Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


’)l\ i & \ jS-© 


rl 


cmrcuiuGik *jL1M7 


PAGE 3' 








'mm: 



^5 



INTERNATIONAL 





The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THpWA^gM^koN POST 




Paris, Friday, September 5, 1997 \v£ „ 

. \ . i 



No. 35.6 IS 




Malaysia Threatens ^ Die in Jerusalem Mall Bombing 

Economic i Saboteurs 9 A New Blow to Peace Process 


By Michael Richardson 

liuentatioiul Herald Trib une 

SINGAPORE — Malaysia threat- 
ened Thorsday to use its tough anti- 
subversion law to arrest those who 
“sabotage’' its economy and an- 
• nounced that it had been forced ro 
postpone key construction projects 
because of damage to its currency 
from financial market turmoil. 

The moves came as fresh financial 
turbulence dragged most Southeast 
Asian currencies, led by the Malay- 
sian ringgit, to new lows ag ains t the 
dollar. 

Among the postponements. Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad said, 
was the $6 billion Bakun hydroelectric 
project in Borneo, which he said would 
be delayed indefinitely. Its developer, 
Ekran Bhd., said earlier Thursday that 
it bad dropped ABB Asea Brown 
Boveri and the other main contractors 
for the project following a dispute over 
contract terms. (Page 13 j 

Kuala Lumpur, Mr. Mahathir said, 
had “decided that recently an- 
nounced projects such as the northern 
airport, me Linear City and several 
highways will be deferred owing to 
the weakness of the ringgit.’* 

It was not immediately clear what 
effect this would have on the gov- 
ernment's high-profile plans to es- 
tablish a huge multimedia corridor in 
the country. 


In an apparent shift of policy in- 
tended to try to restore battered in- 
vestor confidence, Mr. Mahathir also 
said that a ban imposed last week on 
short-sellmg shares would be lifted 
because the problem was now “under 
control." Foreign hind managers had 
protested the restrictions. 

The threat ro use the anti-subver- 
sion law was a move that underlined 
sharp policy differences with other 
countries in the region also trying to 
halt turmoil on their stock and foreign 
exchange markets. 

Despite the arrest warning and Mr. 
Mahathir's announcement Wednes- 
day that the government would inject 
up to $20 billion into the market, 
Malaysian stocks fell for the 11th con- 
secutive day Thursday, with the 
benchmark Composite Index finishing 
down 2.62 percent, at 7 3 1 . 1 2 points , its 
lowest level since 1993. The index had 
fallen as much as 10 percent in the day 
as foreign investors dumped shares, 
before recovering on local buying. 

The ringgit fell sharply, raising the 
dollar to a record 3.0352 ringgit from 
2.9353 on Thursday. 

Analysts said investors had been 
unnerved by the government’s threat 
to use the Internal Security Act 
against Malaysians found aiding for- 
eign speculators selling off stocks and 
the ringgit The act allows for vir- 

See ASIA, Page 4 


< I ^ -is M it 




■ifeifeS #!$!?: /H 



T*ll| 


■Mt - 



tlnka Kihlmnl/ Frann-ltaM- 

A wounded woman being, treated Thursday at the Jerusalem blast scene. 


Stung by Critics, Elizabeth Will Address Her Subjects 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Scn-ice 

JERUSALEM — Three suspected 
Palestinian terrorists walked into a busy 
pedestrian mall Thursday afternoon and 
detonated bombs, killing themselves 
and four other people and wounding 
about 170 in the heart of Jewish West 
Jerusalem. 

About 3 P.M. on fabled Ben-Yehuda 
Street, which was crowded with shop- 
pers and diners at outdoor caf£s, the 
three bombers, one of whom apparently 
was disguised as a woman, detonated 
nail-studded explosives concealed in 
bags. The succession of blasts shattered 
windows up and down the street and 
sent pedestrians running for cover. 

After the blast, which was heard 
throughout the city, die police promptly 
sealed off the area, which was strewn 
with body parts, upended caf£ tables and 
chairs ana other debris. A corpse lay 
under a white plastic sheet not far from 
the Burger King, one of numerous 
American franchises in the area. 

The attack was the second here in 
little more than a month and dealt an- 
other crippling blow to the disinteg- 
rating partnership between Prime Min- 
ister Benjamin Netanyahu and Yasser 
Arafat, the Palestinian leader. 

In a statement faxed to international 
news agencies, the militant group 
Hamas took responsibility for the at- 
tack. 

Israeli officials, however, said they 
held Mr. Arafat responsible for the at- 
tack and promptly banned Palestinians 
from crossing into Israel or from trav- 
eling to other Arab countries or between 
Palestinian-held towns. 


The Israeli authorities had only this 
week begun to ease the closure imposed 
after fbe July 30 bombing of an outdoor 
market here, which killed two suicide 
bombers and 15 other people. 

Mr. Arafat, speaking with .reporters in 
Palestinian-ruled Gaza. said. "I con- 
demn completely these terrorist activ- 
ities, which are not only against the 
people who lost their lives, but against 
the Israelis, the Palestinians and the 
whole peace process." 

Mr. Netanyahu, however, rejecied 
Mr. Arafat's words as inadequate. “Un- 
less we find changes in the Palestinians' 
fighting terrorism, unless they make the 
choice between peace with Israel and 
peace with Hamas, then this process 
cannot continue," he said while visiting 
wounded at a hospital here. "We will 
not continue on this route of periodic 
bouts of terrorism." 

The suicide bombings posed a new 
challenge for American policymakers, 
in particular Madeleine Albright, who is 
scheduled to arrive here next week on 
her first visit to the Middle East since 
becoming secretary of stare. 

Declaring that terrorism would not be 
tolerated. President Bill Clinton con- 
demned bombings in Jerusalem and said 
Mrs. Albright would go ahead with a 
trip to the region next week. 

Mr. Clinton said the bombers were 
Dying to kill the peace process as well as 
innocent people and that they must not 
be allowed to succeed. He again called 
on Mr. Arafat ’s Palestinian Authority to 
“do all it can to create an environment 
that leaves no doubt that tenor will not 
be tolerated." 

See BOMB, Page 12 . 



v/-. ’*-• • > ' . 



'-sm* 

K*vl 


Jeff J MtebdUKeoien 


By WaiTen Hoge 

New fork Tones Service 

LONDON — Stung by changes that 
the royal family was unmoved by the 
death of Diana, Princess of Wales, 
Buckingham Palace announced Thurs- 
day that Queen Elizabeth D would come 
to London from her holiday estate in 
Scotland on Friday and make a tele- 
vision address to the nation on the eve of 
Saturday's funeral. 

“The royal family have been hurt by 
suggestions that they are indifferent to 
the country’s sorrow at die tragic death 
of the Princess of Wales,” the queen’s 
press secretary, Geoffrey Crawford, 
said in a statement, which was as un- 
expected as it was rare. 

“The princess was a much-loved na- 
tional figure, but she was also a mother 
whose sons miss her deeply,” the state- 
ment continued. “Prince William and 
Prince Harry themselves want to be with 
their father and grandparents at this time 
in die quiet haven of BalmoraL 

“As their grandmother, the queen is 
helping the princes to come to terms 
with their loss.” 

The royal family generally does not 
respond to criticism and the statement 
was striking for its confessional and 
defensive tone. 

A queen making a speech other than 
the ceremonial Christmas greeting or 
the reading before the opening session 
of each Parliament of the government's 
legislative goals is a great departure 
from tradition. The only other time in 
her reign that she has done so was an 
address to the nation about the Gulf W ar 
on Feb. 24, 1991. 


She was to have taken an overnight 
ride on her train, arriving in London on 
Saturday morning for the funeral that is 
expected to bring as many as 2 million 
people here. 

Since the death of Diana in a car crash 
in Paris early Sunday morning, the family 
has issued only two brief comrauniquds. 

In neither did it mention the princess, 
a point noted by people critical of die 
family for keeping its feelings in check 
and remaining in Scotland while there 
was such an outpouring of grief in the 
capital. 

The statement Thursday did not ex- 
plicitly mention the sorrow felt by die 
queen or members of the family for the 
death of Diana, whom they resented in 
life for the damage they believe she did 
the monarchy during her acrimonious 
separation from Prince Charles. 

But it has been the memory of her 
complaints of ill treatment by the royal 
family that has dominated the feelings of 
the tens of thousands of mourners who 
have been lining up to sign condolence 
books and burying In floral tributes the 
various sites associated with her. 

Anger at the family, its treatment of 
Diana and its aloofness from the as- 
tonishing wave of sorrow that has en- 

See QUEEN, Page 12 


A Diamond for Diana ? 

A Paris jeweler refused to com- 
ment on a press report that he had 
sold a $200,000 diamond ring to 
Dodi al Fayed on the day of his last 
dinner with Diana.' Page 12. 


Major Political Prisoner 
Is Released by Vietnam 


ys z stittssx * b srsas | gass 

Japanese, Welcome Now, Occupy Dalian Again 

mix in Dalian's 50 karaoke bars and 30 of China. Largely because of Japan's ~ : 

By Kevin Sullivan Japanese restaurants, some of which occupation of this region from 1905 — r \ 

Washington pos: Service rival Tokyo’s fanciest. People shop at until 1945, Japan and China remain un- lJSS]A / v " 

DALIAN. China - -A — J 

mocks artS work the assembly golfat fo^an.but 1945 to MONGOL* 

ines at Mabochi Motors, using Jap- “ o ^ c ; not iSTnSttastero China. During his J . &A 

nese metals, Japanese Djachmw and jjjis * gne ^ welcome. four-day visit, Mr. Hashimoto wiU visit •Jm 

apanese technology to make mororsfor xmtog fought two a war memorial near Shenyang, then -LgFk 

omputer components that will be sold fa ^f^r hinfT and both times the move on to Dalian to see Japan s grow- 

nainly in Japan. _ , . rr? * „ n ,i this northeast comer ing industrial might in a city that was ' „ J 

Thousands more Chinese laborers banlegro once the repionaTbeadquarters for the CHINA Shanghai 


MONGOLIA fS Shenyar 




omputer components that will be sola 
nainly in Japan. 

Thousands more Chinese laborers 
/ork in dozens of other Japanese elec- 
ronics factories in a modem industrial 
one on the outskirts of this booming port 

ity in northeastern China. Working be- 

eath the Japanese flag flying alongside 
teir own, they follow strict workplace 
ales written in Tokyo. No one speaks.no 
ne smiles, but no one complains, eam er » 
ecause workers earn $75 a month 
bout S25 more than the average wage at 
xal Chinese companies. 

Near die waterfront, Chinese locals 
nd Japanese executives and tourists 

Newsstand Prices — 

Nidonau 10.00 FF Labanon -U . £000 

Anuses 1230 FF 

Sameraon...1.600 CFA Qatar. iWgOR 

Snot. ,££ 5.50 B&lrion 12^0^ 

SSbTZiOOOFF |autfAiabfc---^0^ 

Sabon 1.100 CFA Senega! 1.1000* 

toy- — 2,800 Life Span-..- — -225 

Jvoy Coast. 1.250 CF* Tunsa. “J 

ffuaait 700 Fib US- ML (Eur.)--51-20J 


Hashimoto Soothes C h i na 

Prime Minister Ryufam Hgjjj- 
moto sought to calm Chinese fears 
over the U.s. -Japanese security al- 
liance as he met his counterpart, u 
Peng, in Beijing. Page 4 - 


Japanese Imperial Army. 

Anti-Japanese rallies pop up all over 
China at the slightest provocation, and its 
leaders remain angry at what they see as 
Japan's unwillingness to acknowledge 
or apologize for its past aggression. 

See CHINA, Page 4 


BURMA 


VIETNAM 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Past Service 

HANOI — Vietnam on Thursday 
freed one of its longest-serving and 
most prominent political prisoners, 
Pham Due Kham. 

Human-rights groups and diplomats 
said they hoped the release might mark 
the beginning of a new effort by the 
government to resolve some lingering 
rights cases. 

Mr. Kham, 65. had been imprisoned 
since 1990 as pan of a small, loose circle 
of southern intellectuals and others who 
circulated a clandestine pro-democracy 
newsletter called Freedom Forum. 

He had served seven years of a 12- 
year sentence for plotting to overthrow 
the government when he was released 
Thursday afternoon after two weeks of 
secret negotiations involving family 
members and eventually the U.S. Em- 
bassy here. 

It agreed to give Mr. Kham a visa, 
invoking a rarely used U.S. law to grant 
the emergency visa as a “public ben- 
efit,” 

He was scheduled to leave Vietnam 
to join his wife and children in San 
Francisco this weekend. He said he 
hoped to return to Vietnam and would 
decide later whether to resume his pro- 
democracy advocacy. 

“I had hoped for this day for a long 
time,” he said in an interview ar the 
small Hanoi hotel where be was staying 
with a nephew. 

Mr. Kham was recently brought to 
Hanoi from Vietnam's notorious Camp 
5 prison in Thanh Hoa Province, 240 
kilometers (150 miles) south of Hanoi, 
and the government invited a Wash- 
ington Post reporter to be on hand for the 
release. 

"I’m shocked,” Mr. Kham said 
“I’m in shock sriU.” 

He said that his Freedom Forum 
group never aimed to overthrow the 
government. 

"AH we were crying ro do was push 
the process of democratization, he 
said. 

He added that he believed his biggest 
problem was that he spoke out too early, 
advocating rapid political change at the 
onset of the country's experiment with 
liberalization in 1986. 

* ‘I do think chat I spoke too early,” he 
said. “The process of opening and 
democratization — to go into an entirely 


new system — needs time.' ’ 

He attributed his release to what he 
said was a changed environment both in 
the country and abroad. 

This includes a gradual move toward 
more democratization by Vietnam's 
Communist Party and the elderly lead- 
ership’s recognition of the need ro adapt 
to a changing world since Vietnam 
joined ASEAN, the Southeast Asian 
club of nations, and entered a new dip- 
lomatic relationship with the United 
States two years ago. 

He was released while the Communist 
Party has entered what some here have 
described as a painful and wrenching 
debate about the country’s political fu- 
ture and the governing party's role in it 
Government leadership changes are 
expected later this month and could 
bring more younger members into the 
ruling circle. Recent elections to the 

See VIETNAM, Page 4 


AGENDA 

Explosions Bock 
3 Havana Hotels 

MEXICO CITY ( AP) — Explo- 
sions shook three tourist hotels in 
Havana on Thursday, and the Itali- 
an government said an Italian res- 
ident of Canada was killed. 

The blasts, at the Copacabana, 
Chateau and Triton hotels, ap- 
peared to be part of a campaign by 
dissidents aimed at Cuba's increas- 
ingly important tourist industry. 

Governor Resigns 

Governor Fife Symington of 
Arizona was forced to resign and 
faces the prospect of prison after a 
federal jmy found him guilty on 
seven felony counts of defrauding 
his lenders as a commercial real 
estaie developer. Page 3. 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

A Republican Raps Republicans 

Books Page 9. 

Crossword Page 12. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


Race for 2004 Olympics Comes Down to the Wire 

” ■ ■ . .... — . i .L_ xmitinn that tUa untart hmire twfnr# thA h 


The Intermarket 


Page 7. 


Cameroon 
Egypt — 
Prance „„„ 
Sabon ...... 

Italy. 

Wy Coast 
? Jordan 


By Ian Thomsen 

imtMMional Htnld Trihuw 


nocent compared with the upcoming 
vote of 107 largely upper-cnist Inter- 
national Olympic Committee voters. 
The winner of their race will imme- 


— 77ZZ- e„nWHflnd The The winner of their race will imme- 

LAUSANNE, Swt B last diately be saddled with expenditures 

outcome of many uiy P predict budgeted at close to $2 billion, with a 
summer in Atlanta was * r ^ potential economic payoff for city, re- 
than the election tnai the 2004 gion and country reaching imo billions 

Friday to name a host city ror me gf dollars more. 

Summer Olympics- running The predicted winner, according to 

While those races aroun ^ ^ among the delegates at Lausanne 

tracks and .^Sy inSon- and the way faey have voted in the past, 
Atlanta paid off 0C ^i°|!rSg for C ham- seems to be Rome, which like the other 
dollar endorsement conus ics cities began campaigning two years ago 

“onsofihenesh-MdjilorfOlymp ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 0 ^ mpjcs ^ 10c 

that competition seems nui 


voters and other experts caution that 
they have never seen a closer race. Any 
of the other four finalists — Athens. 
Cape Town, Stockholm and Buenos 
Aires — could be the winning name 
announced from the stage by Juan Ant- 
onio Samaranch, die IOC president, as 
he tears open the envelope in the early 
evening Friday, Academy Awards 
style. 

So important are the Olympics that 
Presidents Nelson Mandela of South 
Africa and Carlos Menem of Argentina 
have come halfway across the world to 
the IOC's home base of Lausanne to 


address the voters hours before the bal- 
lots are cast Luciano Pavarotti will be 
one of the speakers on behalf of the 
Roman bid. 

"I have told Pavarotti not to say 
anything, just to sing,” said Primo Ne- 
biolo, a controversial IOC delegate 
from rtaly who is also president of the 
international federation overseeing 
track and field and has campaigned vig- 
orously for Rome. 

He has turned off some voters while 
winning over others. 

See GAMES, Page 20 


The IHT oo-line www Jht.com 
The Dollar 


NewYoiK •nmr8dayB4P.M. pteviousdog? 

DM 1-8157 1.8165 

Pound 1-5832 1.586 

Yen 120.95 120.635 

FF 6.108 6.1206 


The Dow 


786754 7894.64 


change Tfmaay e 4 P.M. previous ewe 
4&00 mss 92735 


I 







PA- 


E 


Mi 


Both 

New 

Bast 

Tom 

DriP 

dew 

MIM 

Olio 

Mim 

Kara 

Seat 

Anol 

Team 

OoU 


AHQI 

Flori 

Nm> 

Men 

Ptiik 

Hot* 

Pith 

SLL 

Cine 

Oilc. 

Los, 

Son 

Coto 

San 


pm 
Ki> 
Mi-C 
L— t* 
am 
Pitts 
Jr. 
Alon 
Lot* 
14 
HPs 
P|lt5 
Mr 
ABn 
Ke 
and 
W— 


INTERNATIONAL herald TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 19h 

PAGETWO 



Unrest in the Golan / Village Protests Arrest of Student 

Espionage Case Revives Druze Bitterness 


By Douglas Jehl 

/Ven' fiwf Times Sen ice 


M AJDAJL SHAMS. Golan Heights — At 
rhe entrance to this mountain village, 
charred tires speak of an anger that is 
welling once again among the Druze in 
their Israeli-held lands. 

Most of the 18,000 Druze m the Golan live here, 
just a shout away from Syria, to which they are 
bound by history and blood. But since Israel captured 
the heights in the 1967 war. it has permitted only a 
few to venture back across the border, and now one 
of the most admired among them, a 32-year-old 
woman, has been taken away by Israeli plainclothes- 
men and accused of being a Syrian spy. 

The arrest may have been merely the latest in 
what many Druze say amounts to three decades of 
Israeli indignities. But in the apple orchards that spill 
down the Golan's rocky slopes, and particularly in 
the homes whose residents had begun to dare to 
display rhe Syrian flag, whar happened ro rhe wom- 
an, Ilham Abu Saleh, is seen as a warning sign. 

"This is directed at all of us." said Kaiim Abu 
Saleh. 27. who shared an apartment with his sister in 
Damascus and says he is certain of her innocence. 

At his home in Majdal Shams, where a pho- 
tograph of President Hafez Assad of Syria hangs in 
the living room. Mr. Abu Saleh said angrily, "I 
think that the Israelis are trying to force all of us to 
think twice." 

The young woman ’s relatives are by no means the 
only ones to have turned belligerent/ After she was 
taken from her family home in the early hours of 
Aug. 24. residents builr barricades to keep the Israeli 
authorities away and staged a raucous daylong 
protest that served as a reminder that discontent with 
Israeli rule extends beyond the usual focal points of 
the West Bank and Gaza. 

"I'm a Syrian, so of course I'm pro-Syrian, ' ' said 
Fouzi Abu Jaber, who was bom in Majdal Shams 45 
years ago. long before Israel captured the Golan. 
Mr. Abu Jaber spent 10 years in an Israeli jail — 
convicted, he said with pointed irony, of ‘‘spying for 
the enemy" — and now' he is among the leaders of 
a community group, the Academic Association of 
the Golan Heights, that has helped to keep that 
national consciousness alive. 

The Druze religion is an offshoot of Islam, and 
the world's 1.5 million Druze are both Arabs and 
Muslims. Most have proved fiercely patriotic in 
their allegiance: The 500.000 Druze in Syria are 
staunchly anti-Israel, while in the Galilee 'area of 
Israel, the 90.000 Druze who live there have taken 
Israeli citizenship. 

A nd even in the Golan, whose total pop- 
ulation of about 34,000 includes some 
16.000 Israelis, some have cast their lot 
with Israel, including Salim Shufi. the 
Israeli-appointed mayor of Majdal Shams, who is a 
former officer in the Israeli Army. But most of the 
Druze have resisted Israeli anempts at assimilation, 
choosing instead to heed a longstanding sense of 
loyalty to Syria. 

In Majdal Shams, nearly everyone in the village 
has relatives on the other side of the long border 
fence, some of them just across a valley where, 
when the wind is right and lungs are strong, 
on either side shout their news back and for 



Bwul J t^Th 1 \rm Tim--* 


Naif Abu Saleh holding a portrait of his daughter, Ilham, who is in Israeli 
custody on spying charges. On the wall behind the father in his Golan Heights 
home is a picture of President Hafez Assad of Syria. 


Once that was the only means of communication 
between the Druze in Syria and those who found 
themselves in territory now called Israel, since Israel 
formally annexed the Golan 16 years ago. Now there 
are long-distance calls, at about S2 a minute. 

And periodically, first from 1977 to 1981 and 
then since L9S9, the young and gifted among them 
have been permitted to make their way northward 
across the demilitarized zone monitored by the 
United Nations to Damascus, die Syrian capital. 

Ms. Abu Saleh, who joined that group in 1993 
after divorcing her husband, took a degree in psy- 
chology in June at the University of Damascus, 
where she was president of the Golan Druze stu- 
dents' association. That made her a respected figure 
among the 300 or so Golan Druze who now study in 
Syria each year, and her relatives say she had 
planned to return to the Syrian capital to begin 
graduate work in classes. 

But since her arrest, none of the students has been 
permirred back across the border. {On Wednesday, 
82 Druze students were permitted to cross into Syria, 
but only after passing what Israeli officials de- 
scribed as very strict security checks. ) 

Ms. Abu Saleh has not yet been charged with any 
crime, but she remains in custody, under inves-- 
ligation for what Israeli officials say may be serious 


security offenses. Israeli officials have suggested that 
she may have had a romantic relationship with Sakiv 
Abu Jebil. a member of the Syrian Parliament, and 
may have provided the Syrian authorities with in- 
formation about local residents in Israel's employ. 

People in Majdal Shams say this is absurd. Any- 
thing that Ms. Abu Saleh knew about internal pol- 
itics was known to everyone in the village, they say, 
and Mr. Abu Jebil is her 70-year-old great-uncle. 

Syrian officials, including the rector of the Uni- 
versity of Damascus, have asked for the United 
Nations to intervene, calling the arrest part of Is- 
rael’s "barbaric oppression'* of Syrian students 
from the Golan. 

The Israeli annexation of the Golan in I9S1 
prompted the Druze to stage a seven-month general 
strike. Forced since then to cany Israeli documents, 
only about 10 percent have agreed to become Is- 
raelis. Papers issued to the others list their cit- 
izenship as "undecided.” 

And after what happened last week, no one in the 
mayor’s office or anyone else in Majdal Shams 
known to be pro-Israeli would agree to talk with a 
foreign visitor. They may have been mindful of 
graffiti that have begun to appear on village walls: a 
swastika with the slogan ‘ ‘Death to the Collab- 
orators." 


Ex-Soviet Spymaster 
Seeks Residency in US. 


By Walrer Pmcus. 

II ‘a t hingum Aar Sirrici . 

• WASHINGTON — Oleg Kalugin, a 

legendary former chief of Soviet es- 
pionage 'and counterintelligence who 
has written about his involvement in the 
death of a U-S. double agent, is seeking 
to become a permanent legal resident or 
the United States. 

The attempt by Mr. Kalugin, a retired 
KGB major general, to obtain a green 
card was disclosed to The Washingren 
Post by several retired CIA clandestine 
operatives who oppose his application 
and are worried that the agency might be 
assisting him. 

"When you consider what he has 
done as a major figure in the Cold War, 
recruiting Americans to spy, even brag- 
ging about arranging murders, including 
one of a double agent who was an Amer- 
ican citizen, you have got to object,” 
said a former top clandestine official for 
the Central Intelligence Agency. 

Bui Paul Joyal, a former staff member 
of the Senate Intelligence Committee 
who works with Mr. Kalugin in the 
Washineton-based consulting firm In- 
tercon USA Inc., insisted the former 
officer of the Soviet secret police and 
intelligence agency ‘ ‘is trying to turn his 
life around and move forward.” 

Mr. Joyal said Mr. Kalugin’s public 
revelations about the KGB and oppo- 
sition to its leaders in die 1 990s. his brief 
service as a member of the Russian 
Parliament and his 1994 memoir. "The 
First Directorate.” helped contribute to 
the demise of the Soviet empire. 

Mr. Joval said the opposition to giv- 
ing Mr. Kalugin a green card was com- 
ing from "an unholy alliance" of 
former CLA and KGB officials "who 
want to make Kalugin's life miserable 
everywhere. ' - Mr. Joyal said Mr. Kalu- 
gin's current three-year work visa 
would run out within 1 8 months and that 
his life would be endangered if he were 
forced to return to Russia. 

There is no formal mechanism for 
opposing an application for a green 
card, according to the Immigration and 
Natu raliza tion Service spokesman. 
Russ Bergeron, who said that when the 
agency considers applications, "we do 
not invite public comment as pan of the 
decision-making process.” 

Since he left Russia in 1994, Mr. 
Kalugin has taught at Catholic Uni- 
versity. made speeches around the 
United States, joined the former CIA 
director. William Colby, to create a spy 
game and worked at Intercon as a con- 
sultant on Russian business ventures 
with clients that include AT&T Corp. 

Mr. Joyal said Mr. Kalugin did not 
plan to become a U.S. citizen and * *is not 
a defector and is not going to be one.” 
He-derued that Mr. Kalugin Was talking" 
about his past to the CIA. "He is not 
going to give up people who put their 


trust in his hands.” Mr- Joyal said. . ,'jj * 

CLA officials refused to comment 
whether the agency was helping Mr> : 
Kalugin obtain a green card. In 
the CIA spokesman Mark Maasiffilatjv 
said the agency's policy was. not At%:. 
discuss whether it nad a relationship* > 

with any individual. ' 

It is not known whether Mr. Kalugin is^.y 
cooperating with U.S. foiefflgenee/On^_ 
former top clandestine officer said oe 0 . 
had provided information “but it is notr _ 
new. and not worth keeping him here.*" 


T -ti 


New Round 
Of Slaughter 
Hits Algeria 

The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — In the latest mas- 
sacre in Algeria, an aimed group 
descended on a northern village, 
slitting die throats and burning the 
bodies of 22 people, residents said 
Thursday. 

The attackers entered El Arbi, a 
village 100 kilometers (60 miles) 
south of Algiers, early Wednesday., 
die witnesses said. 

In the capital Algiers, five people 
were killed Thursday and 20 were 


ly and 21 

wounded when a bomb hidden in a 
basket exploded in a residential 
quarter, rescue officials said. 

No one claimed responsibility for 
either the massacre or die bombing.. 

Algeria has been wracked since' 
1992 by an insurgency by Muslim, 
extremists who are seeking to oust 
the military-backed government. 
More than 60,000 people have died 
in violence. 

The bloodshed has increased in 
the last few months: Up to 300 
people were killed in an attack last 
Friday, and there were more mas- 
sacres over the weekend. 

In another attack, two regional 
leaders of the Armed Islamic Group, 
the most violent of the anti-gov- 
ernment groups, were killed Tues- 
day by government security forces, 
according to the La Tribune daily. 

Last week. Abassi Madam,, die 
former leader of the banned Islamic 
Salvation Front who is now under 
house arrest asked the UN sec-' 
tetaiy-generaL. Kofi Annan, to have, 
the United Nations mediate in Afc 
geria. But President Liamine Zer-" 
oual rejected the idea. He told Mr. 
Annan that his government’s ef- 
forts to resolve Algeria's political 
problems, hid wide public suppoirt, - 
state-run media reported. 


m 


i 




i *_ 

4 "i 



‘Black Box’ Stolen From Site travel update 

Of Phnom Penh Air Crash Close Call Over India 


Comoros Says It Recaptured Rebel Island 


C-yiyiiW hy Our 5utfFn.ni C'apjn hrt 

PHNOM PENH — Looters have 
made off with a "black box” flight 
recorder from the wreckage of a Vi- 
etnamese plane that crashed in Cam- 
bodia, killing at least 64 people, an 
aviation official said Thursday. 

Preliminary findings, however, 
showed that the pdor was off course 
when the Vietnam Airlines Tupolev Tu- 
134 made its approach at Phnom Penh 
airport Wednesday, but he was too low 
to regain altitude and correct his flight 
path, the official said. 

Sok Sambaur. deputy director gen- 
eral of Cambodia's airport authority, 
said that one of the plane's flight re- 
corders had been recovered but that the 
second had been stolen when looters 
descended on the crash site. 

He said he did not know if it was the 
flight data recorder or flight deck voice 
recorder that had been stolen. 

People were seen rifling the pockets 
of victims, rummaging through the 
wreckage and carring off broken pieces 
of rhe aircraft. 

“We have to let people know by TV 
and radio there's nothing valuable in- 


side and we need it to further investigate 
the accident and we will give a reward,” 
he said. 

He said preliminary findings were 
that the pilot was off course when he 
began his approach to land after flying 
from Ho Chi Minh City in southern 
Vietnam. 

Doctors in Phnom Penh, meanwhile, 
said a 4-year-old boy being treated in a 
Phnom Penh hospital for serious head 
injuries could be a second survivor from 
the crash. 

The airline originally said dwt 66 
people — 60 passengers listed on the 
manifest and six crew — had been on 
board the plane. 

•The name of the sole confirmed sur- 
vivor — an IS-monrh-old Thai boy ap- 
parently accompanied by bis mother, 
who died in the crash — was not listed 
on the manifest. 

But doctors at Kanta Bopha chil- 
dren's hospital said Thursday that they 
were treating a 4-year-old Vietnamese 
boy for serious head injuries and broken 
ribs. The boy was.betieved to have been 
listed on the manifest as a child pas- 
senger. i Reuters. AFP ) 



Are You Prepared ? 

1997 S 1998 Will Generate 
Major Currency Moves. 

These moves wifi directly effect the value of 
your Portfolio. Prepare yourself to take 
advantage of these moves by calling today. 


SUPERIOR Selection of Managed Accounts 
OUTSTANDING Globa/ Currency Analysis 
EXCEPTIONAL Exocutton Forex or Futures 
MINIM U MS ffO.OOO ft) SS.OOO.OOO (USOj 

COMMISSION 2S FX Saneds Futons S12S3B 


For My Complimentary Services Guide, Latest Re-search Reports. 
Opinions and Performance Records Call (24 hours) Toll-Free. 


Australia 1800125844 
Colombia M012M37 
France 0800002248 
Hang Kong B0098T209 
Japan 0031120809 


Belgium 08001 S880 
Denmark 80016132 
Greece 0800119213013 
Israel 1771000102 

Korea 0038110243 


Mexico 058008784178 aVirtfarrlaatfi 080220657 
Portugal 050112632 Singapore 6001202501 
Spain 900931007 Sweden 020793158 
ThaHaad 001800119216813 VSA 9009945757 


Brazil 00081192155131 
Finland 08001110064; 
Germany Q 130829666 
Italy 167875828 
Luxembourg 06004552 

H. Zealand 0800441880 

SJfrice 0600098337 
Switzerland 0800897233 
IV 0800066632 


US-Toll Voice Lino +714-37&-8020 US-Toll Fax Line +714-376-8025 


>i* our 

Recruitment 

even, iWondav 
in The InK’rmarkfi 


NEW DELHI (AFP) — An Indian 
Alliance Air Boeing 737 carrying 100 
people had a close call with a military jet 
near New Delhi on Thursday, the United 
News of India reported. 

Disaster was averted when the Indian 
Air Force pilot swerved after sighting 
the 737 approaching from the opposite 
direction at an altitude of 29,000 feet 
(9,660 meters i, die agency said. There 
have been some 20 near collisions in 
Indian skies since November. 

Hungary Tourist Plan 

BUDAPEST (Reuters) — Hungary 
hopes to increase its revenues from tour- 
ism by 1 0 percent this year and by 60 to 
70 percent in the longer term, a gov- 
ernment spokesman said Thursday. 

Elemer Kiss said that the government 
had approved a tourism development 
program ro raise revenues from S2.2 
billion in 1996. 

The police evacuated more than 120 
French tourists from the Nile cruise ship 
Alexander rhe Great on Thursday after it 
collided with a barge, a police spokes- 
man said. ~ (API 

British Airways said Thursday that 
it would add the airline Portugalia to its 
frequent-flier program . ( Bloomberg l 

Peru will open bidding next year for 
a private concession to expand and op- 
erate Luna's international airport, ihe 
country's largest, according to Presi- 
dent Alberto Fujimori. ( Bloomberg i 


Reiners 

MORONI. Comoros — The Co- 
moros government claimed Thursday 
that its forces had recaprured all stra- 
tegic points on the secessionist Nzwani 
Island including its main town. Mut- 
samudu. 

Nzwani is also known as Anjouan. 

"The Comorian forces have capture d 
the strategic points of Anjouan and the 
regional capital Mutsamudu as well as 
the symbols of the state including the 
presidential residence," said a state- 
ment issued by President Mohammed 
Taki’s office. 


There was no independent confirm- 
ation of the claim after witnesses earlier 
reported heavy fighting. 

Government forces met fierce resis- 
tance when fighting started early Thurs- 
day moming ar Mironrsy. three kilo- 
meters east of Mutsamudu, and spread 
into the town itself, according to wit- 
nesses contacted by radio. 

The Island Frigate, one of two ships 
requisitioned for the invasion, was hit in : 
the assault, witnesses said. 

Mr. Taki's government assaulted 
Nzwani Island early Wednesday to 
crush a secessionist revolt. The troops 


attacked Domoni town and the airport at 
Oiiani. seven kilometers east of Mui- : 
samudu. before moving toward the cap- 
ital. witnesses said. ■ - - • 

In a separate statement, the Comoros ■ 
Foreign Ministry said the operation had ; 
been carried out "without bloodshed.*' 
But two wounded government soldiers ' 
were brought back by air to the main ■ 
Njazidja Island, also known as Grande- j 
Comore, on Thursday morning, wit- 1 
nesses at the airport said. A senior sad - 
official in contact with Nzwani earlier ; 
reported many were wounded and some : 
killed in the fighting. ! 


WEATHER 


Esi 1911 1 
"ihe Oftgifli d" 
lust tell the taxi driver, 
“Sank roo doe noo~ >2 

5, rue Ctamou Pans (Open; 
Tel.: Ill 42.61.71.14 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELORS * HA57BTS • DOCTORATE 
f« KM. Life and Arad* me Exrencncei 
Through Cametet Heme Study 
( 008 ) 597-1909 EXT. 23 
BUI (3101 471-6456 
Mpjhrmt .pwu-hi.edu 
Fax o> serf detrierfrtstro hr 
FREE EVALUATION 
Parific Western University 
iriOAiah.SiiW.Dew 23 ' 
HonoMu, HI 968144322 


Europe 


T«tay 

TorTTOrror; 




High 

LOWW 


OF 

OF 

OF 

C/F 

Al-ian* 

.V-iN 

l*W 1 

CtJ?: 

I9Y<'- -.h 

rfiiyn 

18*4 

9-46 ; 

17 -ec 

10*50 pc 


22 ?i 

5 41 , 

^*71 




i^-e; 1 



8are-k-*yj 

* 7 . 

ie-cJ •) 

K-cy 

1* 04 K 


K-3E 

1 

7*-ec 


Perr»r 


USSfc 

JK( 

li?: CZ 

Bnswh 

tew 

1*50 r. 

1 k *;-i 

nr;-. 



IT CL cc 

OfH 

1C <1 K 


2I-T- 

1M1 vh 

1 1V 

rc 

rv-i s-> 


I T o? 1 

nae 

l^r+o 5 

C'.tlm 

17-W 

*■* He 

1 


E-witi*!* 

If s? 

IJ'53 / 

10 *; 

11 V •• 

Fy.-KKf 

»«• 


Ti 84 


F«3n*ji/n 

25-77 

11V, c 

41 - J 

11 V pe 

O-xv.-a 

27-W 

14 sr p: 

:5 77 

1 S55 pc 


M'S* 

12 /S 3 r c 

•4170 

H-i? ih 

lA.nbJ 


1555 -J. 


1*51 pe 


taw 

04* V 

?l "’J 

U’ff pc 

Lx. FM mi 

e j 

_*-? “l 



Lr-pnn 

:e E 

\ti-fr5 * 

2 ~? O 


J.C ndon 

18-54 

ii-5.Tr 

21-7C 

C f J 1 


3 V 1 ’ 

^“•6r bh 

K-89 

f ' a-. 

UoSor^i 

wee 

l&nl p: 

.■.-e-82 

I7'I y 

Mim 


18 /Ai pe 

TvVJ 


Moiee a 

i* ei 

’4flpr 

18 W 


[.tuner. 

2l~i 

Il'V-: 

^ “1 


la 

lf><0 

1 •»&■> !■; 



Oau 

IW. 

ii*V pi 



-jrn, 

2068 

a. 4 ? ck 

1 “ 

iif:-. 

Prn^/r 

J7-70 

Iff 9 c 

::-n 

1 '' 10 C 

RwrtUV* 

lifj 

T44 ( C 

15-69 

WSJpe 

nip., 

SVT-j 

ilSf; 

SuW 

U 55 t, 

Bean, 

K 



•»'4 pc 

5l <*•*> 

i.’-iS pc 

i?U. 

i«r. c 


l>6C 

:?5}r 

l^ro 

II--V-* 



• c 

2170 

11 


■ w 

1 J- J5 c 

nv> 

i;v c 



9 48 t 

16-64 



i--8h 10-fJp-: 

»8I 

tyve p- 


X- 7? 

H-€l pe 

;j:5 

ijr.'r: 

•VaiUii . 

;*JTf 

ii*S! rc 


i;. 4 1 -v- 


L>7“ 

lAtl i 

— "■ 

' ’>:? c 

Middle East 

•Si-uEVi rrt 

4*171 

07.-p-.-i s 

I-:-'. 

:-ao A 

E'ruUI 

;>p p; 

'-‘KA c 

T'l-fl.' 

j: 7l -.1, 

■raid 

JL7? 

ie6J i 


!9-r< p; 

C-amaieg-. 

3: 93 

lUKs 


te 61 • 

JcviAik-m 


14S?S 


14-0 7 

lull JT 

?? '4M 

i/.bi j 

.17 -f 

20 GA \ 

Rr»*rt- 

t? KYT 

74— f ; 

4I.TX. 

K — • j 


Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



’ Jr & w ‘*‘ ar ™ W V 

North America Europe 

The Northeast and New Quite warm ham Romania 
England wiN pe sunny and nonhward to Poland and 
m'ldar ihis weekend Thun- into western Russia Saiui- 
Jsriioirrts will tumble day. Du: thunderstorms win 
acre 55 rhe Midwest and rumtjw through later Saruc- 
in* no' them Plains. H aril day mto Sun-Jay l» will be 
be hoi in the Deep South oner and cooler across 
w in a mur cil clouds and central Europe from Ger- 
sunshme along with pep- many sown 10 Italy. Paniy 
up thi*vJetshow*rs Hoi -n sunny in London: hot and 
in-? J-oumwesl wan men. inanity dry In Madrid 
scon ihundersJrrmj 


Asia 

Monsoonal tains will per- 
il SI across me southern 
ih.rd ol lnd*a this weekend 
Tokyo will be partly sunny 
and more hum-o with an 
at!-? moor, thundershower 
omwo Some sunshine and 
QUte warm n Seoul but a 
couple ol showers are pos- 
sible Sunny, not and dry 
across western and central 
Ch.na 


CotJh a 
Chang Mai 

CC*MT*» 

Hanoi 

Ho Cty Mnb 
HengKong 

IHamnfcod 
iate/b 
Karachi 
h Lunina 
K KiruOaki 

Man*! 

New Deo» 

Phnom Pert, 

Phuket 

Rangoon 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Taipei 

Trtrytj 

Vienbane 


Today 

High Low* 
OF OF 
1SI56S 
31*88 20*88 » 

32*89 23/73 sh 

3391 22*71 pc 
im* 33773 pc 
31-W 26.79 , 
»» 22-71 r 
29*M 2*75 pe 
31*88 2679 • 
32 W 2*75 tc 
2082 23/73 C 
*070* 25-77 8 
31 -ee S/Ti pc 
32 89 23/73* 
32188 2271 pe 
32/89 2573 pe 
XVB6 23/73 pe 
37/98 26 79 pe 
32*89 2373 pe 
32/89 20*73 ST, 
2682 2371 r 
2082 IVtl a 
27/80 227 T , 
3tW 2t/T0s h 
29/8* 24-75 r 
2079 21/70 pe 
2184 32/71 t 


High LM/W 
Cff OF 
2*75 5*8 pe 

»»l 2170a 
32*89 25(77 pc' 
3i*Ba 2271 pc 
29*8* 2475 e 
31*88 2*75 c 
29*4 2373 r 
2*82 25/77 c 
31/88 2679 r 
32 89 2478 c 
28*82 2*75 c 
4C 104 2*751 
3f *88 2*73 pc 
31*88 2475 ) 
31/88 23*73 C 
30*88 23. 73 c 
» 8 B 23*73 pc 
3S®6 24-75 all 
31*88 24-75 c 
32ffl» 25*77 pe 
■2W8Z 2373 c 
27/80 19*65 a 
29--B4 2373 PC 
JCrtM 2271 pc 
31*88 2*75 e 
28*82 3*75 pe 
28*82 2171 r 


Africa 


North America 


en^^nj/y. 

Atlinlfl 

9C3WI 

'The**- 

DtAc. 

D"V.r 

w™ 

Hanciyiu 

Motisvn 

.rt»- 

vijir,, 


Today 

High LowW 
c/f or 
15/58 11*52 sh 
:utw: H(4 
»rj ;.V5?s 
24TU 14-57 oc 
trti-J 1 

;\T\ 14S7pr 

41 (*B - JT3 s 

»-*i 11*i# PC 

4--V1 f ->, . 

?l 88 2* rs ft, 


JO mwiWV 



High Lon W 


High 

LonW 



C/F 

OF 

17-6^ -.is; jr, 

McnyspoH* 



:r.bo irepc 

Mcrthwi 

21*70 


xri 1355 Pf 

Njss m 

TUBS 


14571 

N-Wlol 

34 75 


V»fc IV-fd 1 

OrLirylo 

30-86 


&** 12 :53 pc 

Phomi, 

JT.irfo 


77 7 T llfSpc 

fan Brrvi 



Xl'-l 34/75 pr. 

Sratth* 



39--6J lf«pc 

Tcror.to 



)3 Va tarV ■■ 

••'*rtcou««r 



Ti'88 JJTjr 

IVflrhrj/ijn 

^?7I 

UK i 


Tomorrow 

High UwW 
OF OF 
24.75 14*57 pc 
1*86 11*52 pc 
3388 2475 r 
27*80 17.-62 s 
31*88 2 f -70 pc 
JOTO* 27*80 pc 

23 73 1*55 PC 
JOW 11-32 III 
217C lO'SAor. 

1*61 e sn 
28*83 16-yl c 


*jgwm 
Cape Town 
Cas Atone* 
Haros 
Lagoa 

NairrtH 

Tuffu*. 


27<60 IT/62 pc 
21-70 7*44 s 
28*84 2|,70 a 
24/70 uvso pc 

20*! 25-71 sh 
2»82 11/50 pe 
26*7» i**4 r 


31-86 
17-62 
M/a 2 
2373 
28*82 
27*80 

ra m 


18-64 pc 
7'44 pc 

aw «h 

12*53 pe 
23735 
12/53 pe 

10*64 PC 


Latin America 


B-jenccA**, ityfri lv 52 ah 

2SU4 22.71 n. 
L*"» 21-70 17 *62 nc 

Citj, 237} 'j-55, “ 

wcoJanerc 28,79 19*6pe 

S4rt«W? i»55 -yj 7 , 


/. sh-^howwa. r-#M>jdif*5toz7ns. rvon. signer lto/r« 

JVW= ' ^ =nd *rta pmyStod by AccuW«ho^.o IS/ 


Oceania 


Auckland 

Sydney 


i«7 a-afc, 
17-6? 9-43 ce 


13/55 81*6 c 

*9-158 71*62 pc 


A two-month trial 
subscription. 
Save up to 60% 

Try a specie), low cost 2-monib foal subsa-ipfion to the 
International Herald Tribune to enjoy delivery to your 
home or office every morning AND save up to 60% off 
Hie newsstand price. 


I COUNTBT/CURBfNCY I NEWSSTAND I OFffn Off 

, j PRICE ; PRICE .COVER PRICE 

‘ AUSTRIA AJS~~i 1 ,456%" 650 55 % 

! BEIGIUM/IUXEMB. B£F j 3,330 1,350 OC\ 

I DENMARK DKK I 730 360 54*/. 

I FINLAND FIM ; 624 i 310 S0% 

FRANCE f f i 520 1 210 60% 

; GERMANY DEM 1 1 82 j 72 ! 60% 

1 GREAT BRITAIN C f 47 22 I 53% 

! HONG KONG HKS • 676 2ft4 | 57% 

: ITALY m | 145.600 * 58,000 I 60% 

[JAPAN Y | 26,000 I 12,150 53% 

MALAYSIA DM • 132 I 101 44% 

NETHERLANDS MEG | 195 • 73 60% 

| NORWAY NOK : 832 i 390 53% 

i SINGAPORE SS )46 • 32 43% 

I SPAIN PTAS 11,700 S.OOO 57%, 

i SWEDEN 5EK I 332 | 350 58% 

SWITZERLAND CHf j 1 66 - 66 60% 

j USA S_i 78J 33 53% 

frai OTHER COUNTRIES, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR NEAREST IHT OFFICE 


[ Kef. I wouW li he Jo stari receiving Inc /irtanaftcna( He/oW Tnixme 
| D My efted ri endasied [payable kr lh~ IHT) 

j Charge try 7~ Ame* (2 Diner. “■ '/ISA 1 A«e» H ,Mcnh-rCard D Eorocad 
I For e*.-US ana A;.(P 1 ptXK card-. »-■ 17 :Fdrgod m Fi-xnh Frc/V.y .31 . : i,mjr.i 


Counfry 
Horry; Tel No 
E-Mail Addr«-. 


I Card Nc 

I Sr^iotuie 

| For busmen orders indtcato «> '■‘AT EA> . 


Lp Dale 



1 gol Ifin cop> ol beiHlai- Obosk 1 IU 1 -T — =; 

niddna.wi-Ji.c/^ir 


5-9-97 


IIHI YAT Number FR7i?iS}2 1 1 261 


Mr/Mri-'Ms Prjmily NcRhC-- 
Frrul Name 


.JobTiHc, 


| Mating Addrea 

| Oty/Code 


Inipnmr pjr Ofiprm. me Jr TFuin .'ili'. "vJlS P.m:. 


-/p , 85 ^^11-800-082.28^ 

2^*, 







PAGE 3 


ftPDTPMWPtt 4L4 — Uk on. 


ts 


fy faster 


. ™ rromiTVi? FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 5. 

INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TOlBt^E. FtODAI. 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


: v 

V in A Republican’s Quest: Plain Talk for the People (It Gets Votes) 

H * 1 *- . He devotes 13 naves lo the gender gap, stress- formal illS 


By Ceci Connolly 

lVjs/»#i«rfi<n Post Sen-in 


the mediocriw of his thinking has He devotes 13 pages io SdUhismnyf^ cm SS?HiU sayU would 

"The Language of the 2 1 st Century” is a how-to duration. I h^the majesty of his lan- ing that Republicans _ c „ be wrong to underestimate his knack for capping 

marketing strategy for politicians who do not been concealed y worked women, especially so- imo the American psyche with catchy phrases, 

i u_.a mmbr .. .iv M . if^n' t mme «.-hrt in hie words bnns home the bacon mio idc j ^ r . . 


. 11 I Uiuw Iiuw IU laxK IO real people — women, souna duc!». auai'K wasnincion oureaucrais, c - c»curiry xunu. «• uo..;, nimis>uuu..i.-s-ir — 

for example. conservatives a bone by atolishins the National manage YOUR -Social Secunry^ a bener j ob _- Republicans only whisper. For willing lawmaker, Mr. Luntz s blue- 

So Frank Luntz. one of the primary drafters of Endowment for the .Arts and '“stop calling the possible tha ' . . Clinton's re-election last ning the education debate hands - g ^ 0 ff ers months’ worth of tips from sample 

the Republican Party's "Contract With Amer- House speaker. Newt Gingrich, by his first name Ever ^iT^Ljrh Republican losses in the back in the debate, he "conum P ^ speeches, to hot-button phrases to a script tor 

ica," is offering to teach Republican politicians a because it shows a lack of respect. year. h ave been groping for a make tour key phrases d ‘^Going after the president: a rwo-minote 

new language to win back disenchanted voters. Unlike the 1994 Contract With America. House. Rcpnbhan _have safe, parental mvolvemenu u , 

"You have suffered through communication which listed 10 legislative commitments the strategy and rj&ro n and the Demo- equality "Sentences *^twprk P“JJ£Ul * If a Republican is at a loss for what to say about 

disaster after communication disaster, and noth- latest document was not requested by Republican Mr. Luntz note ■ . ^ ^tiens war on well . he continues, include. . . the American family, he or she can simply flip to 

ing ever seems to change,” he writes to Re- officials or paid for by campaign committees. crats continue . :*! ^ the environment, serve a chance at a quality ed who freouendY Page 145 for six c on“ nui J lcatlon . sl ^f^“ 

publican lawmakers. “Linguistically, you are out Mr. Luntz. 35. introduces his opus as "the women s issues, educatwnM^ ^ RepubHcan A controversial image with -language that works. Among 

of touch with the American people. They really mosr serious effort ever made by either parry to to name a fe ' ^ joes not begin targets his own 5^^, isine r oss the effective words: values, morality, spirituality 

think Bill Clinton feels their pain, and they really put together an effective, comprehensive na- mjjon^lb. jtasttfth Mr. Luntz drew faith in God. t , , nnthe 

think you feel nothing.’* tional communication strategy. He simplifies attractm^ m s ^ ccess ^ large states such Perot on his independent pres For the politician who is not up to speed on die 

: Mr. Luntz personally distributed his 222-page even the most complex issues such as the gender Texas Horida and New Y ork is the in 199 2. control of the twists and turns of energy deregulation^he offers 

“ v plan to Republican lawmakers as they went home gap and entitlement reform. Republicans do not he says ‘ 1 Supporting issues that One year after h ^ d no , con . seven simple principles including. P«regula 

■ > last month. A copy was obtained by The Wash- need public policy propolis, he says, they just *£££££ tion should lead to lower prices for all con- 

maton Post need to communicate better. WIIi . ,u uT C nanics not just Puerto duct detailed powngun _. p j him a sumers. 

^rom basic tips for writing a cogent Letter to a "Just ask Bill Clinton.” Mr. Lima says "He appealed by all H, span.es. ica . an admission that eventually earned him a sum 

complex formula for wooing minority voters, is a man of many opinions, most of them or snort Kicam. 

Aw ay From Politics I 

• The embattled president of the nation’s largest black 
church group has survived a determined effort to remove I 
him, as thousSids of members supported emouonal appe^s 
to forgive him for his admitted mistakes m handling the I 
denomination’s money. The failed attempt to remove Henry 
Lyons was led by a coalition of ministers who denounced 
previous votes by the National Baptist Convention USA j 
h£ to retain Mr Lyons, saying they had been cynically 
ragineeiedby Mr. Lyons and did not reflect the true wishes 
of the convention. 

• Severe thunderstorms unleashed 12-foot ( four-meter ) I 

walls of water that washed cars off roads in ^ ern County m 
*e Southern California desert, stranding dozens of mo- 
torists in the heavy downpour. y 

• The launching of the $3.4 billion Cassini spacecraft to 

explore Saturn will probably be delayed next month as a 
result of damage caused by a ground cooling-system mal- 
function. space agency officials said. J * 

• Arizona authorities have arrested two fugitive 
’ hunters who allegedly broke into the wrong house 1 n 

Phoenix Ln puisuii'of a bail jumper and shot and^lulled^ 

. young couple. . . I 

• The owner of one of the world’s most prominent art 
galleries, Wildenstein & Co., was charged wi* menacing 
ffter nolice said he pulled a gun on his estranged wife. Alec I 

— T swsssSSrSSSjS 

ss "fHfiif map* - 2 ? 

iif;J3E5£tW!.*s?,ss* American sfsfSstssusSEtf 

chief defense lawyer. John to a select few.” _ , . _ „ balloons and sophisticated planes at summer s i 

Dowd, once a week. The judge THPlfS Other Carmelites support her. One Sd, whentherelon’spoUutedaff 

set sentencing for Nov. 10. lUX Iw c'tlman has called the ban almost im-Amencm ^ i|S worst _ instead has been marking time. ^Cool 

• It was the second time in a — And Dick Hardin, owner of the Carmel Pipe Shop. spawned by the El Nino ocean cimeni -.bam 

r ~ decade that an .Arizona gov- . , Make Town's Dav said that tourists, ^ account f °r^ethanMf smogat ^ 

n Th>n1 emor faced felony charges. Tourists Don t Make lOWU s my ^ ci - s budge t of $9 million, des^veresp^t- 1987 1 ^ coincided with a clean-an year- 

■ Impatience Over lobacco Deal Repubtican, Evan - set of viUains in CarmeL Cali- --when someone comes to rown, you dbett^n^ ■ one scientist to note wyly, S**™ * 

■ ss-^'ssris ^sSsssaiaaat sse^sssssss'S?' 

tasSSEjgSSg^ IsS 

predicted Wednesday that the proposed settlement worn be torced from otrice bee Francisco known for its tiny Englisb-style mns, ^ nurces These festivals, which combine tra- youth, thewis E ure ka from 1909. the 

Sususags^SiS ashes 5E*r«nS3^ EteKasaagg 

SSSsr^ss““ ss*£| ^wSasagsg SSSISfss 

:s*ssj»e ssssaSi5£^ gaMMKe"— gS-jigaasg--" 

i».alks^U : b e , f no ai er40y^ ? Horn of ^ab^Rep^ 'in sLner. up J» :0.000 Sollthern Calif o™ a appear to be having a BnaB KnowUon 


ni tR '^ 

. ^"ugh 

n "' 


Governor Is Forced 

Arizona Republican Convicted on 


to Resign 

7 Felony Counts 


Hirin’! Me 


• By Todd S. Purdum 

' New York Tinits Sen iVc 

' PHOENIX. Arizona — A 
federal jury convicted Gov- 
ernor Fife Symington of Ari- 
■ zona on seven felony counts 
, 2 of defrauding his lenders as a 
commercial real estate de- 
veloper, forcing his resigna- 
tion from office and leaving 
him facing the prospect of 
prison and hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars in fines. 

; "I have never been one to 
linger, and I don’t intend to 
start now,” a solemn but 
composed Mr. Symington 
told supporters in a farewell 
announcement at the State 
Capitol about 90 minutes 
after the verdict Wednesday. 

• "My lot is to offer best 
wishes and full support, to say 
thank you and move on.” 

■ The jury was deadlocked 
oh 11 of the 21 counts over 
all. and it acquitted Mr. Sym- 


ington on three of the charges. 
But, under state law, Mr. 
Symington, a Republican, 
had to leave office if con- 
victed on even a single felony 
count 

Mr. Symington’s lawyer 
said the 52-year-old gov- 
ernor’s resignation would take 
effect at 5 PJM. on Friday. 
Since the state has no lieu- 
tenant governor. Jane Dee 
Hull, the secretary of state and 
a fellow Republican, will serve 
as governor until the regular 
statewide election next year. 

After a 17-week trial that 
involved 1 more than 1 .400 
pieces of evidence assembled 
in a five-year investigation, 
the jury convicted Mr. Sym- 
ington, who took office in 
1991 and was once a rising 
star in national Republican 
circles, of filing false finan- 
cial statements in an effort to 
shore up his crumbling real 
estate business in the late 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Impatience Over Tobacco Deal 

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders say they 
! have no plans to act quickly on the proposed loi^cco 
; settlemem even though a^rocatg for * e P ropo j 

a Senate com- 

■SSSSfcasM 

Net Site on Benefits to Resume 

. cuTN.ir.TnN — Wrestling with one of the largest 
WASHINGTON vvr» * . of electronic 

test cas ®f ° f th ° W Qi n ron administration will soon re- 
information, the Uuuo ^ ple can see how much 
esiabhsh an Internet site he Social Security 

they are cnotiod »i» B ^ government wfll 
benefits, federal oW ^ e gnal privacy. ' 

■ impose new - ited advice from banks, credit 

J55S^.SSg£-S3SSfi 

financial inflation. confere nce Thursday- the 


19S0s and early ’90s. Of the 
three counts on which Mr. 
Symington was acquitted, 
one of the most serious was 
that he used his power as gov- 
ernor to threaten to steer state 
tenants away from a troubled 
center-city development if 
the union pension fund that 
financed it listed him in de- 
fault 

Judge Roger Strand of the 
U.S. District Court here de- 
clared a mistrial on the 11 
deadlocked counts, and pros- 
ecutors said they would con- 
sider whether to seek a new 
trial on those counts. 

In all, Mr. Symington 
faced 21 counts accusing him 
of lying to lenders about his 
true financial condition, of 
extorting the pension fund 
and of perjuring himself in a 
b ankr uptcy hearing. 

Mr. Symington was re- 
leased on his own recogniz- . 
ance, with the only require- 
ment that he check in with the 
chief defense lawyer. John 
Dowd, once a week. The judge 
set sentencing for Nov. 10. 

It was the second time in a 
decade that an Arizona gov- 
ernor faced felony charges. 
Another Repubtican, Evan 
Mecham. was eventually ac- 
quitted of accepting illegal 
campaign contributions, but 
i not before being impeached 

in 1988. . 

Mr. Symington was the 

third governor in the 1990s to 
be forced from office because 
of a conviction. 

Last vear Governor Jim 
Guv Tucker of Arkansas, a 
Democrat, resigned after his 
conviction on’ fraud and con- 
spiracy charges in Whitewa- 
ter-related business dealings. 

In 1993, Governor Guy 
Hunt of Alabama, a Repub- 
lican. was convicted and 
forced from office for looting 
his 1987 inaugural fund. 



Du ki Zjlub»'**kj/Thc AvaKisifd Pie-- 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Tourists Don’t Make Tow s Day 

There’s a new set of villains in Carmel, Cali- 
fornia. the town once ruled by the movie toug 
guv Clint Eastwood. They clog pine-shaded sicte- 
waUcs traipse through elegant courtyards and 
teeroverfences. Thly are tourists who to 
group walking tours. And nowthey are outiaws 
Tn Cnrmel Those tours have been banned. 

The ban isn’t the first in the town south otSan 
Francisco, known for its tiny Englisb-style mns, 
chic boutiques and ocean views. For years- Car 
mel has had no neon tights or visible scree 
addresses. Women require permits to wear high- 
heel shoes, though this is seldom enforced. May- 
or Kenneth White and others tried to ban dnppy 
ice cream cones. But with the walking-tour ban. 

some say Carmel is going too tar. 

Many admit ihere is a problem. Carmel ha. 
4.700 residents. But ia suramer^ up to -O.TO0 
tourists flood imo town every day. TJere me 
principles at stake.’ ’ Mayor White said. Bnl Gale 


Wrausmann, who runs the only licensed walking 
tour in town, blames the ban on "a smaU group of 
people who want to keep Carmel available only 

10 CWher Carmelites support her. One local coun- 
cilman has called the ban "almost un-Amen^ 
And Dick Hardin, owner of the Carmel Pipe Shop, 
said that tourists, whoaccount fat morel than half 
the city’s budget of $9 million, deserve respect. 

■ "When someone comes to tow-n, you better treat 
them as your guest.’ * he said from his shop, packed 
with tourists. ‘‘You treat them very, very nice. 

Short Takes 

In recent years. Indian powwows have been 
spreading across the country as tnbes t^ene 
pride in their heritage and seek new fiindmg 
sources. These festivals, which combine tra- 
ditional dances and religious 
times cold commercialism — fried buffalo bur 
gers and "I Love Powwows” bumper stickers 
are on offer — now number an estimated -,000 a 
year across the United States and Canada, ap- 
parently far more than even a few years ago, 
reports The New York Times. 

