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By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright appealed for 
Senate approval of NATO enlargement 
on Tuesday, but senators raised an array 
of doubts and concerns that foreshadow 
a sharp debate ahead of a ratification 
vote next spring. 

. “We do not know what dangers may 
y arise 10, 20, or even 50 years from 
now," Mrs. Albright told the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee, in its first 
bearing on NATO's plan to accept Hun- 
gary, Poland and the Czech Republic as 
members. * ‘We do know that, whatever 
the future may hold, it will be in oar 
interest to have a vigorous and larger 
alliance with those European democ- 
racies that share our values.” 

But senators, who will be asked to 
ratify enlargement only after NATO has 
signed letters of accession with each 
member in December, expressed a 
range of reservations, indicating that 
ratification, if expected, is not a cer- 
tainty.' 

Most prominent were questions on 
die costs of expansion and how they will 
be shared, ana on the alliance's future 
relations with Russia. 

Senator Jesse Helms of North Car- 
olina, chairman of the panel, endorsed 
enlargement, with a condition: “We 
must embrace these democracies, and 
guide them, and show diem away from 
their tragic histories of ethnic division 
and war," he said. 

The United States, he added, is pre- 
pared to bear some costs, bat only if the 
European members of NATO were 
“w illin g to fulfill their end of the bar- 
gain." 

The adminis tration has estimated the 
costs of enlargement at $35 billion over 
10 years, with the United States paying 
- $2 billion of that; some outside esti- 
mates are higher. Mrs. Albright said 
Tuesday that U.S. officials were work- 
ing to agree on an estimate of costs by 
December. 

Mr. Helms noted that last week, at an 
alliance meeting in Maastricht, Neth- 
erlands. some European governments 
voiced reservations about bearing the 
bulk of enlargement-related expenses. 

Ratification by the Senate, Mr. Helms 
. told Mrs. Albright, “may very well suc- 
* cecd or fail on whether you can dissuade 
our allies of that notion." 

The same point was made by the 
ranking Democrat on the panel. Senator 
Joseph Biden of Delaware, who also 
supports enlargement 

The Europeans, Mr. Biden said, 
“must step up to the plate and agree to 
bear their fair share” of costs. 

This issue, he said, would raise a 

See NATO, Page 8 


Fausto Bertmotti, left, the Communist leader, listening Tuesday as Prime Min- 
ister Romano Prodi addressed Parliament during debate on die 1998 budget. 


In Release of Sheikh, a Glimmer of Hope? 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Yasser Arafat joined hundreds of 
Palestinians on Tuesday in planting a respectful kiss 
on Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, the returned religious leader 
of the Islamic movement Hamas, raising a possibility 

that for all rtw damag e done hy th e failed Tm iftli attack 

in Jordan, there might also be opportunities. 

The Palestinian leader, who was conspicuously 
absent when Sheikh Yassin arrived to a triumphant 
welcome in the Gaza Strip on Monday, went to greet 
the sheikh on a makeshift platfonn set up on a play- 
ground outside his house. 

The image of the two men, one in the fatigues and 
head scarf of a guerrilla and die other in the robes of an 


Islamic cleric, laughing and conferring, suggested that 
the major powers of Palestinian society — the Pal- 
estinian Authority of Mr. Arafat and the Islamic move- 
ment of Sheikh Yassin — could finally find common 
cause. 

There were also reports that Prime Minis ter Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu, under attack for having approved an 
assassination attenmt that backfired disastrously, was 
working through the American mediator, Dennis 
Ross, to arrange a quick meeting with Mr. Arafat as 
early as Tuesday night 

“We are one people, we are one body and, God 
willing, we will not allow the conspiracies of the 
enemies to divide the Palestinian people," the 61- 
year-old invalid sheikh declared as Mr. Arafat held his 
paralyzed hand. 


Mr. Arafat for his part declared that “no doubt’* 
die release of die «h«VH “strengthened the narirmai 
unity, will make it more stable, more brotherly, 
stronger as a platfonn for the Palestinian people." 

Before Sheikh Yassin's release, Mr. Arafat had 
been under heavy pressure from Tstm»- 1 and the United 
States to crack down cm the infrastructure of Hamas, 
and the movement tom between a relatively moderate 
domestic leadership and a militant leadership abroad, 
was tbrpotwiing mim attacVm against Israel and die 
Palestinian Authority.: 

The release of the sheikh, however, raised hopes 
that Hama« would now have a leader with sufficient 
authority to iqjeak for die entir e movement If be then 

See ISRAEL, Page 8 


AGENDA 

All-Party Talks Get Under Way in Ulster 

Full-scale negotiations on the future Sinn Fein, the political wing of the 1 
of Northern Ireland began Tuesday in Irish Republican Army, entered the 
Belfast as pro-British unionists and discussions committed to achieving 
Roman Catholic nationalists seeking a an end to British rule of die province, 
united nation sat down with the British The unionist parties are equally de- 
and Irish governments to try to fihd termined to remain a put of the 
agreement on the future. United Kingdom. Page 6. 


German Unemployment 
Marches to New Heights 

Rise to 11.7 % Deflates Hope for Economy 


The Doilar 


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Books Page 11. 

Crossword.™ Page 20. 

Opinion Pages 10-11. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


Campaign Measure 
Is Stymied in Senate 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two key 
procedural votes in the Senate on 
Tuesday failed to muster enough sup- 
port to advance legislation aimed at 
revising campaign-finance laws. 

Backers of the main bill — co- 
sponsored by Senators John McCain, 
Republican of Arizona, and Russell 
Femgold, Democrat of Wisconsin — 
have threatened to attach it to other 
bills pending in die Senate if they 
cannot pass it on its own. 

MQETWO 

An Ethiopian Midwife's Big Role 


Tha Intamwrkat 


The IHT on-line wmv.iht.com 


Pages 4, 7. THE AMERICAS Pag* 3. 

Women Who Run New Hampshire 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Unemployment in 
Germany crept up to a fifth consecutive 
postwar record last month and deflated 
the government's hopes that the na- 
tion’s exwut-driven recovery would 
help the ailing job market, die Federal 
Labor Office said Tuesday. 

The number of Germans, without 
work rose 34,000 to a seasonally ad- 
justed 4,497,000, outstripping expec- 
tations of an increase of 25,000. The 
unemployment rate climbed to 1 1.7 per- 
cent from 11.6 percent in August 

“The trend is dear. It is an unbroken' 
upward trend," said Thomas Mayer, 
senior economist in Frankfurt for Gold- 
man, Sachs & Co. 

As in France and some other Euro- 
pean countries, Germany’s unemploy- 
ment crisis has stymied Bonn’s ecot- 
nomic planners with its failure to 
increase employment well into die third 
year of what is statistically an economic 


recovery. As Germans bemoan the 
political paralysis in Bonn that thwarts 
an economic restructuring, raising wor- 
ries that they mil be left behind in the 
age of globalization, they speak in in- 
creasingly envious terms or the "job 
wonder" or “job machine" in die 
United States, where 11 million jobs 
have been created since 1991. 

The September figures also represent 
an acute embarrassment to Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's hopes of being re-elect- 
ed next year. Mr. Kohl has promised to 
cut unemployment in half by 2000. The 
numbers also seemed to contradict fore- 
casts by Economics Minister Guenter 
Rexrodt of a turnaround in die labor 
market in the autumn. 

Neatly half a million German jobs 
have vanished since September 1996, 
according to the Federal Labor Office’s 
report 

The figures, showing die worst un- 
employment in any September since 

See GERMANY, Page 17 


With Euro at Stake, 
Communists Resist 
His Budget Cuts 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


Prime Minister Romano Prodi ap- 
pealed to his Communist allies Tuesday 
night not to derail Italy's chances of 
qualifying for European monetary union 
by bringing down the center-left gov- 
ernment over proposed welfare cuts. 

But the Refounded Communists, a 
small extreme-left member of the gov- 
ernment's parliamentary majority, said 
it would vote against die government’s 
1998 budget proposal, including 5 tril- 
lion lire ($2.9 billion) in welfare cuts 
that are deemed vital for Italy partic- 
ipation in EMU. 

Hie Communist announcement, 
which effectively deprives die govern- 
ment of its majority aqd could yet trig- 
ger the collapse of die 17-montfa-old 
government, came after Mr. Prodi 
offered fresh concessions. He said he 
was ready to discuss welfare reform 
again with die Communists, as long as 
any changes to die 1998 budget did not 
put at risk Italy’s ability to meet die 
terms of European monetary union. 

Mr. Prodi (fid not resign on Tuesday, 
and was planning to meet with President 
Oscar Luigi Scatfaro to discuss die situ- 
ation. Mr. Scalfaro was then expected to 
ask Mr. Prodi to explore prospects for a 
last-minute compromise that would 
avert a government collapse. 

Fausto Bertmotti, the C ommunis t 
leader, left foe door slightly ajar to a deal 
by saying in his speech Tuesday that he 
was still awaiting “a signal”. from the 
government ‘Tmnot saying it’s take it 
or leave it, but die government most take 
into account at least one of our pro- 
posals," Mr. Bertmotti said. 

. Addressing Parliament on Tuesday, 
Mr. Prodi said that reforming the wel- 
fare state was “the last and mdispeos- 
able step on onr march toward Europe." 
The government, he added, “cannot 
. yield on this.” 

After stressing his achievements in 
making Italy eligible to launch the euro 
by pushing through deficit-reduction 
measures totaling 100 trillion lire ($58 
billion} and bringing inflation down to 
1.4 percent, Mr. Prodi warned that “the 
Italians don't want to go back to con- 
tinually shifting coalitions and unstab le 
government" 

If Mr. Prodi’s government collapses, 
it would be the second in Europe to fall 
over issues related to monetary union. 
Last May in France, the government of 
Prime Minister Alain Juppe was de- 
feated in a vote that , highlighted the 
public’s resistance to sacrifices imposed 
in the name of the tough conditions 
contained in the Maastricht treaty on the 
single currency. 

In Lisboa on Tuesday, die European 
See ITALY, Page 8 


Bonn Set to Clear Funds 
For the Eurofighter 2000 


By Joseph Fitchett 

international Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The German government 
is set to approve funding Wednesday for 
the Euronghter, clearing the biggest 
outstanding hurdle to production of a 
2 1 st-century warplane for Britain, Ger- 
many, Italy and Spain. 

Officials said Tuesday that Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl had finally overruled 
objections from Finance Minister Theo 
Waigei and ordered 180 Eurofighters — 
nearly 100 fewer than originally 
planned but enough to satisfy Defense 
Minister Volker Ruehe. 

Mr. Waigei had resisted the purchase 
at a time when he was trying to cu rb 
spending to ensure that the German 
budget qualifies for the single European 
currency. But Daimler-Benz 
Aerospace, the German arm of the four- 
nation group that will build the plane, 
argued that the jobs and technological 
payoff were indispensable to the future 


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of the company and a German place in a 
European aircraft industry. 

Another crucial factor in die Bonn’s 
decision was the announcement this sum- 
mer by the British government. Ger- 
many’s main partner in die venture, that it 
would build more than 200 Eurofighters 
on its own if necessary, costing Germany 
millions in lost development expendit- 
ures. Prime Minister Tony Biair’s de- 
cision meant that Bonn would see Lon- 
don gamer the sole profit from the 
development investment unless the 
Luftwaffe also bought the plane. 

The Eurofighter order promises sig- 
nificant industrial and political benefits 
far Europe’s ambitions to strengthen it- 
self militarily in die face of U.S. pre- 
dominance in power. A primepayon is 
jobs — probably more than 30,000 across 
Europe — linked to Eurofighter over the 
next decade. It will be die first combat 
plane in wide service in Europe dial pilots 
will “fly by wire," depending on ex- 
tensive computer assistance for maxim- 
umperformance in difficult maneuvers. 

The German decision will also help 
preserve die cohesion of Europe’s de- 
fense industries, which are reeling from 
budget cuts and intensifying US. con- 
petition. The Eurofighter will enable al- 
lied governments to field a competitor for 
sales to NATO countries, including pro- 
spective new allies in Central Europe. 

Lockheed-Martin of the United States 
is almost alone in the market with its 
upgraded F-16 Fighting Falcon. Al- 

S the plane’s electronics make it a 
for any potential foe. Luftwaffe 
pilots would prefer a “fly by wire” plane. 
The Eurofighter fits that bill As a twin- 
engined, muitirole plane, it also over- 

See FIGHTER, Page 6 




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Mat Ft0aidecf(HemaUM«l KenU Trihwie 

A shopper checking out a video camera Tuesday at an electronics store 
in Kuala Lumpur, the bargain hunter’s paradise in Southeast Asia. 


A Currency Crisis Fire Sale 

Malaysia and Thailand Offer Bargain Hunter’s Par adis e' 


By Thomas Fuller 

International Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — Attention 
shoppers! The- Southeast Asian sale of 
the decade is on! Bay now while sup- 
plies last! 

Foreign buyers aimed with a strong 
U.S. dollar in Malaysia and Thailand are 
getting unexpected bargains these days. 

Retail outlets in Southeast Asia are 
loaded with goods that were stocked 
before die region's currency crisis erup- 
ted in July. Prices for many of these 
items — everything from video cameras 
and computers to suits by Givenchy — 
have not changed since then, making 
them quite a bit cheaper in dollar 
terms. 

That prices in countries with a 
weakened currency are cheaper today in 
dollar terms is an obvious economic fact 
But the real surprise for foreign shoppers 
is the value of imported goods. 


A leather pair of British-made Dr. 
Martens boots, for instance, sells at foe 
Sogo department store in Knala Lumpur 
far 239 ringgit. 

Before foe crisis, when foe ringgit 
was 2^2 to foe dollar, that, translated 
into about $95.' 

But today foe ringgit is worth 3.25 to 
the dollar, so the shoes cost $74. A 
similar model in the United States re- 
tails for more than $100. 

“Most of foe articles in the store are 
old stock," said Fanny Chai, a depart- 
ment manager at Sogo. “This is a good 
time to buy." 

Retailers and suppliers in Malaysia 
have been loathe to raise prices after 
government warnings against profiting 
from the crisis. _ 

A government official said Monday 
that retailers that wanted to raise their 
prices most prove the need to foe Min- 

See BARGAINS, Page 8 


Japan War Veterans Now Speaking of the Unspeakable 


By Sonni Efron 

Lta Angeles Times Service ' 

TOKYO — With a quavering voice, Yutaka Mio, 
83, told a Tokyo courtroom last week of the atrocities 
he committed as a Japanese military police officer in 
Manchuria during World War II. 

“I tortured him by holding acandle flame to his feet, 
but he didn’t say anything," said Mr. Mio, identifying 
from sepia photographs two Chinese prisoners he tried 
to force to confess to being Communist spies in 
1941. 

He told a three-judge panel that, despite doubts 
about their guilt, he handed the men over to the 
notorious Unit 73 1 , where they died as human guinea 


pigs in Japan's top-secret biological warfare pro- 
gram. 

“1 feel that I’m the one who murdered them." Mr. 
Mio said.. He called on foe Japanese government to 

A French war crimes Suspect, Maurice Papon, 
surrenders on the eve of his trhL Page 6. 

apologize and pay $826,000 to their bereaved fam- 


Dozens or Japanese veterans at? at last beginning to 
unburden themselves of their war guilt, delivering 
confessional lectures and publishing books with such 
titles as “Die Hell I Fell Into." 


But Mr. Mio is the first to describe his atrocities in 
court, according to his lawyers. 

Last week’s legal scene was made possible by an 
extraordinary collaboration between Chinese who 
claim they were victims of Japanese aggression and a 
group of Japanese lawyers and activists who believe 
Japan has yet to shoulder foil responsibility for its war 
crimes and so are helping their neighbors sue the 
Japanese government. 

The Justice Ministiy says that 38 civil lawsuits filed 
since 1991 hy Chinese, Koreans and Filipinos, as well 
as by former prisoners of warfrom foe United States 
' and foe other Allied countries, are working foeir way 

See JAPAN, Page 8 


■ i 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 




PAGE TWO 


Mothers at 12 / Community Health Care 


In Ethiopia, a Midwife’s Role Goes Beyond Babies 


By Stephen Buckley 

Mufoigtoa Post Servire 


T ULA Ethiopia : — ■ Haaa Yohanes, eight ' 
months pregnant, . thought her baby 
®ight be dead. She’couid not feel the 

‘How we you feeling? Are yon ready to 
wiver? Are yonfeding sick?’ 7 asked Tamunie 
Hegisso, a traditional midwife, bush nurse and 
arguably the most important person in this vil- 
lage 265 kilometers sooth of Addis Ababa, 
Ethiopia’s cap ital 

“The baby has stopped moving,” Hana 
replied. 

Tamunie pressed her head to the 20-year-old 
woman’s belly. Then she pushed on it wife both 
hands. Again, she rested her head on Hana’s 
belly. 

There were five small children in fee hut, four 
of them belonging to Shorro Bekele, Hana’s 
neighbor and close friend, who also was preg- 
nant. The children stood quiet and wide-eyed. 

Someone lit a s mall fire in fee late-afternoon 
darkness, illuminating Hana’s worried brown 
eyes. Her husband, in the middle of the hut, 
nibbed a hand over his face, distressed. 

“Try to save hfer life," be said. “I’ll do what 
you say.” 

Tamunie said they must take Hana to a nearby 
clinic. “It’s my duty to save lives," she stud, 
before everyone rushed out of fee hut 
Tamunie, 61 , has delivered babies here for 32 
years. She has delivered the grandchildren a nd 
great-grandchildren of some of her fellow vil- 
lagers. She helps wife fee births of about 100 
babies a year. 

But she does more than deliver babies. She 
provides the .village women wife regular pren- 
atal checkups, offers workshops at the church, 
and examines neighbors’ babies when they come 
down sick. 

Everyone in this villag e of cactus plants and 
coffee fields seems to know fee woman wife fee 
joyful brown eyes. Her angular face framed by a 
head of tight black curls, she often breaks into 
sudden grins. Her large, strong hands are seem- 
ingly in perpetual motion. She slaps her fist into 
her palm when she makes a point She hugs 
strangers. 

“She comes and helps me all fee time,” Hana 
said later through an interpreter. "Even her 
touch is like medicine for me. When she treats 
me, it’s like someone has given me money." 

Traditional birth attendants, fee formal title 
for people such as Tamuaie, “are considered 
more important than an educator or agricul- 
turalist,” said Dawit Mengistu, director of an 
institute in nearby Awassa that trains health 
professionals. "She is held in high status." 

She is held in even higher status these days after 
receiving formal, government-sponsored t raining 
from fee institute. She got dps on how to deliver 
babies safely, how to advise mothers — expecting 
and otherwise — on various issues, and she was 
given equipment to help her do her work. 



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Tamunie Hegisso sucking the belly of a newborn child to “move the liver.*' She 
also provides Ethiopian village women with regular prenatal checkups, offers 
workshops at the church, and examines neighbors ’ babies when they get sick. 


S 


UCH EFFORTS over fee past decade 
have helped Ethiopia slash its infant 
mortality rate — fee number of deaths of 
children in the first year of life — from 
about 250 per thousand live births to 160. The 
government also has doubled its spending on 
health care and has placed greater emphasis on 
educating girls. But this East African country, 
which has one of fee highest fertility rales in sub- 
Saharan Africa, is still a long way from its health 
care goals. 

Foremost among fee country’s problems is a 
lack of health facilities; only 4$ percent of 
Ethiopians have access to a clinic or hospital. 
This dearth means that poor prenatal care and 
routine childhood illnesses till many children. 

And fee fertility rate itself — fee average 


family has seven children — is a problem. 
Health experts say feat the fewer children a 
woman has, the more likely it is they will sur- 
vive. 

It also does not help that sometimes girls here 
are as young as 12 when they have their first 
child. Forced marriages for preadolescents, 
combined wife female circumcision, often cause 
crushing damage to both mother and child. 

“When they are children, their bodies are not 
mature enough,” said Sister Iqbal Mangha, ad- 
ministrator of a health center run by fee Roman 
Catholic Church in fee nearby town of Bushido. 
“We have girls 1 1, 12, 13 here who have babies 
under their belt. Then she’s producing babies, 
every year.” 

Shorro, Hana's close friend, is 26. She had her 


first child at 11 She hadgiven bnth' tb five other, 
children, and was now' nine months pregnant. 
She was not eager to give birth a seventh time. . 
One afternoon recently, she said, in front of her 
husband, Shetu: “I don’t want to have any mare 
children. He’s fee one who wants mote chil- 
dren." 

Shetu, defensive, replied: "What can we do?". 
It is God’s wilL" 

The day after that exchange, Tamunie went to 
check on Hana and Shurro. Hana sat up in bed, 
sipping coffee. The doctor at fee clinic Hana 
visited had seat her home but said be wanted to 
watch her condition closely. Meanwhile, she 
could feel fee ferns moving again. The bleeding 
had stopped. 


T 


j AMUNIE examined Hana before going 
to Shnrro’s but next door. There fee 
midwife made a quick check; fee baby 
was apparently moving welL Shurro - 
was feeling good.- 

Now Shetu and three other men — neighbors 
— watched Shurro toil on her knees, straining 
water from vegetables, pounding coffee beans, 
splitting firewood. She also was being observed 

Tadelech, one of Hana’s sisters. Tadelech is 

Like most everyone in Tula, these villagers 
are from the Sidama tribe, which holds that girls 
of Tadelech’s age are ready to bear children. If . 
she does not agree to be married, a young man 
probably will kidnap her. 

One of fee neighbors in fee but predicted feat ' 
a young man will abduct her soon. ^ ‘She’s going 
to be mar ried next year," fee man said, un- 
solicited. 

The girl, sitting against a pole in fee center of 
fee hut, did not respond. Hernair was a torrent of 
black ringlets. Her eyes 'were wide and serious. 

said Walana Warikof^ofonc of the men in fee 
hut ."If she doesn’t, she’ll be sent from fee 
house. We want our women to be pregnant" 

Then this fromHamara Bocku, 55: “ A lady is 
bom for fertility. The man wants to extend his 
generation. If fee wife does not give birth, his 
name cannot be extended." 

The next morning, Dawit, behind a desk 
choked wife documents and books, described 
Ethiopia's desperate battle to transform such 
attitudes. 

E sse ntial to changing these viewpoints is fee 
training provided by his organization, fee 
Awassa Health Professional Training Institute, 
which worked wife Tamunie for four weeks last 
March. 

Dawit said that traditional birth attendants, 
such as Tamunie, can articulate fee dangers of 
preadolescent marriage and pregnancy to Tula 
residents more effectively than any outsider. 
And they will listen to her. 

“People in the rural areas are very interested 
in being assisted by their own people,” be said. 
“If you give people a choice, they prefer the 
traditional birth attendant, who -knows the cul- 
ture and who knows them." 


Central Italy i 
Shaken Again 
By Aftershock 


The Associated Press 

ROME — A strong aftershock struck 
central Italy early Tuesday, hitting a re- 
gion battered by 11 days of continuing 
manors. At least four minor injuries were 
reported, along wife further damage to 
die Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi. 

The temblor, with a magnitude of 4.9 
on fee Richter scale, hit at 1:24 AM., 
the National Geophysics Institute said. 
That comparts with fee 5.7 readings of 
the first quakes , on Sept 26. 

It caused panic among fee 50,000 
people displaced by fee previous termors, 
who were sleeping in tents, campers and 
blic buildings as heavy rains fell in the 
iria and Marche regions. Many 
le who had recently returned to their 
es rushed out to sleep in their cars. 
Twin quakes on Sept. 26 killed 10 
le ana severely damaged fee basilica 
isL The Reverend Nicola Gian- 
domenico said more stones fell from the 
roof and fee south transept facade, or 
tympanum, in Tuesday’s aftershock. 

’ jThe situation has gotten worse, be- 
cause "fee shock was strong," Antonio 
Paolucci, a former culture minister and 
the official appointed to oversee the 
basilica’s restoration. 

“What worries us most is the tym- 
panum of fee left transept,” he said, 
referring to fee triangular external por- 
tion of fee wing. Most of fee outside 
stones of fee upper part of the tym- 
panum appeared to have fallen away. 

The entire tympanum “could fall 
down at any moment" he said, adding 
feat there was damage to a part of fee 
basilica’s cloister. 

The medieval tower of the town hall 
of Foligno, about a half-hour west of 
Assisi, also suffered further damage. 
ANSA said. 

Authorities have said fee series of 
quakes could cost more than $1 billion 
in repairs to buildings. 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 


French Transport Strike 'Widens sevice m and *<= starts by about so percent 


PARIS (Reuters') — France braced Tuesday for a 36- 
hour rail strike beginning at 8 PJvi. and a Paris Metro 
strike Wednesday. 

The state-owned railway company said train service 
was expected to be severely disrupted across fee country 
until 8 A.M. on Thursday, when the strike is set to end. 
Only Eurostar trains between Paris andLondon would be 
unaffected, fee railway company said. 

In Paris, Metro engineers and bus drivers are also due to 
begin a strike at 530 AM. on Wednesday, cutting Metro 


A senior court judge in Athens cm Tuesday ordered . 
a stop to all tunneling work on fee city’s new subway as 
one of fee city’s avenues was closed to traffic. (AP) 

Virtually all employees of Norway’s main airport 
will leave their posts on Wednesday, closing fee airport 
for 30 minutes during rush hour in a protest strike. (AP) 

Indian Airlines will increase its fares from 10.5 
percent to 14 percent starting Oct 15. ( Bloomberg ) 


Expensive Smoke 
For Regine’s Son 

Reuters 

BOSTON — The son of the Parisian 
nightclub entrepreneur Regine has 
pleaded guilty to charges he threatened 
an American Airlines’ flight crew over 
cigarette smoking. 

Lionel Rotcajg admitted Monday be- 
fore a U.S. District Court in Boston that 
he interfered wife the cabin crew in 
1996 on a flight from Paris to Miami, 
which was diverted to Boston as a result 
of fee incident 

Mri Rotcajg. a French music and reie j 
vision producer, agreed to pay Amer- 
ican Airlines $2,956, fee cost of di- 
verting the flight He also was fined 
$3,000. 

According to court documents, after 
being repeatedly cannoned to put out his 
cigarette, Mr. Rotcajg became unruly and 
threatened to shoot a flight attendant 

Mr. Rotcajg and his mother, Regine 
Choukroun, who owns nightclubs in 
Paris and New York, were held by fee 
police in Boston after the incident. 

Miss Choukroun allegedly came to 
the defense of her son and cursed the 
pilot, according to court documents. 
Charges filed against her were dis- 
missed in May 1996. 


€'•* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


,1 




6 Senate Panel 

To Clinton: 
Face Issues 

'flwinpson Calls Again 
for an Outside Inquiry 

G’WtvOvStfFnmDtyaciB 

WASHINGTON - The chauman of 
tue Sraaic investigation into fund-rais- 
*^ d Tue «iay that President 
ouiCLmtOQ should ‘‘step up to the plate 
and take responsibility’ 3 by requesting 
an independent prosecutor for the fund- 
raising investigation. 

1 “Nobody wants this to go down look- 
tike a successful cover-up,” said 

<J Thompson, Republican of 

Mr. Thompson chastised the White 
House for a belated disclosure over the 
weekend of White House video footage 
ofcoffecs with political donors — one 
showing Mr. Clinton meeting donors in 
the Oval Office. 

_ But the White House has given no 
sign of retreat on die issue of a special 
counsel, and on Monday it blamed a 
series of '‘inadvertent errors” few its 
failure to turn over videotapes of Pres- 
ident Clinton at 44 coffee gatherings. 

President Clinton said that die tapes 
had not been deliberately withheld from 
congressional and Justice Department 
investigators. 

| ) “I think it was just an accident," the 
'* president said of the lapse, during a brief 
exchange with reporters at an unrelated 
event 

The White House also produced the 
missing audio portion of a tape that 
shows John Huang, die Democratic 
fund-raiser, introducing Mr. Clinton to 
several business executives. 

The meeting in die White House Map 
Room, on June 18, 1996, included a 
□umber of people involved in hade with 
China. 

In one moment of clarity, Mr. Clinton 
is heard to say to Mr. Hoang. “Hi, 
John.” 

Republicans said die tapes provided 
• new evidence that government property 
was illegally used to help Democratic 
fund-raising. 

I The Justice Department last week 
said it did not believe Mr. Clinton or 
Vice President AI Gore violated any 
federal law with the coffees — but that 
was before the tapes came to light 

Harold Ickes, the framer White 
House aide who directed Mr. Clinton's 
fund-raising machine last year, was to 
testify Tuesday, and a robust defense of 
the campaign was expected. 

“Much of the criticism that has been 
leveled at the 1996 presidential cam-' 

Kfr. Ickes said in a prepared statement 

He accused Mr. Thompson’s com- 
mittee of trying to “tarnish the Demo- 
cratic Party in general, and President 
Clinton, and more pointedly, Vice Res- 
ident Gore." 

Making public months of personal 
frustration over delays in White House 
cooperation and criticism of his inves- 
tigation, Mr. Thompson accused pres- 
idential aides of “trying to run out the 
clock on this committee” by withhold- 
ing key evidence until the committee’s 
year-end deadline passes. 

"People leave the country; docu- 
ments are destroyed” and "trails get 
cold,” he said. 

The chairman demanded that Mr. 
Clinton request Attorney General Janet 
Reno to seek an independent counsel in 
the fund-raising inquiry, just as he did 
for the Whitewater investigation nearly 
four years ago. 

Fellow Republicans demanded Ms. 
Reno’s removal from the criminal in- 
vestigation. "I think we have clear-cut 
obstruction of Justice in the White 
House,” said Senator Aden Specter, 
Republican of Pennsylvania. 

But Senator Robert Torricelli, Demo- 
crat of New Jersey, stepped to Ms. 
Reno's defense. “The criticism she has 
received, the threats made against her 
are the political equivalent of an ob- 
struction of justice," be said. 

One Democrat, Senator Joseph 
Lieberman of Connecticut, suggested 
the committee should seek Senate per- 
mission to extend die investigation into 
next year because of the delays and 
failure of witness ' cooperation. 

Mr. Thompson opened the hearing by 
showing the lootage of Mr. Clinton with 
donors mside the Oval Office, and said 
if the video had been turned over earlier 
it might have affected the opinion on the 
legality of the coffees. 

The tapes showed one event where a 
donor tried unsuccessfully to offer the 
Democratic Party chairman five checks 
on the White House grounds and an- 
other in which donors woe brought into 
the Oval Office. 

Other footage showed an Indonesian 
gardener, Arief Wiriadinata, stiffly 
chairing Mr. Clinton’s hand and telling 
the president. “James Riady sent me.” 
Mr. Wiriadinata’s $225,000 donation 
was ultimately returned because of 
qurctiwis of legality- (AP.NYT) 


In New Hampshire 9 Women Now Steer the Ship of State 


By Carey Goldberg 

New York Times Service 


CONCORD, New Hampshire — Walk down 
the long, silent halls erf the New Hampshire State 
House, and important old m en with names 
Styles Bridges, Huntley Spaulding and Henry 
Quinby peer down at you from their oil portraits in 
musty dignify.. 

But enter the offices of the most powerful 
politicians in New Hampshire today, and sud- 
denly, that old world is turned mo st resoundingly 
on its brad. 

For this granite-faced state is fast becoming the 
closest tiling the country has to a political mat- 
riarchy, run by the first tandem in American 
history of a female governor and a female speaker 
of the House. 

The deputy speaker is a woman as well, and 31 
percent of the seats in the Legislature are filled by 
women. 

Even though politicians here shy away from sex 
stereotypes, they say that the style in the 178-year- 


old State House has become decidedly Venusian 
of late, with a new emphasis on listening, in- 
clusion and compromise emanating from the gov- 
ernor's office. 

That, could be wby things are running so well, 
they say, because by the usual political measures, 
there should be a big mess. 

Governor Jeanne Shabeen, whose auburn hair 
and virtuous demeanor call to mind the revamped 
torch-raising lady of Columbia Pictures, is a 
Democrat 

The Legislature is two-thirds Republican. And 

Donna Sytek. a House speaker known to speak her 

mind uustintingly, disagrees deeply with Mrs. 
Shaheen on issues like abortion and taxes. 

But although there have been wrangles, they 
have been civil ones, both sides say. In ter first 
* nine moothsin office, Mrs. Shaheen has managed 
to get enough done, from new public money for 
kindergartens to a generally acclaimed budget, to 
earn the highest approval rating of any politician 
in the state. 

She won with 57 percent of the vote, and recent 


polls show that she is more popular now than she 
was then. ' 

“I believe in consensus building,” Mrs. 
Shaheen, the first female governor of New Hamp- 
shire, said m an interview. "I think women tend to 
view decision-making in that way. So that’s cer- 
tainly been a focus for me, I flunk most people 
would agree I’m less confrontational than some of 
my predecessors have been.” 

Some of her predecessors would go even fur- 
ther. 

“The fact is, Jeanne Shaheen has had a much 
easier time than I did,” said ter predecessor as 
governor, Stephen Merrill, the popular tax-cutting 
Republican whose place she won after he chose 
not to run again. 

“She says, Tm the governor, they’re the Leg- 
islature; we’re working together for your best 
interest,’ ” he said. "When Iwas governor, I said, 
‘I’m Steve Merrill, I fight these people every day 

for you.' " 

Of course, some people, including Mrs. 
Shabeen herself, point out that with lawmakers so 


stacked against her by party affiliation, she had 
better find ways to get along, with them or she is 
sunk. But she also firmly believes, she said, that 
“no one party has a lock on the best answers.” 

Anita Perez Ferguson, president of the National 
Women's Political Caucus in Washington, said 
that Mix. Shaheen’s style and substance largely 
conformed to what national studies have reported 
about women in political power — they tend to 
focus on “service” issues, like health care and 
education, and that budgets in those areas tended 
to grow when they were in power. When women 
rule, she said, “communication and dialogue be- 
come less combative and there is a lot more 
collaboration across party lines.” 

At this point, Mrs. Shaheen is doing so well dial 
she is expected to be reelected next year, though 
a former United States senator, Gordon J. 
Humphrey, and several others arc expected to run, 
too. 

New Hampshire, which chooses its governor 
every two years, has never denied a second term to 
a sitting governor who wanted iL 


Canadian Envoy Resigns 
Over Remarks on Mexico 


By Mary Beth Sheridan 

Los Angeles Tones 

MEXICO C1T Y — The Canadian am- 
bassador to Mexico has been forced to 
step down after granting an interview in 
winch he labeled Mexico corrupt and 
described its war on drags as a. joke. 

“1 am an expert on the Middle East, 
and when I came here 1 thought I already 
knew everything about corruption,” the 
ambassador, Marc Perron, told a Mex- 
ican weekly newsmagazine, Milenio- 
“But Iwas mistaken.” 

Mr. Perron stepped down after the 
Mexican foreign minister, Jose Angel 
Guzria, called & Canadian counterpart 
to protest, the authorities said. 

Canada is Mexico’s No. 3 trading part- 
ner, and business between the two coun- 
tries has picked up since the North Amer- 
ican Free Trade Agreement took effect in 
1994. But unlike the United States, which 
has a history of disputes and wars with 
Mexico, Canada had enjoyed serene re- 
lations with its NAFTA partner. 

Mexicans, who are sensitive to whit 
they consider frequent condescending 


comments by U.S. officials, were taken 
aback by die ambassador’s criticism. 
“It's suiprising,” said Sergio Aguayo, 
a political scientist who writes about 
U.S. -Mexican relations. “The Cana- 
dians have been extremely discreet in 
their relations with the government.” 

In die interview, Mr. Perron praised 
Mexico’s transition toward democracy 
and its recovery from its economic crisis. 
But he complained that Canadian busi- 
nesses are sometimes at a disadvantage in 
Mexico because of corruption. 

“In Canada things are very clear, 
there’s a law,” he said. “But here it’s 
not like that It's ‘Look, the law says 
this, but if you give me something, then 
we’U make a deal.’ ’’ 

Mr. Perron was critical of Mexico's - 

fight agaillSt drug t rafficking , noting that 

the anti-drug mr l General Jesus Gu- 
tierrez ReboDo, was arrested after being 
accused of working for a top drug lord. 

"The authorities say, ‘Oh, yes, we are 
wor king on that,' and then they put a 
general at the head of the anti-drag fight 
and it turns out he’s a drag trafficker,” 
said Mr. Perron. “What a joke.” 



Iran Lashes Out at U.S. 

Tehran Criticizes Shift of Carrier to Gulf 


By Douglas Jehl 

New fork Times Service 


Ambassador Marc Perron said: 
“When I came here I thought I 
already knew everything about 
corruption. But I was mistaken.” 


TEHERAN — With the United 
States hurrying to reinforce its fleet in 
the Gulf, Iran redoubled a campaign 
across the region on Tuesday to un- 
dermine support for American control 
of the strategic waterway. 

The country’s new defease minis ter, 
Ali Sbamkhani. said toe Americas de- 
rision to dispatch toe aircraft carrier 
Nimilz to the uutf ahead of schedule was 
nothing more than an attempt by the 
United Slates “to justify its presence.” 

U.S. officials have tailed the move a 
warnin g to both ban and Iraq to refrain 
from moves that could lead to renewed 
conflict between the two countries. But 
Iran is trying to steer sentiment toward 
the view that the dispatch of toe aircraft 
carrier represented another American 
overreaction. 

The new Iranian government of Pres- 
ident Mohammed Khatemi is giv ing a 
high priority to efforts to mend fences 
with its neighbors in the Gulf, which 
have been tattered since toe I ranian rev- 
olution 18 years ago. 


Nearly all of toon — including 
Kuwait, Bahrain and the United Arab 
Emirates — have provided ports or oth- 
er support for an American military 
presence in the Gulf that has expanded 
greatly over toe last six years. 

The United States has said toe pur- 
pose of that buildup has been to head off 
any hostile action by Iran or Iraq against 
one another or their neighbors. But Iran 
appears intent on exploiting public 
opinion in many of those' countries that 
has proven far less s upp o rti ve of toe 


POLITICAL 


President Johnson’s Doubts 

WASHINGTON — Lyndon B. Johnson, des- 
pairing'owerpersonal attacks and worried that the 
Democratic Party would split along racial lines be- 
cause of toe civil rights movement, drafted a state- 
ment before toe party’s 1964 convention bemoaning 
his own shortcomings as a leader and saying he 
would be “absolutely unavailable” as a candidate 
for president, according to a new boric of Johnson 
White House tapes. 

“I am absolutely positive that 1 cannot lead the 
Sooth and the North,” Mr. Johnson told George 
Reedy, his press secretary, during an Oval Office 
conversation on Aug. 25, 1964. “I am very con- 
vinced that toe Negroes will not listen to me. They 
are not going to follow a white Southerner. And I 
think the stakes are too big to try to compromise.” 

Twenty minutes later, Mr. Johnson told another 
aide, Walter Jenkins, that although he would be 
accused of “cowardice” for not running, “I’ve had 
doubts about whether a man bora where I was bom, 
raised like I was raised, could ever satisfy toe North- 
ern Jews and Catholics and union people.” 

During his six years in the White House, Mr. 
Johnson taped not only his telephone conversations 
but also selected Oval Office meetings. Tapes re- 
cently made public have provided insight into Mr. 
Johnson’s public positions and private inusings on 


themes from the escalation of the war in Vie tnam to 
the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. 

Several previously unscrutinized tapes are in- 
cluded in ‘ Taking Charge; The Johnson White House 
Tapes, 1963-1964.” a new book editetoby Michael 
Beschloss that is the most comprehensive collection 
so far of transcripts from Mr. Johnson’s- tapes. 

The transcripts in the book, mostly taken from 
conversations during Mr. Johnson's first nine 
months in office, catch the former president in vari- 
ous poses of deal-making, manipulation, good hu- 
mor, self doubt, suspicion and reflection on his place 
in history. 


place 
r WP ) 


No Ruling on Campaign Ads 

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court has 
sidestepped one of the most contested points in 
American political campaigns today, how much gov- 
ernment can regulate campaign advertising focused 
on abortion, gun control and other issues without 
violating free speech rights. 

On toe first day of toe new term Monday, as they 
rejected appeals in hundreds of cases, tire justices 
tinned away a Federal Election Commission request 
that the court review a rale governing ads that 
address the issues of the day but also could wind up 
aiding in the election or defeat of particular can- 
didates. 


