Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


PAGE 3 




*)l[ ik, \ 


i! -Mh 


tft. 


* 


^[* | k INTE 

VijMl 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


R 









Thr Am<iM Pro*. 


The diamond ring Dodi al 
Fayed gave to Diana. A jeweler 
said that they chose it together 
10 days before they died. Page 8. 


* il p ( f Quiei British Paper 

Bans Photos 
That Intrude 
On 2 Princes 




tfnr< 


* »IiaaPvK 


By Dan Balz 

Washington PosrSerrtce 

f LONDON — British newspaper ex- 
ecutives, responding to searing crit- 
icism from the brother of Diana, Prin- 
cess of Wales, that they had hounded her 
throughout her life and to her death, and 
. hoping to head off governmental action, 
. pledged new steps Monday to restrain 
: ibeir coverage of her two sons. 

'a The Independent newspaper vowed 
that it would never again carry a pho- 
: tograph of Prince William or Prince 
: Harry in a private setting, while the 
: owner of a leading tabloid said his pa- 

• pers would refrain from running in- 
trusive photos “except where they are 
considered necessary" — although he 
left himself room to reconsider for com- 
petitive reasons. 

The efforts at self-regulation fol- 
lowed Eari Spencer's bitter attack on the 
press in his remarks at Diana's funeral 
on Saturday. 

Lord Spencer said his sister never 
understood why her acts of charity 
"were sneered at by the press" and said 
the media’s “permanent quest to bring 
her down" had turned her into “the most 
hunted person of the modern age. 

A In a front-page editorial, the lnde- 

* pendent said Monday that enough was 
enough. 

“We will never publish pictures of 
the young princes, William and Harry, 
in private situations again.' * the editorial 
said. “On state occasions maybe, or on 
maners of constitutional significance, 
but even then we wifi be sparing. 

- The Independent is a broadsheet 
newspaper, not a tabloid, and it has 
resisted the extreme pursuit of Diana 

See DIANA, Page 8 


A Slice of France Telecom 

Private Investors to Be Offered 20% of Stock 


By Joseph Fitchett 

in temanundl Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The government said 
' Monday it would sell 20 percent of 
France Telecom to private investors, 
making it clear that control of the state- 
owned company, Europe’s largest re- 
maining phone monopoly, would re- 
' main firmly in state hands. 

Another slice of shares, perhaps 1 ? 
£ percent, will be swapped with Deutsche 
Telekom, the French company’s closest 
v partner, with the government ’s share of 
£ Fiance Telecom perhaps dropping as 
>; low as 62 percent. 

’. a ‘TTiis is not a privatization. ' ’ Finance 
'M Minister Dominique Suauss-Kahn said 
*’ 1 m announcing the planned sale next 
£ month. The share price has not been 
l: fixed, but the sale could generate more 
to 70 billion French francs l $11.5 
f . billion), analysts said, making it the 

if I T Newsstand Prices ~ ~ 

• Bahrain 1.000 BD Malta.. -55 c 

Cyprus C£1X» Nigeria... 125,00 Naha 

• DenmarK _.14.00 DKr Oman 1-2SJ OR 

f finJand -..-.12.00 FM Qatar 10.00 OR 

Gibraltar .£0.85 ftp. lraland...JR £ 1.00 

Great Britain....£ 030 Saudi Arabia .-10 SR 

Egypt £E 530 S. Africa — R12 + VAT 

Jordan 1.250 JD UAE. 10 ? > * 

, Kenya K. SR 160 U.S. Mi (Eur.) -Si ^ 

r Kuwait 700 Fib Zimbabwe Zm330HU[ 


0 


$ 


'70294 805025 


largest-ever public offering of a state- 
owned company in France. 

The move — in effect, a partial pri- 
vatization — was so limited thai it 
amounted to another blow to prospects 
for the new Socialist government to in- 
stall private management in state-owned 
companies to help them meet compe- 
tition in deregulated world markets. 

In the case of France Telecom, as 
with Air France last week, the sale of 
onlv part of the company wiJJ still gen- 
erate a windfall for the cash-strapped 
government, improving the country s 
chances of qualifying for a single Euro- 
pean currency. But private shareholders 
Jre liable to be stuck in the role of a 

powerless minority. 

France Telecom’s future had been 
closely watched both inside and outside 
the country as a major test of how the 
Socialist government intended to rec- 
oncile its commitment to protect the 
nation’s tradition of public service with 
pressures to make these companies 
more profitable and competitive. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn said thar the gov- 
ernment wanted to give France Telecom 
“the means to keep its world ranking or 
even improve it” by enabling the com- 
pany to raise money itself rather than via 
the government and improving the pros- 
pects for international duanCM. 

But the move may prove toohmned 
to catapult the company into the front 
ranks in international competition or 
even enable it io fend offdomesuc nv^ 
when the market is freed in 1998, in- 
dustry sources said. 

See TELECOM, PageS 


London, Tuesday, September 9, 1997 


| $250,000 a Day Pour In 
For Diana’s Charities 

Sacks of Mail With Coins and Checks; 
$Al Fayed Pledges $15 Million to Hospitals 


Blair Stumping for Scottish Devoh 




No. 35,621 




By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — First there was the 
shock, followed by tributes, tons of 
flowers and a million cards of con- 
dolence. 

And now, in memory of Diana . Prin- 
cess of Wales, comes the money. 

Donations are pouring in at a dizzy- 
ing pace for Diana's various charities in 
a phenomenon that follows an aston- 
ishing outpouring of love and affection 
that saw up to 2 million people bid her 
farewell as she was buried at her family 
estate in the village of Great Brington. 

Since Tuesday . when her lawyers, 

. reacting to popular demand, set up the 
Princess of Wales Memorial Fund to 
cope with pressure from people wanting 
to send money, funds have cascaded at a 
rate of more than $250,000 a day. 

They come in sacks of mail con- 
taining children's contributions from 
their pocket money — a few coins at- 
tached to handmade cards — to a $4.8 
million company check from an an- 
onymous corporate donor. And that is 
just for starters. 

Big donors digging into their pockets 
. include the singer and friend of Diana's. 
Elton John, who has announced he will 
donate- all the proceeds from the new 
version of the song he performed at her 
funeral in Westminster Abbey, * 'Candle 
in the Wind," to her charities. 

On Monday. Michael Cole, a spokes- 
man for the Hacrods department store, 
said its owner. Mohamad al Fayed, had 
pledged a total of at least 5 1 5 million in 
donations to hospitals that were part of 
Diana’s charitable work, including the 
construction of a new children's fa- 
cility. Mr. al Fayed is the father of the 

S rincess's friend Dodi al Fayed, who 
ted with her in a car crash in Paris. 
Callers to phone credit lines set up on 
12-hour shifts by British Telecom are 
making an average pledge of £20 (S32). 
at the raze of 350 pledges an hour every 
day. according to a spokeswoman for 
Mishcon de Reya. Diana’s law Firm, 
which is handling the fond. The phone 
lines’ capacity has been increased to 
handle 3,500 callers at a time. 

Mr. John sang “Candle in the 
Wind.” which was originally written 
about Marilyn Monroe, at Diana's fu- 
neral service Saturday to a worldwide 
audience estimated in the tens of mil- 
lions. He has said he will donate to ibe 
Princess Fund all proceeds from what 
the music industry predicts to be the 
biggest-selling single of all time when it 
is released Saturday. Conservative es- 
timates suggest initial sales of $16 mil- 
lion but possibly much more. 

“There has been a huge volume of 
donations,” said Kale Knightlev Day, 
an executive at the law Firm handling the 
fund. “And the amounts vary 
widely.” - 

Ms. Day said the momentum was 
such that she would give a briefing to the 
press every morning this week. 

Executives at the firm, which handled 
Diana ’s divorce from Prince Charles last 
year, would not say how much money 
had come in, saying it was being tallied. 

But others connected with the project 
said at least some £ 1 50 million had been 
collected and projected that — with 

See CHARITIES, Page 8 



TTS; 

- . ... • 


Chrt» BmxwpAgOKc Fraorr-JYcvc 

Prime Minister Tony Blair campaigning Monday in Glasgow for a “yes” vote in the 
referendum Thursday on Scottish devolution, one of Labour’s main electoral promises. 


Computer on Mir 
Shuts Down Again, 
Sending Orbiter 
Into a Slow Spin 

Battle Is On to Keep Solar Panels 
Pointed at Sun for Electricity ; 
Crew Said to Be in No Danger 

By Daniel Williams 

HjjjfaiUftw Port Sen-U e 

KOROLYOV, Russia — The crew of Mir struggled to keep 
their space station from mmbling out of control on Monday 
after the main computer inexplicably failed and shut off the 
automatic systems that keep the station upright. 

With the computer down. Mir began a slow rotation, and in 
this unsteady mode its array of long, rectangular solar panels 
only intermittently caught the rays of the sun, which provide 
energy. 

The cosmonauts Anatoli Solovyov and Pavel Vinogradov 
and the U.S. astronaut Michael Foale turned off an energy- 
consuming oxygen system and instead used slow-burning 
canisters that produce oxygen through chemical breakdown. 
They also worked in semi-darkness to preserve electricity. 

To right the station, crew members fired jets to keep the 
panels oriented to the sun. There was no danger to the crew, 
nor any thought of abandoning ship, Russian officials said. 

“1 think this is nothing frightening, although it is un- 
pleasant,” said Valeri Udaioy, deputy director at Mission 
Control. 

The breakdown ».■» ine third computer malfunction aboard 
Mir this year, a period marked by numerous scary mishaps: a 
June collision with a cargo vessel, docking malfunctions, a 
fire on board, broken oxygen generating and cooling systems. 
In July, a member of the previous Russian crew accidentally 
pulled a plug on a computer that threw the ship into a tumble 
similar to the one Monday. 

The fresh problems once again raised the question of 
whether the equipment used on the station is getting too old to 
be reliable. Mir's core module is 11 years old. Russian 

See MIR, Page 8 


Paula Jones Confronts Her Own Legal Setback 


By Brian Knowlton 

hueraoiUnul HerM Tr.hunc 

WASHINGTON — The sexual harassment lawsuit 
against President Bill Clinton appeared to suffer a 
setback on Monday as wo attorneys representing the 
plaintiff. Paula Corbin Jones, asked a court for per- 
mission to withdraw from the case. 

The attorneys, Gilbert Davis and Joseph Cam- 
marata, filed the request in a federal district court in 
Little Rock, Arkansas. The judge may hold a hearing 
to decide their request. 

A judge in a civil case would normally grant such a 


request if it did not prejudice the diem's case, said 
A. E. Dick Howard, a constitutional law specialist at 
the University of Virginia. But he noted that “this is 
not a garden-variety case.” 

A spokeswoman for Ms. Jones said that new law- 
yers were being interviewed, and that the May 26 trial 
date should not be affected. 

“The train is on the track,” the spokeswoman, 
Susan Carpenter McMillan, said on CNN. “Every- 
body’s set for a May date." 

The request for withdrawal, reportedly reflecting 
sharp disagreement over possible terms of an out-of- 
court settlement, appeared to demonstrate the de- 


termination of Ms. Jones to pursue the charges against 
Mr. Clinton in court 

But regardless how the judge rules, according to Mr. 
Howard of the University of Virginia, Ms. Jones’s case 
will probably suffer. Either she is left with attorneys 
who disagree sharply with her, or she is forced to form 
a new legal team from scratch. 

Mr. Clinton ’s top lawyer, Robert Bennett, described 
the spat in blunt terms. 

“This is a nasty and highly personal dispute 
amongst Paula Jones, her attorneys and her public 

See SUIT, Page 8 



Mobutu, in Exile, Dies of Cancer 

Longtime Dictator of Zaire Came to a Humiliating End 


lait UaMflhun/Rcukas 

Mobutu Sese Seko answering a reporter’s 
query in Kinshasa shortly before his downfall. 


By Howard W. french 

New York Times Service 

Mobutu Sese Seko, Zaire’s longtime dictator and 
the last of a generation of Cold War rulers who grew 
fabulously rich by providing a bulwark against com- 
munism, died in exile Sunday in Rabat, Morocco, after 
a long battle with prostate cancer. He was 66. 

Marshal Mobutu was chased from power in May 
after a seven-month rebellion led by a lifelong op- 
ponent, Laurent KabilaJn his first official act, Mr. 
Kabila restored the name of Congo used by Belgian 
colonists and changed by his predecessor in 1971. 

Marshal Mobuto’s panicked flight into exile was 
merely the beginning of a humiliating end for a man 
whose almost constant presence at the front and center 
of the African political stage had turned him into one 
of the world's most vainglorious leaders. France re- 
fused to give him asylum, as did Togo. Finally, Mo- 
rocco took him in. For most of his four months there, 
the longtime dictator’s failing health kept him con- 
fined to hospitals. 

[Marshal Mobutu will be buried temporarily in 
Morocco in the coming days, his son Manga Mobutu 
told Agence France-Presse on Monday.] 

After seizing power in a 1965 coup. Marshal 
Mobutu formed one of the continent's archetypal one- 


party states, tolerating no dissent and encouraging a 
strong personality cult. The symbols of his power 
became a leopard-skin cap and wooden walking stick, 
carved with the figure of an eagle at the top. 

Under the banner of an ideology dubbed "au- 
thenticity," and laier known as Moburaism, he sought 
to legitimize his rule by reawakening pride in values 
supposedly unique to Africans, all the while enhancing 
his own power as the country's undisputed chief. 

His rapid rise -from obscurity, beginning at the 
outset of his country's chaotic independence from 
Belgium, was also due in no small part to the help of 
Washington and other Western powers, who saw in 
him a valuable ally against instability and Communist 
encroachment in Central Africa. 

Playing this card to the hilt. President Mobutu 
allowed nis huge country, which borders nine other 
African nations, to be a staging ground for Western 
client states and anti-Communist guerrilla movements 
in the region, notably next door in oil-rich Angola. 

By the same token, he was able repeatedly to call on 
his Western allies to help put down the rebellions that 
have almost continuously marked his country's his- 
tory after independence. 

The Zairian leader's aid in the effort to contain 
See MOBUTU, Page 7 


AGE WPA 

400 Feared Dead as Haitian Ferry Sinks 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (API 

77 A_feny sank north of the capital Monday04P . M „»***<*« 

Monday, and Haitian officials, said as — — 

many as 400 people were missing and 25* 

feared drowned. Radio reports said Poimd ij58i JJ94 

about 25 bodies washed ashore. Yen iat.155 1 21.075 

Haiti’s Coast Guard reported that at pp 6.0825 6.0535 

least 700 people were on the ferry and 
that 300 to 400 people had drowned, 
according to Veronica Bandrowsky.a 

U.S. Coast Guard petty officer in +-J2.77 7835. IB 7822.41 

Miami. _ 

The ferry. La Fterte Gonavienne, 
sank at dawn Mondav near Mon- Monday c a p.m. previoufictoi 

trouis, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) +2.15 931.20 929.05 

northwest of the capital. It had left die 

port of Anse-a-Galeis on Gonave Is- {J.S. SoCCCr VlCtOrV 
land in Port-au-Pnnce Bay. J 


The Dollar 


The Dow 


U.S. Cautions Ramos 
On Political Turmoil 9 


+ 12.77 


Monday © * P M. 
931.20 


7822.41 

previous dose 
929.05 


Books Pa 8*4. 

Crossword Pa S e 

Opinion - Pages 10-11. 

Pages 20-21. 


kTr Ti «i 

The iHT on-line vmv.iht.com 


U.S. Soccer Victory 

The United Stares moved a step 
closer to qualifying to play for the 
1 998 World Cup when its soccer team 
beat Costa Rica, 1-0, in Oregon. The 
lone goal came in the 7$tb minute 
with a blast from Tab Ramos from 
outsice the penalty area. Page 20. 


CMfaMtvOw-S^FnimDlsivirbn 

MANILA — A senior U.S. official on 
Monday urged President Fidel Ramos to 
head off “political turmoil" and preserve 


head off “political turmoil" and preserve 
democracy in the Philippines. The cau- 
tionary comments came as Mr. Ramos 
tried to shake off suspicion that he was 
looking for ways to remain in power. 

Mr. Ramos took the highly unusual 
step of addressing the nation by radio in 
an effort to subdue mounting tensions 
over efforts by his political allies to 
amend the country's democratic Con- 
stitution in ways that would allow him 
to run for a second six-year tram. 

Analysts warn that political unrest 
would scare off investors, and fears of 
political instability were blamed for the 
rail of the Philippines currency, the 
peso, to a record low Monday. 

Initially hit by regional currency tur- 
moil, the peso has sunk nearly 24 per- 
cent against the U.S. dollar in two 


months. The monetary authorities in 
Manila called Monday for a police 
crackdown against people who eroded 
confidence in the financial system. 

On Monday night, Roman Catholic 
churches around the nation rang their 
bells for five minutes in the start of a 
daily "noise barrage” against consti- 
tutional change that is to culminate in a 
mass protest Sept. 21. 

The United States, which backed the 
dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos into 
the 1980s, joined the chorus of appeals 
for the Philippines to keep the issue 
under control. 

The presidential palace quoted Stan- 
ley Roth, the assistant U.S. secretary of 
stare for East Asian and Pacific affairs, 
as telling Mr. Ramos that Washington 
"would want to see that democratic 
institutions are maintained" and to 

See MANILA, Page 8 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9. 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Remaking Reality / Sculpturing Mao's E ar 

CIA Model-Maker Carves 
Role in Momentous Events 


_ cation Cenrer, a CIA facility at toe Navy Yard, 

By Peter Finn carrying classified material across the United States. 

w.,J,inf>ton post Service in 1 064. the agency started a three-dimensional- 

* — _ “ was a time modeling shop at the Interpretation Center, using 

W f h eS^ W eU =t cd 

with “Su 2 phL. It was fteonly 

option of to kind in ft. alphabet soup of in- 



In Waves of Butchery* 
No Letup for Algerians* 


"By Charles Truehearr 

Uflsftwsioa Post Servwe 


PARIS — The deadliest massacres in 


last hours. vinlenee Taft 


Aig^s Uo^y six-year Muaihn , to; new surge of viotace^t 

daSientalist insurrection have triggered up the heat on the govemmen|| 

unprecedented denunciations from *e h{ P ^ it ^ brook no fo J®gg 

United Nations and the Vatican, and . rference ^ its internal affa^- 14 ^ 
Hnivn the worid's attention to a bttl - , , # the most restrained express 


S6 IfhLas^ vSto^alotofstmnge operation of lb ta 
workshop at the Wash- telhgen^e^ 


Sn^nhel^and outs of the Son Tay prison in 
North Vietnam. His fingers traced every room in 
General Manuel Antonio Noriega’s vacation home 
in Panama. He surveyed the streets of Iraqi-oc- 

-B whentefinally stood before the Kremlin in 
198*?, he had already built iL “My colors could have 

been a little better, * ' he said. 

For most of his 36-year career at the Central 
Intelligence Agency. Mr. Lane made fine-scale 
models of foreign weapons systems, prisons, gov- 
ernment buildings and sundry far-flung terrain. 
And, in one odd departure from replicating the 
hardware of the Cold War. he created an oversize, 
water-putty model of the ear of Mao. the former 
Chinese leader. 

“As I understand it, m his later years, we didn t 
know if Mao was living or dead." Mr. Lane ex- 
plained. “Every once in a while, his photo would 
show up in the newspaper, but the only thing you 
could see was his head. He was always in a river up 
to his neck. You can identify a person by their ear, so 
they had us build this 12-inch ear to figure out if it 
was him or a stand-in.' ’ 

Mr. Lane retired late last year. And his departure 
from the CIA coincided with the agency’s decision 
to shut down its three-dimensional-modeling shop, 
a victim of government downsizing and the rise of 
sophisticated computer imaging. 

it's just so much easier to do that on a computer 
screen," said Chase Brandon, a spokesman for the 
CIA. "You can generate three-dimensional images 
on a computer screen. And you can put that on a 
videocassette and take it over to a policymaker, 
which is a whole lot easier than transporting a 200- 
pound terrain map." 

Mr. Lane, who used wood and plastic to represent 
some of the pivotal moments in recent U.S. history, 
can only look back wistfully. “They can do Fant- 


temgence ageuu». • 

Mr. Lane, an amateur modeler who worked with 
kits he bought at hobby stores, applied for a job m 
the new section. He was turned down. He kept 
trying, and in 1969. he was asked to show what he 

could do. . , o 

Toiling every evening after work for two weeks, 

he built a model of his house and yard. He was 

k^Among his first projects was a model of the Son 
Tay prison 30 miles (50 kilometers) outside of 
Hanoi, where a U.S. strike force- planned a raid to 
rescue prisoners of war believed to be held there- No 
prisoners were found in the November 1970 raid, 
but there were successful rescues at other POW sites 
in North Vietnam that the shop had modeled. 

Mr. Lane, who became chief of the modeling 
shop in 1987, stresses that the shop’s work wasa 
team effort. Just before Operation Desert Stor m, fo r 
instance, five modeler^ put in 246 hours of overture 
in five days to build a model of a section of Kuwait 
City from the U.S. Embassy to the Persian fJulf 

- ■* .. ■ . j _ /btniwinhv nnn in- 



umtea now™ — - 1;# .. interrerence mu* ^ 

drawn the worid's attention to a bttl ' . ^ at prost restra ined exyicsff- 

understood civil war whose unpunished bnsU md concemfromhmn^r. 

atrocities and staggering civilian toll western editnrafcr 

make oiher conflicts seem tame ^ Ees and a few foreign governments, 

D tiring the weekend, more than 100 P 3 ® ^ the Sidi Rais ms^ 

people reportedly were slaughtered m ^ Uniled Nat ions sea^aryu 

wo attacks on a shantytown area of Kot \ Annan, declared 

Beni Messous, 30 kilometers (-0 miles ) g . ‘Words are no longer enough, 
west of Algiers, the capitaL extremely difficult for os to pretend? 

Following a familiar pattern. accord- Jus e^ .> that wetoown 

mg to news reports m rreach ““J* nothing and that we should abandon totfl 
gerian media, the unidentified assailants ^ ple t0 their fate. - j?. 

killed their victims, who included m- for “tolerance 

H.itAtneh r* WMTTOIlS. 1H3. - AVU,rM j.. A Inonon aifil 




wo attacks on a shantyfown area n eraL Kofi * 

Beni Messous, 30 kilometers U0 miles £ . * ‘Words 

west of Algiers, the capitaL 


Kenny Lane holding the only model 
he has from his days as a CIA 
model-maker - a model of his office. 
He hopes eventually to get one or two 
declassified pieces as souvenirs . 


But it was the excitement produced by a world 

. ■ i > ...» amunA q nrnim-f mnftklV 


telbgence reports. *. ‘That’s what you live for,’ ’ he said. Lives are at 

^ VER THE years, the shop turn * out 862 ^Somebody. 


O VER THE years, the shop rumeo out boa 
products, the CIA says. Much of the work 
focused on reproducing Soviet military 
equipment and sites. Occasionally, to 
save time, Mr. Lane and others went to local model 
shops and bought kits to make Soviet planes. Then 
they would add details from intelligence reports. 
Store employees “were kind of wondering why 

. . .* * 1 * Dimxian -lirmift 


SIO&.C. JVJIHWWUj, u*v • T,| , f — 

quickly. You get a high for projects like that 
In 1989, for instance. Mr. Lane and his colleagues 


OIUIG Cllljuiujww - 7 . «-* ,-, 

we would buy a couple dozen Russian aircraft, 
Mr. Lane said. “We didn't announce we were CIA, 

but eventually they knew.” 

After the hostage crisis in Iran, which ended m 
1981 the shop produced models of many U.S. 
embassies. And during the hostage crisis itself, Mr. 
Lane spenr 18 months working on models of toe 
U.S. Embassy compound and the Iranian Foreign 
Ministry and creating large sections of Tehran in 

miniature. , _ , _ 

While in Moscow in 1985. he visited Red Square 
and stood before the Kremlin. “It was an un- 
believable feeling standing there and physically 
seeing what you had already modeled.’ ' he said. I 
felt like I had already been there." 


uaii uuiy iwn. - . y ... , 

astic thin gs with computers, but it s still not tne 
same as seeing a model.' ’ he said. “We were all sad 


to see it go. . , . 

Mr. Lane was hired by the CIA straight out of 
Osbourn High School in Manassas in 1960. For tus 
fircr nine years at toe agency, he worked as an armed 
courier out of the National Photographic Interpre- 


ill 1707, - * — — . — . 

quickly turned out a model of Modelo Prison in 
Panama City and other buildings in Panama, in- 
cluding one of Mr. Noriega's vacation homes. A 
U.S. citizen was being held at the prison, and Mr. 
Noriega had threatened to kill him if the United 

States invaded. . _ _ 

U.S. forces stormed the prison jO minutes before 
toe fiiU-scale U.S. invasion, and toe American was 

Mr. Lane, who is retiring to toe Northern Neck of 
Virginia, has returned to his original avocation- 

modeling as a hobby. _ , . 

Over the years, he has stored hundreds of model 
kits which he bought in stores and now wants to 
build. Much of his life’s work has been warehoused 
by the CIA. but he says he hopes that one of these 
days, he can get one or two declassified pieces he 
worked on to keep as souvenirs. 

“It’s a little bit of history, and a little bit ot my 
own history," he said. 


gcnan mcuw, ■ — -- 

killed toeir victims, who included in- 
fants, wito automatic weapons, ma- 
chetes and hatchets, during some three 

hours of butchery. 

*“Thev kicked toe door in, took the 
men. forced them outside, slit their 
throats," a resident of Beni Messous, 
who lost seven relatives Friday night, 
told The Associated Press. 

“Thev came back, took out my aunt 
and slit her throat after slashing open her 

stomach.” . 

Although sporadic bomb attacks ana 
other killings have occurred on the 
streets of Algiers, a massacre on this 
scale had never taken place so close to 

toe capitaL „ 

A week earlier, as many as jOO men. 
women and children were shot or 
hacked to death in the town of Sidi Rais, 
according to unofficial accounts. The 
government put toe number of dead at 
98, blaming Muslim terrorists for toe 

klW . . ., w 


“dialogue” angered toe Algerian ^ 
toorities, who fonmally P ro ^^ h SS. 

secretary-general’s "unacceptable^! 
comments about toe country s internal-! 

John Paul n also spoke oin- 

3g ^"for *e Clinton 7 

istration. without assessing Uamg 
called toe massacre 

"yet another astonishing threshold of^ 

ba H^xpressed hope that “the politic^: 
system ran begin to generate peaceful? 
channels for dissent and to f 

Algerian people to overcome this nighty W 

mare." - -ij 

v . 


TRAVEL UPDATE % 


Mil 111 ^. _ — ' - ^ 

been able to explain how Algerian police TAP Pilots End Dispute 
nmi military forces at barracks only afew . *t>\ t-aP-AW- Pnrtnmlai 


nnn miiiuu % imua •« -“j - " ■ 

kilometers away from the carnage failed 
to respond during hours of shooting and 
screaming and dwellings set ablaze. 

The indiscriminate killing of men, 
women and children by unidentified 
Muslim terrorists, government-armed 
paramilitary squads and local criminal 
aangs has become a numbing fact of life 
In Algeria, notably in an area south of 
Algiers called the “zone of death.” 

The warfare, which has claimed tens 


LISBON (API — TAP-Air PortMda* 
toe state airline, signed a deal Monday, 
wito its pilots to end a dispute ova- work* 
ins hours that had disrupted sCTVices. c* 
The dispute erupted in March when the. 
company’s 430 pilots said the strain ofr 
excessive working hours threatened*, 
safety. The pilots agreed to raise the ceiF: 
ing on weekly work time from 45 to 5ft*. 
hours: in return, they were granted extSL 
rest periods and days off if they worked' 

more than 90 hours in two weeks. _ 


ADVERTISEMENT 


I Woman Sues Citadel Over Sex Bias 


of thousands of lives since 1992 - more than 90 hours m two weess. , . - 

15 £ 5 ^"— KLM Sees Japan link- 

round of elections that promised victory AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — KLN£- 
for toe Muslim fundamentalist Islamic ^ f^g carrier, said Monday that. 

Salvation From. . was c i 0 se to sealing a cooperation pac^ 


Shopping Galore 


? Hong Kong earned the title ranging from Miftg vases 
“ of a shoppers' paradise to Mao memorabilia. 

. fii f\r frv Hnrnr k.OTlff 5? 


Ui a auuupvu — , 

long ago. All it takes is one Or try Hong Kon S s 


long. agu. J-iii *•» “ —s « 

visit, and you’ll soon find glitzy^ malls, where toe 
out that more than ever, world s top names in high 


The Associated Press “She just wanted to rake ad- Ms. Mentavlos and Ms. Mess- 

-Essaaass p&S?S£ ; SS?SS5tt: 

mmm mmr, 


Hong Kong is a treasme 
trove overflowing with 
some of the most 
exciting and un- >y» 
usual shopping 
experiences in the 'p 
world. 


fashion and luxury vie for 
the attention of toe terri- 
tory’s affluent 
\/A elite. 

And now that 
Hong Kong is 
r under Chinese 


a v LVUAll V* t l_ ft 

the college for creating what her cadon. 

lawyer said Monday was a hostile The lawyer said Ms. Men- 
* , - tauine wnn H seek monetary 




sexual environment. 

Ms. Mentavlos of Charlotte, 


tavlos would seek monetary 
damages in the federal lawsuit. 


MS. JViemavius ui umihhk, — , 

North Carolina, and Kim Messer fot he : would [not jay how much 


WULIU. . , 

Haggle for bargains in sovereignty, why not pay a 
Hone Kong’s narrow, visit to Shanghai Tang, toe 

- i 1 nAiif focViinn 


of Clover. South Carolina, quit in 
January. Among their allegations 
was that male cadets set their 
clothes afire wito fingernail pol- 
ish remover. 


“We think she lost a year of 
her life,” Mr. Harpootlian said. 
“What’s that worth?” 

A Citadel spokesman declined 
to comment. 


nor Petra Lovetinska, a Czech 
national from Washington, com- 
plained of hazing last year. 

“A 50 percent failure rate, 1 
think, would indicate that there 
was a significant hostile envir- 
onment,” Mr. Harpootlian said. 

Federal authorities have inves- 
tigated possible civil rights vi- 
olation but have not announced 
their conclusions pending a 
meeting with the women's fam- 
ilies. 


jiuiuuvk ■ * 

The Front was quickly banned as a 
legal political party by toe military re- 
gime of Liarrune Zeroual, a former gen- 
eral who has been .Algeria’s elected 
president since 1995. 

But toe Front's breakaway military 
wins, toe Aimed Islamic Group, has 

. a ^•ArrAmi.'orcinrp a 


* ■ — * 

waged a campaign of terror ever since, a 
campaign that has begotten reprisals 
and gans violence often operating under 
toe banner of Muslim holy warfare. 

The death toll this summer alone is 
estimated at nearly 2.000 victims of 
bomb explosions in crowded streets, 
roadside executions and armed attacks 
on villages for which no responsibility 
is ever claimed. 

The Algerian military occasionally 
reports its own successful “eradica- 
tion" of Muslim guerrillas. 

With more than 60 journalists, 
mainlv Algerians, killed since toe war- 
fare began, and toe government tightly 
restricting visas for foreign reporters, 
coverage of toe bloodletting is not al- 
ways reliable or complete. 

The shroud of secrecy and intim- 
idation that clouds certain knowledge of 
what is going on has enabled the gov- 


neon-lit night markets flamboyant new fashion 
while Chinese fortune-tell- store that’s making Chinese 

« i .J nuft u/av trv 


ere read palms and 
Cantonese opera singers 
croon. Or roam the ancient 


style chic all toe way to 
Paris? 

A suit made in 24 hours. 


croon. UT roam Uie aiieicm * * ; 

streets of Hollywood Road tax-free electronics and 
and Cat Street in search of precious jewelry, toe most 
Chinese heirlooms and up-to-date personal com- 


£7 t's 

your Gull 


antiques. 

As you walk by Chinese 


puters and software — 
these are just a few of toe 


rwjvu 

temples, you’ll discover shopping buys that await 
local and Chinese history you in Hong Kong, where 


at The Elizabeth, 
a stylish boutique hotel 
located in the heart of 
Orchard Road, Singapore. 


in toe multitude of shops 
and stalls that offer wares 


wonders never cease. 
http://www.hkta.org 


H©«® K*N 



wonders never cease 


Are You Prepared ? 

1997 & 1998 Will Generate 
r.lajor Currency Moves. 

These moves will directly affect the value of 
your Portfolio. Prepare yourself to take 
ndvantaqe of these moves by calling today- 



For My Complimentary Services Guide, Latest Research Reports 
Opinions and Performance Records Cal if 2*. hours/ ToU-Frce- 



US-TqU Voice Line +714-376-3020 US-Tcll Fax Line 


14-376-3025 


In celebration of our 

4th Anniversary 

we are giving 

* free upgrades and 
* ^hogenuk GlobalHandy 
mobile phones 
when you stay 
with us between 
16 June to 16 December, 
at the rate of 

SS 1 75.00+++ per night with .\Bh 

* Conditions Apply 


For enquiries and rcscndXiuns, 
ph ase fax 

( 65 ) 732 3866 

or call 

< 65 ) 739 8012 / 13 / 14 


-Ujtkth 



Correction 


A front-page article on the British 
monarchy in Monday s issue contained 
an incorrect honorific in referring to the 
royal biographer Elizabeth Longford. 
She is Lady Longford. 


AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — KL!v£- 
the Dutch flag carrier, said Monday that, 
it was close to sealing a cooperation pac% 
wito Japan Air Systems and that it wa§. 
studying other such links in Europe an<j, 
Latin America as part of ks push,.^ 
create a global network^. , jirt 

Japan Air Systems serves 38. Jap-, 
anese cities and destinations ,in Aus^ 
tralia, Singapore and South Korea*. 
KLM operates 14 flights to Japan eari*, 
week and hopes the deal will be in place 
in time to benefit its winter timetable. ;r 


A***! 




A brush fire threatened the Inca ciH 
adel of Machu Picchu, blazing up a, 
mountain toward Peru’s most populaj, 
tourist site, authorities said. ( Reuter# ■ 


. y 

The hurricane designated Enkag 
grew stronger in toe Atlantic on Monj^ 
day. but was on a course taking it away, 
from the northeastern Caribbean is-, 
lands. Hurricane watches were chopped- 
for toe U.S. and British Virgin Islands- 
and Puerto Rico. (Reuters) 


The Statue of Liberty and Liberty, 
Island reopened Monday after water and* 
sewage problems caused a weekend- 


shutdown. 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


AJgarrt 

Amsterdam 

Ankara 

Attain 


High LamW 
OF CJF 
2&ra? IWflfla 


High Law W 
OF CJF 
20*2 18*84 pc 


17*62 W&pC 18/84 12ffi3 pc 
27/60 W4J » 27/BO 7/44 pc 


i 31/88 2C/71 s 32*69 21/70 S 

ora 2 S/77 17/8T a 2«79 17 62 9 

kJs 28/82 liK » 2V73 S'** s 

17/62 7<44 pc 18/81 12.53 c 

Ms. 1 W 8M6 i 19/66 12/53 pc 

KW! 26/79 I O'M 2QH68 9i48 5 

dvraon 15/50 B/«8pc 1MH I2/Mpe 

Del Sol 28/62 lMJJ i 2WW '9*6 1 * 

i 1H/64 18/64 11<S2 pc 


18/64 11/Kpe 



sr 

sar 

Bombay 

CokartM 

CteangMai 

Hanoi 


Today 

High Low W 
OT OT 


IMUUMiie 

Mgh 

OF OF .. 


wr Uf vrfr wr h . 

22/71 7744 pc 2V73 &***-- 
3086 1&/BB » Z*B4 


3OT1 24/7B pc 33/H 24/79 P» _ 
31/88 16/61 C 1«81 WWr-Ji, 


ir«i 7/44 pc ia/04 nvsocc 
35960 17*62 1 27/80 1 W s 


18/64 &4J pc 17*02 VJSc 

25m IWDl 26*79 'HSs 


I Umauso rubh 
Cola 


I /JmeaswnnUv 

Wd 


, u blamabad 
Hoavy joVwta 
} »!»■ Karachi 

K Lumpur 


28/82 vim i son* am e 

3086 24/75 r SO/BB 23m 0* _ 

31/88 22/71 6 3VB8 28/71 ' 

29/84 28/76 1 3*82 JV7|r 

31/80 20/78 r 31/88 9am r ; 

32/89 23/73 r 91/W 23TO *h 

28/82 24 m r 2*84 S4/75 BC - 

36/87 23/73 pc W« 


HoChiMnh 32/89 23/73 r 
Hong Hot*] 28/82 24/75 r 


16/61 7/44 pc 16/61 9-48 pc 

27/W 18/64 t 2082 16-61 V 


Kiev 19/66 W4S c '2/53 o.43r 

LasPakrus 28/82 22*71 pc 27/80 2 1 <70 pc 

Labon 2" SO 1HA4 t .VO 17*62 pc 

Linton 21/70 10/50 ■> 21/70 IMS i 

»91 14/57 s .«4/W i«Aj1 s 


Jofslmom YS/A ” Karachi 

North America Europe Asia It 

A Pacific storm win spread Pa my sunny and pleasani Bering could haw? a show- 
clouds and rain into ihe across England. France or early Wednesday, then 
Nonhwa&i Wednesday, but and Germany Wednesday mostly sunny and cwnfnn- 2*??? 


31/80 22/7i pc sow amy 
xzm 27/aO pc 31/88 MT7B 


32/89 23/73 sh 31/08^71 
31/88 23/73 pc 3MB WT\ f-r 4 


28«4 1S59 pc 28/82 16*61 pc 
25/84 14/57 o 27‘80 15.55 i 


16/61 13/35 r 16/61 8/4* 

1*86 7'44pe 18-64 a jk 

29*84 21/70 8 27/80 i-*66 

14j57 7.44 c 17/62 IJ/S.) pc 

22*71 8/48 5 21*70 n*T^-. 


2088 5/41 pc. 1 7 82 0 4i, pc 

1050 6/43 r C/i? .1*31-. 


clouds and rain into the across England. France er early Wednesday, then SSllirpLj, \ Am* 

Nonhwest Wednesday, but and Germany Wednesday mostly sunny and comfon- Sm? Vim c 

sunshine will return by Fn- and Thursday, but a front able rnr.jugh Fnday. Soak- Rangoon 28*82 swts 5 

day Hot and dry in the will bring showers and 0 ing ram will continue in Seoul 32/09 i a/44 a 

Soulhwesi. bul another te«v ihundarslorms across southeastern China, while shangh* 2*»4 £3/ra r 

storm unit oring soaking Ihe region Friday Showers Seoul and Tokyo will be Smgopore 30/86 ci/70 c 

rams to ihe northeastern are *n sic/e lor western humid with clouds, some 

U S and souiheasiem Spain and southern Italy, sun and ihe chance of a 

Canada Warm wilh sun- bul Ihe resl of Spain and shower ai any time. Hot 

shine Irom Saskaichewan Italy win be warm with sun- and dry in southern Viel- . . 

to Texas shine nam and Cambodia. ATTlca 


31/88 z»73 pc ain» ■ ,1 

3088 22^1 pc 29/84 22^® 


JOBS 2V77<£' 
31/88 23/73 6 


32/89 24/75 f 31/88 23773 C. 

33m 24/76 pc 33/91 

28/02 virra * 20 a 2 22 m 


24 m 18/80 r* 
lane 24/78 rj* 
3088 2 1/70 « 


30/06 21/70 c 30/68 21/70K 
31/89 24/75 pc 31/88 24/7Bl£i 
29/84 M/79 r 2»R2 23rt3r— 


29/84 22/71 r 1 


16/41 9/48 r 

50*86 18*4 4 


24 Mount Elizabeth, Sin::p>’it. 22S5 18. 
Inicmit : hfint'/’A-ww . farcj't.con .sgrTiotcis 
E-mail : clizabpr^'pacificjtcl.sj 

A member ofFar East Organ hatum 


• buflt-in power antenna 

• low radiation 


SI Pmwtbunj 17/82 12*3 r 
SI*ektK*n 14*57 9*48 e 

Strasbourg earn a/48 i 

ToJSnn 16/61 ?/44 » 

thb : vn i4«7 p 

Vonlco 28*2 14/57 1 

Vienna 2VTJ »«8 1 

Warsaw 17/132 7.44 si 

Zurich 12/71 10/50 5 


10 41 SH4* i 

24*2 17*2 6 
15*69 ir’CO * 
1661 ■J*4bc 
2170 12/5.1 ■■ 


North America 


Mp« 
Cap« Town 


2S/B2 TS*e« 30/88 18*4 a * 
20*8 8/48 pc pl/70 11/82 M 

25/77 17/62 ■ 24/75 17*2 PW 

23/73 1 1/52 pc 23/73 IlflEe,. 
28/82 22*71 fr 28/82 2373 C - 


1661 7*44 PC 18/61 

25/77 14/57 pc 27.80 14.T7 I< 


Today Tomorrow 

High LowW Mgh Low «/ 

OT OT OT OT 

14*7 10/50 r IKI »48 *n MciroapcWs 
l'j/(0, 2H*82 179121 MonlnwJ 

71*70 iva re 2T7J 16/61 r NuSUU 

23/23 14/9/1 ;i/70 11/52 Sh New York 

■Xfl 7 26»68 5 28.7I2 I7«?pc Orlardo 

2475 11/521 27.-80 ll-52pc Pboantt 

24*75 14*57 ah 2271 11<5?I San Fran 
li st 2173 pc 32*9 24/75 pc Sonde 
ill? 21701 31*88 17/6J pc Towmo 

El'i 7 1-70 * 31.68 1-62 DC Viinoouver 

12*89 24'"S i J2,«9 24,75 pc Wnlm^on 


24.75 14*57 i 
tatio to,5d: 


17*2 7.44 sh I2'S3 "'44 r 
22/71 10/50 0 2170 Ijg3i 


The GlobalHandy by 

-hagenuk 


Middle Ea9t 




AMiOhabi 

B*wut 

Cora 

Pamoseus 

Jauu>en 

Lioor 

Riyadh 


43/109 26/79 » 43J1P9 2C7*> 1 
29/*:' 18*4 i 27'Btl 20/68 1 
34-49 18/64 % 35*75 1966 " 

34,93 lOfiOs 3391 12.53 4 
28*2 13/55', 28.**: 14>',"a 

42*107 19/66 S 43*189 19 66* 
42*107 28/79 y 4STC7 2577 c 


“/cJwrnnu 

A/birCa 

305100 

Chugo 

DnBai 

Pcmrur 

IVj1f04 

Mpij-JOn 
La,. Ar^k-i 
Ukira 


i 1M1 Wi I UamoapcWs 2271 10*50 pc ia/84 9/48 pc 

r 2H/82 179171 I Momma! 73,73 I3,5fi p< 23/73 14/57 , 

e 2973 1«61 r tAisuu 31*BB CVH 1 32,U9 25/77 pc 

i.. —* 23^ , 7 ^ r 


Today 

High LowW 
C/F OT 


luniuaiuw ■ r- ’ 

High LowW Norab 


27/80 9/48 pc 27/80 B(48pdi 
28*84 19/60 « 31/88 18/08 SK 


Latin America 


2475 16/64 c M73 17*2 r Buenos / 

31.68 2^.71 •, 92/8B 2373 pc Caracsa 

41*108 27/80 a 42/107 27*0 5 Umo 


Buenos Ans t7«2 -2/29 5 11/52 QTSW 

Canon. mm 22/71 pc 20*84 22/71 pc. 

lima liftn icu, - mnn ,wi. i 


IV1Q8 27/OOa 42/107 27*0 s Uma 21/70 16/61 s 21/70 1J182 8 - 

24/76 14/57 PC 22/71 14/57 ps McnKoClty 74*7? 11*3 pc 22/71 ISB3c« 

-J* “ :,UTa ’3*S8' n» OsJonun 32*8 25/77 j 30/88 21/70 i'_ 

" ' Samago 1^53 -i27 pc 11/52 1/3* F& , 


22,71 I3*5f. pc 23m lOTWi 
27*00 18/61 » 24/75 12*S3 ! 


Legand: it^unny. pc-p artty <tVuoy c-cicwjy. sh^nowom. l-IhUNKtShimw. r-min, 'J-wob Durnaa, 
Mi-snun. i-Kf W-Wcamer All maps. Torocasts and dan novktad by AccuWaattiar. tne.fi 1^ — 


Oceania 


14*7 13*36 r 
21/70 11/52 a 


15*9 1 3*55 r 
TW88 IWSOptr 


A two-month trial 
siil)s(ri|)lioii. 

Save up to 60% 


COUNTRY/CURRENCY 


Try a special, low cost 2-monifi trial subscription to the 
International Herald Tribune to enjoy delivery to your 
home or office every morning AND save up to 60% off 
the newsstand price. 


AUSTRIA 

BELGIUM. 'LUXE MB. 
DENMARK 
FINLAND 
FRANCE 
: GERMANY 
I GREAT BRITAIN 
: HONG KONG 
: ITALY 
; JAPAN 
! MALAYSIA 
; NETHERLANDS 
1 NORWAY 
i SINGAPORE 
i SPAJN 
i SWEDEN 
SWITZERLAND 
I USA 



r*, I wouUtte Id Start mcening ihe International Herald Tnfcunrj. 
| □ My check is enclosed fpayobfe to ihe IHTJ 


Owrge my □ Amex □ Diners I I VISA G Access I "1 MasterCard i J Eureard 
For ca-USond Aston pnwi. ctedtl cords will bo <k 0 rc|cd « Fiend, F <ontt of CM'fcni rates 


Home W N«. , 


. busirMH Td No. 


Cord No . 


.E*p Date.. 


E-Mail Address 

IgoMhiscopyolthelHTot Dboslc H hotel aoidirw U other 


I Signature' 

| For business orders, indicate your VAT No: 


□ I do ntf wish lo /raw information Irom other car dully sawed companies 
Moil w fe* i to. tnlemaiionaf Herald Tribune 


9-9-97, 


[IHI VAT Number FR,' , 4?3202 1 1 1'*| 


TOUR NEAREST !HT OFFICE 


' Mr /Mrs/Ms Family Nam8.. 

I First Nome 

| Maitrci Address 

1 City/Code 


°i *sve manes cte V2521 NeuiSy C*d«. Firm 
far +33 1 41 A3 92 10 Tel. +33 1 <fl 4?Wdt 
04.-, TL , . THE AMERICAS 
bOU Ih.rd Avenue. New York N Y 10022-6275 USA 
Fax +1 212 * 55 8785 Td- {foil free} 1-800-882-288*4 
. ... A5»A 


7/F ^B^ 50CW*, Rd. U. Hong Kang 

F ® *83/2922 1109. W. +852 2922 1171®^ 
E-Mail; sufas^ihfxcun 


TJ 1 AsiatvbshkOBrtbkaCom J 

utter *dia for new subscribea only. HA7M 1. 


Printed by JVfiw fax htenmanal. Lomdn* Regxtered at u n rmpuptr M the [*><1 > 'fa e 






PAGE 3 


ossa 








LSEFTEWBER Z*>W*L 


I 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


PACE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


.r-S 


•v‘'< 





!i EndO^S 


■V 

-it 

. M :i 

- t 


■' it 


^ Japan lid 


-.1 


{y A Panama Canal ‘Congress 9 
Rams a China -Taiwan Rock 


By. Larry Rohier 

NevYori Times Service 




PANAMA CITY — As 
originally envisioned, the 
Universal Congress on the 
Panama Canal” was to be a 
&assd gathering of world 
leaders here to discuss the fu- 
ture of the vital waterway. 
Bat that was before Panama 
stumbled into the bitter dis- 
pute between China and 
Taiwan, prompting the in- 
censed authorities in Beijing 
to undertake a two-year cam- 

' ypaign to sabotage the event. 
As die conference opened 
Sunday on the 20th an- 
niversary of the signing of the 
Panama Canal treaties, the 
magnitude of Beijing's suc- 
cess became clear. Presidents 
Lee Teng-hui of Taiwan and 
Ernesto Perez Balladares of 
Panama were in attendance, 
but nearly all the other heads 
of state and business leaders 
who had been invited bowed 
to the Chinese offensive and 
stayed away, drastically re- 
ducing the scope and impor- 
tance of the encounter. 

; For Mr. Perez Balladares, 
this outcome is an embarrass- 
ing and politically costly set- 
back. The shipping industry 

- and many foreign govem- 

- meats have been openly skep- 
tical of Panama's ability to run 
the canal after the United 
States hands it over on Dec. 3 1 , 
1999, and his administration 
had hoped that (he congress 
would demonstrate that 
Panama was up to the task. 

a “This was meant to be an 
important act of presentation 
to the international commu- 
nity, in which Panama would 
tell the world it knows how to 
manage and modernize a wa- 
terway that will soon be ours, 
and is ready to assume a more 
serious and responsible global 
role;” said Ricardo Arias Cal- 
deron, a former vice president 
and a leader of die Christian 
Democratic Party. “Instead, it 
is a major lost opportunity.” 
Although the United States 

1 remains the main user of die 
canal it constructed more than 
80 years ago, China and 
Taiwan have growing com- 
mercial and political interests 
here. Measured by total ton- 
nage shipped through the wa- 
terway; China is now the 
fifth-laigest user, while 
Taiwan, which China, regards 
as a Tjreakaway^jrovince and 
therefore seeks to isolate dip- 
lomatically, is the ninth. 

- The rivalry between China 
and Taiwan dates back to 
1949, when Nationalist 
Chinese forces retreated to 
the island after losing a civil 
war to die Communist army. 
Ih 1971, the United Nations 
seat held by the Republic of 
China on Taiwan was trans- 
ferred to Beijing, and now 
only a few countries, mostly 


in Central American and the 
Caribbean, retain formal re- 
lations with Taiwan. 

Paaama's plans for a gran- 
diose global assembly began 
unraveling, it is now obvious, 
in 1995, when the Taiwan 
Embassy here learned of die 
congress, saw it as a rare 
chance for Mr. Lee to appear 
on the world stage and sought 
an invitation. According to 
diplomats here. Panama con- 
sented after Taiwan agreed to 
defray $800,000 of the costs 
of organizing the event. 

Given the international im- 
portance of the canal's future, 
Panama had also sought as- 
sistance and representation 
from the United Nations. But 
once the conference's Taiwan 
connection became known, 
all UN agencies withdrew 
their support, and China 
began to press others who 
were invited either to stay at 
home or limit themselves to 
small, low-level delegations. 

As a result, the only pres- 
idents attending the confer- 
ence, other than Mr. Lee. are 
those of Honduras and 
Nicaragua, which also have 
warm relations with Taiwan. 
The U.S. delegation is led by 
Transportation Secretary 
Rodney Slater and Thomas 
McLaity, President Bill Clin- 
ton's envoy for Latin Amer- 
ican and Caribbean affairs. 

In remarks to reporters 
here, Mr. McLarty said the 
United States was "frilly con- 
fident that canal operations 


will remain solid after 1999" 
because "all parties involved 
arc committed to a seamless 
transition.” He declined to 
criticize Mr. Perez Bal- 
fadares's embrace of Taiwan, 
saying “the Panamanian gov- 
ernment appropriately chose 
who they would like to in- 
vite” io the conference. 

Fearful of offending China, 
most major shipping compa- 
nies have backed away from 
sending high-level delega- 
tions. Even Chang Yung-fa, 
who as head of Evergreen 
Marine Corp., Taiwan’s 
largest shipping company, was 
being counted on by Panama 
to play a conspicuous role, 
ending up sending his regrets. 

Evergreen has become one 
of the most prominent in- 
vestors in Panama, with proj- 
ects that include a large con- 
tainer port, an industrial park 
and an airline. But Mr. Chang 
and his company also have 
substantial interests on the 
Chinese mainland, which dip- 
lomats said could be en- 
dangered unless he lowers his 
profile in Panama. 

Stripped of its political di- 
mension, the congress, which 
ends Wednesday, will be de- 
voted largely to technical 
matters. Conference organ- 
izers declined to provide re- 
porters with a list of those 
attending, but have an- 
nounced panels to discuss is- 
sues tike "Long-Range Canal 
Traffic Projections” and 
"Locks Modernization.” 



/no HcwR/H.-urr. 

The Clintons beading home from their vacation. 


Line Drawn on Tobacco Deal 

Administration Sets 3 Conditions i, Industry Reports 


By Barry Meier 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Two cig- 
arette industry representatives 
say the White House has told 
(hem that three crucial con- 
cessions must be made to the 
proposed $368.5 billion to- 
bacco settlement to win Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton's approval. 

The representatives, speak- 
ing on condition they not be 
identified, said administra- 
tion officials had told them 
that the deal must be amended 
to give federal officials a freer 
hand in regulating nicotine 
levels in cigarettes. 

The officials also insisted 
that heavier fines be imposed 
if the industry did not meet 
targets for reducing youth 
smoking over the next decade, 
the representatives said, and 
said they wanted to eliminate 
or restrict a federal budget pro- 
vision dial allows the industry 
to deduct $50 billion raised 
from new tobacco excise taxes 
over the next 25 years. 

The administration does 
not want the deduction to re- 
duce the settlement’s original 
cost, agreed to in Jane after 
three months of negotiation 
between the industry, state at- 
torneys general and public 
health advocates. 

Bruce Reed, Mr. Clinton's 
top domestic policy adviser, 
declined to comment on de- 
tails of the latest talks be- 
tween the White House and 
industry representatives. 

"The president has not 


made any decision on the pro- 
posal,” he said. "But we 
have made no secret of the 
fact that he is going to be 
tough on the industry and 
tough on youth smoking.” 

Another administration of- 
ficial, speaking on the con- 
dition he not be identified, 
characterized the three de- 
mands as deal breakers 
should they not be met He 
also said that the administra- 
tion would probably seek to 
strengthen provisions under 
which industry documents 
would be disclosed. 

Administration officials 
have said settlement provi- 
sions on nicotine regulation 
and penalties on youth smok- 
ing need to be revised and 
expressed concern about the 
$50 billion credit. 

Major tobacco producers 
have agreed to pay $368.5 
billion over 25 years to settle 
lawsuits by stales and smok- 
ers. restrict cigarette adver- 
tising and pay penalties if 


youth smoking fails to de- 
cline. The industry would be 
protected from certain types 
of lawsuits and punitive dam- 
ages under the settlement, 
which also requires congres- 
sional approval because it un- 
dercuts some traditional legal 
rights of individuals. Mr. 
Clinton has indicated his gen- 
eral approval for the proposal 
but has criticized pans of iL 

Industry officials spent 
much of last week huddled in 
Washington discussing the 
terras of die compromises ihey 
planned to offer the White 
House, the two cigarette com- 
pany representatives said. One 
said that company officials 
were “absolutely certain” that 
Mr. Clinton would approve the 
deal if the White House’s three 
basic demands were met. 

But another industry rep- 
resentative said that while the 
industry would very likely 
compromise on regulatory is- 
sues, it would fight to keep the 
$50 billion deduction. 


POLITICAL 


New Jersey Governor 
Battles for Re-election 


TRENTON, New Jersey — Despite a 
strong economy and a record of cutting 
taxes. Governor Christine Todd Whitman is 
battling for re-election against a little- 
known Democratic challenger who has put 
her on the defensive on the issue that is most 
important to New Jersey voters: auto in- 
surance. 

Only a few months ago. Mrs. Whitman's 
strategy for re-election was to remind 
voters that they are better off today than 
they were four years ago. At the time, her 
campaign aides said riiey believed their 
biggest challenge in the Nov. 4 election 
against a state senator, James McGreevey. 
the Democratic nominee, would be exciting 
a complacent electorate. 

But Mr. McGreevey, a 40-year-old 
former assistant prosecutor, has tapped into 
voters' anger over paying the highest auto 
insurance premiums in lie nation. Recent 
polls show that even though he is unknown 
to many voters, he is making inroads 
against the governor. (NYT) 


cation, and on the last week of his 21-day 
stay in Martha's Vineyard a new one ar- 
rived, courtesy of his staff back in Wash- 
ington. 

The book is actually a three-ring binder, 
and Mr. Clinton himself is the main char- 
acter. Hie mystery: What does Mr. Clinton 
want to do with the rest of his presidency? 

The document, lists “14 pillars” of the 
administration, including sections on edu- 
cation, race relations, renewing cities, en- 
titlement reform and crime, drugs, and pris- 
ons. 

Each listing has different initiatives Mr. 
Clinton might pursue, as well as the polit- 
ical benefits and risks of each course. 

The idea, aides said, is that Mr. Clinton 
would read the document on vacation, then 
after returning to Washington, which he did 
Sunday, meet with aides to set priorities on 
which of the pillars he wants to move ro the 
forefront. (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Clinton Ponders Future 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clin- 
ton loves to read mysteries while on va- 


Senator Arlen Specter, Republican of 
Pennsylvania, urging Vice President A1 
Gore to volunteer to testify before the Sen- 
ate committee investigating campaign 
funding violations: “It’s reaching an apex 
as far as he is concerned, and the conflicting 
stories which he has told and which have 
come out of his office really make it an 
essential matter of timing for him. ' ' (AP) 


:n 


Away From Politics 



-The remains of Dr. Sam 
$heppard, whose sensation- 
al trial led to the television 
series and movie “The Fu- 
gitive,” will be placed in the 
crypt in Cleveland where the 
wife he was accused of killing 
was entombed 43 years ago, 
their son said. (AP) 


• Lockheed Martin’s F-22 
Raptor stealth fighter made 
its maiden test flight in Mari- 
etta, Georgia, spending an 
hour in the air at speeds up to 

285 miles an hour. (AP) 


— unless they are cleared of 
all charges, said the police 
commissioner, Howard Safir. 
But the salaries of Justin 
Volpe and the three other of- 
ficers will have to be rein- 
stated at the end of this week 
as required under the state’s 
civil service law. Regulations 
say suspended police officers 
must go back on the payroll 
30 days after they are re- 
moved from duty. (AP) 




CMONSC ■ (STANIUI 


THE PALACE FOR 

SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS 

IN 1 ST A N BUL 


tia iac\h ctf. 4-. usjku'. wo* iMMttui tu * o in » 'Mi m •• «i w * 

ftjp«tv»nu{apl«r(ia 9 fenJ wn»f#iiri(»fl«l«f t*»N 




■oil iui ku«im 

niviii ii jo ij .*> vu tun cmuu iimmjo si n ■ cm- uii.in i im ii is m 


•.After the 14th reported 
, rape this year in Greenwich 
r Village — one of the few 
New York City neighbor- 
hoods where die number of 
rapes, robberies and Other vi- 
olent crimes is rising — res- 
idents and community groups 
are asking for more police 
protection. The 14 rapes are 
more than triple the total for 
all of 1996. (N*T) 


iA Trident submarine 
skipper has been relieved of 
command for the first tune in 
the program’s 15-year his- 
tory. Commander Michael 
Alfonso was removed from 
the Florida by Rear Admiral 
Paul Sullivan, commander of 
the navy’s Trident base at 
Bangor, Washington, be- 
Y cause he had lost confidence 
r in the commander. No spe- 
cific incident was cited. (AP) 


• The Los Angeles County 
Ijair will offer a chance to 
check out the names of the 
stale’s 64,000 registered sex 
offenders. The state will set 

up eight computers 

ffibitron hall that can display 
offenders’ names, pictures, 
zip codes and crimes. A sun- 
iEr exhibit at the awe fur 
drew 4,000 inquiries. (AH 


* The New York City police 
\ officers accused in the as- 
r saab of Abner Louma, a 

Haitian, will not be allowed to 

resume working in any ^ca- 
pacity — not even desk duty 



29 a 55, quai Branly - Paris VII 8 
Daily from 12.00 - 8.00 pm 

„ . cl m 1000- 8.00 pm - Sunday from 10.00 - 6-00 pm 


S^e C-'— -*'l«' 5 '' " ™' e TA “ * ' “ ‘ 4 ” 


Offshore... companies, trusts, 
bank accounts, credit cards, 
legal second passports, 
alternative citizenship, tax free 
residency... expertly arranged 


The Qffshore Professionals Jg| 4.44 1 624 801801 

Fax +44 1624 801800 

Established in 1 977 bttjK //WWW.ICSLCOTTI 


THE INTERMARKET 


On Internet 


Classified ads placed in the 
International Herald Tribune 
can now be seen on the IHT web site. 


http://www.iht.com 


A great deal happens at Hie Intermarket 



THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


Looking for a whale of a time 
on your next vacation? 


It's no problem for an ASTA travel agent 


•A 










CANADA 


An ASTA agent can land you right in the midst of your dream vacation, baking for a whirl wind European 
tour or five-star island accommodations? No problem. Or maybe the time of your life is 
combining Canadas great outdoors with its most exciting cities. No problem there, either. 

ASTA travel agents have the knowledge and skills to make every vacation just as perfect 
and hassle-free as you imagined it. & your only surprises will be pleasant ones. Want 
a referral? No problem. Contact us at 1 800 965-ASTA or http:/ /www.astanet.com integrity in navel • 


mfs 

bfittu 


American Society 


of Travel Agents 






PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


asia/pacific 


After Kobe Killing, 


By Mary Jordan 
ana Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — It was like a scene from 
"The Godfather. 7 ’ Four mob assassins 
walked into a crowded coffee shop in an 
expensive hoteL, pulled out .45-caliber 
pistols and pumped seven ballets into a 
rival gang leader, blasting him out of his 
chair and spraying blood all over the 
caffi. . 

But this was not New Y ork or Sicily. 
The brazen, daylight assassination oc- 
curred late last month in the Japanese 
port city of Kobe, and it has touched off 
the biggest crackdown in years on the 
country's organized crime syndicates, 

known as yakuza. 


Dissident Tells 
Chinese Chiefs 
To Heed Calls 
For Change 


The Associated Press 

SHANGHAI — A veteran Chinese . 
dissident urged his country’s leaders 
Monday to adopt democratic reforms 
and prove their commitment to change 
by cremating the body of Mao Zedong. 

The appeal by the dissident, Bao Ge, 
to the Comm unis t Party is the latest of 
several petitions urging leaders take up 
political reform at a congress that opens 
on Friday. 

Mr. Bao’s open letter, addressed to 
the party’s Central Committee and Gen- 
eral Secretary Jiang Zemin, warned that 
they could only delay political reform at 
their periL He cited recent protests by 
workers and peasants around the coun- 
try against official corruption and unfair 
policies. 

The letter said that the Communist 
Party leadership “must see” that “the 
people's demands for democracy are 
growing stronger day by day.” 

‘To move ahead with the tide, your 
party now* must fight actively.” it ad- 
ded. Mr. Bao distributed copies of the 
letter ro reporters in Shanghai. 

Mr. Bao recommended strengthening 
agencies for fighting corruption, im- 
proving the rule of law and protection of 
civil rights and permitting new political 
parties, including his planned Citizens 


A manhunt involving 5.000 police 
officers was begun throughout Japan 
against the Yamaguchi-gumi. the coun- 
try’s largest crime family, looking for 
guns and dying to stop a mob power 
struggle that apparently led to the 
killing. 

At least 11 gang members have been 
arrested and scores of yakuza homes 
and offices have been raided. At die 
funeral for the slain mob boss. Masaru 
Takurai, about 400 police officers 
showed up, photographing the 700 
mourners and frisking the pallbearers. 

Perhaps even more significantly, die 
assassination has raised police fears that 
the long-tolerated domestic crime fam- 
ily is turning into a violent organization 
with ties to foreign mobs, especially to 


■ - ■fz'TS.'.ZZ' 

■ w -i.V-r •*-- .-#r/ 


.T.-.J'.r:. 


Congress Party. 

“Forbidding people from setting up 
political parties shows a lack of con- 
fidence," the letter said. “Political 
parties ought to be able win the people's 
support to advance their policies and not 
refy on iron-handed controls. ’’ 

To show they have left dictatorship 
behind, party leaders at the upcoming 
congress should call for the cremation 
of Mao’s body, Mr. Bao said. 

Mao led the Communists to power. 
Deified by the party in life, his body lies 
in a glass coffin in a mausoleum on 
Tiananmen Square. 

But his legacy remains troublesome 
to many Chinese. Mao’s ruinous eco- 
nomic policies and divisive politics are 
blamed for the deaths of millions of 
people. 

Mr. Bao also called for breaking with 
the past by reassessing the military as- 
sault on protesters in Tiananmen Square 
in 1989. That violent suppression also 
ended flirtations by party leaders with 



Apenx Fme&cr* 

Mao Zedong's statue in Chengdu. The dissident Bao Ge wants the party to 
break with the past by cremating Mao's body, now in a Beijing mausoleum. 


reforms to open the political system. 

Mr. Bao served three years in a labor 
camp for trying to commemorate vic- 
tims of the assault and for setting up a 
human rights group. Released in June, 
he is one of the few dissidents still 
actively pushing for change. 

“Many activists have either fled the 
country or are now locked up, so I plan 
to carry on in their absence, and others 
will in mine,” Mr. Bao told reporters. 

The party has revived hopes for polit- 
ical reform in the past few weeks, saying 
it would be a topic for discussion at the 
congress. 

Held once every five years, the cpn- 
gress will choose a new Central Com- 
mittee. the party’s top- policy-setting 


body, and endorse a blueprint for re- 
forms. 

Dissidents have renewed calls for tol- 
erance and freedom. One academic, a 
solid party member with no record of 
dissent, also has urged party leaders to 
consider adopting Western-style di- 
vided government to check abuses of 
power. 

The party’s intentions remain un- 
clear. But officials have moved to 


dampen expectations. 
“No big change wil 


‘ ‘No big change will take place in the 
.. general pattern of China's political 
structure,” the state-run Xinhua press 
agency cited Wang Jiaqiu. an admin- 
istrator at the party’s top training school, 
as saying Saturday. 



Patricia Wells 
Food Critic 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON • EUROPE 

THE FBCSmHE MOST SWCSE 
IB - 38+ MTEMttnONAL 
BEAlfflRJL 8 ELEGANT STUDBfTS 
SECHETAWS, AH HOSTESSES & 
B OOBS * 

AVALABLE AS YOUD COMPANION 
Escort Agency CreS Cards Wttom 

TEL LONDON ++ 44 (0) 

0171 589 5237 


NTERNAHONAL ESCORTS 

Worth Rtf b Most ExdusM Savta 
Ifacfch, Efeauty Ouwu, Actresses 
Entartafawa, Hamm, Secretaries 
Uttffinatai Toni Companions 
•Rated- "Beat h Km Ywr to New 
York MagFeafirtd in Hsrettvu News 
Mata ft TV. Vtteo tapes S Photos awf 
$le far setadion Credt cads accepted 


DINING 


The World’s Top Tables 


If you missed it in the IHT, look for it 
on our site on the World Wide Web: 


http://www.iht.com 


swrrzERLAMMxmuNvmGui 
h31'20427 28 27 

ZurichOanra-Banl-Berae 
Frankfort-Uai^ffiesbadef+CoiognF' 
BamvnineMiifHkaBcMerfiiv 
BmsBlft-ADtmrp + A: Vwra 

LONDON: (0)171-978 6606 

COSMOS Escort Ageaw - Cw» Cants 


Hashimoto- Yeltsin Talks Reported 

Reuters Yeltsin would hold informal 

TOKYO — Prime Minis- meetings on Nov. 1-2 in the 
ter Ryu taro Hashimoto of Ja- eastern Siberian city of 
pan will meet with President Krasnoyarsk. 

Boris Yeltsin of Russia in A Foreign Ministry 
Siberia as part of efforts to spokesman in Tokyo refused 
settle territorial disputes to comment on the report, 
lingering since World War H, Russia and Japan have nev- 
the Kyodo news agency re- er signed a treaty formally 
ported Monday. ending World War II because 

Quoting government of their dispute over owner- 
sources, the news service said ship of islands off Japan’s 
Mr. Hashimoto and Mr. northern island of Hokkaido. 


VENUS IN FURS 

24ffl WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 362 7D0Q 

Al cans. Manx bookings wefcane 


HIGH SOCIETY 

Encslfte Ettut Sen** 
Waktafe 

Tat +44(011712661033 
07000 4444 78, ehqbsodety.GO.iA 


PARIS & WORLDWIDE 
APOUO ESCORTS 

senteeeapol&creiifflrtsOTi 

*316-5408-124 


EURO CONTACT WTT 
Top local S travel service vmttade 
PAHIS'STtlCKHOUrGS'lEVA’ZlJRICH 
RMERA'BRUSSELS'LONDON’VIEIMA 
MLAN-ROMPM GERMANY & NY. 
Escort Service Vienna **43-1-212 0431 


GLAMOUR INTERNATIONAL 
L0M3ON ESCORT SERVICE 
0171 724 0771 


HEiDTS HXW SOCCirVEWiA*PARIS 
COTE DAZUR’ZUWCH'GEWTAJWCH 
kttmafional Escort & Trairrt 
Vienna *+43f1/5» 4i 04 al den cants 


*GUYS B DOLLS ESCORT SERVICE" 
MBjWTROtE-JTALYlXWXJfTPA RE 
rae.UXni^ANCTGERl.UNrSPAM 
COTE OAZUR’SCAMJHAVlA'TOKrO 
Tet +39 (0} 335 619 0438 Crefl Cants 


WARSAW MODEL ESCORT 

AH) TRAVEL SERVICE 
Cafl *48 22 6710048 or *48 602 224145 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Benctoqi PJsct, London SW1 
T* 0171-584 6513 


GENEVA PRETTT WOMAN 
Cd CC2 1 3*6 00 © Esau Agacy 
LAUSWNE-MONTHEUX- SASQ. 
ZURICH - CREDIT CARDS 


USA&WOflUfflDE 


AHGEUQUE A FHBOS 
Sm* IDs ses Escort Senro 
London 24 IBS 0171 S86 O069 


Do YOU LIVE IN AlHElVS? 

For a hand-drlirprcd subscription on the day 
of publication, call 00 33 1 41 13 9361 
7* tf v MMunmiw «■ 

IteraiOs^^&nbunc 


,THF.»OBLirS DUU MTCCOtHX, 


WLAN * ROME ‘ PARIS TOP CUSS 
Jufia escort carvic* *39(0)3%SQ3J)953 

•^ERtH - FRANWWr* 

“CARtSUA ESCORT AGBCY" 

Ter 0041-848 00 70 77 - GwW Cards 

BLACK BEAUTY ESCORT SERVICE 
Enkisve Elegant Educated 4 Fnendy 
London & Heatnw. 0181 9062261 .Cards 

■•EXECUTIVE CLUB** 
L0MX3N ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL: 0171 722 5008 date Cads 

FRANKFURT ft AREA 
Maas Escort Agency 
Phase caJ 069 - 597 66 £5 

'GENEVA • PARIS * COTE D A2UR 
Ginger Escort Service 
Tet 022 / 731 90 81 

JULIETTE (Blond Glamour Model) 
Educated Discreet Escort Service 
WPS Crty. Cafi 0956 545 922 

MORRISON CLUB - VENNA ESCORT 
Service. 5. Reerte WietoertE 2a 
0222696 96 B4 

PREHEH ESCORTS 24 hr? 

Oriental. Asian and Engksh Roses lor 
</or DeSgfo 0171 589 8081 Credl Cards 

STUNNING AUSTRIAN BLONDE 
Fluent Engfch and German and Italian. 
Ca8. UK 0860 528 27& 

VALENTMS DfTBWATKMAL 
VIP Escort Service photos 1o rw wiral 
laden rtfe 0171 B35 0005 al Out 

YOUNG ft NEW ESCORTS 
London's Nunter One Escort Semes 
Tet 0171 834 3329 - Mw 

ASIAN ' PERSIAN * ORIENTAL ft 
CONTiNSfTAL Escort Serve? London 
Tel. 056 223317 24 its Cte* Car* 

• ZUREM ' CAROLWE * 

Esot! Semes 
Tel 01 ! 261 4s 47 


own on 


the Mob 


Chinese crime syndicates. Mr. Takurai, 
61, was the Yamaguchi-gumi s secood- 
most-powerful figure and its chief fi- 
nancial officer, controlling millions of 
dollars. 

Police officials regarded him as an 
old-school moderate who advocated 
less involvement in drugs and violence 
and tried to steer the crane family into 
legitimate business ventures. After the 
devastating 1995 earthquake in Kobe, 
members of the Takumi organization 
helped in rescue efforts and made dona- 
tions, winning public toanks. 

Mr. Takumi disagreed with more mil- 
itant gang members, who sought new 
forms of revenue through links with 
Thai and Malaysian prostitution rings as 
well as Chinese criminals manufactur- 


ing illegal compact disks for pinball- 
like pachinko machines — an extraor- 
dinarily lucrative gambling venture. 
Some yakuza gangs have recently 
forged ties with Chinese syndicates to 
smuggle people into Japan by sea for up 
to $25,000 apiece. 

After the slaying of Mr. Takumi, the 
jjolice began investigating a violent fac- 
tion in tus crime family that was re- 
cently “excommunicated.” Those 
more militant members are said to have 
disagreed with the way he was running 
the family. 

Atsnshi Mizoguchi, a journalist who 
has been following the yakuza for 30 
yean, said in an interview that the 
killing was “a symbol of the chaos” in 
the cmne world. “The traditional yak- 


uza is in the process of dismantling, he 
said. “It is becoming more cramnai, 
more underground and more like the 
overseas mafia.” 

Mr. Mizoguchi said the yakuza s 
sources of income were changing, its 
membership was declining and its hes 
with Thai, Malaysian, Iranian and es- 
pecially Chinese crime syndicates were 
increasing. 

“It used to be the pride of the yakuza 
rhat they would never rob or steal from 
ordinary people but that is no longer 
true,” Mr. Mizoguchi said. 

The recent, highly public incidents of 
violence have reinvigorated Japan’s re- 
solve to weaken the yakuza. That effort 
has been under way since passage in 
1992 of an anti-mob law. 


Unopposed, Hashimoto 
Is Re-elected Party Chief 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryutaro 
Hashimoto, re-elected without opposi- 
tion as bead of his party Monday, vowed 
to tackle key domestic and international 
issues swiftly. 

It was the first time since the Liberal 
Democratic Party's founding in 1955 
that no other contender, not even a nom- 
inal one, had challenged the favorite for 
the presidency. 

The victory guarantees that Mr. Ha- 
shimoto will remain as prime minister 
for the foreseeable future. 

The party presidency carries with it 
the prime ministership because of the 
Liberal Democrats’ newly gained one- 
seat majority in the House of Repre- 
sentatives, the lower house of Parlia- 
ment. 

“We need a strong and stable polit- 
ical base," Mr. Hashimoto, 60, said ar a 
news conference after the vote. 

Mr. Hashimoto is expected to shuffle 
his 20-member cabinet shortly after the 
party formally approves his re-election 
at a meeting of Liberal Democratic law- 
makers Thursday. 

“L am thinking of structuring the 
party and the cabinet in such a way as to 
ensure that it can deal properly with key 
issues faced by the government,” he 
said. 

News reports have said that Hiroshi 
Mitsuzuka is expected to remain finance 
minister. 

But Foreign MinisterYukihiko Deeds 
is likely to be replaced by Keizo Obuchi, 


THE WRONG KIND OF MONEY 

By Stephen Birmingham. 406 pages. 
S24.95. Dutton. 

Reviewed by Susan Dooley 

W ATER passing over stone will 
eventually remove its roughness. 
Time passing over money will do the 
same, turning the corrupt capitalist into 
a romantic highwayman and taking the 
taint from the family fortune. Unfor- 
tunately for the Lieblings, central char- 
acters in Stephen Birmingham's “The 
Wrong Kind of Money,” this meta- 
morphosis usually takes at least three 
generations and they are a generation 
short 

Not that they seem to care. The ma- 
triarch, Hannah Liebling. daughter of a 
respected Jewish family, may have mar- 
ried out of her class back during Pro- 
hibition. when she took on the rough- 
neck, rum-running Jules, but she has no 
desire to dine with the Pookies and 
Pippys of New York’s social world. 
And as for her first son, Cyril, he prefers 
midnight assignations with young men 
ro dinner-hour dalliances with the very 
rich. Her daughter. Ruth, occasional 
countess, occasional actress and even, 
occasionally, sober, has enough money 
to buy the companionship she wants. 

Which leaves only Noah, youngest 
son and head of the family liquor busi- 
ness. Noah is the point around which the 
story revolves, though Birmingham, in 
one of his delighrful asides, lists nine 
characters early on and tells us “those 
nine are the ones to keep your eye on." 

Would that he had kept his own eye 
on that particular style — ihe worldly, 
knowledgeable observer, watching with 
interest and amusement the foibles of 
the rich. Bui though he returns to it 
periodically in the course of his story 
(and uses it consistently to prick the 
pretensions of those idle society mat- 
rons known as The Ladies Who Lunch), 
he gradually allows himself to slip in- 
side the confines of his tale. 

And a conventional tale it is. hanging 
on Hannah Liebling's reluctance to turn 
over direction of the family business to 
her son. Noah, feeling both frustrated 
and foolish at being tied to hi.s mother's 
apron strings, is thus susceptible to a 
seduction attempt by his daughter's best 
friend. 

The difference between a good novel 
and a mediocre one is how deeply we get 
involved in what happens and whom n 
happens to. It’s hard to care much about 
the Lieblings. whose personalities 
rarely rise above the stereotypes as- 
signed them: domineering mother, good 
son. bad son. drunken daughter, loyal 
wife. Additional characters — like the 
seductive best friend, the nasty literary 
lion, the street-smart gigolo — never 
really find their place in the plot. 

The book is full of the daily details 
that form the life of New York's rich: 
where The Ladies Who Lunch eat and 
which tables are called “skinny 
tables." visible to passersby so that “no 
woman larger than a size eight is per- 
mitted to sit there." 

But the details don't make the world, 
because Birmingham never lets us see it 
from a single point of view. He wants 
sympathy for the Lieblings and wants us 


a veteran politician and former chief 
cabinet secretary. 

Reports have also said that Mr. Ha- 
shimoto is likely to choose the Liberal 
Democratic veteran Kenzo Muraoka to 
succeed Seiroku Kajiyama as chief cab- 
inet secretary, a pivotal coordinating 
post that also carries the responsibility 
of being top government spokesman. 

The Liberal Democrats held power 
for 40 years straight until repealed scan- 
dals toppled the party from power in 
general elections in L9v3, even though it 
remained the biggest party. 

The Libera] Democrats made a 
comeback in June 1994 by forming an 
unwieldy coalition that made Tomiichi 
Murayama. toe leader of toe Social 
Democratic Party, prime minister. 

Mr. Hashimoto became prime min- 
ister in January 1996, and his govern- 
ment won a four-year term in elections 
last November. 

“We must not forget about our elec- 
tion defeat four years ago,” Mr. Ha- 
shimoto said, adding that he would do 
his best to lead his party to a majority in 
toe upper house of Parli ament 

Mr. Hashimoto won outright control 
of the more powerful lower house Fri- 
day when a politician from the main 
opposition party defected to toe Liberal 
Democratic Party. 

But toe party is 14 seats shy of a 
majority in toe upper body, toe House of 
Councillors, where it needs toe support 
of toe Socialists for legislation to pro- 
ceed smoothly. 


BOOKS 

to involve ourselves with them, though 
they seem unable to involve themselves 
with each other. % 

They have little cohesion as a family, 
either physically or emotionally, and 
though Hannah attempts to control 
things, her relationship to the rest of the 
clan doesn Y generate enough tension to 
feel the plot. Instead, toe family story 
comes out in bits and pieces, each part 
abandoned before it takes hold. 

Nor are these tensions present in the 
business or social world toe Lieblings 
live in. In business Noah is risking his 
reputation by introducing a new brand 


briefly 


17.5. Calls for Halt 

To Cambodia Aid 

MANILA — The United States/ 
wants all donors to suspend aid to 
the Cambodian government to en-: 
sure that Prime Minister Hun Sen 
conducts free and fair elections, - a 

senior U.S. official said Monday. 

Washington stopped all but hu- 
manitarian aid following the ouster 
of the co-prime minister. Prince / 
Norodom Ranariddh, on July 6. 

“We’d like to see all donors to., 
try to follow a similar policy tortile 
purpose of sending a clear message 
to Hun Sen that it is not going to be. 
business as usual unless he under- 
takes the arrangements that will " 
permit free and fair elections.” said 

Stanley Roth, assistant U.S. sec- 
retary of State for East Asian and 
Pacific affairs. - (Reuters) 

Korea Talks Slated 

SEOUL — Senior U.S. and 
North Korean negotiators will meet 
this week in Beijing to discuss toe 
future of four-nation talks aimed at 
securing peace on the Korean Pen- 
insula, diplomats said Monday. 

Charles Kartman, deputy assist- 
ance secretary at the U.S. Stale De- 
partment, will fly to Beijing on. 
Tuesday for a meeting with Deputy 
Foreign Minister Kim Gye Gwan of 
North Korea, said a Seoul-based 
diplomat. A source m the South 
Korean Foreign Ministry con- 
firmed the meeting had beensebed- i 
tiled but declined to give photos) ] 

An ‘Honor’ in India 

CALCUTTA — _ .Mother ! 
Teresa’s religious order defended 
on Monday the military pomp 
planned for her funeral later this 
week, but acknowledged that the 1 
austere nun might have frowned on 
toe attention being lavished on her 
rites. ! 

The Missionaries of Charity also 
gave assurances that the distressed 
and toe poor, whom she akfoi, 
would join her funeral procession i 
Saturday. The Indian cabinet tie- ! 
cided to accord military honors. . 

"This is given as a national bon-, 
or," said Monsignqr Francis 
Gomes, toe vicar-general of the 
archdiocese of Calcutta. “So we . 
accept it. ” • ( Reuters ) 


of Scotch, but the reader never gets the 
sense that anything is really riding on it 
And who could possibly care about a 
snub administered by someone as silly 
as the social-climbing Georgette Van 
Degan? 

Birmingham views toe rich and fa- 
mous with a mocking eye, and because 
he doesn’t take that social world se- 
riously, neither do the Lieblings. Anti 
neither do we. 

Susan Dooley , who writes frequently 
about popular fiction . wrote this for The 
Washington Past. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byme 


A half-point separation becomes a 
vast difference in Swiss-system 
tournament prizes, where clusters of 
grandmasters can be closely bunched in 
toe last round. Consider toe World Open 
Tournament in Philadelphia. 

A 29-year-old Pittsburgh grandmas- 
ter. Alexander Shabalov, won his final- 
round encounter with Gregory Serper, 
an Uzbek grandmaster, and picked up 
$14,000 for his 8-1 score. The runner- 
up. Sergei Kudrin, a grandmaster of 
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, got 
$7,000 for his IVi - 1 !A tally. The dropoff 
for the players who tied for third place at 
7-2 was still steeper, to $1,500. Serper. 
and the other players who tied for 9th- 
1 8th places, each got $ 150. 

Shabalov is well-suited to this kind of 
tournament. Success requires the spirit 
of adventure that he imparts to his 
games. His fourth-round defeat of 
Maurice Ashley, a New York interna- 
tional master, was one of bis favorites. 

These same players played the same 
variation of the Richter-Rauzer Attack 
against the Sicilian Defense in their 
encounter in the New York Open in 
April. Then Ashley broke early in the 
center with 12...b4 13 Nce2 d5 14 ed 
Nd5 15 Nf4 Ne3 16 Qe3 Bd6 and 
Shabalov hammered away with 17 
Nfe6!? Be6 18 Ne6 fe 19 f4 Nd3 20 Rd3 
Qe7. but the fight ended in a draw. In 
diverging now with 12...Qc7, Ashley 
either knew a refutation of his previous 
play or simply feared that Shabalov 

ASHL £ VKJLACK 


would not have taken the identical 
course a second time without a refut- 
ation in his pocket. 

After 13 Rhel, Ashley should prob- 
ably have played 13...Nc4 14Bc4 Qc4. 

The problem for Ashley after 14 g4 
was where to stow his king. Gw ..:O-0, 
Shabalov was getting ready to blast 
open the ktngside with h4 and g5; on 
...0-0-0, there are too many white pieces 
aiming at the queenside. 

After I6...Nd3, toe recapture with 17 
cd bolstered the white center and thus 
nullified any counterattack there by 
Ashley. 

Ashley’s exchange, 19..3b3 20 ab, 
was not desirable; but Shabalov was 
threatening 20 de de 21 Nc5. . 

With 22..,d5, Ashley tried to resolve 
the central situation, but 23 hg fg 24 f4! 
opened central points of attack in front 
of the black king. Ashley kept as much 
of a blockade as he could with 24..J4HS 
26 R* 6*' ^ e P f coming with 

After 28 Ng3, Ashley could have 
recovered his pawn with 28..Jv/d5, but 
after 29 Re6 Nf6 30 Bgl, Shabalov 
could not be prevented from capturing 
the e4 pawn with decisive pressure on 
toe e file. 

After 31 Ne4, it would have been 
useless for Ashley to play 31...Qc4 32 
be Ne3 33 Re3 Rd4 because 34 Kc2 a5 
35 Rc7 Kf8 36 c5 a4 37 f6 Bd8 38 Ra7 
permits no defense to 39 Nd6! 

Bu' 3 1 ...Rhe8 was no better. After 32 
Rh6 Qc4 33 be Ne3. Shabalov produced 
the annihilating 34 Rh7! Kf8 35 Refal! 
Smcf *!} ere was no defense to the threat u 
of 36 Rh8 Kf7 37 Rlh7 mate, Ashley: 3 . 
gave up. - 


■ 

lAttana 


» » c d V ' t "" 7 ^ 

SHABALOV<WH/TE 

Position after 33 . . . Ne3 


White 

Shabalov 

1 e4 

2 Nf3 

3 d4 

4 Nd4 

5 NcS 

6 Bg5 

7 Qd2 

8 tWH) 

9 Be3 

10 f3 
H Kbl 
(2 Sd3 

13 Rhel 

14 g4 
!5 h4 
is jvce 2 

17 Cd 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 

Black White 

Ashley Shabalov 
cS 18 Nb3 

46 19 d4 

cd 20 ab 

Nf8 21 Rci 

NcS 22 h5 

€6 23 bs 

aS 24 t4 

h6 25 ed 

Bd7 26 Rc6 

b5 27 ra 

Ne5 28 Ng3 

Qc7 29 Qc2 

Qb7 30 Qc4 

g« 31 Ne4 

M 32 Rh6 

Nd3 33 be 

e5 34 Rh7 


White 

Black 

Shabalov 

Ashley 

18 

Nb3 

Bee 

19 

d4 

Bb3 

20 

ab 

Nd7 

21 

Rci 

Be7 

22 

h5 

d5 

23 


fg 

24 

t4 

NfS ' 

25 

ed 

©4 

26 

Rc6 

Kf7 

27 

ra 

g5 

28 

Ng3 

RadS 

29 

Qc2 

N« 

30 

Qc4 

Qb5 

31 

Ne4 

Rhe8 

32 

Rh6 

Qc4 

33 

be 

Ne3 

34 

Rh7 

KfS 

35 

Rehl 

Resigns 







Are you ready to meet 

the American Challenge? 


'V 


■v 



s'.'."' 


" ' - 'A \ 






i 


















September brh. lOCwill be a famous day in European 
Luxury Motoring History. Today, at the IAA Shorn (Hair 
in Lu.nkh.rt, Cadillac will unveil the all new Seville. 

Never before has the top selling luxury ear in America 

, ii . : i rhe- 1'S A It's ap part of the C.. ad ill 
been launched outside tiu c . w. i 

American Challenge. 

Clicd; it outfilt V 0 ii~lf. Bu, he I'^P-ucd « ...ollv 

.Wdlnctm ***** 


dc 


The new Cadillac Seville sere new standards in styling, 
technical innovation and performance. And offers more 
features las standard' than any comparable car. 1 lus full 
list will ama/e you - as it will astound our most distinguished 

E u r o p e a n c o m p eric o rs . 

The Cadillac Seville W orld Premiere. .Are you ready 
meet the American Challenge. 


to 


It's all happening in Hall ~ LFA Frankfurt Motor Show. 





PAGE 6 


IN TERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 

EUROPE 






Bosnian Serb Rivals in Mediation 


President and Karadzic Aide Meet as Crisis Deepens 


The Associated Press 

BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Heraegovi- 
na — With tension mounting before a 
planned rally by supporters of the Ser- 
bian hard-liner Radovan Karadzic, the 
Bosnian Serb president, Biljana Plavsic, 
met with a leading rival Monday in oJts 
mediated by the Serbian Orthodox 

Church. - 

Security was tight during _ Mrs. 
Plavsic's meeting in the bishop s res- 
idence here with Momcilo Krajisnik, 
the Serb member of the tripartite Bos- 
nian presidency and a chief aide to Mr. 
Karadzic. Army units loyal to Mre. 
Plavsic were deployed in three armored 
personnel carriers just outside, streets 
were cordoned off and nearby shops 

were closed. , . . 

It was the first time in weeks that the 
two rivals had met face to face to discuss 
the crisis that has convulsed the Serb- 
controlled half of Bosnia, splitting 
politicians, the police and the media mto 

hostile camps. . . 

Mr. Krajisnik reportedly intended to 
demand that the Banja Luka television 
studio be reintegrated into Bosnian Serb 
state television, which his camp con- 
trols. a television source said. 

Two weeks ago. the Banja Luka stu- 


dio broke away from Serb television m 
Pale, which is controlled by Mr. Karad- 
zic, 'and switched allegiance to Mrs. 
Plavsic, setting off a scramble by the 
two sides to control transmitters. The 
peace force led by the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization intervened, seizing 
control of a transmitter near Bijeljina, 
but returned it to hard-liners. 

Mr. Krajisnik was accompanied at 
the taiks by several officials, including 
his interior minister, Dragan Kijac, who 
brought about 30 armed policemen with 
him. By the afternoon, about 50 heavily 
armed special police loyal to Mrs. 
Plavsic had taken up position outside 
her offices in the center of town, near the 
bishop's residence. 

Supporters of Mr. Karadzic and Mr. 
Krajisnik have scheduled a rally for 6 
P.M. in Banja Luka, Mrs. Plavsic’s 


nik’s political adviser. 

A mass rally supporting Mr. Karadzic 
on hostile turf could easily provoke vi- 
olence. 

Dozens of buses and many more pas- 
senger cars left Pale and horn places 
further south Monday en route to the 
rally. The demonstrators were waving 
Serb flags, Karadzic posters and badges 
and said they were going to Banja Luka 
to see what Plavsic supporters wanted, 
to “see for ourselves who destroys our 





French Train 
HitsTruck, 





Killing 12 

a isjtffi Press 




unity. 

The local television station in Banja 

I nlrn hmarlrajcf mntf minns anneals tO 



The Associated Press 

PER1GUEUX, France — A tom- 
burst into 


burst into flames -j 

Snginroatockf^-th^ 

ihable fiiel, killing : 3 

Others in southwest- a 


main support base in the half of Bosnia 
controlled by the Serbs. They have 


controlled by the Serbs. They have 
vowed to proceed with the demonstra- 
tion even though on Sunday the Banja 
Luka police chief, Milan Sutilovic. 
banned all public meetings until the 
two-day Bosnian local elections begin- 
ning Saturday. 

“We do not recognize the ban on the 
rally,' ’ said Jovan Zametica, Mr. Krajis- 


Luka broadcast continuous appeals to 
the public to stay indoors and refrain 
from public gatherings. 

■ Reprisals by Karadzic Allies 

Tracy Wilkinson of the Los Angeles 
Times reported from Bijeljina: 

Forces- loyal to Mr. Karadzic have 
begun a campaign of reprisals, arrests 
and death threats against people who 
joined U.S. -backed efforts to expel the 
indicted war-crimes suspect. 

The American-led efforts failed last 
month, leaving Mr. Karadzic's hard- 
liners celebrating their hold on power 
while his opponents have gone into hid- 
ing and Western diplomats are strug- 


Fchm DnwJAflWWftma-Prc** 

Bosnians wor king with international monitors sorting ballots Monday in a 
suburb of Sarajevo. Local elections in Bosnia are scheduled for next week. 


gling to come up with a new strategy. 

The setback endangers the West’s 
long-term goal of backing moderate and 
cooperative Serbs — grouped around 
Mrs. Plavsic — over hard-liners who are 
blocking the peace accords. 

In recent days, in three key cities in 
the Bosnian Serb half of the country, 
gunmen have carried ont raids on the 
homes of Mr. Karadzic's opponents, 
purged pro-Plavsic police and arrested 
or fired dozens of anti-Karadzic Serbs. 

Human rights activists and opposi- 


tion politicians in Serbian areas also say 
they have received death threats. 

A senior American official in Brcko 
accused Mr. Karadzic’s supporters of 
unleashing “a reign of terror." - . 

Many of those who challenged Mr. 
Karadzic believed they were acting with 
the approval of U.S. and European of- 
ficials, and they expected material sup- 
port. ' 

Now, they express bitter disappoint- 
ment and much less willingness to take 
comparable risks again. 


™d invest- ; 

Monday as the truck was crossing 
the train tracks near 
de-Breuilh, a village in 
region about 540 kilometers (330 
miles) southwest of Pans. . ■ 

At least one of the train carsapti 
the engine were totally charred by 
the firejhe police said. Four of die 
people injured-in the accident w.ere 
in serious condition, the pobce 
said. 

The regional express train was 
oavding between Bordeaux and 
the city of Bergerac m the hilly 
Perigord region,. said the Interre- 
gional Center for Coordinating 
Help, which was coordinating res- 
cue efforts. Teh fire trucks were 
fighting; the Harness and twjo heli- 
copters were sent Jo try to get vic- 
tims out quickly, the center said. 


.=* 


Are yOU 


Nortel = Networks 


8 JW : 


busy? 




Or are yOU 


productive? 


^ ■ -_r --V ■ ' ■ 




XX •• - '/ 


1 ■' 



if your company s computers are connect 



mm 




through a Nortel communications network. ^ 
you'll be able to share voice, data, and video 
information faster than ever. You II be more 
efficient, more productive, and very likely- 
more profitable. Any question?.??.? Nortel. 
Communications networks for the world. 






N£?RTEL 




N 0 R I H E R N TELEC 0 


! N America call i Bool NORTi',. Europe. Africa Middle East tan -4s 4)149 * Asia Pacific fax ’B S i 1589 £196. Caribbean. Latin America ( «< on Bn ARiR Internet hup nonet com net Hurls 




Sweden’s Ruling Party; 
Counters Tax Criticism;: * 


The Associated Press 

SUNDSVALL, Sweden— 
The governing Social Demo- 
crats, battered in recent pub- 
lic-opinion polls, opened a 
weeklong national congress 
on Monday by meeting its 
criticism head-on. 

The party, led by -Prime 
Minis ter Goeran Persson, was 
flooded with requests to re- 
view key tax issues and social 
welfare problems before na- 
tional elections a year from 
now. 


The party’s popularity has 
fallen substantially as the 
country faces declining social 
services despite continuing 
high taxes and as corporate 
leaders increasingly com- 
plain that the taxes inhibit 
their businesses. 

Mr. Persson, in an opening 
speech to the congress, 
countered that in the party's 
four-year term leading the 
government, nearly 25,000 
jobs have been created. - - • 

He also p ointed _ to_ jmo^ 

gnoses by banks and other 
institutions that the economy 
is positioned for along period 
of growth and said the con- 
servatives’ call for tax reduc- 


tions would make life farl 
worse for many. ^ 

“It is the unemployed, the^ 
sick, children and the elderly^ 
who . are left aside in tax re-“ 
duction,’* he said. 

On .the eve of the conven- 
tion on Sunday, the; Social^ 
Democrats announced iha£ 
Sweden would get a new per- 
manent income tax- for high 
income earners if the party 
stays in power after elections^ 
in September 1598. i 

The party’s . executive, 
board decided to introduce a 5, 

P ercent tax on incomes above 
0.000 kronor ($3,850) per 
month from 1999. The new, 
tax will replace the exiting 5; 
percent temporary special ta^T 
on income above' 20,000 j 
kronor per month. . 

“We won’t enter the elec-,. 




tion campaign promising nr 


cut taxes,’ ■ said Thomas OesA 
tros, the tax minister. “In-? 
stead, we will enter it pri- 
oritizing an impro v ed w etfcce- 
system.” • 

Two opinion polls last ; 
week said die conservatives j 
would defeat the Social i 
Democrats if national elec- | 
tions were held today. '* 


BRIEFLY 


\ i UAI 


French Politician Is Censored 


AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France — A French court gave 
Catherine Megret, the far-rigb t mayor of V itrolles , a three- 
month suspended prison sentence on Monday for racist 
remarks made in an interview, justice sources said. 

The court rejected a state prosecutor’s plea that the 
politician of the National Front party be declared in- 
eligible to be mayor of the southern French town for 
having incited racial hatred and discrimination in the 
interview with the German daily Berliner Zeitung. 

In the interview, given shortly after she was elected last 
February, Mrs. Megret called immigrants' “colonialists” 
and espoused racial inequality. (Reuters; 




EU Farm Ministers Open Talks 


ECHTERNACH, Luxembourg — The European ag- 
riculture commissioner, Franz Fischler, admitted Mon- 
day that proposals for farm reforms faced a long haul 
before they had a chance of adoption. 

Mr. Fischler, speaking at an informal first meeting of 
European Union farm ministers in Luxembourg, said his 
initial expectations were moderate. "I would be satisfied 
if there were an agreement that reform is necessary," he 
said. Then, after the EU summit in December, there could 
be more discussion on the details, he added. (Reuters) 




Estonia Ferry Disaster Inquiry 


STOCKHOLM — The head of a new commission 
looking into the Estonia ferry disaster said Monday that 
his group was empowered to recommend bringing bodies 
up from the wreck. 

The official. Peter Oern, made the statement to 
Swedish television soon after his appointment was an- 
nounced by the government. The commission that he 
heads is a second level of investigation in the sinking on 
SepL 28, 1994. that killed 852 people. Sweden, Finland 
and Estonia all participate in a commission looking into 
the cause of the disaster. 

That commission’s report has repeatedly been post- 
poned, raising suspicions among many survivors^ and 
victims’ relatives. The suspicion was aggravated in June 
after the chairman of the Swedish contingent in the 
commission resigned after admitting he lied to a reporter 
about receiving a letter connected with the case [AP) 


Chirac-Yeltsin Meeting Is Set 


— Pres ^ e ?‘ ^.ques Chirac of France will 

?? m re 0 S, ? e ■ 1 . B °™ Ye,tsm m Russia Sept. 25 to 
-7. Mr. Y elisin s office announced Monday 

There was no word about topics to be discussed or a 
precise site of the meeting. fAP j 


Bomb Found in Car in Spain 


•• • r' : 


, . Spain — The police deactivated a bomb 

hjdden m u wheel of a town council member’s van Mondav 
B . dS M ue separatist group ETA responsible^’ 
The council member, Francisco Robles, a member of 
the governing Popular Party in the souieiTtown 

IL ^ <toec,ed b ° mb 














Ul >*mgP aih 

1 a* Critic 


•tiint 




1r.,' 



PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY' SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


P AGE 7 • 


international 


MOBUTU : Deposed Dictator Dies of Cancer in Moroccan Exile 

• _ ... ■.ii.!. .i • Kni u>nc canto 

Continued from Page 1 


or assassination, but be was Capture- 
Flown to Katanga and handed over to 
the secessionist leader, Motse 
Tshombe, Mr. Lamumba was killed in 

mysterious circumstances. _ 

Power was restored to 
thorities in 1961, but on Nov. 24. 1965, 


who had married his mother. 

In 1 950, he joined the colonial army, 

Soviet influence in Africa, and his coun- the Force PubJique, working as a jour- 
try’s status as a repository of immense nalist and rising in six years to the rank 
mineral wealth, earned him direct con- of sergeant- Leaving active duty in 
tacts — unmatched by any other leader 1956 . he went to work as a columnist for 

of black Africa— with every U.S. pres- the Leopoldville newspaper L‘ Avenir, unim *» *r; rv" « h<- now 

idem from Dwight Eisenhowe? to In 1959, he was sent by the colonial Lieutenant General 
George Bush. Only late in the Bush administration to Brussels for fellow- was, seized power again, tms nme w 
administration did Washington offi- ships atihe Institute of Journalism and no intenuqn of relinqmsmng ^ 
cjally begin to shun him. the Institute of Social Studies. 

: He rose from being a lowly colonial He returned to Leopoldville just in 
police informer, journalist and army time for the pro-independence riots that 
sergeant to become chief of staff of his swept the capital and dramatically ac- 
•' — ■ — > * — j; - ceierated Belgium's timetable for hand- 

ing over power to its African subjects. 


j 


if 






country's armed forces, military dic- 
tator and ultimately president. 

! He changed his name from Joseph 
Desire Mobutu to Mobutu Sese Seko 
Kuku Ngbendu waza Banga, which, ac- 
cording to most translations means: 
‘■The all-powerful warrior who, be- 
cause of nis endurance and inflexible 
'fill to win, will go from conquest to 
conquest leaving fire in his wake.'* Ac- 
centing to an alternate translation, the 
name meant: * 'The rooster that watches 
overall the hens.” 

! The name Congo was changed to 
«$aire, an old Portuguese corruption of a 
local name for the country's greatest 
rjver. As European-derived place names 
were replaced, the capital, Leopoldville, 
was renamed Kinshasa. 

* Initially, Marshal Mobutu's ideology 
ail so contained a strong component of 
ebonomic nationalism, and in 1973, the 




ig over power tc . . 

At independence in 1960, the new 
prime minister, Patrice Lumumba, 
made him his army chief of staff. Mr. 
Lumumba, a left-leaning, fiery African 
nationalist, also revoked the Belgian 
officer corps commanding the Force 
Publique. This almost immediately 
thrust the country into a period of tur- 
bulence and repeated secession at- 
tempts, abetted by an embittered Brus- 
sels. It also placed the new chief of staff 
near the center of a political stage. 

On Sept 14, 1960, the then Colonel 
Mobutu “suspended" the country’s 
political institutions, effectively, if tem- 
porarily, seizing power. 

The move came as the Congo was in a 
civil war with the copper-rich province 
of Katanga, now Shaba, seeking to se- 
cede, and with Mr. Lumumba and the 


economic nationalism, and in 1973, the ceae, ana wun mi. uhhuuiw. a,.« — 
government began rakin g over foreign- president, Joseph Kasavubu, locked m a 
owned industries and plantations, par- power struggle. 


ticularly Belgian ones. 

The distribution of these assets 
among the president's closest domestic 
allies instantly created a class of nou- 
veaux riches, but within two years had 
nearly brought the once prosperous 
economy to a crash. 

Marshal Mobutu was born on Oct. 14, 
1930, in the northern town of Lisaia. 
Born out of wedlock to a traditional 
chief of the Ngbaka ethnic group and 
Mama Marie Madeleine Yemo, he was 
adopted in his infancy by Alberic Gbe- 
mani . a cook for Belgian missionaries 


The United Nations secretary-gen- 
eral at the time, Dag Hammarskjold, 
died in a mysterious airplane crash in 
1961 as he tried to fly into Katanga to 
settle the crisis. 

Marshal Mobutu is widely believed 
to have been strongly encouraged by 
Washington, acting through the Central 
Intelligence Agency in the waning days 
of the Eisenhower administration. His 
action prevented Mr. Lumumba from 
bringing in the Soviet Union to help put 
down the Katangese secession. 

Mr. Lumumba sought to avoid arrest 


Separatists Establish Indian Ocean State 


r Agence France-Presse 

MUTSAMUDU, Comoros — Sep- 
aratists on the Indian Ocean island of 
Anjouan declared Monday that their in- 
dependence from Comoros was irre- 
vocable and empowered their self-pro- 
claimed president to rule by decree. 

A spokesman for the separatists, Mo- 
hammed Abdou Madi, said a political 
council had “established the stare of 
Anjouan" and entitled Abdallah 

Ibrahim to make laws. 

The council, meeting Monday, also 
decided to set up commissions on food 
and medical care, the reform of the 
island’s armed forces, and the recovery 
of weapons given to civilians last week 


to rout troops sent by the government in 
Moroni in an unsuccessful attempt to 
put down the insurrection. 

Anjouan separatists declared inde- 
pendence Aug. 3, asserting that their 
economic and political interests were 
being ignored. 

The government in Moroni, on the 
island of Grande-Comore, dispatched 
troops Wednesday, but they met fierce 
resistance Thursday and about 40 sol- 
diers were killed, together with about a 
dozen civilians, according to members 
of nongovernmental organizations and 
other sources. 

Comoros became independent from 
France in 1975. 


no intention of relinquishing it. 

He abolished party politics ami for 
the next several years worked gradually 
at establishing his own uncontesied au- 
thority. A year after his coup, he foun- 
ded the Popular Movement of the Rev- 
olution, or MPR, the country s sole 
party whose membership was to be- 
come obligatory for all Z a iri a n s. 

With a carefully engineered election 
in 1971. he virtually ruled as an absolute 
monarch-He introduced his “authenti- 
city" policy, adopted the title of mar- 
shal. in 1 982, and began a series of major 
projects intended to transform Zaire into 
an economic powerhouse. Instead, they 
nearly bankrupted the country. 

In 1975, President Mobutu again con- 
solidated bis links with Washington by 
cooperating with the CIA in an assault 
on the Angolan capital, Luanda. The 
incursion of the Zainan Army was aimed 
ai helping a pro- Western guerrilla force, 
the National Front for the Liberation of 
Angola, seize the capital on the eve on 
independence from Portugal. 

The Zairian leader wrestled most of 
the 1980s with increasingly intractable 
economic problems, exacerbated by the 
fall-in copper prices and the regime's own 
constant theft of national resources. 

In 1990, when a democratization 
movement swept much of Africa, he 
ordered a massacre of students at the 
University of Lubumbashi, in the far 
south. As word of the killings spread, 
Belgium, Zaire’s largest source of for- 
eign aid. cut off assistance, demanding 
democratic reforms. Soon, the United 
States and France also joined in. 

Rioting erupted in the capital in Janu- 
ary 1993, when Marshal Mobutu’s in- 
troduction of new bank notes to cope 
with triple digit inflation angered sol- 
diers. The rioting, in which the French 
ambassador was killed in his office, 
again sharply raised international pres- 
sure for democratic reforms. 

His dwindling powers received a 
boost in 1994 when neighboring Rwanda 
exploded in a genoridal civil war mat 
sent over a million Hutu refugees 
streaming into Zaire. His permission to 
France to intervene eased his interna- 
tional isolation, as did his country s tak- 
ing in large numbeis of refugees. 

But his perceived support for exiled 
Hutu militia members proved costly. In 
October 1996, a newly formed Zainan 
militia, backed by Rwanda, routed gov- 
ernment forces when Marshal Mobutu 
was under treatment for cancer in 
Switzerland. He returned, but the swell- 
ing coalition of countries brought him 
down and placed Mr. Kabila in power. 



THE PENINSULA 


CROUP 


The FM-fc Ho^Kon, ■ M-.be • Ne. Vo* ■ Bevel, HUb. •< S»l L * Wt Cl.* 

The Palace Hotel Beijing • The Kowlonn Hotel Hong Kong 

||fTri h " — UTELL @ l F ‘* r Huu-H 

E-mail: LnfoepeninwUconi Wehsitc: www.penin5uU.com or CONTACT YOUR TKAV U. rROFESSlO. . AL 


CENTRAL BANK OF NIGERIA 


PRESS STATEMENT ON ADVANCE FEE FRAUDSCAM 


YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED 


-I Since the early 1990s, the Central Bank ° f J£BN) 

I has endeavoured to combat the scourge of Advance Fee 
Fraud/Scam being perpetrated by fraudsters via 
telex etc both locally and overseas, through publicrty 
ramnaians ' seminars, press statements, and cooperate*, with 
agencies. To date, the CBN has placed advmoty 

advertisements in ov« - JXTarn al. 

“Prions and^individuals who are likely to fell prey to the 
corporations and ^ ^ proliferation of Advance 

Furthermore, the Bank replies routinely 
Fee Fraud, aka telefax, etc to the effect 

s — *«££££&£ 

correspondence emanating from their coun 

ruination of their nationals. 

r\ Unfortunately, tlw^amh^^^^^^^^ty, avarice 

S Of the scam, who are also 
and greed of the so-caii nmn^sals/deals which run into 
villains. The bogus ‘biisin^ P^po tioQS ab initio, 

millions of US dollars ; marnfe* ^ law abiding 

which should ordinarily pu fiaudulent tendency, 

person on mquiiy money at the expose 

greed and the urge to make qut . * have continued to 

. of Nigeria, many of Nigeria, to the effect 

ignore the warnings *e fraudulent, 

that such transactions are t»gu» 


, ftaud/scam takes various 

O To recapitulate, an a ce ^ letter 0 f solicitation, 
J forms. A typical one starts J^“ Tbe lette rs often offer to 

followed by telefax or telex nresagjs-^ aiiy ^ u§ dollars , 

transfer huge amounts of contrac ts, to the 

purported to be part in some proportion 

adtfressee’s bank accomrt, to to A favourab lc response 

between the writer and the addres funds cannot be 

061 w - JT-n hv excuses wuy , innate 


Central Bank of Nigeria, Nigeria Natlon ®' ^ 

Corporation, etc., documents is a common prance. The 
fraudsters usually request that die transaction be done under 
the cover of confidentiality. Sometimes, the “victims aremvited 
to Nigeria where they would be given red-carpet reception an 
fibers posing as Nigeria - 

Central Bank officials. To consummate the ^ ansa f^°V*! 
“victim” would be required to pay advance fees for ^no^ 
reasons e.g. Processing fees, unforeseen taxes, licence fees, 
registration fees, signing/lawyers fees. National Economic 

Recovery Fund fees, insurance coverage release fees, W, • 

S nffeese ad i mrr frr- nbiective f 

A recent variant of the scam, directed primarily at 
SSe organisations and religious bodies overseas, involves 
bogus inheritance, under a will. Again the sole aim is to collect 
the”advance fees described as one form of inheritance tax or 

other. 

A The Central Bank ofNigeria has taken this initiativeof once 

4 again warning the business community and individuate 
b^a^e of its concern to maintain the good name of the Bank 
ft. public standing as well as those of its Senior Execifev^ 
Often the names of the Bank, members of its 
team, including the Governors (past and present) theDep ty 

Governors together wife those of highly P laced G °^T™“‘ 
- i have be en fraudulently used and abused by the 

with reckless abandon, to lend cred.b.lity and 
respectability to the scam. As on previous occasions, the Central 
bSTS Nigeria wishes through this medium, to ware all and 
sundry about the existence and the modus 

criminal syndicates whose nefarious 
, gnmv.e of emb a rri-nnent to the Bank and the Nige rjan 

pT nyfimmeat . 


Justice Charles A. Sham of the United States of America District 
Court (Eastern District of Missouri). The case was nded in 
favour of tbe Central Bank ofNigeria. The Judge ruled that the 
case of the plaintiffs - Messrs. Sorth and Tei - wasno 
sustainable, because they neither engaged in any commercial 
transaction with the defendant, nor had contact with genuine 
Central Bank ofNigeria officials, nor with my offietd of the 
Federal Government ofNigeria. The Judge further noted that 
documents tendered by the plaintiffs as evidence were forgeries 
and that they were, from the onset, aware that the^transacUons 
were bogus, fraudulent, and too good to be true. We hope that 
this landmark Court decision among mmiy others decided in 
favour of the Bank would serve as sufficient warning to al 
those who do not heed our advisory advertisements and who 
would subsequently like to seek relief from the courts after 
felling “victim” to advance fee scam transactions. 

6 The Central Bank of Nigeria is once again warning ail 
recipients of such fiaudulent letters, that there are no contract 
payments trapped in the Bank. Also that all documents, 

appertaining to these “payments”, “claims or transfers 

purportedly issued by the Bank, its Senior Executives or the 
Government of the Federal Republic of Nigeria are all forgeries, 
bogus and fraudulent. These documents do not originate from 
the Bank or the Government. They are n0 ‘ 

» t>-c THEREFORE warned and advised, in your 

SSstTtO IGNORE THE “GET-R1CH-QU1CK 
BUSINESS SOLICITATIONS. The Central Bank of Nigeria 
implores you to assist in the fight against these enm,^ 
syndicates by reporting any solicitation to your local aw 
enforcement agencies or the local International Police 

Organization (INTERPOL). 


r On numerous occasions, the so-called vrtmrfj* ™ 

J scam have brought law suits agamst the Cent^lBankof 
Nigeria, all of which the Bank has defended successMy. In a 

brought by Larry Sorth and Mr. & Mrs. Tei Vs. The OenM 
Banlfof NigS «t al, the issues of advance^ ^4 ^ 
impostors and Clearing House banks were decided on by H . 

CENTRAL BANK OF NIGERIA 

Samuel Ladoke Akintola Way, P.M.B. 0187, Gadti, Abuja, NIGERIA 


nVor the avoidance of doubt, it should be restated that fee 
7 Central Bank ofNigeria will not accept responsibfety fo 
any loss sustained by any person or corporation feat fails to 

heed our warnings* 

YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED SEV ^^ ™ ES 
BEFORE! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED AGAIN!! 


8 




t t 


I 



PAGES 


TNTFKNATIQNAT. fTFR ALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 

IISTERNATIONAL 


Bodyguard With Diana 
Is Unable to Talk After 
Major Facial Operation 


Dima’s Brother Says Public Grief Whs “Source of Comfort 

Reuters my family over the past eight days, in death, her legacy will be 

LONDON Earl Spencer, brother “The flowers, die letters, the tele- “Thank yon all very, very 

of Diana, Princess of Wales, thanked grams — all in their tens of thousands your kindness. 

Derate worldwide on Mondav for their — have been a source of comfort and In his funeral oration 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — The British bodyguard crit- 
ically injured in the high-speed auto- 
mobile crash that killed Diana, Princess 
of Wales, on Aug. 31 , is recovering from 
a 1 0-hour operation on Thursday for 
facial reconstruction, but he will be un- 
able to talk to French investigators for 
some time, his family said Monday. 

Trevor Rees- Jones, a 29-year-old 
former paratrooper, was in the front pas- 
senger seat of die Mercedes S-280 sedan 
when it hit a support pillar of an un- 
derpass near the Seine half an hou r after 
midnight at a speed one police official on 
Monday estimated at 90 to 110 miles 
(145 to 175 kilometers) an hour. 

The speed limit at that stretch — 
which curves, dips, and then curves 
again slightly in die tunn el — is 30 miles 
an hour. Prosecutors said the driver, 
Henri Paul, a 4 1 -year-old bachelor 
whose hobby was flying airplanes, was 
legally drunk. 

The police said that Mr. Rees-Jones 
was the only one in the car wearing a seat 
belt, and that an airbag inflated in front 
of him at impact 

Two French judges are investigating 
whether photographers chasing the car' 
in hopes of gening shots of Diana and 
her escort. Emad (Dodi) ai Fayed, may 
have contributed to the causes of the 
accident. Nine photographers and a mo- 
torcyclist who worked with one of than 
have been officially placed under in- 
vestigation so far. 

A blood test just after the crash on Mr. 
Paul's body showed a level of alcohol 
more than three times the legal limit, 
investigators and press reports said. 

At the insistence of Dodi al Fayed's 
father, Mohamed al Fayed, owner of the 


Family Rejects 
H.R.H. for Diana 

LONDON — Buckingham 
Palace said Monday that it had con- 
sidered restoring the designation 
H.R.H. after the funeral of Diana, 
Princess of Wales, but that her 
brother said she would not have 
wanted to be known after death as 
Her Royal Highness. 

Diana received the style H.RJL, 
which is held only by the most se- 
nior royals, when she married Prince 
Charles in 198 1 , and she lost it when 
they were divorced a year ago. 

At her Westminster Abbey fu- 
neral on Saturday, Diana’s brother, 
the 9th Earl Spencer, made a poin- 
ted reference to the loss of the 
H.R.H., saying she had “needed no 
royal title to continue to generate 
her particular brand of magic.” 

Hours later, palace officials 
spoke with the Spencer family 
about restoration of the H.R.H. 

But a palace spokesman said the 
“very firm view” of the family 
“was that the princess herself 
would not have wished for any 
change to the style and title by 
which she was known at the time of 
her death.” 

A spokeswoman for Lord Spen- 
cer said. “The palace statement is 
correct, and we have nothing to 
add.” (AP) 

Palace Flag Struck 

LONDON — The flag flying at 
ha If-staff above B ucfcingham Palace 
for the first time during Diana's 
funeral was lowered on Monday. 

In a break with tradition. Queen 
Elizabeth II ordered that her Royal 
Standard flag be lowered from the 
Palace flagpole when she left to 
attend the funeral at Westminster 
Abbey on Saturday. (AFP) 

Service in Paris 

PARIS — A memorial service 
for Diana will be held Wednesday at 
the Madeleine church in Paris, the 
British Embassy said Monday. 

The service, ro begin at 7:30 
P.M.. will be attended notably by 
Britain's ambassador to France, Sir 
Michael Juv. (AFP) 


Ritz Hotel in Paris and of the Hairods 
department store in London, who is a 
civil complainant in the criminal inves- 
tigation, the authorities took another 
sample of blood from Mr. Paul's body last 
Friday. Neither prosecutors, policemen, 
nor authorities at the main Pans morgue, 
where the body is believed to be, would 
say anything about the case Monday. 

But the police and a lawyer for Mr. al 
Fayed said they had not heard drat a 
sapphire and diamond necklace belong- 
ing to the princess or $5,000 in cadi 
belonging to her escort had been found 
missing after the accident, as The New 
York Post reported on Sunday. 

A statement by Mr. Rees-Jones's par- 
ents, Jill and Ernie Rees-Jones, issued by 
the British Embassy in Paris on Monday 
said that the operation on their son had 
been a success and that he had started on 
what they called “a long road to what we 
expect will be a fall recovery.” 

Mr. Rees-Jones is at the Pitie-Sal- 
petriere hospital in Paris in critical but 
not life-threatening condition with a 
concussion and severe injuries to his jaw 
and face. 

A hospital spokeswoman denied re- 
ports that his tongue had been ripped out 
in the accident But toe statement issued 
by his parents on Monthly said, “It will 
be some time before he will be able to 
speak to the investigators.” 

Dr. Bruno Riou, head of toe surgical 
team that tried unsuccessfully to revive 
the princess, said Monday that he would 
have no comment on Mr. Rees-Jones's 
condition or anything else. Officials of 
toe hospital and toe morgue have also 
refused to say when the results of the 
latest blood test on the body of the dead 
driver would be available, or whether 
tests were made on other bodies before 
‘ they were returned to Britain for burial. 


In a statement hesa fl- I wniliu u&c ua iu inuura uer ucaui. — 

to thank all toe people from all over the “The knowledge that Diana's life and implicitly criticized the royal Tam- 
worid, who have communicated gave so many people so much, can ily for stnppmg Diana ot ner nu 
their grief at Diana’s loss to me and now be balanced by toe hope that “Her Royal Highness. 





jgH 


Geny ftrovMgaice FimcePrcflc 

Two days after the funeral, mourners by the thousands continued to converge Monday on Kensington Palace 
in London, former home of Diana, to lay down flowers and leave tributes to the Princess of Wales. 

Queen and Charles Reportedly Quarreled Over Funeral 


Reuters 

LONDON — Queen Elizabeth II originally wanted Di- 
ana, Princess of Wales, to be given a private funeral and 
only relented after Prince Charles put op fierce resistance, 
Channe l Four television news said Monday. 

The program said Charles had a huge argument with Sir 
Robert FelJowes, the queen’s private secretary, and “told 
him to impale himself on his own flagstaff. ' ' The source for 


the story was a senior official close to court circles, the 
program said. 

Channel Four said toe royal family also had feuds with 
Earl Spencer, Diana’s brother, once the queen's initial 
wishes became known. Less than an hour before toe prin- 
cess’s body was borne into Westminster Abbey, family 
members were arguing over who should walk behind toe 
coffin. 


Diana and Dodi Picked Out the Ring Together 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Poet Service 

PARIS — Princess Diana and Dodi al 
Fayed together picked out toe diamond 
ring he gave her hours before they died, 
the jeweler who sold them the ring said 
Monday. 

Alberto Repossi said in a telephone 
interview th at the couple went to the 
Monaco branch of his store unexpec- 
tedly about 10 days before the accident, 
which would make it Aug. 19 or 20. The 
couple were vacationing on the Riviera. 

They spent only about four or five 
minutes in toe store. Mr. Repossi said, 
because they already knew which ring 
they wantedL 

They had seen it in a Repossi ad- 
vertisement in toe September edition of a 


high -fashion ma gazin e. Neither Diana 
nor Mr. al Fayed said anything in toe 
store about becoming engaged, Mr. Re- 
possi said, contrary to initial press re- 
ports about toe ring. 

But toe theme of he advertisement for 
the ring was marriage, and toe ring was 
designed as an engagement ring. 

“Tell me yes!” was toe headline on 
the advertisement, which featured only 
toe one ring in a large picture. “A little 
yes for toe most beautiful day of your 
life. It was worth waiting for! ' ' 

Mr. Repossi said he had designed the 
ring, contrary to press reports that Mr. al 
Fayed designed it. It had been in toe store 
since May and was the top of a line of 
engagement jewelry modeled after the 
“cocktail rings” of the 1930s, he said. 

The picture shows a a emerald-cut dia- 


mond surrounded by four triangle- 
shaped diamonds atop a thick band en- 
crusted with smaller diamonds. 

Mr. Repossi declined to say how many 
carats the principal diamond weighed or 
to specify the price, which press reports 
have put at more than $200,000. 

After an alteration in size, the ring was 
picked up by Mr. al' Fayed at the Paris 
store in the Place Vendome, the same 
square as toe Ritz Hotel, about 6 P-M on 
Aug. 30, the day of the fatal car crash. 

“He said he loved it and he was 
certain the princess would love it as 
well,” Mr. Repossi said. 

He declined to say whether he had 
sold other pieces of jewelry to Mr. al 
Fayed or Diana. 

Michael Cole, a spokesman for Mo- 
hamed al Fayed. Dodi aJ Fayed's father. 


said last week that the pair exchanged 
gifts: a silver plaqoe with a love poem 
inscribed on it from him to her, a gold 
cigarclipper from her to him with a gold 
tag inscribed “With love from Diana” 
and a pair of cuff links that had belonged 
to her father. 

Mr. Repossi said the existence of toe 
ring only came to light because his in- 
surance policy required him to file a 
claim within 24 hours for losses and. 
despite toe nature of toe tragedy, he felt 
he had to since he had not been paid. 

“Someone at Lloyd’s must have told 
the press,” Mr. Repossi said, referring to 
the insurance company. “I would never 
have spoken of toe ring if it had not 
already been revealed. 

“My pain does not permit me to re- 
joice in toe publicity. ” 


DIANA: Enough Is Enough, a British Paper Says of Intrusive Photo Coverage of Princes 


Continued from Page 1 

that many of toe tabloids have practiced. 
But toe editorial by its editor, Andrew 
Marr, said that ail papers should be 
chastened by what has happened. 

“If we are not all sadder and wiser, we 
damned well ought to be,” the editorial 
said. “The hunt became a blood sport. 
The quarry dead, let us find gentler pur- 
suits. 

The Independent's comments were 
echoed by others. 

Max Hastings, the editor of the Even- 
ing Standard, one of the more restrained 
tabloids, said in a radio interview, “I 
doubt if there’s a journalist around the 
country who hasn't spent a good deal of 
time over toe weekend thinking about 
the response to Earl Spencer's words in 
Westminster Abbey on Saturday.” 

He said a combination of public pres- 
sure and press restraint was needed to 
correct toe problem. 

“The overwhelming responsibility 
must rest with us to run our newspapers 
decently,” he said. “But toe surest sanc- 
tion for making sure that self-regulation 
works is that people stop buying news- 

iu>rd Rotoennere, toe chairman of toe 
company that owns toe Evening Stan- 
dard and toe Daily Mail, another major 
British tabloid, said press executives 
should take steps to police themselves, 
in part to prevent new legal sanctions 
from being imposed. 


As a first step he announced a ban on 
“all intrusive pictures" except those 
deemed necessary for news purposes. 

“Only proprietors have toe authority 
to actually do this,” he said, “and 1 do 
hope that my fellow proprietors will 
agree with me.” 

But his pledge was far from irre- 
vocable. Unless others follow suit, he 
admitted, “I don’t know bow long I can 
keep up that instruction.” 

The moves toward self-regulation 


came as the chairman of the official 
Press Complaints Commission, Lord 
Wakebam, announced that he would be- 
gin discussions with tabloid editors 
about how to respond to toe complaints 
voiced by Diana’s brother and others 
during the last week. 

The Press Complaints Commission is 
a newspaper- industry organization es- 
tablished in 1991 to self-police the in- 
dustry. The commission's goal in this 
situation will be to persuade editors to 


impose restraints on their own practices 
as a way of avoiding action by the gov- 
emment- 

Meanwhile. at the Spencer family es- 
tate of Al thorp, many of the flowers left 
by the public during toe last week were 
moved to the small island where Diana 
was buried. Mourners continued to file 
by Kensington Palace on Monday, many 
stopping to sign the official Book of 
Condolence that has been reopened since 
the funeral. 


MIR: Crew Fights to Keep OrbiterFrom Tumbling Out of Control 


Continued from Page 1 

cosmonauts have complained that so- 
phisticated replacement equipment is no 
longer reaching toe station because the 
space agency lacks funds to buy them or 
because factories that produced toe ma- 
terial are no longer functioning. 

Since the June collision, Mir has op- 
erated on less than full electrical power. 
That has meant that some backup sys- 
tems on board have been shut off to save 
energy. 

With this latest setback, the mood at 
Mission Control turned sullen. When a 
reporter asked the Mission control di- 
rector, Vladimir Solovyov, wbat caused 
the mishap, he snapped back, “Why 
does a car break down?” 

Ground controllers where studying 


data to pinpoint toe cause of the prob- 
lem. A technician commented sourly. 
“The Americans become alarmed when 
something like this happened.” 

Vladimir Solovyov said Mir had a 
backup computer in “cold reserve” that 
could be used to replace the malfunc- 
tioning one, if necessary. Asked why the 
reserve computer did not automatically 
kick in. he said that it was not designed to 
do that. 

He said he expected the station's “at- 
titude control” system to be back in 
operation within two days. 

Both the Russians and the U.S. Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration have gone of their way in recent 
weeks to point out the positive value of 
the recurrent crises on Mir. It is a way of 
practicing for the perils of space flight. 


they say, and the experience will be 
useful when a new international space 
station is built and launched over the 
next few years. 

There is an alternate view, one offered 
Monday by JetTy Linenger, a U.S. as- 
tronaut and Mir veteran who was on 
board when a fire broke out early this 
year. He contends that survival in space 
has already been proven, both on Mir 
and on the U.S. Skylab orbiter, which 
crashed to Earth in toe 1980s. 

In the heyday of both stations, one 
member of toe crew could keep the life- 
support systems operating and toe rest 
could cany on scientific chores. That is 
no longer the case on Mir staying alive 
has practically become the primary goal. 
“It is survival for survival's sake.” Mr. 
Linenger he said. 


CHARITIES: . 

Donations for Diana 

Continued from Page f 
uroe corooraie donations unfolding — 

largest charities in the world. * 

Swe have had .ouchmg fffe 
as 20 pence,” Ms. P|ysaid.WeshOTg 
sun getting official figures «“• n 
rnstees have ton named g 
handle toe investment of the money until 
to details of its disbursement a*® 
dded upon, Ms. Day ^ They are 
AnfoonyJuiius, a partner in toe -0Q± 
strong law firm, and Diana’s persona) 
secretary, Michael Cibbms. 

The two will have wide discrown i* 
disbursing the funds to the six categories 
of Sties Diana had become assj 
dated with, primarily children s bos 7 
State, AIDS patients, toe homeless, le^ 
rosy patients, the Enghsh Nation^ 
Ballet and cancer hospitals. 

The princess was patron of about 1 00 
charities until her divorce, when she 
announced she would restrict her public 
activities to the six categories. But wi$ 
so much money coming a repns 
sentative for toe law firm said that toe 
scope might- be broadened. _ 

Pledges and checks were arriving at toe 
rate of SI 1 ,200 an hour for a daily average 
of $268,800, fund administratore sard: 

Sacks of checks are arriving at Buck- 
ingham Palace and Kensington Palace, 
Diana's official residence, as fast as the 
Royal Mail can deliver them. Most of in? 
donors have given anonymously. < 
Mr. al Fayed said he had set aside $8 
million for toe Great Ormond Streep 
Hospital for Children in London, whieft 
Diana had been a patron of for some 
time, frequently visiting children therj 
discreetly. 

Mr. Cole, the Harrods spokesman, said 
an expected $7 million from toe auctiog 
of about 4,000 items of toe Windsor 
collection in Paris that go on sale Feb; 
ruary in New York would go toward 
building a Diana children's hospital and 
hospice. 

Other celebrities are joining the banct 
wagon, including the former Beatle Pain 
McCartney, the Rolling Stones anij 
Sting, who will be among 10 rockstars tj 
perform a tribute album to Diana, ac- 
cording Richard Branson, a close frientj 
of toe princess who built his fortune on 
the Virgin record label. The album will 
be released before Christmas, he said. ' 
“I think there are millions of peopltj 
around toe world who want something 
positive to come out of Diana's life,” he 
said. “And one way is to raise as much 
money as possible for the charities shf 
supported.” 

Those wishing ro donate money can 
write their checks to Kensington Palace*, 
London W8 4 PU: or to Diana, Princess 
of Wales, Memorial Fund. P.O. Box I, 
London WC1B5HW. 

A Web site has also been set upon the 
Internet to allow people to make credit 
card donations. Telephone donations 
can be made with international credit 
card by calling (0990) 66 44 22 in Britain 
(drop the initial zero if calling frorp 
overseas). i 

•ft 

U.S. Says Saudi 
Won’t Be Charged i 

Reuters g 

WASHINGTON — The Justice 5 
Department said Monday it would ■ 
drop criminal charges against a - 
Saudi dissident who was deported . 
from Canada and who has been * 
linked to the deadly Khobar Towers i 
truck bombing in Saudi Arabia in j* 
1996. j 

The charges were unrelated to the 7. 
bombing. a 

It said the suspect, Hani Sayegh. J 
had reneged on a plea agreement to * 
admit to being guilty of plotting an " 
aborted anti-American attack in toe 2 
Middle East and in return cooperate s 
with the investigation into the truck * 
bombing that killed 19 U.S. troops, i 
“Since we have not been able to 3 
develop the requisite evidence, it is ^ 
necessary that this prosecution be 2 
withdrawn,” toe Justice Depart- j 
mem said in announcing that it 
would drop toe criminal charges ^ 
against Mr. Sayegh. ; 

The Justice Department said I 
Saudi authorities plan to seek toe 5 
extradition of Mr. Sayegh in con- 1 
neciion with toe Khobar Towers * 
bombing. If Saudi authorities meet 2 
toe requirements for extradition, * 
then “the United States would re- 3 
spond appropriately" to the request, 3 
the Justice Department said. * 


TELECOM: 20% of Its Stock to Go on Sale MANILA: U.S. Warns Ramos on Turmoil SUIT: Paula Jones Hit With Legal Setback ; 


Continued from Page 1 

France Telecom — which describes 
Use II as toe fourth- largest internation- 
ally in its sector, behind British Tele- 
com. AT&T and MCI — has not been 
able to form partnerships with those 
private-sector leaders. 

Already, estimates of the company's 
market value have fallen off in recent 
months, analysts said Monday, appar- 
ently because of the Socialists' decision 
to turn away from the previous govern- 
ment's intention of putting France Tele- 
com on a trajectory of total sell-off. That 
perspective lias buoyed prospects for 
Deutsche Telekom and Telecom Italia. 

Prime Minister Lionel Jospin's ap- 
proach reflects France Telecom's polit- 
ical symbolism as a bastion of unionized 
government employees, a key constitu- 
ency for the leftist government The 
company's status as a state-run utility 
guaranteeing public service to all cit- 
izens has been defended by France's 
Communists, who could play an influ- 
ential role in the government’s policy on 
jobs, the overriding national issue. 

Leftists criticized even the limited 
opening of France Telecom's capital. 
“I’ve never known any private investor 


who was ready to stop with only partial 
ownership,” a trade onion official said. 

Bolder action to move France Tele- 
com to private management had been 
urged by many specialists — including 
Jacques Delors, toe former president of 
the European Commission and an elder 
statesman among France’s Socialists — 
who said that the company needed to 
escape government control so thai it 
'could move faster to energize the French 
economy as a whole. 

Government control of France Tele- 
com has been blamed by analysts for 
impeding innovative telephone services 
considered critical for businesses and the 
economy to become more competitive. 

For example, the slow take-off of the 
Internet in France — now publicly pin- 
pointed as a source of concern by toe 
new government — has been traced to 
France Telecom's determination to de- 
fend its own older technology, a more 
limited system of transferring text by 
phone known as Mini tel. 

Soon, France Telecom will face com- 
petition in its home market from British 
Telecom and MCI: They have a joint 
venture with the French company Gen- 
erate des Eaux that plans to offer local 
service under the name Cegetel. 


Continued from Page 1 

“avoid a period of political turmoil.” 
Mr. Roto was visiting toe Philippines. 
There was no confirmation or ampli- 
fication of his remarks from toe State 
Department in Washington. 

Accusations that Mr. Ramos will not 
quit office next year, as toe constitution 
requires, have begun to overshadow his 
five-year tenure, which has brought a 
rare period of prosperity and stability to 
toe Philippines. 

“These are blatant lies, falsehoods 
and fabrications,' ’ Mr. Ramos said in toe 
radio address, accusing his detractors of 
a massive disinformation campaign. 
“As president. I categorically and em- 
phatically deny these irresponsible ac- 
cusations." 

“Likewise, I am against term exten- 
sion,” he said 

“I have no intention whatsoever to 
proclaim martial law," Mr. Ramos said, 
adding that national elections would go 
ahead next May as scheduled. 

But be did not comment on what many 
in toe Philippines consider the most im- 
portant issue — whether he supports a 
constitutional amendment that would al- 
low him to run again. 


On Friday, Mr. Ramos sent waves 
through toe political and business com- 
munities by telling a group of business 
leaders that “I must keep my options 
open” on running for a second term. 

Many analysts see the political con- 
frontation over toe proposed constitu- 
tional change as the most critical test for 
Philippine democracy since Mr. Marcos 
was ousted in 1986. The Constitution, 
approved in 1987, limits presidents to a 
single six-year term in an attempt to 
prevent future dictatorships. 

“The fate of Asia's oldest democracy 
has not been so uncertain since toe dec- 
laration of martial law in 1972,” said 
Amando Doronila. a political analyst for 
toe Philippine Daily Inquirer, 

Mr. Ramos's supporters say he should 
be allowed a second term so the country 
can continue to benefit from political 
stability and economic growth. But op- 
ponents of constitutional change, includ- 
ing former President Corazon Aquino 
and the archbishop of Manila, Cardinal 
Jaime Sin, contend that divisions over 
toe proposed change are eroding the 
country's political stability at a time 
when the government should be focus- 
ing on recent declines in the stock and 
currency markets. (AP, AFP, Reuters ) 


Continued from Page 1 

relations representative. Susan Car- 
penter McMillan.” he said. 

He added that he hoped the matter 
would not interfere with the trial date. 

Ms. Jones has accused Mr. Clinton of 
requesting oral sex from her in a Little 
Rock hotel room in May 1991, at a time 
when she was an Arkansas slate em- 
ployee and he was toe state's governor. 

The two lawyers. Mr. Davis and Mr. 
Cammarata. said in a filing toar “certain 
fundamental differences of opinion have 
jnsen' ' between them and Ms. Jones. 
Officials familiar with toe case, who 
requested anonymity, fold The Asso- 
ciated Press that Ms. Jones and her at- 
torneys had argued about the risks and 
expenses, including attorneys' fees, in- 
volved in pressing toe case. 

The precise nature of those differ- 
ences was nut clear. Ms. Carpenter Mc- 
Millan insisted Monday, as she has be- 
fore, that the argument was nor over 
money. “It’s never been about monev.” 
she said, “it’s always been about lan- 
guage. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Cammaraia, she 
said, had tried to persuade Ms. Jones to 
accept a proposed settlement “with very 


weak language that was not something 
that she wanted.” * 

Ms. Carpenter McMillan said Iaj» 
week that if Ms. Jones “can get ah 
apology and an admission, she woulS 
take no money and it would be over.” ■ * 
Mr. Clinton has denied any wronj*- 
fr ? m ±e a/d his 3 

Sfn haVC he would not ap<* 

logize for something he did not do. ™ 

We .^ e Publicly all along tool 

he president would notapologize to Ms- 

not atoSTto cord 
duct which d,dn t occur,” Mr. Clinton’S 
tewyor said late last month. ? 

havem £"5 ° f any sett! emem woui£ 
sonaM be terms that could not rea- 
sonably be- interpreted as an admissSi 

Mr. Clinton s attorneys suggested st 
one point however, that tolv wouU 

22“ «■ POss.bUit/of ^g f 

settlement terms to Ms Jones P tW°h3 


. [i) I 


fc*" 

' -Tf,- • 


Mr, T, 




c “Sie5 






7 



briefly 


*• 


Visa. The World’s Best Way To Travel 


n TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 
INTERNATIONAL TRIBUNE, 


INTERNATIONAL 


Nigeria Denies 


, . officials said. pended Friday, demanding that the Pal- 

tounn genior administration official ac- estinians meet their security obliga- 

irtowledE«i that it would go down well rions. The accords include a troop 
" . home tf Mrs. Albright were to use withdrawal from the West Bank ong- 

strong language to press Mr. Arafat to inally scheduled for Sunday and another 
Palestinian extremists and to due within a year. . , ,, 

down on Hamas. How Mrs. Albright deals with Mr. 

Everyone from Mr. Netanyahu and Netanyahu's suspension of Israel s ob- 
ihe House speaker Newt Gingrich to the ligations under the accords, erven it the 

liberal Democratic senator from Con- suspension is temporary, will be closely 

norticuL Joseph Lieberman. have urged watched throughout the Middle East. 
So cto that. She most also tty, as another sen.or 

But the official said she also needed official said, to gel agreement from coin 
m nress Mr. Arafat and Mr. Netanvahu the Israelis and Palestinians on Amer- 
m meet their responsibilities toward iran ideas that could “clear a pathway 
neace and bear in mind the concerns of to accelerated final-status talks on a 
KSerate U.S. Arab allies, like King comprehensive peace settlement 
Hussein of Jordan and Egypt’s pres- Despite the new carnage and the _em- 
SESHosni Mubarak. phasis on Mr. Arafat's security obhg- 

In a statement issued in Cairo, they ations, “it is also a reality she has ic 
urged Israel to refrain from actions alien go out there and engage on both issue 
In “rtie soirit of the peace." — security and peace, the official said. 

They called on Mr. Netanyahu to put Mrs. Albright will reinforce Presi 
into effect all the clauses of the interim dent Bill Clinton s statements in tele 
Os?o accords, which he unilaterally sus- phone o„s -I 


Ruler Is Very Sick 


dial a heavy-handed public defense of stales. The summit, only m ik 
M r. Netanyahu would further estrange year, includes an Israeli aeiegat 
the two sides, the officials said. The meetings symbolize the 

With the negotiations between ihc sion of a peaceful, cooperative - 
Palestinians and Israel in la tiers and the Easi concentrating on trade ana muiu 
chance for a comprehensive Middle interests rather than on recnmwau 
East peace agreement fading, the United and suicide bombers. . 

Cion*; k facino the nmsnect ihat the During her trip, Mrs. Albngn _ 


By Steven Erlanger 


New Kiri Timex Service 


WASHINGTON — Under pressure 
from Congress. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright will head to the 
Middle East on Tuesday with the in- 
tention of putting pressure on the Pal- 
estinian leader, Yasser Arafat, to crack 
down on terrorism, senior American 
officials said. 

She must ensure that Mr. Arafat com- 
mits himself wholly and publicly to the 
pursuit of peace with Israel "and stops 
trying to have it both ways," a senior 
official said. 

But she must also ensure that Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel 
"does not use security as a pretext" to 
avoid talking about Israel’s own re- 
sponsibility for the breakdown in mu- 
tual confidence with the Palestinians 
and the larger Arab world. 

Mrs. Albright's first official trip to the 
Middle East has raised regional concerns 


position magazine that the military 
ruler, General Sani Abachsi. is "very- 
sick" with cirrhosis of the liver. 

•*We denv that this story is cor- 
rect " said one official at the pres- 
ident in Abuja, commenting on 
the report in Tell magazine. 

Tell quoted sources at the pres- 
idency as saying General Abac ha 
needed treatment for cirrhosis in 
the run-up to last month’s annual 
summit of the Economic Commu- 
nity of West African States and was 
still verv sick. General Abacha. f>-\ 
has ruled Nigeria since taking 
nnu'fr in a 1993 coup. [Reuters! 


35 Members of Hamas Seized 
As Arafat Pledges Crackdown 

The Associated Press West Bank land until Mr. iyafat 

•* JERICHO, West Bank — Under cracked down on suspected lemonsls 
pressure from Israel and the United Mr. Arafat has said he would only 
States, the Palestinian leader Yasser, arrest suspected militants once mere 
Arafat pledged Monday to fight ter- was evidence to tie them to attacks 

rorism. and his security forces followed against Israel. 

tip by arresting 35 suspected Islamic Mr. Arafat has also said hebeue es 
militants in the first such sweep since the assailants in the last two bombings 

‘die suicide bombing in Jerusalem last came from outside of areas under his 

week. control. 

. Many of those detained were mem- However, the arrests Monday of ac- 
bers of Qassam Brigades, the military tivists of the Qassam 
wing of the Islamic militant group ted that Mr. Arafat believed thaieveoif 
Hamas, which has been blamed for Je- the suicide bombers had come from 
riisalem suicide bombings on July 30 abroad that they had recet p 

and on Thursday. The blasts killed 20 from Hamas activists in the West 
Israelis and five assailants. . Bank. ,. H * 

In a message to Foreign Minister On Monday lsrael 
David Levy of Israel, Mr. Arafat said raeli investigators as saying the explo- 
teat he " ju not tolerate violence and sives used in the J 
Lor.conunitted eitherby Phlestnuans jngs-je gqnd 


bid for control of Owando. buu 
kilometers (350 miles) north ot 
Brazzaville. The city is the strong- 
hold of General Jacques Yhomby- 
Oponco. head of an alliance or 
parties backing President Pascal 
Ussouba. (AFPi 

Paraguay General 
Leads in Exit Polls 

ASUNCION. Paraguay — A 
former general accused of plotting 
a 1 996 coup was clinging to a slight 
edge Monday in the ruling party s 
presidential primary, according to 
exit polls. 

General Lino Oviedo had 39 per- 
cent of the vote from Sunday’s bal- 
loting, according to a poll b> 
i nrivate radio station Nanduti. Col- 


PAGE 10 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 



editorials/opinion 


Heratti 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


fvbushed wmi thb row «HBt times and tub washwctqw post 


Mixed Hong Kong News 

«• rtf« — A La VMfl'arl 


Tung Chee-hwa, the new leader of 
Hong Kong, is making his first visit to 
Washington since his city-state moved 
from British to Chinese sovereignty. 
That transfer of a relatively free society 

into the hands of a repressive regime 
aroused many misgivings in the United 
States. Mr. Tung, well aware of such 
apprehensions, will no doubt be eager 
to reassure Hong Kong’s friends in 
America, and he has some good news 
to report However, in one crucial area. 


Ten would be picked by a small elec- 
toral college, while 30 would be 
chosen by “functional constituen- 
cies'’ — business associations, pro- 
fessional organizations and the like. 
This was true during the last election, 
too, but the constituencies were 
defined so broadly that most Hong 
Kong voters — 2.7 million of them — 
could participate. Mr. Tung now pro- 
poses to narrow the voter pool to about 
80,000. The effect would be to make 


to report However, m one * — - " ,r uuw. 

tv ramoects for free and democratic the process more easily controllable by 
the prospects - Reiiine and less accessible to the 


elections, the news is not good. 

The good news consists mostly of 
what has not changed in the early 
months. Life in Hong Kong goes on 
pretty much as before. The People s 
Liberation Army has behaved itself. 
Political demonstrations have taken 
place. The economy, while a bit buf- 
feted by the finan cial crisis sweeping 
through Southeast Asia, remains 
strong. Unfortunately, none of this can 
be counted on for the long tenon if Mr. 
Tung does not keep his promise to 
bring more democracy to Hong Kong. 

He is a shipping magnate who was 
installed with Beijing’s blessing by a 1 
Beijing-controlled assembly. He gov- 
erns now with an appointed Legislative 
Council that China likewise installed, 
replacing one that had been elected 
during British rule. Thus the impor- 
tance that many outsiders, including 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, 
have assigned to an election next 
spring, which would put back in place a 
legislature reflective of popular will 

But the election law that Mr. Tong 
has drafted would have die opposite 
effect Out of 60 council -members, 
only 20 would be popularly elected. 


Beijing and less accessible to the 
Democratic Party and its allies, the top 
vote-getters in the last election. 

Weakening the Democrats is sim- 
ilarly the god of a change in rules to 
proportional representation for the 20 
popularly elected seats. As Mr. Tung’s 
associates point out, many democra- 
cies use some variation of this system. 
But they choose to do so democrat- 
ically, and their goal usually is to give 
minority patties a say. In this case, the 
system is being imposed, and the goal 
— to strengthen the already over- 
whelming influence of Beijing and its 
allies — hardly qualifies as sticking up 
for the underdog. 

Most Americans understand the 
challenge Mr. Tung faces as he seeks to 
protect Hong Kong’s autonomy while 
getting along with a Chinese regime 
leery of Hong Kong’s potentially sub- 
versive example. Few, however, will 
understand the rationale for restricting 
democracy and removing the franchise 
from those who have shown them- 
selves more than capable of exercising 
it responsibly — and shown as well 
that they want to. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Do It Right in Bosnia 


Inflammatory television broadcasts 
in Bosnia threaten the peace, but si- 
lencing the offending stations is not the 
way to handle the problem. Rather than 
ordering NATO forces to knock 
venomous broadcasts off the air, as 
NATO is prepared to do, the United 
States and its peacekeeping partners 
ought to help give viewers more di- 
verse programming. It ill suits an al- 
liance of democratic nations to impose 
censorship in the pursuit of peace. 

There is no question that television 
and radio broadcasts controlled by 
Radovan Karadzic and his henchmen 
in Bosnian Serb regions are poisonous. 
What passes for news on Srpska Radio 
and Television is hateful propaganda 
designed to incite ethnic conflict and 
mob attacks against NATO forces. 

British troops, for instance, were 
recently depicted as fascist forces in- 
tent on slaughtering Serbs, and NATO 
aircraft were alleged to be dispersing 
toxic chemicals over Bosnian Serb 
communities. 

On the theory that the broadcasts 
pose an immediate threat to peace- 
keeping forces, NATO is threatening 
to shut down stations that fail to change 
their programs. Studios and transmit- 
ting towers will not be destroyed by 
military attack, at least for now, but 
NATO fences are ready to cut off elec- 
tricity, block access to installations, 
and electronically jam broadcasts. 

Using the tools of dictators to bring 
peace to Bosnia is offensive to Amer- 
ican principles and is bound to back- 
fire. The jamming towers that loomed 
over Moscow and other Soviet-bloc 
capitals like ominous spider webs were 
among the most visible symbols of 
Communist repression. For America to 
use similar if more advanced tech- 
niques in Bosnia can only make cit- 
izens there doubt the difference be- 
tween democracy and dictatorship. 

A far better approach would be to 


increase support for the establishment 
of independent radio and television 
stations. Government and private 
donations from abroad have helped 
get several fledgling stations on the 
air in Serbian-controlled areas of Bos- 
nia, although their reach is limited 
and official opposition to them strong. 
The latest, ATV in Banja Luka, just 
went on the air this week with neutral 
news broadcasts. 

These stations have the advantage of 
being homegrown operations rather 
than foreign ones, and they rely on 
local, independent journalists who 
have credibility in their communities. 
Broadcasts beamed in from specially 
modified American aircraft, one of 
NATO's preferred options, .would, 
seem artificial and are likely to be tone- 
deaf to Bosnian concerns. 

Washington, seeking a quick way of 
reaching a wide audience, has concen- 
trated on helping the Bosnian Serb pres- 
ident, Biljana Plavsic, Mr. Karadzic’s 
main rival, gain control of state-owned 
stations. In recent weeks, Mrs. Plavsic's 
supporters, acting under NATO pro- 
tection, have taken over stations that 
dominate roughly 60 percent of the Bos- 
nian Sab region. Broadcasts on those 
stations are now more evenhanded, but 
trading one Bosnian Serb faction for 
another will end up merely changing the 
propaganda message rather than repla- 
cing it with unfettered news. 

The manipulation of television and 
radio broadcasts is a long, dishonor- 
able tradition in Bosnia. Although the 
Dayton peace accords called for in- 
dependent broadcasting, Muslim and 
Croatian authorities have shown no 
more inclination to liberate their chan- 
nels than have the Bosnian Serbs. 
Washington is right to insist that the 
airwaves be free, but it will do itself 
and Bosnia a disservice if it practices 
censorship to reach that goal. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


A Matter of Maimers 

The public’s right to know (as op- 
posed to its desire to know) need not, 
I think, extend to the sight of some 
celebrity without her blouse. Still, this 
thorny problem is all the thornier be- 
cause — like so many problems — its 
solution does not lie in the law. 

What would we do? Bar photo- 
graphers from public streets? Outlaw 
telephoto lenses? Have government 
censors determine just where a line of 
privacy is to be drawn? Cut holes in 
newspapers that foil to observe it? 

This is really a matter of mores. Of 
manners. People who would be em- 
barrassed to stare through a telephoto 


lens at someone in an intimate moment 
will buy a magazine to see iL People 
who would avert their eyes from the 
grief in the free of a child who has just 
lost his mother may turn quickly to a 
photo of the moment. 

Someone else does the intruding; we 
enjoy the fruits of it 
The right to privacy has little cur- 
rency in newsrooms today, and little in 
the hearts of the public. If the latter 
changed significantly, the former 
would change as well. Diana’s death 
is so powerful a moment; some step, 
however measured, in that direction 
just may be a result 

— Geneva Overholser, 
ombudsman of The Washington Post. 


$ 


ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Cfunmen 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher A Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER, Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS, Managing Editor • PAUL H0RV1JZ, Deputy Managing Editor 
• KATHDUNE KNORR and CHARLES MITCHELMORE, Deputy Editors • S AMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWIRIZ, A sso ci ate Eduars a ROBERT J. DONAHUE, Editor if she Edhorioi Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Finance Editor 
* R&fls BONDY. Deputy Publisher 

• JAMES McLEOD, Advertising Director * DIDER BRUN, Gradation Director. 
Direacurdela Publication: Richard McClean 


IntHmtkml Horrid Tribune, 181 A venae diaries -de -Gaulle, 91521 NeniHy-sur- Seine, France. 

flfcflMMUIAl q)4M3 ^1Q QJ4MMU& 

Edik* far Asia'. MkhaeiRkkirdurij Gaartay fci. Sawww- 119800. Td. 1651 472-7768. Fax 0} 274-2334 
Hug. Da. Ada. Rdf D. KnaepdH. 50 Gbucaur ltd. Hmg Kang. Td 851-2922.1188. Fax: 852-29t2-ll90 
Gen. Up German: T.Sd&a.Fnatxktr. 15.60323 FrwdfmlH. Td. *49(097/2500. Fax: *4969197125^20 
Pas US, Ukhid Camay. 850 Dad /Ur. New Tat NT Td (2121 752-3890. Fax: (212} 75543785 
UK. Advertising Office: 63 Long Acre, London WC2. Tel. {171} 836-4802. Fax : f/7/J 240-2254 
SAS. au capital de 1 200JXU F RCS Nantent B 752021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337 
91997, haenmond Herald Tribune. AU right reserved 155 N: 0294-8052 




Fighting Against Poverty, One Hovel at a Time 

O O O J 7 opment and market forces, there were 


N EW YORK — Mother Teresa, the 
Roman Catholic nun who died last 
week at 87, was not a political figure in 
the conventional sense. But she had a 

S olitician’s sense of issues and timing. 

he knew that in modem-day India, a 
nation of nearly a billion overwhelm' 
ingly poor people, the biggest issue of 
all was poverty. 

She attracted larger crowds and in- 
vited greater affection than any politi- 
cian, testimony to her integrity and her 
humility, qualities conspicuously ab- 
sent in the people governing the 
world's largest democracy today. 

No soaring rhetoric for her, no ap- 
pealing to atavistic impulses — just a 
simple, central message that-resonated 
among everyday Indians and non-In- 
dians alike: Poverty is neither noble 
nor acceptable, and social justice does 
not automatically follow fitful eco- 
nomic development. 

Why was her message so compel- 
ling? Because, notwithstanding the 
economic liberalization and progress 
that every commentator cites with ap- 
proval in this 50th anniversary year of 
Indian independence, the chasm be- 
tween haves and have-nots in India is 
so great that they might as well be 
living in two different countries. 

Mother Teresa herself would some- 
times toss out a statistic or two. Her 
delivery was always soft, but the effect 
could be c hillin g: 300 million Indians 
living below the poverty line, millions 
more with few if any options for eco- 
nomic advance. Where were the jobs, 
she would ask, where was the large- 
scale investment in human develop- 
ment? What happened to the vision of 
Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharial 
Nehru for a just India? 

Powerful questions, articulated by a 
simple woman whose frail body 
packed more power than any other con- 
temporary world figure. 

Lake Gandhi’s, that power, of course, 
flowed from her spiritual wellspring. 
And like Gandhi. Mother Teresa was an 
unelected spokesman for the poor every- 
where, not simply highli gh ting their des- 
pair but also underscoring their hopes. 

At a time when majority-Hindn fun- 
damentalism was on the rise and 
Muslims were becoming increasingly 
worried about their identity in sup- 
posedly secular India, few dared ask 
what business a Christian missionary 
had representing India on the global 
stage. When she spoke, all India 
listened, and the world took notice. 

Implicit in what she said was also an 
indictment of the international devel- 


By Pranay Gupte 


opment organizations whose many bil- 
lions of dollars had fattened bureau- 
cracies but not sufficiently lifted the 
poor from their despair. 

You did not have to be Indian to 
understand what she said. Just ask 
people in the slums in dozens of West- 
ern countries that Mother Teresa vis- 
ited and where her charitable orga- 
nizations worked. 

That is not to say that her judgment 
was unchallenged on every issue. In a 
nation that adds 20 million people each 
year — more than the entire population 
of Australia — she stubbornly resisted 
family planning programs. In keeping 
with hex conservative Catholic beliefs, 
she was vehemently opposed to abor- 
tion, which is permitted in India. 

Some advocates of social develop- 
ment, especially in international aid 
agencies, fretted (hat Mother Teresa was 
the biggest stumbling block to the in- 
ternational family planning movement. 


Her prescription for India’s popu- opmen Uvcs remained mired in 

ion problem was predication the l*»P"L f S umsmnC es of their bath. 


Ia n on — *- , . 

overriding belief that every child, bom 
and yet to be bora, has the inalienable 
right to the pursuit of a full, happy life 
free from the malignancy of poverty. 

Her work in Calcutta’s slums illus- 
trated something that the high priests of 
global development often overlook: In 
order to pull people out of poverty, it rs 
important to first empower them wim 
the hope that change is possible. 

Her mis sionary efforts exemplified 
the - notion that, when confronted with 
such Himalayan challenges as tradi- 
tional poverty, small steps are more 
effective t han monumental anti- 
poverty programs administered by bu- 
reaucrats. And so, for Mother Teresa, it 
was always one hovel at a time. 

In an age of self-promotion where 
even missionaries succumb to bland- 
ishments from publishers and lecture- 
circuit agents. Mother Teresa did not 
seek fame. She recognized that, despite 
all the fancy talk in the world’s fi- 
nancial salons about economic devel- 


ency.^bis 
JtoUly extending. More than . 

third of foe world s 

billion fives in abject poverty today, m 

rich and developing states alike. . 

Ln a few days, the barons of global 
finance and economic dwdflpnnt 
will eather in Hong Kong for the an 
nual meetings of the ^ or 
the International Monetary FuncLThey 
will debate policy, lament the growtir 
of poverty, and issue grave commen- 
taries on sustainable development 

They might do better to study how 
one small woman didn't bother much 
with conferences, commissions, re- 
ports or theories, and instead simply 
went out into the world and changed 
the lives of m illions. ■ - 

The writer is editor and publisher (if 
The Earth Times (New York) and au- 
thor of ", Mother India." He contrib-f- 
uied this comment to Newsweek. 




But Less Concern for Bodies Than for Souls? 


S INGAPORE — Mother Teresa’s 
death should be a time of renewal 
for her Missionaries of Charity. 

For Calcutta, the city that will 
forever be finked with the “saint of the 
gutters, ’ ' it should be a time of practical 
stock-taking. Her mission made the 
city a metaphor for deprivation, des- 
titution and degradation. 

Her successor, the Nepalese-born 
Sister Nirmala, may not find it easy to 
function in the shadow of a legend. 
Mother Teresa's white skin and aura of 
sanctity enabled her to overcome In- 
dian suspiciousness. 

Sister Nirmala ’s task may be sim- 
plified if she asks herself how much of 
an impact the Missionaries of Charity 
have actually made on pain and 
poverty, and whether their dedicated 
opposition to contraception best serves 
the needs of an India that groans under 
the weight of an additional 17 million 
mouths to feed every year. 

Many might argue that Calcutta’s 
misery, reflecting the plight of 300 mil- 
lion Indians languishing below the 
poverty line, is beyond redemption by 
any individual. But the gap between 
effort and outcome might not have been 
so wide if Mother Teresa had been as 
interested in bodies as she was in souls. 
I gained this insight into her personal 


1 By Sunanda K, Datta-Ray 

faith in 1971 when Indian television, 
Doordarshan, asked me to interview 
her. Meeting hex for a preliminary chat, 
1 asked what distinguished her from 
other social workers. She was horrified. 
She was nor doing social service. She 
was “helping the poor” because “our 
Lord” had told her to do so for her 
soul’s salvation. 

“ So the good work that you do is for 
your own sake?” I asked. “The real 
purpose is your personal salvation?” 
She did not disagree. 

Doordarshan telephoned early next 
morning to say that she had called to 
say she refused to be interviewed by 
me. Her chosen interviewer was Des- 
mond Doig, a British journalist who 
had made Calcutta his home and had 
written a book about her. 

What she had confided to me was 
then a secret only in India. Abroad, she 
did not conceal her contempt for sec- 
ular labor to relieve poverty. 

“There is always the danger that we 
may become only social workers or just 
do the work for the sake of the work,” 
she admitted to another British bio- 
grapher, Malcolm Muggeridge. 

Christopher Hitchens’s critical bi- 


ography, “The Missionary Position, ’ 
quoted her as saying: “I think it is very 
beautiful for the poor to accept their lot, 
to share it with the passion of Christ! I 
think the world is being much helped 
by the suffering of the poor people.” 

When Navin Chawla, a New Delhi 
civil servant who wrote “the author- 
ized biography,” asked her if there 
were fewer destitute as a result of her 
efforts. Mother Teresa laughingly said 
she did not know. “But those who die 
with us die in peace ... for that’s for 
eternity.” 

Struggling to escape hunger and dis- 
ease. Indians might now seek tangible 
evidence that the vast wealth that the 
Missionaries of Charity collect world- 
wide is not only for eternity. 

First-class hospitals, sparkling or- 
phanages, schools for girls, training 
centers for women and adult education 
institutions alone will prove that Sister 
Nirmala' s piety does not also thrive on 
poverty, and that her sacrifice is not 
rooted in others' suffering. That is the 
challenge for the future. 

The writer, formerly editor of The 
Statesman in Calcutta, is now an ed- 
itorial consultant with The Straits. 
Times. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


I 

{-■ 


v. 


Yes, Get Karadzic, but Hard Choices in Bosnia Will Remain 


W ASHINGTON — Prod- 
ded by the Clinton team, 
NATO has stepped up efforts to 
harass, if not arrest, Bosnian 
Serb thug-in-chief Radovan 
Karadzic. Bringing Mr. Karad- 
zic to trial for war crimes is 
surely foe right thing to do, and 
I hope it happens soon. But the 
recent focus on him has an air of 
unreality about it 
To listen to Clinton officials, 
if only Mr. Karadzic were re- 
moved the Dayton peace ac- 
cords would fall into place. 
Hardly. The fact is, arresting 
him will solve die Karadzic 
problem — the problem of an 
evil, indicted war criminal still 
operating right under NATO’s 
nose — but the Dayton problem 
is something else. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


The Dayton problem is em- 
bedded in the Dayton accords. 
Let us remember that there was 
a war in Bosnia because the 
Muslims wanted a single cen- 
tralized state and the Serbs and 
Croats wanted their own inde- 
pendent entities. 

The architects of Dayton 
stopped the war by promising all 
sides what they wanted: part one 
of Dayton was the de facto par- 
tition of Bosnia to create a cease- 
fire; part two was a promissory 
note to create a unified, mul- 
tiethnic democracy in Bosnia 
sometime in the future — 
through elections, power-shar- 
ing and a return of refugees. 

The only reason the two 


strong powers — Serbia and 
Croatia — agreed to Dayton 
was that it satisfied their war 
aims. It carved out of Bosnia 
serai-autonomous Serbian and 
Croatian regions and even gave 
them the right to align with Ser- 
bia and Croatia proper. 

The weak parly, the Bosnian 
Muslims, got the promissory 
note — that if they swallowed 
the de facto partition, one day 
these regions would be knit back 
together under a single central 
government in Sarajevo, which 
the Muslims would dominate. 

But neither the Serbian lead- 
er Slobodan Milosevic nor foe 
Croatian leader Franjo Tudj- 
man ever intended toaiiow such 


Stifling Democracy in Hong Kong 


By Robert Stone and Esther Lam 


H ONG KONG — The new 
chief executive of Hong 
Kong. Tung Chee-hwa, visits 
Washington this week to seek 
foe benediction of the American 
political establishment. 

Coming just over two months 
after Britain handed the terri- 
tory back to China, his mission 
is to convince foe United States 
that Beijing means what it says 
about its “one country, two sys- 
tems” political formula for 
Hong Kong, and that individual 
rights, civil liberties, the rule of 
law and an evolving democracy 
all continue to thrive. 

The U.S. Congress would be 
wise to listen with a degree of 
skepticism. Mr. Tung has set in 
motion a concerted effort to 
structure an administration and 
a legal system designed to neu- 
tralize Hong Kong’s democrat- 
ic political forces and place 
power firmly in foe hands of the 
business community. 

It is true that his first two 
months in office have been 
characterized by tranquillity 
and orderliness beyond most ex- 
pectations. Opinion polls reveal 
a growing confidence in foe new 
regime, replacing recent strong 
doubts. Not a single political 
dissident has been arrested. 

Arrangements have been 
made for Legislative Council 
elections in May to replace the 
group of yes-men known as the 
“provisional’’ legislature foal 
was put in place to wipe out the 
influence of foe democratic re- 
forms instituted by Britain’s last 
colonial governor, Chris Patten. 

But Mr. Tung’s new team has 
been at work behind the scenes 
to design a system both ex- 
tremely hostile to democratic 
political forces and heavily 
weighted in favor of Chinas 
Communist capitalists. 

While Hong Kong's consti- 


tution, foe Basic Law, calls for 
an eventual evolution to full de- 
mocracy, the elections planned 
for May are a giant step back- 
ward. The democratic base of 
foe electorate has been reduced 
from a previous potential of 
about 4 million eligible voters, 
most of whom were able to cast 
double ballots — one for their 
regional representative, and one 
through foe so-called functional 
constituencies that represent 
Hong Kong’s various profes- 
sions and industries. 

In foe new system, half of foe 
60 seats in the legislature will be 
chosen through a complicated 
system that will give over- 
whelming influence to about 
186,000 elite voters, mainly se- 
nior business executives. 

Twenty seats will be decided 
through direct elections and 
universal suffrage for five re- 
gional jurisdictions, reduced 
from a previous 20. But instead 
of the traditional first-past-the- 
post arrangement, with the win- 
ning candidate in each district 
getting foe seat, these legislators 
will be chosen through a system 
of proportional representation 
which effectively reduces the 
influence of Hong Kong’s pop- 
ular democratic politicians. 

This is because parties will 
gain seats based on foe per- 
centage of the votes they win. 
meaning that marginal candi- 
dates will receive places. There 
ore an array of democratic 
parties in Hong Kong. They will 
stand forelection as fragmented 
political entities. As a result, 
their overall influence will be 
diluted under this system. 

As if these provisions were 
not enough to ensure the desired 
outcome, the recently organized 
Election Committee seems de- 
signed to do just that It is a group 
of 800 select voters, including all 


foe provisional legislators, Hong 
Kong delegates io China's Na- 
tional People’s Congress and a 
selection of compliant corporate 
executives. Each will cast 10 
votes for foe remaining 10 seats 
in foe legislature. 

If there had been any doubts 
about Mr. Tung's desire to se- 
cure foe dominance of business 
interests within foe Hong Kong 
government, these were dis- 
pelled by one of foe first acts of 
his administration. This was to 
freeze a set of labor protection 
laws passed by the previous Le- 
gislative Council, which among 
other things would have given 
labor unions foe right to arbit- 
ration in disputes. 

Arguing that such labor pro- 
tection would ruin Hong Kong's 
competitiveness, foe laws were 
frozen rather than repealed to 
reduce the impact of bad press. 
They are set to be reviewed 
again next month. Meanwhile, 
behind the scenes foe secretary 
for education and manpower is 
systematically lobbying foe 
members of the provisional leg- 
islature for their repeal. 

On the surface, Mr. Tung’s 
appeal to America might seem 
convincing, particularly to those 
whose China policy favors en- 
gagement (read tradej over con- 
tainment. But the reality is that 
he is consolidating his leader- 
ship as the boss of a powerful 
business cabal bent on imposing 
strict limits on the scope of de- 
mocracy in Hong Kong while 
entrenching foe dominance of 
the economic and political elite. 

Mr. Stone is an assistant pro- 
fessor in the Department of 
Journalism and Communica- 
tion at the Chinese University of 
Hong Kong. Ms. Lam is a polit- 
ical reporter for the Hong Kong 
Economic Journal. They con- 
tributed this conunem to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


a strong Muslim-dominated 
central government. 

So, ever since Dayton, U.S. 
officials have been wrestling 
with this problem: Does foe 
United States force implemen- 
tation of foe promissory note, as 
it winked to foe Muslims it 
would do, or does it simply po- 
lice the cease-fire and Bosnia’s 
de facto partition, as NATO 
commanders and America's 
European allies prefer? 

If mere is a strategic reason to 
arrest Mr. Karadzic, it is not that 
it would open foe way to fully 
implementing Dayton, but that 
it might make it easier to man- 
age Dayton’s likely failure. 

What is foe difference be- 
tween Mr. Karadzic and foe 
Bosnian Serb president. Biljana 
Plavsic, whom Mr. Karadzic is 
trying to oust? They have both 
long advocated a separate Bos- 
nian Serb republic. They just 
disagree on the means to 
achieve it. 

Mr. Karadzic thinks it can be 
secured by scuttling Dayton, 
and Mrs. Plavsic thinks it can be 
secured by building on foe de 
facto partition in Dayton, and 
obtaining some Western aid and 
legitimacy along the way. 

But she hasn't had therapy. 
She is no more prepared than he 
is to implement Dayton's pro- 
missory, with full integration 
and refugee returns. She is pre- 
pared to accept a softer par- 
tition, even take in a few 
Muslim refugees, but without 
threatening the purity and au- 
tonomy of foe separate Serbian 
republic in Bosnia. 

Still, even that might prolong 
foe cease-fire, and grow into 
something more stable and in- 


• . . 

legrated one day. But forget thisri . 
nonsense that the- -Serbian” 
people are just confused and - ** 
misled and will all want whaL- 
the Muslims want if only the 
evil Karadzic is removed. Mr. •• 
Karadzic reflects widely held. 
views in Serbian society. 

That is why, with or without 
him, America’s real choices in 
Bosnia are still very hard: 

1 . The United States can forge 

a de jure partition, which might 
allow NATO forces to leave by 
their June 1998 deadline, but-* 
that would require redrawing? 
some of the current dividing- 
lines so that they better reflects 
populations on the ground. - ■ 

2. The United States can~ 

force full implementation of- 1 
Dayton and impose a unified,-'. 1 
multiethnic democracy in Bos^ 
nia. but that could be done only-' 
by NATO troops indefinitely 
holding such an artificial entity- 
together. r 

3. The United States can"; 
settle for the de facto partition-* 
we have now, but in that case 
some NATO troops would', 
probably have to remain indef-—' 
initefy to police foe interethnic 
boundary lines. 

4. America and its allies can L- 
just leave Bosnia in June, and/ 
let events take their course. : 

The first option is only stable 
if you redo Dayton; foe second 
option is only stable if you redo 1 
Bosnia; the third option is stable 
but offers no exit strategy; and ^ 
foe fourth option offers an exif - 
strategy but isn’t stable. 

So let’s get Mr. Karadzic. It’fj* 
the right thing to do, and oned - 
he’s gone, maybe we can focus/ 
on our real choices. 

The New York Times. ‘ 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO / 


1897: Wife Sentenced 

PARIS — Mme. Leconte, foe 
woman who last January com- 
pletely disfigured Mile. L6on- 
tine Raimbault, her husband's 
mistress, by throwing vitriol in 
her face, was yesterday [Sept. 8] 
sentenced to two years’ impris- 
onment. The infidelity of M. Le- 
conte, says the Liberie, caused 
frequent scenes with his wife. 
Mme. Leconte had an interview 
with Mile. Raimbault, who 
promised to discontinue the li- 
aison. This was not done, and it 
was then that Mme. Leconte 
committed foe assault for which 
she has been sentenced. 

1922: Author’s Disgust 

NEW YORK -“Prohibition 

denies all foe results of culture ” 

said Mr. Cosmo Hamilton y«- 
lerday [Sept 8J when seen at the 
Pans hotel where the noted au- 
thor is stopping for a few days. 
“It is really discouraging and 


. - f 

humiliating to be told that all 
that education has been sup- * 
posed to be bringing about"* 
through centuries, such things as 
self-control and a knowledge of 
how to live, has been a failure^ 
that you are all ipso facto drunk- ‘ 
ards, and you have got to have: 
drink taken away from you by'., 
law. It makes primevals of us/ V 

1947: Stem Gang Foiled/; 

NEW YORK — Reginald G. M. 
Gilbert, a former combat fighters 
pilot from Sl Louis, was of-*;: 
ficially hailed by French police/ 
as foe “hero” who risked his life 
foiling a Stem gang plot to bomb 
London by air. At the same time - 1 
Rabbi Baruch Korff, alleged ! 
ringleader, faced the equivalent ; 
of an American grand jury hear- i 
ing on formal charges of “illegal ! 
possession of explosives and 1 
war weapons” as well as “pos-; ; 
sessions of foreign-inspired' \ 
tracts prejudicial to the (French), * 
national interest.” ; 



INTERN ATI 




SEPTEMBERS^ 1997 


PAGES' 


EVTERIVATI0NA1. HERALP TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


PAGE 11 


OPINION /LETTERS 


The Africa Connection: Should Blacks Give It Up? 


ASHESGTON — Jj m 


Sleeper's ancestors 
«ere Lithuanian Jews, a fact 
that prompts him to raise this 
uperesting question: Why 
should black Americans feel 
sflch a primal connection to 
Africa when he has no par- 
ticular interest in Lithuania'’ 
■/'If I went back to 
Lithuania to be with my fel- 
Ww white people,” he said 
when l called to talk to him 
about his controversial 


By William Raspberry 


new 


book. “Liberal Racism," 
"I’d find the Roman Cath- 
olics who expelled my Jewish 
tribe. If blacks went back to 
Africa, they’d encounter the 
same murderous ethnic rival- 
ries that have beset Europe. 
My question is, why should 
blacks feel so much more an 
automatic tie to Africa than J 
do to Lithuania 1 ?" 

Perhaps, he offers, it's be- 


cause, unlike his ancestors, 
who came to America seek- 
ing haven, the ancestors of 
black Americans were wrest- 
ed from their homeland ami 
sold into slavery. “But even 
that's interesting,” he adds. 
"After all, half of all the 
blacks who came over here 
were sold by other Africans, 
not captured by whites." 

Mr. Sleeper says his in ten- 


' Mum fur 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


More on Diana 


Hit'fii ; W in Ilf 


uni 




V 


- :'S\ 


; Regarding “These Days. 
You Don't Haw to Be 
Churchill to Become Myth" 
(Opinion, Sept. 6) by Charles 
Krauthammer: 

i Mr. Krauthammer ought to 
have seen that Diana's ex- 
ample to women was part of 
her humanity. The young 
woman who broke royal pro- 
tocol and questioned gen- 
era! practice by simply" of- 
fering her ungloved hand to 
aii AIDS victim was far 
more than a “fashion plate 
with a few charitable 
causes" who "stuck it" to 
the royals. 

"Diana had genuine respect 
for others, regardless of rank, 
and as she matured she de- 
veloped compassion for the 
poor, the sick and the dying. 
She was concerned to instill 
these qualities in her sons. 
Both qualities deeply touched 
life public and earned her its 
admiration. 

The world mourns not just 
a beautiful celebrity but an 
unusual human being who 
was truly concerned about or- 
dinary people. 

JANET SAVIN. 

Paris. 


Regarding “The Fault Lies 
With the Man in the Back Seat 
of the Mercedes ” ( Opinion . 
Sept. 4) by William Safin?: 

For Mr, Safire to say that 
Dodi al Fayed was responsible 
for the death of Diana, Prin- 
cess of Wales, is unfair and 
insensitive — especially when 
the worid is still mourning the 
queen of hearts and more facts 
are emerging about the events 
of that fateful night 

GBENGA OYEBODE 
Lagos, Nigeria. 


Diana’s death brought to 
the surface the animosity be- 
tween theroyalty and its * 'sub- 
jects" — an antagonism that 
has been brewing for a while, 
creating an increasing chasm 
between the older and younger 
generations in Britain. 


At the moment, Diana's 
frivolous side is irrelevant and 
her resentful, bitter television 
interview seems like it never 
took place. 

What we are witnessing is a 
revolution — not a revolution 
of barricades or slogans but a 
civil revolution taking place 
in one of the most civuized 
countries on earth. 

The editor of a major Lon- 
don newspaper rightly said 
that the country has become 
less deferential and more 
emotional and pluralistic. Ex- 
tremely important is the ex- 
istence of a leadership that can 
take the pulse of the nation 
and understand its clamor for 
more accessibility and open- 
ness from the royal family. 

JOAQUIN GODOY. 

Bath, England. 


tion in raising his “connec- 
tion" question is not to dwell 
on slavery or to paint a neg- 
ative picture of Africa. 
“What I'm trying to convey 
is that despite the unspeak- 
able horror of how you came 
to be in America, your destiny 
is irreversibly here. That’s 
where you are, and the Africa 
connection is just too slender 
a reed on which to base your 
selfhood.” 

He acknowledges, when 1 
point it out, this difference 
between Lithuanian Jews and 
African Americans: Both 
may have been badly treated 
in their homelands, but one 
has found acceptance in 
America as fully American, 
while the other... 

And that brings him to the 
critical point of bis book — 
not his excoriation of the 
political left as racist in its 
insistence on seeing blacks as 
“objects of exalted moral 
fantasy or exotic interest,'' 
nor in his denunciation of con- 
servatives as insufficiently in- 
terested in solving the prob- 
lems of race, but this: 

There will be no racial 
justice until blacks are willing 
to acknowledge — and whites, 
at last, to understand — that 
the descendants of slaves are 
in some ways the most 
“American" of all Precisely 
because America’s is a society 
which blacks didn't choose to 
join and cannot hope to dom- 
inate, yet cannot really leave, 
they have much more at stake 
in society's fulfilling its 
premises than most of the rest 
of us Americans comprehend. 

But wait The histoty of 
blacks in America — going 
back even before Emanci- 
pation — is imbued with the 
hope that the society would 
somehow muster the decency 
to fulfill its noble premises. It 
is tiie nonfulfillment that ac- 
counts for the yearning for 
Africa that Mr. Sleeper finds 
so puzzling. Black Americans 
are. in a sense, like bar mag- 
nets: attracted to Africa in the 
same degree to which they 
feel themselves repulsed by 
America. 

“I don’t dispute any of 
that," says Mr. Sleeper, a 
former political columnist 
(New York Daily News) and 
editorialist (Newsday). "I 
note only two things: that a lot 
of wise black writers, from 
James Baldwin to Harold 


Cruse to Stanley Crouch, 
have pointed out the tenuous- 
ness of the Africa connection 
and that most blacks I’ve 
talked to and read would like 
their skin color to count for 
less in the political and eco- 
nomic life of ibis country. 

‘To not saying you can't 
be proud of your roots, or even 
have Afrocentric schools, if 


African 
Americans are 
urged to see 
themselves as just 
Americans . 


that's what you want And 
I'm not talking about a uni- 
lateral disarmament that re- 
quires blacks to forget race 
before whites do so. What I'm 
really saying is that we can 
have a two-tiered civic mod- 
el. Each of us may be raised in 
a particular ethnic or religious 
subculture but each of us also 
transcends it at times — when 
we enter a jury room or a 
workplace, for instance — to 
join in a larger American 
civic culture and identity that 
is thick enough to live on its 
own, evolving terms." 

A lot of us Americans 
would agree with Mr. Sleeper 
that, if you scratch through 
the surface of skin color, you 
find a good deal of common 
morality — mostly based on 
the primacy of individual 
character and integrity. At 
this level, there is a surprising 
consonance among West Vir- 
ginia coal miners, Western 
New England Yankees and 
black Baptists. 

Mr. Sleeper has a sugges- 
tion. Instead of each of us 
endlessly pointing out how 
the others have failed to live 
up to their supposedly deeply 
held moral principles, why 
don’t we build upon the sim- 
ilarity of those principles and 
bold one another to account? 

"We should be working 
overtime on those common 
bonds, especially as this 
country becomes more eth- 
nically diverse," he says. "If 
we do. we could resume the 
moral anger at discrimination 
and develop the wherewithal 
to pursue political and eco- 
nomic and civic justice.” 

The Washington Post. 


TV Allows the Global Village 
To Mourn Diana Together 


By Tom Shales 


ASWNGTON —-If the whole world 


was watching, then the whole world 
was probably weeping, too. The globally 
televised funeral of Diana. Princess of 
Wales, could well rank as the most widely 
seen event in history — proving perhaps 
that nothing unites the world quite so ef- 
fectively as grief. 

Cameras showed people 1 mourning in 
Hong Kong, in Canada, in Paris and 
throughout the United States, a gathering 
via satellite in honor and memory of an 
internationally popular figure. Even watch- 
ing at home, one felt like a participant in a 
story that now had achieved painful but 
definitive closure. Diana lived most of her 
adult life in the public eye, the heroine of a 
great nonfiction novel that now drew to a 
dramatic close. 

And what a close — a combination of 
pageantry and intimacy, of grandiose spec- 
tacle and the close-ups of those who 
mourned her, whether similarly famous or 
merely part of the ever-peeping public. 

All the American broadcast networks 
offered extensive coverage Saturday, with 


MEANWHILE 


big-name anchors like Dan Rather, Peter 
Jennings and Tom Brokaw signing 'on at 4 
A.M. or earlier to report on events from 
London. 

The British showed their customary 
aplomb at staging massive ceremonial oc- 
casions, and the American networks showed 
admirable and entirely uncharacteristic re- 
straint in their approach, at least during the 
service from Westminster Abbey. 

Pictures from inside the abbey, supplied 
by the BBC and ITN to American networks, 
were stunning, and many of the images 
inside and outside immensely poignant — 
especially a card inscribed simply 
“Mummy” that rested among white 
flowers at the head of the casket This 
gesture from William and Harry, the sons of 
Diana, was in its way more moving than all 
the shots of tearful mourners huddled out- 
side the church. 

The dignified ceremony and mostly dig- 
nified coverage were the climax of a week of 
wallowing by the American networks that 
seemed excessive and often snide, with lots 


of wild speculation about bow the popularity 
ia was somehow going to destroy the 


of Diana was somehow going 
British monarchy, if not what was left of the 
empire itself. Reporters appeared gleeful in 
passing along each new criticism of the royal 
family, including the preposterous idea that 
they should parade their grief in public as a 
way of somehow satisfying their critics. 

Reporters and commentators also tried to 
outdo one another in characterizing Diana 


as a Cinderella-like working-class waif 
with whom the lowly masses could identify, 
when in fact she was bom into one of 
England's oldest aristocratic families. 

Over and over, the British were cas- 
tigated, essentially for having been insuf- 
ficiently Americanized and for not follow- 
ing the new rules of emotional 
exhibitionism. When the queen made a tele- 
vised speech Friday that quieted some of the 
clamor, reporters scoured the streets to find 
people who felt that this, too, was an in- 
sufficient display. Apparently nothing less 
than uncontrollable weeping and the tend- 
ing of garments would do. 

Dan Ratber’s voice broke last Sunday 
when he concluded the special edition of 
“60 Minutes" devoted to Diana’s death, 
and he appeared to be choking up again as 
he read closing comments Saturday morn- 
ing in London, just before signing off. 

Among them: 

"It is the nature of modem life that, by the 
time a great event has arrived, there is 
almost nothing left to be said about it ... 
What any American must say who has been 
here the past week is this: The great British 
people, who are more than allies to America, 
have been profoundly touched by the loss of 
their princess. Touched — and changed." 

At least these remarks seemed reasonable 
and not as hyperbolic as much of the com- 
mentary that aired on the networks during 
the days between the fatal car accident and 
the funeral. The race was to see who could 
attach the raostextravagant social and polit- 
ical significance to the princess* death. 

The simple point of tiie whole amazing 
international ordeal may be that the entire 
world felt it needed a good ciy, and the 
ceremony and its coverage were certainly 
designed to inspire one. As Elton John sang 
a rewritten version of “Candle in the Wind," 
the networks tried to turn his song into a 
music video, with misty shots of a happy 
Diana as people want to remember her. 

One might have wondered, as one 
watched, and watched and watched, what 
alien beings from other worlds might have 
thought of the spectacle if they were watch- 
ing, too. They might find it bizarre and 
outlandish. Or they might understand that 
someone much loved on ner home planet had 
died and this is the way we global villagers 
convene, via television and satellite hook- 
ups, to demonstrate grief and affection. 

It is impressive, and encouraging, that so 
many millions could stop and watch and 
listen in honor and memory of someone 
most of them had never met Certainly it's 
one of the finer purposes to which the 
much-maligned and much-abused medium 
of television could ever be put. 

The Washington Post. 


t. :• •<. 
V*.. . 


U\ 




<* 


-As many search for ans- 
wers. driven by sorrow and 
loss, a huge backlash of anger 
is being poured upon a small, 
aggressive group of photo- 
graphers called the papa- 
razzi. But before we, as a 
society, condemn this group, 
let's remember who really 
pays their salaries: those in- 
dividuals who purchase the 
tabloids. 

Our curiosity and insati- 
able appetite foy new, unique 
or private information is the 
fuel that motivates this pack 
o£ wolves. 

.Our personal choices pro- 
foundly affect this place we 
call home. 

:The next time you buy a 
tabloid, remember that by so 
doing you are fueling the fire. 
Make sure i: is the fire you 
want to fueL 

STEVE and SU ZANNE 

; DOUCETTE. 

Carlsbad. California. 



***■- 1 

■ 

£ "■ 


■ > 


.U: 


;How many more examples 
do we need to finally prove 

that excessive automobile 
speeds loll? Why must our 
automobiles go over 70 miles 
pqr hour? 

Except for ambulances, 
fire engines, police cars and 
other similar vehicles, I can 
t hink of no reason why we 
should allow manufacturers 
to build cars that go faster and 
faster. , . 

.Limiting vehicle speed 
would be a far more direct 
way of reducing deaths than 
airbags, for example. 

'Forcible control of auto 
speed is a win-win situation. 

might decrease gasoline 
sales, it would certainly re- 
duce environmental pollu- 
tion. Most important, it would 
save lives. . M 

.Unless someone ha* a j**: 
ter and more direct ay 
saving lives, we should 
started today. 

henry u straoe. 

Theouie surMer. France. 


Subscribe and SAVE 
up to 53% off 
tne cover price. 

Also available: 

PAY MONTHLY 
by easy, low cost, 
direct debit. 


HAND DELIVERY IN 
CENTRAL LONDON & PARTS 
OF THE SOUTH EAST? 

•Momby through Friday outride Central London. Postal subscrip- 
tions are available throughout the UK on the day after publication. 

- ** 



For more information about easy ordering 
and availability of hand deJnrery call our 
Subscriber Customer Service Unit: 

Toll free: 0800 895 965 or Fax:(17l) 140 34 17. 


payment by monthly direct debit 


□yes I'd like to subscribe and have my bank account 
monthly by £17. Please start my subscription 
and send me a bank form to arrange my payment. 


PAYMENT BY CHECK OR CREDIT CARD 


□YES I’d like to subscribe and pay for the following term; 

1 □ 12 months (+ 2 months free): £210 

□ subscription: £22 

(Saving off met price 53%) 

! QMy check is enclosed (payable to the IHT) 

□SLs^.gAcc^ g*£^rCart 
Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at 
| current exchange rates. 

Cart N". ***— 


mure: — — ~ . 

*lease start delivery and send invoice. 


Family Name:. 

first Name: 


JobTW 


Mailing Address: QHome □ Business. 


Qry/Code:, 
Tefc. 


.Fax:. 


E-Mail Address. 


YourVAT N* (Business orders on W BHTW> . M , 7WBM | , ^ 


□ hotel 

□ other 


tiKia 




**■ 


IT 

17 E-Mail: subs@tht. 03 m 


ject to editing. Vecamiot^ 

responsible for the return J 

Unsolicited manuscripts. 




:+33 1 41 SL.CB1CAS 


Tel: +33 l thE AMERICAS 
^ ASIA 

, , £*=*0*852 29 22 1 1 99 

ab+B52 29j 


Tel 



Hotel Inter-Continental Singapore 


tke keart of tke city 


You’re always in 

d at tke soul of tke culture 


an 


One World., One Hotel. 
Uniquely InterContinental. 


M 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 


HOTELS. AND RESORTS 


asia pacific 

BALI 

BANGKOK 

BROOME * 

CHENGDU 

COLOMBO 

JAKARTA 

KUALA LUMPUR 

MANILA 

NEW DELHI 

PHNOM PENH 

QINGDAO 

SEOUL 

SHENZHEN* 

SINGAPORE 

SYDNEY 

7AJPB 

TOKYO 

YOKOHAMA 

EUROPE 

AMSTERDAM 

ATHENS 

BARCELONA 

BELGRADE 

BERLIN 

BRATISLAVA* 

BRUSSELS 

BUCHAREST 

BUDAPEST 

CANNES 

CRACOW* 

EDINBURGH 

FRANKFURT 

GENEVA 
THE HAGUE 

Hamburg 

HANNOVER* 

HELSINKI 

ISTANBUL 

LEIPZIG 

LISBON 

LJUBLJANA 

LONDON 

LUXEMBOURG 

MADRID 

MONTREUX 

MOSCOW 

MUNICH* 

NICOSIA* 

PARIS 

PRAGUE 

ROME 

STUTTGART 

TASHKENT 

VIENNA 

WARSAW 

ZAGREB 

ZURICH 

AMERICAS 

BOGOTA 

BUENOS AIRES 

CALI 

CANCUN 

CARACAS 

CARTAGENA 

CHICAGO 

CIUDAD GUAY ANA 

COZUMEL 

GUADALAJARA 

DCTAPA 

LOS ANGELES 

LOSCABQS 

MANAGUA 

MARACAIBO 

MEDKJUN 

Mexico erry 

MIAMI 

MONTREAL 

NEW ORLEANS 

NEW YORK 

PANAMA Cm 1 

PUERTO VALLAKl* 

WO Dfi JANEIRO 
RIO NEGRO* 

SAN FRANCISCO 
SANTO DOMINGO 
5AOBWLO 
TORONTO 
Valencia 
WASHINGTON, D C. 

middle East 

ABHA 

ABU DHABI 

ALAIN 

ALJUBAIL 

AMMAN 

BAHRAIN 

BEIRUT 

CAIRO 

DUBAI 

KUKGHADA 

JEDDAH 

MAKKAH 

MUSCAT 

PETSA* 

RIYADH 

SMARM EL SHEIKH 

TAIF 

APtUCA 

ABIDJAN 

CAPETOWN 

DURBAN 

JOHANNESBURG 

KINSHASA 

KRUGER NATIONAL PARK 
LUSAKA 
NAIROBI 
VICTORIA FALLS 


www.mtexconti.com 


■PORUM HOTEL 


J 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 
PAGE 12 


■o 



Future Chic: New Kids on the Block 


By Suzy Menkes 

InunwUontd HemlJ Tribune 




MAR C JACOBS 

Louis Vuitton 

Julia Roberts was tbe first customer 
to walk through the door of Marc Jac- 
obs’s New York store. Now. bow cool is 
that? 

Jacobs, 35, is known for deluxe hip, 
which is expected to be his take on 
clothes for Louis Vuitton. The com- 
pany, which is part of the LVMH (Moet 
Hennessy- Louts Vuitton) luxury em- 
pire, has asked Jacobs, an American, to 
define a clothing image that will reflect 
the craftsmanship ana quality of its fa- 
mous leather goods andluggage. 

At the same time, LVMH invested in 
Jacobs's company, hence the new Man- 
hattan boutique, which officially 
opened in SoHo on Wednesday. In the 
modernist space, its furniture — de- 
signed by Christian Liaigre of France — 
makes an appropriate Franco- American 
blend. 

“I spend half my time in Paris, al- 
though 1 don’t find it as stimulating as 
being in New York," says Jacobs, 
whose ultrasimple sportswear in fine 
fabrics has become his trademark. That 
was after he gave up on grunge, which 
reflected the anti-fashion, recycling, 
flea-market spirit of the early 1990s but 
proved a commercial flop and put Jac- 
obs out of business. 

“Everyone has different ideas about 
what I will be doing for Vuitton,” Jac- 
obs says. “I am trying to define what the 
fashion spirit is — but in the end it is just 
another fashion collection.’ ' 


ANDREW ON 

Balmain 

“European chic. American comfort, 
Chinese depth.” says Andrew Gn to 
describe his design spirit The stream- 
lined clothes he has produced under his 
own label since 1993 show close at- 
tention to fabric and detail and reflect 
cross-cultural currents. 

He was bom in Singapore, majored in 
fashion design at St Martin's in Lon- 
don, did a semester at Parsons in New 
York and then studied at the Domus 
Academy in Milan. Georgina 
Brandolini. the director of Balmain, 
hired Gn in June to design ready-to- 
wear in tandem with Oscar de la Renta’s 
haute couture. 

“ f pay a lot of attention to cut and do 
research on the form of garments and 
fabrics.’* says Gn. “It is easy to create a 
garment which looks outrageous. The 
most difficult thing is to do something 
extremely simple." 

A casual tunic and pants in a famous 
Cecil Beaton photograph from Bal- 
main's glory days was the starting point 
of the collection he will show in Oc- 
tober. Gn wants to use “tire images and 
ambience of the house itself — it s all in 
the mix." 

How does he rate his training? Gn 
appreciated the way that SL Martin’s 
"made you love clothes"; that Parsons 
made him face fashion realities: that Italy 
“puts your two feel on the ground.” 

“But London really teaches you how 
to dream,” he says. 



STELLA MCCARTNEY 

Chloe 

A Union Jack is furled by the window 
of the Chloe studio on the Faubourg 
Saint Honore. Stella McCartney, 25, 
“kid of* (as she puts it) Beatle Paul, has 
taken over as chief designer from Karl 
Lagerfeld in a dramatic generational 
change. 

A child of the 1970s, whose Amer- 
ican mother, Linda, she describes as 
“the ultimate grunge chick,” is known 
for flimsy, whimsy, nicely crafted 
dressmaking contrasted with classic 
tailoring. That is a blend of her fashion 
background and interests: an appren- 
ticeship with a Savile Row men's tailor 
after training at Sl Martin's College of 
Art. and a passionate interest in flea- 
market domes, bringing details like 
glass buttons and French seams. 

Her first collection for Chloe — a 
French house known for fluid femin- 
inity — will be presented in October and 
is inspired by a nightgown found on an 
antique stall The style has mostly 
evolved from previous collections un- 
der her own label. 

“My clothes are frocks for chicks — 
nothing more than clothes, but for wom- 
en aware of their sexuality," says Mc- 
Cartney. who was wearing a lace- 
trimmed tank top under a beige pantsuit 
worn with sneakers. 

She describes Sl Martin's — whose 
alumni seem to be taking over the Paris 
fashion world — as a place with a 
“good vibe” that “brings out the crazi- 
ness” and tbe competitiveness. Mc- 
Cartney’s response was to get her su- 
permodel friends to show her graduate 
collection and get her father to write the 
music. 

“It’s a great perk being a 'kid of.’ but 
I’m not living off that,” she says. “And 
in a work situation, it can be quite a 
drawback." 



NARCISO RODRIGUEZ 

Loewe 

When Narciso Rodriguez picks up 
the “Designer of the Year” award from 
the Hispanic Society in Washington this 
month, the Cuban-American designer 
will be receiving recognition of his rast- 
forward trajectory. 

Since he designed Carolyn Bessette 
Kennedy’s slip of a wedding dress last 
year, Rodriguez, 36, was briefly die 
design director of Cerruti, but he will 
now launch his own label in Italy with a 
show in Milan in October. He has also 
been named design director of Loewe, 
the Spanish leather goods company 
owned by LVMH (Moet Hennessy- 
Louis Vuitton.), where he appreciates 
the “inspirational wealth” of a history 
that goes back to 1846. 

“My clothes are sensuous, tailored 
and feminine — but cut in a masculine 
way," says Rodriguez. “My love is to 
fit and tailor.” 

A graduate of Parsons School of 
Design in New York, where Isaac 
Mizrahi was a classmate. Rodriguez 
worked for Anne Klein and Calvin 
Klein. Now he commutes between 
Madrid, where Loewe is based, Paris, 
Milan and New York “which is my 
energy and where I recharge.” 

Grandparents from the Spanish Ca- 
nary islands and Cuban-American par- 
ents give him the right pedigree for 
Loewe. which was founded in Madrid. 
Rodriguez, who likes flamenco, says 
that a Latin sensibility is already part of 
his personality; he also reads Heming- 
way and is at ease in the States. 

“There is a very practical side to 
designing in the United States,” says 
Rodriguez. “Working at Calvin Klein 
taught me merchandising experience; in 
Italy I have learned about manufac- 
turing a collection; but here in Paris it is 
the romance of fashion. ’ ’ • 



From the 

sketchpad of Alber 
ElbazforGuy 
Laroche, a new 
fashion spirit. 





PARIS 

31, Avenue Montaigne 

Pour tout renseignement: 
Max Mara 5.A. - Paris 
Tel. 1 /49 52 1614 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Fruit ot me 
Loom rival 
• Where boys will 
be boys 

10 Frost 

14 Word with time 
or rights. 


18 Indian music 
ic Some mutual 
tundaccts 
17 Ingratiate 
oneself, e.g. 
1C Oust busters, 
lor short 
20 Film critic 
Pauline 


MEDITERRANEAN 

YACHT MOORINGS 

For Sale 


Contact 
Marco Recchla 
COGEMAD 
Tel.: 33 4-93 633-633 
Fax: 33 4-93 633-634 


*« Cuckoo bird 
22 Style 

2 > Original state 
27 'Virginia Wooir 
dramatist 
2» 1955 children's 
heroine 
20 Ogle 

22 Charged 
particle 
33 Mail carriers 
have them: 
Abbr. 

77 With 6-Down, 
operator ole 
63-Down 

3C Auction offering 
40 Butterfly 
catcher 

42 Pttcherful. 
maybe 

43 Droops 

49 POSt-W.W. il 
grp. 

“Shucks!" 
4CLaScala 
productions 
as Shark watchers' 
protectors 
sa Sherlock 
Holmes player 
17 Way in 

BS Sale item 
marking: Abbr. 

9C Big exam 
•3 Pulitzer writer 
James 
•3 Words of 
wisdom 
•4 “Twittering 

Machine” artist 
•rGutfwarmissHe 

MAI ( firm j 

••Does lawn work 
tc Summer shins 
n Lock of hair 


DOWN 

1 “Shucks!* 

• Water color 
•Famed trial 


venue 

4 Before now 
SUkeWHeE. 
Coyote 

s See 37 -Across 
7 Italian cheese 

or meat dish 

s Give it pry) 

• Rooftop 

10 Rosie the 

11 Khomeini, for 
one 

12 Computer 
shortcut 

is German 
Pittsburgh 
M The 2% of 2% 


today 
24 Patricia of "HucT 

aa Twelve 

2C Ate fondly 
27 Word of 
resignation 
aa "Star Wars' 
princess 

21 Radio station 
need 

m Cousin of an 
orange 

35 Peace NobeUst 
WSaeef 

sc Places for props 
3* “Gone With Ibe 
Wind* setting 
4i Guacamote's 
place 
44 Evening 
get-togethers 
••Rundown feeing 
4C Hinted ne« 
door, e.g. 

so Thickness 
51 Tears up 
•3 Prominent 
toucan features 
54 The *A* of 
WASP 

M Riding horse 
sc Stagewear for 
Madonna 

••Plays the part 
•i Some popular 
jeans 

89 See 37-Across. 


>0 Heur York tinm/Edfad by fTiU Short*; 


Solution to Puzzle of Sept. 8 


•f Serve like 
Sampras, e g. 
•8 Banned 
pesticide 


ALBER ELBAZ 

Guy Laroche 

Of all French fashion’s new arrivals, 
the exuberant Alber Elbaz. 36, has had 
the most impressive apprenticeship — 
and has already shown his first col- 
lection for Guy Laroche. 

Seven years with Geoffrey Beene 
have given Elbaz the technique, as well 
as the flavor, of high fashion. This 
graduate of Shenkar College in Israel 
can turn out a bias-cut dress" with only a 


ESCAQA 

in Paris 

NEW COLLECTION 
FALL-WINTER 

1997 

Marie-Maitine 

8, rue de Sevres. 

Parts 6th 

Tel: 01 42 22 18 44 


single seam, and imaginative sketches 
fan out across the flea-market table in 
the Laroche studio. 

“I don’t do clothes for club girls, I 
want my clothes to be modem. But for 
women to stand in front of the mirror 
and say ’beautiful,’ ” says Elbaz, whose 
North African background, Israeli up- 
bringing and New York experience 
make bun a global fashion citizen. 

Careful cutting with an impish touch 
was the spirit of his first collection for 
Guy Laroche, where be needs to create 
an image for the house without fright- 
ening off establishment clients. Or, as 
be puts it: “I couldn’tcome in overnight 
and change everything from beige 
boucle to black vinyl.” 

For his new collection, he feels in- 
spired by the “crispness of a tailored 
shirt” tamed into a fresh evening gown 
and takes his inspiration from the idea of 
Sl Moritz as a spring spa resort, where, 
like his fashion, the concept is to “make 
women younger without any surgery." 

"Clothes are something you touch 
and which touch you,” he says, dis- 
missing the idea of so-called “sexy" 


clothes or executive dressing . He wants 
his woman to be able to eat a meal aq^ 
still feel comfortable. He says, “I make 
clothes, not costumes. If I wanted to do 
costume. I’d work for the ballet." 


intebkaxU 






PAGES' 


rt' <-f | 


”'u lh 


r,r 5il» 

% 


KYOCERA SHOOTS 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Asians Seek 
Ways to Lift 



Currencies 


Manila Issues Threats , 

«|W/| -ST P\ 

^And Thais Alter Rules 

cr/w . 

<? fin: ■ 




. . ■ ‘ '■"■ \ . . 

■ . V • .V • ' 


• 2 :- 

5? 



ji 




, ' iKiisad 


i ^VtotoOurSupFniitDttyuk-in 

L BANGKOK — Thailand and Malay 
pia planned new measures Monday 
aimed at stabilizing their currencies, 
tvniJe monetary authorities in the Phil- 
ippines cal led for a police crackdown on 
people who eroded public confidence 
pn the financial system, 
i In Bangkok, Finance Minister Than- 
png Bidaya and the central bank gov- 
ernor, Chaiyawat Wibulsawasdi, cur the 
maximum doliar-holding period for ex- 
porters to 120 days from 180 days and 
lowered the reserve requirements for 
commercial banks to 6 percent from 7 
percent. 

, The proposals, to be submined to the 
niU cabinet Tuesday, are aimed at im- 
proving market liquidity. 

' i J? Malaysia, rhe central bank stepped 
It Up its push for mergers in the banking 
and insurance industries at a meeting 
>vith executives. Bank Negara unveiled 
new breaks for major or so-called tier 
one hanks and urged banks planning 
Initial public offers to merge before 
£oing public. 

. In the Philippines, the central hank 
intervened heavily in foreign-exchange 
markets to support the peso while call- 
ing for police to help track down people 
who were spreading “lies'* that banks 
were in trouble before such talk could 
Irigger a run on deposits. 

• “it is unfortunate," said Gabriel 
Singson, the central bank governor, 
"that such lies are being spread, which 
tan be self-fulfilling if enough people 
are gullible enough to believe them." 

J While such measures appeared to 
have the desired effect of stabilizing 
currencies in the region Monday, the 
} , threats against naysayers have sent 
A many analysts under cover. 

! “We've been fold to keep a low profile 
in the media for now,” a maricet econ- 
omist at a U.S. investment bank said. 

• “I’d rather not comment for the time 
being," another regional economist 
said when asked to comment on the. 
JVIalaysian economy. "It's getting too' 
Sensitive." 

L In recent weeks, other Southeast Asian 
countries have lashed out at market ana- 
lysts and foreign fund managers, saying 
{lire pronouncements from the invest- 
ment community had helped drive down 
currencies and stocks across the region. 

'■ Leaders have launched a range of 
Initiatives to salvage their economies 
since July 2, when Thailand’s decision to 
lei the baht float freely against the dollar 
triggered a regionwide currency crisis. 

' -Some of those are paying off: The 
benchmark stock index in Kuala Lum- 
pur rose 7.07 percent Monday, while the 
tdrres ponding index in Bangkok gained 
£9 percent 

LV But doubts about the future and anger 
fryer what had led to the financial mess 
hjmained. 

-» in Thailand, opposition lawmakers 
^ formally sought to censure Prime Min- 
ister Chavalit Yongchaiyudh for his 
handling of the ailing economy, and 
their no-confidence morion against him 
js to be debated Sept 24 and 25. 

; The censure motion, signed by lead- 
ers of four opposition parties, said it was 
} -obvious" that Mr. Chavalit's admin- 
istration had caused unprecedented and 
crucial damage to Thailand and its ccon- 
qitiy. It accused him of running a con- 
flfeed administration, one irresponsible 
ffiboth words and deeds. 

[AFP, Bloomberg , Reuters. A r) 







£> - - -■ 


<Xto Zkw 


Paris’s Economic Model 
Looks to 19th Century 


P ARIS — In an eerie echo of himself even more squarely in this 
past strife, French anti-cler- tradition by promising the French 
ical demonstrators took to the they can avoid change by slowing 
streets last month to protest the pace of privatization, mainrain- 
the visit of Pope John Paul n to Paris, ing rhe welfare state, subsidizing 
It was as if the 19ih century were not new jobs and reducing the work- 
yet over. And in some ways, for the week. 

French, if isn't. In France, one of the Like the 19th century revolution- 
world's most history-conscious na- aries who took to the barricades to 
tions, the past shapes the present more defend what they saw as acquired 
than almost anywhere else. social and economic rights, today it is 

The country’s current rearguard re- the left that is most resistant ro 
sistance to economic globalization is change. 

strikingly similar to its efforts to France’s historical reluctance to 
evade the consequences of industri- adapt to the international economy 
alization in an earlier age. helped to delay the country’s indus- 

S tripped of its propaganda wrap- trialization for a century and half, 
ping, the “new" economic Some say that was not so 

model" that Lionel Jospin's bad — '* P reserved 11111 rural 

leftist government claims to ahead way of life, and France now 

be pioneering for the 21st has a higher income per 

century looks like the same commentary head than Britain, which in- 


By Reginald Dale 

ImernuiUmul Hertihl Tribune 


“social cohesion." 

Mr. Jospin, leader of a Socialist- 
Communist coalition, has placed 
himself even more squarely in this 
tradition by promising the French 
they can avoid change by slowing 
the pace of privatization, maintain- 
ing the welfare state, subsidizing 
new jobs and reducing the work- 
week. 

Like the 19th century revolution- 
aries who took to the barricades to 
defend what they saw as acquired 
social and economic rights, today it is 
the left that is most resistant id 
change. 

France’s historical reluctance to 
adapt to the international economy 


helped to delay the country's indus- 
trialization for a century and half. 

Some say that was not so 

1||G bad — it preserved the rural 
L D way of life, and France now 
— has a higher income per 


old model with which 
France has consistently tried ro resist 
economic change for much of the last 
200 years. 

Mr. Jospin’s program of high taxes 
and public spending, government 
make-work projects and resistance to 
market forces is rooted deep in the 
19th century — when France chose 
the path of protectionism and state 
intervention, while its Anglo-Saxon 
rivals opted for economic liberalism 
and free trade. 

In his recent book, “France, 
1814-1914," the historian Robert 
Tombs writes that through most of 
the 19th century, “The State con- 
sistently aimed at protecting the 
social order by cushioning it 
against economic shocks; it 
favored established interests, large 
and small, against change, risk and 
disorder." 

The same could be said about 
vintuaily.eveiy French government 
of recent years. The obsession of 
19th century France with "order" 
in an age of revolutions is the direct 
antecedent of President Jacques 
Chirac’s fear of "social fracture" 
today. 

Like their 19th century forbears, 
modem French governments of both 
right and left have yielded to vested 
interests — truck drivers, railroad and 
airline workers and farmers, to name 
but a few — rather than jeopardize 


dustrialized faster. 

That analysis does not take account 
of the three horrendous wars with 
Germany that France lost, or nearly 
lost, partly because of its industrial 
weakness. 

But the main point is that times 
have changed. France is now com- 
mitted to free trade, not to mention 
economic and monetary union, with 
its European neighbors. 

In that Europe, the role at which 
France has traditionally excelled — 
being a great state — is increasingly 
obsolete. Nobody wants to challenge 
France's title as the tax and spending 
champion of the leading industrial 
nations. 

On the contrary, everyone else is 
looking to the private sector as the 
main source of jobs and economic 
growth. 

Mr. Jospin may get a short re- 
prieve. The economic recovery now 
under way will nudge down the coun- 
try’s horrific unemployment rate and 
help to mask its huge underlying 
structural problems. 

Some say he will use that reprieve 
to introduce cautious reforms — 
and that the labor unions will trust a 
Socialist government. But already 
some unions are threatening strikes 
that would make change more dif- 
ficult. and Mr. Jospin still looks 
more in tune with the last century 
than the next one. 


World’s Tallest Tower Is Planned for Melbourne 


Bloomberg News 

i MELBOURNE — An Australian 
jjbup plans to build the world’s tallest 
lower in Melbourne as part of a 2.5 
Billion Australian dollars ($1.8 billion) 
pTan to redevelop the city’s waterfront. 
kThe Melbourne Docklands Authority, 
igiich is in charge of the redevelopment, 
announced Monday the preferred bid- 


ders for the development of five separate the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, 
nrecincts within Melbourne’s Dock- which measures 1 ,483 feet. 
rLjk A consortium led by New Zealand- 

One of the bidders, Melbourne Tower based Brierley Investments Ltd. and 
Piv Ltd. a consortium of closely held Australian engineer Walker Coro, was 

» " . _ * ■ ^t__n ktifld n rtf Ktfrt m-ttforrad KiddArc lAf tb#* 


Ptv Ltd- a consortium of closely held Australian engineer walker Coro, was 
Australian companies, plans to build a one of two preferred bidders for the 

ftUMTdlKUJ . 1 1 1 ViAtnvin U<irW nrorinrt of thft renter of 


560>meter (1.837-foot) tower wjth 113 
levels and a 111 -meter light pinnacle. 
The world’s tallest budding now is 


Australian engineer Walker Coro, was 
one of two preferred bidders for the 
Victoria Harbor precinct at the center of 
the Docklands. The group plans retail, 
residential and health-care facilities. 


gyppEMCY & INTEREST RATES 


®oss Rates .. « Y « a » 

m u£ <*j m - ** « JS 3 $ 

es. iSassstfSis 

London (a) ISO* — ii9n tttfft laZSS US® ,,ll 2 

SS - S5 SK "j - g* ™ ”S m3 1J i; 

S S S i SS T» ■= s 5 

l&o mu WM4 IMS jwa us* 

ZwS* 1JW 2A« UB ItfttJ U® Wg I3S UUB 

?S3 SSS- u» jB g SSS iS IS u* »■ 

’SSSSKSS * r. ^ ^ 


London (a) 
tf&drtd 

\ m Yortit 


Other Dollar Values 

Camoey For* ConwKy 


Peri canwci 


Notavafebto 


Pws CWT ** J ’ 


tl 

v %n«ard Rates 

uHioy !W cwrmer 

fea SB s il SST 

Qtehdwmnrtt \SXH 1/932 


^ «^oy «hW 

ISS S 3S 


tBkniMIkmLBmqitetie 




Ubid-Libor Rates Se P L 8 

Swiss French 

Donor D-Mark Franc storting Franc Yen ECU 

V month 3H»-3Vk T * ■ TVn 3Mo ■ 3W. h-JJ* 

Lnontn S»ta-5W 3rt-3Vn n-a-m 7V»- 7Vu 3»-3W 

VST sU? 3W-3-W. Vo-W «*•«* 

of Si miaion minimum «>re<,um!pnn. 

Key Money Rates 

uoBttl State a#w Piw SHHfl 

3! 3! ZSKST »S • S 

sE £ S55ST M«ta« m r* 

SSSSSmw IS 5J9 strati rtcrbonk 7«* 

sJi Ln 4«dthw«tr®* ri* a* 

i^tfifTreesuryKS $-2* 5J8 

jHsSSS. 5S S SSmatm 3.10 » 

B-SSSi ™ S^Kwhaa, % 5 

lunw Tteunry band *** Wertank 3«o 

SSJi4nd.aWdVRA 5.10 5.10 3 S 

j fl P” Sourcnt: Kanees.BHKMbarg. MeirJII 

Dlscwmf nrto °*5 i-rncfr. Sank of TUyo-MllsiMlBltl, 

(U2 (M3 Com&&m&Cr^LrvimtA. 

SS 1 1 — 

KHfWirCWtiWWi xurtd, 322.15 321 JO -0.10 

GenauUK „ Laadoa 322.05 321JO +025 

IwSrf™* ^ ff? NwYWt 325^0 32W0 -OSO 

crt money Ji" “I? u.S.tompera^lMdmotffM 

a S 0®“!“ 


S3 “ora u a..,, 

237 

Zurich 322.15 321 JO -0.10 

lASdoa 322.05 32130 +025 

* JO NwYM VSM 32460 -OM 

“1? U.S. (totters per ounce. x Lntttton offictof 

fki^zwfchtmd New YIm opening 
mtWostng price* New Yori Come* 

5.89 source: Antes. 


WorldCom Signs CompuServe Pact 

Agreement Gives AOL Control of Rival’s On-Line Service 


Our Stuff r*ttpui»/tr\ 

JACKSON. Mississippi — World- 
Com Inc. agreed Monday to buy Com- 
puServe Coip. for$ 1 .2 billion in a three- 
way transaction that would make World- 
Com a global Internet powerhouse and 
give America Online Inc. control of rival 
CompuServe’s on-line service. 

The deal would more than double the 
number of European subscribers to 
AOL ’s joint venture with Bertelsmann 
AG to 1.5 million, challenging 
Deutsche Telekom AG as the biggest 
provider of on-line services in Europe. 
Deutsche Telekom said this month itsT- 
Online service had nearly 1.7 million 
subscribers. 

After purchasing CompuServe, 
WorldCom would sell the on-line ser- 
vice to AOL in return for AOL’s com- 
munications network. ANS Communi- 
cations, and $175 million. 

AOL also would receive $75 million 
from Bertelsmann as compensation for 
the 870,000 European subscribers from 
AOL’s acquisition of CompuServe. 

In the past 14 years, WorldCom has 
expanded from being a second-tier 
long-distance phone company to a top 
provider of Internet access and data- 


transmission services for businesses. 
Swapping CompuServe's on-line ser- 
vice for AOL's network will give 
WorldCom a bigger network, while 
AOL takes control of its biggest rival in 
the on-line-serviccs business, 

“This is in keeping with World- 
Corn's overall strategy/* said Joe Ar- 
senio. an analyst at Hambrechl & Quisr. 
“It also allows AOL to expand their 
customer base dramatically and gives 
them some cash, which they can use." 

At the same time, it would let Com- 
puServe's owner. H&R Block Inc., jet- 
tison a declining business it has been 
trying to unload for more than a year, 
concentrate on its tax -preparation busi- 
ness and use the proceeds to buy hack 
shares. 

Antitrust lawyers said the transaction 
w as almost certain to get a long, close 
look from U.S. federal authorities. 

After the swap. AOL would own the 
wot Id's top two on- line services, raising 
its subscriber base to more than ( 1 mil- 
lion from 9 million. 

After CompuServe, with 3.2 million 
subscribers. America Online's nearest 
rival is Microsoft Network, with 2.3 
million. 


In the AOL-CompuServe combina- 
tion, federal officials would primarily 
try to determine whether the larger com- 
pany would have enough market power 
to raise prices without fear of being 
undercut by current or would-be com- 
petitors. With the industry moving to- 
ward a flat-rate pricing structure, some 
antitrust lawyers said that even if AOL 
and CompuServe joined forces, they 
might not be able to raise prices without 
losing customers. 

Still, investors seemed to favor the 
purchase. AOL's shares surged $6,125 
to close at $76.0625, and WorldCom 
rose $2.25 ro $33.75. CompuServe, 
meanwhile, fell 18.75 cents to 
SI 3.3 125, and H&R Block fell 43.75 
cents to $39.75. 

To pay for the deal, WorldCom said 
each CompuServe share would be con- 
verted into 0.40625 of a share of World- 
Com. valuing each CompuServe share 
at $12.80, a 5.2 percent discount to 
Friday’s closing price of $13.50. 

Like on-line services, the data-com- 
munications business has been rapidly 
changing in this decade. WorldCom, 

See NET, Page 14 


Legal Guns Drawn Over a Gray Matter 


By Geanne Rosenberg 

New York Times Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — Everywhere Evan 
Brown goes, he brings with him, nestled 
in the gray matter of ms bruin, an asset his 
former employer demands: the record of 
what may be a muItimillion-doUar soft- 
ware system that could transform out- 
dated computer software and make it 
usable on modem computer systems. 

Two questions about this piece of in- 
tellectual property are keeping lawyers 
busy: To whom do Mr. Brown's thoughts 
belong? And. if they do not belong to 
him, can the owner of Mr. Brown’s think- 
ing force him to hand it over? 

“In some ways, it’s quite intrusive," 
Mr. Brown observed dryly of his closely 
watched legal case. 

The ranks of those staking claims to 
Mr. Brown’s potential invention — 
which he said could save companies bil- 
lions of dollars — are swelling. Among 
the parties: Mr. Brown; DSC Commu- 






What Evan Brown has under his 
hat just might be miracle software. 

nications Corp., his former employer, 
which dismissed and sued him in April 
after he refused to divulge his ideas, and 
Lance Bore*;, a computer programmer 
who says he may be (he original thinker 


— private banking — 


of the thoughts at issue and is seeking to 
imervene in the lawsuit 

Even Mr. Brown's lawyer, Richard 
Sayles, has a stake. He said he had 
agreed to take the case — scheduled for 
a jury trial in a Collin County, Texas, 
district court in November — on a con- 
tingency basis with his fee tied to Mr. 
Brown's profits from the software solu- 
tion. "Believe me. I've asked him if it 
works." Mr. Sayles said. 

Mr. Brown’s case would be a fairly 
typical trade-secret dispute — except 
that his purported solution has appar- 
ently never been articulated. There are 
no notebooks, computer files or audio 
tapes to help establish whether it works 
or to whom it belongs. Moreover, there 
is no way anyone can seize custody of 
the ideas without Mr. Brown's cooper- 
ation. He has already refused to comply 
with orders from two county coun 
judges to disclose his ideas. 

See BRAIN, Page 17 


'tbu’ve got the vision. 
We’ve got the know-how. 


You see things for what they 
are. And also for what they 
could be. 

It’s the kind of vision that 
ignites and fuels the entrepre- 
neurial spirit. 

We at Credit Lyonnais Private 
Banking share this vision. 
And, equally important, we 
have the knowledge, special- 
ized products and services 
to help you get where you 
want to go. 



Our Geneva subsidiary , specialised 
di Private Banking since 1876. 


We’ve gained unrivaled, in- 
depth experience from our 
group's worldwide presence. 
Even in the most out- of - the - 
way countries. 

But there is .yet another 
key dimension to Credit i 
Lyonnais Private I 

Banking strength. 

From the time /f_ ^ 

we opened our . M 

first office in ' 

Switzerland, 

120 years C *® ^*^* 
ago. our 

history has revolved around 
durable, personal relation- 
ships, based on dialogue and 
attention to detail. 

We listen first... and then 
respond with speed, efficiency 
and a total commitment to 
providing the precise solution 
for your demands. From trade 
financing and international 
logistical support to portfolio 


management, financial instru- 
ments and precious metals. 
Whether you are a private, 
corporate or institutional client, 
you’ll find Credit Lyonnais 


Private Banking can anticipate 
and serve your needs through 
close partnerships built on 
trust and vast resources. 
Together, these two dimen- 
sions create something 
unique in Credit Lyonnais 
Private Banking. 

Let’s talk. 


CREDIT LYONNAIS 


Private Baxkiivc Network: 

Switzerland: Geneva tel 4! 22/705 66 - Headcu'arjek.s for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 

Rasletel41 61/284 22 22 -Zurich tel. 41 1 21786X6- Lihiano tel. 41 91/92351 65 
Paris tel. 33 1/42 95 03 05 * Luxembourg tel. 352**476 83 1 442 * London tel. 44 171/499 91 46 
Monaco tel 377/93 15 73 34 - Vienna tel. 431. 531 50 120 - Muntt.vidlo tel 598 2/95 08 67 - Miami tel 1 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong iu. 852/28 02 28 toi • Singapore ti l 05 535 94 77 








R 


PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 



investor’s America 


30- Year T-Bond Yield 



Exchange tadftx.' 

The..Bw 




f#YSE. . - 


93233: ^ 

NYSE 

. s&p.iop- ■" 

.'SOSM.- 

WBE“- ‘ 

Ciwr?>ijSBe 


US. 

■ ' Nasdaq Cffrifjosrta ■■ 

AMEX - ■ 

MSakei Value- ... 

% 6G9J8 

Toronto 

■TSE index' '■ J 

6763L3** 0:30 

^o pauto ; 

Bovespa 

1f^51 ■ 11870.^.^:. 

Meaieoci^r Botea 

495057 4&TJ0 

Buenos Aires Mervat. 

8334W 

Santiago 

tPSA General 

552$u47 

Caracas 

Capita General 

HX 4 ■' :<02bmb . 


A Revolution in Wkb- Searching? 

Info seek Says Approach Retrieves More Precise Information 


By John Markoff 

New Yori Times Service 


SAN FRANCISCO— Infoseek 
Corp., one of the three leading 
Internet search-engine companies, 
planned to announce Monday that 
it had received a patent covering a 
new approach to decentralized 
searching of the Web that should 
provide more accurate results. 

The company said it expected 
the patent to give it a strategic 
advantage in the competitive mar- 
ket for the Internet’s most popular 
search sites. Currently, most In- 
ternet users routinely use one of 
the major Internet search sites, 
such as Yahoo, Excite. Infoseek, 
Alta Vista or Lycos, when they 
search for information on-line. 

The major Internet search-en- 
gine companies keep centralized 


indexes that are updated regularly 
by software programs that auto- 
matically search sites on the Web. 
Infoseek executives said the Web’s 
growth was now rapidly outstrip- 
ping the ability of the individual 
inffe ring programs to keep up with 
the explosion of information. 

“The system is starting to break 
down," said Steve - Kitsch, In- 
foseek' s chairman and founder. The 
early signs of a breakdown of the 
current generation of search engines 
are already there, he said. Most 
search engines have many dead 
links and outdated information, and 
searches are often inaccurate, re- 
turning many false matches. 

The new Infoseek technique 
uses multiple indexes and searches 
across numerous databases and 
Web sites. Mr. Kirsch likened it to 
the way information is sought in 


conventional libraries: An indi- 
vidual will go first to a central card 
catalogue and then be directed to 
books, which will have their own 
individual indexes. 

“This is like the move from 
mainframe to personal comput- 
ing," he said. The industry is now 
seeing a significant shift to search 
tools that have the ability to com- 
bine the retrieved information 
from a variety of sources, he said. 

He acknowledged that search- 
ing multiple databases was not a 
new concept. But he said the In- 
foseek system was able to rank 
more accurately the relevance of 
documents that may be stored on 
millions of comparer databases 
and listed in thousands of different 
indexes. He said each query yields 
a list of documents ranked by bow 
relevant they are to the search. 


U.S. Stocks Advance 
On Greenspan Remark 


Sov'ce Bloomberg. Reuters 


Imernautiul Herald Tribune 


Vary briefly: 


Reader’s Digest Rehires Old Hands 


a Barnes & Noble Inc. will offer better commissions and 
other incentives to Internet publishers next week, intensifying 
its on-line bookselling battle with rival Amazon.com Inc^ 
publishers said. About 30 publishers will let readers who visit 
their Web sites buy books at a discount from the retailer. 

® Fiat SpA's Ivecu unit said it would spend $303 million to 
increase truck production in Brazil ana Argentina to meet 
growing demand in the Mercosur regional trade pact, 
a Enron Corp. has formed a joint venture with Montana 
power Co. and a Williams Cos. division to build a fiber-optic 
network between Portland, Oregon, and Los Angeles, 
o Anheuser-Busch Co. and the Czech Republic are ne- 
gotiating with over the terms of an agreement that would give 
the brewer exclusive rights to use the “Bud* ’ name worldwide 
in exchange for the purchase of Czech hops for 10 years, 
according to the Ministry of Agriculture ip Prague, 
o (3 ra ham -Field Health Products Inc. is buying Fuqua 
Enterprises Inc. for as much as S22I million in stock and 
assumed debt, adding a supplier of hospital- room furnishings 
to its medical-supplies distribution network. Bloomberg 

Weekend Box Office 

The Aiwciwett Prru 

LOS ANGELES — “Fire Down Below" dominated the U.S. 
bri\ office over the weekend, with a gross of $6.1 million. 
Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday’s 
ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


Bloomberg News 

PUEASANTVILLE, New York 
— Reader's Digest Association Inc. 
on Monday brought back several 
executives who had left and shifted 
others into new roles, a sign that its 
interim chairman may stay longer 
than ori ginall y expected to try to 
turn the publishing house around. 

The company, whose namesake 
magazine and other publications are 
struggling to attract younger cus- 
tomers. said the changes were in- 
tended to bolster its direct-market- 
ing expertise. Just a month ago, 
James Schadt abruptly resigned as 


c hairman and chief executive when 
his attempts to expand beyond pub- 
lishing backfired. 

The executives will report to 
George Grune, 68, a former chair- 
man who is heading the company 
until a successor ro Mr. Schadt is 
found. The moves indicate that Mr. 
Grune, who directs two trust funds 
that own 72 percent of the voting 
stock, may pur the search for a new 
chief executive on the back burner 
while he revamps Reader's Digest. 

“He’s going to be there a while 
until this company is turned around 
and on the right track,” said Mi- 


chael Murphy, a portfolio manager 
at Carl Domino Associates, which 
owned 214,000 shares in June. 

Mr. Murphy said be expected that 
Mr. Grune would stay on at least a 
year and a half. 

Mr. Grune led the company 
through a decade of growth in the 
1980s. Since then, Reader's Digest 
has battled with stagnant sales as it 
tried to expand into television, 
videos, software and music. 

Reader's Digest shares, which 
had tumbled 27 percent so far this 
year, closed at $29.6875, up 37.50 
cents. 


Wall Street’s Climb Gives Dollar a Lift 


T.Fire Down Below 

(Warner Bros ) 

SX1 million 

7 G.I. Jon- 

(HoOrmoa Pksonsi 

S5X minkm 

3 iVicney Talti 

(Nen Line Cinema) 

SX9 million 

- Hoodlum 

[Unfed Artisb Pk- 
lUal 

S4J million 

j -ir Force-One 

I Colombia Pictures) 

SX1 miffion 

•> CoiepirocvTheory 

(Warner Bm ij 

S3X million 

T .E»ces5 Bangage 

i CoAunMa Picturesl 

33miTion 

8. Cop Lond 

IMIramax) 

S2Jmi®an 

V. A* aide 

tDbnenstan Rims) 

SZdmSton 

10. Men in Block 

(Columbia Pictures) 

51 3 million 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the Deutsche mark Monday 
as U.S. stocks and bonds advanced 
and it appeared likely that the 
Bundesbank would leave its secu- 
rities repurchase lending rate un- 
changed Tuesday. 

U.S. financial markets rose in 
early trading, helped by comments 
made late Friday by the Federal Re- 
serve Board's chairman. Alan 
Greenspan, suggesting that U.S. in- 
terest rates were not headed higher. 
Global investors buy dollars to pay 
for U.S. asset purchases. 


The dollar was quoted in late trad- 
ing at 1.8078 marks, up from 1.8033 
DM on Friday, and at 121.155 yen, 
compared with 121.100 yen. 

The dollar was held back from 
further g ains against the Japanese 
currency by signs that the Southeast 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE "" 

Asian currency crisis may be abat- 
ing. 

Traders also bought dollars on 
speculation that Germany's econ- 
omy was not growing fast enough to 
prompt the Bundesbank to raise 


rates A recent preliminary estimate 
of August inflation in Germany 
showed prices rose 0.2 percent, 
bringing the annual rate to 2 percent, 
the Bundesbank's desired ceiling. 

The pound fell agains t the dollar 
as new economic reports damped 
expectation the Bank of England 
would raise interest rates any time 
soon. It was quoted at SL5839. 
down from SI 5937 Friday. 

In other trading, the dollar was 
quoted at 1.4850 Swiss francs, up 
from 1.4783 francs Friday, and at 
6.0781 French francs, up from 
6.0650 francs. 


Ccsnpdatt* OurSmSFrrm (hspOihr, 

NEW YORK — U.S. stock s ad- 
vanced Monday after the Federal 
Reserve chairman, Alan Green- 
span, signaled that interest rates 
probably would remain steady, bol- 
stering optimism that corporate 
profits would rise. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age climbed 1 2.77 points to close at 
7.835.18. Hewlett-Packard led the 
advance, rising 1% to 66 7/16 on 
optimism that its high-end graphics 
computers would capture more of 
the market. 

Mr. Greenspan said the economy 
was co ntinuing to grow without in- 
flation — in contrast to previous 
expansions — probably because 
new products such as computers 
were enhancing productivity. He 
made the comments in a speech late 
Friday in California. 

The highlight of the quiet session 
was the announcement that Com- 
puServe was being sold to World- 
Com for $1.2 billion in a three-way 
deal that handed CompuServe’s on- 
line subscribers to its biggest rival. 
America Online. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index 
rose 2.15 points, to 931.20. The 
Nasdaq composite index climbed 
9.58, to a record 1,645.35. 

U.S. bonds rose for the first time 
in four days after Mr. Greenspan 
said inflation had almost been 
quashed, indicating thai he was in 
no hurry to raise interest rates. 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond was quoted 1 2/ 
32 higher, at 96 30/32, while the 
yield slipped to 6.61 percent, from 
6.64 percent, on Friday. 

Small stocks continued to gain. 
The Russell 2000 index of s mall er 
shares rose 2.95 points to 435.99. its 
eighth consecutive record. 

“The outlook for earnings is veiy 
good,” especially those of mid- 
sized companies, said Richard 
Cripps at Legg Mason in Baltimore. 

4 4 Most of tiie earnings estimates are 
being raised.” 

Paper companies such as Inter- 
national Paper and Weyerhaeuser 
fell after Merrill Lynch lowered its 
opinion on the pulp industry. 

Some companies also warned 
that profits would not be able to 
match analysts' expectations. 

General Signal dropped after it 
said 1997 profit would be 35 cents 
below the consensus estimate of 
S2.88 a share because of slow sales. 

Stock in Bell Microproducts, a 
semiconductor and computer-parts 
distributor, fell after the company 
said it expected third-quarter earn- 
ings to be 6 cents to 12 cents a share, - 


compared with 19 cents in the 
second quarter. . . 

Titan International, a tire anti 
wheel maker, weakened after it said 
it saw third- and fourth-quarter 

US. STOCKS 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


earnings below analysts' estimates 
because of spending costs related to 

releasing new lines. 

RexaS Sundown and Twrnlab 
slipped after Rexall, a maker Of 
vitamins and nutritional supple- 
ments, called off its $707 million 
purchase of Twinlab. The Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission re- 
fused to approve favorable account- 
ing for the transaction. 

Mr. Greenspan’s speeches have 
roiled markets in the past, as m 
December, when he questioned 
whether “irrational exuberance- 
had unduly inflated stock prices. 
Higher rates can drain funds from 
stocks and put them into bonds. 

( Bloomberg . ABl 

NETi F 

CompuServe Sold : 

Continued from Page 13 ■■ 

which has made more than 40 ac- 
quisitions in the past five years to 
become the fourth-Iargesi U.S. 
long-distance company, wants to 
take advantage of the growing 
worldwide demand for these ser- 
vices , which include faxing, e-mail 
and Internet hookups. ! 

WorldCom and the other top U.S. 
long-distance companies — AT&T 
Corp., MCI Communications Corp. 
and Sprint Corp. — are looking to 
offer a wide range of services on one 
bill for higher-spending business 
customers. These services are the 
fastest-growing part of the telecom- 
munications industry, analysts said. 

“Data is a big deal to everybody. 
Eventually, everything is going to 
be data,'’ said Jeffrey Kagan, an 
analyst at Kagan Telecom Associ- 
ates in Atlanta. “That's where the 
money is.” •* 

During the past five quarters, 
CompuServe's on-line service has 
lost customers to cheaper on-line 
and Internet services that have mar- 
keted their offerings more aggress- 
ively. CompuServe finally aban- 
doned the U.S. consumer market to 
competitors in November, deciding 
to focus on business customers aria 
the international market. 

- - (Bloomberg, NYTr AFX) 

. nn.-a , - ... 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The tep 200 most adive shares 
up !o the closing on Wail Street. 
AsxcaNti °re-s 

V‘ Se*. HTh LA.i Lova Ol* 


ni if - i» 


^.OTpij 

•jnrliu* 


ii*.*.. = r.r. 

-frVw 

-tl.il 

-*iD57tn 

-rr rutin 
'-JfLii iiC 
irodw 

rthBRin 

"'"A 8 

-riafn 


IX. 

-‘I'M 

n 

Wh 

uJUmiT- 

AaC.t, 
Au=*ei 
stWoh: 
•» 
MHO 
B A I ind 
5F> 

Ea»?i 
Bair. 
Barn:* , 
Sarto: 

(UtTM 

BwrorcH 

Bcrtlto 

Bltf A 
Bawl 
BMkk 
00*1* 
E-J»H 31 
E.Mr* 
Braiffln: 
C6 Fit* i 

•:im 

frflr.iC l 

Tin lr« 
CifcOc <J -j 

UHWOnAi 

Caniooi 

GjwrnlT n 

Wfcnl 

i«il 

CFCtoq 

CtadTh 

•>*i 

•Uyw: a 

CTniftr 

Cdlt 
fort 
■Tuainr 
-ImdrAef 
pT(l” 

Const 

Otnf.'.at 

CifflCir a 

>w 

THK-'.I* 

■ZrrJBr 

vre. 

C'jflml 

ClUBn 

Oi in 

on i«* 

ocm=M 

(<MHa 

Or'infe 

UllWBii 

Puri 
DtattT 
G+iPw n 

OKO'. 

DnC'Vio 

EZ'xft 

linear 

•EIPlME 

EnvTar 

Eniuflt 

FFV 

■SIBlM 

fsiml -MB 

Fvnttfin 

Fii.ra 

FA** 

FIlFO 

FffiLf 

FnMpP 

FffflEi 

Ml Trt 

oGTCri 

Cjjviui 

Gi«a, 

•jn-urc 
0* 
1*31 [94 

twin 

'iwrtrS 

C’ttW 

-T-WGtJP 
CJaf i: 
«ftlj|» 
'"■r+nMl 

VHWttP 

MJtff 

Han./Un 
MgoaOi 
no+rte 
Ham ct8 
Maif.n 

HjJii: » 

M-n,i 

pm;-.- a 
• J Cr.-.+« 

rt-i-v.-. ,i 

Wi’V >' 

Maiiraa 

ll<H (i» 
lanfflT 

lGlfC.’’JU 

rarjDa 


-.1*0 

y- 

if. 

\n 

■a 

XT 


n: 

2* 

JIS 

£o2 


7.'»J 

12 * 

138 


JS» 

n 

liO 

1451 


IK 

ISA 

IBS 


»>. 

i; 

lev. 

io. 

ij-1 

12 *. 

IA»: 

Jl-U 

12* 

21 

M"n 

lew 

14>. 

l p . 


3 

lBu 

IK, 


1'i 

10 

41, 

1»>« 


JiK 

15W 

l**l 


i'* 


| 0 i. 

10 

Kl 

!?; 

12- 


2 

IB- 

11* 


10: 

ia*. 

i- 

'S. 

I2*» 

U>1 

3T*i 

1JW 

1AV. 

7 

nr. 


»** 

-n. 


I7>» IP. 


7 

18 

II 

«•* 


!"•% 

JW 

?t 

41* 


2Ki 

ISh 

iff* 

v* 


70H 

Pi 

Q 

77S 

7»‘S 


1'* 

10, 

74'l» 

17V 


I SC- 
SI : 


set 

.'35 

2fl 

Hi 

7<li 

io: 

ffi) 

oM 

04’ 

i;»< 


443 

;ji 

mi 


in; 

813 

IC4 

1C-3 


Idl 

JO 

JJSJ 

JW 


l.'J 

j: 

ICO 


so* 

m 

io> 

7»» 


low 
I2'.« 
19 'k 


15 -V 

i', 

Iw 


l>. 

27-. 


8 

3" 

38 i 


S 

I: 

at* 

Ij 2 , 

K» 


i! . IS'. I2 -i 


Safes Hign Lr; uses! Orgo Indexes 


4W. 

l> 

SV, 

IKl 

1*. 

h 


i’iKR 

ragnHurf 

MaunuEf 

.van» 

rAaWaM 

BT 

S* 

AWfenn 

UeteMb 

a 

« OOJA 

ser 

MM 

l-ffvslaa 

MtHCan 

HVP 

natan 

NIFOH 


n. 

iw 
5>* 

% 

»• 

in 3*1 

2» IBi* 12W 

a m M 

»•* Wm 

7D» 3 lrtm 

M H4 |W» 

a a 

Ua Vn IS 
1C ti h 
SI in Jh 

TX W- 4-4 

«77 7*» *H 

TU 1111 10V, 

114 4h 4 
IIS 1IM lift 

£ V 

441 7ft 


TV, 

77. 


17ft 17V3 
17 lift* 
5'1 Jft 
lift 1IW 
17Vi 13V. 

:i 7m 

34ft 34ft 

Wl 


«h 

lift 

7«ft 


A 

»*• 

lift* 

1** 


nrim* 

iteWti 

NAVOff 

OSvfemC 

OanMutf 

Ona 

Obcmibo 

w* 

&& n 

Patmaa 

RfeUnCa 

PannC 

PeWft 

FtHM 


PfeFjC 

MWai 

St 

SSL. 

Fi6«n 

WPow 

Scuta* 

s«*»rn 

Udffto 

SMC* 

SftwFOi 

UM 


SPDB 
SPAIBI 
SWftwi 
Mhni 
SBraCraa 
fttsiAhn 
5** 
SUMT4 

TafUctch 

H»fnM 


27ft 7ift 
34ft 34 
12ft Uftt 
IS » 
414 4ft 
SOU 49 
75ft 741* 
33H 73ft 
10ft 10«V 
1ft Ift 
41ft 4ft 
7ftft 7ft 
in* in* 

249* 34ft 
14ft 13ft. 
IV. Ift 
Sft J 
*V» »K 
lt*ft 17 
4ft 4f* 
IV* 1ft 
7** 7ft 
17ft 179* 
12H lift 
7** IV* 
ft ft 
35ft 34 


Ift *h 
Sft S 
13V* 13 
Ift IV* 
» 39ft 
IIS lift 
2W 2 
14ft lift 
IZft 121* 
1 2 * 

29* 2ft 
lift 121* 
Ift lu 
I** M* 
9* * 

I*. »** 

94 Rft 

Oft 43Va 
74ft 24V* 
21ft 20ft 
17V* 11* 


41* 

It. 

rv. 
II v* 

7* 

3ft 

l«ft 

41* 

37V. 

M* 

1*4 

ift 

n 

3ft 

n 

4ft 

iff 

4 

lift 

39ft 

2ft 

79* 

ft 

17ft 

■12 

5ft 

119* 

177. 

30ft 

X* 

99* 

ft 

*9. 

lift 

7ft 

27* 
36* 
129* 
rv« 
4* 
499* 
74ft 
23** 
MB* 
IV* 
4 ft. 

n* 

191* 

24ft 

u 

IV* 

i 

I*. 

12ft 


ft? 

•V* 

ft. 

41 

-ft 

-ft 

-ft 

•v. 

*9 

*ft 

*v* 

ft. 

-ft 

■** 

-v* 


•v* 

-ft 

-ft 


Dow Jones 

om Hit* Lav iX am. 
Indus TBKLM 7881 17 782IJ1 785171 +3U5 
Tnns 2971.91 303583 295US 302119 *1116 
USJ DIJ8 137ft 1 23152 23W2 *aw 

lG\JU 


Coop 2i 


2484318 2459.71 20156 +2147 


Standard & Poors 


Industrials 

Trartsp. 

Uffllties 

Bnanat 

SPS00 

SP 100 

NYSE 

CamDarilg 
I MKWm ofa . 
Tnmsp. 

utny 

Finance 

Nasdaq 

CampoUe 

Indusfeiab 

Ba ft* 

Insurance 

FinmCB 

Tmto. 


Toft* 

m Qn« MO 
—1091 JO 1095.97 

- 65&JJ2 667.85 

- 20093 20IJ7 

- 107.36 108.78 

- 9293)5 932.93 

- 901X5 90543 


HW U. 3P.M. Os- 

48758 48464 48658 +2J4 

617.12 61146 61544 +158 

44445 439JJI 444-50 +144 

290.16 aa.13 2WJ1 +1.08 

4514)9 451.14 45120 >444 


mm ut 3 pjm. m. 
164851 114122 164628 +1049 
13J647 13223)4 132560 +SJI 
17B9.I9 1779-50 178642 +800 

175347 1 743-37 1746.10 * 023 

2m532 71 £5* 311630 +11.44 
105245 1ID9J1 105142 +1047 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


FslDota > 

Conjioa s 

AmOrftw 

WOcnis 

PtoKO 

BaslSc 

Kmart 

PDlMlars 

Seagntes 

Bonvrt 

KcflnsBBS 

s 

OfWW 

StaiCpn 


AMEX 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
loumiitas 
10 Industrials 


Mm U. 3PJM. C*t- 
I7D25 16740 609.78 +223 


Nasdaq 

WortdCm 

was 

Cymern 

TrtCaraA 

HlT+rtE 

SSSSff 5 

Ascend 

AUansfls 

CmpuSn 

NadatCin 

Korn 

Ortxle-s 


AMEX 


TWA 

viocs 

TufeMn 


VoL Hft* 
72237 39ft 
52873 69* 
52415 79Vi 
42389 41ft 
33336 3M 
32056 «4ft 
31303 Hft 

30474 447* 
79350 36V. 
78957 66ft 
38573 57*» 
27293 55*1 
26737 V* 
25846 70ft 
2«H1 39V. 


1727*5 33ft . 
84510 96 ft* 
66170 71ft 
65831 19ft 
65120 13ft 
6H 23 34%» 
47596 »ft 
42106 41 VV 
40618 139ft 
40015 13ft 
39632 78 
38701 50V. 
37916 79 
35411 37 
34677 40 


Lav 3PM 

37*. 37ft 
68ft 189* 
75U 76 V. 
42ft 43ft 
38 3*ft 
62* 63V. 
14ft 14* 
44 44ft 
34* 34ft 
65V* 65* 
57>* 57ft 
54ft 54V, 
J*l 

20V. ? 0ft. 
79V* 29ft 


a*. 

•2*. 

- 1 ’., 

+7 

-4ft 

+;i 

+»i 

;15 

X 

+■*1 

♦ft 

-V* 


Sept. 8, 1997 

Mgh tow Latest Chge Opbd 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

&000 Du minimum- cenls p tr bushel 


Sep 97 
Dec 77 
Mor «8 


766 263ft 245ft 
264 210ft 263 

273 269* 271* 


May 98 776* 274ft 276ft 

Jut 98 280 277* 279* 

Sep 98 271 - 268ft 76“ ft 

Dec 98 268* 766* 267* 

Est srtn NA Ftfs sales 7MS7 
Fifs apm M 30(1 225. oR 1 339 


-* 11,112 
-1U 189,186 
-1* 51307 
-1* 1SJ43 
-!* 20968 

-1 1J49 

•1 11638 


High Law Latasi Oitje Oplri 

ORANGE JUICE CNCTH5 

1SOOO Ks.- cents per Ql 

Sep 97 70-00 69.10 7G00 -4L50 512 

Nov 97 7000 6060 6195 -045 10258 

Jon 98 7260 7160 TIES -0.45 8L36S 

M«0e 7S75 7470 7475 -050 S51S 

Esi. soles NA Fw sales 5J»7 

Fris open M 3480* up 453 


High Low Latest Chge Optra 
10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATTF) 


FFSOaOOO-ObOflOOpcI 
* ~ N.T- K.TL 


- I3N-T + 0-20 144645 

N.T. N.T. 9860 + 018 39.454 




ST* 

95* 95** 
64 70ft 
19ft 19>* 
12 12* 
30* 32V* 
47ft 49 

40ft 40A* 

137* 139* 
12*b 13* 
26»* 76N 
44ft 48V* 
76* 21ft 
If 36V* 
J7ft» 39V. 


a*. 
+ 2 *» 
♦ Ift 
•lift 
-4* 

-4 

•2V. 

+n« 

+v+ 

+!■»* 


■Ift 

•lifti 

-2V* 

+*» 


dew T Nwn 

10175 10174 

101 J7 10165 

10&Z6 105^3 


SPDR 

Roniog 

hastro j 
PLCSys 
XCL Lra_ 


wm Him 
14901 7*. 
7757 34V. 

6919 199* 

4625 36ft 
4276 94 

3744 I* 
3711 2tft 
3648 14ft 
3379 V. 
3101 ft 


1M 1PM Of. 
7V.7* »•* 

3»* 

149* _ 

_ 36 369* ♦*■ 

9W* 93ifte ♦‘Hi 
2 2v* -v* 

27ft 277* +ft 
13^* 14* +ft 
* * -V* 


Soper 

709 

693 

6991* 

Noe 97 

439 

632ft 

637 

Jon® 

640 

634ft 

638 

Mor® 

646 

641 

64S 


5* jS Trading Activity 


7418 
945 
2» 

433 
li* 

44S9 * V* 

r* iv* 

12 II V* 

S'- 5* 

19* ft* 
D* 31* 
ZH 41* 

720 Sft, SV* 

150 11* lift 


741 

29B 

its 


l»* 

29* 

127* 

12 


8ft 

Ift 
Ift 
Sft 
12 . 
aft* 
2 ** 
12V* 


13* 41 

12ft -* 
2ft .ft 
2ft 

Ut* +V» 
Ift 
Ml 

ft -ft 


24U 

zm 

no 

ft 

2 

lift 

SW 

29* 

37* 

41* 

Sft 

m 


NYSE 

^ SSK? 
* MS 
*+ft 

+tm 

-ft AMEX 


SI355 9 

S 

KenHWis 
New law 


1671 

941 

S9B 

3217 

198 

7 


413 

35 

3 


1652 

11*8 

Ml 

« 

6 


& 


Nasdaq 

Advanced 

petAnw 

unamraed 

Tidal Issitas 
RfwHfglB 
Kan Law 

Martlet Sales 


NYSE 
Ames 
Nasdoq 
In melons. 


2013 

1440 

2044 

*s 

39 


3410 

1191 

1437 

5730 

322 

36 


toe nn. 

38430 669.68 

1631 3233 

48120 699.77 


Dividends 

canpany 


Per Amt Rec Pay corapaiy 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


+»* 

.ft 

.ft 

-* 

.ft 

*ft 




Jo 

ifiw 

m 

UVl 

22VV 

ZTft 

-i> 

IJ** 

lift 


InEcas 

306 

uw 

UV. 

14V. 

-Mi 

I01» 

io-. 

-‘m 

rbFarn 

192 

•ft 

P» 

9h 


-, 

• i 


ThaiRb 

281 

lift 

lift 

11* 

■ft 

t i 

; Ja 

-v5 

Iwtra 

M 

41 V* 

AM* 

41 

*ft 

IQ 

IB 


TNwdter 

N29 

144* 

IPft 

14ft 

ft 

6“l 

Mr 


Thtafcm 

3E 

m 

lift 

17ft* 

-V* 

*.| 



Thnjd 

471 

17k 

15ft 

17ft 

-ft 

2*i 

ti** 

Jim 

TI*rao4 

241 

to 

25ft 

25 

■ft 

tfr 

lift 


Ttmod 

2BT 

2>W 

»* 

»• 

ft 

1 

ift 


Tups as 

US 

it* 

1ft 

1ft 

-ft 

7 

2 

+m 


EU 


- lc 

ft 

♦ft 

1 1 

Io 

_ 

TWAef 

m 

i>. 

Ml 

4ft 

-t. 

3ft 


T u 

1W4 

2 an 

Ift 

7ft 

■ 

-ft 

0 . 

a • 


tnnlteq 

IM 

•ft 

6 

9ft 



I'o 

-*n 

■Wroraral 

W 

mt 

in 

IWB 

+1 

£}'. 

c. 

-*a 

T»MM 

157 

15** 

15ft 

19ft 


C 

42‘.1 


Titobcdi 

M 

r> 

7 

7ft 

_ 

Ift 

P. 


TtiWe 

TO 


IR* 

1911 


71', 

lift 

4>«te 

toltea 

XU 

15ft 

IS 

15ft 

tft 

1-. 

»>, 


USPCP 

ias 

179* 

17ft 

17ft* 

.V* 

j‘i 

S'. 


HliEpfs 

1737 

77V* 

25ft 

75ft 

■Ift 

BU 

V. 


untie 


Uft 

Ift 

Ift 


lift 

W 

J/i 

umnoi 

H’J 

4>l 

4ft 

4ft 



1 -J 

Ift 


UWBti 

117 

7 

M 

*H 

-ft 

ill 

U-4 


JFjjM 

117 

2*W 

7ft 

3ft 

-ft 

32U 

a>. 

I’ll 

XPt 

■’ • 


nir 

451 

Hfe* 

3U. 

18ft 

lift 

10ft 

3* 

•ft 

-ft 


14". 


unnv 

432 


n 

in 

-ft 


IRREGULAR 

London PodfGrp b 353 9-12 ia-2 

STOCK SPUT 
Oieyets Ice Own 2 for lspttt 

STOCK 

Buffington Coat _ 20% 10-1 10-16 

INCREASED 

BedftmfProp Q 30 

Capstead Mh O J> l 

Century 5ootn Q .105 

INITIAL 

Burlington Coat _ .02 

Omrrir ’ 

Santa 


OMITTED 

Imperial CrwSt c 
c- suspends optional a*sti payment: 


9-30 10-15 
9-22 9-30 
9-15 10-6 


_ .01 

-.0325 


9-19 10-16 
9-1 9-35 
9-30 10-15 


Omrtiwto 
laFelnK 


SPECIAL 

TowvSomlcan _ 1.00 9-26 10-20 


BMC Indus 
Conation Tlreg 
Cardinal Brushra 
FstlndusS Rtty 
Fluor Carp 
GendtelncAg 
GfOCD Inc 
Hancock Pert FrDv 
Hafleias Inco Sec 
Jones Metical 
Katyinduti 
5tm» St Bancorp 
TriNetCap 


REGULAR 
. 0 JJ15 
0 
O 
Q 
Q 
o 

a 


.to 

JOS 

.19 

XQ 

.14 


M .0583 
M J395 

Q B2S 
0 JUS 

a ,ii 2 s 

O A3 


9- 17 10-1 

10- 31 12-1 

9-15 10-15 
9-30 10-20 
9-23 1014 

9- 19 10-6 

10- 1 11"5 
9-15 10-1 
9-15 9-30 
9-14 10-1 
9-26 1030 
0.22 9-29 
9-30 1015 


o-aanuafc b-awradmale amount per 
sbarcfADifc 9-pcynttfe In Canadian lands; 
m-nrantWyi g ^w terty ; s-seari-anmiat 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT1 
100 tans- dslton per lan 

Sao 97 280 JO 172.00 273.10 -9J0 7Ae5 

Oct 97 2J7JJO 229-60 ZtaJD -480 24A1J 

Dec 97 218-50 21450 21A80 -190 4S130 

Jan 98 212-00 209 30 2O9J0 -JA0 11A63 

Mor 98 206.00 203 JN 20450 -2J0 11161 

May 98 204JW 20170 20250 -050 8.237 

EsL sote NA Frti soft* 41.804 
Frt* open milt 2,61ft up £880 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

6ftOOQB»r cants pw lb 

Sep 97 22 JS 22J» 22.35 -0.04 2.76a 

Oa 97 2252 2250 22A6 -0.06 2Q5B5 

Dec 97 2257 2255 22 83 41.04 41.177 

Jan 98 23JN 2275 2100 4103 1IA3I 

AAar98 2X30 2295 2X25 -005 7545 

May 98 2150 2X10 2143 -0JJ7 1023 

Esl sties NA Frrs sties 2X711 
Frt* open liri 91529. up 1,178 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

XOOO bu mtalmum- cents per bushel 

-9* X441 

■3V> 91588 
-4V4 201724 
-3* 9552 

May 98 657V. 647ft 451ft -2* 6A70 

Esl. sates NA Fits win 50.745 
Pits open Ini 14X902 up 744 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

5000 bu ndnirnum- cants per bushel 

S«P 97 370 363 365 -7V4 2044 

Doc 97 386ft 377 379* .7* *9.957 

War 98 397 389 391ft -7ft 22736 

Moy 98 398 392 394ft -Sft 1806 

Esl. Wtes NA Prfj win 70,265 

Fits open Ini 108. lift up 896 

_ Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

4X000 fes.- cenls per lb. 

Oct 97 6640 6810 6850 +0 aS JUST 

DCC 97 69-80 *9.25 69A7 +0 60 25.456 

Feb98 7165 71.97 7250 +0.62 16661 

Apr 98 7500 7427 7445 +0 67 6954 

JW198 7152 70.75 71 A3 *aT7 4.6*0 

AU998 71.00 7025 70 95 +ft70 1.197 

Esl sates 11,919 Frt* sales 1*997 
Fits open im 9X391 off 189 

FEEDER CATTLE ICMER) 

51X000 Rk. cents per lb. 

SCP97 8045 79 75 8045 +0.90 

Oct 97 80 90 7955 B050 +1.10 

NO* 97 8192 8055 81.67 +125 

Jon 98 8282 81.70 82.77 +1AS 

Mar 98 8260 8130 8X60 *150 

AprQB 8255 fijQ 8255 +150 

Est. soles A093 Frt* sates 251 7 
Fits open M 14969, alt 28 

HOGS-Lm (CMER) 

40000 lbs.- carte per Us 

00 97 70.77 7020 70.22 -055 17558 

Dec 97 *740 6645 6750 -030 ft 380 

Feb 98 65.9s 6535 6567 -032 1625 

Apr* 6225 6200 62H -020 1.613 

Jun 98 6737 U.90 66.95 -<U3 940 

Est. sales 5211 FWs sales 4273 
Frit open M 32922, up 399 

PORK BE LUES (CMER) 

4X000 Sts.- cenhperta. 

Feb 98 67.70 6640 6647 -055 1942 

Mor 98 6745 6652 67.15 -055 44* 

May 98 67.77 6477 66 77 -0.97 85 

Est sates 1,771 Firs sales S98 
Frt s open ini 4522. up S 


Metals 

COLD CNCM30 

100 troy co. ■ donors per npy «. 

Sep 97 32230 -070 46 

Od 97 32130 32200 32110 -0.W 14156 

Non *7 32170 4X70 

Dec 97 32540 32100 32440 4X43 ii 1227 

Feb 98 32620 324.70 3262C -040 15^87 

Apr 98 32B50 32640 3J7 90 4X80 5297 

Am 91 32940 32880 32940 4190 X23T 

Aug 98 33)40 -1.00 4069 

Oa98 22190 -100 115 

EsL sates N A Fits sales 21,772 
Firs open ml 201,781 up 1.294 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX3 
210001b*- cents per 8>. 

Sep 97 9750 9410 9415 -1.60 19M 

Od 97 97.90 9*45 9465 -1 45 1705 

Nov 97 9840 97.00 97 00 -t.6fl 1576 

Dec 97 9845 9490 9730 -135 31914 

J«*i 98 97.70 9710 97 10 -135 810 

Feb 9f 97.60 97.10 97.10 -1.10 750 

Mar 98 9800 97.05 9705 -130 1290 

Esl sales NA Frrs sales 4199 
Fits open ill 44617, off 776 

SILVER (NCMX) 

4000 troy cc.- cenls pa< troy ol 
5ep97 467 00 4*4.00 46450 -250 849 

Ort 97 46S90 -240 78 

NOV97 46920 -180 

Dec 97 47440 te&OQ 47030 -240 574S* 

Jon 98 471.70 -180 20 

479J0 2-80 11408 

MoyW 481.00 -180 1209 

All 98 48510 -240 2280 

Esi. sates NA Fit* sates 1*413 
Fits tiwn ml 7652ft up 667 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

SO froy at- doSarc per hoy «. 

Od97 42550 4Q950 41450 -190 9.691 

i 0 " 2S tiiiao 40750 -1 90 1297 

Apr9g 404.00 40350 40150 -1.90 423 

Jul "8 399.50 -1.9p 2 

Eta sain NA Fris sties 1.786 
Fits open mi 1X411 up 798 

LONDON METALS (IJNE) 

Daltars per mefrte Ion 
Atanteara (Him Smd#) 

,, , J “3* 1584ft 1*0100 1*05.00 

1604ft I«5lS 1*2100 1673A0 
Copper Cathodes CHlgn Grade) 

^p °' „ . *1^-22 J’AOO 2164ft 2166ft 
forward 215500 2157 00 217200 217100 


1052 

6459 

4265 

2507 

1238 

417 


Fan* am 

Nickel 

SSLard 

Tta 
Spot 


64*40 

65840 


647.00 

659.00 


640ft 

65440 


6S9040 660000 6+10.00 
469100 669540 *710.® 


S4S040 5464® 543040 
- - ^SfWOO 5490® 5470® 

D*c(Sp9cW Him Grad.) 

,m{n 

r-arwam 748 1® 1484® 140840 


641ft 

655® 


6*2040 

6715.® 


5440® 

5480® 


1680® 

1490® 


HlfiO Low Close C3»ge Opfert 


UKSes 

Vcopr 

vacua 

WEB 

Vfcan 

mco 


..JI 

»<A«inl 

_ 

•TOID D 

WaoBr 

WIRET 

AtaURs 

v^WnsT 

NEBAfiB 

.VELFra 

WEBGer 

:ici nr 

7JEBBU 

WE8JM 

WESMOI 

ivtlitag 

mr 

viud 


VX 121* I2h 
m life ii* 
133 4fe in 
ass nft nt* 
9127 Zlfe Hf, 
177 7V* 6fe 

s m m 
au» *, tj 
HI i« is* 
i» 13* ix+ 
3W 16V* 1»* 
1U T* 7H 
lfll lift u 
229 ft, lit 
127 13* I3ti 

m n n, 
414 111* lit, 

710 W«. IP, 

306 15V, I5>* 

US 17* Ift* 
^7 lS»i m 
17V 111* 17ft 

2154 12* Uft 

<677 *** Sft 

io m* s*> 
ess ti, y. 
1011 14* 14ft 

«0 !*■», 1*6* 

B17 ** * 


121 * 

no* 

4H 

Hft 

Tg? 

TV. 

II 

4* 

10% 

m 

16h 

7* 

life 

It 

UH 

5% 

11 ** 

ion, 

19»i 

im 

15ft 

IT 1 * 

12ft 

ft* 

% 

U*4 

1 * 0 * 


1 

- 1* 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figures are urafftont Yearly highs and lows reflect the previous 52 weeks plus the 
ament week, but not the latest trading day. Whereo split or sock ffivldend a mourning to 25 
perwntormore has been ptid, the years high-tow range and dividend are shown fori he new 
stocks only. Unless otherwise noted, rotes of dividends are annual disbursements based on 
the totes* doctoral ion. 

a - dividend aba extra (s). b - annual rate of dividend pfen stock dividend, c - liquidating 
dividend, a - PE exceeds W^ld - coiled, d - new yearly tow. «fd - loss In the Iasi 12 months, 
e - tiwdcmf declared or paid In preceding 12 months, f - onnuof rate, bowsed on tost 
(federation, g - ti vidend to Canadian funds, subject to 1 5% non-residence hi 1 - dividend 
declared after sp fit-up orstock dhrideixL | - dividend paid this y«C, omitted, deterred, or no 
Odton token Of latest tividrnd rneeling. k - dhridend dedored or paid this year, an 
acaimulaifve issue with dhidends in arrears, m - annual rate, reduced on last dedarolim. 
n - new Issue to the past 52 weeks. The high-low range begins with (tie stmt ut trading, 
nd- nan day delivery, p- initial dividend annual rate unknown. P/E - price-earnings ratio, 
fi-ctosed-end mutual fund, r- dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock 
dhridend. s-stock spot Dividend begins with date of split, its -sales, t - dividend paid in 
Blurt in preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on ek-dlvidend or ex-distribution date, 
u - new yearly high. *- trading halted, vi- In bankruptcy or recalvorehlp or being reorganized 
underthe Bankruptcy Ad or securities assumed by such companies, wd- wnendfeiributed- 
wt - when issuedt ww - with warrants, x - sx-tividend or ex-righis. sfis - ex -distribution, 
m - Without warrants, y- ex-dhridend and sties In full, yld - yield, z - sales in Full 


COCOA (MCSE) 


Food 


1643 

1420 

1643 

-12 

147 

1665 

1U1 

1663 

-12 

4X791 

1694 

1660 

1692 

■10 

27®2 

1711 

1680 

1711 

-0 

12X46 

me 

16® 

ITS 

-0 

2X86 

1746 

1712 

1744 

■8 

4X63 


Sep 97 
Dec 97 
Mar 98 
Mov 98 
Jill 98 
Sap 98 

Est. satei 4134 Fits rties 10470 
FfW open InJ 107,989, Up 347 

COFFEE C OKSE) 

37.500 lbs -rails pm ib. 

Sen 97 210 JO 187.70 207 JO -1.4} 

D«97 19235 187® 187.70 -115 

Mar 98 174® 170® 170 ID -045 

MUV98 166® 16150 16150 -135 

Jut 98 161® 157® 15750 -150 

Esi. rates 4344 Fits sales 6J88 
FiVs epen W 22,254, up 357 

SUCARWORLO II (NC5E1 
1)2,000 lbs ■ cents per Bl. 

Od 97 11«2 M® ii5) -0.03 

Mor® 12® 11.96 1X01 +0® 

May 98 1243 11.93 11.96 +041 

Jut® 11 82 11.75 11.77 until. 

Ed. wkn 1X260 Fih sties 17361 
FtteOpMM 30X826, up M 


510 

1X987 

4284 

1,652 

13® 


82.422 

76416 

1X320 

1X644 


si mifeon- pis otiw oa 

n£o? ejH 9498 uneh 4*7S 

?TL-L 9 «6 +043 1922 

MV98 9483 9483 M83 +0L02 tJ39 

Esl. sties N A Ftto iate* 1.239 

RTS even ini X936. off #74 

5 YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

i ,a yP° K”. pls *“« « 1« Pti 

Sjre 97 106-57 106-44 106-48 + 01 705*1 

06C97 106-32 104-J3 106-26 unrt 151022 
Esi. Sties Na Fns wte* iw. tm 
F n* open Ini 22X5&1 U p 738 

18 YR TREASURY iCBOTl 
5t®4® porv pis & TlntH ell® nd 

311OTto4 +W 90443 

htere JSm 2-Jf !St U ♦ 05 779.008 
Marre 108-11 108-1) 108-11 *53 ^739 

Esl. soles NA Fns sotej isawi 
Pits open Ini 38l.2ia up *531 

W TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

2Si 5ll 57i |lh 4 32rw. of 1® pa) 

Sep 97 111® 11273 1 13-07 -- 

Dec 97 112-29 117-04 11X77 
Mar® 1 13-13 IJ7-04 JJMj . « 314,4 
JunW HI-27 unch. mt 

Ed. sates NA Fits sties 639,722 
FilS opan bit ®X94X up 18^19 

LONCCILT(UFFE) 

CSOOM - pn& 32nds el I® pd 
Sep 97 115-72 115.11 115-20 +0-10 11 lie 

Dec 97 115-06 11+27 115-04 +5^9 isJSl 
Esl. sates; 15704 Pm. wtey. 9X«|5 
Pray. Open InL: 16X336 off 1540 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFPE1 
OM2SMOB- pistil® pci 
DOC 9/ 101.63 101.78 101.58 >034 25X2® 
BtarW HI. NT 1®M -034 3® 

Esl. stias: M.937. Pm. wtos- 22X050 
Pie*, open bit- 259.922 off 1410 


Sap 97 
Dec 97 

est. rates: 51926. 

Open toL: 184002 off 1JB8. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFE3 
ITL 2® ra®an - pis ti 1® pet 
Dec 97 109.97 109JC 10976 +044 K&897 
MarW N.T. N.T. 1»46 +044 101902 
Esl. vi fe is-TA A SS . Plfev. solas; 4X661 
Prev. open inlj 101902 oft 756 

UBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 

S3millDn-otstiimpa 

Sep 97 9435 9434 9434 until. 1X816 

Od 97 9433 9432 9433 +0.01 12^29 

Hue 97 9438 9427 9437 unch. 11256 

EsL sates NA FWs Mies 5.970 

Fits open bit 47.191. Up 1.040 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI maian-ph of I® pti. 

Sep 97 9437 9426 9436 undL 43e*Q36 

OcS97 9419 9418 9418 unch. 1717 

Dec 97 9410 94® 94® until 542.194 

Mor® 9401 9198 9400 until. 36456? 

Jun 98 9190 9X87 9X88 until 278.394 

Sep ?8 91® 9378 9179 unch. 219.978 

Doc90 9168 93*6 9167 unch. 109.999 

MOT99 9166 9X63 91*5 until 13X252 

Jun 99 9161 9X» 9160 until. 10X69* 

Sep 99 9157 9155 9156 +0J>l 87665 

Dec99 9150 9147 9149 +O01 7x629 

Mor® 9150 9X47 9149 +0.01 6X324 

Esl. rates NA Frrs rates 61X612 
Frft open Ini 1844208, up 4X934 

BRITISH POUND OMER) 

6X500 pourxfc. S per pound 

Sep 97 1-5924 I -5804 1X836 -0®84 41,992 

Dec 97 1-5858 )J7« IJ7744L0086 7^59 

Mar 98 1-5726 15726 15726-00070 209 

Esl. sales NA Frte sties 9.063 

Frts open bw 49.761, up 118 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100®OdoUtis. S per Cdn. dr 

Sap 97 .7245 .7231 .7240+0®03 38394 

Dec 97 .7287 .7268 7779+O®06 2G266 

Mar® .7314 .7303 -7303-0X007 777 

Est sates NA Fris rates 21579 

Frts open tel 59,611 off 129 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

12X0® rrtorSs. S per mark 
5JP97 5574 5513 5536-0®! 6 85356 

D°c97 5MB 5556 5568-00017 22147 

Mor® 5603 5593 5593-0.0024 1442 

Esf. safes NA Frts sates 4*. 1 5« 

FtH open Ini 109314 up 1049 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

125 niBItii yen, t per too yen 

’K? 7 -8265 -0.0004 81924 
97 .8395 536* 5370-0®07 24784 

Mar® 5495 .8490 5472+00007 686 

EiL sales na Fit* sates 44881 
Fits open Ini 107,901 aft X639 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 2X080 hanexs pm tone 

Sep 97 Mil 5723 4740 -0®36 47447 
D«99 -*SS -6813 4L0034 9385 

Mor® 6882 4873 6873-0.0044 14)66 

Esl. sates N A Fits sates new 
Ftf* open felt 5B5IG uo X704 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

mooo pesos S per Pom 

%? 9 J, 12512 1^5? -12B17+JMM8 18563 
Oec99 . 2345 .12295 1233 7 +.00319 14604 
Mor® .118® .1)860 llMW+JKn® 5898 
Est. safes NA Frit sates 9344 
Fits open HU 41.171, up 92 


tftqh Low Latest Chge Opinl 

s*p® 9445 9456 9445 +0.12 37JMO 

Dec® 9437 9466 9X76 +0.13 30315 

Esl. sates: 64319. Am. sties: 6X452 
Prev. open InL: 391304 off 1416 4 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTH) 1 

SAO® lis.- cards per 1b. ’ 

Od 97 7X05 7230 77.97 +043 X9)4 

Dac97 7X15 7232 7X12 +051 47,968 

Mor® 7450 7165 7X48 +0156 116M 

May 98 75-00 7X35 7X00 +035 £®4 

Jui® 7X60 7X20 7X40 +032 SA 5 

EastimNA Fits sties 10015 ') 

Fits apw bit tBjtm. up 22 + 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

43,000 gc4 Cents per gal 
Oct 97 5XOT 5X10 5330 4L4B 4X085 

Nov 97 55.15 5X35 5X90 4138 23365 

Dec 97 5630 55X5 5X70 -023 22.903 

Jan® 57.10 5635 5635 -038 21,117 

Feb® 5740 56X5 56® -0)3 11,751 

Mar® 56X0 5645 5630 +007 MSS 

Apr® 5530 5X50 5X50 +032 1613 

Est soles NA Fits sales 4X41S } 

Frts open Ini 148461 oil 152 ‘ 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) i 

1,0® MX- donors par bbL 1 

Od97 19.75 19.41 1947 -016 98.9SB 

Nov 97 1935 1938 1942 011 30.737 

Dec 97 19.® 1946 19.72 -009 S2»8 

Jssi® 1938 1932 19.77 -038 31327 

Feb® 19® 19 J8 19.® -008 1G1J5 

Mar® 1939 1931 1931 005 10.^3 

Est. sties N A Frfs sales 10M28 
Fits open M 40&B54 up 2323 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

100® nun bhrs. S per mm btu 
Oct 97 1735 1625 2485 -0.012 5X^3 

Nov97 2355 17® 2320 -0302 2*127 

Dec 97 1930 18® 1910 0004 21^9fl 

Jan® 1930 2365 19® 0014 3ZJOO 

Fob® 1670 1610 2455 -0302 15319 

Mar® 1410 23® 1402 unch. 10^7 

EsL sties N A Fits sates 61492 T 

Rts open hri 220465. up 2,404 T 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

410® gal, cents par pat 
Od 97 *035 5935 99.70 095 


10 158.778 
10 407,336 


3-MOMTH STERLING tUFFEl 

ESKIMO- pH Ofl® pa 

loasoj 

Dec 97 9265 9161 9245 +034 130.217 

Mor® S’# 22-59 nM t0M ^7<m 

}? n *£ Yia -034 13417 

5S2 S-25 2-1? ^74 +0 04 5X978 

Dec® 9184 9741 9182 +034 SX901 

Mar® 92.90 9187 9239 +004 S 

Est. sties: 69.472 Pnv. rales: 5X306 
Piw. open bil.: 671957 up n* 

J-MONTH EUROMARK OJFFQ 
DM1 mWlon tfi of I0Q po 

3 d Y1 9662 9X63 +0 02 1046 

N -J. UT. 96X6 +032 4® 

Dec 97 9* 50 9647 9X50 +034 284438 

»34 9X33 +034 mto 

e^M oe« 9407 ®11 +034 216863 

Xf 89 *’ 0j0j 

9lA4 +OAi iw on 

MorJJ 45 95^2 95^5 ‘4004 

Jun® 953* 9535 W *004 

Prev.opsnbil.. M75.787 up 11.156 

l-MOKTH PI BOH (MAT1F) 

FFSmWton-pisoMOT^i ' 

NT St ' 001 4X2® 

51 NT 9646 .004 

52?« ®T. St JlfJ 

*p® mt. ut. ^ g® 

Esl. Min: 38.) 76 

Open Ml.: 247^14 up 4.B5B 

ftrawwa??* 

Mar® 9X07 piii ££ ^g’wgo 

Jun® 9445 94.34 £2 luS 


Jtov97 57.® 5X90 57 JO -065 If 

Dec 97 5675 56X0 5X75 0X5 14 

Jon® 5X65 56X0 56X0 -0X0 15 

Feb® 57® 5630 57® -0.17 3 

Mur® „ _ 5773 until. ■ 

tor® MXO 60X0 MjO 432 2 

May ® 6077 until. 

Est sates N A Frfs rates 31^65 
Fits open hi 101,945, off 1175 

GASOIL OPE) 

U3. dallan parmtirtc tan - lets ti 1W tans 
Sap 97 145X0 14025 16325 —125 II. 

Od 97 147® 145-00 145.® —0.75 22 

Nov 97 IM® 16700 167® -0® la 
Dec 97 170® 169® 1«9® —025 14 

Jem® 171® 17075 170® Until IQ 

Feb® 171.75 171® 170.75 Until X 

Mor® 170® 170.® 169.75 +025 a 

Est. sties: 1X9®. Prev. sides : 1X423 
Piev. open bit.: 91,707 up 919 

Stock Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

500* Index 

Sep97 93875 930® 933® ,;uiu 

DocW 94875 943® lere '« 

Mor® 957.75 *57.75 9^.75 tf® i 

Esl. soles N A Fits soles Brnc i 
Frts open tat 210.987, vp3,zst 

FTSE IW(UFFE) 

05 per Index ptiip 

SR SH ft 

N.T N.T ^0 7| 

^Miei: 11448. Prey. teto; 2&6M 
Pte*. open tel: 77,®4 up 389 

CAC«(MATIF) 

PPMO pw bite point 

S"?” N.T N.T. 29S1.0 +J«3 4a 
NT. 2S37X +215 

M. T. 2965X +24 0 | 

S? 5 *240 1 ; 

N. T. 2W7X +215 i a; 


0097 
Nov 97 
Dec 97 
Mar® 


N.T. 

UT. 

NT. 

N.T. 

EsL rales; 188) 

Open InL 47.774 off 411 


Commodity Indexes 

Moody's 1.5S9X0 *?sl 

5 e j rt « s . lSam 

™« Fw,wra 15037 'ii 

CRB 2-12.18 3 ) 

KSSSS*S»r 


Sop our 

*«•* Antiques 

<*vno Saturday 


1 



INTERNATH 


*)l\ \'JL£i 1).^ SEPTEMBER 3*, 1997 


PAGE 3* 




^/i 7y> — _ 

* ^-k i « Rules 


IINTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 19 97 

EUROPE 


PAGE 15 


m 2 


ir a- v 


^ Parti 


Sought for 
Networks 

Official Urges Unity 
-for Communications 

tj c,m V M ‘"i*rSktfhn'mDtt f vielk3 

— The European 
ih?r mu ? s,on called Monday foVan 
flftteniauonal charter to smooth the 

,Sr en l 0f a Slobai commu- 
-^ a i^_ J industr y that would gov- 
br ° adcas , [ and telecommunica- 
I *u >ns netu, ° r ^ s and their content as 

they converge. 

Speaking at a communications 
-conference here, the EU’s industry 
["'Commissioner. Martin Bangemann, 
^so criticized U.S. authorities for 
stamng the entry of foreign compa- 
■^■nies into American local and satel- 
’’■‘^l^onynumcations markets. 

The idea of an European Union 
’ communications regulatory author- 
Jjy- while advocated by some in- 
dusiry players, is a sensitive one 
because it would take power away 
from national regulators. 

Mr. Bangemann said attempts by 
countries to create different rules for 
trade m products and in services were 
no longer relevant as communica- 
tions networks blurred borders be- 
tween previously separate industries 
•'-such as publishing, telecommunica- 
tions and computers. A European 
Communications Act could bring to- 
gether legislation on infrastructure, 

- services and content he said. 

Geographical borders have also 
become irrelevant, Mr. Bangemann 
^said, as global communications net- 
works are created. 

• r “The world community needs to 
‘establish a new set of rules adapted 
-to the capabilities of new technol- 
ogies,' * he said. "Telecommunica- 
tions policy constitutes a central pil- 
-iar for economic growth in the 
.■information society. 

• < Mr. Bangemann said the EU 
cshould consider his proposals when 
tit reviewed its telecommunications 
-liberalization plan in 1999. 

- The commission will start a broad 
consultation with companies, reg- 

. nJators and customers to determine a 
^charter for communications regu- 
lation, Mr. Bangemann said. He said 
-the EU executive body would soon 
-publish a discussion paper on the 
-industry’s development for the next 
efive years. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


2004 Olympics Fuel Surge in Athens Stocks 


CimvUnlln (Act Chqvirfa 

ATHENS — Greek equities scored a record 
opening rise Monday amid widespread ebul- 
lience over the selection of Athens by the 
International Olympic Committee as the site of 
the 2004 Olympic Games. 

"This is good news for .Greek assets, es- 
pecially equities and the hard drachma,’ * Harris 
Makkas, country treasurer at Bank of America 
here, said after the city was awarded the Games 
on Friday. ‘‘The marked improvement in sen- 
timent will certainly help all Greek markets in 
the short run." 

The Athens Stock Exchange’s benchmark 
index of 60 companies rose an unprecedented 
1 22.69 points, or 7.96 percent, to 1 ,663.69. with 
53 of its shares rising more than 7.8 percent. 
Trading volume was double the average of the 
past three months. 

Institutional investors have said they had 
been selling shares ahead of the decision Friday 
to reduce risk in case Athens lost the bid and to 
increase their disposable cash to join a rally in 


case it won. Shares in a wide range of industries, 
including construction and banking, rose on 
expectations that the winning bid would ac- 
celerate public works and investments, promote 
tourism and help secure regional peace and 
stability, analysts said. 

Investors and analysts said they expected 
new capital to enter the market throughout the 
rest of the year amid confidence that Greece’s 
economy would continue to expand while in- 
terest rates continued to decline. 

With or without the Games, Greece has been 
planning public works and investment valued at 
2 trillion drachmas ($7 billion) a year. The 
government has budgeted 1 .6 trillion drachmas 
to modernize transportation this year. 

The 1998 budget, government officials re- 
cently said, will increase by 20 percent, to 2 
trillion drachmas, while similar amounts will be 
injected into the economy until well after 2000. 
in the form of European Union subsidies. 

But Prime Minister Costas Simitis also 
stressed thar Greece would continue its strict 


economic policies, particularly reducing the 
government deficit and maintaining a strong 
currency to battle inflation ahead of joining 
European economic and monetary union bv 
2001 aithe latesr. 

Mr. Makkas said he did not expect bonds to 
rally as much as stocks because they faced the 
constraints ot future tax liabilities linked to the 
Games and local institutions' substitution of 
equities for bonds and cash. 

Other bankers warned against the issuance of 
new bonds to finance the Games and said the 
future supply of bonds that might he needed to 
finance the 2004 Games should be limited. 

"It would be better if the responsibility for 
the financing of the Games is given to an 
independent private comminee that will man- 
age cash flows in a cost-effective way that will 
not add to the counity's public debt," a senior 
banker at a foreign bank said. 

The budget for ihe 2004 Summer Games is 
projected at Si. 6 billion, and a profii of $36.6 
million is forecast. < Renters. Bln, hu hem i 


Renault to Meet Unions Over Part-Time Deal 


Reuters 

PAWS — Renauli will meet with 
its unions Tuesday to negotiate an 
agreement to allow employees to 
choose to work part-time without a 
fully commensurate drop in wages, 
the automaker said Monday. 

.Under the proposal, which has 
been discussed at three previous 
meetings with unions, part-time em- 
ployees would work no fewer than 16 
hours a week and no more than four- 
fifths of their current schedules. 

“Renault would pay staff who 
shifted to part-time from full-time 
status an indemnity equivalent to 40 
percent of the loss of gross remu- 
neration over 12 months." a com- 
pany document stated. “This mea- 
sure would in tum require a 
commitment from the employee to 
hold a part-time job for at least two 
years." 

A spokesman said the agreement, 
which the company said could be 
signed Tuesday if there were no 
complications, would be open to all 
categories of staff. 

The company offered no figures 
on die financial impact of the pro- 
posal, which was first discussed 
with unions in April, nor would it 
say how many workers it expected 
would choose to work part-time. 

Renault, which employs 141,000 
people, has said it needs to cut about 
3.000 jobs a year over the next few 
years to be competitive but is under 


pressure from the government to 
examine ways to preserve jobs. 

Representatives of the company’s 
two biggesr unions, the Communist- 
led CGT and Socialist-led CFDT, 
were not immediately available for 
comment. 

Meanwhile, analysts said Renault 
was expected to report a half-year 
loss Thursday because of difficult 
market conditions. But they also ex- 
pected the company to show an im- 


proved performance in the car di- 
vision. helped by the commercial 
success of the innovative Megane 
Scenic minivan and favorable cur- 
rency trends, notably the strength of 
the pound. 

Analysts say Renault’s rival PSA 
Peugeot Citroen SA. which reports 
interim results next month, is gen- 
erally expected to break even. 

Both companies were hit by a 
23.7 percent slump in car sales in 


G-10 Bankers Advise Asia 


{' vptlftJ ly Chn Sufi Frmi Dtifka,-Jtry 

BASEL — Bundesbank Pres- 
ident Hans Tietmeyer said Mon- 
day that the Group of 10 nations 
hoped that calm would be restored 
to Asian financial markets but that 
countries whose currencies were 
in turmoil there would need con- 
vincing adjustments. 

Mr. Tietmeyer also said the G- 
10 would continue to monitor de- 
velopments in Asia “very closely" 
and that discussions on this issue 
would continue at the International 
Monetary Fund meeting in Hong 
Kong this month. 

Looking at the overall global 
economy, Mr. Tietmeyer said the 
other major problem area was 


continental Europe because of its 
structural rigidities. In both areas, 
Mr. Tietmeyer said, G-10 central 
bank governors, meeting at the 
Bank for International Settle- 
ments, believed that develop- 
ments were moving in the right 
direction. The G- 10 consists of the 
Group of Seven leading industrial 
powers plus Sweden, Switzerland, 
Belgium and the Netherlands. 

Separately, the central bank 
governors said the Basel Com- 
mittee on Banking Supervision 
would work with bank super- 
visors worldwide to help banks 
prepare for computer problems at 
the tum of the millennium. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


| Investor’s Europe | 

Frankfurt 

London 

Paris ' 


DAX 

FTSE 100 Index CAC 40 


4500 

5200 

- 3250 •• 


4250 / 

\ 5000 

iAr 3100 


4DG0 / 


2950 W 

fX 

s* J 

■S6G0 py 

2300 ft/ 

Tf 


m J 



■* 4 ^ A M J J A S A M J 

J A S M J 

J A S 

1997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange 

index 

Monday Prev. 

' '% 



Close Close 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

905^0 916.51 

-153 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

2L42&27 2,436^5 

*0.31 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

4,068.01 4,100.87 

•0.80 

Copenhagen 

Stock Marks! 

609.47 603.64 

40-.14 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

3,431^5 3,445.60 

+0.18 

Oslo 

OBX 

702J57 702.43 

-0.02 

London 

FTSE 100 

4,98550 4,994.20 

•0.18 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

593,90 S91.28 

+0.44 

Milan 

MJBTEL 

14743 14701 

+0.29 

Paris 

CAC 40 

2^40-89 2 ,92451 

+05$ 


I Zurich 

Source- Tefehurs 


1, 391.40 1,40 1 .89 -0.75 

3^37.93 ~ 3,554.35 -0,46 

InunvuionJ HoaJJ Tnhuifc: 


France in the first «ux months of 
1997 from high levels a year earlier, 
when ihe French government was 
giving rebaies io 'new car buyers 
replacing old models. 

But ihey both reported 6.3 percent 
gains in total first-half sales after 
increasing their activities in other 
European markets ami deriving 
gains from a rise in the Italian. Brit" 
ish and Spanish currencies against 
the franc. 

John Lawson, a Salomon Broth- 
ers analyst, said he expected Renault 
to report a first-half net loss of 270 
million francs ($44.5 mi (lion) after a 
capital gain of about 450 million 
francs from the sale of Elf Aquitaine 
SA shares and a small gain from the 
redemption of some" Volvo AB 
shares in June. 

■ Porsche Doubles Its Profit 

Porsche AG said profit for its 
latest year more than doubled amid 
strong sales of its fast-selling Box- 
ster sports car, Bloomberg News 
reported from Stuttgart, Germany. 

The company had a net profit of 
48.1 million Deutsche marks (S26.6 
million) in the previous year. 
Porsche, which did not provide an 
exact figure for the latest year's 
earnings, said it expected profit to 
rise in its current year as well. 

Sales in the year that ended July 
3 1 rose 43 percent, to 4 billion DM 
from 2.8 billion DM. 


Very briefly: 

• Olivetti and Cofide shares were suspended from trading in 
Italy after rising sharply in the wake of Friday's announce- 
ment of a joint venture w ith Mannesmann AG of Germany. 
Pre-opening deals showed Olivetti set ro open 51.7 percent 
higher and Cofide rising 30.53 percent. 

• KLM, the Dutch flag carrier, is within two months of sealing 
a cooperation pact with Japan Air Systems and is hoping to 
conclude similar arrangements in Europe and Latin America, 
a KLM spokesman said. 

• Air France director Marc Ladreit de Lacharriere said he 
would not seek renewal of his mandate after the departure of 
Chairman Christian Blanc, who failed to persuade the gov- 
enwnenJ io privai ize the airline. The director said his move"was 
a protest against the government’ s decision. 

■ B a ye rise he WagnisbeteiligungsgeselLschaft GmbH, a 
German investment company, is discussing buying a 43 
percent stake in the German consumer-electronics concern 
Grundig AG from London investment bank Botts & Co. 

• Tele Danmark A/S, the Danish state-owned telecommu- 
nications company, agreed with the government to buy back 
14 billion kroner ($2 bill ion) of its own shares next year. After 
the sale, the government will sell ihe remainder of its 51.7 
percent stake, depending on market conditions. 

• Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette said it would buy London 
Global Securities, an international securities lending firm, to 
try to lift its European business. People familiar with the 
purchase, which would be DU's second British acquisition 
this year, said last month that the price under discussion was 
about $50 million. 

• Dresdner Bank mortgage subsidiaries Hypothekenbank of 
Hamburg, Deutsche Hypothekenbank of Frankfurt and Nord- 
deutsche Hypotheken- & Wechselbank AG will merge next 
year, the banks announced Monday. The new group will be 
named Norddeutsche Hypotheken- & Wechselbank AG. 

AFP. Reuters. BiiWmberg 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 




-r - Monday, Sept. 8 

Prices fn local cumencles. 
Tefekurs 

r High Law Close Pit*. 

in 

^Amsterdam “*”£*** 

A3N-AMRO .90 4050 4150 « 

Aegon 15X30 155.90 156*0 1SL4S 

-Ahokl 55,® 5240 5140 5530 

AftZO KoW 32BJD 32550 327 JO 327.10 

BamCa. 12550 122 125.10 12S.W 

BobWtaon £30 £30 

. CSMon 9650 9320 9190 9150 

monllEChe M ?T0 108 109.10 M7.W 

e .bSM 192-70 190.10 192* 1W 

32.40 32 32J0 73M 

87 JO 8120 8530 BOM 
59 59 6240 

55 5590 55.70 

Haaanem 10540 10120 10340 105JS 

Hetnekiin 324 316.10 319 32190 

‘gig ^ 

93 91 JO 92-48 93 

72,70 6940 7170 USS 
4450 4150 43J0 4180 
74 72-80 73.20 74 

6270 6270 6250 6270 
64.30 62-30 62.30 64 

iQoeGrintan 247 *0 242 243*0 248 

PhBps Ok 15540 15110 151,70 157.70 

FMma 11150 107 A0 108*0 10950 

SfcriHdg 87-40 84 86 S550 

SoftmT 19110 193.10 193.10 19550 

“ESSco O.90 n a ,*i» 

194 19350 19350 19170 

S „ 118 11770 H770 11750 

Dntdi 109.70 10750 10940 111 JO 

BTcwa 436 43150 434 439.90 

JtartnW 1DU0 107 10750 

246 247.10 149.10 


G-Broccva 

tssr 

HODOnWIKCVO 

HwdDau#* 

-JWGG<t>up 

’KLM 

CXNPBT 

*KPN 

tMHflkWlGp 
:4tutrida 
lOceGrintai 
PhS|H Bee 


'OtTfpt Dates 
“unfltvstcYO 
.^emtalnS 
‘VNU 

Waters Kina 

Bangkok 


•ssatf 

‘Tdocmnosii 

ffisr&F 

IMCnwi 

^Bombay 

e , 

H 1 
m 

State Bt MB 
SfedAofcorty 
Tata Eng Loco 

^Brussels 


Cbtoyt 

MNduLtao 

EtedmM 

fclcdralkia 

Forth AG 

Gewfirt 

GBL 

-Gen Bongue 
UttHfietenS 
-Priofina 
Powsfin 

(tefdeVMw 
Sac Gen Brig 
Sonny 
Tractate! 

KB 


Copenhagen 


gw *S&5;2£5 

s s !§ 

922 920 822 919 

372 364 371 367 

lie 649 655*6 65& 

. 604 rZl BaaS Mown 


(Ugh Low .dose 

Deutsche Bonk 110.15 109 1005 

Dent Telekom 3740 37 37 JB 

DresdnerBaak 7550 7150 7570 
Frasenfan 312 310 310 

FiBenhn Med 13130 131 131-80 

Pried. KrupP 400 395 400 

Gefie lOMB 108 100 

HeWefcgZmt 151 14950 150 

Henkel pH 102 101 102 

HEW N.T. HT. H.T. 

Bad** 8750 M 8750 

Hcetlttl 7570 7150 7570 

Karatndt 660 648 648 

Lahmeyer 9150 89.10 89.10 
Linde 1255 1238 1255 

Lufthansa 38 3750 3755 

MAN SB B0 ® 

Mamesmam 918 911 91770 

MetaBpesetodiafl 40.10 40 40 

Metal 8740 8470 85L15 

Munch Rueck R 604 9« 604 

Preussug 49850 490 _49B 

RWE 8150 80.70 8140 

SAP pH 42651) 419 420 

Sdieriog 186)80 1B3J50 1BSJSJ 

SGL Carton 241 739 24) 

Siemens 11740 1164Q 11735 

Springer {A«D 1515 1512 1512 

SMAUCbW 865 B65 865 

Thyssen 42750 43550 435.70 
Veto 10181! 100-90 10150 

VEW 583 580 577 

Vfag 78850 774 78850 

Wsw 122650 USS 1165 


Helsinki 


RWE 
SAP pH 

Siemens 


SET Mac 57Z3B 
PTC*tau;540J9 


26JS 27J5 21M 
390 40* 390 

stt m «e 

101 115 9550 

32 3175 30.75 
50 5150 47.25 
111 112 08 


Ensa A 

HuMamaUI 

KfiBiho 

Kesko 

AtofloA 

MeMB „ 

MrtEO-SeftaB 

Neste 

Nokia A 

Orion- Yhtvraae 

Outokumpu A 

UPMKymmene 

VahMt 


48 47 JO 4750 4740 
217 215 215 212 


,mm 47 

7150 70 

27 21.70 
156 154 

45-50 4450 
139 13850 
459 452 

175 170 


SwBeKjOMeicggJO 

P imi —H <832-35 

B50 B34 849 83955 

139850 1373 1397 J5I4WLM 


10955 mas 10955 110.75 
54675 534.75 54450 54250 
273 2*1-25 270-75 
34750 385-75 34*75 
28675 79275 29550 29550 
2050 1975 2050 1975 
35675 34950 35450 35175 

BEL-aiodee 2429-27 
Pmtaas MJtB 

1695 1665 1685 100 

7630 7560 7620 7630 

5SS60 9430 947*} W70 

3100 3240 31* 

17850 17600 17^ IfTOO 
1745 1690 173T 1780 

7750 769® T710 7740 

1SJ0 3500 3535 3520 
TOW 7400 74B0 7500 

3CT 3380 3445 343ffl 

am 5700 58® ,^0 
14700 14400 14650 14500 
1W5 14800 14850 MM 
14175 13960 1«0 

4K&S 4910 4920 49M 

1IM50 10300 1065* 10M 
X00 3400 3440 

So 2175 2175 2m 

1-4875 14800 I4U0 14880 
124700 122050 124000 126000 


Hong Kong 

7.90 

ssass h.8 

40.90 

OlcPodfic 4*40 
DaoHeng Bh 355D 

MPadnc w 

HangLw>gOev 

SS ”aii 
f 

HKBedric V 

HKTWecnmni 18.15 

was* % 

Hukhlsan Wh 7*K 

sssshu f! 

OrimiWPWss 255 
PeartOrienW 
SHK Piocs- 01 

smmTakHdgs 
o, — i — ,rn 7JS 

bJ5 

meratH 44 

Wharf Hdgs »^0 
Wheelock 14J5 


Jakarta cww ^s»til 


Astmtoh 

Bfclntilndon 

Bk Negara 
GutaogGcnB 


Indoeat 

Scmpoer«KM 
SenWiGresOc . 
Tdekomunami 


4425 3700 

1200 HBO 
103P 9»0 
4000 3M0 
4500 fPS 
8125 7975 

AW f»0 
3775 3475 
3700 3600 


3925 *275 

1050 1100 

J m ii50 
10000 10200 
MOO 3775 
WS 4500 
809 7775 
8850 8225 

3575 3400 
$75 3575 


Johannesburg 

195 200 • 203 „ n« 31 JO 


ixSi Ills 
KSTb 1111 
sasna* ajBJtJS 


Frankfurt 

0*- 

2AMBB 1575 

219J0 
427 JO 

-mua 12X90 

BkBwtin 4175 

BASS 4145 

45 302**9 




QCAGCriooia 165 
goawrAank 64J5 
DwilffBaa 14L70 


UAX.-4068JH 

PrtvtoBK^l*^ 7 

™ ™ g'l 

424J0 42570 43i^ 

9 VS “I 

S S w 

MX 9190 9180 
68.70 49.10 «9.ra 
ai »» , JI 

MJ5 38JS 

1315 I3W 
164 ]6d 163 

ritt *340 6555 
1A60 139 JO 13SJ0 
SlO 93-50 9*80 


saris j-sj gs 

S S3 

wr“ 4 !i i 

warns ‘gs 'Slo 3280 

38.S 3«0 33.15 37^ 

wk 11J0 n ig 

ISSSW 4 2165 2140 73-* 2*^ 

sis 

Mtaoren 99^ ,940 19 JO M 

ts? -E 


High Low Clue Piev. 

SA Breweries 139 137-50 13825 14025 

Samoncnr 3875 3850 3850 38 

Saw*.. .6650 .6550. 66-6625 

5B1C 212 210 21B 712 

Tiger Onto 73 7050 7125 7075 


Kuala Lumpur C“2255=g*S 

r Previous: B31 59 

AMMBHdgs 1870 10 10* 920 

GmUng 1120 1870 11 1870 

MolBmWlflg 19-60 1840 19* 1880 

Mdln85NpF 590 530 550 5.38 

ftefrorasGos 9-45 895 9* 3.90 

Proton 9J5 9.10 9* 920 

Pubic Bk 199 2* 296 271 

Renong 3* 130 328 134 

Resorts World 7* 7 7.10 7.15 

Rothmans PM 2725 25 27 2525 

6JB> 7J5 • “ 

9* 1020 
845 895 

12 13 

5-90 6.60 


51 4820 4740 

70 71-50 71 

.70 22 217® 

54 154 15850 

5a « 4650 

-SB 139 143 

52 459 457 

70 ITS 175 


Store Derby 7-45 

Telekom Md 1820 

Tonga 895 

UM Engineers 1110 

YTL 620 

London 

Abbey Natl 879 

AMkxtDonwai 420 

Angfian Water 820 

A/IJOS 620 

Asco Group 1* 

Assoc Br Foods 525 

BAA 5.77 

Baidars 142* 

Bass 849 

BAT bid 534 

Bank Scartand *34 

Blue aide 405 

BOC Group ro* 

Bools 818 

BPBInd 160 

Bid Aamp 1575 

Bril Airways 4-47 

BG 275 

Bril laid 597 

Bril Pedro 9.19 


91.90 89 JO 9? .90 90 

131 1274® 12860 130.40 
7950 79 7950 S9 


Hang Seng: !*•** 
Pnvtoesi 145(155 

725 725 720 

27-45 37J5 2720 
1250 13* 1270 
84 8525 8450 
2350 2*15 US 5 
3920 4870 3920 
42.90 4*30 * 

tS W 
^ 

825 825 875 

6625 6825 6625 
15* 1525 1545 
2140 28.95 38* 
1720 18 1720 

*35 428 438 

235 239 240 

71-75 3^5 71 

2350 23.75 22* 
19* 71-10 19 

1870 TOTS 18g 
4720 47.90 *7^J 
2M Iff 
1.18 121 1.19 

8815 89J0 B850 
** W7 *45 
7 -» 730 725 

625 670 6-45 

64 65 6£5 

2890 29.15 2898 

1635 1620 16221 


soc Group ro* 

Bools 818 

BPBInd 3* 

Bid Aamp 1875 

Bril Atosays 4-47 

BG 225 

Bril laid S97 

Bril Pedro 9.19 

BrtMel 173 

Bril Telecom *17 

BTR 222 

Burmch Costrol 11 

Burton Gp 122 

CoWeWWeffi 5.58 

Cadtnnv Sdiw 6 j07 

CatllanCamai *93 

Comm! Union 7.97 

Compass Gp 6.02 

CowtauHs 3.10 

Dtasns 842 

Eledrocomponails *98 
EMI Group 5* 

BS 3 

(Seal Accident 9J4 

GEC 897 

GKN 1810 

Grand MH 529 

is* a 

GUS 6*7 

HS^C Hldgs 

I^Tohocco %° 

KtocdWwr 7jB 


Lund Sec "10 

Lfisma 868 

Legal Genl Grp *71 

Lloyds T5B Gp 7^ 

LuaaVariSv 812 

M^sp«re. 

ftUffl S26 

NolWest 8^ 

Ned 7.93 

NorwtdiUnton 80 

Orange 221 

PSO 604 

Pearson 7J0 

PUktagton 1-44 

Powerful fM 

Premier Fomd &M 

Prudenfiol 629 

RmBrotiGp 7.ff 

Pn* Group 85S 

ReduflCota' ’72 

RedHod 2.99 

Reediidl SJ9 

Rcntakfl IriW 2JQ 

Reuters Hdgs U0 

Ream ,.3 

RTZrtg mu 

SMC Group Itt* 

Rafc Royct 221 

Royal Bk Sent 4.14 

RcMdSiSun AI 520 


SwS .If, aS 45io 

RBg«g ,GP S ^ 7075 

nJ5 n 


SUmStUf ** 

Sd««W5. 

SCBlNBWOKfe 7 A 

5ml Power *» 

Securicor 2i7 

s^nTtarf an 

ShdTnnspR A* 

State 11-91 

SnShNephew 1J4 

SndBiKbw J45 

sfi a 

issa,. a 

Tote 8 Lyle all 

££»•«» « 


u mem rj, 

UW Assurance KO 


FT-5E IN: 498521 
PmtoHS: 4)9*20 

8*8 869 828 

*7? 422 4.77 

810 813 808 

6.12 620 617 

I* L4S \M 

528 528 5J2 

5*7 523 520 

14* 1*55 14*7 
832 839 848 

525 527 531 

427 *31 

191 193 195 

10.53 1053 10*4 
am am am 
155 3*0 156 

15* 15-70 15-31 

6-35 63? 643 

220 2.72 225 

5.91 5.97 523 

9 Ot 9.14 926 

4*0 *71 *60 

1.72 122 1.72 

*09 *15 *18 

2.17 819 Zl» 

1092 lass- IftM 

121 121 121 
5* 5-53 5-50 

6 6*1 *06 
4JB0 *B9 422 

7*3 7* 7*4 

5.90 6.01 602 

113 116 115 

U2 640 642 

*80 *92 426 

523 525 528 

6J0 632 631 

689 699 690 

1.73 125 123 

In HA 

1328 13J59 1186 
1113 1121 1137 
ao5 8-12 aie 

a ) 5*5 682 

I 185 186 

4*0 4L74 423 

IS 3 6M 

6* 643 641 

1921 19*4 19*5 

m ^ % 7 

7*5 7*4 7*5 

““ IS IS 

2*3 2*6 2*4 

*45 *71 *67 

7*2 7J8 7*6 

3.07 W 207 
608 61T 613 

*68 *25 *71 

1137 12*7 12*7 
2*8 220 2*8 
5*7 5.72 5*7 

815 830 816 

721 7.93 722 

3*7 2M 3*3 
218 219 218 
6*5 658 6*3 

727 7*4 727 

1*1 1*3 1*4 

728 728 72B 

522 5*2 523 

627 633 636 

7*0 7*0 723 

3*3 IS 150 
9*3 9*7 922 
287 292 199 

524 5*4 5*1 

226 226 229 

628 644 629 

195 196 195 
1001 1006 926 

WJ5 KU8 70*3 
226 130 
603 605 6.74 

5.12 5.15 524 

193 l«i 197 
*24 *26 425 
1&13 1825 1823 
725 7J8 729 

*$6 4*9 4*1 

2*3 266 1*7 

8*5 8*6 849 

4*0 *C *48 
11*0 1105 11*7 
101 104 103 

5*4 5*8 5*6 

8-48 8*7 844 

*58 4*0 4*1 

6*0 6*0 6*2 
7.90 B 8E3 
*05 407 *13 
420 *22 *27 

B 8<B 801 
*89 *» 492 

595 603 596 

107 111 308 

1802 1810 1825 
425 *39 *38 

706 723 723 


UH unites 
VendomeLxuts 
Vodafone.,. <.s _ 
WhUbread 
WiKonu Hdgs 
WDheiey 
WPP Group 
Zeneca 

Madrid 

Acerinox 

ACESA 

Aguas Barceton 

Argwitaria 

BBV 

Banesto 

Bardanter 

Bcq Centro Hisp 

Boa ftipular 

Ben Santonder 

CEPSA 

Cantlnenfe 

FEC5A 
Gas Natural 
Ibenfanlo 
Pryco 
Repud 

Sevflfana Elec 
icboadenj 

Tetefanks 

Urtoa Fenasa 
Uolntc Cement 


Manila 


Ante Land 
BkPhflpisl 
C6P Homes 
Mania Elec A 
Metro Bate 
— 

PCI Bank 
Phi Long DW 
ScnMlgadB 
SM Prime Hdg 


Mexico 

AttaA 
Banned B 
Cemex CPO 
□hoC 

Emp Mcxterna 

GpaCOrsaAl 

GpoF Banner 

Gao Fm mewsa 

UmbOaricMek 

TsfcvtoaCPO 

TelMeaL 


itf 

Auric 

1MI 

•.HA 


High Law dosa Prey. 

7 695 697 697 

i *55 453 *53 4*4 

... 321. 325 327-. 131 

826 815 824 829 

170 3*5 165 3*9 

4.82 *65 4.70 *83 

206 2LB2 205 283 

19.40 1905 1929 1923 

Bafea fries: 59198 
Previous: 59128 

24450 24100 24150 24400 
1885 I860 1880 1065 

i 5650 5580 5640 5580 

7770 7650 7750 7770 

4185 4150 41B0 4175 

1480 1460 1470 1475 

mao 8ooo siso soio 

I 5910 5860 5900 5890 

N.7. N.T. N.T. 34900 

4360 4290 4360 4300 

4530 -uns 4495 4525 

3030 2S0B 3030 2975 

8550 8400 8550 8900 

3230 3700 3715 3215 

1220 1200 1220 1215 

7240 7160 7220 7150 

1760 1715 1 755 1 720 

2710 2675 2705 2670 

6220 6140 4190 41*0 

1350 1340 1350 1350 

8220 8100 8180 8150 

4320 4250 *315 4275 

1225 1215 1225 1230 

2850 2835 2835 2830 


PSE tries: 21 86*8 
Preview: 210902 

1175 1*75 1*50 

16J5 17*0 17*0 

111 121 116 

175 190 4.15 

68 73 70 

345 355 355 

*40 4S *75 

152 153 1 51 

870 895 875 

51 57 -SO 52 

640 600 680 


High Low Close pro*. 


High Urn Close Pm. 


Yrib Index prees 3S a,3V0 P M Ne " > York r * n ® 

jan >. 19*?- IOC 1 Level Change % change year to date 

% change 

World Index 173.64 -007 -0.04 4-16.43 

Regional Indexes 

Asia-Pacific 120.98 *0.32 -0.27 -1 98 

Europe 185.0t -1.11 -0.60 +14.77 

/V. America 206.89 +O.S6 +0.42 +27.78 

S. America 16&73 +0.23 +0.14 +48.33 

Industrial Indexes 

capital goods 22*22 +1.52 +0.68 +31.18 

Consumer goods 188.76 -1.02 -0.54 +16.93 

Energy 203.19 -0.21 -0.10 +19.03 

Finance 128.66 -0.18 -0.14 +10.48 

Miscellaneous 184 04 +1.78 +0.98 +13.76 

Raw Materials 186.08 +0.35 +0.19 +6.10 

Servo? 163.98 +0.03 +0.02 +19.41 

UltMies 17028 +0.73 +0.43 +18.70 | 

T+i? tnienviKmui Herat! TnDune Wond Stock Inlet p tracks the US. dollar values ol 
SPJ .nternauonalk- vurestable stocks I'om 25 cournnes For more nlormanon. a tree 
bookie! >s available by wrung to The Tab Index. t$l Avenue Charles de (SauSe . 
Veu-Hv Cede*. France Compiled bv Bloomberg New s. 


CAM* 294809 
P rev loss; 2*2*51 


MeAdxraca 

MonJodhon 

Oflverti 

Parmari 

RAS 

Roto Banco 
SPocde Torino 
TOecomlMla 
TTM 


Montreal -teshtatejriwa^ 


Bee Mob Cora 

QtallreA 

CdnUtliA 

CTFWSvc 

Goz Mete 

Gt-wesl LHecD 

B1M5QD 

hnestonGip 
LobtowCoi 
Nod Bk Canada 
PowwCnip 
Power Hni 
QuebecorB 
Rogers CamB 
RmdBisCdo 


51 50U 

I7R 27.70 
37M 37*5 

404 43U 

18*5 1835 
3305 32*5 
'3905 39* 
33*0 33*0 

20Mi 20<k 
17M 17*0 
39 38*0 
3700 3705 
25W 25*0 
9.95 9*5 

66,10 6190 


51 50*0 
2714 27.70 
37*0 37*0 
4*0 4344 

18*0 1805 
33 3305 
3905 »70 
33*0 33R 
2000 2020 
1716 17*0 
3X80 38.90 
3705 37 JO 
2546 2541 

9.95 9.90 
65.90 65.70 


OBXtadeoc 78207 
Pievteos: 702*2 


Oxfitoua Bk 
DennorstarB* 
Etken 
HofstofldA 
KvaemerAsa 

NanLHyteo 
NootesusA 
NycanwdA 
OridoAsaA 
ReftaGeaSvc 
<~>"PeltroA 

sted 

TnlHocean Off 
Storebrand Asa 


127*0 126 

201 200 
2X20 2400 
30Li» 3030 
135 132*0 
45*0 45 

387*0 380*0 
434*0 430 

273 170 

162 159 

568 552 

465 46050 
162 161 
123 122 

690 690 

52 50*0 


126 127 

201 200 
2*90 1500 
3040 3080 
133*0 134 

45*0 46 

381 386*0 
433 434 

273 273 

159 160 

548 550 

461 440 

162 162 

23 13 

52 50*0 


AlrLMuide 

AlaidAbtti 

Axa-UAP 

BencnJrF 

BIC 

BNP 

Carol Phis 

CtarekHlr 

Casino 

OCF 

Cetelem 

ChristianDior 

CLF-Drala Fran 

Credit Agriote 

Don one 

Bl-Aquitalne 

EridantaB5 

Eamfisnar 

Euntonnel 

GeaEaux 

Havas 

imetal 

Uriarge 

Lngrond 

LTJraal 

LVMH 

MkliefnB 

Paribas A 

Pernod RJcaid 

Peugeot C« 

PwSilt-Prlnl 

Proatadw 

Renauli 

RnH 

RtvPoulencA 

Sanofl 

SdmUer 

SEB 

SG5 Thomson 
SteGenmde 
Sodexho 
StGobain 
Suez (De) 

Suez t-«an Eaux 


970 954 

237.70 233*0 
937 

807 788 

401.80 398J0 
739 R6 
43*80 421 

29*40 281*0 
1059 1028 
39*5 3530 

Siep. SUSP. 

332.70 316*0 

858 845 

582 566 

1283 1283 
897 876 

757 742 

820 
8*5 B*0 

60S *75 

742 714 

409 400 

870 853 

440 425 

1235 1175 

7325 2275 

1311 1282 
360.60 354.10 
44&B0 432*0 
293.90 290J8 
768 753 

2627 2585 

7173 7133 

171J0 166 

1724 1679 

238 230*0 
599 587 

m» 329.10 
889 876 

553 544 

791 768 

2770 2701 
909 884 

1525 15.10 
681 655 

730 708 

169 I63J8 
660 645 

111.49 JOT-5D 
371 363*0 


967 977 

236 238-50 
937 931 

80S 796 

401 48L30 
737 710 

4Z4 426 

797 285.30 
1048 1027 

3539 3564 

susp. 307 
33I.W 32270 
628 619 

847 853 

582 574 

1283 1304 

879 898 

753 755 

040 835 

8*5 8-50 

60S 600 

723 714 

J0&.90 396.10 
860 854 

437 428.10 
1733 1196 

2290 2307 
1298 1310 
35*20 357 

446 432 40 
293.90 29*10 
759 773 

2623 2620 

2164 2156 

170.40 169 

1689 1715 

237.60 231.90 
590 591 

332 332 

880 889 

54* 5SS 
786 775 

2730 2778 

905 891 

15.10 15.10 
681 667 

714 715 

16*90 16*20 
653 6J8 

717.147 I1P-S1 
370 366 90 


Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
KenrewB 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
MoDoB 
Nordtmnlien 
Phamvllptohn 
Sandvfii B 
Sauiio B 
SCAB 

S-E Bonken A 
SMhkEoPois 
SX ansLn B 
SKFB 

SparbanSofl 4 
Srora A 
5v Handles A 
Volvo B 


Sydney 

Amc« 

ANZ Bklng 

BHP 

Boral 

Brambles Ind. 
CBA 

CC Amato 
Coles Myer 
Coma la) 

CSR 

fosters Brew 
Goodman Rd 
KJAusIrafc 
Lend Lease 
WIM Hdqj 
Not Ausl Bank 
MalMutoriHdg 
New Carp 
Poafic Dun log 
Pfcntn InH 
Pub Broadurd 
RtoTmto 
SI George Bank 
WMC 


WbodsntePel 

Waolvrorms 


Balsa todero 49516* 
Prevtow: 492703 

63.90 6*60 6300 

§ .10 2120 2130 
.90 4010 39.70 

1*42 1*42 1*50 

41.00 4100 4140 
58*0 6060 58*0 
150 150 3-54 

3300 33J» 33-00 
3605 3*90 3700 
143*0 14*00 14*00 
1840 18.70 1808 


MIB TetaMriice: 1474308 
Previous: 1478101 

>070 14755 14950 14810 
1475 4620 *W0 4470 

,240 6040 6240 6200 

774 1694 1724 1730 

750 26000 27250 27050 
1625 3570 3595 3«» 

1470 8299 8325 8450 

025 9898 10020 9935 

H50 5740 WM 5815 

'EM 37400 37850 37850 
*45 17260 17535 173B0 
1650 2605 2645 2615 

1620 5515 561* *595 

®10 7820 799* 7945 

i3*0 12105 12280 12285 
195 1170 1174 1170 

967 B90 914 775 

750 2705 Tim 273S 

1775 47DJ 4710 4700 

IM0 14790 14805 14» 
H00 22650 22750 22700 
1290 13015 1311* 13000 
400 1110) 11240 11235 
400 6385 *325 6265 


Sao Paulo BovenatodBcii83i.io Taipei 

Prevrous: H 638-48 


BrodescoPH 
Bra luiw Pfd 

CemtaPfd 
CESPPM 
Cupel 
Efedcteus 
It on banco Pid 
UgM Setvtetes 

P^uEras PH 
PauUstaLuz 
Sid Notional 
Sown Cnrt 
Telebros Pfd 
Tetemig 
Tried 
TdesaPM 
Untoanca 
Usiminas PH 
CVRD PH 

Seoul 


1005 1005 
80*00 780.00 
57*0 55-00 
84*0 02*0 
1740 1701 

991.00 565.00 
59001 58500 

530.01 51000 
39000 36001 
30600 39700 
189*0 18800 
43*0 42*0 
1029 10.10 
148.20 14*10 
17300 17200 
15600 15100 
33*99 331.00 

38.10 37*0 

12.10 1100 

29.10 28-60 


1005 70-35 
800 00 79000 
57-30 5*20 
8300 82-30 
1740 17.15 
58300 56401 
58800 99000 
515.00 51000 
36500 380 00 
30101 29700 
189*0 18700 
42-Sfi 42.99 
10.10 M.I3 
14*10 14779 
172-30 17100 
15200 15100 
33200 33200 
3800 3800 
1200 1200 
2875 28.70 


.’da Motors 
Korea El Purr 
Korea Exeh Bh 
LGSemksn 
Pahang Iran 51 
Samsung Olslav 
Samsung Elec 
Sldrdnn wnfc 
SK Telecom 


Compostte iadeu 49708 
Previous: 7*072 

88000 85400 86000 37900 
7420 7200 73SC 7410 

19400 18800 19006 19000 
12500 11300 11700 11900 
23700 23100 23200 23300 
5330 5200 5300 5260 

45000 «W9 42000 42000 
59BS3 57600 5BWD 59000 
46700 45000 46400 46400 
70000 68600 691 CC 69600 
B9S0 8720 8720 8950 

488000 475800 477000 480000 


Singapore s.ramrjmg.g.g 

Asia Poc Brew S35 5J5 535 5^ 

CwetKK Poc *30 6 605 5 90 

CByOnds JJL40 TO IfliO 102> 

Cycle Cantoge 975 9*5 9*5 9*5 

Da ay Faro fir 009 0*6 006 084 

1*90 1*30 1*50 1630 

4 386 4 382 


DBS 
Fraser* Neaw 
HKLand* 
JardMathen 
Jard Sirofcgft: 
KeppdA 
Xtppd Bank 
Keppel Fels 
‘Land 


Parinny Hdgs 
Sembmiang 
Sing Air iarrign 
Sing Land _ 
Sing Press F 
Sing Tedi bid 
SirMTeteaunm 
Tunis Bank 
UM Industrial 
UMOSaBkF 
Wing Tat Hdgs 
•;fl US- Mars. 


935 *95 

304 2.97 

8 7.80 
184 182 

5*0 *40 

334 336 

404 3.92 

*16 *04 

11*0 1130 
7.75 7 JO 
*45 *10 

US *25 
1280 12*0 
7.15 70S 
2*30 2350 
278 2*4 

231 7 JO 

281 278 

102 101 
12,20 11.70 
458 3-16 


P.lfl 9*0 
3 2.97 

7.90 7.95 

382 384 

5*0 5*0 

380 120 
194 4 

*16 *10 
1180 11 

7.7S 7 JO 

*45 *30 
625 *25 

12*0 12 JO 
7.1 D 705 

2150 2190 
277 7*0 

230 219 

279 278 
101 101 
1210 11.50 
138 112 


Stockholm sxui^ctmiij 

PmfBK: 3309 J9 


AOAB 
ABBA 
AssiDaman 
Astra A 
Alias Copco A 
AuhOv 


11*50 11230 114 11*50 

111 109 110 110 

241 238 241 244 

134 12930 134 131 

23 247 JO 251 248 

312 306 31QJ0 30730 


Cathay Life Ins 
Chong HnaBk 
ChknTungBk 
China Devejpmt 
China SI eri 
Fast Bank 
Fatnrosa Ptosbc 
Kua Nan BS, 
InriComm Bi 
Nan Ya Pteucs 
Shin Kang Uto 
TahmnSeml 
Tatung 

Uld Maa Elec 
Utd World Chin 


Tokyo 

Ajinomoto 
All Nippon Air 
Aimmr 
Ascrii Bank 
AsahiChem 
Asahi Gtoss 
8k Tokyo Miftu 
Bk Yokohama 
Bndgeslw 
Canon _ 

Owbu E)« 
ChugaKu Elec 
DaiNIpg Print 
anw 

Dailcto Kanq 
Dan*a Balk 
Dahra House 
Dnwia 5ec 
DDI 
Denso 

End Japan Ry 
feat 
Fanuc 
FuQ Bar* 

Fim Photo 

Fmitsu 

HadvjureBIc 

HifOCra 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Ito-Yakada 

JAL 

Japan Trtwto 

Jmcc 

Knjhno 

KansaiEtec 

Kao 

KotwsakiHvy 
Kavra Steel 
KinUMppRy 
Kirin Brewery 
Kate Steel 
KdBUtW 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Kyushu Elec 
LTCB 
Marubeni 
Moral 

MoRuCnmra 
MotHi Elec Ind 
Matsu Eke Wk 
MMubishl 
Mitsubishi Qi 

Mitsubishi El 
MriviUsN EsI 
MdsubiJIb Hvy 
Mitsubishi Mat 
Mitsubishi Tr 
Mitsui 


’ 555 544 

I BO 325 

i 340-50 377 

I 771 730 

: juijso yn 

! 271 27*50 

! 753-50 154 

i 27900 774 

251 746 

719 21430 
188 185 

8730 8* 

336 334 

319 J17J0 
22150 218 

18750 1 19 SO 
133 130-50 
249 244 

20680 204.50 


AI Ortinretes: 265680 
Previous: 26260# 

865 8.79 S..V 

9.86 9 99 9.92 

1680 1705 16.77 
*04 4 Ot *05 

27.08 77.18 27.13 
1*34 15.60 15.38 

1435 M40 1*22 
6i5 *57 6J7 

710 735 710 

5 13 533 5.1J 

7 66 209 2*7 

102 7.14 2.01 

1726 13 -« 17*0 

79.99 3085 3035 
1.65 1*7 1.66 

19.14 19*2 19.18 
208 2.18 207 

*32 635 6.32 

3*2 3.74 3.65 

*50 *53 *51 

*38 BJO 838 
19.94 20.17 1905 
a 04 815 8 06 

6.B4 606 607 

791 7.9B 7.94 

11*0 II e>5 1168 

*12 4 15 *15 


Stock Market aide*- 9149.29 
Preview 929039 

136 131 IJ1 13750 

104-50 100 100 101 

B8 82-50 KLSfl 82.50 
12e 170 120*0 173 

20.90 2030 701 2300 
105 100*0 10050 102 


61*0 

60 

60 

60*0 

114*0 

109 

109 

no 

56*0 

54 

54 

54*0 

73 

70-50 

70*0 

71*0 

89 

84 

87*0 

64 

)5B 

146 

150 

156 

4610 

45.10 

4110 

45 911 

17X50 

117 

113 

120 50 

65 

63 

63*0 

64 


Nttai MS: 1863306 


Previous: 18450.17 

1110 

1090 

1090 

1100 

714 

708 

708 

710 

3600 

3580 

3S90 

3600 

876 

866 

866 

876 

677 

617 

618 

621 

934 

913 

977 

913 

2170 

2160 

7140 

7170 

527 

571 

534 

570 

2800 

2770 

2780 

2770 

3560 

3480 

3480 

3560 

7050 

20X1 

2050 

2040 

1980 

I960 

I960 

1970 


7b30 

7SO 

2630 

785 

2640 

787 

1410 

1390 

1398 

1390 

619 

599 

599 

672 

13M 

1360 

1370 

1390 


no 706 710 735 

6010a 5960a 5970a 6i7tto 
2880 2850 2E50 28X 

5610a 5580a SS90a Win 
2370 2330 2350 2340 

5140 4950 4950 5100 

1500 1480 1*90 1^0 

4810 47W *7W 47» 

1480 1460 1460 1470 

1210 1180 1210 1180 
1100 1060 1060 1090 
3770 3910 3910 3910 
1620 MOD 1610 1600 
381 372 378 375 

509 584 506 507 

6450 6350 6400 6450 
505 500 500 503 

93Md <Offlo 9310a 9490* 
3180 3070 3070 3170 


618 m 

2360 2230 
1730 1700 
4 M 449 

208 m 

688 685 
1100 1060 
168 161 
752 747 
489 481 
8240 8080 
2010 1990 
590 571 
430 475 
1970 1950 
3980 3850 
2220 2170 
1290 1250 
1140 1110 
335 316 
535 516 
1660 1630 
7J3 773 
707 690 
1720 1690 
1010 990 


2220 2260 
1710 1700 
450 449 

205 278 

£06 6B8 

I860 1080 
16$ 160 
750 745 

481 481 

81 70 3070 
2000 1990 
573 590 

426 477 

1950 1 9*0 
3860 4000 
2180 22<0 
12"0 1320 
1130 1120 
317 337 

51? 536 

1660 1630 

780 769 

6M 699 
1700 1680 
994 1000 


year to dale 
change 
+16.43 


High 

Mitsui Fixtosn 1410 
AUsul Trust 
Murata Mfg 

NEC 

NWiaSec 
Nikon 

Nintendo 10900 

Nipp Express 
Nippon W 
Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 

NKJC 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 1140b 

NTT Data 53906 

Oji Paper 
Osalii Gas 
Btoah 

Rchm 13900 

5akuro Bh 730 

5ankyo 
SanwaBcnk 
Sanyo Elec 
Seam 
SribuRny 
Sriasui Cnera 
Sekisui House 
Sewn- Eleven 
Sharp .... 

Shikoku El Pwr 1990 

Slrmiiu 
Shto-cKUCh 
Shiseida 
5hO"Dfca Bk 
Softbank 
Sony 11700 

Sumitomo ~ 

Surntfamn Bk 
SumttCheffl 
Sumitwnci eicc 1830 

Sumfl Metal 

Sumll Trust 

TaaM Ptrorm 3010 

lakedaCheni 3490 

TDK 10200 

TohoAuElPwr I97D 

Tokal Bank 1040 

Tofcia Marine 

Tokyo El t\w 

Tokyo Electron 6900 

Tokyo Gas 
TotnyuCorp. 

Tanen 

TnpponPrinl 
Totay Ind 
Tostubo 
Tosrtm 
T ay o Trust 1000 

rayato AAator 3350 

lamanuictH 3070 

a.-* lOOtb-x IMP 


1370 1400 

610 615 

5140 5220 

1400 1400 

1960 1990 

54? 551 

10600 10800 
795 798 

513 519 

795 295 

757 ISO 
1B7 189 

1580 1590 

1120b 1170b 
5340b 5340b 
602 602 
787 787 

1700 1720 

13900 mao 
719 725 

3900 3950 
1550 1580 

422 427 

8430 8450 

5730 5730 

1010 1010 
1140 1140 

8870 8970 

1150 1150 

1970 1970 

611 611 

33(0 3280 

VWO 1990 
1300 1300 

5280 5JI0 
11400 11500 

953 960 

17X 1710 

457 457 

1800 1810 
284 784 

1210 1340 

7970 3000 

3440 3470 

9990 9990 

JPH» JW-0 
1(0) 1030 

1390 1400 

2260 2270 

6770 6830 

m m 
618 618 
1160 1160 
1730 1750 

792 796 

679 fifli 

3470 7470 

990 990 

3310 3320 


Toronto 

Abdtol Cons. 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Anderson Enpl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nava ScotM 
Barnet. Grid 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
Btochun Phamn 
Bunbardtaf B 
Camara 
CIBC 

Cdn Nall RaA 

CdnNalRes 

CdnOcodPet 

CdnAnft 

Comtotn 

DOttMO 

Domur 

DonohueA 

Du Ptml Ctfa A 

EdpetSruscan 

EuraNnMng 

FartuFlrt 

Folconbridge 

Ftefcher Ctell A 

Franco Nevada 

GtiHCdaRos 

impunal Oil 

inco 

I PL Enemy 
LohUowB 
Locvien Group 
Mnanfll Bldl 
Magna UWA 
Mcmanet 
Moore 


TSE IndHlftolS! 676*74 
Previote: 674122 

ID 2140 73 AS 2410 
40 3105 31.20 3120 
30 48*5 48 J i 49.30 
85 17.65 1705 1705 
IU 52V 53 52.10 

70 58 85 AO 58*0 

90 29*5 29*5 3000 
30 39.90 4020 39.95 
05 33.90 33.90 34'i 

90 3905 39 JO 39-50 
45 28 20 28-35 2830 
80 46-35 46 70 Ji’n 
rk: 36. BS 37.10 36 

71 69.70 70.95 69*0 

« 39U 39-40 39 'j 

30 35.70 36W 35.95 

Ite 41.20 41-30 4135 
ito 36 35 36V9 36V. 

28 27J5 2760 2B 
60 11 15 11.45 11*0 
Ite 32 32.70 32'* 
M 32-55 32*5 32 V5 
li? 7120 7320 2345 
65 20W 70^ 20.15 

97 388 392 390 

35 2* BO 24.90 25'* 

ft 22-t Wr. 2170 
32 31 31'< 31 

70 11.40 1U0 HAS 
10 77 20 J&10 7735 
r>* 37.05 3735 3730 
05 51*0 52 5i« 

05 21.55 21*0 71*0 
ft 43 -. 42*0 42 65 
ft 1ft 17.35 17*5 

98 95 97*0 95 

65 lit? 11-55 11.60 
90 28.65 ' 2800 30*5 


Newbridge Nel 
WararKfa Inc 
Narccn Energy 
Nthern Triccam 
Nova 
One* 

Ponctln Peflro 
Petto Cda 
Phxer Dome 
PacoPeltm 
Potash Sask 
Rerarscmce 
F!<0 Aigam 
Roqen Cartel B 
Seagram lo 
S tiefl Cda A 
5 linear 
Tafamoo Eny 
Tee* B 
TelcqJobe 
Tefire 
Thurson 
TarDam Bank 
rnucrofla 
TransCda Pipe 
Trimnit Flnl 
Trizee Hahn 
TVXGoto 
Westeuast Eny 
Weston 


80.10 77‘1 

2735 3635 

3i58 35 

141 JO 140 
11.91! 114* 

3m 3i 
75J0 25b 

35V, 2510 
22*0 7105 

13.95 1265 

IDS 106* 
35*i 35V, 

Jit* IIW 
27 vj 27 1 *: 
49 '4 4880 
22-iEO 22-Si 
48 65 47*5 

46.95 46.40 

26 25*0 
48 47 

29-35 28 

32.70 3110 
4X20 42*5 
I7<+ 17*0 
7705 26*5 
71.15 69 JO 
3ft 30.90 
7 JO 7.10 
2 (LID 2705 
951* 95 


Vienna 

Boahler-Uddeti 

CreddanslPtd 

EA-GeneraB 

EVN 

RughoJen Wien 
OMV 

OestEtektriz 
VA Stahl 
VATech 
Wtenerhera Bau 


ATX HdK 139140 
Pnvtaast 1481 JV 

1016 991. JO 10161075.10 

651*0 644 647*0 654 

3100 3060 309 03093*0 

1571 1546 1552 1560 

499 494 496*5 495 

181790 17961802.10 1812 

876,90 861.10 875 367*0 

554 532 536 549*9 

2537244510 2453 2512 

I&18 2S91 2610 2588 


Wellington NzsE^tadacwin 

^ htm: 247247 


AirNZcddB 
Briefly Invt 


bon Ntrihon 3 SB X75 3.7 5 308 

Trietom NZ 700 7*E 7n 7 08 

WUsan Horton 1165 11*0 11*0 11*5 


*38 

125 

125 

438 

1J9 

137 

1 J8 

135 

332 

334 

130 

325 

143 

4*2 

142 

4*3 

605 

5.98 

605 

*05 

1.92 

108 

1.91 

108 

3.1B 

3.14 

114 

115 

2 SB 

175 

17* 

188 

700 

7*8 

7 n 

708 


Zurich 

ABB B 
Mecca B 
AhisutsseR 
Ares SemnoB 
Aid R 
Boer Hdg B 
BaknseHdgR 
Bk Vision 
ate Spec Chen 
dorian R 
CntSubseGpR 
EleHnraaHB 
Ems-Chwme 
ESECHdg 
HoktefbonkB 
LieditensILBB 
Nestle R 
NovorthR 
Dertikn Bueh R 
Pargeso WdB 
PhnrmVfaiB 
RkhemonlA 
Pint* PC 
Roche Hdg PC 
SBC R 

ScJWHSerPC 
SGSB 
SMHB 
Sutler R 
Swiss Reins R 
S Air Group R 
UBSB 
White rthurR 
Zurich AsiurR 


SPI ndcc 3537 J3 
Previous: 355405 

1158 2163 2188 
558 565 565 

340 1357 1362 
!390 7K5 3400 

850 850 W6 

!0U 2085 2150 
N.T. N.T. 4300 
1070 1082 1090 
8-50 14.50 14015 
1110 1128 1)20 
050 18215 IB* 
05 S38 538 

080 6905 6940 
1325 4325 4320 
1306 1330 1321 
584 587 587 

1822 184? 1844 
2207 2234 2248 
177 1B3J0 186 

1800 1830 1820 
093 893 896 

2005 2013 2050 
327 332 332 

3300 133B5 13*75 
3(6 36750 360 

184) 1889 1900 
2705 2755 2740 
874 884 884 

1060 1077 1105 
2076 2080 2093 
1822 1830 1835 
1517 1517 1532 
1310 1319 1335 
595 607 603 


I 



PACE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


NYSE 


Monday's 4 PH. Close 

NaimwkfepJKMnolrefl^ 

The Asaodmn Pass. 


oar TM re mart* ire u*» «**• 


a* no re loot hub u* 


or yh re MUtagn 


Dm m re MUM* ire 


um ew»[ “W 


re lint** ire um Ohm] 


Hh m 1M A U B 40 34 DR SR -W 

* Sw UM JliD M 9 •« 

m. m aim Min m u . m »> w» am *» 

m am mm jt ia v seam «* re -•« 

m re *ou jm ts _ ta tore ire* «* 

i re ACwO* Mil - w re » - 

tm* re km Sc jo u ~ «a m ore >r 

7 «i KWf dm - **"»£& * 

MR HHIACMMO 111 U . ® MR Jf » - 

kw vt acmm re u _ tarn 

ore r» aomm re is _ a? ire* ore nre *™ 

ore u tub** - u 1U7MM m re 

m wr kxtu _ n w nre Sf** *L t; 

«» m «*tt» - a S! m * 

OR Ji ARK M M It Mjft g S J 

M ZMr AOCO Ji .1 ™ »■ £5 2? Sr * 

n MR WUM LHUM HJ re J™ 

are m HOpfr » m - S S *i 

are hr ail ia u - «m* SL r J 


i re mmD* 
Mre PI ACM 3c 

MR IIH>«auIo 

Mre re kmh 
ore m* kmm 
ore m acmnui 
m ur Anna 


£* S Ss** « “ ,7 mS.ES 


ire M AMR - is ixa-g* •22 ‘SJ Vw 

2* TrESS- 5SS? S 
SnSisiT 1 : ss «*g|j sir a 

«-323, “ 14 2"S& as 5 * 

L S 3 - e s su£ a; s I 

ini u SSt - - E }£L iri a* •» 

Si £ ;sr » “ g a sms *"• 

gags-sreHijaagi 

■*» «» jmo ri > n n h nw sire _ 
*» L 5£2L j * i«w»*"***i-» 

& £ irS u 10 itw lire n» *re 

«S ?5?“ .fl i* " fS 3? ST ™ .i 


MR U MtttM 

OR UM Aon* 


MU IM OMljl* 

ire re ■fg* 

SN MR 

PR MM 8*° "*° 

ire S* - 
r» o 22* 
2* i« 23 

Si *8 §~ 

Swi^ga 

” "S5 

MR PI — 
pr pnbwooi 
i» ire ggg 

n 'ass* 
;r r as? 

ire OR HAM 
CR TM BRKTT 
I UR KM MMWX 

lire mu wm* 
(OR w* BMW 
Ml 7» bm; 

Mr aw BUT 
3Bk II Bwcb 
MR MW BKUM 
MR ]3R BgolA 
urn 7R BMcChp 
MR 9k m »p—l 
sm SR BMRa 
ASH 44* Mff 
41 OR BM 
SR in Banco* 
TR 1H BH* 
MU M BeXCTl 
J7W if Mni 

a 3» bsmwr 
PH I Boats** 
PR PR BodEd 

an am saaret* 
mir a BOOJC 
Ml 12ft BaTTo* 
m mi Mffti 
MW S Burn 
11R » anaon 
MR X BaiMKLD 
3» MW BndRE 
U» R UR W«< 
SR MM ftn^Sn 

asu xw BMM 
in hr brmef 
MR 17 BcdTttl 
OR SU BBOM 


3D iMMIn 

- »» rt 

. BMk 
S TI7 4HR 
S IUmiUIR 

k am 


UhiDR I4» 1MR ♦' 
aa« ik n «u 
«w am OR »r *f 


Ja nu n« life llw Ah 

74 IM tare MM IBM -«* 
1MSIBR M 3HR *w 
11 ZQ WR SM 7HR *IR 

„ ' JM HR W* M -R 

M HR IM Pa - 

- Mff PR *R WR *5 

. Illl UR MR R 

- law IM WR. *VR 

_ im are cm mr # n 
_ sm in isr uw -re 

- 411 HM I MR MR .OR 

_ s im lire lire -re 

. B m ki h - 

. IBM TOR TOR - 

- in 15h UR 1PR - 

. « iw im inn - 

_ <a -m n m - 

_ aw m «r ire .re 

a im am ore OR 

m MHB «m OR OR -re 
it iw «re MR 4PR -re 

_ M tore U* row .re 

st. aat a ire ire -re 

n us v or ore -re 

n sat st* j4» m * 
_ xir m acre w* -ir 
h iw are are ore -re 
_ TO T» 7*R 7R -R 

u na ire, hi mr -re 
n lia acre xre sre *re 
u as jn s*re ure -re 

28 so* *re **j w »u 


u an lire u 
_ im at *» 
H NBiDVi MVR 
17 2M7 S41R gre 
_ ib an 2JR 
u isb an a» 
_ a<« in lire 

_ m tre m 



S? iL. is u - in sir »R tor »re 

<££ 2£ SSStS its tlo ip mi uin -re 

^ £ amSc ajIsj - «s«»« «» 

» iZzSr . _ as MTOR 27 Tor »re 

a if* Kg 1 M-u-iMirem are -w 

K TO S5S S « M « »re TO. TO .re 


TO PR BUM 

law am nrr* 
an am bkp 


S £ - - - ,n .» - a* nre o* on - 

S S UM ■ u l » M fare MR .re 

&" i£ - - «■ Li aa mh w aw* a are -re 

2m um <25*5 S L4 73 us trre ure nu *u 

Sr fS m3 — ai to mt tor to -w 

L M Sn X s st amnnssre sm srr -i 
m! m aw _ n UP ii UR h 

nS re | W BI i P HR lire lire -re 

g; ,r Jssi - » »5 a s" *5? 


am aan bmpio 

UR 11 Ml 
MR 17 feWB 
TO um Bn«Ca 


M TO I OnfMC 
a pu ttewfi 

UR UR BOOM 


S Sard Sc in im - aa lore it 

mbL. nu ri.r -r c U 7 lauore tm ffli >M 
» in Swr _ ii stio am am sre .m 

JL IS S£Z jt it it ps tor am tor *u 

kL T5W SSSm Altawiw TOR TOR- *R 

£ 12 SSj _ - « ws a® j» .w 

g* re (MCI to J S3 aat a» TO TOR - 

Sm ito SSu» »,i2iS!S£?£l?SL - 

«u m Jinta ii u it wa asre i» ore - 

S? j£m, Jt L7 1* IMS TO SM SM -*h 

Sr UK IU& MU - im are Mre aaM -r. 

S im anSSt .1* - - WTO27fh]7re-re 
S SS awri lac u — n* ure rare tor -re 

PR SM ww IB U I! 05 lire ant to. ^r 

are Sm u£r**t b* xo p wt 7 aa» PR PR *« 


TO in IbO bo o * 
am MR BaatM 
a* iou mcm 


lire xm Bixroor b< u a mu » »R at *» 

jnl u tZLc* x u it ctn pre n nre -r 

ST Uu SBw - p w ga are s .re 


a tj i ms m d tor 


I7M m BBB 


U« U Ajnmo ixa IB - las Mre ure MM re I 

an «n form _ zi re* « am at -31 

om MR — J r i u it ti c am as .v» 

34fe AkflM 1JM U II 171 S3 PM PM «R 

R MR Acretat m m _ Ins m to r dm .re] 

TO iu> AtadPOa .la J 15 » lath 2XM am *u' 

Mr «• amsto i at u n hw v hm mr .re 


JB J ta tan arre 4 «h « 
Mo 7i — nnmHMWM _ 
jm u u m mh ism to .ire 


imr aaw atom « u u nu wt m m .ire 

to am ajwpm rji n — ms* zm to .re 

Su hr am 1.11 If is MM as tor PM -re 

ZM IM Iprn JB I — SX 22W ZtR TOR VR 

TO n M*a£r - U <n MM I4M ure -re 

St TO AUTO . » PC « «h « 

ire SPm Mam IM U ts an am n nre ire 
to aaM am - a laai m sre sre -re 

M sr ret. 0 - - 2S3 are afe are -re 

MM taw UWM JV s is HUS BJM PA. IZM <*R 

s im not* lai ai - o» 2 P« zm n .» 

TO UK Mod BUB min M n -a 

« 47W JWRK B II I III TOR SKR TO. 

TO 33R AMR - - HTOTOM TO MVR «l* 


Im pa *«. - . ns ci cw m .re 

B till AAUir B« B II X» PR PM PH .M 

TO TO ABdr XI U M 404 U TOR TO. .R 

tre n um - 04 xi am are m -■» 

BM It ABdK* BUI* l» ZIH ZPR 23M -A 

x to AEf ax u u opmsir care aan .re 

BH 4VM ARlx X LI P I05M B1U TIM PM >R 

Xr nu AFnOGB IM X2 12 437 CUR TOR TOR re 

am an *mc lx 17 n las sik si n re 

am M TO c ccpu u u _ i« lire tor at -re 

sm hr ib uni ix *■ ii pi B x i t «kr 

SM CM UGH 34 *1 - SI SM s«R sre -R 

are SM ago* x» 17 _ to ft au. are re 

SM PM MMPr UO U U 770 23 TOR PM. -A 

bm um Ai* >m * * ii ii aa nv. v arre *re 

xh si auxap *» ti _ sj a ter* a -u 

m 57 AWtOM vac U s M2S law. TOR Mr -re 

are im ARdPnt - _ u i l a re 

HAM a*. MAH* x J *3 < MH 1DJV. UBR RBM >IU 

«IR n MM* _ 7S 7S Fre ■ BM -A 

iim um uxn a 2 o sj - x ii um nw. - 


m sm oaf 
am iim otter 
am iau aurec 

PM HR A* BOOM 

sy“m agf 

iw u. ME** 


_ 

S SOM 

10ft 

BTft 


IM Afe 

*m 

AW 

a 

in nre 

to, 

OT 

u 

it* fir* 

Bfe 

24 

— 

33S iih 

sou 

sore 


SI 3* 4 

2AH 

ttw 

« 

S92 Ilk 

life 

lie. 

_ 

UK fe 

ft. 

W 

«s 

223 2Sk 

Sift 

2SH 


333 1* 

Uk 

Hfe 

_ 

« Ilk 

lift. 

lift 

If 

IMS X> 

XH 

Xft 


PM »w AmSM _ M MB «■ XM C7V5 .IM 

X 22R AMfllRo M U IS p atWa 4t*R .HR -VR 

am ii auawt jt u a. xis acre m are -t 

I1WR ww MS* MU- at HM lire IIM 
nre ww «*o»n .n is - ax ii*. iim tim 

nre wr Oman m bs _ sn lire m» um 

IM iu omm . ■ im IR im ire .re 

am IBM a Mm m to it »7 pu pre pre .re 

HR UK Annan XU- S7 W M IR *K 

S IIM Bun* - a »*TO 27* are -re 

J7M TO UX | H U0lt»2PSHSV>2sn - 
ire re Aaxwrc _ - up re re u -re 

are 37 um . ■ nre n a .re 

TIM CM* Ommta IS JU II M Ml TO ta 

am pm uui sum ua am to a%* -m 

«W HR uau IB U » CD « m MK 

scream amp iu u a n sm ms .* 


IMr 11M A W* M U II 54 I7M ITS* I7M 

SIR 2W A«U _ » *1 CM CR 4,'t 

acres AXnKi U3 at l« itMrXR aare am. .a 

as an xu* is* 1.7 _ a pm taw pa -w 

a*M I2M A— «*= II t 17 H » B 73*. -W 

hm am um x a* 17 pi pm xm p 

23M 12H iDvdrJ a II U IM ISM IMR 15M .re 

TM TO wm X A X n»7 TO 77WR 73* Jt, 

am ITS* Anaat* - n HU MR TOR TO -M 


am ww ww* _ aa hu mr nre to re 

UM IS* An«nc HUH an WR 17M na .*■ 

am sm mm ib* la i* ssi am m m -*v 


wre n omm -n* b an »« i*re itre it* .re 

TO IXR AxTBH - 39 lax ISM ISR IM 

um am ackChi ip u si up dwr pre saw, *» 

X 29M Amd« S J 13 2BI PM am m -R 

a* xn mm i* u * in im m n* -w 

wre im in m u _ m im m. nre -re 

M am mriid i hu- us* a* m 
am TO Aptuxr x u B ip cere *> aaw *im 

«m IM A«am _ * 17B4 tor br nw -IR 

sm am AsHRi .11 j u an mir ti pm .re 


HM TO ASM JH A M S77 TOR MM 54M X. 

TO a*M un ua ab la in 771* to atre >re 

MM WR An— C X J W ZM IOM IBM Tore -w 

zrre im moki .in J - an to. TO to -re 

M CM AmorF! A U 71 MIW IM M _ 

x a* A m H W ii - - dm iim io* nre >iu 

am mr aknmu » j n i am tmr pre nre .w 

TO 37 C HU B B ■ 1.M* At _ 7U BR TO S »» 

sm am* ahkma _ - nx acre aare acre -m 

UM IIW AifaUBd B U . M XL I4K IM #R 

jw a* *mr . . m n sre sw .re 

tM SM AIMS* . II Ml PI* M *M -M 

7SM PH AXI IS 1C 14 » « 47WR HM >* 

am am ux _ m id* aiR tor a .w 

m a* ax* _ x h a aw sm re 

TO p «nu s U it ns b as* tor Jt 

MR Ok Atman X Id it IMS HR TO nre -re 

MM m omm ?.» I7 - MS ioh wre m 
saw am —mom Lin 11 it lco* sire nre aw «R 

im im omot si it _ 11s tore mh m* .re 

« IR A—PH _ _ H77 IR d M 3R 

ihr re Amp** .-mu um 11 * 


nre am bcbhsf 
sm am bc— * 
ww aw Bac— a 

life UM ButP 
Kfe TO BnKBA 
PM 27M l—w 
CCh 27R ClDTCt 

4CM SM CAKTVl 
tore to esc otc 
Ml B CCAMu 
ns S3M CCBFd 
<n m cm 
aro him asu 
re ■ ogm 

TO Ufe OPSOO 
17 IBM CAE Ml 
TO 30 CAAAC* 

5W JR CMCp 
SM IM CM. GO 
37W If CMS Edk 
PM 17* CBSG 
tire m cma — 

UR WW CMAl 
«* as* CHS Bat 
h it* avru 
are n« a*irn 
nm tm ere 
TO TO* CPI 
TO am cplcopP 
fit. PM CSC 
TO TO CTG—1 
PRR TO CBCM1 
U HA CVREI 

sm/, am evs eew 

X IBM CdUOl«D 
XM zri cotere* 
TO PM COM 
TO 13* CUOG 
SR MW CodScOpC 
at* are ccdkys 
ere na Codooct 
Tfe 1 dCdM 

c to cm* m 
is re cxkm 
are am unzor 

are IIM CXUM 
113* MS'* UFdH 
V aaw cxrnx 
Br> aaw ccbsxi 

27* II COM 
TO ISM Mwn 
71* TO ecus 
BM TO CoMnF 
14 '* CmRt 

Safe. TO CmdSpi 
S 2CR C— Gnpf 
ST4 TO UHT0D 
P»R 22* C— ■ 

MW « Gourds 
77* TO CoO— D* 

am ate tcoou 
sm aaw cop— 

SR 2T* Cam X 
IIM IM CnBXTr 
TO TO C— MAC 
3SM It 1 Candor 

amis* capm 
HM 14** CcsMltV 
am are Camel 
14*. tm rmwi 
I0*R TO CM— Hi 
aa-a m Ciauvi 

am » cswca 
re 1M COdXt 
3SM 21R ecu* 

TO 37M CaOMCB 
ara 33M cure 

S2 SwSSS 

aw a* omgh 

17 7* Canaan 

are are w» 

HM 1IM CXIWW 
HM IIM OmatCa 
Tlo TO CiwCt 
UM a* Cornu 
IBM 11 GMCk 
r-R IM CrtotU 
ta SR CHMd 
P 3 CORM 
aim to am* 

17M r-1 CnH) 
CSV, 14M UXFf 
1I1R Ife CenEn 
DVr 75* CaaraPr 
PM I CM CamCa 

TO T 25SU. 

1 s*irgss ■ 

sm 3a* colas 
nre 10 cure 

MM W4 anMra 

xm are cax— 

* IR UTndU 

law iom cvips 

23*. 17 CUdm 

ww XM cunt 

BM BM emu 

saw 2tM COM 
to ire cmtE 
are xw 0*0 

IW. UM 0*5* 

wa aw unto. 

PM low ami 


— IW PM 37 » .M 

a ants are tz* fre -h 
n IMS nre b » «— 
_ Afl ZM aa— aaw .« 
s refit sn m M a 
_ M tv* ire «RR -H 

_ 1»>M 3SRR W*h -M 

it CD nw in ire — 
_ 1U1 um um ire *«h 

_ 2257 jm pw are .9h 

.'aw zfRR am -re 
_ an ism isre isre -re 
n uam w asm. -w 
n an xw ore to. -re 
_ ‘ns IOM w u -M 
x un mm. ua ism -» 

3* 14677 PIR 7*v» NM -HR 
X lid MOM. t*3W U3RM r— 

ir HM DK MU WR -M 

t 1271 sire 37— are -re 

U 1L3J 45KR a<* MM -M 

IS ST7 ZSM 35M 25R *fe 

_ 11H HR m SM -W 

11 in n xm am .re 

n t m nre imr 

n. ic* X— C7RR «t .Mr 

m *17 nre lire ire *» 

— inx aare aare 3 arr -re 

_ ■ W a imr ax* -re 

u nn aare am am -re 

17 a» nre 2sw are re 

— UP PM XM Cl M 

ic • m x nu im -ire 

TI IO» EK » -M 

31 47 MM TO Ml -VR 

n Md am iw* aw* re 

M l*M UM UM »re 

17 -ia» za to am >re 

is. ifx dm nre lire re 

17 tm tew mm .« 

it -ent a tare «» re 

t 311 tm are » .m 
za <w wre wre lew .1* 

x dm am nu xm .re 

11. 71 nre *sm nre .1* 


_ an ire d 7* 

jb sm to* am 

- 7B l/re lire 

_ ft m nre 
_ no st tew 
X IBM sire S3W 
. mm u» 
_ 41 13W IBM 

■I 3314 P nw 
U OI lire 12 
V iff WR V 
u nu am m 
B m pm am* 
_mb tm 

- 710 24* H 

20 1177 «re cm 
_ ns pit pre 
a nu nn 3iw 
v m csre xw 

M 1187 IOM it— 

_ 2Tt w at 
_ ss itre it* 
26 SB um at 

p as b 31 re 

ic w ure iam 
H JM 10* life 
B iw vh ire 
22 cm B SP«i 
n lie iw tin 
at Ms as* as— 
at ab. 1 sn ure 
it an to xw 
it au etre xu 


- ** M it lfl * iS jS 

IX P V H St StreCTR' 1 " 

- » no* UM WW -* 
jo u 31 aa* son XM 

li in reu Sn '** 


12X00 . rt, TM pe mft* uxunexOH* 

W Lto » “* - 11 • 

U _ IU 3» *2 **" 

fsbf jjt*4s ■. 

« & hb SuSssF-Fs 



»» 3« fKL'* *ss - 

SM "A L52? a LB It 


3AM UW tm* 1 


■ - u IP BW 3VR gw 2S» wn erm J* I, " 

j? u b mm m !E_ SI a w* lx**, * 1, 1f 

w I! _ « m » nw * S«1» iww >S SJ " 

MS 55 - .JZ ™ '2 ’ST .w m nffiSSf iS S : 


JO 7A _ U» Hta n* *” 

J* It - 2H 1IR lire lire 

IJt 14 _ - IB UM MIR Mre *W 

M— Jt _ AO MOM * * *; 


xm 1SS unto" 
few 38W UW 


* tk 5 s ? s is! f § }£L a j s 


-K U i « PH an Zi* - *S H um** *3 * 

SKS’SSLSrSreJ ,^s?Ksr 5 i - ^ 
xtuExSSiSr^re si f I 

_ D It IM IB *• ** tnt im LoOlHT® J ! « 


A II s 

- M ™ 


- 49 
_ 2M 
_ a 

- ED UM 

_ 781 TM. S 

U 7*5. HU 

31 HU 
7 SSSS 

11 TM 
H 1CM 
It 1X7 
17 11* 

12 ru 
22 
B 


asm RCMME 
I7W FkHMh 


it aa a etre to 
17 iv 21 nw 

u SS7 ore 77re 
_ (2 tin nre 

IT WSU 1BR W 
23 2flC Mre im 

23 W A 4BM 

_ ZO tare lire 


SS SSfEi 

33W PMK3 


B HM 

Z2 m 
sm BM 
SAM xm 
» 3tM 

z»r an 
nre bm 

ATM 2tH 

xm sen 
as* zm 
am no 
are sin 
«k n 
IP* CM 
HM U 
m xm 

17H PM 
2HR HR 
3SW HM 
am 1 TM 
an 33a 
2HR BM 
sat ism 
v* nw 
iw ere 
x m 
m pr 
nre 


I *r n "L ’re re 2 g* g- ffl u. « « •« 

Hiu.TMBreXMsmare 3^ ” LMonf -5* H 2 ,Sf 

JO TA D os a» jure nre -re £5 iT i SSf **■ 11 * Sa 

x.j b nw m » "! 22 s* 'Am 

a c » * m a « •» S 5 £ „ - J* 

a u h mim am *re -re p J » ™ 

- 17 tax 23* HW HW .-re fr* f5* Jt u E Si 


pre sire ■» 

arn af* *re 

Sm Sw 5 
5“ 3£ - re ^ 
grr - i 
'£ ST 35' j 

lafre t«* *>re .31 

jfire 2£re * Jj 

r £ z 1 

S S -5 i 

am gre* : a 

low Mre- xh d 
ure MW. ^ 
xw »re •— 


K/ Ik 





wt cm* « is p ffli »»> “ y’-*; 

2PM 17 IA P * S , S Mil JP* 37— * 

to nre um. . * A h iS aw fit. 5 


a n » «X xre TO Ctre .re TOM? £££, - iab aJ 17 UP TO «*re ^ ■ 

At J h wa am am TO *» 2"?51 jocin S S' m * * ' 

193 m _ 139 asre 2sre »w - *w ,1,^. m «-**?» .m : 

uoSutoS. miSi-re SS5US5 »re.*2'! 


is . an zrre to are -* 
_ .on nre 3*M MR -re 
17 to nw at e 

x' to 3HR am 33 _ 

II NS3HBU 1H Ifefe .JMr 

_ - au «re • 9 -re 

17 479 37 IM 3M <M 

3* 3X47 34 nre Dm .ire 

M at sore » wre .re 
if ; UK m cm cu «w 

_ . ns 3* ire are -re 

is M2t asm nre asre -re 
_ • 7T BR lire »H *k 
» 55H7 iw* litre .re 

- : a HR IIM HM - 


j— u P : lot ore pm ent *r I 


23 iimid3toM BM 3fre *vw 

- . D7XM TO AIM *«• 

n zj49 sore bk — >K 

at »ti as* ssre asm *w 

_ n 75fe 3SM am. -re 

is epo to mm are -re 

ic i a are n» aa >n 

MTOtSlTO 27 17M >lk 

U 1 71 HR IIM IIM >M 

- . 2007 Sire sm »w -re 

1(39 IM 3AM 3dH *R 

at im am arc asre -re 
Z7 U5I4 W &K W -IK 

ti un nre at* 2 t*r .re 

2S WA.TO 27W 2TW -I 
_ A3 3AM BM lOR _ 
H - 315 33 BM BM -h 

34 4155 XT. m «K A 

- -IMI IM IM IM >M 

H 13*11 3A1R MR 3aVr -IRv 

B WS H I3M law .M 

U 257 XTl Mr XH> -M 

- lWtax a or. .ire 

_ 349111 HOW 1I0M -*l 

m 3tn ate aw* it 

n 3*60 pm asre asre «re 

n to? nw 22re m >re 

17 Bo 2D*. lfRk l«W. U 

33 no HR H HR 

23 IP* HM 29M »*k -V. 

- lco re — w w 

3* <3s* sir. on sore «re 

M.iAR am* Wr -re 

_ 5*7 P-. S*--. sire -IM 

- 973 20 AM 39<re n 

_ S7 I AMR IAR IAR 

- u am »i at i re 

1* tMI ]9Lk 3Hk 39 

ia «A4 see S‘t Ml .ire 

. us acre 2CR im .re 

_ 4A HM 101 «•. A 

it JA5 X> 77=.. 30* -2». 

- lie acre a«u a*'.. 

H IB wre are wre .re 

- 112 WVk lire 19VR *H 

ii win » » w 

II H M»R 111 I CM *W 

a rea mm tire n -re 

ts BiflM ill cr. -re 

P M ore TOR XV. -W 

c i2S » 2 a -re 

u is27 an srre saw >vr 

n tJ4» x,« xw to w 

is nx nre jx, a*M *re 


_ jt? ire 
- ia as* 
u iM3 zare 
II MB 
17 IPllltM 
_ 79* nw 
U XM BM 
X PSlIM 


I » zb n Th- m» »iw Jg? u3S™ 

3 II H IB IMR IBM IM *•* J®? HS 

it* aa is w nre xw bm -w spt m. vmo 

9X1 17 17 con BH 37 B _ r “ 

m ii n xt 3tM as— xw _ I 

_ B- 2X73 2ZR PW Bit »W * _ M mtmwu 

144 71 17 3041 ttM UM IBM _ ** JSJ* 

.7 mint n m -w 1 ESu, 

“ ” ? to to si nw * £ s Sr 

A 17 ■ SUM. 15- m *M JS iS Ki 

UA U II HI TOR CBR fife t* S! S SSir 

J2 J n W«7m 331R Z— *B* JSS-B, 

ix la u nn saw nw pm .re 2?*. w* 

ip ia _ mom nw are. >w ™ "* 

no - 7* life im nw -re *w *w jaw 

MC U tf U3S S3 «R Ml -A ' * * JH*. 

jm *nin»3i* -r mjw HE 

St A M.HM5 C7M tt AM .IW J* * "ES 

_ _ am am ir* a*» *h S*K£ SSL- 

. . Bl IR » — rfe Sff 

2 U It tMSKinR HH 17 .W J*? "J 

P U - ft A ». M .R “W™ “SSL 

J3D 9A _ 3i* 4* - tw- Ok. .W *,a gg?g 

am. o> m iwTw-w 


fit 1* “ S™Sw2JH*W 

* V *, BB^ 5- W '»* 




H nw* ‘5 11 X «S fiW TO TO .w 

Si 25 2SrLy D » U ts * > 25 Hr “£ ■ 


SSSP-Sfli JSEE J-S.. 


49 It 379 2SW 7« g- JS’ ' 

n 77s ure n» J*w r™ ; 
US « " ■» 5 


S3M ZM PffCpt “IH’Sim-W-h- '^25 

... m a g 3 ft 1 IS % Si & M 

3 >« S* ** ' J5 Jf xu-.!S» tw»*w> --wa 

dm xm zap, — mm JoHlfitiw »— “Tw .. -jm 

TM 44 AM .IW J-f »J«» AO “ ‘ ww » Ufe * 

g* w* am *x », gS'p w s 17 z» *4Vk OT. nre. *- £5 

ZW MR aiR .VR J2 » S , H MX— >** 1HR *1* 

^ M *»k |s is sgj&d xu b 1 S ££ SL-25 *- "S 

sr aL-atx SS-sS sa sst s-S 

Sfg E 5J ffi S- ST E « 

Wl .7 th J** wife <nx I -TO BA lJi L4 9 OB 23* 2» ZAIR - 


S'* 

y * 



_ na iTRR 

35 AOHn 

u a nre 
u m m 
7* so ssre 
H M7 life 
_ an mw 
B 3SB 34* 
7 47«( 3Vk 

-am 

IS »47 *4M 
i jc m 

10 70 44 


ti « ire to 55 “safg- 


_ 1IU 10W 
17 XIR 57 

44 HO 39* 

_ mo itre 

_ IDfrlBM 

ia kx itre 

13 97 C5R 

44 IIM 3A 
9 I74M 99* 

_ 19 an 

30 573 AM 

- 141031* 

IA 7K DM 
P B 17M 


—hm ua it 

Ford HO 2DA 7J 

— HCXT US BJ) 

FCMdE 71. U 

ware m 19 


u tt m 
X 3P IAU 
at tm 

- 368 37*9 

I M3 IR 
_ 44 IIM 

74 W3 74*4 

X 2S-R 

- *W P 

u ni in 
_ 147 2AM 

17 OI UK 
71 m n 
st icx lire 

AS 7147 SAM. 


46 *433 TO. 

_ it* asre 
X 2S4I XM 
ao sm PM 
i4 so a 
x n am 

30 71X 79V. 

i; kb 4 ire 

39 ISC 44 

_ 6460 MM 

. *4 7/ 



FUnM X IA 
RJxapK 130 It 
FdOUSe 33 IA 
tt> 23 
M 19 



9« = « m 5 3 i s5 » l s ts a ar s « 

** “ I *»KMfe ^ f ' » 5? g* JSSSf 2£t9UMwLmMW.W /L 

tuxAaawinkMM x g"g- _ aw aore 3 <t» *w ure 

«UP S .«M.xfc4gR ; w totbk u, iJ „ « to » to* x. *jd 

j3U»sSJS.TO.«^* toxm jjwdi - 5 ’SSSS 7m TO™ 

94. VI 73 X* X BOW TOR AMR .» - S ■ ■ 5S 3Q tm m* .» xa 

All n nil W* » *R JSS %££ 13XX9 W HR TO* H *W 

.95 79 - 446 Q n-k a .CM ** — 22^ ~S LB U 1*47 BW SS. 3» X . _ 

ij 2 u x ”S ™ are Sm .5 S S »t#x • u» w - w ii«* J™ UJ* * 

,JJ “ ! S w ^ W .m im aw jhhw »«,. 3'“ fc » s I 

_ t. 9i. am. ix, Tjre w dw nfe J-g" fig ; fi lire ill i u re 


in**;. 


Jinro- 




itre a calxa is* 9* _ 99 at— X'. Jam -r 

A». 4X4 t*TX 194 11 14 9DI ASA. At U7k -M 

XW UK CM 290 SB 12 24*3 3*re 34'-. UM 

PA ft C4CH _ _ IW 74. TA IT. 

UM 19*4 GTDlAR 40. Id _ *4» 17 : . DM tPk -W 


S u » SM I- a 3 TO ias AtoKdTH .sm u « *m aaw xw .. 

“_h!S Si. SSreS is" 222. " u » oS25 STS £ ,> i 

5 it iy; ■“ susssf x 5 ^ isr* *. m ,. r j » 

JOTIM M S S 5? -i AM 3M IM.UD JO 74 W X XR 4 4 W 

a UD w zn. are x mj sm wnrenn jm U - ® "J iSm ■ *re - 

Jt 7* 47 » PM PW PM re TO » ***** - » gj TO m» ure re 

is £5 ” £ % ’£ ’Sf 4?k 5Skn £ST" : s Sti |w -a* 

s a : S 5 & a 5 ^ ssss ■s-s s ss^- g.ga 

I a r 1 L S £ 1 » r «• s-'a * as st a-B a 

5 " s *S S € .j asas.ar.'sagga . :•* 

- Z S tS ,-iir „ * kilf .J? fix 1TA nftinU ft 117 re _ 72 33«k 3Hb 3SW — . . 

J !A TOPdOttfc Tf fT iTtSiT iTj n aro «oti CM arm 

no m in nit 3nw m 5J5 252L. H! H S mJSSi SJk m #35 

J2 Jt 17 am 3AM Btk xw re -TO H2 lj n Sr XM JW . A 

SSJ’Sia s^TO iSSw. “ f _ ra 3S- SK Si iw ,A 

:re 73 ii cS S; SJ. tE? ^ tod mom B; U « «>»*"- nw *- 

~£'?I 1 ip. CM *-*5 fitTw ito S tXc “ 1 C WW w!. K .IW -91R 

» u a m m m m -i to g? x ij ic wr xre xw tor *■ w _■* 


_B7IB UP. », -to 
to it it ns* an. n to -w 5* x wmflt 

:x st u S77 um n nw -re *t apk my 

JO ic H 299 ISM 74M UM re ™*k fife ww* 

.■* a a tan x m m -n ** jw m«f. 

m si is ;doa jam x in .« 55 S2 , MO d 

u u . M 9* KA BO A arre w mwx 

4 'J 5 HH TO. XW 4TTR - '* TO TO **«—£ 

vat k * ua nre a zam -w *» *w 

_ E last 29W 2BM 2t*R -T7R »— JW^t 

ZX2 - 3* M XU 374 n *M *—*5 

2J9» 17 X 1143 A4V. life ACV. -»* reXI» MHLf 


an it MeDon at a _ im «. sm -jm re 

S*fe 42M Mdftm* 31 1 71 140*. 47-4 JTM 4P> *M J 

ISWatM rkcDO.1 ID 7 A - 124 EM TS* ISM ■* l« 

TCit ITA isetWTI ■ 1*7“ Mm 72 33fW 2M BW — . . 

*n £ «kC«H Ijii 12 27 7m ts*fc gjr .. 

9t CM MOCtreiD LOO 19 JJ «aa9JW WJ 9* TO ,, 

72W.49M Maud Ut L7 Z3 HP MW OR TO JW J_4 

X 1714 MtdPori - - toll 22M - n— 22M +» 

n-A n MtdMD ft u 11 « lire 13W nw *w ;n? 

mr-m x cm m url M If SO 44 ire TOR -W r 

Mfe m A M Xredc rS, J 41 AX, MR S5 -S5* 1 - -«ia 

,*;i safe 2*44 were. X u u 1377 etre XW xw* >fe * 

-M »*W 3M re t X L * I at l* V I HO* DA 14 SOW *lw >1 

All 9*4 3k maatoc J4 49 - 32D 99k 944 - MR 

31 Pfe X MreBtp 1JZ 1C 23 P4tt I73VR 7TW TOR .1— rj.- 

X 4PK freest UO 19 U 420 AMR UM. 44 .W *'*• 

WW XA Mrel UM 19 77 H7S2 HIR TM «M * jm . ■* 

U IM AWtF. ' _ 2 2K2M IW HR IM - 

PM CSN W-CUM LI* LC I* 141 (SW tCW ISfe 

ZIW TOM MMKXtll 2* 9 ft 7Q7 flW* II TOR *IW 

am m hwt -- i,i» u ic isa mk nw n *n -to. 

Do 97* WMMtKl _ P . Pit 1241 12W IZM -*k 

24U am AtorLpfC 290 74 - 201 3HR TO 2A4R - l~tc 

an. 3ft fttnjjni a 12 u INI m am ttre -w <3 

Bhdn UM-ffiL las 7J _ UBfi, TOR P TO *TJ 


" IE®- 


Living in the 


x ts S in z^kdure xw re a> u «WS2? , - s “ - 2 ? if ?5 


1J _ P TOR 1BM UM -wl g* »W 


MS ss - us so. dX* so. S,. >fw 

93 AT 50 9». 9M 94* -hi «M TO 


li am ft » * 

_ on *re sr .A 

_ un um un -w 

I* Ntltofe Jt jn .rw 

N IN H I5T. IA -fe 

11 SM He 19 1911 44* 

U 1IM X *7W * ft -ft 

o nn hr iom re 

- CEalffe 17ft 19ft -ire 

- 7239 94 SW AM .a 

M 294 SIM ire sore •*. 

_ AX W4, HM I9W re 

M ftfZ ST-R S44 saw -w 

9 01 11 -1 IIW IHR - 

IS 172 XM 44 *4 4M 

u toil iim lire lire 

2S ISO 22ft pre 225* .W 

14 MS 3T.» MW 74ft -ft 

W 1311 53*. DM ST>. .IR 
11 ItU TDM 209k JOVk .ft 

- Ill TO 34 24k 

» an m ZIW are .W 

14 IP 27ft 7AM n .W 

15 231 DM 1244 13M 

x zn pm x»> rih -iw 

X 414 44ft 44k 44k -1ft 


Vow Printed ip 
New York 
For Same Day 
Delivery 
m Key Cities. 


fi *J - 50 9». 9M W* -h 

90 AC - IX 9=-. 9M 9ft 

SO .1 _ XM ore Oft 9* . M 

M4 .r _ ax ft*-, tire itm -*» 
BM -nSc^i 121 U U tt ZT. SW 2SM -*. 
12s ’ aa«i - - E* « • Jj *• -ft 

!f , a » uoxox BO U - BC ZT*. 2P« 279* •' * 

2A-* UM lanTX Ztf ■ 4 - Ml H IIW 24ft -1-. 

to. k ftsuei :e s » sn a x a -*» 

x*. rt bD6«. k ■£ s’ 3:Q 41. m c -■• 

sift a idxjsiis _ jr aaojr-* to no. ♦* 

rra !• =4SS as 0 r: M 221k Ptt Bn. _ 

■9R to *««r ur ts IS c»i 'S=. u tire - k 

U Be astfStt _ 1. Z7550 TO 2*ft 774 .JM 

ii* sea ;n?*= . s □ in rrw av. -m 

9m sm saoo a i< *3 -.a *w r* ha 


UM MLGIW _ _ T2S MIR U left -ft 

UM MUCUS 129 Ml - BO nu TOR MM m 

94k MUMfiD _ _ Ota 10W 9M 9M 

HR TA DLSPOIn - - PI IOM . MW IBM 

ua iau mam _ _ pa m dm ic *w 

Xh an mm itu /j _ 99 asre xsre ass* 

a 1*1 re*TU UIH b » 8* m » j 

12M n bwxad _ _ cnKiluw i» nre •— ■ 

7U M4K0D JWrfl-IMlWBM bh x 
lift MM - X Ml n 1U. Pre *W .?* 


bmx ik* 79 _ tf asre 
Xante ix it n sx 22M 


£ fiCB 


,,w « ” JHSfe si as* ‘.it 

- ’J naJSE: S w S“ ,iw -*•> f 

IM 79 X S3 TO BW 21ft - «W n - * 
sa io 22 n ww im ire re HJ 


lift ICR mo reen IS M it ia m 12? H— . ,9/ 

TO X MMC Ott 199 7J - AS 2Sft TO 25ft X ^ 

ti rot MdOco ut u i n SWR saw sm* 


TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212 - 752 - 3890 ) 


■Sft -.[.ft d nre™ 
TO 9. -jSrfK 

x* 2p fcsr-J 

dR S ->•= 

TO* i ft -rc» 

J.-, TO .03 
1». ’5ft 1=S4 
TO UM JXEof-V 
IS». i: ID-SC9 
:a. ir-i cs»7 
km :a em 
i» :** r.v 
TO* TO* LSW3 
If-k 14 'JVTR 
«*« TTft Ke*» 
TO* B'u B'TSte 
JSv* rr smi 
ts Tt ;:yw 
nw a art 

4- . ts Sm 

ETt. TO* cTOei 
25-1 IS* '» G ear 
79ft SS-* nr»a 
41 asft i=s>a? 

TO is-ft :ra»wS 

iA «SSii 

••£ . » «sp<=» 

■J AM rtGnrsk 


Is ^k ‘Ift’ m *1 »* «d0« 100 11 9 121 SW* 

At* n IM m £ 17ft 9M Mtotarn _ _ m DW 

ii U I It X Pi Si >4 TOM mSgSd ***'*' p ™ Si 

93 -■ » w* ». im ate. .-.k S. BSES* - 5 

ni'Sniin'n* ^ 5*9M fSom 30 19 a 1T2 TOR 

*" U - 129 Ue 1J n - xw uu MMCfeH *1 If _ 42M Ww 

: ss? fu s? * “sk; r s ° jsa 

? S : : £ Si SS Si :2 SS® « •* » ^ » 

■4 IS - g UT • TO* TO- - TTO 67M 


ISM- . X: Hi 
DR . -W. 


07 UM »* ISW -w n.\ 

usi xm xw cm x 

an nre 27H are .hr c . 

<239 tire 4iw -are *w 


x si -■ ns a* iim. u .» 

99B *4 _ AX IS -. IP* lift 

We 44 _ » UM l»R lift u 

js s» _ Mi aj on in* -w 

_ s x* sere lew mm .re 

_ 1 SCSI 9 ft* «* *A *M 
S B ’-> ZSIXHe*-. ia ua -ft 
- - ta fe i h -ft 

■At 59 K St: PM Si'* »M -« 

.12 S r .OB 2?re toft Bh .U 

BJ 19 71 tc 2P* TO* TO -C 

-.X 7d _ CfUt SJfr 5JJ. flft ft 

_ _ zavze-. Sj TO* -i 

13 Si to A* 51, M * It*. 

a : ia e u* :*-i um 

. - * I* >« ft - L 


aft » ■SZ -fO.—J 'J 

IM 7 7 -ft 

T V^-- w 

*M ..—r. .»> *5/ 


Jt U P UI54 449k 

a-TB* 


9 an ure lire nre _ 

■ B4 PH 30* am. ** 

P 191 56ft SAA* SSI* -ft 

11 OO JtVk 274* HR •<• 

14-Uia 25 33H toft -Aft 

n wm itw lire .w 

- CMS 9BW 59** S3 -7ft 


3teralQ»ribunc 


HAM 74*1 CM44M 
ton 17ft umaMA 
a» am OmafV 
26k 34k CDMfK 
Xft 24k CWdPCX 
PM 22ft CM60K 
2ft vi amti 
3CM 9*4 am*** 
JD* 79ft once* 


KM 9* dXX ft MB ~ 14 55X 12R 12M TOR -ft 

lire 9M Atoonw D* e - IDO UK MM Wk •«*] 

*■ 3M *XM X AC 7 1X7 20. 2*k 31* 


* nw 0x1 

14H AW CkoBiv 
B1 sm damn 
S*M AAM QmCH 
23M IM OfcSaJu 
17ft HM CXMFd 
MH Oft OdCTdi 


. COBS SBW 5*re S3 -ZM 
ii aoKin isv* isft .w 

si tw m bw .w 

M IP PH 30W »re .ft 

13 ,44 lO*k 254* 2511 -ft 

UplPHdM ,15ft llsre-lOk 

- ioa atre am nre >w 

- »n* Bm, tor 2sre - 

- 200A 2AIR 25** 259* - 

- PI BM X 2AM .M 

20 77 30 am* 20 

_ om iu lu hr .ft 

2 * hjf 2 mw im ure -w 

to 4» XM X 36W .W 

17 90 TOR 23ft BAR -4R 

19 191 PM PM PM 4ft 

5 U6 75ft 25k 25W -W 

41 774 24V. M X -9k 


THE WORLD’S DAIDf NEWSBVPER 


1AK. 

"J- 

199000(4 

•U !J 

If IX 15 

ss 

SS 

K. 

77k 

igaf-sv 




A/t*% 






4ft Ji 

4n 



L-SS33=> 


S4 21? 61 -S 

MUR 






» 4X 

Bh 

w* 

Zt 


lrt.Tr 

1* J 

77 SPa27W 

a 

V 

CJ, 




. UM Si 

SB 

s>» 

a*. 

a-, 

lOdr 

fi il 

P 1231 27k 

23- 

23k 

IF.. 

lift 

llj-uxg 


- 200 ITti 

17k 

Ip] 


IF* 

MinSKS 


- 414 17W 

17W 

in 

is-. 

IT. 

fnvGWtf 

93 5 9 

. 179 rsik 

ISW 

ISV. 

J9.V 

11 


_ 

X S»15I 29-V 

28-« 

atm 



too 

_ 

JS 487 419. 


a-\ 



| pffljT 





IPl 

Ck 

IlMffP 

_ss» ii 



■AH 

Vs 

£ 

<no>aASI 

IJO SJ 

21 XO 28~( 


IM 

to 

tt-v 

MsflrBn 


- 283 »■ -. 

77ft. 

PH. 



MV40V 





It- . 

12** 

EMAtiar 



1ST. 


wr, 

1,1 


J49 U 

_ 225 ta - ,. 

09, 

ore 


CP* 375. /WnTOi 10 J B X39 41 ■** 4UM a 1 ** 4 Mr 

^.g-JSSftL a iJ S S?:-S»--«3ia 

SS X S2ST' x 7i “ 5 KX ^ .« IS-Jui 

ES.iS2£S 5 S U XSL X -E-^ 

27ft sm SSi'i a.,, » S £ t£ lift « nt 

ICfe xa MXfita - . n I «w M -ft 

lift 7 KOMI . p U - K TM . ,9H. M> ‘M 

59W 39*1 WOK *4 1-5 31 13134 449k .XM XW . At 

are TOR Mad**. IX AT 11 UK 23M WR 33M •* 

L*. Sft MdXKd - . *4 144 AR *W AW *W 

■X* *e MncdnHt JA* J 19 732 12 lift lire -re 

it* no Mcmaa x u 8 an 8Hr m jim* -m 

IBM 17 NUufll Mh M - Tf MM IBM . IMR -W 

to * 1AM Hoax .*4 45 14 SM am aw m -m 

Ut 9ft HxgGr LI l* 14 - -410 139k 13 IIW -w 

IM 2-t* 3* 12 » m m im »re «re 

9*4 X* BapP _ _ SOS OW m CM X 

MLR 12ft MS4aea LSI# M - 233 17*k HM 17ft _ 

T3H 9 ns ADO J**IB_MX«W Wk BM .M 


■ 

C7- >-'■ ■■ 

Si-"-' 

«: : -• 

'vAv 7 :;-- 

S-Tr^ •_ 

■u-'-lI: 

4r.~- • 
cli • 

•T:; . 

, e. — . : \ 


ra * m m -ft 

JTS ^ 

b* « *a 

Tto iz um nre re a-- 
wi nw am nw re 
75 MM IBM . ure re . 2/1 
sm am am m >w jVJ 


| E=rr :• 
[ DiC :-t ' 


.94 *3 14 SM 3m 30ft IOM- -W JVi 

lie 1C - ttO 13V. 12 ISW re. 

“ S% 'S *■& 

ut M - zn 17V* 17k 17ft _ 'Ui 


st i.i ii 4504 91W JM nw •* *0! 


15ft WW MfEJW IJJte 1QJ _ 577 tt* lCMR IS , 

»>. 2JM BWOJJ2 196 It - 70 2SM S ISW - .Up 

35ft ZT4 MStfl7jQ 1.95 7J _ 73 75ft 75 IS -VR 

2t't 2SH MSFnOJo 235 SJ - ID 3tVR » W »M -rin 


»-■> 24*1 JUfKiM 110 U - 50 25M 


S£r 
ib;.— j- _ 
te.' - 

Sr..- 
Ire • 

Cr:.. - ‘ 


Hft 24 h msfosw US BJ - W* 2SW- 

Ip* I3« MSCtoU 1479 BJ - X 164k 

is:. IP. MoSHV ,J3 15 K UM 


IS--. IP. JWsSHV |J3 15 _ . K UM IB Iff* - ‘ 

le:. a win, _ - 14fl il H» lire *w 

.elk 17ft MSPatetr M4_IP3*U3BR3t _ 

litre fi- Morgn in u it 3737 mre mu lpre.sre '. ^ 

19*. IOM MdRMO* J3 42 23 P7 191R 19M 19ft -M : ■ 

14*4 BM Mamma _ _ X i 12W lire U -VR .rjl. 

t 4W Manaitll P U IS IW 4*1 AM « -W , 


ON VU PE lllh Hlga Lad Lotos! ago 


Oh na pe loo* non Le- Land qd» 


sn » dMEMd Ut II II IM TWn n 73V. >M 

27k X4M JtodEnn 244 93 _ 44 2AM SMR 2*W .IR 

A6k 111* AXfCcp MSB U M AN IM ,tt 

tore uh amdAs io» li _ ztn iw itre ttw •** 

19M MH AMI -IW U _ 112 16k MW IAW *W 

are is mckcd _ n 7» 2tw m» sow re 

iim it AK>n ij u i< n h itm nre -w 

TOR MH MM* 2D] 15 M mittW TOR IBM .Ik 

WW UK AXUWV7 IB U - P14 24 22 23*. .1H 

779. to ATMOS UBI 11 22 to? 77 2SH2MK.M 

(2M 44 dtotoOc -Si Ml 9P> PH 92M -2H 

am jam Oman* ut u - ins an* nw ns* 

»k tft oom .iw u . m low law tor .w 

UM IN Idfl I 2 . XISI in ISI* Jo 

tm ok mail m u - iwi ioh nre x »m 

Wl ITVl AMI 44 1J 77 5710 47W Xft 4A4R *W 

am m* aoMto _ as auo bw tore nw *w 

7*4* HR A toXtP f 1 32 14 35 731 SK 37H SH -*R 

re u mm _ _ ix* im im ire 

AM BM AtMOl X 33 1411 414 X X -HR 

I4M TM MX - P 494 41AM UM 144k 

an* im axxx - r* ix nre 39W are *m 

HO X AXX 40 9 It 879 X MW XV. -Ok 

tt XM Awn 1J» II 24 1*926 «M 40k tOfe .** 

izm ift Aim _ - in nw lire nw - 

HM AM om _ 13 XX TM T TW tft 

21 fe CM AdeM JH J H nxxan PM 23H .1W 

TO* 17 BAJMOlD _ _ 7SB rtk lore 19M -H 

SM PM BBKTCe IM U II n* S3 sn, DM ... 

nw im bce 91 ua _ _ pp tor am n •« 

HA TM ff*hr JJ U . 07 H aw BM .w 

5M ait see no — — an a*r s s ■** 

ww are us _ ai ran m* tm tor -re 

am nw fttoftam _ - mipw mi pw *m 

am 7* bmc a* a a* an m tore nre .ft 

am* atre but mc us tj . xs tsw* 2 $m ism 

BW IS BP Pin ZJB 111 ft « ITM life IM 4 4 

17 tv itr ME 1J1 It I XdTH HM TOR .» 

■M 5M BX2 _ n 57 «M 144 M ,k 

U AM BTCNT _ 11 3723 ife 04 M .ft 

Bit IW OTP CX* 247 7.9 - St TOk 2FX 254. .*k 

am hh tamer - st emu am 
11 Sft Mnu Jl U 11 BS Hfe IP M X 

P ISM B0U£ UM lie . Id 2N an »* <1 

47H 2*H Bonn. 4* 1.1 is mid 43V. 4, re 4th .re 

s* mh boon c >j n n an* am shr *m 

a nu jo 1.7 as us* sr v jw .w 

are iu mm .io j 2* lniaiMk ttv< mh *,u 

am am utc lj* *0 ltewm 779. g stw .w 

»re safe m. ic u 8 13«3 sore sw. saw .ire 

29ft IN ficeBSV ■ ,97a IS 23 IB TO* 77k 27H -ft 

am n Bxofn d ii u iiu p m » .** 

4ft *4*i Kim ia u . 20 nre 37W nre .ft 

m im Bean p> ia u . ion w ■ an tin 

17 x BUM Ml 12 U p <M ore a -M 

mh nv> Batau it _ it» iw id iu c 

Tfe Sft BrfAtt.il JNt J _ 119 Aft AM «. 

»* iu BxsodL nun mi itre an aw tre 

Mfe B KTOrta Sr U It MAkJPR 239k XM *KR 

to* im mok - u im bw an am • ft 

TOR X Bxtog UM) U IX TOR 52R TOR *H 

TO* 44ft Bento* Ut 19 U « Sire S3 57 -ft 

ton im bd*w ,«i . is m m sw sm re 

JN 25ft BUftdifi i«u . ftjiuznznt -ft 

31ft im «TD*ft JDa J > PS 170* 17V. nre .ft 

2! 22! H5P*’ *» «*• wre ** •« 

XW » MV JA II 19 1043 «H CAM cn "W 

Mk M MAXI in L? 19 Itm 724R 7BR 32W >** 

SSL 2P* ^“P** *» 7J _ ae awr zm, n . 

TO M BkAtooS L94 7J _ Ut BH tore TO* .W 

2! JS 5“**' .10 A *4 PO 17M 12H TOR -W 

S? S gg**-- M* U B 3444X1 »ere TOR .M 

•22. JI* 2if“ - Ml to sere to *re 

!»re Jt BxKn U U IS BH llOft Wft Hire till 

!I£ J f* Si?* - at in n mu >w 

3E E“ S2S*£ - x itm m. nre -w 

jm bm BxfitD mm _ in am tor atw «w 

w J5 gam, SJM 19 u IX M re re *> 

E 5£ ^ nl JB IB 33 MI 291* tore 25ft -VR 

B JSft him _ 30 IZtt X CM XU -W 

5* IS S"*? 1 .f W » H » » » >1 

•» am Mx ut Lt » nsn tat tsw osre -ft 

f*S »i BxwoBi - U on atre itw w, * 

*£ *2? 5— ” ■«* -J « lira bw rw Pih -re 

UM m MK -IT B life life DM tfe 

2jw nu re ia u H io zm d nre re 

a* * Mti JSf-nnsMiwsw-w 
oh Bfe i i i u i mm u *4 ns xw oh are .re 

fi! SS 3KE. , - 11 *■! 51 *ZM0 HH UK It* rl* 

w Bh ®M*CI U* AJ li SB 3PR BW TO .ft 

B l» BarftW K - _ 19422 A B B « 

E* SS .LX 04 It 1H 294 29ft TOR .ft 

* Wfe JxoJr Ut U g US w, » » 

» BW BxafX 2J9U-4BBM2M1M -M 

x j» mi a* to io pci xre x are .w 

ZM left BtMtB Lff U . HH n Si » - 

2UR 2N BUS ta IM U - X2Stk2SM.SW.iik 
STV. to MM JO 1C 15 5837 41H X Cfe «H 

SIM IT BtOtt S II to TOO XM Xm SOM .1 

PU in fltXMP Ift U II S3 BUR Bw IN -ft 

am ire gxftxi - - x m im itm -re 

TO* IB* BXh - 14 09 2N 20 20M »*R 

ttfe s» Bddx J) s it it** an* sire am -»w 
BM nw BXWM -to IM toft JO JM Jt 

WA 50ft BMW IB U II M Ift KM TOR <VK 

JB U» MMi - 12 B I7I» 17H I7H rk. 

xre am Btes* l ji u u 10227 xw ecu tire -n 
Xft He BXMH 31 II S Ml *4W «*» edw «M 

ore 31 tow 19 U 34 <53 **. Xft Xft -tk 

27R 1IH BdkdEt - SS 14A S5M atw 2« -14 

7* SSM Btoocc U9 11 14 3*1 7<U 71 IP* .IW 

w ft, tow* - - n w re re- 
am UM ill « _ 15 XA ISM ISk HM Jt 

caw am Bone*: _ b 10 aw an xre .ire 

CAM 29R flrefli* 4 LI 31 2819 KX AAW C .ft 

lift 9M BxtStr .91 U - XI IIW IIW lift <W 

Ift W Mfid _ _ 3H ft t* ft 

BM 7ft BCSMhqr - _ IB 19R IIW IBM *1W 

BM 12 MU US If _ 2X 37 3AM 2AW -ft 


TO* JIM amEAn 
19M IIM CBAkiFa 
3AM 77ft OXSAUa 
IM Ift 0X7*9 
IH 2M OdVRe 
ISM lift CH*XK 


II 20943 IBM. 79R TOR «3W 

S3 SM 59 9 3* 

- 174 3DW 20 20k 

- « b jam atre .1* 

_ 941 ore toft toft 44 

_ TO ink 27H , 37ft re 

_ 111 nw p<* pre *iw 

- ITS ISW ITM lTftk j* 

_ io » are aoie .** 

a i27 nre itm iau re 

e ■ 1 ire 3 -m 

- 1199 Ure 14ft 14ft -w 

tt 113* Tft AAR 7 -w 

B . eOl I9W TO* l*u • ft* 

_ at PH a*w wr -re 

10 SB* SHR iOW SOM -re 

11 50 AH 384R HM -ft 

* UM V BW M •* 

19 IMS A9M Hfe tBH X 

at' im aw* 27» aare -re 

71 3* Sk SW SM -M 

P 945 Xh MM XH -m 

11 »c* tore xw _ 

I* 8*1 27k 27H art 4* 

u sn atm saw a*n -re 

_ SH9 1H IH IM itR 

17 IP I tore XM 339k .1* 

- 1113 15 MK IC. .* 

3) 0X1 OOM CN X»* *M 

32 11307 3SMR 25k asm -ft 

it uMkinvi um ip ft .are 
ta asre bm asre -re 

- am asre ism 2sre -re 

_ ■ is/] ir atre acre .ft 

BK* W H* -Mr 

11 77 Bft 2BM an- >1* 

_ PAT ire IH IW -ft 

ao nainre tore wre .m 

» iw Pft zift aim _ 

11 pi nw atw 27 >re 

11 tm lire i7v* 11 .re 


ic itw an* 

_ xn 7ty* 
X JKiUAtk 
II 125* UK 

- m acre 

- cm ipk 

2S 3KI Xk 

24 2X 229* 

II 1271 «M 

i» ix nre 
11 AU3 core 

17 109 csre 

tr an aw 

17 itt IIM 

25 3774 Oft 

99 Ift 

- PC low 

- UO IOM 


Ui ej 
V II* 63 
2 231 07 


23 a toft 

- 19 ft 

_ m nw 

is 47*1 M 

22 mo am 
II 1572 BW 
a am 

30 IB 19fe 

13 tr IIM 
22 dll WW 


- ISB* TV, 

- 119 3k 

n wre 

u itk Pre 

21 ISA AH 


Cenrpf IX 
C I 9 XI* .11 
Canon .Ho 
CridMD 


OaOItt JS 

UB9H M 

Coam coa 

CdUDiC J64 

CUM* Jl 

OXnPT TOR 


- p, um n un -ft 

9 XU xre er* 43k -W 
17 24*4 Bk XM Bk .3k 

as. 2x1 a tore ddre -*k 

23- IBB 2794 Bit wthr -ft 

12 so itre im low **r 

27 CIS 4H* 49M 49k -ft 

u 2*71 sire sm sire -u 

_ 373 7k 3k 7k _ 

12; 375 14ft 14 IM -k 

3d 26771 60M S*k SOM -ft 

94 UH BM 26*k Hfe .Ik 

53 in sat 539* saw .re 

_ P* lew lew ieH -Vk 

_ 111 IZM ITW 17M • W 

29 1X7 4M 41 if* 

H 17M 17ft ITM *ft 

17. tt » 5ft $1* .ft 

- 2B tare cm xw -ft. 

- 402 19W 19ft im _ 

ar BXl am 64ft tsu x 

c in liw u 11 ft 

17 2*5 W m N .re 

IZ7 IH AM All *ft 

. w n un, 11 .H 

_ IBS IW TW TV. .W 

172 MM tore 1NR - 

_ SS7 are 7W TM 

17, MI WR m* 28W -VR 


- ISA SAW 

ia x nw 

- 1*01 S4M 
j* ia,«CH 

11 ■ Ufe 

13 XP JM* 

13 XM 19k 

U in mre 

IS IIP 90*4 
P 1974 AfW 

i* up im 
u os am 
,• aez nw 

S Ta 47V, 

1* sen asm 

1 .in ih 

12 2390 41W 

it tot ore 

19 SS* 57W 
> MX 47W 


37W SIR .*k 
46H Ok -ft 
»re a<* -w 
IH Ift *W 
eofe ton, -re 
tft ere _ 

SAM SAW ere 


MOD 1J* 
CMMCAl Jl 
CehnJtr IJ9 


CMt LB 

CUE OTC 190 

G» El ut 

caoOaon 
CattUSAt 
WAll 


-] 2SM 3CU UtOUetl UI U I 
■Ml 14M AH UnUi _ « 


a PM CBCapta U3 
27V, 2SW CaCxpfC UA 
PM 43M CaaAor l« 
9M 7 C«DtMi 

UM Mfe CmoM 

AAM PH Ceau, .11 

39M URiMM Ut 

TOR PH CnOao 
BH 24*4 OHEA LM 
asw a» Ccoeop 1.94 
SM HM CanCcM 
dire Xft CoottM IX 

AOlk OH CoMp IX 
19 14 CmPN IJd 

ilk B CinStor* 

SM IM CSEan 


11 ana nre bm nre .w 
li- ax AtH *sm Asre • w 
u. ism m law are -re 
SUB TO* 23 -W 
19 133 BW 2lW BM - 

c an an s, -ft 
21 HiToNlR «ft asre.lw 

- xo a iom ao 

it: bun m m •* 

11 ir am a a -re 

n. 3439441k XI* X *M 
17. XT 17W IN l/W .tk 
13 at nw an j, ire 
1* ai isre in ism -m 
_ ai am atm atre 
11 ass 9S9R Efe SSW 

- pia ure 011 lire -ih 

H 4X5 IBM O Oh rl 

- lUlHft JSft JAW »W 
ii «S3i an* Am *ire -ire 
2 a asHdire 17 m •!* 

73 Mft TOR WM X 
27 Oh XM A7W 47ft -IV. 
29' 3030 MM Nfe MM -TM 
99 672 4K X 47M -IU 

- 1926 Bk ift aw -W 

- mo a pre aa .ire 

H asw Bft asm .w 
9- tx toft m tare -w 


x im m 

- M 31* 

- zn wm 

- 49 ITW 

S3 19H 

- nr itm 

- Pi lift 

- Ml 10 

- to iom 
B SI 51 Sam 
1* na 1791 

- aa a 

17 196 Pfe 

tt «U l*Bk 

as w toft 

- a im 

_ «S 39ft 


- . Itt 23ft 32ft 32ft W 

- 95 Bk XU TO* .w 
23 am 67M tore tore re 

— , PO IW IW PR .16 
1>- too IIM 119k I3*k tH 
20.9toSkC7 XM AAW >re 
-■ mo pw imr acre re 
za- n no w tore -re 
X. xx *23*6 as* nfe *re 
MH2SH &re asr* -w 
JO ' 713 XW C7W cm . w 
», anr saw are a -w 

2|. 637 99W SM SHR JV 
SI- 49 ttk WW UR -w 
tor iw « am 4M -ft 


1* aat lire 

u ua 24M 

.HOT 
u un uw 
3! 33X 2411 
to 4101 li 

_ ta 9 

- X 2A*R 

n u« *SH 

_ Sftt 2SM 

_ a km 

- II 2*1 
S9 210 Bft 
O MB Hfe 
B JiX XM 

it m ts* 
79 cn pm 
u a BK 

31 Z224K1SM 
_ |0A*19Lt 
29 1654 3U 
_ mum 

- H 26H 

_ Ai SM 
B ItU imr 
» » »W 

- »•¥. 


IX 19 TO* Ilk ■*■ 

■1174 xre «ere «h -re 

114 3Afe lAM 2*M - 

136 36H 2**k 3A*k 

130 low OH «v. *:r 

16*7010*6 IOH IOH -fe* 
119a6 7H 7W , re 

ill atre lore 26W re 

tA 2SR 2SVk are 

sis w 9 9 re 

3m xo 26W nre -ire 
76 iam isre Mre 

2667 ITM 16V. |AVk -M 
SM PM PH PH 
*063 99ft f*U 9BW tlW 
obxbsoh xm sow , ire : 

SO 35 3AH 2S 
linn uw xw nre .re 

1344 34k 2OT'( 3CW ,*k 

X9 23k 24H 364k -Hi 

XO MH S7k S7k 

47 ure ZH. BM .m 

» UK in 34k -H 
ISO 30 j*4. PH .m 

MS 2216 730 BH .re 

no 7m tw rw k 
928 vu nre om. -h 
30700 47V, Mft x . « 
1127 Ilk li 24H .re 
nw iv. im am -k 

tt 10 99* «h •» 

UOS 66k tire i&M -*. 
r»jQ i«re ure asm -k 
117 36k 36k 76k fe 

UM xre u ure ,v» 

1377 nife 1 09W M3M .SM 
TOO IP* ip. um 

20879 XH TO. 269K -5M 

1253 lire ia’. lire .«r 
ao* 20 lore nw 

tto 251* Mre 3M> -M 

231 Jfe P. 3V> 

M80 28k 27M 33M Cr 

ll» to low SOAR > w 

233 20W 20 20 re 

134 39*k P 29H -re 

x tor »m ism re 

•I ZSH Eft 2SH _ 

wl core Btk etre -ire 

382 23BR Bfe BW _ 
255 ISW 14k ISW .Vk 
SB ISW 144R II .VR 

*60 sm sh sm -H 

120 AM Afe AH •<% 

ISIXOfe. 19M 30W -<* 

M477 nre 39k Wre -MR 

,03 *4k AM 64. i Vk 

2333 xw am aw -m 
lOieUW 57 57 

434X7 36k 26*6 -K 

3713 PH 30ft 31 >H 

sm nw urn ion re 
431 ISM nre 1JM 
3J6 10W 19ft 2V9 tft 
CM BAR 289. TBH Ift 

SP life 16m JAM _ 
3393 tore tow tore -*6 

ip are ok iso .. 
Pi dBm baw itv. . im 
310 W H 4. tft 
101 26 JSft TO* -H 
1691 are 47k elk .H 
SOT am alW u 
7217 69W Mk 69 rW 

20f um rw uw *m 

UM lift 16k ,71ft .re 

1173 PH tore PH ife 

4/TIlllTR II** irre .W 
ITO ISM LAW ISW -ft 
PS SBW 31 38 

IIM tow 37*1 life lift 
IP Pfe P PH »VJ 
lOAClOVe 114k lift rk 
50e9iH 2JH Jife .1 
is* (23m pr jam *ire 
1154 2AW 25W 256k ilk 
1216 XH 46W (fee 
471 lire ITM ITW .re 
a pm iim nre m 
at cow tore aaw >v. 

3267 a Cam CAR >W 
5* l jm Itt* 1JM -56 
AX AIM AM fife U 

jjj ure iiw lift 
707 MM IN l*k 
l» 7R »H TM *66 
123 TTO 27 t«M rfe 

165 lore Lire lew. tk 
ix im uw UR -fe 

IX 2*M 2tH 79H .R 

na are are sir >h 
n « n m . 
an lew 16 iam -w 
87 17ft 17 17 ft 

El UM life IIM *Vt 
1117 ITW rife ITM -Hr 


lex ip* 
BH Zt 
PH life, 
ir., arc 
tom so,. 
22R Pc 
47k 14m 

12k 9k 
»W PA 
IOH tfe 
life ire 
7H Sft 
14-R 9H 
Ufe tfe 
7JH sn 

JTt S1K 

TTVj ill 

Ilk sv» 

XH soft 

ST . 6 ZdM 

TTfe isn 

IOH JH 

124. (fe 


jo If &c x u*k in. fjm 

ICO AO 31 763 33V, 22 nw >H 

J2 2 12 JM 13k 12H lOTk -fe 

_ 28 342 2d. 2* 24 -V. 

- 21 524 », Tt* 3BH -k 

IJ4 7J IA 133 3SW 24R 244k H 

IX U M IfiiXH 47R 47k -*. 

Jl if 13 na nw um lire 

- :* len are lore p 

- _ Aid TW TW 7k rW 

tt* 71 _ AX 9M Ota OR 

MS .7 _ «B4 A*. Ift AM 

ms I - Ml ISR ISW 15*. Jk 

_ _ xi ore ,h n .« 

20 J IS 41 72k 73H 73H k 

ico 12 ic 2S42 n<* ph pre .w 

JOB 11 <7 tow 3M« 23M 

- » 111 IK PK 7V. -k 

JO* Ss 13 286 2*Vk 34 74V. ilk 

js u a lot itw tor j«re 

tto l* II 147 27k PM IIM .1 

- 1* ISO are 6M Bk .VR 


m J"h»«n» IX IS le TM UW I2W ITW -W 

_ AW C7H mm It IJ 2S 1*713 56k S7V, S7H -H 

m ^ ***** « 'I u «ii m xh xii in 


3N 364 MOtMUn C Li li 13349 3» Jire UW tk !*iQ 

JS 'a m mn a - si nu mw a ■ N 

«*M Sft Mrnfemi . S W ft 9 MR -W 

« CM M CO Tre _ to 7B3X4H. 2Bk 24 - 

90ft Aik Mc ft iBW X J X- inx TTM 76W 77V. tfe 

» M.Xaih KI _ 13 ax or C3SR XM CM 

JS T 4 - a jt 27M nre nre ■ hr -Si 1 

lire 12ft remad Jt A* _ im i3M izre ure -w 

Ife Ilk MimAdi » U . si TJM 13W 13M 

'S. Jft ttHtS fi u _ M9W 9W 9W-- -SHE 

9k Ik MBITS Jl U _ ,c M V 9H 

£L S 2"?! 1 At t» - MS IOW IIM .1*6 -W V|K 

re f**L SM OO - H Ife 9W 9H.IR ■* V ' 

re “*US a » - iu rkr 9m otr -hr 

,*« re rem ih u . m. tw m oh x 

'2S 'S5 CSJ? 0 J « - 6i 17R ,IH IN *W . 

8% MnPfT UAH i] „ Hk . ftft «M| _ •* 

U2* If' 729 Al - 491 UK UM lift- 9W - 

IS! SttSS* '5 f! - iw isre . un ure -re ■ 
re ji; 77 sj — a iih is ia . -w 

Iiw 17k Mu m M At _ 303 nre SIM I3K -VK -S 

(A 4 * MM 4*S2a° R H - 2* 're ,j re HH .ft 1 

L JS5 35“ w m _ asa nre in isre -re i 

IS! !£ SSf!“ £ H - i® 1* ure is ^6 . 

15H 13h UiCa job SJ _ in isre uw ism m -7 

ISH lift BHHFL « - 1^7 ,SVk IMR IA» Jtk 

ISM l» MafUn 

!*w icr Mottrw 

ISW Ufe iWn 
15k 136* MkBMI 
1£* U M dd AI BI 

lire um Mm PU 

JAM Ufe MaHJM 
■AW 14M MBdffY 
life in* 6HNV2 
ISH I to* MaaPA 
Its Ilk HkO) 

ISR 13 Mnoa 


-TR - - .711 AW Sk dW .w 

_ - 2 21U to nw sire -k 

«• 25 22 im 35W 23 2fre .M 

- - 2M I/ft 77Vk 1/ft rk 

- - TO 2k 2H 3k -k 

- - 377 ism 17k ,2k Jm 

At 15 19 300 30 29M 2tft -M 

J! A tt 0ood 3O zm tore -m 

-AW U B UK JN » JN rk 

_ 21 B711o14h life UM .Vk 

re “ - 6*do#0R SOM 60k * d. 

IB* LS 19 879 .XM X XH dm 

x hem 3N jsft re 

iji Si m » ». ok »n -re 

- - !«d lire UW uw re 

- 20 1 170 ere 4KR «M -H 

Ifi SA 29 ten 28ft BM 26M .ft 

Ctt t 12 929 TBH 771* 71 tW 

* IZ II 61 17k ITVl lire re 

si li id ffl » m in re 

5* s II ISC ilk 90H X (14 

to 19 JV 2059 47k 46W MVR -k 

« II 20 »*4 2»re 3AH 2AM .k 

•to to , at lew *re ia re 

M 6-7 _ 546 /SR 7H TH : 

*7 61 24A TO* 10KR WW 

fi AJ - 203 lift ure ure _ 

|J “ » i - n im ife iw 

fi 63 _ M7 lift 13 life 

M IJ 17 14* 4AR 4AH CAM “ 

- 19 X2 ISW 14H IS ift 

„ - c W lore lew itw - l! 

■ JO 28 14 2721 AN 43H UI. ,S 

_ IS 676 13V, lift Ip. 

I-6C U 10 2AM XkR ilk dTW • V. 

.. .7 M . IS1 lp * l *** l»* -k 

CSC 15 - ISX SH xm BH ft 

-M u 10 25X1 XH 44k Sw re 






ma M _ m ibr nu i» «■ ' 

■JW JB - 71 15W ISW ISW JO 

.jm is _ bs ure ure sere _ . 




UW Ire yy* '-H® ff ~ M lp W ISM IN -w u 

Kk Ire M - p« isw icre is 

ire M - Jl I5» SOW 15H . «W ? 

5k 5E2fT * “ - 2SC IN 14H UM dl* • • 

Itm ire uSum 4* ft* - fi UN UW um _ . 

,7* 2 * ** - IB UR 1*tt IN rk -i 

Cfe im SuSvs J g “ - 73 iShR ure ure -fell -J 

sh Sf 5223 " - at in m uk ■» J 

CM Ini ■’is ^ - 53 15UUWUW-MJ 

IS “to -to w _ J07U6RUM seta. rev. 

«£ JL, -“"S u - 7*3 itm ich um - J 

^ ■•iS.SSSd « » (SaUf % "k *«• * 

SS. 7K iSS* * i W »!»• cm core dS Z 

XH ire (Sra. fi ■! S *77 239k Mr BH -fe ' 

Mw Si 2S>2«< X n ** tohR XR TOR »re i 

K UH 5gc3“ js « mi Wl OT .» 5 

5 ® - - s ss a ■» 3 ; 


*H 3 Nf On 
» j* tnvftn 
bm ire uw 


«C u 2X XH cm -41 d 

- - axuim uw is 

- - itodpm bh xm 


w Lm 

matte 


!S H fi ^ » re J 


2a ss ass* 1 *« - ■ n m* % “ sr _ 3 

£2 Vl* SttStl ^- r » II S3 €TA 41 fw clh 4ft 


mm 

MW Jm SET - - 297 12k 12 nu re 

tow 25 2£5_ AJ - 61 PW TOW PR (I J 

n? ^ SSSL? 41 w » » TOW-* fe 


life TH ncmkmc _ ia 5n km *5 bST “dl • 

ShSesss* 's^jjssssisi j5:ia v 

m S Vfi m » nruS* ai %** 2 - 


1.73 SI 31 IM UW SJ 

— - 170 A M 

CTO 17 30 348 (P *0 

ZJ0t U II UI XH X 

- - 96 4M «W 


UH fit US*-- ZJA 7J U ra a* am » 

are « aWI 7^ fl - - IB SW SW svk re 


cm ao iiicoBke ■ - x ssi xh aiw ash .iw 1 

Ifel*. S3R NVkUtt UJo R7 — J70 Mft ir . -™ 1 

20H ^5 “ I! 12*** TO* XM re ’ 

^ - a 2s* im im iih J! * 


TOM 16k 

•V, IM 
Bhk 24k 

T3H 17ft 

PW li'* 

I0R MH (dkir JM J 6 3X3 

BR IA‘6 fear JO, LA il lit 

27k ISM KaooEk JOB 19 .1223 


1 1' S5 KSU&c US S r '2 fifi ffi 2L? * 


■im to _ m m aw i*w I 

M U If TSee^k ok 5JV ,k| 


- - 333 toft 306R 3DW feh 

_ *7 iCOi 70H 09Vk TOR 43 

J i i n uk in um .( 

U U il 114 PM HH PW .V, 

Bt 19 . irn RK ISM. U -l. 


i «to NMWc afiTJ ttm. ureSJ * 

SJSh^ u.» S”g s gg-e- 

tor asu mm 2.97 tj _ ia bh mI 2 *H . 

M 24 MPMoK Lid 6C _ <u S. S S» *H 

UH 8M NWttH fin 43 - n » 3 fS‘ »W re . 

■fe 2R WnMI Si U _ )M fK » *K I 

9 ft TM HMeOi fi 69 Z S Sk S -ft • 

nre cik mmm ifi U n mS »re sKS J!L - : 


im UR Km 1.B112 S CK.19H lift lire .ft 

2> !?“ won _ ao in. aew sow no -w 

,5H IAM JO 1.9 21 424 HM PW lift -W 

171 107 Kiocar IQso 4 - 74 135 1, 134 IJSV, .n 

Th 1ft l>G«or - PI IW IR 1ft 

zr* IM Lam. - X CBS 34W Z2M MR .14 

2SM PU LOIE IIH u If NO 23CR TOR SJW W 

d LLE Or JArUAWJXSWJ J 
Vi to IMH Ji U MM CW4W.W 

JSl ?!! FSL'a. - x 'wi nw ph .,h 

UJto If* LTC feD IX 7.7 M 1137 tow 1*H 19 ,K 

BH 25 LTC pit 2J7 12 _ A* Bfe ZSHk TSW -Vk 

uv. IO LTV .12 0 11 *74 I3*k UW UM 

JH k LTVfi - - 119 W W M, 

fm IOH UAHI Jl J h Ml BK Bh B -CR 

gfekJm LDZBsr J4 14 15 m uk w, iu, .* 

Bk LO lIttdl l LM BJ - 197 MH Uk. jtft ,w 

'R tS3- * l J ; & % *£ % « 

SS. *? )“£"’** - - » m* w? »f js 

life SOM UdbH U U II H » BK Bit Ir 

lew im imne x u u jm bw n trt .r 

SR IM UMadE _ _ SASSl WR AM CKR -*k 

- AI IBI ISH ISW 152k 

ZIP *9 II IM ASM Acre asm ,M 

_ 9 2*0 m *H Bft 

- IS 449 Z7KR JAM J7>. .u 

- - MM VK SK -w 

■ut t . i«i 13 izw i/re . « 

258 43 — tt atre MM ttM 

ifis u > IX lire 15M Ifk -W 

-IM .9 _ 205 ITR 1/ IIH ,Vk 

.Ih IS _ Mi life IIW IIH .ft 

7 JO* 166 _ UM 18ft life IIW ,w 

2 * u . m iso itm ure 

* ** « «*ijm '*L uw *6. 

2* .7 * 40 29W are 29 m ft 

- 17 2127 XM 4CKR (ere re 

_ - - 209 UM ICH IeH .ft 

fi IC IA 2S7 Hfe 1IKR PM .ft 

au» w nre sah mw n 
fif * 30 313 MUM xw um (ft 

5*7 u 21 icM om ore ore 

- - 75* 9ft H> Hr Ik, 

.34 J 17 4432 C7H XW 47V, _ 

ZB* u . i« acre 2SM Mir .w] 


P 420 HM 
2) MX sore 


acm im un loo 

Xfe 36* Coaiod 

X fl CdfirA 

m TIM CUBE 

06. HR CiltCKn 

tt ism cawm 0 

PAR UM GCdClftB J4d 

31 g U a mm 


-■ xm am sw >w 
-■ 50 Bw nre 2fft 

13 TO IM 33 23H -H 

P 91 X life X -3ft 

t-Ml7B»XW » xmo»* 
IS AAT PH am Pfe .1ft 

a tc Jem mh an .* 

— 1 UO P 21 P .ft 

k 1157 life lire 11R re 


20 ID* X 
II 26X1 Oft 
_ 13 17ft 

_ 0*7 IN 

If 1 S*So34M 

IS 77 II 
li XI Iff 
s un MR 
r m in 
17 361 (KM 

26 SfiirCM 

10 SO STM 

to za Sim 
- BH ICH 
20 2X50 AW« 
U AC Zatok 


has IW IW lm - 

734 ISM UM UM -ft 

SOT 37V. 1AM 37ft *M 

l» pv IK fm .m 

,4*9 SM DM Bfe -ft 

914 IN. 17k I TOR re 

■n afr* a/*: atm >iw 

319* sm *7» 57*k re 

ip TW W* OM -w 

C6 UM SM 13ft -ft 

1*17 TO* wre XM ISM 

182* (34M 24M 34H -re 


-■--.TOZrjd^j. 


“teKS- fj 


36M 22ft NNiKtt 
im IH NdMiT 
bh tm mmc. 

Bfe 19ft NoPw 
Jfe DM Nardil 
xw 29 HOMED 
PR ISR KEIm 
OT h 21 HCaoEl 


S *3 ” a SS* si & ‘i 5 

,J4 ^ i & E 5 

-u i ss 

5 -5 

L iS ss " hS sE C £ a ' 


£5‘K. l 2lS "HR £ p 

S- “*■ sm - Z SS SS. 

5a IfS K5S. w >5 * ST at 


gfe 36R NJJHc 180 JJ 15 S? 5** M W *W 

BH Pfe NFMB Ire tl li (2 52. 525 Pfe <K 

sj S S! «- “ “ g S' 3 

PH 16k NdhOC m .u 1 “ ’SSL Sfto 53ft .imr 

I W — ij i) q aS'Si S! 9,11 *Vh 

n im ttomevs 

S HfeKs * j Vi ^ a s 

saa. Sw 

ZIfe 12 UMW, ,. i * CS2 25H 34k Umr 

«to ir* SSSSot S ,3 ** J® Sre Sm ?s*% ■* 

te\5F - im IS *8 

» rasa as r $ - 

Ufe to « IJ „ 6 86 Xk k. .r 


* r *m 


--- * 
T-t 


sift MkDBf fi rn nw nft 34R tth -m 

S {*22? - « «5Sl S l 2^.*- 


via sou atre aom in 
xi lire iam ii** «w 

BS I2U 1JW IN .W 

aw a** n a*re - 
cts isre. ism asre 
B02 oTH fire Aim 
ia asw aft asm -w 

47 lift Ilk 18*9 BU 


.10 3 u ell in* zrw ]/m .vi 

f J 6 uia> v> B> .u 

U0> d» 12 IX TAW *5h* »* .m 

LIA U X 137 ISH Mft. Iiw * 

- '■ /iw asu am, a^m -i 
JO j it ax aaw wre irw 

1J0c 4J _ IIH 13ft U9Vk 111. .«(. 
i4KR Tft MP— . I Mr 07 - IT* I/ft nw Ilk .IR 

dTU 32R LHtLo JO U 14 J0O C*H Bfe 4*H ,h 

Mfe 30k UBAKi JO 12 13 7X S3 P SIR .r 

77 p UMAX IH AJ B IX 24 2N tfft .w 


»H SIR KAkfll 
S7R Bft WhMW u 
Jm i3R nSm 

3* H! Es ,Tr 

» 32ft WoMdl 

uSss, - 3 !! 'ii K E ,J S 

‘SS S' S -a “ 5 s & & % :S 

P£SSi *-^S s |K ssr ss. 

» Hfe HarftODn — >W 0* 2» w 25 

3*W l*fe MdJIft* j. - 31 77 2/ g ‘J 

2* UM NUFuc i « J-! H 1® ZTN 27k 77m Vk c* - 

IN 7 k M 0 MU 1 TO OJ » MO 2 . Bfe Sk :? _ r 

bm lie merer X <na *k tw hi .k . i 

,“fe- Cift WA4W. iS ii » IM BMR BW jK ;5 ’ ' 

l0 *re cm Nffiai x l li ,21 cow cm Jl 

_ fe re*f •“ * Up ibtw worn »55t ,V? J 

'*re 71M tamo icb ,5 « ,2* h re w n : 

u 23 IIM 130 1109 . I» 


* to ’SS »*h XW ^ .Ik 

Ble e * SeSwS S'to-'to 

* V e «> ^5 


3*W I Afe IldJIfte 
M ISM UdlCi 


br bvk merer 


Continued on Page 19 


*r** 

r - .... 










: ' 

ri' : £■ >' * 

■ys _ 

Sj . ij - . 

: r 2' 

>.r fc 

2-f ^p: * 

fe-^.v ,2 

*■ 

. . >■ _ . i. 

J “ • **- * . '. 

■- ■S®I . . 




(NTEKNATf 


, SEPTEMBER **,!»: 


PAGES' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 


RAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


China to Ship Zinc to Cover Loss 

State Media Say Move Will Bad Out 2d-Largest Smelter 


k WAIT — Construction of the world’s longest 

Duilding, the Giga world, shown in a model here, is being 
aeiayea by Malaysia to help slow an overheated economy. 


Blaamherg New a 

BELTING — China National Non- 
ferrous Metals Corp. will ship 
20,000 metric tons of zinc to the 
London Meiai Exchange this month 
and possibly the same amount in 
October to cover the futures trading 
contracts of a Chinese smelter, ac- 
cording to a report published Mon- 
day. 

China Metals, a publication of the 
official Xinhua news agency, said 
China's second-biggest smelter, at 
Zhuzhuu in Hunan Province, was the 
only Chinese supplier that needed 
help to meet its contracts. 

The publication said it was not 
clear whether the zinc shipments 
would be sufficient to cover 
Zhuzhou’s position. 

Zhuzfaou and other Chinese smelt- 
ers sold short as much as 250,000 
tons this year, a move that would 
bring them profit if zinc prices fell. 
When prices instead rose to seven- 
year highs, the companies faced as 
much as $100 million in losses. 

China Metals said Zhuzhou's 





Jinro Seeks Shelter From Its Creditors 


problems had already been taken up 
by the State Council, the Chinese 
cabinet, which ordered the state to 
release 15,000 tons of zinc reserves. 

The Stare Council has also ordered 
the country's biggest smelter, Hu- 
ludao, to lend Zhuzhou zinc, the re- 
port said. 

China exported 293,823 tons of 
zinc in the first seven months of this 
year, a 1 60 percent increase over the 
like period last year. 

U Xinyan, director of Zhuzhou 
Smelter's general office, said the 
company had raised its production 
target for this year to 250,000 tons of 
zinc from 2 1 1 ,000 tons. The smelter 
produced 177,000 tons of zinc in 
1996. 

Mr. Li said the company had asked 
for 40,000 tons of zinc from the 
country’s strategic reserves. 

“About 10.000 to- 20.000 tons of 
this will arrive in shipments from the 
state reserves by me end of this 
month,” he said, adding that the 
smelter was not sure whether the 
stare would provide all "40,000 tons. 


Mr. Li said Huludao had promised 
20.000 tons but had delivered only a 
few thousand tons by the end of Julv 
and none in August. 

Even with the help, the eompanv 
will still have to make deliveries into 
nexl year, he sard, declining to state 
the size of Zhuzhou's outstanding 
exposure. 

Wang Chunyin, the director of 
Huludao’s planning department, de- 
clined to say what help his company 
would give to Zhuzhou. 

Mr. Wang said output at the smelt- 
er was likely to reach 300,000 tons 
this year, up from 260.000 tons in 
19%. 

Executives of China National 
Nonferrous Metals declined to com- 
ment on the China Metals report. 
China Metals disclosed Zhuzhou’s 
exposure in July. 

A government publication said in 
July Dial several zinc producers, in- 
cluding Zhuzhou, were facing “great 
Josses” from their short positions on 
the London exchange. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hbng-Kpng . 
Hang Seng y 

17000 

15000 

13000— 

\m- 


12000 



Tokyo:; S 
. Nikkeraast::^' 
22000 



A MJ J A S 
1697 


Singapore 

Straits Times. 

: 2200 - 
21001 
' 2000 
1900 — 


5700 A M J J A S l7M0 A M J j A~S 
1997 1997 


20000 

-19000 



Exchange 

fntfex 

Monday 

dose' 

■■ -rim. ■ ■ -v 

Close mi 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

74,806.49 14,563.55. 

Singapore 

Spate Times 

1.891.93 

1,884.06 *0.42 

Sydney 

All OnSnaries 

2,65620 

2,628.00 +i;i£ 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

18.633.86 18,650.17 ’-gQ9] 

Kuala Lumpur Composite ' 

'879L71 

321.59. ■■ 

Bangkok 

SET 

S7JL30 

540-38' ■ 4SJSSB 

Seoul 

Composite index.. 

697.98 

702L91 . -0.70 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 9,149.29 

9,382.73 JZM 

Manila • 

PSE ■ ■ 

2,10638 

2,109.22 -0.T3; 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

608.31 

594.11- +154 

Woffington 

NZSE-40 

2,462,67 

2,472.67 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

<5,087.30 

4.032.35 

Source: Telekurs 


i 

L-ru,:i .lul Herald Tribune 


'■* ■■ 
» •> 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Jinro Group, South 
Korea s biggest liquor maker, sought 

• court protection from creditors Monday, 
stepping up efforts to preserve its shrink- 
ing business. 

In an unusual request, company man- 
agement asked the courts to keep its 
leadership in place while it renegotiated 
2.6 trillion won ($2.88 billion) of debts 
with creditors. 

Jinro’s struggles illustrate how South 
Korea’s biggest companies are being 
squeezed by the country's slowest eco- 
nomic growth in four years after a spurt of 
borrowing to expand earlier in the decade. 
Jinro is one of a handful of companies 
rescued by an agreement brokered by the 


government in which commercial banks 
froze companies debts and extended them 
emergency loans. The grace period for 
Jinro expires Sept 25. 

Shares of Jinro's three listed units — 
Jinro Ltd., Jinro Genera] Food Co. and 
Jinro Industries Co. — were suspended 
from trading. The Korea Stock Exchange 
said their trading would resume Wednes- 
day. Jinro’s initiative with civil courts in 
three cities — the sites of its businesses — 
came after its own fund-raising efforts 
failed. White it sold 14 of its 20 business 
-units, its plan to raise 1 trillion won selling 
real estate flopped in a sluggish market. 

Commercial Bank of Korea, the prime 
creditor of Jinro Group, said die bank may 
support die group's turnaround plan. If it 


fails, creditors would lose any chance to 
recoup their loans, a bank official said. 

A positive response from creditors 
probably would prompt the court to ap- 
prove Jinro's bid, analysts said. The 
court will decide within two weeks 
whether to allow the group to freeze its 
debts and assets, allowing it to postpone 
repayment of interest. 

Jinro's request is unusual because 
South Korean companies seeking court 
protection generally give up manage- 
ment rights. It underlines the willingness 
of government and business officials to 
seek solutions to prevent big companies 
from going under and to “stabilize the 
entire economy.” said Kwon Jyun Joon, 
economist at Samsung Securities Co. 


BRAIN: In Texas , Legal Guns Are Being Drawn in a Gray Matter 

Continued from Page 13 


sc 


. 


i Ov 


“There is no case like this,” said Roger 
. Milgrim, a partner at Paul, Hastings, Jan- 
ofsfcy & Walker and a leading authority 
on trade-secret law! Mr. Brown's case, in 
Mr. Miigrim’s view, “addresses the pos- 
sible limits of judicial power.” 

Mr. Brown, 45, a self-proclaimed 
“computer geek” who now lives in Pla- 
no. Texas, has been a software rinkerer 
for some time.. In the late 1960s, while in 
higheschobi. he wrote a program to. cal-; 
culatfe square rdOCs-'-Wnen calcfHhiors" 
were hotavaiiable. he said. He majored 
in compute- science atTexas A&M Uni- 
versity and began working as a compute 
programmer during college. After years 
as an independent consultant, he joined 
DSC in April 1987. 

About a week later, he said, he was 
told to sign an agreement requiring him 
to communicate to DSC, and to grant the 
company rights to, any “inventions” 
related to the telecommunications com- 
puter company’s business or suggested 
by his wont for the company. 

George Brent, the general counsel of 
DSC, said: “Our technology is very valu- 
able to us. We’re under an obligation to 
our shar eholders to protect our technol- 


ogy and not let it walk out the door.” 

Mr. Brown argues that his software- 
translation idea was 80 percent complete 
before he joined DSC. He also said he 
believed that his agreement with the 
company covered only telecommunica- 
tions inventions, not the slowly coales- 
cing idea he first conceived in El Paso, 
Texas, in 1975, . while visiting a friend 
who had posed the software problem. 

It was at a 1991 gathering of the 
Dallas-Fort Worth Unix Users Group, 
-which Mr. Brown defined as "a bunch 
of computer geeks 7 that get together,” 
-that tie first met Mr. Flores, the man now 
trying to intervene in DSC’s suit 

The two discussed the problems of 
trying to convert old software. Mr. 
Flores said he had an approach using 
artificial intelligence. Mr. Brown said he 
urged Mr. Bores to bring the idea to 
DSC. which was struggling with its own 
need to convert old software. But DSC 
rejected Mr. Flores’s proposal. 

Mr. Brown said he had periodically 
mentally revisited the problem of find- 
ing au algorithm for a software program 
that could convert old computer code 
into, modern source codes. In March 
1 996. he said, while coming home from 
a long weekend, he envisioned the re- 


maining 20 percent of the solution. 

He approached DSC to ask for per- 
mission to develop his idea independ- 
ently of DSC. Initially, Mr. Brown said, 
DSC executives were agreeable. But 
then a senior executive realized that the 
idea could benefit DSC. In exchange for 
his developing the idea, the company 
offered Mr. Brown a share of as much as 
$2 million in any money that DSC and 
Motorola Inc., a major customer, would 
save as well as 50 percent of the profit 
from sales of the software to third 
parties, according to Mr. Brown. 

Mi. Brown said he asked far&5iraT- 
lion and 50 percent. In early 1997, ac- 
cording to Mr. Brown, DSC stopped the 
discussions, informed Mr. Brown that 
DSC owned his ideas outright, deman- 
ded that he disclose them and, when he 
refused, dismissed him on the spot. DSC 
then sued him for breach of contract 

So fax, county court decisions have 
not gone Mr. Brown’s way. Two judges 
have ordered him to spend his days at 
DSC disclosing his ideas to the company 
— for no pay, under an initial May 1997 
order, and for $45 an hour in an order 
issued in June that he is currently vi- 
olating. Mr. Brown’s motion to dismiss 
DSC’s claims was denied. 


Announcements 


. U- 


I # 

Ip . T- 




r #*• 


: '*-> ;r 


Rcralb^&B^Sribune 

SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: 
For questions a queries atari Pebe 
gyotprer newspaper. We gaBBrf)iqur 
sttecrotion or atari otertng a srisertp- 
ttan, pfoisfl af toe toamrwiMtesfs: 
EUROPE, MDDLE EAST MO MWCA: 
TOLL FREE - Austria 0680 8120 Eld- 
□turn 0800 17538 France 0800 437437 
Seonuy 0130 MBMrivim 
Luxembourg 0600 2703 NaftartM* 06 
0225158 Sweden 020 TOOB -Moor- 
land 155 5757 UK MOO 895965 Ete£ 
■here 1+33) 1 41438381 THE AMERf- 
CAST USA (toU-tiW) 1-8004822884 

(hi™. 

Hong Kong Z322 1171 Indonesia 809 
192 fja»n (loWee) 0120 464 0Z7 
Korea 3672 0044 Malaysia 221 7055 
PhiEppinK 895 4946 jMn 3B 
0£O4 Taiwan 7753456 Ttattand 277 
4485 EtoWtae (+852) 29221171 




BRKHH. ITU flneif ftanJ-made wfi. 
Lames selection tn Switzerland at 
WEWBERG the leading- mer^ aora. 
Btfirirttr. 13, ZUtti 01-211 29 50 

FEBJHG low? - taring irajhw? SOS 
HELP otsis-lna m Engisti. 3 p.m ■ 
IlfLfll Tat Paris (01)47 23 80 80 


Legal Services 



DN0RCE.M 1 DAY. No BawL Wta: 
Bat 377, Sudbury, MA 01776 USA Tet 
5QW43«CT,ftc5aW430I83. 1. 


Business Opportunities 


ft. 




OFFSHORE BANKS 
KWAMS A TRUSTS 
MtfiRATTOWPASSPORTS. 


1/ 







Aston 

WmftoMe.fiauplaaWirf* 0 

' Sc tUfll) 162* 625126 

London 

T«fc +44 (DJ m 37 WQZ 

Far +44 (0) 171 233 1519 


wnta«on*raJeimauft 


OfiSWE C0MESL For 1« te 
chm dr advice Tet London 44 181741 
1224 F« 44.. 181 748 6558/6338 
mnap0ebnaufc 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with correspondent relatianship- 
Class A commercial license. 
Immediate delivery. US 560 , 000 . 
Nassmt, Bahamas 

T6L- (242) 394-7060 Fax: (242) 394-7088 
Agents Wanted Worldwide 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


New Lower 
International 
Rates! 


Germany.... 

310 

Japan 

380 

France. 

330 

UK 

190 




• NO Set Up Fees 

• NO Minimums 

• Six-Second Billing 

• AT&T Quality 

• 24-hour MultHingua! 

Customer Service 

tailback 

Wh«* SUndartv « 5«. «« V" 11 

Tel: T-206.599.t99l 
Fax: 1.206.599.1981 

Email: lnfoekallback.com 
wwW.kallback.com 

417 Second Avenue West 
Seattle, WA 9B119 USA 


Susf/isss Services 


YOUR OFFICE w LOJfflOK 
Av»< ■ tel Ptora. fo- Telex 
Tet 44 171 290 9000 Fax 171 499 7517 


PHOJECT CARTW- 

available now 
holm t 

NO SECURITY - 
FAX: +44 (0)171 470 7213 


COHIIERClAUBUStNESS FINANCE 
ava&tts ky any vi aUe projects warti- 
wile. Fax brief synopsis In EndfeJi to 
Carom Adarea, (+)44-1 Z73-&1300- 


FinancJaJ Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 
ka 

soujmns 

Carted 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


10 seara tuning 
vtabto projects: 

VENTURE CAPITAL 

Eourry loans 

REAL ESTATE 

long ttttn aflateral 
Supported Guarantees 

’ Fac (632) 81M284 
Tat (832) B946SS8 

(Comoteion earned orAr upon FinfinQ) 

Sotec Cunnbsfan Aasuad 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Paris and Suburbs 


8 th, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

and rue Fg St Honore, hr safe ti I9fi 
Haussmam ate deader hJttng: 
0FFH3ES a HIGH CLASS apartrart B 
tte rented (pres»dy flted as ofTtoesL 
Atari 300 pa ML Partial » 
msstie. VHff GOOD OPPOHTWtTY. 
Cored owner drsd on 
F«+33ffll5 56»HB 
Teh +33 Ktfi 0785 66 19 


AVENUE ME 

7 rooms, an ftw. tee. an 
'A +33 (0)1 47 05 24 10 


USA Residential 


FLORID* GETAWAY-Boca Weal. 
2 oedrKxns. 2 batte. 4 goM 0 

cU). Inwaflatey aralaiN? JiSK 
TeJ t-561 483 8650 


Wholesale Prices 
Fall Again in Japan 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Domestic 
wholesale prices fell Iasi 
month for the third time in 
four months, data released 
Monday showed, offering 
fresh evidence that the 
April increase in tbe nation- 
al sales tax was still slowing 
the Japanese economy. 

Wholesale prices fell 0.2 
percent in August, the steep- 
esr decline in 10 months, the 
Bank of Japan said, as weak 
consumer speadtng and in- 
creased competition led 
suppliers to cut prices of 
food, cars and electronics. 

“Declining wholesale 
prices are a sure sign that 
spending remains weak 
after the tax hike,’ ’ said Mi- 
chael Hartnett, an economist 
at Merrill Lynch Japan Inc. 

With stable prices and a 
slowdown in spending fol- 
lowing the tax increase, the 
central bank is unlikely to 
raise interest rates before 
next year, economists said. 


Because tbe biggest de- 
clines were in oil and lum- 
ber, which are used at the 
beginning of the produc- 
tion process, the drop in 
prices also signals that 
companies will cur back on 
output in the coming 
months, economists said. 

The Ministry of Interna- 
tional Trade and Industry 
forecast last month th3t in- 
dustrial output would show 
a decline for August and no 
growth for the quarter end- 
ing this month. 

Most of Japan’s raw ma- 
terials are imported, and the 
decline in prices came even 
though the dollar rose 2 
percent against the yen dur- 
ing the month. 

Domestic wholesale 
rices were 1 .8 percent 
igberthan in August 1996. 
The overall wholesale price 
index, which includes ex- 
port prices, was unchanged 
from July and 2.1 percent 
higher than a year earlier. 


E 


Very briefly: 


• Mitsubishi Corp. of Japan, Gencor Ltd. of South Africa,’ 
Germany's Fried. Krupp AG Hoesch-Krupp and Vietnam 
Steel Corp. scrapped plans to invest $1 billion to develop an 
iron mine in central Vietnam after tests showed the irou ore 
deposils there were inferior. 

• China Telecom (H.K .1 Ltd. may h;.ve to delay its $2 billion 
share sale in Hong Kong and New York next month because 
China Telecom Veam mgs prospects and other confidential 
information were leaked to newspapers last week. 

• Jubilee Gold Mines NL shares fell 40.3 Australian cents 
(29.4 U.S. cents;, or 28 percent, to 1.04 dollars after the 
explorer reported poor results from a third drill hole at its 
Cosmos nickel prospect in Western Australia! 

• Kokusai Denshin Denwa Co.. Japan's largest international 
phone- service provider, agreed with AT&T Corp. to cut 
connection charges by 40 percent to 70 percent on telephone 
calls between Japan and the United States. 

• Hokkaido Tnkushoku Bank Ltd.'s shares fell 1 1 yen (9 
cents j. or 9 percent, to 109 yen in response to reports that it 
would scrap plans to acquire Hokkakio Bunk Ltd. Hokkaido 
Bank’s shares fell 3 yen. or 2 percent, to 137. Bloomberg 


Ssangyong Rules Out a Big Sale 

Agence Fruturc-Presxe 

SEOUL — Ssangyong Group said Monday that Daimler- 
Benz AG may increase its 2.44 percent stake in the struggling 
automaker Ssangyong Motor Co. but denied that the German 
company would Take a controlling stake. 

“The* reports that we are considering selling a controlling 
stake to Benz are totally groundless,' ' a Ssangyong spokesman 
said. He said Daimler-Benz was studying Ssangyong’s books, 
but he said that was in line with Ssangyong’s announced plan to 
raise foreign investors’ combined slake in the company to 49 
percent In Stuttgart, a Daimler-Benz spokesman said talks were 
under way but said, “We are not under any time pressure.” 


See Wednesday's Id—fa* 

for Bnaioeas Opportunities, 
franchises. Commercial Real Estate, 
Weco— atatiens, Automotive 

■rel F-nffylalnmiHL 

To a doertue contact Sarah Werabof 
on +44 171 420 0326 
or fan +44 171 420 0338 

A CHEAT DEAL UAPPESS 

AT THE INTERBIARKET 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Paris Area Furnished 

Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 

AGENT N PARE 

Tel: 433 (0)1 47^0^005 ' 

AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

. Rufctad sawwfc, 3 mams or non 
or irtifnfcted, testierttal areas. 

Tel: +33 (0)1 42 25 32 25 

Far +33 (0)1 45 63 37 09 

AT HOME H PARS 

PARIS PROIIO 

Aonnterts d m hitetad or kl 

Sate & Pnpsty Management Sesvfces. 

25 Av Hod* 75008 Pans ft 01 -4561 1020 

Tel: +33(0)1 45 63 25 50 

B.Y5EE PALACE, teeing sort, refine 

2 rooms, Ira baft, derm, wspttinal 
rite. Fg.000 fit 0)}U7 42 1flffi 

Switzerland 

GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
merts. From skdos ft 4 tedrcon*. Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 F9t +41 22 736 2671 

International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


r 



NATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK 
FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT SA 

An Affiliate of the National Bank of Greece 

INVITATION TO EXPRESS INTEREST 

FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF A PROJECT PERTAINING TO THE STUDY AND 
PROVISION OF EXPERT OPINION ON THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE TERMS FOR 
THE CONCLUSION OF A CONTRACT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A POWER 
STATION PRODUCING THERMOELECTRIC ENERGY COMBUSTING LIGNITE 

The NATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK FOB INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT S.A. («ETEBA») which by virtue of a resolution of the 
Governmental Committee dated August 1 . 1997 has been appointed by the Ministry of Development as advisor (hereinafter 
to be referred to as “the Advisor*) . hereby invites whoever is interested (hereinafter to be relerred to as «the Interested 
Parties-), having the qualifications mentioned in the present invitation, to express their interest lor the assignment of a study 
and provision of an expert opinion (hereinafter to be referred to as -the Expert Opinion-) as to the competitiveness of the 
terns of a contract to be concluded for the construction, on a turn key basis, of a specific power plant of a capacity of 330 
MW combusting lignite (hereinafter to be referred to as -the Project-), taking into consideration given technical and 
commercial specifications. 

The Expression of Interest should include, at least the following: 

• Details regarding the experience of the Interested Parties evidencing each interested Party's knowledge and expertise in 
connection with cost evaluation of, studies, constructions, procurements, installation and delivery on a turn key basis of power 
stations of a large size and complexity generating thermoelectric power combusting, by preference, solid fiief of low calorific 
value (lignite), as well as any other details evidencing their ability to respond to the requirements of the Expert Opinion. 

• Information regarding any participation of each Interested Party or of its affiliates and/or associates in infrastructure projects in 
Greece and/or abroad, related to the energy sector (for procurement of material, as contractor, in preparation of studies , etc .). It 
is clarified that any existing or under negotiation contractual relations of an interested Party or its affiliates and/or associates, In 
projects (wherever executed) in which projects are involved third parties linked in any manner whatsoever with the Project may 
lead to the exclusion of such Interested Party, if the Advisor, acting at its absolute discretion, decides that said contractual relations 
are incompatible with the assignment of the Expert Opinion. 

• Reference to any relevant experience of each Interested Party and of its areas of expertise, evidencing its knowledge of the electric 
power market and particularly of the European one. 

• Any other information which in the opinion of each interested Party, will assist in the evaluation of its international reputation and 
objectivity as an independent firm in order to meet satisfactorily the requirements of the Expert Opinion. 

The Interested- Parties are invited to submit to the Advisor details regarding their experience by specific reference to the nature and 
size of the projects undertaken by them up todate, as well as to their role in connection with such projects and details of the clients 
on behalf of which they have acted. Jt is clarified that the Advisor may ask for references as regards each Interested Party. 

■The Interested Parties are kindly requested the text of their Expression of Interest which they wiil submit, not to exceed fifteen (15) 
pages and to be submitted until September 22, 1997 and at 17:00 (local time), at the Advisor's offices at the following address: 

ETEBA . 

12 - 14 Amalias Ave. 

102 36 Athens 

Attn: Mrs A. Boumi 

The Advisor mil contact those Interested Parties which it considers as possessing the required qualifications for the provision of the 
Expert Opinion (hereinafter to be referred to as -the Selected Interested Parties*). Following completion of the preselection phase, 
the Advisor shall make available to the Selected interested Parties additional information regarding the Project in order to enable 
them to bid. One of ttie most important criteria tor the evaluation of the bids and final selection of the successful bidder, is the element 
of the time required for the provision of the Expert Opinion. However, said time element must not affect the completeness and quality 
of the Expert Opinion. 

The interested Parties are not entitled to any right, claim or demand for compensation against the Ministry of Development and/or the 
Advisor for any reason or cause whatsoever in connection with the present invitation. 

The present was drafted fn the Greek language and translated in English and in any event, the Greek text prevails. The Interested 
Parties may contact exclusively the Advisor for any relative information, as follows: 

ETEBA 

12-14 Amalias Ave. 

102 36 Athens 
Responsible: 

Mrs A. Boumi Mr. G. Coulsoudakis 

Tel.: 32 42 883 32 96470 

Fax: 32 96 221 32 96 393 ^ 


t 



? j -/n 







PAGE 18 


OH III FEDERAL CAFTTALINC 



MP 

% 

“eS'Ts 

is 



■r cortsifflatlo L 
^ tWMTW*lV___ 

- tKryasLSE?,: 

rr| mor fwmonai r 

m SfenilPocSSiWWJiiai 
111 AMERICAN PHOENIX INVT PORTWHJO , 
e EuraMMaHnnamlPin $ 

a Gum MuRtanang! Pis f 

>9 U XL Gtumtti CrtPm 
a UJ.RMMMStcl 


{ :8s 



AqovoSHm^SalBinl 

DEF Araaatn N.V. 
fctlQla Sctod FvTKJ 

* nw^a n SSogi Fd 
ms ASIA PACIFIC PERFORMANCE. HCAV 
APP S 1211 

I ATLAS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
The own SaecmimFd S TOlJJSr 

Aho5 GKCOIRJ S 1 1738+ 

Altai K'TC AraTOog* Fd 
_ Camenibta ArtWraS Fd 
rt CUCengctFa 
i» Tnc DiKovenr Fond 

r» The Scccnd AB3S Arattuge 

017 Bull T(t *4.171-714 im 

IFdLrdrtNAV 


j'YBSs 


• Ir tamartur? Fd I 
bunpeiWio Fund 

* rmofiinM An r 


MSAS 


I OISS1 t 772-51 

Oil BANK BRUSSELS LAMBERT CBKO 411 »■ 

3 SBLIrraCS America Cgg J 407.54 

- SOL irrcsi Begum Coo BF 

- iJiL rams Jinan Cap 


e s L inns: Latta Aiict Coo 


SSL Inert HK & China iCno 


xaLinnx! AnnGrdi __ 

ZSLITTrtUKCep 
r BO. OJ Ira MOmanCaa 
? SSL -.LJ ;n»rt aroyeCaa 


BF 2523600 
Y siawoo 
S 71IUS 
S 31747 
5 29QJ8 

£ All JR 

* 100 16 


= B5L 'U inert . 


3 1st Renta Fd igaCap^ 


LF 58*7.00 
S 53057 
A 57394 
FF 409.93 
LF 5035 OQ 
LF 2*427 00 


3 SSL Patnnnrajl Bid _ _ 

: 'BLBCStFftoianCop BF 1345713)0 
3 B3L& 7/C Fund CroivemMrs DM S723B2 


Snare Ci.aroulw Overran 441481 734414 

Irr Eo-jny Fum S 

inf Bond Fund i 

a Dollar Zene Ba Fd _ * 

a Auj Poolrc Repon Fd S 

* too Finrc _ J 

■ Starting Equnvr F« £ 

SWJnj Bd Fd £ 

211 fiAMOUE EDOUARD CONSTANT 
J BEE Du Fd Intataunfl SF 

S SEC Cu Fd JrdelMC SF 

a BECSMuhird SF 

BANOUE FRANCABE DE LORI ENT 
m SFC SicTi-Otood Strataglo S 1 
azi Basque scs alliance 


1243 

IIS 

99J 

*00 

147V 

1.930 


M 

2913* 


(Cl 721 I3V-4M0. Cam 

• Mecca Norm Am Eqmtn 

• Pimoca Emraj Eqoftea 


i* OWaca *w Erratic Eg 
Monool 


w PVMCCelWIA-CapMor 

• Pta-aoe Donor Bondi 

• P wane Ecu Banos 
■» PiMde FF Band* 

■ PMaM tart Com Bondi 
F Made Donor Been* 


rBtaa. ECU Route 
PUNXdoSF Rsram i 

rleaoe FF Rnonm 



asn 

-•! 13 £ 

t m 

rFuto £ ,J?H 
I GLOBAL ADVISORS LTD 



ranr 


wcmnmsr ■ 
n OUbMmu 


wim- 


srsarasiKS""^ 


MNGTLTD 


nnri 





DM 

uri . DM 220UD 


: '£& 






B 


rs*^“ 


■» CAPITAL INVESTMENT CROUP PI 
■ CoplM Cmertti Fund S 1IUP 


Ah CM IHTENNATHHAL 
• CEP Coon Twna 


ff ramus 

0U CHEMICAL IRE LAMD FD ADM LTD 
lu-i u ii«n 

» AHLPNf t MIlBBPlC I 1502 


CHILTON 

'lob Fwfl SmkH (Cvracao) fLV. 


siianjiDG 



s w 

DM 177/73 




Id 3 lw£ 
BSffi 

SF WO* 


£ m 

SF ' 103-23 


CSEtuorad 

C REDT T AG Rl COLE 

LUXEMBOURG 
m Dicntman Fond LM 

' Fund L3d 


D Mudcno FutFdSorlV^ 
m Manmo Fot FdSwzaa 
Im Wdcauig Cnrr. □ A Urdu 
a GamonJODCMWaiM 
m waxu*z KhQti Yldl 
« IndonWHIgnYldB 
tr MmnEssxna 
■Wdoiw Loan J 



S 151A2 
PMS 17641100 
£ HUD 


INDOSUEZ ASSET MCiMH 
d Ingown Aston PiB-PhDp A 
a mdeme Ami Plfl-PtHBd B 
a I5A Aum Gminn Fund 


a ISA I _ 

0 SA Mm ham Fund 
rona Fund 


■e HkreAmm Fund 
m MOBSPFund 
m MaacaiFand 
a Th* San Fund 
d IndsaiMZ Hona.Kpeg Fund 
T«J 


d Menei Jaaoi Fd _ . 

a MdOMZ Mmn| Tj» { 3L275Z 

d tadanozAikin PS-didonA 3 1UI 

a Moasna: Asian PRUnKMi fi S 1303 

? 4 Kfi 2 SSS aAtDEn, W“, 7 »P,s 

a Son Adcmn usd B S lSka 

04S CREDIT UTOHIIAIS ROUSE B mH d U LM. 

, iail 

m Dt> OrtlOnJ — 

m pteFFcOid 

^G^MayPP 
ASGnHjoina 


Tr 

AS 


its 

1X2P 



! BffiHL 

n If 2 P 

i FUND 

c4 

r PRODUCTS 

nfrdi 



The Communicator. 




NOKIA 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 




Advertisement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS Septecr 

available on Internet: http://www.iht.com/IHT/FUN/fundS.html 


Septembers, 1997 




tw.ia 


MHI 


service sponsored by | 


QuotnUooBiiuppitad by fund groups to fcBcropMlPwta (tel: 33-1 402609 09) 

Ftar fnkjfmatfon on hewv to Hat yoiM- flMid. tax K^y HolbI at ( 33 - 1)41 43 92 12 or E-mal : funds OttrLcom f%|Q|<JA 

T n fa ^u ia frvsa daiy ourtatfons far your ftinds b» &<wal - susergaa at &fundaCflTtootn 1 




15BA2 

23DI3 
I3U89 
231 JG 

m 

SM.B4 


w SSSriinv*** m c l S?Ti.w 

: i 

2 gTlA TW~2?. a SS’l A j SISjp 

H itegr rii 
ssur-rfe 

ifHLsc 

A 


fern 


FF 

S!«3 


rsS“*rin 

■GROUP 



TWJt^f^-****™'** 

W WEBB^ CnLOBM-EIIUgW MKW LTD 



~*ra« 

. SSI^S 

agaasBattgu 
las 

i esssi-MMi 

v GAMAulifBQ 

ir GJUM Ml 

: gasssssr 

w 

r ss» 

* ^S a * ftu, - Fo 

* gam&KXco 

iv GAMMghY&ld 

“ ““IMFSndFdMc 

Japan 

iss 


i A inmid a Ui in me 


- GAM 

: SSK 



DM 


SF 


» GAMSatocnon 

ITimneDM 


SF 


*1109 

\ 32 i 

13949 
90706 

IKS 

13*10 
201.98 
349A9 
109 04 
103.74 
1 Q 3 B 3 
m-n 
79167 
93249 
75*54 
152*92 
141 JH 
48*28 
17722 
107.14 
11101 
209 JB 
J 00 J 7 
10004 
101.17 

^ 100 95 

1 - 1-422 2424 

“s? 15105 

SF 79 Q 00 
SF 29000 



I IGJ2 


: fSM\ 

7415 
. *57 

WOgCn^^NDMARACEME^ 

1051-73 

r , g^s^"s- 6Roup I IWJ . 

‘ JPE mi?«WE2 PURDS06W97 






GRYPHON FUND MANAGER 

m G^SnB5S"S£dild 

LIGHT 

t 12544 



208333 

1929.00 





tissud?*™ 

jFds (BSD M4* i^»i 


m 




anuiWff, 



fisaMSf-*' 

Ij gifW gggjjL- 

luivui tjncniiK 

si 


SC-TOW 

I JAM 
5JUOO 






DM 



r&«r LC 10054100 



279500 



,OPOB4ilK4ll 





7J?JJ7 
SB 30OA5 



Km »'4b 

I \m 

FF 1 392.44 
SF 1 09.94 
Ah 229*99 

gam 

M 

*** llsiB 
□Ui 159.30 

h {gg 

PIOS 13865.00 
SM 141.45 
S 110-40 
DM UB.T1 
DM 121.30 

( 149.95 
10170 





097924 

l % 

i 7I7A5 

i fflg 

MEMT INC 
S 1530r 




'SS»f 


_ S.T.LB. 1 

d L&mvi HWgaMktFd 

Fmno.UQK21) 521-2*77 

*r Jaea Fund 

e> IDi? Money Mania Fd 

V M ™—"™ GmMII Fd 

112 LLOYD GEORGE MM GMT (152)3 


MAT COS Fd 

w£ 


472 

13A0 

2*43 

E4433 

19JJ3 

241943 

1042 

577; 


* Unfits Ameruas PamoBa 
154 LOMBARD, ODIER I OE - GROUP 
U3 5vteSI.MCaasCHF SF 


1159 


?04 ldkKid^Ir®fortvnitv 
a ntaiud 5* 


d uS Kingdom A inland 
a Ge mcnD * auotc 
a Saumcm EunOa 

DBuff^x?T% (Cll 
d Meitcuermcy 
d Donor JUk-dnmi Twin 
d Dollar Long Term 
a JMwtTiii 
d Pound STurom 
d DeanchAUoii 
d Dutm Fteftn 
d Hv EvmCancnclM ' 

d SwfeU Franc 


, i Cun Dwm Pay 

a Swta Mum a ine n cv 
C Eurnpfiai Currency 
o SMoeai Franc 
a ConedraiM 
d Fiend Franc 

3 SnasMutb-DniKJnnd 

a Swiss Franc Sncn-Tenn 
a Ccnodtan Donor 
a Dutch Fionn Mum 
a Sjn iftneft nS Poe 
d MUaSHmiKAUI uurr 
d Convert**" 
d DAuiscnraors Shan Tom 


_ __ 1 Twin 

a BanOVCorv CHF-Dbtiibut 
a MeiOiCurrOisriButtiG 

* NL& MuDicurr niy 

I LDWBAHD ODIER INVEST 
W BMC Band Fond 
Mr Euraneor Cobs 
tAnarfca 
ScBm 


1041 


d Eda wn Europe an 
a Ewnpeur Bond Fond 


Yen 114*00 
DM 1546 
DM 10*4 


m dots AA 1 
ItS MAGNUM FUNDS 


Magnum 
v Magnum 


pWFO* 
w Magnum Fund 
w Magnum GfesoalEq. 


iv Magnum hill Eg 
w Magnum Mood Bind 

iv Magnum MuH-Fumr 

m Magnum Opportuntfr Fd 
w Magnum Rina Fd 
w Magnum Rimla Eg. 
w Mognum J 

v Magnum 1 
w Magnum 1 



- . J GMWlh 

: ffiBSKSSsma 

■V VIP sma Fund 


19159 
131.01 
14197 
i42.se 
11*24 
119.32 
152L*) 
14155 
30300 
I >1.91 

ffiS 

14*54 

179.60 
131.01 
1035. 
10192 
14AB2 
2045 

305.60 
192.96 
130.29 
15*64 

WK 

11446 


m Maksxr Inti Fund 
IN MANULIFE GLOBAL FUND 
T7{BSJ) 2581-91000=: B57) >81 5-951* 

a Anwrlcan Grawdi Fund 
d |ump«vi Growth Fund 

3 Sfffes^SS 

J ^nOBMIUGL«gJ | GiU|^p^l,Fuild 
d PcEecteilo .Grown Fund 


39A9 


147608 
7.1 Ml 
4*405 
L0061 



AT10HAL MOT 
IES FUND 


84 7/ 


w ANanCq 


i? 

\wr* 







.s 221112 
5F 359394 
_ 5 1851.81 

Ed 2027-38 


I 


211 MERRILL LYNCH DEV LTD MATURITY 

“iKI, IS5S 

IOBmAI S 954 

!O0»BI | 9.94 

} iai« 


1 UlsHSKSl < ,„ s 

111 MERRia LYNCH EMEJW1HG MARKETS 

2 3 SS l !iw 

714 KKUULL LYNCH EflUtTY/ CONVERTIBLE 
AmN^B®fe^pt 81 fl^NmE 3 PTFL 

BA S^vj yie PoftTFOUO | 




IULfol 


I 


2oi| ^SbLE SECURITIES PTFL* 
SlO^Wat- 1 


ATION PTFL (U5S) 


1« 

1*13 



iaUITYPMTPOUO 


in 


MALL CAP PORTFOLIO 


ffil 


'ALUE PORTFOLIO 


l liiS 


nY PORTFOLIO 


fi 


IRKA PORTFOLIO 


MW 1 "- PORTFOLIO 
d COM B 


1*10 

11.91 


HD LOGY PORTFOLIO 






PORTFOLIO 


d Qgn B S 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 
d Qb( S 


DHWN^ORTFOUO 
d nut 


1*80 

w 


a Cion. 6 
d dgnB 
US MERRILL LYNCH GLOBAL CURRENCY 


\w 

18-21 


BOND SER IES NAV as 
■■■WLERATC SECURITIES PTFL 


ADJUSTABL 
e aossA 



HFB 


Silli 


AS | ghG|RBON° PORTFOUO 
d CtaiH s 

d CkSSB-l 5 

d Ocsm B -2 l 

AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

CAI^&N DOLLAR PORTFOLIO** 
a qbssa CS 

d Dbb B CS 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

I 3S& 1 

&e3sCH 6 ? MARX PORTFOLIO * 
d m ) .. DM 

EURS^Iun BONO PORTFOLIO §HW 
a 0053 A- 1 DM 

0 OHM DM 

s SftH BJS 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (U5S 

“ * 
d pauB-1 S 

r a»M t 

POUNDSTERUNG PORTFOLIO 
d Class A i 


iWdauWelCH) _ 

HiasraaBS 1 ™ 


m pjSfrtW &iugrFdnB 

S S^S^PIusRl 


S 1511-1 
5 !«Z4 


Bftr 1 

■chnYMA 

hnr (Tu-P^ iCHFi YlB B 

iHiM 

jgKwPin^iRGm'-B 


CS Ui 

D S L_. 

Ea 57*86 

S'lEHf 

US 705844.00 

Pto 9»‘“ 

1 f 

SF 12 

V® 


DM 14H45 

s j 

0 A ' 

Y 74SYU0 
f 165.16 


sl 


JI&" 1 If 


S IHLUk ' 


l li§ 

ATI OH AL LTD 


ps 


RICA 


gK ill 

DM ISIS 


iS2^ 


Z wnaGretw CMna 

: ^^5“ 


1490 S 
USB - 
1*52 


ISlBA 

2*74 


d P rangm Htfi me. GNMA Fa | 
u Putnam inn Fond 5 

JM GROUP OF FUNDS 


PI 


1519 


COP 


£ 1*73 01 

INVESTMENT GRaD| PTFy sAj m 


: assem™ 

.’K™' 


d SKGOji-PW j 

3 siEgri 

■il 


iM&« 


Ee» iim? 


pq T9 ' 


s* 


MULTICURRENCY BOND PTFL 


a Clara 
11 4 MERRILL LYNCH INC 


d Pass l 
a Onsl 
e Oanc 


PORTFOLIO 


10jS? 


IS 

1J4 


ff M4UC3T >nc 5 Pffl 

ff Mrtcaa Inc s Ptt a B 
ff MflxCT. Inc Pen P» a A S 
s Ataucar. lira Pub PM D B S 
III MERRILL LYKOI NAVra M BWM7 


\ IKK S 





595.03 

CC77 


if 

iw ^ 


1^5 


43424 


WBjf 

'liSSSf** 

mg j i 

s sHansns^f fi 

s w »?s^raTsss l , ® D, i ^ ! ‘“ * - 
rBBKgasBP^ * 


19144 ' 


!S, r «EMfl ds .s 




ii«ijn 

8*53 • 
1311.82 . 
214.10 
1*94 


T9 A3 
13JX7 

*75 

42.93 

5*13 

IL26 


- Jraranoll 
s 'UruMisdl 

d Yen Bond! 
II 


1:25314747481 


143*84 . 

,78 i^ 

1310 

3!kg- 

, M: 


,Ji P T 




7.78 


7IN07KE PORTF 

d CmA 

d dsn 9 s 7.7B 

119 MILLENNIUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
T CTBGJOOOl W> 3 1 COCOS 

rt s.viouan LmiwagM SF tac i? 

m VJII OUad UnteWTOWfl SF 129121 

r~ Franc CuiSrraJRl SF H2i°? 

m The UES Got Cjit h - - 

■a USIGJaba QirrFd 


i 

120 MOMENTUM ASSET MAHAGEMEKT .. . 
R> Leiennvd Fund 5 111 77 


... MarrenUSI 

■=■ vow us vow 

V UonrewuTTi au imiv 
■ n AiarenunAmftncticr 
ir. ManaRj tn Doinm ggtr 
n momentum Eiwoifl 
m CVnnartum MccnmcFer 
a Vcmemani Havener fieri 


m r.'vonwTh ro W»L 
m Momanum Sr emir food 
m Mo ' 



11*46 
T 16-77 
113*3 

1ID.97 

'.C7*l 

10*89 

11057 

9*17 

114-30 

1CGJG 

ICIOOl 

109.94 

1G393 


\m 

131 48 
125-61 
IUJ7 
1CZ74 
9394 
12179 




411 


1*9 


iK8 

’KB' 

15152. 


ii 


n: 


OR 


iCorp 


Tfiijn 


VomMUuie TMcom I 

m Momencjm Trovers Hedg e 
it MDmenfjrn Voiwniauier 
122 MDLil MANAGER K.V. 

■* Japcnese Eau-liK 
■n Emergin; JAereeh 
i~ AitvnngB 


19*85: 
'71 2E 
18141 3 


197 RICH COURT 


..I Asiwtca UK i 2U.1SE 

• 1 iSSM 


Kcttaam Fohres're 
Racsun C^eiTB M4 


i Guwnuriipir 
ff .'Janond CurtencY Fd 
a CEIuLffUd Rewne 

% 

d Kensn 
d TDaOend Fund 
J Hl^lYffifJ 


DM 


l 

4 


1542.1219 

«4| 

TDOOOCi 

3*85 
1CD7J35 
10*13 , 
34898 - 
T76JQQ . 
14054 
36*73: 

,ift £ 

4 90 
15*403 
27017 

“SSI 

1DH77.00 

rain 


13437 ja 
4T II 
3477 00 


d lmerad ran d Band . 
ff GLPispenyS 


llj 


19.0 


123 NAM FOREX MANAGEMENT 

» NAM Mum Hedge SF <M6 

124 NICHOLAS-APPLEGATE CAPITAL MET 

e NAStmtOdFOrtumlesa A S 27-32 

C NA 5t«0l CooonumliO* Q B S ICO 04 

ir \A ReuWo Dictrm Fd I 251 u 

V na Helge Fund i >8129 

ITS NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG) LTD 
ff Ssn-uru JcHra Fund S J7t 

124 NORTH STAB FUND MANAGEMENT 
Tft Y 45-23371127 FB* *4533324717 ___ 

> NjirewcncniFund _ gwi S3A0- 


149 

e Ru E_. 
a PGPe*-&Fmd 
ff sg Bend PVn Fa >NUT a 
RG Sand ana Fd <XlC-> 9 


GROUP 

" l teBwdBiri37 tn 

R b£h} 


25*90 

11*19 

10*39 

I 2 S. 1 S 

;S£3 

rr^ 

9992 


_ . — /Sweats s iv 

TH E ENVIRONMENT I NV T4* 1 S34 «B 000 

; 28PT 2 ’■ 

H4 THE PEGASUS FUND 
d OossB 

w InO Fhsd Income Ecu ■*» 13 

hr.EaDtn F fif lwJ3 

SSotSibt u> imm 




* 1 ■£ 

S I M 

S 1 60 


n N5 Hinn Fwfar ne rfe Fd £*' JS5-2L- 

w NS.-i,«dlniefTCiS-Kl =d DM jS5S» 

4 NS Corddrd Fgns D» 23100* 

k IJSlrr*r=TienaIC3Tr=« S .72 70- 

m NS 3 d* ‘.’odCTO* F-jro D** I 63 W* 

“ 127 OLD MUTUAL INTL IGUERNSEY1 LTD 


li&ia 


u LKFk! L-tert 

: 

m jV-’tz Saocal .'.'rrne: 
a IrT 9,*B7 InVuF 

« 3e r -vrsejs 

rt :rv{ Asm Sracirrffhur: 
n ®s: (stRSiirJtf 

* .verse 


S4E4 


ff RG3 crfPlLAFd'B—. 

Mem Rcboa ste Ams!rt=i SSMa 

ISO ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
GROUP FUNDS 

TM 44171 240 3000 Fez *4 171 1403028 

0.3 
:!*» 
ISSIVS 


» Lac Rwiffincsota L4 ussauM 

m Smaniwd PanMO Lfl 12011 -00 


L 44 171240 380D Fcra 44 17 
Asran Uses; rH^njs Fs 

e uiu-hv; Zsz. Hagcqs 

m Reamer i-red Cep HffICffX 


*s» 

37471 586 


i fKEa” i '{ifess 
"BB5® v "" e D “ its 

■ USSracUr&B S HAD 

r ire vfiii ffunmi rtm u s * i ifio.y» 

■ The '.VffiWkdon Fuad a C S 168*11 

147 7HENU INTERNATIONAL FUND PLC 


15164*00 . 
. 1511A7- 
159916 
21933 X0 - 
2393200 , 
I»63 
1*1X17 
I91J8- 
22345 


120.71 



: FtttsCdsnTrai'aKY* ■-■3 S "fi54 
4 2 **xY s ?" - - , c 5 - 

sQB 


i HeagtdUS Eauces 

wasasim^^ 


coniiuuu krroup me 

ForMUdO «gh RH* Me 
GCM HUhYcM Fd Ud 
GCM InflConuertMa Fd 


sam 


■ wed 94 nw Lid sf 


7 P-iac-SSlrcIjS 
: rriesct, yrz E-130 
t p-as- t '. , cz 


I 5 T i5n! * J. - 'Tjer FtfLa 

1 e vsxsstz s efc ftcn 


r f| 7jJf 

J icS 

j. *vw — ss •'? vss sc- =:c i..5 -" 

* lYnr *--3C In- S4- r- =77 J jJ ffT 

•t -wroirw --ten - roei 

4 a-rtcc.Gdse ■reset c 5 -3*4- 

* ?..-n swt4- •.•jii. 5. Er s 

* Cl.-TJC r». A~Tr356 S ;.9 

/- avTjsaNiiaTsrsewrss 


* or-.— csL'ff 


r ^lmlFSAsc-5-Swe: 
: « =cr-c 

s Sert-I* .-.e* 2A 

• * IrS 

1 '.r:"» Arena 


1-iSS 

S MAi!7 



. - SwK* 

I « K=ss S 

I J A»cc C rffir-l _ } 

l a XOdcr. Xi jn jJ» Fend S 

• ff A>cn •ffrsjr >nVT Ter * 

T *SA' TIGER SEL FUND 
j £ HsngKsne | 

; S <cnxi S 

1 3 S 

s. riuuasi ..... - - -• .a 

ff V“ffW= s 

ff cs:nra4s s 

ff Laffqtty } 

ff cr-ffo * 

c tm=ss=« S 

ff FOustsn t 

ff S'' —tto 4 

“PCRNT2N T AI. VAN FUND 
- sr.-viasra S 

n Ess-Sf jrawOl * 

— Ig TITAN CAPITAL MCT [FAX 92506 
Fc*iA 171 DV3cr;Pecr»44 177 379303. 
» Ty-ffr Ert-wnenoo 
* 2*r ;* C*sc 
■ T.!Sn Fee* 


49 J3 
2*15 
2195 
*48 
TUB 
351 
8-43 


Giofaa* ArnHragc Ud ■ 
Wotol Blue Umjs FCLW 
GMHFMUSMflrroUO 


1198 S3 - 
337S.9J; 
30831 
1310 
1116 16- 

DM 

s toffijS- 

J 7 791 -HOE . 

S 102*51 
S 137889 • 

S 143JH 

I 907%3 

S l ifl- 
iE % n s-' 


s? 

j 14755 . 


3!S3 


HM 

40.92 

» 


Htargem Gwtfwn I 
1AM Growths 


1029.1^ 
3M.42 
.ID. II 
3443 
37545 
9530-64 


•jSiSjfl 
■ Jmmn PMfiel 

re K<ngn1e l^rt 


1*27 

2*46 


13124 


OCT Crt CS' Fff.Gt.l 5 J6 p DV. :'5ffBs 
Ot:ijrtOi ,c 3--n!£cSuh D*.l 1CS-EK 
131 OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
7) rreni 5- '-:r--.lm.B«TT-TL=: 6C» ^>f-5i- r b . 


* C vt*v~ ,* * Lie 

i. .-ro-cTT or Pimm L'ff > 

c Oci.no Altana jo V”‘ S 

e Otr.raa Eo»-=Ic Fd lts 1 

rt cafiffc fur - ff S 

ir GONRia FuIrrfe^FouiC 5 

= C>ctimc0fcsalr.i4 S 

r Ootmc Oswnjiu:* =c l:c i 
k Ccruna Span r j.™ ; 

I. . piannum R! m.- S 

ORBIS INVEST Bermuda (441J 294 30DD 
i» oronGtaeci iTYAugi 


: .■esc?' vc 
; v ■: nc 
: sw" 

j roTAffTnmrtS r; 
ff itoiB ;, 
ff Srangv fcrrv*;- 5 .n; 
ff ff itmwstte: .'ir 
SKANDiFOl.DS 
c Ejedi :m A:: 
ff Effji'v inn er. 

a ffdrt’. oieloi 

KJI S«ut:*5 


n Ora* Lenogad it 
IJ3 OflUTEX GROUP OF FUNDS 
Nassau Tei(339lSS66J56 Fo»f8Wl 380541 
hna-’orai-vi im. 


5 *cf 

3*15 


j ecjcy Mere, 

J EatnlY LUC 
r Effvrr> C:al>nefi:3l Evrose 
d “wurv rAtCJia-Tcrwan 


: is 


. r , Teen Fd 

d OrMea Dvnanlc Fd _ 
a Orhtiaii Ota- Diwowv Fd 
e orore* OrawTTi FJ 
ff Orewn Hoalm A Emir Fa 
ff Ora. lev Jaoan Fd 


3 QrMKBl I 

134 FACTUAL 


S 21883} 
s 6 . 9140 : 
1 *79j»: 

* 6A3S2I 

S 6 736U 
S.999S: 

% *1212: 
s fljvsff: 
CS 1*4537: 


r=o-J 

ff inn Emejgvis Cffcnett 
j Inn EaOMTi Enrage 
r im Korea 


Bono I 

Bond ranine 
Bona Eano* acc 
S ena Eurace lira 
1 Sweden Aa 


S 24626 
5 [J»rt 
S JGC55 
S *9854 
S i-Sff? 
S IJ9S4 
NO* 10.9491 
Nak iconsft 
S 144611 


- 11*29 

_Sn Cucwnw Fcr3 S 12B.88 

- TTfvLffSaHrtS* S 11*48 

!70 TRANS GLOBAL raNDS GROUP 
» TranGrffOSi iTWlPIC S 37442 

j- Tiran Geracl Fact! hie Pfc } J16.ll 
rt 7rans GiffffCJ EquAn PK S 12*80 

193 TWEEDY BROWNE VALUE FUNDS __ _ 
» USVfflue s 97 00 

rt InfJVdi* ,? 3*13 

> usi Value SF 1123 

UBS 

r<ttOG4i-l -235-3434 FradXMl -1 -35jC72 

ff ijES BC MvCHF DaDTesne SF lllJSAr 

ff USS Bd m> CH F linerma SF 21*610/ 

d UBS 3d lnv Convert AIM 1 «347y 

a U6S 3c lnv DEM DM ZTirar 

ff ubs an inv GBP t 3o4.«py 

d UBF OdliwGtabaJ SF StS~ 

ff UBSMlm JPY V97432X__. 

C U^SBdMvNLG B 2760570/ 


48744 

2X1.15 

14*38 

267.92 

220944 

111X0 

100988 . 
10300 - 
249.57 
3137 
11B4A3 
11(6 Off 
119^: 


f LaFai«n». 

r La Fgrefa Reoalor Grmrth 
m La JoMotafGtSiFd Ud 
■ IMS SKPY.- 

ra Lm Pvfftnmnc* Fune Lid 
n Life prabai Fd Ud 
t> urx Iml Mat Pd LM 
n Lira 5vL HakBngi 
m MlOagHn Offunra N.V. 

* mjOC i n ws lm M Wi Ud 
m ManmllnieqBtionaUJd 

m Atoorr C«j * Hedge Fd 

w Munphum anmore Fd 
m McGkmGiaoai um3U 
m MJM ndwnanonai Ud 

» MoofBGiocal YIVTA 
» MoaraGtabai raw B 
w MeanGMfaallnvTD 
Nampa LnwogM Hid 
Nwmanti Deheraum 
NfcjfloiTi Poaflc Fa Ud . 

P&d 5 ** 

n Overseas Pamun 


i 


UpaasnvNLG B 27*670/ » 

ff Ual ig Uw &nedca LaOnc si IdizO/ "i ^ 

J uBsIgliwAMB NewHorU £ 44 B»r m Pmw«FundLM 


i S^Ef^ 0- 

d Twtnitar High YloW Fd 


S 532.7333 
J 74043IS 
S 1833635 
5 2334837 
5 1724347 
S 11*0715 



5 20 


!« 


. .14243 

Sei 7*2950 

M 1 Loops 

S .'A 14949 

!A 1.0109 
5 1.7305 

I I UP 
Seh 134431 


c U 

ff uustq invenwgy 
ff UBS Eb lnv Europe 
e UBS Eg lnv France 


601220V I 


ff UBSEqlnvC. 

s libs Eq rnv GaM 
a UBS Eq lnv Gfuar Britain 
ff UBS Eq lnv JMna 
ff UBS Eq mu naif 




1.7965 


Snsdbh Kraror Sr*. 154592 


L'83 Ea lnv I 


PARA INTERNATIONAL FUND LTD 1 >W WETEBNMgERE PRrreEMIrtVA 

a Qum A Stares 5 I46J87 ADMINISTRATION TEL *41 22 8182131. 


» Crescendo IWta Fima 




Ld 11820X0 

L7 IG888DJW 
S 11144 


S Kgff g ! nv l n ' dlCB,n < M SF 'junior 



Sf. 

2834 771. 


14*40 

11BJ0 

12*44 

2»d2W 

14*407 

111549 




a Pancsl Avxm 
j Pannsi Anon c-juwm B 
ff Pgrvpn Bvtgivm 
ff Paroesi Evrage B 
ff Pnrvesi tump* Mid Cap 


1 B 


5740 

ra.33 

835900 

47(U 

19*00 

188749 

572.96 


'050.60 
1211 10 


ff FarwnJ IRUr 
ff PofYBii Jaoaa B 
a Panesi Jaoan Small Cap B 
ff Pamnt ScardlnavH B 

d FtafYM SOTirertorW 

ff Pareasi UK B 
ff Paved USA B 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 
a Paroesi Owi B«ta» B 
ff Pa-.ffrt owi cad 0 
ff PanertOLVCHF 


rr StratBqlc Audi itAngT 
m OmSA mmtmeidFdi 
m Csncortki ImrasnTjav Fg 2 
m Seiediw Fiirvro Portfolio 
SOCIETE GENERALE 
ASSET MANAGEMENT F-J2 I <2 1( 7454 
hitenwr. nttjY/'Hvrw. socgeticorartgora 
ff Seraon intarnanara sscav S 1172.il 

" soIam IKStoy % ^pV 1 D ‘ ,fl * 


.... , -ImiSija 1 c. Eoropv dm 169/rtor 

i S&t i3fS?&SP ,rta,,a i ^ 


UK 


iS3 

11198 


v* 507401 

1 i 


2182 
x 24JI 
S 2409 
S 2*41 


S n M 


i KSSSkB£! B 
j te’8a» 8 


OP* 


ff Parvtsi Oh* ScanomaiM B □** 


Ecu 1716* 
FF 128*2 

R 707 &S, 


nss iTc^b— 

d Proved S-T DEM B 

a p3?S I^t eSIw B b 


S £IS2 


a Panmr X- Kraal 1 BEF 
d Parresl Global 4 BEF 

J Pomes' Globed 3<HF 

ff Panioxi Global I U5D 
d Porwm Global 2 USD 
ff Parvesl Global 3 USD 


BF Ml OO 
BF 15474 
SF 72599 
1 11*10 
I 12*38 
S 14140 



Ja 8 m 

iBdlneCHFT SF 1232, 

i Bd Inv-DEM A DM 119.170/ 

"ipsr 

iJiYilfe. lbi 7" 
f In 


IK 47 
12.7S . 
*30 
1899 J* 

I4*n 
95351 
_ 9*33* 

l ’TO 
l 

S 1649J32 


U0 


V-U5D 
»-S C US 


ff UBS 
•7 UBS 
d UBS 
0 UBS 
« UBS.,. . 

3 

ff ugs 
a uSs 
ff UBS 


inv-turopo DM 412 
mi BWach s 11 
KarnraEura SF 13 
he wnopmo on, 5 i> 
. liEuroatronra Ecu 1 

'**%&& 1 ,j i 


216.70 
12139 . 
57*19. 
182.2492* 
10146 


^Sra-OspL, . 

Med Term MUD AS 10£>*r 

^ d jffdsi 
IS 


o UBsOdl __ 

J BMpgS?r!:ls M P r te,®g 

I SM I«nn I4TL 


■dBSPb tup 


SF O3A3B0 
FF 594I35D 
. 5 482260 


I MODEM DEM 70*401 

- /MU FRF FF 197.7928 

a SogrtinFd Mono/ MnlTL ITL32S9iim 
ln “P.ITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


^ ro , 


jmwi uiinuim 


29734 

15585 

10*31 

188.17 

TS378 


137 PAJU PLACE MANAGEMENT . 

% ES!Sff« sf 3?5SH 

■ PPI B 1*7 Gan Part! S I03979E 

» PPI C 3N7 Eor FranUon 1 10*754| 

m Gtano CamRd un DM 717330E 

121 PERMAL FAMILY OP FUNDS 
t Awn Holdings N.V. J 2§l6S 

’ Awn Hatanga N.V. B 5 W40 

I Brazil Ltd S 113001 

t Emorqliy Mtt! Hldgs , _ S !«LSS 
• Imergino MMX Hldgs N V B 
1 turoco un 
1 FA. nnonaas A Pul LM 
f Growth N.V. 


w GSAML 

* GSAM CHF CaamojiM 
J GSAMGBPOmJr^ 
a CSAM Manor Mfc 

d GSAM Manor MR 

d GS AM Mom MBS SF 


’ConuoNte 
•rMfisyss 

mrunUSkv 

KW MBS SF 

GSAM Motor Midi DM 

®saar- wlnB 


lilOB 

107.14 

iati 

10004 

10837 

11101 

20938 

140.82 



ff°?SS8 

_ s imrao 
* 9flS.U0/ 

\1P* 

FI SF 'wjly 



SF 


XTM 
359 00 
1723732 
*2-38 . 
750 
1710 
1648 45 
*00 


11 91 ■*! 

1135 
SF I1CPA5E 
10502 
103894 
18740 
2147700 

1“'-W 

2113X16 . 


9911 


1I14LS3 

I*Q7JC3 


,piu lsS£^ 


1*12x0 
19157 . 
366.13 
2194/9 


TSfl 


1 Invoshncnl HHgs K.V. 
f bimtmonf Hldgi N.V. B 
1 Memo G CorrimortadHra 
r MBtmniufii DaM Hldgi NV 


r Ntrscsi Lid 


DM 4727.94 
} 1463.15 

S 4TO.02 

\ » 

| 1479 J? 


a QfisnomAmGwmFa . . 

ff Whharn Artgn Sir* MkH S IJ34J 

a onsham Emrog Cn Fa ■ L1R12 

ff DPmmb Eurapaari &WIP } 3A4BK 

a onvnaFarEwGwm i 4.244* 

S Ctoiwra lr» Growni * d MBA 

ff OHM 16 Jdpgn*** Gwlh S OWL 

a onTnrajjf ArnGwm Fd S Mg| 

INCACCFUND^ 

3 uss^S 1 | 

a USS Mono/ MarvofCkm S 1JH2& 

148 FICTBTAaE. CROUP 


UlS- 


w P.C.F infflowi 
w P C F Noranwol ILuU 

• E-tFUKVU ILuU 

• 2X-F ynPrancD >i_im 

• per uidiiw fLoti 
■ FS-gwiMitgiLini 

Z p&f 


: ^ij^Egc 


P.F.i. RomoraiCHF 


m AtaTO 5AM 
158 SOFA FUND LIMITED 
m navi A 
nr CtassS 
m CknsC 
m CkBfD 
m ThaC/pnn Furrt 
SOFAER CAPITAL INC 
w amencon Quor* Fima 

- fi iSiTssaySr 

■ uaoa Hooge Fund 
140 SR OLOBALFUHD LTD 
* SH EflWKHl 

w 5 B Agi - 
w 5 k mviunuiul 

: 

STAINES FDMNGBB [GUERNSEY] LTD 
w Cuir Canaqn Tm Tnauiand 1 TflOUBi 



* 1 w* 


iU1 ^ 

! mmm< b il 

r , | 1 .)t5^“* EIU,M l«2WWl IF^S 




130877 

5343.40 

1*1*4 


1.11 


a 4-Fyna 
tf M-ftlH. 
d UHI Em-incom) 


1 ■ 

a Ujg Nippon ra v mr 



\ ffliatassg 




SSBJSSftl 


J 


ZT>J>7 
255 74 
193.45 

zoi.n 

.15-“ 

I ».W 


i IS 


w J3 

.2413* 


( 


& 


\ ■. 


fe^ri < 'i - t.t 


~r 


sSSsBSrSS* 




uifwipioo sfFniB] H c .IT 

B^paaMyg—- 


gy.BWB DoSS: SF -'ftftalSrZ 

Swwflah Krono r; THg . 

a ■ Mkari x 



tr MogrillM 

: sa Ea 

£&PI'fimKllUNTE6D 1C 



^WPrtCdS; NX.MX AygflgMrt. 

■•WSSSf.tfiS? 


WS - nock SdP. sLrZZJ:- 






**}nt»*t*o* BfianEit^ spied by ^ tie fart gaps to Mowd SA, Is ccfatedm rebndBdhsfie 1 st bebe banotaisnitifiB he HI AAsqtfrttwltf itowwanante 
ai^a3S>pflfyg^Tlieaisnaflnd8ftalnabedaaTiedtobo»icfabyi]BWglifeq^aiiBl33aftegnw5n«iac9eivlgidhas>iiB<sc»Ttsl«welMilsaRBapgtoTT^ ^ 










NYSE 


D* YM PE 100a H* lc- M Cm 


DK YM PE letcMtk U» 


I IS KWh 

>*E» "S* l* 


B» YW PE into m*« to- LM Clpe 



3M ISM IW 
■ M> Pram* 

10 * r pu w c — 

M* Wt P*Bff 
am it* phis* 
3Hk.ni> Mk 
u* a** mo* 


H a* MM 
|3M srn FMH 
34 IS* Man 
«t in pmumi 
IM k m PMSwg 

34* 74kV PWJDl 


34* 34**PI06*4I 
400* 37* m 

34* 34* PMUkpK 
IS* M* PMVN 
«* * PkOiV 

27* 7* PM pl Mil 
77* 77 HrWS 
SN MflS 
33* 33* FVraa_« 


14 12* PK* 

S3* 27* «•* 
34 SSW PM« 
11 * 17 H MM 
44* 34* PMMk 

a** n* npMtf 
IHk 0W 1 *1 * 
34* JJ* MBS* 
3Mk 17* PMBoS 
W* M*PMn 
cm «* «mr* 
27* 13*kP**rt> 
ss*.3m pw»i« 
3c*. 1«* Mai 


X) 18* «*■» 44 21 

4M* 34* MM 41 l.l 

44 JJ*. PICfMB 

13 21* PMBLP - 

-^^4 Zs 

^ 1ST ESS s s 

»» 12* Pw*j4 2» .1 

44* aw PWlff 7DJ 2 U 

41* IS* Pwfcp M» u 

SHI 44* ftWfl ’-** - 

37* pmadi 174 14 

37* 31 PkhkS .VS ” 

is X PMtmMtt l» 11 

B ill* Mot *4< .f 

3 4S* PlOCU » .4 

stos a* PMDfm - 

IMk 1J« PJM- fj* 

14 13* PWf 

13 10* PHOT * ?•' 

» IS* Pmn* J* 1-1 

IB* 7* Pn*03 - 

Wk sS pjkjSvk TIB »i 

^21- S3. «7S 

23* 12* MB 

r a. ga a » 

us* 4 b* £*«9" **« >■* 

77*i <4* PlBCWlU - 

Bk 31 * M* — 

111* 54* PCflCO J* J 
44 27* IW W _ .J 

4* M Pm»Sl A M 
SJk IP. PWU 44 '■* 
47 34* PmO M ' 2 

3Mk 33* PHH*J • *3! 

31* IS* P U T K *» 
7 fi* IS* PSrWM .48 17 
»* 72* PS£C 114 «T 
}*w. *» PS£0|*I 1U “ 

nx 31 * phot, .■* JJ 

2m am Pmsy s f* 

14V. 53* PPHg» ’** *' 
54* 40* P0BP84 •» 

£? & E&r .£ 


*■ m 

24 41774 ak 

33 MIS 77V. 
U 1M 13 

34 512 JJ* 

_ man 
34 40 04 

» in a* 

V *wa s*k 

_ 134 TV. 


m iw an 

4B im K« 

- >4 aw 

u w * 

- m a*. 

- 777 14 

II IBM 7* 

14 JOB 10* 

15 TBtiST* 
72 S731 13*4 
. U4 27* 


a «» 

- j*n* 

IS 473 37*4 

a 7*0 *7* 

- *42 IS** 

_ 710 44 
74 Didst. 
U DH.lYto 
77 443bM* 

13 407 34*. 

« ia ii* 

0 114kB* 

44 SOTS IM 

- 7»4 75* 

a S4f >33 
a m mv. 
» 91 PK 

7 334 B* 


IS IMS nv» 
75 1063 S 

a la «* 


_ 107 17k. 

24 40 45*. 

IS 02 2744 


« Ud SI* 
33 ua.Ovt 

_ 1411 *e* 

_ a is* 


_ 144 34* 

3 HI 4* 

_ M7 27* 

0 1* 
1* »OK 
37 S3D 72* 

a wm 

- 3S4S«15* 
77 sanra* 
_ m m. 


_ mi j* 

14 471 13kk 

11 ua im 

12 SOB* 55* 

_ 127 343k 

a 540 a 




a < 7 no hr. 

- » a* 

IT 331 2l*b 

« ®7 [Mt 

a .133 aw. 
43 SM IS* 
3 214 MM 

10 M 34*4 

a 10 im 

M 4218 OOk 
_ »57 7* 

U 41 M 

a sa it* 
si *n«zi 

18 2B 14* 
» *l3o32*k 
14 ZJ0 14*. 

- 230 a* 

> am 
n a m 
a a/ a* 

- 0 27* 

_ St 34* 

_ GU 1ZU 

- 34 3Mk 

17 20 0* 

11 11447 54* 

_ 1437 33* 
_ 1477 IS* 


34* 34* 4k 
S. B* .Ik 
71 T. 31 - 


II 1338 23 
74 1617 25 V. 
31 6313 40*. 
14 2M IBV. 
31 M7 224k 
40 111«k84* 
» IB In 
a 344 043k 
II W KMk 
74 471 

a 4i 4* 
14 4357 40k 

a 347 a 

11 IIS 1 

n iiv am 


14* IS* 

m Ji». 
a* is* 

25* 2S*V 
24* aik 
3W> 3B*V 
44* 01* 


a* m •* 
3Mk 34* •*. 
MU I4*k .*. 
IS 2SB. .Ik 


15V. 154k •* 

11* II*. .* 

4Kk 8U tV. 


U SPSTrm 
3** «>*£» 

10* So H« 

73k SamCik 

14* M(0C 
UM 8M0 
27* SMhmr 
IS* **M 

14* M)rfl 

42* 5K 

a* 0244* 


4* una 
. MN MB 
s* uni 
M* SftCoT i 

sm SHf? 

71* SoSPbM 
224 SsffpiC 
34* WfpiE 
34* MIPpM 
«* sbmpmm 
0 1*0*8 
a* M oij . 
73* 2*4b* 


54* 38* WklPl 


17* lOKl 

44 * a Soto 

soap*. 


14* m aaaspp* 
25* 14* S44C0M 
47* 33* l— i k 
» 4 0 * smm 
0* 33* fni|iki 

«? » 24*Sur 


_ 27 IKS 31 4« 

231 U .. M 27* 27 

Sir .1 _ MS 10 7M 

«. — 34* 34M 

a 3 17 730.11k IB* 

. a b b. « 

_ a 4« a* a 

14 - * 712 531k SM4 

1440 M4 IS MulfWk ISM 

_ _ 22»oJJ* DU 

_ 30 IM 3». UM 

3» U 31 73H nr. 71* 

. U 4570 51* 51 

444 21 - 0 11* 3I3S 

<7. 7.4 — a a im 

4JOC - 4» m 443k 44V. 

.M J at 130 44* 0 * 

_ 24 Wl 34* 384k 

la 24 M 1377 T7* 74* 

a 3M0 23* 77*. 

_ M 111 3k* 34* 

1J4 12 17 140] K*k M7* 


2*. .4* 
10 * -* 
m •«* 


24* 28* 

2 D* 13* 
0 3M 

aw 17» 

. IM U4 
11* «• 
25* Hit 
13* 14* 

a* 75* 

** JL 

a* 24* 
23*. IT* 
MB «* 

b im 
33* » 

wT »m 


23* 27* 

14* 18* - 

3A* 34* 

25* »* * 

a* 3M 
a* 30* •* 

1» ITS * 

a s» •* 

70 M -*> 

n 3K * 

13* 13* -*» 

mm-* 
m w of* 
iw n* »i 


3 MA* 


tf* a Mt* 
iak TV- MB 

am. » "■» . 
an 

44* 33 B3M« 

’JB 1 ! S 

jib n* » ww 

a* £25 

TO* SB* "43*{8 
uk a* Baft 


n 13M. 

van * 

*’S 

CB STM 
a f«w 
in j* 
708 a* 

m St 

in m 


aw •« 

H* t» 
21 * - 
31Vk »*k 
49kk -*k 


l« H71 £7* 4M 

m mi* wik 
2> 3M« «3k 3M 

- 34 32* 37* 

U 44W.1I* llVk 
_ IK 70K-. 33* 

B in «» 42V. 

It 14) Iftv 35 


^ IB 344k 3S*k 

_ 0 271k 24*. 

_ 771 34* 343. 


a 104 am 41** 
V 0 IT* IT* 
13 IIA4 ink 1* 


24 71*4 TBM 744. 
_ 150 134k IM 

X SMS 44k 44* 

It 153 41* 4Mk 

S it 710k 21* 
a* 73*4 23* 

t 177 O Ok 


Tl « 71 > 

25 IM 40 34* 

_ 341 II* MW 

_ 403 II UK 

_ 247 IJ*k U 


a m «* 

11 IB BK P* 
70 5W S7k S4W 

it io a* a* 

- 1 P 30 o 

_ W 3SW. » 

a 7M 714k Tin 


a ua a 
_ II im 

_ 537 16 

_ 130 ISM 
X B S2W 

73 OB a 

77 577 77k 

- .MB W* 

B 1340 HSk 

a w* u*w 
a a» J 
i » 

IB 40 a 
JO an JJ* 
M 71 74* 
D 481 «P* 
a as 3Mk 

a a » 

BUM 
it am 

u as im 

13 40 *7* 

D 70 037V. 

_ in im 

14 10 31*1 

i4 e as* 

24 1*3 50k 
47 2375100k 
_ JS4031M 

a M* »* 

_ 1SJ J7V» 

. HM» 

- 234 11* 

■ ik m 

a *471 w* 
33 ns n 
7i ra I* 
14 57 33W 

!? Sw 1 

a wn m 

21 WISH 
_ MSI 44* 

_ 10 9Mk 

a IK 74* 
a 137 25 



25* 15* IMI 


































































































Sports 


PAGE 20 


Top Scottish Clubs 
Plan a Breakaway 


soccer Scotland's 10 premier- 
division soccer clubs said Monday 
that they intended to break away 
from the Scottish Football League 
in a move aimed at bringing more 
money into the game and raising 
standards north of the border. 

The clubs took the first step to- 
ward setting up the new league by 
informing the Scottish association 
of their intention to resign their 
membership. 

“Following an independent re- 
view, Celtic and the other clubs 
consider that the formation of such 
a football league will be to the 
benefit of both its member clubs 
and the other football clubs in Scot- 
land,” Celtic, which is a publicly 
quoted company, said in a state- 
ment to the London Stock Ex- 
change. 

The planned move mirrors the 
breakaway of England’s top clubs 
from the soccer establishment in 
1 992 to set up their own premier 
league. 

That move triggered an upheaval 
in the game, with the new league 
negotiating lucrative television 
contracts and a string of clubs is- 
suing slock shares. (Reuters} 


Fittipaldi Fractures Back 
In Ultralight Plane Crash 


MOTOR RACING The racing 
champion Emerson Fittipaldi frac- 
tured his lower back in an ultralight 
plane crash in Brazil, escaping 
death only because the aircraft fell 
in a swamp, a doctor said. 

The 50-vear-old Brazilian and 
his 6-year-old son, Luca — the only 
two people on the plane — were 
taken to the Sao Paulo Hospital in 
Araraquara. a citrus-growing re- 
gion about 220 miles (352 kilo- 
meters) northwest of Sao Paulo, 
shortly after midnight on Sunday. 

X-rays revealed a fracture in the 
lumbar* region, and Fittipaldi re- 

E rted difficulty in moving his left 
j. Dr. Luiz Roberto Neves, the 
hospital’s clinical director, said in a 
radio interview. 

“By some miracle. Luca didn’t 
have even a cut.” Dr. Neves said. 

Dr. Neves said Fittipaldi told 
doctors that the motor stalled and 
the ultralight crashed into a swamp. 
“Everything now seems to be 
O.K.,” said Wilson Fittipaldi. 
Emerson's brother. (APi 


Wust Wins Another Stage 
But Dane Maintains Lead 


cycling Marcel Wust of Ger- 
many won for the second stage in a 
row in the Tour of Spain on Mon- 
day. although Lars Michaelsen of 
Denmark kepi his overall lead after 
stage three. 

Wust, who won the second stage 
in ihe Portuguese city of Vilamoura 
on Sunday, outpaced the rest of the 
pack in the final sprint to complete 
the 173-kilometer (107-mile) stage 
in 4 hours 28 minutes 7 seconds. 
Wust races for the Lotus team while 
Michaelsen rides forTVM. 

Fabrizio Guidi of Italy was 
second and Sven Teuienberg of 
Germany third in a mass sprint at 
the end of the race in the southern 
coastal city of Huelva. Guidi also 
rose from fifth to second place in 
the overall lead, six seconds behind 
Wust. 

Tuesday's stage is to cover 193- 
kilometers from Huelva to Jerez de 
la Frontera. (AP) 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 i 


Rafter Cashes In at U.S. Open 


By Selena Roberts 

New York Times Ser'iC* 


NEW YORK — Patrick Rafter of 
Australia was as loose and relaxed as a 
reggae tune. He had been listening to a 
Ben Harper CD just hours before he 
would have to walk through the cor- 
ridors that led to Arthur Ashe Stadium 
for his first Grand Slam final. 

The music gave his thoughts an es- 
cape hatch from the pressure that had 
dogged him for years, all the expec- 
tations that had been slapped on his 24- 
year-old back to be the next John New- 
combe or Tony Roche or Ken Rose wall. 
He did not want to think it, not before he 
was about to play Britain’s Greg Rused- 
ski for the U.S. Open title Sunday. 

And yet, once he used his ubiquitous 
court coverage and reflexes that were as 
quick as the camera shudders recording 
every moment of his 6-3, 6-2, 4-6, 7-5 
getaway from the record- fast serves of 
Rusedski, all Rafter could think about 
was another Australian he had to live up 
to: How would Pat Cash have cele- 
brated? 

So Rafter scaled the wall to the 
Friends' Box in koala-like fashion, hop- 
ping into each embrace. The last rime an 
Aussie was spotted making such a climb 
in a Grand Slam final. Cash had just won 

the 1987 Wimbledon. 

“Cashy did it,” Rafter said. “I 
thought it was pretty cool. 

Well done, mate. Those were the 
words cascading down from the rim of 
the stadium, where Australians were 
giving a bloody ribbing io those waving 
the Union Jack. 

They did not care that the women's 
final had overshadowed the men, per- 
haps the only ones to be thrilled over a 
U.S. Open championship that did not 
'spotlight the hangdog -looking Pete 
Sampras. His departure, along with An- 
dre Agassi ’s and Michael Chang’s, gave 
everyone a chance to get to know the 
affable serve-and-vollev duo on the 


court. There was Rusedski, his voice 
hoarse from a bacterial infection in his 
throat and his sorrow deep in mourning 
the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, 
knowing the funeral procession for her 
had wound through the streets near his 
London home just a day earlier. 

And then there was the self-effacing 
Rafter, up two sets to one but thinking 
the worst when Rusedski pulled out a 
record-breaking 143 miles an hour (2 j 0 
kilometers an hour) serve to rock him. 
That left the two on serve in ihe ninth 
game of the fourth set. 

“Pretty bloody big,” Rafter said. “I 
just thought, ‘Oh no, he’s going to win 
the tournament and he’s going to take 
the record with him.’ I'm not trying to 
hit it My arm would fall off.” 

Rafter remained intact. He broke 
Rusedski in the 1 1 th game of the fourth 
set after winning a net showdown 
during which three face-to-face volleys 
were ricocheting between them — and 
coming up with a huge overhead with 
Rusedski on the run. 