Southern California appears to be having a 
I second straight record clean-air year — which 


Justice Dept, to Open Inquiry on Gore’s Solicitations 

r .... ,™.V *. wav bv in tori. *e com- Mr .Gum’s 




Social Security It initially 

Internet service by *e end < f^oLd it down four 

launched the service m March bu don could be 

*— ■ em « 

coworkers and banks. 

Quote /Unquote 

Senator Tom Harkin. ^ vaca tion and 

Senate reversed a^ administration s 

overwhelmingly appr . j q „_ 0I1 cigarette sales to 

"fl^^iSSeS AWf break . Tbrt* » 

SThvS^ese folks backhon 


By Richard L. Berke 

Nw York Tima Sen iff 

WASHINGTON — As the 
Senate campaign finance 
hearines mm toward Vice 
President Al Gore, his fund- 
raising activities are coming 
under broader scrutiny and 
the Justice Department an- 
nounced that it would begm a 
preliminary examination into 
his telephone solicitations.. 

The Justice Department m- 
Quiiy is an initial step to review 
allegations that some dona- 
tions solicited by Mr. Gore 
were improperly deposited in- 
to Democratic accounts. 

In the past, several cam- 
paign finance accusations 
have been subjected to the 
<mme review and, in each case, 
the Justice Department has 


found that those accusations 
did not merit an invesrigauon 
by an independent counsel. 

But if any accusations were 
found to be credible, the find- 
ings could increase Repub- 
lican demands for an inde- 
pendent counsel to 
investigate campaign fund- 
raising during last year s 
presidential election. 

The White House has 
mounted a defense of Mr. 
Gore, anticipating the re- 
sumption of campaign fi- 
nance hearings Thursday. 

The Senate Governmental 
Affairs Committee began by 
railing its most colorful wit- 
nesses to date, three Buddhist 
nuns with shaved heads and 
long saffron robes. They were 
summoned to explain how 
they helped launder money to 


the Democratic National 
Committee. 

[The nuns told senators 
Thursday that they did not 
intend to break the law when 
they accepted reimbursement 
for political donations that 
ihev made at an event last 
year attended by the vice 
president. The Associated 
Press reported. 

[The nuns admitted in a 
statement that members of the 
Hsi Lai Temple were reim- 
bursed for their $5,000 con- 
tributions to the Democraoc 

* >a [?he statement said that if 
any law was violated, "it was 
not done so intentionally 
and that the funds did not 
come from abroad. 

[The nuns said that "wnat 
Americans call reimburse- 


ments is simply the way by 
which the Temple helps its 
monastics to meet living ex- 
.penses or to perform good 
deeds.”! 

Republicans on the com- 
mittee said they hoped die 
hearings, which resumed alter 
a monthlong break, would 
dramatize that Mr. Gore has 
not been entirely truthful about 
his participation ar a fund-rais- 
ino luncheon at a Buddhist 
temple in Hacienda Heights, 
California, in April 1996. 

I PlH Fnsllsh 

E-books 

to yoou* door 
ifllW In 7-12 dAT» 
nKflmowei • no( a dub* fres catdoff 
Tfel: +33 (0)139 070101 
1 Fait +33 <0)1 39 07 00 77 j 


In later sessions, the com- 
mittee intends to examine the 
vice president’s practice of 
making fund-raising solicit- 
ations on the phone from his 
office in the white House. 

The fresh disclosure about 


Mr. Gore’s fund-raising calls 
involves some donations that 
were funneled into a Demo- 
cratic Party bank account 
subject to federal election 
law. which limits the size of 
contributions. 


This way to 





Don’t miss it. A lot happens there. 






; ■ T r -jv 

: L; 





1 


, .informed yet impartial, the affairs of the world unfold on tke pages of the ^brld’6 Daily Newspaper. 

Comprehensive yet coDC1 ’ 


T 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5.1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Hashimoto Calms China 
Over Fears on U.S. Pact 


CantM/n OtvSu&Fw DapJrMri 

BEDING — Prime Minister Ryutaro 
Hashimoto of Japan assured his Chinese 
counterpan, Li Peng, on Thursday that 
revisions to a U.S.-Japan security al- 
liance were not aimed ar China. 

But Mr. Li told his Japanese visitor 
that including Taiwan in the scope or 
U.S.-Japan security operations was ■‘un- 
acceptable” to China, which intends to 
settle the issue of reunification with the 
island without external interference. 

“The ™iirc were very serious,” a se- 
nior Japanese Foreign Ministry official 
said. “But the atmosphere was quite 

S 00 ^’’ w T • 

Mr. Hashimoto met Mr. Lt m 
Beijing’s Great Hall of the People on the 
first day of a four-day trip that the Jap- 
anese prime minister wants to use to 
rebuild a relationship scarred by pasr 
conflict and clouded by fears of future 
rivalry. 

Chinese anxieties about the revision 
of the 1978 guidelines on U.S.-Japan 
security cooperation, as well as expan- 
ded defense cooperation between 
Beijing and Tokyo, dominated the talks. 
The visit is scheduled to mark 23 years 
of Chinese-Japan diplomatic ties. 

Mr. Hashimoto assured his host that 
the revision in the defense guidelines 
would not result in a major change in 
Japan's security role — bound by the. 
constraints of Japan's war-renouncing 
constitution. 

“The U.S.-Japan security alliance is 
not directed at a specific country,” the 


official quoted Mr. Hashimoto as say- 


He said the treaty was designed ro deal 
with defined threats to Japan's security, 
rather than a defined geographic re- 
gion. 

Beijing is concerned about Japan's 
security alliance with the United States 
and has loudly expressed anger at recent 
remarks by Tokyo officials that new 
alliance guidelines to be unveiled later 
this month would cover crises near 
Taiwan. 

Members of Mr. Hashimoto’s con- 
servative government said last month 
that the security treaty with Washington 
might oblige Tokyo ro get involved in a 
conflict between China and Taiwan, 

touching a raw nerve. China insists that 

recovery of the island is an internal 
issue. 

China's state-controlled media kept 
up its attacks on Japan's agreement to aid 
the United States in regional conflicts. 
The English-language China Daily 
called the pact a product of Cold War 
thinking aimed at containing China. 

China has considered Taiwan, a 
former Japanese colony, a rebel 
province since defeated Nationalist 
forces fled there at the end of the Chinese 
civil war in 1949. 

Beijing threatens to attack Taipei if it 
declares formal independence and de- 
nounces foreign concerns about the 
prosperous, democratic island's fate as 
meddling in China's internal affairs. 

(Reuters, AP) 



CHINA: Japanese Invest Big in a Port City 

' - >• - L..» nanllI«V 


ifAj * 



„ , an Japanese airlines have regular directL 

Continued from Page 1 Aightshere, and announcements in the* 

But things are different in Dalian. The airport 5 ky^rapers and j 

Japanese government sees Dalian as a ^ wfth Japanese money. * 

model for Japan-China relations here is exploding almost 

21 st century, a place where Ouneseset ne weai ^ ^ strength Qf 


¥ 


Tfi’H- 

- 1 * . 


2 1st century, a place where Chinese set .. on ^ strength qf 

aside historical animosmes toconceD- ^ Sj millions of dollars in 

fiiture economic oartnerehtp. unineacia , 


asiae mauiKw amiuioiuvs « rhinese labor and millions or oouars m 

irate on future economic partnership. unmese ^ el ^ sueh 


High- 1 1 ; 
0N^ Pb 


pokin'- • 


He is studying the Japanese language mMoninforei gn aid 

at a local ^entity *and says mo* “ Tde^IoTrS 

people in Dalian ihinkrelanons «ith tawmdja ' 

Japan are in their interest. . _ laicas “ vvyriV,. rj aT ,i. Research In- 

^odav wemus. *h* of econonoc tag 

By°vSg DaUaTaml Shenyang. Mr. ^ ® 

Kttsss cS=«£&s?- 

China. Tokyo U nervous about die giant sure Tcfcyo ® Pf°K« ‘Sd. 


1 '- * .. . 









China, lokyo ts nervous aooui me gw* k 

growing to its west, and it is trying to court Japanese “ I ^*2 < L- - ex _ 

better relations with Beijing without precautions to not be seen as being ex 
. . nioirivft or of makrne Chinese too de- 


harraing ties to Washington. 


to make amends for the past and to back 
up his words with pledges to remove 
more than 2 million poison-gas shells left 
behind by Japan after World War H. 


J M WIUIUUL , - , 

rt ploitive, or of making Chinese too de- 

Hihimoto intends to use the trip pendent,’ ’ Miss Inoguchi said, 
make amends for the oast and to back thing that would be seen as a new type of 
[es to remove aggression in disguise. 
i-gas shells left Many elderly Chinese like Guo \ ong- 

rid War H. jiang remember that when they were 


t-pD? 

i;nV c ' f * : 
if kvfr^' 1 

Strp 1 , V \ . . 


Denind Dy Japan aner wona waru. 

The prime minister is using his trip to young, the Japanese segregated schools, 
“make an appeal for a new era, one housing and children s parks, jailed any- 
beyond war memories,” said Kuniko one who spoke out against them ana made 
Ino«nichi. an Asian-Pacific affairs spe- it illegal for Chinese to eat nee, keeping 

h thvi nrannnc Ctflnli*. fhf thfilTVieiVCS. 1 


-caidwnSr 

rod nur>;- 

icjr ■ 


E icking the place where the Japanese Dalian have separated the horrible ac- 
ave most heavily invested in China.” tions of the Japanese Imperial Anny 
More than 1,500 Japanese-Chinese from those of ordinary Japanese. And 

- ■ . - : J have fnrmwl Fnpnil(hin$ VltO J3D- 


More man i.juu Japanese-^ uuioc uuui w — . ■ ■ 

joint venture companies have opened in many have formed friendships with Jap- 
D ali an, mainly in the past decade, and anese that have lasted decades. 


Will BuifCM/RkMfn 

Prime Minister Hashimoto bowing next to Prime Minister Li during a 
welcoming ceremony Thursday. Mr. Hashimoto is in China for four days. 


there are 4,000 Japanese among the 
city’s 5 million residents. 

In all, Japanese companies have 


“We don’t pursue the bad feelings 
from the past/’ Guo Yongjiang said- 


“We .build on the friendships we made, 


pumped more than S2 billion into Dali- and we move on from there. 




Correspondent Sentenced 
In Malaysia Over Article 

Canadian Guilty of 6 Attacks 9 on Judiciary 


Lighthouse in Disputed Isles 
Downed, Japan Rightists Say 


CnfflpfWtn OsrSkffFnmi DafvKhn 

KUALA LUMPUR — A Malaysian 
court Thursday sentenced a Canadian 
correspondent for the Far Eastern Eco- 
nomic Review ro three months in prison 
for contempt of court over an article that 
offended Malaysian judges. 

The correspondent, Murray Hiebert, 


Foreign Press 
Cancels Talk 
By Megawati 


47. of Steinbach. Manitoba, was ordered 
to remain in police custody until an 
additional $54,000 in bail was posted. 
He was then freed pending an appeal. 

Since his conviction May 30. Mr. 
Hiebert had been free on $40,000 bail. 
But he had to request the return of hi s 
passport from the authorities each time 
he traveled out of the country. 

The case concerned an article he 
wrote for the magazine about a student 
who was dropped from his school de- 
bating team. 

Chandra Sri Ram sued the Intema- 


TOKYO — A group of Japanese rightists said 
Thursday that a homemade lighthouse, which 
sparked beared debate over ownership of islands 
claimed by China. Taiwan and Japan, had been 


democracy will come to Burma and that repressive 
tactics by the military rulers show they are worried 
about the opposition. She made the comments in a 
videotaped interview, a copy of which was obtained 
by Reuters on Thursday. 


a visit to Washington and New York next week. 

At China’s bidding, Mr. Tung is reintroducing an 
old voting system that will dramatically reduce the size 1 
of the electorate in next May's legislative elections. - 
Mr. Boucher said, “We want to see the direction * i 


Creatine 

\\ ir -' 


The Nobel Peace laureate said continued arrests of and pace of democratization are mai n ta in ed. That s 


mysteriously pulled down. 
The revelation coincided 


The revelation coincided with the arrival in China 
of Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan for a 
four-day visit. The disputed islands in the East China 
Sea wifi be one of the topics he will discuss with 
Chinese officials. 

Toyohisa Eto, president of the Japan Youth Fed- 
eration, said he would send several supporters to the 
island to determine why the lighthouse was destroyed, 
and added that his group planned to build a new 
lighthouse on the island later this month. (Reuters) 


members of her National League for Democracy 
party and restrictions placed on her owm movements 
showed the leaders of the ruling State Law- and Order 
Restoration Council feared the parry. 

The interview was taped at the house of one of her 
colleagues because the journalist was not allowed 
through barricades blocking access to the opposition 
leader’s home. ~ {Reuters j 


why we question how you reconcile returning to 1 ] 
earlier methods of voting which reduce the numbers . ' 
of voters for functional constituencies. ‘ * { Reuters) - 1 


t allowed Businessmen Oppose Effort ; 
By Ramos to Change Charter 


U.S. Prods Hong Kong 
On Future of Democracy 


HONG KONG — The United States chided Hong 


MANILA — The Philippines’ most influential/ 
businessmen on Thursday told supporters of Pres- 
ident Fidel Ramos to stop trying to tinker with the - 
constitution and to make sure he leaves office next .. 
June as scheduled. 

In a strongly worded statement, four leading busi- ) 






Ch ,“‘t» ? ri , S™ s , ued lhe > t ' ma - On Tape , Burmese Dissident 

tional School of Kuala Lumpur for drop- 0 X • _ „ . . 

ping her 17-year-old son from a team SaVS KulerS rear ( JopOSltlOTl 
that traveled to Taiwan. That case was J Mr M 


Kong on Thursday over its plan to restrict the scope of ness associations said political uncertainty created by 

J _ _ . C T> _1_ V .1. ■ . I_ Z I. fk A s-s-v * 


Cm voM ** Our luff Frvm Dapuxfin 

SINGAPORE — A foreign corre- 
spondents’ association has confirmed 
that it had canceled a speech by an 
Indonesian opposition leader at the re- 
quest of Singapore's government. 

The move against the opposition lead- 
er, Megawati Sukamoputi, marked the 
first time that the Singaporean govern- 
ment has objected to a guest of the 
Foreign Correspondents Association, 
said Darren McDermott of the group's 
executive committee. 

The committee voted, 4 to 3, in Au- 
gust to withdraw an invitation to Miss 
Megawati to speak at an association 
luncheon, tentatively planned for that 
month, sources said. 

“The committee considered the gov- 


that traveled to Taiwan. That case was 
settled out of court. 

The article, which analyzed the merits 
of the 6 million ringgit l$2 million) civil 
suit, was written while the case was still 
pending. 


democracy in the former British colony, which is now 
part of China. 

Richard Boucher, the U.S. consul general in Hong 


proposals to alter the nation’s charter so Mr. Ramos ; 
could stay in power was undermining the economy. • 
The increasingly bitter debate has followed efforts - 


BANGKOK — The Burmese opposition leader. 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, says she is confident that 


Kong, speaking at a luncheon, predicted that Hong - by Mr. Ramos's supporters — and many suspect the 
Kong’s leader. Tung Chee-hwa, would be questioned president himself —-to get changes in place before his 
about democracy and autonomy from Beijing during term ends next June. { Reuters) 


Mrs. Chandra then brought the charge VTETJNAJWfj Major Political Prisoner Is Released and Granted a Visa to Travel to U.S. 

of contempt of the Malaysian judiciary * 


against Mr. Hiebert. who mentioned in 
his Jan. 23 article that her case had 
moved quickly through the court system 
and that her husband was a judge. 

Mrs. Chandra said there was an ob- 
vious conflict of interest for Mr. Hiebert, 
as his wife was a senior employee of the 
school. She contended that the article 
was calculated to excite prejudice 
against her. 


Continued from Page 1 


National Assembly, while still tightly 
controlled by the party, are said to have 
given the Vietnamese more genuine 
choice than ever before, with 61 of the 
450 assembly delegates elected de- 
scribed as ' “nonparty members." 

Mr. Kham said that the Vietnamese 
authorities put no conditions on his re- 


in his decision. Judge Low Hop Bing lease and that he made them no promises 
said the article had without doubt chal- or guarantees. 


lenged the supremacy of the law, ‘ ‘strik- He said he would decide later whether 


eminent 's request and the various issues justice. 


ing at the core of the administration of he would continue to be active in calling 


involved, and voted not to hold the lec- 
ture as originally planned," the press 
group said in a statement. 

A spokesman for the association said 
the government had explained that Miss 
Megawati was a “sensitive issue." 

In Jakarta, an aide to Miss Megawati 
said Thursday that the opposition leader 
had not been informed of any such can- 
cellation. 

"What I know is we have asked the 
association to reschedule the meeting, 
originally set for Aug. 7,” the aide 
said. 

Miss Megawati could not be reached 
for comment. She is the daughter of 
President Sukarno, who lost power in 
1966 when the current president, 
Suharto, instituted a military-dominated 
government that sharply restricts op- 
position political activity. 

Miss Megawati was removed as the 
leader of the minority Indonesian Demo- 
cratic Party in a government-backed ma- 
neuver in June 1996. Outrage against her 
removal triggered the worst riots in 
Jakarta in more titan 20 years. 

At a meeting with the journalists’ 
executive committee, a Singapore of- 
ficial was asked "whether there was an 
implied threat" to their position here as 
rejporters. "and he said, ‘No,’ " Mr. 
McDermott said. 


The high court judge said that Mr. 


for more democracy here or whether he 
would step back and let a younger gen- 




Hiebert h3d in his article repeatedly eration take over the push for reform. 


scandalized the courts and the judiciary 
by “portraying and publishing lies, 
threats, wrongfulness and culpability io 
the parents of the applicant" 

Mr. Hiebert. who has worked for the 
magazine for more than 10 years, had 
also “tendered no apology at all but a 
mere qualified expression of regret, ' ’ the 
ruling said. 

Mr. Hiebert had said in an affidavit. 


"I wish to express regret to this hon- 
orable court if what I have written is 


“He said he felt the government saw it court in Malaysia. The last cj 
as a sensitive issue, and while reporters tain, oq whose legal system J 
based in Singapore are free to call her or is based, occurred in 1949. he 
visit her for an interview, her coming “The article, we believi 
here to give a public speech might be straightforward attempt to ] 
seen as problematic,” Mr. McDermott readers of the Far Eastern 
added. ‘Review the facts of one parti 

An Information Ministry spokesman, suit, in context,” Mr. Shafie s 
Woong Wee Jai. said there would be no The Review, published in H 


orable court if what I have written is 
incorrect.” 

In his view. Judge Low said there 
appeared to be “unabated contemptuous 
attacks” by and through the media on 
the judiciary that have passed the limits 
of reasonable courtesy and good faith. 

“Ir is high lime that our judiciary 
show 5 its abhorrence to such contemp- 
tuous conduct as illustrated by the facts 
of this case,” he said. 

Although the original conviction is 
being appealed, as well as a ruling on 
admission of evidence. Mr. Hiebert ’s 
attorney, Mohammed Shafie Abdullah, 
had argued for a fine as punishment, 
saying that was normal in Malaysian 
contempt cases. 

In fact, Mr. Shafie noted, no journalist 
had ever been convicted of contempt of 
court in Malaysia. The last case in Bri- 
tain. on whose legal system Malaysia’s 
is based, occurred in 1949. he said. 

“The article, we believe, was a 
straightforward attempt to present to 
readers of the Far Eastern Economic 
Review the facts of one particular law- 
suit. in context.” Mr. Shafie said. 

The Review, published in Hong Kong, 


“People of my age should step back 
because the new environment, the new 
climate, needs new thinking." he said. 
“I will need some time to reassess. ” 
U.S. officials, including Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright, who visited 
Hanoi in June, have consistently raised 
human rights cases with the Vietnamese, 
Much of the lobbying was focused on 
Mr. Kham's colleague in the Freedom 
Forum case. Doan Viet Hoat. who is 
serving a 15-year sentence in a remote 
prison near the Laotian border. 

Vietnam issued no official statement 
announcing the release. But last week, 
when it appeared imminent, officials of 
the country's powerful Interior Ministry 
said that Mr. Kham was being freed 


mm 


fey 


Pham Due k.ham, the V ietnamese dissident, speaking in prison last year. 






because qf humanitarian reasons." longer considered a threat to the gov- 


Answering written questions, the In- eminent. 


tenor Ministry officials confirmed that 
the government had placed no conditions 
on his release and said that he was no 


Asked if the release might presage the 
release of other prisoners, the officials 
said that each was being reviewed on a 


case-by-case basis and that other releases, 
including Mr. Hoar’s, were possible. 

U.S. officials and human rights 
groups estimate that there are 70 well- 
known political prisoners in Vietnam, 
but some said the actual number could be 
much higher. 

Dinah PoKempner, deputy general 
counsel of Human Rights Watch/Asia in 
New Y ork, said in a statement: ‘ ‘ Kham's 
release is a very welcome and very over- 
due step. Sadly, he is only one of dozens- y . 
of well-known persecuted dissidents m. 
who have been the object of interna- ■ 
tional concern. 

“We fear many more languish in pris- 
ons or suffer harassment and cunailraent 
of their liberties." 

Ms. PoKempner said that since the 
Clinton administration normalized re- 
lations with America's wartime enemy, 

“the climate in Vietnam has not been 
one qf liberalization, but political anxi- 
ety tied to more repressive policies, ” 

The new U.S. ambassador here, Pete 
Peterson, said he thought Washington 
might have played a role “in a general . 
way” in convincing the Vietnamese that 
human-right issues do matter and were 
an impediment to establishing a better 
relationship with the United States. 

Mr. Peterson, in an interview, said he M] 
had raised Mr. Kham's case with Vi- 
etnamese officials on more than one 
occasion. 


ASIA: Malaysia Threatens Traders as It Refoises to Join Region in Reassuring Investors 


Continued from Page 1 


comment on why the government asked repons on business and politics in Asia, 


the correspondents to withdraw their in- 
vitation to Miss Megawati. (AP. Reuters ) 


and has a circulation of abour 14.000 in 
Malaysia. (AFP. A P) 


tuully indefinite detention without trial. 

"If they continue to break the rules 
and sabotage the economy." Deputy 
Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim said 
when asked if Kuala Lumpur would use 
the law against local stock market spec- 
ulators. “of course, we do not preclude 
that possibility." 

"But. what I'm suggesting is that 
right now as it stands, I'm satisfied 
there's absolutely no necessity for us to 
resort to any such measures. 1 ’ he said, 
adding, "We are being supported by all 
quarters." 

Mr. Anwar, who is also finance min- 
ister. said Kuala Lumpur was discussing 


sociation of South East Asian Nations. 
ASEAN groups Brunei. Burma. Indone- 
sia. Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines. 
Singapore. Thailand and Vietnam. 

Malaysia's slock market has plunged 
about 40 percent so far this year while 
the ringgit has fallen about 20 percent 
against the dollar since early July, when 
TTiaiiand triggered a regionwide cur- 
rency and stock market rout when it was 
forced to devalue the baht. 

Since then. Thailand and Indonesia 
have introduced reform measures to cur 
their large current-account deficits and 
restore investor confidence. 

Thailand agreed last month to a pack- 
age of reforms, including cuts in gov- 
ernment spending and tax increases. 


$17.2 billion multinational loan. 

Indonesia announced Wednesday that 
it would cut its budget, delay foajor 
infrastructure projects, curb luxury im- 
ports and increase exports. 

Jakarta followed up TTiursday by cut- 
ting interest rares and abolishing a 49 
percent limit on foreign ownership of 
new shares. 

In reaction, the benchmark Jakarta 
stock index closed up 4.15 percent at 
533.87 points — its highest level in a 


would restore investor confidence. 

"Malaysia is. in a sense, swimming 
against the current and looking outside 
its own boundaries for the source of the 
problem,” Dennis de Tray, chief rep- 
resentative of the World 'Bank in In, 
donesja. told Reuters. “That’s a mis- 
take. 


The reforms introduced by the gov- 
ernment of President Suharto, he raid, 
"indicated that Indonesia, in contrast,' 


week ~-while~the Itufcnesian rupiah 

was relatively stable, with the dollar Is the orLcfoal eC ° nomy # 

failing to 5.029 rupiah from 3,037.50 fidemce ™ Ms of restonn 2 coa ~ * 
From record highs in July, the stock Mr u j i_ 

index has tumbled more than 30 percent. staSJiino of^L had M 

The rupiah has fallen hv to do some hard 


a collective strategy to fight back against after negotiations with the International amount asainst the dollar since thesiart In?? ^ QOt faU b; »ck on populism or 
speculators with its partners in the As- Monetary Fund. In return, n was given a of the year ' “ e itart nat! °nahsm as an excuse for closing” 


For investment information 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday in the IHT. 




of the year. mXTV? * S? excuse for closing” 

Singapore — although not affected to Mr \ de Tra V sa »d. 

the same degree by currency volatility sia's recen^S P Uzded . b y MaJay- 
because of its strong economic funda- ei°ners fo/ : t ?”J enSlly . 10 h J ame f °r- 
mentais — has indicated that U wiU mess cauw^hi P robtem S **- 

ahead wuh financial deregulation andpri- just w h™rh^ ^8^^° investors away 
valuation to make its economy even more inH 52® 1 ur gentiy needed 

°P£D internationally competitive. rrv rn difficult for the coun- 

The Philippines i s expected to reaffirm 1T ^ f^^on to become a 

its commitment to open-market oolicip* financial hub. 

when President Fidel Ramos meets Fri- freauent'eriri^ • M ?J 1 . alilir has been a 
day with senior officials and business econmnir'lSS- ^* e , Westul Repast, his 

leaders on economic directions. xenonhJihi,? 0 ^ 1 ? 5 have been far from 

h Sa ' d ^ dl on,y Kuala Lumpur iobt^nm^ COm “ g Wp labor, 

had sought to intervene in the stock .^^hnent and technol- 

markeI Polices St ,hat ^grediemof thTS- 

y s growth and modernization. 







PAGE 3' 


ap u rr M ngn iflK 


j*.. 

*'• i, ‘ j ,j 


; p: . 

n ^!f f 



INTERiNATIONAX. HERALD TRIBUNE, FTHDAi'. SEPTEMBER 5. 199: 


PAGE o 


SPONSORED PAGE 


IFA: Advanced Electronics Showcase 


/ 


High-Tech: On Screen, 
On Tape, On the Road 

Products on show ■ at the IFA make work and pla\' easier. 

T he convergence of the ironies production, imaging, and 
electronic media has made document and information pro- 

oossible innumf^mhlf* nPU! npccinii ciVtftre 


T he convergence of the 
electronic media has made 
possible innumerable new 
ways of processing, marrying, 
displaying and broadcasting in- 
formation. images and sound. 

Do-it yourself multimedia 

'j ; Many of these trends are on dis- 
play at IFA (Internationale 
-Funkuusstellung). the world's 
largest trade fair for consumer 
'electronics, held from Aug. 30 to 
Sepr. 7 in Berlin. Among them 
j*ere the usual array of eye- 
-catching displays, including a hot 
rod transformed into the world's 
largest jukebox, along with more 
serious technologies like DVD 
"(digital versatile disc), which this 
i year will probably become the 
prime medium for the recording. 
,processing and display of pro- 
1 grams. 

■ Says Yoshihiro Maeda, pres- 
ident of Toshiba Europe GmbH: 
'.‘The new consumer electronic 
% devices are creating the first gen- 
)■ -oration of ‘multimedia do-it- 
yourselfers’ — people who will 
jie able to fully express their cre- 
ativity through the content cre- 
ated or molded with these 
■ devices." 

Creating new markets 

‘ With sales of $44 billion in 1996, 

• Toshiba ranks among the world's 
top 10 producers of electronics. 

; Over the last few decades. 
! Toshiba has established an im- 
1 pressive record of transforming 
> technical innovations — many of 
;them developed by the cora- 
• panys own researchers — into 
’ major new market segments. 
•Technologies and facilities de- 
i v eloped by Toshiba have become 
•the basis ’of today’s microelec- 


_ 


ironies production, imaging, and 
document and information pro- 
cessing sectors. 

Toshiba has been serving the 
European market for 30 years in 
all its core businesses with man- 
ufacturing. marketing and distri- 
bution facilities, many of them 
directed by local executives, its 
European manufacturing opera- 
tions are among the company's 
star performers in terms of pro- 
ductivity, and they all meet high 
environmental standards, includ- 
ing the ISO 14001 and EM AS 
(the European Union's eco-man- 
agement and audit scheme). 

Toshiba is also involved in re- 
search and development in 
Europe. The Toshiba Cambridge 
Research Centre, for example, is 
studying the application of 
quantum physics to semicon- 
ductors. 

In Europe. Toshiba has a net- 
work of 26 subsidiaries, one af- 
filiate and 24 representative of- 
fices. They employ 4.200 people, 
more than one-third of them at 
Toshiba’s four factories and one 
research facility on the Contin- 
ent 

At the IFA consumer electron- 
ics, communications and enter- 
tainment show, Toshiba is 
presenting a variety of innovative 
new products, among them tele- 
visions and VCRs that may help 
explain why cocooning is so pop- 
ular today. They bring a new size 
and clarity of picture and “sweet- 
ness" of sound into their owners' 
homes — and offices. 

Flicker-free TV 
Take the Cinema Vision televi- 
sions from Toshiba. They come 
with 100 Hertz TV screens — 
guaranteed to be flicker-free — 



.5 A fk . s - • I 

r . ■' , . I 

,,, 

4 m r j 




: -V- - . * - . 

: , ... 


\ 'v» . 

r »; 

-V.. ' -V 



-IFA: Advanced Electronics Showcase" 
n os produced in its enriren' by the Advertising Department 
of the International Herald Tribune. 

Writer: Terry Swandberg in Munich. 
Program Director: Bill Mahder. 


Toshiba booth at FA in fuB nourish. 


of between 70 and 82 centimeters 
in size. The TV's are equipped 
with six loudspeakers, a Dolby 
Surround Prologic R' system and 
Dolby Digital Decoder. 

Even larger is the Mega Vision 
family of projection televisions. 
In fact, they are among the largest 
of their kind in the world, with 
screen diagonals of up to 140 
centimeters. These TVs maintain 
their “exceptional quality of im- 
age" (HiFi Test) at projection 
distances of up to 1 1 meters. And 
because their projectors are built 
into the televisions' main bodies, 
focusing — usually difficult with 
this type of TV — is quick and 
easy. 

Picture-perfect 

Available in two models, the 
48PJ6DG (with diagonals of 120 
centimeters) and 55PJDG (with 
diagonals of 140 centimeters), 
the Mega Vision televisions have 
a sound quality that matches that 
of their images. Both models 
come equipped with a Dolby 
Surround PrologicB decoder. 
Two high-performance speakers 
flank the screen, and two “sur- 
round" speakers can be placed 
anywhere in the viewing area. 

The Mega Vision TVs come 



Enter Toshiba's V856 and 
V827 VCRs. Both are equipped 
with the Digital Noise Reduction 
(DNR) system. As its name sug- 
gests. this system uses a digit- 
alizing technology to identify 
and deal with any disturbances in 
the picture being transmitted. 

In addition to a large-sized 
screen and a high-quality sound 
system, the VCRs come with a 
wide range of other useful fea- 
tures, including Toshiba's “long- 
play system." Its heart is a mi- 
crochip capable of ascertaining 
whether the videotape is long 
enough to record an entire film 
— and of taking appropriate 
measures. 


At the IFA: New creative possib&ties are available to the consumer. 


equipped with all interfaces re- 
quired to set up links to video and 
data communication systems. 

Picture-perfect viewing quality 
is rarely attained by VCRs; the 
image is often marred by abstract 
collages of electronic snow, stripes 
and other disturbances caused by 


mechanical and electronic factors. 
Videotape is prone to acquiring 
scratches and spots, and any 
impairment in the transmission of 
electronic signals results in 
changes in screen brightness or 
accuracy of color, or even inter- 
ruptions in the program itself. 


The DVD revolution 
There are two differences be- 
tween the DVD and earlier tech- 
nologies. Instead of creating dis- 
g crete new sectors, as other 
3 technologies have done, the 
S DVD systems integrate existing 
1 sectors into a single one. And 
DVD does not render CD-ROMs 
obsolete — CD-ROMS can be 
played on-a DVD system. 

The advantages of DVD oyer 
conventional methods of playing 
data and programs are obvious. A 
single-layered, single-sided 
DVD-ROM can store up to 4.7 
gigabytes of data, and a double- 
layered, double-sided DVD- 
ROM can store up to 17 giga- 
bytes of data, seven times the 
capacity of the most advanced 
CD-ROMs. 

This allows for the playing of 
multimedia programs of great 
visual complexity or of a full- 
length feature film on the disc. 

Add in a perfect picture and 
sound clarity, and it's easy to see 
why the DVD-ROM is expected^ 
to become the prime medium ot 
audio and visual programming 
e over the next five years. 

| Toshiba holds 80 percent of 
a the patents associated with the 
| DVD technologies and has been 
foe driving force behind its de- 
velopment. The company has 
brought a DVD-ROM player to 

s. foe IFA, along with a full range of 

e display materials and working 
y models. 


All visual materials and in- 
formation had to be scanned or 
keyed into a computer, which 
then processed them into images, 
charts and other displays used in 
the presentation itself. That’s all 
part of foe past now. thanks to 
Toshiba's TLP511 Mediastar 
data projector. With a resolution 
of 480,000 pixels, its built-in 
camera can transmit images of 
everything from small, three -di- 
mensional objects to large-sized 
illustrations. 

Via docking links, documents 
stored in laptops and video re- 
corders can also be displayed 
without any prior preparation. 

Two other advantages, of foe 
Mediastar TLP511 over other 
companies’ data projectors are its 
resolution (2.3 million pixels per 
screen) and picture brightness. 
Achieved by a 120 Watt UHP 
(ultra-high-performance) lamp, 
foe brightness is so strong that the 
image projected by Mediastar 
can be seen perfectly in normal 
dayiighr conditions. • 


Easy going on road shows 
Putting together graphics used to 
be the most difficult part of or- 
ganizing a road show. 


Products Available 
From Toshiba Europe GmbH 

• Notebook and desktop com- 
puters 

• Copiers, fax machines 

• TVs, VCRs, air conditioners, 
LCD projectors, DVD players, 
digital still cameras 

• CD-ROM and DVD-ROM 

drives, hard disc drives 1 

• Letter sorting and banknote 
processing systems 

For further information: 
Toshiba Europe GmbH 
Hammfelddamm 8 
04 1460 Neuss 
Tel.: (49-2131) 15801 
Fax: (49-2131) 158 137 
Internet: www.toshibateg.com 

Toshiba at the IFA 

iNTEFiNATIONALE FUNKAUSSHRIJJNG 

Berlin 

Consumer electronics, 
communications, 
entertainment 

August 30-September 7, 1997 
Toshiba: Hall 7:2/03 
Tel.: 1030) 308 306 
Fax:(030)308 30709 



' -S" •• •/ & 

■ 

IL . MW - J 








-■m 


'tJI 





&&&&& 






QUIET PLEASE. 
NOTEBOOK 
ON THE AIR. 


■ 

g 



Mfl 

■ 

X' 



■R 

i 

1 ft 


-.V 


it 


Intnmibonjlc 

Funkausstellung 

Berlin 


| Consumer electronics | 

Communications 

Entertainment 


30 August - 
7 September 1997 

Kail 07.2/03 




"Please save your applause for the end of the 
live broadcast" requests Gerd Pasch, a sound 
editor from Deutschland Radio, and one of 
the first to leave the studio behind to start 
producing solely on location - a feat made 
technically possible by Toshiba Notebooks. In 
a typical interview, the voice signals travel 
from the mic to a specially equipped Toshiba 
Notebook that sends them via ISDN to the 
editor's computer. The editor can then down- 
load narration, music and anything else 

2 





needed for the broadcast. After ediung ir all 
on the Notebook, he sends the final product 
via ISDN to the broadcasting studio, where it 
is put on the air for the listeners' enjoyment. 
New digital solutions are opening up a world 
of unlimited communication options in the 
public and private sectors. Toshiba continues 
to invest heavily in technologies like DVD, 
and has recently developed Mpact™ media 
processor, a single compact chip that handles 
all seven multimedia functions, from image 
compression to video conferencing. 

Toshiba wants to make more and 
jjjllpP 1 more things run even smoother. To 
out more about Toshiba and its 
technologies, please visit our web site at 
http://www.toshiba-teg.com 
Toshiba, your partner in digital technology- 
Multimedia is Toshiba. 

ttpxP a 8 trademark of Qinsflobc RBWid'. Inc. 


In Touch with Tomorrow 

TOSHIBA 




.*■ 





PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 


W 


E 



U.S. Troops Withdraw 
At Bosnian Serb Bridge 

Step to Defuse Tension Before Elections 


Cto¥tMfcOurSkgFwDuf*it?l*! 

BRCKO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
U.S. troops with the NATO-led peace 
force withdrew early Thursday from a 
key bridge in an apparent attempt to 
defuse tensions that built when the 
troops entered a Bosnian Serb political 
dispute a week ago. 

International envoys have scrambled 
in recent days to repair the damage done 
when U.S. soldiers and armored 
vehicles moved into this and four other 
strategic northern towns last week. That 
drew an angry response from Serbs sup- 
porting Radovan Karadzic, a former 
president and an indicted war criminal. 

Diplomats consider it vital to defuse 
tension if internationally supervised local 
elections that have cost millions of dol- 
lars and months of effort to prepare are ro 
go ahead Sept. 13 and 14. 

The United Stares said Thursday that 
it was beefing up its air forces in Italy to 
help the NATO- led troops keep tight 
control over the municipal elections. 

The announcement in Washington 
that six F- 16s in Germany would go to 
A viano Air Base in Italy to join 12 based 
there for flights over Bosnia punctuated 
NATO warnings that it would not tol- 
erate further mob violence by Bosnian • 
Serb hard-liners against troops in Bos- 
nia. 

Withdrawal from the Brcko bridge, 
the scene of the worst clashes last 
Thursday, came after the Yugoslav 
president, Slobodan Milosevic, urged 
Bosnian Serb leaders in Belgrade on 
Wednesday to take part in the elections, 
which they had threatened to boycott. 

The top international envoy in Bos- 
*nia, Carlos Westendorp, met Mr. Mi- 
losevic on Wednesday to pressure him 


into making the elections possible. Mr. 
Karadzic and his camp, conscious of 
their victory against U.S. troops last 
week, had threatened to stay away from 
the elections, charging that the inter- 
national community had not prepared 
them well enough. 

U.S. troops again confronted angry 
Serbs this week at a key transmitter that 
might have been handed over to sup- 
porters of the Bosnian Serb president, 
Biljana Plavsic, who has turned against 
Mr. Karadzic and has the backing of 
foreign envoys. 

But they backed away from that con- 
frontation, too. 

Withdrawal from the Brcko bridge — 
which was destroyed at the start of the 
Bosnian war in 1992 and reopened this 
summer by the U.S. secretary of state. 
Madeleine Albright — seemed another 
attempt to step back from direct con- 
frontation with the Serbs. 

The bridge is a key traffic link be- 
tween Bosnia and Croatia across die 
Sava River and Bosnia's main link with 
western Europe. 

Robert Farrand. a U.S. diplomat who 
has been appoinred administrator of 
Serb-held Brcko, called the pullout a 
“normal reduction and redeployment” 
of peace troops, “which should nor 
spark alarm." 

A NATO spokesman. Major John 
Blakeley, said in Sarajevo that troops' 
were deployed "in more active and 
rolling patrols” to increase their pres- 
ence throughout Brcko. 

l/.S. troops moved into Brcko and 
four other northern towns last Thursday, 
saying that they had word that men loyal 
to Mrs. Plavsic aimed to take over five 
police stations by force. (AP. Reuters ) 



Jam-CJirtaopti* hAhn/Rnnm 

A policeman at the window of a Paris apartment building damaged by the blast 

Paris Gas-Leak Explosion Injures 53 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — An explosion that investigators 
think was caused by a gas leak ripped through a 
six-stOry Paris apartment building Thursday 
morning, injuring 53 people, two seriously. 

“It is an explosion that has all the char- 
acteristics of a gas explosion in an apartment,’* 

Police Chief Philippe M; 


. 4 (assoni said of the blast 
Major Jean-Luc Chivot, spokesman for the 
fire department, said many of the victims were 
treated by two medical teams at the scene, 
mostly for cuts from flying glass. Some of them 


were sent on to the hospital. The fire department 
said a call came at 8:45 AM. reporting an 
“explosion followed by a fire” in a building in 
the French capital's 15th Arrondissement More 
than 150 firemen and 40 vehicles were dis- 
patched to the scene. 

Major Chivot said six dog teams were con- 
ducting a search of the building for more vic- 
tims. 

The fire was quickly extinguished. Labora- 
tory personnel were attempting to determine if 
gas was the cause of the blast. 


briefly 



Funds 


International Funds via E-mail. 

A new service for IHT readers. 


^ What is E-Funds? 

E-Funds is a 
international 


automatic 


ilSIHow do£ 




BBS 

Pffiail box daily, 
ibe? 

oup, send aa 
e message. 



regular updates on the 
updates aj*e delivered 


, to subscri 
SUBSCRI 
he Interna 
ription will 
the fund. 



il message 
^ RIBEfoU 
®al Asset 
e fund codes 
nds page of the 
stered and you 



jpy funds ma^fiPsubscribe to? 

\ou ma^^bscribe to as many funds A &s you like 

individu s 

funds codes ^ the 

e-mail message to 4 ‘e-funtl^^ the 

first text in the body of the message. 

IllgWhat mu^gay? 



There is no cost 
feature for IHT reacfSSfg^ 







er service 




Brought to you in collaboration with NOKIA, the official E-Funds sponsor. 


Follow your funds 
via the 





THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


Mir Walk 
To Refocus 
Sun Panels 


Reuters 

KOROLYOV, Russia — 
Cosmonauts will focus on ad- 
justing the space station MIr's 
solar panels during a space 
walk Saturday, mission con- 
trol said Thursday, because 
energy problems continue. 

Manually twisting the solar 
panels on the Spektr module 
“is the number one priority 
now,” said Jerry Miller, 
NASA’s top space walk ex- 
pert in Russia. 

A few days after the space 
walk, mission control will 
have to reorient Mir to guar- 
antee a proper thermal bal- 
ance. Unless the solar panels 
are readjusted, they will lose 
substantial power, space ex- 
perts say. 

Commander Anatoli So- 
lovyov and a NASA phys- 
icist, Michael Foale, will still 
devote most of their time to 
their original space walk fo- 
cus of looking for holes in 
Spektr, which was punctured 
when it collided with a cargo 
resupply ship June 25. 

But by including the solar 
panel job at the last minute. 
Russian flight officials have 
acknowledged the extent of 
energy problems since the 
crash. 

Solar panels lose their ef- 
fectiveness over time, and 
Spektr has the newest set, 
which make them by far the 
most important source of en- 
ergy on Mir. But motors to 
keep them in place have not 
woriced since the crash. 

During work last month. 
Mr. Solovyov and Pavel 
Vinogradov, a flight engi- 
neer, connected cables from 
Spektr's solar panels to the 
mother ship before again 
sealing off Spektr. 

That repair has bolsrered 
overall power on the station 
from about 60 percent of what 
it had before the accident to 
80 percent, space officials 
say. 

But efforts to use electron- 
ic motors to point the solar 
panels toward the sun have 
failed. 

“The solar batteries must 
be actively controlled to face 
the sun,” said Igor Braver- 
man, a solar energy expert at 
Energiya, the rocket company 
that designed Mir. 

“How much energy the 
batteries generate depend on 
their orientation toward the 
sun.” 

The importance of facing 
the sun is obvious every 90 
minutes, when in a single or- 
bit around the Earth the sta- 
tion passes through up to 36 
minutes of darkness. During 
that time the solar panels pro- 
duce no energy. 

Mr. Braverman estimated 
that the operation would en- 
able Spektr's panels to gather 
at least 80 percent of the en- 
ergy they would get if they 
were continuously controlled. 

This shortcoming, along 
with one damaged solar panel 
out of the four on Spektr. 
means that engineers are 
already planning more moves 
to increase power before the 
space station’s expected de- 
commissioning in 1999. 


Swedes to Probe Sterilisations 

QTfY’K HOLM — The Swedish government will in- 
vestigate a forced sterilization program 
vears and possibly pay compensation to its victims. A. 
S-3r coS*. ap^mted TUmday^ ex- 
peered to complete its investigation by July 1999, the 

H &m^ i W35 al md 1976 more to 60000 force* 
sterilizations were performed in Sweden. Many of tbe. 
victims were judged to have undesirable racial chav 
acrerisiics or to be congenitally handicapped or ; 
“inferior.” Adults and children were singled out by of- 
ficials and were pressured to consent to the procedures. : 

The announcement gave no explanation of why it may. 

take almost two years for the investigation. fAr) 

33 Killed in Turkish Bus Crash 

ANKARA — Thirty-three persons, including two 
Spanish tourists, died Thursday when two buses collided 
in northwest Turkey, the Anatolian News Agency said. 

Forty people were injured in the crash on the highway 
between Ankara and- Istanbul, which was closed for 
several hours. Two other Spanish nationals were badly 
hurt and hospitalized in Istanbul. (Reuters) 

A Van Gogh Stolen in Antwerp j 

ANTWERP, Belgium — A Vincent van Gogh painting 
.with an estimated value Of more than $800,000 was stolen 
from the Royal Museum of Beaux Arts here early Thurs- 
day, museum officials said. The 1885 work, “Potato 
Harvest,” is a small painting on paper and wood. 

The thieves also took a sketch a by minor 19th century 
French artist, Adolf Monticelli, and damaged a pastel by 
Edgar Degas while attempting to take it from its frame. 

A museum official said the burglars entered through an 
unbarred window, setting off an alarm, but they had gone . 
by the time the caretaker arrived. (AFP) 

2 Russian Regions Sign Pact 

MOSCOW — The leaders of North Ossetia and In- 
gushetia, two feuding Russian regions in the Caucasus, 
signed a treaty on normalizing relations Thursday. Details 
of the pact were not immediately made public. 

“This is a historic step and a serious victory,” said the 
Russian prime minister, Viktor Chernomyrdin, who 
presided over die unannounced signing at the Kremlin. 

‘ ‘The decision did not come easily, given die accumulated 
problems. Now we must do everything to implement iL" 

North Ossetia shares a border with Ingushetia near the 
rebel republic of Chechnya. The two fought a short but 
bloody territorial and e thni c war in 1992. Hundreds of 
people were killed and most ethnic Ingush were expelled 
from North Ossetia's disputed Prigorodny region. Thou- 
sands have since returned. 

Tensions have become aggravated in recent months, 
including some clashes between ethnic Ingush refugees 
and North Ossetians who objected to their returning to the 
Prigorodny region. President Boris Yeltsin summoned 
the feuding leaders to Moscow in early August and 
pressed them to reach an agreement 

It was not clear whether the treaty deviated from a draft 
mentioned by Mr. Yeltsin last month — pledging to put 
all territorial claims on hold for 15 to 20 years. (AP) 



OUR READERS 

The 

International 
Herald Tribune 
regrets that it is 
unable to supply 
the International 
Funds Listing 
today. 

This is due 
to technical 
difficulties at 
Micropal. 



ivmtNvnnwi.i 


THE WORLDS PAHA NK flremiw 


une 


% 








t: 






J 



4 

t 

t 


P.V 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 


PAGE 7 



t ,.u.V ■ ■ THE INTERMARKET 


S +44 171 420 0548 




iteHSWMHGi 


rnrnmmm 




#gESIDENHAL REAL ESTATE 


-Hi 171 <UQ 0326 
. «' £ «-H4m 12003M 
r a^S^^ealhappems 
L AJ^rVTnERMAJR KET 

fe*E gjateSefvtefls~ 


! ! «» OWN A PROPERTY M FRANCE 

< •, „w se rvices ower in yourrtsgte- 
U,< mE?®'?- *anrift BWering. repahs 

|/; jK&ff 5 W 

” ■ CONTACT US FOP UCfZ DETAIS 

FAX 433 raw 50 85 94 34 

r' ‘ , T*+»PSD35 35 3S 

i • / Damahe da Cretin F-74160 flossey 


Tn 

01 

S* 

Pr. 


1 

\ 


c 


< 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Caribbean 


•JAVA MAGIC- Us sad that the Tduric 
Carafe a Qiintana Roo ml cure any 
B, physical or awaaL Mage 43 sqm. 
studto with terrace, tidy equated, tor 
sale 50m from a pure, wttiie sandy 
beach on the Mexican Carrtrean 
USSS3000 Fax NYC: 1-212-243-9505 


prene/j Alps 


BAREGES - sfd resort studio. ground 
Hoar. 23 sqm 2 rooms, sleeps 4. My 
tanushed. equipped Ucften. prorate 
garage balcony Tet +33 «ft5 56096250 


french Provinces 


xvnth certL HILL FOR SALE 
ME HOUR SOUTH OF PARIS 
FuSy renovated. 4 buidhgs. 620 sqm 
Mm spaa 5 bedrooms 4 btitams 
MATED SWIMMING POOL 20 X 7n 
of vrtttft t/3 Moor. Savoyard ctmei air 
sama 36 ha heed park; tha pond. Dm 
on 200 m m2 M. Owner Mi Raynaud 
Td +33 (OH 4222 4848 Fat 4222 6230 


NUMARAJS France 
Sperafeed si real estate nveslmerts 
proposes. Mss & Bastdes in Provence 
New and dd revenue 


Fax 


PROVENCE: Afl kinds properties 
Pleasa ask lor Mis Wagner. Agent e 
Auquter. F-84210 St Dk&ht Tet 433 
(OH 90 86 07 53 Far (OH 80 66 12 35 


French Riviera 


• CAP F6RRAT, owner sells inque. baau- 
1 (Id home, large siting with fireplace. 

* 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, garden, paths. 
■ parking, conoetge Tat IS) 93 76 10 28 


NEAR MONACO - Merton (5 mfles from 
Monaco, lfi mfle tram beach! Luxury 
apartment 333 sqm. m pwaie park. 
Double fining. 4 batoous. 2 btefnooms. 

I dmrag room, huge foyer, tafchen mth 
rater, targe terrace |53 sqm) wifi view 
on sea ana mountains. Askmq FF4M. Tei 

IUS) 334 342 0C93 Fax; 334 342 SOS) 

ST PAUL DE VENCE. 15 aim airport 

Via wM) beaiiht riw. 170 sqm on 2 
levels 3 bedrooms, i bath 2 tortm 
rooms Celar. garage, lerrace. 2200 
sqjil pine garden. Pool possible. 
FFiSM Message lo ixmer Tet *33 <0)1 

43 54 08 33. Fax *33 |0)1 4354 0830 

S mtafl MCE ABVORT, ST. LT. haiDOrt 
French banker otroer sells luxurious 

4 -room 35 sqm ttai - 300 sqm. sur- 
rounding noiic garden. 2 baths, large 
equnnd kitchen, cellar. 2 garages. 

FFt 7M Tet’ +33 raM S3 07 £043 
Avertable NOW. QUIET LOVELY PLACE 

ANTIBES. 10Q sqm 2-sloty house on 

MO sqm garden + garage/aiHotialc 
door + 3 parang spaces, n residence of 

6 houses Low registration lees. Fr!JW 

Cal 9am-7pm week +33 (Oka 91483330. 
raksfld *33 (OU 91 59 36 65 

APARTMENT NEAR CANNES, 3 rums. 

2 x tsthWC, 100 sqm. gufen. exdu- 
swe pnvafe resort. 2 pools. 2 imras 

Swiss owner French Francs 12 rmo 

Fax -41 1 381 8348, TaL 381 E50 

CAP FERRAT WATERFRONT £WEL 
Unquety beautiful 3-toflraom via + 4 
bedroom annexe Pnvae beach & boat 
pier SIM Tet +377 0)6 07 93 51 38 

LE CASTELLET Htsuncel msieral vfl- 
lage. 12 km sea. amidst vineyards 75 
sqm house 2 bettnms. i bate, pet- 
ted COMMA Tel +33 (0)494320715 

ST PAUL DE VENCE. property on 1 lev- 
el 4 bedrooms. 4 -car basement 3.700 
sqm park, pool quid. FF2.950.Q0a. 

LV.C Tel Fa* +33 (OH 93 20 22 44 

Germany 

FAST CLASS CONDOMMUM 

Bated n an OU) CASTLE surrounded 
by a 103 year oftf part, rear Duessetarf 

115 kmj. 261 sqm - 2 fivmg rooms. 

3 bedrooms wrth marbled batnxxns. 
krtchen balcony. 2 garage parking 
spaces, son by owner Uss 000.000 

Cdl 0049 2159 8020G Fax 817S2 

Holland 

AMSTERDAM. EXCELLENT LOCATION, 
modem area n flie crty "AMSTR CfR- 
CLF, large, luxurious, tuky fumshed 
apartment £ bedrooms. 2 baths. 200 
sq m ptas garage & storage, beautiful 

Views USS 425000 Tel +31-20- 
6004233 F3X +31 -20+3004328 

Italy 

IKWTEFJORE ASO VALLEY 

From owner lor sale, anoetrt mansion 
over t2 rooms. 4 bahs partly restored 
with hand pamtrngs arro decorations 

4500 sqm ganten and arangerie 1 tour 
south of Ancona port auport. 7 nries 
from ssa. Please correct Mr Segatto, 
Concieroe. Suvretta House. Sl Moritz 

Fax: +41-S1-033 85 24 

Tit *41-01-832 11 32 


PORTO CERVO VILA. 100 sqm. 3 
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms, kitchen, taring 
room tarn firquaca rod terrace, gantal 
ntti rise d me sea Smawd In banqui 
area, oily 5 mus walk to the barter. 
Access to private beach. Coca owner 
Urea Tel 39 3358041807 



London 


LONDON TOWNHOUSE 

6 FLOORS 
South Atxfcy Sfleet 

2 Unrig roams, 2 Master Bedroom sutes 
1 Ubran. 2 Large Bedrooms 
1 Dlnkig Room, bony Batmans 
SEALdm GARDEN 

USS3JIA1T0N 
FAX: *{212)9864629 USA 


HOHE5EARCH LONDON Lei US 
search tar you We find homes flats 
to buy and ram and provide corporate 
relocation services For individuals 
and companies Tel: -44 171 83B 
1066 Fax * 44 171 B38 1077 
t8pjtvif*.ivrm&nft co uk/horo 


Monaco 


SUPERS APARTMENT, 240 SQJL 
penthouse rkptaj. panoramc sea view 
and mtmalns. large reception room. 

3 baflooms, 3 bate. age My 
fraed Ucben. partly, laurejry room. 

' j room, large terrace and 
14) sqm. 2 refers, 2 garages 
INTERMEDIA 
Tab *377 93 50 66 04 
Fax +377 93 50 45 52 


Paris and Suburbs 


HEART OF MARAS. 10th an bulling, 
completely renovated. 1200 sq.lL triplex 
♦ 160 eqA. root terrace. Lairdry. 2 
Ms. Z trahs. stub. taring room + My 
equipped custom EJK. chestnut floors, 
security concierge. move ei S700000 
Tet owner *49^2166-1505 


SAINT LEU LA FORET 12 minutes b 
La Defence. very large estate tor sale, 
recam amanjcuon. tracfithnal m free- 
stone. 2 .B 60 sqm landscaped park, pos- 
tffev k> butt poof and rims coot 330 
sqm! taring surface. Price FF38 Mb. 
Tat 4-33 iQjl 39 32 (» 61 On French) 


7th, NEAR MVAL1DES modem apart- 
ment 150 sq.m Large reception wflh 
marble fcor. 2 bedrooms, ftiy esufliped 
kitchen. 2 shmen. lerrac* Garage 
available. LYRHOLM. Tel +33 (0)1 
38622296 Fax 433(0)1 39120973 


5AJNT MANDE. Metro line 1. 100 sqm 
flat. character, sunny, hiy rwwnrted and 
decorated. large bring. 2 bedrooms, 
TeVFax +33 (0)1 43 90 
naL nradieckthiflemaLfr 


ST CLOUD, high class apartmem. 104 
sqm. swh. large bring, 2 bedrooms. 2 
baths, equipped krtchen Parking Close 
uni school, tennis, swimming pod. 
FF£250,000. Owner +33 10(1 4602 2726 


PARIS NEULLY. exceptional 210 sqm. 
DUPLEX, 6th and 7lh floor 1 110 sq.m. 
terrace, 4 bedrooms. 2 
S1.100.00Q. Tet +33 (0)1 44 60 00 I 


6th. NEAR PONT NEUF. DIRECT 
OWNER, pretty JHuem, equipped kbhen 
bathroom toilet room, calm 
FF2.200.000 Write I HT Box 396. 
92521-Neuly Cprifff France 

600 SOili. MANSION. 8000 sQ.m of 
land, near Euroisney. sold by owner 
FF5 Mo. Tet +33 (0|1®09 1l 82 


ETOtLE 180 SUN., sun view. 4tn floor, 
balcony. quiet FF4.4M. 
Tel/Fax +331011 39 65 76 98 


Spain 


61ZA - FEET In SEA DwghtfU. excap- 
Donal location 2tetPom apanmen with 
100 aqjn. nod garden overtaking sea 
Direct access to private creek 
USSI 35.000 Fax -33 10)5 53 <0 63 92 
htfejVwww rtoroueMidahein -property 


Switzerland 


□ 


lAKEGENB/A&ALPS 

Sate to foiagners authorized 
shce1975 


our 


AxaOve pnfmen weibcfcng view 
1 to 5 bedrooms. Iran SFr 200.000 
HEVAC SA. 

52. Homfarflbnt CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 


MONTANA-CRANS. Valais. 1500m 
Apart mem 2 bedrooms. 2 baths, stout 
SO sqm 2hrs Genera aepon Southern 
view over Alps Sab to braoiers aitto- 
nzed Indoor pool & garage, all amerv- 
ttes. SFr ^3,000 or best oflet Detais- 
Owner POBcix 33d CH-IB15 Ctoens or 
Fax +41-21-963 86 02 


LUXURIOUS VILLA-LAKE OF GENEVA 
si the twtonqal saraundngs d Castte ol 
Btasy. beautW raw d late & Alps. I 
hour Geneva sirpori and mam sti re- 
sons. 5 bedrooms. 5 trams 2000 sqm. 

highest standards d canstaronn. 
Price SFr 1.700.000 By owner. TeiFax 
00 41 2t 943 38 91 


USA Residential 


HERMOSA BEACH, CALIFORNIA 
Beautiful 4600 sq n home with 
ISO degree new of Pacific Ocean S 
coasSne 20-25 mb. b Beverty t«s a 
ctownonn Lw Amjetes Sui decks. 1 * 0 - 
Cteces. seamy system Wafting detente 
b beach. mMtuto rasmants. shopping, 
onema. etc Sale price US S784.000 
Long term lease posstrfe a S500ftmo. 

Contact George Teh 31D-37H819 
Fax: 310-379-7397 


DEFW7ELY NOT FOR EVERYONE! 
35 acres bordering National Foreran n 
New Mexico's Rudy Mountains Huge 
aspen grove, eft Iran, seasonal creek. 
Powerful views, including ski area and 
gol course 

USSmaXMernK. 

Call today, gone tomonar f 
Brim & Linda Ccfaida 1505) 377-4210 
Land Properties, be. 
www.newmexicoreairoraxnialniw 


FLORIDA GETAWAY-Boca Weal. 
2 bedrooms. 2 baths. 4 god. 40 tennis 
Healh dub. krmadatety avadabb S139K 
Tei 1-561 483 8650 


SOUTHAMPTON VLLAGE NY.L., 

House buft 1680 s on prestigious wow. 

'BesuUUy ItmUied. 5 bedrooms, 4 1/2 
bailu. mate house Enclosed garden, 
kbutods irees Alsa 2 bedS bath «s- 
ooe Both incomslwng. Room lor pod 
or rands caul 5 note naft to ocean 
beeches & siding shops. S725K FIRM. 
Gonad Margot Hon. Broker 1-516-283- 
8020 Fax 1-51fr2B3-e048 USA. 


40'3 EAST NEW YORK 4 U2 ROOKS 
Stunning pre-war duplex psffllwuu. 

a nffleem views Lflrhg toom. ifl ft. 

lie neign ceflng with woodburdng 
fkeplate 3.200 sq fl tandccaped 
terraces. No board approval S75CK. Gal 
owner 212-856-9551 FAX 212-27M811 
No brotera. 


WHITEF1SH. MONTANA. Beautiful 

2 -bed room. 2-bath home along aflune 

lain Pnvale office annex with house 

Pine floor, gorgeous Mctien. near sU 
area and natwial part; S24SJXX) US. 

Cal Peggy Banka «&0fiW2OO USA 

HD BE SOUND, FL 30 mtes north ot 

PBkn Beach. Yacht & Tennis comuuty. 

