J7 5J _ 244 Mnk 48* 480k +Jk 
r MO 4J _ 851071% 71* 71* +9k 
1711 59 19 305 29* 2W9 28* -9k 
J4 64 _ 250 51k n* 51k +Vk 


jui am am nn + 

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2699 31* 30)9 300k ■ 




47V. 39* AEP 240 57 15 17© 46% 46V. 46*ta _ 

BA* 45* AraExn .90 14 22 9977 (k Ik STO 84Vk+lVk 

47* 32* AHlSEp 140 12 12 895 45% 5% 45* +*. 

27* 24* AFlKlST2J8 BJ _ 94 27V. 7649 34* -* 

55* 35* AGonCp 140 24 34 5U9&% 54* OTk+Ok 
<B* 37* A&5 SD247 5J _ 244 Mnk 48* 3% +Jk 
71* 51* ACODEM UO 42 _ 851971% 71* 71* +Vk 
29* 19H AOaHnp 1711 5J 19 305 29* 2MI 28* -% 

5* 5 AmdSr J444 - 250 51k 5* 5*W+Vk 

6* 6 A CUP 42a 64 _ t34 4* 6% CM - 

24* 21* AHDPr 110 SJ 14 344 23 24* 24% -Ik 

84* 57 AHom* 172f 2J 2313S49 73* 72* 73* +1* 
3* 1* AlndPta _ _ 165 3* 20k 2 

1CB* 67* AniUSs JO J 241149t(MU 107% 108* +tk 
vy» 4* AMsdbi _ 24 328 809i 8H 81k _ 

11* WW A<nMliT2 420 54 _ 97 11% 100k 11 +% 

6% 5* AO IF 44 7.1 - 260 6* 6V. 6% 4k 

26* 11* APadP _ 14 1479 12* 12Vk 12* +* 

52* 23* AmRmto - _ 1691 48* 48 4Vk+0k 

141* 0* AREs) _ 3 744 100k lOVk 10* -U 

28* 15* Altexusn: _ 31 IBS 18*1 17* 17* -* 

21* 14* ARdben „ _ 203 21 20* 21 +* 

,7^iSTS3£ia+% 

26* 19* AmStari J4 14 2712038 25* 24* 25V. +H 
llOklOU AmSIP3 79 B4 _ 132 11* 110k 110k _ 

llOklOM AmSIPa 79 87 — 792 111k 11% 11* ,*X 

2* 1* AWM* _ 45 557 1* 1% 1% - 

24* 18* AmW9r 76 3J 18 614 23* 23%. 23% +7k 

s* ws nr WF^^st 


19. Vk AmartgTc - - JM * 9 J _ 

45* 37* Anidiac - £ 1022 59Vk 57% 57% -* 

71*54 AnmtkA 274 37 18 4573 70* 69% 69%+* 
24* 21* Ametakn 74 1J) 14 1319 24 43* 23* -* 

99 Q* Amoco 270 27 17 5SV0 97% 96* 97% •* 

560k32* AMP UU 17 30 3731 53% 52* 53%+Ok 
45* 19 Anpbri _ 2 9 & bW 44 461k 4 TV. 

7* 3* Amnm _ 36 108 6* ML 4* -Vk 

4914 29* AmSadbi 1.12 2J 21 1032(49* 48* 4M +1* 
2Svk 12* Amvettp .12 A 16 714 21* Zl% 21% -* 

49* 28* AmwyAt JB 11 16 408 29% 28* 28% -U 

21* 12* AnnmrJ M t 23 22 431 14* 14% 14* +* 

74* 50* Anadm JO A 41 2524 75* 73 74% +2* 

»’ .%43a 4 3^SS?FJ 

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( 


f 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. OCTOBER 7, 1997 


PAGE 17 


~^RS. Electronic Navigator Helps Lost Drivers and Amuses Them in Traffic Jams 


S«^£2S?“ ’ offers 



, jnfn ... -jy • cuort >s m transmit-- 

sgSaaar-*- 

i “SnMtion and Com- 
"m, or VICS, Ac first 
mAe world. transmits 
on the latest traffic con- 
tO naviPfltrHM Wv . 


roads show up on Ae 

can then automatically 

ro avoid the worst con- 

by the government 

com p anie s .foavailabtein 

Osaka and Nagoya regions 
250,000 users, 
to receive VICS infbr- 
aboot $500 to the cost of a 
mere is no charge for the 


Page 1 


fORDF 

forty Cm 

.Continued fix 

l*A 


ittvative Party dqies have a 
gobl em competing with a 
Egpty that has adfopted so 
ngmy of its policies bat has 
more attractive leadens,” said 
Dennis Kavanagh of tme Uoi- 
>gsrsity of Liverpool. \ 

' - Mr. Blair is a hugelV pop- 
■ i liar leader who has embnraced 
fSrs. Thatcher’s free-m^trket 
economic policies while hrat- 
tfiSg a more human face ora his 
government. New Labour amd 
Sfew Democrats have ^pt 
conservatives cm bo A sides d»f 
tfie ocean wondering whiem 
to move, farther to the* 
ijeht or back to the center, ini 
(ftder to compete. I 

IStili, some Tories think 
tjjiey confront the more for- 
midable opponent right now. 
‘^Imagine a Bill Clinton who 
had not gone for gays in the 
militar y and health reform, 
bjjt who had gone for welfare 
reform and bad an impeccable 
. • private life,” David Willetts, 
v ar Conservative member of 
Parliament, said in an inter- 
mew. “That's roughly what 
w!e're faring today.” 

£Mt. Willetts added, 
l&wever, that he believed Mr. 
Blair might find that “reor- 
ganizing welfare in this coun- 
ty is as tricky as reorganizing 
health care in America.” 
^Numbers help to tell the 

jjggbE; .tbeit^xSnlES in ran 

ijbuse: pf; Commons ' have,; 

bCcn' Slimmcd from 336 to I 
1*5, lower than at any point 
sjhce before World War 1, and 
hjve been reduced virtually 
tpibeing an all-England party, 
with no members of Parlia- 
ment from either Scotland or 
Wales. 

Their 31 percent share of 
die vote last spring was the 
\floret since 1832, and a new 

• Gallup poll published in the 
Monday editions of the Daily 
Telegraph showed that, if an 

\ election were held today, the 
Conservatives would get just 
22 percent of the vote. 
...-Three-quarters of those 
surveyed said the Tories do 
qot lode after the interests of 
average people and that the 
party does not have a bright 
future. 

«;;“At the moment. Labour 
has found die moving center 
and they are living there,’* 
s^id Byron Shafer, a profes- 
sor of government at Oxford 
University. 

.'‘/Mr. Hague's approval rat- 

• uig hit 18 percent in a MORI 
v. -poll for The Times last week. 

A . the Gallup poll published 
Monday, only 6 percent of 
those surveyed believed he 
\pbuld make Ac best prime 
minister for Ae country, 
tfiich pot him third but far 
behind Mr. Blair at 66 per- 
cent. The Liberal Democratic 
jj&der, Paddy Ashdown, had 
1# percent. 

£ The main issue on the con- 
$jrence agenda early this 
week is a vote mi Mr. Hague’s 
proposals to modernize his 
gjnrty, principally- by giving 
ipore power to rank-and-file 
Qboservatives. The underly- 
ing! Acme will be Mr. Hag- 
ofs effort to solidify his hold 
cjft power. He has been the 
tjiiget of criticism almost 
Apm the day he was elected 
Igst June, after former Prime 
‘ ■ Minister John Major stepped 
ct&wn. . 

- v Mr. Hague, who is just 36, 
tjfok a predictably upbeat 
pasture as Conservatives 
gathered for whar could be a 
rfjeek of private hand- 

. .J —Uin Ai-r. iou. 


unity. The party, he told 
The Tunes in an interview 
published Monday, was “off 


traffic information. Coming next are 
two-way systems, allowing users to re- 
quest more customized inrormflHn n 
Starting tins autumn, the Mercedes- 
Benz unit of Daimler-Benz is equipping 
all its S -class cars sold in Japan with a 
navigator that will use a cellular phone 
to dial an information service every five 
m inutes automatically, retrieving not 
only the latest traffic updates fra* the 
area Ae driver wants but 

Ik is not illegal in Japan 
for a driver to watch 
television while the car is 
in motion. 

also weather, fishing reports, airline 
flight information and schedules of 
events. The system will be able to es- 
timate die driver’s time to arrival based 
on traffic congestion information. 

Similar systems will be introduced in 
Germany in 1998 and in the United 
States probably about 1999, said Her- 
mann Gaits, senior vice president of 
Daimler-Benz. 


Toyota Motor Corp. established a 
company in July that also aims to use 
c cJlntar phones and car navigators to 
provide drivers wiA information on 
traffic, news, weather, gas stations, res- 
taurants and parking. 

Honda Motor has just announced a 
navigator, available as an option on Ae 
Japanese version of its new Accord, that 
wul allow drivers to tap into Ae In- 
ternet, transforming the car into an of- 
fice on wheels. 

Toshiba, wiA 12 other companies, is 
looking at developing a satellite broad- 
casting service aimed at cars and other 
mobile users. 

Instead of the big dish-shaped an- 
tennas needed to receive existing satel- 
lite broadcasting services like DirecTV, 
the Toshiba system would be designed 
for a pencil-shaped antenna? 

It is not illegal in Japan for a driver to 
watch television while Ae car is in mo- 
tion. 

Under voluntary guidelines issued by 
Ac Japan Automobile Manufacturers 
Association, the parking brake must be 
on for the television set to work or for 
navigator users to be able to perform 
tasks more complicated than just look- 


ing at the map and zooming in or out— 
tasks such as plotting a destination or 
making menu choices. 

But systems installed by car stereo 
shops often do not have Aese safe- 
guards, or drivers figure out how to 
circumvent them. 

Yashina Tana ka, deputy director of 
the traffic regulation division at Ae Na- 
tional Police Agency, said safety had 
not been a big problem. 

In Ae last six months of 1996; nav- 
igators were responsible for 62 acci- 
dents injuring 84 people, he said. 

That pates beside the 1, 140 accidents, 
causing 1,627 injuries and nine deaths, 
that have been linked to cellular phone 
use. 

Still, Mr. Gaos of Daimler-Benz said 
that m Germany car navigators did not 
use screens because of safety concerns, 
but guided drivers by voice alone. 

Toyota Media Station’s service will 
also provide information only by voice 
when the vehicle is moving. 

Since the navigation systems already, 
have electronic speech synthesis to teu 
drivers when to turn right or left, they 
can be readily adapted to read data or e- 
mail aloud, engineers say. 


Nader Takes On Microsoft, 
Citing Fear Over Monopoly 


By John Markoff 

New Vori Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft 
Corp., which has so far fended off 
accusations from competitors that it 
holds monopoly power over the com- 
puter software industry, has now 
drawn a new adversary , me consumer 
advocate Ralph Nader. . . 

Mr. Nader and several of his public 
interest organizations are preparing a 
national campaig n against the grow- 
ing economic power of Ae software 
publisher based in Redmond, Wash- 
ington, arguing Aar Microsoft is a 
craftier and more potent force -than 
many monopolists of an earlier era. 

Mr. Nader’s very name is evoc- 
ative, given the number of consumer 
crusades be has launched. But those 
activities may have diluted his in- 
fluence in Washington, where he first 
made his name wiA a crusade against 


aiinihcr con sume r giant. General Mo- 
tors, mere ft an three decades ago. 


campaign in recent years was not 
against anything, but rather, for him- 
self — bat Ins run for president in 
1996 did not get far. 

Still, Mr. Nader met this month wiA 
top of Ae Justice Depart- 

ment's antitrust division, urging mem 
to take actio n agai n st Microsoft 
“Recently, people in many differ- 
ent lands of businesses have been 
prrpnwwing fear and criticism about 
yoor company’s business practices 
and strategies,” Mr. Nader wrote in a 
letter sent Thursday to BUI Gales, 
chainnan of Microsoft 
Mr. Nader and Essential Informa- 
tion, one of bis organizations, are 
planning a conference in Washington 
on Nov. 13 and 14 to. discuss Mi- 
crosoft’s strategy and its i nfluence on 
the software market 


Ssafra Republic Holdings SjV. 


