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'"If | W INTERNATIONAL , 4 ^ 

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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE' WA^iHNGTON POST 


>^rhe Worlds Daily Newspaper 


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London, Tuesday, September 2, 1997 




On Jobs, Europe Goes 
The Temporary Route 


Short-Term and Part-Time Positions, 
Long Avoided, Make Up Most Hiring 


By Edmund L. Andrews 


St *■ York Times Service 


PARIS — Tabienne Rogaid just 
soned a job as an executive secretary 
at one of France’s biggest food compa- 
nies. Bat she is not excited: This will 
be her tenth job in four years, and she 
already knows she will be looking for 
work again in six months. 

“I used to think that if I was very 
good and very involved, 1 could stay 
with the company," said Miss Rog- 
ard. who is 32 and a single mother. 


After victory in UPS strike, U.S. 
labor scents comeback. Page 12. 


“But no. There is no possibiliry. 
With this job, I am replacing a woman 
who is having a baby. When she 
comes back. 1 leave.” 

Miss Rogard is at the center of a 
broad shift in the way Europeans 
work: the rapid decline of the tra- 
ditional full-time job. Temporary 
jobs, pan-time work and other form’s 
of nontraditionaf employment — 
long anathema to European unions 
and governments — have become by 
far the most important source of new 
jobs across the Continent. 

Although the recent United Parcel 
Service shrike focused attention on the 
use of pan- timers in the United States, 
the global trend is quite different. 

The proportion of part-time workers 
in the United States has been steady at 
about 18 percent for more than a de- 


cade. But the proportion is higher in 
many European countries and is grow- 
ing quickly. Meanwhile, the number 
of temporary workers — people who 
may work full-time but move from 
company to company — is soaring. 

In France, the national job-place- 
ment agency reports that 66 percent of 
its postings are for temporary con- 
tracts rhat last less than a year, in 
Spain, more than 90 percent of all new 
jobs go to workers with temporary 
contracts, and only a small percentage 
of those turn into permanent posi- 
tions. In the Netherlands. 37 percent 
of all workers are part-timers. 

That is a tremendous shift front 10 
years ago, not just in numbers but in 
cultural taboos. For years, European 
governments prided themselves on 
enforcing strong job-protection rules, 
making it extremely difficult for 
companies to lay off’ workers. Tem- 
porary job agencies were scorned in 
many countries and illegal in some. 

Now. with unemployment running 
more than twice as high" in Europe as Ft 
is in the United States, many gov- 
ernments and unions are encouraging 
alternatives to traditional work. 
Companies have jumped at the new 
opportunities, creating few new per- 
manent jobs and plugging gaps with 
temporary workers or pan'timers as 
much as possible. 

Executives say the biggest force 
driving this is the rigidity of standard 
workplace rules, which make it al- 


See LABOR, Page 7 


AGENDA 


Burma Faces Ban 


Over Drug Trade 


bn 


i if 


Burma will be banned from a gath- 
ering of European and Asian gov- 
ernment leaders next year, according 
to Foreign Secretary Robin Cook of 
Britain. Mr. Cook, who was in Singa- 
pore Monday on the last leg of an tour 
of Southeast Asia, said Burma’s lead- 
ers would be denied visas to attend the 
talks because of the country’s in- 
volvement in the drug trade. 

‘‘Burma is the largest single world 
producer of opium, and it has 
achieved that infamous position pre- 
cisely because it is a government that 
does not act against the drug barons, 
the British minister said. Page 7. 



Adtl H*u.Tte AuaattM 


PAGE TWO 

Enforcing Press Laws in Turkey 


HOPING — Gaza Strip Pales- 
tinians waiting Monday to be is- 
sued Israeli work permits. Page 5. 


THE AMERICAS Page3. 

Mexico Ruling Party Backs Down 


ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

Hashimoto's Trip Stirs Concern. 


Books — Page 10 

Crossword Page 10 

Opinion Pages 8*9. 

Sports Pages 16-17 


The IHT on-line iwnv.ihtcom 


Hong Kong Bears Pounce 
On China - Linked Stocks 


By Philip Segal 

Spn Ml in the Herald Tribune 


HONG KONG — Local investors 
Coined the panic to exit the Hong Kong 
nock market Monday, driving China- 
inked stocks down along with the 
ilrcady bartered blue-chip shares, and 
;ending the benchmark Hang Seng In- 
iex to below where it was when the year 
legan. 

Shaken sales executives at broker- 
iges across the city said more losses 
rould be in store, since the China shares 
lave risen so far this year on speculative 
topes rather than on firmly improving 
.■arnings. 

The Hang Seng fell 709.60 pornis 
vlonday to 13,425.65, a fall of 5.02 
lercenr. That brought the decline since 
he close on Wednesday to a stuiuung 
3.57 percent. The index has fallen from 
i high of 1 6,673.27 early last month and 
s now below the 13.451.45 mark ai 
vhicb it started the year. , 

“Liquidity has just evaporated, its 


phenomenal,'' said Niall Gooding, head 
of sales at Schroder Securities, who noted 
that the American marker was closed 
Monday for the Labor Day holiday. 

“It all happened in the absence of 
U.S. investors.” he added. “They will 
come back and chances are there will be 
another wave tomorrow. The outlook, is 


noiUgood. 


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See HONG KONG, Page 12 




No. 35,615 


Diana’s Drivef^as Legally Drunk; 


Cyclists ‘Surrounded’ Speeding Car 


Palace Sets 
The Funeral 
For Saturday 


By Tom Buerkle 

tiuenhiiionut Herat J Tribune 


LONDON — From every pan of 
Britain and beyond, people came to St. 
James’s Palace by the thousands Mon- 
day to mourn Diana, Princess of Wales, 
in a powerful testament to a personal 
appeal thai transcended barriers of age 
and sex, class and nationality. 

Buckingham Palace opened a week 
of national mourning by announcing 
that Diana's funeral would be held Sat- 
urday at Westminster Abbey, the site of 
coronations, weddings and most other 


major royal occasions for 800 years. 


replace and the timing were chosen 
to allow the greatest number of people 
to pay their respects, officials indicated. 
Her family’s desire for privacy will be 


met by a private burial later that day at 


the Spencer family burial site in 
Northamptonshire in central England. 

' ‘This is a unique funeral for a unique 
person,” a spokesman for the royal fam- 
ily said. 

It was a sentiment shared widely by 
the people who stood for hours in a 
nearly half-mile-long line outside St. 
James's Palace, where Diana’s body lay 
in a coffin, to sign books of condolence. 
Mourners were not allowed to file past 
the coffin, which rested before the altar 
of the palace's chapel. 

Diana's sons, William, 15. and Harry, 
12. remained with their father. Prince 
Charles, and other members of the royal 
family in Balmoral. Scotland. 

The memory of her beauty, style and 
courage, and the sense of a dynamic life 
cut brutally short, led many commen- 
tators to evoke the memory' of President 
John Kennedy’s assassination in J963. 

“Kennedy’s death left a great void in 
the lives of Americans,’’ the Daily Ex- 
press said in an editorial “The death of 
Diana leaves a similar void in ours.” 

In Paris, meanwhile, the scene of the 
automobile accident early Sunday that 
claimed the lives of Diana and her com- 



Exact Cause 
Of Accident 
Still Unclear 


By Craig R. Whitney 


New York Times Sen-ice 


tanmc Delay/Thc Anoud Pro* 

Hundreds lined up Monday, waiting hours to sign a book of condolence 
inside St. James's Palace, where Diana's coffin lies in the royal chapel. 


Paparazzi, Under Attack, 
Fault Editors and Public 


By Alan Riding 

.Vor York Times Sen-ice 


panion. Dodi al Fayed, French pros- 

r.Heni 


ecuiors announced that the driver, Heim 
Paul, who also was killed, had a blood- 
alcohol level well above the legal limit. 

Pro sec uton have not yet interviewed 
Trevor Rees- Jones, Diana’s bodyguard 
and the only survivor, who is hospit- 
alized. 

Controversy also continued to rage 
over what role, if any, the press played 
in the accident. 

Prosecutors extended the detention of 


PARIS — With paparazzi facing 
public outrage for their role in the car 
crash that killed Diana. Princess of 
Wales, photographers of all genres 
closed ranks Monday to claim they were 
scapegoats for the public's embarrass- 


News media soul-searching. Page 6. 


See FUNERAL, Page 7 


mem at its insatiable appetite for in- 
timate shots of celebrities. 

"There's too much hypocrisy,” said 
Jean-Frangois Leroy, director of the 
Perpignan Festival of Photojourna- 
lism. “Those who denounce the 
paparazzi today will be the first to buy 
the photos of the young princes crying at 


Lady Di’s funeral. The paparazzi re- 
spond to the photo agencies, which re- 
spond to the newspapers and magazines, 
which respond to the public.” 

In an editorial, Bild Zeirung. Ger- 
many 's top-selling daily, even used pu b- 
lic interest to justify' its front-page color 
photograph Monday of the crashed Mer- 
cedes S-280 in which die princess died, 
with rescuers still trying to extract the 
victims. The photograph was apparently 
taken while emergency services were 
struggling to save Diana's life. 

“Members of a royal household have 
less of a private life than normal mor- 
tals,” BUd Zeitung wrote. “They lead a 
public life and enjoy a higher regard the 
more that this life is exemplary. A cam- 
era cannot censor that. But there are 


See MEDIA, Page 6 


he Hang Seng’s slide over the last 
three trading days came as mutual fund 
managers, racing the possibility of in- 
vestor redemptions in the midst oi 
Asia’s currency instability, have sought 
to sell ibeir most liquid stocks to raise 
cash. In Asia, the most liquid stocks are 
Hong Kong blue chips- 

Although Hong Kong is still one of 
Asia's better-performing markets in the 

year to date . the Hang Seng Index is now 
down 0.2 percent since Jan. 1. but is still 
trading at 15.9 times the latest year s 
earnings of the companies whose shares 
comprise the average. Thai is well 
above the 11.6 times earnings the Hang 
Sena reached at the time of Mas l&t 
currency crisis in January l995 /^. re ' 
cendv as April 4, the index was trading 
at just 14.1 times earnings. The higher 

the price-to-eamuigs ratio, the more in- 
vestors are willing to ber that the slocks 

* ‘Tbesell-off that began in August has 
until now affected blue chips, but on 
Monday a new factor came into -play. 
Local investors who had bought higy 

speculative China-linked stocksonbor- 

S^'valSIheh colS^ofteo blue- 
clients to lower their margins, sard 



IWIkmu'l/lpm' I'wwr-lfcw 

Flowers were placed over the Alma tunnel in Paris on Monday where the Princess of Wales was killed Sunday. 


PARIS — The Paris prosecutor’s of- 
fice said Monday that the blood alcohol 
level in die body of the driver killed with 
Diana, Princess of Wales, and her com- 
panion. Emad Mohamed (Dodi) al 
Fayed, in a high-speed car crash was 
above the legal! imit. 

A statement by the office leading the 
investigation said the driver's blood 
showed a “violation level” of alcohol. 

Investigators speaking on condition 
of anonymity said that the body of the 
driver, Henri Paul, 41, assistant director 
of security at the Ritz Hotel, which Mr. 
al Fayed ’s father, Mohamed al Fayed, 
owns, showed a blood alcohol level of 
1 .75 grams per liter, or more than three 
times the 0.5 level above which it is 
illegal to drive. 

Police sources, quoted by Reuters, said 
it would lake 10 glasses of wine for an 

-rage-sized man to reach 1.75 grams. 

What caused Mr. Paul to lose control 
behind the wheel of an armored Mer- 
cedes S-280 sedan — not a heavier S- 
600 as reported initially — and slam 
into a support column in a road tunnel 
early Sunday was not dear. 

Bernard Darievelle, a lawyer for Mo- 
hamed al Fayed, said Monday that he 
had spoken to a witness who had been 
driving ahead of the Mercedes who de- 
scribed it as “surrounded by so many 
motorcyclists that he believed it was an 
official cortege.” 

The Ritz press office said that Mr. 
Paul was a specialist in military security 
and had been trained as a chauffeur in 
high-security driving situations by Mer- 
cedes in Germany. 

Police who examined ihe wreckage 
said the car was traveling far above the 
speed limit of 50 kilometers (30 miles) 
an hour before it went out of control in 
the tunnel. One investigator estimated 
that it was going 150 kilometers (90 
miles) an hour. 

After the accident, the police said that 
the photographers pursuing the couple 
on motorcycles and scooters could have 
contributed to the causes of the accident, 
in which Diana's British bodyguard was 
also seriously injured, and took seven 
people they described as photographers- 
into custody at the scene. 

French news agencies and Le Monde 
had reported that the first police on the 
scene found photographers snapping 
pictures instead of trying to help the 
survivors of the crash, and resisting 
police orders to leave. 

The seven people detained can be 
held for 48 hours before prosecutors file 
charges. The prosecutor's statement 
Monday indicated that some of them 
could face judicial charges, including 
failure to provide aid at the scene of an 
accident, a criminal act in France that 
can email five years of imprisonment 
and a 500,000-franc ($83,000) fine. 

“Searches have also been carried out 
in the offices of various press agencies 
for possible seizure as evidence of pho- 
tographs of the chase and the accident 
which they may have received,” the 
prosecution statement said. 

“Investigations have been ordered to 
determine the context of the chase and 
to evaluate the behavior of the driver of 
the car so as to determine how he may 
have been hindered or influenced on the 
road, not only by the pursuing vehicles 
but also by any other circumstances,” 
the statement continued. 

“In this regard, the analysis of his 
blood revealed a degree of influence of 
alcohol of violation level.” 

As for thephotographers, ihe state- 
ment said, “The investigation has been 
able to determine more precisely the 
behavior of certain persons who did not 
give the aid and assistance normally 
required in case of an accident on a 
public road. 

“When the 48-hour detention period 


See PARIS, Page 6 


U.S. Military Wants to Test-Fire Laser at Satellite 


By William J. Broad 

New York Times Sen tee 


NEW YORK — Developers of the 
/erral laser 


are 


U.S. military's most powi 
seeking permission to fire its beam into 
space at a $60 million Air Force satel- 
lite in what military officials say would 
be the first test of its kind. 

The test, planned for September, 
would be a major step toward per- 
fecting a weapon that could demolish 
satellites and other spacecraft, an abil- 
ity that the Pentagon regards as crucial 
in time of war. 

But advocates of arms control say 
the test is likely to set off a race for new 
space weapons that will ultimately en- 
danger the nation’s own satellites. And 


the maker of the satellite, which is 
owned by the Air Force, says that the 
craft still has years of useful life and 
that its destruction would be a foolish 
waste. 

TTie military wants an anti-satellite 
weapon mainly to stop enemies with 
orbital cameras from spying on Amer- 
ican weapons and troops during com- 
bat. For years, the United States dom- 
inated space-based reconnaissance, 
but recently other countris and even 
private companies have begun efforts 
to loft their own spy satellites, with the 
companies seeking to market high- 
quality satellite photos. 

The United States has no demon- 
strated way of shooting down satel- 
lites. though experts speculate that it 


may have secret ways that could work 
in an emergency. In theoiy, a laser 
weapon would allow the United States 
to dominate the world of orbital re- 
connaissance at least for a while. 

The laser, installed at a sprawling 
base in the New Mexico desert, is run 
by the army. The planned test would 
have it strike the Air Force satellite, an 
experimental craft designed to im- 
prove ways to track missiles, to see 
what it takes to destroy it. The Air 
Force says it no longer needs the satel- 
lite and plans to switch it off, despite 
the maker’s protests. 

On Thursday, military officials met 
at the Pentagon to review the laser plan 
but came to no decision on whether to 
approve iL A final go-ahead would 


probably have lo come from the sec- 
retary of defense, probably in concert 
with the White House. 

Congressional critics and arms-con- 
trol groups have long campaigned 
against firing the powerful laser at 
space targets, an idea much talked 
about since it flashed lo life over a 
decade ago. Around 1990, congres- 
sional Democrats won a legal prohib- 
ition on test firings of the big laser 
against satellites. But in 1995, the Re- 
publican-led Congress let the ban ex- 
pire. 

The powerful laser, known as Mir- 
aci. for Mid -infrared Advanced 
Chemical Laser, is based at the White 


See LASER, Page 7 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Censorship in Turkey / Vigil on the Bosporus 


Algeria Order? 
House Arrest 


Prosecutor on Alert for Propaganda and Sedition of Rebel Who 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Timer Service 


I STANBUL — In a sunlit office near the 
Bosporus, Erol Canozkan spends his days 
reading newspapers in search of terrorist 
propaganda. 




propaganda. 

Mr. Canozkan is a government prosecutor 
assigned to help enforce Turkey's press laws. 
Many critics here and abroad say that the laws 
limit free speech and penalize writers who give 
f rank views about social and political problems. 

But Mr. Canozkan is proud to be on the front 
line of what he calls a war against subversives 
se eking to destroy Turkey. 

"We have special laws here because a war is 
being fought in this country," he said, referring 
to the 13-year conflict between the army and 
separatist Kurdish guerrillas. "As part of their 
strategy, the terrorists have set up all kinds of 
little newspapers that openly advocate the vi- 
olent destruction of Turkey. The people who 
write for these papers are not read journalists but 
spokesmen for terrorist groups." 

When Mr. Canozkan finds an article that he 
deems an incitement to violence or that he thinks 
insults die security forces or the memory of 
Mustafa Kemal Atatuzk, founder of the Turkish 
Republic, he puts it in a pink folder with the 
offending passages underlined. Then he for- 
wards it to his superiors for possible prose- 
cution. 

"I get a very good feeling doing this work," 
he said. "I'm defending the Turkish nation and 
its unity. My only regret is that we have not been 
able to explain to our friends in the West why it 
is so urgent that we do this." 



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A relentless fighter against censorship , Ayse Nur Zarakolu , a publisher who 
has been in prison four times* says there can never be real democracy in 
Turkey ‘as long as people cannot express their identities and their views / 


A lthough there is no prior censorship in 
Turkey, laws that restrict press free- 
dom are considerably tighter than 
those in the United States and most 
other Western countries. Foreign governments 
and international press organizations have con- 
demned the laws, saying they are used to sup- 


press not only libel of state institutions but also 
legitimate criticism. 


igitunate criticism. 

It is difficult to learn how many Turkish 
journalists are in prison for actions that would be 
considered legal in most Western countries. The 
Publishers Association of Turkey estimates the 
number at more than 100. The New York-based 
Committee to Protect Journalists, which sent a 
delegation here in July to urge a loosening of 
press laws, said there were 78 before the recent 
release of six. 

“We want to save Turkey from the shame of 
being a country where writers and intellectuals 
suffer in prisons," Sezer Duru, chairman of 
PEN -Turkey, the writers organization, said in a 


recent speech. "Our greatest wish is to live in a 
modern, civilized, democratic and peaceful en- 
vironment-” 

The two-month-old government of Prime 
Minister Mesut Yilmaz has pledged to take steps 
'toward greater press freedom. 

Previous governments also made such prom- 
ises but failed to keep them. 

Powerful political forces, among them the 


military, insist that restrictive press laws are 
necessary to fight subversion. 

‘‘We are not going to allow debates in which 
the Turkish flag is called ‘a piece of cloth,’ the 
national anthem is called ‘a piece of music’ and 
the Turkish Republic’s founder and leader, Kemal 
Ataturk, is exposed to humiliation.’’ Admiral 
Guven Erkaya, commander of the Turkish Navy, 
recently told the Istanbul newspaper MilliyeL 


Turkish Islamists Attack a Secular TV Station 


Reuters 

ISTANBUL — A group of 150 Turkish 
Islamists attacked the studios of a leading 
secularist television station, breaking win- 
dows and damaging equipment but causing no 
injuries, according to the Anatolian News 


Agency. 
The as 


The agency said the attackers chanted slogans 
against a government bid to restrict religious 


education in the incident on Sunday night at the 
ATV channel in Istanbul. 

Islamists have staged demonstrations all over 
the country in recent weeks to protest gov- 
ernment plans to bolster compulsory secular 
education to eight years from the current five. 
Parliament two weeks ago passed the reforms, 
which diminish the role of religious secondary 
schools. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Built for Change 


SAS Goes Smoke-Free 


By April next year, you 
might hardly recognize 
Hong Kong. 

Even the airport will 
have changed. The new air- 


through the third cross-har- 
bor tunnel from Kowloon to 
Hong Kong. 

But traditional ways of 
life have altered very little. 


port at Chek Lap Kok off The Western H arbor Cross- 
Lantau island will be one of ing links Kowloon with 


the most advanced in the 
world and will 
eventually handle ^ 
up to 87 million 
passengers a year, 

The new airport 


Western District, a maze of 
traditional Chi- 
Mg nese medicine 
stores and rice 
® p traders. 

On the water- 




is just one of a multitude of front of Victoria Harbor, 
major infrastructure proj- you can see the ultra-mod- 


STOCKHOLM (AFP) — All Scandinavian 
Airlines System flights are nonsmoking as of 
Monday, three months after the airline’s 
European flights became smoke-free. SAS 
announced. 

During a transition period, cabin attendants 
on all SAS flights will offer nicotine chewing 
gum to those in need of a cigarette substitute. 
On services to Japan, a nicotine inhaler will be 
provided as well. 

“Half a year ago, we decided to introduce a 
nonsmoking policy on our entire network. 
Since then we have made considerable efforts 
to inform the public so that it won ’t come as a 
big surprise," said Jan Olson, director of 
service and product development. 


ects, costing a total of $20 
billion. There will be high- 
speed rail links, a whole 
new town development, 
and 34 kilometers (21.7 
miles) of expressways and 
tunnels. 

You can already cross the 
Tsing Ma Bridge, the 
world’s longest road-and- 
rail suspension bridge, 
which links the new airport 
to Kowloon. Or ride 


era HK Convention and 
Exhibition Center Exten- 
sion, which opened just in 
time for the historic Hand- 
over Ceremony on June 30, 
1997. 

One thing that hasn't 
changed is Hong Kong’s 
simple entry procedures. 
Most people still don’t need 
a visa to visit the land where 
wonders never cease. 

http:/\cww.hkla.org 


Russia Hit by Hepatitis 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — A hepatitis out- 
break in the SL Petersburg, with contaminated 
well water reported to be the Likely cause, has 
sent at least 53 people to the hospital, gov- 


SAirGroup said its airline Swissair had 
signed an agreement with Malaysian Airlines. 
“The agreement calls for three weekly flights 
between Zurich and the Malaysian capital 
Kuala Lumpur." SAiiGroup said. (Reuters) 


Europe 


AroTeniain 



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“Debates like these aim to create a vacuum that 
would be exploited by those who wish to replace 
the current regime with an outdated model 
Last month. Parliament passed an amnesty 
that resulted in the release of six editors who had 
been jailed for permitting the publication of 
illegal articles. Conditions of the amnesty were 
very narrow. The laws under which the editors 
had been imprisoned were not changed. The six 
were warned that they would be sent back to 
prison if they wrote or published more articles 
deemed iliegaL 


Urged Talks 


■:S« 


The Associated Press 


ALGIERS — Algerian authorities^ 
placed the former leader of a banned f 
Islamic group under house aiiest otEi 


Islamic group under house arrest 
Monday, a day after he called, for dia-^f] 


A 


sked a few days after his release why 
he thought Turkish governments had 
been so reluctant to allow broader 
press freedom, one of the editors, Ocak 


logue to end the insurgency rending 
country for five and a half years. . - v -ft A 
The Algerian government ordered % 
that Abassi Madani remain in his hoirxjffl 
and have contact only with his family^™ 
The authorities threatened to seod^."' 

. . . ■ - -ji— j: 1 1 rx i 



him back to prison if he disobeyed. 


Isik Yurtcu, who spent more than three years in 
prison, smiled wanly and replied: ‘ T can’t really 
say. Please understand that I’m on probation. 
You know what that means." 

One of the most relentless challengers to 
Turkey's press laws is a publisher named Ayse 
Nur Zarakolu. She opened the Beige Interna- 
tional Publishing House in 1976 and now op- 
erates it from a cluttered basement in central 
Istanbul. She describes her mission as chal- 
lenging taboos, and she has done that as re- 
lentlessly as anyone in this country. 

In the last few years, Ms. Zarakolu has pub- 
lished books that denounce the government’s 
war against Kurdish guerrillas, accuse the se- 
curity forces of involvement with death squads 
and document mass killings of Armeni ans m the 
early years of this century. 

She has served four prison terms since 1982 
and was most recently convicted for pub lishing a 
human rights report that quoted an unnamed 


Mr. Madani. who was freed from jazf,£ 
July 15 after six years in prison, bad £ 
already been warned once since his re-; *?. - 
lease to refrain from political activity. 

Over the weekend, Mr. Madani urged y, 
the United Nations in an open letter to. - 

* I.... a iHqlnmil’’ tA pnH >’ . 


Senat^ f, 


‘open a serious dialogue” to end th4 
violence that has taken more than 
60,000 lives. 


Killing continued unabated over the f 
weekend. Independent sources and ^r 
news outlets said Monday that Islamid ' 
militants killed 33 civilians and that o- 
govemment units killed 15 rebels. : . ‘ + " 
Nineteen of the civilians were raemf 2 
bets of two families, and 13 of the dead f 
were children, including three infants^ ' 
They were slain in a coastal area lmowi) 
as Miramar. 1 

The 14 other civilians were killed . 
early Saturday by armed men who erecl- 
ted a fake police barricade near Khemis- 
Niliana, 100 kilometers outside the capr- '- 
ital. Witnesses said the attackers { 
sprayed two packed taxis with g unfire , . 
lolling everyone. 

Algerian security forces, meanwhile 1 , 
killed 15 suspected militants in a gun . 
battle in north-central Algeria on Sanr y 
day, sources said. It was not immef .. 
diately known whether any security 
troops had been wounded or killed. 

About 1,500 people have been killed— 
in attacks attributed to Islamic militants 
since early June, when the government : 
swept Algeria's first multiparty elecr - 
tions with promises to crush the ini- 
s urgency. ; 

In August alone, it is estimated, about ~ 
700 people were killed. • ! - r 

The insurgency erupted in 1992 after i 
the military-backed government can- 
celed an election runoff that the Islamic i 
Salvation Front was expected to win. '■ " 


diplomat describing some Turkish soldiers as 
“muas.’’ 


Twenty-two cases are pending against Ms. 
Zarakolu, but she shows no sign of weakening. 
After her most recent conviction, she vowed to 
continue her work even if it meant more jail 

Some Turks, including Oktay Eksi, president 
of the Press Council an independent group that 
works closely with the government, assert that 
the figures on imprisoned journalists given by 
die Publishers Association of Turkey and the 
Committee to Protect Journalists are too high. 

“We have looked at every case,” Mr. Eksi 
said in an interview, “and after eliminating 
journalists who were convicted of crimes like 
rape and fraud, and those who directly advocated 
terror or violence, we came up with 24 who were 
truly imprisoned for simply expressing peaceful 
beliefs, with the recent releases, we now count 
18. 1 am not going to tell you that 18 is not a big 
□umber. One is too many. But it's important to 
give a true picture." 


Unrest Keeps Kenya Schools Shut; 


emment medical authorities reported. 

Residents of the city of Vyborg and towns 
of Svetogorsk and Lesogorsky were among 
those diagnosed over the weekend as infected 
with the hepatitis A virus. 

Karl Smolikov. a spokesman for the Rus- 
sian Emergency Situations Ministry, would 
not comment on what might have caused the 
outbreak, but the Interfax news agency quoted 
local emergency officials as saying that water 
from contaminated wells appeared to be the 
most likely reason. 

Local authorities ordered schools and 
kindergartens in Svetogorsk and Lesogorsky 
closed. 

Russia has seen a steady rise in the number 
of infectious diseases as the state-run health- 
care systems struggles with a serious shortage 
of funding. 


.K^rrtce Fmnce-Pruse 

MOMBASA, Kenya — Schools in the 


Likoni suburb of Kenya’s port city of Mom- 
basa failed to open Monday, the first day of 
this year's final term, after residents fled 
violence in the area, teachers said. 

The suburb was deserted during the week- 
end after people left their homes in fear that 
the police would begin a search operation for 
33 guns still missing after an aimed band 
attacked a police station there Aug. 13. 

“Aimosl all parents have fled to safer areas 
with their chilaren,'' said the head teacher in 
the Likoni primary school. Said Hamisi Gan- 
zala. 

None of the 1,400 pupils enrolled in the 
school turned up for classes Monday morning, 
Mr. Ganzala said. Teachers did not report for 
work because most of them had fled. 

Residents have been leaving Likoni saying 
the police sent to the area to search for the 
guns were beating civilians, raping women 
and demanding bribes. 

Others fear that armed gangsters, who have 
warned members of inland tribes in this Indian 


Ocean coastal region to leave or be killed, 
would cany out their threats. 

At least 47 people, most of them from the 
interior, have been killed since the violence, 
which started with the raid on the police 
station. A dozen of the victims were po- 
licemen. 

Five boys turned up for classes in. the 
Likoni secondary school, but no teachers did. 
About 500 boys and girls attended school 
before the violence erupted. 

"If the government does not restore se- 
curity, our fives will be disrupted because we 
will not be able to sit our final examinations in 
November," said a student at the Likoni sec- 
ondary school. Said Abdallah, 18. 

The head teacher of Consolata primary 
school, Patrick Jacob Ouma. said teachers 
from upcountry districts were applying to be 
transferred to inland schools because of in- 
security in the coastal region. 

Ninety percent of the teachers in Mombasa 
district come from the interior. Mr. Ouma 
said. None of his 630 pupils and 22 teachers 
turned up for classes Monday morning. 


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PAGE 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


PAGES 


'■‘=> 0,1 


THE AMERICAS 


a ,,' 1 Mexico R uling Party Backs Down 

i -'l % ‘ 



By Julia Preston 

Nn r York Times Service 


MEXICO CITY — Lawmakers from 
the government’s party have- made a ma- 
jor concession u> the opposition, acting to 
avert a crisis that threatened to leave 
Mexico with two competing legislatures 
and a constitutional crisis just as it is 
testing real democracy for the first time. 

Delegates from the Institutional Rev- 
olutionary Party backed away from a 
protest they had pledged to stage and 
recognized the legitimacy of an oppo- 


sition-led ceremony Saturday to inau- 
gurate a new Congress. They abandoned 
plans to hold their own inauguration of 
an alternate Congress with no oppo- 
sition representatives. 

The delegation of the Institutional 
Revolutionary Party boycotted a session 
Saturday where opposition legislators 
inaugurated the new Congress — the 
most pluralistic in Mexico’s modern 
history — and elected its first leaders. 

The feud brought turmoil to the outset 
of Mexico’s passage from an author- 
itarian one-party system to a working 


POLITICAL NOTES 




k* IJ'.l VlilH':'- 


Senators Attempting 
: To Unpack a Court 

WASHINGTON — For more than 
a decade, a group of senators from the 
Northwest has been trying with little 
success to break up the 9th U.S. Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals, complaining 
that it was too large and, more im- 
portant, was dominated by judges 
from California who issue liberal en- 
vironmental rulings. 

This summer, the lawmakers, all 
Republicans, managed to insert a 
little-noticed rider into an appropri- 
[; ations bill that would split the circuit 
It passed die Senate days before the 
August recess. The House has ap- 
proved a different measure, one that 
would authorize only a study of die 
issue, and it is likely to balk at the 
Senate’s swifter approach. 

Nonetheless, the Senate action is 
the high watermark of the effort to 
' dismantle the 9th Circuit, which de- 
" cides federal appeals from nine states 
in the West and two territories, which 
makes it by far die nation's largest 
" appellate court. 

• The legislation is opposed by the 
White House, the majority of judges 
on the 9th Circuit, including the last 
three chief judges, the American Bar 

“ Association, the California Bar As- 
■ sociation and Governor Pete Wilson 
~ of California. The reason this effort 
was successful in the Senate appears 

• to be that the 9th Circuit recently 
aroused the ire of Senator Ted 
Stevens, Republican of Alaska and 
chairman of the Appropriations Com- 

’ mittee. (N YTl 

Hired and Fired 

WASHINGTON — If all had gone 
according to plan, Joseph Holley 
would have gone to work Tuesday, 
. writing speeches for Hillary JJodham 


Clinton for a salary of $90,000. The 
good news came last month in a 
phone call from Melanne Verveer, 
chief of siaff for the first lady. 

With a job offer in hand, Mr. Hol- 
ley quickly set about moving his wife 
and family from Austin. Texas, to 
Washington, breaking one lease and 
signing another, quirting his pan-time 
job as a journalism teacher, arranging 
new schools for his children. 

The bad news came a week later. 
This time the call came from the 
White House counsel. Charles Ruff, 
who told Mr. Holley to forget about 
his move. The job offer was revoked, 
Mr. Holley said Mr. RulT told him. 
after White House officials learned 
that Mr. Holley was the defendant 
seven years earlier in a sexual dis- 
crimination and harassment lawsuit. 

Mr. Holley’s then-employer, the 
San Diego Tribune, sealed the case 
brought by a writer Mr. Holley once 
supervised with no admission of 
wrongdoing. He said that the wom- 
an’s charges were * ‘absurd” and ‘ ‘fic- 
tion” but that Mr. Ruff told him that 
the White House decision was final. 

The result is that a decision that 
was designed to avert controversy is 
causing it nonetheless. Mr. Holley's 
friends, some well-connected in jour- 
nalism and liberal politics, say the 
White House is setting a standard of 
guilt-by-accusation that President 
Bill Clinton — himself the subject of 
contested sexual harassment charges 
— could never clear. ftt’Pi 

Quote /Unquote 

Alexis Herman, secretary of labor, 
noting that repairing the gap between 
rich and poor remains America’s un- 
finished business: “These are indeed 
prosperous times, but still a quiet un- 
ease lurks that our nation will declare 
success before all Americans will 
have their chance to claim their fair 
share.”. . >APi 


democracy. In elections on July 6, the 
Institutional Revolutionary Party, 
which controls the presidency, lost its 
majority in the lower bouse of Congress 
for the first time in seven decades, to 
four opposition parties that have banded 
together in a coalition. 

The controversy revealed deep dif- 
ferences berween the party that dom- 
inated Mexico unchallenged for gen- 
erations and a newly empowered 
opposition determined io demonstrate 
its weight and independence. 

Mr. Zedillo called on the two sides 
Saturday to resolve their differences and 
said he would stay out of the dispute. 
The events left the impression that the 
government's party, long considered a 
rubber-stamp party subordinated to iron 
rule by the president, had momentarily 
acted outside of Mr. Zedillo’s control. 

Leaders of the feuding congressional 
factions negotiated Into the night to find a 
solution io ensure that Mr. Zedillo would 
be able to deliver his traditional state of 
the union address as scheduled Monday. 

Opposition lawmakers contended 
that the Institutional Revolutionary 
Party had refused to attend the session 
Saturday or to accept its results because 
it could not work in a legislature where it 
was not in complete control. The party 
has 239 seats in the new lower house, 
and the combined opposition has 261. 
The government's party continues to 
hold a majority in ihe Senate. 

At the heart of dispute is a fight over 
the distribution of posts and benefits in 
the Congress. The government’s party 
contends it was slighted in negotiations 
over the last two weeks with -the op- 
position. 

“This is a legislature that is just wak- 
ing up from a 70-year sleep,” said San- 
tiago Creel Miranda, a newly elected 
member from the conservative National 
Action Party. He said many of the rules 
of the Congress were written on the 
assumption that the government’s party 
would always dwarf other parties. 

For years the Congress was run from a 
small committee, dominated by legis- 
lators of the government’s party, which 
made every important decision about 
when and how laws were adopted. But 
the way the rules are wrinen. without a 
majority for the government 's party this 
committee cannot even be formed. 

Legislators from the government’s 
party were incensed when the oppo- 
sition chose a flamboyant anti-govern- 
ment politician. Porflrio Munoz Ledo, 
to be the first leader of the Congress. . 

In a speech late Saturday in the Cham- 
ber of Deputies, Mr. Munoz Ledo in- 
formed the delegates of the govern- 
ment’s party that they had 30 days to 
appear. ‘‘It is a fiction that there will be 
an alternate Chamber of Deputies,” he 
said. “The members of the government's 
party will injure the nation and create an 
image of a crisis that doesn’t exist.” 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

pure Americana: 
Barns With Message 

The message, for those 
who travel in rural America, 
js almost impossible to es- 
cape, borne in big block let- 
ters on thousands of red, 
black and yellow bams: 
“Chew Mail Pouch To- 
bacco; Treat Yourself to the 
Best” While chewing to- 
bacco has fallen increasingly 
into disrepute, as its links to 
cancer have been publicized, 
the story of how these thou- 
sands of bams came to bear 
their picturesque roadside 
message is pure Americana. 

In the late 19th century, 
the brothers Aaron and 
Samuel Bloch manufactured 
cigars in Wheeling, West 
Virginia. They discovered 
that by adding flavoring — 
mainly licorice — to cast-off 
cigar clippings, they had a 
salable commodity: “chew- 
ing tobacco.” 

The barn-painting cam- 
paign began in the 1 890s. By 
the 1930s, four two-man 
painting teams were busy six 
days a week. “We’d knock 
out some two, three bams a 
day,” a long-time painter, 
Harley Warrick, 72. told 
American History magazine. 
In 43 years, he painted more 
than 20,000 bams. 

Although some farmers 
were wary of city-slicker to- 



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A barn in Elk view. West Virginia, with one of the better-preserved ads. 


bacco company representa- 
tives in shirts and ties, paint 
crews sometimes did the ne- 
gotiating themselves. Farm- 
ers received a small annual 
payment. Someone like Mr. 
Warrick, with his paint- 
smeared overalls and caJ- 
lused hands, made them feel 
right at home. Even when a 
barn was not due for repaint- 
ing. roving paint crews 
would drop by farms to chat 
and they learned who was 
good for a hearty meal. 

In 1966, came trouble; 
The Highway Beautification 
Act banned such commercial 
signs near interstate high- 


ways. But fans of the bams 
lobbied Congress, which fi- 
nally passed an exception for 
signs on farm structures or 
natural surfaces “of historic 
or artistic significance.” 

Short Take 

A rafting company in 
Colorado, looking for a 
faster way to get phoios of its 
clients from the point where 
they shoot the Poudre River 
rapids to their arrival point 
downstream, came up with a 
decidedly low-tech solution: 
homing pigeons. Tony 
Costlow, a co-owner of 


Rocky Mountain Adven- 
tures, had decided that using 
digital cameras and modems 
was too expensive. Then, be 
hit on the idea of pigeons. 
Mr. Costlow designed spe- 
cial lightweight backpacks 
for his 16 birds. Each of them 
makes the half-hour flight 
two or three times a week. 
He has learned a few lessons: 
As with human workers, 
they sometimes loaf. ‘ ‘Every 
once in a while,” Mr. 
Costlow said, “they’ll hang 
out on the roof." 


Brian Knowlton 


Away From Polities 


• A VS. fighter jet crashed 

off Japan but the two crew 
members aboard ejected and 
were not seriously injured. 
The F-14 jet, assigned to the 
aircraft carrier Independence, 
crashed at sea about 225 ki- 
lometers ( 140 miles) east of 
Yokosuka while on a routine 
training mission, the navy 
said. (AP) 

• More than 76,000 
marijuana plants were 
seized in a mountainous area 
north of Boise. Idaho, in a 
series of raids by law-en- 
forcement officers last 
month. The raids came on the 
eve of the fall marijuana har- 


vest, and authorities estimat- 
ed that the crop would have 
brought more titan $26 mil- 
lion from consumers. (NYTi 

• The hunch of a Customs 
inspector led ro the arrest of 
the man suspected of stealing 
$22 million, the biggest hol- 
dup in U.S. history. Philip 
Johnson. 33. an armored car 


driver accused of stealing 
from his employer. Loomis, 
Fargo & Co., in March in 
Jacksonville, Florida, was ar- 
rested in Brownsville, Texas, 
near the border with Mexico. 


His arraignment on a federal 
charge of unlawful flight to 
avoid prosecution was sched- 
uled for later this week. The 
money has not been re- 
covered. (AP) 


LASSERRE 

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after dinner 
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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 

ASL4/PACIFIC ’ 


East Asians Caution Japan on Taiwan’s Role in U.S. Pact 




By Michael Richardson 

Inrcnuthwal HcrjIJ Tribune 


SINGAPORE — As Prime Minister 
Ryutaro' Hashimoto of Japan prepares 
for a sensitive visit to China this week, 
other countries in East Asia have told 
Tokyo that they are deeply concerned 
by moves to have the strengthened U.S.- 
Japan alliance cover Taiwan. 

Southeast Asian countries and South 
Korea fear that if the scope of the al- 
liance specifically included Taiwan, it 
could provoke China into outright op- 
position to the U.S.-Japan security 
treaty and the basing of U.S. forces in 


be unwise for new military cooperation 
guidelines under the U.S.-Japan alliance 
to referto a specific geographical area, a 
Singaporean official said. 

Japan’s chief government spokesman, 
Seiraku Kajiyama, prompted a furious 
reaction from China when he said re- 
cently that the new defense guidelines, 
due to be made final soon, would require 
Japan to provide logistical and other 
uoncombatant support to U.S. forces in 
any emergency in the Taiwan Strait as 
well as on the Korean Peninsula. 

On a visit to Southeast Asia, Premier 
Li Peng of China said that the Japanese 


treaty and the basing of U.S. forces in 
Japan and South Korea. 

Officials said that ambassadors from 
members of ASEAN, the Association of 
South East Asian Nations, expressed 
their concern at a meeting in Tokyo on 
Wednesday with policymakers of the 
governing Liberal Democratic Party and 
the two political parties that support it. 

That meeting was followed by talks 
in Tokyo on Friday in which Singa- 
pore's prime minister, Goh Chok Tong, 
cautioned Mr. Hashimoto that it would 


plan was “utterly unacceptable.” Beijing 
regards Taiwan as a rebel province. 


regards laiwan as a rebel province. 

Mr. Hashimoto will arrive in China 
on Thursday for a four-day visit with 
hopes that a speech he made in Tokyo on 
Thursday, in which he said that Japan 
would abide by its 1972 statement rec- 
ognizing Taiwan as part of China, will 
pacify Beijing. 

But he also stressed his hope that a 
peaceful resolution could be found to 
the issue of Taiwan, which Beijing has 
repeatedly threatened to invade if the 


island abandons its stated goal of even- 
tual reunification with the mainland and 
declares independence or if on ouu>idc 
power supports independence. 

The formula used by Mr. Hashimoto 
is similar to one used by the United 
States to justify its readiness lo protect 
Taiwan, a neighbor and former colony 
of Japan, against a Chinese attack. 

“As there is one China, I don't want 
to interfere with it,” Mr. Kajiyama said. 
“But we have strong anxieties over a 
possible military liberation of Taiwan 
by mainland China.' ' 

Despite Mr. Kajiyama '& remarks, 
Tokyo s official position remains that it 
will not specify the geographical limits 
of the new guidelines governing mil- 
itary cooperation with the Unired States, 
a Japanese diplomat was quoted by Reu- 
ters as having said in Beijing. 

Japan and China have differed on 
Taiwan ever since they restored dip- 
lomatic relations in 1972, with Japan 
unwilling to accept fully Beijing's oft- 
repeated position chat the mainland’s 
ties with Taiwan are an internal affair. 

Mr. Hashimoto has little diplomatic 


room for maneuver on either Taiwan or 
the revised guidelines, but Beijing is 
likely to accept Japanese attempts to 
focus on other issues, the Japanese dip- 
lomat added. 

However, Yuan Ming, director of the 
Institute of International Relations at 
Peking University, said that for China 
the “core issue" aboui the U.S.-Japan 
security treaty was Japan's role in sup- 
port of U.S." forces in the event of a 
conflict in the region. 

“More specifically, the Chinese are 
watching closely whether any such Jap- 
anese role would extend to the Taiwan 
Strait.” he wrote in an article for a 
monthly publication of the Institute of 
Southeast Asian Studies that was made 
available during the weekend. “Such a 
development would definitely increase 
the suspicions of China and cast a heavy 
shadow on U.S.-China relations." 

Mr. Yuan said that partly because of 
moves to strengthen the U.S.-Japan al- 
liance and include Taiwan within its 
scope, some quarters in China suspected 
that the United Stales was trying to 
contain China. 


If the alliance was enlarged in this 
wav, he warned, it would strengthen that 
view and “no Chinese leader would 
then be able to take a moderate stand 
toward the U.S.” 

Analysts noted that ASEAN coun- 
tries and South Korea followed a “one- 
China" policy that recognized Taiwan 
as part of China. 

They said that ASEAN states and 
South Korea did not want to be put in a 
position where they were forced to take 
sides in a dispute over Taiwan. 

“We think that the Korean Peninsula 
should be regarded as the main focus of 
the new guidelines. ” said a South Korean 
Foreign Ministry official in Seoul. 

“ASEAN countries do not want to 
have to make a choice between good 
relations with China and preserving the 
U.S.-Japan alliance, which is an im- 
portant factor for regional stability,” 
said Lee Lai To, chairman of the Singa- 
pore Institute of International Affairs. 

“We can have both provided Japan is 
not seen to be using the alliance to 
broaden the scope and the areas it covers 
to include Taiwan.” 


Ramos Requests 
Church Support 


f"‘ 

baNJ* s^yv.r.- 


MANILA — President Fidefo"JJ| 
Ramos, given a cool reception by.f*j 3 
pri ests and nuns at a public functicin- ^ -3 
here, urged the Roman CatholiciT a 
Church on Monday to cast aside ittfiT j 
“emotionalism” and support his t]| 

economic reform agenda. ■'-•La 

About 500 protesters led by#, j 
priests and nuns staged a demon- ''■jMi 
station to demand that Mr. Ramos^fe j 
leave the constitution alone amid 
moves by his political allies to press -T" J 
for changes to enable him to stay in. I 
office after 1998’ 'jfil 

* ‘The church and other pillars or • 
the society must closely work to-”- - : 3 
gether in the spirit of solidarity by« fi 3 
binding the nation ’s wounds,-’ ’• Mr. ■; j 
Ramos said in a speech at the’^ „•] 
launching of a Catholic radio sta- 
tionhere. (AFP)"' 






*ae*» nSl vr . ... 




man 




•assess 


barren “■ 




Taiwan’s Leader 
fines Peace Effort 


later - 
Mr. 


ptavai- 


Sihanouk, 6 Not Dead Yet, 5 
Seeks Peace for Cambodia 

Ailing King Is 'Not Completely Pessimistic’ 




ft * 


By Seth Mydans 

IVnt York rimes Swire 


SIEM REAP, Cambodia — He is old, 
he is sick and he is discouraged as he 
sees his country tom apart by what he 
called a new civil war. Once again. King 
Norodom Sihanouk is ruling by his wits, 
trying to find the balance between 
powerful forces that threaten Cambod- 
ia. 

“I have to always swim between hoi 
and cold water,' ' he sa id — a small, frail 
man of 74 who still has not given up. 
“So I must be a fish like that.” 

In the 1960s he maneuvered deftly 
among the great powers, keeping Cam- 
bodia. as he said Sunday, “an island of 
peace” in ihe Indochina war. Now he is 
maneuvering between his own coun- 
try’s leaders, who have turned Cam- 
bodia into “an island of war.” 

“1 am not dead yet. hah?” he said, 
addressing reporters in the courtyard of 
his villa in this provincial town. “1 
apologize for still being alive. I present 
my apologies to you." 

King Sihanouk, u constitutional mon- 


arch with little .forma l power, returned . of him. 


north of the capital. 

The king is offering himself, if the 
contending forces will have him, as a 
mediator between Air. Hun Sen and the 
opposition represented by the prince. 
But King Sihanouk has lived among 
powerful and ambitious men all his life, 
and he has few illusions. 

“If the ones who have power in their 
hands do not listen to me. I cannot 
achieve anything useful.” he said. “I 
have very good relations with Mr. Hun 
Sen. but he has his own ideas. 1 propose 
and he decides. 

“I am not completely pessimistic. I 
am pessimistic, but not 100 percent. I 
hope it is still possible to get back de- 
mocracy.” 

But the king himself has his own 
source of power, as he demonstrated 
early this morning: He is still revered — 
in his own words — as a “sod-king” by 
large numbers of Cambodians. 

ui the same tree-shaded courtyard 
where he later addressed reporters. King 
Sihanouk received 124 poor farmers 
who had traveled here from their village 
four days ago hoping to catch a glimpse 



TAIPEI — President Lee Teng-_ 
hui pledged Monday to help main-* 

_ ■ ■ _ t i_n:< 1 


rain regional stability and renewed^ 
his wish to make a peace journey ta- 


lus wish to make a peace journey to~- 
China. 

He also urged countries in thej 
area to shelve sovereignty disputes^ 
over the Spratlys archipelago to re- 
duce tensions in the South China 
Sea. 

“Peace and stability over the _ 
Taiwan Strait affects security and" 1 
prosperiry in the whole Asia and-- 
Pacific region, and we have striven'*' 
to lower tension by calling for ,! 
peaceful cross-strait negotiations.’ ' 
Mr. Lee told the Asia-Pacific Se- " 
curity Forum. / 

Prime Minister Vincent Siew : ' 
also said Monday that Taiwan au-" 
thorities were ready to reopen talks 
with Beijing whenever China de- 
cided to resume the top-level talks 
it suspended in mid- 1995. (AFP} A 


In NoTtra?- 

foraLa< ui 


North Korea Reels 
From Tidal Wave 


fhl*> Manimi.’Rraii'i* 


King Sihanouk being mobbed by admirers before a service at a Buddhist temple Monday in Siem Reap. 


to Cambodia on Friday, after a . six- 
month absence during which his eoun- 
tty’s fragile democracy disintegrated in 
infighting. It collapsed July 6 in a 
coup. 

Although the royalist forces of Prince 
Norodom Ranariddh, the king’s son. 
were driven from the capital, Phnom 
Penh, in the coup led by Hun Sen, a 
small group of holdouts continues to 
fight Mr. Hun Sen’s army in the jungles 
less than 60 miles (100 kilometers) 


"Before we die, we have to see the 
king.” said Yem Khom, a 52-year-old 
widow who, like the other villagers, had 
borrowed from friends and relatives to 
pay S 10 for the 10-hour minibus ride 
here from Kompong Thom. 

She nearly fainted as she approached 
the king, who embraced the bowing 
villagers in armfuls of two and three and 
five as they filed into his courtyard. The 
villagers gripped the arms and shoulders 
of the king and his wife, Monineath 


(who has also gone by the name Mo- 
nique). and mopped their eyes with 
scarves. 

/.'They just want to see us. to meet us. 
to meet the queen and me.” King Si- 
hanouk said. "Iam very moved because 
they love us and love each other as 
always.” 

The king, who has been in Beijing for 
treatment of cancer, a stroke and other 
ailments, said he would stay here for 
three months, in the shadow of the great 
temples of Angkor Wat, built hundreds 
of years ago by his ancestors. From time 
to time, he said, he would travel, in- 


cognito. to the temples ”io pay my 
respect to the statues.” 

But his main mission here, he said, is 


one last attempt to bring peace to a 
country that has beeii devastated by war 
and genocide for nearly 30 years, de- 
spite the king’s sometimes frantic ef- 
forts to swim between the hot and cold 
waters. 

He proposed that Mr. Hun Sen and 
representatives of Prince Ranariddh — 
who is now in exile in Thailand — come 
to his villa here to seek a peaceful res- 
olution to their conflict. 

“1 want to return to the status quo 
ante.” the king said, "with genuine re- 
spect for human rights, genuine freedom 


of the press, peace and democracy.” 

Yet, despite the veneration of the 
villagers from Kompong Thom, the 
king has learned through difficult ex- 
perience the' reality of the limit of his 
power. 

"They continue to believe that I am a 
god-king. like the kings of Angkor,” he 
said, as he took leave of the reporters 
gathered under the trees. “But I could 
not have stopped the fighting. Unfor- 
tunately 1 am not a god. I am a human 
being. ” 

He disappeared, waving, through the 
lace-curtained doors of his villa as two 
white lap dogs with bows in their hair 
jumped happily about his legs. 


BEIJING — A typhoon-fueled*! 
tidal wave that smashed dikes and-" 
flooded fields in North Korea has'" 
dealt a heavy blow to farmers strug- . 
gling to avert famine. Red Cross ^ 
officials said Monday. 

The wave stack North Korea's" 
western coast early on Aug. 21, 
destroying an estimated 700,000';: 
tons of com and leaving 28,000 
people homeless, said .. Erik-. 
Petersen of foe International Fed- 
eration of Red Cross and Red Cres- 
cent Societies. (Reuters) 


OSLO - 1 
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hoping lo urs” - - = • 
conference : '-r- 
sale or u.-e-r 
Diana. Pnr.c- - 
honored :th ' 
b\ the defeca'e- . ' . 


For the Record 


Thousands of U.S. sailors 
began shore leave Monday in Hoag 
Kong from die Constellation, the_ 
first aircraft carrier to visit the ter-Tx 
ritory since it was returned to;' 
Chinese rule on July 1 . ( AFPK 


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SEOUL — Two rival candidates for 
the South Korean presidency recom- 
mended Monday that an amnesty be 
granted to two former presidents — 
Chun Don Hwan and Roh Tae Wo»* — 
who were imprisoned in 1995 for 
mutiny, treason and corrupt ion 

Lee Hoi Chang, who is running as the 
governing New Korea Party candidate 
in elections set for Decent her. suggested 
that Mr. Chun and Mr. Roll lie released 
before Cluts<>k. ihe threc-da v harvest - 
moon holiday Marling Sept. 15. 

"Lee’s proposal was nM’ieially nuule 
Monil.o and endorsed by senior NKP 
members." a spokesman of the parly 
said. He added that Mr. Lee wanted the 


former presidents to “spend the hol- 
idays with their families." 

the New Korea Party candidate 
promised to discuss the proposed am- 
ncsly with President Kim ^oung Sam 
during a weekly meeting on Thursday, 
ihe spokesman said. 

Cho Soon, a popular former mayor of 
Seoul who joined ihe presidential race 
last month, also declared his support for 
an amnesty, bui he denounced Mr. Lee’s 
.suggestion as a " political gambiL” 
Alluding to the case of President 
Richard Nixon in the Watergate .scan- 
dal. he noted that the U.S. president was 
not jaded in the affair, although he did 
resign. 

Mr. Lee’s proposal was seen as a bid 


to gain support of old ruling-parfy 
forces and voters in the hometowns of . 




s 



X .V-“ 

_ . ?.•: L ; V: .<■ 

. -- ** -Lr 


the jailed presidents at a time his pop(- 
ularify has been sliding behind the top 
opposition candidate, Kim Dae Jung, of 
the National Congress for New Pol- 
itics. 

Buoyed by his own growing pop{- 
ularity. the National Congress for New 
Politics candidate suggested last week 
that Mr. Chun and Mr. Roh couid bj: 
pardoned before President Kim steps 
down in February. ! 

“I believe President Kim Young Saiji 
should grant a special amnesty to them 
in order to achieve national harmony, 1’ 
the candidate told a weekly magazine: 

(AFP. Reuters) 






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PAGES* 



PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


^ Karadzic Allies Stone NATO Force at Transmitter 


briefly 





The Associated Pr^ ss 

' BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herze- 
govma — Supporters of Radovan 
^radac stoned NATO troops 
Monday ai a TV transmitter secured 
after backers of the war-crimes sus- 
pect broadcast calls for violence 
against foreign organizations, offi- 
cials said. 

" Troops had taken control of the 
.Udrigovo transmitter on Mount Ma- 
jevica to prevent rival Serbian fac- 
tions from fighting for its control, 
said Major Chris Riley, a spokes- 
man for the NATO-led peace 
■force. 

■ The takeover occurred Thursday 
NATO sources said. Shortly after- 

y ward, 27 armed men believed to be 
.loyal to Mr. Karadzic showed up, 
■and NATO troops disarmed them] 
■confiscating 25 unauthorized long- 

■ barreled weapons. The NATO 
troops then sent Che men away, the 
•sources said. 

An unarmed group that appeared 
later and was thought to be loyal to 
■Mr. Karadzic's rival. President Bil- 
jana Plavsic, also was turned back. 


NATO officials said. 

The transmitter was the sire of 
renewed tensions Monday. Major 
Peter Clarke, another' NATO 
spokesman, said about 100 people 
had gathered there and some of them 
had thrown srones at peacekeepers 

A United Nations official, who 
spoke on condition of anonymity, 
said the demonstrators were being 
bused in. That suggested orches- 
tration similar to anti-NATO vio- 
lence last week, when participants 
also arrived in buses. . 

The UN official said Bosnian 
Serb police had been asked to in- 
tervene but had not yet responded. 

■ Serb Distrust of NATO 

Chris Hedges of The New York 
Times reported from Comja 
Omarska, Bosnia-Herzegovina: 

Vlada Stevanic, bare-chested and 
wearing a faded pair of shorts, 
walked slowly through his cow pas- 
ture until he stood in front of a 
gaping hole in the ground. 

“There,” the Bosnian Serb farm- 
er said, as if the huge pit could be 


missed: “We were all in bed when 
the missile landed, blowing out the 
windows in our house. It was like an 
earthquake. Now NATO says it has 
come here to help us. But none of us 
trust NATO. How can we trust any- 
one who tried killed us?" 

The Tomahawk cruise-missile 
strike, which took place in Septem- 
ber 1995 and killed one of Mr. 
Stevanic 's goats, was part of the 
two-week bombing campaign by 
NATO forces to end the Bosnian 
Serbs' siege of Sarajevo. 

NATO warplanes blasted mili- 
tary installations and gun emplace- 
ments throughout Serb-held Bosnia, 
severely crippling the Bo snian Serb 
military and laying the foundation 
for the Dayton peace agreement 

The missile strike on Mr. Stevan- 
ic’s farm, about three kilometers 
( two miles) off target, was part of an 
attack on a television transmitter on 
Mount Kozara, in northwestern 
Bosnia, as well as the nearby mil- 
itary barracks. The transmitter and 
the barracks were demolished. 

The transmitter was replaced 


about seven months later. The bar- 
racks remain a tangled shell of brick, 
cement and undergrowth. 

The new transmitter, controlled 
by supporters of Mr. Karadzic, the 
former Bosnian Serb president who 
continues to hold de facto power 
from his stronghold in Pale, is one of 
the installatio ns (hat backers of his 
rival and nominal successor, Mrs. 
Plavsic, hope to seize. 

The role of NATO in the UN 
peacekeeping force during the 
1992-95 war in Bosnia as well as the 
devastating 1995 NATO bombing 
campaign have left many Serbs 
deeply skeptical about the Western 
alliance's loyalties and intentions. 
And Serbian propaganda, even be- 
fore die current power struggle be- 
tween Mrs. Plavsic and the hard- 
liners in Pale, repeatedly warned 
that NATO was against the Serbs 
and could not be trusted. 

The effort by NATO troops to 
displace Karadzic loyalists from po- 
lice stations and media outlets in 
western Bosnia and replace them 
with people who back Mrs. Plavsic 


has played on these perceptions and 
fears. Such prejudices were best il- 
lustrated in Breko, where mobs at- 
tacked U.S. troops with rocks and 
gasoline bombs Thursday when the 
troops ousted Karadzic supporters 
from the police station and turned 
the building over to police officers 
backing Mrs. Plavsic. 

“There is a feeling among most 
Serbs that foreigners should not be 
here telling us how to live our lives,’* 
said Milivoj Stevanic, 37, who lives 
in the small farmhouse next door. “I 
take my horses up the mountain and 
pass the NATO soldiers. I always 
wave and say hello, but I don’t like 
them. I wish they would leave. " 
While many in the village said 
"" were disgusted bv the comit 


this, did not translate into support for 
Mrs. Plavsic. 

“No ooe likes these politicians in 
Pale," said a fanner down the road, 
who would not give his name. “We 
know they are all getting rich. But 
this does not mean we will support 
Plavsic selling us out to the West." 


In Norway , a Quest 
For a Land-Mine Ban 



• Carifflalln £W Strff Fmm Disparts 

• OSLO — Delegates from more 
!than 100 countries opened a con- 
ference Monday that they hope will 

•lead to a ban on anti-personnel land 
[mines. 

; * ‘This conference, ’ ’ said the Nor- 
■wegian foreign minister. Bjoem 
[Tore Godal. "offers a historic 
■chance to reach an accord which 
[will allow for the significant re- 
. ;duction in the suffering caused by 
■these weapons." 

[ Some 1 10 million anti-personnel 
; mines are believed to be scattered 
! around tbe world, mostly in devel- 
oping countries. 

■ Anti-personnel mines kill or 
! maim about 26,000 people a year — 

'■> one person every 20 minutes. Ac- 

■ cording to Norwegian estimates, SO 
r [percent of those maimed or killed 
» are civilians, and most are women 

[and children. 

[ ; Backers of a land-mine ban are 
•hoping to draft a treaty at the Oslo 
! conference that bans the production, 
, sale or use of such mines. 

Diana, Princess of Wales, was 
. honored with a moment of silence 
■by the delegates. The princess, who 


died in a Paris car crash Sunday, was 
the most prominent proponent of a 
global ban on the mines. 

“Her tragic death has made a 
deep impression on all of us," the 
Norwegian foreign minister said. 

China, one of the world’s biggest 
producers of land mines, is not rep- 
resented at the conference, which 
aims to draft a treaty for a total and 
immediate ban on anti-personnel 
mines, to be signed in Ottawa in 
December. 

The conference is part of the so- 
called "Ottawa process," an ini- 
tiative by Canada to encourage 
countries to voluntarily undertake to 
renounce the production, sale, 
stocking, transport and use of the 
weapons. 

Apart from China, the main pro- 
ducers are Italy, Russia and the 
United States. 

Britain, France, Germany, 
Sweden and Switzerland also man- 
ufacture the weapons, as do Chile. 
India, Pakistan and South Africa. 

Hie talks, scheduled to last until 
Sept. 19, continue a process that led 
to an anti-land mine declaration 
signed by 98 nations in Brussels in 



Afiu Frracc-Plrw: 

The Norwegian foreign fLnister, Bjoern Tore Godal, opening the Oslo conference on land mines 
Monday with a moment's silence for Diana, Princess of Wales, who pressed for a ban on them. 


June. Three more countries — the 
United States, Australia and Poland 
— have since joined tbe process. 

Objections from the U.S. and 
Finnish governments could make it 
difficult to reach the goal of a total 
ban, however. 

The United States wants self-de- 
stroying “smart mines," which de- 
stroy themselves after a pre-set peri- 
od, to be excluded from the 


negotiations. The United States also 
is likely to call for exceptions, such 
as on die Korean Peninsula, where 
the border separating communist 
North Korea and capitalist South 
Korea is heavily mined. 

And Finland says land mines are 
an integral part of its defense on die 
790-mile border it shares with Rus- 
sia. 

Last month. Diana visited Bos- 


nia- Herzegovina, where millions of 
land mines still litter the countryside 
more than a year and a half after the 
war ended. 

The princess openly wept after 
meeting young victims of the 
weapons. 

The United Nations, secretary- 
general, Kofi Annan, was to address 
the land mine conference on 
Wednesday. (AFP, API 


Bonn to Return Loot to Russia 

MOSCOW — Germany will return what is believed to 
be pieces of Russia's famkl Amber Room, looted during 
World War H, President Roman Herzog of Germany said 
Monday, in a potentially far-reaching goodwill gesture. 

“If it's established Thai they’re genuine, we have no 
doubt that they belong to Russia." Mr. Herzog said after 
talks in the Kremlin with President Boris Yeltsin. 

Mr. Yeltsin stud: “The experts haven’t yet finished 
checking the identity of the mosaic, which supposedly 
came from tbe Amber Room." 

“As soon as it’s finished, there will be an adequate 
decision," he said. 

Mr. Yeltsin also said that Russian-German relations 
had the “highest priority of all other priorities.” 

The fragments, discovered in May, are believed to be 
part of the Amber Room panels, removed from the palace 
of Catherine the Great outside St. Petersburg and seized 
by German troops in 1941. (AFP) 

$35 Million Swiss Postal Heist 

ZURICH — A gang of gunmen got away with 53 
million Swiss francs ($35.8 million) in neatly packaged 
cash after robbing a post office Monday in the banking 
district of central Zurich, the police said. 

They said the five men drove off with crates of cash that 
had been awaiting delivery to the nearby Swiss National 
Bank as a deposit for a customer. 

No one was injured in the robbery. 

The gunmen entered a courtyard of the post office 
through security gates in a van disguised as a repair 
vehicle of the state postal and telecommunications 
agency. They escaped in the same van, leaving behind 
more crates of cash because they had no more room in (he 
vehicle, the police said. ( Reuters i 

Mir Space Walk Tentatively Set 

MOSCOW — A space walk to find holes in the 
damaged Russian space station Mir tentatively has been 
set for Saturday, ana the crew is checking space suits and 
making other preparations, officials said Monday. 

A spokesman for Russian Mission Control, Valeri 
Lyndin, said a final derision on the date would be made 
after exercises Tuesday with the space suits. 

The Russian commander of Mir, Anatoli Solovyov, 
and die U.S. astronaut aboard Mir, Michael Foale, are 
expected to inspect the outside of Mir’s Spektr module, 
damaged in a collision with a cargo craft in June, and 
patch any holes they find. Several space walks may be 
needed to repair the damage. 

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
has not yet given formal permission for Mr. Foale to take 
tbe space walk. But Russian space officials are pro- 
ceeding as if he will participate. (AP) 

Blast in Bulgarian Mine Kills 5 

SOFIA — Five miners were killed and scares were 
trapped Monday by a methane gas explosion at the Bobov 
Dol coal mine in Bulgaria, the government said. 

Rescue workers were working to reach those buried 
under tons of earth, and Prime Minister Ivan Kostov and 
the interior and social affairs ministers went to the scene, 
70 kilometers (45 miles) west of Sofia. ( Reuters / 


INTERNATIONAL 


. j;. ■•■♦/« . 


Israel Eases Palestinian Entry Ban 




i_*n 



By Joel Greenberg 

New York Times Scnicv 


• Ftrcr SanASx&AEB** Frmcc Prewc 

An employee distributing Israeli work permits Monday 
to residents of Jabalia refugee camp in the Gaza Strro. 


briefly 


relations with Egypt. Mr. Netanyahu 
said tbe defendant, Azam Azam, was 
innocent and called the of 15 

years in prison "twisted. Mr. Net- 
anyahu said he phoned Egyp t ’^ ™~ ; ' 
ident Hosni Mubarak and asked that 
Mr. Azam be pardoned. 

However, Mr. Netanyahu said re- 
lations with Egypt were not in senous 


Armenian Soldier 
Slain as Vote Opens 

_ STEPANAKERT, Azerbaijan -- 
An Armenian' soldier was shot and 
killed, adding to the tension surround- 
ing the presidential election Monday 

in Nagorno-Karabakh, the <hspu:ed tro t n i _5- . . Qns ^tween Egypt and 

- Armenian enclave inside Azerbaijan. all-time-low, ' ’ Mr. 

Azeittaijan, which lost a stvycai “° X fcmel radio in re- 

- war with Armenia for contra of the Neonyahu two 
enclave, has called the voting invalid- sponse to a quesaou 

Russia also has criticized the election. _ 

‘ ^"octr^wlXd LissoubaFoe Calls 
^o^l^^Mon- For Disobedience 

* day.the-Aimenian soldier was killed by AZZAVILLE. Congo Republic 

' a sniper near Agdam, a town that nms Pascal Lissouba’s chief 

along the border manned by - him as a “monster 

Azerbaijani and Armenian troops^AP) as bs term 

otrnired with no eIecti ons fo sight- 

rtos Sasson-Ngoesso, a 

militia leader and ex-pi^dent w 

Kto5in 8 fori»««" y 

IFRTKAT FM Prime Minister on his pn i issouba’s five-year 

Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday wess^re him to yi^d power, 

that the rocky Israeli-Egypnan reU- should 

tions would survive the spying^ disobedience, someth*^ 

yiction of an Israeli Arab in an Egyp- measure ir i* ^ 

urn court. , A1IIr1oe «arand made lawless by three raon 

. The verdict Sunday caused 4 ng { ap ) 

in Israel and put a further strain on the 01 134:11 _ 


Israel Plays Down 
Spy Trial in Egypt 


JERUSALEM — Israel eased a ban on the entry of Pal- 
estinian laborers Monday, taking a first modest step to loosen 
a tight border closure imposed on the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip in the aftermath of a double suicide bombing in Je- 
rusalem in July. 

Hie gesture came about a week before a visit here by 
Madeleine Albright, the U.S. secretary of state, to help revive 
faltering peace efforts. American officials have criticized 
Israeli economic sanctions imposed after the bombing, es- 
pecially a suspension of tax and customs transfers to the 
Palestinian Authority. 

Israeli officials discounted speculation that the move Mon- 
day was linked to Mrs. Albright’s visit, asserting that they 
were grided solely by security considerations, as well as by a 
concern That worsening economic hardship was increasing 
support among Palestinians for violence against Israel. 

"It is not true that we are lifting the closure,” Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told Israel Radio. “We are 
easing it gradually to the limit set by our security assessments, 
which are examined daily." 

An Israeli Army statement said that 4,000 workers who are 
married and over 35 years old would be allowed back to work 
in Israel, half from the Gaza Strip and half from the West 
Bank. Most suicide bombers involved in attacks in Israel over 
the past two years have been single and younger than 35. 

The number of renewed entry permits was small, although 
Israeli officials said it could grow over time if security 
conditions permitted. 

Before the closure, imposed after the 
July 30 bombing that killed 15 people 
and the two attackers in a Jerusalem 
market, more than '50,000 Palestinian 
workers were allowed into Israel, mostly 
for construction jobs and other manual 
labor. At least 30,000 more worked in 
Israel illegally, circumventing check- 
points to get to jobs. 

During the month of border closings; 
the loss of income by workers, coupled 
with the Israeli freeze of tax and customs 
transfers to the Palestinian Authority, 
have crippled the Palestinian economy. 
The World Bank estimated last week that 
Palestinian losses could reach $4 million 
to $6 million a day. 

Israeli officials have defended the clo- 
sure as a security measure, intended to 
prevent the entry of potential bombers, 
although hundreds of Palestinians go 
around Israeli checkpoints every day, 
using dirt roads and paths to get to jobs. 

The army said it would allow 2,000 
more Palestinian businessmen aged over 
30 to enter Israel, bringing the total of 
such permits to 4,000, as well as 250 
West Bank teachers who work in East 
Jerusalem and 200 employees of the au- 
thority who needed to move between the 
Gaza Strip and the West Bank. 

But the suspension of tax and customs 
transfers remains in force, and the money 
owed by Israel to the authority has now 
reached $65 million, according to the 
International Monetary Fund. 

Tbe transfers make up more than 60 
percent of thejevenues of the Palestinian 
Authority, and it has borrowed heavily 
from local banks to pay salaries of its 
8] ,000 employees, including 36,000 po- 
lice officers. 



GLOBAL EMERGING MARKETS: LONDON '97 
The mining Investment Summit 

ROYAL LANCASTER HOTEL 
HYDE PARK 

LONDON SEPTEMBER 15-16, 1997 


WHY YOU SHOULD ATTEND 

Global Emerging Markets: London ’97 offers an opportunity for fund managers and analysts to come 
together and compare notes. It is a meeting place to discover dynamic mining companies— like the 
ones that are operating in the emerging markets. 


Global Emerging Markets: London '97 is the summit that allows you to hear about global mining 
investment from a wide variety of perspectives. 

Hear the perspective of global investors ... 

how they identify the fast growing companies that will grow by exploration and development and 
through the acquisition of new properties. 

Hear from the political strategists and worldwide organizations... 

how they minimize risk successfully and ensure support by international development agencies in 
the mining project. 

A FEW OF THE PRESENTATIONS 

The Rise of Pension Funds will Change the 
Global Economy in the 21st Century 

David Hale 


Chief Economist 

Zurich Kemper Investments Inc. 

Finding Value for Shareholders 
in Global Growth 

Dr. John M. Morganti 
Vice President - Gold 
Tech Corporation Ltd. 

European Stability: 

EMU Impact on Foreign Markets 

Bernd Fischer 

Chief of Protocol, Head of Foreign Relations 
City of Berlin 


Value Investing at Market Lows 

Alan R. Hill 

Executive V.P., Corporate Development 
Barrick Gold Corporation 


Equity Finance in Today's Market - Where 
are the Alternatives? 

John Barker 

Vice President, Global Mining 
RBC Dominion Securities 

Ministries from Visiting Countries 
Argentina - Liberia - Mexico - Nigeria 
Norway - Sweden - Vietnam 


A FEW OF THE SPONSORING COMPANIES 

America Mineral Fields Inc. • Arian Resources Ltd. • Barrick Gold Corporation • Bema Gold Corporation • Business 
Monitor international Ltd. • Casmyn Corporation • China Clipper Gold Mines Ltd. • Consolidated Granby • Cusac Gold 
Mines Ltd. • David Williamson Associates Limited • DiamondWorks Ltd. • Eldorado Gold Corporation • Explore Minerals 
Corporation Ltd. • Fairstar Explorations Inc. • Goldbelt Resources Ltd. • Golden Star Resources Ltd. • Gordon Capital 
Corporation • Hunter Dickenson Inc. • IBK Capital Corporation • Indochina Goldfields Ltd. • International Toumigan 
Corporation • International Wayside Gold Mines Ltd. • Kenor ASA • Lanta Bank Commercial • Latin American Newsletters 

• Lyon Lake Mines Ltd. • Meridian Gold Company • Metal Bulletin pic • Mindex ASA • Nelson Gold Corporation Ltd. • 
Noranda Mining and Exploration • North Atlantic Resources AB • Northern Crown Mines Ltd. • Northern Orion Explorations 
Ltd. • Panorama Resources NL • Patrician Gold Mines Ltd. • Peter Grandich Company, Inc. • Platt's Metals Week • 
Resolute Limited • Reunion Mining PIC • Rex Diamond Mining Corp. Ltd • Rift Resources Ltd. • SGS Societe Generate 
de Surveillance SA. • South American Gold & Copper Co. • SouthemEra Resources Ltd. • St Genevieve Resources Ltd. 

• Summex Mines Ltd. » Teck Corporation Ltd. • Tenke Mining Corporation • The Mining Journal Ltd. • The Mining 
Record • Trivalence Mining Corp. • U.S. Global Investors Inc. • Ursa Major International • Viking Gold Mines • 

Virginia Gold Mines • Yamana Resources Inc. • Yorkton Securities Inc- 

For Sponsorship, Exhibit or Registration Information: 

INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT CONFERENCES, INC . 

6310 Sunset Drive, Miami, FL 33143-4823 
Phone 305 669-1963 • 800 282-7469 (US & Canada) • Fax 305 669-7350 
Email: iiconf@iiconf.com • Website: www.iiconf.com 


l 



PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


Death of a Princess / We Feel Thai We’ve Lost a Family Member ’ 


London in Mourning: 
‘All the Sad Faces ’ 


A Rich Playboy in Life, 
But a Footnote in Death 


fUN 


ERAJ 


. u 


F-.Vl r 1 

f’'” 


altf* 5,n‘-l hc> ■ — • ' 

v- 


A Heaviness Seems to Fill the Gty’s Air 
As Crowds Line Up to Pay Condolences 

— — - — t~z — 7j endless crowds of grieving people car- 

By Sarah L-yall rying flowers, cards and candles clogged 

New York Times Sentce J 00 


Now, Press Gives Dodial Fayed Little Notke- 


s gssfe 


LONDON — Life in Britain’s capital 
went on as usual Monday, at least in the 
sense that people went to work, subways 
and buses ran more or less on time, and 
stores — even Harrods, which is owned 
by the father of Dodi al Fayed, the man 
killed alongside Diana, Princess of 
Wales — opened for business. But noth- 


ing really seemed the same. 

Most of the signs were obvious. Flags 
flew at half-staff. Men arrived at work m 
sober suits and black mourning ties. Da 
the royal hubs of the city — Buckingham 
Palace, the home of Queen Elizabeth II; 
Kensington Palace, where Diana lived, 
and St. James's Palace, where her body 


the streets. 

As the reality of Diana’s death sank 
in, a heaviness seemed to fill the air. 
James Moore, who runs a flower stall in 
Westminster, felt it when he went to pick 
up the day’s flowers at the market 

“When you see big, stroppy men up 
in die market so sad, all the salesman and 
porters holding their heads low, you 
realize that there was something about 
Diana that touched everyone,” said Mr. 
Moore, who sold out his flowers by 1 
P.M. and was packing up to go home. 

' 'I’ve been doing thus for 35 years and 
I’ve never seen anything like it, all die 
sad faces.” 

Below Piccadilly, hundreds of peqple 


is lying in a coffin in the royal chapel — lined up along the Mall, the huge thor- 
oughfare that connects Trafalgar Square 





.'-i 


I 




'• • •'«»* * - 

-A 



Dr. Frederic Maillez at the scene. 


Co Buckingham Palace, waiting three or 
four hours for a moment’s chance to sign 
a book of condolence inside Sl James's 
Palace. There were men and women, 
young and old, retired people and people 
taking time off from work, and many 
said that the depth of their own sadness 
had actually startled them. 

“I was really upset, and it surprised 
me,” said Assunta Palenni, 28, a 
hairdresser way at the end of the line, 
who said that Diana 's death had forced a 
re-e valuation of her life. 

“She was always in die papers and 
you took it for granted that she would be 
there,” Miss P alenni said. “There was 
good publicity and bad publicity, and 
you could make up your mind what you 
thought about her. But before now, I 
don't think I really realized how much 
good she did do.” 

As they tend to do after a death, most 
people put to one side any reservations 
they may have had about Diana’s be- 
havior or the choices she made in her 
life. Instead, they remembered only the 



tragic death alongside her barely got a 
passing mention Monday. 


found happiness with the 41-yeai-ol* • 

LONDON - Dodi aJ Fayed had milUonam:. Mjnor ^ out 4,3 ., 

grabbed the headlines of the British The Dai y Faved's raoufe • 

SEES since the start of his romance short arhek ! that Mr d . . 

with Diana, Princess of Wales, but his ecy of nev^h^gajjn^ua ancr^ 

tragic death alongside her barely got a D “ jJKShed a photo §..\ 

passing mention Monday. . So amre with acmfw . 

The Egyptian-bom businessman, m Mr. alrayeoin po 

line with Muslim tradition, was buried “ __ who V 

within hours of his death m a quiet fa ^ u ‘^* r ei£t3ty denied BriUshriWiv 

K^heSH press "concentrated on izenship despte his 


' -t \»n i ■ - • 


r fp n v >>- .s- 

^ Rill * ^ 


passmg mennon Monaay. 

The Egyptian-bom businessman, in 
line with Muslim tradition, was buried 




by the British establishment. 


'Mr. ai Fayed, the son of Mphamed al acceptedby 




SrrSTtbT B=3s j»id tribute to lumm n,B “8®**™*j**S 
cemetery near Guilford, southwest of m ® bookof condolent^ at Hamds^ 


Mkhd Sphnln/IW Awodunl Prtw 

Parisians at the British Embassy Monday to sign the book of condolence. 


T r >nrWi , less than 24 hours after the 
high-speed car crash in Paris that also 
trifled the driver and seriously injured a 
bodyguard. 

British television showed brief im- 
ages Sunday of his coffin bring trans- 
ported to a central London mosque in 
Regent’s Park, and the tabloids, which 
ViHfj gone into a frenzy this summer over 
his romance with Diana, treated the sub- 
ject discreetly, more occupied at heaping 
praise on the princess they had so crit- 
icized and hounded the week before. 

Several tabloids, which printed pic- 
tures of Diana and Dodi together, did 
mention that the princess seemed to have 


French Doctor 
Tells of Trying 
To Save Diana 


positive things — her work with the poor 
and the sick, how much she loved her 


Reuters 

PARIS — “She was unconscious, 
moaning and gesturing in every direc- 
tion.” said a French doctor who was the 


and the sick, how much she loved her 
children and the way she made milli ons 
of Britons feel, in some ineffable way, 
that she was part of their lives. 

“She lived in our newspapers; she 
lived with us every day,” said Steve 
D’Avis, 45, a computer manager who 
was dropping off flowers at Sl James's 
Palace. "She was like a member of the 
family and now we feel that we’ve lost a 
family member. 

Deirdra Saffery, who works in a hos- 
pice in Stamford, Connecticut, and who 
is here on vacation, said that Diana's 






Tbi* Wiairi IVr** 

Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto bowing Monday to a photograph of Diana at the British Embassy in Tokyo. 


first person to treat Diana. Princess of deliberate embraces of AIDS victims 


Wales, at the scene of her fatal car crash 
early Sunday. 

Dr. Frederic Maillez told France-2 
television on Monday that he drove by 
minutes after the accident, which oc- 
curred in a road tunnel in central Paris. 

“I stopped my car and went to see,” 
said Dr. Maillez, who appeared to be in 
his late 30s. “There were many people 
around and lots of panic. 

“I saw that two people were dead and 
two were seriously hurt I went back to 
my car to call emergency services and 
give them a first medical assessment 


brought about nothing less than a com- 
plete change in the way society treats 
them. 

“We have a lot of AIDS patients and 
what Diana did for them was wonder- 
ful,” Ms. Saffery said. “They long for 
touch, for human contact, and before, 
everyone shunned them. But Diana dis- 
pelled the myth that you can get AIDS by 
touch.’ ' 

And 70-year-old Angela Mierzynski, 
who volunteers at a homeless shelter in 
London, said that on several occasions, 
unannounced, Diana had slipped in to 


News Media Turn to Soul-Searching 


By Howard Kurtz 

Wjshingtoa Post Service 


;fore returning to the site with some of talk to the homeless people inside, twice 


my equipment. 

When he returned to the car, a man 
who turned out to be a volunteer fireman 
had started giving first aid to the front- 
seat passenger. Trevor Rees-Jones, a 
bodyguard and the only one of the four 
people in the car who survived. 

“1 therefore went to the aid of the 
young woman in the back who turned 
out to be Lady Diana,’ ’ Dr. Maillez said. 
“I did not recognize her immediately. 

“I helped ro free her upper respiratory 
tracts.” he continued, describing how 
Diana's head lay on her shoulder, “in a 


bringing along her two sons. 

“I bad the pleasnre of shaking hands 
with her,” she said, smiling at the 
thought and saying that the outpouring 
of emotion could compare only to one 
other time in her memory, when Win- 
ston Churchill died in 1965. 

“I queued for three hours to see 


WASHINGTON — Last May, Maria 
Shriver, who is President John F. 
Kennedy's niece, and Arnold Schwar- 
zenegger. the actor, were briefly trapped 
in their Mercedes when two Fleet Street 
photographers in separate cars forced 
them off the road outside Los Angeles. 

The photographers. Giles Harrison 
and Andrew O'Brien, were tiying to get 
exclusive shots of the pregnant Miss 
Shriver as she and her husband were 
taking their son to school. The pho- 
tographers were charged with misde- 
meanors, and Mr. O’Brien with battery 
for shoving the school's principal. 

The incident barely caused a ripple. 


mainstream papers, magazines, wire ser- 
vices and TV shows. 

Thus file establishment press can tit- 
illate readers and viewers while dis- 
daining the tawdry tactics involved. 

“In every profession there are people 


the guy out there taking the pictures." 
Besides, he said, “I have a mortgage.” 

Before Diana, the world’s most pho- 
tographed woman was probably Jac- 
queline Onassis. In 1975, Mrs. Onassis 
obtained a court order requiring the pho- 


who go too far, who stretch notions of tographer Ron Gallela to stay at least 25 


ethics and decency to the limit and be- feet (eight meters) from her and 30 feet 


yond,' * said David Lutman, president of from her children. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Such legal tangles were rare before 
: birth of tabloid television shows in 


the National Press Photographers As- 
sociation in Washington. "It's had a 


Churchill in state, and I think Diana, rest Paparazzi, after all, routinely and rc- 


her soul, should be lying in state, too,” 
Mrs. Mierzynski said heatedly. 

Her anger was trained on Britain's 
royal family for the way members 
treated Diana when she was alive and for 


lentlessly pursue famous figures in 
search of pictures that can be marketed 
to the highest bidder. 

But what was once widely considered 


sociation in Washington. "It’s had a 
dramatic effect on our image. The mar- 
ketplace has pushed some aspects of 
photography in the direction or pursuit 
journalism. Somebody's purchasing this 
sniff. 

“All of us ought to be thinking, was 
this necessary?” he said. “High-speed 
chases are clearly a deplorable ex- 
treme.” 

In this environment, almost anyone 


position in which you cannot breathe if the way, she said, they are exploiting her fame, seemed to turn chillingly dan- 


intemational spoil, or a mere hazard of can suddenly become the figure in the 


you are unconscious. 

* ‘ I therefore lifted her head and helped 
her breathe with an oxygen mask.” 

Diana died in a hospital more than 
three hours after the accidenL 


Her companion, Dodi al Fayed, and 
eir chauffeur, Henri Paul, were killed. 


their chauffeur, Henri Paul, were killed. 
Mr. Rees-Jones was seriously injured, 
but doctors say his life is not in danger. 

Dr. Maillez said there were many pho- 
tographers at the scene. 

“About 10 or 15 of them, and they 
were snapping away at the car nonstop, 
though one cannot say they hampered 
me or my work. They were just like the 


now that she is dead. She was not the 
only one to feel that way. 

“I think they're a national embar- 
rassment," said Don Blevin, a civil ser- 
vant who was using his lunch hour, 
accompanied by his wife and their two 
young children, to drop a bouquet of 
sunflowers near Sl James’s Palace. 

Pointing ro a card bearing the message 
“To Diana: with respect from a repub- 


gerous Sunday in Paris with the high- 
speed car crash that killed Princess Di- 
ana and her friend Dodi al Fayed as their 
driver, reportedly under the influence of 
alcohoL, raced to elude several paparazzi 
on motorcycles. 

“This is ugly.” said Steve Coz. editor 
of the supermarket tabloid National En- 
quirer. who admits that he often buys 
celebrity photographs without knowing 


lican." Mr. Blevin said he was coming how they were obtained. “It’s getting 


around to the republican point of view 
himself. 

“I think when the Queen Mother dies 
they lose ail credibility,” he said of the 


crazy. It's changed from just observation 
to bunting people.” 

Nearly everyone in the global media 


viewfinder. Local camera crews, for ex- 
ample, slake out the homes of parents 
whose children have just been killed, 
hoping to capture the raw emotion. 

At a time when polls show dwindling 
public confidence in journalists, the 
death of the 36-year-old Princess of 
Wales could become one of those sem- 
inal events that convince millions that 
the media are out of control. The on- 
going clash between those who wave the 
banner of freedom of the press and those 
who want to protect their private lives is 
perhaps the most visible element. 

Diana’s brother. Charles, the 9th Earl 


people you find milling around the site remaining members of the royal family. 


food chain has feasted on the fruits of Spencer, said Sunday that he always 


of serious accidents.” 

French media have said that the police 
are looking for other photographers who 
left the site before the police arrived, 
presumably to develop photos of the 
accidenL which have been offered to 
publications for huge amounts. 


He looked down the Mall toward Buck- 
ingham Palace, which looms large and 
forbidding at one end. 

“I reckon Di would be hopping 
mad,” he said. “She’s dead, but the 
family firm’s still controlling 
everything.” 


these celebrity stalkers, creating a lu- 
crative market for their shots of the 
powerful at play. While the British 
tabloids and American supermarket pa- 
pers spend hundreds of thousands of 
dollars for such pictures — often taken 
from blacked-out vans or planes or boats 
— the images are often recycled in the 


MEDIA: Paparazzi Blame Editors and Readers for Excesses 


Continued from Page 1 


limits. And they are dearly overstepped 
when reporting turns into a state of 
siege." 

Still, with seven photographers de- 
tained for questioning by French police 
after they chased the car carrying Diana 
and her companion. Dodi al Fayed, who 
also died in the accident, photographers 
as well as editors of gossip and photo 
magazines were clearly on the defen- 
sive. 

“We've been declared the assassins,” 
said Fred Eric Garcia, a French pho- 
tographer who until this weekend was 
willing to describe himself as a 
paparazzo. “If Lady Di had slopped in 
front of a restaurant, everyone would have 

been happy to buy the pictures and would 
have forgotten that the car was going at 
150 miles per hour." 


ternoon that the driver of the Mercedes 
that crashed in a tunnel beside the Seine 


Match in France. Genie in Italy and Bume 
in Germans’ or tabloids like the Sun and 


early Sunday had an “illegal” level of Daily Minor in Britain are willing to pay 
alcohol in his bloodstream. such sums, the presumption is that they 


Yet it may still be difficult for the 
photography profession to shake off the 
perception that paparazzi somehow har- 
assed Princess Diana to her death. 

A few photographers still concentrate 
on what they call ’ ’serious” journalism, 
such as wars, natural disasters, social 
problems and political events, but they 
often struggle to make ends meeL 
“You can't get anyone to put up the 
money and you’re happy to gel ex- 
penses,” said Thomas Haley, an Amer- 
ican photojournalisL “You risk your 
life, you get back and then you can't 
even give the pictures away."’ 

Thus, when a paparazzo strikes lucky, 
as when the Italian photographer Mario 
Brenna rook photos of Diana embracing 
Mr. al Fayed in a boat off Sardinia in 


such sums, the presumption is that they 
can sell more copies. And they do. 

At least one of these Paris-based agen- 
cies was reportedly offering color pho- 
tographs of the crashed Mercedes, with 
Princess Diana covered in blood and Mr. 
al Fayed dead. 

Stephen Coz, editor of the National 
Enquirer, the sensationalist American 
tabloid, said he had been offered ex- 
clusive United States rights id the pic- 
tures for S 250, 00Q. He said he had turned 
down the offer and urged other pub- 
lications to do the same. 

"Don't blame the press," Britain’s 
Sun said Monday, aware that public fury 
was being fed not only by the angry 
reactions of Princess Diana's brother. 


knew the press would kill her. and his 
comment suddenly seems less than hy- 
perbolic. This was a woman who fre- 
quently complained she could not go to 
on exercise class — or. in one case, to her 
therapist — without a half-dozen shul- 
terbugs snapping away. 

Lord Spencer had his own run-ins 
with one of South Africa’s leading 
paparazzi. Fame Jason, who once got 
inside the Spencer home by posing as a 
worker in overalls, his camera stashed in 
his iunchbox. Mr. Jason, who revealed 
the carl's relationship with a new girl- 
friend, was ordered by a court to stay at 
least 10 meters away from Lord Spencer, 
and some of his camera equipment and 
furniture were seized. 

In the process. Mr. Jason became 
something of a celebrity himself; Bri- 
tain's Guardian newspaper described 
him as ‘ ' one of Sou th Africa ’s new breed 
of big game hunter.” 

Russell Turiak, a photographer in 
New York, photographed the wedding 
of the actors Don Johnson and Melanie 
Griffith in Aspen. Colorado, from a heli- 
copter. and earned six figures for his 
shots of John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn 
Bessette honeymooning in Turkey. 

“My feeling is that I am the mes- 


the birth of tabloid television shows in 
the mid-’80s. But as television greatly 
increased the market for such pictures, 
and the demand for ever-more exposure 
of ever-more celebrities, the stars have 
been fighting back. 

Last year, the actor George Clooney 
organized a boycott against the Para- 
mount Pictures television after one of its 
programs, “Hard Copy,” violated an 
agreement not to do stories about him. 
Joined by Madonna (whom “Hard 
Copy” filmed with her baby through the 
windows of her home). Whoopi Gold- 
berg, Steven Spielberg and others, the 
group said they would no longer co- 
operate with Paramount TV shows such 
as “Entertainment Tonight.” 

Paramount eventually agreed not to 
air celebrity video obtained surrepti- 
tiously or through harassment 

While some have sought legal rem- 
edies. the actor Alec Baldwin took mat- 
ters into his own hands. Mr. Baldwin 
accosted the photographer Alan Zanger 
and shoved his camera into his face after 
he tried to take pictures of Mr. Baldwin's 
wife, the actress Kim Basinger, as she 
brought their newborn home from a hos- 
pital in 1995. Mr. Baldwin was acquitted 
of misdemeanor battery; Mr. Zanger 
filed a SI million lawsuit against him. 

Some paparazzi regard such confron- 
tations afmosi as a badge of honor. Mr. 
Turiak boasts that he was assaulted by 
Bun Reynolds after tailing pictures of 
the actor and his then -girlfriend, Loni 
Anderson. 

“I was walking away and he punched 
me in the back of the head." Mr. Turiak 
said. “That actually brought me quite a 
bit of notoriety.” 

