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| Prodi Quits 
As Far-Left 
Allies Reject 
Italy Budget 

, Euro Bid in Jeopardy; 
Berlusconi Suggests ' 
i' A ‘Grand Coalition ’ 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

ROME — Prime Minister Romano 
Prodi resigned Thursday after his ex- 
treme-left Communist allies withdrew 
their support for the government's 1998 


The collapse of the 17 -month-old 
government places Italy's bid to join in 
the inauguration of European monetary 
union in jeopardy because welfare cuts 
contained in the 1998 budget were 
deemed vital for Italy to meet single 
currency conditions. 

Mr. Prodi resigned after a parliamen- 
tary debate in which the Refounded 
Communists 'made it clear they 
would vote down the government on his 

vote, J^^ProdL handed in hhfresig- 
nation to President Oscar Luigi Seal- 
faro, who asked him stay on in a care- 



Germans Push Up Rales 

Bundesbank’s Move Forces Europeans’ Hands 



By Edmund L. Andrews 

New York Times Service 

FRANKFURT — Germany’s central 
bank sent shivers around die world 
Thursday by raising interest rates for the 
first time in five years, a move that 
deflated stock markets across Europe 
and knocked down the value of the U^. 
dollar. 

Because many West European coun- 
tries have locked their currencies and 
monetary policies to those of Germany, 
the increase led within hours to similar 
rises in France, the Netherlands and 
Belgium, and others were expected to 
follow. 

But the broader significance of the 
move was what it said about the evo- 
lution of Europe toward a planned 
single economy with the euro as its 
common currency. 

Across the Continent, economists 
said the German bank had been driven 
in large part by the need to align its low 
interest rates with the higher ones that 
prevailed in most other countries. 

That is because the euro, scheduled to 
come into being Jan. I, 1999, also will 
mark the debut of a common European 
interest rale. Thus, even though Goman 


mams stuck above 12 percent and growth 
is even more a nemic than in Germany. 
Even though French economists and 
political leaders have complained for 
years about tying their ole to the 
Deutsche mark, nance's central bank 
lost no time Thursday in following its 
neighbor. 

Not entirely coincidentally, the in- 
visible hand of the euro also helped 
topple the Italian government of Prime 
Minister Romano Prodi. He resigned 
Thursday after a Communist party 
blocked budget cuts that were crucial far 
Rome to satisfy tbe tough fiscal require- 
ments for particip ating in the euro. 

More pain could be on the horizon. 
Many economists estimate that a 
Europewide interest rate, one that blends 
the rales of every country in the monetary 
union, would be nearly S percent By 
contrast the rates in Germany and France 
now are slightly above 3 percent - 

“The basic message today is that we 
have entered a period when- a single 


Mr. Scalfaro will begin a round of 
consultations Friday to see if a new 
parliamentary majority can be formed to 
avoid elections. When these talks end on 
Tuesday, he will decide whether to call 
an election, which could come as early 
as Nov. 30, or give Mr. Prodi or another 
political leader a mandate. 

Reacting to the government’s collapse, 
Silvio Berlusconi, leader of the oppo- 
sition center-right, offered support tor a 
government of national unity that would 
approve the 1998 budget and seek to 
make final electoral reforms aimed at 
making the country more governable by 
shifting from a system of proportional 
representation to majority voting. 

“The only serious* solution is fra: a 
grand coalition,’* Mr. Berlusconi said. 
It is tiie best way to ensure that Italy 
joins European monetary union, he- 
said. ‘ 

Massimo D’Alema, leader of the 
Democratic Party of the Left, the largest 
component of tile coalition, has indicated 
that be is opposed to a government of 
national unity. On Thursday, Deputy 
Prime Minister Walter Vehroni signaled 
his preference for a general election. 

Foreign Minister Lamberto Dini, 
leader of Italian Renewal, a small cent- 
rist party, said he favored the formation 
of a new government that would not 
include the Refounded Communists. If 
this were to take place, it could take the 
shape of either a minority government 
or a cross-party coalition as suggested 
by Mr. Berlusconi. 

Financial markets reacted to the polit- 
ical chaos in Rome, with the lira losing 
1.8S to the Deutsche marie to close at 
982.40, and the Milan bourse index fall- 
ing by 2.85 percent to close at 15075. 

The 1998 budget is considered es- 
sential for Italy to enter the EMU be- 
cause it contains 5 trillion lire ($2.9 
billion) worth of welfare cuts that would 
enable Inly to sustain fiscal rigor and 

See ITALY, Page 10 


its inflatio n is less than 2 percent, its 
central bank decided on a rate increase 
rhar will, if anything, add slightly to 

Agon FmeAenc fi ramany 's pain. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi grimacing in Parliament on Thursday as the It also will put a significant new bur- 
Refounded Communists made dear they would vote down the government den on France, where unemployment re- 


ly started," said Bruce Ka&man, chief 
European economist at JP. Morgan in 
London. “This is the first concrete step 
toward a common economic and mon- 
etary policy for the European Union.’’ 

European stock and bond markets 
generally fell in the wake of the in- 
creases. The dollar declined quickly but 
only modestly against the marie. Ana- 
lysts said its drop might have been 


See RATES, Page 16 


math of 

Japan Clones Another U.S. Idea: Creativity 55 

vestors’ 

Corporate Giants Catch On to the Advantage of Nurturing Nonconformist Thinkers ^ 


By Sheryl WuDuim 

New York Tones Service 

TOKYO — This is Japan, traditionally the land of 
consensus and conformity, of finely calibrated bows 
and maxims like “The nail that sticks up gets 
hammered down.'* So what on earth is Torn Uchida 
upto? 

Mr. Uchida, a 28-year-old executive in a small 
software company, dyes his hair brown, keeps a 
sleeping bag by his desk for late nights in the office 
and occasionally takes tbe day off to go windsurfing. 

“Sometimes I listen to soft music to soothe my 
feelings, and sometimes I listen to hand music to 
build my energy," said Mr. Uchida, who manages 
the technology-development division of Runnel 


Corp., an Internet-access provider. “It’s important 
that we always keep in touch with our sensibilities 
when we want to generate ideas." 

The creative whiz kid, a business personality often 
prized by corporate America, has come to Japan Inc. 
Unlikely as it might seem in a country renowned for 
deference to authority and devotion to group soli- 
darity, freethinkers like Mr. Uchida-are popping up all 
over the workplace. Nonconformity, is suddenly in. 

It was probably inevitable. This is the country that 
soared ahead of the West in the 1980s on the strength 
of its system of factory-floor worker empowerment 
and its fabled management by consensus, only to foil 
back in the 1990s. So it studied the resurgent United 
Slates to figure out what had gone wrong and con- 
cluded that the secret to growth in today’s global 


economy is creativity. Japanese business leaders 
have apparently decided: We’ll be creative, too. 

Mr. Uchida is precisely tbe kind of employee that 
a growing number of Japanese companies crave. 
When imm ersed in a project, he works through the 
night, collapsing for a few hours in his sleeping bag. 
Other times, he turns on the radio at the office to get 
thej trices flowing. 

Rx now, Rimnet remains a rarity in indulging such 
departures from workplace norms of rigidity and form- 
ality. But many other Companies are clearly eager to 
cultivate the entrepreneurial spiri t that he represents. 

Not that they are ordering middle managers to stop 
being subservient — yet But, with Japan's do- 

See JAPAN, Page 10 


For African Women With AIDS, Debatable Placebos 


• By Howard W. French 

New York Times Service 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Ceciie Guede, a 23-year- 
old HIV -infected mother and patient in an American- 
financed AIDS treatment experiment here, doesn’t yet 
know if die disease has spared her year-old son. 

Like scores of other women who have taken part in 
the same tests, she has no idea whether she received 
medicine or a dummy pilL And she may never be told. 

It is now more than a year since she took pills 
prescribed to her in tbe program meant to determine 
the effectiveness of a short course of the anti-AIDS 
drug AZT in preventing pregnant mothers from 
passing the HIV virus on then 1 children. 

A longer treatment with AZT is known to reduce the 


rate of transmission of the virus from mother to baby, 
but the cost and complexity make it prohibitive in foe 
Third World. That is why tests to determine tbe 
effectiveness of Iowct levels of foe drug have been 
conducted here, the Dominican Republic and Thai- 
land. The use of placebos in these tests, however, has 
set off a furor among medical ethic is ts in foe West 
Miss Guede still doesn’t quite grasp what a placebo is 
or why she might have been given one instead of a real 
medicine. “They gave me a bunch of pills to take, and 
told me how to take them" said the woman, who is 
illiterate, unmarried and unemployed. “Some were for 
malaria, some were for fevers, and some were supposed 
to be for the virus. I knew that there were different kinds, 
but I figured that if one of them didn’t work against 
AIDS, then one of the other ones would.” 


Fra Miss Guede, foe reason to enroll in foe placebo 
trial last year was clear: It offered her and her infant 
free health care, and a hope to shield her baby from an 
infection that she understands is deadly. 

Still the question of whether she and other pregnant 

test hangs over the project, financed by^be National 
Institutes of Health and tbe Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention. It has set off a debate over medical 
ethics in the United States but has barely raised a ripple 
in this West African country of 1 1 million people. 

In the United States, tests of an intensive treatment 
with AZT, known as die 076 regimen, and comparing 
foe drug’s effects with those of placebos ended in 1994 

See AIDS, Page 10 


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Pound LS24 1822 

Yl 121.135 121.10 

FF 5.8560 5.8754 

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-33.64 8061.42 8095.06 

changa ThiUBday O * P M. prevtoua ctoee 

- 3.33 970.45 973.78 


Is It the End 
Of Europe’s 
Bull Run? 

Opinion Is Divided 
As Markets Tumble 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune ’ 

FRANKFURT — European stock.' 
maHcMs tumbled Thursday m the after- 
math of the unexpectedly steep increase 
in German interest rates, abruptly forcing 
already skittish investors to ask whether 
they rieed to brace for further losses. 

The Bundesbank compounded in- 
vestors' jitters a day after Alan Green- 
span, the chairman of foe U.S. Federal 
Reserve Board, unnerved markets with 
blunt comments that investors said 
could foreshadow a rate increase in the 
United States. 

The one-two pnnch put markets 
around foe world on edge and led to 
fears that tighter credit could interrupt 
two years of bullish activity in Europe s 
stock markets, analysts said. The 
Bundesbank’s move was quickly fol- 
lowed by other central banks and ended 
a five-year period of steadily foiling or 
stable interest rates on the Continent. 

“We are clearly in a phase wheo fears 
of rising interest rates will hamper foe 
’ stock market,” said Joachim Fels, an 
analyst with Morgan Stanley. “The bull 
run fra foe Goman stock market is over 
for foe time being. Not forever. But for 
now foe market will focus on foe risk of 
rising interest rates.” 

“What we saw today will not be foe 
end," said Adolf Eosenstock, an econ- 
omist at die Ffonkfurt office of Industrial 
Bank of Japan, speaking of foe selling. 

Still, tbe major European blue-chip 
indexes finished above their day’s lows, 
keeping opinion divided about foe near- 
texm outlook' 

In Frankfurt, foe 30-share DAX index 
slid 2.4 percent, to 4,243.01. Since Mr. 
Greenspan spoke on Wednesday, the 
DAX has lost more than 4 percent, but it 
is still up 47 percent for foe year. 

In London, the FTSE-100 index 
slipped 1 percent to close at 5,217.80. 
The Bank of England’s monetary policy 
committee left benchmark interest rates 
unchanged at a meeting Thursday. 



See MARKETS, Page 16 


Italian Playwright Wins Nobel Prize 

literature Award Goes to Dario Fo, Noted for Leftist-Satirical Themes 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Tima Service 1 

ROME — Dario Fo, a prolific Italian 
playwright-performer known for mix- 
ing whacky social force with sharp 
political satire, was awarded foe Nobel 
Prize in Literature on Thursday, to foe 
guarded amazement of Italy’s literary 
establishment and tbe outright dismay 
of foe Vatican. 

In its announcement of this year’s SI 
million {Size, the Swedish Academy 
compared Mr. Fo, 71. to foe “jesters of 
tbe Middle Ages,' ' who, like him, relied 
on wit, irreverence and even slapstick 
humor to poke fun at authority, while at 
the same time “upholding the dignity of 
the downtrodden.” 

As a long-time member of Italy's 
Communist Party, Mr. Fo was twice 
denied visas by the U.S. government, 
even as many of his 40-odd plays de- 
lighted American audiences. One of his 

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best-known plays was “The Accidental 
Death of an Anarchist,” which had a 
major success in Italy and Britain, be- 
fore reaching foe United States in 1980, 
10 years after it was written. 

The ban against Mr.. Fo, and other 
foreign cultural figures who were or had 
been members of Communist parties, 
was lifted in 1984, and Mr. Fo has since 
traveled to foe United States, where 
critics have praised his rare ability to 
excel as both an author and a per- 
former. 

"Imagine a cross between Bertolt 
Brecht and Lenny Bruce, and you may 
begin to have an idea of foe scope of 
Fo s anarchic wit,” said foe New York 
Times theater critic Mel Gussow, writ- 
ing in 1983. 

His one-man tour de force, “Mistero 
Buffo,” which finally opened .at the 
Joyce Theater in New York in 1986, has 
its stylistic roots in foe strolling players 


and minstrels of the Middle 
was also a satirical blast at 


es. But it 
gion and 


S lides, delivered in “grammelot,” a 
id of double-speak masquerading as a 


of double-speak masquerading as a 
rage, wholly invented by Mr. Fo 


In 1962, Mr. Fo, then a young- actor, 
caused his first scandal’with a sketch 
about Italian workers that was censored 
by Italian television. His politics be- 
came increasingly radical, and he did 
not appear again on Italian television 
until 1977, the year when “Mistero 
Buffo’ ’ was first put on the air, causing 
foe Vatican to call it foe “most blas- 
phemous show in foe histoiy of tele- 
vision.” 

Twelve years later, Mr. Fo came out 
with another impertinent play, titled 
“The Pope and the Witch,” featuring a 
papal press conference at which foe 

See NOBEL, Page 10 



AGENDA 


45 Killed as Hurricane Swipes Acapulco 


A hurricane pounded Mexico's 
southwestern Pacific coast Thursday, 
its torrential rains creating churning 
rivers of mud, water and debris that 
raced down the main streets of Acap- 
ulco, killing more than 45 people. 

Many of foe victims were caught in 
the muddy torrents that swept hun- 
dreds of cars, huge tree trunks and tons 
of earth down the mountains behind 


Acapulco toward foe sea. 

Tourists huddled in darkened hotels, 
and hundreds of locals sought refuge in 
emergency shelters. 

Hurricane warnings were extended 
up foe coast to Puerto Vallarta. 

-President Ernesto Zedillo, on a state 
visit to Germany, ordered military and 
civil defense workers into foe hardest- 
hit areas. Page 4. 


MAE TWO 

Poland's Home-Grown Soap Opera 

THE AMERICAS P«S«3. 

Reno Criticises die White House 


Books Page 4. 

Crossword „ — Page 13. 

.Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports — ,. Pages 22-23. 




With State Visit, Jiang 
Aims to Calm U.S. Critics 

Officials Expect Ceremony Over Substance 


By Thomas W. Lippman 
and John F. Harris 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — From a wreath- 
laying at Pearl Harbor to a speech at 
Harvard University and a chat with com- 
munity leaders in Los Angeles, President 
Jiang Zemin of China is planning to 


Dario Fo, whose $1 million award 
has gotten a mixed reaction in Italy. 


as part of a rare state visit to the United 
States scheduled to begin Oct 26. 

With a schedule that includes a tour 
of Colonial Williamsburg and a visit to 
Independence Hall in Philadelphia, foe 
trip seems designed as a major attempt 
by the Chinese to warm foe popular 
American perception of China and its 
leadership, even in the shadow of public 


Klimt Painting Sells 
For $23.5 MilHon 

•LONDON (AP) — A landscape 
punting by the Austrian artist Gustav 
Klimt was sold for £145 million 
(S23.5 million) Thursday' after a spir- 
ited contest between two bidders. 
Christie's auctioneers trad predicted 

milEoiLT& buyer was nbt identified. 


protests that are expected to follow him 
across the country. 

The ceremonial and other public- 
components of the' trip are likely to 
overshadow the diplomatic substance, 
administration officials said. 

While the administration is hoping 
fra some agreements, such as Chinese 
permission for foe Drug Enforcement 
Administration to open a Beijing Office, 
major disagreements over trade and 
weapons proliferation are unlikely to be 
resolved, officials said. 

U.S. officials said Mr. Jiang’s pro- 
gram reflected a willingness by res- 
ident Bill Clinton and Vice President A1 
Gore to stand behind their commitment 
to seek normal relations with . China, 
even in foe face of criticism over 
China’s humanrights record. 

1 ‘There's this debate raging around,’ * 
a White House official said, ‘‘that we- 
sbouJdn’t have this summit.” 

“Our policy is one of dear, unam- 
biguous, forward-leaning articulation 
that this is very much in our interest,” 
the official added. 

Mr. Clinton is p lanning a major ad- 
dress in Washington outlining what he 
hopes to achieve from the meeting with 
Mr. Jiang, and more broadly, from his 
policy .of “engagement” with China. 

Cm foe Chinese sidfe, U.S. officials and 
independent analysts said, the Mr. Ji- 
ang's itinerary reflects either confidence 
that he wili be welcomed as foe head of a 

See VISIT, Page 10 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY OCTOBER 10, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


w 




Soap Operas Sweep Poland / Can a Young Woman From Warsaw ... ? 

Tales of Lubicz Clan: Escaping Politics 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tones Service 


W ARSAW — Should Pawel, a talented 
surgeon at a public hospital, switch 
jobs and make money doing plastic 
surgery at a private clinic? What about 
the ethics of Jerzy, a shady businessman, who 
pulled his son out of amateur sports and sold him to 
a professional soccer team? 

These are some of the family-finance issues that 
Poland's groundbreaking television soap opera, 
“Clan," is to tackle during its initial run this 
autumn. 

■Then there are the emotional questions. What 
should Dorota. a 20-something pharmacy student, 
do about her boyfriend, who is a married man in his 
40s? And what should Wiesea, a young wife, do 
when her drunken husband beats her up again? 

These may sound like problems that are common 
fare for television in many countries: but several of 
these situations are being dealt with for the first time 
in a mass-market series in Poland. 

The fact that they are being written into the daily 
lives of three generations of the Lubicz clan marls 
a coming of age for Polish television, where the soul 
of family life is traditionally backstage and 
private. 

"We're showing the normal life of a normal big 
family," Pawel Karp inski, a veteran film director, 
said os he took a break from filming an emotional 
outburst between Dorota and her lover. "It's based 
on Polish reality. We speak about love, careers, 
hate, money, business. But no politics." 

The government television station decided this 
year that it was time for an indigenous Polish soap 
opera. 

Enough, it said in effect, of America's "Santa 
Barbara" and of series from Latin America that 
glamorized the rich in luxurious foreign settings 
that Poles could only fantasize about. 

The station ran a contest and invited producers to 
make three pilot shows. The three tests were then 
shown to foe us grou ps intended to represent a cross- 
section of Polish television audiences. Mr. Kar- 
pinski's "Clan" won the highest ratings from po- 
tential viewers. 

The runner-up featured a drama about bribery in 
high political circles. ButPoles, Mr. Karp inski said, 
are tired of politics. 

T hey are fascinated, though, he added, with 
seeing how domestic quandaries, now en- 
meshed with the capitalist way of life, are 
dealt with inside die family. 

In striving to be realistic and relevant, Mr. Kar- 
pinski has pUed so many problems into “Clan" that 
the Lubicz family sometimes sounds totally dys- 
functional. But with characters ranging from die 70- 
year-old matriarch, Maria, and patriarch, 
Wladysiaw. to their five children and their spouses 
and many grandchildren, Mr. Kaipin&ki says he has 
a large canvas on which to present many issues. 

The Lubiczes, graying and tender — she is a 
pharmacist, he is a lawyer — represent the remnants 
of Poland’s pre- World War H gentry. 

Thus, one of the sets is a gracious though crum- 
bling two-srory house with old-fashioned interiors 
on the outskirts of Warsaw. 



ICdnrl Dranftb* Yodln&n 


Pawel Karpinskiy left, director of the innovative Polish television drama “Gan,* 
with two of his actors . The series is ‘‘based on Polish reality,” the director says. 
“ We speak about love, careers, hate, money, business. But no politics.” 


Money is central to many of the scenes. "In the 
1990s, there have been huge opportunities to make 
money for those who were predisposed to do so," 
Mr. Karp ins Id said. * ‘Bat this created the problems 
of fraud, bankruptcy. Money can mak e people 
crazy. The kids of the parents who ate always 
hunting for money often can't see the world for 
what it really is." 

There is a slight moral edge to the scripts. Picking 
up on a theme that has emerged as Poland's schools 
have come under scrutiny for authoritarian-style 
teaching, Mr. Karpinski has created a scene in- 
volving a high school class. 

A teacher develops a pathological hatred for a 
teenage student and drives her to attempt suicide. 
The girl has no moral support in her family. Instead, 
she wins reassurance from her classmates, who 
decide to help her fight back by staging a strike 
against the teacher. 

The moral, according to Mr. Karpinski: "In this 
way, the students learn democracy, and perhaps the 
Polish teachers can learn that students can be treated 
as partners, not subjects." 

Traditional Polish behavior is not completely 
forsaken. A church wedding will be featured in the 
series. One of the five children of the Lubicz parents 


becomes a nun. Maria Lubicz, the matriarch, de- 
cides to transfer the family pharmacy to her daugh- 
ter rather than sell it outside the family. 

But mostly, die action reflects Poland's shifting 
values. Yes, the doctor decides to drop pnblic 
service and make money. Yes, the father does profit 
from his son's athletic prowess. 

The tale of the battered wife, Wiesea, takes a 
more unusual turn. She leaves her husband and 
takes a humble job as a housekeeper, a first step to 
becoming independent 

In Poland, Mr. Karpinski said, women were 
taught by the Communists that taking such a job was 
a demeaning form of exploited labor. But die di- 
rector said he hoped to snow that such a job could 
actually be the beginning of a better life. 

And in the extramarital affair between Dorota 
and her older, married boyfriend, Mr. Karpinski 
plans an unusual twist 

"Such love affairs are very common in Poland, 
but they are not spoken about,” be said. 

“In our situation, the man leaves his daughter 
and wife for the younger woman. It happens a lot, 
but what we're interested in is how die mother of 
Dorota feels when the rightful wife of her daugh- 
ter’s lover appears." 


!(:- 


Ii' 


it,U & 


. \ ~ % C 

A Japanese Atonement ^iin" > 

Helps to Heal Wounds 

By Thomas Crampton 

. International Herald TYibwie 

. KANCHANABURL Thailand 
— Nagase Takashi, a retired Jap- 
anese school teacher, is not sure if 
tins is his 94th or 95th voyage to 
Kanchanabuii’ 

But he clearly remembers that 
on his first trip, while working for 
Reraped — - the Japanese wartime 
military police — he spied on war 
prisoners and helped torture a man' 
to the brink of death. Now racked 
with guilt, he wants to die in Kan- 
chanaburi west of Bangkok. 

“That would be perfect It is my 

wish,” said Mr. Nagase, 79. after . 

an hour of distributing rice and Mr.Nagase, right* with tfiect-priMlier, 
small mang o- trees to villagers in Trevor Dakin, next to me Kiver Kwat. i| 
the brutal heat at a temple just 



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TRAVEL UPDATE 


Louvre Opening Iran- Arabia Wing 

PARIS (AFP) — The Louvre Museum will open a new 
wing co the public on Friday to better display its collection of 
treasures from ancient Iran and Arabia, in its latest ex- 
pansion. 

The new Sadder wing, housing 1 1 rooms on a surface area 
of 1.200 square meters (12,000 square feet), presents some 
2,000 works, including the renowned "frieze of Persian 
archers" and a monumental vase from Cyprus. 

The wing is named after the British art patrons Mortimer 
and Theresa S adder, who contributed 22 million francs ($3.6 
million) to the reconstruction work. 

Airline Price- Cutting Expected 

PARIS ( AP) — World airline traffic is likely to grow faster 
than expected, but price-cutting by airlines could offset that 
growth, a senior industry official said Thursday. 

As airlines reduce fares to attract more customers, their 
profit margins shrink so much that a downswing will send 
some companies into the red, said Jean-Pierre Jeasniot, head 
of the International Air Transport Association. 

The airline industry group had projected the number of 
international passengers to grow by an average 6.6 percent 
between 1997 and 2001. The group now expects passenger 
traffic to grow by 7.6 percent this year. 

Mexicana, a major Mexican airline, said on Wednesday 
it had suspended all its flights to Colombia until further notice 
because of concerns about security at Bogota's El Dorado 
Airport. Mexicana "s action came a week offer the airline was 
embarrassed by the discovery of 68 pounds (31 kilograms) of 
cocaine hidden in the emergency exit of one of its planes 
flying in from Colombia. f Reuters) 


8 Die in Gambia Crash 

Reuters . 

BANJUL. Gambia — A tourist 
charter plane from Spain crashed in this 
West African state on Thursday, killing 
eight of the nine people on board, the 
Gambian Civil Aviation Authority an- 
nounced. 

Spanish stare television reported that 
seven of the dead were tourists from 
Germany. 

"Out of the nine people on board one 
survived,” the Gambian aviation au- 
thority reported in a statement 


outside of town. 

Mr. Nagase smiled as a doctor from 
the mobile health clinic he finances ex- 
amined the inside of a child's ear. 

The mobile clinic is just one of sev- 
eral projects initiated by Mr. Nagase to 
atone for having worked a regiment that 
forced Allied prisoners during World 
War H to build the railroad immor- 
talized in the film, "The Bridge on the 
River KwaL” 

Considered a traitor in Japan for his 
apologies about the wartime atrocities, 
the soft-spoken former interpreter is a 
contr o v er s i al figure who likes to point 
out that he’s shown remorse for his war- 
time actions through his projects here. 
“You see, I am not this evil man like all 
the journalists like to write about me,’ ' he 
said in an interview this week. 

The famed bridge in the film is ac- 
tually just one of 688 built on a 415- 
kilometer (257-mile) rail line that 
crosses mountains anid penetrates deep 
into the jungle in Burma. 

The rail line was intended to save as 
the supply backbone for an invasion of 
India, which was then ruled by the Brit- 
ish. Japanese Imperial Army surveyors 
reckoned it would take five years to 
construct it Instead, the line was op- 
erating in a mere 17 months, thanks to 
the sweat of thousands of Allied war 
prisoners freshly captured after (he sur- 
render of Singapore. 

The speed with which the line was 
completed resulted in a heavy toll: 250 
workers died for each kilometer of track 
that was laid. In all, an estimated 16,000 
prisoners of war and 90,000 forced 
Asian laborers died during the construc- 
tion. Mr. Nagase says fewer than 100 
Japanese soldiers died. 

Having chosen surrender over sui- 
cide, the prisoners were seen as being 
disgraced by the Japanese. They were 
fed a starvation diet of a daily bowl of 
rice and were literally worked to death. 

Mr. Nagase’s chief responsibility 
Was inspecting prison camps ’for' any- 
thing suspicious. He said he also in- 
terpreted during the brutal torture ses- 
sions of a British officer, Eric Lomax, 
who had drawn a map of the top-secret 
rail line. The sessions, which lasted 
days, are described by Mr. Lomax in his 
book, “The Railway Man.” 

In the book, the former prisoner re- 
calls Mr. Nagase calmly telling him to 
confess everything. “You will be killed 
shortly, whatever happens,” Mr. Na- 
gase said. Mr. Lomax says there were 
other people in the room speaking Jap- 
anese, but years later he could recall 
only the mechanical voice of Mr. Na- 


gase relentlessly asking him questions. 
The interrogations were combined with 
beatings aim various forms of torture, 
earned out by other Japanese officers.' 

Years later, Mr. Lomax decided to 
track down and kill his tormentor. 

Mr. Nagase insists he was merely an 
interpreter and not the interrogator, and 
he says he, too, was haunted by the 
sessions. 

After the war, Mr. Nagase was en- 
listed by the victorious Allies to search 
for the remains of dead prisoners. He 
Nagase spent three weeks traveling cn 
the railroad into Burma, his first trip 
along the route beyond Kanchanaburi. 

“We found about 220 cemeteries >. 
with 12,000 bodies," he said. “If I did 
not see those miserable things. I would 
still love our emperor.” 

Mr. Nagase returned to Japan to runs 
language school, but his health deteri- 
orated, and tormenting memories drove 
him to attempt suicide twice. In night- 
mares, he was haunted by the sound qf . 
Mr. Lomax crying "Mother,” he said. 

Relief came only when he returned to 
Kanchanaburi almost two decades after 
the war to lay a wreath in the British 
cemetery. “As I placed the wreath, a 
pure sound came into my ears and a light 
poured out from my chest, " Mr. Nagase . 
said. “My health recovered and every . 
time I come here ray health gets bet- 
ter.” ' 

Since that first visit, Mr. Nagase has { 
made voyages of atonement from his I 
home near Osaka to Kanchanaburi an 
average of three times yearly. He has 
financed the studies in Japan of 23 Thai 
students from die area, built a temple 
and founded the mobile health clinic for 
remote villages. 

Several years ago, Mr. Takashi was 
made an honorary citizen of Kan- 
chanaburi for his good works here. And 
in Japan, where the wartime atrocities 
remain a divisive issue, remorseful Jap- 
anese have donated more than 100 mil- 
lion yen ($800,000) to Mr. Nagase's 
projects, which have included bringing 
dozens of former captives and jailers 
together for die first tune since die war. 

“I have become very, very close to 
Mr. Takashi,” said Trevor Dakin, a 
former British infantry corporal who 
spent three years as a prisoner building 
the railroad and has now returned to live . 
in Kanchanaburi. ‘‘I have been called a . 
Jap-lover for it, but I don’t care,’ * Mr. . 
Dakin said. 

“Mr. Nagase is an honorable man - 
who realized the horrible atrocities 
committed by the Japanese. He has 
helped me lay a ghost to rest ’ ’ \ 







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Puarabtag. In the west 

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EYTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY OCTOBER 10, 1997 


PAGE 3 


Clinton Tape Affair 
Irks Attorney General 

Belated Find Made Her ‘Mad,’ Reno Say, 


THE AMERICAS 


®y Brian Knowlton 

™ fl HvruU Trihunr 

J" , W,T ,T0N - A «*n*y Gen- 
era! Janet Reno expressed rare anger 

MdfimauniThunday with the White 
House for its delay in providing lone- 
fgft ev,dc °ce. but she said she stSl 
lacked grounds to seek an inde^l 
eownsel to study possible fundtaSw 
abuses by the president. u ° 

bis. Reno is known for being stu- 
drausty circumspect and unfailingly 
cautious m her weekly news confer- 

SS- S UI w *“° shc learned that the 
White House had belatedly produced 
video tapes that had been requested 
months earlier, she told reporters “I 
was mad. r 

. -y. ou have a situation where 

the White House has received the re- 
quest to produce the documents, it is 
very, very frustrating to have them pro- 
duced in such a delaved fashion,” she 
“id- *"! J a l so tit^Shi we should have 
been told immediately as soon as they 
were found.” 

Asked whether the discovery of the 
tapes would alter her conclusions in a 
letter to Congress that there was no 
evidence linking President Bill Clinton 
to possible illegal fund-raising, she 
replied, “No.” 

The White House now says it found 
the tapes — showing portions of coffee 
meetings involving Mr. Clinton and po- 
tential donors — last Wednesday. On 
Thursday, the White House counsel. 
Claries Ruff, who knew of the tapes’ 
existence, met with Ms. Reno without 
mentioning them. On Friday, she sent 
the letter absolving Mr. Clinton to Con- 
gress. 

Yet. it was only on Saturday, the 
attorney general told reporters, that she 
learned the tapes had been produced. 

For the most part, the tapes merely 
show Mr. Clinton and his aides en- 
gaging in small talk with potential 
Democratic donors. 

White House aides have said the 
tapes were simply overlooked under the 
flood of requests from congressional 
and Justice Department investigators 
lor information. Mr. Clinton has said 
Republicans were using the tapes as a 
smoke screen to cover their opposition 


to campaign-finance reform legisla- 
tion. 

In turn. Senator Fred Thompson of 
Tennessee, chairman of the Senate com- 
mittee investigating alleged fund-rais- 
mg abuses, has accused the White 
House of possibly Hying to “delay and 
obstruct” the investigation. 

Ms. Reno said that she had not spoken 
to Mr. Clinton about the tapes. The 
attorney general has come under in- 
creasingly sharp criticism from Repub- 
licans and some editorial writers, who 
have accused her, more or less bluntly, 
of protecting the man who na med her to 
head the Justice Department. Some 
have called for her resignation. 

“There have been claims that we 
have somehow tied investigators' hands 
or chosen not to pursue all available 
leads or spared high-level figures by not 
triggering the provisions of the inde- 
pendent-counsel statute,” Ms. Reno 
said. “These claims are not true.** 



Mr. Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno heading past lawmen to the Thursday meeting with gunmakers 


House Passes Abortion Bill 

WASHINGTON — The House has approved by a 
wide margin a ban on a form of late-term abortion 
that opponents see as violent and unnecessary. 

President Bill Clinton, who vetoed the measure 
once before, has promised to do so a gain. The ban 
passed the House by six votes more than the two- 
thirds needed to override a veto, bat when the S enate 
approved the same measure last May, supporters 
were three votes short of the number needed to 
override a veto. 

Supporters of the measure said they would lobby 
hard for those three votes, bat they were also looking 
past this fight and to next year's congressional elec- 
tions. People on both sides of the debate said the issue 
could be important in a number of Senate and House 
races. (NYT) 

Firm to Pay Campaign Fine 

WASHINGTON — A Pennsylvania landfill com- 
pany has pleaded guilty to fnnneling SI 29,000 in 
illegal corporate donations to 10 political candidates 
— including the presidential campaigns of Bob Dole 


and Bill Clinton — and agreed to pay an $8 million 
fine, the largest penally ever for a campaign financ e 
violation, an attorney said Wednesday. 

Six individuals also implicated in the case — four 
former officials of the firm, a business associate and 
a Pennsylvania state legislator — face trial in a 
separate indictment, charging they made the illegal 
contributions and then tried to cover them up. 

The biggest beneficiary of the scheme was die 
Dole presidential campaign, which allegedly re- 
ceived $80,000 in illegal contributions. The Clinton- 
Gore campaign received $10,000 in illegal con- 
tributions, die indictment said. (WP) 

A House Vote for Fast Track 9 

WASHINGTON — The House Ways and Means 
Committee has voted to give President Clinton broad 
authority to negotiate global trade agreements, but 
the administration won the support of only a handful 
of the panel's Democrats despite a late flurry of 
lobbying. 

The committee voted, 24 to 14, to approve com- 
promise legislation agreed to Tuesday after a night of 
bargaining between the administration and the com- 
mittee's Republican majority. 


With the vote, the administration cleared another 
hurdle in its effort to renew “fast truck” authority to 
negotiate trade agreements — like the North Amer- 
ican Free Trade Agreement — that Congress can 
only approve or reject, without attaching amend- 
ments. 

But the vote also showed that Mr. Clinton has been 
able to rally only tepid support from his own party, 
raising questions about his ability to push the trade 
legislation through this year. 

Many Democrats have opposed renewing the 
president's fast-track authority, arguing that any 
future trade agreements must have tougher pro- 
visions to protect the environment and workers' 
rights. (NYT l 


Quote/Unquote 


Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona and 
co-sponsor of legislation overhauling campaign fi- 
nancing, on why his own party does not support him: 
"We're challenging all incumbents to change a 
system that insures incumbency. Republicans, as the 
majority party, it’s obviously more of a threat to them 
than to the minority party.” (NYT) 


Clinton Gets 
Gunmakers 
To Add Locks 
To Weapons 


By James Bennet 

Nnr font rams Sartre 1 

WASHINGTON — After quietly ne-i 
gotiating with the Clinton administra-j 
don, representatives of major U.S.! 
handgun manufacturers gathered 
Thursday at the White House to an- 
nounce that they will provide child- 
safety locks with their firearms by the 
end of next year. 

The announcement, which covers 
about 80 percent of the handguns made 
in the United Stales, produced the un- 
likely spectacle of President Bill Clin- 
ton, who has sought throughout his pres- 
idency to restrict access to firearms, 
standing in the Rose Garden beside ex- 
ecutives from more than half a dozen 
gun manufacturers. 

The firearms industry has been under 
increasing pressure from state govern- 
ments as well as the White House to 
address the problem of accidental shoot- 
ings, which killed 18S children in 1994, 
according to the most recent federal 
statistics. This year, two large firearms 
companies began providing such locks. 

The deal apparently would avert a 
battle in Congress over legislation man- 
dating the locks. Mr. Clinton called for 
such a law in his State of the Union 
message in January. In March, he dir- 
ected federal agencies to require safety. ! 
locks on every handgun issued to any 
law-enforcement agent 

“Thai in many ways started the pro- 
cess of examining the issue,” said 
Richard Feldman, executive director of 
the American Shooting Sports Council, 
an Atlanta-based group that represents 
manufacturers, retailers and distributors. 

“We very much want to be the re- | 
sponsible industry, and perceived that 
way by the public,” said Mr. Feldman, ' 
who represented the industry in talks 
with the White House. 

Without White House action, he said, 
the industry would eventually have 
offered the locks, “but not as quickly.” 

Although some critics have dismissed 
Mr. Clinton's push for child-safety 
locks as a trifling proposal. White House 
aides say the locks are effective. 


Ickes on Clinton Financing: It Was All Legal 


By David E. Rosenbaum 

Yort Times Strrite 

WASHINGTON — At 
times combative, at times 
whimsical, Harold Ickes par- 
ried every thrust and swipe 
from Republican senators in- 
vestigating campaign finance 
practices, never giving an 
mch or wavering in his loyalty 
to President Bill Clinton. 

"Wc did what the law per- 
mitted," said Mr. Ickes, the 
chief political officer in the 
■White House during last 
year's election campaign, im- 
plying that in politics, legal 
and proper are synonymous. 

Later, he embellished this 
refrain. "We were littered 
with lawyers,” he said. 


Mr. Ickes has been inter- 
viewed countless times on 
campaign finance matters. 
His testimony on Wednesday, 
before the Senate Govern- 
mental Affairs Committee, 
broke no ground. 

Among the points he made . 
were these: 

•He knows nothing about 
a proposed plan in which the 
Democrats were to swap 
funds with the re-election 
campaign of Ron Carey, pres- 
ident of the Teamsters un- 
ion. 

■ He did not, contrary to 
what a witness testified last 
month, ask a potential donor 
to shred a fund-raising doc- 
ument 

• He never intervened with 


the Interior Department on 
behalf of party-supporting In- 
dian tribes in Minnesota and 
Wisconsin that wanted to sink 
a casino proposal by a rival 
tribe. 

•The coffees Mr. Clinton 
held in the White House for 
his supported were not ex- 
plicitly fund-raisers, although 
they were helpful in gener- 
ating contributions. 

• Any phone calls the pres- 
ident made to prospective 
contributors were legal 

• If Mr. Clinton had known 
of illicit practices by John 
Huang, the patty's chief so- 
licitor of contributions from 
Asian-Axnericans, he would 
have had Mr; Huang dis- 
missed 


If the senators were dis- 
turbed by Mr. Ickes 's theme 
that there is no right or wrong 
in politics, only legality or 
illegality, it rarely showed. 

Senator Joseph Liebennan, 
Democrat of Connecticut, 
asked whether anyone in the 
White House had ever said: 
“Hey, die lawyers tell us that 
technically this is legal. But is 
it right?” 

The question was posed 
among a string of others; Mr. 
Ickes never addressed it, and 
neither Mr. Liebennan nor 
anyone else ever returned to 
iL 

The committee's Republi- 
cans were frustrated because 
Mr. Ickes couched most of his 
answers in phrases like “my 


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recollection is” or “I may 
have, but I don’t recall it” — 
words intended to inoculate 
him against accusations of 

pe ? uy - ■ r- 

At one pomt, Senator Don 
Nickies of Oklahoma, the 
deputy Republican leader in 
the Senate, was asking Mr. 
Ickes about a particular doc- 
ument that had not been lo- 
cated. 

“Obviously, we’re talking 
about obstruction of justice,” 
Mr. Nickies said. 

Most witnesses before 
Senate committees do not 
have die audacity to interrupt 
a senator, but as Mr. Nickies 
tried to continue speaking, 
Mr. Ickes broke in: “If I may, 
senator, since you're now al- 
leging obstruction of 
justice..." 

Mr. Nickies cut him short: 
“I’m trying to find out if there 
was obstruction of justice.” 

Mr. Ickes interrupted again: 
“I think you’re alleging it.” 

Their voices raised, the two 
men then talked over each 
other until Senator Fred 
Thompson of Tennessee, the 
committee chairman, re- 
stored order. 

■ House Hearings 

Members of the House 
Government Oversight Com- 
mittee opened their campaign 
finance hearings on Wednes- 
day, with 43 of the commit- 
tee's 44 members lining up to 
speak and argue at length. The 
New York Times reported. 

The chairman. Representa- 
tive Dan Burton, Republican 
of Indiana, began the pro- 
ceedings with a denunciation 
of what he called the “any- 
thing goes" White House. 


Away From 
Politics 

• A jury ordered Chrysler 

Corp. to pay $26225 million 
to the parents of a 6-year-old 
boy who was killed when he 
was thrown from the family 
minivan in an accident be- 
cause a rear latch was de- 
fective. The $12.5 million in 
actual damages and $250 mil- 
lion in punitive damages 
awarded to die parents of Ser- 
gio Jimenez Jr. in Charleston. 
South Carolina, was the 
largest award ever against the 
automaker, which said it 
would appeal. (AP) 

• A garbage-strewn house 
where a woman kept an es- 
timated 1,200 rats and 
treated them like pets was de- 
molished after her neighbors 
in Tampa, Florida, com- , 
plained about the smelL (AP) 

• The arnrjr has decided to 
court-martial its top enlis- 
ted man. Gene McKinney, 
the Sergeant Major of the 
Army, on sexual misconduct 
charges resulting from accu- 
sations of harassment and as- 
sault by six servicewomen. 
Mr. McKinney is expected to 
enter a plea at an arraignment 
within a few days. He has 
denied the allegations and ac- 
cused the army of racial bias. 
Mr. McKinney is black; his 
six accusers are white. (AP) 

■ A man who castrated and 
killed an advertising sales- 
man in 1986 was executed by 
lethal injection in Huntsville, 
Texas. Ricky Green. 36, was 
pronounced dead seven 
minutes after a deadly mix of 
chemicals was injected into 
his right arm at a state pris- 
on. (Reuters) 


Bumped, Cyclist Murders 
Motorist in Washington 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A bicyclist angry about being bumped- 
by a car ar a busy intersection in Washington shot the motorist 
to death in front of stunned onlookers, then led police on afoot 
chase through the traffic before he was captured 10 minutes 
later. 

The cyclist, identified as a 26-year-old man from Silver 
Spring, Maryland, was charged Wednesday with first-degree 
murder. The woman was identified as Joy Estrella Mariano 
Enriquez, 19- 

Police and witnesses said the victim's car bumped the 
cyclist as she made a left turn, and the cyclist fell from his bike. 
As the driver pulled over to check on him, the cyclist ap- 
proached the car and accosted her, they said. 

Several onlookers told detectives that the cyclist shouted 
and cursed at the woman before drawing a handgun, firing 
once into her head and riding away. Across the street, he 
ditched his bike behind a tile store, then led officers flagged 
down by motorists on a chase for several blocks. 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


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Consensus Saves Wilderness Tract 


Gnpxj BuU/TSc AxkxtuM hvaa 

A man fighting the wind to cross a drenched Santa Cruz street as the hurricane blew along the coast of Mexico. 

Hurricane’s Punch Kills 45 in Acapulco 


By Anthony DePalma 

flenr York times Service 

TORONTO — A huge area of nearly 
untouched wilderness id the Rocky 
Mountains of British Columbia is to be 
protected from all development under an 
agreement announced between the pro- 
vincial government, oil anf t mining 
companies, environmentalists and Indi- 
an groups. 

More than 2J> million acres (a mill k m 
hectares) of magnificent mountain 
ranges, remote rivers and deep valleys 
densely populated by caribou, grizzly 
bear and wolverine, is to be surrounded 
by a vast buffer zone where limited 
development can take place under strict 
guidelines. 

.Significant amounts of natural gas 
have been discovered in the buffer roue, 
and it was feared that without a plan, 
development could damage one of the 
largest and most important wilderness 
areas in North Amcnca. 

Environmental groups see die action 
as a model for large-scale conservation; 
industry leaders backed its provisions 
for sustainable development and the cre- 
ation of jobs. 

‘This is a decision on the scale of 
Yellowstone in terms of its significance 
for conservation in North America," 



NYT 


said Mary Granskou, executive director 
of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness 
Society, an environmental group- 

“We have unprecedented coopera- 
tion hero to preserve wildlife values as a 
whole,” tiie said. 

David Manning, president of the Ca- 
nadian Association of Petroleum Pro- 
ducers, said that while drilling would be 
prohibited in the core area, where tests 
have shown there is plenty of natural 
gas, the plan gives exploration compa- 
nies a guarantee of access to the buffer 
zone. 


“The test will be whether the 
province will stand by industry to make 
sure that the management area is de- 
veloped in a responsible way,” he said. 

In all, more than 10 million acres in 
the northeastern corner of British 

Columbia is to be safeguarded. The area, 
known as Muskwa-Kechika for its two 
major rivers, is larger than Switzerland. 

The Alaska Highway crosses the buf- 
fer zone. 

Tamara Static of Greenpeace Canada, 
which has fiercely opposed the com- 
mercialization of British Columbia’s 
forests, said die accord was important 
because the provincial government rec- 
ognized the need to protect an area large 
enough to include the corridors that an- 
imals use to migrate. 

“It is not typically the way govern- 
ment has looked at managing re- 
sources,” Ms. Siark said. 

“If the mechanisms agreed to for the 
special management zone are all im-. 
piemen ted correctly and development is 
truly restricted, this could be a good 
deaL” 

Under the plan, a management ad- 
visory board representing everyone with 
a stake in the area is to recommend how 
much commercial activity is to be al- 
lowed and oversee government de- 
cisions. 


The Associated Press 

ACAPULCO, Mexico — A hurricane 
pounded Mexico's southwestern Pacific 
coast Thursday with 100 mile an hour 
winds and torrential rains, creating 
churning rivers of mud, water and debris 
(hat raced down the main streets of 
Acapulco. More than 45 people died, the 
authorities said. 

Many of the victims were caught in 
muddy torrents that swept hundreds of 
cars, huge tree hunks ana tons of earth 
down the mountains b ehind Acapulco 
toward the sea. The resort, a city of 2.9 
million, was turned into a disaster zone. 


with hundreds of homes wrecked by 
floods. 

Governor Angel Aguirre reported 
more titan 40 deaths in Acapulco and at 
least five others elsewhere in the state of 
Guerrero, where the resort city is situ- 
ated. 

Tourists huddled in darkened hotels, 
and hundreds of locals sought refuge in 
emergency shelters. Ropes were strung 
across downtown intersections to help 
people cross torrents of roaring water. 
Towering waves carved np most of the 
city’s pristine beaches. Boulders the size 
of cars were swept down die hills, and 


cars were flipped over like toys. A 
coastal highway became a raging river. 

A hurricane warning was extended 
Thursday morning hundreds of miles up 
Mexico’s southwestern coast, from 
Acapulco to Puerto Vallarta, as satellite 
images showed the hurricane, desig- 
nated Pauline, moving roughly parallel 
to the shore, the U.S: Hurricane Center 
in Miami reported. 

President Ernesto Zedillo, on a state 
visit to Germany, ordered military and 
civil defense workers into the haid-hit 
states of Oaxaca and Chiap as, die of- 
ficial Notimex news agency reported. 


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AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow Knew It All Along 

Somewhere in heaven there is surety a laughing cow: A 
Chicago City Council committee this week supported a 
resolution absolving Catherine O'Leary and her cow of 
blame for the fire of 1871 that destroyed most of the city. 

Historians have said that the fire was ignited when the cow 
Mrs. O’Leary was milkin g on the evening of Oct. 8 kicked 
over a lighted lantern. The fire raced north and east through 
the city’s wooden buildings, sending panicky families flee- 
ing, some of them into the cold waters of Lake Michigan. 
Perhaps 300 people died; 90,000 were left homeless. But new 
research prerented to the City Council committee says the 
most likely culprit was young Daniel Sullivan, who probably 
dropped a match, a pipe or a lantern when he went to the bam 
to fed a cow. After the fire, many of the finest American 
architects came to Chicago to help rebuild. For all the honor 
of the fire, Chicago rose from the ashes to Secome one of the 
world’s great cities. 

Short Takes 

Some catalog designers are going to great lengths to stick 
out. In its “A&F Quarterly,” the retailer Abercrombie & 
Fitch includes dps for college students on how to stock a 
refrigerator, where to find a “cool’ ’ job and how to pick the 
perfect dog. Another contribution to this new genre, the 
‘magalog/’ comes from Barneys New York. Its “Love 
Book' ' tells a story: Boy meets girl; girl shows up for date in 


long black velvet dress (price: $1,415); boy gets girl, and then 
loses girl. Some industry specialists praise this approach as a 
creative way to draw attention in a glutted market: Americans 
receive an average of 93 catalogs a year. Others, according to 
U.S. News & World Report, say customers get confused 
when they see a product without a price. 

When does a garish commercial symbol become part of 
the national heritage? The question is being debated in 
Williamstown. Massachusetts, where a young developer 

Howard JoSraon’s restaurant h^purdhased. Howard John- 
son’s, or HoJo's, was among tire first rational restaurant 
chains^ offering smiling service, crispy clam strips and 28 
flavors of ice cream, recalls The Boston Globe. But fester, 
cheaper restaurants have left only 60 HoJo’s nationwide. 
And the one in Williamstown is the best preserved, according 
to Arthur Krim, a preservation consultant who helped save 
the first McDonakrs, in Southern California. Mr. Krim and 
others say the HoJo's deserves to be maintained as a symbol 
of a fondly remembered time of postwar prosperity. But its 
new owner, Michael Zeppieri, 24, wants to convert the 
building to office space. “I don’t honestly know if I can live 
with that orange roof,” he said. 

If there were a “mansion index” in Southern Cali- 
fornia, it would be pointing straight up. In Laguna Beach, a 
sprawling, cliff-edge mansion known as the Gucci house, 
which failed to sell last year for $10.8 million, has just sold 
for $13 million. Just up the coast, a house that sold last year 
for $14 million is back on the market — for $18 million. 
Luxury abodes all along the coast are again hot items, 
reports the Los Angeles Times. 


Brian Knowlton 


BOOKS 


THE KENNEDY TAPES: 
bride the White House During 
the Cuban Missile Crisis 
Edited by Ernest R. May and Philip D. 
Zelikow. 728 pages. $35. Belknap- 
Harxard University Press. 

Reviewed by Walter Pincus 

F OR those who want their history 
straight, who enjoy reading the 
words of government officials from the 
president on down as they attempt to 
deal with a serious international crisis — 
not filtered through print reporters, tele- 
vision announcers or cloistered histor- 
ians — this is a book to treasure. 

It also should be read, at least portions 
of it, by those present-day consumers of 
newspapers, magazines and television 
news shows who t hink the briefly spun 
daily doses of what purport to be the 
activities at the White House capture 
complex presidential decision-making 
even slightly. 