LUXEMBOURG 

NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN by Ae Board of Directors of the company that an exttaaciSnary general meeting of shareholders of SAntAREPUBUCHWJXNGSSJL<^tHOwffl be hekl at teieghiaed offices to Luxqhbowg 
32, boulevard Royal 

on October 15, 1997 at 1L-00 jun. 

for Ae purpose of considering and voting on the following matters: 

1. Creation of a dass of authorized p re fe rred dares. 

Z Authorization of the board of directocs to issue from time to time onfiratry and/or preferred shares out of the total auAorized shares, at such tunes and on suAtcnra and coocfiifom inducing tire issiK price as the Baud 
may wsolvewiAora reserve ar y p ree mpti v e rights to the Am holders of shares, during a five year period to expire on ftefifft a nni vers ar y of AepubBcmka of dteiesohalop of tlteezliaopflnaiygencial meeting held 
on October 15, 1997 in Ae “Memorial C, Hccudl des Sotietes et Associations'. 

3. Amendmemofartides 5, 6, 8; 10, 18, 22, 24 25, 26 of tire 2rtkte5 of incorporation: 


Amendment of Article 5 which shag be read as follows 

a) The authorised capital is set at one bSEon 0,000,000,000) US dollars to be represented by two hundred 
ndlion (200,000,000) authorised common Aaies of two point fifty (2.50) US dollars each, and two hundred 
million (200,000,000) amtmriNrrf p referred shares of two point fifty (2.50) US doDars each. 

b) Hie Board ofDBectoismay from time to time issue common and/or p refe rr ed shares tip to the total autho- 
rised times for each dass of shares, directly or upon conversion of preferred shares or convertible bonds at 

aifii rimi- and on guefa wttk and mnrijfimre inHiitUng prir*» as thr Rnatri may in fcs dbOCdOO tCSOl- 

ve, withota reserving any preemptive rights to Ae then holders of shares, during Ae whole of the five year 
period during which the authorised shares wffl be avaibble for issue, wfaidi period will expire on the GfA 
anniversary of the publication of die resolution of the estxaonfinary general meeting held on October 15, 
1997, in the 'Memorial C, Rccuefl des Sodftes et Associations". 

c) In respect of prcfeoed shares, the Board of Daectora may m its (fiscretion determine whether such shares 
arc to be nonvoting or voting preferred shares or redeemable preferred shares or a combination thereof The 
Board may also resolve to issue d i f feren t da s se s of picfai ed dates, each dass having di f fere nt rights. 

d) In case the Board of Directors resolves to issue preferred shares which are non voting: 

® such noo-veting shares may not represent more Aan 50 % of Ae toiaJ issued Aare capital 
1 1 ■ (ffjhe JBbarrishall derenBine; ittj3espccr ,qf each dass, of preferred shares which are nonvoting the rate 
• of cbeprefened cuniulathe rMdead to bep^ableoa ea& ebss of such aonvoting preferred abates in atccoc- 

danrr. with Tinrrmhm Mg taw which rtig may nor hr higty-rlhan a combined «arg pw annum ontriamg In a 

rate of not more than 20% peranoum of die par ralue ^of the relevant nowodpg preferred shares and a rate 
of not more than 20% per annum of the premium at which the shares in the relevant dass will be issued (the 
sum of par value and premium being hereafter referred to as the “Issue Price"). 

e) In case the Board of Directors resolves to issue prefcne d shares which are redeemable, the Board shall in 
respect of each dass of p refer r ed shares wfaidi an- redeemable dete rmin e : 

6) the redemption winch shall be fixed by reference to the Issue Price of the shares of the relevant dass 
which Redemption ftioe shall however not exceed 200% of the Issue Price; 

(g) the conditions upon whidi the holders thereof can require die Company to redeem their shares. The 
Board is specifically authorised to d et e rm in e the period (which period may be unlimited) durin g which or 
the dare starting from which, holders may require the Company to redeem thdr shares. The Board may also 
resolve that the prefcned redeemable shares will be conyubotfly red ee m ed either at a flacd dace or at die 
option of the Company. 

The Board is authorised to canod afl rr rirrmabl c prefcne d shares tendered for redemption. 

f) In case the Board of Directofs resolves to issue preferred shares which arc nonroting and redeemable, the 
provisions of paragraphs (d) and (c) shall Jointly apply. 

g) The Board may fi u tfaenno re resolve that the preferred shares of any class are c on v er ti ble inco common 
shares. In such case, ihe Board shall determine: 

(D die convection rare; 

(3) die con eB tkw s tyop which a holder can exchange his shares. The Board is specifically authorised to 
deter m ine die period (which period may be unHmiied) during which or the date from whidi holders may 
convert their shares and to set a record date which will detennine as from what date those holders who have 
conve n ed their preferred shares into common dares wfll be entitled to participate in the dividend paid to 
holders of common shares; and 

CB) whether the preferred convertible shares wffl be com pu bod ty co n verted either at a fixed dace or at 
the option of the Company. 

The Board will be am horfer d to caned afl p e efcn ed shares co nv er te d into com mon shares, fa case the appb- 
cation of Ae conversion rate wutdd require more Aan one preferred share to be tendered for one common 
share, the difference b et w e en the a g greg a te par value of the preferred shares so tendered over the aggrega- 
ue par^ value of die common shares issued as a result of Ae conversion shall be carried to a reserve account. 
Amounts credited to such reserve account may be used for the same purposes as the amounts credited to the 
extraordinary reserve fund provided for by Artide 6 of the Articles of Incorporation one month after pubti- 
carton of Ae cancdhtion of the relevant preferred shares tendered for conversion. 

h) Each time Ae Board of Directors shafl have determined die rights and coxfitions of any cfass of preferred 
dmes and issued authorised shares of any dass and accepted payment therefor or cancelled p referred shares 
tendered Arconverskai or redemption, this Artide shall be amended to reflect such rights and ccmdiciocis 
and Ae result of sudi issue or cancdfation and Ae amendment wil be recorded by notarial deed at the 
■request of Ac Braid of Directors. 

0 The issued capital of the Company is set ax dghtynine million one hundred fiftyflve thousand sixty 


Any stareholdcr whose *ucs arc in bearer lam and who wiftes toanend die exmonSmiy general meeting (ibc "Meeting”) 
moot produce a depository receiptor present tab share Gortfficztca to gi f t, admiiMiu a. 

a ytwn-hnlAr wMilng ta he nqMMeraed «t the Mating mm Indgr a prory rinty em np kaed- toffther with a depostorr 
iGOEfpt n the icgncred offices ofSUi at 32, braiewd Royal. Luxemboug, «* koer dan October 13, 1997 « 5 pjn. The stats 
my rixahubcdcporittKY receipt and ffrccmoL the fan of puny from anv of the banks fisted bdow b»r kxbma the 
sfcKCOdlkSWanhdr offices arbyanaagtagforActnakby whom his certificates arc bdd n> aodfy any of the banks bled that 

tfttzesucsoheid. 


(89,155,060) IS doSars represented by thirtyfive miflioa she hundred shayewo thousand tvrenryfbur 
05.662,024) common shares cf two pant fifty (2.50) US dottais cadi, fully pakL 

j) to adtfitioQ an aggregate issue premium of eight hundred forty mfitan three bunked twcntyitine thousand 
ooe hundred fotry«ix (840329,146) US dollars has been paid in. 

Amendment of Artide 6 wfaidi shall be read as fellows 

“Any share pre mi um which Aan be pakl in addition to Ae par value is carried to an exnaon&oary reserve 
fund. Such extraordinary reserve fund may be used by the Board of Directors to redeem any shares cf the 
Company" 

Amendment cf Artide 8, 3rd J, 2nd sentence which dsdl be read as fellows: 

“Within each dass afsbnes,aO dividends shall be dedmd and paid proportionately to Aepakhip amounts 
oo the shares receiving the payment of Ae dividend, bat no paymeacs made in respect cf a stare prior to a 
caB on shares shall be, for the purposes of this atide, considered as befog paid on the share”. 

A men d m ent cf Artide 10. 2nd sentence which shall be read as follows: 

The business of the C ompany shafl be s u p er vis ed by one or more independent autStras authorised in 
Luxembourg”. 

A m endment aT^dc 18. 2nd. Srwhkh'shafl^jtSidas fcjtoiws:''-!' 5 \) •.« * • ? “ 



a. flcwr-: v-- 


: „'i* •.« . •/ ;; 

-■‘•I •!’ *?» 

» ...r/ c* , • *; • r 


office or at any pfaoe haficated in the cotncntog notice made by the Board of Dnectan. 

Ortflnary general or cfass meetings shafl be dnkedby the Onirman. or in his absence, by a Director appoin- 
ted by the Bond. The agenda of ordinary general meetings and of any dass meetings shall be prepared by the 
Board. The agenda must be spelt out in the convening notices and no point not appearing on Ae agenda may 
be considered, uidixfiTg the dismissal and appointment of Directocs or Aixfitors. - 

Annual ordinary general meetings or ordinary general or dass in cKi iiUj S convened atn anw fi narily shall only 
be validly constituted and may only vabdy ddibeiaie by complying wfth legal pravfeLaos.' 

Amendment cf Artide 18, 6A 5 winch shafl be read as foflows: 

“During general meetings each bolder of common shores and each bolder of preferred shares which are 
voting shares shafi hawt as many, votes as the number of common shares and such preferred shares that he 
represents, boA in his name and as proxy. HaMeraafprefecrcd shares which are notrotiqg shafl have votes 
only in the erreumsonoes provided for by taw. During meetings of a spcdSc dass of stores, cadi bolder of 
shares of the relevant dass shag have as many votes as Ae number of Aares of that dass Aat he re prese nt s, 
both in tds name and as proxy". 

Amendment of Attide 22, 2nd $ 2nd sentence whidi shall be read as fcBcws: 

‘Subject to the pre ferre d dividend rights of 'any cfass of p refer red shares, Ae allocation lobe made of die 
balance of the profits shall be d ct c miinrd annually by Ac Ordinary General Meeting on tbc basis of recotn- 
mendations made by Ae Board erf Director." 

Insertion of the following $ after the first J of Artide 24: 

“If a derision of a General Meeting affects the right of holders cf Aares of a specific dass, the approval the* 
reof shall be subject to the approval of a separate dass meeting of the holders of shares of Ae dass cancer 
ned“. 

Amendment of Artide 25 which shall be read as follows: 

“In any case not governed by the present Articles of Incorporation, Ordinary and Extnoafinary General 
Meetings and class meet in gs shall be governed by Ae law of 10A August. 1915 relating to commercial com- 
panies. 

General meetings, boA ordinary and extraorxBoaty, and dass m eetings may convene mad their d iscuss i on may 
be valid even if no previous notice of meeting has been given, io any occasion when afl Ae sbarcholdeis stall 
be present or represented and agreed to dfeaiss the matters shown oo the agenda." 

Amendment of Artide 26. 3rd sentence which stag be read as follows: 

“It shall, after tire exti ncti on of all Bafa ffi tics. first pay out of the net assfets resulting from Jjqojdarion, Ae sum 
needed to reimburse tire issue Price of any class of preferre d shares entitled to a p re ferred udmburaement of 
their contribution, second to set aside from the balance the sun needed m reimburse Ae sum of the shares 
paid-up and unredeemed: any balance resuhmg shall be equally divided between all Ae rntnmn n .<hane«* 


Ihe Board of Directors 


Any riarebakferwbaK abates arc regetoed wffl icocire » nwioe of the Meeting ar hbaddm an die rcgbla; together with 
a fean of proxy fcr use a tbc Meeting. Hie p«wy tiboukl be lodged at SOTs rcgiswed office itt aocoRtocc with the store Ins- 
tmedoas. 

The ttvnit n ncc of the form of proatywBl not pwcfcidess ira c liu Mcrftom s n a ii fl g g iopeqoo and voting at the Meeting fhc 
so desires. 

ABtfercst*M i OMCOW3«itydicagaai fa fertfac>4calngnHybcpaaodtyaHalorityoftiwtliW<ifaasbate» t qBBK m e d 
at the Meetiafc-the quotum firing tatf of the tinea. 