Mr. Coz says he is bidding against 
People magazine (which has run 43 Di- 
ana covers over the years) for the last 
pictures of the princess before the 
crash. 

"There's this tremendous obsession 
in the public for celebrity information.” 
he said. “Everyone has dipped into 
celebrity coverage, from the big net- 
works to Time and Newsweek. It's 
money — celebrities sell." 

Mr. Coz said he would not buy any of 
Ihe crash-scene photos, which he said 
were being offered for $1 million as a 
w *y °} Protesting the methods of what he 
called the "stalkerazzi.” 

The actor Tom Cruise says he h i* 
been followed by paparazzi in ih c same 


The spotlight of blame may in fact Mr. al Fayed in a boat off S: 
turn away from the photographers after July, he can earn $1 million, 
the Paris prosecutor announced this af- Of course, if magazines II 


Earl Spencer, and Mr. al Fayed "s family. People buy the pictures. This fan-addict 
but also by a number of movie stars and mentality, the hunger for the information 
celebrities, like Tom Cruise. Svlvester — isn't the public then responsible?” He 


Of course, if magazines like Paris- Stallone and Luciano Pavarotti. 


Bessette honeymooning in Turkev. Pans tunn.-l rv nc sa me 

“My feeling is thaf 1 am Ac mes- “vL u dSn't t Kv w , a * 
sencer,” Mr. Turiak said. “What are you chased by them ” hemM Re..!** hem£ 
going to do here - kill the messenger? han.s3 „!l r ( l ^ " u ,s 
People buy the pictures. This fan-addict know, -We are th ^ gU,sc y° u 
mentality, the hunger for the information tilled ’■ And wii-J’U??*' We L urc en - 
— isn't the public tiien responsible?” He private moment m pe °E ,e St havin S « 
added. “The easiest persTto blame is f 0 ** 




One message read: “To a man wfo-; 5 j 
brought happiness to Diana.’ _ j „ I 

Mr. al Fayed, who paraded his ro^ 1 ' \ 
mantic conquests on yachts and in i \ 
palaces, was the epitome of a playboy;- > ■ 
But it was his involvement withthemq#:- J - 
photographed woman in the world that . 
propelled him to the headlines fiv£ ,v 
weeks ago. . 

Real or supposed affairs in Dodi S' 
past included the actress Brooke Shield^, • . 
Koo Stark, who was Prince Andrew ;s. 
onetime companion, and a host of mod-: - 
els and show-business personalities. He 7. 
was mar ried once, to the model Suzanne A 
Gregard, in 1987 for eight months. . 


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PARIS: 

Tested for Alcohol 


LASER: Milito? 


Continued from Page 1 


Cufltinu 


ed fr 1 - :: 


expires, it is planned to request the b 
finning of legal proceedings,’ ’ the stat£ : 
mem said. " f 

“The charges to be filed cannot 
definitively established until the invest- •; 
tigation in process has been completed- ; v. 

Prosecutors said they had not yet begpi 
able to question the surviving body.- _ - 
guard, identified as Trevor Rees-Jones" r : : - 
by the Pitie Salpetriere hospital whe&_ : -_ 
Diana was pronounced dead. He w££ 
still in intensive care Monday. *5 

The heads of several photo agencies in A 
Paris said Monday that photographers ‘ft 
working on contract wi th them were ~ 
among those arrested, and protested that - 
they were wrongly being held respon- 
sible for causing the crash. ?, } l 

Goksin Siphaioglu, director of Sipd - 
Press, which has 140 photographers un- 
der contract, said that one of mem was 
Nikola Arsov, a 38-year-oJd Maced Q- : 
nian photographer who he said had 
simply walked into the tunnel after lje 
heard on police radio that there had been 
an accident there: ’ - • ' • i ■“ 

“He was at the Ritz with a lot of other 
photographers waiting for Diana to 
come out after dinner, but they left by tfje 
back entrance and he didn’t try to follow 
them,” Mr. Siphaioglu said. "He took T 
his camera when he heard about tije ; 
accidenL” ' J f : ’ - 

Christian Martinez, another photo- 
grapher, had been on assignment for tile 
Angeli photo agency, according to thfr 
company’s lawyer, Gilbert CoUarfl. 
“The police came to various ag ency 
offices looking for shots taken just after 
the tragedy.” he said. “We don’t know -v 
exactly what happened, but apparently 
the driver was going at an excessive rale ' 
of speed.” I'-fc 

Bruno Klein, director of Stills, an. T*! 
agency he described as specializing in 
"people and showbiz shots," said that a 
photographer associated with it for 13 
years was among those under arresL but 
Mr. Klein declined to give his name. I 
“He’s a classic photographer whir • 
does soirees, the Cannes film festival - ! 
and covered the Pope on his visit hei? 
last month.” Mr. Klein said. ”He was 
simply doing his job. Holding the phO- ' 
tographers responsible when the cause 
was dearly excessive speed is absurd.” 

Gamma Press Agency, one of the 
world's most prestigious, said that one ■ 
of its photographers and a motorcycle 
driver working with him had been ar- 
rested. but did not give their names. “I 
take full responsibility.” said Stephahe d K- 
Husain, the chief editor. 4{rC 

“If Lady Diana was in Paris, and ■ 
especially with Dodi, after all that had 
happened, one could not ignore her presi- 
ence." * 

But. here as in Britain, there were 
numerous calls for a tightening off 
already-tough French privacy laws 
inhibit “paparazzi” photographers from 
hound mg celebrities. * 

. Catherine Trautmann, the culture mini 
qerand spokesman for the government 
or Prune Minister Lionel Jospin, urged 
on French television Monday a “good 
conduct code” for the press to avoid 

ftiture tragedies like the one Sunday. J 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD T RIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMB ER 2, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


IJNERAL: At Westminster Abbey 


’V* i A f . 


'-’.Ill,, V 
>f J( 


WW\ 


Continued from Page I 

I P^Sraphers to determine 

l whether they contributed to the crash in a 

tunnel along the Seine or failed to come 
to the aid of the victims, while the gov- 
!/, emmenf called for international mea- 
sures to protect celebrities from the pry- 
ing lenses of the paparazzi. 

- Britain's foreign secretary, Robin 
Cook, who appeared to hint Sunday at 
> possible government measures to pro- 
tect privacy, said Monday that the im- 
mediate burden was on the press to ex- 

Scots'Home Rule Vote 
Won't Be Postponed 

’ Agence France -Press* 

.rT LONDON — A referendum ou lim- 
ited home rule for Scotland will take 
place as planned Sept. 12 . despite the 
halt to campaigning since the death of 
Diana, Princess of Wales, the Scottish 
Office said Tuesday. 

. . Political commentators had raised the 
possibility that the referendum, and an- 
' * other in Wales, could be postponed be- 
cause of the mourning bung observed 
- Until Diana's funeral on Saturday. 

7 ' In the referendum, Scots will deckle 

whether their country, governed from 
London as parr of the United Kingdom, 
Comprising England, Wales, Scotland 
and Northern Ireland, should have its 
own parliament and whether such a par- 
j lament should have limited tax-raising 
powers. 

, • A similar referendum on establishing 
• - $ regional parliament with more restric- 

led powers will be held in Wales on Sept 
18. ■ 


amine itself. “I think that they have to 
consider their recent behavior and to 
what extent that may have made a con- 
tribution, and we w ill watch with care 
and with attention what answers they 
give before we consider what it might be 
appropriate for us to say . * • he said during 
a visit to Singapore, 

Elsewhere, Acre was little sign that 
initial public outrage over the intrusions 
of photographers had altered media 
habits. 

British newspapers, broadsheets and 
tabloids alike published greatly expan- 
ded editions and special color supple- 
ments on Diana’s lwe and death. 

A columnist, Simon Jenkins, wrote in 
The Times that the voracious appetite 
for news and pictnres of the rich and 
famous was "a global narcotic beyond 
the ability of any one country to po- 
lice." 

However the political debate over pri- 
vacy develops, Monday was clearly a 
day for Britons to share their personal 
sense of loss at Diana's death. 

Flags flew at half-staff across the 
country, as they will until the funeral. 

Prime Minister Tony Blair canceled 
his official engagements for the day in a 
sign of respect; traders on the usually 
frantic floor of the London International 
Financial Futures Exchange observed a 
minute’s silence at the market's op enin g, 
and children throughout the country 
paused to commemorate the princess at 
assemblies opening the new school year. 

"She was the kindest person I ever 
knew,” said Rebecca Valentine, 71, 
after signing one of the black-leather 
condolence books in St. James’s 
Palace. 

"Although I never met her, I knew 
everything about her. I loved her." 


More Temporary and Part-Time Workers in Europe 

The number of part-time and temporary employees is on the rise in many European countries, although comparisons 
of temporary workers between the countries are difficult because the definitions vary. 



LASER: Military Wants to Target Satellite 


Continued from Page 1 

Sands Missile Range in southern New 
Mexico. In the past, the army has fired 
its beam of concentrated light at mis^ 
sites on the ground and at speeding 
drones and rockets in flight, blowing 
them up. 

.. Like all chemical lasers, Miracl gets 
‘its energy by burning fuels similar to 
those in rocket engines. Much energy is 
liost as beat, but large amounts are ex- 
tracted by mirrors and resonant cham- 
bers and emerge as a concentrated beam 
of light. 

V The beam is about six feet (two me- 
ters) wide. It usually destroys its targets 
fry subjecting them to intense heat 
" Over the years, Miracl has been im- 
plroved so (hat its beam is steady enough 
to track and hit satellites orbiting bun- 
•dreds of miles overhead in space. But 
Uncertainties remain, such as the degree 
To which atmospheric turmoil created by 
the hot beam would weaken its punch. 

The target is the Miniature Sensor 
Technology Integration satellite, MSTI- 
y. The satellite, about the size of a re- 
frigerator and weighing 450 pounds 
(200 kilograms), has telescopes and 
cameras for observing hot rockets as 
well as the cool Earth- 

Launched in May 1996 into an orbit of 
250 miles (420 kilometers), the satellite 
has exceeded its planned lifetime of one 
year and is scheduled to be switched off 
ift the near future. 

■ One aim of the test is to better un- 
derstand the vulnerabilities to laser at- 
tack of American satellites, especially 
ones engaged in spying. 


A longtime worry of military planners 
and arms controllers alike is that firing 
Miracl at a satellite could open a Pan- 
dora's box of global reactions in which 
other nations developed their laser 
weapons, in turn threatening American 
spacecraft 

Military experts say serious damage 
could be done by lasers less powerful 
and complex than Miracl. 

"Our most valuable satellites tend to 
be oar most vulnerable." said an expert 
on anti-satellite arms at a federal 
weapons laboratory, who approves of 
the Miracl test and who spoke on the 
condition of anonymity. 

Bat the recent proliferation of spy 
satellites, he said, has created "a lot 
more pressure to deny people the use of 
space for gathering information." 

He added, "We’re building up to do 
that, other people are building up to do 
that, and over the next few decades it's 
going to be a big issue.’ ’ 

Anns controllers say the growing 
complexity of the situation calls for a 
global ban on anti-saiellhe testing. 

"Shooting a satellite is shooting 
ourselves in the foot," said John Pike, 
the director of space policy for the Fed- 
eration of American Scientists, a private 
group in Washington that opposes anti- 
satellite arms. 

The satellite’s maker — Spectrum 
Astro of Gilbert, Arizona — opposes 
having Miracl Ere its beam at the $60 
million craft. Stan Dubya, the com- 
pany's chief operating officer, said 
"They shouldn’t use a spacecraft that is 
healthy and has several years of life 
ahead of it." 


Netherlands H Germany 


Part-time 

Workers 

Less than 

35 hours a 

week. 

Maybe 

permanent 

employees. 

Temporary 
Workers 
People who 
who may 
work a full 
week but 
move from 
company to 
company. 


7.7% B.0% 


m 


’83 ’96 





’83 '96 


■83 ’96 





’83 ‘95 


10 . 0 % 10 . 4 %* 

(Ejp'-fc 


'83 '96 


'83 '96 


'83 '96 


'83 '95 


'1995 data is the most recent available. 

Sources: Eurostat {European temporary figures); Organization tor Economic Cooperation and Development (pan-time figures) 


77k- Xo* l<«l Tin u. 


LABOR: Europe Takes the Part-Time and Temporary Route 


Continued from Page 1 

most impossible to lay off workers when 
business slumps. 

Temporary workers typically receive 
benefits and pay comparable to those of 
full-time workers, but they do not have 
the job security. Part-time workers tend to 
be paid less and receive fewer benefits. 

‘ ‘We have to accept the fact that this is 
the by-product of inflexibility," said 
Jean-Pierre Rodier, chairman of Pecb- 
iney SA, an aluminum and packaging 
company that went through a painful 
restructuring several years ago and now 
uses temporary workers for about 5 per- 
cent of its jobs. “We need a reasonable 
amount of flexibility." 

John Chait, executive vice president 
in charge of international operations for 
Manpower Inc., the temporary staffing 
company, said: "The perception is that 
Europe is changing very slowly. But the 
market is changing faster than the laws 
are. Things are changing faster on the 
street than most people realize. It is true 
in France. It is true in Spain. It is true in 
Italy." But the solution has also led to a 
two-tier economy in many countries: 
older workers who effectively have life- 
time jobs, and younger workers who trek 
to new jobs at least once a year, whether 
they like it or not. 

About 1 1 percent of all jobs in France, 
and more than 33 percent of those in 
Spain, are now filled by temporary 
workers, according to data compiled by 
the Organization for Economic Cooper- 
ation and Development, a research in- 
stitute in Paris. Although statistical com- 
parisons are dangerous, because 
countries define temporary work dif- 
ferently, the U.S. government estimates 
that Z2 percent of American workers are 
in temporary jobs. 

In other parts of Europe, companies 
have greatly increased their use of part- 
time workers. The undisputed leader is the 
Netherlands. The government and Dutch 
unions have actively encouraged part- 
time work — with benefits comparable to 
chose of full-tune workers — and the 
pr o portion has skyrocketed from 21 per- 
cent in 1983 to 37 percent in 1996. 


To the envy of neighbors like Ger- 
many. where unemployment is at near- 
record levels, the Netherlands now 
boasts one of the lowest jobless rates in 
Europe, about 6.5 percent Government 
officials say the rise of part-time work is 
only one of many reasons for the suc- 
cess, but the contrast is nevertheless 
stark. 

Part-timers also make up more than 
one-fifth of the work force in Norway, 
Sweden, Switzerland and Denmark. 

Europe’s entrenched system of rigid 
work rules is cracking in other ways. In 
Germany, where government regula- 
tions heavily discourage temporary 
workers, companies are filling hundreds 
of thousands of jobs with people listed as 
self-employed contractors. 

Artur Niessen, 32, a truck driver in 
Frankfurt, has been working for a bever- 
age company under three separate tem- 
porary contracts. The company now 

‘We have to accept that 
this is the by-product of 
inflexibility.* 


wants to convert all its drivers into in- 
dependent contractors and persuade 
them to buy their trucks. 

But the company will not guarantee 
the drivers a fixed volume of work, 
and Mr. Niessen is worried about be- 
ing saddled with a truck he cannot af- 
ford. 

A study last year by the Nuremberg 
Institute for Labor Market Research 
concluded that 430,000 German workers 
who were officially self-employed were 
actually company employees without 
the standard social benefits or job guar- 
antees. 

Many temporary and part-time work- 
ers say they prefer their jobs to full-time 
permanent positions. 

" What I want to do is work for several 
companies, so 1 can learn about several 
fields," said Pedro Rodriguez, 27, an 
electrical engineer in Madrid who has 
worked under a series of temporary con- 


tracts at a company that makes air-con- 
ditioning equipment. Still, temporary 
workers became so numerous in Spain 
over the last several years that unions 
waged a major campaign to rein in their 
use. 

Spain, which once had some of the 
toughest job-security laws in Europe, 
relaxed its rules three years ago to let 
companies hire apprentices for as Jong as 
several years. By 1996, virtually all new 
jobs in Spain were temporary, according 
to foe Organization for Economic Co- 
operation and Development. More than 
one-third of all workers were tempor- 
ary. 

Last spring, unions and employers 
hammered out an agreement that re- 
quires companies to keep apprentices for 
at least two years, in exchange, the 
agreement makes it easier for employers 
to justify layoffs of full-time workers in 
court and reduces the size of mandatory 
severance payments. 

Union officials say the agreement, 
which was also codified into law, tripled 
the number of long-term contracts given 
to workers in July. 

“Very strong, very interesting,” re- 
marked Antonio Gonzales, lead nego- 
tiator for the General Workers Union. 

But John Martin, a labor economist at 
die OECD, said the only solution to the 
jobless crisis in many European coun- 
tries was to begin loosening the entire 
structure of workplace regulations. 

While some countries have made it 
easier to hire temporary workers, the 
preservation of rigid job protection laws 
for those with permanent jobs heightens 
the pressure on those who have lost their 
jobs or are just finishing school and 
looking for their first jobs. 

“What the changes have done is to 
give a certain amount of flexibility to 
employers while maintaining a high de- 
gree of job protection for those who have 
permanent jobs," Mr. Martin said. 
"That kind of two-tier solution may be 
satisfactory from the point of view of the 
protected employees and from the point 
of view of the employers, but it does not 
improve the chances for unemployed 
people to find stable employment." 


Page ? 


ILK. Official 
Bars Burma 
From Meeting, 

Citing Drugs 

Coofdrd tn Oar Sijfj Firm DupotrSn 

SINGAPORE — The British foreign 
secretary, Robin Cook, condemned the 
Burmese government Monday, saying 
that it profiled from the drug trade and 
that it would not be admitted to a meet- 
ing of European and Asian government 
leaders next year. 

Mr. Cook said at a meeting of busi- 
ness leaders in Singapore that Europe's 
recent decision to deny visas to senior 
Burmese officials made their inclusion 
at the Asia-Europe Meeting in London in 
April impossible. 

In response to Mr. Cook's remarks, 
Burma assailed Britain as "the world’s 
No. 1 culprit" for narcotics. 

A senior military official said that the 
drug problem Burma is "encountering 
today is the direct result of Britain's 
colonial strategy ISO years ago." 

“Whether Mr. Cook is ignorant of the 
fact or deliberately trying to cover up the 
most irresponsible and unforgivable 
criminal act Britain committed by force- 
fully introducing opium into Asia is any- 
body’s guess,” the official added. 

Burma was a British colony from the 
mid- 19th century until independence in 
1948. 

The opium trade provided major rev- 
enues for Britain from many of its ter- 
ritories in Asia. 

The Asia-Europe Meeting is a forum 
Jinking the 15 members of the European 
Union with Japan, China, South Korea 
and some members of the Association of 
South East Asian Nations. 

ASEAN admitted Burma to its ranks 
this year, despite strong Western crit- 
icism of Rangoon's record on human 
rights and the flourishing drug trade in 
the country. 

"There is a common European po- 
sition across all European countries not 
to grant visas to ministers from Burma, 
which will make it impossible for us to 
consider the inclusion of Burma in the 
ASEAN process next year," Mr. Cook 
said at the end of a four-nation tour of 
Southeast Asia. 

“Burma is the largest single world 
producer of opium, and it has achieved 
that infamous position precisely because 
it is a government that does not act 
against the drug barons," he said, 

“It is not only a deeply repressive 
regime, but it is also a deeply irrespons- 
ible regime in that it is one of the few 
governments in the world whose mem- 
bers are prepared to profit out of the 
drugs trade rather than to seek to sup- 
press the drugs trade," he added. 

Mr. Cook said at a news conference 
before leaving for home that Britain 
could bar Burma from the gathering 
because it was not a bloe-to-bJoc meet- 
ing but a voluntary dialogue between 
nations. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


Sc*«* our 

Entertainment 

every Wednesday 
in The Jnlermaikel 


Iran Reports Executing Alleged Spy for U.S 


‘ Reuters 

•' TEHRAN — Iran has executed an 
‘Iranian man, saying he spied for the 
United States, the official Iranian press 
agency, IRNA, said Monday. 

’ • It said Siavash Bayani was banged in 
■fivifl prison outside Tehran last week on 
charges of spying for the ‘ ‘Great Satan, 
America." 

-. Mr. Bayani left Iran for the United 
Slates about 1984 and sought political 
isylum but returned about three years 
; aso to gather information for the Central 
'Intelligence Agency, IRNA said. 

' Iran announced Mr. Bayani ’s arrest in 
June 1996 and said then that he was an 
‘air force eoloneL It did not say if he was 


retired or on active duty. IRNA quoted a 
statement by a military court in Tehran 
as saying Mr. Bayani had relayed mil- 
itary intelligence to the CIA. 

It said he had confessed to ‘ ‘disgrace- 
ful activities" and had received SI, 000 
to $1,500 for each contact. 

The press agency said Mr. Bayani had 
been arrested shortly after returning to 
Iran by the Iranian Army’s intelligence 
division. 

He was convicted of spying m early 
1995 and later sentenced to death, the 
press agency said. , 

Iran last year passed a law imposing 
the death sentence for espionage in a 
variety of areas not covered by earlier 


legislation, such as giving information to 
foreigners on the country’s social con- 
ditions. 

The law singled out agents working 
for Iran's arch enemies, the United 
States and Israel. 

Relations between Tehran and Wash- 
ington have been tense since militant 
Iranian students stormed the U.S. Em- 
bassy in 1979 and held 52 Americans 
hostage for 444 days. 

The United States severed diplomatic 
ties with Iran in 1980. 

Tehran often accuses Washington, 
which has imposed sanctions against the 
Islamic republic, of attempting to de- 
stroy its government. 


111 .V 

in' 1 


‘ Yeltsin, in a Surprise, 

: Says He’ll Step Aside 
When His Term Ends 

' MOSCOW (AP) — President Boris 

■ Yeltsin announced Monday he would step 
‘ aside when his term expired m 2000. 
* clearing the way for a pack of candidates 

■ already jockeying to succeed him. 

Mr. Yeltsin’s age, his recent health 
.. problems and the Russian Constitutional] 
appeared to rule out another term for toe 
Russian leader. But the 66-year-old pres- 
ident caught many by surprise when he 

announced his planned retirement at a 

Moscow school where he spoke on the 
first day of the academic year. 

"My term ends in 2000, 1 wifi i not rim 
anymore," Mr. Yeltsin toldchddren and 
teachers at School Number 1,25-- 
Mr Yeltsin, who underwent heart sur- 
gery 1 last year and had pneumonia early 

Kl^nimedtofoU-timedu^se^ 

months ago. He appears in flood t heatth 
and no one questions his 

out the final three years of 

-His family reportedly opposed arjy 
move for Mr Yeltsin to seek a thud term 

because of his health and ag®- . 

With Mr. Yeltsin’s long history ofbeart 
problems, the 1996 election 

attack during the campaign. 


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PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Jteralfc 


[INTERNATIONAL 



TV BUSHED Wmi THE NEW YORK TJMRS AND TUB WASHINGTON MST 


tribune Vulnerable Princess With a True Commitment 


» 


rTffee an* 1 th 

\ fv*** 


Why Diana Mattered 


A Gift of Empathy 


The sudden, brutal death of Diana, 
Princess of Wales, at the young age of 
36, preempted and quickly engulfed all 
other news and all other subjects Sat- 
urday night. This was true not just in 
Britain and the rest of Western Europe 
and the United Slates, but all around 
the world. There was much more to this 
response, we think , which included a 
torrent of expressions of grief and of- 
ferings of flowers and other tokens of 


works and proved it by taking real 
personal risks in the pursuit of her 


condolence, than the usual, age-old 
human fascination with horrible ac- 


h iiman fascination with horrible ac- 
cidents and unexpected reversals of 
fortune, especially as they befall the 
powerful and exalted. And the pre- 
dictable media extravagance and ex- 
ploitation didn't explain it all either. 

The young woman who died in a 
Paris hospital at the end of the summer 
of 1997 bad been, from the day almost 
two decades ago when she entered the 
public's consciousness as the wife-to- 
be of the heir to the British throne, the 
central figure in a gripping and con- 
tinuously unfolding drama. It was part 
“fairy tale" and romance, as no one 
ever tired of saying, but in larger part, 
we think , contemporary morality play 
as well — and nothing if not searingly 
up to date. 

Diana, as one commentator ob- 
served Saturday night, grew into an 
identifiable human being in the course 
of her miserable marriage and its af- 
termath, as distinct from the innocent, 
happy, almost fictional abstraction she 
had seemed to be at the beginning of 


Identity of Her Gum 


The cruelly short life of the Princess 
of Wales bore the markings of fate 
from the moment she entered the public 
stage. Her marriage to Prince Charles 
in 1981 brought pageantry, triumph 
and renewal to the monarchy. Soon, 
however, the fairy tale succumbed to 
human frailty. After a bitter divorce, 
Diana, like Charles, earned out a 
highly publicized quest for privacy, 
cultivating some of the very images she 
complained had become her prison. 

Diana lived in a remote universe of 
glamour and fashion, but her death is a 
shock because she made a genuine 
emotional connection with those out- 
side her world. She did so by dint of her 
mesmerizing beauty and her intense 
personal struggles. 

Fascination with the British royal 
family dates at least from the time of 
Shakespeare and extends to the House 
of Windsor's troubles for much of this 
century. Diana’s death has a certain 


her for profit until the very end. This 
could well be one of those galvanizing 
events in which die forces of public 
pressure finally brings some sense of 


proportion to tabloid journalism. 
Of course, there is not likely to b 


'quality of tragedy, with the appalling 
denouement of a car crash after being 


denouement of a car crash after being 
chased through Paris by paparazzi. But 
it was not a tragedy in the classical 
sense. Diana was not a traditional 
states woman or historical figure. Her 
arena was entirely one of images and 
igestures. With evident compassion, 
she embraced many good causes, from 
;AIDS to the Bosnian refugees to the 
^scourge of land mines. But die work 
she did in these areas, however helpful, 
was to publicize the work of others. 

| For many, die great sadness of Di- 
Sana's death will forever be mixed with 


'bitterness over the circumstances. 


There is no question that her brother, 
; Earl Spencer, hit a deep vein of public 


S ) ini on when he spoke of the blood on 
e hands of journalists who pursued 


Of course, there is not likely to be any 
regulatory approach to the abuses of die 
paparazzi and their outlets that does not 
compromise die essence of an open 
society. But this moment could also 
provide a chance for the serious main- 
stream press to sharpen the line between 
themselves and the sensationalists. 

The world will now be plunged into a 
new series of dramas unfolding in Bri- 
tain. As the royal family takes up the 
rituals of mourning and transition. 
Prince Charles may well be able to seize 
the occasion for some healing, however 
awkward it might be, of the acrimony 
that visited all sides of the family after 
the collapse of his. marriage. 

The spotlight will now turn also to his 
young sons. William and Hany, for 
whom so much sympathy has been 
poured forth. The people of Britain have 
had their hearts broken, and now they 
must turn again to the task of adjusting 
their monarchy to modem pressures. 

The young image of Diana has now 
been sadly frozen in time. As a girl, she 
was given scant education or training 
appropriate to the fame that waited her. 
But she possessed what Lord Jeffrey 
Archer, the author and politician, said 
on Sunday was a "strange God-given 
gift" to touch people, a gift that might 
well have increased in the years ahead. 
In finding her own way, she lived a life 
of self-indulgence, vulnerability and a 
certain determination to build an iden- 
tity of her own, a determination that the 
public could admire. A nation and in- 
deed a world that had grown older with 
her has now been robbed of the chance 
to keep doing so. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 


Tourists Look for Soul 


The travel writer Arthur Frornmer 
says: "Among cities with no particular 
recreational appeal, those that have 
preserved their past continue to enjoy 
tourism. Those that haven’t receive 
almost no tourism at all. Tourism 
simply doesn't go to a city that has 
lost its soul." 

How can a community attract tour- 
ists without losing its soul? First, the 
community's leaders must recognize 
that the place itself, not the trappings 
around it, is the reason most tourists 
come for a visit. Second, they must 
understand that sustaining tourism re- 
quires a long-term strategy. 

The economic development expert 
Don Rypkema says: "Nobody goes 
anywhere to go down a walerslide or 
buy a T-ahirt. They may do both these 
things, but that isn't the reason they 
went There." Any place can create a 
tourist attraction, but it is those places 


that are attractions in and of them- 
selves that people most want to visit. 

Cities that have obliterated their past 
attract hardly any visitors at all, except 
for the highly competitive and notori- 
ously fickle convention business. 

Focus on the authentic. Make every 
effort to preserve the authentic aspects 
of local heritage and culture, including 
handicrafts, art, music, language, ar- 
chitecture, landscape, traditions and 
history. The true story of an area is 
worth telling even if it is painful. 

Recognize that tourism has limits. 
Too many cars, boats, tour buses, con- 
dominiums or people can overwhelm a 
community and harm fragile re- 
sources. Tourism development that ex- 
ceeds the capacity of the ecosystem or 
fails to respect a community's sense of 
place will result in resentment and the 
eventual destruction of the very at- 
tributes that tourists come to enjoy. 

— Edward T. McMahon, 
commenting in The Washington Post. 


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N EW YORK — Speaking some 
years ago to a charily for children. 


By Anthony Lewis earth, prin ted ever y to of rink-tattle 


the public’s fascination with her. Be- 
hind all the luxury and glamour and 


high style, she seemed to be dealing in 
the 2997 way with the fa miliar per- 
sonal issues that so many others face. 

She was breath takingly unconven- 
tional by traditional standards of pro- 
priety and role-modelship. At the same 
time, she was deeply engaged in good 


personal risks in the pursuit of her 
different causes. She was insistent that 
her children gain an unroyal appre- 
ciation of something approximating 
normal life. And she was famous for 
her ability to connect naturally and 
empathetically with others who lived 
far outside the beautiful-people uni- 
verse she inhabited. 

It was her insistence on trying to add 
this dimension ro her royal life — - and 
succeeding in doing so — that dis- 
tinguished her, we think, and won her a 
wide following. 

The conduct of the ‘‘paparazzi" was 
said to have been particularly reckless 
on Saturday night, and the alleged re- 
sponse of one, reported to have moved 
in at once for priceless photos of the 
kill, rather than tryi ng to help, takes the 
breath away — although there are pre- 
cedents for it in the mainstream press 
. on dramatic occasions in the past 

But the hounding, harassing role of 
these ruthless junkies, who supply the 
tabloids, the rest of the media and the 
public with the photos that they — we 
— all simultaneously seem to crave 
and denounce is a separate question for 
another day. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Diana said children nowadays were 
less likely to experience the early death 
of parents but more likely to suffer the 
trauma of divorce or other family trou- 
bles. So, “We must help them to face 
life as stable and confident adults.’ ' 

Stability and confidence — nothing 
could have been further from the reality 
of her own life. Her mother went off 
with another man when she was 6, 
abandoning the family. During her 
stressful marriage to the Prince of 
Wales she had a severe eatin g disorder, 
bulimia, and reportedly attempted sui- 
cide several times. 


despite that she got to you. There was 
the jet-set side, empty-headed; but then 
I think she was genuinely moved by 
suffering, perhaps because of her own 
experience. She had a side of her that 
really did respond to casualties, to vic- 
tims. There was a true commitment" 

That was the Diana who hugged 
AIDS victims when it took courage to 
overcome prejudice. And it was the one 
who, in recent years, campaigned 
against land mines, meeting legless 
children in Bosnia and elsewhere. 

Does it malm a difference when a 


they could connect to her, 
The other day they had 1 
ohotoeraphs of the pi 


Her vulnerability was part of what princess is photographed with the vic- 
made her so appe aling to the British tuns of disease or cruel weapons? I 


public. She came from a long line of 
landed aristocrats, but she did not come 
across as a member of the aristocracy. 
This past Sunday, people said, “She 
was one of us." 


think it does. Diana called attention to 
important causes. 

For one, she made it harder for the 
United States to continue opposing the 
movement for an international ban on 


There was an opposite side, and of land mines. Her death just might move 
course that had its appeal, too: the President Bill Clinton to give up some 
glamour, the jet-set life, the look. It had of the remaining American reserva- 
the drawback of frivolousness. tions to the proposed anti-mine treaty. 

"She was so glamorous," an in- She was a victim of the press. The 
tellectual American woman said, “but British tabloids, the scummiest on 


were doctored to move the two closer 
together than they really were. 

The paparazzi pursued her every- 
where, in the end to her death. 

Their behavior was so dreadful that 
you can understand why people outside 
Kensington Palace shouted at reporters 
and photographer, ‘ ’Haven’t you done 
enough?” It would do no harm to the 
true interests of a free press if those 
who were after her in Pans were pros- 
ecuted, or if the paparazzi were 
chastened tty other means. 

Yet there was an ambiguity in Di- 
ana’s relations with the press, too. She 
complained about the invasions of her 
privacy, but she confided in her fa- 
vorite tabloid journalists, and invited 
their attention. 

She made the decision to tell all to 
Andrew Morton about her unhappy 
married life, and he told the world in his 
1992 book “Diana: Her True Story.” 

She married Prince Charles at 20, 


about the world or about noscn un- 
derneath what we thought was a fairy 
tale it was a marriage of two people 
with nothing to give each other. 

She seemed always to find mappro- - 
like the cavalry officer 


rl'M ... : 


0 tr. , i 


Priam lovers, like the cavalry officer , 
who wrote a book about then afiair =; 
Then, at the end, there was the fetal • 
association with Dodi al Fayed, 1 j 

She was criticized in Britain when < 
she took her two boys on a long Medt,, 
termnean visit this summer with his i 
father, Mohammed al Fayed, the owner ; 
ofHarrods. 

But now there will be only sym- - 
pa thy, and myth. 

“I didn’tlikeher,” an English friend - 

of mine said, “but that doesn t come . 
into it really.” No, it doesn’t. Even ' 
man y who thought her sad or silly felt ■ 

personal grief at her death. Mortality. - 

If I were given a wish now for that 
beleaguered royal family, it would be * 
that Prince Charles be allowed to find 
his own way to peace. That can only be * 

with Pamilla Parker Bowles. It would * 
not be a fairy tale, but Diana showed us . 
the price of fairy tales. 

The New York Tunes. 


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Celebrity Is Synthetic, Infantile and Sometimes Lethal 


W ASHINGTON — One 
cause of the death of 


By George F. Will 


Diana was the modem form of 
fame. ' ‘the frenzy of renown. ’ ' 
The frenzied — meaning 
people who are intoxicated by 
synthetic significance — are 
complicit in her death. 

Death came when the Prin- 
cess of Wales and her com- 
panion of recent weeks were in 
high-speed flight from photo- 
graphers hell-bent on supplying 
the highly remunerative market 
for snapshots of her life. 

Hers was a life somehow 
always rich in opportunities for 


really believe the subsequent 
justification, which, unlik e the 


photographs of the sort she de- 
plored. Greta Garbo she was 


plored. Greta Garbo she was 
not She had a great fondness 
for cafo society, which is not 
the mili eu of the reclnsive. 

She died in, and to some 
extent because of, the vortex of 
publicity that surrounds — no. 
that is — the modem British 
monarchy, into which she fell 
by marriage at age 20. 

Once upon a time, the jus- 
tification for the monarchy was 
clear: It was God’s will No 
one now believes that, and few 


justification, which, unlik e the 
first, was more or less true for a 
while. It was that the monarchy 
is a constitutional necessity. 

The monarchy is a residue of 
the infancy of the British 
people. They still like it, and it 
is their right to retain it, ra- 
tionality being broadly option- 
al. But there is no evading the 
fact that an occupational hazard 
of royalty is infantilism, now 
that royalty is shorn of serious 
duties and exists primarily to 
do public relations for itself. 

One manifestation of infant- 
ilism is a sense of entitlement 
to incompatible things. Diana 
felt entitled to be forever the 
social fiction that she became 
by marriage: royalty. In nego- 
tiations about her divorce she 
fought for, and bitterly resen- 
ted the forced surrender of, the 
title “Her Royal Highness.” 

However, she also wanted 
the sort of privacy often 
c laime d by me privileged, 
meaning publicity on her terms. 


She wanted to be listened to 
concerning various social 
causes (the latest being a ban 
on anti-personnel land mines). 

But she had a hold on public 
attention only because she was 
a celebrity, as Daniel Boorstin 
has defined that term. That is, 
she was known for her well- 
knownness. 

Thirty-six years ago, in his 
book ‘‘The Image,” Mr. 
Boorstin argued that the graph- 
ic revolution is journalism had 
severed fame from greatness, 
which generally required a 
gestation period in which great 
deeds were performed. This 
severance hastened die decay 
of fame into mere notoriety, 
which is very plastic and very 
perishable. 

The severance was apparent 
by 1905, when die narrator of 
Edith Wharton’s “House of 
Mirth” spoke of living in “a 
world where conspicuousness 
passed for distinction, and the 
society column had become 
the roll of fame." 


The noun “flack” pertain- 
ing to modem communica- 
tions, was prefigured by a 
proper noun, George Flack, the 
journalist in Henry James’s 
“The Reverberator” (1888), 


who thought of himself as a 
servant of democratic values: 


servant of democratic values: 

“Yon ain't going to be able 
any longer to monopolize any 
fact of general interest ... it 
ain’t going to be possible to 
keep out anywhere the light of 
the Press. Now what I’m going 
to do is set up the biggest lamp 
yet made ana make it shine all 
over the place. We’ll see who’s 
private then ... and who'll frus- 
trate the People, the people that 
wants to know. That’s a sign of 
die American people that they 
do want to know. 

All democracies want that 
They want royalty of their own 

making, and unmaking De- 
mocracy's leveling impulse is 
saved by democracy’s power- 
ful, if fickle, machinery of el- 
evation through publicity. 

Diana died, in a sense, at the 
intersection of a premodem in- 
stitution, royalty, and the mod- 


em sensibility, which holds' 
that privacy is a denial of a 
democratic entitlement, the 
public’s entitlement to any feet 
that entertains. 

She seems to have under- 
stood that her life was a con- 
stant conjuring trick. There 
was an incurable precarious-, 
ness to herposition as she tried ’ 
to live off derivative dignity . 
from an anachronistic institu- : 
tion while cultivating the roy- 
alism of a democratic age — 
celebrity. \ 

In one of her last interviews, 
she, who kept the company of, 
the flamboyantly rich, struck a 
populist note: 

‘ ’I am much closer to people-, 
at the bottom than those at the * 
top, and the latter won’t for-, 
give me for that." 

What proved to be fatally 
unforgiving was the insatiable.' 
craving of society, from top to - 
bottom, for details of Diana's ' 
life as princess for a. demo- 
cratic age. It was a drama on * 
which the curtain came down , 
with a crash. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


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Watch These Alliances Waver and Shift in the Middle East 


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Here I ‘ 
the Sui if e.Tp. v 


W ASHINGTON — In mid- 
July, a Saudi Arabian air- 


YY July. a Saudi Arabian air- 
craft secretly took off from Syr- 
ia for Saudi Arabia carrying one 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


passenger and several guards. 
Therein lies an intriguing tale of 


Therein lies an intriguing tale of 
shifting geopolitics. 

The passenger was a Saudi 
Shiite Muslim code-named 
“Khassab." - one of five key 
suspects initially sought by 
Saudi Arabia for the June 25, 
1996, bombing of the U.S. 
Khobar Towers barracks in 
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia^ which 
left 19 Americans dead. 

Of those five, Jaafar 
Chueikhat "committed sui- 
cide" in a Syrian prison: Hani 
Sayegh fled to Canada and has 
been turned over to the United 


States: Ahmed Mughassil and 
Ali Khuri remain at large, sus- 
pected of being in Iran. Khassab 
was apparently tracked down 
by the. Syrians in Lebanon. 

Officials familiar with the in- 
ner workings in Syria (which 
initially resisted helping the 


Saudis) say the Syrians sirot 


telephoned the Saudis one day 


and told them to send a plane, 
because they had "someone” 
for them. Presto, a key suspect 
was handed over. 

Pay attention to this new- 
found Syrian cooperation. The 
Syrians* arrest of Khassab fol- 
lowed by just a few weeks a visit 
to Syria by Saudi Arabia’s 


Crown Prince Abdullah. He has 
always been the most pro-Syrian 
of die Saudi leaders, and he had 
been embarrassed at home by 
Syria’s lack of cooperation on 
Khobar. In late June, Abdullah 
spent a week in Syria and Leb- 
anon, accompanied by a 172- 
member official delegation. 

The Saudis have apparently 
decided to deal with Khobar in 
their own. Middle Eastern way. 
They seem to feel that by leak- 
ing information from their own 
investigation that points to a 

S issible Iranian involvement 
ey have effectively deterred 
Iran from mounting any more 
mischief in Saudi Arabia. 


The Iranians are on notice 
that anything that goes 
“boom" in Saudi Arabia will 
now be blamed on them. That is 
all the deterrence the Saudis 
need or want The last thing 
they desire now is for the United 


Iraq, Syria, Hezbollah or Islam- 
ic Jihad — in order to halt iis 


States to start shooting up Iran, 
with Saudi Arabia then left to 


The Kennedy s Are Paying Up 


W ASHINGTON — Jo- 
seph P. Kennedy 2d has 


YV seph P. Kennedy 2d has 
pulled out of the Massachu- 
setts gubernatorial race over- 
whelmed by the son of per- 
sonal problems that a previous 
generation of Kennedy s would 
have dismissed as trifles. He 
had many problems, but his 
biggest was being a Kennedy 
at the wrong time. 

It was not Joe but his broth- 
er Michael who allegedly had 
an affair with the family baby- 
sitter. Questions have been 
raised about whai Joe knew 
about Michael and when he 
knew it, but whatever the case 
this was a matter between 
brothers and not, as tacky as 
the allegations are, the stuff 
for public denunciations. 

And it was not Joe who was 
accused of rape in Palm 
Beach, Florida, not so very 
long ago. That was William 
Kennedy Smith, a cousin, who 
was staying with his Uncle 
Ted. the Massachusetts sen- 
ator, at the time. 

It was not Joe who posed 
son of nude in the magazine 
“George” and penned a 
somewhat incomprehensible 
essay about temptation and 
women and that son of thing 
— and. in passing, mentioned 
the travails of his two cousins. 
John F. Kennedy Jr. called 
both Joe and Michael "poster 
boys for bad behavior," al- 
though in Joe's case the bad 
behavior amounted to little 
more than seeking a church 
annulment and leaving behind 
"an embittered wife.” 

The essay is innocuous. It 
was so widely quoted that you 
might have’ thought John 
Kennedy, editor of "George'* 


By Richard Cohen 


and son of the late president, 
had really bashed his cousins. 
Instead it seemed that he felt 
reluctantly obliged to mention 
them, and he did so with some 


compassion. 

No matter. The press 
pounced. It seems that the sins 
of previous generations of 
Kennedys — and boy did they 
sin! — are now going to be 
paid for by this generation. 

The patriarch, Joseph 
Kennedy, publicly flaunted 
his mistresses, cruelly humi- 
liating the sain Led Rose. She 
took solace in religion when, 
of course, she should have 
brained him. No jury would 
have convicted. 

John Kennedy behaved 
similarly and he, too. was nev- 
er called to account. It is stun- 
ning now to contemplate his 
presidency — the liaison with 
the mobbed- up Judith Exner, 
for instance. Here was a man 
who clearly felt that none of 
the rules, not even ones about 
co-mingling sex with national 
security, applied to him. 

Even so. the knowledge of 
his behavior is scant match for 
the dazzle of his smile. When 
you look at the old pictures of 
him. his charisma still tri- 
umphs over judgment. 

Now. John gets lambasted 
for posing nude when, if you 
look at the picture, it is so dark 
that he could be wearing a 
neon bathing suit and you 
wouldn't know it. 

As for Joe. the controversy 
over the church annulment he 
got from his first wife, Sheila 
Rauch Kennedy, tells it all. 


She wrote a book criticizing 
the whole absurd procedure. 
fHow can anyone say that a 
12-year marriage that pro- 
duced two children is a 
nullity?) But this was not, as 
some thought, yet another ex- 
ample of a Kennedy using 
money and power to get what 
is denied others. 

Church annulments are to 
my mind, and in the eyes of 
many Catholics as well, illo- 
gical and sometimes cruel, but 
they were granted 54,463 
times in 1 994, a typical year in 
the United States for such 
matters. Most divorced Cath- 
olics don 't seek them, but they 
are not prohibitively expens- 
ive <$450 or so will do) and are 
necessary in some cases. 

Joe Kennedy got his so that 
he could remarry within the 
church. That is required of a 
Massachusetts Kennedy with 
political ambitions. It is also a 
lie that prepares one for the 
subsequent lies of politics. 

TTie irony is that in politics 
the Kennedys can't annul any- 
thing anymore. Their onetime 
ability to make the past dis- 
appear. lo write their own ver- 
sion of events, to substitute 
myth for truth, is clearly not 
what it used to be. They arc 
not victims, of course — and 
Joe, to his credit, does not 
claim to be one. 

They still have wealth and 
connections, not to mention 
an unaccountable yen for pub- 
lic sctyice. But their power 
has slipped, their inheritance 
is a two-edged sword. With all 
they got from their parents 
came a bill. The Kenned vs arc 
finally paying up. 

The Vta.d:uu:i»n /*,«.« 


with Saudi Arabia then left to 
deal with Iran's wrath. 

I believe that the Saudis don’t 
trust the United States to handle 
Iran or Syria, so they are doing 
it their own way. 

Through quiet diplomacy 
they are getting Syria to roll up 
the anti-Saudi forces in Leb- 
anon, and they have signaled to 
Iran's new president, Mo- 
hammed Khatami, that they are 
ready to have good relations 
with him if he reciprocates. If 
not. the Saudis can always sum- 
mon the United States. 

The Syrians are using their 
rapprochement with Saudi Ara- 
bia to help construct a new re- 
gional coalition. 

In the wake of the U.S. -led 
victory over Iraq in the Gulf 
War a de facto “American co- 
alition" arose in the Middle 
East comprising Israel, Turkey, 
Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, 
Qatar, Morocco and Kuwait. 
This American coalition was 
going to settle lhc Arab-Israeli 
conflict, forge a new Middle 
East economic order and es- 
tablish a regional system in 
which the United States and its 
friends were predominant. 

Die attack on U.S. troops at 
Khobar was an attack by one (or 
several) of those parties left out 
of the U.S. coalition — Iran, 


momentum. 

In many ways, it worked. 
Those who want to deconstruct ; 
American dominance are no^r.. ; 
cm the rise, energized fry the-'' 
collapse of the peace process, a ; 
new regime in Iran ready to have -j 
better Arab relations and 
calling aftermath of Khobar. l m : 

So Syria has patched up.tiqs 
with Saudi Arabia, it is pressing" : 
for a new Arab summit with Iraq 
included, it has reopened trade ! 
and borders with Iraq, and Pfe£ 
idem Hafez Assad, who rarely 
travels, recently visited Iran, i 
where he mediated between Iran . 
and Saudi Arabia. The Syriafr-- 
goal is to blunt U.S.-Israeli pres- • 
sure to make peace on their-:-’ 
terms, and to counter a growing 
Israel-Turkey alliance. 

The symbol of the Americah - 
coalition has been the annual 
Middle East economic summit, : 


held for the past three years, it 
which Israelis, Americans and 
Arabs mix openly and cut d«aig 
in an Arab capital. 

Syria has been trying to or- 
ganize a boycott of this year’s 
economic summit set for Doha, 
Qatar, in late November, and as 
pan of the Saudi-Syrian rap- 
prochement the Saudis will 
likely join that boycott. 

By coincidence, an Islamic 
summit is set to be held on Dec. 
9. just after Doha, and it will be 
interesting to see how many 
Arab leaders attend that, instead 
of Doha. That Islamic su mmi t 
will be held in Tehran. 

The New York Times 



IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YF.ARS sen 


1897: Mayor Nominee 


PARIS — Mr. Seth Low, the 
well-known president of 
Columbia University, is the first 
nominee for First Mayor of 
Greater New York. He is the 
chosen candidate of the Cit- 
izens Union, whose aim it is to 
elect to the highest municipal 
office in the recently aggrand- 
ized city of New York a man 
associated with neither of the 
“machines’ by which local 
politics are mainly worked and 
standing on a non-partisan, pub- 
lic franchise-reform platform. 


the smaller banks when ordin- 
ary currency is lacking. Die 
Reich sbank and the street be- 
fore it were jammed with people 

before ten o’clock. The officials 

confessed that they were far be- 
hind in the handling of currency jft 
and the flood of checks, so that ▼ : 
policemen were called to clear 
place and allow the bank to 
close its doors. 


1947: Palestine Plan 


1922: Black Friday 
c? U1 S“ Th t! s is caI,ed Black 

Friday. Everything is in the air. 
Those who have money cannot 
spend it; those who need it can- 
no get it; those who have goods 
will not take if. Literally thou- 
sands arc frantically trying to 

whi.ht C checks, 

which are being handed out by 


LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y. -The 
United Nations Special Com- 
mittee on Palestine recommen- 
□ed in a majority report that 
Palestine be carved into two 
st ? Ies °ne Arab and one Jew- 
ish -- to become fully inde- 
pendent on September 1, 1949 
on condition they sign an agree- 
ment for an economic union, 
rhe histone and holy city of 
Jerusalem would become a UN 
trusteeship administered by a 

£2™* non-Palestinian) 
appointed by the UN. ’ 






f 




\Vl i y» 


PAGE 3' 


""Uni 


"in 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD T RIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMB ER 2, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 




In Hi', 


Coffee and the Rise and Fall of Empire: 
Ail Incontrovertibly Perky Theory 

■k rit\nnu -m.. • » 


Lethal 


M UNICH — The summer 
of . ’97 in America: 
Dairy Queen and A&W root 
beer floats are but faint 
memories , like sock hops and 
30-cent gas. It’s frappucino 
now. And macchiato. And 
Starbucks. 

; And, perhaps, the end of 
the American empire. 

The handwriting was on the 
•wall when the McDonald’s in 
Boston’s Logan airporl began 
serving espresso to the Big 
Mac crowd. You can now get 
a double at the Pii Stop Es- 
“ presso in Palmer, Alaska. 
■ There are 1,300 Starbucks 
outlets in North America, and 
■each week, 5 million people 
come for a mocha or a latte. 

. What handwriting? And 
•why the Gibbonesque rumin- 
ations about the rise and de- 
cline of nations? 

; The connection between 
.'coffee and clout first thrust 
itself on this author in Mos- 
cow in 1978, while the “Evil 
Empire” was still on a roll. 
The Brezhnev ites had just un- 
leashed a Europe-wide pro- 
,'paganda campaign against 
•America's “neutron bomb.” 

On an official visit with a 
■delegatsiya. I complained bit- 
. -lerly to ray KGB handler 
| about the nasty swill the 


By Joseph Joffe 


single Melina filter in sight. 
Not even one of those lowly 
percolators Americans used 
to bubble their beans between 
the conquest of the West and 
the advent of the Melior. Just 
toxic mud and tepid water.- 
But what an empire-! The 


Moors* from Granada, their 
fasr stronghold on Iberian 
soil, in 1492. 

It so happens that qahwa 
came into use throughout the 
Arab-Islamic world in the 
mid- 15th century. That rang 
the death knell "for the two 


I , „ r , vi^uui Niieii lur me two 

than Z re A nUkeS and - grea* Islamic empires, the Ot- 
-n, I* Amencans - toman one on the northern and 


They were masterminding 
wars throughout Africa. They 
were collecting Third World 
pawns by the bushel. And 
they were about to invade Af- 
ghanistan. 

Was it communism or cof- 
fee that drove them? A sys- 
tematic survey of world his- 
tory quickly turned the germ 
into a fully blown and. I might 
add. incontrovertible theory. 

Who had ruled the world 
for 400 years? Britain. What 
had distinguished Albion 
from the rest? The Magna 
Carta? The Royal Navy? Big 
Ben? No. horrible coffee all 
the way to victory in the Falk- 
land war of 1982. 

What about the United 
States'? The age of American 
expansion from the Louisiana 
Purchase to Vietnam was 
marked by the ubiquitous cof- 
feepot where the coarse- 


the Arab one on the southern 
rim of the Mediterranean. 

The Turks made one more 
tiy, which brought them to 
Senta. southeast of Vienna. 
There they were stopped in 

Bad coffee 
equals 

expansionism, 
imperialism and 
i car; good coffee 
drips with 
civility, pacifism 
and lassitude . 


■Rossiya Hotel was serving up ground meal was first scalded 
■ as l!° . ee -” and then left on the fire to 


as “coffee.” 

Trying to humor me, he 
offered KGB jollity: “What 
do Russian coffee and the 
neutron bomb have in com- 
mon?" I was flummoxed. 
"Both kill people and leave 
buildings intact And what is 
the difference? You can 
protest the neutron bomb but 
not Russian coffee!" 

At that point the germ of a 
theory began to bud in my 
caffeine-depleted brain. It is 
destined to dethrone every 
theory about the rise and fall 
of the great powers developed 
in the last four centuries — 
from Machiavelli via Gibbon 
and Spengler to Lenin and 
Paul Kennedy. 

Bad coffee equals expan- 
sionism, imperialism and 
war good coffee drips with 
civility, pacifism ana lassi- 
tude. That is the long and the 


thicken into an acid brew just among the best in the world, 
right for tanning buffalo The Onomans had their 
hides. bittersweet revenge, though. 

Or take Germany. During Withdrawing from Vienna, 
the height of German expan- they left their coffee sacks 
sionism between the 1890s behind. The Austrians took to 
and the 1940s, Germans dis- mocha with more passion 
Linguished between “Kaf- than young Wolfgang 
fee" and “Bohnenkaffee" Amadeus to the violin, 
(literally: bean coffee). The Soon Vienna was replete 
masses drank the former, a with coffeehouses, whence a 
mix of burnt barley and great culture grew, from 
chicory. Only the very rich Strauss to Musil and Freud, 
could afford the real stuff. But the Hapsburg empire was 
And look where it got them — doomed, reduced to a has- 
all the way to Moscow. been by the coffee-snubbing 

Bad coffee, then, is the Prussians in the 19th. 
milk of waniors. But any de- So far, we have established 

cent theory must also work in that bad coffee makes for vir- 
reverse, and hence good cof- ility and expansionism while 
fee should reduce the martial the art of the demitasse favors 
passions along with a nation ’s bad generals and the gentler 
military skills. The Arabs are pursuits of life. To deflate all 
the best case in point When naysayers, we must show that 
was Arab power done in for the theory works not just in a 
good? When Ferdinand and static but also in a dynamic 


f- Whittle ki'f 


short of it good? When Ferdinand and static but also i 

Here I was in the hearr of Isabella of Spain completed way. 
the Soviet empire, and not a the reconquisia by driving the Accordingly, 


1697, and ever since neither The age of American great- 
Turfcs nor Arabs have won ness will come to an end in an 
any significant battle. Why ocean of hazelnut and am- 
not? As is well known, Arab aretto if Starbucks and epi- 
or Turkish coffee, especially gones expand unchecked, 
when laced with cardamom, is There is a reason why the 
among the best in the world, great empires of yore have 
The Onomans had their gone under when confronted 
bittersweet revenge, though, with a Melior full of freshly 
Withdrawing from Vienna, brewed Kenyan Blue. Either 
they left their coffee sacks you tend to your gold-plated 
behind. The Austrians took to Gaggia or to your F-16. Y ou 
mocha with more passion don’t fight with a frappucino 
than young Wolfgang in hand. 

Amadeus to the violin. All isnot lost yet, America. 

Soon Vienna was replete Just dig out that old percol- 
with coffeehouses, whence a aior. Put in some coarse- 
great culture grew, from ground Maxwell. Scorch and 
Strauss to Musil and Freud, bum for an hour or so until the 
But the Hapsburg empire was brackish liquid smells like 
doomed, reduced to a has- your very own toxic dump, 
been by the coffee-snubbing Shudder and gulp. 

Prussians in the 19th. This is the kind of stuff that 

So far, we have established made Clint Eastwood’s day 
that bad coffee makes for vir- and took Douglas MacArthur 
ility and expansionism while all the way to the Yalu 
the art of the demitasse favors River. 

bad generals and the gentler 

pursuits of life. To deflate all The writer is editorial page 
naysayers, we must show that editor and columnist of Sud- 
the theory' works not just in a deutsche Zeitung, a Munich 
static but also in a dynamic newspaper. He contributed 


when moving, say, from in- 
stant to mocha java, should 
turn pacific at the first hiss of 
an espresso machine. 

This is precisely what 
happened to Germany, the 
most aggressive nation in this 
century. But since 1945. hob- 
nails have been strictly ver- 
boten, and Germans have be- 
come as aggressive as sloths. 

Go to Moscow today and 
you'll probably find a lane 
stand right next to Lenin's 
tomb. But the heirs of Mar- 
shal Zhukov can no longer 
beat a bunch of ragtag 
Chechens. 

So what about America? 1 
fear the worst Yes. the 
United States still has the 
most sophisticated military 
machine in the world, and 
every once in a while it does 
slug it out with the Saddams 
and the Karadzics. But look ar 
the downside. In 1992, Star- 
bucks operated a paltry 162 
hangouts nationwide. Just in 
the first half of 1997, it hss 
opened 212 new stores, aim- 
ing for a total of 2,000 by 
millennium's end. 

No good can come of this. 
The age of American great- 
ness will come to an end in an 
ocean of hazelnut and am- 
aretto if Starbucks and epi- 
gones expand unchecked. 
There is a reason why the 
great empires of yore have 
gone under when confronted 
with a Melior full of freshly 
brewed Kenyan Blue. Either 
you tend to your gold-plated 
Gaggia or to your F-16. You 
don't fight with a frappucino 
in hand. 

All is not lost yet, America. 
Just dig out that old percol- 
ator. Put in some coarse- 
ground Maxwell. Scorch and 
bum for an hour or so until the 
brackish liquid smells like 
your very own toxic dump. 
Shudder and gulp. 

This is the kind of stuff that 
made Clint Eastwood's day 
and took Douglas MacArthur 
all the way to the Yalu 
River. 

The writer is editorial page 


Reflections on American Marriage, 
Or Togetherness With Loopholes 


cultures. 


this comment to The New York 
Times. 


P ROVIDENCE, Rhode Island — 
How shall we resolve a marital 
crisis? 

Consider an example from the advice 
column of Ann Landers. An “Iowa 
Wife” wrote to ask what she should do 
about her husband's habit, after 30 
years of marriage, of reading magazines 
at table when the couple dined out 
Ann Landers advised the wife to 
engage her husband by studying sub- 
jects of interest to him. Readers from 
around the country protested. A “14- 
Year-Old Girl in Pennsylvania" crys- 
tallized the objections: “You told the 
wife to read up on sports or business, 
whatever he was interested in, even 
though it might be boring to her. 
Doesn't that defeat the basic idea of 
being your own self?" 

Chastened, Ann Landers changed 
course, updared her stance: Reading at 
table is a hostile act, perhaps even 
grounds for divorce. 

When it comes to marriage, Ann 
Landers seems a reasonable barometer 
of oar American values, in practical 
terms, reading the sports pages might 
work for some Iowa wife — but we do 
not believe that is how spouses ought to 
behave. Only the second response, 
consider divorce, expresses our over- 
riding respect for autonomy, for the 
unique ana separate self. 

Look south now from Iowa and 
Pennsylvania to Louisiana, where a 
new law allows couples to opt for a 
“covenant marriage” — terminable 
only after a lengthy separation or be- 
cause of adultery, abandonment, abuse 
or imprisonment- The law has been 
praised by many as an expedient against 
the epidemic of divorce and an in- 
carnation of our “traditional values.” 

Whether the law will lower the di- 
vorce rate is an empirical question to be 
decided in the future, but it is not too 
soon to ask: Does covenant marriage 
express the values we live by? 

History seems to say no. American 
literature's one great self-help book is 
“Walden,” a paean to self-reliance 
and an homage to Henry David Thor- 
eau's favorite preacher, Ralph Waldo 
Emerson, who declaimed: “Say to 
them, O father, O mother, O wife, O 
brother, O friend, I have lived with you 
after appearances hitherto. Hencefor- 
ward, I am the truth’s. ... I must be 
myself. I cannot break my self any 
longer for you, or you.” 

Hie economic philosophy we 
proudly export, fundamentalist capital- 
ism, says that society functions best 
when members act in a self-interested 


By Peter D. Kramer 


manner. The nation's founding docu- 
ment is a bill of divorcement. Autonomy 
is the characteristic American virtue. 

As a psychiatrist, I see this value 
embedded in our psychotherapy, the 
craft that both shapes and expresses the 
prevailing common sense. 

In the early 1970s. Carl Rogers, 
known as the “Psychologist of Amer- 
ica,” encapsulated the post-World War 
12 version of our ideals: A successful 

MEANWHILE 

marriage is one that increases the 
“self-actualization” of each member. 

Of a failed union, he wrote: “If 
Jennifer had from the first insisted on 
being her true self, the marriage would 
have had much more strife and much 
more hope.” 

He was expressing the predominant 
viewpoint; for most of the past 50 
years, enhanced autonomy has been a 
goal of psychotherapy. 

Erik Erikson began the trend by 
boldly proclaiming that the search for 
identity had become as important in his 
time as the study of sexuality was in 
Freud’s. 

Later, Murray Bowen, a founder of 
family therapy, invoked a scale of ma- 
turity whose measure is a person 1 s abil- 
ity to maintain his or her beliefs in the 
face of family pressures. The useful 
response to crises within couples, he 
suggested, is to hold fast to your values 
and challenge your partner to rise to 
meet your level of maturity. 

But autonomy was a value for men 
only, and largely it was pseudo-au- 
tonomy, the successful man propped 
up by the indentured wife and over- 
burdened mother. (No doubt Thoreau 
sent his clothes home for laundering.) 

The self-help movement, beginning 
in the 1970s, extended this American 
ideal to women. Once both partners are 
allowed to be autonomous, the con- 
tinuation of marriage becomes more 
truly voluntary. 

In this sense, an increase in divorce 
signals social progress. 

It signals social progress, except that 
divorce is itself destructive. So it seems 
to me the question is whether any other 
compelling value counterbalances the 
siren song of self-improvement. 

Turning again to psychotherapy, we 
do hear arguments for a different type 
of American value. Answering Erik 
Erikson 's call for individual Identity, 


Helen MerreU Lynd. a sociologist ai 
Sarah Lawrence College, wrote, "Nor 
must complete finding of oneself ... 
precede finding oneself in and through 
other persons.” 

Her belief entered psychiany through 
the writings of her pupil lean Baker 
Miller. A professor of psychiany at Bos- 
ton University, Dr. Miller faults most 
psychotherapy for elevating autonomy 
at the expense of qualities important to 
women, such as mutuality. To feel con- 
nected (when there is genuine give-and- 
take) is to feel worth. Dr. Miller wants a 
transformed culture in which mutuality 
“is valued as highly as, or more highly 
than, self-enhancement'' 

Mutuality is an ideal Lhe culrure be- 
lieves it should honor but does not 
quite. Ours is a society that does a 
halfhearted job of inculcating compro- 
mise, which is to say that we still teach 
these skills mainly to women. Much of 
psychotherapy addresses the troubles 
of those who make great efforts at 
compromise only to be taken advan- 
tage of by selfish partners. 

Often the more vulnerable spouse 
requires rescue through the sort of 
move Ann Landers recommends, vig- 
orous self-assertion, and even divorce. 

Mutuality is a worthy ideal, one that 
might serve as a fit complement and 
counterbalance to our celebration of 
the self. But if we do not reward it 
elsewhere — if in the school and office 
and marketplace we celebrate self-as- 
sertion — it seems worrisome to ask 
the institution of marriage to play by 
different rules. 

What is insidious about Louisiana’s 
covenant marriage is that, contrary to 
claims on its behalf, it is out of touch 
with our traditional American values: 
self-expression, self-fulfillment, self- 
reliance. The Louisiana law invites 
couples to lash themselves to a mor- 
ality the broader culture does not sup- 
port, an arrangement that creates a po- 
tential for terrible tensions. 

Though we profess abhorrence of 
divorce, I suspect that the divorce rate 
reflects our national values with great 
exactness, and that conventional mod- 
ern marriage — an eternal commitment 
with loopholes galore — expresses 
precisely the degree of loss of auton- 
omy that we are able to tolerate. 

The writer, a clinical professor of 
psychiatry at Broun University, is the 
author of ‘ Listening to Prozac " and 
the forthcoming “ Should You Leave?" 
He contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 



UlAHA. 

PRWCE3S0F WHES 




IfeJtit'J* BERTRAMS in IH IW<I < lartrrJm. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


NATO Question 

-. Regarding “A NATO That 
'Creeps Eastward Is Bad for 
Russian Democrats " ( Opin- 
ion. Aug. 27) by Alexei Ar- 
batov: 

- Two things are truly re- 
• markable about Mr. Ar- 
’batov's article. First, that it 
' has become possible for the 
deputy chairman of the Rus- 
sian Parliament’s Defense 
Committee to write such a 
candid but moderate analysis 
of as delicate a subject as 
NATO’s eastward expansion 
without fearing retribution at 
home. This in itself is a sig- 
-hificant sign of the quantum 
'leap that Russia has made in 
•its democratic process. 


Second, one has to agree 
with Mr. Arbatov when he 
contrasts the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization’s em- 
brace of Poland, Hungary and 
the Czech Republic with the 
largely meaningless role 
offered Russia in the Part- 
nership for Peace. 

Western policymakers 
made one major- error from 
the very beginning: NATO’s 
posi-Cold War role was never 
defined. So what, in fact, is 
being expanded, and why? 
This is a question the Rus- 
sians are legitimately asking 
themselves — and so should 
we in the West. 

KARLH.PAGAC. 

Villeneuve-Loubet. 

France. 


'‘Singapore Defamation Case 

- Your report (Aug. 19) of »««■££ 

" Ule - S' £ y S Slito donation containrfm a po- 

• entitled Singapore Leaaers gave e v- 

Sue Foe Over ***2®®“^ ^encediat he and the other 

Campaign ;ffinue^o^tel ^ had sought the ad- 

s Danger. peramanon p f our QCs. i.e.. spe- 

and “innuendo exists m English law. before 

'Common usage. Yei yourea commencing action. 

-Jitors put them m inverie omme ^ ^ explain the 

■commas, implying basis 0 f Mr. Goh’s case. The 

'Minister Goh C !) ok Y sting of the defamation was 

J case had no merit- You ais nol fimply that police reports 

stated that such a ease w°uld filed, bm also in the 

; be “ thrown out of court u nder m ^ context 

•laws in some countries- , ^ ^ Uv publicized ac- 

- did not substantiate any of by Mr. Tang 

/these assertions. Liang Hong that Mr. Goh 

■; You also Jf n0 ^£ eeD - s and others were guilty of 

that it was an English Que n ^ min3 i conspiracy and def- 
'Counsel tQO. relymg on enm^ ^ Jeyaretnams 
•English legal aut^nti«^. s amounted to 

argued that Mr. Jeyoretnam 


Correct Date 

Gideon Rafael (“Remem- 
ber Sept. 1: The Time for Ac- 
tion Is at the Beginning," 
Opinion, Sept. I) says the 
German Army invaded 
Yugoslavia in June 1940. The 
correct date is April 1941. • 
MLADEN 
ANDRDASEVIG 
Beersheba. Israel. 

Letters intended for pub- 
lication should be addressed 
“Letters to the Editor ” and 
contain the writer's signaiure, 
name and full address. Letters 
should he brief and are sub- 
ject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


an endorsement of Mr. 
Tang’s clearly defamatory al- 
legations. It was significant, 
as pointed out by Mr. Goh’s 
QC, that Mr. Carman, QC for 
Mr, Jeyaretnam, did not 
meet this argument in his 
summing up. 

The IHT formed its judg- 
ment on the first day of the 
trial, before listening to any of 
the evidence- The judge, on 
the other hand, will carefully 
and impartially weigh and as- 
sess the evidence before he 
decides. 

L1M SIAM K3M_ 
Singapore. 

The writer is press secre- 
tary to the prime minister of 
Singapore. 




Hotel Inter- Continental, Rms 


Insight into a city takes decades to 
acquire and just a moment to skare. 


One World. One Hotel. 
Uniquely Inter’Continental, 


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PUERTO VALLARTA 
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INTERNATIONAL herald tribune, 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 
PAGE 10 




The Power of Style: Odyssey of a Modern Princess 


P ARIS — Diana's contribution to 
fashion was in understanding in- 
tuitively the power of style. She 
used the language of clothes to 
create an image on a global scale. And 
through her wardrobe, she revealed her 
metamozphosis from “Shy Di” to prin- 
cess superstar. 

The Princess of Wales may have ap- 
peared first as a clotheshorse and some- 
time fashion victim. But as she broke 
free from constraints, her clothes ex- 
pressed her independence. Is the last 
years of her brief life, her style became 
symbolic of postfeminist dressing. 


. By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


The body-conscious clothes, gym- 
vied figure and confident sexual allure 


honed figure and confident sexual all ure 
expressed the spirit of her thirty- 
something generation, free of bourgeois 
inhibitions that once tilled women’s 
closets. Her streamlined workday ward- 
robe and casual off-duty elegance rep- 
resented a (save new fashion world and 
a revolution in the convention-bound 
royal family. 

At times the message was startlingly 
explicit, as when, disillusioned with her 
fairy-princess role, she swapped tiara 
and gown for baseball cap ana jeans, or 
when she chose a seductive little black 
dress to flash before photographers the 
night in 1994 that Prince Charles con- 
fessed to his adultery on television. 

Ah, those sidelong winks to the cam- 
eras' adoring eyes! The first time that I 
witnessed the complicity was when the 
princess, shortly after die birth of her 
second son, Prince Harry, swept up her 
hair into a chignon for the state opening 
of Parliament — and patted the new hair 
style as a signal to the snappers. 

From that moment can be dated the 
conscious creation of her photographic 
image, which led in the 19S0s first to the 
“Dynasty Di." whose shiny lips and 
royal blue lashes glossed private pain 
with public glamour. 

It led also to those perfect-pitch photo 
ops: the sand-beige safari dress pho- 
tographed Hlc<*. a fashion magazine 
spread against the pallid immensity of 
the Egyptian pyramids, or the message 
— as vivid as the Rajasthan pinks and 


purples of her outfit — when a solitary 
■princess was framed by the Taj Mahal, 


princess was framed by the Taj Mahal, 
India's monument to love. 

The most preposterous candy-fodder 
■ for the cameras was when Diana dressed 
her husband and sons like a Ralph 
Lauren ad and sat exultantly center 
stage in designer jodhpurs. With hind- 
sight, such an image, taken at the height 


of her romance with James Hewitt, had 
'the defiance of a woman taking herself 
to the edge. 


PICKFORD 

The Woman Who Made 

Hollywood 

By Eileen Whitfield. 441 pages. $25. 
University Press of Kentucky. 
Reviewed by Wendy Smith 


M ARY PICKFORD is unfairly re- 
membered, if she’s remembered at 


IVAmerabered, if she’s remembered at 
all, as a ringleted actress who played 
angelic children in maudlin silent 
movies. The Canadian journalist Eileen 
Whitfield’s excellent biography re- 
claims Pickford from clicnd, arguing 
forcefully and persuasively that her 
films — and performances — are better 
than their reputation. Whitfield paints a 
nuanced, three-dimensional portrait of a 
complex woman whose story is a fas- 
cinating case study of a seminal period 
in Hollywood history. 

She entered the world as Gladys 
Louise Smith on April 8, 1892, in 
Toronto. Her father died when she was 
5; less than two years later she appeared 
in her first play, quickly becoming the 
financial mainstay for her beloved moth- 
er, Charlotte, and younger siblings, Lot- 
tie and Jack. Apprenticeship in such 
melodramatic classics as “Uncle Tom’s 
Cabin” and “East Lynne,” followed by 
five grueling years touring North Amer- 
ica, completed her transformation into a 
mini-adult whose ability to incarnate 
youngsters onstage was remarkable for 
one who'd had little direct experience of 

carefree childhood. 

By the time she bluffed her way into 
the office of Broadway producer David 
Belasco, who gave her the stage name 
Mary Pickford and put her in a hit play, 
the 15 -year-old actress was a seasoned 
professional whose delicate, vulnerable 
beauty barely masked an iron will and 
ferocious ambition. In “The Woman 
Who Made Hollywood,” Whitfield 
makes good use of Pickford's memoirs 
and interviews she gave late in life to 
deduce that her theater acting was 
already simpler and more concerned 
with inner emotional truth than the peri- 
od's conventional showy posturing. 

Analyses of Pickford's most famous 
roles — the Poor Little Rich Girl, Re- 
becca of Sunnybrook Farm and the Little 
Princess, to name a few — point out that 
she perfected the blend of pathos and 
slapstick humor that Charlie Chaplin 
later made his trademark, and that her 
characters were usually feisty, streetwise 
adolescents, not innocent little girls. 

She was tough off screen too. with a 
shrewd sense of her commercial value. 
"America’s Sweetheart” was the most 
famous woman in the world in 1917. 
when she set off to sell war bonds with 
Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks, who 
became her second husband in 1920. Her 
1916 contract with Adolph Zukor's Fa- 
mous Players gave- her $500,000 a year 
or half her films’ net profits (whichever 
was greaier), ha - own production com- 
pany, the right to choose her directors 
and a voice in the final cut. Three years 
later, she created United Artists with 
Chaplin. Fairbanks and D.W. Griffith. 

She had less command over her per- 
sonal life. Her substance-abusing sib- 






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M edia- savvy princess: Diana alone at the Taj Mahal in 1992, playing the seductress as Charles admitted adultery on TV in 1994, in designer jeans during her visit to Bosnia last month. 


Haunted by pictures of the princess as 
a hunted quarry, people will argue about 
whether Diana played to the gallery and 
therefore courted the bloated publicity 
that turned ho- into a media monster. 

The truth is that she was one of those 
rare, charismatic figures whom the cam- 
era loves — although this was evident 
only a few years into her marriage. 

Like any language. Diana's fashion 
vocabulary had ro be learned, with stut- 
tering mistakes in the gauche early 
years. The befeathered creations of her 


mother's milliner, die coat-and-dress 
ensembles of British establishment cou- 


floppy skirts of her upper- crust upbring- 
ing, the British fashion world adored 


turiers and the dowdy engagement outfit her. Since her early role was to be wife 
bought off the rack at Hairods did not and mother, she was dressed appro- 


bought off the rack at Hairods did not 
suggest a natural flair for fashion. 

When the young nursery teacher 
Lady Diana Spencer posed with her 
charges in a see-through skirt, it showed 
die artless innocence of a fashion am- 
ateur rather than the artful manipulator 
of her mature yeans. 

As soon as Diana had shed her puppy 
fat, her hats and the frilly collars and 


and mother, she was dressed appro- 
priately in pretty dresses, special oc- 
casion outfits and those billowing ball 
gowns beloved of the tiara set 
When the transformation came, it 
was with the POW! of superwoman: a 
slinky one-shouldered dress worn on a 
visit to Australia in 1985. It revealed a 


sinuous figure, magically slimmed (al- 
though we now know that the skinny 


BOOKS 


lings were a constant source of embar- 
rassment and potential scandaL Her 
primary commitment to her mother sab- 
otaged her first marriage, and Charlotte’s 
death in 1928 probably triggered her long 
slide into alcoholism. She and Fairbanks 
ruled Hollywood from Pickfair, then- 
mansion cm Summit Drive, but the mar- 
riage foundered as the talkies swept silent 
films' royalty into professional oblivion 
and psychological drift. 

Whitfield’s account of the couple's 
lurching trajectory toward a 1936 di- 
vorce neither of them really wanted is 
quietly heartbreaking, as is her gentle 
depiction of Pickford’s final marriage, 
to the selflessly devoted Buddy Rogers 


(whom she frequently called 
“Douglas”;. Pickford died in 1979, an 
alcoholic recluse so dismissive of her 
work that she once threatened to burn all 
her movies. Many have in fact been lost, 
and the otters — like most silents — are 
often shown in badly deteriorated 
prints. How fortunate, then, that the 
loving descriptions in this well-in- 
formed and passionate biography re- 
capture die essence of those films, and 
of Mary Pickford’s pioneering artistry. 


though we now know that the skinny 
waist and sculpted cheekbones were the 
result of bulimia). 

In pictures alone, without a word of 
commentary, you could trace the rest of 
the stay — the steely independence 
emerging from marshmallow prettiness 
as Diana swapped feminine fluff for 
pants and power-shouldered suits. 

Then, as she sloughed off her royal 
skin and faced off her problems, a new 
body emerged, strong and muscled. To 
complement it, there were tank-top 
dresses, bicycle shorts and the swim- 


suits in which she paraded on Medi- 
terranean vacations this summer. 

Her 1990s look was as racy, stream- 
lined and modern as ter earlier style had 
been sweetly traditional. 

For British designers, who had served 
their princess loyally, there was dis- 
appointment that she mostly deserted 
them after her marriage broke up. 

Although she kept her close rela- 
tionship with Catherine Walker, whose 
dresses Figured prominently in the 
Sotheby’s dress sale last June, Diana 
was no longer British fashion's dutiful 
ambassador. 

By embracing Versace and Galliano 
or by carrying Gucci bags and wearing 
Armani jeans, Diana was reflecting her 
new status as a global humanitarian 
ambassador, and also revealing the 
private Lear-jet world in which she now 
moved. 

Significantly, the princess, for all the 


gown set to which she was bom and to 
which the royal family clings. 

Her spread of different designers and 
seesawing style accurately reflected- a 
personal insecurity. She was at her most 
radiant dressed up for her public, or 
dressed down with her sons. 

She was less successful for her work- 
ing life, when she developed a semi-royal 
style of brightly colored suits (but minus 
the fancy hats). A more modem approach 
would have been basic tailbring with 
ever-changing accessories. More re- 
cently the princess had moved into the 
sleek, minimalist clothes’ of the'1 990s. 

Diana will be remembered not as a 
fashion leader, bat as a woman who 


people wanted to look like and look aL 
As befitted a princess of the Internet 
generation, her image was often more 
powerful and luminous than the face-to- 
face reality. 

Photographers said of Diana that it 
was almost impossible to take a bad 
picture of her. Her tragedy is that this 
could be her epitaph. 


luster she brought to gala occasions, was 
never part of English society. She was 
uncomfortable with the tweeds and ball- 


Wendy Smith, the author of “Real Life 
Drama: The Group Theatre and Amer- 
ica, 1931-1940," wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 


Whither the Royal Jewels? 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


T HERE has loag been a lively debate 
about who is the strongest player of 


A about who is the strongest player of 
all; prominent candidates are Bobby 
Fischer, Garry Kasparov, Jose Raul Cap- 
ablanca. Alexander Alekhine or Emanuel 
Lasker. But there is no argument about 
the greatest female player, she is 21-year 
old Judit Polgar of Hungary, the young- 
est of three amazing sisters. 

Polgar is the only woman ever to 
consistently compete on equal terms 
with the top 20 players in the world. For 
example, in the recent elite Dortmund 
International Tournament in Germany, 
she took a very respectable fifth place in 
a field of 10. 

Women have been generally con- 
sidered plodders in chess, but Polgar is 
especially recognized for her extraor- 
dinarily spirited attacking play. This can 
be seen clearly in her Dortmund victory 
over Nigel Short of England. 

Short’s 4„.Qb6 is an offbeat variation 
of the Sicilian Defense that can lead, 
after 5 Nc3 Bc5 6 Na4 Qa5 7 c3 Bd4 8 
Qd4 Nf6 9 f3 Nc6 10 Qdl d5, to an 
advantage in development for Black. 
The alternative. 5 Nb3, obviates that, 
but at the price of taking the white king 
knight away from the center. Still, tire 
black queen is not well placed either. In 
Novgorod last year. Polgar had Black 
and Short White in the same opening. 
Now each wants to see how the other 
half lives. 

The aggressive Polgar hardly ever 


misses an opportunity for a sharp shot 
like 10 g4!? No matter whether Short 
took it or left it, she was going to get a 
kingside attack. 

On 15 Bd4. defense by 15...e5? 
would let Polgar win material by 16 Nd5 
Qd8 17 fe Ne5 18 Nb6 Nbd7 19 Na8 
Bb7 20 Nb6J Nb6 21 Be5. Also, in this 
line, 16...Q67 17 fe de 18 Ne7 Qe7 19 
Bc5 wins material. 

Polgar’s 21 eS! was a pawn sacrifce 
that could not be accepted because of 
21— de? 22 Ne4! Qe7 23 Nc6! Qc7 24 
Nf6 Kh8 25 Qh7! Nh7 26 Rh7 mate. 

After 22 Bd3, the threat of 23 Nf3 and 
24 Ng5 prompted Short to give up a 
piece with 22..ReS 23 fe Qe5. 

He then had three pawns for a knight. 


International Herald Tribune 
PARIS — Will Diana's jewels now 
go back to the royal family for Prince 
William’s future bride? 

The princess's most important piece 
was her bow-knit diamond- and -pearl 
tiara — a wedding present from Queen 
Elizabeth, who bad received it from her 
grandmother. Queen Mary. 

This might have been given back 
under the divorce settlement, but Diana 
had recently worn another Queen Mary 
heirloom: a cabochon emerald necklace 
that she once sported tike a sweatband. 
From the queen mother, Diana re- 


ceived a Prince of Wales feather 
pendant, originally a wedding present to 
the future Queen Alexandra in the Vic- 


torian era, and a sapphire pin that the 
princess mounted on a pearl choker. 


princess mounted on a pearl choker. 

Among her stale wedding gifts was a 
suite of sapphires and diamonds from 
the crown prince of Saudi Arabia. 

Jewels that would be considered per- 
sonal are Prince Charles's wedding gift 
of an emerald Art Deco bangle, a charm 
bracelet and a diamond heart necklace 
for the birth of Prince William. 



te 3 


Suzy Menkes/I HT 


Tim Grduu/^^fiv) 

Diana in her royal tiara in / 9X6 . 


pain 


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M J L»‘ n ‘ r 1 


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land's^ 1, 
on Jul>' — ... - - 

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u here m ik 

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Inflauer •.* - -•* 
Thailand- \ 

jumped ;; 
year aso 
country '* 

Monday. ViJ;> 


Yamaichi ti* 


LONDON - 1 
Europe Lid . ^ 

majclu Seat n 
it had >u*per.:c: 
ployee> in 

losses" in >:. f Sr: • 

business 

The empiey - - ■ 
pending a rev:.-- 
eralion>inLonc '.. 
by rising costs 
fomunce ir. the - 
The hank ri , :u*iv 
scale of the 
ations they : 
In the \r;_' : 


The Ousted I 


By Jo*' 


WOODS IDE. •' 
steady stream: o:' r • 
big steel jute - 

have time so ciir „ 
haromai csti- ’ - 

hills merkn&u > 

Bui behind:?:,: ■ •- 
— oranini«pr r ;/’.' 
early glory ^ - . 
ley’s nw-i __ 

For here m :r . ; 
domain atop a-.. > - . 
'ti groves ofi’i- ' 
ArmasCluYorj 
Jtodandpeikr.';- ' 

winder of .w.,*": .. 

More than • • •' 


le J toe comp*-; . 7_ 

? wanJrootr " ■ 

* 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 
i -Red" tree 
• Tues.. for 
Tuesday 
io Polands 
Walesa 


■ is Peeved 
ic First name in 
seal 


17 Open, as a 
botile 


but in a middle game that was not ic 24 sheets of 


ia They produce a 
row on ihe (arm 


enough. 

Short’s 29...Kg7 accelerated his 
downfall by permitting 30 Nf4! Both 
30...Qd4? and 30...Qf6 lose to 31 Nh5. 
After 31...Qc7 (31...Qd6 loses to 32 


Nf5!) Polgar broke through incisively 
with 32 Nfe6! Ne6 (32...fe is defeated 
by 33 JRf8!) 33 Re6!, when 33...fe drops 
the queen to 34 Ne6. 

After 35...Kg8, Polgar struck a dev- 
astating blow with 36 Ne7! The nice 
point was that 36..JCf8 (or 36..JCh8 37 
Qd4) 37 Qh6 Ke8 38 Nc6! fe 39 Bg6! hg 
40 ^6 Rf7 41 Qe6 Kf8 42 Qd6 Ke8 43 
Rg8 forces mate. 

Short had to lose a rook for her knight 
with 36—Re7 and after 37 Re7 Qc3 38 
Ke2 d4 39 Qf4, be saw that 39...Rf8 40 
Rb7 Re8 41 Re5 was hopeless and gave 
up. 


:ra; 

HORSli 


SMORTIBLACK 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 



POLOAR/WHITE 


Position after 35 . . . Kg8 


WMte 

Black 

White 

Btaefc 

Polgar 

Short 

Polgar 

Short 

l ei 

c5 

20 RH3 

N(8 

2 n n 

c6 

2! eS 

05 

3 d4 

cd 

22 B03 

Ne5 

4 N«J4 

Qb6 

23 fe 

QeS 

5 Nb3 

a6 

24 Qh4 

Hb7 

6 NC3 

06 

25 Rf3 

RacS 

7 BM 

N(6 

26 Ncc2 

Rc7 

8 Qd2 

Be7 

Z7 Rf6 

Ree7 

9 04)4) 

04) 

28 K02 

Red' 

10 g4 

Ng4 

29 a3 

Kg7 

11 Rgt 

Ne3 

30 NI4 

Rc8 

12 Qe2 

13 Be3 

& 

31 R 85 

32 Niefl 

NC6 

It M 

Ncfl 

33 Re6 

Qa5 

15 BtH 

86 

34 b4 

Qa3 

16 Qt i5 

NOT 

Bf6 

35 NTS 

Kgfl 

17 Qhfi 

18 Rd3 

36 Nc7 

Re7 

Bd4 

37 Re7 

Qe3 

19 Nd4 

Re8 

38 Ke2 

04 



39 QM 

Resigns 


20 "Act your — r 
ai Baled 
24 Opera set rn the 
timeol the 
Pharaohs 
29 Hershey brand 
26 Elated 
si Kandy 
32 Large pneher 
33Tnangular sail 

36 Fall cleanup 
need 

37 Longed 

39 Western writer 
Grey 

40 P. in Greece 

41 -Hi , H»-LO‘ 

(1 953 film song) 

42 Quarterback 
Brett 

43 Elated 

46 Countenance 
46 Open 
so Elated 
S3 33 or 45. e g. 
se It's taken out ai 
the Seams 
S7 Bucket 
M ‘Behold'" 

60 Writer 
Lindbergh 

61 Ever 

62 Bailyhooed 

sitcom d| J997 

63 Latvian 

64 Lack 

63 Chill, so to 
speak 


7 Engage, as an 
entertainer 
6 Belgian 
songwriter 
Jacques 
9 Not showing 
emotions 

10 Ballet dancer, at 
times 

11 Oft-cued 
sighting 

12 Copy 

13 Peddles 

22 Uganda's Amin 

23 Forest denizen 

24 Competent 
26 Extra-short 

haircut 

2T Bryce Canyon 
locale 

26 Anti-apartheid 

activist Sieven 


29 Magic wiGh 
granters 

so Be in debt 

33 Cawfee 

34 Letters for Jesus 

35 Miller, tor one 

37 Join in a football 
heap 

38 Kind 

39 Wacky 

41 Italy s - — di 
Como 

«2 Eiemalfy 

43 Picture gallery 
site? 

44 Threw out, asa 
runner 



. to 'Marti uV'.'' 
had been u 

. foVf .vear ^ .! " ■ 
"should j* - 

u, ’ 6uf ^ : 

S*»W T :- : - 


e<uul« oy AlMi Anmalai* 


York Times/ Edited fev Will Shorts. 


* s 

s 

■a* 

'5 


Solution to Puzzle of Sept I 


12 Ave. George V, 75006 Paris 
Reservation: 

m(H 4723 3232-Fu m 47 23 48 26 


1 Shade ot b»u* 

2 It's 

breath taking 

3 Cut into cubes 

4 Slat tor Maddus, 
9 Dinosaur, e g 

6 Depth charge. 
»n slang 


45 Word to end a 
card game 

46 Song part 

47 Hole — 

48 M Paper 

Si Scandinavian 

sa Enjoyable 

S3 Brook 
94 Emotional 
request 


ss Domc^i-c cal 
59 Corrida cry 


mnriH □OGma 

@9 nia aaona 
gSggnBQH aancua 
QaaHQQQnQna m&m 

agnona Haaaaaa 

ggn Bgsna aanaa 

ranSBH laaaaa aaa 
Quagong aoaaaa 
□□□□ aasaa 

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aSSgH -Paata hbbb 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


PAGE 11 


Pain Sharpens in Asia 

Economists Lower Forecasts for 1998 


By Michael Richardson 

Inrcmariivial Herald Triton* 


SINGAPORE - Economists are 
lowering tbeir l 998 growth forecasts for 
severai major Southeast Asian countries 
SI? 6 currency turmoil in the 

region, which enters its third month this 
week, dnve interest rates and inflation 
higher. 

ferahari Etftweikr, regional econ- 
omistfor JP Morgan, said Monday that 
growth next year in Indonesia, Malay- 
sia, the Philippines and Thailand would 
be significantly lower and consumer 
pn<* inflation considerably higher than 
projected by the investment bank at the 
end of Juae. 

That was before currencies in those 
countries fell sharply against the US. 


INTERNATIONAL stocks 


dollar in a rout touched off by Thai- 
land’s effective devaluation of the baht 
on July 2. 

. a report to clients, Mr. Escbweiler 
-said that economic adjustment would be 
most severe in Thailand, “but even else- 
where in the region, real GDP growth in 
1998 is expected to fall one-to-two per- 
centage points below earlier forecasts.” 

Inflation is already accelerating in 
Thailand, where consumer prices 
jumped 6.6 percent in August from a 
year ago and 2.6 percent from July, the 
country's Commerce Ministry said 
Monday. Analysts attributed part of the 


jump to the three-percentage-point in- 
crease in the value-added lax that the 
country implememed in Aueust as pan 
of the conditions of a bailout package 
from the International Monetary Fund. 

With the possible exception of Thai- 
land, no Southeast Asian country is ex- 
pected to slide into recession. Growth 
appears likely to continue at rates that 
mature economies in Japan and Western 
industrial nations would regard as a 
boom. 

But economists and executives 
warned Monday that the high interest 
rates imposed to defend fragile South- 
east Asian currencies from further steep 
falls were depressing imports, invest- 
ment and consumption as well as stock 
markets, and that this could cause a 
further slowdown. 

Philippine stocks fell nearly 2.3 per- 
cent Monday to a four-year low as rising 
interest rates cast new gloom on the 
market, brokers in Manila said. 

Stocks in Thailand. Indonesia and 
Singapore also ended sharply lower, 
reflecting concerns about currency in- 
stability. slower economic growth and 
poor corporate results. 

The Malaysian slock exchange was 
closed for a holiday. 

Last week, investors sold down the 
Manila bourse by nearly 15 percent, 
Kuala Lumpur's key stock index by 1 1 
percent. Bangkok by 10 percent and 
Jakarta by almost 7 percent. 

“A lot of wealth has been lost in the 
35 percent fail in the value of Malaysian 


^Diminished Expectations ”1' 

Economic forecast changes in Southeast Asia. 



Real 

GDP 

% growth 

Current 

account 

(S billion) 

Consumer 

prices 

{A Doc/Dec} 


1997 1998 

1997 1998 

1997 1998 

Indonesia 

lofd'i 

7.0 6.0 

7.1 7.5 

-10.7 -10.6 
-10.7 - 10.6 

6.0 7.0 

6.0 7.0 

Malaysia 

(old-) 

8.0 7.0 

7.8 8.2 

-9.1 -7.0 

-8.8 -6.9 

3.5 4.0 

3.2 3.5 

Philippines 
( dd •) 

5.3 4.4 

5.9 5.8 

-3.7 -3.3 
-4.0 -4.9 

3.5 4.0 

7.5 7.0 

Thailand 

1.0 0.5 

-7.0 0.6 

9.0 6.5 

(old 7 

3.0 2.0 

-7.0 -0.3 

4.0 3.0 

Source. J.P. Morgan 


' previous forecast, made June 27 


Promodes Makes a Bid 
For Two French Rivals 
In Supermarket Field 


lith.-muif.inaJ Herald Tribune 


shares since March,” said Gan Chin 
Lee, an analysi at Nikko Research Cen- 
ter Pie Ltd. "Earlier this year, stock 
market capitalization was three rimes 
the counry's GDP. We should see 
brakes being applied to economic ac- 
tivity in the coming months as high 
interest rates and a weaker currency 
begin to take their toll.” 

Since July I, the Thai baht has lost 
more than 38 percent of its value against 
the U.S. dollar, the Indonesian rupiah is 
down over 2 1 percent and the Malaysian 
ringgit and the Philippine peso "have 
each fallen by some 15 percent. 