3 532 sf. 4 1<2 / 2 1C. off Wraooastel 
Mteerway. Pax. 5S dock, ftepiaa, solar, 
o'afe S319D00 Tet 561-546-3589 USA. 

NAPLES. FLORIDA + GOLRGULF! 

Beach, wnrfe. yadiL 3 bedroom. 3 firth, 
irede/dai & momng rooms. LE 31.45M 

Tenv Warren dtarffing-Ftya Reaky} Tet 
941-434-0049 Fat 941434-7324 

Brokers vrdcome. 

HAMI BRIC KNELL Superb 1600 sqJl, 

3 bedrooms, 3 battxooms, art taong «• 
ter ant Key Biscayne Pa fang, pod 

USS 109000- Contact G RatschTal 39 

55 262201 

Austria 

VIENNA Next 10 Opera elegant, tar- 
nehed. sunny 1 bedroom. Stan term 

TeL 309 04 68 in US61742l-ffi00 

Holland 

RENTHOUSE WTERNATIONAL 

No 1 n Hoffand 

tar (semfj hireshed housesfltes. 

Tet 31-20-6448751 Fat 31-206485909 
Nhoven i9-2i, 1063 Am AmsteTOam 

HOMEFINDERS INTL Harengradx 141 

1015 W Amsterdam Trt +31206392252 

Fat 6392262 E-ma4noonBdectGifli.nl 

Inland 

DUBLIN - KILUNEY 3X00 sq It house 
on 075 acres. Direct access to beach. 

$« vfcms. Irish £2,7® nuntfify. Tef 
*363 |1) 450 9577 (Mtk) Fat 450 4819 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


London 

HOLLAND PARK ffll-Compfctely retar- 
bishad studio Art. separate bath & krten- 
en. Sot* taong botany. Iim tram HP 

Into. E275taak. Tet 44(0)1817856622 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: +33 {0)1 47iQ.3Q.Q5 


AT note n PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

Apanmenb to im tamebed or not 
Sales 8 Property uansanaro Services 
25 Av Hcch? 75CC8 Pails FvQI -*561102) 

Tel: +33 (0)1 45 63 25 BO 


EXCEPTIONAL 9) sq.ni. lofl 
apanmen caihedral cwSnw. stytiehly 
iunwtod tally eqjrpped 20 mmutes 
Best d Pais, a Gartab si Laye. 
FF6800 charoes included Avateble Od 
?71oir 98'TM *33 (0)1 34 51 69 15 


LEFT BANK-13th - LARGE FUT 3 
bedrooms 2 baths, oefcony on garden 
S230013.500FF Available now. let 
Pans 43-31-14-23 USA 1506) 645-9529. 


6th SAINT GERMAIN. 65 sqm. high 
standard, i betfoom, tdv swipel top 
floor, ovariwwg Sxi S«3w» FF7J® 
per month Tec 33 |0)i 45 01 B6 36 


LE ST LOWS JEWEL Soaring cel 
loft, fireplace, cable TV. pbiu Mor 
Tel- (0)1-4143 9EA tax (Oil 4143 ! 


PARIS -Loin re iSomWig 2-Oedrown fiat 
wamiwlcomejiay equipped Ffflidafly 
Mir 7 ntghls Teh +33 10|1 42 60 69 45 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


7th, ST. GERMAIN 2 rooms m 17th 
cert tmnhojse 24 hr security/caretaker. 
heateb pookgvnHau^equ^ttcton 
marine bath collar Ffl 1 000 or Sab 
FF1JW Tel +33 toil 42220268 caetak- 
a TetTax Spain +34 5 282 8969. >mner 


MONTPARNASSE. SUrto. 36 sqm. 7th 
floor, lifts, balcony, sunny, equfpel 
lichen, ctowts maibid bath, high class 
txJdkig nth caretaker. F47D0 nd Guar- 
arflee requested. Tel +33 <0)1 46267839 


NOTRE DAME VIEW, superb 5-room 
apamronl 12S sqm. Modem equwed 
kitchen. 2 bertooms 2 traihs. quiet, vay 
sunny, optional parking. FF13 000 + 
(Aaxgesr Tet +33 m 86 66 40 2f 


Switzerland 


GENEVA. Attractive, irturrwhw pen- 
men b FVresan area. 4 bedrooms 0 4 
bahs Liwig roan, separate dmmg room, 
lotchertiinrn area SFr TOOOfmo. Teh 
+41-22-3213493 ! office - 


GENEVA. LUXURY FURNISHED apan- 
nrants. Rom shift* to 4 bedrooms Tel 
+41 22 735 S320 Fax +41 22 736 2671 


USA 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS; 1 
week to i year. Great Locations Call 
Pat/Owjrrt 212-448-9223 Fax. 212- 
4484226 & Mad. athometwnOadionv 


EXCMTWNAL 

PARTIAL OWNERSHIP 
In HOLIDAY RESIDENCT 
— AUCTION SALE — 
on September 22nd, 
at 930 UXL (Sc 2:30 pjn. 
TOTAL of 79 pwriadw 
dt MARINA 
BAH ESS ANOM® 
and AUKON 

StucSos, 2 -room & 3 -roo*n 
cqxnlinents 

STARTING PRICE: 

FF 3,500 for a week 
EF 31,500 for a fortnight 
blbntulmf: 

Maitrc de La Have St Hilaire 
TeL +.13 i0/l 53572105(Mrt. Dekftme) 
VlsHs; 

On appointtnott on +33 (0)4 93 22 10 10 
{Manrvi Sendee) 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


a.ba.l^ 

Gerald Krener 


Ycur REAL ESTATE Aqent i n PARIS 


\\lli i* in** h-.-'Mirn i‘ , i 
& mil r>lin)«iU‘ thf pf"i M ' r,v 

1M.i 33I«W 53 20 0BWJ 

[•‘ax.: 33(0) I 33 20 U8 bO 

flljtti: Wrttt 


RREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON 

Unique t3etactwd frwhoW 

SRJBWVUL 

Gard^^asy S maingi 

a a^sssBf^ 

£ 500 , 000 . Private sale through 
solicitors. „ . ^ 

Enquiries to Michelle Bare & co. 

L TU; *44(0)1713816677, , 

Fax +44(0)171 381 6692 — I 



HOLIDAYS 


Residence Hotels 


CtlWm aE CTIMP g ELTSBE8 

High dass rooms & aides 
Daily. nwMy & mortWy rates. Paris 
Tei+33 (0)1-44133333 Faxt0)1-4225O468 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 
stay knarry apartments, superior B & B 
registry. . many locations. 
T« 212-475-3390 Fax 2124770420. 
wirwmaiMlartodpi^.cora 


Hotels 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East ol Beirut. 
5 star Muxe. Exceptional locator, secu- 
rity. corriot. line cuisine, conventions, 
business senses. sateIRe TV IB rmn 
transfer from airport tree. UTELL Fax 
1961) 4472439 1 1+33) (0)147200007 


DISCOUNT TRAVEL 



Holiday Rentals 


U.SA. 


BREA1HTAKMG VEW OF NEW YORK. 
20 ft glass wait Central Part 4 CUy 
Lunrartly hirtshed pane, fax, cable 
For business, musician or honeymoon 
ooupka. 1 block to Cam erne Hal, 2 to 
Lettwman. 5 to Lincoln Center, Muse- 
ums. Theaters. Weekly. Morarty, 3 day 
weekends (mWmumi or tong term. 
Tel. 212-262-1561, Fax: 7188844142 


Caribbean 


ST. BARTHELEMY, F.WJ- OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beach- 
front to Mflside wth pools. Ou agens 
have tespeded alt v«a& peraonaly For 
raseivatians on SL Bens. Si Martin. An- 
oila. Barbados, Musbque, the Vkgn ts- 
tek. Call WlMCOffSIHARTH - U.S 
(401)B49-B012/lax 047-6290. from 
FRANCE 05 90 16 20 - ENGLAND 0 
-000688318 


GENERAL 


Announcements 


personals 


k 


HrraJb^a^eribunc 

TmaifiH mpiniu 

SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: 
For questions or quenes about Hie deiiv- 
eiv of ywr newspaper, ihe statra ri yow 
stoscrextan or about nntotnfl a atoerp- 
eon. please cal lira toiov.-teg ntmers 

EUROPE. MIDDLE EAST AW) AFRICA: 

TOa FRE - Austria 0660 B120 Bel- 
ohm 0000 17538 France 0000 437437 
Germany 0130 848585 Italy 167 780040 
Luxembourg 0000 2703 Natheriands 06 
0225158 Sweden 020 797039 Smflzsr- 
tend 155 5757 UK 0000 895005 Bse- 
where 1+33) i 41438361 THE AMERI- 
CAS: USA lion-tree) 1 -000-8822364 
Elsewhere r+lt 212 7523890 ASIA: 
Hong Kang 2922 1171 tedonesa 609 
m Jacan (UHreei (7120 464 027 


Elsewhere 1+852) 3221 171 


MAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be adored, gfcrfcd kared and prwaved 
ttnpu^nut me world, now and forever 
Sacred Heart ol Jesus, pra/ tar us Sam 
Jude, worker ol imades. pray for us 
5aoi Jude, helper dura hopeless, pray 
torus. Amen Say tins prayer nre tma 
s day. by ihe nmn day. your prayer win 
be answered t has new been taw , it 
to & Pubfcawn must be ptmesed IX 


MAY THE SACHEtf HEART OF JBUS 
be adored, dorifled kwd and preserved 
thnwghmn Bra world, nm and forever 
Sacred Heart ol JesiE. pray lor us. 
Sabfl Jude, woita ol inrades. prav tar 
us Satan Jude, helper of tha hopeless, 
pray tar us Amen Say ihs prayer lira 
times a day. by the ninth day. your 
prayer wfl be answered Pubficaaon mud 
be pramsud. IF 


Autos Tax Free 


EUROPE AUTO BROKERS, INC 

TelttOtend 31(0)30^064494 Fvia60SS4 


Legal Services 


DIVORCE WAY CEHTWED 
Cat or Fax (714 i 966-B®5 Wrte 16787 
Beach Bhd mr. ftantmgron Beach CA 
92648 U SA- erinai - wstarniJnro com 


DIVORCE M 1 DAY. Ho tra-rel Wnte 
Bor IK Sudbury. UA OlTTB USA Tel 
5QE443-83S7. Fax 5C&‘443C163 


LEGAL ANO FAST SOLUTIONS FOR 
ume g r at on and 'risas to North America. 
Serous Only. Musi be single Cortacr 
5144836336 (Montreal Canada’- 


Import/Export 


AUTHENTIC BELUGA CAVIAR. 

in*: lists orders only 

Martiwn 2 Igs Fac +^ 94 28513 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
IMMIGRATION/PASSPORTS 



Aston Corporate Trustees 

Aston House, uoogtas, We ot Man 
Tet *44 m lte« 626591 
Ftx: *44 (Q 1624 625126 

London 

TMi *44 (01 171 233 1302 
Fat +44 ffl 171 233 1519 

E Mad: astonMrprls&net 

wwvuxton-iomjfenKHixo.uk 


OFFSHORE COMPARES. For free ta>- 
ctxie or advice Tet London 44 181 741 
r22J Fax- 44 fSf 746 d5Z&'6338 
wwwanrtetoncojA 


OFFSHORE BANK 


mth conespandenr xelatianrtiip. 

Class A commercial license. 
Immediate delivery. US S60,000. 

Nassau, Bahamas 
T et (242) 394+7080 far (342? 394-7083 
Agents Wanted Worldwide 


Business Services 


YOUR OFRCE IN LONDON 
Bond Strew - Mai, Phone. Fax. Telex 
Tel 44 171 290 9000 Fax 171 499 7517 


Financial Sendees 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANTEES 

venture Capta! Finance AvatetXe 
tar Government Protects and 
Gwemmem Coryanes 
ma are tor sale. 

Large Protects ow Specxdty 
Also. Lang Term Finance n 
urge am Small Comoanes 
No ammsson unll Ftnded 

REPISSENTAT1VE 
Needed to act as Lason 
Please reply n Engtetr 

VENTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
tavestmint bankas 
18311 Ventura BhnL. Sdta 999 
Eodno, CaHomta 91436 U5A 
Far to.: (816) 905-1696 
TaL- (810) 7894)422 
Honan! £r. Asset Csfla 0.6. Lefystao 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - EUROPE 

THE FINEST & THE MOST SMCBtE 
ffl ■ 38+ WTERNATMWjL 
BEAUTfm l ELEGAN T STUP9I TS 
SECRETARES. AW HOSTED ft 
MODELS* 

AVAILABLE AS YOUR COMPANION 
Escort Agancy Cm* Canli WUflJOfe 

TEL LONDON H 44(0) 

0171 589 5237 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

watts Fist i Unsl EafluM Smte 
Motfete. Banufy 

Ertatttinflrft Italtaw ft Swaatt rat 
MdOhigual Travel Comnantanx 
'RatW ‘fiat fo New 1WT te jj* 
York Uaa Fotued n WenraW* New 
Meda &TV. vejeo tapes 4 Phcteaw 
able taf aleaon. Op« ads accetfcd 


IWwacoratafer 

USA 4 WgRLDWCE 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 

Cafl 022 < 346 £C 89 feccn Acrenc/ 
UIU5AWIE-MCNTREUX- BASEL 
ZURICH ■ CRSJIT CARDS 


VENUS IN FURS 

24HR KfORLDkVCE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 362 7000 

All cards Advance bookings wetoome 


' HIGH SOCIETY 

Exacuttre Escort Service 
woridwde 

Tet +44 W 171 208 IDES 
07000 4444 76. ^tegh-sooefy COlA 


AR1STOCATS Escort Service 
3 Shouttam Sl London W1 
0171 258 0090 


PARIS 

APOLLO ESCORTS 

semce 0 apoftKff&rflaras com 
++316-5422B-124 


HBOTS HIGH SOCfETTVENNA-PARlS 
COTE ITAZUR^UfllCHftjEMTIUNICH 
irtenationai Escort & Travel 
Vienna ++431'535 -il Ot all credn cards 


‘GUYS A DOLLS ESCORT SERVICE" 
MlLANDOMEITALY'LOi'OCWPARIS 
BBJELUXtUGANO'GERllANrSPAIN 
COTE D AZUffECANUNA VIA 1 EUROPE 
Tel +39 10) 335 613 0438 CredB Caros 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Beauchamp Place, London SW1 
Tel: 0171-504 G513 


Do YOU LIVE IX 

Helsinki? 

For a hand-delivered subscription 
on the day of publication, 
call OO 33 1 4-143 9361 



THE r»«*xi n> nilL> M.*S!>\PER 


— EURO ESCORTS 
Amsterdam! Frame* Esuxt Servce. 
Hah dass'dsoeetlriefldlv lades 
Teteptone J 1 10)20 482 0120 


• ZURICH * CAROL!* ■ 

Escon Savxre 

Tel Ol '2614947 

AN1XU0UE & Ffl ENDS 

Simply The Best Escort Serves 

London 24 his 0171 536 0059 

- BERLIN “ WELCOME- 
ESCORT i GUIDE SERVICE 

Tel 0172 740 13 96 

BLACK BEAUTY ESCORT SSIV1CE 
Exclusive Elegant Educated A Frwmfly 
LonM & Healvts* Ji8l9Q6Zt6i Cans 

CARIBBEAN BEAUTY * TWA * Infl 

Travel & Escort Sana tat VIPs 
"MILAN ' LUGANO ‘ *23 i0|3474244623 

HIGH UFE 1 WENNA ■ 24 In. 

MOST EXCLUSIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
VIBWA +443-1-3675690 aH credit cards 

JULIA BEAUTIFUL YOUNG Brunette 
Frenfly and very Sapek’ Prwae Escort 
Serves London T«* WIG 772 016 

i MONOPOL FRANKFURT 

THE LEADKG ESCORT ffiRVICE 

OFFICE NUU3EH 069 1 955 20 774 

MONIQUE BEAUTIFUL BLOND private 
escort service. Kennsmgton 

Tel 0171 SB 1685 9 01«1 259 3623 

PRBflER ESCORTS M hra 

Oriertal. As bn and Engten Roses tor 
ynr Deign Q1T1 503 8031 Croclt Caras 

STUNNING AUSTRIAN BLONDE 

Fbert EngKh and German and talari 

Cal UKSKSaiTO 

VALEHIIlCS IfTHWATONAL 
■ VIP Escort Savtce photos lo new central 
London office 0171 835 0905 al cards 


YOUNG & NEW ESCORTS 

Umfcfls Number One Escort Service 
T# 0171 634 3M9 - Whts 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 

lor 

SOLUTIONS 

Contact 


BANCOR 


Bankable 


OF ASIA 

n secure hnfrg 
viable projects: 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQW7Y LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Long fern colateral 
Supported Guarantees 

Fax: (632) 0104084 
Tat (632) 894-5358 


(Commission earned only 
Brokers Comrtssion 


Banking 


FOR SALE: Banks S Banktog ^ 
nee. For information Ml Beighim Tel. 
+32-7595-1023 Far +32-32130406 


Financial Investments 


OUISTAHDMG BfZA (Spain) property .- 
Goodlocalar Seeks pnrtnerehp to toy 
Tet +44 (0) 171 22? 5289 


Serviced Offices 


Telecommunications 


Cn - Harnrifeml 
knematonal Prepad Cards 
Exfremakr CanqraUive Pricing 
78. 39-81-5096243 Fax 3Ml-5«6272 
3422 Old Capaal Trail Sue 670. 
MMrtgm Deenare I960WJS2: USA 


New Lower 
International 
Rates! 


Germany.... 

310 

Japan 

380 

France 

33C 

UK 

190 



• NO Set Up Fees 

• NO Minlmums 

• Six-Second Billing 

• AT&T Quality 

■ 24-hour Multi-Ungual 
Customer Service 

77w Original 

kallback 

Whtre Standards are Set. not Met! 

Tel: 1.206.599.1991 
Fax: 1.206.599.1981 
Email: info©kallbackxam 

www.kallback.com 

417 Second Avenue West 
Seattle, WA 9 B 119 USA 


PROJECT CAHTAl 
AVAILABLE NOW 
NO LUX 
NO SECURITY 
FAX: *44 |up71 470 7213 


YOUR PRESTIGIOUS FURMSHB) 
OFFICE IN 11 MAJOR LOCATIONS IN 
ITALY. WWWJ5XEClriIVENCTWORK.IT 
TEL 3fl 6 8543241 FAX 39 6 85350107 


Employment 


Executive Positions Available 


Construction Project Managers wtb a 
ran. d 15 yre experrarce n directing civ- 
il. architectural, mechanical & eteorical 
rencvaiior work m Wslonc braidings. 
Famifariy mth Amencan rtfsWi a an- 
svuchon standards reqiwed kffel to flu- 
ent in Erepsh. both wrtaen & oral Send 
resunes S salary lequfremerts m 
Bra 333, I H T., 850 Rwd Ave. tOth fl. 
New York. NY 10022 USA 


DINING OUT 





MMSM 

MBS 9th 

LE BUBOQUET 

Ansfempfe store 1947 
wWdi boat* tta rmfeta kizgnraL 

ferdknworainK 

Gmliwiwiicd menu at a rwmmobii 

13, rw SataM«5tT.01 4JWM1 M. 

Tha Amorkan Bistro 

Great Food and Cocktails 

Fun Peoplo— 

S, BU Manfmorlni Tab 01 47702720 

{% Dtyaraj 

You am xuiyrh Um W, enwirft knloori 
dMas M ora beooinftg ranol n Frowo- 
'Fronxner'i 97“ far axdtomd) 

14, nw Doupliii».Tr01 43 26 4491 

PARTS I7Hi 

§ KIRANE’S 

Now Indkn tatourarl BMbr a Mdhonrtah. 
Bogloncd spickAito from Peodpb. ifey 
goad prns ririm. Open avondoy. 

Air concfeiomd. • Urrch ff 99 
• Dimer ft 155 to FT 199 

8S, w. d m Tom, - Tot 01 45744021 

CHEZ GANDHI 

rtaauuimndodfortop gaUmnani]'. 
Gobfei o4 Firm *nor to min’ 

/w44 07M^%M3»onS. 

VB9JNA 

PAKtS7*> 

mmm 

THOUM1EUX 

SpKkJWuofthsSouih-Wfist. 

Ceniir on cawd A ausouW ou «noH cfe 
canard. Air axnfiioiwd Opon ttvaryday. 


r Opan holdayi. ' | 


Heral&SSribune 

the upnurs haiu jjtuw 

PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Ploce your Ad quickly and easily, contact your nearest IHT office or representaHve with your 
text. You will be informed or me cost immediately, and once payment is made your ad will 
appear wrrfiin 48 hours. All major Credit Cards Accepted. 

EUROPE 


EUROPE 

PAHS: (HOI Tel (01)41 439385. 

Foe (01141 43 93 70 
Eithb OonAetASJir com 

AfrCORRArArefcnobVdb 
.at 067813 
Fa. 867 BI3 

GBWANY, AtKTTSA S OtmSJftOPfc . 

rronkiiiTt 

Td i06rt 07)25iX> 

Fto: (069) 9,' I y020 


BaQUNHJJXEMBOUC 

E®^ n2l ^ n7 

"WWSftfr 

Fa.. 3C l,« K 357 

RMAND: Hds.nl. 

Td 158«tfiH623 
Fu* 3M9646506 

ITALY: Mfcno 
Tol i:i50J 15739 
Fa')i)5B3»J35 

MEDffltUU'IS: AmsiBftioni 
Td 21206641000 
Few 3) ZOJ6B13 7i 

NOWAY, swaeq & PPWWK: 

55^1X70 
F» (47155913372 

KKIUCAtbsb* 

Tol 351 [>1457-729: 

Fw 351-1 -457-7352 

SRAftkModhd, 

Tri 4572856 
Fa <586074 

swnaBWMhPx 

' 7?B»2I 


ZM\% 


'211720 * 91. 

TUKEYtoW 

Td 230 59W/J327150 
Fw.2<7 9315 


UMIH) KNGOOM: londoi. 

Td -0171 836<802 
Tk 363009 fiat 2400338 

iWOMEEAST 

ISHAHJ.TdAw. 

Td 972-99-586245. 

972 - 99-586246 
Far. 972-99-585685 

KUWAIT: Corood London, 

Tfll 071 836-1802 
F a. 071 240 225< 

IEBANOK 5YI8A: Beinjl, 

W/To. (« I II 706564/706576 

SAUDI ARAfUA; Cgrat London. 

Td ■ 71 834 4802. 
fm. 71 240 2254. 

UWH) ARAB EttmATBc Shorn*. 

Td (06)351 133. 
fot -1061374808 
Tbc. 60404 TKM3LF, 

SOUTH AHOCA 

JOHANNESBUIG; 

Jd (271 1)803.5692 
foe (2711)803.9509 

NORTH AMBUCA 

WWTOfifc 

W.J2J375738W. 

TEXA5: Hflwtiv, 

Td- 281 -496-9603 
fat 31 496-9584 
TtA fhia 80J-526-7B57 

LATIN AMEMCA 

BOtMAiSomaCns. 

Td. (591-3)539900 
Fas (591-3)53 9990 


LATIN AMBUCA 

BRA3L Soo PbOD. 

Tel ( 55 ) 1 ) 8^4133 
Fbt (5511 1 852 0485 

asiapacbtc 

HONGKONG: 

>.(852129221188 
Tbt 5117D IHTHX 

Fat (853 2922 1190 

WMwaAiJobraFuia 
Td. 62-21-251 l4sS'l445 
Fax.- 62-21-251 2501 

JAPAN: Tokyo. 

Td: 32 6) 02 10 

TkJ33673 Foe 32010209 

"ffiSSSSteBr-au 

Fare (6031 02039827751 

TBBBah 

Fok: I632)633<J751 

foe 3250842 
•be 28749 MTSin 


AUSTBALI^ 


W&BOWM: 

Jd 96501100 
kk. 9650 6611 




N< 

K 

ih 
je« 
m, 
a . 


\ 


rr- :i 


e 

b 


fur 

'•s* 

\n 


wh 

tie 

ilk 

vo 

t 

tv 


F ' = 

il 


-it 
. et 
s ■ 
»' r 
?s 


1C: 

T u - 


ii- 

5«iy - 




k;.- - ! 









PA 


C 


I 


PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 


editorials/opinion 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PUBUMtgU WITH TllE >f.W YORK TIMES AW* THE WWHIVGTON POST 


Too Much Diana? 


Regret over the death of Diana, Prin- 
cess of Wales, is beginning to mix with 
more complicated emotions, including 
wonderment over the celebrity-wor- 
ship that made her such a public ob- 
session, and some misgivings about 
the overwhelming news coverage of 
her passing. . 

The sight of network anchors flying 
off to the funeral, the coverage on all- 
news networks that seems to rival that 
of the Gulf War, and the competition 
by interviewers and interviewees to 
claim Diana’s friendship do seem to 
suggest a world gone out of whack. 

But the cult of celebrity that put 
Diana's picture on the cover of People 
magazine 43 different times is at least 
as old as the industrial revolution. 
When people left their small towns and 
moved to anonymous cities to work, 
they retained their yearning for the 
human bonding that comes with gos- 
siping about other people’s sins, errors, 
triumphs and misfortunes. 

In 19th century England, the news- 
papers responded by creating the Pro- 
fessional Beauties — society women 
who were famous only for being fa- 
mous, and photographing well. 

In America a few decades later, tens 
of thousands of people showed up for 
the dedication of a statue in Ohio be- 
cause the newly married Alice Roos- 
evelt Longworth was scheduled to of- 
ficiate. While her father. Theodore, was 
president, Alice Roosevelt was the same 
son of celebrity as Diana, although 
somewhat c hilli er in temperament. 

So were the first ladies Frances 


Cleveland and, much later, Jacqueline 

Id j 


or Frances Cleveland in person to find 
out how they appeared in the flesh, 
moved and sounded. At the peak of the 
craze over Mrs. Kennedy there were 
only three television networks, no 
hand-held cameras and no cellular 
phones and modems that now allow 
photographers to take and transmit pic- 
tures to their agents in seconds. 

All this equipment, held by so many 
photographers and technicians, makes 
a qualitative change in the wav famous 
people conduct their lives. 

President John Quincy Adams took 
his exercise by swimming naked in the 
Potomac every morning, and no one 
disturbed him. Now a presidential can- 
didate trying to meet the voters on a 
walk down a New Hampshire street is 
virtually encased in a moving wedge of 
cameras and microphones, as remote 
from normal citizens as if he were in an 
armored car. 

The media's quest to present real- 
life pictures of people in the news 
actually strips the life away from these 
events’ as it must have deprived Di- 
ana of any sense of what normal ex- 
istence is like. 

People are clearly eager to share in 
expressing sorrow at her sad end, and 
to be part of the international discus- 
.s ion of her life. But the mind-numbing 
attention that the media are offering up 
is not solely a response to public de- 
mand. There is a war going on for 
ratings among the old networks and the 
proliferating cable stations. The tra- 
ditional prim media scramble to main- 
tain an audience in an era of declining 


Kennedy. Mrs. Cleveland could never 
appear in public without fear of rioting 
among her admirers, and Mrs. Kennedy 
suffered from the same problems with 
paparazzi that plagued Diana. 

The difference between Diana and 
those predecessors is technology. 
People had to seek out Alice Roosevelt 


readership, and the supermarket tab- 
tie 


loids jostle for attention. The Internet, 
still trying to find a mass-market iden- 
tity. offers forums for mourners and 
conspiracy theorists. 

. Responding to the public's natural 
interest in Diana's story, the media may 
be fanning it into an unnatural size. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Yeltsin Stands Out 


Boris Yeltsin says he will not run for 
re-election. That mighr not seem re- 
markable. given that he is serving his 
second term as president of Russia, 
where the constitution limits presi- 
dents to two terms. But leaders in other 
nations of the former Soviet Union 
seem determined to hold on to power 
whether their constitutions approve or 
not In that context. Mr. Yeltsin's 
simple, seemingly offhand declaration 
to a group of schoolchildren this week 
t "My term ends in 2000. 1 will not run 
anymore.") is remarkable indeed. 

How remarkable becomes clear 
when you look around Mr. Yeltsin's 
neighborhood. One Soviet legacy, it 
seems fair to say, is a reluctance to 
relinquish power. 

Down in Turkmenistan, President 
Saparmurat Niyazov has declared him- 
self Turkmenbashi, or Leader of All 
Turkmen, and has encouraged a per- 
sonality cult that might have embar- 
rassed Stalin — although without it 
should be said, Stalin’s terror. 

Similarly ensconced, and brooking 
no challengers, are the heads of Uzbek- 
istan. Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and 
Azerbaijan. Supporters of Armenia’s 
president manipulated the vote count 
when it appeared that he might not win 
a second term. Only Ukraine and the 
Baltic republics have witnessed peace- 
ful transfers of power. 


Mr. Yeltsin, too. it should be said, has 
shown himself determined not to be 
pried out of the Kremlin. In 1993 he 
called in tanks to defeat a political up- 
rising. and last year he shamelessly ma- 
nipulated state-controlled media as part 
of his successful re-election campaign. 

The miserable state of his health by 
the end of that campaign led many 
observers to doubt whether he would 
survive one more year in office, let 
alone rule long enough to prompt spec- 
ulation about a third term. But Mr. 
Yeltsin, 66, has emerged from heart 
surgery looking slim and healthy, 

He did not have to announce his 
retirement plans so definitively, es- 
pecially since his statement may well 
cause him some problems. The jock- 
eying among would-be replacements 


will intensify, and his lame-duck status 
lalh 


will gradually weaken his authority. 

Those negatives are more than out- 
weighed by die sense of constitutional 
orderliness conveyed by Mr. Yeltsin’s 
remarks. His overarching goal as pres- 
ident, in fact, has been to make Russia 
more of a “normal” country — in its 
economics, in its ties to other countries, 
in its stare institutions. A peaceful tran- 
sition to an elected successor, in a coun- 
try where no leader has enjoyed apeace- 
ful and voluntary retirement, would be 
an importani_step in that direction. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Why We Need Paparazzi 


The deaih of Diana and the other 
passengers was an accident caused by 
bad decisions and bad driving, not by 
the celebrity photographers following 
her and not by her fans who eagerly 
consume the images they produce. 

To hold the media responsible for 
this highly symbolic yet isolated in- 
cident is to misunderstand the absolute 
necessity for vigorous journalism, 
even media scandals, in democracies. 

It is clear that whoever made the 
decision to race that Mercedes into the 
tunnel was not a photographer. 

Let us hope that the hysteria about 
the media' s role in the accident fades in 
the discussions that will follow. What 
must never be forgotten is the indis- 
putable requirement of a free and vig- 
orous press in the Western world's 
delicate system of checks and balances 
on social power. 

The underlying factor in all of this is 
visibility’, wanted and unwanted. 
When a princess or a president wants 


media attention, he or she gets it. But if 
we allowed media celebrities — polit- 
ical figures, sports heroes, movie stars, 
billionaire business people, pop mu- 
sicians, members of royal families — 
to limit the contexts in which they are 
viewed and pondered, then we would 
miss out on lots of important history. 

We would have a very different 
view, for instance, of the late Richard 
Nixon, O.J. Simpson, Jim Bakker. 
Carlos Salinas de Gortari. even Hillary 
Rodham Clinton, among many others. 

Media visibility' holds accountable 
those who influence us by means of 
their political, economic or cultural 
power, which itself often is won 
through media exposure. 

Some revision of the rules regulating 
invasion of celebrities' privacy may be 
appropriate, but the visibility and ac- 
countability that the news media guar- 
antee are fundamental to democracy. 

— James Lull . a professor of 
communication studies at San Jose 
State University, commenting in the 
Los Angeles Times. 


Itcralo^fe&nbunc 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 


KATHARINE P. D ARROW. Vice Chairman 


RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief Excvutin 
MICHAEL GETLER, Ewentrve Editor 


• WALTER WELLS. Mitnatnug Editor » PAUL HORVIYZ. Depur\ Managing Editor 
KATHERINE KNORR and CHARLES MTTCHELMORE Deputy Editors • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWTRTZ. Associate Editors • ROBERT J. DONAHUE, Edimr if the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE. Business and Finance Edutv 
• REN£ BONDY. Deputy Publisher 

• JAMES McLEOD. .Adx eniunt Dinrh.tr • DlDER BRUM. Cinv/aiion Dimtor 
Birecteur de lu Publication. Richard Mi •Clean 


ImemaliumJ Herald Tribune. IS I Avenue Charlet-dc-Caulle. 92521 Nctiiih -vUr-Scine. France. 
Tel.; \ I » 4 1 ALAUtt fin: Sutecrpocns. 1 1 1 4I.-13.92.il>. Advcnwng. i 1 1 41.43 9212: New. 1 1 )4I.419.UB. 
Inicmci address: hapVAi wu .ihu'osn E-Mail: ihig iin.com 

iLiMlorAsu SlidwIRkLTib.nJ Cam far. .Siwjpure 1 1 WOO Fax. iVflZ?4^34 

J/flS At tai RuijD Ktdvpuht. ffl QjucrSir RJ.. HuKg Kont. Tel JKOC2-WW Fax 
Her Gamer T Sxldisn FneJn-bir l. : . (•>323 Frjntf.m V 7W Fas 

Fn s VS \heiai-: Ctnnn. Vi' Thir.l liv. bwt, \ f U»22 Td ,2/2i 7324891' Fax ‘2I2< 

L'.K. AJt erttiing Off. c. X' Lang A> re. London HV2 Tel. \ l7ll 836-48(12 Fax-il 71 1 240-225- 
SA S an eapiial de 1 200.VU0 F. RCS Namerre B ~3262ll2t Commission Paniairc No. *>1337 
laenutitful HtulJ Tnbune Ml rithti rewnvJ ISSN (UW-WfJ 



Cry Out for Algeria, and Press for Peace 

J what it can nc 



P ARIS — The barbarity of mur- 
derous attacks in Algeria has 
reached a level of- deliberate cruelty 
that is incomprehensible as well as 
outrageous. Almost as hard to under- 
stand is the deliberate lack of reaction 
— ■ from the terrified Algerian public, 
France and the West at large, the other 
Arab states and their populations. 

For nearly five years now, scarcely a 
week goes by without a report, some- 
times two or three, of 10, 15.29 people 
including two entire families having 
their throats cut or being burned alive 
in their village. 

Usually it ls a one- or two-paragraph 
item without comment, perhaps adding 
up the death toll of the month and 
repeating the figure of “over 60,000 
killed” since the 1992 elections were 
canceled and the Islamic Salvation 
Front was outlawed. 

The apparently indifferent silence 
was broken, for die moment, after last 
week's attack on the village of Rais 
some 25 kilometers south of Algiers 
and not far from its airport. The number 
of victims reported varied, but as usual 
women, children, even babies were 
killed, mutilated, sometimes beheaded. 
A baby was found stuffed in an oven. 

Now the London-based, Saudi- 
owned paper Al-Hayat has pul the of- 
ficial figure at 256 dead at Rais. 

The censored, harassed Algerian 
press was allowed to print pictures of the 
bodies and to comment on the gov- 
ernment's failure to suppress terrorism, 


By Flora Lewis 


but stale-owned television was discreet. 

There isn’t much foreign press rep- 
resentation in Algiers because journa- 
lists have been regular targets for as- 
sassination. The courage of those 
Algerian journalists who continue to 
try to tell what is happening despite 
official constraints as well as terrorist 
threats is incredible. 

One of them, a young woman who 
couldn't stand it any more and came to 
France a few months ago, told me that 
the lack of popular protest is because 
people have become too numb, too 
distraught to think of anything but try- 
ing to survive. “Everybody lives for 
the moment,” she said. “If a few days 
go by and nothing happens, they tell 
themselves it’s getting better.” 

The government claims it is fighting 
the last gasps of “residual terrorism,'’ 
but the facts, which won’t stay sup- 
pressed, show that to be nonsense. 

The Rais case was particularly dis- 
turbing not only because of the num- 
bers and the vicious methods of killing 
but because nobody ever came to help 
or protect the villagers. There were 
survivors, who said the slaughter lasted 
more than four hours. 

That reinforced suspicions that some 
of the atrocities, always officially at- 
tributed to “Islamist terrorists,” were 
perpetrated, or provoked or colluded in. 
by forces from the Algerian military. “I 


can't allow myself to believe n, it 
would be just too awful,” the young ex- 
journalist expatriate said. But clearly 
she half did. There have been too many 


rumors, too many strange events. 

United Nations Secretary-General 
Kofi Annan finall y spoke out and said 
that “tolerance and dialogue must take 
over from the forces of violence." But 
the government ordered the house ar- 
rest of Abassi Madani, a former Sal- 
vation Front leader it had released after 
six years in prison this past July pre- 
sumably in recognition of the split be- 
tween moderates and extremists in the 
Islamist movement 

His new crime was to address an open 

letter to die UN railing for “a serious 
dialogue” to end the violence. The gov- 
ernment refuses any talks. 

But those who know the situation 
well say it is becoming more and more 
of a euphemism to speak of “the gov- 
ernment.’ ’ There are rival cliques with- 
in the army, mafia gangs, important 
family clans, who have scores to settle, 
wealth to dispute, power claims to as- 
sert Algeria is on the cusp of what has 
come to be called a failed stare. 

Other leading Arabs try to ignore it, 
to exorcise it by saying “Algeria is 
Algeria, unique” and thus have an ex- 
cuse for turning away. France, the 
former colonial power! which ceded 
independence after a long and very 
brutal war, has complex relations with 
it as well as an important dependency 
for petroleum and natural gas. It does 


whai it can not to embarrass Algiers, V 
It has a mean policy of refusing,; 
asylum to people whose 
clearly endangered on the grounds that 7 
people are not political refugees unless* 
they are fleeing their government 
There are already several million^: 
Algerians in France, a strident nnti-ri 
immigration movement, and a fear ofo 
being swamped if the Islamists lake-? 
power in Algeria, so the pretense is tot, 
respect the 'authorities’ Claim to the^ 
sovereign right of noninterference:" 

But this is an egregious case of civffj 
war and humanitarian disaster. Non-p 

intervention abets the honor . ■ 

The onlv alternative to nghtingiis.^ 
talking. There is urgent need now fora 
an outside initiative to organize aeon-* 
ference and to exert pressure for nefo 
go nations among nonextremists, toe-o 
great majority. ... -4 

Mario Giro of the Sant’ EgidioCpn^ ; 
munity in Rome, which attempted to^ 
launch intra-Algerian negotiations -in* 
early 1995, said the situation is now£ _ 
much worse than it was then, because^ ' 
of the “Soraalia-ization” of the coun-rj 
try. But he also feels that international! 
pressure could now succeed, and that ity 
is more than ever necessary. 

It is a matter of prudence. Much isaW 
stake in volatile North Africa. .. _-g 
But even more, it is a matter of* 
conscience. Passive indifference toy. 
such crime is also shameful. Why is j 
there no resounding outety? 1 4 

<0 Flora Lewis. 


-4 
& 


Behind the Noise About Taiwan Is a Chinese Strategic Vision] 


i 


T AIPEI — China laid do wn a 
barrage of invective against 
Japan-U.S. security arrange- 
ments before the current visit of 
Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashi- 
moto to Beijing. In the process 
it redoubled the importance of 
the Taiwan issue to all parties. 

Beijing addressed its angry 
words to Tokyo, not to the 
United States. China evidently 
feels that it can say whatever it 
likes about Japan, often in the 
crudest terms, but cannot afford 
to challenge America on such a 
central issue as the U.S.-Japan 
treaty in advance of Jiang 
Zemin's visit to Washington. 

China exploited to the full 
some remarks by government 
spokesman Seiroku Kajiyama 
in Tokyo about the inclusion of 
Taiwan in the revision of 
guidelines on U.S.- Japanese de- 
fense cooperation, to raise the 
specter of a revival of Japanese 
militarism and impute dark 
motives to America as well. 
That played well with the 


By Philip Bowring 


dwindling number of Japanese 
who oppose the treaty and the 
also dwindling number of those 
in Japan who want closer re- 
lations with Beijing. 

Despite congressional sym- 
pathy for Taipei’s predicament, 
the ruckus will strengthen the 
hand of the pro-Beijing camp in 
America, so well represented in 
academia as well as in business. 
These circles tend to view 
Taiwan as an inconvenience. 

Beijing's verbal offensive re- 
flects its growing interest in 
Taiwan as a strategic question. 
The One China goal now has 
practical rather than merely 
symbolic nationalist value. 

China's power projection ca- 
pability is still weak, but if we 
look a decade ahead, control of 
Taiwan assumes greater signif- 
icance for the region. It would 
give China control not only over 
the Taiwan Strait but also over 
the Bashi Channel the strait be- 


tween Taiwan and the north- 
ernmost Philippine islands. 

Thus China would control 
both northern entrances to the 
South China Sea, making pos- 
sible exercise of the sovereignty 
it claims over much of that sea 
as well as over most islands and 
undersea assets. It would also 
bring China's power close to 
Okinawa and southern Japan. 

Taiwan is thus central ro 
China's long-term goal of re- 
placing the United States as the 
dominant power in the region 
and marginalizing Japan. 

Those goals require under- 
mining of the U.S.- Japanese al- 
liance and. if possible, prevent- 
ing a further significant buildup 
in Japan’s ability to conduct op- 
erations outside its immediate 
waters. It is thus natural for 
Beijing to stoke domestic and 
regional opposition to the in- 


creasingly flexible interpreta- 
tions of the Japanese constitu- 


tion required by a role in 
regional defense. 

The Taiwan Strait has always 
been implicitly included in the 
U.S. -Japanese treaty, which 
provided for use of Japan as a 
base for “regional security in 
the Far East.” Although the po- 
sition of Taiwan itself may be 
ambiguous, the strait, as an in- 
ternational waterway, is clearly 
wi thin the treaty's scope. 

In 1978, the treaty was de- 
veloped by fee adoption of 
Guidelines for U.S.-Japan De- 
fense Cooperation, which cover 
the Far East as well as toe case 
of attacks on Japan. 

China is probably right to see 
revision of the guidelines as 
partly due to changing percep- 
tions* of China after last year's 
Taiwan Strait crisis. In Japan, 
popular sentiment toward C hina 
has plunged, and at elite levels 
Japanese are. beginning ro think 
more seriously about their role in 
toe increasingly complex power 
relationships in the region. 


Guideline revisions may be a . 
small step toward Japanese in- 
volvement in collective defend- - 
arrangements rather than meifc * ; 
supply of logistics and nonconi- 
bat support to U.S. operations) 
Despite toe prior verbal bat. 
rage, Mr. Hashimoto's visit will:i= 
be positive for Chinese-Japjj- 
nese ties. The two powers Havp- 1 


issues of mutual interest -4-, 

mb'-- 


trade, investment and Noi 
Korea — which require a halt 
toe deterioration in relations. \ • ' 
Still, toe exchanges over life “ 
guidelines are crystallizing 
thinkin g about toe longer-term • 

, regional strategic roles qf- ' 
China, Japan and America, j * 
As for Southeast Asia, it- " 
needs to stop assuming that 
talking is a substitute ; for 
strategy, or conferences for de- 
fense cooperation. At least oti 
the South China Sea and on law{- 
of-the-sea issues, it needs a co- 


herent regional security policy 
that can influence events. 


International Herald Trihune 



#1 - 1 ■ 


pill 


r> I" 

■ifuKJT': 

* (B : 


*5? e .. 

RV 

■****£:■ 
^ on ,\Ji- 

with . 

■ Sptf 131 X : : 

’tin* 0 

•bvrri^V 

■ VVhtf . 

*35 3° J, .V- 

‘the Pn R “ 

• patii>- 
'rfquenK: ■ ; 





t: ■ 


A Saddam Story: Fiddle With the Tap and Buy Oil Futures 5. 


W ASHINGTON — Memo 
to m> literary agent 
You recall last summer I sent 
you a proposal for a novel about 
how Saddam Hussein was 
deftly using his relationship 
with toe United Nations to in- 
fluence oil prices. Every time 
Saddam feigned cooperation 
with the UN, it triggered hopes 
that toe UN would let him sell 
some oil, so prices went down. 
Every time Saddam stiffed toe 
UN, it triggered fears that the oil 
embargo on Iraq would remain. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


so prices went up. 

LSat 


In my novel. Saddam was do- 
ing all of this deliberately be- 
cause through front companies 
he was actually buying and 
selling oil futures, and be was a 
winner every time because he 
knew just how he was going ro 
jerk toe market up or down. That 


novel was entitled “Manipulat- 
ing the UN for Fun and Profit” 

Well, he’s back! Saddam is at 
it again, and I have a great idea 
for a sequel novel, “Scuds & 
Scams: How to Rebuild Your 
Army With Oil Futures.” 

The book opens with oil 
traders at Morgan Stanley 
crowded around their Bloom- 
berg machine, waiting for any 
news about Saddam, because in 
today’s tight oil market with 
low inventories Saddam’s be- 
havior can be the key variable of 
world oil prices. 

Moreover, last December the 
Uniied Nations partially lifted 
the oil embargo on Iraq. Under 
UN Resolution 986, Saddam 
was allowed to sell SI billion of 
oil every 90 days, with toe 


money going into a UN-run ac- 
count to buy medicine and food 
for Iraq's hungry people. This 
was a perfect setup for Saddam. 

In the latest 90-day period, 
which began in early June, he 
sold only about 5500,000 in oU, 
saying he was protesting how 
toe UN was distributing toe 
food bought with that oil. That 
really had oil traders howling in 
laughter. Saddam’s refusal to 
sell his full Si billion allotment 
came right when summer gas- 
oline demand was rising and 
helped to tighten the market and 
boost prices. 

Now, with summer demand 
over. Saddam wants permission 
to sell SI. 5 billion in this next 
90-day period, and the prospect 
of that is depressing oil prices. 


As my novel explains, Sad- 
dam was using dummy compa- 
nies in Switzerland and Lux- 
embourg. and rogue traders 
with whom he has special ac- 
counts. to buy oil futures last 
June at $20 a barreL Then he 
told toe UN that he was not 
going to sell all his allotted oil. 


so toe world oil price shot up to 
S25 a barrel. Saddam made $5 j 
barrel on his oil futures. 


United States and toe United 
Nations into stopping and staff- 
ing his oil sales, so that he can 
make a killing in oil futures i$r 
his own account. 

In my novel Saddam alsb 
strikes a deal with an Asian na- 
tion (North Korea? China?) ud- 
der which it agrees to secretly 
repair some of his tanks, and he 


] jays with insider tips on the (53 

]Utll 


He also uses options on fu- 
tures. a complex derivative that 


In Defense of Rome ’s Candidacy 


R OME — When the mem- 
bers of toe International 
Olympic Committee vote in 
Lausanne, we will finally 
know whether toe site of the 
2004 Olympic Games is to be 
Athens. Buenos Aires, Cape 
Town, Stockholm or Rome. If 
a city ocher than Rome is 
chosen, the Italian govern- 
ment will be the first to con- 
gratulate the representatives 
of that city’. 

However. I would like to 
offer one final element for 
consideration, in the form of 
the reasons for the Italian gov- 
ernment’s firm endorsement 
of the candidacy of Rome. 

Barcelona in 1992 and At- 
lanta in 1996 showed how toe 
organization of the Olympics 
can reconcile modernization 
with respect for tradition and 
culture, large-scale investment 
with sound administration. 

Few if any of the world’s 
cities can bring to a challenge 
requiring the latest technolo- 
gical advances toe centuries of 
history, the concentration of 
an. architecture and archae- 
ology that form Romes her- 
itage. Yet these treasures, toe 
monuments, squares and 
streets of Rome, are no jus- 
tification for shutting our eyes 


Bv Romano Prodi 


The writer is prime 
minister of Italy. 


to the future. That is not what 
our forefathers did when they 
built the marvels of Baroque 
Rome next to those of the 
Renaissance, which were 
themselves built alongside the 
monuments of the Caesars. 

Cities, like the men and 
women who inhabit them, 
have a life and an evolution of 
their own. This evolution 
needs to be governed, gen- 
eration after generation, with 
the courage and resolve to set 
sights high and look far ahead 
to construct toe future. 

Emerging from decades of 
dictatorship and the death and 
devastation of World War II. 
in half a century the Italian 
people have built a solid de- 
mocracy and a robust econo- 
my. Ranking among toe 
world’s leaders in national in- 


come and output, in exports 
i. Italy is now a 


This article responds ro 
“Spare Rome the 2004 
Olympics' (IHT Opinion. 
Sept. 3} by Jas Gawronski. 


and savings. Italy 
nation of immense resources. 

Its entrepreneurs, architects, 
urban planners, engineers, 
artists, designers and "coutur- 
iers are appreciated world- 
wide. So are Italian workers 
and craftsmen. Italy has all the 
human and financial resources 
that it takes to stage an event 
like toe Olympics with every 
assurance of excellence. 


Organizing toe Olympic 
Games is not just a fascinating 
challenge. It is an exception- 
ally difficult and complex test 
whose accomplishment de- 
mands great rigor, adminis- 
trative transparency and cap- 
able management. 

The Italian government is 
aware of this, and we are con- 
fident that toe forces and re- 
sources mobilized on behalf 
of the Olympic candidacy for 
2004 will guarantee unpar- 
alleled success. 

Italy today is a manire na- 
tion which, with determina- 
tion. rigorous administration 
and great sacrifice, has 
traveled the arduous path to a 
degree of stability comparable 
to that of our partners, with 
whom we now are preparing 
for the launch of a truly his- 
toric enterprise. European 
monetary union. 

Rome can assure athletes of 
an environment and an atmo- 
sphere of human warmth 
without peer. 

Already engaged in prep- 
arations for the Holy Year of 
2000 and thus all the better 
equipped, with the city gov- 
ernment in the forefront, to 
host and organize internation- 
al events on the largest scale. 
Rome offers the ideal site. 

I would almost say the nat- 
ural site, for the Olympic 
Games of 2004. 


hucrnaitoiul Herald Tribune 


options 
derivati 

allows him to put up even less 
money to control even more oil 
futures. It’s leverage on lever- 
age, and if you know* toe way 
the market is going — which 
our boy Saddam does — oil 
forures options are like a license 
to print money, because with 
every dollar you can make 10. 

Everyone looks at Saddam 
and says: “What a fool! He 
keeps doing things that force 
toe UN and toe U.S. to block 
him from selling oil for food for 
his people.” But he’s just toy- 
ing with the U.S. and UN. 

He is not interested in selling 
oil to benefit his people. He is 
only interested in benefiting 
himself and the army that he 
needs to protect him from his 
people. The only way he can do 
that is not by selling oil through 
toe UN program'’ — because 
none of that money comes to 
him — but by manipulating the 
UN program, and provoking rhe 


.jtures marker. (Don’t laugh. 
The Chinese just told the d 
Kuwaitis that if Kuwait wanted f 
China to vote for a renewal pf 
toe UN sanctions regime on 
Iraq, toe Kuwaitis better think 
• about buying Chinese howitzers 
instead of Western ones.) * 

In my novel, toe CIA finally 
catches onto Saddam. As a re- 
sult, Bill Clinton asks Saudi 
Arabia to declare that it will 
increase or decrease its own oil 
production to blunt whatever 
Saddam does. But the president 
is too late. While he was ig- 
noring toe Middle East. Sad- 
dam forged a quiet rapproche- 
ment with Saudi Arabia, Iran 
and Syria, and none of them will 
do America’s bidding. ii 

(Don’t laugh. Iraq this Thurs- r 
day opened its border with Iran 
for toe first time since 1980, 
when toe Iran-Iraq war started:) 

Well, as I said before, ir'sjusr 
a little novel idea I had. No thing 
like this actually could be hap- 
pening in the real world ... 

The New York Times - 


M0NKE1 BU 

:■ 


Review e*: 
MichikO K 


M - 


V- 




"'ij* 
io i-.it 

neitne: 
the r; 
hm\t. 
her \ i; 
ienr-r.e 
create ; 
Anter.: 

jh-ifr; 
her rr ; ■ 
>L:v 

•foil;: 
lege, j . 
■hr F.y 

h • 


! a, •••- 


• i u 5 . ■ 

J MS nj. !■ 

'■ Ld^ S.h . 

; i ran,!-. •• 

t eicani V. . 

fflittiev. 

Kiri 

j 'Rimtgrar,: 

i \ :l i- mi-.-.. 
' “It- .r-: 

it.tr i:;V 

■whe i .. 
jl.C-j .. _ 
'•’f PU-. . 

ihl- 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


tf, .< .. 

rr>rrr - 

M- - 

iV , 
Cur., 


1897: Police Attacked 


its welfare, and that there was 
no need to fear that it misht 
become a sort of super-state "in- 
fringing the sovereignty of die 
nations. The Assembly will deal 
with disarmament, toe admis- 
sion of Hungary to the League 
and the affairs of Austria. *’ 


Barcelona — The chief 

and Assistant-Chief of Police 
were walking in the Plaza de 
Cataluna towards midnight 
when they were accosted by a 
stranger, who fired three shots at 
them. Both officers were 
wounded, and the perpetrator of in 
toe outrage was evenrually ar- Defense Treatv 

rested. The assailant, who is a --- - **“ 

son of a former Councillor-Gen- 
eral, admits he is an Anarchist. 

The Chief of Police expresses his 

conviction that he is an accom- 
plice of the murderer of Senor 
Canovas. tire Spanish premier. 



1922: League Session 

GENEVA — The third Als 
sembly of the League of Na-' 
lions opened its session with the 
representatives of forty-four na- 
tions. TJe president. Senhor Da 
Gama, declared that the Lea°ue 

had taken its place in the world 

as an organization essential to 


WASHINGTON — Secret 
°* St ^ le George C. Marshall de- 
clared that toe agreement of tlfe 
nineteen American nations on^a 
hemispheric defense treaty wtis 
. n ] ost stimulating action 
since theclose of hostilities. He 
said: Tlie results of the cofr- 
rerence demonstrate that where 
nations are sincerely desirous df 
promoting peace and well-be- 
rng in the world it can be do* 


Pc- 


ir.r.. 


“ tan oe aone 

wi hour frustrating delays arid u- 
without much of the confusing W 
and disturbing propaganda tlfii 
has attended our effort of foe 


X fo' 

J ’ 
l ."; r 


past two years" — a direct ref 
erence to foe Soviet Union. “ 





v 




ixtppimatTON AL HERALD TRIBUNE, FBH)-**, SEPTEMBER 5. 199T 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 




The Real Tragedy Was Diana’s Dependence on the Public 


pARIS — The New York 


iHi t>ii % * Lll i 


111111 " 


Times devoted 40 percent of 
; its general news space on Monday 
to the death of the Princess of 
•Wales. The Times of London. 

. once the august journal of Bri- 
' tain’s rulers, gave it 26 of 2S news 
.pages. The Daily Mail, a 

• middlebrow paper with a middle- 
| class audience, gave the subject 

• SO pages. The hysteria and hy- 
■pocrisy of the London tabloid 
. press was beyond description. 

The BBC canceled virtually 
. everything else on Sunday, as did 

• CNN, most of the rest of Amer- 
; ican television and that of much of 
. Europe, and indeed of the world, 
j By Sunday nighr there probably 
■ were drummers in the rain forests 


Bv William Pfaff 


of New Guinea relaying debates 


‘■NraL-iiicVuif, « 


on the responsibility of paparazzi 
in Diana’s death. 

The world's magazines were 
stopped in the presses and remade 
with the princess on the cover. 
Special publications wiU be on 
newsstands everywhere by the 
time of the funeral on Saturday, in 
Westminster Abbey, carried live 
by television worldwide. 

What is going on here? Diana 
was an attractive young woman 
whose accomplishment In her life 
was to have been chosen to marry 
the Prince of Wales, be betrayed 
by him. make this betrayal public 
in a calculated bid for public sym- 
pathy, divorce him and sub- 
sequently Figure in an internation- 


al demimonde of film stars, 
fashion junkies and the nouveau 
riche. 

She made undoubtedly well- 
meant excursions into the promo- 
tion of good causes, which in turn 
reflected well upon her. She had 
several lovers and died in the 
company of the last of these. He. 
too, had apparently done nothing 
with his late, other than survive 
Sandhurst, pui money into a few 
movies and hang out in Malibu 
with starlets. 

A comparison has been made to 
Evita Perdn as well as to Jac- 
queline Kennedy. Evita Perdn 
was someone serious. She began 
as an actress, and married power, 
but she then genuinely threw her- 
self into a political struggle on 
behalf of workers, uomenand the 
poor, in defiance of powerful in- 
terests. 

The difference between Diana 
and Jacqueline Kennedy is that 
the latter never courted or wanted 
publicity. 

One explanation for what is 
happening, as The Wall Street 
Journal said earlier this week, is 
that Diana "wus the center of an 
industry — a diversified, multina- 
tional. multimillion ^ -dollar one ... 
and. though many won t talk 
about iu her death could well ex- 
pand the industry.” It is a wholly 
parasitic industry. She profited 


from it simply because she was its 
subject. 

People also explain the atten- 
tion given her death by saying that 
stars like Diana lend themselves 
10 the fantasies of ordinary 
people. This seems very condes- 
cending. 

The people who followed Di- 
ana’s adventures were not vicari- 
ously living her life. They simply 
were fascinated by it. and why 
not? It was a great story. It was 
better than the movies or tele- 
vision. It was entertainment. 

Harder to understand is why 
people like Diana wish to reveal 
the details of their lives to ihe rest 
of us. It is clear why we are in- 
terested. but why do they want to 
tell us? They seem to need the 
public’s attention more than the 
public needs them. 

It is not. as some psychologists 
and social commentators say, that 
the star brings glamour and vi- 
carious romance into the hum- 
drum lives of ordinary people like 
us. It is rhe opposite. The public 
figure's life would be empty with- 
out the public's attention and 
love. 

Jacqueline Kennedy resolutely 
insisted upon remaining a private 
person despite John Kennedy's 
assassination and the notoriety of 
her marriage to Aristotle Onassis. 
She sued phorographers to keep 


rhem away from her, protected her 
children and found a useful job 
and conventional life in New 

^°Diana seemed compelled to 

arsssrgs 

arranged a return to the luneugni. 
She wanted to have it both ways. 

The narcissistic personality ex- 
periences not only an extreme 
love of self but an extreme need to 
have that love validated by ev- 
idence that others also love the 
narcissist. The lives of such 
people are dominated by the need 
toplease others, so as to win oth- 
ers’ attention and approbation. 


And even when they have ihaL it 
is never enough. 

The narcissist as politician 
makes a great campaigner and a 
terrible leader. Narcissists are not 
autonomous persons. There is no 
core: they are unprincipled because 
they can’t afford principles. They 1 
have to please others to feel alive. 

That. I suggest, was the actual 
tragedy of Diana. Her belief in her 
own worth depended upon public 
attention. That attention was in- 
directly responsible for her death, 
so that one can say that she lived 
by publicity, and "died by it. It is 
that which’ excites our pity, and 
our terror. 

litlcrnaiivnal HeroU Tribune 
<£• Lt>s .\itzclcs Trmi‘1 oie 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Silvery Reflection 
Of Others’ Desires 


Bv Maureen Dowd 


Diana’s Gift 

Regarding “A Piece of Advice 





-Voir that ice hare freedom of religious expression m the federal workfrace, tcould 

it be too much to expect some work in the federal workplace? 


for Diana's Sons: Flee the Stul- 
tifying Roval Zoo" (Opinion. 
Sept. 3 ) bv Richard Cohen: 

Mr. Cohen’s article was com- 
pletely wrong. The two young 
British princes will gain from me 
enormous outpouring of love for 
their mother and will be inspired 
to carry on her work of caring, 
touching and helping all those she 
encountered. 

It is this invaluable work that 
Mr. Cohen ignores or refuses to 
acknowledge. This great gift Prin- 
cess Diana had wyis her real life. 
She knew it was her power and 
used it to a degree hitherto un- 
known in the history of the roy- 
als. 

Mr. Cohen ignores the real 
work of the British monarchy and 
ihar of Diana in particular. She 
used her position and her beauty 
to benefit so many. 

It is to be hoped that the young 
princes will understand, appreci- 
ate and follow her example for 
their own lives’ work. They. too. 
will then know the reason for the 
extraordinary gratitude of so 
many British people for the life 
and "work of Diana, Princess of 
Wales. 

THE LORD HANSON. 

London. 


zone comprising the two Koreas 
and Japan. That is a good idea, one 
discussed for some time. But his 
suggestion that the U.S. nuclear 
umbrella, which now covers 
South Korea and Japan, remain 
— while China and Russia are 
urged to commit themselves in a 
legally binding way to not use 
or threaten to use nuclear weap- 
against South Korea and 


WASHINGTON — The 

W New Age Princess did not 

have to contend with lumpy 
mattresses, fire-soorting drag- 
ons, evil magicians and im- 
pudent swineherds wanting to 
steal kisses. 

It was far worse than thaL 

She was enmeshed in a shal- 
low world of psychics, astro- 
logers, fashion, aromaiherapy. 
colonic irrigation, bulimia, self- 
mutilation, adultery, TV con- 
fessions. tell-all books, tapped 
phones, international playboys 
and Furies swooping down on 
her with cameras. 