It is particularly fascinating to read the 
exchanges among President Kennedy; 
his brother Robert, the attorney general; 
Secretary of Defense Robert Mc- 
Namara; Secretary of State Dean Rusk; 
national security adviser McGeorge 
Bundy, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff Maxwell Taylor; and others almost 
equally well known as they pose ques- 
tions, provide answers, argue, reach de- 
cisions and frequently change them. 

The plot is familiar. The Soviets 
clandestinely bring intermediate- and 
short-range nuclear missiles into Cuba 
in 1 962 and attempt to deploy them. U.S. 
overflights discover them. There are 
secret diplomatic exchanges against a 
background of public statements. The 
United States puts in place a blockade 
and makes preparations for air strikes 
against the missile sites and Cuban air 
defenses if the missiles are not removed, 
with a full-scale invasion to follow. 

What is not familiar, however, are the 


myriad steps and potential missteps over 
the 13 days, as disclosed in transcriptsof 
taped meetings of the so-called Ex-Com 
or executive committee. The editors 
have bolstered the transcripts with help- 
ful historical and political notes. 

If you do nothing else, read the tran- 
script of die meetings of Saturday, Ocl 
20, the day that McNamara said he went 
hoote from the White House thinking that 
perhaps they had taken a step toward 
nuclear war. It was a day that had 
Kennedy and his aides dealing with the 
famous private and then public statements 
by the Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev. 

The first, private statement said that 
the missiles would go if the United 
Stales made assurances that there would 
be no invasion of Cuba. The second, 
public announcement offered to ex- 
change the Cuban weapons for with- 
drawal of U.S. missiles in Turkey — part 
of NATO’s nuclear arsenal. Next 
the firing on low-flying U.S. reconnais- 
sance planes prompted by an earlier 
White House statement that we would 
retaliate for such action. Later, word 
came that an American U2 spy plane had 
been dot down and its pilot killed. 

As Ocl 20 goes on, each of these 
events must be dealt with. 

W H IL E in the room, Kennedy 
clearly takes the lead, although 
other Ex-Com members, including his 
brother, share their thoughts freely. The 
group goes back and forth working out 
responses to each event; its discussions 
take place against a background belief 
that Khnishchev will not back down and 

that eventually the plans under way at the 

Pentagon — plans not only for mass ive 
air raids on Cuba but also for an invasion 
of the island — will inevitably be im- 
plemented within the next few days. 

As the pages unfold, dozens of items 
are discussed. A U.S. U2 has strayed over 
Siberia into Soviet air space; Kennedy 
with McNamara’s support deckles not to 
disclose it publicly so as not to embarrass 


Khrushchev with a provocation. The 
president and his aides go back and forth 
over whether to tell the NATO allies that 
Washington is prepared to agree to with- 
draw U.S. missiles from Turkey became 
nuclear-armed Polaris submarines are to 
be stationed off Turkey as less vulnerable 
replacements. In file end the NATO brief- 
ing is limited to arepart on tbe serioasness 
of the situation because, as Kennedy put 
it, "anything else would leak.” ' - 

McNamara, convinced that a U.S. at- 
tack on Cuba would bring retaliation , 
against the missile bases in Turkey, sog-f 
gests making them “inoperable. And let 
the Soviets know that before the Cuban 
attack ... on that basis, I don’t believe 
the Soviets would strike Turkey.” 

Bundy at one point reminds the pres- 
ident dial his desire to show the world he 
was inepared not to reject out of hand 
Khrushchev's offer to trade Cuban mis- 
siles for those in Turkey would inevitably 
harm Washington’s relations not only 
with NATO countries but other allies. 

Showing his realistic view of his 
people and tbe allies, Kennedy points 
out that although talcing U.S. m issiles 
out of Turkey might appear unaccept- 
able to some, the prospect of haying to 
fly 500 U.S. bombing sorties a<fey over 
Cuba for seven days to destroy the So- 
viet nuclear capability there, followed 
by a possible invasion of Cuba, might 
make the Turkish deal look better. “We 
ail know how quickly everybody’s cour- 
age goes when the blood starts to flow," 
he says, “and that’s what’s going to 
■I^Jpen in NATO. When we start these 
things and they (the Soviets) grab Berlin, 
every body’ s going to say: ‘Well, that 
was a pretty good proposition (meaning 
the Turkey missile trade).’" 

It’s lucky for all of us that Kennedy's 
words that day weren’t leaked and that 
the crisis came to a successful conclu- 
sion, t hanks in part to the fact that almost 
all the conversations hwhinri closed 
doors 25 years ago remained secret 

Wuhingnm Post Service 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


I N the early days of the 
game, writers and theorists 
were greatly excited about a 
rare play, die grand coup, and 
an even rarer one, the double 
grand coup. These terms are 
rarely used nowadays, and 
few players know what they 
mean. 

One who does is Albert SiJ- 
ber of Southfield, Michigan, 
who has been trying to ex- 
ecute a double grand coop for 
60 years. Finally, at a recent 
sectional tournament, he suc- 
ceeded. As South he arrived 
in four spades after opening 
with a weak two-bid ana hear- 
ing a takeout doable on his 
left. 

West took two heart win- 


ners and followed with die 
club ace, fearing that. South 
would discard club losers on 

NORTH 
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Wot led the heart kh^. ' 


dummy’s diamonds. He then 
led the diamond eight, a good 
move that cut down South’s 
entries to the dummy. 
Dummy's jack was success- 
fully finessed. 

Silbcr expected spade 
length on his right, and in- 
stead of routinely playing 
trump he made a farsighted 
plan. To allow for the pos- 
sibility of four trumps in the 
East hand, he led the winning 
heart Queen from the dummy 
and ruffed it 

A spade lead to the king 
followed, and the spade jack 
was finessed. The club king 
was cashed, and a diamond 
was led. This collected the 
king, and after taking the ace 
South ruffed the club queen. 
The ending is shown at right 

The diamond nine was led 


to dummy’s queen, 
double grand coap -w 
plete. It consists of 
two winners in a 
shorten the trump s 
achieve a coup positk 


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% Court Allows Deporting 
Of Hong Kong Children 

Challenge to Immigration Law Rejected 


by Our Fntn Diyuacbn 

HONG KONG — Thousands of 
n^iniand-born children face deporta- 
tion from Hong Kong after a court on 
l nursday threw out a challenge to a new 
unmigration law. 

The suit was brought on behalf of 
four feirls aged 7 to 10, along with a 19- 
year-old man. They are among thou- 
sands of people, mostly children of 
cross-border marriages, who have 
entered Hong Kong illegally but claim 
residence because one of their parents 
has Hong Kong papers. 

The Basic Law, the constitution 
China wrote for Hong Kong, grants 
them residency. But as soon as Britain 
handed Hong Kong back to China on 
July 1, the legislature passed a law en- 
titling the government to expel immi- 
grants who were not ran of the quota 
agreed to between China and Hong 
Kong. 

The government feared an influx of 
up to 75,000 child immigrants once the 
Basic Law took effect Under the terms 
of the sovereignty change, the border 
stays in place and the Hong Kong gov- 
ernment maintains its own immigration 
controls. 

Lawyers argued that the new law was 
unconstitutional. They also said it was 
flawed by being retroactive, since it 
empowered the government to deport 
children who arrived before the legis- 
lation was passed. 

But the Court of First Instance ruled 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 5 


that the government had not violated the 
Basic Law, and it upheld the retroactive 
status of the legislation. It held that the 
children broke the rules because they 
entered without a Chinese exit visa. 

“We are very disappointed because 
these children will face deportation im- 
mediately.” said Diana Pang of the So- 
ciety of Community Organizations, an 
advocacy group that supported the law- 
suit. She said the ruling would be ap- 
pealed. 

Peter Lai, secretary for security, said 
the government had no immediate plans 
to deport die children affected by the 
ruling. 

"Given the fact that it is not certain 
ail the legal progresses have been com- 
pleted and we cannot rule out the pos- 
sibility of appeal, so for the time being 
we are not caking any immediate action 
of repatriation,” Mr. Lai said. 

Spouses and children of Hong Kong 
residents have to wait years for Chinese 
exit visas, and maintain that the system 
is corrupted by bribery. 

“I feel very sad. It’s an unfair judg- 
ment,” said Yeung Wing-kin, father of 
one of five children in the test case. 

“All my family is here in Hong 
Kong," said Mr. Yeung, a permanent 
resident of the territory, whose main- 
land-bom daughter Ni-ni, 10, was at 
home with the rest of his family to hear 
the verdict. 

"1 am concerned that my daughter 
will have no one to look after her in 



Ctaigrrhc Mwcukd-Picw 

Yeung Ni-ni, left, and Cheung Lai-wah at a press conference Thursday in 
Hong Kong after a court threw out their bid to maintain their residence. 


China.” he said, adding he was con- 
sidering an appeoL ( Reuters , APJ 

■ Forget Ti ananme n, Tong Says 

The people of Hong Kong should 
look to the future and stop dwelling on 
China's 1989 crackdown on protesters 
at Tiananmen Square, Tung Chee-hwa. 
the Hong Kong leader, said Thursday, 
The Associated Press reported. 

Replying to a woman on a radio talk 
show who asked whether China should 
admit it was wrong to violently crush 
the 1989 protest movement. Mr. Tung 
sai± 


China Rebukes 2 Countries Over Taiwan 


The Associated Press 

BEIJING — In actions designed to 
further isolate Taiwan, China said 
Thursday that i! was closing Liberia’s 
consulate in Hong Kong and had lodged 
a stem protest with Iceland for receiving 
a visiting leader from Taiwan. 

The closing of Liberia’s honorary 
consulate followed the African nation's 
declaration last month that it recognized 
the governments of both China and 
Taiwan. 

China regards Taiwan, governed 
since 1949 by the Chinese Nationalists 
who lost the country's civil war to the 
Communists, as a rebel province with 
no right to diplomatic representation of 
its own. Beijing insists that all jts dip- 
lomatic partners have no official ties 


with Taiwan. The Chinese Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman, Shen Guofang, said 
Liberia was "creating two Chinas.” 

The Liberian consulate in Hong 
Kong, the former British colony that 
China recovered July l, was ordered 
closed down as of Thursday, he said. 
China broke off ties with Liberia on 
Sept. 9. 

On a related issue, Mr. Shea said 
Iceland had ignored China's protests 
over allowing the vice president of 
Taiwan, Lien Chan, to visit and or- 
ganizing official activities for him. 

“This is unacceptable to the Chinese 
people and government," Mr. Shen 
said. “These activities will seriously 
harm bilateral relations between China 
and Iceland.” He added that the "dam- 


age” would "include all fields." 

Mr. Shen did not give details. Bat 
Taiwan media reports said China had 
canceled talks on importing several mil- 
lion dollars’ worth of fish from Ice- 
land. 

The reports said China had issued two 
stem protests to Iceland, one of them 
before Mr. Lien arrived for his visit Mr. 
Shen said the visit "interfered in 
China’s internal affairs, hurt the feel- 
ings of the Chinese people and damaged 
China-Iceland relations.” 

Iceland and Taiwan have said they 
expect the visit to lead to an exchange of 
trade and tonrism offices. Iceland is the 
only West European country in which 
Taiwan does not operate a de facto 
embassy. 


"I think it’s now time for Hong Kong 
to lose this burden. We have a very 
important future ahead of us. We are 
now in a new era and so we have to work 
very hard on many fronts.’’ 

"We cannot forget it,” the woman 
said. "The memory is still very 
fresh." 

“What happened in the course of 
history, history itself will have a verdict 
on that,” Mr. Tung replied. 

The attitude of many Hong Kong 
people to China is defined by the events 
of 1989, and tens of thousands of people 
rally every June 4 to remember the 
victims. 

Mr. Tung was careful not to imply 
that he would ban the commemorations. 
Instead, he urged the program's listen- 
ers to focus on China's economic and 
social development since 1989, saying 
it was "something of which we should 
all be proud." 

The phone-in program on govern- 
ment-owned radio came a day after Mr. 
Tung delivered his first annual policy 
address as Hong Kong's chief exec- 
utive. 

His speech Wednesday focused on 
bread-and-butter issues, with only brief 
comment on the future of Hong Kong's 
democracy, leading the pro-democracy 
camp to complain that the subject is low 
on Mr. Tung^s agenda. 

But the array of questions on the 90- 
minute radio program suggested that 
democracy is not foremost in the public 
mind either. 

Almost all the questions were about 
the housing shortage, pollution and eco- 
nomics. 


Tokyo Ends 
Freeze on Aid 
To Pyongyang 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan resumed food aid 
Thursday to North Korea after a halt of 
15 months, announcing a package of 
527 million of humanitarian aid to the 
Communist nation. 

Citing alleged abductions of Japa- 
nese citizens by North Korean agents, 
some members of Prime Minister Ryu- 
taro Hashimoto’s Liberal Democratic 
Party had opposed resuming food aid 
until the issue was settled. 

“We are donating $17 milli on worth 
of food aid to the World Food Program 
for distribution in North Korea," 
Kanezo Muraoka, the chief government 
spokesman, said. 

He said the program would use the 
money to purchase 67,000 tons of sur- 
plus Japanese rice. 

Mr. Muraoka- also announced Japan 
would donate 1.1 million Swiss francs 
($762,000) to the International Red 
Cross for medical work in North 
Korea. 

Japan gave $6 millio n in humanit- 
arian food aid to North Korea through 
the United Nations in June 1996 but 
since then bad held back from joining 
the United Stares and other nations in 
sending more aid as North Korea’s fam- 
ine worsened as a result of two con- 
secutive years of record floods. 

Japan has alleged that North Korea 
abducted at least 10 Japanese citizens in 
the 1970s and 1980s. 

Japanese intelligence sources said the 
kidnapped victims may have been put to 
work giving Japanese-language training 
to North Korean agents so they could 
travel as Japanese nationals to carry out 
espionage or sabotage. 

North Korea has rejected the kid- 
napping allegations. 

Tokyo had also cited North Korea’s 
refusal to let Japanese women living in 
the Stalinist state visit their homeland as 
another reason it would not send food 
aid to Pyongyang. 

There are an estimated 1,800 Jap- 
anese wives who moved with their 
spouses to North Korea between 1959 
and 1982. 

Most of those Japanese women, 
whose husbands are descendants of 
Koreans who moved or were brought to 
Japan before World War IL have not 
been heard from for years. 

In early September, North Korea 
agreed that groups of 10 to 15 Japanese 
women could spend about one week in 
their homeland. 

A first group is expected to visit this 
month. 


BRIEFLY 


Uighur Separatists 
Claim Bombings 

ALMATY, Kazakstan — Uighur 
separatists killed at least 22 .people 
in five bomb attacks in China s 
northwestern Xinjiang Province, 
exiled rebels said Thursday. 

The biggest attack took place in 
Kuytun, a city in the east of the 
province, where a bomb went off on 
OcL 1, killing 22 people and dam- 
aging several buildings, said a 
spokesman for the United Revo- 
lutionary National Front at its 
h eadquar ters in the Kazak capital. 

Four other bombs exploded be- 
tween OcL 2 and Tuesday in the 
cities of Suydun and Shihczi, 
killing many Chinese, the spokes- 
man added. 

He said the Uighur fighters were 
" targeting official buildings and 
meetings.” (AFP) 

Sun in Singapore 

SINGAPORE — Smog that has 
blotted out the sun across Southeast 
Asia for almost two months is be- 
ginning to recede as monsoon rains 
arrive, experts said Thursday. 

Scattered showers have already 
fallen on Singapore, parts of 
Malaysia and northern Indonesia, 
bringing the first glimpses of blue 
sky to a region blanketed by smoke 
from forest fires in Indonesia. 

Weather forecasters expect the 
air to clear in the next month, but 
say the rains will be intermittent for 
a while and the fixes may not be put 
out for some time. ( Reuters i 

Kashmir Calmer 

SRINAGAR. India — Guerrilla 
attacks have eased dramatically in 
Kashmir over the past year with the 
restoration of democratic rule and 
the be ginning of peace, the region’s 
political leader said. 

Farooq Abdallah, chief minister 
of India’s Jammu and Kashmir 
state, said that some separatist mil- 
itants had surrendered and joined 
government paramilitary groups 
since his government took office a 
year ago and that the army was 
withdrawing from some towns. 

Mr. Abdullah's party, the Na- 
tional Conference, won a landslide 
victory in elections last year to the 
stale legislature, the first local polls 
since the outbreak of a separatist 
rebellion in 1990. (Reuters) 





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Russians Rebut 
Drug-Link Story 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — The Foreign Min- 
istry denied Thursday an article by 
The Washington Post (IHT. Sept. 
30) that Russian crime groups were 
forming alliances with Colombian 
drug traffickers. 

“The btest figment of runaway 
imagination,’' said Grigori Tara- 
sov, a spokesman. Such repons, he 
said, are prompted by “quite real 
interests of U.S. arms exporters." 

He called the articles pan of an 
effort to “squeeze Russia from the 
Latin American market by hook or 
by crook." 

“Russia's policy,” he said, “is 
that sales of military hardware to 
other countries should not add to 
tensions or disturb the balance of 
power anywhere in the world.” 


In Another Shift, Yeltsin Says He Won’t Run 


BRIEFLY 


By David Hoffman 

WasMingitm Post Service 


MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin doused specubtion Thursday, 
which he had recently encouraged, that 
he .might try to change the 1993 con- 
stitution and seek a third term in the next 
presidential election. 

The election is not until the year 
2000, but the conjecture about Mr. 
Yeltsin's future has quickened btely 
because of the growing number of con- 
tenders, their backers and political con- 
sultants, all of whom are jockeying in 
for the next election. 



coronary 

year, but nas returned to omce m ap- 
parent good health and kept up a vig- 
orous schedule. 

He has warily eyed the presidential 


“wannabes.” His comments Thursday 
to reporters while on a visit to Stras- 
bourg, France, for a speech at the Coun- 
cil or Europe, marked the third rime in 
recent weeks he has. addressed the pos- 
sibility of r unning ag ain 

Just this week, Mr. Yeltsin’s spokes- 
man, Sergei Yastrdxembsky, publicly 
said Mr. Yeltsin could run again without 
violating the constitution. 

The 1993 document limits presidents 
to two consecutive terms. Mr. Yeltsin is 
in his second tom, but was elected to bis 
first before the constitution was en- 
acted, leading some to say he could 
legally run again. 

Mr. Yeltsin first announced a few 
weeks ago, while visiting a school, that 
he would not seek a third term. 

According to a high-ranking Kremlin 
official, the statement was off-the-cuff 
and caught many of Mr. Yeltsin's aides 


l Immediately, there was re- 
to the lir 


by: 

newerf attention to the line-up of pos- 
sible successors and their plans to 
mount a campaign. 

The question became more, heated 
because of the bitter feud among the 
Russian business tycoons over a recent 
privatization sale. 

The money and support of the mag- 
nates were instrumental in Mr. Yeltsin's 
victory last year, and his announcement 
that he would bow out prompted a flurry 
of questions about whom they would 
back the next time. 

At a Kremlin meeting Sept. 15, Mr. 
Yeltsin confided to the tycoons that he 
mi ght have eared in taking himself out 
of the running so early. 

Then, while ou visit to Nizhny 
Novgorod, Russia’s third- largest city, 
late last week, Mr. Yeltsin backtracked. 
He refused to repeat his earlier vow. 


Among those who are in the^ front 
ranks of the race to succeed Mr . Yeltsin 
are Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemt- 
sov: the Moscow mayor, Yuri Luzhkov: 
die former Security Council secretary’. 
Alexander Lebed; the Communist Party 
leader, Gennadi Zyuganov, and the 
Yabloko Party leader. Grigori Yavlin- 
sky. 

■ Duma Rejects Draft Budget 

The Communist-led lower house of 
Parliament, the Stare Duma, battling 
Mr. Yeltsin over economic reforms, re- 
jected the government’s draft budget at 
its first reading on Thursday, Reuters 
reported from Moscow. 

But, in a concession, the Duma voted 
to send the draft to a joint government- 
Parliament commission, which will re- 
work; it return it to the chamber for a 
second reading. 


Belarus Frees 
Reporter but 
Plans Trial 


l' nijTlrJ In Onr Suit Firm, Otff Mk'kj 

MINSK. Belarus — One day after 
freeing a Russian television journalist 
who had spent more than two months in 
prison, the Belarussian president re- 
minded the Kremlin on Thursday that 
the reporter still would face a trial. 

1 The journalist, Pavel Sheremet, who 
-is a citizen of Belarus and a reporter for 
.Russia's ORT television network, was 
.taken in handcuffs to his apartment in 
Minsk and then freed but was told he 
.was still under investigation and should 
hot leave the country. 

- The episode has strained relations 
-between the two states to the point that 
president Boris Yeltsin had banned his 
Belarussian counterpart from visiting 
Russia until the journalist was re- 
leased. 

\ Mr. Sheremet was detained by Be- 
larussian border guards in July and ac- 
cused of illegally Hying to cross the 
border into Lithuania. 

* Mr. Sheremet, who had been filming 
a report on smuggling, denied the al- 
legation and insisted ms detention was 
'politically motivated. The journalist, 
whose reports were critical of President 
Alexander Lukashenko’s autocratic 
government, was kept in a provincial 
jail as Russia and Belarus traded snubs 
and insults. 

I The case assumed considerable im- 
portance in Moscow after Russian au- 



Papon, Feeling 111, Is Helped 
From Bordeaux Courtroom 


VialflUmMItaKD 

Pavel Sheremet, center, a reporter for Russian television, hogging his 
father and wife in his apartment in Minsk after he was released from jaiL 


thorities demanded that Mr. Lukashen- 
ko order Mr. Sheremet freed. 

Ou the surface, it seemed that the case 
could easily have been worked out Be- 
larus and Russia have signed a largely 
symbolic agreement on integrating the 
two stares. There has also been spec- 
ulation about an actual merger, spurred 
by nationalistic resentment over the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 
decision to expand. 

But the talk of harmony quickly 
faded. Mr. Lukashenko was intent on 
demonstrating his independence, and 
many Russian officials said the cost of 
merging with Belarus's unreformed 
economy would simply be too great. 


The ill feeling reached a peak last 
week when Mr. Yeltsin refused to allow 
Mr. Lukashenko’s aircraft to land in 
Russia, forcing the Belarussian pres- 
ident to cancel a visit to two Russian 
cities. 

Mr. Lukashenko retaliated by saying 
that Mr. Yeltsin had violated an un- 
derstanding that the case not be raised 
publicly and cast the Russian president 
as a doddering old man. 

But in an interview to be published in 
Sobesednik, a Russian weekly, excerpts 
from which were released by Interfax on 
Thursday, Mr. Lukashenko said he 
hoped to remain friends with Mr. 
Yeltsin despite the incident. ( AP.NYT ) 


CmfOedln Oar Sufi Fnmt Dtspacka 

BORDEAUX — Maurice Papon, 87, 
felt “slightly ill” and had to be helped 
out of court Thursday during the second 
day of his trial for wartime crimes 
against humanity, his lawyer said. 

The lawyer, Jean-Marc Varaut, said 
Mr. Papon, who underwent a triple- 
bypass operation last year, had had trou- 
ble breathing in the not courtroom and 
had taken heart medication. 

The coart session was suspended, but 
Mr. V araut said later that Mr. Papon was 
feeling better and had agreed that the 
proceedings could resume. 

Mr. Papon has been charged with 
ordering me arrests of more than 1.500 
Jews, including more than 200 children, 
by the Bordeaux police between 1942 
and 1944, while he was an official in 
Fiance’s Vichy government. The Jews 
were handed over to the occupying Ger- 
mans and nearly all died at Auschwitz. 

Earlier in the day, the court heard 
testimony from two medical experts that 
Mr. Papon suffered from heart pain and 
should spend his ni^its in a hospital 
rather than in a prison. Defendants 
charged with serious crimes are nor- 
mally kept in prison during their trials. 

Judge Jean-Louis Castagnede read 
out the report by a heart specialist, Jean- 
Paul Broustiet, and a colleague, 
Stephane Chatenoir, who had examined 
Mr. Papon at the judge's request The 
doctors said Mr. Papon required con- 
stant medical attention, which was not 
available in the Gradignan prison out- 


side Bordeaux where he has spent two 
nights. 

A decision on whether to grant bail to 
Mr. Papon, a former French cabinet 
minis ter, was deferred. An assize court 
will give its decision Friday on whether 
to free him on bail or commit him to a 
guarded hospital. 

Mr. Varaut urged the court to set his 
client free on bail, arguing that Mr. 
Papon could not adequately prepare his 
defense while in detention, even in a 
hospital. 

Mr. Papon, spe akin g in a clear, firm 
voice, said he wanted to ‘ ‘work with his 
lawyers without having to suffer the 
unbearable weight of detention. ” 

Mr. Varaut told the court: “This goes 
to show that human rights depend on 
who is involved. Even in hospital, the 
jury would be prejudiced against him 
because he is already in detention.” 

The lawyer also claimed that con- 
ditions in the Gradignan prison were 
“inhumane.” Prisoners there have kept 
Mr. Papon awake at night with shouts of 
“Put mm to death ! ” 

Mr. VarautpLans to argue that the trial 
violates Mr. Papon’s human rights be- 
cause no direct witnesses — his su- 
periors and subordinates at the Bor- 
deaux prefecture or contemporaries in 
the police — are still alive. The court 
will, however, hear testimony from 
Jews who escaped police raids or the 
surviving children of victims, caking 
into account deportation orders signed 
by Mr. Papon. (Reuters, AFP) 


Book on ^3 Killing 
Troubles Chirac 

PARIS — President Jacques 
Chirac on Thursday urged strict ap-‘ 
plication of the law in a major scan- 
dal over a book accusing two 
former cabinet ministers of order- 
ing the 1 993 killing of a member or 

Parliament 

Newspapers said the charges 
were ihe most serious against 
politicians in decades and were a 
direct attack on the French military , 
which the book said was involved 
in the killing. 

“What’s at stake is the proper 
working of our democracy and the 
rule of law.” Mr. Chirac said in a 
statement, according to his spokes- 
woman. (Reuters) 

Ex-Hostage Found 
Dead in Germany 

BERLIN — A desperate search 
for a young man who was kid- 
napped almost four weeks ago 
ended Thursday when the police 
said they had found his decom- 
posed body in a hole in the woods 
north of Berlin. 

Authorities said 20-year-old 
Matthias Hintze apparently died 
from starvation three weeks ago in 
the shaft 

One of two suspects arrested 
Tuesday confessed and led police 
to the body Wednesday night, the 
prosecutor Hans-Dieter Bamler 
said in Potsdam. f AP ) 

Call for Measures 
To Help Save Fish 

ATHENS — Environmental 
groups Thursday urged a pan- 
Mediterranean fisheries body to 
adopt urgent measures to sustain 
fish populations and save what they 
called a traditional industry 
threatened with extinction. 

Greenpeace and the World Wide 
Fund for Nature said that they had 
rallied another 39 nongovernment- 
al groups to push for tougher mea- 
sures from the General Fisheries 
Council of tiie Mediterranean, 
which meets in Rome on Monday. 

At tiie meeting, the council will 
decide whether to adopt control 
mechanisms to enforce its de- 
cisions, which for decades have 
been nonbinding. (Reuters) 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 




INTERNATIONAL 


k. 


# New Study Alleges 
Congo Massacres 
By Kabila Forces 


By Barbara Grossette 

Ne w Yort Times Service 

UNITED] NATIONS, New 
rone — a report by two hu- 
™n^hts organizations says 
there is irrefutable evidence 
. that President Laurent Kab- 
ua s troqps in Congo have 
•oiled large numbers of d- 
v *han refugees since last fell, 
and that killings continue. 

The report, published 
Inursday by H uman Rights 
Watch/Africa in New York 
and tire 1 International Feder- 
' ahon of Human Rights 
Leagues in Paris, included 
some of the first pictures of 
bodies in one area where 1 ,700 


youpie, many ot mem women 
and children, appear to have 
been bludgeoned to death. 

Unlike most previous re- 
ports, this one, titled “What 
Kabila Is Hiding: Ci vilian 
Killings and Im punity in 
Congo,’* included names of 
officers who could be iden- 
tified in areas where mas- 
sacres took place. 

Since Aon l, Mr. Kabila has 
blocked UN efforts to inves- 
tfi i tig ate several' sites in Congo-, 
V fonnerly Zaire, where thou- 
sands of Hutu refugees from 
Rwanda and many Congolese 
are thought to have been 
killed. 

The report came as the 
United Nations is preparing 
to send high-level envoys to 
Congo to persuade Mr. Kab- 
ila to allow investigation of 
suspected massacre sites. 

It charges that Rwandan 
forces were heavily involved 
in atrocities and blames the 
United States for giving 
Rwanda's government, 
which backed Mr. Kabila, die 
impression that Washington 
if . would not look too closely at 
f}| ' what Rwandan troops did in 
the battle to onst die late Pres- 
ident Mobutu Sese Seko from 
Zaire. 

UN officials said that Sec- 
retary-General Kofi Annan 
had given the United States 
two weeks to win access for 
his investigators. 

The report is largely die 
work of Scott Campbell, a 
consultant who lived in 


“Refugee men, women 
'and children who were too 
weak or sick to flee were 
killed by the first units” of die 
forces of Mr. Kabila and his 
Rwandan Tutsi allies, Mr. 
Campbell wrote. For three 
days die killings continued, 
refugees said, with Mr. Kab- 
ila’s troops using knives, ma- 
chetes or bayonets. 

Bodies were left lying to 
decompose in groups of up to 
40 or 50, or were buried in 
mass graves. In one village, 
where UN officials thought as 
many as 30,000 refugees had 
gathered, hundreds of bodies 
were found. 

■ Uganda Backs Congo 

President Yoweri Musev- 
eni of Uganda on Thursday 
defended Mr. Kabila’s objec- 
tions to a UN probe into al- 
leged killings and chided Sec- 
retary-General Annan for bis 
approach, Reuters reported 
from Kampala. 

Mr. Museveni, speaking at 
celebrations attended by 
President Benjamin Mkapa of 
Tanzania to mack Ugandan 
independence day, said the 
UN investigation must start 
with the genocide in Rwanda 
in 1994 before covering Mr. 
Kabila's seven-month rebel- 
lion. 


30 Groups Deemed 
Terrorist by U.S. 


By Steven Erianger 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Under 
a congressional mandate, the 
State Department has desig- 
nated 30 groups as foreign 
terrorist organizations, mak- 
ing it illegal to provide funds 
for them and denying their 
members visas. 

While a wide "range of 
Middle Eastern and South 
American groups are on the 
list, it does not include the 
Irish Republican Army be- 
cause the IRA announced an 
“unequivocal cease-fire” 10 
weeks ago and because its 
political wing, Sinn Fein, had 
begun peace talks on North- 
ern Ireland, officials said. 

The IRA will remain “un- 
der active review,” said a 
State Department spokes- 
man, James Rubin. “Any re- 
sumption of violence by the 
IRA is totally unacceptable to 
the United States and would 
have a direct impact on the 
ongoing review.” 

Officials said the IRA had 
become an issue only in the 
last 10 days, when it was de- 
cided, after a vigorous debate 
pitting political considerations 
against intelligence concerns, 
not to include the group. 

A spokesman for the British 
Embassy said London “un- 
derstands the logic of the de- 
cision" to omit the IRA, de- 
spite its history of terrorism. 
Mr. Rubin’s warning that a 
resumption of violence would 
cause an immediate review, 
he said, could add pressure on 
it to maintain the cease-fire. 

OS. law makes it a crime to 
provide fends or other material 
support to the groups named 
Wednesday, denies visas to 
' ‘aliens abroad who are mem- 
bers or representatives” of the 
groups and requires American 
financial institutions to block 
fends under their control that 
belong to the groups. 

But Mr. Rubin said. “The 
goal of this law was more de- 
terrence than confiscation.” 

While publication of fee list, 
as required by the 1996 Anti- 
Terrorism Act, brought praise 
from many groups, including 
the Anti-Defamation League, 
questions were raised about 
the constitutionality of punish- 
ing individuals for supporting 
the groups’ lawful activities. 

Support for terrorism is 
already illegal in the United 


States, and fee Supreme 
Court has rejected efforts to 
punish individuals “for as- 
sociating wife or supporting a 
group unless it can Ire proved 
feat fee person specifically in- 
tended to further feat group’s 
illegal activities,” said David 
Cote, a law professor at Geor- 
getown University. 

He also cited a July 10 rul- 
ing by the 9th U.S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals in San Ban- 
cisco, in a case in which he is 
defending immigrants who 
provided support for fee Pop- 
ular Front for The Liberation 
of Palestine. The court rejec- 
ted a government argument 
that there is no First Amend- 
ment right to raise funds fora 
terrorist organization. 

Houeida Saad, fee legal di- 
rector die American- Arab 
Anti-Discrimination Com- 
mittee also noted feat laws 
exist to punish terrorism. 

“Criminalizing political 
activity is a dangerous in- 
fringement on the efforts of 
people throughout the world to 
improve their lives,” he said. 

Many of fee Middle East- 
ern groups have already been 
banned from fund raising in 
fee United States and have had 
their assets here seized under 
an executive order signed by 
President Bill Clinton in 1995 
and renewed since then. 

These were the organiza- 
tions on the list 

ALGERIA — Aimed Islamic Group 
CAMBODIA— Khmer Rouge 
CHILE — Maruiel Rodriguez Patri- 
otic Front Dissidents 

COLOMBIA — National Liberation 
Army; CotomWoi RenMkmarf Aimed 
Forces 

EGYPT— HO* War 
GREECE — RavoitlfiOMty OiQarri- 
zatlan 17 November;. Revolutionary 
Peoptrt Strode 

IRAN — Islamic Group; Mujahidin 
Khalq 

ISRAEL— Kudu Katnne Um 
JAPAN— Japanese Red Array; Aum 
SNnrikra 

PERU — S Wrung Path; Tupac Am- 
aru Revolutionary Movement 

PAKISTAN — Hflrskat ut-Aiw 
(Supporter* Movement) 

PHILIPPINES— Abu Sayyof Group 
TURKEY — Kunxsh Worn n Party; 
RewhJttoncry Pwpte'* iteration 
Party-Frart 

SPAIN — ETA (Basque Homeland 
and Liberty) 

SRI LANKA — Liberation Tigers of 
Tamil Edam 

The toflowing groups operating (n me 
Meddle Scat: Abu NkSal Group; Demo- 
cratic Front for the Liberation of P «- 
estfne-Hmrotmeh Focftorc Mamie Re- 
ilitarice Movement (Homos); Palestine 
Islamic Holy Wor-Shaqaql Faction; Pal- 
estine LRwrollon Fronwuni AM»as Fac- 
tion; HezboHah; Popular Front tor the 
Liberation of Palestine; Popular Front 
for the Liberation of Potesfine-Generol 
Cammand. 


Congo for three years and 
used his network of Con- 
golese friends and local rights 
groups to move around fee 
country for six weeks in July 
and August, avoiding govern- 
ment troops. 

Using information from 
rights and relief organizations 
and from fee United Nations, 
which has compiled a list of 
more than 200 possible mas- 
sacre sites, Mr. Campbell 
settled for two weeks in a 
cluster of three villages in 
western Congo to which 
refugees from camps farther 
east had fled. 

“What we’ve come back 
wife is a smaU piece, but it’s 
irrefutable evidence of what 
was happening,” Mr. Camp- 
bell said in an interview. 
“There is no question what 
happened in those three little 










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Algerian Army Finds 
20 Bodies in a Well 


f&Si 


1 ...A**. Afotnaz nin 

When You Hear the Whistle Blowing 

A group of children linked together playing at choo-cboo train in tbe Iranian countryside outside of Tehran on 
Thursday. With almost half its citizens under the age of 20, Iran has one of the youngest populations in fee world. 


CMQQedtyOwSrofFitmDUpiBcha 

PARK — A well crammed 
wife at least 20 bodies of kid- 
napped 'civilians was found 
by Algerian security forces 
advancing on Muslim rebels 
south of Algiers, an Algerian 
daily reported Thursday. 

"Die newspaper, A1 
Khabar, said fee well was in 
Ouled AlleL, where troops and 
other forces have been be- 
sieging members of fee rad- 
ical Aimed Islamic Group for 
nearly two weeks. 

“According to some 
sources, the number of bodies 
is between 20 and 40, includ- 
ing women.” the paper said. 

Rebels have kidnapped 
hundreds of women, used 
them for sex and later lolled 
than, according to residents 
and security sources quoted 
by Algerian newspapers. 

“Access to the well has 
been mined,” the paper said. 
“Civil protection workers 
have already brought out sev- 
eral corpses.” It added that it 
was feared more mass graves 
could be found in Ouled Al- 
lel, which rebels have used os 
a base since 1994. 


Many local people or trav- 
elers have been kidnapped in 
their homes or al false road- 
blocks ser up by fundamen- 
talists. The road through th 4 
region was closed for a long 
time because of the danger, j 

Ai Khabar reported feat 34 
women had been kidnapped 
during a massacre in ErRaisJ 
in Blida Province, in late An* 
gust, when fee authorities 
said 98 people were killed. . 

Tbe mili tary was pursuing 
its assault on the Aimed ‘Is? 
lamic Group in the Ouled Al* 
Id region and has lolled twq 
of fee fundamentalist guer- 
rilla’s emirs, or leaders, iden-j 
tiffed as Beggas and 
Laazraoui, as welfas a score 
of their fighters, a senior of- 
ficer said. 

In a rare move, the army 
has allowed journalists to ob- 
serve its offensive against fee 
fundamentalists at Ouled Al- 
leL, backed up by tanks and 
helicopter p un shin s. A wom- 
an captured by the troops said 
Emir Laazraoui had planned 
and led the massacre on Sept 
22 of more than 200 villagers 
in Bentalha. (Reuters, AFP) 


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PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


i ,1*1 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Herald 


liYTERIVATIOiNAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMM \ND THK wVMinsr.im rWT 


It’s Fundamentally About Power , Not Religion 

, _ . _ Hnwn fo ancient hatreds, ethnic it 


Get on Trade’s Side 


Wh3t will likely be the key trade bill 
of President Bill Clinton's second term 
is approaching a crucial juncture. The 
Senate Finance Committee has ap- 
proved a version with strong bipartisan 
support: the House Ways and Means 
Committee is considering its own vari- 
ant. But it is by no means dear that 
Congress will reconcile the two and 
complete work on so-called fast-crack 
legislation this year. Such a failure 
could doom its prospects, given the 
approaching election and the strong 
emotions generated by the bill. “1 fear 
if we do not get it done this year/' says 
the Ways and Means chairman. Bill 
Archer, “we may not get it in this 
century/ ' That would be bad news for 
the U.S. economy. 

The heat of the debate may be sur- 
prising. given that what is at stake is a 
procedural bill. Fast-track legislation 
allows the president to negotiate trade 
agreements and then bring them back 
to Congress Tor an up-or-down vote, 
rather than have them be amended and 
picked at. Without such assurance, no 
other government would embark on a 
complex, time-consuming negotiation. 
So Congress is not voting here on any 
specific trade agreement But without 
this bill there won’t be any measures 
opening other nations* markets to U.S. 
goods. Congress has given this au- 
thority to every president since Gerald 
Ford, usually without much fanfare. 

. This year the debate has become a 
lightning rod for the anxiety many 
people feel about the growing inter- 
connectedness of the world economy. 
Many Democrats and -labor unions 
want to stop fast-track in its tracks, 
because thev believe that trade only 


serves to take jobs away from Amer- 
ican workers. They would allow new 
trade agreements only with countries 
that promise to meet high labor and 
environmental standards — promises 
that could be enforced by means of 
trade sanctions. In response to this 
demand, some Republicans would es- 
sentially bar the president from even 
discussing labor and environmental 
matters in trade talks. 

Both extreme views are wrong. For 
the most part, trade leads to job cre- 
ation, not job loss; and the best way to 
promote higher wages in poor coun- 
tries is to promote trade and the 
prosperity it can bring. But there are 
also times when labor and the envir- 
onment are properly subjects of in- 
ternational negotiation: most nations 
have agreed, after all. to bar child labor 
and other abuses. The Senate bill re- 
cognizes as much when it cites as a 
legitimate goal of negotiations pre- 
venting other countries from lowering 
their standards — whether in labor law 
enforcement or health, safety' and en- 
vironmental regulation — in order to 
inhibit U.S. exports or unfairly attract 
U.S. investment. 

The arithmetic of trade on Capitol 
Hill is pretty dear Republicans will be 
key to passage, but they can’t do it 
without some Democratic votes. As a 
result, it is encouraging that some 
House Republicans may be willing to 
compromise a bit. The differences in 
approach now are minute compared 
with the damage the United States 
would suffer if no bill were passed and 
the country were relegated to the side- 
lines of global trade politics. 

— 77/E UASHIXGTOX PCS l 


A New Mideast Start? 


No one expected the botched Israeli 
assassination attempt against a Hamas 
leader in Jordan to help revitalize peace 
talks with the Palestinians, but that 
seems to have happened. On Wednes- 
day. Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin 
Netanyahu, and the Palestinian leader. 
Yasser Arafat, held their first face-to- 
face meeting in eight months. 

To appease King Hussein's anger 
over the assassination attempt, Israel 
had already released Sheikh Ahmed 
Yassin, the founder and religious lead- 
er of Hamas, from prison. Sheikh 
Yassin has now returned to Gaza, 
where he may well start putting new 
pressures on Mr. Arafat to toughen his 
negotiating demands on Israel. 

This combination of events — Is- 
raeli embarrassment over the attempt- 
ed assassination and Sheikh Yassin’s 
re-emergence on the scene — seems to 
have jolted Mr. Netanyahu and Mr. 
Arafat into a starker appreciation of the 


Bank and Gaza and theuprooling of all 
Jewish settlements. 

It is therefore encouraging to see Mr. 
Netanyahu and Mr. Arafat talking 
again. When Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright visited the Middle 
East last month, she tried unsuccess- 
fully to get Mr. Arafat to commit to 
unconditional cooperation with Israel 
on security issues and Mr. Netanyahu 
to agree to a “time-out” on expanding 
Jewish housing in Jerusalem and the 
occupied territories. Now, in the af- 
termath of the assassination fiasco and 
its attendant political damage to both 
sides, there is every reason to face the 
larger issues of peace and address Mrs. 
Albright’s original requests. 

It is just possible that this week’s 
visible strengthening of Hamas re- 
minded Israeli leaders that Mr. Arafat, 
flawed though he is. still represents 


their only available negotiating part- 
ner. The same events may also have 


dangers that lie before them. 

! While Sheikh Yassin’s public re- 


. while bheiKn > assin s public re- 
marks have so fair been mild, he en- 
visions no more than a temporary truce 
with Israel — and that only if Israel 
agrees to meet his maximalist demands 
for full Palestinian rule in the West 


ner. The same events may also have 
focused Mr. Arafat’s attention on the 
need to stop posturing and deliver tan- 
gible results to his constituents. It has 
been a roller-coaster week, but it is 
ending with hopes of a new beginning 
toward Israeli-Palesunian peace. 

— THLXEH YORK TIMES 


Key Irish Players 


• The success so far of peace talks in 
Nonhem Ireland is die achievement of 
many different groups, but two figure 
prominently in the effort They" are 
small Protestant panics, the Progres- 
sive Unionist Party and the Ulster 
Democratic Party. Both grew out of 
violent paramilitary organizations and 
lire led largely by men who have served 
time in prison. Their members and 
leaders are not pan of Northern Ire- 
land’s white-collar class that has dom- 
inated Protestant politics. All these 
factors could have helped tie (he two 
panics to violence, but instead have 
increased their commitment to peace. 

■ The panies began as armed groups 
formed lo protect working-class Prot- 
csiaiit neighborhoods from IRA vio- 
lence. Tins protection often took the 
form of bombings, shootings and bett- 
ings. David Ervine, leader of the PUP. 
served five years in jail for possession 
of explosives. His colleague Billy 
Hutchinson served 15 years for driving 
the getaway car for a gang that 
inurdcred two Catholics. 

■ Prison gave them lime to think. They 
became angry' at Nonhem Ireland's 
iraditional Protestant leadership, 
which many felt was using the working 
class as cannon fodder. “They weren't 
leading us to better rimes, just holding 
onto wlwt they had, thinking they 
didn't liave to do anything,” Mr. 
Ervine says. The need for peace was 


more palpable to residents of their 
neighborhoods, devastated by violence 
and loss of jobs, than to many tra- 
ditional political leaders. 

When the IRA called a cease-fire in 
1994. the loyalist groups replied with 
one of their own. The man who an- 
nounced it. Gusty Spence, founded the 
first Protestant paramilitary in 1966 
but became a convert to peace while in 
prison. He offered “abject and true 
remorse’’ to the relatives of ail the 
victims — an apology that has yet to be 
heard from the IRA. The loyalist 
groups have formally maintained their 
cease-fire to this day, although they are 
widely believed to be behind un- 
claimed killings of Catholics. 

The two panies now hold seats in the 
peace talks, which are going better than 
many dared hope. AH sides are now 
present. The widespread fear was that 
the refusal of violent groups to turn 
over their weapons would block ail 
progress. But negotiators passed right 
over the issue, agreeing to aim Tor 
disarmament but to deal with it only as 
the talks proceed. The rwo small loy- 
alist groups are influential in no small 
pan because they hold most of the 
Protestant guns and can always 
threaten to resume hostilities. But their 
recent history and many points of 
agreement with the Catholic nation- 
alists are reason for optimism. 

— THE VE» YORK TIMES 


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P ADUA. Italy — In speaking about 
the Mediterranean in particular and 
Muslim-Western relations in general, 
clarity would be served by doing away 
with the words fundamentalism and 
fundamentalist. Their use promotes 
stereotypes and misrepresents political 
struggles as religious conflicts. • 

, That comment follows from a dis- 
cussion in Padua on Tuesday among 
Muslim and Western scholars at a 
meeting organized by the Community 
of Sant* Egidio. The Community is an 
ecumenical Catholic Jay group, borp of 
the intellectual and religious ferment of 
the ’60s, which two years ago managed 
to bring the factions in Algeria, the 
government excepted, to agree on a 
platform for dialogue. 

The talks that followed continued for 
a year and a half but ultimately failed, 
as Algeria sank more deeply into the 
horror of its internal struggles. The 
Community's earlier peace efforts 
from 1990 to 1992 in Mozambique had 
been a success, ending a 16-year war. 
The group is active in other contem- 
porary conflicts, concerned with cla- 
rification as well as mediation. 

An American scholar, Thomas 
Michel, noted at the Padua forum that 
as a religious phenomenon fundament- 
alism is specifically American. It was 
an .American Protestant movement 
early in this century protesting against 


By William Pfaff 


liberal theology and the influence on 
Protestantism of secularism and Dar- 
winism. It defended, and defends today, 
literal interpretation of the Bible. 

The Muslim movements called fun- 
damentalist are theocratic. They want 
to install governments ruled by strict 

■ . J w ■ l: 


c ommitting the atrocities are acting for 
political motives. They are trying to 
seize power, or keep it Some are acting 
for an even more basic reason, greed. 
Algeria is rich in oil and natural gas. 
The government controls those re- 
sources. The struggle is for wealth. 

Power and wealth are linked, and the 
gover nm ent is reliably reported to be 
divided in the struggle for power and 
control of the country’s wealth. The 


down to ancient hatreds, ethnic rival* 
ries. national character or even an al- 
leged Islamic disposition to violence 
(hard to sustain, one might think, in 
view of Christian Europe’s record in 
the matter), we don’t have to give fur- 
ther thought to them. Nothing need be 
tried since nothing can be done. 

To say that does not imply that doing 
something is simple. It is not apparent 
what international action can accom- 
plish. The Italian, Spanish and French 


interpretations of Koranic teachings, control of the country s wealth. The wmu 
They night also be called "mtegrist," insurgent groups are also divided. A 

a word used in the past in Europe to (necessarily) anonymous Algerian governments last week made an appeal 
describe Catholics who believedfoat journalist, writing in a French weekly, for ^ new ofrerof 


Catholicism should be a state religion. 

This Padua panel included an Al- 
gerian professor of Muslim dogma at 
the University of Rabat in Morocco, as 
well as others from the Islamic wcrid 
and Europe. They agreed on the need to 
call things what they are. A murderer is 
a murderer, and a terrorist a terrorist. A 
terrorist acts for a political purpose. His 
motivation is power, not religion. He 
may be a religious fanatic, but fanat- 
icism is oot religion. 


la Algeria the complexities of the 
rible snuggle have left the outside 


terrible struggle have left the outside 
world horrified, but also inclined to 
assume that what is going on is in- 
comprehensible and in some sense col- 
lective. The blame lies on “Algeria,” 
or Islam. It is a matter of cultural or 
national fatality. 

Yet the people who are ordering and 


identifies at least six factions. 

This journalist also writes that in 
Algeria a rich government — which 
profitably sells energy on international 
markets, deals with international fi- 
nancial agencies and foe international 
banks and oil companies, and is able to 
buy foe arms and whatever other im- 
ports it wants — rules a population 
which grows steadily more impover- 
ished and desperate. 

Thousands of ordinary people have 
been atrociously massacred since a na- 
tional election was annulled in 1991, 
when it seemed that foe military gov- 
ernment would be defeated. 

People have assigned a nebulous re- 
sponsibility to ethnicity, history or cul- 
ture when trying td explain conflicts in 
Yugoslavia. Rwanda,’ Somalia and 
elsewhere. If these affairs can be put 


mediation, rejected by foe Algerian au- 
thorities as an interference in their 
country’s internal affairs. An earlier 
attempt at international intervention by 
foe United Nations’ Kofi Annan met 
foe same fate. 

The Sant* Egidio group is continuing 
its private peace efforts, mainly 
Through its religious contacts. It is not 
optimistic. But a religious group can 
afford to go on in discouraging cir- 
cumstances because it believes that the 
ultimate outcome is not in human 
bands. Even when nothing else seems 
to work, it can always pray. 

That is how foe Sant’ Egidio con- 
ference ended, with Muslims as well as 
Buddhists, Hindus, Jews and Chris- 
tians doing foe praying. 

International Herald Tribune 
© Liu Angeles Times Syndicate. 


What Kind 


W ASHINGTON — An 
American-Israeli educa- 


yv American-Israeli educa- 
tional institution recently in- 
vited me tb deliver a lecture at 
its upcoming gala dinner, but 
the lecture offer came with an 
unusual condition. It said my 
speech on Arab- Israeli affairs 
had to end on an uplifting note. 
There was a time when people 
didn’t wony about that; now it 
has to be written into the con- 
tract I declined. 

A few days later a rabbi 
friend told me that at this time 
when Conservative and Re- 
form Jews were under attack 
by ultra -Orthodox elements in 
Israel, he didn’t know what be 
should say in his annual Yom 
Kippur appeal for Israel 
Bonds. Meanwhile, virtually 
every Jewish Federation in 
America is now debating how 
much of its donations it should 
keep for local institutions and 
how much it wants to keep 
sending to Israel. 

I cannot recall a time of 


of Israel Do American Jews Want to Be Assisting? 

By Thomas L. Friedman IS? “ EtffiS ST "t SStata 


greater disquiet among main- 
stream American Jews over 
the drift of events in IsraeL It is 
for the same reason many Is- 
raelis are distressed — foe 
dashed hopes of foe Oslo peace 
process, combined with the 
rising tension between reli- 
gious and nonreligious Jews, 
all happening under an Israeli 
leadership that has more in 
common with Larry, Moe and 
Curly than with David Ben- 
Gurion, Menachem Begin and 
Yitzhak Rabin. 

Both in Israel and in the 
United States there is a deep- 
ening concern that Israel today 


do: Look beyond the current 
leadership, take the long view 
and build institutions and con- 
stituencies that reflect their 
values by giving money in a 


very targeted way. 