“Issue advocacy ” by interest groups often targets 
members of Congress but stops short of specifically 
urging voters to elect or defeat the law makers named. 
The myriad groups that engage in such advertising, 
from labor to business, have become a powerful farce 
in politics by spending money to influence races 
while being free of election law disclosure require- 
ments and limits on contributions. 

.In a varied day of Supreme Court business, the 
justices also rejected appeals by California and Ari- 
zona seeking billions of dollars from toe U.S. gov- 
ernment to cover costs of illegal immigration. 

In addition, toe high court spurned, without corn- 
meat. a constitutional challenge to the Clinton ad- 
ministration's “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on gays 
in the military. 

It was the third rejection in the last year of appeals 
by people who had been discharged because of their 
sexual orientation. (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Fred Thompson, chairman of toe Senate inves- 
tigation into fund-raising abuses, urging Resident 
Bill Clinton to request an independent prosecutor for 
the inquiry “This committee has tried to be fair to 
you, Mr. President. I’ve taken an awful lot of crit- 
icism. Now, I think toe American people expect you 
to step up to the plate and take responsibility.’VAPl 


In anticipation of a Golf tour that 
Foreign Minister Kamal Khanazi of Iran 
is scheduled to make in craning weeks, 
Iranian newspapers gave prominent at- 
tention Tuesday to an editorial in a 
United Arab Emirates newspaper ques- 
tioning the need fra American haste in 
dispatching the Nimilz, whose scheduled 
port call in Singapore was canceled so 
that toe task force could arrive in toe Gulf 
four or five days ahead of schedule. 

At a news conference Tuesday, die 
new defense minis ter, Mr. Shamkhani, 
told reporters that Iran would begin a 
major naval exercise in the Gulf this 
week to demonstrate that the countries 
on its shores “can defend their sov- 
ereignty without any outside power.” 

He said the exercise would include at 
least 150 naval vessels. As toe United 
States has added to its firepower in toe 
Gulf, Iran has also su bstantiall y im- 
proved its naval capabilities in recent 
years, in part through the acquisition of 
three Russian-made, submarines and 
new anti -ship missil e systems. 

American officials say that Iran now 
has the capacity to halt temporarily but 
not to shut down shipping traffic in toe 
Gulf, toe channel for more than half of 
the world’s supply of oiL 

In announcing that the annual 10-day 
exercise would begin on Thursday. Mr. 
Sbamkhani said he did not expect that 
the Iranian operations in toe northern 
part of toe Guf would clash in any way 
with toe expected arrival of the NImitz 
and its seven-vessel battle group within 
a week. 

Despite American protests, the de- 
fense minister issued a staunch defense 
of Iran’s decision last week to launch air 
raids on the bases of Iranian rebels who 
operate from Iraqi territory. He min- 
imized toe prospect of a flare-up be- 
tween Iran and Iraq, which were at war 
from 1980 to 1988. saying that be did 
not believe toe Baghdad government 
gave much importance on the rebel 
group, the Mujahidin Khalq. 


Mary Gold, 88, Dies; fBI Ties Health Care Firm to ‘Systemic’ Fraud 

Aided Fleeing Jews 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Maty Jayne Gold, 88, an American 
socialite who helped the painters Marc Chagall, 
Max Erast and about 2.000 Jews and other anti- 
Nazis escape from occupied France during World 
War n, died Sunday near Saint Tropez. She had 
pancreatic cancer 

The Chicago heiress, who used some of her 
fortune to finance toe flight , of artists and in- 
tellectuals, joined the Paris high life in toe 1930s 
with a large trust fund and fled to unoccupied 
southern France after the Germans invaded in 
1940. There she met an American journalist, Vari- 
anFry. 

“He was a Harvard man and a bona fide WASP 
just tike me,” Ms. Gold once said in an interview. 
The two organized toe Emergency Rescue Com- 
mittee in Marseille, arranging fake passports, shel- 
tering refugees and organizing escape routes to 
Spain and Portugal. 

Among others she aided were Jacques Lipchitz, 
toe sculptor; toe writers Franz Werfel, Hannah 
Arendt and Hans Habe, and a Nobel prize-winning 
biochemist, Otto Meyerhof. ( AP ) 


By David S. Hilzenratb 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
nation’s largest health care 
company, Columbia/HCA 
Healthcare .Corp., engaged in 
“a systemic corporate 
scheme” to defraud Medicare 
and other government health 
insurance programs, the FBI 
has charged in an affidavit 

The scheme was ‘‘perpet- 
rated by corporate officers” 
as well as managers of hos- 
pitals, home health agencies 
and other facilities operated 
by Columbia, an FBI special 
agent, Joseph L. Ford, said in 
toe affidavit, which was un- 
sealed Monday. 

The statement contained 
the government’s strongest 
assertions yet in a wide-rang- 
ing probe of Columbia. It was 
unsealed in the case of three 
mid-level Columbia execu- 


tives indicted in Jane for 




A Columbia spokesman 
said he was unable to respond 
to the specific allegations in 
the affidavit. The company 
said previously that its intern- 
al investigations had found 
“no systemic evidence of 
wrongdoing.” 

David D. Aufhauser, an at- 
torney for Richard L. Scott 
who resigned in July as the 
Columbia chairman and chief 
executive, said affidavits 
were not required to meet the 
standards for evidence 
presented at trial. 

“They ’ re not subject to the 

crucible of cross-examina- 
tion,” toe attorney said. I 
“They frequently contain 
nothing more than the rankest | 
kind of hearsay.” 

. Citing unidentified inform- 
ants previously or currently 
employed by toe company, I 


the affidavit said Columbia 
hospitals had inflated revenue 
by millions of dollars, listed 
fictitious expenses, shifted 
costs such as advertising ex- 
penditures from hospitals to 
home health agencies and 
sought hospital -care reim- 
bursement for patients who 
did not enter a hospital. 

Under federal law, whistle- 
blowers are entitled to a share 
of any money they help toe 
government recover in fraud 
cases. 

According to the affidavit. 


several Columbia executives 
discussed ways to prevent a 
Medicare auditor from dis- 
covering a reimbursement er- 
ror that was m Columbia’s 
favor, and one of them al- 
legedly proposed offering a 
job to the auditor. 

The affidavit was used to 
obtain search warrants'before 
investigators seized records 
at more than 30 Columbia of- 
fices and other facilities in 
July. The affidavit claimed 
the government had probable 
canse to believe- die searches 


would reveal evidence of 
criminal violations, including 
conspiracy, false claims, mail 
fraud, affidavit fraud and 
health care fraud. 

If Columbia is ultimately 
charged with health care 
fraud and is found guilty, it 
would face a five-year exclu- 
sion from Medicare, the fed- 
eral insurance program for toe 
elderly. 

Last year, this program 
brought in more than a third 
of toe company’s nearly $20 
billion in revenue. 


Away From Politics 


The health of children in the United 
States has worsened in terms of obesity, 
physical activity and low birth weight, ac- 
cording to an annual report by the American 
Health Foundation. But overall, the report 
gave the state of children’s health m Amer- 
ica a grade of “C” - which a a Mi 

improvement over the “C-rnmus’ that toe 

health-evaluation program came up with 
last year. (AF) 

An E- coti outbreak has sickened nearly 
20 students in Parkersburg. low 3 - The 
school ’s cafeteria was suspected. Three stu- 

released. Tests on toe three confirmed the 
presence of E. coti bacteria. (AP) 


The U.S. Postal Service has begun ac- 
cepting credit cards at 32,000 post offices. 
making it America’s largest retailer ac- 
cepting such payment. The post office and 
NationsBank of Charlotte, North Carolina, 
installed 60.000 card terminals across toe 
country and trained 100,000 workers to 
handle toe system. (AP) 

Two armed robbers stormed a gun shop 
in Greenwood, Indiana, killed toe clerk 
and made off with an arsenal of high- 
powered weapons, including assault-style 
rifles. The police suspect drat some illicit, 
militia-type organization was likely in- 
volved because no money was taken from 
toe shop, only guns. (AP) 


Don t miss 
the upcoming 
Special Report on 

International 

Education 

on October I I- IV ( )7 



THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 



if -A* 


t 






PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 


-s.-aa 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Thailand Extradites Key Suspect in Alien-Smuggling Ring 


By William Branigin 

Kington Pag Service 

. WASHINGTON-Afterafonr-year 
American authorities 
tave taken into custody a Taiwan man 
say tiled to smuggle neariy 300 
OHocse illegal aliens into the United 
States aboard the ship Golden Venture. 

Lee Peng Fei, 47, who allegedly ran 
one of the world's most notorious alien- 
smuggling rings firom Thailand, was ex- 
ttnditKl by the Thai government to the 
United States last week and arraigned in 
federal court in New York on Monday. 

He pleaded not guitar to 10 federal 
charges, including one homicide count 


for each of at least six Chinese who 
drowned while trying to swim to shore 
after the Golden Venture ran aground 
off New York City four years ago. If 
convicted, Mr. Lee faces np to 80 years 
in prison and $2.5 million in fines, pros- 
ecutors said. 

The dramatic offshore scene, com-, 
bined with a series of Other smuggling 
attempts, raised concerns that the 
United States was facing a deluge of 
long-distance Chinese “boat people” 
and spurted countermeasures to track 
and intercept die freighters at sea. At- 
tention then shifted largely to the plight 
of the Golden Venture passengers, 
many of whom were detained for years 


in U.S. jails while their claims for polit- 
ical asylum were making their way 
through a heavily backlogged system. 

All but lost from view was the crim- 
inal conspiracy that launched the ship in 
die first place. 

Mr. Lee. alias “Char Lee” and “Ma 
Lee,’ 1 arranged the Golden Venture op- 
eration, which took the Chinese pas- 
sengers from Thailand to Kenya before 
heading for New York. Mr. Lee was 
waiting for the freighter on a beach in 
Queens when it ran aground, federal 
prosecutors charged. When police and 
agents from the Immigration and Nat- 
uralization Service arrived to round up 
the Golden Venture's passengers and 


crew, Mr. Lee escaped and later made 
his way back to Thai land. 

As investigators unraveled, the com- 
plex smuggling operation, a federal 
grand jury in Brooklyn indicted Mr. Lee 
in August 1994. Acting on a UJS. ex- 
tradition request, Thai police arrested 
him in November 1995 in Bangkok. The 
Thai government finally ordered his ex- 
tradition in September after a long legal 
battle. 

Two years ago, the U.S. government 
estimated that as many as 50.000 
Chinese were being smuggled into the 
United States every year by various 
means in return for fees of $30,000 to 
$40,000 each. Many have been pressed 


into debt bondage upon their arrival, 
toiling in garment sweatshops, restaur- 
ants and other businesses.to pay off their 
snuggling fees. 

About 100 of the Golden Venture 
passengers wereireturwcfllfiw Chinas a 
dozen 'were taken in by Latin American 
countries, and most of the rest *werc 
granted asylum, paroled into die United 
States for humanitarian reasons or oth- 
erwise released from custody. 

Early this year, 53 still remained in 
detention. But all were freed following a 
decision in February by the Clinton ad- 
ministration to let them pursue their 
claims while living with sponsors under 
federal supervision. 


Korea Opposition Chief 
Accused of Corruption 

Presidential Favorite Tied to Slush Funds 


Reuters 

SEOUL — The governing New 
Korea Party said Tuesday dial it had 
.uncovered evidence that the opposition 
leader Kim Dae lung amassed more 
than 67 billion won in a political slush 
fund. 

Mr. Kim immediately denied the al- 
legation, saying, “It’s nonsense.” 

Kang Sam Jae, die secretary-general 
of New Korea, said the money, equiv- 
alent to $73 million, had been deposited 
in 365 false or proxy name accounts. 

Mr. Kim, the candidate of the Na- 
; tional Congress for New Politics, is the 
leader in most opinion polls for die 
December presidential election, with 
about 30 percent support. 

Mr. Kang accused Mr. Kim of getting 
help from South Korean conglomerates, 
or chaebol. 

“Another shocking factor we found 
is that some chaebol and people in the 
curb market,” Mr. Kang said, referring 
to unofficial trade in stocks, “illegally 
helped Kim transfer abont 6.2 billion 
won, some of it left over from Kim's 
election funds in 1992, to real name 
accounts.” 

The National Congress for New Pol- 
itics attacked the allegation as political 
maneuvering. 

“It's totally groundless,'’ the party 
said, saying dial New Korea “has re- 
sorted to mud-slinging.” 

Lee Hoi Chang, the governing party’s 
presidential candidate, is running thud 
in opinion polls behind Mr. Kim and 
Rhee In Je, who quit New Korea after 
failing to win its nomination. 

In a bid to unify his divided party 
before die Dec. 18 election, Mr. Lee 
replaced President Kim Young Sam as 
hud of New Korea at a hastily called 
convention last week. President Kim is 
’ constitutionally barred from seeking a 
second term. 

Kim Dae Jung revealed in 1995 that 
■former President Roh Tae Woo had 
given him 2 billion won around the time 
of the 199 L election campaign, when he 
was running against Kim Young Sam. 


Mr. Roh admitted that he had ac- 
cumulated a political slush fund, saying 
the money was used to “help carry out 
state policies smoothly. ' * He and another 
former president. Chon Doo Hwan, are 
in prison after being convicted of 
mutiny, treason and corruption. 

Mr. Kang accused Kim Dae Jung of 
receiving much more than the 2 billion 
won he got from Mr. Roh. 

Waving photocopies of vouchers and 
bank checks, Mr. Knng said New Korea 
had discovered that Mr. Roh had given 
another 630 milli on won to the op- 
position leader. 

“He must resign as presidential can- 
didate and volunteer for public and legal 
judgment,” Mr. Kang said, calling on 
state prosecutors to investigate the case. 

■ Koreas Resume Air Talks 

South and North Korea resumed avi- 
ation talks Tuesday and removed a key 
stumbling block, clearing the way to 
open their skies to each other’s flights, 
Seoul officials said. The Associated 
Press reported. 

North Korea agreed last year to open 
its airspace to all countries ' airlines. The 
annual savings are expected to exceed 
$ 125 million as airlines will be able to fly 
shorter routes by no longer having to 
avoid the area. North Korea is expected to 
gam $5 million a year in overflight fees. 

But aviation relics between Seoul and 
Pyongyang stalled because of differ- 
ences over communications and other 
key issues. 

The breakthrough Tuesday came in a 
meeting in Bangkok when Pyongyang 
accepted Seoul's demand that air traffic 
control towers of the two sides com- 
municate through surface telephone 
lines crossing their border. Foreign 
Ministry officials said. 

The North had insisted on using satel- 
lite connections, as it tends to avoid 
direct communications with the South. 

Seoul and Pyongyang remain tech- 
nically at war, as they have never signed 
a peace treaty ending the 1950-53 Kor- 
ean War. 



BURNING BRUSH — A Dayak tribeswoman passing a fire on the Indonesian p art of Borneo island near the 
Wanariset rehabilitation center for orangutans. The World Wide Fund for Nature says Mazes in the region, 
which are key contributors to the haze over Southeast Asia, have killed at least 29 of the endangered apes. 


Cambodia Is Still Like a 4 Frog in the Well’ 


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THE WORLD* OUUT NEWSPAPER 


The Associated Press 

PHNOM PENH — Scavenging 
through die mangled corpses at the site 
of an air crash last mouth, Cambodian 
villagers and rescue workers emptied 
pockets of the victims, carted away lug- 
gage. and tried on clothes of the dead. 

Some went to a nearby pagoda — at 
night so that jealous neighbors would 
not see and target them for robbery — to 
receive blessings to counter any bad 
fonnne from their newly acquired 
goods. 

“It was like a stroke of good luck for 
a lot of people around here,” said Sras 
Kong, who lives by the site of the Vi- 
etnam Airlines crash near Phnom 
Penh’s airport that killed 64 people on 
Sept 3. 

Cambodia has no long tradition of 
civil society, and crashed planes bave 
been looted elsewhere. But the post- 
crash scene graphically shows how de- 
cades of war — carpet bombing by the 
United States in the early 1970s, the 
Khmer Roage genocide from 1975-79, 
military occupation by Vietnam in the 
1 980s and a bloody coup in July — have 
shredded the social fabric. 

Institutions that traditionally foster a 
sense of community and build values 
bave been destroyed. Parents have con- 
fused ideas of right and wrong. Teach- 1 
ers, underpaid and uneducated, are open 
to bribes. Buddhist monks are mostly 
young and unlearned. Corrupt police are 
feared more than robbers. And judges 
rule according to politics or payoffs. 

“There is a survival mentality,” said 
Ellen Minotti. of the Social Services of 
Cambodia, which provides health care 


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Decades of War Keep 
People Peering Inward 

to the mentally ilL “Anything you can 
get away with, you do.” 

Sociologists note that there was a 
sense of personal isolation among Cam- 
bodians before the country was dragged 
into the Vietnam War. Bat Cambodians 
and interested outsiders hope that if a 
long period of peace ever returns, a 
sense of common morality may be nur- 
tured. 

Willem Van De Pat, project director 
of IPSER, a community mental-health 
program, hopes that in coming years 
village chiefs, traditional healers, 
monks,- teachers and others can again 
become useful parts of society. 

But the task is monumental, espe- 
cially after the Khmer Rouge, which 
purposefully obliterated all aspects of 
traditional Cambodia. 

The Maoist revolutionaries emptied 
the cities and herded people to the coun- 
tryside, to work as slaves in the rice 
fields. Families were separated and chil- 
dren indoctrinated to betray their par- 
ents. Schools were closed and intel- 
lectuals executed. Monks were killed or 
disrobed and pagodas used as death 
camps. 

More than a million Cambodians, 
perhaps as many as 2 million, out of a 
population of 7 million, died of star- 
vation, overwork, execution or illness. 

Mr. Van De Put said people were 
taught to think only of the revolution, 
with the result that tiiey learned to think 
only of themselves — to survive. Today, 
they still do not trust each other. 

Little was done in the decade after the 


BRIEFLY 


Afghan Opposition 
Says It Retook City 

KABUL — The Afghan opposition 
alliance said Tuesday that it had re- 
captured the strategic town of Hairatan, 
on the border of Afgha n ist an and the 
former Soviet republic of Uzbekistan, 
from die Talebaa Islamic militia. 

“Our forces captured Hairatan in an 
operation this afternoon,” an alliance 
spokesman said fay telephone from the 
northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif. 

No comment from the Taleban was 
available in Kabul. But a Pakistan- 
based Afghan press agency quoted 
Taleban sources as saying that the Is- 
lamic militia had left the town Monday 
night. The Taleban, which controls 
about two- thirds of Afghanistan, took 
Hairatan about three weeks ago. 

The town was the main border cross- 
ing between northern Afghanistan and 
the ex-Soviet Union until Uzbekistan 
closed it following a previous Taleban 
advance in the area in May. (Reuters) 

Rain in Indonesia 
Fails to Ease Smog 

SINGAPORE — Rain fell in a burn- 
ing region of Indonesia on Tuesday, 
Singapore glimpsed its first blue sky in 
two months and local authorities pre- 
dicted Southeast Asia's choking smog 
would not get any worse. 

But die smog closed the airport at 
Langkawi, a Malaysian holiday island, 
and the .Antara press agency reported 



Khmer Ronge fell to reconstruct all that 
was destroyed, leaving people uniquely 
vulnerable during a material boom of 
cash and growth in the early 1990s. 

After years of isolation and Com- 
munist economic policies, the interna- 
* tional community poured billions of 
dollars into Cambodia to hold elections 
in 1993. A rich elite quickly developed, 
1 but the vast majority remained desper- 
ately poor. 

After the elections, members of both 
parties in the coalition government lined 
their pockets from dubious business 
dealings like casinos, drug trafficking, 
logging and money In u ndo ing. 

And the July coup by Second Prime 
Minister Hun Sen against his co-prime 
minister, Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 
represented yet another setback in the 
efforts to heal a war-scarred psyche. 

“All violence is fear-producing,” 
said Robert Clarice of the American 
Friends Service Committee. “A lot of* 
fear interferes with normal community 
process.” 

An anesthesiologist, Keo Bony, said 
that the fighting in Jaly, followed by 
looting by Mr. Hun Sen’s victorious 
troops, dimmed the belief that Cam- 
bodia had become part of a larger in- 
ternational community. 

“We really are like the frog in the 
well,” said Miss Keo Bony, one of 20 
doctors and nurses who abandoned pa- 
tients at a hospital during the fighting to 
join her fanmy and protect her home 
from looters. 

The frog in the well, according to the 
popular Cambodian story, believes he is 
alone in the world, that the sky is limited 
to the small circle of blue he can see 
from his pool and that he is the only one 
that matters. 


The early morning rain, reported by 
residents in a town in Indonesia's 
Sumatra Province did nothing to help 
visibility or remove the thick smell of 
smoke from the air. 

But-tbe meteorological department in 
Jakarta forecast more rain over the 
town, Jambi, and other parts of Sumatra 
over the next few days, Antara report- 
ed. (Reuters l 

Mongolia Aid Deal 

TOKYO — Donor countries and in- 
ternational organizations pledged $250 
million Tuesday in a new aid package 
for Mongolia, in a strong message of 
support for its market economy reforms, 
officials at an aid conference said. 

The figure was $40 million more than 
the minimum sought by the World Bank 
and Japan, which shared the direction of 
a one-day meeting of the Mongolia As- 
sistance Group, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala 
of die World Bank said. The group 
.comprises 20 states, including the 
United States, Russia, China and South 
Korea, as well as six international or- 
ganizations, such as the International 
Monetary Fund, the European Union 
and the Asian Development Bank. 

“This aid package shows a strong 
support for the Mongolian govern- 
ment’s program, particularly its efforts 
to stabilize the economy,” Mr. Okonjo- 
Iweala. co-chairman of die meeting, 
said at a press conference. 

The package for 1998 was signif- 
icandy higher than the $212 million 
package for J 997. ( Reuters ) 

For the Record 

Robert Euthorn, deputy U.S. assist- 
ant secretaiy of state for nonproliferation, 
was holding talks in Beijing ahead of a 
U.S.-China summit meeting at the end of 
the month that is expected to clear the 
way for U.S. nuclear exports to China, 
officials said Tuesday. (Reuters) 

Ryutaro Uashimoto, prime minister 
of Japan, will visit Saudi Arabia from 
Nov. 7 to Nov. 10, the government said 
Tuesday. The talks are to focus on Ja- 
pan’s oil supplies and other bilateral 
issues. ( Reuters ) 

Surya Bahadur Thapa, the leader of f. 
a small royalist party, took over Toes- 
day as Nepal’s fourth prime minister in 
three years. (AP) 



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..PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNES DAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 

EUROPE 


;|Nazis Sent Swiss $2 Billion in Looted Gold, Jewish Group Says n c hy Official 


■ Uavid E. Sanger 



&£ZSHSJSff* tata -« 

fhPti 11 ?!? ^ cstimates ** more 
“55 S2 bdbon of the privately owned 
S°J“ ®od®d op in Swiss banks. 

*- Switzerland would now have to pay 
-_«wne $2 to $3 billion to compensate for 
^Jtang w looted gold,*' the report con- 
andes, much more than Swiss 
have so far indicated they would be will- 
lag to contribute to funds to benefit sur- 


vivors of the Holocaust and their heirs. 

The World Jewish Congress has been 
pressing Switzerland to release more 
information about its Nazi gold hold- 
ings, and the report, drawn from recently 
declassified documents mostly from the 
Federal Reserve System and the U.S. 
Treasury, -is clearly aimed at increasing 
that pressure. 

“This has descended into something 
of a legalistic argument,’* Elan Stein- 
bog, director of the congress, said Mon- 
day. “But the question. I think. is wheth- 
er it is ethical tor Switzerland to hold on 
to this money whatever the legal con- 
siderations.” 

A study issued by the Clinton ad- 
ministration this year came up with sim- 
ilar estimates of the amount of looted 
gold Nazi Germany seized during the 


! Building a New Berlin 

h-With an Eye on Fast, Present and Future, 
^Germans Debate the Architectural Frenzy 


? By Alan Cowell 

■ New York Times Service 

! BERLIN — Berlin sometimes seems 
i qnable to shake the impression that it is 
"■ no more than Europe Vbiggest construc- 
*tioo she; a cacophony of traffic and 
* cranes, a snail of Dumps and earth- 
movers gouging the foundations of what 
' is supposed to be a glittering metropolis 
to greet a new millennium. 

But beyond those images, a less ob- 
vious debate confronts planners and ar- 
chitects with a question that could be 
asked only in a land so burdened by its 
past How do you build a new Berlin 
without either reviving — or seeming to 
deny — history? 

“This discussion could only take 
place in Germany,” said Werner Sew- 
ing, a sociologist from Technical Uni- 
versity here. 

The debate is not just about relics of 
the Third Reich — like the building in 
the former East Berlin that once housed 
Goring 's Air Ministry, set to become a 
new Finance Ministry when the gov- 
ernment and Parliament start moving 
here from Bonn in two or three years. 

Hie discussion also encompasses 
geometric Communist-era architecture 
that elsewhere might be tore down on 
- .aesthetic and environmental grounds. It 
even reaches back to the baroque 
grandeur of the Berlin Palace, destroyed 
by the Communists after World War U, 
forcing planners to decide whether to 
destroy the past to escape it, or recreate it 
so as not to forget it 

“We lack a considered approach to 
baildings that are linked to the dark parts 


Tories Begin 
Conference 
With Therapy 

Ratters 

BLACKPOOL, England — The 
annual conference of Britain's Con- 
servative Party turned into a mass 
therapy session Tuesday as party 
members confronted die reasons for 
their crushing election defeat rive 
months ago. 

Rank-and-file members reserved 
their loudest applause of the first 
conference session for the new 
party leader, William Hague, and 
his predecessor, John Major, when 
they attributed their party’s defeat 
to years of infighting among its 
members of Parliament 

Mr. Major, whose six and a half 
years as prime minis ter were marred 
by repeated bloodletting over 
Europe, was greeted with a loud 
“No” when he suggested that per- 
haps he was responsible for the May 
1 election root at the hands of Tony 
Blair’s Labour Party that ended 18 
years of Conservative rule. 

“Reform the party, back William 
Hague, rediscover the art of work- 
ing together, fight every seat for 
every vote — or fight one another 
and lose elections,” Mr. Major 
said. 

The same theme was taken up by 
Mr. Hague, who is hoping to mend 
the party’s wounds over Europe by 
letting Conservative members of 
Parliament vote according to their 
conscience if and when the Labour 
government derides to join 
Europe's planned single currency. 


ue said. ”1 am sure many of you do 
too. So let’s not mince words. 
People thought we had lost touch 
with those we always claimed to 
represent 

“Our parliamentary party came 
to be seen as divided, arrogant, 
selfish and conceited,” he said. 
4 ‘Our party as a whole was regarded 
as out of touch and irrelevant Thai 
is the truth of it, and we have to 

come to terms with it.” 

It was an important speech for 
Mr. Hague, 36, who knows he must 
win the affection of his demoral- 
ized, cash-strapped party before he 
can shake up its organization and 
develop policies that might help it 
win re-election. ' 

An opinion poll this week said 
only one in five Britons were sat- 
isfied with his performance, and a 
sizable minority of Conservatives 
withheld their endorsement of him 
in a ballot conducted this summer. 
Although Mr. Hague was hacked by 
a margin of 4 to 1, only 1 80,000 out 
of 400.000 ballots sent to party 
members were returned. 


war and sou to Switzerland and other 
nations for safekeeping or to pay for war 
materiel. It also concluded that “mon- 
etary gold” — gold stolen from central 
banks — had been intermingled with 
“nonmonetary gold,” or gold taken 
from individuals, and, in some cases, 
tooth fillings of Holocaust victims. . 

The administration is already pressing 
other nations to turn over $68 million in 
gold to a survivors fond. That figure rep- 
resents the last of the gold still under the 
control of the Tripartite Gold Commis- 
sion, set up after world War B to return 
looted gold to Europe’s central banks. 

The $68 million is a tiny fraction of the 
gold distributed by the commission, but 
before it can be used for a survivors fend, 
nations with claims on gold lost during 
the war must renounce those claims. ' 


The World Jewish Congress report 
may place more pressure Swiss banks 
to make restitution payments, a tans that 
the banks themselves have refused to 
use. Instead, die banks have contributed 
to survivors fends created in Switzer- 
land. 

The largest of those funds requires 
approval in a national referendum, and 
Swiss officials have declined to set a 
date for the vote for fear that the measure 
could be defeated. 

■ Centra] Bank Offering Allowed 

The Swiss Parliament gave the go- 
ahead Tuesday for the central bank to 
donate 100 million francs ($69 million) 
to a fund to compensate Holocaust vic- 
tims and their heirs. The Associated 
Press reported from Geneva. 


The Council of States, or upper house, 
decided that the Swiss National Bank 
was allowed to make the donation with- 
out authorization from a national ref- 
erendum. 

The central, bank will add the money 
to a Holocaust compensation fund cod-. 
fining 17 Q mill ion francs given by 
private banks and industry. It was set up 
to ease criticism that banks were sitting 
on millions — if not billions — in Jewish 
assets. 

According to Swiss National Bank, 
figures, it bought gold worth Z.21 billion 
francs — at World War It era prices — 
from Nazi Germany’s central bank. The 
Swiss bank estimated last year that ithad 
earned 20 million francs in profit from 
gold dealings wife the German bank 
during the war era. 


Irf W 


ism 



A i- f • ; 


of our history,” said Klaus Wagenbach, a 
Berlin publisher. “We tend simply to 
dear historical s tumbling blocks out of 
the way.” 

Thai possibly explains why, eight 
years after its fall, barely a few hundred 
yards of the Berlin Wall still exist — and 
then only in out-of-the-way comers of 
the city. And Hitler’s bunker — closed 
to the public lest it become a neo-Nazi 
shrine — remains hi ririan by an on- 
marked grassy mound near the frenetic 
construction of die Potsdamer Plate. 

But nowhere is the debate over the past 
more divisive than in the Schlossplate in 
the former East Berlin, a wide open space 
at the other end of Unter den Linden, 
Berlin’s best-known boulevard, from die 
Brandenburg Gate. This vast space was 
dominated for centuries by the Berlin 
Palace, which was partly destroyed by 
Allied bombing in World War n and then 
obliterated by the East Gennan Com- 
munists in the early 1950s. In its place 
came the Palace of die Republic, a huge 
concrete-and-glass edifice designed as 
monument to socialist advance. 

But it was more than that for East 
Germans. “Everything that there was 
not in East Germany, you could find 
there,’ ’ said Peter Strieder, a senior city 
official overseeing Berlin's develop- 
ment “This was where people came for 
entertainment, pleasure, life.” 

It was also, choiring with asbestos, to 
die extent that said Barbara Jakubeit, a 
high-ranking city planner, it will have to 
be gutted over the next two years to 
remove toxic substances that are un- 
acceptable in a reunified Germany. 

And then what? “If we pull down the 
Palace of the Republic, we will be doing 
the same thing to a monument as the East 
Germans did to the Berlin Palace,” Miss 
Jakubeit said. 

Moreover, many East Germans, seven 
years after reunification, are still prickly 
abont theperceived superiority complex 
of West Germans and sensitive to West- 
ern suggestions that life before reuni- 
fication was third-rate. 

“The argument that the palace 
doesn’t have architectural quality means 
to Easterners; You weren’t good 
enough,” Mr. Strieder said. “People 
resist that” 

Some suggest that the facade of the 
Berlin Palace should be rebuilt wife a 
modem structure behind it. “Disney- 
land,” Mr. Strieder said dismissivdty, 
“a Potemkin facade.” 

Equally, though. Miss Jakubeit said, 
you “can’t put a department store” on 
fee historical heart of fee city, still 
defined by opera house and museums, 
cathedral and churches. 

The question is only one of many in a 
vast project of urban renewal. Here, two 
cities that had grown apart in four decades 
of Cold War division are supposed to be 
fused as one over the next five years. Even 
to create modem services, be said, is 
costing a fortune; $6 billion for fee water 
supply, $4 billion for the telephones and 
$25 billion for electricity and gas supply 
and garbage removal. Road, ran and canal 
connections to the rest of the country will 
absorb more than $40 billion in public 
money. Private investors are pouring 
some $16 billion a year into construction 
projects. 

“The transformation to modernity is 
going ahead at a blistering pace,” Mr. 
Strieder said. 

At Miss Jakubeh's offices in the former 
East Berlin, a scale model of the projected 
new city is laid out across most of fee 
ground floor, existing buildings marked 
in white plastic, new or projected edifices 
in brown wood. In many areas, fee two 
colors are evenly balanced. 

At fee Potsdamer Plate — a supposed 
bridge between East and West — huge 
buildings commissioned by Sony and 
Dahnkr-Benz claw for the sky. Wife 
some fanfare at a recent topping-out cer- 
emony, a latticed steel dome was placed 
atop the forma Reichstag building feat is 
to house fee Gennan Parliament from 
1999 — an architectural expression of fee 
future’s absorption of the past. 

Some projects are less advanced, 
paralyzed by division. Fifty-two years 
after World War II, no one seems able to 
decide on fee form of a tribute to Mar- 
lene Dietrich, let alone the shape of a 
memorial to victims of the Holocaust In 
all probability, the government’s move 
here will be delayed until the year 2000, 
some officials said. 

Even today, architects debate what the 
connotations of new government offices 
should be: Could solid designs be mis- 
interpreted as the monumentalism of Al- 
bert Speer's creations for Hitler? 

A reason for such debate, some say, is 
that after years of division Germans have 
yet to absorb their history into a common 
perception of fee past. As Mr. Wagenbach 
put it: “East and West still have contrary 
understandings, or at least a different 
knowledge, of Goman history.” 





* CiSwKi-.' • • • V : • •; S’.'- - . *:• 

j-.. 1 f -ir-’ 



Mgr - 


Man Kokkaivrfar > 


HUNGRY GODS — A truck filling a gaping hole Tuesday that opened up along an Athens avenue as a tunn el for 
the city’s new subway is bored beneath it A judge ordered a halt to tunneling after shopkeepers demanded that 
the construction company prove it was not endangering their property. A kiosk was swallowed over the weekend. 


Surrenders 
Before Trial 

The Associated Press 

BORDEAUX — Maurice Papon 
arrived at a French prison Tuesday 
to surrender on fee eve of his Nazi- 
era war crimes trial. 

Mr. Papon, 87, a former police 
supervisor in fee Bordeaux region, 
is the hi ghe st-ranking official of fee 
pro-NaziY chy government co face 
trial on complicity in the persecu- 
tion and deportation of Jews. 

He arrival at fee prison at 5:15 
P.M. in a gray sedan accompanied by 
a police convoy. He was required by 
law to tom hims elf in by 6 P.M. 

Mr. Papon was to spend fee night 
at the prison, then file a request in 
the morning to be free for fee re- 
mainder of fee triaL 

Eartier Tuesday, he lashed out at 
French judges and fee media for 
concocting a ‘‘prefabricated’’ trial 
that falsified history. 

In a statement issued by his law- 
yer, Mr. Papon condemned judges 
and the media, and he called the trial 
“a masquerade unworthy of a law- 
abiding state-” 

Mr. Papon, a former budget min- 
ister under President Valery Gis- 
card d’ Estaing , condemned fee trial 
for disregarding the conclusions of 
an honor jury of leading members of 
the French resistance and historians 
of fee period feat had found him not 
guilty of fee charges. 

■ Police Union Apologues 

France’s main police union ac- 
knowledged and begged forgive- 
ness Tuesday fra: fee role of officers 
in rounding up Jews for deportation 
to Nazi death camps under the 
Vichy government. Renters report- 
ed from Paris. 

“The SNPT recognizes that 
French police officers were accom- 
plices in fee deportation of Jews 
during fee occupation,” Andre Len- 
fanc, head of the National Union of 
Uniformed Police Officers, known 
by its French abbreviation, said in a 
letter to leaders of the 750,000- 
member French Jewish community 
“Those who committed the ignoble 
were not only a minority,” he said. 
“For them, we beg forgiveness.” 


Now the Hard Part: All-Party Talks Begin in Ulster 


The Associated Press 

BELFAST — Full-scale negotiations 
on die future of Northern Ireland began 
here Tuesday, wife deeply entrenched 
opponents eyeing each other over an 
ideological chasm. 

It was thefirst time since fee creation of 
the Northern Irish state in 1921 dial pro- 
British unionists and Roman Catholic na- 
tionalists soaring a united nation sat down 
wife the British and Irish governments to 
try to find agreement on fee future. 

Sinn Fein, fee political wing of the 
Irish Republican Army, entered fee dis- 
cussions committed to achieving an end 
to British rule of the province. The un- 
ionist parties were equally determined to 
remain a part of the United Kingdom. 

The IRA has been observing a cease- 
fire since July 20, clearing fee way for 
Sinn Fein to join fee peace talks. 


Sinn Fein iS’One of eight political 
parties participating in the talks. The 
Reverend Ian Paisley’s pro-British 
Democratic Unionist Party and fee UK 
Unionist Party are boycotting them be- 
cause of Sinn Fein’s participation. 

While Sinn Fein asserted that it was 
committed to ending the Northern Irish 
state, Gary McMichaeL leader of the 
Ulster Democratic Party, vowed Tuesday 
that Sinn Fein would be “dragged kick- 
ing and screaming” into the real world. 

He said the IRA’s 30 years of terrorism 
had not succeeded in smashing the union. 
“We are certainly not going into these 
talks to be talked out of fee union by Sinn 
Fein,” Mr. McMichael said. 

The Northern Ireland Political De- 
velopment Minister, Paul Murphy, said 
Monday night that fee government did 
not expect miracles, but be believed fee 


talks had a real opportunity of healing 
historic divisions. “It is important for 
people to be clear that nothing is ruled 
ont and nothing is ruled in in -nego- 
tiations,” he said. *~ r "■ ■ -»■• -• - 

Talks are to begin simultaneously on 
three key issues — fee internal gov- 
ernment of Northern Ireland, Anglo-Irish 
relations and relations between the Brit- 
ish-ruled North and fee Irish Republic. 

Mr. Murphy said that all parties would 
have their own agenda, but that fee im- 
portant point was that nothing would 
emerge without consensus, backed by a 
referendum and Parliament. 

Sinn Fein said Sunday feat it had one 
goal; End British rale and unite Ireland. 

“Sinn Fein is not going to the ne- 
gotiating table to strengthen fee union — 
we are going to thp negotiating table to 
smash the union,” the party’s chief ne- 


Communists Set a dash With Yeltsin 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The opposition Communists, rais- 
ing fee stakes in a battle with President Boris Yeltsin, 
said Tuesday they would seek a no-confidence vote 
in Parliament against the government because of its 
“disastrous” attempts at economic reform. 

The decision put die Communist-led State 
Duma, fee lower house of Parliament, on coarse for 
a showdown wife Mr. Yeltsin, who has hinted he 
will dissolve the chamber if it does not stop drag- 
ging its feet and enact laws aimed at reforming fee 
economy. 

“A radical wing has taken over the Russian 
government and put fee country on a disastrous 
course,” the Communist Party leader, Gennadi 
Zyuganov, said. 

Asked whether he feared that Mr. Yeltsin would 
dismiss the Duma, Mr. Zyuganov said: “If new 
elections are held, opposition in fee new Duma 
would be 10 times stronger.” 

Mr. Yeltsin, in a radio speech Friday, accused fee 


Duma of blocking economic-reform efforts and, in 
a veiled threat that he might dissolve Parliament, 
said his patience was running out. 

The Communists ignored both the threats and 
some signs of compromise during crisis consulta- 
tions on Monday. 

Mr. Zyuganov said 146 Duma deputies had 
signed a petition to put a no-confidence motion on 
fee chamber's agenda and that it would be sub- 
mitted for discussion within a week. . 

The Communists’ anger over fee economy co- 
incided wife a warning by the Russian Red Cross feat 

rhw luring ci hia linn o/ac t ‘^«ltaElTlnphi^- ,, in Rncria and 

three other former Soviet republics. The Red Cross 
said many people could die this winter of poverty 
and cold. 

The Communists’ defiance also increased the 
risk of a confrontation in which Mr. Yeltsin could 
dissolve the Duma, although there is no immediate 

Communists to avoid a showdown!^ 


Irish Foreign Minister Resigns 

DUBLIN — Foreign Minister Ray Burke resigned from 
Parliament on Tuesday, dealing a severe blow to Prime 
Minister Bertie Ahern's minority coalition government 
Mr. Burke, 54, co-chainnan of the all-party Northern 
Ireland peace talks, had already been embroiled in a saga 
over his acceptance of a 30,000 punt ($44,000) political 
donation from a building firm executive in 1989. 