She was. to paraphrase Oscar 
Wilde, the spendthrift of her 
own celebrity. 

It is unbearably sad to imag- 
ine Diana, bloody aod mangled 
and gesticulating, being de- 
scended upon in a tunnel by oni- 


ons 


(North 
in this 


Japan — is surprising. 

Korea is not mentioned 
context, i 

The basic objective of nuclear 
weapon-free zones, including 
the four existing ones, is to re- 
move nuclear weapons from an 
area, a measure that must be 
verified, and to remove the threat 
of nuclear attack against that 
area's states. 

All nuclear-weapon powers 
must be committed to not using 
threatening to use nuclear 


meanwhile 


nivorous paparazzi- But it is also 

sad to see the imaj 


OT 


Nuclear-Free Zone 


Regarding "Link Japanese and 
Koreans in a Nuclear Weapon- 
Free Zone " (Opinion, Aug . 29 ) by 
Shinichi Ogawa: 

Mr. Ogawa suggests the estab- 
lishment of a nuclear weapon-free 


weapons against a zone s states. 
The latter component would in- 
evitably limit some of the scope 
of the U.S.-Japan Mutual Security 
Treatv. 

The complicated ocean geog- 
raphy of the area, and the fact that 
two nuclear-weapon powers 
would be immediate neighbors of 
the zone, could require some fine 
print in a zone agreement. 

If Taiwan was also added to 
such an arms control regime, 
guaranteed by all major powers, 
its sovereignty problem could be- 
come easier to resolve. 

JAN PRAWITZ. 

Stockholm. 


The writer was the arms control 
adviser for Sweden's Ministry of 
Defense from 1970-92. 


^ image of Diana. 

sparkling and shy and smiling, 
being served up in death through 
as many news cycles as the om- 
nivorous market will bear. 

The insane coverage of her 
death is of a piece with the 
insane coverage of her life. We 
can’t stop. The photographers 
can’t stop. The reporters can’t 
stop. The producers can’t stop. 
The editors can’t stop. And the 
consumers can’t stop. The 
celebrity culture has become a 
mass psychosis. It has broken 
out of its former confines in the 
entertainment industry and 
overrun institutions of author- 
ity. It has swamped the British 
monarchy as it has swamped the 
American presidency. 

There is a theory that the 
identification with celebrities 
(and with really big celebrities 
known as “icons") is a form of 
empathy, that it enables ordin- 
ary people to expand upon their 
ordinary experience and under- 
stand more about the world. 
Would that this were so. 

All that the celebrity culture 
teaches is a counterfeit em- 
pathy. which mistakes pruri- 
ence for interest and voyeurism 
for a genuine human identifi- 
cationrUving vicariously is not 


the same thing as living ima- 
ginatively. 

The pictures of die princess 
dying — and it is only a matter 
of time before these scummy 
photos surface — are not news. 
They are pornography. And por- 
noeraphy is the natural conclu- 
sion of a culture of voyeurism. 

Women all over the world 
said they had related to Diana 
because she was so normal. She 
was a tender mother and warm 
souL but she was anything but 
normal. The Princess of Wales 
was the queen of surfaces, ruling 
over a kingdom where fame was 
the highest value and glamour 
the most cherished attribute. 

In Britain there were 50 free- 
lance photographers who vir- 
tually lived off Diana, hounding 
her every move. Sometimes she 
begged them to stop, and some- 
times she used them. She rode 
the Nikon riger. 

Evervone is trying to connect 
Diana’s life story with the fu- 
ture of the monarchy or the state 
of feminism or the deaths of 
American royalty like Marilyn 
Monroe (same age at death). 
Grace Kelly (same mode of 
death) and Jackie Onassis 
(same romantic trajectory ). 

But as usual. Diana is simply 
the silvery reflection of what 
others want to see in her. Maybe 
there is no larger lesson in her 
death. Maybe she was just a 
self-absorbed Sloane Ranger 
who found herself in a painful 
situation and did the best she 
could to improve herself. 

Maybe this survivor of a dys- 
functional home and a dysfunc- 
tional marriage finally found a 
man in whose company she 
could relax. Maybe it was just an 
unlucky car wrecked by a drunk- 
en driver, tragically leaving her 
two children without a mother. 

In a way, the most chilling 
pronouncement of all came in 
USA Today, which declared 
Prince William “a global teen 
idol, with Internet fan-sites 
crowded with condolences 
Monday between gashing 
praise of the best looking guy in 
die world and the Future 
King!" The Princess is dead. 
Long live die Prince! 

The Sc* York Times 


monkey bridge 

By Lon Cop. 200 pages. 

523.95. Viking. 

: Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

M Y dilemma." says Mai. 

the narrator of Lan 
Cao's affecting first novel. 

’ -was that, seeing both sides 
lb everything. I belonged to 
neither.” Mai lives at once m 
toe past and the present 
;haunted by the memories o 
her Vietnamese youth and de- 
- temuned at the same time to 
% create a new life for hersel If in 
■ .America. On one hand, she 
■shares the immigrant tears l 
her mother, on the other, she 
shares the shiny teenage 
dreams of her friends — ■ col- 
lese. a career, hanging out at 

the mall^ou^ Bridge, 

■Cao. who left Vietnam m 
iQ75 and now teaches inter- 
national law at the Brookly n 
law School. leUsthestoryof 
afamilv fractured b> the Vj 

iSSKx 

" 1U reinventing toem- 


iries ano 

rS life, reinventing gem- 

■Srsassaffls 

:^ ub and v r 

^quencesofculniral^d 

me N Cnfb&fonhb, ; 

, w een Mai’s IWJjP^u 


'giiniscences 


written by her mother. 
Thanh. Cao does a sensitive 
job of delineating the com- 
plicated relationship be- 
tween a mother and a daugh- 
ter. a relationship that has 
been turned upside down by 
their move to the United 
States. Back home in Saigon, 
Mai not onlv found comfort 
in 'The solid geometry’ ot 
her mother’s life, bat also 

defened to her politely ljea 
model Confucian daughter. 
Here in the Virginia suburbs, 
Mai is the one who quickly 
masters the language- she is 
also the one who tells her 
mother what is "acceptable 

or unacceptablebehavior. 

In Saieon. Thanh would 
but dozens of hummingbirds 
and canaries and release them 
in the garden to generate pos- 
itive karma for the family- to 
America, such charming ges- 
iures. along with her belief in 
curses and countercurses, are 
rejected bv her teenage 
daughter as "bad fortune- 
cookie advice.' Mai s impa- 
uSce will rum to concern, 
how ever, when a stroke sends 
ffiTi *e hospital, aud 
Mai is forced to become her 

the only thing loundergoa 

sea change. As Mai obsen.es. 
many Vietnamese 

S arrived in ihe : Limed 

Kites without identification 
and the lack of proper 
S&ution .has conferred 

on them the abilitv to invent 

themselves anew. Sometimes 


the changes are cosmetic are to toave 

for simple van- something terrible Happens. 
SR 1 Se A woman who Baba Quan does nor arrive * 

doesnTtike having teen bora 

in the Year of the Rat gives and Thanh is forced to iea e 
i if - KinViHnv in the 


in ujc i ciu ui uw 
herself a new birthday in the 
Year of the Tiger when she 
applies for a Social Security 
card. Sometimes the changes 
are more fundamental: a bar 
girl who once worked in a 
nightclub frequented by 
American soldiers gives her- 
self a new past as a virtuous 
Confucian teacher from a 
small village in a distant 
province. 

Intent on shielding her 
daughter from the brute real- 
ity of her family’s history, 
Thanh has put a spin on her 
past. The story she tells Mai, 


without him. 

As Mai begins to look mm 
her mother's past, she slowly 
discovers that this official 
version of their family’s his- 
tory conceals an even sadder, 
darker story — a story in- 
volving marital betrayal, 
political intrigue and cold- 
blooded revenge. Although 
Cao’s orchestration of these 
melodramatic revelations is 

far from fluent — incongru- 
ous developments and 
clumsy foreshadowings mak- 
ing us suspect that something 
long before we’re 


f s s&r 

and marned off leaves and friends are rendered 


me aciua iv» » j , 

house on a Saigon boulevard 
and gives birth to a beautiful 
baby girl. 


I T is only as the war es- 
calates that Thanh's world 


they have called home 
from the tiny villages of the 
Mekong Delta to the bustling 
streets of Saigon to toe air- 
conditioned malls of Virginia 
— are made equally palpable 
•. With "Monkey 


begins to fall apart: After her 
husband suddenly dies in his 
sleep Thanh decides to move 


to toe reader. 

Bridge." Cao has not only 
sleep Thanh decides to move matte an 

£ ‘Sills IsfeSE 

gTO^rapbyof loss and hope. 


S a l Q r£;S riagl/ne New York Times. 



Bv Alan Tniscott _ 

i>’ T N World 

lin * , ’ e * ie JTp h j n ^s!e Nation- 

capital of toe ^ 

alists under Chian- vis . 

Li„r/4lv anv Westerns 


al£ B under Cmaos — vl5 

Hardly any '\«' e ™ ve *ey 
’ P ‘world 

.penng in tne ■ 

tournament. , -r.^j tfie 

totoe Women >Te^ ncan 

favorites r are . ^ei-Sender. 

;squad- Ka^ie charn . 

Lynn Deas. * am Sl3 *ha 
hers. Inna The 

Cohen and s « tti u rep- 


World Championships in 

S*S2?K 

TV wo no-uump 

oS D ineVhowedammonu.o- 

STH’SS-fs t 

v «* a r h0 ,hi< h two no-trump 
agamst opponents 

suggested asin^^ * weak ^a- 
a cue-bid sh ^ 1 ^ j,a- 
• ior gmajorovo-. 

mondsto : T was soft} 

^ iier ’, N °'kJ Se wanted to 

she had a^ed- lly and 
bid toree ctoh^™ es , were 
could not- 


shut out of the auction and 
never discovered their heart 

fit. 


The three-spade response 
« -- - — —4 ftinr heart! 


l ne — r-— 

was forcing, and four hearts 
was a cue-bid supporting 
spades. After two more cue- 
bids North revealed her dia- 
mond support at toe seven- 
i. ve i This was unbeatable, 
since after any lead South 
could ruff two clubs in toe 

dummy and draw®™. 

Past- West were left to dis- 
cover that they should have 
saved to seven hearts, prob- 
ably losing 800 instead of 
? So Inspired defense 
would give toe defense four 
*° cks fc 1 100 . This good 

achievedtf West had seized 
jSJSSrSnliy * double toe 

cue-bid of four hearts. 

In the replay. South did not 


open toe bidding. Afta 'East 
opened one heart,. Notto- 
Souto reached six diamonds, 
but their team lost 13 imps. 


NORTH 
* A Q J * 3 
7 J 10 5 4 
4 A Q 10 3 

*- 


WEST 

*92 

0 K9S62 
«- 

4AKQJ63 


EAST 
*108 7$ 
O AQ73 
0 J98 
*95 


SOUTH (D) 

*K6 
0- 

CK7654 2 
*105742 
Both sides were vulnerable. The 
bidding: 

sooth West North E* 

Pass 3 * pe 

Pass 5* Pe 

Pass 7 * Pe 

Pass 


2 N.T. 

40 

5$ 

Pass 


West led the club king. 



BEE 

WORLD 


Breaking 


the News 


BBC World, the BBC's 24 hour international news and information 
channel, presents a four part documentary which tells the dramatic 
history of television broadcast news. 

Today's News Today September 7th 

This programme looks at the empires built by Charles Pathe and rival 
Leon Gaumont and the development of newsreel up to World War II. 

Break on Through September 1 4th 

A look at the 60’s when the Soviets created the biggest news 
programme in the world on salellile and Ihe USA broadcast the 
first televised presidential election debate between 
John F. Kennedy ond Richard Nixon. 

The Reckoning September 2 1 st 

The 80's were difficult times for television journalism. In Bntam, 
new Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, was unhappy with the BBC's 
coverage of Northern Ireland and The Folklands. 

Dishes and Digits September 28th 
A new global, interactive age, ruled by computer, rather than 
broadcaster, is underway. 


For information on advertising and sponsorship 
opportunities, please call Nick Carugati on: 
+44 171 580 5420 


° ^ U * *** =w™- 


I 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 




PAGE 10 



im , 





9K3%; 


mi 


m 


MM 




rr^ 

** '..*i 


gg 




Jill 



77jc* Turkish village of Cavusin (inset) and the citadel at Uchisar. a maze of caves and cells carved into soft volcanic rock. 

Ancient, Awesome Cappadocia 

Early Christians Used Spectacular Landscapes as a Refuge 


By Stephen Kinzer 


Am )»»rt Ti‘in\Scn-h\- 


K AYSERI. Turkey — The 
cave I gazed up at during 
my visit to the bizarre 
Turkish region of Cap- 
padocia was carved out of a soaring 
rock formation by a Christian monk 
more than 10 centuries ago. It was 
built for the seclusion of monastic 
life, and if still looks forbidding and 
unapproachable. I wondered what 
the cave must feel like from inside, 
and briefly considered the idea of 
trying to scale the almost vertical 
cliff in order to find oul Prudence 
prevailed, however, and I decided 
to appreciate it from below. 

Then something happened that is 
ti bane of male existence. A face 
appeared at the cave's entrance; one 
of my travel companions had suc- 
cessfully completed the ascent. As 
he waved triumphantly down at the 
rest of us. a subtle rush of testoster- 
one must have stirred me. If he had 
made the climb. I also could and 
must. As others in our group shook 
their heads and turned to saner pur- 
suits, I began to claw my way up the 
volcanic "rock. There were few 
footholds, and the surface was so 
soft it often crumbled under my 
sneakers. Somehow, after a few 
scares, I managed to make my way 
to the top. There my friend and I. 



A potter in the craft center of Ay , 


adventurers' credentials now secure, 
quietly celebrated our triumph. 

The cave looked much as it prob- 
ably did a millennium ago. Its main 
room was a decent size, considering 
it was probably used for sitting and 
contemplating the infinite. A 
couple of shallow holes in the floor 
were evidently used for cooking 
and washing. Shelves had been 
hewn from the walls, and there was 
even a second floor, perhaps a bed- 
room. The view of the ancient val- 
ley was spectacular. 

FAIRY CHIMNEYS Cappadocia be- 
came a refuge for persecuted Chris- 
tians as early as the second century, 
and by the’ fourth century it had 
produced several important saints, 
among them St. Basil the Great, 
who served as bishop of Kayseri. 
These Christians, safe from the hos- 
tile rulers of regions closer to the 
Mediterranean, carved caves in the 
cliffs and in the weird, soaring 
“fairy chimneys" that make Cap- 
padocia one of the most extraor- 
dinary landscapes on earth. 

There can be few places where the 
strangeness of nature is more strik- 
ing. Volcanic eruptions millions of 
years ago covered Cappadocia with 
a soft form of lava known as tufa. 
Over die eons, wind, rain and rivers 
eroded the tufa in amazing ways, 
creating a series of deep valleys 
bordered by steep, gently 
undulating cliffs. Most 
unusual of all. they cre- 
ated the fairy chimneys, 
tall cones of tufa and vol- 
canic ash that are topped 
by protective slabs of hard 
basalt. They resemble 
crudely cut columns with 
hats, and some of the hats 
look as if they have been 
precariously placed by 
some gargantuan prank- 
ster. and could fall off at 
any moment. In some 
places, the variety in rock 
quality adds color to the 
bleakness, giving the im- 
pression of shimmering 
waves of greens, blues and 
ochers. 1 

These geological for- 
KmiirKir mations make Cappado- 
nos. cia an ideal spot for long 


hikes and. for those so inclined, 
death-defying climbs. Visitors 
quickly run out of adjectives, but 
amazement at the strange shapes 
does not fade. To walk among them, 
or to ride on horseback with the 
tours offered by local agencies, is an 
otherworldly experience. 

This rugged beauty would in it- 
self be enough to make Cappadocia 
an important destination for trav- 
elers. The fact that it was also a 
cradle of Christianity gives it a pro- 
found human dimension as well. 

Most of the caves that early 
monks carved into the soft Cap- 
padocian rock were private cells. 
As the Christian community be- 
came stronger, however, its leaders 
began to cut bigger caves for 
churches. Many have been redis- 
covered in recent decades, and they 
give a sense of the spiritual lives of 
early Christians. Priests and artis- 
ans painted murals on their walls 
and domes, many of which are still 
visible. Most depict scenes in the 
life of Jesus. 

C appadocia has no official 
boundaries, but many of its 
attractions are within a tri- 
angle formed by the towns of 
Avanos in the north. Nevsehir in the 
west and Urgup in the east. Visitors 
often base themselves in or near 
Goreme, which lies near the center 
of this triangle. Goreme is about 
200 miles (320 kilometers) south- 
east of Ankara, and the drive there 
takes die better part of a day. I chose 
instead to fly to Kayseri, which is 
less than rwo hours east of Goreme. 
From there I drove to the 
Kapadokya Lodge in Nevsehir for a 
four-day stay. It was a bit too 
crowded and modem for my taste, 
but it is built in a false-cave style 
many guests find charming. 

Probably the most popular attrac- 
tion in Cappadocia is the open-air 
museum at Goreme. Here visitors 
can experience both the region's 
geological extremes and its rich re- 
ligious heritage. There are small 
caves in which monks lived, chapels 
and full-scale churches decorated 
with soaring murals depicting the 
lives of Jesus and early saints. From 
the museum, it is a short drive, or 
long but exhilarating walk, to the 


Goreme Valley, where the land- 
scape is especially extreme and 
churches include lavishly decorated 
ones built into stone columns. 

A few miles from Goreme is the 
citadel at Uchisar. a warren of cells, 
caves and promontories. From the 
top you have one of the finest views 
of Cappadocia, out over the vine- 
, yards and apricot groves to the val- 
leys and wavy rock formations that 
make the region famous. 

Underground Cities 

Few visitors leave Cappadocia 
without visiting one of its under- 
ground cities. It is unclear who first 
began construction of these aston- 
ishing mazes, but some of them are 
said to date from the fourth century 
B.C. They were apparently used as 
sanctuaries for emire communities 
during epochs when conquering 
hordes swept across Anatolia, and 
they are complete with complex 
ventilation systems, storage areas, 
cooking and "washing facilities, and 
even heavy stone slabs that could be 
rolled across passageways to bar 
invaders. 

Guidebooks are naturally helpful 
in a place like Cappadocia, but it is 
so full of wonders that simply set- 
ting off by yourself can often 
provide the most memorable ex- 
periences. One morning I left my 
car in a small village called Cavusin 
and began walking along a dusty 
path. After an hour I saw a gaping 
hole in the side of a bill, and upon 
investigating found an ancient 
church with three splendid crosses 
carved into the ceiling. 

After continuing past lagoons 
and colonies of sleeping turtles, 
halfway up a craggy cliff I found a 
man sitting in a small cave selling 
hot tea and cold sodas. He was the 
custodian of a lovely thousand- 
year-old church in an adjacent cave, 
decorated with paintings of saints 
and prophets. No guidebook 1 found 
mentioned this place, and only from 
an unpublished work by rhe British 
scholar David Barchard was I able 
to learn that the two churches 1 had 
stumbled upon date from the 10th 
century. He described the walk 
from Cavusin as "one of the most 
sublime excursions in the world." 


Homage to Catalonia: - 
Astonishing New Food | 


By Patricia Wells 

Iniemariondl Herald Tribune 


it is as if Adria rose out of the ashes of, 

^ve^ed ftoift one French 

SSTmEig friends and picking up *e m- 
nexi, glanc, Guerard andi. 

Reoinnmfin 1983 at El Bull! (a 


OSAS EN CALA MONTJOl Spain next, wm ^ Gu/rard antf. 

— Just when you are certain that you fluent* of l 6* ■ a( BuIli (a res _ 
have seen and tasted and digested Chapel. Be^inn g * named after the- 

— everything astonishing the late 20th taurant begun i ^ey mode ied thefr) 

century has to offer, along comes a new high owner s fontwe 

priest of food, Ferran Adria. cuisine after the mas ■ still as head - 

It comes as no surprise to find this cherubic native began to?t 

35-year-old Catalan in the land of Gaudi and chef at El Bui It. the Barcelona native oegan to^i 

Dali. His magic is expressed not in architectural create his own style or cuismc. , 

drawings or oii paints, but with herbs and spices, “Nothing is spontaneo , « q 

crustaceans, organ meats, nuts, oils and. yes. plaining that the W’intenuoruhs _ . .. . 

even water. Adria is redefining gastronomy as creation, testing and P.,. £ Z-f* 

we know it. His approach is intellectual, but he to inspire, adapt and as soc iaie. He wU 1 often tafce 

won’t confuse you or put you to sleep. On the a dish, such as gazpacho, and ,, A 

contrary, he will ■ challenge you and, hope- grediem by ingredient. Once rhe pieces are ah setn 
fully, offer you a gastronomic experience that apart, he attempts to create the essence cu eacn^j 

will rocker you into the 21st century, ingredient, reconstructing it on the plate as a* 

Walk, run, fly, drive to this heavenly cove piece of a puzzle. y 

along Spain's Costa Brava, 156 kilometers (100 A 

miles) north of Barcelona. But leave all food salty almond ice cream After the tapeteso 
preconceptions at the door of El BuIli. this Adria continues the assault with a salty alrnoou^ 
raeMnn* Awr.' id* crcum paired with fresh almonds, dt* 

touch of oil and a sprinkling of balsamic-;, 
vinegar, his deconstruction of the fa-H 
mous white Spanish almond soup, ajo% 
bianco. Next, that classic combination _ 
of tomatoes and basil appear as pure" 
p<«*nces. mounds of red and mounds of 


drawings or oii paints, but with herbs and spices, 
crustaceans, organ meats, nuts, oils and. yes, 
even water. Adria is redefining gastronomy as 
we know it. His approach is Intellectual, but he 
won’t confuse you or put you to sleep. On the 
contrary, he will ' challenge you and, hope- 
fully, offer you a gastronomic experience dial 
will rocker you into the 21st century. 

Walk, run, fly, drive to this heavenly cove 
along Spain's Costa Brava, 156 kilometers ( 100 
miles) north of Barcelona. But leave all food 
preconceptions at the door of El BuIli. this 
1950s hacienda-style restaurant over-’ 
looking the lapping waters of the Medi- 
terranean. Put yourself in the hands of 
Adria and his outgoing, able partner. 

Julio Soler. Come with a clean, open 
palate and be prepared for fireworks. 

Your palate will do handsprings and 
somersaults and you will walk on water. 

Don't come for a serious business dis- 
cussion, to propose to your beloved, or 
to simply tide yourself over from meal 
to meal 

So here we go: Fasten your seat belts, 
it’s going to be a heavenly ride. Sign up 
for the 28-taste menu, a whirlwind of 
flavors, textures, colors, presentations 
that you will not have imagined. 1 hope 
you love everything, but no doubt, like 
me. you will be less than enthusiastic about two 
or three creations. Perfection is only there as 3 
goal one that is unattainable. 

Your Palate Will Applaud ~ 

Sit on the sun-drenched terrace overlooking 
the beach, sip a glass of Spanish bubbly or finest 
old amonrillado sherry and get set for the parade. 
The taste menu changes twice daily, but may 
well begin with about a dozen tapetes . carefully 
conceived little rations served on a stick, or from 
tiny silver spoons; squat, clear glasses; Chinese 
porcelain spioons. They will go by in a daze and 
your palate will twirl, shout, applaud. Pay at- 
tention to the textures, the smooth and the 
crunchy. Listen to the assault of sugar, of salt, of 
fat They are there to wake you up. 

Tiny cigars of peanut brinle are filled with an 
ooze of guacamole. to keep on your tongue, to 
crush, then swallow and consider. Lollipop 


jfH 



sticks sprout triangles of crisp, fried artichokes, 
and puffy crumbs of ascetic rice crackers are 
quietly laced in a mild cuny powder. Adria 
makes you work for your food — the unex- 
amined meal is not worth eating. 

Squares of crisp Parmesan shortbread are 
filled with a frozen mix of sweet cream and 
grated Parmesan — you wake up with a start. Oh, 
hedonism was never like this. From crescendo to 
crescendo: You bite imo sandwich-like wands of 
parchment-thin salty bacon, spread with a dab of 
sweet prune puree. Cubes of foie gras are 
drizzled with sugary caramel and dosed with a 
touch of mango. A giant clam arrives with snip- 
pets of bacon, ail bathed in a seaweed froth. 

And just when you think you have now, at last, 
tasted it all. along comes — no. believe me on 
this one — a froth of smoked air. Don’t ask me 
how he does it, but that little shot glass filled with 
fragrance and salt and oil is not much more than 
air infused with smoke. And we smack our lips 
with delight. 


essences, mounds of red and mounds of 
green in a fitting tomato gelee. 

Adria continues to demand your par- 
ticipation. No unconscious nosning 
here. 

Just when you thought there were no j 
more food revelations, he surprises yon rf 
with a rectangle of bone marrow topped^ J 
with a fence of salty, glistening caviar.; 
This is not food as fuel, but a workshop ■ 
in texture and taste. 

Less convincing, and less successful"' 
are the eggplant soup intense with pine nuts, ancbj 
langonstines served too raw for my taste, burl 
artfully wrapped in rich cepes mushrooms, 
trompe I ’ oeil presentation designed to mimic the 
crustacean's layered shell. 

Desserts follow suit, with tiny pillars of black - ■ 
chocolate filled with pools of coconut creanu~ 
and rounds of chocolate imbedded with mint*! 
leaves, like bright green fossils. - 

While the dining room is traditional — white' 
stucco wails, dark wooden beams, sparkling^ 
chandeliers and comfortable high-back up--. x 
holsteted chairs — Adria 's kitchen is. as one i 
might expect, a space-age creation. Shiny stain- 1 -' 
less-steel counters are inset with induction" 
cooktops, and a glass wall looks out onto a 
garden beyond. The gods and. Michelin are., 
behind Adria and Soler. who were awarded the 
coveted three-star raring this spring. But it is£ 
clear that they are only hitting their stride. If you. 
care about fabulous, modem, creative. food,* 
don’t miss the ride. ,= 

El BuIli. Aparrado 30. 17480 Rosas en Cala ~ 
Montjoi. Spa ip. Tel: (34 ) 972 15 04 57. Fax: (34 1 ‘ 
972 15 07 17. Closed Monday and Tuesday £ 

1 except July to September I and front Oct. 15 to 
March 15. Credit cards: American Express ^ 
Diners Club. MasterCard. Visa. Menus from- 
10.000 to 14.000 pesetas ($05 to $901. including* ' 
service but nor wine or tax. 



pm 


© 


& 




- • 

S&VV.r 

. 

** J. I.» ■ 


2";.- \ 

i* B .r 

» - 

tdiiur* ■• •• 

*’w? 


• bob 

. ffliuB-- 

of'U^Y'r -- -■ 
- 

lit FT”' v- - . 
Ahffl ; ; ■ 

iRhiiuv 

d«j ‘ a a ; : ... 

Nei Or.--'-' “ 


[AtfS_TR » * 

VEM HA 

Itonstforurn. ; 

o?er 
* war.-' 

A sh . . 
CSS- 

(-ir,;*. 5 5 

nuK's .I'-"-? - 

r\S' =' '■ • 

csyc-.r 

a B E y oTuja 
Brussels 

Palais aes - 

os-. V .*.*’« "i • ■ 
1 ??: 

;r.~ = -.» :? i 
Be i*= 

M BRITA IN 

London 

National Gat*-. - 
25 k :• C-r -- * 

Se:: I: 

Bbkjs =•■" ’ : - 

2V — i • i- . 

jc 2. 

F «■ 

Tate Giire-. -i ■■ . ■ 
.‘Cc-!:-.-;- 

Ur:-:- 

\ xr. V;-i . 

:L; 

y B_P E W Mj R K 

\ HlLLEBOD 

J "edenksccrg ^ 

!: - ’ 

1 • : 

. 2 r <' - .. ; r 

' ;; 

Ca | v"" r ' t ’ 


P«is 

1 .iif” . . r- 

Legs- ; : : 

a-« 2:.' 






N'.ul*: AniwIHT' ‘ 


m *l** tH T 
Sftuft 

JSfWbrurs V . 3 

^ 5 2; : =':;r 


Safari Blues: Political Violence Takes a Toll on Tourism in Kenya 


By James C. McKinley Jr. 

Am t Two St-.TiiV 

AIROBI — More and more 
tourists have canceled trips 
to Kenya ’ s w hi te-sand 

beaches and wild-same 
parks as accounts of armed gangs 
wreaking havoc and killing police of- 
ficers on the Indian Ocean Coast have 
hit the news. 

The violence, around the port city of 
Mombasa, has claimed at least 42 lives 
since Aug. 13. It is the latest in a series 
of blows to Kenya's tourism industry. 

Since May. the images coming oul of 
this East .African country have been 
uniformly scary: prodemocraey protest- 
ers lighting street battles with the po- 
lice. baton-wielding soldiers clobbering 
a defenseless clergjman during a riot, 
demonstrators hurling stones at cars and 
looting stores. 


But until recently, most of the polit- 
ical violence had not touched the game 
parks and beach resorts that attracted 
most of the 770.000 tourists who visited 
Kenya last year. 

In mid-August, however. Kenya’s 
political crisis took a nastier mm. Al- 
though no tourists were attacked, the 
Stare Department has warned Amer- 
icans to avoid the coast, while Britain, 
Germany. Belgium and Italy have told 
their citizens to use extreme caution and 
avoid troubled areas. 

TRAVEL IRS HMD WARNINOS The 

warnings apparently have been heeded 
by many international travelers, who 
spent S465 million here in 1 9%, making 
tourism the biggest industry in Kenya. 
Ln mid-Angust. hundreds of” vacationers 
from Europe canceled trips to Mombasa 
at the last minute. A charter jet from 
Italy, for instance, landed in Mombasa 


with only 98 people when more than 
200 had bought tickets. 

In general, people planning a once- 
in-a-lifetirae safari or looking forward 
to a peaceful African beach holiday 
might want to consider postponing their 
trips until after Kenya’s elections later 
this year, when the situation will prob- 
ably cool down, diplomats say. *Tra 
starting to think this could really spin 
out of control," said a diplomat, in- 
sisting on anonymity. 

For those who cannot wait, the major 
game parks in the north and south of the 
country are still insulated from the cap- 
ital and die coast, where most of the 
violence has taken place. And on the 
coast, the police and tour operators 
maintain that they have set up measures 
to insure protection at the major hotels 
of resorts. 

In Mombasa, for instance, tour compa- 
nies have a 24-hour communications war 


room to warn hotel owners and bus op- 
erators by radio of trouble spots. Tourists 
are being moved in convoys between the 
airport and the resorts. 

S TILL, the heightened security’ has 
eroded the relaxing atmosphere 
most vacationers crave. For sev- 
eral days, hundreds of tourists in the big 
resort hotels north and south of Mom- 
basa were trapped while the police 
fought gun battles with aimed gangs 
along rhe coast highway. 

The current wave of violence began 
on Aug. 13. when more than 100 men 
armed with guns, machetes and clubs 
attacked a police station in Likoni, just 
south of Mombasa, then went on a ram- 
page through a section where many 
people from inland tribes live. Seven 
police officers were killed, along with 
eight other people. 

"Then, well-organized gangs, appar- 


ently drawn from the ranks of unem- 
ployed men along the coast, razed busi- 
nesses. homes and kiosks belonging to 
people from other parts of Kenya, and 
lynched dozens of people. On Aug. 19. 
gangs burned down more than 300 
kiosks belonging to residents in Ma- 
lindi. 70 miles ( l IQ kilometers i north of 
Mombasa. 

The raids have seemed more like 
ethnic wars than traditional tribal 
clashes. Leaflets have appeared in 
Swahili, saying: "The time ha* come 
for us original inhabitants of the coast to 
claim what is rightly ours. We must 
remove these invaders from our land." 

The government has arrested more 
than 400 people, including twy local 
political leaders with connections to rhe 
governing party. But the raids m:,\ have 
been the first volley in a long struggle. 

President Daniel arap Moi. the *7 3- 
y ear-old patriarch who ha* been in 


power since 1978. has blamed oppo-' : 4 
siuon politicians and civil ri°ht$ ad-- * 

2™ l** tiring up tribal hatreds. 
Opposition leaders maintain that Moi .. 

rr .™ 1 refom * 

avoiding trouble spots It is still 

™ to Visit Kenya and avJi^trou: ' • 

blL spots. Tourists who decide ro come 1 • 
^ ld 1* cautious: traveling wUh one 1 
of the well-established safari operators 
rather than on one's own is also ad- ' 

nSoiT ** acknowledge : 

: * 






'■fid 1 " 




<v » Cti\ i 


x - 

h r r 

m +" w *r 


H v i 


” f L- 

- r.‘; 









Ul i 


'■\\ 


nif 


'%d 


- 

LEISURE 


PAGE 11 


■ ^ , 

From Port to Citadel: How History Played Itself Out in Halifax 

By Anthony DePalma city of wooden ships and iron men. there mercial liners, container ships and JfcSs at Uuisburg on whaHs new waterfront Sheraton Hotel, and the 


— w and nose in mind — to counter the huge 

By Anthony DePalma city of' wooden ships and iron men. there mercial liners, container ships ““ fcJeneh fortress at Louisburg on what is 

Sew Yurk Tmes Semce are constant reminders of how Close we briehtlv oainied lobster boats man me r* p g ret on Island. A 50-minute 

once were, but how differently our his- port of Miami. And with the grwt, gray "V. ^ is continuously shown at the 

ALIF AX, Nova Scotia — It tones have played ihemselves'out. frigates and hulking submarines ot - ves B dear overview of the 

dealh i n Hal ' 0ne of m <* 1 powerful of these is NATO often lining the piers, u is just as ch . En gii s h rivalry that led to the 
iw S A I Bur y m S Gtouod the sandstone marker just inside the ves- brawny as the harbor of San Diego with- „ 0 f foe city. It covers the tu- 

1 C a i l ° me why ^ dbule of St - paul ’ s Anglican Church, the out the California cuteness. jJqSuous relations with the American 

grand port city of the A Lianne seems at oldest Protestant church m Canada. The During an early summer visit to Hal- m w juch in 1745 raised their own 

once so familiar and yet so foreign. marker commemorates the arrival in ifax that lasted four days — two days .of ’ d Louisburg them- 

The angel s outstretched wings and Halifax harbor on June 6. 1813. of the rain and two of glorious sun and blue rorc ^ t0 discomfort of Eng- 
grim countenance were carved over sev- U.S.S. Chesapeake, a warship captured skies, about par for thai time of year , l A European treaty gave Louisburg 

e Z al . 1 5£ s, * le that date from by H.M.S. Shannon in a heroic naval had the chance to sample Halifax s ^ French in 1749. but the 

the J 1 750s, just a few years after Halifax battle of the War of 1 8 1 2. Although that bou ntiful fare. _ British decided to keep an eye on therr 

was founded by the British, and continue conflict is nearly forgotten in the United For my headquarter I picked uma- publishing Halifax. Scottish High- 

through the sarlv 1770s. The smnnth it io j u... Paoi-fir’c ^tatelv Hotel Halifax, anu py , mumc r»f rh» PmniM 


There is now a gambling casino in the 
new waterfront Sheraton Hotel, andthe 
old Public Gardens on Spring Garden 
Road certainly are worth seeing. Bui 1 
found mvself constantly drawn back to 
the old warehouse buildings, in one oi 
which I discovered The Lower Deck, a 

__ . . - ■ i_ L«% n 


street in Halifax, or to hear bagpipes 
coming from one place or another. At 
night, locals bounce from one dark but 
friendly place to another, sampling a 
Keith’s and listening to the likes of 
Highland Heights and Clam Chowder, 
the rainy days were damp but not 

. . .1 ..II.. C.-*w iilnivinn 


qutimcu auu i4i vtu in uig Dusiun area 

and then shipped to Halifax in the years 
leading up to the American Revolution. 


icauuig up me /American Revolution, seeing ine united States, through the city sspeciaeuioi ms *w*jr Konfi the army marenea out iar me iosl 

a when such confidential commerce as other side of a looking glass. As the the many voices of its past, including endian troops took over, 

y gravestones ceased and Halifax became cheerv guide pointed out during a tour of those at the Old Burying Ground. With its clear vantage on a grassy hill 

the impregnable garrison for the Im- the Citadel, the historic hilltop fort that . mii - not far from the waterfront, the Citadel 

penal Navy in British North America. has dominated Halifax for two centuries, anosls and urns Among tne angeis Cana( ja' s most visited historic site — 

the citv had to be fortified against the and the urns of the cemetery me nresents the perfect place to get ac- 

A DIVERGENCE OF Ways threat of an invasion from the United singularly taUstone^kmg jhegave or the city. . 

States. "But you're friends now/’ she two brothers: one, Charles. ,, . 4 Except for the climb to the Citadel, 

Had it not been for those broad- told the group made up. as many are on a voyage from hence to . everything else in downtown Halifax is a 

beamed British vessels in Halifax’s su- here, mostly of Americans. the cruel winter of 1839. an ; nont axing walk- Just down George 

perb ice-free harbor. Nova Scoria might Even without that unique historical Lamont, who toed : .oVi tl. sneer from the slopes of the Citadel is 
very well have sided with Massachusetts perspective. Halifax would standouiasa arms at toe age ot z*. 1 the old Grand Parade, the plaza that was 

and become the 14th colony to fight for fascinating seaport. I grew up in a port oldest gravesi (toe once the vital center of the city. On on 

independence. But the headstones in the town where my father and many others years after Edward uorn - v side j S Sl Paul s, whose wooden ftam 


aboard ihe schooner Christina Lstm. 

Sssskssmm ssS?f.SS5S 

Kong 0 the army marched out for the last rnmrnd^ °f^ch^ adding across the sky-, the 

ti£e S as Canadian troops took over. - Cheddar, voices of HaU fax’s pas t mingled 

With its clear vantage on a grassy hill J“ k Swer D^ck around with the light flapping of * e Chnswja 

n0 t far from the waterfront, the Citadel 1 returned “ pervasive Lvnn's mainsail. Even through the ugly 

^Canada’s most visited historic site 10 PAL to sample ra 'odem office towers, the Citadel 

nresents the perfect place to get ac- aspect of toe Hakf rhythms loomed over the city. A flotilla of private 

ESd with toe city. type of ^ luSTvou sailing vessels swept across the mouth of 

^ Except for the climb to the Citadel, and a rock be^- Bio Sea or the harbor, some entering, some leaving 

everything else in downtown Halifax is a might Sg bamif in the for the open waters of the Atlantic, much 

tooldGraLd ParatoTthe plaza that was their day 5 ^^th Ttacfmusic is walked backdown the water s edge to the 

oiKe dievriwl center of the city. Onone Waterfront Warehousewuh i.splj^n 

side is Sl Pair's, whose wooden feme Med wnfcM s » Bll[ sitting mno over looking docked tugboats like 


A S we tacKea 

under the few wisps of clouds 
scudding across the sky-, the 
many voices of Halifax s past mingled 
with the light flapping of 
Lvnn's mainsail. Even through the u^iy 
modem office towers, the Citadel 
loomed over the city. A flotilla of private 
sailing vessels swept across the mouth ot 
the harbor, some entering, some leaving 
for the open waters of the Atlantic, much 


sksss.-'TSS: =stsssis~jssa 

?sspss5£ras?K s^r-s assiw? SSSSStss S-Snijsst.*" ■ 

^rre^dsSpSe^nin W Thursday. m— ■»-*■■■*' ^ 

who has a chance lo wander about this. New York. It is more active with com- Haina* was rounacu r 

movie ©uide 






• BOB DYLAN “The Best Of’ 
(Columbia t: You don’t get a bener “best 
of' than this: 18 tracks from 14 albums, 
from “Mr. Tambourine Man” 10 “Shel- 
ter From the Storm’’ by way of “All 
Along the Watchtower.” Remastered. 
(Not available in United States.) 

• the METERS “The Very Best Of’ 
(Rhino): The Neville Brothers before 
they were called the Neville Brothers. A 
New Orleans version of Booker T. and 


M AUSTRIA 

Vienna 

Kunstforum, tel: (1) 533-2266. 
open daily. To Dec. 8: “Kunst und 
Wahn.” More than 350 works 
showing the influence of madness 
on art. Features representations of 
mental hospitals and patents by 
Rubens, van Gogh. Dix and Kjrch- 
ner as well as works created by 
psychotic or schizophrenic artists. 

P BELO IUM ~ 

Brussels 

Palais das Beata-Arts, tel. (Z) 
507-8466. dosed Mondays. 10 
Oct. 5: "Jeune Peintura Beige 
1997." Works by the laureates 0 
Uw Prix de la Jeune Pemture 

Beige. 

g bbitaTn 

!£Son5 Gallery, Jekll71) W 
2885 . open daily- Conttnumg/T 
Seal “Seurat and me 

lamers." -Bathers at M™eres 
py Seurat is the centerpiKe ^ 
exhibition of works by the Frendi 

-wasasna 

If Dutdi pioneer of Abstract art- 

p| p I M M A R < Z-—- 

as 

contemporary Bellamy. 

Calum Colvin and John uenan y 


reco rdings 

±e MGs with rouches of .Allen Tous- 
saint. Dr. John and LaBelle. all of whom 
they backed at one time or another. Re- 
member the scorcher “Fire on the Bay- 
ou”? The band calls iL “The perfect 
union of funk V soul ’n roIL _ 

• TOM HARRELL “Labyrinth 
(BMG): “Music is the total integration 
‘of all the elements of what it means to be 
human.” says Harrell. "Emotional, in- 
tellectual. spiritual.” Harrell was dia- 

ARTS GUIDE 


onosed as schizophrenic some years ago, 
and he still takes powerful medication. 
Before playing, his head hangs and his 
face is veiled. Then, playing his flu- 
oelhorn, he quickly becomes erect and 
radiant. Watching this dramatic trans- 
mutation may be the strongest evidence 
of the power of music we will ever be 
privileged to witness. 

Mike Zwerin/LHT 



Phillip King’s "Reel" is now on display at the Forredi B ^ e uenmy. aim* 

sskS SEKEmS 


^ntedcuBurd figures Of me ^"M^um of American 
^J^rS^quitydunnga 

sfM» B,mpaa 

A«°SB !*m 


G.I.Jane 

Directed by Ridley Scott. UA. 

See Jane rna See Jane jump. See Jane 
pump. See Jane - oh. hdl. see 
and be done with il "GJ. Jane is, let 
ns be frank, pore posi-feminisi junk- 
■ food entertainment, a cliche-ndden 
muddle of Sergeant Glory and Gloria 
Seeinem. It's just another comic book on 
film, one dial plays both ends against toe 
middle — drop your logic duffel at toe 
door — and makes no serious attempt to 
hide toe guy wires. Thai said, compared 
to toe rest of toe summer’s star-charged 
shoot-’ em-ups, “GX Jane’’ is about as 
eood as it gets, with a lot of small guilty 
pleasures and not many more annoy- 
ances *han you would reasonably expect 
from a script so dependent on stereo- 
types. If you somehow have missed toe 
heavy promo campaign, or can t simply 
work it out from toe phrase “ ‘G.L Jane 
starring Demi Moore,” it s the guts- 
and-green-beret saga of J 

Jordan O’Neil, determined to be toe first 
woman to make it through toe ultra- 
rigorous training of an ultra-secret navy 
SEAL strike force made up of ultra- 
elites from toe combined services. 
When toe going gets tough, you know 
who gets going, though you also have to 
swallow that a woman tough enougtw 
work her way up to one-ami. spraaaie 
push-ups in a matter of weeks, m and 

around20 hours a day of bon 1 ^T c 7? c J^f 
make-’em-quit drills, wouldn t have 
beat the system already. Nevothetes, 
Moore’s grim face is one of the fi^is 
surprising strengths: It’s perfect com- 
SSanoon matenal. esp^y once 
she shaves her head. (EveZibart.WP) 

Hoodlum 

Directed by Bill Duke- UJ*- 

U he might to be a likable heroic 
^iTurenfe Fishbume has always 



Demi Moore as Lieutenant Jordan O’Neil in "GJ. Jane. 


SepL 7: “Exiles and Emigres: The 
Right of European Artiste from 
Hitler." Musee dee Beaux-Arts, 


TALY 


florae* Pompidou, tel: 

ESsr«SSssa 

| PER M~aE XH-- 

Kutouforum JSflSSJS'oS 

9 ^ rante: 

tmuing/ To On. f - .. More 
Precursors o\ M |ewe wy. 

>00° ^VjSS'wdfun.r- 

manuscripts. oriqins of 

ary pieces document me ong ^ 

these Germanic w M 

diets with the Romans^ ^ me 

century, tne end reii- 

Kaigdom. their daily me w 

gion. — — 

BjTHanXII-- 

Dublin . lrft iand, tei: 

A Nation*! Gallery of 


[01 ' [i Si 03 Otirufc 4 *" 

FLORENCE Mt%tlorpi tel . ( 55 ) 234- days. To Oct 5: "Jeff Wall. For 20 
Forte di BeWedare, t gg. ^ ^Qrican artist has 

24-25. high above Kked in large-scale transparen- 

-Phillip i? s interior cies that depict scenes ^9^ 

Rorence. the Fort lo m ore cations, sets and actors. The nar 

galleries and ts terra«s. ^ rattwe process Df traditional 

than 90 ^[pto? (bom paintings and 

prints by the Britisn scu p Mtlvcentuiy photisgraphy merge 

1 934). _________ i n wall’s works. 

BTfTfj j 1 um York 


Los Angeles nmei. 

Museum of Contemporary^ Art g^^cranach: A Closer Look. 
Bt (2131 «M*SjS2ttS£ totional Gallery. Lo"*" .. 


tel: (21 3) B2B-B222. National Gallery, Londt ^- H „ 

days. To Oct 5: ‘ Jeff Wail. For2G 7; -paraorsl Recentl. 

years, the American artist has pa[azzo Reale. MBan. 

Ororked in large-scale transparen- 7: “Baselitz. 

cies that depict scenes temg \ d 'Arte Modema, tojogna.ttaly- 

cations, sets and actors, ^h® na ^ sept. 7: "Christian Bottanslu. Pen- 
rative process of traditional =j£ ntr . villa delle Rose, Bo- 
Daintings and the conventions ot 

20 ttvcStury photisgraphy merge 7 . -Balthasar Buritoard. 

in wall's works. Eloge de I'Ombre. Musee Kam, 

CMUSVa. Amorik- 


amomous uui --c, - 

film about organized crime m Har em 
in toe 1930 s, Bshbume has arolei toat 
suits his aura of implacable pessi- 
mism. As Ellsworth (Bumpy) John- 
son, an ex-convict whotakes oy«toe 
Harlem numbers racket and fiercely 
defends his turf against a rival mob- 
ster, Dutch Schultz (Tim Rodl) - 
Se is as cooUy rutoless as i AJ Pa- 
cino’s Michael Corleone m The 
Godfather.” The comparison is not 


frivolous. With a running rime of 
nearly two and a half hours . 4 ^, a 
sprawling cast of characters, Hood- 
l5n’ ’ aspires to be an urban AmencMi 
epic on toe order of Francis Ford Cop- 
pola’s masterpiece. Its vision of enme 
and upward social mobility is SUT ^{' 
as is its portrayal °fg° ve [ I ^f n . 
ficials on the take and loyal mob lieu- 
tenants sacrificed along the way. But 
“Hoodlum” fails to evoke toe tragic 
realism that gave the firat two msraU- 
ments of “The Godfather *e force 
of social history writ iq ston % 
set in New York Oty, it was filmed in 
Chicago, and you feel toe discrepancy. 
And while Duke’s direction has visual 
panache, toe movie is uneventy ■paced. 
Ctms Brancato’s pulpy, mdotoramanc 
screenplay labonously 
each dramatic turning point. Andy 
Garcia’s Lucky Luciano “ another 

weak link. The actor is too relaxed and 

jocular to convey toe kingly pnde or 
{he tension and insecurity^ bemgan 
■ underworld monarch. And Wtowm 
i Atherton as the comipt special pros 
t ecutor gives one of his typically o er- 
5 tho-top, snake-hissing performances. 
But Roth’s Schultz is a compeLhng 

Wwirins a fatuous half-smile 


eniema. Wearing a fatuous half-smile 
Sd^ingtoough hooded eyes, the 
actof plays Schultz as a sadistic, 
poker-faced madman who remains un- 
readable until toe second he warts, 
which is usually with i a gnjn^sp^® 
of violence. (Stephen Holden. Nil l 


Leave Itto Beaver 1 

Directed b\ Andy Cadiff- U -j. ... \ 

If you’re of a certain age, toe doodily 1 
mS signature to "Leaye t to 
Beaver” makes your gums bleed and j 
vapors rise steamilv throuoh vour 

skuU. NO. vou think. NOT THE ?Us. 
PLEASE! 'NOT THE ’50s AGAIN. 
Well, set a grip. The new movie ver- 
sion, drawn from the famous 19 d 7- 
1963 TV series that drilled like a laser 
shot into toe cerebellum of most baby 
tooraers, isn't such a honor show after 
all It features a winmngly adorable 
youngster (Cameron Finley) in toe title 
role, finds enough room even for 
Beaver’s “real mom (Barbara 
Billinssley) and generally doodles 
^ong a middle co^e. lf a movie ro 
sUght could have a flaw it s that 
screenwriters Brian Levent and Lon 
Diamond and director Andy Cadiff 
can’t really solve toe problem of tone. 
It’s not out and out sarcastic, as was 
Betty Thomas’s take on “The Brady 
Bunch.” which dumped them, as» if out 
of a cryogenic chamber, into the harsh 
’90s to great comic eftect. But Cadiff 
keeps some of toe ’ 50 s ploys to 
completely white suburban neighbor- 
: hood, toe unusurped authority ofdad, 

■ toe happy housewife mom whose 
nrimaiy occupation is vacuuming 
! while bringing in toe odd, mrongruent 
touch of the ’90s. The result feels haff- 
i hearted and unsure. Cute just goesso 
5 (Stephen Hunter. WPJ 


CROSSWORD 


New York sect 7: “Birth of the Cool: Amerik- 

"" JSSopoTitan Museum of Art, tel: ^che Malerel von Georgia 

AMSTEROAM 570 . (^2)570-3791 . closed Mondays. 0 'Keeffe bis Christopher Wool. 

Van Gogh Musounj. fo t d Oct 5‘ "Georgia O'Keeffe: A iry^sthaus Zurich, Zunch. 

5200, open datiy. ^ Gl ^ h : The ? ortra it by Alfred Stieglifc" More ^ 7: -The JPJgjF 

Oct. 12: and peas- ^ so photographx: poruaite of ^ From Constable toWtonet- 

Drawings- ^j^Ltween 1BS3 ^ American artist Georgia Mcl^HanGaUenee. Glesg®™- 
ant figures created betwee g ® Keef{0 ^ ^ husband. They ^ 7: “Nlmrud and Nlne^h. 

and 1 8B5. “an two decades In the We of the Trea sures from Assyria !r i theBrrt 


ACROSS .NubteDesert 

« Thoroughfares: ia Canvas coats? 

Abbr. ie Where to see 

Ben Franklin's 

4 1920 's chess portrait 

Ca?E» ’ 7Pu """ humP 


Rotterdam 4 4(M)oi- 

KunS ?S;nclavs. Continuing Jo 

dosed Mondays- picass0 

Oct. 5: “Monet. Gog ^ pa , nl . 

and Others. drawings and 


440-031. 


than UU pnoiogi«aF>"“ ism; num 

Se American artist Georgia Mcl^llan GaUenM, Glaagow. 
O'Keeffe by her husband. They 3 ^. ?: “Nlmrud Nineveh- 
^jan two decades In the life of the Trwsures trom^da 

modern artist. ish Museum.' National Museum 


liberated modem artist. 

MrijonaMHuseuin ol Amarican 


^TMusaum. 1 ' Natio nal Mu seum 

S^ea.iam-iffT.-Louu;- 

ana Museum of Modem Art, 


Oct. 5'- "Monet, van ainl . .. [2Q2 \ 633-9898, open ana Museum ot Mom*" 

Others." More to^. P and ^^unitagfro Nov. 30: Humlebaek, __ Q)B 

iSliss ggSssss 


ASTHMA FREE 

and drag free! 


poraries. 

TT wITp jj 


ToDec. t. 


clos.mc seow 

Sept 6: -me (Sffr^SSS'SS^ 


BIIU miw—# 

seum, Jerusalem- 


w 





w 


m „ vo uS tlTTH A VINTNES- 




jjt)FF 


, JYrt.' era* 1 * ~ ,„. O 0pjn.» ac 

' Tue^Sep^^StOlf^^ 


for retreat**: 


Do you live in Austria, 
Belgium, Luxembourg 
or Sweden? 

For information about subscribing call: 

Austria 01 8?1 363 830 
Belgium 0800 17538 (toll-free) 
Luxembourg 0800 2703 (toll-free) 

Sweden 020 797039 (toll-free)- 

HcraJbSSnbunc 

" THE TOftm* mm' NEWSfttPEtt 


The Harley Respiatory 
Health Clinic 
12 Harley Street, 


is Attorney 
modifier 

19 Going around 
tne worid 

20 Much of boot 
camp 

21 Fax button 

22 Give away 

33 Projecting part 
29 Cry of glee 
26 A.C.L.li. 

concerns: Abbr. 

29 Vogue 
2 »Cigs 

30 One of Frank's 
exes 

31 Bill and Bob's 
opponent 

32 Sheds 

33 Archly theatrical 

34 Ab (from 

the beginning) 

35 Cornerstone of 
Cartesianam 

39 Centers 
37 Nonexistent 

39 Air France 
terminal 

3 a Goggles 

40 Threw over 

42 '..to a printer 

43 Particular 

44 Greens, 
politically. 

48 Ardent 
40 Quid pro quo 
so Sweetie pie 

51 Monet subject 

52 Physicist Mach 
as Raw material 
MTarqwn'sntie 


1 Area near 
TriBeCa 

2 Class 

3 Tabtetop. 

perhaps 
4 In agreement 


5 Upnght P" 

sActaeon, v 

ultimately, in ‘ 

Greek myth j, 

7 Hrs. m Quebec 

8 Hermes s 

accessories 

9 Free from 
restraint 

10 Important 
monetary 
currency peg 

11 Every minute 

12 Intelligence 
14 Cooler places? 
is Work on. with 

‘to’ 

20 Hero s list 

22 Butler of fiction 

23 Support 

24 Denouement I 

25 Young role on 
TV 

27 Drains 

28 Suffix m 
high-tech 
company 
names 

29 -be 

32 Prized 
mushroom 

33 Rodeo nder 

35 Most moronic 

36 Psalms singer 
39 Faux pas 

41 Exchanges 

42 She played 
Margo in "All 
About Eve" 

43 See 

44 Jim Carrey, in a 
1997 movie 

45 Sensation 

46 Scheherazade 
specialty 

47 An oath on n was 
once held to be 
inviolable 

48 Company 
number 



““""©Not York TuneelEdited by Will Shanz. 

Solution to Puzzle of Sept. 4 


nflHQ QDQQ 

nrain 3000 ES9U! 

BiinnnHHgJs annaa 

0 io0QOD iaianaa 

mQQia 0 ilaias|aa 

KSiB ggSl u SS§i 
Hhqhb 



PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 


liH 


INTERNATIONAL 


N0* 


o l® 


Blasts Turned Street of Cafes and Shops Into a Bloodbath 


By Joel Greenberg 


phone. Another woman, frantic with worry. 


New York Times Sen-tee 


JERUSALEM — The first boom cut through the 
workaday drone of central Jerusalem a little alter 
three o’clock Thursday afternoon, followed by a 
second blast. Then, incredibly, there was a tniro, 
and a few seconds of tenible silence. 

In minutes, ambulance sirens began wailing as 
shaken survivors staggered from the Ben-Yehuda 
mall , a pedestrian street of cafds and shops sud- 
denly turned into a bloodbath. 

Chunks of flesh and bone lioered the pavement, 
and buildings were spattered with blood- Knot s or 
people bent over the wounded as stretcher - bearers 
raced among the piles of splintered glass, shattered 
cafiS umbrellas and overturned chairs to carry the 

wounded away. _ . 

On the doorstep of a building, a seriously 
wounded victim lay bleeding on her side as a 
medical team worked frantically to save her. 

A young woman wept, holding her head in her 
hands, and another wailed as she talked into a cell- 


pleaded with police officers to let her into die area 
so she could find her mother. 


so she could find her mother. 

“Get everyone away?” an officer shouted to his 
men through a megaphone. "There’s a danger of 
another bomb!” 

Huddled on the floor of a leather goods shop with 
a young woman who was trembling silently, Rachel 
Cohen shielded herself with a leather bag. “When 
we heard the explosions, we took cover, and a piece 
of flesh landed on me," she said. “My husband 
covered me with bags. We thought there was more 
coming.” 

Bomb-squad members in protective vests sifted 
through piles of toys and children's schoolpacks 
that had spilled out of a store, searching for more 
explosives. Some officers held sniffer dogs. 

The remains of two of the three bombers lay 
nearby: the separated legs of one, the mangled body 
of another. Investigators in white plastic suits col- 
lected what seemed to be their clothes — a pair of 
sneakers, a blood-soaked scrap of denim shirt Over 
everything hung the stench of seared flesh and 


blood. ... 

“People flew in the air, said Barak Marciano, 
who works in a currency exchange shop on the 
mall. "1 saw ooe boy lying there. He was all white. 
He didn’t respond.” 

Natan Gamer, the shop owner, said. “It looked 
like a battlefield: people lying on the ground, some 
of them still some of them moving." 

A photo shop worker who identified himself as 
Doron said he felt the impact of the blast where he 
stood, around the corner from the mall. “The whole 
store shook, and two girls who were walking up- 
stairs fell down,” he said, ‘ ‘I went outside and saw 
some people lying without moving, and some who 
were screaming. 

On a doorstep down the street, a soldier guarded 
three Palestinians who worked in a cafe on the mall 
and had escaped injury. One of the blasts was 
outside their place of employment. Now they were 
under arrest as possible suspects. 

In his damaged office overlooking the bomb 
scene, Yoram Aran, an Israeli lawyer, received a 
call from a Palestinian colleague, a lawyer in East 


Jerusalem. “He wanted to check if we were all 
right,” Mr. Aran said as he surveyed die carnage. 

A few blocks away at the Focaccia Bar cam, 
Arielia Ben-Shoshan and her friend Keren Conen 
were still sipping their drinks, frozen where they 
were when they heard the blasts. 

There were a few other people on the outdoor 
terrace, having lunch. “It may look peaceful hoe, 
but inside us a storm is raging,” Miss Ben-Shoshan 
said. 

The streets soon emptied as people headed home 
early. . . . 

A police helicopter circled high overhead, ana 
dozens of border policemen gathered in a p arkin g 
lot for a briefing before fanning out across the 
center of town. 

As evening approached, a pall of silence settled 
over the streets around the Ben-Yehuda maiL The 


BOMB: 

7 Killed in Jerusalem £ 

Continued from Page 1 ~ - 


quiet was broken by a man talking on a cellular 
phone, telling a friend how he had passed by the 
scene of the bombing minutes before it occurred. 

“What mi ght have happened,” he mused, “if 
someone had stopped me to say hello?" 


Long Procession to Bear 
Diana to Her Funeral 


v- '..v„ -V.l* -V • • ; 


Palace Won’t Say if Royal Family Will March 


By Eugene Robinson 

Washing ten Post Service 


LONDON — The funeral procession 
bearing the body of Diana, Princess of 
Wales, an event that is expected to be 
seen by millions lining the route and 
hundreds of milli ons watching on tele- 
vision, will begin Saturday at 9:08 AM. 
in west London at Kensington Palace, 
which was Diana’s residence. 

The red-brick mansion that dates from 
1605 was turned into a royal palace by 
the monarchs William and Mary after 
they ascended to the throne in 1689. 
Princess Victoria of Kent was living 
there in 1837 when courtiers awakened 
her to tell her that her uncle the king had 
died and that she had become queen. 

Diana’s body will be borne on a gun 
carriage and draped with a royal stan- 
dard, the flag that symbolizes the British 
monarchy. Four mounted policemen 
will ride in front of the carriage, and four 
more will ride behind. Twelve bearers 
from the King’s Troop will serve as 
escorts. 

Press reports have indicated that 
Prince Charles, and perhaps Diana ’s eld- 
er son. Prince William, may also walk in 
the procession. Buckingham Palace of- 
ficials said Thursday that they could not 
confirm whether any members of the 
royal family will be in the procession. 

The procession will first move south 
down Palace Avenue, then turn east onto 
Kensington High Street, then jog north 
and quickly east onto South Carriage 
Drive. 

It will then pass the Albert Memorial 
an ornate tower completed in 1876 in 
honor of Albert, Queen Victoria’s be- 
loved consort, who died of typhoid in 
1861. 