And the first rule of giving 


money to general pools where 
it has no real political or re- 
ligious impact 
There is a struggle going on 
now for Israel’s religioos and 
political soul, and if you want 
foe winner to be those forces 
that support tolerance, plural- 
ism. democracy, the Oslo 


money to Israel is this: Never peace. Reform, Conservative 
give to any charity or ins ti- and modern Orthodox Juda- 


tution in Israel that isn’t build- 
ing an Israel you would want 
your own children to live in. 

Say what you want about the 
right-wing magnate Irving 


ism, then you have to invest 
directly in their institutions 
and people. 

I am talking about the New 
Israel Fund, the Israel Policy 


Moskowhz, but he puts his Forum, foe Jerusalem Demo- 
mooey where his mouth is. He cracy Institute, Peace Now, 


doesn’t send blank checks. He 
gives to ultra-Orthodox ye- 


is led by people who have no ' shivas and ultra-hard-line 
clear vision and no courage to politicians to build their vision 


stand up to the religious and 
political extremists bent on 
driving Israel over a cliff. 

What to do? Well, unless 
you move to Israel and become 
an Israeli voter, moderates 
have to do what the extremists 


of Israel — a vision that will 
only increase Jewish tensions 
and Arab- Jewish ones. • 


Seeds of Peace, Naamat Wom- 
en and the ADL’s tolerance 
project — as well as grassroots 
institutes that are trying to pro? 
mote a Judaism and politics 
which embrace modernity, like 
the Shalom Hartman Institute 


.But the new generation of and high' schools, foe Pardes 


American Jews is either grow- 
ing alienated from Israel, and 
drifting away, or giving its 


Institute, Oranim, Elul, the 
Conservative Masorti Move- 
ment and the Reform Hebrew 


Union College in Jerusalem. 

The White House knows 
there is a new mood out there 
among American Jews. Mel- 
vin Salberg, the thoughtful 
new chairman, of the Confer- 
ence of Presidents of Major 
American Jewish Organiza- 
tions, told Bill Clinton on 
Monday that American Jews 
want him to press both Yasser 
Arafat and Benjamin Netan- 
yahu to do what is needed to 
restore the peace process. 

A poll just commissioned by 
foe pro-peace Israel Policy 
Forum found that 84 percent of 
U.S. Jews believe America 
should “pressure” both sides 
to be more constructive, and 79 
percent favor a “time-out” in 
Israeli settlement activity. 

This Friday, Jews gather for 
Yom Kippur, a day dedicated 
not only to atonement but to 
the possibility of change. But 
change doesn’t happen on its 
own. It has to be willed. 

The New Yurk Tunes. 


Blame the Southeast Asian Turmoil on Information Deficits 


H ong kong — stop 

blaming speculators for 


1 1 blaming speculators for 
Southeast Asian financial mar- 
ket turmoil. Look instead at 
some failures of the Information 
Age as the IMF is brought in to 
help a country, Indonesia, on 
. which it has lavished praise. 

• As in Gresham’s Law on 
money, bad information drives 
out good and is much more 
damaging than no information. 

• The volume of information 
drowns important items in a sea 
of minutiae. Observers count 
trees and overlook the wood. ’ 

• People believe what they 
want, regardless of data. 

The International Monetary 
Fund and the World Bank may 
be as blameworthy as foe cen- 
tral banks that believed in their 
own wisdom, the foreign banks 
that threw money at the Asian 
“miracle.” the local companies 
which forgot that even fast- 
growing economies have busi- 


By Philip Bowling 


ness cycles, and foe economists 
and journalists (this one in- 
clud«I) who observed the icing 
but did not try foe cake. 

The systemic shocks in the 
region can be attributed to late 
receipt of information. There 
has been an element of hysteria 
but it was in reaction to a sadden 
awakening to reality. 

When the Thai baht col- 
lapsed in July, it was widely 
commented by many (including 
myself) that the disease would 
not spread to other countries in 
the region. They had smaller 
current account deficits, relied 
more on direct in vestment, had 
smaller short-term foreign cur- 
rency debt and more flexible 
exchange rates. 

In practice that has turned out 
to be only part of the picture. 
Thai private foreign debt was 
mostly visible, as it was mostly 


financed by participants in foe 
Bangkok International Banking 
Facility. Data on its onshore 
lending was published monthly. 
But elsewhere a very different 
story has emerged. 

Indonesia is the most obvious 
case. According to a World 
Bank report issued, in May, 
private sector foreign debt had 
risen by about $17 billion in the 
preceding two years but total 
external debt increased by a 
much smaller amount The situ- 
ation seemed comfortable 
enough. But it has turned out 
that Indonesian companies, by- 
passing foe local h anking sys- 
tem, had borrowed perhaps 
twice as much as was assumed. 

Much of this was not hedged, 
because of an assumption that 
the exchange rate was predict- 
able. Since it proved not to be, 
foe rupiah collapse soon fed on 


Mahathir- Quixote Does Have a Point 


K uala lumpur — A fter 
nearlv three 'years of un- 


XV nearly three 'years of un- 
precedented popularity at home. 
Prime Minister Mahathir bin 
Mohamad has seen his repu- 
tation take a beating in the busi- 
ness community. This is be- 
cause of rhetoric that in the past 
lilted his stature in developing 
countries — his bold, almost 
quixotic tilting against foe wind- 
mills of Western dominance. 

Rather than analyze the con- • 
sequences of international fi- 
nancial liberalization, Mr. Ma- 
hathir has been railing against 
George Soros, foe American 
financier, for allegedly leading 
a speculative assault that has 
undermined foe currencies of 
Malaysia and several other 
Southeast Asian countries. He 
recently said that currency trad- 
ing was “unnecessary, unpro- 
ductive and immo ral,’* and 
should be "made illegal.** 

His call for an end to in- 
ternational foreign exchange 
markets and currency specula- 
tion only seemed to confirm Mr. 
Soros’s claim that he had be- 
come a "menace to his own 


By Jomo K.S. 


what has actually been happen- 
ing. Not surprisingly, Mr. Soros 


country” because “interfering 
with foe convertibility of capital 
at a moment like this is a recipe 
for disaster." The value of foe 
Malaysian ringgit and stocks 
has plunged each time foe prime 
minister has advanced his rad- 
ical remedy. 

By accusing Mr. Soros of us- 
ing financial power to manip- 
ulate Southeast Asian curren- 
cies for profit, while offering no 
real evidence for such a con- 
spiracy theory, Mr. Ma hathir 
Iras obscured understanding of 


ing. Not surprisingly, Mr. Soros 
accuses him of trying to deflect 
attention from his own econom- 
ic mismanagement. 

Still, foe same Mr. Soros re- 
cently said unregulated expan- 
sion of capitalism threatened to 
undermine capitalism's own fu- 
ture. He argued that excessive 
liberalization had resulted in 
virtual anarchy that was endan- 
gering the stability so necessary 
For orderly capitalist growth 
and democratic development 

The prevailing system . of 
flexible exchange rates was in- 
troduced 1971 when the United 
States withdrew unilaterally 
from foe Bretton Woods ar- 
rangement of fixed exchange 
rates, which had pegged foe dol- 
lar to gold ai $35 per ounce and 
the ringgit at three to the dollar. 

The new order has had very ’ 
mixed consequences. Under it, 
the volume of foreign exchange 
trade increased to more than 67 
times foe value of the interna- 
tional trade in goods by 1995. 

The present system is not — 
as was suggested recently by 
U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert 
Rubin — an integral and long- 
term foundation of global trade 
in goods and services. In fact, 
various critics have offered al- 
ternatives to the present system, 
including a return to fixed ex- 
change rates. 

The Nobel laureate James 
Tobin of Yale University has 
called for a modest tax on for- 
eign exchange spot transactions 


to enable national authorities to 
operate more independent mon- 
etary policies, discourage spec- 
ulative capital movements and 
increase foe relative weight of 
long-term economic nmda- 
mentals against short-term, 
speculative activity. 

Another Nobel laureate. 
Lawrence Klein, has mentioned 
two other options: regional 
monetary arrangements, and 
foe introduction of “circuit- 
breakers” into foe system — a 
suggestion also made by the 
World Bank’s chief economist, 
Joseph StiglitZ; 

But the lobby for financial 
liberalization remains much 
stronger and far more influen- 
tial, dominating most of the 
business media and key finan- 
cial institutions internationally, 
especially in foe United States. 

Nonetheless, it would be a 
pity if Mr. Mahathir 's argu- 
ments were dismissed oat of 
hand. He was raising a real 
problem, albeit incorrectly. 

The fact is that the present 
international financial system 
and its proposed liberalization 
favor those already d ominant 
and privileged in the world 
economy, at foe expense of de- 
veloping countries, especially 
those at foe poorest end of foe 
spectrum. 


itself as borrowers sought to 
cover themselves against fur- 
ther losses or shift good assets 
into safe havens. The rupiah has 
now fallen even further than the 
baht, a collapse that in no way 
reflects Indonesia’s current ac- 
count position. Malaysia is suf- 
fering from a less virulent strain 
of foe same disease. 

Meanwhile, watching foe fall 
of the Philippine peso, foe mar- 
ket has grown ever more skep- 
tical of official foreign borrow- 
ing figures and taken to reading 
the “tombstone” advertise- 
ments foot record international 
syndicated loans. 

Analysis of tombstones as 
well as official data presents a 
much more alarming picture of 
Asia in general than is available 
from official figures. Accord- 
ing to one such study, new syn- 
dications to Indonesia since 
January 1996 totaled $55 bil- 
lion, to the Philippines more 
than $25 billion, and to Malay- 
sia $15 billion. 

Hong Kong saw foe biggest 
credit binge of all — a $65 
billion leap. Although much of 
this was destined for foe main- 
land, even resereve-rich China 
saw a $25 billion rise in foreign 
syndicated loans. Cumulative 
syndicated lending to Asia (ex- 
cluding Japan) has almost 
tripled in two years. . 

The data may be very rough. 
There may be double counting 
and inclusion of rollovers of old 
loans. But there would be omis- 
sions, too, such as loans to 
Caribbean tax haven companies 


complete as to be misleading. 
Old or bad information lullet 


Old or bad information lulled 
many into a sense of security for 
which the region is now paying 
a heavy price. Timely data 
would have caused warning 
lights to shine earlier. 

Many lenders would have ig- 
nored them, as they did in Thai- 
land and are doing in Hong 
Kong today. But the debt mole- 
hill would not have become foe 
mountain that it is today. 

The corollary of open capital 
markets must be much better 
real-time information on pri- 
vate sector debt flows. The IMF 
should’ use a tiny part of its re- 
cent huge increase in resources 
to keep up with the marketplace, 
rather than record history as told 
to it by central banks. 

International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND SO YEARS AfiO 


1897: Weyler Recalled 


LONDON — General Weyler’s 
game seemed to be to pose as a 
little Cuban Napoleon, foe one 
strong man indispensable alike 
as a soldier and a statesman. It 
remained for foe' Government to 
show him confidence. Confi- 
dence had nothing to do with it, 
said Senor Sagasta, the new 
Premier. There was a change in 
policy, and it would be more 
convenient to have a man who 
agreed with foe new one. Gen- 
eral Weyler goes and Marshall 
Blanco succeeds. A name neatly 
suggesting tremendous force 
and a tabula rasa in one. 


board foreign vessels. The basis 
of the protest will be thar, while 
foe American right to maintain 
sovereignty within foe three- 
mile limit is inviolate, foe de- 
cision interferes with foe rights 
of French liners on foe high 
seas, by forcing them to adapt 
themselves to American law. 


1947: Arab Measures 


The writer, author of “South- 
east Asia’s Misunderstood Mir- 
acle," is a professor in the Ap- 
plied Economics Department ai 
the University of Malaya in 
Kuala Lumpur. He contributed 
this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


1922: French Protest 


PARIS — The French Govern- 
ment will protest at once to foe 
United States Department of 
State against the ruling of At-? 
ronipy General Daugherty con- 
cerning foe banning of foe right 
to bring intoxicating liquors on 


ALEY, Lebanon — Chief del- 
egates of ail seven Arab nations 
at die meeting of foe Council of 
the Arab League were reported 
today [Oct 9] to have agreed on 
a number of military measures 
for enforcement of Arab aims in 
Palestine, but there was no in- 
dication what these decisions 
might be or when they would 
take effect The Arab aims con- 
sist of the establishment of an 
^dependent Arab state cover- 
ing all Palestine — and for foe 
thwarting of Jewish aims for a 
Zionist state as well as thwart- 
ing partition of the country. 




1,1 1 11 


i' ^ 


1M 


that are destined for, say, a prop- 
erty development in Penang. 

Whatever the actual num- 
bers, it is foe rate of increase 
that has been astonishing. 

But surely the banks that are 
doing foe lending know about 
it? They make the loans and pay 
for foe tombstones. 

In practice, few international 
bank loan officers think stra- 
tegically. They concentrate on 
the trees (perceived individual 
credit risk), not foe wood. 
Bankers are usually better {raid 
for making than for collecting 
loans. As for foe IMF and foe 
World Bank, they naturally 
tend to use foe data provided by 
their clients the central banks. 
Even when accurate, these data 
are often so out of date or in- 


me 


' - • V : 4 . . 

• ! "• t n t 



mm 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


R4GE9 


■? 


n:- - **«** - 








* 


inn 


I Mi* 




l**“ •■i- 



; - 


Pmson Gas for an Israeli Assassination: 
What Could They Have Been Thinking? 


5"^. AS 


By Jim Hoagland 


office 


in 


walked to- 
Aznman on 


reconstruction (JUT, Oct. 9) by 
Banon Ge liman. The Washington 
political leaderin AmrnarL 2ft! Jerusale ” correspondent, 

disclosed last week. ButiuiSom f. pra ^ of P° ison on Mr- 
io be asked: Why did ffi M “l^ s sk K 
espionage service spray a lethal 
nave toxin on an Arab adversary in 
a failed murder attempt, instead of 
rcIjTng on tried and true methods? 

f7vwv*rtv” n ? likely ever lo know 
for certain. It may involve trade- 

cralt, such as increasing the 
agents chances to get away un- 
detected. Or maybe Mossad had 
constructed a cover story to deny 
there was any attack at all, hoping 
people would believe that Khaled 
Meshal . the Hamas leader, died of 
some strange disease. 

But the image is so shocking — 
the political symbolism is so clear 
— that questions shorn thic 


at questions about this choice 

This Mossad attack 
is incomprehensible, 
on the symbolic 
as well as the 
political level 

of weapon cannot be avoided: Is- 
raeli agents using a poison gas to 
eliminate a foe. Is memory so 
transient? Did technology ride 
over a psychological threshold 
one would have thought made in- 
delible by the Holocaust? 

It is fair to raise questions 
against my questions, as many 
will. Does h really make a dif- 
ference if Mr. Meshal had been 
done in with a silencer-equipped 
pistol or an expertly thrown dag- 
ger? Docs it matter more that the 
Mossad used a poison spray in- 
stead of the bombs Palestinian 
suicide artists have employed to 
(ear Israeli bodies apart in the 
streets of Jerusalem? 

Id one sense it surely makes a 
difference. Mr. Meshal would un- 
doubtedly be dead today if the 
other methods had been used. 
He was saved when King Hussein 
of Jordan, with American help, 
forced the Israelis to provide the 
antidote for the poison, which 
would have killed Mr. Meshal 
in 48 hours. 

Bui I think it makes a difference 
in a larger sense as well, a dif- 
ference pointed out by the brilliant 


ward his 
Sept. 25. 

One of the two Mossad agents 
posing as Canadian tourists "fell 
m behind Mr. Meshal as he left his 
car and extended an arm to die 
Hamas leader’s left ear. 

Prom a lead-colored instrument 

wrapped in tape came a loud pop- 
ping sound,- Mr. Meshal said and 
a shivering sensation raced down 
his spine like an electric shock.” 

The instrument disappeared 
during a car chase that ended with 
the capture of the two Israelis. 
Two hours later. Mr. Meshal was 
taken violently ill. He hovered 
near death until the antidote was 
administered. 

This attack by Mossad is in- 
comprehensible, on the symbolic 
as well as the political level. 

Some symbols are so strong 
they dictate how we act toward 
other people and even how we 
think about them. 

Who can forget the power of 
die images of Israelis forced to 
don gas masks during the Golf 
War, as Saddam Hussein 's Iraqi 
forces fired Scud missiles at their 
nation? -Who could avoid thinking 
then: Not again. It cannot be hap- 
pening again. We must not let this 
happen again. 

But here are agents of Mossad 
ready to dabble in administering 
death by poison gas, presumably 
for efficiency's sake or to try out 
new technology. . 

The two have been returned by 
Jordan in a big prisoner swap, and 
will now presumably disappear 
back into the shadows. But they 
should not be allowed to fade 
away without being asked — here 
if nowhere else — how they could 
have done this thing 

Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu has to answer the same 
question at the political level, since 
he has taken overall responsibility 
for die operation. By staging the 
attack in King Hussein’s territory, 
Mr. Netanyahu knowingly en- 
dangered his relations with the one 
Arab ruler who has genuinely 
made peace with Israel. 

Mr. Netanyahu has sought to 
make the question of the attack 
one of fighting terrorism or giving 


in to it. “The choice is either 
peace or terror,” he said Tuesday. 
3 ‘The targets we choose are just 
targets.” . 

But the truth is harsher for him. 
The best that can be said for Mr. 
Netanyahu at this point is that he 
is fighting terrorism ineptly, un- 
successfully and at an intolerable 
political price for Israel. It is not 
necessary to debate his intentions, 
or Khaled Meshal's alleged mas- 
terminding of terror operations. 

The costly failure or Israeli mil- 
itary operations into Lebanon in 
recent weeks was already eroding 
the image of Israeli intelligence as 
the supermen of the Middle East 
The debacle in Amman raises 
even more serious questions about 
die judgment, skill and sense of 
their own history displayed by Is- 
rael’s national security leaders. 

The Washington Post. 



JFK Took Special Care 
When It Mattered Most 


By Richard Reeves 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Coping With Crime 

Regarding "Japan and Its 
Economy Have a Crime Prob- 
lem" ( Opinion . Oct. 8) by 
Gregory Clark: 

I was saddened by the article. It 
is true, Japan does have a problem 
with crime. But there is no country 
on earth that does not suffer -from 
die illegal activities of gangsters. 

Most Japanese are furious over 
the recent scandals involving 
leading securities companies. 
Last month, Japanese public opin- 
ion forced a convicted bribe-taker 
from his cabinet post The Jap- 
anese do react when politicians 
make unacceptable remarks in- 
dulging the links between gang- 
sterdozn and politics, though per- 
haps not as vehemently as the 
writer would like. 

Most Japanese lead sound and 
honest lives. That is why our stan- 
dard of living has increased stead- 
ily and tremendously in die last 
several decades despite Japan's 
small size, large population and 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “ Letters 
to the Editor " and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


lack of natural resources. In Japan, 
we have a system that rewards 
those who put their faith in fairness. 
That is why we continue to work 
hard despite these scandals. 

MK3EKIYOL 

Tokyo. 

Meddling Abroad 

Regarding the New York Times 
editorial "US. Interference " and 
“ America on Its High Horse Is 
Asking for a Fair by William 
Pf off (Opinion, Oct. 2): 

The level of U.S. interference 
and unilateralism has indeed trou- 
bled many of America’s friends 
and allies, and it should be reined 
in. Common policies toward Iran 
and Libya should be hammered 
out at summit meetings, not by 
national legislators who are fo- 
cused on re-election. 

PANAYOT1S DRACOS. 

Paris. 

Art Imports and VAT 

Souren Melikian ("The Flight 
of European Heritage ” Art. Sept. 
13) rightly describes the damage 
to the European art market that 
has been caused by the decision to 
tax an imports. The British art 
market, with its long tradition of 
international trade, has been the 
main victim of the European Un- 
ion’s drive to harmonize the in- 
ternal European market 


It is an irony that while the 
countries of Europe have gone io 
great lengths to control the export 
of works of art they have created 
a tax system that discourages 
European collectors and mu- 
seums from bringing an works 
back into Europe. 

The present VAT system will 
accelerate the displacement of the 
European art market to centers 
outside the European Union. The 
European Commission is com- 
mitted to review the effect of VAT 
on the an market and repon to the 
Council of Ministers before the 
end of 1998. We must hope that 
something is done to put this mat- 
ter right before it is too late. . 

ANTHONY BROWNE. 

London. 

The writer is chairman of the 
British Art Market Federation. 

Keeping Shutters Closed 

Photographers refused to take 
pictures of the actor George 
Clooney (People. Sept. 24) to 
protest his criticism of paparazzi 
Every celebrity who is sick of the 
antics of these self-proclaimed 
"news gatherers” should insult 
their “profession” vehemently 
and publicly. If they refuse to take 
photographs in protest, so much 
the better for the world. 

PETER BLACKWOOD. 

Stuugan. 


N EW YORK — John F. 

Kennedy was a man of many 
secrets. In his private life, his char- 
acter was questionable or myster- 
ious enough that a reporter as se- 
rious as Seymour Hersh and two 
network news departments could 
fool around with fraudulent doc- 
uments “proving” the president 
was being blackmailed by Marilyn 
Monroe. In his public life, his work 
was important enough dial his de- 
cision-making during the Cuban 
missile crisis 35 years ago is still 
worthy of admiring study. 

Recently published transcripts, 
compiled in “The Kennedy 
Tapes; Inside the White House 
During the Cuban Missile Crisis,” 
show that Mr. Kennedy’s 

MEANWHILE ~ 

public “character” was more el- 
evated than his personal character 
— hot such a bad thing to those of 
us who try to be better than we 
know ourselves to be. 

Jack Kennedy was personally 
careless and impatient, so much 
so that W. AvereU Harriman es- 
timated that his attention span was 
less than seven seconds. Yet in the 
transcripts of taped White House 
meetings during the missile Crisis 
in October 1 962 the president was 
cool, careful and patient as he 
deliberated how to handle the So- 
viet threat. 

The transcripts, edited by Ern- 
est R. May and Philip D. Zelikow, 
are a wonderful read. One can feel 
the difference between the pres- 
ident and his men, especially the 
generals who were demanding in- 
vasion of Cuba. 

The first meeting of those 13 
days in October was a few minutes 
old when the president said: 
“What is the advantage? Must be 
that they're not satisfied with their 
ICBMs.” Later he said: "It makes 
than look as if they're coequal 
with us ... This is a political 
struggle as much as military.” 

He was right. The United States 
had surrounded the Soviet Union 
with a picket fence of medium- 
range missiles in Europe capable 
of reaching important targets in 
only a few minutes. Soviet inter- 
continental ballistic missiles were 
thousands of miles from targets in 
the United Stales, and their guid- 
ance systems were primitive. In 
effect, America held a loaded gun 
to die head of the Soviet Union. 


Mr. Khrushchev was willing to 
gamble that he could match the 
American advantage with medi- 
um-range missiles in Cuba aimed 
at the Americans’ “soft under- 
belly.” (At the time, most Amer- 
ican missile defenses were poin- 
ted north to detect ICBMs coming 
Over the North Pole.) 

Mr. Kennedy knew his man, a 
tough old politician. After it was 
over, and the Soviets were dis- 
mantling the Cuban missiles, die 
president said he would have tried 
the same trick if he were in Mr. 
Khrushchev’s position. 

In the 13 days of crisis after 
American spy planes spotted con- 
struction of the Cuban missile 
sites, the two leaders were ob- 
viously searching for a way out. 
Again and again Mr. Kennedy 
told his men that the object was la 
get the missiles out of Cuba but 
that the tactical goal was to "give 
Mr. Khrushchev room.” 

“I don’t want .him put in a 
comer," Mr. Kennedy said. 

On the other side of the con- 
frontation, according to Soviet 
historians. Mr. Khrushchev said: 
“We are face to face with the 
danger of war and nuclear ca- 
tastrophe. In order io save the 
world we must retreat. 

In the end, Mr. Kennedy, who 
chose a naval blockade over direct' 
military action, was surprised at 
how little the Soviet leader settled 
for in exchange for withdrawing 
the missiles: an American pledge 
not to invade Cuba, allowing Mr. 
Khrushchev to claim he saved the 
island from Yankee imperialists. 

When Mr. Kennedy turned on 
CBS News and saw" two corre- 
spondents reporting an American 
“victory," he told his press sec- 
retary, Pierre Salinger, to tell them 
to stop — which they did. 

Jack Kennedy was no saint 
President Kennedy was no fool. 
The rich boy was capable of using 
friends and strangers, then dis- 
carding them. The president was 
capable of safely guiding his 
country and the world through the 
first nuclear confrontation. 

He was among the most com- 
partmentalized of men, able to 
separate private and public, a trail 
we now seem to have lost. 


Mr. Ree\'es. the columnist and 
author of "President Kennedy: 
Profile of Power" contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


§Te 

HELLENIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS ORGANIZATION S.A. (OTE) 


Condensed Financial Statements 
Prepared under International Accounting Standards 
as of June 30, 1997 and 1996 
(In millions of Greek Drachmae) 


BALANCE SHEETS 


Assets 

Fixed Assets 

Telecommunication Property, Plant and Equipment 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 


Investments 

Other non current assets 
Detfered income tax benefits 


30.06.1997 30.06.1996 


1.507.289 

(647.320) 

1.381.353 

(537.622) 

859-969 

843.731 

185.537 

30.380 

38.465 

22.152 

63.162 

57.130 

287.164 

109-662 


Current Assets 
Gash and cash equivalents 
Accounts receivable 
Materials and supplies 
Other current assets 


143.545 

220.862 

9.304 

77.949 

451-660 


1.598.793 


6.401 

172.189 

8.950 

43-688 

231.228 


1,184.621 


Shareholders’ Investment & liabilities 

Shareholders' investment 
Share Capital 
Paid in Surplus 

Reserves and retained earnings 

Subsidies, net of amortization 
Long-term debt . 

Reserves for staff retirement and other employee benefits 
Other reserves and long-term liabilities 
Current liabilities 
Bank loans and .overdrafts 
Accounts payable 
Income taxes payable 
Dividends 

Other current liabilities 


30.06.1997 

30.06.1996 

340.237 

316.499 

236.943 

74.636 

317.425 

208.831 

894.605 

599.966 

116.720 

102.422 

125.875 

123.149 

j 162.767 

■146.653 

17.991 

26.803 

94.262 

24.450 

44.592 

44.568 

48.172 

57.119 

1.408 

3.860 

92.401 

55.631 


280.835 


185-628 


1.598.793 


1.184.621 



Operating revenues 
Operating expenses 

Operating profit 
Financial, net 

Profit on sale of investment 
Other, net 


Profit before income taxes 
Income taxes 

Set profit 


374.375 

(229.670) 

321.010 

(189-558) 

144.705 

131-452 

(1.723) 

11.000 

(12.160) 

(3-027) 

0 

(7-139) 

(2.883) 

(10.166) 

141.822 

(50.893) 

121.286 

(43.105) 

90.929 

78.181 


30.06.1996 


Shareholders’ investment January 1 
Net profit for the period 
Capital increase 

Paid in surplus, net of share insurance expenses 

Shareholders' investment, June 30 


617.596 

429-138 

90.929 

78.181 

23-738 

18.011 

162.342 

74.636 

894.605 

599.966 


c.anrtrtw -and IAS financial statements relate to the accounting of staff re ti re m ent and other employee benefits, subsidies and deferred income raxes. 

The major differences ^ Amount of Drs 28.615, which represents an amount due from shareholders regarding the 1997 share capital increase. 

This amount was hrily of operations include provisions for doubtful accounts receivable and contributions to the Pension Fund relating to voluntary retirements of approximately Drs 7 rim 

■Operating Expenses in me fo. the six - month period ended June 30, 1996. ' ,UUa 

similar pnmsaona ■ 







antf as* aaa* B'SSS 3 BB hel gS.SS’g- r^S 9t> l<l SI sJ«*l«*lrflWPISt3ISlS .CP = s ; fill a S B 


PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


*'Jk‘ v 


Israel Set to Give Palestinians $49 Million in Withheld Taxes 


Cc^OhUh Oar Staff F*m Dej&rSa 

JERUSALEM — Israel has told the 
Palestinian Authority that it will release 
$49 million in tax and customs transfers 
that it withheld because of Islamic mil- 
itant suicide bombings, a senior Pal- 
estinian official said Thursday. 

The official, Nabil Shaath, the Pal- 
estinian planning minister, said after a 
meeting with the director-general of the 
Israeli Finance Ministry, Shmuel Slavin, 
that he was told that Israel would release 
the withheld revenues, about 170 million 
shekels, as soon as possible. 

Israeli officials said the money could 
be handed over to the Palestinians next 
week if the remaining details could be 
worked out. 

The Israeli government spokesman, 
MosheFogel, said there was less friction 


between the two sides after Wednes- 
day's early morning summit meeting 
between Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu and Yasser Arafat, the Pales- 
tinian leader. 

Mr. Netanyahu and Mr. Arafat agreed 
at the meeting to resume contacts “at all 
levels.” 

Israeli government sources said Israel 
also was expected to take further steps 
next week to ease a closure of die West 
Bank and Gaza Strip that has prevented 
thousands of Palestinian workers from 
entering the Jewish state. 

Israel also will announce that it will 
allow Mr. Arafat to land at the new 
airfield in the Gaza Strip, Israel Radio 
said. 

Mr. Netanyahu froze the transfer of 
tax and customs duties Israel is meant to 


give to the Palestinian Authority after 
two suicide bombers from the Islamic 
militant group Hamas killed 16 Israelis 
in Jerusalem on July 30. A triple suicide 
bombing, again by Hamas, killed a fur- 
ther five Israelis in Jerusalem ou Sept. 
4. 

Mr. Netanyahu released portions of 
the frozen funds in August and Septem- 
ber in response to U.S. pressure but has 
continued to hold -back millions of dol- 
lars. The amount wi thheld increases by 
the day 'as more money flows into hold- 
ing accounts. 

According to the Oslo peace agree- 
ment, Israel is obligated to. hand over 
customs duties and other taxes levied on 
Palestinian imports and purchases. 

On Monday, Israel ana the Palestinian 
Authority resumed committee talks on 


implementing pledges made under their 
interim peace deals that have been 
stalled by the crisis. (Reuters, AP) 

■ Forei^ Minister Might Resign 

Foreign Minister David Levy said 
Thursday be was considering resigning 
because of his troubled relations with 
Mr. Netanyahu and suggested his health 
had suffered because of he tension with 
the prime minister, news agencies re- 
ported 

Mr. Levy told Israel Radio he was not 
consulted about the decision to order 
Israeli agents to assassinate a militant 
Islamic leader in Jordan and that he 
would have opposed the plan. 

“If I had been consulted, I would not 
have let it happen, ’ ' Mr. Levy said of die 
bungled murder attempt, which rocked 


' relations with Jordan. “The damage is 
definitely grave/’ Mr. Levy said. Asked 
about the chances that he might cesign, 
he replied, “about 50-50.” 

. Mr. Levy’s relations with Mr. Net- 
anyahu have been rocky since the gov- 
ernment was framed; Mr. Netanyahu 
and his aides have kept Mr. Levy and the 
Foreign Ministry on the margins- of 
policy-making. ’ , 

Mr. Levy, who was hospitalized 
Tuesday night with chest pains, said his 
condit io n was- caused by overwork, but 
admitted that it was aggravated by his 
anger with Mr. Netanyahu. 

Also on Thursday, a member of a 
panel appointed by the government to 
investigate the bungled assassination 
resigned over charges that he was biased 
in favor of the operation. (AP, Reuters) 


Castro Affirms Revolutionary Line 


C&tqttteOm’SujfFmaDqutdia 

HAVANA — Hearkening back to the 
early days of the Cuban revolution, Fidel 
Castro lashed out ar the United States, 
and he vowed in a seven-hour speech 
opening a Communist Party congress to 
continue on the path of socialism. 

The 71 -year-old leader, who has made 
few public appearances recently, ap- 
peared hollow of face, but his endurance 
at the podium Wednesday seemed to 
combat rumors that he was ill and frail. 

For hoars after hour, Mr. Castro out- 
lined the crisis Cuba has faced since die 
political collapse of the Soviet Union in 
December 1991 eliminated Havana's 
main source of financial and military aid 
as well as trade. 

“The historic enemy,” the United 
States, “which never renounced beating 
back our independence, became more 
powerful than ever” as Cuba’s economy 
plunged, he declared. 

“The world waited for news that the 
revolution had disappeared.” 

The speech opened the Fifth Com- 
munist Party Congress, which is to lay 
outgeneral policy forCuba until the year 
2002. 

On Thursday, the focus was on eco- 
nomic policy and the need to maintain 
limited market reforms while staying the 
socialist course. 

The delegates were expected to adopt 
an economic resolution proposed by a 
special party commission calling for 
making state-owned business the engine 
of economic growth by Hying to max- 
imize efficiency, while leaving a space 
for foreign investment and some small- 
scale private enterprise. 

The congress wUl replace some mem- 
bers of the 25-member Politburo, giving 
a hint about the future. 

Much of Mr. Castro’s speech, which 
rivaled in length the epic oratory of his 
early years in revolutionary power, was 
dedicated to analysis of recent prob- 
lems. 

There was no indication of any im- 
pending major policy changes by the 
Castro forces. 

President Castro repeatedly attacked 
the United States, saying the country 
wanted to be “owner of the world” and 
was dedicated to dominating Cuba. 

He said Cuban officials had docu- 


Hint of Small Shifts 
In His 7-Hour Talk 

men ted 24 terrorist attempts against 
tourist sites in Cuba since 1990 and “all 
without exception were organized and 
supplied from the Unitexl States.” 

He noted that men accused of killing a 
Cuban policeman in an escape and an- 
other who had hijacked an aircraft at 
gunpoint were acquitted in U.S. courts. 

That “greatly s timulates such acts," 
Mr. Castro said. 

He also complained that the United 
States had ignored Cuban claims that the 
C uban -American National Foundation 
in Miami was behind recent hotel bomb- 
ings. 

The foundation has denied any role, 
and U.S. officials say they have found no 
evidence of a link. 

But Mr. Castro said that a recent U.S. 
denunciation of the hotel bombings and 
its return of two men accused of 


• 


hijacking a boat were “constructive." 

There was no live television or radio 
coverage, but state-controlled media 
began to repeat excerpts from his address 
late in the night 

The congress, being held the Palaceof 
Conventions, is closed to foreign jour- 
nalists. (AP, AFP ) 

■ Church Harassment Denied 

Disputing reports by the Vatican, the 
Roman Catholic Church of Cnba said it 
was not aware of any government har- 
assment of worshipers amid prepara- 
tions for a visit in January by Pope John 
Paul D, Reuters reported from Havana. 

The Vatican news agency said Tues- 
day that Cuban security forces had been 
detaining and threatening worshipers 
and videotaping open-air Masses. It ad- 
ded that agents had been sent to infiltrate 
Catholic groups. 

The report “doesn’t make sense to 
us." said Orlando Marquez, a spokes- 
man for the Roman Catholic Arch- 
diocese of Havana. 



.. • 

. ■ 


Tbo AjmomS Pro* 

President Fidel Castro, opening the Fifth Congress of the Cuban 
Commnnist Party, said the fall of communism in Russia hurt Cuba. 


NOBEL: Awarding of Literature Prize to the Potiticcd Satirist Dario Fo Surprises Italy 


Continued from Page 1 

Pope confuses a children's rally on SL 
Peter ’s Square with a pro-choice demon- 
stration, and other improbable happen- 
ings at the Vatican, which caused con- 
troversy in San Francisco, where it was 
staged in 1992. 

In Italy, where his popularity peaked in 
the 1 970s, Mr. Fo remains a well-known 
personality whose strong political views 
still win him friends and enemies. 

News of the prize reached Mr. Fo as he 
was driving from Rome, where he had 
finished filming a television special, to 
Milan, where he lives with his writer- 
actress wife. Franca Rame. “I am flab- 
bergasted," he told a news agency re- 
porter, after a car pulled up alongside his, 
with a sign at the window saying. “Dario, 
you have won the Nobel Prize." 

To reporters over the phone, Mr. Fo 
said he found out 15 days earlier that he 
was a finalist for the prize. “Certainly, it 
gives me a certain sensation to be in the 
company of people like Pirandello and 


Beckett,” he said. “I’d be a hypocrite if 
I told yon that I counted on it. I didn’t I 
didn’t expect it at alL” 

Astonishment was heard elsewhere 
Thursday as Italian writers, critics and 
theatergoers registered surprise, in some 
cases mixed with pleasure, in others with 
outrage, at the news that one of the 
country's most popular playwrights had 
been so honored. 

“No one expected this,” said Carlo 
Bo, a literary critic and senator. “What 
does this mean? Everything changes, 
even literature changes." 

Marcello Veneziano, a rightist intel- 
lectual and editorialist for the Roman 
newspaper II Messaggero, insisted that 
the prize for Mr. Fo was a “misprint.” 
He said: “I think he is a great actor but 
everyone has to be recognized for his 
own worth- If Fo is a prize winner and 
Ernst Jnnger isn't, then I say drat this 
prize has lost its residual credibility." 

The editorialists at L’Osservatore Ro- . 
mano, the Vatican newspaper, were 
clearly unhappy with the choice. “Flab- 


YISIT: Jiang Intends to Calm U.S. Critics With Promotional Tour 


Continued from Page 1 

major country seeking a more construct- 
ive role in the world or an underestim- 
ation of the potential for protests, hostility 
in Congress and critical press coverage. 

Anticipating demonstrations on Tibet, 
Taiwan and human rights, administration 
officials said they did not know how Mr. 
Jiang would respond. They said -they 


servatively. trying to duck in and duck 
out,” another official said. 

White House officials say that, from 
their vantage point, the spotlight Mr. 


of the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee. He assailed the administration's 
reluctance to impose economic sanc- 
tions on China or Russia over their sales 


Jiang will draw is to the good. “We want of advanced weapons and technology to 
to demystify Jiang,” an administration nations such as Pakistan and Iran. 


official said. 

To many members of Congress and 
human rights activists, there is not much 
mystery. They regard Mr. Jiang as the 


Mr. Jiang is scheduled to have break- 
fast with about 30 members of Congress 
on Oct 30, after a state dinner at the 
White House. The congressional group is 


who bears responsibility for the 1989 
massacre near Tiananmen Square and 


hoped Mr. J!ang ^°old be supple auiocnitic head of an authoritarian stare expected to include critics as well as 
enough toshreg off protsts. who bears responsibility for the 1989 friends of China, officials said, giving Mr. 

He needs to talk to the American massage near Tiananmen Square and Jiang an opportunity to state his case, 
people about what China is and isn t, a for selling technology abroad that could hf addition to the state dinner, Mr. 
senior administration official said. If ^ use£ j ro build missiles and chemical Jiang will be the guest at a luncheon held 
he Chinese are gorng to sen theirstoiy, md buc|ear wca pons. by Mr. Gore andtwll deliver a speech on 

they ve got to take that story not only to .-china's nuclear traffickers made a Chinese foreign policy, officiaKd. 


■ . . « . /*>1 - • * ■ I. M luuaouviw UWl 4 UUUUUiMi bfuutuv U4IU 

people about what China is and isn t, a for x]hn technology abroad&at could 
senior administration official said. If be used ro build iSiles and chemical 
the Chinese are going to sell their story, md uuclear wcapoas . 


they’ve got to take that story not only to -china's nuclear 'traffickers made a 
he president and the Congress, but also complete ^eiy of U.S. sanctions le- 


the public.” 

“They are not coming in here con- 


gelation." said Senator Jesse Helms, 


Chinese foreign policy, officials said. 

He will visit Philadelphia for the In- 
dependence Hall stop and a reunion with 


JAPAN: Companies Try to Push Creativity 


Continued from Page 1 manager at New Business Investment 

Co., a venture-capital outfit set up by 
thronement as the world's economic su- Japan Development Bank. Reflecting 
perstar, it may come to that. for a moment, ne added, ' 'Or maybe they 

“Major Japanese companies think have given up on their own creativity.'' 
that in older for them to develop into the So far, the big push for creativity in 

next century, they need to let the ideas the workplace has had spotty results, 
buried within the company bloom on an When Toshiba Corp. introduced flexible 
individual basis rather titan in an or- working hours for managers in its re- 
ganized effort,' ' said Yoshihito Iwama, search and development unit three years 
who heads a committee on new cor- ago, it told 150 employees responsible 
porale ventures at Keidanren, the dom- for the development of services, like 
inani business organization. digital video disks, that they did dol have 


Republican of North Carolina and head an elderly former teacher, New York for 

meetings with business groups, Boston 

for the Harvard speech and Los Angeles 
T 1 4 . IX „JL for what are described by a U.S. official 

l ry 10 tuSll creativity as “meetings with community leaders." 

“As soon as I heard the schedule, I 
manager at New Business Investment said, this is nuts,” said James ftzystup. 


manager at New Business Investment said, this is nuts,” said James ftzystup, 
Co., a venture-capital outfit set up by an Asia specialist at the conservative 
Japan Development Bank. Reflecting Heritage Foundation. “All the boutique 
for a moment, ne added, ' 'Or maybe they Buddhists are going to show up at Har- 


vard. And he's going to the cradle of 
liberty. Independence Hall? And Boston, 
home of the revolution, the minutemen, 
the guys wbo fought the oppressors?” 

Only a sweeping amnesty for political 
prisoners or some such grand gesture 


inani business organization. digital video disks, that they did noL have 

“The leaders of Japanese corporations to come into the office, so long as they 
think that creativity is very important were productive, 
because the sectors that have fueled eco- The program seemed logo so smoothly 
nomic growth so far have matured,” he that Toshiba expanded it to include 400 
added. “Japanese corporations are fa- managers, accenting to Keisuke Oomori, 
cing global competition with not only a spokesman. So did the chosen ones turn 
European and American companies but into workplace mavericks, throwing 
also Southeast Asian and East Asian themselves into projects for tong stretches 
companies. And for Japan to survive this before collapsing in exhaustion, waking 
severe competition, executives think that ar home on some days and hitting die 
creativity is very important. ” beaches or the golf links on others? 

But can creativity be summoned up at Not exactly. “Most people," Mr. 
short notice in a society that has always Oomori said, “still come into the office 
valued rule-making above risk-taking?' during regular hours." 

A number of large companies are at least Japanese head offices are notorious 
trying. They are developing in-house for bloated bureaucracies, endless meet- 


ago, it told 150 employees responsible would spare Mr. Jiang from protest and 
for the development of services, like ridicule at such sites, Mr. Przystup said. 


for the development of services, like ridicule at such sites, Mr. Przystup said, 
digital video disks, that the}- did dol have Nancy Bemkopf Tucker, a professor 

to come into the office, so long as they at Georgetown University in Washing- 
were productive. ton, said: ‘ There are going to be demon- 

The program seemed logo so smoothly straiions here certainly, and I would as- 
that Toshiba expanded it to include 400 sume at Harvard and in Los Angeles.” 
managers, according to Keisuke Oomori, She predicted few agreements on sub- 
a spokesman. So did the chosen ones turn stance between China and the United 
into workplace mavericks, throwing States, but said that “in the Chinese 
themselves into projects for long stretches view, ceremony is sufficient.” 

hof/vo rvxtldUcinn in ovhoifrtinn Tinnn 


It gives Jiang status,” she said. 


bergasted,” the paper wrote, “expresses 
the state of those who have to accept this 
assignation as true/’ adding that “the 
prize to an author who is also the author 
of debatable texts (apart from any moral 
consideration) has surpassed the limits 
of any imagination. " 

But Giorgio Strehler, Italy’s best- 
known theater director, said the prize to 
Mr. Fo ‘ ‘can only give further presage to 
Italian literature and our theater.” Mr. 
Strehler, a long-time director of Milan’s 
Piccolo Teatro, said that “with Dario Fo, 
we feel honored as Europeans and as 
men of fee theater.” 

Bam on March 24, 1926, the son of "a 
railroad station roaster and part-time act- 
or, in the tiny town of Legghmo Sangi- 
ano on the banks of Lake Maggiare, Mr. 
Fo has said in interviews that be was 
always drawn to a view of society seen 
from the bottom up. "Culturally, I have 
always been part of the proletariat.” he 
told die British newspaper The Guardian 
last year. “I lived side by side with the 
sons of glassblowers, fishermen and 


Post-TWA Crash: 
Fuel-Tank Checks 
Ordered On 747s 

New York Times Sen’ice 

WASHINGTON — Airlines 
around the world will begin inspect- 
ing their planes’ fuel tanks for con- 
ditions that could cause an explosion 
tike the one that destroyed TWA 
Flight 800, the airlines and plane 
manufacturers have announced. 

The airlines, which plan to pool 
die data from the inspections, still 
emphatically resist die argument by 
the National Transportation Safety 
Board that the way to prevent future 
explosions may be to insulate the 
tanks to keep them cool, or to inject 
inert gases into the tanks. 

Trade associations representing 
68 airlines, said Wednesday .they 
were working out the details of a 
research program that would in- 
clude inspection of every plane un- 
dergoing major maintenance for a 
period of about two and a half years, 
which would cover 2,000 planes. 

Boeing has- already begun such a 
program involving the model that 
crashed, a 747. inspecting the center 
wing tanks on 29 of them. 

The airlines are adamant that the 
equipment currently in use is safe 
and that adding anything could make 
it less safe. Michael Rioux, senior 
vice president of the Air Transport 
Association, the trade group for ma- 
jor American carriers, said, for ex- 
ample, that adding insulation around 
the fuel tanks to keep fuel cold on hot 
days might cause rust from accu- 
mulated moisture. 

“We have to evaluate very care- 
fully whether that solves a probl«n or 
creates 10 other new ernes,” be said. 


smugglers. The stories they told were 
sharp satires about the hypocrisy of au- 
thority and the middle classes. The two- * 
facedness of teachers and lawyers and 
politicians- 1 was bom politicized." 

His best-known play, “The Accident- 
al Death of an Anarchist,” translated 
into dozens of languages, was based on a 
real event in 1969, when a young an- 
archist, under interrogation by the police 
as a suspect in a bombing in Milan, fell 
four stories to his death, an * ‘accident” 
that many on the Italian left firmly be- 
lieved was murder. 

Among his other well-known plays Is 
“We Won’t Pay! We Won’t Pay!” 
(1974), a broadside against consumer- 
ism and capitalism. Another, “About 
Face,” fantasizes about the possible kid- 
napping of Giovanni Agnelli, Italy's 
preeminent industrialist It turns into a 
play about mistaken identities, the CIA 
and a satirical look at just about 
everything and everybody, from the 
former Soviet leader Yuri Andropov to 
macrobiotics. 


BRIEFLY 


1 ■■ 

UN Suspects Iraq 
Is Hiding A-Secrets f 

VIENNA — Iraq could still be 
hiding some nuclear secretshecause 
it has not provided a full picture of 
its program, the International Atom- 
ic Energy Agency said Thursday. - 

The Vienna-based UN agency 
sent a report to the Security Council ; 
last week, which will be discussed 
in further detail when the IAEA 
director-general, Hans BHx, speaks 
to the Security Council next Thurs- 
day, according to a spokesman. 

Iraq wants the Security Council 
to lift sanctions imposed after the 
Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 
19 $), insisting that it has complied 
with all requirements. (AP) 


Congo Asks for Aid 
In Border Conflict 

KINSHASA — The Democratic 
Republic of the Congo renewed ap- 
peals Thursday for international ef- 
forts to prevent the conflict in neigh- 
boring Brazzaville engulfing the 
volatile Central African region. 

Troops in Kinshasa fired volleys 
of rockets across the Congo river 
into Brazzaville ou Wednesday 
after shells from the twin capital city 
killed two soldiers guardin g Pres- 
ident Laurent Kabila's offices in 
Kinshasa. 

Residents in Brazzaville said two 
pebple were killed when a shell hit a 
residential area next to President 
Pascal Lis scuba’s palace in the Ba- 
congo district. Shrapnel landed in 
the compound of the French am- 
bassador, Raymond Cesaire, they 
added. .. (Reuters) 

Libel Settlement 
Pleases Mulroney 

OTTAWA — A former prime 
minister of Canada, Brian Mul- 
roney, says he feels completely vin- 
dicated by a settlement that will 
have die Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police pay $1 .44 million for libeling 
him by asserting that he had profited 
from an alleged kickback scheme. 

“I. was very pleased with the 
judgment and pleased that the mat- 
ter has been resolved,” Mr. Mul- 
roney told CTV News. 

Mr. Mulroney sued the govern- 
ment for $36 million because of 
allegations he received payoffs in 
conjunction with the purchase of 
Airbus jetliners by Air Canada 10 
years ago. An out-of-court settle- 
ment reached in January was ap- 
proved by a justice Tuesday. (AP) 

For the Record 

Colombian U'wa Indians who 
threatened mass suicide if Occi- 
dental Petroleum Corp. drilled wells 
on their ancestral lands have asked 
the Organization of American 
States for help, their leader said 
Wednesday. (Reuters) 


S' 


AIDS: ForThese Women, Debatable Placebos ^ 

Continued from Page 1 jects about the nature of the testing pro- * 

gram. But a session in which one HIV- 
onoe it was shown that the drug sharply positive woman was invited to take part 
reduced transmission of the virus from showed just how quickly the details of 
mothers to their babies. It would be the testing are disposed with, 
virtually impossible, doctors say, to re- Minutes after she was informed for 
ceive approval for tests in the United the first time that she carried the AIDS 
States on AIDS- infected mothers using virus, one pregnant woman, Siata Ou- 
placebos now that the 076 regimen has attara, was quickly walked through the 
been proved effective. _ details of the tests, as well as advice 

But other medical ethicists argue dif- about maintaining her health. ^ 


ferently: There is no qaestion of 076 ] 

being adopted in Africa because of its pre 
high cost, they say, and that is precisely wa 
why a low-cost method is needed. ovt 

“We cannot afford the 076 regimen," illii 
said Dr. Rene Anatole Ehounou Ek nini, tesl 
one of a team of kwalheallh-care workers rcs] 
employed in the program. The treatment are 
is not only costly, it requires early in- < 
tervention in a woman's pregnancy, l ong wo: 
courses of the expensive drug, and in- yea 
travenous treatments dining childbirth, law 
And none of this seems practical here. sak 
“We already knowwhatthe alternative unc 
is to what we are doing," said Dr. Ekptni, AZ 


In less than five minutes, in which the 
previously unknown concept of a placebo 
was briefly mentioned, the session was V 
over, and Miss Ouatiara, unemployed and 
illiterate, had agreed to take part in the 
tests. Asked what had persuaded her, she 
responded, “The medical care that they . 
are promising me.” 

One of the most highly educated of the 
women who spoke to a reporter, a 31- 
year-old single mother with a degree in 
law who gave her name only as Nicole, 
said that she had never been made to 


we already Know what the alternative understand that the medicine being tested, 
is to whai we are doing,” said Dr. Ekptni, AZT, was already known to stop trans- 
^peaking in dm state-run m a ternal and mission of the vims during pregnancy. 
mfent-care clime m Abidjan’s working- “I am not sure that I understood all of . 
class district of Koomassi, where the trials this so well," Nicole said. “But there ^ 
arebeing conducted. “The alter n ative is were softie medicines that they said might v 
giving everyone here the placebo treat- protect the mother and the child, and they x 
meni, because if you step outside, that is wanted to follow the evolution of my 
what pregnant women with the disease are pregnancy and the effectiveness of the 
get™? hoe: nothing.” treatment.” 