While this slide should lay the basis 
for a strong rebound in the region's 
exports and growth, economists said, in 
the short term it was undermining in- 
vestment and business confidence. 

Anna Tong, managing director of In- 
vesco Asia Ltd. in Hong Kong, said that 
investors in Southeast Asia were “con- 


cerned about bow much lower these 
currencies can go and how high interest 
rates have to get.” 

In a report Monday, the economic 
research group of Goldman Sachs Asia 
in Hong Kong said that it expected 
Asian currency market volatility to per- 
sist for at least another three months, 
slowing growth in the region. 

[A forecast from NatWest Markers 
was even more dire, predicting that the 


regional currency turmoil would not 


come to an end until 1999. Agence 
France-Presse reported. 

[The investment hanking arm of Bri- 
tain's National Westminster Bank said a 
' ‘degree of stability” could come for the 
Singapore dollar., Malaysian ringgit and 
Indonesian rupiah as early as the second 
half of 1998, but that the Philippine peso 
and the baht would have to wait until 


See OUTLOOK, Page 15 


Yan laichi Europe Unit Idles 50 After Heavy Losses 


CorqAri try pw S&iff Fmm Dapocka 

LONDON — Yamaichi International 
Europe Ltd., the European arm of Ya- 
maichi Securities Co., said Monday that 
it had suspended 50 of its 340 em- 
ployees in London amid “significant 
losses” in its British stock and bond 
businesses. 

The employees were suspended 
pending a review of Yamaichi’s op- 
erations in London, which have been hit 
by rising costs and poor trading per- 
formance in the last few years. 

Hie bank refused to comment on the 
scale of the losses or in which oper- 
ations they occurred. 

In the year ending March 31. Ya- 


maichi's London office had a loss of 
£9.9 million ($16 million). 

The cuts come as Yamaichi Secu- 
rities struggles io rebound from losses 
this year and to reorganize itself amid an 
investigation into its relationship with 
Japanese gangsters. Last month, the 


arrested in the affair, which involved 
illegal payoffs to racketeers to stop them 
from disrupting annual shareholders’ 


company's top 1 1 executives resigned 
tid allegations the company paid 


amid 

hush-money to gangsters. 

The firm is suspected of paying 79 
million yen to Ryuicfu Koike, the cor- 
porate racketeer at the heart of a fi- 
nancial scandal that has also ensnared 
the giant brokerage Nomura Securities 
Co. and Dai-ichi Kangvo Bank. 

More than a dozen people have been 


Jpting 

meetings. 

While this year’s losses may have 
proved the final straw, the performance 
of Yamaichi 's London operation over a 
number of years had been a problem, a 
Yamaichi spokesman said. 

“It is a process of the accumulation 
of losses over a period of rime,” he 
said. 


The spokesman said the job cuts were 
likely to be spread across the board and 
involve sales and trading, bonds and 


equities and the back office. 

Yamaichi would nor sav how much it 


has lost in Britain since March, although 
a spokesman in Tokyo said the losses 
have passed the mark of £9.9 million. In 
its latest quarter, through June, Yamai- 
chi Securities lost 5.43 billion yen. 

Yamaichi said the suspended em- 
ployees will receive full pay and ben- 
efits until the end of September, when 
the company will decide how many will 
be fired. 

The 50 were suspended because of 
European Union regulations prohibiting 
a direct firing of employees in cutbacks 
without a suspension period. The Ya- 
maichi spokesman in Tokyo said ail 50 
would probably lose tlieir jobs: • 

, . (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Cmynlrd by Our Staff Fro*) Dapaickr* 

PARIS — Promodes SA said Mon- 
day it had offered 28 billion francs 
/ 54.63 billion) for two rivals as France’s 
third-biggest supermarket chain posi- 
tions itself for global competition amid 
a ban on new stores in France. 

The company offered 19.1 billion 
francs, or 340 francs a share, for Casino 
SA, which operates Geant and Casino 
stores, a 12.6 percent premium over 
Friday's closing stock price. It also 
offered 8.7 billion francs, or 420 francs 
a share, for Rallye SA, which owns Go 
Sport and Athlete's Foot stores and a 
stake in Casino. That is a 66.7 percent 
premium on Friday’s close. 

Promodes’s unsolicited offers, if suc- 
cessful. would make the company the 
country's largest retailer, ahead of Le- 
clerc SA and Carrefour. The bids, the 
biggest ever in the French retail in- 
dustry. follow a series of mergers after a 
law passed last year intended to stop the 
construction of giant stores. Since then, 
Auchan SA bought Docks de France 
and market leader Carrefour S A bought 
a stake in Cora S A. 

“The acquisition would put Pro- 
modes in a different league, enabling it 
to better compete with Carrefour,” said 
Dominique Sabassier, a fund manager 
at Caisse Centrale des Basques Pop- 
ulates. 

Shares in Promodes rose 109 francs, 
or 5 percent, to 2.298. Prices were 
buoyed by the takeover bid and the 
simultaneous announcement of a 6 6 
percent increase in first-half net profit to 
528 million francs. Trading in Casino 
and Rallye shares was suspended. 

First-half sales rose 4.9 percent to 
51.8 billion francs, and the company 
said it expected frill-year sales to be 
around 7 percent higher than in 1996. 

Promodes said sales in July rose 1 0.7 
percent from a year earlier and forecast 
a 7 percent increase in 1997, suggesting 
a recovery in French consumer spend- 
ing. Finance Minister Dominique 
Strauss-Kahn said he expected a re- 
covery in consumer spending in the 
second half of the year. 

Promodes said the main aim in seek- 
ing Rallye was to take control of Casino; 
Rallye owns 33.2 percent of Casino, it 
said the bid is dependent on its getting 


more than half of the shares of both 
companies. 

Casino and Rallye said in separate 
statements that their directors would 
consider the bids Tuesday. 

A Promodes-Casino linkup has been 
long expected by investors. Such an 
acquisition would allow Promodes to 
grow in its home market, where there is 
a restriction on building “hypermar- 
kets," large suburban stores that sell 
mostly food and other household goods, 
to protect smaller stores. The combined 
companies would also help with foreign 
expansion. Promodes said. 

“Perhaps one day we will be able to 
compete with giants like Wal-Mart,” 
Promodes Chairman Paul-Louis Halley 
said at a press conference. “We are now 
one of the largest in France, but still 
small in the glohal market, where com- 
petition continues to increase.” 

Promodes said the acquisitions 
would create one of Europe’s biggest 
food companies with a presence in 15 
countries and annual sales of about 170 
billion francs. Current market leader 
Carrefour had 155 billion francs in 1996 
sales. The company would be bigger 
than Tesco and Sainsbury of Britain, 
though smaller than Germany’s Edeka 
Zentrale AG and Tengelmann. 

Promodes, along with most large 
French retailers, has expanded aggress- 
ively overseas to offset weak domestic 
business. It owns the Dia chain of 1 .723 
discount stores in Spain, as well as 
chains in Germany, Greece, Taiwan and 
elsewhere. 

Last month. Promodes said foreign 
sales rose in the first half by 5.4 percent 
while domestic sales rose 4.7 percent 

PTOmodes said the merger would give 
it an 18.5 percent French market share, 
the largest in the industry. It said Car- 
refour ’s share was 15.9 percent and 
Leclerc’s 153 percent 

Even if Euris. an investment com- 
pany that owns 75 percent of Rallye, 
refuses to sell, Promodes would prob- 
ably proceed with its Casino bid, said 


Stephanie Guntz-Hedoin, a distribution 
alys 


analyst at Wargny brokerage. 

Luc Vandevelde, director general of 
Promodes, said the company expects 
Euris to accept the offer. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


The Ousted Hacker at Apple’s Core 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Service 


with the public's perception, it may _ be 


WOODSIDE, California — The 

steady stream of bicyclists who roll by the 
big steel gale each weekend may scarcely 

have time to glance through the bars at the 

- baronial estate inside as they pedal to fee 
■" hills overlooking Silicon Valley. 

' But behind that gate is an explanation 
7 — or an interpretation, at least — of the 
-7 early glory and recent perils of fee val- 
ley’s most storied company. 

. For here in this 50-acre (20-hectare’) 
. domain atop fee San Andreas Fault, with 
*- its groves of stately redwood trees, lives 
£ Annas Clifford (Mike) Maxkkula Jr. , fee 
"‘■.third and perhaps least understood co- 
* • founder of Apple Computer Inc. . 
More than 20 years after Apple's 

- * creation and less than a month after he 
' left fee company as deputy chairman, in 

a boardroom overhaul on Aug. 6, Mr. 

- Markka la strolls the grounds and, in a 
rare interview, offers his version of fee 


company’s rise and near-fall. 
Mr. Marl" 


rkkula and the Apple board 

had been widely criticized for allowing 
three different chief executives in a 
four-year span to preside over cumu- 
lative losses of $1-7 billion. _ 

“I know the board gets criticized for 

- its decisions after fee fact, and that s as 
it should be,” he said. 

“Bui the good decisions never get 
* written about. There were a lot of good 
decisions made by Sculley, Spmdier 
! andAmelio.” 

- If Mr. Markkcla’s executive assess- 

- meat of the managerial legacies of John 
Sculley, Michael Spindler and fee re- 

■ cently ousted Gilbert Amelio do not jtbe 


because the public perception of Mike 
Markkula has never quite jibed with his 
own view of his Apple role. 

Mr. Markkula, 54, said feat while he 
has regrets about management errors in 
recent years, he is also optimistic that 
under the temporary direction of an- 
other Apple founder, Steve Jobs, the 
computer manufacturer will re-emerge 
as a viable company. 

But whether Apple lives or dies, the 
company’s quixotic nature, and thus its 
strengths and its weaknesses, have 
much to do" with Mr. Markkula 's per- 
sonality and bis passions. 

It was Mr. Jobs, a bearded and bare- 
foot visionary toiling in his parents’ 
garage in the iate 1970s, who is still the 
most publicized Apple founder . And ii 
was Mr. Jobs’s buddy. Stephen 
Wozniak. amiable but sometimes en- 
igmatic, who gets credit as the hacker- 
genius founder. 

Bui invariably fee founding role of 
Mr. Markkula. l"2 years older than Mr. 
Jobs, is described as tittle more than that 
of an experienced executive who 
brought “adult supervision” to fee 
fledgling Apple Computer. 

True, as a former Intel product-mar- 
keting manaaer who had already made a 
small fortune on his stock options and 
retired early, Mr. Markkula was a cor- 
porate veteran compared wife fee young- 
er men. The three were brought together 
by a pair of seasoned Silicon Valley 
executives. Regis McKenna and Don 
Valentine, who correctly guessed that 
Mr. Markkula might be willing to invest 
some money and management time in the 
Jobs-Wozniak effort to build and market 


a new kind of personal computer. 

But less well known is feat Mr. 
Markkula, besides playing president 
and camp counselor, was himself a. 
hands-on hacker. 

It was he. For example, who instruc- 
ted Mr. Wozniak to design the floppy 
disk drive for the Apple II, after dis- 
covering feat a checkbook- balancing 
program he himself had written took far 
loo long to load into fee machine from 
the computer’s original tape drive. The 
floppy disk, a new approach, helped 
Apple differentiate its early computer 
from competitors’ machines. 

And it was Mr. Markkula who wrote 
several of the early software programs 
for fee Apple II — and freely distributed 
them — under the pen name Johnny 
Appleseed. 

Later, this engineer wife a hobbyist’s 
passion for personal computing became 
Apple’s best product tester, often find- 
ing dozens of flaws in hardware or soft- 


ware that was supposedly ready to ship, 
rly Apple ■ 


according to early Apple employees. 

The point is that rather than being fee 
executive's executive, as be has been so 
often described, Mr. Markkula was 
really more fee engineer’s engineer. 
And feat may help explain some of fee 
management turmoil over the years at 
Apple, for which Mr. Markkula has 
shouldered much of the blame. 

Even though he has served at various 
times as chairman, president, board 
member and deputy chairman in his two 
decades at fee company, he may have 
been less suited to the formal man- 
agement-expert role into which he was 


See APPLE, Page 12 


CURRENCY &. INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


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Other Dollar Values 

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Greek*!*. 28Z3 i 
Hong Knag S t-MT* 
Hung, forint WJ.0S 

J*38 

lndO-rupW 
Irish £ <16721 

!!£*** *55 

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Austrian 5*6. uura 
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cnritkanma 33.80 
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PAGE 12 


CMTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


After UPS Victory, Labor Scents a Comeback 


By Steven Greenhouse 

Near York. Times Service 


NEW YORK — With the United 
Parcel Service settlement seen as a ma- 
jor triumph and an omen of future suc- 
cess, union leaders, and many experts, 
say the'U.S. labor movement is in. its 
strongest position in nearly a generation 
and is poised to increase its membership 
after a two-decade decline. 

This fall might be a watershed for 
unions, some experts say. The 15-day 
UPS strike, which ended Aug. 19. es- 
tablished a surge of sympathy for unions 
as many of the efforts at revitalization 
pushed by John Sweeney, the AFL- 
CIO’s president, have taken root. 

The largest U.S. labor federation, 
with 13 million members, is spending 
$20 million a year on organizing new 
members, up from S2.5 million a year in 
the early 1990s, and several unions that 
had essentially stopped organizing have 
started pumping money and staff into 
recruiting members. 

Hundreds of college graduates are 
signing on as union organizers, while a 
new generation of labor leaders in their 
40s has emerged, far more interested in 
shaking up and expanding the labor 
movement than were the crusty old 
leaders who dominated labor in the 
1980s. 

"Things are better for labor than 


they’ve been in a very long time," said 
Tom Juravich, director of the Labor 
Relations and Research Center at the 
University of Massachusetts. “The 
mood is fundamentally different from 
just two or toe years ago, when there 
was a sense of hopelessness." 

As part of Mr. Sweeney’s push to 
reverse labor's slide, there is a surge in 
union organizing, including campaigns 
to unionize 16,000 teachers and school 
aides in Dallas, 20,000 strawberry 
workers in California, 55.000 apple 
workers in Washington state, 70,000 
home health-care workers in the Los 
Angeles area and 1 10,000 employees at 
Federal Express. ■ 

Labor has recently scored some of its 
biggest victories in two decades, among 
them unionizing 5,000 mechanics at 
Continental Airlines and 30,000 gov- 
ernment workers in Maryland. 

There have, of course, been major 
defeats, too. most notably the loss of an 
election two weeks ago for represent- 
ation of more than 5,000 textile workers 
at a dozen North Carolina factories 
owned by Fieldcrest Cannon. 

Despite the new confidence, some 
critics assert that all (he activity aimed at 
reversing labor's decline has generated 
little but sound and fury because it has 
failed to increase labor’s bottom line: 
the number of Americans belonging to 
unions. 


In 1996, the first full year after Mr. 
Sweeney was elected president, union 
membership declined by 92,000 and the 
percentage of U.S. workers belonging to 
unions slid to 14.5 percent, down from 
35 percent in the 1950s. 

“Unions have become much better at 
communicating," said Thomas Dono- 
hue, the new president of the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce. "They’re 
spending a lot of money. But they still 
seem to be flailing around trying to find 
something that works." 

The decline in membership as labor 
tries to expand its ranks is a result of 
numerous persistent forces like retire- 
ments, plant dosings and downsizing. 
In addition, labor must contend with 
expensive campaigns by employers to 
keep out unions and the hostility felt by 
many Americans who see some labor 
officials driving Cadillacs or using un- 
ion money to attend conferences in 
Hawaii or Italy. 

Mr. Sweeney predicted in an inter- 
view that in the next few years his big 
organizing push would begin raising 
labor's overall numbers. He said the de- 
cline in labor's ranks last year was un- 
derstandable because he had only begun 
putting his organizing plans into place 
and- because the AFL-CIO’s focus in 
1996 was on the congressional and pres- 
idential elections, not on organizing. 

“The bottom line is, nobody has any 


unrealistic dreams of doubling our 
membership in one year." he said. 
“We're going toget on amodest growth 
pattern of 2 or 3 percent a year. " 

Under Mr. Sweeney, the AFL-CIO 
has provided many unions with match- 
ing grants to encourage them to do more 
organizing. The labor federation has also 
reorganized dozens of city labor coun- 
cils to make them focus on recruiting. It 
has also set up a program in many cities, 
called Street Heat, in which hundreds of 
union supporters hold raucous protest 
marches at companies that dismiss 
workers who back unionization drives. 

To extend labor's reach, the AFL- 
CIO has sponsored teach-ins with aca- 
demics and has established alliances 
with members of the clergy, environ- 
mentalists, women's groups and ethnic 
groups. 

“A lot of what we're doing is for the 
long term.” Mr. Sweeney said. “We’re 
just beginning to see the payoffs." 

He said he believed that die strike by 
1 85,000 UPS workers, the biggest strike 
in the United States since an AT&T 
walkout in 1983, would attract more 
Americans to unions because the public 
saw whar the Teamsters were able to 
accomplish by standing together. 

The UPS workers won most of their 
demands, including converting 10.000 
part-time positions to full-time jobs and 
restrictions on subcontracting. 


Bell Atlantic to PuU Out 
Of Olivetti. Phone Venture 


Bloomberg News 

MILAN — Olivetti SpA said Mon- 
day that Bell Atlantic Cotp. would 
leave an Italian joint venture. In- 
fos crada, opening a place for France 
Telecom SA to become Olivetti's 
partner in the project. 

Olivetti said it postponed a planned 
Infostrada shareholders' meeting 
Monday because Beil Atlantic, with 
33 percent of the venture, plans to 
leave. Ivrea-based Olivetti controls 
67 percent of the alliance. 

The companies were expected to 
discuss France Telecom’s partnership 
by injecting as much as 165 billion 
lire (S93.9 million; into Infostrada. 

An Olivetti spokesman said the de- 
parture leaves the stake open to other 
partners. 

Under terms of an agreement 
reached in April between Olivetti and 
France Telecom, the French state 
telephone company was to take a 49 
percenr stake in Infostrada, with Bell 
Allantic and Olivetti controlling the 
remaining stake. 

Before that could take place. Bell 
Atlantic needed to sign off on France 
Telecom’s entry. 

Infostrada provides telephone ser- 


vices like Internet access and data 
transmission to 900 businesses in 
Italy, competing with the state phone 
monopoly Telecom Italia SpA. 

The decision comes amid increas- 
ing speculation that Deutsche 
Telekom AG, already a partner with 
France Telecom in another venture, is 
interested in taking a stake in Oliv- 
etti's fixed-line telephone services 
venture. 

■ Telefonica Denies Sale 

Telefonica de Espana SA said it 
had no plans to sell a stake in its 
international unit and would concen- 
trate its global expansion in Brazil 
and Southern Cone countries like Ar- 
gentina and Chile, Bloomberg News 
reported from Madrid. 

“We stro ngl y deny Telefonica is 
considering selling a stake in Tisa to 
MCI or Portugal Telecom.” said 
Francisco Blanco, director of investor 
relations at Telefonica. 

Telefonica is now the biggest for- 
eign telephone operator in . Latin 
America, and revenue from its in- 
ternational operations reached 223.0 
billion pesetas ($1.47 billion) in the 
first half. 


pnn 

* < # Gro^' 1 , 

In ff ,,h 

few** 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Sept. 1,1997 

High Lon' Unml Chge Optan 


High Lot lotos] Chge Opu 


High Low Latest Chge Optra 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 


itl 300 manon - ph or n» pet 

Sep 97 13644 T3S53 13440 +OS2 7S2I0 
Dec 07 I OS 53 10773 10SL48 +072 38727 
Est. sates: 57.423. Pnv. sates: 52.106 
Prev. open hiL: 113.037 aft 377 


Otne 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Dolton par metric ten 


Industrials 


Big Blue Hopes Java Will Lure People in Black 


Muutoam (High Grade) 
Spot ismoo isn. 


Spot 1996 00 1593.00 161400 1417JM 

Forward 1617.00 161 LOO 163300 163400 

Copper Cathodes (High Grade) 

Sped 2173.00 2175 00 2187.00 2190.00 

Foment 3176.00 717700 2182 00 2184.00 


Spot 636"i 6371.4 

Fervara 649.00 65000 

NMtt 

Spot 6525.00 653500 
Ponvnra 662000 6630.00 
Tia 

Spat 534500 535500 
Forward 5400.00 5410 00 
Hk (Specfel Htga Grade) 
spot 1622.00 1625 00 
Forward 148100 148400 


1- MO NTH STERLING (UFFE) 
£500000 - pti a! 100 pd 
Sep 97 92.71 9167 9270 +00) 

Dec 97 9155 9140 9154 +003 

Mot 98 9151 9144 92JD +003 

Junto 9154 9147 9153 +0JJ3 

Sep 90 9163 9256 9161 +003 

Dec 98 9172 9166 9171 +003 

Mar 99 9180 9173 9170 +003 

Est. sates: 44545. Pm. Mm: 31638 
Pm open hi: 664002 off 1206 


GASOIL (tPO 

IL5. dahn per mNrtc tan - lots oi 100 torn 
Sep 97 16425 16125 16350 —075 15,213 

Od 97 1664)0 16450 165.73 — 075 19.206 

Nov 97 16750 MATS 16775—075 11.080 
Dec 97 16950 168.75 16950 - L00 1&3S0 
■AnifS 771.00 17025 77150-075 IOT14 
Feb 98 17125 17150 17150—075 0576 
Mar 98 17025 170.00 17050 -025 1672 

EsLmMkIOSOO. Pmv. sales : 1H03 
Prav. open intd 8&604 up 1J02 


By Laurence Zuckennan 

New York Times Service 


3 -MONTH EUROMARK CLIFF El 

DM1 mHton ■ pn of 100 pci 

Sep 97 9657 9655 9656 Unch. 724652 

00 97 N.T. N.T. 96JB UnOL 1.976 


High Low Close Chge 


LONG GILT (UFFE) 

£50000 - pfc A 32np>, <H 100 pd 
Sop 97 714-27 114-11 114-27 + 0-11 81032 

Dec 97 114-16 1144)1 114-16 +0-10 117,461 

Mar 90 N.T. NT 11441S +0-09 0 

Ed. (da 28.179. Pm. Mies: SLS76 
Pm. open tat.: 200,493 of) 3 32 


Not 97 N.T. N.T. 9651 UlKtL «U 

Dec 97 9656 9M4 96.45 -O0I 2B63S3 

Mar 90 9651 9628 9630 UndL 270623 

Jun 98 96.09 9646 9608 Unch 211,419 

Sop 98 9587 9S54 9555 -051 1542S7 

DOC 98 9552 9358 9550 -04)1 160,754 

Mar 99 9543 9550 9552 UlKtL 130671 

Jim 99 9524 95.23 9525 UnCh. 69565 

Est. sdes: 64309. Pm. sate 136834 
Pm. upon tat4 1.661972 an 7,901 


BRENT OtLdPEl 

UJL Goto* per barrel -Wf of WOO bands 

Od 97 1055 1850 1843 -108 71042 

NOV97 1867 1853 1858-003 29.982 

Dac97 1L75 1863 1870 Unch. 19440 

Jam 1874 law 1823-001 16351 

FeW8 1870 1869 1871 —051 6620 

MoT 98 N.T. N.T. 1865—001 8316 

Eat sates: 11.000. Pm.sdes ; 16592 
Pmv. open InL 158869 oli 1831 


Stock Indexes 


GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE) 
DMJSOOOO-plinl 100 pd 
Sep 97 10255 102.12 10133 +0.14 221.186 

Dec 97 10155 10122 101.44 -014 68410 

Mot 90 NT NT. 1Q055 +014 64 

Eli. sates: 101.326 Pm. Mm 178463 
Pm. open mi. 289540 on 384 


MAO NTH Pi BOR (MAT! FI 
FF5 mlOon-pteaMOOpd 
Sep 97 9656 9654 9656 + 081 

Dec 97 9659 9436 9659 + 082 

Mar 98 9625 9622 9625 +001 

Jim 98 9608 9605 9608 Unch. 

Sep 98 9893 95.09 9892 — 001 

EsI sates: 17,054. 

Crpen M.: 254617 off 7,706 


FTSE 100 (UFFE) 

£25 per Index potm 

Sep 97 4921 J 47920 49000 +760 08836 
Dec 97 49600 48550 49600 +750 7,783 
MOT 96 N.T N.T 50020 +75* L810 
EsLsdes: 9509. Pm.Kfas: 11,107 
Pm. open ML: 79529 up 290 


16-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FFsmuua - pis at iaa pci 
Sep 97 129.93 13958 > 2986 - 0.13 156301 

Dec 97 9872 9851 9868 *016 18641 

M0T98 97.92 97 92 9808 + 0.16 O 


EsI- sates: 31 302. 

Open U.. 176842 up 42B8 


3-MONTH EUROURA (UFFE) 

JTL 1 mJKan ■ pti at 100 pd 
Sap 97 9322 9320 9322 Unch. 

Dec 97 9356 9152 9155 + 002 

Mar 98 9388 9383 9388 +004 

Jun 98 94.16 «407 94.16 +007 

Sep 90 9453 9455 9453 +007 

Dec 98 «442 9456 9442 +006 

Ed. sates: 16020. Pm.satec 38517 
Pm. open mu 390643 off 842 . 


CAC 48 (MATIF) 

FF200 pot Index poM 

Sep 97 28220 27850 28100 +385 46810 
Oct 97 28250 2801.0 28170 +390 1,368 
Dec 97 38340 28170 28315 +375 1,267 
Mar98 28580 28515 28575 +390 9580 
Esl sales; 15561 
Open tau 66986 oil 1524. 


See our 

Residential Real Estate 

every Friday in The lnlcnnarket 


NEW YORK — David 
Gee has a daunting mission, 
one that has defeated many 
older, more experienced ex- 
ecutives. His challenge? 
Making IBM look cool. 

“See this person on the 
wall?" He said recently, 
pointing to a picture hanging 
above ms desk in Silicon Val- 
ley of a young man in a 
magazine advertisement 
sporting a black T-shirt and a 
goatee. “He is a PIB — a 
person in black. I want to make 
IBM exciting, relevant and in- 
teresting to people in black." 

It is the people in black — 
the stereotypical 20- 
something, mostly male com- 
puter programmers who are 
propelling the Internet forward 
— who may help determine 
whether IBM can overcome 
years of missteps, outman- 
euver Microsoft Corp. and 
once again become a paceset- 
ter in the computer industry. 

Mr. Gee, a 29-year-old na- 


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live of London, is the IBM 
executive in charge of pro- 
moting Java, the new pro- 
gramming language on which 
so many in the computer in- 
dustry are placing their hopes. 
He is helping to lead a cam- 
paign for the hearts and minds 
of software developers — a 
crusade that pits International 
Business Machines Corp.. 
Sun Microsystems Inc.. Net- 
scape Communications Corp. 
and others against Microsoft. 

If enough code writers be- 
come convi need that IB M has 
cool technology, they will use 
its products to write software 
and develop Java products of 
their own. transforming IBM, 
which has been overshad- 
owed by Microsoft in (he last 
decade, into one of the leaders 
of a new de facto industry 
standard. 

Java was invented — and is 
still owned — by Sun, a long- 
time IBM rival. But IBM has 
licensed the technology and is 
betting its future on it. seeing 
Java as the foundation of a 
lucrative opportunity to con- 
nect businesses of all kinds to 
their suppliers, employees, 
customers and partners elec- 
tronically on the Internet. 

Java’s industry success is 
far from certain — but then, 
so is the viability of IBM's 
Java strategy. 

IBM now has 2.400 soft- 
ware developers in 25 loca- 
tions on three continents 
working literally around the 
clock on improving Java — 
more, the company says, than 
Sun itself. Earlier this year, 
IBM, along with Sun. Net- 
scape. Oracle Corp. and oth- 
ers. sponsored a Java World 


Tour, preaching the Java gos- 
pel in 40 cities. It has also 
joined those companies and 
others in a $100 million ven- 
ture capital fond to finance 
Java-related start-up compa- 
nies. 

Yet despite the large num- 
ber of resources it is devoting 
to establishing Java, IBM is 
still widely perceived in the 
computer industry as a 
second-tier technological 


that was co-sponsored by 
IBM, the computer giant still 
has a lot of work to do to raise 
its Java profile. 


Java was invented 
— and is still 
owned — by Sun, 
a longtime IBM 
rival. But IBM has 
licensed the 
technology and is 
betting its future 
on it. 


power, valued far more for its 
size, wealth and influence 
with its huge stable of cor- 
porate customers, than for its 
software prowess. 

•‘Their endorsement really 
matters because they can 
throw a lot of energy behind 
it." said Scott McNealy, 

Sun s chairman and chief 


executive. 

But he qualified his praise 
for IBM. “They are king- 
makers: they are noi neces- 
sarily a king procreator." 

And based on a sampling of 
programmers who attended 
last week's Java Internet 
Business Expo, a trade show 
ar New York's Javits Center 


“From what I have seen of 
their marketing, they are not 
really pushing it," said Mike 
Di Troia, 24, a senior program 
analyst at Buck Consultants, a 
computer services company 
in Secaucus. New Jersey. 
* ‘They are just not out there.” 

So far, IBM, like other 
players in the industry, has 
only a handful -of Java 
products on the • markeL 

Most of IBM's developers 
are working feverishly to 
transform Java into a mature 
technology that can handle 
- critical jobs for big companies. 

However, IBM does sell 
software tools used to baild 
Java programs and its Lotus 
division will soon introduce a 
word processor, spreadsheet 
and other productivity appli- 
cations written in Java. 

Java’s great selling point is 
that programs created in it can 
run on a variety of different 
computers — from tiny hand- . 
held machines to the largest 
mainframes. It is also de- 
signed to take .advantage of 
computer networks so that 
programs can be sent to a 
multitude of users from a cen- 
tral location. 

Java has a natural appeal to 
IBM because it could breathe 
new life into its numerous 
computer lines. Mainframes 
and mini-computers that were 
destined for the junk yard a 
few years ago, according to 
industry pundits, can now be 
linked to networks of person- 
al computers. 

IBM plans to make money 


with Java by selling more of its 
old-style hardware and by put- * 
ting its giant services division j 
to work helping its list of pres- j 
tigious customers around the ’’ 
world make the transition to “ 
network computing. . 

The company also hopes to 1 , 
become one of the dominant// 
suppliers of a new breed of -’ 
Java-based software that will ^ 
connect disparate computers/ 
and help keep track of and * 
maintain security for the nail- „ 
lions of transactions that IBM - 
is convinced will take place 1 
on the Internet J 

That IBM would so : - 
strongly embrace a technol- „ 
ogy that it did not invent itself ' 
— much less own — shows ,f 
how far the computer giant 7 
has fallen from the days a gen- 
e ration ago when die main- r 
frame was king and IBM die- ' 
tated the industry’s hardware 
and software standards. '! 

But the fact that IBM is' 
willing to stake so much on i 
another company's technol- 7 
ogy also shows 1 how flexible j 
and pragmatic it has become 
under its chief , executive, ; 
Louis Gerstner Jr., Who took 4 
over the company after it 1 
faltered in the early 1990s. * 

For companies like IBM * 
and Apple Computer lac., n 
which also lost the war to- 
control the personal computer 
operating system to Mi- “ 
crosoft’s Windows, Java is a 
chance, if not to win the next 
round, to at least establish a 
more level playing field and 
get back in the game of sup- . 
plying PC software. - 


Recent technology articles ; ; 
www.iht.comJ IHT/TECHI 


APPLE : At the Core, an Ousted and Misunderstood Hacker 


Continued from Page II 


originally cast than to the informal hack- 
er-entrepreneurial roles that were his 
earliest, and perhaps best, contributions 
to Apple Computer. 

Some recent news reports have sug- 
gested that Mr. Markkula was driven 
from Apple by Mr. Jobs as an act of 
revenge, retribution for (he bitter dispute 
that led Mr. Jobs to himself quit Apple in 
1985. Bui as Mr. Murkkuln tells ii. after 
being the perceived power behind the 
throne at Apple for so long, he had 
already decided it was time to move on 
and to leave to others the struggle to 
revive Apple. 

He does acknowledge some board mis- 
takes over the years. One of them, he said, 
was the company's decision about four 
years ago to reject a purchase offer by 


IBM that was reported to be $40 a share. 

Later, with Apple's stock trading well 
below that level, the company tried to 
rekindle IBM's interest. Instead, JLBM 
acquired the software company Lotus 
Development in mid- 1995. a move that 
Mr. Markkula still views as a mistake. 

"IBM needed Apple's spirit," he 
said. “It would have been right for both 
companies." 

Mr. Markkula describes his current 
relationship with Mr. Jobs us "not un- 
friendly." noting that even after the re- 
cent board shake-up. he sat with his old 
colleague for many hours at a picnic 
table in one of his redwood groves, 
where the two men discussed the future 
of the company they worked together to 
found. 

Although Mr. Markkula is no lunger 
the company’s largest stockholder — 


that honor now goes to Prince Walid bin -• 
Talal of Saudi Arabia — he still holds " 
several million shares. And he said he U 
was optimistic that Mr. Jobs could help •" 
restore the value of the stock and the 2 


company. f 

But Mr. Markkula is now spending •• 
much of his own time in the small en- 5 
gineering laboratory he has set up on his ’ 
estate. Since leaving Apple’s board, he"’ 
has taught himself to program in a new : 
computer language known as GDL, used - 
for computer-aided design work. 

"I stay awake at night thinking about 
engineering problems," he said, sound- . 
ing nor like a boardroom executive but - 
instead like an engineer’s engineer. “I 
love to think about this stuff. ’ ’ 








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HONG KONG: After Blue Chips, Panic Hits China-Linked Stocks 


Continued from Page 1 


Ben Kwong, head of research at 
Dharmala Securities. 

“The risk when you gel into these 
situations is you get into that vicious 
circle when the value of collateral {all;,, 
so more shares have to be sold." .said 
Peter Bnstowe, head of sales at ABN 
Amro Hoarc Govelt. 

The fragility of China-linked stocks, 
which in recent weeks have eclipsed 
blue chips in local investor intereM. K j 
new phenomenon here. 

As recently as Friday, local investors 
stayed firmly invested in Chinn shares 
while institutions stampeded out t»f the 
Hang Seng Index. 

"Even if they invest in red chips and 
H shares, they also hold u lot of blue 
chips and index-linked derivatives." 
said Percy Au-young. head of research at 
DBS Securities. H shares refer to compa- 
nies backed by the Chinese government 
and incorporated either in Hong Kong or 


China. “It is kind of a domino effect." 

More of the same could be in store for 
the rest of the week. The Hang Seng 
futures contract for September closed at 
a 1 .3 percent discount to the actual Hang 
Seng Index, and many Chinese shares 
are still extremely expensive despite the 
falls on Monday. 

For instance, CNPC. the Hong Kong- 
lisled arm of China's state oil company, 
foil 18.4 percent Monday, but is still 
trading at 247 limes next year's expected 
earnings, after rising more than 500 per- 
cent since April 3. 

Like many red chips, which still trade 
at an average of 53 times earnings, in- 
vestors have bid CNPC higher on ex- 

pec unions that it would be able to buy 
attractively priced assets from its parent 
company. 

Usually with red chips, those assets 
.ire not specified until well after ihe sale 
is first announced, causing investors to 
pile into stocks based more on hope, than 
on firm earnings information. 


Adding to the fragility of red chips is 
the questionable quality of their man- 
agement. Most this year have consis- 
tently failed to improve operating earn- 
ings on a year-to-year basis, relying 
more on increasing income from share 
offerings and acquisitions of new busi- 
nesses. 

These may raise earnings on a gross 
basis, but the rate of profitability is often 
unaffected or even lower. 

Many investors may have decided to 
sell and capture what profit they can. 
The Hang Seng China- Affiliated Cor- 
porations Index, which tracks red-chip 

clnrtc c,;il . . r 


gfc' : ' 


: en >• •. 


stocks, is still up 97 percent in the year to 
Monday 60 aftCr ™ ling 8 ' 6 DerceQt on 


fling 8.6 percent on 


Markets Closed 


1 1 marke ts were closed in the 

K* on Monday for ^ ub ° r 


Recruitment 

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PAGE 3' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


PAGE 13 




‘■y.'j.w 





q Bonn Sees 
3% Growth 

In 9 98 ; With 

Deficit Rise 


EUROPE 


Cigarette Price Rise Lifts Tabacalera Profit 




DUSSH-DORF - Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl said Monday that 
fcurope s largest economy would 
expand at a rate of up to 2.5 percent 
uus year, accelerating to around 3 
percent in 1998. 

“This year, we will see growth of 
over 2 percent and near 2-5 per- 
' * M*. Kohl said at a trade con- 

ference on East German consumer 
goods. 

“Next year’s growth will cer- 
tainly be near 3 percent," 

The German government has pre- 
viously said it expects the economy 
to expand by 2.5 percent this year 
after growth of l.*f percent in 1996, 
while the nation's six main private 
economic institutes forecast growth 
of only 2.25 percent. 

The Munich-based Ifo institute, 
one of the six major private insti- 
tutes, forecasts half of Germany’s 
expan sion this year would come 
from export growth. 

The institute forecasts a 9 percent 
increase in exports this year, a third 
of which will result from a fall in the 
value of the mark against the U.S. 
dollar and other currencies. 

Separately, a member of Mr. 
Kohl’s party said Germany’s 1997 
tax revenue could fall below es- 
timates that have already been 
lowered because of continuing high 
unemployment 

After a rise in unemployment in 
July, the 1997 deficit was likely to 
be “a good 20 billion” DM 
($11,173 billion), up from May's 
official estimate of 18 billion DM, a 
Christian Democrar finance expert, 
Peter Rauen, told Die Welt. 

But the Frankfurt Ailgemeine 
Zeitung reported that Germany was 


O»^Mtn0^Sk^FnmtDaiiaarhfs 

MADRID — Tabacalera SA 
Spain’s stale-controlled tobacco 
company, said Monday that group 
profit in the first half rose 12.7 per- 
cent on rising sales and an increase 
in cigarette prices. 

Profit reached 8.04 billion pe- 
setas ($52.8 million.) in the period, 
up from 7.57 billion pesetas in the 
same period a year earlier. 

Group net sales rose 8.7 percent, 
to 168.66 billion pesetas in the 
half. 

Tabacalera’s profit rose in pan 
because of “the higher volume of 
sales in all tobacco products, which 
were not affected by stockpiling pri- 
or to the end of 1 996," the company 
said 

In past years, the expectation of 
tax increases in January have 
prompted vendors and smokers to 
stockpile cigarettes in December, 
bolstering fourth -quarter sales at the 
expense of the first quarter. 

Tabacalera said the rise in profit 
came despite sales of the company's 
stakes in the olive oil producer 
Koipe SA, the sugar manufacturer 
Ebro and the leaf tobacco dealer 
Intabex, which reduced dividends 
but increased income. 


Tabacalera, which is more than 
52 percent-owned by the Spanish 
government and controls more than 
90 percent of Spain’s tobacco mar- 
ket, also lifted its profit with a in- 
crease in cigarette prices in March 
that allowed the company to recover 
some of the revenue lost after the 


government announced an increase 
in tobacco taxes in July, 1996. 

In March, Tabacalera increased 
the price of its premium Virginia 
style cigarettes by 20 pesetas. It was 
the second price increase since 
November. 

The principal operating company 


Industrial Clients Boost Iberdrola 


Bloomberg News 

MADRID — Iberdrola SA, 
Spain’s biggest private power com- 
pany, said Monday that net income 
rose 1.5 percent in the first half as 
rising sales to industry offset stag- 
nant sales to private consumers. 

The company said first-half profit 
rose to 49.42 billion pesetas ($325-5 
million) from 48.69 billion paswraa 

Sales in the half fell 2.1 percent to 
395.73 billion pesetas, partly as a 
result of the price cut. 

The average billing price fell 4.3 
percent, because of the government 
cut and because of the increased 
proportion of sales, which went to 
industrial users. Those customers 
pay lower prices than residential 
customers. 


“They’re about what everyone 
expected,” said Fernando Godino, a 
fund manager at BBV Gestinova. 

Spanish power companies have 
seen their profit limited by a gov- 
ernment-imposed price cut of 3 per- 
cent, a warm winter and cool sum- 
mer, which depressed demand. 
Sp anis h companies were permitted 
this year to revalue their assets in 
line with inflati on, taking a one-time 
charge equal to the amount of the 
revaluation. 

Iberdrola’s share price rose 25 
pesetas to 1,735. 

Relatively low rainfall hurt earn- 
ings because it cut the amount of 
cheap hydroelectric power the com- 
pany could produce. Hydroelectric 
production fell 32.8 percent. 


Dollar’s Momentum Stays Strong 


budget deficit target for European 
economic and monetary union . 

Meanwhile, the Federal Statistics 
Office said next week’s revisions to 
the country's 1996 budget deficit 
were in line with normal domestic 
practice and would not be harmon- 
ized to EU standards, as the FAZ’s 
report suggested. 

The paper said the statistics office 
would revise Germany’s 1996 def- 
icit to 3.4 percent of gross domestic 
product from a previously stated 3.8 
percent, as statisticians bring their 
figures into line with EU standards. 

This will mean the country’s 
1997 budget deficit ‘could’ be 2,9 . 
percent or 3.0 percent of GDP, thus 
meeting one of tee key criteria for 
countries teat want to participate in 
economic and monetary union. 


ConpUtd by Our SXfffFitxnDapaKhcs 

LONDON — The dollar ad- 
vanced against other major curren- 
cies Monday, pursuing the gains be- 
gun late last week in calm trading, 
with U.S. markets closed for Labor 
Day. 

The dollar closed in London at 
1.8130 Deutsche marks, compared 
with a New York close Friday of 
1.8085 DM. 

The dollar was at 120.895 yen, 
compared with 120.800. The dollar 
climbed to 1 .4927 Swiss francs from 
1 .4925, and to 6. 1 009 French francs 
from 6.0861. 

The dollar fell to £1.6135 from 


£1.6205. “The dollar is continuing 
its gains that were prompted by 
Hans Ttetmeyer's comments last 
week, dampening expectations of an 
early rise in German interest rates,” 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE - 

said Michael Metcalfe, an econo- 
mist from NatWest Markets. 

Mr. Metcalfe said the dollar 
gained against the yen because “the 
Japanese authorities have an interest 
in the yen weakening since the sharp 
devaluation of Southeast Asian cur- 
rencies so that Japan can maintain 
its export competitiveness.” 


In addition, the weakness of the 
Japanese economy is not helping tee 
yen either, Mr. Metcalfe said. 

Japan’s monetary authorities may 
reluctantly allow me dollar to stay 
above 120 yen far a while to prevent 
their economy derailing and keep 
exports profitable, traders said 
Monday. 

Traders were now awaiting tee 
release on Tuesday of tee August 
National Association of Purchasing 
Management's business climate in- 
dex in the United Slates. Bat August 
jobless data, due on Friday, will be 
scrutinized even more closely. 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


ICB Shipping Rejects Takeover Bid 


Conyded by Our Pnm Dispatcha 

STOCKHOLM — The board of 
Swedish shipping group ICB Ship- 
ping AB said Monday that it had 
rejected a 3 billion Norwegian kron- 
er ($404.7 million) . takeover bid 
from its Norwegian rival Frontline 
Ltd., a move that would have cre- 
ated a leading tanker shipping com- 
pany. 

ICB’s board rejected tee offer, 
saying; “The board doesn’t feel the 
bid reflects ICB’s full value and 


particularly not ICB’s good prof- 
itability and strong cash flow. The 
board sees good possibilities for 
ICB as an independent company." 

Frontline offered three Frontline 
shares for each ICB share, although 
itsaid it was prepared to buy op to 25 

S ercent of ICB’s shares for 115 
wedish kronor ($14.70) apiece in 
cash. 

Frontline said tear “a com- 
bination of the two companies will 
lead to substantial economies of 


scale and benefits in chartering, op- 
erations and administration.” 

Cato Hellsienius, at Handels- 
banfcen Markets in Oslo, said: “It 
may be a dangerous game expand- 
ing so fasL At least for one year I’m 
optimistic, but I’m a bit concerned 
about tanker rates in 1999.” 

Frontline’s share mice rose 03 
Norwegian kroner to 36.2 kroner in 
Oslo, and ICB’s share price rose 10 
Swedish kronor to 110 kronor in 
Stockholm. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


more tnnn os percent ot toe Spanish 
cigarette market, and through dis- 
tribution agreements with foreign 
cigarette manufacturers controls an 
additional 25 percent 

( Bloomberg , Reuters) 

L’Oreal Profit 
Rises 15 % With 
Boost by Dollar 

CoaqUedby Our Smg Fran Dupaeha 

PARIS — The French beauty 
products and pharmaceutical 
group L’Oreal S A said Monday 
that first-half pretax profit rose 
15 percent from a year earlier, 
helped by a higher dollar and 
earnings growth at its Syn- 
thelabo SA drugs subsidiary. 

The make r of Maybelline 
cosmetics said first-half pretax 
profit was 336 billion francs 
($583 million), up from 3.09 
billion francs a year before. 
Sales increased 13 percent, to 
34.02 billion francs. 

* ’They’re doing well because 
Synthelabo has been doing very 
well in the first few months of 
this year and becanse than is an 
interesting currency effect” 
said Antoine Colonna, analyst 
at Credit Lyonnais Securities 

Sales of Synthelabo rose 16 
percent to 2.9 billion francs in 
tee quarter. L’Oreal holds a S6.6 
percent stake in Synthelabo. 

L’Oreal said it expected its 
full-year profit to match tee in- 
crease of die first half. 

L’Oreal shares rose 32 francs, 
or 13 percent to 2,199 francs. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 



Monday, Sept. 1 

Prices in tocof currencies. 
Tefekurs 

High lam One Pw»- 

Amsterdam 


ABH-AMRO 
Aegon 
AhoM 
AkzoNoM 
BoonCa 
Bob Wesson 
CSMwa 
DortfedwW 
1 DSM 
: Elsevier 
FratisAmev 

Gc&Bjites 

G- Brae cm 

Haaemeyer 

HesKhen 

Hoogwenscra 

Hum Douglas 

MG Grow 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

Medford Gp 


39 JO *J0 
150 1 ‘ 

49J0 
31450 316 

\TLS> 1M 
33® 34 

92.70 94JQ 
102 105.M 
190 19150 
3070 31.40 
SOM 84.10 
4050 a 
57 50-30 
102 104.48 
32050 32420 
11X40 11?® 
S3 8150 
S7 P 0 .ro 
65-40 67 

4140 4420 
71 7150 

4030 62 

60.90 6150 


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PtoSiS Bee 
Polygram 
Ranariad Hdg 
Rabeco 
Rudamco 
RoSucd 
R orente 

j VendnM 
^ VNU 

wottsraKlcw 

Bangkok 

AM Into Svc,. 
Bangkok Bk F 
Krona Thai Bk 
. - PTT tip tor 
Siam Cement F 
. Ham Coro BkF 
TeteawwsJo 
Thai Airway* _ 
Thai From BkF 
UtdCawn 


145.10 14180 
10£50 10150 

77 80 

187.10 ira® 

6020 61 
18850 190 

11620 >16.70 

102.10 105-40 
409-60 41130 

99 101* 


S ET lades: 4918* 
Picvms: 582JS 

167 157 163 1« 

172 l«> 164 1« 

22.75 21.75 22 Z?J 0 

324 318 322 322 

5 M 504 SK 524 

86 8® 81 

29J5 27 29 27.75 

jojo 39-50 40 39.50 

103 9450 95 98 

112 108 110 107 


High 

Addos 221 JO 
AUouHdg 408 

Altana 132 

Bk Borin 4490 

BASF 64 

Borer Hypo Bk 67® 

Bav.VHWKbank 95 
Bayer 6857 

Befcmdorf 7470 

BMW 8 1290 

CKAGCotonta 163 

Commerzbank 6640 

Dander Benz 136JO 

Degussa 98.31 

Deutsche Bank 1DBJ0 

Deal Telekom 37 

DiesdnerBank 73.90 

Fiesente 3® 

FresertusMed m 

Fried. Kropg 396 

Geha 11450 

HenJetboZait 1® 

Henkel pH M 

HEW 461 

Hocfttta BA 

Hoechst 7X20 

Kanlad) 633 

Lnhmoyer 92 

Unde 1230 

Lufthansa 3420 

MAN SOS 

Mcnroetawron 851 

Metangesdbtfwfliia 

Metro 0440 

Munch Rum* R 584 

Preussag 517 

RWE B3® 

SAP pH 408 

Sdteraig 17880 

SGLCarooa 233 

Stamens T11I5 

Springer (AwO 1580 

Suedracter 875 

W M 

VEW S75 

VoSwogen 132*58 


Low Close 

218 220 
404 40650 
126 129 

44.30 44.90 

62.90 63J0 

6685 67 JO 
9470 95 

&190 67.15 

72.90 73 

3750 38 

1275 12® 

15750 162 

6550 66 

13£30 136.70 
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72.90 73.90 
323 323 

126 127 

389 38950 
11080 11358 
136 13850 
93A0 9470 
445 460 

84 8550 
7090 7220 
636 633 

90.10 90JD 
1222 1222 
35 3520 


High Low Owe Prow. 


Johannesburg nutM-nsM 

AmoteofllMBta 30 28JO 2X65 3045 

sssrs. m 

AVMIN 11.™ 1150 11.90 1150 

Brotow K1S 54J3 5S25 

CG 5rahh 24 nso 24 2195 

DeBeen 14950 148 14980 14950 

Driefaoleto 34JD 3355 3480 34J5 

FsSMsSBfe 34.75 3450 35 37 

G«kot . 12.10 11 JO 11JS I1JH 

GF5A 96J5 96 96 96 

imperial Hrigs 6250 6125 6250 « 

IngweCaal 24 23.15 24 7X30 

teST 2.90 284 2.90 XW 

Johnnies hull 62JS 61 6225 6150 

Liberty Hdgs 379 379 379 368 

LfljertyLife 144 14175 14275 14480 

IMjfeStad 17J0 17J0 1780 1780 

Mnwtn 98 97J5 9875 9875 

Narapak 19J5 19 I9J5 19 

ItetanT 92-25 91 71 n 

Rembrandt Gp 45J0 44 4425 4540 

Richemont 63 62 6225 63-25 

Rod Ptofinum 7925 7925 79JS WJ5 

SA Breweries 14150 13925 14150 14025 

Sfflwmcor 35 3475 35 K 

Sasal 6325 6225 63 6250 

SBK 200 19B 205 210 

Tiger Oats 6980 68 69 70 


8110 BIS 

560 57B 

500 50650 
W50 81M 
40250 408 

177 17780 
229 233 

naso na» 

1559 1559 

859 800 

421 £XLX 
98.10 99 

575 575 

761 765 

1315132580 


Markets Closed 

Stock markets in Ganada, 
Malaysia and Mexico were 
closed Monday for holiday. 


Rank Grow 

RaMWColm 

aeOaai 

Reed Wl 

IteataUMIU 

ReutmHdgs 

Rraam 

RTZim 

RMCCSoup 

Rods Royce 

Royal Bk Scot 

Royal & Sun Al 

Safeway 

Sabsboiy 
Schraders 
Scot H ewC M fle 
Sad Power 
Seawtas 
Seven Tieni 
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OKiiol Union 
Compass Gp 



FT-SE 100: 40929 


Pmioas: 4B17J8 

IL42 

B25 

a ® 

820 

473 

463 

4/3 

467 

726 

7.77 

7X\ 

7J8 

US 

6.1B 

619 

4W 

14/ 

1X1 

146 

1-45 

5.77 

5.17 

£23 

£19 

5J8 

£50 

£43 

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Madrid 

Acerinox 

ACESA 

AgmsBonxion 


163 2-63 

828 828 
427 4.17 

1082 1025 

12* 1 24 

589 536 

824 821 

481 485 

682 682 
333 827 

4.10 4.10 

4.18 -4-09 

7« 7J3 

481 452 

590 589 

194 229 

17JB9 1IJ» 
4J9 428 

73)1 6®i 

689 S.S® 
486 440 

113 113 

ara 887 
386 3J9 

480 4J6 


Baba tadwc 57941 
Previous: 574.82 


CACJOrUMJ* 

Piertooss277BJ9 


AirUairide 

AJcoIh Ahth 

Axa-UAP 

Bancaire 

BIC 

BNP 

Omni Plus 

Cteretaur 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetetesn 

ChrisflaaDtar 

CLF-OeriflFron 

Crerift Agdoafe 

Danone 

Etf-AquHatne 

EridairiaBS 

Eurodtenev 

Eunriurma 

GaaEotn 


925 910 

219 21510 
929 913 

752 744 

38920 38510 
687 649 

449 431.10 
26480 259.10 
990 950 

3798 3730 

613 


925 910 

21780 217 

923 929 

747 744 

388.10 387 

669 669 

44480 439 

263 259 

965 979 

3777 3661 


HKLond 
JariMamewi 
Jard Strategic 
KeppefA 
KeppaiBank 
KappdFds 

^} lOTd 
OS Union 
ParininyHdgs 
Senrixnana 
Sing Air fcerlgn 
Stag Lind 
Stag Press F, 
SkigTediM 
Sing Telecomm 
Tat lie Bank 
Utd Industrial 
indOSeaBkF 
WtagTid Hdgs 

tinUJ5.Mbn. 


171 223 

685 460 

386 16* 

5 5 

10B 3J» 

156 388 

386 190 

1023 1QJ0 
6J0 685 

585 585 

525 520 

1050 1020 
680 435 

18J0 ia» 
229 VB 
2.16 117 
280 » 
1 lJOl 
11-10 T1J9 
195 228 


Stockholm S X_U total 33K.17 

Pie*taK:3271J8 


3fi 299.T0 ^4 300% 
618 613 

844 855 

537 S25 525 524 

1283 1283 1283 1277 

913 901 907 904 

697 672 685 675 

808 SB® 802 7« 

840 885 855 880 

7 490 7 7-05 

fl 680 681 678 

38140 375 382.48 3».90 

844 838 840 848 

40590 mss 404 .iff 392 
use 1870 5078 1874 

2235 2181 2195 2167 

1293 1260 1269 1263 
342.98 33620 338 341 

42*80 418 420 £1840 

2*9-30 2B5 28460 28380 

490 672 685 681 

26*6 2580 2592 25*2 
2329 222B 2298 2189 

W40 152 1543) 15* 

1745 1685 IT® 1700 

234 227-60 «r« n 
m, 584 607 

32490 315 318.10 ■ .. 

925 875 890 950 

568 560 565 561 

763 754 763 754 

2815 2750 276S 2745 

838 824 831 834 

1525 15.10 1410 15.1 B 

N.T. N.T. NX 611 

765 730 750 733 

165 16020 161.91 163.10 
590 575 589 589 

107 JO 10X10 1M 10520 
372 36280 37080 365 


s | 

SS S>g S 

48000 41000 4WW 
S Sow 290000 2880“ 

S i i b 

So * too en.16 


S^rocranpooenli 483 

BWOW ^ 

St 

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gssrr « 

«s 

CreentdSGP 
Guinness 
GIIS 


824 824 

5.13 529 

4.13 432 

236 187 

1087 1086 
785 8 

328 380 

1485 1480 
628 681 
284 285 

527 583 

885 8J8 

425 480 

122 1J4 
194 m 
XII 224 

10.44 1Q8B 

123 124 

S-25 580 

580 525 

4® 

780 7™ 

403 <SJB 
112 113 
628 622 
AM 4M 
580 588 

623 638 

623 639 

187 1 20 

MB 7-25 

174 194 

1121 1X03 
1X28 1286 
US &12 
583 589 

X71 174 
4J0 4J1 

583 550 

423 628 
412 621 

1725 1820 


GagMapfro 


UntaflPBiesff 

UateMCeeneni 


Manila 

AyeloB 


25200 25000 
1820 1800 
5550 5450 

7760 7550 

4040 3995 

1440 1425 

7770 7700 

5660 5550 

34290 34010 
4295 4240 
■mu 4SM 
3285 3105 

85?» asse 

3125 3060 

1220 1205 

6830 6700 
1740 1715 

2875 2850 

6090 6020 

1365 1345 

8100 ago 

4035 3W® 

1200 1180 
2B35 2750 


25000 25070 
ima isiffl 
5520 5530 

7760 7570 

4030 4005 

1435 1425 

7750 7730 

5660 563B 
34710 34070 
428® 4240 

4545 4S3S 

£§§ i5 

3125 3070 

1215 1200 

6700 6850 

1735 1710 

2860 HE0 
6090 6020 

1365 1355 

8020 8120 
4035 3950 

1200 1180 
2800 2005 


Jakarta 

g&SZU. 

imtecagw 1 

Indafow 


D AX: 3987 J* 
PfritawWWB 
IfflO liM 1453 




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184 

328 

185 

7JO. 

722 

729 

725 

164 

X59 

242 

£59 

9JD 

825 

85B 

BJfl 

221 

£42 

247 

£59 

460 

4® 

457 

453 

7^4 

7-13 

7J9 

723 

1.98 

1.95 

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127 

6 

£84 

6 

525 

472 

467 

468. 

449 


ANNUO Ascic 

BcaCammtkd 

BaFUeunm 

to d Roma 

Benetan 

CrafloltaiMO 

Etfiui 

EW 

Rtd 

INA 


282 171 286 

580 523 588 

7-5* 753 7J8 

741 750 7J2 

339 145 W1 

2JB 113 X17 

626 155 6J0 

7.16 741 725 

U2 \M 146 

7M 725 7JB2 

522 536 523 

6J04 6.19 6J9 

7JJS 7J9 723 


Mediobanca 

AtantaBson 

OSNtfi 

Parma lot 

PIRN 

RAS 

Rota Banco 
SPooto Torino 
TNeamltata 
TIM- 


PSEtadMC 197518 
PttHton 2921-52 

1475 14 1425 1425 

1525 1*25 1475 15 

117 93 93 114 

5 425 430 5 

71 68 70 71 

370 335 337 JO 335 

445 413 <X 435 

IS 133 149 150 

770 735 770 770 

5050 49 JO 49 JO 50 

6J0 590 520 630 


MIBTetewAce W3J9 J8 
Preriota: T421IJ0 

U77D 14500 14730 14700 
4545 4365 4525 4400 
5950 4050 6100 
1588 USD 1588 1570 
26000 25550 26000 25550 
3640 3590 3625 3650 

8260 8150 8260 8240 

10000 9760 10000 9850 
S520 5410 5430 5420 
37650 37100 37450 37200 
16735 16290 16710 16395 
2580 2535 2580 2575 
5430 5360 5410 5420 
7790 7700 7730 7745 
11870 11550 11790 11490 
1085 1066 1078 )0» 
745 710 724 715 

2790 2745 2770 2735 
4565 4500 4520 4445 
14995 14825 14950 14985 
22000 21700 21850 21700 
1»45 12289 13845 12300 
loro 10305 ions io4bo 
5940 5780 5940 6100 


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Lueal 

LVMH 

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PstaasA 

Pernod Rfcart 

Peugeot C8 

PtaauS-Prlrd 

Pianades 

Renaull 

Rexel 

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Sinioli 

Schneider 

5EB 

SGSThoensan 
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Sodexho 
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Suez (0*1 
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Souza Cruz 
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Daewoo Heury 

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LGSetnom 

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Samsung Dttoy 
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l 72599 moo 
I 4SJ0 49JOO 
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I 146fi 15410 
I 443JB 46900 
I 597.00 618410 
I 41 (LOO 41000 
I 385.00 4094)0 
I 25100 266412 
I 179.00 188410 
i 3600 37410 
\ 995 1029 
I 12100 12XS1 
I 1574)0 17000 
I 1394)0 1474)0 
I 30100 32X00 
I 3600 374U 
I 10.15 11.10 
I 2431 2140 


’SSSS'SS’SS 

19200 18000 18000 19000 
12400 11300 12100 11800 
23800 271(0 22500 23600 
5100 4950 4950 5ja 
39900 35100 37000 40100 
59000 57100 57900 57900 
46000 44600 45303 « 
noon mm 70000 7tm 
8850 » ms 8760 
499000 465000488000 478000 


AGAB 
ABBA 
AntOaman 
Astro A 
Aria* Copco A 
AUtoM 
BedrotaxB 
Ericsson B 
Hemes B 
hreenfrre A 
bneskrB 
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gp- 

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Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBUna 

BHP 

Band 

Brambles toil 
CBA 

ccAmma 

||SS 

SS 

NatAustfctank 

fBF 

Pub Broadcast 
Rio Tlnto 
stGeoqfeBank 
WMC 


WaodsfafePel 

Wootwaclifi 


Taipei 

Cotaoy Life las 
ChanaHwaBk 
□wziTurtgBk 
QtapDevetand 
□ten Steel 


FamosaPlasnc 
HuaNmBk 
MtCBomBk 
Nan Ya Plastics 
Ship Kong Lite 
Taiwan 
Ti 


Tokyo 


I13L50 115 

U4JD 116 

238 239 

125JD 130 

237 JO 245.50 
303 308 

an 556 

323 333 

297 301 

725 729 

384 391 

258 24150 
246 

267 272 

237-50 240 

Z14.50 217 

174 17650 
B4SD 86 
30X50 311.50 
313 321 

211 21450 
169 172 

123-50 12650 
236 241 

203 205 


PravtoOK 259U0 

8.19 BAS 824 
9 JO 9J5 928 

1696 174)4 174)8 
3L93 4JM 197 
2600 3 699 2&E» 
1480 1485 I5JM 
1129 13J6 1388 
628 641 63* 

687 694 680 

676 4-88 4452 

X57 X62 Z57 

1.93 \9S }9S 

12/0 12-45 1X70 
29 29-33 2935 

ija us ij3 

1175 1689 18-90 

1.96 1J9 24B 

610 617 613 

345 3^48 150 

445 4J0 4J8 

7.95 725 8 

20 20.12 20.11 
7.95 604 684 

60S 694 690 

7.76 729 729 

1026 11416 10.9G 
410 615 616 


State Mnrimtiedae9S»4W 
Prtrtoofc 982729 

M2 139 139 142 

112 10B 100 11220 

9120 86 86 98 

134 125 12650 12920 

29 JO 2820 2020 2920 

113 110 11020 112 

63 41JD 6120 A2A 

121 117 11720 121 

58 56 56 5720 

75 73 73 75 

9250 87 87 9320 

163 ISO 151 156 

47 JO 45 4690 4&60 

131 IB 12220 131 


NBM 225: 1797630 
Praetan: 1822922 


BergesanDyA S "W. 3 


Singapore 


D&PtaSSi 

DBS Land 


Stn«*TtaeK 171M4 

PlHtaH!l88U4 


AINtePmAIr 

Anway 

Anhlwak 

AsaMOiem 

AeaMGtas 


1110 1090 

no 701 

32S0 31 fC 
873 857 

433 618 

917 892 


5.10 

5 

£10 

£10 

Bk Tokyo M£aJ 

7190 

21® 

478 

408 

428 

408 

BkYeMiOraa 

514 

511 

955 

855 

855 


BrtSfssSme 

2770 

2670 

910 

850 

82S 

£70 

Canon 

34® 


054 

OR? 

a 82 

054 

OhMm Etoc 1 

20® 

Will 

IS® 

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1450 

3.58 

14® 

342 

16 

358 

OwgotoSoc ■ 
DriMpOPlM- 

I960 

2540 

1930 

2430 

840 

8 

£15 

8 

Data 

US 

799 


1110 1100 
701 708 

3220 3180 
866 874 

624 628 

900 917 

im 2190 
514 512 

2200 2670 
3320 3330 
2010 2020 
1960 1950 
24S0 2520 
■00 121 


r m t mmxm 


\ Investor’s Europe 




of the group, Tabacalera S A, earned 
8.41 billion pesetas in the first half, an 
1 1 percent rise from a year earlier. 

Tabacalera shares fell 100 pesetas 
to 8,020 after the announcement of 
the earnings. 

“The profit figures are in line 
with our expectations,’ ’ said Emilio 
Sanchez; an analyst at BZW Se- 
curities in Madrid. “With die U.S. 
stock market closed today, it’s not a 
very representative day, and Tabac- 
alera shares could be down, because 
they've outperformed the rest of tbe 
marker lately.” 

This year, die Spanish govern- 
ment adopted a one-time change in 
accounting laws, allowing compa- 
nies to revalue fixed assets to take 
into account the effect of inflati on. 
Tbe process increases the total value 
of a company's assets, though 
companies must reflect much of the 
difference between the original 
value and inflation-adjusted value 
as depredation costs. 

Tabacalera brands account for 
more than 65 percent of the Spanish 



Source: TeJ&kurs 


bnemaitaaol Herald Tribuoc 


Very briefly; 

•Renault’s production at its Vilvoordc plant in Belgium will 
end next week, union officials said. Renault had been crit- 
icized for failing to negotiate with unions over the plant's 
future at a time of high unemployment. Meanwhile, Fasa 
Renault, the carmaker’s Spanish unit, said profit rose 153 
percent to 417 pesetas ($2.7 million) in the first half because of 
improved performance in its subsidiaries.. 

•French new -car registrations fell a larger- than-expected 29 
percent to 121,595 in August, the tenth consecutive monthly 
decline, indicating the market still has not recovered from the 
end of a government sales- incentive program last year. The 
number of cars sold in the first eight months of this year was 
1,1 17,673, down 22.1 percent from a year ago.] 

•Tele Danmark AS said 1 ,683 employees were willing to 
take up an offer of early retirement as part of a drive to cut tbe 
work force by 2,000 by tbe end of next year. 

•Russia will join the Fans Club of creditor nations in two 
weeks. First Deputy Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin told a 
banking conference. Russia, which reached an agreement in 
principle with tbe Paris Club in June, is seeking repayment of 
$37 billion in debt inherited from the Soviet Union. 

•SMH SA shares rose 4.1 percent on optimism that the Swiss 
watchmaker’s decision to lower its stake in its Smart car joint 
venture with Daimler-Benz AG means earnings will not be 
hurt by likely losses at the car unit 

•Italian workers' hourly wages grew at a fas ter- chan-ex- : 
peered 0.9 percent pace in July from the previous month. The 1 
figures brought the average wage increase in the 12 months 
ended in Jiuy to an annual 4.4 percent, but few analysts 
forecast serious wage inflation. 

•Psion PLC shares fell 7.6 percent on concerns that the 
British hand-held computer maker's inability to meet demand 
for its new Series 5 model would hurt profits. The company is 
doe to announce first-half earnings Thursday. 

•RAO Norilsk Nickel, the Russian metals producer, saw its 
operating profit decline 27 percent to $1 83 million in the first 
half as costs increased, said Svetlana Smirnova, analyst at 
United Financial Group. Net sales fell to $1.61 billion in the 
first half of this year from $1 .62 billion. 

•Deutsche Telekom AG said it would press ahead with plans 
to launch digital pay TV next month despite criticism of its 
pact with Bertelsmann and the Bavarian magnate Leo 
Kirch. AFP. Bloomberg. AFX 


The Trib Index 

Prices ns at 3M) PM New York tmA 

Jan 1. 1992= JOO. 

Laval 

Change 

% change 

year to data 

World Index 

166.13 

-0.66 

-0.40 

+11.39 

Rafllonal indinnm 





Asia/Paalic 

115.40 

-3.80 

-3.19 

-8.51 

Europe 

179.59 

+1.83 

+1.03 

+11.41 

N. America 

198.58 

-1.15 

-0.58 

+22.B5 

S. America 

'14a49 

-6.21 

-4X11 

+28.78 

Industrial tndoxos 





Capital goods 

215.24 

-1.18 

-0.55 

+25.93 

Consumer goods 

183-24 

-OJ24 

-0.13 

+13.51 

Energy 

192.70 

+0.49 

+0-25 

+12.88 

Finance 

123.72 

-1416 

-1.48 

+6.23 

Miscellaneous 

17050 

-1^9 

-1.10 

+5^0 

Raw Materials 

178.88 

-0.73 

-0.41 

+2.00 

Service 

154.71 

■2.06 

-1.31 

+12.68 

UWtkts 

154.57 

-2.15 

-1.37 

+7.74 

The biwmaoonal Herat! Tribune World Stock tndex C tracks m» U.S OoSar values at 

280 intematlanalig imesoOlo stocks from 25 courtrws. For mom Information, a tmo 

booklet Is avataUB by wring to The Trt Index, 191 Avenue Charles de Gauffe, 

J 8252J NevatyCodBx. Fiance. 


Campietity Btoombag News, j 

High 

Low Close 

Prow. 

High Low 

Oom Pm*. 


DaHcMKong 

DotaaBanic 

DahnHowe 

Dana Sac 

DDI 

D««w 

East Jancn Ry 
Ekoi 

5i&* 

Fun Photo 


Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Uo-Yotado 

JAL 

J<«>an Taboos 
Jwoo 
Kaftan 
Kama) Else 
Kao 

Kawatata Hvy 
Kavw Steel 
KinkJ WppRf 
IGrin Brewery 
Kobe Steel 
Komatsu 
Katata 
Kyocera 
Kyushu Elec 
LTC8 

Mwubeul 

Moral 

Mate Comm 

Mate Elec Ind 

Mate Elec Wk 

MfeutoWtJ 

MHsUbbhiOi 

MttsubbNEl 

MflsuWiWEst 

MltsubfiU Hvy 

MtaubbUMd 

MflNbbHTr 

Mitel 

MBSui Fudoen 
Misui Trust 
NtaretaMfe 

MMaSec 

Niton 

Nintendo 

ssisr 

Nippon Steel 
NtesanMatar 
NKK 

NonronSec 
NTT Data 


1410 1360 

628 59B 

1410 1370 
776 749 

6390D 6200a 
2630 2560 

5400a 5350a 
2280 2210 
4420 4530 

UTD 1420 
4650 4450 
1420 1338 

1150 11*0 

1100 1010 
3810 36*0 

SOT 1610 
368 3e0 

495 486 

6510 6420 


1430 1350 1350 1440 

1150 11*0 1150 1150 

1100 1010 ‘ 1030 1110 

3810 36*0 36*0 3720 

1670 1610 1610 1660 

368 368 

497 

6510 6420 6430 6500 

508 *84 488 503 

9710a 9350a 9*70 d 9690a 

3190 3050 3030 3228 

630 612 619 634 

2250 2220 22*0 2250 

1780 1670 1700 1780 


*73 

468 

471 

471 

293 

2® 

291 

299 

683 

6® 

683 

679 

990 

9/0 

974 

977 

164 

133 

137 

165 

754 

689 

707 

747 

488 

*70 

474 

486 


7540 7410 

1900 1*50 
595 563 

437 429 

1910 IBM 
3989 3890 
2220 §160 
1290 124B 

1190 1170 

318 305 


TakedaCheffl 3220 

TDK W00 

TahotoBPwi 1980 

Total Bank 1050 

TaMo Marine 1*00 

TafcyoEIPwr 2300 

Tokyo Bedroa 6480 

Tokyo Gcs 
Tokyo Carp. 

Tran 1110 

Toppaa Print 1740 

Toraytad 
Todua 
Tataem 2*80 

ToyoTnnt 970 

Toyota Motor 3180 

YtananoucN 2920 

aximtcxIMO 


Vienna 

Sid “"640 61L0S 6M25 619*90 
EA-Generaft 308720 2995 3M2 2985 

EVN 1550 151 820 1531 20 1515 

Runt! ofen Wien 495JD 49025 49* 4J0 

OMV 1742 1675173125 104 

Oof EfekMZ 868 061.80 MS 861“ 

V A Stahl 5*9-60 532 S48J0 L_ 

VATedl 23852339.90 2373232450 

WtenertMll Bdv 2530 2466 2518 2460 


Osaka Gas 

Hah 

Rohm 

HS8T 

Sana Bata 
Sanya Elec 
5ean 
5dbuRwT 
StalnlQwm 
State! House 
Seven-Eleven 
Shop 

ShSakaSPHT 

Shteizu 

Statute Oh 

SHMUO 

SMnakoBk 

SoAbank 

Sony 

swwtomo 

SurattoraoBk 

Sumnchem 

SuadtonwEtec 

SUDBMftM 

SrerinTros! 

TaWioRiaiai 


1610 1630 
776 781 

487 687 

1650 1600 
963 974 

1320 1330 

659 669 

*mi jpg 

1280 1290 
1950 1950 

565 566 

10000 10000 
754 763 

497 497 

298 303 

725 732 

185 189 

1530 1540 
1090b lova 
5190b 5210b 
601 604 

273 277 

1610 1630 
12100 12100 
685 686 

3710 3730 
1460 1470 
425 430 

8350 ffyjfl 
5220 5500 
993 1000 
1120 1130 
8500 8580 
11 ® 11 ® 
19® 1950 
611 625 

2980 3020 
1870 1870 
1240 1240 
5000 5290 
10300 10300 
965 976 

1720 1 7® 
465 472 

1770 1780 
272 278 

11® 1150 
2880 2910 


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Briefly Invt 1 

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| NZSE-40 tarioc 2446J6 

Pra ta MKlW ai 

*23 4.10 4.15 423 

125 122 122 U4 

326 323 324 124 

428 436 437 438 

5J0 5-52 5J6 5JZ 

123 129 1® 124 

IIS 103 324 116 

324 322 322 325 

723 7.78 722 721 

NX N.T. N.T. liaO 


SPIKriHC 340457 
PimtooE 337X83 

!170 21® 2193 
309 525 507 

275 1285 1200 
12® 2350 2320 
R.T. NX 842 
1095 2100 21® 
BtTO 3900 3870 
1027 102 ms 
9.75 134 128J0 

975 1010 972 

178 1® V ' 

535 535 

1745 67® 6810 
1290 4350 4300 
1231 1240 1245 
577 584 5® 

1734 1764 17® 
till 2117 2M8 
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PAGE 3 


Australia 

f props Plans 

To Soften 

< 

Media Law 

< 

* 

■ Cat^M In Cur Sag Fmn Dtnurkrt 

; SYDNEY Plans for a change 
in Australia’s media laws, which 
£ouJd have allowed the magnate 
Kerry Packer to take over John Fair- 
fax Ltd., have been abandoned the 

government said Monday. 

- “Cross-media changes have been 

f put on the back burner to focus on 
• pigher priorities such as jobs, tax 
reform and native title.” a spokes- 
man for Communications Minister 
pjchard Alston said. 

. A report on Mr. Packer’s Channel 
Nine network said the company's 
topes of taking over John Fairfax by 
Christmas had been dashed by the 
Cabinet at the urging of Prime Min- 
ister John Howard, who had decided 
<o put the issue “well and trulv" on 
Pae back burner. 

■ government had been expec- 
ted to announce changes in its tight 
Jimits on cross-ownership between 
television and newspapers in capital 
city markets. 

■ Mr. Packer, who also owns a 
string of magazines, had positioned 
himself to acquire Fairfax if Can- 
berra relaxed its 1 0-year-old cross- 
media ownership laws, which bar 
£ him from increasing a 15 percent 
1 Stake in Fairfax without sellins his 
television station. 

: Fairfax owns three of Australia 's 
Jour most influential papers: the 
Sydney Morning Herald. The Age 
pf Melbourne and the Australian 
-Financial Review. 

■ Mr. Howard reportedly told the 
^cabinet that any attempt at change 
.would be used by the Labor op- 
position and the centrist Australian 
Democrats as a distraction and 
•would clog the business of the Sen- 
ate. 

J The government decision coin- 
cided with a report Monday in the 
^Australian Financial Review saying 
Jthat Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. 
•was on a collision course over the 
^government’s proposals to change 
jthe media rules. 

5 The decision came before a meet- 
ing scheduled for late Tuesday be- 
tween government backbenchers 
Jand Communications Minister 
’"Richard Alston, who had been ex- 
pected to take plans for new laws to 
"the communications committee. 

‘ Changes in the foreign ownership 
-rules had also been expected to be 
relaxed to allow News Corp., which 
publishes rwo-thirds-of Australia’s 
•newspapers, to increase its stake in 
the Seven Network Ltd. television ! 
.stations. 

I But the chairman and managing 
director of News Corp.’s Australian 
.operations, Lachlan Murdoch, re- 
■portedly told the opposition com- 
'munications spokesman, Chns 
•Schacht, that the changes would nor 
•be sufficient to compensate for Mr. 
Packer's strengthened interests. 

! Mr. Alston said two months ago 
•that legislation to change the cross- 
‘ media ownership rules should be in 
•place by the end of the year. 

• But he disputed atthe time claims 
;that Mr. Packer would be the main 
-beneficiary of any changes and said 
a group based in Melbourne was 
Iprepared to bid for the Fairfax news- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC ~ 


PAGE 15 




■>Y . tis 


Hi 


^ iso 




TE""£ ss9 r ^ ~ " 


By Naiki Tanikawu 

.iy<n I..-/ H.i.ii.i n 

TOKYO — fn the past iwo 
years. 14 Western banks have 
withdrawn or reduced their op- 
erations in Japan, deterred by high 
costs and onerous regulations. 

But since 1 99 1 . H f major Asian 
banks have entered the country, 
bringing the total to 32. a sign of 
the growing integration of the 
Japanese economy with the rest of 
the Pacific region. 

Banking tends to follow com- 
merce. analysts said, and Japan’s 
trade with the rest of Asia topped 
33 trillion yen ($273. IS billion) in 
1 996. compared \\ ith 20 trillion in 
trade between Japan and the 
United States, according M the 
Ministry of Finance. 

“I am not surprised b\ the 
trend at all.” said the chief man- 
ager of a major Western bank in 
Tokyo, "because Japan’s affil- 
iation with Asia — it* trade flows, 
capital flows and business imest- 
ments — has grow n quite rapidly, 
at a much higher pace than with 
the U.S. and Europe. The banking 
industry generally, follow > trends 
in capital and trade flows." 

Those Western banks that re- 
main interested in Japan generally 
focus on operations in v. hieh their 
technological expertise i> \jiu- 
able. such as derivatives .trading 

or risk management, l ncse sec- 
tors require highly trained em- 
ployees but not in large numbers. 

Mariko Noda. economist with 
Sanwa Research Institute in 
Tokyo, points out that the activity 
of Asian banks is a mirror image 
of a few years ago. "Japanese 
banks once poured into Asian 
countries to follow Japanese 
companies that went into. Asia.” 

She added: “As more Asian 
companies assume business op- 
erations in Japan, financial insti- 
tutions from the same country are 
gearing up to pro\ ide services for 
Stem, feanks and ihe corporations 
have moved abroad as a set." 


Many Chinese companies, for 
instance, are serting up Japanese 
operations, said Masaraka lida, 
deputy branch manager of Bank 
of Communication of China. His 
bank upgraded its Tokyo oper- 
ation from a representative office 
to a branch, in 1995. 

Taek-Myung Kwon, deputy 
general- manager at Korea Ex- 
change Bank in Tokyo, said his 
bank mainly serves Korean busi- 
ness interests and the resident 
Korean community, the biggest 
foreign national group in Japan. 

Similarly, one" of the most re- 
cent Asian entrants. Metropolitan 
Bank & Trust Co., the largest 
Philippine bank, opened a branch 
in Tokyo last year because the 
bank perceived growing demand 
in trade-related financial transac- 
tions and in handling remittances 
from Filipinos working in Japan. 

More Asian banks are on then- 
way. China Trusr Commercial 
Bank, a Taiwanese bank, and 
Dong Hwa Bank from Korea are 
among the hanks that are con- 
sidering raising the status of their 
Tokyo representative offices to 
branches by the end of the year. 

Following the growth in bank- 
ing. Asian brokerage houses also 
are attracted to Tokyo’s financial 
sector. In the fast three years, 
eight Asian securities firms, six of 
which are Korean, have obtained 
licenses to trade in securities in 
Japan, including Daewoo Secu- 
rities Co., the biggest brokerage 
company in Korea. 

Jong-Tae Kim, Daewoo Secu- 
rities' Tokyo branch manager, 
said that reflects the possibility 
that the Korean government will 
soon lift a major barrier to Jap- 
anese investment. Japanese in- 
vestors currently must pay a hefty 
capital gains tax of 27.5 percent in 
the Korean market. 

“On one hand, you have a 
country awash in cash looking for 
places to invest," said Mr. Kim. 
“On the other hand, you have a 
country hungry for capital." 


Korea First Bank 
Struggl es to Survive 

‘Self -Rescue’ Plan Offers Staff Cuts 
And Subsidiary Sales to Trim Debt 




WHEEL OF FORTUNES — Tokyo traders plotting strategy. 


Asia’s Banks Follow 
The Money Into Japan 


CaurdritoOttrSuffFnmiPifpiKthrf 

SEOUL — The troubled Korea 
First Bank will sell seven subsi- 
diaries, including KFB Securities, to 
try to extricate itself from a sea of 
bad loans, the bank's president. 
Ryoo Shee-Yul, said Monday. 

The six other subsidiaries to be 
sold off dealt with leasing and ven- 
ture capital, mutual savings funds, 
trusts, investment and futures, he 
said. 

He also said the bank's work 
force would be trimmed from the 
current 8,300 to 6,540 staff by 2001 
and its 4 14 branches reduced by 
40. 

Mr. Ryoo denied speculation that 
Korea First Bank's headquarters 
building would be included in the 
sale, saying the actual financial im- 
provement to the bank was out- 
weighed by the credit uncertainty it 
would create. 

But he said rwo more floors 
would be rented out, bringing the 
number of floors rented to five. 

The self-rescue plan, along with 
his own resignation, would be sub- 
mitted to the central Bank of Korea, 
pending consent of the Korea First 
Bank trade union, he said. 

The Bank of Korea last week an- 
nounced it was extending a special 
soft-loan package to Korea First 
Bank to help tide it over financial 
difficulties resulting ffom rising 
nonperforming loans jinked to a 
spate of corporate bankruptcies. 

Separately, South Korean com- 
mercial banks will tighten the con- 
ditions under which companies can 
qualify to receive Insolvency pro- 
tection, the Korea Federation of 
Banks said 

The federation said banks would 
now require companies seeking pro- 
tection to submit documents relin- 
quishing managerial control and 


pledging manpower cuts. 

The tighter conditions were 
agreed on at a meeting of repre- , 
senta lives from 35 local commercial : 
banks, ihe federation statement 
said. 

Companies should also submit 
documents giving creditors the right 
to dispose of assets held by owners 
or top management, if said. 

Life insurance companies will 
also join an alliance of financial 
institutions ser up in April this year 
to prevent major companies from 
going under, it said. 

Only commercial banks and mer- 
chant banking corporations have so 
far been members of the anti -in- 
solvency pacL 

The banks also agreed to limit the 
grace period for loan repayments to 
no more than two months. Previ- 
ously, banks have been given an 
extendable two-month grace peri- 
od. 

The federation said the stricter 
conditions for insolvency protection 
were preferable to scrapping the 
system altogether. 

“At this stage, the banks agreed 
that scrapping the system is undesir- 
able.” the federation said. 

Analysis saw the bankers' de- 
cision as putting further pressure on 
the beleaguered Kia Group, the 
lares r beneficiary of the bail -out 
pact, which has so far stubbornly 
resisted plans to restructure its busi- 
ness. 

Top Kia management has refused 
to step aside, and aggressive unions 
have stood firm against wage and 
job reductions. 

But some bank officials said Kia 
was exempted from the new rules 
under the anti-bankruptcy pact, 
which was introduced in Apnl to 
prevent major corporations from go- 
ing under. (AFP, Reuters ) 


HongKong S 

HsmgS|gng! ".S 

17000 v 2 

-.16000 -/l- 2 

15000 - sfif j 
14000 S* 

.13000 -/ 11 

1997 

. Exchange - .'.iftdpx- 


Singapore - 
.Sfrais Ttmes . 
2200 


A M J J A S 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 
22000 

21000 

'20000 rf'Vl 

'19000 J - --V 
IBOOOy -A_ 

17 ®°A M J j A s 
1997 


Monday 


HongKong • . Hanging.. 
Singapore straits Timas 
Sydney'"' AH Ort^ries . 
Tokyo 

Kuala Lumpur Compost ' 
Bangkok Ts£T 1 
S eoul ~ CwnpoettB Inddx 
Taipei ■' StodTNtealtetlnda? 
Manga PQ£ ' r 

. Jakarta Composite Index 
Wellington MZSE-40 7 

Bombay Sensffiva lodeaT " 

Source: Tetekurs 


1&QSSS 14.135.25 -5,02 
1,786.44 t. 805.64 * -1:95 
2^90-ra 2,S33idd -J5.se 
17, 9700 18^9,4^71,40 
Closed. ' 604.40- 
4S&64 • ; 50253 :, -'7'^;67 
682.20 -635.37.. 

&504,9 9 9,756.47 
1,975*28 '.Zm.&f&SQ 
485.97 493.96 '^62 

2,44626 . 2,456.21 .-0.41 
3^43.67 . 3,876.0$ A1.74 

liucnuiiiHiaJ HctoU TriTmnc 


Very briefly; 

•.Toyota Motor Corp., Japan’s largest automaker, will buy 
34 percent of USK Corp., a home contractor, paying 6A 
billion yen ($55 million) for 6.37 million USK shares and an 
unspecified amount for another 1.07 million shares. 

• Tuan Sing Holdings Ltd.'s first-half profit rose 2 percent to 
15.2 million Singapore dollars ($10 million), or 1.24 cents a 
share, from 14.86 million, or 1.21 cents a share a year ago. 

• Foreign investments on Indian stock exchanges fell in 
August to their lowest level in three months. The Securities 
ana Exchange Board oflndia said net foreign investments last 
month totaled $139.4 million, 49 percent less than the $273 j 
million in July. 

• First Pacific Co., an Asian conglomerate, posted a net profit 
of $1 10.2 million for the six months ending June 30, up from 
$90.8 million a year earlier. Revenue totaled $3.77 billion, up 
from $3.18 billion. 

• Mitsui Fudosan Co.. Japan’s second-largest real estate 
developer, will sell land near Tokyo Tower at a loss of 14.73 
billion yen. Mitsui Fudosan said it would receive 2634 billion 
yen for selling land to Chuo Trust & Banking Co. 

• City Developments LtcL's stock fell by one Singapore 

dollar to 8.55 dollars, its lowest closing price since Sept 7, 
1995, after the government increased the cost of developing 
land in Singapore. Bloomberg, AFP. Rcuicrs 


Watanabe Talks Up Japanese Economy 


Cinrikil hvOurSutfFmm ftiftaAn 

TOKYO — The effects of April’s sales 
tax rise are still lingering on Japan's econ- 


omy, but the economy has not entered a 
vicious cycle. Deputy Trade Minister Osamu 
Watanabe said Monday. 

Economic problems sweeping much of 
Southeast Asia will put further pressure on 
the Japanese economy, with exports to the 
region particularly In question, economists 
said. 

“The negative impact of recent Asian 
currency falls on the Japanese economy is 
emerging as Japan’s exports to ASEAN 
countries slow — and are expected to con- 
tinue slowing,” said Susumu Kato, chief 
economist at BZW Securities. 

Toshio Sumitani, an economist at Tokyo 
Research Institute, said that the negative 
impact of the regional downturn on the Jap- 
anese economy would not be “negligible as 
Japan’s exports to the region account for 
more than 20 percent of the total.” 

Mr. Watanabe also said he was watching 
Japan’s trade surplus very closely, but he 


added that Japan would not return to its 
previous trade structure where the surplus 
was a large percentage of gross domestic 
product 

He added that companies had entered a 
period of inventory adjustment. 

But Watanabe said he had not changed his 
view about the economy. 

“Car dealerships have good plans for pro- 
moting sales of new vehicles from the au- 
tumn,” he said. “Bonus payments have risen 
year on year, although not greatly. Looking 
at the economy as a whole, it has not entered 
a vicious cycle.” 

Mr. Watanabe said he still saw the effects 
of the sales tax rise in April, when the 
government raised the consumption tax to 5 
percent from 3 percent and discontinued 
income tax rebates. 

He said the recent industrial output data in 
which the outlook for August was revised to 
a fall of 0.9 percent from a preliminary 
estimate of a 0 5 percent drop was due to 
“inventory adjustment, taking advantage of 
the summer holidays after active production 


between Af>ril and June, which was seen 
particularly in the auto sector.” 

Japan's domestic automobile sales fell in 
August as the April tax increase continued to 
keep customers away from car showrooms 
and other consumer spending. 

Car sales fell !0.3 percent to 260.210 
vehicles in August from the same month a 
year earlier, die Japan Automobile Dealers 
Association said 

August was the fifth straight monthly de- 
cline in auto sales and follows a 10. 1 percent 
drop in July. 

“People are not spending money at the 
moment,” said Christopher Redl, an auto 
industry analyst at ING Baring Securities 
(Japan) Ltd. 

Toyota and Nissan Motor Co., Japan’s two 
largest automakers, said they were betting 
that new models to roii out before March , 
would bring customers back. 

Nissan said it expected sales to be down 
about 5 percent in September. Toyota said it 
should be fully recovered to last year’s 
levels. ( Bloomberg . Reuters. Bridge News) 


aSSnmaii lus been wo™* OUTLOOK: Economists Lower Growth Forecasts for Several Southeast Asian Nations Hit by Currency Turmoil 


'by many groups against sanctioning 
la takeover of Fairfax by Mr. Packer 
‘while he owns Channel Nine. 

\ Eighty prominent Australians 
■representing a broad gamut of polir- 
'ical opinion warned last month 
‘against a further concennation of 
•media ownership and claimed that 
‘too much of the media is already 
J owned by too few people. 

1 Separately, Standard & Poor’s 
■Corp. said it expected Australia’s 
J major companies in the printing in- 
dustry to sustain average to above- 
■ average credit quality in the medium 

.“term. . . . 

’ The ratings agency said in a re- 
port that most of the major compa- 
res benefited from strong market 
’positions, strong cash flows from 
’ core businesses and sound financial 
. positions. (AFP . Reuters) 


Continued from Page I J 

mid-1999 and end- 1999. respectively.] 

Jn Indonesia, where short -term interest 
rates have been driven to about 30 per- 
cent. Sofvan Wanandi. chairman of the 
privately-held Gemala Group, said that 
GDP growth could fall to less than 5 
percent this year, from nearly S percent in 
1996. ’ , 

“Growth at this level, though taken as 
fairly high in many other countries, 
would be painful for a large developing 
nation like Indonesia with a huge labor 
force.” said Sjultrir. an economist with 
the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry in Jakarta. 

“Asia's growth i- investment-led, 
said David Roche, managing director of 
Independent Strategy - a global investment 
research consultancy based in London. 


“It will suffer from falling investment.” 

He said that the most worrying aspect 
was the outlook for interest rates. 

“Many Asian governments thought 
that floating their currencies and devalu- 
ing would yield lower interest rates,” he 
said. "Bur foreign money is not flowing 
back. This leaves little room for Asia to 
reduce interest rates much without ad- 
ditional currency depreciation." 

■ Thai Banks Assess Bad Defats 

Nonperforming loans at Thailand’s 
commercial banks range from a low of 
4.6 percent at First Bangkok City Bank 
PCL to a high of 12 percent at Bangkok 
Metropolitan Bank PCL, analysts who 
have assessed audited mid-year financial 
statements filed with the Stock Exchange 
of Thailand said, Bloomberg News re- 
ported from Bangkok. 


Ncmperforming loans are those on 
which no interest or principal has been 
paid in at least six months. If the loans have 
adequate collateral, a loan is not classified 
as nonperforming unless payment has not 
been received for at least a year. 

Bangkok Bank PCL, the largest of the 
country’s 15 commercial banks, and Thai 
Danu Bank PCL, the fourth smallest, 
each claimed nonperforming Joans of 5 
percent. 

The stated NPL rates are actually much 
lower than the real level of bad loans, said 
Pipat Ronakiat, an analyst for Adkinson 
Securities PCL. That is because the Bank 
of Thailand in January fold lenders that 
they could restructure loans to strengthen 
the look of their balance sheets. 

Even with restructurings, three banks 
had nonperforming loans of more than 10 
percent as of June 30. They were 


June 30. They were 


Bangkok Metropolitan, with 12 percent, 
Krung Thai Bank PCL, 10. 1 percent, and 
Thai Military Bank PCL, 10 percent, Mr. 
Pipat said. 

Standard & Poor's estimates that non- 
performing loans made by Thai banks 
and other finance companies will peak ar 
about 25 percent next year. 

Other bank NPLs are. according to a 
consensus of analysts contacted by 
Bloomberg News: Thai Fanners Bank 
PCL, about 7.4 percent; Siam Commer- 
cial Bank PCL, 6.8 percent; Bank of 
Ayudhya PCL, 6.0 percent; Siam City 
Bank PCL, 7.2 percent; Bank of Asia 
PCL, 7.2 percent; Nakonwhon Bank 
PCL, 8.5 percent; Laem Thong Bank 
PCL, 9 percent 

Among the country’s six largest non- 
bank finance firms, NPLs ranged from 
6.5 percent and 10.4 percent of the loans 


they have extended, analysts said. 