He was up. 6-5, and about to serve for 
the match. On match point, lie punched in 
a forehand- volley winner, then fell flat on 


dangled like a pinata for Rusedski. Oth- 
erwise, Rafter, who had lost five tour- 
nament finals in his career, did not look. 
like the uptight Aussie that never 
seemed able to pull off victory. For 
awhile, when an injury to his wrist 
shattered his morale in January 1996, 
some doubted he would ever succeed. 

‘ ‘He was so frustrated by the injury,” 
his brother, Peter Rafter, said after the 
match. “And the pressure to be a great 
player really took the enjoyment out of 
it, too. But now, he's a totally different 


person. He is happy, real! 
tennis. It makes all the di: 


his back. It was over. The No. 14 player 
in th** world had iust rocketed to No. 3. 


tennis. It makes all the difference," 

The difference in Rafter’s' life will 
now be huge. Coining home to Australia 
with a Grand Slam in his bags will 
change everything. The player without 
an agent might need a management 
team in a hurry. 

“I’ve got no idea what it’ll be like, 
mate,” Rafter said. “There's going to be 
a lot of pressure around me, I suspect.” 

But he is getting more comfortable 
handling pressure. Before a big match, 
his nerves used to jangle, his brow used 
to sweat, his nights would end up sleep- 
less. “He got some sleep last night/' 


in the world had just rocketed to No. 3. 

“If he can get ahead of Pete, I H bow 
down,” said Rusedski, referring to the 
dominating No. 1. Pete Sampras. 

Of course, Rusedski had wanted to be 
the one to end Rafter’s run through this 
tournament. Rusedski had never played 
so well, having lost in the first round of 
the U.S. Open in three previous tries. He 
was not as big-point sharp against 
Rafter, sending a backhand volley into 
the net to be broken in the sixth game of 
the first set. 

He dropped the second set, too. but 
that was more a product of Rafter's hot 
passing shots than his own mistakes. 
Rafter gathered 13 winners to his five in 
the second set. Rafter’s only dip in 
energy came in the third set. when his 
first serve faltered and his second sen e 


Peter said. ‘ ’We just took it easy during 
the day. j list listened to music aod talked 
about eveiything but tennis.” 

When the match was over. Rafter 
allowed himself to get excited, too. To 
heck with the calm exterior. He climbed 
the wall of the Friends’ Box, he found 
Tony Roche and embraced Australian 
tradition. 

“Just to see him here, be in my 
comer.” Rafter said. “You can't get 
better guys in your comer.” 

And as he walked off the court, an- 
other Aussie legend. Newcombe, patted 
him on the cheek as he approached him 
for an interview for Australian tele-' 
vision. “Newc did interview me.” 
Rafter said. “It’s so nice to have all the 
Aussie guys. They know what this feels 
like." 

And finally, so does Rafter. 





N.n IliwWAjp-mT t'onn-Pirali 


Patrick Rafter celebrating after winning the VS. Open title on Sunday."^ 


U.S. Soccer Team Moves a Step Closer to 5 98 World Cup 


By Lawrie Mifflin 

iVrn York Times Srr.ii i- 


PORTLAND, Oregon When the 
ball rocketed off Tab Ramos's right 
instep just outside the penalty-area arc. 
it traveled with the force of tremendous 
frustration being released — 78 
minutes* worth for the U.S. team, more 
than nine months’ worth for Ramos. 

The goal gave the United States a 1 -0 


team for almost the entire 90 minutes, and 
after Ramos scored, the noise, amplified 
by fireworks, went off the decibel chart. 

' Until that moment, the Americans 
were facing a real prospect of a sco- 


reless tie at home against a depleted 
Costa Rican team that looked capable of 


keeping its defensive poise, though it 
also never threatened Kasey Keller in 
the U.S. goal. 

The United States didn't pressure the 
Costa Rican goalie. Erick Lonnis, 
enough, either, although he bobbled two 
relatively routine shots early on, show- 



victory’ over Costa Rica in a World Cup 
qualifying match Sunday, a victory that 


qualifying match Sunday, a victory that 
made "the United States a heavy favorite 


made the United States a heavy favorite 
to join Mexico as two of the three teams 
representing North and Central America 
and the Caribbean at the World Cup in 
France next summer. 

The U.S. team is now in second place 
in the group with a 2-1-3 record, two 
points behind Mexico (3-0-2), with four 
matches remaining. 

Costa Rica fell to 2-3-2 and into a 
third-place tie with Jamaica (2-2-2), 
which beat Canada. 1-0, on Sunday. The 
top three teams in the group advance to 
next summer’s 32-nation tournament in 
France. 

The goal' made Ramos a hero in his 
first game back with the national team 




mB 




since tearing up his left knee in a qual- 
ifying match Nov. 24, 1996. 

“I don’t remember ever feeling hap- 
pier after a goal,” said Ramos, a 30- 
year-old midfielder who also plays for 
the MetroS tars in major league soccer. 
“I’m not one to celebrate and run around 
a lot after a goal, but today I was a maniac 
out there. I haven't been in a game with 
this kind of atmosphere in a long time, 
and I wanted to win so badly.” 

The sellout crowd of 27396 kept up a 
thunderous din of support for the U.S. 


, • . fr ■*.* . .. 





ins. signs of vulnerability. 

"Ramos’s goal began with a dazzling 
bit of faking on the right side of the 
penalty area by Preki Radosavljevic, 
who then sent a pass toward the goal that 
deflected out toward Marcelo Balboa, 
just inside the area. Balboa did not have 
room or time to turn on the ball and 
shoot, so he quickly touched the ball 
back to the onnishing Ramos, about 22 
yards oul 

Ramos had been hesitant about char- 
ging forward in the first half, a half the 
Americans dominated when it came to 
possession of the ball but who failed to 
penetrate Costa Rica's central defense. 

“But at halftime, I told Mike Sorber 
that in about 10 minutes, I was going to 
stan taking more chances, one on one, 
because we had to get something go- 
ing." Ramos said. 

With Eric Wynalda out with an injury 
fhe was nor even on the substitutes’ 
bench), coach Steve Sampson started 
Roy Lassiter and Roy Wegerle up front. 
And in something of a surprise, 
Sampson benched Alexi Lalas, repla- 
cing him with the veteran Thomas 
Dooley. Patrolling the back with Balboa 
and Eddie Pope, Dooley also pushed 
forward into midfield several times to 
launch attacking plays. 

“Dooley can do that and Alexi can- 
not," Sampson said, explaining his de- 
cision to sit Lalas down, the first time 
the lanky redhead has not started for the 
U.S. team because of a coach’s decision 
since July 10, 1993. 

In midfield, Claudio Reyna was im- 


behind (getting a yellow card) in thtf« 
second half, and, in the 68th minute, ^ 
Reyna came out, replaced by the del r - 
fense-minded Mike Bums. . r " i 

Soon after, Sampson palled the tiring- ; 
Wegerle and Lassiter, sending on Cow-' 
Jones ■and- Radosavljevic us fresh Jegsp 


Radosavljevic repaid him for that con- ' 
fidence five minutes later, setting up' 


pressive controlling the play and the ball 
For the Americans in the first half. But 


I lmip iGiirr-lVi’**- 

Tab Ramos, right, outmaneuvcrmg Roy Myers for possession of the ball. 


for the Americans in the first half. But 
Costa Rica’s Joaquin Guillen clobbered 
Reyna's right ankle with a tackle from 


fidence five minutes later, setting upu 
Ramos's goal. 

In the welter of reporters and tele* 4 
vision cameras surrounding RamoSN 
after the game, a member of Sam’-s 
Army — the self-appointed fan club of” 
the U.S. team — approached RamoS^- 
with a gift It was a long red woolen - * 
scarf, of the kind worn by English soc«-' 
cer fans, and woven info it were Sun- 
day’s date and opponent. “We give on*-* 
of these to the game's most valuable- > 
player," the fan said. “And today wtf.' 
voted that it was you.” 

* England to Gel 5th Captain 

With Alan Shearer, Tony Adams and-; 
Stuart Pearce all injured and Paul Inctt ■ 
suspended, goalkeeper David Seaman T. 
will be England's captain for the first-- 
time in Wednesday’s World Cup qua|^_ 
ifying game against Moldova, TTie As- 
sociated Press reported from London. . - 

Capped 36 times since 1988, the 33- 
year-old Arsenal player will become the 
fifth England captain in 12 games imd^F 
coach Glenn Hoddle. 

“ft’s a great honor for me, although f 
never really thought about it before, V* 
Seaman said. 

England is expected to collect three 
points from its Wembley game against! 
Moldova, which has lost all five games’ 
so far, while Group 2 leader Italy hash! 

tougher visitto Georgia. 


Scoreboard 


Major League Standi nos 


AM RICAN LIAOUI 

EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

Bdtlmore 

88 

52 

.629 

— 

New York 

80 

61 

J47 

8'6 

Boston 

efl 

14 

M3 

HI, 

Detroit 

48 

7i 

.479 

21 

Toronto 

48 

74 

J79 

21 

CENTHAL DIVISION 



devetand 

75 

43 

.543 

— 

Milwaukee 

71 

70 

504 

5'/i 

Chicago 

69 

73 

.m 

8 

Mbrnsata 

58 

83 

All 

1P.4 

Kansas Oty 

57 

83 

.407 

19 


WEST DIVISION 



Swttte 

79 

64 

-552 

— 

Anaheim 

75 

48 

J24 

4 

Texas 

67 

76 

469 

12 

Oakland 

57 

86 

399 

22 

NAnONAL UUMKM 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Atlanta 

89 

54 

622 

— 

Florida 

83 

58 

389 

5 

New Yori 

77 

64 

346 

11 

Montreal 

71 

71 

300 

17 , 6 

Ptaknfdphia 

54 

B3 

.403 

31 

CENTHAL DIVISION 



Houston 

72 

71 

303 

— 

Pittsburgh 

70 

74 

JX> 

2'6 

St Louts 

64 

77 

Ml 

6 

Cbieirmafi 

44 

77 

A54 

7 

Chicago 

59 

84 

413 

13 


WECTDtVtStON 



LatAngefe5 

81 


366 

— 

SaiFrandsco 79 

64 

352 

2 

Cotarado 

73 

n 

307 

8'9 

San Diego 

67 

77 

465 

14‘^ 

AUHbAY'S UHMCOKU 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Tam DOS 000 000-4 2 1 

Toronto 200 100 in— 4 a 2 

D.OSvet w. Here*! (0) and Leyrte 
demons and O'Brien, w— Clemens, 21-5. 
L— D. Oliver, ll-Jl. 

Mftwaafctt 000 101 000—2 11 0 

Boston IQS |01 301—11 14 1 

D - Am Ico. Davis C5), Wickmon 16). 
Do Jones (81 ond Mathony, Levis (7}, 
Stliwett IB); ELHcnry, Btowfanbunj (6), Coni 
(6). Motor fit). Gordon 191 and HaKimdA. 
1M— B. Hemy, 6-2 L — D Anrico. 5-5. 
Hfts — Boston, j it. voteniin 2 M8), Cordero 
(171. Oleary n«j, Haselman {5), Frye 131. 
Bafflmore 100 000 101-3 II 1 

NOW York 002 305 Mk-IO 12 0 

Mussina. N. Rodriguez (4), Br.WHttams (7) 


and Webster; Kn. Rogers. Stanton (61, Lloyd 
(9) and Posada W—Kn. Rogers 6-6. 
I — Mussina 13-7. HRs— Baltimore. C. 
Ripken <171. New York. Raines C2J. ONoill 
(191. BoWiTTiams (19). Posada (3). 

Seattle 000 300 201-4 12 2 

Minnesota <04 101 OOx-9 8 0 

Lira, Carmona (3), Ayala (6), Hotzemer (4). 
Slccumb (8) ond Mamma R. WlJUns (7); 
Tewksbury, Swindell (7). AquSera (9) and 
StaWracta W— Tewtafaury6-ll. L— Urn 5-4. 
HR— Seattle. Griffey Jr (SO). 

Otedand 001 400 820—9 14 0 

Kansas Oty 000 012 001-4 IT 2 

Ludwidc. Groom (4). WilastcJc (71, T. 
J .Mathews (8) and MaSna; Rosado, Service 
(4), Carrasco (5). Oban (8), Pichardo (7) ond 
MLSweerwy. W— Lndwtdc 1-1 . L— Rosado 9- 
It HRs— Kan.C1ty. Y.Berttez (7). Dye (4). 
Angels 200 010 010 000 001-4 8 2 

Detroit 300 001 BOO 000 000-4 12 1 

15 aalngs 

Dfctaon Cadoret (7). James (8). Holtz 19), 
Perdval 00). Howgovra (19 and Turner. 
EncomaCiefl (7), Kreuter (9); Keogfa. Dani 
KL Mieefi (7), M. Myers (7), Gafflard |8), 
ToJnnes (9), Sager (10), Dtshman (131 and 
Casanova W— Hasegawa 3-d. L— Dtshman, 
1-lHRs— Defn»tt,Tg.ClotM31),Fryinan (19). 
Chicago 010 100 000-2 7 D 

Qovttmd loo no n*-a 7 o 

Dratoh, T. CosWd (7), Kurchner (U) ml 
FabreuosJrWitght Merman (7), M.Jodtson 
(8), Assenmadter (8L Mesa (9) and S. 
Alomar. W^JrtVrigM 6-3. L-Drabek 10-10. 
Sv— Mesa (12). HRs— Chicago. Ventura (4). 
Cleveland, T. Fernandas (9). Thome (371. 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

PbiftxtafaWo 000 000 110-2 7 1 

MOrttmot 000 010 000—1 4 1 

Stephenson, Gomes (7)< Karp (7). Spradlin 
(8). Bond tea (9) and Lieberthal; Hermanson. 
Tattard (71, Kline (9) and Fletcher. W— Kara 
l-O. L— Toward. 4-5. Sv— Bontiftca am. 
HR— PMadefaftia. Brag no (181. 

PirtSOwgh 200 000 001-3 8 1 

Gncdwtl 800 023 0)2—4 11 0 

Conte Silva (5). Peters (6), Christiansen 
(71 and Kendall) Burba, Befinda (7), 
Schourek (9). Shaw (91 and j. OBver. 
W — Barba 8-10. L— Silva 1-1. St* — 5hm® 
(33l.HR— CindnnalL Normally (8). 

New York 000 030 114-9 13 0 

Chicago 000 000 020-2 8 I 

BJ Jones. McMIOkkI (8). Udle (9} ond 
Hundley; Trotted Bottonfold (8), D. 
Stevens (9), R. Tate (91 and Houston. 
W— 6 J Jones, 14-8. L-Tnxted frit. 
HRs— Hew York, Gil key (15), Huskey (21). 
St. Lours 100 Ml 002 — t 6 1 

Colorado 180 001 Q5x-7 12 2 

AaBeneo Petkovsek (7), Rogqio (8). 


Bautista (B) and DHefice Astnda Dlpolo (9) 
and JaReed. W— Astada 10-9. 
L— Peth0vsek.4-6.HRs— SI. Louis. McGwire 
(14). Lankford (24). 

Annum 200 too ooi—4 7 1 

San Diego 000 000 000-0 4 0 

N eagle. Embree (8). Wohlers (9) and J. 
Lopez; J. Hamilton, Sniske (B). TuWorrrfl (*>J 
and C. Hernandez. W — N eagle. 20-1 L— J. 
Hamilton. 10-4. HR— Aflarrto. CtiJunes 
(20). 

Houston 100 000 000—1 9 3 

San Francisco 011 002 01x-5 5 1 

Kfe. T. Martin (4). Hewiquez (71, B. 
Wagner (8) and Ausmus Ruder, Tavarez 
(7), R. Hernandez (81. Bedt 19) and B. 
Johnson. W— Ruder. 11-4. L— Kile. 17-6. 
Florida 010 ON 400-5 6 1 

Las Angeles 520 DM 20x-9 12 1 

Saunders. Atfoteeco tt), Stftnifer (3). Ojala 
(5). F . Heredia (7). PoweH (7). Nen (B) and C 
Johnson; CondWtl Hall (7), Guthrie (7), 
Osuna (8), To.VUanefl (91 and Piazza 
W— Candida 10-5. L— Sounders. 3-6. 
HRs — Florida 0 White (3). Los Angeles. 
Zefle (2d). 


Minnesota 

2 

0 

0 

1.000 

61 

37 

Tampa Bay 

2 

0 

a ijx» 

37 

23 

Detroit 

r 

i 

0 

-500 

45 

41 

Green Boy 

i 

i 

a 

300 

47 

34 

Chicago 

0 2 
WEST 

D 

.000 

48 

45 

Carolina 

1 

l 

0 

500 

19 

30 

St. Laure 

1 

l 

0 

300 

50 

39 

San Francisco 

1 

l 

0 

500 

21 

25 

Atlanta 

0 

2 

0 

.000 

23 

37 

New Orleans 

a 

2 

D 

.000 

30 

58 


The AP Top 25 


The Top Twenty Five teams In Urn 

Associated Press college lootban pod. wttti 

tirot-place votes In parentheses, records 
through BepL 6. total points based an 2S 
points lor 3 first place vote through one 
point lor a 25th mace vote and previous 
ranking: 


Tour of Spain 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 

Buffalo 28. New York Jets 22 
Carolina 9. Atlanta 4 
Baltimore 21 Cincinnati 10 
Miami 16, Tmviossaa 13, DT 
Minnesota 27, Chicago 24 
Hew England 31. Indianapolis 6 
San Diego 20. New Orleans 6 
Son Francisco 15, Sf. Louis 12 
Tampa Boy 24, Detroit 1 7 
Pttteburgn K Washington 13 
Duwor35, Seattle 14 
Philadelphia Id Green Bay 9 
JadisonvUe 40. N.Y. Gians 13 
Arirona 25, Dallas 22. OT 


Top 25 College Results 


NFL Standings 


Miami 

NewEngtoto 
Buffalo 
N.Y. Jets 
India no pots 


Jacksonville 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 

Pittsburgh 

Tennessee 


Denver 
San Diego 
Kansas CHy 
Oakland 
Seattle 


AMWCAN CONFIRINCZ 

EAST 

W L T Pd. Pf 
2 0 01.003 7. 

tgkmd 2 o 0 i.ooo r. 

M 0 500 41 

is ii o 5oo s: 

pate 0 2 0 .000 11 

CEKTRAL 

wine 2 o oi.ooa a 

ire I I O JOO 5i 

atl 1 1 0 -500 3. 

igh 1 l o JOO 21 

see i t o joo 3i 

WEST 

2 a o i.ooo & 

igo 1 1 0 £00 21 

City 0 I 0 000 

s o i o jxn 21 

Cl 2 0 .000 II 


■UOnOHAL CONFEMNCI 

EAST 


Ann no 
Dallas 
N.Y. Giants 
Philadelphia 
Washington 


W L T PeL PF PA 
1 I 0 500 44 4 1, 

1 1 0 JOO £9 32 

t I C .500 44 57 

I 1 G JOO 27-10 

1 1 0 JOO 37 2d 


Haw me lop 25 noma In The Associated 
Press' college football poll farad Iasi week: 

No. I Pam Stott jug beta PiiTLburqh 3J- 
17; No.2 Florida (1-0) vs. Cenlrol Michigan; 
No. 3 Tennessee (2-0) boor iJCLA 30-24; No.4 
Washington (1-0) beat No ltBrighmnVouno 
42-20: No. 5 Florida Slate (1-0) beat No. 23 
Southern California 14-7. 

No. 6 Nebraska (1-0) did nal ploy; No. 7 
North Carolina (1-0) beat Indiana 23-6. No. 8 
Colorado (l-d}bcalNo.34ColorDdr>5tatc31- 
2 1; No. 9 Ohio State (1 -0) did not Dlay. Na. 10 
LSI! (1-01 beat Taas-Ei Paso 55-3 

Na. II None Dame (141) beat Georgia 
Tech u-13. No. 72 Texas (14)) beat Rimer, 
48-U- No. 13 Miami tl-d) did not piny. No. 14 
Michigan (M) did not play; No. IS Alabama 
(141) did not play. 

No. 16 Auburn (H» beat Virginia 23-17. 
Thursday; No. 17 Stanton! (14)1 bear San 
Jose Slate 28 it No. 18 damson (i-a) heal 
Appalachian Slate 23-12; No. 19 Brigham 
Young (0-1) fast to No. 4 Washington 42-20; 
No. 20 Iowa (1-01 teal Northern Iowa 66-0. 

No. 21 Kansas State (T4D brat Northern 
tifinoa 47-7; Na.11 Norttaweslwa (1-1) Iasi fa 
Wo*e Forest 21-70; Na 23 SBaftnm Calf- 
farm) (0-1) loss to No. 5 Florida Stale 14-7: 
No. 24 Colorado Stole (1-1) last fa Na. B Col 
erode J! 21: No. 25 Michigan Mofo H-0) b«ff 
Western Michigan 42-10. 


1. Penn St. (22) 

Record 

1-0 

Pts 

1.620 

Pv 

1 

2. Florida (75) 

20 

1.590 

2 

3. Washington (14) 

1-0 

1380 

4 

4. Tennessee (6) 

2 0 

l,5IB 

3 

5. Florida 51. (4) 

1-0 

1442 

5 

6. Nebraska (4) 

1-0 

1,433 

6 

7. North Carolina (2) 

1-0 

1,342 

7 

8. Cotarado (31 

1-0 

1J31 

8 

9. Ohio St. 

1-0 

1,144 

9 

I0.LSU 

1-0 

1.IZ7 

10 

11. Texas 

1-0 

1,054 

12 

12. Notre Dame 

1-0 

911 

u 

13. Miami 

1-0 

904 

13 

14. Michigan 

0-0 

838 

14 

15. Alabama 

1.0 

812 

IS 

14. Auburn 

1-0 

488 

16 

17- Stanford 

1-0 

587 

17 

18. Iowa 

1-0 

527 

20 

I9.Ctefnson 

1-0 

402 

18 

20. Kansas 51. 

1.0 

377 

21 

21 Michigan St. 

1-0 

305 

25 

22. Virginia Tech 

1-0 

213 

— 

23. Sairthem Cal 

0-1 

182 

23 

24. Arizona St 

1-0 

150 

— 

25. Cotarado St. 

1-1 

127 

24 


Leading placing* in Monday's 1734Mnn 
(96-fnUe) 3rd stage tram Louie. Portugal to 
Huehm, Spain: 

f . Mattel Wust Gee. Latin J h. 28 m. 7 b. 

Z Fabrhfa Guidi Italy. Scrigno 

3. Sven Teutenberg, Germany, UjS. Postal 

4. Marco ZonatlL Italy. AK1 

5. Lean von Bon, Netherlands, Rabobank 
4. Stephana Barthe, Franca Casino 

7. Lara Mkhoetsen. Denmark. TVM 
B. Oriando Rodrigues, Portugal, Banesta 

9. Endrio Leonl Italy, AKJ 

10. Laurent Jaiabert France. ONCE, all s.1. 
Ovduull: 1 . Mkriatisen 14 h. 1 1 m. 34 u 

1 Guidi at 1 3J 1 Claudia Chiappued, Italy, 
Asfcs 7 su 4. Jaiabert 9 sj 5. Angela Can- 
zanied Holy. Sacco s.lj 6. Maura Baffin, Italy, 
Refin It s.- 7. Frondsoo Caere, Spain. Es- 
tapena 12iu8. EfcirtcrioAngutta, SpahvE> 
lepona 1 5s«- 9. Andrea VWteranl I hrty, Scrigno 
3-L 10. Abraham Otana Spate Banesta 16 s, 


Grenoble 33 Bridgend 35 

OftOUPF 

Gloucester 43 Padova 10 

group a 

Newcastle 37 Biarritz 10 
Perpignan 21 Edinburgh 9 
a ROUP H 

Narbonne 16 Saracens 18 
Neatti 12 Cadres 36 


Canadian Open 


Omen rocoiving votes; Tams A&M 118. 
N Carolina Sr 113. Brigham Young 75. West 
Virginia 74 Washington Sf- 64 southern 
Miss. 24. Georgia 2J. Wake Forest 12, Saulh 
Carolina ia Mississippi St. 6. Northwestern 
5, Virginia 4 Wyoming 3, Air FdrtfiZ Georgia 
Teen 2, Oregon 2. Utah Si. 2. Arkansas 1, 
Hawaii 1. San Diego SIT. 


Final u cores Sunday from S1J mUtan 
Canadian Open, ptayed on Royal Montreal 
C*M Cfab'S 6410-yard <S,129-tm«r), par-70 
BluaCounw: 

Steve Jems, UJL 71-68-47.49— 275 

G. Norman, Australia 44-72-49-49—276 

P. Tatairrangl N. ZcaL 69-67-72-69—277 

David Ogrte U.S. 69-70-72^7—278 


CFL Standings 


Frank Udditwt U.S. 
Davis Love 111, 05, 
JuHHn Leonard, U.S. 
Fulton Al fame, S. Air. 
OOvid Frosts. Afr. 
Payne Stewart UJSL 


71-6847-69—275 
66- 72 -69-69— 276 
6947-72-69—277 

69- 70-72-47—278 
48-72-68-70— 27B 

70- 67-77-65—279 

70- 70-49-70—279 
69-69-73-49—280 

71- 69-71 -69—280 
66- 72- 72-70— 780 


SPANISH n*sx EH VISION 

Espanyoi 1 Cetta Vigo l 
Deporitvo Coruna 1 MaHorea 1 
Merida 3 Compastefa 3 

SacMaiil Hoang Santa nd er 0 
Salamanca 0 Real Madrid 2 
Sporting Gf|an 0 Tenerife 2 
Zaragoza 3 Oviedo 3 

STANDIMaS: Aflettco Madrid 4 points. 
Compostela 4 Ovfatta 4- Real Bete 4- Es- ■ 
panyrri 4 Real Madrid * Tenerife 4 Cetta 
Vigo 4 } Moltoren 4- Barcelona 3: Racing San- 
harder 1 Real Socfedad 3; Deporitvo Core no 
2; Zaragoza 1; Mendo i; AtMenc Biboo l; 
Valencia fa Sotamonco fa Sporting Ginn 0: 
Valladolid 0. 

MAiOB UUGU8 SOCCEN 

Los Angeles 4 Tampa Bay 1 
tTAMHNOS: Eastern OmfctWK*: vD.C 
48 polite; Tompa Bay 39? Columbus 7L New 
England 2&- NY-NJ 22. Western Conference: 
X-Konsas City 4& Doflas 36: Cotarado 35; Los 
Angeles 29: San Ja&e 27; 
x-c Hnched playoff spar 
SOUTH ORAM CHAMPtaH SHIP 
India 1 Bangladesh 0 


OPKJUIKHMS 

1 - Pete Sampras, U £ * 4585 points 
Z Michael Chang. US. 3^42 

3. Patrick Rafter. Austraflo. Z889 

4. Yevgeny KafaMkov, Russia Z493 

5. Carters Moya. Spala 2^49 

6. Thomas Minder, Austria, 2J57 
». Sergi Bruguera. Spain, 2J57 
8- Marcefa Rios Chile Z322 

9. Goran Lranfcevjc, Croatia, 2,291 _ 

1 a Alex Corretia. Spain. 2.2B4 

1 1. Greg Rusedski Britain, 2,235 

12. Gustavo Kuerten, Brazil. 2,230 

13. Jonas Bjorionan, Sweden, 2.190 
14 Feftx Mantilla Spate 1 .986 

15. Thomas EnqvtsL Sweden. 1,983 

WIAKANKHMU ~ 

1 Martina Hingis. Switzerland. 0855 points 

2. Jana Novotna Czech Republic. ZST7 

3. Monica Setes, U.S., 1482 
J.lwMaloft Croatia. 1341 

5- Lindsay Davenport. 1120 — ■ 

6. Amanda Coelzw. South Africa 2,755 

7. Anke Huber, Germany. 1505 
B. Maty Pierce, France, 2^159 

9. Irina Spirt ea Romania 2235 

10. Aron^Sonchez Vlcarto, Spain, 1166 

n. Conchilo MartineL Spain, Z13 b 
J 4 Moiy j« Fernando, t,9(B 

13. Steffi Grot Germany, 1,788 

}4,Sandrine Tested. Franca, 1.733 

15. Brenda Schultz-McCarthy, Neth. Uto* 



1 


f < i 


Would Cup 


COHCACAI 
United Stales 1. Costa Rica 0 
Jamaica 1. Canada Cl 

i-l-oi 'I points; United 
StatasftC«toR<cQ8; Jamaica B> El Salvador 
6! Canada 5. 


SASTCUI MVHHKHf 

W L T PF PAPfa. 

Two nlo 9 2 0 18 400 20) 

Montreal 8 3 0 16 299 310 

Winnipeg 2 9 0 4 264 367 

Hamilton 1 10 0 2 221 346 

WISTOtN DIVISION 

Edmonton B 3 0 16 306 259 

British Cotembia 6 5 0 12 316 320 

Calgary 5 6 0 10 300 264 

SrnMrtchcwon 5 6 0 10 252 289 

flfflMTIUMUn 
Toronto Mk Winnlpeq 25 
Saskatchewan 44, British Colombia 12 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

«rw roBK- Optioned RHP Donny o* 
Columbus, IL "riKioita 

NATtOMAL LEAGUE 

Qnunhatt— R ecaBed 3B Aaron Boo™. 
OF Ppt Wilkins, INF Oamton JackWR^S 

SeoH WlnchoeterondLHPjlmCrteiS R *‘ 
B^ontatetof'NFRussMonnon^- 


amuPA 

Bristol 33 LoRochette 14 
EbbwVafai6Agen27 

CROUPS 

Montfenand 25 Sole 16 
Nawpart 42 MorripeOcr ) 7 
GROUP C 

London Irish 25 Slade Francois 41 
OROUPE 
Coiomten34 Richmond 18 


U.S. Open 


•UN'S UNCUS 
FINAL 

Patridr Rotter, 13- Austrafia def Greg 
RusedsM. Britain 4-1 6-2 4-4 7-5 

WOMIM'aXIHCUS 

FINAL 

Martino Hingis. I.. Switzerland, dcf. Venus 
WfiEanc, U5. 6-0, 4-4. 


Houston— C aNed up RHP Manuel -s' 

RHP Oscar H onriquez, C Randy 
OF James Moufan from NeworieQ^[f fl ? 

■ASKfTBAU 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSSQciatm - 
DENVER— 5lqned C 

oonhact. Pefeosed F Tommy ^11 *° ■ V 

Renounced rights fa G Broovs Th™!? 1nvinds ' 

















VNTERKATH 


*${ ye /ft IpAX, SEPTEMBER 24 , 1991 


PAGE 3 


? f Butt C 

01 A W,.*W es Beat Packers 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, T UESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 21 




. ..MIS'. 


■'.i; 

• r* : &- 


On Missed Field Goal 

Rookie Is Wide Right on 28-Yarder 


. • .. • 








/Vw York Times Service fense. led by Bryce Paup. had eieht 

PHILADELPHIA — Chris Jacke had sacks. Aaron Glenn scored on a 96-yard 
been the Green Bay Packers’ most pro- kickoff return for the Jets. 
lific field-goal kicker and Brett Con- Rmns 23, Bengal* io Vinny Test- 
way, from Penn State, looked during the averde threw a pivotal touchdown pass 
preseason as if he could earn his mark, to Eric Green with 9:36 left and the host 
No. the Packers decided that this year Ravens avoided another late collapse to 
they would let Ryan Longweil, the rook- beat the Bengals (Mj. The Ravens ( 1- 
ie:£rmn California, have his kicks. 1). who had lost nine of their last 1 1 

Life in the National Football League games despite holding a second-half 
with a rookie place-kicker can be alarm- lead, took the lead for good on Jay 
^tng. Frightening. The Packers were re- Graham’s 5-yard touchdown run late in 
^pTu&ded of that Sunday. the third quarter. 

longweil lined up to boot a 28 yarder Panther* 9 , Falcon* 6 Steve Beueriein 

“ 15 seconds left that would give downed the ball with one second left 
Bay a victory over the Phil- and John Kasay followed with his third 
Iphia Eagles. But surrounding him field goal of the fourth quarter, a 39- 
e 66,803 screaming fans, and watch- yarder that lifted the visiting Panthers 
on national television were millions (1-1) over the Falcons (0-2). Both of- 


-*L: 







-Longweil lined up to boot a 28 yarder 
15 seconds left that would eive 


wWi 15 seconds left that would give 
G|5en Bay a victory over the Phil- 
adelphia Eagles. But surrounding him 




K 5*4 


’’C 7 NFIKovndvii 

of others. The snap was a tad high, the 
' v : bail was a tittle wet and the kick floated 
wide right 

. .. --V Thus, Philadelphia survived and 

won, 10-9, in a game that Green Bay led 
• ' * “ m \^i k. by 6-0 at halftime and one in which the 

• ''-•■s; Packers managed a field goal in the third 
- . quarter and none in the final quarter as 

: they failed to score a touchdown for the 
first time in 76 games. 

7. _ “No excuses,” Longweil said. “I 

: - cj Ajust missed it. Everything seemed to be 
▼working for me, bur things like that will 
_ happen. I never get too excited about the 

ones that go through, and I never get too 

"■ ' t \ , . down on the ones that don’t." 

; 1 1 ’ 1 . ! . I PfUTr In other games, reported by The As- 
u A1l seriated Press: 

; i • j., " Cardinals 25, Cowboys 22 Kent Gra- 

«' i’hN r tifi Hiw ham overcame boos and three lost 
UlSpH fumbles to lead host Arizona to a 
comeback victory. The Cardinals 
.... v T! snapped a 1 3-game losing streak against 
, ~ the Cowboys (1-1) when Kevin Butler's 

. . . ' 20-yard field goal attempt in overtime 

• hit the left upright and went through. 

' IV, Arizona (1-1) trailed by 15 points in the 
1 " '777 third quarter, but rallied to force over- 
7~' time on Graham’s 1-yard TD pass to Pat 
. 7 ‘,77 Carter and 2-point conversion pass to 
7". Rob Moore with 1:06 left in regula- 

. . Aon. 

Patriot* 31, Colts 6 The Colts (0-2) 
.failed to score a touchdown for the 
V % . r- li/second consecutive game. Visiting New 

• • * Jiipan LlllSf England (2-0) held Marshall Faulk to 23 




H. LPDate 
End Dispnt 


fenses struggled wiihout their starting 
QBs — Carolina’s Kerry Collins didn't 

£ y because of a broken jaw and At- 
ta's Chris Chandler was sidelined by 
a concussion in the second quarter. 

Wrings 27, Boars 24 At Chicago, 
Brad Johnson and Chris Walsh con- 
nected on ihe winning, 9-yard touch- 
down pass with 37 seconds left. Johnson 
completed 33 of 44 passes for 285 yards, 
including 7 of 9 on the final 61 -yard 
drive for Minnesota (2-0). The Bears (0- 
2) took a 24-20 lead on Raymont Harris’ 
59-yard scoring run with 1 1:52 remain- 
ing. 

Chargers 20 , Sants 6 Jim Everett beat 
his old team and coach Mike Ditka, the 
roan who cut him. Everett, who believes 
Ditka didn't give him a fair chance to 
retain the starting spot with the Saints 
(0-2), sealed the victory for visiting San 
Diego (1-1) with a 21-yard scoring pass 
to mddie Jones with 2 : 10 left. 

Bucconows 24, Lions 17 Tampa 
.Bay’s Warrick Dunn rushed for 130 
yards and a touchdown, while Detroit's 
Barry Sanders was shut down for the 
second straight week. Sanders, who led 
the league in rushing last year, was held 
to 20 yards on 10 carries after gaining 
only 33 yards in the Lions’ opener 
against Atlanta. The visiting Bucs im- 
proved to 2-0 for the fust time since 
1992. 

StMlM 14, Kariakins 13 At Pitts- 
burgh. Jerome Bettis carried on all but 
two plays on a 72-yard fourth-quarter 
scoring drive that rallied the Sieelers ( 1 - 
1) past mistake-riddled Washington ( 1- 
1). Bettis ran for 134 yards against what 
was the league's worst rushing defense 
last season, and accounted for nearly all 
of Pittsburgh’s offense on Its two scor- 
ing drives. 

Broncos 35, Saahawks 14 At Seattle, 
John Eton* threw a pair of touchdown 


V * 







w 1 " 

% 

in ruler. 

Robert Brooks of the Packers pulling in a 31-yard pass from Bret Favre as the Eagles' Charles Dimry moves 
in for the tackle. For the first time in 76 games, the Packers were unable to score a touchdown. They lost, 10-9. 

Griffey Hits No. 50 \ but Mariners Lose 


The Associated Press 

Ken Griffey Jr. hit his career-high 
50th home run. marking the 22d time the 
mark has been reached in major league 
history, but his Seattle Mariners lost to 
the Twins in Minnesota, 9-6. 

With 19 games remaining, Griffey is 
11 homers short of matching Roger 
Mans’s record of 61 in 1961. Griffey, 
who had 49 home runs last year, became 
the 15th player to hit 50 homers in a 
season. He leads the major leagues this 
year. 

Griffey connected for a two-run drive 
in the fourth inning Sunday against Bob 
Tewksbury (6-11 ). Seattle’s starter, Fe- 
lipe Lira (5-9). gave up seven runs and 
six hits in 2 l A innings. 

Blue Jays 4, Rangers 0 In Toronto, 
Roger Clemens pitched a two-hitter, 
tying Jack Morris’s club record for vic- 
tories in a season with his 21st. 


Clemens (21-5) struck out 14. the 
12th time this season he has had 10 or 
more strikeouts in a game and the 80th 
time in his career. 

Angels 5, tigers 4 Anaheim ended a 
five -game losing streak when Tony Phil- 
lips doubled and scored on Robert Een- 
hom’s sacrifice fly in the 15th inning. 

AL Roundup 

Yankees 10, Orioles 3 Kenny Rogers 
got his first victory in more than a 
month, and host New York used four 
home runs to beat Baltimore for the first 
time this season. 

fieri Sox 1 1, Brewers 2 Troy O’Leary 
hit his first career grand slam, John 
Valentin homered twice, and Bill Hasel- 
man, Jeff Frye and Wilfredo Cordero 
also homered for host Boston. 

Butch Henry (6-2) came out of the 


bullpen to earn his first victory as a 
starter since Aug. 10. 1995. 

Athletics 9, Royals 4 Eric Ludwick 
earned his first major league victory and 
visiting Oakland scored nine runs for 
the third straight game, defeating Kan- 
sas City. 

Ernie Young, who went 3 for 4 and 
scored three times, hit a key single dur- 
ing a six-run fourth inning against Jose 
Rosado (9-12). 

Indians 5, white Sox 2 In Cleveland, 
Man Williams extended his career-high 
hitting streak to 23 games and the In- 
dians held Albert Belle hitless in his 
second homecoming series as the Tribe 
completed a rhree-game sweep of 
Chicago. 

Belle, the former Indians outfielder 
who signed with rival Chicago last au- 
tumn, was 0 for 3 with a walk. He was 0 
for 1 1 in the series. 




yards on 15 carries while Drew Bledsoe 1). Bettis ran for 1 34 yards against what 
passed for four touchdowns. was the league 's worst rushing defense 

.■Dolphins 16 , Odors 13 At Miami, Dan last season, and accounted for nearly all 
Marinorebounded fromapoor opening- of Pittsburgh’s offense on Its two scor- 
game performance with his first 300- ing drives. 

yard passing day since 1995. Marino, Broncos 35, Soahawks 14 At Seattle, 

who passed for only 105 yards againsr John Elway threw a pair of touchdown 
JhdiaoapoJis Jast^eek. .completed 24 of .. tosses .to.Ed.Mcprftfey.in a game Am 
43iaJterapts for;324 yards against Ten- featured amatchup of aging, future Hall . 
nepsee (1-1). of Fame quarterbacks. The 37-year-old 

The Dolphins (2-0) won it on Olindo Elway completed 18 of 26 passes for 
Mare’s 29-yard field goal with 12:45 197 yards and two touchdowns, 

left in overtime. Seattle’s Wairen Moon, the oldest play- 

^ 49 ars 15, Rams 12 The 49ers (1-1) er in the league at 40, was 20 of 33 for 
overcame a shaky showing by Jim 222 yards and one score. The Broncos 
Druckenmiller, their rookie quarter- improved to 2-0, while the Seahawks 
b$ck, ro beat the Rams for the 14th fell to 0-2. 

straight time. Jaguars 40, Giants 13 A third-string 

-Druckenmiller, filling in for the in- quarterback. Steve Matthews, played 
jiged Steve Young, was intercepted with poise in his first NFL start, leading 
three times and passed for only 102 the host Jaguars (2-0) to the highest 
yards and one scare in his first start The point total in their three-year history. 
Rams (1-1) were hurt by four Matthews, claimed off waivers last 
turnovers. month, completed 23 of 35 passes for 

Bins 28, jet* 22 Todd Collins threw 252 yards, and Natrone Means ran for 
three touchdown passes as visiting Buf- two touchdowns for the Jaguars, 
fajo (1-1) rebounded from an opening Jacksonville’s top two quarterbacks, 

- - - Mark Brunell and Rob Johnson, are 

injured. 


Burba Retires 17 in a Row to Lift Reds 


kiqss to. band the Jets (1-1) their 13th 
lx' ^straight home defeat. The Bills’ de- 


The Associated Press 

Dave Burba retired the last 17 batters 
hefacfd, setting up Jus third victory over, 
Pittsburgh this season, and Jon Nunnally 
drove in three runs as the host Cincinnati 
Reds rallied for a 6-3 victory. 

Burba (8-10) allowed only two runs 
on four first-inning hits in Sunday’s 
game, and left the contest after his right 
hand was grazed by a pitch in the sixth 
inning. The right-hander is 5-0 in his last 
six starts against the Pirates. 

Pittsburgh lost three of four to the Reds 
and has dropped 10 of its last 14 overall, 
was ting a chance to catch Houston for the 
NL Central lead. Jose Sflva ( l-l) took the 
loss in relief of Steve Cooke. 

Rockies 7, Cardinals 4 Ellis Burks and 
Todd Helton bad RBI hits that triggered 
a five-run burst in the eighth inning and 
led host Colorado past St Louis. 

Mark McGwire hit his 48th home run 
of the season, and 14 th for Sc. Louis, in 
the first innin g. The Cardinals scored 


twice in the ninth, but McGwire hit a 
weak grounder to the pitcher, Jerry Di- 
.poto, for the final out as die Rockies 
won for the 1 1th time in 1 2 games. 

Met* 9, Cub* 2 Bobby Jones gave up 
four hits over seven shutout innings and 

NL Roundup 

Butch Huskey hit his third home run in 
three games, leading visiting New York. 

Phiifim 2, Expos 1 Rico Brogna hit a 
tiebreaking home run with two outs in the 
eighth inning, and visiting Philadelphia 
won for the sixth time in seven games. 
With the game tied. Brogna hit a 2-2 
pitch from Anthony Telford (4-5) for his 
18th home ran. 

Giants 5, Astro* 1 Kirk Rueter pitched 
6% strong innings and host San Fran- 
cisco capitalized on eight walks by 
Darryl Kile to beat Houston. 

The Giants were two games behind 
Los Angeles in the NL WesL Kile ( 1 7-6.) 


lost his third-straight start, lasting just 
five-plus innings. He tied a career high 
for bases on balls, walking seven in the 
first three innings, and also hit a barter. 
Rueter ( 1 1-6) allowed a ran and six hits. 

Dodgers 9, Marlins 5 Todd Zeile hit a 
grand slam and Mike Piazza hod three 
hits, including two RBI singles for host 
Los Angeles. Tom Candiotti (10-5) 
gave up five runs on four hits in 
innings, while tying a season high with 
seven strikeouts* and walking four. 

Bravos 4, Padros o In San Diego, 
Denny Neagle became the NL’s first 20- 
game winner, pitching three-hit ball for 
seven innings as Atlanta beat the Padres. 
Neagle (20-3) joined Roger Clemens, 
who earned his 21st victory for Toronto 
earlier in the day, as the top winners in 
the majors. 

Neagle won bis fourth straight start, 
striking out six and walking three. Chip- 
per Jones hit a rwo-run homer off Joey 
Hamilton (10-6) in the first inning. 


Jones Outlasts 
Norman on 
18th to Win 
Canadian Open 


By Clifton Brown 

Ncn' York Times Sen-in- 

ILE-B IZARD, Quebec — Paired in 
Ihe day's final twosome, Steve Jones 
and Greg Norman battled to the final 
hole, and then to the final shot, on the 
last day of the Bell Canadian Open. For 
Jones, the ending was sweet. For Nor- 
man, it was another day when he was 
forced to settle for second place. 

Jones held off a back-nine charge by 
Norman, who trailed by four shots with 
seven holes to play, and captured the 
Canadian Open for’the second time. He 
finished with a 5-under-par 275, one 
shot better than Norman and two shots 
better than Phil Tataurangi. 

Both Jones and Norman sbor 2 -un- 
der-par 69s, but Jones never relin- 
quished the one-shot lead he started the 
day with. Norman could have forced a 
playoff at the Royal Montreal Golf Club 
by making an 1 S-foor putt for par at No. 

1 8, but the ball stopped just to the right 
of the hole. Norman tapped in for bogey, 
then Jones clinched the victory, also 
with a tap-in for bogey. 

Not only did Jones win S270.000. but 
he ended a summer slump that had cost 
him a place on the American Ryder Cup 
team. Jones had not won since the 
Phoenix Open in January. 

“It’s been a long five months,’’ said 
Jones, winner of the ’96 U.S. Open. “My 
goal was to make the Ryder Cup team, 
and 1 didn’t do it It was really tough. 1 felt 
like I had the game to do it. Buf some- 
times you learn a lesson when you mess 
up. I was putting a lot of pressure on 
myself. This week I was more relaxed, 
even though down the end, I was getting 
a little bit tight. I was surprised we both 
bogeyed the last hole.” 

By the time Jones and Norman 
reached the par-4, 444-yard 18th, the 
pressure was enormous. Norman, trail- 
ing by a stroke, teed off first and figured 
he would need a birdie to force a play- 
off. But his drive sailed well right of the 
fairway and into deep rough, about 197 
yards from the hole. 

Now Jones was in control. All he 
needed was a decent tee shot, and Nor- 
man’s hopes would be dashed. But Jones 
hit a shot that was worse than Norman's, 
in the same area but 13 yards shorter. 

He followed with another poor shot, a 
4-iron that traveled only about 40 yards 
and stayed in the rough. Norman hit a 4- 
iron from the deep rough that was well- 
played considering his lie. But it still 
landed 15 yards short of the green. Now 
Jones needed a good shot, and he re- 
sponded with an 8-iron that landed on the 
green 35 feet short of the hole. 

Jones and Norman walked up the 
18tb fairway as the gallery gave them a 
thunderous ovation. Norman's goal was 
to chip and putt for par, which would 
have farced Jones to make his 55-footer 
for the victory. But Norman’s chip shot 
rolled 18 feet past the hole. 

From 35 feet, uphill, Jones hit a great 
putt that stopped about 18 inches right 
of the hole. Now Norman knew he had 
to make his 1 8-footer or Jones would be 
the winner. He hit it well but jusr slightly 
off line ro the right. 

It was a familiar position for Norman, 
who has won two British Opens bat has 
finished second in eight major cham- 
pionships. But this was not a case of 
Noiman playing poorly. Jones simply 
played better. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




S DlptfT 60.. I 
EAM.I SOT TO 
PROMT DOOR. 
VT I DIDN'T 
60 IN.. A 


I 5AT ON THE STEP5 

roRAl*£~TOENI 
OPENED TOE DOOR... 



NOBODY ANSWERED 
50 1 U)ENT HOME.. 


Aaiiri! 




GARFIELD 

WELCOME TD 
"THE LOOP SHOW 1 


AND WE'RE 
MEAN ,! ’OOU 


WIZARD oflD 
I ( KEEL'HAvl MM! 


r<w«AH*r.,rrfc 
osen flvoAurep 
Brine eeuevA 
cenvetmoHf j 


♦MRWILSON STltt SMOKES A 

air rife Norm* PEACE KiNtt 


Eiii'ffllBjlM 


on* Mm » web nfM, In kmo 
kwr mcMn mib. 


r 7H eotte > 
wHeAe we 

ANP-nmew 

PSLUWSOVT 
T»EWI NPOWy , 

v 5H»» y 


hvisfatH 



V# 

/\ i 1 K ' 

I.ONDON/STANSTED 

\lfLAN/LI.VA1E 


BOOKING OFFICE 
0^/488800 - 1478/48880 



















PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Fall of Washington 


After Austen, Henry Janies Goes to Hollywood 


WASHINGTON — O.K., 
jt’s tune to get serious about 
Washington. We have to 
move the capital somewhere 
so it won't embarrass the en- 
tire country. 

The final blow came when 
Washington c ouldn't even 
open schools 
on time be- Wi- 


cause so many 
repairs were 
needed. A local 
judge ruled 
that the build- 


vi*. * * 


I know what you people in 
Flagstaff, Arizona, are say- 
ing: “How is it possible for a 
city to fell when the 
president and his wife live 
there?” . 

There are several theories; 
One is that the president is so 
well protected he doesn’t 
even know the capital is fall- 
ing apart- Since Chelsea is 
going to Stanford, the schools 


By Rick Lyman 

New York Times Sen-ice 


N EW YORK— There is a mo- 
ment, early in Henry James’s 


in Washington are not a pri- 
ority item for him. Another 


ings were too 
unsafe to allow r — 
children inside. Buchwald 
Now some 
people are saying that per- 
haps the country doesn’t need 
schools, but others maintain 
schools help the appearance 
of the neighborhood. 

Listen, I don’t want to be the 
one to break it to you people 
out in Kansas, but Washington 
is broke — dead broke, belly- 
ap broke. Thar's a big problem 
if you want us to run your 
government from here. How 
can we tell people in the Third 
World to shape up and fly right 
when their kids are in school 
and ours aren't? 


only item for him. Another 
theory is that Clinton’s main 
focus is on Bosnia, North 
Korea and Gaza, and Wash- 
ington’s problems don’t have 
any effect on the national se- 
curity of the United States. 

So what should be done to 
solve the problem? One solu- 
tion might be to halt all con- 
struction of the B-2 bomber. 
This would save die country 
$40 billion that we are now 
paying for a plane that can’t 
fly when it rains. Someone 
also suggested that guests 
who sleep in the Lincoln Bed- 
room donate a surcharge of 10 
percent to our city. 


novel “Washington Square,” 
when Austin Sloper, an eminent, 
pompous 19th-century New York 
physician and widower, is instruct- 
ing his sister Lavinia on die rearing 
of his daughter, Catherine, for 
whom he has exceedingly low ex- 
pectations. Catherine should be 
brought up to be clever, he tells 


Lavinia. This puzzles her. Isn’t it ‘ 
better, she asks, that the girl be 


Recalled Dylan CD 
Is Collector’s Item 


LOS ANGELES — A re- 
issued Bob Dylan album has 
become an instant collector's 
item because of several errors 
that forced die singer’s label 
to recall unsold copies. 

Sony Music Entertainment 
Inc. is fixing glitches in “I’ll 
Be Your Baby Tonight" and 
two other cuts on “Bio- 
graph.” a three-CD compil- 
ation of hies and rare tracks 
originally released in 1985. 
About 5,000 copies were on 
sale for just a few days before 
Sony learned of the errors. 


But the solution I liked best 
because it makes the most 
sense is to move the nation's 
capital to Martha’s Vine- 
yard. 

This summer proved that 
the Vineyard can handle the 
nation’s business. We could 
move Congress into the Tab- 
ernacle in Oak Bluffs and the 
Supreme Court could con- 
vene on the cliffs over Gay 
Head. There are plenty of 
white houses for the Clintons 
to chose from. But one of the 
biggest advantages of the 
Vineyard is that its schools 
are open. 

Washington had its chance, 
and it blew it The nation can 
still preserve the city like 
Pompeii, and the tourists can 
ny to figure out what made it 
fall. 


better, she asks, that the girl be 
raised to be good? 

“Good for what?” Sloper re- 
torts. “You are good for nothing 
unless you are clever. ’ ’ 

For several generations of 
people whose primary knowledge 
of this 1880 novel came from Ruth 
and Augustus Goetz's 1947 stage 
adaptation, “The Heiress,” or Wil- 
liam Wyler’s brilliant 1949 screen 
version of the play, which won an 
Oscar for Olivia de HavillandL the 
point of the story was that Sloper 
gets his wish: Catherine becomes 
just the clever,- hard creature he 
thought he desired, exacting her 
revenge on those who have abused 
her clumsy innocence. 

Agnieszka Holland, the director 
of the new film “Washington 
Square,” said she found greater 
resonance in the Catherine who 
emerges from James's novel than 
the ironic creature of the play, 
which was revived so successfully 
on Broadway two years ago. 

This film, one of two movies 
based on James novels opening this 
foil (the other is “The Wings of the 
Dove”), is much more faithful to 
the novel. Holland said. As a result, 
the character Catherine, portrayed 
by Jennifer Jason Leigh, ends the 
story not so much hardened as en- 
lightened. 

If anything, Holland's screen 
version goes further in this direc- 
tion than did James, whose expec- 
tations for Catherine often seemed 
to be as low as her father’s. As 
played by Leigh, Catherine ends 
the story with almost a triumph of 



give special -effects- ad died movie- 
goers an antidote for summer ex- 
plosions and studio executives 
products they can easily promote 
for Academy Awards. 

James ma y seem to be the. lit- 
erary giant of the moment for h igh- 
end filmmakers, but both Holland 
and lain Softley, the British di- 
rector of “The Wings of the 
Dove. ’ ’ said they were not drawn to 
their projects by any grand desire to 
tackle one of the most difficult 
writers in the English language. 

“It was really this particular sto- 
ry; it wasn’t Henry James as such,' ’ 
said Softley, who is probably best 
known to American audiences for 
“Backbeat," his film about the 
Beatles’ early years in Hamburg. 
“You know, he is not the easiest 
person to adapt to the screen, Mid 
‘Wings of the Dove' is a partic- 
ularly difficult book, but buried in 


by James's characters more than 
the creative challenge of mastering 
a master. . 

“When I was younger in Eastern 
Europe, J preferred ozher writers, 
you know, ’ Holland said. “Tome,_ 
James was just loo, I don't know,' 
too stiff and Anglo-Saxon and cold. 
It was only five years ago, when 
someone showed me a script of 


'Washington Square’ that I read the 
book. I didn’t really like the script. 


% 
*v~ 

. •* .. ‘jJ. 


Iks Kaitliirfl Hnlh-*uoJ 


Jennifer Jason Leigh and Ben Chaplin in “Washington Square. 


self-realization,' in a state resem- 
bling calm contentment. 

"I was more Innocent than any 
American director because, you see, 
l had not seen the Wyler film or the 
stage productions,” said Holland, a 
native of Poland who now lives in 
France, “It wasn’t for me the kind 
of cult movie that it is for Amer- 
icans. I just read the book and it 
touched something very deep in me, 
and I wanted to tell that story.” 

Leigh plays Catherine as an al- 
most comically clumsy young 
woman, good-hearted but painfully 
shy and socially inept. The casual 
cruelties of her' father (Albert Fin- 
ney) seem to shrink her. just as the 


smooth attentions of die fortune 
hunter Morris Townsend (Ben 
Chaplin) seem to make her grow. 

Literary adaptations have be- 
come a staple of the fall and winter 
movie season, from die Merchant 


Ivory productions to the recent 
spate of Jane Austen -inspired films 


spate of Jane Austen-inspired films 
to the current flirtation with Henry 
James (last winter saw Jane Cam- 
pion's idiosyncratic version of 
James's “Portrait of a Lady.” star- 
ring Nicole Kidman). 

Besides giving accomplished 
actors like Leigh a chance to break 
from more standard Hollywood 
fare and take on difficult roles with 
pedigree, these adaptations also 


“The Wings of the Dove” come 
from opposite ends of James’s cre- 
ative life. The former comes from 
his earliest years as a writer and is, 
for him. a very straightforward type 
of narrative. The latter, published in 
1902. came from the last and most 
artistically dense phase of his life, 
and is largely filled with stream-of- 
consciousness imagery, having 
very few dramatic scenes as such. 

Yet there are striking similar- 
ities. Both involve a somewhat na- 
ive wo man who is victimized by 
people who want her money. But 
instead of the monsters who sur- 
round Catherine Sloper, Miliy 
Theale in “The Wings of the 
Dove” is beset by more ambiguous 
adversaries who are victimized by 
their actions more than she. 

In “The Wings of the Dove," 
Softley said, James was glancing 
into the 20th century and drawing 
some of his characters from the 
strange people he saw there. This is 
why, the director said, he and his 
screenwriter, Hossein Amini, de- 
cided to shift the story slightly for- 
ward. from 1903 to 1910. 

Holland said that she was at- 
tracted to "Washington Square” 


but I found something very mys - 
terious about Catherine, and in a 
way, 1 was haunted by this book.” 

Eventually, she watched Wy- 
ler's “Heiress" and was surprised 
at how different it was from the 
novel. “The play is about some- 
body being betrayed and taking her 
revenge and becoming, in some- 
way, the same as the persons who 
abused her," Holland said. 

“The book is much more about a 
very shy awakening of selfhood. It’s 
about how you accept yourself, bow 
you understand who you are. What 
is so beautiful about Catherine is she ' 
is so simple and truthful. Nobody 
can see it because she is so abused 
and shadowed by the image every- 
body has of her. During this story, 
she makes this travel from a ca- 
ricature of a human being to a beau- 
tiful woman who understands that 
life is difficult and can be sad.” 

Holland, a protegee of the Polish 
filmmaker Andrzej Wajda, first 
gained international notice for 
“Angry Harvest,” which was. 
no min ated for the Oscar for best 
foreign-language film in 1985. In 
1991, "Europa. Europa” enhanced 
her reputation, and in 1993, she 
made her first English-language 
film, the highly praised adaptation 
of the Victorian children's classic 
“The Secret Garden." 

She said she found much in com- 
mon between the Victorian world 
of “The Secret Garden” and 
James’s late- 19th-century New 
York. "They were much alike but 
also different in very interesting 
ways.” she said. “In America, you 
found many of these same Vic- 
torian values, but it was also smal- 
ler scale, freer, a little rougher." 


CRIMINAL ARTS 


PEOPLE 


A Writer’s Legacy: Little Tales of Cats and Snails 


By Joan Dupont 

Inienuiionjl Herald Tribune 


NTRAGNA, Switzerland — There is a room 


X devoted to jotted portraits of cats, snails, camels, 
and other animal friends. One cat looks out above 
the caption and asks, "Are ye dunkin' on the end o' 
the world?” Another sketch is signed: “P. High- 
smith IS A CAT!'’ 

Patricia Highsmith, the mystery writer boro in 
Fort Worth, Texas, who lived and died in 
CentovailL this Swiss valley of gray sbte villages, 
may indeed have been a cat, one who led several 
secret lives. “Patricia Highsmith (1921-95): Be- 
yond Words,” at the Centovalli and Piedmont 
regional museum ( through Oct. 26), is an exhibition 
of drawings, warercolors, prints and furniture — 
she made coffee tables in blond wood, like sleds — 
garden tools, along with the tools of her craft, her 
Olympia typewriter, her manuscripts and cottiers . 
notebooks that she had kept since age 15. The roost 
surprising feature of the exhibit is that it reveals a 
playful side to a personality who, in the public eye, 
struck a forbidding figure. 


S pj\ 


.... : .. ** 




Often pictured with her favorite cats hiding her 
ice. Highsmith, a best-selling author abroad, was 


face. Highsmith, a best-selling author abroad, was 
known as a reclusive exile who preferred cats and 
snails to human company, skittish with journalists. 


and as footloose as her notorious Ripley, the gen- 
tleman forger who had a lot to hide. She first 


Lh:* K."h ’ c 

o' klov . 


tleman forger who had a lot to hide. She first 
traveled abroad after Alfred Hitchcock bought the 
rights to make “Strangers on a Train” (1950; film 
1951) for $6,800. Later she lived in villages in 
England and France and landed in this valley, 
where she had a house designed to her taste, a house 
that turned around on itself like a snail. 

She died of lung cancer in February 1995, Amer- 
ica's unsung expatriate. Her ashes are buried in the 
village cemetery, 

"This business of Pal being a loner was 
something of a myth,” says Vivien De Bernardi, an 
American friend from a neighboring village who 
helped organize the exhibition. “She was sur- 
rounded by friends, but she was constantly bom- 
barded by requests and she couldn’t be with any- 
body for long, because she worked so hard. Tbe 
woman never stopped.” 

De Bernardi knew the drawings, which had 
never been exhibited. “She look lessons from a 
village artist; Pat didn't do anything superficially. 
Once, she told me, *1 can’t put love in my writing; 
1 can put it in my paintings and drawings.’ ” 

On the top floor of the museum, a small 16th- 
century house with birds flying in and out of 
chimneys, the curator, Mario Manfrina, has caught 


A Patricia Highsmith portrait of a cat. 


the Highsmith spirit and set out a dish of cal food to 
lure the locals. The portraits room contains ink 


drawings of husky, almost Amazonian female 
nudes. There is a landscapes and travel room, with 


nudes. There is a landscapes and travel room, with 
watercolors other novels’ settings: Tunis of “The 
Tremor of Forgery ”; Positano, where she said she 
spotted the original for Ripley, a young man alone 
on the beach at 6 A_M.. and Ripley’s Fon- 
tainebleau countryside, where the writer lived for 
many years. The Ripley room has her original 
manuscripts, first editions, and the Edgar Allan 
Poe Award from the Mystery Writers of America 
for the first of the series. "The Talented Mr. 
Ripley” (1956). 


"I didn't like the Ripleys, and I wouldn’t have 
wanted to meet Tom Raplev.” De Bernardi shud- 


w anteo to meet tom Ripley/ De Bernardi shud- 
ders. “r loved ‘Edith’s Diary’ and ’The Tremor of 
Forgery,’ the way she wrote about ordinary people 
who committed evil. This was her strong point and 
what is going to make her an enduring writer. She 
had a hold on the banality of these lives, rootless, 
without family, religion, a milieu, they were free 
floating, ordinary people that you didn't want to 


meet. To me, she was a deeply southern writer, 
strongly moral, but with a twist.” 

Beyond words, beyond a bland unhurried style, 
lay a subversive mind. Highsmith knew so well, 
observed so minutely, the criminal beneath the 
banal, and in a voice almost without affect, she told 
of violent impulses, wandering minds, and crooked 
ways. She described Ripley as sane, saying, “He 
just doesn't feel guilt in a normal way." the wav 
you might talk about an unruly child. 

Ripley went to Posiiano and murdered a friend to 
take over his identity and fortune. He settled near 
Fontainebleau with a French wife and lived an ideal 
bourgeois existence, interrupted by an occasional 
murder. Alain Delon played Ripley in Rene Clem- 
ent's “Plein Soleil” (1959), and the author found 
him perfect. Wim Wenders's “The .American 
Friend” (1977) was the only other adaptation that 
she could stand; the others had what she called the 
obligatory sex scene that made her cringe. 

The writer always described her own exile as 
accidental, as were the murders in her books, tossed 
in to pitch her heroes into the worst possible pre- 
dicaments. Yet the expatriate situation, living away 
from her language and her country suited her. When 
her first story collection appeared in 1970, Graham 
Greene called her “the poet of apprehension.” In 
the United States, she was not the best-seller she was 
in Europe, perhaps because of her foreign settings 
and the way she stuck to her own unpopular politics: 
She was pro-Palestinian, wrote gleeful “Little Tales 
of Misogyny,” and dwelled on the amorous life of 
snails, the morbid side of human love and sex. She 
had written “The Price of Salt" (1952), a story 
about an affair between women, under a pseud- 
onym; her last novel, "Small g: A Summer Idyll,” 
was set in Zurich, in a homosexual milieu; the book 
was turned down by U.S. publishers. 

The exhibition came into being when Daniel 
Keel. Hiehsmith's Swiss agent, publisher and 
literary executor, and De Bernardi. also an ex- 
ecutor, had to empty her house, “filled with a 
lifetime of things,” after her death. "Daniel was 
afraid the executors would be remembered as the 
people who let the Highsmith legacy slip through 
their fingers. 

"After he had taken what lie thought was valu- 
able. there were still her sketches, tools, the things 
she made — and I wondered If the little museum in 
Intragna wouldn’t take them. 1 felt that Pat would 
like to be in some small place: she didn’t like flashy 
things: she had no vanity.” 

A more extensive exhibit is planned for next year 
at the Swiss National Archives in Bern, where the 
writer bequeathed her work. 


T HE Venice Film Festi- 
val’s coveted Golden Li- 
on for best movie went to 
"Hana-bi.” a Japanese film 
about a good policeman gone 
bad. The film, whose title 
translates as “Fireworks," 
was directed by and stare 
Takeshi Kitano' as a detect- 
ive whose personal tragedies 
lead him to rob a bank. Wes- 
ley Snipes won the best actor 
award for his portrayal of an 
advertising executive in 
"One Night Stand” by the 
British director Mike Figgis. 
And Robin Tunney took the 
best actress honor in another 
American movie, “Niagara 
Niagara,” by Bob GosseT 


If Steve Brill has his way. 
Peter Jennings, Dan Rather 
and Tom Brokaw are in for 
some bad publicity, along 
with Diane Sawyer. John 
McLaughlin arid Cokie 
Roberts. The founder of 
American Lawyer magazine 
and Court TV has just sent out 
250,000 pieces of promotion- 
al mail for his new media 
magazine. The style is pug- 
nacious and personal, an ap- 
proach Brill believes could 
produce a monthly circula- 
tion of up to 700,000, or more 
than 20 times that of the typ- 
ical journalism review. "At 
last, the media's free ride has 
come to a screeching halt.” 
one flier says modestly. If this 
son of hvpc draws an ad- 
equate response, the mag- 
azine, dubbed Content, will 
debut early next year. “This 
isn’t a magazine about jour- 
nalists written by journalists 
for journalists." says Brill. 
"It’s a magazine about one of 
the most powerful forces 
shaping every thing in our so- 
ciety and culture, meant for 
the consumers of media." 



Myitete Prancr-Pl*** 

MIGHTY MIRA — Mira Sorvino and the director 
Guillermo Del Toro before the screening of their film. 
“Mimic," at the Deauville festival of American films. 


magnet for celebrities of all 
sorts. Where else, for ex- 
ample. can writing students 
leant their craft at the feet of 
luminaries like Shana Alex- 
ander, Jules Feiffer, Kurt 
Vonnegut, Bruce Jay Fried- 
man, Norman Lear and 
Peter Matthiessen? They 
will be among those teaching 
in a master of fine arts writing 
program starting next sum- 
mer at Southampton College 
of Long Island University. ” 


said the project's director. 
Taylor has long been in- 
volved in AIDS causes. 


There’s no escaping the 
fact that the Hamptons are a 


Elizabeth Taylor has giv- 
en $100,000 to an AIDS or- 
ganization That will provide 
food, clothing and 24-hour 
care from four centers in 
Southern California. Taylor’s 
“tireless work and generosity 
enable us to continue to offer 
desperately needed support.” 


A lost “Symphony of the 
Americas" by the Nicara- 
guan composer Carlos 
Ramirez Velasquez, redis- 
covered in an attic a few 
weeks ago, has been per- 
formed in his homeland for 
the first time in 50 years. The 
symphony is a patchwork of, 
national anthems. The Ger- 
man cellist Walter-Michaei 
Vollhardt, who conducted 
the performance in Managua. 
had to overcome obstacles 
from bus breakdowns and 
power outages to the humid 
tropical climate and arctic air- 
conditioning, which wreaks 
havoc on instruments, to 
bring the work to the stage. 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


AT&T Access Numbers 



makes calling home or to other countries real I v east- 


just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you' re 


nmnt-tm 


calling from and you’ll get the clearest connections 



0 - 800 - 99-0011 


home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 
Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone 
charges on your hotel bill and save you heaucoup de francs 
(up to 60°n ). Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers, 


Steps to folkw for easy 
calling worldwide: 


I . Just dial the AT&T Acres Number 
Jr the oxuittt *wi an? calling from 
1 Dial ihe phone number you're calling. 

3 Dial the calling card number listed 
jbow your name. 


EUROPE 

Austria*o.. . 

Belgian!* 

France 

Germany . . . 

Greece* 

Iralando 

Itsty* 

Nethertaods* ... . 
Russia •a(Moshw)» 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland* . 

United Kingdom a 


022 -903-011 

. .9-800-180-10 
.0-600-99-4011 
8130*0011! 
00-800-1311 
1-800-550-888 
, .172-1811 

080B-02Z-9111 

75H042 

...900-99-00*11 

820-795-611 

0880-894011 

,.8500-89-0011 

0800-89-0011 


KIDDLE EAST 

Egypt* (Cairo) ♦ _ 510-0200 

Israel 177-100-2727 

Saudi Arabia o 1-880-10 


AFRICA 

Ghana 0191 

South Africa 0-890-99-0123 


in the springtime. 


fjni find die Access Number for the country you're calling [ram? Jus ask any operator for 
XT&T DlrecT Sertcv, or yfcJi our Web sf to at hd^nntiRuconVMvete 




r>tii 

'i.iii i * 1 


*• . . r llh 


* . a 1 I 

. - i i * I * 

L 8 i * 


.r„ r 

Oder 


k l 

If: ! ' 
¥" 


<«r 


fyj,. , 

■‘KX/Jff 


roi 


ire hU-^mn,Mp«n«<»innir^ • i .Cn.-jHrep JbhTil.. i \ i . ~ ' . ... feMita'* I-*** iks« .'«■ i hllmr mnh..> iii* m 

‘•"vvmeimKimbnl 'ItinPtt-ICttolO t*SWI Olff-TOT ****** »AUlMal (tow 44* »| M toJ 


AT&T 


: f) 1 : 

f r-»ii