In the United States, proponents of the Asked if the treatment had helped her, 

AZT tnals have said that the women who Nicole said, “I am sure, because I gave 
take part sue willing volunteer who ac- birth to a little girl who is doing very well ' . 
cepttberisks. But interviews with a hand- and I feel fine myself." PresSd further, 

M °f *= women. ™ade available to a Nicole, like other mothers, said she had S. 
repo rter by the researchers, made it clear not been told the results of blood tests on ^ 


that despite repeated explanations by 
project case workers, the understanding of 
these mostly poor and scantily educated 


her one-year old. -i(* 

Then asked what how she would feel \ ^lj <’ 
if she learned tomorrow that she had 


subjects does not march the complexity of received a placebo when a proven treat- 
the ethical and scientific issues involved, ment existed. Nicole’s tone changed ab- 
Social workers and nurses employed ruptly. “I would say quite simply that 
in the experiment do brief potential sub- that is an injustice.’ ’ she said. 


ITALY: Prodi Resigns After Communist Allies Withdraw Support for 1998 Budget Bill ^ 

S" 5 ®!™ sfomaira of the workweek to 35 horns, a 5’ C 


Continued from Page 1 


liable cyclones of creativity. 


ease,” said Minoru Takaoka, a senior die government’s cost of financing its national debt. 

.1 MCr D— .. 1 . d r? • J 


“By going to California, they are try- manager at the high-tech giant NEC in Brussels, the European Commission president, 
ing to be more creative, nying to meet Corp., “this process of slow decision- Jacques Santer, said he hoped die resignation of Mr. 
American entrepreneurs and develop al- making, that makes it hard for major Prodi ’s government would not affect the country's prep- 
j lances with them to make new Japanese companies to react to the rapidly arations for EMU. He praised the government's “re- 
products.” said Takeshi Nakabayashi, a changing business environment.” markable effort at cleaning up" Italy's public finances. 


Mr. Prodi had watered down his budget and made could mean that Mr. Prodi or another political leader ^ 
lasi-rainute concessions designed to appease the Re- might have to Seek Mr. Berlusconi’s support. 
founded Communists, whose votes were needed to There was also speculation in Rome thar President .\V 
susiam the government. Bur the militant Communists Scalfaro might turn to Treasury Minister Carlo Azeclio VN. 
said these were not enough. Ciampi to head a government of technocmsto steer V S V; 

The prime minister s concessions included a pro- Italy through the crisis. KV 


I 


PAGE li 



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pd more to 1 20 reia from Nee ifl air- 
port. £315000. For more totonaaltait 

Lsxtel Hoktag LM Fax +33 (0)4 92 10 

77 88 r 

Germany 

CHOICE RESIDENTIAL LOT (1.135 
sqm) wih arnerb view owriooting kk> 
sal ati Tiabeti Ttabacti Zoned hr sto- 
gie ut or up to 6 tor* apartnata. 

Plica USS lOOJKtt TeL +486372-1701 

Greece 

PELffitoWESUS - Unique 19th cent 
mountain mason Easy reach to andenl 
Ohms. Superb views. Contact J. Sin. 

P.O. Box 14003. GR - 115 10 Athens. 
Greece. Ter +3016410776 

forty 

UGURIA - ALASSfO, H A HILLY AREA 
a prefiOgous 1920 English vrta of 350 
sqm Hta sqedacula panmairfc Hew of 
ihe bay. Lounge, rtutfio. tiring room, 
utility room. Inreaoia torchen 3 bath- 
rooms. 6 bedrooms Spacious anoert 
garden at about 1700 sqm Price USS 
1JXK3.000. Direct Deakng wfli owner (lax 
only) 00 39 2 490 36 B0. 

VENICE IMghdri specious bright fei on 
ins Gudecca. Tap 2nrt3rd toots, ndud- 
mg skyCgtl sbxfio + prMta roof tomx 
overtoung lagoon Antique tunshed. 

Fax 1 39-41 714 571 Eraat 
r.iAfiveneOino I 

M0R1H OF ITALY, 99 taa from Venice. 

Limy vfe set h the career of a 3J00 
sqm. park. M sqm. of Bring aim Tel 
+38 431 93394 

London 

BEAUX ARTS BUILDING, Istaglon N7. 

1st floor mriKnne, 2 doutrie tndrooms, 

2 bahnotiG. rtessmg room, (twig, 2 re- 
caption rooms, lined kitchen, covered 
paling, patter, gymnasium and tots , 
oommxnl gardens 1042 sq ft. 123 vro 
lease E 245.000 (+44) 0171 26E 3975 

ROMESEARCH LONDON Lei us 
search In you We Imd homes I tats 
to buy and rert and provide corporate 
retacatan services. For ndwiduals 
and company Tel: +44 171 B3B 

1066 FaX + 44 171 038 1077 
MtpgTinmJioniesearchjcaiMDm 

NORTH LONDON EXCLUSIVE Suburb. 
Bingrim n#i 2 Luge dorife bedrooms 
wttti en-side baffiroont. auert ckrak- 
room. 2 large racepoon rooms . «J) 
maintained tpden, large lichen - break- 
last room, double garage with electrical 
doom Tet .44 [0) 181 3M 0372 

Paris and Suburbs 

IS MM ft 15 KM WEST OF PARS by 
toe A1< 20 nta SI Lazare station Very 
beatfri 1958 MODERNIST house. 240 
sgre. Wig space on 2.000 sqm garden 
m private domar Luxuous tttxigs 60 
sg m. iwig. targe Sraptee. bay wndow 
lacing South terraces. 4 bedrooms. 2 
bate 2 showers Ofice Room Mh ja- 
cuzzi S sauna Outdoor heried smm- 
mng pool Praae quay on Seine Water 
siring. gaB QuieL Greenery QuaWv 

Me style- Ha* shops. US$650 JM) Tet 

NY 212 219 9565 Fax NY 212 965 1348 

Fax: Pans D1 39 75 ?« 94 


BETWEEN NICE BACK COUNTRY and 
MERCANTOUR REGIONAL PARK. 
3-racm Dal f- vdage near elation, new 
ms TrtFav ’33 |i)11 40 I 20 74 


CANNES, seafran 132 sqm luxurious 
flat, v*m pool two bq Braces, pres* 
S 2 S resufcrt? Td-Fa 104 91227277 


PARIS 16tt - NEAR RADIO FRANCE 8 
5 nns to Nftto hotel & Stated I 
6to (bor. 79 sqm . double tong. 2 1 
rooms, snap terrace 1 catoiy Excep- 
ironai >931 buittna and apartment 
TaqueboT archtaclure Listed hsoncal 
nenurwm U 55320.000 For visit cal 
owner on +33 (OH 4ZB8 7983 ate 7JQ 
pin or Fat +33 10)1 45 23 25 SO 
attention Francos Baxter 


PAMTERS VILLAGE 

8 kvn from BARBIZ0N 

HACIENDA STYLE PROPERTY $8Ck*te(J 
In 6JJQQ sqm. part owtookfag Seta 
rrar. TO sqtn verandah decorated with 
r tanas | 

■ j101 
C&BwBti house, oarage, (ends, pod. 

MUSTSSErSTnfc, 

Tab +33 (Dp 64 71 00 S3 office or (0)1 
64 24 67 05 home, Ffflt (0)1 6471 0094 


PAHS 16th 

Near TROCADERO 8 PLACE VCTOH 
HUGO. NEW ■ VB1Y HIGH CLASS. 
Beoafd 2+oom 54 sqm, high Boor 
DEAL “PEP A TERRE *. Cm and 
g. JUSTIRED PRICE. 
1(0)141053030 


PAHS 7ft -HUSEE ROOM 

Sh and lop Door 

EXCEPTIONAL 243 S&U PENTHOUSE 
+ 115 sqm terrace an ana tevsl 
2-cargsage 
K.L (0)1 45 53 62 82 


PORT MARLY - 78, school bus (Bed to 
Wemafaot tyoaun, seBs choiring m- 
ctont 200 eqm house, renovated, 2200 
eq-tn. geaden. LWtog. rtring room, 
equipped kitchen, bin volume, 4 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, 2 WCs. 1 Bn on room, 
cetar, storeroom, 70 sqm outxitfng to 
renew®. FF2.71L Tet +33(0)139160955 


U0NTMARTRE4B8ESSE5. exceptional 
Former artist atefer on 3 levels > 
and luxury restored 2 yean ago. 
sqm Sven room inter glass roof (7m 
tigti ceffiq). A bedrooms. 2 hate, study 
mezzanine, big fireplace, kitchen lufly 
equqjed, very eurny. ^ shops around. 
Price: FF4.7U. Tet Office +33(0)1 
4032 4401 How +33(0)142 62 05 85 


CROfSSY SUH SEINE 

11 new houses 3 8 4 Oedrocrc, uNh 
gaiden, near coder and RER toll class 
fffinga. Row ff 1,620,000 
to FF zsaojooo. Tet (0)1 39 76 59 B 


VEUZY Ln Ctas, 15 KM from PARS 
and NEAR VERSAILLES, bodertog (br- 
ed. 1930 HOUSE on 3 levels aw total 
basement surface. 4 bedrooms, quia, 
very special surroumfeip, cowry style 
living In the heart of town. Price 
FF2.730.000 VEUZY UMOBOJER Tet 
(0|1 39 46 38 99 Rax (0)1 39 4ft 33 70 


PAFSS f 6th - BD SUCHET 

293 sqm tpartment - 8 rooms 
VIEW OVER BOB DE BOULOGNE 
NOTA1RE (Ml 42 97 55 15 


IPOawdu Prukknt KENNEDY, own® 
seto apartment high class (Hikfng. 
100 sqm.. 4tti (tear 1406, 3 rooms, 2 
bate eqUpped kkhen, betaxiy, cetor, 
Bg9 parking FF 13734. VeH on spol 
Friday. Saimfiy. Sunday. Monday 1030 
to 1pm and 2pm - 6pm, see gaton 


QUAI LOUS BLERIOT. 250 iq.m. 
exceptional reBrimed with panoramic 
v«w over Biel tower and Seine, triple 
eqrosue. 9th & top floor + treed Brace 
and vast botanies, 2 partings. VAUBAN 
(016 07 71 32 77 


16th, LONG CHAMP- VICTOR HUGO, 
wef totaled, bright 4th floor apartment h 
character brtotog, double Irina room, 2 
bedrooms (poestte ffl. ktoteriroreaHast 
room S bath. Makes room & cetar 
FF2590OT. T* (DJI 44 05 14 50 


PARIS 4th, LE SAMT LOWS, 2 rooms, 
chaining pied a terra, tpieL fireplace, 
beams, ivrg & bectoxxn & kflehen, 
•mower Owner. FFBOODOOl Tet +33(0)1 
44767603 pm or +33 (0)1 45054062 


NEXT TO ETOL TOWER 1st tow. 93 
sqm, two bedrooms, 2 bate 45 sqm 
lounge, petttnacstar. private 130 sqm. 
terrace Price FF2.4M. + parting. Owner. 
Tfit +33 (0)1 4734 6681 ftx 4449 9106 


LUXURIOUS fiat overlooking Val de 
Grace gardens, near Rartheon, 70 sqm, 
SWiy. wry qpaai. FF 1JM pbrs parting 
T& + 33 (Ej 1 45 89 49 73. Paris 5th. 


7th Mn BAC, a bout 75 sqm. 15 beds on 
cwxtyanL hUi ceffins, beams, chaimnu 
street S42KTe6tat+33 ffil 4S5 4456 


CHAMPS aYS EES, LARGE STUDIO, 
conlortabte. Iwh Door, new, sunny. 
Tet + 33 (0) 145 629332 


ETOHE, 180 eqm. SUL view. 48i flow, 
bataony. quel FF4.6U TelfFax: +33 
(0)1 39 65 76 38 


LE SAMT IDUJS. In beautiful character 
- buMng, 4- room duplex on courtyard, 
farting nearby. Tel (0)1 <5 53 32 37 

NEAR D6NEYLAHD, (58 sqm fuse. 

978 sqm. land Softs toy owner HM5M 

Tet +33 (0)1 GO 43 32 83. aft* 8Hn 

FED A TERRE IN LES HALLES, (Met 

38 sqm. data, modem conrerienees. 

TM & fax Owner +33 (D)1 42 33 » 2ft 

ST GERMAN DES PRES top Boor wow. 

16» cent how. M rooms, ntazzartne, 
cM. Ideal couple. +33 (0)143293757 


BetKM GAHE DE LYON and Bastflhi 
to beautfliU Haussmai style butkflng. 
abort 105 sqm. smtainsL Swig roan 
end dtohgroom 2 bedrooms, bricony. 
SBOBta. (+2,150000. Tel owner (Gene- 
va) +41 22 799 7815 (writ) and 310 

3321 (tame). E-mat Ftaadefeorg 

Spain 

IBIZA 

IDEALLY LUXW0U5 IEW ESTATE 

Stperti sea vtaw, 10,000 sqm ted. 

600 sqm house: Living, dining. 5 bed- 
rooms. 5 matte baths, port, raretata's 
house, garage. SI .000,000. Tel: Pate 
+33 (0)1 4553 6756. Fax (0)1 4553 40S3 

MALLORCA, CALA D'OR. VBa over- 
botting Marina, front ine on W05 sqm. 

5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, fauns, ndt- 
en, Btemmhgpod USS SHOCffld/Fan 
+44 1794 367718 Df +34 71 650053 

- COSTA BIANCA, SPAH. EwirsiK? » 
top residence. Spectacular mews. 2 
acres 4 beds. 5 baths, pool PRIVATE 

SALE. UK£E75JOOO. Tet. 1346) 640 84 56 

Fax (346) 649 73 67 

Switzerland 

nUXEfflEIH&ALPS 

L J Sate to tariows authorized 

1 M oar spedafay ainco 1875 

Attracttro properties, oeertxtang vns 

1 to 5 bedrooms, from SFr 200000. 
REVACSJL 

S, ModtxttM CH-1211 GBIEVA 2 

Til 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 

H0NTREUX “Pea if ol (he Sires Rwr 
era'. Several first dass apatmofc. Sale 
to foreigners artturizud FDM SJL. F» 

+41 24 494 Z7 67 

USA General 

TELLUROE, COLORADO. Large acre- 
age parcels avariable dose lo town of 
Tetaride and Ski area. The views and 
sibi goon toranri Broker inqitaes wet- 
come. Contort DM dePaqter or Sieve 
Catsman. Tel unde Real Estate Carp. 

Tit (970) 728-3111 USA 

USA Residential 

76 SL, 30 EAST COWO 

Comer Mad A ve. 

Opporifc Cartyte Hotri 

EXCLUSIVE LISTING 

Duplex, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. ♦ mart's 
roam & bath. Uaster bertaam & bato on 
upper floor. Large tang non and dnre 
area, spartu 2362 sq ft Bngtt ft avv. 

One rt a kill Ateng S1.15H. 

CC J2Jl6fim: RE taxes SI. 170 nn 

BOB THABT BHOKH) -21MBWB1 

HECOX BAY, WATERMLL' 

LONG ISLAND - li ACRES 

Living roam. 20" ceikng. A Bert owns. 

2 172 bates, cental air. raatrf swmnng 
pool 2U x 4(7, Aflame Ocean 5 mmutes 
USS12SUM0 516-537-0596 

FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 
Exclusive waterfront estate with 700+ 
test ol water frontage ioo tool yachts 
aBamrortaW. home has al Ihe ameni- 
ties. Just reduced to U5S6.099.000. 

Call May Bum, agal RE- MAX Partners 
954-396-5977 USA or E-mail. 

rtfaucdtaheneUBi 

FOR SALE IN FLOifiDA KEYS brtween 

Mam ft Key West Two stay home, car- 
pote, boat dock proto red on Interne! al 
www.ftanrto4outowert.comtods/ektor him 
nta aerial pnoto S location map S tea 
sate ty owner enaltameUaebrighlnfl 
or Bn 1386, Marco Island, Fl 34146 US 


OASIS m WEST LOS 

200 sqm 3 bedroom, 1 374 tefil pool 
, txJi-*i B8a peach dm t 
i d Fa. Sony 8 Paamourt 

, USS269.900. Owner mnaterrad 

to Florida Fax Owner 954-2024688 or 

cal 9542024433 tor ttatala 


NYC CENTRAL PARK VIEWS ttagr«i- 
ctent 2300 so. tL cwdcntohirL 2-3 bed- 
noma 3 bathrooms. Bong, dtoirig, CPW 
4 6ffs 2 balconies, 24 how doorman 
US 32.295U negotiable Owner relocat- 
ing Tet 212886197D Fat 2125010691 


PALM BEACH, FL Near Worth Avenue. 
3 badtf bath. Over 2400 sq I plus wrap 
around terrace, unda FL- Ofeson, Inc, 

Fsdw. S535K. 561 -82D-919&Fax+5253. 


Pska Beedi Florida Usury Oco Bifant 
Condo pool doorman Sbertoaros 2bath$ 
tetany lueiUriub fimshed 5 239,000. 
Phone 1-201-3271111 Fax 1-ffi1-3CT8Z22 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Holland 


RENTHOUSE INTERNATIONAL 
No 1 n Holand 

tar (semfj tarts hed housssr/lfals. 

Tet 31-2D6448751 Fat 31-20-6465909 
NTwn 1921. 1083 Am Amsterdam 


HOMERNDERS KTL Herangracht Ml 
1015 BH Anfitndam Tet +31 JO 6392252 
Fate 6382262 E-flHU.wonselect01]pJl 


Ireland 


DUBLIN C ENTRAL L UXURY 
Fumcfteti apartments 
Tel/Fax 00 353 1 2632731 


London 


CAPITAL Apartments & ham tor rert 
starting say tot see mmJHEnffmufc 
w letophune t-44 171 794 


Monaco 


MONACO 

The printed ant social sH* y. 

ihe geagophe snahan, 
toe ^Hdat protecton at both 
people and assets as wgl as 
adractiw ox laws make Monaco 

THE IDEAL LOCATION FOR LUXURY 
LIVING AND NTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS ACTIVITIES. 

Fw further totormattonon 
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS, 
and SETTING UP BU5BES5 
please contact 

MflOCONTACT - Edwin TASCHE 
Tet +377 93 25 51 22 
Fax +377 92 IB 17 00 


Paris Area Furnished 


ISttl FRONT DE SEINE, 2-room, 100 
sqm., bath + shower room, 
kitchen, loggia, 8th Hoar, ateqert ; 
tan. FF10.000 net Tel (Oh 42604936 






kteaf acconmxteon; stodtoS bedroana 
- Qtefy and sanies asand 

RODY TO HOVE H 
Tfll +33(0)143129900. Fax (0)1 <3129006 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: <33 (0)1 (7iOaL05 


CAPTTALE * PJW7NHJS 
KovtoiAed quafiy apartmanb. 
al sees Paris and atoubs. 
Tet +33 f»1 42 68 35 60 
FBK +33 (0)1 42 M 35 61 
to help jwr toff 


4ft, VIEW SEINE . 

130 sqm SipBEb, sunny. 

B. FREUNG Tel; +5 (0)1 40 20 96 00 


481, MARAIS - MODERN HOUSE 
160 sq.m. on garden, port. M0 dass. 
FF25XJ00 net Tel +33 (W 11 60 38 90 
w +33 (0)T 42 65 33 07 office tons. 


7Bi, near fanafides. Charrang, sumy. 
roily hnmstwd 1 bedroom apartmaa. 
Vbw of Eial Tower. KSchen area, wash- 
ing machine, CD ptayet. cable hr. 
EXtOOK/naomn. Arabia 1st Nov. 97. 
Cal Lna Stevens 1-617-354-2369. 


parting. 


+33(0)1' 


PASSY. 100 sqm dqote modem tort- 
tore .Bring +2 bedrooms.eqispped Udca 
FF14D0D net Tet +33 (OjtTffl 44 66 28 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


PARIS 16Hi. 90 sqjn., Impeccable 2 
bedroom pled a terra, facing the EM 
Tower. FF 9000. Td+33(0) 1 47237057 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
merts. From studbs to 4 bedrooms. Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 736 2871 


USA 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week to 1 year. Groat Locations. Call 
PWCNqut 212-448-9223, Fax: 212- 
448-9226 E-Mato afiKmehroflarixaHi 


Don't miss our coming 
Sponsored Section on 


International I ranrhisin^ 


which trill appear on 

Nov. 19, 1997 

For further information, 
please contact: 

Judy KING at I.H.T. New York 
Tel: (212) 752 3890 
Fax: (212) 755 8785 


GENERAL 


Personals 


HAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 

be afiare-: g'cnfirt. loved, and 
preserve; imouchcul tne world, 
rrw ard laesw Sara! fieai d Jesos. 
5ay fa a St Jude Via M n J mraefes 
fa & 3t -Site. Hioa dteins- 
!??s. pray tor us Say rss pravw me? 
lines a fia, XO ty Se red day vox 
sra.er n:F be ansxwrard it has raw 
Den iron; O te" Futtfnaixi must be 


Announcements 


AmowciM te craatjrr ot toe 
dtTERNATf&WL AMERICANIST =4RTY 
■hose gcai a la rarj sure nat U3 efr 
.ve respect tfi snwiy toe US CONSTI- 
TUTION. an nftaesate c t- the tixiri 
mImb into a Fa: -54 72 • so (S3 


Hcral O&l gribunf 

mi ii-niFiMm vw jug 

SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SEHVTC& 
For aKSons w queries about the delfr- 
ery cl vow rawspapa. the status ri your 
susofton w atari ordemig a subscrip- 
tion pleas? can the totawmg antes 
EUROPE. MIDDLE EAST Mr) AFRICA; 
TOLL FREE - Austria 0660 6120 Bet- 
nwn OSH l-^ Fiance 0600 437437 
Germany 0130 34B58S Italy 167 7BHM0 
Luxentwurg 0800 27D3 Netoeriands 06 
0225155 Sweden 03) 7970 Swlzer- 
land 155 5757 UK 0800 695965 Bse- 
mtm (+33) 1 41439361 THE AUEHF 
CAS: USA don-tree) 1 -600-B822B84 
Bsewhere i+l) Z12 75238S0 ASIA: 
Hrxig Kpng 2922 1171 tndonesia 609 
1£8 Japan |ic8free) d20 464 ftr 
Korea 3672 0 Ms Ualavsia 221 7055 
Phrtppinfo 595 4946 Singapore 325 
0634 Taman 7753456 Thailand 277 
4465 Elsewhere HE21 23221171 


DINING OUT 




PJUBS4A 

wuas 17th 

LEBUBOQUET 

AinxlenqibrineilW 

which famthe gradut jumjan. 

iordnrvadrink. 

,sss issxsrs&ifc. 

ALGOLDENBERG 

Mofti btrlngi ■ Fa*tmi > Cnan draw hagri 
md 1st lurtinoa-Oinn aria idtet lad. 

JiwiteiBK M ita da Hfarawi 

MIDI 4a37A77.lwyiki r rptodU^t 

NBMLY 

'■#: ‘yugoraj 

-I i roc LY 1 ii» 
SSB& ’•1 

» I orOi^r«adtaNw*plMJUUL3& 

A 71, BT.SuSnn Part 7KT. 01 -A7J3.27.1L 


1 mam 

VB«M 

i j 1 1 

KERVAN5ARAY 




Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DEF» FRANCE: Weekend 
FF5Q0 7 days FF1500. Tet Pans +33 
(0)1 4368 55S Rax (0)1 4353 9529. 


Legal Services 


DIVORCE 1-OAY CBRTHTED 
CaS W Fax (714) 966-8695. Wltia: 167B7 
Beach Bhd. (137. Hudmgton Beach, CA 
92648 U SA- e+nal - MXMiSjunuam 


DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. No bte Write- 
Box 377, Sutuy. MA 01776 USA Tet 
978/443-8387. Fa 978M434181 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


New Lower 
International 
Rates! 



• NO Set Up Fees 

• NO Minfmums 

• Six-Second Billing - 

• AT&T Quality 

• 24-hour Multi-lingual 
Customer Service 

Tht OrigVnto 

kallback 

Wwm Stondanla are ffirt, not Malt 

Tel: 1^06^99.1991 
Fax: 1.206.599.1981 
Email: InfoOkallbacIccom 
www.kallbaek.com 

417 Sweond Avwnuw Wewt 
SMtUtoWA 08119 USA 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

COMPANIES & TRUSTS 

UHGRATOWPASSKfflTS 

tartw 
Val 


Senses Wdrumfe 

Aston Corporate Trustees 

Alton Horn. Dougha, tote d Ifan 
Tat +44 (0) 1624 626S91 
Fax: +44 (fl) 1624 625126 

London 

TO +44 (IQ 171 233 1382 
Ape +44 (D) 171 233 1519 

E Mail: astonGenterprisejiet 

wwwjatorhitniteraamufit 


We. SWISS ESTABLISHED HAUMO 
WHOLESALE COMPANY, 
are looking lor a p whsstaa l person, 
Hftl to take wrer our tan (toe to 
refiremert We tom terg fasting connec- 
tions arttin toe industry sc writ as to the 
mritManxE watch & lewetory produc- 
er We own various patents torcflng 
OTsetts stales. 

Hrfier Homctoi wl be given to 
interested purchasers qprn leceipt of 
wool d ample firaval resoicas. 

Haase canted our sates agert at 
Fax +41.1.713 2433 or tv matt PO Box 
SB. CH-8T35 Langnai. Swfizatsto 


CASH MONEY 

te provtdB far edtange of currencw 
no toe ottrency of yocr eftote. 
wattride, irfsndal anj dtsoeel 
Ptewe me ytw proposals a 
Far. +32.3233 1848 
taopoUftate 10 Die 5 
2000 Antmap. Bd$un 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For fcea bo- 
rim <r advice Tet London 44 1B1 741 
1224 Fax; 44 181 748 E55&’6338 
wrwapptetofuoi* 


Business Services 


TOUR OFRCEM LONDON 
tend Steel - WaB. Phone. Fax. Telex 
Ttt 44 171 290 9000 Fax 171439 7517 


YOUR OFFICE IN NEW YORK 
UatxH, Phone. Fax. Photcany. Typng 
Seretes. Rjrasned OBims. Conference 
Rooms Houty or Dafly flernaL Cal 
516-482-2155 Fax 5UH62-2167. 


Business Travel 


IstffluGinus Class Frequeri TOrefien 
VRxUwoe. Up to 50% oft No capm 
no ream ions Imperial Canada Tel: 
1-514-J4 1-7227 Fax. 1-514-341-7998. 
e-mail address unDenaidogto twi 
MlpihrwwJcigiAmlftnpnW 


Financial Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


soomoNS 

Contact 

BANCOR 

. OF ASIA 

Bankable aaatos to sectxa 

kx vhUb tmeds: 

VSmJRE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Long tom cofeted 
Stcpoded Guarantee 

Fix (B32 $10-9284 
TO (Ka 894-ES8 


(Cammissxxi eemed only 
Broken Commission 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANTEES 

Vote Captai Fkonce Avribfale 
tor Gowmment Projeris and 
Gwemmem ConpaVes 
toat are far sate. 

Large Projeos our Speodty 
Ate. Long Term finance far 
Large and Smal Conpanles 
No ranvrtsston Unfl Rntod 

REPRESEKTAUVE . 
Needed to ad as Uafaon 
Pteasa reply h Engfeto 

VEKTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 


14311 Vetera Bhd, SriH 989 
Enctno, Cafitotria 91436 USA 
fax Noj (818) 805-1698 
TO: (ElBj 760-0422 

Hofenrt Sr Asax. Dda O.G LefysM 


Employment 


General Positions Available 


NEW AGENCY 

IN SEARCH OF 
BUNGUAL PHOTO EDITOfl 
GOOD WOMNG KNOWLEDGE OF 
W0TOSH0P SOFTWARE A MUST. 
Send CV + jtoo inter 
reference renter 6K7B5Z to; 

HGC, 94 nn Ooudeauvflle 
75«a PARS, wtnwHbMRL 


Domestic Positions Wanted 


COUPLE, axperiraced, cfodtourfeuttor, 
oook/botHkeeper. spariehFrendVEn- 
gfcfL USA city. Fte: +351 1-4577352, 


AUCTION SALE through SCP J--F- JWjSViS 8T 5? • -£ ! 
CARIOT fit B. DEPAQUfT, associate | 

d'Aniou, at tJHAMBRE INTEF® EPARTEMENTAL£ L_^ 
NOTA1RES DE RAWS’ 12 avenue Victoria - 75001 Pan. - 


Tuesday October 28, 1997 at 5HI0 p^m. - 2 lots, | 

LA SEYNE-SLR-MER (VAR) 

so-called location "La Benoit Fracbon 

1st lot: LAND 2nd lot: LAND 

with bufcflngs used as cafeteria with several buildings used ^ . 
and union offices for 42a 50ca carpentry tor lha IS- 
Starting Price: FF2,700£00 Starting Price: FF2.100.uuu 

Deposit FF875.000 Deposit: FF525.000 

For information: let Etude of Me JOUVWN, dUPONT-CAWOT =t 
DEPAQU fT. Notaries in Paris 8th, 85 me tf Anjou. Tel.: iO|t -3 b. o. w 
2nd: Me. J.-C. GIRARD, legal representative in Fans oft 
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a * * 1 


’EiTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


v 


PAGE 12 


i.'i* 


A Cruise Back Through Time 


Venerable Cruise Line Evokes Somerset Maugham 


• .. ..J-J'i’: v y\ 
:-W': 


By Vicki Weissman 


T O cruise is not to travel. Travel 
exhausts, demands, rewards, bat 
the cruise comforts, soothes, 
nannies you along. It is the 
choice of the elderly, the fatigued, be- 
sotted lovers and hopeful widows. 

Adventure is not an ingredient. Or so 
1 argued to my husband, Steve, before 
finally agreeing to a voyage in February 
on board the Minerva. 

Launched in April 1 996, the Minerva 
is the latest ship — and the only current 
ship — of Swan Hellenic and heir to a 
great tradition. 

It was with mixed expectations that I 
boarded the Minerva, all 12.500 shining 
new tons of her, at Sri Lanka's port of 
Colombo for the “Arabesque’' section 
of the ship's long voyage from Hong 


Kong to Aqaba. Suddenly we were in 
Somerset Maugham country, with the 


Somerset Maugham country, with the 
crew in their whites, nautical jargon, 
‘palm trees and the Indian Ocean. 

The entire voyage was divided into 
four independent cruise sections, and 
our leg was to take us from Colombo up 
the west coast of India, then across the 
Arabian Sea to the desen worlds of 
Oman, Fujaira, and Dubai. In 16 days 
we would pass through three time zones 
and dip into the Muslim. Hindu. 
Buddhist, Christian and Jewish reli- 
gions, as well as Portuguese and British 
. colonial culture. In addition, we would . 
be entertained by Bobby Winchester at 
the piano and dance to the music of the 
Ken Ames Dream Ticket. With such a 
full schedule, we would clearly need our 
sleep, so we went below to inspect our 
beds. 

On B Deck (which we promptly nick- 
named steerage), at a cost of $6,248 a 
person, we had a twin-bed cabin with 
private bath (shower, no tub), a mini- 
sofa. wardrobe, two sets of drawers, a 
writing desk and a television. There was 
also a small safe. A hair dryer and the 


usual toiletries were provided. Double- 
bed cabins cost the same. Our porthole 
gave os a view, but could not be opened. 
An additional S4d0 would have meant A 
Deck, with a larger, rectangular win- 
dow. 

Our accommodation was a tight fit 
(and I was glad I had some extra 
hangers), but perfectly adequate, fully 
carpeted and air-conditioned. 

Since the ship had plenty of public 
areas, it was not difficult to put up with 
our basic space for 16 days. 

Available to all were the bars, the 
lounge, the smoking room, the library, 
the poolside area and the two upper 
decks. The small cabin area meant room 
service did not make much sense for A- 
and B-Deck passengers, but it was 
there if needed. Housekeeping was 
thorough, and there was an excellent 
laundry. 

Shipboard facilities were extensive. 
Two shops, one with stamps, postcards, 
film, T-shirts and other sundries, the oth- 
er with a good range of duty-free items 
and a small selection of clothes. There 
was also a beauty salon, a massage ser- 
vice. a gym and a movie (heater. 


There were two possibilities for din- 
ing. The Bridge Cafe, self-service at 
lunch and half-service for dinner (you 
choose from the buffet, and the waiter 
brings your food). The Dining Room, 
aft on the Main Decfc was fall service ar 
all times, including breakfast The of- 
ferings were similar and more or less 
Continental in style, with the fare in the 
Bridge Cafe a bit simpler. 

Service was efficient, but since the 
waiters were either Ukrainian or 
Filipino and did not all speak English, 

(he nicer points — waiting to take plates 
until everyone has finished, for example 
— were sometimes difficult to get 
across (despite the helpful list of phrases 
in both languages placed in our cabins at 




tobai -\v & ’.Y-jS ■ ■ '• ■ v* v** 




Gamis, Books and Bars 


Bridge and backgammon were avail- 
able in the card zoom, and the library 
was well stocked with both fiction and 
reference books and a selection of 
fiendishly difficult jigsaw p uzzles 


There were two bars: the Orpheus 
xun, light, airy and popular at lunch- 


Room, light, airy and popular at lunch- 
time, also offered drink service at 
poolside; the Wheeler Bar. traditional 
and wood-paneled, with leather sofas 
and the cocktail pianist Drinks, tea and 
coffee could also be had in the main 
lounge. Since we never had bad weath- 
er, it was quite possible to forget that we 
were at sea, except on our two black-tie 
evenings, when the captain and his of- 
ficers appeared in full dress whites and 
made us all feel highl y n au ti cal 



The food was occasionally first-rate 
(such as a nice salmon terrine and a good 
pastry selection), sometimes reminis- 
cent of school cafeterias (overcooked 
meats and vegetables) and most of the 
time remarkably bland. When we went 
ashore at Fujaira on the Gulf of Oman, 
we found a huge modem covered mar- 
ket knee-deep in fresh fish, fruit, meat 
and vegetables; still, that night we were 
served with produce that seemed to have 
been taken on board at the start of our 
trip. 

I returned from the market with a bag 
full of mangoes, oranges and limes and 
was agreeably surprised when one of the 
dining room staff, watching me fight a 
mango with a blunt knife, took it away 
for the chef to slice properly. Chatting 
with other passengers, I found I was not 
alone in thinking the cuisine could do 
with some improvement. 

But the Minerva’s principal offering 
was that Swan Hellenic trademark, pur- 
poseful culture. Before each port of call 
there were lectures on the customs, re- 
ligion and history of our next destin- 
ation. 

A panel of five lecturers (augmented 
by a professor from Yale traveling as 
cicerone to a group from the United 
States) saw to it that every aspect of die 
itinerary was covered. 

The lectures varied enormously in 
content and delivery. John Marr, a man 


In Oman, a timeless sight: camels grazing -with the moumains ofDhofar in the background. 


A. HnWteEiftacr - 


KIDS 


Aboard a Floating Playground 


By Kirk Johnson 

New York Times Service 


O ne of the joys of taking a sea 
cruise with your children is 
that you can sometimes for- 
get you have them. They 
tend not to fall overboard, but on a big 
cruise ship .with its limitless possibilities 
of exploration, they do disappear for 
long stretches. 

To my 10-year-old twin boys, An- 
thony and Paul, the Windward, a Nor- 
wegian Cruise Lines ship, was like a 
floating antimatter universe away from 
their regular world of home and school 
and responsibility — full of freedoms 
and guilty pleasures and biding places. . 
Often that newfound independence 
made them distinctly hard to find. 
Somewhat paradoxically, though, it 
also made our vacation much more of a 
happy family experience than some oth- 
er trips we’ve taken, notably the week 
we spent together boxed inside a tiny 
motor home in Maine. 


of prodigious learning and enthusiasm, 
talked us through the intricacies of In- 


talked us through the intricacies of In- 
dia, and, when we reached the Emirates, 
Sir Donald Hawley, formerly the British 
ambassador to Oman, was cogent on the 
area’s history and politics. Gerald 
Cadogan, a classicist, provided a nar- 
rative thread for die whole journey. 


A t almost all stops a choice of 
excursion was possible, and 
the day’s program precisely 
defined die difficulty of each 
outing and arrangements for food and 
comfort stops. Buses waited at the quay- 
side and security arrangements were 
strict. Passengers had passes, and a sen- 
tinel stood guard at die head of the 


could see them reflected in the eyes of 
our children. 

And our kids liked the ordinary stuff 
of the boat just as much if not more. 
Elevators can be fun,' for example, when 
you push the buttons then run for the 
stairs in a scrambling race to die next 
deck. So can staying up late to eat at die 
midnight buffet just because you can. 

And, besides die two pools, there was 
the hot tub, which often seemed filled 
with gig gling preadolescent girls intent 
on splashing ray sons. 

Purely by chance we had selected the 
perfect time to try this particular kind of 
vacation. The boys were old enough not 
to need supervision and, within the safe 
confines of die ship, could come and go 
pretty much as they pleased. But they 
were still young enough to want to be 
with us, too. 

There was plenty of room for all of us. 
The ship, die length of two football 
fields, with 10 passenger decks, was 
imm ense — and cruise officials an- 


Caribbean, we sailed only by night, ex- 
cept for the initial 36-hour stretch from 
San Juan to Barbados. We arrived in a 
different port every morning, an itin- 
erary that included (in addition to Bar- 
bados) Sl Lucia, St-Barthelemy, Tor- 
tola in the British Virgin Islands and St, 
Thomas in the U.S- Virgin Islands, be- 
fore die return to San Juan. Our ex- 
cursions on die islands ranged from the 
simple and quiet — our long days on the 
beach on Sl Thomas and Sl- 
Barthelemy — to the jam-packed, like 
our final day in Puerto Rico, into which * 
we squeezed a tour of old San Juan and ' 
a trip to the El Yunque rain forest 
Everywhere but St-Barthelemy. where 
they drive on die right side of the road, 
we took taxis — the better ro meet mope 
residents — and on several islands we 
also took the ship's snorkeling excur- 
sions, which were without question the 
highlight of die vacation for all of us. 


ait* • 


On a cruise ship, togetherness is a 
fluid concept. Our family was able to be 


nounced during the trip that the sfai] 
would be lengthened farther in 19 9> 


gangway throughout a stopover. 
There were occasions wh 


r --^.1 


There were occasions when all 
agreed that the trip had been too long. It 
was also generally felt that India is not a 
country to be seen from the sea, for 
much of its power over our imaginations 
comes from its awe-inspiring land mass 
and teeming rural life. 

Overall the captain, his crew and staff 
could not be faulted. The cruise director 
in particular made heroic efforts to 
please everybody and ran a complex 
scenario with a minim um of fuss and 
confusion. Swan Hellenic is moving 
with the times, and the Minerva is a fine 
cruise ship. It’s just not travel. 


together and yet apart, with just enough 
of each: We didn’t get on one another’s! 
nerves, but still had some wonderful 
family moments. And I think that de- 
spite the white-bread package that 
cruise companies strive to assemble for 
their customers, it can also be an edu- 
cation about the ways of the world, 
including the subculture of the cruise 
boat itself. ' 


would be lengthened farther in 1998 
through a surgical dry-dock procedure 
that would add another 130 feet (49 
: meters). The rooms were s mall, but not 
claustrophobically so. Our cabin had 
spare for a tiny couch and sitting area 
racing a large window, which, at our 
price range at least, offered a view of the 
lifeboats and little else. 


B eing on the ship only at night 
meant less exposure to the 
cruising elements that most 
made my skin crawl, like af- 
ternoon poolside games organized by 
the cruise director. And while there 
were nighttime activities, including a 
kind of Broadway revue and a variety 
show with a stand-up comedian and a 
magician, they were O-K. at best — and 
certainly no competition with the nat- 
ural wonders of the stars and the sounds 
of the sea in utter darkness. Frances and 
I could stand by the rail holding hands, 
enjoying the contrast — the unfathom- 
able ocean and the very human world of 
the ship — and as for our kids . . . well. 


Chaotic and CIiarming 


Vicki Weissman, a free-lance writer 


A dramatic rock formation. Citadel ofSigiriya. in Sri Lanka. 


Fmtn.'EirtoreT living in London, wrote this for The New 
:a. York Times . 


Cruising the Caribbean with kids — 
and there were hundreds of children on 
our trip over the spring school vacation 

— was at times noisy, chaotic, frus- 
trating and fall of wondrous c harms . 
The scenes of island and shipboard life 

— from the villagers in Sl Lucia who 
paddled out in their rafts to sell coconut 
and conch to the snotkelers. and the 
women in Barbados who braided our 
faux dreadlocks, to the volcanic plume 
from Montserrat that dusted our ship 
with ash as we passed — were doubly 
amazing when my wife, Frances, and I 


TWO-STATIBOOM option Crucially, 
we made the extra financial stretch of 
getting two staterooms (though this op- 
tion was considerably less than the cost 
of a suite). 

In theory it .meant that according to 
the ship’s roster, Frances and I were 
staying in separate cabins, since the 
rules require one adult per stateroom. 
Whar it really meant is that after a long 
day hiking and sw imming and exploring 
together, we could retreat to our own 
spaces for a few quiet moments. Since 
our cabins were next door, we could 
pound back and forth our goodnights 
and other simple messages in a kind of 
made- op Morse code that reassured the 
occupants on both sides of fee wall 

On our cruise, called the Exotic 


I * 1 * • 


they’d show up sooner or later. 
The cruise directors offered n 


The cruise directors offered no short- 
age of things for the kids to do, ranging 
from a shipwide scavenger hunt to a no- i 
alcohol teen disco nighL 


The basic charge for two adults and 
two children for two staterooms, in- 
cluding round-trip airfare from Newark 
International Airport to San Juan, was 
$5,500. which included $320 of optional 
insurance. That total also included 
$470 in port charges, government taxes 
and fees. 


■ * 1 1 * - :• * 4 


Alfresco in Auckland: Life on the Waterside Hums With Activity 


By Bruce Weber 

Veil York 7mki'i ScnikV 


A uckland, New Zeal- 
and — One early evening 
in Auckland, New Zeal- 
and's largest city, I was 
riding a bicycle along Ta- 
maki Drive, the harborside boulevard 
that runs from the center of the city 
along the water into the eastern suburbs. 


The light was a lovely, early summer 
son, glinting off the blue-green waters 
of the Hauraki Gulf, illuminating the 
still islands that separate the city from 
the South Pacific. Sailboats dotted the 


the South Pacific. Sailboats dotted the 
gulf; Auckland, where one out of every 
six residents owns a boat, calls itself the 
City of Sails. 

The footpath along the drive, lined 
with native pohutukawa trees and 
shaded by their spreading, spectacularly 
articulated branches, was busy with jog- 
gers and strollers and other cyclists. I 
crossed the long causeway over Hobson 


Bay, passed the Takaparawa Regional 
Park, where several pickup rugby games 


Park, where several pickup rugby games 
, were in progress, then rode through 
Mission Bay, a youthful neighborhood 
of cafes and clubs where it seemed as if 
every bod) 1 was out — Frisbees flying 
across the road — and picked my way 
through the traffic, around the bend to 
Kohimararaa Beach. 


Biathlon at the Beach 


There, a biathlon was starting. On one 
part of the beach, great waves of athletes 
galloped across the sand and dived in, 
swimming away from shore toward the 
volcano- like profile of Rangitoto Is- 
land; a few hundred yards our, the swim- 
mers rounded a buoy and turned, swim- 
ming parallel to the beach. 

It’s hard to reconcile an urban center 
of more than one million people with a 
fife predicated on the outdoors, but this 


impressive cocktail-hour display of ac- 
tivity — it was all over in an hour, and 
by the time darkness had fallen, the 
Mission B&y restaurants were all bust- 
ling — had die feel of ritual. 

1 shouldn’t have been surprised. 
Auckland is anomalous only by its size 
in New Zealand, a nation that defines 
itself by its thrilling natural beauty and 
the opportunities ir affords for adven- 
ture. Nearly a third of all Kiwis, as the 
natives call themselves, live in Auck- 
land, where the work is. and so they find 
ways to indulge their physical lives in 
the urban environment. It’s a city of 
walkers, runners, cyclers, swimmers, 
sailors — and the occasional loopier 
endeavor. Downtown one afternoon, I 
spotted a man attached to a tether leap- 
ing from the roof of a hotel. He skittered 
down the side of the building, maybe 30 
stories, not really rappelling because he 
was heading down race first, pushing off 
the wall with his feet and bouncing 
several stories at a time. It’s called rap- 
jumping, and you can pay to do it if 

you’re so inclined (I wasn't) 

The history of Auckland dates from 
the Maori settlements of the 1300s, but 
its current incarnation is much more 
modem. It was the capital of New Zea- 
land from 1840 to 1865 (when that 
status was transferred to Wellington), 
though it was not until the early pan of 
this cenmry — following a gold rash in 
nearby Thames — that the city began 
the growth that continues today. 

Auckland is a nice-looking city, not a 
beautiful one, more notable as a place to 
live than to visiL It is sprawling, with 
some interes ting, busy neighborhoods 
and active night life. But its real dis- 
tinction is the water that nearly sur- 
rounds iL 

From the harbor, die city slopes 
steeply upward. Or, looked at another 
way, Auckland spills a visitor to the 
shore. After spending my first morning 


wandering a little aimlessly around the 
grounds of the Auckland Domain, the 


city’s verdant central park, I found my- 
self drawn by gravity, really, down 


Queen Street, the main shopping 
boulevard, to die busy wharves, where 


boulevard, to die busy wharves, w 
life gathers around the ferry docks. 
You can depart from there, it so 


can depart from there, it seems, 
to anywhere. The steady parade of boats 
carries commuters back and forth to the 
north shore suburbs, day trippers and 
weekenders to the gulf islands mur grow 
wilder and less settled the farther out 
you go; it’s two and a half hours to Great 
Barrier Island, the last outpost before 
the vast expanse of the Pacific and a 
haven for bird-watching and off-road 
biking. 

I was considerably less ambitious, 
opting for a less strenuous 20-minute 
trip to Devonpon, a pleasant village that 
was once a hippie haven but now bears 
die un m i s ta k a b le signs of upscale chic. 
It’S a little like Sausalrto was 20 years 
ago, an especially appropriate compar- 
ison because from across the water, the 
Auckland, skyline can remind you of 
San Francisco's. 


dow shopping, walking. 

Auckland is tourist friendly, but it 
also can feel a bit bland. Its hotels are 
numerous and various but without dis- 
tinctive reputation; I found yon can stay 
at decent accommodations cheaply. 

The Auckland Museum is an impos- 
ing edifice with some commanding dis- 
plays rendering die history of the South 
Pacific, including an intricately carved 
and burnished Maori war canoe dating 
from 1836, and a stuffed reconstruction 
of a 12-foot moa, a once-native but now 
extinct flighiless bird. 

There is also some kitsch — I par- 
ticularly enjoyed Kelly Tarlton’s Un- 





■aft* 5 

- hfcJgP ■ , .1 


Auckland, where one out of every six residents owns a boat, calls itself the City of Sails. 


IP. FenenyExpJfliw ■' 


derwater World and Antarctic Encounter, 
a hilarious aquarium. Built underground, 
in a network of old storm-water holding 
tanks, it includes a moving footpath that 
travels through an acrylic tunnel; die fish 
are swimming above and around you. 


sidedly thrown pots. Perhaps it is unfair 
to expect Auckland to deliver die kinds 
of indoor experiences that one travels to 
other places for. The appeal of New 
Zealand, after all, has most to do with 
its outdoor splendor. And for a visitor, 
Auckland functions best as an 


known as Northland, or hiking on thejVs! 
magnificent tracks of the South Island. \v , 
Which brings me back to the night ofv>' 
die biathlon. After a few days of waJk-»L 
- mg the conventional tourist paths oKB 


indoors and our Beyond that, the efficiently arranged way station, a 
galleries I visited were reminiscent of pleasant stopover on the way to air- 


Auckland, feeling like an outsider — 
little as though I was missing something** dL" 


hippiedom — ■ local work with sunbursts 
and vegetable motifs and a lot of Lop- 


pleasant stopover on the way to air- 
borne sightseeing in Tanpo, deep-sea 
fishing off the tong northwestern spit 


— my evening jaunt on a bike made me > 
feel for the first time as though Td-a 
gained entrance to something special: 
the bloodstream of toe city. I; 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


PAGE 13 




THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 


MOVIE GUIDE 


* Malaria: How Not to Get It 


L 


By Roger Collis 

International Herald Tribune 


I 

V 


T HE day before I was dne to leave 
for a conference in New Delhi, I 
look my first tablet of meflo- 
quine (Larrarn), the latest high- 
tech drug for malaria. I’d left It too late to 
start with chioroquine, the conventional 
choice of prophylactic. 

I never made it to the airport. The next 
morning l was struck down with vertigo, 
nausea, and whai I can only describe as a 
panic anack. 1 sent a message that I could 
not give my speech ai the conference. I 
put it down to stress and working late to 

prepare the trip. 

I might have avoided acute embar- 
rassment and recriminations had I 
known that I was victim of the side 
effects of mefloquine, which can include 
sleep disturbances, nightmares and anxi- 
ety attacks. 

Anti- malari al drugs have a history of 
side effects. But as malaria becomes 
ever more dangerous with new virulent 
resistant st rains , so drugs for prophy- 
laxis and treatment become more toxic. 
Business travelers, forced to choose be- 
tween side effects or catching the dis- 
ease. are tempted to take a chance on 
short trips to the main cities in Africa, 
India and Southeast Asia. Did I really 
need to worry about malaria oo a quick 
trip to New Delhi? 

TAKING IT MRIOUSLY 

Richard Dawood, a London physician 
who specializes in travel medicine and is 
editor of “Travelers’ Health,” says: 
“Malaria needs to be taken very se- 



aria is not a disaster. It's recognizing it 
and treating it; that’s the real problem. 

‘ ‘I'm always a bit careful when people 
say, ‘I’m just going to Delhi so I don't 
need to take anything.’ Li doesn't turn 
out that way. Even in an urban situation, 
you land in rural outskirts. An air-con- 
ditioned limo doesn't protect you. It only 
takes one bite. And malari a is a killer; 
it’s too dangerous not to take drugs.” 

One hundred years ago this August, 
Captain Ronald Ross, a British military 
medic stationed in India, established that 


dACin. 

MnteAxnVJHT 


it was female anopheles mosquitoes that 
were spreading the malarial parasite as 
they fed on human blood. It was a mo- 
numental discovery that promised the 
near extinction of the disease, through 
insecticide programs and prophylactic 
drugs such as quinine and latex 
chioroquine by the mid 1950s. In I960, 
the World Health Organization was con- 
fident that malaria could be all but abol- 
ished, with about 4 million cases world- 
wide by 1980. 

It didn't work out that way. Malaria is 
on the march again. The 700 scientists 
who met in Hyderabad. India, two 
months ago to marie the centennial of 
Ross’s discovery had little cause to cel- 
ebrate. According to the latest WHO 
estimates, malaria kills up to 3 milli on 
people worldwide and sickens more than 
200 million every year. In the next three 
years. WHO predicts that the worldwide 
incidence will increase by 16 percent 
Around 20 million Western travelers are 
at risk every year. 

There are four types of plasmodium, 
the malarial parasite: Plasrnodium viva: r, 
P. ovale, P. malariae and P. falciparum. 
None of them is any fun. But falciparum 
is the deadliest the one you are most 
likely to catch, especially in Africa, and 


die one most resistant to drugs. One 
percent of falciparum victims die, ac- 
cording to WHU. 

Dr. Peter Trigg, a physician at the 
WHO Malaria Unit in Geneva, says: ‘In 
virtually every country that has falcipar- 
um malaria there is some degree of re- 
sistance to chioroquine. That does not 
mean that it is completely ineffective; it 
still has a role to play in prophylaxis and 
treatment. We still recommend taking 
chioroquine plus proguanil in India, Sri 
Lanka, Pakistan, parts of Bangladesh!, 

Solomon Islands in the Pacific, Thai- 
land, Malaysia and Indonesia. Most tour- 
ist areas and major cities are not at risk. 