The lowest rate of nonperforming 
loans among nonbank finance companies 
— 6.5 percent — was held by state- 
controlled Krungthai Thanakit PCL, said 
Suraphol Thipvilai, an analyst for Vick- 
ers Balias & Co. The highest rate was 
Asia Credit's 10.4 percent 

Among the other big nonbank lenders, 
Dhana Siam Finance & Securities PCL’s 
was 9.7 percent Nava Finance & Se- 
curities PCL 7.6 percent, Phatra Thanakit 
J>CL 7.4 percent and National Finance & 
Securities 7.2 percent 
Krungthai, Phatra, Dhana Siam, Na- 
tional and Nava are the five nonbank 
lenders the government said were the 
healthiest among the country’s 91 non- 
bank lenders. Since June, the government 
has ordered 58 of those companies shut 
because of insolvency. 


** [EUROPE 

l | Exquisite style, witty provoca- 

• I £,on ’ nsto 011 

I of European government. 

’ If you missed his reporting in the 

: , | ij T ^ 0r i 0 h n01jrste0ntl ' ,e 

; Senior Correspondent Worl d Wide Web. . 

i Do you uve in Austria, 

Belgium, Luxembourg 

or Sweden ? 

for information atom subscribing: iaU: 

\u5tria 01891363830 
Belgium 0800 H338 (toll-frw) 
Uxem&un: 0800-r03M-6v,-l 

Sweden 020 (mlMnel. . 

HnalggSritot 

. ^ I IN OUU 


First six months 1997 

excellent results: 

net profit increases by 28% to 
U.S.S 1,031 million 

shareholders’ equity increases by 
28% to U.S.S 23.1 billion 


/id millions of dollars, 
except, tor amounts per share) 

Result before taxation: *) 

. jivyirancc operations 
- banking operations 
Net proiii 

\et pn>f« per ordinary share 
Interim dividend pa ordinary share 


First six 

First six 

% 

months 1997 

months 1996 

change 

739 

617 

19.8 

740 

541 

36.8 

1,031 

804 

28.3 

IJ5 

1.13 

203 

0.53 

0.44 

20.5 

30 June 

31 December 


1997 

1996 


288.728 

247,682 

16.6 

23.139 

IS, Of i 

28.5 


1 Tniil g«seis **) 288 , 72 o *' 47 , M 2 16.0 

SforchoUfers’ equity «■) 23,139 IS, Oil 28.S 

» , Rgju'u U.S.S 1.00 = NIG 1.884 (average exchange ratel 

„* t anj .shareholders' equity: US.S 1.00 = NLG 1.964 (exchange rare on 30 June 1997) 


. In the first six months of 1997 business volume, results, shareholders' equity and total assets 
showed continued strong growth. All the Group's activities contributed to this growth. 

: Total income from the insurance operations rose by 28.0% to US.S 1 1 .6 billion. Total 
income from the banking operations increased by 23.8°b to U.S.S 3.6 billion. 

The result from the insurance operations rose due to an increase of 12.9% in life insurance 
(to US.S 352 million), of 42.2% in non-life insurance (to U.S.S 141 million) and of 19.3% 
in insurance-general {to U.S.S 246 million). 

, In the banking operations, interest result increased by 16.3% to U.S.S 2,095 miltion, 
commission income by 27.6% to U.S.S 873 million and the result from financial transactions 
by 68.0% to US.S 476 million. 

. Provisions have been made for future expenditure for a total amount of US.S 171 million. 

: In the first' six months of 1997 the item Value adjustments to receivables of the banking 
operations amounted to U.S.S 212 million and the addition to the new Fund for general 
banking risks was U.S.S 48 million. In the first six months of 1996, the Value adjustments 
to receivables of the banking operations amounted to US.S 305 million. 

■ The assets under management of ING Asset Management increased by 11.8% from 
US.S 125 billion at the end of 19 96 to U.S.S 140 billion at the end of June 1997. The 
performance has been favourable. 


ING 






GROUP 


Internet: http://www,i nggroup.com 

The report for the fim six months 1997 can be obtained at the following address: ING Group, 

P.O. Box 810, 1000 AVAmstctxlam,ThcNetficrfcmds..Telephone:(+3I)20 54l 54 71, fax: (+31) 20 541 54 51. 


i 


PAGE 16 


Sports 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 ■> 

-A:'. • -s 



,-*• v' 


World Roundup 


Games Canceled 

Sports events in Britain are to be 
called off Saturday to mark the fu- 
neral of Diana, Princess of Wales, 
officials said Monday. 

Scottish football chiefs were 
locked in talks with FIFA, the gov- 
erning body of world soccer, and 
the British government to decide 
whether the World Cop qualifier 
against Belarus in Aberdeen should 
go ahead on the day of the funeral. 

Engl ish soccer’s Premier League 
is inactive Saturday before Eng- 
land's World Cup qualifier against 
Moldova the following Wednes- 
day, but matches in the lower di- 
vision will be called off Saturday. 
So will rugby union league matches 
and horse race meetings. 

Princess Anne, sister of Diana's 
former husband. Prince Charles, 
will not attend the International 
Olympic Committee congress in 
Lausanne, Switzerland, that will 
vote this week on the site of the 
2004 Olympics. Anne has been a 
member since Reuters) 

Olympic Traznpolining 

Olympics The IOC gave its ap- 
proval Monday for the addition of 
whitewater canoeing, women 's wa- 
ter polo and trampo lining to the 
2000 Sydney Olympics. 

Whitewater kayaking, or canoe 
slalom, had been dropped from the 
program last year on grounds that 
the course was too expensive. 

Among those who had put pres- 
sure on Sydney to reinstate canoe 
slalom was President Jacques Chir- 
ac of France. France won a gold 
medal in the event in Atlanta. 

Trampo lining will be included 
for the first time. It will take place 
during a rest day of gymnastics. 

FINA, the governing body of 
world swimming, has resisted 
adding women's water polo and 
must approve the decision at its 
congress at the world swimming 
championships in Perth, Australia, 
in January. Australia, the world 
champion, has lobbied for the in- 
clusion of the sport 
The IOC had previously ap- 
proved two new sports for Sydney: 
triathlon and tae kwon do. (AP) 

Bomb in Athens 

Olympics A leftist group 
claimed responsibility Monday for 
a firebomb attack that damaged the 
entrance to the offices of the Greek 
Olympic Committee in Athens. 

A police official said an anonym- 
ous caller claiming to represent the 
group, known as the Struggle, told 
an Athens newspaper that it carried 
out the attack late Sunday to oppose 
Athens's bid for the 2004 Sommer 
Olympics. No one was injured by 
the bomb — three gas canisters and 
a fuse. The fire burned the door to 
the offices. (AP) 

A Rose by Any Other Name 


. Pete Rose Jr., the son 
of Pete Rose, base-ball’ s a! l-rime hit 
leader, made his major league de- 
but Monday in Cincinnati and got a 
hit in the second inning. 

Petey, as he is known, is 27. He 
started at third base for the Reds, 
the team with which his father made 
his name. With Pete Rose watching 
from the first row next to the borne 
dugout, Petey struck out swinging 
against Kevin Appier, the Kansas 
City pitcher, in his first at-baL But 
in his next at-bat, Petey singled off 
the glove of first baseman Jeff 
King. He raised his fist, but didn’t 
look at his father. The crowd 
chanted: “Pete! Pete! Pete!” 

Petey wore his father’s No. 14. He 
went to the plate with one of his 
father's black Mizuno bats, a gift 
he’s been saving for this occasion 
since 1986. He imitated his father's 
batting crouch for the first pitch, then 
went into his normal stance. (AP) 


Seles and Agassi Rise 
To ‘Former Lives’ 


By Robin Finn 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Been there, done 
that, won that And there's no time like 
the present to do it agaio. 

Monica Seles and Andre Agassi, both 
former U.S. Open champions, are con- 
vinced that their stars are finally on die 
rise again and are tired of talking about 
how much more intrepid they were in 
their self-described “former fives." 

Back then Seles was unstabbed and 
fearless, and Agassi was balancing 
Grand Slam tides with celebrity. Now 


U.S. Open Teni 


both are trying to get on with the busi- 
ness of reasserting, and reinventing, 
themselves on the Grand Slam front 
Sunday, die second-seeded Seles and 
the unseeded Agassi punched in for 
their assignments at the Arthur Ashe 
Stadium and reclaimed a level of com- 
petitiveness that left their opponents 
drained, bedraggled and wishing they 
had caught die two revivalists on an off 
day. 

Though Seles allowed the ninth- 
seeded Mary Pierce to dictate the power 

S lays in their opening set the two-time 
r.S. Open champion turned testy in the 
second. Up went the volume of her 
grunts, up went the velocity of her 
serves, and out went Pierce. 1-6, 6-2, 6- 
2 . 

"Once she's on a roll, she doesn't let 
up," said Pierce, who admitted that die 
hints of vintage Seles — the forehands 
jackhammered down the line, the nasty 
angles carved by her backhands — were 
daunting. "Over all, she’s not as ag- 
gressive as she was before, but she still 
hits amazing shots." 

Seles conceded that she does not have 
the sting that look her to Lhe No. 1 
ranking and brought her eight Grand 
Slam titles while she was still a teen- 
ager. Back then she was on automatic 
pilot and unafraid of her destination; 
these days, after the 1993 attack that 
changed her life and effectively cut her 
career in two, she does not have the 
luxury of thoughdessness. 

"J pretty much wasn't thinking," 
Seles said of her early years, when she 


terrorized opponents with her two-fisted 
shots and single-minded ambition. 
don’t think I would have started think- 
ing if somebody wouldn't have stabbed 
me in the back sitting on the tennis court 
during a match. I still believe I have the 
same mindset, but once somebody does 
that, they lake your feeling of security 
away. 

Obviously the level I played was very 
different at that point, but that’s the level 
I’ll hopefully get back, and maybe even 
belter. 

Agassi bas not yet set his sights on 
being better than he was before, but 
knowing he won the U.S. Open while 
unseeded in 1 994 has convinced him he 
can reprise that feat this year. 

Sunday, he roared past the Australian 
Mark Woodforde, who confessed to be- 
ing frightened by the quality of Agassi’s 
returns. After completing his 6-2, 6-2, 6- 
4 rout, Agassi proclaimed himself back 
in Lhe grip of the tennis gods he regularly 
defies. 

"The fact is. I’m extreme in what I 
do, and my priorities, and when 
something shifts, my intensity does with 
it,” Agassi said. “J’m trying to give all 
to everything in ray life, and it doesn’t 
seem to do anything but drain you, so 
I’ve respondedby focusing my attention 
intensely at different times." 

Though no seeded men were knocked 
from the r unnin g Sunday, two of them 
took the long route into the round of 16. 
After blowing his two-sets-to-none lead 
over the persistent Argentine Heraan 
Gumy. the seventh-seeded Sergi 
Bruguera of Spain needed three hours 
but survived with a 6-1 , 6-4, 5-7, 3-6, 6- 
4 victory. 

Michael Chang, seeded second, ad- 
vanced against outclassed Sargis 
Sargsian of Armenia, 6-1 , 6-3, 7-5, and 
will take a 4-0 record against Cedric 
Pioline of France into their fourth-round 
matchup. 

And the lOth-seeded Marcel o Rios of 
Chile, who is using the U.S. Open like 
his own marathon training session, won 
his second consecutive five-setter and 
reached the round of 16 for the first time. 
Rios popped out his sixth ace at match 
point and. helped by 71 unforced errors 
from a cramping Tommy Haas of Ger- 
many, advanced, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 1-6, 6-1. 




And Faces 
Her 





c V<e: 


Partner 


1 1° 


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ludn ViQpa/Hir LmvnJInJ FVm 


Lindsay Davenport concentrating Monday on a backhand to Magui Serna. 


Before this tournament began, Rios's 
sponsor, Nike, provided him with a cus- 
tom-made pair of shoes to match his 
clothing line. 

Unfortunately, the custom-made 
shoes left him' with a badly irritated 
tendon on top of his right foot. He 
survived a five-setter in the second 
round against Kenneth C arisen of Den- 
mark and went back to his old footwear, 
but he could only practice briefly on 
Saturday and received treatment 
throughout the match Sunday. After- 
ward, he complained of numbness in his 
lower right leg. 

“He can’t push off with his right foot 
on his serve,” said Larry Stefanki, his 


coach. "The good news is he toughed 
something out." Rios, one of the most 
gifted shotmakers on tour, has a repu- 
tation for folding when adversity 
strikes, but he has now won seven five- 
set matches in a row. 

• 

Agassi wore a black ribbon- on his 
pink shin to pay his respects to Diana, 
Princess of Wales, and to her com- 
panion, Dodi al Fayed, who were killed 
in an automobile accident in Paris early 
Sunday. Several years ago. Fayed was 
romantically linked to Brooke Shields, 
who is now Agassi's wife. A moment of 
silence was observed in Arthur Ashe 
Stadium before Agassi's match. 


CcmptM bvOarSKg Fwm 

NEW YORK — Martina Hingis, tfei; 
World No. 1, beat 40th-rated FlorenciaT-- : 
La bat 6-0, 6-2 on Monday as four seeded-' • ' 
women moved into the U.S. Ope*- 
quarter-finals with straight-set victories. 1 ^ . 

The results mean two doubles tan^v; 
dems will be opponents in singles- . 

quarter-finals. • . 

Hingis will face her doubles partner'.;.,.., 
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario of Spain. This* •: 
No. 10 seed beat Rachel McQuillan of- 
Australia 6-1. 6-2. 

"We play each other often, Hing® 
said: "At the French Open, it was the^. 
same. It doesn’t make a difference. Yon- 7 : 
are maybe a little better friends, but you^ _-t 
still want to win." 

Jana Novotna, the No. 3 seed, bedt- 
Mary Joe Fernandez, the No. 12 seed, 7^’ 

5, 6-A. Novotna’s doubles partner Lind- A' 
say Davenport, the No. 6 seed, crushed ; 
Magui Serna, anunseeded Spaniard, 6-0j| . - 

4 ‘It’ s strange because we more or \tss- ■ . 
know each other so well," Novotna* ' 
said. "We will go after the weaknesses 
It doesn't bother me.” 

Davenport who needed only 2F 
minutes to zip through the first set, break- 
ing Serna, who is 18, three times while’ 
pounding out 13 winners. The second set* 
took 32 minutes as Sema calmed . •’• 
nerves and held serve three times. . . -*■*- 

"I don't think you have to be 15 to 
well on the tour." Davenport said. "IF- 
I’m playing well, I can definitely win’ 
this tournament." 

"In the past couple years, you always' , 
hear, ‘Well are you ready to win a Grand* 
Slam? When is the next American-born _ . 
player going to win’," she and ‘T 
maybe let the talk get to me a little bit.* 5, : 

Greg Rusedski of Britain became thk£- ( 
first man to reach the quarterfinals, oust- ' 
ing Daniel Vacek of the Czech Republic; ■ 

7-6 (7-2), 6-2, 6-2. in 99 minutes. : c m 

Rusedski blasted 16 aces past Vacek; 
and won the match with a service win- 
ner after an hour and 39 minutes. - 

(AP, AFP, Reuters) 


jtuTfl-poon 

: 






kni* * 


5u*y , 



Red Hot White Sox Brush Aside Astros 


Sun Hi&WAgcficc Fiancr-ftc* 

The Expos' Vladimir Guerrero trying to beat out a ground ball, with 
Yankees catcher Joe Girardi in pursuit. Guerrero was thrown out at first 


The Associated Press 

The Chicago White Sox warmed up 
for their visit to Cleveland by beating 
the Houston Astros, 3-1, at home in 
interleague play. 

The victory Sunday gave Chicago a 
sweep of the three-game series. 

The White Sox. who are four games 
behind the Indians in the American 
League Central Division, start a three- 
game series Friday in Cleveland and 

Baseball Roundup 

then return to Chicago for three games 
against the Milwaukee Brewers, who 
are a half-game ahead of them in the 
division. 

Albert Belle drove in two runs for 
Chicago on Sunday to reach 100 runs 
batted in for tbe sixth straight season. 

Brewers 3 , Pirates 2 In Milwaukee, 
pinch hitter Jeff Huson hit a one-out 
run-scoring single with the bases loaded 
in the ninth. 

Milwaukee picked up pitcher Pete 
Hamisch from the Mets, one day after he 
was dropped from New York’s roster. 

"It gels us an experienced arm for the 
next 30 days,” said Sal Bando, the 
Brewers' general manager. 

The Pirates, meanwhile, acquired 
shortstop Shawon Dunston from the 
Chicago Cubs for a player to be named 
later. 

Yankws 3, Expos 2 Mariano Rivera 
escaped a bases- loaded jam in the eighth 
to help Andy Pettitte (16-7) win and 
host New York avoid being swept by 


Montreal. During pregame ceremonies, 
the Yankees retired Don Mattingly’s 
No.23. 

With the bases loaded, Rivera, who 
had blown his last two saves, struck out 
pinch hitter Danin Fletcher for his 40th 
save in 48 chances. 

Mots 4, Orio las i Rick Reed (11-8) 
allowed four hits in seven innings as 
visiting New York beat Baltimore. 

Bernard Gilkey and Butch Huskey 
homered for the Mets. 

Cardinals 5, Royals 4 Willie McGee’s 
infield single enabled Royce Clayton to 
hustle home with the go-ahead run as Si. 
Louis scored five limes in the seventh in 
Kansas City and won the rubber game in 
the rematch of 1985 World Series 
rivals. 

McGee, the only man in tbe game 
who played in that series — won by the 
Royals — also starred Friday night 
when his bases-loaded triple beat Kan- 
sas City, 9-7. 

Twins a, Rads 6 In Minneapolis. 
Many Coidova ended a l-for-26 slump 
with a pair of run-scoring doubles to 
help Brad Radke (18-7) win for just the 
second time in five starts. 

Mariners 3, Dodgers 1 In Los Angeles, 
Dan Wilson singled home the go-ahead 
run in the 1 0th for Seattle. 

Ken Griffey hit his major league- 
leading 44th home run in the first. *" 

Padres 5, Rangers 3 In San Diego. 
Wally Joyner went 3-for4 and Ken 
Caminili hit a two-run single in a four- 
run third. 

Rockies 10, Athletics 4 In Denver, 


Larry Walker hit his National League- 
leading 39th and 40th home runs. WalJC- 
er went 3-for-4 as Colorado won itf 
sixth straight 

Angels 7, Giants 4 Angelo Encar- 
nacion, who entered the game without d' 
hit in the American League, connected 
for a three-run homer and added an rutf* 
scoring single as Anaheim won in Saa 
Francisco. 

Braves 7, Red Sox 3 Atlanta ’ s AndruW 
Jones hit the 10th grand slam in the Nfr 
this season, a league record, as til’d- 
Braves swept the Red Sox in Boston. 

Tom Glavine retired 18 consecutive* 
batters from the second inning until thb 
eighth, when Mo Vaughn hit his second’ 
homer. 

In games reported in later edition j, 
Monday: 

MarOns a, Bhw days 3 In Toronto, rook- 
ie Livan Hernandez improved to 9-0 as 
Florida completed a three-game sweep: 

Indians 9, Cubs s In Cleveland, 
Charles Nagy pitched seven innings ami 
Matt Williams extended his hitting 
streak to a career-high 17 games with 
two run-scoring singles. 

During the game, the Indians ac- 
quired Jeadoff hitter Bip Roberts froth 
Kansas City for a minor-league pitcher. 
Cleveland made the deal because Mac- 
quis Grissom has been unable to provide 
consistency in the leadoff spot of the 
Indians' batting order. 

Tigers 2, Phillies 1 In Detroit, Justip 
Thompson outdueled Mark Leiter for 
his first victory in four starts, and Deivi 
Cruz had three hits for the Tigers. ‘ 


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<r& 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 



W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

Bodunoro 

BS 

48 

439 

— 

New York 

79 

55 

-wa 

6V1 

Boston 

07 

70 

.489 

20 

Toronto 

65 

70 

-481 

21 

Detroit 

63 

72 

.467 

23 

CENTRAL DIVtSION 



Cleveland 

70 

62 

J30 

— 

Milwaukee 

68 

67 

.504 

T-: 

Chicago 

68 

68 

MO 

4 

Minnesota 

56 

78 

.416 

15 

Kansas City 

AS 

78 

414 

IS 1 ^ 


WEST OtVBtON 



Soattla 

75 

62 

.547 



Anaheim 

74 

£3 

.540 

| 

Teos 

64 

73 

.467 

u 

Oakland 

53 

84 

J87 

22 

NJUIONJULUAWn 



EJLETHVBKMI 




w 

L 

Pd. 

6B 

Atlanta 

85 

51 

625 

— 

Florida 

80 

55 

593 

4tv 

New York 

73 

62 

-S4I 

im 

Montreal 

67 

68 

-494 

17>6 

Philadelphia 

50 

82 

.379 

33 

CENTBALOtTOWH 



Houston 

70 

66 

J15 

— 

PMsburgh 

68 

69 

496 

TVi 

SL Louis 

43 

73 

.463 

7 

Cincinnati 

59 

75 

440 

10 

Chicago 

55 

82 

401 

IS'i 


WESTOmSSON 



Los Angeles 

78 

60 

.565 

— 

SonFrandsec 

1 75 

62 

Si ; 

T, 

Colorado 

68 

70 

493 

10 

San Diego 

65 

73 

471 

13 

SUNDAY'S UHISCOUS 



hterleaouE 



Florida 

318 

010 003-8 

10 0 

Tsraata 

100 

100 001-3 

9 ! 


LHOMndM, Powell (6), Cook (91. ken (91 
and Zaun- W.WHflqms, Janzai (8J and 
OBriai. W— L. Hernandez, 9-U. L— W. 
WlUtarm. 7-U HRs— Florida Sheffield (Id), 
Toronto, Cnn Jr. (211. 

PMaMpMa on 001 OOO-l 1 1 

Detroit 000 200 Kfe-2 7 0 


M-Lefler, Karp (B) and Parent 
Ju. Thompson. Brecon (8), ToJones P»l and 
Casanova. W — Ju. Thompson. 12-10. L— M. 
Letter. 0-U. S*-TaJcnes OS). 

Chicago (KL) 000 001 12T-5 11 0 

aevetaod 230 030 01X-9 II 1 

Batista D. Stevens 15), R. Tatis IB) and 
Houston; Nagy, Juden (S, Assenmaehei (81 
and S, Alomar. W— Nagy, tW. L— Batista, 0- 

3. Sv— Assenmadwr G). HRs— Chicago. D. 
Clark (5). Cleveland. Grissom (10). 

Now York (NL) 102 100 000—4 B 0 

Botfiman 000 001 oot-l i l 

R.Reed. Rojos (B). Jc-Froncn (9) and Prate 
Key. Rhodes 173. A .Ben Iter (9) and Holes. 
W— R. Rood, 11-8. L— Key. 14-8. 

Sv— Jo.Fnmoo (33). HRs— New York. Gilkey 
U4i. Huskey (171. BaRhnore Surhoff (!«>. 
Ctednatt B3B 001 101— « 12 a 

Minesata 000 304 Olx-fl 11 0 

G.WMte> Graves W). P. ZLMort1ne2 (6). 
Sullivan (Al and Fantyca- Radka Swindell 
(73. TretnUev (7). Goar dado (8), Aon Beta (9) 
and SWnboch- W— Radke.. IB-7. L — G. 
White, 2-2. SV— Aguilera (22J. HRs— 
Ctnctenatl Slynes (3). w. Greene (201. 
Manfred 000 000 020-2 9 0 

New York (AL) 101 000 10s— 3 B 1 

Ml Johnson. Bennett (7). Line (8) and 
Widow. F Metier (B); Pottttte, Nelson (8), 
S ronton (8). M. Rhera (81 and Girardi. 
W— Petlttta 16-7. L— MUohnsoa Vi 
Sv— M. Rivera (4Q). HR— Now York, 
Be.W3Hm«{!B). 

PittsteirdT 00O OM 000-2 7 0 

MOwtekee 000 200 601—3 it a 

Schmkft CMsttaraen (0), M. WllUire (Bl 
and Kendall; Eldred, Davis (63. Wlckman (6), 
DaJones (9) and Levis. W— DaJones. 6-S. 
L-M. WBdns. W. HR— M- Ju.Fninco 161. 
St. Louts 000 000 500-5 9 0 

KnsasGtr <00 00T 010-4 8 1 

Osborne. C King (7), Eckcrelcr (9) and 
D'lfefas Rusch, Oban 17). Pichardo (BI. J. 
Monkjomery (9) and Ml.Swceiwy. W — 
Osborne, 3-6. L— Otsoa 1-2. Sv— Eckcrster 
132). HRs — ICC Palmer (19), Y.Benrrez (6) 
KoMlun 000 000 100-1 7 0 

Chicago (AU 001 026 IKbt-3 9 0 

Reynolds. Hudek (71, T. Marlin (8) and 
Pena Ausmus flfl; Baldwin. T.CosWIo (73, 
Foulke (Bl Karehner (9) and Fabregas. 
w— Baldwin, 1M1 L-ReynoWi 6-9. 
Sv— Koretnw (13J. 


OakkMd 002 018 100-4 10 2 

Cohrato 002 170 OOx-IO 13 0 

OqutsL uvernurt (5). □. Johnson (5). 
Kubinski (81 and GaWittnins, Moyne (7); 
R.BoOpy. Holmes (5). LesfuraK (Bl. QcJenn 
(91 and Je-Reed. W— Hohnes 6-2. L— Oquist 
2-5. HRs— Oa Hand Stairs 2 (25). Colorado. 
L. Walker 2 (401. 

Tens 109 020 000-3 9 1 

Saa Diego 0*» 010 OOx— S 12 1 

Burkett W. HerwSa (S3, Wteteside (61 and 
I. Rodngirer; Hitchcock, TLWorrell f7l. 
Haftman (9) and Flaherty. V/— Hitchack 1 u- 
B. L— Burkett 7-11. Sv— Hoffman (32). 
HR— Tcus, Buford 17). 

Seattle 100 060 000 3-3 6 0 

Los Angefet 000 000 001 0-1 3 1 
()0lnnmgsl:Moyer. Timlm (81. Staeinnb (10). 
Aynta (101 and Da.Wibore Candied 
TD.Worreil m, Radinsky (10). Had (30) and 
Piazza, ft — Tartm 4-3. l.— To.WorreU 2-S. 
Sv-Ayakr 17). HRs-S«flte. Gnftey Jr. r44J . 
Las Angeles, Kanos (28). 

Anaheim 010 330 000-7 9 0 

Son Fraatixo 002 010 100—4 6 2 

DaJWay, Jones (6). Haiti (73, Perdrai (9] 
arid Encaimdon: Ahwrez, D. Henry (5), 
Tawez (6), MulhoSand (8) and B. Johnson. 
W — Da.May 2-1. L— Alvarez 3-2 

5v— Perehral (22). HRs— Anaheim. 

EncamaaonOi.SanFiuncisca Mueller (7). 
B. Johnson (8). 

Atlanta Ml 001 100-7 13 0 

Boston 200 NO 0)0-3 6 2 

Glavine. WbNen [93 and J. Lopez; Avery, 
Brandcnbura (4), Wakefield (ai. Cam >8). 
Gordon (7) and Harclman. W— Ghnine tJ-4. 
L— Avery ChS HRs— AH cntn, A. Jcn« iljt. 
LocUurl (41. Boston. M.Vovqtm 2 'Ml. 


FOOTBALL 


w FL Standi nc s 

AMIR KAN CONHBANCI 


Cincinnati 

1 

0 

0 i.ooa 

24 

21 

JadusamriDe 

r 

0 

0 1.000 

28 

27 

Tennessee 

1 

0 

01.000 

24 

21 

Batltmare 

a 

1 

0 .000 

27 

?S 

Pittsburgh 

0 

1 

0 000 

7 

37 


WEST 



Denver 

1 

0 

0 1J300 

19 

3 

Kansas City 

0 

1 

0 JH0 

3 

19 

Oakland 

D 

] 

0 jdoq 

21 

74 

San Diego 

0 

1 

0 OOO 

7 

41 

Seattle 

0 

I 

0 .000 

3 

41 


tn rough Aug. 30. tom! points based on 25 
points far a first placa vote through ono 
poM lor ■ 25 Hi place *ato and pravlous 
ranung: 

Record 
0-0 


mmoNAi coNFnxNcs 

EAST 


1. PenrtSL (23) 

2 . Florida (14) 
ITismessee 173 
4. Washington (93 
5 Florida Sf («J 

6. Nebraska <41 

7. North Carolina (4> 
B. Colorado <3j 

9. Ohm SI. 


1-0 

1-0 

0-0 

0-0 

1-0 

0-0 

00 

1-0 


Pts 

1.616 

1^43 

1.523 

1-502 

1.494 

IMS 

1.335 

1,373 

1,149 



W 

L 

t Pd. 

PF 

PA 

ta lsu 

GO 

1,098 

10 

Deltas 

1 

0 

01000 

37 

7 

It. Notre Damo 

(3-0 

1.M1 

II 

NT. Giants 

1 

0 

01.000 

31 

17 

12. Tom 

04) 

W 

12 

•Vashmgton 

1 

0 

0 1X00 

24 

10 

13. Miami 

1-0 

887 

14 

Aruona 

a 

1 

0 .000 

21 

24 

14. Michigan 

0-0 

820 

15 

PWladetpWo 

0 

1 

0 MO 

17 

31 

I5.Atabamo 

1-0 

7S3 

16 


CENTRAL 



16. Auburn 

0-0 

619 

17 

Detroit 

1 

0 

0 1.000 

28 

17 

17. Stanford 

0-0 

561 

18 

(Ainncsota 

1 

0 

01.000 

34 

13 

18. Chanson 

0-Q 

417 

20 

Tampa Boy 

1 

0 

01000 

13 

i 

19. Brtghon Young 

0-0 

411 

19 

Chicago 

0 

a 

0 .000 

0 

0 

2a Icwa 

04) 

374 

21 

Green Bay 

0 

0 

0 .000 

0 

0 

21. Kansas SI. 

041 

745 

22 


WEST 



be. Northwestern 

1-0 

245 

24 

Sf. Louis 

1 

0 

0 TjOOO 

38 

24 

21 Southern Cal 

0-0 

216 

23 

Alfcwta 

0 

1 

0 J300 

17 

78 

24, Cotorodo St. 

ID 

197 

_ 

CaroOna 

0 

> 

D JX» 

to 

24 

25. Michigan St. 

OJI 

163 

25 

NnvOriearts 

0 

1 

0 JJ00 

24 

38 

Othcnreccfving votes; Syracuse 144k Virginia 

ScnFranaSCe 

0 

1 

0 000 

6 

13 

Tech I4i. Artrana St. Ml N. Carolina 51. 87. 

SUNDAY’S MOULTS 



Toas 4&M 71, Washington st. 49. 

Easl 


Miami 

EAST 

W L 

1 0 

t p«t 
01.000 

PF 

16 

PA 

10 

New England 

1 

0 

01.000 

41 

? 

N.Y. Jets 

1 

0 

oijooo 

41 

3 

Buffalo 

0 

1 

0 oca 

13 

34 

Indianapolis 

0 

1 

0 .000 

ID 

16 


Cncinintl 24, ArizarM 21 
Detroit 2& Aflaita 17 
□albs 37, Pittsburgh 7 
Miami t& IndksiapaTa 10 
7/inr>c50ta 34. Buffato 13 
Si. Louis 3& New Oilcans 24 
Tennessee 24 Oakland 21, OT 
New York Gtanh 31. Pteladclphic 17 
New England 41. San Dteao 7 
Jndtsenvifloa Bottimorr 27 
Cenverl9, Kansas 3 
Nee. York JMs4i,S«iftie3 
Tsmpd Bay 13. San Francisco b 
Wfisttmaton 24 Carolina 10 

The AP Top 25 

The Top Tw e nty Five Mama m The 
Ajwoelated Praas cofioga (ooiMtt poll, wfth 
firshplace voles in parentheses, records 


Carolina 27, Virginia 7& Arirona 21, Geatgio 
2a rrra vnglrea 19. South Caralira la 
SNithcre MKs. a Pico 3. Utah 2. Georgia 
Tech 1. San Diego St I. Wisconsin l . 

CFL Stanwngs 

EJUTDUI DIVUHON 

tf L T PF PAPh. 

Toronto 7 1 0 1* 286 1 73 

Montreal 7 3 0 14 261 29? 

Winnipeg 2 8 0 4 239 301 

Hamilton 1 8 0 2 200 264 

WKxmtM cnruROM 
Edmwlon 7 3 0 14 268 217 

British Catambta t> s » i!3w 77< 
CMgary 4 5 0 B 253 224 

SeskatbtevRm 4 6 0 a wa 777 

Suwtan Game 

Wirmipt-g 41 Sast atchcwan 1 2 


Milwaukee Open 

Final scares ana aamlngs Sunday at SI J 

mull an Creator UUmaukoe Open, piayod on 
6.739-vard. par-71 Brown Door Parti Golf 
Chib In Brawn Dear. Wrs.: 

Scott HoctL U J. 7046^6«—26B 

Loren Roberts. U.S. 67-6&67-6&—M 

David Sutherland. U.S. 7045-45-69—26? 

Tom Pernict Jr. U.S. 68-69-64-69-770 

Ckncncc Rose. U.S 67-46-71-07—271 

Lrv Rinkrr. U.S 68-4 < 7-b6-AB — 2 1 1 

Fulton Allcm, S. Alnca 67-49-64 71—271 

Pmuito Stack. US 70-66-70-64—272 

Frank Lie* liter, U5. 67-7148-46-772 

B4I C-tassan, U 5. 64-71-6847—272 

Jerry Kelly, U J. 7l 466649-272 

WOE LB MI7 RAMKIMOS 

I l iger Woods, U.S, 11 J2 points average 
• ■Greg Norman. Australia. I I.D4 

3. Eitnc Eh, South Africa ?.B3 
J. Nic* Price Zimbabwe. •> 48 

5. Colin Montgomerie. Britain, v ^4 

4. Tnm Lehman. H45 
7 PM Mickekon. U.5. 8.J3 

8. Masasni OrakL Japan, 8,ia 

9. Mark O'Meara. U5. 7 A? 

10 Dqws Lave III. Ui, 

11. Justin Leonard. U.S- 4.90 

12. Scott Hodb U.S- <a,‘j 

13. Fred Couple*. U.S. 6.64 
I4.5tcve Ellington. Auslrallo. r. 43 
IS. Nick Falda Britain. 6.46 


*WUU*H 9 NUT DIVISION 

Tone rile 0 Dcpariivo La ConmaO 
Barcelona 3 Real Sociedad 0 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 

Sampdona 2, Vlcerua 1 

MAMR U AOOt SOCCIB 

Dallas 4 Cutaradc I 
D C. 2, Kansas City 0 

eattere Co itlii men DC 
48 points. Tampa Bay ?3. Columbus 32. N™ 
Enqlnnd 78. NY NJ7& Western ConFarence: 

fCansas c.rv J3 ptunre.- Cotorada 3 5. Dallas 13. 
LOT Angel...-. 36, ^nn Jose 74 


TENNIS 


U.S. Open 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 

womih's sntotis 

POVHTH ROUND 

Inna Spirieo 1 1 1 j, Romania, def. Amanda 
Coeizcr (53. Souih Africa 74 f 7-4), 6-4. 

WOMEN'S DOUBLES 

THIRD ROUND 

Yayuk Ba&uki, Indonesia, and Caroline VK 
NMtierlands (a). 0<H. Annabel Elhrood and 
Krtsllne Kuncc, Auslrafla, 64), 6-4. 

DUN’S MMOLES 
THBD ROUND 

Mareelo Rtos U0>. Chile, def Tommy 
Haas Germany. 4-4, 3-e. 6-3, 1 4. 4-1. 

Andre Agassi U.S. dcf. Wart Woodfortia 
Australia, 6-7. 6-2, a-4. 

Michael Chong (2). U.S. del Sargis 
Sargsiaa Armenia 4. 1.6- L 7-5 
Semi Bniauura (7). Spain, del Hcmon 
Gumy. Argentina. 6-1, 6-4. 5-7. 34, 4 .j. 

Magnus Larssoa Sweden def Fernando 
Mefigenl, BroziL 62, 6-4, 6-3 
Wayne Ferreira Sauih Africa del Jusiln 

GlmHriob Ui. 5.7. 7-4 (7-31,4-3. 6-0, 

MEN'S DOUBLU 

rmno round 

. do Jogerond Pobbie Koenig, 

Dfl,re Random ond Jock 
Walta U.S. 61 3-4. 6-2. 

JW Nova hand David Pikl Cicdi Republic, 
del. Trevor Kroaemonn UJ. and Dawa 
Moepherson Aushalia fid). 6-4. 7-5. 

P cCro - nnd Cyn , Sul(,C4«h 

R. dci. Martm Damm. Crvch R. and Andrei 
Dihovskiy. Rus i/i. 6-4,6-2. 

11 c ' ^ and Jim Grabb, 

U.S. del. Gronl Cwinell and Dental Nestor, 
Canada (1 51 7-4(7-51.6-1 

Moiroars RESULTS 
WOMEN'S imam 
FOURTH HOUND 

Lindsay Davenport (41. Off. Mogu. 
Sema Spam. 6-a 4-3, 

13). Crcch Ruoubhe oei. 
Mory Joe Fernandes (12), u.5. 7.5. « 

Anmtm Sane he; VKarfa (I0i. Spam! d e r 
Raoiol McOiiQtaiv AuslraUad-l.a .2 
Martina Hingis M3, Swllrertand. dot. Fk>- 
renao Labat. Argentina 6 0 . 4.2 


WOMEN’S BOOBUS — 

THMD ROUND 

Ruumdra Dragamir. Romania and Iva 
MaiofL Croatia tlai. del. Larisa Nettand 
Latvia and Helena Sukova Ciech Republic 
i5i. 5-1 relired. . ■ 

Nleale Arendl. U J. and Manon Boriegral 
Nethertands (d). def. Amy Frailer ond Kim- 
berly Pa. UJ. rUj .64 6 . 2 . 

MEM-SSINOLES 
FOURTH ROUND 

Greg Rusedski Bntain. dot. DaniH Voa*. 
Ciech Repubfic. 7^ (7-2). 6-1 6-7. 


) 



lASfBAU, 

ANCRICAM LEAGUE 

fLEV elan a— Acquired OF Bip Roberts 
Irom Kxutsas Cily tar RHP Roland do lb 
Moza 

Minnesota— T raded OF Danin Jacksonte 
hllhuaukee Brewers for player la be named: 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

CHiCAco-Traded SS Shawon Dunslon ra 
(..sburgh Pirates ter playei Id be named. 

Houston— B ought contract of C Randy 
Knon ham Hew arteans. AA. and pm him 1 5. 
day disabled Bst. 

new York— D esignated RHP Pole Har- 
msch far assignment and traded him la Niti. 

wnukcetarOF Danny Moa«u Activated PHP 

Paul Wdvm tram 60-day disabled fef and 
aphoned him to Sf. Lucfc. FS L " 

FinsBu«CH-Put SS Kwh Pwcovfch ^ 

d r d ,!?" 6ted 051 ^ eCnm ,NF CoS 

from Calgary, pcl 

M4TIAU 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE * 

^«SSSSS. Ei, “ s *«i- 

^Xto^on for^r^r^ T™ 

ST. JOSEPHS. PA._Am, f0f Dl - | l- * 

bashcmaii q Althu »Ptiomore 

'ncIra.WebrfaHsemrrSr ***«*«* 



T " : . ■ 















L." 


— * **W7 


PAGES* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 

SPORTS 


R4GE17 



'ermeiVs Luck: 

'"'is taints March In 

V11 .I f. 



ife 








\ 


By TJ. Simers 

Los Angela Tones Service 

ST. LOUIS — Dick Ver- 
eiL tbe SL Louis Rams new 
>ach, came across the field 
fore the game and gave a 
ig bear hug to Mike Ditka, 
ke New Orleans Saints new 
Dacfi, obviously thankful to 
itum to coaching in the Na- 
onal Football League 

■ gainst the hapless likes of the 
aims after a 14-year layoff. 

" The lights were turned off, 
‘ ‘ . laser-light show began and, 
-■ is the introductions started, 
/ermeil ran 30 yards full 

- ;peed through a line of wav- 
ng cheerleaders and leaped 

- into the aims of a St. Loois 
Rams tackle, Fred Miller. 

. Sixty years old and kids 
• will be kids as Vermeil re- 
turned to the sideline for the 
first time since Jan. X 1983. 
. . Three hours later he was 
. ’'shaking Ditka ’s hand after a 
. 38-24 party in the Trans 
7. World Dome before 64,575. 

■ ■ Doused by water bottles by 
. his appreciative players, he 

then moved into the Ram 
' Icxrker room. 

- /‘Give me a football,” Ver- 
meil said, and then he was 

~ handing it off to Lawrence 
Phillips, who had rushed for a 
." career-high 125 yards and 
1 scored three touchdowns. 

• ‘Tve beat to jail with him, 
been behind closed doors with 
him and this is a good guy. " 

Three cheers went up for 
~ Phillips, and Vermeil, who 
■ flew to Nebraska earlier this 

• year to fetch Phillips from jail 
after the player served 23 
days for a probation violation, 

' ■ added. “It's all up to this guy 
. now on the field and off. 

Another cheer followed, 
.. and Phillips moved in front of 
. . .-.his teammates. 

.. ■ • “I couldn’t have done it 
. __ without you guys," Phillips 
. - said. Although the Rams had 
•. ■ .; .ust overcome a 17-14 half- 
. ime deficit to beat die lowly 
■ -.r; Saints, they talked as if this 
vas comparable to winning a 
...Super Bowl. 

Down the hall, Ditka took 
lis place in front of the mi- 
• . otophones. 

"Well, I'd like to say I 

haven’t been here before, but 

I'm afraid I have,” said Ditka, 
who left die game four years 


The Saints had been 
charged with 10 penalties. 


per 

five 



ioued butt-whippin’. You all 
saw it. I saw it, too, and there’s 
. not much else I can say about it 
— we just got hammered.” 

He will probably be saying 
that a lot this year, given the 
Saints’ level of talent, and if 
anyone chose to begin their 
season by watching New Or- 
leans, they had to leave feel- 
ing cheated: No Ditka explo- 
sions. No spitting, kicking or 
obscene gestures. 

"We were completely in a 
daze half die time,” said 
Ditka, who benched his start- 
ing quarterback. Heath Shuler, 
to start the fourth quarter. 


turned the ball over five times 
and had been outgained by Sl 
L ouis, 403 yards to 24 1 . 

Ditka tried to be different, 
calling a flea-flicker on the 
second play of scrimmage for 
a 39-yard gain and then again 
on the team's second posses- 
sion for an interception. And 
he had his kickoff team run a 
fake reverse, allowing Erie 
Guliford to post a team-record 
102-yard return for a score. 

But then it "came down to 
just football," Vermeil said, 
and the Saints were over- 
matched. 

"They throw a three-yard 
pass to a tight end who runs 
60 yards over everybody in 
tbe country." said Ditka, who 
also had his streak of nine 
season-opening victories 
broken. "Everybody had a 
shot at him, but nobody 
tackled him.” 

Ernie Conwell, a tight end 
and one of the young, talented 
players the Rams have been 
able to stockpile because of 
good drafting position after 
so many bad seasons, actually 
went 46 yards back and forth 
across the field, shredding die 
Saint defense to give St 
Louis a 21-17 Jead midway 
through the third quarter. 

Rookie Troy Davis 
fumbled tbe ensuing kickoff, 
and two plays later Phillips 
went left 25 yards for his 
second touchdown and the 
rout was on. Phillips scored 
from five yards out on St 
Louis' next possession. 

"I think the whole team 
wanted to come out and per- 
form for Coach Vermeil,” 
said Phillips, who became 
downright chatty after record- 
ing the third 100-yard rushing 
game of his two-year career. 

Phillips, while bothered by 
a sore knee recently, has had 
much more serious problems. 
He was arrested for assaulting 
his girlfriend while still at the 
University of Nebraska, ar- 
rested again on drunk driving 
and speeding charges in Los 
Angeles and arrested again in 
St Louis in February on dis- 
orderly conduct charges. 

Enter Vermeil, who at first 
proclaimed a no-rolerani ap- 
proach to dealing with 
today’s troubled athlete, but 
then relented after meeting 
Phillips, or watching him 
cany the ball on videotape. 
Vermeil began counseling 
him and working to raise his 
self-esteem. 

When Phillips lost 
$100,000 of a $300,000 
workout bonus because of jail 
time. Vermeil had team man- 
agement reinstate the money 
as part of his base salary this 
season. 

"Lawrence and I have ex- 
perienced a lot of things and 
let me tell you. I’ve been 
around a lot of [bad guys], and 
this isn’t one of them," he 
said. “This is a complex kid 
but a good kid and a damn 
good football player." 



Cowboys Ride 
Roughshod 
Over Steelers 


kimbtih Batik/ Agraer Fnnn^hr^-* 

Anthony Miller, tbe Cowboys wide receiver, broke free of Randy Fuller of the Steelers and got a first down. 

Bucs Batter 49ers for 13-6 Victory 


The Associated Press 

Steve Young walked off the field 
slowly, soon to be followed by Jerry 
Rice. With them went the San Francisco 
49ers' chances of victory in Tampa. 

Young, who suffered a concussion, re- 
turned in the third quarter bnt Rice could 
be out for the year, Steve Mariucci, tbe 
new San Francisco coach, said Monday. 

The wide receiver had a scan on his 
knee on Sunday night. Mariucci. the new 
San Francisco coach, said the team's 
doctor told him that Rice probably tore 
two ligaments in his left knee. 

With Young slowed and Rice miss- 
ing. a relentless Bucs' defense led by 
Warren Sapp held the usually potent 
49ers to 45 second-half yards in a 13-6 
victory. 

"After those two guys, they'rejusran 
average football team." said Hardy 
Nickerson, a Buccaneers linebacker. 

"You saw how the team reacted — 
from the coaches all the way down." 
said William Floyd, a 49ers fullback. 

"This is just a starring point,” said 
Sapp, who was involved in both plays 
that sent Young and Rice to the sideline. 
"There’s no more old Bucs, baby." 

Young, plagued by concussions in 
recent seasons, returned with 1 1 seconds 
to go in the third quarter with the 49ers 
leading, 6-3. 

Sapp chased the 49ers' quarterback 
down from behind to sack him for an 1 1- 
yard loss, forcing a punt on the fifth play 
of the game. Rice hurt his knee late in the 
second quarter after taking a handoff 
from Y oung’s replacement. Jeff Brohm. 
on a reverse. Sapp penetrated die 49ers’ 
backSeld, reached out and caught Rice’s 
face mask as the NFL’s all-tirae leading 
receiver tried to circle the left end. 

The 49ers were limited to Gary An- 
derson's two field goals, and finished 
with 191 yards total offense. They failed 
to score a touchdown for the first time in 
97 games. 

Jets 41 , Seahawfu 3 In Seattle, Neil 
O’Donnell passed for a five touchdowns 
as New York rolled over Seattle, which 


suffered its worst home loss ever. 
O’Donnell was 18-for- 25 for 270 yards 
with no interceptions. Adrian Murrell 
rushed for 131 yards on 24 carries. 

“I couldn’t hope for anything better 
than that," said Bill Parcells, the Jets' 
new coach. 

Lions 28 , Falcons 1? Detroit got only 
33 yards from its starting running back. 

llW^lOU NO UP _ 

Barry Sanders but scored two defensive 
touchdowns to win Bobby Ross's first 
game as coach. 

Stephen Boyd returned a fumble for a 
touchdown and set up a go-ahead score 
with an interception, spoiling Dan 
Reeves's debut with Atlanta. Linebacker 
Reggie Brown returned an interception 
38 yards for an insurance touchdown 
with 3:57 remaining. 

Oilers 24 , Raiders 21 Eddie George 
rushed for 216 yards — the second- 
highest opening-day total in National 
Football League history behind O.J. 
Simpson's 250 in 1973 — and Steve 
McNair led an overtime drive capped by 
a 33-yard field goal by A1 Dei Greco. 

The Raiders, under their new coach, 
Joe Bugel, got good performances from 
Jeff George and Tim Brown. Jeff George 
was 21-for-37 for 298 yards and three 
touchdowns, all of them to Brown, who 
caught eight passes for 158 yards. 

Jaguars 28 , Ravens 27 A girapy Rob 
Johnson, playing in place of the injured 
Mark Brunei!, threw a 28-yard touch- 
down pass to Jimmy Smith with 5:47 
left, lifting Jacksonville to victory in 
Baltimore. Inhis first NFL start, Johnson 
overcame a badly sprained left ankle, 
completing 20 of 24 passes for 294 yards 
and two touchdowns. 

Bengals 24 , Cardinals 21 Cincinnati 
scored three fourth-quarter touchdowns, 
including a 6-yard pass from Jeff Blake 
to Carl Pickens with 38 seconds left 
against Arizona. 

Ki-Jana Carter's 1-yard run made it 
21-16 with 2:14 left. But die visiting 


Cardinals couldn't run out the clock. 
Larry Centers fumbled at Cincinnati's 
37 with 1:10 left setting up the final 
drive. Blake completed three consec- 
utive sideline passes to srop the dock 
and get the Bengals close. 

Giants 31, Eagiss 17 Tiki Barber, one 
of five rookies starting for host New 
York, rushed for 88 yards and a touch- 
down in Jim Fassel's debut as the Gi- 
ants' coach. 

The Giants' defense sacked Phil- 
adelphia quarterbacks nine times, and 
safety Sam Games returned a fourth- 
quarter interception 95 yards. 

Dolphins 16, Colts io Olindo Mare 
lucked his first three NFL field goals and 
safety Shawn Wooden came up with 
three turnovers for Miami against vis- 
iting Indianapolis. 

Dan Marino, playing in his 200th 
game in his 15th season, completed just 
10 of 26 passes for 105 yards. 

Broncos 19, Chiefs 3 Terrell Davis ran 
for 101 yards and the game’s only touch- 
down. a 10-yard burst early in the final 
period, and Jason Elam kicked four field 
goals for host Denver. 

John El way, shrugging off the ruptured 
biceps tendon he suffered on Aug. 4 and a 
hand injury just before the half, com- 
pleted 17 of 28 passes for 246 yards. 

Redskins 24 , Panthers IO Washington 

handed Carolina its first loss in the 10- 
game history of Ericsson Stadium be- 
hind Terry Allen's 141 yards rushing 
and two touchdowns. 

In games reported in later editions 
Monday: 

VBtmgs 34 , sms 13 Minnesota's 
Robert Smith gained a career-high 169 
yards on 1 6 carries and broke loose on a 
78-yard touchdown run early in the 
fourth quarter at Buffalo. 

Patriots 41, Chargors 7 Drew Bledsoe 

threw four TD passes in die first half as 
New England teat visiting San Diego. 

The Patriots outgained San Diego. 
323-47. in the first half, taking a 31-7 
lead as Bledsoe completed scoring 
passes to four receivers. 


By Mike Freeman 

New York Times Service 

PITTSBURGH — Mid- 
way through the second 
quarter, Pittsburgh quarter- 
back Kordeli Stewart went 
deep to wide receiver Charles 
Johnson, and Deion Sanders 
got in tbe way. 

Going for the interception, 
the Dallas comerback 
smashed into Johnson and 
comerback Kevin Smith in 
one of the scariest collisions 
you will see this year. Sanders 
was flipped over, landed on 
his head and lay on the turf for 
several seconds after the play 
before getting up. 

Instead of being stunned or 
frightened that Sanders was 
seriously hurt, the crowd of 
60,396 at Three Rivers Sta- 
dium cheered enthusiastically 
as he lay on the turf. When 
Sanders stumbled off the 
field, the fans cheered even 
louder. 

Maybe they were venting 
their frustration at how a 
game that many thought 
would be tight turned into a 
37-7 blowout of the Steelers 
by the Cowboys. No matter 
how much people try to write 
them off, no matter how many 
times they shoot themselves 
in the boot, the Cowboys are 
still one of the league's elite 
teams. 

"It butt very bad — the 
pain all through my body, es- 
pecially my back,” Sanders 
said about tbe collision. 
“When I was down on the 
ground. I heard those fans 
cheering and they were just so 
happy and something hit me 
ana said: ‘Get up. You're not 
going to give these people this 
glory. Get up. Get back out 
there and do your thing.’ And 
that's what I did." 

The Cowboys have never 
lost their toughness. Beating 
up Pittsburgh at home, so 
badly, in so many ways, well, 
that about says it all. 

"This did kind of shock 
us," said Anthony Miller, a 
Dallas wide receiver who had 
two catches for 43 yards. "I 
don’t know what it was. We 
just clicked.” 

The Cowboys’ explosion 
was keyed by receiver Mi- 
chael Irvin, who, with his sev- 
en receptions for 153 yards 
and two touchdowns, seems 
to be benefiting from Miller, a 
former Denver Bronco, since 
defenses can no longer 
double-team Irvin. 

MUJerbad a 12-yard touch- 
down catch io give Dallas a 7- 
0 lead, but then it was all 
Irvin. He bad a 42-yard touch- 
down catch on which he 
simply ran by comerback 
Donnell Woolf or d. Irvin later 
added a 55-yard catch over 
the rookie Chad Scott that led 
to a 52-yard field goal by 
Richie Cunningham. 


Irvin ran a sweet corner 
route early in the third 
quarter, catching the football 
with his fingertips and Scott 
draped over him. That touch- 
down was for 15 yards and 
gave Dallas a 24-0 lead. 

The Cowboys made this 
look easy, and it should be no 
surprise. They are old hat at 
these kinds of games — the 
big game. 

Pittsburgh has nor beaten 
Dallas in nine years. 

The “anyone else" now at 
quarterback is the artist 
formerly known as Slash. It is 
not that Stewart was horrible, 
going 1 3 of 28 for 1 04 yards, a 
touchdown and an intercep- 
tion in his first regular-season 
start at quarterback. It is just 
that nothing was working of- 
fensively for the Steelers. 

Before Stewart's late 4- 
yard touchdown pass to wide 
receiver Mark Bruener, the 
Steelers had nine possessions, 
eight pums and two turnovers. 
For the game. Pittsburgh con- 
verted just one of 11 third- 
down opportunities. 

"This loss is not going to 
deter anyone's attitude." 
Stewart said. "If we could 
play again right now. I'd go 
back out there and get some 
things straight” 

Even when things were go- 
ing right they were going 
wrong. Pro Bowl running 
back Jerome Bettis (15 car- 
ries for 63 yards) was getting 
4 yards a pop early in the 
game, but Bill Cowher, tbe 
Pittsburgh Coach, inexplica- 
bly went away from him and 
to the backup George Jones. 

If be was looking for a 
spark, it wasn't there. Then 
when Cowher went back to 
Bettis later in the game. Bettis 
fumbled, and it was recovered 
by Brock Marion, the Dallas 
safety, at the Pittsburgh 10. 
That led to another Cunning- 
ham field goal, for a 27-0 
lead. 

While Troy Aikman was 
tossing his four touchdown 
passes, Stewart was looking 
downfield and finding no one 
open. As the Dallas defense 
played an unbelievable game 
(the Steelers’ longest gain 
was only 15 yards), Pitts- 
burgh's defense played one of 
its poorest in years. 

And Sanders got his re- 
venge on the crowd. After re- 
turning a punt 38 yards to the 
Steelers’ 27-yard line — it 
would lead to a Daryl John- 
ston 13-yard touchdown 
catch and 34-0 third-quarter 
lead — he hot-dogged to the 
crowd. The few fans left in tbe 
stadium booed again, but be 
didn’t care. 

"If I would have scored,” 
said Sanders, who recently 
became a bom-again Chris- 
tian, "I might have tried to 
climb up the goal posts to give 
the Lord a high-five.” 


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ART BUCHWALD 


The Road to Learning 

W ASHINGTON — “I promise. Mom.” 

■nirougboat the land Father “If you have any 
the time has arrived when par- problems you call us. We're 
ents are sending their children your mother and father, and 
off to college. we know your weak spots." 

The station wagon is “You’ll get the first calL" 
packed,* the brownies are Mother “Imagine that you 
wrapped in tin foil, aprf every are Chelsea Clinton and the 


Can Limerick Rise From ‘Angela’s Ashes ? 


By Warren Hoge 

Neve Times Service 


mother and fa- ______ 

ther has a nag- MP55H| 
ging suspicion 
that their child 
is not ready to ^ 

driwjaa-min- 

ute advice is be- Buchwia , d 

mg dispensed. 

Mother “Don't drink beer 
or hard liquor. I don't care 
what those filthy fraternity 
boys try to talk you into. 1 ’ 

“I won’t, Mora. If they try 
to offer me a beer. I'll throw it 
all over their car." 

Father “Always go to the 

movies with another girl." 

"I will. Dad. You raised 
me never to go to the movies 
with a boy." 

Mother “Remember, no 
marijuana. I don't want you to 
even try it. That’s how people 
get all messed up. Promise me 
you won't touch pot even if 
someone offers it to you in the 
library." 


Secret Service is watching 
you all the time. Let her be 
your role model. Any time 
you want to do something, 
just ask yourself, ‘Would 
Chelsea approve?’ “ 

4 TU even call her collect if 
you want me to." 

Father. “Obviously we are 
going to miss you very much, 
but as long as there is a 
Planned Parenthood Counsel- 
ing Service at Dartmouth 
we’U feel better about it." 

Mother “You’ll have to 
moke your own bed. I know 
you never did it at home, but 
there won't be anyone to 
make it for you at school. If 
you want to make honor roll, 
change your sheets at least 
once a week." 

Father “This above all: to 
thine own self be true, and it 
must follow, as the night the 
day, thou canst not then be 
false to any man." 

"That's good, Dad.” 

Father “It's the only thing 
I learned at Harvard.” 


New Edu-tainment for Children? 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — In pro- 
ducing episodes of the pop- 
ular * 'Doug' ' cartoon over the 
past few years, Jim Jinkins 
had one central worry: Will 
children laugh? 

Now his scripts must pass 
muster with a team of Har- 
vard educators who have an- 
other concern: Will children 
learn? 

New federal rules taking ef- 
fect Monday require televi- 
sion broadcasters to air at least 


three hours a week of edu- 
cational shows for children. 

Several new features de- 
signed to fulfill the mandate 
debut this week, but many 
programs will simply return 
ro the schedule, newly 
defined as “educational.” 

"For us, this was just busi- 
ness as usual," said Maureen 
Smith, in charge of children's 
programming at Fox. "We 
will continue to pick shows 
that will not only educate but 
entertain.'* 


L IMERICK, Ireland — This 
sodden city in western Ireland 
has been such a hard-luck town that 
it cannot even lay claim to the form 
of verse everyone assumes was 
named after it. 

‘The truth is you can go into 
pubs here, and you'll bear yams 
and doggerel and songs and par- 
odies," said Brendan Halligan, ed- 
itor of The Limerick Leader. “But 
I’ve never heard anyone recite a 
limerick." 

H.D. Inglis, author of an early 
travel guide, came here in 1 834 and 
found Limerick “the very vilest 
town" he had ever visited Hein- 
rich Boell, the German Nobel 
prize-winning novelist, saw it for 
the first time in 1930 and pro- 
nounced it a 4 'gloomy little town" 
with “everything submerged in 
sour darkness." 

More recently it has been made 
fun of in a popular television show 
as "stab city,” a label — arising 
out of several muggings in the 
1980s — that Mayor Frank Led din 
finds so objectionable he will not 
utter ir. “You can mention it,” he 
said in his office overlooking the 
Shannon River, “but you won’t be 
quoting Frank Leddin.” 

Long considered Ireland’s most 
entrenched Catholic city — the au- 
thor Conor Cruise O’Brien once 
called its bishop the "Mullah of 
Limerick" — it has suffered from 
stereotyping as “violent, intoler- 
ant, obscurantist and reactionary" 
in Halligan ’s words. 

So picking on Limerick had long 
been something of a national pas- 
time when the Irish- American au- 
thor Frank McCourt wrote "An- 
gela’s Ashes," the evocative 
account of the miseries of his 
starkly impoverished upbringing in 
Limerick in the 1930s and '40s. 
The book, which won a 1997 
Pulitzer Prize, has sold 1.4 million 
copies in the United States and is 
still No. I on The New York Times 
best-seller list. 

While its image of Limerick is 


not one the residents of this much- 
maligned place would wish the 
world to seize upon, they are hop- 
ing the popularity of the book is 
something they can turn to their 
advantage. 

"People come from all over die 
world to see James Joyce’s Dublin; 
maybe this will do the same thing 
for Limerick," said Kevin Ttaomp- 
sione, an official of Shannon De- 
velopment, the government agency 
that has watched tourists arrive at 
nearby Shannon International Air- 
port and then speed through Lim- 
erick on their way elsewhere. 

But even though Limerick is a 
much changed place from young 
Frank McCourt's days, it will take 
an imaginative tout operator to 
make a pilgrimage here as popular 
as the route that follows Leopold 
Bloom around the Irish capital. 

The Limerick of the author’s 
youth was a forbidding place where 
his family lived in a squalid hovel, 
with frequent flooding on the 
ground floor and the accumulated 
slops from an entire street’s chamber 
pots in a lavatory by the front door. 

The mother begged from Cath- 
olic charities, the children often 
had nothing but fried bread and 
sugared water for food, their 
clothes were threadbare, their 
shoes resoled with scraps of bicycle 
tire. Their sleep was disturbed by a 
carousing father who would spend 
his dole money and his wages from 
his infrequent jobs on drink and 
then lurch home singing revolu- 
tionary tunes and roust his children 
from bed demanding that they 
loudly declare their willingness to 
die for Ireland. 

Wondering how he survived his 
childhood, McCourt writes. 
"People everywhere brag about 
the woes of their early years, but 
nothing can compare with the Irish 
version: the poverty, the shiftless 
loquacious alcoholic father, the pi- 
ous defeated mother moaning by 
the fire; pompous priests; bullying 
schoolmasters; the English and the 
terrible tilings they did to us for 
eight hundred long years." 

In the memoir, composed in an 




hraU" 1 


Swans now glide along the spruced up Shannon, the “river that kills” of McCourt's memoir. 


affecting present-tense, child’s-eye 
narrative, the city emerges as "a 
gray place with a river that kills." 
Many of its young, including twin 
brothers of McCourt, die of tuber- 
culosis, and those who make it to 
adolescence are subjected to the 
menaces and punishments of cane- 
wielding teachers and the judgment 
day warnings of the Catholic cler- 
gymen. “Doom," McCourt wrote. 
“That’s the favorite word of every’ 
priest in Limerick." 

Among the sites that remain as 
they were are the towering Re- 
demptorist church, the Leonty's 
National School building, the St. 
Vincent de Paul Society town 
house where Mrs. McCourt lined 
up for assistance, and W.J South, 
the pub where his Uncle Pa Keating 
ceremoniously gave the freshly lfr- 
year-old Frank his first pint. 
"We’ve had a couple of coach 
loads come in already," said David 
Hickey, the bartender. 


Other spots, like the dockside 
area where young Frank tries to 
scratch together enough coal dis- 
carded from barges to cook the 
family Christmas meal of a pig's 
head, have made way for arts cen- 
ters, museums, cafes and restau- 
rants with names like Quenelles. 

Beyond the material benefits 
that prosperity and development 
have brought the city, its spirit has 
lightened with a shift in the city’s 
attitude toward the Shannon. From 
its day 5 as a walled city, Limerick 
traditionally built densely to the 
shore, shutting off access with 
breweries, foundries, mills, bacon 
factories and warehouses. In the 
last 20 years, it has opened up the 
riverside with parks and promen- 
ades. Swans now glide along the 
“river that kills." 

The city has a modem university’ 
on its outskirts, which provides un- 
derpinning for the information 
technologies industry that has 


grown up around the airport. Mc- 
Court is to be writer in residence 
there starting in October. 

Since the publication of "An- . 
gela’s Ashes," conversations have 
centered on little else in the se- 
cluded areas of pubs called 
“snugs." behind the curtained win- 
dows of the bowed Georgian build- : 
ings in the city’s gracious Crescent, ; 
along O’Connell Street, the city's 
commercial thoroughfare, and 
among the lanes aud tenement areas : 
where young Frank McCourt rode . 
out his desperate early years. 

People chew over the depictions-' 
of Limerick, its poverty and in-., 
siituiions and individual charac- 
ters. 

But a feeling that the book is 
talking about an unlameuted past, 
is well-written and does not reflect 
the Limerick of today seems to be 
w inning out over the original fear 
residents had of being held up to 
ridicule again. 


PEOPLE 


Black Rock desert during the anything-goes Burning Man festival there. 


T HIRTY years ago. Linda McCart- 
ney took a camera with her when 
she hit the road with the Beatles during 
the 1967 “SumfnerofLov<e."Shecafne 
up with black-and-white photos of some 
of the era’s biggest stars — Stephen 
Stills, Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin 
and a young John Lennon working on a 
song with Paul McCartney. The pho- 
tos are now hanging in the Museum of 
the City of San Francisco to help raise 
money for a free conceit in Golden Gate 
Park this fall. The show will commem- 
orate the fabled summer’s 30th an- 
niversary. “She saw people in moments 
of personal space and intimacy that 
would be hard for a lot of us to capture,’ ’ 
said Chet Helms, who hitchhiked to 
San Francisco with Janis Joplin three 
decades ago and is organizing the con- 
cert. "So we get to share those little 
moments through her eyes." 

□ 

An autographed picture of former 
Vice President Dan Quayle brought 
more giggles than bids at a benefit auc- 
tion. “I’ll give you S5 for Dan.” one 


bidder offered during the sale at the 
Tubman African American Museum in 
Macon, Georgia. Quayle’s photo even- 
tually went for $20, considerably less 
than a Bill Cosby-autographed picture 
that sold for $75 and one of Whoopi 
Goldberg for $70. The auction ben- 
efited children's dance, art and pho- 
tography programs at the museum. 

□ 

Leni Riefenstahi, notorious for di- 
recting Nazi propaganda films, has been 
given a film achievement award. "It’s 
too much honor," said Riefenstahi, 95, 
accepting the award from Cinecon. a 
California group dedicated to restoring 
and showing old films. It was her first 
public trip to Los Angeles since 1938. 
The visit was condemned by the Simon 
Wiesenthal Center, a Jewish human 
rights organization. “There’s no doubt 
that she was a brilliant documentarian 
and filmmaker," Rabbi Abraham 
Cooper said. But he said that her films 
had “helped inspire millions of Ger- 
mans and Austrians to embrace the Nazi 
ideology." adding, “You cannot sep- 


arate the art from the implications of the 
art.” Riefensiahl’s 1934 film “Triumph 
of the Will." made at Hitler's request, is 
considered a masterpiece of propaganda. 
She also filmed the 1936 Summer 
Olympics in Berlin. Cinecon said it had 
honored Riefenstahi because she rep- 
resented "all facets of filmmaking.” 

□ 

Madonna is reportedly on the 
lookout for a mansion in Nyack, New 
York, a suburb of the Big Apple. The 
pop star has been looking at mansions 
on the Hudson River in and around 
Nyack, a short drive north of New York 
City, according to a real estate agent. A 
friend of Madonna's, the talk show host 
Rosie O’Donnell, lives nearby, and 
Madonna “certainly seems interested in 
the area." the real estate agent said. 
Madonna is said to want a place with 
privacy and a view of the river. 

□ 

She's out of the closet in life and on 
television. But Ellen Degeneres may 
not be ready for prime-time smooching. 


The star of ABC’s “Ellen" told TV-- 
Guide that she wasn’t as comfortable- ^ 
kissing a woman on screen as in real life! ' 
“I’m more comfortable kissing -a man 
on camera because I've done it more '; 
times." she said. Kissing a woman, she ■ 
added, 4 4 is really the last thing I want to 
do.” Since acknowledging last spring - 
that she’s gay, Degeneres has mugged 
For cameras with her girlfriend, die act- 
ress Anne Heche. Degeneres said her 
TV character would get a girlfriend this 
season. The relationship will be difficult ■ 
for the network. "This is a delicate 
balancing act because we don’t want to 
lose any of our audience." she said. 

Everything in Texas is bigger, right?- - 
Now the Lone Star State has a second; . 
school of govemmen i named for a pres- 
ident The George B ush School of Gov- 
ernment and Public Service opens this 
week aiTexas A&M University in Col- 
lege Station, with 19 students in its first 
year. It will compete with the Lyndon 
B. Johnson School of Public Affairs ar 
the University of Texas in Austin. 


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Ever)- country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 
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tiiR. : 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1997 


PAGE 18 


check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


Steps to folio* for easy calling worldwide: 
l. Just dial the TOT Vxe» Number for the entinirv ynu 
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83G 000 0730 llli 
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AT&T Access 

Numbers 



EUROPE 


Sweden 


020 - 795-011 
0 &DQ > 89-0011 
0500 - 89-0011 
0800 - 89-0011 

Au«iia*c- . . 

Belgium* 

Czech Republic* 

Prance 

Germany 

Greece* 

Irelaudo 

Italy* 

Nethartands* 

. DZZ- 9 B 3-011 
B-B 0 Q- 1 B 8-10 

00 - 42 - 0 PS -1 01 

0 - 800 - 99-0011 

0130-0010 

00 - 800-1311 

1 - 830 - 550-000 

172-1011 

0000 - 022-9111 

Switzerland* 
Untied Kingdom* 

MIDDLE EAST 

Eoypi*{Cairo)r 

Israel 

Saadi Arabia* 

AFRICA ~ 

510-0200 
177-1 BO -2727 
1 -B 0 D -10 

Russia* a (Moscan)i 

Spain 

7554042 

900 - 99 - 00-11 

Ghana 

South Africa 


8191 

0 - 800 - 99-0123 


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*7{t 4 W INTERNATIONAL M ♦ 4 'm 

iieralu^^^Snljunl 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


*?■■- -«T 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 

Russians 
Blame Crew 
For Mishap 
With Mir 

Investigators Defend 
Spaceship and Assert 
2 Cosmonauts Erred 

The Associated Press 

■ MOSCOW — Russian space offi- 
cials formally blamed two cosmonauts 
on Tuesday for the worst space collision 
ever and said they faced probable 
fines. 

A space commission concluded “be- 
yond any doubt” after an inquiry that 
•Vasili Tsibliyev and Alexander 
Lazutkin caused the June 25 collision 
between the aged Mir and a robot supply 
craft, an official said. 

' The commission rejected complaints 
of the veteran space filers that worn-out 
equipment on Mir had malfunctioned. 

* ’Personally we felt pity for the boys, 
but the facts remain,’* Valeri Ryurnin. 
the coordinator of the Mir-NASA pro- 
gram, told the ITAR-Tass news agency. 

‘ ‘ Most likely we will have to fine them, 
cutting the payments due under the con- 
tract.” 

It is not certain the decision will 
stand. The head of the Russian Space 
Agency's mann ed flights pro gram , 
Mikhail Sinelshcbikpv, told the press 
agency later that the commission had 
yet to make a final decision, a nd another 
-panel could still overturn it. 

A spokesman at Russian Mission 
.Control said ground controllers were 
unaware of the decision. A call to Mr. 
Ryu min went unanswered. 

_ An American astronaut aboard Mir, 
Michael Foale, who is still on the craft, 
was the third member of the crew at the 
time of the accident But, like other 
visiting astronauts, he is not usually 
involved in operating or maintaining 
Mir. 

The conclusions of the commission, 
which were issued Tuesday, are un- 
likely to put all questions to rest. 

Skeptics could argue that the verdict 
was predetermined, that the Russians 
had a vested interest in finding that Mir 
— an important vehicle to attract re- 
search money from other countries — 
did not cause the collision. 

Mr. Ryumin, who also is deputy di- 
rects ofEnergia, the company that built 
the Mir and oversees it, said me finding 
was reached after a thorough exam- 
ination of flight data. 

But he would not specify in the in- 
terview what errors the crewmen had 
made. 

The near-calamitous Mir accident oc- 
curred during a practice manual dock- 
ing. Mr. TSibliyev was guiding the sev- 
en-ton supply ship toward its docking 
port by remote control and it went in too 
fast, banging into the Spektr laboratory 

See MIR, Page 4 


Paris, Wednesday, September 3, 1997 



Inquiry into Paris Crash 
Moves to Manslaughter 

Photographers Are Freed but May Face Trial 


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No. 35,616 





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Media members outside a Paris court Tuesday awaiting a judge’s 
ruling ou whether to open a formal investigation of the photographers. 


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By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Sen-i ce 

PARIS — A French judge opened a 
formal investigation Monday of six 
photographers and a motorcycle driver 
to determine whether they should stand 
trial for involuntary homicide and fail- 
ure to come to the aid of Diana, Prin- 
cess of Wales, and two other victims 
killed in a car crash Sunday. 

Five of the men were released on 
their own recognizance, but two. Ro- 
muald Rat. a photographer for the 
Gamma agency, and Christian Mar- 
tinez of the Angeli agency, were re- 
leased on 100,000 francs ($16,500) 
bail each. The latter two were 
forbidden to work as photographers 
daring the period of the investiga- 
tion. 

The judge, Herve Stephan, opened 
the formal inquiry in the case by no- 
tifying the men of the crimes involved. 
The judge will have wide discretion to 
investigate the case and ultimately 
decide whether to end the inquiry 
and close the case or to send any of 
the seven to trial before another 
tribunal. 

Diana's companion, Emad Mo- 
ll amed (Dodi) al Fayed, and their 
French driver, Henri Paul, were also 
killed in the crash. 

Prosecutors said Monday that Mr. 
Paul's blood alcohol level was far 
above the legal limit, but that did 
not lessen their determination to es- 
tablish whether the photographers fol- 
lowing the automobile as it raced 
through Paris were a factor in the ac- 
cident 

The powerful Mercedes S-280 lim- 
ousine. which started its fatal journey 
ar the Ritz Hotel where Mr. Paul was 
assistant director of security, hit a sup- 
porting pillar m a tunnel under the 
Place de 1' Alma near the Seine while 


racing away from the pursuing pho- 
tographers at such high speed that foe 
front third of the car was demolished. 

Prosecutors denied a widely pub- 
lished report that the speedometer of 
the wrecked car had been found frozen 
at 196 kilometers (122 miles) an hour. 
It was snick at zero, they said 

A spokesman for Mercedes said in a 
telephone interview from Stuttgart that 
the car was nor a heavy armored model, 
as earlier reports stated, but said that 
police would be able to determine its 
speed at the time of impact by ex- 
amining the wreckage and skid marks 
on the scene. 

Mohamed al Fayed die Egyptian- 
born British businessman who owns the 
Ritz as well as.Harrods department store 
in London, has pressed prosecutors to 
pin criminal responsibility on the pho- 
tographers for setting off the chase 


that led to the death of his son, Diana, 
and the driver, a Ritz employee. 

French law makes involuntary hom- 
icide or injury a crime punishable by 
three to five years’ imprisonment and 
fines of 300,000 francs to 500,000 
francs. In some countries, this charge is 
roughly the same as manslaughter. 
Failure to seek help for persons in 
danger, or hampering the work of those 
trying to help, can bang panishment of 
five years in prison ana fines of up to 
500,000 francs. 

A bodyguard seated in the right front 
seat of die car, Trevor Rees-Jones, a 
former British paratrooper, survived, 
but doctors said he suffered serious 
chin and facial injuries, a brain con- 
cussion and lung injuries. They es- 
timated that it could be weeks before he 

See DIANA, Page 10 


Central London Falls Silent 
As Thousands Pay Tribute 


By Eugene Robinson 

Washington Post Service 

LONDON — The first thing you 
notice is the silence: The center of 
London, with all its monuments and its 
boulevards and its palaces, is qniet as a 
church. 

The death of Princess Diana was such 
a profound shock for Britain that many 
people, including many officials, did 

and Monday, crowds pouring toward 
the royalpalaces to express their con- 
dolences had to fight their way through 
the city’s normal choking traffic. The 
result was gridlock for motorists and an 


obstacle course for pedestrians trying to 
lay their bouquets of flowers. 

On Tuesday, as Britain settled into a 
routine of mourning, the authorities 
closed oft all the streets around Buck- 
ingham and St James's Palaces to 
traffic, roughly the area between Hyde 
Park Corner and Trafalgar Square. The 
effect was to create a city within a city 
— to create, within this huge metropolis 
bustling about its workday, a smaller 
London that moved to a slow, stately, 
elegaic pace. At the circle in front of 
Buckingham Palace, a place normally 
filled with the sound of taxicabs honk- 

See MOURN, Page 10 


The Graying of Japan: Pension Lab for a Cost-Conscious World 


By Sheryl WuDurm 

New York Tunes Service 

TOKYO — The year is 2025. The 
nation has twice as many old people as it 
has children; its economy is groaning 
under the weight of heavy taxes, its 
population is shrinking and the gov- 
ernment's reserve of social security 
funds has run dry. 

Unless things change, this is the not- 
too-distant future of Japan, once the 
fastest-growing economy on the globe 
and now die world’s most rapidly aging 
industrial society. 

With one person in six already older 


than 65, the challenge of how Japan will 
support its aging society grows more 
bedeviling with each passing year. 

Not that many other countries will be 
exempt from some of the same hard- 
ships. But Japan will be the world's 
guinea pig: No nation has ever had ex- 
perience with such an elderly society, 
and Japan is graying faster than the rest 
of the industrial world in North America 
and Europe. So bow it faces the quandar- 
ies presented by a rapidly aging society is 
likely to serve as a model — or a warning 
— to other countries that will eventually 
undergo the same transformation. 

The lessons from Japan so far a re not 


encouraging, for it seems that the only 
way that Tokyo will be able to finance 
the nation’s wrinkled future will be with 
significantly higher taxes and consid- 
erably smaller benefits. 

“There is no golden egg,” said At- 
sushi Sc ike, an economics professor at 
Keio University. “So we have to get 
money from somewhere and that is only 
from the people or an increase in their 
productivity." 

A declining birthrate and a graying 
society — rather than exchange rates 
and trade surpluses — are likely to be 
the key factors during the next several 
decades in shaping the economies of 


Japan and other rapidly aging industrial 
countries. 


AGENDA 



U.S. Stocks Soar to Record Gain 
On Easing of Inflation Fears 


that time, the total social welfare burden 
— much of it retirement and health care 
costs for the elderly — could reach as 
high as 73 percent of national income, 
according to an official forecast 

Taxpayers, of course, will have to 
pick up much of the swollen tab, and 
higher tax rates could lead to a flight of 
talent — even among the famously loyal 
Japanese. 

“Who's going to work?" asked 
Robert Alan Feldman, chief economist 
at Salomon Brothers Inc. in Tokyo. 
“The most productive guys will go 
somewhere else." 

A simulation analysis by an advisory 
council to Prime Minister Ryu taro Ha- 
shimoto forecast dial unless the gov- 
ernment’s finances are overhauled, the 
burden from social welfare and fiscal 


debt wall balloon. For 2025, it projects 
an overall national debt of 153 percent 
of gross domestic product, compared 
with 115 percent of die overall eco- 
nomic output in 1995. 

As a result, the analysis concluded 
with perhaps a touch of typical Japanese 
alarmism, if die current system is not 
changed, the “economy will col- 
lapse.” 

“We don’t have any concrete di- 
rection,” Junichi Sakamoto, a Health 
and Welfare Ministry official, said. 
“But I think that many people think a 
cut in the benefits is inevitable.” 

The future strains on society are ev- 
ident in the reaction of those unlucky, 
workers, like Aisuto Hayahara, who 
have already suffered pension cuts for 
other reasons. A 55-year-old employee 
at Seishoku Kohyo, Mr. Hayahara saw 
his benefits cut when the pension fund at 
the troubled textile company was bank- 

See JAPAN, Page 4 








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p.*.. 


Stocks rallied more than 3 percent 
Tuesday, propelling the Dow Jones 
industrial average more than 250 
points, its single largest points gain 
ever, after a report offered some relief 
from the inflation worries that have 
jostled the market in recent weeks. 

Broader stock indicators also rallied 
as interest rates fell in the bond market 
following the release of the first major 
reading on last month's economic ac- 
tivity. 

After a series of reports suggesting 
that the economy might be accelerating 


The Dollar 


at an inflationary pace, the National 
Association of Purchasing Manage- 
ment report ou manufacturing in Au- 
gust showed that manufacturing growth 
had slowed, heartening investors. 

The surge in' stocks and bonds fol- 
lows the largest monthly percentage 
decline for the Dow in seven years and 
coincides with investors’ return from 
summer vacations. 

In percentage terms, stocks posted 
their biggest rise in percentage terms 
since Jan. 17, 1991, when the Dow rose 
4.6 percent at foe start of foe Gulf War. 


EU’s Duty-Free Shops Make 
Last-Ditch Stand for Survival 


THE AMERICAS 


Page 3. 


> jV 

\ 1 ’#£• 


n<w vo* Tuesday e 4 p.m pwmedow Mexico’s Leader Pledges Cooperation 


1.5915 

121.575 

6.1722 


The Dow 


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emu »«»*-**; E3S5SK*!£ ££ 

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change Tuesday 9 4 P.M. prewous dose 

+2Biii 927.57 89946 


BUSINESS/FINANCE Page 13. 

Tiro Major Hotel Chains Merging 

Books Page II. 

Crossword - Page 11. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


The bjtBrnwrket 


Page 7. 


The IHT on-line www.iht.com 


By Dirk Beveridge 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Travelers caught in die 
bustle of Europe's airports are bom- 
barded with ads promoting duty-free 
sales, but this summer many of the signs 
cany a warning — crossing out the 
crucial word “free." 

The European Union plans to elim- 
inate all EU duty-free sales on June 30, 
1999, and foe $6.4 billion a year in- 
dustry that has posted the signs is lob- 
bying hard against their eventual ex- 
tinction. 

The idea of wiping out duty-free does 
not sit well with many travelers either, 
though some acknowledge it might 
make little difference because often 
they can get better deals at their final 
destination. 

The European Union plans to get rid 
of duty-free stores because, as it be- 


comes a single market, goods can be 
transported freely across borders for 
personal consumption with — theor- 
etically — no need for people to pay 
import and export duties. 

"But it’s theory, not practice,” said 
Edward Oir, from Kent, England. 

Exactly, say the lobbyists. 

“I think we should have duty-free- 
something/* said Angela, a Londoner 
who has taken the feny across foe English 
Channel to stock up on duty-free hems 
and cheap groceries in France. “We pay 
so much taxes on everything.'’ 

Across Europe, lobbyists are posting 
their signs on ferries and bovercjafts, 
hoping customers will pressure foe 
politicians. Spaniards are urged to sup- 
port la continuidad del duty-free, while 
the English are told thai “traveling 
would never be foe same again.” 

See DUTIES, Page 4 


Newsstand Prices _ _ 

Artdora.- 10.00 FF Lebanon U-3.00Q 

Antilles 12.50 FF Morocco ..-low 

Cameroon... 1.600 CFA Qatar laop aB 




$ 


Egypt 5.50 Reirtion 

France 10.00 FF SaucHAraWa.--JO^ 

Gabon 1.100 CFA Senegal- 1.100 CFA 

......ZBOOUre Spain — gf* 

ivory Coast .1.250 CFA Tuntaa 

Jordan 1250JD U AE » 

Kuwait 700 Fils U.S.Ma.(Eur.)-~Sj.20 j 


China’s Gay Community Finds an Open Place in Urban Society 

; slinky black gown and curly shoulder-length hair quietly grows in China, they are taking their first gather and socialize in places openly known as 

Rv Seth Faison «- lfVV i nn , rhairtoeroon alove sone. his orotrodine steps toward openness." as the mere existence of homosexual hangouts like restaurants, bare and pub- 



‘ ’ By Seth Faison 

New York Turn Scn irc 

SHANGHAI — On a side street not far from foe 
waterfront small restaurant filled W one recent 
avenina with customers, many of them homo- 
3 Some came to see a long-hatted cross- 
ing stager perform, but more seemed happy 
j“md aV« to mlax. and laugh. ^ 

dn ^ e £h!^ 1 overloaded with plates of 
££« |£Zd sauteed vegetables. A singer in a 


slinky black gown and curly shoulder-length hair 
stood on a chair to croon alove song, his protruding 
Adam's apple the only due to his sex. Mixing his 
own suggestive lyrics with more conventional 
ones, the singer evoked hoots of laughter from the 
crowd, who thrilled to his irreverent humor. 

“No one bothers about us anymore.” said a 32- 
year-old man with a crew cut, sitting with a half- 
dozen friends at a comer table. “As Tong as we’re 
not disturbing anyone else, we can enjoy ourselves 
and the police will leave us alone.” 

As official tolerance of gay men and lesbians 


quietly grows in China, they are taking their first 
steps toward openness,* as the mere existence of 
this restaurant — run by two openly homosexual 
managers — testifies. 

The last few years have brought a significant, if 
tentative, coming-out for homosexuals in urban 
China. Until recently, gay life in Communist China 
existed only behind closed doors, almost uni- 
formly considered a social disgrace or a form of 
mental illness, sometimes treated With electric 
shock therapy. 

Now, in cities all over the country, homosexuals 


gather and socialize in places openly known as 
homosexual hangouts like restaurants, bars and pub- 
lic parks, largely unafraid of the kind of police 
roundups that were common only a few years ago. 

Yet. many homosexuals complain that they still 
face harsh discrimination, that Chinese society is 
still so closed that an overwhelming majority of 
them keep their sexual orientation secret from their 
families and co- workers. 

“We all talk about it much more openly than 

See CHINA, Page 4 


c 






jnVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER V199 


PAGE mo 


Scientists at Play / Lively Debates Among the 'Porch People' 

At Woods Hole, the Summer Is a Seminar 


By Carey Goldberg 

Nfw ftvfc Times Service 

W OODS HOLE, Massachusetts — As 
they bid farewell to their squid neu- 
rons. their global cliniate models or 
their late-night discussions of the mi- 
croscopic mysteries of life, the summer scientists of 
Woods Hole do not wax maudlin at season's end. 
They are not the type. 

But by a certain light in their eyes as they describe 
their ••vacations’ ' of laboratory work, seminars and 
discourse, one can tell: Among the many beloved 
seaside spots from which melancholy summer folk 
are now making their exodus, this Cape Cod viilage- 
turned-scientific-colony is one that evokes par- 
ticular passion, and araoDg a caste known for being 
dispassionate. 

“Critics will accuse the place of being a summer 
camp for scientists," said Dr. Gerald Weiss mann, a 
New York University rheumatologist and writer 
who works summers at the Marine Biological Lab- 
oratory here. "‘But anyone who's ever been in love 
as a teenager remembers a summer romance — and 
this is a place where a lot of people fall in love with 
science. 

They converge here by the thousands in the 
summer, top-flighr researchers, teachers and stu- 
dents — 1 . 100 to the Marine Biological Laboratory, 
500 to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 
hundreds more to several other scientific magnets 
and more than 5,000 for brief stints at the National ' 
Academy of Sciences conference center, a shingled 
mansion overlooking the bobbing boats of Quissett 
Harbor. 

Their progeny may study at the Children's 
School of Science or in science-timed clubs for 
teenagers; their spouses may take seminars or sail 
on Buzzards Bay. 

Woods Hole scholars of nature are not the kind to 
make unfounded claims, but it could be, it just could 
be. some say, that this is Replace to be for a scientist 
in summer, at least for those in biology, ocean- 
ography, environmental studies and several other 
disciplines. 

Many Woods Hole scientists say that as this 
mellow village of 1,300 more than triples its pop- 
ulation in summer, it seems to reach a certain critical 
mass, one that makes it not only a pleasant place to 
work but a superior one. where 
colleagues are likelier to learn t 

from one another than elsewhere A- 

because the organisms they ex- ; Boa &n \ 

periment on, or their paths to the t v 

tennis court, overlap. \ * - 

These distinguished professors MASSACHUSE 

and occasional Nobel laureates, ^ 

slouching about in shorts. T-shirts R . L* 

and boat shoes, say the informal z ' ' 

atmosphere contributes to a flow § 

of information across disciplines o 95 Jy/r \ 
and ranks that serves as a further .. f 
catalyst to learning and discov- vf ' 
ery. 

“ When I was a child in school, " 
said Juergen Theiss, a German doctoral candidate 
who spent the summer in the Oceanographic In- 
stitution’s geophysical fluid-dynamics program. “I 
had this picture of Greek philosophers sitting 
around and talking to students, and I thought it was 
a fairy tale. But here it really was like ancient 
Greece." 

Mr. Theiss spent his summer among what are 
affectionately known here as the * ‘porch people." a 
collection of lop experts in fields like applied math- 
ematics and geophysics who hash out some of the 
knottier abstract problems of Earth’s physical pro- 
cesses sitting on a porch or in the decrepit seminar 
room of the institution's 122-year-old Walsh Cot- 
tage. 

The intellectual atmosphere is so intense that 
once, recalled Edward Spiegel, an astronomy pro- 
fessor at Columbia University, "one poor guy came 
to give a lecture and before he knew it. three guys 
were at the blackboard and none of them were 
him.” 

The porch people delve into unusually abstract 
matters, but the liveliness of their debates is par for 
the course here. 

Lewis Thomas, who wrote lovingly about the 
Marine Biological Laboratory in ‘’The Lives of a 



/' A" 

K Boston m. 




5SACHUSETTS 

"-s EffiHSS®? 

/Jr^- rr.-/: 6 


Sheldon Segal of the Population Council right, chatting with 
Baccio Baccetti of the University of Siena, Italy. 'We have a 
synergy of ideas and a synergy of methodologies . ' Mr. Segal says. 


"V Ceil," described the sound 
of scientists confabulating 
<*$?.. on the beach or after one of 
the laboratory ’ s famous Fri- 
Crf&i day nigbr science lectures 

■ s i-H like this: 

nvt "It is that most extraor- 
dinary noise, half-shout, half-song, made by con- 
fluent, simultaneously raised human voices, ex- 
plaining things to each other.” 

So much exchange of scientific information goes 
on here in the summer that “there are more lectures 
than you can go to." said George Woodweli 
founder of the Woods Hole Research Center, which 
focuses on global environmental problems. "You 
can spend all your time in lectures and seminars.” 

And there are parties almost every night as well, 
scientists say. 


B UT THIS is not the Hamptons, they hasten 
to add: That fraternizing, whether ar wine- 
and-cheese mixers or at picnic lunch tables 
or on street comers, often serves a purpose 
beyond the pleasure of relaxing between a long day 
in the lab and the long nighf in the lab that fol- 
lows. 

“People tell ions of anecdotal stories about 
bumping into A, B or C and getting an idea about X. 
Y or Z,” said John Burris, director of the Marine 
Biological Laboratory, the largest private marine 
laboratory in the country and home, ar one time or 
another, to 37 Nobel laureates. 

Summers at Woods Hole also allow teams of 


scientists from different institutions to come to- 
gether for intense, short-term collaborations that 
can prove critical in research. 

Sheldon Segal of the Population Council said 
that in his work this summer at the Marine 
Biological Laboratory on the potential use of 
gossypol. a substance extracted from cottonseed, 
as a potential male contraceptive, he could call on 
the services of a senior Argentine specialist in 
electron microscopy; a young medical student 
from Cornell University: George Langford of 
Dartmouth College, an expert on intracellular 
transport methods who looked at how the sub- 
stance affected sperm motion, and Joan Ruder- 
man, a Harvard biologist. 

"You come to Woods Hole and sit on the seawall 
and have a hero sandwich and talk about these 
things, and I say. 'Joan, would you take a look at 
gossypol's effects on cyclins'?* " Mr. Segal said, 
referring to proteins involved in cell division. "We 
have a synergy of ideas and a synergy of meth- 
odologies." 

Robert Gagosian. the director of the Woods Hole 
Oceanographic Institution, noted that scientists 
brainstorming there decades ago came up with the 
idea of submarine-based nuclear weapons — which 
eventually became the anchor of the United States' 
triad of missiles based on land, bombers and sea — 
as well as many overarching plans for global sci- 
ence projects. 

"You get a cross-fertilization of ideas here." he 
said. "There’s all this brilliance that comes into the 
village in the summer.” 


Yemeni Search Opens 
Old Wounds in Israel 


\riS 


By Joel Greenberg 

iVcir York Timer S erricr 

JERUSALEM — For a few days last 
week, two ordinary Israeli women be- 
came an extraordinary news sensation. 