The cortege will then continue east- 
ward on South Carnage through Hyde 
Park. The expansive park, one of the 
most popular in London, was seized for 
the royal family by Henry VUI in 1536. 

At the southeastern comer of Hyde 
Park, Diana's body will pass Apsley 
House, an ochre-colored mansion that 


Dodi, Diana 
And the Ring: 
A Tragic Twist? 


By Charles Trueheart 

Washington Post Service 


PARIS — A Paris jeweler re- 
fused Thursday to confirm or deny 
reports published in a British 
tabloid that he had delivered a 
$200,000 diamond ring to Dodi al 
Fayed the day of his dinner with 
Diana, Princess of Wales, Saturday 
night 

The possibility that the two had 
become engaged only an hour or 
two .before they died would add 
another deeply cruel twist to their 
deaths. 

The extravagant price of the ring 
would give it the luster of the gem 
immortalized in the title of F. Scott 
Fitzgerald's novella, “A Diamond 
as Big as the Ritz.” 

Mr. Fayed' s multimillionaire fa- 
ther, Mohamed al Fayed, owns the 
Hotel Ritz. 

Alberto Repossi, whose jewelry 
shop faces the Hotel Ritz on the 
other side of the Place Vendome, 
was quoted in The Sun newspaper 
of London as saying ‘ ‘Dodi came to 
me 10 days before this tragic ac- 
cident and told me that he wanted 
me to make a ring of (he like that had 
never seen before. He told me how 
much he was in love with the prin- 
cess and he wanted to spend the rest 
of his life with her." 

The Sun said the ring had been 
found in the wrecked Mercedes and, 
according to the British news 
agency. Press Association, was giv- 
en to Diana’s sisters Sunday when 
they came to Paris to collect her 
remains. 

On Thursday. Repossi Jewelers 
issued a terse statement that said it 
had “no comments regarding the 
news coming from the source of an 
insurance company that he delivered 
a diamond ring to Mr. Dodi al Fayed 
on the 30th of August 1997." 

But The Associated Press said in 
a dispatch Thursday that an un- 


named Repossi employee had con- 
firmed the gist of tne report. 


was the London home of the Duke of 
Wellington, hero of the Battle of Wa- 
terloo in which Napoleon met defeat It 
will then pass through Wellington Arch, 
a grant monument crowned by a dy- 
namic statue of rearing horses and 
winged victoiy. 

The procession then will veer south- 
eastward onto the wide, leafy boulevard 
called Constitution Hill until it passes 
Buckingham Palace, the residence of 
Queen Elizabeth and the monarchy’s 
headquarters. 

From Buckingham Palace, the cortege 
will proceed eastward down the Mall a 
ceremonial avenue that runs between St 
James's Palace, where Diana’s body has 
lain since it was returned to London, and 
St James’s Park. 

About halfway down the Mall, the 
tiny procession is due to grow substan- 
tially: Officials have invited about 550 
people, representing the 1 10 charities of 
which Diana was a patron, to follow the 
casket on the final few blocks of its 



A# 4 

: ,f 4 

••/W »•’* 

* 



QUEEN: 

An Unusual Address 


Continued from Page 1 


JcJnSuBwcU/Apm F 

Prince Andrew, right, and Prince Edward, center, approaching Buck- 
ingham Palace on Thursday after they signed condolence books. 


bh&Mfv* '£A rriS*: sdl 









journey. 

The cortege will turn right onto Horse 
Guards Road, crossing the vast open 
space called Horse Guards Parade — 
once Henry VTII’s tournament ground, 
now the venue for the colorful Changing 
of the Guard. 

It will pass through Horse Guards 
Arch and turn south onto Whitehall the 
street whose name is synonymous with 
the British government. 

It will pass Downing Street, where the 
prime minister lives and works, and the 
Cenotaph. Britain's war memorial, be- 
fore entering Parliament Square in front 
of the Palace of Westminster, where 
Parliament sits and the clock tower 
called Big Ben sounds the hours. 

The procession will then cross the 
square, and at 10:55 A.M. it is expected 
to reach die west entrance of West- 
minster Abbey, where the funeral ser- 
vice will be held. 

Westminster Abbey is the traditional 
coronation site of English kings and 
queens. It serves as the burial site for 
many English monarchs, and it is also 
the traditional place for state and royal 
funerals. 

The funeral service inside the abbey 
will include readings by Diana’s sisters, 
Lady Sarah McCorquodale and Lady 
Jane Fell owes, a tribute by her brother 
Earl Spencer, a reading by Prime Min- 
ister Tony Blair, a song by Elton John 
and prayers by Archbishop of Canter- 
bury George Carey. 

No member of the royal family will 
speak. 

Buckingham Palace officials said 
Thursday that at the request of the Spen- 
cer family, no photographs of the Spen- 
cers or the royal family will be allowed 
during the service. 

The service, which officials said 
“balances tradition and liturgy with 
something of the free spirit of the prin- 
cess.” wuJ end with a minute of silence 
to be observed throughout the nation. 

After the service. Diana’s body will 
be put into a hearse and taken for burial 
to Althorp, the Spencer's family burial 
ground since 1508. 

The hearse will retrace the cortege's 
path to Hyde Park Comer, then head 
north up Park Lane — past the apartment 
of Dodi al Fayed, Diana's boyfriend, 
who was killed with her in the car crash 
in Paris — and through residential 
neighborhoods of north London. 

The hearse will continue north 
through the countryside on the Ml free- 
way until it reaches Northampton where 
it will proceed along narrow roads to 
Althorp. 

In a private ceremony, Diana will be 
buried in the ancient Spencer family 
chapel. Only family and her closest 
friends are expected to be invited, and no 
press coverage will be allowed. 


fig be gin here 

Ip 


— “ — -i-y . M Is- 
sues the cortege may $ Funera | ser 

pass after the service [ y Sal 

s ;.£.y* Stf&ivv.'xi ''' y= r rr yzr z 

■ fi ll in' fil 'mi ll . i ' i T i ii 'i li 'l ' i V 11 '■ 


service 1 
Saturday . 


Diana's funeral procession will weave through London to Westminster 
Abbey. She will be buried at the Spencer family burial site at Althorp. 


3 More Are Held in Paris 


Photographers Took Pictures of Wreckage 


By Craig R. Whitney 


New York Times Service 


PARIS — French police on Thursday 
detained three more free-lance photo- 
graphers who had snapped pictures of 
the automobile wreck that killed Diana, 
Princess of Wales, in an expressway 
underpass after a high-speed chase last 
Sunday. The three turned themselves in 
after learning that the police were look- 
ing for them. 

Six otber photographers and a mo- 
torcyclist, some of them in the paparazzi 
escort the driver was apparently dying to 
shake, are under investigation for pos- 
sibly contributing to the crash by their 
own conduct on the road that night, and 
for failing to provide aid to the victims or 
for hindering emergency workers. 

All either in person or through law- 
yers, have denied being anywhere near 
the car when it rammed into a support 
pillar at high speed, or doing anything to 
hamper rescue efforts. 

Mohamed al Fayed, whose son Emad 
Mohamed al Fayed, known as Dodi, died 
with Diana in the crash, has instructed 
two lawyers here to make him a civil 
party to the investigation. According to 
lawyers; such a step would make it likely 
that all those in the investigation would 
eventually have to go to trial. 

Police from Scotland Yard in London 
also joined the investigation Thursday, 
according to the French police, who said 
their arrival was “in the framework of 
international technical cooperation.” 

Mr. al Fayed, an Egyptian-born busi- 
nessman, owns Harrods department 


store in London and the Ritz Hotel in 
Paris, where the dead driver, Henri Paul, 
41. was assistant director of security. 
Prosecurors said Monday that he was 
legally drunk at the time of his death, and 
French authorities said Thursday that he 
did not have a chauffeur's license. 

The regular driver was at the wheel of 
a decoy car trying to lure photographers 
oft her trail when the couple left the Ritz 
Hotel shortly after midnight. 

The photographers already charged in 
the inquiry into her death were released 
from police custody Tuesday but for- 
bidden to leave the country, and two of 
them had to post bail of $ 16,700 and were 
forbidden from working as photograph- 
ers until the inquiry is completed. 

Police said nothing about the iden- 
tities of the three new suspects they were 
questioning Thursday, but Laurent Sola, 
owner of a picture agency. LS Presse. 
said that two of his photographers had 
taken pictures of the wreck and had left 
the scene before the police arrived and 
that the police had wanted their names. 

Trevor Rees-Jones. a 29-year-old 
former British soldier who works as a 
bodyguard for the al Fayed family, was 
in die seat in front of Diana when the car 
crashed Sunday and was seriously in- 
jured. but a spokesman for Pitie Sai- 
petriere Hospital said Thursday that re- 
ports that his longue and lips had been 
tom off in the accident were “rumors.” 

The hospital said Sunday that Mr. 
Rees-Jones, who was wearing a seatbelt at 
the time of the crash, had suffered mod- 
erate concussions, pulmonary contusions 
and severe facial and jaw injuries. 


British Tabloids Face 
Running Out of Paper 


Star Paparazzo Quit Job ‘to Live With Myself 5 


A fierce Fnuce-Prrsse 

STOCKHOLM — British newspa- 
pers, whose sales have skyrocketed 
since the death of Diana, Princess of 
Wales, have asked a Swedish paper mill 
to increase newsprint deliveries as they 
are running out of paper, the mill said 
Thursday. 

“Several London daily tabloids have 
called and asked for more paper on short 
notice,” Lars-Ove Staff, president of the 
Kvamsveden paper mill, said. “But we 
are already running at full capacity, sev- 
en days a week around the clock." 

On Monday, the tabloid Sun increased 
circulation by a million copies. 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 


PARIS — Years ago, Francois 
Apesteguv was not just a paparazzo — a 
photographer who snapped pictures of 
celebrities in their private moments. He 
was one of the best. 

He was even a celebrity himself, fea- 
tured in ihe 1980 documentary film 
“Reporters." in which he was seen 
hassling the actor Richard Gere over 
taking Mr. Gere's photo. 

It was jusi a couple of years after that, 
Mr. Apesieguy said, that he could no 
longer live with himself. 

“I was feeling bothered and I wasn't 


sure why," he said. ”1 asked myself, 
‘Why do you do what you do?' 1 couldn't 
answer at first, then I realized f par- 
ticipated in the stupefaction of the pub- 
lic." 

He left the paparazzi business, turned 
to news and project photography and 
said he has felt better ever since. 

He has been a voice of conscience in 
the debate here since the death of Diana. 
Princess of Wales, speaking on tele- 
vision and in newspapers about the dan- 
gerous cycle he feels photojournalism 
has caught itself in. 

"It's loo easy just to focus on the 
photographers. They’re just employ- 
ees,” he said in an interview, “They 


were ordered to be at the Ritz that night, 
to harass. 

"The agencies they work for are de- 
pendent on the magazines that buy the 
pictures. And the magazines are depend- 
ent on the powerful press groups. 

" At the top of the pyramid, enormous 
profits are made. The rest is just a chain 
of underlings." 

Everyone in the chain, however, is 
avoiding the issue by insisting they are 
only giving the public what it demands 
he said. 

said' 1 * k WC Wh ° dru ® ^ P u ^‘ c -"’ he 

"If there were no drug dealers, there 
would be no addicts.” 




Mrs. Albright’s decision .to make the 

trip had been predicated in part ot de- 
terminations by U.S. officials that Mr. 

Arafat had begun to cooperate more vig- 
orously in the fight against tenor groups 
operating from Palesuman-coutoDed , 
2nd. But on Thursday she andaud 
the bombing and urged unilateral Pal- 
estinian action to preempt terror. ; - 

Greg Salzman, a chiropractor from - 
East Brunswick, New Jersey, J'hcr "e-; 
cently moved to Israel said he had-jus^ , . 
finished dining with two friends at foe 
Village Green, a vegetarian cafe, wha • 
“I was thrown from my chair by the 
force of the first blast • ' 

Mr. Salzman, 25, said he immediately 
began running away from the direction.' At 
of the blast, at which point he heard the * 
two other explosions. "I feel blessed, r 
Mr. Salzman said as he lay in his hospital , 
bed Thursday evening recovering from 
min or shrapnel wounds and burns. But- 

he said he had no word ou the fate of ms - 


ibter 


stioH 

iiwi* 


' .. , + ‘“f 

Itch' 11 * 1 ’ 

Lli 


Tn<-' v "-. 


gulfed London has been rising, and 
Thursday it burst forth in headlines chas- 
tising the queen for not having come to 
London or sent a representative. 

“Your people are suffering. Speak to 
us Ma'am," said the Mirror in a front 
page showing a crabbed cameo image of 
foe queen surrounded by pictures of 

_ _ i . - nm r 


Israeli police said Thursday night that 
the bombs apparently were small which 
IjmitwH the number of deaths. Most of 
those wounded received relatively 
minor burns or shrapnel wounds, bat 
eight were reported in serious or critical 
condition. 

Among foe wounded were a number 
of foreign visitors, including Americ- 


- ■ - 


, SlOP-' 


uw : v ; 
Sl2- nj9 " 

••(.ofi . - 


.cent P r *; 

fofTU- ,r “- — . ; ' 

rerof 1 ■; 


tfcV"?-; V.- 
. ted tP 


•Uldi 

On July 30, two suicide bombers blew 
themselves up in an outdoor market 
here, killing 15 bystanders. 

The bombers could hardly have 


gfiiur j v~_-. ■ 

Smefli"*;. 

In n^V. - 
. from -"f 


people sobbing. The tabloid The Sun 

‘--ren.. t. 


g cked a more prominent target than 
en- Yehuda Street, once a center of the 
secular Zionist movement that founded 
the modem state of Israel in 1948 and 
now one of the city’s most popular shop- 
ping areas. 

Witnesses described terror and pan- 
demonium as they heard the first bomb 
and saw. the flash. “I tried to get up,” 
Bob Helfman of Detroit told The As- 
sociated Press. 4 ‘My feet could not even 
support me and I fell over. Then I heard 
another bomb, and everybody started 
r unning . No one knew which direction to 
go in.” 

In his statement, Mr. Clinton said: “It 
.is clear that foe perpetrators of this attack 
intended to kill both innocent people and 
the peace process itself. They must not 
be allowed to succeed. Everything pos- 
sible must be done to stop them.’ - 
He added “The peace process can 
only move forward in a secure, envir- 
onment This is a message that Secretary 
Albright will emphasize when she 
travels to foe region next week."' 


The Express said “Show us you care.” 

The feelings of antagonism against the 
royal family have been fueled by the 
startlingly emotional response the British 
have had to the death or the princess. 

Their view of her as someone who 
straggled a gains t a cold and castigating 
family has emerged in foe inscriptions in 
tiie books of remembrance and foe mes- 
sages with foe massed floral tributes and 
in conversations along the lines that have 
thrown people together for hours at a 
time with the subject of Diana foe prin- 
cipal talking point. 

While no one could recall the family ’s 
issuing the kind of reactive statement it 
did Thursday, no one could recall public 
opinion aiming on foe queen as fero- 
ciously as it has in recent days. 

The palace has appeared bewildered 
and has sought advice from the gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Tony Blair, 
whose youthful new cabinet is more at 
ease with foe nontraditional Britain that 
has shown up in forCfe in London. 

Mr. Blair and Prince Charles had a 15- 
ntinute phone conversation Wednesday 
evening and, though details of the talk 
were kept private, foe prime minis ter 
later said it was “unfair” to take the 
royal family to task. - - 

Then foe palace made decisive moves 
Thursday to avert further alienation 
from foe public. 

For the first time, members of the 
family appeared at foe Chapel Royal of 
Sl James's Palace where Diana's body 
lies in private. 

Dressed in blazers and black ties, foe 
Duke of York and Prince Edward paid 
their respects to their former sister-in- 
law and then mingled with the crowds of 
mourners outside waiting to put their 
messages in one of foe 43 books of 
condolence that have been set up in a 
corridor off foe chapel. 

Although great moments in Britain’s 
history are usually associated with elab- 
orate pageantry, foe defining symbol of 
this extraordinary week in foe country’s 
life has been foe stark imag e of a naked 
flagpole above Buckingham Palace. 

It is fully visible to foe mourners on 
line at Sl James's Palace, and many of 
them have noted foe sight with irritation, 
taking foe absence of a flag at half-staff as 
yet another slight by the House of Wind- 
sor on the woman they are honoring. 

There is an explanation, offered re- 
peatedly by palace spokesmen. The staff 
is for foe royal standard, which flies only 
when the queen is in residence. 

In any event, it is never lowered be- 
cause, under the thinking most often 
conveyed by foe phrase “foe king is 
dead, long live foe king, “foe re is always 
a live sovereign. That has made people 
even angrier. 

"The flag should be flying at half- 
mast, and to hell with tradition.” said 
Debbie Jones, 36, a housewife from 
Middlesex. 

As part of its moves to ease under- 
standing. the palace offered a compro- 
mise Thursday that it said was being 
adopted at the queen's suggestion. 

When she arrives at the palace Friday, 
the standard will be raised. When she 
departs Saturday morning for Westmin- 
ster Abbey and before Diana’s casket on 
its ceremonial gun carriage rolls by the 
building, the standard will be taken 
down and in its place a Union Jack will 
be flown for the first time. And it will 
ride at half-staff for foe rest of foe day. 

"It is a unique occasion for a unique 
person," a palace spokeswoman said. 

‘ 'This will be a mark of respect for the 
princess." 


Ccopey:. .1 r- 

v 

■ tfjunir 1 ;; 

~ inc — 

Euro? 4- ; ■■ 
l£r ^T'. . - - 

tali’ 

ebwk * 17 ; 

ndt- ’ '. - 
: 

. pr.Vl: 


lern-i*'* •• 






liicrr-' T • 

it. -hr-'.' • 


BRIEFLY 


brir.c: 
iifc« .••r-- 

leomej 

Thf Mckr- 

a rv •' 

•C'li'. 

bnn:.r.: 

V\ !«:. “ - " 


; une^p 


130 Die in Nigeria 
In River Collision 


Corr.;:" - 


’ jr.c - - 


LAGOS — At least 130 people 
drowned in foe Niger River delta on 
the sou them Nigerian coast when a 
passenger ferry collided with a 
string of barges, press reports said 
Thursday. 

The M.V. Olodiaraa, carrying 
passengers from foe state capital erf 
Port Harcourt to the port of Olo- 
diama, on Monday rammed foe con- 
voy of barges at foe mouth of the 
Nembe River, which flows into foe. 
Niger, foe Daily Times said. 

On Aug. 25, about 100 people 
drowned off Port Harcourt, the cap- 
ital of Rivers State, when two over- 
loaded passenger boats collided, ac- 
cording to press reports. (AFP) 


Du::r. 

rhr. L .;_'" 


trie 

"i” - ’ "* 

E> ; •- • 


Kuwait to Purchase 
ffkapons From U.S, 


: Ci* ■ 
i.'Li.vj 

iL T7* : 
ue:r: 
* ptrer 


!r >- L-.V. 


WASHINGTON — Kuwait 
plans to buy 16 U.S. AH -64 Apache 
attack helicopters and more than 
11,000 air-to-ground missiles and 
rockets for $800 million, foe 
Pentagon has announced. 

The sale would include the heli- 
copters built by McDonnell 
Douglas Helicopter Systems, a di- 
vision of Boeing Co., and 384 Hell- 
fire missiles and 10,918 Hydra 
rockets made by Lockheed Martin 
^ or P- (Reuters) 


Colombian Rebels 
Seize 23 Hostages 


•-Vi-r. r _. 

snip!-..-. 

hjj' i.. 


■Ll£:r. . r 

lllii.in ■ • 




» fit: 


BOGOTA — Marxist rebels have 
stormed into one of Colombia’s 
largest hydroelectric power stations 
and taken at least 23 hostages. 

Army sources said the guerrillas 
smashed their way into the Guatape 
plant, which supplies the nearby in- 
dustrial hub of Medellin and much of 
northwest Antioquia Province, just 
after nightfall on Wednesday and 
disconnected foe main turbines. 

Authorities were able to avert 
power cuts by drawing energy from 
smaller generators in the area, an 
anny spokesman said. (Reuters) 


''■SSiC:... 


c URRSm 


**. 


Indonesia Buying 
Russian Fighters 


. JAKARTA — Indonesia has 
agned a letter of agreement to pur- 
chase 12 Sukhoi Su-30K fighters 
and eight Ml- 17- IV helicopters 
from Russia, Planning Minster Gin- 
atijar Kartasasmita said Thursday. 

nie deal, signed Friday and worth 
around $500 million, will be com- 
pletely financed by foe counter-pur- 
Indonesian commodities, 

ssfts?— sse; 


- 

■ * ■- ■S-^LV 


: 

-V - . 


"" r; - '-/■ 

— « ■-'-* ..; 

■ -iV!r • i f” 5 - ■ v* 

. ’’ y* v 

-hi-, 






L 




$\ be 


g mw cMwwi 


PAGES 


T< 



You wish ro finance a [aigc-tcalc intcnurimuf project? 

NORD/LB 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



R 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Think twice! 

A second Opinion IS always smart. 

From a major German bank with international experience. 

NORD/LB 

NORn DEUTSCHE LANDESK,M. CIFOZt *JTB SJ.I 


Doubters 
Question 
Dutch Path 

.McKinsey Study Takes 
Dim View of Recovery 

By Erik Ipsen 

' iH/ernarional Herald Tribune 


j,«k. 

m*r 




jT-rr^ 

iRCW-’f'- 

|k)H# 


»aw 

t' 

SriO***'.:' 



**.- 

=**»■■/ . 

> - Ai .*■ 

V' V. 5 **' 

f. 

j'-'; »•■'«-■ 

:%• ! "■■ ’• " 
sfe** 5 '' 


I > 


Tlxe Netherlands economy, widely re- 
i °s. ne of Euro P e ’s rare success 

5 0nes J* the « r ? w ^ in its economy and 

■ Lne reduction in its unemployment, 
stands as little more than a statistical 

■ Easton, according ro a new report. 
Contrary to popular belief and re- 

“ ? ent P^s reports, Dutch economic per- 
formance still lags that of other major 
^.economies by a wide margin,” said the 
report from international consultants 
McKinsey & Co. The study was presen- 
7 ted to the Dutch prime minister and a 
group of leading business executives at 
a meeting Thursday in the Hague. 

recent years, observers ranging 
..from the Organization for Economic 

a . Cooperation and Development to a bevy 

VJ.! •» - of international banks have held up the 
» 4 ' * IM(1|S H • n «ample of the Netherlands as the lead- 

" - reg — if not only — example of how 

■ Europe's overtaxed and underperform- 
- jug economies could be turned around 
- into job-generating machines. 

By succeeding without tossing out 
Europe’s abiding concern for workers’ 
'rights and social welfare, the Nether- 
lands has often been put forward as a 
- proof that there exists a humane al- 
~ tentative to the American model. 

In a report last month, for example, 
*■ David Kern, chief economist for Britain's 
o National Westminster Bank, conceded 
that the United States has indeed excelled 
. 1 at creating new jobs with what he termed 
- its “harsh” economic regime. 

Bui because the American approach 
.•brings with it what he calls "low job 
security, a widening of income jpequal- 
•' ities and many social problems,” Mr. 

~ Kem said that * ‘there is much that can be 
■ ■ \ learned from the Dutch experience.” 

■ -4 ■" TbeMcKiBseyreportbegstodiffer.lt 
zeroes in on- whaz most consider the 
seminal achievement of Dutch econom- 
ic reformers, its stunning success in 
bringing down unemployment rate. 

* With 7.2 percent of its work force 
« unemployed, the Netherlands stands as 
the envy of its European neighbors such 
r as France, where 12.5 percent of the 
; labor force is without jobs. The decline 
‘ contrasts markedly with most other 
> Continental countries. 

“The biggest surprise for us was that 
I I* lilt*' i Dutch economic penormancewas not at 

\ I Hit- m v- , the high levels that everyone commonly 

. believes.” said Bill Lewis, director of 
the McKinsey group that put together 
■ the report 

Exhibit A is what the report calls a 
“real” unemployment rate of more than 
20 percent — or nearly three times the 
■ official level. 

The authors say the biggest group of 
• the hidden unemployed includes the 
tens of thousands of Dutch whom they 
■ classify as ‘ ‘able to work but instead are 
supported by welfare benefits.” With 
unemployment benefits thatcotneto 78 

v percent of die level of the minimum 
t ! wage — compared with a European 
1 average of 64 percent — and with other 
official programs chipping in a bit more, 

• the Dutch jobless can reasonably expect 
; to stay at home and exceed the nun- 
■ imum wage by 5 percent. 

The authors fault the government tor 
' giving its citizens incentives to steer clear 

■ of work, but also for malting jobs too 
! pricey for employers to create. For the 
■ unskilled, the Netherlands minimum 


unskilled, 

wage 
J as 


UW, , 

of nearly $10 an hour makes these 
as nearly twice as expensive to 



McKinsey credits much of tee u- 
i 1 us ion to the fact that between 1970 and 

■ 1985 the Dutch economy fell into a tar 
. deeper recession than its neighbors. 

■ Since 1985. the Dutch economy has 
1 revived, but its growth has been more of 

_ r Intt (wAiinri nftf Ot 



dUluoa^mg — 

■ terms of economic output per person, 
‘ for instance, Holland has now pulled 
i even with France, but it still ranks a 
• conspicuously average eighth out ot i£> 

! Western European nations. 



Mass to Class 


U-S. sales of cases of 
Gallo's Carlo Rossi 
and Gallo label brands. 


U.S. sales of cases of Gallo’s Turning 
Leaf brand and its premium 
cabernet sauvtgnon. 


*«*•>. . 19.6 


15.9 

million 



12- 5 12.1 
m,Hl0n million 


’87 


m 


*96 


Ernest 

and Julio *£#.4 
Gallo 'ifJ* 
founded the %'■. 
company in 
1933. Julio 
died in 1993. 

Source: Adams Wine Handbook 1997 




Gaflo produces only 
1.2 2,000 cases 

million each vintage year. 


0.8 

million 




Gina and 
Matt Gallo 
run me 
premium 
Sonoma 
wine division. 

NTT 


Gallo Goes for a Premium Label 


By Frank J. Prial 

New York Times Sendee 


HEALDSBURG, California — 
Over lunch recently at Bistro Ralph, a 
wine makers’ hangout in the heart of 
the California wine country, some- 
body mentioned that E.&J. Gallo 
Winery foe. — the mass producer of 
inexpensive jag brands like Carlo 
Rossi and Gallo Hearty Burgundy and 
street fortifiers Idee Thunderbird — 
had placed in the top 10 in a rating 
competition with one of its new 
Sonoma wines. 

But the remark only exasperated 
Gina Gallo, a third-generation mar- 
keting executive with the company. 

“First would have been better.” 
Ms. Gallo said, pausing between bites 
of her lamb burger. “Second is okay, 
too. But just being in the top 10 is 
unacceptable.” 

Gallo has always wanted io be No. 1 
at eveiything it does. And it mostly 
has been. Since it was founded in 1933 
by the brothers Ernest and Julio Gallo, 
it has grown into the biggest winery in 
the world, with production of nearly 
900 million bottles last year and rev- 
enue approaching an estimared 5 1 bil- 
lion. Tne privately held company does 
not release its financial results. 

Sales representatives like to quote a 
line by Ernest Gallo, the 88-year-old 


family patriarch: “We don’t want 
most of the business: we want if all.’’ 

One marker segment always eluded 
Gallo, though. That was premium fine 
wines, those cabernet sauvignons, 
chardoonays and pinots noirs aged in 
wooden barrels and corked in 750- 
milliliter bottles. So, after several 
false starts in the marketplace, the 
company is trying once again to con- 
quer that territory. 

Finally, despite its reputation as a 
mass rather than a class wine maker. 

INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Gallo has managed to make a name for 
itself in the midpriced and premium 
categories. 

The name, though, is not just Gallo. 
Turning Leaf. Gossamer Bay. Indigo 
Hills, Zabaco and Marcelina are all 
new wine labels owned by Gallo that 
sell anywhere from about $7 a bottle to 
as much as $20. 

Not only is the Gallo name never 
mentioned on those labels, but they 
usually say, “Made in Healdsburg,” 
rather than Modesto, where the Gallos 
got their start and which has become 
almost synonymous with the winery’s 
name. 

Other new lines rely on the Gallo 
name, although the labels vary from 
the traditional one, often displaying 


simply the signatures of the founders. 
These include die Single Vineyard 
varietals — chardommys. cabernets 
and the like with price tags of $14 to 
$18 — and the top-of-the-line 
Sonoma Estate wines, including a 
chardonnay that retails for $30 and a 
cabernet sauvignou that goes for $40. 

A $40 bottle of Gallo wine? Yes, 
and to the consternation of Gallo’s 
competitors, some of the wines are 
winning raves among customers and 
critics. Chez Panisse, the Berkeley 
restaurant owned by Alice Waters that 
is in the vanguard of the best in Cali- 
fornia cuisine, recently bought its first 
cases of Gallo Sonoma wines. 

“they said it couldn’t be done.” 
said Ed Everett, an importer and wine 
consultant based in San Francisco. 
“Everyone in the industry said Gallo 
could never shake off its jug-wine im- 
age. Which is just the kind of challenge 
die Gallos love. And they’ve done iL” 

There is a good reason, of course, 
that Gallo is so determined to remake 
its image. Consumption of the blended 
table wines on which Gallo feasted for 
years has stagnated, while varietals, 
named for the predominant grape used 
to make them, have taken off. 

Last year, for example, the volume 
of varietals shipped by California 

See GALLO, Page 18 


ABB Loses Contract 
For Malaysian Dam 

Biggest Project Ended in Cost Dispute 


Carftlnl ht Our Satf From Oopatchn 

ZURICH — Share prices in ABB 
Asea Brown Boveri Ltd. fell Thursday 
after the Swiss-Swedish industrial com- 
pany lost its biggest-ever contract to 
build a dam in Malaysia. 

Ekran Bhd., developer of die Bakun 
Dam project in Malaysia, announced it 
had canceled ABB’s contract, which 
was worth more than $2.5 billion. 

Shares of ABB AG, die Swiss parent, 
declined 57 francs to 2,178 ($1,452). 
Shares in die Swedish parent. ABB AB. 
fell 3 kronor to 1 13 ($1426). 

The announcement In Kuala Lumpur 
followed a dispute between Ekran and 
ABB over terms of the contract for the 
$5.3 billion dam. 

The cancellation will wipe about 
$220 million off ABB’s operating profit 
in the five years from 1998. analysts 
said. In 1996, ABB posted operating 
profit of $3.03 billion. 

“This is going to hit ABB hard,” said 
Thomas Schenker, a fund manager at 
ING Bank (Schweiz) AG. 

“It’s possible the contract has just 
been put on ice, but things look bad for 
the company.” 

The decision was made after die two 
parties failed to come to an agreement 
over the engineering, procurement and 
construction contract, the official said. 

‘ 'Despite the protracted negotiations, 
no agreement has been reached,” he 
said, adding that “certain procedures 
will have to be followed” in the ter- 
mination of the contract. 

Ekran, which holds 32 percent in 
Bakun Hydro-Electric Carp, that was 
f earned to cany out the dam project, had 
last month revealed a possible delay in 
the project caused by the dispute with 
ABB on the issue of cost overruns. 

The dam project in eastern Sarawak 
state on Borneo island is scheduled to 
begin commercial operation in 2003, 
with production capacity to reach 2,400 
megawatts. 

ABB, however, did not confirm 
whether it had lost the contract, but said 
it “is of the opinion that the parties 
concerned are close to an agreement” 

The company said that the Malaysian 
announcement “has been initiated by 
one” shareholder in Bakun Hydro- 
Electric, and that it did not “constitute a 
majority opinion.” 


ABB’s consortium included Brazil’s 
Companhia Brasiieira Projectos e 
Obras. The project, which has had the 
personal backing of Prime Minister Ma- 
hathir bin Mohamad, has faced oppo- 
sition from environmentalisrs. concerns 
over share financing and doubts about 
its financial viability. 

But Mr. Mahathir identified Bakun 
later on Thursday as one of several 
public works projects that he was delay- 
ing indefinitely because of stock and 
currency market upheaval. 

The contract included supplying six 
420-megawatt hydro-generators and a 
500-kilovolt high voltage direct-current 
transmission system, and installing 650 
kilometers of (400-mile I submarine 
cable to connect the dam to Peninsular 
Malaysia. 

Pans of the orders from Bakun were 
booked by ABB in the first quarter of 
this year. 

Ekran Bhd, controlled by tycoon 
Ting Pek Khiing. has a 32 percent stake 
in the Bakun holding company. 

Other key shareholders are the fed- 
eral government’s Employees’ Provid- 
ent Fund, state-owned Tenaga Nasional 
Bhd, government investment arm 
Khazanah Holdings Bhd, the Sarawak 
state government and Sarawak Elec- 
tricity Supply Corp. 

Equity analysts in Kuala Lumpur said 
the news would be another big blow to 
the already slumping stock market. 

Rapidly eroding investor confidence 
pushed Malaysian stocks down by more 
titan 10 percent ai one point on Thurs- 
day but they recovered in late trading to 
end down 2.62 percent, or 1 9.64 points, 
to 731.12. 

With economists bearish on Malaysia 
because of its long list of major in-- 
frastructure projects that have caused 
economic overheating, a delay in the 
Bakun and other projects may be a 
blessing, some analysts said. 

“It is possible that the whole dam 
project could be renegotiated, and 
scaled down so that they just provide 
power for east Malaysia and Kali- 
mantan,' ' said the head of research at a 
foreign brokerage. 

It may be a signal that the economy is 
slowing down, he said, “and that some 
sensible decisions are being made.” 

(AFP. Bloomberg, Reuters J 


Government to Retain 
Its Holding in Air France 


E 


C*qOfO try Omr Sag From Orpoffte 

PARIS — Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin on Thursday ruled out the pri- 
vatization of Air France, putting him on 
course for a clash with the carrier’s 
chairman Christian Blanc. 

“Hie government “confirms that 

ivatization is not on the agenda,” Mr. 
ospin said after two hours of talks with 
Mr. Blanc. 

Mr. Blanc, who has said he will not 
remain chairman of the airline if the 
privatization does not go ahead, de- 
clined to comment after the meeting. 

Mr. Blanc also had demanded that the 
state make clear its intentions by Sept. 
12, when die boards of Air France and 
Air Fiance Europe meet to approve a 
merger. 

Transport Minister Jean -Claude 
Gayssot met earlier with Mr. Jospin and 
Economics and Finance Minister Domi- 
nique Strauss- Kahn to discuss the pri- 
vatization issue. 

Mr. Gayssot, one of two Communist 
ministers in the Socialist-led govern- 
ment, said earlier this week that there 
would be “neither privatization nor 
maintenance of the status quo” at Air 
France. He also said that he favored 
closer alliances between the airline and 
other carriers. 

Philippe Seguin. a member of Par- 
liament and head of the conservative 
Rally for the Republic, which is President 
Jacques Chirac’s party, said that retain- 
inE- control of Air France was “a dan- 

g^ous path for the company’ to uea± 

He raid employees who had had to 
make sacrifices as part of cost-cutting 


plans at the airline would be ill-rewar- 
ded if the government did not agree to 
give up control of the carrier. 

The labor union Force Ouvriere, 
which represents the majority of work- 
ers at the carrier, has come out in favor 
of Mr. Blanc’s position. 

Force Ouvriere, like Mr.. Blanc, ar- 
gued in a statement released Thursday 
that only by selling a majority stake in 
the carrier can Air France raise suf- 
ficient capital to fund expansion. 

Mr. Blanc also said that rally as “a 
normal company — that is, a private 
company” can the carrier be attractive to 
such partner airlines as Delta Air Lines 
and Continental Airlines, with which it 
already has marketing agreements. 

Air France is 90. 12 percent owned by 
holding company Groupe Air France, 
which itself is 100 percent owned by the 
French state. The state owns another 63 
par ent of the national airline directly. 

In another closely watched privat- 
ization, a government report on the fu- 
ture of France Telecom to be delivered 
Friday is expected to recommend at 
least partial privatization of the tele- 
phone monopoly, analysts said. 

The unions are fiercely opposed to 
the privatization. 

The government has a problem, 
however, because full liberalization of 
the European Union telecommunica- 
tions market takes effect Jan. 1. and 
most other European telecom mono- 
polies, such as Deutsche Telekom, have 
already been partially; privatized or are 
well on the way to being so. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


qiPPENCY & INTEREST RATES 




Cross Rates 



s t (4 Ft tt W l3i £ |5r WB , -® 5 * 

ISOS a UJB — HJ 35 B 33 »* 

as* sJ-ssasss 

S "St £* » JS; S B5 ,on 

S £ *111 as iS * 

{§!! iS 

Ctaains A **** . . v . . ^ miafobb. 


Aflttfcttfoa 
Bnsstu 
FitoWurt 
London (0) 
Madrid 

M Sea 

Htw Tort M 
Puis 
Tokyo 
Toronto 
Zurich 
I ECU 
1 SDR 




Other Dollar Values ^ 

K2S vA 


Hans-forint 

*nM iS!™*? 3H2V0 

KSi “5! 


Ausfri dHMiS UM 
taMBKi ». >2£ 

BrmBMd .««« 


Mn n»;w» ' Q fi fl Q? 

Cmfctororw 34Z2 151*1 

a5?«2^a esu ag 

Mata*. MS- 10353 


m- 


Berfi.9uat 1398 
Hn. markka 54619 


CWTtOCt 

Mofcpw 

Mon*, ma? 

FULf*B 

PofebzW 

Port escudo 

Kessrobfe 

SamAmd 

SblfrS 


POT* 

7-759 

1J738 

7.5185 

32J2 

3J0 

I6C5S 

5SJ5.D 

3J5 

15U9 


Contact 

S.Kor.*w 

Swod-kw* 

Taw** 

TTuri&flW 

TBjfcsObm 

UtEdAX 

VeH z.boflv- 


WtS 

4.702 

90530 

7.38*4 

2942 

3* AS 
168555. 

U no 

495-25 


LibidWJbor Rates 

Swfs ftwcfl 

DvMar D-Mark Prone Staling Franc Yen ECU 

1 -month 3V*-3w. IVn-lv* 7V» -7V. 3U-3V* Wt-Tta 4H-6W 

3-monfh T7|» TV » - TVS, 3V»s - »*- Y* 4Vfc-JVB 

6-morOh 5*-5**fc 3*0-37* 7Xi-m 35*-3I4 Mta-APi 

1-yeor S%-6 39U-3V* ll*-!** 7*h-7T* 3W-3* *»- V* 4W-4W 

Sowces: Reuters. Unfits Bank. , , , 

Roles appHatlt to Interbank deposits of St mtOon minim am (orequMueaQ. 

Key Money Rates 

Uaflrt stew 
Dtscomrirate 

Prtmondt 

MenUmds 
9 Moy CDs daidn 
iMktayCPMsr* 

34Mth TtaaanrW 
HwrTroowyWI 
1 -yrtrTroerorr b« 

S^oOrTreasarr not 
7^8«r TlMsvy ooto 
KHwIDeemyooto 
30-yoor TrtdWiT howl 
Mwr* Lynch 36-dor RA 


t • T 


% 


Forward Bates 

Omnocy 


— awtoy ^ 

M iivji ;ss 

r tS77B IS75 1 1j892 

PotadStalb* J-®* 3779 IJ756 Wnatrase 

2S2S IS 1— 


iSSL 

DtscmwIrWt 

Colt money 
I^noffiiohifttak 
3-owrth krierbonk 
64MnthMntaok 
10-fcor got) bend 

6W«g 
Lombard rata 
COD money 
HMiifoinfeifcnak 
Wwolh lolertank 
umiuth Motlnmk 
KhverSoad 


Ctoso 

Pro* 

Brittal 


sin ■ 

550 

BtakOounti 

750 

,w> 

SW 

Calewun 

7V» 

5Yj 

5* 

l-aoatb Inlertou* 

7V» 

551 

551 

34sentb lntertwnk 

7U 

551 

551 

Smooth Hotadk 

7*t 

501 

5.01 

IHearGBt 

599 

579 

528 



5.96 

5.9S 

Pnoet 


622 

621 

lotanenitnraK 

110 

627 

626 

Ob money 

3¥» 

533 

422 

j-awHhWmOMk 

314 

651 

659 

3HnoRffi iUwboBk 

3V* 

5.10 

5.10 

6'ooatt) Moboek 

3 9W 



16-rwOAT 

6M 


n* 

TVk 

no 

7H 


3!6 


050 

044. 

054 

055 
054 
2-23 

450 

3.13 

121 

321 

145 

£67 


050 

046 

054 

055 
054 
227 

450 

au 

323 

323 

3.4S 

5.93 


Sources: Reuters. Btaaaoem, MemO 
Lynch, Bankof Tokro-MIfsubliht. 
CewMk Cm& tyoniM- 


Gold 


AJ*. PM. QVge 


Zurich HA 32090 -0.75 

London 32170 32150 +0.10 

Now York 325.10 32430 -4L7D 

U^.doifas per ounce. London offt&H 
OSWS Turfcfr mwl New York opening 
and cfcsfirfl prices, tow VOrt Cwnex 
(Decj 

Sbuo: gevm 








\ -Vr' > 

. , = . -j 




Good Value 
in World 
Bonds 

OifUiu-: v 

Limited 

ipcorpc-rsisd in 
Jersey:. Obannt ;• i Mantis 

3</10 


Go OBLIFLEX 
and Travel Light 

^jj Lombard Odier Mutual Funds 
Steadfast Excellence 



a i 








I < M M)l i> I N I 7‘>N. 
I 1 >'-ii \ u 1 1 < >t>i) k v'v < n 


1-. . .V.I < ll llll Ol III 'i W|. 


x> 


• - ’ Kt*Z- 

V : Ft .-r. 
* ' • • < t / 

■:•••• A-‘V • 

•• Ur 


. 4. • ■ - ■ 




' • - v * -V; 

- 


I \ K«. I V I I’KM Ul (! INK' 


IN S'.MI/l Kl 'Ml. 


Iiii { i * n; 1 ; ' icp ( >:mi u 


< . i,i lU’si'n in irf\ r 


\v,| I MI.N 


l» \.-l )> 1 *n 1.1 SfN.NJ 
| 1 ll UK WC ,|| , \M > 
•.(. I :> < ; > I \ Kll - I I -I IN III 
I N U J I / I li l \ \ I • 
\m» \ r-K ( ' \ 1 *. 

.!'l(l '.Ml >1 
;itimr.i, (« \> :-.1 .i\ .1. ';i ;»1. 
Ilpmi JV.jm -l 1 1 • . 1 : : 

i i.imImi .'i (M > i X < 

1 ] . niL d- lu ( -<i 1 .iiv.nv 
I J.' 1 (inn ’..1 - >v il/v: , 

1,!.: 4i:2- :i :i 


: K. -I ^ > '9 . • !T„ 







: / r~E W 


WES 


-__™. 

’ -• 

fr' ■ V,. - ■% 





PAGE 14 



: The Dow 


30-Year T-Bohd Yielcf_ 




A M J J A S 
1997 


1,0 1 A ' M J J- A S ‘ : 
1997 

"• , •v'-lT.-kiti* : 


NYSE 

NYSE .''.'“s&P^n 
NVSEv/ • -...Can^5 

U.S: r ~~'" Nas&5^ 

AMEX . ; 

■■" ^T SS-lfe- 

. gove^'-.; 
Mexico City” Bofea 


If * ■"'•Ay TWT ■ 






:«Z22A8-v^ 



f«3jfc6& , =$1$ 




INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

Tyson to Buy Hudson Foods 

{\wmi*dlr?Otir Staff Fnwtt DLvuAa moL-** UaTYihuTJPT nroduced at the about $110 million came i 


Caracas _ • • -Cap^^afteEaT 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

Very briefly: 


tmcnuuuul Herald Tribune 


la Argentina, Private Tax Collectors 

BUENOS AIRES (Bloomberg) — .Argentina’s govern- 
ment pushed forward with efforts to reduce widespread tax 
evasion by approving a measure that allows it to hire private 
companies to collect overdue taxes. 

The measure, signed by Economy Minister Roque Fernan- 
dez. is expected to help collect about 2 billion pesos ($2 
billion) of an estimated 9 billion pesos in delinquent taxes. 

The move is the latest in a campaign to reduce evasion that 
bas cut the country ’s potential tax revenue by almost half, the 
tax department estimates. 

Tax superintendent Carlos Silvani, who wrote the measure, 
bas said hiring third parties to collect overdue taxes will hasten 
collection by helping relieve an understaffed legal depart- 
ment. 

• People's Bank said it agreed to buy Norwich Financial 
Cor p. of Connecticut for abou t $1 64 million in cash and stock, 
creating a bank holding company with more than SI 0 billion in 
assets. 

a Saturn Corp. is dropping two production shifts in Spring 
Hill, Tennessee, because of slumping sales for its small car. 
Beginning Friday, the company will eliminate its day shifts on 
Monday and Friday, leaving 10 shifts a week. Sarum sold 
153,713 cars through July 31, down 6.8 percent from a year 
earlier. 

©MasTec Inc. said it asked Spanish labor authorities to 
approve its plan to fire 1,400 union workers at its Sintel SA 
subsidiary. MasTec. which designs and maintains plants for 
phone companies, plans to rehire 1,200 of the workers as 
lower-wage independent contractors or employees of non- 
union divisions of the Spanish unit. 

o A former accountant at a Coca-Cola bottling company in 
Akron, Ohio, who tampered with a batch of the soft dnnk and 
threatened to make the action public if he was not paid off, was 
sentenced to a year in prison. Bloomberg, ap 


Ctardo* by Our Staff Firm Dftwto 

LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas — 
Tyson Foods Inc., the largest 
poultry producer in the United 
States, said Thursday it was ac- 
quiring Hudson Foods, which last 
month retailed 25 million pounds 
of hamburger because of a con- 
tamination scare. 

Tyson said it had agreed to pay 
about $642 million in cash and 
stock for Hudson. The two Arkan- 
sas-based companies are situated 
only a few miles from each other. 

Hudson is the fifth largest U.S.- 
poulay producer. 

“Hudson's probably the last of 
the major producers out there that 
could be bought,” said Leonard 
Teitelbaum, an analyst with Mer- 
rill Lynch & Co. “It's got a great 
brand name . At least it used to.” 

Hudson branched into the raw 
ground beef business only two 
years ago when it opened a pm- 
cessing plant in Columbus, Neb- 


raska. Hamburger produced at the 
plant was linked to an outbreak of E. 
coli contamination in July in Col- 
orado, forcing a nationwide recall. 

The plant is not part of the sale. 
Hudson announced last week it 
had agreed to sell the plant to IBP 
Inc. of Dakota City, Nebraska. 

An IBP spokesman said Thurs- 
day that the Tyson-Hudson deal 
* ‘does not affect our plans’ ’ to buy 
the Hudson plant. 

Tyson has agreed to exchange 
$8.40 in cash and six-tenths of a 
share of its stock for each of Hud- 
son’s 30.25 million shares. Hud- 
son stock closed Wednesday at 
$17.19. Trading in the stock was 
suspended before the stock market 
opened Thursday. 

Hudson Foods* tainted beef 
caused at least 16 people to fall ill. 
Five were hospitalized before the 
nation's largest meat recall ever. 
Mr. Teitelbaum said that of Hud- 
son’s $15 billion in sales, only 


about $110 million came from 
sales of red meat 

After Colorado health inspect- 
ors traced possible E. coli con- 
tamination to the Nebraska Hud- 
son plant, the company recalled 
12,000 pounds of meat in mid- 
August. Within a week, the De- 
partment of Agriculture asked the 
company to broaden the recall to 
25 million pounds. 

The Columbus plant was a ma- 
jor supplier to Burger King, hun- 
dreds of whose outlets were left 
temporarily without meat two 
weekends ago. 

Burger King canceled its con- 
. bract with Hudson, and the com- 
pany, not having a major customer 
for the plant, decided to sell it to 
IBP, which has other major beef 
operations in the Midwest 

The Tyson-Hudson transaction 
is subject to regulatory approval as 
well as to approval by Hudson’s 
shareholders. (AP. Bloomberg) 


Truck Sales in High Gear in U.S. 


By Robyn Meredith 

New York Times Service 

DETROIT — The new Mer- 
cedes-Benz sport utility vehicle has 
not yet reached U.S. showrooms, 
but most dealerships are sold out for 
the rest of this year. The Lincoln 
Navigator, a huge luxury truck, is 
also in short supply. And sales re- 
sults for August show that Amer- 
icans continue to buy more and 
more trucks, with expensive truck 
models among the most popular. 


General Motors Corp. said that its 
sales rose a higher-man -expected 
7.6 percent last month from a year 
ago, with truck sales rising 12 per- 
cent, propelled by minivan sales. 

Chrysler Corp. said its overall 
sales rose 0.5 percent with car sales 
down 1 3.4 percent but truck sales up 
6.8 percent from their record levels 
of a year earlier. Japanese auto- 
makers reported generally strong re- 
sults, partly because their small 
sport utility vehicles sold briskly. 

While the month appears to be 


Shift to Small Issues 

Hits Blue-Chip Shares 


shaping up as particularly strong for 
the industry in general, the trend 
re mains clean more and more light 
trucks, not cars, are cramming the 
roads, with customers lining up to 
buy the newest, largest sport utility 
vehicles. Data show that the per- 
centage of buyers choosing trucks is 
creeping closer and closer to half the 
new autos, up from less than a third 
a decade ago. So far this year. 44.5 
percent of buyers chose a sport util- 
ity vehicle, mini van or pickup 
truck. 


Camped by Our Staff FnM Dispauhn 

NEW YORK — Stocks were 
lower Thursday as investors re- 
newed their drive to swap expens- 
ive shares of big multinational cor- 
porations for smaller issues that 
were seen as better values. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 27.40 points lower, at 
7,867.24. 

Concern that growth in Asian 
economies will slow contributed to 
the decline in big stocks. About half 
the loss was attributable to Cater- 
pillar and Boeing, both of which 
derive more than half their sales 
from non- U.S. markets. 

“We are seeing a rotation away 
from the big-cap growth stocks,' 
said John Maack, a money manager 
at Crabbe-Huson Group in Oregon. 
His fund, which owns smaller 
companies like Lyondell Petro- 
chemical, is up 24.5 percent since 
April 30, outpacing the Dow by 10 
percentage points. “We’ve been in 
die small-cap arena. We’re begin- 
ning to see those flows come in.” 

’Hie broader Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index rose 3.01 points, to 
930.87. The Nasdaq composite in- 
dex, which includes both small and 
large companies, rose 6.40 points, 
to 1,624.64. 

Bond prices edged lower as 
traders awaited the report on un- 
employment in August, due Friday, 
that may suggest die economy is 
growing at a pace that could lead to 
an acceleration of inflation. 

“The employment number may 
set the tone” for bond yields over 
the next several weeks, said John 
Kohn of NationBank’s TradeStreet 
Investment Advisors unit* “The 
economy is still stronger than most 


Dollar Is Mixed Ahead of U.S. Jobs Report 


CampOrd by Our Staff Front Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
mixed against other major curren- 
cies, but fell against the Deutsche 
mark on Thursday on mixed signals 
from the Bundesbank over the di- 
rection of German rates and before a 
U.S. unemployment report that may 
give clues on the direction of in- 
terest rates. 

While the Bundesbank left two 
key interest rates unchanged on 
Thursday, signs of economic pickup 
and comments by bank officials 
raised speculation it might lift rates 
as early as next week. 

“Bundesbank officials are rais- 


ing a cautious finger, suggesting that 
because of recent economic figures, 
they might manipulate interest 
rates,” said Dieter Bluhm. a cur- 
rency trader at Wells Fargo Bank in 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE ~ 

San Francisco. “That's making in- 
vestors a little cautious.” 

The dollar fell to 1.8157 Deutsche 
marks from 1.8185 DM. The dollar 
was at 1.4977 Swiss francs, down 
from 1.5015 francs and at 6.1080 
French francs, down from 6.1206 
francs. The pound was at $1.5832, 
down from S1J860. 


The dollar was at 120.950 yen, up 
from 120.635 yen, but further gains 
were held back by concern that 
U.S.-Japanese trade tension may 
flare up. 

The dollar rose against the yen 
after a U.S. factory orders July report 
suggested that manufacturing may 
grow at a faster pace in coming 
months, fanning talk the Federal Re- 
serve Board might soon raise lending 
rates to rein in growth, traders said. 

Meanwhile, other reports showed 
Japan's trade surplus for the first 20 
days of August expanded sharply. 

The dollar’s gains against the yen 
were tempered after the United 


States and Japan failed to agree on 
measures to bolster access to Jap- 
anese ports, setting the stage for 
Washington to impose penalties. 

“Trade is weighing against dol- 
Lar-yen,” an analyst said. 

Traders are awaiting Friday's Au- 
gust unemployment report for signs 
whether the U.S. economy is grow- 
ing fast enough to spur the Federal 
Reserve Board to raise interest rales. 

Analysts expected die unemploy- 
ment rate to be unchanged at 4.8 
percent and only some 70,000 to 

75.000 jobs created, down from 

3 16.000 in July because of the UPS 

strike. ( AFP. Bloomberg) 


Pe §arii£r, the government reported 

ftatordOTtoU^fectonrauicM 

0 2 percent higher to a record level 

in July, after a big 

earlier, and that shoppers returned 

to the nation s stores in Augist 

signs the economy churned at- a 
brisk pace this summer. 

Separately, large retailers report- 
ed that after a dismal spring and, 
early summer, shoppers snapped up , 
new ai mim n merchandise, espe- 
cially back-to-school supplies. CM- , 
dxen’s clothes and personal com- 
ourers were among the top sellers. , 
*AJso, the Labor Dejarment said 
first-time claims for jobless ben- 
efits edged 2,000 hig her last week . 

U^. STOCKS 

to a seasonally adjusted 326,000. 

The price on the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond was down 2/32 
at 97, with the yield rising to 6.61 
percent from 6.59 percent Wednes- 
day. 

Caterpillar dropped 3 7/16 to 
56% after a Smith Barney analyst, 
cat his investment rating on the 
stock amid concern that overseas _ 
revenue may slow. Asian govern- 
ments are trying to protect their 
currencies by raising interest rates, . 
measures that could eventually 
make it more expensive to finance , 
building projects. ■ 

Ingersoll-Rand dropped, as did 
Chicago Bridge & Iron and Deere. , 
Losses in certain computer-re- 
lated shares prevented the broad ' 
market from gaming further. 

Advanced Micro Devices sank 
after it warned of a third-quarter 
loss due to production problems 
with one of its microprocessor. 
That news helped the rival chip- 
maker Intel gain. ! 

AMD's warning came a day after . 
Gateway 2000 said its earnings.' 
would drop far below estimates be- 
cause personal computes: sales 
failed to meet expectations. But 1 
Gateway recouped on Thursday its 
sharp losses Wednesday. , 

Applied Materials, Dell. Com- 
puter, Adaptec and Sun Microsys- ' 
terns slipped. 

Retailers rose on the August sales 
data. Wal-Mart gained after saying 
that sales at stores open at least a year 
bad gained 7.7 percent; Dayton Hud- 
son said its same-store sales rose 6.1 
percent sending its stock higher. ‘ 
But Sears shares fell despite its 
reporting a 2.8 increase in sales. 
AnnTaylor Stores fell after it said ' 
sales had dropped 22 percent 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


W ' \ i8° o » 

3*- 


pc L ” .j;.* • 
nji^': J- V 1 ' 


’ ^ - • - 

igss.i' 

: '■ 

: r; _ 




; 

1 I 

j 




<sy ' 

'• &■ 

r; : . .. 

_ 

:ise ' 

.yr;* 

Ei: .. ' 




Thursday. 4 


Amsterdam 

-k*' 

. t-: :•* 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most active shores 
up to the dosing an WaH Street. 

The Associated Press 

Stock Sate hjji Low Luted Org* 


l# * '5 

iyi iM* 
'■o k* 
12*. 11 
i2o ir-« 
17»« 17!» 

'?*. IX 

Pi* 5*t 


19 -M 

4V. 

!*>• -w 

10 -I* 

£ ** 
Vo 

R *'* 

lo 7 * Ut 

1% *Vk 

W* 

«v» ■ v» 
2*% -** 


i»4 in 
jm mu 


ww m 

Z”V» 

7V4 Mt 
M 1 
m am 
I T*. 

Sltt 51 
IT* 27 
life lta 
n 

2W. 29> 
» 2h 
mt n>» 
2S*» 2M 

». JV. 

A 1 

l(M *4 

2S>« 24U 

on on. 
1*1 m 

17 14H 


V . V . i 

r. i ■ * 


4. 5. 

in is. iiii 

I# 1 . 111*0 Iffl 



12V) 

P.V 4. 

in ■**» 


$ 

L i 

in 44 

4W» -4* 

25*. -V, 

in .'-4 

2in .n 

25*i -n 

2n 

4 _ 

*i4 -n 

in* -n 

an ,v) 

in .*» 

1M J* 


l> -Vh 

2H -n 
IM* 

3V, .v. 


n 

70. 

ST4 -1* 

Ci| .Ik 

n -u. 

Zl ■<! ■V' 

-h 


4Vk 4 
TO 7*k 
5» SV) 

ii n ion 


low 1CV4 
4H 4h 

St ^ 

in in 

e si 

5* 

a* a 4 

10 

4 M 

an* it 

27k 2W 
M 
SOW 

ii ww now 
cn izn 

21 20W 

37>k 3M4 

» 34V4 

2on itn 
Wk m 
ion in* 
2n m 
m m 

3WI 34*4 
121k TB4 
4*n 40V) 

M 

m am 

15k 15*4 

sn 5*4 

2V. IVk 

ii in 

l*k h 
4*4 4W 
7ii m 
im now 
2fl* 24W 

in in 
ur, ijv* 
UVh 14 
i9o» in, 
>W 2 
5H 5U 
«V4 m 

ion nn 

4H 

7W 
Ilk 

n 

I2W 
7W 

41, 4*4 

15k UW 

m 24 

■vk n 

ikk it. 

(H th 

am mV. 

4k 444 
•Wa W 
6 5*1 

ik H 
104k I0H 
JOVk 2544 
im inn 

7)4 10k 

14k IM 

200 k 20W 

11*4 11*4 


144k 14V, 

**l «V| 

v> 4k 
74k 2*4 

M4 *4) 

wi on 
*7*4. unu 
7 II* 

20*4 20k, 

15*k 1<W 
Ik 7, 
I 1*4 

1444 m 
SV. 5V. 

m Jin 
0*1 48 

m 4V. 

i«k m 

llw iffk 

24«k 27*. 

Ut» ilk 

124k 110k 

ion rm 

n i 

17V) 140k 

»** 29*k 

71* 2W 


15k, I4M, 

Ok mi 


I2h 12 

nm 10 
ii 1 '* in, 
ii“*. in, 


i»k .n 

B *-5 

n .n 

K A 

a. a 

n *v* 

i R & 

in -n 

1W» 4k 

15 *4k 

50k rkk 
94 ,4k 

*V4 
.10 
3744 4* 

21k 

V» Jk 
5w -n 
110k ■» 

W*k -4k 
704, -4, 

3M -Ik 
30*4 -14, 

1W* *W 

m 


B«, .Va 
m -*k 

U, ,44 
*4* 
♦1 

5V. -4k 

24k -*k 

-4k 
,W 
-,4k 
TV* -*k 
1»W ,0k 

2*4* -Vi 
ID *4, 


1VW *4% 

7W ,» 

sn 44 

lilt -<k 

4h -Vk 

7W -44 

l*k 

204 -44 

TlWk ,Vk 


1»*4 .44 

240k 
"I -Vk 

M -*k 

*V) -Vk 

Jt»l »“k 

4V4 -U 

■Wo -*EI 

sn 

h -m 

1W -4* 

2f*t -Vl 

11 "k ,44 

74, ,4, 

in* ■)* 

2004. ., 

1114 -W 

114, .4, 

74k -Y* 

13 »W 

IVk 4k 

104* *>k 

140k ,W 


2H> -Vk 

1544 
tk 
I Ok 

154 -4* 

SVk -Vk 

32*, .V) 

«W ,W 

SVk .4* 

IV, 

W*k -H 

23W -Vi 

1444 

II*. -V. 


TV. 