“Mefloquine, in spite of its side ef- 
fects, is the recommended drug in areas 
with high chioroquine resistance and 
high risk of infection — countries in 
Africa, the Indo-Chinese Peninsula, 
Papua .New Guinea and the Amazon 
bason. On tbe borders between Thailand, 
Cambodia and Bozina, where there is a 
high degree of mefloquine resistance, 
we recommend doxy cy cline, an anti- 
biotic with an anti-malarial action. 

“ Southeast Asia — Vietnam, Burma, 
northern Thailand — seems to be the area 



Vanessa Williams, left, Nia Long, center, and VivicaA. Fox in “Soul Food.’ 


first appear.” Dawood says. "Meflo- 
quine is first choice for East and West 
Africa, parts of cemral India. Chioroquine 
alone is useful for central America; 
Chioroquine plus proguanil is useful for 
most parts of Soum America and parts of 
India and Sri Lanka, but not all Me- 
floquine is necessary for the Amazon 
region, parts of India and. all of Africa. 

a new comm nation “The latest drug 
is Malarone, a combination of proguanil 
and atovaquone, which was licensed in 
Britain last December for the treatment 
of resistant malaria. It has few side ef- 
fects and I think we’ll see it registered 
soon as a prophylactic. Tbe mefloquine 
issue will disappear as mefloquine re- 
sistance spreads and new rations like 
Malarone become available.” 

The best defense a gainst malaria, of 
course, is not to be bitten. Avoid being a 
soft target If you are outdoors, use an 
insect repel lent c ontaining at least 20 
percent of DEET (diethyi-toluamide) on 
exposed skin. 


Soul Food 

Directed by George Tillman 
Jr US. 

In “Soul Food,” family ma- 
triarch Mama Joe or Big 
Mama (Irma Hall), presides 
over bar battling Chicago 
brood by dishing out equal 
parts advice, recitations mom 
tbe “good book" and cook- 
ing instructions during Sun- 
day family dinner gatherings. 
While “Soul Food” aims to 
be the kind of hearty, satis- 
fying stray that sticks to your 
ribs, it comes across more litre 
an appetizer ora midnight raid 
on the fridge. Tasty, but easily 
forgotten. Vanessa Williams 
plays the successful lawyer 
Ten. Her constant fights with 
sisters Maxine (Vivica A. 
Fox) and Bird (Nia Long) 
over money, careen, com 
bread, any and everything, are 
fueled by Ten ’s long-simmer- 
ing resentment over Maxine’s 
first stealing and then mar- 
rying her boyfriend nearly a 
decade earlier. Throw in cous- 


in Faith, the - newly returned 
former exotic dancer and 
troublemaker, and mysterious 
Uncle Pete, who never leaves 
his room, and yon have a re- 
cipe for loud-talking, eye- 
popping, neck-rolling drama. 
(Comae O'Neal Parker. WP) 

Different for Girls 

Directed by Richard Spence. 
U.K. 

If it weren’t so beautifully 
understated, Steven Mackin- 
tosh's. portrayal of-a shy but 
determinedly independent 
transsexual named Kim 
Foyle in “Different for 
Girls” might qualify as the 
stunt performance of tbe 
year. Kim, who is blond, 
thin-Lipped and cautious, ra- 
diates an air of wounded em- 
battlement as she embarks on 
a new life as a writer of oc- 
casional verses for a greet- 
ing-card company. And foe 
subtlety with which Mack- 
intosh conveys her compli- 
cated mixture of vulnerabil- 


ity, defensiveness and pride 
makes her one of foe most 
fully realized characters to be 
portrayed on foe scree n in a 
long time. An opening flash- 
back remembers Kim when 
she was Karl, a viciously 
secuted English 
school student whose only 
defender against savage 
group beatings was a spirited 
roughneck rebel named Paul 
Prentice (Rupert Graves). 
“Different for Girls” is a 
modem Cinderella story 
masquerading as a gender- 
bending serious comedy. It 
effuses foe same mood of 
good-hearted cheer as 
“Beautiful Thing,” foe 
likable film about two Eng- 
lish working-class teenage 
boys who tremulously fall m 
love. “Different for Girls” is 
acted with almost cartoonish 
gusto by everyone except 
Mackintosh, whose perfor- 
mance remains subdued and' 
exquisitely shaded. 

( Stephen Holden, NYT) 


d»* R«to 


TheSwdt 

Hereafter 

Directed by Atom Egoyan. 
Canada. 

The lone special effects shot 
in “The Sweet Hereafter” is 
beautifully executed and ter- 
rible to see. A school bus 
skids off an icy road and sinks 
into a frozen lake, taking with 
it foe children of a tiny, once 
neighborly Adirondack town. 
Presented midway through 
this biggest and most wrench- 
ing film by the brilliantly ana- 
lytical Atom Egoyan, tins im- 
age becomes foe basis for a 
many-faceted moral inquiry. 
In foe aftermath of such 
calamity, bow does life go on? 
Then Mitchell Stephens, Esq. 
(Ian Holm) arrives in foe area 
with a self-appointed mission. 
“Letme direct your rage, "he 
exhorts one prospective cli- 
ent For all foe suffering it 
describes, this film also nas 
foe exhilaration of crystal- 
clear artistic vision. 

(Janet Maslin, NYT ) 


ARTS GUIDE 


OPERA SEASON 


BRITAIN 


London 

Hayward Gallary; tel: (171) 928- 
3144. open daily. To Jan. 4: "Ob- 
jects of Desre: The Modem Still 
Life." Traces the evolving lan- 
guage af modem art through still 
fifes: from Paris at the turn of the 
century and the experimentation of 
the European avant-garde after 
Worid War I. to the impact of Sur- 
realism, Pop Art and post-modern- 
ist art in recent decades. Features 
150 paintings, sculptures and ob- 
jects created by more than 70 
artists, inducting Picasso and Ma- 
tisse, Ensor, Magritte. Arman. 
Kahlo, Christo. Cindy Sherman 
and Dan Flavin. 

Victoria & Abort Museum, tel: 
(171) 938-8441, open daily. To 
March 29: "Colours of the Indus: 
Costume and Textiles of 
Pakstan." Mare than 130 cos- 
tumes and textiles dating back to 
the 1 850s: silk and cotton dresses, 
coats decorated in goto thread, 
turbans, tobacco bags and qufits. 




Paris 

Grand Palms, tel: 01*44*13-17- 
17, dosed Tuesdays. Continuing/ 
To Jan. 12: “Prud’hon, 1758- 
1 823. M A retrospective of the works 
ol the French painter who Intro- 
duced 19th-century Romanticism 
in painting. Also, to Jan. 26: 
"Georges de La Tour. 1593-1652." 
A survey of the French painter's 
works. Beggars, players of the 
hurdy-gurdy and holy figures were 
the artist's favonte themes until he 
turned to figures caught In the bght 
and shadow of candle names. 


GERMANY 


sterdam, London and Paris, and to 
the United States. Features works 
by Kandnsky. Beckmann, Feirv- 
iriger and Grosz, among others. 

Munich 

Kimsthalle der Hypo-Kulturstff- 
tung, tel: (89) 22-44-12, -open 
daily. Continuing/To Jan. 11 : "Co- 
bra." Documents the work of the 
International art group whose 
members tried to revive Expres- 
sionism. Founded In 1948, the 
group cSssoived in 1951. The ex- 
hibition brings together 130 works 
by Alechlnsky. Appel. Corneille,. 
Jom and Constant 

■ »«»«» 

Thessaloniki 

Museum of Byzantine Culture, 
tel: 131 ) 86-65-70. open dally. Con- 
tinuing/ To Dec. 31 : "Treasures of 
Mount Ath 06 ." Paintings, icons, 
manusenpts and consecrated ves- 
sels from toe monastenes of Mount 
Atoos. 

M ITALY 
Florence 

Palazzo Pitfi, tel: (55) 213-440, 
closed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
Jan. 6: "The Magnificence of the 
Medici Court.” Art In Florence In 
the late 1 6th century. 

■ LUXEMBOURG 

Casino Luxembourg, tel: (352) 
22-50-45. closed Tuesdays. To 
Nov. 30: "The 90s: A Family of 
Man?" Approximately 100 photo- 
graphs and videos document the 
role of man in his dally environ- 
ment. Features works by Christian 
Bohan ski, Nan Goldin and Ofiviero 
Toscani. 



Berlin 

Neue Natkmslgalerfe, tel: (30) 
266-2653, closed Mondays. To 
Jan. 4: “Exil: Ftochtund Emigration 
Europtuscher Kunstier. 1933- 
1945.” An exhibition of 130 works 
by painters, sculptors, architects 
and photographers who fled 
Hitler's Germany to Prague. Am- 


<W 


N D 


Geneva 

Muses d*Art et d’Hlstoire, tel: 
(22) 418-2600, closed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To Nov. 16: "L’Art 
d'irmter. Falsifications. Manipula- 
tions. Pastiches." A selection of 30 
pastiches of paintings of the Italian 


“ U milled . " by Robert Go- 
lier. on show in New York. 

Quattrocento, that were created at 
toe turn of this century. 

MJL N.TEDB TATiT: 

New York 

Brooklyn Museum, tel: (71 8) 638- 
5000. dosed Mondays and Tues- 
days. To Jan. 4: "Monet and toe 
Meefitenanean." More than 60 
works created by Monet during his 
several trips to toe French and Itali- 
an Rivieres In 1884 and 1888. Fea- 
tures views of toe olive groves at 
Bordtghera, of toe pines at Cap 
d' Antibes, as well as several works 
executed while in Venice in 1 908. 
Museum of Modern Art, tei: (21 2) 
708-9400. closed Wednesdays. To 
Jan. 20: "On toe Edge: Contem- 
porary Art from toe Weiner and 
Elaine Dannheisser Collection." 
More than 80 paintings, sculp- 
tures, video installations, photo- 
graphs and drawings are Included 
in this recent donation of works by 
European and American artists. 
Features works by Carl Andre, 
Joseph Beuys, Tony Cragg, Jeff 
Koons and SJgmar Polke, among 
many others. 

Whitney Museum of American 
Art, tel: (212) 570-3633, dosed 
Mondays and Tuesdays. Tb Jan. 
11: “Richard Dfebenkom." More 
than 150 paintings and works on 


paper or other materials by toe 
California painter (1922-1993). 
Dlebenkom embraced the ab- 
straction of his American contem- 
poraries and, at the same time, 
steeped himself In the figurative 
tradition of Cezanne and Matisse 
to fuse the two Influences to create 
art anchored in geometry but sat- 
urated with color. The exhibition 
gives special emphasis to abstract 
canvases and drawings from the 
early years. The exhibition will 
travel to Fort Worth, Washtogton 
and San Francisco. 

Washington 

The Phillips Collection, tei: (202) 
387-2151, dosed Mondays. To 
Jan. 4: “Arthur Dove: A Retro- 
spective Exhibition." More than 70 
paintings by the American painter 
(1880-1 946). A pioneer ol Abstract 
pointing in the United States, Dove 
assembles flowers, leaves, paper, 
cloth, wood and metal In witty jux- 
tapositions. The late works consist 
of boldly co n trasting geometric 
forms In open fields of color. 

C1QSINO BOON 

Oct 11: “Edge of Madness: Sa- 
rajevo, A City and Its People Under 
Siege." The Royal Photographic 
Society, Bath. 

Oct 12: "The Power of Erotic 
Design." Design Museum, Lon- 
don. 

Oct 12: "Ulama: Jeu de Balle dee 
Ofmeques aux Azteques* Muses 
Olym pique, Lausanne. 

Oct. 12: "Vincent van Gogh: The 
Drawings." Van Gogh Museum, 
Amsterdam. 

Oct 12: “J.M.W. Turner 1775- 
1851.” Fukuoka Art Museum, 
Fukuoka, Japan. 

Oct 13: fl 800-1 938: Prague, 
Capital Secrete dee Avant- 
Gardes." Musee des Beaux-Arts, 
Dijon. 

Oct 13: "Kudaia Kan non: Une 
Sculpture du Japon Anden." 
Musee du Louvre, Paris. 

Oct 13: “King of toe WOrid: A 
Mughal Manuscript tram the Royal 
Library, Windsor Castle." Sadder 
Gallery, Washington. 


CROSSWORD 


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© New York Times/Edited by fPUl Shorts. 


As the curtain goes up on the 
1997-1998 season, here is a 
sampling of the productions at 
some of the world s major opera 
houses . The list will continue in 
weeks to come. 

Behun 

Deutsche Oper Berlin, tel: (49) 34 
38 401. Christian Thielemann con- 
ducts a new production of “Le 
Nozze d Figaro" and a revival of 
“Lohengrin. " Eva Marton sings toe 
title, role In a new production of 
Ponchieli's "La Gioconda,” con- 
ducted by Marcello Viotti and dr- 
ected by Filippo Saryust The com- 
plete Ring Is performed in 
November and In February, under 
Jiri Koto's baton, in January and 
February, toe Deusche Oper 
travels to Tokyo and Yokohama. 

Copenhagen 

The Royal Theatre, tel: 33-14-10- 
02. New productions include 
Verdi's "Falstatt” Mozarts “ido- 
meneo” and Wagner's "Tristan 
und Isolde, ” staged by David 
Pountney. Also, Philip Glass's 
“Orphee” (premiere) and Gluck's 
“Orteo et Euridlce." Revivals fea- 
ture "Madama Butterfly." 
Poulenc's "Dialogue des Carmel- 
ites,” Strauss's “Arabella." “Lo- 
hengrin.” Prokofiev's “Love of the 
Three Oranges" and 'TurandoL" 

London 

EngBah National Opera, tei: (171) 
632-8300. ENO presents 17 operas 
at the London Coliseum. Among 
the eight new productions, British 
composer Gavin Bryar’s "Doctor 
Ox’s Experiment" (world premiere). 
The revivals indude works by Moz- 
art, Puccini, Tchaikovsky and Gil- 
bert and SulBvan. 

The Royal Opera, tei: (171) 304- 
4000. With the house at Covent 
Garden dosed for two years, the 
RoyaJ Opera performs at the Royal 
Festival Hall (tel: (171) 960-4242), 
toe Royal Albert Hail ((171) 589- 
821 2), the Barbican Theatre ((1 71 ) 
636-8891) and the Shaftesbury 
Theatre ((171) 379-5399). "Julius 
Caesar” launches toe season, fol- 
lowed by Rameau’s "Platee" and 
Britten's “The Turn of the Screw," 
conducted by Colin Davis and dir- 
ected by Deborah Warner. The 
season also features “Otello," “II 
Barbie re d SlvlgBsC’ a new pro- 
duction of Britten's “Paul Bunyan," 
“Lb Nozze dJ Figaro" and “Cod' 
Fan Tutte." 

Lyon, France 

Op4ra de Lyon, tel: 04-72-00-45- 
46. Two commissioned worid 
premieres: Peter Eotvos's "Three 
Sisters” and Sergio MenozzTs 
“Pinocchio." New productions of 
Busoni's “Doktor Faust," conduc- 
ted by Kent Nagano” and 
Wolfgang Rihm's “Jacob Lera." 
Three variations on Orpheus myth: 
Offenbach's "Orphee aux Enters.” 
Montevertf’s "L'Ortao” and 
Gluck's “Orphee at Eurydce.” 
From toe repertoire. Britten’s “Mid- 
summer Night's Dream,” 
Prokofiev’s "Love of toe Three Or- 
anges" and Humperdinck’s 
“Hansel und Grate! " 

Milan 

Teatro alia Scala, tei: (39) 2-860- 
787 (for callers outside Milan). Ric- 
canjo Mutl conducts Verdi's “FaJ- 
statf, " directed by Giorgio StrehSer 
with Juan Pore in toe title role: ‘La 
Traviata," with Andrea Rost, Gi- 
useppe Sabbatini and Renata 
Bruson; “Macbeth," directed by 
Graham Vick; “Die Zaubertiote." 
directed by Roberto De Simone 
and Puccini's “Manon LescauC 
directed by .Uliana Cavani. Other 
productions indude Nino Rota's “II 
CappellQ di Pagila di Firenze," 
conducted by Bruno Campanella 
and directed by Pier Luigi Fid: a 
Meryinsky Theater production of 
“Kovanchtna,” conducted by 
Valery Gergiev: Donizetti's “Linda 


di Chamounix!” conducted by 
Roberto Abbado with Edita 
Gruberova as Linda; Weber's “Der 
Fretechutz," conducted by Donald 
Runnldes and Donizetti's 
"Lucrezia Borgia.” directed by Gi- 
anluigi Gelmetti. 

Pans 

Oprira Basts le, tel: 01-44-73-13- 
99. Georges Pretre and Fablo Luisr 
alternate in conducting a new pro- 
duction of Turandot”; new pro- 
ductions also indude "Der Rosen- 
kavaller," Franz Lobar's “Die 
Lustige WFtwe,” Traviata," 
Tristan," "L'ltaHana in Algerf," 
“Lulu" and a worid creation of 
“Salammbo,” by the French com- 
poser Philippe Fenelon (bom 
1952). From toe repertory. Robert 
Wilson directs Debussy's “PeBeas, 
et Melisande," under James Corv 
Ion with Jose Van Dam: Jeffrey 
Tate conducts Kurt WeiB's “Maha- 
gonny"; Robert Careen directs 
“Nabucco." Also. Tosca,* “Cos! 
Fan Tutte," "Carmen.’’ Britten’s 
“Billy Budd" and Tchaflcovsky's 
"Eugene Oneguine.” 

Thefitre des Champs-Bysees, 
tel: 01-49-52-50-00. The Maryin- 
sky Theater offers new produc- 
tions of Mussorgsky’s "Boris 
Godunov" and Prokofiev's "Be- 
trothal in Monastery.” Valery Ger- 
giev conducting. "Rdefio" is a co- 
production with the Welsh National 
Opera, and Its earlier version “Le- 
on ore,” is a co-production with the 
Opera de Lausanne. 


TMdtre du CMtelet, tel: 01-40- 
28-28-40. Four staged operas: 
“Parsifal," under Semyon Bych- 
kov’s baton with Matt! Satin inen 
and Waltraud Merer; Hump- 
erdinck's “Hansel und Gretel,” 
staged by Yannis Kokkos, with 
Dame Gwyneth Jones singing the 
role of Gertrud; Ligeti's “Le Grand 
Macabre,” tflrected by Peter Sel- 
lars and conducted by Esa-Pekka 
Salonen; and Berg's “Wozzeck," 
conducted by DanteTBarenboirn 
and staged by Patrice Chereau., 
wyDam Christie conducts 
Rameau’s “Zoroastre" and Jeffrey 


Tate leads Act ill of “Gotterdam- 
merung," both In concert versions. 

SrurraANT 

Staatathaoter tel: (711) 202-090. 
Lottiar Zagrasak conducts the 
premieres at Palish comp os er Ka- 
rol Szymanowski's “King Roger." 
“Die Entfuhrung aus dem SeraJI" 
and Tosca.” Other premieres are 
“Rdefio" and Handel's "Aktina." 
Among the revivals, “Die Zauber- 
fiote." "La Boheme” and Shos- 
takovich's “Lady Macbeth von 
Mzensk.” Thirteen repertoire op- 
eras complete toe season. 





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WAS IT THOSE HEADY 

VANILLA-SCENTED DAYS IN TAHITI? 
OR JUST SOME STRANGE MAGIC IN 
THE WOODWORK OF RAFFLES HOTEL? 

Either way, when Signor Gambicini and his bride-to-be ended their 
world tour in Singapore, they approached the concierge with an nxgent 
request. They absolutely, definitely, simply had to be married before 
the end of the week. One glance at the bonfires raging in those dark 
Mediterranean eyes and the concierge knew that here was a passion 
that would brook no denial. “1*11 attend to it," he murmured. And then, 
whilst summoning up his strength to maintain the calm composure for 
which he was famous, he launched into a spate of frenetic activity. 
Phone calls were made to Milan, London and Paris. Guest lists drawn 
up. Air tickets arranged. Even a church was (bund in Singapore with an 

Italian speaking priest Cupid , , - himself could not have done 

belter. So, finally, as the last peal of wedding bells 

faded on the evening air, I 1 a question was put to the 

redoubtable concierge. Did t ^ iese hie less ministrations 

of the past week indicate the " " presence of a romantic streak 
lurking beneath that carefully composed exterior? The concierge considered 
for a moment, then casually flicked a sliver of confetti from his tunic. 
Let's just say," he smiled, "that I’m a great fan of Luciano Pavarotti.' 

A RAFFLES INTERNATIONAL HOTEL 
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


PAGE 15 


- i 


Indonesia Faces 
IMF Bailout Plan 
With Confidence 


V 


Cae&edbjOwSufFamUspaxha 

JAKARTA — Indonesia is 
not worried about conditions 
that would accompany finan- 
cial assistance from the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund 
and other nations to bail it out 
of its financial crisis, a senior 
official said Thursday. 

“If we do our homework 
well,” said State Secretary 
Murdiono, “the bank will not 
request too many condi- 
tions.” 

Two teams from the fund 
will arrive in J akar ta this 
week to begin discussions on 
an economic program and to 
provide technical assistance 
for financial-sector reform, 
said Michael Camdessus, the 
IMF’s managing director. 

“The IMF strongly sup- 
ports the approach that has 
been followed by Indonesia, 
which sees this as an occasion 
to strengthen its economic 
policies even if fundamentals 
are basically sound,” Mr. 
Camdessus said in a state- 
ment 

President Suharto of In- 
donesia said Jakarta was 
sounding out other Interna- 
tional agencies, including die 
IMF, as a “precautionary” 
measure. 

Indonesia is die third coun- 
try, after Thailand and the 
Philippines, to turn to the fund 
for foreign-exchange support 
since Bangkok was forced to 
let its currency fall July 2, 
triggering cnrrency and 
stock-market turmoil in other 
Southeast Asian countries. 

Indonesia's rupiah has lost 
almost SO percent of its value 
against the dollar in the en- 
suing currency thrmoil. 

But some analysts criti- 
cized Mr. Suharto’s quest for 
help as premature and warned 
that assistance from interna- 
tional finance institutions 
usually came with tough con- 
ditions attached. 


i 


Rizal Ramly, economist at 
Econit, a consulting group, 
said the move was “too 
hasty” and reflected die gov- 
ernment's “low self-es- 
teem.” 

Mr. Ramly said that an 
IMF aid package would come 
with long-term obligations 
that would burden Indone- 
sians, including measures to 
reduce demand that would 
only bring lower purchasing 
power and the ruin of middle- 
arid small-sized businesses. 

He added that die economy 
did not need “to be treated in 
an emergency ward” because 
its fundamentals were much 
stronger than those of the 
Philippines and Thailand. 

Mr. Murdioao said Indone- 
sia had enough foreign-ex- 
change reserves to fund five 
months of imports and had 
substantial standby loans, so 
it was actually only seeking 
“an umbrella before the rains 
falL” 

Mr. S uhar to appointed 



U.S. China Visit 
Brings No Sales 

Boeing Pact Still Sought 


Tfht HJkajnbr MfegUni Rm 

The hardware behind file high-speed Internet connection as displayed in Washington by backers of file system. 


Researchers Soup Up the Internet 

Mr. Suharto appointed a 

System’s Next Generation Has Arrived at U.S. Universities 


help 

the country’s economy. Wid- 
jojo Nitisastro, 70. was 
named to a special post to 
coordinate with the IMF and 
other institutions to help ease 
die crisis. 

Mr. Widjojo. 70, is a vet- 
eran economist and one of the 
architects of Mr. Suharto's 30- 
year-old regime, known as the 
New Older. He is among those 
credited for Indonesia's re- 
covery from near bankruptcy 
and chaos in the mid-1960s to 
become one of die world's 
fastest-growing economies. 

He represented Indonesia 
at the United Nations in the 
early stages of his career and 
later led the Planning Min- 
istry, the agency responsible 
for development planning, 
and then became coordinat- 
ing minister for economics 
and finance. 


By Rajiv Chandrasekaran . rf “ 

wishing,™ Port Service lall0IL 


the country with the simu- 


Alan Millman had de- 
veloped what he thought was 
a “really cool” three-dimen- 
sional computer model of the 
h uman ear. Displayed on a 
big-screen monitor, the sim- 
ulation could smoothly zoom 
into the ear's nooks and cran- 
nies, simply with the move- 
ment of a hand-held pointer. 

But when Mr. Millman, an 
assistant professor at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Chicago, 
tried to ran his program on the 
Internet two weeks ago, the 
ear appeared frozen* on the 
screen. 

“The Net was just too slow 
to do what we wanted to do,' ’ 


said Mr. Millman , who had 
(AFP. Reuters) ■ hoped to train students across 


This week, he found sal- 
vation in something called 
“Internet^" 

It’s a collaborative effort 
among research universities, 
the National Science Foun- 
dation and several technology 
companies to get around toe 
traffic jams and speed limits 
on today’s commercial Inter- 
net by creating an ultra-fast, 
membe re-only network. 

In service experimentally 
at 12 universities, it allows 
users to send and receive data 
as much as 100 times more 
quickly than on toe normal 
Internet. In many ways, the 
project represents a sneak pre- 
view of me Internet's future. 
Just as today’s Internet started 
in the 1960s and '70s for uni- 


versity researchers, the tech- 
nologies that rnalre Internet 
work conld migrate into the 
broader, commercial Internet 
over toe next year or two. 

The most significant devel- 
opment, researchers say, will 
be toe ability to send very 
large files over toe Internet at 
near real-time speeds. For 
businesses, that could mean 
having high-quality video 
conference calls or t ransmit - 
ting vo lumin ous data files. For 
ordinary people at home, it 
could mdse possible toe trans- 
mission of clear television im- 
ages and CD-quality sound. 

Started a year ago with 34 
member universities, the 
project has blossomed to in- 
clude 112 educational insti- 
tutions that collectively have 
invested more than $50 mil- 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


New Team Aims to Revamp Los Angeles Times 


By Howard Kurtz 

and William Gai borne 

Washington Past Service 

Shelby Coffey 3d has 
resigned as editor of the Los 
Angeles limes rather than 
work with the paper's ag- 
gressive new publisher, 
sources at toe newspaper 
said. 

Mr. Coffey’s departure 
comes weeks after Mark 
Willes, chief executive of 
parent company. Times Mir- 
ror, also took toe reins as the 
paper's publisher. A former 
cereal company executive 
who took toe helm at Times 
Mirror two years ago, Mr. 
Willes is charging ahead 
with an extensive remake of 
the million-circulation 
newspaper. 

Mr. Coffey, who has run 
the paper for eight years, 
may be offered a corporate 
post, perhaps with the title of 
editor at large, sources at the 
paper said. The managing 
editor, the former foreign 
correspondent Michael 
Parks, has been offered the 
top job and is expected to 
accept, they said. 

“Marie Willes has been 
saying consistently that he 
believes toe paper, its pro- 
cesses and culture need sig- 


nificant change,” one Los 
Angeles Times editor said. 

“It’s very hard to do that if 
you’re keeping the editor 
who has run the place for the 
last eight years. It’s standard 
corporate doctrine that the 
quickest way to make visible 
change is to change people at 
the top.” 

Said another Times 
staffer “This is toe least dis- 
ruptive move Willes could 
make because you're not 
bringing someone in from 
the outside. The big un- 
answered question is how 
come, other than the desire to 
change things to prove that 
you're changing things.” 

A knowledgeable source 
said that Mr. Willes asked 
Mr. Coffey to reconsider his 
decision but that Mr. Coffey 
insisted on stepping dowa 
The recent resignation of 
Dick Schiossberg, the pub- 
lisher, was also portrayed as 
voluntary, but insiders say 
be. too. found it difficult to 
meld with Mr. Willes’s ac- 
tivist style. 

Mr. Willes has been shak- 
ing things up in recent 
weeks, declaring thax he 
wants to boost circulation by 
500.000, launch a special 
section for Hispanic readers 
and revamp the Life & Style 


section. He has also em- 
braced the notion of com- 
munity-oriented “civic jour- 
nalism” and plans to name a 
“publisher” for each edit- 
orial section who would 
have both editorial and busi- 
ness duties. 

All this has been em- 
braced by some Times 
staffers and viewed with 
alarm by others as a man 
with no previous journalistic 
credentials tries to remake 



l« UpV-tn 

Shelby Coffey 3d. 


one of the largest U.S. news- 
papers. 

Mr. Coffey, 50. a former 
top editor at The Washington 
Post, is known as both a 
smooth-talking journalist 
and bureaucratic survivor. 
He briefly held the editor- 
ship of U.S. News & World 
Report and was editor of toe 
Dallas Times Herald before 
going to Los Angeles. 

He has weathered numer- 
ous controversies at the 
Tunes with a consensus- 
building style that some have 
seen as indecisive bat that 
has held the paper’s dispar- 
ate factions together. He has 
tried to defuse racial ten- 
sions, particularly after in- 
ternal dissension over toe pa- 
per's coverage of the 1992 
Los Angeles riots. He has 
also withstood complaints 
about a softening of toe 
Times 's Hollywood cover- 
age. Mr. Coffey started the 
high-visibility but money- 
losing Washington edition, 
which was canceled by Mr. 
Willes but later revived. 

Staffers who know both 
men say that Mr. Coffey, 
who is accustomed to run- 
ning his own editorial show, 
quickly concluded that Mr. 
Willes’s hard-charging ap- 
proach to the publisher’s job 


would leave him little of toe 
leeway normally accorded 
the paper's top editor. 
Shortly after taking over, for 
example, Mr. Willes de- 
clared that he wanted to 
make the Times a statewide 
paper by expanding into 
Northern California. 

■ Swap Buoys Scripps 

E.W. Scripps Co., a news- 
paper publisher and televi- 
sion company, said Thurs- 
day its third-quarter earnings 
increased 7 percent, to $38.6 
million, aided by a gain from 
a newspaper swap with 
Knight-Ridder Inc., The As- 
sociated Press reported from 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Revenue rose 8 percent, to 
$286.2 million. 

Scripps’ earnings were 
boosted by a gain of $11.1 
million that it received from 
trading its newspapers in 
Monterey and San Luis 
Obispo, California, to 
Knight-Ridder for its paper 
in Boulder, Colorado. 

Scripps operates nine tele- 
vision stations, newspapers 
in 14 markets, two TV pro- 
duction companies and the 
Home & Garden Television 
cable channel. The company 
also licenses and syndicates 
news features and conics. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


oct - 9 LibM-Ubor Rates 


OCL 9 


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AinBtMtfmn 1 95* 1 TO lMi* UK2 MW — & OS' \SB litB* 1C6 13335* 

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1 -fflontft W-SVa 3ft-3ft IV* 7Vk-7V» 3ft-3ft 


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Oumcy Pol Cuwocf 
AfflMtlMM 0.9906 Crook drac- 
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Andrian sch. 12.2*5 Kong.teiM 
Brad real 12)973 ludtanrapoo 
CMnowynu 8J1 toOo.nmaS 
Czocb Kotom 32-89 Irish £ 
Danbhhrenc 64635 knoBitak. 
Egpt.poond 34) KmrOoar 
Fta. markka 52267 Motor- tin*. 

Forward Rates 


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27490 

7.7352 

195B5 

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330 

643 

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SPHtKRWtal 


To Our Readers 

To present toe New York 
Stock Exchange tables more 
legibly, toe International 
Herald Tribune has begun 
publishing a redesigned list 
of NYSE share prices. (Page 
14) 

The type size has been en- 
larged and the space between 
lines widened. This has been 
achieved by eliminating 
shares that seldom trade and 
by dropping shares not avail- 
able to most investors. In lim- 
iting toe list to the 2,600 most 
traded shares, the new table 
nonetheless represents about 
99 percent of all NYSE mar- 
ket value daily. - 

This is the first in a series 
of revisions aimed at making 
the share prices in all of our 
U.S. market tables more 
readable. We invite you to 
write to us with your com- 
ments and suggestions. Full 
daily U.S. share-price infor- 
mation remains available at 
toe IHT’s site on the Internet: 
www.iht.com 


lion in the network. Project 
leaders expect about 30 in- 
stitutions to be on-line by the 
end of toe year. 

At a meeting in Washing- 
ton on Wednesday, the proj- 
ect took another big step for- 
ward,' transforming itself 
from an informal consortium 
of universities to a nonprofit 
corporation that intends to 
spearhead toe development of 
a host of advanced network- 
ing technologies. 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Pott Service 

BEUING — After deliver- 
ing a tough talk oa the need far 
China to increase its imparts 
from toe United States, Com- 
merce Secretary William Da- 
ley returns home from Beijing 
on Friday without any new 
commerc i al deals in hand.de- 

contract signings Thursday. 

Mr. Daley said he had lob- 
bied specifically on behalf of 
a dozen American companies 
trying to win contracts from 
Chinese companies or min- 
istries. If signed, the contracts 
would have totaled about $3 
billion, he said, and would 
have covered such industries 
as energy, aviation, medical 
equipment, financial services 
and insurance. 

Boeing Co. and Aetna Inc. 
wears among the companies 
that had hoped to sign agree- 
meats this week, other 
sources said. 

Mr. Daley said this week 
that be was optimistic that 
some contracts would be 
wrapped up during his four- 
day visit here. But oa Thurs- 
day, he said that this was not a 
trade mission. 

“I was hopeful,” he said. 
“I’m still hopeful. I’m still 
optimistic. Bat I’m realistic 
about diem.” 

A U.S. official said toe 
commerce secretary had 
wanted to avoid hi ghlightin g 
agreements that were not yet 
complete. 


Three years ago, then- 
Commerce Secretary Ronald 
Brown boasted about having 
witnessed $6 billion of deals, 
many of which later failed to 
come to fruition. 

This time, Chinese offi- 
cials appeared more eager to 
announce agreements that 
migh t polish their image in 
America on the eve of Pres- 
ident Jiang Zemin’s visit this 
month to Washington. 

Wu Yi, miniRfgr of trade 
and economic cooperation, 
reiterated Thursday that 
C!hhiB would send a purchas- 
ing mission to the United 
States to go on a buying 
spree. 

However, signing a hand- 
ful of large contracts would 
bandy dent toe $44 billion 
annnnl u.S. trade deficit with 
China. 

“There’s no silver bullet to 
solve toe deficit problem 
right now,” Mr. Daley said, 
“now matter how many deals 
were announced.” 

Aviation-industry officials 
still expect' Beijing to ondeF 
about 30 aircraft from Boeing 
valued at about $2 billion, 
matching’ its purchase this 
year of planes from the jet- 
maker’s European rival. Air- 
bus Indnstrie, Reuters report- 
ed. 

Two carriers, Hainan Air- 
lines and Shanghai Airlines, 
have said they plan to order a 
handful each of 737s, Boeing’s 
smallest model, toe report ad- 
ded, instead of huge contracts 
for 737s, 757s and 777s that 
toe industry had expected. 


Bombardier Lashes Out 

Canadian Concern Bristles at Failure of Bid in Mexico 


By Howard Schneider 

Washington Post Service 


TORONTO — Over toe past 10 years. 
Montreal-based Bombardier Inc. has become 
the pride of toe Canadian economy, cutting 
deals from Kuala Lumpur to New York and 
inventing markets for such products as its 
state-of-the-art Canadair comma ter jet, snow- 
mobiles and jet skis. 

So when the company was abruptly dis- 
qualified from competition for a new Mexico 


In contrast to Canada's usual reserve in 
international affairs, Prime Minister Jean 
Chretien has demanded that Mexico inves- 
tigate the circumstances surrounding the deaL 
And Canada's ambassador, angered by what 
he called toe “barbarity” of Bombardier’s 
treatment, publicly castigated Mexican au- 
thorities this week and then resigned. 

“I’m an expert cm the Middle East, and 
when I arrived here I thought I already knew 
everything there was to know about corrup- 
tion, but I was wrong.” the ambassador, Mare 
Perron, said in an interview with a Mexican 


City subway line this summer, it came as no 
surprise that Canadian authorities rushed to its joornalisL “Mexico is very complicated.” 
defense. In this case, some of toe * ‘complications” 


The only other competitor, a Spanish-based 
consortium, had been disqualified weeks be- 
fore, and Bombardier seemed to be in position 
to win the $350 million contract. Instead. 

Bombardier also was ruled out, oa grounds 
that company officials say they still cannot . former official in the administration of Carlos 


case, some or me "complications’ 
circulating in Canadian press accounts of the 
deal include family ties between Mexican 
authorities and employees of toe Spanish con- 
sortium. and controversy over whether Bom- 
bardier had been linked to an unpopular 


comprehend. 

* ‘They were technical grounds that have no 
basis.” said Michel Lord. Bombardier's vice 
president far public affairs. “It was a com- 
plete surprise. It was almost a done deal. At 
this time our position is really jeopardized.” 


Salinas de Gortari, Mexico's former pres- 
ident. 

Whatever the reason, toe treatment of Bom- 
bardier “is a very dirty story,” Mr. Perron 

See TRADE, Page 19 




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PA« 


PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 







THE AMERICAS 


| A s . i ^,y % A 


Investor’s America 


. ■ A > t.y. v':v , avW? v* w i v 4 vX- v -, , V 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 



^ 600 
; 6.40 



6900^ - 

•; (loo v - 

-— 

| Dollar in Deutsche marks 


■ 


1.75 



■ 130 
\ 120 



M J 
1887 

NY as 

J A s 6 * 110 m’ J J A S 0 . 

1997 

•NYSE •• • •• 



; NYS£- ■•:■■■■ 

:S 4 P 100 ~'" ; 


NYSE,.;:. 

..X 5 dfop«^:r:::-j: 


ii js. 


AMEX 

Martwtyal^' 


Toronto 



SaoPauio 

S 0 YBS§> 8 ' ■;■■■■ 


Mexico City 

■aofci' ;.-.V‘v. 


Bueno* ;-v .'-v; 

r.'asSw^ .. , SM» ! - 

Santiago - 

tPS A ’General ; ' 


Caracas 

'Cf^etiGeoe^;'- 



Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


European Rate Moves Drag Down Stocks 


CaupIMbyOvSi^FnmDi^nKitB 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell Thura- 
day after European central banks 
raised interest rates, reducing the 
likelihood of lower borrowing costs. 

But bond prices climbed late in 
the day on expectations that further 
U.S. economic data would show in- 
flation under control. 

The rise in European interest rates 
came one day after Alan Greenspan, 
the U.S. Federal Reserve Board 
chairman, shook financial markets 
by warning that the tight domestic 
job market could stoke inflation. 

“If investors think interest rates 
are going op, they jump out,” said 
Charles Smith, chief investment of- 
ficer at Fort Pitt Capital Group in 
Pittsburgh. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Av- 
erage fell 33.64 points, to 8,061.42. 

Better-than-expected earnings 


horn' General Electric kept the drop 
from steepening. The Standard & 
Poor's 500-stock index fell 333 to 
970.45, and the Nasdaq composite 
index rose 4.08 to 1,745.85. 

General Electric climbed l A to 70 
% after it said its profit rose 13 per- 

U^. STOCKS 

cent in the third quarter, slightly more 
than expected, as higher sales of spare 
parts and services by its equipment 
businesses helped lift revenue. 

Quarterly net income was S2.01 
billion, compared with $1 .79 billion 
a year earlier. Revenue rose 10 per- 
cent to S22 billion. 

Earnings were up at 10 of the 12 
GE units, including Capital Ser- 
vices, where profit rose 15 percent 
to S938 million. 

Bond prices gained, reversing an 


early plunge, amid optimism that a 
report doe Friday on producer prices 
wul suggest that inflation remains 
subdued. The 30-year Treasury bond 
price rose 7/32 to 100 8/32, which 
took the yield down to 6.36 percent 
from 637 percenr Wednesday. 

Bonds erased sharp losses after 
the Fed’s vice chairman, Alice 
Riviin, tempered Mr. Greenspan's 
assessment of the economy. 

“Nobody wants to take the punch 
bowl away, and nobody wants to. 
slow down the economy unneces- 
sarily,” Ms. Riviin said. Her com- 
ment convinced some that the Fed 
will wait before raising its target for 
overnight borrowing. 

Meanwhile, the Labor Depart- 
ment said the number of unemployed 
Americans claiming jobless benefits 

for the first time dropped last week, 
providing Anther evidence of the 


country’s tig htly stretched labor 
markets, analysts said. Initial claims 
for stale jobless benefits fell to 
304,000 last week from an upwardly 
revised 309,000 in the previous 
week. 

In other data, U.S. retailers said 
September sales were disappointing 
as unseasonably warm weather 
stifled demand for new fall mer- 
chandise. 

Georgia-Pacific declined % to 
106 after third-quarter profit rose 69 
percent, carried by higher prices for 
its paper and building products. The 
maker of paper and pulp said profit 
from operations rose to $86 million 
from $51 million, before gains, in 
the year-ago period. 

Bametf Banks fell on a 3.5 per- 
cent drop in third-quarter net in- 
come. to $122-6 million. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


RATES: Bundesbank Increase Marks a Step Toward Single European Economy 


braunanul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• HD ton Hotels Corp. agreed to buy the century-old Atlantic 
City Country Club for an undisclosed price, making it the 
only casino company in New Jersey to operate a golf course. 

• Fingerhut Companies Inc. said it planned to spin off its 83 
percent stake in Metris Companies Inc. to shareholders, 
allowing the credit-card unit to grow without hurting the 
parent company's balance sheet. 

• CoreStates Financial Corp. rejected a takeover bid from 
Mellon Bank Corp. Neither bank would provide details of the 
offer. 


• Trikon Technologies Inc^ a supplier of etch and deposition 
equipment used in making semiconductors, said that it would 
have an unexpected loss of about 70 cents to 75 cents a share 
in its third quarter, cut 20 percent of its work force and that it 
had hired Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Inc to help it explore 
“strategic alternatives.” 

• The Federal National Mortgage Association, America's 
largest buyer of hone loans, said thud-quarter net income rose 
14 percent, to 5775 million, as income from its main business of 
packaging mortgages into bonds grew and credit losses fell. 

• Brazil's Supreme Court ruled that a law openin g the coun- 
try's telecommunications industry to competition was con- 
stitutional, removing a barrier to the sale of Telecorau- 
nkacoes Brasileiras SA, the state-owned telephone 
company, next year. 

• Amoco Corp. said it made a “significant” oil discovery in 
the central area of the North Sea that will allow it to speed 
development plans of the Halley field nearby. 

• Nissan Motor Co. will shift production of the Sentra sedan 
from Tennessee to Mexico as part of an $800 million ex- 
pansion of its Mexican operations. 

• Microsoft Corp.'s chairman. Bill Gales, denied Sun Mi- 

crosystems Inc.'s accusation in a lawsuit that the software 
giant had breached its contract over the use of Sun's Java 
technology. Bloomberg: Reuters 


Continued from Page 1 

muted by comments Wednesday 
from Alan Greenspan, chairman of 
the U.S. Federal Reserve Board, 
who said America's blissful blend 
of high growth and low inflation 
was “not sustainable.” 

His' comments prompted specu- 
lation worldwide that U.S. interest 
rates might head higher before long. 

The Bundesbank had been hinting 
for months that it would be getting 
tougher. Officials, led by the central 
bank’s president, Hans Tietmeyer, 
were unhappy about the steep decline 
of the mark against the dollar daring 
die past year. The cheaper mark has 
made it much easier for German 
companies to export, but it also has 
pushed up prices of imported goods, 
reviving worries about inflati on. 


But the rate increase Thursday — 
a lifting of the repurchase rate used 
between German banks from 3.0 
percent to 3.3 percent — caught 
many economists by surprise. 

Economists noted that the mark 
had actually climbed nearly 5 per- 
cent against the 1 dollar since early 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

August. Though import prices had 
been rising, many said they had 
started to ease in response to the 
stronger mark. 

“I would have expected them to 
wait,” said Holger Fahrinkrug, an 
economist at UBS Securities in 
Frankfurt, “given the recent 
strength of the mark, the low in- 
flation and the continued weakness 
of the labor market” 


In a statement accompanying its 
decision, the Bundesbank said it had 
taken a preemptive step to head off 
inflation and instability. 

“The monetary policy of the 
Deutsche Bundesbank has been ex- 
pansive for a lengthy time,” it said. 
Although it said there was no reason 
to “dramatize” concerns about in- 
flation, it said that “the risks to 
stability have increased' ' and that a 
“modest tightening” was in order. 

But analysts said the bank’s un- 
spoken agenda was to prepare the 
way for the euro. Gemot Nerb, Sa- 
lomon Brothers’ chief economist in 
Germany, predicted that Germany 
would have, to raise its interest rates 
to more than 4 percent by May, 
when the European Union is to for- 
mally decide which countries will 
be part of the new monetary union. 


Though each country theoretically 
will still control its own monetary 
policy through the end of next year, 
Mr. Nerb said, the countries will 
have to work increasingly by con- 
sensus after May. 

■ Rate Rise Weighs on Dollar 

The dollar fell against the mark 
after the Bundesbank and other Euro- 
pean central banks raised their lend- 
ing rates, Bloomberg News reported 
from New York. 

The dollar fell to 1 .7433 Deutsche 
marks in 4 P.M. trading from 1 .7488 
DM the day before but was at 
121.135 yen, up from 121.100 yea. 

It also climbed to 1.4563 Swiss 
francs from 1 .4430 francs but fell to 
5.8569 French francs from 5.8754 
francs. The pound was at $1.6240, 
up from $1.6220. 


MARKETS: After Bundesbank Increase, Some See a Bear Market for Europe 


Continued from Page 1 

Britain is farther ahead in its eco- 
nomic recovery, and has increased 
rates several times this year, to 7.00 
percent, in an effort to slow the 
economy to meet its medium-term 
inflation target of 23 percent 
In Paris, the CAC-40 index fell 
2.1 percent, to 2,960.65. The main 
index in Amsterdam fell 3 percent, 
while the markets in Brussels and 
Zurich both lost 1 3 percent 
In Italy, the resignation of Prime 
Minister Romano Prodi added fuel 
to die fire, and die main index 
tumbled 2.8 percent to 15,075.00. 
Financial markets expect further 


interest rate increases. According to 
German futures contracts, a baro- 
meter of market expectations, Ger- 
man money-market interest rates 
will rise to 4.7 percent by the end of 
next year, from current levels of 
around 33 percent . . 

Attaining that level could only 
mean a succession of increases by 
the Bundesbank, which in turn 
would mean copycat moves by other 
European central banks that shadow 
German interest rate policy. 

“Those expectations were rein- 
forced by today’s events,” said 
Christopher Potts, equities analyst 
in Paris at the Cbeuvreux de Virieu 
investment bouse. “The key ques- 


tion for the year ahead is whether 
you believe those interest rare ex- 
pectations or not If you believe they 
are accurate, then the bull market in 
Europe is over.” 

Other analysts saw no reason for 
■ panic, saying fears of an emerging 
bear marker are overblown. They 
pointed out that high unemployment 
and weak consumer sentiment across 
the Continent give central' banks 
strong arguments to keen, credit as 
cheap as possible. Even the Bundes- 
bank, in its statement Thursday, said, 
“There is no reason to dramatize the 
current inflation trends.” 

Many analysts and economists 
say Thursday's rate increases will 


not impede Europe’s economic re- 
covery. Strong corporate profits and 
continuing economic growth will 
provide enough fuel for stock mar- 
kets, some said. 

'‘The market might be worried in 
the short term but will realize that a 
strengthening of the economy is un- 
der way,” said an analyst at Com- 
merzbank in Germany. 

Others point to how Wall Street 
reacted in February 1994 after the 
Federal Reserve raised rates, also 
from a low of 3 percent Wall Street 
shivered, they recall, but then began 
an extended climb even as U.S. 
short-term benchmark rates rose to 
53 percent 


Ford Set 
To Divest 
Finance 
Operation 

DEARBORN, Michigan — 
Ford Motor Co. plans to spin off 
its 80.7 percent stake, valued at 
SIS billion, in its consumer fi- 
nance unit. Associates First 
Capital Corp., saying the 
companies were worth more 
apart than together. - 
Ford bought Associates in 
May 1989 for $3.35 billion and 
sold 193 percent of it to the 
public in 1996; 

Ford said in its announce- 
ment late Wednesday that it 
would spin off its remaining 
stake to current shareholders so 
it could concentrate on auto- 
making while giving Associ- 
ates more flexibility to sell 
stock and acquire companies in 
the future. 

Ford's shareholders “should 
be happy, because from here on 
in, automotive fundamentals 
will be more in focus,” said 
Nicholas Lobacaxro, a Merrill 
Lynch auto analyst. 

Ford has long insisted that 
investors overlooked Associ- 
ates in appraising the auto- 
maker. 

“We believe the market 
value of the Associates is 
neither fully nor consistently 
reflected in Ford’s stock 
mice,” said Alex Trotman, 
Ford’s chairman. 

The automaker said Ford 
stockholders would receive one 
share of Associates for every 
four shares of Ford common or 
Class B stock. Ford owns 2793 
million Associates shares. 

The auto company also said it 
would maintain its quarterly div- 
idend at 42 cents a share, even 
without the benefit of profit from 
Associates after the spin-off. 

“We’re very pleated,” said 
Matt Greenberg, executive vice 
president of Greenhaveo Asso- 
ciates, an investment company 
wife 22 million Ford shares. 

Ford shares rose $135 to 
$4930 in late trading. 

Mr. Lobaccaro predicted that 
the new shares would rise by at 
least $3 from their indicated 
initial value of $33 after die 
spin-off. (Bloomberg, AP ) 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 






INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 PJI. Close 

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n.1 

ran 

22ft 

r. 


♦w 

-t 

-a 

-'ft 

-•ft 

-ir* 


ft Standard & Poors 


■7J0 


WjA L* CtaM ipff 

InduSMob 1146JS2T 131^2 IT 37223 1133.87 


Traup. 
UHVes 
Finance 
SP 500 
5P100 


NYSE 


CampaAi 

MUAWs 

Tramp. 

LW* 

Riaroo 


IS>, IS, 

40>t 
1*1 1(ft 

ft Vft 
* Sft 

lavft io 

4*» n 

lift 17ft 

IJt! IKI 

276* nil 

4 3'6 

4ft ft ft 

20 lfft » 

91* ft, W, 

in I3*ft nit 

lift 1X6* lift 

2 16ft 1** 

24ft 23ft 24'ft 

4M 4Si 41: 

1» T7U 121* 

7ft Aft I 

4ft tX 

nit i« in 

X 2M 2M 

»■ 5 9* 

i* m n 

Aft 4ft ift 

ft "ft 'I 

9ft 1 5ft 

HA, l**. Bit 

9ft 7 r* 

llfti 13ft 


•1. 

+Vfc 

•I, 


-I* 

-•ft 

+6ft 


Nasdaq 

Connuk 

laomnab 

Bafts 


F inance 

Transp. 


70106 AVX54 6M48 693.14 
209.13 20486 20SJ53 204.77 
11806 115J4 11AJ50 116.05 
98112 96866 97304 971US 
04637 932.95 938.91 93SJ0 


Nta* ft* im an- 

50939 50428 50B. 14 -U1 

*39.90 &3241 437J5 -104 

4*467 44408 4*803 

30tS 30121 saw 

48751 482.13 485.83 +1 


1748*2 173157 174504 
U11I7 139&9S 141104 
1WI77 1W&72 194176 
1*4141 184847 185837 

231024 72W51 2308*5 
115093 I1J6.II 115037 


AT&T 

SdS? 1 * 

Opw 

caioec* 

LonSp 

5unCo 

AlMPnn 

BOfHtME 

HostMor 

Tairasl 


Nasdaq 


Wat 
80844 ISftft 
*5771 41ft 
406*4 ITU 
54*67 ZS* 

mS S3 

32*51 7AV* 

51871 34ft 
4*141 77 
44187 24ft, 

37714 lift 
3644 T 7m 
34117 145 


Mok um un a*. 