Tzila Levine, the daughter of a Ye- 
menite Jewish woman, had been put up 
for adoption without her mother’s 
knowledge after they immigrated to Is- 
rael nearly 50 years ago. 

Last week. Mis. Levine traced and 
apparently found her mother, Margalit 
Umaysi. A DNA test confirmed the 
relationship with a 99.99 percent cer- 
tainty. 

Their emotional reunion attracted 
wide attention because it nourished a 
persistent conspiracy theory that is part 
.of an ethnic fault line in Israeli society. 
Those who believe the theory contend 
that hundreds, perhaps thousands, of 
Yemenite babies who were reported to 
have died or to have disappeared after 
their parents came to Israel were ac- 
tually kidnapped and given or sold to 
European-born Israelis and American 
Jews. 

The controversy over the Israeli es- 
tablishment’s treatment of the 50,000 
Yemenite Jewish immigrants, most of 
whom were airlifted to Israel in 1949 
and 1950, has festered for years. It has 
stoked deep resentment among the 
country's Sephardic Jews of Middle 
Eastern and North African origin. 

A generation of young Israelis of 
Yemenite descent has demanded ex- 
planations for the disappearance of their 
brothers and sisters from crowded ant 
camps where the Yemenite Jews were 
housed when they arrived. 

Babies were often taken from their 
parents to be put in nurseries and hos- 
pitals, and their parents were often told 
that the babies had died or were simply 
no longer there. 

"1 am living proof that things like 
that happened," said Mrs. Levine, 49. 
as she sat with Mrs. Umaysi in her 
simple stucco home in Ramat Gan, a 
suburb of Tel Aviv. "It's an inexcusable 
act, and it's time to apologize and make 
restitution by uncovering it.” 

Mrs. Levine was brought up by ad- 
optive parents on an Israeli kibbutz and 
now lives in Sacramento, California. 

The circumstances of Mrs. Levine’s 
adoption and even her link to Mrs. 
Umaysi remain unclear, reflecting the 
uncertainty surrounding the fate of the 
Yemenite babies. 

Last week, at a hearing of a gov- 
ernment commission inquiring into the 
treatment of the Yemenite infants. Mrs. 
Levine’s adoption papers were pro- 
duced by a lawyer for the commission. 
The papers indicate that the adoption 
procedures began in 1948, a year before 
the records say Mrs. Umaysi arrived in 
Israel. Mrs. Levine's lawyer asserted 
that the papers were forged. The com- 
mission suggested a second DNA test. 

Ami Hovav. an. investigator who 
served on two earlier official commis- 
sions that examined the fate of the Ye- 
menite babies, said that out of 650 cases 
of babies reported missing by their par- 
ents. 80 have still not been solved. 

Conditions in the tent camps were 
chaotic, the investigator said. Records 
were sloppy and communication with 
the immigrants was poor because of 
language 'difficulties, leading to fre- 
quent mix-ups when babies were trans- 
ferred to and from nurseries and hos- 
pitals. 

Many of the infants died because they 
were suffering from diseases and mal- 
nutrition that developed during their 
families’ trek through Yemen to a trans- 
it camp in Aden. Sometimes parents 
were not told of a death. 


Ai a time when the new state of Israel# 
was still fighting skirmishes on its borH? 
dera and facing severe economic 
Acuities, the immigration strainedTh^ 
country’s resources, contributing to^j 
confusion, Mr. Hovav added. A .™- 

Dov Levitan of Bar-Ban University 
an authority on the Yemenite imrmjf 
g rants , cites similar statistics, adding^; : 
that he has found no evidence of 
organized conspiracy to spirit away Ft-; 4 ?' 
menite children for adoption. But there; 
was a condescending attitude towardthn ! |f 
arrivals. A" 

The problem was compounded w&q : .| 
successive Israeli governments refused 

to order investigations. ■;* 

The two earlier inquiries about ther r ? 
Yemenite babies produced only limited:^ 
findings. The latest commission was-i? 
announc ed after a shoot-out in 1994 4 
between a radical Yemenite group nnd : !| 
the police that left one militant dead.] ^ 
The group, led by Uzi Mesbulam, who; 3 
is now serving an eight-year sentence,- 
contends that more than 4,500 Yemen- • 
ite babies were kidnapped for adop- 
tion. 

Other Yemenite Jewish advocates put ^ 
the numbers at between 1,000 and more .-■* 
than 2,000. They assert that the Euro- A 
pean-bom Ashkenazic Israeli establish-' v 
ment looked down on the new muni- ^ 
grants and felt free to take their children ~X 
for adoption by childless European Jew- c; 
ish couples, many survivors of the.' ^ 
Nazis. ' 

Avner Farhi, an Israeli reporter of 
Yemenite descent who has been inves- 
tigating the disappearances, contends 
that the children were deliberately sep- 
arated from their parents and moved tq * 
nurseries or hospitals to pave the way ;• 
for their adoption. : 

Mr. Hovav disputed this, asserting -yi ; 
that many infants who seemed healthy 1; : 
were actually quite sick. ■ 

Mr. Levitan agreed these was a pat- 
ionizing attitude toward the immi- * - 
grants. In some cases, the Yemenites’ A 
religious studies were restricted and~.. : 
their traditional side-curls were cot to : ’ - 
remake them into modern Israelis. 

"The concept was absoiptjou: 
through modernization, by inculcating;* 
the values of Western society," Ite ’ 
said. - •' 

The disappearance of the children left ■} 
a trail of grief that continues to haunt - 
their parents nearly 50 years later. Sev- •, 
eral weeks ago, four families of missing ;. 
children opened graves bearing their 
children's names, but found no remains, 
deepening the mystery. 

“I was looking for her for 50 years, - 
dreaming about her,” said Mrs. Umaysi 
of her lost daughter. She fed her one day 
at a hospital near her camp and the next 
day the baby was gone, she recalled. 

Mr. Htivav ays the baby girl was : 
mistakenly returned to a different tent 
camp and never traced to her mother. 

Mrs. Levine, who knew she was 
adopted from the time she was 6, said 
that she began searching for her bio- 
logical parents in the 1970s. Two years 
ago, she said, she saw Sampson Giat, the.' 
chairman of the Yemenite Jewish Fed- 
eration of America, on a television pro- 
gram, and began corresponding with 
him about her case. 

Earlier this month, she arrived in Is- 
rael and a photograph of her as a child 
appeared in an Israeli newspaper. Fam- 
ilies who got in touch with her Israeli 
lawyer were screened, and a DNA test 
was given to Mrs. Umaysi and Mrs; 
Levine by a Hebrew University genet-' ^ 
icisL The results left them in no doubt /- 
that they are mother and daughter. i 
' ‘The circle has closed," Mrs. Levine 
said. "I feel that I've won a war — a 
lifelong war.” 


, Jllo 


jobs a* 1 , " ar:.--'.*" ■ 

.r - 

PorfiH 0 L ': . ... . 

- ••• 

been a 

jnstituuona ; p^iKt-r. _ . 

jivered an L flL-, : -c 

ecowrruc 
bailout or „• r 

‘ vesocatt corr^ -y ... 

ieagft* - 

. Oppos itJOn . •: • 

Mr Munoz U- 1 -' ^ 

.outfit appba^ M 5 ;; ’ - 

vowed 10 - 

^powers as - ■ 

“•historic 

power. . - - 

. -From I04-J; 1 . . 

forever, in ;; : 

be subordinate • ■ - • 

-ozUdosiiJ- .. . 

\n contras. M: 

tamed applaud c.ir - ' 

boilerplate 

aimed force? 5 ]7, '7: ; 
livered in from " ‘ s . 

more than tjTO sena: ■ 

-most of Mexico ‘ 

In the Jui} 
sihon parues cr.^ 

.the 500-member O'-" 
compared win : ' 

Revolutionart P-';- •' - 
followed, oppose r .” - ' -- 

an agreemen; to \ c:-: 

the ke> leacer-h.r r. 

tees, while rc?er:'.c ■: “. ' 
agree later in: •; ui. -... 
to vote on <uSs:jr.~ - : .v 
The lesiiii’j.': :■ ' - ' ' 
session oper.-.-c ' 

dillo’s am\ai v./_- . .. . 
Institutional r.v . • 

lies repeated:) rr.'-r: 
position law "a- r 
“Vearaicj:.,:: • v 

Mexico ma: v 

minors legis _• 
tial imnaLt; ■ 

proval.ha*fn:;-.e: 
leaderoiihs^rr: 
said ui a >per:: 

"Sit dour" 


on dour" . .• 
tionan-pjrr. L* 

“Leani how :■■■ i 



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Are You Prepared ? 

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TRAVEL UPDATE 


Death Toll in French Alps 1$ Stable 

PARIS — Ninety-five people died climbing in the French 
Alps this summer, matching the toll last year, police said 
Tuesday. 

But more people were injured this year, and the police 
carried out more rescue missions. In 1997, there were 1,120 
missions and 796 injuries, compared with 1,004 rescues and 
68S injuries last year. 

Of the victims, 36 were killed on Mont Blanc. Europe's 
highest peak and the most-visited one in the Alps. The police 
listed three persons as missing. (Reuters i 

New Setback for Athens Subway 

ATHENS — The chronically delayed expansion of the 
Athens subway has run into another snag: fears that digging 
could swallow' up parts of one of the city's main boulevards. 

Two lanes of the six-lane Panepistimiou Avenue were 
opened to traffic Tuesday after five days of activity by the 
construction company to fill areas of loose soil with cement. 

The subway was originally intended to be finished by 1996. 
The extended system, with two new lines adding 17.6 ki- 
lometers (10.5 miles) to the city's largely surface rail line, is 
now expected to be completed in spring 1 999. lAP) 

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Windy and cool in New 
England and the Nonheast 
Diursdav then Survry and 
miiaai by Saurday Pleas- 
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Midwest, bui ih>jnaei- 
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southern Sweden, out 
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es #1 from the west. Ootn- 
fortebte witn some sun m 
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m Scotland. 


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Typhoon Brig will be north- 
east of Tokyo and moving 
away Thursday, but coukt 
stiff cause rain along the 
east coast. Hoi and dry In 
northwestern China, while 
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comfortably warm. Soaking 
rains wll continue in south- 
eastern China Humid witn 
showers in Seoul. 


North America 


Sr«rv.4v>». 

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PAGE 3' 




q x - 

ij|j^ ^ Zedillo Vows 

Cooperation; 
Congress Foes 

Seek Reforms 



f' .AJa 


INTERNATIO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WED NESDAY, SEPTEM BER 3, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


- By Sam Dillon 

New York Time s Service 

•' MEXICO CITY — Facing a Congress 
• controlled for the first time by opposition 
-parties. President Ernesto Zedillo has 
' pledged to respect the work of Mexico’s 
„ newly independent legislature and called 
on lawmakers to support free-maiket 
..economic policies he said have fostered 

■ growth and modest new spending on 

schools and hospitals. ‘ ° 

- Mr. Zedillo’s State of the Nation 
1 speech Monday, a broad defense of his 
< attempts to fight rising crime, create 
►jobs and increase spending on social 
programs, was greeted politely but with 
•little enthusiasm. 

. Porfirio Munoz Ledo, the newly 
-elected speaker of the boose who has 
been a fierce critic of Mr. Zedillo’s 
-institutional Revolutionary Party, de- 
livered an opposition response foliow- 
,.ing the president's speech, an exercise 

- unprecedented in Mexico in thic cen- 
tury. Be offered to seek common ground 

-with Mr. Zedillo and his party, but 
pledged a full review of government 
•.policies in the upcoming legislature. 

Opposition legislators have vowed to 
.review the tax system, attack unpopular 
economic measures, like a recent costly 
.bailout of wealthy bankers, and to in- 
vestigate corruption when the new Con- 
gress gets down to work later this week. 

- Opposition lawmakers responded to 
Mr. Munoz Ledo’s address with fre- 
.quent applause, especially when he 
vowed to strengthen congressional 

.powers as a curb on what he called 
•“historic excesses” of presidential 
power. 

“From today forward, and we hope 
forever, in Mexico no power will ever 
he subordinated to another, ’ ’ Mr. Mun- 
“oz Ledo said. 

^ In contrast, Mr. Zedillo’s most sus- 
tained applause came when he offered a 
..boilerplate eulogy to the Mexican 
-armed forces. Both speeches were de- 
livered in front of Mr. Zedillo's cabinet, 
more than 600 senators and deputies and 
-most of Mexico’s 31 state governors. 

In the July 6 balloting, four oppo- 
sition parties won a total of 261 seats in 
_the 500-member Chamber of Deputies. 

■ compared with 239 for the Institutional 
- Revolutionary Parly. In the weeks that 

followed, opposition leaders negotiated 
an agreement to vote as a bloc to harvest 
..the key leadership posts and commii- 
■tees, while reserving the right to dis- 
agree later this fill when the time comes 
to vote on substantive legislation. 

The legislature’s inaugural working 
.session opened an hour before Mr. Ze- 
dillo's arrival with raucous debate as 
^Institutional Revolutionary Party depu- 
• ties repeatedly heckled speeches by op- 
position lawmakers. 

. “We announce today to the people of 
•Mexico that the period of smoke and 
-minors legislation, when any presiden- 
tial initiative won unconditional ap- 
proval, has finished,” Gouzalo Yauez, a 
leader of the opposition Worker’s Party, 
said in a speech. 

.. “Sit down!" Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party lawmakers shouted back. 

. “Leam how to read!" 



' '?/ ' \ 


W 


tlBll 



Both Parties Grope 
For Election Fodder 

WASHINGTON — With the 
economy strong and die balanced- 
budget fight behind them. Democrats 
and Republicans find themselves 
groping for economic issues to argue 
about when they return to Washing- 
ton this week. 

Part of the problem, strategists from 
both parties acknowledge, is that eco- 
nomic issues simply don’t stir voter 
passions when times are so good: 
when inflation is subdued, the jobless 
rate has fallen to a three-decade low 
and the stock market remains buoyant. 
Indeed, many economic policy en- 
trepreneurs say they are writing off the 
next two years and concentrating on 
ideas that will resonate in 2000. 

Equally vexing, however, is that 
policy proposals being debated in 
both camps seem as likely to highlight 
intraparty differences as to draw clear 
distinctions between parties. 

White House economic advisers, 
reflecting President Bill Clinton’s in- 
terest in securing his legacy, are pon- 
dering long-term challenges — how to 
increase productivity through im- 
provements in education, for ex- 
ample. 

“It’s one of those rare moments 
when you have a chance to step back 
and reflect on your fundamental pri- 
orities." said Gene Sperling, chair- 
man of the president's National Eco- 
nomic Council. t\VP) 

Laptops in Senate? 
Screen Is Frozen 

WASHINGTON — Shortly after 
he was sworn in, Mike Enzi, a fresh- 
man Republican senator from Wyom- 
ing. asked the Senate parliamentarian 
whether he could bring his laptop 
computer onto the Senate floor. Ask 
the sergeant at aims, he said. 

It turned out that ScnaTc Rule IV 
authorizes “mechanical devices" in 


the chamber when the sergeant at 
aims deems them “necessary and 
proper" to conduct official Senate 
business, and as long as they “do not 
in any way distract, interrupt or in- 
convenience" others. 

Gregory Casey, the sergeant at 
arms, explained that he couldn’t deem 
anything without Senate guidance, so 
the answer was “ao." In May, Mr. 
Enzi, a gentle-spoken former shoe 
store owner and the Senate’s only 
professional accountant, asked the 
Rules Committee for permission. 

The panel asked Mr. Casey for a 
report, which he presented to the com- 
mittee on July 31. 1997, which may 
live in American history as the date 
when the U.S. Senate saw the future 
and gave it a raspberry. 

The committee's ranking minority 
member. Senator Wendell Ford of 
Kentucky, 72, didn't want to be “an 
old fogy." and said he was hip 
enough to notice that some of the 
younger senators treated laptops like 
legal pads. But if be was hying to 
encourage younger colleagues, he 
needn't have bothered. Senator Kay 
Bailey Hutchison, 54, a Texas Re- 
publican and a senator since 1993, 
had already weighed in, and she 
didn’t like it. At all. Other senators, 
some even younger, agreed. 

The committee chairman, John 
Warner of Virginia, 70, and a cagey 
four-term veteran, ordered copies of 
the report given to all senators, after 
which the committee would meet 
again. Stay tuned. ( WPj 

Quote /Unquote 

Victor Kamber, a labor consultant 
who has worked for Democratic can- 
didates, saying the relationship be- 
tween the White House and the labor 
movement will be awkward because 
die two sides are at odds over coming 
issues like expanding the trade agree- 
ments: “You’ve got several issues 
where labor wants to find itself in 
opposition to the president, yet wants 
to be supportive of him because they 
have nowhere else to go. ” (NYT) 


groupe Promocfes 


First-Half 1997 Financial Results 





Consolidated net Income for six months ended June 30, 
1997 reflected the generally favourable sales and 
market trends at the Group’s operating companies, 
as well as the benefits of last year's refocusing of the 
business portfolio, notably the divestment o 
Promohypermarkt. the German hypermarket subsidiary. 

Consolidated interim sales increased by 4.9% during 
the period, and by 6% at comparable scope of 
consolidation and constant exchange rates. Excluding 
Germany, sales would have risen by 12%. 

■ in France, sales gained 4.7%. led by good muHtAot 
the Continent hypermarket chain and fhe Champion 
supermarket chain, both of which outperformed foe 
market on a same-store barfs, 
in Spain, sales rose by 5.1%, reflecting conflnued 
satisfactory growth tor Dia and renewed growth in 

same-store sales for ContlnerfeFour nw Cantinente 

hypermarkets, Including a franchise outlet, are 
scheduled to open by year-end. 

in Holy, sales include Gruppo G and < 
comparable with last year's e S^eA n^ConUnente 
hypermarket was opened during the first halt 

Elsewhere, sales rose by 14.6% k> Greece. 
£«££* Dia In Muffl 

expectations'. 


FfmilSons 

June 30. 
1997 

June 30. 
1996 

% Change 

Net sales 

51,822 

49.383 

4.9% 

Earnings before interest, 
faxes and exceptional items 

■s 

007 

34.4% 

Earnings before taxes and 
exceptional Items 

1,153 

825 

39.8% 

Net Income 

634 

383 

65.5% 

Net Income excluding 
minority interests 

528 

317 

66.2% 


Interim 1997 earnings before Interest, taxes and 
exceptional items increased by 34% compared with 
foe same period foe year before. Excluding Germany, 
growth would have been 17%. France accounted for 
half of foe gain, and Spain and Italy for foe remainder. 

Cash flow exceeded capital expenditure over foe 
period. As a result, net financial Income continued to 
Improve, at FRF 68 million versus FRF 10 million, 
underpinning a 39.8% rise in earnings before’ taxes 
and exceptional items. 

Net exceptional income improved by FRF 38 million, 
helped by foe decision to record store opening 
expenses as an operating expenditure as of this year. 
Income from companies accounted for by foe equity 
method rose by FRF 25 million. 

Income taxes Include foe impact of the new tax 
measures fn France for FRF 23 million. 

Net Income for foe first half of 1997 increased by 65.5%. 
Excluding minority interests, growth was 66.2%. 
Excluding Germany, net Income after minority interests 
would have risen by 1 7%. 

Consolidated sales for July were up by 10.7% 
compared with foe previous period, mainly because 
of foe deconsolidation of foe German subsidiary 
Promohypermarkt in second-half 1996. This Indicates 
on increase In foil-year 1997 consolidated sales of 
approximately 7%. 

•Sales growth is expressed os a percentage ot sales figures 
translafed into French Irenes. 


INTERNET: http://www.promodos.fr 


Congress Back, in Relaxed Mood 

Members Detect Little Pressure From Contented Constituents 


Porfino Munoz Ledo, speaker of the house, drawing applause from 
President Ernesto Zedillo as he replied to the State of the Nation speech. 


POLITICAL 


By Helen Dewar 
and John E. Yang 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — With 
little guidance from an un- 
demanding and largely 
cuned-out electorate. Con- 
gress began returning Tues- 
day from: its monthlong s um. 
raer recess to figure out what 
to do for an encore now that it 
has enacted its huge and gen- 
erally popular budget-balan- 
cing and tax-cutting plan. 

U they listen to their con- 
stituents, lawmakers may 
simply take care of the nec- 
essary business and head 
right back home again, pos- 
sibly in two months or less. 
Only a few contentious 
snuggles, such as campaign 
finance reform, could com- 
plicate a smooth slide toward 
adjournment 

“As opposed to a couple 
of years ago when I was cam- 
paigning, I don’t sense much 
passion out there,” said Sen- 
ator Chuck HageL Republi- 
can of Nebraska, after a 
month of making the rounds 
at home. “There’s not one 
big. dominant, passionate is- 
sue. The general feeling is 
keep doing what you’re do- 
ing, don’t get distracted by 
political sideshows, and keep 
government off my back and 
out of my life." 

In Sacramento, people 
talked a little about the 
United Parcel Service strike 
and contaminated ham- 
burgers but had virtually 
nothing to say about what 
Congress should be doing for 
the rest of the year, said Rep- 
resentative Robert Matsui. 
Mr. Matsui, a Democrat, had 
expected some flak for vot- 


ing against the tax bill but got 
none. No “afterglow" for 
the budget deal either. 
‘ ‘People are pleased with the 
economy and reasonably 
happy." he said. 

According to many law- 
makers, Congress is under 
more pressure to suppress its 
normal contentiousness than 
it is to embark on any tem- 
pestuous new crosades. de- 
spite both parties’ perceived 
needs to sharpen their mes- 
sages for the congressional 
campaigns next year. 

As a result, congressional 
leadens have scheduled few, 
if any, bombshell initiatives 
for the remainder of the 
105th Congress's first ses- 
sion and are pushing for ad- 
journment by the end of Oc- 
tober, if not before, unusually 
early -for a nonelection year. 

Congress has many heavy- 
weight issues on its agenda, 
from transportation funding 
and juvenile crime to the pro- 
posed tobacco deal, hazard- 
ous waste cleanup, overhaul 
of bousing programs and a 
new trade negotiating au- 
thority for President Bill 
Clinto n. 

Some lawmakers may try 
to force votes on major re- 
form initiatives, such as re- 
vamping campaign finan ce 
laws, but their prospects are 
not helped by the country’s 
mellow mood and apparent 
lark of interest. 

With the Senate back on 
Tuesday and the House on 
Wednesday, the main order 
of business will be final ac- 
tion on the 13 regular ap- 
propriations bills for the fis- 
cal year that starts Oct 1. 

Those bills contain con- 
tested provisions about abor- 


tion, census methodology 
and national educational test- 
ing. But spending priorities 
were largely determined by 
the bipartisan budget deal, 
and Republican leaders are 
determined to avoid the kind 
of brinkmanship that forced 
partial government shut- 
downs during budget fights 
two years ago. 

Newt Gingrich, the House 
speaker, has two priorities, 
both involving provisions 
dropped from the budget deal 
at Mr. Clinton’s insistence 
and both of which Repub- 
licans believe can be pursued 
to their advantage. 

One would exempt wel- 
fare recipients from various 
federal workplace standards 
as they seek work. The other 
would allow parents to use 
tax-free savings to finance 


tuitioa and other costs for 
elementary and secondary 
education, including private 
and parochial schools. 

On the top of his list, the 
Senate majority leader, Trent 
Lott of Mississippi, puts 
these two items along with 
legislation to revamp the 
Food and Drug Administra- 
tion, reauthorizing highway 
and other transportation pro- 
grams, and a bill that would 
impose sanctions on foreign 
governments that do not al- 
low free religious expression 
— a top priority for the 
Christian Coalition. 

Mr. Clinton’s big new pri- 
ority is approval of legisla- 
tion to allow “fast track" 
congressional approval of 
trade agreements, meaning 
acting on them as presented, 
without amendments. 


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Away From Politics 

• Shoppers are taking advantage of a test week across New 
York City, Long Island and Westchester County, in which the 
city and state are omitting sales taxes on clothing. (NYT) 

• Four men and a woman died at Bremerton, Washington, 

when a small plane carrying sky divers crashedLater, across 
Puget Sound, several people were injured when die nose gear 
of an Alaska Airlines jet collapsed. (AP) 

• Baptist leaders in Denver have forgiven die Reverend 

Henry Lyons, dropping an investigation into allegations be 
spent funds on luxury items for a female aide. (AP) 


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|> 

■ 

Romania 

II 

IVCMIllCIIL 

Summit 



Athenee Palace Bucharest Hilton, October 29-30, 1997 

Romania is increasingly attracting the attention of the international investment 
community. To assess future investment potential and to highlight the reforms Romania 
is putting in place in a bid to position itself as one of the more exciting investment 
opportunities in the worid, the International Herald Tribune will convene a major 
investment summit in Bucharest on October 29-30, 1997. 

President Emil Constantinescu will give the opening keynote address of the Romania 
Investment Summit He will also host a special dinner for speakers, delegates and guests 
on the evening of October 29 at Cotroceni Palace. 

The fact that President Constantinescu has agreed to support this summit as an integral 
part of the Romanian government’s efforts to attract foreign investment is a measure 

of the importance of the summit 



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PACE 4 


INTERNATIONAL mzRATH TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


international 


JAPAN: PensionLabfor an Aging World 


briefly 


Continued from Page 1 


runted by the ailing economy 
staling regulatory climate. 


He bad been expecting a lump-sum 
pension payment of 221 million yen 
($18,300), but that has been reduced to 
880,000 yen. 

“I’m just infuriated," Mr. Hayahara 
said. *T believed in the system and look 
how it turned ouL I’ve been betrayed." 

“I wanted to do something good for 
my wife, who has had a harsh life, but 
now that the pension will be reduced, my 
dream has evaporated," be added. “We 
were putting in our own money. What 
we thought would be for our retired life 
has disappeared" 

Japan's experience is relevant pre- 
cisely because it is uot unique, just ahead 


investments abroad, propping up foreign 
bond markets. 

“The savings rate could be zero or 
negative by 2010," said Charles Hori- 
oka, an economist at Osaka University 
who has analyzed the savings habits erf 
the elderly. “Japan will have less sav- 
ings. less money to finance investment 
and the economy won't grow as fast.” 

In any case, since other countries are 


Aging Societies 

Projections show that the elderly are becoming an increasingly large share of the populations of many 
industrialized countries, straining the government budgets and economic resources of those countries. 

GERMANY wtiiira! BRITAIN UNITED STATES 


FRANCE 


BRITAIN 


Population H 
65 and over 


Joint Exercises Set 
In Mediterranean 


□ot far behind in their own aging pro- 
cess. Japan will be forging a plan from 


Of its time. Many experts say that other 
countries face similarly difficult out- 


looks, as the populations bora after 
World War II all begin to age. 

By comparison. America is aging 
more slowly than Japan, and — at least 
for now — its Social Security retirement 
program is running decent surpluses. 
Elderly Americans will make up only 20 


percent of the population by 2030; in 
Japan, they will account for 25 percent 
or he population by 2015. 

The Japanese are legendary savers, 
and worries about their future have 
already driven them to accumulate an 
average of 9.6 million yen in savings for 
each man, woman and child. 

But even this tendency to save may be 
in jeopardy, for in general most people 
save money in middle age ana then 
spend it after retirement, so that an el- 
derly population is expected to have a 
much lower savings rate. 

For the rest of the world, that m«ins 
that Japan may no longer be the source of 
excess savings that are channeled into 


cess. Japan will be forging a plan from 
which others may learn. 

That is, if it comes up with a plan. 
Many economists argue that the gov- 
ernment has been slow to revamp the 
nation's archaic pension system, a pay- 
as-you-go plan l&e America’s and most 
others in the industrial world. 

Hie government pension system has 
generally tried to provide enough funds 
to cover all of a retiree’s dally expenses. 
Every Japanese worker is required to 
join the national pension system and 
some also join supplememary corporate 
plans. Most workers pay at least the 
basic fixed monthly amount, around 
12,700 yen, into the national system 
regardless of bow much they earn. 

But many individuals, mainly the self- 
employed, are not making their con- 
tributions to the national pension system 
because they no longer trust iL Failure to 
contribute is technically illegal but 
quietly tolerared. 

Japan’s complex social security sys- 
tem embraces a network of public, cor- 
porate and indivi dual pensions plans 
with numerous quirks and peculiarities 
that have developed over the years. 

As in Mr. Hayaham’s case, many em- 
ployees join company pension plans to 
supplement the national program, and 
the troubles of (he economy since the 
stock market collapsed in the early 
1990s have plunged numerous pension 


Health 20 ill || 
spending ■ ■ ffl g ii 

in 1993 for 9 g || 

people 65 || 9 9 89 

and over 99 P 9 — 99 — I 

as a share *95 -on *io *20 95 ’00 ’io *20 

of total 

health care A $L3% 

spending “ 

Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 


ANKARA — Turkey. Israel and 
the United Stares are to hold joint, 
naval exercises in the eastern Medi- 
terranean in November, an Israeli 
Embassy spokesman said Tuesday. 

><Tha.i will take nlace at some 


10 *20 '95 '00 '10 *20 WOO *10 "20 


I — — _ ■ 

-They will take place at some 
tune between Nov. 15 and 25," he 
said, adding that the three navies 
would rehearse search-and-rescue 
operations in international waters. 

Syria reacted angrily, expressing 
“astonishment” at tire announce- 
ment of a U.S. role in the exercises 
as Secretary of Stale Madeleine A1-- 
briHhi prepared to visit the Middle 

SSt y (Reuters) 


The New Yurie Turns 


funds into bankruptcy. Interest rates are 
at rock bottom in Japan, with the bench- 
made: overnight lending rate at 0 .5 per- 
cent. 

In the meantime, pensioners are mak- 
ing out well, for many of them joined 
pension plans later in their working lives 
but collect full benefits. 

The result is th»r young and middle- 
aged workers are effectively subsidizing 
the elderly. 

"If we keep the structure of the 
present system unchanged, then there 
will be intergenerational inequities," 
Mr. Hdrioka said. 

“The younger are getting less than 
they paid, losing out to the older people 
who are making out like bandits." 

Many company pensions do not have 
enough money in reserve to cover their 
future payouts comfortably, and collec- 
tively, publicly listed companies could 
be underfunded by as much as 40 trillion 
yen, according to estimates by Watson 
Wyatt, a pension consulting firm in 
Tokyo. 


•' - - 


. • - 

\* ° i: 



.• > i -n 




Television Worker 
Slain Near Algiers 


■ •- 



PARIS — Islamic fundamental- 
ist rebels were suspected of killing 
an Algerian television director’ s as- 
sistant over the weekend, cutting 
her throat in an Algiers suburb after 
stopping her at a fake checkpoint, 
Algerian newspapers reported 
Tuesday. The news coincided with a 
report in the London-based Ai Hay- 
at that official figures showed that 
256 people had died in the massacre 
last week at Sidi Rais. (Reusers) 


FU)» A»M/nr NemYmk Time. 

As Japan ages faster than the rest of the industrial world, these citizens 
are facing major changes in their pension and retirement programs. 


Thrust by Comoros ? 


CHINA: After Years of Intolerance, the Gay Community Is Quietly Finding an Open Place in Urban Society 


Continued from Page 1 


before,” said a 28-year-old fashion de- 
signer in Beijing. “1 think most of my 
gay friends now accept it in themselves. 
But if you can’t tell your family or 
colleagues, how open are you?” 

There is no law against homosexu- 
ality in China. In the past, the police have 
arrested people and charged them with 
hooliganism or disturbing public order 
simply for gathering in places where 
homosexuals were known to meet; such 
incidents are becoming less frequent. 

Wan Yanhai, a former health official 
in China and now a visiting scholar at the 
University of Southern California, said 
that while life was gradually becoming 
easier for homosexuals, the authorities 
were still nervous about any sort of 
homosexual-related organization that 
they could not fully control. 


Mr. Wan helped set up and ran an 
IDS telephone line in Beijing in 1992, 


AIDS telephone line in Beijing in 1992, 
when the authorities also allowed several 
books about gay life to be published. But 
he was farced to close down the phone 
line a year later after he began speaking 
out about homosexual rights, and be was 
dismissed from his job at a public health 
institute the following year. 

“Tbe government no longer has a 
problem with gays; it has a problem with 
political organizations," Mr. Wan said. 
*‘As long as you don't organize or speak 
out. you can do what you want.' ' 

A landmark case involved two les- 
bians who were arrested for Irving to- 
gether in Anhui Province in 1992. But 
after lengthy internal debate, the Min- 
istry of Public Security ruled that there 
was nothing illegal about two people of 
the -same sex living together. 

Although homosexual women say life 


is changing for them as fast as it is for 
homosexual men, they have fewer pub- 
lic gathering places. 

1 The pickup attitude that a lot of men 
have is less true for women,” said a 29- 
year-old public relations executive in 
Beijing, who acknowledged that she was 
a homosexual- “We use more informal 
networks, going through friends.” 

One of the driving forces behind the 
growing openness, several scholars 
agreed, is China's economic growth and 
the increased open-mindedness that 
have accompanied iL ' ‘People are busy, 
they're making money and they don't 
care about your private life,” said a 
sociologist in Beijing. “Before, people 
were idle and liked to tell you how to 
lead your life, but that's changed." 

As with any touchy issue in China, 
official practice varies from city to city, 
and town to town. In many places, ho- 


mosexuals still face possible dismissal 
from work if their sexuality becomes 
known to their superiors. At the same 
time, a growing number of their col- 
leagues may accept iL 

“Everything is becoming much more 
open.” said a manager at the restaurant 
with the cross-dressing singer. “Gay 
people themselves are starting to under- 
stand that the way they live is natural." 

Yet, he acknowledged that one reason 
his restaurant was so popular among gay 
people was that it was one of tbe tew 
places where they feel completely com- 
fortable. Shanghai's main public meet- 


benches. A murmur of conversation fills 

the s umm er air 

“You can do iL but you can't talk 
about iL" said one 37-year-old man. 
“At least I’m not afraid to come to a 
place like this and meet other people. 
That's progress." 

But homosexuality is still classified as 
a mental disorder by the Chinese Psy- 
chiatric Association, and psychologists 


MORONI, Comoro® — The Or- 
ganization of African Unity urged 
the government of Comoros on 
Tuesday to resolve a secession 
crisis .peacefully and abandon what 
appeared to be the start of military 
intervention. 

The secretary-general of the or- 
ganization, Salim Ahmed Salim, 
sent the message as fears of a mil- 
itary showdown mounted. Wit- 
nesses said about 300 troops had 
sailed from Moroni, possibly head- 
ing for the breakaway island of An- 
jouan. ( Reuters ) 


typically regard tbe sexual orientation of 
homosexual patients as an illness than ran 
be cured Many homosexual men say they 
still wonder what is wrong with them. 

“1 think I’m missing a gland or 
something in my brain,” said a 30-year- 
old hotel worker in Shan ghai, who was 
looking for conversation in the park 
known as a homosexual hangout “I read 
that in a newspaper, that homosexuals are 
the same as everyone else except that we 
are missing some gland " 


ing place for homosexual men is just two 
blocks from the restaurant and directly 


blocks from the restaurant and directly 
across the street from a police station. 
Hundreds of men gather there each even- 
ing, some holding hands as they wander 
along the tree-lined paths, while others 
chat as they congregate on low-lying 


Peru Military Drill 


LIMA — The Peruvian military 
said it had begun a large six-day 
exercise of its air. land and sea 
power in zones along the country's 
disputed northern border with 
Ecuador. 

The head of the military. General 
Nicolas de Bari, said they were 
routine, defensive maneuvers and 
disaster-relief drills. (Reuters) 


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MIR: Inquiry Blames Cosmonauts for Collision 


Continued from Page 1 


EARLY MORNING DELIVERY 
TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE 


module attached to Mir and 
puncturing the module's alu- 
minum hull. 

The Spektr had to be sealed 
off, and the Mir lost nearly 
half its electrical power. 

Theories about the cause 
included the possibility that 
three men had inadvertently 
accidentally stuffed too much 
garbage into the cargo ship, 
making it harder to controL 

One Russian newspaper, 
citing an unidentified source, 
claimed Mr. Tsibliyev had 
failed to properly record in 
Mix's computer the extra 
weight on tbe cargo ship. 


Other Russian papers said 
that in simulations of the in- 
cident conducted afterward, 
several highly experienced 
space pilots also "crashed” 
the ship. 

Officials at the Russian 
Space Agency said an inquiry 
could not determine what 
happened until the men ar- 
rived back on Earth on Aug. 
14. But a week before their 
return. President Boris 
Yeltsin — presumably 
briefed by space officials — 
said it looked like a case of 
human error. 

"Such a categoric conclu- 
sion that the crew is to blame 
sounds rather strange," a 


Kenya Boycotts Talks on Burundi 


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Reuters 

DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania — A meeting of African 
leaders on Burundi's ethnic crisis will begin in Tanzania on 
Wednesday night but one key regional leader. President 
Daniel arap Moi of Kenya, will not attend. 

A senior Kenyan official said in Nairobi that Mr. Moi was 
frustrated with "holier than thou" countries that had de- 
manded tough sanctions against Burundi but failed to enforce 
them. 


news anchor for Russian 
Television said in a brief 
commentary Tuesday. 

He noted the crew was 
plagued by equipment break- 
downs throughout its six- 
month mission. 

Mr. Tsibliyev, who was the 
Mir commander, and his 
flight engineer, Mr. Lazutkin, 
apparently anticipated such a 
judgmenL Following their re- 
turn, they blamed die Mir's 
rundown equipment for the 
collision and expressed bit- 
terness at being found at fault 
by Mr. Yeltsin and the me- 
dia. 

“It has been a longtime tra- 
dition here in Russia to look 
for scapegoats." Mr. Tsibli- 
yev said after his return. He 
said he could not explain why 
die cargo ship spun out of 
control, only that ‘ ‘there is no 
specific person to blame." 

Meanwhile, the Mir's cur- 
rent crew tried on special 
spacesuits to simulate condi- 
tions for a spacewalk this 
weekend in which they will 
try to find and patch holes in 
Spektr. 


Contact Is Cut 
With a Rebel 
Comoros Isle 


DUTIES: Last-Ditch Appeal 


Continued from Page 1 


Agence France-Presse 

MORONI, Comoros 
— Air, sea and telephone 
links were cut Tuesday 
between Moroni, capital 
of the Comoros, and the 
separatist island of An- 
jou an. scuttling a mission 
to die island by a special 
African envoy. 

Pierre Yere, envoy of 
the Organization of Af- 
rican Unity, said that the 
Anjouan airport had been 
closed and that his plane 
bad been ordered not to 
take off from Moroni. 

Mr. Yere had been ex- 
pected in Anjouan on 
Tuesday for new con- 
sultations with separatist 
leaders ahead of O A Li- 
sponsored talks set to be- 
gin next Wednesday in 
Addis Ababa. The sepa- 
ratists say that their polit- 
ical and economic in- 
terests are being ignored. 


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REPITOLIC OF LEBANON 

COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 
Announcement to participate in the tender for land reclamation, environmental and infrastructure works for 
“The Reclamation and Development of North Beirut 1 .in oral" railed “LINORD Project". 

LINORD Project is one of the largest environmental and development projects in Lebanon. The project paraOeb other schemes 
which Will upgrade the BlfrastrnctHrt and environment in the countT}. The project will improve the Httorat area between Nahr 
Beirut and Nahr Antdias, creating a development for residential, touristic and commercial area, also providing public works and 
addressing envir on mental issue*. 

The Govern m ent of Lebanon represented by the Council for Development and Reconstruction (CDR) calls for a public and 
re st r i ct e d tender in connection with the Finance. Design. Construction and Warranty of Sea Defences. Land Reclamation. Harbour 
Works, Rehabilitation of Bourj Hammond Waste Dump, Sewage Pre-treatment Headwords and Infrastructure Works for LINORD 
Project, tednding transfer of pobtic related works and other obligations to tbe Government of Lebanon. 

The project wffi be tendered on a Finance, Design & Build “Contra! d'Engjgagr'' based on ■ Concept Master Plan, Technical & 
Legal Conditions, Employer's Requirements and Design Crileria/Brtrf. 

A Conceptual Master Plan ami Conceptual Engineering Design will be included in tbe tender file for reformer purposes. Alternative 
design concepts and modifications to the Conceptual Master Plan may be submitted and will be duly considered. 

The total overall area of the LINORD Project to be recbdmrd/develnpfd according to the Conceptual Master plan amounts to 
approximately a Gross Area » 2,400,000 nr with a Net exploitable Area approximately - 1,200.000 m*. 

The Successful tenderer win receive a proportion of the bund reclaimed in return for undertaking the following : 

1) Coat of financing (he Sewage Coastal CoDector between Ras Beirut and Nahr El Kalb = USS47 Million. 

2) Cost for prefiminary studies ■ US$10 MflUon. 

3) Provision of 260.000 m 1 of land for a ftature Secondary Sewage Treatment Plant, 

4 ) RrhaMStatioa of the existing Bourj H am m ond Waste Dump and converting H into a 260.000 nr 1 District Park. 

5) Execution of the Sewage Pre- t re a tment Head works, rehabilitation and protection of existing Sea Out foils. 

6) Construction of Coastguard and fishing Uarboms al Dbayrh. 

7) Provision of 300. 000 nr of land as a Tank Farm to be sold for Ofl&Gaz Companies. 

Interested parties should note that this tender is restricted to Tenderers with sufficient financing and experience to undertake And 
manage a project of this Harare. Hie Tenderer shall pledge to employ experienced marine contractors, design consultants, 
specialized geotechnical and toil improvement companies and environmental firms for ifae preparation of a final design and the 
execution of the project 

The Tenderer shall also undertake to establish a Lebanese Joint Stock Company with a share capital in Ofumese Pounds equivalent 
In not less than USS200 Million for the execution of the project. 

Tenderers win need to submit, with the tender, a letter from a prime bank acceptable tn the Employer, stating their financial 
capability to undertake a project of this magnitude. 

The bidding documents may be purchased as from Thursday 4th of September 1997 during working hours, by interested bidders 
upon payment of VSS20JKK) (Twenty Thousand LS Dollars) by a bank certified cheque in the name nrthc C.'nnnril for Development 
and Reconstruction. 

Bids shall be defivered io CDR to the address given below at or before 12:00 noon (Beirut local limr) on Thursday 1 8th or D re ember 

1997. 

Further information may be obtained from, and bidding documents shall be Inspected at. the offices of : Council for Development 
and Reconstruction - Talk* El-Serail - Beirut - Lebanon - Fax No. : (961-1) 647 947 / 864 494 


Without duty-free, the in- 
dustry claims, airline and 
ferry tickets would cost more, 
and some thinly traveled fcny 
routes would be wiped out 
without tbe subsidies from 
onboard duty-free sales. 

It remains unclear whether 
the last-gasp effort can suc- 
ceed, 50 years after Europe’s 
duty-free industry was foun- 
ded in a small airport kiosk in 
Shannon, Ireland. 

The approval of all 15 EU 
finance ministers would be 
necessary. Thus far, the lob- 
byists say they can count only 
on Germany, Spain, France, 
Greece and Italy. 

As for vacationers, they 
have mixed views about the 
value of duty-free. 

Eric Stranex, from Preston, 
England, took a cruise to Cal- 
ais, on the ferry and said he 
got a better deal buying his 
Belgian beer in France, even 
paying the French duty. 

In France, he paid about 10 
pence (16 cents) for a small 
bottle, compared to the 40 
pence he pays at home, and he 
was not restricted in the quan- 
tity he was allowed to buy as 
he would have been in a duty- 
free store. 

Duty-free shops limit pur- 
chases to just three or four 
bottles of wine and spirits. 

The British government al- 
lows it, citizens going to 


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» »F T1 IE WORLD 


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Discover the dc^ncc and annlun 
ot‘ nur SunirjiiUy ■; hak-au and 

surrounding park 

P indiiidn.iii, cJci-orjlcd rooms. 
To make a reservation _ 


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France, Spain or other cheap- 
er countries to bring borne 
120 bottles of wine, several 
hundred cans of beer and a 
few dozen bottles of spirits 
and fortified wine — and no 
questions are asked. 

“As far as duty-free is con- 
cerned, it seems a waste of 
time,” Mr. Stranex said. Bat 
his wife, Pauline, disagreed. 
“It’s exciting when you get 
that little something duty- 
free,” she said. 

Some nations, such as Bri- 
tain, impose taxes on liquor 
and robacco that -are much 
higher than their neighbors. 

Many Britons ride the fer- 
ries so they can stock up on 
cheaper alcohol and tobacco 
in France, and end up saving 
enough to pay for the fare. 
Duty-free prices are also 
cheaper than those in Britain, 
but with limits on quantity, it 
is impossible to make the type 
of huge savings enjoyed by 
day-trippers who come back 
with a car bursting with 
booze. 

Duty-free sales will con- 
tinue for people flying be- 
tween EU nations and other 
countries. One of the top 
European players, the British 
airport operating company 
BAA PLC, made a big U.S. 
acquisition in August to 
hedge its bets. 

BAA paid $674 million for 
Duty Free International Inc., 
which operates about 175. 
duty-free stores in 14 inter- 
national airports, including 
Kennedy and La Guardia in 
New York, O’Hare in Chica- 
go and Logan in Boston. 

B ut the traveler on the feny 

has no such chances of beat- 
ing ihe sysrem. 

A French taxi driver, Ray- 
mond Lebrun, purchased 
duty-free cigarettes for 120 
rrancs ($20) that would have 
cost him 180 francs at home. 
He lamented the idea of. 
br >ngmg the savings to an * 
end. “It s bad because it’s a 
good deal for everybody.” 
Mr. Lebrun said. 




0"r hour from P„n s - Highm,^. “1 


COMEIEGNE 

From Sept 5-8 1997 


30th antique show ■ 

St Nicolas Hall - historical site 1 

Presence of expert ■ 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1991 


PAGE 5 



EUROPE 


: Bosnian Serbs Offer Deal 

In ;■ ; 

rtlln % ; For Transmitter, They Will Soften Criticism 


■ Vflfc 


The Associated Press 

BRCKO. Bosnia-Herzegovina — Backers 
of Radovan Karadzic pledged Tuesday to 
temper a vicious media campaign against 
foreign organizations in Bosnia if NATO 
troops yield a transminer to Bosnian Serb 
television. 

Seeking a breather in their struggle over the 
media, Karadzic backers signed an agreement 
aimed at ending confrontations between 
stone-throwing Bosnian Serbs and the 
NATO-led peace force. 

In the hrest such clash Monday, a mob 
challenged U.S. soldiers guarding the trans- 
mitter. The soldiers — part of the peace force 
— fired a tear gas canister after the crowd 
grew to 350 and temporarily detained four 
demonstrators before handing them over to 
Bosnian Serb police. There were no injuries. 

The soldiers moved on the transmitter on 
Mount Majevica, 150 kilometers <90 miles) 
east of Banja Luka, last week after backers of 
Mr. Karadzic, Lhe wartime Bosnian Serb lead- 
er and indicted war criminal, broadcast calls 
for violence against foreign organizations. 

Officially. NATO said the transmitter was 
secured to prevent opposing Serb factions 
from battling for its control. 

Even as the media war eased, potential 


conflict was building on another front With 
Karadzic backers apparently ignoring a Sun- 
day deadline restricting heavily armed special 
police, a NATO spokesman. Major Chris Ri- 
ley, said that the peace force “will undertake 
appropriate action’ * against them. 

Mr. Karadzic depends on special police units 
to guard him against any attempt by NATO 
commandos to seize him and fly him to trial at 
the UN war crimes tribunal in The Hague. 

With many Bosnian Serbs depending ex- 
clusively on television and radio for their 
information, control of transmitters and other 
broadcasting equipment has assumed primary 
importance for the rival Bosnian Serb camps. 

■ Atrocity’ Suspect Arrested in Croatia 

The Croatian police have arrested a man 
who confessed in a newspaper interview pub- 
lished Monday to wartime atrocities leading 
to the deaths of 86 people, the Interior Min- 
istry said in reports published Tuesday. 
Agence France- Pres se reported from 
Zagreb. 

Miro Bajramovic, a Bosnian Croat who 
fought for Croatia after it declared indepen- 
dence in 199 1 , was arrested late Monday in his 
home in Dodosac, south of Zagreb, the min- 
is try said. 



BRIEFLY 


LuncW Bctww The A. Pit-.. 

FUGITIVE AMERICAN — Ira Einhorn, on the run since 1979, leaving a 
court in Bordeaux, after a hearing Tuesday on a L;.S. extradition request. The 
self-stvled hippie, 57, was tried in absentia in Philadelphia and sentenced to 
life in* prison in a woman’s death. The French court will rule Sept. ~3. 


2 Cases Light Up the Trail of Italy’s Illicit Cigarette Trade 

— * -i— An -jnrf invmiioiimrc with the European thev sell to middlemen and are not pino said that he had managed to 


onto ; 

> : 


'T 


Drill 


V . 


By Raymond Bonner 

York Times Service 

BRINDISI, Italy — Smoking is 
such a pan of Italian life that con- 
sumption is not measured in cig- 
arettes. packs or cartons, but in tons 
— more than 25.000 tons last year. 

And in a country where organized 
crime and smuggling are part of the 
landscape it is not surprising that a 
substantial portion of the cigarettes 
here — nearly one in five, or 4,693 
tons — are contraband. 

Cigarette smuggling in Italy has 
flourished for several reasons, in- 
cluding an ill-fated decision in 1992 
to ban the sale of Marlboros after the 
authorities concluded that Philip 
Morris Cos., which makes the 
brand, had some complicity in the 
smuggling. The ban led to a surge in 
smuggling before it was lifted. 

Still, smuggling continues because 
of high tobacco taxes and because 
Italy has long tolerated street vendors 
hawking contraband cigarettes. 

Two criminal cases provide some 
unusual detail of how smuggling 
operates in Italy. In one broad rack- 
eteering case that is on trial in the 


Adriatic city of Brindisi, about- 60 
defendants are described in an arrest 
warrant as members of a “Mafia- 
like association.'’ which buys 
“enormous quantities of cigarettes 
directly” from the tobacco compa- 
nies. 

The criminal organizations sign 
contracts with the tobacco compa- 
nies, and the criminals have so much 
economic power that they insist that 
the company not sell to any of the 
gang’s competitors, according to an 
arrest warrant in the case. 

In another case. Augusto Arcel- 
laschi. who is described by law en- 
forcement officials as one of 
Europe’s major cigarette smugglers, 
is to go on trial in Belgium this 
month on charges growing out of 
smuggling a billion Marlboros from 
Antwerp, through Switzerland into 
Italy. 

According to the charges against 
him, during two months in 1993. 
Mr. Arcellaschi smuggled 113 
truckloads of Marlboros to Italy. 

Mr. Arcellaschi allegedly has 
been smuggling Marlboros into 
Italy for more than a decade, ac- 
cording to criminal records in Italy 


and investigators with the European 
Union's anti-fraud unit. 

Philip Morris, which makes 
Marlboros, denied that it had sold 
cigarettes to Mr. Arcellaschi or to 
any of the other individuals who 
have been charged. 

Mr. Arcellaschi declined to com- 
ment, and his lawyer, Filippo Fer- 
rari. refused to discuss any of the 
accusations. 

While Philip Morris says it does 
not knowingly sell to smugglers, it 
benefits from the trade. Marlboro’s 
market share in Italy jumps 15 
points, to 70 percent, when con- 
traband is included. Italian officials 
said. On the street, a pack of con- 
traband Marlboros sells for about a 
third less than a legal pack. 

“I am personally sure that they 
know the final destination of their 
cigarettes.” Nicola Piacente, a pros- 
ecutor in the racketeering case nere, 
said about Philip Morris and other 
tobacco companies. “But they have 
excuses and arguments that they 
don't-” 

In fact, none of the companies has 
been charged with wrongdoing. Es- 
sentially, the companies say that 


they sell to middlemen and are not 
responsible for what happens with 
the cigarettes after that. 

Two organized criminal groups in 
Italy take in more than $600 million 
a year from the illegal trade in cig- 
arettes, Mr. Piacente said. 

Evidence in the racketeering case 
Mr. Piacente is pursuing includes 
wiretaps in which a purchase of cig- 
arettes from Philip Morris is dis- 
cussed. according to official doc- 
uments. In one conversation 
monitored by the police, at 11:44 
A.M. on June 20, 1993, the warrant 
said. Benito Leo received a phone 
call from Cosimo Pupino, “who in- 


pino said that he had “managed to 
get favorable conditions both for the 
price and for the terms of payment,* ' 
but that the deal “is conditioned on 
the payment of a security deposit to 
a bank account in Switzerland.” 

“Get moving, this is a good deal, 
directly with Philip Morris.” Mr. 
Pupino told Mr. Leo, according to 
the warrant. 

Phiiip Morris denies it ever sold 
ciaarettes to Mr. Pupino or Mr. Leo. 
Neither of these men “is or has been 
a customer of Philip Morris, or. to the 
best of our knowledge, a customer of 
any of our customers,” said Andre 
Reiman, a senior vice president with 


call rrom uostmo rupinu, wuu — r-— - . : . 

forms Him that he has just concluded Philip Moms Europe, which is based 
a deal directly with Philip Morris to in Lausanne. Switzerland. 


buy Original 05 Marlboro and Mer- 
it.” Both Mr. Leo and Mr. Pupino 
are defendants. 

Two weeks later, at 7:40 P.M. on 
July 3, according to the warrant, Mr. 
Leo received another call from Mr. 
Pupino. This time Mr. Pupino re- 
ported that “he had reached an ac- 
cord with Philip Morris to buy 
10,000 cases of Original Marlboro 
05 at the price of $230 a case. ” 

According ro the warrant, Mr. Pu- 


As for Mr. Arcellaschi. a decade 
ago he was convicted in Italy of 
smuggling more than 2,000 tons of 
cigarettes, mostly Marlboros, into 
the country' and was sentenced to six 
years in jail. After serving part of his 
sentence, he moved to Lugano. 
Switzerland. As long as he remains 
in Switzerland, Mr. Arcellaschi may 
be safe from the prosecutors in Italy 
or Belgium because he is unlikely to 
be extradited there. 


French Minister Faces Inquiry r 

PARIS — Justice Minister Elisabeth Guigou is being 
investigated over an allegation that she defamed Xaviere 
Tiber!, wife of the mayor of Paris, lawyers said Tuesday. 

They said the case, which could lead to a trial, is 
centered on comments Mrs. Guigou made on the TF1 
television channel in March in which she questioned ihe 
value of a report written by Mrs. Tiberi. said the lawyers. 
Jean-Pierre Mienard and Eric Diamonds. 

Mrs Gui°ou'became justice minister in June, and was 
not indie cabinet at the time of her critical statement about 
Mrs. Tiberi’s report. 

Mrs Tiberi was accused of misuse of public tunds over 
a report she wrote for a regional council south ofPans. for 
which she was paid 200,000 francs (S.iO.000). The report 
was said to be bogus, but the case against her was dropped 
in July because of procedural irregularities. \AFP\ 

German State Accepts Algerians 

FRANKFURT — The northern German state of 
Schleswig-Holstein said Tuesday it would *°P s * n 
Algerians who fled strife in their homeland back to their 

C °in the past week, hundreds of people have been 
murdered in Algeria in a brutal power struggle between 
Islamic extremists and the military-backed got ernmeni. 

Under German asylum laws, only refugees who risk 
political persecution are eligible for asylum. Many Al- 
gerians whose lives are threatened by armed Islamic 

groups do not qualify. .. . 

Schleswig-Holstein’s interior minister, other politi- 
cians and refugee organizations have iirged the German 

government to change the asylum laws. ... 

About 8,000 of the 23,000 Algerian refugees living in 
Germany face deportation, according to refugee orga- 
nizations. 

Yeltsin Wants Journalists Freed 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin said Tuesday he 
wanted a feud over the imprisonment of Russian jour- 
nalists in Belarus resolved before he meets the Belarus 
president next weekend. .. . . - „ 

“Everything should be cleared out by then, the Interfax 
news agency quoted Mr. Yeltsin as saying. The kremlin 
has demanded the release of two reporters of Russian 
Public Television who have been held in Belarus and 
charged with trying to violate its border with Lithuania. 

Mr. Yeltsin "said during a regular meeting with Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin that he would meet the 
Belarus president, Alexander Lukashenko, in Moscow on 
Saturday. fReutmi 

3 Danish Neo-Nazis Convicted 

COPENHAGEN — A Danish jury found three neo- 
Nazis guilty Tuesday of trying to send letter bombs to 
targets in Britain, officials said. , 

The defendants. Thomas Derry Nakaba, Michael 
Voider and Nicky Steensgaard. were convicted of pre- 
paring three letter bombs. One was addressed to the 
British television personality Sharron Davies. a white 
who is married to the black athlete Derek Redmond. 

The jury rejected pleas of clemency. < Reuters > 




SMOOTH AS SILK IS 827 FLIGHTS EVERY Vt 
TO 37 DESTINATIONS IN ASIA. 






PAGE 6 


EU Shrugs Off 
Boycott Hint 
By Malaysia 
Over Burma 


< CaHpUrd ty Our Suff From Pafna-hn 

BRUSSELS — The European Com- 
mission dismissed Tuesday threats by 
Malaysia to boycott a major Europe- 
Asia meeting, saying that Burma ’s par- 
ticipation was not an issue for Asian 
countries to decide aione. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Moha- 
mad of Malaysia said Monday that he 
would lead a boycott by ASEAN, the 
Association of South East Asian Nations, 
of the Asia-Europe Meeting next April if 
Burma was not allowed to attend. 

Burma and Laos were recently made 
members of ASEAN, which aiso groups 
Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, 
Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia and 
Brunei. 

The Asia-Europe Meeting, known 
sometimes as AS EM. groups the seven 
original ASEAN members along with 
Japan, China and South Korea and the 
European Union's members. 

•'Burma’s elevation to ASEAN was a 
single ticket affair,” said a spokesman 
for the European Commission, the EU "s 
executive agency. “Membership of 
ASEAN does not mean automatic mem- 
bership of ASEM. It is up to the Asian 
members of ASEM to propose other 
Asian members and for die EU to ap- 
prove their participation.” 

On Monday Mr. Mahathir, the cur- 
rent ASEAN president, suggested that 
the organization considered Burma’s 
participation in next year's meeting to 
be a foregone conclusion. 

“If there is discrimination against 
Myanmar,” the national Bemama news 
agency quoted him as having said, “it is 
a discrimination against ASEAN. You 
may find other countries in ASEAN also 
deciding not to attend.” 

No other ASEAN member raised the 
prospect of a possible boycott, and the 
Singapore government said that the 
question of B urma's participation would 
nave to be decided by consensus. 

Mr. Mahathir was reacting to a state- 
ment in Singapore by the British foreign 
secretary. Robin Cook, that Burma 
would not be admitted to ASEM. 

Mr. Cook accused Burma of profiting 
from the drug trade-. He also cited EU 
sanctions against the ruling military 
junta. The sanctions deny visas to of- 
ficials from Burma, which prefers to be 
known as Myanmar. The junta seized 
power in 1988 and is widely accused of 
human rights abuses and links with drug 
traffickers. (Reuters. AFP) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


ASIA/ PACIFIC 




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Vietnamese braving torrential rain to visit Ho Chi Minh’s mausoleum on Tuesday, the 52d National Day. 

Hanoi Awaits Leadership Changes 


Reuters 

HANOI — Rain-soaked red flags 
hung limply in the streets of Hanoi and 
thunder rumbled as bedraggled pil- 
grims lined up at Ho Chi Minh’s 
mausoleum on Tuesday, Vietnam’s 
5 2d National Day. 

The weather was perhaps fitting for 
a nation that — with economic reform 
in the doldrums, a leadership reshuffle 
looming and unrest simmering — has 
little heart for celebrations right now. 

Prime Minister Vo Van Kiel, in a 
speech to commemorate Ho Chi 
Minh’s declaration of independence 
from France in 1945, promised a 
quickening of reform. 

But analysts say that many in the 
riding Communist Party have their 
minds on the maneuvering of coming 
weeks, which will bring new leaders 
and set the direction of policy after 
months of uncertainty over the pace 
and scope of further reform. 

Mr. Kiel and President Le Due Anh, 
both in their 70s, are dne to step down 


when the newly elected National As- 
sembly meets for the first time on Sept. 
20. Before then, the Politburo and me 
party’s Central Committee will meet 
behind closed doors to debate who 
should replace them. 

Political sources say Deputy Prime 
Minister Phan Van Khai, like Mr. Kiet 
a reformist from the more freewheel- 
ing south of tire country, is likely to 
become prime minister. But they are 
still giving mixed signals on who will 
take over from Mr. Anh, an army 
general and conservative. 

■ Hanoi Bars UN Prize Winner 

• Barbara Crossette of The New York 
Times reported earlier from New 
York: 

The first Vietnamese journalist 
awarded an international fellowship to 
report on the United Nations has been 
barred from traveling to the United 
States by the Vietnamese government, 
the editor of the publication in Hanoi 
that employs him said. 


The journalist, Nguyen Manh 
Hung, 22, was one of four winners of 
the 1997 Dag Hammarskjold Awards, 
which bring promising young writers, 
editors ana broadcasters to UN 
headquarters for annual General As- 
sembly sessions. 

The fellowships are awarded by the 
United Nations Correspondents As- 
sociation. Recipients are chosen by an 
independent panel of journalists from 
around the world. 

Mr. Hung is a news editor at the 
weekly newspaper Vietnam Invest- 
ment Review, which backed his ap- 
plication. The paper's acting editor in 
chief, Nguyen Tn Dung, tola reporters 
in Hanoi on Thursday that the Vi- 
etnamese government, after assuring 
Him of an exit permit, had in fact 
barred him from accepting the award 
because it had not been presented 
through government channels. 

The newspaper is published by the 
Ministry of Planning and Investment 
in English and Vietnamese editions. 


Hashimoto Set to Keep Finance Chief, but Not Foreign Minister 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto is set to reshuffle his 20- 
member cabinet as early as next week 
but will retain Finance Minister Hiroshi 
Mitsuzuka, news reports said Tuesday. 

In a cabinet overhaul that is expected 
to take place on Sept. 11, after Mr. 
Hashimoto is re-elected as president of 


the governing Liberal Democratic 
Party, Keizo Ubuchi, the leader of a 
party faction, is favored to replace Yu- 
kihiko Ikeda as foreign minister, Kyodo 
news agency quoted party sources as 
saying. 

The re-election of Mr. Hashimoto, 
who became prime minister in January 
1996 and started a second term last 


November, is virtually certain. He is run- 
ning unopposed for the. top party post 
Mr. Hashimoto, 60, is likely to 
choose Kenzo Muraoka, a senior party 
figure, to succeed Seiroku Kajiyama as 
chief cabinet secretary, -a key coordin- 
ating post that also carries the respon- 
sibility of government spokesman, the 
reports said. 


Church Riled 
Over Ramos’s 
Talk of 2d Bid 

CofiMhUV SvtfFim Depuuitn 

SOLO, Philippines — President Fidel 
Ramos appeared for the first time Tues- 
day to leave open the possibility that he 
might run for a second tenn, which the 
Roman Catholic Church assailed as an 
' * unabashed greed for power.’ * 

The constitution bans a president 
from r unnin g for re-election, and in the 
past Mr. Ramos has said he would step 
down at the end of his six-year term, 
next Jane. 

Asked under what circumstances he 
mi ght change his position and stay in 
power, Mr. Ramos told reporters Tues- 
day that the issue was pending before 
both the Supreme Court and foe Con- 
gress. “So why don’t we just waif?” he 
asked in this southern town. 

Previously, Mr. Ramos has respond- 
ed to questions about bis political plans 
by saying he would leave office in 
June. 

The constitutional question has ad- 
ded to the country's difficulties at a time 
when local stock and currency markets 
have sunk to new lows, hit by financial 
turmoil sweeping the region. 

The Philippine Catholic Church has 
set itself mi a collision course with the 
administration by condemning any 
moves to prolong Mr. Ramos's stay in 
power. 

In a statement, the Catholic Bishops 
Conference said that the issue behind 
moves to amend the constitution 
marked an “unabashed greed for power 
by self-serving politicians. ” It said con- 
cern about the issue “has resulted in 
serious setbacks for the country. 

“On the economic front, the peso is 
plummeting, the stock market is drop- 
ping,” it added. 

A citizens' group has a petition 
pending before the high court that seeks 
a referendum on changing the consti- 
tution to allow Mr. Ramos to nm for re- 
election. 

Also, both houses of Congress are 
debating a resolution to convene a joint 
session to propose amendments to the 
constitution. 

This week. Cardinal Jaime Sin, who 
rallied thousands of people in 1986 in a 
popular revolt against the late dictator, 
Fe rdinand Marcos, rejected appeals by 
Mr. Ramos to call off a demonstration 
against the amendments planned for 
Sept. 21, which foe Manila archbishop 
plans to lead. On Tuesday, Cardinal Sin 
urged priests to join the protest 

Former President Corazon Aquino 
also plans to take part “This is the time 
for us to fight once more for our de- 
mocracy, ’ ’ she said. (Reuters. AFP ) 


Hun Sen Rules Out 
Talks With Rival 

PHNOM PENH — Hun Sen, the 
Cambodian leader, on Tuesday ap- 
neared to rule out talks with the co- 
prime minister he overthrew in Ju- 
ly saying Prince Norodom Ranar- v 
iddh had to face trial for his alleged 

crimes. ,. ' " 

Mr. Hun Sea, responding to a : 

call from King Norodom Sihanouk \ 

for peace talks wifo his ousted rival, 

Prince Ranariddh, also said fee- , 
Portal fighting in the northwest of 

foe country would cease when roy- 
alist forces gave up and returned to ; “ 

foe government side. . 

Kong Sihanouk returned to the | 
northwestern town of Siem Reap on f 
Friday from Beijing where he had • 
been receiving medical treatment 
for several ailments since February. V 
It was foe king’s first trip home 
since Mr. Hun Sen toppled Prince 
Ranariddh. (Reuters) 

Ex-Korea Leaders 
Won't Be Pardoned 

SEOUL — President Kim 
Young Sam ruled out on Tuesday 
an immediate amnesty for his two 
jailed predecessors, and analysts 
said confusion over foe issue re- 
flected a crisis in the ruling camp. 

Mr. Kim was responding to a ^ 
suggestion by Lee Hoi Chang, the . j 
ruling New Korea Party can d idate 
for presidential elections in Decem- 
ber, that he grant clemency to Chun 
Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo with- 
in two weeks. Both have been im- 
prisoned for mutiny, treason and 
corruption. (Reuters) 

VOICES From Asia 


Saburo lenaga, a Japanese 
historian who won a partial vic- 
tory in his campaign against gov- 
ernment censorship of school 
textbooks last week, saying Tues- 
day that he was worried about a 
backlash by far-right extremists: 
“I don’t think foe current situ- 
ation is going in a positive di- 
rection. The dynamism of history 
calls for reactionary movement 
whenever the opposite force 
proves successful All I can hope 
now is that foe younger gener- 
ation fights such reactionary 
moves.” (Reuters) 


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PAGE 3' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 , 1997 



PAGET 


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DOMINICAN CIGARS. 9 styles, Hand 
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Telefax USA+954474-3866 


LEVI 501 'S. Used and New. Quality 
leans tired (ran the USA. Honest and 
RaaWa. Fax. 50342WT/49 USA 


QUALITY T-SHIRTS from Hamburg. 
Ready slock. law quantities tor sale. 
Fax Germany +49-40 


9-40-371726. 


SHALL ARMS AMMUMnONMUTARY 
equnment and supplies, lowest prices, 
volume only: FAX USA +954-474-3866. 


T-SHIRTS 9 SUQOZEN501 JEANS 6 
SUPAIR SHRIMPS 6 $27; 1-6 KG. 
FAXiTEL 44 10)151 707 8543 


USED LEVI 501 JEANS - Al colors & 
grades. For price fa FAX B 01 -561-3849 
USA. HECY 



- WHOLE MILK POWDER 26% or Stain 
lift porter 0 °i> for sale a bea prices. 
Any mattes, fine 506484-9483 USA 


Business Opportunities 


Do you wmt to HttbSehed your own 
travel company fa Soitnrimd 

IATA TRAVEL AGENCY 

to sell Locaxcn dy carter. 

Agent ol map ton operators. 
Manta of Swes Trara Seorty. 
Please contact PO Box 9167. 
048038 ZURICH, fits +41 1 29t 3255. 


FWANCE AVALABLE FOR 
* LETTERS OF CREDIT 
• STANDBY LETTERS OF CRHMT 
■ FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 
• PROOF OF FUNDS 
’ INVESTMENT LOANS 
Fax appecatonj only to +00 382 22B8291 


ANONYMOUS BANK ACCOUNTS 
TRADE FWANCE 
BANK INSTRUMENTS 
Fax htay otfy to *90 392 288291 


2 nd PASSPORTS I Driving licences / 
DMf&es/CamDuffeaa Ptasportsite^ 
Bank Account. GM. PO. Box 70302. 
Athens 1661ft Greece Fax B962152. 
«tpiAww.gttaHwii^ 


GREEK MAN. h 9* educated. En^sN 
FiendVSfanfsh. seeks senous reprasen- 
taikm tor Greek mariof. Ptese Fas 
+30 61.423757 Greece. 


OFFSHORE COMPAWES. For Ira 
chute or advice Tel London 44 181 741 
1224 Fax: 44 181 748 6558/6338 
Mmapptetonco.sk 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with correspondent relationship. 

Class A commercial license. 

Immediate delivery. US $60,000. 

Nassau, Bahamas 
D eb (242) 334-7000 for (2421 384-7082 
Agents Wanted Worudwide 


We sell the following 
brands of leather goods: 
Cued, Pra da. Lane el. Celine. 
YSL, Nina Ricci. Cartier. Coach 
and manv others. 


supplies: 

Fax; + 31 (0; 20 6330394 
The Netherlands 


in 


EMPIRE STATE BUILDING 
ADDRESS 

Gain Instant credtbihty. 
Establish a NY presence in 
the world’s bast-mown 
bultdlnq. Moll received, phone 
onswerfaig. conference 
mom, furnished mmt-oifflcsa. 

am* state ofhce semes 

7H; 2B-73M872 ( FAX: 2D-5H-1U5 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
IMMIGRATION/PASSPORTS 



i Trustees 

Aston House, bougies, isle of Man 
Tel: +44 (0) 1624 626591 
Fax +44 (IJ) 1624 625126 

London 

Tefc +44 ( 0 | 171 233 1302 
Far +44 (0) 171 233 1519 

E Kail: astonSenteipnse.net 

www.aatoiHoflutainfl.co.uk 


OFFSHORE COMPARES 

READY MADE CDs. FULL ADMN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND UC 
BAMUNG & ACCOUNTING 
CHINA BUSINESS SERVICES 

Cnttd Stefia Ho tar iflimtfete 
unices & compenv brochure 
MACS LTD. Room 1108. Aten Plaza 
2-6 Grawtfp Road. TST, Kmrioon. 
Hong Kong, emal- nacsGtes/pwnH 
“ b ffiZ-27241 


Twt 


41223 Fax 27224373 


LIVE AND WORK H FRANCE 
CANAL BARGE COMPANY 
Esabfcted 1963. 104 n charter boat. 

6 passengers. 4 03w escallert 
cont&on hmesl reptmm nMbus. 

utfKy vetucufe, exisSng ctertefe 
sten+jp support, catnusd marketing 
pwsUe. advice on tarmaBies/wxIang 
papers. USS400.000. Wrffe to: Box 363 
IKT.. 92521 Netdy Cedex. France 


RELIABLE EUROPEAN CONNECTION 
Assistance a-vd RfipaserariaB 
Comome, TVada & Fmance 
y, Agreement. Fo#re-up 


EMC -Tab +33(0)1 45 56 (6 22 
Fax +33 (0)1 47 05 44 08 
Emaiem:eanpe.fr 


WELL KNOWN FRENCH 
■ COUTURE HOUSE' 

seeks tttters to increase its equity 
capital in onta to develop & (as 
axpaiuSna traemfitaial business. 

^33 |D)1 44 17 92 70 


WE REQUIRE WTRODUCBtS Mth con- 
tacts in S-America. Africa, and Eastern 
Europe. We wil provide foreign ex- 
change. Mures and options Pfotams. 
Hon renkfwatxxi on an arming basis 
possUB. Tai‘ Fax -W ( 0 ) 171 286 3329 


SWISS TRAWIG Cwnpany *1 
seing stocks of consnetdai i 

« ouOfl pitas far fflqxjtL Now avatoble 
2000 bote drosses 'Mrs W sizes 
42-60. COOESCO Fta -41 26 401 42 45 


REAL ESTATE COMPANY created in 
1989. capital 5,000.000 BEF. seeks m- 
restore ( 3 . 000.000 BE?) for South-fast 
Asa projects. TeFFtac ■*32£38<iW6« 


WANTED: CONTACTS FOR REWORK 
MARKETING b Europe EraWo and w- 
entire. Haase cortaa Monks ! 

Fax 468844046 


COMPANY looking far financial partner 
far al b inportaa intamabonal bisnas 

fransacticns. Ftac +- 33 (0}1 *4 «0 <0 34 


INCORPORATE 


IN THE 


Protect Tour Personal Assets 

■ Incorporate m any state, including 
Delaware. Nevada & Wyoming 

■ LLC s tirrnen Liawxy Comtunest 
• 'n as little 35 48 hours 

Corporate Agents. Inc. 

Fa* 13021 996-7076 
CompuServe GO INC 
M© . ■ www corporate com 


302 - 998-0598 


Soccer (Fi 


Tee-shirt 

Kn&um, 

100.1 




holo^ainEMaa. 





Fax 


Cohter$fctMJV.L*a, 
+32jmiM^i4+i 


+32J3434249 


BUSINESS 

SERVICES 


INCORPORATE 


• FREE Information 

* AH u.S. States and Offshore 
■ Attorney owned and operated 

Fax 305 - 672-9110 

www.corpcreations.com 


TRADEMARK 


Telecommunications 


CV - International 
International Prepaid Cards 

Tel 

3422 Old Cartel Trai. Suite 570 
Mmmgun. Delaware 1980B-5192. USA 


Business Services 


RUSSIAN BUSINESS Visas metaling 
mitt-entry plus all other travel services 
va an dmnoivn Moscow office let *44 
(01113 222 0G6Z Fax 10)113 232 0228 


MAILING LISTS by Berger & Company 
Euvpean harness and consumer data 
Tel 44 1312282996 Fax 44 1312267901 


YOUR OFFICE IN LONDON 

8 cni SUea - Uei. Phone Fax. Telex 

Tet 44 171 290 90W ‘ax 171 499 7517 


Consultants 


FINANCIAL CONTROLLMG SERVICES 
Semei rational ffluen Engtish-French) 
Key areas n Accounting CortroTng. 
SAAF-Reportatg. Autflng Organsafan. 
German exes. Acmg nnoerary or in- 
terim basis and or spesal asagmsts. 
For. ~4f-4!22-S5 4S-2 (Germanyi 
E-mail erases eJndmnesurtta 


BANKS NEEDED AND BANK br OT+ 

sirefc 73 -jerm from Ring ranpany 
cJ LSS =:•: V (piiJSr legal iwowr. 
Please xck 2i3l c S S 


Capital Wanted 


SI HLUON. PAYS BACK 5150^00 M 
90 days tufty cotaeraftzed No broken. 
Tet 31B-5&240G or 31667M555. 


Capital Available 


CAPITAL CORP. 

H & A 

Ccrparate Rnarmng 
Vsmure CapQl 
(Worttmde) 

Tel: 001 -407-248-0360 
Fax: 001-407-248-0037 USA 


COMMERCIAL FUNDING AVAILABLE 
Busks Snares * Venture Capasl 
Wortfrafe ’ Braters welcome 


EMC 1NVEST1IENTS LTD 
FAX t44 (0)115 942 7846 


PROJECT CAPITAL 

AVALASLE NOW 
NO LIMIT 
NO SECURITY 
FAX: +44 (0)171 470 7213 



-1AV* V4 >i ) AM 


IDEA OR 
INVENTION? 


asnans 

... ...tfwn 

AmertCfl i taracOrag product 

dcvoJqprerrn: company b Int n e sm i 

(INTERNATIONAL PRODUCT DESIGN 

Z Harley Street, London WIN ZDA 


CONSULTANTS 


BRITISH BUSINESSMAN 

based in Asia with broad 
Financial and GM experience 
at VP level with multinationals 
in Europe. US and Asia. seeks 
interesting assignments with 
Western companies .operating 
or starting up m Asia. 

Fax 66 38 411894 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 


AGENTS REQUIRED 

No Capital Required 
Full Assistance Provided 
Excellent Rate of Commission 
to sell 

OFFSHORE & UK COMPANIES I 

Corporate Bumess Centre Limned 
Tel. (44) 181 201 0502 
Pax. (44) 1 81 201 0309 


Anglo American Group 
■ — PLC • — 


PROJECT FINANCE 
VENTURE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Corporate Brochure and 
tftormaton (BcX 
TeL +44 1924 201 365 
Fax: ♦ 44 1924 201 377 
You ere welcome to veil us 


LEASE SCASHS 
FOR YOUR INVESTMENTS 

WE DEPOSIT CASH INTO YOUR 
ACCOUNT OR ARRANGE UC 
IN YOUR FAVOUR 

PINNACLE CREDIT (CANADA) 
Tab (416) 601-2270 
Fax: (416) 801-2280 

BR0KER5AGENTS WANTED 
HIGH COMMISSIONS PAID 


PROJECT FINANCING 

Venue Capsai - Joint Ventures - 
Na Maximum - Brokers Prated ed 

RLJ.I. INTERNATIONAL 
Tel: {XH-8NS3-1H9 
Fax: 001-716-779-8200 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING VEN- 
TURE CAPITAL -JOINT VENTURES- 
PROJECT FINANCING 


a B 

I\tli-<\riDMi Visiiiil 

T«J: +44 113 2727 550 Fax: +44 113 
2727 560 Fees are not requested prior fa 
an offer of timfing twng made 


Project Capital 
Avanbls for Rant 
Minimum USS Sm 
Madmun USS 10m 
Rsrtal taste vary wfeh 
Period money required 
Fax 44 (0)171 470 7205 
Ai Brokers Wetoroe 


-IMMEDIATE 6 UNLMTED " 
Capiat aranebb tor 
ALL business projeco 1 
MIN U.S Si mlJlno max. 

Wi Business Consuftng 
(717) 397-7490 (US. FAX| 
hOtwWwtt rtbusoxioom flntemei) 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
Un USS 3m from Principal 
Start upc, dwatapmort, etc 
New Pool AwflaWa Saptentar 
Fax: +44 (0)171 470 7158 
Mbu Corporate finance Orecfar 
Al Broken Wekxrne 



JUST PUBLISHED 

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375 Park Awl, NY. NY 10152 USA 


BROKERS 

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UNLIMITED WT1 FUNDING / LOANS 
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cial Sources. CROWN NST. Inc. via tax 
* 212.972-9337 (USA) 


COMMERCfAl/BUSINESS FINANCE 
available tor any viable protects world- 
wide Fax brief synopsis in EngCsii fa 
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FUNDING PROBLEMS? 

far 

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. Finds Guaramed 

Financial tRsHuttans 



33-year proven track record. / 


. Over 1700 locations worid’Aide. > 


29 courtries awarded: 
Nine countries operating. 


Seeking Master license candk&w 
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r 




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Financial Investments 


YOU CANT LOSE Ccmnoifty investors 
vnmod info an irwMimenl programme 
winch returns a reakslic 4% per month 
rnnanum ln</estment US S1DO.OOO. 
wtticfi is nett m ESaow and your rseresi 
is bank guaranteed. Please ol 
■» 44 1274 542 591 


Creator ol cornpany seeks investors wth 
about FF12M . Subs&noal return on 
rnreetment. fiett wholesale eteoncal 
appterces.Talax. +33 (0)1 43 B0 69 24 


Diamonds 


ROUGH DIAMONDS. We afl pay tears 
cash tor gem qualy. African origin, 
volume only. Far 954 474-3866 USA 


SERVICED OFFICES 
DIRECTORY 


mm GUARANTEES 
Ireuance / Rereuarce backed 
grarantaes tar quafifled 
buaness presets. 

Tel. 561-898-3222 
Far 561-999-3226 USA 
northcnpffwrttwLaana 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


Sates 


LONDONBATreRSEA 
Freehold tor sale. 835 sqm 
on poutl Poor and pan basemen 
Curenfy aranged as Photogr^rtc 
States. StiaWe for vUetfreconing 
/commercial producttortdesw stalos 
&. Neer pra&gfous RtcranJ Rogss aid 
Battereaa Pow station devetopmeras. 
C4950Q- Teh +44(0) 17im711fl 
Far: +44 (0) 171.9242958 


CANARY ISLANDS - South of Tenarito 
Most touristic area - sea front 
hotel - apart-hotel A restarta) 
compiax ta sale, i.ioo beds. 
m Bosoms. ICS burgsbws 
ExDkHatbn coraacto wth tax operaton 
guaranteed. Only One buyers. 

Box 383, IHT, 92521 NeuWy Cedex 



Your Top-Class Office 

Berlin ■ Dresden • DOsseidori ■ Frankfurt ■ Hamourg 
Hanover • Cologne • Mumcti ■ Nuremberg ■ Stuttgart 
Budapest • Luxemburg ■ Prague • Los Angeles ■ New York 


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Business address - Modem technology 
A strong secretarial team at your disposal 


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ki Europe and EiBOpa-Conttr 13. 06 - WWW Berfip 
054 7feL +4330/26493-0 - Fax 25493-299 


~SD 


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YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

is ready whan you need fa 
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and conference rooms to rent by ffw 
hour. day. mortfr at . . 

■ Your lacicai w permanent bass 
- Preset maling address All senrices 
BBE — 

81, Fg St-Honote 75008 Paris 
TM +33 (0)144713836 Fax(D|1 42661560 


07* BUSINESS 

im CENTERS 

FULLY STARFED & 

FURMSHED OFFICES 
Immedtately svatette m over 170 
tacaore flortJwde 
Ter. +* « 40 23 Xi 55 62 
Faxt49 40 23 5Q5566 
Franktat Munich. Hamburg. London 
Geneva. New Yort Hongkong 



Facing the Arc de Triumphs 
a restigous offices vrih servfcss 
Tel +33 (TO1 44 17 IB 44 
Fax +33 (Wl 44 17 18 43 


YOUR PRESTIGIOUS FURNSHED 
OFFICE Hf 11 MAJOR LOCATIONS IN 
ITALY. WWWSECUnVENETWWIUT 
TEL 38 B B543241 FAX 38 8 85350187 


WE REPRESENT YOUR COMPANY H 
Fran Id un inctafng office senice. office 
rate and assistance n estabWiirapr 
company In Germarw H.HEPP GkfflH, 
Frankfurt Tef +4WW690B910 Buro- 
Aiiiragsrtenst. Fax *4M5h6690e9ll 


PARIS; Staffed Bushins PremfoM 
avaitobfa noo metres tram Champs - 
ENseesi open 2<hrs. 7 days a week 
Tef +33 (0) 4 9370 0688. 


YOUR OFFICE IN DUES5ELD0RF. 
Prsstigaus address, muMingual aafl. 
Pirass ax *49 - 211 - 47U 73 55 



^GENERAL 



^Announ«f7»finfs 




BARBIE AS 24 

AU 3 SBTaiBRE 1997 
Prix Hots TVA en dawsa toe# 
mducion dtepontte so denande) 
Rempto »s twemes mtereure 

FRANCE (ZOrtB C) » FFfl ■ TVA fflF* 

GO 3.69 FDD' 233 

5C97 5.44 SCSP: 532 

UKflH.«-'7VAf7iV(SO<8%/ 

GO: 0.5580 FOD": O- 3476 

ALLEMAJiIC taxtt I) DM/1 - 7VA 15". 
ZONE f - G : 

GO 1.10 


SMI. 

J: 

SCSP. 

GO: 

106 

ZONE fff- 

■F: 

SCSP- 

GO- 

1.05 

ZONE IV 

■F: 


SCSP 

1.45 


ZONE IV 

-G: 

FOD: 

GO 

100 

BELGIQUE enFBri- 

TVA 21% 

GO 

£t.?B 

FOD. 

SC97 

32£S 

SCSP: 


DTP 


HOLLANDS izcneS) NLGfl - TVA 175*+ 

w mm „ M naE 

GO FOD O.0E 

SC97 20» SCSP 1.940 

LUXEMBOURG CTLUF.i- TVA If. 

GO 19.48 

ESPAGNE [zone A) en PTASri-TVA ift 
GO 8569 

SCB7: 103, 45 SCSP. 10759 

* usage regfcnMe 


Legal Services 


fflVOflCe 1-DAY CERTIFIED 
Cal or Fax (714) 968-8695. Wne 1GT8? 
Beech Bhtl n37. Hutifington. teach. GA 
52S<8 USA- wnaB - wsomejutoxam 


TRAVEL DOCIMEN1S AND EETS Sinct 
WC1N3XX Ufa 


DIVORCE M 1 DAY. NO ««' 

377. SucBstir/ MA 01776 USA. iet 
5084436387. Fax sO&^MMIEG 


LEGAL VISA FREE USIEC 2nd pasS- 
pons + quck atfapnons. East Eaope 
paUrsn. Fax -359 84 2B513 


Real Estate 
for Sate 


Baal Estate Investments 


US. NET LEASES 

car ’“a YP LEASES AVAL4SE- 
yyALGREEN’S WBflHJIXE 
MANY CfiHErS. 8-1F+ YEJ3S 

utYKARDiRICH fflOFEHTlES-MALV 
Stic FAX 
«SSttR!CHSl9977eAOLC0M 



6th NEAR PONT NEUFJiRECT 
ggp & pretty W* 1 

taSrn. »3« 

FF2£C0.OW- Wme talT- 5°* 
SSiJtefly Sens* f™* 


Monaco 


SUPERB APARTMENT, 240 SQJ4. 
patfwae tlffex, pantx amc se a «w 
aid mountains, large recaption room, 

3 bedrooms. 3 bate, forgo firty 
fated Uchen pamy. taurty roam. 

1 dressing mom. forge tomes and 
1 140 sqm.. 2 cetoo. 2 garages. 
INTERMEDIA 
Tefc +377 S3 50 66 84 
Fax +377 93 50 45 52 


Switzerland 


CHATEAU D’OEX (NEAR GSTAAfl) 
Open to non- Swiss resktaft Luamoiis 
4 t /2 room apfoOWt on souffwesi sta. 
Supab vfo». taring morn wlft open Ste- 
ntace fufly Wed ttchen. Z bfahrooms 
rth BIB, guea m. 3 
tv frioco garage, m pnme contstfan 
Surtax 100 sq.m., bakany 45 sqbi 
Prte SF 735000. Wo: fmlnr. 
CW+flU DDex Tet ’At 269 245SOO i 
Far. *41 29 245400 


Peal Estate Services 


YOU OWN A PROPERTY IN FRANCE 
qj saviws cover m yw atsscf 
Uantenace. ctaning. 9a«fw?8- W”? 

wSfe?S0SS 35 35 

ToideSisnnF-FAieOBossey 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Paris Area Fumisbed 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 


Funehed asnmens. 3 months or more 
or irtmhed. resUsoai areas. 

Tel: +33 (0)1 42 25 32 25 

Fax: +33 mi « 83 37 OB 


AT HONE K PARC 

PARIS PftOIIO 

Apatmerts fa ram furnshed or nol 
s*ss Proneny Management Savtas. 
25 Av Hocte750QePais WH-45811180 

Tel: +33 (0)145 63 25 60 


CHAMPS ELYSEES, LARGE STUDIO, 
comfortable, ww. 4th floor, sunny. 

Tfll ♦ 33 (0) 1 45 62 93 32. 


LE ST LOUIS JEWEL hoart* Ml 
HI fire ptae table IV. pern Mr 

Tet 10)14143 9222. fo* (0)1*4149 


PARtS -Louvre, chaining 2-bedfflom flat, 
norm wtotetoly equW»I FWO Wr. 
Mn. 7 rigltt TeL +33 (0)1 42 60 09 45 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3. 1997 



Stone Wall in Congo 


For months, the new Congolese gov- 
ernment of Laurent KabiJa has been 
trying to thwart a United Nations in- 
vestigation of ethnic killings and other 
human rights abuses during that coun- 
try’s recent civil war. The Security 
Council must now make clear that it has 
run out of patience with his obstruc- 
tions. If that fails to inspire better co- 
operation. Washington should suspend 
its plans to provide generous aid to 
reconstruct the Congolese economy. 

A credible investigation is crucial 
because ethnic violence drove the 
fighting in Congo, formerly known as 
Zaire. Tutsi troops from Rwanda and 
eastern Congo joined to defear ma- 
rauding Hutu militia units in the border 
area. In the process, they allegedly 
massacred innocent Hutu refugees. 
The insurgency continued until the 
largely Tutsi rebels entered Kinshasa. 

Many Congolese now distrust die 
Kabila forces' as an instrument of 
Rwandan foreign policy and inad- 
equately representative of the coun- 
try's ethnic diversity. Democratic gov- 
ernment may not be possible until Mr. 
Kabila resolves these suspicions by 
permitting an impartial investigation as 
well as the punishment of any soldiers 
guilty of killing innocent civilians. 
Thai investigation must begin now. 
before crucial evidence disappears. 

The UN team has already been 
delayed for nearly two months because 
Secretary-General Kofi Annan tried to 
accommodate earlier demands by Mr. 
Kabila. The United Nations agreed to 
replace die first head of the inves- 
tigation and to expand its mandate to 
alleged atrocities by Hutu militias. 

That seemed reasonable. Hutu vi- 
olence was an important part of 
Congo's human rights problem. But 
with its latest demands, the Kabila 
government seems to show that its real 


goal is endless delay. Congolese of- 
ficials have rejected Mr. Arman’s new 
choice of chief investigator, refused 
visas for six UN security people ac- 
companying the team, and demanded 
that the whole effort be held up until 
the Organization of African Unity 
forms a parallel team to accompany the 
UN investigators. 

The Security Council has called on 
Mr. Kabila to reconsider these unac- 
ceptable demands. It should take fur- 
ther action in the coming days if he 
refuses to cooperate. 

As it happens, the U.S. represen- 
tative to the United Nations, Bill 
Richardson, took over the rotating pres- 
idency of the council on Monday. Mr. 
Richardson, who also serves as Bill 
Clinton's personal emissary' to Mr. 
Kabila, has previously urged the United 
Nations to give the new Congolese 
leader time to prove his good faitlT. That 
gives him a special obligation to de- 
mand strong steps if Mr. Kabila con- 
tinues to obstruct the investigation. 

Washington has greater leverage 
outside the United Nations. Last spring. 
Mr. Richardson proposed a large .Amer- 
ican aid package for Congo provided 
Mr. Kabila respected democracy and 
human rights. The Clinton adminis- 
tration must make it clear that this aid. 
' which has already begun to flow, will 
be suspended until Mr. Kabila cooper- 
ates with the United Nations. 

After decades of uncritical support 
for Mobutu Sese Seko. the corrupt dic- 
tator Mr. Kabila overthrew. .America 
has some obligation to help rebuild 
Congo’s shattered economy and soci- 
ety. But Washington should not repeat 
its’ original mistake by giving a blank 
check to a new strongman who refuses 
to be accountable ro his own people and 
to the international community. 

— THE SEW' YORK TIMES 


Tobacco Deceits 


The tobacco companies are trying to 
create a new image of themselves as 
repentant and in retreat when in fact 
they remain on the attack. Only the 
packaging bas changed. 

When they settled the lawsuit that 
Florida had filed against them the other 
day. the companies said the deal was 
“a concrete demonstration that the in- 
dustry is prepared to cooperate with 
government and the public health au- 
thorities to emphasize that it doesn’t 
want kids ro smoke.” They called the 
settlement "another step in a process 
to end the climate of confrontation and 
litigation that has marked the national 
debate on tobacco-related issues.” 

So they are pussycats, except that: 

• As part of the national deal they 
now want President Bill Clinton to 
bless, they have agreed to pay $368.5 
billion over 25 years. Pretty imposing. 
But the companies also gor the Re- 
publican leadership of Congress — no 
less than House Speaker Newt Gin- 
grich and Senate Majority Leader 
Trent Lott — to tuck into the budget 
they sent the president in July a couple 
of sentences forgiving them S50 billion 
of this before they were even required 
to pay iL The S50 billion was to com- 
pensate them for the tobacco tax in- 
crease that Congress had just voted in 
part to help finance a new program of 
children's health insurance. No one 
professes to know exactly how the 
forgiveness made its way "into the le- 
gislation — who suggested it, for ex- 
ample. But part of the explanation, we 
are willing to guess, lies in the enor- 
mous campaign contributions that the 
tobacco companies have made to the 
Republicans in recent years. (They 
also have given a lot, but less, to the 
Democrats.) That is what these folks 
mean when they say they are buying 
"access.” The $368 billion figure 
won’t endure; they will find ways to 
knock it down. The durable part of the 
deal, if they have their way, will be the 
limits on future lawsuits that the S36S 
billion is meant to buy. Surely no one 
would be so crass as to suggest that 
Congress go back on its word on that. 

• A second aspect of the deal has to 
do with the power of the Food and Drug 
Administration to regulate nicotine. The 
companies professed to agree that it has 
such power, which was nice of them, 
since a court had already ruled so. Then 
they proposed that thejiower should be 
exercised only if the FDA could jump 
through a series of impossible and ir- 
relevant hoops whose effect would be. 
as intended, to negate the power. Mean- 
while. the companies continue to appeal 
the court ruling which confirmed that 
the authority exists. 


• They agreed as well to back off ads 
calculated to appeal to kids, and a great 
show was made of the withdrawal of 
the Joe Camel series. But it was with- 
drawn only ro be replaced by another 
aimed at pretty much the same market. 
The current behavior of the companies 
demonstrates the same thing that their 
past behavior so amply shows: They 
will game any system that is put in 
place to keep' them from selling cig- 
arettes. It is a mirage to think thar they 
are preparing to go out of business. 
They simply warn to buy at as low a 
price as possible a steady platform 
from which to continue. 

Here is a rule, which the president 
and Congress alike should keep in 
mind as they try in the weeks ahead to 
figure out what to do about the pro- 
posed master agreement: Almost by- 
definition, any deal that the tobacco 
companies find congenial is against rhe 
public interest. 

It is a real temptation to sign off on a 
big peace pact such as has been pro- 
posed — a world-class photo op, and 
there are in fact some substantive fea- 
tures of the proposal that would be 
gains. Our own instinct is that the politi- 
cians should go carefully and slowly. 

Among other things , they need to see 
w'hai a few- more of the pending state 
suits, (he one in Minnesota particu- 
larly, turn up by way of evidence that 
the companies knowingly put the many 
millions of people they hooked on their 
product at risk. Which politicians want 
to vote fora limit on future lawsuits and 
other liability in advance of that? 

— THE W ASHISGTOS POST 

Other Comment 

Because She, Too, Was Frail 

It is surely right to dwell just now on 
the supreme quality of one who sought 
above all to help the vulnerable people 
in society. [Diana] was good at this 
because she herself was vulnerable. 
She knew the feeling. 

She did not set out to be a saint. This 
was a human being, with all the faults 
of most us. but also with a bigger heart 
than most of us. As I discovered [in 
Bosnia Iasi month J on that last mission 
for humanity', there was an underlying 
humility which, at least to me. redeems 
it all. She was not a grand person 
setting out to bestow favors on the 
poor. She knew herself too well for 
that. Re-cognizing her ow n frailty, she 
was the better able to understand and to 
sympathize with the frailty of others. 
— H'jF. Dct Jcs. commenting in 
The Daily Telegraph f London i. 


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t 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 



Here Is a Crucial Juncture in Northern Ireland 


L ONDON Last week I annou need 
that after six weeks 1 believe the 
restoration of the Irish Republican 
Army cease-fire is unequivocal. I also 
am inviting Sinn Fein to take pan in die 
Northern Ireland talks process, which 
will start again next Tuesday. 

. We are at a crucial juncture in the 
peace process in Northern Ireland. The 
second IRA cease-fire is a welcome 
step. Since it was announced, we have 
had the quietest period anyone can re- 
member since the troubles began in the 
1960s. Bur to achieve a permanent 
peace, the cease-fire must continue. All 
the parties must work together to build 
a new future for Northern Ireland. 

Everyone wants this cease-fire to 
continue as it has started — a total 
cessation of terrorist activity. 

I know that not everyone in the Re- 
publican or Loyalist movement is 
happy with the cease-fires; there are 
already splinter groups. But during the 
first cease-fire, the IRA leadership 
showed great control over its members. 
I expect the IRA to make its followers 
toe the leadership's line. 

Just the same applies to the Loy- 
alists. Now that Sion Fein is in the talks, 
it — like everyone else — must sign on 
to former Senator George Mitchell's 
principle of democracy and nonviol- 
ence. If it dishonors these, it's our. 

Sinn Fein has an important part to 
play. But its supporters in America must 
remember that Sinn Fein is just one of 
many parties present at the talks. 

Because it is the best financed and 
has the biggest public relations ma- 
chine. it makes by far the biggest impact 
in America. Yet within Northern Ire- 


By Mo Mowlam 

The writer is Britain’s set retaiy of 
state for Northern Ireland. 

land it has less popular support than 
John Hume's Social and Democratic 
Labor Party, and less than half the sup- 
port enjoyed by the Ulster Unionists. 

The guiding principle in the talks 
must be the principle of consenL The 
talks will succeed only if Unionists and 
Nationalists come to an agreement. 
Then the outcome will be put to ref- 
erenda. north and south. 

The key question now for-Sinn Fein 
is whether it is prepared to accept an 

For all the players now. 
the icatchword 
must be compromise . 

outcome arrived at through negoti- 
ations and consent, even if the agree- 
ment falls short of its ideals. 

We want quick progress. Prime Min- 
ister Tony Blair has set May as the date 
for agreeing to a settlement. To gel 
there, we need confide nee- building 
measures from all sides. 

The United Kingdom is responding 
to the new situation. Our government is 
working on reforming the police, set- 
ting up an independent parades com- 
mission and incorporating the Euro- 
pean Convention on Human Rights 
into United Kingdom law. 

But confidence-building is a two- 
way street. The two communities both 


can take steps to increase confidence. 

It is in this context that decommis- 
sioning is so important. 

No "one is asking the IRA or the 
Lovalists to give up ail weapons in 
advance of an agreement Bui, as Mr- 
MiTcheli proposed, we are looking for 
some decommissioning during the 
negotiations in ihe name of genuine 
political progress toward the settle- 
ment we all seek. 

A start to the removal of paramilitary 
weapons from Northern Ireland would 
be the most effective confidence-build- 
ina measure of ail. We are fortunate to 
have Mr. Mitchell as chairman of die 
plenary’ session of the talks. 

A settlement will be possible only if 
the parties can identify common 
ground. So far, it has proved difficult 
for either community to move for fear 
of conceding ground Here the United 
States can play a central role. 

In its dealing with Northern Ireland, 
the Clinton administration has given 
equal weight to both traditions. The 
1995 Washington Investment Confer- 
ence set up by President Bill Clinton 
and his visit to Northern Ireland at the 
end of 1995 demonstrated his tremen- 
dous personal support for the efforts of 
both the U.K. government and the Irish 
government to achieve a lasting set- 
tlement in Northern Ireland. 

The U.S. government’s support 
provided to the International Fund for 
Ireland since its inception in 1986 
totals some S455 million. American 
involvement has reassured both com- 
munities thar they have more to gain 
than to lose by taking risks for peace. 

U.S. interest in Northern Ireland 


does not begin and end with political 
support. Many Ammoai om 
have taken advantage of Northern Ire- 
land’s highly trained work force^Re- 
cemly- DuPont, which has operated in 
Northern Ireland for more than 37 
ySrs. created 110 jobs and invested- 
SI 22 million to expand its Lycra fac- 
tory in Londonderry- .’ . 

With a second cease-fire m place, 
Sinn Fein representatives will fx vis- . 
itin« America more often than during 
the past IS months when there was no 
cease-fire. I hope that their supporters 
in America recognize that the cease- 
fire is a beginning, not an end. 

It is an important step. We are re- 
sponding positively. But really hard 
work, for both communities, soil is to 
come. Neither side will achieve all it 
wants. The only way forward is 
through agreement. That requires both 
sides to understand each other’s views 
and fears, to see how they can ac- 
commodate them and to forge an agree- 
ment that both the Unionists and the 
Nationalists can support 

At this negotiation, no group will be 
allowed to block progress, and no 
group is going to exert its maximum 
influence over the final package by 
merely repeating a time-honored in- 
flexible position. Local politicians also 
have a responsibility to work together 
to Find some accommodation. 

For all the players now. the watch- 
word must be compromise in order to 
achieve the widest possible consent. ^ I 
hope that all with Northern Ireland's 
best interests at heart will hammer home 
that message to all their Irish visitors. 

The Washington Post. 



r-- 




Finally Starting to Own Up to the Crimes of Imperial Japan 


T OKYO — The recent de- 
cision of Japan's Supreme 
Court to throw out decades of 
bureaucratic censorship on war- 
time imperialism is welcome. 
Tokyo’s friends in the region, 
and the West, must hope~thar 
further official recognition of 
past barbarism will follow. 

The extraordinary reluctance 
of the Japanese establishment to 
confront the horrors of Japan’s 
aggression in China and other 
parts of Asia before and during 
world War Q may at long last 
be shifting. 

There is. however, a consid- 
erable distance to go before the 
slate can be wiped clean. School 
history textbooks will continue 
for the time being to be cen- 
sored by the powerful Ministry 
of Education. 

Outsiders find it hard to un- 
derstand how for two gener- 
ations Japan dodged these is- 
sues that lie at the heart of its 
modem history, while postwar 
Germany went through a rel- 
atively frank self-examination 
of the years of Nazi tyranny. 
The view that Japanese offi- 
cialdom desperately hopes that 
mortality and amnesia will dis- 
solve recollections of atrocities 
in Asia is hard to dispute. 

The controversies and bitter- 
ness of the Pacific War have not 
gone away, and demands for 
official apologies and generous 
compensation continue to 
plague Japanese domestic and 
foreign policy. Tokyo remains 


By Roger Buckley and William Horsley 


in the dock over both its official 
history and its responsibility' for 
past misdeeds. 

Undoubtedly, it would have 
been better to have shown genu- 
ine repentance immediately 
after Japan’s surrender in rhe 
autumn of 1945. The extraor- 
dinarily slow progress is largely 
a reflection of two factors. 

FirsL the legalities estab- 
lished at the 195 1 San Francisco 
peace settlements let Tokyo off 
the hook by agreeing on limited 
compensation terms w ith the re- 
gion and Western allies. The 
Cold War environment helped 
smooth Japan's speedy reinteg- 
ration with the West 


Secondly, the highly charged 
domestic divisions in Japan 
about World War II remain too 
entrenched for . its society to 
face up to unpleasant truths. 

Japan's conservative prime 
minisrer. Ryuiaro Hashimoro, 
has political links to veterans* 
associations and is unlikely to 
support any fresh debate on the 
Pacific War. Yet the controver- 
sial issue of Japan's imperial 
responsibility could resurface. 
Already it has led to intimi- 
dation by ultranarionaiisr thugs 
of scholars and journalists who 
dare to question the role of the 
late Emperor Hirohito in the 
conduct of the Pacific War. 


For the moment, the hopes of 
other Asian governments and 
the West for an open debate in 
Japan are likely to be disap- 
pointed. Yet Japanese author- 
ities know full well that inter- 
national coverage of Professor 
Saburo Ienaga's symbolic vic- 
tory in the textbook case can 
only lead to further questioning 
of "Japan’s cover-up of vital 
facts of histoiy. 

Reminders of Japan’s war- 
time behavior are ever present in 
the region. The contrast between 
the relative ignorance of the war 
among Japanese students and 
the continuing resentment of all 
generations in the rest of Asia 
still poisons Japan's relations 
with its regional partners. 


Keep Helping Cambodians to Recover 


S AN FRANCISCO — After 
the coup d’6tat by Hun Sen. 
the U.S. Congress voted to limit 
severely aid to Cambodia. This 
month "a conference committee 
will decide the fate of aid. 

The U.S. Agency for Inter- 
national Development "sus- 
pended” much of its S35 mil- 
lion aid package, including 
most aid that supports rule-of- 
law education. 

Aid that supports a totalitar- 
ian government and aid that 
nurtures the rule of law are crit- 
ically different. Ignoring that 
difference in Cambodia will 


By Jeffrey S. Brand 

strengthen Hun Sen’s hand and 
exacerbate Cambodia’s prob- 
lems. The conference commit- 
tee s till has time to avoid that. 

"Rule of law" is not a plat- 
itude in a country’ in which 2 
million people were murdered 
by Pol Pot and his henchmen. 
.Almost all educated citizens 
were killed or forced to leave 
the country, and all institutions 
that support common decency 
and respect among citizens 
were destroyed. 


Spare Rome the 2004 Olympics 


R OME — On Friday. 

members of the Inter- 
national Olympic Comminee 
meet in Lausanne to deposit 
secret ballots, like cardinals in 
a conclave, and choose which 
of the five remaining candi- 
date cities will host the 2004 
Summer Olympics. The 
choice is between Stockholm. 
Athens. Buenos .Aires, Cape 
Town and Rome. 

Unfortunately. Rome ap- 
pears to be the favorite. 

The eternal city will suffer 
enough in the year 2000 when 
an expected 30 million pil- 
grims flock there to celebrate 
a Roman Catholic Jubilee. 
Changing the venue for that is 
impossible. 

VVliat is more, given past 
performances of Rome's ad- 
ministrators and developers, 
we must hope for a different 
Olympic choice. 

Organization of the Games 
and construction of the nec- 
essary sports facilities would 
be likely to fall imo the hands 
of many of the people in- 
volved in planning the 1990 
World Cut> soccer tourna- 
ment. which became a major 
scandal, revealing a shameful 
waste of public resources. 

The more than $200 million 
earmarked for the building 
and renovation of 12 stadiums 
in 12 cities hardly sufficed to 
build two. One of these, in 
Turin, may soon be demol- 
ished because of ih poor con- 
struction and extremely high 
running costs. 

A symbol of w hat the Rome 
Olympics risk becoming is the 
Osiiense tram terminal. Built 
for the ! 990 World Cup ai a 
cost of S2 million, the terminal 
resembles a descried cathedral 
and is today "scarcely used. 

Inefficiency maned the 
world university games in 


By Jas Gawronski interesting to know the names 


Palermo last month. On the 
day of the opening ceremony, 
only 14 c*f rhe planned 23 
sports facilities were ready. 
And in one of these, compe- 
tition later had to be suspen- 
ded because it began to rain 
through the roof. 

Despite these precedent, 
and despite the experience of 
cities that hate hosted 
Olympic Games in the past 
and come away with losses, 
the mayor of Rome. Francesco 
Rutelli — once a supporter of 
the environmentally con- 
scious Green party, and today 
vehemently pro Roma 2U04 
— insists that "the stare will 
earn about tw ice what n. in- 
tends to contribute.” 

The Italian government has 
assured the IOC that it win 
invest approximately .$2 bil- 
lion if Rome wins the bid. But 
that cenainly won’t be 
enough, as Prime Minister Ro- 
man Prodi implied in his letter 
io IOC President Juan An- 
tonio Samaranch when he said 
that his government "is com- 
mitted to come up with any 
additional funding required." 

That sort of generosity ap- 
pears out of step with the 
times, as Italians are currently 
being forced to make painful 
sacrifices to ensure their coun- 
try’s entry into European 
monetary union by 1999. 

Almost all political purtie.s 
and a majority of Italians sup- 
port Rome's candidacy. 

To illustrate the advantages 
of holding the Games in Rome, 
the city’s bid committee 
presented the IOC with a report 
in three glossy volumes replete 
with suspect information. 

The report speaks of 91 hos- 
pitals. ot which it would be 


and addresses: of an Olympic 
Village for I5.0U0 people that 
would be converted into a cam- 
pus for Rome’s three universit- 
ies. which have declared thar 
they don’t need it: of sleeping 
room for 600.000 visitors, 
when respectable estimates 
count a maximum of 180.000: 
and of the possibility' of trav- 
eling from Fiumicino airport to 
central Rome in 23 minutes, 
w hen everyone knows that 
perhaps Michael Schumacher 
would be able to accomplish 
such a feat, but only at night 
and with no traffic. 

Pietro Calabrese, who has 
close links with Mayor Ru- 
telli. resigned after only a few 
months as head of the Rome 
bid committee. Developer 
Francesco Gaetano Calta- 
girone offered Mr. Calabrese 
the editorship at his newspa- 
per. II Mosaggcro. the daily 
with the largest circulation in 
Rome. Mr. Calabrese has 

nee transformed the paper 
imo a pro-Olympics journal. 

Rome's second largest 
newspaper. II Tempo/ is 
owned by another Roman de- 
veloper. Domenico Bonifaci . 
who b in prison awainns trial 
lor ihe bribing of judge v 

Obviously, it is hard to aet 
anything that looks like ent- 
icisni of Rome s Olympic bid 
into the Roman press. 

Hence the suspicion arises 
of the existence nf a close re- 
lationship between the con- 
MruUion lobhy. which wants 
to lake advantage n! Olympic 
business at the expense of ihe 
slate, and politician* who want 
the benefits of the publicity 

77?t' writer . ,/ lotiniuUy mnl 

mi whir, -I hilly's Seihtte . ,«»». 

irihuieJ this r. ‘itniinii in iftc 
hiicninii, >n,il Herald Tribune. 


The international effort since 
the time of the UN-brokered 
peace in 1991 has helped Cam- 
bodia rebuild institutions cap- 
able of guiding the country by 
fair and consistently applied 
rules rather than by the arbitrary 
whim of the powerful and cor- 
rupt A primary focus of this 
effort includes a broad-based 
program in rule-of-law educa- 
tion to ensure that sufficient hu- 
man resources exist to support 
democratic institutions. 

For the first time in decades, 
judges are being trained, the bar 
is becoming an independent 
force, legal aid is becoming a 
reality, and defenders appear in 
some criminal courts. A cadre 
of Cambodians now exists that 
is capable of supporting demo- 
cratic economic development. 

No one is arguing that de- 
mocracy exists in Cambodia. 
Hun Sen’s victory surely has set 
back the democratic process. But 
withour rule-of-law educational 
aid. any move toward a more 
democratic government will be 
impossible because of the ab- 
sence of a supporting infrastruc- 
ture. Rule-of-law education is 
essential regardless of the nature 
of the current govemmenL 

If a transition to democracy is 
ever to succeed, it will occur 
only when an educated popu- 
lace is capable of supporting it 

_ The writer is director of the 
C ambodia Law and Democracy 
Program ai ihe University of 
San Francisco School if Law. 
He contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


Outstanding issues include) 
compensation for forced pros-* 
titutes ithe so-called "comfort) 
women” and other mainly > 
Asian victims of Japanese slave) 
labor), as well as responsibility i 
for the infamous Unit 73 1. J 
which conducted horrific med-j 
ical experiments on live pris-t 
oners in China. ‘ J 

Comparisons with German 
experience are instructive. Suc- 
cessive postwar German gov- 
ernments grasped the chance to 
rebuild the nation on' the basis} 
that Hitler's era had indeed been j 
thoroughly evil. Germany was] 
therefore reconciled with its* 
former enemies, and German] 
yoath now has ample chance rot 
learn about the nation's past' 
sins, in the classroom and] 
through explicit media coverage j 
of the Nazi era. - *-• | 

Still, recent revelations about I 
the disappearance of gold- 
plundered by the Nazis have! 
caused deep embarrassment to a 
number of governments, in- 
cluding thar of Switzerland. 

Germany has acted less than 
generously in settling the 
claims of Czech survivors of the 
Holocaust 

Volkswagen and Deutsche! 
Bank have been obliged to pub- j 
lish die facts about systematic) 
use of slave labor under the] 
Third Reich, in the bank’s case* 
by- an industrial empire it pur- 
chased in the mid-1980s. 

Jewish leaders are still wait- 
ing for an answer to their de-1 
maud from Bonn to end a glar- 1 
ing injustice: that former Na 2 i) 
SS members get state pensions,* 
while the claims of many East) 
European Jews who suffered int 
the death camps have not been! 
recognized. In Europe, too, it is! 
easier to forget than atone. » 

Professor Ienaga ' s persistent) 
stand in his Supreme Court 1 
battle over the Imperial Armv’sJ 
bacteriological warfare Unit* 
731 — the “secret of secrets”) 
of the Pacific War — ensuresi 
that Japanese war crimes in' 
Asia can no longer simply be! 
aerosoled out of the school cur-' 
riculum. His determination will) 
give fresh impetus to a demo-' 
cratic campaign thar should) 
have been won decades ago. * 

Mr. Buckley is a professor of 
history at ihe Internationa^ 
Christian University in Tokyo.* 
Mr. Horsley is the BBC’s Euro-\ 
pean affairs analyst. They con -! 
rribured this comment to the In -' 
ternational Herald Tribune. I 




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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS ACo"i 


1897: Canal Rumors 

WASHINGTON - Semi-offi- 
cial advices received here from 
Nicaragua report thar the Jap- 
anese are secretly negotiating 
with the authorities of Central 
America for the construction of 
the Nicaragua Canal, indepen- 
dently and in defiance of the 
United Stales and other nations 
It is suspected that England is 
working in collusion with Japan 
but nothing on the surface in- 
dicates that nucIi is the case. 

1922s Peachy Protest 

TRENTON — Because they 
were not getting enough Jersey 
peaches wuh their meals. 600 

inmates ofthc SiatePrison. after 

h nur yesterday 

££ “ii* re J u>ed fo rittum to 
their cells. A mutiny threaten- 

a t,ft y P r,! '° 1 } guards, thirty 
State police and thirty city txj- 
ice irarned their revolvers on 
«he prisoner* and ordered ihem 


back. The men finally yielded. 1 
but, once in their cells. 600* 
voices were raised in a barber-' 
shop rhapsody which compelled! 

families in neighboring houses" 
to shut their w indows tight and! 
cover their ears until it ceased. * 

1947: Calcutta Riots ) 

CALCU7TA Troops and po-I 
lice, heavily reinforced, moved 1 
swiftly imo vantage spots ini 
Calcutta with orders to "shoot to’ 
"II to stem newly-arisen com-! 
munal disturbances in which 1 
had been) 

£iih? rc* 1 29 2“j«red up to last* 
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commissioner imposed today a! 
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from I k areas of 12 hours daily) 
Pf 1 ^ 6 am Police' 
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international herald tribune, Wednesday; September 3 , 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


More Grist for the Gracious Celebrity Mill 

Yi WASHINGTON _ tk* J 


A Piece of Advice for Diana’s Sons: 


~ ^ sick fee ^g 
anflpS^fL^ graesome death of Dj- 
SSSf f WaIes ’ h“m»n reaction 

Kf a homd event — unfair, bizarre, terrible 

of ^S gS ° nS ~ _andthe S uilt y ^ponse 
?* JJJ® Twdw-consuming world choking on 
its obsession with celebrity. 6 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 


TTie papers and the television screens re- 

K e S,5 e l!.“ l !? en ! s ' of P eo P le wh0 spoke of 
5?" j£fy fe,t they knew her. Of course we 
felt that way. We were exposed to more 
sweet and sour material about this young 
woman than about any other human being 

But we really didn't know her. We knew 
only an idea of her pieced together from 
laudatory press releases. Jess flattering in- 
formation leaked by her adversaries in the 
royal struggles and. of course, the photo- 
graphs. It seemed that a bad picture did not 
exist of this beautiful woman 

Our obsession with seeing her face came at 
a cost, to hex privacy and our dignity. But no 
one expected the cost to rise as high as it did 
on that Paris highway. So now we blame the 
paparazzi who stalked her and who stand 
accused of chasing her car into a wall. 

It's foolish to say “we all did it" because 
of our obsession with her picture. It's idiotic 
that photographers would engage in a high- 
speed chase of any sort for pictures of the 
princess and her beau, even if Diana's re- 


portedly drunken chauffeur were to be held 
primarily responsible for the crash. Plemv of 
such pictures existed. The relationship was 
no secret. This was not journalism. 

There was no reason for this final act. 

But, yes, we — or rather the consumers of 
royalist photographs — certainly created the 
market that provided the incentive for those 
photographers to snap at any cost. Some of 
the snoop-picture takers cleared a million 
dollars a year or more. 

"Hie brother of the Princess of Wales com- 
plained bitterly: “I always believed that the 
press would fall her in the end. " No one can 
blame him for his grief. But the celebrity 
business rarely goes one way. As Sarah Lyali 
wrote in The New York Times. ‘ ‘Diana often 
seemed to use the press as much as the press 
used her" (1HT. Sept. I ). 

One could say she had to. given the ex- 
pectations created for her and the fact that her 


critics were always ready to use the Dress 
against her. Pan of the sadness people feel is 


against her. Pan of the sadness people feel is 
that she may never have had much of a 
choice, marrying into fame so young and 
spending her entire adult life as a figure of 
fantasies. 

This event will create a new counter- 
industry. perhaps a healthy one, buili on the 


bashing of our celebrity culture. It surely 
deserves bashing, since it celebrates jjeople 
not for what they do or how they think or 
even who they really are. All is "person- 
ality." narrowly defined and mostly in- 
vented. 

Nothing so reveals the celebrity culture's 
emptiness as the attention it lavishes on 
powerless royal families whose reasons for 
existing are purely symbolic. When mem- 
bers of royal families get the symbols wrong, 
behaving in ways that break from the true and 
the noble, the celebrity machine is revved up 
all the more. Maybe it’s human nature: 
We've always loved snickering at die foibles 
of the people who live in the big house up the 
hill. In an age of democracies and republics, 
we should be able to ignore royals. That 
seems impossible. 

Princess Diana did many good things with 
her celebrity — on behalf of the victims of 
AIDS and breast cancer and land mines — 
and they will be remembered. Her sons will 
be prayed for. In Britain, many people still 
hold the royal family in great affection, Di- 
ana especially, and their grief over her death 
is genuine. We should all mourn this sense- 
lessness even as we acknowledge that the 
public spectacle of the coming week will be 
yet more grist for a celebrity culture that can 
adjust its moods but never its purposes. 

Washington Post Writers Croup. 


Flee the Stultifying Royal Zoo 


W ASHINGTON — In his bi- 

osraohv of General 


Tv ography of General 
Douglas MacArthur, William 
Manchester tells us that when the 
old soldier died in 1964, his son. 
Arthur, slipped away from the fu- 


Bv Richard Cohen 


neral and was not seen publicly 
again. Granted that sort or thing is 
harder to do today, but 1 heartily 
recommend it for the two sons of 
Diana, Princess of Wales. Flee, 
boys. flee if you can. 

Of course, they probably can- 
not and, most definitely, they have 
been raised not to. But when I saw 
them in the endless television cov- 
erage of Diana's death, it was old 
footage and they were walking 
somewhere in the countryside, 
William. 15, and Harry, 12, and I 
thought. Oh no. here we go again. 
We shall lake these two “kids and 
give Lhem lots of money and noth- 
ing to do and they will become, in 
due time, what their mother was 
before them: not just a celebrity, 
but some son of creature that has 
been captured and imprisoned in a 
media zoo where, for our enter- 
tainment. such creatures can be 
watched. 

This, of course, was Diana. She 
married into the British royal fam- 
ily, eons and eons of mediocrity, 
and now familiarity. That had 
brought contempt or, if nor that, 
then a realization that they, the 
royals, are like you and me- They, 
too. are nor so smart and cannot 
always marry well and say some 
pretty stupid things. They reign, in 
some abstract way, but do not rule 
and there is nothing they can do — 
nothing! — ? that -can in the least 
way affect anyone’s life. They 
have fame and they have fortune, 
but thev have earned none of it. 


There s No Excuse for the Jackals of Journalism 


N EW YORK — The brother 
of the Princess of Wales said 


IN ofthe Princess of Wales said 
it devastatingly and correctly, in 
a sentence of icy passion from 
which there is no hiding place: 

"It would appear that every 

S ’ e tor and editor of every 
atdon that has paid for in- 
trusive and exploitative photo- 
graphs of her, encouraging 
greedy and ruthless individuals 
to risk everything in pursuit of 
Diana’s image, has blood on his 
hands today." 

No hiding place — none for the 
executives who permit and en- 
courage press harassment unto 
death, for no other reason than to 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


increase their own profits and sal- 
aries, and none for journalists 


aries, and none for journalists 
who say they would never use 
such pictures but create excuses 
of moral, ethical and professional 
garbage to explain those who do. 

Someday, I believe, the words 
of Earl Spencer will hang in the 
private offices of publishers, net- 
work chiefs and print and elec- 
tronic editors worthy of any re- 
spect or trust One way to speed 
mat day is to expose the excuses 
as swiftly as possible and get on 
with root reality. 

About die crash itself, die es- 
sential details involving the press 
are two. The princess and fimad 
Mohamed (Dock) al Fayed 
jumped into a limousine to try to 
escape a gang of photographers 
pursuing them on motorcycles. 
The chase killed them. 

Was the chauffeur driving too 
fast? Did he have too much to 
drink? Did his passengers tell 
him to slow down, or to go faster 
to escape the gang behind? Those 
are questions perhaps pertinent 
in deciding the sentence the pho- 
tographers should pay. But this 


fact remains and will forever 

Had that gang not chased the 
couple, the princess and her 
friend would be alive today, 
knowing they would be chased 
again and again, but that perhaps 
with luck they would not die 
some other night on some other 
road fleeing some other gang of 
photographers. 

Now, for the reality that 
brought the photographers to the 
Ritz and the princess and Mr. al 
Fayed to their deaths. Money. 

The paparazzi, as they like to 
be called, pursued the couple as a 
jackal his prey. They knew that a 
“good picture'’ like a kiss or hug 
seen through a car window 
would bring scores of thousands 
of dollars and that any picture 
would bring a price handsome 
enough for their gas and waiting 
time until the next gathering of 
the jackals, the next day. 

The pictures would be bought 
by certain newspapers, mag- 
azines and TV networks to at- 
tract readers and advertisers: 
spending money to make money. 
Sometimes the awaiting picture 
and writing jackals are staff 
people. But ofren ihe money is 
laundered — not enough to cover 
the stink — through "indepen- 
dent" photo agencies. 

Thai permits the executives to 
say that the photographers do not 
work for them, that often they do 
not even know their names and 
that certainly they would not 
give them credentials! It permits 
journalists who do not do this 
kind of filthy work to say that the 
photographers and free-lance 
writing dirt-diggers who some- 
times hang around them are not 


really journalists at all, and it is 
not right to lump us all together. 

No. But oeither is it right for 
real journalists not to acknowl- 
edge that enough more 1 'main- 
stream" newspapers and glossy- 
paper magazines print that kind 
of picture, and are publishing 
more unverified and sadistic gos- 
sip of their own creation. 

That enough TV news shows 
harassed Jackie On ass is almost to 


her deathbed, and then played the 
jackal around her children. That 
enough hordes of reporters and 
photographers routinely camp on 
the lawns of ordinary people 
somehow caught in the news. 

That enough newspaper 


people play the fool for money 
by snarling and barking at each 


other on TV yap shows. That 
there is enough of all this going 
on that very soon the public may 
not be able to tell the difference 
between real journalists and all 
those others, and, heaven help 
us, neither may we. 

In America we do not need new 
laws or industry-wide self-reg- 
ulation. We do not have to give up 
our constitutional rights to hdve a 
free press. All we need is a couple 
of hundred Americans, each act- 
ing as individual editors and pub- 
lishers, who have enough self- 
respect to give figures in die news 
the space, safety and civility they 
would demand for themselves, 
their spouses and their children on 
the day they find the tape re- 
corders, reporters’ pads and cam- 
eras outside, waiting for them. 

TheNen York Times 


The fatigue of privilege shows 
on their faces. 

And this woman, this one-time 
child bride with the doe eyes and 
the lithesome body, was at a re- 
move from the throne. Her former 
mother-in-law was the queen and 


MEANWHILE 


her husband was the prince and she 
... well, she was Diana, snipper of 
ribbons and hugger of children 
and, in the secret places of her own 
home, vomiter and depressive. 

Even that, after a while, we 
came to know. 

She was always on display, this 
royal panda — a zoo creature. 
And just as a zoo lion cannot kill, 
a princess cannot work, cannot be 
anything but a princess — and one 
with bourgeois values at that. 


Once, the royals did pretty 
much what they wanted, but 
today 's must live like politicians. 
Edward VII flaunted his mistress, 
but no contemporary monarch can 
do that. Might as well order a 
beheading. 

As for Diana, she could glean 
her self-worth only from the 
press. Pleasing the public, after 
all. bad been her job. She did 
nothing that could be measured — 
wrote nothing, created nothing, 
sold nothing. She was a good 
mother, which is not nothing — 
far from it — and she had a good 
heart, big enough for causes like 
breast cancer, and that, too, is not 
nothing. 

Still, though, her main job was 
celebrity and that, by any mea- 


sure. she did exceedingly well. 

The press did not kill Diana. 
The photographers chasing her car 
are the bottom feeders of jour- 
nalism. but they are not assassins. 

They wanted to take her pic- 
ture, not heT life. They did not 
order her driver m speed or, as it 
now seems, to drink too much 
beforehand. Anyway, Diana had 
hardly been consistent in her de- 
sire for privacy. When she wanted 
to, she could use the press and use 
it well. 

Soon, somehow, the press will 
discover and the public will em- 
brace yet another personality who 
can live a life that we all can share. 
She . — it has to be a woman — 
also may be pretty and sweet, pos- 
sessed of a ballerina’s grace and a 
lack of haughtiness, someone who 
also can triumph and fail, and by 
so doing show us over and over 
again that a famous life is still a 
life, even a sad one. 

Harry and William can never be 
Diana in that sense. They will be 
men and, probably, more like their 
father, a bespoke fuddy-duddy. 

Still, though, theirs will be hol- 
low lives. At the core of the con- 
temporary monarchy is an empti- 
ness surrounded by a fog of 
sadness. It cannot ever succeed 
since it does nothing. It can only 
fail — while we, of course, 
watch. 

William will wait for the throne 
and Hany will wait for Will, and 
we will watch them all, the royal 
menagerie in the worldwide me- 
dia zoo. I hope one night someone 
leaves the gate ajar. 

Run for it, boys, run for your 
very lives. 

The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Mourning Diana 



To the members of the 
world's tabloid press, I have 
this to say: “You have, among 
you, killed a sweet lady, and 
her death shall fall heavy on 
you!" (William Shakespeare, 
"Much Ado About Nothing." 
Act V, Scene I). 

1 hope that, in death, Diana may 
continue to do good by giving 
energy and purpose to the strug- 
gle “against media harassment. 
Enough is enough? 

JENNIFER McDERMOTT. 

Geneva. 


medicine would be just punish- 
ment for their acts, which con- 
tributed to this dreadful accident 
Their personal information 
should be published in every 
tabloid. 

JAN HODGSON. 

Doha. Qatar. 


the aftermath of this monstrous 
tragedy. 

RHODERIC BANNATYNE. 

Paris. 


In looking for causes to explain 
e aooallme deaths of the Prin- 


t's time to break the "if it 
bleeds, it leads" paradigm. Other 
people’s suffering should never 
be viewed as either entertainment 
or as a chance to boost ratings or 
circulation. 

HEATHER PARK-ALBERTSON. 

Elmhurst, Illinois. 


the appalling deaths of the Prin- 
cess of Wales and her com- 
panion, we should remember thar 
their car was being puraued by 
photographers, not gunmen. 
There was therefore no life-or- 
death reason for the driver (who 
was also killed) to be traveling, as 
we are told he was, at the life-or- 
death speed of 150 kilometers per 
hour through quiet city streets. 

We are also told that the driver 
was a security officer from the 
Ritz Hotel, but surely any prop- 
erly trained and experienced se- 
curity officer or driver would have 


B> PHILIPPE Ii ELE?THt m L'&» Rt|iuMirtin i\m»i.FmwL 


The French authorities should 
publish the photographs, names 
and addresses of the photograph- 
ers involved in the events leading 
up to the crash that killed Diana, 
Bmad Mohamed (DodiJ al Fayed 
and their driver. 

Maybe a touch of their own 


known how to evade a group of 
photographers on scooters while 


photographers on scooters while 
negotiating a gentle bend in atwo- 
lane stretch of urban causeway. 

Tins is not to excuse the pro- 
vocative intrusion of photograph- 
ers, but we should hope that the 
role and qualifications of the 
driver are carefully examined in 


Would it be too much of a vain 
wish to hope that the editors of the 
various tabloids and magazines 
thar commissioned and paid for 
the hounding of Diana now make 
amends by selecting a few pho- 
tographs of dead and injured men, 
women and children who have 
stepped on some of the 2 million- 
odd land mines that violent people 
have seeded in parts of Europe, 
Asia and Africa? 

These editors could also ask 
paparazzi to snap pictures of the 
arms dealers and millionaires that 
profit from the continued sale and 
production of land mines. Many 
of these people can right now be 
found at the very resorts and 
beaches and on the yachts where 
the paparazzi loved to photograph 
the Princess of Wales. 

SAMIR SANAD BASTA. 

Mougins. France. 


Humanity has lost one of its 
crown jewels. Pray it learns from 
its mistake, 

TOM BIONDO. 
Paris. 


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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 









PAGE 10 



INTERNATIONAL HEBAi.il TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


Detrili of a Princess/ A Country Church Fears for Its Future 


In the Name of Duty, 2 Boys Mask Their Grief and Act Like Princes 

if •/ y y V w . ^wRoval sources let it be known 

paid to his mother. Koy j ^ , 1ac rfemlv 


By Dean E. Murphy 

Los Angeles Times Service 


"The vicar was amazed at how diy-eyed and The Diana-Cbarles rif. in rearing chUdna goea 


controlled they were. It is a terrible situation for 
children at that age to be dry-eyed and con- 
trolled/’ 



lUVUM a UwULU. 

Prince William and Prince Harry, in black ties 
and somber faces, attended regular Sunday 
church services in Scotland, arriving with their 
lather in a dark limousine with oversized win- 
dows. Their b lank gazes appeared Monday room- 
ing at every London newsstand — precisely 
according to royal plan. 

“The shell-shocked boys were doing what the 


were being consoled by Queen 
Elizabeth U and her husband. 
Prince Philip, at Balmoral, die 
royal Scottish palace. 

. The fretting over the two 
boys is straightforward: With 
their mother gone, are they 
destined to grow up like their 


‘The vicar was amazed at how dry-eyed and controlled 
they were. It is a terrible situation for children at that 
age to be dry-eyed and controlled. 9 


days" and “work days* ' for the by the loss who" is younger, happy-go-, 

^Sr uAe ^ nofhis '- 

eat at McDonaSFs. a movie or a brokers royiU ^ wjthdrawn andwas, 

YYUiiaiu. vj .mhnnnv mamace 


•Tbe sbdl-shockedboys were doing what the destined to grow up like thefr ~ “ ride on a toUer^osster. un .S™ofhis^ems’ unhappy marriage 

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to them was their duty,” wrote Ingrid Seward, considered his own childhood cold and lonely? party for visiting European officials. hands and forget any thoughts of selfishness, most wonderful thing is that Prince 



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some attribute to the relentless media attention years are already mere. • 


Diana’s Choice 


To Renounce 
Guards Left 
Her Vulnerable 


CaB%&fltrfOarSe$FromDcp<2c)xs 

LONDON — A decision by Diana, 
Princess of Wales, to renounce round- 
the-clock police protection given to 
members of the Royal Family, exposed 
her to danger before her fatal Paris car 
crash, security experts said Tuesday. 

After her divorce from the Prince of 
Wales a year ago, Diana began to slip 
from the tight confines of royal circles. 

Diana chose to cast off the constant 
surveillance of specially trained police 
officers, whose role it is to protect the 
House of Windsor. 

The car in which she and her com- 
panion Dodj ai Fayed died in a high- 
speed Paris toad crash was being driven 
by a man who French police said was 
more than three times over the drunk- 
driving limi t. The driver. Henri Paul, 
was employed by the Ritz Hotel, which 
is owned by the al Fayed family. 

British security experts said that if 
trained members of the Royal Protection 
Squad had been still looking after her. 
that would not have happened. 

A British police spokesman said driv 
mg — or reporting for any kind of duty 
— under the influence of alcohol was a 
disciplinary offense. 

An independent expert was scathing 
about Ibe level of protection — just one 
car, a driver and a bodyguard — ac- 
corded to “the world’s No. I celebrity” 
on the night she died. 

“Had that been my assignment I 
would expect to be sued," Ivor Haring 
of Associated Emergency Security Ser- 
vices in London said. His company spe- 
cializes in close protection of celebrities 
and VIPs. 

He said the Mercedes car carrying 
Princess Diana and Mr. al Fayed should 
have been followed by another car with 
two more trained bodyguards and pos- 
sibly even a third car, also with two 
security men. 

The chase cars should have contained 
medical equipment, and the bodyguards 
should have been trained in paramedic 
resuscitation skills. Mr. Haring said. 

Following cars would also have been 
able to deter some of the paparazzi pho- 
tographers on motorcycles who were 
shadowing the princess through the 
streets of Paris on the night she died. 

The driver of the car carrying the 
princess, Mr. Paul a 4 1-y ear-old former 
French naval officer, twice attended 
courses run by Mercedes at its Stuttgart 
headquarters, according to the Hatreds 
department store owned by Mr. al 
Fayed’s father. 

“Mr. Paul was trained in anti-ter- 
rorism techniques using heavy bullet- 
proof cars and conventional models. Chi 
this occasion he was driving a standard 
Mercedes S-class car," a Harrods state- 
ment said. 

But all the training in the world would 
not be much use if the driver had con- 
sumed what has been estimated at the 
equivalent of well over a bottle of wine. 

“It is irrelevant whether he had par- 
ticipated in a driving program because 
he was legally intoxicated at the time of 
the accident," a Mercedes official said. 

Already the world’s most photo- 
graphed woman, Diana gave up her Roy - 



- A girl with a bouquet of flowers waiting outside St. James's Palace on Tuesday to sign the book of condolences. 

1 


Village Braces for Its Role as Shrine 


The Associated Press 

GREAT BRINGTON, England — 
Outside the tall iron gates of the an- 
cestral home of Diana, Princess of 
Wales, candles, gifts and balloons nestle 
in a sea of flowers. Villagers believe it 
may be the makings of a shrine. 

For it is to the tiny local church of St 
Mary the Virgin that Diana's body will 
come after her funeral service Saturday 
in London’s Westminster Abbey. 

She will be buried close to her beloved 
father, the eighth Earl Spencer, and 
among 20 generations of forebearc go- 
ing back almost five centuries. 

“It is right she should come back here 


— it is her home.” said Tom Regan, who 
came to Al thorp House, where Diana 
was raised, to mount her death. 

“But look at all this — it reminds me 
ofGraceland/' he said, referring to Elvis 
Presley’s home in Memphis, Tennessee, 
which has become a virtual shrine since 
the singer's death. 

Villagers worry about the burden that 
may fall on this rural hamlet propped 
against an emerald hill if Diana’s ad- 
mirers come in large numbers, emu- 
lating the hordes of Elvis fans. 

“My initial reaction was, ‘Great! This 
is where she should be.’ But then I 
thought about the implications for the 


Investigated but Not Charged: 


How French Legality Operates 




al Protection Squad bodyguards as her 
marriage to the 


ie royal heir. Prince 
Charles, fell apart and she felt the need lo 
Strike out on her own. I AFP. Reuters ) 


PARIS — The photographers who 
went before a judge Tuesday to deter- 
mine their role in the crash that killed 
Diana, Princess of Wales, were con- 
tinuing a three-step legal process. 

In France, for a person to become a 
suspect in a case, he must first be placed 
under formal investigation. A suspect is 
not charged unless he goes to trial. 

The three-step process begins with the 
arrest of a suspect and a preliminary 
investigation by the prosecutor's office, 
which decides whether a case should go 
before judicial authorities. 

Zf a judicial investigation is opened — 
step two — a judge is assigned to con- 
duct the inquiry. The judge decides 
whether the su^ecl should be placed 
under formal investigation and on what 
counts. 

When placing a suspect under inves- 
tigation, the judge can free him on his 
own recognizance or decide to hold him 
in jail. 

When the judicial inquiry is com- 


pleted. the suspect is either exonerated 
or brought to trial — step three. At the 
trial, the specific charges are formally 
lodged. 

A vaguely worded French law re- 
quiring people to help accident victims 


or face possible jail or fines lies at the 
>f the investigation into Diana's 


heart of the investigation 
fatal car crash. 

The French law is an unusual vari- 
ation on “Good Samaritan" laws in 
force in other countries. It seeks to pun- 
ish those who fail to offer assistance 
rather than to encourage people to help 
by indemnifying them from legal blame 
should their efforts fail. 

Last revised in 1993, the law gen- 
erally requires people to help — or sum- 
mon help for — someone in danger 
unless they would themselves be placed 
in danger by doing so. 

It also bars individuals from ham- 
pering the work of emergency crews, 
violations are punishable by up to five 
years in prison and fines of up to 500.000 
francs t $8 1,500). (AP, Reuters) 


DIANA: Judicial Inquiry Into Paris Crash Moves to Manslaughter 


Continued from Page I 


would be able to talk to investigators. 

The photographers released without 
bail Tuesday were Jacques Langevln, 
who was on assignment from the Sygma 
agency; Nikola Arsov. of the Sipa 
agency; Laszlo Veres, a free-lancer, and 
Serge Amal, of the Stills agency. 
Stephane Darmon, a motorcycle driver 
working for the Gamma agency, also 
was released on his own recognizance. 

Goksin Sipahioglu. head of Sipa, said 
after Mr. Arsov’s release: “He was not 
among those who took off in pursuit of 
the car from the Ritz. He arrived on the 
scene 15 minutes later, when the police 
and the ambulances were already (here, 
and walked into the tunnel with his cam- 
era. For that he was handcuffed and 
attested, it’s just a big show.” 

Mr. Lange vin. an award-winning 
news photographer who has covered 
wars and other events around the world, 
did not even know about the wreck when 
he came on it unexpectedly. Sygma's 


director, Hubert Henrotte, told Le 
Monde. 

“He has never gone on a ‘chase’ in his 
life," Mr. Henrotte said. “He has noth- 
ing to do with die gang of paparazzi But 
on his way he came on the accident 
scene, a good seven minutes after it 
happened, and the police were already 
there. As a good professional, he took 
pictures of the rescue and of the wrecked 
car, and they hauled him in." 

If the photographers had tried to pull 
the injured Diana or her bodyguard out 
of the wrecked vehicle, where doctors 
found her unconscious and moaning, 
they could have hastened her death and 
killed Mr. Rees-Jones unless they knew 
what they were doing, experts said. 

“The injured should never be moved, 
but the emergency services should be 
notified and futther collisions avoided." 
Alain Patel, head of the trauma depart- 
ment of the Raymond Poincare hospital 
in Garches. told Agence France-Presse. 

The driver in the accidenr, Mr. Paul, 
was called in place of Mr. al Fayed’s 


usual chauffeur at the Ritz, who drove 
off as a decoy while the couple and their 
bodyguard set off from a back entrance 
of the Ritz Hotel toward the Place de la 
Concorde and around it in a wide arc to 
where the riverside artery heads west. 

At the place where that artery takes a 
lefthand jog and goes under the Place de 
I’AIma, Mr. Paul apparently lost control 
and smashed into the 13th square con- 
crete support pillar. The car then 
bounced across the roadway and 
smashed into a concrete wall. 

Mr. Rees-Jones, the bodyguard, is 29. 
served in the Gulf War and has been 
working as a bodyguard for the al Fayed 
family for die last several years, ac- 
cording to friends and relatives. He was 
apparently die only one in the car wear- 
ing a seatbelt at the time of the ac- 
cident. 

Mr. Rees-Jones is one of a large se- 
curity staff employed by Dodi a I Fayed’s 
father. His regular assignments with the 
younger al Fayed had earned him the 
nickname “Dodi’s Shadow." 


AI Fayed Files Suit 
On Privacy Invasion 


Reuters 

PARIS — Mobamed al Fayed, 
whose son Dodi died in the car crash 
with Diana. Princess of Wales, filed 
a civil suit in the case at a Paris court 
on Tuesday, his lawyer said. 

Georges Kiejman told journalists 
that he had informed the investi- 
gating magistrate to ask for the in- 
quiry to be widened to include pos- 
sible charges of violation of privacy 
against his son and Diana. 

‘ ‘This is very important insofar as 
this is a prior chapter to the tragedy 
and there is a causal link," he said. 
•‘There was a chase, without which 
the driver would neither have taken 
that route nor used that speed." 

Tile suit would allow Mr. al Fayed 
to participate in any trial against the 
photographers and be paid repar- 
ations if they are decided. 


Britain Set to Stand Still 


Country Will Shut Down to Honor Diana 


village,” said Christine Whiiey, post- 
mistress of Great Brington. 

“We are a very quiet village, and this 
will bring a lot more people for a long 
time to come. We don’t want it to turn 
into a circus, so we just hope that people 
will remember that the church is a place 
of worship." 

Nevertheless, Britain’s churches have 
long offered a focus for pilgrims. Over 
the centuries, they have encouraged vis- 
itors to tour the graves of monarchs, 
priests and other notables; Westminster 
Abbey, where many British kings are 
buried, was designed with that in mind. 

Jean MacPherson, whose husband, 
David, is the priest in charge at St. 
Mary's, is also concerned about the im- 
pact of Diana’s death on this close com- 
munity of 200 near Northampton. 50 
miles (90 kilometers) from London. 

“I spoke to the church warden, and he 
was bonified because he felt it would not 
only be this week, but there would be 
tremendous interest for years to come,” 
she said. 

Great Brington. which has a post of- 
fice and pub but no public parking, first 
began attracting visitors after Diana 
married Prince Charles in 1981, but in- 
terest declined after their 1992 divorce. 

The 13th century St. Mary's, with its 
square steeple and small tidy church- 
yard, is a mile from Al thorp House. 
Diana will be interred in the Spencer 
family’s private chapel in the church's 
northeast comer. If is visible through 
blue and gold ornamental iron railings. 

Diana’s brother, Charles, the ninth 
earl, who has returned from his home in 
South Africa to supervise funeral ar- 
rangements, has said that only imme- 
diate family will attend the buriaL 

Betty Andrews. 76, a former cook and 
housekeeper at Althotp, said Diana 
loved the estate, with its rambling, 
wooded grounds. “Looking back, it was 
probably the happiest time of her life,” 
she said. “You get the sense that she is 
coming home.” 


Ca*p0eAb}OirSa&FmailiBpairi>a 

LONDON — Britain will come to a 
standstill and silence will echo 
throughout the land on Saturday as the 
n ation mourns Diana, Princess of 
Wales. 

Buckingham Palace has called on the 
country to observe one minute of silence 
as a marie of respect to Diana after her 
funeral Saturday at Westminster Ab- 
bey. 

Town centers will be deserted. Most 
major retailers said that they would not 
open to enable their employees to mourn 
Diana, who was killed in a car crash in 
Paris early Sunday. 

“Closing businesses for ail or part of 
Saturday will give people the chance to 
privately marie the occasion in whatever 
way they choose,” said Simon Speriyn, 
chief executive of die London Chamber 
of Commerce. 

“Retailers should be assured that cus- 
tomers will understand the reasons why 
the shops are closed," he said. 

“And it is likely that they themselves 
will be in no mood for shopping," he 
added. 

One major retailer said Tuesday that 
its stores would be open Saturday but 
would commemorate Diana by donating 
profits to the British Red Cross’s cam- 
paign against anti-personnel land mines, 
a charity close to the princess’s heart. 

The Cancer Research campaign has 
said that it would close its 250 charity 
shops on Saturday. 

Britain’s football stadiums, normally 
packed on Saturday afternoons, will 
stand empty. 

All horse races have also been can- 
celed. and a major cricket final has been 
postponed. 

After the massive outpouring of grief 
for Diana following the shock of her 
death, the focus is on the funeraL which 
is expected to be the biggest in London 
since 300,000 people lined the streets to 


Al thorp, central England, for a private- 
burial beside 20 generations of her ram- ; 
ily. ’ 

People are expected to flock to the 
capital from all over the country. 


Many will line up along the funeral 
frot 


route from St James’s Palace, where; 
Diana’s body is now lying, to West- « 
minster Abbey. , 

Bu ckingham Palace announced that- 
500 representatives of charities with 
which Diana had close links would also , 
walk in the procession. 

“We hope that the representatives, 
will come from all backgrounds, and • 
include children and disabled people,”" 
said a palace spokeswoman. 

“The families believe that it would be- 
fitting and in accordance with the Prin- - 
cess’s wishes if the procession is J; 






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said. 

Railroad companies say they will add 
extra trains to bring people to London .- 
from around the country. • 

Bu ckingham Palace has begun talks 
with the police about expanding the area .. 
where mourners may stand. 

Concerns had been raised that the; 
route could not hold the waves of people; . 
expected. 

A palace spokeswoman said consid- , 
eration was being given to placing crowd • ' 
barriers in die road instead of on the j 
sidewalks to create more space. - 

(Reuters. AFP) 


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Hillary Clinton to Go 
To Diana’s Funeral 


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pay their respects to Sir Winston 
Churchill. Britain's wartime leader, in 


1965. 

The minute of silence will follow the 
funeral, which begins at 1000 GMT at 
Westminster Abbey. 

After the funeral. Diana's body will 
be taken to the Spencer family estate in 


Reuters 

EDGARTOWN, Massachusetts : — l 
Hillary Rodham Clinton will attend thej 
funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales, in* 
London on Saturday, the White House _ 
said Tuesday. 

A White House spokesman, Joe Lock-*:' 
hart, made the announcement in; 
Martha's Vineyard, where President Bill . 
Clinton and his wife are on vacation. 

The president will not attend the 
neral, an official said, because protocol • 
rules made it inappropriate. , 


BaaxEQ 

T H E A T 5 - 


MOURN: Central London Falls Silent 



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Continued from Page 1 


ing their boms at tourists who looked left 
instead of right while stepping off die 
curb, a policeman cocked his ear and 
marveled: “Listen to thar. It’s so quiet. 
I’ve never heard it like this. Never.” 

Britons have surprised even them- 
selves with their great outpouring of 
emotion following Diana’s death. The 


wa 




national stereotype calls for accepting 
tragedy with a stiff 


_ r upper lip, but Britain 

is obviously shocked, and obviously un- 
ashamed to show its feelings. Anchor- 
men become choked up on the air. 
Callers to talk shows read poetry they 
have written in Diana’s honor. People 
talk of little else than her death and her 
coming funeral. 

One of the places to measure the depth 
of those feelings Tuesday was central 
London. As they have (tone the since 
Sunday, thousands came to place 
flowers at the gates in front of Buck- 
ingham Palace, the residence of Queen 
Elizabeth 11. The perpetual large crowd 
in front of the palace, hundreds of people 
at any given time, makes no crowd noise. 
People whisper when they speak, or do 
not speak at all. 

There are now thousands of bouquets 
stretching the length of the ornate palace 
gates, flowers along with teddy bears, 
handwritten notes, paintings and 
sketches of Diana. The messages are full 
of unabashed sentiment. “The one and 
only Lady Diana. The one jewel in the 
crown," reads one note, attached to a 
bunch of irises, slowly wilting in the 
uncommonly bright sunshine. 

Walking Tuesday down the Mall from 
Buckingham Palace toward Trafalgar 
Square was like being sent back in time. 
With no traffic noise, and no shouting or 
laughing from tourists, the only sound 
was the crunching of gravel underfoot A 
few mounted policemen rode past and 
“wn a dozen of the queen’s guard ridin° 
lall in scarlet coats, and ihen anoiheT 
mourned group in ceremonial green capes 

Ihe clip-clop of horses, sounds that 
echoed along the Mall 200 years ago 
Stretching several blocks was a line of 


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of parishioners in a church heading up to« 
the altar to take Communion. 

Miles away, on the other side of Hyde,' 

Park, lies another oasis of quiet amid the 
cacophonous city — Kensington Palace, 
where Diana lived. On Tuesday, adjacent- 
Kensington Gardens were foil of the usual,’ 
lunchtime strollers, Frisbee-throwers and- 
RoUerbladers. But as you walked toward., 
the palace, the moment you crossed an^ 
imaginary line the noise ended. In front of 
the palace gates was a large, silent crowd- 
thousands strong. 

The final quiet place in central London 
Tuesday was the sidewalk in front of rhe- 
Harrods department store owned by Mo- 
hamed ai Fayed, whose son Dodi died . . ... 

with Diana in the automobile crash in* 'nHS? 

Paris. Harrods is in a narrow, bus tling . - ■' 

noisy part of west London. But on Tues- f 
day. when people passed the tables wherel. 
the condolence books for Dodi al Fayed*- 

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Internet Is a Shortcut 1 

For Tributes to Diana j 


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Reuters I 

frr»m RUSSf !Hi ~ Thousands of people ‘ 
plugged into foe ; 

nS p° n Mon ^ ay 10 pay tribute to i 
Diana. Princess of Wales ' 

noiIriS.y e! ^ fcn,ed out-,' 

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STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 


Day-to-Day Dominates Dinos at Venice Film Festival 


By Roderick Conway M^riT 

/mnuiiuiMl Henihl Tribune 


V ENJCE — While major glob- 
al threats like the invasion of 
the planet by hostile aliens 
and rampaging born-again di- 
nosaurs are taken care of bv fcebie 
studios with the big bucks, more dayS 
day concerns such as unrequited love, 
adultery, sickness, death and bereave- 
ment some of the main themes of the 
in-competition films shown at Venice 
so far — currently seem the preserve of 
the lower-budget productions. 

_Zhang yjjn OU - s eagerly anticipated 
Keep Cool was finally screened at 
.V u Veruce Fihn Festival, which runs 
> through Saturday, after failing to over- 
come the bureaucratic hurdles in time 
for Cannes. 

It begins racily with Xiao Shuai (.Ji- 
ang wen), a muscular book dealer with 
a speech impediment, in love-sick, hot 
pursuit of the leggy, chic An Hong ( Qu 
Y mg), who. however, turns out to have 
more of a walk-off than walk-on pan. 

An Hong has some shadv friends in 
the entertainment business' who over- 
react to her complaints that her admirer 
is pestering her and beat him up on the 
street. During the affray the bookseller 
grabs the portable computer bag of a 
harmless, bespectacled passerby, Lao 
Zhang (Li Baotian). The pedestrian's 
subsequent embroilment in Xiao Shuai's 
vendetta provides the mainspring of the 
farcical events that follow. 

There- are some amusing moments, but 
<2 Zhang's anxieties that this brand of 
Chinese humor might not be fully ap- 
preciated elsewhere were well founded, 
and the noisy, pop-video-style sound 
track and relentlessly jerky camera work 
become tiresome and repetitive. 

The Russian writer-director' Pavel 
Chukhrai’s “ Vor” (The Thief) is more 



Mihin [nirmUMuk Jel Cuunu 


Mother and daughter: Phyllida Law. left, and Emma Thompson in Alan Rickman's “ The Winter Guest." 


traditional in form and more substantial 
in content. Chukhrai, who was bom in 
Moscow in 1946, sets out ro depict 
through an idiosyncratic story the world 
he grew up in. a world of communal 
apartments where, with the devastation 
of World War II and Stalin's gulags, 
men were in short supply and tens of 
thousands of children were being raised 
by single women. 

Katya, a war widow, is on a train with 
her small son. Sanya, when she en- 
counters and is seduced by a handsome 
army officer. Tolyan. who in reality is a 
con man, cardsharp and thief. Soon 


hopelessly in love with this scoundrel, 
Katya remains with him despite her 
disgust at his activities and terror of the 
consequences, and the three rove around 
Russia, taking rooms in apartment 
houses and fleeing after Tolyan has be- 
friended and robbed the neighbors. 

Despite the man's obvious villainy, 
Sanya finds in Tolyan a substitute for 
the father he never knew and learns 
from him how to survive in a hard world 
in which before long he will find 
himself utterly alone. The story, su- 
perbly shot and infused with bittersweet 
humor and pathos, conveys a vivid pic- 


ture of a little-known Russia. Eight- 
year-old Misha Filipchuk gives a won- 
derful performance as the child Sanya, 
and Vladimir Mashkov and Yekaterina 
Rednikova are no less convincing as 
Tolyan and Katya. 

Although tackling adultery and Aids, 
Mike Figgis's “One Night Stand” is 
essentially a comedy of modem man- 
ners, and none the worse for that Max 
(Wesley Snipes) is a successful adver- 
tising executive who briefly returns to 
New Yoric from Los Angeles, where he 
has married and settled, and ends up, 
through a series of wholly unpredictable 


circumstances, spending a night with the 
also married Karen (Nastassja Kinski). 

Returning a year later to see his dying 
gay friend Charlie (Robert Downey Jr. j. 
Max is again confronted with the con- 
sequences of his brief encounter. Some 
of the zaniesr scenes take place by 
Charles's death bed (in which Downey 
triumphs over a face covered by an 
oxygen mask that reduces him to acting 
with his eyes and eloquent eyebrows). 
Wesley Snipes brings dignity and depth 
of character to Max, and Ming-Na Wen 
is memorably awful as his lissome, low- 
fa I. crashingly boring, culture-free Cali- 
fornian wife, Karen. 

I N. Bob Gosse’s “Niagara, 
Niagara,” Marcy. credibly played 
by Robin Tunney, suffers from the 
rare Tourette’s syndrome, which 
afflicts sufferers with severe physical 
tics and can intermittently cause them to 
blurt out involuntary obscenities. She 
falls in with an incompetent young 
shoplifter, Seth (Henry Thomas), whom 
she persuades to set our with her on a 
journey to Niagara. 

They commit a series of crimes along 
the way, but lack the viciousness and 
hardware of Oliver Stone's preposter- 
ous “Natural Bom Killers.” Solidly in 
the road-movie tradition, ‘'Niagara. 
Niagara” has the requisite “alternat- 
ive” aura. Yet the unintentional moral 
seems to be that, if you suffer from 
Tourerte's syndrome, keep taking the 
prescribed medication, and don't on any 
account try to substitute it with lashings 
of Jack Daniels. 

Admirers of Alan Rickman's acting 
may find his first excursion into di- 
recting, in “The Winter Guest,” less 
satisfying. The film, set in a wintry 
Scottish coastal village, stars Emma 
Thompson as the recently widowed 
Frances, with her mother played by 


Thompson's real-life mother, 
Phyllida Law. ^ 

A day the fictional mother and 
daughter spend together is paralleled by 
the days spent by Frances's teenage son 
Alex and the girl who has taken a fancy 
to him; two younger boys who are play- 
ing hooky from school, and a pair of old 
ladies who fill their empty hours at- 
tending funerals. The pace is slow, the 
feel often irritatingly stagy and the 
script ultimately insubstantial. 

Lighter and with fewer pretensions is 
Philip Saville’s “Metroland,” which 
premiered in Venice in the our-of-com- 
petition British Renaissance section. 
Based on Julian Barnes 's novel, the film 
is the tale of Chris (Christian Bale), who 
has serried down with Marion (Emily 
Watson) in northwest London's super- 
staid commuter belt. 

Their placid life is disrupted by the 
reappearance after several years of 
Chris's old school chum and onetime 
fellow '60s rebel Toni (Lee Ross), who 
is still living out the anti-establishment, 
bohemian aspirations of rheir younger 
days, and who seems determined to lay 
temptation in Chris's way and break up 
the happy home. Casting and perfor- 
mances are good, and the flavor and 
language of the English ’60s and '70s 
are well caught in Adrian Hodge's 
script. 

Grittier, more contemporary, but 
tinged with an old-fashioned idealism 
that recalls “To Sir, With Love,” is 
Shane Meadow's first feature, 
“TwentvFourSeven.” In this No- 
Weddings- and- a- Funeral, set in run- 
down. working-class Midlands Eng- 
land. shot in black and white, and in- 
troducing some raw new talent. Bob 
Hoskins plays a local oddball, Darcy, 
who starts a boxing club to get the 
aimless, chain-smoking local lads off 
the street. 


Hollywood ‘Hurlyburly’: A Tale of Sex, Drugs and Self-Obsession 


SjjS 


By Sheridan Morley 

huemarunul Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Given the mutual 
loathing between New York 
and Los Angeles, it js remark- 
able that “Hurlyburly” ever 
: became a Broadway hit. unless the dis- 
' integration of the movie industry, which 
is mirrored in the sex, drugs and 
rock’n’roll of young people living in 
sordid splendor in the Hollywood Hills, 
• made their East Coast contemporaries 
feel even more superior. 

Ser in the early '80s, that time when 
the idiotic flower power of the '70s had 
transmuted into the twentysomething 
self-obsessed, all-important generation, 
“Hurlyburly" reached 
into the underside of 
the a t e r the movie industry ar 
exactly the moment 
• g> 0 Jl° when it was taken over 
; by the "suits” and 

— ' came up with sex, 
drugs, some rock 'n‘ 
roll, but mainly sex and 
. drugs. Here we have a collection of 
. young Hollywood hopefuls of the 
: younger variety, circa 1984, for all of 
: whom the most important element in life 
is expressed by a line early in the play, 
“What did she say about ME?” The 
self-obsession of these educated but out- 
of-control young men, the cheap or not- 
so-cheap thrills of the single or single- 
; again lifestyle of the nearly rich and not- 
quite-famous is David Rabe’s subject 
matter, and in those innocent days be- 
fore David Mamet’s * “Speed the Plow” 
and even Ben Elton’s “Popcorn” this 
was original, incisive and troubling. 
“Hurlyburly" is really very funny 
: and, despite its scatological vernacular, 
‘ deeply and traditionally moral. Most of 
the time, though, the hostility that un- 
derlies the entire play — toward the 
movie industry, toward women, toward 





A scene from "Hurlyburly." 

their best friends, toward their ex-wives, 
toward an America moving too fast into 
corruption, depravity and rootlessness 
and toward Themselves — takes second 
place to Rabe's uncanny ear for the 
psychobabble that started in L.A. and 
spread to the rest of the world. Rabe's 
men are terrified of their women, even 
the hitchhiking girl who has been given 
to them as a present and who touches 
down with' them briefly; their fear is 
expressed in general misogyny and a 
tendency to refer to all women, even a 
newborn baby girl, as “bitches.” 

Rabe has perfectly skewered his time 
— the way the empty-headed flower 
power of the '70s gave way to the self- 
absorbed and violent egotism of the 
'80s. and the director, Wilson Milam, 
has clearly rethought his production 
since it premiered at the Old Vic as part 
of Peter Hall's first season. It needed 
rethinking. It's now faster, funnier. 


CROSSWORD 


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Calif 

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scarier, more outrageous and better 
played, and it often rises to the shock 
value of its first Broadway run. He has 
recast, too, replacing Elizabeth McGov- 
ern with Jenny Seagrove (proving a gain 
that we have underestimated her abil- 
ities) in the small but crucial role of 
Darlene, the chick with brains, and 
while Su sannah Doyle. Andy Serkis and 
Rupen Graves remain from the original 
cast, he has also drafted David Tennant, 
Mark Benton and Jessica Waison to add 
definition ro the fexL 

Since the Old Vic. Graves in the 
pivotal role of Eddie has grown and 
broadened, no longer afraid of the 
sharpness of his long speeches, no 
longer slowing up in the emotional mo- 
ments. but pounding relentlessly 
through the corrosive dialogue, finding 
the weaknesses in Eddie and the soft 
underbelly of an easy-come, easy-go 
society. Graves has turned into a dan- 
gerous actor who takes risks, most of 
which work well here. This is a fine 
technical performance and through it 
the audience has the opportunity to view 
this alien world through the eyes of a 
participant rather than an observer. 

“Hurlyburly” is a period piece as 
frozen in time as its brave producer's 
other West End success, “An Ideal Hus- 
band," but one that still has something 
to say. Even if it hadn't. Rabe, Milam, 
Graves and Serkis are all giving power- 
house performances at the Queen's. 

“Lucky Stiff” is a surprise, and a 
good one. This charming little show is 
another triumph for the off-West End 
Bridewell Theatre, a British premiere of 
a comic musical by the American writers 
who were responsible for "Once on This 
Island," which was a huge hit both on 
and off-Broadway. They are also behind 
this season's most eagerly awaited 
Broadway musical, “Ragtime.’' Lynn 
Ahrens (book and lyrics) and Stephen 
Flaherty’ (music) write big, tuneful scores 


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in the Golden Age of Broadway tradition, 
but their sensibility is resolutely of then- 
own time. Here, they have adapted Mi- 
chael Butterwonh's novel “The Man 
Who Broke (he Bank at Monte Carlo.” 

The usually stunning Tony Award- 
winner Frances Ruffelle is unrecogniz- 
able in a tweed skirt, stringy hair and 
ankle socks, while Paul Baker, in ad- 
dition to being able to sing and act, has a 
fine line in English embarrassment in 
foreign parts, complete with shorts and 
gray socks. The show is unamplified, 
which gives the more experienced cast 
members a problem, accustomed as 
they are to body mikes for volume. As a 
result, Ruffelle’s lyrics are often swal- 
lowed and hard to hear. 


The casting coup was unquestionably 
the hugely talented Olivier Award win- 
ner (for “She Loves Me”) Trade Ben- 
nett Some day soon someone is going 
to write a musical for hen she is a comic 
in the Carol C harming tradition with a 
fine voice, and she looks sensational. 
As the New Jersey Mafia bride she is 
little short of breathtaking on every 
level. And Paul Baker is a real find as 
Harry. 

That’s on the plus side. On the minus 
side, just about everybody else works 
hard but is dther undercast, miscast or 
inadequate 

-‘Lucky Stiff" is designed with over- 
size casino chips and dice that also serve 
as phone boxes, suitcases and chairs, in 


a clever primary-colors set by Gary Un- 
derwood and directed by Steven Dexter, 
whose last Bridewell production, “Ro- 
mance, Romance," transferred to the 
West End. His work is sharp and in- 
novative, with an imaginative comic 
sense. The entire Bridewell creative 
team is young and new, musically lit- 
erate and bursting with energy. As ex- 
pected from Ahrens and Flaherty, the 
songs are tuneful, intelligent, often very 
funny. Several are clever and all of them 
work. 

With “Lucky Stiff "the skeleton is 
there. A better supporting cast and a 
bigger budget for the “special effects” 
will give this delightful little musical the 
future it desen’es. 


BOOKS 


APACHES 

By Lorenzo Carcarerra. 336 
pages. $25. Ballanrine. 
Reviewed by 
Andy Solomon 

C ONTROVERSY sur- 
rounded the 1995 pub- 
lication of Lorenzo C area- 
terra’s allegedly nonfiction 
“Sleepers," and took anoth- 
er swirl last year when the 
film version appeared Dis- 
claimers at the film’s end by 
New York's Department of 
Corrections and the Manhat- 
tan District Attorney’s Of- 
fice raised suspicion that the 
only real crime in the film 
was its bombastic voice-over 
narration; wardens and bish- 
ops denied the likelihood of 
the book’s reformatory rapes 
and priestly peijury. Carca- 
rerra stuck by his story. 

Artistically, the argument 
seems barely worth making. 
As Frank Lloyd Wright said, 
“The truth is more important 
than the facts.” 

Whatever the facts. Car- 
catena convinced us that 
some- incarcerated boys, en- 
dure far more anguish than 


they’d ever intended to in- 
flict, and that their lives can 
be destroyed rather than cor- 
rected by institutionalization. 

Now, with his first novel. 
"Apaches," he moves from 
memoir to pulp noir, working 
in a hackneyed but ever-ap- 
pealing format: the all-star 
team of good guys assembled 
to battle evil. Nothing about 
“Apaches" purports ro be 
factuaL Everything about it 
cries out “Cable TV 
Movie.” 

The “apaches” are 
Boomer, Dead-Eye, Pins, 
Geronimo, Reverend Jim and 
Mrs. Colombo. Each was a 
New York cop. Each was 
among the best. By the early 
1980s, each suffered some 
career-ending wound that 
stole the meaning from their 
lives. To them, "A life void 
of action was a death sen- 
tence. . . . The red gauge on 
their adrenaline tanks was 
brushing on empty." 

But in 1 982. when 1 2-year- 
old Jennifer Santori is kid- 
napped in front of New 
York's Port Authority termin- 
al and ho - father comes for 
help to Giovanni (Boomer) 


BEST SELLERS 


Yurk Times 

Thu list is based on reporn from more 
than 2.000 bookstores ihroughoui the 
United States. Weeks on List are noi 
aece Jy consecutive. 

FICTION 

™ UMVmIu 

Wh «IK 

1 COLti MOUNTAIN, by - 

Charles Frazier 2 8 

2 UNNATURAL EXPO- 

SURE. by Patricia 
Cornwell — I 5 

3 SPECIAL DELIVERY. 

by Danielle Steel 3 8 

4 FUIM ISLAND, by 

Nelson DeMille - 4 13 

5 IF THIS WORLD WERE 

MINE, by E. Lynn Harris 6 5 

6 THE NOTEBOOK, by 

Nicholas Sparks 5 45 

7 THE PARTNER, by John 

Grisham 7 25 

8 THE GOD OF SMALL 
THINGS, by Anindhwi 

Roy 10 3 

9 LONDON, by EdwanJ 

Ruthetfurd S 13 

10 UP ISLAND, by Anne 

Rivers 9 12 

11 PAT TUESDAY, by 

Sandra Brown ...... II 10 

12 SERPENTS TOOTH, by 

Five Kdkrman i 

13 CHASING CEZANNE. 

PwerMayle 12 10 

14 APACHES, by Lorenzo 

Cartauem 1 

13 POWER OF A WOMAN, 
by Barbara Taylor 
Bradford ....... t3 7 

NONFICTION 

1 ANGELA'S ASHES, by 

Frank McCourt-....— — 1 SO 

2 THE PERFECT STORM. 

by Sebastian Jtmger., 2 12 

3 INTO THIN AIR. ty Jon 

Krakuier 3 17 


4 THE MAN WHO 
LISTENS TO HORSES. 

bv Mono; Roberts 15 2 

5 llHE BIBLE CODE by 

Michael Drosnin — 5 1 1 

6 MIDNIGHT IN THE 
GARDEN OF GOOD 

'AND EVIL, by John 
Berendt ... 4 163 

7 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH OOD: Book I. by 

Neale Donald Walsch 6 37 

8 THE MILLIONAIRE 
NEXT DOOR, by Thomas 
J. Stanley and william D. 

Danko . 7 32 

9 BRAIN DROPPINGS, by 

George Carlin. fi 13 

10 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD: Book 2. by 

Neale Dooald Walsch — 9 15 

11 THE GIFT OF FEAR, by 

Gavin de Becker., — 10 0 

12 EVEN THE STARS 
LOOK LONESOME by- 

Maya Angel on I 

13 MARTHA STEWART - 

JUST DESSERTS, by 
JknvOppenheunrr ...... — 11 7 

14 JUtfT AST AM. by Biflv 

Graham 12 16 

15 BILLIONS AND BIL- 
LIONS. by Car) Sagm.._ 13 5 

ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 SIMPLE ABUNDANCE 

by Sarah Ban BreatbncL I 4 

2 MIRACLES CURES, by 

Jean Career- - 2 72 

3 MEN ARE FROM 
MARS. WOMEN ARE 
FROM VENUS, by John 

Gray. 3 204 

4 KIES ARE PLINNY. from 

the "The Rosie O’Donnell 
Show" 4 7 


Frontieri, these walking dis- 
ability pensions can return to 
life. Boomer calls ex-partner 
Davis (Dead-Eye) Winthrop. 
and die two ex-cops track 
down Jennifer just in time to 
save her life, though not in 
time ro prevent her repealed 
rape and savage beating. 

Carcateira, though, is more 
intent on showing that 
Boomer and Dead-Eye have 
saved theirown lives. Boomer 
assembles all the “cripples” 
like himself at his neighbor- 
hood pub, Nunzio's, run by 
Nunzio Goldman, the mob- 
connected friend with a heart 
of roughly 10-karat gold. 
We’ve seen this assemblage 
before — from “The Seven 
Samurai” to "The Iliad" — 
but this time think of it as 
“NYPD Bruised.” In addi- 
tion to Boomer, who was 
slashed, shot and flung down 
three flights of stairs, and 
Dead-Eye, shot in an elevator 
in the leg, chest and both 
arms, there’s Pins Ryan, the 
electronics whiz who took 
four mistaken bullets from a 
jealous husband; Geronimo 
Lopez, monitions expert who 
dived onto a grenade; Mary 
Silvestri, a/k/aMrs. Columbo, 
homicide sleuth who was 
stabbed in the lung and stom- 
ach, and the Reverend Jim 
Scaiponi, junkie turned un- 
dercover cop, who left the 
force after he was set afire on 
a stakeout. 

Their mission, should the 
reader decide to accept it: 
Bring down Lucia Carney. 
She’s the 38-year-old beauty 
who rose above an impov- 
erished childhood and pre- 
teen work in the family pros- 
titution business to become 
one of the largest cocaine 
smugglers in the world. 


We’re talking no garden- 
variety ruthlessness here. Lu- 
cia's method of smuggling? 
She finds teen runaways, has 
her crew get them pregnant, 
takes the babies, fattens them 
for six months, then kills 
them. The tiny corpses, 
sliced open and packed with 
cocaine, are then flown 
around the country by young 
“mules" masquerading as 
mothers of unusually sound- 
sleeping infants. The chil- 
dren fly back filled with 
money. 

Like his plot, Carcarerra \s 
prose has all the subtlety of a 
George Foreman right cross. 
He’s made the common mis- 
take of thinking that by his 
third book he should souod 
like a "writer." 

H E does. He sounds like 
Raymond Chandler with 
a migraine: “Lucia Camey 
was sitting on the crest of a 
six -hundred-mill ion-dollar 
raountaintop and had come 
too far over too many long 
nights to let anybody throw 
her off." 

Yet, despite its triteness, 
“Apaches.” like "Sleep- 
ers," showcases Carcaterra s 
ability to create chillingly 
evil characters and a world 
horrifying in its depravity. 
Miles Davis once said of mu- 
sicians, “Sometimes you 
have to play a long time be- 
fore you can sound like your- 
self." Writers too. When 
Carcaterra does that, he has 
some gifts that may show to 
powerful advantage. 

Andy Solomon, who chairs 
the English Department at 
the University of Tampa, 
wrote this for The Washing- 
ton Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 

1 - 800-882 2884 


rrmi>vru«s\L 


. THE WORLD'S DAiU' NEWSPAPER 


PAGE 12 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

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I on Page 16 



















































L. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



VASHCA KC 600 QK3TALCAME8A 


:2i<yocERa 




WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


RAGE 13 


Doubletree 
And Promus 
Set Merger 

US. Hotel Operators 

To Form No.3 Chain 

,< Cjmpdnl in Air Skjf Fwm Oopia Vl 

PHOENIX, Arizona — Doubletree 
Corp. and Promos Hotel Corp. agreed 
Tuesday to merge to form tbe third- 
largesr hotel chaw in the United States, 
uniting such lodging brands as Embassy 
Suites and Red Lion, in a deal that 
values Doubletree at $1 .98 billion. 

Doubletree holders will get one share 
of the new company, which will con- 
tinue to be called Promus Hotel Corp., 
for each of their shares, while Promus 
investors will get 0.925 share. 

In addition to the exchange of stock, 
the new Promus will acquire $201 mil- 
lion of debt from tbe old Promus and 
$514 million in debt from Doubletree. 

The union of the companies, which 
cater to upscale and mid-priced trav- 
elers, would create an entity with $5 
billion in annual revenue. That is third 
^ behind No. 1 Holiday Inn and second- 
. place Marriott. 

“This m a k es the entire entity much 
more competitive,** said Joseph 
Coccimiglio, an analyst at Prudential 
Securities Inc. in New York. 

The combined company would have 
1,136 hotels, approximately 172,000 
rooms, and more tbao 40,000 employ- 
ees in the United States and parts of 
Latin America and Asia. 

' ‘They don’t step on each other’s toes 
as much as they complement each oth- 
er,” said Hany Venezia, an analyst at 
Raymond James Associates. 

But shares of Phoenix-based Double- 
tree tumbled on die news, finishin g 
down $5 at $45, reducing the value of 
the deal. 

Shares of Promus, based in Memphis, 
Tennessee, rose $2.0625, to $40,875. 

Raymond Schultz, the president and 
chief executive officer of Promus, will 
: be chairman and chief executive of the 
; merged company. 

Doubletree's president and chief ex- 
. ecutive, Richard Kelleber, will serve as 
president and chief operating officer 
following the merger. He will succeed 
Mr. Schultz as chitf executive when Mr. 
Schultz retires, the companies said. 

Promus operates the Embassy Suites. 
Hampion Inn and Homewood Suites, 
Embassy Vacation Resort and Hampton 
Vacation Resort chains. Doubletree is 
the franchiser of Doubletree Hotels, 
Doubletree Guest Suites, Club Hotels 
by Doubletree and Red Lion brands. 

The merger is the latest in series of 
combinations in the booming hotel in- 
dustry, which is generating record 
profits as the industry rebounds from the 
overbuilding of the 1980s. 

The hotel real estate investment trust 
Starwood Lodging, for example, is in 
talks to buy Westin Hotels & Resorts for 
more than $1 billion from Starwood 
Capital Group LP and Goldman Sachs 
& Co. (Bloomberg, AP) 




Inflation Relief Vaults 
Stocks More Than 3% 

257-Point Dow Gain Is Biggest Ever 


Suffering a Slump 


Although CNN has expanded 
substantially since 1990... 

1990 1997 

Worldwide 59miBon 190 million 
distribution households' households 

International 14 24 

news bureaus 


U.S. broadcast 225 475 

affiliates 

TV news channels 3 7 

* 5 millions outside the U.S. 


... its ratings have fallen almost 
continually since 1992 

Pweertege of households wat£Wng CNM, 
based on the total number that receive CW, 


*92 *93 ’94 '95 '96 ’ 97 * 
*lo Aug .22 


Source; Cable News Network 


TV Wj*tan£u<n Post 


lUJrWVlacA 


Rick Kaplan, hired to restore vigor to CNN, especially its evening newscasts, is looking for a prominent anchor. 

CNN Confronts a News Crisis - Itself 


By Paul Farhi 

___ WqshinRUut Post Service 

WASHINGTON — For CNN, the 
latest trouble spot is not in some far- 
flung country. It is right at headquarters 
in Atlanta. 

Cable News Network Inc., which re- 
volutionized television news with 
round-the-clock reporting, is mired in a 
long and deepening slump. No longer 
the innovator, CNN has been struggling 
to keep viewers' attention in a field 
overrun with look-alike competitors. 

Daily ratings have sagged 5 percent 
in the last year and are down 49 percent 
since the OJ. Simpson murder case 
fueled viewer highs in 1995. 

While CNN undoubtedly will see a 
ratings jump for this week, following the 
death of Diana, Princess of Wales, it has 


mainstays, Bernard Shaw and Judy 
Woodruff, may be yesterday’s news. 

The network made passes ar Dan 
Rather and Tom Brokaw, bur neither of 
the network anchors is signing on. 

So far, CNN’s problems have not 
translated into an exodus by the one 
audience that Time Warner probably 
cares about most: advertisers. Despite 

MEDUMARKETS 

declines in viewers hip, CNN’s core 
audience is educated and affluent, mak- 
ing it highly desirable among sponsors, 
according to Kathy Haessle. an ad buyer 
for Advanswers Media in Sl Louis. 

According to internal figures, CNN 
will generate about $540 million in ad- 
vertising and subscription revenue this 
year — an increase of 78 percent since 


otherwise been a slow news year — a 1990, when ratings began to run up to 


Mars mission here, a plane crash there. 

The audience numbers this year have 
occasionally descended to depths un- 
precedented in CNN’s 17-year history. 
The downward trend has raised con- 
cern, if not panic, for CNN’s owner. 
Time Warner Inc. . which bought CNN' s 
parent. Turner Broadcasting System 
Inc., last autumn for $7.5 billion. 

Last month. Time Warner began a 
face-lift of Ted Turner's most famous 
creation by fairing an ABC news vet- 
eran, Rick Kaplan, to takeover domestic 
operations. The first assignment for Mr. 
Kaplan, a 34-titne Emmy winner: spru- 
cing up the dreary 8 PM. and 10 r.M. 
newscasts that bracket “Larry King 
Live,” CNN's highest-rated show. 

Mr. Kaplan has also been given carte 
blanche to hire “a major anchor,” as 
one senior executive puts it, tacitly ac- 
knowledging that CNN’s early evening 


historic highs with the Iraqi invasion of 
Kuwait and the resulting Gulf War. 

What is more, CNN has begotten an 
expanding stable of TV networks and 
related media enterprises, all of which 
use some pan of the network’s golden 
brand name. 

The CNN News Group includes sev- 
en news channels, such as Headline 
News, CNNfh for financial news, the 
sports news service CNN/SI (a venture 
with Time Warner’s Sports 111 us baled), 
and CNN en Espanol. 

Sources inside the company say the 
group will post sales of more than $900 
million this year, more than double tbe 
level of seven years ago. Operating cash 
flow has also doubled, to a projected 
$280 million. 

But CNN executives clearly view the i 
erosion of the network’s audience as a 
major long-term threat 


Fed Keeps Eye on Economic Might 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times Service 

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming — 
Once again, the surprisingly robust U.S. 
economy is testing the limits of the 
Federal Reserve Board’s pragmatic ap- 
proach to monetary policy. 

Several Fed officials, interviewed 
last weekend during their annual meet- 
ing with central bankers, government 
officials and economists from around 
the world, said that they were less con- 
fident that the economy was about to 
slow on its own. 

While they said it remained unclear 
whether the long-lasting expansion was 
finally pushing the economy into an 
inflationary danger zone, for now the 
economy should be considered gnilty 
unless proved innocent 

But the officials gave no direct in- 
dication of whether they were more 
likely to raise interest rates when the 


Fed’s policy-making body meets next 
on Sept 30. 

Some of die officials admitted that 
they had underestimated the economy's 
resiliency, especially in light of Thurs- 
day’s figures showing that second- 
quarter growth was 3.6 percent, not the 
2.2 percent originally estimated by the 
Commerce Department And they sug- 
gested that they were now less inclined 
to assume that prices would continue to 
be stable. 

Despire its reputation for waging an 
uncompromising war on inflation, the 
Fed has proved willing over the last vear 
and a half to generally refrain from 
interest-rate increases even as growth 
remained strong and unemployment 
was low and falling. It has done so 
because there have been no real signs of 
accelerating price increases. 

During that period, the Fed felt com- 
pelled to raise rates only once, on March 
25, when it nudged its federal funds 


target rate up by a quarter-point, to 5.5 
percent. That action came at the end of a 
quarter in which the economy grew 4.9 
percent, roughly twice what most econ- 
omists consider a prod cm rate. 

Since then tbe Fed has left official 
rates unchanged at three successive 
policy meetings, in May, July and Au- 
gust, and the central bank's chairman, 
Alan Greenspan, has ruminated pub- 
licly about whether unrecorded im- 
provements in productivity have helped 
to increase tbe economy’s noninflation- 
ary growth capacity. 

But with that big question still un- 
resolved, Fed officials said they con- 
tinued to examine the economy closely, 
looking for hints that the strong growth 
might be creating the conditions that 
lead to inflation. 

Fed officials said that they viewed the 
economy as subject to swirling cross- 
currents that make its course for die rest 
of the year difficult to predict. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


AnEftma a 

Brands 

Frankfurt 

London (a) 

Madrid 

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(Dec J 

Source-. Reuters. 


*'No one here is content with static 
audience levels, and I can assure you, no 
one is happy with a decline." said the 
group chanman, Tom Johnson, who 
oversaw CNN until Mr. Kaplan was 
hired. “ ’We expect to continue growing, 
both domestically and internationally.'' 

CNN's problems do not seem amen- 
able to an easy fix. For one thing, the 
network traditionally has thrived when 
the news is hot In an earlier house- 
cleaning, Mr. Johnson tried, with some 
success, to ease CNN's dependence on 
hard news by adding "magazine" and 
news talk shows, such as the legal- 
affairs chatfest “Burden of Proof.” Mr. 
Kaplan may try more. 

But some observers suggest that the 
news is not CNN’s problem — it is 
CNN. they say, that is the problem. 

‘ ‘They’ve been doing things the same 
old way for a long time,” said Herb 
Brubaker, a former network news pro- 
ducer who heads the Television News 
Center, which trains journalists for the 
medium. "Their stories aren’t visually 
imaginative.” 


CtmriWbFOtirSkffFtoetDtiparhes 

NEW YORK — Stocks rallied more 
than 3 percent Tuesday, propelling the 
Dow Jones industrial average more than 
250 points, its highest gain ever, after a 
report offered some relief from die in- 
flation worries that have jostled the mar- 
ket in recent weeks. 

The Dow closed 25736 points high- 
er. at 7,879.78. surpassing its 186-point 
rally in 1987. a day after the stock 
market collapse. 

The market was closed Monday for 
Labor Day. 

The surge Tuesday followed the 
worst monthly percentage decline for 
the 30-stock average in seven years and 
coincided with investors' return from 
summer vacations. 

In percentage terms, stocks posted 
their biggest rise since Jan. 17, 1991, 
when the Dow rose 4.6 percent at the 
start of the Gulf War. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock in- 
dex was up 28.1 1 points at 927.58, and 
the technology-heavy Nasdaq compos- 
ite index soared 30.68 to 1,618.00. 

Stock prices also got a lift as pros- 
pects for earnings appeared better t ban 
August’s retreat had suggested. 

"If yoo stick with die quality names, 
I think you’ll be rewarded in the Jong 
run, so I’d buy on weakness.” said 
Richard Ciardulio, head of trading at 


Liberty Investment Management Corp. 
in St- Petersburg, Florida. 

The rise in stocks picked up speed as 
bonds rallied on a National Association 
of Purchasing Management report on 
manufacturing in August. 

After a series of reports suggesting 
that tbe economy might be accelerating 
at an inflationary pace, investors were 
heartened to see that manufacturing 
growth slowed in August. 

The group's index of business ac- 
tivity fell to 56.8 points in August from 
58.6 points in July, suggesting that 
growth is not fast enough to speed up 
inflation or prompt the central bank to 
raise interest rates. An index of prices 
was little changed. 

The price of the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond climbed 20/32 to 
9720/32, lowering the yield to 636 
percent from 6.61 percent on Friday. 

Verity dropped I ‘A to 5 5/16 after the 
network software publisher said it ex- 
pected to exceed the $6 million loss 
recorded in the quarter ended May as 
revenue slid to $5.3 million from $8.8 
million. 

Donaldson. Lufkin & Jenrette rose 1 
to 60% after Frankfurter Allgemeine 
Zeitung repotted that Dresdner Bank 
AG, Germany's second-largest bank. 

See MARKET, Page 14 


Apple Buys Out Clone Maker 


CenyM In Our Stuff Fma D h parch n 

NEW YORK — Apple Computer 
Inc. said Tuesday that it would buy 
Power Computing Corp.. a maker erf 
Macintosh clones, for $100 million, 
neutralizing some of the competition 
that has taken a piece of Applets sales 
and giving the company new expertise 
selling machines directly to the public. 

Apple is also getting back the license 
that allows Power Computing to sell 
Macintosh-based machines, and Power 
Computing will stop selling the clones 
at the end of the year. 

"Power Computing has pioneered 
direct marketing and sales in the Macin- 
tosh market, successfully building a 


$400 million business,” said Steve 
Jobs, the Apple co-founder, who has 
been leading the company while it looks 
for a new chief executive. 

The assets also include the right to 
retain “key employees” from Power 
Computing's direct marketing, distri- 
bution and engineering operations; 
Power Computing's customer database; 
and the license to distribute the Macin- 
tosh OS operating system. 

Power Computing was the first com- 
pany given permission to market its own 
version, or clone, of Macintosh com- 
puters. Sales of Macintosh clones have 
risen in the past few years as Apple's 
losses widened. ( Bloomberg , AP) 


Global Private Banking 


Ordinary 


SERVICE MEETS 


CLIENT NEEDS. EXCEPTIONAL 


SERVICE ANTICIPATES THEM. 



/ /iwJi/iurfi'rf oJ k't’paklic 
Nalionut HanL .«/ \'ur Yuri 
(Sulteul Jv.l. in (wiwn. 


At Republic we take service very seriously. 
We not only respond to client orders, we 
aim to anticipate client needs. . . to prepare 
tbe way in advance. 

We do this mainly by building close and 
enduring relationships. In tbe process, we 
gain clear insight into our clients’ financial 
goals and beep these constantly in mind as 
we look after their interests. 


Our advanced operating systems, too, are 
fully geared to this idea of exceptional service. 
They help us respond to investment opportu- 
nities with uncommon speed, and carry out 
client instructions to the letter. 

It is this forward-looking approach, 
together with a genuine sense of commitment 
toward our clients, that makes Republic a truly 
one-of-a-kind bank. 



