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By John Vinocur 

,m wtiongl Herald Tribun e 

MARSEILLE — - The Castellane 
public housing project is cut into a 
ndge rising from the green and gray 
hiRs ai this city’s northern edge. Td- 
ward the horizon, there is the Medi- 
terranean, a hundred colors in a day of 
sun and cloud, and back up the ridee. 
eucalyptus trees, limestone cliffs and 
a vast sky. 

. J*y New York’s or Johannesburg’s 
definition of mean streets, the side- 
walks at La Castellane migh t as we ll 
be the lavender-edged pathways of 
Provence. But the local cops do not 
like to tread here; doctors tor weeks 
this year boycotted entering the proj- 
ect out of fear of attack, and life has 
crumbled to the point where a social 
worker, standing between pine trees 
in the pastel morning light, says: 

“We’ve got entire projects in 
Nath Marseille where 60 percent of 
the people don’t work, and some 
braidings where nobody does. There 
are endless families where the only 
people who get up in the mo rning are 
die kids who go to school. That is the 
awful normalcy now, the awful, 
worsening normalcy. ' ' 

The fact is, if Marseille is emblem- 
atic of the most obvious poverty in the 
countries of the European Union, it is 
also representative of a particular 
European problem in dealing with it 
In European communities conditioned 
in their notions of despair by tele- 
vision images of misery from around 
the world, appearances in the slums at 
hone arc relatively reassuring. 





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Children playing in the north Marseille low-income housing project 
Of La Castellane, an emblem of the poverty growing in Europe. 

No Data, No Problem 

Lack of Current Statistics Hides Income Gap 


By John Vinocur 

la termtuonal HerabtTribwu 

BRUSSELS — Statistics about 
poor and rich in the European Union 
» such a vexed, even tortured subject 
among the civil servants paid to create 
policy guidelines that they seek shel- 
ter from them by suggesting that the 
numbers should not be allowed to get 
in the way of the big picture* 

When a reporter askedwhy theEU 


households in its member countries 
fell beneath the Union's minimum 
standard of living in 1993, with 
France counting 16 percent of its 
households under die poverty level 
(designated as half of the national 
average income) and Germany 13 per- 
cent. TheEU offered no official anal- 
ysis of growth in poverty, but com- 
paring the 1993 figures with those for 
198$ (not released until 1994), 
showed that poverty in Germany had 


material on capital accumuwwM 
the growth of wealth, Jos Jondcers of 
the European Commission said; 

“Instead of arguing how we mea- 
sure things and what we measure, 1 
say let’s agree our societies are not 
perfect — nobody will deny that — 
and why don’t we start looking ax our 
policies instead?” 

What the EU’s most recent sty- 
mies do say is that one out of six 


LMUUtUf — — . 

As far as the European Union is con- 
cerned, comparative numbers from 
1994 to 1997 on poverty and income 
disparity are just not available yet By 
contrast, the U.S. Census Bureau re- 
leases annual rich-and-poor statistics 
with a lag time of about nine mouths. 
This situation means that Europe 

See STATS, Page 10 


1 .11 1 


WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


g Wg AND Wn P v 

Poverty Grows Quietly 
Along With Wealth 


■ Since La Castellane looks all ri ght 
nothing like Brooklyn’s Bedford- 
Stayvesant or the Robert Taylor 
Homes on Chicago’s South Side or 
Soweto, nowhere in France or in all of 
Europe has the political will catalyzed 
to acknowledge that, beyond appear- 
ances. poverty in Western Europe is 
deepening, worsening, 
and becoming a matter of ugly 
routine. 

Occasionally, a politician in power 
will emerge from the shelter of ap- 
pearances and acknowledge the depth 
of the situation. President Jacques 
Chirac of France, at a news con- 
ference with Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
of Germany in June, briefly brought 
up the subject of poverty in Europe, 
saying, “Something isn’t right 
here.” 

“Contrary to its historical tradition 
since the 19th century,” he said, 
“Europe, the EU, is experiencing cir- 
cumstances for die first time in which - 
poverty is growing, expanding. And 
with that, there are all the phenomena 
this implies about margmaltraTjo n 
and exclusion of all kinds.” 

But it was not a subject that Mr. 
Kohl {ticked up on. Protestant and 
Roman Catholic charities reported 
this spring on a “dramatic” increase 
in poverty in Germany, estimating 
that for every 100 welfere recipients 
there were 167 “hidden poor” who 
had not claimed assistance. Claudia 
Nolte, the Christian Democratic min- 
ister of family affairs, suggested that 
this concept was tnreinmgli^g and 

See POVERTY, Page 10 


Paris, Wednesday, October 15, 1997 


No. 35,652 



A Rosy Forecast 
For EU Currency 

Recovery May Allow 11 Nations 
To Adopt Single Money in 1999 


fata SuBwcUm* AnetBod Pkw 

Queen Elizabeth, her shoes removed but not her white ankle socks, making 
her way to the Golden Temple of Amritsar, a holy site for India's Sikhs. 

Queen Pays Homage 
To Victims of the Raj 

She Lays Wreath at Site of India Massacre 



By John F. Bums 

New York Tones Service 

AMRITSAR, India — In an act of 
contrition for Britain’s colonial past. 
Queen . Elizabeth came to this Punjab 
city Tuesday, removed her shoes and, 
with her husband. Prince Philip, paid 30 
seconds of silent homage at the site of 
the Amritsar massacre of April 13, 
1919, one of the blackest days in the 
history of the British empire. 

The British monarch, 7 1 , laid a wreath 
of white and gold marigolds at a pink 
granite memorial at Jallianwala Bagh, 
the walled garden where- Brigadier Re- 
ginald Dyer, British commander in Am- 
riisar, ordered 50 soldiers to open fire on 
a crowd of unarmed Indians protesting 
an extension of World War I detention 
laws. ABritish commission concluded at 
the Ti me that the fusillade killed 379 
people and wounded 1,200, while an 
independent Indian inquiry impaneled 
by Mohandas K. Gandhi, the indepen- 
dence leader, estimated the shooting bad 
killed more than 1,000. 

Whatever the toll, the incident had a 
similar effect to the police shooting of 
protesting schoolchildren in the black 
township of Soweto in South Africa in 
1976, galvanizing a protest movement. 
After Jallianwala Bagh, Gandhi’s for- 
mula of nonviolent resistance caught 
fire across India, sidelining conserva- 
tives who had argued for pragmatic co- 
operation with die British, to the extent 
that Indian historians regard the Am- 
ritsar massacre as a watershed in the 
struggle that culminated with India’s 
independence in August 1947. 

But like everything touching on Bri- 
tain’s imperial past here, Tuesday’s cer- 
emony touched off a babel of opinions. 

What began as a fevered debate about 
the appropriateness of Queen Eliza- 
beth’s Amritsar visit became a replay of 
India's conflicting views os the Raj, as 
the 150 years of British rule are known. 


For some Indians, it was an occasion to 
flay the British anew for their imperial 
arrogance and repression, while others 
contrasted the India of 1997, with its 
disorderiiness, political instability and 
corruption, with the more settled and 
seemly society ordained by the British 
before 1947. 

Some Indians delighted in the fact 
that the granddaughter of King George 
V, Emperor of India at the time of the 
massacre, had acknowledged the wrong 
done at Jallianwala Bagh, while others 
were angry that Queen Elizabeth, who 
made no statement during her 15 

See QUEEN. Page 4 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The European Com- 
mission issued a bullish forecast for 
monetary union Tuesday, predicting 
that a broad group of about 1 1 countries 
would kickoff Europe’s single currency 
amid an economic recovery that was 
already "well established” across the 
Continent. 

The economic forecast issued by the 
executive body of the European union 
was the last survey before members of 
the single-money group are chosen nexr 
spring on the basis of their economic 
performance this year. 

“The recovery is confirmed,” the 
commission said. “The conditions are ■ 
set for the recovery to continue.” 

At the same time, Italy announced it 
had overcome its budget crisis, restor- 
ing hopes that it would be among the 
first wave of countries to adopt die 
single currency, the euro. 

In a related development France and 
Germany reached an accord on a co- 
ordinating council of countries joining 
the monetary union. Germany agreed to 
the measure on the condition that the 
council did not interfere with the in- 
dependence of the future European cen- 
tral bank, which will set the key eco- 
nomic policies for the euro. 

The commission, raising its estimates 
from its previous forecast in the spring, 
forecast that the growth in gross do- 
mestic product in all 15 EU countries 
would be 2.6 percent this year, 3 percent 
next year and 3.1 portent in 1999. It said 
that economic recoveiy would create 
some 3.8 million jobs tty the end of the 
century, reducing the percentage of un- 
employed in the union’s working pop- 
ulation to 9.7 percent from its peak of 1 1 
percent this year. 

But the commission said there was no 
prospect of an early decline in unem- 
ployment in either France or Germany. 

The head of the European Monetary 
Institute, Wim Duisenberg, warned in 
Frankfurt that central banks might have 
to take unpopular steps to contain in- 
flation. entailing a loss of output and 
jobs, unless countries in the euro zone 
adopted sound budget and economic 
policies. Mr. Duisenberg is seen as die 
leading contender to head the European 
Central Bank. 

The commission justified its rosy as- 
sessment by citing the following eco- 
nomic indicators: 

• Average inflation in theEU stands at’ 
a historically low level of 2.J percent 


Greenspan Cautions Asia 

Fed Chief Warns Against Currency Controls 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Alan Greenspan, 
the Federal Reserve Board c hairm a n , 
warned governments Tuesday against 
imposing controls on currency trading 
as ne joined the debate on how to avoid 
the sort of crises that have jolted Asian 
markets. 

Any attempt to restrict financial 
flows, he said, would probably have 
“adverse unintended consequences.” 

Mr. Greenspan also called on his fel- 
low central bankers around the world to 
help prolong this decade's uncommon 
run of price stability, describing the 
low-inflation environment as the “most 
important development’ * of recent years 
ana declaring it essential to longer-term 
growth. 

Traders appeared heartened dial Mr. 


Greenspan had decided to enter the fray 
on the Asian financial turmoil. Stock 
markets and currencies in Thailand, 
Malaysia, \he Philippines and Indonesia 
have suffered heavily since the Thai 
baht was allowed to rail in early July. 

Although the Fed chairman made no 
direct reference to the issue, his com- 

Foreign investors are disappointed 
by Thai reform plans. Page 21. 

ments were viewed as a response to 
Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
of Malaysia, who last month angrily 
lashed out at currency trading as “un- 
productive and immoral” and said it 
should be made illegal. 

Malaysian officials later retreated 

See GREENSPAN, Page 4 


• Exports from the Union are booming 
as com pani es squeeze costs and improve 
productivity. Exports are forecast to rise 
by 8.5 percent in 1 997, and by 7 .5 percent 
in each of the next two years. The strong 
dollar contributes to the phenomenon. 

• Investment across the EU is ex- 
pected to increase by 2.6 percent in 1 997 
because of favorable monetary condi- 
tions. 

• Moderate wage growth is likely to 
continue. 

• EU consumers are showing signs of 
confidence. Pointing to improved do- 
mestic demand, the commission said 
there were indications of confidence in 
the construction industry, adding that 
order books, both domestic and export- 
oriented, were filling up. 

The commission's survey concluded 
that if present policies continued, “there 
are good prospects for the cyclical up- 
tum to be transformed into a sustainable 
job-creating recovery supported by ca- 
pacity-increasing investment” 

The commissioner in charge of fi- 
nance and monetary policy, Yves- 
Thibauit de Silguy, said the conditions 

See EMU, Page 12 


Communists 
Accept Prodi 
Plan, Ending 
Italy’s Crisis 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Service 

ROME — Italy’s political crisis drew 
to a swift close Tuesday after Prime 
Minister Romano Prodi reached a new 
accord with die same hard-line Com- 
munists who only a few days ago were 
ready to sacrifice his 17-month-old cen- 
ter-left government in a fight over 
spending cuts. 

Under the agreement, patched togeth- 
er in less than 48 hours, the Refounded 
Communist Party will now support Mr. 
Prodi’s 1998 budget, with minor 
changes. The Prodi government, match- 
ing an example already set in France, 
promised to introduce legislation re- 
ducing die legal workweek to 35 hours 
by the year 2001. 

The accord allows Mr. Prodi, who 
submitted his resignation to President 
Oscar Luigi Scalfaro last Thursday, to 
return Wednesday to Parliament, where 
he is expected to ask for a vote of 
confidence. With the support of die neo- 
Communists, who have backed the cen- 
ter-left government without joining it, 
Mr. Prodi is assured of the majority he 
started with two weeks ago when the 
crisis began. 

“In tins crisis, there were no winners 
or losers.” said Mr. Prodi at a news 
conference Wednesday afternoon at die 
presidential palace. “Italy and good 
sense won.” 

The revival of the Prodi government 
will allow Italy to pursue its steady 
course toward joining Europe’s com- 
mon currency in 1999. 

In Brussels, the European Commis- 
sion revised downward its 1997 deficit 
forecast for Italy from 3.2 percent to 3 
percent of gross national product, bring- 
ing it under the ceiling for entry into the 
euro set by the Maastricht treaty. 

The Prodi government’s success in re- 

See ITALY, Page 12 


Brazil Joins U.S . in Pledging Free Trade by 2005 


QwittbjOvSt&FramDiewkB 

BRASILIA — The United Stales and Brazil re- 
affirmed their commitment Tuesday to reach a Free 
Trade Area of the Americas tty 2005 as President Bill 
Clinton assured his host that a regional pact in South 
America would not interfere with broader U.S. trade 
goals- 

Mr. Clinton said he and President Fernando Hen- 
riqne Cardoso “agreed that at our next Summit of the 
Americas in Santiago, we should launch compre- 
hensive and balanced negotiations to achieve that 
goal.” That meeting will be in April in Chile. 



Mr. Clinton also sought to reassure Brazil that the 
goal of a Free Trade Area of the Americas would not 
conflict with the four-nation Mercosur trade orga- 
nization grouping Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and 
Uruguay. 

Brazil, struggling to cope with rising trade deficits, 
fears any further short-term easing of trade could ruin 
its economy and has urged its neighbors to proceed 
with caution on the free trade area. 

‘ ‘We believe that these sort of regional trade agree- 
ments everywhere, if they serve to open borders and 
increase economic activity and promote growth, pro- 


AGENDA 


mote stability and opportunity that benefit America,” 
Mr. Clinton said. 

He said it was a “false choice” between a free trade 
zone and Mercosur. “We believe we can create a Free 
TTade Area of the Americas consistent with Mer- 
cosur,” he said. 

Mr. Clinton openly faced what he called “some 
misunderstanding” about competing trade interests 
between the United States and the Mercosur trade 
bloc. He asked the members not to consider it an 

See CLINTON, Page 12 


California Cuts Ties With Swiss Banks 


Reuters 

SAN FRANCISCO — California’s 
treasurer has halted the state's dealings 
with Swiss banks while investigators 
look into Switzerland's role in han- 
dling funds stolen from Holocaust vic- 
tims by Nazi Germany, a spokesman 
said Tuesday. 

Roger Wildemmth, a spokesman for 


the state treasurer, said he did not im- 
mediately have thenames of the compa- 
nies affected by the moratorium. 

Mr. Wildennuth said the Treas- 
urer's Office had done business with 
U.S.-based banks owned by Swiss 
banks and with two brokerage firms 
owned by Swiss firms. 

Swiss hanks in media hlic. Page 2. 


Recalling an International TreoW Rebels Take 

boo* IZZ p^s. Presidential Palace 


Books Page 8. 

Crossword Page 8. 

Opinion Pages 6-7. 

Sports Pages 22 -23. 

The intarmarket Page 19. 


The IHT on-line wvv'.v.iht.com 


Rebels in the Congo Republic said 
Tuesday that they had captured the 
presidential palace in the capital, 
Brazzaville, rebels, loyaTtoa 
former president. General Ctenis Sas- 
&ou-Ngues$o, also control the inter- 
national airport. Page 12. 








I 

l 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


PAGE mo 


Killed i n Chechnya / 'Running on Empty,' Wrote Fred Cuny, the Aid Giver 

Remembering a Humanitarian, Warts and All 


By John Pomfiet 

Washington Post Senior 

W ASHINGTON — Frederick Cony 

was a ■ tail-tale- telling Texan, a 
glider pilot, a specialist in disaster 
relief who labored in war zones 
from Biaffa to Bosnia, a bear of a man with a 
bone-crushing handshake and an easy lau gh 
When he disappeared in Chechnya in March 
1995, Morton Abramowitz, a formes- top State 
Department official, bulled him an “interna- 
tional treasure.” Mr. Cony was, in many ways, 
the best America had to offer. 

In his seedy Russian hotel room, the 50-year- 
old Mr. Cuny left behind a John le Cane spy novel, 
his laptop computer and an anguished note: 

“West’s compassioned out R unning on 
empty,” he wrote, packing all the disappoint- 
ment of years trudging through wars and refugee 
camps into six words. 

They never found Mr. Cuny’s body. But in 
Aug ust 1996, they found his passport and de- 
termined how be died. He was shot, execution- 
style, in a forest .with his Russian translator. His 
alleged executioners were thugs working for the 
chief of Chechnya's military intelligence. 

At first, it was reported that Mr. Cuny died 
because Russian intelligence operatives con- 
vinced Chechen lighters that Mr. Cuny was a 
spy. It was an ending be would have loved — 
and, strangely, one that was mirrored in the le 
Cane book “Our Game,” about a spy who 
disappears in a war in the Caucasus. The real 
reason appears more mundane: simple robbery 
in a forest near one of the worst places in the 
world. 


A mong the tightknit coterie of aid work- 
ers, military men, diplomats and jour- 
nalists who frequent the bad corners of 
the globe, Fred Cuny was a hero. He 
had a genius for inventing simple solutions to 
complex, problems amid toe chaos of the world 
after the Cold War. 

He had an all-consuming love for his work — 
helping others. But he also had an all-consuming 
ambition for greater tilings and he dreamed of 
surfacing from the mud of a refugee camp into 
the marble corridors of power in Washington. He 
never made it. Perhaps it was ambition that undid 
him in the end. Mr. Cuny always took risks to 



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Cuny had an all-consuming love for his work 
and an nll-«n ngnming ambition. 

make a name for himself. His journey to a calling. It n 

Chechnya was the riskiest by far. For Ms. Jo 

Mr. Cuny’s tale — his undoing and his dreams way to probi 
— has been hashed over in bars and barracks heart: How 1 
throughout the world, from the wilds of eastern harm than g< 
Congo, to Sarajevo, Kurdistan and Chechnya, national conn 

U.S. public television is airing tins week a 90- to engage in 


minute documentary 00 his 
life: “The Lost American,” 
produced for “Frontline*’ 
by Sheny Jones and dir- 
ected by Foster Wiley. 

Ms. Jones and Mr. Wiley 
spent 18 months untangling 
Mr. Cuny’s life. .The result 
is a fascinating exploration 
of what motivates a man to 
dedicate his life to helping 
others and a journey, too, 
into the darker side of sin- 
gular ambition. To tell these 
tales, Ms. Jones and Mr. 
Wiley assembled an impres- 
sive lineup of Mr. Cuny’s 
friends ana lovers, who ap- 
pear in pithy interviews that 
betray intense affection and 
respect for the man. 

To add a dash of Hol- 
lywood, Harrison Ford nar- 
rates the show. It makes 
sense. Mr. Cuny sometimes 
seemed as u he had 
stumbled out of * ‘Raiders of 
the Lost Ark." 

For Mr. Wiley, Mr. 
Cuny’s life encapsulates is- 
sues that bedevil many 
American men and women, 
tom between sacrifices de- 
manded by family and de- 
sires to roam across fron- 
tiers. Mr. Cuny did not raise 
his only child, Craig;, his 

parents did. He was married 

-nwti-anafdh’w once and divorced. His ro- 
mances never lasted long. 

“ * ‘He just loaded up both 

r his work barrels and fired down the 
alley,” Mr. Wiley said. 

• “He decided very early on 

his work. It was a devotion, 

a calling. It required a kind of selfishness.” . 

For Ms. Jones, a story of Mr. Cuny’s life was a 
way to probe questions that were close to his 
heart: How humanitarian aid often does more 
harm than good; how the failure of the inter- 
national community, especially the United States, 
to engage in regional crises has placed more 


responsibility on the aid-givers, and how the aid- 
givers were failing to meet the challenge. 

■ Mr. Cuny started in the aid business as apilot 
daring Nigeria’s -war in Biafra in the 1970s. 
(Then the aid industry was worth about $200 
milli on a year; in 1995, when he disappeared, the 
aid business topped $8 billion.) 

He first made a name for himself during the 
crisis in Ethiopia, where in the 1980s hundreds 
of thousands fled drought and civil war. Hoping 
to lure Ethiopia away from the Soviet Union, the 
United States and other Western powers put no 
pressure on the Ethiopian government to allow ' 
its people to come home. Bucking the system, 
Mr. Cuny devised a plan that would allow the 
refugees to return. It worked. 

In Somalia, be argued against the U.S. plan to 
focus on Mogadishu and instead urged Wash- 
ington to use food to bring starving Somalis out 
of the cities and home to their villages, thereby 
breaking the urban power base of Somalia’s 
warlords. The Pentagon ignored him. 

I n Sarajevo, he saw the need to intervene 
three years before Clinton administration 
officials did, and be badgered them un- 
mercifully. “The Lost American” also 
takes a blunt look at Mr. Cuny’s tendency to 
stretch the truth about himself. Ifwas, the film 
suggests, part of the ambition, the hubris, that 
was so much a part of him. 

Mr. Cuny tola his friends, for example, that he' 
had been a U.S. Marine but had to leave the corps 
because a drunken taxi driver ran over his leg. m 
feet, Mr. Cuny was put out of the corps because 
he did not graduate from college cm time. 

“Why would someone of such real accom- 
plishment have the need to embellish like he 
did?” Ms. Jones asked. “Some said it was the 
Texan in him. Others said it gave him the oomph 
to go out and do another day.” 

The title, “The Lost American,” evokes im- 
ages of Graham Greene’s novel ‘"The Quiet 
American.” It was meant that way. The name 
was picked because it was slightly mysterious and 
because Mr. Cuny was a Greene-type character, 
someone who danced to his own tune on a stage of 
international intrigue, plots and disasters. 

“This is a guy who walked down paths that 
most of us don’t take the trouble to even imagine 
walking down,” Ms. Jones said. “He asked 
questions few of us have asked.” 


Swiss Banks 
Begin a Media 
Campaign to 
Buoy Image 

Agace Fronee-Presse 

GENEVA — The Swiss Bankers As- 
sociation launched a new media cam- 
paign Tuesday to explain the efforts its 
member banks are making to resolve the 
issue of Nazi-cxa dormant accounts and 
help needy Holocaust victims. 


DEATH NOTICE 

MASON RICHARD, 

writer, died peacefully in 
Rome on 13th October 1997, 
beloved husband of Margot 
and fa feer ofTbeo and Jessica. 


DEATH NOTICE 

The American Section 
of the Lycec International 
de Saint-Gennainen-Laye 
regrets lo announce 
the death of 

JOSEPH FREEL, 

beloved husband of Mazy, 
hither of James and Catherine. 
The funeral will be hdd at the 
EgfeeSainte Croix, Founjueux. 
on Friday, October 17. 


DEATH NOTICE 

A funeral service for 
JEAN PASQUAUNI 
(BAO KUO-WANG) 

who died in le Kremlin-Bicfitrc, 
Ftance on October 9, 1997 
wiQ be held on Wednesday, 
October 15 at 11 AM. 
at St Marcel de la Salp&tr&rc 
82, boulevard de lHppical 
Paris 13e 

followed by cremation 
at Pcrc Lacbaise at 2 PM. 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 

Soon, Paris - Brussels in 85 Minutes 

PARIS (AFP) — High-speed trains will link Paris and 
Brussels in 85 minutes starting in December, and die travel 
times to Germany and the Netherlands also will be shortened, 
rail officials said Tuesday. 

The Thalys train will connect Paris to Cologne and Am- 
sterdam in just over four hours when a new 7 1 -kilometer (40- 
mile) stretch of high-speed track is opened in Belgium on Dec. 
10, a spokesman for the French state railroad SNCF said. 

The Paris-Brussels service, which will trim 33 minutes 
from the current travel time, will be the first full-run high- 
speed train between two European capitals. Trains will op- 
erate every 30 minutes at rush hours when die service begins 
on Dec. 14. 

Swiss Ease Trains 9 No-Smoke Ban 

BERN (AFP) — The Swiss railroad network has lifted a 
ban on smoking in commuter trains. 

A spokesman for the railroad, Jean-Louis Scherz, said that 
on routes of up to 30 minutes, nonsmokers had continually 
complained about passengers who failed to respect the ban 
and that conductors were often asked to intervene. Nobody 
was happy with the system, he added. Now, smoking will be 
permitted in one of the train’s cars. 

Three people died and hundreds of houses were flooded 
in heavy rain that pelted Istanbul on Monday night, the state- 
run Anatolian news agency said Tuesday. 

Austria's first snowfall of the season dropped up to 30 
centimeters (12 inches) on southern and western regions. Icy 
roads caused numerous road accidents in the south, Austrian 
meteorologists reported Tuesday. (AFP) 

Philippine Airlines plans to raise fares 35 percent on 
major domestic routes, citing the need to recoup huge operating 
losses compounded by the fall of the peso. The increase, to take 
effect Wednesday, will affect passenger feres and freight rates 
to all domestic destinations also served by competing airlines, 
the national carrier. (AFP) 

After the outbreak of the deadly meningococcal brain 
disease, which has killed one person and infected four others, 
Australian health authorities said there was no direct link 
between the cases but added that a miss vaccination program 
had been set up as a precaution. f Reuters) 


Correction 

The Special Report on French Business and Technology in 
Monday's editions erroneously stated that the French TVR 
tram-bos was operating in Caen. It is to be running by 2000. 


Turn here for 


Richard Mason Dies at 78; 
Wrote 6 World of Suzie Wong 5 


The Associated Press 

ROME — Richard Mason, 78, the 
British novelist whose story of a Hong 
Kong prostitute, “The World of Suzie 
Wong.” became a best-seller and later a 
popular play and film, died Monday of 
throat cancer in a Rome clinic, his fam- 
ily said. . , 

“The World of Suzie Wong,” pub- 
lished In 1957, tells of a prostitute who 
falls in love with the artist for whom she 
poses. It was turned into a play on 
Broadway and London's West End and 
a film starring Nancy Kwan and Wil- 
liam Holden. 

Many of Mr. Mason’s novels were 
based on his experiences during World 
War II, when he served in Burma with 
the RoyaJ Air Force. 

His early successes included “The 
Wind Cannot Read, 4 ’ published in 
1947, and * ‘The Shadow and the Peak,” • 
1949. 


Antonio Maria Nieva, 53, 
Longtime Philippine Journalist 

MANILA (AP) — The veteran Phil- 
ippine journalist Antonio Maria Nieva, 
53, died Monday in the Czech Republic 
of Ever cancer, his organization said 
Tuesday. 

^ Mr.. Nieva had been bas gfijn Prague; 
since being decfeasonetaiy^general of 
the International Organization of Jour- 
nalists in 1995. Mr. Nieva was well-: 
known as a writer and organizer of 
journalists’ unions. He founded the Na- 
tional Union of Journalists of the Phil- 
ippines and 'served as- president of the 
National Press Club from 1984 to 
1986. 

Adll Carcani, 75, prime minister 
from 1981 to 1991' in. Albania's 'last 
Stalinist government, died Monday of a 
stroke in Tirana, his daughter said Tues- 
day. 


WEATHER 


Tie association published full-page 
advertisements in 1 20 newspapers in 27 
countries to spell out how Swiss banks 
are helping Nazi victims and their de- 
scendants track down accounts un- 
touched since 1945. 

The media blitz follows the publi- 
cation in July of the names attached to >_ 
some 2,000 dormant Swiss bank ac- { 
counts that contained a total of around 
60 million Swiss francs ($41 million). 

This break from Switzerland’s tight 
bank secrecy laws has generated 30,000 
requests for information and 3,000 ac- 
trial claims , the association said. 

■ 4,000 More Accounts Found 

Swiss banking officials said that a 
further search of their archives bad 
turned up 4,000 more unclaimed ac- 
counts that belonged id foreigners be- 
fore and daring the Holocaust era, twice 
the number they bad discovered and 
published in July, The New York Times 

^Thefaccounts. contain about $4 mil- t. 
lion, meaning that the majority of them f 
are quite small, although at least one 
account contained roughly $650,000. 
That figure is much smaller than the 
roughly $40 million that was contained 
in the July list 

Officials of the Swiss Bankers As- 
sociation said that it was impossible to 
know how many of these long-dormant 
accounts may have been opened by vic- 
tims of the Holocanst or others who 
were trying to protect theirfamily assets 
from seizure by the Nazis. 

The lists, which will be available on 
the Internet on Oct 29, are bound to set 
off a round of new discoveries about 
interactions between the banks, refugees 
from fee Nazis, and their persecutors. 

Nonetheless, the new discovery of , 
4,000 more, all accounts that the Swiss £■' 
banks said they did not know about, 
calls into question how the banks could 
have argued that they searched then- 
records over the years in response to 
claims pressed by Holocaust heirs who 
believed their families entrusted their 
assets to Switzerland’s famed banks.' 

Swiss banking officials say the lists 
released on Oct 29 will be accessible 
through http'7/www.dormantac- 
coants.ch — the banks' Internet site. 
They will also .be made available to 
Jewish groups and will be’niailed to 
people'calling toll-free telephone hum- . 
bers in more than 30 different countries. 

In the United States that number is 1- 
800-662-7708. 

The second round of lists to be pub- 
lished at die end of the mouth will also 
include about 10,000 accounts, worth $7 
million to $8 million, that were opened 
by Swiss citizens before 1945. Jewish 
groups have long pressed for that dis- 
closure, noting that residents of Germany 
and countries around Europe sought out 
Swiss citizens to open accounts for them 
to make it more difficult for Nazi Ger- 
many to- find and seize their assets. / 




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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AcaJWaathar. 



Europe 

Motor in London and Pads 
Thursday throutfi Saturday 
with soma sunshine. Chilly 
In Moscow Thursday and 
Friday with soma rain; a bit 
milder Saturday. Madrid 
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North America Europe Asia 

Cloudy with showers train Mtter in London and Paris Parity sunny end dry In 
the Qutt Coast to Florida Thursday through Saturday Beijing Thursday and FrF 
Thursday through Satur- with soma sunshine. Chilly day; chance of -showers 
day. Dry and cool In the In Moscow Thursday and Saturday. Showers In 
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-J 



EVTERNAXIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


^Inquiry on Fund-Raising Deepens 

R^o Expected to Delay Decision on Naming a Special Prosecutor 


Thr Associated Prrss 

wIrolwMff r / residem Biil Oinffis 
IfS? iS, func !' rais ^g should be inves- 

g«* *« ScX^ 

S^ dc f lde whether flwre is enough 
evidence to warrant a special progS 

5.1??;“?? Justice Department officials 


“It's the same old s tuff/ * he said, 
adding that the tapes would probably be 
boring to anyone who hart seen the 
White House coffees live. 

“I’m not worried about it,” he ad- 
ded. 

Ms. Reno had until Wednesday to 

decide whether to extend her current - 

initial inquiry to the next stage — a * political sideswiping. 


news conference asked Mr. Clinton how 
he felt about Ms. Reno's decision, the 
latest step in a drawn-out highly public 
process. 

“I feel nothing about it,” Mr. Clinton 
replied, but quickly added that “it 
would be better” if the attorney general 
were allowed ‘“to do her job” without 


preliminary investigation. O fficials gai 'd 
she wanted to make the decision before 
her appearance before the House Ju- 
diciary Committee on Wednesday. Re- 




Brazil. Mr. Clinton said he 
would cooperate but repeated what he 
has i been .saying in recent days: “I don’t 



. Q , Photon ““L " There is a law 
and a fact-finding process, and I’m go- 
“8 to coopenue with it." At the suae 
time, Mr. Clinton said that he was not 
concerned about what newly found 
fund-raising videotapes would show. 


that she seek appointment of 
an independent counsel. 

Earlier this month, Ms. Reno took the 
same step with respect to fund-raising 
calls by Vice President A1 Gore from his 
office. 

Justice officials, cautioned that mov- 
ing to a preliminary inquiry, even 
though it is one step closer to an in- 
dependent counsel, does not make such 
an appointment inevitable. 

The first questioner at the Brasilia 


Court Rules Out Skin 
On Welfare to Newco] 


iping 

uers 


* 


By Robert Pear 

Afav York Times Sen-ice 


4 


WASHINGTON — A federal judge 
has ruled that states may not discrim- 
inate against new residents by paying 
them lower welfare benefits than long- 
time residents. The decision blocEs 
Pennsylvania's use of a tool given to 
states by the 1996 welfare law. 

The decision has broad implications 
for other states that have adopted similar 
restrictions. 

The judge, Clarence Newcomer of 
the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, 
said in his ruling last week that such 
disparate treatment violated the Con- 
stitution because it was not rationally 
related to any legitimate government 
purpose. Specifically, Judge Newcomer 
said, the provision denies "equal pro- 
tection of the laws” to indigent families 
moving from one state to another. 

At least 13 states have adopted such 
restrictions, according to the National 
Governors' Association, and other 
states are considering them. Critics of 
the new welfare law have begun to 
challenge this and other provisions, and 
Judge Newcomer's decision will give 
them ammunitiah. 


While his decision bans the practice 
only in Pennsylvania, the ruling is sore to 
be cited as poor people challenge similar 
residency requirements in other states. 

Pennsylvania was taking advantage 
of a provision of the 1996 law that allows 
states to calculate welfare benefits for 
new residents by using the rules of the 
states where they previously lived. 

The case involved people like Edwin 
and Maria Maldonado and their six chil- 
dren, who moved to Pennsylvania from 
Puerto Rico in May. Under an option 
allowed by the federal welfare law, 

witifi304 a month in cash assistance, 
representing the maxtmnm they could 
have received in Puerto Rico, rather 
than the $836 paid to families of the 
same size who have lived in 
Pennsylvania more than a year. 

The “desire to save money is not a 
legitimate basis for discriminating 
a gains t newly arrived residents in the 
distribution of welfare benefits,” Judge 
Newcomer said in his ruling. 

Pennsylvania said it wanted to avoid 
becoming a magnet for poor people. 
Moreover, it said it wanted to discour- 
age people from “shopping around for 
the best benefit package of the year.” 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Rather than ipake the designation of 
an independent counsel inevitable. 
Justice Department officials said the' 
task force had been leaning against 
naming a counsel in the case of Mr. 
Clinton. Most of his calls apparently 
were made from the White House res- 
idence, which is not covered by a law 
prohibiting solicitation of campaign 
donations in federal office buildings. 

But the officials said investigators 
need more time to review all the ev- 
idence. 

Both the Clinton and Gore prelim- 
inary inquiries, as well as oae into an 
allegation that a businessman donated 
$2S,Q00 to die favorite charity of former 
Energy Secretary Hazel O’Leary so that 
he could- meet with her, can last until 
Dec. 2 — 90 days after these issues were 
raised in a letter by a majority of the 
Republicans on the House Judiciary 
Committee. 

Admitting his communication 
with Ms. Reno had been poor, Mr. Clin- 
ton said Monday that he would co- 
operate with her if she asks to question 
him about the fund-raising practices of 
the Democratic Party. 

Justice .Department officials said 
Tuesday that they had expressed an in- 
terest in asking Mr. Clinton about the 
campaign finance affair and were ne- 
gotiating the format with his represen- 
tatives. Based on Mr. Clinton’s remarks 
Monday, they now expect some ques- 
tioning to take place. 

Mr. Clinton said that he had taken 
great pains to avoid talkin g to Ms. Reno 
so it would nor appear that he was trying 
to influence the Justice Department’s 
investigation of campaign fund-raising 
abuses. 

Flying to Brazil, the second step of 
his South American trip, Mr. Clinton 
appeared in the press cabin suddenly. 
Dressed in a short-sleeved navy golf 
shirt and matching slacks, the president 
took questions for 30 minutes, occa- 
sionally sipping a diet soda. 

Mr. Clinton said he would do “any- 
thing that is necessary” to provide Ms. 
Reno and the Justice Department with 
the information they needed for their 
investigation. 

"Including speaking to her?" a re- 
porter asked. 

"If she wishes to interview me,” Mr. 
Clinton replied. 


3 Texas Democrats Switch Sides 

AUSTIN, Texas — With great fanfare, Governor George 
Bush welcomed the newest members of bis Republican 
Party — a Grayson County constable, a Blanco County 

justice of the peace and the mayor of a small town in south 

Texas. 

Fifteen former Democrats and three former independent 
politicians, who took part in the ceremony, stood near a 
banner that read: "Texas Republicans — Here We Grow 
Again.” They represent a. small, but increasingly high- 
profile group' in Texas politics: Democrats who become 
Republicans. . , _ _ . 

Texas leads the nation in die number of Democratic 
officials who have become Republicans; of the 302 officials 
who have switched to the Republican Party since Novem- 
ber 1994, 85 are Texans. 

The ceremony last week at an Austin hotel was the second 
in recent months, unveiling a group of elected officials from 
mostlv rural sections of the stale. In June, 15 other formerly 
Democratic constables and county commissioners also 
transferred their allegiance to the Republican Party at a 
similar ceremony attended by the governor. 

Democratic Party officials said no one should read too 
much into the party-switching events put on by the Re- 
publicans. Relatively few Democratic officials have 
changed parties, they said. 


"I know the Republican Party here in Texas has a formal 
program to recruit people to switch parties, and our re- 
sponse is, if in a year and half, this is the most they can get, 
these are pitiful results,” said Jorge Ramirez, executive 
director of the Texas Democratic Party. (WP) 

No Hearing for Law on Suicide 

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court, which ruled in 
June that terminally ill Americans had no constitutional 
right to doctor-assisted suicide, refused Tuesday to bear a 
challenge to an Oregon measure that legalizes such help. 

The justices, without comment, refused to revive a 
lawsuit filed by a terminally ill woman and two doctors. A 
federal appeals court threw the case out after ruling that the 
three plaintiffs lacked the proper legal standing to sue. 

Tuesday’s action, although not a decision that sets any 
national precedent, clears the way for Oregon's assisted- 
suidde law to take effect — at least for a short time. 

In 1994, Oregon voters passed a referendum allowing 
doctors to help mentally competent but terminally ill pa- 
tients end their lives. The initiative, however, never has 
taken effect because of court challenges. 

The state legislature has pul the measure on this year’s 
ballot, and voters will be asked in November whether they 
want to repeal the Death With Dignity Act, also known as 
Measure 16. (AP) 


Executions at 40- Year High and Rising 


By James Brooke 

.Vpr >i»* Times Service 


CANON CITY, Colorado 
— Two decades after the U.S. 
Supreme Court reinstated the 
death penalty, states are ex- 
ecuting prisoners at a steadily 
accelerating pace, and e xecu- 
tions are spreading out from 
their traditional Southern base 
to states around the country. 

Here in Colorado, for ex- 
ample, Gary Davis, a con- 
victed murderer and rapist, 

was wheels into the execu- 
tion chamber at fae Colorado 

J State Penitentiary on i Monday 
* night and put to death by 
chemical injection in me 
state’s first execution m iu 


Dieter, executive director of 
the information center, a 
Washington-based group op- 
posed to die death penalty. 

Proponents say the death 
penalty is used in a tiny 
minority of possible cases: 
fewer 'than one out of 500 
homicides nationwide. 

‘ ‘The death penalty will by 
its very nature both punish 
and discourage criminal be- 
havior,” Steve Curtis, chair- 
man of the Colorado Repub- 
lican Party, wrote recently. 

“Too often we see com- 
passion misplaced on offend- 
ers instead of being rightfully 
directed to their victims.” 
said Mr. Curtis, who in 1989 
survived' an attack that left 
two friends dead. A Denver 
jury gave the murderer, Kevin 
Fears, a life sentence. 

Still, the Colorado case 


^Within the last year. Ore- 
gon and K^tuckybaw con- ^ ^ 

ducted their tirst f highlights three other modem 

^n«1962^endof^t move away from the 

year. Connecticut, ivew j i — — « 

lev, Ohio and Tennessee may 
fir * 1 Mcecu- 


has accounted for 138 — 
about 1 out of 3 — of the 
inmates executed since the 
death penalty resumed in 
1976. It is followed by Vir- 
ginia , Florida, Missouri, 
i xnrisiana, Georgia. Alab ama 
and Arkansas — which to- 
gether account for 337 of the 
417 executions. 

The total number of inmates 
on death rows around the 
country has increased by al- 
most 10 percent in the last two 
years, to 3,269 in August. 

The national pace of ex- 
ecutions has picked up, in 
pare, because of a falloff in 
clemencies granted by state 
governors. In some years in 
the 1950s, clemencies spared 
as many as 20 percent of death 


row convicts from executions. 
This year, there has been only 
one, in Virginia — roughly in 
'keeping with the annual av- 
erage of the last decade. 

In Colorado, Mr. Davis and 
his lawyers appealed for 
clemency from Governor 

Roy Romer. About 400 of 
Mr. Davis’s supporters, in- 
cluding the papal nuncio and 
Amnesty International, sent 
letters asking the governor to 
stay the execution. Mr. Davis 
even sent a 40-minute video- 
tape, which included his first 
apology in the decade since 
he was convicted of murder. 

Mr. Romer, who opposed 
the death penalty until the 
early 1970s, was unmoved by 
the apology. 


E; tZ ** ru,. 

nons since *e 

ing to lhe Death Penalty In- 

formation Center. . 

Twelve states and tne 
tnct of Columbia outhw the 
tothpenalty. Of the 38 stai ® 8 

SESSSSKSg 

executed this year, executions, 
are at a 40 -year high- _ 

“We will see more 
tionsinmorcstatcsinthef^ 

secabte furore, said Richard 


midnight hour, a move to- 
ward lethal injection and an 
increasing reluctance by gov- 
ernors to grant clemency. 

Midnight executions have 
proved taxing on prison per- 
sonnel, witnesses, family 
members and judges who are 
sometimes awakened with ap- 
peals. 'But critics of the death 
penalty say earlier executions 
and their increasing fre- 
quency often make it difficult 
for opponents to stage rallies 
and call attention to die ethical 
issues in capital p unishm ent. 

Around be nation, Texas 


Don't miss the upcoming 
Special Report on 

Arts & Antiques 

on October 25. 1997 



THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 



I himrl Mnllmt/TV WnrWlnl fa- 

"Firemen and rescue workers checking the Canadian bus that plunged into a ravine. 


Away From Politics 


• Middle-aged women feel more aches 

and pains and are physically weaker than 
commonly believed, according ro prelimin- 
ary findings of a nationwide study of wom- 
en’s health. In a study of 10,000 women aged 
40 to 55 who were monitored over the last two 
and a half years, 8 percent reported sig- 
nificant difficulty completing such simple 
tasks as climbing a flight of stairs, carrying 
groceries or walking around the block. The 
study said that such physical weakness tra- 
ditionally has been expected of much older 
women. • (AP) 

• In attacks that came in time for 
Columbus Day on Monday, vandals in Pitts- 
burgh splotched paint on statues of the ex- 
plorer and spray-painted them with the words 
“murderer” and "505 years of resistance." 
In Philadelphia, a Columbus monument on 


the Delaware River waterfront was splashed 
with paint. American Indians say the Italian 
explorer ordered the murders of native Amer- 
icans. (AP) 

• A fire at a dump containing thousands 

of tires diverted rush-hour motorists in the 
Pittsburgh suburb of Elizabeth and prompted 
officials to close a small airport. The fire 
continued burning despite a steady rain- 
storm. (AP) 

• A woman in Cleveland who gave birth 
after being shot and declared brain dead has 
died after she was removed from a life- 
support system. Tara Turner, 27. was shot in 
the head at a family gathering in her home. 
She was about seven months pregnant A 
Caesarean section was performed soon after 
at tiie hospital. The police said a 29-year-old 
man was being sought in the shooting. (AP) 


Bus Crash 
In Canada 
Fatal to 43 
On Outing 


Reuters 

QUEBEC CITY — Forty- 
three people were killed when 
a bus full of retired people 
went out of control and 
plunged into a ravine in rural 
Quebec. Canadian officials 
said. 