416ft 416ft 
111ft 17ft 
J3V1 35tft 
409ft 
45ft 461ft 
75*ft 766ft 
174 346, 


38ft 
lift 21ft 
401ft 416ft 
221ft 221ft 

130ft lllft 


-6ft 

■ft 

+ft 

+6ft 

+1 

■Ift 

♦6ft 


^ AMEX 


718J0 71X49 7T7J3 
Dow Jones Bond 


20 Band* 
lailUMiei 
10 Industrials 


10829 

102.00 

10600 



Oct* 9, 1997 

High Law Latest Chga OpW 

Grains 

CORN CCBOT) 

3JM0 Minlnlnum- cents par mnhsl 
Doc OJ 384 27 Vft 283ft *1 208332 

Mar 98 292ft 280ft 29266 +T 72493 

May 98 298 294 297ft +16 19,433 

Jul 90 XI ft 297 301 +66. JL425 

Sop 98 291 288 29065 -V* 1308 

Dec 98 2B8V5 285ft 288 -H 19.7*8 

Jul *9 300 297 300 uncfi. 183 

Est *8» 6&000 KIWI sates T01^M9 
Wnh open bit 3S2.llft op 7485 

SOYBEAN MEALICBOT) 

100 km- iMten Mr tan 
Od 97 22370 21 7 70 232.90 +X00 7,935 

Dec 97 21880 71180 217A0 +320 41384 
Jan 98 217A0 211 JO 2U40 +2L3D 16*50 
Mar 98 Z13J0 20BJ0 2 1270 +1J0 14540 
Ma*9fl 711 JO 207 M 210J0 +1.10 14018 
JUVB 713.00 209 JO 21240 +1J0 9446 
BLsda 24000 VMs sate 2SL344 
Wad* open kfl 1 1148ft an 864 


SOYBEAN OIL (CSOT) 

60000 fc*- cents per Bi 
Od 97 2196 2175 2196 +013 

Dec 97 2430 2403 24J7 +012 

Jan 98 24J0 2428 244? +011 

Mar 98 2422 2445 2422 +013 

May 98 2488 24A5 2486 +014 

Jul 98 2580 2480 2580 +013 

Est.mtas 11000 Wstf« nfcs 30543 


man Law Laleet Cbgs Oplra 

ORAN6E JUICE (NCTNJ 
TS«00ttB^ certs jw lb. 

Mo* 97 7220 7120 7280 -055 17.614 

Jan 98 7520 7460 7495 -CJD 112*2 

Mar 98 7860 7740 78.10 -030 7201 

May 98 81.40 BOAS BOBO -035 1.744 

EsL Kdn N A Weds saka 1900 
Werfiopen bit 39,122. up 23 


-680 148 

-6.10 1 
-410 99,589 
-410 21.733 
■410 5,952 

-410 9.M7 
400 4381 

-400 484 

-400 s/m 


IllU 

54381 

20256 

11.596 

4956 

7J77 


7892 3861 

6616 

S950 ZTVi 


1ft 1*» Aft 

S* 56ft -ft 

96* 96* -M 

Kk 96* «ft 

28ft 2866 -Vl 

M? -rt 

27 +16* 


94074 

340V3 

17JS7 

14246 

11387 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Nasdaq 


4ft 


m 

4ft 


ill* in* .. . 
AH 5*k Stk 
2 P6 Ulk mt 
1ft » 11 


•111 

•■ft 


Ift 

1ft 

Oft 


*■6 


Ift Kft 

Ift 111 
IVft l» 
1 ft 16* 
ft I 
n tv* 
m ir, 
m » 
•ft n 
Hft II 
<ft 4ft 
V» 5 56* 

12ft Oft Bli 
Ift ft ft, 
4 6* 

llftft 111* Tift 

4*1 *f.5 IS* 

ift in ift 

I** r . jh 
uvv m* uk 
ran uf* Kft 
12 118ft U*i 

r* 2v» ii* 

7. 6ft *■« 
lift 1ft Ift 
»ft 14* IK* 
7ft 7ft 7ft 
VTfti 96ft 976a 
*6*b ASM. 1*0*, 
7ft 7ft 2ft 
21*1 21*6 til* 

*ft JN 2ft 
10ft I* 10 
« 6ft 
ft ft 
Bta 29ft 
41ft 44l« 

ft ft 
if* <ft 
1ft 1ft 
111 m lift 
l*ft 19»k 
27ft 17ft ins 
frl 1». ISA 
Ah ». rtft 
U6t IT* Hft 
17ft TJi* -I7V, 
UU 2VJ 2M 

11 2ft 1ft 
2>k S* 16* 
Ift, IV. 11* 
in ft 6ft 
3ft 1ft Ift 
n* 7ft r» 
lift 17ft 17ft 
un uit m 
Ift 7ft 8ft 
29ft 2SV6 3*ft 
TO» 191* in* 
171* 171, 

41 4F1 

ill Hi 

44 41b 

V 9** 

iw mu 


UaSUngeri 

Tonmun 

US IS? 

AMEX 

Mtotneri 
□eouiaa 
unenanaed 
T om mug 

NewUws 


1189 1006 Mnncad 

1742 in? D*cKnwl 

4 ™ SrtSSS 

*tt SS1S& 


602 2100 
19*6 IMS 

U7D 1453 
5438 5717 

>s ■ % 


145 163 

7U 741 

% 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amen 

Nmdnq 

Inmtttons. 


539 J7 
29 J7 
68446 


70131 

S&67 

78641 


Wwft apes bt 104217, op 797 

SOYBEANS (CBOTJ 
\ooo btt raMawm- cant* per imM 
No* 97 675 661 6731* +6 

Jan 98 679V, 665 678 •7ft 

MnrM 683 472 6841* +71* 

MarJB 691 678 690 +61* 

Jilin 695 683 6941* +61* 

EsLnftg 47,000 Vttedi talas 61639 
Weth man W179J44 rtf 992 

WHEAT (CBOTJ 

5800 bu mWmwa- anti par bothsl 
Dac97 372 362 368ft +6 *1743 

Mar 98 384 3756* 3816* +6 2 6MS 

Atoy98 391 383 3871* +41* S19S 

Jul 98 392 385V* 390V) +4H IU92 

EsL tales l&OOO Wen sale* 1U30 
Wetfi open U 110522. off *82 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMEID 
40000 X9. -cents par b. 

Oe297 6737 66J0 66.92 +0L35 9J17 

67 X (A40 t&St +U5 41583 

69 JS 49 JS 49 J2 +0J0 11776 

7305 7135 7190 +060 11.4S3 

TOO; 6935 69.72 +147 8.116 

69 JS 6932 6932 +OA7 1773 


11-4 

1~ 


66 * 

ii 

Xft 

41ft 

6* 

&n 

it; 

nn 

i*ft 


17ft 
A 
l«> 

46* 

II 

m> 

Sr-. St SJ 

» ^ 

Vi TO, 

2714 271 

,1 .ft 
IA*. lift 
81 Ift 
Aft 1ft 
HH l« 

Ift A 
9te m 
W* ICft 
K* Ift 
8ft Ift 
win lift 
Vft »» 


2M 

30ft 

A 

,6? 

Ift 

M 

14ft 

Ift 

8ft 

lift 

lib 

(ft 

14ft 


■ft 

4* 

•ft 

-ft 


■It 
•Sk 
-ft 
■ft 
»ft 
46 
•V, 
• ft 


•a* 

-ft 


•ra 

-Hi 

•Ut 

-6b 

*>> 

-ft 

•ft 

•4b 


• U* 


• ft 

-X 

■ft 

-ft 

■ft 


•ft 

-ft 

■ft 


OivSdends 

Caapoay Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRRE60LAA 

AMeoaeLTd - 3310-30 

Banco Indus Co - . 0673 10-24 

CtiHaener SA. . 327810-29 

Erabateflad And - .0578 10-22 

Embotetod And x .063610-22 

STOCK SPLIT 
AKStmIHIdgZtol ipBL 
Aasockded Gre r ' ‘ “ 

FFLCT 

Labor I 

Srtte<iiK2iorlufiT 

Thermo Imtrum 5 for 4 spfit. 


kJRlCifiJtarlsflL 
Bwscoip 5 far Siam 
Ready 3fer2»« 


Frt Common! 


STOCK 

. 5% 10-14 11-3 


Company 

Alamo Group 
Afl AmerTenn 
BlckRodc StnriTnn 
Buffington Res Inc 
Dole Food AC 
Emlai Inc 
FTUBaicorp 
Fed Signal 
HooaxxPdtPr 
Wonnoford Bros 
Latin Am Dollar 
NewHamm Thrtl 
Nottd SbypesTr 
PuaetSmmdEn 
mdna»n 

Rite AW 


Bk 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
UC Teterfsteo l lar 5mene 9put 

INCREASED 

AK Steel Htdg Q 3510-31 11-17 


BetzDeartxm 

FrtNaflOpSC 

NanCaRPrajH 


a 3810-30 11-13 
a .11 1024 11-7 
Q .d ID-31 11-14 


UM ... 

Voyagef AZMurt 
Voyager CO Munt 
Voyager FL Muni 
VOyngerMN Mart 
VdyngerMNMaai 
Voyager MN Muni 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
REGULAR 

a .10 10-10 11-3 
M J38S 10-10 10-31 
M .0395 10-15 10-31 

q .1379 12-12 1-2 
Q J669 11-1 11-15 
Q .28 11-3 11-14 
O .1210-20 11-3 
Q .1075 12-15 1-0 

m mm 10-17 loot 

a .135 12-5 12-18 
M J3S 10-20 10-31 
Q .125 10-20 10-27 
0 2537 11-1 11*15 
Q .4610-20 11-15 
" .« 11-11 11-26 
X 70-20 1047 
JOSH-14 12-1 
J3 10-20 10-31 
JSS 10-24 11-14 
_23 11-14 12*1 
jOM 10-17 10-28 
M .0612 10-17 10-28 
M 3)631 10-17 10-28 
M .0775 10*17 10-28 
M J068 10-17 10-28 
M .063 10-17 10-28 


4482 

4951 


INITIAL 

Pan Pndfkfirtt - .2128-10-22 1M1 


iMmnuafc t Hip p miuu ite gmeoirt par 
sbnre/ADR; gwn«* to C*«8on femis.- 
eHnooaiy: n-quartertr s-senH-oantml 


Stock Tatties Explained 

Sotos figures m unoffibaL Yearty highs mid tews idled toe previous 52 weeks plus toe amM 
neeibbrtnntttwl(riesltafirraitay.Whenaspttrtsloa(dMde!MarnountlngX25pe(antarmHe 
hnsfaemi paid teyncs UgMav mnga and tMdend am shewn tartte new starts only. Unless 
rtfienafisenrted mki afAndendsaeaiiiuol dUwnemenb bcaed on the latest fledonllon. 
a - dividend obo extra (s). b - onnoal rale rt dhndwid pbj* stock dividrttd. 0 - BquidtMng 
dividend, a - PE onsets W.da - eolled d - new ywrty tow. M - bus intlwimfltmDfifts. 
e - tfividend declared or pnW in preceding 12 months, f - annual rate hcreosedoo last 
dedarafian. 9 - dNidend in Canadian funds, subject to 15% non-residence tot i^ - dividend 
dedurod after udit-up or tf«k dividend. | -dvidand paid Oils yeatocrtlled, deferred, or no 
action Mam at Met dividend meeting, k - dividend dedared or paid mis year, on 
occurantatim isane w»i dMdends hi nrreors. hi - annual rate, reduced an lost dedatatan. 
a * nme hsae in the post 52 weeks. The WgtHow range begins wtm Me Stott of irwflno- 
■nd • trod day deiwsy. P ■ Initial fflyidemt annual mte unknown. P/E - pricMcnwgsioiiQ. 
q-dosed^nd mutual fund. r*«Mdend dedaredarpaid in preceding 12 months, ptosstodt 
dhideod-s-stodisplit. Dividend begins wttti dale otspli*. sis- sales. t-dMdend paid in 
stodt Hi pr ece di ng 12 nwwltis eedmuled catii value on n-dhidendot«*db tf rtt>utfan dale, 
u ■ new yearly higb. Y-lmiSafl MM.* >id tartuigitcy orrecetwrsWp or brtng leamanlnd 
underlie Bankruptcy Ad. or KCuntin assumed by nidi amipa nies. wd- when dhdributed. 

«d ■ when i»u«V ww - with wcmnrfs. * - ex-divkiefid or ex-rigtih. «Bs - ex-dlslributiofi- 

m • wtttiout wanants. y- awtfvkiend and sales in fWL ytd - yield, z- sales in fuH. 


Dkc97 
firti 98 
Apr 98 
Jan 98 

Ert. sate 12J07 Wade sates 1X669 
Wadi apaaM *4644 aft L20* 

FEEDER CATTLE tCMEW 
54000 Ite- caafs par b. 

OU97 77 JO 7460 7733 +14B 

Mm 97 77 JS 7490 77J3 +1.12 

Jpn« 7885 77.95 7SM5 +4L7S 1998 

Mm-98 78JS 77.90 78JD +4167 4177 

Apr 98 7880 7830 7840 +047 812 

Ntay9S 79 JO 7980 79AS +4170 728 

EsLsrtas 2.972 Wwfs soles X353 
Weds open hit 14309. up 500 

HOg4mttNEID 
40000 lbs.- omis parte. 

Oct 97 6857 6890 6837 +4L22 4391 

DOC 97 63-50 61 JS 61.97 4Utt 14759 

B»b9B 41 JS 61J7 61J2 -0-72 49*0 

Apr* 5920 5BJ2 5187 +0.07 W75 

JM98 6400 6448 64JD -0.17 1^63 

EaLartes 5.927 W6tft»*»74ni 
Waft open W 37^37, up 747 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

4UH0 tei- certs par lb. 

Feb 98 Slffl MJ2 MSS -1.2J M3S 

Mar 98 6145 6075 605$ -1.15 681 

May 98 6120 6U5 6240 -1.10 141 

Esi sdos TAB Wads sates 1J76 
Weds span bd7,u& up 226 


Food 

G0CQA0K5B 

10 bhMc tens- S par Ion 

Dec 97 1714 168S 1691 -15 45467 

Mm 98 1742 1716 1722 *14 2421* 

May?® 1756 1740 1741 -14 12035 

Jrtite 1775 1757 1757 -T6 1732 

Sep 98 1782 1774 1774 -15 4703 

Dec 90 1790 1789 1790 *1$ MSI 

fet sales 4784 Weds solas 4508 

Wetfs open toll 12591 up 875 

OCWEE C (NCSE) 

37J00 DtL- cents perte. 

Dec 97 16BJ5 161 JO 16175 -3JS 12158 

Mar 98 15425 14M0 M925 -265 4838 

May 98 14L75 14200 144S -3-50 2061 

Jilt 98 14275 138J00 139 JS -250 2228 

5ap98 13450 13200 13425 -275 601 

Est. srtes &337 Mats sate 4370 
Wttfs open hr 24279, up 213 

SUGAKWORUntOKSE) 

112000 Ox.* arts parte. 

Mar 98 1200 11.93 11.97 +007 92905 

Maytt 1108 1101 1103 +003 22796 

MW HO* 1TOO 1108 +0J3 17.627 

0098 1104 11-78 1178 +0JU 14705 

Estsdes 17095 Weds sate 14922 
Wads open tel 151,492 up LS47 


Metals 

GOLD QKMX) 

100 hnytK^dollanperlrayaz. 

M 97 33100 32600 32490 

Ite 97 327 JO 

Dec 77 33470 32700 329 JO 
Fab 93 33700 32800 33040 
Apr 98 339 JO 331-30 33200 

JW1 98 34260 30300 33180 
Aug 98 325-70 

Od 98 33740 

Dec 98 34700 33900 33900 
Esi. sate 8*000 Wads srtm 31737 
wars span ktf 182712 up 1142 

HI GRADE COPPER OKMXI 
24000 tea.- cenb dot Bl 
Q d97 94J0 91® 9405 +105 916 

Ite 97 93-00 9440 9455 +080 2532 

Dec 97 95J0 9440 9505 +0J0 27,985 

Jon 98 KUO 95.40 9540 +0J5 1037 

Frt>90 9145 9540 9545 +070 1,125 

Mm 98 9410 9520 9555 +CLS 9 

Mr98 WJO 9530 9&30 +055 1003 

MoyVS 9550 95J5 93.25 +050 2570 

J«"98 9500 +050 966 

BO sate 4000 Wads srtes 4075 
Wad* open M 51 J13. up 268 

SILVER (NCMX) 

4000 boy m.- carta portray ol 
00 97 50090 -1010 10 

Ite 97 510.70 .IOlSO T 

Dec 97 52090 50050 51290 -1050 72121 

Jan« 51290 -1050 22 

Mar98 53350 31500 51BJO -104X 18-04 

“STM 531J0 -1070 2199 

Jrt98 53100 52440 53440 -1080 2681 

SapVS 527 JD -1090 640 

Est srtos 34000 Wads sate 19.41 6 
Wads open bit 104680 up 2300 

PLATINUM (HMER) 

50 tray ab-<hrtan per tray ol 
O d 97 43400 42850 £050 -6-50 ZB 

JW98 COOT 42020 42050 -7J0 12J2B 

Api-98 42950 432-00 433J00 -750 893 

M98 42200 41700 417JW -050 4 

Est sales N A Hods sate 1597 
Wars open M 12648. up 71 

LONDON METALS OJAE) PW*» 

DoBbi per monte ton 
Atertnom (Htqfc erode) 

Spot 163IJX 163200 1S19M I63X* 

Fonaonl 1637 JW 1638X0 X636JU U36V6 

r Oflbodea (HteGrade) 

sarexM imjx xmajm 20*700 

2097.00 209000 209400 309400 


pEmiad 


595.00 


597JW 

61000 


99000 


5pot 655000 656000 
F™w 665000 666000 


561000 373000 
569000 570000 
Steal 
imoo 
131 ZOO 131300 


Si^KS 

Rximad 121700 


58900 

*0000 


65*000 658500 

man fiQ maenn 


572000 373000 
575000 576000 


129600 139700 
130600 130708 


HBgti Loir Latest diga Op bit 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMAT1B 

FF500000 -pte of 100 pd 

Dec 97 99.94 98.96 99.12 —056 T4&490 

Mar 98 9998 9852 9800-000 4860 

Jun 98 98.90 90.90 9816-896 0 

EsL sates; 291784 

Open tat; 151350 rtf 1519. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND fLIFFE) 

m. jao niHon - pts or 1 00 pd 

Dee 97 11254 11890 11103 —100124112 

Mar 90 N.T. N.T. 11108 —100 

Jun 90 N.T, N.T. 11100 —100 125561 

Est. sates 139,708 . Pm*, sates: 02,142 

Pn?». Open tal.: 125561 Off 567 

LIBOR 1-MOIfTH (CMER) 
SSirtHan-rtsoHOOpd. 

Od *7 9407 *40! 9406 undi. 24943 

N»77 9434 9401 9403 unch. 30890 

Dec 97 9420 9415 9417 UW& 9,907 

EsL sales NJL Wads sales 11,905 
Weds open hi 70905, off 551 

EURODOLLARS (OHER1 
SI mlPon-pta of 100 pd 
Od 77 9405 9422 9425 uacth 24340 

Nov 97 9422 9419 9422 undL 12514 

DacW 9430 9416 9418 undL 605086 

MmVO 9415 9400 9412 -001 452,707 

Jun 98 9400 93.99 9405 -001 321931 

W02 ra.91 9198 -O02 26S847 
D«W 9192 9301 9309 002 231,917 
MarW 93.91. 9309 9187 -002 154938 
Jun 99 93.99 9874 9183 -001 124090 

Sap 99 9309 93.70 9309 -O01 1000X1 

One 99 9102 9164 9172 -001 84639 

MarOO 9172 91*4 9302 4101 68839 

Esl aales HJL Weds sate 962.91 7 
Ifttfs opaa bit 2J3&677. op 44312 

BRITISH JH1UND (CMER] 

bURO pounds, S per pound 

Doc 97 .1.6266 10160 15190+00038 29016 

Mar 90 10100 1,6110 1J136+0.W30 7M 

Jun 98 14074+00030 27 

Est. sate ILA. Wedv sate 3 jI93 

Wads open H 29491, off 249 

CANADIAN DOLLAR {CMER) 

100000 date* S per C*idta 

-2211 -33 -2E-OA009 574*6 

Mar 98 0354 032S 0335 -00009 2051 

Jim 90 0345 0345 0399-00009 507 

EaL sates NJL Wed* ante 896S 
Wad* open Im6a707. up 1,749 

BERMAN MARK (CMER) 

12&O00 maria, S per rat 

-2? -8raOffl0O15 61197 

MOT90 5818 5204 5787+00014 2X12 

Jun 9* 5813+00012 2421 

EstdBrtea NX Ifttfs sdes 17599 
Wed* open bit 68344 up 55* 

JAPANESE YEN (CMEM 
iZJnjMgnwftSperlOOym 

Doc 97 0361 J316 0332+00002 S75S8 

Mor«8 0445 0435 0443+00001 837 

Jun 98 0556+00002 163 

Est sate fLA. War* sate 44200 
Wad* opaa M 08558 up 379 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 2S0DO tana. S par hmc 

Dec «7 4990 4900 4914-00067 43017 

Mar 98 0053 4920 4980-OW9 1454 

JmW 004400073 363 

Est stfU NJL Wed* sate 11172 

Wad* open H 4&04& op 600 


HDgh Lour Latest Chga OpklT 

Jun 98 ' 9509 M08 9409 -0.18 90875 

Sep 98 9S.10 9407 9499 —0.17 61445 

Doc 90 95.15 94J6 9497 -0.10 «.969 

Mar 99 9505 9477 9487 -0.18 26,1*9 

Est srtos: 150030. Prav. sales: 81126 
Pnw.apwtaL: 457,399 off 4197 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 CNCOO 
50000 Recants per lb. 

Dec 97 7185 71-30 7182 -00* 5023* 

Mar 90 7385 7205 7208 -002 U4B2 

May98 7405 7305 7306 +013 7016 

Jul 90 7400 7455 7455 +0.IS 7051 

OtJ98 7545 7505 7545 +005 787 

Est sates N A. Woduatea 5664 
Wad* open M 90027. rttl 73 

HEATIH6DIL(NMEfR) 


47472 

36993 

21,901 

110U 

8035. 

4133 

1297 


60S S945 6008 -008 
6185 5040 61.17 -009 


4069 

3473 

2466 

U6I 


High Lnar dose Chge OpU ME30CAN PESO (CMER) 


Financial 

IIS T BILLS (CMER) 
flnataj-pteotWoct " 

££Z «« te05 ndi 5099 

Mte 98 9507 9506 9507 undt 1882 

• tanW 9502 ondt 107 

^HASNA Wed* soles 127 
WatfsopanM9.1«&oBU 

5 YR TREASURY (CHOI) . 

SJUMOO Pjn-^i A 64ft* ol WO pet 
Dae97 107^187-05 107-27 -OS 231098 

&i**te 74100 Weds aotes 85091 
Wed* open W 231071, rtf 2023 

10 YR TREASURY {CBOTJ 
5100000 Prin- pb & 32nds rtioo pd 

II®- 1 *' 0 *-® 110-10 -03 391.956 

Mar90 109-26 109-21 109-31 -04 17432 

JunW 109*23 - 04 2 

Ed. wflesiaMOO Wed* smm 194432 
Wodiopon lid 4094*, off 7052 

^TREASURY BONDS CC80T1 
Of 1 ** 1 4 32nd* rt 100 pel) 

°K V. MM3 1T4S6 IlS-aS -06 665434 

MteW 115-20 114-15 115-tS -04 54084 

11503 -04 7,117 

SapW 116-25 * 04 2056 

&t sate 700000 IWMj sates 815494 
W«t4 open int 739034 otf 11.951 

UUWCtLTOIFFE] 

M0M - pb L32ndsa( loo pa 
S* 2 n ?,i a «Ml -MB 195083 
Mte9S N.T. N.T. 1 10-30 -0-J9 
gt OTte: 134349. Pm. (uteK 120,107 
Pm. open bit: 194720 off 20SD 

6ERMAN COV. BUND OiFFD 
DMMOW.rtioflOOpel 

Dec 97 10123 102-31 10249 — UO 314548 
Mar 98 1048 101 JO 101.75 ~6J7 9062 
M-»ote: S0H.PiM.sdes: 12.921 
PM.apeninL: 14205 rtf 551 


Dee 97 
Mm 90 
Jun 90 
Sep 98 
Pec 98 
Mar 99 
Jun 99 


DOC 97 -12590 ,12$H1 .12572+00085 24339 
Mar 98 .12160 .12100 .12152 + 00071 *737 
Jun tt -11790 .11745 .11790+00071 lift 
Est. sate NA Wed* soles 6401 

open W 38442, off $a 

3-MOUTH STERLING (LIFTS) 

£500000 - pfs rt 100 pcf 

Baffin® 

SS JP 2 —004 SUB 9 
92-92 9201 9207 HUM SUM 

TW* 9205 9302 —007 30980 

10*006 

Pnv upon tat: 621475 off 365 

3-MOMTH EUROMARK (LIFFE) 

DM1 rrtDtei- pb rt 100 pa 
Od97 9456 9642 9642 HLI5 lua 

NW97 N.T. N.T. 9605 — Sij m 

Ctec97 9640 9A21 94^2 — (LM 308J57 

9A16 K.9J KM^fiaSua 
S+S JJA* 95 l68 —025 254383 

££*£%£ SUIzSii'gig 

Sap99 95.11 9493 9493 HUO nm 
Ert-sate: 56M61 he*, sates; 155393 
Pna.opnlaL- U9J430 up i B ■ 

3-MONTH PI 80S CMAT1F) 
BFSoflStel-pttrtlOOpct 
0X91 SU 9i»-0.16 44666 

mIS S'* 1 V5-97 — (L23 344>j 
«■« K-2 9173-002 w3o 

Ssr S'*} -120 

9157 9140 9541 —0.18 se w 

Est OTHte 184131 
Open WL: 2384*5 eft 88). 

VMONTH EUROURA CUFFS) 

rTLl nrtaon -part 100 pd 

Dec 97 9180 9155 91*6 —OH insn 

Mar 98 9468 W 3b 9447 HU5 !K 


Mar 98 
Jwt 95 
Hp 98 
Dec 98 


No* 97 
Dec 97 

Jn 98 6205 61.10 61 J7 +001 

Fib 98 61205 6105 6107 +001 

Mar 98 6105 60 JO 6007 +001 

Apr 98 5092 5050 S0J2 +006 

May 98 57JD 56.90 5707 +0.11 

EsL nte NJL Wad* sates 2A915 
Weds open kit 144161 off 51 

UCHT SWEET CRUDE MMER} 

1000 bbL- dolors per bbL 
No* 97 22-30 2101 2112 -006 94901 

Dec 97 2U0 21 OT 2L10 -003 94712 

Jon 98 2204 21 JO JIM 4101 44138 

F«b« 2109 21-53 2126 an*. 27,171 

Ma-98 2143 2105 21JB +0101 14692 

Apr 98 2142 7123 2142 +007 11472 

Est. sate NJL Weds sates I3A9M 
WOT* BUM H 40041, up 10256 

NATURAL CAS (HMEIQ 

10000 nun Mu% S per ma fate 

Nov 97 I960 20M 2026 +0071 4*441 

0*c97 3.050 2050 3027 +0015 34860 

Jan 9S 3030 2.93S 30m +0.013 36.965 

1=00 98 2J30 2655 2700 +0020 1S.7E9 

Mar 98 2500 24*0 2475+0005 11W2 

Apr98 2280 2250 2266+0006 1119 

Eat ados NJL WM* Ida 47.704 
WtadS open H23L18A off 1450 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (HMER) 

42+000 fpl rwitt dvqqI 
Noe 97 6100 mS 61.18 -4L32 3R790 

Dk97 6140 6040 6L30 -006 17J81 

JenW 6140 60J0 6140 -A14 15815 

6143 6123 6145 -006 *968 

Mte 98 6215 6210 6210 -006 

A8T9B 6455 -006 

Mqr98 6425 -006 

Jun 98 6150 -006 

EAsaes njl weds sates 29,111 
WOT* aped W 92667. off 2JB6 

GASOIL UFO 

Ui ^dpOanparndrictaa - late aflOO tans 
Od97 18700 18125 18500 -0J0 1LII4 
NO* 97 188.50 18500 18600 —100 34449 
Dec 97 18725 18625 187J5 —100 17485 
JW 98 19075 1*725 18725 —150 167S6 

F*« 19000 18800 18725 -1JD 7,123 
Mar 98 18S25 18425 134-50 — 1 JO 1077 
Apr98 18S2S 18300 18125 —I JO 2421 
Esl ados: 22000. Prov. sate : 19,909 
Pnv. apsn bit: 104334 off 4952 

Stock Indexes 
SP COMP (HDBX (CMER) 

5aoxkidm 

Dec 77 98125 9*900 97820 *415 1B9047 
MV98 991.50 WO JO 99025 -240 2416 

JW98 100345 WKtk 914 

EsL sates NJL Wed* sates 71240 
wed* apaa W 192732 off 435 

FTSB UitUFFE) ‘ 

RtSperindweaW 

Doc 77 53280 S2750 52640 -350 72682 
MW9B N.T N.T 53120 -360 1.951 

EAsaki: 14041 Prav. sate: 11773 
Psw.epanH.- 74638 up 402 

CAC4l(MATin 

FRnOparWspoM 

0«77 30600 gaO0 29620-660 31.195 

Nw97 30370 2900 29900-660 7052 

DK97 30510 29500 29780 -6SJ 17054 

Mar 98 000 000 31020 +340 10.973 

Est sate; 3(1914 
Open hL 80423 off 138. 


Commodity Indexes 

awe PtntaK 

1,53700 1 43110 

108SJO 1089.90 

16608 14606 

24417 24677 

Skwbk tM$L AsaotMea Press, Loadea 
Inn Ffnonotd Futures Eadtonv* Inn 
Patmteum Euhongt, 


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Arte and Antiques 

rvwy Saturday 









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PAGE 17 




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- 4VIW1A UU4 

known to tour companies 


French Theme Park 
Plans Stock Listing 

'*+**** O 

PARIS — Shares in Parc A <* ^tegy is above all 

tcnx. the Fa-nch amumS£% by increasing the 

inspired by the exploit of^ of visitors rather thanrais- 

Gaulish cartoon hero Asterix F^jces,” the company’s pres- 
to* menhir-cam% fl£? o£ ^ 0,1 T * siid 

d*. will fee offered on iheVlrk ^mg is designed 

Bourse imOcLiA ™ !° make Parc Asterix better- 
Stoek exchange authoriiies said 
SJtmS Parc ****& would 

float 14 million shares, or a 63. 1 3 
percent stake in the company at 
***** 145 and IftTSiS 
($.4.50,0527.95) each. The final 
price u. ill he set next Thursday 
Sinuted north of Pans, an hour's 
“ nv , e *}* bigger rival. Dis- 
neyland Pans, Parc Asterix is a 
family theme park based in a 
forest. The French park is con- 
stderod to have been hol ding up 
wcu in the competition with the 
better-known Disney outpost. 

The sale of Asterix shares 
would allow the majority owners 

and early backers of the park 

Gencrale des Eaux SA, Accor S A 
and Barclays Bank PLC — to get 
cash for their investment. 

Asterix comic books have sold 
more than 2 SO million copies in 
15 languages since they first ap- 
peared in 1 959. Gmcinny ft IHterzn Albcfl Rrnc I Paris) 

i AsiCTix expects between France and the rest of Europe and 
i£?t ^ 19 J™ 011 visitors in to raise capital both for new at- 
compared with 1.7 million in tractions in die original and 
1996. Disneyland Pans had 11.7 for expansion, he added, 
million visitors in its latest finan- Mr. de Bosredon said Parc As- 

cial year. Parc Asterix had a 1996 terix p lanned to take stakes in 
net profit of 15.4 nullion francs, family attractions in Europe cur- 
down from 30. 1 million francs, as rently owned by individuals or 
sales were flat at 304 million small companies. (Reuters, AFP) 



Danone Sells Off Grocery Units 


PARIS — Danone SA, France’s 
largestfood company, said Thursday 
it had sold parts of us grocery busi- 
ness for 5 billion francs ($846.7 mil- 
lion) to focus on its more profitable 
drinks, gnacks and health products. 

Campbell Soup Co. agreed to bay 
Danone's soup unit, which makes 
the PurSoup and Liebig brands, for 
1.1 billion francs, raising tbe US. 
company’s presence in the world’s 
fifth-largest soup market 

Paribas Affaires Industrielles, 
Lazard Acres & Co. and H nance 
Investors, three investment banks, 
joined forces to buy Danone's 
sauces, pasta and ready-prepared 
food units for 3.9 billion francs. 

* "Our aim is to concentrate re- 
sources OTom three businesses with 
worldwide potential — health, 
snack foods and beverages, which 
already represent 80 percent of our 
sales," said Danone’s c hahman , 


Franck Riboud- Danone, perhaps 
best-known for its yogurt products, 
has been seeking to shed its least 
profitable brands. 

In the first six months of this year, 
profit from its grocery unit fell 17 
percent to 416 million francs. Dan- 
one said profit margins on the 
products sold averaged less than 3 
percent, compared with 9 percent 
for all Danone goods. 

“These businesses are the least 
desirable,’ ’ said Christian Laubie, 
Danone’s chief financial officer. 
“They drive down the company’s 
margins, and they don’t create 
shareholder value." 

Paribas, La 2 ard and Finance In- 
vestors said they would spend 1.3 
billion francs in cash for the units 
they were buying and borrow 2.6 
billion francs to pay Danone a total 
of 3.9 bilhon francs. Tbe banks are 
to create a joint venture to manage 
the brands, which include ready-to- 


serve dishes made by Panzani Wil- 
liam Saurin in France and Agnesi in 
Italy. Paribas will own half the ven- 
ture, and (he other two partners will 
own a quarter each. 

Danone said it would use the 
money from the sales to cut debt and 
fund overseas development, notably 
in Latin America. China and In- 
donesia. It said it might also sell its 
packaging unit, which it no longer 
considers a core business. 

Danone 1 shares fell 6 francs to 
close at 954 before the announce- 
ment, amid a general decline in 
European equities triggered by the 
Bundesbank s decision to raise in- 
terest rates. 

Analysts said the sale would help 
Danone's earnings in the long term. 
Some added that the sale had 
already been factored into Danone’s 
share price. Mr. Riboud announced 
in May that he wanted to sell the 
units. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Siemens Offers Some a Shorter Week 


Investor’s Europe 



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1997 £ " ... x 1937 : _ 1987 




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Source: Tefekurs 


iHmuoiuiul Herald Trihunc 


Bloomberg News 

MUNICH — Siemens AG, Ger- 
many’s largest electronics and en- 
gineering company, said Thursday 
it would cut working hours for older 
workers by half while guaranteeing 
diem more than four-fifths of their 
full-time pay. 

Tbe company said workers aged 
55 and older could cut their working 
hours by 50 percent while retaining 
82 percent of net full-time wages 
under an agreement with tbe com-, 
pany’s central workers’ council. 

About 10,000 workers, or 5 per- 


cent of the company's German work 
force, will be eligible, Siemens said. 

Last month, 1G Metal), Ger- 
many’s largest union, and employers 
in southwestern Germany reached a 
groundbreaking agreement with 
metal-industry employers in North 
Baden and North Woerttemberg 
states on die introduction of the 
shorter week for older workers. 

That agreement was welcomed 
by Wemer Sttunpfe, president of 
Gesamtmetall, the carmaking, en- 
gineering and metals industry as- 
sociation. He said he wanted the 


pact extended to the whole industry, 
and Labor Minis ter Norbert Biuem 
urged other industries to adopt sim- 
ilar arrangements. 

IG Metall, which represents 2.7 
million workers, said the introduction 
of part-time work for older employ- 
ees would help alleviate German un- 
employment, which was at 1 1.7 per- 
cent in September, a postwar high. 

. Separately, unions and employers 
in Bavaria agreed on a shorter week 
for older workers in the metals and 
engineering sector, the business 
daily Handelsblatt reported. 


Very briefly: 


Commerzbank Takes Itself Out of Bidding for BZW 


SurfFn-iiPuiv* hr\ 

LONDON — Pressure on 
Barclays PLC to find a buyer for 
parts of its BZW investment-bank- 
ing division grew Thursday as Com- 
mcizbank AG of Germany ruled it- 
self out. 

Only the French bank Paribas has 
officially expressed interest in buy- 
ing BZW's equity and corporate ad-' 
visory businesses, and bankers 
warned that the unit could lose staff, 
clients and credibility unless there 
was a quick sale. 


“They have got to move very 
quickly,’ ’a corporate financier at one 
European bank said of Barclays. 

Abandoning its ambitions to 
break into the top league of global 
investment banks, Barclays said last 
week it would sell BZW’s stock- 
broking and mergers-and-acquisi- 
rions units. 

Analysts and fund managers have 
been divided on what the attempt to 
sell these businesses means. Kathryn 
Newton, an analyst with UBS, said, 
"What the market had been pricing 


in was a much larger sale than what 
we have actually seen,” referring to 
die strong rise in Barclays shares in 
die weeks before the announcement. 

But the stock of the British bank- 
ing heavyweight dropped when 
Commerzbank said it was not in- 
terested in buying all or part of the 
BZW businesses. 

Barclays’ shares closed in Lon- 
don at 1,615 pence ($26.19), down 
33, or 2 percent. 

Meanwhile, a Paribas represen- 
tative said the French hank was 


"looking at BZW businesses.” 

Other European financial insti- 
tutions thought to be interested in 
BZW include ING Barings, the 
Dutch-owned London merchant 
bank, and Credit Suisse First Bos- 
ton, the investment . banking arm of 
the Swiss bank Credit Suisse. JJ*. 
Morgan & Co. has also been named 
as a potential buyer. 

Commerzbank, Germany’s third- 
largest bank, said it would not bid 
for Barclays PLC’s stockbroking 
and corporate finance units because 


they did not fit with its strategy. 

- "Commerzbank is not interested 
in taking over BZW nor in buying 
any of its parts,” said Peter Pietscb, 
a spokesman for the bank. “We 
have higher profitability goals.” 

Travelers Group Inc., the U.S. 
financial group that last month 
agreed to buy the U.S. investment 
bonk Salomon Brothers, also has 
held informal talks with BZW about 
a possible takeover, according to a 
published report. 

(AFP, Reuters, Bloomberg) 


• Worms & Cie., the target of two rival takeover bids, said its 
board had unanimously recommended that shareholders ac- 
cept the friendly joint offer of Italy’s Agnelli family and the 
French insurer Assurances Generates de France SA. The 
offer, which exceeded Francois Pinault’s hostile bid for 
Worms, values the sugar, paper, shipping and insurance 
company at more than 32 bilhon francs ($5.45 billion). 
Russia’s State Property Ministry canceled a regulation that 
would have allowed the privatization of Rosgosstrakh, Rus- 
sia’s biggest insurer. 

• Alcatel Alsthom SA said Toshiba Corp. would invest an 
undisclosed amount in its $3-5 billion multimedia satellite 
project with Loral Space & Communications Ltd-, giving 
the venture a third major partner. Loral joined Alcatel's 
SkyBridge project in June when the two companies agreed to 
combine their satellite networks. 

• National Westminster Bank PLC announced a $5.5 billion 
securitization of part of its portfolio of high-quality, low- 
margin corporate loans and commitments. 

• The European Union will increase anti-dumping duties on 
television cameras shipped by Japan's Sony Corp. to 108.3 
percent from 62.6 percent and those on Ekegami Tsushinki 
Co.’s cameras to 200.3. percent from 82.9 percent. 

• Deutsche Telekom AG agreed with Microsoft Corp. to 
jointly develop and market Internet and multimedia 
products. - 

• SPT Telecom AS, the Czech Republic’s national phone 
company, is discussing plans to raise about $1 billion, in- 
cluding the possible sale of a Eurobond, to complete financing 
on its $4.2 billion program to expand and upgrade its phone 
network. 

• Austria's Futures and Options Exchange will begin trading 

Russian stock-index derivatives Dec. 1 1 based on the 1 2 most 
frequently traded Russian stocks. Bloomberg. Remers 








WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday, Oqt. 9 

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24.90 27.15 

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31X 2170 
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39*0 39 JO 
32*0 3270 
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1*05 1A15 
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6150 64 

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16.90 17JJ5 

405 AID 
245 ?« 

20 7025 
2175 71*0 
31.10 2175 
17.05 17.95 
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277 US 
089 495 

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4*7 470 

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5775 5125 
3645 *75 
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4040 

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116 320 
9.71 922 

9J8 956 
236 236 

688 655 
611 626 
125 176 
463 4*5 
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7.11 725 

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283 2*4 

934 931 

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13-07 015 
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6 607 

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360 

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355 335® 

345® 357® 

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8380 

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678 

658 

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479 

4455 

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4390 

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595 

566 

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810 

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£10 

8X5 

6® 

8 

670 

80® 

7550 

7800 

8060 


725 

700 

705 

725 

3UM 

2900 

7910 

3000 


407® 308® 

401 40*20 

1715 

1145 

1175 

1210 

bnetd 

755 

737 

7® 

757 

7750 

6710 

69® 

7180 


*39® 42*10 425® 439® 

17® 

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1700 

1760 

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L*M 

1253 

un 

1186 

1231 

2635 

3425 

2500 

26® 

23® 

2210 

2255 

2338 

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64® 

6*90 

6400 

LVMH 

1262 

1217 

1218 

1238 

1365 

1320 

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362 

347 351® 

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9450 

9560 

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*39® *3030 

436 *41.10 

4435 

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4770 

4475 


290 281.10 28370 285.® 


1255 

1345 

7290 

Peorota 

795 

764 

787 

795 

2015 

29® 

2975 

Ptaaufl-Prtrt 

2780 

2632 

2700 

2800 






7W5 

2080 

21® 

21® 





Reraud 

179® 

172® 174® 179® 





RW 

1685 

16® 

1637 

16® 


PSEMftgeWS® 

Rh-Padenc A 

268® 

252 

253 260® 


Petaw 
POBonk 
PWLxegKs) 
SaaAUgndB 
SM Prime HdQ 


1325 

16 

105 

375 

73 

272® 

*25 

143 

930 

54 

660 


Pnvioas: 1046*3 sanofi 

Sdmekter 
SEB 

SGSThonmn 
SteGenerde 886 

SrxteriTO 2990 

SIGobate 996 

5au{Oe) l £20 

Suez Lyon Eaux 644 

1B9® 
<43 

ro 

309 


1275 1325 13 

15® 16 15® 

100 104 T01 

3J0 170 370 

77 72® 70 

250 272® 248 

4*5 *20 *05 

135 Ml 141 
920 9X 920 
53 54 3 

620 660 6X 


ToMB 

IKtoor 


CSF 


553 _ 

368 358 

878 8® 

533 S22 

886 889 

2852 
902 
7570 
616 
640 
184 
635 


540 544 

36070 36610 
864 860 

526 S29 

876 888 

2925 2982 

913 927 

7570 75*5 
624 647 

660 681 
187® 188*0 
645 664 

120® 124® 
38770 308.10 


Mexico 

ASaA 

BanocdB 

CaracxCPO 

OraC 

Emp Modem 

GpoCnnoAl 

GdoPBgormt 

S fin Irtwso 
I Omk Ms 
Tfefev&aCPO 
TtTMexL 


ajy _«• J24U9 ra. 

PrrriooK 5306*2 SaO Paulo Bow^otedHt12W® 


7220 

2X40 

3&6S 

7632 

41® 

6 '£ 
S3 0 
40JO 
751*0 
2000 


71® 
21 ® 
37*0 
1610 
4175 
6000 
130 
31® 
39® 
749 JO 
19*4 


71® 72® 
23.10 2273 
3840 30.15 
7622 74X 
4075 41*0 

6a® 61® 

X36 3J0 

31® 32X 
4070 40.30 
157.00 75170 
19*6 20® 


I PM 

BrataaPM 
Cam PM 

cEspn- 


PH 


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UftM 5 «rvWo$ 


Milan 




CVRD PM 


PM 


12 ® 

830X0 

61® 

9651 

17® 

627® 

705X0 

40600 

42000 

322X0 

195® 

42X1 

1056 

1®® 

190X0 

168® 

376X0 

4370 

1770 

2600 


11® 11.95 
815X0 829® 
58X0 6070 
92*0 96® 
1698 17® 
598X0 62*99 
695X0 705X0 
<8000 490X0 
J90X0 408X0 
308X0 377® 
193® 195® 
41® *2® 
1052 1056 
15000 157.90 
179.99 19000 
162X0 168® 
364X0 375X7 
41® 4200 
71® 11® 
2631 2690 


”■80 

820X0 

59X0 

9170 

1690 

607® 

700® 

483X1 

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314® 

19*39 

42® 

10X6 

15460 

iaaio 

164® 

370® 

43J0 

11 ® 

2665 


Seoul 


KoreoBPwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
l£ Seaton 
Potato Iran SI 


CntHsBeWEsBUi 

Pra*tam<l0J4 

75000 731® 740® 750® 
6950- 67M 6950 <810 

174® 16800 17100 1«S00 
7450 6970 7450 60® 

18300 1 7400 179® 177® 
4W0 4520 4630 4600 

310® 29000 202® 297® 
500® 453® <7800 49200 
410® 39000 305® 406® 
61400 57000 583® HOW 
7150 7020 7190 7090 
4330® 3000® 4330® 4030® 


Montreal 

tetaJbtalltaUL >45811 
Prows: 3640® 

Bo Mob Com 

*SM 

45.10 

45J5 

4555 

C* Tire A 

29 

2&5S 

7365 

2W> 

CdoUIBA 

301b 

m 

39% 

3Vte 

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46® 

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46® 

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GozNtefao 

1870 

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1870 

GLWeCLiteCO 

035 

3320 

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3370 


45J0 

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4535 

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m 

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21 

21 

21 

21 

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20** 

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PnwCorp 

PofetrRnl 

4110 

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4*55 

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42® 

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4190 

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2 TA 
4® 

3L10 

8® 

2115 

8® 

32.15 

8® 

Royal BkCN 

n® 

7W 

71X5 

7114 


Singapore 

AafaPacBmr 5 
OretaPoc 610 
GtyDenfe 93S 

35SJS- IS 


DBSMniai 
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Oslo 


AfearA 


OKMr 72653 
Profess? 721X6 


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277® 

2620 

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127 

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260 

164 

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152 

132 

370 

56 


1C 147 
211 314 

2&S0 J6 

3U0 31 

125 13650 
43 44 

424 J32 

424 CO 
2SS 255 
152 162® 
624 628 

487 404 

I £ 1C® 
128 120 
365 370 

9 S 


1C 

217 

2670 

31.10 

725® 

42 ® 

433 

420 

261 

162® 

627 

491 

148 

132 

375 

53 


DBS 

Fiaser&Neave 
HKLond* 
MMflttwn' 
JartShrtB^c' 

KSSta* 

KrppdFefc 
KwpdLanfl 
oSBCfciHp 
OSUnknBtP 
Pintetmy Hdgs 
Sembownig 
Sng Mrfcss® R-» 
SknLaOd 6® 
SgtaP 22 
SaaTedilad U6 
S 6 w 7 efeaiiw 239 
TalT raBdA 278 

UMIndaltW O .00 

UMOScaBAF 1040 
MngTdHdgs 320 

fir US dabs. 


1570 

146 

8J5 

3J2 

7.® 

*08 

5*0 

3.16 

4*0 

3J2 

9*5 

675 

5® 

695 


Strata Timw: id J6 
PlW HO K 1822X2 

5 5 5 

*88 *N £70 

0 ® 9.15 975 
8 ® 855 865 
(£93 893 071 

1*30 1570 1530 
3 J 8 3 L 40 140 

870 875 8 ® 

121 128 134 

7 ® 7 ® 7JS5 

4 X 2 4*2 *06 

5.75 £75 SJS 
3 X 6 HO 116 
190 *74 A» 

326 3 ® 334 

975 975 9 .® 
6 X 5 6.15 625 
63 5 ® 578 

£70 570 190 

11 ® 11.70 H® 
6 ® 6,35 655 

21® 21® 21® 

2*7 2*8 266 

271 233 137 

177 278 278 

0.98 6.96 698 
1070 10 ® KMO 
114 118 118 


Electrolux B 

609 

668 

679 

673 


377 

360 

365 371® 


331® 

318 

372 

-3® 

bieentaeA 

706 

693 

695 

701 

hnestnr B 

«7 

380 399® 

405 

M0O0B 

279 

270 

279 

782 


285 271® 

2® 

2/4 


268 

757 

767 

7® 

5cratrisr 

274 

260 

266 

910 

ScariaB 

239 

233 236® 

23/ 

SCAB 

188® 180® 

182 186® 

S-E Bcnken A 

94® 

91® 

92® 

94 

SunSaFon 

017 35159 3«59 

360 


StamtaB 

SKFB 

SpatxmtanA 

SfcraA 

SvHontlGfeA 

IMwB 


324 305 317® 32*50 

243 231® 234 238® 

193 1® 186 192 

120 IS 177 IN 
273 26*50 265 273 

23] 22*® 226® 229® 


Sydney ABOnMiratej.2722® 

7 7 . Prawns: 276149 


Amcor 

AMZBking 

BHP 

Bern) 

Bnmbfested 

CBA 

CCAranS 
Cotes Myer 
CornolcD 
CSR 

Ratal Blew 
GoodnaoFld 
ICIAifrtraSO 
Lend Lease 
MIMHrim 
NotAidlank 
NdMutad Hd5 
News Corp 

Pacific Dunk*) 
Pioneer Wl 
Pub Brnodcost 
RtoTWo 
SIGeorpa Bank 
WMC 

WeSncBtaij 

WooaridePet 

Wootworte 


842 

11-31 

16 

*C 

2870 

6® 

670 

534 

2 ® 

119 

12*8 

3133 

1® 

21® 

231 

695 

IN 

4*5 

870 

2899 

8® 

636 

876 

1192 

*46 


830 

11.18 

15*2 

*40 

27® 

17® 

13*5 

648 

6*7 

£15 

2*5 

215 

12*4 

30*0 

1® 

21 

23J 

6*5 

176 

*47 

865 

20J0 

8*2 

618 

8 J 6 

1270 

*31 


835 8® 

11® 11J4 
1572 1607 
*43 *46 

27® 2831 
17® 17® 
1175 13.01 
652 6® 

670 £72 

£31 530 

2*6 2 ® 
2.18 275 

12*8 1276 
30*5 3239 
160 1.62 
21*1 21® 
230 237 
670. 696 
181 192 

*49 4® 

873 891 

20*5 21X5 
8*6 865 

623 644 

869 8*3 

12® 13X5 
4J3 *53 


The Trfb Index 

Prices aa of 3:00 PM New York tbne. 