Tli rlj lluuJtiuiirterii «/ 
ftrr.M.Y iVu/ifiHu/ Hunt 11 / 
AW )ii rlt in AW Yuris. 


||| Republic National Bank of New York” 

Strength. Security. Service. 

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*' k.-gojilk Xjlhm.1l ImiiL.’I X.H Wlf, 1‘ltlll 


PACE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


The Dow 


30- Year T-Bond YieM 




Executive Pay Outpaces Earnings 

IRS Data Show Raises Grew Much Faster Than Sales or Profits 


Dollar Strengthens 
On German Rate Talk 


By David Cay Johnston 

New York Tunes Service 


130 

i-V' 


NEW YORK — Internal Rev- 
enue Service data made public 
Tuesday showed that from 1980 to 


A m j j a s 

1987 


' A M J J A S 

1997 




■'G^Thepow' 

c'sp&So; 


Tuesday 'ftm.-iC-. % ... 
■■94 PM . . Close Changfl 

7873.70 792242 *338 


• . 7- • v-*; mM '-- . : bbsm, • +a37 


Tuesday showed that from 1980 to 
1995, a period when US. corpo- 
rate sales and profits soared, the 
senior executives of companies 
did even better — with their pay 
rising at a much faster rate. 

Total tax-deductible executive 
pay, before inflation, rose 182 per- 
cent, to $307.6 billion in 1995 
from $109 billion in 1980. 

Corporate revenues rose 129.5 
percent, to $14.6 trillion in 1995 
from almost $6.4 billion in 1980, 


Executives can defer part of sal- 
ary or bonus, for example, and delay 
tax payments until the deferral ends, 
usually after retirement. 

But the really big deferrals are in 
stock options. No taxes are due on 
stock options until they are ex- 
ercised, which on average is seven 
years, said Giaef Oystal, publish- 
er of The Crystal Report, an ex- 
ecutive-pay newsletter. 

At the 1,000 large and midsize 
publicly traded companies that he 
tracks. Mr. Crystal said, the value 
of options awarded but not yet 
exercised by CEOs was $9.9 bil- 
lion last year, while the executives 


made $ 1.2 billion from options 
they did exercise. 

KEEP: Chief Executive 

Roberto Goizueta of Coca-Cola 
Co. alone has more than $1 billion 
in his deferral accounts, company 
filings with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission over die last 
17 years show. 

The highly publicized compen- 
sation packages granted to some 
executives a few years ago, at a 


CfwrWM 1 Onr Oojvrbn 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against other major currencies 
Tuesday* particularly the Deutsche 
mark, after a Bundesbank council 
member indicated there was bttle 
chance of an imminent rise in Ger- 




time when pay for ordinary work- 
ers was relatively flat, prompted 


KSpaPduto.'. t ,jBo^p»S s 


t8sl&3e ;-togta5iT*i56. 


while taxable corporate profits 
rose 127 percent, to $560.1 billion 
from $24o.6 billion. 

Corporate income taxes rose 
1 14 percent, to S197 billion from 
$91.9 billion. 

Executive pay can grow much 
faster than corporate profits “only 
because chief executives are paying 
themselves.” said Robert Monks, a 
principal of Lens Inc., an invest- 
ment fund. “They have all this dia- 
phanous language about perfor- 
mance and ail these committee 
reports on how pay was determined, 
bur the simple truth is that exec- 
utives are setting their own pay.” 

The tax data actually understate 
significantly both die actual rise in 
corporate pay and the higher rate at 


'.82034 -.8&38 -t.39 

-5WS3? I 5481,14 .'.*$.62. 


Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


iiUcnud-nul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Beckman Instruments Inc. said it had agreed to buy 
closely held Coulter Corp. for $1.05 billion in cash and 
assumed debt, moving to broaden its presence in the medical 
diagnostic equipment market Beckman said it would pay 
$875 million in cash and assume about $175 million in debt to 
acquire Coulter, and will rename the merged companies 
Beckman Coulter Inc. 


Workers Like Jobs 
But Not the Bosses 


• AlliedSignal Inc. agreed to sell its automotive air-bag and 
seat-belt business to Breed Technologies Inc. for $750 
million in cash and assumed debt. The business has annual 
sales of more than $900 million. It is the Largest seat-belt 
supplier and third-largest supplier of air bags in the United 
States. 


which it has grown in comparison 
with corporate revenues, profits and 


• Ranger Oil Ltd. said it made a friendly cash-and-share bid 
to acquire Elan Energy Inc. for 874 million Canadian dollars 
($630 million) including assumed debt 


with corporate revenues, profits and 
income taxes. This is because over 
the 15-year period major changes 
took place in the composition of 
executive pay packages, effectively 
delaying corporate income-tax de- 
ductions for the bulk of executive 
compensation for periods ranging 
from a few years to decades. 


Washi/t/tU* Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Most 
American workers like their jobs 
but think their supervisors' man- 
agement and people skills are 
poor, according to results of a na- 
tional survey by the management 
consulting company Watson 
Wyatt Worldwide. 

About 61 percent told the com- 
pany that they were * ‘satisfied ’ ’ or 
f ‘very satisfied” with the work 
they do, but fewer than one in three 
said managers at the companies 
where they work made good and 
timely decisions. 

And fewer than half of the work- 
ers thought their supervisors dealt 
fairly with them, clearly commu- 
nicated, goals. built teamwork or 
were able to coach workers to 
greater success. 

The workers surveyed said that 
managers did not listen to them. 


ers was relatively flat, prompted 
calls to rein in executive pay. 

In 1993, Congress passed a law 
limiting to $1 n-ulli on the amount 
of base pay to senior executives 
that a corporation could deduct on 
its income-tax return. Before 1994 
there was no limit on the deduct- 
ibility of executive pay. 

But the new IRS figures show 
that not only did the (aw fail to 
accomplish its advertised goal, but 
executive pay increased at a 29 per- 
cent faster rate in the first year after 
the law took effect than in the pre- 
vious 14 years feat (he service had 
collected comparable information. 

From 1994, when the law took 
effect, to 1995, the amount that 
corporations deducted on their in- 
come-tax returns for executive pay 
increased more than 9.1 percent, 
the IRS figures indicate, compared 
with an average increase of 7 per- 
cent between 1980 and 1994. 

“There was a lot of hoopla 
about how this law was supposed 
to cut down executive pay.' said 
Michael Graetz, the author of 
“The Rise (and Fall?) of the In- 
come Tax” anda Yale Law School 
professor. “But foe law was really 
designed to not have any real effect 
— and this shows that, just as 
intended, it had do effect.” 


man interest rates. 

The dollar also climbed against 
foe yen because of the financial 
turbulence in Southeast Asia and 
after a Japanese official indicated 
he approved of foe decline in the 
yen. . , 

The dollar was at ].8344DMin4 
P.M. trading, up from 1.8130 DM 
on Monday in London. U.S. mar- 
kets were closed Monday for Labor 
Day. 

The U.S. currency rose to 
121.575 yen from 120.895 yen. It 
climbed to 15060 Swiss francs 
from 1.4925 francs and to 6.1722 
French francs from 6. 1009 francs. 

The pound declined to $1.5915 
from $1.6135. 

The dollar's rise against foe mark 
was helped by the National As- 
sociation of Purchasing Managers 
data for August, which showed U.S. 
growth remains strong and price 
inflation is being kept at bay. 

But most of the dollar's rise 
stemmed from comments by Olaf 
Sievert, who is a Bundesbank coun- 
cil member and president of foe 
regional central bank of Saxony and 
Thuringia. He said that raising Ger- 
man interest rates to support foe 
flagging mark would be “prema- 
ture.” 

Mr. Sievert also suggested that if 
foe euro, foe planned single Euro- 
pean currency, proved weak, it 
could lead to increases in interest 
rates across Europe. 

Keith Edmonds, an analyst at In- 
dustrial Bank of Japan, said that foe 
dollar was benefiting from the 


Bundesbank’s indications that ir 
would not raise interest rates in the 

near future. p 

On Tuesday, foe German central; 

bank had an opportunity to make a 
move on rates, but it left its se-, 
curities repurchase rate unchanged 
at 3 percent. •* 

Ib next chance to decide a move, 
on its key discount and Lombard 

rates is Thursday. 

Speculation that the German cen-j 
nalbank planned to raise rates bas> 


Sell 




foreign exchange : 


mounted over the summer, first be-) 
cause of currency weakness and 
more lately because of signs of 
growing inflation in foe economy* 
traders said * 

But foe German central bank s. 
chief economist, Otmar Issing, who 
is also a council member, reiterated, 
on Tuesday President Hans Tiet- 
meyer's comments last week that 
the German inflation rate should not 
be overdramatized J 

The dollar benefited from the. 
yen's weakening as welL ] 

Much of foe gains against foe yen,' 
came from comments by Finance- 
Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka of Ja-| 
pan that traders interpreted to mean. 
Japan will not try to halt foe U.S/ 
currency’s rise. . 

Mr. Mitsuzuka said current ex- 
change rates reflected “economic) 
fundamentals,” suggesting that he* 
was comfortable with foe dollar’s; 


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rise. 

The depreciation of Southeast; 
Asian currencies has pulled the yen. 
down in rum. and that is not ne-' 
cessarily unwelcome to Japanese) 
authorities because their country- 
must maintain its competitiveness,' 
against other Asian countries. - 
(AFP, Bloomberg . AP)\ 


« Walt Disney Co. said char foe president of the Disney Online 
operations. Jake Winebaum. will head a newly formed di- 
vision encompassing all of Disney's Internet busi- 
nesses. ( Bloomberg , API 


Weekend Box Office 


MARKET: Wall Street Returns to Life After Manufacturing Report Shows a Slowdown in August 

Continued from Page 13 C-Cube rose after Robertson, Stephens & gap has made alternatives very compelling.” Retail prices will increase about 7 c< 

Co. analyst Elias Moosa raised its rating to Hewlett-Packard rose 1% to 63 V4 after the an average of $ 1 .87 a pack, the two com 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “G.I. Jane" dominated foe U.S. box 
office over foe weekend, with a gross of $10.1 million. Fol- 
lowing are foe Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday’s ticket 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday, Sunday and Monday. 


1.GJ. Jana 

(HoBrocod Pictures) 

110.1 million 

2. Money Talks 

(New Line One mol 

S9Jmlbian 

3. Air Force One 

(Columbia Pictures) 

58.1 mUGon 

4. Hoodlum 

(Unded Artists Pic- 

576miWon 


tures) 


S. Conspiracy Theory 

(Warner BrosJ 

$A6nrilSon 

*. Mimic 

(Dimension Films) 

543 million 

7. Excass Baggage 

(Columbia Pictures) 

56-3 rnSBtan 

L Cop Land 

(Miramax) 

56.1 ml iron 

9. Kulltha Conqueror 

(Unhrenai Pictures) 

53^ million 

10-Men In Black 

tCotomMa Pictures) 

S3 J million 


was in talks with French insurer Axa-UAP SA 
to buy 20 percent of foe U.S. securities firm, 
citing “financial circles close to the b ank, ” 
Some half-dozen securities firms have been 
snapped up by banks since foe Federal Reserve 
Board loosened restrictions on commercial 
banks ownership of investment banks. 

FX Energy fell after foe company, based in 
Salt Lake City, announced that a lest well in foe 
Baltic region was not capable of commercial 
production. FX said it was plugging the welL 
Smaller stocks continued a four-day rally, 
hitting records, though they could not match 
the Dow's clip. 


C-Cube rose after Robertson, Stephens & 
Co. analyst Elias Moosa raised its rating to 
“buy" from “attractive." 

C-Cube 's revival speaks volumes about the 


US. STOCKS 


rally in small-cap stocks. The stock has 
jumped 86 percent since its low on May 22, 
even though it is still well below last sum- 
mer’s high of 48Vi 

“The Cokes and the Microsoft of the 
world are still very expensive, even though 
they have come down a lot, ” said Chris Luck, 
director of equities at First Quadrant Corp., 
which oversees $24 billion. “The valuation 


computer maker said it would cut prices as 
much as 30 percent on some networking 
products. 

Netscape Communications rose lYs to 41 7/ 
16 after foe developer of Internet browsing 
software said Novell and' Oracle chose its 
Navigator software as their preferred browser-. 


The company also plans to release "major 
Web initiatives" on Wednesday. 


Web initiatives" on Wednesday. 

Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco Holdings 
Corp. raised wholesale cigarette prices Tues- 
day by an average of 7.6 percent to help pay 
for foe tobacco industry's $368-5 billion plan 
to settle health-related lawsuits. 


Retail prices will increase about 7 cents to- 
an average of $ 1 .87 a pack, the two companies) 
told analysts. S maller U.S. cigarette compa- . 
nies are likely to march foe increase, said Gary) 
Black, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein. Hei 
said the increase, foe largest in several years/ ' 
showed that foe companies were willing to) . W; 
raise prices to pay for the national settlement* 5 
even before it is approved by Congress. The) ! 
settlement calls for retail prices to rise about 62. 
cents a pack, said Jeffrey Harris, an economist* 
at foe Massachusetts Institute of Technology.) 

Philip Morris shares rose $1,125 to 
$44.8125. RJR stock rose 62.50 cents to. ‘ 
$35.4375, and Loews Corp. shares gained 
$3,375 to $ 105.3 125. (Bloomberg. AP ) 


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WORLD STOCK M 


Tuesday. Sept. 2 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The lop 300 most nefive stares, 
up 1o the dosing on Wafl Street. 

The Assocaiod Press 


sum n*b lot, low a* Indexes 


Most Actives 


i*> i>» 
4 » 

1M HP. 

& r 

5*» SVi 


w r s 
H <*• 


Dow Jones 

Qr« Hfe* LOW LOW CP*. 

Indus 7647.23 TMQJ 4 742E42 7879.71+257.3* 

Turns 207*21 WI7.1I 24*9-16 297 660 +SM3 

un zn.«j mi# mjr hsS 

romp 2*6.90 74*2.7} 2397.12 74*1*8 *i&2 


Ues Htfi U» U*ed Opr 


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& £ 
rv, 
lift 10ft 


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lift 


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lift .ft 
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Industrials 

Tramp. 

umtes 

Finance 

SP50Q 

SP100 


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Lnr OsM Mi 

— 1Q57U3 1090 JO 

— 6*3.73 664.76 

— 197S5 20<L61 

— 10L*1 106.75 
— W9J7 VDjQ 

— 868.94 098J2 


ft. HU* 
89 187 49 
0931 46ft 
41764 S7W 
6099 59W 
53354 39ft 
51777 459* 

uSK. 

49972 34ftV 

SHi T 

35727 9 

nil jni 

33718 64ft 
5223 2*u 


Sept. 2y 1997 

Wgti Law Latag Chge Oplnt 


LOW Lrfvjt O199 OpM 


HBgh Lon Udesl Chg* OpiM 


HVi Left Latest Cfcpe OpM 


ft* ft* 
tin* 4tN 
43ft *41* 
6 SV» 46ft 
s*vv m 
35ft 36ft 
4* 45ft 
57 am 

""isss 


Grains 

CORN CC80TJ 
S0«? bu mlTiDnmn- cents per 
Ssp97 770 2 64ft Z*W« *4 1*478 

D*c*7 272ft 2**U 272ft 4-3190511 

Mo/ 98 28? ft 275ft 297ft -31* 4X397 

IWW98 28* 279ft 295ft *3 12927 

Jl4 98 299ft 293 789 .Jft 19J69 

5au98 27* 271 14 775ft -5ft 1499 

DSC 99 273ft 2*8 273ft 11,775 

Ea. sates 52000 Pm sales 59JII 

Fit* open 1 m 303.01a on 221* 


ORANGE JUICE OICIN) 

I&000 lbs.- arts par h. 

Sap 97 6050 6770 4025 -040 2^76 

Nor 97 7070 *970 *755 030 16577 

Jan 98 72.90 7270 7250 040 7790 

MorTB 75.95 75.10 7SM 4L4D J,9B 

EM. sates fCA-FftsKriw WOO 
Fits open HI. ofi 34494 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 

FROOOOO-pkariOOpd 

Sep 97 129.90 12954 12954 -072 154722 

(W 6 T daw am jo catjj. am imam 


Oec*7 9B.7B 9M 9064-072 19.057 
Mar 98 9014 9014 9876—072 0 

Est sales; lUMtO. 

Open btL: 1 71774 aH I76& 


War 98 9195 9378 9355 -077 S9,15T 

Jim 91 9425 9415 9475 +079 46-520 

Sep 98 9462 9473 9463 +0.10 34769 

OK 98 9452 9463 9453 +0.11 31719. 

Esteatss: 54930 Piev. sales: 3&517 , 

fter. open tit: 39 ? MS up 960 


Amsterdar: 


Nasdaq 


17W 11V. 
3 V. 7* 
ft Vi 
7ft 6 ft 
*U ft. 


45190 47068 48390 +1262 
41274 5*559 *1275 +147* 


VM. Kle* 

124728 9?* 


12 lift 
2ft Z*» 
77ft 74ft 
20ft 19ft 
lift lift 
WV *ft 
24V |V 
22ft 21ft 
25ft 2*14 
1 7ft leu 
lO'v eft 

17+W lift 

4ft 1ft 


43452 OU 3 43437 +769 

285.19 380.15 28519 +574 

448.17 4277* 448.17 +149) 


10 Ml! 17V« 
93155 311ft 
9075* 43ft 
71513 51ft 

gj» 

a® Sf 

Sf* 

4151! 


Nasdaq 


141412 >59507 I418L00 +30*8 
0762 130! JO +17*1 


1301*0 129762 130!- 
174477 171340 1744J 
!7»44 lfeU4 17382 


issstsas 


SOYBEAN MEAL CCBOT) 

1 00 tons- Hollars par Ion 
Oct 97 22470 22070 22470 +2*0 

Due 97 21020 20570 209.00 +170 

Jon *9 2O500 20ZBO 20*70 +7.70 

Wor 90 200 JO 19750 19970 +310 

Marie 19970 19*70 19BJM +150 

Julia 20070 19400 20400 +250 

E*t. sales 21.000 Frts sales 22*09 
firs open Wlia 739, up 457 


Metals 

COLD O+OAXJ 

100 hift at.- ckAas pertrav a. 

Sep 9* 32370 -150 4* 

0d97 226.10 32120 32*00 -1J0 1563B 

Nor 97 32*90 -1*0 

Dac97 32860 32570 32580 -1*0 101970 

Feb 99 329.90 32730 32750 -1*0 15323 

Apr9« 32960 379 JO 32960 -1*0 5307 

Jim 94 33150 331.10 33150 -1*0 4282 

6* «98 33X70 -1*0 5! 49 

Od98 33*70 -1*0 111 

Est safes 25000 FfTS solas 113*15 
Rts open kit 191,9*5 OH 2*47 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONO (UFFE) 
ITL20Q mSBon - pteoflOOpd 
Sep 97 I37J4 13*3* 13732 +032 71098 
Dee 97 109.15 10438 10970 +0*0 49548 
MnrM 7LT. NT. 109*2 +0*0 121*4* 
EsLsalea: 83-5*8. Plw. cutes: 52.106 
Pm. open Mj 121*4* op 7.709 


UBOR 1**0NTH (CMEIO 

S3 nnan- pfs of 100 pd. 

Sea 97 9*35 9434 9*35 unch. 1*923 
Od*7 9633 943) 9*33 unch. fU 35 


Industrials ; 

COTTON 20*070 ’ 

50700 lbs.- cents par Bl ; 

Od97 7338 7370 7330 +CLS0 T.22T 
DeCW 7367 7370 7361 +048 *5100' 
Mnr90 7*7D 7*20 7*40 +060 1X449- 
M0999 7SJS 7510 7531 +038 sm 
JU98 7510 75J5 7598 +0*6 5*84' 
Est sales NA fifs sales 14500 
PitsapcnM 1.HIIB7.22S 


Nor 97 9438 9435 9438 unch 10253 

Est. sdtt n A. Frts sates *538 
Fits l*>efl Int 41.79* lip 7 


® ss 

53 55ft 
75ft 77ft 

95 98ft 

49VW 49ft 
4»ft 9YV 


IPl HI 
5tfe 5ft 
» 5ft 
7*1 m 
lift U 
1T4 1ZU 


JS, 

K -1 

a 


4»W 47ft 

21 » 


Hl«k lav Lud Ch*. 
*5689 *50.14 45437 +67? 


Dow Jones Bond 


mi an 
21ft 21 


7ft 6 V 
lift -ft 
12ft -ft 

ift -Vk 


7*1 n~. 

ir* lift 


20 Bonds 1033* 

lOUflWies 101.59 

10 Industrials 10613 


VaL Hl«k 
71879 9 W»j 
SZf O 7Vk 
1141 4V+ 

4950 5ft 
*l» ft 
5777 TV 
513* 39ft 

ss &■ 

4951 28 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOTJ 
MOOO las- cents per ® 

Sep 97 22.94 2235 3X87 +037 

Od97 2112 22.9* 23JM +020 

Dec 97 23J3 2331 2141 +0.21 

Jen W 23*9 2368 23-59 +0.19 

Mar9i 2X88 7X72 73*4 +033 

May9« 23.90 2360 2197 +032 

Eli sates 1X000 Fits sales 1&523 
Fdsopan W 8*079. 0B 1673 


lav Lost cao. 

9Vft5 9Tft. + 2 «*. 
At m 
4 US .’ft 
4ft 5ft +ft 
av ft 
2 ft 2 ft> -ft 
3*ft 39 +Sft 
24ft 77ft +lft 
29ft *» +lft 
2*ft 27ft »ft 


SOYBEANS tCBOT) 

6000 buralnl mum- cenb per bushd 
See 97 *74 MS *711* .S’* 8*47 

Nor 97 *35 424 433ft »|ft S7.9S3 

Jan 90 *37 427ft *3*u +fltt RT6IS5 

«nor«0 645 43Sft 44P* -8ft 067* 

Way 90 *51 6*3 450ft +8 6577 

Est sates 37,000 Frts solos 4G047 
Fits open tel 141,976 up 1*51 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX1 
2JW00 tea.- cart# per Bl 
S ap 97 9935 95-50 9S4S -235 *344 

Od 97 98.50 9630 9630 -360 2.133 

Nov 97 9760 9610 9640 -365 1*76 

Dec 97 10060 9*65 9620 -3.10 21.152 

Ton 90 9*20 -190 773 

Fob 98 *30 *60 94X0 -ZJ0 736 

MW 98 9760 9*35 9650 -260 1195 

Apr 90 9600 -7JQ S3? 

May 90 9760 9S80 9560 .230 16*5 

Est. sue* 10000 Ffts seta 1*198 
ft* open M 6X751 off *225 


EURODOLLARS OCMERJ 
tl mtBon-pH ot 100 pd. 

Sap 97 9*27 9434 94 34 unch. . 

Od97 9*19 9*15 9*18 unch 


8ft 8*v 
4* tft 
21 20 * 
> P» 
519V 5T. 
V* 24 SV 

MU 4ll 
25ft 24ft 
rii 2 ft 
3ft Ti 
21ft 20’S 
25*8 75ft 
Jft 3*4 


Trading Activity 


Sft -w 

B -ft 

a. ' v * 

77ft .V? 


lift 17ft 
12ft lift 


Nasdaq 


!»ft I S’. 
U-I .T, 

Tl ft 


Adwmcea 

D+ane« 

WaiW 


TBUlSSUn 

n«i Hions 
NcuLoas 


2174 1337 AOtcrad 

757 1485 Oeeava 

3^ 

*3', 'S K5K? 


WHEAT CCBOT) 

SOW bv mteteiwn- cent, porbinM 

Sep 97 379 372ft 377ft -ft 6354 

DocW 3»4ft 389 391 unch 4&331 

Mar« 408 399 406ft +ft 21.241 

May 98 407 400ft 407 unch 1238 

Est sates 21.000 Hh safes 2*7*8 

Frts open Ini 1083*6 aft 61 


SILVER (NCMX) 

5600 tny ol- ants par tray a. 

Sap 97 46730 45800 459.50 -HO 3693 

OC197 4*1.90 -2J0 70 

NO* 97 6*130 -2 JO 

D« 97 67660 66*50 6*620 -230 J}£33 

Jon 98 6*760 -130 22 

Mate 480.00 672.00 67110 -2J0 11344 

Mcy98 68060 67740 47740 -130 1220 

J«I98 41.70 -130 23*3 

Est sates >2600 Fits series 1*999 
Frts open M 77425, off 1985 


Od97 9*19 9*15 9*18 unch 6759 
Dec 97 9*11 9465 9*10 +061 511350 

Mar98 9*02 9194 9402 +0.03 254394 

Jon 98 9192 9183 9191 +063 277.748 

Step* 92JB 9173 9367 +063 217J84 

Dec 98 9170 91*0 93 M +064 189.15* 

«A7 9158 934* +063 13*6*9 

Jim^ 9143 »=L*2 +066 105,791 

5*p99 9158 9150 9158 +064 8*750 

DeCW 9152 9343 93U1 +064 7401* 

Mar 00 9151 9343 9351 +064 64,751 

Est sates NJL Ws sates 6«258 
Frts open kit 2607626 OR 1452 


HEATING OIL MMERJ 

42600 grt, cents par gal 

22^. 53 ^ 5 5140 *°-l* 4840*. 

SJJ®* 51511 +«• 21.7*7, 

SS S- 25 ^ +11* 21,5*5, 

SIS S'® 5*^3 +0.16 19431 

3% ££ +AM 10814* 

Mor*B 56.75 5605 5613 +0.1* &239 

Apr 98 SL50 5*90 5*93 +01* 3422. 

EsL solas N A. Fits sales 41)6* 

Ffts open Irt 148,90* off 1642 , 


UWT SWEET CRUDE (NMEIO 


22 , m 19JSS +004 1013*3 

19 . 9 * 1954 19 . 7 * +062 486*9 

JJ-M 19 JB +h 02 5 L 228 - 

S- 9 6 1 ’- 70 1968 +062 29 , 923 . 

SS nM U963 

WVB 2060 19J7 1958 *061 10648 

Est soles NA Frts tola 58192 

Frtsopan tel 60269a 0(11.307 


*» 'Wrr-'. 

=e 

-w.;.'- 
■Wr: - 

•tw 


BRITISH POUND (CMERI 

*2400 pWJWfc. * per pouna 

S8P97 14716 1-S8W 7J90* -.0288 4SJ57 

DeCW 1/650 15800 1584* 6286 1.707 

Mar 98 15782 -6286 217 

Est sales ha Frts sales 1250 

Fits open Ini 47,782. off 957 


Market Soles 


t*h TV, 
14ft ISfti 

TV, A Is 

S'V Sft 


fft - l A 

14 4V 

4ft -ft 

-‘i 


Mft J*»S 

11 h I 1 >v 
!»• 
lift nu 

14} 14 

Uh IM 


iOrencea 

Deainea 

jJndjanqcd 

1HNISM10S 

Hen High 
Ne+i LMn 


a*» P«. 

S4 Ss NYSE 


ur i«9 Arne* 

™ Nasdaq 
“ g InnOkm. 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

<0600 !».- cents pet Ih 
Od<r7 0760 ol.Of 67 60 *QJ0 

Ctectr 69 JO 6840 69 J5 +050 

7ftt>98 7167 7142 71.75 +R12 

Apr«B 73.92 73-SS 7360 +067 

Jun98 7055 70 JO 7tU7 +067 

A«a«8 7035 7005 70.OS +065 

Est. K*B 8706 F«ts sates 17.1 SO 
Frts open in* 9S*22 ah 1-02? 


PLATINUM (MMERJ 
50 tror 01- OMon per tray ocl 
O d97 41260 4J440 60S 70 +2.00 9029 

Jan98 60600 40050 60*20 +15Q 2,798 

Apr9B 4«L20 +300 638 

Jul98 39&J0 +X0Q 2 

Ed sates NJL Fits sales 559 
Frts open W 136e7,afl 14 

LONDON METALS OMEJ 
Mias per metric ton 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

laiooo dolkFS J per can #r 

S*P9T .72^ 7208 J232+06O22 S*a*l 

2^2 ‘2?5 -72*8+06022 8703 

Mar«S -7312 7290 7J97+06022 731 

Ert. sates NA Frts sates 16708 

FrfV open ftil *4 37Z off 925 


NATURAL GAS CHMER) 

lauoomiBlMrs. tpefmmbtu 

JJW 2J93 +0079 

{**2 X940 2620 2.90J +0.080 

MM +S i*»+007O 

I?” 2 *-15° U75 2.715 +0045 

MorfB 1520 2455 2490 +0.045 

EU. srtas N A. Frts iotas 5*21 1 
Ffts open Int 2I132R off 1,969 




UNLEADED GASOUNE [NMEIO 


ilHtofeGntos) 

. 1579ft 1580ft 159060 159360 

Fonrard 160760 1607ft 1*1700 161860 

CspMr Cramtes INJgfe Grofee) 

SP?. . 2153 60 215260 217360 217560 
forward 215560 215600 217600 217760 

M 

*** . *31ft 432ft A3*ft 637ft 

FWteOrt *44 U> 44560 *4960 65000 


5M 4ft 
MS 3Ut 
Jft 2V 
*U 6', 

ft ft 

li| lft 
Jft 7* 
41- 4T* 

*+ ft 
16ft 

lift lift 
1»« 10ft 
Jft Bh 
Wi 9ft 
4ft 4', 


13ft 12 + 
1ft, U. 
4V+ 5ft > 


14ft 1U9 
2ft Sk 
toft. +MW 
u-ft, 41+s 
21 20'. 


Dividends 

Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


IRREGULAR 

Royal PTT Ned 0 5394 9-25 9-30 


Bumtam PacM 
CmHoiatrBk 
Casta C 


STOOCSPUT 
Andrea E lection 2 tor 1 spBt. 
Diaitat Micrawawe 2 fori split 


Uiqiim wirciwavea torispO 
Mofott Common 2 far lsjrifl 
UT( Energy 3 fan spfff. 


9-23 9 30 
9-1* P-30 
9-1 S 929 
9-30 9 30 
8-31 9-30 
91 6IS 
9-8 930 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

.90,000 fen • cents par to. 

Sep 97 79 15 76*2 78.90 . 0,22 

00 97 7967 7850 7ti 7 .005 

Now 97 80.10 7950 79*2 -0.10 

Jon 98 81.00 8055 80.72 +0.12 

Mar98 80.75 0055 8055 +0.12 

Ate 98 80*7 0050 BOM +015 

Esl sates U27 Frts sates 3247 
Fits open Ini 21.7E. off 90 


GERMAN MARK ICMER3 

1 2i000 marts, s p« marti 

Ssp 97 -5543 5*51 3454 4 jjm 

SS -sw-ojam 

MOT98 .5540 5517 551706079 

Ed. sales MA Frts sates 3*295 

Frts open bit 106-44* up 3.768 


r — : — — — tiimciu 

^600 nl unis per Ml 

227, S' 10 60 42.79 +157 

Nay 97 58.70 5735 5847 +162 

bSJae S’ 7 ? 5 4 -* 0 5742 +0J7 

S’SS J 430 5777 +037 

Feb 9B 5757 5*50 5757 +0J7 

’F*™ sm +037 

"Ww 40*2 +037 

Eg sates UCA. Fits soles M45* 

Fits open fell 101071. an i+58 


*49000 *50600 6525 00 453*00 
659060 *60060 6*2060 4*3000 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 
!^ 5 g fPo "jr9h liter 100 yen 
S«pV7 TOO -BJ27 £7*9 Jtocrtj 

0*97 5425 5334 53S706O» 

M«9B 8470 .8470 547O0OW3 

EN. sates NA Fits sdes 4&7I2 
Fits open hil 10*248. up 12,611 




. ^-00 04500 534560 535500 
Hlfevrard S3SS60 539560 540060 5410.00 


Dec (Spedal Hah Gtods) 

Spot 1640.50 1 64560 1*22 00 142500 

Forteted 1«960 149000 148360 148*00 
Wpn Law Oase Oigo Qpfert 


1» ■*« 

4Vft -ft 

lift -■+ 


REVERSE STOCK 5PUT 
Kushner Lock* ? tor*revarce sfta. 


SOft teft 
0 ft , II* 
lit l»I 


JPi -» 

8V. 

-'ft 

ft 

SDft .14 


401ft 19- 

17'. I7ll 


INCREASED 

Bfc at Commcicc Q .05 9 30 11-3 


KeUmotl 

LTC Properties 
MonriaidFctK 
MAHeatti&Ed 

MunlopcriAdvFrf 

OppenhmrMol 


9-12 9-30 
9-20 10-17 


»’•- ?7'i 
IT’ft I*!* 

Itft lj-+ 


Oft 22 

»*» 9V» 


Am% 

SicARckC 
Sic* Kelt Ft 
BICKRck NJ 
BKkRcKNY 


REGULAR 

O .06 10-15 10-31 
M 6731 9-15 9-30 
M .06 9-15 9 30 
M 6578 9-15 9-30 
M 6M1 9.15 9 30 


DpaenftmrwM 
Pcfnrtewn Heat 
Pflqrim AmPrmRt 
TcUepfume Data 


9 9 9-19 
9-15 9-30 
9-5 9-19 
9-15 9-30 
9-1* 10-1 
9-12 9 2e 
91J 9-34 
9-15 10-1 
9-8 918 
9-16 0-JO 


HOCS-itete (CMER) 

4CL0OT tos.- cents per lb 

CO 97 77.10 4957 70.15 -*» I7J34 

Dec «7 68.10 *7.10 *7*7 +0.10 7605 

Feb 98 4*77 4*00 **32 007 1337 

Apr 90 *300 4235 62.45 0 20 1404 

Jun 98 *7.70 4730 *755 *0 05 933 

Esl. sales *34® Pm 1112 
Ffrt open fed 31.493. up 131 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12&00D francs. S per banc 

Sep 97 A 77V 440 5646 0 0044 

Marw M7*r illf • n7 - w »*5 

4MTM 5787 4787 6787 0XQb5 

Esl. sales HA Frts sates 1123* 

Fits open Ini 5J, 3J7. ^ ^ 


GASOIL OPE) 

^ PK"? Mc ton • lcrt « °f S » K*B 

H1J1 16*75 +150 15.3SO 
22 « IS* ,UH 1*760 +SS 

gs MS ISi I :s s 

£5 gs sss :« 

Mor98 1*9.75 1*950 17160 *oio 17« . 

***** fi.OSO- Pre». sates. Iai34 i 
Pter. open «].: 90640 up 2J)^ 


hwproMate amaoM per 
mnVADft: g p ay able In Canadan hmds. 
BhmaMr: q^ooMr. 


PORK BE LUES (CMERI 

40600 lbs.- cents pd I) 

Fob 98 *9 SO **90 *760 07? 1813 

Mgr 98 *960 *705 67.15 0 65 3*3 

Mayra 6920 4* 80 64.80 -122 88 

Esl sates 2.057 Ftrs sates 783 
Fris open fed *30/. off »9 


I) mBon-ptsd loopd 

Sap 97 94.9* 94.94 9*95 + 062 *407 

BES” UB * Un «« +062 SSs 

MertO 9*79 +0.0* 1JD4 

E* sdes N A. Fit*, sates ssi 

FriftepenmmrSRaffo 


MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500600 (MBcn. s per pno 
55*” l»!5 • ,J7W ->2807+6(090 10897 
jnS • f 23I7+60390 14003 

Esl. sole; NA Firt ^te* *gai 5,716 

Firs open fell 41771. otf 1.297 


BRENT OIL (IPE) 


N0V9T 1*75 1U17 69.9J2 


HmV7 1875 867 iSIf *9,922' 

Sm HEMS 


5 YR TREASURY (CSOT) 

*700.000 prtn- Bh A Mlhs oMOO pd 

/wS !St55 10 *- S4 +00 ni6*i 

D« 9? 106-47 I0M4 IOp-36 . 08 10*777 
Esl. sales 47600 Fits sate. 7*487 
Fteopcnw 2)4244 off 14« 


Stock Tables Explained 


Si 5ft 

nil 

IJ-i !3ft» 
l »» ft 
2 ft 

Sii i 


77 + 24-., 

19., 1|, 

!*• Jft 


?+. 8 
J . »• 3- 

3»- . S» 39 : 

I? » >?‘r IT* 

I 1 ft I * 


79 + 

Nft J»-| 


u n ■ n . 


14-1*. 1*. 


li'., lift ir . 


:»>• si - » 

55- . U ■ te' i 

t: f. 


Sales figures ere urratficiQL Yearly highs and lows reflect me previous 52 weeks plus hw 
current wool, turf ran me roiesi trading day. Where a spfil or stock dhrtdond a mounting to 25 
percent or more has been pad the years higtvlcw range and dividend «e shown forme new 
stocks only. Unless otherwise noted, rotes d dividends or? annual disbuTscmaris based on 
Me tok-sf dedarotion. 

a ■ muidcnd also extra (si. b - annual rate a* ifev+dwd plus slock awfdend. c - tiquidatag 
(hvxtend. c c- PE exceeds ?9.dd -colfca. d - ncwrwnty tow. dd - loss In the tasl 1 2 months, 
o - dividend declared or paid in preceding 1? months f - annual rale, in creased on tasl 
declaration, g - dividend in Canadian funds subject to lS“i. non -residence fan. i ■ dividend 
declared otter split up or sled, dividend, j - dividend paid this year, orntnea. deferred, or no 
Kiwi token ei lotPsl dividend meeting, k ■ dividend declared or po>d this year, an 
cccumutoMre issue with dividends m prreors, m - annual rate reduced on lost decJdiOtion. 
n - new rssuc m Me post 52 nerhs. The high-low range begins with the s»crt ot trading, 
nd - no*! ouy delivery, p - irana dividenQ annual rate unknown. PTE ■ pnee-nmings nrrto. 
q - doscd-cud mutual fund, r - dividend Sectored or paid in preceding 12 months, plus stock 
ditmiena t - stock spiff. Ocndend begins with date of Split, sis ■ soles. 7 - dividend paid m 
stack in preceding 12 months. estiiTOled cosh value on ex-dhhderid orc*-datnnutjon dale 
u-ncvfveortyfllgfi V -timSng halted *i- in bankruptcy or receivership ur being reorganized 
under :he Bankruptcy AC. or securities assumed by such companies, wd- when distributed . 
uri - when issuedi uni ■ with werronh. t ■ ei -dividend or ev-rigtris. ttts - ei drstnOution 
*w ■ Aittipul Aorranfs.y- :v d-videnc ono soles mtuiLyW- yield.* - solos <n tun. 


Food 

COCOA JNCSEJ 
10 metric tons- S per Ion 
Sep 97 1*73 1445 1*72 -1* 

DTC97 1773 1*85 1704 H 

Mar 98 1 745 1714 1733 •? 

TWrrVS 1744 1731 1751 ♦! 

Jut W» 1768 1757 1768 *) 

Sep 98 1787 177* 1787 *1 

Esl saKS 7A65 Fits sales 11095 
Fits wen ml 105.901. Up 1.373 


'■totrsavwt tcBon 

StOMW prto. art i 32nds aiioo pa 

§2: « !£ li 108 13 >0908 ♦ 07 |9(n*3 

£££ HI! Iff” *** -o*mm 

108-18 108-17 IOB-17 +04 1741 

Ert IdR 70007 FBft +40OJ (3(^6 

F ITS open HU 41 i4T9. UP 9A05 


2-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 
CS00600 . ph at 100 pd 6 ’ 

Uli 9?ra 92.73 +063 

£k!C97 97-58 97.54 yjjj .n„ 

M IriS **-» +001 

SS"* 8 **-5* 9157 +0.04 

2-** 92*1 9265 +064 

0<* 98 9775 9} 71 ‘om 

MOT9* 9203 ^ )«« 

Esl soles- 65.097 Prpv sates Tl 4 -ki 
PIW. open fell *67677 up 3.WQ 


JttM 869 1# xn ™ “S'" IW17- 

F+*9« ,5U JK* -0.02 1*452, 

Mo- 98 !8A3 ~ <L02 4S70 

Eftl ™ '~ 3 18 63 -«* 3J1* 




Plbv-aponlw . 1 5»630 oh '* 


Sjj as as '««m 
S5Stssa:fig ■sg 

EV.MtesNAFrtssra+jjg™ 1343 

Fri»ouonrt20*S94^£r° 


HSPSSHj^apisasF <uffei 


^ n«oj 


COFFEE emesE) 

37.500 tos.- «nh per B 
Sep 97 10*25 191 75 19*25 *4.75 
Dec 97 1R5J0 Ml 00 IS49S -565 
fetor 98 1*7 0Q 1*335 I4*.W *4» 
Afetn98 1*0.85 law 1(065 0*5 
*1198 155 7S 15350 15S75 +330 

Esl. sate 7,101 F+fs sain *M0 
Firs open «nt Ido** up 356 


“TRe*SUjr BONDS (CBOT1 

2£S;* , “*5ff k t 432 ,H tooi ioo pen 

EU soles jsaooo Fte sotes tcj +,. 
Frts open tet in* mtSag™ 


■XI 97 NT nY £?£ W460J 

tbrW N.7 n £5 I.W* 

5 ^ SS 


Me 97 9*47 9+ « y.™ _ 400 

Mor 98 9*3, 

Jun 98 9* 09 £■£! “S? 25 


5* >00 (UFFE) 1 

QSPWfejdetDrtnj 

Sir? Xoo 'Si 

«or9« NT NtSSK**® 

Era uiLw. ,+ L !' T 51000 I.B10- 


SUGAR WORLD II UKSE) 

1 14000 tes . cento per to 

Ocl 97 I17J 1149 11.70 - 0.10 85,740 

Mai 98 17 10 1169 I1W +008 75J9B 

Ntay9t 12.05 1109 12 04 .009 10.122 

JWW It S3 1174 1176 .064 16304 

E« 1*1 7*250 FHX safes, 72.730 

F<is ami kit 2017V+ aft 2.4*1 


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cso .000 pMUifte 100 pci 

11500 11419 114^ .am 

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Mar9B NT Nr 114-08 .JS JratUl 
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Sep 98 95 B7 95 m «2J Z52' 7,A * 5 ? 

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Mar 99 9544 95S 252 

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Open IH • ?51 a 44 qn 19^ 


Commodity Indexes 


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PAGE 3 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


RAGE 15 


»»ia n \{, 


a ‘e Tali. 






V 


hua w 


Siemens 
In Talks 
To Sell 

Divisions 


Canptlm f » r On Snff Frew Dkp&rhrs 

MUNICH — Siemens AG 
said Tuesday that it would sell 
three units, which account for 
about 2.8 percent of total sales, 
and seek a partner for a fourth 
subsidiary as ir revamps indus- 
trial operations. 

Germany’s largest electron- 
ics and engineering company 
said it was in "cooperation 
talks" that could lead to die sale 
of its X-ray equipment, com- 
munications test equipment, 
electric wiring and lighting sub- 
sidiaries. 

Siemens also said it was 
seeking a partner for its elec- 
tricity unit, which has annual 
sales of 400 million Deutsche 
marks ($220.4 million), though 
it has no plans to sell the unit 

The company also expects to 
use acquisitions to lift profit- 
ability, bolster its competitive 
position and spark annual sales 
growth of 5.5 percent over the 
next five years, according to 
Edward Krubasik, a manage- 
ment board member. 

“By the year 2002, we want 
the majority of our business 
areas to assume a leading 
worldwide position.” he said. 

The shuffle is a step in 
Siemens’ yearlong effort to rid 
itself of noncore units and 
strengthen its most important 
businesses, responding to in- 
vestor criticism that it has been 
sluggish on that from. 

Siemens shares closed up 
3.95 DM at 1 17.10, a gain of 3.5 
percent. 

Siemens also said it would 
separate its three industrial op- 
erations units into four sections 
to focus on “key" areas where 
the company sees chances to 
expand market share. 

Mr. Krubasik said the 
greatest growth areas are die 
United Stales and the Asia-Pa- 
cific region, which should help 
offset a weaker domestic en- 
vironment. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


EUROPE 


Airbus and Boeing Win Big Lessor Orders 


I'AflflW h Our Slj£ From fa 

-- The European consor- 
tium Airbus Industrie said Tuesday 
tnat it bad won an order for 65 
aircraft from International Lease Fi- 
nance Corp., another indication of a 
buoyant civil aircraft market fol- 
lowing a boom year in 1996. 

At the same time, in Seattle Boe- 
ing Co. announced that it had won 
an order for 6 1 jetliners from In- 
ternational Lease Finance Coro. 

Neither company said how much 
the lessor would pay, bm based on 
list prices the Airbus order would be 
word) about S4 billion and the Boe- 
ing order about S4.5 billion. Compa- 
nies usually get significant dis- 
counts when they make large 
aircraft orders. ~ 

The Airbus order comprises 50 of 
its A3 19. A320 and A321 narrow- 
body jets and 15 of the A330 wide- 
body twin jets. Airbus said. De- 
liveries will begin in 2000 and be 


spread over five years. Airbus said, 
adding that the contract brings to 
167 the toial number of its planes 
ordered this year. 

The Boeing order is for a mix of 
aircraft, including 31 737s, the 
smallest model Boeing makes. 

In New York. Boeing Co.'s share 
prices rose. 

Both Airbus and its U.S. rival 
expect to reap orders this year on a 
scale similar ro 1996, when the two 
had 1,043 orders. The orders Tues- 
day also confirm a growing move- 
ment by airlines to use airplanes 
under lease rather than purchasing 
them outright. 

“This is just a continuation of 
what we are seeing in the industry: 
buoyant growth, and lessors pos- 
itioning themselves for that,” said 
Eddie Pieniazek, director of con- 
sulting services at Air Claims in 
London, an aerospace consultant. 

By leasing a plane, an airline can 


use it for five years or so and then 
rerum it or exchange It for another if 
the airline’s needs change. 

About 20 percent of the world's 
airplanes are now on operating 
leases. 

“We think that figure will reach 
30 percent,” Mr. Pieniazek said, 
adding that such leases are useful to 
airlines for both financial and stra- 
tegic reasons. 

International Lease Finance 
Corp. said it now had firm orders for 
266 Airbus aircraft- Thai makes rhe 
Los Angeles-based corporation Air- 
bus's biggest customer. 

Benefiting from a turnaround in 
the market for jetliners. Airbus in 
1996 saw new orders triple to 326 
planes worth $23.6 billion. Boeing’s 
1996 orders doubled to 717 planes. 

The Airbus consortium partners 
include Aerospatiale of France and 
Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG, each 
with 37.9 percent; British 


Preussag to Buy German Shipper 


Ctvryvfat fc- Our Skiff f nwi OiifWrluz 

FRANKFURT — Preussag AG 
said Tuesday that it would buy 
Hapag-Lloyd AG from its seven 
largest shareholders for 2.78 billion 
Deutsche marks ($1.53 billion), 
shifting its focus from coal and 
metals to shipping and tourism. 

The German steelmaker agreed to 
buy 99.2 percent of Hapag-Lloyd 
for 2 ,040 DM per share. VEB A AG, 
Lufthansa AG and Gevaen NV of 
Belgium agreed to sell their 18 per- 
cent stakes and Metro AG its 15 
percent. Veritas Vermoegensver- 
wal rungs mbH. Deutsche Bank AG 
and Dresdner Bank AG each agreed 


to pan with 10 percent shares. 

Preussag is moving into the fast- 
growing tourism business at the 
same time it is scaling back in coal 
and metals. German steelmakers 
face a stagnant domestic market, 
overcapacity in Europe and lower- 
cost competition from Asia. 

"We will consider more acqui- 
sitions in tourism," said Michael 
Frenzel, chief executive. Preussag 
will pay for die acquisition from its 4 
billion DM reserves, he said. 

Christian Obst. an analyst at Bay- 
erische Vereinsbank AG, said, 
"They can make more money in 
tourism than they can in coal min- 


ing, factory construction or 
metals." 

Preussag shares finished up 1.50 
DM. at 508. Hapag-Lloyd shares 
rose 120 DM, to L030. 

The sale hinges on approval from 
German antitrust authorities and 
Preussag’ s policy-making supervis- 
ory board, which will meet to dis- 
cuss the issue in midmonth. 

Preussag had said in June that it 
wanted to buy Hapag-Lloyd to bol- 
ster its transportation business. 
Hapag-Lloyd owns a steamship line 
as well as travel bureaus, tugboats 
and a tourist charter airline. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters 1 


French Stocks Up More Than 4% 


GwFiJfd tn Oitr Stuff Fran Pofutcha 

PARIS — French benchmark 
stocks posted their largest one-day 
gain in seven years as the dollar’s 
climb bolstered profit prospects for 
multinationals. The dollar-eaming 
oil producers Elf Aquitaine SA and 
Total SA led the climb. 

The CAC 40 Index surged 115.31 
points, or 4.1 percent, to 2,921.15 
points, mirroring the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average’s 174-point morn- 
ing gain. 


The dollar has risen steadily 
against the franc over the past few 
days, closing in Paris at 6.1304 
francs, up from 6. 1042 francs Mon- 
day. A rising U.S. currency boosts 
earnings of French companies when 
they convert dollar sales into their 
home currency'. 

A weak spot in the CAC was the 
food retailer Promodes, which fell 
1.9 percent, to 2,255 francs, a day 
after offering 28 billion francs for its 
rivals. Casino SA and Rallye SA. 


was 


Casino rejected the bid Tuesday, 
and investors were worried that Pro- 
modes would raise its offer. 

The founder of Casino, Antoine 
Guichard, said Promodes 
"badly advised" about the 
itability of Casino. Mr. Guichard 
stressed that Promodes was unaware 
of the * ‘very good’ ‘ earnings results 
that Casino would release Wednes- 
day. 

Shares of Casino and Rallye were 
suspended. ( Bloomberg . Renters) 


Union Leader 
Predicts Sale of 
France Telecom 

Cooifktfd in OurSvffFi.wl Dtqvtthrs 

PARIS — The French gov- 
ernment will "in all probab- 
ility " sell 20 percent or more of 
France Telecom, according to 
reports Tuesday that quoted a 
union leader involved in dis- 
cussions about the state-owned 
company’s future. 

The Finance Ministry, 
however, responded that the 
government had not made any 
decision on whether to privatize 
the phone company. "All this is 
at the least premature." a min- 
istry spokesman said of die un- 
ion leader's remarks, reported 
in the daily Le Monde. 

The report quoted the lead- 
ership of the Sua-PTT trade un- 
ion as saying the government 
could list part of the stake on the 
Paris stock market and offer the 
rest to employees. 

Pietre khalfa, head of the 
union, which represents 26 per- 
cent of France Telecom's 
150.000 workers, said he was 
confident that the government 
would opt for a partial sale of 
the company. He also predicted 
widespread union opposition to 
any sale. ( Bloomberg . AFP) 


Aerospace PLC. with 20 percent, 
and Casa, or Consttucciones Aero- 
nauticas of Spain, which owns 4.2 
percent 

The consortium is fighting for a 
half share of the world market, 
which is dominated by Boeing. As 
pan of its aim to match the U.S. 
company. Airbus is in the midst of 
discussions wiih its partners on 
changing its partnership status into a 
limited liability company. 

Boeing now has 6:5-70 percent of 
die world market for commercial 
jetliners, with Airbus controlling the 
rest. Boeing recently acquired Mc- 
Donnell Douglas, whose Douglas 
Aircraft division had 4-5 percent of 
the global airline business. 

International Lease Finance 
Corp. is the leasing subsidiary of 
American International Group Inc., 
a U.S. insurance and financial ser- 
vices company. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters) 


Investor’s Europe 


fiianjdurt' 
DA* : . 

4500 
4200 


. :Londori 
' FTSe .100 



■“* M.J -J 
1987 


2500 — 

A M J J AS 
1997 


Becftanga.'" 

■tone* y •• '. 

.Tuesday..' 

Aw. 

• 

> 

■ Ctose 

Close 

Change 

Amsterdam 

A€X;. 

92621 ■ 

88t.S2 ' 


'Srwscsefe- * 

.S6L-20. 

" ^435.48 


+a'4S 

Frartrfurt 

• DAX ' • ■ 

. 4,047^7. 

3,98a«L.. .+1.44] 

; . .ffiDpeot»aw Stock Market •• 

613.54 

608.50 

•eO.83 

HeJafnfcl'. 

■HEX General 

/&7SL30 

3^371t6 


Oslo ' 

dex ■ 

70025. 

69^92 

■41^56 

Lonrfon '. 

FTSE ii»-‘ 

4J95SL20 

4 t 870^J 

+1-88 

ItertrW - . 

Stodc Exchange- 

566.12. 

579 J52 . 

+1,47 

Mitoa r^' 

WISTEL ■ 

14537 

■14339 

;+2.04 

f%ria *’ * • 

.CAC 40 ' * 

. imis 

2,805.84 

+4.1 f 

Skockhobn . 

SX16 ■ 

3*40083 

3,325.17 

,42.25 

VUmna ■ 

ATX 

1^7954 

ij365.<k 

+i;bs 

Zurit^i 

SPi 

. 3*507715 

3.404.57 

+g.oi 

Source: Telekurs 


InumuiiimJ H.taU TriKioc 

Very briefly: 


• Kellogg Co. plans to start negotiations on plant closings 
with workers representatives at three sites that employ a total 
of 400 employees. Production at rhe factories in Riga." Latvia; 
Svendborg. Denmark, and Verola. Italy, is expected to be 
moved to Germany, England and Spain. 

• HJ. Heinz Co. has bought a 51 percent stake in Pudliszki 
SA, Poland's biggest ketchup maker, to increase (he U.S. food 
company's presence in Central and Eastern Europe, where it 
expects sales to reach S400 million by 2003. Pudliszki, which 
also markets tomato concentrate, canned vegetables and cook- 
ing sauces, employs about 700 people and has annual sales of 
more than S25 million. 

• DBS Management PLC shares fell sharply, for a 13 percent 
decline so far this week, after it was fined a record £425,000 
(5685,400) for failing to adequately review cases where 
pensions may have been improperly sold. 

• Total SA said it had taken a 20 percent stake in Azerbaijan’s 
Caspian Abserfaon offshore oil prospect. The French com- 
pany. which already has stakes in other Azerbaijani sites, said 
it was ‘ ‘strengthening its position in a region that is of strategic 
importance. ” 

• Koninklijke PTT Nederland NV said its PTT Telecom 
would cut international phone rates by an average of 25 
percent Oct. 3, with some rates dropping 50 percent. 

• Novartis AG is creating a joint venture with International 
Business Machines Corp. to manage the information tech- 
nology infrastructure of Novartis's Basel-based business 
units. Novartis will initially own 30 percent of IT pro and 
transfer ownership to IBM by the end of the seven-year 
contract. 

• Frontline has pledged to continue the shipping company's 
takeover bid of its Swedish rival, ICB Shipping AB, saying 
that it held 10 percent of ICB stock, making it the top 

shareholder. AFX. Bloomberg . Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


ilff 


Diecday, Sept. 2 

Prices In tacnl currencies. 

Telekun 

High Low dose Prrr. 


Amsterdam 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AkmNoM 
Boon Co. 

Bolt Wesson 

CSMcvq _ 

OordtsttaePet 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Farits Ataev 

Oflhonlcs 

G-Bmcan 

Hogeraever 

Hameken 

Hawairensevo 

Hunt Dough* 

IMG Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

NedfloydGp 
Nutnda 
OceGrtatei 
PhSpsElec 
Polygram 
RanflsradHdg 
RnOfw 
Rodamco 
RcBm 
Sfarento 


Unilever eva 

i'entfexliti 

•mu 

Woden Man 


jn w fljflo 
\SBj60 15X50 
57 JO 5420 
33X50 31X50 
13X80 130 

34.90 33.90 
94X0 94® 

111.50 107.60 
300 1949 
339 319 
B9J0 8420 
449 629 
589 S69 
108.10 l<M 
330 3269 
12X30 121 

87 849 
969 91.10 
709 689 

45.90 45.10 

739 719 
639 62 

318 3069 
248 2349 
156 149.80 
113-40 10410 
83 809 
1919 1889 
619 609 
1929 190 

11740 1179 
112 106-0 
44440 419 

)0X90 101 

4640 . 43 
25040 240.20 


Bangkok 


Ad* into S« 
Bangkok BkF 
Kruno Thai 6k 
PTT Expire 
Siam Cement P 
Siam Com BkF 
TeteCMnasta 
Thai AJntrow 
Thol Farm Bk F 
UM Coram 


SET indet 51537 
PrwtoofcWLM 

143 

144 
33 
322 
504 

n 

29 
40 
?5 
110 


175 

164 

m 

179 

163 

178 

24 

22 

24 

332 

318 

332 

SM 

506 

512 

93 

fllJO 

93 

31JS 

29 

31X0 

42.73 

40 

42X5 

107 

95 

106 

118 

109 

118 


Bombay 

BctfdAuto 

State unw 

Hindus) Pette 
IndDwBk 

ITC 

/^uhwwiptfTei 

Refioncema 

State Bktodta 
steel Authority 
Tain Eng Loco 


seaso n todey 5^03 

Previous; 39410 

817 784 800 814-50 

139013549 1389 1370 

51 D 470 4K740 486.75 
107X5 1009 1069 101 

52675 506 5249 ^518 


250 242 

04375 3339 
296 2819 
20 1X25 

345.75 336 


343 344 

>S *§& 

344 345 


Brussels 

Almma 

Barca tod 

BBL 

CSR 

Cotruyl 

Demote UoA 

Eledrobel 

Etecftnfiiw 

Forte AG 

Gerojfl 

G8L 

Gen Barque 

Kredfeftonk 

P rtrc fl no 

Pmnrfin 

Ramie Beige 

SocGwWg 

Sofcoy 

Troebei 

UCB 


Copenhagen s“JSS*s» 

rai rn 349 


High Law Ctos* Pm. 


Deutsche Bank 1099 10970 
Deal TeJekon 3645 359 
Dresdner Book 749 7620 
Fresenius 321 317 

ResadusMed 1309 1299 
FitolKnJPp 395 382 


AEXiwtaC 92521 
Previous: 88172 


439 409 
1589 15120 
5680 529 

330.10 314 

13240 12X20 
349 34 

9640 949 

1119 10590 
200 1939 
3120 3140 
899 84.10 
64J0 62 

579 589 
106 HR JO 
326 3249 
1249 119.90 
87 839 
959 90.10 
70 67 

459 14.90 

73.10 729 

an a 

314 314 

24B 23740 
1549 14X80 
112 10X9 

81.10 80 
190 1BX30 

ol9 61 
1929 190 

11740 116.70 
111 10540 
443 4169 
1019 10040 
4570 4120 
29 2409 


Gehe „ 
HeWe&gZmt 
Henkel pto 
HEW 
Hochtief 
Hoedid 
Knraodt 
Lnhroeytr 
Unde 
Lotthanso 
MAN 

Moinestnam 


1149 1119 
142 1399 
101 979 
47615 47615 
84 8110 
7365 7345 
639 637 

919 BX10 
1260 1230 
35.95 3X75 
496 487 

873 afc 


MetoOgeseUsdioR 42.90 419 
Metro 8X90 B49 

MtmchRueckR 5989 Sta 
Preussag 514 508 

RWE 84 83 

SAP pto 415 4139 

Sdtetnq 1829 1819 

SGI Carton 242 236 

Sterner; 11770 11*55 

Springer (AxeO 1560 1560 

Suetmxker 870 866 

sr ,»s *g 

v “ 8? S 

swigen 1343 1330 


VkM 

Vote* 


10940 10&4C 
359 3645 
749 7190 
321 323 

130 127 

383 3899 
1149 1139 
142 1389 
10030 9470 
47615 445 

B39 859 
7175 729 
63X50 633 

88.10 909 
129 1222 
3X90 3X9 
492X0 505 

B679 843 

4155 4130 
659 8335 
5979 S78 

508 50650 
8335 839 
415 «6 

1819 1779 
242 233 

117.10 11115 
159 1580 
865 89 

43680 43050 
1009 99 

■580 575 

765 765 

1342132X50 


Helsinki 

EnsoA 

HuMnnxAii 

fieffllra 

Kata 

MerttaA 

AWtroB 

Metso- Seta 8 

Net* 

NokkrA 
DrwvVWymce 
Outokumpu A 
UPMKymmene 
Volmet 


HEX General Wa: 33759 
Pmnou: 3337.16 

99 48 A50 47 

2189 214 21X50 214 

48 469 479 43 

7030 4960 70 699 

27-43 71 279 2t«0 

157 155 1559 153 

47 JO 46^0 469 469 
140 13 138 IJ6.I0 

43490 430 4349 428 

119 126 178 lg 

8X90 879 889 37 

1309 1279 12S 128 

8070 79 80 7X60 


Hong Kong 

MS ™ 

Cojhoy Podfic 129 

n 

OiinoUflW 3X80 
OHc 




BEWOI MfWf 

Previous 235633 

1685 1620 76J5 1615 

7580 7360 7580 7430 

WQ 9260 »00 

3220 3715 3220 975 

18300 17950 1B1S0 17X50 
1815 1730 1790 ;725 

7630 7480 7670 7440 
35S0 3450 3525 3440 

tmi 74 OO 7550 7300 

3420 335C 3420 

5790 590 5690 970 

14350 14050 14300 13925 
14700 14325 M5» Mgj 
14025 13810 13975 13625 
49S0 4915 4940 4B7a 

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419 

H^U^pee Ilf 
Hang Send Bk _9T 
HendHSonlnv 
Henderson Lri 
HK China Gos 
HK Electric 

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X45 

6625 

1665 

279 

16 


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Ss aen 930 


SkuLxmOCfi. 
SBi dime Pas 
SwtrePocA 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wwetoc* 


Jakarta 

Astra InH 

BkWnndon 

BkNegrnp 

Cu^angGarm 

HvJoceiwnf 

Indotood 

Indeed 

SangswnoHM 

SdnenGi«fc 

7 #letomunft™ 


4630 
248 
135 
B6 
6S) 
720 
615 
599 
27 JO 
1X60 


Haig Seng: 1373X33 
PrertcS! 1342X45 

7.10 79 79 

239 2X80 269 
1070 12.15 12-J0 
7X75 ®J£ 7X9 
209 21 2125 

339 3530 3470 
389 409 4030 
31 3120 349 
69 7.15 7 

129 1170 139 
82 *09 85 

7 JO 135 610 

5a9 63.7S 61 

1125 1185 14 

2650 279 26.95 
149 1XSS 159 
190 49 445 

216 230 222 

suss 44.75 .6i 

219 23 219 

179 1X20 179 
189 189 

4150 459 459 

29 29 2-58 

UK 1.17 

39 8475 3325 

1 W 423 435 

665 7.10 705 
5X5 5.95 X90 

55 JO 9 5725 
25ZS 269 76 80 
1430 1490 lo9 


Compowtolwiec <79-81 

3300 MOO 3300 ^ 

875 830 B2a 89 

925 673 87S J® 

8075 7250 7SH 8000 

259 7700 

MO 3550 3575 369 

63E 6225 6325 62M 

flW 25 mn ms 

2950 2W0 2900 2925 

2800 2675 279 2700 


BGBook 

“I i M ___ 

©'SSSa Johannesburg 

r ffi ® =2 Sf -- -- M 

g gu raS row 

s I 

® 3 2 


NsoNdrUB 

SOMWBWB 

JatDantnkB 

Tiw8a«m 

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Frankfurt pdt&xmM 

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AtaBB 1600 

Adda 221-50 

•JfimrHag 414 

Atom 132 

BkBefia 

|#SF 055 

SawHymBl 6&45 

Bayer 69 J3 

l^nd ad MTO 

& fiw 

pWGCctoato 161 

6tS 

-*30415 91X0 


1600 ISM 

53 J 'ln 

Jirc\ 4i60 4-9 

SS 

AB W 

is K 4 

739 7X90 | 

’I ® 1 

•5 *2 <4 

B8io 90 


WidjgmtdBW 29.M % 

— flSms 

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3125 31W 

T= it tn >7 AS 


J» Inu 

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Barton 

CGSnum 

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jfetJBk 

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6FSA 


35 


„f « 

GST ^ -g S 629 

big* 0 ® \ta 2 53 W3 .frS 

^ ULS0 iaJ5 1 i^JS 

^ *S 

BWa 19.20 19 JO 

s? 8| ’ 3 gs 41 
S» «■ 7,JD 


High Low dose Prev. 

SABrewotes 142 139J5 1409 1419 
Smanrar 3r7S 3X9 3X75 35 

S as* 6i7f 63 63.75 63 

5BJC 2U9 205 235 

TajerOals 69 J5 69 69.75 69 


Kuala Lumpur <=?£££! gJ3 


High Low Oom Prev. 


High Low Close Prev. 


uidutomes 6.92 
VtndOweLxutS 459 
'.■■odaftvre 
WMIbread 
V/Bioms Hdgs 
VToistfa/ 

V.'PPGnxm 

Zeneca 


678 6X3 689 

_ 49 4J8 456 

120 3.11 Jlfi 313 

X25 X16 833 X13 

HO 1S4 39 W 

472 450 471 49 

2X6 U2 285 UB3 

1968 19.15 19-55 1946 


AUMB Hflgs 
Gertmg 
Mol Banking 
Md tart Ship F 
PrtroncsGas 


PubScBk 

World 
RoflvnansPlA 
Sene Dartv 
Telekom /Aol 
Teraca 
Uto Engineers 

m 

London 


10X0 

10.90 

10 

10 

10.10 

1030 

10X0 

10 

Madrid 


2D 

18X0 

IV 

1940 



6.05 

4.W 

530 

£ 


355® 

*60 

7X5 

H 10 

8X5 

ACESA 

1860 

X80 

815 

a® 

850 


5540 

3 

324 

274 

299 

2JV 

330 

234 

3 

Anjenterio 

BBV 

78® 

41® 

*35 

sxo 

6 

560 


1450 

74 


2330 

2150 


81® 

7.® 

645 

6X0 

*90 

Bco Cento Htep 

5850 

9.10 

X40 

B V0 

X90 


346® 

8.90 

115 

X20 

X70 

Ben Santander 

4315 

1230 

1130 

11.71) 

11.90 

CEPSA 

46® 

530 

*66 

4.78 

466 

Contlnente 

3150 


Abbey Natl 
AUiea Domecq 
Anglian rtWer 
Argos 

AsdaGcotv 
icBrftoods 


h^:i 


. . :»iB» 
ta 

ImptTciBCCo 


Land Sec 

U3SDW 

tsssgB 

LiKnsVcrtty 

frtfflVs Spencer 
MEPC 

(Asset 

dGrid 

NcSJ Power 
NatWest 

Norwcri Urban 
Orange ’ 
P&O 
Pearem 


XJ3 

L38 

465 
6S7 
867 
All 
. 431 
XOS 
462 

& 

17.95 

440 

73a 


FT-SE 108: 4*3220 
Piwtoas: 487030 


865 
477 
MB 
635 

3- 1.47 

AssKBrFoctU XX 

BAA ,59 

BokBYs 149 

Boss M5 

BAT tod X30 

Bank Scotland 437 

BlucOde ,49 

BOC Group 10.85 

Boats Xffl 

BPBInd J9 

Bril Atrasp 1X14 

Brit Airways 69 

BG 268 

Brt Land XM 

BrtPitfrri 9 

Irt^ei 136 

IS*" *5 

Burro* Castral 1X75 

B-xtanGp 134 

CtaJe Wireless 
C odbur v Scrip 
Carton Comm 
Comml Union 
Compass Gp 
CornttwWs 

Oban dm 

ElerJrocoraoanaits 465 
EMI Group X63 

Rxn Catariat 132 

Genl Accident 9.70 

GEC 4D4 

GXN 1238 

C3o» VMKwne 1288 

Granoda Gp X15 

Grand Mel 536 

GRE 265 

GreenoOsGp 474 

Guinness XS5 

QUS 6g 

19.92 
1035 
191 
79 
265 
9.15 
2.70 
430 
79 
1-98 
604 
471 

is™ 

an 
79 
19 
122 
662 

765 

MS , re 

Ro4*ock Gp 79 

RoJ* Group 

RedjrtCdm 9.fl 

toSond 

1 

^ I 

RrtCGratra IW9 

BMl I 

assr -1 | 

SartltertO**® 7^1 

Scot Par*- 
secunew 
Severn Trent 
StMflTnmspR ^ 

cisXp lf-15 

Snstn Neplww 175 

smfiittiw 
srailtfihw 
StheffBK 
StogeoKh 
Stand Owler 
Tate X Lyl9 
Tesca 

■nwmeswaier 
31 GrtUP 
T1 Gnwp 
TarnUni 

unflwer 

Utd Assurance 
UtoNWft 


132 

550 

zx 

39 

438 

I860 

7J2 

463 

263 

835 

435 
1X90 

174 

563 

8-30 

4X5 

673 

134 

405 

415 

7SS 

436 
X47 
192 

17.15 

438 

7JB 


434 433 

1473 1475 
739 736 
468 469 

265 263 

X80 878 

AM 427 
11.13 M72 
174 134 

X64 439 

433 434 
459 461 

K ts 

407 410 

431 418 

BXri 7.9S 
478 481 

SS2 SX 
3 1W 
17.95 17J» 
425 429 

774 761 


Baba iadtc 58X12 
Prevlore: 57963 

5090 25400 25000 
1305 1855 1310 

5500 5530 5520 

7700 7810 7760 

4040 4100 930 
1425 1 450 1435 

7750 8020 7750 

5570 5850 5660 

XJ00 34500 34210 
(265 4305 42SQ 
4550 4600 4545 
3100 3125 JIQ5 

B340 8460 8390 

J140 3175 3125 
1205 121S 1215 

6740 6830 6100 

1725 1745 1725 

2855 2920 7860 

6030 6180 6090 
1360 1365 1365 

9000 0040 8020 

4050 4115 4025 

1200 1215 1200 

2790 2815 2900 


laSBSS 

Ayala B 14 13 1150 1425 

Ayala Land 1X75 14 15^0 14.75 

Bk Phflip W 97-50 BB 90 93 

CXPHomw 425 26Q 4 OO 

Manta Elec A 6750 AS 6X50 __7D 

Metro Bank 34760 320 34260 3J760 

Petran 42S 195 4 4^ 

PCI Bank 155 1« 1« 149 

PftJLongDbt 800 740 790 77D 

SanMigudB 5160 4760 5060 49J0 

SM Prime Hdg 410 560 X70 X90 


Mexico Baba indae 47064 

Prevtooc 4*4X41 

Alto A 6160 6060 61.90 60 JO 

BanaaSB 2260 216 0 22.00 2 0£S 

Cemex CPO 3960 38J0 39.15 3M0 

QfraC 1428 1198 1406 1360 

EmpModema 4220 6160 61.a0 61 JO 

Gpo Carso Al 56J0 KJO 56J0 S4J0 

368 3-50 364 3J5 

1 32-60 33 JO 3205 

; 3560 35J0 3480 

i 13X20 13160 ia.10 

1X14 1X68 17X2 


Milan Brugge™* 
'So ^ 

BcnFWeuran 4100 5940 61® 6M 

Scatg Roma 1610 1545 1410 ISffl 

Benetton 27450 25850 27450 260® 

Cmfltoltoiar* ^ 

EtflsOfl 5300 B200 093 8260 

ENl 10080 9910 10065 100® 

Ftat 5765 54® S76S S6J0 

Ga»ufiA»sJe 38100 37M0 381® 37« 

IMI 17170 16675 16930 16710 

IMA 2620 2565 2620 2580 

Tteton 5515 5390 5515 5410 

Set B000 7750 80® 77® 

Medobenco 120® 11765 11970 11790 

Montedison . 1105 1D81 1105 1078 

atvetti 760 732 759 724 

I^bS 67® 46® 6725 4520 

RA5 150® 16950 ISO® 14950 

5SJ & 

B ’B'B'S'H 


Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

Ak-Ltoiride 

AJcoS Alsth 

AW-UAP 

Boncoire 

BK 

BNP 

Cwwl Ptaa 

Camtour 

Casino 

CCF 

Crtetern 

Ovirton D*r 

CLF-Dexto Fran 

Credit Atytotie 

Donooe; 

EH-Aqultolne 

EridarsaBS 


CA MX 2921. 15 
PrevtomiatSJA 

973 930 973 925 

227-40 217 m ao 217J0 

960 912 957 923 

777 747 77 5 767 

394® 386.40 39X60 38X10 


Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
HennesB 
Ineai rive A 
Investor B 
MoDoB 
Ncrttbonktfl 
Phtvnvilptorin 
SondufcB 


High Law Ora Pro*. 

560 547 553 556 

33X50 33350 33X50 333 

315 303 J15 301 

731 726 731 729 

401 393 40X50 391 

279 370 279 268-50 

252 249 25150 251 

2® 269 779 277 

20 240 248 240 


686 

£70 

684 

669 

Scunia B 

223 215 

223 

217 

45B 441X0 457.70 444.90 

SCAB 

184 1775) 

184 

17/ 

277 264-50 

377 

263 

S-EBonkffltA 

B8 855) 

875) 

84 

1008 

W9 

1007 

965 

StonrftaFore 

324 312 

323 3115) 

3955 

3X31 

3949 

477/ 

StamskaB 

325 223 323X0 

321 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NX 

302 

SKFB 

217 2)35) 

216 216-50 

322.90 30630 322® 

314 

SnorbunkwA 

SoraA 

177 17051 

177 

172 

638 

621 

627 

618 

13250 12*50 

132 

12651 

86) 

845 

B61 

844 

Sv Handles A 

247 73950 

244 

241 

547 

528 

545 

525 

VatvaB 

209 2045) 

20V 

20b 


12941282.101282.10 1283 
920 9® 920 9B7 


685 

802 


687 735 

B01 817 

X55 X60 X55 

7 

681 


735 
817 
BAD 

7 6X5 7 

710 685 709 

397.® 390 397® 382X0 

844 814 837 840 

42X90 401.10 42X90 401 

1160 1106 1155 1078 

23S3 2205 2346 2199 

1326 1275 1319 1269 
251 34250 351 338 

433690 42050 63X10 420 

294® 285.70 294® 28650 
706 683 703 6X5 

2739 2576 2684 2S92 

2319 2250 2255 2298 

15X90 152.10 155.90 15430 
1750 1705 17® 17® 

23330 227 JO 231® 22750 
625 600 625 6® 


338-40 31650 
905 093 

5B8 575 

780 753 


336 31X10 
9® 894 
587 565 
779 763 


2788 27® 7755 2765 


iCSF 


362 

832 

850 

831 

NX 

N.T. 

NX 

15.10 

670 

623 

670 

6® 

759 

740 

746 

750 

165 

161 

164 lfil.® 

632 

595 

632 

509 

109.90 

104 10920 

104 

381.® 

365 381® 37050 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ Siting 
BHP 
Bortl 

Brambles tod. 
CBA 

CCAmaS 
Coles Myer 
Comafco 
CSR 

FodeaBm 
Goodman Rd 
(Cl Austro® 
Lendl 
MIME. 
MrtAuill ... 
NdMuturtHdg 

isatiss*. 

Pioneer toft 
Pub Braodcost 
RtoTtnto 
Sf George Bonk 
WMC 

:Bktog 
i Pet 


AiiOrttonrtes; 358750 

Previous: 259X® 

X46 X4S 
956 9.75 

1X86 17.04 
190 401 

27759 26.90 
1470 1485 
070 1356 
6-15 Ml 


9.® 955 

17619 1484 
401 185 

27.15 2*90 
1485 1446 

14 1351 
650 M3 
*98 *90 

495 488 

162 257 

1.97 1.94 

1256 1230 
29 28 

150 157 

196Q 1X70 
159 154 

*32 *17 

358 167 

452 445 

845 8 

2031 1958 
XflS 7.95 
7 *92 

751 7.73 

1156 1X98 

4.15 413 


*96 

491 

258 

1.95 


494 

488 

242 

1.95 


1251 12-65 
2X01 29.05 
150 158 

1X75 1X89 
1.95 1.99 
*30 *17 

357 148 

445 450 

X01 7.95 

1950 2X12 
JSS BM 
*92 *94 

753 759 

1136 IT .06 
413 415 


sa 0 Pauio •"■ksEBSK; Taipel 


Stock MoMtodec 931 157 
Previous; 950499 


BrodwcDptd 
Brorima Pfd 
CemlgPtd 
CESPPW 
Copal 
Eletrobras 
noubarxnPfd 
L ight Ser ridw 




Cathay Life Ins 
awMHuoa* 
CWooTimg Bk 
China Devetpmt 
China Stoef 
FtadBank 
Formosa Ptosfic 
HwNanBk 
toll Comm Bk 
Nan Ya Plastic* 



141 

10950 

B6Sn 

121 

29 

111 ® 

6250 

11950 

5650 

7350 

89. 

153 

4740 

123 

64 


1® 13X50 
im im 
82 82 
1® 12150 
2510 2B.10 
1® 103 

6050 61 

113 »3 
5450 5450 

71 72 

8550 B6 
10 10 
4550 4550 

114 US 
63 6350 


139 

100 

86 

126® 
wy i 
11050 
61® 
117® 
56 

87 

151 

4*90 

122 ® 

63 


Seoul 

Docom 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
10a .Motors 
Korea El Pint 
K orea ExhBk 
LG Santa* 
Poftortg litmSI 
Sonsung Dbloy 

5omsu nflfctec 
Shinhan Bank 
5K Telecom 


SC 68478 

Prertms: 68230 

89000 85000 89000 87000 
7320 7050 7200 7320 

1X500 17900 18300 18000 
124® 12300 125® 127® 
22500 21800 223® 225® 
5330 50® 5300 4950 

370® 35000 350® 370® 
58100 570® 581® 579® 
460® 445® 460® 45300 
71000 6X700 710® 70000 
8890 85® J890 8600 

488000 4780® 4880® 4880® 


Singapore 



Tokyo 

AUnomato 
AH Nippon Air 
Anrwtry 
AsaHBanta 
AsartChetn 
AsattGtoM 
Bk Tokyo MBw 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridsestaw 
Canon _ 
ChubuEkc - 
CnugataiElec 
Drtffipp Pitot 
Doiel ' 
DaWdsKnifl 
Datwa Bank 
Demo House 
Datvmsec 
DDI 
Dwso 

East Japan Ry 
EUal 
Faruic 
” § Bank 
i Photo 


AterA _ 

%Z££X 

DennonteBk 

lion 

KedsJMdA 

KtemerAsa 



Snaa Mb 
Scfitsled 
Transvaal Off 
Storebrand Ala 


134 13150 
20350 200 

25J0 2550 
31.10 3050 
138 133 

45 64 

396 391 

417 410 

290 27650 
IB un 

540 3D 
•8750 473 

168 .164 
128 12SS0 
710 700 

49 4X20 


Stockholm 



11*50 

119 

242 


SX 16 MM 348X13 
PrsrtWfc332S.t7 

116 115 

US U6 
242 239 


114 

a 


134 129® 134 IX 
255 245 255 l4t® 
312 306 31150 308 


HadiSunIBk 

Hitachi 

Honda Motor 

1BJ 

IHI 

Hsdiu 

Ito-Yakada 

JAL 

Japan Tobaotn 

Jusco 

Kafrina 

KnoiElK 

Kao 

KowasaWHvy 

KemSM 

aSN'opBr 

Kirin Brewery 

Kobe Start 

Komatou 

Kubota 

Kwcara 

'Kyushu Elec 

LTCB 

Maubeto 

Marti 

MptuiCann 
Matsu Etoclnd 
Matsu EtacWk 

fflgfflo, 

Mitsubishi El 
MSaibtsbiEsl 
MRsubtsW Hvy 
Mitsubishi Mot 
AHwbWTr 
Mitsui 



NMfeel 225*. 1823U2 


Prevtauv. 1797430 

1140 

11® 

11« 

1110 

706 

703 

704 

701 

3370 

3230 

3290 

3220 

B60 

840 

860 

844 

634 

6® 

634 

624 

919 

9® 

719 

WO 

2140 

514 

« 

2130 

514 

2130 

514 

7750 

2700 

27SO 

7/00 

34® 

3340 

3430 

3320 

2030 

2010 

2020 

2010 

1960 

1950 

1960 

1960 

2530 

2460 

TOO 

2450 

815 

7® 

815 

8® 

1390 

1360 

1390 

I39U 

607 

580 

595 

607 

13® 

777 

1370 

75A 

W 

1380 

756 

6240a 

3670 

6100 a 

6130a 

6250a 

2570 

2640 

2580 


S3V0a 

53H0a 

5370a 

775Q 

7700 

2230 

2230 

4790 

4550 

4/B0 

4550 

1440 

14® 

1440 

1420 

4410 

4b® 

44® 

4511) 

U- 1 

1370 

1390 

KftU 

lirj 

1130 

11® 

11® 

1080 

109 

lwo 

1X1) 

3490 

3610 

3670 

3640 

USX 

)5V0 

16J1) 

1610 

■ 366 

356 

365 

368 

495 

6470 

J 

490 

6360 

488 

6430 

500 

475 

90 

488 


9370a 9260a 9260a 9470a 
3530 2940 3020 3M0 


647 

2240 

1700 

463 

389 

689 

980 

162 

729 

487 

7590 

1980 

573 

436 

1910 

4040 

zm 

1280 

1170 

314 

525 

IBB 

778 

693 

1680 

1000 


633 647 
2230 2240 
1660 1690 


« 

283 

680 

971 

156 

703 

471 


463 
286 
688 
960 
160 
720 
487 
7370 7550 
1960 1980 
S58 565 

429 434 

1880 1910 

3890 4020 
2160 2190 
1240 1280 
1)30 USD 

304 314 

513 523 

1570 1600 
770 774 

<84 693 

16tS | 660 
973 980 


61? 

2240 

1700 

471 

291 

£83 

974 

157 

707 

474 

7450 

1970 

563 

432 

1900 

3900 

21 ® 

1260 

USD 

311 

SOB 

1630 

781 

687 

li® 

974 


| The Trib Index 

Prices as at 3.00 PM. New York me 

Jan r. 1992* too 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 

World Index 

16960 

+3.47 

+2.09 

+13.72 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/Pacmc 

1 16.29 

*0.89 

+0.77 

-5.78 

Europe 

182.35 

+2.76 

+1.54 

+13.12 

N. America 

204.49 

+5.91 

+2.98 

+26.30 

S. America 

Industrial indexes 

155.34 

+6-85 

+4.61 

+35.75 

Capital goods 

221.17 

+5.93 

+2.76 

+29.40 

Consumer goods 

1B7.3Z 

+4.00 

+2.23 

+16.04 

Energy 

198.72 

+6-02 

+3.12 

+16.41 

Finance 

125.10 

+1.38 

+1.12 

+7.42 

Miscellaneous 

173.51 

+3.31 

+1.94 

+7.25 

Raw Materials 

181-27 

+2.39 

+1.34 

+3.36 

Service 

158.14 

+3.43 

+2.22 

+15.16 

UtiBties 

156.89 

+2.42 

+1.57 

+9.43 

The International Herald Trbune World Stock Inctax © racks the US. dollar values ol 
280 miamaaonaffy rnvesmoie sTocto from 25 countries. For more information, a (roe 
booklet is available 6y among » Tim Trfc Index. J 81 Avenue Charles do GauBe. 

1 92S21 hleullly Cedax. Fiance. 


Compibd by Bloomberg News. J 

High Low 

One Prev. 


High Law 

Close Prev. 


Mitsui Fudoai 

Mitsui Trust 

MurntaMfg 

NEC 

Niton 

NlkkoSet 

rflrtendo 

Nippon Steel 
Nissan Mrtor 
NKK 

Natnura Sec 
HTT 

NTT Data 

& 

RJart 

Rohm 

SakuroBk 

Sankyo 

Sonwa Sreik 

Sanyo Bee 

Secom 

SeftuRwy 

SekJsuJ Chem 

Sekhul House 

Seren-Eiwen 

Sharp 

ShBwtaiEJPwr 

Shimizu 

Sriin-eteu Qi 

ShiseidO 

StozuokoBk 

Soflbark 

Sony 

Sum lhmo 

Sumitomo Bk 

SumriChem 

Sumitomo Elec 

Sum it Metal 

Sum It Trust 

TatshoPharm 

TakedaChem 

TDK 

TotmkuEIPwr 
ToknlBonk 
Taldo Marine 
Tokyo El Pw 
Toicyo Elscfron 
Tokyo Gos 
Tokyo Carp. 
Tonen 
Tap pail Prfrt 

~ rind 


oroyiiH 
osreba 
Taster 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 
Vomanouchl 
«j»wiAr 


13® 

MS 

4®0 

1360 

2070 

573 

107® 

779 

497 

303 

73S 

19S 

1550 

1090b 

5210b 

6477 

277 

1720 

126® 

712 

3090 

1470 

425 

64® 

520 

10 ® 

1160 

8570 

11 ® 

I960 

633 

88 

7260 

62® 

107® 

974 

1730 

462 

1790 

282 

1180 

2950 

3290 

9460 

1990 

1040 

14® 

2280 

6400 

299 

629 

11 ® 

1720 

772 

669 

24® 

980 

3220 

29® 


13® 13® 
601 645 

4700 48® 

1310 1350 
1970 2070 

565 570 

102® 107® 
759 779 

489 496 

300 301 

72a 730 

188 195 

1520 1540 

107® 109® 
513® 521® 
MO 6® 

270 273 

1640 IT® 
12200 126® 
690 702 

3770 3880 
1440 1470 

417 420 

8160 8230 

5480 5550 

985 1000 

11® 1140 

8470 8570 

1110 11® 
1940 I960 

624 633 

3020 3050 

1890 19® 

1740 1250 

5X10 6®0 

104® 10600 
963 968 

1670 1690 

451 457 

1760 1770 

275 282 

1160 1180 
2910 2950 

32® 32® 

91® 9360 

1990 
10 ® 

2260 2270 
6i20 6360 


1970 

1020 


286 

617 


287 

£28 


1110 1140 

17® 1720 


763 

652 


771 

665 


1470 2M0 

961 980 

3110 31 TS 
2880 29® 


1330 

6*9 

4840 

1290 

1950 

566 

100® 

763 

497 

303 

732 

189 

1540 

1090b 

521® 

60S 

277 
16® 

121 ® 

686 

37® 

1470 

4® 

8350 

£5® 

10® 

11® 

8580 

1140 

1950 

*25 

3020 

1870 

1240 

S2B0 

103® 

976 

1720 

472 

1780 

278 
11 ® 
2910 
31® 
9150 
1970 
1040 
1390 
22® 
63® 

2B9 

621 

tiocr 

1710 

765 

653 

2480 

960 

30B0 

28® 


.... 'Net 

Moran da 
Norcefl Energy 
Nttem Telecom 
Nova 
Onex 

PancdnPtrtn 
petni rito 

Placer Dome 

PiicoPatftn 

Potash Sask 

Renaissance 

RtoAigom 

Rogers Conte) B 

SeogromCo 

5be»QtaA 

Simas* 

ToflsmanEny 

Teck B 

Tetoglobe 

THUS 

Thomson 

TacOomBank 

Transalto 

TramCdn Pipe 

Trimark Flnl 

Trtec Hahn 

TVXGold 

WestcoaflEny 

Weston 


65ta 

2r* 

34X6 

139* 

11.90 
31.60 

26 
24-J5 
2120 
13X5 
10130 
3619 
32<* 
27 M 

4 4 

22J0 

44.90 
46<* 

2640 

45 
27X0 
31 JO 
4245 
1740 
2640 

J 55 * 
31 JO 
73D 
26X0 
96'S 


6X60 65>» 

2*90 27V 

3345 34 

137.85 13X7U 
llta 11X5 
31U 3)to 
25.90 25.® 
2170 2440 
22X0 23 

li70 111* 
1® 103.15 
35* 36'* 
32 12 

Z7»* 2740 
4XX0 4X95 
2 120 2235 
43*5 44.70 
45J0 461* 

2X95 26 

4160 444 

27% 27X0 
31.40 JIX0 
42.10 4240 
17X5 17W 

!6 26*0 

64 65* 

3140 3T<4 

7.10 7.15 

2*55 2*90 
94 96VS 


63N 

27.15 

3345 

1371* 

11% 

31X5 

2*10 

24 

2X20 

13.70 

102.85 

35% 

J2'« 

27% 

48ta 

2240 

43X5 

4545 

26 

45 

27X0 

31X5 

42 

17JD 

26 

65-05 

31 'A 
730 
2*55 
93X5 


Vienna 


ATX index: 1379 34 
PnvtaUII 1365X2 


1018100250 

1013 

1003 

645 

631 

643 

63475 

3151 

3070 

3110 

3W2 

1560 

1525 

15361531.70 

5® 

494 

495 

494 


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PAGE 16 


Tuesday’s 4 P-**. 

The 1,000 nwst-ltwfed Notional MmteT securities 
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CAGES' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


RAGE 17 


SPONSORED PAGE 


Technology and the Environment 


World Environment 
Center: Setting a Standard 

The WEC helps companies improve both business and the environment 

¥*£ ™ nmental Problems. Called the interaa- 
,an £ ground the Polish dona] Environment and Development Ser- 

sulfim?ldd 50,000 tonS ° f vice tDEDS) ’ il has offcTCd 400 todustrieto 

SSZI year over the 45 countries the pro bono and reduced-fee 

d^^n^S Ued Pohsh mdu ? tri i expertise of more than 2.000 eo- 

P meers ’ wh o work with materials donated by 

market Dolicies nnrhfei"* 0 ^ 0011 of . indust[y ^ governmental organizations. 

d0ne * Sl °V' “ A bi S constituency talkedlbout this ap- 
^ management who proach foryeare, and is still talking * bout iC’ 

rc T 1U S5 <*“* Ae Mr. Marcil. “But not that mfnv people 
ahttlfr-hoalded not-for-profit were out in the trenches doing it" 

^ ca ? e ® catL With WEC can do much with ro little, says Mr. 
L a Tao ^ L . mvestaient Marcil. because the IEDS program operates 

m Just three with “in-kind contributions of services and 
jmS" .Center materials fora industry, government non- 

woriced wrth Polchem engineers to eliminate government organizations and academia." 

J e ™ m fee Process, to save more At the heart of its scheme lies the vo- 
&an $ 1 million a year in raw materials and hinteerism of the IEDS participants and other 
e «^£J2 1Ch T' s y n ? bollz ® s ^e predicament corporations and agencies that support WEC 
Jf ®<^es throughout .Eastern Europe in by asking their employees to act as hosts of 
the post-Soviet era and, indeed, throughout study tours, offering in -country volunteer 
the wider developing world. experts and donating funds. 

Since its founding in 1974, the World IEDS starts with the belief that corporate 
Environment Center has introduced “eco- benefits can be gained from sound envi- 
emciency to businesses like Polchem in 45 ronmental and management programs, 
countries. Eco-efficiency is a process that WEC volunteers aim to change “end-of- 
pttens the company s bottom line while pipe" treatment of industrial problems; they 
keeping the environment clean. As WEC’s prefer instead to eliminate pollution by in- 
President and Chief Executive Officer Ant- creasing plant efficiency. WEC's Waste M in- 
ony G. Marcil says, “We quietly convince imization Program begins by identifying the 
skeptics of die true cost of unsound en- sources of pollution. Then local managers 
vironment, health and safety practices." and workers talk to each other and leam to 
The WEC has increased environmental draw on each other’s expertise with the help 
awareness anx>ng the world’s managers, who of WEC-sponsored Pollution Prevention 
bad perceived few viable alternatives to their Centers. In 1 996, WEC saved companies $1 3 
old polluting ways — and WEC has ac- million on corporate investments of $3.5 
complished this with a worldwide staff of million, while conserving nearly half a mil- 
only 45 people, a modest $7 million budget lira tons of fresh water and 75,000 tons of 
this year and littie fanfare in the media. A not- fuel and at the same time e liminating from 
for-profit, non-advocacy environmental or- die environment 486,000 tons of pollutants, 
ganization, WEC has field offices in Jakarta, In die end, IEDS seeks to eliminate pol- 
Mexico City, Geneva, Bangkok and Wash- hition at the source and save on raw materials 
iqgton, D.C. WEC works with three separate while improving efficiency. As a byproduct, 
but complementary programs that have de- IEDS reduces losses from worker health care 
velqped models for guiding industries to costs caused by pollution. It also shows 
become good corporate citizens without feel- industries in transition to a market economy 
ing downtrodden. that poUution-prevention programs eliminate 




'j TfeWorid Environment Ceffa has kttrot&Jcedec&eff&ency to busmessesbi 45 cowrfries. 