The charter bus carried 48 
people — 47 passengers who 
were members of a club on an 
afternoon outing Monday and 
the driver. The police said the 
driver was among the dead. 

The accident, thought by 
authorities to be the worst in 
Canada In 30 years, occurred 
near the small community of 
. St. Joseph-de-Ia-Rive on the 
north shore of the St. 
Lawrence River, about 60 
miles (100 kilometers! north- 
east of Quebec City. 

The travelers, mostly aged 
between 60 and 70, came 
from the village of Sl Bem- 
ard-de-Beauce. about 20 
miles southeast of Quebec 
City. They were headed for an 
island resort in the St. 
Lawrence. 

Witnesses said the charter 
bus appeared to have missed a 
mm at the bottom of a steep 
hill. It broke through a rail and 
plunged about 60 feet (20 me- 
ters) into a ravine. 

Although the cause of the 
accident has not been deter- 
mined, the police called brake 
failure a leading theory. An 
autopsy of the driver was also 
planned. 

Local residents have long 
complained that the stretch of 
highway is dangerous. It was 
the site of an accident in 1974 
in which 13 people died. 


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PAGE 4 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




The Marianas Are Again a U.S. Battleground - Over Workers’ Rights 


By William Br&nigm 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTC^ - Veterans of foe 
Pacific campaign remember the North- 
ern Mariana Islands as the scene of hor- 
nfic fighting between U.S. Marines and 
Ja ^f* a ’ 00ps durin S WorW WarIL 
Today they are a battleground of a 
dmerent sort, a remote U.S. common- 
weahh m the western Pacific where local 
pol iticia ns, federal officials and mem- 
bers of Congress have been slugging it 
ontover immigration laws, themm- 
uiuiLu wage, garment sweatshops and 
alleged exploitation of foreign workers. 

Those differences came to ahead last 
week with a lobbying visit to Wash- 
ington by the islands’ governor, Froilan 
Tenorio, and tile introduction in the 
Senate of legislation aimed at reining in 
what President Bill Clinton's admin- 
’s abases 
> covenant 


administration. In a campaign to defeat 
the proposed legislation — and to help 
his campaign for re-election next month 
against a Republican who happens to be 
his uncle — Mr. Tenorio has been court- 
ing Republicans in Congress. Over the 
past year, he has invited several mem- 
bers of Congress and dozens of staff 
members to visit his tropical isles on 


United States without duties or quotas, 
even though the workers and materials 
are all imported and the factories are 
largely foreign-owned. The result, U.S. 
officials say, is an end run around the 


imports as well as the regulations on 


U.S. soil, the Interior Department says. 
One such contract says me worker “is 
forbidden from engaging in any polit- 
ical or religious activity" op the islands, 
must not request a raise or go on strike 
and “cannot fall in love or get married.’' 
Violators face penalties back in China. 


“marveled at the growth of the com- 
monwealth economy/' 

The “crowning moment," the state- 
ment said, came when the House raa- 



proposed legislation, introduced 
last week by Senators Frank Minkowski, 
Republican of Alaska, and Daniel 
Akaka, Democrat of Hawaii, would ex- 
tend federal immigration and minimum- 
wage laws to the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariam Islands and restrict the 
use of “Made in U.S-A." labels by its 


The islands 9 factories bring in thousands of low-paid 
temporary workers to make clothing for die 113. market 



The governor, a Democrat, strongly 
opposes the Senate bill and has com- 
pletely fallen out with Mr. Clinton's 


Arab Gunmen 
Attack Base 
In Philippines; 
3 Soldiers Die 


Reuters 

COTABATO, Philippines — Two 
Arab gunmen attacked one of the Phil- 
ippines’ largest army camps with gren- 
ades and automatic rifles Tuesday, 
killing three soldiers before being shot 
and killari themselves, the military said. 

Ten people, including five civilians 
enlisting in the army, were wounded in 
the 30-minute gun battle -inside Camp 
Siongco about five kilometers (three 
miles) from the city of Cotabato on 
son them Mindanao island. 

“One was carrying an Egyptian pass- 
port and the other one was carrying a 
Saudi Arabian passport.*' General Raul 
Urgello, an army battalion commander 
based in the camp, said in Cotabato. 

Military officials in Cotabato said 
they were investigating the possibility 
that the gunmen were p lanning to take 
General Urgello hostage or to seize the 
regional army spokesman. Captain Noel 
Detoyato, who was with Genual 
Urgello at the time of attack. 

In Manila, the armed forces chief of 
staff. General Amulfb Acedera, said the 
attackers might have been trying to de- 
stroy aircraft on thp base. “Haa they been 
able to lob grenades at the Philippine Air 
Force aircraft there would have been 
many aircraft destroyed,” he said. 

Military intelligence has long report- 
ed that foreign extremists disguised as 
missionaries were on Mindanao work- 
ing with local Muslim rebel groups. But 
this was the first known foreign attack 
on a Philippine military target 

Some army officials said they sus- 
pected the gunmen were members of a 
nit-squad from the More Islamic Lib- 
eration Front, which is fighting for an 
Islamic state in (he southern islands. But 
the group, which is due to resume peace 
talks with the government in three 
weeks, denied it was involved. 

According to an army report, the two 
gunmen broke into the camp after 
killing a soldier guarding the gate. They 
then entered the army information of- 
fice, lolled two sergeants and battled 
with other soldiers by firing grenades 
from launchers for half an hour before 
they were killed, the army said. 


Its garment factories have benefited 
from local control of immigration and 
minimum-wage matters by bringing in 
thousands -of temporary workers, 
mostly Chinese, to toil in rectories that 
tun out clothing for the U.S. market. 

Because tile c ommo nwealth is a U.S. 
territory, the garments made there carry 
“Made in U.S A.” labels and enter the 


wages and workers’ rights that apply to 
U.S. domestic manufacturers. 

Garment factories in the Northern 
Marianas often pay their workers even 
less than the islands’ current minimum 
wage of S3 .05 an hour, force them to 
work long hours with no overtime and 
require them to live in crowded “bar- 
racks” with restrictions on their free- 
dom, according to workers and human- 
rights organizations. The current U.S. 
minimum wage is $5.15 an hour. 

Before they leave China, workers 
must sign contracts with the Chinese 
government that violate their rights on 


So many Asian guest workers have 
been brought in mat native islanders 
now make up a minority of the 60,000 
population. The foreign workers bold 
more than 90 percent of the jobs in the 
private sector, while unemployment 
among natives .exceeds 14 percent 
Mr. Tenorio shrugs off criticism, in- 
sisting that local control of immigration 
and the minimnm wage is needed to 
keep die islands’ economy humming. 

In what a news release described as *' ‘a 
triumphant march across Capitol Hill” 
last week, the governor said Republicans 
in tire House of Representatives had 



dreg Babrfltc AnodMed Pie« 

BULLDOZING — A man taking a nap Tuesday under the bucket of an excavator at the China Coal ’97 
exhibition in Beijing. The four-day exhibition aimed to promote new technology in the coal industry. 


China Rolls Out New Abortion Clinics 


Reuters 

BEIJING — A mobile abortion clinic 
- a white van equipped with a bed, 
t — rolled 


up Tuesday to an international pop- 
ulation conference in Beijing. 

It was one of 600 that China plans to 
send to the countryside to help control 
tiie growth of its population of 1.2 bil- 
lion. 

Western experts at the conference 
said that China commonly used coer- 
cion to persuade women to terminate 
their pregnancies, a charge that Chinese 
officials denied. 

The issue arouses intense emotion 
among Western critics of China’s hu- 
man rights record. 

Several international researchers at 
the conference said that while Chinese 
women might no longer be dragged into 
abortion clinics, more subtle forms of 
coercion were widely used against 


women with unapproved pregnancies. 

These included ones and the threat of 
demotion in the workplace. 

“In reality, every effort is made to 
convince couples to terminate their on- 
authorized births,” Joan Kaufman, an 
officer with the Ford Foundation, said in 
a speech at the conference. 

Gao Eraheng, director of the Shang- 
hai Institute of Planned Parenthood Re- 
search, denied that a policy of coercive 
abortion exists. “No, there is no forced 
abortion in China, ” he said. 

Another participant, Zheng Xiaoying 
of Beijing University’s Institute of Pop- 
ulation Research, said, “The govern- 
ment criticizes people who give women 
coercive abortions.” 

Officially, China's policy is to en- 
courage die use of contraception. 

Outside the conference building in 
the Chinese capital, the rear door of the 
abortion van was thrown open for in- 


BRIEFLY 


U.S. Takes No Sides 
In Korean Election 

SEOUL — The U.S. Embassy tried 
Tuesday to dispel fears in South 
Korea’s governing party that the Clin- 
ton administration might prefer an op- 
position victory in upcoming pres- 
idential elections. 

With its candidate trailing badly in 
the polls, the governing party is 
scrambling to reverse the tread before 
the Dec. 18 elections. 

“We do not favor any candidate 
over any other,” the embassy said in a 
statement issued at the request of 
South Korea's Foreign Ministry. 

The Washington Post reported in its 
Monday editions that South Korean 
government officials, preoccupied 
with the elections, were reluctant to 
make any concessions to help restart 
stalled Korean peace oiks. The report 
quoted souk U.S. government offi- 
cials as desiring an opposition victory 
in the election. (AP) 

Jewish Group Reads 
To Mahathir Remark 

KUALA LUMPUR — The Simon 
Wiesenthal Center has accused Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad of 
“outrageous provocation 4 * after he 
was quoted as saying that Jewish 
groups had an agenda to block the 
progress of Muslims. 

In a statement dated Oct 13, the 
center quoted its associate dean. 
Rabbi Abraham Cooper, as saying: 
“Once again. Prime Minister Ma- 
hatiiir has shown himself to be a clas- 
sic anti-Semite." 

“Never mind that there 4re vir- 
tually no Jews in his country; whenev- 
er he is in a pinch, you can rely on him 


to play the stereotypical racist card of 
an alleged Jewish conspiracy aimed at 
him and at the people of Malaysia,” 
Rabbi Cooper said. 

On Friday, in a reference to Jews, 
Mr. Mahathir was quoted by the na- 
tional Bernama news agency as say- 
ing, “We may suspect that they have 
an agenda, but we do not want to 
accuse.” (Reuters) 

Crime in Japan 
Hits 25-Year High 

TOKYO — Tarnishing Japan’s 
reputation as a haven from violent 
crime, the government reported Tues- 
day that robberies resulting in deaths 
totaled 1,044 last year, the highest 
number in more than 25 years. 

Still, while the number of reported 
crimes reached a postwar record of 
2.46 million cases last year, violent 
crimes causing injury or casualties 
accounted for only 0.7 percent, the 
Ministry of Justice said. 

The total number of murders, 
1,218, compared with 19,645 in the 
United States in 1996, where the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation recorded 
1 3.5 million total crimes. (AP) 

Hong Kong Frees 
278 Illegal Detainees 

HONG KONG — The government 
agreed Tuesday to release 278 
Chinese-Vietnamese illegal immi- 
grants from a detention center after 
the Court of Appeal upheld a lower 
court ruling that they had been de- 
tained. unlawfully. 

The Vietnamese had been detained 
since arriving In 1990 because the 
government refused to screen them 
for refugee status until last year. (AP) 


GREENSPAN: He Hops Into Asian Fray 


Continued from Page 1 

from his comments, saying the matter 
was under review. 

Mr. Greenspan, in remarks prepared 
for a conference on global investment, 
said that today’s stunningly rapid flow 
of direct investments was bolstering 
growth and improving living standards 
in developing countries such as those in 
Southeast Asia. 

But it was also, he added, creating 
risks and vulnerabilities of a magnitude 
once unknown. 

“Increasing global financial effi- 
ciency, by creating the mechanisms for 
mistakes to ricochet throughout the 
global financial system, has patently in- 
creased the potential for systemic risk," 
he said. 

“The new world of financial trading 
can punish policy misalignments, actual 
or perceived, with amazing alacrity,” 
far more rapidly than was the case even 
15 years ago, Mr. Greenspan said. As 
shown by the recent developments in 
Asia and in the 1994-1995 Mexico peso 
crisis, he said, serious macroeconomic 
policy mistakes ‘ 'reverberate around the 
world at a prodigious pace." 

But to resort to capital controls to deal 
with this problem, he said, “would be a 
step backward.” 

Even largely speculative investments 
in other countries or currencies, he said, 
are fundamentally “part of the support 
systems for efficient international 
movement of goods and services." 

[In Hong Kong, leaders of the Phil- 
ippines and Singapore reaffirmed their 
commitment, to open markets Tuesday, 
The Associated Press reprated. 

[President Fidel Ramos of the Phil- 
ippines and. Prime Minister Goh Chok 
Tong of Singapore, speaking at a con- 
ference, both implicitly rejected calls by 
Mr. Mahathir for controls on interna- 
tional currency trading. 

[“The remedy lies not in turning 
away from the world but in embracing it 
closely,” Mr. Ramos said.] 


Rather than government controls, Mr. 
Greenspan said, the key to avoiding 
future currency crises was for govern- 
ments to provide more accurate, com- 
prehensive and timely financial and eco- 
nomic data to prevent the sort of 
stampede that can result when investors 
are caught off guard by bad news. 

He described the new speed and fluid- 
ity of financial markets as a source not 
just of risk but of opportunity, making it 
easier for money to flow from countries 
with excess savings to those with scarce 
capital and helping investors disperse 
their risk and hedge their opportunities. 

“This,” he said, “suggests the po- 
tential for a for larger world financial 
system than currently exists." Trends 
also point to a much greater interna- 
tional division of labor in the 21st cen- 
tury, benefiting both investors and con- 
sumers, he said. 

Botfor that, Mr. Greenspan added, “a 
stable macroeconomic environment’* 
will have to be maintained. 


said he also had - been assured that the 
Senate bill, as well as a similar House 
bill, would be “dead on axrivaL” 

In presenting the Senate- bill, Mr. 
Murkowski said he visited Saipan, the 
commonwealth’s largest island, last year 
and found unpaid Bangladeshi workers 
living in “appalling conditions.’** 

But Mr. Tenorio' s strategy seems to 
have worked. After a series ofjunkets that 
included seveialof their aides, Mr. DeLay 
and the House majority leader, Richard 
Armey, Republican of Texas, wrote Mr. 
Tenorio in June to pledge their opposition 
to Mr. Clinton's plan to apply federal 

ThTfeShailed'^t Tenorio’s “tough 
approach to labor abuses” and said, 
“Economic progress is being achieved 
with sincere concern for the quality of life 
of the inhabitants of your is lands ” 


One of Mr. Armey’s constituents, 
Peggy Japko of McKinney, Texas, takes 
a dmerent view. While working at a 
hospital on Saipan, she said, she be- 
friended a Chinese woman employed in 
a South Korean-run garment factory and 
learned of numerous “atrocities” in liv- 
ing and working conditions. 

The 34-year-old worker, nicknamed 
Jenny, lived with 14 other women in a 
small zoom in a guarded barracks sur- 
rounded by barbed wire, Ms. Japko said. 
Jenny often worked as much as 17 hours 
a day, and occasionally more than 20, for 
less than the minimum wage, received no 
overtime pay and was rarely allowed out 
of the barracks when not working, Ms. 
Japko said. She was paid $30 a month, 
Ms. Japko said, with the rest of her salary 
held by her employer and reduced by 
various deductions. When Jenny left 
Saipan, Ms. Japko said, she received 
$900 for the year she had worked. 

During Ms. Japko’s two years on 
Saipan before leaving in February, she 
said, neither Jenny's sweatshop nor her 
barracks was visited by any congres- 
sional staff members. 


Beefcake Selb in Japan 

A Male Strip Club Featuring Westerners 
Is ‘Very Cool’ for Shrieking Female Fans 


By Mary Jordan 

Washing ton Post Service 


spection by the 1,400 delegates. 

“We plan to make 600 of these buses 
to travel around the countryside,” Mid 
Zhou Zhengxiang, of China Triple-U 
High Technology Industrial Group, 
which makes the vehicles. 

China, home to one-fifth of human- 
ity, began rts tough control on family 
size in the late 1970s. Beijing has vowed 
to keep the population at 1.3 billion by 
2000, compared with the present 1.224 
billion. 

Some foreign academics said forced 
abortion was still practiced in crude 
forms in rural areas. 

Family planning officials sometimes 
make inspection tours of villages, said 
Yves Blayo, a French researcher at the 
National Institute of. Demographic 
Studies. “If someone is pregnant but 
has no permit she would be put into a 
truck and dragged into a hospital to have 
an abortion," be said. 


TOKYO — Dante w; _ 
bottom, immodestly cleaved by the 
thinnest of thongs, at a crowd of Jap- 
anese women who scream his name. 
Tony and Enrique, who have just peeled 
off American football uniforms, pump 
bare* hips to the pounding music and 
smilf! at the admiring howls from their 
delirious audience. 

Tokyo is known for sex joints, fea- 
turing naked women in acts that range 
from coy to raunchy. A favorite male 
practice is to dine at clubs where sushi is 
served with a naked woman as the plat- 
ter. 

But at J .men's, it’s men — mainly 
American men — who strip to G-strings 
fra* the entertainment of Japanese wom- 
en who come here by the busload, some 
three or four times a week. 

“This is the best, the best,” said 

deal who pays the $42 cover charge as 
many nights as she can. “I never get 
tired of craning here.” 

She knows all the dancers by name, 
“ft totally changes my mood,” she said. 
“My life is so boring otherwise.” 

Janen’s is Tokyo’s first male strip 
joint, and the nightly crowds are proof 
some Japanese women are sick of sitting 
at home while their husbands or boy- 
friends are out on the town. Japan is still 
a male-dominated society, where men 
work long days and spend long evenings 
out with colleagues. Women are ex- 
pected to tend to home and children. 

“This makes me feel good,” Miss 
Hotta said. She spends her hard-earned 
cash to watch hunks stripping out of 
flight suits and singing “Wild Thing." 
Or peeling off pinstriped baseball uni- 
forms and doing provocative moves 
with Louisville sluggers. 

She loves Tony, Enrique, Mario, 
Bobby, Colin and Dante — well-oiled, 
big-muscled lads who come dancing 
through dry-ice smote. It's a thrift, a 
kick, a shiver of fun to watch the guys 
singing “Good Vibrations" while 
wearing leis around their necks and little 
else. There is. visible swooning when, at 
the finale, Dante Henderson croons 
Kenny Rogers’s sugary ballad 
“Lady.” 

Mr. Henderson is lead singer of the 
J.men’s revue. He sings surprisingly 
well. 

“Dante! Dante! Dante! Very cool!” 
screamed Rurrriko Nakamura, 22. 

“He really does have talent,” an- 
other woman said to those around her in 
the J. men’s theater, where seats are in 
neat rows and drinking never gets out of 

hand 

“There are some seriously cute guys 
up there!” said another woman. 

Some of the dancers lean over and 
kiss women in the audience. 

Sometimes they drag a shy one on- 
stage for a dance or nuzzle. A hug freon 
goes a long 

the giggly, 
time are the 
performers completely naked (though 
they come close). 

the hook is young American guys, 
with the occasional Englishman or 
Mexican, singing and dancing in de- 
cidedly American garb. Besides sports 
uniforms, sometimes they are in top hat 
and tails, or full U.S. militar y uni- 
forms. 

“Ooooh, they're so cute, don't you 
think?” said Miss Nakamura. 



On Friday, Russia, which had long 
resisted the treaty, announced it would 
endorse the ban. 


QUEEN: A Quiet Homage to Victims of the British Empire 


Continued from Page 1 

minutes at the massacre site, had i 
short of the more explicit apologies’ 
Japanese and German leaders have 
offered for World War II atrocities. 

After months ‘of consideration, British 
officials settled on what amounted to a 
half-apology, delivered on Monday 
night as part of die Queen’s keynote 
speech for asix-day visit marking India's. 
50th anniversary as a free nation. British 
officials said that the Queen, who began 
her reign in 1952, had never gone further 
toward acknowledging that colonialism 
was not always, or even mainly, foe 
1 ‘civilizing mission* ' that British school- 
children learned about before foe empire 
began collapsing after World War f L 

“It is no scout that there have been 
some difficult episodes in our past — 




Jaftianwala Bagh, which I shall visit to- 
morrow, is a distressing example,” foe 
Queen said at a state banquet in New 
Delhi “But history cannot be re-written, 
however much we might sometimes wish 
otherwise, ft has its moments of sadness, 
as well as gladness. We must learn from 
ttie sadness and build on the gladness.” 

.Although leftist groups gathered to 
protest a few hours before foe British 
monarch arrived from New Delhi, the 
people of Amritsar turned out in force to 
welcome the royal visitor, with foe route 
from foe airport lined wifocheering, flag- 
waving schoolchildren, interspersed 
with the turbaned Sikhs fra* whom Am- 
ritsar, with its Golden Temple, also vis- 
aed by Queen Elizabeth, is a holy ciiy. 

For the Sikhs, foe visit was a tri- 
umphal moment In recognition of the 
occasion, Sikh leaders' bent an other- 


wise rigid rule, allowing foe Queen, 
after removing her shoes, to enter the 
temple complex wearing white socks. 

The visit to the Jaftianwala Bagh, 
coupled with the Queen’s words in New 
Delhi, appeared to have placated the 
most influential of the groups that have 
nurtured foe memory of the 1919 mas- 
sacre. Shortly before the Queen arrived, a 
committee representing relatives of those 
lofted called off a demonstration, issuing 
a statement saying that the Queen's 
speech in New Delhi “is virtually noth- 
ing short of an atonement for foe wrongs 
done by foe British rulers in India.” 

Many people in Amritsar seemed to 
share foe view that the Queen had gone 
far enough.Tahmi Bhandari, 92, rafted 
. foe d«nand for an apology absurd. 

Why should she apologize?” she said. 
. She was not even bom at that time.” 


(r 


Mr. Henderson, 28, is from Kansas 
City but worked as a singer and dancer 
in Los Angeles before coming to Japan 
in 1996. “We're just taking our shirts 
and pants off,” he said. ‘Tm not 
ashamed of it*’ 

Stri p p e rs might feel awkward or em- 
barrassed the first time, he added, “but 
it is so mething you get used to. After a 
while it’s no big deal.” 

Some of foe guys are former dancers 
from Chippendale’s male strip chibs. 
Nobody does anything rude, said Mr. 
Henderson. And, he said, it's a kick to 
entertain Japanese women, who are of- 
ten restrained. 

Mr. Henderson would not reveal how 
much money he makes, but said it kept 
him doing this for a living. He wants to 
sing professionally, and added, “I hope 
that when I look back on my career, rll 
be able to say that this is where I got my 
start.” 

Many dancers seem twice as tall as 
the Japanese patrons — making it that 
much easier for the women to slip 
money into their jockstraps. It's not real 
mooey: J.men’s has a vending machine 
where you put in a bill worth about $8 
and get two vouchers worth $4 each 
back. The women slip them into the 
dancers* loincloths until some of foe 
guys look as if -they ’re carrying a 
s alad 


Japan Moves 
Toward Joining 
Land Mine Ban 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan is moving closer to 
a decision to sign a comprehensive ban 
on anti-personnel land mines, officials 
said Tuesday. 

Foreign Minister Keizo Obuchi said 
at a news conference that he wanted 
Japan to sign an international land mine 
ban treaty at a meeting in Ottawa on 
Dec. 3, 

“I would be greatly pleased by a 
settlement in that direction,” be said. 
He was referring to reprated differences 
on the issue between foe government, 
which is under international pressure to 
sign, and military leaders, who are hes- 
itant. Kyodo news agency quoted 
unidentified Foreign Ministry officials 
as saying foe military was waxy about 
trying to defend Japan's long coastline 
without land mines. 

Local media quoted Prime Minister 
' Ryu taro Hashimoto as saying Tuesday 
that he had asked the Defense Agency to 
find alternatives to land mines. 

Canada has been leading a worldwide 
initiative for an agreement prohibiting 
the use and export of anti-personnel 
. land mines. 

The movement has gained the sup- 
port of about 100 countries, which are 
expected to endorse the treaty ar a cer- 
emony in Ottawa in December. 

The United States and China are 
among foe most vocal opponents of foe 
treaty. Washington insists mines are im- 
portant to maintain stability on foe 
Korean Peninsula; China has said all. 
states have a right to use mines to fight 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


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PAGE 6 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1991 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Tteratb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WIT1I THE MEW IDRk TIMES AND HIE WASHPlCTOW POST 


tribune. Join In Singing the Praises of Globalization 

i THE WASHINGTON POST C7 O . , • , 

- . Vv-iuvtn compankN. w 






\ Hi ill i 
!nu*wii^ 


Yes, Ban Land Mines 


Hie Nobel Peace Prize awarded last 
week to the Internationa] Campaign to 
Ban Land Mines and its coordinator, 
Jody Williams, is a fitting cap to an 
extraordinary few years in which the 
cause of banning land mines has won ' 
broad support. In 1994 not a single 
government would endorse a ban on 
these mines, which kill or injure 
25,000 people each year, almost all of 
them civilians. Last month about 100 
countries agreed on a treaty requiring 
the removal of mines and a ban on the 
production and use of new ones. After 
the Nobel award. President Boris 
Yeltsin said that Russia, one of the few 
remaining important holdouts, was 
likely to sign the treaty. 

Yet America remains recalcitrant. 
The White House, bowing to the 


Pentagon's argument that mines are 
needed to protect U.S. soldiers in Korea, 
has affir med that Bill Clinton's oppo- 
sition to die treaty, is “rock solid." 

Decades after a war is over, land 
mines continue to kill. They are the 
poor country’s weapon of choice, of- 
fering no advantage to America's so- 
phisticated military forces. American- 
made land mines were the single 
largest cause of American casualties in 
Vietnam. A ban on land mines has been 
endorsed by many retired generals and 
60 American senators, including every 
member of the Senate who saw combat 
in Vietnam. Mr. Clinton should change 
his mind and sign the treaty in Decem- 
ber. It will save lives, including those 
of American soldiers. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Stuck in the Gulf 


The broad Western strategy must be 
to take the political steps necessary to 
exploit the immense energy resources 
of the Caspian Sea area. In this way the 
West can diminish dependence on the 
oil and gas of the uncertain states of the 
Gulf. But it will be some considerable 
time before such a transition can be 
made. In the interim, the United States 
and its partners will have to do their 
pan to maintain the Gulf stability es- 
sential to their own national interests. 

This is by way of saying that even in 
relatively quiet times the Gulf is a 
troubled area. Just in the past -10 days 
or so. the UN committee set up to 
police Iraq's rearmament accused 
Baghdad of brazenly obstructing in- 
spectors looking into its suspected bio- 
logical weapons program. Twice Iraq 
attacked international observers on its 
territory. Iran sent warplanes into 
southern Iraq against Iranian rebels 
encamped there, and Iraq sent planes in 
response. Specifically against Iraq's 
violation of a no-flight zone that the 
United States has enforced since the 
Gulf War of 1991, the Pentagon 
speeded up the scheduled patrol of an 
American aircraft carrier group in the 
Gulf and expanded air patrols. Iran 
announced new naval maneuvers. 

There seems to be no particular rea- 
son to think that a new crisis is brew- 
ing. But there is do denying that the 
normal political temperature in die 
Gulf is set pretty high. The Gulf War, 


moreover, established the United 
States as the leading guarantor of the 
region's security and stability. 

Iran poses a growing challenge- to 
American efforts to isolate it. The rest 
of the West has never shared the Amer- 
ican readiness to hold the ayatollahs to 
norms of respect for other states. As a 
result, the gap between the United 
States and its allies on direct sanctions 
against Iranian oil re mains large. 
Meanwhile, however, new Caspian oil 
and gas seeking an outlet are forcing 
the united States to accept Iran as a 
corridor into the Gulf and, through 
Turkey, Europe. Washington is left to 
step up efforts to induce allies to mod- 
erate Ir anian foreign policy. 

Iraq was defeated in the Golf War. 
But Saddam Hussein was not shorn of a 
capacity for regional assertion, and he 
has never stopped testing the American 
will to contain him. American shows of 
military force — to enforce the no- 
flight zones, for instance — appear to 
comfort friendly Gulf states but to 
make them nervous at the same time. 
Iraq’s flouting of UN arms inspectors 
catches the Security Council at a time 
when a number of members would 
likely resist any new enforcement 
showdown with Saddam Hussein. The 
common hesitation leaves the principal 
burden on the United States to ensure 
that he will not again become the re- 
gional-menace that he was. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Listening to Johnson 



The publication of Lyndon Johnson's 
secretly recorded tapes is an important ' 
event Unlike the Watergate tapes, 
which focused on a presidency in crisis, 
the Johnson tapes provide an intimate 
portrait of a full range of presidential 
activities, of matters high and low, pub- 
lic and personal. Covering die period 
between John Kennedy’s assassination 
in November 1963 and the following 
August the tapes are given further and 
even tragic resonance because of what 
the reader knows and Mr. Johnson does 
not — that Vietnam will in time destroy 
not only thousands of American lives 
but the president himself. 

In “Taking Charge," edited by his- 
torian Michael Beschloss. LBJ is at the 
height of his powers, bending Wash- 
ington to his will in a way that few 
presidents have. His imposing physical 


presence had something to do with this, 
but on the big issues what counted was 


but on the big issues what counted was 
his uncanny sense of liming and a fierce 
determination to finish what he started. 

He knew instinctively, for example, 
that he could not trifle with the 
Kennedy mystique, and that by cap- 
italizing on it he could complete, 
against heavy odds, two of the late 
president’s unfinished projects — tax 
reform and a major civil rights bill. 

Others were not so smart. The day 
after the assassination. Senator George 
Smathcrs advised Mr. Johnson that the 
way to ingratiate himself quickly on 
Capitol Hill was to set aside the tax bill 
and focus on bringing in a balanced 
budget. To which Mr. Johnson replied: 
“No, no. I can’t do that. That would 
destroy the party and destroy the elec- 
tion. and destroy everything. We’ve 
got to carry on. We can't abandon this 
fellow’s program, because he is a na- 
tional hero." He got the tax bill and the 
civil rights bill. 

He was. further, a famously persuas- 
ive man and, when normal argument- 
ation failed, a consummate sandbagger. 
At one point be gets his old mentor. 
Senator Richard Russell, to agree to 
serve on a commission to investigate 
the assassination by hinting broadly that 


Chief Justice Earl Warren, whom Mr. 
Russell detests, will not be appointed. 
He then names Justice Warren to nm the 
whole show. At another point he asks 
Sargent Shriver to run his new war on 
poverty, and when Mr. Shriver demurs, 
he holds a preemptive news conference 
announcing his appointment. 

These are amusing sequences, rich 
with well-timed profanity, but no fun- 
nier than his equally successful efforts 
to persuade a San Antonio tailor to 
outfit his White House staff in ranch 
clothes (at wholesale prices) and a New 
York hairdresser to fly to Washington 
to do Lady Bird's hair and spruce up a 
few of his secretaries, one of whom has 
“got to have a bale cut off if I’m going 
to look at her through Christmas." Mr. 
Johnson, worth eight figures at the 
time, says he is living from paycheck to 
paycheck, and would the hairdresser do 
it out of patriotism? “This is your coun- 
try," the president says, “arid I want to 
see what you want to do about it." 
“Don't even worry about that. Pres- 
ident," says the hapless hairdresser. 

To Lyndon Johnson, a stickler for 
detail, one’s personal appearance was 
important in the larger scheme of 
things, the scheme being to impress the 
country. “I want to build you up," he 
once said to George Reedy, his portly 
press secretary But you ' ve got to help 
yourself ... You come in those damn ola 
wrinkled suits and you come in with a 
dirty shirt and you come in with your tie 
screwed up. I want you to look real nice. 
Get you a corset if you have to.” 

The disaster of Vietnam had not yet 
folly unfolded, but LBJ was already in 
agony, afraid about getting more deeply 
involved but equally fearful of the polit- 
ical and diplomatic consequences of 
withdrawal. “Whar the hell is Vietnam 
worth to me?” he asks rhetorically of 
McGeorge Bundy, his national security 
adviser. "What is Laos worth to me? 
What is it worth to this country? ... Of 
course, if you start running from the 
Communists, they may just chase you 
into your own kitchen.” 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES 


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I STANBUL — It is high time to 
spread the good news about glob- 
alization, wrongly vilified in some 
quarters as a destroyer of jobs and 
living standards in Western Europe. 
For all its powerful impact and breath- 
taking momentum, globalization is a 
comparatively new phenomenon, still 
imperfectly understood. 

The global marketplace is an in- 
escapable fact of commercial life. Gov- 
ernments would be well advised to 
abandon futile attempts to turn back the 
clock and concentrate instead on as- 


Bv Rahmi Koc 


sisting the people who elected them to 
adapt to today’s global reality. Failure 
to accept this challenge will seriously 
jeopardize prosperity. 

Within a very short time, billions of 
consumers in Asia, Latin America and 
Eastern Europe have gained their first 
access to the global marketplace. 
China, India and Indonesia together 
already have 100 million people with 
an income equivalent to the average 
income in Spam today. With economic 
growth averaging 6 percent, some 700 
million people in those countries will 
have reached that level by 2010. 

These trends are wholly positive for 
living standards and hence for world 
political stability. Increased equality of 
opportunity worldwide is giving more 
people the chance to build decent lives 
ror.themselves and their children. 

The UN Development Program es- 


timates that in the last 10 years more 
than 500 millio n inhabitants of the de- 
veloping world attained income levels 
above the poverty' line. Over the next 
30 years, the UNDP expects a further 
1.5 billion to do the same. 

European governments and compa- 
nies would do well to focus on the new 
sales outlets that this means for their 
products, since the opportunities far 
outweigh any threat to domestic jobs 
from imports of cheap goods from the 
newcomers — a threat that has been 
grossly exaggerated. 

This is amply illustrated by the 

OECD's most recent Employment 
Outlook published in July. Imports of 
manufactured goods to OECD coun- 
tries from a selected group of key 
emerging economies rose slowly over 
27 years to reach a mere 1.6 percent of 
total OECD economic output in 1994. 
OECD exports to those countries grew* 
at broadly the same rate, so that total 
trade in manufactured goods remained 
close to balance over the period. 

The economies concerned are Ar- 
gentina, B razil, Chile, China, Hong 
Kong, India. Indonesia, South Korea, 
Malaysia, Singapore. Taiwan and 
T hailan d. They were chosen because 
they account for most of non-OECD 
manufacturing trade. 


Delocalization, or the export of jobs 
through the transfer of production to 
low-wage developing countries is an- 
other bogey associated with globaliz- 
ation. whose threat to European live- 
lihoods is more written about than real. 


petition between companies which arc 
forced to become more nimble, more 


The European Commission has .es- 
timated that more than 80 percent of the 
European Union’s overseas investment 
goes to other industrialized countries in 
the OECD and only 10 percent to 
newly industrialized Asian and Latin 
American countries. And a mere 4 per- 
cent of French overseas investment 
goes to low-wage countries. 

The advance of technology poses a 
challenge similar to that of globaliz- 
ation in forcing on the industrial eco- 
nomies the painf ul process known to 
economists as structural adjustment. 

New technologies, particularly in 
the gathering, storing and processing of 
information, are dictating growing de- 
mand for skilled workers, with the re- 
sult that wage differentials are widen- 
ing. The most effective response to this 
undoubted social problem is to raise 
educational, standards and provide 
more on-the-job training so that the 
skills of the labor force correspond to 
industry's increased requirements. 

It is absolutely vital that govern- 
ments, educational authorities and busi- 
ness collaborate closely to this end. 

The growing interdependence of the 
world economy makes for keener com- 


_ - 

enterprising and more responsive io 
consumer demand. That is mu a bad 
thin- particularly for the consumer. We 
now- 7 have a global division of labor in 
which people can focus on the goods and 
services they produce most efficiently. 
The benefits are increased productivity 
and. lor the consumer, mure choice, 
high** quality and lower prices. 

In contrast to America, .where the 
economy is thriving oft globalization, 
economic and social rigidities have kept 

unemployment unacceptably high in 

Franco. Germany and other European 
countries. Some European govern- 
ments are trying to create jobs and pro- 
tect living standards artificially by stat- 
utory minimum wages, shorter working 
weeks and early retirement — surely a 
recipe for reduced competitiveness, 
morejob losses and stagnation. 

Since the global economy is here to 
stay, it is a pity that so many politicians 
shy awav from encouraging voters noi 
only to come to terms with it but to 
embrace the opportunities. Responsible 
political leadership demands no less. 


The writer, a member nj the pres- 
idency of the Paris-ltased International 
Chamber of Commerce, is chairman of 
Koc Ho Id ins in Htanhul. He contrib- 
uted /his comment to the hucrnarionol 
Herald Tribune. 


American Society Needs Greenspan to Prefer Further Growth 


N EW YORK — American 
society increasingly is split 


IN society increasingly is split 
into two classes; people who 
own stock and those who wish 
they did. 

Sixty-three million Americ- 
ans have money invested in 
stocks or mutual funds, but 
most of that wealth is concen- 
trated in relatively few hands. 

Only half of all households 
own more than $1,000 in fi- 
nancial assets. Despite an ex- 
plosion of mutual funds, the av- 
erage wage earner has only 
limited participation in the 
booming stock market. 

The blame is often put on die 
low personal savings rate. Amer- 
ican households now save less 
than 4 percent of their disposable 
income. But this explanation, 
while technically correct, 
glosses over die real reason for 
die failure of so many Americans 
to participate in the greatest bull 
market in history: The average 
family is drowning in debt 

Total household debt has 
reached the $5.4 trillion mark. 
The share of disposable income 
that households must pay to ser- 
vice their debts has passed 18 
percent — higher than the 
alarming level it reached just 
before foe 1990 recession, 17 5 
percent Among lower- and 
moderate-income families, debt 
is higher stilL 

For many workers, retire- 
ment security has had to take a 
back seat to rising principal and 
interest payments. These folks 
are struggling just to stay ahead 
of the bill collector. 

If too many Americans can 
treat foe bull market only as a 
spectator sport, it could turn in- 
to a major political problem. 
After all, we are talking about 
an appreciable fraction of foe 
middle class. 

These Americans can only 
hope that economic expansion 
will last long enough for them 


By Maria Fiorini Ramirez 


to pay down at least some of 
their debt load. However, this 
debt iceberg still is not melting 
— even under bright economic 
sunshine. Consumer lending 
rates remain punishingly high 
for less affluent debtors. 

With one big exception, there 
is not much Washington can do 
to help. The liberal solution — 
raising taxes on foe rich to pay 
for tax cuts or spending in- 
creases for the less affluent — is 
not an option in foe current 
political climate. The conser- 
vative alternative of across-the- 
board tax cuts for everybody 
has been ruled out by the bal- 
anced-budget agreement 
That leaves the Federal Re- 
serve as the only game in town. 
Alan Greenspan, chairman of 
the Fed, has always rejected foe 
notion that it could or should try 
to reverse foe trend toward 
growing income inequality. 
And last week, he warned that 
labor shortages could lead to 
rising prices. Inflation, in nun, 
could begin the familiar, cycle 
of Fed rate increases that typ- 
ically ends in recession. 

But raising rates would 
severely damage foe Fed’s 
political support in Washing- 
ton.' Many Democrats and Re- 

[ mblicans are now calling for 
ower interest rates and endors- 
ing the view that foe economy 
can grow faster without setting 
off inflation. The issue has cre- 
ated on unlikely coalition that 
includes foe AFL-CIO and 
Steve Forbes. 

In the circumstances, the Fed 
simply cannot afford to cany 
out another "preemptive 
strike" — raising interest rates 
to head off the threat of in- 
flation, as it did in March. Mr. 
Greenspan’s best option may be 
to hold rates steady, continuing 
foe pro-growth experiment that 


foe Fed has been conducting for 
much of the past two years. 

Far once, economic logic and 


political necessity may be on 
foe same side. As he weighs his 


foe same side. As he weighs his 
options, Mr. Greenspan could 
consider that real rates, which 
are foe actual level of interest 
minus the inflation rate, already 
are high — and rising. 

For example, foe Fed’s key 
short-term interest rate now 
stands at 5.5 percent, but con- 
sumer price inflati on is running 
at about 2 percent So foe real 
rate is close to 3J5 percent 

The distinction is crucial. 
Real rates are the best measure 
of the Fed’s policy stance. Giv- 
en that household incomes tend 
to rise at least as fast as in- 
flation, real rates determine the 
ability of families to stay ahead 
of their debt-service burdens. 


By that yardstick, interest 
rates are quite high- During the 
late 1950s, which were also a 
tim e of low inflation and low 
unemployment, real short-term 
rates hovered around the 0.5 
percent mark, and real long- 
term rates rarely rose above 2.5 
percent. Today, real short rates 
are more than six times as high, 
while real long rates are above 
4 percent. 

What is more, real rates are 
rising, even though the Fed has 
held actual rates steady since 
March. That is because the so- 
called “core" inflation rate, 
which excludes volatile food 
and energy prices, has been fall- 
ing. This disinflationary trend 
stfll holds despite foe recent up- 
tick in producerprices. 

With inflation decelerating, 
real races have risen nearly half 
a percentage point in foe past 
year — even though foe Fed has 


The writer. is president and 
chief executive of her own glob- 
al economic constdiing com- 
pany. She contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times . 


No, Low Unemployment Isn’t Scary 


E VANSTON, Illinois— Just 
when we thought Alan 


JJiwhen we thought Alan 
Greenspan, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve, had settled in- 
to a wise laissez-faire approach 
to the surging .economy, he 
warned that we may soon be 
tasting some foul medicine. 

Why? Because we are doing 
too well. Unemployment has 
been at or below 5 percent for 
six months and below 6 percent 
for three full years. And foe 
growth in gross domestic 
product has been running at' 3 
percent for the last four years. 

The conventional wisdom 
has long been that such figures 
could not be achieved without 
accelerating inflation. Yet in- 
flation and prices have been 
falling, and Mr. Greenspan 
seemed to have abandoned this 
conventional view. 


By Robert Eisner 


Unpredictable Korean Season 

EOUL — As the Dec. 18 By Douglas Paal In the meantime. Wash 


South Korea approaches, the 
peninsula is again entering a 
period of unpredictability. 

President Kim Young 
Sam's interest in taking a dra- 
matic initiative to launch four- 
party talks with North Korea, 
the United States and China 
will intensify. Opposition 
candidate Kim Dae Jung has 
already expressed fear that foe 
president will play foe "North 
Korea card." either by seek- 
ing progress with foe North or 
by manufacturing an incident 
along the demilitarized zone 
to rally nationalist sentiment 
behind foe governing New 
Korea Party. 

The 1 second preparatory 
meeting last month for foe 
. four-party talks to negotiate a 
peace treaty on the divided 
peninsula broke down when 
foe predictable became obvi- 
ous. Seoul and Washington 
saw clearly that Pyongyang 
was not going to drop its pat- 
ently unacceptable demands 
concerning the agenda unless it 
got substantial additional food 
aid as an up-front payment for' 
participating in formal talks. 