Jan. 1 , 1937 = 100. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to data 
% change 

+ 20.13 

World Index 

179.16 

- 2.15 

- 1.19 

Regional Inrioxna 

Asia/Padfic 

118-67 

- 1.99 

- 1.65 

- 3.86 

Europe 

195.63 

• 4.10 

- 2.05 

+ 21.36 

N. America 

212.94 

- 0-24 

.- 0.11 

+ 31.52 

S. America 
tnduHrW bidraas 

177.23 

+226 

+129 

+ 54.88 

Capital goods 

229.75 

- 0.15 

- 0.07 

+ 34.42 

Consumer goods 

197.96 

- 1.80 

- 0.90 

+ 22.63 

Energy 

208.82 

- 2.44 

- 1.15 

+ 22-32 

Finance 

132 U 32 

- 2.76 

- 2.04 

+ 13.62 

MisceBaneous 

189.19 

■420 

- 2.17 

+ 16.94 

Raw Materials 

186.57 

-391 

- 2.05 

+638 

Service 

169.81 

- 1.52 

-029 

+ 23.66 

(Mites 

171.70 

ATI 

- 1.02 

+ 19.68 

7befrvamaaonaiHBraki Tribune Worid Stock Index C tracks the U.S dollar values of 
2ao*itematlan80yimastable stocks from 25 countries. For more MomaDon. a tree 
booklet ts arasatfe Oy nrttrwro 77 » Avenue Charles deGauBe. 

92S71 Neurily Codex. France. 


CompBod by Bloomberg Ne no. | 


Taipei 

Cathay Ufo In* 
Cboog Hue Bk 
CWooTangBk 
Chtao Develptnf 
Oibn Steel 
FtstBwk 
Formosa PlosBc 
Hub Nan Bk 
teHCpmmBk 
NanYa Ptefics 
SNn Kang Lite 
TmwDnSeral 
Tatung 

Bid Mod Elec 
UM World Oibi 


Stock Mcrtrttatae 8461® 
Pmteas:8255® 


174 

122® 

124 

122 

07 

95 

07 

94 

72 

TO® 

72 

TO 

96® 

94 

96® 

03 

2*® 

2*10 

2-UO 

2*10 

07® 

95 

97 

9*® 

54® 

53 

53® 

53 

102 

99 

101 

ro 

54 

S3 

.54 

S3 


60® 

62 

60® 

79® 

7B 

79® 

77® 

1® 

144 

147 

1*1® 

3230 

32 

32 

31.90 

82® 

00 01 

82 

79 

56 

55 

56 

55 


Tokyo 


IOM22S: T737692 

piWNsnaMi 


Stockholm 

Sit! m i3 . 0 ^ 10 ^ .e^S 

2S2 240 346® 253 

SmA 133® 125 132® 1® 

utSon CPA ^7 24S 250® 257® 

AdSte 32T 316 319 319 



id) 

?3rfninltn Bk 

SoObank 

Sony 

SwaVwuo 
SumBonfeBk 
tCbera 
tamo Bee 
I Metal 
ITrusl 
TofahoPtam 
IctecloOiem 
TDK 

TohoUiEIPwr 
Tc*d Bank 
Total Mafne 
Tokyo El Pwx 
Tokyo Efetkro 
Tokyo Gas 
TdqvCng. 
Tonen 

Tappm Prlnf 

faff 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PACE 19 


ong Kong Plans 
ome-Building Spree 

Shares Fall After Greenspan Warning 



HONG KONG — The govern- 
ment said Thursday it planned to 
more than double the rate of apart- 
mens construction by 2001 to try to 
meet Chief Executive Tung Chee- 
hwa’s housing-supply targets. 

A day after Mr. Tung delivered his 



planned to build 166,700 apartments 
m 2001, two-aad-a- ha 1 f times this 
year’s output of 63, 100. 

The figure underlines the diffi- 
culties the government faces in solv- 
j ing Hong Kong’s chronic housing 
\yfoortage, which has caused average 
■ apartment prices to jump 60 percent 


Unemployment 
In Australia 
Drops at Last 


SyOer Staff FmmOapar ha 

SYDNEY — The unemploy- 
ment rate fell to 8.6 percent in 
September from 8.7 percent in 
August, the Bureau or Statistics 
said Thursday, the first sign of 
reduced joblessness since the 
central bank began cutting in- 
terest rares last year. 

Nearly 75,000 Australians 
found work in September — the 
biggest improvement in almost 
fwo years — but because the 
number of job-seekers also 
rose, the rate fell only slightly. 

“Conditions in the economy 
are improving,” Stephen White 
of GIO Asset Management 
said. ’ *The employment figures 
suggest that the Reserve Bank 
is under no pressure to cut of- 
ficial interest rates again.” 

The reduced likelihood of a 
rate cut lifted the Australia dol- 
lar, with the U.S. dollar falling to 
13539 Australian dollars from 
13765 dollars Wednesday. The 
benchmark All Ordinaries stock 
index fell 46.2 points to 2.7223. 
Treasurer Peter Costello said the 
jobless figures showed the econ- 
omy would grow 33 percent to 
4 percent in 1997. after expand- 
ing 3.8 percent in 1996. 

( Bloomberg , AFP) 


since 1995. The benchmark Hang 
Seng stock index fell 565.40 points 
Thursday, or 3.8 percent, to 
14,273.12, bat many analysts said 
Mr. Tong’s move to increase supply 
and deflate real-estate prices had 
been largely expected and was 
'already factored into share prices. 

* ‘Tung's speech was not so harm- 
ful to the property market,” said 
Michael Wong, a fund manager at 
Pegasus Fund Managers Ltd. “It's a 
neutral message to the market” 

Analysts said the market was re- 
acting largely to the inflation warn- 
ing delivered Wednesday by Alan 
Greenspan, the chairman of the U.S. 
Federal Reserve Board. Investors 
are concerned that U.S. interest rates 
could rise, leading to a rise in Hong 
Kong dollar interest rates. 

“Hong Kong has been holding 
out as a bastion of safety.” said Nick 
Anthony, sales director at Indosuez 
W.L Carr Securities Ltd. of the stock 
market's falL “Now you see people 
chipping away at that People feel 
the nill is being invaded from all 
sides, so they'll leave the fort ” 

Mr. Tung wants to supply an av- 
erage of 85,000 apartments a year — 
35,000 more than last year — by 
2001. According to the government 
forecast, the average over die next 
four years will 6e more than 98,000. 

“The most important thing is, the 
government’s policy is to create 
more housing and reduce stress in 
housing need.” said Payson Cha 
Mou-sing, managing director of the 
developer HKR International Ltd. 

'‘Under the circumstances, we’ll 
be delighted to increase our construc- 
tion program and develop more.” 

Mr. Tung has pledged to set aside 
690 hectares (1,704 acres) for hous- 
ing in the craning five years. 

The government has blamed spec- 
ulative buyers for the 60 percent rise 
in average apartment prices from 
1995 through die first half of 1997. 

“The level of speculation, as 
evidenced by the level of confirmed 
sales, has crane down,” said C.Y. 
Leung, a housing-policy adviser to 
Mr. Tung. Genuine home-buyers 
now account for 90 percent of all 
apartment purchases, compared with 
55 percent “four or five months 
ago, he said. After taking office 
July 1, Mr. Tung threatened to crack 
down on short-term speculation to 
rein in pices. Since then, prices have 
subsided about 15 percent. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 



PALM REAPING — A harvester in Malaysia gathering palm 
ofl fruit, an export expected to benefit from the weak ringgit 


Daewoo Is in Talks to Buy 
Kia’s Truck and Bus Unit 



j F . ' J WMl Pg .'.' 

^Investor’s Asia 


mg. 

Woi 


. Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — . Daewoo’ Group, 
which owns South Korea’s second- 
biggest anto manufacturer, said 
Thursday that the financially 
strapped Kia Group had offered to 
sell Daewoo its commercial vehicle 
subsidiary, Asia Motors Co. 

The acquisition of Asia Motors, if 
successful, would help Daewoo 
fend off Samsung Motors Inc., the 
latest entrant in the domestic anto 
industry. Asia Motors' technical 
edge over Daewoo in truck and bos 
production would strengthen the 
company's expansion into overseas . 
markets, analysts said. 

“It should be a heart-throbbing 
offer for Daewoo,” said Lim Dong 
Soo, an analyst at Jardine Fleming 
Securities Co. “It’s an opportunity 
for Daewoo to intensify its rela- 
tively frail commercial-vehicle sec- 


tor at a reduced cost.” 

Separately, the Ministry of Fi- 
nance and Economy said the gov- 
ernment would revise rules on mer- 
gers and acquisitions to promote the 
restructuring of struggling compa- 
nies. By promoting takeovers, 
Korea aims to stem a tide of bank- 
ruptcy caused by the slowing of 
economic growth. 

Daewoo may face competition 
from foreign rivals. Press reports 
have said General Motors Corp. and 
Scania AB were also interested in 
acquiring Asia Motors. 

Asia Motors is losing money be- 
cause of sluggish demand and 
mounting interest expenses. Even 
so, its factory sites in southern 
Kwangju and its annual production 
capacity of 115,000 commercial 
vehicles are “very attractive,” Mr. 
Lim said. 


Cmffthff tn Ow Sx&Fna Oporto 

KUALA LUMPUR — Finance 
Minister Anwar Ibrahim said Thurs- 
day that Makysfc had made two pro- 
posals to the International Monetary 
Fund on ways to curb currency ma- 
nipulation and hedge-fond activities. 

Mr. Anwar, who is also deputy 
prime minister, said Malaysia was 
proposing more supervision and full 
disclosure for both types of trading. 

“We need to know who is buying 
and who is selling, so trading is not 
hidden,” he said. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin M<h 
haraad said Tliursday that the World 
Bank had taken an interest in Malay- 
sia’s plans to regulate cnzrency trad- 
». He said James Wolfensohn, the 
forld Bank president, had contac- 
ted him about foe plan. 

“He said he wants a Malaysian to 
be seconded to the World Bank in 
order to see bow we can regulate 
currency trading.” Mr. Mahathir 
said of Mr. Wolfensohn. 

Analysts were skeptical, saying 
any plan to regulate currency trading 
would be fraught with difficulties. 

“It would probably be quite dif- 
ficult to enforce given foe extent of 
electronic trading around the 
world.” said an economist at a for- 
eign brokerage in Singapore. 

The Malaysian ringgit has lost 
around 20 percent of its valae against 
the U.S. dollar since July, a drop that 
Mr. Mahathir has 'consistently at- 
tributed to currency speculators. 

At the annual meetings of foe 
World Bank and IMF in Hong Kong 
last month, Mr. Mahathir called for 
a ban on currency trading. On 
Wednesday, Mr. Mahathir called for 
a “specific” market for foreign ex- 
change transactions to ensure great- 
er transparency. 

Mr. Anwar also warned that the 
Malaysian budget to be announced 
next week would be “tough” and 
highlighted the importance of aim- 
ing for a surplus. “I am not re- 
peating this as more rhetoric.” he 
noted, adding that “the budget will 
not be popular” and a lot of people 
would be affected- • 

He also said Malaysia did not 
require the help of foe International 
Monetary Fund to stop foe slide of 
its currency and shore up its fi- 
nancial system. (AFP. Reuters ) 



Source: Tstokurs 


Very briefly; 


• China approved new rules, to take effect Wednesday, 
allowing large foreign trading companies to keep a portion of 
their hard-currency earnings. The move is intended to slow foe 
rise of China’s foreign reserves. 

• Fukotoku B ank Ltd. and Bank of Naniwa Ltd., Osaka 
banks with a total of 120 billion yen ($980 million) in bad 
loans, will merge Ocl 1. 1998. The government hopes the 
move will make foe industry more competitive. 

• Thailand is looking to foe private sector fra- a company to 
complete the $33 billion Bangkqk mass transit project: Last 
week, it scrapped a contract with Hopewell Holdings PLC of 
Hong Kong to build the system. No formal approaches to or 
from foe Transport Ministry have been made. 

• Dassault Aviation SA of France said it was talking with 
China about a possible purchase of its newest fighter plane, the 
Rafale. The talks come as Dassault begins deliveries of its 
Mirage 2000 fighters to Taiwan. 

• Pratt & Whitney, a unit of United Technologies Corp.. 
began a $30 million joint venture to make jet engines in China. 
It will join-Blade Technology International of Israel and 
Xiao Aero-Engine Corp. of China. 

• Coca-Cola Co. opened its first non carbonated drinks fac- 
tor in China. atDongguan in Guangdong Province. The plant 
will produce fruit juices, mineral waters and tea drinks. 

• Petroiiam Nasional BhcL, said it did not recognize a Ui. 
law that bars foe Malaysian government-own ed oil company 
from investing in ban. Petronas thus threw its weight b ehind 
its partner. Total SA of France, in its opposition to foe law, a 
week after foe $2 billion deal was set 

• Great Wall Electronic International Ltd. of Hong Kong 
reached a deal with Gran dig AG to make and distribute the 
Goman group’s televisions in Hong Kong and China. 

• Bharti Telecom Ltd. shares climbed 10 percent, to 108 

rupees ($3), after foe company announced it would join a 
group that will set up a telephone system in the Seychelles. 
making it foe first Indian company to build and operate a 
telephone network outside India. Reuters. Bloomberg. AFP 


TRADE: Bombardier’s Fury 

Continued from Page 15 


said. “It’s a barbarity." 

Mr. Perron resigned the 
day after his remarks ap- 
peared 
Minist< 


in print, and Foreign 
Lloyd 


linister Lloyd Axwortby of 
-Canada and other officials 
were quick to register their 
disapproval But it was ob- 
vious foal their censure was 
pimed in part at the public 
‘Jinanner in which Mr. Perron 
nad made his remarks, as op- 
posed to their substance. 

President Ernesto Zedillo 
of Mexico, while visiting Par- 
is this week, suggested at a 
news conference that perhaps 
the Canadian and Spanish 
companies could negotiate a 
solution under which they 
would share foe contract, but 
foe legal and procedural ram- 
ifications of this were not im- 
mediately clear. 

Bombardier’s disqualifica- 
tion, which came near foe end 
of a competition it seemed to 
•f-e winning, touched a sen- 
sitive chord in a country 
where trade has become im- 
portant to the standard of liv- 
ing, and whose businesses 
ana politicians have begun 
looking farther south, beyond 
the United States, to the rest 
of the Western Hemisphere. 

Along with its ties to Mex- 
ico through foe North Amer- 
ican Free Trade Agreement, 
Canada has signed a trade 
treaty with Chile and is push- 
ing the United Stares to be 
more aggressive in bringing 
about lower trade barriers 
throughout Central and South 
America. It also plans a trade 
mission to Mexico early next 
year. 

“We want to be sure that 
foe subway bid was done 
rfairly, and we want that ex- 
plained,” said Leslie Swart- 
man, a spokeswoman for 
Canada’s international trade 
minister, Sergio March!. 
“We just want to make sure 


that all of foe procurement 
processes are conducted with 
transparency and with fair- 
ness. ’ 

That judgment sometimes 
is in the eye of the beholder 
and can raise issues between 
even the closest of trading 
partners. When Air Canada 
was shopping for a fleet of 
jets in the 1980s, for example, 
foe U.S. aircraft maker Boe- 
ing Co. complained that foe 
airline, then government- 
owned, unfairly favored a 
consortium of European 
companies 

Air Canada ultimately pur- 
chased Airbus Industrie jets, 
but Boeing's complaints 
helped fuel suspicions that 
led to a criminal investigation 
into the deal. 

The outcome of foe Mexico 
city subway contract may not 
be known for several mouths, 
but it will continue to be 
watched closely here. Com- 
pared with hs$l billion-a-day 
trading relationship with the 
United States, Canada’s eco- 
nomic ties with Mexico are 
small — about $6 billion an- 
nually, mostly in Canadian 


Indian Exchange Reopens 

Agence Frunce-Presse 

BOMBAY — The head of India’s . National Stock 
Exchange, which reopened Thursday after a four-day in- 
terruption caused by a satellite failure, said the government 
needed to link foe exchange’s on-screen trading to another 
satellite to ensure that more business was not lost. 

“We have no option but to shift to some other satel- 
lite,” said Ramchandra PatiL, president of foe National 
Stock Exchange. “Otherwise it will be calamitous.” He 
said he might ask for a link to a non-Indian satellite. 

.The exchange had to shut down Friday after foe satel- 
lite failed. Analysts estimate that around $2 billion of 
trading was lost as a result of the break in service. 


imports of Mexican goods — 
but they have been growing. 
For companies like Bom- 
bardier, Mexico represents a 
starting point to pursue larger 
hemispheric ambitions. 

Until the recent deal Bom- 
bardier's Mr. Lord said, the 
company felt good about .its 
Mexican operations. 

In 1992 foe company pur- 
chased a state-owned subway 
car manufacturing plant, rec- 
ognizing that Mexico City’s 
public-transportation system 
was due for massive new in- 
vestment. Bombardier, fourth 
in foe world now in subway- 
car sales, has won two large 
contracts since then for foe 
city's system and is bidding 
as well for a system linking 
urban areas in foe Mexican 
state of Guanajuato, 


| This MummcHHtt ipftetfs a*a awns' of rMonddnlr 

t unique international av. 

Unique International N.V. 

Global Offering of 4,000,000 shares 
Unique International N.V. 


Clutul Cnardnuror 

Rabo Securities 



October 19*7 


Rabobank 

mKBtnSDQnsa id 


Notice of Redemption ■ 

National Westminster 
Finance B.V. 

U.S. $100,000,000 

12% per cent Guaranteed Capital Notes 
due November 15, 2002 

(origtealy issued on November®, 1982 In ihe name of NatWest Capital 
Cotporadon and guaranteed by National Westminster Bank Pic) 

(the ’Notes’) 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the conditions of the 
Notes that National Westminster Finance B.V. (the ’Company') wfH 
redeem all outstarxSng Notes on the Interest Payment Dale faffing on 
November 17. 1997. The redemption price of the Notes Is 100% erf the 
principal amount of the Notes plus accrued and unpaid interest 
thereon to November T7, 1907. On November 17. 1997 the redemption 
price of the Notes wffl become due and payable and. unless the 
Company ehafl fail to pay the redemption price upon presentation and 
surrender of the Notes, Interest thereon wil cease to accrue on and 
after such date. 

Payment of the red e mption price of the Bearer Notes will be made 
against presentation and surrender ol the Notes at the specified office 
of the Paying Agent named below. 

Each Bearer Note p resente d ter redemption must be presented 
together with afl unmatured Coupons, falling which the amount of any 
such missing coupons win be deducted from the redemption price. 

PRINCIPAL PAYING AGENT 

The Chase Manhattan Bank 
Window and vault 
Crosby Court 
38 HshoDsaate 
London£C3N4AJ 

October m. 1997 



£ia 



BSTANTIA 1 RISE IN 1997 HALF-YEARLY 
tROFITS (*23%) TO FRF2.1 BILLION, 

M TO BEF 12.9 BILLION 


itevbi ;v«? '.r*-stc«t In 
iitc er/jnu,Tic wyr 

'tf tit* FfEt».*>. 

rfw* fr'-ncf: locaJ gmnrnn|mr > 
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tot men sand 

menhn or* bank 
IViLj ba* a * r 

12 ouo enari'ri nes fprraO 
mr>HK'bw tounre 
(hr i roW Sf-tres and Asia. 






• Dexia: a European banking 
in a range of activities 



ialising 


condb'ir$r to Dexia's 


and already has to X of 



SOVEREIGN FINANCE GROUP 

SWITZERLAND 


24 hours FOREX DESK 
Financial consultancy, daily market comment 
inter banking rates, no commission 
Individual credit line and special conditions 


investment strategies without risk 
100% Capital return guarantee 
High return on investment 
Confidentiality guaranteed according to' Swiss law 


Established 1977 
Bahnhofstrasse 64, 80001 Zurich 
Tel:41 I 213 1881 Fax:41 1 222 0830 


— Local development Pnancmg is Dexia's main activity and 
profits. Dexiti is active in most countries of the European 
the European market. 

— Commercial banking. Including combined bank and insurance . Dexia specifically 
intends to develop the synergy between the banking and insurance professions. 

— Third party asset management is a highly profitable sector with high growth potential. 

• A new international subsidiary dedicated 
to "Public Finance" 

This subsidiary win deal with ail die international fsiandngaaivtty relating to local development 
which Is currently handled by Credit local and Credit Communal. Outside their respective 
national territories (Initial balance sheet total FRF125 bill! on/B 0763.7 billion). ^ 



An expanding banking group 




In millions of French Francs 
In miHiond Belgian Francs 


} \ •; j; # j 



Net banking Income* 

Operaring charges* 

Gross operating income 
Corrected values and provisions 
Tax 

Net income, group share 



June 1996 





1 








Bglllly 



tlSXJB 











loan and. 


;4; !- .••VATh" ;• 

r. : ■ &irif 

e&i 





•Rjurw restated In order.ro compart accounts lor the Jfrsr hall ol 1996 and 1997. 

•The 7.7* in FRF/9.0% In BEF rise in net banking income reflects considerable 
deposit activity. 

■ Operating charges have been kept under control, despite foe expei 
group expansion. 

■ Return on expenses (R0X) dropped from 55% in June 1996 to 51.5* year; 

Rerum on equity (ROD rose from 12. 5* to 144%. 

- Net income for the first half of 1997 amounted to FRF2.1 billlon/Bi 
a growth of 23% in French Francs and 25* In Belgian Francs. If the recent 
corporate income ax were discounted, this growth would have been 26%. 


• A strategy of growth and specialisation 1 

'Dexia will continue to gain market share worldwide and increase fro profirabliiry. Given 
the excellent general level of activity m October, we have every hope Thar Dexia group's 
annual' multi will be on huger, and thus highly iatlAfactory. “ 



Francois Naraton 
President 


Pierre Richard 
President 







G BANKING GROUP 
VICE FINANCE 



* 












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INTERN.4IT0IWL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAS, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


SPONSORED SECTION 


SPONSORED SECT 


BUILT FOR BUSINESS: TAIWAN 


$ 


The Small Island With Great Clout 

Having navigated through regional turbulence, Taiwan now seeks a greater international rote 


I f some of the Asian tigers have been reduced to meowing 
in the past couple of months. Taiwan is still roaring. 
Sound financial policies, low debt, strong exchange 
reserves and encouraging political developments all mean 
that Taiwan has had a good year economically in spite of die 
regional currency problems. 

One of the world's wealthiest economies today, Taiwan 
was recently reclassified by die International Monetary Fund 
as an “advanced economy." Gross domestic product reached 
$273 billion in 1996, while exports reached almost $115 
billion and are expected to hit $125 billion in'1997. GDP 
growth, which has averaged an extraordinary 9 percent from 
die 1950s to the 1990s. is tipped to accelerate from 5.7 
percent last year to 6.5 percent this year. 

This is a considerable achievement for a breakaway 
province of China with few natural resources that was still 
destitute when its Kuomintang leaders fled die mainland after 
defeat by the Chinese communists in 1949. _ 

Political disagreements with the People's Republic of 
China over acceptable terms for reunification or indepen- 
dence remain unresolved. 

Taiwan — celebrating its national holiday today — is 
becoming more and more democratic in the Western sense, 
thus moving de facto closer to in- 
dependence. Just 10 years ago, the 
island was still under martial law; 
since then, h has become one of the 
most open societies in Asia. Last 
spring, the island held its first direct 
presidential elections, in which Pres- 
ident Lee Teng-hui was re-elected. 

The government is heeding the 
voice of the business community 
more often, and this should help en- 
sure an even more stable and com- 
petitive economic environment 
What started as a small agricul- 
tural economy in the early 1950s 
quickly thrived and became an in- 
dustrious export-oriented economy. The label “Made in 
Taiwan" became synonymous foe world over with a steady 
supply of cheaply produced goods like toys and clothes. 

- This early industry paid on, and Taiwan has prospered. Its 
21 .5 million people now number among foe most affluent in 
foe world (GDP per capita stood at $12,872 in 19%). Taipei, 
with its high-rise office towers, is beginning to resemble 
Tokyo or Hong Kong, and international brand-name stores 
line foe trendy shopping malls. 

After decades of racking up huge trade surpluses, Taiwan 
has one of the world's largest foreign exchange reserves ($88 
billion as of foe end of 1996). 

As die nation has prospered and costs have escalated, 
Taiwan has seen its comparative advantage eroded. In- 
vestment has been moving into lower-cost centers like 
Thailand. Vietnam, Malaysia and, of course. China. 

In recent years, the island has successfully upgraded its 
industries in strategic areas with a higher added value, such as 
computers and electronics. Taiwan is a leading producer of 
semiconductors and is foe world leader in the production of 
notebook computers. 



SpedaBsts test microwave communications. 


The government knows that it needs to attract foreign 
investment and expertise to upgrade its industries, and that 
since production costs have risen, services will form an 
increasingly significant component of its economy (6 LI 
percent of GDP in 1996). The government has therefore 
embarked on an ambitious plan to turn Taiwan into an Asia 
Pacific regional operations center (APROC). The’APROC 
plan aims to see Taiwan's imports and exports reach $300 
billion a year and per capita GDP exceed $20,000 by foe year 
2000. The plan offers incentives to develop industries in 
which Taiwan will excel — mainly in high-tech production, 
but also in service areas like shipping and finance. 

Going global 

As part of Taiwan's preparations to join foe World Trade 
Organization, Taipei has -embarked cm a foil program of 
economic liberalization that has made it easier for foreign 
investment to enter this previously closed economy. This, 
combined with Taiwan's economic recovery, has led to a 
surge in foreign investment 

In the first seven months of 1 997, approved investments in 
Taiwan by foreign nationals (including overseas Chinese) 
reached $2 .59 billion, more than double foe same period in 
1996 and close to foe record high of 
$2.93 billion for foe whole of 1995. 
Recently, Siemens AG, a GEC-A1- 
sthom unit and a group of Taiwan- 
based companies have discussed 
building a high-speed rail link be- 
tween Taipei and foe port city of 
Kaohsiung. The contract would be 
| worth $ 1 1 .8 billion. 

5 Monopolies such as foe telecom- 
1 muni cations authority are in the pro- 
| cess ofbeing dismantled, and private 
I licenses have already been awarded 
5 for foe operation of cellular com- 
munications services. Even foe five- 
decade monopoly on the production 
of tobacco and cigarettes is due to be abolished next year. 

Taiwan wants to play a bigger international role in keeping 
with its financial clout But this has proved difficult since the 
People's Republic of China has succeeded in blocking 
United Nations membership or any official recognition of the 
island in all but a handful of countries. 

The ultimate aim for both Taiwan and China, officially at - 
least is “one China." Although achieving this peacefully is a 
long and painful process, cross-strait tensions seem to have 
eased considerably this year. President Lee Teng-hui's visit to 
foe ceremonies marking Panama's assumption of control 
over foe Panama Canal in August including his transit visit to 
Hawaii, seem not to have angered Beijing in the way that his 
other visit to foe United States did two years ago. 

Both sides expect to resume direct talks in foe near future, 
and Taiwan is expected to ease restrictions on investment in 
foe mainland. 

Direct shipping links with mainland China are about to 
become a reality, and foe possibility of direct air links seems 
considerably less far-fetched than it did a year ago. 

Paul Hicks 



Nature Trail Leads to Paradise 

The island offers countless attractions away from the urban areas, all year round. 


i 


T aiwan might be best known for 
its urban areas, but foe island also 
has a fair shztre of natural at- 
tractions, ranging from snowcapped 
peaks to tropical beaches. 

Taroko Gorge National Park, with its 
deep, twisting canyon, is probably foe 
most famous natural attraction on the 
island The Taroko River cuts a 20- 
kilometer (12-mile) gash through foe 
solid rock of foe central highlands as it 
plummets toward foe rugged eastern 
coast 

Most people explore foe gorge by 
driving along the spectacular Central 
Cross-Island Highway (Route S), but 
the park also has dozens of hiking trails 
and several hot springs, including the 
popular Wenshan Springs near 
Tienhsiang. 

Yehliu Country Park, near foe is- 
land's northern tip, is a ruggedly hand- 
some place that protects an unusual 


coastal environment: weird sandstone 
formations sculpted by wind and water. 
Beyond foe rocks is a breezy promon- 
tory with a lighthouse that offers sweep- 
ing views of foe ocean. 

The surrounding parkland is perfect 
for picnics, hiking and sunbathing in 
isolated coves. Feit Sui Wan Beach is a 
load surfer’s paradise, while China 
Shan Beach has more of a family at- 
mosphere, with hot springs and seaside 
shops. 

Surf or turf 

Aiishan is the best by far of Taiwan’s 
many high-country resorts. A blend of 
peaks, forest and Buddhist shrines, foe 
village perches at 2,200 meters in foe 
central highlands. You can explore foe 
area by road, foot or rail. The brisk 
climate offers rainstorms in the summer 
and snow flurries in winter. The mois- 
ture fosters lush vegetation, which 


makes hiking even more enjoyable. The 
most serious trek is a two-day circuit 
thro ugh Yushan Park, including 3.952- 
meter Jade Mountain — one of foe 
tallest peaks in East Asia. 

Renting Park offers a complete 
change of mood. Situated at the south- 
ern end of Taiwan, this fabulous coastal 
area has a climate that is decidedly 
tropical, with warm waters that drift up 
from foe Philippine Sea. 

The scenery is incredibly diverse, 
ranging from white-sand beaches and J 
rugged green peaks surrounded by sub- * 
tropical forests to coastal marshland 
where thousands of water birds make 
migratory sojourns. Most people come 
to Renting for foe water sports — scuba 
diving, windsurfing or sailing — but 
there are lots of other distractions, such 
as hiking, biking, birdwatching and vis- 
iting hot springs. 

l.. .l n 



pening in 1 984 . the Howard Plaza Hotel Taipei fulfilled the Liao family's dream of 
^ bringing Taiwan its first world-class business hotel devoted to traditional Chinese hospitality. 
A five-star hotel entirely designed, constructed, and maneged by Chinese, 
embodying the culture's traditions of graciousness and taste. 

The Liao's Insistence on tradition and quality was rewarded with the immediate success of 
the Howard Plaza Taipei, and has been followed by a succession of openings around 

the island, averaging one per year. Now a total of twelve properties, 
each Howcrd hotel and resort offers the same renowned 
service in its own distinct setting. 

And the settings couldnl be better. The Howard Resort Kenting 
and the Howard Beach Resort Pacific Green Spy are 
prestigious properties located in two of the island’s most 
beautiful areas: the southern tip and northern coast af 
Taiwan. The Howard Prince Taichung and 
the Howard Plaza Kaohsiung lay at the 
heart of the island's most important trade centers. 

The Liao family Invites you to come and share their vision of 
Chinese tradition. As the many guests of 
the islandwide Howard Hotels 8c Resorts will attest, 
you wont be disappointed. 

For reservations please call : 886-2-708-0505 
E-mail: howard@howard-hotels.com 
Web site: http//www. howard-hotels.com 




Howofd 

HCHB51 RESORTS 
MTERNMIQNAI, 


160 Jen Al Road. Sec 3. 
TdpeCTdwanR.O C 
Tel (D3 7002323 
(02)700-0729 




rts network excellency 
and service proficiency 
for better satisfaction 
in this global village 

From Jan. 1, 1998, the telephone numbers 
In Taipei and Keelung areas will be changed by 
adding "2 ° in front of the existing 7 numbers. 
Example: 

+686-2-344-5385 (Before Jan. 1 , 1 998) 
+886-2-2344-5385 (From Jan. 1 , 1998) 






D 


SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


SPONSORED 


BI£$ 




High-Tech Briefs 


• Fust International Computer. Inc. — one of broad selection of high-end multi-user serv- 
the largest computer manufacturers in the ers, multimedia PCs, notebooks, computer 
world, with a monthly capacity of 650.000 peripherals and communications devices, 
units — has just announced the launch of its The Acer Group has 100 enterprises in 36 
powerful new LEO Titan 9100 Series 30 countries, as well as dealers and distributors 
graphics workstations. The new workstations in 100 countries. Its turnover in 1996 was 
feature arcade-style 3D capabilities that are $5.9 billion. 

said to provide ' ■future-proof" systems for • The Taiwan Semiconductor Manufac- 
junnrng the next generation of 3D visual turing Company wifi invest $400 billion 
computing applications. The LEO Titan 9100 Taiwanese dollars (almost $14 billion) over 
Senes systems are currently in mass pro- the next 10 years in new manufacturing fa- 
duction and are now available throughout the dlities at the Tainan Science-Based Indus- 
Asta Pacific region and the Middle East via trial Park in south Taiwan. Donald Brooks. 
FIC’s LEO distribution network. president of TSMC. says the project will be 

A leading supplier of notebooks, desktop carried out step by step in line with the 
PCs. scanners, monitors and computer peri- national policy of developing southern 
plwrals. F?C operates a global manufacturing Taiwan. 

.inrt distribution network spanning more than ’ The company’s investment will create 

ICO countries and has over 4.500 employ- more than 1,000 higMech career oppor- 
4jj- ees worldwide. In 1996, FJC's total revenues tunities before the end of the centuiy. In the 
I ; reached $1.1 billion. next 10 years, six more advanced production 

• The Acer Group has become the first centers will be constructed in Tainan and will 
company in Taiwan to develop a TV-set-top provide more than 5.000 local jobs, 
box. die Acerstar, which will give households • Taiwan's Mosel Vitelic has just pro- 
access to satellite programming through duced the first 512K x 16 EDO (extended 
their TV screens. This digital product will be data out) DRAM (dynamic random access 
combined with an Internet appliance to allow memory) chip. Applications for the chip in- 
consumers to surf the Net as well as enjoy dude digital video disc products, graphics 
direct satellite programming. Acer has frame buffers and peripherals such as laser 
teamed up with Space TV, a Sino- American printers. The company applies state-of-the- 
TV company, to offer Chinese programs to the art design techniques and high-density pro- 
global Chinese community. cess technologies to manufacture various 

Established m 1976. Acer is one of the types of memory chips with fast access 
world’s largest PC companies, offering a times. P.R. 


BUILT FOR BUSINESS: TAIWAN 


Telecoms Deregulation in the Offing 

Taiwan has every intention of staying competitive internationally — Taipei already has plans in plac*f- 


limited their involvement to 
40 percent. The relaxation 
does not. however, apply to 
trading in the stocks and 
shares of these firms. Indi- 
vidual overseas investors are 
now limited to trading 10 
percent of the shares issued 
by any single listed firm, and 
there are no immediate plans 
to lift these restrictions. 


“The Hsinyi district will 
be Taiwan's Manhattan, 
while the Tunwha area will 
be our very own Wall Street," 
said Taipei Mayor Chen 
Shui-ban at a recent Amer- 
ican Chamber of Commerce 
luncheon. He added that he 
plans to be mayor “not just of 
Taipei, but of a major in- 
ternational city." P.H. 


"After what I went through , the special treatment onboard 
China Airlines cheered me up considerably! " 

At China Airlines , we look after every detail. 

For you.- We blossom every day. 


ts the government moves to globalize the economy, foreign participation will expand in some sectors. 


■fcjC'YThile some other To proceed with this plan, 
* \\f Southeast Asian government policy in the 
V V currencies have short term is to divide fi- 
suftcred sharp devaluations nancial markets into domes- 
agarnst rite U.S. dollar in re- tic and offshore segments, 
cent months, the New Offshore markets • will be 
Taiwan dollar has declined totally free while domestic 
only slightly — and some markets arc liberalized 
have welcomed this as a gradually. At the same time, 
means of ensuring that foreign exchange, foreign 
Taiwan's exports stay com- currency and offchore bank- 
pelitive. The Central Bank, ing will be broadened to at- 
however, has had to reduce tract more foreign financial 
bunks' reserve requirements institutions, 
in order to case liquidity in The government aims to 
.the banking sector. raise the number of foreign 

[ Earlier this year. Taiwan’s bank branches from the cur- 
[stock market surged to near- rent 42 to SO. and the number 

4 'Tconi highs. Although it has ' of offshore banking units 
‘dipped somewhat in the from 66 to 100. Ministry of 
wake of recent problems in Finance officials recently an- 
the Asian markets. it is still nounced the removal of the 
up significantly since the be- two-year period required be- 
ginning of the year. fore a foreign branch is al- 

Taiwan has no trade deficit lowed to add new branches, 
or significant bad loans, and Taiwan’s big three com- 
it has no foreign debt The mercial banks -Chang Hwa. 
island continues to hold very First Commercial and Hua 
high foreign exchange re- Nan. as well as several smal- 
serves. As a result no spec- ler banks — are to be privat- 
ulutive currency attack ized by the year 2U00. 
should precipitate the kind of In the medium to long 
monetary crisis that has oc- term, the government seeks 
curred elsewhere in the re- to expand the bond and stock 
’cion. markets, as well as to im- 

* Taiwan's go-it-alone prove the regulation of the 
policies — which have lim- capital market so as to move 
jted Foreign participation in toward internationalization, 
the economy — have doubt- The government proposes to 
3css contributed to the mon- remove the current 7 percent 
clary stability. Nevertheless, cap on daily stock price 
ihe doors to Taiwan's finan- swings by the middle of next 
trial markets are beginning to year, for instance. Another 
open wider. proposal is to raise the stock- 

* A financial liberalization trading volume ratio of in- 
^Ackugc is a key component stitutional investors from 10 
pf the gov ernment’s plan to percent to 20 percent of the 
turn Taiwan into an Asia-Pa- total market trading value 
irific regional operations ccn- within three years. The gov- 
lor ( APROC I by the year emment has also given the 
’201 JO. The APROC program green light to futures trading, 
seeks to eliminate current re- set to begin this month, 
porting pavedures and allow Foreigners arc now al- 
free inflow and outflow of lowed to own and run in- 
capital under a "freedom as vestment and trust compa- 
re golden rule, approx a I as nics in Taiwan, following the 
die exception" policy. removal of a restriction that 


Banking and Finance: Stability Reigns 


A fully fiberoptic nationwide cable system by 201 1 , 60 
telephones for every 100 people by 2001, 2 million 
mobile phone subscribers and 3 million Internet 
subscribers by the year 2000, commercially available broad- 
band services such as telemedicine and distance learning by 
the end of 1 997, commercial licenses for fixed-line services 
by the year 2001. These are just a few of the telecom- 
munications goals that Taiwan is pursuing in its effort to 
become an Asia-Pacific regional operations center 
(APROC). 

Taiwan already has a well-developed telecommunications 
infrastructure. In 1996, the total capacity of local telephone 
exchanges reached 12 million, wife 95.89 percent fully 
digitized The island has now embarked on a program to 
build a National biformation Infrastructure (Nil) to enhance 
the efficiency of telecommunications services. Chunghwa 
Telecom is investing $15.2 billion Taiwanese dollars 
($53 1 .47 million) over the next two years to construct a high- 
speed broadband circuit to accommodate fee increasing 
traffic on Taiwan's information superhighway and to allow 
multipoint videoconferencing, etc. 

In addition, to ensure a variety of innovative and com- 
petitive services in fee future, the government has begun full- 
scale liberalization of the telecommunications industry. 

“To reach the goal of building an Asia-Pacific regional 
operations center, the government is ultimately going to have 
to deregulate such basic telecommunications services as 
local telephones, long-distance telephones and international 
telephones,” says Stephen Chen, chairman of Chunghwa 
Telecom. To this end, Chunghwa Telecom was setup in July 
1996 as a state-run enterprise separate from the previous 
government monopoly, fee Directorate General of Tele- 
communications, feus ending fee latter’s role as what Chen 
called “both referee and player.” 

Though Chunghwa has inherited all fee former DGT 
customers and 99 percent of its workforce, the company’s 
brief is to provide competitive and innovative services, and 
ultimately to compete for market share. 

The government has already completely deregulated 
value-added network services, including Internet access, 
frame relay data services, and fax and voice data services. But 
the great milestone in Taiwan’s telecom liberalization came 
earlier this year wife the awarding of wireless licenses to the 
private sector, in particular for mobile phone services. 


Far East Tone, a consortium of companies 
telecoms giant AT&T, is likely to be the firetpi vate ceil 
operator to introduce its services to the market, later 

yC “This will certainly be a very popular service and will offa 
a wide range of services and price packages that have so 
been unavailable to cellular users in Taiwan,” says bto 
Lee, AT&T’s Taiwan manager • 

Currently, fee cellular phone penetration rate in Taiwan } 
around 4.5 percent — rather less than fee JO percent i 
Singapore and 11 percent in Hong Kong, for instance. 
according to AT&T, fee cellularmarket in Taiwan is expectea 
to grow to $3.6 billion a year wifein 1 0 years, or nearly one 
mobile phone for every two of fee country’s 21 million 
people. 

Market share 

AT&T is also taking a key role in the development of Internet 
services in Taiwan. The company was recently awarded a 
contract by state phone carrier Chunghwa Telecom to expand 
and upgrade Chunghwa ’s Internet service. Hi Net AT&T has 
also signed a $14.5 million contract wife fee Institute for 
Information Industry to provide systems integration and 
project management for its SEEDNet network infrastructure. 
SEEDNet has more than 80,000 customers in Taiwan. 

Taiwan has predicted a surge in Internet users to 3 million 
by fee year 2000. Chunghwa’s HiNet service, the most 
popular in Taiwan, already has 320,000 subscribers. 

“Initiatives like these move Taiwan ever closer toward its 
goal of being a telecommunications hub for Asia-Pacific,” 
says John Legere, president and CEO of AT&T Asia- 
Pacific. 

Once fixed-line services are also liberalized, Chunghwa 
Telecom will have to compete for market share. The com- 
pany's strategies for maintaining market share include in- 
creasing fee number of sales channels and service centers, 
improving fee quality of telecommunications services and 
expanding feeir coverage, creating fee most competitive 
price tariff and variety of cost packages, establishing a one- 
stop-shop accounting procedure for important subscribers 
and simplifying procedures to apply for services.. 

Hoping to pity a role in fee. international arena,- Chunghwa 
Telecom has just opened an office in Hong Kong, as well as 
in Washington, D.C., and Tokyo. PJL 


Why Taipei Is tempting 
According to Y D. Sheu, 
governor of the Central Bank 
of China, five key advan- 
tages make Taipei an attract- 
ive regional financial center 

• Taiwan has an unusually 
high national savings rate of 
26 percent of GDP. Each in- 
dividual holds an average of 
more than $50,000 in domes- 
tic financial assets, which 
suggests a very strong de- 
mand for financial services. 

• Taiwan's capital- and 
technology-intensive manu- 
facturing base requires sig- 
nificant investment capital. 

• Taiwan's huge exchange 
reserves allow the island to 
export capital. 

• Taiwan has a vast net- 
work of trade and investment 
relationships in the region. 

• The island’s money 
market instruments and stock 
exchange are already vibrant 
and are set to grow with fur- 
ther liberalization. 

More evidence that fee 
government means business 
in its APROC plan is the 
construction of fee 66-story 
Taipei International Finance 
Center. The biggest property 
development in Taipei to 
date, it is to be built by the 
year 2000 in the Hsinyi dis- 
trict. This S35.9 billion 
Taiwanese dollar ($1.26 bil- 
lion) financial complex will 
cover an area of more than 
3.5 hectares (S.6 acres) and 
will be built over a period of 
three years. 


^ stock exchange is padtedwift trader Taipei Mayor Chen Shui&rn soys that the Tixiwha area wS be the (Ay's own Wa8 Street 


“Bl'iLT tor Business: Taiwan" 

ii 4 iv iinkbtccd in id ertfinw fry dw Adivrtuing Deportment of the International Herald Tribune. 
Writers: Paid Hicks, based in Hong Kong, Julia Clerk ami Joseph R. Yogcrst. 
hath based in Southeast .Asia and the United States. 

Program Director: Bill Mahder. 


China airlines 


. ow HMdbiK M continue to cere tor or Beopeen pessangvs aWi i.imnd comnfcnsrt. 


httpi/Anm-china-akin e&com/ 







oa. BH-a. RBB ffl S-ftSSS - O'S S W l<l SI 0J»fl«*MHHSISHH»5 ! ff sTTffiTl H US 


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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 



SPONSORED PACE 


SPONSORED \>\(,\ 


Technology and the Environment 


• -r 

.-t'f 

’ •- > 
< ?- 


World Environment 
Center: Settinga Standard 


The WEC helps companies improve both business and the environment 


T he chemical company Polchem was 
polluting the land around the Polish 
town ofTonm with 50,000 tons of raw 
sulfuric acid and lime every year, over the 
decades of state-controlled Polish industrial 
development, this built up as a mountain of 
toxic waste. With the introduction of free- 
market policies, nothing was done to slow it 
down. Those in Polchem’s management who 
cared could find no revenues to deal with the 


vironmental problems. Called the Interna- 
tional Environment and Development Ser- 
vice (IEDSX it has offered 400 industries in 
45 countries die pro bono and reduced-fee 
technical expertise of more than 2,000 en- 


group based in New York came to call With 
a single volunteer and a modest investment 
by Polchem that was recouped in just three 
months, the World Enviro nment Center 
worked with Polchem engineers to eliminate 
the waste and, in the process, to save more 
than SI million a year in raw materials and 
energy. Polchem symbolizes the predicament 
of industries throughout Eastern Europe in 
the post-Soviet era and, indeed, throughout 
the wider developing world. 

Since its founding in 1974, the World 
Environment Center has introduced “eco- 
efficiency” to businesses like Polchem in 45 
countries. Eco-efficiency is a process feat 
fattens the company's bottom line while 
keeping the environment clean. As WEC’s 
President and Chief Executive Officer Ant- 
ony G. MaicQ says, “We quietly convince 
skeptics of the true cost of unsound en- 
vironment, health and safety practices.” 

The WEC has increased environmental 
awareness among the world’s managers, who 
had perceived few viable alternatives to their 
old polluting ways — and WEC has ac- 
complished this with a worldwide staff of 
rally 45 people, a modest $7 milli on budget 
this year and little fanfare in themedia. A not- 
for-profit, non-advocacy environmental or- 
ganization, WEC has field offices in Jakarta, 
Mexico City, Geneva, Bangkok and Wash- 
ington, D.C. WEC works with three separate 
but complementary programs feat have de- 
veloped models for guiding industries to 
become good corporate citizens without feel- 
ing downtrodden. 


industry and gove rnmental rtr gftnigari nfris- 

“ A big constituency talked about this ap- 
proach for years, and is still talking about it,’ 5 

says Mn MazciL “But not that many people 
were out in fee trendies doing it” 

WEC can do much wife so little, says Mr. 
Manril, because fee IEDS program operates 
wife “in-kind contributions of services and 
materials from industry, government, non- 
government organizations and academia. 

At fee heart of it s scheme lies the vo- 
hmteerismofthe IEDS participants and ofeer 
corporations and agencies feat support WEC 
by asking their employees to act as hosts of 
study tours, offering in-country volunteer 
experts and donating fends. 

IEDS starts wife fee belief feat corporate 
benefits can be gained from sound envi 

mn me ntal and management prog rams. 

WEC volunteers aim to change “end-of- 
pipe” treatment of industrial problems; they 
p refer instead to eliminate pollution by in- 
creasing plant efficiency. WEC’s Rfaste Min- 
imization Program begins by identifying the 
sources of pollution. Then local managers 
and workers talk to each other and leam to 
draw on each other's expertise wife the help 
of WEC-sponsored Pollution Prevention 
Centers. In 1 996, WEC saved companies $ 1 3 
million on corporate investments of $3-5 
million, while conserving nearly half a mil- 
lion tons of fresh water and 75,000 tons of 
fed and at the same trnv» eliminating from 
fee environment 486,000 tons of pollutants. 

In fee end, IEDS seeks to eliminate pol- 
lution at fee source and save on raw materials 
while improving efficiency. As a byproduct, 
IEDS reduces losses from worker health care 
costs caused by pollution. It also shows 
industries in transition to a market economy 
that pollution-prevention progra ms plfmmatffi 



The WtarfoBi v korwna ra Center ha s frrfrpdUoedecoeflfcfancylobusfoBsafl«fo45ccirtfcE. 


All too often, industry has found itself at 
loggerheads with fee agencies feat patrol fee 
environment The reasons for this are not 
hard to find. Especially in rapidly indus- 
trializing nations, environmental regulations 
slice into profits and interfere with traditional 
methods of business. Environmental restric- 
tions are often enforced through laws feat 
cany heavy fines and tarnish corporate and 
product images. In the end, the punitive 
methods serve to make the quest for a cleaner 
environment a “them against us” issue that 
has left a trail of resentment and a reluctance 
to come togefera: for the common weaL 

WEC takes a diplomatic approach to these 
new conflicts. It points no fingers. While 
funded by the U.S. Agency for International 
Development, the Swiss and Royal Thai 
governments, and corporate andprivate con- 
tributions, WEC is beholden neither to gov- 
ernments nor to private industry. It tries only 
to provide what it describes as a bridge of 
understanding between industry’s leaders 
and those governmental and nongovern- 
mental agencies charged with malting the 
environment a cleaner and safer place. 

Four times a ye ar at International En- 
vironment Forums (IEF), WEC brings to- 
gether executives of 60 international compa- 
nies and those charged with keeping the 
environment dean. “There was such ac- 
rimony between governments and private 
enterprise over the envi ronm ent when we 
started,” says Me Marcil. “We needed to 
start a dialogue.” 

Problems and mutual solutions are aired 
and debated in the forums; representatives of 
industry ore told about foreign and inter- 
national environmental issues, while policy 
makers are introduced to industry's concerns 
in the fields of environment; health and 
safety. The give and take of co n versation 
outside the formalities of position papers and 
speeches has offered many leaders on both 
sicks of fee debate a view of fee human feces 
behind fee policies and attitudes. 

The second program that WEC operates 
seeks to find more direct solutions to en- 


or reduce fees and fines as well as the cost of 
natural resources. 


WEC Gold Medal 
Every year since 1985, fee WEC Gold Medal 
for International Corporate Environmental 
Achievement has been awarded to a mul- 
tinational company for its efforts in making 


its worldwide working environment a clean- 
er and safer place. “We felt that industry was 
getting press only in negative situations and 
feat companies were working bard to do the 
right thing and were not getting credit,” says 
Mr. Marcfl. “The jury selection is not equi- 
valent to saying that a company has solved all 
of its environm ental problems — just that 
this company is an excellent example of an 
approach feat, if followed by all companies, 
would make fee world a betta* place. It also 
draws attention to fee potential benefits of an 
environmentally sound corporate policy. 

An independent jury selects fee award’s 
recipient flora a list of nominees that have 
demonstrated “an outstanding, sust ain ed and 
well-£mplemented worldwide environmen- 
tal, health and safety program.” In past years, 
fee winners have included 3M, IBM Cor- 
poration, EX du Pont de Nemours & Co^ fee 
British Petroleum Co., Pic and fee Ahi- 
minum Company of America. 

This spring, WEC presented fee 13 th an- 
nual Gold Medal to Conqnq Computer Cor- 
poration, which is fee fifth-Jaige& computer 
company in the world and the largest global 
supplier of personal computers. 

In making fee award, Dt Joel L Abrams— 
chairman of WEC’s Gold Modal Jury and a 
professor emeritus of fee University of Pitts- 
burgh — told Compaq's President and Chief 
Executive Officer Eckhard Pfeiffer “From, 
its inception, Compaq’s innovative approach 
to product stewardship, dedication to cre- 
ativity in its e n v ir o nm ental programs and 
integration of concerns for environment, 
health and safety have set a standard for 
others to emulate with pride.” Mr Abrams 
might well have been describing fee World 
Environment Center itselfl 


“T^CTPKHXX^AIWTBQEENVHWfQWENr” 

was produced in Us entirety by the Advertising Deportment of the JjtlernaUoml Herald Tribune. 

7fe series is firougfa to you by Compaq. 

Writer: Malcolm MacPherson, based in Virginia, 
f Program Director: Bid Mahder. 


WEC Gold Medal Recognizes Compaq’s Environmental Achievements 


- A 

"Vi 


T be Worid Environment Center gave 
its prestigious Gold Medal for Inter- 
national Corporate Envirorvnental 
Achievement to Compaq Computer 
Corporation this spring in recognition 
of Its global efforts, which people in 
and out of the green movement 
praise for farsightedness and cre- 
ativity. 

In receiving fee award, Compaq’s 
chief executive officer and president, 
Eckhard Pfeiffer, said: “We endeavor 
for leadership in all aspects of our 
environmental, health and safety per- 
formance," specifically through a 
tough corporate policy that “cham- 
pions the environment" This attitude 
has been present since the founding 


of fee company, which is fee fifth- 
largest producer of computers and 
the largest manufacturer of personal 
computers rn fee world. 

Compaq designs its products with 
the environment In mind, in terms of 
energy, it makes its computers as 
efficient as technology allows. In 
mechanical desiffi, product engi- 
neers plan right a t the beginning of 
fee computer’s design process for 
fee end of its rife and fee eventual 
recycling of its components- 

The company’s recycling programs 
save an estimated 9 million gallons of 
water and 6,000 trees each year. 
Compaq packaging is made of ma- 
terials feat can be easily identified 


and recyded- Throigh the ISO 114® 
Standardized Material Marking Sys- 
tem. Compaq enhances recydaMfty 
by labeling a product’s plastic com- 
ponents with fee blend of plastic 
used, the resin and fee manufac- 
turer’s name. This enables custom- 
era and recydere an over fee world to 
quickly and accurately identity 

plastics and prepare them for rwyi> 

Brig. Simito- labels are placed on bat- 
teries, packaging and a variety of oth- 
er components. 

In 1989, concerned with ozone de- 
pletion, Compaq set a goal to elim- 
inate chlorofiuorocarbons from its 
manufacturing processes. By 1993, 
It beat Its own deadline by two years 


and became one of the first elec- 
tronics companies to achieve »* 

goal. . 

The U S. Environmental Protection'^-" 
Agency recognized this achievement 
wife its Stratospheric Ozone P roteo- 
tion Award- . . 

Compaq has remained a meas^V 
urem^-driven company that reviews 
and updates its efficiency and per- l 
formanoe. Each Compaq manufaotur- 
jng site works from a set of specific V 
goals and otyectiwes. Thesehare In- 3 : 
eluded a 35 percent reduction in ha&.;.l 
ardous waste, a 125 percent to;... 
crease in recycling, a 61 percent * :• 
decrease in landfiD and a 73 percent JV- 
decrease in air emissions. '/ir ■ 




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why we try to minimize the ermronmental impact of everything we do. From product design to manufacturing 
to recycling. Quite simply, success shouldn’t be at the expense of the environment. c^eei 

This yeai; we were presented fee 1997 Wrrld Errvnraunent Center Gold Medal for International Corporate 


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a.S.SS'g- 0'S a W l<l SI Cl SPi 91 Si SC! S*l fcl.f*l 31 3i»3 !?. k -. s ISIS S § HI Cl 


PAGE 22 


w- 

. • *■»% 



RaiKn 

Douillet celebrating his fourth 
judo world title on Thursday. 


4th Title for Douillet 


judo David Douillet of France 
retained his heavyweight title at the 
world judo championships in Paris 
on Thursday. It was JDouillet’s 
fourth world title, and his third in a 
row in the over 95-kilogram over 
class. 

Douillet beat Shino Shinohara of 
Japan in a tight final that ended 
when Shinohara was penalized for 
a fourth time and disqualified. 
Douillet was also within one pen- 
alty of being disqualified. (AFP) 


Woosnam Wins Match 


golf Ian Woosnam, who has 
twice won the World Matchplay, 
beat Jesper Pamevik 4 and 3 over 
36 holes in the first round Thursday 
in Wentworth, P-nglanri. to set np a 
second round meeting with die de- 
fending champion, Ernie Els, 

Frank Nobilo of New Zealand 
survived an afternoon comeback at- 
tempt by Phil Mickelson, an Amer- 
ican, before winning at die second . 
extra hole. Brad Faxon of the United 
States, seeded sixth, beat Darren 
Clarke of Britain 2 and 1. Vijay 
Singh of Fiji beat Tsukasa Watanabe 
of Japan 4 and 3. ( Reuters ) 


Legal Fight over Inquiry 


RUGBY union The South Af- 
rican Rugby Football Union said 
Thursday it would Cake legal action 


to stem Sports Minister Steve Tsh- 
wete frotn setting up a commission 


wete from setting up a commission 
of inquiry into die game. 

The rugby board said it had been 
advised that the planned inquiry's 
brief was so wide that it infringed 
die board's constitutional 
rights. (Reuters) 


South Africa in a Spin 


cricket Saqlain Mnshtaq, a 
Pakistani spin bowler, took five 


Pakistani spin bowler, took five 
wickets as South Africa reached 359 


for six wickets in its first innings of 
the first test at Rawalpindi Musntaq 
bowled 59 overs on the fourth day. 
His victims included Gary Kirsten 
who made 98. (Reuters) 


Warrant for Bam Morris 


football An arrest warrant was 
issued for Bam Monts, the Bal- 
timore Ravens running back, as pan 
of an attempt to revoke his pro- 
bation on a 1996 drug conviction. 

Jay Eihringlon, Morris's lawyer, 
said the player would mm himself 
in by Friday. 

Ray Sumrow, a district attorney 
in Rockwall, Texas, said Morris’s 
probation should be revoked be- 
cause he violated his probation by 
using alcohol and failing to report 
to his probation officer. (AP) 


Ifcralb^^Sribunc 

Sports 


& 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, i 






,« SI*** 

■ n in 


World Roundup 


In Spite of His Times, 
Peschel Faces Trials 


German Specialist Finishes 4 th , 
As Jalabert Wins Gold Medal 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


S AN SEBASTIAN, Spain — Uwe 
Peschel has these two problems: 
He does not get along so won- 
derfully with authority figures, like the 
people who negotiate contracts and sign 
pay checks, and he is a major talent in a 
min or field, like a virtuoso on the ka- 
zoo. 

The first problem is sot necessarily 
fatal to professional bicycle racers since 
many of them quarrel with coaches or 

manager * and Still manage to Stay eOh 


Wokld Cycling 


ployed. Their saving grace is that they 
climb hilts spectacularly or sprint to 
finish lines as if they had been food from 
a cannon. 

Alas for Peschel, a German who will 
turn 29 on Nov. 4, he cannot climb and 
does not sprint, both a big part of most 
races. 

What he does do well is time trial, or 
race individually against the clock. That 
is a small part of most races — two daily 
stages in a three- week race and no part at 
all in a one-day classic. Sometimes, as 
in the case of Miguel Indurain, who won 
the Tour dc France five times, suprem- 
acy in time trialing is the key to victory 
when it is combined with strong climb- 
ing. In the case of Uwe Peschel, 
however, time trialing ability alone is 
barely enough to get him a job. 

“I do what I do,” he said Thursday, 
shortly before he was scheduled to ride 
in the 42. 6-kilometer (26-mile) elite — 
riders over age 23 — time trial at the 
world championships in San Sebastian. 
His tone implied that he was speaking 
about both Ins problems. 

“Stubborn,' 1 another Gorman said. 
"He gets along with te ammat es but 
always has trouble with officials. He 
didn’teven start to rideabicycle until he 
was 18 because his father was a cham- 


pion in East Germany and he didn't 
want to be like him." 


Peschel had his own version. “Some 
peoplelikeme, some don’t,” he said. ‘‘I 
ride my own race. What I have to do is 
show today how good I can be, and 
maybe it leads to a good team." 

The German went out and rode afine 
race, just foiling to win a medal He 
finished fifth in the 47-man field as the 
race against the clock was surprisingly 
won by Lament Jalabert, a Frenchman, 
the No. i ranked rider in die world and 
heretofore only a middling time trialer. 

For the last week Jalabert, 28, has 
been saying that he expected to finish 
between fifth and 10th m this race and 
was riding only to test his form for the 
road race Sunday, in which he is a 
favorite. The only other time trial be has 
won in his nine-year career was the 
Paris-Nice prologue in March. 

“I’m surprised," he said after don- 
ning his rainbow champion's jersey. His 
victory pointed up die absence of such 
exemplars of time trialing as Jan Ull- 
rich, Bjame Riis and Abraham Olano 
because of either illness or lack of in- 
terest in world championships dial are 
now held in October instead of the pre- 
vious August. Another star, Alex Zulle, 


seconds behind, and Peschel was fifth, 
45 seconds behind. 

The race was conducted under ideal 
conditions. The temperature was in the 
low 90s Fahrenheit (33 degrees cen- 
tigrade), the breeze soft, the sky pure 
blue, the two beaches in the heart of San 
Sebastian were packed, and die only 
problem was remembering to keep 
switching a watch from one wrist to 
another to avoid the telltale white scar. 

Disappointed to have foiled to win a 
medal, Peschel seemed otherwise jolly 
afterward. "Maybe some big team no- 
ticed me," he said. 

He rides now for the smallest of small 
teams, the Schanff OscheUbronn outfit 
in the German second division. Until 
August, he was a member of a similarly 
minor team. Cantina Tollo, in Italy. 

“Problems there,” he said. He and 
the team are suing each other over 
money either paid or unpaid. 

As a time dialer, Peschel has won the 
Olympic gold medal in the 100-kilo- 
meter team event at the 1992 Games in 
Barcelona, the team gold medal in Ger- 
many in 1994 and foe individual gold 
medal in Germany in 1991, 1993 and 
1996, finishing second in 1992 and 
1995. He was third in the elite world 
championship time trial in 1995, behind 
Indurain and Olano. 

He turned professional only this year, 
which, at 28, limited his job oppor- 
tunities. Nevertheless he won a nmt 
trial in the Toot of Denmark and the 
Regio Tour in Italy before he finished 
first in foe prestigious Grand Prix des 
Nations long time trial last month. 

Peschel also won foe Grand Prix 
Telekom time trial in his homeland last 
year, riding in the pairs competition wifo 
Boaxdman. When the Briton decided to 
skip foe race this year, the organizers 
foiled to invite Peschel to appear with 
another partner of his choice. 

“Organizers," a Goman said, "he 
doesn’t get along too well wifo them." 

■ Longo Fined for Wearing Logo 

Jeannie Longo of France was fined 
200,000 francs ($36,000) for displaying 
an unapproved sponsor's logo at foe 
medal ceremony after she won foe wom- 
en’s time trial Wednesday, Ageace 
Fiance-Presse reported from San Se- 
bastian. 



f.k* ■ 


Laurent Jalabert of France riding to victory Thursday in the men’s time 


trial at the world championships, .. . 


Fast Cars and Drugs: 


By Brad Spurgeon 

International Herald Tribune 


T WO YEARS ago this month, two 
Formula One drivers — Rubms 
Bamchello and Max Papis — ad- 
mitted during a drug test that they had 
taken banned substances. 

“Formula One was rocked by its 
first-ever dope scandal last night," a 
British tabloid newspaper proclaimed. 

But motor racing is not like other 
sprats, and nobody inside Formnla One 
thought there was a scandal. 

This weekend at foe Japanese Grand 
Prix, Bamchello will still be racing, 
while Papis drove last week in die last 
CART race of die season in Los 


Angeles. . 

Had it been another sport, their ca- 
reers might have been jeopardized. But 


while motor racing is strict about en- 
forcing technical rues — MikaHaldtin- 
en was stripped of a podium place last 
month because of fuel irregularities in 
his McLaren — it is more lenient when 
it comes to dope tests because it ba- 


Brawl Spoils Paris’s Victory 


who was foe defending work! cham- 
pion, stopped early in the race to have 


S ion, stopped early in the race to have 
is front wheel replaced and rode wifo- 


his front wheel replaced and rode with- 
out zest thereafter, finishing 1 1th. 

Jalabert was timed in 52 minutes one 
second, a speed of 49.1 kilometers an 
hour (30 mph). Second was Sergei 
Gontchar, a Ukrainian, 3 seconds be- 
hind and third was Chris Boardman, an 
Englishman, 20 seconds behind. Tony 
Rominger, a Swiss, was fourth, 24 


CrmpOalbyOw StagFtam DbpacAa 

Paris St Germain’s first victory in 
five games was marred by violence, 
and the club could face punishment 

"There should be sanctions. It's 
serious, and the video will show (his,” 
said Franck Glochon, the referee, after 
PSG beat Guingamp, 4-2, in Paris. The 
French soccer league match ended in a 
brawl Wednesday night after Paul Le 
Guen of PSG fouled Charles-Eduard 
Coridon, who broke his leg. 

Glochon admitted he had made 
some mistakes during the match but 
be said, violence was unacceptable. 

“I can only intervene during foe 
course of play and within foe limits of 
the field. But foe incidents will be part 
of a report I’ll send to the disciplinary 
committee," he said. "It was a dif- 
ficult match. I made some unfortunate 
decisions, but I did what I could." 

Guingamp led 2-1 a£ halftime 

Rai scored twice, including a pen- 
alty, as the Parisians turned foe march 
around in the second half. 

PSG’s victory kept them just two 
points behind the leader, Metz. 


MLS In Denver, Paul Bravo scored 
two goals and assisted on one to lead 
the Colorado Rapids to a 3-2 victory 
Wednesday over the Kansas City 
Wizards and a two-game sweep of a 
Major League Soccer Western Con- 
ference semifinal series. 

In Foxboro, Massachusetts, Carlos 
Llamosa beat Walter Zenga in foe 
seventh round of a shoot-oat to give 
D.C. United a 2-1 victory over foe 
New England Revolution and help the 
defending MLS champions advance 
to the Eastern Conference finals by 
two victories to none. 

Is Dallas, Dante Washington scored 
two goals to give foe Dallas Bum a 3- 
0 victory over the Los Angeles Galaxy 
and a 2-0 sweep in their playoff series. 
Dallas advances to foe western Con- 
ference finals against Colorado. 

In Columbus, Ohio, Brian 
McBride and Robert Warzycha each 
scored, and Columbus beat the 
Tampa Bay Mutiny, 2-0, to give foe 
Crew a two-game sweep. The Crew 
will face D.C. United in foe eastern 
finals. (AP, Reuters) 


sicaily trusts the drivers to police them- 
selves, given the possible consequences 
of driving while impaired. Tests are Still 
administered, however, as a double 
check. 

Pierre Cometet, who worked as Bar- 
richeHo's physical adviser at the time of 
drug test, said Bamchello had been 
treated for a cold wifo an over-the- 
counter nasal decongestant that con- 
tained ephedrine, which is banned be- 
cause his a stimulant. Formula One uses 
the International Olympic Committee’s 
list of banned drugs. 

When Cometet learned foe driver had 
taken foe medication, he informed Syd 
Watkins, president of the International 
Automobile Federation’s medical com- 
mission, who was scheduled to test the 
driver later that day. 

Watitins, a neurosurgeon at The In- 
dependent Hospital in London, said 
Barrichellowas “totally ignorant" that 
the medication contained a banned sub- 
stance and was not punished. Moreover, 
he said, the driver’s performance could 
not have been improved by the drug,. 

Papis was found to have ingested a 
similar over-the-counter drug that con- 
tained a forbidden substance. 

Watkins has served as a medical in- 
spectra- at Formula One races since 
1978. He instituted foe dope testing 
nearly a decade ago when drag use was 
suspected in many spoils. He was also 
worried about the drivers' possible use 
of recreational drags. 

He said there were a variety of po- 
tential performance enhancers mat 
might be temping to drivers, such as so- 
called beta blockers. 

"They quiet out tremor," said 
Watkins. "They’re very good drags to 
coordinate neuromuscular activity. So 
this is why the billiard players were all 
ou beta blockers at one stage. Violinists. 
Pianists." 

He said drivers might be tempted to 
use them fra controlling stress during 
foe early parts of a race when they are 
jostling for position, and fine movement 
is important 

“They’re dangerous because they 
limit foe rate at which the heart can 
respond if you have an accident" 
Watkins said. 

Drugs that may improve alertness and 
accelerate reflexes are amphetamines, 
alk a loi d s, and cocaine and its derivative ' 
products. The problem wifo most of 
them, said Cometet, is that "they annul 


the perception of danger. It's qojfe 
simply dangerous." . 

Following the lead of athletes in othw ‘ 
sports, many drivers in the 1980s hired ■’ 
personal trainers. Watkins became cog* 
earned that such advisers might expos*, 
unwitting drivers to steroids, as bijfc 
happened in other sports. '. 

"Often, foe athlete would be unaware - 
that in his special diet was a nice potion . 
of steroids, right?" Watkins said. "Autt 
believe a lot of these young men w& 
have said, ‘I’ve never taken anything^; 
But somebody’s put it in his pcmklgcUf 
And usually you can guess who." .. £ ^ 
Cometet, a physiotherapist and os- 
teopath who works as a physical trainer ■ 
for ukyo Katayama, a Japanese drivet ■ 
fra the Minardi team, cannot see thfe 
point of steroids in racing, 

“If ycm fabricate muscles, you’r? 
fabricating weight," he sakL “And 
weight is also foe enemy in Formula 
One." • ■ ; 

Watirihs, however, said steroids were 
“physically reinforcing, particularly 
with regards tomuscleppwerandstam- 
ina.” V 

Cometet said there were better ways , ; 
to improve a driver’s physical resfc 
tance, one being the use of natural medi- 
cines, homeopathy and acupuncture 1 
“They’re not doping products, hesaid; ‘ 
“but they help to heal illnesses, even 
infections illnesses, even foe flu. It's ■ 
quite simply a question of a moral and 
medical choice." 

Watkins said the attitude of drivers 
was currently “much greener" than it 
had been in the past He said most 
wanted a clean-cut, healthy imagfr. - 
rather than a rakish one. * 

Jan Magnusson, a Danish driver foA'! 
the Stewart team, quit smoking this year - 
because, “everybody looked weirdly at' 
me. I was trying to be as fit as I could,' - 
and I thought foe cigarettes might put: '. 
me back a little bit.” n 

And what of those stories of chain - 
smoking, marijuana- indulging, J op- ^ 
caine-sniffing, binge drinking drivers of ' 
thepast? ? 

“I can’t see how in a Formula One car [ 
you can take any drag whatever,” said } 
Jacques Laffite, a French driver in the V 
1970s and '80s who is now a television ’ 
race commentator. “It’s an intense e£- ? 
fort over a period of one and a half to ■ 
two hours. It’s extremely hot, and yo# 1 -? 
have to be in complete possession of£ 'j 
your faculties.” * ■: 


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INTERNATIONA! HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 

SPORTS 


E3 


W»ui 1( |‘ P rioles Take Game 1 
As Anderson Shines 

Indians Go Down 3-0 in Baltimore 




i ■&** 

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By Mike DiGiovanna 

J* n Angeles Tunes Sen iet 

. BALTIMORE — It has been a rel- 
«ivdy peaceful year for Brady An- 
toson compared with 1996, when the 
Baltimore Oriole center fielder stirred a 
media frenzy by clubbing 30 home inns 
by the All-Star break. 

Andereon didn’t hold a news con- 
ference in every road city this season. 
There were no questions about breaking 
Roger Maris’s record. & 

No one wondered how he could hit 50 
i Somers after never hitting more than 21 
& eight previous years. But truth be 
hold, Anderson missed the iimeliehL 
4 ‘I 'll ^ being bothered and hit 50 
home runs.” be said. 

Anderson didn’t come close, finish- 
ing 1997 with 18 homers, but he did find 
a way to thrust himself back into the 
. national spotlight in Game } of the 
American League championship series 
Wednesday night. 

Anderson robbed Manny Ramirez of 
a homer in the top of the first, homered 
in the bottom of the first, and doubled 
and scored in the third, helping the Ori- 
oles defeat the Cleveland Indians, 3-0 
before 49.029 fans in Camden Yards. * 

Scott Erickson continued Bal- 
•tiinore’s impressive postseason pitch- 
ing run with an eight-inning four-nitter; 
Randy Myers completed the shutout 
with a scoreless ninth, and Roberto Alo- 
mar added a two-run homer as the Ori- 
oles scored a decisive knockout in 
Round I of the best-of-seven series. 

“I look at it logically,” Anderson 
said, assessing the importance of win- 
ning the first game. “We need four 
wins. We’re one step closer.” 

The first two steps toward victory 
Wednesday night were provided by An- 
derson. who packed two of his three 
highlights into back-to-back pitches in 
the first inning. 

With two outs in the top of the first, 
Ramirez sent a fly ball toward the wall in 
right-center, but Anderson, after a long 
run. leaped at the seven-foot fence and 
inode the catch above the wall to end the 
inning. Moments later, when Cleveland 
starter Chad Ogea hung a breaking ball 
on his first pitch of the game, Anderson 
drilled it into the right-field bleachers for 
his fifth leadoff homer of the season. 

“When Ramirez hit that ball, I 
thought 'Oh, no, 4 ” the Orioles’ Cal 
Ripken Jr. said. “But that catch was one 
of those moments that energizes a club. 
Then Brady comes up and pops the ball 
out on the first pitch. It’s a great thing 
having a leadoff gay with power.” 

Showing his offensive versatility. 
Anderson opened the third inning by 
slapping a double down the left-field 
line. Alomar then feasted cm another 
bulging Ogea breaking ball, sending it 
into the right-field seats fora homer and 
a 3-0 lead. 

“Brady is a big-game player,” Ori- 
ole manager Davey Johnson said. 
'‘Ever since I’ve been here, for two 


thrav only 90 pitches, 61 for strikes. 

Only once did the Indians get a mneer 
to third: Bip Roberts stole second and 
advanced when catcher Lenny Web- 
ster’s throw went into center field in the 
third inning, but Erickson goi Omar 
Vizquel to ground out to end the in- 
ning. 

Erickson also helped bfmo»if by 
grabbing Sandy Alomar’s eighth-inning 
shot up the middle to start a I -6-3 double 
play. 

“He was tough because he used all 
his pitches on aQ the counts,” said 
Roberts, the Indian second baseman. 
‘ ‘You couldn’t wait for a fastball inside 
because he’d throw a down an d 
away.” 

■ Davig Likely to Start-Game 2 

Eric Davis was out of the Baltimore 
Orioles* starting lineup for Game 1 of 
the American League Championship 
Series against the Cleveland Indians, 
The Washington Post reported. 

Manager Davey Johnson said he 
didn’t feel the outfielder would be able 
to start each of die first three games of 
die series with a chemotherapy session 
in die middle, and he and Davis decided 
that the contest Wednesday night was 
the one to miss. 

Davis entered the game as a defensive 
replacement He played the final three 
innings in right field and was inten- 
tionally walked in Ms only , plate ap- 
pearance. Johnson said that Davis would 
very likely start Game 2 on Thursday and 
Game 3 on Saturday. Davis, who un- 
derwent surgery for colon cancer in mid- 
June, is scheduled to undergo his weekly 
chemotherapy treatment on Friday. 



A Basketball Legend 
Quits at North Carolina 


CtmfOeibyOiirSKffFnm Dupacha 

CHAPEL HILL, North Carolina — 
Dean Smith retired Thursday as the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina’s basketball 
coach, ending a career of 36 years, two 
national championships and more vic- 
tories than anyone else in the history of 
the game. 

Smith, 66, said he enjoyed the game 
bat that he could not bring as much 
enthusiasm to die team as he had. 

“I enjoy basketball. I enjoy coaching 
basketball,” Smith said at a news con- 
ference. “It’s the our-of-season stuff 1 
didn’t handle welL” 

Sources close to the coach and the 
school said Smith made the decision 
Wednesday. 

Smith will be replaced on an interim 
basis by BUI Gufbridge, his assistant for 
31 years. Gtrihridge has stayed with 
Smith despite many opportunities to be- 
come a head coach elsewhere. Practice is 
due to begin in nine days. Smith wants 
Ms other longtime assistant, Phil Ford, a 
former Tar Heels guard, to become the 
coach eventually, a source said. 

The derision was not health related, 
said Robert Seymour, Smith’s former 
pastor and his longtime" friend. Seymour 
said he and Smith had discussed the 
coach’s retirement “for a while.” 

A number of Smith's former Tar 


Heels players were in Chapel Hill earlier 
this week and “had 'no idea 4 ' S m it h 
would make such a decision, according 
to Christopher (Kit) Morris, director of 
college sports. marketing for Nike, the 
sneaker brand tftar Smith endorses. 

Smith told his players of his decision 
at a team meeting Wednesday night, 
Seymour said. 

When asked last season, after coach- 
ing the Tar Heels to an 11th Final Four 
appearance, how much longer in he 
planned to coach, Smith said he ex- 
pected to honor his contract, which ex- 
pires after the 2001 season. 

But, he also said after his 876th vic- 
tory surpassed Adolph Rupp as the col- 
lege game's winningesr coach; “I take 
each year as it comes and I won’t make 
that decision in April.’ 1 In April, he 
explained, be is usually tired 

“So. you wait to see how excited you 
are in August,” he said “For 36 years I 
guess I've been excited in August and 
September.” 

Among the Smith-trained alumni of- 
ten mentioned as successors are the 
coaches Roy W illiam s of Kansas, Eddie 
Fogler of South Caro lina and George 
Karl of the Seattle Super Sonics. All three 
were in Chapel Hill earlier this week. 

Smith finished with a 36-year record 
of 879-254. (AP.WP) 


Red Wings Hoist Banner, 
Then Drop the Stars, 3-1 


Ok- taffldoWTbr AMormnJ Pirn 

Cleveland left fielder Brian Giles robbing Lenny Webster of a home ran. 

Braves Come Roaring Back With 7-1 Victory 


The Associated Press 

It was a banne r night for the Detroit 
Red Wings. First they raised the Stanley 
Cup banner to the rafters in pregame 
ceremonies celebrating their 1997 NHL 


By Buster Olney 

Net*' fort Times Service 


tional League Championship Series at er, pro] 
one victory apiece. The fonr-of-seven- Lofton 


• . EVCI 9UKC 4 ™ ‘"W 

years, he's been a big-game player. He 
rises to the occasion, and he’s not in- 
timidated by these situations.” 

\ Erickson mixed a crisp fastball wim «. 
nasty sinker and a heavier diet of break- 
Ag balls to win his second playoff 


The right-hander, who has given up 
,wdy 1 1 bm and three earned runs in 14% 
playoff innings, struck out three, walked 
none and got 12 ground-ball outs. He 


ATLANTA — Just when the Ailanta 
Braves appeared to lack enough relief 
pitching or defense or motivation, one 
of their pitchers spun a three-hitter and 
reminded us all why they are the de- 
cade’s best team. 

They're too good to play as badly as 
they did on Tuesday for too long. 

Atlanta’s collective decline ended 
Wednesday after a starting pitcher ap- 
plied die Makes. Tom Glavine allowed 
Just three hits in seven and two-thirds 
and the Braves thrashed the 
Marlins. 7-1, to even the Na- 
Series at 

victory apiece. The fonr-of-seven- 
game series resumes Friday in Florida. 

Hie Marlins’ manager, Jim Ley land, 
haunted often by the Braves’ pitching 
during his managerial career, was 
hardly surprised that Atlanta rebounded 
in Game 2. ‘They’re not going to get 
excited about one loss,” Ley land said, 
his tone dismissive. “They came back 
today and played almost a perfect 
game.” 

Several of the Braves verbally 
flogged themselves after Game 1, in 
particular third baseman Chipper Jones, 
who blamed himself for letting a hard- 
hit grounder turn into a three-run double. 
Atlanta would play better in Game 2, 
Jones was sure, his confidence betraying 
the Braves’ years of experience in the 
postseason. Jones and others did not 


speak so much of what-could-have- 
beens, but of what would be. 

“We'll play better tomorrow,” Jones 
said after the game Tuesday. He then 
followed his time-honored therapy for 
self-help. “1 have a system down pat 
I’ll take a ride home with my spouse, 
cuss and rant and rave in the car. but 
once I get home I just forget about it” 

The Braves did not wait long to 
change the tenor of die series. Kenny 
Lofton, Atlanta's leadoff hitter, bunted 
Alex Fernandez’s first pitch of the game 
in front of the plate, die ball rolling 
through the heavily watered area in 
front of home plate and stopping on the 
grass. Charles Johnson, Florida’s catch- 
er, probably didn't have a chance to get 
i, bnt he tried anyway, his throw 
bounding down the right field line. It 
was Johnson’s first error in 175 games. 

Lofton took second and scored when 
Keith Lockhart smashed a line drive off 
the base of the wall in right-center field 
for a triple. 

Fernandez struck out Jones and Fred 
McGriff. zipping fastballs over the out- 
side comer, and it seemed he would 
escape the inning without giving up any 
more runs. But he threw a high and fat 
fastball to Ryan Klesko, who attacked it. 
When the ball leaped off his bat, Klesko 
raised both hands triumphantly and 
began a long, slow trot around the bases 
while fans in the right field stands 
scrambled for the souvenir. This was the 
moment, Jones said later, when be knew 
all was right with the Braves again. 


The Braves' defense, which looked 
atrocious in Game 1 . was transformed in 
Game 2. Jones handled two grounders 
flawlessly in the first inning. McGriff 
made a nice stop at first base in the third 
on Devon White's grounder, then out- 
ran White to the bag. 

Shortstop Jeff Blaus er and Lockhart, 
the second baseman, combined on two 
double plays in the middle innings, with 
Lockhart being knocked onto Ms back 
by Kurt Abbott in the fourth inning after 
relaying the ball to first 

Jones smashed a two-run homer in 
the third inning, and after a double by 
Javy Lopez, Fernandez was relieved, 
complaining later of diminished velo- 
city. 

Jones and Lopez each drove in single 
runs in the seventh, pushing Atlanta’s 
lead to 7-0. 

And there was Glavine, throwing a 
good fastball, almost always to the out- 
side comer, never giving in to hitters, 
the hitters always surrendering to him. 

Bobby Cox, Atlanta’s manager, 
offered the usual praise for Glavine and 
his competitiveness. But Cox, who can 
be dour and grumpy , kept on mention- 
ing something positive after the game. 
The Braves, he said, are swinging the 
bat well. Klesko's homer was his third 
in five playoff games, a dramatic con- 
trast to last year when the slugger swung 
poorly going into the playoffs and was 
virtually silent in the World Series. 
Jones has four hits in his last nine at- 
bais, and Lockhart is 3 for 6. 


Then they lowered the boom on Dal- 
las, beating die. Stars, 3-1, on Wednes- 
day night 

The Red Wings were playing then- 
first game before the home fans at Joe 
Louis Arena since w innin g the Stanley 
Cup last spring. They opened with two 

NHL Roundup 

victories on the road before their cel- 
ebratory home opener that featured the 
appearance of Detroit legend Gordie 
Howe in the pregame ceremonies. 

“It was just an unbelievable cere- 
mony,” saidMathieu Dandenanlt, a De- 
troit forward. ‘ ‘They just did a great job. 
Seeing Ted Lindsay and Gordie Howe 
was a great thrill for me. I don’t think I'll 
ever forget it.” 

Dandenanlt, Viacbeslav Fetisov and 
Vyacheslav Kozlov scored for the Red 
Wings. Chris Osgood, the Red Wings’ 
No. 1 goalie since playoff hero Mike 
Vernon was traded to San Jose, came up 
with several clutch saves. Osgood made 
an especially good stick save to deny 
Darryl Sydor during a second-period 
power play. 

Centals 6, Islanders 3 Adam Oates 
reached the 1 .000-point mark with three 
goals and two assists as Washington 
won at New York. It was the Capitals’ 
fourth straight victory. Oates improved 
his career total to 1.004 points (261 
goals) as the Capitals equaled their best 
start in the franchise’s history, matching 
a 4-0-0 start in 1991-92. 

D»v3s 4, Flyers i Randy McKay 
scored his third goal in as many games 


as New Jersey beat visiting Philadelphia 
and the Flyers' Eric Lindros made his 
second questionable Mt this season. 

Lindros, whose hit along the boards 
gave Florida's Rob Niedermayer a con- 
cussion in the season opener, ran into 
Martin Brodeur early in the third period, 
knocking the Devils' goalie off his feet 
and sending his helmet flying. Brodeur 
was shaken but apparently unhurt. Nie- 
dermayer is out indefinitely. 

Lindros, whose hroiher, Brett, had to 
retire because of concussions, got into 
another scrap later in the period, squar- 
ing off with Me Devils’ captain, Scott 
Stevens. Both received four-minute 
penalties in a game in wMch the Devils 
held a 10-3 advantage in power plays. 

Canadians 3, Pe n guins O Andy Moog 
became die first opposing goajtender to 
get a shutout in Pittsburgh in more than 
five years as he stopped 26 shots in 
Montreal's victory over the Penguins. 

It was Moog’s 26th career shutout, his 
first far the Canadians. Moog, who 
signed as a free agent last summer, has 
allowed only three goals in three games. 

Oilers 3, Rangers 3 Doug Weight 
scored twice, including the first , suc- 
cessful penalty shot against New York 
goalie Mike Richter, as Edmonton tied 
the visiting Rangers. 

Referee Dave Jackson awarded Ed- 
monton a penalty shot after the Rangers 
covered- the puck in their own goal 
crease in the first period. Richter had 
stopped all seven previous penalty shots 
he had faced in his career. 

Brains 3, Coyotes 2 Ted Donato 
scored 2:09 into overtime to give Bos- 
ton the victory in Phoenix. 

Donato took a centering pass from 
Jason Allison and flipped a wrist shot 
into the top comer. Dmitri Khristich and 
Kyle McLaren had the other Boston 
goals, both on power plays. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1997 


POSTCARD 


Dance Craze: Rueda 


By Mireya Navarro 

Writ- York Times Service 


M IAMI — Inside a cozy 
nightclub with starfish 
on the walls and silk palm 
leaves shooting out of chan- 
deliers, the crowd on the 
dance floor on a recent Friday 
night suddenly parted to make 
room for the rueda, a circle of 
couples. Beginning their 
dance to the one-two-three 
salsa beat but hardly looking 
at each other, the couples in- 
stead fixed their attention on 
one of the men, their leader. 
With a barked command ot 
abrupt hand signal, he made 
them step and spin and ex- 
change partners in unison. 

“ Exhibela !" (“Show her 
off!"), die caller shouted, and 
the men pushed the women 
into a turn and snapped them 
back to their right sides. 
“ Dame una!" (“Give me 
one! ”), and the men let go of 
one partner and grabbed an- 
other to the righL 
This is salsa dancing, 
casino rueda style. 


Nights at the Palladium in 
the New YorkCity *s East Vil- 
lage once meant expressing 
individual exuberance and 
dance-floor passion to Latin 
rhythms. Now, nights at clubs 
like Starfish in Miami Beach 
and Club Mystique ai the 
Miami Airport Hilton mean 
synchronized choreography 
and partner swapping in what 
looks to outsiders like a hy- 
brid of salsa and square dan- 
cing with a disco flair. 

As an incubator of the ma- 
c arena, the line dance adored 
even by the rhythmically im- 
paired, Miami is now serving 
up a more challenging dance 
style that originated in Cuba 
but is now spreading around 
the United States. 

Fans call salsa rueda ad- 
dictive and exhilarating, like 


a roller coaster ride. Connois- 
seurs already talk of a Miami 
style (technical and compli- 
cated). a Havana style (looser 
and more free- form) and a 
Los Angeles style (showy, 
with jumps and splits), but the 
basic steps are die same from 
city to city, and a list with 
descriptions for each one can 
be found on the Internet at 
www.saJsaweb.com. 

In salsa rueda (rueda means 
wheel or circle), the leader 
calls out fast three-step com- 
binations that dancers per- 
form before moving on to the 
next partner, building to a 
choreography that draws on 
more than ISO steps, with 
names like finger, Coca-Cola, 
balsero (a term for a Cuban on 
a raft) and “tell her no."' 

Ana Martinez, 36, who 
made news last year when her 
husband was accused of spy- 
ing for Cuba when he aban- 
doned her and resurfaced in 
that country, said she took 
lessons four times a week, 
with her 1 3-year-old daughter 
and 12-year-old soa„partly as 
therapy. 

“It's something happy to 
do,” she said. “It’s not 
threatening. I hate the club 
scene, but I can go to Club 
Mystique, do the rueda, and 
that's it. I leave sweaty, 
soaked from head to toe.” 

Intricate even by the stan- 
dards of experienced salsa 
dancers, casino rueda began 
in the 1950s. to the cha-cha 
beat, in members -only sports 
clubs in Cuba known as easi- 
nos deportivos, said Carolina 
Sanchez, an official at the Na- 
tional School for the Arts in 
Havana. 

The casinos held balls with 
big orchestras and provided a 
place for dancers to impro- 
vise and create new styles. 
Soon, she added, people 
would say, “Let's dance tike 
in the casino.” or “Let’s 
dance casino.” 


4 Neocolonialists’ Seize the French Language 


By Alan Riding 

Pie*' York Times Service 


P ARIS — The fact that Tolstoy. 

Strindberg and Wilde all wrote 
works in French is proof enough 
that foreign authors have long been 
attracted to this rich and demand- 
ing language. Two of this century's 
greatest French-language play- 


wrights were Samuel Beckett, an 
Irishman, 


and Eugene Ionesco, a 
Romanian, while die heir to Andie 
Gide as the French literary diarist is 
Julien Green, a 97-year-old Amer- 
ican. 

Yet times have changed, which 
explains why the latest generation 
of foreigners writing in French is 
being heralded here as if it were the 
first In the past when France took 
the supremacy of its language for 
granted, the nationality of writers 
here was irrelevant Today, with 
French steadily losing ground to 
English around the world, it is sud- 
denly significant that a good num- 
ber of foreign novelists should still 
prefer French. 

‘■‘France is going through an 
identity crisis." said Eduardo 
Manet, a Cuban-bom playwright 
and novelist who writes in French. 
“So it appeals to their vanity and 
sense of national glory that for- 
eigners should come and write in 
French. And we benefit from 
this.” 

Rachid Boudjedra, an Algerian 
novelist who first made his name 
writing in French, put it more suc- 
cinctly: “The French are 

flattered.” 

What has drawn these writers to 
the public's attention, however, is 
that they have begun snapping up 
French literary prizes. More than 
one local critic has sniffed that they 
are simply being rewarded for writ- 
ing in French, but a different ex- 
planation seems more credible: 
Foreign novelists are popular here 
because, in contrast to many of 
their French contemporaries, they 
know how to tell stones. 

“I think the French like us be- 
cause we tell stories that go beyond 
our personal problems,” noted Ta- 



Yet these are only a few of the 
foreigners currently writing in 
French. Some of them — like 
Green, Spain's Jorge Sempron. 



Senegal's Leopold Senghor and the 


MtrbH l \p-oi.- Fn 

Andrei Makine, who won the Prix Gon court in 1995. 


har Ben Jelloun, 53. a Moroccan 
novelist who moved to France in 
1971. “We come from countries 
where there is fictional creativity, 
poetic folly, wild imagination — 
and the public has a need for this. 
We invite the French language to 
live our intensity.” 

Still, if the success of foreign 
writers reflects the uninspired state 


of French fiction today, they may 


ey 

also contribute to its revival. Just as 


Commonwealth writers like Wole 
Soyinka, Salman Rushdie, Michael 
Ondaatje, Derek Walcott and, most 
recently, Anindhati Roy have 
breathed life into English fiction, 
French-language writers from 
Europe, Latin America, North 
Africa, French Antilles and Quebec 
may do the same for French lit- 
erature. 

The phenomenon was noticed, 
although hardly initiated, when a 
young Russian, Andrei Makine. 


won the Prix Goncourt in 1995 for 
bis novel “Le Testament Fran- 
ca is,” which was published to ac- 
claim in the Unitea Stares this sum- 
mer as “Dreams of My Russian 
Summers.” It defeated, among 
others. “Le Pas Si Lent de 
I’ Amour,” or “The Slow Pace of 
Love.” by Hector Bianciotti, an 
Argentine-born Paris-based 
writer. 

Further. Makine 's book shared 
the Prix M edicts with “The Mother 
Tongue” by Vassilis Alexakis, a 
Greek novelist who also writes in 
French. 

Last year, the Goncourt short list 
included books by two other for- 
eign writers, “Cuban Rhapsody” 
by Maner and “Instruments of 
Darkness” by the English-Cana- 
dian writer Nancy Huston, to use 
their English titles. Neither won the 
Goncourt but both won other lit- 
erary honors. . 


Russian-born Henri Troyat — were 
well established long before being 
foreign became fashionable. 

Ben Jelloun (“The Sacred 
Night”) and Lebanon's Amin 
Maalouf (“The Rock of Tanios”) 
won the Goncourt in 1988 and 1993 
respectively, while even the Czech- 
bom Paris-based novelist Milan 
Kundexa wrote his latest book, 
“Slowness,” in French. 

One leading French critic, Angelo 
Rinaldi, who writes in L’Express. is 
less than impressed. “Prizes have 
never been proof of quality,” he 
said. “I have something of the feel- 
ing that these foreign writers have 
been rewarded for their exoticism.” 
In his view, Beckett, Ionesco, Green 
and the late .Emil Mihai Cioran, a 
Romanian philosopher, are the only 
foreign French-l angu a g e writers of 
importance. 

Makine *s autobiographical nov- 
eL “Dreams of My Russian Sum- 
mers.” nonetheless stands out. not 
only because it was an immense 
best seller in France, with close to I 
million copies in print, but also 
because it is a Proustian paean to 
France by a writer who discovered 
this country ■and its language 
through, the dreamy memories of a 
French-born grandmother. 

At the age of 5, Makine had 
already begun writing poems in 
Russian and French, learning “to 
pass from one universe to anoth- 
er,” as he put it in a recent in- 
terview. 

“The first thing you discover 
when you go from Russian to 
French Is the incredible discipline 
of French,” he recalled, “the ra- 
tional construction of the language, 
the aphorisms, the conjugations. In 
French, there are 26 tenses. In Rus- 
sia, there are only three — a nos- 
talgic past, a vague present and a 
hypothetical future. 

Eager to live off his writing 
when he finally moved to France in 
1988, Makine decided to write in 


French. But suspecting that no Par. .< 
is publisher would believe iLuu m 
newly arrived exile could do so, he 1 

presented his First two books as 
translations from Russian. These as 
well as his third novel fared poorly: 
When he completed “Dreams trf 
My Russian Summers”in 1994. u 
took him eight months to find a 
publisher. 

At 40, tall, bearded Makine has 
been embraced as a French audits, 
but he still cannot identify* with the 
French tradition of “la belle ex. 
pression." 

“The French gourmet approach 
io language frightens me,” Ik 
said. - r. 

“Ninety percent of French nov- 
els fail because they are lost- in. 
beautiful phrases. The French 
know how to construct and use - 
phrases, but that is not literature." 

Foreign writers enjoy the advan- 
tage of approaching the French Ian- 
guage through different linguistic 
and cultural traditions. Like Mak*^- 
ine, thev can enjoy the disciplinttjffi- 
writing’ in French, yet they fed 
freer to improvise, to invent, even 
to challenge the language, than na- 







1 


tive French speakers. 

ib writer 


“The Arab writers in French , 
bring with them their heritage of' 
storytelling, ‘One Thousand and ■ 
One Nights' and all that” Boud-" 
jedra. 56, stud on a recent visit to - 
Paris. “French was imposed on us 
by colonialism, but Arabic is a rich-' 
er language. So we can bring' an- 
other vision of the world, even a 
different way of writing. ’ * 

In contrast some older writers 
for whom French is a second lan- 
guage pride themselves on the cor- 
rectness of their French. Green, 
who was bom in Paris but reared as 
if his parents were still living in the 
American South, was drawn by the 
challenge of what he calls * ‘a very 
poor language.” 

“Today the French use only 
about 4,000 vvoids.” he said in an 
interview in 1991. “But it means 
there is only one word to describe a 
certain thing . You have to find the 
mot juste, whereas in English (here 
are many words.” 


I 


MILAN FASHION 


PEOPLE 


tllllillic* Jll*l 


ff 


The Dream and the Drama of a Designer’s Image 


By Suzy Menkes 

imematioml HeraU Tribune 


M ILAN — It is the dream 
of every fledgling styl- 
ist to create a fashion image 
— and the drama of every 
established designer to es- 
cape its stranglehold. 

The changes that Giorgio 
Armani made io his spring- 
summer collection must have 
seemed to him momentous. 
No more suits! Instead there 


were casual couplings of easy 
aning pants or 


jackets and w 
fluid skirts. No more beige — 
as shades of sea green from 
pale to deep washed over the 
runway. Down with the bor- 
ing old jacket! Enter the new 
floaty cardigan slopped over 
bare skin, or welcome back 
the firm, androgynous 
shoulder pad. 

It all added up to a serene 
and graceful show, but quint- 
essentially Armani. That is as 
it should be. When he has in 
the past broken his own code, 
by using harsh colors or in- 
serting bra-seaming, the re- 
sult has been uncomfortable. 

The designer said before 
the show that he had, for the 
first time in his career, studied 
the tapes of his earlier shows 
in a desire to recapture “my 
spirit of simplicity, rigor ana 
modernity. 

“But it has to be a mod- 
ernity that is not the mod- 
ernity of 10 years ago — and 
it mustn't be forced. I wanted 
to give a fresh feci.” Armani 
said. 

So everything was tight 
and airy*, from the opaque and 
sheer striped fabrics, through 
the gauzy jackets to the 
dangling glass beads or trans- 
lucent dragonfly pins. They 
appeared later as delicate em- 
broideries on chiffon evening 
dresses. 



now been overlaid with the 
fashion equivalent of fancy 
flourishes and curlicues. 

Out they rolled in relent- 
less waves across the sand- 
strewn runway. The parade of 
bold, pallid-colored clothes 
seemed endless. So did the 
repeated bare bosoms, 
brazenly viewed through 
sheer fabrics or clasped by die 
embarrassed models who 
were obliged to parade top- 
less in jeans. 

But the flood tide that over- 
whelmed Ferre’ s show was of 
decoration. There was never a 
single pocket, where four 
could be fitted at the hips of a 
jacket and the thighs of a long 
skin. And on those pockets 
would dangle tiny leather 
straps tike baggage tags. A 
fancy white leather jacket 
was not just fretted, but em- 
bedded with lace. By the time 
grand evening gowns ap- 
peared (and they are already 


an outdated concept), pleats 
here and fa' 


Armani's embroidered tops with floaty skirts. 


MmwrTVwu* 


Armani’s refined sensibil- 
ity means dun the transpar- 
ency seems natural and nor- 
mal — a revolutionary 
achievement if you think 
what going out in semi-sheer 
pants would have suggested a 
decade ago. Other changes 
were technically brilliant, tike 
putting sharp shoulders into a 
limpid modem jacket. 

But for all the show's 


beauty and subtlety, espe- 
cially in its exquisite evening 
clothes, you can sense the 
frustration of both the audi- 
ence and of Armani that he 
should be a captive in his own 
corral. 

Gianfranco Ferre started 
his career 20 years ago as a 
modernist and a fashion pur- 
ist. Although the architectural 
bones are still there, they have 


fanned here and fabric 
swooshed there. Embellish- 
ment had run riot. 

Yet the show started well. 
The sweeping coats over nar- 
row pants were dramatic — 
but that is Ferre’s way. And 
the designer found on easy 
stride with light shirts, worn 
with simple pants or long 
skins, and always in the 
whites and creams that 
echoed the gauzy sail billow- 
ing on the runway. 

“Iam trying to put woman . 
in our time, but making her a 
little more tender, to express 
femininity, poetry and ro- 
mance,” Ferre said before the 
show. 

Modem women are into 
clearing out their closets, and 
now that Ferre has left Dior 
and is concentrating on his 
company’s expansion, he 
could use some feng shui to 


clear out the couture grandeur 
— and go back to his archi- 
tect's drawing board. 

Moschino is now a brand, 
and the show it sent oat Fri- 
day was fine as a commercial 
take (or sometimes a parody) 
of what its founder. Franco 
Moschino, stood for. His wit 
and wisdom was given yet 
another spin, cleverly done 
when a ‘ ‘smoking " or tuxedo 
jacket had a no-smoking sign 
on the back, when “I love 
high heels” was written in 
sequined letters on a stiletto, 
or a photoprint of the bind- 
shaped Concorde was re- 
named “couture.” 

All this worked allied to 
sleek Italian tailoring, but 
fringed jersey dresses on a 
vaguely Spanish theme 
looked tacky and pin-striped 
cropped pantsuits and 
zippered black leather could 
be found on any runway in 
Milan. 

Alberta Ferre ui is building 
a strong image on fragility. 
Her collections use lingerie 
fabrics to give a womanly 
softness and intimacy. But 
this season, things moved into 
the intimate apparel area, 
with too many transparent 
dresses along with the silken 



.Vicln Viilt- Oi 

i hi 




KeeJ SawaThc Aw*uird Pic- 


DIRTY HANDS — Members of the Los Lobos rock- band displaying their ceroenfa 

u ‘ ■ ’Van! 


covered hands after making prints for a plaque in the Los Angeles Rock Wt 


tailoring. That was a pity, be- 
ats — i 


cause Ferretti’s details — the 
lace edging fraying tike a 
well-loved antique piece, or. 
shredded, raw-edged chiffon 
inserted into the seams — was 
delicately done. 

Ferre tti had another good 
idea: a focus on the bared 
back. Discreet dresses turned 
to reveal an asymmetric cut- 
away or a completely bared 
back. She. tike the rest of 
Italian fashion, should now 
turn her back on the sheer 
chiffon veiling bare bosoms 
that has haunted the spring- 
summer season. 


I T looks as if Alaio Gomez, who was un- 
ceremoniously dropped as chairman of 
Thomson SA last year by the then Prime 
Minister Alain Juppe, has had his revenge. In 
1995, after a scandal erupted about the rel- 
atively low rent Juppe was paying for a large 
and luxurious apartment owned by the city of 
Paris, the prime minister moved oat to calm 
the criticism. Now the apartment on Rue 
Jacob on the Left Bank has been auctioned 
off. The buyer? None other than Gomez, 
according to Agence France-Presse. The rep- 
resentative at the auction would only say tne 
apartment had been benight by “a man of 
taste” whose first look at the former chez 
Juppe had been “love at first sight” The 
price? 7. 1 million francs ($1 .2 million). 


The former film star Brigitte Bardot is . 
suing her second husband, Jacques C har- 
rier, for $80,000 over his bode about their life 
together. Bardot failed in a bid to get the book 
“My Reply to BB,” banned in June but.. 
pressed on with her libel action against C har- 
rier for what she calls an invasion of privacy. ! 
A Paris court will give its verdict Nov. 5. 


□ 


Betty Ford says one of the toughest aspects 
of enduring cancer was facing the stares at a 
White House formal gathering following her 


Chay Blyth, the first person to sail around 
die world from east to west, has been knighted 
at Bucki ng ha m Palace by Princess Anne, 
who was filling in for her mother. Queen, 
Elizabeth IL In 1970, he began his 
nonstop trip around the world in the 59 . 
yacht British SteeL He returned to Britain 
Aug. 6, 1971, after 292 days ai sea. 


I 1 &UMV1 

Queen... 

mlixniiiij 


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□ 


mastectomy. Ford, 79,openly disensfed her 
breast cancer in the mid-1970s, when few 


women were as willing to be so candid about 
it. Asked during an interview with “60 
Minutes” whether char took guts, she said, 
“Well, it was gutsy the first time I appeared at 
a state dinner and I walked down those stairs 
and I just knew all eyes were upon me.” 


TJjny years ago, the movie “In the Heat of 
the Night,' ’ about a bigoted Mississippi sher- 
iff and a black police detective, was released 
and won five Academy Awards. On Oct. 18, 
mere will be an anniversary screening in East ’ 
Hampton, New York, with a discussion fea- 
fonng Norman Jewison, the film's director, 
Walter Mirisch, its producer; Haskell 
vvexler, the cinematographer; and Rod 
Steiger and Lee Grant, two of its stars. 











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