All too often, industry has found itself at 
loggerheads with the agencies that patrol the 
environment The reasons for this are not 
hard to find. Especially in rapidly indus- 
trializing nations, environmental regulations 
slice into profits and interfere with traditional 
methods of business. Environmental restric- 
tions are often enforced through laws that 
carry heavy fines and tarnish corporate rad 
product images. In the end, the punitive 
methods serve to make the quest for a cleaner 
environment a “them against us” issue that 
has left a trail of rSenfiSSnt and a reluctance 
to come together for the commonweal. 

WEC takes a diplomatic approach to these 
new conflicts. It points no fingers. While 
funded by the U.S. Agency for International 
Development, the Swiss and Royal Thai 
governments, and corporate and private con- 
tributions, WEC is beholden neither to gov- 
ernments nor to private industry, ft tries only 
to provide what it describes as abridge of 
understanding between industry s leaders 
and those governmental and nongovern- 
mental agencies charged with making the 
e nvi ronment a cleaner and safer place. 

Four times a year at International En- 
vironment Forums (TEF), WEC bring? to- 
gether executives of 60 international compa- 
nies and those charged with keeping the 
environment clean. "There was such ac- 
rimony between governments and private 
enterprise over the environment when we 
started,” says Mr. MaicU. “We needed to 

start a dialogue.” , . 

Problems and mutual solutions are aned 

and debated in the forums; representatives oi 
industry are told about foreign mdirea-- 
national environmental issues, Mill® P° y 
makers are introduced to 
in (be fields of envnonmen^h^^and 


or reduce fees and fines as well as the cost of 
natural resources. 

WEC Gold Medal 

Every year since 1 985, the WEC Gold Medal 
for International Corporate Environmental 
Achievement has been awarded to a mul- 
tinational company for its efforts in ma k in g 
its worldwide working environment a clean- 
er and safer place. “We feh that industry was 
getting press only in negative situations and 
that companies were working hard to do the 
right thing and were not getting credit,” says 
Mr. Marco. “The jury selection is not equi- 
valent to saying thata company has solved all 
of its environmental problems — j ust that 
this company is an excellent example of an 
approach that, if followed by all companies, 
would make the world a better place. It also 
draws attention to the potential benefits of an 
environmentally sound corporate policy. 

An independent jury selects the award s 
recipient from a list of nominees that have 
demonstrated “an outstanding, sustained and 
well-implemented worldwide eovironmen- 
ud, health and safety progmre'lu 
the winners have included 3M, IBM Cor- 
poration, EL du Pont de Nemours & Goodie 
British Petroleum Co. Pic and the Alu- 
minum Company of America. 

This spring, WEC presented the 13fli an- 
nual Gold Medal to Compaq Computer Cor- 

ehairtnanof WEC's Gold Medal Jury mda 
professor emeritus of die University of PnB- 

Pfeiffer “From 


safety. The give and take of conversation mpreou ^ environmentaI programs and 
Se fee formalities of ^ 0 f concerns for earnest. 


oinsiae me iouuauu*^> — - * * , , 

speeches has offered many leaders on bo* 
sides of the debate a view of the human feces 

seels to^find moredirect solunons to en- 


S~Ljon of concerns for environment. 
3Ta£d safety have set a standard for 
£ to Lu!a£with pride^Mr_ Atoms 

midit well have been describing the World 
Environment Center itself. 


Wsn®: Malcolm B ^ 

Program Director: Bill MoMer 


The Worid Environment Center gave 
its prestigious Gold Medal for Inter- 
national Corporate Environmental 
Achievement to Compaq Computer 
Corporation this spring in recognition 
of its global efforts, which people in 
and out of the green movement 
praise for far-sightedness and cre- 
ativity. 

In receiving the award, Compaq's 
chief executive officer and president 
Eckhard Pfeiffer, said: “We endeavor 
for leadership in aJJ aspects of our 
environmental, health and safety per- 
formance," specifically through a 
tough corporate policy that “cham- 
pions the environment ’ ’ This attitude 
has been present since the founding 


of the company, which is the fifth- 
largest producer of computers and 
the largest manufacturer of personal 
computers in the world. 

Compaq designs its products with 
the environment in mind. In terms of 
energy, it makes its computers as 
efficient as technology allows. In 
mechanical design, product engi- 
neers plan right at the beginning of 
foe computer's design process for 
the end of its life and the eventual 
recycling of its components. 

The company’s recycling programs 
save an estimated 9 million gallons of 
water and 6,000 trees each year. 
Compaq packaging is made of ma- 
terials that can be easily identified 


and recycled. Through the ISO 11469 
Standardized Material Marking Sys- 
tem, Compaq enhances recyclability 
by labeling a product's plastic com- 
ponents with the blend of plastic 
used, the resin rad the manufac- 
turer's name. This enables custom- 
ers and recyclers all over the world to 
quickly and accurately identify 
plastics and prepare them for recyc- 
ling. Similar labels are placed on bat- 
teries. packaging and a variety of oth- 
er components. 

In 1989, concerned with ozone de- 
pletion, Compaq set a goal to elim- 
inate chtorofluoroca/bons from its 
manufacturing processes. By 1993. 
it beat its own deadline by two years 


and became one of the first eleo- 

tronics companies to achieve that 


The U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency recognized this achievement 
with its Stratospheric Ozone Protec- 
tion Award. 

Compaq has remained a meas- 
urement-driven company that reviews 
and updates its efficiency and per- 
formance. Each Compaq manufactur- 
ing site works from a set of specific 
goals and objectives. These have in- 
cluded a 35 percent reduction in haz- 
ardous waste, a 125 percent in- 
crease in recycling, a 61 percent 
decrease in landfill and a 73 percent 
decrease in air emissions. 





•" - : At Compaq, we believe in changing the world but we don't believe in changing the Earth. Which is 
why we try- to minimize the environmental impact of everything we do. From product design to manufacturing 
to recycling. Quite simply, success shouldn’t be at the expense of the environment. 

This year, we were presented the 1997 Wbrkl Environment Center Gold Medal for International Corporate 
Environmental Achievement. Not for doing something extraordinary. But for doing something we believe in. 

COMPAQ 








PAGE 18 


.TP TB1BUISE, WEDNESD^ SEPTEMBER 

asia/pacific 




; lifts?. 


Arco Sets 
Gas Deal in 
Indonesia 

$3 Billion Is Slated 
To Develop Big Field 


Thailand Tries to Reassure Lenders 

tftelav His company was not facing such a pro 




— 

JAKARTA — Atlantic Richfield 
Co said Tuesday it would spend as 
much as $3 billion to develop a 
natural gas field in Indonesia s east- 
ernmost province, in its 
international foray in liquefied nat- 

UI TteWiriagar field, with estimat- 
ed reserves of 13 trillion cubic feet 
of aas, is the company s largest dis- 
covery outside of the United States. 

Its development will create Arco s 
fust international liquefied natural 
gas complex and put the company 
into competition wth Mobd Oil 
Core, of the United States and Total 
SA of France, which dominate the 
business in Asia. 

Arco said the discovery of the 
onshore and offshore fields in Inan 
Jaya Province, about 2,000 kilome- 
ter HOBO miles) east of Jakarta, 
was the company ’s third-biggest ny~ 
drocarbon find ever. 

Indonesia is currently me world s 
largest gas marketer. 

“President Suharto is convinced, 

as we are, that this is the beginning of 

another major LNG center, ’ ' said Le- 
on Codron, president of Aflanm: 
Richfield Indonesia Inc. “Tim is 
very important to us. The basis of our 

business in Asia is natural gas. 

The investment will cost about 
billion to $3 billion. Mr. Codron 
said Pertamina, the Indonesian state 
oil and gas company, will begin 

looking for customers for the gas 
immediately, he added. Minority 
shares in the project are also held by 
Occidental Petroleum Corp- Nip- 
pon Oil Co. and Kanematsu Corp. 

Production of about 6 million tons 
of liquefied natural gas per year from 
the project is expected to begin by 
2003. Pertamina will receive a ou 
percent cut of production; it is already 
die world’s top marketer of liquefied 
natural gas, commanding about half 
of the Asia-Pacific region market 

In recent years, Arco has made a 
number of high-profile foreign in- 
vestments, including its purchase ot 
a 7.99 percent stake Lukoil, a Rus- 
sian oil company, and a 20 percent 
stake in Zhenhai Refining & Chem- 
• ical Co. of China. ( Bloomberg , AP ) 


BANGKOK — Faced with a mounting eco- 
World Bankvnll be broughtin 

™ncy 

ssssssssra 

institntioos in cases of default. . 

Foreign resistance to continue todingjjaf 
brought a credit crunch to the private sector, 
despite a $172 billion bailout oi&uuzed last 
month by the International Monet^y _ 

Mr. Thanong pledged to do whatever was 
required to improve confidence in the S ov " 
ernment, including increasing transparency - 
• ‘The central bank has disclosed our forw j“j{ 
contracts,” he said. “I don’t know many central 

We have nothing to hide. 

“The important thing is to amve at an agree 


His company was not facing snch a problem, 

Mr. Santis uk said. 

Thai PVC production capacity 
700,000 metric tons in 1997 torn 18 °- 
metric tons in 1991. But with a rush of con 
sanction baited in Bangkok, annual 
demand for PVC and the pipes 

has dropped from 12 percent m the boom years 

to about 2 percent so far this year. 

a am 


ment with international credited not delay 
theproblem,” Mr. .Thanong “d^i^ ^ ^ 

Th<= economic crisis, which ( ^ 

ssessssvSs.ts 

by foreign inshtunoos w me i ^ moncy to about 2 percent so iar uua , , 

wemintobuUdmgfactonWj ® e areas like real A petrochemicals analyst h^ esuma 
was tunneled into less productive areas use real ^ of PVC even if de- 

estale and consumerism ^ w . ; — * ,A ' w ~*" r rhis vcar - 

Falling export gro . ability to man - 

confidence in the government ■«« lenders 

age the sinuMn have ^ 


maud grew at 14 percent this year-. 

Part of the problem facing *e industry, the 
analyst said, is that the petrochemical 
was built to help the tievelopmentof the ™ 
economy, not to compete in the export marfce 

“fete long tenru the development of a 
domestic petrochemical industry makes a Lot of 
sense,” said die analyst, who 
condition he not be identified “It’s 
electronics and auto-parts industries have not 
yet come fully on line.” t , _ . 

Many domestic petrochemical products, in- 

gss£&s sw*£= =» s^ssssa’zj&E 

aSSsssisasa? r 

“This was an important government action 
that helped the industry," Mr. Saunsuksa^ 
fast growth m J ^teoceand ad- “ II is urater consideration for the government to 

keep it at fliis level for severa. years. 


nsSSSsg^ 

SSSssrr 

die construction capital for 

sFSEsrSESS 

fast growth in deraancL^ ^* finane(1 and ad- 


22000 - 


. • 22 “~ ' : 21000 
-20000 
V 19000 




17000 «- m j J AlT j 
!L rTTs'* 1700 a"“M J J A S 1997 . | 

A M J J A S - 199 7 

1907 v 




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lltK 


Australia Cracks Open Its Financial Sector 

between banks and other financial end bans on feueign 


CM^tyOurStfPnmDBfmd** 

CANBERRA —-The government 
unveiled on Tuesday the biggest 
shake-up in IS years of thecounuys 
multibillion-dollar financial sector, 
redrawing laws and opening bank- 
ing services to more compention- 
Treasurer Peter Costello, announ- 
cing the government’s response to an 

inquiry into the sector, told Parlia- 
ment that the changes would increase 
competition, cut costs, increase ef- 
ficiency, streamline controls and de- 
liver a better deal to consumers. 


• “This is a major structural reform 
bv the government which will de- 
liver billions of dollars of benefits 
for Australian business and con- 
sumers,” Mr. Costello said. 

The financial sector is worth about 

40 billion dollars ($29 billion). 

Under the reforms, a new agency 
wifi take over the Reserve Bank s 
job of supervising banks and a 
megaregulator wfilbe set up to over- 
see financ ial institutions. 

The reforms also break down 
much of the regulatory differences 


Hong Kong Stocks Recover, Rising 2°/« 


Agent' e France-Presse 

HONG KONG — The bench- 
mark Hang Seng index plunged 
Tuesday to its lowest level m four 
months on a sell-off of China-re- 
lated shares before recovering to 
rise 2.3 percent in die last hours of 
trading. ,, 

But die sell-off in “red chips 
and other mainland Chinese compa- 
nies listed locally triggered panic in 


Shanghai, where foreign-denomin- 
ated B shares feU 65 perc<mL 

The Hang Seng gained 309.oa 
points to finish at 13,735.33, ending 
five days of strong selling on con- 
cerns about regional weakness. 

John Schofield, a director at Nava 
SC Securities, said; “After the wild 
swing this morning, I think the mar- 
ket is trying to find a level since it 
has heavily been oversold.” 


between banks and other financial 
institutions and continue the gov- 
ernment’s push for more compe- 
tition in retail banking. 

Mr. Costello said the package of 
reforms would dramatically reshape 
the financial sector as it approaches 
the next oenlnry. 

“The finan cial sector lies at the 
heart of the entire economy, and we 
all depend on its success,” he said. 
“The measures I have announced 
today will facilitate greater choice 
and competition in financial service. 
They will encourage more rapid in- 
novation, providing wider access 
and enhanc ed levels of service. 

“Australia will have a world- 
class regulatory structure that en- 
sures the highest standard of 
prudence and safety and consumer 
protection,” be added. 

The reforms are the final stage ot 

the government's response to the 

Wains inquiry into the financial sys- 
tem, which -in April urged the most 
sweeping liberalization of the sector 
since its deregulation in 1983. 

In his preliminary response to the 
inquiry, Mr. Costello had agreed to 


. Jardine FlemipgGr oup^ n^s u negotianng to sella 

Bank, which is controlled y. 

by the Chinese government. Mitsaznkai said he Be- 

sjsS^ts-i- r^?o^ posing 01 “ 

. Malaysia %ffcorrMor, in Janu*y 

applies for tite project, 41 

- - >* 

■ Eastman Kodak Co. °? ^ ; Q Chinon Industries 
• 1 11 »"" : 

India Raises Prices for Fuels : 

Bloomberg Sews fill'-' '• 

- - &a^£SS£233& 

quirement that banks keep 1 percent _g 26 percent for diesel, 5 percent £ 

of their Australian-doflar assets The P 11 ^® for i ^trinp gas — 1 will m 156 ^ 

within Australia with the R ®s®P[ e j fhr rwnnanies and hurt profits, i 

Bank in the form of noncallable 
deposits. Banks are paid below mar- 
ket rates for the money, earning me 
oovemmeni about 196 million dol- 
lars a year. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 



end bans on foreign takeovers of 
local banks and said mergers be- 
tween the four Largest banks and two 
plain life insurance offices should 
be allowed . He also ended the re- 
□ tore men i for deposit insurance, 

But Mr. Costello did not announce 

Tuesday when the government 
would permit takeovers or mergers 
among the country’s four big banks 
Westpac Banking Corp., Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand Banking 
Group, Commonwealth Bank of 
Australia Ltd. and National Aus- 
tralia Bank Ltd. — to go forward. 

Commonwealth Bank expressed 
some reservations about the new 
regulatory structure, and a Westpac 
spokeswoman, Susan Brooks, said 
the moves were "not without 

^^e risk is the end of the re- 


- - ti 1 --' 



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I Malaysian Takes On a Commcting Economy 

t m .. stocks He also promised that the i 

haraad, who has led Mahysia for n^rly oercent, to 795.73 points. . • • 


of the country’s four decades as an mde- 
mdent nation, counts himself as one or 
rank Sinatra’s biggest fens. 
t iir<> the octogenanan crooner, the 7 1 -year- 
old Malaysian prime minister has been doing 
it his way, and his response to the slump m the 
region’s stock and currency markets is no 


a further 1 percent, to 795.73 points. • 
■“Mahathir will face a huge loss. or erm- . 
ibility when the index falls bdow 700 
650, which it's bound to do,’ saidMahmooi- 
Ghaemmaghami, head of research at Weft-, 
deutsche Landesbank in Singapore. ■ 

The index has slumped nearly 20 percent • 
since Malaysia slapped restrictions on trading- 
r.i : Ann 1 Hip I' pnlral hank S3K1 


“•6"'“" since Malaysia i sou ^ . 

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on Malaysia’s yawn- 
ing current account 
deficit, the combative 
former physician has 
| come out swinging. 

“Because Malay- 
! sia has been so suc- 
j cessful over the past 
10 years, they think 
I they can solve every 
problem that comes 
| their way,” said Tim 
Julien, who manages 
Southeast Asian 
stocks at Mercantile 
Mutual Investment 
j Management Ltd. in 
Sydney. 

| Mr. Mahathir, 

| stealing much of _ the 
economic limelight 
from his deputy. Fi- 
nance Minister Anwar 
I Ibrahim, has clamped 
restrictions on cur- 
rency and stock trad- 
ing and blasted cur- 
rency speculators as 
“international crim- 
inals." 

Mr. Mahathir has pointed the finger at the 
billionaire financier George Soros, accusing 
him of trying to destroy economic growth 
through speculative attacks on Malaysia’s 
.... .i u.» hoe 1-iMod Mr 




to *2 
foreifeu 


AUdj Ki*aiolrUAEcnLC FraiM-Pre™: 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
of Malaysia: Not just a Sinatra fan. 

1981, he has sold 


transactions 
milli on per 
customer. 

That was a brcAk 
from two years of 
policy aiiried 
loosening the grip on 
markets and luring 
more foreigners u?o 
Malaysia's fledgling 
capital markets. \ 
Now, not only are 
foreigners not beihg 
lured, but existing in- 
vestors are running 
for cover. . 

Last week, the 
Composite Index fell : 
11 percent *.& 

Beefing up KuEpnF 
Lumpur's status a&a 
Financial center w£s 
central to Mr. Ma- 
hathir’s plan to give 
Malaysia a Western- 
style, fully developed 
economy by 202D- 
Since becoming 
prime minister Jn 
state companies and 


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i: 






fostered the development of heavy industries 
like car-making in an economy that was de- 
pendent on the export of commodities. ’ 
From the word go, Mr. Mahathir has 


through speculative attacks on iviaiaysia s rrum uie worn go, wit. ivianaimr nas 

currency, the ringgit. He has labeled Mr. worked to put Malaysia on the world map. To 
Soros a “moron” who epitomizes the “self- him, that means such giant public works pre- 
serving rogues" who would suck Southeast ects as the world’s tallest office building, the 
Asian economies dry. world’s longest building, one of the worlds 


ZIIOH , 

Last week, he rejected the International 
Monetary Fund's view that Malaysia's cur- 

i rency and economic problems are a wake-up 

call” to slow the pace of giant infrastructure 


ua uiw wuJiu o tauvoi UlIILt; UUllUUlgi UTC 

world’s longest building, one of the world's 
largest dams, and Southeast Asia’s largest 
airport ‘ & 

This brand of big-is- beautiful breakneci^r ■ 
development brings - 


call” to slow the pace or giant infrastructure development brings costs — principally 
projects, saying the internal ional agency “had Malaysia’s yawning cureem-account deficit, 
to subvert" the economy to prove it was right, which the central bank has forecast will be 
A n ence France-Presse reported. 14.8 billion ringgit i$5. 05 billion) this year 4- 

< The nationalist rhetoric br'rngs a price, as it or 5.5 percent of gross national product. Both 
may have dashed — at least for now Mr. Mahathir and Mr. Anwar, the finance 
Malaysia's push to become a regional Fi- minister, have warned the deficit could be 
nancialccnter.lt has almost certainly stalled greater. 

the liberalization of Malaysia s capital mar- Other economic clouds loom. Money sup- 
kets. . ply has been expanding at 2 bout 20 percent 

“li may be quite some time be tore people this past year, and the property market — after 
feel comfortable with Malaysia again, said years of rapid growth — could be headed for a 
Bruce Gale, regional manager ot Political bust. All that plus a slump in the value of the 
Risk Consultancy Ltd., which advises foreign ringgit has investors fretting about the health 
companies on Asian investments. oF Malaysia's banks ” • 

The rhetoric may now mom a loss^ of face The new glass and chrome skyscrapers d«F # 

for Mr. Mahal hir himself. Last week. the dot the capitals of Southeast As iT— it if 
Prime minister called ° n M ala y!.ia ; s eluding Kuala Lumpur — were once symbols 


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PAGE 19 


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PAGE 20 


^ Italtefeerttrunc 

Sports 


R 


Wo RLD Roundup 


Martin Dropped 
From Ryder Cup 

GOLF Miguel Angel Martin was 
dropped from the European Ryder 
Cup team Tuesday after refusing to 
take part in a fitness test. He was 
replaced by fellow Spaniard Jose 
Maria Olazabal. 

A Ryder Cup committee spokes- 
man said Martin, who has not 
played in atoumament since July 1 8 
because of a wrist injury, had said 
he did not think it “necessaiy or 
convenient'* to play 18 boles of golf 
as requested by the commit- 
tee. (Reuters) 






Tlie Olympic champion loan- 
nis Melissanidis, performing 
floor exercises Tuesday in qual- 
ifying at the world gymnastics 
championships in Lausanne. 


Bidding Cities Deny Bribes 

Olympics Stockholm and Cape 
Town Olympic bid organizers 
denied Tuesday that they had 
offered gifts to International 
Olympic Committee officials to se- 
cure votes for the 2004 Olympics. 

On Tuesday, a senior IOC mem- 
ber, who declined to be identified, 
said both cities had been warned 
about infringements of the 
Olympic rules. 

The official said Stockholm had 
been accused of offering free fur- 
niture to IOC members while Cape 
Town bad allegedly offered free 
flights to Switzerland to members' 
wives. The IOC is meeting in 
Lausanne, Switzerland, this week 
and will chose the 2004 host from 
five candidates on Friday. 

Stockholm officials said 
had received a letter from the I( 

Finn Persson. a Stockholm bid 
spokesman, said the bid organizers 
had offered help to members to 
arrange the transport of furniture 
but had not offered to .pay for the 
goods or the transport. 

Paul Johnson, a Cape. Town 
spokesman, was adamant that 
South African officials had not 
offered free trips to Lausanne. ' 
(Reuters) 

England Drops Teenager 

soccer England dropped de- 
fender Rio Ferdinand on Tuesday 
from its squad to play Moldova in a 
World Cup qualifier next week be- 
cause of a drunk-driving Incident. 

“The England coach Glenn 
Hoddle has been informed by West 
Ham United of a drunk-driving in- 
cident involving Rio Ferdinand,'’ 
the Football Association said. “He 
has lost the chance of making his 
England debut at Wembley.” 

But Ferdinand, 18, will continue 
to train with the England squad. In 
the unlikely event that had been 
selected he would have been the 
youngest England player for more 
than 40 years. (Reuters) 


A Startled Sampras 
Goes Down in 5 Sets 

Korda Easily Unseats Top Seed 


By Jennifer Frey 

Washington Post Service 


NEW YORK — This time. Fete 
Sampras was not nauseated or emo- 
tional or carrying some heavy personal 
burden. There was no vims that 
weakened his body, no trauma that tore 
at his heart He was simply human — a 
human who made too many mistakes. 

In a gritty, five-set match Monday at 
the U.S. open that included three rain 
delays and three tiebreakers, Sampras’s 
supreme serve disappeared at the most 
crucial of times. His usually quick feet 
grew sluggish. His backhand fell in love 
with the net It was a stunning per- 
formance for the world’s top-ranked 
tennis player, who fell to the No. 15 
player Petr Korda 6-7 (7-4). 7-5, 7-6 (7- 
2), 3-6, 7-6 (7-3) in what was oaly a 
fourth-round match. 

It was so stunning, in fact, that the 
instant after Korda served op his final 
winner, he slapped both hands to his 
head and let his mouth hang agape before 
be finally remembered to execute his 
trademark scissors kick of celebration. 

A five-set loser to Sampras at Wimble- 
don earlier this summer, Korda advances 
to the quarterfinals, where be will face 
the unseeded Jonas Bjotkman in what is 
now a wide-open bracket The power left 
appears to rest with the No. 2 Michael 
Chang and the unpredictable Andre 
Agassi Bjorkman beat Scott Draper, an 
unsettled Australian, in four sets. 

After his demise, Sampras said that “it 
would be pretty tough” for Korda to win 
the tournament. “I probably see Agassi 
or Chang winning it now, ” be added. 

At almost every Grand Slam, though, 
Sampras seems to have one match that 
turns into an epic, when he teeters on the 
brink of disaster, but rarely topples off. 

“I’ve been in this situation a lot,” 
Sampras said Monday, almost sighing, 
“ana the majority of the time I've come 
through. But I'm not going to come 
through all the time.” 

It seemed impossible that Sampras 
would not prevail in the final tiebreaker, 
this time, just as he had prevailed last 
year at the Open, when Alex Corretja 


took him through five draining sets, and 
Sampras left his guts on the court. In- 
stead, the tiebreaker was most certainly 
a letdown: Sampras was quickly down 
3-0 on three consecutive backhand er- 
rors, and he never got closer than 5-2. 
He double-faulted, of all tilings, to set 
up match point for Korda, who finished 
it off with a service winner. 

“It was a long day with the rain and 

every thing ." Sampras, who had 66 

unforced errors, 19 in the fifth set. 

The match was a roller-coaster, with 
Sampras's gamp varying widely from 
set to set and game to game. In foe first 
set, he saved himself with four straight 
brilliant serves when Korda had triple- 
set point, then saved himself again in foe 
tiebreaker, when he trailed 2-4 before 
reding off five straight points. 

He destroyed himself with two double 
faults in the crucial 11th game of foe 
second set, whan Korda broke him to take 
a 6-5 lead, then served out the set And in 
tiie third set, Sampras lost his backhand, 
and Korda took him apart in the tiebreak- 
er — Sampras's only two points came on 
aces. “I just didn’t put tbe clamps on him 
when I had him,'’ Sampras sajd. 

In foe fourth set, foe rains came in 
earnest, forcing a third, extensive break. 
Leading 1-0 but looking rather ex- 
hausted, Sampras packed his bags and 
headed for foe players’ locker room for 
a much-needed break. 

He returned looking like a different 
playo* and pounded to a 6-3 fourth-set 
victory. Korda — a tall, bird-like man 
prone to showing emotion — seemed 
ruffled. Tbe next set started out no better 
for foe Czech. Sampras's fust serve of 
foe first game was an ace. He held, and 
broke Korda in foe next game with a 
backhand so spectacular that the nor- 
mally sedate Sampras celebrated. And 
he started foe next game with an ace as 
well Ahead 3-0, Sampras looked ready 
to finish foe nonsense. But Korda was 
not ready to let him do that. 

Seizing on the backhand that had 
been his best weapon all day. and sud- 
denly serving up aces like he was, well. 
Sampras, Korda stormed back to win 
three straight games and tie foe fifth set 



NSkeScgar/ Roden 

Sergj Bruguera of Spain, the No. 7 seed, fighting for a point Tuesday 
against Marcelo Rios. Rios, the No. 10 seed from Chile, won, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4 


at 3-3. “When he gets hot, there’s nofo- 
ing you can do.” Sampras said. 

Both players held serve until the 
match advanced to foe tiebreaker, and 
then even Sampras was thinkin g about 
his marathon against Correia lut year. 
He had won then even .he had been 
nauseated and reeling over foe recent 
death of his coach, Tim Gullikson. This 
time, though, he just couldn't survive. 

“It reminded me of my match with 
Correia,” Sampras admitted. “1 came 
from basically out of foe match and 
ended np winning it and winning foe 
tournament." Then he shrugged. 

'‘Maybe what comes around, goes 
around.” he said. . 

■ Krajicek Makes Quarter-Finals 

Richard Krajicek, an unseeded 


Dutchman, served his way into the 

S r-fmals of foe U.S. Open with a 
firing straight-sets victory over 
Felix Mantilla, foe No. 12 seed, of 
Spain, Reuters reported. 

Krajicek, foe 1996 Wimbledon 
champion, belted 16 aces and never 
faced a break point in a march which 
ended with only a few in Arthur Ashe 
Stadium to cheer foe lopsided 7-5 6-3 6- 
4 victory. 

The victory by foe 18fo-ranked 
Krajicek guarantees at least one un- 
seeded semifinalist in a tournament that 
has lost six of foe top eight seeds. 

In foe quarter-finals Krajicek will 
face another of foe game's biggest serv- 
ers Greg Rusedski of Britain, who beat 
Daniel Vacek. a Czech, a 7-6 6-2 6-2 
earlier on Monday. 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 

Seles Falls 

To Spirlea; • 
Rios Beats 
Bruguera 

NEW YORK — Monica Seles foe 
No 2 seed, lostTuesday to Irina Spjrle* 
seeded No. 1 1, in the quarter-finals of 
foe U.S. Open tennis championship. 

Spirlea, playing brilliantly in foe best 
match of foe women's tournament so 
for, outbattled foe gritty Seles, 6-7 (5-7), 

U.S. OM WliWNIS 

7-6 (IO-S), 6-3, to reach foe semifinals 
of a Grand Slam for foe first rime. 

“I know not so many people mow 
me compared with Monica.’ Spirlea 
■ta.H “Bat now they’ll know me. , 
Seles won foe first set by sweeping 
foe last four points to win the tiebreaker; 
7-5. In the second tie break, Spirlea took 
a 4-1 lead, but Seles fought back to earn 
a pifiwh point at 6-5, which Spirieji 
saved with a sharp volley. 

Spirlea broke a tiring Seles in foe 
third game of foe final set to take a 2-1 
lead and then broke foe Yugoslav- bom A 
American in foe ninth game to claim her 
first victory in five tries against the 
former world No. I. ► 

Marcelo Rios, a 21-year-old Chilean 
seeded No. 10, served 11 aces and 
cracked 39 winners to beat Sergi 
Bruguera, foe No. 7 seed, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. 

Rios, who had not advanced past foe 
second round in three previous trips to tbe 
Open, continued a strong Grand Slafo 
season in which be has reached the 
quarterfinals in Australia and foe last 16 
ax the French Open and Wimbledon. 

“I wasn’t moving that well today,’'' 
said Bruguera, a 26-year-old Spaniard. 
“He was serving very good and made a 
lot of free points. I kept thinking it’£ 
going to change, it's going to change, 
going to change, and then I’m shaking /. 
hands at foe end.” 

In a match between two unseeded 


men, Magnus Larsson of Sweden adr.i 
vanced to his second U.S. Open quarter- 
final when he beat Wayne Ferreira of 
South Africa, 6-3, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3. - • • 

(AFP. AP. Reuters) 


Once Again, Maradona Stands on the Lip of a Brutal Fall 


International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — We will know late 
Wednesday whether to cry for 
Diego Maradona — again and by 
how much. He is in his apt-unfamiliar 
state: Hiding behind foe shutters, afraid 
or contemptuous of publicity. An icon 
so vulnerable it hurts. 

Maradona has reached late sporting 
life without wisdom. He was allowed to 
kick a ball again, for weekly pay greater 
than other men earn in a year, before it is 
too late for his beautiful talent. 

Unless Wednesday’s second urine 
sample contradicts foe first, which 
showed once again traces of cocaine, 
Argentina’s superstar is in for another 
long ban from soccer — his love, his 
life, his dependency. 

Poor, spoiled Diego. He has a waning 
magician s wand of influence over a 
ball- He craves the pain of working his 
body after so many injuries, so much 
wear and tear. 

Plucked from his shanty and his fam- 
ily at nine, used as a child performer for 
rich and ruthless entrepreneurs, he 
hasn't grown up. He drew back his 
shutters this week to ally himself to 
Princess Di. to say that she, like him, 
bore foe burden of being hounded. 

His words were semi -coherent He 
came close to admitting drugs were his 
escape. Maradona sees himself as vic- 


World Soccer / Br Rob Hughes 


tint Those around him, including by 
now his growing daughters, may see foe 
paradox of a man gifted yet irrespons- 
ible and inadequate. 

Perhaps when Boca Juniors washes 
its hands of him, and withdraws -his 
$50,000 match fee, he will finally let go. 
Perhaps there are chapters left to enact; 
small rises, painful falls. And perhaps a 
return to poverty, ultimately to foe gut- 
ter, awaits. 

Life, and sport, goes on. Last Sat- 
urday in Madrid’s huge theater, foe 
Bemabeu. a younger player noted for 
headstrong aberrations celebrated a new 
season in wondrous fashion. 

Clarence Seedoif, one of those hand- 
somely skilled Durch players of Sur- 
inamese stock, blossomed in foe all- 
white of Real Madrid. His team was a 
goal down to Atletico Madrid, facing 
defeat in the city derby for foe first time 
in a dozen contests. 

Juninho, the miniature Brazilian with a 
huge and infectious appetite, had scored 
Atietico's opportunist goal. Had Chris- 
tian Vieri. Atletico’ s $17 million Italian 
import, converted his chances, there 
would have been no way back for Real. 

But Vieri missed, four times. Real 
Madrid found purpose and rhythm. 


Seedorf began to play as if on a mission 
and finally transcended tbe heights of 
his career to score foe equalizer. 

He was 46 metere from Atletico 's net, 
15 meters to foe right of foe center 
circle. Either by instinct, or by obser- 
vation, Seedorf knew that Jose Fran- 
cisco Molina, Atletico’s solid but some- 
times careless goalie, was off his line. 

Seedorf unleashed a pearl of a shot. 
Inducing spin with foe outside of his 
right boot, he deceived Molina; first foe 
ball seemed to go straight, then it veered 
in a graceful, rising arc, into foe un- 
guarded side of foe net. 

Intended? For sure. The Dutchman 
was guiding it with an imaginary wave of 
his hand, willing it and wishing it And 
yes. he had an inspiration, a higher pur- 
pose. Clarence Seedorf had become a 
rather for foe fust time, foe night before. 

His form and his renewed sense of 
leadership and responsibility could be 
manna from heaven for foe Dutch. They 
have Dennis Bergkamp at his peak as 
well, for foe blond striker, so very close 
to Johan Cruyff’s Dutch national scor- 
ing record now, is playing and finishing 
with rare class and determination for 
Arsenal. 

Together. Seedorf and Bergkamp 


could make foe difference on Saturday 
as foe Netherlands plays Belgium in foe 
decisive World Cup qualifying game of 
European Group 7. Others, such as the 
Germans and foe Norwegians, might 
also move significantly toward , qual- 
ification that same day, but we expect 
such things from the knowing Germans, 
foe obdurate Norwegians. 

But the Dutch, who knows when they 
deliver? The talent abounds. The tem- 
perament confounds. 

Right now foe Dutch supporters won- 
der whether to cheer or jeer Patrick 
Kluivert. their tall, troubled center for- 
ward. He has been playing only three 
weeks after surgery and. more to the 
point, after a rape case that followed his 
conviction for killing another motorist 

Kluivert is a marvelous talent, a big 
man with a deft touch. The nation could 
forgive him one catastrophic mistake, a 
misdemeanor of overpaid and over-eu- 
logized youth. Yet even some of his 
teammates now feel this was a time to 
leave him out, not to rush or reward him, 
and in part it is the lack of remorse or 
apology that brings this upon him. 

Should Kluivert play and miss even 
one opportunity on Saturday his night 
will be harrowing. The public will deride 
and revile him. 

At 20. he perhaps aeeds shelter, time 
and space to find nis feet 


His Dutch national team colleagues 
are being more charitable elsewhere. Ob 
Monday their skipper, Frank dc Boer, 
organized a whip round of players' dona- 
tions and then a short private plane ride. - 
Typically Dutch, the players gave 
their. Saturday match fees, totaling 
100,000 guilders ($48,000), to Jean 1 
Mare Bosnian, the Belgian player whosfc : 

K it of his rights in foe European - 
led to foe liberation and enriclF v 
ment of soccer players across Europe. .. 

But when de Boer’s men asked foe 
Belgians to join in foe gesture, foe re- 
sponse was negative. George Leekens, 
Belgium's national team trainer, said it 
was “a trick’ ’to bring his players out of . 
concentration. i. 

More likely, the Belgians feared re- 
prisals from their soccer federation, 
which in April prohibited a testimonial 
match for Bosnian. 

Bos man, the liberator, is suing foe . 
Belgian FA and his former club Liege, 
which in 1990 effectively aborted his 
career, refusing him a move to D unkirk 
One of foe few Belgian players still 
around from that time, Georges Grim, 
now 35, made his own donation to Bos- 
nian, a $350 check. Come Saturday, foe 
Dutch might ask what is one among so 
many? 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Tunes of London. 


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Packers Forced to Work in Beating Bears 


By Leonard Shapiro 

WmAinctt'n Fun Sen ire 

GREEN BAY, Wisconsin 
— The Green Bay Packers 
were nor expected to roil this 
hard in their season opener 
against foe Chicago Bears. 
The defending Super Bowl 
champions churned out a 
sloppy 38-24 victory in a 
game that was far more com- 
petitive than many could 
have imagined. 

Chicago held the Packers 
to minus-two yards rushing 
in foe first half Monday and 
put pressure on quarterback 
Brett Favre all night. The 
Bears took a quick 8-3 lead 
and were still close early in 
foe fourth quarter before 
Green Bay’s defense took 
charge and the Packers won 
their 19th straight at Lam- 
beau Field. 

Still, it was a costly vic- 
tory. Starting comerback 
Craig Newsome suffered a 
season-ending knee injury on 
foe game's first play. Also 
walking off foe field on 
crutches at game’s end was 
light end Mark Chmura. who 
suffered a tendon injury in 
his left knee. 

Coach Mike Holmgren 
said he didn't think Chmura 
would need surgery but prob- 


ably would be lost for four to half. But only when the Pack- 
six weeks. ers drove 84 yards for a one- 

The Packers' tunning yard touchdown run by 
game finally began to show Dorsey Levens with 8 
signs of life in the second minutes 12 seconds left in the 



ping away the ball «n a bungled extru-point attempt. 


ravre iook. aavaniaj 
Chicago turnover by I 
fog a one-yard scoring i 
tight end Jeff Thou 
then passing in the enc 
to Levens for a two 
conversion and an 11- 
wiih 5:51 remaining 
second quarter. The P: 
never trailed again. 

The offense caugh 
after the two-minute w: 
at the end of foe first 
Favre moved his tea 
yards in five plays, fon 
an 18-yard scoring pj 
wide receiver Robert B 
one play after he foum 
open for a 44-yard gair 
That provided an 
advantage with 48 so 
remaining in the half 
nice emotional lift goin 
foe locker room. The Pa 
held Chicago scoreless 
third quarter, ran off t hi 
13 points for a 20-poin 
and never were sen 
threatened again. 

. Ryan Longwell, a n 
kicker, had field goals i 
36 and 29 yards in pla 
Chris Jacke. And 
Schroeder averaged 21 
On five punt returns ; 
replaced Desmond Hoi 
last year's star returner. 






’ft do \ 


BtlWOMMaO M. 1A/yt 


PAGE S’ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1997 


PAGE 21 




SPORTS 


m 


■&- j • • 





V.^ 




^ l "' Fails 

-is 

b,>u ^er a 


Now Pete Rose Jr. 
Needs 4,255 More 


~' s7T ^; 


The Associated Press 
Pete Rose Jr. has spent his 
whole life trying to be tike his 
father. Ancf when he reached 
first base after his first big 
league hit, Petey raised his fist 
to salute baseball's hit king. 

Pete Rose clapped along 
with 31,000 Ians, then cel- 
ebrated his son’s single by 
holding up his index finger — ■ 
No. 1. 

It was a sweet moment for 
the younger Rose, 27, who 
toiled for a third of his life in 
the minors before getting his 
•chance with the Cincinnati 
Reds on Monday. 

“It was everything and 
ftore,” Rose Jr. said, still 
wearing eye black and a 
.Sweaty jersey with No. 14 on 
the back long after the game. 
“Those nine years of bus 
rides, bad food, bad hotels, bad 
fans — it was all worth it. ” 
After he struck out in the 
Inst inning using a bat that his 
father gave him 1 1 years ago, 
Pete Jr. led off the fourth in- 
ning against Kansas City's 
Kevin Appier. 

- On a 2-2 pitch. Rose, this 
time swinging one of Barry 
'Larkin’s bats, lined a single 
off first baseman Jeff King’s 
slove. 


“After his first at-bat, I 
said, ‘He’s only got 1,142 to 
catch me,’ ’’ Pete Rose said, 
referring to his career 
strikeout total. 

“After the second ar-bai, I 
said. ‘He’s only got 4,255 hits 
to catch me.’ He did all 
right.” 

A 7-4 loss to the Royals 
was merely a footnote to- 
Rose’s day. 

When Petey took the field, 
his father was hurrying to his 
seat after flying from Florida 
and getting caught in traffic. 

The son finished 1 for 3 
with a walk and a .333 batting 
average — 30 points higher 
than his father’s career 
mark: 

The game meant brisk 
business for the team, with 
some fans saying they came 
back to the ballpark for the 
first time in years. 

The attendance of 31.920 
included about 7,000 in walk- 
up sales. Before Rose was 
called up from the minors 
during the weekend, the Reds 
had sold 16,000 tickets for the 
Labor Day interleague game 
against the Royals. 

“I haven’t been to a Reds 
game in seven years, since 
Pete was banned,” said An- 



thony Lorenz, a former Cin- 
cinnatian who lives in Indi- 
anapolis. “But 1 saw Pete’s 
first game at Crosley Field in 
1963, and I*m here to see 
Petey’s first game.” The eld- 
er Rose was banned for 
gambling. 

The fans cheered 
everything Rose Jr. did. They 
rose when he was introduced, 
stood throughout his first at- 
bat and applauded when he 


struck out. They cheered his 
first assist at third base, a 
fourth- inning ground out, and 
went wild when he got his 
first hit. 

“This is what we came to 
see,” said Steve Rose — no 
relation — of Indianapolis. 
“I think this is wonderful, 
historical.” 

“I was in tears.” Pam Car- 
min. of Enon, Ohio, said of 
Petev’s hit. 


Griffey Adds 2 in Homer Chase 


SmJ Ljmnn5t *u!c n 

Pete Rose Jr., wearing his father’s No. 14, walking 
away from home plate after he struck out in his debut. 


Ct*npW fn Our Sufi From L'upo, hr, 

Ken Griffey Jr. cranked up his chase 
of Roger Maris 's home run record by 
homenng in his first two at-bats as the 
Mariners beat the San Diego Padres, 9- 
6, in Seattle. 

Griffey, who hit 12 homers in Au- 
gust, has 46, with 24 games left to break 
Maris’s mark of 61. set for the New 

BasibauKo»ndu» 

York Yankees in 1961 . Griffey went 4- 
for-4 on Monday with a double and four 
runs batted in, giving him the American 
League lead with 126. 

“Let’s not start with that.” said Lou 
Pimp -1 la . the Seattle manager, cutting 
short a question about Griffey vs. Maris. 
“All right? I don’t want to hear it 
OX?” 

* ‘We’ve put ourselves in a position to 
be in the postseason,” Griffey said. 
“We’ve worked real hard ro be here, 
and this is when it counts. I’m just going 
our and playing. Whatever happens is 
going ro happen.” 

PhBliM 5, Yankee* 1 1n Philadelphia, 
Curt Schilling ( 14-101 struck out a ca- 
reer-high 16 while Hideki Irabu (4-3) 
left the game early. 

Schilling pitched eight innings on a 
humid afternoon, raising his* major 
league-leading strikeout total to 280. 

Irabu left with none out in the fourth. 
He gave up five runs and nine hits and 
his earned run average climbed to 7.68. 

Irabu, who has had problems con- 
trolling his temper on the field, broke a 
sprinkler bead in the Yankees’ club- 


house after his early departure. 

Schilling’s pitches consistently reg- 
istered 97 and 98 miles an hour on the 
radar gun. Irabu’s fastball got only as 
high as 95 mph, and it was consistently 
measured between 91 and 94. 

Schilling struck our Derek Jeter, the 
Yankees' shortstop, four times. After- 
ward Jeter said: ‘‘You guys are talking 
to the wrong person. You better talk to 
someone who saw his stuff.” 

Indians 7 a Pirates 5 Sandy Alomar hit 

a three-run homer as Cleveland scored 
four runs in the first on the way to 
victory in Pittsburgh. Cleveland and 
Pittsburgh are 1 30 miles apart and since 
1901 both have been in the major 
leagues. Yet they had not previously 
met in a regular season contest. 

Mats 3, BiueJaysO In New York. Jason 
Isringhausen allowed two bits in six in- 
nings for his second victory’, and John 
Olenid horaered off his former team. 

Isringhausen was making his second 
stan since coming back from a broken 
wrist and tuberculosis. The right-hander 
won his last stan despite giving up 1 1 
hits in five innings. 

Olerud, traded by the Blue Jays in 
December after playing eight seasons in 
Toronto, homered in the fourth. 

Expos 4, Rad Sox 2 In Montreal, rook- 
ie Vladimir Guerrero hit a two-run 
homer with two out 'in the 10th as 
Montreal improved its interleague re- 
cord to 10-3. 

White Sox 5, Cardinal* 4 Magglio Or- 
donez, in his first pinch-hit appearance, 
homered with two out in the ninth to 
give Chicago victoiy in St. Louis. 


Brewers 3, Astros 2 In Houston, 
Jeromy Bumitz had three hits, including 
a two-run double, as Milwaukee sent 
Houston to its fifth straight loss. 

Twins 7, Cubs 6 In Chicago, Pat 
Meares hit a tying, three-run homer in 
the fifth and added the go-ahead single 
in the seventh. 

Minnesota’s Paul Moliior had two 
hits, tying Paul Waner for 13th on base- 
ball’s career list with 3,152. 

Marlins io,orioioa 4 In Miami, Devon 
White hit a grand slam and Cliff Floyd a 
three-run homer as Florida won its third 
straight. Baltimore's Lenny Webster 
drove in four runs with a homer and his 
first triple since 1992. 

Tigers 4, Brave* 2 In Atlanta, Deivi 
Cruz squeezed home the go-ahead run 
in the seventh, and Detroit ended Greg 
Maddux's 10-game winning streak. 

Maddux (17-4) had not lost since a 
June 13 interleague game against Bal- 
timore. The four-time Cy Y oung Award 
winner allowed eight hits with eight 
strikeouts in seven innings. 

Giants a, Athlatics 2 JT.T. Snow drove 
in four runs as San Francisco won be- 
fore 50,792 fans, the largest baseball 
crowd in Oakland history. 

Snow, who went 2-for-4 with a walk, 
had a two-run single in the fifth and a 
two- run double in the ninth. He is hitring 
.400 with nine homers and 20 RBIs in 15 
interleague games. 

Roc ki«s 4, Angela 1 1n Anaheim, Har- 
vey P ulliam hit a two- run homer, and 
rookie John Thomson pitched eight 
strong innings as Colorado won its sev- 
enth straight. (AP. NYT) 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


‘ Major League Standings 


i a Praia 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

35 

49 

334 

— 

New York 

79 

56 

585 

6‘6 

. Boston 

67 

71 

4B6 

20 

Toronto 

65 

71 

.478 

21 

- Detroit 

64 

72 

.471 

22 

r CENTRAL DIVISION. 


Clevetond 

71 

62 

-S34 



- Milwaukee 

69 

67 

307 

3'h 

emrago 

69 

68 

304 

4 

. Minnesota 

57 

78 

-122 

15 

- Kamos City 

5a 

78 

A IS 

)5>.t 


WEST DIVISION 



; Seattle 

76 

62 

551 



- Anaheim 

74 

64 

336 

2 

_• Texas 

64 

73 

-467 

IV. 6 

BakJand 

53 

85 

384 

23 

NATIONAL LUOIM 


■ -— . 

EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

- Atlanta 

85 

52 

520 

_ 

Florida 

B1 

SS 

596 

39. 

New York. 

74 

62 

544 

10-6 

Montreal 

<3 

68 

500 

16’.4 

Philadelphia 

51 

82 

383 

32 

-■ CENTRAL OlVIStON 



Houston 

70 

67 

311 

— 

— -Pittsburgh 

68 

70 

.493 

2'n 

SL Louis 

63 

74 

460 

7 

Cinckmafi 

59 

76 

437 

10 

i] Chicago 

55 

83 

399 

IS 1 * 

WEST DIVISION 



j Cos Angeles 

79 

60 

565 

— 

[ SanFrondsca 

. 76 

62- 

351 

2 - 

1 Cotoreda 

69 

70 

496 

916 

San Diego 

65 

74 

468 

13M 


MOMPXTl U H lKOMf 

.. MTERLEACU/E 

New York IAU w 001 000-1 7 0 

PhiMetpUa 200 300 00s— 5 11 0 

i Irabu, Boehrihger (A Uoytf (<4), Mendoza 
(8) and Girard* Schilling, Battuta (91 and 
LieberttiuL W— Sdulfin* 14-10. L-lraba, 4- 
3. HH-PhflodetpWq, Boron ffl. 

Oewtand 482 100 00b-7 12 0 

fWMwrtfi mi wi m-s ? s 

- Ogea. A. Lopez (6), M. Jackson (81, Mesa 
(91 and S- Alomac Cooke, JJahnson Ml. 
.WOOoce. COj Ruetael (9) and KendalL 
W-Ogea 64. L-Cook* 9-14- Sv-Mesa 
(10). HRs— Oewtand. Ramirez (23). S. 
Alomar(17). 

Toronto 000 MM 000-0 2 0 

New York (NL) 600 711 ms-3 4 0 

' Hentgen QuonhH {71, Plesoc (81 and B. 
, Santiago Isringhausen, McMktmd (7). 
Raias (8), JaFranca (91 und Hundley. 
W— isringhausen. 2-0. L— Hentgen. 1*0. 
'■ --JzLFranco 04). HRs— New York. Oterud 
, Huskey (18). 

. ; -<us cay ioo oca 012-7 10 1 

JKtouS 012 000 001—4 8 0 

. Applet Sendee (61. Whfeenant (7). J. 


Montgomery (9), Pichardo (9) and 
Modartane: Remfinger, Belinda (6), Graves 
(81, FeJiodrtguez (9) and J. Oliver. 
W— Appier, B-ll. L-Rerrttager. 6-7. 

Sv— Pichardo (101. HR*— Kansas City. 
Damon (8). Cincinnati. Taubemee (9). 
Boston 000 002 000 0-2 3 0 

Montreal 010 000 010 2-4 6 I 

B.Heniy. Lowe (6). Corel (8), Hudson (10) 
and Hattebetg; M.Vafdes, Tetfonl 1 6 ), 
BuUInger (71, Urbina C9i and Wktger. 
W — Uitrina. 4-8. L— Hudson. 31. 

HRs— Montreal V. Guerrero (9). Segul (161. 
Mi lwaukee 000 120 000-3 7 1 

Houston 001 000 010-2 8 1 

Adamson. Fetters 16), Wkdanon (8), 
DaJones (9) and Matheny; Holt. Magnante 
(B) and Ausmus. W— - Adamson, 5-2. l— H olt 
8- 10 So-DaJanes 00). 

Otago [AU ' 000 030 011-5 7 0 

SI. Loots 001 100 110-4 10 1 

Drabek. Foulke (7). McElroy (81. J. Darwin 
(8), T. Cnstfflo (8), Kq refiner (9) and 
Fabregau Mons, Beltran (B). Frasariore 
(B). Fossas (9), C King (91 and Difence, 
Pognozzi (B), Lumpkin (91. W-T. Castilla 4- 
4. L—Fossas. 1-6. Sv—Kmcttner (13). 
HR— Chicago, Ordonez (21- 
Mtanesoto 201 030 100-7 13 1 

Cttago (NL) 202 200 000-6 12 0 

Robertson. Ritchie (31, TrwreXey (61. 
Swindell (71. Aguilera (9) and Stemboclv 
Trochset D. Stevens (6j, Patterson (71. 
Plsdotto (8) and Servais. W— TroroWey. 2-2. 
L — D. Stevens. 0-2. SoSgoilem £23). 
HRs— Minnesota Means (9). Chicago, Soso 
(311. 

Bant more 003 010 000—4 TO I 

Hondo 301 005 01K-10 9 0 

Erickson, Boskie (6). Orosco (61. 
TfcMoiftews (7) and Webster; Sounders. 
Alfonseca (51. F. Heredia <*:. K. Miner (7!.‘ 
Cook (7). Powe* TO nod C. Johnson. W— F. 
Heredta 5-2. L— Boskie 6-5. HRs-Baltlmom 
Webster (61. Ftarido, D. White (21. Floyd 

Strutt M0 200 101—4 M 0 

Atlanta 000 200 000-2 6 1 

Moctrler. Sager (7), M. Myws (71. Brocoil 
IB). ToJones (91 and Casanova G-Muddox. 
Cottier (81, Embrea (91. Oort* (9) and 
Edd.Perez. J. Lopez (81. W-Moehter 9-10. 
L-G. Maddux 174. Sv— ToJones (261. 

San Diego 000 000 204-4 7 3 

Seattle Ml 100 12x— 9 11 0 

J -Hamilton. Bergman (4). D. Veras (61, 
BocMter (71. Bnwfce C7J and Flaherty; 
Fosse ra. Spofiaric (HI, Ayala (91 and 
Da Wilson. W— Fossero 14-A L-J. Hamtiton 
10-5. HRs— Son Diego. S. Finley 04). 
Ctanfracco (4). Seattle. Griffey Jr. 2 (461. 

Saa Francisco 012 100 003-8 10 2 

Oakland 010 001 BOO— 3 9 3 

Rawer, R- Hernandez (8), Berk (9) and B. 
Johnson; Lorraine, Groom Q), A. Smell (5), 
Taylor (8). T. J-Mothews (9) end Molina 
W— Rueter 10-6. L— Lorraine 2-1 . HRs— San 
Frondsca Bonds C32). Oakland. State (261. 
Colorado too 010 000—4 11 0 

Anaheim too 000 000-1 9 0 

Thomson, Dipoto (9) and Mannaring; 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


mm 


-p 

& 


SCHOOL STARTS 
A6A1K NE5CT 
WEEK, RERUN.. 


Watson, P. Harris (7) ond Kreuter. 
W— Thomson 7-8. L— Watson 11-9. 
Sv— Dipoto 02). HR— Colorado. Pulliam 
( 2 ). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 

FThomas ChtY 122 Ut> 96 1S7 JS2 

Justice O 113 396 73 134 J38 

Be Williams NYY 105 415 88 137 330 

SAtomarCle 107 391 54 129 330 

E Martinez Sea 137 477 94 157 329 

WCtofkTex HO 393 56 128 326 

Greer Te» 133 508 92 165 325 

Ramirez Cte 124 455 80 148 325 

M Vaughn Boa 117 447 31 U2 J2T 

ONeHINYY 127 475 77 152 320 

RUNS— GoroopoTTO, BostOtV 107; Griffey 
Jr. Seattle, 1Q5.- Knoblauch. Minnesota. 101; 
Jeter. Nw; York, 99; F. Thomas. Chicaga 9& 
E. Martinez. Seattle. 9 4.- B. LHunter, Detroit 
91 

RBI— Griffey Jr. Seattle 126: T. Martinez. 
New Y01K. 125; Saimaa Anoheiin 10% F. 
Thomas, Otago. 1°6; JuGonzolez, Texas,. 
105: 0. NeiE New York, 105; Belle Cttago. 

10 a 

HITS — Gordaparra. Boston 18& Greer, 
Texas. Io& Griffey Jr. Seattle 162; Jeter. New 
York, 161; JhVofentin. Boston. 160: I. 
Rodriguez, Texes. I6£t F. Thomas. Oilaign 
157; E. Martinez. Seattle 157. 

DOUBLES— Jnvaletriia Boston 42; 
China Alikvukee. 39; Cora, Semite 3E 
Belle Qiicnsn 77: a Neill New York. 37; A. 
Rodriguez. Seattle 3& Garcinparra. Boston 
if Ere tan Anaheim. 2i. 

TRIPLES— G 3rd 3pcntL Boston Itt 
Knoblauch. Mftinetsis, 9: Damon Kanscs 
Chv. 7: Jeter, Nets- York, 7: Bumitz. 
.VjSwaaLee. 7; Alnee." Aratietm. 7i Gtierman ' 
Kansas CZy. a Griseoa. Cles^lsnd, & 
VcqueL Ctetrebnd. & ByAnderson 
Bctfimore.6. 

HOME RUMS-Gri ftey Jr. Seonje, 46; T. 
Martinez, Ner; Ycrit. 4lr Thome. Cleveland, 
36; McGwire CaKtaRd, 34; JuGonzolez. 
Texas. 32; Buhner. Seattle 32 R- Paflrteiro. 
3attimore 31. 

STOLEN BASES— B. LHuntet Detroit 64 
Knoblauch, Minresota. S3: Naan Toronto, 
47; T. Goodwin Terns. 44 VizqueL 
Clevetond 37; Dumont. Cltago, 30e A. 
Rodriguez. Seattle 29. 

PITCHING 05 Decisions)— Clemens, 
Toronto. 20-4, £33. 1.73: R. aJofinsan 
Seaffle 17-4 Et& 232 Moyee Seattle 14-4. 
J7& 191; Eriqxsan, Bctttfnore. 15-5, J5U 
33ft Rodke /Ainnesota. 18-7. J2U 346; 
Herehiser. Cleveland. 12-5, .706, 46ft Btoir, 
Detroit 14-i 30ft 403. 

STRIKEOUTS— RaJormson Seattle 264 
Clemens. Turertu, 237; Cone New York, 21fie 
Mussina Ball mom. tBft Appiac Kama 
City. 166; Fossero. Seattle 161; C. Firtey, 
Anahemv 155. 

SAVES— 4*u Rivma New York, * ft 
RoMyers. Baltimore. 4ft DoJorws. 
MOwnuLee 30; R- Hernandez. Chicoga 27; 
Wedekind, Tenon 27; T. oJoires. Detroit. 24 


Perctval Anahekn 23; Agulleret Minn. 23. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
LWaUwrCol 133 496121 187 377 
GwrrmSD J 29 516 BO 194 276 

Piazza LA 126 460 86 162 352 

Lofton All 99 415 76 144 347 

Joyner 5D 113 394 52 132 335 

Alfonzo NYM 125 424 69 140 330 

MaGroce ChC 128 472 72 153 324 

Galarraga Col 132 514 100 162 315 

Lankford S1L 109 390 75 121 310 

Mondesi LA 136 525 82 162 309 

Bigglo Hou 137 538 123 166 309 

Bichette Cal 129 466 68 150 309 

RUNS — Biggie, Houston. 123,- L Walker, 
Coioroda 121; Bands. San Frondsas 10); 
Galarraga. Colorado. 10ft EcYour^j. Los 
Angeles. 94 Bagwell Houston 94 Piazza, 
Las Angeles, B6. 

RBI— Galarraga Coiorada 121- Bagwell 
Houston I14r L Walker, Cotorada 110s Kent. 
San Frandscn 10& Sosa Chicaga lOi 
G wynn Son Diego. ItB; ChJanea Atlanta 
103. 

HITS— Gwyna San Diega 194 L Waller. 
Coiorada >67; Bigglo. Houston 764; CasffUa 
Coioroda 163; Mondesi Los Angeles 162; 
Piazza Los Angeles, 162; Galarraga, 
Coiorada 162. 

DOUBLES— Grudzielanek. Montreal/ 46s 
Gwyna Son Diega 43; L Walker, Coiorada 
41; Lansing. Montreal 39, MorondlnL 
Philadelphia 37; ChJones. Atianta 35,- 
Mondesi La Angeles 34 Bagwell 
Houston 34 Blggia Houston 34 Bonilla, 
Florida 34. 

TRIPLES DiSWuMa St Louis. 12; W. 
Guerrera Los Angelen 9 Womack. 
Pittsburgh. 9. Rondo. Pittsburgh, ft Daulton, 
Roridc. B: Tucker, Atlanta 7: Ec Young. Los 
Angeles. 7; A. Martm, Pittsburgh, 7; McRae. 
New Yon, 7; D. Sanders. Cincinnati, 7. 

HOME RONS— L. Walker. Coiorada 4ft 
Castilla. Colorado. 371 Bagwell Houston 37; 
Galarraga Colorado. 34 Piazza Las 
Angeles, 34 Bonds. Son Frondsca 34 Sosa 
Cttaga 31. 

STOLEN BASES— O. Sanders. Cincinnati 
Sn- Womack. Pittsburgh. 47; D. eShleldi 5t. 
Louis, 45; EcYouna Los Angeles, 39; Blggia, 
Houston 3S O. Veroa San Diega 3ft Bomte 
San Frandscn 2% Dunstorv Chkaga 24 
Henderson Son Diega 29. 

PITCHING (15 Decisions) — N eagle. 
Ationta 18-1 357. 233; Estes. San 
Frondsca 18-L 314 iJ3r KHa Houston 17- 
4 31 a 234 G. Maddire, Ationta 17-4 31ft 
239: P. J Martinez. Montreal 16-6. .727, 134 
Judea Montreal 1 1-5, 3S7, 424 Park, Los 
Angetea 13-4 384 3.14 
STRIKEOUTS— Schlinng, PhSadeiphta, 
28ft P- JMoittnez. Montreal 255; Smoltz. 
Atlanta 204 Noma Los Angeles, 201; X 
JBrown Rorlda 1 79; (Ole. Houston 173; 
AnBenes, St. Louis. 165. 

SAVES— Beck, San Frondsca 34 
JoFrancn New Yor*. 34 T. oWorreU Los 
Angeles. 31 Hoffmon San Diega 32t Nen. 
Florida 34 Wohlers. Altonto. 3ft Edwratey. 
St. Louis, 34 


Japanese Leagues 

CKfCTRAL UCAStfK 


New Orleans 
San Francisco 


0 1 0 .000 24 38 

0 1 Q .000 6 13 



W 

L 

r 

Pet 

.GB 

Yakut! 

66 

44 

2 

300 

— 

Yakohorna 

60 

47 

0 

361 

4 Vs 

Hiroshima 

56 

52 

0 

319 

9 

Hanshln 

49 

60 

1 

450 

16S 

Otunlchi 

50 

63 

1 

442 

17W 

Yomiurl 

48 

63 

0 

432 

IBS 


MancuMdi 





W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.GB 

Seibu 

63 

45 

2 

383 

— 

Otfc 

56 

45 

3 

349 

4 

Nippon Ham 

S3 

58 

1 

477 

11 V. 

Kintetsu 

52 

57 

3 

477 

11 Vi 

Daiel 

51 

59 

1 

464 

13 

Lotte 

46 

57 

2 

452 

14 


nnun femurs 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yakult 3, Yakohorna 0 
Chumchl 4 Hiroshima 2 
Yomiurl 4 Hanshln 1 

PACFIC LEAGUE 


Seibu ft Daiei 4 

Nippon Ham AOrtt4 

Loffe ft Kintetsu 4 



J FOOTBALL 

■ 

NFL Standings 


AJWZXKAM COMHUMCt 

EAST 



W LT Pd. 

PF 

PA 

Miami 

1 0 0 1.000 

16 

10 

New England 

1 0 0 1.000 

41 

7 

N.Y. Jete 

1 0 0 1.000 

41 

3 

Buffalo 

0 t 0 .000 

13 

34 

JndJonopoOs 

0 1 0 .000 

10 

16 


CENTRAL 



Cmdnnofi 

l 0 0 1-000 

24 

21 

JoacsonvBle 

t 0 01.000 

28 

27 

Tennessee 

1 0 0 1-000 

24 

21 

Baltimore 

D 1 0 J»0 

27 

28 

Pittsburgh 

0 1 0 JB0 
WEST 

7 

37 

Denver 

1 0 01-000 

19 

3 

Kansas aty 

0 l 0 JK» 

3 

19 

Oakland 

0 1 0 .000 

21 

24 

San Diego 

0 ) 0 .000 

7 

41 

Seattle 

0 1 0 300 

3 

41 

NATIONAL COKnfeBfCI 

EAST 



W L T Pet. 

PF 

PA 

Deltas 

1 a ouxn 

37 

7 

N.Y. Gkinte 

1 a oijwo 

31 

17 

Washington 

1 0 0 14)00 

24 

10 

Arizona 

0 1 0 300 

21 

24 

Phnodefphto 

a 1 0 .000 

CENTRAL 

17 

31 

Detrott ■ 

1 0 0 1.000 

2S 

17 

Green Bay 

1 0 0 1.000 

38 

24 

Minnesota 

1 0 0 1-000 

34 

13 

Tampa Bay 

1 0 0 1.000 

13 

6 

Cltago 

0 1 0 .000 

WEST 

24 

38 

SI. Louts 

1 0 014)00 

38 

24 

Ationta 

a 1 0 .000 

17 

2fi 

Coral too 

0 1 0 300 

10 

24 


MONDAY’S USULT 

Green Bay 38, Chlcogo 24 

CFLStanpincs 

SASTBEK SIVlfiaN 

W L T PF I 
Torardo 8 2 0 16 3 

Montreal 7 3 0 14 2 

Winnipeg 2 8 0 4 2 

Hamilton 1 9 0 2 2 

WIST1KH DIVISION 
Edmonton 7 3 0 14 2 

British Colombia 6 4 D 12 3 

Calgary 5 5 0 10 2 

Saskatchewan 4 6 0 B 2 

Mondays Gaaws 
Calgary 27. Edmonton M 
Toronto 44 Hamilton 3; 


SOCCER 


OSfeMAN DONDKSUOA 

1 B60 Munkh 1. Arnrinla Bleiefeld 0 

SPANISH RfeST DIVISION 

Valladolid 1, Real Bells 3 

BIOUSH PfeUMIK UAOUS 

Bolton a Everton 0 


TENNIS 


U.S. Open 

NOW ATS RESULTS 

MIN’S UNGUES 

FOURTH ROUND 

Richard KroffceA, Netherlands, del. Fefo 
MontiOn (12). Spain 7-5. 6-3. 6-4. 

Jonas Biorkmare Sweden def. Scott Drap- 
er, Australia 6-16-3.1-4 7-6 (ftd). 

Petr Kordo (15), Czech, def. Pete Sampras 
PULS* 6-7 (4-7). 7 -ft 7-6 (7-2), W, 7-6 (7-3). 

MIN'S DOUBLES 
THIRD ROUND 

Mahssh Bhupatm and Leamter Pass, In- 
dia (10). def. Guillaume Room. Franca and 
Jeff Taronga U3* 4-6.647-6 (7-3). 

David Adams and Wayne Ferreira. South 
Africa def. Alberto Bernsategui, Spain and 
David RodtH, U3j 6-3. 6-3. 

Yevgeny KateWkov, Ruk and Daniel 
Vocek. Czta (4), def. Donold Johnson, and 
Fronds a Montana 03. (13), 1 4 6-ft 64 

Jonas Biorfcmon and Nlcfclas Kulti. Sweden 
(11), det Mari. PWBppoussIs and Patrick 
Softer, Australia (5), 6-Z 64. 

WOMEN' DOUBLES 
THIRD ROUND 

Alexandra Fusai ond Nathalie Touzlat, 
France (7), def. Mary Joe Fernandez, U3* 
end Anke Huber. Germany (12), 446-3.6-1. 

Glgi Fernandez, U3. ond Natasha Zvere- 
va Belarus (1). def. Lisa Raymond 03, and 
R ennoe Stubbs. Australia 6-1 64 


Lindsay Davenport, U3„ and Jana Novot- 
na Czech Republic O), def. Naoko Kljimuto 
and Nana Miyagl Japan 6-7 (2-7), 6-Z 6-Z 

ConchRa Martinez, Spain, ond Patricia 
TorabH Argentina (8). d ef. Katrina A darns. 
U.S. and Kristie Boogert Netherlands 04), 
64 6-7 (4-7), 6-4. 

Martina Hingis, Switzerland, and Arantxa 
Sanchez Vkarta Spain (2). def. Anno 
Koumikova and Elena Llkhovtseva Russia 
(1 5). 64 64. 

MIXED DOUBLES 

OUAflTEflFINALS 

Mercedes Paz and Pablo Albana Argenti- 
na def. Larisa Nefland Latvia and Andrei 
Olhorekfy, Russia watkewr. 

Motion Botlegraf. Netirerionds. and Rick 
Leoch. U3. 5), def. Nathalie Tauztat Franca 
and Daniel Nesnro Canada 7-5. 6-3. 

Brenda Schultz-McCarthy, Nettu and Luke 
Jenseib U3. def. Gig] Fernandez, U3, and 
EEs Ferreira, S. Africa (2). 7-6 (7-4), 64 
TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

MEN'S SUM US 

FOURTH ROUND 

Marc eto Rios (10). Chile, dot. Setgi 
Bruguera (7), Spain, 7-ft 6-4 6-4. 

WOMEN' DOUBLES 

OUACTERFHiALS 

Undsay Davenport. 03. and Jana Novot- 
na Czech (3). def. Yoyuk BasukL Indonesia 
and Caroline vis. Netherlands (6). 6-4 7-ft 

MIN'S DOUBLES 

OUARTERFMALS 

Wayne Btodu Zimbabwe, and Jim GroMv 
U3. def. Goran Ivanisevic. Croatia and Cyril 
Sok. Czech Repubfc, 7-6 (lt-9). 63. 


TRANSITIONS 


IASI BALL 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ANAHEIM— Activated INF Randy Vetarte 
from 60-day disabled tel. Bought contract of 
RH P Anthony Chavez from Vancouver, PCL 
Transferred RHP Moih Gubkza from 15-day 
to 60-day disabled Bsf. Designated RHP Jeff 
Schmidt for assignment. 

Baltimore— A ctivated RHP Shawn 
Boskie from IS- day disabled 1st. derated 
RHP Brian wntioms from Rochester, IL. 

boston— Activated OF Shane Mack from 
15-day disabled list. Recalled RHP Derek 
Lowe and OF Michael Coleman from Paw- 
tucket IL 

Chicago— Recoded LHP Mike Sirntka and 
C Robert Machado from Nashvtlte AA. 

Cleveland— A ctivated RHP Chad Ogea. 
RHP Alble Lopez and LHP Ahrtn Mormon 
from 15-do y stabled list. 

KANSAS CITY-Colfed ub RHPScoff Service 
ond OF Roderick Myere from Omaha. AA . 
Activated 3B Scott Cooper and INF David 
Howard from 15-day disabled fat. 

Milwaukee— Designated INF Tftn Unroe 
foroubgnroenl. Put RHP Biyce Ftorie on 1 5- 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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day (tabled list. Recalled RHP Jose Cabrera 
from New Orleans. AA. 

Minnesota— T raded OF Darrin Jackson to 
Milwaukee Brewers tor ployerto be named. 

NEW York- Activated 2B Pat Kefly from 
15-day tabled list Recalled OF Sarit Pose 
ond Infielder Andy Fax from Columbus, IL 
Optioned infletoer Homer Bush to Colum- 
bus. 

Oakland- Put DH Jose Canseco on 15- 
day disabled tet retroactive to Aug. 27. Ac- 
tivated OF Scott B rosins (ram 15-day dis- 
abled list. Recalled C toy Molna and LHP 
Tan KubintU from Edmonton, PCL 
Seattle— Recoded INF Bran Raabe, OF 
Raul Ibanez. RHP Rafael Carmona, LHP 
Greg McCarthy, RHP Felipe Lira and INF 
Brent Gates from Taaima, PCL Activated C 
Rick Wilkins from 1 5- day disabled fist. Op- 
tioned RHP Ken Claude and RHP Bob Wal- 
cott fa Memphis. SL. Designated RHP Alex 
Pacheco tor assignment. 

TEXAS— Activated RHP John Burkett from 
15-day disabled list. Optioned RHP Eric 
Moody to Oklahoma City. AA. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Arizona— B ought contract of SS Junes 
Matas from Sioux Ctty, NL. 

Atlanta— R ecalled RHP Kevin MHJwood 
ond RHP Kerry Ugtenbeig ham Durham, CL. 
and INF Randall Simon from Ridunon IL 
CL Bought contract of C Dm Spehr tram 
Richmond. T ra nsferred LHP Ttrreu Wade 
from the IS- to the 60-day tabled IlsL 
Chicago — R ectified OF Brooks fOeschnicfc 
hom town AA. 

Cincinnati — Recalled Pete Rose Jr. from 
Chattanooga SL Claimed IB Mark Johnson 
off waivers from Pittsburgh Pirates and op- 
ttoned him » Indianapolis, AA. Put SS Bony 
Lark In on 60-day disabled list. 

Flos 1 da— A ctivated LHP Al Letter OF C3rfT 
Floyd. INF John Wehnercmd RHP Kurt Miller 
ham )5-day disabled list Sent RHP Drum 
Poll to Charlotte. IL RecoBed RHP Bill Hurst 
from Portland, EL ond pur Mm on 15-day 
disabled Rst. 

HOIKTON-Recalted OF Bet Abmh OF 
Richard Hidalgo, and INF Lute Rivera from 
New Qtleans. AA- Transferred OF Ray Monti 
gomery from iS-day to 60-day dtoabled Bst 
new roBK-Recolled RHP Juan Acevedn 
LHP Joe Crawford, LHP Takeshi Kashlwo- 
da INF Shawn Gtiberi, C Alberto Casfflto and 
2B Jason Hardtfce from Norfolk, IL Booght- 
oorrtract of IB Roberto Petagino from Nor- 
folk. 

Philadelphia— A ctivated RHP Ken Ryan 
from 15-day tfcc Wed fist 
st. LOUts-Recalled RHP Jose Bautista, 
RHP Serai Lnwa, INF Dmitri Young. INF Lab 
Ordaz, INF Jeff Beihllnger, INF Scott Liv- 
ingstone. C Ell Marrero, LHP Lance Painter 
and RHP Manny A ybar from LoubviBa AA 
Sent RHP Sean Lowe to Louisville. 

san feahosco— R ecalled RHP Pat Rapn 
INF WDson Detgada OF Jacob Cruz ond OF 
Dante Powell from Phoenix of PCL Bought 
contract of RHP Cory Baitoy from Phoenix. 


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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 3. 1997 


OBSERVER 


Photo Opportunities 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Because 
of Princess Diana's 
death, tabloid journalists will 
be condemned for constantly 
invading the privacy of the 
rich and famous. Afterward, 
they will keep right on doing 
it anyhow. 

Invading the privacy of the 
rich and famous pays too well 
to be abandoned simply be- 
cause the work is crude and 
coarse, and a disgusting thing 
to do, and a shameful way to 
make a living. ’ ’Money’s 
muck," as they said in Lan- 
cashire when I was a lad. 

We are all cultural slaves to 
markets nowadays, and there 
is a booming market for pre- 
cisely the kind of journalism 
that sent photographers chas- 
ing Diana through Paris on 
Sunday morning- 
Americans love it. So do 
the English, probably the 
French and, for all l know, 
also the Albanians, Kenyans 
and Pakistanis. I would not be 
shocked to learn that Outer 
Mongolians are hunkered in 
their yurts at this very mo- 
ment pondering the signifi- 
cance of Julia Roberts's latest 
marriage or divorce, as the 
case may be. 

The more famous they are, 
the more eager we are to hear 
the dark, unspeakable secrets 
they've hidden for years. 


Duchess of York, extensively 
ungaibed. , 

And in the presence of a 
gentleman! Well, a male per- 
son at any rate. And both of 
them thinking themselves 
alone, never suspecting that a 
camera was preserving the 
moment for millions. 

Did anyone, even the most 
conscientious reader of for- 
eign news, refuse to study the 
tabloid photo of President Bill 
Clinton's political ace, Dick 
Morris, cuddling on a hotel 
balcony with a prostitute? 

Morris was a hired political 
gun. His sex life was of no 
public consequence. He was 
important only because he 
was outfitting Clinton in Re- 
publican clothing. 

Still, the squalid balcony 
scene seemed artistically part 
of the shabby politics being 
played out in the White 
House. 


□ 


□ 


Of course there are elegant 
souls who consider such 
journalism beneath their at- 
tention. They want news of 
the latest UN debate, bullet- 
ins on the Sudanese econ- 
omy. the inside dope on the 
recent political coup in Cam- 
bodia. 

Yet, even readers of such 
meaty' news, you can bet, can, 
if pressed, recall the tabloid 
photo of Fergie. the divorced 


The emptiness of tabloid 
journalism evokes memories 
of Nathanael West's eerie 
Hollywood novel, “The Day 
of the Locust.” 

This was a macabre vision 
of the empty lives of ordinary 
people enchanced bv glamor- 
ous Hollywood life. It ends 
with these disappointed 
dreamers rioting in a rage in- 
duced by sudden awareness 
of the emptiness of their lives. 
The disillusioned mob's firry 
consumes the stuff its dreams 
are made of. 

We now consume “celeb- 
rities” like potato chips. And 
what is a “celebrity” if not a 
reminder that we are less in- 
teresting, less rich, less sexy, 
Jess lucky, less glamorous, 
less vicious, less talented, 
than people at the top? Ce- 
lebrities rub our noses in our 
own emptinesses. 

And. oh, how we need 
them. 

AVh York Timer Sen-ice 


From Good Life (Cuba, B.C.) to Life on the Road 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


ARIS — One day, a blues 
up in 


P ARIS — une day 

musician pulled __ 
Remy Elliott's driveway in 
a Cadillac. Young Remy 
was dribbling a basketball in front. 
"Let’s sec the bail, kid,” the man 
said. He took some shots at the 
hoop and introduced himself: * ‘My 
name's Lightnin 1 Hopkins. Your 
dad at home?” 

“He wanted my dad to put his 
records on the jukeboxes. You 
know , you never forget a name like 
that.*’ 

The Elliott family was living in 
New Orleans. Remy. bad been a 
navy brat at Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba. He was 4 when his father the 
admiral saw die writing on die wall 
and retired. Later, Admiral Elliott 
would refer to this period of time as 
B.C. — before Castro. 


His dad set up shop in the juke- 
s. Hjs tern io 


box business. Hjs territory was die 
district with the black bars nor* of 
Lake Pontchaitrain. 


An admiral's pension was just' 

At 



fine. “My father was an excellent 
cat,” Elliott says today. He has 
laiely been banging on a word pro- 
cessor in his excellent duplex in 
the Marais district in Paris trying 
to reconstruct his memories of 
B.C.: 

“Let me paint you a picture of a 
place long ago and far away . . . 
where life was neither determined 
by the grace of God nor the good- 
ness of one's mother, but some- 
where in between." 

“New Orleans was fine. I’d go 
around with my dad to service the 
jukeboxes.*’ 

Elliott formed a band with the 
son of one of the Italian bar own- 
ers. They were the only white guys 
in the band. One of the first things 
he learned was that behind the 
doors that said “black only,” the 
people were playing better mnsic 
and having more fan. Otis Red- 
ding played his high school 
prom. 

He studied architecture in 
Louisiana State University and 


Remy Elliott's father told him, “It's a dangerous life. I’m afraid you're a bad risk, son/ 


I JiiMian H— 


again, later, in Austin, Texas, 
where he also played the blues in a 
bar. Then another name to reckon 
with, Albert King, passed through 
and asked Elliott to come on the 
road with him. It took Eliott, who 
was 20, about 25 seconds to say- 
yes. 

His parents were not thrilled. 

“It’s a dangerous life,” his fa- 
ther said. “An insurance man told 


me that the average life expectancy 
of a road musician is 42. I m afraid 


you're a bad risk, son." 

Remy, who is 42 now. even- 
tually learned that his dad was * ‘ab- 
solutely right. There's no question 
about it. 1 should be dead by 
now.” 

Elliott “kicked around" in road- 
houses deep in the woods playing 
soul music in barn-like structures 
where the specialty was chicken 
fried in bacon grease. He was with 
Wilson Pickett “for a minute.” 
When a bass player he knew from 


the Butterfield Blues Band was 
hired by Cbaka Khan. Elliott went 
out to Los Angeles with him and 
joined her too. 

Chaka Khan's schedule was that 
she would go on a hard tour for 
about six weeks, then she wouldn't 
do anything for months. And then 
she’d get another batch of work and 
call everybody up again. This was 
considered a steady gig. 

The folklore could get a little 
heavy. He worked with a soul sing- 
er around Texas who hired a bunch 
of white guys to play with him for 
“minimum bread.” 

“They were happy just to be 
associated with his name. Daring 
his rehearsals there would be a 
bottle of Jim Beam on the table, a 
gram of coke and a gun. In about an 
hour, the Jim Beam was empty. 
Then the coke was gone. The gun 
was still there. At this point, the 
singer said: 'No mistakes, man. No 
mistakes.’ ” 


Along similar lines, he remem- 
bers a veteran manager advising a 
certain hot young singer, who shall 
also remain nameless for obvious 
reasons, that be should “put .the 
pipe down, put the guns away and 
get those gins with the sequins out 
of here.” 

His biggest influence was Pro- 
fessor Longhair, and he loved to 
hear Lee Dorsey sing ‘‘Woririn’ in 
a Coal Mine.” He made a record 


with the Gap Band but it flopped. 

‘ y ■ off” he 


No promotion to speax or, nc 
said. * 'No thing was straight in those 
days. Forger promotion. It was all 
payola. 1 just couldn't handle that. 
Promotion was when the manager 
sent an express package with cash 
in it and a record and maybe, just 
maybe, the record got played on the 
radio. These blues groups I played 
with were real road warriors — a 
venerable breed. But I got burned 


out. I wanted to play salsa again and 
irtoRic 


I moved to Puerto Rico. 


“There's another side to all of 
this, though- You got to remem- 
ber, man. working with these 
people involved more than chump 
change. There was plemy of cash 
and there were rimes when I was a 
couple of hundred large. I had a. 
bundle from rime to tune. Of 
course I wasn't going anywhere 
either, but I wasn’t worried about 
my future. I was still youDg and, . 
believe it or not, around this tin* I 
was starring to leant to play some 

serious piano.” 

He was in musicians heaven; - 
Freedom without obligations. 

Money without responsibilities. He 
went to the town of Woodstock to , 
play with the Butterfield Blues 
Band. It was “great music, a beau- ; 
tiful summer, and the fall was Su- 
perb. But then winter hit and igot - 
out. I hate cold weather. He was.;; 
making big- league money but slay- 
ing laid back in perpetual spring 

training. , 

Not too long ago, he was work- 
ing with Bonnie Rain in Los 
.Angeles, replacing Aaron Neville’s 
son Ivan on keyboards: “It wasn t 
exactly . . . well it was just backing 
up a singer that’s ail, and I was 
staying in the Motel Six. not the 
Ritz.” 

He felt like he was being 
“drawn and quartered" in Los 
Angeles, So his father told him: 
“Son, the world's like a big house. 
You don’t have to spend your en- 
tire life in one room. Why don’t 
you get out of this country? Rezo, 
leave America.” 

So he is now leading a Parisian . 
band with a good African rhythm 
section. Which seems to be the 
thing to do for people like him 
these days. 

"I always liked Europe,", he 
says. “1 don’t see any point in 
fin ing back right now. f bought a 
bam in the country down near 
Montpellier. It's got these tremen- 
dous old beams. I can put my ar- 
chitectural training to some use. " 

Remy Elliott & Prime Crime . 
Lionel ' Hampton Jazz Club, Hotel 
Meridien. Porte Maillot. Paris. 
Sept. 22-27. 



THE ROARING EIGHTIES 


PEOPLE 


High Times, Fast Food: Cooking Up ‘The Story of Junk’ 


By Molly O’Neill 

AVh - York Tima Sen-ice 


YORK — AH in avant-black, razor 


thin, deadpan, downtown and not about 
to endanger the fastidious contour of her 
blood-red lipstick with a superfluous smile, 
Linda Yabionsky considered the neighboring 
tables at Restaurant 147 in Chelsea. 

To her right, two women gossiped about 
friends and the hurdles that lay along their 
corporate fast tracks. To her left, a young 
couple parsed each course they were served. 

"Restaurants have gotten very serious." 
Yabionsky said dryly. 

She remembers talk of dreams and art, sex 
and drugs in the decade when she was chef at 
the hip, downtown restaurants favored by 
scene makers and scene seekers in the late 
1970s and early '80s. 

Restaurants were different then. Sybarites 
of the age of junk bonds and junk art were 
satisfied with high-style junk food, she said. 

And people who cooked for them were un- 
derpaid and often under the influence; kitchens 
were often an alcohol-drenched, drugged-out, 
seat-of-the-pants world, not the smooth, pro- 
fessional machines many are today. 

Yabionsky portrays that world in her first 
novel, “The Story of Junk," which was pub- 
lished by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in April. 

Previous generations of writers came of age 
sitting in cares. Yabionsky, 49, is one of a number 
of young Americans who came of age working in 
resraurants. 

Half a dozen restaurant-centric novels, memoirs 
and essay collections have been published in recent 
months. But most of them, like "The Butter Did 
It,” a whodunit by Phyllis Richman, the restaurant 
critic for The Washington Post, or “How I Gave 
My Heart to the Restaurant Business” by Karen 
Hubert Allison, are romps that do not reach beyond 
the pageantry of restaurants for their drama or the 
threat of dietary intemperance for their danger. 

“The Story of Junk,” on the other hand, delves 
into the underbelly of restaurants, presenting the 
physically exhausting process of cooking as a path 
to transcendence, albeit one riddled with pitfalls. 

In “The Story of Junk,” a chef can be the master 
of her universe or a casualty of glitz, drugs and 
grand schemes. 

In the middle of a different decade, Yabionsky 
ordered ginger ale on the rocks at Restaurant 147. 
It's been seven years since she retired from res- 
taurant work. 12 since she quit drugs and alcohol. 



name dives to the Empire Diner, the Lower 
Manhattan Ocean Club, 1 University Place. 


“Because I ! m small and a woman I thought 


I had to work twice as hard to prove mysel 
she said. She thinks that the discipline of 
cooking may ultimately have saved her from 
herself. 

“Cooking caught me not to be afraid of the 
knife/ ’ she said/ ’That’s a lesson that came in 
handy in cutting self-destruction out of my 
life. It probably helped me create a sparse 
prose style as well." 

Kicking heroin, along with the daily mara- 
thon of cooking upscale j unk food, the book' s 
heroine is last seen cooking contemplatively 
in a tiny health food restaurant. 

Yabionsky, on the other hand, can usually 
be found in her ground-floor apartment in 


Chelsea, writing a monthly column for Paper 

Out 


VhlH|- Cir-nb-rf-Th- '■-» Wi Turu- 

Linda Yabionsky, novelist of the hip restaurant scene. 


magazine or weekly an criticism for Time 
New York or organizing Nightlight. a writers’ 
reading series that she founded and runs at the 
Drawing Center, 35 Wooster Street. 

From her desk, she can survey the garden 
she built in the years since she quit cooking 
and started writing. 

“I am still not sure how I lived through it," 
Yabionsky said. “I worked 12-hour days, 
didn't eat. goi high, went out until dawn, came 
home and did it again. A loi of the people I 
knew then are dead.” 

Many others are writing or painting, raising 


T HE Petit Larousse, the 
French dicrionary/mini- 
encydopedia, is bringing into 
its 1998 edition a host of for- 
eign terms and names from e- 
mail to Magic Johnson. The 
Larousse team, which spent 
three years on the revamp, 
resisted a recommendation by 
France’s General Commis- 
sion on Terminology and 
Neologisms to write a 
Frenchified “E-mel” instead 
of -‘E-mail.” The dictionary' 
features recent terms like cy- 
bercafe and Creutzfeld-Jacob 
disease (“Internet” made the 
Larousse in 1995.) Also ac- 
cepted are a bouquet of ce- 
lebrities. among them the act- 
ors Jack Nicholson, Robert 
Redford and Liv Ullmann; 
singers David Bowie. Chuck 
Berry. Leonard Coben and 
Aretha Franklin; and the 
chessmen Anatoli Karpov 
and Garry Kasparov. 


□ 


aiy lir 

"Everything went so fast in the ’80s,’ ’ she said, children, running record labels or' making movies. 
“People got famous, got crazy, got sick, lost Others stayed in restaurants, providing some of 
everything. I thought 1 had to make them feel the inventiveness and finesse that has changed the 
better.” * nation's menus, and contributing to the rising stan- 

The succor provided by Yabionsky. like the dard of professionalism in restaurant work, 
unnamed narrator in her book, was not just grilled None of them go out much anymore, 
fish and roasted baby vegetables. Restaurants are too good and too expensive to 

“When I had a minute to step away from the take lightly. Yabionsky said, 
stoves, I'd take them, one or two at a time, into the “And they've gotten so well organized.” she 
walk-in fridge for a snort,” the chef in "The Story continued. "They rum the tables two or three times 
of Junk” recalls. “Here, among the lobsters and a night. You can’t just sit forever anymore." 
lettuces, the sides of beef, was my own little private Predictability has been one result of this pro- 
club, my sanctified place in the world. ’ ’ fessionalism. " ’You can get a good meal just about 

The counity was in those days just becoming anywhere now.” sbe said. “Of course, its usually 
infatuated with food, and college graduates were the same meal." 

just beginning to cook professionally. What changed everything was that 1 980s dream 

Yabionsky was an aspiring playwright from of making a quick fortune, she said. 

Philadelphia. "Unenthralled with the ivory "Artists, cooks, everybody stopped taking risks 
tower,” she ruled out graduate school. She found and started working to meet the expectations of the 
chat creating menus “offered more of an instanc people who could pay them.” she said, 
gratification than creating fiction." In the late '90s. Yabionsky said, she misses the 

Like the narrator of her noveL Yabionsky rose downtown ‘ 'where everybody was broke but doing 
quickly from scullery to chef. She moved from no- whac they wanted. ' ' 


Warren Beatty is being 
sued by a Hollywood screen- 
writer who claims that the act- 
or and producer did not pay 
him fully for his work on the 
script for “Ocean of 
Storms.” Aaron Sorkin. the 
screenwriter for "The Amer- 
ican President” and “A Few 
Good Men." filed the suit in 
Los Angeles Superior Court 
against Beatty and 20th Cen- 
turv-Fox. 



Mahathir 



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HERE COMES THE SUN — Costumed members 
of the Sun Tribe troupe dancing down Brooklyn V 
Eastern Parkway in a West Indian Day parade. 


Asians Insist 


BvM;;-— • .V 


Andy Garcia playing crime 
bosses based on real gangsters 
in Harlem. 


□ 


Nine Nobel prize winners 
meet in Prague this week to 
discuss the world in I he next 
millennium in a forum hosted 


□ 


Laurence Fishburne 

plays a character in the new 
movie “Hoodlum” that he 
says many Americans aren’t 
used to seeing — a black. De- 
pression-era gangster. “Black 
people are everywhere, and 
they've done extraordinary 
things everywhere as well as 
some things that are quite em- 
barrassing and shameful." 
Fishburne said. "There are a 
lot of stories, and a lot of them 
should get told.” "Hood- 
lum” features Fishburne and 


Singers, dancers, comedi- 
ans, impersonators and celeb- 
rities helped Jerry Lewis 
bring in a record $50.5 mil- 
lion during the 32d annual 
muscular dystrophy telethon. 
The 21 */:-hour telethon fea- 
tured performers from the 
musical “Ragtime" and a 
taped number from "River- 
dance. ’ ’ Celebrities including 
Tony Danza, Charo and 
Jerry Springer joined Lewis 
in urging pledges. -'The 
American people have set a 
new standard in expressing 
love and caring." said Lewis, 
who is the national chairman 
of the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association. 


by the Czech philosopher 
t Havel. The 


president Vaclav 
forum is being co-organized 
by the Jewish Nobel Peace 
Prize winner Elie Wiesel. 
Other Nobel Peace laureates 
due to take pan are the Dalai 
Lama, the former Israeli For- 
eign Minister Shimon Peres, 
the former Costa Rican Pres- 
ident Oscar Arias, the former 
South African leader F.W. de 
Klerk and the East Timor in- 
dependence activists Bishop 
Carlos Beio and Jose 
Ramos-Horta. The exiled 
Nigerian writer and lireramre 
prize winner Wole Soyinka 
and the 1958 medicine prize 
winner, Joshua Lederoerg, 
are also expected to attend. 



Even 1 country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to other countries really easy, 
just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country voure 
calling from and you’ll get the dearest connections 
home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 
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charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 
‘up to Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 



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calling cwhhrfde: 


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for i he cnuntn you art calling from 

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above tour name 


EUH0PE 

Austria** . 

.. 022-903-011 

Belgium* .. . 

a- 80 fl- 1 M- 1 B 

FtaotB .. 

0-80B-9M011 

Germany 

. .0130-0010 

Greece* 

...00-800-1311 

Ireland^ 

1-SOO-550-MS 

Italy* 

. . .172-1011 

Neifterfands* . .. 

0800-022-9111 

Russia **[Hosraw)».. 

...755-0942 

Spain 

900-99-00-11 

Sweden. 

OZO-79S-611 

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08S0-89-0D11 

United Kingdom* .. . 

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OWO-89-fiOH 

KIDDLE EAST 

Euypt»tcairo)r 

..510-02 00 

Israel 

. 177-100-2727 

Saudi Arabia $ 

1-800-1B 

AFRICA 


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