II -* 
i*v, -*, 


07*, -M 
441 -ft 


12 

in, ,w 

ns -*k 


Indexes 

Dow Jones 

OM* HW LOT IM 

I non 7M&54 7075 J9 7BI7JO 7BC7J4 

TRUK 2712715 29MJM 274153 275046 

UH 234J5 23TM 336-15 33656 -031 

Coop 147036 2477 JO 165716 266736 -7 M 

Standard & Poors 


Most Actives 


MW LOT aou 

Induofttab 1 100141 089^9 1D9064 
Transp. 66610 65666 A60JB 

mama 203.10 200l64 20176 

Finance 107 £7 10475 104.95 

SP 500 935-90 924J7 927.86 

SP100 904J4 89777 89189 


4MW 4S265 
61147 


Nasdaq 


•dHHMI 

□adkiefl 

New HJvb 
M aw Lam 


1501 1751 

1322 1152 

560 506 

3*83 340k 

222 740 

12 « 


290 342 

275 244 

157 164 

730 750 

65 55 

■ 11 


ABeqhonyPwr 
AmPsf Apllnv 
AmFa Porticpf 
Am Fsl ToExMtg 
AmRcfflUr Tr 
Area Bsncshaies 
BanoFstCoipOK. 
QirnlurCarp 
Coral Mtg & Eq 
Equity Res Prop 


9-15 9-30 
9-30 10-27 
9-30 10-31 
9-30 10-27 
9-15 9-30 
9-19 10-1 
9-30 10-15 
9-75 70-15 
9-15 9-30 
9-26 10-10 


wn. rank 

77050 29U 


Nasdaq 


:i3 

43U4 -au 


HI.K Um Inraf QhL 

167599 161777 lgt|l +677 

m im m 

2$4l53 7WU6 2^J0 ,‘p5 

103176 102675 102949 +2.12 


662-26 45*51 66X26 ,126 


66638 34V| 

63661 26M 
62162 4lftl 
62153 194k 
61771 14ft 
51 BIS 20 
50631 57ft 

m gw 

44317 3W 
43*02 45ft 
43479 5Bft 
43324 47V* 


Vft MW 
252MOI8*k 
11W7 6M 
117157 95ft 
72964 17ft 
68788 23ft 
63558 Wk 
54*37 131ft 
53H77 50 
53854 22ft 
43930 78ft 
42908 37V. 

SfflS M) 

38380 39Vk 
^1 14ft 

35854 27k 


Law LOT 

27U 28Vk 
66 ft 67 ft 
35ft 35)4 
2 SVk 26ft 
36*k 40ft 
17ft 19ft 
14Vk )4ft 
25ft 2714 


34ft 36ft 
3Z* k 33ft 
44ft 4SV* 

"a a 


177k lift 
41 41Vk 
93ft 94ft 
85ft im* 
.29 rift 


31ft 3»Vk 
141k 16ft 
25V, 25m. 


Dow Jones Bond 

dm CUo- 

20 Bonds 10184 -0JU 

lOUtnniea 101-55 -029 

10 Industrials 106.12 +020 


Trading Activity 


Vft High Law LOT Ckf. 

23364 IVk 1ft I*» +v* 

226*9 YPVn 92ft 93ft ,*k 

9103 6Vk 6ft. . 6ft -ft. 

662* 3tM 34 ft 3595. +1k 

8318 7Vk 7ft TV* 

§298 an 7*. ii* +ik 

7717 1ft 1ft lftk +*k 

7517 5ft 5*fta 5ft. +Va 

7li2 ft ft. ft 

6485 32ft 3IM 31 


Dividends 

Company Per Ami Roc Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Ho-Yakado b .5248 9-8 

STOCK SPLIT 
Herley Ind 4 tor 3 spliL 
Lflk0*wwFncf2ftirT split 

INCREASED 

Bank West Find 0 -0B 9-17 10-2 

BrownUraFeirts .19 9-19 10-6 

Cdn Imperial Bk a Q JO 9-29 10-28 

REDUCED 

GreenMI Power Q .275 9-17 WO 

INITIAL 

CCA Prison _ J46 9-30 10-15 


Nasdaq 

Mwmura 

DodBwd 
yn^nnwi 
Total mues 
New HKHb 
N ew Lows 

Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amm 

Nasdaq 

InmSOons. 


Company 

FFWCwp 
F5l FiwE-iuBncp 
FW Mutual Subs 
H osJ Funding 
Houslon Ind 
JnconwOmnrtfS 
Johnson ControK 
Lakeriew Fnd 
NYTxEx Inarm 
Nil Austriia excaps 

NflReanyLP, 


OiKxIaLM Q .13 9-10 9< 

PCAlim Q 4)7 9-15 10 

Patrick Ind Q .00 9-15 10 

Pf Income Fd M OS! 9-23 9-: 

Pf Inca Mngmid 

PI InoaOppbrt m .ura v-Z3 9-j 

Pttomwjaa Upjohn Q 37 10-7 11 

Psydvimcdics 0 .0! 9-15 9-j 

Saathwesf Bnqi 
Stanhamelnc 
ThoroaB Betts 

Tianscontl Rliy 
United Wl Svcs 
Walbrocorp 
World PwHSws 
(Monwfc I wq ipn a l ui ale amounl per 
sbore/ADR; g-poraUein Canadan tands. 
m-aianthhi; q-qwmty; s^«iih«bwbI 




179T 710* 

1592 MIS 

7001 161* 

5470 5717 

165 376 

50 39 


559J2 668.76 
2482 3571 
625J7 65X52 


Per Anri Rec Pay 

0 .18 9-15 9-30 

O JJ7 9-12 9-26 
O .05 9-17 10-8 
Q 24 7-12 9-23 
Q J7S 11-14 12-10 
Q .10 9-15 M0 

□ 215 9-10 9-30 

Q .0625 9-18 10-2 
M .053 9-1 S 10-1 
Q -523 9-15 MO 
Q .10 9-15 9-30 
O .14 9-16 10-1 
Q .13 9-10 9-30 
Q 4)7 9-15 10-7 
Q .00 9-15 10-3 
M j087 9-23 9-30 
M .087 9-23 9 30 

M .073 9-23 9-30 
Q 27 10-7 11 3 
O .02 9-15 9-30 

□ J* 9-17 10-1 

0 28 9-15 10-1 

Q 28 9-15 10-1 
Q .07 9-15 9 30 
Q .12 9-10 9 24 
O .10 9-30 10-31 

a ms 9-19 10-2 


i*n li-t 

«■ '* 


stock Tables Explained 

Sates Figures are unofficial Yearly Ntfte and laws ififled the pnwious 52 weeks plus the current 
we*JLlxifw»1t»la«tiw*^ day. When a spBmaxkdwidend amounting to 25poramtarmon? 
lias Seen paid, the wars WqMot range and fflridend are shorn toggrww flocks only. Urtess 
□menrfce noted rates ofdMdends ore annual dfebursenw* based on toe krtei dedaraSon. 
a - Wvidend also extra ts).b- annual rate of dividend ptvs stock dividend c- liquidating 
dividend « ■ PE exceeds 99.dd - ailed, d - new yearly km. dd - lass in hie kali ! months, 
e • dvidend dedored or paid in preceding 12 months, f- annual rate, incroawd an lost 
deda ration, g - dMdend In Canadian tunas, subiect to iyv non-residence lax ■ - divniend 
dedared after split -up or stock dividend. ) - dividend paid this year.omined, deferred, or no 
action taken at briesl dividend meeting, k • drfdend dedared or paid this year- an 
accumukritve Issue wttti iftridends in arrears, m- onnual rate, reduced on last dedaretton 
n- new issue m hie past 52 weeks. The high-low range begins wtth Ihe start of tradmg. 
nd- nexttRry deBvery. p - initial dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - price-earnings ratio, 
q - ctased-end mutual ftmd. r- dividend declared or paid in preceding 1 2 monfta. plus stack 
reyWawd. s - stow spa. Dividend begins wfth dote of spH. sts- sales. 1- dividend paid in 

sloe* In preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on at -dividend or ex-distribufian date- 

u- new yearly high, v- irad&ng halted- vi - in bankruptcy orracciveiship or being leonianircd 
undenhe Bankruptcy Act Or securities assumed by such companies, wd- when distributed, 
wl - when issued/ wvt - with warrants, x - ex-dividend or ex-rig hK nfis - ex-drsHbulkm. 
iw- irittiaul warrants. y- ex-dividend and sates in lull, yid- yield, r • sales in lull. 


Sept. 4, 1997 

l-Ugh LOW Luted Chge Opild 

Grains 

CORK (C80TJ 

5.000 bu mWmom- cents per bushel 
Sep 97 270 267 270 undv 16.110 

Dee 97 270V- 268 269ft -2 191100 

Mar78 279ft 276V, 27BV, -2 <9,258 

May 78 284 281 ft 283ft -1ft 12*36 

Jl4 78 287 284ft 286ft -1ft 17.972 

Sep 78 275 273ft 275 +1 1-530 

Dec98 273ft OTM 273 unctL 11.654 

Esl sates 412000 Weds sales 49,708 
Weds open in 301 390l up 616 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CflOTJ 
100 tons- dollars per Ion 

» 77 275-30 26580 Z7150 ,530 11,183 

97 23630 229.70 23430 + 2.60 22,273 

Dec 97 21«X0 21250 21730 +210 42804 

Jan 98 21250 20830 21130 +130 9,912 

Mar 98 70660 20100 205-50 +1.70 9,510 

May 98 20530 20150 20280 +J.10 7360 

EsL rate, 36000 Wads sates 373*0 
Weds open W 109^01. oft 903 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

60,000 ft s- cents peril) 

Sep 97 2294 2264 2272 -0.08 1237 

0*397 2110 2277 2287 -am 2A079 

Dec 97 2349 73.11 2338 -002 40349 

Jan 98 2168 2330 2349 *001 11798 

Mflr98 23.93 2335 2177 + 0.03 7,407 

May 98 7<05 2330 23*6 +0.0* 2687 

Esl. sates 2tL0Cia Weds solos 29399 
Wetfs open ml 89,122 up 14 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

MOO bu minimum- certs per bushel 
Sep 97 494ft 679 693ft ,9ft 7,772 

No* 97 648 636 643ft +lft 89.025 

Jan 98 649ft 639 645* +1*4 21,085 

Mar 98 657 647 653ft +* 8.763 

May 98 662ft 654 657 -1 A588 

Est. sales 54000 Weds sales 52129 
Weds ooen ml 142437. off 249 

WHEAT (CSOD 

LOOO bu mmbninn- certs per bushel 

Sep 97 376 378ft I71>» -3 1672 

Dec 97 371 '2 385 MeV, -31* 68384 

Mar 98 403 3*7 399 -3ft 22047 

May 98 eOS 379ft 600ft -41* 3JO* 

Esl. hum 2i£KXJ Weds, rales 72425 

weds open uu 107.407, up 51 


Livestock 

CATTLE ICMER) 

40.000 lbs.- eerrts per Eb. 

0C197 67 JO 67.17 4722 4J0 

Dec 97 66 62 6ft 77 68.82 -a*S 

Peb98 7215 7142 71.45 -0 57 

Apr08 7JJ0 7X67 7167 4145 

Jun 90 70.75 7020 70.25 -042 

Auq 98 70A1 70 05 7807 4L72 

EsL sales 1 6.68* Weds soles 11 J04 
Weds open mi 48874 up 780 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMEIO 

50.000 lbs . Ctms per lb 

5ep9 7 79 8S 79.10 79 15 -0 40 

Od97 79 80 78 « 7H.95 -0.40 

No* 97 B0 75 79 90 79.95 4L32 

Jan 98 8150 80.70 80 72 -0.45 

Mar 98 81 10 KL50 BO-55 4L32 

Apr 96 81.05 «LS7 80 57 4L27 

Esl srtes 2287 iModk seies 2707 
Weds open ml 19.110. oh 1.930 

HOGS-Ltn ICMER) 

40.000 lbs.- cenls per to 

Del 97 71 M 70.15 70.n -1.40 

Dec 97 4855 *700 67 JO 1.35 

Feb 98 67 JO 65J5 66.05 -1 32 

Apr 98 63 JO 61.95 41 9S -1.20 

JunOB 67 BO 6650 66.77 -IJ 12 

Est. soles 8.«75 Wed, sates &380 
Wcdk open Ini 32.T4& up IBB 

PORK BELUE5 (CMERJ 
*0.000 IBs., eonh per lb. 

Feb 98 *6.97 67.77 -085 

Mar 98 MOO 46.90 67.70 0.70 

Moy9B 6880 r.785 67.55 -125 

Esl sates 2.736 Wop's sates 1.1 18 
Weds open in} 4.399. up -O 

Food 

COCOA INCSE] 

10 me Inr; ions- s per ton 
5ep97 1*91 1*74 1691 +71 

0«97 WI5 1677 1710 *21 

MorW 1742 1707 1740 *73 

Moyre )759 1743 1757 + 77 

Jul 98 1 774 17*2 1774 * 72 

Est sates 7 184 -/.Dds sates 6.025 
Woos open mi roacra up 814 

COFFEE C (NC5E) 

37^00 fes.- cents per lb. 

Sep 97 212.00 199J5 2ia» ,9.00 
Dec 97 10+ DO 18225 195.00 ,550 
Atar9B 175 50 1A5S0 17570 ,470 
Mo, 98 168.75 16100 168.75 <3 75 
JUl 9S 1(3 10 I57C>1 16310 >3*0 
Esl. sales 10,135 Weds sates 9*075 
Wed's open ml 21.154. op -W 

JUCARWORLO I r MCSEI 
1 1 2000 Rn.- cents p« lb. 

0c*97 11*5 Mil 11.61 ,001 

Mar 98 mu ||9* 1200 -007 

May 98 1700 1194 11.98 inch 

Esl sates UOSSHWds rates 11^79 
Weds open ml 201401 up 653 


Vflgh Low LatesJ Qujo Oplnt 


ORANGE JUICE (NCTN7 
1SM00 to*.- cents par lb. 

Sep 97 6940 68-75 68JS +0J5 \M> 

No* 97 71.25 69 JO 69 JO -0.15 17^34 

Jan 98 7400 7235 7155 -005 7,934 
MOT 98 76J0 7530 75.40 4L20 5.244 

Est. sales H A Weds sales 1,787 
WWs opan ini 31584 off 183 

Metals 

COLD tNCMX) 

100 hoy ct- dollars por bay at 
Sep 97 321.70 -060 46 

Oct 97 32270 321.90 322*60 -0.70 15,977 

Nc» 97 32338 -0.70 

Dec 97 325J0 32340 32430 -0.70 107^81 

Feb 98 326.90 32530 32400 -0.70 15433 

Aprra 32BJ0 327 JO 327 JO -070 5394 
Jim 98 33000 32880 32980 -070 0389 
EsL aria 22800 Wedx sales 23400 
Weds open Inf 197,1*4 up 1.296 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

25800 lbs.- carts per lb. 

Sep 97 97.90 9570 949S 4L20 4J71 

Ocl 97 98.00 9470 9780 -015 2479 

Nov 97 98J0 9490 98.15 +005 1851 

Dec 97 98J» 9470 9785 -005 21745 

Jan *8 97.85 -005 782 

Feb 98 9780 unchL 747 

Mar 98 *785 9460 9785 UDCh. 1291 

Apr 98 9780 9780 9780 ^LIO 540 

May 98 9715 imffl. 1877 

Ed. sates 9800 Weds sates 9,242 
Wmfs open bit 44510, aft 358 

SILVER (NCMX) 

5000 hay oz.- cents per hoy is. 

Sep 97 46680 46080 4*480 ,040 1415 

0d97 46470 +OJO 7B 

NOT 97 470.10 +0J0 

Dec 97 47500 46550 471.00 ,DL30 52450 

Mar 98 480.00 47550 477.70 , 0.10 11.674 

May 98 481.70 -0.20 1209 

Esl. sales 1 1000 Weds salu 12405 
Weds open Ini 77431 up 249 

PLATINUM DIMER) 

50 troy 02.- daAars par hay ol 
O ct 97 420.00 41100 41420 , 650 9J50 

Jan 98 40950 404.50 409.20 +450 7,918 

Apr 98 405.20 +450 423 

Esl sales N A. Weds sates ZOO* 

W«ds open Ini 11192. up 1*7 

Close PievkHK 

LONDON METALS ILME) 

Dalian per inefitc ton 
AtowHhnm (Hlah Grade) 

Spat I SB' 80 158880 156780 IS6&80 

Forward 1612.00 141100 159580 15*400 

Copper Cathodes (Mgk Grade) 

Wf 7142ft 2186ft 2131ft 7131ft 

Fawn'd 215180 215280 2138ft 2139ft 


Spol 63000 63180 

Forwrrd 64400 64400 

tbchei 

Spot 658580 65*800 
Forward *49080 66*580 

Tta 

Spot 538580 539080 
Frtward 5430.00 50580 
nee {Special Ugh Grade) 
Spot 163780 144080 
Fanmrd 1470 00 147180 


631ft 632ft 

64*00 44780 


660080 661080 
6705.00 6715.00 


535000 535580 
540580 541000 


1673.00 167400 
148880 148980 


High Low dose Chge OpM 

Financial 
UST8IU5 (CMERJ 
SI manor), frts Of 100 pel 
Sop 97 75.01 94.99 9581 Uiveh. 5.&OT 

Dec 97 9484 9483 9483 undv 2853 

Mar W 9481 9*80 9481 ,0.03 1869 

Ell solos 667 Weds sales 1,280 
Wed's open bit 9802. elf 704 

S YR TREASURY (CBOT) 
tlOOOOd prat- pis & 44HI& Of 100 pd 
s^97 106-53 106-46 106-48 03 49877 

Dec 97 106-33 106-25 106-78 - 03 134767 

Esl softs 81800 Weds sates 818*0 
Wed* open nl 716346 off 1,802 

10 YB TREASURY (CflOT) 

1100800 prte- pis & 32nds of 100 pd 
Sw97 W Or lOT-oo f 094)4 -or 1 71.121 

£*97 108-28 10870 10825 tmdi 261,110 
Marre 10815 10814 10814 undv 1753 
EsJ-sotes 72.1 11 W«h scan 235.807 
X'tetf* open Inf 30i»i off Jl 804 

US TREASURY BONDS WBOT1 
i 8 »■ 32nds or 100 pd) 

S*p97 113-16 1 13-04 LIU I undl. 105849 

JJ3-0S 112-23 112-3) undv 3718*4 

Marre 112-24 112-16 112-21 undL n , ** 1 

J"" 8 * 112-08 un*. 2^39 

isr. Idas 7*0000 w«r» sates 311.153 
Wed* open M S9A937. off 1,3*7 

LONG GILT (UFFE) 

CSLOOO - p|] 4. 37ndS rt 100 pel 
5cp97 115-04 114-28 115-04 +04)1 44337 
Dec 97 114 27 114-18 114 23 ,04)1 139,770 
Esl. sates 49827. Pro* sales 68491 
Pro* open In): 185.107 all 8J03 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFEI 

DM750800- pfsol 100 pd 

Sep 97 102.47 10115 102J7 ,0 07 

Dee 97 10154 10125 101.47 .00* 186868 

Marre NT NT 10087 *005 200.122 

EsT sates 260338 Piev. sates: 77AI52 

Pro* open nl 781122 OH 9.976 


Hlgti Law Latest Chgo Optat 

10- YEAH FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIFI 
FFSOOOOO - pis aflOO pd 
Sep 97 12990 129 JO 12982 +082 157.747 
1 Dee 97 9384 9856 9378 +082 3L286 

1 Mar 98 9&00 98.00 98.18 + 02)2 3 

! EsL sates: 174.701 
1 Open InU 1892)36 up HV686. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFE3 
1TL 200 mMan . pis of 100 ipd 
Sep 97 137.95 136J4 13771 +081 33246 

Dec 97 10985 108iH 10986 +027 93884 
Mar9B N.T. NLT. HJ980 +027 131730 
Esl. kMe 94801. Pnrv.sdei: 13A839 
Prex. atm Intj 13a 730 up 1.933 

LIBOR 1 -MO NTH (CMER) 

S3 mlfflon- pis of 100 pd. 

Sep 97 94J6 9434 9425 «ldL 14366 

Od 97 9421 9421 9422 unck &907 

Nov 97 9427 9426 9427 undl. 10.937 

Est. arias 7,965 Wetfs soles MIS 
Wetfs open tot 42,715) up 113 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI mJOon-phof lOOpd, 

Sep 97 9427 9425 9426 UDCh. 447,700 

Od 97 9418 9417 9418 undL 7820 

Dec 97 9409 9407 9408 -081 515,238 

Mor9a 9401 93.98 9400 inch. 357.126 

JunTO 9190 9387 9389 -081 273870 

Sep 98 93.80 93.77 93J9 4381 218700 

Dec 98 9348 9385 9167 -081 1B&973 

Mar« 9167 9X62 9X65 inch- 134201 
Jim 99 9X61 9X58 9160 -081 106)573 

Sep 99 9X57 9154 9X56 -081 86)524 

Dec 99 9X58 9X47 9X49 4181 7X391 

Mar 00 9X50 9147 9349 -081 64*55 

EsL sates 302878 Wetfs sates 26*247 
Wads open Inf 2800511 off 1X440 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62500 pound! I par pound 

Sep 97 1.5880 12784 128224)8020 41722 

Dec 97 12840 12722 12764-08018 6185 

Mar9B 12700-08018 218 

Esl. sates 7.945 Weds Mites 10666 

Wetfs open M 50124) up 433 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

lOOOOO dollars. I per Cdn. <flr 

Sep 97 .7233 .7220 .7226-08806 48.776 

Dec 97 .7269 .7257 J762 -08006 1X198 

Marre .7795 .7285 7291-00006 749 

Esl. sates 0795 Wetfs sates 12432 

Wetfs open Irt 61,999, off 758 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

12X000 marts. S per mark 
Sep 97 2531 2480 2508+08012 91,107 

Dec 97 2552 2515 2541+00013 1X775 

Mar98 2557 255* 2573*00014 1,040 

Est sates 32824 Wetfs soles 30016 
Wetfs opon M 108491. aH l.iu 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1X5 miUon yen. 5 per 100 yen 

5ep97 8326 .8245 8267 -0JW09 96215 

Dec 97 M0 .8354 8375-O.OOOV 14,937 

Mar 98 8488 -00009 603 

Ed. sates 34436 Weds sates 30M3S 

Wads open Ini 112064 up 1,911 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

125800 bones. Sperhnnc 

Sep 97 2696 2453 2683+08016 48)266 

Dec 97 2765 .6728 2754,0.0016 JL417 

Marre 2024+08016 1061 

Esf. sate f£428 Weds sates 11,733 
Weds open tot 54954 off 181 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

5OCLQQ0 DOTtNL £ BMP DMA 

Sap 97 .12870 .12740 .13767 .00319 19,954 
Dec 97 .12315 .12265 .12287-00319 14296 
Morn .11880 .11810 .11817 - 00369 4905 

Esl. sates 1481 Wotfs sates 5251 
Wedn Open H 4X22X off 1A53 

1-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

ESOftOM pfs Of lOOpd 

Sep 97 9X74 9X77 92 73 -001 101259 

Dec 97 9221 9327 9229 — 0.01 129234 

Mar 9# 9158 922S 9XS8 Undl. 107,280 

ter) 98 9162 W59 9221 -081 74474 

Sop 98 9X69 9X67 9228 -001 57254 

Deere 93.78 9176 9X77 -002 51239 

MarW 92.85 9X82 9284 -0 02 4X498 

Esl. sales: 61849. Prov. sateii 80895 
Pro*, open M.. *69.549 rtf im 

3-MONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

DM1 «Won ■ pladlMpd 

?« * 0J1 2,8jn « 

Od97 N.T. N.T. 9658 t08| 1,976 

NOT 97 NT. N.T 9653 +081 400 

DOC 97 9446 9*47 9625 +0.02 184230 

Marre 9&JQ 04*3 ^ 

96-06 +00J 214816 

SSototS 9S ' £1 ,S M16 

,S - 5B 90.(0 161237 

MW 99 9521 95 J7 9559 ^181 134,908 

Esl. aries: 132,189 Prov. sain: 1B*J88 
PICT open tot.. 1,6*4176 up 992 

3- MO NTH PI80R (MATIFI 
FFSmNtan pfi «( loupa 
SreW re-ST 9*26 76 J7 , 081 51530 , 

DeC97 96J9 4*.36 *1 59 , 082 1 

Marre 96.74 *621 9423,001 29507 

Junre 96.07 96.04 94.07 , 081 2X6S4 

5cp9* 95.W 9587 9589 *001 25582 

Esl sates 71* 45 

Dpcn tot -747.785 ofl 965. i— 

] -MO NTH EUROUHA (UFFE) 

ITL * roUQrti - ph rt log pa ' 

5*p97 *119 9117 *XIB —OD2 wn , 

Oec97 9359 9352 9356 ^002 SS , 

Marre 9401 9392 9J98 UnS wm 


High Law Hted Chgo OpM,; 

Jlffl98 94X1 9423 9458 (Inch. 47,287 , J 

Sto>98 9452 9441 944 +081 34538 ' 

Dec98 9443 9451 9458 +081 33527". 
EM. sales: 69401 Pnv. srtK J98S7 
Prav. open Wj 386)880 ap 1481 ft 

■ . ■ —.4 

Industrials "i 

cotton zMcno »•: 

9M®a»».- certs parto. * 

Oct W 7X10 7X30 7X93 +053 4>95B 7 

Dk97 7X25 7X50 7X40 +052 4X423 ■ 

Marre 7455 7X80 7440 +05) 1X454 

May 98 7585 7455 7490 +058 4972 \ 

EsL sales NJLWwfs sates 8563 
Weds open W 8X211 up 4J9 - ; 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

4X000 gab certs par gal 

Od97 5X53 5M 5X54 -081 4M54 ■ 

No* W 5450 5165 53J3 0.70 21,912 

Dec97 55.70 5455 5493 055 21,970 

Jan re 5545 5573 55.73 060 2X512", 

Feb 98 5680 5688 5688 055 10854- 

Mar9B 5675 5548 5S48 045 0200 J 

Esl sates 24035 Wetfs sates 17,974 
Wetfs open M145.178, rtf 2862 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1800 bbL- doBm per bM. 

Od»7 1949 1976 1940 071 100752 • 

NOT re 1979 19 JO 1942 022 49893 

Dec97 1944 1958 1941 031 5X021 

Jrti« 19.90 1946 1946 020 30523 ' 

1947 (947 1947 019 15097 . 

MarW 1986 1948 1948 018 10186 “ 

Est sates 77492 Wetfs sates 6X552 
Wetfs oprti tot 4Q&534 off 899 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

II B800 am Mu’s. S par mm Me 
OdW X790 1670 2477 0.130 57J76 . 

No»re 2885 2JOO X808 0117 22497 

DecW 3818 1900 2711 0104 22849 ' 

J«W 3820 X904 X913 0102 23729 

JWiW 1739 X645 2445 0095 10776-/ 

MrtOT 1485 1390 2390 0095 1O3S0 • 

Estsoles 40219 Wetfs sates 40933 
Wetfs open tot 210457, up 786 

UNLOADED GAS0UNE (NMER) 

428W grt, cents par gal 

Odre 6940 5940 5952 -243 40333 v 

Nov 97 58 JO 5070 56.91 -145 10091 . ' 

Deere 57.15 S6.I0 5676 -1.05 14165.7 

Jmw 5680 56.16 Ss.16 097 1X136 : 

Fed 5735 5646 5*46 097 0461 

EAsrtOT 34895 Wetfs sales 34458 ", 

Wetfs open W 10X540, up 17 ‘ 

GASOIL a PEI 

U8.MhCTpw-fflrtic tan -lots aflOO Im 

t«8S 16375 -050 1X693 . 
Od re 16780 165110 16580 -075 21,923 ", 
Ncvre 16980 16780 16715 -0.75 11894 ’ I 
Dec97 17075 169X5 169.25 -050 14206 ■' 
Jrtire 17X25 17075 170 JO -050 10203 
Feb 98 17280 17X80 170JS -050 6895 ' 

Marre 16915 16915 169J0 —050 2.815 

ESL sates: 11,995. Pt». totes : 1X991 
Prov. Open W_ 91^467 off 384 

BRENT OILflPE) 

JJ^rifrilara per barrel - toll of 1800 bamuls 

Od97 1&« 1814 1816 -Oil 64979 * 
NOT97 1840 1838 1889 +0.10 34077 

Deere 1070 1850 1B51 -009 20M 

£** 1X76 1856 1856 -008 T<v446 

Fsb98 1812 1858 185B —a Or 4fs? 

MOT98 1842 185* lOB iSm aju . . 

Eri- idhe*: 37800 . Prev. sates : VLW 1 ‘ 

Pict. Open tot: 159830 up 1531 

Stock Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMERJ 

jW I n KMX 

D«re 9«10 WJS tijo ’Sqm 

MarW 9S5.J0 953J0 W5.10 +7^ ^ . 
EsLsatei n a. Wetfs sates 105848 
Wetfs open Irt 210149, up X168 

F«E IM (UFFE) 

{25»erlnde*prtni 

SiV 4,5410 50130 +1X0 64601 

m£m 5S 4 - 5 ,i7j iiua 

Mm° 8 5093 0 50910 51168 +188 i'iS 
EkL sates; 9^sx Prov, srtex ijjjs 
P ro*, open InL 77.744 oft 822 

CAC4B (MATIF) 

PF700 po* man* prtpf 

o3re SloSKxm? i 

g«re fS& ;b . 

JreiO 29798 29838 +108 *«?»■' 

Esl soles: 19511. ,a,3 ° 

°«nlnl.; 68)492 Oft 680. 


Commodity indexes 


Moody's 

Reuters 

DJ.Fufures 

CRB 


“ 24347 


Banohok 




Bombay 


. -- ■ 
/p r. 


Sf 1 ** mir 

tT’.h.v i,, n J„, 




_ n TRrftTTNF FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5. 1997 
INTERNATIONAL hf«ALD TRIBUNES 

n -nr» 


PAGE 15 


ft 


Elf Aquitaine Profit 
Soared 48 % in Half 
As Oil Prices Climb 



Cumfklftt fn Our Sutf Fmm PajiaHm 

PARIS — Elf Aquitaine S A said 
Thursday that first-half net profit 
rose 48 percent because of high oil 
prices, the stronger dollar and im- 
proved productivity. 

Net profit rose 10 5.26 billion 
francs ($859.4 million t from 3.56 
billion francs a year earlier. Ner 
profit was lifted by a 342 million 
franc exceptional gain from the sale 
J-. of stakes in such oil-related corapa- 
• / nies as Technip and ErameL 

Without the exceptional gain, net 
profit would have been up 38 per- 
cent at 4.92 billion francs, still high- 
er than the 35 percent growth fore- 
cast by the chairman, Philippe 
Jaffne. in May. 

Sales climbed 13 percent to 12S.4 
billion. 

“A little more than half” of the 
profit rise was because of the rise in 
oil prices and the stronger dollar. Elf 
said. “Improved productivity and 
increased business account for the 
other half." 

The higher profit comes amid 
srrong earnings growth for oil 
companies around ihe world. On 
Wednesday, Total S A, France’s No. 
2 oil company, said first-half profit 
surged 51 percent to 3. 98 billion 
' J francs, also surpassing analysts’ ex- 
’ pectarions. 

"These are good results," said 
Veronique Gomez, a fend manager 
at Jean-Pierre Pinatton in Paris, 
which oversees $700 million in 
equities. _ 

"Elf has done a great job" of 
Finding oil recently, she said, “and I 
think, that earnings will show that in 
the future. I'm not about to sell my 
shares." 

Elf shares rose 29 francs, or 
nearly 4 percent, to 760 francs in 


Paris 


rails after Salomon Brothers 
brokerage reiterated ita ’’buy" rat- 
ing on the stock. Share prices in Elf 
climbed nearly 61 percent this 
year. 

Some analysis warned, however, 
that growth in the second half of the 
year might not be as strong as in the 
first. ( AFP. Bloomberg ) 

■ Carrefour Profit Falls 34% 

Carrefour SA said first-half net 
profit fell 34 percent amid sluggish 
consumer spending in Europe "and 
Latin America, news agencies re- 
ported. 

France ’-s biggest publicly traded 
retailer said net profit declined to 
1.41 billion francs from 2.15 billion 
francs a year earlier. The year-ago 
figure included a 936 million franc 
gain from the sale of the Price- 
Costco subsidiary. Excluding that 
gain, the supermarket group’s first-. 

naif profit rose 17 percent. 

Sales climbed to 79.13 billion 
francs from 72.48 billion. 

Carrefour’s chief executive. 
Daniel Bernard, said a proposed in- 
crease in the French corporate lax 
rare to 41.6 percent from 36.6 per- 
cent will cost the company more 
than 100 million francs this year. 

Promodes SA this week made a 
takeover bid for the retailers Casino 
S A and Rallye S A. while Casino on 
Thursday announced the purchase 
of two other retailers. If Promodes is 
successful, it would supplant Car- 
refour as France’s largest retailer. 

Mr. Bernard said Carrefour wants 
to acquire 100 percent of Cora, a 
supermarket chain in which it bought 
42 percent earlier this year for 3 
hill in n francs. The rest of Cora is held 
by the Bouriez family, which has 
resisted selling- (AFX. Bloomberg) 


Backing 

JL — * O 

Central Banker Res, ales Support for Starting En, a on Torn: 

however, let 


Ob' Sutt F™> £*¥■*■ to 

FRANKFURT — Hans Tiet- 
meyer, president of the Bundes- 
bank, moved Thursday to silence 
the heated debate on the merits or 
delaying Europe’s single cur- 
rency. denying that he had called 
for a larer start to the project. 

Mr. Tietmeyer had said earlier, 
in an interview with the newspaper 
Die Woche, “I simply cannot 
agree with some arguments I have 
heard recently that if the euro is 
delayed the sky^over Europe 
would crash down.” 

The centra] banker’s comments 
were widely interpreted as open- 
ing a debate on a subject so far 
taboo among Germany's leader- 
ship — the wisdom of a controlled 
delay in the start of monetary un- 
ion if key countries do not qualify 

for entry. . _ , 

In a statement issued Thursday. 
Mr. Tietmeyer made it clear that he 
had not intended his remarks to be 
seen 35 3 coll for 3 d&lsy The 


-sod Jan. 1. 1999. launrhing 
bf die single European currency. 

"My statements are clearly not 

a plea for a delay in the start ot 
monetary- union," Mr, Tietmeyer 
said. "It is much more the case that 
I firmly declined to give the 
Bundesbank’s position on this and 
said that a discussion of delay was 
not appropriate at the moment. 

* 'The interview merely points to 
the dubious nature of the one-sided 
economic arguments ^ 
raised." he added- Such argu- 
ments. in my view, do not promote 
confidence in the future of the 
common European currency. 

In a transcript of a television 
interview on Thursday. Mr. Tiet- 
mever said. "I am a supporter of 
the' euro, and I am above all a 
supporter of a stable euro. 

He also said that the timetable 
for the euro’s introduction, as laid 
down in the Maastricht treaty, 

should be adhered to. 

Mr. Tietmeyer s remarks to the 


weekly newspaper, however, led 
to reaffirmations from other na- 
tions that monetary union would 
go ahead as planned. 

Finance Minister Antonio Sou- 
sa Franco of Portugal said that any 
delay would be "politically dis- 
astrous" and that it would be 
doubly wrong if a postponement 
were engineered to give some 
countries a better chance at par- 
ticipating. 

In Brussels, a European Parlia- 
ment subcommittee said European 
finance ministers must put an end 
to talk of a delay by reaffirming 
their commitment to the project at 
their informal meeting next week 
in Mondorf. Luxembourg. 

"We need a really clear mes- 
sage from ministers that the 
timetable for the euro will be fully 
respected," said Christa Randzio- 
Plath, head of the monetary panel. 
"Talk of delaying the euro is dam- 
aging Europe's best interests. 

^ “ ( Reuters. AFP ) 


.Frankfurt 

DAX 



Copenhagen SpeKMattet 



Madrid 

Milan 


Stock Exchange 

M1BTEL 


585/79 587-27 

14628 


Paris 


CftC40 


2,926199 2.917.92 


Stockholm SX 16 


3,338.73 3^51-34 -0.35 


Vienna 


ATX 


1394.02 1.378.06 *1-16 


Zurich 


SPI 


3.525.04 3^24.01 +0-03 


Source: Telekurs 


Very briefly: 


Psion Profit Off as Old Model Ends 

. . . _ _ j rVi„ «tf>ri^<; 5 to 40,001 


C.iH^lrJ to Um SUtt F«m PlVU, Ara 

LONDON — Psion PLC. the 
British maker of hand-held com- 
puters. said Thursday that first-halt 
profit fell 35 percent as consumers 
delayed buying its products until 
new models were introduced. Jt also 
warned that full-year profit would 

decline. .... 

Net income was £2.65 million 
($4.2 million), down from £4.1 mil- 
lion in the fust of half 1996. Psion s 
sales rose to £64.4 million from 
£53.7 million. 

While Psion's new Senes 3 has 
received rave reviews since its in- 
troduction in June and demand out- 


strips supply. Psion’s industry lead- 
ership has come under attack as 
computer makers such as Compaq 
Computer Corp. and Hewlett-Pack- 
ard Co. introduced hand-held com- 
puters using Microsoft Corp. s Win- 
dows CE operating system. 

But investors banked on pros- 
pects for solid profit growth next 
year, and Psion’s shares closed up 
10 pence at 337.5. 

The Series 5. which starts at £440, 
is based on a more advanced 32-bit 
technology. It features a laptop- 
style keyboard and a touch- sen siuvg 
screen, and it records sound. 

Psion said it would increase pro- 


duction of the Series 5 to 40,000 
units a month bv October or Novem- 
ber, and will hire subcontractors to 
bolster production further it 

needed. . . 

“Ii's not a production problem, 
it’s a demand problem, and that s a 
very nice problem to have, said 

David Potter, Psion chairman. 

Although the popularity of the 
Series 5 will help Psion accelerate 
sales growth, the company said full- 
year profit will fall short of last 
year's figure because of the rising 
bound and slowing sales of the earli- 
er-generation Series 3 unit. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


.Suez Lronnaise des Eaux's director- general Guy de 
Panafieu, resigned to become chairman ot Groupe Bull SA, 
France’s largest computer company. 

• Roval Ahold NV*s second-quarter net surged a greaier- 

SJSW- 

XchS|bt C S?Sp &ShoJ 

rose 48.6 percent, to 11 .6 billion guilders. 

50 pfennigs. In addition, the number for inouiries will "be 
SlfSSfc to 11833 from 01188; foreign mquu.es will be 

1 1834, not 001 18. _ , 

S{ = 

closed-end«l fond would target small investors. 
c Bloomberg. Reuters 



WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Close Ptw. 


High Low Close Pm. 


High Low dose **rev- 


Thursday Sept. 4 

Prices In local currencies. 
Telekurs 

High Low Close Prw. 


Amsterdam 


ABN- AMRO 

Aegon 

Ahold 

Abo Nobel 

Boon Co. 

BotsWesscw 

CSMcm 

DonttschePet 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Portia Aroer 

Gentries 

G-BrOCCVO 

Hagemeyer 
Hemeten 


AEXMHcmir 

Previous: 92L41 

4280 41.50 42J0 4110 
140.20 155 150.90 157 

v. tfl 5430 S&AO 5440 
33070 325.50 32750 331 

12050 123 124 1293B 

35.10 34.40 35 35.10 

93.40 9250 9150 » 

112 109.10 111 J11-W 

19701 191 192 19750 

3256 3150 32.10 3160 

8020 86* W “5 

6350 6250 ,63 64 

55 55.60 5430 

„ sa as iu as 

MESS" 'SS "b m aS 

***** ti "1 S8 ?3 

45-AQ 44.10 4450 £20 


RWE 

SAPpfd 

Sdiering 

SGLCotboo 

Siemens 

Springer {Audi 

SWHtzucLer 

Thyssen 

Veto 

VEW 

Viqg 

Voinviagen 


High 

0375 

42450 

10150 

241 

116.10 

1535 

865 

440 

102 

574 

780 

1340 


Low 

82 

422 

17850 

235 

114.90 

1535 

855 

43650 

10070 

574 

749 

1334 


Close Prw. 
8220 0450 
42450 422 

1798P 182.10 
241 242 

115.55 117.10 
1EE 1545 
855 843 

43650 437 50 
101.10 102.15 
574 577 

77850 774 

1345135550 


INC Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN ^ 

Ned Boyd Gp 

Nohtao 

OceGrinten 

Pnfflps Eke 

Polygram 

Randstad Hdg 

Roheco 

Rodomco 

RoBnco 

Rorerto 

Royal Dtfkh 

Unilever eva 

Vender lml 

VNU 

wanrsKIcvo 


3070 7150 7280 7350 
it sn 63.20 6130 6450 
6U0 6150 6350 6540 
M90 20 247.10 2485" 

142 15750 15950 16150 
109.60 107 10750 11150 

8450 B2J0 84^ 

TM 192.60 19350 19350 
6230 61.90 41.90 4220 
WS 19440 19450 19SSQ 
11 7* JO 117.40 11750 11750 
110.90 109 109.W 1J4 

S 70 435J0 43750 4jg|) 
TQ7J0 10250 107.70 lOG.™ 
45 4150 4410 4620 
252 24750 250 25440 


Helsinki 

ErtsoA 

HuMaambl 

KjotIfo 

Kesko 

mam A 

Meha 3 

Metaa-SeitaB 

Neste 

NoMdA 

OrtOh-VWr™* 
Outokumpu A 
UPMKymmene 
Vdmel 


HEX Gwertfjiidm: OT9J2 

pmtous:34lU3 

NX MX NX AS 
217 214 214 2L 

4730 4620 4650 4750 
70 69 69.43 69.53 

21 JO « 21.^ 21.TO 

162 159 ig 1-1 

4750 4650 46ffl ,4660 


BSkyB 

BrB Steel 1-73 

3 nt Telecom 4tt 

BTR 2J3 

Burmofi Costrol 10^ 

Burton Gp 

Cable I’/iretess 559 

Cadbury Schw 
CarttonCamm 
Camtrd Union 
Compost Gp 
Comraulds 

ErtSocompon«ts47S 
EMI Group 675 

693 
1.73 
970 
405 

wru, 12J0 

Gin? 'AWksaw 1618 


697 

505 

7.44 

602 

350 

669 


Geril Accidenl 
GEC 
OKU 


T« 136 iS 139.10 
I* 447 451 445’" 


_ __ 44620 

178 m ire ire 

9050 88 89 8890 

|» 127 \V 126M 

7950 7630 79 60 


GraodsSp 
Groni ,'.\et 
GRs 

awns-tiGs 
Gdi=n«B 
GUS 


AM 

159 

4.02 

2.15 

1068 

150 

546 

690 

4.92 

735 

6 

110 

637 

471 

557 

631 

688 

1.72 

953 

3.94 

1250 

1251 
8 

575 

279 

4.70 


HSBCHWgs 

ia 

Impl Tobacco 


KbwSsher 

Lsabroke 


Hong Korig 

Aroojr Props 
Bk&s 


7.90 

2750 

1250 

8475 

2350 

39-40 

44 

3530 

7.90 


Bangkok 

ifflr 

SiomCemwtF 

\ Stem Cam BkF 

1 TeteowwsB 
UtdComm 


SEThJhs 

PlWi0OK514O7 

197 182 W 1« 

tie 164 165 174 

■jM 2150 24-25 2175 
380 354 MO 3M 

^ nl tS S3 

31 29.75 29.75 30^ 
43J0 4175 £ 

108 100 104 

123 117 123 119 


CheunoKorw 
aartrortrod 

861 ® 

DooHenoBk 

9 

6750 
1550 
29.90 
1630 
453 
244 
7075 
24 
21 
19 


Bombay 

Bojol Auto 
HmdUSl UWW 
HindusiPetri 

lndD«Bk 

|TC T-J 

Mahanagwjel 

ReGance Jnd 

Stole Bk India 
Steel AuthortY 
Toto Eng Loco 




nuiiy uo-T, — 

Hong 5eng Bit 

Henderson Irn 

Henderson Ld 

HKCWwGas 
HKEledric 
HKTeteajmm 

KT 

HiAdwumWIi 

J 

isrars. 

Swire Pk A 
Wharf Hdgs 
WheelocK 


820 80350 81975 *050 
1608 1388140075 14M 

WAB4 “ 

345J5 33650 34475 339 

295 28775 29458 290.75 
1950 19 1935 j* 

M975 34250 348 347 


635 

64 

2850 

1635 


HrngSeog: 14TW.J7 
Piwrtotn: 1471199 

750 7 JO 7.95 

2A4) 2670 27 JD 
11.95 1275 12^ 
8150 82 85 

22J0 22.95 045 
37J0 38.10 3950 
41-60 4170 44 

34.10 3530 34J0 
750 765 7.95 

14 147D 1440 
92-SI 94 9675 

A rn 8.70 9 

4175 6450 M 

1435 1550 16M 
1825 2860 M 
1550 1605 16J0 
478 AM •• 
234 237 

67 6775 
2175 22-90 - 

19-10 1950 2040 
1850 1650 TJ 
4670 4690 48» 

2,55 2.58 250 

1.19 170 179 

8825 8575 89J5 
4S 440 445 

6.90 7U5 7.15 

605 615 645 

62 6250 65 

2755 28 2840 

1865 16 16 


443 

245 

70 

24 


LsndSec 
Lasroo 

upacw&p 
LtoydsTSBGp 
LucnsVcmly 
Mohs Spencer 
ME PC 
SAerOTY 
Nationol — 

Natl Power 
NotWest 
Ntaff 

Norwteh Union 
Orange 
P&O 
Peonan 
PBdngton 
PtWJEtG«l 
PrenuerFamen 
Pnidetdrol 


677 
643 
2135 
1074 
197 
7.66 
2JD 
916 
168 
4.75 
743 
106 
612 
4.71 
Asset 1327 
Grid 2J2 
5.70 
822 
7.75 
355 
2.19 
649 
738 
1.45 
7JB 
537 
641 
779 
IS 
959 
3jn 
575 
132 
637 
199 
989 
1058 
233 
60S 


Brussels 

Almani 
Botco lad 
BBL 
CBR 

cdrayi llM 

DelhtflzeLW 

\ Etedrotel 

I’ll Eledroftw 
t’ FarhsAG 
Gevaert 

GBL » - 
GenBrmaue 
YjstHettxmk 
Pstrofiro 
Powetfin 
Rotate B 
SocGen 
Solvoy 
Troctebd 
UCB 


BEL-20 

Previous: 243954 


1^ 1«“ 

7590 7500 

9930 9510 

3240 312° 

1B475 1803 
1805 1770 

77M 7«£ 

3550 3»0 

7570 7370 

3500 3460 

5900 57® 

14500 14300 
14900 14525 
14250 14000 
4930 4915 

10700 1MM 

3460 3385 

H15 ,2175 
14B75 14800 
lWlfl 126000 


1710 

7570 


1495 
.... 7580 

9730 95TO 
3W0 

18050 182» 
1790 1800 

7480 7710 

3520 3£» 
7440 7480 

3445 3460 

5B30 5790 

14400 14400 
4800 14600 
{4100 141® 
4920 49® 

10330 10550 
3450 3445 

7185 2215 

14850 .MSB 
126650 127700 


Astro Inti 

Bfc Inti indent 

Bk Negara 

GudWigGrum 

indacemem 

Inrftriaod 

indasat 

SampowrajlM 

Semen Gre« 
TetetaWturOkad 


^ ^ WO TO 
lioa 1025 IIW 
*75 8500 91TO 

3025 3075 

Sf? ^1 3975 3fflff 

fJa TOO 7525 690® 

7500 ma 71® 

3375 3075 31® 32K 

34OO 3175 3200 3150 


Johannesburg 

... *1 ft « 



BGBaik 

CortsbwaB 

Codon Fob. 
Danfcco 
Den DonskeB* 
ttSSwnfttgB 
D/51912B 

FLS IndB 
KobLuWioww 
NwNortlskB 
SopbusBef B 
T« DanmkB 

SSSS.A 


380 373 

345 336 

k-T- N.J. 
370 356 

655 643 

438430 425000 

297000 290000 

21021 195 

750 IS 
700 SI 

1000 985 

364 357 

400 400 

408.74 395 


380 378 

336 342.29 
NX 73° 
360 368 

645 660 

425000 &M0 

790000 2977® 
195 214-79 

745 IS 

986 .995 

1100 ss 

396 


Bks 

nn vmvnCpai 
AngtoAimCorp 
AngioAm GoW 

«r lnd 

DeBe^ 

□netontem 

FstNotlBk 

Geneor 

GF5A 

Imperial HdRS 
mgweCoal 

lscor . . M 

ffiSS 

SEKS 

Mirons 

Ncrapok 
Ncdcar 
Remhrandl Dp 
(Scheroont 
DuH piatmum 
SA Breweries 
Somancar 
Sasd 
SBlC 

Tiger Oats 


3845 29-50 
270 269 JO 
748 244 

2 a 245 

197-50 19650 
1150 1160 

5&2S are 

2435 2350 
153 149-75 
3335 32.75 
3Sre 3A65 
1TJB5 11-60 
100 

64 6350 
2430 
330 HI 

a 64^ 

385 382 

14635 14435 

n i9.io 
94 are 
4535 **2? 
63J5 6235 
7950 79 

14035 139J5 
36J0 3fre 
e*re 65J0 
209 m 
7035 69 


3030 29-65 
2tfi0 269-W 
247 J4AS0 

I* 5 ?« 

195 I 8 # 

1125 1235 
5625 a 
W30 2AI0 
iso 149.75 
3235 3350 

35S ii| 

JS ^ 

2440 2420 

118 3-11 

*4JD a 

■12 mS 

17 w 9jre 

4S A»-70 
Vi 6 j 
79 7935 

SB 

TO 2W 
69re rtrt 


Rank -.-r 
ReckiUColm 
Redkmd 

RMSoSSTlnttiml 

Reuters Hdgs 
Ream 

RMC&oup 

^^ t BkSari — 

bs 

Sdratwy 
Sduartars 

Sot Newcastle 

Sari Power 
Seeoria* 

Severn Trent 
She* Tramp R 
State , _ 

Smith Nephew 
SmtthXIlne 
Smiths lnd 
5 them Elec 

Stagec oach, 

Stand Charter 
TatefcLYte 

TesaJ 

Thomei WMw 
31 Group 
71 Group 
TomlMi* 

UnOevcf 
Utd Assurance 
UldNews 
utd utames- 


1170 

7-45 

446 

065 

8.85 

450 

1150 

1J1 

552 

8^ 

453 

632 

851 

410- 

432 

8.12 

488 

603 

aos 

1830 

445 

7.17 

6.96 


6.16 

635 

1&A3 

10-13 

177 

7-48 

254 

9J8 

253 

465 
751 

1.98 

5.99 

466 
12.88 
257 

5-60 

B.03 
742 
349 
115 
64JJ 
738 
141 
7-70 
530 
639 
7.72 
346 
955 
vm 
558 
235 
638 
188 
9.75 
1035 
229 
589 
533 
387 
433 
1855 
733 
453 
■ 253 
833 


455 447 

I. 7! 1.73 

408 407 

117 233 

1078 1077 

132 131 

553 560 

5.94 593 

J. 95 504 

742 7-U 

6 6 
110 113 

650 654 

471 4.72 

555 553 

632 632 

691 597 

1.73 1J2 

950 951 

197 389 

12.71 12-60 

11)6 12-95 
8.05 8.08 

5.75 5S2 

232 280 

473 4H 

553 563 

437 6j0 

643 636 

1949 1949 
1031 1032 
194 389 

759 7A5 

159 157 
9.14 9.1 0 
256 253 

467 471 

759 752 

Z06 1J9 

407 682 

468 469 
1195 113? 

170 HI 

555 5J2 

8.14 &07 

7.73 751 

132 350 

118 230 

647 646 

736 736 

143 142 

7.72 7J9 

531 538 

637 635 
7J9 7J8 

as) yi 
955 950 

190 2.91 

558 577 

126 237 

633 635 

2.5*4 193 


Bco Comm llal 
Bar FWenram 
Bead) Roma 
Benetton 
Cierftfo Italkmo 
Edison 
ENI 
Fial 

Generali Asslc 

I Ml 

INA 

Haksas 

Medkuet 

MerfloboiKU 

Montedison 

Ofiwtfi 

Paimutot 

Pne8l 

RAS 

Rota Banco 

S Poalo Torino 
Tetecom Itoko 
TlVi 


4700 

6200 

1709 

27200 

3*90 

8345 

10110 

5890 

38200 

17610 

2635 

5560 

8020 

12040 

1115 

785 

7785 

4790 

15030 

23200 

13250 

11175 

6150 


4580 

6020 


4700 

6165 

1687 1687 
26650 36950 
3565 3680 
B225 8345 

9900 9955 

5735 5865 
37550 38200 
17120 17560 
2585 2630 

5470 5480 

7855 7940 

11850 12020 
1102 1108 
748 775 

2735 2750 
4660 4750 

14800 14890 
22500 22650 
12900 1318S 
11050 11120 
6020 6075 


4630 

6050 

1625 

27000 

3580 

8320 

10050 

5770 

37950 

17440 

2600 

5535 

7985 

iisa 

1107 

751 

2775 

4710 

14970 

22350 

13000 

11160 

6050 


Ptnautt-Pnnt 

Promodes 

Renault 

Reset 

Rh- Poulenc A 
Smrii 
Schneider 
SEB 

5GS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodeuho 
SI Gabo In 
Suet (Ciel 
Suet Lyon Emm 
Syntamabo 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
Ustaor 
Valeo 


2095 2630 
2215 2182 
170 162J0 
1770 1700 
235 228 

. 605 587 

334 32940 
915 8W 
571 545 

776 761 

2775 2710 
877 846 

SUS£. SUSP; 


656 
730 710 

16630 164 JO 
436 603 

110JO 107.10 
378 36670 


2664 2668 

2190 2206 

169.70 162-50 

1744 1770 

234.70 232.90 

S99 594 

334 33460 
904 915 

560 574 

768 767 

2715 2753 
868 856 

SUsp. 15.10 
647 667 

713 738 

16630 166 

636 626 

107 JO 108.90 
368-50 379 JO 


Sao Paulo "nSaKliiiJS 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Com 
CdnTire A 
CdnUIIIA 
CTfinISvc 
Gat Metro 
Gt-WestLiteco 

Imasco 

Investors Gip 
LofatawCu . 
Natl Bk Canada 
PaaerCaro 
Power Firn 
OuebeafB 
Rogers CommB 
Royal BkCda 


ladusW ofsm drrorewre 

PHVtOUV. 35*9-35 

50. on 50.80 50.80 SOta 
2617 rere 26*: 2635 
37ia0 3735 3740 3735 
<3VJ 43 *a 43'J 434 

16.55 1835 1635 18JM 
-|lh 32-85 3330 33 

39.90 39*6 39.70 3^« 

S.95 33.95 3195 3330 
20.10 20.10 20-10 20 
17.70 17Vj 1740 17V. 

39.20 3830 39.05 38^ 
374* 37% 37J* 37-“ 

25J5 25*7 25*t 25J5 

9W 9.90 9.90 lore 

66*> af*> 6610 65.95 


BrodescoPfd 

Brahma Pro 

CemtaPId 

CESPPW 

Cope* 

Ekftrobras 


ABBA 
AssIDoman 
Astro A 
AHosCapcoA 
Autoliv 
ElectroknB 
Erics son B 
Hemes B 
htcenflimA 
Investor B 
M0O0B 
Nardbanken 
PlwmvUpiahii 
Sondvlk B 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S-E Banker A 
SUnndtaFors 
Shansho B 
SKFB 

Spartranken A 
SfcfflA 
SvHondlesA 
Volvo B 


1040 1030 1031 1037 
75700 750.00 757.00 755.01 111 

St %% II If Sydney 

FShobra- 53IDO S ■££ 51 0W 

NSJSSLpm »699 MjOO 289.00 2B4J1 

IKoO 1KJJ0 18600 18600 
12J0 40J1 41 JO 4130 
T045 1040 1040 10>« 

14097 135.00 139.20 13690 
17000 16690 169.00 169J0 
157,00 145 JO 15400 15699 
mw 3V9J1 32100 322J0 
»D0 37.90 38J0 37M 
1140 1130 H-29 11-50 
27J1 2690 2670 2600 


116 
245 
12930 
257 
312 
548 
335 
324 
740 
403 
275 
253 
277 JO 
249 
220 
186 
87 JO 
33230 
320 
220 
1B0 
130 
249 
205 


109 113 

M2 24450 
126J0 129 

25150 25350 
309 311 

535 544 

33030 333 

317 322 

731 736 

39b 39858 
2« 272 

25130 25230 
27230 77730 

2-M M9 

21730 218 

178 185 

8530 8730 
32650 33230 
315 317 

214 220 

177 1B0 


127 


„ 130 

11 24430 
20*30 


116 

245 

12930 

257 

31050 

541 

335 

323 

738 

401 

273 
253 

274 
24630 

220 

181 

87 

329 

318 

214 

17730 

12730 

24930 

20430 


The Trib Index 

Jan. 1. 1992° >00 Lflvo ’ 


PouHstoUa 

SidNadorari 

Sous Cruz 

TeWwnsPfd 

Telem'iB 

Teteii 

TeiespPM 

Untaanco 

Usiminas PM 

CVRD PM 


Oslo 

Aker A I* »' 131 133 


OBX Mac 69939 
u previiws; <99.10 


Seoul 

Dacom 


Composite Mete WW* 

PTWtous 68843 
89000 85200 88000 89000 


Amcor 
A HZ BUng 
BHP 
Boral 

BromMnlna. 

CBA _ 

CCAmnti 
dries M»er 
Coma tea 
C5K „ 

Fasten Brew 

Goodman Flu 
IC1 Australia 
Lend Lease 
MIMHdW . 
Hoi Ausl Bank 

Nat Mutual Hdo 
Hews Carp 
Pacific Diniop 
Pioneer Inti 


All Qniaartts: 2606M 
previous: 2(1940 

865 B50 855 8^0 

9?3 0.72 9J4 9.97 

1699 1671 1673 17J1 

4.04 4 4 4-rrT 

2730 26.90 27.06 27^ 
1539 1*20 1634 1624 
14 13J0 1167 14 

662 656 6-60 656 

7.10 7.05 7.05 7.06 

5.12 697 610 499 

235 233 W3 M5 

1 9fl 1.M l-W 1-98 

1230 1230 1148 1231 

29.05 2&48 29 2660 

132 139 131 13J 

19.15 1895 19J5 79J7 

o 11 2.04 2J09 2.05 

2j7 4“ 639 6^ 

334 335 334 

657 446 446 4j4 


World Index 
Regional Indexes 

Asia/Pacitic 

Europe 
N. America 
S. America 
industrial Indexes 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
Miscellaneous 
Raw Maienals 
Service 
Utilities 


172.36 

119.89 

183.74 

206.69 

163.77 

223.13 

169.07 

202-26 

127.38 

178.53 

183.84 

161.93 

164.26 


prices as or S00 P M. Afew V'art- rime 
% change 
-022 


mar to dale 
% change | 

+15.57 


-0.76 

-0.07 

-0.28 

+0.65 

-0.62 

-0.24 

+0.05 

-0.33 

-O.B2 

-O.U 

-0.09 

+ 0.88 


-2.87 

+13.98 

+27.66 

+43.12 

▼30.55 

+17.12 

+18.48 

+9.38 

+10.35 

+4.82 

+17.92 

+14.50 


Utilities l ^ u „ _ . 

The tnjemaoonai Hera** a tree 

200 mtematormr f*** ™ fooZ^utitoenue Criadea oe «3fluB6 

txvktet is avartoWe uyermng to ttw 7no r comp/ted toy Brocrr.oe <g News. 

poca i Ateuitfv Cenex. France — ■ — 


High Low Close Pr«. 

Dd 1“ ScC 6300o 61400 6190a 6350a 

REki. - 2810 2730 2790 2720 

Sfr-* la ^ ^ 


High Low Close Prev. 


:BOl 
IUC 
Bank 
Photo 


FufiB 

FufiR 

Fultei 


mssemmm 


ma umpa - 

VeMwneUuti 4^ 


Vodafone 
Whflbread 
WBumsHdas 
Wteri 
WPP Group 
Zeneai 


128 

127 

337 

483 

2-87 

19.60 


ius 

1J9 

646 

sre 

655 
633 
8JU3 
604 
623 
8 
67B 
688 
101 
17 JO 
635 
709 
630 
431 
119 
620 
333 
680 
183 
19.25 


935 9X1 

1035 1031 
2-31 2-31 

6M sre 
SJ3 529 
191 185 

614 435 

1169 1833 
731 7-0 

637 432 

165 233 

173 U5 
667 451 

mo lire 

1-90 1.76 

639 539 

832 831- 
43! 442 

636 673 

621 838 

410 4JM 
623 427 

&04 613 

485 480 

199 696 

106 103 

18.13 18.14 
443 439 

7.15 7.16 

694 692 

455 453 

125 121 

830 831 

165 165 

682 482 

285. 284 

1930 1934 


Frankfurt 

A/4BB 

Addas 
AOanzHdg 
Altana 
BLBetta 
BASF 


1590 

220 

4» 

12680 

4670 

6140 




Boyer 
BAndori 


69 
7830 
3910 

KttWJd 1® 
Commerzwnk 45.W 
Daimler Beu 

teSSsBarti 1H® 

Fried. Xrapp •»' 


Gete , , 
HeradbgZmi 
Henkel pld 
HEW 
Hochtief 
Hoedist 
Kastadt 
Lahmever 
Unde 
Luftoanso 

Marmesraarm 889-® 

Met3Uqewnsction*<g 


110 

148 

10130 

476.15 

84 

7610 

655 

8980 

1345 

5£C 


„’S 5 
m S3 

”$ a 

J'S^ 

1KW '*£ 

1^ “w 

sgkl!*& 


M 

39 

1320 


AMMBHiHs 
Geridnri i g cn 

®E f - 

' a-is 

Pnrion 

PutecBfc 

Shoe 0°** 

Telekom Mol ^ 

UM^jineerS ^ 
YTV 


— ii 35 

B330 K ji25 

JS goffl 88-10 

lire IMS 


36^ 

473 


MwldiRWCkR *10^ 


PreuKoo 


If ^ 

Si & 


4C3 

494 


London 


$BU 

BAA 

Boday* 

Boss 

S^torid 

Blue Off® 

BOC GnwP 

l^lnd 

BrilAWBP 

BnlAimoy* 

laLffOP 

BrtFetim 


Madrid 

AownoK 

A^uBaroetan 
Aroentaria 
BBV 
Banedo 
BanUntW ... 