V) 


gotialor, Martin McGuinness, said at a 
rally. He said negotiating wife tire un- 
ionist parties was not Sinn Fein’s prime 
concern. 

“The key player we have renegotiate 
with is fee government,” he said, re- 
faring to tbeBritish. ‘ ‘We are bringing a 
message to them that it’s time for British 
rule to end.” 

In an attempt to soften fee effect of his 
words, Sinn Fein on Monday made pub- 
lic pari of fee opening address by its 
leader, Gerry Adams. He said the party 
was “absolutely committed to demo- 
cratic and peaceful methods of resolving 
problems” and its objective would be 
’‘to achieve through dialogue among the 
Irish people an agreed Ireland. ” 

London and Dublin have set a May 
deadline for concluding a political set- 
tlement on the province's future. 


BRIEFLY 


o an Arab 
(Reuters) 


Mir Becomes a Little Cleaner 

MOSCOW — The Mir space station jettisoned a 
supply ship filled wife garbage Tuesday, a day lata than 


British Red Cross Rejects Gift From ‘Diana’ Publisher 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The British Red Cross announced 
Tuesday that, after consulting wife fee family of 
Diana, Princess of Wales, it would refuse any dona- 
tion from fee publisher of a biography of her for its 
campaign to abolish land mines. 

Outer charities pursuing fee same end said last 
week that donations from the biographer, Andrew 
Morton, would be rejected outright. But fee Red 
Cross had been discussing a contribution with the 
publisher of “Diana. Her True Story — In Her Own 
Words,” the revised version of Mr. Morton’s 1992 
best-seller. 

Mr. Morton outraged Diana’s family last week 


by revealing that sbe was fee main source for his 
book. 

The British Red Cross said in a statement, “After 
much consideration, the society feels that being 
associated wife this book would not be appropriate 
and has decided to withdraw from all negoti- 
ations.” 

A spokeswoman for fee publisher. Michael 
O’ Mara, had no immediate comment 

Mr. O’Mara had defended the decision to rush 
fee edition into print after Diana's death in a Paris 
car crash on Aug. 31, saying “history demanded 
it” because “Diana would never be able to speak 
for herself again.” 


FIGHTER: Bonn Is Set to Clear Funds for Warplane 


Continued from Page 1 

shadows Sweden's Grippen, a snail inter 
France’s Rafale, whose future is cloud 
certainties about government support 
Eurofighter's ftiture wife the German 


nor, and 
by un- 


Eurofighter's future wife fee German Luftwaffe 
still depends on final approval by the Bundestag, but 
officials said that the same combination of pressures 

— work far the German aerospace industry and a 
continu ing European industrial alliance in this sector 

— was expected to provide backing for the project 
when it comes to a vote next month in Parliament. 

Even with last-minute adjustments in fee number 
of planes and the size of Germany’s share of the 
manufacturing, a German order will preserve fee 


initial consortium: British Aerospace (37.5 per- 
cent), Daimler-Benz (30 percent), Italy’s Aleaia 
(19.5 percent) and Spain’s CASA <13 percent). 

The same consortium bulk Tornado, the first 
multinational European warplane and a success in 
the Gulf War. Both planes, however, have been 
economically problematic. The Eurofighter will 
have cost an estimated $75 billion, almost double its 
original price tag for the program. By the rime it goes 
into service in 2003. it wilt be almost a decade Late; 
the plane has been renamed “Eurofighter 2000” to 
reflect the new target date for deliveries. 

Last month, problems were discovered with the 
software that replaces the pilot in tricky maneuvers; 
these will reportedly cost $75 million to fix. ■ 


Russian controllers said tiiat^e^discarded ship would 
bum up in Earth's atmosphere and feat fragments would fall 
into the South Pacific. The cosmonauts Anatoli Solovyov 
and Pavel Vinogradov fixed a problem that had prevented 
fee ship from undocking as planned on Monday. (AP) 

Kohl Faces Doubters in Party 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl is coming under 
pressure within his own party to relinquish the party 
leadership before parliamentary elections next September. 

Senior members of the Christian Democratic Union, 
which opens its annual conference Sunday in I -ftiprig, 
have called on Mr. Kohl to step aside. 

“There’s increasing pressure for a change at the top,” 
Peter Mueller, party chairman for die German state of 
Saarland, said in the current edition of Stem ma gazine, 
published Tuesday. In fee same report, Technology Min- 
ister Juergen Ruettgers warned his party against basing its 
1998 election campaign around Mr. KohL And Kraus 
Esther, chairman of fee party’s youth wing, said it was 
time for a ‘ ‘generational change. ” (AP) 

War Criminal Gets 2d Chance 

THE HAGUE — The Yugoslav war crimes tribunal has 
ordered a convicted killer to enter a new plea on charges 
stemming from a massacre of Muslims in July 1995. 

The decision Tuesday may set up a trial for Drazen 
Erdemovic, a Bosnian Croat who'pleaded guilty last year 
to crimes against humanity in the massacre in Srebrenica, 
a mostly Muslim enclave in northeastern Bosnia. 

He was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading 
guilty to a single crime against humanity. Judges have 
trow ruled fear his original plea was entered without his 
knowing its full implications. . (AP-) 


1 ■■ ■ . 






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Announcements 


BAREME AS 24 

AU 8 QCT06RE 1997 
Pfr Hon TYA a deWso tab 
Qadudai dspaftte six demarate) 
Ranftocs Ibs bonnes Marians 

FRANCE (m C) an FH - 7VA 205% 
00: 3JB1 F00 1 : 2ff 

SOT 5ff SC8P: 544 

UK (am B) and- TVA 17.5% (BoMSW 
60: 05690 FOD* 03478 

AUBUQNE (zotb D DMA - TYA 15% 
20NEI-G: 

GO: Iff 

ZOKEi’l: _ 

GO: Iff SCSP: 1.44 

20HEM-F: 

00: Iff SCSP: Iff 

ZUMErt'-f: _ 

GO: Iff SCSP: Iff 


BELGIQUE en FBI - TVA 21% 

GO: 2234 FOB: llff 

SOT: 3339 SCSP. 31.49 

K0LLANDE (zones) Hffl - TVA 17J% 
GO: 1316 FOft D3Z3 

SOT: IffB SCSP 1.915 

LUXEMBOURG an LUH ■ WA 15% 

GO-. 1932 

ESPAGKE (zone A] «i FTflfH-TVA 10% . 
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gium 0600 17538 Ram 0600 437437 
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Bsmhen (+1) 212 7523880 ASIA; 
Hon Kong 2922 1171 Indonesia BIB 
1828 Jura (loMed 0120 464 027 
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Real Estate 
for Sale 

Monaco 


SUPERB APARTMENT, 240 SQ.M., 
Perthouse depta, panooo*: see ton 
and motrtains, large racapto rjoii, 

3 bertoonts, 3 tarite, Inti Uy 
Btod Mchen, potoy, tanfiy room, 
guest drasting mon, krge tsTBce ad 
loggias 140 s gkm,2 rtaig, 2 gnge& 

Tit +377 S3 SO B884 
Ffoc +377 S3 50 45 2 


Paris and Suburbs 




K j 


Med aaajnrnodatorc studo-5 bedmons 
OuMttand nrvice assured 
READY TO MOVE H 
Tel +33(0)1 4312980a Fax (0)143129600 


MONTAIGNE 

High decs, beadU 95 8 qj&, doitte 
Wna + bertoom ■ Sum ■ FF20000. 
FtACE FRANCOS IB) (HEAH| 
Mgh das - BeatfM sufo, 

46 earn. - ffhuooo. 

C0RB>1 TEL* +33 (OH 45 89 2 2 
FAX: +33 (m 45 65 44 13 


CAHTALE ■ PARTNERS 


CHAMPS ELYSEES, LARGE SHJ0I0, 
cofnforteMe, Wgh Roar, new, sunny. 
Tet + 33 Id) 1 45 62 83 22. 


Germany 

CHOICE RESDENT1AL LOT (1,135 
atfinj alh stpsb Aw owrioddng Mo- 
mt and Traben Trartach. Zoned for stv 
gle uni « up to 6 fan* apartnertt 
Wa USS lOOffO. TeL +4M372-1701. 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


Paris Ana Furnished 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 


FftWed apenntts, 3 monso or more 
«r unluntishaa lakhnial sms. 

Tefc 433 (OW 25 32 25 

FMc +33 CIB1 45 63 37 09 


PARS 17th - AYE TERNESt higti chss 
tailing. beeuKii apertmem. Mu man, 
1 bedenm. batfam, equipped ndran, 
parting. FF920a Tai:*33 (tjfl 4SZ9QSQ 


M sizes Paris aid Htubs. 

. Tet +33 m 42 68 35 60 
Foe +33 (DJI « 68 35 61 
We help fou but! 

7TH, i block tram EMel Tower, 
Umifous 4 batocm, ft* acadppBd 
Tet 212-496-7294 IfiA. 

CLOSE LOUVffi, f* equipped ado, 
brfoWGpoUess. Shon/ten term. Owner 
Ta +33 (tQI 42963967, In CCQ142E14724 

PASSY, 100 sqm ifoptac, randan hwl- 
lrc.Mng +2 bedmnB.eaftped ttchen. 
FR4«» IWL Tet +33 ill 44 66 28 


Paris Area Unfurnished 

7th, CHAMPS DE MARS, Ugh class, 
120 tain. + wccny-terraces, 3 bad- 
rasns/2 Irihs, equpped Behan, paridng 
ff!7ff0 net Owner ftl <7 27 42 81 

U, 20 nh ftwa Unendnoru sadai 

PfoaeanL Cebu Ctoer. Needy renowfod 
54 sqm Hat. Td +33 (0)1 4222 2889 


SieftzBrianrf 

QENEVA LUXURY FURNISHED apai- 
mar& Ron dufos ip 4 beftxRW, Tet 
+41 22 735 G32D FK +41 22 736 2671 



See Friday’s hd«rmarl«t 
for Hofidays A Havel, Reshlentia] 
HwJ Estate and Wring OuL 
7b admrtue coalad Sarvb WenArif 
on +U 171 420 0326 
or tax *44 171 420 0336 
A GREAT DEAL HAPPENS 
AT THE LVTERMABKET 


Import/Export 


NOAIIEXMC. 

LARGE GRADER OF USB) CLOTHMG 






WE EXPORT WORLDWIDE 

ALL AfO ANY 
00N8UMER PROOUCIS 
NO MATTER WHAT 
YOUR NEEDS ARE 
Item cosed 
'USA EXPORT Ca* 

Tet 2014964550. Fee 201-896-1661 
E-mat 103?3120660cDnpuBBniBjOom 

DESIGNER FRAGHANCES - UqudaSui 
Sale - MeoiWbmen. Dahkar Nor, Win 
Dteraoni Obararion, OaodnCer, CusrinL 
Mns. Bftnto bw prices. S25 per 46 
oz. boiue. 140 tor wo. Linfled npply. 
No Wholesalers Please. Tel: 716- 
4823052 USA. Vege Uquttkn. 

WWW.TRAKCHANNBJXR1 
Wtae iepooee and other ta^e whine 
buyers can sane products end find 
sfplera woriiMde 

SMALL ARMS AMUffTONIMUrARY 
equipment and suiples, toaraet prices, 
whine only; FAX USA +8644743866 . 


Business Opportunities 

OFFSHORE BANKS 
C0MPAMES & TRUSTS 
MIIGRA110N/PASSP0RTS 


Malflta»S?SentoM' 


Aston Coraon^ Ihstas 

Aston Hwm, Dou^b, We of Mb 
T el: +44 (0) 1624 B2B5S1 
Fax: +44 M 1624 S2S126 

London 

Td +44 01 171 233 1302 
Fw +44 171 233 1519 

E Mai: BstanGontanxtanoi 

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OFFSHORE COMPAMES 

READY MADE OCTa, FULADMN 
TRADE DOCUMHTS AND Iff 
BAMWG & ACCOUNTING 
CHKABUSMBS SERVICES 

Contact Stella Ho for fouwfete 
senfees t oorapeny bndue 
NACS LID, Room 1109. Alton Ptaa 
2-6 Gramie Road, TST, Kowloon, 
Haig Kong, e+net nacsOhLanerjut 
Taft 852-27241223 Fax 27224373 





Mil NETWORKEBS AJU) SALES 
AGB4TS WANTS) for Theilanfs Bar- 
rington Gol Coarse and ha Fkst CIbb 
R enal Hotel on the werid tonus Bwr 
Kwal Bridge. BIG PROFITSin Please 
»rte tor more kdomaSon to: PjO. BOX 
25 MJKDAHARN POST A. MUANG C. 
lAJKDAHAm 49000 THAILAND. FAX 
BB-42412-651 

FOT 8ALE: SPACE EXWTT1DN, tome 
ati utpe. Oia Uaal year 2000 erfwi- 
honl Up u 1 jxB sqm itf quaByf Maks 
many qwddy with only a heoful oi 
ccrtrads a year. Also eatt for speo- 
eoring am admUig wra Brardri Hes 
ahrady land 3 tames and 30 dies. 
Htai tamorandth 80% gains. Craaw 
saha fte to new mfocts. If Harassed 
C8l Rate +33 (0}4 94 85 71 16. 

MAKE 8fG MONEY h Hie ewdanand- 
hgfarawing world U IMPORTING & 
EXTORTMa We wl even Into wu to 
tl« excKnn wnid of OOSmrrS & 
LIQUIDATIONS. For a modes! rirefl- 
mnL yctfl recede everysing you need 
to succeed. We may ewn ft you ta foe 
USA Fn yw request to »2ff7-5449 
or 7Q2ff7-6458 enytkne. 

2nd PASSPORTS./ Driving Licences 7" 
De^ees/Camudlage (tassportaSeata 
Bank Accounts. GM. P.0. Bat 70302. 
Athens 16810. Greece. Fax 8982152. 
hhpSwwe^obel+aingjfiaB 

m S0OE1Y OF FMANCSS' 


projects for fonrfng or taxing hi 
projects. FREE Airmailed fi 
70f252-K*J7 Far 704251-5061 I 


2ND PASSPORT 51 OK Also EU, 
DIptonaHc, Driven! Lfoences. Emai: 
ayelGuneLnetph fax: B3MM 7552 

RON QXDE. Wgh grade, dkect seta, 
■fflffO MT, dfoeraa cdous. fax Spate 
34-76234 233 


Mail Boxes Etc. 


A prestigious address in 
South Kensington, London 

From £2.80 per week 

^ Mall fm w arding Woridwidc 
^ftee Fa* Receiving 
Mall and Pared Becebpx 
^ Call In Mall chei Service 

✓ VoiceMalL Service 

✓ UPS, FedEx and DHL Ccurim 

28 Old Brampton Road, 

South Kensington, 

' London SW7 3SS, UK 

Td: +44(0)171 581 2825 
Fax: +44 (O) 171 581 4851 


INCORPORATE 



302 - 998-0598 


We, SfflSS ESTABLISHED DIAM01D 
WHOLESALE COMPANY, 
are tooting for a professi onal person, 
«Hng to toe over our firm due to 
iBBrEnwtVWihawbngbstingcaneo- 
lom wllto the toduton as ml as to toe 
norid-tamous aafch a (evefcry produc- 
ers. We own various cams tar otto 


procfcxs stones. 

Hither kntanrffon wl be given to 
tteraeted purchasers upon receipt of 
proof of anpe ftaencial rasoutss. 
flwee cotaKt <xr sabs agenl at 
Fax +41.1.713 2439 or by net P0 Bor 
56, CM135 Irngnat, Swftzariand 


¥E PRODUCE POLYETHYLBE 
TerepMatate - PET - ptksfcbodfca 
and jaa From FDA aoprovnf food grade 
ri^nieclnh46deBai3insbnisng- 
hg turn 60 id to 3000 nd wtti 2VSH3 
mn tapper erttort cape, ri iirtaw ap ped 
on pai&is will Uatayasbn ceriDcde of 
origin end GSP eerffcata. Contact ++ B0 
3 2933114. Inqurias Iram ifistitwlors 
end estflbfBhed agentos mkane. 


HAIR REPLACEMENT: Nan sugical 
frandtos availabto now. WbridwHe ex- 
penston prograratne. Huge ratlins, kin. 
*50,000 mv»stn«t European mnaged 
traWng. Fax 92-42-5869585 or oH 
92-3C-313095. 

SURVIVE 2008, 93% of IBM conpatfobT 
WONT. Wl yours? FREE dtapnsffc 
softwoB avaUfie from WWW.evvlve- 
ZaOQoon nr Info hum eealsbfieam or 
lax +6170-335570. Ntabnal dbbfotaora 
aoujpL 

RESORT VILLAGE. SALE/ LEASL 
Aegaar mast Tlitey. hi opoation since 
1996. 600m see Inxl 950 beds. Tel: 
+322646&05, Fax: +32264437.61. 
E-flet aspendosOMbbe 

DIPLOMATIC PASSPORTS. 100* Legal” 
Honoan Consul, EU passports, Escrow, 
LS, LM. hdpJ/«*»2nd-pesjporis-com 
Tet +3+39042999 1 fax +34^2883109 

•mWOUCBS RS3URED: rti faretai 
exchange, futures, options and aquttee 
chrts, receiw an anekri ranuneradai 
package. TehFec+ 44 171 288 3329 

INVESTMENT BROKERS WANTEdT 
most audrirn, adatanthil bums phis 
htatog. Contact Lloyd Morgan Tel: +33 
(0)4 6a 26 64 16. Fax (Q)4 66 26 63 00 

OFFSHORE COMPAMEB, For free bre- 
din or aditoe Tet London 44 161 741 
1224 Foe 44 181 748 65506338 
mnr4Qttaimvk 

PAHTTERS - SPONSOR WAfmffto~ 
hatp excsvde targe Wbrid Warn trea- 
sure. My to ta 419, FT, RtotbkMr. 
15, MtBffl FrantiOL Fermany. 

REAL ESTATE COMPANY created to 
-1889. cadtal 5ffOffO Bff.aoehsin- 
vestots QflOO.OOO BEF) far Bouth-Eafl 
Ada projects. Tetfac +3228846464. 

SINGLE DISK software md onfer US. 
S12D to start. Info: wwvuneganetooro or 
fax at demand 7CT-429ff»toc306 


Telecommunications 


FROM ANY COUNTRY- Ftoony. 

A new butaress epporiuntt for 
tabamnutofiBanc confoenies or 
dart for hveston In any couty. 

FAXWAY: 

The Hew Stay si Stating Fax to Fax. 
We prortte nnHtey aystam, hardnmS 
sdtware km Under a Aamd partner- 
sty - Very Mgh inaralrB. Fax bKuAtas 
to: BEST DATA 1M TELEtXw, 

FIX : USA +1 305 792 0682 


Business Services 

-YOUR OFFICE If SWITZERLAND. PbeF 
d addess araVor company domicBdSan, 
98cratariel posstoltfos, Swbs banting 
end Used referais. Yba port d contact 
hi Geneva. TeL A FOx +41 22 755 38 46 

YOUR OFFICE IN NEW YORK 
Mahon, Pbona, fax, Phctoeopy, Typing 
8«Ytees, Furoiriad Offices, Corferance 
Rooms. Hoaly or Da9y RerdaL Cat 

516482^155 fax 516482-21 B7. 

2ND PASSPORTS. Visa free (ravel a 
banting back door to Spain & EU. 
Agate era wetoane. Teh 972 506831 £, 
FiK 972 4 8643236 

NOMTATUS BANK ACCOUNTS, Deb- 
it/Credh Cam, ATM today, hradbte 
decision. Tet UK +44 ffi} 1763 244288 
a &rich +41 1 306 382 

RUSSIAN BUSKESS Vlsai lnchaftg~ 
(nufreaby phis as dher navel senices 
vie our doantown Moscow efts Tet +44 
[0)113 232 0062 fax |0)113 232 (Bag 

LONDON, MAYFAIR Accouflodatlan 
Address £ 150.00 per anrun. Tet 
+44 (0] 171 439 3806 {Est. 1961} 


SECRETARIAL SERVICES: UadPC, 
wad processing, bustafons (Engfeh 
Fnrai^ Teh farts +33 (0)1 60 17^ 12 92 

YOUR OfflCE M UMXW 
Bond Street - Mai, Plane, fax, Telex 
Tflt 44 171 290 9000 ftam 489 7517 

Bankmg 

EUROPEAN BANKS Isu far you UC*. 
SBLC* PayrortlHnandai Quvameec 
Prodd Fim & Fundbn CoribntolaL 
ft +4W611B32658 Tt +*-17280^17 


The Middle East Desalination 

^niVBil ^wivnt nf 

Anlfadxflxejr of Xender Package [Km 

Series 97-A f 

The Middle Easi D^iUnaiion 

announces the availabflriy of lender r ^^S t /tothi; FieW 


announces we avauaenwy ^ Field 

which tadudes wn CIO; specific v.ill 

erf desalination tedmotogy and related flews. TW ^ v 
provide 50% funding for seteaed 
beast one CD paima on the proposal from me ™ 
East/North Africa (MENA) rcptxx- ‘ 

Effective October 5. 1997, 

tutsans can download the tender P ad * a *® i ?^ ^ via 

at Wnp-7/wwwjnedrc.orgXBD, or may contact 

fax » 1968) 697-107. 



We sell the following 

brands of leather gooos 

Gucci, Prada,Lancel,Celiw, 

YSL, Nina Ricci, Cartier. Coad? 
and many others. 

International . 

Fax: + 31 (0) 20 ^30394 m 
The Netherlands 


Don't miss our coming Sponsored Section on 


which will appear on IVov. 19^ 1997 
For Jurther information, please contact: 
Judy KINC at LH.T. New York 
TeL: (212) 752 3890 - Fax: (212) 755 8785 


Business Travel 

tsfflubiess din Ftacuert Trawlara 
WokMde. Up n 50% ot No anpons, 
no restraints. Imperial Canada Teh 
1-514-341-7227 Fez: 1-514-341 -7m 
Man address: frapertalO login jwt 
bOpdtamJogktaittawM 


Capital Wanted 

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PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL 


A Damning’ UN Report 
Will Again Accuse Iraq 
Of Hiding Weapons Data 


By Robin W rig ht 

Los Angeles Times Service 


- ~ k 3 re P° rt P 110 - 

pared for the Security Council, weapons 
inspectors for (he United Nations will 
accuse Iraq this week of a series of major 
violations and Qbstractioas that are al- 
most certain to force the United States to 

'demand new o i_ j a 


UNamiomats say. 

"Toe report has lots of damning. 
’ a senior UN diplo mat familiar 
with the report said Monday. 

• The report contends that Iraq is with- 
holding large amounts of vital data on 
and materiel for its chemical and bio- 
logical weapons, both its past programs 
. and its continuing efforts. The report is 
to be submitted to the Security Council 
on Saturday. 

But despite the report. Security Coun- 
cil approval of tougher sanctions against 
Iraq — including a proposed ban on 
international travel by top Iraqi intel- 
ligence and military officials — may be 
out of reach. 

Russia, China and France, which as 
permanent members of the Security 
'Council have veto power over resolu- 
tions, have long been eager to restore 
commercial tbs with Iraq. Russia ini- 
tially announced that it would veto such 
a resolution, although it changed course 
after President Bill Clinton appealed to 
President Boris Yeltsin. 

* The UN inspectors’ report reveals 


new information about Iraq's chemical 
and biological warfare programs. 

. Iraq admitted that it tested long-range 
missiles in 1985 that were loaded with a 
harmless chemical, blit it said the pur- 
pose of the test was to determine whether 
an enemy country would be able to send 
chemicals by missile. After concluding 
that it could be done, Iraq claimed, it 
abandoned the program. 

But in 1 990, the government of Pres- 
ident Saddam Hussein now says, Iraq's 
military industries began a full-scale 
program that produced 80 missile war- 
heads loaded with deadly toxins and 
germs in a mere three months — an 
unlikely scenario, UN inspectors say. 
The team of international experts so far 
has been unable to verify the fate of all of 
the 80 warheads and of any others that 
Iraq might have produced. 

These warheads are one of many big 
issues remaining," said a source at the 
United Nations who has seen the in- 
spectors’ report 

Most of Iraq's research and devel- 
opment work on arms before the Gulf 
War in 1991 was on chemical and bio- 
logical agents (hat had long storage 
lives. Much of what was produced then 
may still be active today, the inspectors 
fear. 

More than six years after Iraqi oc- 
cupiers were driven from Kuwait and the 
Gulf War ended, Baghdad still denies 
UN aims inspectors access to many of its 
prime weapons sites. 



A CHANGING LONDON — Construction cranes framing Big Ben on Tuesday as 
workers pressed to complete an extension of the Underground's Jubilee Line next year. 


BRIEFLY 


24 More Die in Algeria Violence 

ALGIERS — Thirteen villagers have been killed in Al- 
geria, while die security forces said they had killed 11 
members of the Armed Islamic Group, press reports said 
Tuesday. . ^ 

The 13 villagers were slain overnight Sunday at Douar 
Zekmouta, near Medea,, 50 kilometers (30 miles) from the 
Algerian fan ital, El Khabar and Liberte newspapers said. 

On Monday morning, army troops involved in a major 
offensive against an Armed Islamic Group stronghold south 
of Algiers killed 11 militants as (hey tried to escape a siege. 

The Algerian press was allowed for the first time to 
follow a mili tary operation against Islamic groups. ( AFP ) 

No Apologies in South Africa 

CAPE TOWN — A former guerrilla army commander in 
South Africa contended Tuesday that all whites were le- 
gitimate mili tary targets in the anti-apartheid struggle, 
saying there were no innocent civilians. 

Brigadier Daniel Mofokeng, now an officer in the Na- 
tional Defense Force, testified at hearings intended to 
provide a clearer picture of atrocities committed by the 
mili tary on all sides of South Africa's racial conflict. 

Brigadier Mofokeng, a former commander of the Azani- 
an People's liberation Army, said the armed wing of the 
Pan Africanist Congress neither regretted nor would apo- 
logize for civilian killings. 

The brigadier was among the 20 or more military com- 
manders from apartheid-era security forces and black- 
liberation movements who were subpoenaed or volunteered 
to appear before the Truth and Reconciliation Commis- 
sions special hearings this week. (AP) 

For the Record 

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has intervened 
in an effort to persuade Israel to extradite an American 
accused of a murder in Maryland. She asked for the “max- 
imum cooperation’' of the government in having Samuel 
Sheinbein, 17, tried in the United States. (AP) 


JAPAN: Dozens of Veterans Unburden Themselves inPublicMea Culpas, With a Rendering of Wartime Atrocities ITALY: 

Prodi Seeks a Deal 


Continued from Page 1 

through Japanese courts. 

Given Japan’s ponderous, conserva- 
tive civil court system, the trials and 
appeals could drag on for years, if not 
decades, and the plaintiffs are deemed 
unlikely to win. But the Japanese ac- 
tivists say their goal is to create an in- 
delible legal record of the historical truth 
that will be difficult for revisionists to 
deny. “Young people do not know the 
truth, because it isn’t taught in schools,’ ' 
Mr. Mio said. 

Seven lawsuits that were filed in the 
past two years by the Chinese victims or 
their families are the most ambitious 
because they seek to hold postwar Japan 
liable for the Imperial Army’s most 
heinous deeds. 

These are among the plaintiffs: 

• Survivors of the some 40,000 
Chinese who were forced to go to Japan 
in 1941 as slave laborers; 6,630 are 
believed to have died after brutal treat- 
ment Liu Lianren, a plaintiff, escaped 
from a Hokkaido coal mine and hid in 
the mountains for 13 years before he was 


discovered and repatriated to C hina. 

• Civilians who survived Japanese 
massacres. In gripping testimony earlier 
this year, Li Xiuying, 77, who was seven 
months’ pregnant during the 1 937 Nank- 
ing massacre fin the Chinese city now 
known as Nanjing), described being 
bayoneted in the face, neck, legs and 
belly by Japanese soldiers after she re- 
sisted their attempts to rape her. 

• Former “comfort 
women" who claim 
they were dragooned as 
sex slaves for the Jap- 
anese militaiy. 

•Families of people 

killed in Unit 731, in which prisoners 
were infected with diseases in germ war- 
fare experiments and in some cases dis- 
sected alive, without anesthetic. 

• Families of those who died after 
contracting bubonic plague, typhus and 
cholera, which were deliberately intro- 
duced among Chinese civilians by Unit 
731 scientists to test the diseases as 
biological weapons. 

•People killed or wounded by chem- 
ical weapons and poison gas left behind 


in China by the retreating Japanese 
army, including some injured in die last 
several years when buried ordnance ex- 
ploded during roadwork, river dredging 
and sewer repair. China says that 2,000 
people have died from such causes since 
the war. 

Japan has pledged to build a facility in 
China to destroy leftover chemical 
weapons but, fearing a flood of claims, it 


‘I grilled them with the flame. I felt nothing. We 
did not think of them as people but as objects.’ 


event, Japan settled these issues when it 
paid China wartime compensation and 
resumed diplomatic relations 25 years 
ago, said Kaoru Tokuda, the Justice Min- 
istry attorney supervising the defense. 
Lawyers for the Chinese plaintiffs 

maintain that no Statute of limitarinnn 

should apply to international war crimes. 
They assert that war reparations paid to 
nations should not preclude individual 
victims from suing 
those who wronged 
them. 

Mr. Mio joined the 
militaiy police at age 22 
“because the salary was 
thought the uniforms 


higher, and I 
looked sharp." He was assigned to gath- 
er intelligence on the anti-Japanese re- 
sistance in China. 

One of the first suspects he interrog- 
ated was an ethnic Korean woman sus- 


has resisted calls for the payment of 
compensation to individual victims. 

So far, Japanese government defense 
lawyers have not dispu ted feat any of the 
incidents described in the lawsuits oc- 
curred. All have been extensively doc- 
umented by Japanese and Western his- peeled of working fra a guerrilla group, 
torians — although many of the facts are "I kept beating her until her skin broke 
disputed by Japanese conservatives. and started to bleed, but she didn't answer 

But government lawyers plan to argue my questions," Mr. Mio testified. The 
that Japan’s 20-year statute of limitations next day, he sexually assaulted her with 
has long since expired and that, in any the wooden sword that he had used to beat 


her. “Now, I regret this,” he testified. 

In 1943, Mr. Mio arrested Wang 
Yaoxuan, 46, the manager of a textile 
factory and a father of six, and his neph- 
ew Wang Xuenian, who had beep named 
as friends of a suspected communist spy. 
Mr. Mio tortured the elder Mr. Wang to 
extract a confession. 

“I put him on a long desk and tied his 
hands and feet and put a handkerchief 
over his nose and poured water over his 
head,” Mio said. “When he couldn’t 
breathe, he shouted. Til confess!’ " 

But since he did not admit knowing 
the spy, Mr. Mio put a candle to his feet. 
“I grilled them with the flame,” Mr. 
Mio said in an interview. “I thought it 
was natural. I felt nothing. We did not 
think of them as people but as ob- 
jects.” 

In 1944, Mr. Mio said he transferred 
tiie two prisoners, with two other sus- 
pects, to Unit 731, an organization so 
secret that even the military police had 
no idea what it did. “The only -thing I 
knew about foe unit was that nobody fold 
ever come out’ of it alive,” Mr. Mio 
said. 


NATO: 

Senators Concerned 

Continued from Page 1 

broader question in Americans’ minds: 
“Why cannot foe Europeans take care of 
themselves?’ ’ 

Mrs. Albright said she would “insist 
that our old allies share this burden 
fairly.” 

Several senators, Mr. Helms among 
them, asked Mrs. Albright how enlarge- 
ment would affect Russia: Would the 
Russians be given too large a voice in 
NATO affairs? Was Russian resentment 
of enlargement not so broad and emo- 
tional as to risk a dangerous backlash? 

“Those who have predicted that 
NATO enlargement would give solace 
to foe hard-liners in Russia have been 
wrong,” Mrs. Albright replied “The 
dire predictions about foe end of the 
world if NATO enlarged are not coming 
true.” 

She told Mr. Helms that the NATO- 
Russ La joint council that recently held its 
first meeting in New York would “never 
be used to make decisions on NATO 
doctrine, strategy or readiness.” 

She said the council had an important 
“explanatory” function, however, 
adding that “we have walked this line 
very carefully in terms of not isolating 
Russia from a new Europe and a new 
NATO." 

At foe same time, she said foe Rus- 
sians would have uo voice over this or 
any future enlargement of NATO. 

Senator John Warner, Republican of 
Virginia, asked how enlargement would 
affect those countries, like Romania, 



deputy i 
New 


VgriKT Fmw I V i’ 

Mrs. Albright, flanked by Mr. Bides, left, and Mr. Helms arriving to address the Senate foreign relations paneL 


Slovenia and the Baltic states, that seek 
membership but wens not accepted in foe 
first wave of expansion. 

NATO membership, Mr. Warner sug- 
gested, might give Hungary, Poland and 
the Czech Republic an advantage over 
the other countries, making it easier for 
them to attract foreign investment, while 
ultimately easing their militaiy costs. 

Mrs. Albright replied that there was 
no evidence of any financial advantage 
to NATO membership. She added: * 4 We 
are taking a number of steps to ensure the 
Baltic states are more and more en- 
in European institutions." 
secretary of state, in her speech. 


offered three fundamental arguments for 
NATO enlargement: 

• It would help "expand the area in 
Europe where wars simply do not hap- 
pen.” 

• It would make NATO stronger and 
more cohesive, not less so as some crit- 
ics argue. “The Poles, Hungarians and 
Czechs are passionately committed to 
NATO," she said. She praised their co- 
operation on questions including ter- 
rorism and nuclear proliferation. 

• It would help bind the nations of 
Europe together politically, while also 
giving foe candidate members new in- 
centive “to solve their own problems.” 


She praised the three countries fra 
settling “virtually every old ethnic and 
border dispute in the region," to pave 
foe way for membership. 

An opinion poll issued Tuesday in- 
dicated that foe doubts expressed by 
senators are not widely shared by the 
public. But foe survey, by the Pew Re- 
search Center, also showed a remarkably 
low level of public awareness of what 
NATO enlargement involves. 

The survey, taken Sept 4 to 11, found 
foal 63 percent of Americans supported 

But only 10 percent, when asked°could 
name even a single candidate country. 


ISRAEL: In Release of Hamas Leader, a Glimmer of Hope? 


Continued from Page 1 

se to halt terror strikes and to support 
Arafat, the major condition set by 
Netanyahu would be met 
heikh Yassin said Tuesday that 
ins, was prepared to call a truce if the 
eKs withdrew from the West Bank 
removed settlements there, and he 
»sed that "Islam allows a truce but 
i permanent reconciliation.” 
hough the conditions were blatantly 
rceptable to Israel, the talk of a truce 
self, and the embrace of Mr. Arafal, 
id hopes that Sheikh Yassin might 
lis weight behind internal leaders of 
ias who are believed to prefer a 
Icing relationship with foe Palestin- 
fcufoority to a conflict in which the 
orate Hamas social network would 
estroyed. . 

he maneuvering among major forces 
until recently had been locked in 
« struggle injected an element of 
s into afiasco that has largely been 
red among Israelis as a major se- 
ty and political fiasco. 


Mr. Netanyahu remained under fierce 
attack from press commentators and foe 
opposition for approving an assassina- 
tion attempt that banned relations with 
Israel’s only remaining Arab ally, 
Jordan; forced Israel to release Sheikh 
Yassin and some 70 other Arab pris- 
oners; strengthened Hamas, an organi- 
zation Mr. Netanyahu was Hying to de- 
stroy; weakened Mr. Arafat’s ability to 
combat Islamic fundamentalism and 
eroded foe vaunted image of Mossad. 

The affair erupted after two Mossad 
agents tried to poison Khaled Meshal, 
foe political leader of Hamas, and were 
apprehended by his bodyguard. A furi- 
ous King Hussein compelled Israel to 
provide an antidote to the poison, and 
agreed to free the Mossad men only in 
exchange for the trade, painful to Israel 

In his public reaction, Mr. Netanyahu 
lashed out at the opposition and the press 
for using a national-security crisis to 
attack him. while stopping short of ac- 
knowledging foe assassination attempt. 

The counterattack continued Tuesday 
with a statement by Danny Naveh, the 


cabinet secretary and Mr. Netanyahu’s 
close lieutenant, who said: “1 don't 
know if there was an attempt to liquidate 
Khaled Meshal One thing is clear to me: 
there’s a cynical attempt by the op- 
position to liquidate foe government.” 

■ Israel Perceives a ‘Change’ 

David Bar-Dlan, a senior aide to Mr. 
Netanyahu, said the terms offered by 
Sheikh Yassin fra a truce were unac- 
ceptable — but said foe feet that Sheikh 
Yassin's overture was made at all rep- 
resented “a positive change.” The As- 
sociated Press reported 

In the past, Hamas leaders have 
spoken of a “holy war” to establish an 
Islamic stare in what is now Israel 

“We would like to hope that it means 
that he will preach peace rather chan 
violence,” Mr. Bar- Ilian said. “There is 
no question be has a following and cha- 
risma.” 

An Israeli committee looking into that 
bungled hit held its Fust meeting on 
Tuesday and requested documents it 
said it needed for its work. 


Blair to Hold Vote 
On Gay Legislation 

Agence Fnmce-Pmse 

LONDON — British legislators 
are, at the earliest opportunity, to 
take part in a vote on whether to 
lower foe homosexual age of con- 
sent from 18 to 16, the government 
announced Tuesday. 

Ministers decided to refer foe is- 
sue to Parliament after die European 
Commission on Human Rights said 
Britain’s current laws contravene 
the European Convention. Two gay 
men had challenged Britain’s laws 
before the commission. 

Lowering foe age of consent, a 
promise made by Tony Blair during 
his electoral campaign, will make 
homosexuals and heterosexuals 
equal under the law. 

On Tuesday, foe lobbyists wel- 
comed Labour's promise. “This is 
an historic step” said the organi- 
sation Stonewall which defends ho- 
mosexual rights. 


BARGAINS: 

Cash Crisis Fire Sale 

Continued from Page 1 
is try of Domestic Trade and Consumer 

“They can, for instance, increase 
prices if they have exhausted the old 
stock and are selling new stock,” said 
Mohammed Said the ministry’s 

director. ^ 

lew orders will no doubt come with 
new price tags — rates fra some cos- 
metics at Sogo have already risen — but 
in foe meantime Southeast Asia is. bar- 
gain-basement cheap. 

In a store across town, a Fuji Fotomex 
10 antofocus camera goes for 140 ringgit 
— about S43 at current exchange rates, 
versus $55 in June. A Cannon UC 2000 
video camera is selling for 999 ringgit, 
$307 compared with $396 in June. 

In Thailand, foreigners are picking up 
the shopping slack. 

“Thai people have stopped buying 
computers,” said Pairoj Amatama, gen- 
eral manager of IT City Ltd., a computer 
store in Bangkok. “But our sales nave 
not slowed down, oar clients have 
changed. The baht has fallen so much 
that computers here are cheaper than 
they are in Hong Kong or Si ” 

The 
' laptop 
baht. 

But the baht has fallen from 25.61 to 
the dollar at foe beginning of the year to 
35.75 baht today. The computer costs 
$2,235 at Tuesday's exchange rate, $900 
less. 

“I get a lot of flight crews who come 
in to buy digital cameras,” Mr. Pairoj 
said, adding that he would begin raising 
prices 20 percent to 30 percent a month 
from now. 

And Dominique Maliaret, managing 
director of Blugage Siam Ltd., a retailer 
of Louis Vurtton designer luggage, said, 
“When foe baht fell, we only raised the 
price a little bit because we wanted to 
show that we are not indifferent to this 
country’s problems." 

Yet even with that increase, a leather 
bag from Louis Vuitton’s Epi line that 
used to cost $800 now sells tor $700. 

In Malaysia, while foe low ringgit has 
brought prices down 30 percent, the 
country has just opened its annual Shop- 
ping Carnival, a government-sponsored 
initiative to lure foreign tourists, and 
Singaporeans have flocked across the 
border to foe city of Johor Barn. 

“The shopping centers and food stalls 
are overcrowded, foe roads jammed with 
traffic and parking spots all occupied by 
cars from Singapore,” Marliah Mo- 
hammed Amin said in an interview with 
a local newspaper. 

They are hoping to snag bargains like 
a Givenchy men’s wool suit that is now 
selling at Sogo for about $450. down 63 
percent in 'dollar terms from three 
months ago. 


<> 






Continued from Page 1 

Commission president. Jacques San ter, 
warned that a political crisis in Italy 
could have devastating consequences 
for Rome's efforts to meet single cur- 
rency conditions. Mr. San ter congrat- 
ulated foe Prodi government for its aus- 
terity policies, which he said had helped 
reduce foe deficit 

If the Prodi government were to fall 
foe ultimate decision on the next step 
would be in foe hands of President Seal- 
faro. He could dissolve Parliament and 
call an election, or ask Mr. Prodi to make 
a last attempt to find an alternative par- 
liamentary majority in order to gain pas- 
sage of the 1998 budget 

If an alternative majority cannot be 
found, an election could be fixed for as 
early as Nov. 30. This, however, could 
produce a bung Parliament, and yet more 
political chaos. It could also have a dam- 
aging economic impact on Italy. 

A number of Italian commentators 
and political insiders have suggested 
that Mr. Bectinotti's stand against wel- 
fare reform — together with a long laun- 
dry list of other demands ranging from 
legislation foal would force a 35-hour 
workweek by the end of 2000, and the 
use of public funds to create hundreds of 
thousands of jobs — belied the real aim 
of foe Ckmununists. This, (hey said; is to 
distinguish foe hard-left party from the 
larger center-left Democratic Party of 
foe Left, foe main component of Mr. 
Prodi’s governing coalition that has 
abandoned Marxism and embraced free 
market economics. 

Silvio Berlusconi, leader of the center- 
right opposition, told Parliament that Mr. 
Ptodi should resign, but be also suggested 
Tuesday that foe opposition would be 
willing to delay elections in order to ne- 
gotiate a new “transition phase” aimed at 
approving foe 1998 budget and electoral 
and c on s tit utional reforms. 

Massimo D’Alema, leader of the 
Democratic Party of the Left, appeared 
to reject Mr. Berlusconi's proposal for a 
temporary government of national unity, 
saying “the march toward Europe is not 
a three-month problem.” 

Even before foe parliamentary show- 
down, fears of a government collapse 
triggered selling of die lira, which 
weakened Tuesday to dose at 983.59 to 
foe Deutsche mark, compared with 
980.70. The Milan bourse's Mibtel in- 
dex, fell by 26 points Tuesday to dose at 
23,165. 

A protracted old-style Italian crisis 
could cause financial markets to lose 
their confidence in Italy's fiscal rigor 
and send interest rates soaring, thus 
slowing foe country’s fragile economic 
recovery. It could also flatten share 
prices on foe Milan bourse, and it might 
well delay Italy's participation in 
Europe’s planned single currency. 

The budget cuts are of primary im- 
portance if Italy is to prove to its Euro- 
pean partners that it can sustain fiscal 
rigor and meet the conditions needed to 
participate in monetary union. 

A crisis would also damage Italy's 
credibility in financial markets because 
it could delay or even sink a package of 
electoral reforms aimed at making foe 
country more governable by shifting 
from a system of proportional repres- 
entation to majority voting. The Re- 
founded Communists, who are able to 
exert a de facto veto over the govern- 
ment even though they polled less than 9 
percent of the national vote in last year’s 
general election, are among the small 
parties that stand to lose the roost 
through electoral reform. 

In an attempt to placate the Com- 
munists, Mr. Prodi on Tuesday offered 
some concessions, such as introducing 
legislation aimed at reducing working 
hours and channeling some of foe bil- 
lions of dollars of proceeds expected 
from foe partial privatization of Italia 
Telecom into make-work programs. He 
said he was willing to transform the giant 
state holding company fctituto per la 
Ricostnizione Industrial SpA, which is 
now m liquidation, into a vehicle that 
would fund job creation in foe poor 
Southern regions of Italy.' L 


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licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



rruisHra wnn the new yurk timis ajbi the yv ashen eras tost 


Israel Gets Caught 


Japan and Its Economy Have a Crime Problem 

* - mm m . kifnati niitci/law ua hnna <— I 


Who's a Terrorist? 


The assassination operation gone 
wrong in Jordan is being described as 
a major embarrassment for Israel, and 
it is certainly that. Hie Israeli gov- 
ernment, which has put the fight 
against international terrorism at the 
center of its policy, is revealed again 
as a practitioner of cross-border state 
terrorism itself. The exploitation of its 
tie with Jordan has frozen Israel's 
warmest Arab connection. Its connec- 
tion with a friendly Western state, 
Canada, is compromised. It appears 
that the failed operation against Hamas 
has in some measure revived a dan- 
gerous organization that Palestinian 
and Jordanian authorities were already 
constricting in their fashion. 

Hie incident is more than a passing 
scandal. Few others would deny that, in 
the Palestinian suicide bombers, Israel 
has a fiendish security problem that 
requires and justifies special security 
measures. But it matters greatly bow 
Israel addresses that problem. Coun- 
terterrorism has its claims; the Israeli 
public gives the government of the day 
extraordinary latitude (for a democrat- 
ic country) for the extralegal pursuit of 
terrorists. Bur counterterrorism con- 
ducted without due regard for the cir- 
cumstances of each operation ends up 
diminishing Israeli security. No one 
realizes this more keenly than the se- 

j No to Assassination 

Israel has damaged its own interests 
with a bungled assassination attempt 
against a Hamas leader in Jordan. Even 
if the two agents of its Mossad in- 
telligence service had succeeded in 
killing Khaled Meshal with an injection 
of poison, Israel would have comprom- 
ised its relations with three important 
friends — Jordan, Canada and die 
United States — for no obvious security 
gains. Israel's fury and frustration over 
terrorist bombings are understandable, 
but trying to assassinate Palestinian 
leaders in revenge is not the answer. 

The costs of the assassination at- 
tempt are mounting by the day.. On 
Monday, Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, 
Hamas’s founder and religious leader, 
whom Israel felt compelled to release 
from prison to placate Jordanian anger, 
returned home to welcoming crowds in 
Gaza. His presence in Gaza will make 
irthal much harder for Yasser Arafat to 
accept negotiating compromises. 

Sneikh Yassin’s release also under- 
mines Israel's justified insistence that 


curity-conscious Israelis now calling 
for the resignation of Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu. To buy back his 
acknowledged agents — always an Is- 
raeli purpose — a leader who demands 
that Yasser Arafat lock up suspected 
terrorists is evidently freeing 20 con- 
victed terrorists himself. 

A fever to destroy die Jewish state 
prompts the irreducible core of Pal- 
estinian terrorism. But desperation 
bred by political frustration provides 
the tinder. This is what stirs the current 
American effort to get Israeli-Paiesr 
tinian talks started again. The effort is, 
however, very timid. A port in Gaza — 
issues such as this one are too slight to 
bear the tremendous political weight 
unavoidably being placed upon them. 
What is needed now is an approach that 
measures up to the gravity of the dis- 
pute between Israelis and Palestinians. 

The Israeli goals — peace and se- 
curity — are already on the agenda. 
The matching goal for the Palestinians, 
the one for which they joined the ne- 
gotiation in the first place, is statehood, 
but this goal has yet to be similarly' 
acknowledged, not by Israel and not by 
the United Slates. On the American ■ 
side, die reason given for die hesitation 
is that any such acknowledgment must 
be part of an integrated diplomatic 
strategy. So make it pan of an in- 
tegrated diplomatic strategy. What 
other way is there? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. ■ 

the Palestinian Authority stop releas- 
ing Hamas militants from jail for polit- 
ical reasons. In addition to Skeikh 
Yassin, Israel has released 22 Arab 
prisoners and promises to free up to 50 
more as part of a deal to get Jordan to 
return the captured Mossad agents. 

The Amman inciden t hag also cre- 
ated friction with Canada, since the 
Mossad agents used fraudulent Cana- 
dian passports. Further, it has poorly 
rewarded Washington's patient efforts 
to revive low-level Israeli-Palestinian 
peace talks. 

These consequences ought to per- 
suade the Netanyahu government to 
end Israel’s use of assassination to deal 
with its enemies abroad. 

Benjamin Netanyahu must accept full 
responsibility far the Amman fiasco, but 
the policy long predates his rule. Lead- 
ers of anew and weak Israel felt justified 
in defending their country by whatever 
means they had available. A militarily 
formidable Israel that rightly demands 
acceptance from its neighbors should set 
aside state-sponsored assassination as a 
foreign policy tool 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Justice ‘Meltdown 5 


Well, the White House damage-con- 
trol team has embarrassed Janet Reno 
yet again, and the guess here is that the 
attorney general is pretty calm about iL 
It has been a full year since Ms. Reno 
was confronted with initial evidence of 
the biggest political money scandal in a 
generation, and her response shows 
tittle concern with her place in history 
as a custodian of the Justice Depart- 
ment. So it is unlikely that she would 
be chagrined that only one day after 
she assured Congress that there was no 
need for an independent counsel to 
investigate foreign money or influence 
peddling on White House premises. 
Time magazine disclosed the existence 
of videotapes of White House fund- 
raising events that she and her inves- 
tigators had not found. 

Senator Fred Thompson, chairman of 
the Senate Governmental Affairs Com- 
mittee, rightly describes Justice as be- 
ing in “departmental meltdown.” It 
turns out that his committee was assured 
in mid-August by the White House that 
the video recordings of President Bill 
Clinton and his contributors did not 
exist Normally, Congress could refer a 
suspected obstruction to the Justice De- 
partment. “We might as well make a 
recommendation to the Department of 
the Interior under these circum- 
stances,” fumed Mr. Thompson. 

It would be nice if his remark could 
be written off as partisan hyperbole, 
but the record supports him. 

Nine months ago, Ms. Reno handed 
the most important case of her tenure to 
an inexperienced associate, Laura In- 
gersolL On Sept. 16, she removed Ms. 
Ingersoll as agents of the FBI com-' 
plained that they had been prevented 
from following leads into the higher 
levels of the Clinton administration. 
That made a hash of her claim that her 
department could investigate her own 


boss. But last Friday, only three weeks 
after this public admission that the 
investigation was at a virtual standstill, 
she informed Henry Hyde; chairman of 
the House Judiciary Committee, that 
she was refusing his request for an 
independent counsel to look into the 
full range of fund-raising allegations 
against Mr. Clinton. Hie .decision 
could only have been based on Ms. 
Ingersoll's flaccid investigation — 
meaning that Ms. Reno had exonerated 
President Clinton on every issue ex- 
cept telephone solicitation without a 
searching inquiry. 

On Saturday, the White House ad- 
mitted that it had the tapes, and Lanny 
Davis, a White House lawyer, com- 
pletely destroyed any claim Ms. Reno 
might have advanced to base her re- 
fusal on a thorough knowledge of all 
pertinent available evidence. Mr. Dav- 
is said the White House found the tapes 
on Wednesday. It tried to inform 
Justice on Friday, when Ms. Reno had 
already sent her letter, but was not able 
to get through. The White House can 
be criticized for its policy of dribbling 
admissions, but Ms. Reno is ultimately 
the victim of her own incuriosity. The 
tapes may contain nothing that incrim- 
inates the president and Vice President 
A1 Gore. But their belated discovery 
demonstrates that Justice has conduc- 
ted a slipshod investigation. 

The Independent Counsel Act is de- 
signed to provide trustworthy inves- 
tigations into which no one can put a 
political fix. No such investigation has 
yet taken place. The law is also based 
on the premise that the attorney general 
will have the wisdom to order an in- 
quiry to go forward when he or she is 
caught in a “personal, financial or 
political conflict of interest.” No such 
wisdom is within sight. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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T OKYO — The United States gov- 
ernment has released a report on 
the Russian underground. How about a 
report on Japan? 

We now discover that Japan's four 
main securities companies (Nomura, 
Daiwa, Yamaichi and Nikko), together 
with a major bank (Daiichi Kangyo), 
have long been handing out the equiv- 
alent of hundreds of millions of dollars 
to a small-time sokaiya, a person with 
gangster connections who specializes 
in blackmailing corporations. 

Almost daily we have reports on yet 
another conservative politician caught 
with his fingers in the web of cor- 
ruption- Meanwhile, Japan’s main 
gangster group, the Yamaguchi-gumi, 
which is responsible for much of this 
ugliness, is having a carefree nation- 
wide shoot-out between rival factions. 

Outsiders often wonder why al- 
legedly crime-free Japan gives its 
gangsters such a free hand, complete 
with recognized headquarters, branch 
offices and assemblies. What outsiders 
don’t realize is just how deeply em- 
bedded these people are in the society. 

Recently a leading politician in the 
ruling Liberal Democratic Party. Eitaro 
Itoyama, announced proudly in a 
magazine article that, unlike most other 
LDP politicians, he did not have to 
indulge in vote-buying because be 
could rely on .the Yamaguchi-gumi to 
bring out the votes for him. 

He said point-blank that cutting the 
links between the twilight world of 


Bv Gregory Clark something called the Japan Harbor 

° " Transportation Associatio n, long a lu- 

crative source of post-retirement po- 
gangsrerdom and conservative politics sitioos for government officials, 
in Japan was impossible. In short, the chances o f Jap an a con- 

Even in Russia, a statement like that servative establishment reforming lt- 


would draw some comment In Japan it 
was simply ignored. It was seen as one 
of those unpleasant facts of life that if 
left unnoted might just possibly go 
away, like Japan's war guilt 
That small-time sokaiya who could 
blackmail much of Japan’s financial 
establishment so easily has links right 
through to the very top" level of Japan's 

Ihe insatiable need for 
money guarantees that 
there can he no real 
crackdown 

political establishment via the now de- 
ceased power broker and ultranation- 
alist Yoshio Kodama, a friend of 
former prime ministers who had made 
his money from the rape of pre-1945 
China, having been sent there initially 
by Japan’s Foreign Ministry. 

Currently the media are making a 
fuss about U.S. threats to impose fines 
on Japanese shipping as retaliation for 
Japan’s exorbitant and discriminatory 
port charges. What we are not told is 
that those charges are organized by the 
Yamaguchi-gumi in cooperation with 


servative establishment reforming it- 
self are close to niL Apart from any- 
thing else, the insatiable need for 
money to fund LDP vote-buying and 
other political activities guarantees that 
there can be no real crackdown. 

Mr. Itoyama’s article spoke of the 
milli ons of yen that even junior politi- 
cians have to move daily to stay alive 
politically . Scandals erupt only when 
someone is unhicfy enough to get 
caught Threats of crackdowns make life 
easier for die gangsters. They can extort 
even more from their victims by threat- 
ening to create future scand als . 

They can also try to influence Ja- 
pan’s political future. 

Currently, the course of Japanese 
politics hangs very much on a little- 
publicized struggle between liberals 
and right-wingers in die LDP. Corrupt 
power brokers have found an easy way 
to shift the balance of power in favor of 
the r ight? antmiiw**. publicly the names 
of key liberals who nave also received 
some of their political funding. The 
resulting media fuss and turmoil leave 
the LDP liberals discredited .while ig- 
noring die much larger amounts of cor- 
rupt money going to right-wing and 
ultranationalistpoliticians. 

Meanwhile, me pressing needs of Ja- 
pan's stagnant economy are also ig- 


nored. Many outsiders see .hope mJa- , 
pan’s phoned deregulation an tf 
administrative reforms, Bui most of the 
reforms wfli be sidetracked by those 
who rely on the status quo as a source of 
funds and political support - - ~ 

Other promised stimuli for the eco- 
nomy, like reduced company tax or i 
higher land salesUqutdiiy, wifi have 

only marginal effect. 

With interest rates at unhelfcv&fe 
lows. Japan's only real economic card 
is expanded public works spending. 

But widespread revulsion against the 
often gangster-related waste and ear- 
ruption in past spending, phia-the bur- ~ 
den of public it has caused, have ■ 
led the government to promisc reduced ' 
rather than increased spending. 

That could hist be foe straw that 
breaks Japan’s hitherto stout ocooomic 
back. The high level of pononal savings 1 
causes a chronic lack of domestic de- 
mand, and -reliance on export stir; 
pluses, to keep the economy moving. 

Id this situation, mobilization of sur- 
plus funds for domestic spending that 
offers real returns, like improved trans- 
port or education, is the obvious an-, 
swer. But Japan seems determined to 
go in precisely the opposite direction. 

The mentality that carmol handle the 
gangster problem seems incapable of 
handling economic problems, ton. 

The writer, a former Australian dip- 
lomat, contributed this comment to die 
International Herald Tribune. 


Since Dayton Is Doomed, Get On With the Partition of Bosnia 


C HICAGO — The Clinton 
administration has got itself 
into a real pickle in Bosnia. Con- 
gress wants American troops 
out by June 1998, but the Clin- 
ton tram has no exit strategy. 
Indeed, its current policy of 
keeping Bosnia together guar- 
antees an endless American mil- 
itary commitment. 

Congress will eventually 
compel a withdrawal — wheth- 
er in 1998 or later — because the 
United States cannot keep 
troops in Bosnia forever. Bnt 
war will erupt again when 
America leaves, bringing vast 
harm to Bosnia and jeopardizing 
American policy in Europe. 

The administration can avoid 
this disaster only by dropping 
its current policy and moving 
now to organize the peaceful 
partition of Bosnia. Only a man- 
aged partition can let the United 
States leave without triggering 
a new war. 

American forces are stuck in 
Bosnia because they are there to 
cany out an untenable accord, 
the 1995 Dayton agreement. 
The agreement calls for uni- 
fying Bosnia’s three hate-filled 
ethnic groups in a single state, 
but that goal is infeasible. 

The Croats and the Serbs 


By John J. Mearsheimer 


want no part of a multiethnic 
Bosnia — that is why they 
fought the war in the first place. 
They want partition. Even the 
Muslims, wno favored integra- 
tion only because they would 
dominate a united Bosnia, now 
talk openly of partition. 

Dayton’s failure was predict- 
able. History records no in- 
stance in which ethnic groups 
have agreed to share power in a 
democracy after a large-scale 
ethnic civil war. Such wars end 
only with a dictatorship that re- 
stores order by the knout, or 
with partition. The democratic 
power-sharing that Dayton en- 
visions has no precedent 

The Clinton team maintains 
that the Dayton accord is being 
put into effect albeit slowly. 
Richard Hplbrooke, the archi- 
tect of Dayton, sees “signif- 
icant signs of progress,” while 
Samuel Berger, the president’s 
national security adviser, main- 
tains that “peace is beginning 
to take root” These assess- 
ments are based on theology, 
not the facts on the ground. 

Dayton promised to return 
refugees to their homes and to 
build central Bosnian political 


institutions. Unfortunately, we 
see complete failure on both 
counts. Of the roughly 2.1 mil- 
lion Bosnians forced from their 
homes during the war, some 

300.000 have returned home 
since the Dayton accord was 
struck. However, less than 

30.000 of these have returned to 
homes in areas where they are 
part of a minority group. 

At the same time, about 

80.000 more Bosnians have left 
their homes since Dayton, be- 
cause die boundaries it estab- 
lished made them minorities 
* where they lived. Thus, 50,000 
fewer Bosnians live in integrat- 
ed communities after Dayton 
than did before die accord. 
Refugees are moving, but in the 
wrong direction. 

S inn laxly, the effort to create 
multiethnic political institutions 
has been stillborn. The Croat- 
Muslim Federation, which is 
supposed to be running half of 
the country, is a sham. The Bos- 
nian Croats have effectively 
joined Croatia proper, while 
largely refusing to cooperate 
with their Muslim partners. 

The Serbs likewise remain 
firmly committed to partition. 


What Is a Civil Servant’s Duty? 


P ARIS — Trial begins this 
Wednesday in Bordeaux 
of Maurice Papon, who is 
charged with complicity in 
crimes against humanity. It is 
the latest, and no doubt die 
last, of the trials resulting from 
the Vichy government’s col- 
laboration with Nazi Germany 
during World War IL 
Mr. Papon, now 87, was 
deputy to the Vichy prefect in 
Bordeaux, and among other 
duties was put in charge of’ 
“Jewish questions.” He or- 
ganized the arrest and transfer 


By William Pfaff 


Dissent would be 
risky , hut duty 
cannot mean 
collaboration in 
manifest evil 


to camps in France of thou- 
sands of French and foreign 
Jews. They mostly were sub- 
sequently sent on to the Nazi 
death camps. 

The case is significant be- 
cause Mr. Papon was neither 
an anti-Semitic ideologue nor, 
at the time of Vichy, a political 
figure. He was an ambitious 
young civil servant with a 
family background of center- 
left politics. When the war 
broke out he was 29. (His edu- 
cation had been in literature, 
law and political studies, and 
also, unusually for the time, in 
sociology and psychology.) 

Demobilized from the army 
after France surrendered, be 
was offered a government post 
in Vichy through family con- 
tacts. In Bordeaux, under the 
anti-Jewish legislation brought 
in by die Pdtain government in 
1940, he was responsible for 
identifying who was Jewish 
(according to the govern- 
ment’s criteria), or ganizing die 
seizure of their property and, 
lata-, arranging far their trans- 
fer to German controL 

Note that all this was begun 
by the P£tain regime before 
the Germans asked for it As 
Robert- Paxton, the eminent 
American historian of Vichy, 


has written, the Germans ini- 
tially thought of expelling 
Germany’s Jews to France. 
When they annexed Alsace, 
they forced the Jewish res- 
idents out into the occupied 
part of France. The decision to 
exterminate die Jews was not 
made until the end of 1941. 

The Vichy regime had its 
1 own ideology of “national rev- 
olution," by which it wanted to 
remake France as a right-wing 
authoritarian state with a co- 
lonial and maritime- role in 
German-dominated * Europe. 
Its anti-Semitism was connec- 
ted to the thought of certain 
prewar French writers, such as 
Charles Maurras, and to ideo- 
logical and social conflicts go- 
ing back to the 19th century. 

Mr. Paxton argues that in 
dealing with the Germans, 
Vichy officials fell into the 
trap of doing more than the 
Germans asked, arguing to 
themselves that by doing so 
they preserved a certain free- 
dom of action. 

As the aid of the war ap- 
proached, Mr. Papon took 
steps to distance himself from 
Vichy and establish contacts 
with the Resistance, just as his 
contemporary in the Vichy 
government, Francois Mitter- 
rand, later president of France, 
had done a year earlier. 

He slipped easily into the 
.postwar civil service, which 
was pressed to find able men. 
He entered politics in 1968 
and became a minis ter in 
1978, in President Valftiy Gis- 
card d’Estaing’s second gov- 
ernment. It was only in 1981, 
thanks to documents as- 
sembled over the years by the 
son of one of the Bordeaux 
Jews sent to the death camps, 
that Mr. Papon’s wartime ac- 
tions were rally revealed. 

He was formally accused in 
1983. - President Mitterrand 
was one of those responsible 
for prolonging the investiga- 
tions that followed. The trial 
has arrived only now, when 
few survive from Vichy. 

The case is not really like the 
others in France concerning 


crimes against humanity. The 
SS officer Klaus Barbie and 
Paul Touvier, a collaboration- 
ist police official believed in 
the Nazi cause. Mr. Papon was 
a civil servant carrying out his 
duties in difficult times. That 
will be his defense. 

He has said he intervened to 
spare many Jews, warned oth- 
ers before arrest, and tried to 
organize the transports in hu- 
mane conditions. He says that 
as a local official of a gov- 
ernment under military occu- 
pation (after 1942) he had little 
freedom to act cm his own. 

The trial will settle that The 
principle at issue concerns the 
- personal moral responsibility 
of an individual ordered to 
collaborate in injustices, and 
beyond that the collective re- 
sponsibility of a government 
civil service. 

It has provided an occasion 
for the Catholic Church to ac- 
knowledge its own collective 
responsibility in what hap- 
pened to France’s Jews, and 
last week church leaders 
offered a solemn apology to 
France's Jewish comm unity . 

The Gentian army and civil 
service have been condemned 
for collaborating in Nazi 
policies that violated core val- 
ues both of German civiliza- 
tion and of the Christian 
churches in Germany. The of- 
ficers who swore a personal 
oath to Hitler in the 1930s shut 
their eyes to the atrocious 
events of the 1940s because 
they put fidelity to their oaths' 
above common morality. 

It is not an easily dismissed 
problem that concerns only 
■Vichy, the Nazis and the past. 
In Washington just a few 
months ago, an official who 
discreetly but illegally repott- 
ed wrongdoing by the CIA to 
Congress , had his career 
wrecked as the result. The 
president approved. 

Obviously an individual has 
little chance against the weight 
of government, and daring the 
war a dissident would have put 
his own life at risk. But duty 
cannot mean collaboration in 
manifest eviL 

International Herald Tribune. 

& Los Angela Tones Syndicate. 


refusing to cooperate with ef- 
forts to create a central Bosnian 
authority. 

The administration hopes to 
turn the Serbs in favor of 
Dayton by backing Biljana 
Plavsic against its arch-nemes- 
is, Radovan Karadzic. But Mis. 
Plavsic is hardly the leader to 
guide foe Bosnian Serbs into a 
nnii»H Bosnia. Rather, she is an 
extreme Serbian nationalist 
who holds hateful views about 
Muslims and was a fervent sup- 
porter of ethnic cleansing. She 
condemned the Dayton accord 
when it was signed in 1995, and 
her newfound support for 
Dayton is paper thin. 

Meanwhile, relations be- 
tween American soldiers and 
Bosnian Serbs have deterior- 
ated to the point where violence 
is a live possibility. Most Serbs 
now view the Americans and 
foe rest of the NATO troops as 
an occupation .force bent. on. 
punishing them unfairly. 

This new animus stems from 
NATO's recent efforts to arrest 
Serbian war criminals, disarm 
Serbian paramilitary forces and 
seize police and radio stations 
on Mis. Plavsic’s behalf. For- 
tunately, no Americans have 
been killed, but there is a sense 
of danger among the troops. 

This development bodes ill 
for a prolonged American stay 
in Bosnia, especially since there 
will be continuing press ur e on 
NATO to act aggressively to try 
to make Dayton work. 

The problem is not that pro- 
gress has been slow, but that it 
has been virtually nonexistent. 
The Clinton team nevertheless 
argues for staying the course, 
now suggesting that teoojps 
might have to stay in Bosnia well 
beyondJune to bring Dayton to a 
successful conclusion. 

Sadi a policy is bound to 
prove domestically unsustain- 
able. Opposition to Mr. Qin- 
too’s position is clearly grow- 
ing, as is pressure to remove 
American troops sooner rather 
than later. 

Last June, a House bill to stop 
financing the- troops after 
December 1997 was only nar- 
rowly defeated, and a similar 
bill with a June 1998 deadline 
passed overwhelmingly, hi Ju- 
ly, the Senate passed a non- 
binding resolution c alling fot a 
complete troop withdrawal by 
June 1998. Calls for withdrawal 
are appearing in growing num- 
bers chi editorial pages. 

So tiie wheels are coming off 
the policy. The final straw could 
take several forms. Some 
American troops could fell to a 
terrorist attack, or in a firelight 


like foe one in Somalia. Or Con- 
gress could cut off financing for 
the troops after June. . 

Even if Congress allows yet 
another extension, it will surely 
be short, and foe last one. So 
American forces have no lone- 
term future in Bosnia. Nor do 
the forces of America's NATO 
allies, since they have promised 
to follow it out the door. 

The administration needs a 
new policy before the current 
one collapses. There is still time 
to pursue the best alternative, a 
three-way partition of Bosnia. 
Such a solution requires active 
American involvement. The 
United States must design foe 
partition and stand wilting to 
subsidize and oversee it 

Large population transfers 
must be organized and assisted. 
American pressure on foe 
parties will be required to secure 
their agreement, since none can 
be given all they want. But at 
least such a partition might al- 
low an American withdrawal 
without starting a new war. 

The alternative — clinging to 
Dayton until its inevitable un- 
plosion — would have high 
costs for both Bosnians and 
Americans. A savage new war 
would be bound to erupt soon 
after foe departure of American 
troops. New ethnic cleansing 
would be likely. Croatia and 
Sexbia might join forces and di- 
vide Bosnia between them, sup- 
pressing foe Muslims by force 
and leaving them stateless. 

And American prestige 
would suffer the effects of an 
abject policy collapse. Recrim- 
ination and blame games would 
erupt among the NATO powers. 
Indeed, the Clinton administra- 
tion’s plan to expand NATO 
wonld probably be a casualty of 
a second Bosnian war. After alL l 
if NATO could not shut down 
the war in Bosnia, how could it 


the Bosnian question, but far 
better than a violent breakdown 
of Dayton. 

The writer, a professor of 
political science ax the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, contributed 
this to The New York Times. 


York Times. 


Letters intended for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
“ Letters to the Editor " and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing . We cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Fires Raging suiting from the wearing of low- 

v & ntvlrfvl duutcIp^VMlinu 


NEW YORK — The long con- 
tinued drought in the North and 
North-West has caused furious 
forest fires along foe P-arw Hian 
border line. The conflagrations 
that have been in progress in 
Manitoba now threaten North 
Dakota. Twenty or thirty per- 
sons are reported to have been 
burned to death. Settlers have 
been fighting the frames night 


suiting from the wearing of low- 
necked dresses, short sleeves ana 
skirts and high-heeled shoes. 

1947s Korea Proposal 

PARIS — [The Herald saysin an 
Editorial] The Russian proposal 
that both the United State s mm 
S oviet troops be withdrawn 
Korea presumably is a Etched 
move designed to impress world 
Tins proposal under 




to keep them from getting into 
foe more populated districts. 

1922: Fashion Illness 

PAR IS — The question of ’die 
effect of current fashion on 
women’s health has been 
answered in a somewhat alarm- 
ing manner by Swiss insurance 
companies. They have decided 
to increase the premiums of their 
women clients by 15 per cent 
The reason given is the greatly 
increased amount of i re- 


withdraw from northern Kw# 
and American troops fra® 
southern Korea, is possible be- 
cause foe Korean Communists 

are now so strong that they couw 

seize power if given foe oppo£ 
tunity. In northern Korea , u* 
Russians have set up apro-Rus- 
sinn government and nave- de- 
stroyed all political opposing 
The . United States, unfortu- 
nately, never has had a program 

for Korea beyond opposition to 

Co mmunism . This is not enough 
in Korea, dot anywhere else. 









INTENTIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 


v& 



TAGHeuer 

SWISS MADE SINCE 1860 


INTRODUCING 

Kl R I U M 





international HERALD TRmiwT 

™’S--*k : TOBER8 , W7 . STAG E/ENTER TAIJSMENT 


A 



Stones Rolling 
On Same Old Path 

Here’s ‘Bridges to Babylon 



By Jon Pareles 

Ne w York Times Service 


sene 


Win Hivnc- 


John Wood, right, as the aging A-E. Housman and Paul Rhys, left and inset, as the youthful poet in Tom Stoppard’s “ The Invention of Love 

Stoppard’s Latest 6 . Invention’ : Total Triumph 


N EW YORK — The album for- 
mat is a tyrant As the basic unit 
of rock - marketing, 
and the standard since the 
s for musicians who want to be taken 
isly. the album begs to be filled, and 
in tbeiCD era customers feel cheated if it 
holds ess than an hour of music. 

Thai puts the Rolling Stones in a 
peculiar position. Its albums are cross- 
promoted with tours, one generating at- 
tention for the other. Having a new al- 
bum proves the 
Stones 


oidies acTbut bo* Most ofthe album ’s 

the band aad its fans 0 J 
know that hardly 13 SOUgS are 
anyone cares much _ ° ? 7 /• 

about new ; t Roiimg forgettable; fewer 

Stones songs jo j 

It's a s'" 
band has 

putting out forget- 
table, single-plus-filler albums since 
“Some Girls’ ’-in 1978 or, at the latest, 

“Undercover" in 1983. 

The Stones' music is still carried by 
some of the best reflexes in rock: the 
tease-and-grapple guitars of Keith 
Richards and Ron Wood, the foursquare 
drive of Charlie Watts's drums, the vo- 
ciferous dishevelment of Mick J agger’s 
vocals. 

But the songs ring hollow; no one 
expects to hear them in two years. 

The pattern continues with “Bridges 
to Babylon" (Virgin), although it’s a 
better than average edition of the album 
the Stones have been putting out with 
minor variations since 1986. 

There’s slightly more effort in the 
songwriting, both words and melody, 
than there was on “Voodoo Lounge" in 
1994. For one thing, Jagger seems to 
have realized that leering come-ons 
make him sound like a dirty old man, not 
a Casanova; he's more convincing as a 
spumed lover. 

Between the lines, “Bridges to 
Babylon" insinuates thoughts of age, 
decay and death. In “Out of Control.'’ 
which echoes the Temptations' "Cloud 
Nine" and the Stones' own "Heart- 
breaker," the singer recalls “times long 
ago" when he was young, foolish, 
angry, vain and lucky: “Tell me how 
have I changed," he sings self-mock- 
ingly. 


By Sheridan Morley 

InienuiinvhJt Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — For those of us, 
maybe just those of me, who 
believe that Tom Stoppard has 
never written anything greater 
than his 1974 “Travesties," there is 
great news at the NationaL By way of a 
farewell present, Richard Eyre has su- 
perbly staged the latest play by the man 
who is essentially what we on this side 
of the Atlantic have instead of Stephen 

Sondheim, and without 

the music. 

the at e r That Stoppard is the 
■wwl i * 3 w aa >l most intellectually bril- 
Kfc 0 H° liarn playwright of my 
s , J half-century lifetime, I 
^ have no doubt; but 
when that brilliance 
leads, as I believe it did in his last play, 
“Arcadia," to a series of often exclu- 
sionary mind games, there was cause for 
concern. The professor was in danger of 
disappearing into his own genius. 

“The Invention of Love" (Cottesloe 
stage) brings him back center stage and 
in total triumph. Once again we are, as in 
“Travesties," dealing with a group of 
world-class talents who might have met, 
though in fact few of them did, in a place 
where they all happened to be living at 
roughly the same time. Instead of Lenin 
and Tzara and James Joyce in 1917 
Zurich, we now have A. E. Housman 
(the Shropshire Lad himself — oral any 
rate his creator — and how typical it is of 
Stoppard's quirky research that we only 
now discover there were few places 
Housman hated more that Shropshire), 
and Oscar Wilde, Frank Harris, Jerome 


K. Jerome, Walter Pater and John 
Ruskin. all gathered on the banks of the 
Oxford Isis sometime in the early 
1880s. 

Except, of course, that nothing in 
Stoppard is ever quite that simple. This 
river is not just the Isis but also the 
Thames of “Three Men in a Boat” and 
die Styx of Hell, complete 
with a quixotically boring 
boatman, Michael Biyant as 
Charon: “I had that Dionysus 
once in the back of me boat." 

So this is a play about a river ? 

Not exactly. 

h's a play about Housman 
young, (Paul Rhys, in edgy 
undergraduate uneasiness), 
and Housman old (John 
Wood, Stoppard’s best inter- 
preter) here in the perfor- 
mance of his life: “l am not as 
young as I was," he tells his 
younger alter ego, “whereas 
you of course are." 

At one level, and there are 
many, many more, this is a 
play about a little known, 
self- torturing, closet-gay poet 
trying to come to terms with his sexual 
and poetic self amid tremendous late- 
Victorian uncertainty. One of the cen- 
tral paradoxes of the man is that he left 
university without a degree and was 
within 15 years one of the most dis- 
tinguished classical professors in the 
world,, as acerbic in his textual com- 
mentaries as he was paralytically shy in 
real life — so shy that he moved six 
times, each time because a neighbor 
spoke to him on the train to work. 

His life was marked only, as Stoppard 


notes in the play “by long silences,” 
and though many dramatists might have 
been content just to fill in those silences, 
Stoppard is not many dramatists. His 
play veers off into the night sky like a 
fireworks display. One minute we have 
all the great 1870s dons at Oxford play- 
ing imaginary croquet as they debate the 
nature of poetry and philo- 
sophy; the next, we get Oscar 
Wilde cutting to the heart of 
the play's only problem. “Bi- 
ography," says Tom’s Oscar, 
“is the mesh through which 
our real life escapes.' ’ 

“The Invention of Love" 
is a great play about a great 
deal, but in the end it is about 
the comiption of texts and 
men, and the price that the 
hypocritical and flawed pub- 
lic and private morality of the 
last ceatury exacted from its 
greatest talents. 

Elsewhere, the new music- 
al "Maddie" (The Lyric), is 
by no means disastrous but 
curiously unsatisfactory. It 
can best be described as a mix 
of “Sunset Boulevard" and “Blithe 
Spirit " 

A young couple rents a San Francisco 
apartment only to find it haunted by the 
ghost of a 1920s would-be movie star. If 
that sounds familiar, the plot was once 
tried as a Glenn Close movie called 
“Maxie" and that didn't work either. 
But here a lot of new talent has gone into 
papering over the cracks, and in Sum- 
mer Rognlie. who plays the Gose 
double role, we seem at last to have 
found the next Judy Holliday. 


f 


. -v 


Another new musical in towiis vastly 
more wonderful: "Kat and tl Kings" 
(The Tricycle) is the most jc pus cel- 
ebratory sing-along since “E je Guys 
Named Moe" and, being evn better, 
deserves a similarly long Slftesbury 
Avenue life. It tells the stok of the 
Ca valla Kings, an amazing pse-har- 
mony group that came to farnepn South 
African radio circa 1957 befofc anyone 
discovered that they were nt in' fact 
white. Their showbiz story, ofiow they 
were introduced by a white manger with 
the words. “If they weren’ on stage 
they'd be outside breaking ito your 
cars.” and of how they wei only al- 
lowed to sing in hotel caba l if they 
carried guests ' baggage all da> is at once 
true, terrifying and oddly touc ng. 

And at the King's Head!, lens is a 
powerful revival by Kenneth liliott of 
Mart Crowley’s 1968 “Bo in the 
Band," which only serves remind 
how hopelessly that play has jw been 
outdated by the tragedy of AI S. 

Lastly, a personal footnou Were T 
ever again to live outside Lond 1 . which 
is unlikely, perhaps 1 would sei : some- 
where near Newbury in Beri lire. A 
town famous in my childhoodmly for 
racing and farming now finds itaf at the 
center of a triangle of three kite re- 
markable bam-like theaters: Indrew 
Lloyd Webber's private Sydlonton, 
where much of his work is alw awes ted; 
Jill Fraser’s courageous little W&rmill, 
shamefully threatened by a bvpk and 
now Mary and David Russell's jombe 
Manor, private but open to the pdic for 
at least one season a year of smalscale 
opera and late-night cabaret of tmen- 
dous charm in a country-house sding. 


situation the than half may linger, . 

ls abetted by J * c 


T 


“Already Over Me* finds som 
poignancy in a chorus tht hints at Jag 
ger’s worries about his adience as we I 
as the song’s ostensible ale of a one- ■ 
night stand. But just as oftn. as in * ‘ Low 
Down,” Jagger seems toie expanding, 
small ideas by rote. 

A few songs seek to reepture the old. 
Stones' sense of menac. “Flip the 
Switch," for instance, th rocker £hat h 
opens the album, is a taunfrom a man > 
about to face the death pnalty; Met- ! 
allica would understand. 

The choppy, martial “Guface," with 
the singer threatening a woun who has \ 
turned out 10 ■ 
be as disinest as he 
is. migl be the . 
Stones' aswer to the 
sociopath narrators 
of Nine tch Nails 
(who of mrse owe 
somethingo “Mid- 
night Rairier' 

For "light as - 
Well Get'uiced." 
about self-destruction, the Snes get . 
traction in 1990s music, applyij up-to- * 
date distortion, pulsing symhezer and 
the bass-heavy mixes of dance lusic to 
basic blues-rock. Of the albn’s 13 ; 
songs, fewer than half may ling. 


0 




'M&*- 







i } 


| HERE are tenacious pt chor- 
uses in "Already OvtMe." 
essentially an -dated 
"Angie.” and in “A body 
Seen My Baby?." which suggis the 
verse of Michael Jackson's Jillie 
Jean" and copies the chorus 1 k.d. 
lang's “Constant Craving." (Sheares 
the songwriting credit). 

“Flip the Switch" and “Mijt as 
Well Get Juiced" could get by ofceir 
muscle. And two of the three songrith 
lead vocals by Richards are paible 
genre efforts: reggae in “You ln’t 
Have to Mean It' ’ and soul in “Hov^n 
I Stop." 

Elsewhere, the album is full of bid- 
shouldered guitar riffs and unmistakle 
Stones interplay, like die staggjd 
rhythm guitars in “Low Down" anne 
slide-guitar riffing of “Too Tight" 

But professionalism can cany e 
songs only so far. Maybe for the tout 
2000, the Stones should put out a m- 
nificent EP or an album filled out ui 
hard-grooving instrumentals,, instead 
grinding out songs for an cver-growi. 
scrap heap. 



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rucci Offers Some Airs 


9 

n 

1 

l a 

l Worn-( 


By Suzy Menkes 

fiucmationjl Herald Tribune 


i 

r ILAN — Gucci’s stock is falling 


— and that is not just for its 
investors. Tom Ford, who had 
seemed like fashion’s most bank- 
able desher, sent out a spring collection that 
relied orammicks instead of creative energy 
— althoqi there were the usual slick, wear- 
able cloi 

The thde was the thong, in scarlet sequins, 
with its hlstraps (including a rhinestone G 
for Gucci mowing above low-slung skirts. 
Yawn! Fqr s airs on a G-string have been 
played bef* and could not distract from the 
pointed -toekling-back shoes falling off the 
models fed The Gucci-logo brocade will 
make 'them Veil? How cynical, when the 
house's bloats were its fortune. 

“It wasp’&ieant to happen that the shoes 
came off — in then it's sexy to have your 
clothes cone ff at any point in time,” Ford 
quipped bats ige. But the pluses sure stayed 
in place: Th [ ig, flat, neat-for-your-charge- 
cards bags g e held by a strangling strap 
round the net 

Cool luxuift the Gucci take on clothes, so 
there were te leather jackets and a new 
must-have vtj on in ostrich. Ford cuts a 
mean pairof Pts, but iridescent trouser suits 
seemed not cl s j c but familiar; so did the 
cobweb- Fme sw, lers elongated to dresses — 
with flashes c sequined thong showing 
through. For evjing, there were some Hol- 
lywood greats 1> the vintage-style taffeta 
coats, one lined Yh rhinestones, worn over 
narrow pants. 

There was onernall innovation: under- 
wear. But if Guccii ans to do a Calvin and 
make that a blue ch-investment, his soggy 
bra and pants (G-pri^ of course) did noth- 
ing for anyone's botin line. 

You could never ink of Jii Sander as 
cynical. Sincerity andtensity are her trade- 
marks. And the collect she sent out Tues- 
day emphasized her Ijgf that a woman's 
beauty and character ^>uld shine through 
clothes that express a ptd-down modernity: 
hardly a coat collar discing the clean lines 
and just a subtle play oiextures and color. 
Thai meant laminated cotj giving a sheen to 
a straight white coat and freshening of the 
monochrome palette with frirose yellow and 
sky blue (including the mo| s * eyeshadow). 

But there were two pi|ems with this 
tightly focused collection: Sder seems to be 
following precisely die same,* taken by the 
Japanese designers in the I9^ : too many of 
the draped dresses and squan u t jackets had 
their birthplace in the earij-oiJections of 
Yohji Yamamoto and Commits Garcons. 
Secondiy, what she shows is 1 really what 
she sells. Asked whether thertgre the sig- 
nature Sander pantsuits in fine fries on ofier 
to the buyers, the Singapore fq on tycoon 
Christina Ong replied with Ug words: 
“masses and masses." 

Designers often keep comm-* in the 
showroom. But Sander is an ifc 0 f user- 
friendly modern dressing, and n^ 0 f her 







MaoRVThaau* 

Gucci’s G-string, sheer skirt and tuxedo, j 

masterly tailoring and fewer tortured and - 
twisted dresses would be welcome on the ! 
runway. 

For his second show at Byfalos. Richard"'- 
Tyler began to get things right — especially 
his focus on fine couture details tike the tiny_ 
pleats on a schoolgirl suit, pretty edging to 
knits and flower cutouts on leather. Sticking^ 1 
to gray and mauve hues, the designer fash- . . 
ioned a modern woman. She wears plain! 
pantsuits or may be more playful in brief- j 
dresses decent with colored shorts. They loo£--j 
surprisingly cute. Evening lingerie looks' -■ 
seemed familiar, but for Byblos a useful ne.w?! 
image may be on the way. i. > 

You can read the stubborn insistence of. 
Romeo Gigli to do his own sweet thing as a- .' 
mark of individuality. Or of folly. His show 5 
was poetic and pastoral, with Mozart on the 
sound track andf models in rosebud- trimmed 
pixie shoes, filmy dresses or curving frock 
coats. With hipster pants in fashion, Gigli - 
were willfully high rise. Although the fabrics, 
were wondrous and the color palette rich, the 1 
designer is locked in his romantic world. ‘i 

Since celebrities are fashion's currency, 1 ' 
Krizia came up with the actual Farrah Faw-'' 
cett, the big-haired star of the 1970s, stiiil 
showing her assets in a brief black dress witfr'- 
sheer insert at the cleavage. That was one of 
Knzia’s graphic looks in a collection that was- 
on the current track, because it endorsed the t 
general Milan trend for dresses. They were ' ' 
sexy in leather, shiny in lamd and with ait 
arnstic touch when paint strokes caressed: 
sneer chiffon. 


Uf 





I 


KYOCERA prints 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



:Si<yocERa 


- KOOT MCI PHWTBlfS-lW 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Cambridge: Britain’s High-Technology Hotbed 


By Tan Buerkle 

tmemmioia} Herald Tribune 


CAMBRIDGE, England— The low- 
rae, giass-and-!ttick building sits un- 
obtrusively on toe outskirts of this uni- 
versity town, tat the hectic -pace of 

. activity inside gives a hint of the bold 

ambitions of fe corporate tenan t 
Six yens after Nigel Playfonl 

dreamed of usug digital radio to set up an 

alternative, naional telephone network, 
*e company fc founded, lonica Group 
PLC, is tumiig that vision into reality. 
,-’tonica now cm provide service to about 
v JO percent of the population, mainl y in 
East Anglia aid central England, and is 
on track to extend coverage to most of 
Britain and vin up to 10 percent of the 
. national maim in five years. 

A n IniKnUk. 



nological know-how, business acumen 
and venture capital has made ii the lead- 
ing example of the so-called “Cambridge 
phenomenon,” a phrase coined more 
than a decade ago as Britain sought to 
create its own Silicon Valley. 

“In theory, lonica could have been 
set up anywhere in the country,” said 
Ian Morris, the company’s director for 
external affairs, “what Nigel had ac- 
cess to in Cambridge was a network of 
technologically able and also entrepre- 
neurial people.” 

That network won perhaps its biggest 
seal of approval this summer when Mi- 
crosoft Corp. announced plans to invest 
£50 million to establish a research lab- 
oratory here, its first research facility 
outside the United States. 

Bill Gates, the Microsoft chairman, 
also donated $20 million toward a new 
ter-smdies building at the uni- 
versity, and he is chipping in £10 mil- 
lion toward a £30 million venture-cap- 


ital pool being set up by Herman 
Hauser, whose Amadeus fund-manage- 
ment group has played a key role in 
Cambridge’s growth. 

“We’re going to put together a really 
amazing group of people,” said Mr. 
Gates, who spoke at the university on 
Tuesday after meeting with Prime Min- 
ister Tony Blair to discuss the govern- 
ment’s plan to connect all British schools 
to the Internet. “The computer-science 
tradition here and the companies in the 
area made this a great spot for us. 1 ’ 

John Shields, senior vice president 
for research at Cantab Pharmaceuticals 
PLC. said, * ‘Having the opportunity to 
interact with top-quality scientists 
nearby was a big influence in my com- 
ing here." Cantab uses biotechnology 
to develop vaccines for treating cervical 
cancer and other diseases. 

The Cambridge area boasts some 
1,200 “knowledge-based” companies 
employing 30,000 people and generating 


sales of more than £3 billion. About 85 
percent of start-up companies here sur- 
vive more than five years, well ahead of 
the national norm of about 50 percent. 

Cambridge has long been a magnet for 
scientists. University members have 
won more than 50 Nobel raizes, and the 
area is Uttered with public and private 
research institutes Like the Laboratory for 
Molecular Biology, where Watson and 
Crick unraveled the structure of DNA. 

The university has built on that by 
cultivating close ties with industry, cre- 
ating the country's first science park and - 
facilitating the efforts of academics id 
launch companies. 

It is a measure of Cambridge’s break- 
through that some residents are begin- 
ning to question whether the area is 
becoming a victim of its own success. 

The tranquil lifestyle of a small uni- 
versity city of just over 1 00,000 people, 
situated less than an hour north of Lon- 
don, has been a key ingredient of the 



IHT 


Cambridge formula. But the city’s nar- 
row streets are clogged on many days, 
and fast-growing companies like lonica 
are beginning to encounter difficulty 
obtaining the space and planning per- 
mission to expand. 

“There is a dilemma,” said Simon 
Shobet, a consultant with Segal Quince, 
Wicksteed. **1116 quality of life here is 
good partly because it is not hugely 
congested.” 


Sun Takes On Microsoft, 
Filing Lawsuit Over Java 


PALC ALTO, California — Sun Mi- 
crosystcos Inc. took the gloves off 
Tuesday in its battle with Microsoft 
Crap., .uing the software giant for 
breach <f contract over its use of Sun’s 
popularfava technology. • 

The iction represented Sun’s latest 
effort t> preserve what it calls the next 
big advance in computing: a language 
for deeloping software Suit works on 
any omp u ter system, not just Mi- 
crosofs Windows. The complaint, 
which Sun riled in federal court, also 
chargs Microsoft with trademark in- 
fringment, false advertising, unfair, 
comptition and interference with pro- 
tj speewe economic advantage. 

Su said the action came after ne- 
gotirions with Microsoft for the last six 
mortis had failed. 

Sn said it was seeking an injunction 
to psvent Microsoft from using the 
Jav. Compatible logo and is seeking to 
preent Microsoft from “misleading” 
Jav developers and prevent them from 
deleting ‘'anything but fully compat- 
ibl" Java software. 

lie move could force Microsoft to 
mdify its new Internet browser. 


Sun c laims that Microsoft has used a 
version of die Java lan guag e in its new 
Internet Explorer software that only 
works on computers running on Win- 
dows operating software. Java makes it 
possible fra uses of die World Wide Web 
to view fancy animated graphics sent 
from remote computers. 

Sun alleges that Microsoft distorted 
an intended purpose of Java, to run 
seamlessly across many machines, and 
possibly violated the companies 1 licens- 
ing agreement. Sun has never revoked 
any of the hundreds of licenses that it has 
granted since it released Java nearly two 
years ago. Microsoft has defended its 
adoption of Java, saying that it needed to 
make sure it works well with Windows 
and that San is just trying to keep control 
of a potentially lucrative product 
Microsoft executives could not im- 
mediately be reached for comment 
The suit demands that Microsoft 
modify Internet Explorer 4.0, which the 
company began shipping last week, so 
that it uses a version of Java that runs 
across many machines. 

Failing that Microsoft is being asked 
to stop using the Java trademark on the 
Internet Explorer 4.0. (AP,AFX) 



RESISTANCE — Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corp., at the company’s annual meeting in Adelaide, 
Australia, on Tuesday. He declined to repeat his bullish profit forecasts of last year. He also said he opposed 
any tightening of privacy laws after the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, and defended paparazzi 
photographers. “Privacy laws are for the protection of people who are already privileged,” he said. 


Motorola 
Sees a Jump 
In Chip Sales 

Strong Earnings Lift 

Technology Shares 

ficyiw by OxrSitfFn&DutvIckrt 

NEW YORK — Motorola Inc. 
lacked off the third-quarter earnings re- 
porting season by exceeding expecta- 
tions and by delivering a bullish forecast 
for semiconductor sales, sending stock 
prices, particularly computer-related 
shares, higher Tuesday. 

“Investors expect companies to 
come in with great earnings in order to 
keep this market booming,” said Jef- 
frey Serratt, a U.S. equities trader at 
Credit Lyonnais Securities Inc. 

Investors were mostly encouraged by 
Motorola's prediction for increasing 
sales in its main wireless and chip busi- 
nesses, which account for 84 percent of 
its revenue. Although U.S. paging sales 
will not improve until next year. Mo- 
torola said its overall profit would rise 
this quarter, ami it painted a rosier pic- 
ture for 1998. 

The forecast sent the company’s share 
price up $2.1875 to close at $73.1875. 

But Motorola warned of slower sales 
growth in the fourth quarter and said it 
could take pretax charges of as much as 
$100 milli on as it reviewed other busi- 
nesses that had not met expectations. 

Late Monday, Motorola announced 
that third-quarter earnings rose 29 per- 
cents the third quarter but said its results 
were below expectations because of 
weak pager sales ami a decision to stop 

m Thereompai^Mm^ $2^miSioa, or 
44 cents a share, on sales of $7.4 billion 
in the quarter. That compared with earn- 
ings of $206 million, or 34 cents a share, 
on sales of $6.5 billion in the like period 
last year. 

The company said it had taken a $95 
million pretax charge against third- 
quarter earnings to mid its relationship 
with Apple Computer Inc. 

It attributed die move to Apple’s de- 
ciriontolimitthemtroductiotiofitsnew 
technology and to phase out future li- 
censing. 

Excluding the charge. Motorola said 
profit rose 59 percent to $328 million. 

See MOTOROLA, Page 14 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Europeans Revolt at U.S. Studio Tactics 



i By Richard Covington 

Special io the Herald Tribune 

ANNES — After years of 
pouring billions of dollars in- 
to Hollywood film and tele- 
vision productions, European 
broadcasters are voicing outrage at the 
• tactics a number of American studios 
are using to squeeze additional revenue 
ourof noo-U.S. buyers. 

For European viewers, the higher 
prices demanded by the Hollywood stu- 
dios are often passed along as increased 
costs for digital pay-television pack- 
ages. the broadcasters say. “It's an 
emotional issue for broadcasters,” said 
James McNamara, president of Uni- 
versal Television Enterprises. 

Ongoing disputes involving Viacom 
Inc. ’s Paramount Pictures Corp., Kirch 
Group of Germany, Mediaset SpA, 
owned by the Italian media executive 
iSilvio Berlusconi, France's Television 
' Par Satellite digital network and others 
threaten future contracts. 

Past partnerships between American 
studios and European broadcasters 
have contributed more than $10 billion 
to Hollywood films and television 
series in the past two years, according 
to industry sources. 

European broadcasters once could 
pick ana choose individual episodes of 
series, said Harry Evans Sloan, chair- 
man and chief executive officer of the 
Luxembourg-based Scandinavian 
Broadcasting System Inc. 

“Now the major studios say you 


have to take entire series you haven’t 
seen and others that have run for years 
that you don’t want,” he said. 

The Europeans are hitting hack 
where it hum, producing their own 
telefilms and series and turning away 
from U.S. programs, they say. 

“The prices have become so high 
for American series and films chat it 
has encouraged a boom in German 
production, teaching us that German 
product draws more audiences,” said 
Helmut Thoma, managing director of 
RTL Plus GmbH. 

“The big advantage of U.S. product 
was that it used to be affordable by 
comparison to producing in Germany. 
Now with the higher prices, it no longer 
makes sense,” he said. 

bate at being denied Paramount 
films it thought it had paid for, Italy’s 
Mediaset is threatening to cancel future 
contracts. 


“Next year there may be no deals,” 
Giovanni Stabilini, Mediaset’s senior 
vice president for acquisitions, said at 
Mipcom, an international television 
conference that closed here last week. 
“Paramount loses its European loco- 
motive if this practice continues.” 

A spokesman for Kirch Group was 
equally incensed over Paramount’s 
failure to provide films for which the 
Goman broadcaster thought it bad con- 
tracts. In what are known in the media 
trade as “output deals,” European 
broadcasters {raid American studios 
large sums for their total output over 
periods ranging from three to 10 years, 
largely to guarantee that they would 
have the rights to hit films as lures ftx- 


In the first four months of 1996 alone, 
Kirch Group paid $3.5 billion for rights 

See MOVIES, Page 18 


To Out Readers 

To present the New York Stock Ex- 
change tables more legibly, the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune - has begun 
publishing a redesigned list of NYSE 
share prices. (Page 16) 

The type size has been enlarged and 
the space between lines widened. This 
has been achieved by eliminating 
shares that seldom trade and by drop- 
ping shares not available to most in- 
vestors. In limiting the list to the 2,600 
most traded shares, the Qew table 


ss represec 
INYSEma 


99 per- 
: daily. 


cent of all NYSE market value daily. 

This is the first in a series of re- 
visions aimed at making the share 
prices in all of our U.S. market tables 
more readable. We invite your com- 
ments and suggestions (e-mail to 
iht@iht.com or write to the editor. 
International Herald Tribune, 181 
Ave. Charles de Gaulle, 92521 
Neuilly-sur-Seine, France). Full daily 
U.S. share-price information remains 
available at the RTF's site on the In- 
ternee www_iht.com 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


btvsMb 


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Global Private Banking 


Inte 


LLIGENT CONSERVATISM, 


VIGOROUSLY PURSUED. 



There are as many formulas for success 
in business as there axe businesses. Republic’s 
formula has a time-tested advantage: 
it works. 

It is based on a carefully balanced 
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We maintain one of the strongest capital 
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Conservatism, however is only part of the 
Republic story. We combine safety with a dyna- 
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Strength, security, service - the ' ’open secret 
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hank. 



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AW York in 1\W larii. 



Republic National Bank of New York* 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A Safe [{..If * Yorli • Im * Uni* • fWifintf ' Beirut ■ lWily HUIn ■ Rimhh Aim • Ca»nu n ULni* • CWnWn ■ 

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Mnnlml - - IWh • iUU Jd ««.. - R b ie J.aeiw. . &*«.*> . . S 

* Iv.'TiuUi,- ^Unul Kinh iyC Nt> I W(i 



L_l, . 





PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNE SDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 





AOL and Bertelsmann Go Down Under in Italy tat* 


Source: Btoombarg. Reuters iwnmiocai Henu Tiflwne 


Very briefly: 

Wal-Mart to Open 185 Outlets 

BENTO NVELLE, Arkansas (Bloomberg) — Wal-Mart 
Stores Inc., the world ’s largest retailer, said Tuesday it planned 
to open about 185 stores in the year beginning Feb. 1, 
including 120 to 125 supercenters and 50 discount stores. 

Wal-Mart said it also would open about 10 Sam's Clubs, 
which are discount outlets open only to members. 

It said it planned to develop 50 to 60 stores in Argentina, 
Brazil, Canada, China, Indonesia, Mexico and Puerto Rico. 
Overall it plans to add 26 million square feet of retail space. 

Sprint Guarantees Internet Access 

WESTWOOD, Kansas (Bloomberg) — Sprint Carp, said 
Tuesday it would guarantee its customers access to the Internet 
in an effort to show off recent enhancements to its network that 
it says have made it more reliable. 

Beginning Oct. 20, Sprint said, subscribers who cannot 
connect to the Internet using local access numbers will be given 
toll-free numbers. 

If they still have problems, they will receive a week of free 
Internet access or $5 off the monthly fee of $19.95. 

• H J. Heinz Co. agreed to acquire CPC International Inc’s 
single-serve condiments unit in Britain and the unit’s Frank 
Cooper's brand as part of Heinz’s plan to double European 
sales in the next five years. Terms were not disclosed. 

• Eastman Kodak Co. said it had notified 200 managers, 
mostly at the company’s headquarters in Rochester, New York, 
that they were being dismissed as part of a cost-cutting plan. 

• Union Pacific Resources Group Inc said it had revised its 
unsolicited $6.4 billion bid for Pennzoil Co., dropping its 
half-cash, half-stock bid for an all-cash bid of $84 a share. 

• GMAC Commercial Mortgage Corp. agreed to buy $7.1 

billion in mortgage servicing from GE Capital Asset Man- 
agement, raising its loan-servicing portfolio to more than $36 
billion. Bloomberg, Reuters 


By Rajiv Chandrasekaran 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Continuing 
its aggressive overseas expansion, 
America Online Inc. said Tuesday 
it would begin next year to offer a 
version of its service in Australia in 
partnership with Bertelsmann AG 
of Germany. 

The move into Australia — the 
second-largest on-line market in the 
Asia-Pacific region after Japan — is 
part of a continuing effort by AOL 
to bolster its subscriber base m hope 
of increasing its revenue from ad- 
vertising and marketing deals. 

AOL operates similar services in 
Europe, Japan and Canada with a 
total of about 850,000 customers, 
said Jack Davies, president of AOL 
International. 

Although 42 percent of house- 
holds in Australia have personal 
computers, only about 1 1 parent 
use on-line services, according a 
recent survey by AGB McNair, an 
Australian market-research con- 
cern. Mr. Davies said the number 
of Internet users in Australia — 
currently 1.6 million — was ex- 
pected to triple by 2001. 

AOL Australia will feature a 
mix of the on-line service’s stan- 
dard offerings interspersed with lo- 
cal content. AOL said the new ser- 


vice would be in operation by next 
autumn. 

Bertelsmann will invest be- 
tween $27 million and $41 million 
to pay for the launch of the service, 
AOL executives said. They said 
AOL would not invest cash but 
would contribute content and tech- 
nology to the venture. The two 
companies will share the profits 
evenly, the executives said 


44 We think we have a good team 
in place with AOL and Bertels- 
mann," said Thomas Middelhoff, a 
top Bertelsmann executive who sits 
on AOL’s board He said AOL’s 
European venture, jointly operated 
by Bertelsmann, had grown faster 
th an expected and now had about 
700,000 subscribers. 

Bertelsmann, which owns about 
5 percent of America Online, 


Intel Patent Fight: A Truce? 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Is Digital 
Equipment Corp. about to give up 
on its troubled Alpha chip to settle 
its patent-infringement suit against 
Intel Corp.? 

Neither company has confirmed 
reports of such negotiations. But 
even if Digital’s chief executive, 
Robert Palmer, had not been con- 
sidering such a move, he might 
want to now. 

Digital’s shares soared 9 percent 
Monday after a published report 
said Digital was considering drop- 
ping its lawsuit and giving the Al- 
pha technology to Intel- in ex- 
change for cash, product discounts 
and a long-term alliance. 

The news also benefited Intel, 


which was facing years of expens- 
ive litigation with Digital. Its stock 
rose $1.75 to close at $95.25. Di- 
gital was down 18.75 cents at 
$48.5625. 

Alpha has had weak sales de- 
spite the fact that many specialists 
consider it superior to anything 
made by Intel. For Digital, se lling 


negotiations. But consider it superior to anything cause the company b 
; chief executive, made by Intel. For Digital, se lling formance goals for 
tad not been con- the technology to Intel might be a ended in June amk 


For Tnrt-t, the deal might provide 
access to some desig ns worth bor- 
rowing and some Digital custom- 
ers worth courting, while helping, 
avoid protracted patent litigation. 

Both companies refused to com- 
ment on the report; the newspaper 
article said a deal was not assured. 


already operates book and music 
clubs in Australia. 

The venture is expected to face 
competition fromlocal Internet-ser- 
vice providers such as Telstra, Aus- 
tralia's largest telephone company. 

The CompuServe Corp. on-line 
service, whose members AOL ac- 
quired last month, has 25,000 sub- 
scribers in Australia. 

■ AOL Slashes Bonuses 

America Chiline ait bonuses in 
half for some senior executives and 
did not give its chairman, Steve 
Case, any extra pay because the 
company did not meet its earnings 
target for the year, Bloomberg News 
reported from Dulles, Virginia. 

AOL said in si proxy statement 
filed with the Securities and Ex- 
change Co mmissi on that it had cut 
some bonuses by 50 percent be- 
cause the company had missed per- 
formance goals for the year that 
ended in June amid restructuring 
charges and a change in how it 
accounted for marketing expeases. 

America Online posted a loss of 
$4993 milli on for the year, com- 
pared with a profit of $29.8 million 
last year. Revenue rose 55 percent, 
to $1.69 billion from $1.09 billion. 

The proxy did not specify the 
financial targets that die company 
had set. 


MOTOROLA: Forecast of Strength in Semiconductor Sales Lifts Stock Prices 


Continued from Page 13 

The results contrast with a warn- 
ing last month that sent Motorola's 
shares aimhling on word that slow 
paging sales and the exit from the 
Macintosh clone business would 


In its forecast, Motorola said it 
expected the semiconductor in- 
dustxy to show growth of between 6 

US. STOCKS 

percent and 8 percent for 1997 from 
last year. It said that rate should rise 
to between 15 percent and 17 per- 
cent in 1998. 

Motorola said it expected paging 
sales in China to decline fintbe- in 
the fourth quarter and that U.S. pa- 
ging operations would not see any 
4 ‘si gnificant improvement” until 
“sometime in 1998," said Ed 
Gams, a company spokesman. 

U.S. companies will report third- 
qnarter results during the next three 
weeks. 

“We expect strong earnings out 
of many tech stocks as strong de- 


mand for computers and networking 
equipment continues,” said Doug 
MacKay of White Oak Growth 
Stock Fund for Oak Associates in 
Akron, Ohio. 

The sentiment sent share prices of 
other semiconductor makers higher. 
Microsoft rose 1% to 13614. 

Gains in the technology sector 
lifted the Dow Jones industrial av- 


erage 78.09 points, to 8,178.3. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index jumped 10.42, to 983.11, and 
the Nasdaq composite index gained 
1536 points to 1,737.27. 

Abby Joseph Cohen, co-chair- 
man of the investment policy com- 
■ mittee at Goldman Sachs ana one of 
Wall Street's most influential 
strategists, raised her 12-month tar- 


U.S. Investors’ Hopes - or Dreams? 


Bloomberg Nets 

U.S. mutual-fund investors are 
unrealistically optimistic about the 
outlook foe equity-market returns, 
according to a survey by Mont- 
gomery Asset Management LLC 
Investors questioned far the na- 
tionwide survey said they expected 
animal stock-market returns aver- 
aging 34 percent for the next 10 yeare, 
Montgomery said. The survey com- 
prised interviews with 750 mutual- 
fund investors and has a margin of 
error of about four percentage points, 
be San Francisco-based firm said. 


4 The high expectations are cause 
for concern.” Stephen Doyle, 
Montgomery Asset’s chairman, 
said. “While the record long boll 
market has benefited millions of in- 
vestors, they must also maintain 
realistic expectations and prepare 
for some bumps in the marke t along 
the way.” 

U.S. equity-market returns rarely 
average 34 percent for more than 
one or two years, history shows. 
Since 1951, the Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index has risen at annual 
rate of about 123 potent 


get for the S&P 500 index to 1,050. 

Ms. Cohen, in a note to clients, 
said the fears that drove be stock 
market lower in .August “have now 
abated" 

She said those fears included con- 
cern that economic turbulence in 
Asia would impede U.S. profit 
growth, and that U.S. economic 
growth WOtlld spark inflatio n. 

Falling interest rates provided, a 
cushion to the advance. The yield on 
the b enchmar k 30-year Treasury 
bond fell two basis points to 6.24 
percent. 

The market was not without its 
share of laggards. Reader's Digest 
Association dropped after the com- 

J iany said it expected a first-quarter 
oss because of weaker- than-expec- 


The Dollar l 

BloombergNews 

NEW YORK ■— :The dollar fej 
against the Deutsche mark Tuesday 
as political turmoi^in Italy raised 
concern that the country might not 
qualify for Enrope-'i planned eco- 
nomic and monetaiyhnion, sending 
investors to seek ^fcty intS 
mark. -j- 

“The prolonged disis in Italy 
around budget refomfis resulting fa 
higher demand for narks,” said 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

Chris Widness, an kttematioual 
economist at Chase ■■ Manhattan 
Bank, “and that tendl to lift the 
mark across the board." 

Investors bought trades after a 
Communist grouping in the Italic 
Parliament, whose support is crit- 
ical to the govemroem, opposed 
budget cuts considered, ijjtal for the 
country to qualify for {he single 
currency, or euro. 

Also lifting the mark was spec- 
ulation that the Biwdesb&k would 
raise interest rates in the pin- up to 
the euro, even as Gemun' unem- 
ployment rose to a post-Wwid War 
U record last month. ' • 

In late trading, the dolhr was at 
1 .7577 DM, down from L$9D DM 
on Monday. 

It was also at 12235 yeo^pfrom 
121.95 yen, as traders pad mote 
attention to reports indicating thrt 
the Japanese economy conthued to 
perform poorly than to cncems 
over the U.S. trade deficit 

The dollar rose to 1.4485 Swiss 
francs' from 1.4475 francs rnd to 
5.9060 French francs from ?.901l 
francs. The pound rose to $16225 
from $1.6155. > 

While higher U.S. rates lelped 
lift fee dollar 22 percent agaist the; 
mark this year through earij An- 


ted sales caused by a strong dollar. 

E*Trade Group tumbled 5 5/16 to 
34 amid concern that profit will 
slide as competition heats up with 
Charles Schwab and other compa- 
nies with fast-growing on-line se- 
curities-trading businesses. 

Drug shares advanced amid op- 
timism that newly approved drugs 
would bolster companies’ bottom 
lines. (Bloomberg, AP) 


on growing expectations tha the 
Bundesbank will raise Germanasre 
for the first time in five years. - 
“Interest-rate differentials oc 
not supporting the dollar tty- 
more,” said Mike Rosenbetfof 
Merrill Lynch & Co. ‘The dolvi 
in a slow, grinding downtrend.* 
The G erman unemployment re- 
port damped expectations (hat a at 
rise was imminent, traders said. It 
Bundesbank left its securities > 
purchase rate unchanged at 3.0 pi- 
cent Tuesday. i ; 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

The 300 most traded stocks of ttie day, 
op to the dosing on Wafl Sired. 

The Associated Press. 


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45a 44 

3 £ 

f* 4 

»h m 

# a 

4ft At 
37 3M ■ 
374 14 

324 31ft 
1 1ft 
Sft N 
154 IS 
14 IN 
1ft Ift 
74 7 

sat st 
74 7 

« (ft 
IK* 174 

>ft r* 

144 144 

-A 40 
lft IN 
9 14 

ft ft 
1* 54 

lflft 10 

w *» 

Iff* If 
uu m 
174 IT* 
554 55 

14 74 

Ift 7ft 
ft ft 

94 fft 
lift if-* 
14 Ift 

in a 

«e 424 
174 124 

74 44 

1(4 U 
Sft IN 
24 24 

44 44 

ft ft 

5ft #* 

If 2M 
I 54 
35ft 254 

£ ,F 

m m 

IN TV* 

V>* 54 

IK.* 114 
54 5*1 

754 24ft 
1ft 34 
14 (ft 
14 14 

14 14 

IN 14 
2*4 2M> 

144 124 

14 IV* 

I ft 

n 1 * 
n im 
m in 
II 104 
Pt 7-4 
(4 M 
14 5ft 
S4 » 

n n 

nv* lift 

14* 144 

114 lift 
Ift 14 

n 2ft 

140*4 !1N 
94 Kt 
ItM IM 
IK 11N 
2ft IN 
2* 24 

144 Uft 
7 (4 

«* TTfti 
44ft (5ft 
214 2*4 

% s* 

24 2N 
in ift 
ipi ir» 
1034 IM 
94 BA 
45V. 

N » 

44 Sft 
14 14 

lit 114 

m uft 

i» in 

W4 IK 

A’f 491) 

IM II 


5Vh ft 
KM -4 

a -s 

M *4 
2TV ft 
M 

94 ft 
2ft -4 
34 -4 

214 .ft 
4ft ft 
104 -IV* 
374 -14 

22V) ft 
Ift ft 
54 -4 

154 ft 
14 -ft 
Ift *4 
7- .4 

SKt .14 
74 .4 

44 *N 
ION .ft 
04 -ft 
144 ft 
«ft -4 
Ift 

* -4 

ft 

501. ft 
M 

94 ft 
II 41 
114 .14 

13ft ft 
55 -4 

Tta .4 
Ift ft 
ft .4 
fft »N 


13 .ft 

74 .14 

14ft ft 
Sft ft 
7ft .ft 

4ft ft 

ft 

Ift 

If -ft 

0 41 
25> ft 
,1ft .4 
144 .ft 
19ft .4 

Ift .4 
Ift 
ID 
Sft 

25. •* 

So *4 
M .) 
Ift .4 
1ft *N 

14 .** 
»* ft 
l» -4 

1ft ft 
ft 

r* -ft 
304 ft 

1 ft 
HM ■*» 

54 ft 


m* -ift 

14) 

ID ft 
1ft 

2ft .14 
14 ft 
W *4 
n* .4 
124 -4 

24 .ft 


7 .4 

WVc .IN 
«N. .ft. 
son 

Ii ft 

17.4 ft 

14 ft 

IN -4 

154 -H 

W* 

9'4 ft 

45 ft 

h >4 

A) .4 

14 -4 

111* ft 

re» .4 

J74 .4 

154 -2 

U .4 

AN -ft 


Dow Jones * 

opw Htak Kw UM Ota. 
hd» B107J4 H0175 BfflBjn 117131 +78.09 


Standard & Poors 

Mm 
lm> om* 

Industrials 1135A2 1126.19113109 

Tramp. fRUB MUD 694JDZ 

umtfes 209.19 207J0 m38 

Fnamo 117.02 115^0 n&»4 

SP 500 974.14 96503 97149 

SP 100 93448 928J0 93440 


Caivrata 51422 5W.I3 514J1 

MuMlatt 44341 Sort (4U1 

Tnsp. 471 JM 4MJV 471 JO 

U*nr 31071 B74S 31071 

nm» 49109 48849 49107 


V*L MM 

151174 14M 

97146 l»h 

65579 51 ft 

5H7V 4 STm 
ssra 744 
55*97 30V* 
51494 764 

jjjld 

mm 

44746 imw 

3H(B lam 


14ft 171* -ft 
50 SM +1 V, 

sS S 3ft 

441* Su +1T* 
711* 73V) +2ft 
29V) 29V* -IH 
75V* 74 +K 

»n Sft £ 


Nasdaq 


Nasdaq 


1402^7 139443 1402-57 
19300 1920* iwa 
1*8541 IBMJ3 iffiS 
IE 143 230940 232093 
114 LB 113442 114*42 


771JI 71440 77147 

Daw Jones Bond 


IM. Hpk l*w LBf Ck*. 
143429 379) 34ft SMI ft 
110933 359) 34ft ft 

seen ^ 81ft +ift 

45444 ft U ft 

ns +i« 

ist vs ]S ;fls 

575) 55ft 57ft +2» 

l 1 


20 Bands 
lOUtKfes 
10 IndtBtrials 


N* i t s* » T)**t sp® 

O0M K*M GST Till 

104J2 10454 SS2S 1 

10132 10244 gSM*’" 

10473 10649 


VtL him 

145377 « ft U +H 

33063 ft ft ») ;V* 

71437 39ft 28 Uft +18) 

19499 2V) Ift 1ft -V) 

17H9 9Bft 97ft 98ft +1») 

1508 17ft 149) 17 +lft 

iBSt ift 5ft Ht +ft 

12474 10ft 9ft 9* +M 

8410 17*1 14ft 17 -U 

■154 49% 49% 45ft +41 


iBSt (ft 
12676 10ft 
8410 17ft 
■154 49% 


TTwBng Activity 


VSSBS 

USSS 

AMEX 


o*m Him. Nosdaq 

1431 1814 

I S £ 

" 4 BEHfi* 


I960 2573 
1415 1934 
1911 1410 
5486 5717 

M S5 


142 U7 

”8 *8 

5 7 


Market Sales 


MYSE 

Amex 

Nasdaq 

tnmOBom. 


Dividends 

Company Par Ant Roc Pay 

IRREGULAR 

BanudkGafida , J 2610-10 10-21 

STOCK SPUT 
Aner honsstv 3 tar2 spflt 
Atwood Ocxanio 3 lor2 spUl 

CTS Corp 3 for 1 spSI 

CoffiSaatti Btatn>3for2 spttt. 


BUcRAStrarrmi 

Bafl&Benr 
CBES Bancotp 

Coral Fst Corp 

Ceitfr(8 Ve 

Hertapein 



Srajwn EfliiSKS 8 for J 5p8L 
us omoo Pdets 3 hr2 spRL 

INCREASED 

Goodyear Tire 0 JO 11-17 12-15 

NorttnatorCptr S .101031 11-14 

UtkVdsal FPods • 0. MS 11-3 12-1 

INITIAL 

Don! PfldCpn ' , .1011-14 13-5 

REGULAR 

Secfanon liatram 0 .15)1.14 12-4 


NY TaiEi Income 
Qacraco) SNpUdg 
Oxford Indus 
Pal Coro 

SeralwteNrLP, 
UnAxaSvcs 
UtdTecMCp 
Watsoolnc 


g-cwnwt L ppnriii Baw l par 
stwrefADRr 9-poyotAi la Canadian ftods; 
n w ii u i d u ly : qHjujlHy; i^wnKnwiucl 


537A1 6BTM 

CU2 42.12 

0952 715AS 


PM- Amt Rec Pay 

M JQ95 10-15 1IL31 
M .07 10-17 10-31 
- .10 10-11 10-21 
Q .07 10-15 11-1 
a m 10-31 u-i4 

W .077 10-15 10-23 
M .11510-23 10-31 
Q .15 109 10-15 
Q X 11-28 12-15 

M- JK53 10-15 11-3 
Q .15 11-3 11-34 
Q JM 11.14 11-29 

8 .1410-39 11 J 
.12 10-17 1031 
O m 10-17 1031 

S J1 11-21 12-10 
JS35 1015 1031 


lift 

17ft 

i n 

Uft 

-ft 

in 

17ft 

-*) 

271* 

27 

27ft 

-ft 

») 

2 

» 

24) 

19) 

-ft 
+ ) 

1ft 

111 

lft» 

-V) 

D 

ft 

ft 


Ift 

1 

t« 

*w 

HU 

u 

lift 

-ft 

«*: 

IS) 

ID 

-ft 

Dft 

1*9 

13W 

-u 

Sft 

1 

Sft 

> 


278 

44ft 

0ft 

41) 


cut 

IT* 

1ft 

19) 

•« 

M 

4ft 

**1 

ft) 

ft) 

141 

14) 

F.) 

89) 

-ft 

164 

5ft 

5H 

SB) 

-ft 

IU4 

Uft) 

Uft 

WV) 

4% 

385 

MD 

3Bft 

3W) 

■ft 

3S5 

J 

.sft 

9) 

-ft 

liu 

lift 

m 

Sft 

■te 

ao 

31ft 

uft 

Uft 

-a 

419 

tv* 

7ft 

7ft 

■Y* 

147 

27l!l 

17 

77? 

*i 

576 

ft 

h 

ft 

_ 

J1I 

14 

12) 

13k 

A 


7h 

79i 

. -ft 

imtET 

822 

Uft 

14 

17ft 

12 *) 


WbiiuiT 

1954 

9ft 

Ift 

12 

17.1 


HEBHK 

19 

1 « 

151% 

J»* 

7«. 

_ 

«EBM 

4(4 

lift* 

mu 

If.) 

IP* 

»'* 

WEB ten 
WEB MSI 

531 

17ft 

lift 

IF) 

lift 

-ft 

ia 

7ft* 

79) 

27. 

*1'Y 

7T* 

IS-t 

^) 

-3ft 

SH&3 

14(9 

172 

Sft 

151* 

Sft 

IS? 


7ft 

-ft 

WEB UK 

n 

»ft 

114 

in 

W) 

-ft 

xaus 

16S777 

»• 

VI 


Mft -»■, 

41% 

Uft -ft 
9N »« 
15ft ft 
18ft -N 
12¥» -V) 

7 k »* 
r* -«i 
15N »7) 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sates figures « maffieu. Yearty Nghs ond knn reOedthe pmkas 52 weeks pku the eunrit 
wMMnc(1teUesttad^tey.wimosiAar4iAiMManKiiuflig1o25|Kic^aniioie 
habempaUflieiaiistiglHaw range and dhfdend ore shown far Be new starts only. Unless 
oitwwfse noted rates af Aidands aie ensued iffiriiuisemaits based on he Uesl dedraaloa 
a - dividend Oho exlra Csl. b - annual rate of dWWend plus stock dividend, c - Bquidotkig 
rfiwWmd. a- PE eneeds 99.dd- cofled d- mu yerofy Imr.iM-loss In 1t» test 12 mantis. 

■ - ®'MeraJ riedored or paid in preceding 12 months, f - annual rate inottued an last 
dedamtkMLg -dividend in CBnoificmfuti^sutaj^lal 5% nOn-mndoma in i-dhkteiid 
dKkmd offtr spOnip at stadi dnidond. 1- dMdaid poM IWa year, amWed, deferred, or no 
OCflan total at latest ifivtdeftd liiaotino. k - dividend decknd or paid ttib yem> an 
aoatmulalivB issue wiSi dhtdaidi in anean-m-annuid rote. raducEdaa katdedaaflon. 

■ - ita issue in the post 52 weeks. The high-taw range begins wim tt» start of tradftn. 

nd - nod dcry deSvery. P - trdtkri (Svtdend. annual rate unknovra. P/E • prico-eambigs rafia. 
q -doseitaHf muhnlfdad. r- dividend declared or paid In precedtag 12 monttis, plus slock 
dMdmd. s> stack spBLOMdend begin frittidattot spttL sit -sales. |- (QvWendpaM in 
stock In precxdmg 13 manttnasttmaled ash vatueonex-dlvidefldarex-distTttxitiffl date, 
a -newymrir t^tu*- trading hatted, ft -m bantouptcyarraceheislijporbe^ iWrgradiBd 
undertte Bantaaptcy Aaofsecwflieswwmed by swii companies dbtributed. 

wi - vriwn tssueiV ww - wWi ftwrants, x - ox-dividend or ex-rights, xdls - cwfetribufion. 
w -wfttwutvwrorts.y- ex-dividend and sales in tulL ytd - yield i- sates in fun. 


For investment information 

Read THE MOffif REFORT emy Saturday in the IHT. 


Oct. 7| 1997 

tOgh Low Lotmt Cbga OpM 

Grains 

COUI(CBOT) 

Iw mtafcnwrv card* p*r bwsiifll 
Dec 97 279ft 2S7 279ft +12 19M61 

Wor 98 2881% 274 2881% +12 67,531 

MOV98 294ft 277ft 294ft +12 18M9 

-M 98 298 285 297ft +llft 2A719 

54p 98 790 279 '289ft +11 2.143 

Oec» 287ft 276 287 +W 1W03 

A499 298 290 297ft +7ft 154 

EsL aola HA. Mon %ato»4WJ4 
Mon* roan lid 337J84. op 1414 

SOYBEAN MEALKSOT) 
lOOIon*- Ootofjperlon 
0097 21550 20480 21540 +7AI 10547 

Dec 97 211 JO 20240 211.00 +7AI 41840 
Jan 98 211.00 302JOO 21000 +7J0 15771 
Atar 98 30000 20000 20550 *440 15404 
M0T 98 206JO 199.00 20550 +500 15845 
-ID » 2D9HO 20170 20UD +4 l 20 9JH2 
Eri. sola (tA. man ados 25331 
Mans open kd 11*775 off 1020 

SOYBEAN OIL rawn 
60000 to- emta per lb 

0097 2435 2573 2*04 +002 5769 

D°c 97 2*49 2408 2*32 -002-5*728 

Jon 98 2*88 2*27 3*50 -008 1*749 

MorJB 2508 2*48 24A8 -009 11,041 

Moy9B 2520 2*55 2*78 -003 7557 

JD98 2525 2440 2*91 +005 *851 

EsL BOH HA. MOIM HIM 1&384 
Mom open Hfl 105025 Up 1414 

SOYBEANS K80D 
5000 bo PMnNim- amts per hitaM 
Nov 97 473 445M 444 +161% 97JC7 

J® 98 474ft 447 446M +1714 313*1 

ftor 98 481 465 4731% +17 15995 

MCW9S 485 660ft (791% +Uft 11790 

JD 98 492 445ft 48M +171% 12445 

EsL sta NA. Mans sola* 52731 
Mans aptaiM 178406, op 184444 

WHEAT (CXOTl 

5080 ku nMum+OHita dm-ImbM 

Dec 97 347ft 354 365ft +10U 6*703 

M“7 98 379ft 365ft 379 +10ft 3*405 

Mav98 387 375ft 384 +9ft 5272 

AH 98 389ft 377 389 11498 

EsL setei HA. Mans soft* 11479 

Mom open W 110926. op 579 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMERJ 
nwoiikv-cBdipvb. 

0097 6*52 4552 4*32 -007 17,182 

D)C97 4*75 4545 4*22 -045 43447 

Ftab9B 49-47 4840 49.05 4147 17,570 

Apr 90 7242 7142 72.15 4L47 11,34 

Jun 98 . 4940 48J0 69.07 -050 7.195 

ABB 90 M.15 4173 68J5 440 2J09 

at eota 21.743 Mom salts 1*422 
Mom open lid «*3B* off 710 • 

reraER CATTLE (£MER> 

50000 a*, cents par fe. 

Od97 77 jrn 7*05 7*40 4L42 *016 

Nov 97 7747 7645 7440 -1.12 *593 

Jan 98 70.90 7745 77J5 -1JQ U65 

M* 98 7*75 7750 7752 -102 Z047 

Apr 98 79 JO 77.90 78.00 -150 743 

May 98 7940 7430 1175 .1.05 773 

&t. sdas 5010 Mom sates 2449 
Mans open hd 1522* up 331 

HOCft-UoafCMER) 

AUloaa^ cents par lb. 

Ocf 97 6*70 4*12 4*47 undL 74HJ 

Dec 97 6X25 4240 6277 422 17576 

Fob9fl 4245 SIX) 4235 -OJO *006 

Apr 98 5755 5905 59J7 -OJO 1079 

Jun9B 4540 4*77 4*77 44Q 1431 

Eat sates 7405 Mom (Otoe ROBS 
Mom open ht 3M9& up 1,152 

PORK BELLIES CCMEIO 
4U00 as- cents per fc. 

Feb98 O20-41J5 4240 -037 *016 

Mom 4110 41 JO 4240 «? 424 

May 9S 4*40 040 403 4147 130 ■ 

EsL sodas U17 Memories 1483 
Mom open MVm, up 148 . _ 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 

lOneMetnm-Sperton 

Dec 97 1739 1 498 172S +32 4X748 

Mar 98 1742 1731 1755 +33 2*579 

Ma*98 177B 1732 1773 +35 11,955 

Jal«B 1800 1774 1791 +33 1754 

5J19S 1807 1784 1807 +33 *738 

Dec 98 1823 1793 1823 +33 9M2 

Ett star 12434 Mam sales 3422 

Mom open Int 10MS7,up93 

temgewesa 

DkW M 1W-1S -7M 11355 

Morn 15*00 146.00 14650 -743 *840 

Moyn 15000 14X50 14159 *50 2988 

M 98 14250 13836 13835 -635 1182 

Sep « '3*00 13125 1 3335 -5J5 404 

B* Bries 8.904 Morn salts 7.753 
Mom open m 2*479, up 24 

SUCARHORLD 11 tHC5E}‘ 

111000 lb*.*** per *. 

M Mar 98 |lj» 11J7 1139 -002 91557 

8 11A5 11.77 Ua2 UOdL 22429 

1172 11*2 1149 +082 17,947 

00 98 11*7 1141 1146 +007 1*542 

Bri. rotes *381 Mom tales 1 M» 

Mms epan intisrao* off 14*2 


HHjh Low Lntest Clipe Opbri 

ORANSEdUKE (NCTTfl 
iaO0Qfc*-amr*parl). 

Nov 97 7455 7125 7155 -1JM 17457 

Job 98 77J5 7*10 7440 -1JM 11,151 

Mar 98 8040 7935 7947 -1.05 7.178 

May 98 KL2D 8115 8115 -145 W37 

Est sates NA. Mom satos xm 
Mam apsn W 29419, up 410 


COLD (NCMX) 

WO buy ot- daBan r*r tiny at 
00 97 33140 33040 331* -130 .149 

NUV97 33140 -130 1 

Dec 97 33490 33240' 23330 -130 9*079 

Fst) 98 33*00 33430 33440 -140 21,795 

Apr 98 33700 33400 33*10 -140 1920 

Jun 98 33900 33790 337.90 -140 9.924 

Aug 98 339 JO .140 *444 

0(298 24140 -140 44 

Dec 98 34*10 34330 34340 -140 8578 

EsL oalts JMOO Mam eatet 17434 
Mem open M 182450 nffUMS 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX] 

2&000 Ihl- ata psr ». 

Del 97 9*00 9230 93.70 +035 IAS 

Nov 97 9*40 9440 9*40 +055 2445 

Die 97 9540 9330 9*85 +055 20133 

Jon 98 9SJ5 9190 95.15 +045 1475 

Fob 98 9545 9430 9543 +035 1.129 

Mar 98 96J» 9440 9555 +040 X174 

Apr 98 9525 9*75 9535 -+0J0 988 

May 78 9555 9440 9555 +040 2547 

Jun 98 9540 9*75 9540 +035 953 

Est solas *000 Mam sdti *898 
Mans span Inf JMTd up m 

SILVER (NCMX) 

AOOOJmyoKr cuds par Imret. 

Ocf 97 51*31 -050 2 

Nov 97- 51840 -053 1 

Doc 97 52*00 31*00 53030 -050 70659 

J(Sl9H 57140 -OJO 22 

Mar 98 50940 52440 524-50 -050 17313 

MnyW 53000 52970 529J0 -030 3306 

Jain 53300 -OJO 2447 

Sap 98 54000 53*40 53*40 -OJO 6 T9 

Es* sries 0000 Mom sates 10060 
Mom open H 10X83* off 134 

PLATINUM (NMER) 


' Od 97 429J» 42300 42740 +430 

Jon 98 430JD 42X50 42740 +*20 

Aprs* 422-90 41*50 42040 +4JV 

Jut 98 41440 +*70 

EsL B6M NJL Mam nriro 940 
Mom open H 11790 up 14 


LONDON METALS (LM8 
DaSarapa-imMcton 


l(35ft 1436ft 1681ft 1443ft 

1 M7O0 144X00 145900 144000 
AAOMQM 
•Km nn 2S5400 8l8*m 

207000 208000 ZIDMO 211000 

590ft 599ft 595ft 594ft 

61X00 41X00 £09.00 41000 


mkm fcoc* ml 
645000 644000 

575000 57S5JH 
578080 S78SJ10 
rial km erode) 
129000 1297JW 
130930 131000 


658380 4595.00 
640000 470000 


574300 573500 
578080 579000 


129380 129580 
130780 130980 


Hlgto Lm flaw Cbps Opw 

Financial 
UST BILLS (CMEID 
rilnflllan-DfaanoOpet 

DbcW fc.13 95.09 93.10 +002 5317 

MOfW 95.16 9543 95.1* +083 1928 

Jun 98 95.13 +004 157 

EsL Mtai 760 Mem sates 221 
Mom open W sum. afl 78 

1YR TREASURY 0X011 

SI0BJ00 prtn- pts & 64ths d HO pd 

Dec 97 106-11 107-62 H848 +86 233465 

&t sates NA. Mam 9*32*305 

Mom epro H 23173X op S41 

» YRTWEASURY (CBOn 
nttwoo prfn- pti & 32nrii of 100 pd 
Dec W m-12 11140 in-09 +05 40X365 
11140 110-26 110-31 +05 16305 
Job 98 110-24 110-19 11044 +86 23 

EM. sates NA. Mom ntes60151 
Mamaproi U40751. up*336 

US TREASURY BONDS ODBOT) 


D«97 117-19 116-31 117-14 +08 671224 

Mar 98 11749 116-22 11745 +« 5*671 

98 11445 114-24 116-25 +08 4J10 

S«p98 116-15 +09 1,954 

EM. rotes KA. Mem sales 349470 
Mem open M 7498* up 1*283 

long carai fro 

teUBp.pte*3Mianoopd 

Dec 2 “5 40 WW® 12040 -047 190976 
Martt 120-19 120-11 120-18 -447 1402 
B0 sates 7*631 Pra*. sales; 79495 
Pnv. roen biL: 19*978 a B 344 

GERMAN COV. BUND (UFFB - - 
DM250000 -Ms aHODpa . 

Dec 97 103J2 103J7 10X61 —003311538 
Mar 98 10X97 10243 10084 -003 0989 
E*L sdas; 20*5!* Ptok sates: 15*517 
Prav.opooln*: 320927 eV *391 


Ugh Low Latest aige OpW 
IS- YEAR FRENCH COV. BONDS (MAT1F) 

raoaooo-Mienoonci 

Dec 97 10044 10002 10014-01015X623 
Mar 98 9938 99JSB 99 J4- 0.10 *307 
Junta 9934 9934 99.18—010 0 

EsL (Mbs: 117400 
Open 80; 161,930 lip 1.947. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE1 
m.200m*1on-pleal 100 pd 
Dee 97 11283 11185 11175 +032121307 
Mar 98 112.15 11X15 11X70 +032 1324 

Jun 90 N.T. N.T. 11X70 +022 
EsL rotes: 10X299. Pm. seta <7,738 
Pm.apenhtf.' 12X133 aN 1930 

LIBOR 1 -MO NTH (CMERI 

S3 astem- Pt& adoa acL 

Od97 &3S 9<3T 9437 anch. 2*424 

Nov 97 9*37 9*36 9*36 endL 31889 

Dec 97 9*25 9*24 9*24 +001 9,797 

Esr- sales X475 Mam sales 1453 

Mam open tel 713U, off 1,120 

EURODOLLARS CCMEIO 
SI oriNan-atsallOOpeL 
0097 9*28 9*27 9*37 undi 25438 

Nor 97 9437 9435 9*26 +001 1X431 

Dec 97 9*36 9*24 9*25 +001 590817 

Mar 98 9*26 9*22 9*24 uoch. 44*887 

Jan 98 9*30 9*16 9*19 +001 321848 

Sep 98 9*15 9*10 9*14 +002 260963 

Dec 98 9*05 9*00 94JO +083 23*060 

Mar 99 9*83 9199 9*02 +084 151,524 

Junta 9198 9393 9197 +083)2X247 

Sep 99 93.95 9190 9392 +003 90367 

Dec 99 9397 9183 9384 +003 81247 

Mar 00 9X87 9183 9X84 +003 7L5W 

EeL sates 330M4 Mam rotes 33*108 
Mam apsn |*iaov49X off 2X824 

BRITISH POUND COMER] 

61SX) paumte, s pro pawl 

DSC 97 1-6220 lJOSa 1-6180+08004 29,144 

MorW IJ130 1.6072 18118+00090 237 

■ten 98 14034+00090 27 

EsT. sates *564 Mam sabs *401 

Mam open bit 20*00 up 775 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CJAER) 

NNMOpMteas.Sperain.dr 

Ctecta J320 JXO J313-08004 5*038 

Mnr« .7148 3338 3344-08004 L99S 

Junta 3370 48004 507 

EsL s«riss £966 Mam sates 1913 

Mom open to 5481* up 1872 

CERMAN MARK CCMEIO 
m«p marie*. Spar note 
2^97 £J m J717+0OOO3 50908 

Marta J782 J747 J747+0ODOO 2355 

Junta J774+0OOOB- 1616 

Es* rotas 21773 Mam sales 1 0597 
Main apea bri 4*9BL off 464 

JAPANESE YEN CCMER) 

D*C 97 -iSS S Sft 90 ^39 88043 BL49I 

-8401 8349 83«94)8043 836 

Junta 8461-08043 143 

». tapes 10984 Mam sales 7419 
Mom open b* 8X491. up X148 

SWISS FRANC COMER] 

m8W rnmci. s par ftmc 

D»C97 -7UX\ JOSS 8943-011002 39444 

Jteta JB76 J032 ,7032-00002 1404 

JU1198 7099 48602 243 

&t. rotes 12462 Mem Mries 1*1 08 

Mom open W 41417. op 1444 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

^ P a SP r 2 £r.,2587+O800 3 S2 W 2 S 

M ffl:!r 8 gffl+ + S^ 

EsL sates X5D0 Mam nries *402 
Mam apaa bit 38871 up LI 77 

JSS5! M i?5Ry.i» 

8500000 - pte el 109 pd 

JS£2 92J4 9Xffl UndL 12*023 

*£2* wa 9X55 -0oi 105477 

S3 9153 -°J>' 8*543 

5S£2 «« «88 -003 70813 

SS 9U0 9ui -ojo 

MorW 9X05 . 9X99 9383 -084 55X93 

Junta 9125 9116 9130 US 3*050 

Est. arias: 80227. Pm. Mbs; 69864 
Prov.apBilnL! 62*813 off 1415 

MWjnjI EUROMARK (UFFE) 

srsra v « »» 

SI & « a»js 

9*23 96.19 9621 Unc0 29X402 

S 54 Unch. 25*9(0 

rS2 5?9 9174 5SJB U*dL 

taJ9 Uneft. 160109 

95/0 UndL 17*999 

£"2 «401 77.141 

Septa 95.19 95.14 95.17 +001 60760 

Ed-tarie*: 140*41 Pra*. rotes 12X858 
Pnv.apro h tu 1486854 air noy 

SjWtCTH PlBOR (MAT1F) 
^"“w-pteallOOpd 
5" 2 «J8 UndL 44370 

•Sfta «*a 9019 9620 UndL 3*374 

^22 S'2 SM* n9S U"dL 27887 

SS2 95-74 9177-001 1X762 

Dro98 9XJ3 9i» 9540-08? 2*487 

EeL sales: 3^17. 

Ope" ten 238304 ap 657. 

W»MTH EUROURA (UPPO 

ITL 1 MBIen . pts allOO pd 

Pteg- JU5 9143 9282 +002 10*273- 

Mor» 9*45 9447 9*63 +003 HOJ50 


Htgti Law Latest Cbge ON 

Junta 9X1* 9496 95.13 +003 BV 

S«p9> 95X3 9588 9532 +082 

Decta 95X1 9587 95X0 +002 -03 

Marta 9585 94M 9588 +0BJ DM 

Junta 9*86 9*80 9*94 +004 lilt 

3ep99 9*72 9469 9*79 +00] XR 

EtLsdOB 12X750 Pra*. sates; 5*066 
Pm. open taL- 44*673 ap 1813 

industrials 

COTTON 2 OKTN) 

SObOOO ter cents Dir Ok 
Oct 97 69X0 6020 6055 485 1 

Dec 97 7140 7080 71.19 +017 5061 

MorW 7280 7X36 7X60 +009 1530 

May 98 7150 73X0 7345 +008 7.H 

JlHW 7*40 7345 7*23 +015 *M 

Est nriro NA Mom Mriee 9X38 
Mam open bit 9024* up 1862 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 


Nor 97 4035 59.10 9980 -009 AM 

Dec 97 41X5 6055 60X0 +002 3Ujt 

Junta 41X5 6185 61X0 +007 2UB 

ft* 98 61.90 4IXS 41X5 +012 1UH 

Marta 4045 4010 6035 +022 7» 

Apr 98 58X5 50X0 58X5 -039 *W 

May 98 5*85 5650 5*75 +027 11* 

Est srias NA. Mom rotes 3X7SH 
Mom open M 14*935, off USB 

UStfT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1800 bbL-doOos par bbL 
Nov 97 2237 21X2 2156 +003 i _. 

Decta 3230 21X5 21.95 +011 CM. 

Junta 21.95 2143 2181 +016 4U5> 

Fab 98 71X5 Z140 2183 +018 K1W 

Marta 2144 21X7 2146 +019 US. 

Apr 98 21X0 21.10 21X0 +021 1M» 

Est (tries NA. Mom sates 1ZL170 
Mam open Hit 43*097, all HI 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) J 

10800 mm bws.s par nn bta J 

No* 97 X9H 1850 2877 -01(8 514W 

Dec 97 3870 1955 2.931 -0893 W* 

. Jraita 3830 2.930 1SB 087B K» 

Febta 2.730 2440 2450 0867 

Mtr98 151 D 2415 2435 -0841 1ȣ ; 

Apr 98 2X70 1230 1230 -0832 7.M ] 

EsL rotes NA. Mam mro 47,163 
Mans open bit 231937, up 1830 i 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) { 

42i40Q gal, cents par go! • 

MM 97 6280 «5o 6091 439 41® 

Dec 97 4140 40X0 4088 -004 

Jan 98 6140 6040 4089 +tUB IS® 

ft* 98 41X0 4045 6184 +0W 

Marta 41 JO 61X0 414* +015 

Aprta 44X5 6389 4389 +020 3® 

May 98 63J9 +0» 

Junta 4X84 4025 U** 

Est stero NA Mam sates 31441 
Mam open M 95897. up 1X14 

GASOIL OPE] 

UJ. OaBan per metric ton - kris e( raOMH 

OdW 18780 182X5 18*50 -0J0 

Nov 97 18880 18*00 18*50 Uffte SX* 

Dec 97 189XS 18050 ~I87J0 -0» 

Jan 19050 18780 188X5 -OJO 1&*> 

T «»ta 18980 184JB 1B0SD -0* J® 

Mro 98 18480 183X5 185X9 -0X5 50j 

Aprta. N.T. N.T. 18280 -435... VB 

Est *etesX44(W . Pra*. Bries :3XB4! - 
Prav. open *0:109,936 up *20 

BRENT OIL (IPE) 

UA (totem par band - tots of 1800 bronte^ 
Manta 2045 2050 2069 +005 5S«- 
0*tS7 WJ a 2044 2063 +413 

Jroita 2063 30X0 3051 4016 

Fobta 2046 20.13 20X8 +0» 

Marta 2DX3 198S 3130 +» Si 

Aprta 2010 1984 2002 +422 *»" 

EsL sates; 49,000 . Prev. sd«S9X15 
Prau. open tot; 14*922 off 5499 

Stock Indexes 

SPCDMP INDEX KMER) 

HOllodn " ■ 

Dae97 991X5 977 JO 99LW +?Jf “K 
Mro 98 99940 991X5 990)0 +*» 

Junta 10101010101.0101010 +7JS. . 

Est rotes NA Mam sdas 49,955 
Mem open hd I9L065, off 323 

■FTSE 100 (UFFE) 

S^ h sSl5 l, 0338 53878 ^8 ’ 

Marta N.T N.T 54358 +16* 

Est sates: 10450 Pra*. sate* 8J7S . . 
Prav. open bri.' 72X58 up 9M 

CAC 40 (MATIF). . 

FROQprobidexpafel mgs 

0d?7 31068 30368 30718-7J» ^ 
NavW 31118 30568 WJX «« 
Dee77 3119J 20578 30W8-^ 

Marta 3138J 3H07J M118-I». n -~ 
EsL sates: 1*347. 

Open *0:81X00 aff 251.. . 


Commotfty indexes ^ 

• • tisM 

Ntoodyte J5a5i 

Reuters . 188780 »«3B 

DJ. Futures ' 1^42* TfiJl j 

CRB i 

Sources: Mat& Associ &d j 
tonFbmdalFiiWiB&c*u&* n j 

Pegmaim&elmnse. .. . j 


r 





















































































EVTERNAXIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 


PAGE 17 


EUROPE 


l 4. 


2 Firms Say Data Can Flow on Power Lines 


T nxrTv* Blam toer& News 


*3*!** ““to*® electricity Wit5. 

S e 2f?SS^* y - “ould^ tacSta ±c 

maacaJJy cot costs incurred by new phone 

comoames hwane# tkb» e«.u -j j« ■ _ 

[Up 


phone companies would have to fall,” he said. 

The new technology could convert existing 
electricity networks into infonna ti on-access net- 
works, spurring further growth in Internet use, 
and could spark a wave ofjomt ventures between 
telecommunications and power companies. 

Similar technologies have been tested in the 
last couple of years to transmit electricity- 
metering information. 

However, “die technology in the past has 
always hit a bride wall because transferring 


fwvinetfvl f" J tugging up always mi & one 

• s^ S ^ J ^tSno?^d^ Il0l ^ eS, Si aiySlS lnter^ 65 tJiroush . transformers always caused 


wh *ch. account for most of the 


•iM . : ■ — wiiiiNu lira. 

If it dpes work, the monopoly position of 
fto national telecom operators, Deutsche 
Telekom, Telecom Italia, et cetera, would be 
sevweiy weakened, said Jonathan Shantry.an 
analyst ax ^Credit Lyo nnais Laing. 

‘ ‘Forecasts for market share, revenue, earn- 
ings and cash flow for Europe’s dominant tele- 


said David Campbell, an analyst 
at Greig, Middleton & Co. “If they say they’ve 
overcome that obstacle, that would be inter- 
esting." 

Most companies entering die telecommu- 
nications market find it too expensive to lay 
telephone lines all the way to peoples homes; 
instead, they pay the dominant phone compa- 
nies fees to use their local network. 

Relying on their biggest competitor’s net- 


work can prove costly to new companies. In 
Britain, Mercury Communications Ltd. paid as 
much as a third of its profit to British Tele- 
communications PLC during some periods of 
its development. 

Analysts said that was a major contributor to 
the financial problems Mercury incurred in 
1994 when it took a £120 million ($193.6 
million) charge and contributed to a 22 percent 
foil in pretax profit at its parent company. Cable 
& Wireless PLC. 

“BT will have to write down its assets by 
billions of rounds” if the new technology 
works, Mr. Campbell said, “but It takes a bit of ■ 
believing." 

Stock in British Telecommunications PLC 
fell 6 pence, to 453 pence. 

Neither Nortel nor United Utilities would 
give further details of the technology. 

Stock in United Utilities fell 9 pence, to 756 
ice, while Nortel stock was up $2.8125, to 
1 1 1.00, on the New York Stock Exchange. 


I Belgium Takes Aim at EMU With Budget Cuts 


' Reuters 

* BRUSSELS — The center-left government 
Presen ted i ts budget for 1998 Tuesday with its 
Sights firmly set on being in the vanguard of 
European Union nations joining the planned 
Single currency in' 1999. 

-“Our country is sure to take part in EMU," 
Prime Minister Jean-Lac Dehaene said in his 
hnhual budget speech to Parliament 
v He said that Belgium, the EU’s most deeply 
4 indebted country, would cut its budget deficit to 
\ 23 percent of gross domestic product next year 
:> from 2.8 percent currently and its debt to 122.3 
percent of GDP from 125.1 percent. 

■ Under the EU’s Maastricht Treaty , for a coun- 
try to join the single currency, its debt should be 
no more than 60 percent of GDP or approaching 


that level “at a satisfactory pace." Its budget 
deficit should be at or below 3 percent of GDP. 

To by to head off criticism of its forecasts, the 
government said its budget targets had been 
based on what it called conservative forecasts for 
23 percent annual economic g row t h and average 
three-month interest rates of 4 percent. 

“The government remains attached to the 
credibility of its budgetary commitment." 
Budget Minister Herman Van Rompny and Fi- 
nance Minister Philippe Maystadt said in a joint 
statement “As in 1997, the budget for 1998 is 
based on cautious assumptions." 

Mr. Van Rompuy forecast that growth in Bel- 
gium would be more than 25 percent in 1998. 

“I am convinced die reality will be much 
stronger than this," he said at a news conference, 


adding, ‘ 'If current trends are continuing, we will 
probably see 3 percent growth." 

The budget is also based on the assumption that 
regional authorities will balance their budgets. 

Pharmaceutical companies are expected to be 
hardest hit by the 17 billion francs ($4693 
million) of austerity measures in the budget 
There will be curbs on drug prices and dis- 
pensing foes valued at 6.8 billion francs, and a 4 
percent tax on the pharmaceutical industry's 
sales valued at 2.4 billion francs will continue. 

The redaction of Belgium's deficit is the result 
of more than a decade of spending curbs and 
revenue-raising that has allowed the government 
to avoid mayor new belt-tightening as it seeks to 
qualify for Europe’s planned economic, and mon- 
etary union. 


Tax Raid 

Targets 

Dresdner 


Cwftlrdbf Our Staff FrtmtDhpaxto 

FRANKFURT — 'A Dresdner. 
Bank AG management board mem- 
ber, Hans-Guentber Adenauer, said 
Tuesday he would resign after pros- 
. editors raided his home t a wiribning 
investigation into whether Germany’s 
largest hanks helped clients evade 
taxes by concealing assets abroad. 

Dresdner's chief executive, Juer- 
gen Sarrazin, whose borne also was 
searched, said he would not seek 
election to Dresdner’s supervisory 
board after he retired next May . - 

Mr. Adenauer, the great-nephew 
of former Chancellor Konrad Ad- 
enauer, is the second top executive 
at Germany's second-largest bank 
to step down over the inquiry, which 
also is studying whether some of the 
country's top banking executives 
personally evaded income taxes. 

Wolfgang Roeller, Dresdner’s su- 
pervisory board chairman, resigned 
Sept 16 after prosecutors said they 
were investigating whether he had 
steered money to Liechtenstein. 

Mr. Adenauer, whose responsi- 
bilities included corporate finance, 
has been with Dresdner for 30 years 





Very briefly? 



■ The European Union’s competition commissioner, Karel 
Van. Miert, said that; bad been little progress m the EU’s 
investigation into the alliance between British Airways PLC 


GERMANY: Unemployment in September Registers Fifth Consecutive Record 


: Continued from Page 1 

World War D, overshadowed a slight improve- 
ment in figures unadjusted for seasonal variations. 
The jobless total without seasonal adjustment fell 
So 4308,000, or 113 percent of the work force, 
from 4372,000, or 1 1.4 percent, in August 
; Noting that a powerful surge in exports had 
foiled to translate into more jobs, the Federal 
Labor Office revised its estimate for fall-year 
\997 unemployment to 4.4 million from 43 

milli on. 

The agency forecast improvements this au- 
tumn that have not materialized, Bamhard Ja- 
goda, president of the Labor Office, said. 

■ If the projection by the Nuremberg-based 
agency proves correct, the fiscal hardship for 


the government in Bonn are bound to worsen. 
eMinisterTh 
i enough fund 
inly 43 millic 


iegc 

Fin 


nuance Minister Theo Waigel’s latest budget 
sets aside enough funds for unemployment ben- 
efits for only 43 milli on people mis year. 

The jobless data contrast starkly with figures 
showing that Germany steadily is regaining its 
title as a world export champion. 

Germany has clawed back world market share 
that it lost in recent years, although this has taken 
a heavy toll on the domestic work force, econ- 
omists say. By shutting down operations at 
home, German producers have won back their 
competitiveness abroad. 

“I do not think this process has come to an 
end," Mr. Mayer at Goldman Sadis said, noting 
that Goman corporations were continuing to cut 
workers and saying unemployment still could 


worsen well into next year. 

Seven years after the unification of the former 
East and West Germany, the jobs report drives 
another wedge between the two halves of the 
country, commentators said. 

In the West, unemployment on a seasonally 
adjusted basis grew by 7,000 people, while East- 
ern Germany — with a population only a quarter 
of that of Western Germany — had 26,000 more 
jobless people. 

That pusned the Eastern unemployment rate to 
193 percent, compared with 9.9 percent in the 
West Economists said the data showed that 
unemployment may be starting to stabilize in 
Western Germany but that cuts in job-creation 
programs in the East had exposed hidden un- 
employment there. 


and on its board for 1 1 years. ■ 

“In the short term, it s definitely 
negative, bnt in the medium torn, it 
doesn’t really matter," Uwe Bell, a 
manage r at a fand- manag eni cat unit 
of Deutsche Bank AG, said of the 
resignations. 

Although the alleged irregular- 
ities of Mr. Roeller and Mr. Ad- 
enauer concern their personal tax . 
aff aire, Dresdner and outer German 
banks have been dogged by alle- 
gations since 1994 that they helped 
customers evade taxes. 

Mr. Adenauer told prosecutors 
last year he had evaded income taxes 
and agreed to repay a reported 
400.000 Deutsche marks ($227,000) 
to avoid prosecution. 

A spokesman for the Duesseldorf 
prosecutor's office said Mr. Ade- 
nauer's home was searched some- 
time in the past two weeks to see 
whether bank executives had sys- 
tematically advised clients to steer 
money to tax havens such as Lux- 
embourg. 

The tax inquiry also involves 
Deutsche Bank AG and Com- 
merzbank AG as well as the German 
subsidiary of Merrill Lynch & Co. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


and AMR Corpus American Airlines Inc. He said the 
procedure would “take the rest of the year at least, several 
months, because we have to work with an unusual procedure, 
and a tot of time has beea wasted, though not by ourselves. 

• Bouygues SA, France’s biggest construction .company, said 
profit rose to a higher-tfaan-expected 172 million francs ($29 
million) in the first half, compared with a loss of 146 million 
francs in the year-earlier half, mostly because of a one-time 
gain from die sale of a stake in its te lecommunications unit, 
Bouygues Telecom, to Telecom Italia SpA. 

• Daimler-Benz AG said it would spend about 200 million 
Deutsche marks ($113.8 million) to switch ins accounting to the 
European single currency, the euro, on Jan. 1, 1999. 

• Britain’s annual rate of inflation edged unexpectedly higher 
in September, to 3.6 percent from 33 percent in August 

• Royal PIT Nederland NV said it would sell its cable-TV 

operations after the gover n ment said the teleptone company had 

to give up control of its largest unit, Casema, by year's end 

• SAP AG, a German software developer, said growth ex- 
ceeded expectations in die third quarter, driven by favorable 
exchange rates and positive business development 

• Accor SA, France’s biggest hotel operator, said its first-half 
profit more than quadrupled, to 458 million francs, as the 
dollar’s rise lifted revenue from its U.S. units and encouraged 
more tourists to visit France. 

• France Telecom SA’s share offering to institutional in- 
vestors closed after demand rose to 17 times the supply of 
shares. Institutional subscribers asked for more than 400 
billion francs of shares at 187 francs each. 

• Mariks & Spencer PLC plans' to open its first franchise in 

Poland before the aid of the year. Bloomberg. AFX. Reuters 


■ “T- 


>• 

-rvsse. 


rim 




WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Tuesday Oct* 7, 

Prices fn loco* ammdes. 
TeMturs 

High Low dm* Pm. 


Amsterdam Aountasan 



.. . M *0 | i . 

DudsdwBonfc 130.10 
Dent Telekom 3540 
Drcseanr Bank 8330 
Fmenfett 300 

fireewduiMsd 127.00 
Fried Kropp 37380 
Gehe 97 

HWdribgZmt . 160.80 

KenfeefpM 10620 

HEW 477 

HodiOef 82X0 
Hocchst 80.40 

Kanfwfl 6 37 

Utanepr 100-ia 

11* 1285 

LufflnaaR SOB 
MAN 578 

ManMmm _ 854 
MeMBWdWian^m 
Mdro 88 

Munch RutCkR 647 
PrmnacQ 519 

RWE ESL4S 

SAPpM 492 

Schema 19150 
SGLCaAan 264X0 
Stamm 122.15 
SpringviAMO i£» 
Sortwctar 905 
Thwsen 430 

Vteba 109.15 

VEW 500 

831 
1293 


Low dam Pm. 

12865 128J5 127.15 
3490 3450 3495 

82.10 823S 8120 
295 M- 293 

12550 127 12530 

3SS 36S 389 

9530 9530 9550 
15750 157.50 161-50 
10SJO 104 10150 
417 477 465 

7920 79 JO 8220 
79-60 7950 7830 
530 630 630 

99 99 9930 

1278 1281 1265 

3550 35J5 36.40 

574 575 575 

B4650 849.50 848 

WSS 40 3840 
87 JO 87,40 8490 
634 634 635 

512 51S50 506 

87 JO 8820 87.18 
48SL2D 48450 480 

187 JO 187X0 191 

263-50 264 262 

119X0 120 ISO 

1493 1493 1501 

903 905 910 

41780 41780 421J0 

107.10 107.10 1*7.90 

575 580 685 

824 834 830 

1280 1 2851 247 JO 


Mgh Law dm Pm. 

5A Breweries 14050 138.75 140 T385D 

Samanoar 37 3475 3625 37 

Sort 6SJ0 65 - 65, 65 

SBK SffiJO 206 20625 206 

Tiger Oof* 6925 69 6925 6925 


Kuala Lumpur 

nUlMCmU 


High LOW Owe 


i/MUHBef IM 7X8 7J6 7M 

Vendonre Units 449 445 447 447 


Nigh Low Qoi m. 


High Low Om Pm. 


Vodatane 
WMbread 
SIswib Hdgt 
Wobetoy 
WPP GAMP 
Zonal 


151 342 346 345 

am 7.88 102 720 

X70 345 167 148 

5.15 5JB2 5.t5 503 

2X9 2X6 2X9 2X9 

2125 2022 2120 2083 


AMMBHdgi 
Getting 
MulBonfctag 
Mol Ml Ship F 
PetjwxnGcs 


PuMcBk 
Rmng 
Roots Wodd 
RuMwmsPM 


Tetakon 


Daby . 
are Mm 


UM 

YTL 


845 820 

10 925 

j&a 16 
<LHJ 410 
iaio es 
820 840 

243 227 

122 116 
7-05 625 

27 2625 
625 438 

10 9.90 

05 1.05 

1040 10X0 
410 320 


135 840 
9.95 IQ 
16411 1410 
440 405 

&B0 25 
3 33 

7 60S 

3475 27 

M5 999 
530 82 0 

1OJ0 1020 
4W 176 


London 

Abbey McTl 

AtaedDooMcq 

AngflreiVWer 

AsS? Group 
Avsoc Br Foods 
BAA 
Bwdap 


FT-SE 100:530540 
PnviMS: 5308X1 


s 


Bangkok 

VtafrlabSK 
Tim Bit 


SET katas: SSI J? 
Piwrtam: 54205 


iwan&mentF 
Stan Con BkF 
TetaGwnnsta 

UtdCsmm 


254 

243 

342 

250 


140 

2160 

161 

22 

164 

2375 

410 

392 

394 

410 

J7D 

540 

S44 

174 

m 

97 

9760 

108 

%% 

28JD 

55 

2875 

SB 

2875 

56 

T14 

104 

m 

112 

109 

106 

109 

109 


Bombay 


SKMKSOtadn: 399944 

Rmtaesaano* 



Hong Kong 


How 

tvmSSE"* 

,TC rTei 


tBklntia 

StaelAitiHrity 
Tala Eng Loco 


3S3J® 

270 

UJD 

333 


16475 57550 56415 
1345 J35BJ0 134625 
47425 47925 479J0 
99.75 10125 99.75 
590 574J0 585.25 
23450 268 36050 

354 36225 35625 
26325 3® JO 26425 
15 16 l&E 

325 33225 327.75 


57450 56475 57520 
1361 “ 

48025 
101 JO 
586 



85 
2240 
4MB 

4330 

Itfeoatt 3490 
RatPbdflc 405 
HogLonoDev 1465 

SSftS *23 

HK Etadric 


Brussels 


SSL 
CBR 
CaBiiyt 
WWbeUoo 
EfKMM 
BBOBflno 

gss^ 

EBL 

GnBaaqiM 

IMMbak 

•;\8rtpflno 


teGME 

S8taW 


BEL-31 tari«C 35T3J4 
Pmtas: 251328 

1675 1650 105 
7730 • 750(1 7700 

s s s 

77J0 7630 7690 

3590 3S2S E35 
7850 7650 7780 7M1 
1670 1645 U50 1670 

OTtt 5710 5WO 5&W 
15085 U m 1WM 1500! 
15900 15UD 1W0 1^ 

isisa i*sw ian 

5040 4985 5018 4775 

ineaa un25 iocs ws» 

35® 38» 35» 35® 
HQ 2205 2230 32« 

15200 15000 15075 14915 
140250 136000 130HQ 136500 



Wteefack 


820 445 450 

2740 2720 M3*i 
1020 1045 10J0 
hw 8425 83 

22.10 22.10 2225 

4020 41 41 

4220 42JO 4320 
3420 34!^S 3440 

720 8 720 

1450 1455 14J0 
9125 9225 9225 
445 445 440 

M9l 4&2S 6525 
1820 1520 1545 
2820 29 29 

1720 1820 1410 
O 433 435 

252 256 256 

7225 73-50 7125 
?9 75 2225 23.10 

21.10 21.10 2125 
1410 1430 1820 
4520 4680 4580 

2J0 2J0 2J2 

1 181 
9125 93 

4J0 480 

6JM 7.10 
625 680 
57 57 

7} JO 2X45 2X30 
1520 1525 1545 


Gtaup 

MIAcchtanf 

iEC 



122 
92 
422 
7.10 
620 
57 JO 


Copenhagen 

PSSIb ^ » s 

3? ’S'”! | s 

SST 

S is 

as; •-* 


Jakarta 

Astro W1 

Bklrtllndan 

BkHcgoiti 

GodnaGam 

Wocenwi* 

htiofood 

Mm& 

Sanpuma KM 
SeaWlGws* 

T ti ti w mwti iflti 


0651195 

Pmkn: 51289 

2500 2175 2200 3150 

800 725 725 750 

800 725 725 750 

9400 93S0 9350 9400 
2173 21 BO ZlSi 2175 
3875 3825 3825 3825 
7100 8850 9025 8850 

5600 5325 5400 5K3 
3875 2750 2775 2725 
3100 3SZ5 3550 3475 


feflpJ To boccp 

KbigBriw 

Luooroto 

Land Sac 
lam 

legal GMGcp 
UayitaT58Gp 
LnaBVMty 

(UabSpaar 

MEPC 

MecunAsnl 

NttiacnGrid 

NaaPnwar 

HOfMot 

Nod _ 

NomWilWan 

Oraige 
ftfloon 


Planter Runel 
PiwtartU 
RAidiGp 
Rook Group 
RecMD total 


Johannesburg aimpt ^ tw-h 


h i a 

444 436 


Frankfurt 

AMBB 


180 

240 

B5 TiT ’J 

0495 
4QJD 

“"1- . - 
CKAGCakna 16120 

SSSffif -II 

Datpmta 


DAX 08729 
PJWtaat 438113 

ITS ITS IB 
234 70 240 OJB 

451 452 *3.® 

129.70 1»S JS 

47*5 4 959 49.10 
S3 6MB 6M0 
h to IS.X 
10950 10950 111® 

7320 

84 

JUC - n-. r — 

I4tf 1442 UJQ 

W S'“S'S 


040 

OS 

•S3 


ABSAGimp 

AnBtaAniM 

OSM 

AVWHN 
Sortaw 
CJG. Solti 
Dc Ben. 

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Gem* 

GFSA 

htfpatalJWp* 

InaweCoat 

Hear 

Jfltawt*8K> 

taaHpHm 

UbetrLrfe 

LtaUeSttal 

MnaicD 

Ham* 

Nedear 

RamOiwidlGp 

RKheawnl 


31.95 3125 
280 279 

256 249J5 
259 25650 
178 176.75 
8125 81.75 

12 ms 

U wa 
2320 2260 
140 JO 11925 
31J5 31 

3PJ05 33J0 

n-« u 

99 97 

6450 6175 
2375 21SS 
108 X06 

6U5 63 

356 355 

13725 13625 

17 1660 
106 104K 

» I8J0 
10075 180 

4645 4570 
6225 61 JO 


3120 31.90 
280 278 

256 250 

259 258 

177.75 177 JO 

8225 airs 

11.95 12 

S3M 

2US 2260 
140 13925 
31 3260 
37 3830 
1120 1165 
97 99 

64JD 64 
2325 2375 
107 106 

6325 6225 

355 mn 

13425 137 

1660 1680 
1IEJ0 10475 
1880 1835 
100 JO 10025 
46 45 

US 61.75 


..-JlnS 

ReiiloU MM 
RerimlUgi 
Sawn 
RTZraa 
RMC Group 
Rons Bsjoe 

Roytiweati. 

l&SunAI 


santiwiy 
Sctawtan 
Soot NowcnsO* 
SCDlPOW 

S^mTnM 

StatiTrampR 

Stabe 

SotihNopMw 

SnOhXBM 

Sntitalnd 

SOwnEtac 

ShigNOarii 
Stand Omtar 
Tale & Lyle - 
Toko 

Thom Water 

31 Group 

ESS 

Unltawr 

iMAmnnor 

UUNews 


967 

Sl06 

825 

687 

1J9 

565 

185 

17.09 
R4S 

564 
526 
380 

1125 

7.13 

369 

17.94 

472 

269 

766 
9JD 
667 

ura 

458 

261 

1168 

135 

526 

615 

562 

612 

692 

360 

677 

.1428 

407 

649 

67S 

163 

1120 

400 

1430 

1421 

882 

5.95 

327 

367 

520 

722 

7.10 

2063 

iai5 

177 

8J5 

195 

10.57 

267 

497 
820 
261 
762 
567 

1155 

265 

565 
925 
7.42 

364 

139 

7.07 

828 

U7 

767 
562 
6S5- 
966 
360 

10.19 

2J0 

560 

263 

774 

323 

9.92 

10.11 

268 

498 
622 
384 

445 

20.09 
725 
489 
260 
923 
487 

13 

171 

629 

965 

482 

680 

862 

453 

467 

690 

522 

479 

363 

1695 

562 

8 


927 

■465 

8.15 
670 
1J6 
529 
571 
1671 
825 
5J0 
513 
367 

11.05 
89V 
362 
17-53 
4X3 

264 
691 
921 
457 
128 
468 
225 
1025 
123 
563 
598 
524 
720 

685 
323 
661 
423 
527 
646 

686 
180 

11.06 
402 
1412 
1325 

865 

586 

3.18 

171 
580 

784 
690 

2027 
10 
266 
861 
283 
1638 
281 
488 
777 
221 
4 62 
561 
1360 
229 
557 
927 
729 
138 
220 
682 
722 
1.56 
7J7 
523 
4® 

9.15 
152 

1023 

265 
520 
227 

7J5 

JL20 

9.06 

920 

227 

6JS 

68A 

174 

455 

1970 

720 

480 

277 

9.17 

480 

1288 

188 

606 

923 

473 

465 

8.10 

468 

436 

172 
516 
670 
235 
1875 
495 

785 


967 960 
492 485 

824 822 

679 578 

1-58 127 

561 563 

582 569 

1694 14tB 
865 &3A 

553 554 

£22 520 

376 173 

71X9 71.75 
9.03 9X3 

362 358 

17.94 1721 
685 423 

268 2 68 

33 » 

487 448 

iS IS 

264 260 

NX® 17.75 

124 124 

576 564 

615 6 

561 526 

8 B 

492 684 

325 328 

672 664 

498 493 

599 602 

467 669 

489 692 

182 180 

1127 11X7 
4X2 403 

1427 1398 
1412 1406 

879 866 

« fi 

378 372 

588 583 

7.18 7X5 

782 689 

2065 2065 
1085 1087 
171 367 

869 . 865 
,290 284 

10LS 1027 
2X1 285 

493 492 
tM 8.16 

233 229 

45 464 

563 563 

1155 1368 

IS IS 

987 981 
728 721 

3^8 360 

228 321 

699 688 

821 883 

1-57 1 JS 
767 728 

526 537 

689 681 

£ £§ 
10.11 993 

267 147 
520 529 

159 159 
765 762 

125 133 
9.86 988 

1089 9.93 

129 262 

,689 693 
611 686 
179 3JS 
458 456 

20 1988 
724 7.18 

484 483 

178 277 
929 927 
483 480 
1198 1298 
188 190 

609 617 
960 929 
479 479 
668 670 

823 824 

451 469 

4M 457 

880 878 

5.19 5.17 

677 672 
329 3 JR 

1890 1873 
495 498 
7.92 788 


Madrid 

Aarim 

ACESA 

AflunBoRwIan 

Arorntartl 

B8V 

Bamsta 

BanUnter 

8 a>CanhD Htap 

Bopopukr 

BcnSantandW 

CEPSA 

Conhaente 

FECSA . 

Got Nataral 

Ibertmln 

PiWB 

BahbmI 

Sevihma Etac 
Tribocatani 
TeWonfcn 
Union Fruki 
Vaienc Cement 


Btisatadm 62428 
Pl WiW 8. flg.t4 


27500 
1965 
6090 
87 40 
4635 
1475 
8730 
8160 
9510 
4835 
4650 
3105 
B250 
3095 
1235 
7670 
1800 
2745 
6SJ0 
1395 
looao 

44» 

1300 

3000 


26700 

1920 

5930 

8550 

8475 

6099 

7140 

4C9S 


8020 

30® 

1215 

7370 

1770 

2660 

6470 

1370 

9790 

4410 

1270 

2980 


27480 27020 
1955 1975 
6090 6010 
8760 8700 
4630 49M 

1475 1455 

0590 BOO 
6160 6150 

940 94ZC 
4745 4770 
4590 4640 
3060 3090 

BIX) 8100 
3085 3065 

1225 1230 
7450 7600 

1795 1780 
2730 2705 

SSffl 6510 
1395 1385 
9900 9990 

4495 4450 
1300 1300 

2990 2980 


Paris 

Moor 

AGF 

AtaLUntde 

AloaM/Utti 

Ajb-UAP 

Banadn 

BIC 

BNP 

CaMPto 

Correfuur 

Qnlno 

CCF 

Ciis3e*n 

CMsHwiDtor 

CLF-Dntao Ftua 

&edt Affricate 

Danone 

EK-Mitiahe 

EridontaBS 

I5SS3 

GmvEon 






EtedrunarB 

09 

660 

664 

656 


CAC 48: 386462 
Pinkies; 3077-98 

Ericsson B 

372 

366 37160 

368 


Hemes B 
IncenBw A 

335 328J0 

701 m 

335 

699 

326 

697 

1111 

M91 

till 

1104 


41 5 

410 

411 

410 

24460 23X10 239.90 23860 

MaOoB 

272 

269 

Vf) 

270 

1018 

900 

1006 

1016 


273 

271 

272 

272 

824 

793 

804 

814 

Phmn^lpohn 

263 

l«OI 

254 

408.90 40X50 40660 404X0 

27460 27060 27360 

270 

744 

725 

744 

740 

ScnataB 

234-50 22660 23460 

227 

459 45160 

454 

451 

SCAB 

187 

184 

187 

184 

31360 30&50 31160 310X0 

saBatenA 

9560 

9X50 

9450 

95 

1084 

1052 

1073 

1050 

StaBcfluFan 

378 

358 

364 

373 

3750 

3615 

3660 

3730 

Skanska B 

33160 

325 

330 32760 

36060 359.10 36090 

mi 

SKFB 

• 234 2Z76D 

233 22460 

365JD 359.10 361X0 

SpahanfeenA 

1W 

18860 

794- 

19160 

675 

669 

674 

675 

128 

126 

127 

128 

BIZ 

797 

802 

S® 

SvHoBdrti A 

27660 

273 

274 

275 

578 

589 

57B 

571 

VbhoB 

228 22060 

227 21960 


Manila 

AqntaB 
Aynta Land 
BkPMpH 
CU> Homes 
Matin Bee A 
MahoBwk 
Pehon 
PCIBtmk 
PM Long DW 
SaiMtaMB 
SM Prime Hdg 


1225 

It 

99 

3-30 

msa 

240 

420 

143 

no 

■JS 


PSHtades 192163 
PmtaK 196124 

1225 1225 13 

1525 1SJ58 1575 

96 98JD 99 

3 105 no 

S9 75 7050 

217 239 242 

485 4.10 420 

m 141 i44 

B8S 895 895 

52 Stm 5S 

520 6.W 660 


ImaM 

Lafarge 

Lgmmd 

LJOrem 

LVMH 

MkMn B 

Paribas A 

Pernod Heard 

P«igaotC> 

nwun-Piw 

P if model 

UmmM 

RolQl 

Rh- Poulenc A 
SanoR 
SdwefcJer 
SEB 

SGSTbdmton 

SteGenwde 

Soderta 

StGobdn 

SuezfOe) 

Suez Lyon Emn 


CSF 


Total B 
Urinor 
Mriw 


1311 1311 7311 1320 

977 963 969 973 

W » ™ HW 

915 895 904 917 

fl-10 • 8X5 8X5 

635 6.15 630 635 

747 728 734 731 

41960 407.10 41120 414 

765 7SB 7W 759 

44560 434 44169 444J0 

1260 1235 1246 1251 

JfflO 2377 2427 2457 

1278 1242 1252 1263 

374-50 36660 370 37090 

440 438.10 43&» 443J0 
29280 28720 mi® 392-50 
BIS 794 GS4 791 
2848 2805 2843 2800 

2280 2182 2225 2262 

1B5J0 1® JBZ2D 1U93 

1692 1678 1689 1690 

27090 2S3-H1 270 265 

564 545 553 560 

374.90 365JD 371 372.90 

874 851 865 872 

5» 515 518 530 

89Q 873 882 881 

3078 2944 30W 3065 
946 929 940 932 

1585 1585 1585 1660 
667 651 661 658 

499 489 69J 498 

19260 18760 190 190 

4M 647 679 692 

122.90 121 122JB 123 

41 MO 405.10 40730 402 


Mexico 

Aria A 
Banned B 
Cana CTO 
ObaC 

Emp Madam 

GpocnsoAi 

GpoFBoaner 

GarFarlabum 

KMiOarirMa 

TetwtaaCPO 

TeWWzL 


7160 

3935 

1648 

41X5 


33J0 

4060 


Msa tadtt 5M8J7 
PiwtaaKSSUJM 

71X0 7260 7260 
22JO 2335 2285 
3830 3935 3860 
1468 1464 1668 
40X0 41X0 4130 

*!& IS 13 

3360 3140 3140 
4U0 48X0 4080 
15220 15153 153X0 
20-30 20JO 2060 


Sao Paulo 


Bmw tadtt 1M7U8 
WW Hta B l 


: 116030 


Milan 


MlBTrtmiHrn- 1501X1 
Pmtam ' 


: 1545881 




Sydney 


AIMtaoriro: 27S4X8 
Piroirosc 27*938 


869 

853 

840 

846 

ANZtSMng 

1144 

11X2 

1141 

1143 

BHP 

I6J2 

16X3 

16X7 

1625 

Bore! 

438 

4JU 

4X7 

4X5 

Bmrotrintad. 

2766 

27 

27X4 

2766 

CBA 

17X6 

17X2 

1/X6 

17X6 

OCAirwIf 

14X5 

14X7 

W-13 

14.95 

CBw M-far 

644 

648 

661 

663 


678 

665 

6JD 

6jy 

CSR 

5X2 

526 

5X0 

5X4 

PnstareBiwf 

X90 

3X4 

2X6 

2X9 

Goodman FU 

222 

11/ 

2.18 

2J1 

K3 Audmta 

12X4 

1266 

12JI 

1265 


33X2 

3240 

3266 

3X20 

MIM flags 

169 

160 

161 

16/ 

Not AnvBota 

2160 

21 ja 

2161 

2174 

NotMuMHdg 

2X0 

2-22 

7J8 

2X7 

ssss«p 

666 

X90 

690 

3X6 

694 

3X9 

AM 

3X9 

Plonoea-InSl 

460 

464 

466 

460 


8J0 

8. A) 

8717 

887 

RtoTtoto 

21.10 

20X2 

21X5 

21 

StCmgeBank 

8X1 

840 

840 

849 

WMC 

6X0 

64V 

661 

648 


863 

1107 

854 

1760 

860 

17X5 

840 

13X8 

nOOMOTB 

446 

4X7 

446 

44U 

Taipei 

Slock MtaMMta till J5 
PraHoK 839X59 

Catoey life bn 

124 

120 

123 

121 

ChongHwoBk 

□daoTmgBk 

96 

72 

9X50 

6860 

94 

6860 

9460 

70 

□rino Devefanri 
China Steal 

9760 

24® 

93 

24 

94 

24 

SM 

Rut Bank 

96JO 

93 

W 

95 

Fonnaw PfasfiC 

54J0 

53 

53 

5450 

HnaNmBk 

101 

97 

98 

9960 

MtCamnBk 

54 

52 

5260 

53 

NonYaPtartla 

6260 

tfLSD 

6060 

67 

SMnKmgUfe 

TsWmSead 

7860 

741 

75 

137 

77 

139 

7660 

142 

Tatung 

UM Mau Etac 

32X0 

>260 

31 JO 

31.90 

8760 

■# 

UMWaUOdn 

S7 

55 

55 

56 


The Trib Index 


Pilous u of 3m PM. Hem YorittOna. 


Jan. 1. 1392* 100. 

Laval 

Change 

%eltenga 

yew to (Me 
. %«bange 

World Index 
Raglonari Aden* 

182-00 

-0.14 

-0.08 

+22.03 

Asta/Pacttic 

119.49 

-1.69 

-1J9 

-0.19 

Europe 

2O0JS7 

-0.65 

-a^z 

+34.42 

N. America 

214-97 

+2^1 

+1.04 

+32.77 

S. America 

bMhMlrita tmtoxns 

17734 

-1X7 

-1.04 

+54.98 

Capita] goods 

231.06 

+1.71 

+0.75 

+3519 

Comurmr goods 

200.42 

-0.17 

-008 

+24.15 

Energy 

213-64 

-0.13 

-0.06 

+25.15 

Finance 

13537 

■OJO 

-0.81 

+1824 

MbcaBanaous 

192J24 

+0.41 

+0^1 

+1833 

Flaw Materials 

189A4 

+041 

+0^2 

+824 

Sendee 

172.19 

+0.16 

+009 

+3539 

UUSHaa 

17321 

■2A7 

-1-4f 

+20.74 


The International Herald Tribune WorMSfock fodaxO tracks the U.S. dator wrfcjso of 
ZOO tHBmatlonaBy Imuatabte mocha from 23 countries. For mow information, a tree 
fioofctaf Is available by nrtiifl to 7Tw Trt} hxlax, 181 Avenue Chariot deGmOo. 

32521 NouBty Cedes, Prance. Compiled ty Bteomberg Hums. 



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7100 6860 69W MS 
18400 17800 17980 18® 
7#H) 7M 7500 7460 
19060 WlSffl 1B500 19000 
4840 -wre n 4S60 4880 

32200 31500 31700 32000 
SSB® 53400 53400 55200 
4351® 420TO 47680 43500 
66200 64100 64300 66300 
7500 7210 7218 7560 
1 420000 420000 440000 


Tokyo 



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1590 

1990 

1580 

599 

575 

577 

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54W 

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1490 

1510 

1910 

1860 

1888 

1940 

529 

512 

516 

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11900 

11700 

11700 

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680 

671 

471 

680 

S6S 

540 * 

541 

535 

284 

273 

273 

278 

730 

709 

718 

739 

178 

HU 

167 

173 

1630 

1590 

1600 

1670 


11206 IffiOb 1090b 111® 
6000b 59206 S9206 S9a06 
598 572 579 588 

275 -275 m 
1750 173® 1820 

1470D 14800 14700 
SB 566 


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Norandatnc 

NomEnogr 

HBiemTCtam 

Non 

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Petal Cdo 
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Pool PWkn 
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Roger* Comd B 
SeagranCb 
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TMwmnEnr 

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T efal 
TlwoBon 
T orDomB ant 
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Singapore 


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CdnTnA 

CdnlflHA 

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tadMtltabtadtc 378768 
Pmtanc 365664 


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4470 4470 
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2835 1955 
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27V4 2670 

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4660 46JO 
2970 29X0 
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44.70 44X0 
4395 42* 
21 ft 21X0 
201* 19* 

400 43* 
4344 42.15 
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648 640 692 

1250 1260 1300 
536 538 535 

1180 1180 1100 

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18W 1910 1918 
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3020 3850 3060 


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666 

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430 

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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Peso Slides 


As Traders 
In Manila 
Seek Dollars 


LiwfiA d ft ftrS atf fmn Onjwta 


MANILA — Philippine markets 
reeled Tuesday under heavy selling 
that pushed the peso beyond a volat- 
ility band set by bankers and sent 
stocks down more than 2 percent. 

The peso fell 2 percent in the first 
half-hour of trading, forcing a one- 
hour suspension of trading. It then 
quickly fell a further 1 percent to an 
all-time low against theU.S. currency 
as the dollar rose to 35.98 1 pesos. 

The dollar closed at 35.65 pesos, 
up from 34.90 pesos Monday. 

Analysts said that using the volat- 
ility band in such a skittish and 
dollar-hungry market had been a 
mistake because of the pent-up de- 
mand for the U.S. currency. 

“While the volatility-band sys- 
tem on the peso is an understandable 
effort to attempt to calm things 
down, we would suggest it is un- 
wise,'* MMS International said in a 
commentary, “ft just gives the mar- 
ket a target to aim for. 1 ' 

Some of the dollar buying was 
attributed to the unraveling of last 
week's “gentlemen's agreement” 
among the country's bankers not to 
let the dollar rise beyond 34.926 
pesos. This meant buying of dollars 
was simply postponed and the 
agreement was forgotten when the 
volatility band was enforced. 

The Philippine stock exchange's 
main index ended at 1,920.63 
points, down 2.07 percent. 

The currency crisis also spread to 
the streets as strikes called to protest 


Vietnam’s Auto Industry Sputters 

Car Show Draws Few Foreigners as Companies’ Optimism Fades 


C.mpdrxS fir (krSa&Frvt* Dupjeka 

HANOI — As Vietnam's annual 
auto show opened Tuesday, the 
Comm unis t country's traditional 
image as a land of two-wheeled 
and four-legged transport emerged 
unscathed. 

The cars that Ford Motor Co. 
hoped to exhibit, to instance, re- 
mained in a customs warehouse. 


“It’s heartbreaking, but it’s typ- 
ical for Vietnam,” said Paul David 


Cadzow, Ford Vietnam Ltd.’s 

saies-development consultant! 

When Ford tried to import two 
right-hand-drive passenger cars for 
temporary use at the exhibition, 

customs seized the vehicles, saying 
that only left-hand cars could enter 
the country. 

The legal imbroglio could prove 
embarrassing for Vietnam, which 
is striving to build a domestic auto 


industry and battling to improve its 
image among foreign investors. 

Of the 14 licensed joint-venture 
automakers in Vie tnam, only Ford, 
Toyota Motor Corp. and Daewoo 
Motor Co. were represented at the 
auto exhibit, which mostly features 
makers of spark plugs and car wax. 

The five-day annual event, Vi- 
etnam's fifth, has attracted only 38 
exhibitors, down sharply from 60 
last year. 

Foreign executives say an over- 
crowded field of manufacturers, a 
slowdown in consumer spending, 
and stiff competition from used 
imported cars are strangling the 
load industry. 

Only 5.500 locally assembled 
cars were sold last year, and the 
figure is expected to be even lower 
thus year, industry specialists say. 

With a per-capita income of less 


than $300 a year, most Vietnamese 
cannot even a afford a motorbike, 
let alone a car. 

The dreary near-term prospects 
for the local auto market, which in 
1996 amounted to only about 

37.000 units, have forced auto- 
makers to pul the brakes on ex- 
pansion plans and, in the case of 
Chrysler Motor Corp., to scrap 
plans for a local assembly plant 

Hyundai Motor Co:, which has 
been negotiating for a license to 
build a nlant in Vietnam, indicated 
for the first time Tuesday that it was 
reassessing its plans. 

“When we did market studies 
two years ago, we were looking at 

80.000 units being sold per year in ' 

this market by 2000,” said Park 
Young Jim, a company official. 
“But now we think 60,000 at 
best.” (AFP. Reuters) 



Le Ngoc Hoan, Vietnam’s min- 
ister of transport and commu- 
nications, at the Hanoi show. 


Source: TeleKuis 


IwemukiaaSnMT SS 


Economy’s Recovery Is Slowing, Tokyo Says 


Very briefly: 


Omfiltd &* Our Sag Fkwi DbpOrha 

TOKYO — The government left 
its key assessment of the economy 
unchanged Tuesday, saying it re- 
mained on a recovery path, but ad- 
ded a note of caution that the tempo 
was slowing. 

To speed growth, the government 
pledged to institute reforms rather 
than to spend funds. 

“The economic recovery is be- 
coming gradual and rather weak,” 
Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsu- 


zuka said. “We must tackle re- report that the pace of recovery was 


forms.’ 

In its October assessment, the 
Economic Planning Agency said, 
“Although the recovery tempo has 
slowed and corporate sentiment is 
cautious, the economy is maintain- 
ing its underlying recovery trend, 
led by private-sector demand. ” 

Its September report had said the 
economy was “ maintaining its re- 
covery' trend.” 

The agency said in the October 


slow in terms of personal consump- 
: fading ne, 


tion, despite the fading negative im- 
pact of the April i consumption tax 
rise, which hurt domestic demand. 

Personal consumption is “now 
pressured by other fiscal policy 
tigh tening measures, such as the ter- 
mination of income tax cuts,” it 
said. (AFP. Reuters) 

■ Securities Firm to Close 



Echigo Securities Co., a Japanese 


said it would close after 
embezzled 32 billion 
)2 million), caasiog the 
’s debts to exceed its as- 
sets. Bloomberg News reported 
from Niigata, Japan. 

The brokerage decided Tbesdfcy to 
suspend some operations Wednes- 
day in preparation for a closure. 

Echigo is the second brokerage to 

§ > out of business this year. In May, 
gawa Securities Co., shut down 
amid tighter competition. 


& 




& 


weakened peso crippled mass trans- MOVIES: European Broadcasters Blast U.S. Studios’ Changes in Program Deals 

portation. (Reuters. AFP ) 1 

ditional payments to acquire rights 


• Woo Sung Food Co^ a former bottler of CocaGota Co.* g 

beverages in three South Korean provinces, asked£ court to 
reschedule its debt, sending the stock of units of SataHwau 
Group, its parent company, and of its creditors into* tailspin. 
The company owes 110 b il lion won ($1203 .nuUiofl) -to 
creditor banks. . - ■ • • - . ' 

• Newcrest Mining Ltd. shares jumped 4 percent to close at 
2.78 Australian dollars ($2.01) after lhe company released 
information indicating its Ridgeway prospect may contain % 
more gold and copper than previously es tim ate^.. ; 

• Honda Motor Co. plans to invest $800 itriffion m Brazil 

over the next five to 10 years, Kazuo NozaySC a Honda 
executive, said, . V-- 1 

• Daiwa Bank Ltd. cut its earnings estimate by half, to S 

billion yen ($41 million) for the six months that ended Sept 
30, blaming unrealized equity losses. . . 

• Anheuser-Busch Cos. won clearance to more than double 


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■ Confusion for Currencies 

There was confusion in the cur- 
rency market when Reuters Hold- 
ings PLC's trading screens showed 
rwo prices for some Southeast Asian 
currencies, Bloomberg News re- 
ported from Jakarta. 

“People initially thought these 
currencies had gone into two-tier 
markets," said Simon Mahadevan 
Flint, an economist at Independent 
Economic Analysis Holdings Pte. in 
Singapore. A Reuters executive in 
Singapore attributed the dual prices 
to technical problems and said they 
had been corrected. 


Continued from Page 13 


to Paramount's hit films, according 
to films from Paramount, the to Mr. StabilinL 
Colombia-Tristar unit of Sony En- Gary Marenzi, president of Para- 

tertainmem Pictures Inc. and Dis- mount’s international television 
covery Communications Inc., the group, defended the studio, assert- 

i- ' inn mat this was common practice. 


documentary nettvork based in Beth- ' mg 


esda, Maryland. 

Instead. Kirch, Mediaset and oth- 
ers who had contracted with Para- 
mount discovered in recent weeks 
thar overseas rights to major studio 
releases such as “Air Force One” 
and “Face/Off" had been sold to 
Buena Vista International, a branch 
of Walt Disney Co. The broad- 
casters will have to negotiate ad- 


“We are not trying to avoid our 
obligations,” he said. Mr. Marenzi 
declined to comment on the practice 
Of linking series to hit films 
Mediaset's Mr. Stabilini and 
RTL’s Mr. Thoma. however, said 
depriving broadcasters of hit films 
may set a dangerous precedent. 

“This practice undermines the 
whole concept of die ’output deal' 


which is structured on purpose spe- 
cifically to obtain these locomotive 
feature films for TV,” Mr. Thoma 
said. “All the other stuff — the 
series, the sitcoms and so on — are 
not successful, in Germany at any 
rate. Everyone is rethinking the 
whole situation.” 

Meanwhile, independent produ- 
cers complain that they are being 
shut out of overseas markets by the 
major studios. 

“When we go to some European 
stations, they say we’ve already got 
all these American programs that we 
had to take just to get ‘Lost World, ’ ” 
said Todd Leavitt,- chairman of the 


television group of Alliance Com- 
munications Corp., based in Toronto. 
“We’re bong locked out.’ ’ • 

The industry is also seeing increas- 
ing conflict over producers bokfiqg 
back programs from broadcasters to 


output at its Budweiser brewery in China, giving it a chance to Ite 

.. ■■AiMlA. 5J iil i— t jtP’ll 




supply their own channels. 
Children’ 


i's programming, for in- 
stance, once destined for free tele- 
vision networks, is now being 


Viacom’s" Nickelodeon, Time 
Warner’s Cartoon Network and 
News Corp.’s Fox Kids, said Ronald 
Weinberg, president of Cinar Films 
Inc., a Canadian producer of chil- 
dren’s films and television series. 


gain customers in the world’s second-biggest beer market, a 
local government official said. If fully used, the new capacity 
would still amount to leiss than 13 percent of die country's 

beer market. / 

•Japan’s Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto, bendingto 
growing resistance from wi thin his own party, is banking away 
from a proposal to privatize the country’s state^nin postal 
savings and insurance systems. - •< 

• Thai Military Bank PCL, seeking to increase capioito 
meet central bank standards, plans to raise 6-9 biliion fctif fl>£ 
($193 million) by selling shares. . Bloomberg, RtaWi AM L i 




IK. 

# 

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jjfi 

i 


Kia Crisis Intensifies 


I? 


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Agnce France-Pmte and $4.97 bfflion to nOtlbaiA 
SEOUL — Seven mer- financial institutions. ’ 
chant banks in Seoul are fa- The seven unidentified 
cing mounting cash-flow merchant banks are owetii 
^*pstibI*DS‘tli-the aftermath of' total of 3 .4 trillion won ($3.7! 
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The crisis deepened as five 
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PAGE 20 


Sports 


' : . ! 




WEDNESDAy/OCTOBEft ^ i 


World Roundup 


For En 



Waqar Younis smashing the 
ball to the boundary Tuesday. 


New Boys Shine 


cricket Azhar Mahmood hit a 
breezy 72 Tuesday in his first test 
match innings to help Pakistan to 
345 runs for nine wickets on the 
second day in their first innings on 
the second day of the first test against 
South Africa in Rawalpindi 
Three debutants — Mahmood; 
Ali Naqvi, who made 115 on Mon- 
day, and Mohammad Ramzan, who 
hit 29 — scored 216 of Pakistan's 


inns. 

;]ped i 

cover from 231 for eight wickets. 
He shared an unbeaten stand of 74 
with Waqar Younis, who hit a test 
best 45. (Reuters) 


Stark Again Stops Chang 


tennis For the second year in a 
row, Jonathan Static bundled Mi- 
chael Chang, seeded No.l, out of 
die Singapore Open Tuesday with a 
7-6, 7-6 victory in the first round. 

Stark, who is ranked No. 94 in 
the world, also beat Chang, who is 
ranked No. 2, in the final last year. 

•Yevgeni Kafelnikov, the top 
seed, lost 6-4, 7-5, to Slovakia's 
Kami Kucera in the first round Tues- 
day of die CA-ltopby in Vienna. 
Ka felniko v was forced to have treat- 
ment to his back in the second set. 

Sergi Bruguera, the second seed, 
was eliminated Monday, and Goran 
Ivanisevic barely squeezed into the 
second round on Tuesday with a 6- 
3, 4-6, 6-3 victory over Frederik 
Fetterfein of Denmark. (Reuters) 


Becker Takes Captaincy 


tennis Boris Becker was se- 
lected as coach of Germany’s Davis 
Cup team Tuesday. Becker re- 
placed Niki Pilic, a Yugoslav who 
headed the team for 10 years. 

Pilic coached Germany to Davis 
Cup victories in 1988, 1989 and 
1993. Becker, a member of Ger- 
many’s winning Davis Cup teams, 
is gradually retiring from playing. 

• The Corel Corporation, the Ca- 
nadian computer company that has 
sponsored the women's tennis tour 
die last two years, will end its af- 
filiation after 1 998 when its contract 
expires, the WTA said Tuesday. 
The three-year contract was worth 
from $10 million ti $12 million to 
the WTA. (AP) 


A Haunting Melody 


cycling Torsten Hieckmann’s 
moment of glory was upset by a 
notorious tune from the past on 
Tuesday. 

Hieckmann won the junior men’s 
time trial at the world road race 


championships in San Sebastian, 
Spain. But the 17-year-old’s mo- 


ment was somewhat tarnished when 
the old East German anthem was 
played at the medal ceremony , 
drawing derisive whistles from Ger- 
man spectators. (Reuters) 



me 



n> yr 


International Herald Tribune 

I N ROME," wrote Juvenal, “all 
tilings can be had at a price.” As 
England's soccer team heads to 
Rome, for the match to decide whether 


World Soccer / Rob Hughes 


Italy or England qualifies outright for 
IdCup; m 


the World Cup', many question the price 
of allowing sport to grow beyond the 
pride and joy of competing. 

To Juvenal foe Roman poet, sports 
were foe way to a healthy mind in a 
healthy body. To us modems, Italy 
versus England at foe Stadio Olimpico 
on Saturday is about nationalism, about 
bucketloads of lire, about excesses that 
may not be healthy. 

Italians joke that Saturday will be the 
first time Christians devour Lions. Eng- 
lishmen boast foot their team, whose 
crest is three lions, is ready to resume 
world supremacy. 

Italy's government is grappling to 


gome. And France stands by, aware that 
the outcome affects its security situ- 
ation, its tourism, its World Cup. 

Saturday at the Olimpico is winner 
takes all though not quite loser to the 
wall To miss out on automatic qual- 
ification means a play-off that carries no 
guarantees of reaching the finals. 

Normally, foe odds would favor Italy. 
England has not won in Rome, nor any- 


where else in Italy, for 36 years. All 
except 7.000 spectators will be Italian, 
but England’s police warn of 700 known 
hooligans, among them 60 hard-core 
criminals, arriving without tickets. 

In foe stadium, a huge factor en- 
courages England. It doesn't have to 
win, it must simply avoid losing. Italy, 
behind on points, must win. 

In technique, whatever the English 
say, Paolo Maldmi, Demetrio Albertmi, 
Alessandro Del Piero and Gianfranc o 
Zola have the outstanding skills and 
imaginations. 

England has unquenchable spirit 
which manifests itself as a pumped up 
willingness to run until its opponents 
drop. “In their stomach as they go down 
the tunnel" England’s coach, Glenn 
Hoddle, says, “I want every one of my 
players to have that inner belief they can 
win. Its got to be a hundred percent.” 

Hoddle ’s likely captain Saturday, 
Tony Adams, embodies the attitude of 
fighting for one’s country. 

Adams believes be has never lost 
while leading England, that his cap- 
tain’s record is 10 out of 10. He rejects 
the Euro 96 result against Germany. 
“We matched them through 90 minutes 
and extra time," he insists, “Losing on 


penalties doesn't count" 

The Germans, drinking from the vic- 
tory cup. thought it suitably sweet But 
Adams is no man to argue with: Un- 
beaten it is. Tony! 


C OACH Hoddle, like every Eng- 
lish player interviewed this 
week, swears that England fears 
nothing, that tales of Italian technique 
reigning supreme are myth. 

"Other countries always thought we 
were very strong but very stupid, ’ says 
Adams. “Now, we have got the brains 
as well as the brawn." 

From foe head coach to his players, 
and to media who show foe wisdom of 
«>mp followers, it is repeated like a 
man tra- “We are the masters. We are 
coming to win." 

The Italians appear to cower. Itmight 
be a trick, like a boxer luring foe other 
guy onto a stiff right hander. 

If there is a neurosis in Italy, it 
spreads from Cesare Maldmi 64 before 
he assumed the role of national trainer, 
and is said to tr ansmit tension, a fear of 
failure, into players. ’ 

Beware I talian pessimism. Beware 
media talk. Beware foe notion that old 
Maldini — in contrast to his cavalier son 


Paolo who captains .foe Azzuri — 
doesn’t know foe winning game. 

■ Cesare Maldini skippered Milan to 
fourscudeaos — as tic Italian league tide 
is known — and foe European Cup. He 
assisted Enzo Bearzot on Italy’s 1982 
Wbdd Cup triumph. He coaxed Italy's 
young bloods to successive European 
Under 21 titles in 1992, 1994 and 1996. 

What foe coach cannot do is restore 
youth to Franco Bareri, .foe imperious 
defender Italy never replaced. He can- 
not give health to Antonio Conte, who 
would have been a key midfielder had 
his AchfDes tendon not been inflamed. 
And he cannot erase the suspension of 

Roberto di Matteo. 


rather than try to kill foe 
draw, has this positive men 


for a 

approach 



at Wembley, as an off night craned bl 
the absence of key playen. - . • ..if* 
Hoddle prefers to recall la Touring 
in France this summer, where fioglsjjj' 

beat Italy 2-0 ai Nantes in Jane.- a 
friendly game, say Italians; which EugC 
land fought forreaL \ 

Ultimately, k domes down fodjt r 
dpline. England’s match w^mere coni£ 
be Ian Wright or Paul Ctacdgoe, fee- 


ing off foe subtlety of Tcdto Shafok 1 
ham and foe biting force of Wnl f 


stop, key contests cm foe field 

depend on character as much as class, on 
temperament as much as talent. 

Italy keeps a secret. No one knows 


and David Batty. 

Rome remembers Gascoigne. In 
brief period at Lazio he was. tnore ^mi' ? ^ 


1 


.11 


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■ 




peror Claudios than any other — < i 
Claud 



pocket wizardry, but we don’t know if 
the trainer plans to use Del Piero’s sharp 
eye and balance as a third out-and-out 
goal hunter, or as a floating body be- 
tween midfield and attack. 

Emit?) Chiesa, Christian Vieri and 
Filippo InTflfl hi — $50 milli on worth of 
goaJpower could be benched. 

F.n g lq n d, intending to go for victory 


’Iaudius was mad. Gazza 
match through genius, he could m&fc 
foe whole crowd laugh, .he could he 
taunted imo stupidity. . . _ 

The 23d player then becqmss 
portant Saturday's referee Mario V«i‘ 
der Ende is Dutch but already accused of- 
favoring all dungs Italian. CoQgpirapyf,. 
Coincidence? Or excuses in adyaiicef : j. 

Suspicion festers. It always (fid in i 
Italy. 








Rob Hughes is on the staff , qf The 
Tunes of London. . ; 




tv — «s f* 


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His Lawsuit 



son 


The Associated Press __ 

NEW YORK — The fonder heavy- ! 
weight boxer Mitch <lreen '«xmdamed \ 
that he was being “sold out" and bolted ‘ 


£'• 


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from a courtroom where he was ; testifying 


Dm(Col>(i/A|rm fiam-iVar 

Troy Brown of the New England Patriots being brought down by John Mobley, left, and Ray Crockett of this Broncos In a 34-13 vfctoryforDenver. 


Now There Is One Unbeaten Team: The Broncos 


By Thomas George 

New York Times Service 


DENVER — After flirting with foe 
New England Patriots for a half, foe 
Denver Broncos put them squarely in 
their place. 

Leading by 14-13 on Monday night, 
foe Broncos turned things upside down 
in foe third quarter, scoring 17 un- 
answered points and making a mockery 
of a showdown of the National Football 
League’s last two unbeaten teams. 

Now, there is only one unbeaten team 
in the NFL — Denver — after the 
Broncos' resounding 34-13 victory be- 
fore 75,821 delirious fans. 

Denver is 6-0. New England, which 
■ advanced to last season's Super Bowl is 
4-1. 

“Let’s keep this in perspective," said 
Mike Shanahan, foe Denver coach. 
“It’s a long season. This was just foe 
sixth round.” 

“Last year there was a team that was 
7-1 that didn't make the playoffs," he 
said, referring to the Washington Red- 
skins. 

John Elway dived over from foe I and 
Terrell Davis scored from the 1 in the 
thud quarter, which Denver dominated. 
Denver won foe second half by 20-0. 


Elway had his rough spots, but he 
found Rod Smith on several deep 
throws that set up Denver scores. He 
wound up completing 13 of 27 passes 
for 197 yards. 

Davis was sensational rushing for 
171 yards on 32 carries and popping 
through the Patriots’ line with ease. He 
also scored two touchdowns. 

New England could not handle 
Smith, either. He caught 5 passes for 
130 yards. 

And the Patriots could not do enough 
against foe Broncos’ roaming and hard- 
hitting defense, managing to score only 
in the second quarter. Drew Bledsoe 
passed for 234 yards and a touchdown, 
but be was only 40 for 41 and threw an 
interception — one that linebacker John 
Mobley returned for a touchdown. 

New England could not get its run- 
ning game in gear, managing only 51 
yards; its star back, Cards Martin, fin- 
ished with 66 yards on 15 carries. 

And the Patriots repeatedly hart 
themselves, being flagged few 1 17 yards 
in penalties — 74 of them in foe decisive 
fond quarto:. 

The game began as if Denver would 
blow out the Patriots much tike it did in 
their last meeting, a 34-8 victory last 
November at New England. The Bron- 


cos’ Terrell Davis scored on a 2-yard 
run, and then linebacker John Mobley 
intercepted a Bledsoe pass and returned 
it 13 yards for a touchdown. With 3 
minutes 51 seconds left in foe first 
quarter, Denver was ahead, 14-0. 

New England — boosted by two Wil- 
lie Clay interceptions of Elway passes 
— scored all the second-quarter points 
and trailed at halftime, 14-13. 

Bledsoe, sacked twice, threw for 143 
yards in the half, 83 of those in the 
second quarter. Elway was not sacked, 
but completed only 7 of 15 passes for61 
yards in the half as New England's 
coverages kept him in check. 

New England trailed at ha lftime de- 
spite running nine more plays than Den- 


ver’s 29 and gaining 60 more yards than 
Denver’s 1 18. 


1 London Monarchs oat the Move 


The London Monarchs, one of six 
franchises in foe World League of Amer- 
ican Football will start next season with 
a new name and will take to foe rood 
even for some home games. The As- 
sociated Press reported from London. 

The team was renamed the England 
Monarchs. It will move its home base 
yet again — from Chelsea in west Lon- 
don to Crystal Palace in sooth London 
— but will only play three of its five 
games in foe British capilaL 
The club will play two home games 
outside London during the 1998 season. 


inhis $25 million lawsnitover foie beating 
Mike Tyson gave him in a street fight 
Green, angry that foe promoter Don 
King was hot in court returned later 
after a shouting match with his lawyers. 

The judge warned him that the lawsuit 
would be thrown out if he stayed away. 

Green blames King for his career trou- 
bles and called him To testify, although 
Tyson is foe defendant in foe case. 

“Don King ripped me off," Gree§.< 
said during his often rapid, rambling 
indistinct : testimony. . Much of wj 
Green said seemed irretevantto his 
suit, but neither his lawyer. Richan|! 
Gutierrez, nor foe judge seemed tote; 
able to direct his testimony. 

The former heavyweight champion 
and Green brawled in front of a Harleor 
store on Aug. 23, 1988. 

Green admits he went looking fix ; 

Tyson. Frustrated about losing a 1986 
fight, he said he merely asked for a " 
rematch and that Tyson responded by : 
“sucker-punching" bno- 
Tyson contends he was defending; 
himself after Green ripped his shirt. 

Green’s lawyers say that Tyson broke 
Green’s nose, cut up his face and 
knocked him cold, hitting him so hard - K?**’-’- 
that he broke his own hand. Greensaid he 
filed assault charges, but dropped them • 
after Tyson promised him a rematch. 

Green was angry at King because he 
learned before the 1986 fight that Tyson 
was paid at least $650,000 to his $30,000 
and became dispirited, losing the 10-- 
rounder on points, his lawyers say. . 



Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Puram 


AHBOCAM LEAGUE 

NnrYoffc BOS >21 HO— 3 12 0 

OamhaUI M3 1D0 Mt-« 7 2 

N*fcoiT (7), Starts*] (83 and Gtamft 
Posada <67, Jr.WrtgM, M. Jackson (SJ. Av 
KnmadKr (7). Mssa (81 and S. Alomar. 
W-Jf.VWohl 2-0. L— PdBfla (ML 

Sv-Jtesonj. 

Qmfcmf ate mUk 3-2 


N.Y. Gtart* 

3 

3 

0 

-500 

104 

120 

PtdkxfcHpJda 

2 

3 

0 

-400 

90 

99 

Arizona 

1 

4 

a 

■300 

96 

104 


CENTRAL. 




Tampa Bay . 

5 

1 

0 

.823 

131 

97 

Green Bay 

4 

1 

0 

-667 

144 

136 

Mkmeoofa 

4 

2 

0 

40 

155 

141 

Detroit 

3 

3 

a 

-500 

133 

120 

CNcngo 

0 

e 

a 

800 

70 

175 


WENT 





San Frandsco 

4. 


0 

400 

122 

40 

CornSno 

2 


0 

400 

80 

106 

SL Laois 

2 


0 

400 

94 112 

New (Means 

2 


0 333 

101 139 

Attonlo 

. 0 


0 

-000 

82. 

136 


9. Davis Lom ULUS* UK 

10. Phi Mdcebat* (LS.U12 

11. Jotfn Uwnant U.S.7JJ7 

12. Scott Hoch, IL&.&87 

13. Steve EHngton Audmfo &48 
1 A Fred Couples, US* &A8 

15. Nick Fddi England, (L42 


CRICKET 


6. Yevueny KdMnRat Russia, Z438 

7. Sorgf Brag uaa Spain, 1357 
A Maceto Rteh Chfe 1301 - 

9. Goran Ivanbevlc Qoafla,129l 

10. Alex Cornea, Spain, 2251 

1 1. Gustavo KoartenBraril 22» - 
UTIkhihb Muster, Swflzwknvl 2229 

13. Jonas Btartanan, Swadwt 1182 

14. Fflfh Manna, Spain, 3,127 

15. Pott Kmda Czech RepUbBc, 1029 . 


TUeSOAT. M nMHLPMX. PARSON 
Pakfefcm: 345 for nine 




CROSSWORD 


•Iapanese Leagues 


Denver 34 New England 13 

The AP Top 25 


L T Pdt ,GB 


ACROSS 
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i« Start 

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of poetry 

37 Further matter? 
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change, etc. 

53 SfT>00{h worker 

ss Sulky person 
sc Legal thing 


87 Kind oi 
experiment 
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two vowels 
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lame 

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cavaudevdiian 

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Si Diner 


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80 

51 

2 

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70 

61 

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■ 65 

66 

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496 

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63 

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430 

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60 

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66 

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62 

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63 

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438 

77% 


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campaigner 

London 


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35 Much 
38 Bitten before? 


a Fatts into disuse 


3 "There’s — 
chance of that" 


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4 Japanese 
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4a Dispatched 
4i Mourning band 


Solution to Puzzle of Oct 7 


s Sufficient, once 


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with "the" 


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43 First-class 
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47 Sooai misfits 



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mmncsota— E nrdsad 1Mr ogttw » 
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TOMHTo-Ainounowl HHP Uita 
and OF Jacob Bnunfleld refused oatilgM*- 
sfgnrnaiifs to Spbcbk 11 MehterlP Utaa» 
freftagonts. - 

NffnOHWLLEAOOK - -ii 
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off wakwra torn San Diegai 
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BuEnger and OF- IB Jo a Oautak 
otrtrtght csrignmenls In ordtrfo beeoffldlg 


FOOTBALL 


NFL Standings 


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to Dancer with a 
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53 'Carmma 

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17 Element 5a 


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Dalles 

Washington 


EAST 

W L T Pd. PF PA 

4 10 -flOd 143 74 

£67 157 105 

M0 116 136 

MO 88 91 

JX» 66 131 

CENTRAL 

4 10 £00 131 98 

3 2 0 M 127 738 

3 3 0 500 161 134 

14 0 .200 81 134 

1 4 0 300 84 136 

WOT 

t o DIJHO 190 85 

4 2 0 567 122 lit 

3 3 0 500 102 136 

3 3 0 500 107 134 

2 4 0 533 151 148 

■UnoNALCOftHHMCi 

BAST 

W L T-Pst PF PA 

3 2 a 500 124 75 

3 2 0 500 90 73 


10. Washington 

3-1 . 

1,143 

10 

11. Michigan SL 

- 40 

UMS 

12 

11 Washington St 

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980 

15 

13. Georgia 

48 

814 

10 

1AL5U 

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770 

13 

15. Tam ABM 

48 

750 

21 

. 16. Stanford 

4-1 

714 

19 

1 17. Iowa 

4-1 

702 

11 

18. UCLA 

3-2 

‘ 540 

22 

' 19. Air Farce 

64 

416 

23 

20, OMafmna SL 

5-0 

327 


, 21. Brigham Young 

3-1 

309 

24 

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-3-1 

227 

17 

23. Vbginio Tech 

4.1 

174 

14 

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2-2 

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3-1 

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NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASBOOAIpa_ 

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demon 65, Atabama at, Wocon-an 41 
SouBwn Cal 31, Kenlodcy 29, Toledo 27, 
Wyomklfl 26, New Meriao 11 MknLOMilT. 
Arttona Si 1& Kamos 14, Pimte 14 Mandul 
i N. Ckmdna St i VmgWa % andnnaB l, 
GoftMCfe St 1, Ohio U. 1, Oregon St 1 . 



1. Greg Narawn AW 11.74 

2. Tiger Woods, U5.ll.t6p0)nS 

3. Ende EK. Sooth Africa, 9J8 

4 Mk* Price. Zimbabwe, 957 
5.0*1 MarrigetiKriaSaiLBa 

6. Tom Lefimm U5. 8J3 

7. Jimbo OtsSA. Japan SJ2 

8. -Mam OMcarg, Ui. sm 


1. Mattxi Hhgfc. SwHurimck 6,976 jpoWs 

3 Monks Me* UJ5-1429 

4. h«Moi(* Croatia, 1179 

5. LWsoy Davenport U JL 1053 

6. Amanda Coottoi South Africa 1977 

7. Mary Pierce, Franca. 1400 
& Arte Hutar, Gennaiy, 13S8 
9. Irina Splrfag, Romnda, 123S 

I tt Omcfina Marlins, spaliv 1190 

11. Anita ScmdMrVIcarla Spain 1098 

II May Joe Femands, U&, 1.902 

U SandifneTeslud, France, U33 
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1. Pete Samciras.Ui. 4291 points 

2. Mldnxf Cham US. 335 

3. Rjtrlck RBffob AustraBa 1B89 
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5. Cartes Maya Spain 2451 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 21 





h Rn,„ fcdians Win ? Yankees Go Home 

f ' Cleveland Ke eps New York From Climbing Out of a Hole 


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By Jack Cuiry 

._ >«'** Twits Srrvk r 

CLEVELAND - The New York 
Yankees, ihe reigning world champi- 
ons.^i>n'l keep their tide. They lost to 
the Cleveland Indians, 4-3, in the final 
gap* of the five-game American 
League division series. 

Andy Peniue, the experienced Yankee 
starting pitcher, blinked more than the 
rookie Jaret Wright on Monday night 
Then Cleveland’s unheralded bullpen 
halted some valiant comeback attempts 
to give the Indians a 3-2 series victory. 

’Tm very proud of them.” said 
George Stembrenncr. the Yankee own- 
er, who congratulated each player in the 
. clubhouse. “The way they fought back 
i.utd never quit." 

* For Cleveland, the season goes on, 
starting Wednesday night in Baltimore* 
The Indians, champions of die Centra! 
Division, will lake on the Eastern cham- 
pion Orioles in a four -of- seven- game 
scries to determine who goes to the 
World Series. 

Pettine had been the most dependable 
Yankee starter this year, but he lost Game 
2 on Thursday at Yankee Stadium, and 
he put the Yankees in a4-0ditch Monday 
after be apparently lost concentration in a 
three-run third inning. 

The Yankees tried, but they did not 
totally rebound against an unfared 21- 
year-oki and three relievers. Their last 
■ gasp of 1997 occurred in the ninth innjng 
;*s the slumping Bemie Williams flied to 
deft field after Paul O’Neill had rapped a 
two-out double off Jose Mesa. The tying 
1 run was stranded in scoring position, as 
so many others were Monday. 

Wright topped Pettitte, who pitched 
with lower back spasms, for the second 
time in four days. 

Pettitte retired seven of the first eight 
hitters before Marquis Grissom lined a 
one-out single to left in the third and Bip 
Roberts followed by blooping an 0-2 
1 pitch into center for a single. Omar 
- vizquel engaged in a cat-and-mouse 
game with Pettitte as play was halted 







~ Ma^The Aaodari PRm 

Clevelend’s rookie sensation Jaret 
Wright pitching during Game S. 

three times during his at-bat because 
Vizquel either called time out or Pettitte 
stepped off the rubber. Finally, Vizquel 
cued a shot to first that Tino Martinez 
threw to second fa - a force on Roberts. 
But Derek Jeter could not fire back to 
first for a possible double play because 
Pettitte never covered the base. 

“I threw a fastball in and I fell off the 
mound toward die third-base side,” a 
disconsolate Pettitte said. “No way 1 
was going to get over in time, so I don’t 
know if there was a play or not.” 

Vizquel was not done annoying Pet- 
titte. As Pettitte shook off a signal, 
Vizquel streaked for second and stole it 
without a throw. Pettitte jumped off the 
rubber and looked toward third. Gris- 
som had not budged. 

“I just went because I wanted turn to 
do something weird,” Vizquel said. 
‘ ’Maybe I draw a throw to first base and 


Grissom has a chance to scare. I was 
hying to get something going for die 
team. In that situation, two strikes, two 
outs, you try to steal a run.” 

Pettitte then grooved an 0-2 fastball to 
Manny Ramirez on the next pitch, and he 
drilled it over the head of c enter fielder 
Bemie W illiams and over the fence on 
one bounce for a ground-rule double that 
gave the In dians a 2-0 lead. The hit 
snapped Ramirez’s 0-for-13 drought 

mien Matt Williams followed by 
rifling a 1-2 pitch into left to make it 3- 
0, ihe Indians were rolling. 

Sandy Alomar doubled to start the 
fourth, chugged to third on the second 
sacrifice bunt of Jim Thome’s career. 

‘Tm really proud of that,” Thome 
said. “You want m help your team, and 
if you have to make a sacrifice to do it, 
well, I feel good about that.” 

Alomar then scored a controversial 
run on Tony Fernandez’s sacrifice fly to 
right field. O’Neill made a solid throw 
to Girurdi and, although Alomar beat the 
tail, television replays appeared to in- 
dicate that he never touched the plate. 
Girardi tagged Alomar when he stood 
up, but the umpire Dave Phillips said 
Alomar had touched home, and the 
Yanks were in a 4-0 hole. 

Wright juggled die 4-0 lead that die 
Indians had given him after four innings 
as the Yankees scored two runs in the 
fifth. Bemie Williams singled in Tim 
Raines, and Paul O’Neill scooted home 
after right-fielder Manny Ramirez over- 
ran the ball for an e r ro r . 

Mike Stanley, who replaced Cedi 
Fielder as the designated hitter and bad 
hits in his first three at-bats, doubled to 
center to begin die sixth. One out later, 
pinch-hitter Wade Boggs dropped a 
single over second to score Stanley and 
reduce the gap to 4-3. That ended 
Wright’s evening after 115 pitches. He 
had yielded two earned runs in five and 

tWO-thirdS inning s. 

“It’s a lot easier when you have 
50,000 people an your side,” Wright 
said. '“It helps you reach back for a little 
extra. 




&/>- .» i >• ’ZJ"- 


At Bch—nftte Aareintd Pib» 

Cleveland’s Jose Mesa, kneeling; Sandy Alomar, hugging, and Jim 
Thome, celebrating, after the Indians’ 4-3 victory over the Yankees. 


Orioles Draw on Bullpen Arsenal 






The left-hander Johnny Vander Meer in an undated photograph. 

Under Meer Dies, Pitched 2 No-Hitters 


1 he AssiKuitrd Ptrst 

TAMPA. Florida — Johnny 
Vamlcr Meer. S2, who Ditched con- 
secutive no-hitters, died Monday. 

- The left-hander pitched his first no- 
hittor for Cincinnati in Boston on June 
1 1 . 1938. beating the Braves 3-0. Four 
days later m Brooklyn, he no-hit the 
Dodgers 6-0 in the first night game 


ever played at Ebbets Held. 

Innis next stan against the Phillies, 
Vander Meer thought he’d pitched a 
third no-hitter but after the game he 
learned that a mis fielded ball bad 
been scored a hit. not an error. 

He pitched for the Reds (1937- 
1949), the Cubs ( 1 950) and die Indians 
(1951), witha 119-121 careerrecord. 


By Buster OIney 

New Y ork Tones Service 

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore re- 
lievers were die last Orioles spraying 
Champagne and beer and sloshing water 
Sunday in the home clubhouse at Cam- 
den Yards, and that was apropos. Once 
more the bullpen finish ed die action, the 
likes of Armando Benitez, Alan Mills 
and Arthur Rhodes celebrating after 
beating Seattle in the division series. 

They have been finishing all year, 
with exceptional efficiency. 

Atlanta’s starting rotation is gener- 
ally considered tire strongest unit in 
baseball, but die Baltimore bullpen 
cookl be a strong runner- up. 

Ignore the one-inning bkwup in Game 
3 against Seattle by Terry Mathews — 
who probably will pilch only in long 
relief situations in the American League 
Championship Series against Cleveland 
— ana this is what the Orioles’ bullpen 
accomplished in the division series: only 
1 run allowed on 5 hits, 2 walks and 15 
strikeouts in 9% innings. 

“You don’t win pennants unless you 
have a good ballpen, and this year has 
certainly been a banner year," said Dav- 
ey Johnson, the Baltimore manager. 

Tins season Randy Myers, a 35-year- 
old left-hander, started pitching inside 


more and used his changeup more often; 
during the regular season, he converted 
45 saves in 4-6 chances. 

The right-handed Armando Benitez, 
whose pitches can hit 100 miles an hour, 
usually used against right-handed hit- 
ters in the seventh and eighth innings, 
allowed only 49 hits in 73 Vj innings and 
struck out 106. 

Rhodes is hurt and will probably not 
be able to pitch in Wednesday's game. 
He is, in the words of one scout, “the 
best-kept secret in the American 
League.” As he ascended through the 
minor leagues, the Orioles woe con- 
vinced that Rhodes, who is also left- 
handed, would develop into one of the 
best pitchers in the American League 
because ofhis95-mph fastball and slider. 
But Rhodes suffered periods of terrible 
wildness before die Orioles started using 
him out of the bullpen in 1995. 

He became a star middle reliever. 

“I just feel more comfortable than I 
did when I started,” he said. 

Johnson usually uses Rhodes in situ- 
ations in which be will pitch more than an 
inning, sometimes talcing over for a 
starter who lasts only five innings and 
throwing into the eighth (he could be a 
natural to relieve the struggling starter 
Jimmy Key, who lasted only into die fifth 
in Game 3 against Seattle.) Rhodes’s 


control problems are gone: He walked 
just 26 batters in 9516 innings, striking 
out 102, and gave up just 75 hie. 

As a unit, the bullpen went 33-24 and 
allowed just 408 hits in 477l6innings. 

Most managers must be satisfied with 
one solid left-hander, and Johnson has 
three. Most managers would like two 
hard throwers, and Johnson has five. 

“What’s really special with the bull- 
pen,” said Kevin Malone, the assistant 
general manager, “is that it is so di- 
verse. Davey’s got so many different 
weapons out there at his disposal, and he 
uses them.” 

■ Baltimore Picks Its Starters 

Scott Erickson will start Game 1 of 
the American League Championship 
Series for the Orioles in Baltimore on 
Wednesday, and Jimmy Key is penciled 
in to start Game 2 on Thursday, The 
Washington Post reported. Mike Muss- 
ina is to start Game 3 on Saturday. 

Mike Hargrove, the Cleveland man- 
ager, did not name his starting pitcher 
for Game 1 — or any games in the best- 
of-seven series — after the Indians’ 
victory over die Yankees. But the man 
likely to meet Erickson is Charles Nagy, 
the right-hander who was 2-1 with a 
2.61 earned run average in three starts 
against the Orioles this year. 


Selig Says 
Owners Will 
Let Twins 
Move South 


The Associated Press 

ST. PAUL, Minnesota — Major 
League Baseball’s acting commis- 
sioner gave Governor Arne Carlson 
no reason to believe baseball own- 
ers would prevent the Minnesota 
Twins from becoming the North 
Carolina Triplets. 

The Twins owner, Carl Pohlad, 
signed a letter of intent Friday to 
sell the team to Don Beaver, a North 
Carolina businessman, but the Min- 
nesota Legislature can void the sale 
by approving a publicly subsidized 
ballpark before Nov. 30. 

Mr. Carlson plans to call a spe- 
cial session the week of Oct. 20 to 
deal with the issue. 

The governor and a group of 
legislators flew to Milwaukee on 
Monday to ask Bud Selig how Poh- 
lad’s deal to sell the ream to Beaver 
would fare with team owners. 
Beaver wants to move die team to 
the Triad area of North Carolina, 
which includes Winston-Salem, 
Greensboro, and High Point. 

“There will be permission for 
Carl Pohlad to leave if a stadium is 
not built,” Carlson said after a 
meeting with Selig, owner of the 
Milwaukee Brewers. 

Senator Roger Moe, the Senate 
majority leader, who took part in 
the meeting in Milwaukee, said Se- 
lig's response to the possible move 
seemed “choreographed” to put 
pressure on Minnesota legislators 
to approve a new stadium. 

“For anybody to think in this day 
and age you can consign an owner to 
either uncompetitiveness or bank- 
ruptcy is sheer folly,” Selig said. 

Three-fourths of the American 
League’s owners and half the own- 
ers in the National League must 
approve a team sale and relocation. 

Pohlad has said he cannot afford 
to lose any more money in die 
Metrodome, and that the team must 
have a baseball-only stadium with 
revenue from suites, club seating 
and other amenities. 

But a local rival for die team, 
Clark Griffith, said it was not in the 
league’s interest to move the team 
south, where he said it was likely to 
lose even more money. “Selig 
should explain how moving a lame 
duck team, placing the team in a 
bandbox ballpark for a number of 
years, then moving it to a smaller 
market is a solution,” Griffith said. 

Griffith, son of the former Twins 
owner, Calvin Griffith, said he ex- 
pected to have his investment 
group's bid ready to present to Poh- 
lad by the end of next week. 

At about $80 million, it probably 
falls about $50 million to $70 mil- 
lion below Beaver's undisclosed 
offer. But Griffith said the local 
deal most likely involved less debt 
than Beaver’s offer, an arrange- 
ment he contends should appeal to 
the league and fans because it 
would allow new owners to put 
more money into talent 

Griffith said the team would still 
need a new stadium under his 
group's ownership, but could sur- 
vive financially for several more 
yeazs in die Metrodome. 


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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1997 


_ _ observer 

I m Sorry? No Thanks 


By Russell Ba ker 

\X7ASHINGTON — A 

pU named 

^ mfte school 

yanim 1937. Lately, whenev-. 
er the phone rings, memory 
^^gsmeback over a chasm 

f®* s lists making my skull 
bmince up and down on the 
school yard bricks as they 
P“yod a tattoo an xny rhin 

That ringing telephone 
could very well be Poe — 

row old Peie, possibly arth- 
n&c old Pete, maybe de- 
ccascd old Pete - — calling to 
apologize. In the eerie world 
through which we now simOr 
people eager to be praised as 
the salt of the earth are apo- 
logizing for the low-lifes 
they used to be. 

□ 

Washington politicians 
tnDc of apologizing for 
slavery. The Hollywood film 


hold while the nation laps up 
the big barbecue. Why make 


Sized for the second tune to 
screenwriters it blacklisted in 
the 1950s. The Pulitzer Prize 
people are periodically ca- 
joled to apologize for not giv- 
ing their music prize years 
ago to Duke Ellington. 

Note that most of the 
people who would benefit 
from these apologies are dead 
and, hence, unable to cash 
them in. This accords with 


confining himself to those in 
Phradise, the apologizer 
comes away feeling like a 
splendid human being, and — 
me beauty part! — it doesn’t 
cost him a nickel. 

Maybe this apology binge 
is to be expected of a nation 
without much on its mind ex- 
cept a burning desire to not 
think about toe future. All 
Washington has toe future on 


that toe country ought to have 
an agenda? 

It is remarkable how often 
toe “news" nowadays is of 
anniversaries. Scarcely a day 
goes by without some an- 
niversary, cosmic or trivial, 
being reported as news. 

The main issue in toe last 
presidential campaign, for ex- 
ample, was tbe 2,000th an- 
niversary of toe Christian cal- 
endar. For months toe land of 
Jefferson, Lincoln, Truman 
and Roosevelts galore was 
asked to judge whether Bob 
Dole or Bin Clinton would do 
a better job of presiding over 
the arrival of the year AJD. 
2000. Note how many an- 
niversaries of deaths are now 
treated as news. The an- 
niversary of Marilyn Mon- 
toe’s death is a news favorite. 
The anniversary of Elvis Pres- 
ley’s is almost always news. 

Did Americans always ob- 
serve death's anniversaries so 
assiduously? It was birthdays 
of the great that were cel- 
ebrated, and mainly because 
they provided holidays. 

Anniversaries of deaths en- 
courage people to romanti- 
cize me lost rime of their 
youth and, so, to sentiment- 
alize toe past They provide 
excuses for middle-aged 
Americans, who once 
groaned when the old folks 
talked of “toe good old 
days," to say that yes, by 
gum, their own youths were 
toe really good old days. 


Pete, don't phone me with 
that “sorry" malarkey unless 
you’re ready to cough up a 
nice piece of change. Of 
course, if you canpayforyovr 
absolution you won't phone 
as long as I go on living, will 
you? 

■New Yotk Times Service 


Braden’s Temptation: Play Pretty for the Ladies 


By Mike Zwezin 

Inrermuierutl He fold Tribune 

P ARIS — Harvard University 
seems to be making a habit of. 


subjects leading to useful, profit- 
able careers and turning them into 
jazz musicians. 

From 19S1 to ’84. the saxo- 
phonist Don Braden majored in 
engineering and applied sciences, 
includin g courses in computer 
prog ramming, digital 1 electronics, 
history of science and — oops.' — 
jazz history. Braden, the singer 
Sarah Lazarus (English lit) and 
Joshua Redman (economics) were 
all members of toe Harvard jazz 
band. 

This implies either boring 
courses or a very good jazz pro- 
gram. It could also be a commen- 
tary on tire sort of young people 
who are interested in playing toe 
music, or in attending Harvard, 
these days. (The fact that Harvard 
has a jazz program at all will be 
news to some.) Or in a larger sense, 
oar times in general offer more 
choice. 

Like an undergraduate sports 
stair who can't wait, Braden turned 
pro after his junior year. He toured 
with Wynton Marsalis for seven 
months,, recorded with Betty 
Carter (on her Chummy-winning 
album “Look What I Got"), and 
tie played with the Freddie Hub- 
bard Quintet for two and a half 
years. 

His first album under his own 
name, “The Voice of - toe Sax- 
ophone," has just been released 
by BMG. This year, he has been 
appointed music supervisor for 
Bill Cosby's new weekly TV 
show, “Cosby." It involves about 
20 cues, most of them only 
seconds long. Some shows repeat 
toe same ones week after week. 
Cosby likes to change his. Cosby 
himself is musical director ana 
Braden's job is “to help Mr. 
Cosby make the music happen." 

Alternatives are not lacking. 
His father always talked about op- 
tions. Braden has had perhaps too 



Don Braden turned pro after his junior year at Harvard. 


many of them (a Harvard edu- 
cation might have something to do 
with it). Still, no doubt about it. to 
be part of “the great lineage of toe 
amazing American tradition 
called jazz' ’ tops his list. 

Critics are just about unani- 
mously behind Braden: “Knock- 
ed me out" . . .“toe best soloist in 
the band" ... “a big future for 
sure." 

You never hear a discouraging 
word.' He’s a young lion (33 years 

with^adean sound and^articulalion 


consulting company that pro- 
grammed computers for clients 
such as Citibank- and Pitney 
Bowes, while playing his hom 
with fee likes of Tony Williams 
andTomHanelL 

For seven years, he developed 
business programs on laptops in 
hotel rooms on the road. ^It was a 
hard double life,” he says, “which 
I managed because basically I 
didn’t sleep." 

Meeting fee woman who would 
become his wife was toe beginning 
of toe end of his doable-career. 
There was no hesitation about 
which one to drop. “Being a mu- 
sician is what I'm really here for,” 


to match. When he goes far out, 
you are pulled right in. All an all, an 
unusual player (something of. a 
cross between Benny Golson and 
Hank Mobley). 

On a bright Indian Summer af- 
ternoon, sitting in fee club La Villa 
where he worked for a week last 
month, Braden said that he grew up 
in Louisville, Kentucky, and that 
there are no other musicians in his 
family. At Harvard, he learned 
how computers work, “all fee way 
down to toe electrons." Then tie 
started “Heartbeat Software," a 


Faith’ in options remains. He 
keeps toe door to computing ajar. 
Because of toe computer option, 
after all, he does not have to deal 
with the temptation to produce hit 
instrumental records. Or so he 
likes to think. Infect, avoiding fee 
temptation of commercial music 
isn’t all that easy for him. 

Braden is a handsome, likable 
young man with a winning smile 
and manner who knows How to 
listen: “The environment today is 
not geared to artistic greatness. 
When you get right down to it, 
fee awards are more geared to 
someone who sells well ami 
relates at cocktail parties. An 
gjpealing person, a person people 

A friend of his played wife 
Whitney Houston’s band and 
Braden admits feat “if Whitney 
called me, I’d probably say yes. 
Go out for six months and come 
hack wife 100 grand. Make that 
big money for a minute. That 
would make it much easier for me 
to be a serious jazz musician.'’ 

Combining pop orientation wife 
straight-ahead improvisation 
could make money. Along those 
lines, he adapted a Grover Wash- 
ington Jr. tune to a jazz style. 
Braden can’t help thinking of 
ways to parlay that fusion, which 
he knows he’s good at, in his fa- 
vor. “That lure is always there," 
he says. 


As though convincing himself, 
he says: “Ido not feel compelled 
to tty andbeapopstar. My goal ** 
to keep my head on straight and 
■ not get sucked into fee vortex of 
fee need or die desire for too much 
popularity or money. 

“But the contemporary envir- 
onment gives me no inspiration 
whatsoever. Everything around 
me says, ‘Play pretty for toe 
ladies.’” 

This can lead to all-American 
greed as. illustrated by the pop star 
saxophonist Kearny G, who once 
said feat beplayed better than his 
.competitor David Sanborn, Asked 
how he could be so certain, he 
replied, “Because I sell more al- 
bums than he does." 

Competition is tougher than it 
used to be, although there's also 
more money around. All fee 
melodies sound familiar all fee 
rhythms derivative. It's harder to 
come up with something new. 
Everything sounds like something 
else. With all fee jazz schools, 
there are more capable musicians 
now, though they are less original. 
And other art forms (video) that 
did not exist when jazz was young- 
er compete for fee consumer’s at- 
tention. 

Braden’s wife is a manager at 
Xerox. They have a “team thing" 
together. 

“I call it a ‘personal endow- 
ment,'" he says. “We’re building 
up savings for fee future. These are 
long-term survival mechanisms. 

"My 20-year objective is to 
build up enough money — I figure 
somewhere in fee neighborhood 
of $2 million — so that fee interest 
will pay my basic expenses, an 
interest flow of about $150,000 
a year. I'm building up my pub- 
lishing. I’m placing my songs in 
movies. Mr. Cosby’s snow helps 
a lot. 

“In fee meantime, I love music. 
I love toe saxophone. 1 love to deal 
with jazz. I intend to make some 
really good music — and to have 
some run. And maybe help make 
fee world a little more -positive 
along tire way." 





LISTENING TO HISTORY 


A Living Monument to American Musicians 


By Anthony Tommasini 
New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The idea behind 
oral history could not be more 
simple: In. every field of human en- 
deavor there are people around right 
now who have matte history, or at 
Least been witness to it While they are 
still alive, someone should sit mem 
down and get them to tell their stories 
for the record. 

That is what Vivian Perlis has been 
doing from her base at the Yale 
Schotil of Music for more than 25 
years. She is the founding director of 
Oral History, American Music, an 
extensive repository of audio, and to a 
lesser degree, video materials, mostly 
consisting of interviews with com- 
posers, performers and others with 
something to say about fee history of 
20th-century American music. 

Along fee way she has recorded 
talks wife giants like Aaron Copland 
and Eubic Blake, and wife some sur- 
prisingly observant supporting play- 
ers. like Charles Ives's barber, who 
reports feat Ives likened trimming a 
beard to shaping and shading a mu- 
sical composition. Award-winning 
books ana three film biographies 
have come out of her work. But most 
important is fee archive itself, which 
is open to scholars and students and 
has bees used by such distant clients 
as Swedish Public Radio and the 
BBC. 

Hie value of collecting these in- 
terviews would seem obvious. Yet 
Perlis, 69, a soft-spoken, tenacious 
woman, has faced incomprehension 
and even ridicule along the way, es- 
pecially from musicologists, who, 
one would think, should have been 
her biggest allies. 

“Vivian's archive is an incompar- 
able resource, fee most extensive on- 
going oral history project in Amer- 
ica." said H. Wiley Hitchcock, a 
Distinguished Professor Emeritus at 
City University of New York, a lead- 
ing scholar or American music and 
one musicologist who has always 
been excited by Perlis’s work. 





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Vivian Perils, who has recorded 850 interviews in the past 25 years. 


“Scholars haven't used it nearly 
enough," he added. 

Penis ’5 relationship wife Yale it- 
self has been telling. She has always 
had to secure her own financing from 
outside sources. The School of Music 
provides office space, work-study 
students to assist wife the endless task 
of transcribing interviews and the 
clout that comes from an affiliation 
wife an Ivy League university. 

“We are sort of an orphan,” she 
said recently, sitting in her headquar- 
ters, three small adjoining rooms in 
the basement of the Yale School of 
Music building. 

When she began the oral history 
project, a university library was a 

L changed? and wife it entrenched 
attitudes about oral history. 

“Technology has become central 
to scholarship," she said, “and li- 
braries have had to move into fee 
present world of audio, video and 
electronic resources. My aim has been 
to bring the media and academia 
closer together." 

What Perlis and her assistants have 
been able to gather is impressive: 


interviews wife some 850 individuals 
(a figure feat includes pre-existing 
tapes the project acquired from radio 
stations and various historians). There 
are extensive conversations wife 
composers like Henry Cowell, Roger 
Sessions and Charles Seeger, and 
wife jazz greats like Duke Ellington, 
Charles Mingus and Earl Hines. 
When she asked Leonard Bernstein’ 
for an interview about his close re- 
lationship with Copland, Bernstein 
told her to crane by for an hour; he 
wound up talking for six hours. 

Some interviews were accom- 
plished just in time, like a colorful talk 
wife fee flinty composer Carl 
Ruggles, who was 95, and died 
shortly thereafter. But she also had the 
foresight to interview early on com- 
posers she thought destined to make a 
contribution. There is an interview 
wife John Adams, then in his late 20s, 
years before his operas “Nixon in 
China'’ and “The Death of Kling- 
hoffer” caused a stir. 

Perlis was bom in Brooklyn and 
attended the University of Michiga n, 
where she earned a master’s degree in 
music history. She began a doctoral 


book, compiled by Perlis and her as- 
sistant, Libby Van Cleve, and tied to 
fee millennium: a collection of com- 
posers’ voices from fee 20fe century, 
not a scholarly history or a document 
of musical analysis but a vivid cul- 
tural portrait 


program in musicology at Columbia 
in fee early 1960s, but never finished, 
which traditionalist scholars have 
seized on, unfairly, as evidence of her 
scholarly shortcomings. 

*Tbad three small children at home 
in Connecticut and was taking the 
train every day to I25fe Street for my 
classes ax Columbia. WbenI asked for 
some flexibility regarding the require- 
ment to study full-time. I was turned 
down flat. So Icould either orphan my 
children or give up fee PhJD. That 
would never happen today.” 

While living near New Haven, 
Connecticut, where her husband, San- 
ford J. Perlis, was a professor of psy- 
chiatry at fee Yale School of Mem- 
cine, she was a harpist wife fee New 
Haven Symphony Orchestra and 
worked as a reference librarian at the 
School of Music. On a routine visit to 
Ives’s former home in Danbury to 
pick up some materials for fee library 
from Julian Myrick, Ives’s former 
partner in fee insurance business, Per- 
lis was fascinated by the particular 
way this elderly former Southerner 
recalled his old friend. 

It convinced her feat systematic in- 
terviews wife those who had known 
Ives would enrich fee understanding of 
this iconoclastic composer. Over four 
years, starting in 1 969, she interviewed 
some 60 people who bad known Ives. 

In 1974, for toe Ives centenary, 
selections from these intraviews, ed- 
ited and arranged by Perlis, were pub- 
lished by Yale University Press as 
‘ ‘Charles Ives Remembered: An Oral 
History.” It was critically hailed and, 
in 1975, received toe Kinkeldey 
Prize, the highest award of toe Amer- 
ican Musicological Society. 

Two subsequent books, written 
with Copland, met with more mixed 



•* * % 


PEOPLE -j 

T HE queen's youngest 
son. Prince Edward, 33, 
plans to turn a former royal 
house into his home and the 
base for bis film production 
company. He wants to restore 
the 120-year-old house of 
BagshotPadc in Surrey, south 
of London, and convert fee 
stable into offices for fee 
company. Ardent He said his 

C s to move from Bucking- 
Palace would lead to 
speculation that he was about 
to announce his engagement 
to Sophie Rhys- Jones, 32, 
but he said fee two were un- 
connected. “I have enough 
on my plate," the prince said. 

“They are totally separate is- 
sues. Obviously, if that 
changes, no doubt I shall have 
to tell people." If permission 
for fee work is granted, Ed- 
ward will take a 50-year 
lease, wife his mother effec- 
tively his landlord.- . . . Mark 
Phillips, fee former husband 
of Princess Anne, has had a 
child with his second wife. 

The Olympic equestrian Rod piwbct/r«*i» 

Sandy Pflaeger has given STAR TREK — Brad Pitt, light, and B.D. Wong, 
birth to agirl, Stephanie, in arriving for the Los Angeles premiere of “Seven 
London. The baby is feehalf- Years In Tibet,” directed by Jean- Jacques Annaud. 
sister of 19-year-old Peter 

and 16-year-old Zara Phillips, bath from After being spotted near Tiffany’s jewelers, 
Phillips’s marriage to fee princess. The Allen denied that he was in search of a wed- 




former British Army officer and Anne, fee ding ring, saying he and Soon -Yi Previn were 
daughter of Queen Elizabeth H, were' di- ' ‘just browsing.’ ' But in an interview wife fee 
voiced is 1992 after 18 yeans of marriage. New York Daily News, he left open fee 
Phillips has another daughter, bom in 1984 in possibility that such an event could still take 
New Zealand. The mother, Heather Tonkin, place ‘ ‘someday,” as he would love to have 


received an annuity of $12,000 after suing another child. Alien also dismissed rumors. 


him for paternity. 


feat Previn, fee adopted daughter of M 4 
Farrow, is pregnant. The filmmaker con* j 
fessed to having suffered terribly after his 
separation, from his children, Dylan, his 


Heather Locklear has a new rale to play: .separation . from his children, Dylan, his 
Mom, The vixen from the TV series “Melrose adopted daughter, and SatcbeLhis biological 
Place" gave birth to Ava Elizabeth Sambora son, who are in Farrow’s custody. “It’s a 
on Saturday. It was the first child for Locklear, tembte, terrible thing," he said “You know, 
36, who has been married to fee Bon Jovi 1 don't see them." 
guitarist Richie Sambora, 38, fra about two 
years. 

n The B ritish agricultural ecologist Gordon 

u Conway has been named president of the 

The actor-director Woody Allen, 61, Bays Rockefeller Foundation, toe first non-U.S. 






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ft* die county yon an oiling tom. 

2. Pul the phone number ypn’re railing . 
3- Crtal tbe caQlng caidmimber listed 


AT&T Access Numbers 

Z EUROPE — 

BZ2 -883-011 

Balaton* ...M88-1B8-10 

F™*a MW-SWW11 

8138-8*18,,* 

80-880-1311 ) 

fnhoi 1-WKBMOB • 

"■If* 172-1*11 

NsOwtaods* MM-922-9H1 

fUwto*A(Mwow}*..,.. 755-5042 

SMta 98M9-0B-11 

BWdra 820-755-811 

Mtwtond* — 8880-88-8011 

ItofMfftogdtui* 05mm - 

1888-89-0811 

MIDDLE EAST 

E»pt*|Wr0)» 518-0280 

torasl — 177-188-2727 

SmtHArato* .1-888-18 

I 4FH1CA 

JH91 

South Africa _ 8-800-89-8123