' Banque tofnadocalc i Luxembourg SA.. 69, route (fEsch, 1470 Luxemboug 

* Bqjubfc National Bank of New^ Yixk. 30 Monument Street, London BC3R8NB 

* Bepubfic National Bank of Ncw^ Tbtfc (Sutoe) SA^ 2, pbee du Uc, 1204 Genera 
Republic National ftofe of New Wxfc CSirfsse) SjL, Vh Cuova 1, 6900 Lugano 
Republic National Bank of New Vixk (Suisse) SjK-, Paradcplafit 5, B022 Zurich 

” RepubBc National Bade of New Yadt (Luxembouigi&AL, 32, boulevard Royal, 2449 laxemboreg 
Republic Natiotal Bonk of New to* (femce)SA, 20, pboe \fendome, 75001 ft* 

Rcpdflc Kakxxd Bank of New York (Monaco) SA, 15-17, avenue d’Osteudc, 98000 Monaco 
Rq»Mc National Bank of New TRnk (Guernsey} Ltd, Rue di ft<, St^cter ftxt, Guenaey Ounod Isbntb 
RepubBc National Bank of New Tfak (Obratar) Ltd, Neptune House, Marina Bay. Gbafaar 
‘ Vzaoc Bank otSwuzcdsoi, Babnfwfierasc 45, 9021 Zurich 

* Plying Agents cf Safea Republic BokHngs SA. 











































































I * 



l 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


PAGE 19 


TECHNOLOGY AND MEDIA 


. ' world's fa$test-amiLi!^ n has been at Northern Telecom Ltd., the company remade itself into one of the 

*• n tafyy ^ W ' n - maAere of sophisticated gear for wireless networks and data communications. 

1997 

Revenue breakdown 
by region 



C, Maritm, Northern Telecom 


1993 


T-W 


1995 


1896 


1997 


U.S. 

56% 

TTir Nee. Vim* Time 


Nortel Turns Itself Into a Swan 

&Staid Equipment Maker Becomes Lucent’s Top Competitor 


& 


By Seth Schiesel 

Nm- York Times Scn-irc 


BRAMPTON, Oniario — The un- 
t jnspiring facade of Northern Telecom 
fc ■'Ltd.’s headquarters has not changed 
plmuch since the building went up in the 
■early 1960s. 

But from the company's executive 
Offices, a visitor spots a beautiful pond 
pcomplete with willows and swans, and 
£deep inside the structure one finds a 
K lively walkway lined with coffee bars, 
K “d a bank branch — in a half- 
r Disney, half-Microsoft setting befit- 
j ting a modem high-technology giant. 
V The drab exterior/vital interior is an 
^apt visual metaphor for Northern Tele- 
. com, which in the past few years has 
♦remade itself from a dowdy, money- 
bleeding maker of sometime* balky 
'.’equipment for telephone systems irio 
[ - one of the world's fastest-growing pro- 
■■ ducers of sophisticated gear for tele- 
phone and data networks. 

1 * , The company has gone from posting 
,f.a loss of £878 million in 1993 to eam- 
•"‘ing $623 million on revenue of $12.8 
j billion last year. Analysts predict a 
; ( "profit of about $815 million this year. 

> - The company's shares, which trade 
"■on the New York Stock Exchange and 
on the Toronto Stock Exchange, have 
“'risen 73 percent this year. In afternoon 
r . trading Monday, the shares were un- 
changed at $ 107.5615. 

Jean Monty, the man responsible tor 
' this remarkable turnaround, is moving 
p to the holding company that controls 
_ orthem Telecom, so his successor. 
Qohn Roth, has a tough act to follow. 

“The good news is that there's prob- 
•ably not a change,” Mr. Roth, 54, said. 
, “I want to keep the course.” But Mr. 
sjMonty, 50. said Mr. Roth may actually 


have a more difficult job than he had. 

“It's probably easier sometimes to 
pick something up that's troubled than 
to pick up something that's doing 
well.” he said. 

Northern Telecom still makes tele- 
phone switches, the products that can 
sell for$l million or more each and thai 
enabled it to carve out a huge presence 
in the United States in the 1980s when 
the Bell companies, newly divested 
from AT&T Corp., were eager to find 
an equipment supplier separate from 
their former parent. 

Nortel, as the company is commonly 
known, remains the foremost compet- 
itor to Lucent Technologies Inc., the 
hardware company that AT&T spun 
off in 1996. But Lucent is almost twice 
the size, with 1996 revenue of $23.8 
billion, compared with 512.8 billion 
for Northern. 

Nortel's success would have been 
hard to predict in 1992. which Mr. 
Roth, then the head of Nortel's wire- 
less business, recalls as the company's 
nadir. That was the year Mr. Monty 
arrived from the telephone company 
Bell Canada, which is controlled by the 
holding company BCE Inc., which also 
owns just over half of Nortel. 

. “Jean came in when we all thought 
there was only one way to go — up.” 
Mr. Roth said. “We all felt that the 
organization was as low as it could 
sink, from a certain point of view, of 
morale and everything else.” 

At the time, Nortel was being run hy 
Paul Stern, formerly with International 
Business Machines Corp. 

Mr. Stem joined the company in 
1 989, when Nortel was still riding high 
on the success of its digital telephone 
switches. In the 1970s, while AT&T 
was still making mostly analog switch- 


ing equipment. Nortel was the first to 
market a digital switch — which al- 
lowed carriers to offer advanced func- 
tions such as call waiting. 

In 1992. the company posted its 
richesr year to that point, earning 
S25S.6 million on sales of $8.4 billion. 
But along the way, Nortel failed to 
modernize and streamline the software 
that ran Nortel’s flagship switches. 

The regional Bells, the company’s 
most important set of customers, were 
becoming upset at the increasingly 
substandard performance of Nortel's 
products. 

L.R. Wilson, the chairman of BCE. 
which forced out Mr. Stem and brought 
in Mr. Monty, said the BCE board had 
little choice but to take action. 

“The Issues at that time were cus- 
tomer satisfaction, the need to re-es- 
tablish contact and generally speaking 
cover the accounts, particularly the 
U.S. accounts, a little more fully,” Mr. 
Wilson said. 

Seven months after reporting its re- 
cord 1992 earnings, Nortel announced 
that it would post a Loss of $1.03 billion 
for the second quarter of 1993. in part 
because of the cost of laying off 9 
percent of its workers. 

“We had fallen in the trap of being 
too successful,” Mr. Monty said, “and 
we didn’t think we couldn't be suc- 
cessful.” Mr. Monty sold off the com- 
pany's undersea -cable division, its in- 
ternal finance operation and a big fiber- 
optic cable factory in Saskatchewan. 

He started a major campaign to re- 
vamp the company 's software. Perhaps 
most important, he reorganized the 
company to give product-line man- 
agers more leeway over their own op- 
erations and allow them to respond to 
customers more quickly. 


Broadcasters Try to Focus on HDTV 


By Joel Brinkley 

iVw York Times Sen ice 


' NEW YORK — As the heads of the 
major television networks are learning. 
High -definition television is a squish y 
temi whose true meaning lies in the eye* 
oi *he beholder. 

- For the last few months, teles’ ision 
manufacturers, among others, have been 
lion* tiling HP1\ demonstrations lot 
^network executives who are living to 
r«decide how’ louse their new digital chan- 
nels starting next year. 

•The companies. Sony, Panasonic and 
Thomson, among others, are using these 
occasions to cajole the networks into 
broadcasting digital signals that are 
closely matched to the capabilities of the 
new television sets they are planning to 
build and put on sale next fall. 

‘But the shows have clearly demon- 
strated only one thing: As the man- 
ufacturers and broadcasters stare at the 
crystal-clear television pictures, many of 
them see a mirror of sorts that reflects 
back an image of their own particular 
business interests, regardless of what is 
^actually on the TV screen. 
iW 'Take the Panasonic demonstration as 
atl example. The company has de- 
veloped the only working system that 
edit demonstrate all 1 8 formats that are 
part of the grand alliance digital tele- 
vision system. 


At the flick of a switch. Panasonic 
engineers can show the same TV picture 
in high definition or standard definition, 
in the broadcaster friendly interlaced 
format or computer friendly progressive 
formal -- or any combination of those 
and olhtn variables. 

Panasonic, like all the manufacturer-, 
is planning to put HDTVs on sale next 
year and hopes the television networks 
will hr ci- hast Mime high -riel »ro f n hi pv. 
gnuiuning. But the company also wants n» 
make clear that it will build equipment in 
whatever Format the broadcasters prefer. 

“We want them to see for themselves 
so they can make informed decisions,” 
said Jukka Hamalainen. president of 
Panasonic American Laboratories. 

When Panasonic set up its demon- 
stration in the executive offices of the 
ABC television network this summer, 
the network president. Preston Padden. a 
longtime advocate of multichannel 
broadcasting, not HDTV, professed to 
sec no important difference between the 
HDTV pictures and the standard-defin- 
ition digital pictures that followed. 

A Panasonic executive. Patrick Griff- 
is, was pointing to details in a tape shot in 
Bergen, Norway, that was being shown 
in various digital formats. And as Mr. 
Padden recalled it: “People were getting 
down on the floor to point out liny 
differences. You could barely tell.” 

Thomson Consumer Electronics. 


which sells RCA. ProScan and GE tele- 
vision sets, purs on its own demonstra- 
tions at die company's American 
headquarters in Indianapolis. 

Hie demons! rat ton. narrated by the 
company >- most enthusiastic HDTV ad- 
vocate. B'li , Beyers, the program man- 
agei pre viiis an HDTV image on a 55- 
inch 1 1 4<» centimeter I projection tele- 
vision m. ft-on Followed by the same im- 
.ig- ■ . .t,i - 'ard .Ir-fiiMlion. 

1 he seixiii! rendition is clearly fuz- 
zier, anil Mr. Beyers says: “What I think 
broadcasters don’t realize is that in the 
new broadcast environment, high defin- 
ition is always going to be just a channel 
change away.’ 

Sony Corp. puts on the slickest, most 
directed demonstration. Its goal is 
clearly stated: Sony wants broadcasters 
to offer a limited range of digital signals 
to keep costs down. 

A Sony vice president. Larry Thorpe, 
when he speaks to broadcasters who axe 
considering offering only standard- 
definition programming, offers this ad- 
vice: Making the transition to standard- 
definition digital broadcasting “will im- 
pact every camera, every monitor, every 
switcher, every recorder you have.” 

“Itsa complete l liangeover of equip- 
ment." he said. "Thai’s a huge cost. 
And if you guess wrong, if HDTV takes 
oil you ic going to have to do that all 
«ncr lie'll n a few \eur> Iroin now." 


AOL Is Polishing Its Windows 

Service Plans to Revamp i Channels , and Streamline Content 


By Rajiv Chandrasekaran 

Washington Post Service 

America Online Inc. said Monday it 
would revamp its lineup of “channels' * 
this week and focus on simplifying and 
streamlining content 1 

“We're trying to make the service 
clearer and easier to use,” said Booty 
Schuler, president for creative devel- 
opment in AOL's networks division, 
which runs the on-line service. 

“This is no longer a computer ap- 
plication,” he said. “This is a new me- 
dium that has to compete with tele- 
vision.” 

America Online agreed last month to 
acquire the subscribers of its main rival, 
CompuServe Inc., but has said Com- 
puServe will remain distinct and apart 

Each revised ch anne l — which 
groups AOL’s content into categories 
such as entertainment or travel ' — will 
have a slicker look, incorporating more 
photos and graphics. On the left side of 
the screen will be links to specific areas 
within the topic. In personal finance, for 
instance, that includes connections to 
investment research, tax planning, in- 
vesting discussion groups and stock- 
market news. 

On the right side, AOL will present 
connections to a constantly changing 


selection of two or three events, such as 
live discussions or contests. On the bot- 
tom of a channel's. main screen will be 
links to the Web sites of three or four of 
AOL’s partners. 

In some channels, the change may be 
dramatic. In health, for example, the old 
offering prominently featured a “‘health 
resources” page, where users could 
scroll through several screens of links to 
health-related publications, discussions 
and other contenL 

The new channel features fewer re- 
sources in its first few layers of screens 
but organizes them in a cleaner way, 
with links to current health news, a daily 
health tip and a weekly newsletter. Ma- 
terial in the channel is broken down into 
categories for men, women, children and 
seniors. 

“We’ve gone through the bushel bas- 
ket, and we've selected the things that 
i we think interest people,” said Robert 
Jennings, a vice president for channel 
programming at AOL. “We’re not go- 
mgto be piling it on.” 

’. The move is an important first step in 
die rollout of AOL’s next-generation 
software, called Version 4.0, which is 
still in testing and is' scheduled for re- 
lease this year. The new channels will 
start being phased in next week. 

The revised channel lineup and the 


improvements contained in Version 4.0 
— including simplified Web browsing, a 
better e-mail system and easier nav- 
igation through AOL's content ureas - — 
are central to AOL’s mission of creating 
a powerful media company that makes 
the on-line world compelling and ap- 
proachable to legions or neophytes. 

As of August, the average AOL ac- 
count — which can represent more titan 
one person bur generally only one house- 
hold — spent 40 minutes a day on the 
service, a company executive said, an 
increase from 15 minutes a day in Au- 
gust 1996. 

But 40 minutes is not enough for Bob 
Pittman, the president of the company's 
networks division, who says that the 
average American household, by com- 
parison, still watches television seven 
noun; a day. For AOL to become a true 
mass-market phenomenon, he said, on- 
line usage needs to grow. 

That growth also is crucial to AOL’s 
financial health. Since ihc company 
switched Dec. 1 to$19. u 5 a- month pri- 
cing for unlimited access rather than 
charging by the hour, it has been relying 
more heavily on revenue from adver- 
tising and on-line purchases. 

- Recent technology articles: 

leww. ihf.com HHTiTECH! 


Counting Ad- Readers on the Internet 


By Seth Schiesel 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK —One of the 
biggest fetters on the growth 
of advertising on the World 
Wide Web has been advert- 
isers' uncertainty about how 
many people are actually see- 
ing the banners they are 
spending to promote. 

Many Internet service pro- 
viders make copies of popular 
Web pages, like Yahoo (http:/ 
/www.yahoo-com), for in- 
stance. and serve them up to 
their users instead of having 
them clog the Internet wife 
repeated requests for the same 
material. 

The problem is that to the 
administrators of the Web 
page, the copying seems to be 
a single visit when the page 
may eventually be seen by 
thousands of people. That 
practice, known as caching, 


has disturbed advertisers and 
wbo sell ads on-line. 
itheyhaV? little way of 
knowing what they are getting, 
or s elling , for thfcir money. 

This week, a small com- 
pany called Matchlogic Inc. 
(http://www.matchlogic.corn) 
plans to introduce software 
that it says will solve the prob- 
lem, allowing accurate counts 
of how many people see a 
Web advertisement 
The software has fee back- 
ing of General Motors Corp., 
and of the Audit Bureau of 
Circulations, which certifies 
the reliability of circulation 
figures of printed publica- 
tions and now of Web sites. 

“We went in and did a re- 
view of their technology, and 
after agreeing feat their tech- 
nology did what they were 
c laiming it did. we dm now in 
the process of setting up to 
audit it,” said Dick 'Bennett. 


the bureau's senior vice pres- 
ident for audit services. 

Philip Guarascio, general 
manager for marketing and 
advertising at General Mo- 
tors’ North American opera- 
tions. said, “This technology 
is going to give us what we 
think is the most accurate head 
count, and that will let us eval- 
uate our current and future in- 
vestments more accurately.” 

■ AT&T’s Wireless Net 

AT&T Corp.’s wireless- 
services division said Mon- 
day it would introduce a ser- 
vice feat permits * - llul..* 
phone users to tap into j vm i- 
ety of information sources 
and electronic mail via the 


Internet, The New York 
Times reported 

The new seiwct. called 
Pocketnet, will cost a flat 
monthly fee of $29.95 in ad- 
dition to regular telephone 
charges. It has been available 
for more than a year to cor- 
porate users, but now AT&T 
will compete wife a range of 
other providers of wireless 
services to otfer retail cus- 
tomers access to fee Internet. 

Tile service is oneof the first 
to offer computer users remote 
wireless access to the data on 
their own PCs. and AT&T 
sjv:- i?ir. i >-.•»! ’.'ill draw a 
null 1 1 l<u eei auuieiiic thou the 
wireless e-mail services feat 
;irc currently Available. 


*W wil*’ -■ 


ALFRED BERG SICAV 

Socidte dlnvestissement a Capital Variable 

Registered Office: ! 

26, route d’Arion • L-1 140 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 261 50 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

An extraordinary meeting of shareholders of Alfred 
Berg Sicav (the 'Corporation*) will be held at 
11.30 a.m. on October 14, 1997 at the registered 1 , 
office -of the Corporation, 26. route d'Arton,; 
Luxembourg, with the following agenda: 1 

lb amend artides 16, 22, 23 and 25 of the Artides of 
Incorporation mainly to allow for the suspension 
redemptions under certain conditions and to amend 
certain valuation rules. 

The full text of the proposed amendments is available 
at the registered office of the Corporation. 

Shareholders are advised that a quorum of 50% of 
the shares outstanding is required and that the 
resolutions must be earned by a majority of 2/3 of 
the shares represented at the meeting. 

If the quorum is not reached, it is expected that a 
further meeting will be convened at which no 
quorum will be required. 


September 22, 1997 


The Board of Directors 


Holders of bearer shares wishing to attend the 
extraordinary general meeting have to deposit their 
shares, at least 24 hours before the meeting, with 
Swiss Bank Corporation (Luxembourg) Ltd., where 
proxy forms may be obtained. 


Ck 


nstian 


D 


ior 


1997 first half results 

For the six months to the end of June 19«7, The Christian Dior 
Cmtip'fcirtwver fee first half 

of 1996 l p.F 13.945 million). Thia- increase reflects the 
r consolidation of DFS and fh* growth of -other activities. On a 
constant structural basis, the increase would have been 9 % 

The share of fee Group in net income from operations - before 
amortization of goodwill - has increased to FF 776 million, an 
increase of 2d 5 % resulting mainly from the growth in LVMH 
and from the reduction in financial charges at Christian Dior 
level. 

Goodwill amortization totals FF 77 million (share of the Croup) 
and the net income from operations amounts to FF 699 million 


(million FF) 

1st half 
lyy? 

1st half 

19% 

Turnover 

22,176 

13,945 

Income from operations 
before goodwill amortization 

776 

644 

Goodwill amortization 

(77) 

(19) 

Income from operations 
(share of the Group) 

699 

625 


Christian Dior Couture increased turnover of 7 % up to FF 629 
million. The net income from operations amounts to FF34 
million, lower than in the first half of 19% (Ff 49 million), due to 
one-off costs resulting from the revised strategy aimed at 
phasing out agreements with liccncees and extending direct sales 
in its own boutiques.. 

The net income figures do not include fee negative impact of the 
planned increase in French corporate income tax rate, totalling 
FF 48 million (share of the Group), of whidi FF 3 million wifl 
relate Christian Dior Couture. 


* * 
* 


A dividend prepayment of FF 6.30 per share will be paid 
December 1,1997. 



BALLY 


a w i t x. e n l 


AND 


SINCE 1 SSI 





PAGE 20 




Sumitomo Sells Off 

Bad Property Loans 
To Foreign Investor 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 

”” ASIA/PACIFIC 


Malaysia Unveils Its Own Nasdaq 

Despite Crisis , It Will Plow Ahead With 3d Stock Exchange 


JJSFS ~~ Sumitomo Bank Ltd. 
aid Monday it had sold about 40 
bdUon yen ($328 million) of bad 
Joans, most of which were property- 
reiated, to an overseas investor. 

nor the 


ctesed, dduush earlier reports said 

tnat Goldman, Sachs & Co., the U.S. 

myestment house, was the buyer at a 
pnce of between 12 billion yen and 
O btfhon yea. A spokesman for 
Goldman in Tokyo declined to conv- 
nieu. Sumitomo Bank is a share- 
holder in Gol dman 
The bank said it had sold the loans 
to a special-purpose company es- 
tablished in Japan by the investor. 

The loans were mostly advances 
to 250 small and medium-sized bor- 

Japan Agency 
Links Builders 
To Rigged Bids 

Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Four of Japan’s 
top construction companies 
may have rigged bids with a 
value of at least 109.6 billion 
yen ($898.7 million). Fair Trade 
Commission documents show. 

A top commission official, 
who asked not to be identified, 
said Friday that the agency was 
investigating allegations that 
1S6 construction companies 
had been involved in bid-rig- 
ging on 872 government proj- 
ects in the Osaka area. 

Agency documents list 78 of 
the contracts under investiga- 
tion. involving Obayashi Corp., 
Taisei Corp., Shimizu Corp. 
and Okumura Corp. 

The agency was to start ques- 
tioning general contractors in the 
Osaka area Monday, the Asahi 
newspaper reported. A Shimizu 
spokesman confirmed that the 
commission had summoned ex- 
ecutives for talks. Taisei denied 
involvement in bid-rigging. 
Obayashi declined to comment, 
and Okumura officials were un- 
available for comment. 


rowers on which repayment was 
more than six months in arrears or 
die borrower had gone bankrupt. 

Analysts said that while some for- 
eign investors were eager to purchase 
and repackage Japanese banks’ bad 
loans, such purchases woe not a cure 


“It’s premature to say these 
transactions will grow into a major 
market’ ' in Japan, said Koyo Ozeki, 
associate director at IBCA Ltd., a 
European credit-rating company. 

That could be disappointing news 
for Japanese banks, which still had 
27.9 trillion yen in bad loans on their 
books at the end of March, according 
to the Finance Ministry. Those bad 
loans mounted after Japan’s spec- 
ulative real-estate bubble burst at die 
start of the 1990s, causing die value 
of borrowers* collateral to plummet. 

Sumitomo is not the first bank to 
perform such a transaction. The Ni- 
hon Keizai newspaper reported in 
May that Bank of Tokyo- Mitsubishi 
Ltd. had sold bad loans to a foreign 
investor for repackaging as secu- 
rities. James Fiorillo, an analyst at 
ING Baring Securities (Japan) Ltd., 
said that, in contrast to domestic 
Japanese investors, foreigners ’’are 
happy with the yields that are prom- 
ised on some of this stuff.*' 

Other analysts said the disparity 
is market size between Japan and 
the United States showed the dif- 
ferent levels of enthusiasm among 
investors. In Japan, 118.5 billion 
yen of asset-backed securities was 
sold in the year that ended March 31. 
That is less than one-thirtieth the 
amount sold last year on Wall Street 
in commercial mortgage-backed se- 
curities alone. Surmtomo’s sale 
amounted to about 4 percent of the 
bank's 1.07 trillion yen in bad loans 
as of the end of March. 

Separately, Bank of Tokyo-Mit- 
subishi, Nippon Credit Bank Ltd. 
and Daiwa Bank Ltd. lent Sanyo 
Securities Co. 10 billion yen to help 
expand its business in the second 
half of the financial year, a Sanyo 
executive said. 

Shares in Sanyo, one of Japan's 25 
listed brokerages, have fallen 70 per- 
cent this year amid restructurings 
aimed at ending six years of losses 
and cleaning up 80 billion yen in bad 
loans issued try its financial subsi- 
diaries. The shares leaped 13 yen, or 
17 percent, to close Monday at 89. 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


By Thomas Fuller 

International Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malay- 
sia on Monday defied conventional 
wisdom and unveiled plans for the 
country's third stock market with 
its two existing exchanges still reel- 
ing from months of selling pressure 
and a plummeting currency. 

The new exchange, modeled on 
the Nasdaq over-the-counter mar- 
ket in the United Stares, hopes to 
enlist small information-technol- 
ogy companies and other compa- 
nies with limited track records. 

Officials here defended the tim- 
ing of the announcement 

“The launch of Mesdaq — and 
well within schedule at that — 
shows that we will not be deflected 
from our resolve to develop cap- 
ital markets.’' Deputy Prime Min- 
ister Anwar Ibrahim said. 

The exchange is officially 
called the Malaysian Exchange of 
Securities Dealing and Automated 
Quotation Bhd. 

The new market,- he said, would 
provide companies with an inex- 
pensive means of raising capital. 

The prospects of an economic 
slowdown in Malaysia and the 
concerns sparked by Thailand’s 
financial crisis have sent stocks 
and the ringgit sprawling in the 
past few months. 

The announcement of Mesdaq 
reflects the government's commit- 
ment to a project to develop an 
area arouna Koala Lumpur into a 
high-technology industrial zone 
replete with fast computer con- 
nections and fiber-optic wiring. 

Mr. Anwar linked Mesdaq di- 
rectly to that project, the “mul- 


timedia supercorridor,” saying he 
wanted to see Mesdaq trading start 
before a key mee ting , scheduled 
For February, of an advisory com- 
mittee to the project 
Months of falling stock prices 
have shaved about 35 percent 
from Malaysia's total market cap- 
italization since the beginning of 
the year, and the regionwide cur- 
rency crisis has compounded die 
bad news for investors calculating 
their portfolios in dollar teams. 

MB 



Vkwcn ThMnffkacn 


Deputy Prime Minister Ibra- 
him, left announcing Monday 
that Mesdaq will go forward. 


But the exchange's executive 
chairman played down the impor- 
tance of current market condi- 
tions. ‘ ‘A market like Nasdaq took 
almost 25 years to achieve its 
standing today to rival toe New 
York Stock Exchange,” Khairil 
Anuar Abdullah, toe chairman, 
said. “Markets are launched not 
with a view of a currency crisis. 
We’re talking about a long-term 
strategic move of the country. ” 

Nazir Razak, one of toe archi- 
tects of toe new exchange, said the 
opening date of the exchange itself 
was not of primary importance for 
companies considering initial 
pubuc offerings. 

As with Nasdaq, Malaysia 
hopes Mesdaq 's trading system 
will revolve around the role of toe 
“market maker.” 

Given the small size of the 
companies it hopes to bring onto 
the exchange, turnover could be 
low and toe flow of buy and sell 
orders mismatched. To ensure bet- 
ter liquidity, a merchant bank or 
stockbroking company assumes 
toe role of marker maker, baying 
shares when the order flow leans 
to the sell side and selling shares 
when orders favor the buy side. 

The market maker profits from 
the spread between buying and 
selling prices — a spread agreed 
upon by the exchange. 

And as with Nasdaq, the new 
exchange will have no trading 
floor. All transactions will be elec- 
tronic and will pass through a cen- 
tral system to ensure transparency. 
Companies are committed to full 
disclosure “at all points in die 
lifecycle of the company,” Mr. 
Khairil said. 



3357.34 3347.73 + 0.25 


Source: Tetekurs 


IMcnulkoal Ha*U Tnhuif-: 


Losses Mount in Bombay Closing 


Agence France-Presse 

BOMBAY — India's flagship 
stock exchange, crippled by a satel- 
lite failure, remained closed Mon- 
day, and stockbrokers said trading 
losses were expected to reach about 
S2 billion this week. 

Scientists said they hoped to ac- 
tivate another satellite as a stopgap 
measure to allow the Bombay-based 
National Stock Exchange to reopen 
by Thursday. 

The exchange, toe country’s most 
modem share-trading center, was 
forced to suspend its on-screen trad- 


ing Friday after toe INSAT-2D 
satellite on which the exchange re- 
lies for its electronic transfers had to 
be abandoned. 

The shutdown of the stock ex- 
change, which has daily trading 
volume of about $500 million, was 
“bad for the market as a whole,” 
said Ajit Ambani, a stockbroker. 

He said toe Bombay Stock Ex- 
change, toe country's oldest, with a 
daily turnover of $300 million based 
on telephone trading, would in- 
crease its volume by 10 percent to 
make up some of the shortfall. 


Some company shares, however, 
would be frozen because they were 
not listed on the Bombay Stock Ex- 
change. 

The two Bombay bourses account 
for about 90 percent of toe trading 
on toe 23 stock exchanges in India. 

Scientists at the Indian Space Re- 
search Organization said that a 
second satellite that was supposed to 
replace the INSAT-2D had mal- 
functioned recently. ■ 

‘ ‘We should not depend on it.’ ’ S. 
Krishnamurthy. a spokesman for toe 
agency, said. 


Very briefly: I 

• Taiwan has not yet made a final decision on a consortium td 

build a high-speed rail system between Taipei and the port o{ 
Kaohsiung. said Siemens AG. denying reports that a com 
sortium made up of Siemens, the Belgian subsidiary of GEC 1 
Aisthom and five companies in Thailand had won the contract 
to build toe line. 1 

9 

• Broken Hill Ply. will sell its remaining 1 00 million shares in 

Foster’s Brewing Group Ltd. to BHP shareholders for 2.6(J \^' 
Australian dollars ($ 1 .89) each, a discount of about 1 0 percen j 
from the recent market price. J 

• Jusco Ltd., Japan's third-largest supermarket operator, said 

it would help Yaohan Japan Corp. run its 42 domestic stores 
by asking its own business partners to supply goods to thq 
bankrupt retailer. J 

• Telecom Corp. of New Zealand said it had failed td 

conclude the conditional sale of its Australia- based Pacific 
Star Mobile Pty. to CXA Communications Ltd., an Ausi 
tratian communication s-systems company. ! 

• China Everbright International Ltd., an investment comi 

pany controlled by the Chinese government, and Chimf 
Zhaoyang Building Materials Co. said they would jointly 
buy 80 percent of Siu-Fung Ceramics Holdings Ltd. at a 
price yet to be determined. | 

• The VS. commerce secretary, William Daley, at a meeting 
of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong; 
demanded that China open its domestic market to gain entry : 
to toe World Trade Organization, accusing Beijing of ac- 
cepting toe benefits but not the obligations of free trade. ; 

• John Fairfax Holdings Ltd. and Dow Jones & Co. said thej( 
woo Id join forces to create and market a customized business 
research and news service for Australia and New Zealand, j 

• Hong Kong workers received average pay increases of 8.6 

percent last year, while compensation for company directors 
grew by 30.4 percent, according to a survey in The SoutlJ 
China Morning Post. Bloomberg. AFP. Renter} 


eti. .^r, j.. ..i, . ■ 

































































































. }' 


A 

l 


1 i 


* * 


Sports 


PAGE 22 


i 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


World Roundup 


Dave Marr Dies; 
■Ex-PGA Champion 

1 * > ^ Dav p Mair, 63, the 1965 

rioA Champion and longtime tele- 
jjsion golf analyst, died Sunday in 
Houston after a long bout with 
Stomach cancer. Man played on the 
1965 U.S. Ryder Cup team and that 
year was PGA Player of the Year. 
He was captain of the U.S. team in 
1981, ' fA P) 

Love Bounces Back 

QO U Davis Love 3d rebounded 
from America’s loss in the Ryder 
Cap, shooting a 4- under 68 Sunday 
to win the Boick Challenge at Pine 
Mountain Georgia. Love finished 
with a course record 21 -under 267. 
Stewart Cink, a fellow Georgian, 
was four shots back in second 
place. 

ingsogotxf’lastwM&fmeansalotfor 
niy confid e n c e,” Love said after 
accepting his $216,000 check. (AP) 

Naqvi Hits Debut Century 

cricket Ali Naqvi, an opening 
batsman for Pakistan, mar ked his 
test debut Monday by making a 
century on the first day against 
South Africa in Rawalpindi. 

Naqvi, who was playing only his 
10th first-class match, made 1 15 as 
Pakistan reached 216 runs for six 
wickets in the first test of a three- 
match series. ( Reuters ) 

Russia’s Injured Pride 

SOCCER Vyacheslav Koloskov, 
coach of Russia's national team x 
criticized his players Monday for 
not getting injured. 

Koloskov said that the fact that 
none of his players had been injured 
in Russia's recent 1-1 tie in Cyprus 
and 1-0 loss in Bulgaria in World 
Cup qualifying games proved they 
were not trying hard enough. 

“During the Cyprus game, the 
doctors weren't once on the pitch to 
treat the players,” he said. “There 
was no need. Same thing with the 
Bulgaria game, not one player 
needed medical attention. Where 
there are no bumps and bruises, 
there's no fight. There’s no fighting 
spirit in the team.” (Reuters) 



CALL HIM DONALD — 
Jules, cockerel mascot of 
France’s World Cup soccer 
team, in his debut Monday. 


Ditka Shows Old Fury 
On Return to Chicago 

His Saints March Over the Bears 


The Associated Press 

Mike Ditka’s rage-reddened face 
made it clear that die Saints' coach was 
consumed with beating the team he once 
led to a Super Bowl victory. 

He prowled the sidelines, ranting, 
pumping his fists, screaming at players 
and officials and stomping on the turf of 
Chicago’s Soldier Field. 

And when Heath Shuler, the New 
Orleans quarterback, and Randal Hill 

connected on an 89-yard touchdown 
pass with just under six minutes left, 
Ditka had a most satisfying victory as 
his Saints beat the Chicago Bears, 20- 
17, Sunday night. 

“It’s not about me and not about the 
Bears.” Ditka insisted. He had bom fired 
in Chicago after a 5-11 season in 1992. 
“This was about two organizations who 
are both struggling, both hurting. At 
times. I'm sure a lot of people turned off 
their TVs. It wasn't pretty. ’ 

Ditka had complained that his new 
team wasn’t playing with enough emo- 
tion. On Sunday, he had enough for the 
entire team. 

“I went nuts. 1 was an absolute basket 
case out there,” Ditka said. “I'm sure 
every camera, in the world was on me but 
1 don't care anymore. I don't care.” 

Ditka coached the Bears to victory in 
the 1986 Super BowL 

Even though the Saints blew a 13-3 
fourth-quarter lead, committed three 
turnovers and failed to convert a single 
third down, they won for the second 
time in three games. The Bears are 0-6. 

“I've never seen the kind of things 
that are happening tons,” said the Bears’ 

S etback Erik Kramer, who replaced 
Mirer in the second half and led 


Chicago to a pair of fourth-quarter touch- 
downs — their first TDs in 15 quarters. 

Ditka got a warm reception from the 
crowd. He had sat on the Saints’ bench 
nearly three hours before kickoff, soak- 
ing up the sun and the surroundings. 

“I’m a Saint true and true.” be said. 
“1 had a lot of things happen to me in the 
past dial I really enjoyed,, that I've been 
grateful for. I hope something good hap- 
pens in the future. You never know.’ 

Girts 20, Cowboys 17 Dallas out- 
gained New York 428 yards to 166 but 
still lost Tito Wooten intercepted two 
passes and took the first one 61 yards for 
a Giants TD in the third quarter. Charles 
Way scored on a 3-yard run for New 
York, which used Danny KanelJ at quar- 
terback for most of the game after Dave 
Brown reinjured his chest. 

S t— tor s 42, Ravens 34 Kordell Stew- 
art, Pittsburgh's quarterback; showed his 
varied skills in rallying Pittsburgh from a 
24-7 halftime deficit in Baltimore. 
Jerome Bettis rushed for 137 yards, Yan- 
cey Thigpen had 162 yards receiving and 
Will Blackwell returned the second-half 
kickoff 97 yards for Pittsburgh. 

Jaguars 21, Bengal* 13 fo Jackson- 
ville, Mark Brunell threw three TD 
passes for the Jaguars. The Bengals had 
a chance to tie but quarterback Jeff 
Blake missed Carl Pickens on a fourth- 
and-4 play with less than a minute left. 

Jot* is. Cods 12 Adrian Murrell 
gained 99 yards on 30 carries, including a 
24-yard touchdown run for New York, 
which is 3-1 on the road. The Colts rallied 
from a 13-0 deficit behind quarterback 
Paul Justin, who replaced the injured Jim 
Harbaugh, to 13-10. But John Hall then 
got his third field goal of die game. 

vaings 20 , cardinal* is Eddie Mur- 
ray kicked a 38-yard field goal with 10 
seconds left as Minnesota came back 



i/nmit/Th*- WniUl"! IS--- 


Neil O’Donnell, the Jets quarterback, trying to outrun Quentin Coryatt, the Indianapolis linebacker. 

In games reported in late editions 
Monday: 


from a 19-10 fourth-quarter deficit. 

Chargers 25, Raiders 10 In Oakland, 
Calif ornia, Greg Davis replaced the in- 
jured John Carney as San Diego's kicker 
and tied Carney’s team record with six 
field goals. Gary Brown rushed for 181 
yards for San Diego. Oakland gained 
only 210 yards, just 13 on the ground. 

Seahawks 16 , Oilers 13 Steve BrOUS- 

sard had second-half touchdown runs of 
77 and 43 yards as the host Seahawks 
rallied from a 10-0 halftime deficit for 
their third victory in four games. 


21, Buccaneers IB In Green 
Bay, the Super Bowl champion reboun- 
ded from a loss in Detroit last week to end 
Tampa Bay’s winning streak. Green Bay. 
which took an 18-point lead at halftime, 
allowed the Bucs to rally but was assured 
of victory when Trent Dilfer, the Tampa 
Bay quarterback, misfired twice to War- 
rick Dunn in the final minutes. 

bb* 22 , Lions is The Bills seized the 
lead with a safety when Buffalo's Bruce 


Smith trapped Barry Sanders in the end 
zone, ana Phil Hansen tackled the De* 
trait r unning back. ~ 

Dolphins 17, Chiefs 14 Miami held’ 
Kansas City scoreless in the final 31 
minutes and Olindo Mare kicked a 26“ 
yard field goal for Miam i with 5:40 left' 
Eagle s 94. Re ds k i ns 10 Ricky Watters k 
Charlie Garner and Kevin Turner corn‘d 
bined for 202 yards rushing for the host 
Eagles. Watters had 104 of the yards and 
two TDs, and Ty Detmer was 17-of-27* 
for 246 yards and ran for a score. 


‘W 

v ’ 


A Cycling Champ Longs for an End to France’s Sorrow 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


T OURS, France — “Forty-one 
years,” sputtered Albert 
Bouvet, even more red in.the 
face than usual “FoityAwe 
years that I’ve been waiting.” 

Bouvet has been waiting that long to 
have his burden lifted, to get oat from 
under the heavy sorrow of having been 
the last Frenchman to win the esteemed 
Paris-Tours bicycle race. He does not 
say itbuthe thinks it is a disgrace that no 
Frenchman has won Paris-Tours. an ar- 
row through the heart of the country, 
since he did it in 1956. 

He sighed. “For 41 years, it has been 
a very sad story,” he said Sunday at die 
start, wearing a badge dial bore his name 
and his identification as the last French 
winner. “Very sad.” 

The race is 101 years old and was 
dominated by French riders from the 
first year through the mid-1950s. 
Twenty-eight times a Frenchman has 
won it, second only to die Belgians' 37. 
But not since 1956. Since then the win- 
ners have included Italians, Dutchmen, 
Germans, Belgians, of course, an Ir- 
ishman and — can this be true? — a 
Dane and an Australian. 

A Dane? Not a Frenchman but an 
Australian? Bouvet’s eyes rolled. What 
next, an Eskimo? A Bosnian? “Im- 
possible,' ’ Bouvet said, * 'not possible. ' ’ 


He laughed bitterly. “Very sad.” 

He was entirely sincere. Another man 
might glory in his reputation as the last 
French champipn; not Bouvet- He was 
always a : tearn playeiv He;* more proud 
ofhavijng 9 erved Jacques -Anquetil in his 
firet'TourdeFrance victory 5»T957 than 
he is of his own triumph in Paris-Tours. 

The years ease from Bouvet: His 
thick white hair turns dark, his jowls and 
gut recede, he is again the trim, 26-year- 
old Bouledogue (pronounce it “bull- 
dog”) de Fougeres. his hometown in 
Brittany. He wears the glorious Merrier 
team jersey and be is riding Paris-Tours 
in a strong wind, as always, and is far 
back in the race. 

He is not happy, he did not want to be 
here and he has lost a lot of money, he 
thinks. A short time before, he had fin- 
ished second in the Grand Prix des Na- 
tions. a long time trial, and was offered 
60.000 francs (then less than $1,000) to 
race on the track in Rennes the day that 
Paris-Tours was held on the road. 

“Sixty thousand francs, even old 
francs, you don't refuse that,” he re- 
members. But his team insisted he ride 
Paris-Tours, in which be finished 25th 
the year before, winning all of 5,000 
francs. He was not angry, he insists; he 
was, after all, a team rider. The track is 
where he performed best — French 
champion in pursuit in 1958 through 
1960 and again in 1962, silver medal in 
pursuit in the world championships in 


1957 and 1959 — but if Mercier wanted 
him on the road, onto the road he went 
Midway to Tours, 250 kilometers 
( 155 miles) from Paris, he is far behind 
when his coach pulls alongside in his car 
and asks with some asperity, “Yon rid- 
ing or not?’ ’ The rider is stung. 

“Ten kilometers later, I was at the 
front.” Bouvet says. 

A BOUT 40 kilometers from the 
finish of that Paris-Tours, on a 
short descent from a hill, 
Bouvet attacks with an Italian 
rider. They build a small lead, not even 
two minutes, before Bouvet leaves be- 
hind his accomplice. Alone, the French- 
man holds off the pack for 25 kilo- 
meters: “Near the finish, J was this 
close to dropping the adventure, to sit- 
ting up and letting them catch me. I 
didn't believe I could do it” 

At the line, he was perhaps two me- 
ters ahead, but ahead. Two meters, two 
centimeters — he won. His prize came 
to 700,000 francs. 

He never again came close to winning 
Paris-Tours. but what Frenchman has? 
In the last decade, none has been closer 
than fifth place. 

When his racing days were over, 
Bouvet became a journalist, writing 
mainly about bicycle racing, and then an 
official of the Tour de France. Before he 
retired in 1995, he bad risen to director 
of competition, which meant that his 


was the voice everybody heard on the 
radio linking the Tour, screaming at cars 
ahead of die race to move out of the 
riders' way. bellowing at photograph- 
ers’ motorcycles that he had taken then- 
number for interference, yowling ax one 
and all to clear the road. 

Albert Bouvet was quite excitable, to 
tell the truth, but in his retirement he is 
calm. Somebody else is in charge of 
keeping press cars and motorcycles out 
of sight of the race, and he is happy to be 
merely an honored guest. 

Not this day, however, not the Sun- 
day of Paris-Tours. He paced the street 
where the race started in the suburb of 
Sl Araoult en Yve lines. (The “Paris” 
part is as flexible as the “Tours.”) 

French chances of victory Sunday 
were slight. Paris-Tours by whatever 
name is almost always won in a sprint, 
and the best native sprinter. Frederic 
Moncassin — although ne had not won a 
race this year — hadcalleditaseasoaapd 
was home near Toulouse. The second- 
rank French sprinters were just that. 

“Maybe Nazon,” he said of Damien 
Nazon, a French sprinter who blew 
everybody away in the minor Tour of 
China two years ago. “Maybe 
Jalabert,” be said of Laurent Jalabert, 
the top-ranked rider in the world and. 
more important, a Fren chman. Maybe 
anybody, as long as he was French. 
Please not another Italian, Belgian. Ger- 
man, Du tchman. Irishman, Dane or Aus- 


tralian. Not a Swiss. Not a Samoan. 

Six hours later, it was a Ukrainian. *3* 
In a two-man sprint, Andrei Tchmil, tf 
Ukrainian who was bom in Russia anff 
is sedring-Belgiaa citizenship rbeat Mf£0 
Sciandri, an Italian who rides -as ai? 
Englishman. In that stew of national- 
ities, there was nor a French gene. * i6 
The highest ranked Frenchman was 
in 22d place. The only one who haB- 
seemed capable of victory was Jalabert 
who was in front alone with 35 kif; 
lometers to go and a lead of about 3C* 
seconds. He held out for 20 kilometer. 1 
before be was caught * - 

Albert Bouvet slowly got out of an 
official car to watch the finish. His head-' 
was low and his face strained. He' 
seemed to have been weeping. **'- 
“I hoped,” he said, "when Jalabert ; 
attacked. I thought it was possible. 
allowed myself to hope.” • 

An old man pushed up to him in rhe 
crowd and gave him a photograph. 

Bouvet looked at it closely. “Look,*}? 
he said, “this was 40 years ago.” The* 
cream of French racing was in the pht^. 
tograph. “This one here, that’s Louisop 
Bober,” Bouvet pointed out, “that^s 
Francois Mahe. Here, that’s Anquetil 
And here,” his finger stabbing a ridtf 
with a big smile and a look of ease, 
“that's me.” 


arms 

said. 


He peered up at the sky and spread hjp 
ms wide. “Maybe next year,” hfc 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY OCTOBER 7, 1997 


PAGE 23 


SPORTS 


®oy Blanks 
Oilers as 
Avalanche 
Wins, 3-0 

* The Associated Press 

.PatrickRoy, the Colorado Avalanche 
goalie, stopped 34 shots against the Ed- 

W»tOTOaeraforflie38flisbntoatofhis 
l^-ycar career. 

T ^* Yon want to win every gamf. and 
trying to have the best start of my 
Spreer, * said Roy, who is first among 
aefave goalienders in shutouts and who 




NHL Roundup 


tnoved past Johnny Bower into 22d 
place on die all-time shutout list as the 
Avalanche won, 3-0, on Sunday. *Tve 
never had very good starts, and I’m 
hoping this year would be different” 
k Roy has shut cot the Oilers three 
tones and beaten them 17 of the 24 times 
he has faced them in his career. He held 
Edmonton at bay despite eight power- 
play chances for the (bias. 

: Edmonton had four power plays in 
the first period alone, bat Roy blocked 
everything. Roy's best stopcame dozing 
a 30-second, two-man advantage. Todd 
Mercha nt found the puck just outside 
the Avalanche crease, only to be robbed 
/ by Roy’s longing kick save, 
f.'- Marchantwas foiled again in die third 
when he hit Roy squardy in the. chest 
after getting loose on a 2-on-l break 
wife Mike Grier. 

Claude Lemieox scored twice for the 
Avalanche, and Peter Farsberg had Col- 
orado’s other goal 

• ifniif 2, Kings 2 Kevin Stevens 
scored with nine seconds left in reg- 
ulation time to lift New York into a tie 
with visiting Los Angeles. 

Stevens picked up a loose puck to the 
left of goaltender Stephane Fiset and 
swept it into the open side of the net, just 
pulling his skate out of the crease before 
the puck crossed the line. 

Seconds earlier, the Rangers scored 
an apparent tying goal, by Marc Savard, 
that was disallowed wtea a video replay 
A- showed that Pat t j Pontai ne had his 
skate in the crease. 

Donald MacLean’s first NHL goal 
put Los Angdes ahead, 2-1, at 19:27 of 
the second period. 

coyotes 2, Fiyon i Dallas Drake’s 
goal midway through the third period 
snapped a tie and gave Phoenix the 
victoty in Philadelphia. 

After two Flyers collided at center 
ice, Drake and Keith Tkachuk broke in 
on a 2-on-l. Drake waited for defense- 
man Janne Niinimaa to go down and 
fired a shot that beat goalteader. .Garth. , 
Snow at 9:29. 

■ Craig Jaxmey got the assist Drake as- 
sisted on Janney’s second-period goal. 

.. . Rod Brind' Amour scared for the Fly- 
ers in the first period. 

Lightning i, Sabras 1 Tampa Bay's 
Daren Puppa and Buffalo's Dominik 
Hasek pot on goaltending clinics as the 
Lightning and visiting Sabres played to 
a tie. 

Puppa, who supped Randy Bunidge 
from just outside the crease in the final 
minute of overtime, stopped 36 Buffalo 
shots. Hasek made 30 saves. 

.1 A lncky bounce on Alex Selivanov's 
ft backhander helped the Lightning take a 
■ 1-0 lead after one period. 

.. Jason Dawe tiki the game in die 
second period, scoring from the slot 
after an errant clearing attempt by Yves 
Racine at 14:28. 



The Indians’ Omar Vizquel leaping into the arms of his teammates after his base 
hit in the bottom of the ninth inning gave Cleveland a 3-2 victory over New York. 


Cleveland’s Comeback Victory 


Sets Up a Decisive Showdown 


By Jennifer Frey 

WaskbigtoK Post Smlce 

CLEVELAND — The Cleveland 
Indians trailed for seven long in- 
nings at Jacobs Held, their shoes- 
tring hopes of staying alive in this 
American League firet-round play- 
off series shrinking by the batter. 
The crowd was oddly quiet The 
faces rat the home bench were 
severe. 

Then Sandy Alomar blasted a 
home run off the seemingly unbit- 
table New York Yankees bullpen in 
the eighth inning on Sunday night, 
and Omar Vuquk hit a freaky run- 
scoring single into left field in tire 
ninth, nnri the Indians suddenly had 

a 3-2 victory over the Yankees and 
one more chance to play for atrip to 
the American League Champion- 
ship Series. 

With the game- tied, 2-2, in die 
bottom of the final inning , Vizquel 
hit a ball that bounced off pitcher 
Ramiro Mendoza’s glove aim skid- 
ded past a shocked Derek Jeter at 
shortstop to score Marquis Grissom 
from second base. The Jacobs Field 
crowd — which had not shut up 
since Alomar hit his game-tying, 
solo home run off Mariano Rivera 
— raised its noise-level several 
decibels the Indiana exploded 
onto the field. 

The Indians were trailing, 2-1, 
with two outs in the eighth when 
Alomar hit his homer for me first run 
scored — for either team — since 
David Justice bomered in the 


second. Alomar, who also homered 
in the first game of this- series, 
pumped iris arms as he rounded the 
bases. And in the Yankees' dugout, 
starter Dwight Gooden — who had 
been hoping to record his first-ever 
postseason victory — let & small 
grimace cross his face. 

“I can't believe how pumped up 
this placs got,” Alomar said. T was 
so excited when I was running 
around the bases. It was so loud.” 

With die momentum swinging to 
the Indians, Joe Tone, the Yankees’ 
manager, replaced Rivera, his 
closer, with Mendoza for the ninth 
inning, and Mendoza gave up a 
leadotf single to Grissom, who 
dropped a tot in short right field. 
Grissom advanced to second when 
Bip Roberts laid down a beautiful 
sacrifice bnnt then Vizquel came to 
the plate. 

At first, Vizquel’s hit appeared to 
be a simple grounder, ana Jeter was 
moving toward the ball as soon as it 
left the bat Instead, the ball de- 
flected off Mendoza's glove and 
slipped into left field and Grissom 
raced across the plate. 

Vizquel did not want to talk about 
his fortuitous single in the postgame 
clubhouse — he insisted that the 
true heroes in this game were Alo- 
mar and 39-year-old Orel Hershiser, 
the veteran pitcher who gave up two 
first-inning runs, but settled down to 
keep the TnHianc alive in game. 

All Hershiser wanted to talk 
about was the Indians* miracle mo- 
ments after he had left die game with 


the shore 2-1 after the seventh in- 


ning. 

“It’s a special memory now," 
said Hershiser, who did not let a 
Yankee past second base after the 
second inning . “It’s awesome.” 


complete w 
York on Saturday), Sunday’s game 
Started as a pitching duel between 
Hershiser — who is 5-1 career in the 
postseason — and Gooden, 32, who 
marii* his first playoff appearance 
after a nine-year absence. Gooden, 



days and 


game. 

Despite die short notice — and 
his Jong absence from the post- 
season — Gooden pitched 5% in- 
nings and gave up one ran (that 
homo- to Justice) before Torre went 
to his bullpen with runners on first 
and second in die sixth. 

Tone had good reason to make 
such a decision. His ballpen, which 
recorded an 0.00 earned run average 
in die Yankees* first-round series 
with the Rangers last season, had not 
allowed a ran in 9% innings of work 
a gains t toe In dians before the game 
started Sunday tonight. 

“For us to score against their 
bullpen — it was pretty big,” Alo- 
mar said after the Indians’ victory. 
‘ Thope we can continue to do that. I 
hope we can do it again tomorrow 
night.” 



Orioles Advance; Mariners Go Home 


In Pitchers’ Showcase, Mussina Outshines Johnson for 3-1 Victory 


By Mark Maske 

Washington Post Service 


BALTIMORE — They had to beat the 
law of averages as well as baseball's 
most imposing pitcher, but the Baltimore 
Orioles did it one more time. They made 
it five for five a gainst Randy Johnson in 
1997 and advanced to die American 
League Championship Series far a 
second consecutive year by riding the 
masterful pi tching of Mike Mussina to a 
3-1 triumph over the Seattle Mariners. 


“ ‘Certain years, strange I 
It’s possible this might be the year of the 
Orioles,” said Davey Johnson, the Ori- 
oles' manager, after the victory Sunday. 
‘ *ff someone had told me we'U go against 
Randy Johnson five times and won’t lose 
any of die games. I’d have said they’re 
crazy. We just rise to the occasion.” 

The Orioles are scheduled to meet the 
New York Yankees or the Cleveland 
Indians in the best-of-seven American 
League Champi onship Series beginning 
in Baltimore on Wednesday. 


Braves Don’t Scare Marlins 


The Associated Press 

MIAMI — The Florida Marlins 
traveled to Atlanta on Monday, flying 
high and hoping to repeat their regular- 
season success against the Braves. 

Florida won 8 of 12 games this year 
from the reigning National League 
champions. The two teams meet in the 
National Leagne Championship 
Series beginning Tuesday. 

When Atlanta came to Miami in late 
July, the Marlins were strut 


They had gone 10-12 during the pre- 
vious three weeks, and their lead over 
die New York Meis in die wild-card 
race was down to one game. 

Atlanta was cruising toward anoth- 
er NL East tide. But Florida won three 
of four games from the Braves that 
weekend, then split a four-game series 


in Atlanta die following weekend. 

The successful showdown sparked 
the Marlins to a 19-10 record in Au- 
gust They went on to clinch the first 
postseason berth in franchise history. 

Atlanta batted just .210 against the 
Marlins this season. Kevin Brown. 
Alex Fernandez, A1 Leiter and Tony 
Saunders — Honda's likely starters 
in the National League Championship 
Series — were 6-1 against Atlanta 
with a 234 eamed-mn average. 

Still, the Braves won 101 games to 
92 for Florida. Although Atlanta has 
the best starting rotation in baseball, 
the biggest difference between teams 
over the season was at the plate. The 
Braves ranked third in die NLin scor- 
ing and batting. Florida ranked eighth 
and nin th - 


This time, Randy Johnson pitched 
well The Orioles, who got home runs 
from Jeff Reboulet and Geronimo Bear- 
roa, forced him to rely on his slider 
instead of his blazing fastball, bat he 
made the adjus tment and lwniteri Bal- 
timore to seven hits over eight innings. 

The 6-fbot-10 (2.08-meter) left- 
hander walked two and struck out 13. 

‘'He pitched his heart out,” said Lou 
Piniella, the Mariners’ manager. “He 
pitched like a champion.” 

Still, Johnson lost for the second time 
in this series and fell to 0-4 in five starts 
against the Orioles this year.' The Ori- 
oles won all five games. 

Reboulet got things going with & one- 
out homer in the bottom of the flirt, and 
the Orioles added another run. In die 
inning on Bexroa’s double and Cal Rip- 
ken’s run scoring single. Berroa 
ided a home run with two outs in the 


“I pitched my butt off,’ ’ Randy John- 
sonsaid. "I got beat I pitched as good a 
as I have all year. Mike pitched 
lip your hat to die Baltimore 
. Their pitching was much bet- 


Orioles 
ter.” 

like Johnson, Mussina pitched on 
three days’ rest He surrendered only 
two hits and one ran over seven innings. 
Seattle got a lead off home run from 
Edgar Martinez in the second inning, 
but Mussina didn't permit another run- 
ner to reach third base. He walked three 
and struck out seven. 

“Mike rose to the occasion," Davey 
Johnson said. “He pitched an outstand- 


ing game. He gave me all he had. I think 
everybody can put to rest that talk I used 
to hear about how he can’t pitch a big 
game. He pitches nothing but big 
games.” 

Armando Benitez relieved Mussina 
in the eighth inning and issued a leadoff 
walk to pinch hitter Rick Wilkins, but 


t ot Ken Griffey — who went 0 for 4 
unday and was 2 for IS in the series 
with no hornets and two runs batted in 
— to ground out on a dribbler to Ripken 
at third base to end the inning. 

“It’s satisfying,” Mussina said of the 
victoiy. “But it’s only one step. We 
have more work to do.” 


\ DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 



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Friendships 

Appears evwy Saturday In 
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BEETLE BAILEY 



CALVIN AND HOBBES 



NON SEQUITUR DOONESBURY 




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PAGE 24 


art BUCHWAT-n 


Is It Better to Give? 

J®M8 who are to CImton “I cold him, 'Mr/Presi- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1997 


president is in 

S^*£ v, W 0dy 011 “■ 

woe m. the aisle rose to his 


<rfmaldng^ir“ , ^ cu 
ptate cub to 
raise , foods 
from the While 
Home. 

“What's 
wrong with the 
fteskfeat maV. 

ing telephone 
calls from the D 
White House?' Buchwalld 
After all, he does live there 
and you can’t expect him to 
go out into the street every 
tune he needs to call 
someone,” Tyler Cralle said. 

_ ‘There’s nothing wrong 
with it if he’s c alling Boris 
Yeltsin,” I said “But if he’s 
malti n g a fund-raising mil. 
people mi ght consider it a 
wrong number.’ ’ 

. Tyier persisted, ‘ ‘The pres- 
ident is a very busy man. 
Nobody should read any thing 
into it other than he just wants 
to wish someone a nice day. 

“Wheat I got my call, I was 
in the bathtub. The phone rang 
and my wife said it was the 
White House. I immediately 
stood at attention. The pres- 
ident came cm and said, ‘Tyler, 
I need your help. If I don’t 
have any money u two weeks, 

Good-Bye, Love 

Reuters 

SAN FRANCISCO — An 
auction of memorabilia from 
the “Summer of Love," 
1967, inrinrfmg notes from 
John Lennon and YokoOno to 
theBlack Panther leader Huey 
Newton, brought in $183,977, 
less than fee $500,000 organ- 
izers had hoped for. 


^'^11^1 mi 


port I'll send you a check as 
soon as 1 dry off.’ 

“I appreciate that Bring 
the missus over to the White 
House some time and we can 
have a meal together." 

I asked Tyler, “I wonder 

how the president got your 

n umbe r? ,r 

He said, “Probably in the 
Yellow Pages under Big 
Givers. That's where every- 
one finds me.” 

“Tyler, how does it feel 
when the president calls?” 

“It feels good. He is a very 
important mpp — one of the 
most important in fee world 
— and if he takes the time to 
call me I say ‘Bully for him.’ 
He's fee first president who 
ever bothered to call. In fact 
I’ve been waiting on the end 
of the phone line since fee 
Eisenhower administration.” 

“Do you expect anything 
in return for making' a dona- 
tion to fee party?” 

“Of course not On the oth- 
er hand, if I was invited to a 
game of gin rummy wife the 
first family, I wouldn't say 
no. Sally has a great outfit to 
wear if the call goes out.” 


“So fee payoff for you is 
social, not business?” 

“Well, I am trying to build 
a pipeline across the Grand 
Canyon, but I have no inten- 
tion of discussingtfaat with fee 
president. All I want in ex- 
change for my donation is feat 
he tells Hillary he likes me." 

I said, “I really admire you 
for what you’ve done for our 
country.” 

“I don’t want you to think 
feat I only get calls from fee 
White House. I also hear from 
Republicans, but I always tell 
them, ‘I already gave at the 
Oval Office.’ ” 


Back to Basics for ‘Man in the Iron Mask’ 


By Richard Covington 

Imemuionat Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — No one ever accused Alex- 
andre Dumas of letting bothersome facts 
get in the way of a swashbuckling teaijerker. 
The hugely prolific French master of rae- 


The hugely prolific French master of me- 
lodrama was as handy at taking liberties wife 
history as fee Three Musketeers were adept 
wife their swords. 

In spicing up “The Man in fee Iron Mask” 
wife ms own plot twists, fee director and 
scriptwriter Randall Wallace — who wrote 
the script for “Braveheart” — ont-Dumases 
Dumas. 

The only historical certainty about the 
real-life Man in fee Iron Mask was that he 
ended up dying in fee Bastille on Nov. 19, 
1703. Conspiracy theorists have been ar- 
guing over his true identity ever since, wife 
Voltaire fee first to weigh in wife fee anti- 
monarchical bombshell feat fee Iron Mask 
was none other than Louis XIV ’s elder 
brother. 

The new film stars John Malkovich, 
Jeremy Irons and Gerard Depardieu as the 
aging musketeers — Atbos, Aramis and 
Portnos — wife Gabriel Byrne as d’Artag- 
nan. Leonardo DiCaprio plays fee double 
role of fee heartless King Louis and his 
secret twin brother. Philippe, the Man in the 
Iron Mask. Judith Godreche plays fee 
king’s unwilling mistress Christine and 
Anne Parillaud is the long-suffering Queen 
Anne of Austria, the mother of Louis and 
Philippe. 

The film opens in fee United States in 
December ana elsewhere in February or 
Mhrch. 

Suffering through the rainiest June in 137 
years, fee MGM/UA production slogged 
through location shoots m three of the most 
spectacular chateaux in France — Vaux-le- 
vicomte, Fontainebleau and Pierrefonds — 
and re-created fee Bastille prison and fee 
storm-tossed Brittany coast on eight sound 
stages at fee Arpajon studios, an hour's drive 
south of Paris. 

“It was a war,” said Wallace, who is 
directing fra: the first time — only half in 
jest 

Largely because, of the nasty weather, 
what started out as a 1 3-week production ran 
five days beyond the original schedule and a 
few milli on dollars over its initial $35 mil- 
lion budget, according to Russell Smith, one 
of fee film's producers. 

Mercifully simplifying Dumas's convo- 



luted plot, Wallace casts notions of chivalry, 
honor and sacrifice into high relief. 

Thirty years after the musketeers valiantly 
battled Cardinal Richelieu and the wicked 
Milady to protect King Louis XEtt, they have 
gone their separate ways. Aramis, now the 
vicar-general of fee seditious Jesuit order, 
unites them to rescue fee imprisoned Man in 
the Iron Mask and install him as monarch in 

S lace of his evil twin, Louis XIV. Only 
'Artagnan remains inexplicably loyal to the 
treacherous Louis and, as a harrowing sword 
fight explodes in fee bowels of feeBastille, is 
forced to choose between duty and his sense 
of justice. 

Since fee first movie of “The Man in the 
Iron Mask” was made in 1929 with 
Douglas Fairbanks as d’ Artagnan, there 
have been five film and television versions 
of the story — not counting a dozen more 
covering fee exploits of fee original Three 
Musketeers. 

In many of the films, fee musketeers 
evolved into gag-filled caricature. From 
Richard Lester’s absurdist 1974 send-up to 
fee 1993 brat-pack exercise wife Charlie 
Sheen and Kiefer Sutherland, fee Three 
Musketeers began to look more like the 
Three Stooges, sword-wielding comics in 


nifty pantaloons, quicker wife wise-guy re- 
partee than rapiers. 

Wallace aimed to set this unseemly slide 
to rights. “I didn't want them to be farcical,’' 
the director said. “I wanted them to be fee 
lrinri of men who laughed and had great fun, 
but if you insulted them, you were going to 
be in desperate danger." 

As musketeers, Malkovich, Irons and De- 
pardieu are a far cry from slapstick. Tracking 
these three as they roamed about fee set was 
like spying on grizzled but still menacing 
lionspacing then cages. 

“Tney're all used to being at the center 
ring in the circus,” said Wallace. “If you 
don 'i have a whip and a chair and a real sense 
of where you want to go, yon 've had it” 

At 43, Malkovich is fee youngest of the 
three, bat he was intrigued by Wallace’s 
novel portrayal of aging heroes clinging to 
past glories. 

“Life hasn't done well fra: them, as it 
invariably doesn’t,' ’ he said. 4 ‘They’ve been 
kicked around a bit and betrayed. I liked, 
that.” 

On the set representing the Brittany coast 
and the Mask’s islandpcison, Depardieu as fee 


Brian* Geap/lWicdAiffaB 

The ‘Mask 1 team, from left: Depardieu, Irons, Malkovich, Byrne and DiCaprio. 


randy Porthos cut a broad swam through fee 
te chnicians , wetsuit-clad divers employed to 


create waves, and other cast members. The set^ 
was pungent with fee smell of seaweed hnulech 
in from Brittany, 500 kilometers away. , ~ 

“Life is too long for Porthos.” Depardieu. ^ 
later lamented, theatrically bemoaning his £ 
fate. “He can no longer drink fee way he./ 
used to or muster fee same passion for love- - 
making. Time has left its marie; this makes 
him funny and sad at the same time." 

In fee Brittany scene, Aramis drops the • 
freed prisoner hidden beneath his cloak onto 
fee rocky shore, as Athos and Porthos gape hi - . 
disbelief. Despite fee weight of DiCapno's ■_ 
stand-in hanging around his neck and three “ 
makeup artists buzzing around him, Irons- ' 
stood sweatily’ disputing the shot wife the 
director, pleading tar a wider angle. 

Irons was frankly astonished at the lack of 
friction on the set. “I came thinking there - 
might be tension because we’re all big 
egos,” he said. “But we have a very happy 
time together. We're great muckers, great 
mates. 

“It’s like an ensemble theater,” added ■ 
Smith, "wife the same son of camaraderie, ' 
teasing each other and telling ties before you 
goon." 

Splendidly dressed in a knee-length, co- 
balt blue coat with frilly cuffs, Gabriel Byrne 
paced about the overstuffed gilt interior of 
me king's bedroom. He clowned around wife 
a fake beard, then beat out a nervous rhythm 
on the armrests of a chair, drawing laughs 
from the crew. But when rehearsal started, 
wife DiCaprio, equally dandified in lustrous 
scarlet dressing gown and shoulder-length 
wig, fee goofing off fell away and Byrne was 
transformed. 

“Your people are anxious to love you," 
said d’ Artagnan sternly, as fee king picked 
over a table groaning wife fruit. “But they 
see you building palaces, while they eat 
rotten food." 

“Rotten food? I’ll deal wife that dec is- i 
iveiy,” replied Louis, sounding more like a 
spoiled valley brat than the omnipotent Sun 

Dissatisfied, DiCaprio asked for another 
rehearsal before filming the shot. This time, 
it was Byrne who was off. 

‘"I am a young king,” said Louis, “but I 
am king." 

“Then be a good king," d’ Artagnan 
replied, so seriously his face cracked into an 

unwilling grin, 

“A little more Shakespearean, please,” 
Wallace commanded from behind the cam- 
era monitor. 



ARTISTS LEGACY 


PEOPLE 


De Kooning Intrigues Live On in a Wary Market 


By Carol Vogel 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — In the six months 
since Willem de Kbooing’s 
death, tales about his life, his work and 
his estate have become as complex as 
his most famous paintings. Few in the 
international art world would dispute 
his stature as one of the greatest fig- 
ures of American art, but de Kooning, 
the abstract expressionist painter who 
had become a recluse by fee time he 
died in March at 92, continues to 
fascinate collectors and dealers, auc- 
tion-house experts and art historians. 

Not only is the merit of Ids late 
work the subject of continuing debate, 
but also fee mystery surrounding his 
trust and estate — its contents and fee 
closely controlled sales of some of fee 
works — has angered dealers in the 
United States and abroad. 

Since fee 1980s, a period when he 
was very prolific, there has been 
much speculation about how the 
artist’s declining health affected his 
paintings and how much help he re- 
ceived from his studio assistants. 

At auction, de Kooning’s work has 
generally come out on top. “Inter- 
change,” a powerful urban landscape 
painted in 1955, sold for a record $20.6 
millio n at Sotheby's in 1989. That 
remains toe highest price ever paid for 
a work by a conlemporaiy artist. 

But since his death the market has 
had fee; jitters. For starters, no one 
except his executors and their lawyer 
knows fix: sure how much of his art is 
left in his estate or when it was pro- 
duced. After a famous artist dies, 
dure are always fears that a large 
amount of desirable work may have 
been hidden away and if not handled 
wisely could flood the market and 
drive prices down. 

fo May an untitled work from 1947 
sold at Sotheby’s for $1.7 million, 
well under its $2 million to $3 million 
estimate. 

“A^ulyville, , ’ a 1971 painting wife 
brilliant scoops of cotois and thick 
taish strokes, railed to sell at Christie’s 
the next night. While some experts say 
that die ■‘AmityviUe’’ estimate of $2 



laodw GrwtfirW-5«*i»/ 1 Wto 


Willem de Kooning, who died in March at the age of 92. 


million to $2-5 million was too high 
and that the painting had been up for 
sale before, others say it failed to sell 
because of collectors’ uncertainty 
about de Kooning’s estate. 

Matthew Marks, one of the three 
dealers handling art from the estate, 
called the timing of the “Amityville” 
sale unfortunate. "People wondered 
if 27 more Amityvilles will be corning 
on fee market," he said. 

Executors and lawyers for de 
Kooning’s estate are addressing that 
question wife great delicacy. No one 
will say what fee estate is worth or 
how much art is left 

What executors for the estate do 
say is that none of the artist's early 
wanks remain. Of fee art they have 


been selling, sales have been carefully 
monitored and discreetly executed, to 
fee consternation of many dealers 
who would love to get their hands on 
some of it 

At auction, however, one of the 
tests of the de Kooning market will 
occur next month when Christie’s is 
to sell “Two Standing Women,” 
from 1949, which fee auction house 
estimates could fetch $3.5 million to 
$4.5 million. Indeed, most of his 
highly prized paintings from the '40s, 
’50s and ’60s are either in museums or 
in private collections. 

During his lifetime, de Kooning 
often needed money and sold his work 
as he made it. This was especially true 
in the lean years of the ’30s and '40s 


and later in the ’60s, when he was 
building his studio in East Hampton, 
on Long Island. Sometimes, before 
his dealer, Xavier Fourcade, had a 
chance to sell the artist's works, other 
dealers and collectors like Joseph 
Hirshhom would buy up everything 
in de Kooning’s studio. 

The estate does have a small por- 
tion of art from fee '70s, but fee bulk 
of its work is from the ’80s. These late 
works are neither as desirable nor as 
rare. He painted 341 works in the ’80s, 
according to a catalogue essay by 
Robert Storr, a curator of painting and 
sculpture at the Museum of Modern 
Art, who helped organize " Willem de 
Kooning: The Late Paintings: The 
1 980s,” at theSan Francisco Museum 
of Modem Art, the Walker Art Center 
in Minneapolis and the Museum of 
Modem Art in New York last year. 

The exhibition, a carefully edited 
selection of about three dozen works, 
was fee topic of mnch talk. Atthe time, 
many experts denounced the paintings 
as rubbish, with some of mem as- 
seating that they were done by his 
studio assistants because de Kooning 
was not mentally competent to paint. 
(This is a contention that Storr and de 
Kooning’s lawyer, John Eastman, dis- 
miss.) Others praised the paintings for 
their energy and lyrical quality. 

“We wanted to tell the whole story, 
warts and all," Eastman said. “Our 
feeling was to get the work out there 
and let fee punters decide if these 
works were any good.” 

Decide they have. 

“I think it's outrageous that 
MOMA has given these late works a 
housekeeping seal of approval,” said 
Allan Stone, a Manhattan dealer. 
“They don’t have die spirit of de 
Kooning. They’re stiff, rigid. I think a 
lot of them are unfinished. They were 
obviously done by someone who was 
operating on one cylinder." 

Storr said fee show was meant to 
educate fee public, since most of these 
works had not been exhibited before. 

“We tried to be as forthright as 
possible about his medical issues, his 
studio issues," he said. “We weren’t 
trying to fudge it." 


T HE actor David Caruso 
wasn’t wooied about 
flashing his bare bottom on 
“NYPD Blae,” so don’t ex- 
pect him to be bashful in his 
own dressing room. “X need 
to change clothes. You don’t 
mind, do you? You’ve seen it 
ail before,” Caruso said to a 
female TV Guide writer who 
got an eyeful. Back on tele- 
vision as. the tide character of 
fee CBS aeries “Michael 
Hayes” after having left 
“NYPD Blue” early in its 
second season, Caruso was 
soon standing in his under- 
wear. Caruso wasn’t shy 
about discussing his image, 
which suffered when he left 
the popular TV drama to 
make more money making 
feature films. “Saylamabad 
guy, a selfish guy, a destruct- 
ive guy who went through that 
period. Yes! Let’s assume this 
bad guy did let you down! Did 
rip you off! Mfeat do you do 
now?” Caruso said. “The 
only way I can think to re- 
connect and establish trust is 
by tiie quality of my work.” 


Prime Minister Tony 
Blair was to take a cameo role 
as himself in a Russian tele- 
vision series in Moscow on 
Monday, newspapers repeat- 
ed. Blair will step out of his 
limousine while driving 




Soon OIioMlcoia* 

SONG OF THE LAND — Willie Nelson performing at 
Farm Aid ’97 in Tinley Park, Illinois. The singer was 
co-founder of the group, which helps family farmers. 


through Moscow to help pick up shopping 
dropped by Varya, a star of the long-running 
“Dora 7, Podjezd 4” (“House 7, Entrance 
4”), and chat wife her about fee problems of 
ordinary people in today's Russia. Biair was 
then due to meet President Boris Yeltsin. 


The American University of Paris has 
named Michael Simpson as its new pres- 
ident. He has served since 1988 as president 
of Utica College in New York. He succeeds 
Lee Huebner, who was formerly fee pub- 
lisher of fee International Herald Tribune. 


The alto saxophone player Candy Dulfer 
will showcase another talent in her newest 
recording — her voice. “I’m not fee next 


Mariah Carey,” the Amsterdam-born mu- 
sician said. “I have good timing and I can 
cany a tune. Besides, it’s easier to makq^ 
contact wife a crowd and express yourself* ) 
wife your voice than it is with a horn in your 
face.” 


What a difference 30 years can make. Last 
time LuC Besson was in Istanbul, he and his 
family skipped town without paying their 
hotel bilL Now he’s back to promote ms $90 
million sci-fi action movie, ’‘The Fifth Ele- 
ment.” The French film director told the daily 
newspaper Hurriyet that fee hotel incident 
happened when he was about 7. “We ran out 
of money and sneaked out of our hotel with- 
out paying. I apologize to all of you for that,’ ” 
Besson said. 



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