Bco Centro Hlsp 

BcoPPpulcr 

Bco Santander 

CEPSA 

Cantinente 

Cora Maphe 

Endesa 

FECSA 

Gcs Natural 

laerdroia 

Pryor 

SSSln.Ekc 

Tahamlert 

Tetetomoi 1 

UmenFenew 
Votenc Cement 

Manila 

Ayala B 

SffiK 

CAP Homes 
Mntita EtacA 

Metro Bank 

P9riW 

PO Bat* 

PWLpfl/PS 1 

aijgfrt 

SMPrtmaHdg 


U, M «t K w exico 


Compeste! 731^1 

Prwiw* 753 ^ 

7 8,35 |80 

9.W iore 
1530 1630 
338 A 1S fra 

w| 53 

570 6® 

^ 

S 'i 3 



Bo ha index; M679 
Prevtoos: 58737 

25600 24900 36960 25600 ' 
1B45 1830 1S48 1835 

5S 5550 5600 5650 

7B30 7710 7750 TOT 

4145 40B5 4125 4130 

llS 1440 W 1445 
TOO 78» 79® 7918 
589Q 5800 5350 5W9 

3+TO 34S00 34TO 34TO 

4300 4205 4225 4280 

4555 4530 4550 4586 

3iQ5 ZM» 2990 3W 
8550 8460 3550 355.8 

31W 3130 31 B0 31M 

1200 >175 >190 1180 

*S2 

1725 1700 17L5 ]710 
2840 2690 2725 2855 

km 6i3o 6i» 

1360 1330 13® 1350 

SJ40 7W0 8000 8TO 

4210 4120 4205 4150 

1220 1210 I® lg“ 

2840 2815 2830 2820 

PSEtadetWM| 

PiMfoes1994J3 

1430 1178 1425 13U 

i7re 1675 17 i6re 

113 105 m 

645 4 405 3JS 

7130 69 69-M ,69 

s a a in 

645 640 620 




before you book your 

CONFERENCE, YOU SHOULD 
KNOW ABOUT THE REWARDS. 

But „,»v thev offer mo,o. The I-liUon HHooors Borldw.dc 
Medina, Planner Bonus Program. 

Any meeting planner whelks a 

Conrad Intcrnauonal hotel with at ka.st tuioaP - _ niglnrs 

.-,f HH.-nors poind- rh,t cu,. ^ ^ ^ pJrtnm . 

at tl "Honors holds. Or earn mrl.or nnk-s with r.irtwil 

TIk reward s arr yours. S.. m»kh the most of dtO». 

y or3 r;,u P bMkimp „ ; ,d # .H 

si: h:s office in London nt +4-t 

CONRAD 

INTEPsNATIONAL 


r«i irn M ™ 

■ IS fSS AS S 
SS ig 58 IS 

1170 1150 1170 11^ 
1130 11J0 l^g 

3860 3790 3TO 38* 

1660 1620 1630 1650 
368 340 368 366 

SOS 498 504 498 

<3M 63» «-» 

japan Tobacco ^ *gg 

£ ^ 

«S 'S 'SS 

283 279 2B3 

690 684 690 

1040 998 1040 

163 160 161 

745 727 7^ 

485 an 485 


Fujitsu _ 
Hochflunf Bk 
Hitachi 
Honda Motor 
1BJ 
IHI 
Bochu 
Ito-Vokado 
JAL 


Jusco 
Kapma 
KansniElec 
Kao 

Kawasaki Hvy 
Kawa Steel 
Kbiki Nifto Rt 
Klan Brewery 
Kate Steel 
Komatsu 


Kubota 

Kyocera 


luEtec 






BB.V 

DennanteBk 

EUcom 

HatahiPdA 

KiroernerASi 

Norsk Hydro 

NorakaSkagA 

NKonwdA 

Orkla Asa A 

P«traGe^«: 

* i Peftn A 


sow™ _U 
TimuocoHi Ott 
Storebrand Asfl 


200 198 

2380 25re 
■3080 30-30 
140 13530 
iij® J4 

*3 418 

S % 

544 52430 
465 455 

164.E8 1*1 

™ ;s 

6?0 6W 

4930 *80 


199 2W 
25-30 25-90 
3138 31.10 
136 1393® 
44 JS 
393 391 

429 41630 
2?5 280 

158 156 

543 539 

455 46530 
164 IO 
1263) U7 
690 710 

4930 49 


Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundiri Eng. 
K!a Motors 
Korea El Pwr 
Korea Exch Bk 
LGSemteon 
PohanalronSt 
Samsung Dbloy 
Samsung Elec 
SNnhan Batik 
SKTeteamj 


7310 7150 

18600 18000 

12^9 IISSS 

23900 23000 
5180 SJ» 
40000 38700 
57500 56100 
46000 44600 
69600 68100 
8800 8650 
478000 4720M 


7150 ,SSS 
18200 18000 
12400 11500 
23600 23*0 
5110 TOO 
40800 37800 
WOO 56000 
£500 45600 
SSS 69200 
8750 87M 

473000 479000 


R^Ttata 7&S 1*2 1*2 4^ 

*e s 2 sss i 

7 AS 7.00 733 7-83 

ii35 Ha; lire nre 

433 418 4.18 420 


WMC nij 
Waolworths 


Singapore s,rt |ffiiSiwa 


SS ^ ui 

« 3 g ?! 

sre g S3 ^ 

5 iffl Is « 

s ^ 1 3 

'ss H s' 

6 ts 's 


Aria A 

BanocriB 

CenqtCPO 

awe j 

8ESSF 

TelMeiC. 


Bata late 4S01 

Prsvious; 488181 

44J0 6230 6120 «30 
2440 2170 23-95 2*30 
40.10 39* 

iXa 1440 14J8 UM 
41 JO 41.15 51^ 

57 JO stg-stfo ^ 
161 152 339 _*g 

34J0 3330 3165 34J3§ 
nro. mIS 3490 3630 
S 1BS0 138re 13440 
'l838 18-64 18.98 1838 


Milan "'""SSKllSS 

Afleort0 Assfc 1M50 I* 10 11975 


CAGAB: 292639 
Pffviwsi 291732 

073 948 959 965 

241 70 228 235 228.10 

^SI! 
S 

aasassa 

1(00 1003 1024 1 004 
ffio 3420 3675 3970 

jaiM 

OtfWnnDlK m S 573 M 

6.90 4J5 630 630 
718 701 706 711 

4J530 397.90 400.90 397» 
843 826 834 

436.90 41030 43630 *lft.TD 
1216 1179 1197 1171 
2385 2320 2340 2346 

ViS 1305 1308 1320 
36330 34730 3513® 351 LM 

Br 


Paris 

Mat 

AGF 

Air Uqiride 
AtcotHABta 
An-UAP 
BancoW 

BIC - 

8NP 

Canal Phis 

Carrefour 

Casino 

CCF 

Catetem 

OvblianDlor 


Asia Pac Brew 
teebosPoc 
aty Dwlts 
Cyde Cnrringe 
Dairy Farm mt' 
DBS foreign . 
DB5Land 
Fni«r8.N«tve 
UK Land" 
jartMnttiesn' 
Jard Strategic* 

KmwdBoj* 

KrppelFote 

iS»HUmd 

OeKtarejffli 

OS Union BkF 

PskwoyHdB* 


EDWWM 

EridaniaBS 

Eundtanm 

Eurotunne 

Gen. Eat* 

Hava* 

l memi 

Lafarge 


Sngijnd 
Stag Press F 
smgTechlnd 

SlngTetomm 
let Lee Bank 
Utd industrial 
UtdDSaaBkF 
WtagTaiHdgs 


520 S.« 

S3S 4.® 

9 JO MS 
955 9.15 
are o.w 

16 15J0 

174 334 

8.75 8^ 

3 288 

175 Z-fcS 

194 3-S 
530 SJI 
320 334 

4 17fi 
434 194 
1030 ».?s 

7>3S IS 

6 5 JO 

635 5LM 
11.90 11 JO 
630 635 
1330 21-2 
145 I® 

no i.» 

2J8 175 

132 «L?9 
1130 10.70 
2.10 3 


5.15 sre 
SJK) 492 
930 

925 9 JO 

are os 

1530 1530 
166 332 
0.70 8.40 


190 
7 JO 7.90 
332 336 
525 525 

KM 2-S 

ire no 
198 

10 urn 
7 4.95 
535 535 
5.95 5.M 
11.90 

630 42 

23 2030 
233 2J6 

106 2S 
2.75 2JB 
099 1 

10.70 11-492 
3 2.99 


Taipei 

cathay LBei« 
OvangHwoBk 
auwTwgBk 
Oilna Dovelpinl 
Qitaa Steel 
FW Sank 
Formosa Plastic 
HuaNanBri 
Inti Comm W 

Nw Yd Floats 

Shin Kang Life 
Taiwan Semi 


““““Hiissas?. 


Uid Micro Elec 

Utt World Chin 


139 

10430 

re 

126 

20.60 

10630 

*230 

115 

56 

7330 

8730 

156 

4630 

123 

64 


132 152 

in 100 104 

B 8230 86 

150 122 1»-S0 

77 BO 2730 2830 

™ ’Si ’SI 
60 60 . « 

'S TS'BS 

8 “i J 

U9 151 JS 

4430 45 4430 

115 IMJD 
63 6350 6150 


k; 

L— . 

Marubeni 
Wicrrw _ 

Matsu Comm 

Matsu Etecjta 

Matsu Elec Wk 

MteubtaW 

MJhubhWCIl 

MttsufaisM El 

MBsubisH Eta 

Mitsubishi Hvy 

MiawblsiiiMot 

MnsubbNTr 

Mflsul J 

Mksul FudOMi 

MBsulTnsI 

NlurataMfg 

NEC 

NBion 

NMraSec 

Nintendo 

sesr 

Nupon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
HKK r 
Nomura 5ec 
NTT ^ 

NTT Data 
Q? Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Rlorii 
Rohm 
Sokura Bk 
Sankm 
Sanwo Bank 
Sanyo Elec 
Secom 
SenHiRg 
Sektaridrom 
SeUsul House 
Sever-Elewn 

ISuEIPwr 

Shimixu _ 
snm^tsuCti 
arteWo 
ShHimtaBk 
Safthank 
Sony. 

Sumitomo 

Sumitomo Bk 

SumHCftem 

SwnhomoBec 

SumitMeftri 

SumB Trus! 

TatshoPham 

TakeriaChem 

TDK 

TohokuEIPwr 
TakaiBor* 
TakioMatow 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
TtfryuCbip. 
Tonen 

ToppaTi Prim 


7900 7840 7970 79W 

TO° 1«9 TO? 


»7 

435 


425 


993 

432 


I960 1940 TWO 19to 

4120 3990 3990 £130 

B ^ 1 

B ’! B 'B 


Cdn NM Res 
CdnOcdd Pel 
Cdn Pacific 
Comincp 
Dofascu 
Domwr 
Donahue A 
Di> Pont Cda A 
Edpeifiiascan 
EuroNevMna 
Fairfax finl 
Falconbridge 
FletdterLhallA 
Franco Nevada 
Gulf Cda Res 
Imperial Ol 
Inca 

I PL Energy 
Laidk™ E 
Ltiflmen Group 
MocmH BU 
Minna Inti A 
Meflia** 
Moore 

NewtmdgsNel 
Noroitda Inc 
Narean Enemy 
Nthera Tetecom 
Nava 
One* 

PancdnPerim 
Petra Cda 
PtacerDome 
PocoPelfm 
Potash Sask 
Renaissance 


3BJ05 . 37 
3580 35.20 
JU* 41.40 
3635 36re 
1 8 2738 
11.95 1160 
31.40 31*- 

32%. 3160 
23^i 2160 
WJ5 roao 
392 389 

25.00 2545 
24 23.60 
32'y 31 A 

life 1130 
T7to _77 
3730 37.10 
51 50'-: 

21-45 20.90 
4160 42 

1745 17J0 
94W 92^ 

>i»« nre 

2870 2B10 
77.10 70 
275i 2735 
3435 34- 


38.05 36.70 
1530 3i40 
4145 4135 

36 '4 3635 

27.05 27.95 

1130 11.90 
31.30 3M0 
3230 33 


2330 

20M 

392 


23** 

I0V 

390 


141 

1135 

31 


139 1 

llto 

31 


U7 535 545 645 

1470 16* 16* 1TO 
774 764 772 760 

696 689 696 699 

1710 1690 1690 J720 

1010 993 1010 1TO 

1309 1350 1370 1360 
659 *25 *25 J£L 

5*08 SOT 5330 5300 

j,®® 1380 1390 1393 

2140 2040 2080 21TO 

570 556 564 578 

10000 10*00 10TO "MS 

B05 7*0 802 TjO 

1 i is ” 

193 185 188 in 

1*0 15TO 1580 1W0 
114I& n20h 1130b ll*b 
5410b 5330b S350b 5400b 

608 601 *01 *J0 

Ml 277 281 279 

1730 1680 1700 1750 

13900 13600 13TO 12*00 

3«0 3TO 3900 3900 

5*32 

§3 otS-S* ™ 

1040 994 1030 ?2§ 

1180 1170 1180 J!* 

8990 B850 8960 8910 

i>3o >150 nso 
MOO I960 1W 20“ 
432 620 625 433 

3160 3830 3130 3170 

200 1W> 2®2 X 

1320 1270 1328 12B0 • 

cg*in 561Q 56^0 5920 

11*0 11100 11200 11300 
968 959 968 966 

1770 1720 17* 1730 

472 463 472 464 

1810 17» 1810 1TO 

2 B5 276 285 ,M7 

1240 1220 ]20 1220 

3000 2950 2990 3000 

3510 3430 34* 3460 
10100 96* 9*90 10100 

2010 1980 2WC 2MC 

ID* 1030 1W0 1040 
1*3 1M 1400 1410 
CTO 2260 2270 fflj 

7050 6790 ^ 7000 


SeajjramCa 


Shell Cda A 
Suncor 
TafismanEny 
TcckB 

TeteBtote 

Tekis 
Thomson 
TofDarn Bonk 
Transaito 
TransCda Pu» 
Trimark FW 
Trizsc Hahn 
TVX Gc*d 
Westcoasf Eny 
Weston 


26 2535 
25^0 2115 
32.90 22*8 
1365 U30 
109 107.15 

3530 3&2D 
32 31M 

27.* 
«.D5 48re 

22.15 21.95 

46.15 44M 

4635 4585 
9580 2535 
44.30 43>J 

2735 27.70 
32-65 32 

™ H 

3130 31^ 
7^ 785 

27 JO 2685 
96 95^ 


25-45 2565 
24 2410 
3V.S 32 
11-* >1.* 
77-20 ~XL 

37 JO 37.70 
50.95 50'+ 

2130 21.10 
JIM 42.60 
1735 1730 
9380 93.10 
11.70 1135 
28to 28.10 
76415 48* 
2735 2730 
3435 34 JO 
13930 14085 
118Q 11.80 
31 31 ‘5 

26 76 

25U 25to 
2ZM 21*5 
1335 13'h 

109 10&35 
3535 35. BO 
3180 32 

27 vt 27.40 

48.90 49.15 

2215 n.«5 

46.15 4585 
4585 4635 
2535 2512 

43.90 4430 
27’# 27.90 

3230 32-35 
43.10 42.90 
17W IT 1 .* 

2635 2635 
69M 70 

3135 31.45 
7.15 7.10 

2785 27 

95'* 96'. 


Vienna 

BotetaUrW* 
CredhonSl Pro 
EA-Generan 
EVN 

nuqhnton Wien 
OMV 

OestEleklnz 
VA5taN 
V A Tech „ 
Wienerberg Bau 


ATXtodecIMMl 
Previous: 137B84 

3100 3050 3080 3063 

1534 1507 1533 1510 

495 J90 49270 493 

1816.90 176HTOM >770 
86890 863 TO 864 

m 537.50 S44 541-35 

2^ 2453 2509 2465 

2570 2480 2570 2534 


Wellington ***$££%% 


430 488 430 A* 

ia 1J7 1.27 1J0 

are 329 330 336 

4.43 A.Ki 433 432 
5.90 5J2 588 5.70 

Reich Ch FOW 185 ts| 183 184 

esuss 1 ” « a ts k 

ffiri nJs IU* "■* 


AllNZeoWB 

Brleftyliwj 

Carter Hokord 

Retch Ch Bldg 
ReWiChEny 
Belch ChForoi 


291 

63S 


287 

625 


290 

638 


Tormlnd 

TOStlHM 
Toslem 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 
Yomonouchl 
axlttkkxUW 


1180 n* 11» US 

1780 1740 17W 17* 

BOO 7B7 799 7W 

689 682 682 588 

2490 2460 2490 2490 
1010 998 1010 1000 

WTO 3300 SS 

3010 2980 3000 2970 


Tokyo 


NMBri 225:1841586 
Pmtoas: 18735.17 


LTSreal 
LVMH „ 
MkheflnB 

Paribas A 


Stockholm »^‘|S!“S2 

flCAB 114 11130 >14 11330 


JwpPOnAa 

AmvMV . 

AuMBank 

Asahiawm 

AssM Glass 

BkTokyoMihu 

BkYaKohnrtM 

Bridgestone 

Carein_ 

Quite Elec 

Dteel 

DaMcMKang 

DatwaBank 
Dahre Haute 


mo ion 1060 ii» Toronto 

715 704 715 70S 

3750 3490 3630 3390 
679 8S£ 879 855 

. 633 628 633 633 

924 915 920 J27 

2210 2180 2*0 2180 
519 514 517 516 

2900 2770 2780 2870 
3600 3530 3550 3600 

2050 2010 2040 2020 
1TO I960 I960 1M0 
26* 2580 200 2S70 
807 740 805 .782 

M30 1400 m MS 
637 621 630 628 

1380 1340 1360 1400 


AHWCons. 
Alberto Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Anderson Ej<Pl 
BkMndrod , 
Bk Nava Scotia 
Garrick GoW 

see 

BC Tstecomm 
Btochem Pham 
BambardrarB 
Come® 

OBC _ . 
Cdn Natl RaR 


& ss a n 

4980 49-* *.45 49.65 
in 17L 1780- 17.00 
5105 5335 5280 53 

60 59.15 59.15 M 
3\M 31.10 31.15 3130 
* 3945 3930 39-M 
«90 3330 33.90 3335 

28.65 28 K 

in j 46'+ 47 46.6il 

6M 3430 36-70 3645 
mio 4940 70 «V» 


Zurich 

ABBB _ 

Adecco B 

AtoSUiSteR 

Ares-SerwwB 

AWR _ 

tateelSdoR 

BK Vision 

CftaSpecCHem 

CtoriaritR 

CriSvisseGeR 

EleWtwnft.B 

EmsOemle 

ESECHdg 

HoWmtiankB 

UedTtensILBB 

NesileR^ 

NnrtfltsU 

DdfiknBTOR 

PoroesaHldB 
PtamVfenB 
RKhemnitA 
PireRIPC 
Roche Hdg PC 

SBCR 

Schindler PC 
5GSB 

SMH B 
JuberR 
Smss Reins R 
SAh Group R 
UBSB _ 
WlnlerthurR_ 
Zurich AteurR 


SPHndeeWSW 
Prew«5: 352481 

2230 2140 2179 2235 

reg 549 556 551 

1345 1307 1344 1321 
2436 1JSS 2390 3430 
BSD 846 8S> 850 

2150 2135 2140 21* 
4175 393S 4170 3 970 
1M6 1062 1080 1072 

•SB m iMs 'nil 

5900 6815 4TO 6PM 
4390 4390 4390 4350 
1347 1290 1339 1|« 

587 584 584 589 

1848 1811 1837 1®6 
2249 2196 2237 2225 
193J5 187.25 18830 19L50 
1775 1760 1770 \7» 
900 886 900 JM 

3020 1980 2020 1996 
33030 32730 33030 330-50 
13275 13050 12220 13280 
367 35630 357 36330 

19M 1880 1900 1905 

SS s ™ gs 

mu. R7 3 Dol hO' 

1090 1060 1082 1OT 
2070 2049 2065 7061 

1620 iws 

tSS Iffll 1®7 518 

’S 'IS ™ '38 


PACE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 






Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

Nationwide prices no! reflecting late trades efcewfiere. 

Tte AssocaMd Press. 


SM Dh YM PE IBiHgft Up* 


u. UM tti«l I¥ U- a»« on m pe j 


B§«0> l pm 


»<I. K £ W 


YU PE WHS* l" 


tfc ? ■'* 

? is -i 

w. H» 

&• 

ft »W •& 

It IP* ■*» 


L £ J 


feipi 


SV If; 
STft S7 
84 * S/ A 
m & 
io^ a** 

w-H 4J| 

IT* 11 v, 

!l? BJ 

iv. 


A 4 “ 

d a g 


Ul u . 

iO ? 

2JD F.9 _ 

14» 44 - 

■s a 

A E M 

K U II 
4B in . 

mud 

jd 3 a 

.n fl 
a si . 
a u . 
iln u . 
ti u . 


m 






tfS 3 jt 


hi® 


fife-:; 


if 

vr tH 

■# **\I 

i;l| 

li'fll 

: ."i J 

- <i j 

l.'iT 


a:*!!. I 


F' 




m 




m 


l&i 






JJ* 

J9 IT 1 

AS ! 

e g 

'll >3 * 

is a a 

131 




V . ’ I 

Pi' 


“II 

14] 

jj! 

jfif 23 g 

II: 

a a ® 


v 




•i j l 

.zz n a 


9,3 n 

•«’3 [j 

IB 


d ts i 

iii 

9fl | 

■ Ji 

JU: 


‘9 'J n 

111 


Bl! 

J il 

a a? 

to 8 ; 
« « »i 


ii 


ljJ a id 

.K il V 


, } |S| 

« a - 


1 


i 




1 1 1 






GLUMLY, SHE STARED 

AT HER REFLECTION IN THE SOUP SPOON 
AND FELT LONELIER THAN A GOLDFISH. 

Once again their annual wedding anniversary pilgrimage to Scotland 
had been cancelled at the last minute. Last year Roger had jetted 
off to Taiwan on business. Full of apologies and promises that next 
year would be different. Now it was Singapore. Admittedly he’d 
brought her along this time. And even taken a suite in the magnificent 
Raffles Hotel. (After telling her they were headed for the YMCA, 
the rogue.) But still. For him to be called away like this just as they 
were sitting down to dinner was just too much. She wished she’d 
never come. Her sullen thoughts were interrupted by a waiter asking 
if there was anything wrong with her untouched glass of champagne? 
She turned and found the , — . , , fellow grinning at her with 
the sort of impudent expression her husband 

often employed. Which | £ Hpg BS|jj J was hardly surprising. 
For indeed it was her husband, squeezed into 

the sommelier’s uniform. The hotel administration 

had been more than happy to indulge the unusual request when the 
gentleman approached them earlier in the day. As for the lady, 
gallantry forbids quotation of the phrase she uttered at this point. 

A RAFFLES INTERNATIONAL HOTEL 
Rafflr* Hotel I Be*± Road. Stagipore 189673. Td: (65> 337- IM6. fie lb? lii'f-ZhW UmmT: ol«&paciSc.MUg 


• was hardly surprising. 

husband, squeezed into 
The hotel administration 




m 


p? 


I <v 


on ru pe iQfetti* iMiM out 

nitaa in 

HIM L am Mdi Dl» YM PE inuv Loo UM Ofe 




if 


j 

99 i 


A » i 

ia ii _ 
w O li 


an in 

Si W i 


1 =.:. 


\m 


& 


,M IS fl 

.01 n « 


£ 'll! h 

•1 r s? 

J 

5 .as li? 

| hh 

,i* IT y* 

£ IS NJ 


j«3 

i * * c 


:« 6ft jg 

•ft 'ft* '» 

v. in* II 

£ ll£t ISs 

■X: g & 

■5 I" IS 

>9| u 

ia*t n*« 

4 : S' 1 li? 

•I IRi IT* 

is* 

JT* 17W 

•ym 4pi 

•> MV; 


mm 


\t 


|r 


l» »3 ff 
w? rt 3 


i*. w . 

8 S 


VS 8 

^ 13 > 


??. s 

1.T2 U 
SI J K 

M I-/ 

191 1? rf 

f i i5 

M I* 13 

•IH ■: 

■1 S I 


ilB*4 Ills 

K* JT 

2*>< »!• »•- 


If. K‘. 7Sk 

KTiiL* ir 
ft? * 

tit, 


m% r»i 
nn if 

£, U:. r. 

r. 

n r« 

W*. m r« 




to ii 


raa 


.a 


If 


is ss? . 


l * *5 s£ 




r35 iTST 45 






J!’ it* MS? 1 . i» *» 

ij, ?f> 3J» 7* 


fi i\ s ??? 


a as s 


r. >. 

i 1 . 

fr^.' 

£ ^ 

91 U 7-m 

>j P- 

r f-i 

'.I l>;v 

if- (" S-: 

*L] V • 

f. }■ :~v 

V- 

o* - 


S' -i.i 

Cl «. "i. 


J ■_ "i - ; 

•;* r ’-»•• 

- i:’. 

f ■* “ 


s’: • r 


































































































































































page is 


\ Japan Riches 
| Buoy Growth 

t: Globe Relies on Its Capital 

' By Peter Passell 

F New Y i>rk Times Semi f 

'■ Hardly anything is going right for the Japanese 

) economy. After a burst of growth in foe first 
•*. quarter of the year, Japan is once again limping 
*■ along. Protectionist noises are beginning to em- 
» anate from America as Japan's bilateral trade 
*■. surplus grows. Meanwhile, the economy s near- 
» term prospects for less controversial exports of 
capital goods to Southeast Asia have dimmed 
l with the collapse of the Thai baht and other 
*- regional currencies. 

' Japan, it seems, is trapped between the need to 

- grow richer to pay for the retirement of its aging 

* population and the rest of the world’s arabi- 
m valence about buying the flood of Japanese goods 

► and services needed for Japan to accumulate the 
l necessary wealth. 

* But some economists would happily turn this 

~ conventional wisdom on its bead. Without Jap- 
. anese ex pons of capital, asks Gary Saxonhouse, a 
’ University of Michigan economist, who would 

► provide the savings to develop Eastern Europe 

b> __ 

J ECONOMIC SCENE 

[ and Latin America — or. for that matter, the 

- capital needed to keep interest rates relatively 
' low in the United States? “Japan is doing the 

* world a favor.” he said. 

* After expanding at a phenomenal 6.6 percent 

■ annual rate in the first quarter, the Japanese econ- 
’ omy has settled back into tepid growth — or worse. 

I It is’ hard to tell because statistics for the first half of 

■ the year were muddled by a surge of consumption 
' in anticipation of a big sales tax increase and then 

* a sharp fall after it went into effect 

The economically enlightened »but politically 
sensitive) prescription tor what ails Japan from 
the United States is to divert savings into do- 
mestic investment and consumption. “There's 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 






EiftvSnpWRBncn 

RE WING UP — President Nobuhiko Kawamoto unveiling Honda Motor Co.’s Torneo 
model in Tokyo. Redesigned VS. Accord models will go on sale this month, he said. 


lots Japan could do to help itself without in- 
creasing its trade surplus, argued John Makin, an 
economist at the American Enterprise Institute, 
which generally supports free-trade policy. 

Specifically, deregulating agriculture would 
open suburban land to a building boom. De- 
regulating distribution and retailing would in- 
crease efficiency and spur consumption. Dereg- 
ulating financial services would allow Tokyo to 
capture profits that now flow to New York and 
London. 

Some of this is likely to happen. While land use 
reform remains the third rail of Japanese politics, 
financial services and the economy’s archaic 
distribution system are already changing. 

But Mr. Saxonhouse notes that Japanese labor 
will grow increasingly scarce as the population 
ages ? making it ever more difficult to comple- 
ment new capital formation. Hence Japan's best 
investment opportunities will still be overseas. 

In the middle term, he estimates. 3 percent 
domestic economic growth is consistent with a 2 
percent surplus on foreign accounts — not very 


different from the current-account surplus Japan 
has been averaging for the last two decades. “I 
don't see Japan having many options,” he said. 

Is dial bad? If you happen to be an employee or 
major shareholder in Chrysler Corp., probably. 
Any world in which Japan runs a large current- 
account surplus is likely to be a world in which 
competitors to the Japanese car companies will 
never be allowed to relax. But it certainly is not bad 
for American consumers, who are still enjoying 
the fruits of the shake-up in traditional industries 
forced by Japanese exporters in the 1980s. 

More to the immediate point, Japan is the only 
large, rich economy around to generate savings 
for others. 

While America and Europe supply technology 
to the rest of the world, they collectively import 
capital. Although some countries may be able to 
develop without net inflows of capital — South 
Korea and Taiwan managed to through enormous 
domestic thrift — neither Latin America nor 
Africa is Likely to meet its potential without vast 
infusions of foreign savings. 


U.S. Puts Sanctions on Japan Ships 


i. • *■*'/ V *‘iuCf F r rP f'w ui. An 

TOKYO — Trade tensions be- 
tween the United States and Japan 
escalated Thursday when Washing- 
ton. accusing Japan of discrimin- 
atory port practices, slapped sanc- 
tions on Japanese ships arriving at 
. U.S. ports. 

The sanctions, under which Jap- 
anese container ships must pay 
S 1 00.000 each time they enter a U.S. 
port from overseas, came into effect 
Thursday after shippers failed to 
agree on Japanese port reforms. 

With no Japanese vessels sched- 
uled to sail into a U.S. port until 
Fridav. talks were set to continue in 


a bid to solve the issue before any 
fines were levied. 

On Thursday, the government re- 
ported that Japan’s merchandise 
trade surplus for the first 20 days of 
August soared 236.3 percent from 
the same month a year ago as the yen 
weakened against the dollar and as 
expons of both automobiles and 
electronics to the United States and 
Europe rose. 

The surplus stood at 233.11 bil- 
lion yen l$! .93 billion), the Finance 
Ministry said. Exports rose 14.5 per- 
cent to 2.33 trillion yen, while im- 
ports increased 6.7 percent to 2.09 
trillion ven. 


Declining domestic spending, a 
weaker yen and strong demand for 
Japanese products overseas will 
keep Japan's trade surplus expand- 
ing through the end of the year, 
economists said. 

Global exports of Japanese auto- 
mobiles rose more than 10 percent 
in the first 20 days of August, and 
expons to the United States rose 
more than 10 percent, the ministry 
said. 

Separately, sales of imported 
automobiles in Japan fell for the 
fifth straight month in August after 
an increase in the nationafsales txx 
in Apri 1. t Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


Japanese Spent 
3.2% More in July 

Ageme France -Press* 

TOKYO — Japan's household 
spending in July grew 3.2 percent 
from a year earlier, following a de- 
cline of 4.7 percent in the previous 
month, the management and co- 
ordination agency said Thursday. 

The rise was the first since March, 
but an economic planning agency 
official said it was “still too early to 
say” that consumer spending has 
recovered from the negative impact 
of April's consumption tax in- 
crease. 

The official said spending on dur- 
able products was still weak. 


Seoul Gives 
Support to 
Big Bank 

State Gets 49°/o Stake 
In AiMng Korea First 

QwifMt^OHrSagfFi^Paratrhn 

. SEOUL — The government 
agreed Thursday to pump 1 .6 trillion 
won (Si. 77 billion) into Korea First 
Bank and take a 49 percent stake in 
the struggling lender io ward off the 
collapse of one of the country’s 
biggest banks. 

The central bank will provide l 
trillion won in one-year loans at a 
below-markec rate of 8 percent, its 
fourth such bailout ever. Korea First 
will also get 600 billion won in 
government boods in exchange for 
me 49 percent stake. 

The central bank also agreed to 
set aside 1 trillion won in loons to 

merchant h anks . 

The bailout measures came as the 
South Korean financial industry is 
reeling from snowballing bad loans 
and a spate of bankruptcies. 

“The special loan by the Bank of 
Korea to Korea First Bank will ease 
most of the fund shortage problem 
of the bank and help recover its 
credibility, boosting its deposits." 
the central bank said. 

“The liquidity injection for 
Korea First Bank was necessary,” 
said Rhee Namuh. head of research 
at Dongbang Peregrine Securities, 
“given the bank's great impact in 
the economy. But it T s just an emer- 
gency blood infusion, not a remedy 
to help the bank fully recover.” 

Five of the top 40 South Korean 
chaebol , or conglomerates have gone 
bankrupt or been put under bank- 
ruptcy protection so far this year, as 
the slowest economic growth in four 
years, caused by slumping exports, 
has squeezed cash flows. 

Banks have suffered because their 
problems — and the declining won 
— are making it more expensive for 
them to borrow money overseas. 

Korea First's share of bad loans, 
at approximately 7.2 trillion won, 
exceeds that of all other South 
Korean banks, as it was the lead 
creditor in some of the biggest col- 
lapses this year, including Hanbo 
Group and the Kia Group. 

Both Moody's Investors Service 
Inc. and Standard & Poor’s Corp. 
cut the credit rating of Korea First, 
and the American agencies are re- 
viewing the bank for a further down- 
grade. I Bloomberg. Reuters ) 





Source: Telekvrs 


rstock Market 9.460.7S 

pFE ... • . • .£«77.6S~x£^t3 +4-19 


Composite index . 53&S3r.. ; -'fftS 


*0574 4 ■ 3£6&s?": +? 


(nfemaluxuf Herald TcilviK 


SensiSve index 


Very briefly; 

• Hanbo Steel & General Construction Co.'s creditors, who 
have failed three times to auction off the South Korean bankrupt 
company, have begun negotiations to sell its assets piecemeal. 

• Ssangyong Group said it was discussing the sale of its 
lucrative paper-making subsidiary with Procter & Gamble 
Co. and Kimberly-Clark Corp. in a move to ease the South 
Korean conglomerate's credit and financial difficulties. 

• De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd. has resumed talks with a 
B roken Hill Ply. after the Australian company said this week 
tha t it conld not afford to snub De Beers and after Chairman . • 
Jerry Ellis was reported as saying it would not abandon the 
diamond giant’s Central Selling Organization. 

• Arnotts Ltd.’s net profit for the year ended Aug. 3 feU 44 
percent, to 34 million Australian dollars ($24.8 million), from 
the previous year as sales tell 4 percent, ro 697.5 million dollars. 

The company blamed the plunge on an extortion scheme 
involving poisoned Arnotts goods that led the food giant to pull 
its products from store shelves in two states in February. 

• Honda Australia Pty. will import the next model of the 

Accord sedan from the United States instead of Japan. . . 

• Indian Consolidated Services & Securities and Hamon 

Investment Group of Hong Kong have set up a $25 million 
fond to help Indian companies 'restructure operations,, an 
Indian newspaper reported. afp. Reuters. Bloomberg. afp 

Australian Spending Heats Up 

Bloomberg News ■ ’’ ’ 

SYDNEY — Australian retail spending rose a higher-than- j f ^ 
expected 2.6 percent in July, its highest monthly rise for three * - ; 
years, the government announced Thursday. • . 

Retail spending in July rose to 11.16 billion Australian ' 
dollars (S8.13 billion) from 10.87 billion in June, the gov- 
ernment said. ' ’ ‘ 

• ‘It’s quite clear the economy has picked up.” said Shane 
Oliver at AMP Investments. 




Your Guide Tb 
1 29 Tbp French Companies 





0 ^ ^ 


Published by the International Herald Tribune, the 1997 edition includes detailed 
profiles of ali the companies in the SBF 1 20 Index. 

The SBF 1 20 Index includes the CAC 40 plus other major firms. These are the 
companies to watch in the coming years. 

Each profile includes: head office, CEO, investor relations manager, company 
background and major activities, recent developments, sales breakdown, shareholders, 
subsidiaries and holdings in France and internationally, 1Q92- 1 9^6 financial performance, 
and recent stock trading history. 

Updated annually, the Handbook is indispensable for anyone who needs to know 
about the leading companies in the world s fourth-la rgest economy. 


SBF 120 INDEX; 

ACCOR 

AGF 

AN UOU1DE 
ALCATEL ALSTHOM 
A1TRAN TECHNOLOGIES 
ATOS 
AXA-UAP 

BERTRAND FAD HE 

SC 

BNP 

BOU.OR£ TECHNOLOGIES 

BONGRAIN 

SOUYGUES 

CANAL* 

CAP GEMINI 

CARBONE LORRAINE 

GtffREFOUR 

CASINO 

CASTORAMA 

CETELEM 

CGB* 

CHARCEUHS 
ON ENTS FKANCACS 

□ARMS 

CLUB MEDTIERRANEE 
COLAS 

COM PAG N IE BANCAIRE 
COUPAGKIE G£NERALE DES 
E MIX 

CDMPTOIRS MOOERNCS 
CPU 

CREDIT AGRICOIL IDF 


CRfJHT COMMERCIAL D£ 
FRANCE-OCF 
CREDIT LYONNAIS 
DANONE 

DASSAULT ELECTROTMOUE 

DASSAULT SYSTEM ES 
D£ DIETRICH 

oegrEmont 

DEXIA 
EIFFAGE 
ELF AQUITAINE 
ERAMET 

EWDAVM 8EGHJN-5AY 
ESSliOR INTERNATIONAL 
EUBAFEANCE 

EUSOnsnErscA 

EUROPE I COMMUNICATION 
EUROTUNNEL SJt 
F&1PACCHI mEdias 
CAN 

GAZETEAUX 
GEBQ INDUSTRIES 

GKANDOPTICAL PHOTOSERVICES 

GTMhENTOPOSE 

GUtLBEKT 

GUVENNE ET GASCOGNE 
HAVAS 

HAMS ADVERTISING 
hermEs international 
imEtal 

LABINAL 
LAFARGE 
LAGARQERESCA 
IAPEYRC 
LEE RAND 


LEGRIS INDUSTRIES 

LOREAL 

LVMH 

UTONNAISE DESEAUX 

M6-METROPOLE TELEVISION 

MKHEUN 

MOULINEX 

NATEXISSA. 

NORDE5T 

PARIBAS 

RATHE 

FECHINEV 

PEBNODRKARD 

PEUGEOT 

PLNAUCT-PRINTEMPS-REDOUTE 

PLASTIC OMNIUM 

PUHAGAZ 

PROMOOfiS 

RENAULT 

REXEL 

RKdNE-PQULENC 
SAGEM 
SAINT-COBAIN 
SALOMON SA 
SANOfl 

SCHNEIDER SA. 

SCOR 

SEBSA. 

SEF1MEG 

SERA 

5CS-THOMSON 
SI DEL 

sweo 

SfTA 

SWSROSSKNOL 


SOQtTt ANONYME DE 
TfamDMMUNICATTONS^AT 
SOOCTE GENERALE 
SODEXHO 
SOGEPARC 
SOMMER ALUBERT 
STRAFORFACOM 
SUEZ 

synthElabo 

TBCHNIP 

TF1 

THOMSON -CSf 

TOTAL 

UAF 

UNIBAIL 
USBtOB 
VALEO 
VALLOUREC 
WORMS ET □£ 

ZODIAC 

PLUS THESE COMPANIES: 

AEftOPORTS DE MRB-ADP 
CAJS5E OE5 DEPOTS ET 
CONSIGNATIONS 
CECEUac 
CNP ASSURANCES 
COFLEXIP STENA OFFSMOR E 
COCCMA 
ELF AtOCHEM 
FRANCE TELECOM 
CAZDE FRANCE 
METALEUROP 


-T* 4 ^ IVTlR\vn‘*U * f 

Hcraio s ^^ r enbunc 


i ■ •'a tm F'Vbn.jiw hpr 


THE WORUmWIA NEW SttPF.R 


Return your order to International Herald Tribune Offers, 37 Lambton Road. London SW20 0LW. England. 


For faster service, fax order to: (44-181 ) 944-8243 

Please send me - copies of French Company 

Handbook 1407 at UK£50 I US$85) per copy, including 
postage in Europe. 

Three or more copies. 2CPo reduction. 

Outside Europe, postage per copy: North America/Middle 
East £3.50. Rest of world £o. 

Please charge ro my credit card: 

□ Access D Ame\ D Diners 

O Eurocard D MasterCard C Visa 

_ ' r- m*nl !»: in i «' ur>d?- :ji], 

i •h*.' or lor r-.aul E^er r'jt'talvnir Lid i 


CARD N° 

SIGNATURE 

I necessary for credit card purchases) 
NAME liv BLOC*. LETTU51 

POSITION 

COMPANY 

ADDRESS 

CrTY'COUNTRY'CODE 

COMPANY EU VAT ID No 


5-9-97 


GALLO: Winemaker Strives for Premium Label 

Continued from Page 13 w ill be associated only with wine drinkers from jug wint 


wineries was up nearly 10 
percent, to 76.7 million cases, 
according to Impact, an in- 
dustry trade journal, while 
table wine was up only 1.7 
percent, to 52.9 million cases. 
In 1985. generic table wine 
accounted for Si percent of 
all California wine ship- 
ments: last year, it was down 
ro about 40 percent. 

Responding to this shift in 
taste, Gallo has moved pro- 
duction of its premium wines 
ro Sonoma County, where it 
has been buying land for 
years. 

They abandoned the 3- and 
4-liter bottles for Hearty Bur- 
gundy. once the United 
States' best-known jug wine, 
confining it to standard 750- 
fniliimeter 3nd 1. 5-lifer 
bonles with corks, low-key la- 
bels and a price of $4 for the 
smaller bottles. 

"It's nor inconceivable 
that one day the Gallo name 


will be associated only with 
top-of-the-line varietals,’ ’ 
said Mr. Everett, the wine 
consultant. 

Gallo already expons its 
premium brands, but only to 
Europe, while Latin Amer- 
ican and Asian raaikets buy a 
mix of products, a Gallo 
spokeswoman said. Gallo ex- 
ported a total of 6 million 
cases of wine to 85 countries 
last year, she said. 

Marking many of its labels 
“Made in Healdsburg” is 
worth “many millions of dol- 
lars ro the Gallos, ’ * according 
to the wine consultant Jon 
Fredrickson, because it 
avoids the Modesto identific- 
ation that is a Gallo give- 
away. In fact, a recently in- 
troduced Turning Leaf Re- 
serve line is made at Sonoma 
instead of Modesto, benefit- 
ing from the cachet of the 
Healdsburg address. 

Gallo had little choice. It 
had largely missed out on the 
seismic shift of American 


GFOJPE 

rorsD 





CONSOLIDATED FIRST-HALF RESULTS 


(FRF niilhnnsi 

30.06.1997 

30.06.1996 

Sates 

5,129 . 

4.3S7 

Operating iiwme 

396 

340 

Current income 

351 

295 

Nel income 

125 

119 

Net income. Group share 

101 

121 

Net income - depreciation ... 

340 

334 


ExtrjcK irom Chairman Jacques Gai raid's message: 
"During ihoe fir.! six months, the major event for Groupe 
SEB was i he friendly takeover of Arno, the leader ol the 
Brarilian market for small electrical appliances. 

At the end ol February. I jnnounccd tu you that our results 
would increase by 10 % over ihe emire fiscal year. In spue 
of the impact ol mediocre sales in France and Germany on 
the result for the first half of the year. I remain quite 
confident and confirm our growth target concerning ihe 
operating income. This will bo supplemented bC the 
positive contribution made by ihe acquisition of Arno. 
However, the burdensome increase of ihe corporation tax 
in France. b> about FRF 40 million, will reduce the effect of 
this emulh ul the level ot nel income. 

The Group is continuing IO progress , in j j s irnesting in 
order to avail itsell. in nil of the world's m.ijor markets, of 
a network capable of guarantee! na its Ion si- term 
development". 

The \i.\-imiirhl\ report \iill he m , viable ojt of Sepinnhcr /’ 

1 7.1 +A1J IS In. -fit - Fur *.vV 72. f-\ 15. '*) i 
Internet si/tv hup: '.’vn-n’.gnnipvsvl\cmn 


a wine drinkers from. jug wines 
’ to varietals, letting other big 
z names grab a big slice of friar 
market — particularly the' 
s Benziger family with its GJen 
) Ellen line, which it sold to 

- Grand Metropolitan PLC's 
i Heubiein unit in 1993.T - 

> But now Gallo is in a’harry 

- to make up for lost time^To 
i help meet demand for its new 
i brands, the recently- com- 
pleted winery in Sonoma just 

; west of Healdsburg is oper- 
; aring 24 hours a day, pro- 
ducing an estimated 2 millioa 
: bottles a month. Gallo ex- 
pects to increase its capacity 
by 30 percent within the next , 
couple of years in addition to. 
opening three more wineries 
on the California coast. 

Meanwhile, the center of 
power has shifted to the 
second generation, who were 
long overshadowed by Ernest 
and J uJio. Julio was killed in a 
car accident four years ago at 
the age of S3, and Ernest^ still 
stricken by the loss, has re- 
moved himself from daily op- 
erations. 

Now running the show are 
three co-presidents: Julio's 
son Robert, in cliarge of vit- 
iculture and wine making; his 
son-in-law James Coleman. " 
in charge of production; and 
Ernest’s son Joseph, in charge 
of sales. A fourth co-presi- 
dent. Ernest’s older son Dav- 
id. died in March of a heart 
attack at the age of 57. 

There was a time when 
wine makers in Sonoma 
County and over the moun- 
tain in the Napa Valiev 
shrugged off the threat from 
the Gallos. Few do now. 

"The Gallos are laving 
down a challenge wirh thes? 
wines, and anyone around 
who s not up to that challens- 
would be wise to consider an- 
other line Of work " 

Rodney Strong, founder of 
Rodney Strong Vineyards in , 

Sonoma County t0 w Q of ( 

Windsor, who retied 
years ago. ° 

In any case, it is the lure nf 
uxuty that pumps up rhew 
!*> lh . ese And thev 
jumping in in typical G-.ik 
fashion— all out GalI ° 

"Gallo wasslowro set 

premium wines, but^ t h at \ 
their style ” said John Fr c 
drtkson of Gombera & Fre 
dnkson, a wine ‘ 

firm in San Francisco -' U -nl n§ 
^Ch. they wnf, me„^! V 
lumo in f>n,T ,..i. nen foev 


jump in and take over Th ' 
have no stockhnU 
foey pu , eveS., hl n de ^ antl 
fo* business. Thiv*, b f c,c ffl 
vantage of lho ^ ad - 
t-reonomies of sni niassiv e 














cruTKSMHii.1997 

A "“ 

EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 5, 199* 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRID AY. S EPTE MBER 5, 1997 


PAGES 


pa nr. *x.i 


PACE 19 


Summits 
Conferences 


As an extension of the news and commentary the International 
Herald Tribune brings to its readers, the newspaper has a successful 
and highly-respected worldwide summit and conference program 
that focuses on economic and political issues. The program for the 

second half of 1997 includes: 


World Water: Financing for the Future Istanbul 

September 30 -October 1 

Romania Investment Summit Bucharest 
October 29-30 

Oil £t Money Conference London 

November 18-19 

I Southern Africa Trade ft Investment Summit Gaborone 

November 18-19 



of+w events please contact Brenda Erdmann Hagerty, 
SS London WC* 01H. «. «U 1* « 

Inte Fax; (44 171) 836 0717 E-mail: bhagerty@iht.com 



THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 





PAGE 20 


World Roundup 


Pamevik and Faldo 


Sports 


Davenport Ousts Novotna 

To Reach First Slam Semi 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1W ^ 


Rusedski Advances After Edging Krajicek 


golf Severiano Ballesteros, the 

Jesper Pamevik as his wUd or* 
and claimed his team for the 
26-28 match against the Umtefl 
Stales was stronger than the vic- 
torious squad of 1987. 

“I'm very happy to finally have 
the whole team, and the \2 men all 
fit,” said Ballesteros, with obvious 
reference to the dr^mg of injured 
compatriot Miguel Angel Martin. 

“Ten years ago when we played 
it Muiifield Village I “>vrays 

thought it would take a really long, 
long time to find as good a team as 
we had then. I’m glad that I was 

WI Meanwliile Martin, said he will 
po to court to save his place on 
Europe’s team. Martin earned fee 
last of 10 automatic berths, but was 
kicked off the European team Tues- 
day after refusing to play 18 holes 
to prove his surgically repaired 
wrist had healed enough to allow 
him to compete in the Ryder 
Cup. (Reuters) 

Scotland Changes Date 

soccer FIFA, fee governing 
body of World soccer, said Thurs- 
day it would allow Scotland to post- 
pone its world cup qualifying match 
against Belarus until Sunday. 

The Scottish FA had been heav- 
ily criticized when it at first refused 
to switch fee match from Saturday, 
the day of the funeral of Diana, 
Princess of Wales. (Reuters) 

Maradona Fails Twice 

soccer A new test on a urine 
sample from Diego Maradona con- 
finned that fee player took drugs 
before a league game 10 days ago, 
fee Argentine Football Association 
said Wednesday. 

Albino Bemposta, an AFA 
spokesman, said Maradona had 
tested positive for a prohibited sub- 
stance, but added that he was for- 
bidden by law to reveal what fee 
substance was. 

Maradona, 36, has already served 

two bans, once after testing positive 
for cocaine following in 1991, and 
once after testing positive for 
banned stimulants in 1994. (AP) 

Young to Miss Game 

football Steve Young, fee San 
Francisco 49ers quarterback, will 
miss Sunday's game against the St. 
Louis Rams on fee advice of his 
neurologist- Young suffered his 
third concussion in 10 months in last 
Sunday's loss at Tampa Bay. (AP) 

Tanner Sentenced 

tennis RoscoeTanner, the 1977 
Australian Open winner, pleaded 
no contest to passing a worthless 
check for more than $10,000. He 
was given a one-year suspended 
sentence and ordered to pay court 
costs within 30 days. (AP ) 

Hakkme n Loses Points 

formula one The FIA, fee 
governing body of Formula One on 
%orsday stripped Mika Hakkinen. 
a Finnish driver wife the McLaren 
team, of his third place finish in fee 
Belgian Grand Pnx last month and 
fined fee team $50,000 for fuel 
irregularities. (Reuters) 


By Jennifer Frey 

Washington Post Service ■ 

NEW YORK — The day Lindsay Davenport 
won the gold medal at the Atlanta Olympics last 
year, someone asked her if it was bigger than 
winning a Grand Slam. She bad no idea what to 
answer. She’d never won a Slam. Never made the 
finals. Never even made it to the semis. 

And for a long time, Davenport felt fee weight or 
feat failure. She put all kinds of pressure on herself 

. .. .a! : flcfw'i'lllv hftTft at 


broken just once in this toun^^oth were 
broken in their first service games. Better able to 
handle the conditions. Rusedsbprev^^T-S/T-fi 
(7-5) 7-6 (8-6), in a matchup of unseeded players 
and will meet another nonseedjonas Bjottanan 
advanced when No. 15 PetiKorda, conqu 
No. 1 Pete Sampras, ™*drw ™fe a hcad 
cold when already down, 7-6 (7-3), 6-2, l-O. 

Like Davenport, Rusedski will be making his 

first Chand Slam semifmal appearance. 

“I feinfe- 1 handled the conditions better, made 


U.S. OfiwTimnis 

no expectations. And it has turned into fee best 
Grand Slam tournament of her life. 

Inside Arthur Ashe Stadium on a windy 
Wednesday, Davenport survived fee gusty, un- 
nredictable conditions and Jana Novotna, the No.i 

Seed, to claim a ^4, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5) victory in the 
first of two women’s quarterfinals, and to advance 
to a Grand Slam semifinal for fee first tune. There 
she will face No. 1 Martina Hingis, who showed no 
sympathy for her doubles partner. No. 10 Arantxa 
Sanchez Vicario, on her way to a 6-3, 6-2 victory. 
Davenport, the sixth seed, is one of only two 
women to beat Hingis this year- „ 

“Whatever happens now is a bonus, said Dav- 
enport, who beat Hingis in three sets at a tour- 
nament in Manhattan Beach, California, tost month. 

• ‘There were so many ups and downs wife the wind, 
it just played havoc on fee ball. It was difficult to 
play. I’m just really lucky I got through.” 

jun Conner said at the start of this tournament 
that the old facility — Louis Armstrong Stadium 

felt like 4 ‘a toilet bowl’ ’ when the wind swirled. 

The new building proved that it, too. can create 
conditions akin to full flush. Spectators had to 
clutch their ice cream wrappers to keep from 
inadvertently littering, fans held onto their hats, 
and fee players had to make adjustments to their 

games. , . . 

The wind was hardest on the serve, which was 
evident when Greg Rusedski and Richard Krajicek 
two of the biggest servers — followed Dav- 
enport and Novotna onto fee court Both had been 


iiuui mm . , | ■ 

Neither Novotna nor Davenport, who also are 
doubles partners, seemed to knowquite what to do 
with the situation. They didn’t know what to do 
about fee effect fee wind bad on then ball tosses or 
their topspin lobs — not to mention how to deal 
wife tgnnfg skirts feat constantly wanted to blow 
upward. And by the end of their match, which 
lasted 2V& hours, both were almost laughing at fee 
comical effects fee wind had on their performance 

Davenport, for example, once double-faulted 

when her second toss blew sideways, and Novotna 
hit a key shot down the line that literally blew 

wide. . , , 

The last set alone was worth a few chuckles, as 
both tried hopelessly to finish the match. That set 
lasted 1 hour 24 minutes, and featured seemingly 
endless unconverted break points from both sides. 
Once ahead, 4-1, Davenport lost five consecutive 
games before she managed to break Novotna on 
her fifth break-point opportunity of the game — to 
even the set at 5. Told after the match that she had 
converted just six of 25 break-point opportunities 
for fee match, Davenport cringed. 

“That’s pathetic. I didn’t know that Wow. 

Before her quarterfinal began, Davenport 
wasn’t thinking about the wind or her opponent. 
Slie heard the public address announcer state m her 
introduction that she was appearing in her 22d 
Grand Slam. The number hit her hard. This is 
Davenport’s seventh U.S. Open; fellow American 
Venus Williams also has made fee semifinals here 
— she will play No. 1 1 Irina Spirlea of Romania — 
but she did so in her first appearance ax age 17. 

“I was like, ‘Oh, my goodness,' ” said Dav- 
enport, who is 21 and turned pro at the start of 
1993. “I don’t feel old, but I feel in the middle of 



Jonas Bjorkman powering a backhand shot to Petr Korda. Korda retired sick in the third-set. 


three generations- 1 think Venus and Martina are 
fee faces of the future.” , , , 

Hingis is not only fee future, she s fee present, 
and her performance here thus far makes it ap- 
parent she will be tough to beat She hasn t dropped 

a set through five rounds, and the only match she s 
played feat even resembled a challenge was her 7- 
5, 6-2 victory over Russia's Elena Likhovtseva m 
fee fourth round. “It was very easy so far for me to 
play this tournament,” Hingis said. “The only 
hard match was fee first set when I played Lik- 


hovtseva. Besides that I’m playing very weli so , 
far, and the tournaments before I played well, and 
I’m just ready for this tournament.” , . 

Hingis thought Sanchez Vicario might give her a.* . 

rough road, but the Spaniard didn’t Now, she s-; 
wailing for Davenport. 

“She has the potential to win. a Grand Slam, . 
Novotna said, endorsing Davenport as fee biggesfj. 
po tential obstacle left for H i n gis. “If she keeps on-' 
hitting fee ball like she was today, then she def^ ; : 
initely can do it” ■- - ’fe. 


As Stars Fall, Americans Turn Gloomy at Open 


Washington Post Service 

N EW YORK— Everybody’s 
having a marvelous time here 
at fee U.S. Open — the Span- 
iards, fee Brits, fee South 
Americans, fee Swiss. Even fee Romani- 
ans, as Die Nastase says he’s more ex- 
cited over countrywoman Irina Spirlea 
making it to the semifinals than he ever 
was as a player. ■ 

It’s a nig international playground, 
bubbling over wife multiple languages. 
Only one group of people seems not to 
be having a good time: The Americans. 

Why not? Because we don’t have 
enough players left, particularly in fee 
men’s draw. All over fee grounds, 
people of various nationalities rush from 
court to court to see good tennis: juniors, 
doubles and mixed doubles. The Amer- 
icans, regardless or race or gender, won- 
der aloud if Venus Williams can “save” 
fee tournament as if it is going to expire. 
We ask, naively, if CBS, fee television 
network feat is broadcasting fee Open in 
the United States, will still show fee 
men’s final if Michael Chang is elim- 
inated beforehand. 

You want the definition of “Ugly 
American?" All you have to do is walk 
the ground in Flushing Meadows. Any- 
body who looks like a total sourpuss is 
one of ours. 


Van t age Point J WichahWiuom 


It started Monday night when Pete 
Sampras, fee Great American Hope, was 
upset by Petr Korda of fee Czech Re- 
public, then took an ugly turn Tuesday 
afternoon when Monica Seles — one of 

ours for a. few years now — was knocked 
off by Spirlea, and hit absolute rock 
bottom a few minutes before 1 A. M. 
Wednesday when Andre Agassi bit fee 
dust in a rather entertaining four-setter 
against Patrick Rafter of Australia. 

Not only did we lose fee best Amer- 
icans, but we lost the stars, and, of course, 
the only thing Americans care more 
about than themselves is celebrities. 

There's a perception, growing ex- 
ponentially, that tennis is dead. 

But to steal a line from fee flam- 
boyant boxing promoter Don King, I’d 
say feat applies Only in America. 

Tennis seems to be alive and well in 
fee rest of the world. Even interesting. 

Just because Americans are bored 
with tennis doesn’t mean everybody 
else is, or feat fee tennis being played 
here is flawed or bad. CBS might indeed 
be in trouble because 99 percent of U.S. 
sports fans — at least those outside of 
the tennis community — couldn’t 
identify Jonas Bjorkman or Greg 


Rusedski if $1 billion was at stake. 

At 2 AM. Wednesday a prominent 
UJS. tennis pro said wife great passion, 
“I really want to see that Korda-Bjork- 
mpn match tomorrow." And he was 
dead serious. 

It wasn’t until later that it dawned on 
me that Korda-Bjoikman just might be a 
great match. Better than watching 
Sampras-anybody. . 

You know who’s contributing to this 
we-are-the-worid mentality? None oth- 
er than John McEnroe, who is com- 
mentating for CBS. On fee airdoring fee 
interminable Agassi-Rafter match, he 
said sarcastically, “No one will dare 
leave early tomorrow night during that 
Korda-Bjorkman match!” 

As a tennis sycophant, the one thing I 
know is that there have been fabulous 
players here at the Open fee past 10 
days. The crowd, understandably, 
cheered with everything it had until way 
past midnight for AgassL But you know 
what? Rafter at this point in his career is 
a much better player. Much better. 

He’s a stone-cold serve-and-volley 
player who got to fee serais at fee French 
Open and could cause Americans some 
uncomfortable moments in two weeks 


when he leads Australia against fee 
United States in Davis Cup play. 

Why should I care more about 
Agassi, who half fee time doesn’t seem 

__ - *0 Lo tt? marripH 


magazine all the time? Don t get me 
wrong. I’m a big Agassi fan and I’m not 
about to suggest feat at 27 he’s washed 
np if he still wants to play. But he lost in 
fee first' round of just about every tour- 
nament he played this year and had an 
injured wrist. He was not tournament 
tough and was not going to win seven 
matches here. But we bought the tease, 
the U.S. media, fee fans, the corporate 
sponsors, and even Sampras, who, after 
he lost, anointed Agassi as a favorite. 

Obviously, the obsession with Agassi 
has a lot to do wife Sampras dominating 
fee men's game, and wanting him to 
have a worthy opponent. Tennis needs 
rivalries. We got so accustomed to the 
great rivalries of fee 1970s and ’80s feat 
we are still stuck there: Borg-Connors, 
Borg-McEnroe, Connors-McEnroe, 
McEnroe- Lendl, Evert-Navratilova. 
And, you'll notice, there was always an 
American involved. It was no coincid- 
ence whatsoever feat tennis enjoyed its 
American boom during that stretch. 

It's too bad we have to be so narrow- 
minded about this. Our acceptance of 



MsfcLcmtaVAP 

A happy Martina Hingis, who beat 
Arantxa Sanchez- Vicario, 6-3, 6-2. • 

great but locally unknown players isn't 
going to change all of a sudden because 
I want it to. But there used lobe a saying 
feat went, “If you can’t fight, switch.” 