The North concluded that it 
was not going to get that up- 
front payment The meeting 
ended without a date for re- 
sumption. Both sides publicly 
said that foe ball was in the 
other’s court 

South Korean elections and 
leadership transitions have ten- 
ded to coincide with periods of 
instability in North-South re- 
lations. Before National As- 
sembly elections in March 


1996, North Korea staged a 
week of provocative actions in 
foe joint security area at Pan- 
immjom. Pyongyang’s motiv- 
ation was unclear. President 
Kim, sensing opportunity, 
hyped the threat from foe 
North, raising tensions further. 
The outcome was a larger than 


expected win for his party. 

Pyongyang is certainly con- 
fused by the current presiden- 
tial election campaign in foe 
South. How will Kim Jong II, 
now that he has been con- 
firmed as general secretary of 


In the meantime, Washing- 
ton and Seoul remain focused 
on foe proposal for four-party 
talks. President Kim wants to 
get them launched before foe 
end of his term. He and his 
colleagues have been consid- 
ering whether there is a way to 
lure Pyongyang to the table. 

Rumors surfaced in Seoul 
before foe second preparatory 
meeting that the South would 
promise to double the flow of 
aid from foe South Korean 
Red Cross to 100,000 tons a 
month. Washington believes 
that those leaks proved dam- 
aging because, despite deru- 


Until this past week, that is, 
when he declared that wagfes 
may rise unless foe recent 2- . 
million-plus annual rate of job 
creation is cut to foe million a 
year that would be consistent 
with population growth. . 

When shrinking unemploy- 
ment, why stop now? America 
even has a legislated target, in the 
Humphrey-Hawkins Full Em- 
ployment and Balanced Growth 
Act of 1978, of 4 percent un- 
employment. Might 4 percent 
unemployment bring some in- 
crease in wages? It might, after 
years of decline in real wages. 

But with -profits at record 
highs, productivity rising and foe 
dollar strong, companies have 
little reason to increase pices, 
even if they give employees • 
modest wage increases. There is 
certainly no excuse for foe per- 
emptory strike of raising interest 
rates to slow the economy. 

The culprit in all this, es- 
poused within foe Federal Re- 
serve Board, is foe dogma that 
there is an unemployment rate 
below which inflation goes 
crazy — a “nonaccelerating in- 
flation rate of unemployment," 
or Naim, in economists’ jargon. 
Until recently the idea that there 
is such a magic number was 
accepted by liberal and conser- 
vative economists, liberals put- 
ting it at 6 percent and con- 
servatives at 6 J or 7 percent. 

Whatever foe figure, unem- 
ployment below these rates 
would do more than simply 
generate higher inflation, the 


believers say. ft would bring 
continuously accelerating infla- 
tion — foat is, inflation that 
would get higher and higher. 
Who would doe risk letting this 
genie out of the bottle? 

I have been pointing out for 
yeare that foe theory simply does 
not hold up to evidence, and oth- 
er economists have increasingly 
been agreeing. 

Really high unemployment 
has reduced inflation. In foe De 
pression, inflation turned neg 
ative, and in the recession of 
1982-1983, with unemploy- 
ment approaching 11 percent, 1 
inflation slowed markedly. But 
foe critical fact is that unem- 
ployment and inflation are not 
linked so tightly. Relatively low 
unemployment has simply not 
been associated with either 
higher or rising inflation. 

So Mr. Greenspan should 
resist the Nairn dogma. And be 
certainly should not follow his 
counterpans in foe Bundes- 
bank, who have just announced 
an interest rate increase even 
though unemployment there is 
more than 1 1 percent. 

Mr. Greenspan should 
for maximum employmen 
maximum growth and real 
wages that befit the economy. 
He should not even, threaten to 
shoot at inflation until he sees 
the whites of its eyes 


The writer, professor emer 
itus at NorthwestemJJniversiry 
is author of the forthcoming 
“ The Great Deficit Scares: The 
Federal Budget, Trade and So- 
cial Security." He contributed 
this to The New York Times. 


firmed as general secretary of als, they apparently, led 
foe ruling Workers Party, as- Pyongyang to believe that it 
sess its implications? would . be rewarded at foe 


The two-month interval 
after the December election 
and foe weeks following foe 
inauguration of foe new pres- 
ident in February will be a 
period when foe North may be 
tempted to test the new ad- 
ministration or the U.S.-South 
Korean alliance. That might 
be done by a dramatic yet am- 


biguous approach to Seoul, or 
Washington or Beijing. 


Washington or Beijing. 

Pyongyang may np foe ante 
by disrupting cooperation 
with the broject led by foe 
United States and South 
Korea to build two nuclear 
reactors in the North as part of 
foe deal to eliminate Pyong- 
yang’s suspected nuclear 
weapons pregram; the aim of 
such disruption would be to 
get more generous food aid. 
Or foe North Korean test 
might come in the form of 
some limited yet disturbing 
military action. 


second preparatory meeting. 

The North has publicly 
blamed Seoul and Washing- 
ton for foe breakdown, but its 
chief negotiator struck a more 
moderate note before leaving 
New York, saying that foe 
only thing needed to reach 
agreement was a bit more 
patience. 

The autumn harvest in foe 
North, while poor, will tem- 
porarily relieve Pyongyang's 
immediate need for food. Kim 
Jong II may believe, however, 
foat the presidential election 
campaign in the South offers 
an opportunity to continue 
squeezing Seoul for food. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: A King’s Visit come out with a low neck and si 




raised rates by just a quarter of a ? 
percentage point. 

One does not need to em- 
brace foe Latest theories about 
the alleged death of inflation to 
realize that something remark- 
able is going on in the American 
economy. At this late stage of 
foe economic cycle, the infla- 
tion rate should not be falling, 
and yet it is. Global competition 
may continue to keep inflation 
at bay for some time to come. 

The Fed would risk a major 
policy error if it pushed rates 
higher in foe face of this dis- 
inflationary trend. It also would 
risk aggravating the debt prob- 
lems of average Americans, a ■ 
politically perilous course. • | 






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PARIS — King Chulalong- 
kom, foe genial ruler of Siam, 
bade farewell to Paris, its charms 
and its splendors, bright memor- 
ies of which he will cany with 
him to foe city of marvellous 
temples in foe Far East Europe 
has learnt to esteem the Royal 
visitor, because he came with a 
mind open to new impressions 
and Convictions, and was careful 
not to infringe upon foe delicacy 
of his hosts, but, on foe contrary, 
to show us foat he wished that 
the successors to his ancient 
throne should share with him foe 
benefit of his observations and 
experiences. 


come out with a low neck and so 
start a fashion to rid us men of 
these horrible, tight, unhealthy, 
stiff collars. All this talk about 
pneumonia following foe wear 
tag of low necks is absolute non- 
sense. Women are much better, 
much healthier, and much more 
beautiful with their low necks." 


The writer, a former official 
in the Bush administration, 
heads the Asia Pacific Policy 
Center in Washington. He 
contributed this comment to 
the international Herald 
Tribune. 


1922: Men’s Collars 

LONDON — Hie low-neck 


1947: Strike in Fans 

PARIS — The French govern- 
ment moved rapidly to break an 
effective strike of the entire 
city’s subway and autobus 
workers. Parisians walked- to 
work, rode bicycles of climbed 
on the rear of trucks. The gov- 
ernment stepped in with army 
trucks, police cars and volunteer 
drivers. The dispute developed 
into a test of strength between 
the unions and the Ramadier 


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XNTEKNAXIOPWX HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Washington’s Real Crime? 
Scandalous Investigations 


By Richard Cohen 


Washington Vincent 
YV Foster, the onetime White 
House aide, still has not been 
murdered: not by the Clintons, not 
bv anybody. This is the conclusion 
f 1 Kenneth Starr, the Whitewater 
i ndependent Counsel for Life. 

Last week, he issued a report 

supporting his earlier finding 

which was, as you may know 
precisely the conclusion reached 
bv a previous independent coun- 
sel. two congressional panels and 
the cops first on the scene. 

Now can we have an inves- 
tigation into why there have been 
so many investigations? 

1 ask that question a bit tongue- 
in-cheek — but also because I am 
at a loss jo explain what has 
happened in Washington since 
George Bush departed the place 
and Bill Clinton came in. 

There has been one trumpeted 
scandal after another, none of 
them going anywhere and each 
replaced by one that is promised 
to blow the roof off this town. Ah, 
bul a glance upward shows tha t 
the roof still holds. 

Now we have Tapegate, the ter- 
ribly important matter of why 
videotapes of White House coffees 
were not turned over to Attorney 
General Janet Reno, as they should 
have been. The answer, it seems, is 
that the White House once again 
showed how inept it can be. 

Still, no one says there is any- 
thing incriminating on the tapes. 
They show Mr. Clinton commit- 
ting politics, schmoozing with fat 
cats. This is political pornography, 
but protected by the constitution 
and embraced by tradition. 

And yet, the decibel level has 
been raised as if a body had been 
found in the White House base- 
ment. Ms. Reno "looks like a 
fool,** said li-Takes-One-to- 
Know-Onc Newt Gingrich. The 
speaker of the House then re- 
newed his call for yet another in- 
dependent counsel, this one to in- 
vestigate Mr. Clinton and Vice 
President A1 Gore for — brace 
yourself — using White House 
phones to call political donors. 

The Cold war is over and the 
Evil Empire is no more but the taste 
for the show trial persists. Com- 
rades Clinton and Gore have been 
summoned to explain why they 
used the phones at hand and not, as 
any party member would, the ones 
upstairs or down the street. 

If that sounds nutty, consider 


why so many people spent so much 
time and money looking into Mr. 
Poster’s death. His widow, Lisa, 
has remarried and moved on. Only 
Washington remained mired, be- 
lieving that the Clintons could be 
so evil that they would murder their 
friend, move his body from the 
Oval Office or where the Rose Law 
Firm billing records were kept 
(Iron Mountain, I suppose) gn rf 
place that gun in his hand. The 
scenario is so preposterous it 
wouldn’t even make a bad movie. 

Some Of this, I grant you, is Mr. 
Clinton's fault He is not a truthful 
man, and maybe that accounts for 
die venomous attacks that come his 
way. Last week, for instance, Mark 
Helprm, a Wall Street Journal con- 
tributing editor, called Mr. Clinton 
"the most corrupt, fraudulent and 
dishonest president we have ever 
known." Mr. Helprin is a novelist, 
so a little leeway should be granted, 
but has he forgotten Richard Nix- 
on? Nineteen of tbe president’s 
men went to jail. 

That The Wall Street Journal 
could run such a piece says 
something about the political at- 
mosphere of our times. To The 
Journal, it must seem reasonable 
to either wonder about Mr. 
Foster’s suicide or to just plain 
insist that it was Dot as it appeared. 
The list of those who now seem a 
bit crackpot on the subject is long 
and distinguished. 

Remember Travelgate? Re- 
member the FBI files found in the 
White House? Remember the 
missing Rose Law Firm billing 
records? Remember Whitewater 
itself, which still might amount to 
something? Remember poor Ken 
Starr, last seen departing for 
Whitewater in 1 994? Three years! 
Over $25 million spent! Now', 
there’s a crime for you. 

Now, finally, poor Vincent 
Foster has officially been laid to 
rest He was a troubled, over- 
worked man. His death was in- 
vestigated over and over again not 
because there was any real evi- 
dence to suggest it was anything 
other than a suicide, but because a 
significant piece of the political- 
journalistic establishment virtually 
insisted it had to be something else. 
The latest investigation says Mr. 
Foster was deeply depressed. If 
you read between the lines it says 
something else as well: A piece of 
Washington has gone mad. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 




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Safeguard the Children 
From Trash on the Net 


By Robert Coles 


C AMBRIDGE. Massachusetts 
— Is the Internet dangerous to 
children? Parents were asking that 
question after an 1 1 -year-old New 
Jersey boy was sexually abused 
and murdered, allegedly by a 15- 
year-old neighbor. The teenager 
himself apparently had been the 
victim of a 43-year-old convicted 
pedophile whom he met on-line. 

As events unfolded, yet another 
family debate erupted. There were 

MEANWHILE 

calls for greater regulation of the 
Internet. Predictably, all-or-noth- 
ing First Amendment advocates 
responded by saying that parents 
were ultimately responsible for 
keeping iheir children safe— just 
as they guard their children 
against violent television shows. 

Bul this argument against reg- 
ulation does not take into account 
tbe Internet’s interactive nature, 
which makes it an even more dan- 
gerous medium fhan television. 

New technology has always 
posed dilemmas for parents. After 
World War D, television brought a 
visual world into the living room. 
Some parents saw television as an 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Israel’s Right of Defense 

• Regarding “Poison Gas for an 
Israeli Assassination: What 
Could They Have Been Think- 
ing ?" ( Opinion . Oct. 10): 

Evidently it needs to be re- 
peated that Israel does not plant 
bombs on crowded buses, does 
not blow up pedestrian malls, 
cafes or cultural centers, as does 
Hamas. Israel does go after those 
who plan, organize and carry out 
these atrocities, and it uses 
whatever means possible. Khaled 
MesbaL die chief of Hamas’s 
political bureau in Amman, was a 
legitimate target 

If King Hussein of Jordan 
would see his obligations' under 
the Jardan-Israel peace treaty in 
the same way as Jim Hoagland 
sees Israel's obligations, then he 
would not extend his hospitality to 
Hamas, an organization devoted 
to destroying Israel, his neighbor 
and partner in peace. . 

JACKMENES. 

Jerusalem. 


To complain about Israel tar- 
geting Hamas leaders for death is to 
say that it should leave them alone 
to get on with tbe job of blowing up 
Jews. Until all Muslims accept the 
Jews’ right to have a country, 
things are going to be difficult But 
don’t condemn Israel. 

BEN SOMMER. 

Beers heba, Israel. 

Has the botched terrorist attack 
on two Israeli Embassy security 
guards in Amman, Jordan, on 
Sept. 22 been so quickly forgot- 
ten? Is anyone really shocked that 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu would react accordingly? 

REX PRESTON STONER 
Amman. Jordan. 

Does “How tire Hit in Jordan 
Wounded the Israelis” (Oct. 9) 
tell a fantasy tale or relate another 
blunder by Mr. Netanyahu? He is 
now an embarrassment to- the Is- 
raeli people and its institutions. 

RSIMAAN. 

Athens. 


Land Mines, and Clinton Fix the Rich-Poor Gap 


Regarding “A Nobel for Land- 
Mine Foes " (Oct. 11): 

1 warmly congratulate the Cam- 
paign to Ban Land Mines and its 
coordinator, Jody Williams, for 
this year’s Nobel Peace Prize and 
regret that President Bill Clinton 
immediately said that the United 
Slates would not sign the treaty 
banning these inhuman weapons. 

Richard Haas, program director 
for foreign policy studies at the 
Brookings Institution in Wash- 
ington, recently said on television 
that there was no way the pres- 
ident could make American gen- 
erals accept that the U.S. military 
should also be bound by an in- 
ternational ban on land mines. But 
isn’t a democratic government, 
where civilian politicians control 
the milit ary, rather than the other 
way around, a basic requirement 
for participation in the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization? 

FREDRJX S. HEFFERMEHL. 

Oslo. 


Grim, not merely uncomfort- 
able. is the picture drawn by the 
editorial “Not All Boats Are 
Rising" (Oct. 3). The ever- widen- 
ing gap between rich and poor in 
the United Stales is not just a sign 
of an unhealthy society but an 
alarming pattern with global im- 
plications. Still, remedies are 
available. Public policies that 
provide an equitable tax system, 
higher wages, social insurance 
and universal health care can re- 
dress this severe imbalance. 

BERTRAM ALLAN WEINERT. 

Nice. 

A Dangerous Gas Deal 

Regarding the $2 billion gas deal 
with Iran concluded by Total, the 
French oil company: Each time a 
company strikes a deal with a 
country where freedom is weak or 
absent, democracy is imperiled. 

BERNARD HENRY. 

Garches, France. 


unwelcome distraction. Others 
worried that the programs thumbed 
their nose at traditional values. 

The issue of television's effect 
on children is still here today. 
Witness the debate over the V- 
ehip, which would allow parents 
to block inappropriate programs. 

But the Internet takes us into 
quite different terrain. The Internet 
can bring into a home not only 
passive entertainment but also the 
interactive presence of other 
voices, ready to engage in con- 
versation. Unlike the strangers 
children meet on the street, 
however, these outsiders can lie 
about their identity and intentions 
without the visual cues one tells 
children to look for cm the street in 
order to get some sense of whether 
a person is dangerous. And these 
strangers have already gotten ac- 
cess to children in a place where 
they fed safe: at home. 

"Experts’* have always been 
quick to give advice on how to set 
limits for children: Know what is 
available to children; talk with 
them about what is appropriate: 
exert parental authority respect- 
fully but firmly. For many fam- 
ilies, this kind of communication 
is enough to keep children safe. 

But in too many homes, among 
the well-to-do and the poor alike, 
there is Little parental supervision. 
These are the children obviously 
in the greatest danger. 

The Internet is a wonderful 
means of communication, but it is 
also a garbage heap of porno- 
graphy and lewd exchanges. 

Yes. to contemplate some con- 
trol over the dangerous provoca- 
tions of the Internet presents a 
First Amendment problem. But 
Americans have long been strug- 
gling to set limits on what appears 
on television and in the movies — 
and with some success. 

Just as there is a ratings systems 
for television shows, the nation 
should also consider the place of 
the Internet in people’s lives and 
especially in the children’s lives. 

People must continue to make 
distinctions between what is and is 
not a ppropriate for children, and put 
tamers in the way of the inap- 
propriate — on the Internet as well 
as on television and in die movies. 


The writer is a child psychiatrist 
and author of “The Moral Intel- 
ligence of Children He contrib- 
uted this to The New York Times. 


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INTERNATIONAL 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1997 
PAGE 8 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 




At Dior, Galliano 
Fluffs It — Gorgeously 


By Suzy Menkes 

I ntcrnunmuil HvruU Tribune 

P ARIS — John GaUiano had his 
big chance Tuesday to get his 
incandescent romanticism out 
of the boudoir and into Dior 
ready-to-wear — and he fluffed it 
But what a glorious fluff — from the 
feather chokers swathing the necks of 
his Belle Epoque sirens, through the 
saucy bee-trimmed plays ui is that 
peeped under vertiginous side slits on 
ankle-length skirts. 

Just occasionally an evening dress of 
breathtaking classic beauty appeared, 
like the rose pink patterned toile de jouy 

PARIS FASHION 

that captured the rococo lightness of 
French style in a streamlined modem 
wav. 

And as a show, as ever with Galliano, 
it was a great production. We have seen 
before a model writhing cm a bed in self- 
love — this time contemplating herself 
in a feather-trimmed mirror or gazing at 
a fan-trim on satin slippers. And what a 
bed — w orthy of Marie Antoinette, with 
its riot of hand-pointed garlands and 
mountain of lace-trimmed pillows. Gal- 
liano's imagination and Dior's big 
bucks transformed the halls of the sterile 
Carrousel du Louvre into a French man- 
sion with boiserie panels, gilded mirrors 
and a projection of scudding clouds. 

“It was my first fashion show and I 
thought it was beautiful." said Nicole 
Kidman, front row in a tailored Dior 
jacket with her own skinny pants. *Tm 
no expert, but it seemed more like cou- 
ture than ready-to-wear.” 

Precisely. 

The Dior day clothes were an apo- 
logy: pin-striped jackets tucked non- 
sensically into high-rise, deep-cuffed 
pants: and curving jackets inexplicably 
ankle-length, although couture clients 
have already chopped them short to 
bring the Belle Epoque look up to date. 
They were shown over lacy, lingerie 
pieces that, although superbly executed 
at Dior, are getting to be a bore. 

A more serious problem with the tail- 
oring. is that the cuts are derivative. 
Curving tweed jackets edged with 
fringing have looked better at Chanel, 
and blazers and tuxedos belong to Yves 
Saint Laurent. 

But Galliano is a great evening wear 
designer, always using the same sinuous 
cuts, but with magical ideas in dec- 
oration like tulle appliquSd with paisley 
motifs and tiny pearl embroideries (but 
forget the lampshade fringing). All that 


gives a delicious, romantic image to 
Dior — as long as its clients come out 
only at nighL 

Can a designer be both avant-garde 
and romantic? That is the question 
posed by the early collections where 
designers strive to bring femininity to 
practical, mannish clothes. 

The ethnic look is Dries Van Noten’s 
great escape from easy, modem pieces. 
He uses a subtle mix of texture, print 
and. this season, sc If -colored embroid- 
eries to give a twist to soft jackets, gauzy 
tank tops and slender pants. 

By the time models, dressed in white 
singlets with rolled-waist sarongs, came 
out to the bongo beat of a Burundi band, 
the audience was transported far from 
the show's venue in a freezing, dusty 
warehouse. 

The clothes were worn nonchalantly, 
but wrapped and tied to the body to 
slenderize a voluminous silhouette. The 
ethnic details were a touch heavy- 
handed: caftan embroidery came on a 
billowing cotton dress and dangling belts 
fastened wrap coats. More modem was 
the subtle mix of global cultures — here 
an Indonesian batik, there a cute Chinese 
back-wrapped skin. Colors were the 
dusty African blues and mud browns, 
with Van Noren's sparkles subtly tar- 
nished. And beads woven through hair 
looked pretty rather than folksy. 

As the models stepped gracefully out 
at Junya Watanabe's show, their white 
cotton dresses swathed, pleated, folded 
and draped, the faces were shrouded in 
spider webs of cotton padding. It 
seemed an appropriate metaphor for a 
collection that, although often beauriful 
and poetic, seemed to haw been moth- 
balled from 1980s Comme des Garcons 
— Watanabe's parent company. 




W HAT was new-romantic 
were the fabrics: the pa- 
pery flower print like a per- 
ambulating serviette: die 
silvered stripes sparkling on the sea of 
white; or the gossamer strands like a 
silken spider web on brocade. Take 
away the padded phantom-pregnancy 
stomachs and s traitjacket capes, and 
there were fresh pieces, like a cap- 
sleeved top or a pleated wrap skirt 
Lattice was a theme from Dirk 
Bikkembergs, but whereas such ideas 
often look contrived, the designer gave 
it a sophisticated spin, making a trellis 
of woven leather or in knitwear stitches. 
The formula faltered with buckJe-and- 
strap prints, but Bikkembergs also had 
an emerging story of the season: a focus 
on the back, including a single slit down 
a pant leg. 


BOOKS 


CHILDREN OF 
DARKNESS AND 
LIGHT 

By Wcliolas Mosley. 241 
runes. S/J.95. Duller 
Archive 

Reviewed by 
Bruce Bawer 

N OT so long ago. virtually 
everybody tended to 
view die novel as die ultimate 
literary form. Partly it was 
because novels wen.* allowed 
to he big — so big that they 
appeared capable of contain- 
ing life itself. An«.l partly it 
w .is because the form seemed 
flexible that it could bend 
ilseir to any vision, however 
original. Even nonwnters 
would insist thev had a novel 
in ihem. Why? Because to 
ha\e a novel in you meant 
you'd led a life and thought 
about What It's All About. 
That. uliinuicK. was what 
nos els — | Heron novels, am - 
wax — were concerned with. 

The.se days, however, sup- 
rose*ll> serious novels lend to 
he less ambitious thematic- 
ally. if liierary editors once 
iccogiuzed formal innova- 
tion, moreover, as integral to 
the articulation of a distinct- 
ive vision, many editors now 
view prose as a mere vehicle 
lor the conveyance of a more 
or. less conventional story 
along a smooth path across an 
immediately familiar land- 
-e.ipe. 

Which is probably why 
Nicholas Mosley, a veteran 
British novelist and recent 
Whitbread Award winner, 
has to seiile for a relatively 
small publisher while lead- 
ing New York houses dis- 
gorge chic Gen-X retreads of 
Bret Easton Ellis. 

Mosley's newest novel, 
“Children of Darkness and 
Liehi." centers on a London 


journalist who. plagued by 
marital difficulties and by- 
disturbing memories of an 
assignment in the war-tom 
Balkans, is dispatched by his 
editor to Cumbria, a county 
in northern England. There 
some children have formed a 
colony headed by a girl 
named Gaby, who claims to 
have had a vision of the Vir- 
gin Mary. The situation 
plunges the journalist — and 
reader — into a thicket of 
paranoia-inducing ambigu- 
ities. Is a local radioactivity 
scare for real, or a ruse by the 
authorities? is the journa- 
list's wife sleeping with his 
colleague? How did the 
people he meet come to know 
so much about him? 

Mosley's point, it soon be- 
comes clear, is not to tell a 
conventional story: it is to 
adapt plot, character and set- 
ting in such a way as to ex- 
plore — well — What It's All 
About. One can imagine an 
editor’s exasperated com- 
ment: “There are no char- 
acters here! There's no con- 
flict! And where's the story, 
anyway?” Indeed, the book's 
endless conversations about 
who w us or wasn't in a certain 
place at a certain time, and 
who was or wasn't cheating 
on whom with whom, can be 
exasperating. 

But there's a method to 
Mosley's madness: He wants 
ro close in on certain truths 
about how we all try and fail 
to connect, how we live in 
our own worlds and can’t 
make them mesh, and how 
tragic all this is. especially 
for children. And. above all, 
where God comes in. For in a 
way, he observes, adults are 
to children as God is ra 
adults. Given our indiffer- 
ence to children's pain — in 
Bosnia, say — why should 
any of us wonder why God 
lets us suffer? 


As the novel proceeds, de- 
velopments multiply — 
though instead of advancing 
the plot, they take us further 
from any conventional no- 
tion of plat. It emerges, for 
instance, that a local woman 
named Mrs. Ferguson and 
her son. Peter, are perform- 
ing experiments on enuc- 
leated cells, seeking to dis- 
cover how they commun- 
icate. Thus does Mosley ex- 
plore his pel questions — in- 
cluding self-consciousness, 
know ledge, choice, possibil- 
ity. and the importance of 
people's identity both as in- 
dividuals and as pans of a 
larger whole. What determ- 
ines quantum-level activity? 
“Can the brain look at itself, 
or look at itself looking ar 
itself?" 

F OR Mosley, all these 
questions are ultimately 
religious in nature. “We're 
talking about God." Peter 
declares. But what is God, 
and m what sense is religion 
true? What about myths, sto- 
ries? The journalist recalls 
reading fairy tales to his son. 
Billy, who* asks. “But are 
they true?" His reply: “They 
ore shots at talking about 
things that can he sold in no 


better way.’’ Or, as he says 
elsewhere: “This is indeed a 
mythological world: there 
are the shapes of possibilities 
in darkness." 

If there is any consolation 
in this burring world, it is that 
God is with us in our torment 
and that, as Mosley has writ- 
ten in connection with his 
“Catastrophe Practice" se- 
ries of novels (1979-90), 
“humans can leam through 
catastrophe." 

Mosley should be com- 
mended for the seriousness, 
vigor, audacity and freshness 
with which he engages pro- 
found matters. One wishes 
that more novels were as con- 
sistently intelligent and 
thought-provoking as “Chil- 
dren’of Darkness and Light" 
is. That said, one might also 
wish to have had more of a 
sense in these pages of lives 
actually being lived — how- 
ever unorthodox the way in 
which their creator might 
choose to represent those 
lives. 

Bruce Bower. whose 
"Stealing Jesus: How Fun- 
damentalism Betrays Chris- 
tianity " will appear this fall, 
wrote this for The Washing- 
ton Post. 


BEST SELLERS 


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■1 THE angel OF 

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Cjit 4 i 

510 LS. PEN ALTY Bi 

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TTWEGI AKE. te Xun 
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EXPOSURE, to fanvu 
Ccnrasll. __ !...._ fi !1 

10 THE GOD OF SMALL 
THINGS, fv Anmdlua 

Rev. . 9 9 

11 Dal A DEAD K Kalb* 

Rnch. .. .; .' 10 5 

12 NIGHT passage. b> 

RsNbiB. Pater l 

U AMBER BEACH, in 
EJieaheihLinelJ 1 

14 PLUM ISLAND. b> 

Nelson DcMille 12 19 

15 SR93AL DELIVERY. b> 

Dm3eBtri . .. 8 14 

NONFICTION 

1 THE ROY ALS, in- Kioy 

MW. I 3 

2 ANGELA'S ASHES, bj 

Frank McCoun 2 56 


5 THE MAN WHO 
LISTENS TO HORSES. 

by Monty Roberts 3 S 

4 THE PERFECT STORM, 
hv Sebastian longer 4 IX 

s Dirty jokes and 

BEER. In- Dim Got* — I 

6 INTO THIN AIR. b> Joo 

Knkwi... 5 23 

7 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD; Book I. by 

Neale Donald Wakcb — 6 43 
* BABYHOOD, by Pal 

Reiser 8 6 

9 MIDNIGHT IN THE 
GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EVIL, by John 

Bert mil — 7 169 

)fi TJC MLLKKAJRE NEXT 
DOOR, by Duns J. Sunk* 

WBam D Danko 12 3S 

tl DOGS NEVER LIE 
ABOUT LOVE, by Jef- 
frey Mousmeff Masco .. ID 2 

12 WALK THIS WAY. by 
Acromuth nuh Stephen 

Data 1 

13 THE GIFT OF FEAR, bv 

Gavrad* Becker.... .' 9 is 

14 TEARS OF RAGE, by 

John Walsh with Susan 
Sctanddrne II 2 

15 THE BIBLE COPE by 
MidBri Drmnin 14 17 


ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND AOSCELLANEOUS 

1 MEN ARE FROM MARS. 

WOMEN ARE FROM 
VENUS, by Me Gov 1 2H 

2 TEN STUPID THINGS 

MEN DO TO MESS UP 
THEIR LIVES, bv louua 
SchScairtecri 3 2 

i SIMPLE ABUNDANCE, 
by Sarah BanBicaJrach 2 79 

4 THE ZONE bv Bam 
Scan nnh Bill Liwren .' A 51 


The Flamenco Tradition 

Cristina Hoy os Tends the Flame of Iberia 


By Valerie Gladstone 

New Yuri: Tunes 5ai‘tce _ 

S EVILLE, Spain — Seville’s bril- 
liant sun can't penetrate the plain, 
cavelike building where the 
renowned flamenco dancer 
Cristina Hoyos rehearses. It's a dark, 
intimate space, reminiscent of the Gypsy 
camps where the art developed here in 
southern Spain in (he early 19th century. 

Hoyos, 51. grew up in Seville, 
weaned on flamenco songs played on 
the family radio, and later, performing 
in shows at load restaurants. During 
that period in Spain, the dictator Fran- 
cisco Franco forbade everything, Hoyos 
recalled- “He said real flamenco was 
decadent and only allowed tourist ver- 
sions. I determined wheat I was young 
that I would keep the roots strong." 

One recent morning here, Hoyos led 
her troupe of nine sleek men and women 
through a series of patterns to the driv- 
ing rhythm of guitars. Then she stepped 
forward alone. Wearing a purple sweat- 
er, a long, black skirt and a flowered 
shawl tied around her waist, she raised 
her arms sensuously and twisted her 
torso to the romantic songs. Little time 
remained to rehearse before the com- 
pany's American debuL 
Although Hoyos won worldwide ac- 
claim as the partner of the flamenco star 
Antonio Gades, she has not danced in 
the United States since 1985- The fol- 
lowing year, she established her own 


group. Flamenco Cristina Hoyos, which to be a 

has toured Europe, Asia and Latin To con 
America. choreoj 

Until now, the high cost of perform- 
ing in the United Stares made a visit Roads 
prohibitive; Hoyos dipped into her own current 
savings to make it possible. “ 

"Even though we must sacrifice," P lctu *S 
she explained, “we had to go to New f 01 * 13 ® 1 * 
■ York. It is the center." On Tuesday, her lan \w 
16-meraber company, including three U j 
guitarists and three singers, began a snow tl 
two-week engagement at City Center, mouth, 
presenting two different programs, each straies, 
with a full-evening premiere. ing. 

Hoy os's career began with fanfare 
when she made her international debut Toma 
at the Spanish Pavilion at the 1964 ish call 
World’s Fair in New York. Since then, former? 
critics have called her the "flame of ditional 
flamenco,” “the essence of Iberian Hoyos, 
volatility" and have generally congrat- cos turn 
ufcued her on taking the art to new these, E 
heights. classics 

iveness 

F ROM 1969 until 1988, she d&- But 
veloped a following through togethe 
world tours with Gades ’s com- at Setx 
pany and through starring roles Hoyos i 
in the films “Blood Wedding/’ "El my cho 
Amor Brujo" and “Carmen,” made by as I did 
Gades and the director Carlos Saura in inferior 
the 1970s and ’80s. skinny i 

To insure that her audiences under- told me 
stand traditional flamenco, Hoyos in- matters 
variably celebrates its roots. She knows moist w< 
that even today many people believe it Smiling 


to be a dance without histoiy or artistry. 

To correct that impression, she and the - 
choreographer Manolo Marin created . 
“Caminos Andaluces" {“Andalusian 
Roads"), one of the premieres on her- 
current program, which traces the art 
form through the 1940s -and ’50s, de- - 
picting the various dance forms per- 
formed during those years in Andalus- 
ian villages. 

"It’s not all serious, Hoyos said. I 
show the caricatures — a flower in the 
mouth, eyes flashing.” ate demon- 
strates, and her dancers burst out laugh 
ing. 

The second premiere, 'Area y 
Toma" (the phrase is the one the Span 
ish call out to spur on flamenco per 
formers), is based on four different ira 
ditional dances, choreographed by If 
Hoyos, Ramon Oiler and Mann. (The 
costumes are by Christian Lacroix.) To 
these. Hoyos adds the balletic quality of 
classical Spanish dance and the expans 
iveness of modem dance. 

But learning to put these elements 
together took time. Over lunch in town 
at Sebastian, her favorite restaurant, 
Hoyos said: “Here in Seville I work out 
my choreography, alone for hours, just 
as I did as a Urtle girl. I had a very big 
inferiority complex then because I was 
skinny and had bad skin. But my father 
told me: ‘Don’t worry. It’s the art that 
matters, the passion. You will be the 
most wonderful dancer in the world.’ " 
Smiling, she added, “I believed him." 



Dior's slim-line toile de jouy dress. 

Are a handful of shapes in a few 
different fabrics enough for a runway 
show? If noL try cool styling tricks. For 
Ennio Capasa at Costume National that 
meant slinging a pantsuit jacket always 
over the shoulders. The heart of the 
show was in cropped tops, slim skirts 
and simple shapes with an asymmetric 
twist, lliey were in a palette of black, 
gray and sparkling silver, and were 
modem without being especially in- 
ventive. 

It was back to the boudoir — and how 
— at Collette Dinnigan’s show. The 
Australian designer started out in linger- 
ie and she transparently hankers after a 
world where a lacy dress goes over 
nothing but a bare body and a pair of 
panties. However well done, this look is 
on the wane — unless it is made user- 
friendly with underlayers. Galliano was 
the first to launch the blow-away dress 
and visible underpants in 1989. It is high 
time for fashion to lay it to rest 


Royalty, Voodoo and Nazi Gold 


By Sheridan Morley 

Imematiotul Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — My father, who 
knew a thing or two about these 
matters, having speni a long 
lifetime reading several thou- 
sand thrillers, reckoned that in this cen- 
tury there were really only two perfect 
murders. By this, be didn't just mean 
murders in which the killers never got 
caught, but murders containing just the 
right degree of historical and social in- 
terest, and snobbery with violence, to 
justify their continued discussion de- 
cades after the bloody events them- 
selves. - 

Intriguingly, both took place m ex- 
patriate communities within a year or 
two of each other early in World War H. 
The first of these was die “Happy Val- 
ley" murder in Kenya, winch became 
James Fox’s celebrated book and film 
“White Mischief’ and eerily echoed 
Somerset Mangham’s “The Letter,” 
written some 20 years earlier, the second 
was the - Harry Oakes murder in 1943 
Nassau, which now forms at least a pan 
of Snoo Wilson’s new drama, "HRH,” 
at the Playhouse. 

Well, kind of new; this script was tried 
out on the road a couple of years ago with 
a different cast and director, and there is 
a sense in which it still looks like a work 
in progress; but the murder at its heart is 
still utterly engrossing. 

Briefly, Sir Harry Oakes was a larger- 
than-life gold prospector who, by now 
the “uncrowned King" of the Bahamas, 
was found by his staff one morning 
extremely and violently dead in his 
blood-soaked bed. 

The clear suspect was a man deeply 
involved in a Nazi black-market banking 
system that was also being used by the 
current governor general of the Ba- 
hamas. rearful that the killer, if charged, 
would give them all away, the governor 
forbade any investigation by the local 
police and instead brought in a tame 
police captain from Miami to frame an- 
other suspect, the case against whom 
finally collapsed. The requisite extra fris- 
son comes from the fact that the governor 
in question was the Duke of Windsor. 

So here we have it all: royalty, Nazi 
gold, even voodoo, since the unfortu- 
nate Sir Harry was found dead with a 
great many chicken feathers around his 
bedroom. Was he perhaps pecked to 
death by an enraged, pro-German moth- 
er hen? No such luck; but in, surpris- 
ingly, the first script about Oakes (there 
have been several books), Wilson gives 



i 


Lfnfrcrcil Pfcmra Pra 

Simon Callow, director of u HRH ’’ 

a reasonable account of the murder even 
if it does, like so much else here, have to 
happen offstage. “HRH” is a two- 
handed dialogue in which the duke and 
duchess discuss and debate and dissect 
their extraordinarily unhappy post-ab- 
dication lives across a two-hour play 
that somehow never quite becomes as 
exciting or involving as the amazing 
events it describes. 

If we didn't know any better, it might 
be assumed thai “HRH" had been hast- 
ily cobbled together to cash in on the 
current British obsession with the past 
and future of the monarchy. Instead, 
Wilson has tried to combine an Agatha 
Christie whodunit, an Edward Albee 
dissection of a marriage gone rancid, a 
Tennessee Williams account of sexual 
frenzy in the heat of the beach and a 
Noel Coward satire about mad dogs and 
Englishmen out in the midday sun. The 
result is, unsurprisingly, something of a 
mishmash; the surprise is how well 
much of it works. 

The actor and author Simon Callow 
has come up with a wonderfully nervy 
staging on Christopher Woods’s bril- 
liantly tropical set. As for the actors, 
Amanda Donoboe is a perfect Wallis 


CROSSWORD 


Windsor, all pearls and petulance, while 
Corin Redgrave, not often an actor I 
admire, manages an equally impressive 
look-alike Edward VE finding within 
him surprising reserves of schoolboyish 
charm rather like Stan Laurel on speed. 
The trouble is that you still can't see the 
Oakes for the trees. 

Coincidentally, the other major West 
End opening of the week is also set in 
1943, though there all resemblance 
ends. Matthew Bourne's stunning new 
ballet “Cinderella" (at the Piccadilly) 
is a work of considerable genius based 
on one very simple juxtaposition: The 
ball to which this Cinderella goes is not 
set in just any Blitzed ballroom of that 
year. It is clearly meant to be the Caff de 
Paris on die night when Snakehips John- 
son and many of his jazz followers were 
killed by a bomb, the night when police 
bad to fire on looters (in fact fellow 
nightclubbers) trying to tear jewelry off 

die lifeless limbs of . , ___ 

those less fortunate 

than themselves. It was' 

not the finest hour of kk offo 
brave Londoners sur- DC! J 
viving air raids, and 
perhaps for that reason 
the story seldom is retold; but it per- 
fectly suits Bourne's dark vision of a 
Cinders whose father is in a wheelchair, 
and whose stepmother is Lynn Seymour 
doing die full Wicked Witch of the 
West, halfway between Joan Crawford 
and Joan Collins. 

Time and again in this dazzlingly 
dramatic evening. Bourne has similar 
insights into the way in which the old 
pantomime myth can be specifically 
dated and danced to give it a precise 
reference. It brings ballet into the West 
End on an e igh t-s ho ws - a - week basis 
unknown in the 70 years since 
Diaghilev (unless you count the transfer 
of Bourne’s own “Swan Lake” last 
year) and sets the reborn “Cinderella" 
alongside “Phantom" and “Miss Sai- 
gon' as a long-run musical hit Whether 
in the dance of death at the CaftS de Paris 
or in a brief encounter on a station 
platform, this is an astonishingly 
dreamy and dramatic evening, the kind 
that was only the 1940s movie property 
until now of Powell and Press burger. ** 

Quite clearly, if a little early, it is the (J 
Christmas near for all ages, each of 
whom will find something special here 
to take away forever. Not since the Alan 
Bennett's “Wind in the Willows" has 
there been a spectacular that manages 
simultaneously to celebrate and criticize 
its own frames of reference quite so 
triumphantly. 


ACROSS 
« South Seas 
paradise 
■ Put in me cup 
ie Attempt 

14" a 

Teen-Age 
WerewoJT 
tS Taste stimulus 

1*1870 Kinks hit 

ii Sci-fi weapon, 
fermdly? 

« ’A Prayer tor 


So Hedy wars 

ai Had title to 
» With it. once 

23 Neptune's 
domain 

24 Growing locale 


as Highway sight. 

formally? 
ai Elaborate 
tapesuy 
34 Gl. with 

chevrons 
*S Craaby. StiBs 
ana Nash, e.g. 

3* Cate an 

*7 TWo-tune u.5. 

Open tennis 
Champ 
stBedevtters 

40 Ferrara family 
name 

41 Dream Team's 
tearti 

4z Armed band 
43 Western chow 
dispenser, . 
formafly? 


47 Rais run it 
4* Ad word 
4* Unexplained 
S3 Man of many 
words 

“Sensational 

headline 

•7 One gone but 

not forgotten 
*e 1830'fi design 
style, formality? 

*0 No-show’s 
score 

■i Vidal Sassoon's 
workplace 
*2 Turkish bigwigs 


Solution to Puzzle of Oct. 14 


□□on sans aanaa 
ciaHGi aasg □□□na 
□ana anisa Banian 
QnaHsnnaanjnaaa 
□sag nan 
oaamHaHHanBaaQ 
qqeihh sana aaa 
sqhb Sanaa antna 
□□□ □Hina naciaa 
assGiaHEHDsaaaaia 
HQE aasa 
. □□□□□Qcuaaaaaaa 
laaaaa saaa uacoa 
[□□□aa saaiD aaaa 
lasEiaa gihhb aana 


M Dubbing need 
es Giant great 


1 Hazel's cousin 

2 In the know 

3 Mchaaf Jordan 
shot 

4 Doctrines 

9 "Water Music" 
composer 

* Tough going 

7 Captain Wrk’a 
records 

a Feathered 
six-footer 

8 Fancy one 

Id Replay feature 
ii Atlas dot 
is Sheltered. 
nauticaHy 


13 Boston or 
Chicago, e.g. 

« Kalahari 
stopover 

« Celestial sphere 
m Mug 

» Book after Joel 
» Summer snack 
27 Archie or Edith. 

to Mike 
» Weaponry 
29 Tears 

so id cc, perhaps 

31 He played 
Obi-wan 

32 Baby's problem 

33 The Beaties.' 
meter maid 

37 Red Sea access 
3s Being, to 
Caesar 
42 Authority 
** Back muscle. 

tor short 
41 Rattier. *.g. 

44 Verb- turned- 
noun 

4» The end. in 

Athens 
eo Rot 

a* Smelting refuse 
92 Bring down the 
house 

53 Had markers 
rprf . 

C4 Reason tor an 
R rating 


iuiHimaiii 

^■h iii ana 

«H iiiii hiiS 

nil HU U^H 

aiiiaiiiian 


il!ia aaliiiiiii 


mi aam am 


©New York Times/Edited by Will Short* 


M Historic 

Normandy city 

*Reaidenjof 
63- Across 
n Balaam's moont 
*• Cow and wet 


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!' ] 


PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL 


Power Shift to Berlin Stirs Mixed Emotions in Germany 


By William Drozdiak 

Washingimt Past Service 

BERLIN — A glass dome now 
crowns the Reichstag building, soon to 
reclaim its place as the seat of Ger- 
many's Parliament. New embassies for 
the United States, France and Britain are 
sprouting up next to the Brandenburg 
Gate, where the Wall that fell in 1989 
divided the onetime heart of Berlin, 
And the legendary Hotel Adlon, in 
prewar decades the society gathering 
place for Berliners and visitors, rulers 
and royalty, has been resurrected to 
welcome tycoons, princes and film stars 
to the new. and old, capital 
The S10 billion move that will trans- 
fer Germany’s government over the 
next two years from Bonn to Berlin is 
gathering momentum. Nearly 50,000 
politicians, civil servants, lobbyists, 
diplomats and journalists are preparing 
to pack, their bags and depart the tranquil 
town on the Rhine for the sprawling 
Prussian metropolis. 

"Despite all the naysaying, there is no 
going back," Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
said as he laid the cornerstone for the 
new chancellery building at a ceremony 
late last month. "There is no precedent 
in recent history for the new start that is 


happening in Beilin after more than 50 
yean. It is an extraordinarily exciting 
thing to see. and the world beyond our 
borders is watching, too." 

But large questions still loom over the 
historic return of the nation's capital to 
Berlin, as Germans and their neighbors 
speculate how their faces will be af- 
fected when the political center of grav- 
ity for Europe's economic powerhouse 
moves abruptly from a small town near 
the Belgian rorder to a bustling city just 
50 miles from Poland. 

In the West, some of Germany’s 
European Union partners fear the emer- 
gence of a new geographic axis that will 
push the locus of Europe’s trade, wealth 
and political clout toward the north and 
east Not surprisingly, France is for- 
tifying its ties with Spain. Italy and other 
southern partners known as the "Club 
Med" countries to build a counterweight 
to a potential Teutonic bloc concentrated 
in central and northern Europe. 

In the East, Germany's former com- 
munist neighbors have enthusiastically 
backed the move to Berlin and set aside 
their historic qualms about Prussian ex- 
pansionism. German investors have be- 
come a crucial economic support sys- 
tem for Poland, Russia, Hungary and the 
Czech Republic, where they find a 


warm welcome and flourishing profit 
centers because labor costs are so much 
lower than at home. 

Interviews with German and foreign 
analysts revealed a startling disparity of 
opinion, with some suggesting that the 
move to Berlin could foreshadow a dra- 
matic transformation of Europe, while 
others predicted it may be one of the most 
overblown nonevents in modem history. 

“It is hard for foreigners and Ger- 
mans alike to comprehend the scope of 
such a move," said Richard Holbrooke, 
a former U.S. ambassador to Germany. 
“You have to imagine die American 
capital being shifted from Washington 
to New York, while also being trans- 
planted from one end of the country to 
the other." 

While the burghers in Bonn worry 
about v anishing from the map, Berliners 
are already dreaming about a 21st-cen- 
tury revival of the glory days of the 
Roaring Twenties, when their city flour- 
ished as a sophisticated haven far the arts, 
political philosophy and high finance. 

Richard von Weizsaecker, Germany’s 
respected former president and a former 
mayor of Berlin, sees die city becoming 
the crossroads of the new Europe. 

"It will become the human melting 
pot of the Continent, with Poles , Czechs 


and other Easterners blending their 
ideas and energy with those of Western 
Europeans." he said. “Berlin can be- 
come the showcase of how we should 
build a common future. ' ’ 

Others are not so sanguine. Volker 
Schloendorff. an Oscar-winning film- 
maker, who is supervising a revival of the 
famed Babelsberg studios that once made 
Berlin the world's fihn capital, is trou- 
bled by the city’s aggressive personality, 
which he feels abetted some of Ger- 
many's most disastrous misadventures. 

“I feel a little nervous about this 
move,” he said “There is something in 
the air here That encourages grandiose 
illusions about wielding power. The 
small village of Bonn was son of a 
symbol for a meek and timid Germany. 
But when those legislators move into 
the Reichstag, which is four times the 
size of the British House of Commons, 
they are bound to think differently about 
their place in the world." 

Mr. Schloendorff, who spent many 
years living in France, acknowledges 
that his views may be shaped by France 1 s 
constant anxiety that its most vital part- 
ner may grow alienated in a new eastern 
orientation that Could ultimately provoke 
a divorce for what has been called the 
European Union's “power couple." 


But former Chancellor Helmut 
Schmidt, a Hamburg native who scorns 
Berlin's pretensions about becoming 
new global power center, says France s 
worries are grossly exaggerated. 

“I know tile French well, and they are 
too influenced by ancient history," Mr. 

Schnndt said "iW always wony about 

Germany and Russia teaming np against 
them, but that is part of their national 
reflex since die Napoleonic wars. 

“Yet Russia today is far too weak to 
replace France as Germany's partner, 
what do the R ussians have to oner us? 
The only exception might be if France 
turns its back on European integration. 
Then Germany would have no choice 

but to look east.” 

Mr. Schmidt said he believed Berlin 
would never recapture its dynamism. 

“A lot of companies will never go 
frpftir there because their headquarters 
are too well established,” he said. “Anti 
Berlin has lost a lot of the human capital 
that once made it great.” He said he was 
mainly talking about the Jews who con- 
tributed to Berlin's strength in banking, 
publishing and entertainment. 1 ’ 

Josef Joffe, an editorialist at Sued- 
deutsebe Zeitung, a leading German 
newspaper, also forecasts that Berlin's 
dreams, of world prominence will 



.. . , , . 

••a ht 


NYT 


burst like an over-inflated balloon! 

“None of Germany's big cities wil! 
surrender without fighting for theiij 
lives," he said “You can be sure that 
Stuttgart will hold tight to Mercedes-; 
Benz and Munich will make sure that 
BMW remains part of its identity. Be- 1 
sides, computers and high-speed train^ 
will make it ever easier for people tdi 
handle their business so they don’t have 
to move to Berlin." 

Moreover, those companies that have; 
explored moving their headquarters to 
Berlin have found that indemnity costa 
to employees who refuse to transfer 
would be too exorbitant to bear. 


Hotels Put Out an Unwelcome 
For Accused Ex-Vichy Official 




Reuters 

BORDEAUX — All the hotels in 
Bordeaux ore full — if your name is 
Maurice Papon. 

The former Vichy official, accused 
of being a Nazi war collaborator, has 
found doors in this southwestern 
French city and its region slamming in 
his face since a ruling Friday freed him 
from custody during his trial for crimes 
against humanity. In France, defen- 
dants. especially those who are charged 
with grave crimes, are usually held in 
custody during the proceedings. 

"We told ttim to leave by midday,” 
said Christophe Lacroix, head of the 
exclusive La Reserve hotel in Pessac, 
near Bordeaux, where Mr. Papon 
stayed two nights. 

“He won't stay with us tonight!" 
Mr. Lacroix said Tuesday after about 
100 protesters demonstrated outside his 
hotel Monday night yelling “Papon 
assassin" and "Papon to jaiL” 

Mr. Papon, 87, had to leave his first 
post-prison residence, the Luxury Relais 
Margaux hotel, set among the vine- 
ards in the Medoc countryside, on 
unday after spending only two nights 
there, too. 


I 


Mr. Lacroix said Mr. Papon's pres- 
ence at La Reserve meant the 22-room 
hotel could not guarantee peace or se- 
curity for any guests. Mr. Papon had to 
eat his meals in his room, he added. 

The staff has been bombarded with 
threatening phone calls accusing them 
of being "collaborators," "fascists" 
or “Nazis," he said. One caller asked 
"Have you got a room with gas? Any 
place left in your ovens?" 

Mr. Papon, a senior regional admin- 
istrator in the collaborationist Vichy re- 
gime during the war, is being tried in 
connection with the arrest and depor- 
tation of 1 ,560 Jews, including 223 chil- 
dren. Nearly all of them were gassed at 
the Auschwitz concentration camp. 

Many hotels in Bordeaux, fearing 
Mr. Papon's presence would damage 
business, have announced he is un- 
welcome, skirting French laws requir- 
ing hotels to show hospitality to alL 
Remaridng that he had been trans- 
formed into a real estate agent, his 
lawyer, Jean-Marc Varaut, asked jour- 
nalists to run a classified advertisement 
in their newspapers saying: “Seeking 
isolated house, four rooms, small kit- 
chen." 



Maurice Papon, left, helped by his son, leaving an exclusive hotel near 
Bordeaux on Tuesday. The management forced Mr. Papon to check out. 


Kohl’s Party Presents 
Its Vision for 21st Century 


The Associated Press 

LEIPZIG — Laying oat its vision of 
21st-century Germany, Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's jtarty on Tuesday called 
for deregulation, income-tax cuts and a 
new spirit of risk-taking to fight record 
unemployment. 

Wolfgang Schaeuble, the Christian 
Democratic Union's parliamentary 
leader, said Germany was struggling to 
remain competitive in a global economy 
because people had come to rely on the 
government and the welfare state. 

“We must see globalization not only 
as a threat but also as a chance," Mr. 
Schaeuble told delegates at a national 
convention called to sharpen the party’s 
message before the federal elections 
next September. Delegates backed Mr. 
Kohl’s bid for a fifth term on Monday. 

Mr. Schaeuble, a key Kohl aide and 
the chancellor’s heir apparent as party 
leader, made a much more direct attack 
on what many see as Germany’s malaise 
than tee chancellor did in his keynote 
speech Monday. 

“The feet that our social-security sys- 
tems are pushing their limits has a lot to 
do with the feet that we've grown ac- 


POVERTY: Even as Europe Grows Richer, the Poor Get Poorer, and Governments Are Not Tackling the Issue 


n 

customed over decades to always call out 
first for tee state," Mr. Schaeuble said. • 
Taking a cue from John F. Kennedy,'- 
Mr. Schaeuble urged Germans to follow 
the myrim, “.Do not ask what your 
country can do for you, ask what you can 
do for your country." 

Mr, Schaeuble urged his party to re- 
assure Germans that the planned com-; ■ 
mon European currency, due to be . 
launched in 1 999, mil be as strong as tee 
Deutsebe mark, which it will replace. 

“The euro will come, and it will be 
stable," be said. 

He promised new measures to improve 
access to risk capital for small and startup, 
firms and further reforms to keep Ger- 
■ many’s social-security system afloat j 
He said Mr. Kohl's government re-!{ 
mained committed to an ambitious cut 
in Germany's Hi gh personal and cor- 
porate taxes that the opposition Social . 
Democrats blocked in Parliament. To 
offset the lost revenues, Mr. Schaeuble 
proposed raising energy taxes. 

Joblessness at postwar records, with 
4.4 million people unemployed, has sent 
Mr. Kohl’s three-party conservative co- 
alition into a tailspin in opinion polls. 


BRIEFLY 


Continued from Page I 

said teat counting tee number of people 
on welfare was not tee definition of 
poverty. 

In terms of the most uncomfortable 
realities, Eurostat, the EU's statistical 
agency, reported in May that 57 million 
Europeans, or 17 percent of tee EU 
population, lived in poor households, 
more than tee 13.7 percent the Census 
Bureau lists as impoverished in tee 
United States. France had 16 percent 
poor households and Germany 13 per- 
cent. while Portugal had 29 percent and 
Greece 24 percent. Officially, tee EU set 
its total of unemployed at 17.9 million 
people in August. 

Perhaps because tee Eurostat survey 
refers to 1993 conditions (and tee EU 
offers no more timely figures to serve as 
an official comparative reference), or 
because 1997 governments felt little re- 
sponsibility for four-year-old numbers, 
publication of the statistics produced 
barely a ripple of indignation or political 
backwash. 

These days. EU countries’ proud no- 
tion that they forever filed the jagged 
edges off capitalism, with real success in 
sharing the national wealth, has tee look 
of a misplaced conceit. 

With the caution of an international 
civil servant and statistician, Mark Pear- 
son of tee Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development de- 
scribed tec reality of Europe's core na- 
tions this way: 

“There is a growing increase in in- 


come from capital, and it is very un- 
equally distributed. Welfare states are 
doing less in income redistribution. We 
know we are not picking up exclusion, 
homelessness, this kind of phenomena, 
in all of the statistics. At the same time 
there has been a marked increase in 
household wealth in countries like 
France or tee U.K. in tee last 15 years. 
Perhaps you can say the extremes are 
increasing.” 

The explanation for tee changes in 
revenue distribution is evident. At the 
lower end of tee income scale, pan-time 
jobs, short-term contracts, and changing 
requirements in job qualifications nave 
combined with general downsizing and 
the use of new technologies to push 
toward poverty large numbers of people 
with limited qualifications. Until re- 
cently. these workers could count on 
full-time, lifetime employment. 

At the higher end, new incentive 
plans, new remuneration packages, new 
methods and new attitudes relating to 
individual investment have made more 
Europeans relatively rich. 

It is literally tee case in countries like 
France and Germany, once tee embod- 
iment of balanced income distribution, 
that tee poor are more impoverished. 
The fact is accompanied by its ancient 
complement: The rich, and the want-to- 
be rich, are getting richer. 

These realities are as palpable as the 
Grand Mufti, chief of Marseille’s Is- 
lamic community, getting his car stolen 
during an official visit to a project down 
the road from La Castellane — but also 


in everyday stories about vast stock op- 
tions at Canal Plus, the French pay-TV 
operator, or in Frankfurt lawyers' in- 
vestments in an East German shipbuild- 
er they have never heard of in order to 
take a tax write-off. 

But a mosaic of recent evidence from 
other sources — tee EU, at its current 
pace, will not get around to analyzing 
income distribution in 1997 until 2001 
— supports the case that Europe is ex- 
periencing poverty whose extent few 
national governments are eager to ad- 
mit. 

Beyond tee increases in unemploy- 
ment over the past four years, and the 
nearly half-million jobs lost in Germany 
in tee past 12 months, there were these 
signposts: 

• in France, tee soup kitchens called 
Les Restos du Coeur served 31 million 
meals in 1992-93. In 1996-97, the total 
was 61 million. From 1993 to 1996, the 
number of households receiving tee ba- 
sic welfare subsistence payment, tee 
Revenu Minimum d’lnsertion. grew by 
27 percent. Social assistance outlays 
from tee regional administrative dis- 
tricts rose 255 percent from 1990 to 
1996, compared with a 40 percent in- 
crease in tee preceding five years. Just in 
tee last few weeks, tee state telephone 
company gave homelessness institution- 
al status, virtually on the level of tee 
police department or fire brigade, when 
ii created a 3-digit number (115) for 
assistance to people living on tee 
street 

• In Germany, tee number of welfare 


recipients increased 9.1 percent in 1995. 
In Frankfurt, the city of Gennany’s 
banks and its booming stock exchange 
and tee future home of tee European 
Central Bank, one in five residents has 
fallen below tee poverty threshold. Ger- 
hard Seiler, president of the German 
Association of Cities, has estimated that 
welfare costs for tee country’s muni- 
cipalities tripled over the last 10 years. 

Away from tee obvious symbols of 
deprivation like La Castellane, there is 
also a patchwork of details from .every- 
day life that startle in their contradiction 
of Europe’s old assumptions. 

Erast-Ulricb Huster, rector of the uni- 
versity at Bochum, Germany, and one of 
tee country's leading experts onpoverty, 
told of walking through Frankfort on a 
Sunday a few weeks ago and watching a 
“group of three men pulling half-eaten 
food out of a Dumpster in an alley be- 
hind a McDonald’s.” 

“I have never seen teat before,” he 
said. 

In the Netherlands, tee Catholic bish- 
op of Breda, M. P. M. Muskens, said he 
thought an increase in poverty required 
him to call on tee people he identified as 
tee country's 100,000 millionaires to 
give a quarter of their total 250 billion 
guilders (SI 27 billion) to tee poor. If 
necessary, tee bishop insisted, a poor . 
man could steal bread 

Last monte, Sueddeutsche Zeitung of 
Munich published a long article on tee 
needy in the Jewish community of An- 
twerp, Europe's diamond trading center, 
quoting from an appeal to donors in tee 


STATS: Lack of Current EU Data Obscures Growing Income Gap 


Continued from Page 1 


has no official position on what evidence 
from other sources suggests is tee cur- 
rent implosion of the European ideal of 
fair income distribution. Basically. 
Europe deals publicly with poverty and 
wealth in a statistical frame of reference 
that ends m 1993. before apartheid was 
abolished in South Africa and when 
George Bush was still president of the 
United States. 

Whether left or right, that circum- 
stance seems to suit tee EU's national 
governments fine. It diffuses responsi- 
bility. waters down the topicality of dis- 
cussions of rich and poor, and forces 
independent research on disparities in 


wealth to collate and extrapolate material 
from a wide range of unequal sources. 

“In Germany, we know how many 
plum trees we have," said Ernst-Uhich 
Huster of Bochum University. “And 
how many suckling pigs are bom each 
year. AH this can be found in the year- 
book from tee Federal Statistical Office. 
But the data on income and inequality 
make for a very desperate situation in 
Germany." 

This goes along with the officially 
stated Bonn position that poverty does 
not exist in Germany because available 
social benefits eliminate it. With a current 
four-year lag in tee publication of income 
statistics by the government, tee Social 
Democratic opposition says tee govern- 


Slovenia Gets 2- Year Seat on Security Council 


New Ytvk Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New York — 
Slovenia on Tuesday became tee first 
former Yugoslav republic to be elected 
to a rotating seat on the United Nations 
Security Council. 

Slovenia, which joined the United Na- 
tions as an independent nation in 1992, 
will be one of three nations to take a 
council seat for tee first time. The others 
are Bahrain and Gambia. 

Brazil and Gabon, which have served 
on tee council in the past, were also 


elected. The new members will take 
their seats Jan. 1. 

They will succeed Chile. Egypt, 
Guinea-Bissau, Korea and Poland. Ro- 
tating council members serve two-year 
terms and do not have veto rights. The 
five nonpermanent members with a year 
remaining on the council are Costa Rica, 
Japan, Kenya, Portugal and Sweden. 
The five permanent members with die 
jwer to veto council resolutions ore 
Iritain, China. Ranee, Russia and the 
United States. 


ing Christian Democrats apparently feel 
no pressure to furnish timely statistics. 

Although much evidence in the area 
of unemployment and welfare benefits 
points toward greater divisions between 
rich and poor over the past four years, a 
study on household revenue released 
only last monte by the French statistical 
service used the EU's 1993 data as a 
central reference point. 

Beyond that, the service said, "since 
1994 for all of France, no real tendency 
has emerged in tee evolution of tee stan- 
dard of hving, inequality or poverty." 
Yet at the same time it acknowledged 
that this assertion was based mi a single 
investigation teat contained “certain 
variations linked to its small sample.” 

If current information on the poor in 
Europe is difficult to obtain, parallel data 
on the rich is even harder. 

“The wealth statistics are hopeless," 
said Mark Pearson of tee Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment, which like tee EU's statistical 
agency is dependent on national gov- 
ernments for its figures. “It's easier to 
track wealth in the States." 

But there is no discernible pressure 
from within tee EU 's executive body, the 
European Commission, to speed up and 
sharpen the repenting process and move 
the issue of poor and rich from its near- 
archival status to that of current events. 

"If we throw tee doors wide open and 


The EU s Have-Nots 


Percentage of households below the 
poverty fine (defined, separately by 
country, as one-half of average 
household income). 1993 figures 



FRANCE mm ***” 
LUXEMBOURG 
NETHERLANDS 1 
BELGIUM 
GERMANY 


DENMARK 



Source: 


an 


say dungs are very bad, and we haven’t 
admitted all of it, the doors will close right 
away again," Mr. Jonckere said. “No 
society has ever dealr well with these 
problems. It’s a process. of little steps." 


b ■ 


Dutch community’s weekly newspaper 
that said: “Our city is in need, our com- 
munity is in need. Much more need than 
we have long believed.” 

In the Norte Marseille districts where 
La Castellane and tee majority of the 
city’s bousing projects are situated, the 
most recent figures on poverty (referring 
to 1993 and provided last week by tee 
national statistics institute) give an of- 
ficial range of 22 percent to 26 percent of 
the residents. 

But Jean-Louis Lery, who directs the 
Marseille operations of Secours Cate- 
olique, the national Catholic welfare 
agency, and who offered tee observa- 
tions about the buildings in the projects 
where no one went to work, said that on 
his turf, whatever the official version, 
more people were getting poorer than 
richer. 

The new poo:, he said, are accom- 
panied now by second arid third gen- 
erations of wdfare families, with the 
new poor increasingly being pushed into 
miserable private housing and tee equiv- 
alent of welfare hotels. One of tee most 
troubling developments of the past few 
years, he said, was the very tangible 
breakdown of families in the projects, 
particularly the Arab families tear, make 
up a large proportion of the residents. 

“You have Arab street lrids now, 13 
or 15,' ’ he said. * They live in a doorway 
or something. That was inconceivable 
before. There was always somebody, 
somehow who was responsible. That’s 
gone, that’s broken. Do you know what 
teat means?” 

Sister Bernadette Berger, who has 

been a resident and a social worker in the 
projects for 30 years, said the essential 
changes these last years was "tee hope- 
lessness." 

“Kids die from overdoses," she said. 
“Kids commit suicide. Thee are no 
jobs.” 

But appearances have been kept up. 
At another housing project called La 
Bricaide, a group of women has founded 
a restaurant. Down the road at La Cas- 
tellane the social services center was 
shut because of violence, but at La Bri- 
carde subsidies from several groups 
made it possible to serve meals to kids 
for 10 francs ($1.70) and everyone else 
for 45 francs. Delegations, television 

teams and recently a bus full of Germans 

have been drawn, in some wonderment, 

to the restaurant and its view out over the 

sea. 

Marie-Rose Devita, one of the women 
active in starting the restaurant, said a 
young person with tee German group 
had her purse stolen. This, Ms. Devita 
remarked, could have really ban the 
place’s reputation. 

“So I got a couple of kids I know,” 
she said, “and I said, ’I want that bag 
back.’ The kids said if whoever took it 

was from tee projects , teey would find it 
And in half an hour they were back with 
tee bog, all tee papers and everything. 
Not the money, but, hey, what did you 
expect?" 

Tomorrow: The subtle signs of 
Europe’s new wealth. . 


Chernomyrdin Hint 
Over Resignation 

MOSCOW — Prime Minister 
Viktor Chernomyrdin raised the 
stakes Tuesday in the government’s 
confrontation with Russia’s hard- 
line Parliament, suggesting that he 
might resign if lawmakers approve 
a no-confidence motion. 

The lower house, the State Duma, 
is expected to hold the vote 
Wednesday. If approved, it would 
have no legal effect unless followed 
by a second vote within 90 days. 

But in a nationally broadcast 
statement, Mr. Chernomyrdin said 
the government would not wait three 
months to resolve tee conflict. (AP) 

Athens to Protest 
Turkish Flights 

ATHENS — Greece said Tuesday 
teat it would protest to Turkey over 
alleged airspace violations, includ- 
ing the buzzing of a plane taking tee 
Greek defense minister to Cyprus. 

Athens will also call in tee am- 
bassadors of its European Union 
allies and tee acting U.S. ambas- 
sador to brief them on what it says 
are scores of violations by Turkish 
jets since Sunday. 

Greece said Monday that two 
Turkish F-16s harassed a Hercules 
C-130 taking Defense Minister 
Alps Tsoharzopoulos to Cyprus, bur 
Ankara denied it. (Reuters) 

Book Brings Suit 

MARSEILLE — A former cab- 
inet minister is suing the authors and 
publisher of a book that incrim- 
inates him and another politician in 
the 1994 death of a lawmaker, his ’ 
lawyer said Tuesday, a day after 
sales of tee book were suspended. 

Mayor Jean-Claude Gaudin of 
Marseille, who was urban affairs 
ntinister, is seeking 10 million francs 
($1.7 million) over allegati ons in 
“The Yann Piat Affair, Assassins at 
thn Heart of Power,” the lawyer 
said. Yann Piat, an anti-corruption 
crusader, was shot to death. (AP) 

Polish Missile Deal 

Warsaw — The polish gov- 
ernment has signed an agreement 
paying the way for finalizing a $600 
million anti-tank missile deal, of- 
ficials said Tuesday. 

Economy Minister Wieslaw 
Kfczmarek, who signed the pact 
with Israeli government officials 
Monday, said before the cabinet’s 
finnl meeting Tuesday teat Elbit of 
“tael had made tee best offer. (AP) 









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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


RAGE 11 


SPONSORED PAGE 




ro e - 



: Retail 


Gearing Up for Internet Sales 

G ^ Lr ‘ ? P° s ' lfion themselves to take advantage of the Internets commercial 

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the difference. . . 
France's foremost book and 
music store, asked 
IBM to design its six- 
month-old on-line 
shopping site {http;// 
www.ftrac.fr) to cater 
to either profile. Rapid 
navigation tools and 
key-word searches aid 
the shopper short on 
time, while video 
clips, graphics and 
new product an- 
nouncements entertain 
the browser. 

FNAC's hip young 
shoppers may appear 
quite different from, say, the 
suppliers and customers in 
General Electric’s multibil- 
lion-dollar “extended enter- 
prise,’’ but the underlying 
attractions of speed, reach 
and cost efficiencies are the 
same. 

Today’s market 
What is the size of the mar- 
ket for electronic commerce 
today? international Data 
Corporation (IDC). a tech- 
nology market research 
firm, puts it at S2.6 billion, 
including both busincss-to- 
business and busrness-to- 
consumer transactions. 

The marker is developing 
with some clear regional dif- 
ferences, observ es Christian 
Nivoix, IBM’s worldwide 
general manager for retail 
and distribution. “In the 
U.S.. we see lots of users and 
lots of Web sites but not a lot 
of profitable Internet-based 
businesses yet Europe is 
more advanced in the use of 



temative.” He says visitors 
to their Web pages often e- 
mail the company to ask for 
catalogues. 

Notwi thstan ding cultural 
differences among countries 
and regions of the world, die 
reasons for developing 
on-line retail capabil- 
ities are the same: to 
extend reach, reduce 
costs, speed up trans- 
action time and devel- 
op or improve custom- 
er loyalty. 

Reach, both the 
number of people you 
can contact and the 
cost of reaching them. 


value (investment, sports 
news and travel services). 

. • Goods and services that 
appeal to special interests 
(hobbies, pornography). 

• Computer-related pro- 
ducts. 

Inhibitors to retailing over 
the Internet include con- 
cerns about security, tele- 
coms costs, logistics of de- 
livery and legal issues. 



A.-*- 


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Dramatic growth, but still a 
small percentage of the $223 
billion die firm calculates for 
e-commerce worldwide in 
2001 . 

Although North America 
will still be commanding the 
lion's share of that business, 
Asia will play an important 
role. The Japanese market is 
“one of die most dynamic in 
the world,” reports FIND/ 
SVP, a consumer research 
firm, noting that 60 percent 
of the Japanese currently 
connected have made pur- 
chases on tiie Internet, 
primarily from American 
companies. FIN D/S VP pre- 
dicts that 10 million Japa- 
nese will be on-line by the 
year 2000, while IDC es- 
timates almost 32 million. 

At the same time, claims 
IDC, there will be over 35 
million Internet users in 
Western Europe, counting 
both home and business ac- 
cess. 

The most realistic retail- 
smart cards, and France in ers in all three regions may 
'gprticular is used to buying not be looking for increased 
on-line over the Mviiitel. In "sales at the outset, but expect' 


Japan, there is a tremendous 
problem of lack of space, so 
stores have expanded rap- 
idly as virtual stores and 
kiosks.” 

JF.FSA Central, a Japa- 
nese home-furnishings 
group, is using in-store PCs 
connected to an intranet to 
overcome the space problem 
and to improve sales service. 
Customers can input de- 
scriptions of what they're 
looking for and get up-to- 
datc product and delivery in- 


to gain from increased pub- 
licity, a positive image and 
experience in new shopping 
patterns for their customers. 

L.L. Bean, a mail-order 
retailer of outdoor apparel 
and equipment based in 
Maine, put up a Web site 
(http://www.llbean.cam) in 
1995 and began selling via 
the site in November 1996. 

Leon A. Gorman, pres- 
ident of L.L. Bean, says, 
“The Internet is the most 
significant medium to come 


Security 

Security is the number one 
concern about e-commerce 
for businesses and con- 
sumers alike. Ferenc 
Szelenyi, an IBM manager 
responsible for SET in 
Europe, the Middle East and 
Africa, says that security as a 
technical issue no longer ex- 
ists. “The technology is not 
a problem,” he explains. 
“What takes time are the 
is.liznitedonly by the. different legislative, norms 
penetration of the In- and regulations.” 

The SET (Secure Elec- 
tronic Transactions) stan- 
dard, developed by a con- 
sortium of credit card 
companies, IBM and other 
major infbmratiotHechnol- 
ogy companies, uses en- 
cryption technology to safe- 
guard credit card purchases 
over the Internet and in- 
cludes “digital signatures” 
that confirm the identities of 
all theparties involved in the 
transaction. 

Mr. Szelenyi reports that 
there are now 39 SET pilots 
worldwide. By mid-1998, 
they will be operational, and 
there will be pilqts in 100 
more countries that incor- 
porate all kinds of payment 
methods. Once SET is rolled 
out, says Mr. Szelenyi, cus- 
tomers will be safer making 
payments in marketspace 
than they are using then- 
credit cards on Main Street. 

Telecom costs have been 
coming down in Europe in 
anticipation of deregulation 
next year, and tins trend is 
expected to continue. In- 
Wbat sells on the Net deed the trend toward de- 
Althoqgh almost any busi- regulation of the telecom- 
ness can gain from Internet munications industry and 


Wide /he global market for 
electronic commerce is just 
now emerging, ft wB grow 
to $223 btton by 2001 from 
$2£bShn in 1996, according 
to BXZ a technology martet 
research firm. Whde taking 
retail operations to the Web 
may not greatty increase 
sabs immerfiatefy, far- 
sighted retailers are getting 
invoked in projects that let 
them gam experience in 
setSng on'the Net hcreased 
pubficSy, a positive image 
and e x perience at new 
shopping patterns for Mr 
customers am other reasons 
died for engaging 
in e-commerce. 


temet itself. In July, 
the International Tele- 
communication Union es- 
timated the number of hosts 
at 1 9.5 million, which trans- 
lates into about 78 million 
people. 

For General Motors, the 
cost of setting up a pur- 
chase order went from $57 
to just 14 cents when it 
started using the Internet to 
reach its dealers. The man- 
■ uiac turing giant Navistar 
saved $ 1 67 million the first 
year it used electronic data 
interchange, or EDI, to 
communicate with its cus- 
tomers, vendors and other 
trading partners. 

Customer loyalty comes 
from service: the richer and 
more personalized foe ser- 
vice, the greater the loyalty. 
E-commerce makes it pbs- 
sibleto personalize informa- 
tion on a customer-by-cus- 
tomer basis, something no 
other direct marketing me- 
dium can do as cost-effi- 
ciently. 



access, some product cat- 
egories are more suited to 
consumer sales than others. 

A report to be released 
this month by Ovum, a mar- 
keting consultancy, says that 
“a small cadre of often-re- 
used success stories” fit into 
four categories: 

• Small value consumer 
goods (CDs, flowers, wine, 
books) that people have 
been used to buying by tele- 
phone or mail order 

• Information with time 


lower prices is a global 
one. 

The solution to logistics 
problems will vary from 
product to product and in- 
dustry to industry. The suc- 
ces ofAmazon.com, foe In- 
ternet-based bookseller, is 
due in part to its location in 
Seattle, Washington, close 
to one of America’s largest 
book distributors. 

Posten SDS, a Norwegian 
company whose main busi- 
ness is outsourcing, but 


which also runs an electronic 
shopping mall, is conveni- 
ently owned by the national 
postal system of Norway 
(Posten). “We are very well 
established with an excellent 
distribution chain,” says 
Vidar Sandvik. director of 
business development for 
Internet activities for Posten. 
“We can guarantee door-to- 
door delivery." 

Not every business has 
such direct ties to a national 
postal system, so companies 
are experimenting with a 
variety of delivery 


strategies. Some are restrict- 
ing delivery to specific 
demographic areas. Others 
are offering widespread 
home delivery through cour- 
ier services. Still others are 
exploring delivery to of- 
fices. 

Taxation and legal-juris- 
diction issues may best be 
handled by a laissez-faire 
policy for now until a critical 
mass of customers is 
reached, suggests Rosemary 
O’Mahony. managing part- 
ner. e-commerce, Europe, 
for Andersen Consulting. • 


For more information on e-BusHvess: 

Contact IBM by e-mail at kbousquet@fr.ibm.com or by fax at 
+331418852 50. 

Look for the “Business to eBusiness" series on the IHTWeb 
site at http://www.iht.com/IHT/SUP/ebiz.html/ 

The Web version of "Business to e-Business: Retail" hotlinks 
the foltowirg key words to other relevant Web sites: 

• Electronic commerce • Smart cards • EDI 

• Secure Electronic Transactions • Customer service 

• Data mining • IBM Global Network • Net.Commeroe 


.... 






V 


* 


Web Malls and Branding 


Should a retailer stand 
alone m marketspace or set 
its storefront in a virtual 
mall? To answer this ques- 
tion, one of the most im- 
portant considerations for 
retailers to ponder is their 
brand strategy. 

"Brand is essential In e- 
commerce,” says Christian 
Nivoix. IBM's worldwide gen- 
eral manager for retail and 
distribution. He cites U.S. 
clothing marketers L.L Bean 
and Levi’s jeans as ex- 
ampfes of companies that 
have added ©channels to 
ihe* distribution. 

Brands don’t have to be 
household names, however, 
to cave out a niche on the 
Web. He notes that 
Amazon.com (http:// 
www.amazon.com). the vir- 
tual bookseller, is a Web- 
created brand. Its success, 
says Mr. Nivoix, has come 
from “efficiency and value- 
added services like ch 01 
moms with authors, wide 
choice and low prices." 

For retailers who do not 
have the worldwide brand re- 
cognition of Levi’s jeans, 
grouping with others in a 
Web shopping mall may be 
an alternative. The mall it- 
self may provide a orand- j* 
opportunity to ease Into the 
commerce market and the 
lower costs that can come 
from a shared project. 

There are more than 
4,000 cybermalls today. 
Some are 

theme, like Monaco Shop- 

pmg 

assas? 

afity as a branding strategy- 



11 

mu 

^■^ZS?ZZ£2SSr--v.- -^"wg.Tifr-xm.'g ■r-'sm m- ■ 





The home page of the ‘inyworkT Mamet shopping man 


Some are intended as ex- 
periments. This is the case 
with SurfAndBuy (http:// 
www.sitffondtxjy.com). a 
50-store French project de- 
buting Oct 15 for a limited 
twomonth period. Amaud 
Meunier, the project's team 
leader at IBM France, ex- 
plains. "We are doingthis to 

gain an understanding of the 
French market, and we will 
be analyzing carefully the 
data generated. " Participat- 
ing merchants — including 
international names as well 
as artisanal producers — 
also want hands-on experi- 
ence with ecommerce. 

Gaining experience was 
also a motivation for Ger- 
many's Karstadt depart- 
ment store to develop Its on- 
line shopping mail, called 
•■myworkT (http:// 

wvtfw.myworid.de). Just as 

In a “real" mall, Karstadt Is 
the anchor for the 30shop 
mall, which has been online 
for almost a year and av- 
erages 8.000 visits a day. 
According to Ragnar Nfls- 
gon, chief in formation officer 


for the Karstadt' Group, “E- 
commerce revenue Is pre- 
dicted to grow dramatically 
In coming year® and we want 
to be part of 1L" 

Because it is very costly 
to develop a true interactive 
Web site for selling, mails or 
comparable hosted solu- 
tions are a welcome oppor- 
tunity for many businesses. 
‘•With the volatility on the 
Net, you could have 100 hits 
today and a million hits to- 
morrow,” says Bob Lewis. 
IBM ecommerce manager 
for Europe, the Middle East 
and Africa. "These kinds of 
huge fluctuations are a good 
reason for businesses to 
want to rely on someone 
else to handle, change, 
evolve and update their 
sites.” 

Harvard Business School 
professor John SviokJa'has 
Identified three criteria a re- 
tail site must meet regard- 
less of whether fc is “built or 
bought”: "trusted content, 
vfabie economic scale and a 
At with the customer's cur- 
rent buying process." • 


Supply-Side Economics 

Moving the supply chain to the Internet benefits both retailers and suppliers. 

E 


very student of Eco- 
nomics 101 learns 
1 about the classic sup- 
ply chain, in which a man- 
ufacturer makes a product, 
sells it in the marketplace, 
delivers it and waits to repeat 
the cycle. 

In the future, the basic 
economics textbook will 
have to be rewritten, as foe 
Internet transforms supply 
chains into what Andersen 
Consulting calls “the new 
demand chain.” The new 
mode] has also been called 
foe “extended enterprise.” 

In the new demand chain, 
the supplier senses the needs 
of foe retailer and responds 
to them. After foe order is 
filled, foe supplier continues 
to monitor the satisfaction of 
foe client and can suggest 
improvements on an ongo- 
ing basis. 

A precursor to foe exten- 
ded enterprise has been 
around for many years in foe 
form of Electronic Data In- 
terchange. 

EDI is used by 95 percent 
of America’s Fortune 1000 


These limitations effec- 
tively exclude small busi- 
nesses from enjoying its 
benefits. That is not the case 
with foe Internet, whose ad- 
vantages parallel those of 
EDI, but are available to all. 

IBM, ranked first by IDC 
in EDI market share, is 
providing services that make 
it possible for companies 
without such capabilities to 
use customized EDI trans- 
action forms, such as pur- 
chase orders, invoices and 
acknowledgments, on the 
Internet They need only a 
standard Web browser to 
gain access. This levels foe 
playing field between small 
companies and their larger 
competitors. 

Massimiiiano Colombo, 
deputy general manager for 
MIC/Shimano, Italy, a bi- 
cycle-parts and fishing- 
equipment dealer, describes 
his company's service for re- 
tailers on the company’s 
Web site. It offers a cata- 
logue of foe products dis- 
tributed by the company in 
Europe. using IBM’s 


companies, and it offers foe ‘ NeLCommercc software. In 
expected advantages of an addition, retailers can ex- 



electronic network: speed, 
accuracy and cost efficiency. 
Flexibility is increased, in- 
ventory costs are reduced 
and fulfillment by a fixed 
date is standard. “Just-in- 
time” delivery was made 
possible by EDL 
EDI works through 
private networks, however, 
and is not accessible to every 
business with a computer and 
a modem. It requires a pre- 
existing relationship between 
the supplier and the custom- 
er. and it is not interactive. 


change business information 
from foe site. 

MIC and IBM are devel- 
oping a program to link all of 
MlC’s 4,000 bicycle retail- 
ers in Italy so orders can be 
placed directly. 

Though consumers can 
find information on foe site, 
there are no immediate plans 
to sell directly to end users. 
Says. Mr. Colombo. “We 
have invested heavily in our 
dis tribution network, and we 
want to keep our retailers 
happy." 


Capespan International is 
a South African exporter of 
fresh fruits. It was formed in 
1994 to improve foe coun- 
try's competitiveness on 
world markets. 

Speed and safety are all- 
important in this food cat- 
egory, which includes a wide 
range of products and a 
lengthy distribution chain, 
so IBM worked with 
Capespan to improve foe 
flow and volume of infor- 
mation from growers to 
packers to port officials to 
cold-store managers and 
fruit wholesalers. 

Currently, foe system op- 
erates through foe IBM 
Global Network, which sup- 
ports terminal access and 
EDI throughout foe 
“fruitline." Eventually, foe 
system may be extended to 
quality inspectors within foe 
company and to major na- 
tional retailers in Europe. 

The ultimate realization 
of the extended enterprise 
will be a seamless flow of 
information among the cor- 
poration’s intranet (its 
private computer network), 
extranets (foe networks that 
connect companies to one 
another) and foe Internet • 


Getting Closer to Customers 

As retailers large and small, with. offerings simple and 
complex, add an ecommerce channel to their business — 
or start up a business from scratch on the Internet — 
providing service is an issue that both stores and systems 
Integrators must address. 

It is one thing to sell computer equipment to a group of 
technophiles over' the Internet, and another to convince 
Mom that she should buy her groceries that way. 

The former has already happened, and surprisingly, so 
has the latter. 

Christian Nivoix, IBM’s worldwide general manager for 
retail and distribution, cites the example of an Internet- 
based grocery retailer in the United States called Stream- 
line (htfo://www^trM miine.com). 

Orders are taken via the Internet and fulfilled by Stream- 
line’s own out-oftown service center and warehouse. 
Offerings currently include groceries, dry cleaning, film 
processing and shoe repair. 

Delivery is made to a preinstalled container in the 
customer's home (or any designated location) — so the 
customer doesn't even have to be at home. The container 
has separate sections for refrigerated items, frozen food,- 
dry food, plus a clothes hanger and film deposit. 

Streamline benefits from rental costs that are onethird 
those of a normal store, and it can offer services tailored to 
an individual customer's needs. 

A client may receive a weekly shopping list based on 
that household’s consumption patterns, a reminder for 
Items that may be running low or a notice of special offers 
on a favorite brand of cat food or caviar. 

Data mining, sophisticated computer analysis of mar- 
keting information, is the technique that makes this de- 
gree of personalization possible. 

Ulf Johansson, an IBM consultant in retail, calls data 
mining “preemptive marketing." 

Martin Sisley, director of technology vision and re- 
search. Andersen Consulting, cautions that data mining 
can be more difficult than people realize. “The quality of 
data may not be good enough to do what you wait" he 
says. He adds, "ft takes time to incorporate the data 
before a customer can interact with it on-line." 

Although data mining is a marketer’s dream, not all 
customers are comfortable with providing a lot of in- 
formation about their consumption patterns. IBM's Mr. 
Johansson says that the issue is defused when the retailer 
is seen as a “trusted party" by the customer. 

Often customers are willing to supply information to the 
merchant if they are paid, as is done with marketing 
surveys today. 

‘•The winners in the retail business will be those whom 
foe consumer trusts," Mr. Johansson says. 

The winner's circle can be very attractive. Andersen 
Consulting, in a 1996 study, concluded that this new 
"consumer-direct" market for household-related goods 
and services could be worth $60 billion to $85 billion in the 
United States within 10 years. 

Web sites aimed at selling to customers must be easy 
to use. Web buyers need foe same kind of assistance in 
product selection and feature comparisons as traditional 
purchasers. 

The means of providing such assistance should be 
product-specific, because purchasing decisions are made 
differently depending on the product 

A just-released version of IBM’s Net.Commerce soft- 
ware has intelligent catalogue tools with different ways of 
offering Information, so customers can use a shopping 
strategy that best fits their needs. ‘“Sales assistance’ 
helps you identify foe product you want by usage and 
lifestyle, explains Bob Lewis, IBM ecommerce man ager 
for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, “while 'product 
assistance’ helps you identity foe product you want by 
features and functions." • 


“Business to eBusiness: Retail” 

6 the second page in a series that addresses the impact of electronic business on various 
industries. Iris an IHT/IBM intoatiiv sponsored by IBM and produced 
by the fHT Supplements Department. 

Writer: Claudia FJisi, based in Monaco 
Illustrations: Karen Sheckier-Wilson. 

Program Director: BiilMahder. 


FfTERYUTOKiL 






p. 


INTERNATIONAL 


Rebel Brazzaville Militia Says It Took Palace 


C. tn Cur Sufi firm Dbpaxkn 

BRAZZAVILLE, Congo Republic — 
Forces loyal to the Congo Republic’s 
former military leader, Denis Sassou- 
Nguesso, said Tuesday they had cap- 
tured the presidential palace and were 
pushing west through the south of the 
capital, Brazzaville: 

There was no immediate word on the 
whereabouts of President Pascal Lis- 
souba, who is General Sassou- 
Nguesso's rival in the bloody four- 
month power struggle in this oil-pro- 
ducing former French colony. 

“The presidency has now been cap- 


tured,’ ' said a colonel who is spokesman 
for General Sassou-Nguesso’s com- 
manders, adding that Mr. Lissouba had 
not been there at the time. 

Rebel forces also control Brazza- 
ville's Maya Maya international airport, 
another symbolic prize. “We retook the 
airport three days ago,” a rebel com- 
mander said 

The battle is growing more intense, 
with the opposition militia sen ding in jet 
fighters. Witnesses said that a MiG-21 
carried out two raids Monday on south- 
ern Brazzaville, killing about 20 people, 
mostly soldiers in the Makala camp, and 


striking a market in Bacongo, where no 
casualties were reported. 

Until last week, the districts had been 
spared the civil war that has ravaged die 
rest of Brazzaville. However, they have 
become a target for General Sassou- 
Nguesso’s Cobra militia. 

On Tuesday, a French soldier guard- 
ing the embassy in Brazzaville was in- 
jured after several mortar shells fell near 
the mission, which is in an area con- 
trolled by Mr. Lissouba's allies. The 
soldier was not badly injured, the French 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, Jacques 
Rummelhardt, said in Paris. 


A Belgian woman was badly injured 
Tuesday when a shell fired from Brazza- 
ville landed on Belgium’s embassy in 
Kinshasa, the capital of thefonnerZaire, 
official radio said. The woman, a sec- 
retary at the embassy, was not iden- 
tified. 

Shells fired from Brazzaville have 
intermittently landed in Kinshasa, where 
officials have variously blamed them on 
forces loyal to General Sassou-Ngnesso 
or on supporters of the former Zairian 
dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko. Some shells 
are believed to have simply strayed 
across the river. (Reuters, AFP, AP) 



NYT 


BRIEFLY 


Netanyahu 
Gives In to 
Demands by 
Orthodox Jews 


Agenee Fmnce-Presse 

JERUSALEM — Three Jewish re- 
ligious parties said Tuesday that Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had 
bowed to their demands and agreed to a 
parliamentary vote on two bills that 
would guarantee Orthodox Jewish rab- 
bis control over religious affairs. 

Shaul Yahalom, president of the par- 
liamentary commission on laws, said 
Mr. Netanyahu had “given his green 
light*' for a vote on the bills within die 
next three weeks. 

The announcement came after the 
three ponies said they would pull out of 
the ruling coalition unless a law on Or- 
thodox religious control was passed. 

The three religious parties have 23 
deputies in the 66-member ruling co- 
alition and could cause Mr. Netanyahu’s 
government to fall. 

In ari agreement with the parties last 
year, Mr. Netanyahu promised to pass 
legislation ensuring that conversions to 
Judaism in Israel would remain under 
Orthodox control. 

But after the liberal Reform and Con- 
servative movements in Israel and the 
United States demanded that their con- 
verts be considered Jews by Israel, Mr. 
Netanyahu formed a committee to find a 
compromise The Orthodox religious 
parties rejected the committee's con- 
clusions. made public on Monday, that 
would grant the liberal rabbis more 
power over conversions. 

Most American Jews are members of 
one of the liberal movements and U.S. 
Jewish groups have threatened to with- 
hold donations to Israel if Mir. Netan- 
yahu gave in to the Orthodox demands. 

■ Israel Frees Palestinian Money 

Mr. Netanyahu said he had ordered 
Israel’s Treasury to transfer to tire Pal- 
estinian Authority the rest of die tax and 
customs money he froze after a suicide 
bombing in Jerusalem. Reuters report ed. 

In an interview with Israeli Army Ra- 
dio, Mr. Netanyahu said that in light of 
recent positive steps taken by the Pal- 
estinians ' 'in recent weeks on the issue of 
security. I decided this morning to ap- 
prove die balance of the money that we 
suspended at the lime after the attacks.” 

Mr. Netanyahu said Israel had trans- 
ferred 200 million shekels (S57.4 mil- 
lion! to the Palestinian Authority. 



A ftwi 1 Fu n tu Pw t - 

An Israeli soldier guarding a bulldozer Tuesday that was destroying an Arab home in the village of Beit Omar. r 

Iran Accuses U.S. of Spying on Military Moves 


The Associated Press 

TEHRAN — The government ac- 
cused a U.S. destroyer and a recon- 
naissance plane Tuesday of spying on 
Ir anian military maneuvers in the Gulf 
and warned them to leave the area. 

The U.S. Navy denied the charge, 
saying the ship supposedly involved had 
not even left port. 


Senior Ir anian naval officers, speaking 
on condition of anonymity, said die des- 
troyer Kinkaid and an S-3 reconnaissance 
plane had withdrawn from the vicinity of 
the banian war games after the warnings. 
But a spokesman for the U.S. Navy's 
Fifth Fleet, which has its headquarters in 
Bahrain, said he had seen “no indica- 
tion” that either incident had occurred. 


“The Kinkaid has been in port in 
Bahrain since Monday afternoon,” 
Commander Gordon Hume said. 

The Kinkaid is amember of the seven- 


Another Powerful Quake Jolts Italy 


Reuters 

ROME — A powerful earthquake 
measuring around S on the open- 
ended Richter scale hit central Italy on 
Tuesday, three weeks after a string of 
tremors devastated the Basilica of St. 
Francis in Assisi and left thousands 
homeless. 

Italian news agency ANSA quoted 
civil protection officials as saying die 
tremor registered between 7 and 8 on 
the Mercalli scale, which is equal to 
between 4.8 and 5.4 on the Richter 
scale. 

No one was immediately available 
at the National Institute of Geophysics 
to confirm the size of the quake, which 
hit at 5:25 P.M. 


The Reverend Nicola Giandomen- 
ico, a spokesman for the Franciscian 
monastery at Assisi, said there was no 
apparent new damage to the basilica, 
and civil protection officials said there 
were no immediate reports of injuries. 

The shock was felt across the cen- 
tral Umbria, Marches and Abrazzi re- 
gions where thousands have been liv- 
ing in tents since die first quake struck 
on Sept. 26. It was also clearly felt in 
Rome. 

The quake caused a mediaeval bell 
tower in the town of Foligno near As- 
sisi to collapse. The bell tower had been 
left hanging after the earlier tremors 
and workers had been battling to shore 
it up when the new quake struck 


on Sunday. The S-3 is one of 75 aircraft 
operating from the aircraft carrier Nim- 
itz, which heads the battle group. 

Tensions in the region have been high 
since Iran’s air attacks Sept 29 cm two of 
the Iranian opposition’s bases inside 
Iraq. The raids violated a “no-fly” zone 
patroled by the United States and its 
allies. Iraq scrambled two fighters to 
pursue the Iranian warplanes, further 
violating the zone. 

In response, Washington ordered the 
Nimitz to skip a port call in Singapore 
and speed to the region two weeks ahead 
of schedule. 

Chi Monday, a Tehran newspaper 
warned that an accidental collisionin the 
Gulf could spark a confrontation be- 
tween die United States and Iran. 

Iran News said dial Iranian naval ex- 
ercises were covering a “wide area” in 
die Gulf and that U.S. ships were 
“crowding the waterway and increasing 
fee risk of collisions.” If there is a 
collision, “none but fee U.S. will be 
responsible for fee consequences,” the 
English-language paper said. 


gizes for 


R.F. Botha 
Apolo 
Apartheid Role 

r.— tujs iv v, 

JOHANNESBURG — R. F. Botha, 
the former South African foreign min- 
ister. apologized Tuesday for failing to 
turn the tide of apartheid and for his 
reluctance to investigate the killing and 
torturing of political opponents by white 
scctint} forces. 

Den> mg he had authorized the killing 
of political rivals. Mr. Botha told the 
Truth and Reconciliation Commission 
that he had recognized apartheid was 
immoral as early as the early 1970s. 

“I realize feat I could have done more 
to mm the tide of apartheid earlier,” he 
said. “I could have and should have 
done more to find out whether fee ac- 
cusations that government institutions 
were killing and torturing political op- 
ponents were true. 

"Not one of us in the former gov- 
ernment can say today that there were no 
suspicions on our pah feat members of 
the South African police were engaged 
in irregular activities.*' 

Mr .'Botha said the cabinet at the time 
never approved the killing of individual 
political opponents, but added: 

“The question is whether we should 
have done more to insure feat it did not 
happen. I deeply regret this omission. 
May God forgive me." 



Judge in Algeria 
Is Reported Slain 

ALGIERS — An Algerian judge, 
who was- not identified, was shot 
and lrillwi in a town near the in- 
dustrial city of Annaba in eastern 
Algeria as he left for work, die daily 
jcts Liberte and H Khabar 
_ J Tuesday. 

: judge was shot in the chest 
several times Sunday after uniden- 


tified gunmen set off a bomb to stop 
his car. Hi* brother was wounded in 
the attack, fee papers said. 

More than 20 judges have been 
assassinated by Islamic extremists 
at war with the secular regime since 
1992, but such killing s ceased mm 
than a year ago. (AFP) 

Egyptian on Trial 

CAIRO — Saying that be meant 
to attarir Jews and was ready to 
“kill even 100 or even 200” of 
thftm J1 an Egyptian went on trial 
Tuesday for tolling nine German 
tourists in Cairo last month. 

The Egyptian, Saber Abu Ulla, 
said before a court hearing that he 
carried out fee attack to avenge a 
cartoon drawn by an Israeli woman 
earlier this year, depicting fee 
Prophet Mohammed as a pig 

His comments were his first pub- 
lic admission of gufit 

He and his brother, Mahmoud, 
are charged with murder in fee 
shooting and firebombing of a tour- 
ist bus on SepL 18 owside the Egyp- 
tian Museum. The government has 
denied rtiar the attack- was linked to 
Islamic extremist groups. (AP) 

Albright to Haiti 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright will go to 
Haiti an Friday to show U.S. sup- 
port for that country’s economic 
recovery and its troubled democ- 
racy. 

She will break away from the 
party accompanying President Bill 
Clinton on atrip to South America. 

The Clinton administration inter- 
vened to restore democracy in Haiti 
in September 1994 and to stave off a 
flow of refugees to the United 
States. 

Rising crime in Port-au-Prince, 
die capital, and severe economic 
depression are two of the biggest 
oblems confronting President 
:ne PrevaL (AP) 


Cameroon $ 
Faces Turmoil 
After Vote 

By Howard W. French 

New York Tones Service 

YAOUNDE. Cameroon — For 
weeks, citizens of this Central African 
country were inundated with- radio 
jingles, television testimonials and cam- 
paign posters proclaiming the incum- 
bent president, Paul Biya, the “best 
choice” for the country’s future. 

But by the time polk opened Sunday 
for the presidential election, millions of 
Cameroonians appeared to have decided 
that Mr. Biya, who has ruled this country 
with a tight grip for 15 years, represented 
no choice at all. 

After Mr. Biya's government refused 
to allow fee creation of an independent ^ 
board to organize the elections, the y 
country's three main opposition parties 
boycotted fee voting, though minor 
parties were included on the ballot. 

Although Cameroonians mostly 
shunned the polls, the government radio 
reported that turnout was more than 60 
percent and feat Mr. Biya had been elect- 
ed for another seven-year term wife 80 
percent of fee vote, according to early 
estimates. 

With fee avenue to peaceful political 
change blocked, political analysts and 
some Western diplomats said this coun- 
try seemed about to join a growing list of 
countries in the region feat were in a state 
of political and economic meltdown. 

“All of fee ingredients are now in » 
pl ara far a civil war,*' one local in- y 
tellectual, speaking on condition of an- 
onymity, said. 

* ‘You have a president who has built a 
power base exclusively around his own 
ethnic group, an economy feat has been 
horribly mismanaged and a political sys- 
tem that forecloses any possibility of 
peaceful change.” 

Many countries of this region were 
early leaders in Africa's move toward 
multiparty democracy at the start of this 
decade. But since thou France's former 


colonies in Central Africa have badly 
stumbled and often exploded in vio- 
lence, leaving wrecked economies in 
their wake. 

The most dramatic disintegration so 
far has been in the Congo Republic, : - 
whose capital, Brazzaville, has been U 
nearly Leveled in five months of artillery " 
duels between ethnic militias supporting 
the outgoing president, Pascal Lissouba, 
whose term expired in August, and a 
former president, Denis Sassou 
Nguesso, who had hoped to win back 
power in elections. The vote, which had 
been scheduled for July, 'was canceled 
because of fee fighting. 

- To the east. Central African Republic 
has been locked in an intermittent, eth- 
nically inspired army mutiny . against 
President Ange-Felix Patasse for more 
than a year. 

Two other neighbors, Gabon and 
Chad, also face turmoil 

When Mr. Biya assumed power in 
1982. Cameroon’s economy was boom- 
ing, wife cocoa, coffee and timber ex- 
ports and an expanding petroleum in- 
dustry. Mr. Biya, then 49, promised feat 
fee change in leadership would bring 
about a national rebirth, and Western 
investors briefly considered Cameroon 
to be Central Africa's promised land 

Mr. Biya has instead presided over 
unprecedented decline, marked by of- 
ficial corruption, ethnic cronyism and A 
administrative drift “ 


ITALY: Crisis Ends as Prodi Reaches Accord With Communists 


Continued from Page 1 
during the deficit, which just last year was 


of GDP, is one reason for die Re: 
Communist Party's about-face. Another 
was tbe strong sentiment across the left 


Italy's deficit even further below 3 per- 
cent, whereas failure to approve this 



should be drafted to take into account fee 
particular characteristics of Italy’s dif- 
ferent regions, and industries. 

“We see this as part of an overall 
organic plan to combat unemploy- 
ment,? he said. 

Mr. D ’Antoni, who described fee ac- 


end of tbe political s pectrum in favor of 35 hours has already been met by op- cord on the reduced workweek as “con- 
fee first left-leaning government elected position from Italy’s business comma- fused,” said Italy should not trv to fol- 


said a seLgio CXXNTON: He Gains Brazil’s Support 

s second largest national labor un- IT Mr 

Continued from Page 1 


Aienccftawr-nmc 

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, left, chairman of the Truth and Recon- 
ciliation panel, greeting Mr. Botha on Tuesday as he arrived to testify. 


Mr. Botha, who was one of the 
world's longest-serving foreign minis- 
ters, said that a 1986 Commonwealth 
mission nearly brokered an end to 
apartheid, but fear the then white mil- 
itary sabotaged fee process by attacking 
black guerrillas in neighboring states. 

He told Truth Commission that his 
greatest disappointment was fee failure 
of the Eminent Persons Group, set up by 


the Commonwealth to attempt to 
suade South Africa's white and black 
rivals to negotiate. 

The group came close to securing the 
release of Nelson Mandela in 1986. Mr. 
Botha told fee commission. Mr. Man- 
dela was finally released from prison in 
1990 after serving 28 years in prison. He 
was elected president of South Africa in 
May 1994. (Reuters. AFP ) 


in Italy since World War H 

At a press conference Tuesday, Italian 
labor leaders — who had supported fee 
Prodi budget over the Communists' ob- 
jections — said their offices had been 
flooded wife calls, faxes and messages 
from workers concerned about fee fallof 
the Prodi government. 

* ‘The majority of Italians didn’t want 
fee crisis, and tms contributed to ending 

.«!J P*— m a ; « j 

Italy 

ion. ‘ ‘The real miracle here was the grass 
roots: We have never received so many 
faxes and our Internet site exploded with 
messages against the crisis. 

Backed by a broad consensus in favor 
of joining fee common currency, fee 
Prodi government will push ahead with a 
1998 budget that calls for more than $2 J 
billion in cuts to pensions and health 
care. 

In the agreement reached Wednesday, 
fee Refounded Communist Party was 
able io reduce the cots originally pro- 
posed by Mr. Prodi by £290 milli on.. 

According to tbe projected figures 
from the European Commission, fee 
proposed 1998 budget would bring 


uity, and by puzzled skepticism on the 
part of labor leaders. 

Sergio Cofferati, leader of Italy’s 
largest, traditionally Communist labor 
union, said the law should be used to 
complement, rather than replace, col- 
lective bargaining agreements and 



and frankly 
will work there* 
either,” he said. "If these solutions 
helped resolve the gover nmen t crisis, 
feen they are welcome, but in fee long 
run, we will need greater clarity.” 


‘ ,*F 

% 


si 


/ 


EMU: Commission Predicts 11 Nations Will Join Europe’s Single Currency at Outset 


eifeer-or choice. They and the United 
States can "create a free trade area of 
Americas consistent with Mercosur,” 
Mr. Clinton said. 

“To me this is a false choice thar we 
don’t intend to ask the Brazilians, the 
Argen tinia ns and the other members of 
Mercosur to make. 

“I don’t feel threatened by it,” he 
continued. “I just want to makr. sure we 
fully compete. 

* ‘We can build on this and go forward 
to a free trade area of tbe Americas.” 

Mr. Cardoso called Mr. Clinton's 
candor in their meetin gs “a clear sign 
feat we can reach an understanding.” 

Reveling in his nation's status wife 
other “global traders,” Mr. Cardoso 


meats that lawmakers must approve or 
disapprove without amendment. 

En route to Brazil on Monday, he 
called fee battle tough but winnable. 

Brazil is the second stop in President 
Clinton's visit, after Venezuela; he will 
also go to Argentina before returning to 
fee United States on Sunday. 

Earlier Tuesday, U.S. and Brazilian 
officials signed a declaration meant to 
improve access to technology in rural 
schools, link Brazilian and American, 
schools by computer and establish a id:, 
Brazilian equivalent of “TechCoips,” B 
the volunteer effort to expand techno l- 1 
ogy that Mr. Clinton established in 
1995. 

They also signed cooperative agree- ■ 
moats on crime-fighting, environmental 
preservation, peaceful use of nuclear en- 


Contimied from Page 1 

for creating moneiaiy union “had never 
been so favorable, on a broad, stable and 
sustainable basis.” 

With fee exception of Greece, all 15 
EU members will fulfill, or come very 
close to fulfilling, the economic 
to join the currency union, in 
control of inflation, public debt and def- 
icits. 

Once the founding countries are se- 
lected in April or May next year, fee 
rates at which their currencies will con- 
vert to the new money will be locked in. 
Monetary union will start for financial 
institutions on Jan. 1 , 1 999, but it will be 


another three years before Euro notes 
and coins are issued. 

Britain, Sweden and Denmark have 
said they would not join lire currency 
union immediately. But Britain's oppo- 
sition is softening, and commission ex- 
perts said all three countries might be 
for 


pats were predictii 
Hie commission figures indicated that 
fee Italian deficit could rise to 3.7 
cent of gross domestic product in 1$98, 
well above fee 3 percent threshold. Mr. 
De Silguy said, however, that if fee 1998 
budget presented in Rome last week was 


ment and cast doubt on its survival. 

In Munster, Germany, Finance Min- 
isters Thee Waigel of Germany and 
Dominique Strauss- Kahn of France an- 
nounced an agreement on creating an 
informal council to coordinate monetary 
union. France has long been insisting on 


exploration. The spac^ 


mic criteria forced to join later as monetary union implemented in full, Italy'sdeficitwould the measure as a political counterweight 
, including gathered momentum. Even Greece could fall to 2.7 percent by fee end of next year, to fee future European central bank, but 


attain fee tight criteria if its present eco- 
nomic perfamance continued- The com- 
mission forecast growth of upto4percent 
a year for Greece and a further reduction 
of inflation to 3.5 percent in 1999. 

Monetary union could therefore start 
with as many as 1 1 members, making it 
much more broadly based than ex- 


He urged the Italian government not to 
“fall at the final hurdle.’' 

Italy’s caretaker prime minister, 
Romano Prodi, said Tuesday that he 
had reached an agreement on the 1998 
budget wife the Refounded Com- 
munist Party, which had earlier with- 
drawn its support from the govern- 


eadier gave guarantees it would respect 
the bank's independence. 

Mr. Waigel said both countries had 
agreed that monetary policy would be 
solely fee domain of fee future European 
Central Bank- “We have agreed on fee 
coordination of economic policies in 
EMU,” Mr, Waigel said 


willing trade partners in Brazil. “We 
want imports and exports,” he said 
“We want a win-win situation in the 
trade arena.” 

Mr. Clinton’s visix coincided wife 
United Nations balloting that gave 
Brazil a two-year Security Council seat, 
starting Jan. 1. He congratulated Brazili- 
ans and reiterated his position that T arip 
America should have a revolving per- 
manent seat on the Security Council. 

On his firsttrip to South America, Mr. 
Clinton sought to overcome more than 
jost Mercosur reluctance to his call for 


pact provides that a Brazilian astronaut j 
will join die U.S. space station crew on ? 
one mission. 

On trade, Mr. Clinton said that more 
open markets would bolster living start- , 
dards in emerging Latin American de- 
mocracies as well as in Asia, Africa and 
around the globe. In Brazil, for example, - 
he noted that trade almost doubled since ' 
1990, to an about $100 billion in 1996, ' 
with the U.S. share a healthy 20 percent 
providing jobs and income to both • 
countries. 

••MM,*, to Mb... KM 

ako io pereudw! a rducbmt U.S. Con- ^ 

wmen would let him sign trade agree- an slums. (Reuters. AP) 

























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PAGE 13 


Economists 
Get Nobel for 
Risk Studies 

Worlt in Derivatives 
And Options Helped 
Fuel’90s Bull Market 

The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — Two American 

♦ $2^&7«*^*** ae No bel 
• Pn ? e . m Science on 

LTSL f °i *** ^ ork 00 stock option 

*“?. derivatives that have Sped 
tuel the bull market m the 1990s. 

, . Professors Robert Merton of Harvard 
University and Myron Scholes of Stan- 
ford University developed “a pioneer- 
ing formula for the valuation of stock 
options’' that thousands of traders and 
investors now use, the Swedish Royal 
Academy of Sciences said. 

“If you ask what idea in the last 50 or 
60 years coining from economic re- 
search has had the biggest impact on the 
world, this is it," said Avainash Dixit, a 
professor at Princeton. “It’s changed the 
way the financial markets allocate risks 
% among different types of investors.’ * 

9 Mr. Merton sard the work rhar led to 
the prize had evolved from stock options 
and could be applied to the risks of bonds 
and corporate bonds, paying hone mort- 
gages early, evaluating student loan 
guarantees and production flexibility. 

In purchasing derivatives, investors 
are not buying a stock but a financial 
instrument connected to a stock. For 
instance, purchasing a so-called call op- 
tion gives the purchaser the right to 
purchase a stock at a certain price. De- 
rivatives are used by investors to in- 
sulate themselves from losses because 
of sudden market shifts. 

One of the formulas developed by die 
winners attempts to place a value on a 
call option by considering such factors 
a as current interest rates, die stock's fluc- 
J tuation and the probability that the op- 
tion will be exercised. 

Mr. Merton earned his doctorate in 
economics in 1970 at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology in 1970. Mr. 
Scholes earned his doctorate at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in 1969. The raize, 
established by the Swedish central bask 
in 1968 as a memorial to Alfred Nobel, 
is worth $1 million this year. 


media markets 



Agrnrr Fraur-IVw 

A publisher organizing his stand at the Frankfurt Book Fair. About 10,000 publishers are taking part 

Buying a Book? Try Cyberspace 

Surge of Sales on Web Stirs Debate at Frankfurt Book Fair 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — Publishers and 
writers from around the world begin 
their annual pilgrimage Wednesday to 
the Frankfurt Book Fair, the premier 
gathering fra an industry usually linked 
with cracking open a hardcover and 
catching a satisfying whiff of fresh 
pulp. 

But bibliophiles who come to Frank- 
furt each year to trade rights to one 
another’s titles have discovered that a 
new chapter has been written in the S83 
billion book business since the last 
time they met. - 

Bartering books on die Internet, 
which was popular two years ago 
among die digital cognoscenti, has be- 
come a booming industry and by some 


accounts ranks as one of the most pop- 
ular and fastest-growing forms of com- 
merce on the Web. 

The estimated 500 on-line book 
vendors have rewritten the age-old 
rules on competition in the once-sleepy 
world of booksellers. The biggest 
names in the business have begun pom- 
meling each other with price wars once 
unknown in such a tweedy trade. 

The Internet allows vendors to offer 
vast electronic archives, searchable by 
subject or name, without paying for 
stores and staff. But it also has crushed 
profit marg ins with price cuts of as 
much as 45 percent, meant to keep a 
“browser” from clicking off to a pro- 
liferation of rivals. 

“The shocking thing is not that we 
have competitors,” said Jeff Bezos, a 
33-year-old Seattle entrepreneur who 


founded Amazon.com Inc., the first big 
Internet bookstore. “The shocking 
thing is that we had this period of 
almost two years when we were vir- 
tually competing against a vacuum. 
Capitalism abhors a vacuum as much 
as nature does.” 

Until the bookstore war began, the 
story of Amazm.com read like the 
Silicon Valley version of a Horatio 
Alger novel. Mr. Bezos began the op- 
eration in his garage. As recently as 
two years ago. he personally loaded 
boxes of books into his Chevy blazer 
for shipping. 

Now, two years after Amazon.com 
threw open its “doors” on the Web, it 
has a staff of 650 and $114 million in 
sales. 

See BOOKS, Page 14 


Lower Profit at GM 
Holds Back Stocks 


CormUtyOurSi^fFimDejmAa 

NEW YORK — General Motors 
Crap, said Tuesday its third-quarter 
earnings fell 16 percent from a year 
earlier, but a strong performance by its 
North American operations helped it 
beat Wall Street’s expectations. 

The GM results were part of a batch 
of corporate results that buffeted the 
stock market. 

The biggest U.S. automaker earned 
$1.07 billion, or $1.35 a share, in the 
July-September period, compared with 
$1.27 billion, or $1.57 a share, a year 
earlier. Analysts were expecting profit 
of about 51.21 a share. 

GM said year-earlier earnings had 
been inflated by $253 million from a 
reduction in GM’ s plant-closing re- 
serve. If not for that one-time gain , the 
latest earnings would have been higher 
than those in 1996, GM said. 

GM’s sales were $37.1 billion, up 
from $34.6 billion. 

Jack Smith, chairman of GM, said the 
company’s North American earnings of 
$423 million represented its best third 
quarter ever ana showed what could be 
accomplished with a focus on reducing 
costs and delivering new products. 

“The corporation’s financial 
st reng th in the third quarter, which is 
typically die most challenging quarter 


for our industry, is a strong indication 
that our strategies are on target to 
strengthen GM’s leadership position in 
the industry,'* Mr. Smith said. 

But GM’s shares closed down 1 5/16 at 
70% as investors focused on a 77 percent 
profit decline at the company’s Delphi 
Automotive . Systems unit. Delphi’s 
weaker-chan-expected results dimmed 
hopes that an initial public offering could 
come in die first half of 1998. 

“It seems like with that lack of prof- 
itability we’re further away from a 
Delphi initial public offering than we 
thought we were,” said Nicholas Colas, 
a Credit Suisse First Boston analyst 

The GM drop checked the advance of 
the Dow Jones industrial average, 
which finished up 24.07 points at 
8,096.29. On the New York Stock Ex- 
change, declining and advancing issues 
were nearly even. 

The market was underpinned by a 
sharp rise in Treasury bond prices. The 
benchmark 30-year issue finished up 1 
1/32 point at 100 9/32, taking the yield 
down to 6.35 percent from 6.43 percent 
Friday, before a holiday Monday. 

Bonds were lifted by speculation a 
report on retail sales Wednesday will 
suggest the economy is slowing, easing 

See GM, Page 14 


Phony Bid Jars Hong Kong 


Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — A phony bidder 
threw a Hong Kong land auction into 
chaos Tuesday and forced the govem- 
. ment to scrap a sale that had been bid up 
to 890 million Hong Kong dollars 
($115.1 million). 

Before hundreds of executives and 
onlookers in the Hong Kong Cultural 
Center, a middle-aged woman calmly 
raised her hand to top bids by Sino Land 
Co. and some of Hoag Kong’s other 
biggest developers. 

When die gavel fell on her winning 
bid — 890 million dollars for a plot of 
land in the Kowloon Bay district — she 
said she represented Hutchison Wham- 
poa Ltd-, one of die largest companies in 
Hong Kong. 

Minutes later, die Lands Department 


discovered the bid was a hoax when the 
woman, who was not identified, was 
unable to produce a 25-percent deposit 
for her purchase. 

She was being questioned by the po- 
lice and might face criminal charges. 

“It certainly is embarrassing,” said 
Bob Pope, director of the Lands De- 
partment “What happened has never 
happened before.” 

The sale of the Kowloon Bay lot was 
canceled. It will be auctioned later this 
year or early next year, said Francis Ng, 
the auctioneer. 

The Hong Kong markets are sensitive 
to real estate developments in a city 
where seven of 10 companies invest in 
or develop real estate. Even before the 
hoax, two other bids had fallen short of 
investor expectations. 


Teaching a French Dinosaur to Survive 

Messier, an Excunple of the New Manager, Invigorates Conglomerate 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 


% 

6 


PARIS — When Jean-Marie Messier 
was tapped 16 months ago to run Com- 
pagnie Generate des Eaux, he was tak- 
ing charge of the top dinosaur in the 
Jurassic Park of French industry. 

A sprawling conglomerate that out- 
grew its beginnings as a water utility to 
become the country’s biggest private 
employer. Generate des Eaux bad its 
hands 'in businesses from casinos and 
parking lots to telecommunications and 
real estate. . 

But as the paradigm of a big-business 
culture that has long been unfocused, 
inward-looking, paternalistic and enam- 
ored of bureaucracy, not to mention just 
ilain srodgy. Generate des Eaux was a 
Jinosaur in distress. When Mr. Messier 
took over, it bad piled up $9.6 billion in 
debt and had finished 1995 with its first 
loss ever, $624 million. 

Mr. Messier, a perfect example of the 
young (he is now all of 40) modem 
manager on the move in Europe, has 
managed to hold off extinction/ 

He quickly rid Generate des Eaux of 
$5.3 billion of nonessential assets, 
trimmed the work force 


i 



200,000. and sealed a series < 
many with non-French companies, that 
brought S3 billion into Generate des 
Eaux’s depleted coffers. The company 
made money again last year, with net 
income of $320 million on revenue of 

$28.5 billion. , . . 

“Wc had to reform strongly and ab- 
ruptly," Mr. Messier said in an inter- 


Mr. Messier of Generate des Eaux. 

view in his office. “Now, we are in a 
position to be more aggressive. 
Whether he can continue to teach his 
new tricks has ramifications 
that go far beyond Generate des Eaux. 
Managers like Mr. Messier are strug- 
gling throughout France and much of 
Europe to join the new world economic 
order when the old order is sot quite yet 
ready to give up the ghost 
The old ways have left Europe with a 
s tagnan t economy marked by painfully 
high unemployment rates and an urgent 


need to go abroad to grow. Steeped in 
the Continent’s traditions but also com- 
fortable with the brasher business prac- 
tices of the United States, Mr. Messier 
and his peers are racing the clock to 
wean their companies from their os- 
sified ways as Europe itself races to- 
ward full economic union to meet the 
growing challenge of foreign compe- 
tition. 

The efforts of Mr. Messier and the 
others could send ripples across the At- 
lantic and beyond. 

The final verdict is not yet in, of 
coarse. But Mr. Messier's accomplish- 
ments have already made him “one of 
the two ot thr» major players in French 
. capitalism,” EJie Cohen, a leading aca- 
demic economist, said. 

Among the others Mr. Cohen lists 
Francois Pwanlt, head of Pinault-Prin- 
temps-Redoute, the retailing group that 
recently began a $5 billion takeover bid 
for the holding company Worms & Cie., 
and Claude Bebear, chairman of the Axa 
insurance group. 

Mr. Cohen points to Mr. Messier's 
peculiar weave of French and non- 
French qualities. 

Mr. Messier possesses, he said, “the 
ability to manage political interests, the 
interests of the company and his per- 
sonal interests.” He added, “This is 
quite French.” 

But he is also “die first man at Gen- 
erate to speak in terms of shareholder 
value,’ ’ Mr. Cohen said. 

Mr. Messier represents a break in 

See MESSIER, Page 17 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

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WITH THE PROPER RESPECT. 



/AMdipurfenr of K'tpmUic 
Sajltmal Bank of iV«p York 
f&MKl S.A. n) Iwra. 


At Republic National Bank we Lelieve tkat 
kartl-eamed wealth deserves to he nurtured and 
preserved. And so we run our hank according 
to one fundamental principle: to protect 
our clients' capital as we safeguard its purchasing 
power. 

It is a simple principle upon which we hase 
our brand of financial conservatism: private 
hanking huilt upon rigoi; discipline and prudence. 

This sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, 
has created a global private hank of exceptional stability, 
capable of weathering the roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republics capitalization ratio, 
on a risk adjusted basis, is two times 
as great as that required by the world's 
international hanking regulators.. 

To our way of thinking, it is security 
as well as return that we must ensure each 
day. And in the process, to provide 
a -unique quality of service, understanding 
and discretion. 



TmrU IhraJif nrit'M of 
Rr public S'uliuuof ttamb of 
Now York m iVou> )'h4. 


Republic National Bank of New York* 

Strength. Security. Service. 

* <l - ,t * eiriMM • l.mLin • IMtuM B.'ral ■ IVmt. IlltW • I Woo Ain. • Cjnun I.LihJ. • l' - 1 .... - , , 

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non 


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30-Year T-Borrd Yield 


6.00 

6.40 


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1,BB M J J A S O ■ 

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1997 

Exchange Index 
NYSE • • The Dow 


1997 

Tuesday.-' % 




NYSE 

S&P5QQ 

... 370L2S ,968.10: ^23 

NYSE 

S&P100 

932.11 93258 , 

NYSE 

Composite 

■ 58157 . Stiff ,40iS 

U.S. 

Nasdaq Composite t73&88 

AMEX 

Mattel Value.- . 

7PLTB nasz 

Toronto 

TSE Index 

7165^0 v-m&4l....-*6.78 

SspPmto 

Bovaspa 

■ ; i28Mj»: 

Mexico City 

Botea 

53134* 524&KT , -^1^0 

1 Buenos Afrea Nerval 

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. iomm . 1042005 : ^0.43. 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

hHonteMiul Hcokl Tnftmr 

Very briefly: 


Japanese Official's Hint Bolsters Dollar 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 


he was content w ith current exchange 
rates and as U.S. bonds rallied. 


• International Business Machines Corp. said a restructuring 
of its persona] -computer operations could lead to dismissals of 
"hundreds'' of employees. IBM will move the product-de- 
velopment teams in its consumer division to its PC Company 
unit. PC Company mokes computers for the corporate market: 
the consumer division makes the Apdva PC. 

• America Online Im. and Netscape Communications 
Corp. are introducing a messaging product to allow Internet 
users to send messages to each other instantly regardless of 
what on-line provider or Internet service they use. 

• Microsoft Corp. has shipped ah operating-system upgrade 
to support a new generation of Windows-based handheld 
devices. The software maker said 10 consumer-electronics 
companies planned to release palm-top devices starting this 
year based on Windows CE 2.0, which promises to make 
screens easier to read by adding color and support for more 
typeface sizes. 

• Frontier Corp. said it would pull out of certain businesses, 
cut S percent of its work force, or about 700 jobs, and take a 
charge to pay for the moves, as it struggles to become a 
provider or a wide array of phone services. It warned that 
third-quarter earnings would not meet analysts' predictions. 

• Juarez de Siqueira Brito Wanderley, 66, an executive at 
Empresa Brasil eira de Aerooautica S A, died Monday while 
on a business trip to Indonesia. 

• Enron Corp/s third-quarter net profit rose 9 percent, to 
$134 million, on strong returns from its international and 
namral-gas businesses. Sales rose 81 percent, to S3.8 billion. 

• Ipsco Inc-’s third-quarter protit rose 44 percent from a year 
earlier, to 33.3 million Canadian dollars ($24 million), as sales 
grew 24 percent, to 276.4 milli on dollars, helped by strong sales 
of tubular products to the oil and gas industry. 

• Equitable Resources Inc. said it had bought two offshore 

oil and gas fields from Chevron Corp. for $80.6 million and 
sold five properties in the Western United States and Canada 
for S 1 75 million. Bloomberg. Reuters 


minister for int ernati onal affairs, said 
Japanese manufacturers were “quite 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

competitive'' with a dollar rate of 
120 yen. Weakness in the yen, which 
has fallen about 5 percent against the 
dollar this year, helps increase Jap- 
anese exports, a cornerstone of the 
country's efforts to lift itself from a 
live-year economic slump. 

“People keep realizing the yen is 
an undesirable currency." said 
Hans Boman, trader at Swedbank. 
“They don’t see signs of recovery 
over there.” 

The U.S. currency rose- to 
121.600 yen in 4 PJ4. trading from 
1 20.885 yen Monday. It also rose to 
1.7515 Deutsche marks from 
-1.7505 DM after Bundesbank of- 
ficials gave conflicting signals 
about future increases in German 
interest rates. 

The dollar also was at 1.4610 
Swiss francs, down from 1.4620 
francs, and at 5.8730 French francs, 
down from 5.8750 francs. The 
pound was at $1.6212, down from 


$1.6245. The dollar also got a lift 
from U.S. bond prices. Traders 
snapped up Treasury issues on ex- 
pectations that U.S. economic re- 
ports this week would ease concerns 
about creeping inflation. 

The dollar’s rise against the yen 
came amid expectations that Ja- 
pan’s economy would continue, to 
perform poorly enough to keep the 
Bank of Japan from raising interest 


rates soon. That expectation was 
bolstered Monday by a report show- 
ing that machinery orders registered 
a bigger-than-expected decline in 
August from the previous month. 

'Hie dollar rose against the mark 
after Johann Wilhelm Gadduro, the 
vice president of the Bundesbank, 
said interest rates were now at an 
“appropriate" level He echoed 
comments earlier in the day by bank 


council member Helmut Schieber, 
who said the increase last week in 
the benchmark lending rate was not 
“a decision we are going to revise 
straightaway." Traders took the re- 
marks to mean Germany may be 
tfimngh raising rates for now. 

But thedoUar lost some gains after 

a nQihw council member, Helmut 
Hesse, the bank would review 
interest rates every two weeks. 


GM: Drop in Profit Helps to Hold Back Stock-Market Gains 


Continued from Page 13 

concern the Federal Reserve Board 
will raise interest rates soon. 

But earnings reports were die 
primary stock-market movers. 
Technology stocks were weak de- 
spite some strong earnings as in- 
vestors doubted the companies 
could keep up thepace. 

Texas instruments closed down 
516 at 13516, despite reporting net 
income of $1.71 billion in the 
quarter, reversing a loss of $148 
million a year earlier. Most of the 
profit was the result of a $1.47 bil- 
lion gain from the sale of its defease 
business. 

Revenue was $2.50 billion, up 
from $2.41 billion, but analysts 
were hoping for a bigger increase. 


Intel also dragged down the tech- 
nology sector, feuing 14 to 92 7/16 
as investors braced for results that 
were released after the close. The 
world’s biggest ctepmaker earned 

U^. STOCKS 

88 cents a share, up from 74 cents a 
share a year earlier but below ex- 
pectations of 90 cents a share. . 

“Intel’s always so big for the stock 
mark et because it’s seen as the tech- 
nology industry's bellwether,” said 
Michael Driscoll, senior trader at 
Hambrecht & Quist in New York. 

Sprint rose 2% to 54V6 despite 
reporting a 32 percent drop in net 
income, to $211.7 million. Losses 
from new wireless and international 
ventures offset growth in the com- 


pany’s main long-distance and local 
phone businesses. 

But revenue rose to $3.79 billion 
from $3.52 billion a year earlier. 
Investors were encouraged! by the 
company’s ability to increase, its 
long-distance business despite 
heavy competition. 

. Easttpan Kodak also rose despite 
repor ting weaker earnings: the stock 
closed up 15/16 at 64ft on expec- 
tations for the company to cut costs 
to bring results in Ime. 

Kodak’s profit fell 43 percent, to 
$232 million, as price cuts by rivals, 
wider losses from digital imaging 
and a rising dollar eroded the com- 
pany’s dominan ce of the photo- 
graphy industry. Revenue fell to 
$3.77 billion fr o m $4.15 billion. 

(AP, Bloomberg . Reuters) 


BOOKS: Frankfurt's Book Fair Buzzes With Talk of the Surge in On-Line Sides 


Continued from Page 13 

Amazon.com is the No. 1 com- 
merce site on the Web, according to 
the PC Meter rating agency, which 
tracks the 1,000 most popular In- 
ternet addresses. It also is the No. 40 
most-visited Web spot in cyber- 
space, the agency found. 

“Earth's biggest bookstore" is 
Amazon.com ’s new-age slogan. It 
offers 2.5 million titles, including 
every English-language book in 
print and the 1 million most popular 
out-of-print titles, the company 
says. In comparison, there are about 
170,000 titles at many largest book- 
stores. 

“Book-buying in die Amazo n 
way is one of the most compelling 
consumer retailing services on the 
Web,” according to Mary Meeker, 
an industry analyst in New York at 
Morgan Stanley Dean Witter.' 
“Nearly everyone buys books, and 
35 million to 40 milli on people use 
the Internet" 

Price wars began in May when 
Barnes & Noble Inc., the leading 
U.S. bookstore chain, started offer- 
ing discounts on die Web that were 


well below those at Amazon.com. 
Simon & Schuster, a unit of Viacom 
Inc., soon joined in. Borders Group 
Inc., Barnes & Noble’s fast-growing 
rival, plans to start its own virtual 
store soon. 

The popularity of these Web sites 
prompted the internet Bookshop, 
the largest British on-line book- 
seller, to discount U.S. tides as 
much as 45 percent last month. In 
Britain, Dillons and Wateis tones 
also plan Web sites. 

"we do plan to dominate this 
marketplace as we have in every 
other place we have moved into,” 
said Susan Boster, director of mar- 
keting in New York for Bames- 
andNoble.com. 

Mr. Bezos of Amazon.com con- 
cedes that Barnes & Noble, as an 
established giant that buys directly 
from publishers, has a “powerful” 
purchasing advantage. 

Amazon.com subcontracts from a 
wholesale distributor, which takes 
its own cut. The distributor, mean- 
while, the Tennessee-based Ingram 
Book Co., also waded onto die Web 
by selling on-line bookstore kits to 
traditional bookstores. 


With its towering 13 parent mar- 
ket share in the United States, Barnes 
& Noble commands unmatched 
brand recognition. Amazon.com is 
trying to gain recognition too — in 
cyberspace. It spent $19 million to 

Online. It also made large but un- 
disclosed investments to do the same 
on popular search engines such as 
Yahoo! and Excite. 

Amazon ' lost $6 mil linn last year 
and is expected to have a loss this 
year too. Mr. Bezos declined to 
make a profit prediction, but die 
analyst Ms. Meeker said she did not 
expect Amaztxi.com to swing to 
profit until 1999. 

“Amazon is c ur rently in land- 
grab mode,” she said. “The com- 
pany is not focused on profits bat on 
revenue and customer growth." 

As part of that drive, Mr. Bezos 
recently went to a drab conference 
room at the Frankfurt International 
Airport where he spoke with Ger- 
man-language book distributors. He 
wants Amazon.com to be able to sell 
directly to users in Germany, the 
third-biggest book market behind 
the United States and Japan. “An 


Internet company cannot afford to 
think of itself as a U.S. company," 
said Mr. Bezos. 

Web-watchers who care little 
about literature are monitoring die 
book-selling Internet operations as a 
potentially revealing test case for 
retailing elsewhere on die Web, said 
Eric Brown, an analyst at Forrester 
Research Inc., an on-line research 
group. 

“This is good news for Web com- 
merce," said Nicole Venderbilt at 
Jupiter Communications, an on-line 
industry research groop. “This mar- 
ket is growing so fast, there is 
enough business' to go around." 

Back on terra firma, though, wor- 
ried independent booksellers are 
wondering whether they soon may 
feel another squeeze, even as they 
continue to reel from the prolifer- 
ation of tides in giant bookstores 
with inviting couches and cap- 
puccino bars. 

“People are not going to buy all 
their books on-line,” perhaps only 
10 percent or 15 percent, Mr. Bezos 
said. He, too, likes to spend time in 
his favorite bookstore in Seattle, 
thumbing through pages. 


Mergers 
Buoy Bank 
Earnings 


NEW YORK —In the latest 
sign that U.S. banks have 
profited from mergers, Na- 
tionsBank Corp. said Tuesday 
its third-quarter net income rose 
26 percent, mainly because of 
revenue growth and cost con- 
trols as a result of recent big 
acquisitions. „ 

Mean while, First Chicago 
NBD Corp. said its third- 
quarter earnings rose 8 percent, 
mostly because of increases in 
customer fees. Mellon Bank 
Corp., whose takeover offer of 
CoreStates was spumed last 
week, said third-quarter profit 
was up 12 percent after its pnr- 
. chase of Buck Consultants Inc. 
boosted trust and investment 
management fees. 

NationsBank’s net income 
rose to $788 million from $625 
million. Income from lending 
and leases rose 24 percent, to $2 
billion, and the bank’s net in- 
terest mazgin widened to 3.8 
percent from 3.69 percent. 

At First Chicago, profit rose 
to $385 million from $358 mil- 
lion a year earlier despite a con- 
tinued rise in consumer credit 
delinquencies. The company 
raised its reserves for credit- 
card losses 3 percent, to $191 
million. 

It also said its net interest 
income fell 5 percent, to $921 
milli on from $967 million a 
year earlier, as credit-card re- 
ceivables fell to $17.2 billion 
from $17.7 billion. 

Mellon Bank’s profit rose to 
$191 million as fee revenue 
grew to $635 milli on from $476 
milli on a year earlier. 

About half of the increase 
came from the purchase of 
Buck Consultants in July, 
which raised trust and invest- 
ment-management fees for 
Mellon, the bank said. 

The bank’s income from 
lending fell 13 percent, to $369 
million. Its net interest margin 
□arrowed to 4.24 percent from 
4.29 percent 

NationsBank shares fell 
$1.3125 to close at $6435. First 
Chicago was up 43.75 cents at 
$77,625, and Mellon rose 18.75 
cents to $52.8125. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


4 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The 300 mast traded stocks of the day, 
up to the dosing on Wan Street. 

The Associated Press 


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DMdends 


Per Art R*c Pay 
STOCK SPLIT 
Bone Core I Ml 2 (or I spur. 

Marti Vll 2 lor 1 iput 
Pnine WeMer Gib 3 for 2 spa 

INCREASED 

Enron Corp 0 2375 12-1 12-29 

YEAXEND 

Banco Frances Re o .toro-ir 1A27 

SPECIAL 

Lon do n Fncnooi . 5.00 1073 11-6 

INITIAL 

NoiWkSBmn . JO 117 1M0 

Pane WcbOCfpn - .11 1Z-2 1-2 


Coapany 


AAR Carp 
AJLPepsTr 
B WMPB l HMSn 
Conwwnrtr In* 
EQTT Energy 
F&MBancnp 
FstConnwImFd 
FortbSeciir 
CS FfaundM 
Liberty Term Tr99 
PiMpedSIHIlnco 
" “ rWIBam 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


REGULAR 

a .12 
a 3& 
q .io 

Q 08 
O ATS 
Q 32 
rn .0825 

m sm 
- m 

M J135 
M 035 
Q .08 
0 J5 
0 30 


10-27 12-3 

11- 1 IMS 
10-24 11-4 
10-74 11-10 
10-31 11-14 
10-20 11-1 
10-31 11-14 
»27 11-17 

10-24 11-12 
10-24 11-3 

10- 24 1IV31 
M-3 11-17 

12- a 12-29 

11- 31 13-9 


o-onraot EHniYttxzniaft qjqoois} per 
skon/ADR; ^payable in CamHm faorh; 
mno n B U rn^ w nwiy, 


• i Stock Tables Explained 

'.w Soto figures are umffidaLYeatyliigia and bwrelleijmepcEwoosSZ weeks (Aafecureft 

wwLbdnoH*kdesHii>jinBtfayWhawniiltonRiAiWdirti«iioi ii^ 

‘‘ has been pott year* higWow range and dMdem aw stawn kw the new stocks only. Unless 

onift»rtenoM.i*fle5 of (MsenAiaeannudrfisfaiiBenMrOi based on the Westdedufian. 

. 0 - dcVvjwl elso mUo (Jj. b - armwl rale of cSvidenC ply? Stock dividend c - liquidofing 

iftridcfi&tt-P£e(Ceea3tt.£M-adedd-ne«yMify tow. dd-tas In Ihe last 12 months. 
:* «- dhrfdend declared cr pOW in pmedng 12 months. f- annual rule, increased «i lost 
‘j? (S5CltnirtioiL5-drfideiTdmCnria(ficnf«na2.sut7i«1ln I5^a no«vrT>5JOeiicefax.l-t8v1tJftiil 

-1 dectaied after tol^p or SaStflwJend-i-diwkJerKlpoaclffiK year. omiitwL rfetorrert orno 
action token at loM dividend mealing, k • t&mjond declared or paid this year, on 
- , oocvreolalwe Bine wHb dividends in anrori. m - annual rule, reduced on las! rf+yfrirnt m 

• ‘ n- new issue m Dw past 53 meets. The high-ton rmige begun win the start offend**. 

n im-petfdaTdetvw%p-inflhd»rlden49nm7<»i«eimlawwn.lVE-aTioe-ea n i>ifl > »olio. 

q-dawd^nd moM fund, r- Avidend dedared or paid bi preceding 12 monlbs, phn stock 
'•? dividend, s- stack ip&L Dividend bepmSwab date of spflt *• sates. t-dMdeadpakl la 
■*, stock in preceding 1 2 months estimated casta wdiKimcii-dlvidefid vex -distribution date. 
- n-ireiey8 qrt rhi oh .v-tandkmhifeAvi-inbankn7Ptomrecelveniwpnrii*i.viwwwi.,a*-.*rt 
-a* u nder tfaeSonknaptcyAd. or secnriHes assumed tiysodi can ponies, wd-wbaidbtrtbuled. 
-«*• vrt - vmen feiuerV vw ■ Him wonwSs. x .«t-dhaiderxl or ex-ngMs. bSs - w-disttbU&M, 
nv-vrtmout«rarranb.y-«-<»nileiH] and sales inhilLyld- yield, i -sales in fuL 


Oct. 14, 1997 

Hiali Low Latest Owe Opblf 

Grains 

coemcBOT) 

SOHO bumkWmim- contipirliuiM 
Dec 97 29055 28SU 28514 -514 209,109 

Mar 08 29914 29414 29416 

May 98 30314 29914 299V6 
Jul9B SOM 30215 303 

S«p98 292V6 290 29054 

Dec 98 29055 28714 29M 

JUL99 301 301 3in 

Est sates 584100 Morra solos 80072 
Man open H 37L1 40, op 1450 

SOYBEAN MEAL CCMT) . 

WO lorn- doflon porkn 

W97 239410 23680 23640 -6J0 5893 

Dec 97 235.90 23000 231 JO 430 47^73 
Jan 98 21650 22570 TKJB -3J0 19.188 
Mar 98 22820 22520 22590 -610 18312 
May 98 227J0 22150 22680 -2J0 1 6500 
jure 22650 22650 22530 -190 10401 

EN. wee* zuoo Man's iota MUM 
Moire opm M 121 Up 6803 

fOYBEAN WLKBOT) 

40000 lbs- arts par Oi 

00 97 2652 2617 2620 4L39 1699 

Dec 97 2683 5649 2651 -0J3S 56132 

Jon 98 2500 2671 2673 -0.41 20447 

Mar 98 2523 2498 2501 402 10223 

May 98 15.0 2518 2528 -035 SM66 

M9B 2560 2535 2529 -035 7,1 M 

Esl sotes 16000 MOOM safes 20029 
Menrs open Ini 104495, off 279 

SOYBEANS KOTO 
5000 bunManim- cents par burner 
NB»97 717V? 704Vk JW -13W 90036 

Jan 90 722 71114 -1214 40773 

Mar 98 7781* 715 71814 -Hit 10049 

May *8 73« 732 VS 73454 -1114 14504 

Jul9B 737 73715 730 -11% 12661 

EsL sates 59,000 Mare sries 96782 
Mans open W 182J19, up 3297 

WHEAT ICBOTJ 

5«» Iw eteiteiun- oeote per bosbd 
Dk97 371 345 346W -4Pt 61048 

Mar 90 383V. 378 379V> -4V4 27,127 

May 90 389 3B9, 38M -a, 5239 

Jul9f 389 3860 38714 -244 12J49 

btsdei lion Mean sates 14520 
MatsapaaM 110846 on LIIO 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CM E 83 
40000 te6- cents per te. 

0097 “A5 M.90 -092 7J39 

Die 97 47 J7 *575 6615 -1JK 61.940 

*8 A) -00 68*2 68.97 -695 10*02 

Apf98 OS2 72*0 72*2 4165 72,186 

■JOT 98 TOSS 6982 49.97 -0.45 4652 

Aug *3 1015 6975 4975 4L3S 2722 

ECL sstei 157» Merrt totes 10 lS 30 
Morn open Inf 91321 off 1,113 

FEEDER CATTLE (CHER} 

50003 lbs.- cents per te. 

Qd 97 77.90 74 9q 77.15 ^U7 MW 

>*» 97 78.17 7700 7730 4L35 7JW7 

Jan 98 78 9S 77.90 78.05 OJ5 4191 

Mar 98 7875 7778 77.98 -0*0 2710 

Apr 98 7900 7E1S 78.10 -070 800 

May 98 79*0 WOO 79. HI 4L2S 701 

. Est «0« 2,981 Mam «4*s 1,940 
Mans open W 18,128. an 141 

H0GS4JMH CCMER) 

%a»bs.-CMdsperh. 

Oct 97 6770 *773 67 A3 -072 4584 

Dec 97 6270 61.90 62*7 +4147 20777 

feta 88 6277 61*0 6272 +035 7,971 

Aprn 59JS 5938 5970 *QA2 2*31 

Jon 98 65.90 65.10 6175 +070 U67 

6+L sales 6371 Maas boh 9JM2 
Mars apenM 36*49. up 18 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

4&000 Bis.- cents per fc. 

Feb 98 OSS 61.15 6172 4U2 4.599 

Atar98 6270 6175 61*0 -0J0 733 

May 98 43*0 42.75 43*0 -0*0 146 

EsL sales 2J67 Man soles L228 
MaasapenU7*76apl45 


-0*0 1*5 
■OJO 1 
■OJD 91*00 


-050 10*42 
-OJO 4391 


wph lam Latest Chpe Dptat 

0RAN6E JOKE (NCTIO 
15000 bs^ cents parte. 

Noe 97 6BJM 6670 67.15 +41*0 16345 

Jan9B TTJtf 6975 .7070 -+0*5 U925 

Mar 98 7450 72*0 7500 +4U5 8798 

May 98 76*5 7570 7M5 -+4L45 2*76 

Est sates ItA. Mam sta 7*48 
Man open lot 409B& up 289 

Metals 

COLDOKMUO 
100 boy vlt doBars perlmy ol 
0097 32750 32770 32770 

NOV 97 327*0 

Dir 97 mOO 32850 32970 

Feb 98 33170 329 JO 33050 -050 22*05 

Apr98 333*0 33150 312.10 -050 5*91 

JunW 335*0 32X90 33X90 

S in 335*0 

n 337 JO 4150 

Dec 98 34070 33970 33970 -050 

Ext wiej HA. More sales 10643 
Man open W 177,971 ad 1*95 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCM» 

25000 tee- oaate parte 
Od97 95*0 93*0 94*0 +178 

No* 97 95*0 93*5 9575 +1*5 

Dec 97 9470 9375 95*S +1J0 

Jan 98 9625 9505 9673 +1.78 

Fabn 96*0 9635 9635 +170 

Morn 97.10 95*0 96*0 +1*0 

Aprn 
Morn 
Jen IB 

Est soles NJL Mon sales 3*91 
Mon Open Inf 52724 off 501 

9LVER (HCM90 
5*00 boy «t- ants per trey at 
0097 sruoo 50420 50470 -6*0 58 

NOV 97 58630 -470 1 

Dec97 51478 50158 588*0 -670 70*76 

Jan 96 589*0 -678 20 

Mar 98 520*0 512*0 S47D -670 19*16 

Mar 91 322*0 517*0 517*0 -670 3704 

Jain 526*0 51970 519*0 -670 

Sep 98 527*0 522*0 522*0 
EsL sates M A Men pdes 4969 
Man open Ml 01327. Bd 421 


9615 +1*0 
96*0 95*0 9605 +1JD 
9575 +1*5 


8779 


1*39 

1555 

28*06 

1*76 

L1C 

1635 

1*13 

UP 

973 


Hgb Low Latest Chge OpU 

H-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMAT1F) 
FROOOOO -pis af 100 pd 
Dec 97 99.14 98*8 99.10 +016 13X643 

Morn 98*8 98*0 98*6 +814 6067 

Juan 9814 9814 9814 +816 0 

EsL soles: 79767. 

Open taL- 139,710 off 1.334 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFEJ 
[TL 200 moan -ptaaflOOpd 
Dec 97 11270.11275 112-52 +0*4 116*42 
Mar 98 N.T. H.T. H2*7 +8*4 1*37 

Juan H.T. NT. 112*7 +854 0 

Est net 6X083. Prev: sales.- 65,198 
PmcpenM- 117*79 off Z9Z8 

LIBOR 1-MONTH CCMER) 

S3 mRhn- ph of 100 pet 

NovW 94*3 9132 9432 +801 32.116 

Dec 97 9414 9412 9413 +0*1 18155 

Joan 9425 9425 9425 +801 1791 

EsL safes 5*05 Man sates 530 

Man open lot 72*18 up 189 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI mDkm-ptsaMOOpd. 

Nov 97 9470 9419 9419 +0*1 14355 

Deew • 9416 9414 9415 +801 616821 

Morn 9410 9407 9409 +0*3 491*78 

Jtmn 9403 93.98 9402 +805 340269 

S«P W W« 9191 93JM +0*6 271*19 

Been 9188 9881 9887 +804 227,174 

Mm 99 9887 9X83 9186 +806 157703 

*M99 9182 9379 93*2 +0*6 128090 

Sjl>99 9179 9X76 9879 +006108050 

Dec 99 9872 9X49 9372 +0*6 84466 

MmOO 9872 9870 9172 +0*6 70476 

JaaOO 93*9 93*6 9369 +807 58233 

genes 267*66 Mon sates 18344 
Mans open lot 2*69,728 OR 10265 


-470 


2721 

640 


PLATINUM DIMER) 


50 Soy c 

Oct 97 434*0 43120 43170 020 202 

Jann 440*0 43270 43120 -470 12*46 

■Aprn 421*0 42830 42870 -470 t» 

Jain 42370 -420 21 

esL sdes HA Man not 1*57 
Man open M 13*64 up 1C 


LONDON METALS OMEJ 
Datos per Metric ten 

1634ft 1437ft 

1628*0 1629*0 1644*0 164500 
M tege s ORebgiaftO 
2081*0 5*2*0 2064*0 2065*0 
2109*0 211800 2094*0 20(6*0 



596ft 


598ft 

609*0 


403*0 

<16*0 


AIK nn tmie aawnii U KM 
aaa»<n 6445*0 «««• arena 


Spot 5595*0 5405*0 5605*0 5615*0 

Rmwd 5640*0 565808 5650*0 5660*0 

Hoc Special SS# ereOe) 

S pot 1295ft 1296ft mun 1304*0 

ft ml 1312*0 1318*0 1319*0 1320*0 

Hlgn law Ctei* Cbpe opw 


1673 

1630 

1637 

-39 

4X217 

1704 

1664 

1672 

-35 

26738 

1724 

1892 

1892 

-35 

1X184 

1746 

1710 

1712 

-33 

X636 

1760 

1731 

1731. 

-31 

4737 

1748 

17« 

17-fl 

-31 

9*74 


For lyvtstmeint information 

RcaJTHI MOtel RgQBT every Saturday in the IHT. 


Food 

COOAfNCSE) 

10 oieHc tans- S per ton 
Dec 97 ““ 

Mm 99 
Moyn 
join 
Sep 98 
DK99 

Est sates U183 Man sates 51 S9 
Main epee Mnxea, up 1417 > 


COFFEE CntCSQ 

ZUOOIa.. cents per Kl 

Dec 97 169.75 lOJS 166*0 150 12*52 

Mar 98 15100 14875 15070 -1*5 4752 

MOTTO 1 47 JO 145*0 145.15 -2*0 2701 

JdM 142J0 1482$ 14825 -100 1349 

S ft>98 137.00 13525 13S7S -1*0 491 

Ed. Mtes6JW Mem arts 3*73 

Mon open M 14288 up 69 

S USAS WORLD 11 (NCSE} 

112*00 BB.-ceotspa'te 

Morn 11*8 UTS 1179 -806 91,783 

M S M*9 1179 11*5 unet 21917 

1178 11*8 1176 +801 18135 

Odn 1177 11.67 1L7S +884 15213 

Ed. itf« 1 2470 Morrs sates 9*05 
Maas open tel 1 51714 ep 883 


Financial 

US T BILLS {CMER} 

nratnon-ptsonoopet 

DecW 95*3 m m 95*3 undL 4*88 

Mor9« 95*5 95*4 95*5 +0.QJ 4121 

J«N 96*2 95*0 95*2 +806 199 

&LM6»3n Momsdes 
Man <vm lot 9208 offl 

5 YR TREASURY {CBOT} 

naoopo odo-n 1 64asof H» pel 

Been 107-33 107-19 H7-32 +18 223*33 
Jon 98 ,14 oucte 

Ed. sales 30000 Mum soles 
Mm cpmUL off 22X483 

WYRrtEAS(fRV(CBOn 
SlGUOa prtn- pis 6 32ods of 100 pd 

n®" 13 ’KW* 11812. +15 381561 
Mre98 Wf-29 189-26 1W4H +15 18148 
109-25 +15 2 

&8adndUW Mare sates 
Mom open Ml. off 401404 

“™£*5URY BONDS KBun 

{Spd-S108008-ets&32nd|fif WiKO 

“mb VtiOU 38 
MarW HUE 11MB 115-18 +27 <8616 
*•98 115-06 *27 8*04 

Ed sales 240*00 Mam ms 
Manapaa lot 1, off 728Ka 

LONG GILT (LWFE) 

KUn-pb &37nta at 100 pd 
2*2 11821 +085191*76 

Mnr98 N.T. N.T. 119-19 +M5 W62 
Ed. sdes: 48928 Pm, sales: 50236 
Pm. span 88: 198331 elf MW 

GERMAN CQV. BUND flJPPffl 

□Mmooo-pcsonoop^ 

E**9J >Og 1^54 WITS 44135 304,139 ■ 
Morn 101.90 101*5 102*0 +834 7701 
CsLiduu 107,691, Pm: sates; 92*60 
Aw. open 84; 311*30 e«l43» 


BRITISH POUND CCMER} 

iS^TlllAB 8*006 28612 
Mrn w 1*108 -0*006 253 

-tamre 1*0488*004 37 

Ed. sales 4*91 Man SOM 442 
Man open M 29*91 off 52 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100*00 dances. 5 per Cam. Or 
ESS T2L SS -7259 8*016 54403 

l S 0r - (S3. 72928*016 2*71 

Jwn 7332 7300 73168*016 5T0 

EsL sates 4976 Man sates 341 
Mon opeo Int 59788 oft 162 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 2X000 marta, s par marti 

SES. ™ -22 ,.sr»-80012 69*70 

***** -gSS "22 *757**0)3 8546 

Junes &73 sm J7B3800I2 2*17 

EsL soles 14186 Man sales 8220 ' 

Man apea tnt 74728 off 800 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

S5PB. -*126 87*86 

MarW J479 *395 *405 ■*!» ™ 

■™9t *519 -JJ126 143 

&L sates 18674 Mara sates 7.997 
Mem open W B&61 L art 2*4S 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

13MH0 bones. Spa fame 

Morn *961 4930 6953 8.0023 1*75 

JunM 7023 7023 70168*028 265 

Est- sates 8*n Man sates 3*26 
Mem open bd 41*44 off 121 

MECCAN PESO (CMEfD 
304000 pesos. S per peso 

-jjg .126*5+ *0440 28387 

Mar98 .12235 J22D0 .I2235+JM4M un 

juaes .11875 .118m iws+JsSS ira 

Efi. sates 4453 Man S(8ta 37 
Man open 8d 4IUS2. off 134 

WJOJJ™ SJE RLJ W OJ FFH3 

£500*00 - eh el 100 pd 

Dec 97 9X58 OiSi njrt 

**3 nst. 91S3 raS 

Junra 92*0 9X57 915B +SS 

Sep 98 9270 9ZA7 n*9 tc*5 

Dec 98 92J5 92*2 9Zm +8« 

MarW 9X02 92,97 93*0 lam 

JM99 9117 9112 91M +£» 

^.sMet: «JOO. Pm. Bales: 67579 
Pm.apaiMi 434515 aR 178 


High Um Latest Chge OpU 

Junn 95*8 95*2 95*7 +417 85*14 

Sep 98 95.17 95*9 9513 +412 61*79 

Dec 98 9512 95*6 95*7 +410 52.713 

Mar 99 94*9 94*3 94*7 +413 27*44 

EsL sates; 149,905 Pm. sates: 66*31 
Pie*, open hit: 447*53 off 7*33 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCT1Q 
50*00 Dxl- cards per lb. 

Dec 97 72.12 71*0 7145 +426 90284 

MoN 73*0 73*0 7X12 +425 15869 

Moyn 7425 73*0-73*0 +421 0043 

JidW 7500 74*0 7462 +422 7*24 

Odn 7555 7550 7555 undl 762 

Est sides NJL Mem sates 5524 
Man open lid 91,191 up 761 

HEATINCOILWMER) 

424)00 gal cents pir gal 
Nov 97 58.90 S6MS 57.01 -1J6 4X213 

Dec 97 99*5 5400 58.17 -1*9 40518 

Jan *8 4455 58JS SX*2 -1*4 21.4S4 

FW»ra 6480 ».I0 59*2 -1.14 11.129 

Mar9B 59.90 5440 58*2 499 4330 

Aprn 58.15 56.95 5497 -479 5390 

May 98 5640 5550 5562 469 3*31 

Est. sMes HA. Mans sales 25556 
Man open hit 14X704, off 25 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (HMER3 
1*00 M4-dagm per bbL 

N0VW 2-13 21.13 2470 tmdi 

Dec 97 21*7 20*5 20*0 457 

Janra 21J2 2465 2X79 -453 

MM 31*8 2UM 2473 -446 

AteW 31.15 2040 2045 -040 

Aprn 21*8 20*5 2457 -435 

EsL solas NA. Man sates 112*38 
Man open ltd 44X027, off 6*68 


77*34 

99,954 

50418 

27*91 

15170 

12415 


45759 

35,122 

27*54 

19*68 

1X849 

0738 


3X577 

20511 

15243 

5886 

5685 

0702 

2477 

1*02 




□0868 

11X665 

86*64 

6X951 

6X800 

542S8 

30795 


DM1 nOM - ate at TOO pa" 

KwW 96JB 9523 94ii ™ 

DSC 97 96*7 96.24 US 

Jann 96.19 96.18 96)0 ££ 

»094 95.96 I?* 310215 

+flS 2S5474 

S5 gS SS S 5SK 

ss? ss sj ss's 

■Sl.TSJt.sS. 8 ® 

Pm.qienhdj 1 705*54 SuijS** 13 

3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIP) 
FPSinflBce-idjoilOOpa 

Dec 97 9627 9425 9625 i 0*1 + 

EE? K49 52 '!« SEo 

SUE.” 85158 

EjL solas: 3X483. 

(Jpaa tab 22X161 Off 1.931. 

I-MOHTH EURO LIRA CUFFS 
17L IndBm-ptid 100 pet 
DOC 97 9X99 9X83 9X99 iQ36 

MarM MO .9440 WTO ,D77 


MATURALGAS (NMEIO 
loooo mn Mn, Spar ran bta 
Novw 3*60 1980 1006 4027 

Dee 97 3.145 3*81 1108 4*33 

Joan 1120 3*78 3*8« 4*30 

FebW 2800 2760 2780 41*04 

MarW 2-535 2*15 2*15 4*15 

Apr98 2315 2295 2*00 -4010 

EsL satas MA Man sates 47.774 
Man aprn tat 236*55 up 437 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMEIO 
42893 got certs per gal 
Nor 97 4070 3s2fa 58*8 4*5 

DecW 4040 SXI0 5X74 -1.10 

6025 5848 58*0 -1.18 

2*£ 60*0 58JO 59.10 -1*3 

Mor« 40*5 SJJD 5940 -1*0 

Aprn 6340 62*0 62.10 *95 

„ 61*5 4.95 

Junn 61.90 61.15 61.15 4.45 

Ed. sates HA. Mam sates 22409 
Man open bit 92*05 o0 261 

GASOIL OPE) 

35“^° WO-75 -0*0 3X109 
2*2 12^°° le2J0 18150 UndL 1X188 
}2H£ ,84JW 184*5 — 0*0 1X136 
Fj*n 185*0 184*0 184JS +035 7,182 

Mmn 182*0 181*0 18175 +050 X282 

fiC?L S-I- ftT - 179. CO +075 2*05 
(tayra N.T. N.T. 17625 +075 W3T 

EsL srtn 9*80. Pm. sates : 9,908 
Pm. open taL: 9X930 up 66 

BRENT OIL QPQ 

UJ.dpampg.beni- ten rfl*» barrels 
Movw 20*0 19*0 19*8 — n*6 34*78 

W-B !V-a-aS 

j°°” 1940-050 21,162 

5SJ2, Si! 32- 50 19^4 -044 1X469 
**■ " ’■« W40 1941 -044 4735 

Apr98 1974 1970 19*8 —042 X391 

EM sates: 71,128. Pm. sates: 

Pwv.apenln Li 174460 up 7.196 

Stock Indeuo 

» COMP INDEX CCMEW^ 

500xbuta 

SS-S 97840 +2*5 187*41 
ySS St" W7.10 +010 1550 
JWI98 1000*0 999*0 999*0 +140 UB7 
Ed solaiKA. Mews ertes 2X317 • 

Man open lm 19X7SX 00958 

PTSE MOQJFFEI 
05 per hde* paint 

2*2 95! 5351 0 D55* SJS 7X005 
Morn 093* 53910 53910 -5* 1,936 

7426. Prev. sates! X664 
P"». Open b At 7x960 all 11 

CAC4Q tMATIF) 

FFM0 per Index petal 

22.2, SM TW'J* 301411 +3J» 3X561 

IEI2 2S 5 30310 + 100 J, - 1H 

S 2S 1 ! “ 40 -° * 310 njH> 

Morn 3067* 30110 3065* + 2*0 1X973 

£t*ates: 11*05. 

Open tat: 8XS13 off 412. 


(* 


* Int 


Commodity Indexes 


MofttYs 

Rtiites 

futures 

CRB 


dose 

1*36*0 1*35*0 

1*8670 1*8S40 

14728 14742 

244*3 25679 

/JEEZ : J£<mAsiadBkdPie3kl*iKhn 


ClV P *%VC 


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{!“">■ It; 

Kar S s 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


PAG 


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PhiMps Consumer 
Communications 


Lucent Technologies 
Consumer Products 






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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1997 


Tuesday’s 4 P.RI. Close 

The 1600 nwsl Soiled stocks of the day. 
Hottawkfe prices not reflecting tote trades e&ewhere. 
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27%1S% CPI 56 2J 26 1000 X 24% X +119 
62% 41U CSX 1.04 18 15 5275 59% £7% 59% +to 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1997 


PAGE 17 1 


EUROPE 


4 Partners 

Agree to 
New Chiefs 
For Airbus 


CmcdcJt* Ow SvgFnm Dvrwhn 

nf^SJ 5 T'. The . four Partners 
of Airbus Industrie said Tues- 
day thai they would change the 
leadership at. the Europero air- 
craft consortium as part of ef- 
forts to speed up its restructuring 
into an integrated company. 

Airbus, under pressure from 
Us American rival, Boeing Co 
aims to transform itself into a 
limited liability company from 

by the 

start of 1999. 

Tlw French, German. British 


and Spanish partners said Ed" 


aard Reuter would step down 
by early next year at the latest 
and be replaced by one of the 
partner’s presidents * ‘to ensure 
consistent shareholder repres- 
entation and guidance in the 
supervisory beard.” 

Manfred Bischoff, the chief 
executive of Daimler-Benz Ae- 
rospace AG, is likely to replace 
Mr. Reuter, while remaining 
head of the German company. 

The partners will also namg a 
successor to Airbus's man- 
aging director, Jean Pierson of 
France, who retires next year. 

Mr. Reuter, whose mandate 
was to end Dec. 31, 1999, has 
complained about the slow pace 
of restructuring. He criticized 
the partners for letting disputes 
oyer such matters as asset re- 
distribution interfere with cre- 


ating a single corporate entity 


that would be more efficient 
and could better compete with 
Boeing. ( Reuters, Bloomberg) 


A French Defense Juggernaut? 


Cavdrib, O vrSv ff FnmlDtiftBHla 

PARIS — France’s plan to re- 
Sttucture its defimse^iectronics in- 
*JSry around Thomson-CSF will 
create a player with a powerful ne- 
§°aating position in cross-border 
deals crucial to the restructuring of 
the European industry, analysts sad. 

But some industry specialists said 
the structure chosen for Thomson- 
CSF may not allow the rapid de- 
cision-making essential ■ for 
Emope’s industry, given the U.S. 
defense sector’s long head start 

"It’s very encouraging,” said 
Sash Tusa. an analyst with UBS 
Securities. ’“ITiomson-CSF is now 
the natural partner for other Euro- 
peans to join.” 

The government said on Monday 
that ithad asked Alcatel Alsthom &A, 
Aerospatiale and Dassault Industries 
SA to take part of its 58 percent stake 

in Thomson. The state plans to keep 
at least 35 percent of die company. 


The AJcatel-bassauit-Aerospa- 
tiale-Tbomson combination will be 
No. 1 worldwide in military com- 
munications, No. 1 in Europe and 
No. 3 globally in radar and coun- 
termeasures. and No. 1 id Europe 
and fourth worldwide in- telecom- 
munication satellites, Alcatel said. 

France signaled that die new part- 
nership was open to forging alliances 
with such European firms as General 
Electric Co. afJBrizain and Daimler- 
Benz Aerospace AG of Gennany. 

- Officials at companies left out of 
the project grumbled that France 
had put the i nter ests of its domestic 
industry ahead of the European sec- 
tor’s restructuring. 

“We think it’s regrettable that the 
French government has not chosen a 
more immediate European solu- 
tion,” said a spokesman for British 
Aerospace, which had a deal with 
Lagardere Grocp to join parts of its 
business with an eventual 


Lagardere combination. A spokes- 
man for Daimler-Benz said the gov- 
ernment's strategy was “purely a 
French solution ,’ 7 adding that “Our. 
way is the European solution. " 

Last year, the center-right govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Alain Jnppe 
decided to sell all of Thomson to 
Lagardere, but after Lagardere an- 
nounced plans to sell Thomson's 
consrimer-electmiiifs arm to Daewoo 
Electronics Cop. of South Korea, the 
government canceled die sale. 

In July, Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin canceled another plan by the 
previous center-right government to 
sell Thomson CSF. In the time lead- 
ing up to that cancellation. General 
Electric Co., British Aerospace PLC 
and Daimler-Benz Aerospace 
scrambled to sign strategic agree- 
ments to combine parts of their busi- 
nesses with whichever French com- 
pany gained control of Thomson 
CSF. ( Reuters . NYT) 


Carrefour 
Shifts Board 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Carrefour SA said 
Tuesday h would change its cor- 
porate structure as die founders 
of the company, which is rapidly 
expanding internationally, 
ceded more power to manag ers 
Carrefour, France’s largest 
traded food retailer, 
been run by a management 
board in charge of operations 
and a supervisory board in 
charge of strategic decisions. It 
will now be run by an eight- 
person board in charge of both 
strategy and operations. 

The new board will be led by 
Daniel Bernard, 51, who cur- 
rently heads the management 
board. 

Carrefour' s shares closed at 
3,550 francs ($603. 13), up 6 , or 
0.17 percent. 




MESSIER: Young New Manager Is Teaching a French Dinosaur How to Survive 


. himtkm: '- . v : " Paiis . ■ . 

• ' -CAC 4°- ; 

: ‘5S» 1 3250 


M J J A S Q 
1997 


M J J A S O 
1997 


M jj aso; 

1997 

2#ys T;. ? 

■ • .s&wv / vi-wiMx.-.. 93 :-Qg} 


Tirestfay ".'- Prav." 


Con tinned from Page 13 


matters of style as well as substance. 
Married and the father of five, he 
dresses casually and has an easy 
maimer, a finn grasp of numbers and 
a flair for salesmanship. 

A fluent speaker of English, be 
talks readily about g lnhaliratinn and 
return on equity, terms often absent 
from the French business vocabulary, 
and he is friendly wife employees, 
capable of the kind of egalitarian 
gestures that his septuagenarian pre- 
decessor, Guy Dejouany, was never 
guilty of making. 

This year, for instance, Mr. 
Messier invited 5,000 employees 
under fee age of 30 to a kind of town 
meeting in Paris, where he ex- 
plained his goals, fielded questions 
for more than two hours and then 
was host of a dinner rod dance. 

For all his soundbreaking 
moves, however, Mr. Messier has 


been careful not to cot off Generate 
des Eanx from its roots: The com- 
pany is still landing fee kind of big 
government contracts that have long 
been its bread and butter. 

Mr. Messier can pull off all these 
disparate feats because he is a child 
of the very establishment he is shak- 
ing up. Like much of France’s busi- 
ness and political elite^he is a gradu- 
ate of the Ecole National e d’ Admin- 
istration. As a former aide to the 
conservative finan ce minister, and 
■ later prime minister, Edouar d Bal- 
Iadnr, he had good political con- 
nections, and as a partner at Lazard 
Freres & Co., the venerable invest- 
ment bank, he came with the right 
land of corporate calling card. 

When Mr. Messier took control of 
Generate des Earn, it was delivering 
services such as water and cable tele- 
vision in cozy relationships wife mu- 
nicipal governments across Ranee. 
Its executives, who saw their busi- 


ness as heavily dependent on polit- 
ical favor, were suspected of illegal 
dotations to political parties, and Mr. 
Dejouany was under investigation, 
along with a clutch of other company 
managers. The investigations are 
continuing, but there have been no 
indictments. 

And, like many French giants. 
Generate des Eaux was in abysmal 
financial shape. Numerous acqui- 
sitions had produced a mountain of 
debt, and bad real-estate invest- 
ments had pushed fee company into 
debt. Between fee criminal inves- 
tigations rod the financial troubles, 
many began to wonder whether 
Generate des Eanx would be able to 
squeeze the potential from the new 
businesses it was entering, including 
television and telecommunications. 

Mr. Messier’s youth — he was 39 
when named to the top job. the 
equivalent of chairman and chief 
executive — caused some captains 


of French 
pany’s board. 


industry on the coro- 
rd, such 


as the feisty 
ch airman of PcagcoU Jacques CaJ- 
vet, to question whether he was up to 
fee task of turning things around. 

But Mr. Messier quickly showed 
just how aggressive he coaid be. 

He mopped up the real-estate 
problems, concentrating the com- 
pany’s property holdings in a newly 
created subsidiary, ana he shaved 
net debt — by the end of this year, he 
hopes to cut it to $5.3 billion. 

His goal now is to focus on three 
core businesses — water and en- 
ergy, property development and me- 
dia and t e tec ommumcition i — and 
to raise shareholder returns. 

Toward that end, the company is 
tapping its rich experience in the 
French water and utilities market to 
expand abroad, where it is carving 
out a lucrative business in countries 
that expect to have trouble meeting 
their water and energy needs. 





IK ^ 1 ii 1 







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jg^^HESSBBEK 

t—jmaL-uzvsm 

ii, 1 j '"''yn ! " r j mv* 


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3^31.02 3£gW4ft»| 





Source: Telekuis 

bueaKUjnful Herald TriNme 

Very briefly; 


• Pirelli SpA's Cables & Systems unit signed a contract with 
Electridte de France for the joint development of a high- 
iucting cable system for power-trans- 


sut 


mission m 


> Roche Holding AG’s third-quarter sales rose 18 percent, to 


4.68 billion Swiss francs ($3.2 billion), helped by a weaker 
! fee drug company's $ 1.1 billion acquisition of 


Swiss franc and fee drug company' * 
the U.S. flavors company Tastemaker. 

•The Organization for Economic Cooperation and De- 
velopment doubts that French and Italian plans to cut the legal 
work week will create jobs, John Martin Evans, a top econ- 
omist wife fee OECD, said. 

• Britain’s retail sales rose at an annual rate of 2.1 percent in 
September, their slowest rise in 18 months, as higher interest 
rales combined wife the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, to 
dull shoppers* enthusiasm, fee British Retail Consortium said. 
.• Electronic Data Systems Corp„ a U.S. computer-services 
company, said it was still interested in buying a 2 percent stake 
in Banca di Roma SpA. EDS is expected to receive a 10 -year 
contract from the bank in exchange, D Mondo magazine 
reported. Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Kfh lam Qw 


* 


TUesday, Oct. 14 

Prices In loco) aurenoes. 
T&ekurs 

High Lew das* Prat. 


Amsterdam AExwtacj&H 

PlfWWS. 93122 

AM 4 M 0 
169 JO 169 JO 
5130 54.10 
36630 367 JO 
14110 14170 
35 35 

9130 M 
11436 11430 
189 JO 191.10 
3X30 3110 
IS 85.10 
70.70 70 

5930 58J0 
99 99 * 
349 M 
130 w.w 

m «o 
TUB 91 
7180 7490 
51 51,40 
7430 74J0 
73 70.10 
59.90 59.90 
2S3 256 

16410 1645) 
125 12450 
8140 II JO 
194 T9190 
£040 60.90 
193 19230 

liojo lino 

11120 11X50 
10X70 109 JO 
11X30 11180 
4450 4490 
257 JO 26X70 



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Sfcraons 

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VEW 


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in 


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419.60 

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575 

841 JO 

1201 


179 
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887 
41 7 JO 

loxio 

575 


1191 


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in 18345 
27460 280 

17160 12X50 
1538 1570 

891 900 

41940 471 

10X10 10150 
575 £05 

841 B4CL2S 
1195 1200 


456 441 
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BrltTatecv 445 445 

BTR 245 140 

Branch Colftol 11-22 11.12 

BoricmGp 136 134 

Wrote 


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Comal Data 


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57 57 JO 
72J0 7X50 
2730 2730 
149 149.90 


135 135 

sis - sir. 

WO 192 

88 W 

14X50 149 JO 

93 9X50 


5450 
190 
57 JO 
7X50 
28.10. 

UD 

4*30 

136 
. 517: 
192 
92 
149 
91te 


563 SJ5 
434 419 
535 530 

870 118 

408 483 

138 131 
695 480 

Bedroom patents 54B 499 

EMI Group 407 577 

Energy Group 695 447 

EnterpriseCt 7J77 694 

ForoCdooW 136 133 

Gent Accident llte 1135 

GEC 405 4 

GUI 1440 1410 

GkaoWetoew. 1X72 1X58 

Granada Gp 9.12 933 


Grand Met 

gusT 

GreenofaGp 

Gutonexi 

GUS 

l^Scifidgo 

K3 

linpl Tobacco 


Hong Kong 


Am jy Prep* 
Bk Eat Asia 
Camay PodBc 
OmagKaag 
acirrfrodtad 


gjnolJ^W 


aocf 




Bangkok 


teAdttafpSx 

^BongAcAOiF 

KroogTItolBk 

PTTEteUr 
SlonCemMlF 
Stoat Com BkF 
Ta 


SE T Mac g.» 
Piwnaac 53235 


TbalAtotws 
iFomlttl 


TnaiF«Rt»F 

UMCnmm 


in 

2X5B 

402 

N.I. 

99 

N-K 

5450 

123 

110 


242 248 242 

M7 148 M9 

20.75 21 21JS 

*0 400 4M 

RT. H.T. 530 

9S 95 WJ 0 

2X75 28L7S 29 

54 54J0 5450 

119 120 126 

M2 103 no 


HKCWrwGcj 
HKEJedrfC 
HKTetocom 
HopetteO Hdgt 

Hd. 

Hern'toftlQt* 

Ortortol Press 
PeortOrtentoi 




Bombay 


llevex 

HtadattPdbn 
tod Dev Bk 

nc 

MotanogorTd 

Rettoncetod 

SMeBktotti 




small— 

' 5100 Load Co. 

Smim 90 Mb: 401230 

mriim; VU1 05 Sm Poe A 

400 576 59175 58935 

13801341.25 13691^9» 

sno 494 SB 49735 
103JO 102 10235 10150 

5WJ0 587-50 5Wte SU 
J75 271 JO 27450 

479 400 40975 42425 

M47S 27735 278 38375 

339 334 337 33735 


a 

Haaa 

iaaUOLSi 


PmkrorolSTUO 

X25 

a 

835 

XM 

27.10 

2640 

2645 

2645 

93S 

840 

X70 

X95 

B3J5 

8X50 

BUS 

8X75. 

21 JD 

2X10 

2X20 

2130 

40 AU 

3X90 

39 

39 JO 

4X40 

3X40 

39 

39 

« 

3X90 

3XM) 

3X30 

7 

7JD 

7.10 

1435 

13J0 

1330 

1X50 

90 

8650 

B 6 J 0 

89 

R7H 

740 

740 

740 

6395 

59 

59 35 

8X50 

ULJS 

1438 

1485 

1450 

2X75 

2770 

20 

29 

1740 

1640 

1675 

1495 

X90 

375 

175 

340 

2*3 

235 

237 

2*7 

7135 

68 

a 

7035 

72.10 

2140 

2145 

2140 

31.65 

21 JO 

21 J5 

2144 

1735 

1735 

7745 

1735 

45 

4140 

43JU 

4430 

X40 

230 

2 JD 

235 

a9i 

080 

043 

84/ 

9XJ0 

8X50 

S87J 

9735 

440 

446 

447 

432 

685 

635 

6 JS 

635 

630 

6*5 

6 J 6 

635 

57 

5540 

5S-W 

5650 

2635 

1X10 

1430 

2635 

1430 

2645 

1445 


Load Sec 

Lnsroo 

Legal Gal Grp 
UoydsTSBGp 
LuanVorfty 
AtoteSpincrr 
ME PC 


IGrtd 
NaO Paver 


Ned 
NarakliUaton 
DrtBige 
P&O 


Preraiw Famdl 


Jakarta 


ec«JJ 

P l M ofc S»U9 


Astoi 

UMitodan 

BkNegoro 

GodongGaw 

tROOCCRMM 


t Brussels 


Ban tod 

SSL 

CBR 

Cobnyt 

DeontoeUaa 

Efcctmbd 


ElccMtaa 

FartHAC 


Forts I 
Geeaat 
G8L 

Gw Basque 


SSSE 


50My 

TlUCtoM 

UCB 


1685 

7600 

9300 

3325 

J0475 

1800 

7510 

1 S» 

7440 

1670 

5800 

15050 

15200 

14775 

5140 

9850 

3450 

7190 

307? 

133300 


BEL-iatodeK 2*8X02 
pmtoc 2*5*31 

1665 1600 1685 

7530 7550 76» 

9130 9300 9170 

3200 JB2S 3275 
30200 20375 2^ 
1765 1795 1795 

7470 7450 7420 

3475 3545 35*0 

7360 7440 7410 

1610 1430 1655 

5730 5»0 5800 

1495D 15050 JJ075 
15075 15175 15175 
14375 14675 1447S 
50W 5140 5140 

9600 9W0 «SD 

313O 3430 3305 

JUS 7175 2180 

3055 3070 3065 

130050 131500 132800 


Mosal 
SonpoemoHM 
Semen Gt^ 
TetokomurdkMl 


2850 7625 2675 2775 

875 m 05 

350 775 TO B0 

9175 9^ 9^ 9200 

2100 79SC 2 KH ££ 

4X0 2? £25 £52 

9000 8925 8 9K 8975 

6050 5850 3900 SOS 

3250 3150 3775 3200 
3750 3650 3700 3750 


Johannesburg 


ABSA Group 


31 3X40 

19420 W Si IN 

261.20 2SMQ 26OA0 261 jO 

765 262 26460 26180 


31 JO 3WO 




Copenhagen 


BGBonh 


e*s « 8 S W » 5j 
SSK S 

DuoNco 389 3M 55 

D«_De 8 rtf» 


OS fiSeS 482® 4900V 480019 


Bmtaw 
CG-SodBi 
Oe 

MtMdn 

FaMoflBh 

Gencar 

Ear 

hear 

JatotoMftoS 
Liberty Mgi 
LtoettyLWe 
LMJieStnxt 
Mtaoreo 
NefloM 
Nedcv 


12 12 12X5 

53 53J0 5X10 


4. TO 6,01 
Hi 334 
187 3J7 

411 4 

731 7-06 

IjO 737 
19J8 1X75 
9J9 9-51 

192 385 

8J5 X41 
257 252 
10J8 TtU2 
256 2J8 
5.17 555 

460 752 
X30 123 
454 436 

5^44 5J9 

Many AIM 14.15 1X62 

tWIoMGrtd 258 254 

445 535 

9XJ 935 
73* 7 JO 
X54 349 

13) 237 

7J2 742 

ag us 

PMaqkn uo ij* 

PonwGen _ 7J3 743 

537 556 

7.10 6J6 
1045 MJ35 
346 33? 
1U4 100* 
343 331 

430 4VJ 
240 3jB 
7J7 7-35 

135 . 32S 
955 937 
950 933 

245 230 

490 652 

8%r* *i is 

SAAuy ' 469 4.43 

SdTOJeo_ 2C32 19^ 

Sort Newcotfe 757 498 

s is 

he&* J s 

Sicfce 1X37 13.10 

Sndtb Neotev 1-88 156 

Sato* 425 404 

Sattstod 954 946 

saemEta: 

StooeoxxO 648 642 

StadoErter 8^ W 

si Si 

5c££ ywsr IS ^ 

Tl Groop 4« 4J9 

Tocnttw 3^ 339 

UnSever Affi 439 

UWAawnoffl 4S 478 

UtoNasn 407 8 

UWWWte 748 732 

Vendor* totals 431 43“ 

Vobofone 349 xc 

WUthrend 857 _ J 

W^Hdgx 1M 131 


Pm- 


Mgh 

Lew 

Close 

446 





142 


5240 

5040 

stcm 

447 


7430 

7235 

7795 

246 


1760 

1725 

1747 

11.18 


29100 

28050 

7H940 

136 


475 

4575 

4745 

545 

Edom 

72SS) 

91 SO 

91 5S 

621 

EMI 

10840 

107KI 

10755 

533 

fiat 

6380 

6195 

6740 

X19 

Genenta Asdc 

40200 

39000 

40150 

648 

IM1 

18050 

17690 

17875 

3 34 

IKA 

2685 

2655 

7670 

696 

541 

Set 

6335 

8890 

4715 

8760 

6240 

8760 

543 

Medotcnca 

13780 

13550 

13780 

650 


1370 

1337 

1350 

697 

OBrotfl 

980 

Ml 

967 

14* 

Parmalat 

2910 

7/B0 

2825 

1139 

Pbrfl 

5335 

5130 

5170 

401 

RAS 

15530 

15275 

1S415 

74.73 


25700 

Tmn 

25300 

1330 

S Panto Torino 

13650 

13210 

13600 

936 

TeteMlfeSa 

11700 

11500 

11645 

ms 

TIM 

7200 

7050 

7055 




PtoauB-Md 

ProroodBS 

Romm 


Rh-PontencA 

Sawfi 

Sdnader 

SEB 

SG5 Thomson 

Sb Generate 


SI Goteto 

Suezide) 


Total B 
IMnor 
Wien 


Fwl« 

i 

CSF 


2050 2793 
2099 2070 
17340 16830 
1600 1652 

277 26520 
553 5*0 

380 yn g> 
05 771 

555 539 

912 892 

3028 2970 

920 901 

1555 1S85 
654 £38 

682 656 

19S 182 

656 641 

12130 11X50 
395.90 381 


2839 2839 
2087 2107 
1712D 169.10 
1655 1670 

2742) 265 

543 546 

37740 379 

805 836 

539 533 

909 900 

3020 2990 
901 921 

1555 15.10 
£51 6*5 

660 672 

78870 18X50 
646 650 

17130 11940 
39240 38X50 


Sao Paulo 


: 1249748 



High 

LOW 

Ctase 

Prey. 

ABBA 

109 JO 

107 

109 

10750 

AssSTonm 

2*7 JO 

245 

2*6 

246 

Astm A 

IX 127J0 

179 

12950 


256 

70 

256 

252 

Ataafir 

321 JO 

319 

3KI 

319 


674 

640 

67ft 

6*8 

Evkssoo B 

36X50 

365 

367 

365 

llfmtt B 

324 

3)8 

370 

322 

tacenOnA 

711 

700 

710 

TOO 

tovestorB 

402 X4J0 39550 

398 

MoDoB 

XI 

77650 

281 

27050 


270 

263 

263 

274 

sSsssy* 

jtrr u .1 oi TMcn 

26750 

263 

259 

260 

240 

Santa B 

233 

730 

230 

233 

SCAB 

in 

18* 

IUA.9 

IV 

S-EBataiA 

92 

9X50 

9150 

9X50 


364 

356 35650 

3S7 


313 

306 

312 

30750 

SKFB 

236 

23* 

23* 

236 

S^arbonknoA 

IB* 111 JO 18350 
131 IX 12X50 

182 

12650 

SvHtokMsA 

270 

265 26750 

267 

VWwB 

23X50 22750 

229 

229 



55 2355 2320 2X10 
74*20 743 7*330 


.V2, 10W 


$stif m 'is V. 

TtoDWAfi 


3 K 35 30 MS 

SS 475 *3863 *2S 

IT? 455 *69 *M 


_ 74340 

'3340 3320 33J0 34 

1?S fl* ^ 

U75 2450 2*J0 24W 

103 199 3 32J5 

tl 6730 6140 *730 

355 355 SS 355 

13720 1» 06 13*2 

1640 7640 1440 1^8 

HB 101 562 TO 

1170 18J0 1X10 1X70 

„ lirlr 109 10720 108 

BSSSmhBGP 4640 4553 455) *425 

525^^ SS 62 42.18 

KRSSSSm 139 13740 13740 U 8 

SAfegg ha 36 3635 36 

SjO 6330 64 W 

^ 212 2 W J!? m 

Tiger (Ml 


74 7110 73J0 72 


Frankfurt °KS£gS 


AMS a 


I 


ISIJD 

ST" S3 

ssr 

unv J444 

SSSST 1 «s 

DMKteSro* 17»*S 

gas si 

5Sm u>» 

35““ 4 

“I 

S -J 

asr « 

LsnosaR B*g 
Hm 539 

Mwerom C’ 


179 J0 181 5 

■*§ ! 1S as 

i I! 

£S 8iS || 

IDS ior.10 

67.V *7.73 7B35 

ss sa M 

? s * J 

**30 6X20 6*» 
ran 114 75 13B-2 
M70 9120 

.SS .5u 

“S i" SJ 

JM 3*010 3SB 

% w £ & 
uS 04 BM0 

%%:§ 

UlV 825 8^ 

iaw 39 10 39 § 

*2 5*5 ^ 

». 597 **gj 

“o 5*450 52» 


Kuala Lumpur 

B 20 *20 05 

10 1020 10 
1710 1730 1720 
*JS 630 630 

io io TO» 

945 9 JO 925 

244 2-44 146 

328 322 320 

*70 730 7.10 

2150 2X50 26S 
4J0 U0 635 

10 10.10 to» 

9 945 9-» 
U3D na iia 
434 436 448 


K I 

a 

gsssr w 

Sd?wtoe« 

YTL 




The Trib Index 

Prices as <3 300 P A*. New Vort Won 

Jan. 1. 7882 a 100. 

Lwd 

Change 

% Change 

year to date 
% change 
+19.96 

World Index 

178.91 

-0.23 

-0.13 

lleglonel Index** 
Aab/PacMc 

114.77 

-1.82 

-1.56 

-7.02 

Europe 

198.19 

*0.12 

+0.06 

+22.95 

N. America 

211.63 

+024 

+0.11 

+80.71 

S. America 

Indtrotrtsl indexes 

179.49 

+2.05 

+1.16 

+56.86 

Capital goods 

226.93 

+ao8 

+0.04 

+32-77 

Consumer goods 

199.23 

+067 

+0.44 

+23.42 

Energy 

209.85 

+0^1 

+0.10 

+22.93 

Fkiance 

130£1 

-1-34 

-1.02 

+12.15 

MsceVaneous 

189.57 

•0.78 

-0.41 

+17.18 

Raw Materials 

184.02 

-3.33 

-1.78 

+4.93 

Service 

171 J99 

+0.79 

+0.46 

+2525 

UtWes ■ 

172-93 

-0-29 

-a i7 

+20.54 

T7w mromabonol Herald Trtbuna Wortd Stock Index O Uaoks me 17.& dollar values ol 
200 IntomasonaBy Hvestatto stocks from 25 countries. For more tntormaUon, a free 
booklet Is avBtatttgtnrmirttnB to Tire Trib Moc.181 Avenue Cnarias ds GaiOe. 

92S21 NmXBy Codex. France. 


CoeipBoS by Btoombeig Netn. 

HUh 

Law dose 

Prw. 

High Law 

Close Prey. 


fax +49- S9- 12 5-5 -44 91 


VI AO 




220 

214 

220 

.21* 

27 JD 

2650 

2730 

2X70 

3L50 

ate 

3X30 

3150 

131 

1Z7 

130 

1Z7J8 

45 

44 

45 

4* 

*33 

429 

421 

430 

4Z15D 

414 416J0 

*20 

2 S6 

354 

22 

257 

17650 

170 

175 

170 

655 

649 

653 

6S5 

463 

473 473-50 

419 

15150 

149 JO 

151 

151 

131 

120 

128 

132 

*00 

396 

430 

400 

56 

53 

56 

5*5 0 


Daerooo Heavy 

ra^ 9 - 

Kortfl El P*r 

KoreoediBk 

Pahang Iron SI 
SanwngOiitoip 
SanamaElee 
awim erode 
SKTetocm 


6950 6620 6620 6600 
17700 17000 17100 17300 

iSSff 18T00 18600 Itete 
m3 ^ ^ mg 

51000 50800 *9000 

41000 40200 41000 400W 
62900 59800 <1 T» 5«W 
7J00 6990 7000 7M0 
453000 440000 4S3000 434500 


Pocfic Dunlop 
Pfaneerhl! ' 
Pub BnxKtool 
/Sd7Wo 
S tGeoigeBadi 
WMC 




X76 

*47 

8J0 

X36 

X 6 

635 

845 

12J0 

452 


130 

442 

B35 

BW 

831 

SOT 

X55 

1X15 


an us 

447 *43 

846 150 

2026 30.11 
833 843 

5J3 5J5 

444 XS 
123* 12J0 
4J2 446 


Singapore 


Manila 


psEWBaoui 
I S 'WOWi l 88 4 9 89 


Paris 


CAC-40s3*6SJ4 


- iLorod. 


C»P Homes, 
McnOeBKA 
MahoBtek 


London 


F T-Sg.Mfc gH5 

Pmkwc 508X18 


pQBoo*. 

PTdLoogDhd 

SatWuaHB 

SMPrtmeH^ 


142S 14 1425 14 

17 JO T625 17J0 17 

105 KM KS 106 
345 120 160 120 
7450 7 150 74 75 

295 29X50 295 300 

440 4J0 4J0 440 
143 141 142 140 

935 90S 92S 910 

sue S020 2053 5130 
6SI 630 63 640 


SS 5 w» 1 Wler 
N 9». 

AsdaC 
Assoc Bri 
&AA 
BdlOBP 
Sa» . 

jaksertapd 

W? Group 

ISSKS. 

B 

BiHW 


a« gm 945 943 

B 1 is § 

tS « ^ g 

itf Ml SJ M 

a .s i tz 

SAO 159 X5B 
%£ 6 U 111 W7 
541 53S 5^ M 

^ ’§ 

•icq im 337 156 

*g ’3 

«} iU “? SS 

939 920 93* 9J3 


Mexico 


S 527437 

PieAwi 5257 TO 


ABoA 

BcrooceB 

ceawcpo 

Sp Modena 

GooCmoAl 




itto* 

TekvhoCPO 

TciMaxL 


Ate 69J0 7X00 
23.75 2X72 2XBS 
3X00 W® 3720 
1640 1638 1630 
3U8 38te 3940 
6240 6360 61te 
is w ra 
3X90 3465 3400 
•COO da» *058 
. 15040 IfflJfl 15140 
1941 1948 1940 


HUB TilmnUIrr 1683188 
PmriNKlSWU* 


Milan 

AfconZBAssfc >*895 J6S96 I67S9 76560 



AjtoPacBro* 


Form I 


jbs 


Ste 

’J 

057 

1X3) 

154 


750 


Fnsa&Neovc B35 
HKLrad* 128 
JadAkribesa" 

ta r*- 

KeppdBonk 
fen* felt 

OSlMtoftP 

PntaMyHd(p 


-JPWF 
Sing Todi lad 
StoaTdecoau 
mieBonk 

UWtodPthW 

WdOSeettF 

WtagTdHdgs 

■■fclfioUto 


6 

XW 

530 

1 SB 

10.10 

645 

i7S 

6 

1X30 

6J5 

2370 

13 

239 

252 

•B 

X12 


SMl Tiroes; 1»XM 
Pmitm; 117749 

5.15 5» WO 

458 458 5 

9 JO 940 9 JO 

845 BJJ BAS 
09* 055 056 

1550 16.10 Ute 
34* 3J4 X*8 

uS ug &20 

118 126 U4 

7 JO 7J5 750 

402 4« 4M 

S55 6 550 

X12 112 X1| 

348 356 344 

955 10 

630 640 625 

SJ5 «0 

555 6 558 

1X10 1X10 1X10 
435 645 625 

2 X 2 C ZXTO 2320 

Baa 

ajB 058 

W 3& 1 


Taipei 


IMIMMUk 8*2935 
Pmfoou 8*6X14 


12 * 


CaBroyLilelns 
QxMHvmBk 9SJ0 
OAroTangBX rite 

Oltaa Develprot 90 
Cti toasted 2450 
HrriBro* _ 96 

FomwoPSasfc 5* 
Hub Non Bk 10X50 
UlQamBk 5350 
NoflYh Ptesflcs 61 


SMaXoagUb 80 JO 
mi Seal 


TowaiSeroi 157 
Tahme 3130 

WdMfcraEtoc 84 
UdWvldOfc 57 JO 


122 12X50 
94 9450 
70 71 

96 96 

2* 2470 
9* 9450 
51 JO 52 

90 96 

52 5X50 
50 5X50 
79 79 

15* 157 

3030 3040 
0X50 83 

56 Site 


IS 
95 
7X50 
97 
2410 
95J0 
5150 
100 
a 
61 
79 JO 
157 
31 
8X50 
5630 


MwoSec 740 

DDI 5290a 

Dnoo Z770 

Ead Jnpcnfty 5650a 

Ettol 2170 

Fnnuc 5070 

IBank 12*0 

4990 
1530 

Had4N«Bk 1170 

Wtacrt 1100 

Hondo Motor 4370 

1BJ 7290 

IHI 245 

ttochu » 

tta-Yokado 6650 

JAL 470 

Japan Tobacco 99S0a 

Jbco 2*20 

KD|ma 539 

KoMalEtoC 2010 

Kao 1740 

KmttridHvy 364 

town Sled in 

KhtaMppRy 665 

KblnBremrr 7070 

Kobe Sled 139 

tomatso 639 

Kubota 3W 

Kroam 7350 

Kyushu Elec 1920 

LTCB 492 

Marubeni 338 

Marta 2M0 

Matsu Comm 3990 

MatarEltcInd 2280 

MafeaEtocWk 1710 

Attsubtota 1720 

Mlsutasitia 260 

MfisubfehiEI 4*6 

MdstadsMEta 1770 

MttioteHHvy m 

MHsubWd Ma 583 

MUubldilTr 1770 

MHul 956 

.WstafedDSft 7650 

Mitsui Trud J90 

MuratoMg S5D0 

MEC 1520 

HflUroSec 1970 

fan 499 

Ktaendo HBOC 

654 
523 

i Steel 256 

_„.i Me*or 665 

NKK 16S 

Kmiwu5«c 1650 

KTT 1090b 

NTTDtaa 6110b 

Gp Paper 591 

Osaka Ga* 770 

raeoh 1800 

Soto 14700 

StUmBk 528 

Sankyo *040 

SamraBank 1420 

Sanyo Etoc 396 

Seam 86* 

SeBKiRwy *6» 

SdtistaOiera 818 

Sddsul House 984 

Seven-Sewn 9*0 

Sharp 1030 

Sh&ofcoEIPw 1880 

SMmhu 52* 

Shbi-etSUOl 3520 

SJlrSOrdO 1850 

Sh&ucknBk ' 1280 

Saflbonk 4500 

Sny 11800 

SHtatamo m 

... »Bfc 1700 

I Own 416 

I Etoc 1810 

SwIAfett W 

S«n8 Trust 1150 

TrWho Pharoi 3100 

TdsdaChern 3600 

TDK _ 11300 

TabakuElPwr 1890 

TokaBank 865 

TstooWlartM 14*0 

Tokyo BPwr 2220 

Tokyo Electron B3S0 

Tokyo Gas 26fl 

TokyuuMjh 502 

Tnen 1010 

TappanPM 1670 

Torovlnd 66* 

TaVnbo 585 

Teriem 1800 

ToyaTnnl 940 

Toyota Motor 3720 

YtToanoucH 3050 


S 736 
5250a 


3X90 3X30 3814 3X45 
*385 431* 4345 4X10 

3340 3XOT 33 3110 
25H 2535 2540 25.10 
12 1135 1135 12 

SOW 30 3040 3030 
3* 33 33«* 341* 

2565 25.15 2545 2530 
25-70 25W 25to 2510 

37S 362 365 372 

24M 2435 2443 2m 
23 2X80 B 22M 
36 3545 3545 3540 
1X45 1X20 1X40 1X20 
85V: 83.95 B515 84 

3X95 3X30 3X55 3245 
S4* Si 540S 54 

3730 20H 21.15 3X80 

3X10 3740 37** 37.90 
19to 1930 1930 1945 
101 9930 100 9940 

1X15 71.90 12.75 ».9S 

26.10 25.80 26 25.90 

90 B8J0 89.10 8X80 

26% 26.40 2640 26» 

3*to 3410 3430 3(ta- 

15030 147V6 1*930 148U 
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PAGE 18 





NYSE 


Tuesday’s 4 P.H. Close 

(Continued) 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


PAGE 19 


M f 




THE INTERMARKET 


^ +44 171 420 0348 




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LEGAL NOTICE 


NpTlCEOF SEIZURE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
tfaai by virtue of Warraifi for 
Arrest in Rem, issued by the U.S. 
District Court for foe District of 
Maryland, in an action entitled 
United Skates of Amwfoi re. 


SI. 01 9.000.40 in U-S. 
Cmrtncv.L Eddie L Colter. Jr., 
Special Agent, United States 
Secret Service, arrested on June 
4. 1997, said property described 
under Crvfl Docket Nn. JFM 
97-1779 and filed with the Clerk 
of the Court for the District of 
Maryland for violation of IS 
U.S.C. Sections 1343. 1956 and 
1957, and which action request 
that the said monies be seized for 
condemnation and confiscation 
and requests such costs and 
disbursements as decreed by the 
Court. Any person who is 
entitled to possession, or claiming 
an interest in or to said property, 
pursuant to Supplemental Rule C 
(6) of the Certain Admiralty and 
Maritime Rules, Federal Rules of 
Civil Procedure, and within 10 
days after publication must file a 
claim with the Clad; of the Court, 
U.S. District Court for the 
District of Maryland and make 
service upon (he attorney for the 
plaintiff, and must serve their 
answers within 20 days after the 
filing of their claims. All 
interested parsons should file 
claims >nd answers within the 
time so fixed, or be defaulted and 
said property be condemned and 
forfeited to the use of the United 
Stales of America. DAVID L 
SALEM, Assist. U. S. Attorney. 
4th Floor, U.S. Courthouse. 6300 
Cbenywood Lane, Greenbeb, 
Maryland 20770, artn racy for the 
plaintiff! 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE 
TRE ASURY, UNTIED STATES 
SECRET SERVICE. 


Legal Notices 


to the C&afi Court of Are 11th JuK- 
dri Circuit la and (or Dads County, 
Florida, General JoriadkBon Dniskm. 
Cm No. 97-4977 CA Office otte At- 
torney General, Department of Legal 
AfUrs, Stall of Florida, PWnUff, 

UNIQUE GEMS WTL COT 3 , a Florida 
corporation, alkh 1X3, and ENRIQUE 
PffELA, toivkfinlly and as Proridanl 
of UMQUE GEMS Kn. I 


Defendants. 


CORP, 


Notice at B a Dm. Last Ctoy for fteig 
al proofs cf dams and prooatora to 
Uetauins told dates. 

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Ofl Jure 
25, 1997, fids Gout issued an Osder 
Approving Ctasns Procedure. Approving 
Fon d Nefce and Setting Deatflne to 
Ffe Claims fine " Procedure Order*) 
sei ista toe Using pn-ajua to 
determine the vaSd cairns against 
Ultima Gens inti Cup fUGf) and/or 
tie Receiiieirtio's assas. as taftw 
t. The Nadoe shall be pubfislwd every 
day to a period alba (4} note. 
i Aloeatnsof UGMnat desks to 
preserve any drtm against the UGI es- 
lare are icqured to carpiete a Proof of 
Cfarm atadaJ bwtto as Exte4 'A* and 
attach copies of all documenfe ItosheM 
Mends to rely upon to move a claim 
against UGI and/or the ttecaverenp's 
assets. Any credtor who lah to thirty 
da and senre the Proof ol Claiin by the 
Ba Dale stal be forever barred and 
paman andy eryored from asserting ary 
dams against UGL 

3. f you ctan to be a vaHaatMorof 
UGL and you wish to preserve your 
dakn ageing He assets cf UGL you are 
required to Ba a Prod of Cam and al 
Gsppxtag docunerts More Friday, 
October 31, 1997, (the "Bar Date") by 
boon toe Uoung: 

A. He tee original Proof of Claim and 
roptos of all supporting documents 

Levs B. Freeman. Recewer 
3250 Maty Steel 1103 
Coon* Grove, Fknb 33133 

4. The Bing of a Prod rt Cfctim rtal be 
deemed consent to jurtsfctioii by toe 
Court 

5. You are xiged to da a Proof ol Oafcn 
in toe Recewasnp case B you Ml to 
fie a Proof of Cten. you vfi no) be able 
to panic|nle ai the tfctrtxrioo. I any. 
torn) the Receivership tar assets recov- 
ered by tha Receiver. 

t Hamer, you are advised tod toe Re- 
cover Is nef prowSng legal acMce or tax 
coosutong services You may irad to 
conna your own counsel in Bno this 
dakn YOu nay dso wan) to seel the 
advsB of tax coosukaiistecoutets. 

7. To pnHWre n a tfertuson of mon- 
ies reoovared from assds ol UGI or thW 
parties, you musl property Hi out the 
Iona am subni I as bifcatad herein in 
a timely manner. 

a Aiy Proof ol Clakn not tttrty saved 
wfi be rtsrttowed and any docanena; ne- 
led upon by toe ctenani to suppon is 
ctomis which are not twety fled and 
seivad kt accordam art fts notea wff 
be katotissMB rt any ertfertfay hear- 
hg or trial contorted ntofe proceeding 
THE DEADLINE TO FILE YOUR 
PROOF OF CLAIM IS, FRIDAY, 
OCTOBER 31,1857. 

DATED: 

I8SHAN, SLOTO, GREENBERG A 
HELUNGER, PA 
Attxnws ter toe Recehw 
2360 Fkfl Unkxi Financial Center 
200 Sort BEtsyite Bateanl 
Uani Florida 33131 
(35)378-1792 

By: Andies B. HaMnger. ESQ. 

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Continues 
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} 

















V * - 










































































































ASIA/PACIFIC 


poming New’ in TJuu Finance-Reform Packagi 


HotncfKoi# 



. . rjr. \faKr IrjvisPrr^ic 

Mr. lnanong announcing the 
measures in Bangkok on Tuesday. 


By Thomas Crampton 

— Spec ial iu the Herald THbune 

— The government 
d^xjinted foreign investors 
i. Sr® y . flouncing what critics 

caLedalackluster set of refonn pro- 
poses that were intended to build 
confidence in its finance sector and 
neip end Thailand’s worst economic 
cnsts since World War H. 

The long-awaited measures an- 
nounced by Finance Minister Than- 
ops Bidaya and other senior offi- 
cials included giving the central 
bank powers to change the man- 
agement of ailing financial inwi- 
nitions, protect creditors and depos- 
itors of financial institutions and set 
up two agencies — the Financial 
Restructuring Agency and the Asset 
Management Corp. — ro manage 
ailing finance companies. 

Mr. Thanong also said foreign 
ana domestic creditors would re- 
ceive equal treatment when it tams 
to seizures of assets and that foreign 
ownership rules for Thai financial 
institutions would be relaxed. 


But die country's two-tier ex- 
change system, winch has held back 
foreign investment, .will remain in 
place until regional currencies be- 
come less volatile, Mr. Thanong 
said 

* The measures drew quick crit- 
icism. 

4 "There is really nothing new, and 
there is still a general uncertainty 
about die political will to enact the 
measures/’ Bany Yates, bead of 
regional research, at Seamico Secu- 
rities, said “1 do'not think this will 
do much to improve confidence.” 


and Securities, told Bloomberg 
News, “as it will allow some ailing 
finance companies to operate even 
though they do not deserve to be in 
the business.” 

The Thai stock index dropped 
1.47 percent to close at 525.23 as 
investors digested the news, aod the 
dollar rose slightly to 35.90 baht 
from 35.75 baht Monday. 

The measures were announced by 


senior Thai officials at a packed 
news conference attended % rep- 
resentatives of the World Bank and 
International Monetary Fund 

Since August, the Fund has co- 
ordinated a $17.2 trillion economic 
rescue for T hailand in response to the 
precipitous drop in the value of the 
baht that also helped to drag (town 
other currencies in the region. 

As a condition of the bailout 
package, the Fund has insisted that 
Thailand reform its finance sector. 

The authorities have suspended 
operations by more than two- thirds 
of the country's finance companies 
since June without issuing clear 
policy directives, prompting furious 
lobbying by their owners and un- 
dermining the confidence of depos- 
itors and creditors. 

- Although most ofthe members of 
die committee in chaxgeof drafting 
the finance-sector reforms resigned 
over the weekend over complaints 
of political interference. Deputy 
Prime Minister Virabongsa 
Ramankura said the reforms had not 
been not and would not be altered by 


political considerations. 

‘‘If there is any doubt about polit- 
ical interference, this whole thing 
will fail,” he said. 

The reform package received a 
qualified stamp of approval from the 
World Bank. . 

“It is a fairly good package, and 
we do not think a better one could be 
delivered, given the technical and 
legal difficulties, * ’ said Jean-Michel 
Severino, die World Bank vice pres- 
ident for East Asia and the Pacific. 
“The Thai authorities are working 
with much greater convergence than 
in the past.” 

Depending on investor reaction to 
the package, Mr. Thanong said 
Thailand may seek more assistance 
from the World Bank, the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund or the Jap- 
anese government. 

To meet requirements set by the 
Fund, the government also an- 
nounced that it would cut a further 
100 billion baht ($2.79 billion) from 
its 1 99$ budget, now set at 923 billion 
baht, and would raise 40 billion bahx 
through an increase in luxury taxes. 


'18000 . 2200 

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16000 /l — -f 2000^--M^r' 

15000— 1900- 

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1997 1997 

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.Seoul':; •• 


China Agrees to Some WTO Terms 

Brittan Says Breakthrough 9 Bungs Membership Talks to Bast Lap 9 


i i+qoiru h> ‘"hr Stiff Fmn Dujvnrho 

BEIJING — China has agreed to a 
set of principles that may help push 
forward negotiations on its bid to join 
the World Trade Organization. Sir Le- 
on Brittan. the European Union’s trade 
commissioner, said Tuesday. 

The agreement, which Sir Leon 
called a “breakthrough.” will 
“breathe new hfe” into stalled ne- 
gotiations. he said after meeting with 
senior Chinese officials, including top 
economic planner Zhu Rongji and 
Trade Minister Wu Yi. 

Sir Leon said that although there was 
still a “considerable distance” be- 
tween the two sides, “we now have 
greater confidence that real and con- 
crete progress can be made." 

He said the most importar gains in 
the principles agreed to Tl *day in- 
cluded a commitment by China to 
phase out quotas on all imports, al- 
though by a date still to be fixed. 

On serv ices such as banking and 
insurance. Sir Leon said. China agreed 
to "improve its commitment” to open 
its market. 


An ‘'intensive round” of wllcc will 
begin in December in Geneva, Sir Le- 
on said. 

“I believe that we have now entered 
the last lap of negotiations for China’s 
entry into the WTO,” he added. 

In previous visits. Sir Leon has de- 
picted himself as an advocate of 
China's entry into the Geneva-based 
world trade body. 

Last year, he left Beijing pushing a 
compromise approach in which China 
would make initial concessions and 
pledge further changes in return for 
membership. 

But die proposal foiled to advance 
China’s long-stalled bid. 

U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Ru- 
bin and U.S. Commerce Secretary Wil- 
liam Daley both left Beijing after re- 
cent visits without announcing any 
major progress on WTO issues. 

But Sir Leon said the new agreement 
on principles meant China was willing 
to make commitments to specific tar- 
gets on market access, details of which 
are still be thrashed out 

“It narrows the field of the possible. 


it sets parameters, and it sets bench- 
marks, Sir Leon said. 

China’s trade surplus with the rest of 
die world more than tripled in the first 
eight months of the year, to $25.9 bil- 
lion from $8.1 billion a year earlier, 
according to Chinese figures. 

Chinese statistics indicate that ex- 
ports from the EU to China fell 12.7 
percent in foe first Half of foe year, to 
$11.14 billion, while foe EU’s imports 
of Chinese products rose. 20 percent, to 
$12.54 billion. 

Meanwhile, a spokesman for foe 
Chinese Foreign Ministry , Shea Guo- 
fang, said China was qualified for 
WTO membership. 

He blamed the delay in its joining on 
‘ ‘ some countries making excessive de- 
mands” and repeated that China was a 
developing country. 

China's status as a developing coun- 
try. which is disputed by the United 
States and some other countries that 
have resisted admitting Beijing to the 
trade body, wonld give China more 
time before it had to open its markets to 
foreign competition. (AP. Bloomberg) 


Toyota to Market 
Car That Can Switch 
To Electrical Power 


R/ivmhcrg AVms 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor Corp. said 
Tuesday it would begin in December to 
market the world’s first mass-production 
car equipped with a hybrid gasoline-and- 
clectricity power system that the auto- 
maker says doubles fuel efficiency and 
cuts carbon-dioxide emissions in half. 

The hybrid, called the Prius. uses a 
conventional gasoline engine as its main 
<t*owcr source, but a nickel-mctal hy- 
dride battery powers the car at low 
speeds, when conventional engines tend 
to bum fuel inefficiently. 

While low -emission power systems 
are not new. their cost has prevented 
them from coming into everyday use. 
Tovota said it would price the Prius at 
2.1*5 million yen (SI7.700). about half a 
million yen higher than its best-selling 
Corolla sedan. 

Toyota's initial sales target is 1.000 a 
month, a low sales target for a new 
sedan. Executives say they want to see 
whether the public is willing to pay 
more for a fuel-efficient. low-poUution 
vehicle. Tovota also is considering 

f iling the Pnus in other markets, ra- 
iding the United States and will make 
s vehicle available for test dnves at 
the Tokyo Motor Show tins month. 


Vietnam Lets Currency Slide 

Yielding to Pressure, Hanoi Widens Fluctuation Band . 


CMpdtdbsOwSmffFmaDtspascha 

HANOI — Vietnam became foe latest 
victim of Southeast Asia's currency 
troubles Tuesday, bowing to months of 
downward pressure on its currency by 
making room for it to slide. 

In its first adjustment in the value of 
foe currency, the dong, since Match, foe 
central bank widened foe range in which 
foe currency is allowed to deviate from a 
daily central rate to 10 percent from 5 
percent. The currency promptly fell to 
the bottom of foe range, and bankers 
said Hanoi may be forced to let it weak- 
en more to compete with its Asian 
neighbors. 

“I think there will be continued pres- 
sure on the currency,” said Peter 
McLean, head of treasury at Standard 
Chartered Bank in Hanoi. 

Soon after foe State Bank of Vietnam 
set a central rate Tuesday of 11,176 
dong to the dollar, foe dong slid to foe 
bottom of the new range, at 1 Z293 to the 
dollar, and analysts predicted it would to 
stay there or move lower. 

Pressure on the Vietnamese currency 
has intensified in recent weeks amid 
strong demand for dollars, with rumors 
of an imminent devaluation exacer bat- 
in gthe shortage of hard currency. 

Economists have been warning that 
foe slide in Asia’s other currencies 
could aggravate Vietnam’s trade deficit. 


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Very briefly 


• United Bank Ltd., one of Pakistan’s largest state-owned 
banks, plans to lay off 7,000 senior executives in a move that 
may help the country trim spending and receive a $250 million 
loan from the World Bank. 

• Sony Corp. and Fiy i Photo Film Co. jointly developed a 
floppy disk system that they said had more than 1 60 times the 
recording capacity of foe current 1.44-megabyte diskettes. 

• China will sell shares in its largest airline. Air China, as pan 
of its plan to create a new international category of stocks in its 
carriers, airports and cargo handlers. 

• India expects to end state controls over its petroleum sector 
by the end of foe century, the minister of petroleum and natural 
gas, Janeshwar Mlshra, said. 

• New Zealand officials called on foe World Trade Or- 
ganization to help them smooth over a dispute with foe 
European Union over “spreadable” butter, one of New 
Zealand’s smallest bat fastest-growing categories of dairy 
exports. The EU says the product is not really butter and so 
does not qualify for tariff relief under New Zealand’s agree- 
ment with Brussels. 

• Daewoo Corp. of South Korea sold a 5.9 percent stake to 
Prince Walid ibn Talal of Saudi Arabia for $50.5 million. 
“The Pacific is ripe for investment, and 1 intend to make more 


1997 1997 1997 ! 

, Hon g >t&afoss 14 , 072 , 90 . 4,ee j 

■.^Bige^sonai 1377.69. +0.0S| 

’’Sag j 

Tok yo T0.59 j 

; !/ ':v • ‘ •.••.•SB&b tI-47 , 

JSfoift?.;. /•,o:450ftq^ S 1 ^ 00 .. ^^ 1 

" v ‘. 9c8t'W^-^42a3g' >.'^16 -ft 40 , 

Jateuiy*-. Conypsjtgbi^sx ' -52&8g". . S3483 -1.T1 1 

HtfeUtefltqri . : y.PgSE-40 . ' ' • . -2<6T2.8g 2^92.10 +0-80 1 
Bombay /•V .-&ens%ve lndEaf V .'4^n?.4O -4:066.(% • -1^| 

Source: Tetekuis Uucnnn.«al HcraU TnlHinr 


investments in the region,” said foe prince, one of foe richest 
men m foe world. 

• Japan's deputy finance minister, Eisuke Sakakibara, said 
there was no reason to believe the country was headed for a 
recession, adding that its asset markets had “bottomed 
out.” 

• British Telecommunications PLC plans to invest between 
S2 billion and $2.5 billion in Asia in foe next five years, 
including $400 million to $500 million in India. 

• Philips Electronics NV will invest 400 million guilders 
($202.9 million) in an integrated-circuit plant near Manila. 

• Atmel Corp., a U.S.-based maker of computer chips, will 
set up a joint venture with Malaysia's state investment arm. 
Khazanah Nasional BbcL. to build an $830 million semi- 
conductor wafer plant in Kedah Stale. 

Blvomben!. AP. AFP. Reuters 



which last year was equivalent to a hefty 
17 percent of gross domestic product, 
and discourage foreign investment 

Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and 
foe Philippines, which have all seen 
their currencies drop, bought about 5 
percent of Vietnam’s exports in 1996 
and rank among its top 20 investors. 

The International Monetary Fund 
hailed the decision to allow the dong to 
drop, saying it would safeguard Vi- 
etnam’s exports in world markets. 

“I rhinfc it's a welcome step in foe 
right direction because it produces more 
flexibility,” Erik Offerdal, the IMF’s 
resident representative in Hanoi, said. 

Foreign banks in Vietnam buy dollars 
from state-run commercial banks on the 
interbank market, using dong ro meet 
daily needs/ But foe dollar market has 
been at a standstill rince foe end of July 
because Vietnamese commercial banks 
have been hoarding dollars in anticip- 
ation of a dong devaluation. 

The central bank has been forced to 
sell dollars from its reserves to meet 
urgent needs. It sold $10 million in late 
September and may have sold as much 
as $20 million in foe past week. The 
central bank changed its currency policy 
in March, when it set a 5 percent fluc- 
tuation band. Before that, foe dong rate 
was fixed each day. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


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THE W3KUTS DAIQ NEWSPAPER 


ARNO. C4LQR. ROWENTA. SEE. TEFAL 


NINE MONTH CONSOLIDATED SALES 



1997 
(FRF 
millions ) 

1997/1996 

(%) 

1997/1996 
at constant 
exchange 
rates (%t 

European Union 

4*220 

-3 

-5 

including France 

1,910 

-5 

- 

American continent ...... 

L992 

+ 90 

+ 76 

Other countries 

L668 

+ 31 

+ 25 

Total 

7^80 

+ 18 

+ 14 


The sales of ARNO are included within foe “American 
continent " sales for an amount of FRF 729 million. 

Internet site : http://www.groupeseb.com 


THE INTERMARKET 


GENERAL 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
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INTERNATIONAL 


PAGE 23 


Sports 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 




World Roundup 


4 German Coaches 
Charged Over Drugs 

swimnn Four former East Ger- 
man swimming coaches have been 
charged with giving banned ana- 
bolic drags to minors without telling 
either than or their parents, Bolin 
prosecutors said Tuesday. 

The four woe among 10 trainers 
and three doctors employed by SC 
Dynamo Berlin, a swimming club 
in East German, which had been 
under investigation. 

Two of the coaches, Dieter 
Lindemann and Volker Frischke, 
were hired by the German national 
team after unification but were re- 
cently suspended because of the 
investigation. 

I.mtfe mann , 46, former coach of 
the Olympic medalist Fraiudska 
van Almsick, faces four counts of 
causing bodily harm. 

Frischke, S3, coach of the Euro- 
pean champion Kerstin Kielgass, 
faces eight counts. 

Klaus Nottrodt, the swimming 
federation director, said that the 
two were given a chance to confess 
after their suspension, but that 
“neither did.” He said he expected 
that they would be dismissed on 
Wednesday. (AP) 

Spaniard Fails Dope Test 


Daniel Plaza, a 
Spaniard who won the gold medal- 
ist in die 20-kilometer walk at the 
1992 Barcelona Olympics, has 
been suspended for two years after 
failing a dope test in June 1996. 

Plaza, who tested positive for the 
steroid nandralone after the 1996 
Spanish championships in Malaga, 
has denied taking the drag and on 
Tuesday threatened legal action 
against Spam's Superior Sports 
Council. (Reuters)' 

Morris Returns to Ravens 

football Bam Morris, jailed 
last week in Texas, has returned to 
practice with the Baltimore Ravens 
and is preparing to play the rest of 
the NFL season despite the threat of 
having his probation revoked. 

Morris, a running back, turned 
himself in to authorities Friday in 
Rockwall County, Texas, on a war- 
rant dial prosecutors had sought in 
their attempt to revoke his probation 
on a 1996 drag conviction. (AP) 

Stockton Is Sidelined 

basketball John Stockton. the 
Utah Jazz guard, will be sidelined 
forthe first six to eight weeks of the 
NBA season after knee surgery, 
ending a streak in which he has 
played more than seven straight 
seasons without missing a game. 

Stockton, 35, had arthroscopic 
surgery on Monday to repair car- 
tilage damage to his left knee. He 
had played in 609 consecutive 
games, the third-Iongest active 
streak in the league. (AP) 



The Pure Athlete 
Runs Race 

Skier Faces Battle With Cancer 


.7 



By Harvey Araton 

New York. Times Service 


UKStdmdarrheAmotUttdPrtm 

A pack of Redskins making sure Cowboy quarterback Troy Aikm an flies out of bounds, not into the end zone. 

Redskins 9 Defense Frustrates Cowboys 

A 21-16 Victory Puts Washington in First Place in the NFC East 


By Thomas George 

New York Times Service 


LANDOVER, Maryland — It used to 
come so easily for the Dallas Cow- 
boys. 

On offense, they would throw it over 
you and, if that failed, they would 
simply run you over. But against the 
Washington Redskins on Monday night 
before 76,159 fans at Jack Kent Cooke 
Stadium, they coaid do neither. Twice 
in the final 7 minutes 41 seconds, Dallas 
had die ball and a chance to win the 
game with a touchdown. The Dallas 
offense could not achieve it 

The Washington defense would not 
allow iL 

This was a 21-16 Washington victory 
that spoke volumes about how far die 
Redskins have come and about bow far 
the Cowboys may have sunk. 

- Two ships passing in the night? Dal- 
las says hardly. Washington says it does 
not care. It just takes the victory, one 
that moves die Redskins' record to 4-2 
and drops the Cowboys to 3-3. 

After Troy Aikman had passed 14 
yards for a touchdown to Michael Irvin 
with 9:40 left to cut the Washington lead 
to 5 points, the Dallas defense twice got 
the ball back for the Dallas offense. 

But this Washington defense made 
the Dallas offense crumble when it 


counted most. Aikman's last pass, a 
fourth-and-1 1 toss meant for Anthony 
Miller, fell harmlessly to the ground 
with 2:32 to play, and with it any chance 
for Dallas. Washington ran out die clock 
and won for the fourth time in its last 
five meetings against Dallas. 

Washington's star back, Terry Allen, 
went out with a knee injury after die 
Redskins' first possession; the receiver 
Michael Westbrook was sidelined by a 
similar injury shortly thereafter. But Al- 
len’s backup. Stephen Davis, rushed for 
nearly 100 yards. 

The start was good for Dallas, but the 
finish was all Washing ton. In die first 
half, Dallas scored first — on a Richie 
Cunningham 19-yard field goal nine 
minutes into the game — but Washington 
scored last. 1 The Redskins led by 14-3 at 
halftime thanks to a2-yard scoring run by 
Davis and a Gas Frcratte-to-James Jen- 
kins touchdown pass of 13 yards. 

In the third quarter, after the Redskins 
had made the score 21-3 on another 
Davis scoring run (this one for 4 yards), 
Dallas looked beaten. It looked as if the 
only way die Cowboys were going to get 
back into this game was if the Redskins 
gave them a gift, a glimmer of hope. 
And that is exactly what happened. 

Late in the quarter, Redskins back 
Brian Mitchell rambled, and the rookie 
linebacker Dexter Coakley lacked it up 


and scampered 16 yards for a touchdown. 
It was 21-9 now with 4:26 left in the third. 
The Dallas 2-point tzy foiled, but Dallas 
had life. If only for a momenL 

“We just bog down and don’t make 
die plays,” said the Cowboys' coach, 
Barry Switzer. 

“Jf you’ve got any answers, come 
help us,” he tokl reporters. “It’s just 
frustrating.’' 

The Redskins had youth and exuber- 
ance and hunger, and h showed. They' 
gained 200 total yards in die first half 
and limited Dallas to 14S. 

Frerotte outgained Troy Aikman in 
; yards in die first half by 137 to 


1, although by the end of the game 
Aikman had 193 to Frerotte's 155. Dav- 
is averaged 5-0 yards _per cany and had a 
long ran of 18 yards in the half; Emmrtt 
S mith averaged 4.9 yards, and gained a 
long ran of 16 yards. - Michael Irvin 
caught one pass, but Michael West- 
brook caught two. In every instance, 
Washington seemed a little better. 

The Redskins committed no 
turnovers in the first half. They did not 
even commit a penalty in the half. It was 
error-free ball, and it was more than 
Dallas conld stand. 

“We have to circle the wagons,” said 
Nate Newton, the Cowboy guard. “The 
Indians damn near scalped us. Things 
are going to be ugly for awhile.” 


Supersonic Car Is a Minute Too Late to Set Record 


N EW YORK — The husband 
nodded hesitantly to the con- 
versational question of whether 
he, too, had been an athlete. His wife, 
lying in obvious discomfort on her 
stomach on the hotel room bed, said, 
“Steve was a relief pitcher up at Dart- 
mouth.” 

Steve Brosnihan smiled and added, 
“It’s tough to assume Z was an athlete 
with the company I’m in.” 

Mostly, he meant that of his wife, 
Diana Golden Brosnihan, although on a 
day they had been anticipating so much, 
there was also a who’s who from the 
burgeoning world of women’s sports. 

Evelyn Ashford and Gail Devers, the 
champion runners. Mia Hamm, the soc- 
cer star. Dozens more, on Monday night 
at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York, 
where a r emar kable woman, whose ca- 
reer as a world-class champion skier 
began with die loss of a leg, was in- 
ducted into the International Women’s 
Sports Foundation’s Hall of Fame. 

Diana Golden didn't have to win a 
medal or even ski a race to have awed 
Steve Brosnihan back at Dartmouth in 
the early 1980s. when from the adjacent 
baseball field, he would watch her, ou 
crutches, do laps around the track or hop 
the steps of the football stadium. 

She had lost her right leg to cancer 
when she was a 12- year-old in Boston, 
and had taken up siding when she was 
16. He admired mis small, slender wom- 
an's athletic determination, her overt 
passion, and found himself going out of 
his way to contrive a campus chat She 
didn’t remember him when they were 
reintroduced about a year ago in Bristol, 
Rhode Island, at a Halloween ball 
By the time they were marri ed last 
Ang. 9, 34-year-old Diana Golden had 
won one Olympic, 19 United States and 
10 world disabled gold medals. There 
were devastating losses along the way, 
as welL 

Two years after she had retired from 
skiing to write and give motivational 
speeches, a recurrence of cancer was 
diagnosed.- It was New Year’s Eve 
1992. 

She eventually underwent bilateral 
mastectomies, then awoke from a sub- 
sequent surgery to a doctor telling her, 
“We had to remove your uterus. 

Through it all, she still dreamed of. 
having children. She said she felt as if 
she had been hit by a train. 

Golden attempted suicide once, con- 
templated it a second time. As if to 
prove that she had lived through that, 
not merely survived, she went ahead and 
climbed Mount Rainier. 

The athlete in her had made another 
powerful statement about body, mind 
and soul about the core definition of 
what a true athlete is and should be 
admired for. Not for earning a $100 
million contract! Not for being a sneaker 
peddler, a television rating or a tool of 
an expansionist men’s basketball czar. 

For years. Golden fought what she 
caUed “the credibility issue,” the same 
one that con Id have infiltrated the life 
story of every athlete at Monday night’s 


dinner. Her battle wasfougbt on two| 
'fronts, though- 

“I look at it as women’s sports hav^ 
ing once been in the same place as» _ 
disabled sports,” she said. ‘‘Twenty-; 
five years ago, it was, ‘That’s nice, you, 
nra,butyoucan’tnmamaratiion.' 

She always knew, what people were; 
saying about her and others like hen* 
Something along the lines of 
'sweet.” She wanted them to admire how, 
technique, her speed, but at best theyt 
saw her as a profile in courage. “You. 
always wanted to say, ‘This is about 
passion and fire,' " she said. 

That is what she tried to convey to the 
middle school kids and the corporate 
cowboys who came to hear her speak, 
and that was what made the notification 
last summer of her impending Hall of 
Fame induction so meaningfru. 

They might have forgotten someone 
Hifw her, given the growing mainstream 
popularity of women’s sports 25 years, 
after Title DC, which forced U.S. uni- 
versities to give higher priority to worn-, 
en’s sports, and the corporate rush to the. 

for-profit .bandwagon. 

Ata news conference Monday mom-# 
ing, Golden looked around and found * 
herself sharing a stage with Devers, the. 

■ sportswoman of the year, who barely 
avoided having both feet amputated al- 

‘Dealing with a disease 
that is likely terminal, I 
don’t have a solution for 
that right now. 9 

most a decade ago; with Hamm, the! 
team sportswoman of the year, who was. 
dedicating her award to her deceased! 
brother; with the Canadian rower Silken 
T jmmann, who won a bronze medal in 
the 1992 Olympics weeks after an ac-Z* 
cident sent her to the hospital for five w 
operations in 10 days. 

“To be included with this group — ” 
Golden said, not needing to finish her 
thought 

Her induction. Golden explained, had 
been so uplifting at a time when die 
events regarding her health have been 
anything but sanguine. 

The cancer has returned, spreading to 
her spine, pelvis and ribs. Yet as much' 
as she has given of herself, talked and 
written for the benefit of others, she no,' 
longer wished to publicly promise to 
fight ou again Monday night 

"People want you to say that if 
yon’re determined to beat it, you’re 
going to beat it” she said. “The num-! 
hers say that’s not the case, and that’s- 
one of tiie reasons I stopped mothr-; 
ational speaking. Dealing with a disease 
that is Ukely terminal, I don’t have 
solution for that right now.” 

She shifted her weight and her emo- 
tions, as her husband gently rubbed her! 
back. 

Chemotherapy caused spasms, she; 
explained, and the medication made heri 
tired, a bit fuzzy. It was time to rest foCT 1 
her big night She wanted all her! 
strength, tiie way any pure athlete 
would. 



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Thrust SSC, with Andy Green at the wheel, breaking the sound barrier. 


New York Times Service 

GERLACH, Nevada — With a deaf- 
ening roar and billowing trail of dost a 
British jet car has become the first 
vehicle to exceed officially the speed of 
sound on land. 

The car, called Thrust SSC, for su- 
personic car, made three high-speed 
runs Monday across the tan clay floor of 
the Black Rock Desert two of them 
nudging past the speed of sound, known 
in aviation and racing fields as Mach 1. 
The speed varies, depending on tem- 
perature and altitude. 

The 7-ton (6.3 metric ton) black car, 
driven by Andy Green, a Royal Air 
Force pilot and powered by two Rolls 
Royce engines generating 100.000 
horsepower, blazed across a 13-mile 
(21 -kilometer) course at 749.687 miles 
an hour on its first ran, just shy of the 
sound barrier. 

The next two passes, ax 764.168 mph 
and 760.135 mph, nudged slightly past 


Mach 1 and were accompanied by the 
faint thuds of sonic booms as the car 
went through a mile marked out on the 
course for official speed readings. 

Because the last two runs could not be 
completed within an hour of each other, 
however, they were not averaged togeth- 
er for an official land speed record sanc- 
tioned by the Federation Internationale 
Motocycliste, the international accred- 
iting group. The final ran missed the 
deadline by a minute; together, the last 
pair of runs would have produced a su- 
personic land speed record of 762 mph. 

Go Sept 25. the Thrust SSC and 
Green set a land speed record of 714. 144 
mph after two runs. The previous record 
of 633.468 mph was set by Richard 
Noble, who heads the current SSC team, 
almost 14 years ago. ■ 

“We have a supersonic car,” Noble 
said. “This is the first- independently 
monitored supersonic mark on the 
ground.” 


Bulgarian Referees May Strike 

meeting Saturday to discuss improv- 
ing safety measures with the directors 
of tiie Bui 


Cimtp^byOirSiogFnmDapaxhn 

SOFIA — Bulgarian football ref- 
erees said Tuesday they would go on 
strike this weekend to protest becom- 
ing targets of increasing physical 
abuse. 

Borislav Alexandrov, president of 
the referees’ commission, was assaul- 
ted at the end of the first-division 
match between Levski Knstendil and 
CSKA last weekend Two weeks 
earlier, Christo Prototchanov, pres- 
ident of tiie Neftochimik club, hit a 
referee after a league match. 

Last mouth, first-division club 
Dobradzha Dobrih ordered its players 
off the pitch before the end of the 
match against Lokomotiv Sofia to pre- 
vent fans from attacking the referee. 

The referees have demanded a 


Bulgarian football federation, 
presidents and coaches of league 
teams and Interior Ministry ofifi- 
cia l s - ' (AFP. Reuters) 

■ Injured Player Settles 

An English soccer player who ts? 
claimed £1 .5 million ($2.4 million) in 
damages for a tackle that broke his leg 
in seven places settled his case ont of 
court in Sheffield on Tuesday, Reu- 
ters reported. 

_ Knight, who played for the 
Sheffield Wednesday club and for 
England's und ex-21 ream, had his leg 
mattered by Chester City striker Gary 
Bennett in an FA Cup game in Feb- 
ruary 1987. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


PAGE 23 


SPORTS 


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On Brink of Elimination, 
Orioles’ Fortune Changes 

Their Good-Luck Charm? Jimmy Key 


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Baltimore second baseman Roberto Alomar diving for a ball hit by the Indians’ Brian Giles in Game 5. The Orioles won in Cleveland, 4-2. 

Spurs’ Rookie Center Learns From a Master 


By Mike Wise 

New York Tones Sende e 

SYRACUSE, New York — The 6-foot- 1 1-inch 
National Basketball Association rookie is under 
the basket, his 7-foot mentor is close by, and 
college is in the rearview mirror. 

V Hm Duncan admits missing the camaraderie at 
Wake Forest University, but life with David 
Robinson in San Antonio’s Twin Peaks offense has 
its upside. 

‘ T don’t know what I’d do without him, ” Duncan 
said -of Robinson, a seven-time All-Star center. 
“There would be a lot more pressure and it would be 
a lot harder for me if I didn't have turn.” 

The No. 1 pick in the June draft was matched 
against center Patrick Ewing on Sunday night in a 
preseason game between the New York Knicks and 


San Antonio Spurs af the Carrier Dome in Syra- 
cuse. He scored 19 points in the Spurs’ preseason 


opener Saturday, hitting 9 of 13 shots from the 
field, grabbing 4 rebounds and looking the part of 


one of the best young pivot men to enter the 
National Basketball Association in years. 

“Tim’s looked good all along.” Robinson said 
after that game. "I think Tim’s an All-Star. He’s 


already one of the best in the league.” 

Not since an agile Ralph Sampson and a young 
Hakeem Olajuwon teamed to power the Houston 
Rockets in the mid-1980s has there been such a 
potentially fo rmidab le twosome in the middle. 
Robinson is coming off a season in which he missed 
76 games because of injuries, and Duncan will be 
learning the pro game for at least this season. 

How well they co-exist in die middle of the key 
isn’t yet clear, but their off-court relationship has 
blossomed, with Robinson playing a major part in 
molding the rookie. He invited Duncan to his 
Aspen, Colorado, home for a week this summer, 
and die two worked out with die Spurs’ backup 
center. Will Perdue, and got to know one another. 

“It made me fed great that he was willing to 
start working me that early,” Duncan said. “I got 
in on his workouts and got to see what it takes to get 
ready for the season. It was a gradual process with 
the little things you pickup. You store it in the back 
of your mind and use it subconsciously.” 

Duncan was celebrated for remaining in college 
for four years instead of talcing the money and 
coming out, as many young players have done the 
past few years. Making good on a promise he made 
to his mother before her death, he felt he needed to 


mature and did not want to discard the university 
experience for the 82-game grind that awaited him. 

Robinson is still listed as the Spurs’ center in the 
starting lineup, but the position has become in- 
terchangeable, with one playing the high post and 
the other playing the low post in Coach Gregg 
Popovich's scheme. Duncan is unpretentious, 
courteous and thoughtful, and his demeanor seems 
to be a mild-mannered protest to the glut of image- 
consumed young players flooding into the league. 

Popovich phoned Duncan shortly after he was 
drafted, thinkin g be would have to work long and 
hard to convince his young center that be should play 
in the Utah summer league with other young players 
who needed experience. Popovich was telling 
Duncan of the advantages of cutting his vacation 
short to play in the league when Duncan interrupted 
him “Pop, do I need to be there?” he asked. 

“Yes, Popovich said. “It would help you 
out” 

“Then I’m there,” Duncan said. 

“This whole game is about experience,” be said 
in Syracuse. “Going through the whole Utah thing 
and playing with David in Aspen boosted me up. 
So when I came to camp. I’d already be ahead of 
the game.” 


Flyers Repel Sharks’ Attacks to Win in Overtime 


The Associated Press 

The offense of Eric Lindros and the 
defense of Garth Snow made the dif- 
ference for the Philadelphia Flyers. 

Liodios scored 1:49 into overtime 
and Snow stopped 43 shots as the 
Ffyers beat the San Jose Sharks. 3-2, 
on Monday night. 

Snow was especially sharp in the 
second period, when tire Sharks bom- 
barded him with a club-record 25 
shots. * ‘They put a lot of shots on me,’ ' 


The Flyers won then third straight 
despite getting outshoi, 45-24. 

On the winning goal, Lindros took 
the puck at center ice. came into the 
Sharks' zone on a 2-on- 1 with John 
LeGair and fired a wrist shot past 
JCcLy Hiudey. 

I Rod Brind’ Amour tied the game 
lor Philadelphia with 2:55 remaining 
^ in the third period when he fought off 
r defender and slid a rebound past 
Hradey. 


Shawn Burr, obtained by the 
Sharks in a summer trade with Tampa 
Bay, scored both goals for San Jose. 

Islanders 2, Panthers 2 Bryan Be- 

rard scored a power-play goal with 26 
seconds remaining in regulation to 
give New York a tie at Florida. 

Berard, the Calder Trophy winner 
last season as the NHL’s rookie of the 

. NHL Moonpop 

year, scored with Florida’s Robert 
Svehla off for tripping and the Is- 
lander goalie, Eric Fichand, on the 
bench for an extra attacker. 

The Panther goalie, John Vanbies- 
brouck. made 26 saves, including four 
in overtime. Fichaud stopped 25 
shots, one in the extra session. 

Canucks 3, oners 0 In Vancouver, 
Martin Gelinas scored a goal before 
injuring his left knee, and Kirk 
McLean made 33 saves for his 20th 

career shutout. , 

Gelinas, who led the Canucks with 


35 goals last season, scored a short- 
handed goal two minutes into the 
game. A few minutes later, he sprained 
his left knee in a collision with an Oiler 
defenseman, Dan McGillis. 

Gelinas is expected to miss two to 
four weeks. Bret Hedkran and Brian 
Noonan also scored for Vancouver. 

Muss 3, Hurricanes 1 In St. Louis, 
Teny Yake scored the go-ahead goal 
with 331 left as the Blues won their 
fifth straight game. 

Yake put SL Louis ahead by 2-1 
when he poked home a rebound that 
Hurricanes’ goalie, Trevor Kidd, 
failed to clear on the power play. 

St Louis goalie Grant Fuhr stopped 
17 shots to move into fifth place on 
the career victory list with 357. 

Only 12,530 fans attended the 
game, the smallest crowd for a Blues 
game at . the Kiel Center, which 
opened in 1995. 

Coyotes 2, BUckhnwfcs 1 In 

Phoenix. Rick Tocchet scored the 
Coyotes’ first power-play goal of the 


season in a victory over winless 
Chicago. 

Tocchet ’s second-period goal was 
the Coyotes’ first in 33 power-play 
opportunities this season. 

Keith TRachuk, who led the league 
with 52 goals last season, got his first of 
the year for Phoenix, and Nikolai Kh- 
bibulin made 34 saves to improve his 
career record against Chicago to 8-2. 

Ethan Moreau had the lone goal for 
the Blackhawks, whose 0-5 start is 
their worst since the 1969-70 season. 

Brains 3, Mighty Ducks O Jason AI- 
tison had a goal and an assist, and Jim 
Carey stopped 27 shots as Boston 
blanked Anaheim. It was Carey’s 
15th career shutout in only his fourth 
year in the league. 

It was the Mighty Ducks’ first 
shutout loss at home since April 7, 
1995, a span of 91 games. 

Ted Donato scored an insurance 
goal in the third period before Tim 
Taylor added an empty-netter in the 
final min ute. 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Post Servic e 

CLEVELAND — The 
bullpen gate in Jacobs Field 
swung open in the sixth inning 
of Game 5 of the American 
League Championship Series. 
And this playoff for a pennant 
may have swung then. too. 

Through that gate on Mon- 
day night, walking slowly 
with tile dignity of a distin- 
guished veteran, came Jimmy 
Key, marching across die out- 
field grass to the pitcher's 
mound like a soldier. Davey 
Johnson, the Baltimore Ori- 
oles’ manager, and Ray 
Miller, the pitching coach, 
might as well have walked 
every step with him, ready to 
share his humiliation. 

The pro-Cleveland Indians 
crowd gasped with surprise. 
The Orioles were caking out 
their starter. Scon Kami- 
eniecki, who was working on 
a shutout, beating them by 2- 
0, so that they could bring in 
their goat, their stiff, their 
tired-armed and overpriced 
free agent. On the brink of 
elimina tion, the Orioles were 
turning to a pitcher who had 
been so awfol for two months 
that three days earlier he was 
removed from the rotation, 

Baseball doesn’t have mo- 
ments. much better than thin . 
Sometimes die game is about 
stats and strategies. Some- 
times it’s just about heart 

The Orioles decided Mon- 
day night that, what the heck, 
ihey might as well all go down 
in the same lifeboat. Trust 
each other. Believe that, un- 
derneath all the recent failures 
— for Key, for the catcher 
Lenny Webster, for all of them 
the past few days — their team 
was still the genuine article. 

Somebody had to do 
something to change the way 
this series was going for the 
Orioles. They were drowning 
in bad luck, bad calls, bad 
play and bad karma. 

So Johnson .put his neck on 
the chopping block. Kanti- 
eniecki had a little stiffness in 
his elbow but badly wanted to 
continue. The safe route was 
to do nothing. But Johnson 
yanked the hot hand and 
waved for the cold arm. 

“I was shocked,” Key 
said. “I wouldn’t put me in 
with a lead out of the bullpen. 
I was hoping I didn't pitch in 
this game because that would 
mean we were three cm- four 
runs behind.” 

Until this game. Key had 
been battered for two months. 
Twice in these playoffs, be had 
been yanked early. 

“I’ve tried everything,” he 
said then. “I don’t know 
what’s wrong. I felt like laugh- 
ing at myself out there.” 

With this as prologue, it’s 
easy to see why Cleveland's 
Kevin Sertzex, eager to start 
the bashing, swung at Key’s 


first pitch Monday night Bui 
he grounded to second base. 

On a full count, David 
Justice knew he would get a 
fastball. Key couldn’t risk a 
walk. That would bring slug- 
ger Matt Williams to the plate 
as the tying run. Key threw a 
sweeping curveball dial was 
not just low and away, but a 
couple of inches off the plate. 
Key knew Justice's intentions 
and preyed on them. Justice 
fanned. 

Gradually, Key found a 
groove. Sandy Alomar and 
Marquis Grissom, the two In- 
dians whose homers were so 
damaging in Games 2 and 4, 
took their best bolts. But their 
fly Kalis died in center fielder 
Brady Anderson’s glove. If 
Key could survive Alomar 
and Grissom, could the mo- 
mentum in this series be 
swinging into a new dugout? 

By the eighth inning, the 
Key of April, May and June 
— the pitcher who went 1 1-1 
back then — appeared to be 
back on the hilL 

Manny Ramirez and 
Seitz er were so befuddled 
that they took back-to-back 
third strikes to end the inning. 
The line, please: three shutout 
inning s, no hits, one walk, 
three strikeouts. 

This time Key held the fort. 
By the time he handed the 
ninth inning over to Randy 
Myers, the Orioles had built a 
4-0 lead and the game ended 
in a Baltimore victory. 4-2. 

“The bonus tonight was 
Jimmy Key.” Johnson said. 
“He came up big.” 

Johnson’s managerial style 
has three trademarks: He’s so 
quietly cocky that he never 
seems worried; he puts a play- 
er's health ahead of his own 
job security, and he shows 
confidence in his players’ 
skills even when others have 
given up on them. All three 
were on display Monday 
night 

“Kammy was really upset 
with my decision.” Johnson 
said. “1 don’t mess' around 


with elbows. Thai can be ca- 
reer-threatening. I won’t take 
that chance for just a 
baUgame.” 

T^e other Orioles' hero 
Monday night was Kami- 
eniecki, with his five gritty 
inning s. He was rusty and in 
constant trouble. He had gone 
14 days without pitchiiig be- 
fore working three innings of 
relief Thursday. In big jams, 
he faced five Indians with two 
men on base. He got them all: 
Jim Thome twice, Ramirez, 
Justice and Grissom. 

What made Kamieniecki 
so tough? 

“The Indians have great 
fang,** said Miller, the Ori- 
oles’ pit ching coach. “Except 
a couple of ’em. While Kami- 
eniecki was wanning up, two 
guys stood over our bullpen 
ana yelled insu] ts at him for 20 
minutes: ‘You’re a second-di- 
vision pitcher, a crummy fifth 
starter. You're going to gag.’ 
That was about the dumbest 
thing you could do. Those two 
guys may end up costing their 
team a pennant.” 

Now, thank s to Kami- 
eniecki and Key, this series is 
up for grabs again. 

“As crazy as this series has 
been.l don’t see how anybody 
could feel confident about 
anything,” said the Indians' 
manager, Mike Hargrove. 

That’s half the truth. The 
other half is that the Orioles 
suddenly feel far more con- 
fident than they did before 
Game 5. 

The greatest leap in con- 
fidence, however, is in Key. 
Slung by being taken out of 
the rotation in the first place, 
he may have rediscovered his 
form. Since he won't start 
again in this series, who 
cares? Some take a longer 
view than that For weeks, 
Johnson has said the Orioles 
can’t win the World Series 
without the real Jimmy Key. 

Did somebody say the Ori- 
oles might be in the World 
Series? It doesn’t sound so 
ridiculous now. 



Sot Ogncb/Rcoiai 

Manager Davey Johnson and pitching coach Ray 
Miller breathing more easily after the Orioles’ victory. 





















I 


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Page 24 


OBSERVER 

Tent-Show Villains 


t \ 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1997 


R 


By Russell Baker 



. — money 
as just another farce enacted 
by buffoons and hypocrites. 

Fo r coarse burlesque-house 
comedy it will be hard to im- 
prove on President Clinton 


lynamo who wakes up to find 
that once again somebody has 
put chewing gum in his hair. 

The ham-fisted perfor- 
mance by the Senate’s Repub- 
lican leader, Trent Loo, is also 
choice. Ttyiug to play the 
statesman while trilling cam- 
paign finance refonn, he came 
across like a touring tent-show 
villain who sells snake oil to 
the rubes during intermi ssio n, 

AD he lacked was a long 
black mustache to twirl while 
binding the beautiful Belinda 
to the railroad macks. (“Aha, 
me proud beauty, now we shall 
see whether you prefer the 
cowcatcher of the noon express 
to my passionate embrace!”) 

□ 

Corny? Yes, but the whole 
show is corny. Did you catch 
Senator Onin Hatch threatening 
to investigate Attorney General 
Janet Reno's investigation of 

Clinton c ampaign nvwyV 

Don't be surprised to see 
Senator John Glenn put on his 
stooge-of-the-presidenl cos- 
tume. and threaten to inves- 
tigate Hatch’s investigation of 
Janet Reno’s investigation. 

Nor should the hilarious 
cameo performance by Senator 
Mitch McConnell, the Ken- 
tucky Republican and cham- 
pion of free speech, be over- 
looked when the prizes are 
given out “Money talks,' 1 the 
old folks used to say, but it took 
McConnell to argue that money 
has aconstitutional right to talk, 
roar or even thunder. 

Any attempt to stifle 


money’s right to express it- 
self violates the First Amend- 
ment, said McConnell, an- 
nouncing that he would never 
let the Founding Fathers 
down in the strug gle against 
campaign finance reform. 

□ 

Must it be noted that Re- 
publicans are huge benefi- 
ciaries of the present squalid 
system? With few exceptions, 
they voted against reform for 
the perfectly understandable 
reason that although the 
present situation may be, re- 
grettably, shameful, h works 
for Republicans. 

The fan part here is that the 
Republicans ’ abject loyalty to 
the status quo permitted 
Democrats to look heroic. 
They voted unanimously for 
campaign reform though, 
truth to tell many of them are 
as happy as Republicans with 
the way things are. 

The absurdity of this farrago 
can be enjoyed only by people 
who like their mirth sour. For 
every thigh- slapper in the per- 
formance, there is something 
solemn and depressing. 

There is, first, the appalling 
amount of money it now takes 
to elect the kind of clowns 
r ompin g through this show. As 
Meg Greenfield pointed out in 
The Washington Post, for all 
those millions and millions we 
ought to be getting a little com- 
petence at foe top. Instead we 
get only living, breathing em- 
barrassments in statesmen’s 

ntnfhing 

There is also foe apparenr 
lack of public interest, always 
i as “cynicism.” The 
lament this out 
but in the privacy of the 
dub they can only be de- 
lighted. With foe public in- 
different to what they are up to, 
they can safely confine them- 
selves to taking care of their 
contributors and themselves. 

Mm 1 York Times Service 


A Seismic Restoration for San Francisco Opera 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 

S AN FRANCISCO — This is a 
season of anniversaries and 
massive repair jobs. The Golden 
Gate.Bridge logged its 60th birth- 
day in May, .far instance, and is 
now undergoing the first stages of a 
"seismic retrofit” to bring it up 
to modem earthquake-resistance 
standards. 

Likewise, the city's War Me- 
morial Opera House, also designed 
and built before the advent of mod- 
em seismic engineering, recently 
reopened in a celebratory mood. It 
is foe company's 75th season, foe 
65th anniversary of the opening of 
foe imposing, 3,200-seat house on 
Van Ness Avenue, and it marks the 
company's joyous return home 
after an 18-monfo closing for an 
$88 j 5 milli on rehabilitation that in- 
cluded a seismic retrofit, foe renov- 
ation of stage equipment and back- 
stage facilities, and the restoration 
of the lavish Beaux Arts interior 
and upgrading of public comfort, 
from spot air conditioning to ex- 
panded restrooms. 

As is often the case with such 
projects, foe origins were in ca- 
tastrophe, both earthquake and fire. 
The 1989 quake that hit the San 
Francisco Bay Area (7.2 on the 
Richter scale) did not close foe 
theater, but it made its aging and 
fragility apparent One temporary 
measure was to stretch a net undo- 
foe ceiling lest pieces fall on foe 
audience, but thinking turned in foe 
direction of total overhaul 
In 1990 the city’s voters ap- 
proved a 5332 million bond issue to 
repair earthquake Hamagp. a nd 
bang city buddings up to current, 
standards, and $49.5 million was 
allotted to the opera house. The 
major share of this went into struc- 
tural reinforcement, mainly a net- 
work of new interior load-bearing 
walls, steel bracing and shock ab- 
sorbers. The War Memorial trust- 
ees, who manage the house for the 
city, put 59 million into new up- 
holstery for. orchestra-level seats 
and other public amenities. A fire 


set by a worker's acetylene torch in 
foe mezzanine-box tier made nec- 
essary a more ambitious renovation 
than had been planned in that area. 

The Committee to Restore the 
Opera House — private and cor- 
porate donors and board members 
of die opera and ballet companies 
that share foe house — raised $30 
million that went into all the back- 
stage and underground technical 
equipment that make up foe unseen 
engine room of a modem musical 
theater. In effect, a new theater was 
built inside the walls of .foe old. 

There were also aesthetic con- 
siderations imposed by die build- 
ing's stains as a historic site. James 
KiDtoran. the executive director of 
foe committee, recalled an ongoing 
“discussion’' of several months 
with foe preservation architect over 
foe cokfr of foe ceiling. “Finally we 
found an article in the San Francisco 
Chronicle on the opening of the 
honse in 1932 that referred to the 
‘azure’ of foe ceiling,” obviously 

lighter than the murk y tone it had 

acquired over the years. 

Preservation triumphed, how- 
ever, in the case of a basement door 
clearly labeled "Music Library.” 
Killoran explained that while the 
music library was, elsewhere and 
this was now the opera orchestra 
manag er’s office, the door was pro- 
tected, sign and all 

The conductor Gaetano Merola, 
who founded the San Francisco 
Opera in 1923 and ran it for 30 
years, established the company's 
reputation for top voices. He could 
attract great voices and leading 
conductors because in those days 
foe San Francisco season in the fell 
took place before the new York 
Met or the leading Italian houses 
opened for business. Kurt Herbert 
Adler ran the house for foe next 28 
years, maintaining Merola’s mu- 
sical values and introducing a con- 
temporary concern for stage pro- 
duction values, values that were 
maintain ed rinring foe 1980s by his 
successor, Terence McEwen. 

Since 1989 the general director 
— only the company’s fourth — 
has been Lotfi Mansouri, an ebul- 



LuryVeridr 

Carol Vaness and Richard Margison in season opener, “Tosca.” 


lient veteran stage director whose 
association with the San Francisco 
Opera dates from 1963 and in- 
cludes more than 60 operatic sta- 
gings, during much of which time 
he was also resident stage director 
at foe opera houses in Zorich and 
Geneva, then director of foe .Ca- 
nadian Opera Company in Toronto. 
Actually, the San Francisco con- 
nection for foe Iranian-born Man- 
souri is even older. 

"My father sent me to foe Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles 
to study medicine,” he recalled. 
"One day I saw a notice that foe 
San Francisco Opera needed supers 
for its Los Angeles season. They 
were paying $1, which just about 
covered foe bus fere.” 

So it was that he made his opera 
debut, of sorts, as a spear carrier in 
Verdi’s “OtelTo” in 1951, then 
graduated to advanced studies as an 
usher in foe upper reaches of the 


immens e Shrine Auditorium, 
where the San Francisco Opera 
then dispensed culture to the be- 
nighted Angelenos. That was it for 
medicine, although it took years 
and success as a stage director to 
assuage his father's anger. 

“I think opera is for everyone,” 
Mans ouri said, "it has such a wide 
gamut. Nothing has grown so fast. 
Not so long ago foe San Francisco 
Opera was foe only one on the West 
Coast Now there are 22 compa- 
nies, large and small in California 
alone. We are looking at the gen- 
eration of MTV. where each pro- 
duction is a mini-opera.” 

He had a chance to test this idea 
last year, dnrmg the company’s ex- 
ile from its home. Mansouri set up a 
“Broadway style” run of 24 per- 
formances in three weeks of a new 
don of Puccini’s “La Bo- 
in the ornate, 2,400-seat 
Orphenm Theatre. Mere than 


45 , 000 tickets were sold at moder^e 

takes (by operatic standards), an? 
m ore than uO percent of foe audi- 
ence consisted of young peoplewno 
had never gone to an opera before. 

The experiment was repealed 
this year, in a slightly reduced 
form, with "Madama Butterfly- 
It was a less startling success, but 
the food for thought remains. . _ 

On foe other hand, Mansouri is 
also anxious to maintain the com- 
pany's record for presenting new 
works. He has commissioned two 

American composers to create their 

first operas for the company. Andre 
Previn is melding Tennessee Wil- 
liams’s '‘Streetcar Named De- 
sire,” the premiere of which is 
scheduled for next September with 
Renee Fleming as Blanche and 
Rodney Gilfry as Stanley, and 
Colin Graham staging. Bobby Mc- 
Ferrin and foe Pulitzer Prize-win- 
ning playwright Tony Kus liner are 
collaborating on f ‘Saint Cecilia,” a 
tale by the German author Heinrich 
von Kleist set in the Thirty Years’ 
War, scheduled for 1999. 

History and tradition played a 
deter mining role in foe current sea- 
son. Because Merola opened foe 
War Memorial Opera House with 
Puccini’s "Tosca” on Oct. 15, 
1932, that was foe choice for open- 
ing ni ght this year, with Nello Sand 
conducting a solid cast headed by 
Carol Vaness, Richard Margison as 
Cavaradossi and James Morris as 

o^^osquet Iw^dhis&^^eely 
on those of Armando Agnini used 
65 years ago, realistic and highly 
decorative. 

Whatever happens onstage this 
season, it will surely be foe bouse 
itself that stars. For many, the most 
memorable moment will be the 

playing of foe national anthem at the 
opening night gala. When it came to 
‘'foe rockets’ red glare, bombs 
bursting in air,” the darkness gave 
way to a spiraling explosion of light 
in foe five-layer chandelier, 
triggered by a timed sequence of 46 
dimming circuits, revealing the re- 
stored house in all its golden ra- 
diance. 



EVERYUGLYMAN 


PEOPLE 


Cyrano de Bergerac Turns 100, as Fresh and Sassy as Ever 


By Katherine Knorr 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — "Cyrano de Bergerac” turns 100 this 
year, none of its brilliant fireworks dimmed. 
When die play was first staged in December 1897, it 
was such an extraordinary triumph for Edmond 
Rostand, wh’o was not yet 30, foat in some ways it did 
him in as a playwright With three stagings of 
"Cyrano” in Paris this season, along with a his- 
torical exhibition, it’s difficult to avoid this Every- 
uglyman recognizable around the world. The big 
flamboyant production at the Theatre de Chaillot by 
France’s theatrical ringmaster Jerome Savary, star- 
ring Francis Huster, manages both to give us afresh 
take on a classic role, ana also unwittingly to say 
something about the state of theater in this bleak fin 
de si&cle. 

From foe moment Cyrano was first staged, with 
foe legendary actor Constant Coquelin, for whom 
Rostand wrote the play, it was a controversial success 
— audiences loved it but many critics felt uncom- 
fortable. It was too — well too. It felt frivolous and 
vulgar and irrelevant. Its verbal brilliance and its 
relentless cleverness set it in insolent contrast to the 
social theater of, say. Octave Mirbeau, or to Alfred 
Jaxry’s outrageous "Ubu Roi.” 

Rostand's verse play, set in die swashbuckling 
17th century and vaguely inspired by the playwright 
and philosopher Savinien de Cyrano de Bergerac, 
deliberately played at being a costume drama, ana- 
chronistic but nevertheless reveling in its Louis Xfil 
feather hats and musketeer chic. It had, well pan- 
ache. It also played to a slightly farcical nationalism; 
in foat sense; Cyrano's Cadets de Gascogne are not 
unlike Asterix, brave to foe point of madness in foe 
face of a superior enemy, but not so ascetic as to 
accept foe fete that left them without hams, sausage 
and wine. Coming at the time of the Dreyfus Affair, 
' ‘Cyrano” was seen as feeding foe xenophobia of a 
certain France; that Rostand was not anti-Dreyfus ard 
seemed to be overlooked. 

Rostand was a clever courtier in the theater world, 
and was protected by Sarah Bernhardt; Coquelin, 
then reaching the end of his career, specifically asked 
him to write him a play. Rostand was also clever at 
posing, a nervous unsettled man who knew how to 
put on a show, how to fabricate what foe French 
would now call “un look." Still Rostand’s hero, in 
all his self-destructive splendor, laughs at ambition, 
at foe currying of political favor, at all foe vanity 
publishing of the world of hacks and the theater. Non 
merci, saw Cyrano. His own arrogance lay else- 
where. Rostand hims elf could not surpass 
"Cyrano,” which brought him foe Legion of Honor. 



RobuMoa Saw* 

The profile: Francis Huster as Cyrano, 


Only one other of his plays is still well known, 
“L’Aiglon,” which he wrote for Bernhardt. He 
retreated from Paris for health reasons, and died of 
the Spanish influenza in 1918. 

What remains surprising, 100 years later, is how 
well ‘ ‘Cyrano” has aged. What message it threw oat 
amid foe verbal fencing is as fresh today as it was 
then, and there was something amusing about seeing 
famous actors and producers, in a big state-owned 
theater, criticize the vanities in foe presence, on one 
recent evening, of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin. 

Savary’s "Cyrano” is a leaner, reworked version 
of his two previous stagings, in Paris and in Ger- 
many. It is busy and at times rather camp, and it has 
the characteristic Savary special effects, here smoke 
and musket fire, along with the inevitable horse (very 
well behaved, too.). The crowd scenes skirt a kind of 
triumphant vulgarity, but the love scenes are all 
simplicity and quite beautiful 

Anyone playing Cyrano is open to comparison 
with so many other famous performances mat the 
battle is lost before it begins. Huster, thin, good- 
looking, dynamic, is a melancholy Cyrano, more 
austere titan one expects from this bon vivant with 
gigantic appetites, more a romantic lead than, say. 
Gourd Depardieu, who in the 1990 movie by Jean- 
Paul Rappeneau manages to inspire great trust and 
great pity all in one sweep of foe haL Huster is a 
nervous daredevil without the reassuring side. There 
is not necessarily anything wrong with this, but it is 
surprising. Christiana Reali, Huster’s companion 
offstage, is appropriately beautiful and a thoroughly • 
modem Roxane who arrives on foe battlefield in 
clothing that- could have come off Jean Paul Gault- 
ier’s runways. Virgile Bayle, as Christian de Neuvil- 
lette, is adequately ethereal Philippe Khorsand, as 
the Comte de Guiche, is malevolently oily and sexu- 
ally ambiguous. Jean-Marc Thibault, as Ragueneau, 
the cook who loves verse, steals the show. 

This grand spectacle "Cyrano,” foe quintessen- 
tial late-20fo-century theatre de boulevard, is a re- 
minder of just how wide the divide has become 
between popular theater and the stepchildren of Ait 
Theater, who cross-dress die classics and bemoan 
bad things likepoverty, war and injustice. Besides all 
the fun, there is a laten t message in "Cyrano” that 
crosses the decades. It’s not only society that needs 
mocking, but sometimes foe very art that mocks it, 
and in mat sense when Cyrano shoos away the actor 
Montflemy — here played by Francois Borysse — 
he could be shooing away foe makers of so much 
boring and self-important postmodern theater. 

An exhibition, Cyrano a cent ans," is at the 
mairie of the 6th arrondissement until Oct. 31, then at 
the Theatre de Chaillot until Jan. 31. 


T HE Beatles singer-song- 
writer who never learned 
to write or read music was to 
stage foe world premiere on 
Tuesday of his most ambitious 
foray into foe classical music 
world. Paul McCartney’s 
“Standing Stone,” described 
as a symphonic poem, was be- 
ing performed by the London 
Symphony Orchestra at the 
Royal Albert Hall in London. 

The 75-minute symphony — 

McCartney’s second full- 
scale classical work — was 
released on disk last month. It 
is currently on top of foe U.S. 
classical music charts and 
holds the second spot cm the 
British charts. The symphony 
follows his 1991 Liverpool 
Oratorio, which was written 
with the British conductor 
Carl Davis. "Standing 
Scone’’ is a solo effort, written 
by McCartney on a keyboard 
linked m a computer program. 

The Liverpool Oratorio was slammed by the 
critics as lightweight but proved popular with 
audiences and has been performed mare than 
100 times in 20 countries. "Standing Stone” 
looks likely to follow the same pattern. Some 
classical music critics have already dismissed 
it as “background music." 



Spain’s royal newlyweds, Princess 
Cristina and the Olympic handball star Inaki 
Urdangarin, are spending their honeymoon 
in Aqaba, Jordan, on the Red Sea as guests of 
KingHuasein, La Vanguardia reported Tues- 
day. The newspaper cited an official who said 
he had seen the couple arrive in Jordan. 

□ 

National Geographic- Feature Films has 
bought the rights to foe French oceanographer 
Jacques Cousteau's stray and is p lanning a 
movie. Cousteau, a filmmaker ana explorer 
whose documentary work provided a window 
to the riches of the world's oceans, died in 
Paris in June at age 87. 


The Spice Girls, one of the hottest prop- 
erties in pop music, gave their first live concert 
in Istanbul and showed 11,000 fens that they 
really can sing after all. Flanked by the roller- 
coaster-shaped stage topped with a glittery 


BIRTHDAY GREETINGS — The writers Salman 
Rushdie, left, and Guenter Grass at the Thalia Theater 
in Hamburg at a 70th birthday celebration for Grass. 

mini-motorcar, the five Spice Girls did foei;/. 
best to show that they are more than a mert? 
invention. The group came together after an- 
swering an advertisement for "streetwise, am- 
bitious and dedicated” girls. 

□ 

MOM is shaken — and stirred — over 
Columbia Pictures' plans to make its own 
series of James Bond movies. MGM’s United 
Artists division will release its 18th Bond 
film, "Tomorrow Never Dies,” in December. 
Columbia will release the first of its films in 
1999, basing them on a 1959 collaboration 
between the Bond novelist, Ian Fleming, 
writer-director Kevin McCIory and producer 
Jack Whlttingham, McCIory said. "Al- 
though they try to depict us as interlopers, w' 
were in feet innovators, ' ’ said McCIory, wHb 
produced "Thunderball” and its remake, 

7 ‘Never Say Never Again.” 

□ 

An Australian art gallery closed an ex- 
hibition by foe American artist Andres Ser- 
rano after his photograph of a crucifix im- 
mersed in urine was attacked by a youth 
wielding a hammer. The National Gallery of 
Victoria in Melbourne said it had closed the 
show for security reasons, but Serrano said it 
had shown a "spineless” lack of support for 
the arts and democracy. 


'i : 




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