I'm going out right now to watch 
Bjorkman play Korda, and damn it, I, 
plan to like iL 1 


GAMES: Race Down to Wire 


Continued from Page 1 

“ 1 have been elected with 
1 million votes,” said 
Francesco Rutelli, fee mayor 
of Rome. “I think it is more 
difficult to pick up 54 votes 

than 1 milli on.” 

The 2004 Olympics will go 
to the first city to win a ma- 
jority of 54 votes. The vagar- 
ies of the election make it 
even more difficult to predict. 
With each round the city wife 
the fewest votes will be 
dropped from the race. Each 
vote will be cast by secret 
ballot, and wife each round 
the IOC members will have 
no idea which city has the 
greatest or least support 
The system is designed to 
prevent voters from forming 
blocs or otherwise controlling 
the election. Many of them 
are trying to do just that any- 
way. The IOC is a political 
organization, as opposed to, 
say,, fee National Football 
League in the United States, 
which is run according to a 
bottom line of maximizing 
profits. Every IOC member is 
a political animal well-versed 
in the an of exchanging fa- 
vors. 

Some opponents suspect 
feat the Spanish-speaking bloc 
has agreed to support the long- 
shot bid of Buenos Aires in fee 
first round at least. If Buenos 
Aires advances past fee fust 
round, then feat means any of 
the more likely contenders — 
including Athens and Rome 
— might be knocked out at fee 
start. As each round passes. 


voters will be forced to switch 
allegiances. Stockholm, in. 
spire of a dozen terrorist at- 
tacks on Swedish athletic fa- 
cilities this year, could win if 
enough voters consider it their 
second choice. 

As fee rounds progress, 
many of the 44 European 
voters may vote against Euro- 
pean candidates to improve 
fee chances of bringing the 
Olympics to their own coun- 
tries in 2008. 

“I think Rome is the heavy 
favorite io win,” said John 
Krimsky Jr., who oversees 
fee U.$- Olympic Commit- 
tee’s annual $100 million in- 
come and therefore maintains 
good relationships with fee 
top Olympic sponsors, most 
of them American. 

Athens is probably fee No. 
2 contender behind Rome. It 
is holder to gauge Athens’s 
role as its support crosses fee 
entire IOC spectrum on fee 
feeling that fee Olympics 
would regenerate then orig- 
inal spirit by returning to their 
Greek roots. 

Until recently it seemed 
certain feat these Olympics 
would be awarded to one of 
the three European finalists 
who survived the first round. 
The IOC eliminated six other 
candidate cities on fee basis of 
technical merit last March. 

But Mr. Mandela, in his 
address during Cape Town’s 
55-minute presentation, is ex- 
pected to thank fee IOC for its 
: role in the international sports 
i boycotts feat helped rid South 
, Africa of apartheid. By bring- 





Olympics Must Move to Real World 


> rj — * 



Mktacl Bulci/The Aw*m*d Pw« 

Nelson Mandela speaking to reporters Thursday as 

he arrived in Lausanne to lobby for Cape town. 


ing the Olympics to South 
Africa, he might say, fee IOC 
would be completing that 
work gloriously. 

Mr. Mandela indicated that 
he and Mr. Menem, in a meet- 
ing scheduled for Thursday 
afternoon, would agree to 
share their votes — asking the 
Argentine supporters to back 
the Cape Town bid, or vice 
versa, when one or the other is 
knocked out. 

“Three continents have 
had fee honor to hold an 
Olympic Games except for 
two — Latin America and 
Africa.” Mr. Mandela said 
during a press conference 
Thursday. “We consider it 
just and equitable that these 
two continents also have a 
chance of hosting fee 
Olympic Games.” 

Mr. Mandela derided con- 


cerns feat fee new Smith Af- 
rican government might not 
fulfill its Olympic promises 
after he leaves office in 1999. 

“In every way I am almost 
retired,” Mr- Mandela said, 
which was to say that the gov- 
ernment is already ranning 
fine without him. And if his 
counny were able io win the 
world's greatest prize, jusi 
seven years after nis release 
from prison? “I can’t tell you 
how l would feel,” he said.* 1 
think I will be so excited it 
would be difficult for me to 
think rationally.” 

Before the announcement 
is made, Mr. Mandela will 
already have caught a plane 
leaving Switzerland. Hie IOC 
asks feat heads of state not be 
on the scene as the winner is 
named, in order to avoid po- 
tential embarrassment. 


International' Herald Tribune 

L AUSANNE, Switzerland — A 
host for' fee 2004 Summer 
Olympics will be selected Friday 
by an organization wife few present 
worries. The International Olympic 
Committee is secure financially, wife its 
major sponsorships and TV contracts 
guaranteed into fee next millennium. 

The IOC can afford to lake a long- 
term view at this election, while re- 
maining true to its conservative lean- 
ings. That view ought to lead it to award 
fee 2004 Games to Athens. 

There may be a sense that Greece 
‘ ‘deserves’ ’ fee Olympics because of its 
ancient Olympian heritage and because 
it was somehow cheated of its birthright 
when the Centennial Olympics of last 
summer were given to Atlanta. 

But neither of those emotional ar- 
guments provides a real reason for hold- 
ing the Olympics in Athens. 

The Olympics have only recently be- 
come a billion-doUar consignment, a 
treasure lent only to those cities able to 
house fee Gaines and hopefully increase 
their stock. Sentimentality and other 
backward glances have nothing to do 
with fee business of fee Olympics any- 
more. They must move f°t™rd; 

Athens will liberate fee IOC from Us 
restrictive trend. It will steer the Sum- 
mer Olympics back onto a course feat 
will settle them eventually in Africa and 
South America for fee first nme - 
course, fee IOC might show unusual 
bravery and award the 2004 Olympics 
to Cape Town or Buenos Aires.) 

Most journalists and IOC voters 
would choose to sf«nd the three weeks 
in Rome or Stockholm. Rome would be 
a spectacular host, rivaling Barcelona as 
an Olympic site. Stockholm is a han- 
dful and tranquil city in summer. The 


Vantage Point / Ian Thomsen 


organization of either city promises to be 
superb. But where would each lead the 
Olympic movement? 

By continuing to place the Olympics 
in heavenly, well-functioning settings, 
fee IOC is cutting itself off from much 
of the world. 

The IOC is searching for a new di- 
mension io conquer. For fee moment, it 
has solved the issue of financing its 
growth. At Barcelona and apparently at 
Sydney in 2000 it will have perfectly 
combined beauty, infrastructure and 
commercial viability. Atlanta was a 
purely commercial, functional choice. 

Based on fee IOC’s recent choices, it 
is hard to imagine how it will persuade 
itself to visit Cape Town or Buenos 
Aires, cities that cannot guarantee ail of 
those ingredients. If the Olympics con- 
tinues attaching itself to places like 
Sydney, fee IOC will find it increasingly 
difficult to make fee leap to a city like 
Cape Town. The IOC will open itself to 
charges of snobbeiy, superiority and 
isolationism — which won t please its 
corporate sponsors who wish to develop 
such markets. 

Athens would serve the Olympics as 
a kind of transition, a junction to the 2 1 si 
century. It is a real world city with rough 
edges. It would provide perspective to 
the Olympic movement. 

From my Wcsrern colleagues, who 
provide a commercial insight clearly 
shared by the IOC, I hear that Athens is 
physically incapable of holding the 
Olympics: the streets are too narrow, the 
traffic too horrible, the pollution too 
threatening, and the Greeks too much 
given to infighting and disorganization. 
All of these objections are also used to 


l 

keep this enormous festival from vis-’ 
iting Africa and South America. ’ 

Given the opportunity, Athens would.’ 
prove feat a city feat does not seem 
fashionable by current Olympic stan- 
dards could overcome problems of in- . 
fras true lure and organization. 

The IOC can entrust its treasure to* 
Athens because the Olympics are so/ 
important to fee Greek people. They' 
grow up learning about fee Olympics in ■ 
school. The Olympics are pan of their 
heritage.. There would be some frights 
over the next seven years, some or- 
ganizational hysteria, but in the end they’ 
will prove the Olympian ideal — as" 
Atlanta could not — feat the driving 
spirit of the people can overcome fee* 
weaknesses of their institutions. 

Someone needs to prove to fee IOC 
feat there are other, less obvious more 
humane ways of fulfilling the Olympic 
spirit. Athens may not be the “perfect” 
choice — even after it builds new aj r . ' 
port, highways and metro extensions — 
and yet fee value of the Olympic stock 
would rise if fee Summer Games wi-rt 
held there in 2004 Every major city fe 
the world might begin to dream real 
tstically of being, host, providing 
pcople are sincere in their desire Th* 
sons and daughters of the aiicienr 
Greeks would again make the Olymnirl 
a truly universal competition. 7 F cs 

■ Samaranch Is Re-Elected 

Juan Antonio Samaranch „ 
elected Thursday as president S 
IOC until 200 1 . Ruutersreportei? 
Lausanne. The 77-year-old 

,he ™ e by acclamation 
stood against him. Nobody 


tips! R* 


11T-9 


j, 

5S*7S& § .: : : 

ss-sss- 

• r last rtf . 

?-AlOl^ L t - ' 

cause • • 

e-b"* MB..'-- • 

phittw* 3 ’ .-.J 

ikeSt^L 

n by " 

tcbesin*-;^ 

tf-ruc - 

i w on lu> 

bring «S SJ s 

■ 

lariner- tciil-- j _ 
puiethe ' - 

mingwaikiok— 


COREBOARD 


ijorLeauueS^^I 


AMERICAN 




low 

NlSiwwssta 

HluiwGr< 


MOMJUUIASUI 

itr: ■::* 

i „ ; 

UltanB - 

Florida 
NewYcrl 
Mortred 
PWbiIHis o 


DENNIS THE V; 




\ : \ v - 

* > > * 

i ^ 

! i- 1 * ■ 


r, , . . 

J 


S -- 


-nt ■ - 


r: 





l.s 


- 




f 




PAGE 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1991 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 


Who Fared 
The Best in 


Interleagne? 
NL, 117-97 


( ^ 
ll,h "mio 


The Associated Pms 

Interleave play has ended fox the 
season, wth the Honda Marlins and 
Montreal Expos the bis winners Both 
finished With 12-3 records against 
American League teams. 

Overall, National League teams fin- 


■ 


Basiiall Roun 


DUP 


f 


ished interleague play at 1 17-97. The NL 
took the final two stages 28-18 and S 3 - 
31 after dropping the first round 48-36. 

Martin* 7. Oriotos 8 Gary Sheffield 
homered with one out in the ninth inning 
to give the Marlins their 22d victory in 
their last at-bat. 

The Orioles had a scare in the third 
inning when the roof over the visitors’ 
dugout collapsed. No-one was hart. 

“A lot of crazy things have happened 
to cause injuries,” said Cal Ripken, the 
Orioles' ironman. who was on the field 
when the roof collapsed. ‘'That would 
have been the craziest.” 

Expos i, Red Sox 0 Boston’s Aaron 
SeJe and Tom Gordon combined on a 
one-hitrer in Montreal, but that hit was a 
home run by Mike Lansing and good 
enough for the victory. Carlos Perez 
,r shut the Red Sox down by pitchine a 
two-hitter for the Expos. 

Phillies 5, Yankees 4 In Philadelphia. 
Mike Stanton forced home the winning 
run by walking Tony Barron on four 
pitches in the ninth inning, as the Phillies 
beat New York. 

Indians 7 , Pirates 3 Omar Vizquel and 
Matt Williams hit two- run homers in a 
five-run fourth to give Cleveland the 
victory in Pittsburgh. Orel Hers hi sex (13- 
5 ) won his sixth decision in a row despite 
allowing eight hits in six-plus innings. 

Padres 6, Mariners 5 In Seattle, the 
Mariners’ reliever Mike Timlin forced 
home the go-ahead run with an eighth- 
inning walk to Quilvio Veras. 



Schumacher’s Fast Little Brother 


By Brad Spurgeon 

Inremmcwl Herat J Tribune 


’N THE pits at a Grand 
» Raff Sc ' 


Gctm WhlnuaThe .v-k.u'vJ FVe» 

The Phillies' Mickey IVlorandini sliding into second base to break up an 
attempted double play by the Yankees' shortstop Derek Jeter. 


Tigers 12, Braves 4 Tony Clark 
homered and batted in five runs as De- 
troit won in Atlanta. Willie Blair (15-6) 
gave up three runs in seven innings 10 
become Detroit’s first 15-game winner 
since Bill Gullickson in 1991. Atlanta's 
starter. John Smoltz, was tagged for 
eight runs and 10 hirs in 3'/s innings. 

Mets4,Blue Jays 2 In New York. Paul 
Quantriil’s sixth-inning throwing error 
allowed Che rying run to score and Rey 
.Ordonez followed with the winning hit 
as the Meis beat Toronto for their 41st 
comeback victory this season. 

Athitttics 12 , Giant* 3 In Oakland. 
Ben Grieve drove in five runs with a 
club record-tying three doubles in his 
major-league debut as the Athletics 
routed San Francisco. 


Rangers 5, Dodgers 2 In Arlington. 
Texas, Tom Goodwin tripled to break an 
eighth-inning tie as the Rangers sent Los 
Angeles to its third consecutive loss. 

Astros 4, Brewers o In Houston, Ra- 
mon Garcia pitched a five-hiner for his 
first complete game as the Astros beat 
Milwaukee. 

Cardinals 4, White Sox 2 In St. Louis, 
Gary Gaerti hit a tie-breaking homer in 
the sixth and Manny Aybar (1-4) 
pitched six innings for his first victory in 
the majors. 

Cub* 10 , Twins 6 In Chicago, Mark 
Grace hit a two-run homer as the Cubs 
beat Minnesota. 

Reds 6, Royals 3 In Cincinnati. Pokey 
Reese and Eddie Taubensee homered as 
the Reds beat Kansas City- 


I Prix race ^alf Schumach- 
er looks so much like his 
brother Michael that often 
the only way to tell them 
apart is by the color of their 
baseball caps; on the race 
crack, too. they are beginning 
to look more alike. 

In preparation for Sun- 
day's Italian Grand Prix at 
Monza, the younger brother, 
who wears a yellow cap and 
drives a yellow car. has been 
going much faster than the 
better-known one in the fa- 
mous red car and marching 
red cap. It will be the home 
race for Michael’s Ferrari 
team, but Jordan-Peugeoi 
cars set the fastest times dur- 
ing testing at the track last 
week. 

Close up, the differences 
appear. Raff does not have the 
muscle man presence of his 
brother, the double world 
champion. Raff has just 
turned 22, and unlike Mi- 
chael. 28, can look like a pink- 
cheeked, awkward teenager. 

' T don ’t Like to speak about 
ir,” said Raff of his physique, 
in an interview under the 
awning of his team’s mo- 
torhome at the Belgian Grand 
Prix, two weeks ago. "And I 
don’t like to have pictures in 
the gym or whatever because 
thafs not my style.” 

Raff has been called arrog- 
ant. Some say he is simply 
inordinately self-assured, oth- 
ers that, at 22. he is immarure. 
But he shares one character- 
istic with Michael that all race 
car drivers must have: a near 
lack of consciousness of the 
danger of hurtling around a 
track at break-neck speed. 

Ralf answered questions 
while watching the time trials 
for a Formula 3000 race on 
television. 

“It’s really bloody 


quick/' he said after being 
pressed on the danger. "But 
there are several circuits 
where if you go off. you 
wouldn’t have anything. You 
have a lot of big looking ac- 
cidents where the drivers just 
jump out and nothing hap- 
pens. And then other acci- 
dents like Panis’s that didn’t 
look that spectacular.” 

Panis broke both legs in 
his crash in Montreal. 

*‘I think it’s very secure.” 

At which point, on the tele- 
vision, a car spun off track, 
bounced into a tire barrier and 
nearly speared another car. 

”Oh Oh Oh Oh!” said 
Ralf. 

Only last year, little broth- 
er Raff was racing in Formula 
3000 in Japan. He won that 
series. The year before he 
won the most prestigious 
race in Formula 3, the Grand 
Prix of Macau — he say s that 
is his best racing memozy. 

Like Michael, he had been 


team owner who discovered 
Michael in 1991 and hired 
him for one race before he 
was snaiched up by Benetton, 
has said he signed Ralf for his 
qualities as a driver, but knew 
people would say it was for 
his name. 

The other Jordan driver is 
Giancarlo Fisichella, a young 
Italian. 

Jordan said: “Without 
doubt they're the two best 
young drivers in my opinion 
in Formula One at the mo- 
ment. And any young driver 
who has never been at a lot of 
the circuits, to be able to 
score points in his last five 
Grand Prix is something 
quite exceptional, and he can 


brothers for an apparent lack 
of sibling rivalry. 

At the end of the French 
Grand Prix in June, just before 
he crossed the finish line as 
the winner, Michael slowed 
down almost to a stop to let 
Raff — a lap behind — pass 
him. The maneuver allowed 
Ralf to race another lap and 
move up a place and gain a 
point. 

At the Hungarian Grand 
Prix, in August, Ralf. in fifth 


place, did not attempt to over- 
r, inf< 


take his brother, in fourth. 

“I was definitely quick- 
er/’ said Raff. “I knew that 
he needed the points for the 


world championship tide and 
I was quite satisfied wit 


only get better from here.” 

RaSfs 


a go-kart champion. He start- 
ed at 2, Michael at 4. They 


still kart together. Michael 
acts as Raff's mechanic. 
Eddie Jordan, the Jordan 


’5 record is betier than 
big brother's at the same age. 
He was a year younger when 
be staned in Formula One and 
scored a podium finish in only 
his third race. Did he learn 
from Michael's mistakes? 

“Not really, no.” he said. 
“You can't really leam, not 
in car racing. You have to 
make your own mistakes.” 

’Some have criticized the 


quite satisfied with the 
position where I was.” 

It cost Raff, and his team. 


an extra point. 

When pressed, Ralf 
changed his tune, saying the 
team told him not ro over- 
take. because it would be too 
difficult. 



L ast year, woii 

Weber, who manages 
the brothers, said he’d 
like to groom Ralf, now the 
youngest driver in Formula 
One, to take over the drivers' 
title just as his brother leaves 


the sport in a few years. 
“Y 01 


Sirfw Gajttlh/The Av-vnml Pr-- 

The Formula One leader, Michael Schumacher, 
right, with his brother, Ralf, in Monza, Italy. 


r ou can never plan those 
things,” said Ralf. “I’m sure 
one day I’ll try to win the 
championship. But now is a 
bit early to think about it. 
First I have to win a race, then 
we’U see.” 

Ralf turned away and start- 
ed talking to a team member 
about the Formula 3000 race. 
A German television crew 
waited impatiently at the next 
table. So last question: Does 
he race for the love of speed, 
or the love of competition? 

“More the competition,” 
he said. “Speed is nothing. 
When you're sitting in the car 
you don’t realize now quick 
you are.” 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

EAST DIVISION 


.. . \ 


ju'lir! Milllll 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Balttmare 

85 

51 

625 

— 

New York 

79 

58 

-577 

6t 

Boston 

67 

73 

-479 

20 

Detroit 

65 

73 

-471 

21 

Taranto 

65 

73 

Ml 

21 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



Cleveland 

72- 

63~ 

'533 

»— 

Milwaukee 

7D 

68 

507 

Tk 

Chicago 

69 

70 

A 96 

5 

Minnesota 

57 

80 

Jit 

76 

Kansas City 

56 

80 

4)2 

U’A 


WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

76 

63 

547 

— 

Anaheim 

74 

65 

532 

2 

Tams 

66 

73 

475 

10 

Oakland 

54 

85 

JBS 

22 

NATIONAL LEAOIM 



east division 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Atlanta 

86 

53 

419 

— 

Florida 

83 

55 

401 

T't 

New York 

76 

62 

551 

9 V ! 

Montreal 

70 

68 

507 

15'T 

Philadelphia 

S3 

82 

393 

31 

CENTRAL DIVIHON 



Houston 

71 

68 

511 

— 

Pittsburgh 

» 

71 

493 

2'.s 

Sr. Loais 

65 

74 

468 

6 

Cincinnati 

61 

76 

445 

9 

Chicago 

57 

83 

407 

14'a. 


WEST CHVtSKJN 



Las Angeles 

78 

a 

557 

— 

San Francisco 76 

63 

547 

1 'fi 

Colorado 

70 

70 

500 

8 

Son Diego 

66 

74 

471 

12 


WEDNESDAY'S UNESCO RES 

INTERLEAGUE 1 

Detroit 201 603 000-12 IS 0 

Atlanta 101 001 001-4 10 0 

Blair. M. Myers (8). Mia# (9) and Jensen: 
Sniofl Z Ufftenberg (4), Byrd 16). Cicnt z 17), 
Embree <B), C Fox (?) and J. Lopez, Speftr 
(7). W-BJoir, 15-6. L-Smottz, 13-11. 
HRs— Detroit ToXtaik (»), D.Ovz 121. 
Attarta. CoRjmnn C2 j. 

Minnesota 100 010 220-6 id 1 

Chicago (NU 220 120 )2*~10 15 2 

Fr.Rodriguez. Guarotacto (4/, Trombley [51, 
N nutty (6}. Ritchie 181 and G. Myers. 
Stein bach 18}.* Je.Gonzolez, Bottenfieid MR, 
PocJotjo. 17). T. Adorns '"Si and_S«vcis. 
W-Je.Gonzalez.11-A. L— FrJ5odrigi>«. 2-o. 
HRs— Minnesota MoOtor (9). Better 11 M. 
Chicago. Mo-Grace ill). 

Boston 000 000 000—0 2 0 

Montreal 001 O00 00x-l 1 1 

Sde. Gordon IBS and Hasebnanr C- Perez 
and Ftefcher. W— C Perez, 13-10. L— Setfc 
12-11 HR— Montreal Lansing 117). 
develond 000 SOI 010-7 7 3 

Pittsburgh 101 000 010-3 I 1 

Hentasec, Assenmacher 17), fAJockson 
(7). Mesa (9) and Borders. Looiza 
Christiansen (7). Rincon (7). Ruebei ©I and 
KendaiL tV-Herahiser. 73-5. L— Lwtza 10- 
10. HRs— Cleveland, Vhquel 01, Ramirez 
©4),M.WIfliairo 129). 

Kansas Oty 000 000 300—3 5 1 

Gadnati 150 000 DQ*-6 8 1 

Bones, Honey (3). Service 15), Olson (7). 
Wlwenant (8). BeviJ (B> and MSwwney; 
Tomka P. Martinez (7).Sui*van ffl). Shaw (9) 
and Taubensee. ¥V— Tomka 10-5. L— Bones 
3-5. Sv— Show (30). HRs— Gnannatv Reese 
(3), Taubensee 00). 

Milwaukee 800 000 000-0 5 1 

Houston 001 000 Ms— < 7 0 

■Kart, AReyes (8) and Maltwny! RGarcio and 
Ausmus. W— RGarcio 6-8. L — Karl 10-11. 
New York (AU 200 020 000-4 7 0 

PhUmMohia 000 112 H]— 5 11 0 


Gooden, Boe bring er (61. Lloyd f7). Nelson 
(8). Slanton (8) and Posada. Girard (61; 
T.Greea Stephenson (6). Ryan (7). Karp IB). 
Spradlin (9) and Lieberthal. W— 6prodin3-6. 
b— Stanton 6*1. HRs— New York. Curds Cl 4). 
Pidadeipflia, Stocker (4). 

Toronto 100 001 000-2 S 2 

New York (NU «n 002 Dlx-4 18 0 

Person. CuarcnH !6), Ptesac '73. Crabtree 

(7) and 3Santiaga S.Mortno m.- AMcfci 

McMIchoat 17), Roiss 31- J. Franco <9) cnB 
Hundley. '.W.'lidu 7-10. L-Ounntrill 6-6. 
Sv—J. franco f25j. HP— 7- C Delgado £29). 
Baltimore 000 330 000—6 9 0 

Florida 200 103 001—7 13 0 

Katr.ieruecK!, Br.iA interns .'6). Orascc 471. 
a. Benitez ©1. Saskie :« and ftebsten 
AXeirer, ABonseca £6), r. Heredia (7). 
Pawefl hJi and C. Johnson. !l — Powell 5-2. 
L— Baskie 6-i HRs— 3oBimer* C Ripken 
!16). Florida Sheffield r.T,. 

Chicago CAL) 200 000 000-2 ID 0 

SL Louts 002 001 OlX— 4 12 2 

Eyre, N. Cruz (75, Levine 181. T. CnsWo iBI 
and Fcbreges, Katowice 47), Machado (8); 
Aybar. Frasartore (7), C. King (8). Eckeretoy 
(9J and Mama OrfWice (95. W— Aybar M. 
L— Eyre 2-1 5®— Ectersley (33). HR-St 
Louis. Goeffl (15). 

lasAngeies DOt 001 000—2 8 1 

Thus 000 011 03X-5 11 I 

I. Valdes, Dreitort (8). Radinsky (B). Osuna 

(8) and Prince; Witt Patterson (8), Wetteland 

(9) and I. Rodriguez. W— Fattereon 9-S. 

L— Oreifort 5-2. Sv— tf.'etteland (2B). 
HRs— T. 1. Rodriguez (15), L. Stevens (16). 
SaaFrandsa 000 010 200-7 9 O 

Oakland 020 004 51*— 12 n 1 

Dfianvln. MuthoBand (6), Tavurez 46). 
Poole [7)< C. Bailey (71 and B. Johnson; 
Rjgby.Taytar (7). Groom (7). A. Small (71 and 
Moyne- W— Rigby 1-5. L— 0. Darwin 0-2 
Sv— A. Small ( 4 ). HR— Oakland. Moyne (51. 
San Diego Old 071 110-4 12 1 

Seattle 000 050 000-5 5 0 

Menhart, Curmane 15), Bruske 15). D. Veras 


(7). T. Worrell (8). Hoffman (8) and Flaherty; 
Olivares, Spofianc (Tl.Timftn (B). Chariton (8) 
and O. Wilson. W-D. Veras 7-0. L- Timlin 4- 
4. Sv— Hoffman (33). HRs— Son Diego, S. 
Rnley (251. Canvnlfl I21), Joyner (11). 


Japanese Leagues 


CENTRAL UACMII 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.GB 

Yakult 

67 

44 

2 

404 

— 

Yokohama 

60 

48 

0 

556 

S'-. 

Hiroshima 

57 

52 

0 

523 

9 

Hanshin 

SO 

61 

l 

450 

16’t 

Chunichi 

50 

61 

l 

439 

IB'*. 

Ycmiuri 

J9 

64 

D 

434 

19 

PACIFIC IXAOUI 




W 

L 

T 

Pet 

-GB 

Seibu 

63 

45 

2 

583 

— 

Ori* 

57 

46 

3 

-553 

3'.i 

Kintetsu 

53 

57 

3 

482 

11 

Nippon Ham 

S3 

59 

1 

473 

12 

Onto) 

51 

59 

1 

464 

13 

Lotte 

47 

58 

2 

448 

14T 


IHUMAT'S RESULTS 
CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yomiuri 6, Hanshin 3 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 
Seftiu vs. Dalei, ppd^ rein 


M<L Netherlands. 7-5, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (Bo). 

Jonas Blorkmon, Sweden, def. Petr Korda 
CT5). Czech Republic 7-6 (7-3). 6-2. 1-0. ret. 

WOMIM'S DOUBLES 

QUARTERFINALS 

Glgi Fernandez, UA. and Natasha Zvere- 
va Belarus (li. def. Alexandra Fusol and 
Nathalie Tauziat, Franca (7), 4-6, 6-2, 6-1 

Nicole A remit and Manor BoOegrot 

Neth. (4). def. Rinandra Dragomlr. Romania, 
and Iva MakriL Croatia 416), 6-3, 3-6. 6-4. 

■UN'SDOUBUS 

seanFWALs 

Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Rus. and Daniel Vo- 
cek, Czech, (4), def. Moltesh BhupatW and 
LeonderPan, Imfla 00), 7-6 {7-41, 7-6 (7-2). 

MIXED DOUBLES 

SEMIFINALS 

Mercedes Paz and Pablo Albany Argenti- 
na, del. Lisa Raymond, and Patrick Gat- 
braith, U5« (D.6-4, 7-6(86). 

thurs Day-results 

MIXED DOUBLES 

FINAL 

Manon Boflegrat Netheriands, and Rick 
Unch, U.&, (5). def. Mercedes Par and 
Pablo Altaona Argentina, 36, 7-J. 7-6 (7-3). 


TENNIS 


TRANSITIONS 


U.S. Open 


WEDNESDAY RESULTS 

WOMEN' MMOLES 

QUARTERFINALS 

Lindsey Davenport (6), U.S-, def. Jana No- 
votna (3). Qech Republic 6-2 46* 7-6 (7-5). 

Martina Hingis 41). Switzerland, def. Aran- 
txa Sanchez Vkarto (10), Spain, 6-1 6-2. 

mriMNouf 

QUARTERFINALS 

Greg Rusedski, Britain, def. Richard Kro- 


■A W BA I fc 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Detroit -Recalled LHP Glenn Dish man, 
LHP Roberto Duran RHP Eddie Gofflard 
and OF Kinrera Bartve from Toledo, fl_ 
Bought contracts of C Marcus Jensen and 
INF Frank Catalanotto from Toledo. Readied 
OF Juan Encamockm from Jacksonville, 
SL 

Kansas air -RecaBed SS Feftx Martinez, 
RHP Brian BeviJ and RHP Jbn Ptttsley horn 
Omaha, AA. Activated LHP Chris Haney from 
15- day disabled BsL 


Milwaukee -Signed RHP Paul Wagner. * 
Activated OF Matt Mieske, C Kefly Stinnett 
and RHP Jeff DAmico from 1 5-day disabled 
list. Recalled OF Todd Dunn from Tucson, 
PCL 

Minnesota -Recalled LHP Dan SeraftnL 
I B David Ortiz and 3B Todd walker from Saif 
Lake, PCL 

Oakland -Recalled C Izzy Madna from 
Edmonton, PCL and RHP Eric LudwJck from 
Modesto, CL Bought contract of OF Ben 
Grieve from Edmonton. Moved RHP Ariel 
Prieto from 15-day disc tried list to 60-day 
disabled teL 

SEATTLE— Bought contract of DH Dan 
Rotameter from Tacoma, PCL Activated OF 
Lee TJnsI ey from 15-day disabled list. Re- 
called RHP Ken Cloude and RHP Bob Wol- 
cott from Memphis SL Designated 2B Brian 
Roabe for assignment. 

Texas— Readied INF Hanley Frtas and OF 
Marc Sogmoen from Oklahoma City, AA. 

Toronto —Bought contracts of OF Rich 
Buffer. RHP Ken Robinson, RHP Cartas AJ- 
manzar from Syracuse IL. Recalled C Sandy 
Martinez,3BTamEvans,INF-OFFetlpeCre- 
spo aid LHP Omar Daol from Syracuse. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

ATLANTA WtAVES-RBCOlted INF Ed Gin- 
vaiiofa, INF Mike Mordecoi and RHP Chris 
Brock from Richmond, IL Bought contfacf of 
OF Tommy Gregg tram Richmond. Waived 
OF Wonderful Mauds. 

chicaoo— R ecoffled OF Brooks iQeschnk* 
from Iowa. AA. 

Cincinnati -Adtvated LHP Pete 
Schaurek and LHP Kent Mercker ham 15- 
day disabled list. 

Montreal -Recalled INF Orlando Cabr- 
era, C Raul Chavez, RHP Rick DeHart RHP 
Mike Thurman from Ottawa )L Bought con- 
tracts of INF Brad Fullmer and INF Hensley 
Meulens from Ottawa. Transferred 3B Shane 
Andrews and OF Sherman Obando from 15- 
day to 60-day disabled (tot 

new York -Signed SS Cesar Crespo. Re- 


aped LHP Takashl Kashlwada, LHP Joe 
Crawford. C Alberto Castillo, INF Shawn 
GBberiand OF Cartas Mendoza from Norfolk. 
IL Bought contract of IB Roberto Petaglne 
from Norfolk. Recalled INF Jason Hardtke 


from BUM ho Orion. EL Designated -C Chortle 

iefor« 


Greene fir assignment. 

Philadelphia -Activated OF Gregg Jef- 
feries and P Garrett Stephenson from 15-day 
disabled list. Recoiled C Bobby Estaleilo and 
SS Desl Relaford from Scramon-WHkes- 
Borre, tL 

pittsburch — RecnHed.OF Adrian Brown, 
INF Lou Colder. LHP Chris Peters and R HP 
Jose SHvo from Calgary, PCL Recalled INF 
Freddy Gratia from Carodna, SL 

ST. louiS - Recalled C EH Marrero from 
Louisville, AA. 

SAM oi eco —Recalled RHP Marc Kroon 
INF Derek Len INF Jorge Vbki nda, OF Trey 
Beamon OF Ruben Rivera and C Mandy 
Romero from Lai Vegas, PCL Bought cair- 
lrad at INF George Arias from Los Vegas. 

jam FKAMCisa>-Adl voted C Damon 
Berry M l from 15-day cflnablod fat. 

RAIOIIAU 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

CHICAGO— Signed C Joe Klefne lo T-year 
contract. 

Philadelphia— Re-signed G-F Mark 
Davis to 1-year contract 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

id CBfilii PouL Signed LB 


Byron Cobbrns. 

Atlanta— Signed CB Lenny McGOL Re- 
leased CB Donovan Greer. 

CAROLINA -Re-signed LB Carlton Bailey. 
Waived TE Kris Mangum. 

GREEN BAY-Ptoced CB Craig Newsome 
and K Brett Conway on injured reserve. 

in DtAJUPQUS-Added RB Roosevelt Potts 
to ochre roster. Waived OL Garin Patrick. 

Jacksonville —Signed QB Jim Miilerto 1- 
year comrect. Put RB Chris Porter on (n|uied 


Miami — Signed P Kyle Richardson to 2- 
year controd. Placed DE Daniel Stubbs an 
injured reserve. 

Philadelphia— Re-signed WR Freddie 
Solomon. Signed DE Richard Dent and LB 
Jeff Herrod to l-year contracts. Waived LB 
DeShawn Fogle and CB Deaunte Brown. Re- 
leased RB James Alien and CB Tim McTyer. 
Put WR-KR Antwaun Wyatt hi injured re- 
serve. 

san dieco— W otvcd LBMichae! Hamilton. 
Signed LB James Burgess and DT Rashod 
Swinger. 

Seattle— Signed QB Gtno Torrettn. 
Waived CB Darter Sector. 

TAMPA bay— Released WR Ntgen Carter. 

HOCKEY 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LCAOUE 

BOSTON— Agreed to tenns with LW Sergei 
Samsonov on 3-year contract 

Dallas -Agreed to terns with RW Jen? 
Lehtlnen on 3-year controd. 

Detroit— Signed 0 Jon Cafeman to 7-year 
contract. 

ily. rakoers— A greed to terms with F Ken ■ 
Gemanrier and F Srfvain Blauin. Signed F 
P J. Stock and G Robb Stouber. 

Ottawa— Signed D Chris PhBBps to mui- 
Hyear contract. 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed F Dan Kordlcta2- 
year contract. 

pittsburoh -Signed C Robert Lang. Ac- . 
quired D Jlri Siegr horn Edmonton for 1998 
3rd-round pkk. • 

sr. Lours-Agreed to terms wrih RW > 
ShoyneTooorowsU. 

san jose -Signed G Kay Whitmore and C 
Mike Cnsseiman. 

tampa ray -Re-signed F Brenf Peterson 
and G Derek WBklnsan. 


HAVr— Signed Don DeVae mens basket- 
ball coach, to 10-year contract. 









Arts & Ajvtiqwes 

Ajj]trt*rs every Salunlay, 

T., »lvpm> winrat’l Sarali VnM 
muiu-Lontl‘)m^ r <“- 
T»4.: + 44 1 71 420 0326 
Fax: + 4417143) 0338 
nr your n«ur^ l IHT offirt- 
or rej urs-mtative. 



r£ 3 


e* 

of 

D- 

3D 

ns 

10 


id 

y- 

id 


its 

:h 

o- 

in 

m 

n- 

tie 


tie 

of 

it* 

be 

:s. 

se 

of 

n- 

T) 


or 

at 

v- 

e- 

le 

De 

ce 

p ) 


3 

✓ 


nam 

ssue 


i ® 
ality 
eth- 
a at- 
Tger 
in- 
IYT) 


(uaf- 
tsn’t 
uon, 
man 
tros- 
ttbe 
k to 


de- 
skly 
Is to 
r. 

well 

rsin 

an's 

ight 

ead- 

i his 

ioes 

.i to 

eled 

hby 

■mot 


of 

with 
" cm 
• tri- 
es . 


vice, 

Bar- 


ceSl 

9:30. 


i 60. 
974. 


WE> 

TOSS 


3803 

tday 


1 


.cor. 

933 

3B1. 


rue 

iman 


btw, 

Stn 

-048. 


RIS. 

rsay. 

Jma- 


ANT 

■ship 


□ 


OU- 

lom' 

lash 

.Fry 

.7,47 

des 











et tx ■at* m er ra- < -:■ » *o «r < i-« » O < i» ct-crts t» p e. cr < ia c. «<s *& »■*»■ » c. a- o m *-- 


PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 199 < 


POSTCARD 


Sipping in the Stacks 


The Patriarch of Reggae Gets Some Respect 


By Carole Bums 

Se» York' Turns Servic e 


N EWINGTON, Connecti- 
cut — As a library di- 


IN cut — As a library di- 
rector, Maxine Bleiweis had a 
special 'perspective on the 
success of the megabook- 
s tores that have been cropping 
up across the United States. 


ie saw people using them as 
ihev were libraries. 


if they were libraries. 

And so, hoping to draw 
more people to the public li- 
brary in this Hartford suburb, 
Bleiweis decided to take a 
page from the bookstores and 
opened the Cup and Chaucer 
cafe in her library. 

Since February, users of 
the library have been able to 
buy gourmet coffee, muffins 
and biscotti right across from 
the circulation desk. Every- 
one — children included — 
can cany their covered coffee 
cups into the stacks, into the 
reading area, into the chil- 
dren's room. Only the com- 
puter center is off limits. 


Gail Sweet, assistant direc- 
tor of the library in Burlington, 
said the addition of a care last 
year changed the atmosphere. 
‘‘People can come in and ba- 
sically spend the day with us," 
she said. 

The American Library As- 
sociation says the phenom- 
enon is growing, although of- 
ficials there are not keeping 
numbers. Libraries in Los 
Angeles, Chicago and Port- 
land. Oregon, are among 
those that have opened cafes. 
Portland’s has a Starbucks, 
and one in Los Angeles is 
called Bookends. 


By Larry Rohter 

AW York Times Sen-ice 


O CH0RI0S. Jamaica — His 
neighbors here know him 


simply as Ernie, the easygoing, 
gray-hoi red gent who lives on a hill 
above town and sometimes comes 


down with his guitar to iam with the 
younger musicians who play die 
tourist haunts. Ernest Ranglin 
doesn ’t mind such nonchalance: He 
may be the patriarch of Jamaican 
music, having helped invent both 
reggae and ska, but he has remained 
in the background during most of a 
career that has spanned 50 years. 

Now. though, at the age of 65, 
Ranglin is belatedly earning recog- 
nition for the thousands of bours he 
logged in recording studios from 
Kingston to London as a guitarist 
and arranger, shaping songs for 
Bob Mariey and the Waiters, Toots 
and the Maytals, Jimmy Cliff and 
other Jamaican musicians who 
went on to achieve international 
renown. The skittering, inverted 
ska rhythm he devised nearly 40 
years ago once again enjoys world- 
wide popularity, and after a long 
interlude, a flurry of new and re- 
issued recordings has begun ap- 
pearing under ms name. 

The most recent of those, “In 
Memory of Barber Mack,” which 
is expected to be released this fall, 
was recorded in New York last year 
and finds Rang! in playing reggae 
and ska instrumentals with a jazz 
musician's delicate touch, as is his 
wont these days. 

“To me, I still haven't done the 
classic album yet," he said recently 
during a Jong late-night conver- 
sation in the cozy music room of his 
home here, cluttered with guitars, 
records and commendations. “But 
now is the time that things have 
opened up a bit and you can finally 
do something about it." 

To his admirers, that is Ranglin 
simply being self-effacing, as usu- 
al. His achievements over the years 
as a player of reggae and jazz are 
enough to qualify him for the guitar 
pantheon in either category, “but 
the fact that he is both, and is so 


“At first, people said, ‘Can 
I really do this. “ Bleiweis 
said.' ‘Now it seems very nor- 
mal to have people walking 
around with a coffee cup or a 
biscotti in their hand." 

The library is among a 
growing number offering 
something for the stomach as 
well as something for the 
mind. In New York. New 
Rochelle operates a small 
cafe, and the Northport-East 


Northport Library on Long 
Island has included one in its 
renovated building, which 
opens in October. 

In New Jersey. Burlington 
County Library in Westamp- 
ton and the Maurice M. Pine 
Free Public Library in Fair- 
lawn both opened coffee 
shops, and Montclair incor- 
porated one into its library 
renovation, which will be fin- 
ished in September. 


Most library directors say 
the point is not to compete 
with the bookstores but to 
learn from them a lesson in 
customer service. People do- 
ing research can get a snack 
rather than leave for lunch. 
Browsers may simply enjoy a 
steaming cup of cofree. 

“People come to the li- 
brary to fulfill their needs.” 
Nancy Hutchinson, director 
of development for the 
Montclair library, said. 

“And for a lor of us, ihai 
includes filling our faces.” 

Bleiweis said she fears that 
some library users are pnt off 
by technological changes and 
others think the library is old- 
fashioned. “By having food 
and drink, it's a way of saying 
we’re still a comfortable 
place," she said “It says 
something else about our li- 
brary: that this is an up-to- 
date place.” 

Although some of the older 
caffe just about break even, 
□ewer ones, like the cafe in 
Montclair, hope to make extra 
money for the library. 

“Quality library services 
are costly, and the traditional 
way of meeting those costs just 
can't continue to be dipping 
into the never-ending munici- 
pal rill," Hutchinson said. 


I i 


. 



M 


helped invent ska in the late 1950s. 


he was animated by a type of .Amer- 
ican music: hooking rhythm-and- 
blues, beamed in ‘from radio sta- 
tions in New Orleans and Miami. 

“In those days, we were listen- 
ing to Bill Doggett and Louis 
Jordan and those people who used 


y f 


ti 


i/ •«* 

;.1 . * 

v? ;£* 


Jordan and those people who used 
to play that shame rhythm,” he 
said. “I was trying to play in the 


i<3 :r. 


m 


Vm-Oun 

Emest.Ranglin, who helped Bob Mariey achieve world fame. 


adept at both, is just incredible,” 
said Joe Gore, an editor at Guitar 
Player magazine. 

“ S imply put, Ernest Ranglin is a 


great guitar player who has earned 
a place in history as one of the. 


a place in history as one of the. 
innovators of a globally influential 
style,” Gore said. “Not only that , 
he is also a very gifted post-bebop 
player in his own right, and late in 
his career be has now found a way 
to integrate the rwo in unprece- 
dented fashion, doing jazz impro- 
visation using some of the grooves, 
tones and procedures associated 
with Jamaican. pop.” 

Ranglin’ s stock — and influence 
— may be particularly high among 
a new generation of wildly popular 
ska-inspired bands like No Doubt. 
311. Sublime, Rancid and the 
Mighty Mighty Bosstones. all of 
which have emerged over the last 
couple of years and whose mem- 
bers are young enough to be his 


grandchildren. As a result of their 
success, driving horn arrangements 
and playful guitar figures derived 
from records he made years ago 
have suddenly become staples on 
Top 40 radio and MTV. 

“Any musician who has ever 
been fortunate enough to bear him 
knows he is such a great player, but 
he really hasn't gotten the prom- 
inence he deserves,” said Nick 
Hexum, guitarist and vocalist for 
311. who said that Ranglin's last 
outing, “Below die Bassline,” was 
one of his favorite records of 1996. 

At his home here, Ranglin, who 
began his career in the 1940s play- 
ing in the big bands of that era and 
shifted to the Caribbean cruise ship 
circuit before joining the house 
band of the Jamaica Broadcasting 
Corp., seemed amused by the re- 
cent resurgence of interest in the 
United States in his ‘Ti’l riddira.” 
After alL he pointed our, when he 


same stvle, but making it some- 
thing different, nor lagging back, 
but really going ahead. I was trying 
to put a more jazzy influence into it, 
because I felt tin's was what was 
needed, to take it a step further.” 

Ska’s characteristically pro- 
nounced beat was thus as much the 
product of deliberation as inspir- 
ation. Ranglin maintained. “We 
decided one Sunday to have a meet- 
ing and see what we could do k> this 
beat, because we were trying to 
bring out the beat," he recalled. 
The producer Clement (Sir Cox- 
sone) Dodd had a liquor store in 
Kingston near the studio, “and so 
we decided there what we were 
going to do. and on the Monday 
morning we went straight in and 
recorded the first two skas.” (The 
origin of the word ska remains a 
subject of debate, though it is most 
often credited to Rangim, who used 
ska to describe Che cutting sound 
made by his guitar.) 

Hundreds of recording sessions 
followed, with Ranglin occasion- 
ally playing piano and saxophone 
in addition to guitar, and in 1963 
Dodd asked him to work with a 
newly discovered group called the 
W ailin ' Wallers, led by a tail, 
gangly youth named Robert Mar- 
fey. The resulting tracks, “Simmer 
Down” and “It Hurts to Be 
Alone,” marked Bob Mariey 's ini- 
tial taste of commercial success. 
“Oh yeah, Bob got his first hits 
from me.” Ranglin said. 

In 1964, Ranglin moved to Lon- 
don at the suggestion of Chris 
Blackwell, owner of Island Re- 
cords. There he became a studio 


guitarist and arranger of proto-reg- 
gae hits like “My Boy Lollipop, ’ 
played on tour with jazz artists tike 
Cannonball Adderley and joined the 


hoase band at Ronnie Scot’s clubm ' 
Soho, where his admirers included 
Eric Clapton. Jeff Beck and'Jphjp; 
McLaughlin- “I used to go 
clubs to see them, and they woju&V 

come and see me,” he recaneiL "y- 

The skills he demonstrated as 
guitarist won Ranglin the 

star” category in the Mdogjrt 
Maker magazine poll thesanfeyefc; 
that the Beatles, whose admiration., 
for ska led them to write “OWiil- 
Di. Ob-La-Da,” were conquering;. 
America- But the monetary, i 
wards lagged far behind, 
two small sons to rear, he decided^ 
to go borne. Returning to'Kmgsti^ 
he discovered that ska had evolved ' 
into a much slower bear called 
“rock steady,” and he set 
trying to speed things up agaiiLVT 

“The ska was a little fash and 
since this is a hot country, and T“ 
guess they perspire too much or'; 
whatever/ they cut it down to rock s 
steady,” he explained. “WhnjT'y 
eventually came back here, rock- 
steady was going on. But I thought 
it was a little too laid-bacfc;;%n2i 
that’s how reggae came about We,- 
decided to bring the beat up a little' 
bit, so that it was not as fast as ska 
and not as slow as the rock steady, 
but in between those two.” 

In that role, Ranglin played gui— 
tar on or arranged many of the y 
formative songs of reggae, helping, 
design the emphatic “chufcka 
ebukka” guitar accent that is abwr . 
instantly recognizable the weald,. 
over. . -\ 

The renewal of interest m; : 
Ranglin and his chameleonlike 
ability' to adapt his playing to the-, 
needs of a song has prompted 
release of “Ernest Ranglin: Sounds 7 *' 
and Power,” a compilation ofcbisv 
pioneering recordings for Coxsoae;. . 
Dodd’s Studio One in Kingston. 

As pan of that same revival, Is^j: 
land Records, whose first album. 1 ; 
was a 1 958 recording by Ranglinjs , . 
also considering re-releasing two- 1 
even earlier records. In the mean-.; 
time, on Sept. 16, Island will re- 1 
lease “Ska bland,” a compilation*: 
featuring Ranglin on a couple rifs? 
cracks. 



MOVIES 


PEOPLE 




Old Hollywood Meets New in ‘The Game’ 


T HE Italians finally have a hit at the V enice 
Film Festival. “Ovosodo.” a coming-of- 


“Twist and Shout,' 
“Love Me Do.” 


“Please Please Me"-and 


By Stephen Farber 

AVh Jwi* Times Srn ice 


L OS ANGELES — “This is an 
interesting, sadistic place io put a 


interesting, sadistic place io put a 
tie star," the director David 


movie star," the director David 
Fincher said with a chuckle as he 


prepared for a scene that required his 
leading man. Michael Douglas, to be 


leading man, Michael Douglas, to be 
doused with 1.000 gallons of water. 

The scene, filmed last winter, is one 
of the climaxes of the new suspense 
thriller “The Game.” The teaming of 
Douglas and Fincher represented the 
uneasy but ultimately rewarding 
coupling of old Hollywood and new. 
The 52-year-old actor and the 34- 


year-old director brought vastly dif- 
ferent levels of experience to this ven- 


ferent levels of experience to this ven- 
ture. While Douglas has been making 
movies for more than 25 years, "The 
Game" is Fincher's third film; it fol- 
lows the box-office disappointment 
“Alien 3" 119921 and the surprise 
blockbuster "Seven” two years ago. 

“The Game" focuses on Nicholas 
Van Orton, a powerful, coldheaned 
San Francisco rycoon played by 
Douglas. For his 48th birthday, he 
receives an unusual present from his 
younger brother, Conrad ( Sean Penn). 
Ir is a game engineered by a company 
called Consumer Recreation Services 
that offers a few mind-bending thrills 
for jaded businessmen. But as Van 
Orton embarks on the adventure, it 
spins out of control, and he is soon 



age story set in working class Livorno, drew 
applause and strong praise for its director, 
Paolo Virzl. At 33, Virzi is typical of the 
filmmakers featured at this year's festival: 
young, fairly inexperienced and focusing on 
intimate themes. '‘Ovosodo,” which is com- 
peting for the Golden Lion award, is his 
second feature. A comic drama, it tells the tale 
of Piero and his experiences in a working class 
family as he blossoms under the influence of a 
rebellious schoolmate. Most of the Italian 
films shown in Venice have been panned. 


Bob Dole, a World War II veteran whotoisits - 
the use of his right hand in combat, has been, . : 
given the American Legion's highest award: 
“Well, I finally won something,” Dole srid 
as he accepted the Distinguished Service ‘ 
Award. The former Kansas senator and Re- A 


publican presidential candidate was cited for - . 
his four decades of public service. Past, win- * 
ners include William Randolph Hears*, 
Babe Rath, Dr. Jonas Salk ana Presidents - -j 
Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy^ .V; 
Johnson, Nixon, Ford. Reagan and Bush. * 

□ : jff; 

The Motion Picture and Television Fundij* •* 
Los Angeles is honoring Steven Spielberg ' ; 

by naming the private driveway entrance to ii| ... j 
convalescent home after him. The change; 
required approval from the city council, V'v'; 
case emergency vehicles had to find theat^' ’ : J 
trance under the new name. It took a whileih&F: J • I ■ 
the project finally got the green light. - 1 ’ J ' 


Pete Best, whose name might have become 
a household word like, well. Ringo Starr, is 
again laying down die backbear for classic 
Beatles songs 35 years after he was forced out 
as the original Beatles drummer. Starr suc- 
ceeded Best as the Fab Four's drummer in 
1962, just weeks before they began a chart- 
topping career. Best, 55. who is touring 
Canada with his Pete Best Band, plays 1950s 
rock numbers and Beatles songs, including 


Elton to Sing at Diana’s Funeral 


CvmptlrJtn. OarSUffTivm Dispeuhn 


Sir* Film* 

Michael Douglas, who plays a powerful, coldhearted San Francisco tycoon in David Fincher’s new film. 


L ONDON — Elton John will sing at the 
funeral of Diana. Princess of Wales, and 


running for his life from conspirators 
who seem to want to destroy him. 


who seem to want to destroy him. 

In one of the movie’s harrowing 
chase scenes, Douglas is riding in a 
taxi that hurtles into San Francisco 
Bay. One day last winter, a close-up 
of him struggling to escape the 
flooded taxi was being filmed on a 
sound stage that housed a large tank. 
(The cab's plunge into the water had 
already been filmed in San Francisco, 
without Douglas aboard.) Douglas 
was hoisted into a small compartment 
that had been designed to resemble 
the back sear of a taxi. As he opened 
the door to flee the submerged cab, the 
tank unleashed a cascade of water, 
and he was completely drenched. 


“It is a little scary,” Douglas ad- 
mitted as he headed back to his trailer 
to change into a fresh suit for a second 
take. “It gets your adrenaline going. 
But there isn’t any real danger." 

Douglas — the producer of a num- 
ber of movies, from “One Flew Over 
the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) to this 
summer's "Face/Off ' — had inspec- 
ted the tank as well as the three cam- 
eras that Fincher had set up to capture 
the deluge. Fincher seemed to wel- 
come his input, and Douglas was not 
hesitant about offering an opinion. 

Even though they come from dif- 
ferent generations, the star and the 
director approached 1 ‘The Game" as 
a genuine collaboration. They eyed 
each other warily ar first — both were 
known to be obstinate and tough- 
minded — but they quickly came to 
appreciate each other's profession- 
alism. 

Perhaps they clicked because they 


both enjoy making movies with a 
cynical edge. In films like “Wail 
Street.” “The War of the Roses” and 
“Fatal Attraction,” Douglas has had 
great success playing flawed, even 
venal characters. And Fincher's two 
previous features were notable not 
just for the dark lighting they favored 
but also for the dark vision of human 
nature underlying the images. 

“I tike to subvert expectations," 
Fincher said. *T hope 'The Game' is 
entertaining, but it’s also a little pruri- 
ent, a tittle sadistic, because you enjoy 
the suffering and anxiery of the cen- 
tral character. You want to see him 
leam a lesson. And nobody embraces 
that quite as eagerly as Michael 
Douglas.” 

Douglas agreed that he relished por- 
traying characters who were neurot- 
ically driven raihenhan heroic. “I like 
the danger and risk of characters who 
are not entirely attractive," he said. “I 


played a lot of parts before ‘Wall 
Street/ which was my first chance to 
play a more abrasive character. When 
you win an Oscar the first time you try 
that, it does send a message. Those 
characters are fun to play, and the 
audiences enjoy them. too. A ‘nice' 
character often seems boring. * * 

If Fincher admired his star's au- 
dacity. Douglas was impressed by the 
tenacity of his director. “David is a 
stubborn guy,” he said, “but it comes 
our of vision.” 

Both the star and the director have a 
lot riding on “The Game.” Fincher 
wants to show that the success of 
“Seven" was nota fluke, and Douglas 
wants to prove he can appeal to the 
young audiences who adored Finch- 
er’s earlier videos for MTV. 

Asked how “The Game” compares 
with this summer's action extravag- 
anzas. Fincher said: "Ihope our movie 
is not a ride. I hope it's a journey.’’ 


JL/ funeral of Diana. Princess of Wales, and 
numerous celebrities will attend, but prom- 
inent heads of state are sending their wives 
in their stead and there will be few rep- 
resentatives of the world's royalty', in keep- 
ing with the wishes of Buckingham Palace. 

Reversing an earlier statement, a White 
House spokesman said that Hillary' Rodham 
Clinton, the first lady, would be repre- 
senting the United States on an “official" 
basis when she flies to London on Friday for 
the funeral. This hobbling was the latest 
instance of the White House's difficulty in 
trying to deflect criticism from admirers of 
rhe princess who think that President Bill 
Clinron should be in attendance. 

Elton John, a good friend of the princess, 
will pui new lyrics to his 19/3 song 
“Candle in the Wind” and perform the 
special version ar the funeral, Westminster 
Abbey announced Thursday. The song 
originally invoked Marilyn Monroe in its 
opening line — “Good-bye Norma Jean." 
The new lyrics to be sung Saturday will 
open “Good-bye England's rose. ” 


Luciano Pavarotti, who originally saidhe 
was too distraught to attend the funeral, will- 
come after all, his London office said. 

Other friends of Diana’s who will attend 
include Santo and Donatella Versace,.; 
brother and sister of the slain fashion de- 
signer Gianni Versace; the designer 
Valentino, who participated in several char- ; 
ity projects with the princess; the actor John; 
Travolta, with whom she danced at ttifc' 
White House; the singer George Michael,' 
and the model Cindy Crawford. 

But few foreign royals are expected 
Only those with close ties to the jnincess 
have been invited, and King Juan Carlos of 
Spain might be the only reigning monarch 
to attend the funeral, although his presence 
had not been confirmed Thursday. 

Princess Maigriet .of the Netherlands, 
sister of Queen Beatrix, has confirmed that : 
she will attend the ceremony. And Queen 
Noor of Jordan will be among the 2.000 
guests at the service Saturday. 

The Scandinavian countries, the Belgian 
royal family and Japan's imperial family 
have said that they will not attend. 

t AP. WP, AFP Reuters) 


Evert' country has its own .TOT Access Number which 



makes calling home or to other countries really east: 


Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country vou're 


m MO STM'.tni ■ 


AT&T Access Numbers ' 

~ EUHQPE » 

■•c 022 -Ma-flti • 

«• MOMM-lfl ; 

» MM-SlHJmi . 

uiOT-mna * 

a* UMBD-ml* 

to 1'M0-55WW * 


princes 


Tb infi lot 


Queen PayrTrii'^*' 

InTYMes-a^ ^ 


LONDON - '••• 
the ro>^i 

II paid trir-ste : . 

exceptional 

to 


she said m ar. - 
"ltisr.?:?i-: ' 
shock is or.sr. 

disbelief. 
who rented " 

Her 3 jars.- ? :..r 
rescued ov: Jiv.- ;■ 
Pnnce nzr.\. _-i‘~ 
palaces tr.a'. V : 
tribute. 

Vritke use 
speaks, g’as 
Room os the 
looking the Q-tr 
flou-ers E5 ?;• 
background •> ■■.* 

“til 2 CVS ; 

smile and bug:,:.: 
kindness.' ' “fe 

“I admired r; 
cocrtmjcr.er.: 
her two pcv.; " 

The sons. 
earlier Fndr. 
Charles. ;c — 
thank *cr.s c; 
royal palace? 

The fuo to; .. . 

the public v ■ 
Kensington P • • 

Charier ir.c 
moments 

gates. Kad^V-V. ’ . 
then pen-c V'- 


crowd v> 

"ItoldPnr.-, 
u '0rIdan.jH-: ’ 
Liseby HotUV 
shl re. told me 
gesture the, r- -; 

Diana* VC" 
would be t7C 
jpwcerf 4rr<! i”;.. 

5?" .« the jv,:. 

Vs {giP inner-'-":- 
Diana- ; 


5|®tomoto*s ] 


calling from and you'll get the clearest connections 


home. .And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 


Steps to foil oi for eas) 
calling worldwide: 


Austriawc 

Bats turn* 

Francs 

Germany 

Greece* 

Irelsntfo 

Italy* .... 
Netherlands* 

Russia *a(Mosmw)» 








17M811 . 

MtHHK2-9tn • 
T 55 & 42 1 






Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone 
charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 


I Jtw <lhl (he AT&T taJai Aunibcr 
lor ihe tiunwi you an? mlliiti; from. 

1 Dial ih- phone number uju're calling 

v IH.il ilie railing card number listed 
.ib've luunume. 


I love 0-800-99-0011 


(up to 60°a*). Check the list for AT&T .Access Numbers. 


Swedaii 020-7W-SI1 . 

Switzerland* 0880-89-0011 • 

United Kingdom* OSOD-IHHWII 

BflW-Sfl-Wll ! 

MIDDLE EAST 

EWPl*lCairo|t ....510-0200 = 

1 77-1 00-2727 * 

Saudi Arabia o .. 1-BM-UT . 

AFRICA ' 

Ghana fi-jgi » 

South Africa HG0-3S412S ! 


r; 








S, r 

,v 


in the springtime. 


Can'i tmd ihe Acc«*» Suaibi* far du country.™ re calling from'' Jim ask any opwawr far ■ 
MAT Direct" Senfce. or njll our Veto site at bttpVi'wvw jn^comAraw! er 


$ i. 




i3uK*.*«ur ■s 

CT rt.; 1 ! v v 


■-Ttci-.r..‘nr‘ > an-.T<rGciV. r< . 

•r "V,ei J> leirt j a! IPr aunti' h •■(!: »hiib r~ iX tj . tr.f j. lAJiyC o trOw , 1 ^rx. — .1 v . i ’ ' 
net j \ inijrrS t L.^ I'jn. " tC t - i. • oOyi . ; j 




. J' " i * ‘ • J -J ’"''Jel ' |'l|n Ji.aK , j:ii.njlAjTWt;onlinirheff4ir!r : u an-cjll. 
r ' • r- f - »■ --41 » VM ^ ^ 




AT&T 





'm ]}■{: