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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON P 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Wednesday, September 10, 1997 


Sinn Fein 
Vows to End 
Violence for 
Ulster Aims 

Key Unionist Parties, 
Wary, Avoid Belfast 
Preliminary Round 



By Dan Balz 

Washington Peg Service 


LONDON — In another significant 
step in the long search for peace in 
Northern Ireland, the leaders of Sinn 
Fein, the political arm of the Irish Re- 
publican Array, formally renounced vi- 
olence Tuesday and committed them- 
selves to * ‘exclusively peaceful means” 
to end the conflict that has raged for 
decades. 

But the outlook for the formal open- 
ing of peace talks next Monday in Bel- 
fast remained uncertain. 

There were many empty seats around 
the negotiating table Tuesday, and the 
largest of the unionist parties, which 
generally represent the Protestant ma- 
jority in Northern Ireland, has not yet 
decided whether it will take part, di- 
rectly or indirectly. 

The unionist parties regard Sinn 
Fein’s motives with, deep suspicion. 
Several already have said they will boy- 
cott the talks, while the leaders of the 
Ulster Unionist Party, the largest and 
most important, are continuing con- 
sultations before a decision. 

They will meet Saturday to set their 
strategy. 

The pledge by the leaders of Sinn 
Fein was a prerequisite to their par- 
ticipation in Die peace talks, which are 
led by the former U.S. Senate majority 
leader. George Mitchell, the Maine 
Democrat. 

Last month, Sinn Fein was invited 
into the all-party talks after officials in 
the new Labour government of Prime 
Minister Tony Blair concluded that the 
cease-fire announced by the IRA in July 
was genuine. 

The talks include nine other parties in 
Northern Ireland that represent the Prot- 
estant majority and the Roman Catholic 
minority, plus die British and Irish gov- 
ernments. 

Prime Minister Blair is gambling dial 
he can break the long stalemate in the 
talks. 

Led by their president, Gerry Adams, 
the Sinn Fein representatives signed on 
to the six, so-called “Mitchell Prin- 
ciples” that were developed by the 
former senator in a 1996 report that 
helped establish the framework for ne- 
gotiations now entering a crucial stage. 

Referring to die principles, Mr. 
Mitchell said by telephone from Belfast. 
•'We’re pleased that Sinn Fein has now 
joined nine other political, parties in 
Northern Ireland and the two govern- 
ments in affirming not just their present 
commitment to them but their willing- 
ness to adhere ro them in the future.” 

.• "We think it’s a significant step in 
removing the use or threat of violence 
from the political process in Northern 
Ireland.” 

In addition to the renunciation of vi- 
olence and a . commitment to a demo- 
cratic process for resolving the conflict, 
Sinn Fein also agreed to support “total 
disarmament” of all paramilitary or- 
ganizations, and to abiae by the terras of 
any resolution reached through the ne- 
gotiations or attempt to change them 
only through democratic means. 

Mr. Adams called the step “a wa- 
tershed” and urged the unionist rep- 
resentatives not to boycott the talks next 
week. 

‘‘We could find lots of reasons for not 

See ULSTER, Page 8 



wnuan PMpoa/Tte Awwd Pro 

Secretary of State Albright waving Tuesday while boarding a plane in Maryland for 
the Middle East. This is her first trip to the region and comes at a very tense time. 

In Israel, Hard Questions 

Netanyahu’s Policies Are Facing Rising Dissent 


By Serge Schmemann 

Nr* York Times Service 


JERUSALEM — Though Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu has left no doubt that he 
will cite last week’s suicide bombing as a reason 
to demand that Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright lean, hard on the Palestinian leader 
Yasser Arafat, and as a reason to reject further 
obligations under the Oslo agreements, he will 
not be speaking for a united nation. 

Reactions to the bombing and to the calam- 
itous interception of an Israeli commando raid 
into Lebanon have put Mr. Netanyahu on the 
defensive in many quarters, as he faces ac- 
cusations that he has deliberately torpedoed the 
Oslo process and questions about the utility of 
staying in Lebanon. 

Many Israelis were struck by reports that die 
mother of a teenage girl who was killed in 


Thursday's suicide bombings in Jerusalem pub- 
licly blamed the government of Mr. Netanyahu 
for her death. 

The mother. Nurit Peled-Eichanan — the 
daughter of the laic Major General Motti Peled, 
a one-time Gaza military commander who be- 
came a dedicated dove — described the terror 
attacks as a product of the continued oppression 
of the Palestinians by the government A rep- 
resentative of the Palestinian Authority attended 
the burial of her daughter, 14-year-old Smadar. 

"I am very angry to think that my government 
betrayed me,” Mrs. Peled-Eichanan said Mon- 
day in her Jerusalem home, surrounded by 
friends and relatives who had come to observe 
the seven-day Jewish mourning period. “They 
sacrifice our children for their megalomania — 
for their need to control, oppress, dominate.” 

See ISRAEL, Page 8 


Jiang Moves to Extend 
Privatizing of Industry 

Chinese Leader Wins Crucial Backing; 
Party Expels Disgraced Beijing Mayor 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Senice 


BEIJING — China’s ruling Communist Party 
has expelled the former Beijing party chief and has 
backed a major policy address by President Jiang 
Zemin that sources said Tuesday would endorse 
the large-scale privatizing of state enterprises. 

The moves were announced Tuesday at the end 
of a four-day, closed-door plenum attended by 182 
members and 1 23 alternate members of the party’s 
Central Committee. The plenum was held to pre- 
pare for the important 15tfa party congress, which 
begins Friday and will be the first in five years. 

The plenum communique also said that the 
party’s constitution had been amended, bur ir did 
not reveal details. Speculation here focused on the 
possibility that the party has created a new post for 
Prime Minister Li Peng, who must step down next 
March under a constitutional limit of rwo terms. 

Mr. Jiang’s policy address, according to sources 
who have seen early drafts, will gloss over political 
reform and focus on efforts to fix money-losing 
state-owned enterprises by turnin g them into 
companies with privately owned or employee 
owned shares. The early drafts avoided the term 
“privatization” in favor of the phrase “public 
ownership.” That message has been already been 
floated recently in die government-run media. 

Although the government has already been re- 
forming state enteiprises. Mr. Jiang’s speech could 
provide new impetus. The plenum's backing for 
the address represents a major defeat for die party’s 
Marxist ideologues, who have warned bitterly that 
the erosion of state control over the economy — a 
majority. of which is already in private hands — 
would be fatal for the party's political power. 

The communique Tuesday gave few hints of 
behind-the-scenes debates, “hi an atmosphere of 
democracy and solidarity, the plenum had a warm 
discussion on a number of key issues concerning 
China’s reform and opening-up and trans-century 
development of socialist modernization construc- 
tion,” said the Xinhua news agency communiqd. 
Mr. Jiang, who is also general secretary of the party, 
appeared to have scored a victory with the expulsion 
from the party of the former Beijing Communist 
Party chief and mayor, Chen Xitong. The case 
involving Mr. Chen, long a rival and critic of Mr. 
Jiang, has been handed over to prosecutors, who will 
presscharges against him for alleged involvement in 
China’s biggest corruption scandal since the 1949 
Communist takeover. 

The scandal involved more than $25 million 
obtained through kickbacks for construction proj- 
ects and the siphoning off of municipal funds for 
private use, including the alleged payment of costs 
tot a mistress and favors for his son. 

The Chinese Communist watchdog group, the 
Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, said 
Tuesday that Mr. Chen, 67, ‘ ‘had seriously violated 
party discipline and caused extremely severe dam- 
age to die prestige of die party and state, completely 
discrediting himself as a Communist. ” 

Although Mr. Chen was stripped of his position 
on the Politburo on April 29, 1995, his case has 
languished in investigation ever since. The failure 


to expel him from the party or put him on trial had 
become a symbol of the party's failure to act 
vigorously against corruption. 

While many ordinary citizens face the death 
penalty for less serious offenses, Mr. Chen has 
been kept under house arrest in Inner Mongolia, 
according to government sources. 

Earlier this year, a novel was published called 
“The Wrath of God; A Mayor's Severe Crime," 
with uncanny similarity to' the Chen case. The 
novel recounts an anti-corruption campaign that 
gradually fades away because corruption is en- 

See CHINA, Page 8 

Reforms Jfersus 
Marxist Dogma: 
New Ways Win 


By Peter Hannam 
and Christina Mirngan 

_ Bloomberg News ' 

BEUING — Zhang Rongming used to make 
ladies’ underwear at a struggling state-owned firm. 
Now, at 35, he is president of the company and 
drives a purple Honda. 

Zhang Delin lost his job making lightbulbs on an 
assembly line last year. Today, at 29, he sits on a 
curb begging for handouts and lucking din . at 
passing cars. 

The two Zhangs offer a good snapshot of the 
widening disparity in income, status and world- 
view that has riddled China since it started tam- 
pering with Communist economic orthodoxy. 

As China's political leadership gathers for the 
Communist Party congress it holds once every five 
years, many of the reforms that have widened the 
gap — while also launching the economy towards 
an annual 10 percent growth rate — are likely to be 
enshrined into canon. 

Zhang Rongming is a good symbol for the new 
direction. Three years ago, be was a manager at 
Aimer Garments Co., one of the biggest underwear 
manufacturers in China. Since he was tapped to 
lead a privatization of the chronically loss-ridden 
company, sales have soared six-fold while staff has 
doubled. Mr. Zhang himself owns a 16.5 percent 
stake. 

“There’s no need for party secretaries these 
days.” he says, recalling the apparatchiks who 
once enforced Communist ideology on factory 
floors across the country. 

With government spending forecast to outpace 
revalue by about 300 billion yuan ($36 billion) this 
year, Beijing can’t afford to keep subsidizing its. 
state companies — which lost 60 billion yuan last 

See REFORMS, Page 8 


German Economy Slips Again 

Rising Unemployment Bad Timing for Kohl Coalition 


By Alan Cowell 

Nr*- York Times Sen-ice 


BONN — After a summer of in- 
decorous squabbling among his sup- 
posed political allies, Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of Germany was offered 
little corafon Tuesday from statistics 
showing unemployment up to record 
levels — again — inflation on the in- 
crease and evidence that Eastern Ger- 
many is falling further behind the West 
in economic growth. 

Taken together, the figures added sig- 
nificantly to the woes confronting 
Europe’s longest-serving leader just one 
year before national elections, a time 
when his opponents say his coalition is 


showing the same end-of-era fatigue as 
did Britain’s Conservatives, before the 
Labour victory there last May. 

The statistics have implications 
across Europe. The higher Germany’s 
joblessness climbs, the more the state 
loses from unemployment benefits and 


unpaid taxes, defying the government’s 
efforts to meet the fiscal criteria for 
projected launching of a single Euro- 
pean currency next year. 

Theo Waigel, the finance minister, on 
Tuesday forecast a robust economic re- 
bound — largely because of an export 
surge provoked by the weakness of the 
German mark. But German political 

See GERMANY, Page 8 


A Relaxed Scotland Prepares to Vote 


By Tom Buerkle 

huermtiunal Herald Tribune 


EDINBURGH — As people stroll the 
streets of this city basking in the warmth 
of a late-sumraer bout of sunshine, the 
atmosphere is remarkably relaxed con- 
sidering that Scots are about to vote on. 
Britain’s biggest constitutional change 
in nearly 300 years. 

AH signs are that voters will endorse 
the devolution of wide-ranging political 
power from London and the establish' 
mem of a Scottish Parliament in a ref- 
erendum on Thursday. And both sup- 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra. 10.00 FF Lebanon 

Armies 1250 FF Morocco 16 0" 

Cameroon,.. 1 ! 600 CFA Qatar 10 ® < ^i 

ESVPI- SZ5.SQ 

France 10.00 FF Saudi Arab«.....-10 ^ 

Gabon 1.100 CFA Senegal 1-100CFA] 

Italy. -2.800 Lire Spa'" 

Ivory Coast. 1.250 CFA Tun^a 1.2»D*i 

Jordan i 1250 JD UAE. — 

I Kuwait 700 Fib U.S. M l (Eur.) 51^0| 


porters and opponents alike agree that 
political life in this country may never 

be the same. . 

For the Labour government or Prime 
Minister Tony Blair. Scottish devol- 
ution is the first of a senes of fun- 
damental reforms — including devol- 
unon for Wales, 1 lie creation of a 
powerful mayor for London and the 
stripping of voting rights from hered- 
itary peers in the House of Lortfc — - that 
will make government more account 

^'itS^Wof.rooderruzmg 

the constitution of Britain, to bring 


The Dollar 


i si*4 1-8076 




power closer to people,” Mr. Blair said 
during a campaign appearance in Ed- 
inburgh on Monday. 

Bur opponents of devolution, and 
even some supporters like the Scottish 
National Party, contend that home rule 
is only a first step likely to lead to full 
Scottish independence and the breakup 
of the country. 

What is at stake "is nothing short of 
the Union of the United Kingdom it- 
self," Lady Thatcher, the former prime 
minister, wrote in an opinion piece in 
The Scotsman newspaper Tuesday. 

“I do not believe that most Scots 
want to end the Union. Bu t separation is 
the destination toward which me present 
devolution proposals lead." she wrote. 

Scots will vote on two proposals in 
the referendum. 

The first is whether to establish a 
Scottish Parliament, the first since Scot- 
land merged its Parliament with Eng- 
land’s in the Act of Union of 1707. It 
would control a host of policy areas, 
including health and education, local 
government, economic development 
and the judicial system, but leave such 
core issues as foreign and defense af- 
fairs, broad economic and monetary 
policies and social security to the na- 

See KINGDOM, Page 8 



kinw Debj/The AmidM Pic— 


3d Test Confirms Diana’s Driver Was Drunk 

Anew blood test confirmed that tbe driver of the car in which Diana. Princess of 
Wales, was killed, was drunk. The judges investigating die crash, Herve Stephan, 
left, and Marie-Christine Devidai, right, visited the scene Tuesday. Page 6. 


PAGE TWO 

For One U.S. Donor , Money Talked 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

Some Resentment of Mother Teresa 


Books Page 9. 

Crossword Page 6. 

Opinion Pages 10-11. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 

Thelntnrmm*et Pago 12. 


AGENDA 

Serb Hard-Liners 
Flee Banja Luka 

BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzego- 
vina (Reuters) — A Bosnian Serb 
hard-line leader, Momcilo Krajisnik, 
fled Banja Luka cm Tuesday under a 
hail of bottles and stones hurled by 
demonstrators loyal to the Western- 
backed president, Biljana Plavsic. 

Witnesses said Mr. Krajisnik, a top 
aide to Radovan Karadzic, and a dozen 
bodyguards dashed from a hotel where 
they had been trapped and climbed 
into waiting cars whose windows were 
smashed as they sped off. 

Prime Minister Gojko Klickovic 
tried to join them but ran back to the 
hotel when he saw that the police were 
unable to keep me crowd from.jump- 
ing on the cars and hurling any mis- 
siles they could get hold of. 

A U.S. mediator, Jacques Klein, 
said me former Bosnian Serb police 
chief. Dragon Kijac, for whom Mrs. 
Plavsic's police have issued an arrest 
warrant, also escaped, but some wit- 
nesses said he was not in the group. 

NATO personnel had earlier 
offered to rescue all three, but me other 
two refused to leave without Mr. Kijac 
for fear NATO would arrest him and 
take him to the UN war crimes tribunal 
in the Netherlands for trial. 

Earlier article. Page 7. 


DMZ Tension Proves Deadly Once More 


By Mary Jordan 

Washington Past Service 


TOKYO — In me first deadly shoot- 
ing in one year between the armies faced 
on on the Korean Peninsula, South 
.Korean soldiers killed a North Korean 
soldier on Tuesday who had crossed the 
border, rifle in hand. 

Seoul officials said that an unknown 
number of North Korean soldiers had 
crossed me mountainous border laced 
with land mines and that the gtmned- 
down soldier had come within yards of a 
South Korean guard posL 
The border between communist 


North Korea and capitalist South Korea 
is one of the world’s most dangerous, 
and gunfire erupts there sporadically. In 
July, mortar shells sailed across the bor- 
der. and North Korea said several of its 
soldiers were wounded in the ensuing 
exchange of fire. 

But not since a North Korean sub- 
marine ran ashore in the South last 
September. leading to a manhunt and 
the killings of two dozen North Korean 
commandos and crewmen, have there 
been any fatalities. 

"Our side fired about 10 rounds,” a 
Defense Ministry spokesman in Seoul 
said. It was not immediately known if 


the Northerner’s body had been re- 
turned across me border or was being 
kept in South Korea. 

“A human life was lost, and we al- 
ways take that seriously,” said Jim 
Coles, a spokesman for the 37.000 U.S: 
forces stationed in South Korea. None 
of them were involved in the shooting. 

The killing came on same day as a 
breakthrough in diplomatic relations be- 
tween North Korea and Japan. Red Cross 
officials from both countries signed an 
agreement in Beijing that will for the first 
time allow some Japanese women mar- 

See KOREA, Page 8 





INTERNATIONAL WF.B A T.D TR IBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 199/ 

PAGE TWO ~ 


• Selling a Pipeline / Senate Panel to Investigate Access 

How Democratic Donor Overcame Resistance 


Gore’s Prospects: 
Reno Holds Key 


fliH 


t<» 1 


Hi 


By David B. Ottaway and Dan Morgan 

Washington tout Service — 

W ASHINGTON — When two top Democratic 
fund-raisers met the oil financier Roger Tam- 
mz for dinner si the Four Seasons Hotel here 
on Oct 6, 1995, they faced a dilemma. 

As a major donor who had already given 595,000 to the 
. Democratic Party, the dapper Mr. Tamraz wanted access to 
■Vice President Al Gore and other senior admimstralion 


oil company executives and U.S. officials. Mr. Tamraz s 
contacts with While House and other government officials 
about his pipeline proposal are under investigation by a 
federal grand jury, which is seeking to determine whether 
anyone tried to bribe or pressure Clinton administration 
officials into supporting Mr. Tamraz' s pipeline idea. The 
financier is a fugitive from Lebanon, where he is wanted on 


jany and a leader in the Caspian oil rush, sent a letter in 
rune 1 995 to Mr. Tamraz and U.S. officials castigating his 


ByJohn F. Harris 
and Thomas B. Edsali 


1989 charges of embezzling $200 million — allegations he 
denies as deriving from Lebanese political rivalries. 

Mr. Tamraz sard his efforts in Washington wereaimed at 


officiakto oromote his vision of a $23 billion pipeline obtaining a ‘‘nonobjection from the admimstraaon for 
■ carrying oil from the Caspian Sea region of Central Asia to his project that would haveputhim on an equal footing with 
Western markets But Mr. Tamraz had just been pointedly competitors and lent his project greater credibility with 
excluded from a political breakfast with Mr. Gore after the governments in the Caspian region. 

1 DemocraticNabofla] Committee received a scathing memo “To promote your name or to promote your project 

from Mr. Gore's office urging that the financier be shunned wasn’t aul that harmful, he said in one of several telephone 

,-as "an American citizen with a shady and un- 


efforts as "detrimental” to the building of a Caspian 
pipeline and demanding that he "cease any further efforts” 
to promote iL "I walked over somebody’s toes — or 
somebody’s strategy,” Mr. Tamraz said. 

To combat his opponents, Mr. Tamraz, 57, turned co 
methods that had served him well in the past Both in Egypt 
to Lebanese Christian parents, he grew up in a world of 
shifting Middle East politics and intrigue in which personal 
connections to the rich and powerful are paramount. 

In addition to contributing at least 5170,000 to Demo- 
cratic Party "organizations in the 1996 campaign, Mr. 
Tamraz rallied support from influential leaders in the 
Armenian American community such as Haroun Sas- 
so unian, a wealthy Californian, who presented the Tamraz 
pipeline project to Mr. Gore in an August 1995 meeting. 


H'lisAiRjftm Post Sen ice 


WASHINGTON — Long before Vice President Al Gone 
gets a chance to face voters in 2000, he finds himself m die 
precarious position of being judged by an electorate of one: 

Attorney General Janet Reno. . . , ' .. 

Ms. Reno’s staff is in the midst of reviewing whether Mr. 
Gore’s 1996 fund-raisine activities — which have been sub- 
ject to a cloudburst of negative publicity over the past two 
weeks — raise enough questions to mcni further investigation 


under the independent counsel law. 

It will be Ms. Reno’s decision whether to recommend 


trustworthy reputation. 

The conversation at the Four Seasons between 
Mr. Tamraz and his dinner companions — die 
Democratic National Committee’s finance director 
Richard Sullivan and its finance chairman, Marvin 
Rosea — rambled on about politics and pipelines 
before the two fund-raisers asked for a little more 
time to ’“clear things up” and overcome "some - 
resistance” to getting him into the White House, 
according to Mr. Tamraz’s recollection. 

The subsequent success of committee officials in 

- overcoming that ‘ ‘resistance* * could become a cen- 
tral focus of the Senate investigation into cam paign 

- finance abuses before the 1996 election. The public 
. hearings will move into a new phase examining Mr. 

Tamraz ’s additional $75,000 contribution, sent to 
the Virginia Democratic Party less than two weeks 
. after the Four Seasons dinner at the request, ac- 
cording to two sources, of the committee chairman, 
Donald Fowler. 

Far from being ostracized, Mr. Tamraz was then 
admitted to four white House functions, including a 
dinner with President Bill Clinton at which Mr. 
Tamraz touted his pipeline dream and the jobs it 
would bring to American pipe makers. 

[CIA memos made public Tuesday show that Mr. 
Fowler contacted the agency on behalf of Mr. 
Tamraz despite a party memo warning that the 
donor's background was “full of significant fi- 
nancial and ethical troubles,” The Associated Press 
reported. Mr. Fowler, questioned at a Senate hear- 
. ing on campaign finance abuse, firmly denied that 
■ he saw his aide’s memo dated July 12, 1995. about 
Mr. Tamra 2 and insisted that “I have no memory of 
any conversation with the CIA.”] 



M R. TAMRAZ was barely out of Harvard Busi- 
ness School when he pur together a consortium 
in the 1970s to build a S345 million pipeline 
linking the Gulf of Suez to the Mediterranean. 
Far his efforts, Mr. Tamraz received a 5 percent share — 
worth $ 1 5 million at the time — enough to launch his career 
as an independent operator. His first big success on his own 


appointment of an outside prosecutor, a variety ofW ashington 
political hands in both parties said Monday, mat will answer 
the cri tical question for the Clinton administration s heir 
apparent Is Mr. Gore simply bumping through an unpleasant 
stretch of bad Political weather or has he flown into a career- 


involved brokering a deal in die late 1970s between Jap- 
anese companies and the Saudi government to build a S300 


Despite a memo from Vice President Gore’s . office 
saying that he should he shunned, Roger Tamras 
teas admitted to four While House Junctions, 


W HILE providing graphic evidence of 

the connection between money and access in 
the Clinton administration, the Tamraz saga 
also represents the intersection of campaign 
finance with the exotic, high-stakes race to exploit die 
Caspian’s enormously lucrative oil reserves, estimated at 
200 billion barrels. Mr. Tamraz himself holds two Caspian 
oil concessions believed to contain 1 billion barrels; his 
proposed pipeline route would have been in direct com- 
petition with other routes now favored by a consortium of 
oil companies. 

The effort to keep Mr. Tamraz out of the White House 


interviews from Paris. “It was very positive.” 

On Oct. 3, 1995, the administration announced that it 


signaled the beginning of an intense struggle involving the 
UTS. government and American oil companies eager to 
ensure that Caspian oil is exported to the West, according to 


no evrdence that the decision was linked in any way to Mr. 
Tamraz ’s lobbying here. - ' 

Almost from the moment he arrived in Washington to 
promote his plan in the spring of 1995, Mr. Tamraz 
confronted opposition from major oil company compet- 
itors and many administration officials, who made clear 
that they viewed him as an unwelcome interloper in 
attempts to become a central player in one of the biggest 
commercial bonanzas of the decade. 

For example. Pennzoil, a Houston-based energy com- 


anese companies and the Saudi government to build a S300 
■ million methanol plant in JubSl in which he held a 10- 
percent interest. 

In the early 1980s, Mr. Tamraz bought the Italian op- 
erations of Amoco and Texaco — 2,000 gas stations, a 
refinery and 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) of pipelines. From 
those foldings he created TamoiL a company he sold to (he 
Libyan government in 1985 for S375 million. 

From the start, Mr.. Tamraz cultivated contacts with 
influential officials, particularly top leaders and those 
working for intelligence agencies, according to U.S. and 
Lebanese sources. During the 1973 oil crisis, the CIA 
turned to Mr. Tamraz for counsel because of his close 
contacts with Kamal Adham, chief of Saudi intelligence, 
according to Tamraz and Lebanese sources. 

Thereafter, according to one former U.S. intelligence 
official, Mr. Tamraz became a regular unofficial contact — 
* ‘the kind of guy who knew everybody and you had lunch 
with him every couple of months.” For his part, Mr. 
Tamraz has often hired retired CIA agents as consultants. 

After the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982, the CLA 
director, W illiam Casey, exasperated by the slow pace of 
U.S.-led negotiations, called on Mr. Tamraz to intercede 
with Prime Minister Menachero Begin to help accelerate an 
Israeli withdrawal, Mr. Tamraz said. Mr. Tamraz not only 
was one of Lebanon’s leading bankers but also was a close 
friend of the Lebanese president. Amin Gemayel, whose 
famil y had also lived in Egypt for a tune. 

The effort failed, and after Mr. Gemayel’s term ended in 
1988, pro-Syrian forces, hostile to Israel and Mr. Tamraz. 
came to dominate the Lebanese political scene. A rush ou 
Mr. Tamraz’s Mashrek Bank in late 1988 forced its col- 
lapse; Mr. Tamraz fled the country after being kidnapped 
by a pro-Syrian faction and released for a S7 million 
ransom paid into a secret bank account in Sv itzeriandL 

As for the embezzlement charges leveled by Lebanese 
bank officials. Mr. Tamraz concedes he owes S2*2 million in 
Lebanon but also asserts that SI 63 million is owed him. 

. Lebanon has sought his extradition through Interpol but 
“no civilized nation” has taken the banking charges 
seriously, asserts Mr. Tamraz. who appears to move with 
impunity between his homes in France and New York. 


stretch of bad political weather or has he flown into a career- 
threatening crisis? , , . . _ , 

Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., a Democratic lobbyist and fund- 
raiser, contended that the Senate campaign-finance hearings 
will have little long-lasting consequences for Mr. Gore. ‘ ‘You 
spin it and it’s over." he said, adding that most voters will 
r fisTniss the allegations as mere politics "because it’s Re- 
publicans versus Democrats.” i 

Conversely, “an independent prosecutor looking at each 
violation of law, with a lot of money to conduct an inquiry, 
that is a different matter,” Mr. Boggs said. 

"Not only would Mr. Gore’s entire fund-raising network be 
subject to questioning, he said, but, on a much broader basis, 

an independent investigation 
fun damentall y "interferes 
with your life.” 

“It’s hard to run for pres- 
ident with an independent 
counsel running around,” said 
one veteran Democratic oper- 
ative sympathetic to Mr. Gore. 
“People don’t want to vote for 
someone who could be facing 
an indictment.” 

This person argued that the 
allegations against Mr. Goije 
were trivial and were being de- 
liberately pumped up by vin- 
dictive Republicans. Even so, 
the operative added, “This is 
going to guarantee some heavy 
Attorney General Reno, primary opposition no matter 

what happens.” ; 

Mr. Gore’s advisers maintain the criticism die vice pres- 
ident has taken for making telephone calls to contributors from 
the White House and for attending a political event last year at 
a Buddhist temple is unfair. Mr. Gore argues that die telephone 
calls — die issue the Justice Department is examining — were 
le gal . although he has pledged not to make such calls in the 
future. ! 




If \ 


■ i 

mm ' 


And while the vice president said it was now clear die eveat 
was “finance-related,” he and his staff said he did not know at 


Toll Estimates Vary Wildly in Haitian Ferry Disaster 


Atlantic Ocean 


. The Associated Press 

; MONTROUIS, Haiti — Thou- 
sands of mourners watched from die 
beach Tuesday as divers resumed 
foe search for foe bodies of Haitians 
believed trapped when an over- 
crowded ferry capsized. 

The three-member Canadian 
diving team, drawn from the UN 


peacekeeping force in Haiti, could 
see about 50 bodies trapped in the 

rrinle-derked shin a hour feet he- 


triple-decked ship about 25 feet be- 
low the surface, said a UN spokes- 
woman, Patricia Tome. 

She said 49 bodies were re- 
covered Monday. Others could have 
been carried away by the currents. 


Estimates of the numbers of deaths 
varied wildly. Health Minister Ro- 
dolphe Mallebranche said Monday 
nighr that the accident “caused the 
deaths of more than 500 people.” 

. Earlier, Haiti's Coast Guard es- 
timated that as many as 300 pas- 
sengers died when foe ferry cap- 
sized and sank Monday offshore of 
this fishing village 80 kilometers 
(50 miles) north of Port-au-Prince. It 
had come from Go nave Island. 

The coast guard said about 400 
people survived by swimming to 
shore. But survivors disputed those 
figures, saying up to 400 died and 
only about 60 survived. Claude 


HameL the LIN chief of operations 
in Haiti, said Monday there were 51 
survivors 

Among mourners was a Gonave 
Island legislator, Fritzner Saint- 
Fleur, who lost two children. His 
wife, who had accompanied them, 
saved one child, radio reports said. 

The victims also included several 
members of a soccer team and their 
fans, who had been headed to a 
game at Moncrouis. 

Officials said overcrowding was 
very likely a factor in the latest in a 
string of ferry sinkings in Haiti, 
where foe vessels are often over- 
loaded. Each day. thousands of 


Haitians crowd onto ferries, a cheap 
form of transport in the impover- 
ished country. The government says 
it does not have the resources "to 
monitor the vessels. Dozens of boats 
sink each year. 

On Feb. 16. 1993. an overloaded 


ferpt carrying 1 ,000 people sank off 
Haiti, killing ai least 700. In March 


' r* 

Anse-fr-6 

■ ■ / “VU 

■ . ISLAND ) I 

' *'"• . - • ''W*sjj 

Fort-au-Princa % § 


1996, more than 100 drowned when 
a ferry sank off foe coast. 

The ferry had air conditioning, a 
novelty in Haiti. Until foe boat went 
into service 10 days earlier. Haitians 
going to the mainland from Gonave 
jiad to use motor-assisted sailboats. 

Seas were calm when foe ferry 


"4Q . 

*\ •• 


rolled over and sank in front of 
oarsmen who had rowed out from 
Montrouis to take passengers off foe 
ship. Montrouis has no pier. 


the time that its main purpose was fund-raising. 

They chalk up the current political thumping as a pre- 
dictable part of the process for a presidential contender. "Yon 
can't have a long career in modem politics without going 
through some turbulence, but he'll come out of tins fine,* said 
Robert Squier. Mr. Gore ’s longtime media consultant. 

Mr. Gore's staff took heart from a CNN/USA Today Poll 
that suggested be retains a large measure of public confidence. 
Asked if Mr. Gore was * “honest and trustworthy." 64 percent 
said yes, while 25 percent said no. The equivalent numbers for 
President Bill Clinton were 53 percent yes and 42 percent 
no. 

They also showed that among Democrats Mr. Gore is far 
ahead of potential rivals such as Jesse Jackson or foe House 
minority leader, Richard Gephardt, Democrat of Missouri, as 
the choice for foe nomination in 2000. 

Tom Korologos. a Republican lobbyist who advised Edwin 
Meese 3d while he was nominated for attorney general and the 
subject of a special prosecutor investigation, said: “It's a 
debilitating experience. Ir knocks you off your feet; it knocks 
you into a cocked hat. You become consumed by this damned 
thing.” 

Referring to foe prospect that a special prosecutor might be 
appointed to investigate Mr. Gore, he asked; 

"How can he go out and raise money? How can he go out 
and give speeches? How can he be a politically viable can- 
didate in whatever cattle calls the Democrats might hold? You 
watch and see. a governor or two will bounce in the pres- 
idential race. It could wipe out a whole year on him, and he 
ain’t got a year.” 

Ms. Reno announced that her staff would conduct a 30-day 
review to see if more investigation into whether there is credible 
evidence suggesting Mr. Gore broke the law is needed. 


AwayFrcr. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Moscow Historical Museum Opens 


MOSCOW ( API — The State Historical Museum reopened 
T uesday. but after 1 1 years of renovation foe work was far from 
completed. 

! The 1 25-year-old museum on Red Square opened 13 of 40 
exhibition rooms. 

Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, who attended the 
opening, promised foar funds would be found to finish foe 
project in the “near future." 


Cars and trucks were banned Tuesday from the center of 
La Rochelle, France, in a one-day experiment to promote 
bicycle use and demonstrate the impact of pollution. [AFP) 


Europe 


The Cambodian government and business leaders began 
a campaign to promote tourism, following a coup two months 
ago. "Safety will be assured,” said Sok Chen da, under- 
secretary of state in the Tourism Ministry. (AP) 


<u*uva 
Amvoroain 
Ar kata 
Allwta 


Machu Piccbu escaped damage in a brushfire when winds 
carried flames away from the Inca citadel in Peru. (Reuters) 


Clarification 


Peter Catranis 

PWllMMf Ttafer 

Rm&FiAms Sweats 


SUPERIOR 

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EXCEPTIONAL 

FREE 

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COMMSSION 


Sutectian of ManapM Accounts: 
Anslysm hr AO Hafir Ugrxels 
Execution Foret or Futures 
Twang Sotmara t Pnce Data 
Spot FX 2- s Pig Price Spreads 
Futures SH-SM far Pound-Turn 


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To foe extent that foe item 
1 in the People column on June 
i 13 cast doubt on foe integrity 
of Harrison Ford’s status as a 
conscientious objector in 
connection with the draft for 
the Vietnam War or implied 
that his petition filed with foe 
draft board was written to in- 
tentionally confuse foe board 
simply so that they would not 
act on the petition, we dis- 
avow any such meaning. 


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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. 



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continue across We South- some sun and dry weatner 
west Thursday ih rougn irom England eastward to 
Saturday. Clouds and rain Germany Thursday, put a 
will move inio tne Pacific front wifi bnnp snowers and 
Northwest Thursday, but a tew thunderstorms 
sunshine will return by the across the reg/on Friday 
weekend A storm will into Saiurday It will be 
bring damp and rainy damp and cool acrcm 
weather id ihe eastern Scandinavia, but warm 
U.S Dry ana pleasant m weatner will effect Spain 
the Midwest. and southern Italy. 


Asia 

Showers and thunder- 
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rains m much ot southeast- 
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day. Put hoi and dry weath- 
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Ch«a. Warm and humid m 
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some sun and the chance 
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30-86 1*61 a 
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LNTERNATI 



PAGE 3 


& (J+ \ |>^gEFTBaPgH«.» w 



INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


Clinton Bracing for Battle on Trade Pacts and NAFTA 


. 

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By David E. Sanger 

-Vf»- K'ri; SiWKY 

- WASHINGTON — President 
Bill Clinton is about to Leap into 
what promises to be a bruising battle 
.over expansion of the North Amer- 
ican Free Trade Association to Latin 
America, and also authority for him 
to negotiate other international trade 
accords, 

, Even the him of a plan for even- 
tual expansion of the most famous 
. trade accord in the Americas is bit- 
terly dividing Democrats and in- 
furiating labor unions. It is also 
• prompting arguments over whether 
the United States can force other 
'.‘nations inio agreements that would 
require them to raise wages and pro- 
ject the environment. 

On Wednesday. President Clin- 
ton will open a campaign to per- 
suade Congress that he desperately 
.needs authority to negotiate new 
trade accords without ongoing Con- 

f ressional oversight, if the United 
tales is ro keep up with its eco- 
nomic competitors in Latin America 
_.and Asia. 

This so-called fast-track authority 
' expired three years ago. 

Mr. Clinton and his aides are mar- 


shaling an array of economic and 
political arguments to make the case 
that they can wait no longer for that 
negotiating authority, although 
Congress is not being asked to vote 
on any new trade accord and 'prob- 
ably will not do so for years. 

Even when Congress s rants 
“fast-track” authority to the“ pres- 
ident, it must ratify trade pacts be- 
fore they can go into effect, but 
without amendments. 

The Clinton administration is ar- 
guing that the United States has few- 
er trade barriers than most nations, 
so negotiations to sweep them away 
are far more likely to benefit the 
United States than its competitors. 
With the economy roaring, the 
United States is now in a "better 
negotiating position with its trading 
partners than 'it has been in de- 
cades. 

And already, officials warn 
darkly, Canada and Mexico are 
striking trade deals with Latin 
American countries that exclude 
Washington, a trend that they con- 
tend will spill around the globe if 
Congress does not act fast. 

But the reality remains that poll 
after poll shows that NAFTA, as the 
North American Free Trade Agree- 


ment is usually called, is more un- 
popular today than on the day in 
1 993 when it was enacted. 

The pact remains a symbol of the 
kinds of global accords that, in the 
minds of millions, make it easier for 
a good factory job to disappear even 
in prosperous times. 

So even vague talk about extend- 
ing it has touched off a divisive 
battle over whether trade pacts 
simply steal away U.S. jobs, a battle 
already tinged with politics of the 
next presidential election. 

"This has become a matter of 
America's global leadership, and 
the trick is for the president to ex- 
plain it that way," said Commerce 
Secretary William Daley, who in the 
first term serving as a special liaison 
with Congress was put in charge of 
pushing NAFTA through. “But 
let’s face it: the vast majority of 
Democrats are not comfortable with 
it.” 

l.M. Destler, a professor at the 
University of Maryland and one of 
the nation's leading historians of 
trade talks, said “fast track” has 
been "enormously successful.” 

“It has enabled the United Srates 
to shape the terms of globalization 
to the advantage of American work- 


ers” he said. 

But after years as a noncontro- 
versial mechanism to ease negoti- 
ations. Mr. Desder said, fast track 

has gradually become a sulking 

horse for all sorts of other issues. 

The three-year lapse in authority 
is the longest that a president has 
gone since 1974 without the power 
to negotiate broad trade agreements. 
An attempted renewal failed in 
1995 andm 1996 the administration 
decided the issue was too volatile 

and divisive before an election. 

In the broadest sense, it has be- 
come an argument over, the wisdom 
of free-trade accords. But most trade 
agreements are bilateral deals gov. 
erning trade in specific products or 
services, from phannaceuncals t0 
telecommunications. So the debate 
in Congress is quickly taming 
re-examination of NAFTA, which 
the administration insisted in 1993 
would become a boon for the Amer- 
ican economy, and which opponents 
argued would be a disaster for 
American workers. 

Not surprisingly, voluminous 
studies conducted since its passage 
have reached dramatically different 
conclusions, depending on who paid 
for the study. The view of many 


economists who did not have a stake 
in ihe original debate is that NAFTA 
has been far less important to Amer- 
ican workers than either its advo- 
cates or its opponents predicted. 

Even the administration concedes 
now. however, that it wildly over- 
sold the benefits of NAFT A in 1 993, 
and a study that the White House 
sent to Congress in July suggested 
that at most, 90.000 to 160,000 
American jobs rely on increased ex- 
pons to Mexico as a result of the 
pacL In an economy that has created 
roughly 1 1 million jobs over the last 
four years, dial is just a statistical 
blip. ' 

The most vocal opponent this 
year to fast track is the House minor- 
ity leader. Dick Gephardt. Democrat 
of Missouri, a likely challenger to 
Vice President A1 Gore for the pres- 
idential nomination in 2000. 

Mr. Gephardt just completed a 
South American trip and returned, 
he said, more convinced than ever 
that the only acceptable trade ac- 
cords were those that "place labor 
rights and environmental protection 
afrhe core of every treaty.” 

By "labor rights,” Mr. Gephardt 
means a commitment from. trading 
partners to raise workers’ wages. 


■ ... r 

^ :< • > 

t 

• • •: l 
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■i * i 




«v 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Cast of 12,000 (and a Cornfield) 
Set to Re-enact Antietam Battle 

Detailed re-enactments of Civil War 
battles have become a grear attraction for 
history buffs, but rarely have they ap- 
proached the scope and authenticity of what 
is about to happen on a farm near Hager- 
stown, Maryland. 

The Battle of Antietam, on Sept 17, 1862, 
was the bloodiest day in the country’s blood- 
iest war. Reflecting that history, a cast of 
12,000 has been recruited for the re-en- 
actment. to begin Friday. 

To add detail, a 30-acre (12 hectare ) 
cornfield, the setting for one of three battle 
scenes, was planted and tended this summer 
so that it can be slashed and trampled. 

Workers have excavated a 200-yard ( 1 80- 
meter) ditch and lined it with split-rail 
fences to resemble the sunken road that, 
filled with bodies during the battle, was to be 
nicknamed Bloody Lane. 





><tf> Beiyii/Thr Aamiaai Pre» 


CALIFORNIA CRAWL — Traffic backed up Monday at the Bay ®ndge in 
Oakland after a strike brought the Bay Area Rapid Transit system to a standstill 


A paved road will be camouflaged under 
135 ions of mulch. . . 

Dennis Frye, president of the Association 
for the Preservation of Civil War Sites, and 
the organizer of the event, said he hoped 
spectators would begin to "comprehend the 
horror of Antietam,” which left more than 
5,000 Americans dead — roughly one-tenth 


the American toll of the entire Vietnam 
War. 

The victory of the 80,000 Union soldiers 
over the 40.000 Confederate troopsproved a 
turning point, helping persuade European 
powers not to recognize the Confederacy 
and giving President Abraham Lincoln the 
political strength to issue the Emancipation 


Proclamation, ending slavery in the rebel- 
lious states. 

Mr. Frye says he hopes the re-enactment 
will be the largest of its kind. It is slated, 
however, to be surpassed by a re-creation in 
July of the Battle of Gettysburg. 

Short Take 

Thousands of public elementary 
schools now require children to wear uni- 
forms. a reaction to fierce competition over 
fashion that in some cases led to violent theft 
of designer jackets or expensive basketball 

shoes. . 

There is big money in outfitting the na- 
tion's young for school. Parents this fall plan 
to spend an average of S307 per child, the 

Los Angeles Times reports. 

So now comes an unintended (if perhaps 
not unforeseeable) consequence: Fashion 
labels like Gap and Esprit de Corp are 
getting into the uniform business, offering 
clothes that meet dress codes — a lot of navy 
and khaki — but with added flourishes like 
lettuce-edge collars. 

School administrators, who bad credited 
unifo rms with blurring the lines between 
rich and poor students, are not pleased 


Brian Knowlton 


Away From Poli tics 

• The American Red Cross 
issued a national appeal for 
'.blood donations, warning that 
two-thirds of its regions have 
less than two days’ supply of 
a critical donor type — O. 

Type O positive is especially 
valued since it is found in 39 
percent of Americans and can 
*be transfused into anyone 
i positive blood type, or 
than 85 percent of the 


with a 
'more 
population. 


(AP) 


• Schools are no safe haven 
from drugs since more teen- 
..agers see drug deals at school 
t han in their neighborhoods, a 
'new survey found. Forry-one 
percent of high schoolers said 
they witnessed drug deals on 
school grounds, while 25 per- 
\ cent said they saw them in 
'their neighborhoods, accord- 
ing to the study by the Na- 
tional Center on Addiction 
and Substance Abuse at 
Columbia University. (API 

•The Florida Supreme 

-Court suspended indefin- 
itely the execution of the con- 
'victed killer of a policeman 
until it decides whether the 
electric chair, which can set a 
•convict's head on fire, is cruel 
and unusual punish- 
ment (Reuters) 

•Flight attendants who say 
that secondhand smoke in 
S aircraft cabins made them 
■ ? sick rested their case against 
-the tobacco industiy m Miami 
after eight weeks of testi- 


mony. About 60.000 attend- 
ants are seeking $5 billion in 
damages for lung, heart and 
other illnesses they blame on 
cigarette smoke in aircraft 
cabins before smoking was 
banned on all domestic flights 
in 1990. (AP) 

• Beer may be the chaser of 

choice for peanuts, but new 
research suggests peanuts 
really have more in common 
with red wine. Like red wine, 
a new study funded by the 
Peanut Institute says, peanuts 
contain a compound that may 
prevent heart disease and can- 
cer. But because they are also 
loaded with far< their overall 
health benefits remain dubi- 
ous. (AP) 

• A jury in New Orleans 
awarded $3.4 billion in pu- 
nitive damages to about 8,000 
people who said they suffered 
mental and physical injuries 
when a tank car exploded and 
burned Sepu 9, 1987. The pu- 
nitive damages are on top of 
the $2 million, or about 
$ 1 02,000 each, awarded to 20 
p laintiff s OQ AUg. 25. (AP) 



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POLITICAL NOTES 


Drilling for Oil Is Approved 
On Monument Land in Utah 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration has 
approved exploratory oil drilling on federal land in the red 
rock country of Utah, where President Bill Clinton last 
year established a national monument to protect the rich 
wilderness from development. ... 

The Bureau of Land Management, pan of the Interior 
Department, approved the drilling over objections of 
other federal agencies, reflecting its own assessment that 
the immediate environmental bairn would be negligible 
and the view of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt that a 
fight now is unwarranted because the odds of striking oil 
there are relatively slight. 

Other agencies and environmemalists have warned that 
although only a single well was approved Monday, the 
precedent could eventually lead to widespread devel- 
opment, marking the area for decades to conie with tall 
rigs, networks of roads and pipelines, bright lights blot- 
ting out the stars above ballneld-size drill mg pads, and 
impoundments of toxic drilling mud despoiling pnsune 
habitats. < NYTi 

Judge Allows Jones’s Lawyers 
To Quit Suit Against Clinton 

LITTLE ROCK. Arkansas — A federal judge ruled 
Tuesdav to allow Paula Corbin Jones’s lawyers to with- 
draw from her sexual harassment lawsuit against Pres- . 
idem Bill Clinton, but directed that the case stay on course 

for a trial next May. „ . T - 

Judge Susan Webber Wright of U.S. District Court let . 
Gilbert Davis and Joseph Cammaraia leave Ms. Jones s 
legal team, and directed that they be paid for their work. 

“The lawvers said in papers filed Monday that they had 
"fundamental differences of opinion” with Ms. Jones 
about how the case should proceed. Sources said they 
promoted a settlement that Ms. Jones rejected. 

Ms Jones charges that Mr. Clinton propositioned her at 
a Little Rock hotel in May 1991 when he was governor 
and she was a stare employee. The lawyers said they sml 
had "full confidence" in her case. (Ar) 

Quote /Unquote 

Representative David McIntosh. Republican of In- 
dianalon a bill to provide S279 billion for the Department 
of Labor, Education. Health and Human Services: ' This 
bill turned out to be $8 billion more than we expected and 
a more liberal bill than we think a Republican Congress 
should pass. Our goal is to rewrite this bill on the floorot 
the House of Representatives.” < /vri ' 




• e informed yet impartial, the affairs of the world unfold on the pages of the World’s Daily Newspaper. 

Comprehensive yet concise, 1 




INTERNATIONAL — mTBlMJNE, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 ^ 


PAGE 4 


ASWPACIFIC 


Mother Teresas Uncertain Charity 

Behind the Scene h Some in Calcutta Resented Her Work 


./V r ''V-» T-~ 

Hrr , - 


By Barbara Crossette 

flew York Toms Service 


CALCUTTA — While sweepers 
swept Tuesday and dignitaries insp^' 
ted the broad avenues where no less than 
the Indian Army will escort Motter 
Teresa to her grave on Saturday.! Dr 


teresa — a 

Sushinet Raichoudhury. poised on a 

rough stool in a makeshift 

away, focused on the rasping 

bloated stomach of 3 -year-old Salim 


another upper respiratory tract 
infection." DrJlaichoudhury said, as 
Salim’s anxious mother, 
crouched on the muddy floor mher 
worn sari, reaching up now andihea to 
wine the nose of her wailing son. 

Next to him on the examinMion 
bench, a listless, bone-thin boy and his 
frightened mother watched another doc- 
tortryto read an X-ray in a shed with no 

^AU over the poorest neighborhoods 
of Calcutta every day. countless med- 
ical professionals and volunteers whose 


names will never be famous defy dis- 
piriting odds to care for those in this city 
of 14 million people with no recourse 
but to beg for help. 

In shopfront herbal dispensaries, un- 
der tarpaulins whipped by rain and 
wind, in cramped, stifling rooms off 
narrow alleys where orphans are clothed 
and fed, Calcutta looks like a town 
where a lot of people with veiy little 
money try to relieve the sufferings of 
others — and give them some kind of 
future. 

“Like Hollywood makes the star, 
Calcutta makes the social worker,” said 
a man with a minuscule u nnam ed char- 
ity foundation that dispenses small mer- 
cies like free eyeglasses and notebooks 
for schoolchildren. 

The efforts grow from individual in- 
stincts and private initiative, and they 
are not always welcomed by ward 
politicians who drive small charities out 
of neighborhoods to prevent them from 
becoming centers of self-help and self- 
awareness. 

Neighborhood philanthropists, many 


of whom do not want to be quoted oi 
named, say that better health and a Hate 
knowledge threaten entrenched pol'u- 
cians whose corruption has helped cre- 
ate the squalor and deprivation. 

Mother Teresa has been an inspir- 
ation to many in the city, and her IV » “ 
Nobel Prize apparently drew more 
middle-class Calcuttans into volunteer 
work in tile slums and among the home- 
less. . _ „ 

But under die surface there is often a 
hint of resentment that her international 
fame has given her order, the Missionaries 
of Charity, political immunity — not .t° 
mention enough money to ran an empire 
of good works in scores of countries. 

There are also gentle disagreements 
about the avowedly Christian aims that 
the p*™* Missionaries of Chanty imply 
in a majority Hindu country, and about 
the European-born founder s proclivity 
for accepting social conditions and ai- 
leviating them rather than trying ^ 
change the social environment in which 
most Calcuttans live. . 

Many small-scale foundations in t-ai- 



Taleban Takes 
Key Airport; 

3 Pilots Defect 


Suharto Prohibits 

Fives in Indonesia 


Reuters 

KABUL — Afghanistan’s Taleban 
Islamic militia captured tee airport just 
outside the northern opposition capital 
of Mazar-i Sharif on Tuesday, and oval 
factions clashed in the city, Taleban 
sources and aid workers said. 

Hie Taleban-controlled Kabul radio 
said pilots of three opposition jet fight- 


^ ill Li uuvu wj. ~rr , . - - 

ers had also defected with their planes to 
Taleban airports in the west of the coun- 

^“The Mazar-i Sharif airport was cap- 
tured along with all its military equip- 
ment,” said a radio broadcast mon- 
itored in the Pakistani capital of 

UN sources in Islamabad confirmed 
the fall of the airport and said aid work- 
ers sheltering in underground bunkers 
could hear heavy shelling from the di- 


David iMfAratb/n* Awtawd Pr** 

A boy from the streets of Calcutta 
with flowers for Mother Teresa, 



Philippine Church Sets Terms 
For Canceling Ramos Protest 


Reuters 

MANILA The Philippine Roman Catholic Church said 

Tuesday that it might call off a major demonstration against 
President Fidel Ramos if he promised not to tinker with the 

constitution to stay in power. . . . 

The demonstration, scheduled for Sept. 2 1 ,« expected to be 


the largest in the country since the ‘ Prople Power prot^ts 
that brought an end to the 20 -year rule of Ferdinand Marcos in 


Mr Ramos is to meet this week with the rally's chief . 
oraanizers, Caniinal Jaime Sin and former President Corazon 
AaSnoTto try to defuse tension provoked by Ramos sup- 
porters’ efforts to amend the constitution so he can run for re- 

^^aketTtftiierewas a chance the Catholic leader might call 
off the protest. Cardinal Sin’s spokesman, the Reverend Ans 
Sison. said: “We’re not stubborn.” 

“ft is possible that it will be called off, he added. Why 

Asked what would persuade Cardinal Sin to cancel the 
protest. Father Sison said: “If the cardinal, if Cory Aquino, it 
the ones pushing September 21 are satisfied. 

Mrs Aquino, who was Mr. Ramos’s predecessor as pres- 
ident, helped inspire the 1986 popular uprising against Mr. 
Marcos inwhich hundreds of thousands of people pouredmto 
the streets to back army rebels, including the chief of the 

M MSla^ e w^fOTSIto flee to the United States and Mrs. 
Aquino, whose husband, Benigno. was Mr. Marcos s chief 
rival before he was assassinated in 1983, later became pres- 
ident 


cutta are committed to family pla nn i n g, 
for example, which Mother Teresa 
largely opposed, because they see at 
gutter level eveiy day the tragedy of 
malnourished, unwanted children. 

In a culture where all children are 
normally cherished, the prevalence of 
abandoned babies speaks of real des- 
peration, said Cheryl Markson, an 
American who helps run the Interna- 
tional Mission of Hope Society in the 
Calcutta docklands. 

“Our whole focus here is abandoned 
babies,' ’ said Ms. Markson, who is also 
director of the Friends of Children of 
Various Nations in Denver, Colorado. 
’’The babies brought to us are prema- 
ture or of low birth weight Our philo- 
sophy is to serve those children by sta- 
bilizing their health, then looking to 
adoptions. Since adoption is new in 
T ndfa. many of our babies are not 
wanted. Our problem children find 
homes abroad.” . 

' About 70 percent of the babies res- 
cued by the International Mission of 
Hope go to the United States. Indian 
couples want healthier children - and 
usually, though no longer inevitably — 
only boys. 

Babies brought to the mission s 
ihree-story center, once a marine club, 
may weigh two or three pounds or less, 
and can be held in a nurse’s cupped 

hands. . . . . . 

At the strictly secular mission, aid 
workers cuddle the babies and talk to 
them constantly to give them comfort 
and maybe the' will to five. Most chil- 
dren abandoned on the streets will never 
know their mothers or their roots. 

“A lot of their mothers are un- 
educated and may have no idea how 
they became pregnant." Ms. Markson 
said “There is no sex education." 


'^Environment Minister Saiwono 
Kusumaatmadja said Mr. Suharto 
had ordered plantations, timber 
companies and farmers to stop all 
land clearing. 

-If they disobey, 
ishment will be imposed, Mkaar 
wono told reporters after -a 
with Mr. Suharto. He did not elab- 
orate on possible penalties, (nr) 


Japan Police Raid 

Gangland Haunts 


rection of the airport . 

Aid workers in Mazar-i Sharif said 


the Taleban had not captured the city, 
but some dashes had taken place inside 
it, apparently involving rival opposition 
factions there. 

They said supporters of the ousted 
Uzbek warlord General Abdul Rashid 
Dustam appeared to be in revolt against 
General Abdul Malik, the man who 
drove him from Mazar-i Sharif in 

Mav I 

“Pretty heavy factional fighting 
broke out in Mazar,” one aid worker 
said. “There are bodies in the street. 

Clashes began at about 12:30 P-M- 
and lasted more than, four hours before 
tapering into sporadic gunfire. 
“Shortly after the fighting ended, 
the aid worker said, -‘there were people 
in the street chanting: ‘Malik has gone, 
long live Dustam.’” _ , , 

Hie latest advances by the Taleban 
and their allies against General Malik’s 
mainlv ethnic Uzbek troops followed 
Monday’s capture of the town of 
Kholm, 50 kilometers east of Mazar-i 
Sharif, astride the main highway to Ka- 
bul. „ . , 

The Taleban forces briefly occupied 
Mazar-i Sharif in May when General 
Malik allied with teem to force General 
Dustam into exile in Turkey, but were 
driven out with heavy losses after Gen- 
eral Malik changed sides. 

Abdullah, an opposition spokesman 
representing tee forces of .Mimed Shah 
Masoud. conceded that tee Taleban had 
taken Kholm, but said they had failed to 
break opposition lines north of Kabul 
despite regular attacks. 


TOKYO — Policemen raided 80 
gangster headquarters in western 
Japan Tuesday, and thousands or 
officers were alerted in Tokyo to 
stop an escalating gangland war. 

The crackdown follows a dozen 
shootings across the country finked 
to organized crime infighting that 
erupted after tee slaying of an un- 
derworld boss, Masara Takumi, 

less than two weeks ago. 

Several hundred officers raided 
underworld haunts in search of 
«nins or other weapons. Six sus- 
pects were arrested on weapons 
possession charges. (At) 


Beijing Cuts Off 
Ties mth Liberia 


BEUING — China severed dip- 
lomatic ties with Liberia on Tues- 
day, saying the African nation s 
recognition of Taiwan had serious- 
ly damaged China’s territorial sov- 
ereignty and harmed relations. 


ties with Taiwan, which Beying 
views as a rebel province of China 
and not entitled to diplomatic re- 
cognition. 

“The mistaken decision of tee 
Liberian government has seriously - 
damaged China’s sovereignty” 
and interfered in China's internal 
affairs, Xinhua quoted Beijing's 
ambassador to Liberia, Xie Zhi- 
heng, as saying. (Reuters ) ■- 


THE INTERMARKET 









Asian- Americans Targeted 


Taiwan Sovereign, 
New Leader Says 


Hate Crimes Against Them Up h°io. Study Finds 

. n 


GENERAL 


By Lena H. Sun 

Washinutor; P.'s: Service 


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WASHINGTON — Even as violence 
overall is dropping across the United 
States, hate crimes against Asian- Amer- 
icans rose 17 percent last year, accord- 
ing to a report by a national civil rights 

group. , . . _ 

The report by the National Asian Pa- 
cific American Legal Consortium cited 
more than 500 incidents against Asian- 
Americans that it says were primarily 
motivated bv racial animosity. 

They ranged from tee murder of a 
Vietnamese- American snide ut on a 
Southern California tennis court to rac- 
ist slurs scrawled on the campaign signs 
of a Filipino-American candidate for 
local office in Ohio. 

Executives of tee organization were 
scheduled to meet Tuesday with At- 
torney General Janet Reno to discuss 
ways to address tee issue as pan of a 
White House conference on hate crimes 
that will be held in November. 

The group attributed the increase in 
incidents to a general anti-immigrant 
atmosphere spurred by passage last vear 
of a restrictive immigration reform bill, 
welfare legislation denying benefits to 
legal immigrants and a “general anti- 
minority rhetoric"" that intensified dur- 


ina tee 1996 election year. The cam- 
paign finance controversy has also 
plaved a role in perpetuating the ste- 
reotvpe of Asian- Americans as foreign- 
ers who are suspect, according to the 
group's executive director, Karen Nora- 
saki. 

Questions about improper contribu- 
tions bv some individuals of Asian des- 
cent quickly turned into suspicion of all 
Asian-Americans. the report said. 

Ms. Narasaki said it was important to 
note that while violent crime nationwide 
dropped by 7 percent in 1996. hate 
crimes against Asian-Americans rose. 

There were 5J4 suspected and con- 
firmed incidents against Asian-Amer- 
icans in 1996, up from 458 in 1995. 

The most commonly committed of- 
fenses were vandalism and assault, with 
much of the destruction occurring at 
victims' businesses or places of em- 
ployment. 

The group based its figures on in- 
formation collected from local police, 
human rights commissions and com- 
munity and civil rights groups. 

The incidence of hate crimes was 
particularly high on college campuses 
and in public housing, the study said. On 
college campuses, for example, tee 
number of incidents doubled — mostly 
through hate messages sent on e-mail. 


TAIPEI — Taiwan’s new prime 
minis ter used his first address to 
Parliament on Tuesday to restate 
the islands determination not to be 
intimidated by China. 

Vincent Siew’s address came a 
day after China had condemned 
Panama for playing host to 
Taiwan’s president, Lee Teng-hui 
at a conference on the Panama 
Canal. 

Mr. Siew called on Beijmg to 
recognize the “split” and cease 
insisting that Taiwan was its sov- 
ereign territory. (Reuters) 


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Japan’s former ambassador lo 
Peru, Moribisa Aoki, was given a 
new postTuesdayin charge of deal- 
ing with regional conflicts in 
Africa, Foreign Ministry officials 
said. Mr. Aoki’s new assignment 
came about four months after he 
resigned to take responsibility 
forthe hostage crisis at his official 
residence in Lima. (AFP) 


New Zealand has approved the 
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giving in to farmers who have been 
illegally spreading the disease in an 
effort to save grazing lands. (AP) 


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n-H 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY', SEPTEMBER 10. 1997 


PAGE'S 


’ll 




/"i"" 1 f, »lh 


? • Li* stria 


uM 


INTERNATIONAL 


Mir Turns Toward Sun as Crew Fixes Glitch 


'Moscow -■ £ RussiM , , paL . e Computer Is On, and Solar Panels 
Tuesday aftente' ?««" feed [£' binl Are Realigned to Soak Up the Rays 

^ a series of problems aboard the 11 - ° J 

ye w'®!? aafl - M >«ion Control said. Mir on June 25 and punctured a hole Some experts said the malfun 


iij . '.vmiiji joju. 

r s mam computer failed Mon- 
*! a - * forcing i he three-man Russian- 
mencan crew to shut down some 
Systems. The devices which help 
align the station's solar panels with 
the sun switched themselves off auto- 
matically. reducing energy supplies. 

* < ne crew, with help from Mission 


in a science module. There have been 
several other mishaps since then. 

The spokesman said all systems 
appeared ro be working no’rmally 
Tuesda.v. but that the two cosmonauts 
onboard. Anatoli Solovyov and Pavel 
Vinogradov, and the U.S. astronaut, 
Michael Foale. had not said whether 


p . 1 jjviii iuii i van., iiuu uwi dam >vncuicr 

vontrol. repaired the computer they had switched their Elektronoxy- 
j^Hysh* and restarted it early Tues- gen-generating device back on. 
t u*" e s, ?tion is oriented to ab- The crew shut down the unit after 
sorb the maximum of solar rays.” a the computer failed. 

■ 1,s *! on Control spokesman said after The spokesman said the command- 
? radio link-up with the crew. er, Mr. Solovyov, helped Mission 

i hi ~ v° sco P.' c . devices are crucial Control reload’ the computer with 
he P aJlgn M“” s soIar panels with software. ‘‘He worked all night and 
me sun. enabling them to soak up will sleep now.” the spokesman said. 
P 0 ^'^ 10 *he space station. ‘ He had to assisr in reloading the 
A Progress cargo ship collided with computer,” the spokesman added. 


Some experts said the malfunction 
would force rhe Russian-American 
crew to replace the entire main com- 
puter. but the men managed to fix the 
faulty pan. the spokesman said. 

Officials added, however, that 
eventually the main computer might 
be replaced. A spare computer, the 
size of an average laptop, was taken to 
Mir some time ago. But the spokes- 
man said there were no immediate 
plans to swap the main computer for 
the new one. 

He said that, while Mr. Solovyov- 
slept. the two other crew members 
would conduct medical experiments 
during the day. 

Tlte two Russians replaced an earli- 
er crew last month, and Mr. Foale is 
due to be relieved later this month. 


Court Frees Man From Supporting Child in Surrogate Case 


By Davan Maharaj 

Li/s Aiizc/fj Tiu ie\ 

SANTA ANA. California — In 
^ hat an appeals court has called the 
most extraord i nary ‘ ‘ surrogate- 
P^ renl case yet, a judge has decided 
that a California man does not have 
io financially support a baby that he 
and hi.s former wife hired a surrogate 
mother to bear with anonymous 
donations of egg and sperm. 


Appellate court justices had 
ordered the would-be father to pay 
child support until a lower court ruled 
on the man's contention that he never 
legally became the child's fattier. 

In a ruling made public Monday. 
Orange County Superior Court Judge 
Robert Monarch said the man, John 


The couple hired a surrogate 
mother in 1994 to bear the girl, 
Jaycee Louise Buzzanca. But one 
month before her birth, in March 
1 995. rhe husband sought to relieve 
himself of responsibility for the 
child when he filed for divorce. 

Judge Monarch's decision effec- 


Buzzanca of Costa Mesa, no longer tively leaves the child without legal 
had to pay his former wife. Luanne, parents, as he ruled that for the time 
$386 a month to support the 2-year- being Mrs. Buzzanca ‘‘is not entitled 
old girl, who bears his surname. to be declared the legal mother.” 


; Iraq Promises to Give Details 
: To UN of Biological Weapons 

J 

BAGHDAD — Iraq will give rhe United Nations a full 
| declaration on its biological warfare program in the next 
. 48 hours, the head of the UN Special Commission on Iraq 

■ said Tuesday. 

! The official. Richard Butler, in charge of dismantling 

■ Iraq’s prohibited weapons, said the Iraqi government 
I would give the commission either Tuesday or “within the 

• next 48 hours, the full, final and complete declaration on 
] Iraa’s past biological program. * * 

. He spoke at a news conference after ending four days of 

l « talks with Iraq’s deputy prime minister. Tariq Aziz.’ 
y ! Mr. Butler said the Iraqi declaration would be given to 

; the commission’s biological weapon expen Richard 
! Spenzel in Baghdad. “The declaration is some 800 

■ pages.” he said. ( Reuters ) 

I 

; UN Suspends Refugee Mission 
| In Congo After Repatriations 

'■ UNITED NATIONS. New York _ The UN High 

• Commissioner for Refugees said Tuesday that she had 
. suspended operations in the Congo because of that coun- 
; try’s recent forced repatriation of Rwandan Hutu 
! refugees. 

< “This kind of situation obliges us to suspend the 
\ operations,” Sadako Ogata, the high commissioner, told 

■ reporters after a briefing at the UN Security Council. 

' “We have no more people to protect.” 

I But she left the door open for further activities in 

• Congo. * ‘ If there are refugees with whom we have access. 

! or tltey have access io us. we will certainly consider the 
1 need to help them.’ ' she said. 

; Earlier inis month. Congo expelled 700 Hutu from the 

• eastern part of the country where the UN refugee agency 

' was interv iewing them to evaluate whether they should be 
i sent home. (Reuters) 

5 | Canada Files Suit on Salmon 

■ SEATTLE — A Canadian province has filed suit in a 
' u s. court to try to force the United States. Alaska and 

■ Washington state to abide by a treaty on salmon fishing. 

! The suit, filed Monday in the U.S. District Court by 

■ British Columbia, seeks about S235 million in damages. 

; But the premier of British Columbia. Glen Clark, said 

■ the main goal was to force resumption of negotiations on 

■ fishino regulations under the Pacific Salmon Treaty. 

I Agreement on those regulations has eluded negotiators 
; for more than five years. fAF} 

: Volcano Warning in Montserra t 

: OLVESTON, Montserrat — Authorities are urging 
residents of a central coastal town to evacuate inunc- 
-i diateJy, warning that Monserrafs volcano could set off an 

| 1 avalanche of searing ash and rock at any moment 

The warning came Monday after the volcano sent a 
series of small discharges down iK western flank. Sci- 
entists at the Montserrat Volcano Observatory said vol- 
canic activity had increased to a dangerous level and an 
“explosive event” seemed imminent 

Comoros President Replaces 
Government After Failed Attack 


Reuters 

" MORONI. Comoros -- 
President Mohammed Taki 
announced Tuesday that he 
was dismissing the 12 -mem- 
ber Comoran government 
headed bv Prime Minister 
Ahmed Abdou and the sep- 
arate civil and military cab- 
inets. 

- Speaking on state-run Ra- 
dio Comoros, Mr. Taki an- 
nounced the formation of 3 
transitional government Tne 
move followed the failed at- 
tempt by military last 
week to end a secessionist re- 
volt on Nzwani. 

“It will be myself wfaowill 
run the defense and the nut' 
itaiy cabinets,”. Mr- 
said, without giving any other 
details on the composmon ot 
the transitional government. 

The military cabinet was 
headed by Colonel Hassane 
Harouna. He led the assault 
on Nzwani. the second island 
in the Indian Ocean ar- 


chipelago. which declared 
Aug- 3 that it was seceding. 

•Die Comoros Red Cres- 
cent put the death toll from 
three days of fighting If 56 ‘ 
including 40 soldiers. Thirty 
soldiers were wounded, tne 
Red Crescent said . . 

The Red Cross visited 
Nzwani oh Monday to nv to 
negotiate the release ot lu? 
captured Comoran soldiers. 


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Mr. Foale and his Russian col- 
leagues have faced a wide range of 
problems on the aging space station 
both before and since the June 25 
collision. 

■ Cosmonaut Pulled Key Plug 

Mir's' former flight engineer has 

admitted to accidentally unplugging 
the space station’s main computer in 
July, one of the most serious mishaps 
aboard the ship, officials said Tues- 
day, The Associated Press reported. 

The July 17 accident caused Mir to 
lose all power, and sent it spiraling 
through space- It took the crew and 
ground controllers several tense days 
to overcome the crisis. 

Russian space officials would not 
say at the time who had made the 
blunder. The crew consisted of two 
Russians. Vasili Tsibliyev and Al- 
exander Lazutkin, and Mr. Foale. On 
Tuesday, Viktor Blagov, deputy Mis- 
sion Control chief, said Mr. Lazutkin 
was to blame. 

“He said be made the error.’’ Mr. 
Blagov told reporters, adding that Mr. 
Lazutkin accidentally unhooked the 
cable while working amid a web of 
wiring during preparations for a 
spacewalk. 

Mr. Blagov would not say whether 
Mr. Lazutkin faces a penalty. The 
business daily Kommersant reported 
Tuesdav that space officials had with- 
drawn $10,000 from both Mr. Tsib- 
liyev and Mr. Lazutkin — a third of 
their reported pay for the mission — 
pending the end of an investigation of 
their role in connection with the prob- 
lems that occurred while they were on 
Mir. 




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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1097 

international 



;pd Test Confirms Driver 
Of Diana Was Drank 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New Yort Times Service 


j PARIS — A new blood test has con- 
i firmed earlier findings that the dead 
j driver in the crash that killed Diana, 
* Princess of Wales, on Aug- 31 had a 
i level of alcohol that would be produced 
I by drinking the equivalent of eight to 


i vy ui U «i. B equivalent . 

i nine glasses of wine, more than three 
! times the legal limit in France, lawyers 
i and the police said Tuesday. 

' A lawyer involved in the case said 
! Tuesday night that the latest test showed 
'that the driver, Henri Paid, .assistant 
I security director of the Rite Hotel, had 
< about 0.18 percent alcohol in his blood 
,‘(1 8gratns per liter); the earlier tests put 

‘\ — n i*K iwcmt and 


1 I 1.0 rlf "lfr K'* 1 wlv */t — • J 

. the levels between 0.175 percent and 
; 0.182 percent (1.75 and 1.82 grams per 


The lawyer said he could not confirm 
!a report that the sample also showed 
> traces of anti-depressant drugs in Mr. 
; Paul's blood, which could have com- 
■ pounded the effects of the alcohol. 

’ ft is a misdemeanor in France to drive 
! with more than .05 percent and a criminal 
1 offense to drive with more than .08. 

’ Mr. Paul, 41, speeding away from a 

• pack of pursuing celebrity photograph- 
| efs at a speed estimated up to 180 ki- 

• lometers an hour in a zone with a speed 
’ limit of 50 kilometers an hour, lost 
’ control of the powerful Mercedes S-280 

• limousine in a runnel under the Place de 
il'Alma. 

The car crashed into a concrete sup- 
; port pillar in the tunnel ’s median, crasn- 
. ing Diana's body between the from and 
rear seats. 

Dodi al Fayed, the son of the owner of 
the Ritz, also died in the crash. Lawyers 
! for his father, Mohamed al Fayed, an 
Egyptian businessman living in London 


w ho owns the Harrods department store 
there as well as the Ritz in Paris, de- 
manded the new blood test because they 
had doubts about the accuracy of two 
earlier ones. They insisted that wit- 
nesses said the pursuing photographers 
were what made Mr. Paul lose control of 
the vehicle. 

Mr. Paul had been given the evening 
off the night of the accident but was 
unexpectedly recalled to duty to drive 
Diana and Mr. Fayed home after they 
had dined at the Ritz. 

A bodyguard working for the Fayed 
family, Trevor Rees- Jones, a former 
British paratrooper, survived but 
suffered such severe head and jaw in- 
juries that he has been unable to give 
French investigators his version of what 
happened. Diana had no official French 
or British police protection during her 
Paris visit, which came as she was re- 
turning to London after a holiday with 
Mr. Fayed in the Mediterranean. 

Bernard Dartevelle, one of die 
Fayeds’ lawyers, has said that a pho- 


tograph taken by one of the pursuing 

the crash 


paparazzi moments before 
shows Diana and her bodyguard in the 
car blinded by a camera flash with a 
fol 



Diana’s Mourners Asked 

To Hold Back Flowers 


motorcycle following close behind. 
This, he said, confirmed testimony by 
some witnesses that a motorcycle had 
cut in front of the Mercedes at high 
speed, causing it to lose control. 

A spokesman for Mr. Fayed in Lon- 
don said Tuesday night “Lawyers act- 
ing for the Ritz in Paris have yet to 
receive copies of the reports of the third 
blood test. When they do, they will take 
professional advice and give a reaction 
if it is desirable.” 

Investigating judges have placed nine 
photographers and a motorcycle driver 
under investigation for possibly con- 


AgnxcRMzH’iCK 

BRITISH BUS ACCIDENT — Rescuers working at the crash site in 
Staffordshire, midwest England. The bus, on its way to Buckingham 
Palace, collided Tuesday with a truck and a van, injuring 50 people. 


tributing to the causes of the crash, and 
for hindering rescuers by allegedly fail- 
ing to come to the aid of the victims after 
the crash and snapping pictures of diem 
instead. The photographers have said 
the Mercedes left them far behind when 
it took off on die riverside highway at 
high speed. 

The two judges in charge of the in- 
vestigation, which could also probe the 
possible responsibility of the Ritz man- 
agement for the accident, spent about 45 


minutes in the tunnel Tuesday morning, 
e xamining the road surface and damag e 
to the fatal pillar, the 13th from die 
entrance, as well as scrapes along the 
tunnel’s concrete wall where the wreck 
came to rest, hom blaring and lacing 
oncoming traffic. 

The judges, Herve Stephan and Mar- 
ie-Christine Devi dal, have made no 
public statements about their investi- 
gation and said nothing alter inspecting 
the site. 


Renters 

LONDON — The family of Diana, 
princess of Wales, appealed to Britons 
on Tuesday to stop bringing bouquets to 
her home in the hope that they will join a 
carpet of flowers covering her grave. 

Thousands of people flocked to the 
rural Althorp estate after seeing pho- 
tographs of Diana’s last nesting place on 
a Sower-strewn island, where she used 
to play as a child. 

The Althorp estate was deluged with 
bouquets during the weekend. 

“It is turning intoa problem, and it is 
getting worse,” a spokesman said. 
“People seem desperate to get their 
flowers to the gates of the estate because 
they believe they will be taken to the 
island.” 

“We are now concerned for public 
safety, both near the gates and in the 
surrounding lanes,” she added. 

The family asked people to contribute 
instead to the manorial fund set up to 
funnel money to the charities associated 
with the princess. 

At her Loudon home, Kensington 
Palace, thousands more flocked Tues- 
day to add their flowers to the ocean of 
bouquets. 

Trees in the park surrounding the 
palace were adorned with flowers, and 
man y mourners had built makeshift 
shrines to the princess, decorated with 
candles, messages and pictures cut from 


■thousands of notes, 

sages will be colli 

Diana’s family. . ■ ■ 

The cleaning operation, by a huge 
team of volunteers and- staff from t -0* 
royal parks, is expected to take about 

three weeks. • J 

Diana, 36, was buned away from the 
eyes of the media, which, in the worth of 
her brother Earl Spencer, made herjthe 
most hunted, person of the . modem 
age.” 


Teople seem desperate to 
get their flowers to the 
gates of the estate . 
because they believe they 
wiD be taken to the . 

island. 9 


_ Jicials from the royal household 
were coming to grips with the logistics 
of removing the more than I million 
bouquets left at various London 
palaces. 

Work is expected to start Thursday, 
when the freshest blooms will be 
gathered and sent to hospitals. 

The remainder will be used as com- 
post in the palace gardens but the tens of 


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Dutch Mourners Get Video 


Reuters 

AMSTERDAM — Dutch viewers who missed parts of 
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The cable company Casema pledged to deliver the 
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CAPE TOWN — Former President 
F. W. de Klerk, who freed Nelson Man- 
dela from jail in 1 990 and reversed South 
Africa's apartheid policies, retired Tues- 
day, handing the mantle of opposition to 
a young successor. 

Mr. de Klerk, 61, announced after a 
two-hour meeting of the National 
Party’s electoral college in Cape Town 
that tiie party's executive director, 
Marthinos van Schnflcwyk, 37, had won 
a runaway victory in a four-man con- 
test 

“There was a direct result at the first 
ballot with an absolute majority for Mr. 
Marthinus van Schalkwyk,” he told 
about 300 supporters waiting outside 
Parliament. 

The other three candidates — Danie 
Scbutte, Kraai van Niekerk and Sam de 
Beer, all veterans of Mr. de Klerk's 
whites-only cabinet — shared 30 of the 
105 electoral college votes cast 

“I am sure that our new leader will be 
a successful leader who will further 
transform this party until this party is 
part of the government again," Mr. de 
Klerk said. 

Mr. van Schalkwyk, a former political 
science lecturer and a former party youth 
leader, said he would work to eradicate 
the divides that were the basis of three 
centuries of South African racial se- 
gregation. 

“We can turn the tide of history and 
we will,” he told a crowd of black and 
white supporters, adding, * ‘The National 
Party will break down the barriers that 
divided us and build on that which unites 
us. 

"Our origins are less important than 



AnZkoMIAionftanMe 

Marthinos van Schalkwyk, with his wife, Suzette, after his election 
Tuesday In Cape Town as leader of South Africa’s National Party. 


our destiny,” he said. “It is time to buiy 
the spears" It is time to jointly build.” 

Mr. van Schalkwyk inherits a party 
without a clear opposition role and 
maimed by a succession of high-profile 
resignations and defections to a 
fledgling opposition movement led by 
RoeJJF Meyer. 

Mr. Meyer, dismissed by Mr. de Klerk 
for proposing earlier this year that the 
National Party should disband, said in a 
statement that the new leader would 
“sail the same ship on the same 
course." 

Mr. Mandela’s governing African Na- 
tional Congress also said the election 
would mean more of the same from the 
country's biggest opposition party. 

One ANC legislator. Max Sisulu, 
said, "The election of Mr. van Schalk- 


wyk may have brought in a new face, but 
like his predecessor he has apartheid 
skeletons in his cupboard.” 

Mr. van Schalkwyk declined to be 
drawn on the most immediate question 
he will face, which is whether to return to 
Mr. Mandela's 'government of national 
unity for the remaining 18 months of its 
term. 

Mr. de Klerk pulled out of the co- 
alition in June 1996, saying the ANC 


had stopped listening to his party's 
ina tin ‘ ’ 


views and that he could better oppose 
the government from the opposition 
benches. 

Mr. de Klerk was scheduled to ad- 
dress Parliament for the last time later 
Tuesday before retiring to his coastal 
resort home of Herman us to write his 
memoirs. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 They're hailed 
in cities 
everywhere 


■ Ancient Roman 
senate house 
ie Mies of 
Hollywood 


1* Downwind 
IS Mimicking 
leHeficopter 
builder Sikorsky 
17 Compatriot. 

redundantly 
30 Glorify 
11 Miss USA 


MEDITERRANEAN 
YACHT MOORINGS 

For Safe 


Contact 
Marco Recchia 
COGEMAD 
Tel.: 33 4-93 633-633 
— Fax: 33 4-93 633-634 


*2 Youth org. 
2J9C. say 

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®-9- 

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a* Posted 

W Star m Cetus 
3« Guitarist 
Clapton 

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Comics 

superhero, with 
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weapon 

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companion 

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47 Paleozoic and 
Mesozoic 
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60'sorg. 

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Starts 

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64 Stratagizing, 
redundantly 
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61 March 

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71 Unit of force 
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Maltose Falcon* 
73 Match parts 


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coach Karofyr 

4 Moves, as care 

5 Crow's Cry 

6 It's shown In 
bans: Abbr. 

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Rising Star 

a Estuary 

• Shirting brightly 
id Itinerary word 

11 They might 
whip something 
up in the 
kitchen 

12 Get out of bed 

13 Fields 

ia Mayberry sot 
16 Improve 
as Fervor 
as PC key 

27 ‘Good r 

26 Guns, in a way 
2i Stage solo 


P 


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to 


- 


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In his first comments since die death 
of Diana in a . high-speed car. crash on 
Aug. 31, the head of Britain’s press 
watchdog said he wanted swift progress 
on reviewing -the tore of paparazzi pho- 
tographers. .. 

Lorn Wakeham, chairman of the 
Press Complaints 7 Commission, _ also 
urged newsp a pers to respect thepnvacy 
of Diana’s young sons. Prince William 
and Prince Harry. ' ■ . 

An opinion poll cm Tuesday provided 
some comfort fen: the royal family, 
which has been criticized for appearing 
in diff erent to. the nation’s overwhelm- 
ing outpouring of grief over Diana. 

The poll, published in the Sun 
tabloid, said 73 percent of those sur-. 
veyed supported the royal family. But 
39 percent feel less favorable toward 
them since Diana’s death. 


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so Leo. for one 
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antelope 

33 TV staple since 
1/14/52 

64 Lustful looks 
56 Safari lodgings 
so Fido's cousin 




® New York Timea/Edited by WiU Shortz. 


Solution to Puzzle of Sept 9 


DOWN 

1 Site for a bile 

2 “World Capitals' 


tor 200, — ' 


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PAGE 3' 


INTERN ATM 


fA CM> tf, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 10. 199; 


PACE 7 


EUROPE 


Russia’s Reformers Battle a New Elite: Business Barons 


By David Hoffman 

— few >n«i P . ijt Srrvn e 

MpSCOW- When President Boris 
eltsm -recovered from heart surgery 
and launched his second term in earnest 
last spring, he recniiied two youthful 
reformers, AnaroLi Chubais and Boris 
Nemtsov, to help finish the job he began 
m his first term — transforming “the 
economy of post-Soviet Russia from 
state racialism to marker capitalism. 

Today, Mr. Nemtsov, a first deputy 
prime minister, and Mr. Chuha/s. fi- 
nance minister and deputy prime min- 
ister, are locked in a battle with the most 
entrenched interests of the New Russia, 
among them the business tycoons who 
grew wealthy during Mr. Yeltsin's first 
reform campaign — and whose support 
ensured his re-election over a Com- 
munist challenger last year. 

The new government is still snug- 
gling with the economic dead weight of 
the Soviet era, such as wasteful sub- 
sidies and huge, inefficient factories, 
many of which are moribund. 

But die young reformers also have 
taken aim at the new corporate olig- 


archs. whose sudden accumulation of 
wealth epitomize> both the successes of 
Mr. Yeltsin s drive to change Russia 
and one of its most obvious distor- 
tions. 

It is not clear how far the young 
reformers are willing to go to rein in the 
oligarchs, whose financial- industrial 
combines already have gobbled up a 
large share of Russian industry, the me- 
dia and major banks. 

By some accounts. Mr. 

Chubais and Mr. Nemtsov 
are simply jousting with 
the tycoons to demonstrate 
that the Kremlin t.s setting 
the rules — and that the new rules will 
be more even-handed than in the past. 

Nonetheless, the two reformers have 
stirred up plenty of resistance. 

“In 1 992. the government had a lot of 
enemies." recalled Leonid Gozman, a 
professor at Moscow State University 
and a longtime activist in the reformist 
faction of former Prime Minister Yegor 
Gaidar. 

"Bur the enemies of this government 
are even stronger than in 1992," Mr. 
Gozman said. 


Mr. Gaidar's government tried to tear 
down the old state-run system by lifting 
price controls and swiftly transferring 
shops, factories, mines and other state 
property to private owners. 

Bui the resulting transition was 

chaoiic and warped." and the Russian 

economy fell into the equivalent of 
America's Great Depression of the 
J930s. 


We’re at a turning point. Either we become a 
normal state or are ruled by special interests. 

By the rime Mr. Chubais and Mr. 

Nemtsov were appointed earlier this 
year, the state had grown extraordi- 
narily weak. It was chronically unable to 
collect taxes or pay pensions and wages. 

At the same time, the new private sector 
was dominated by a handful of plu- 
tocrats and monopolies. 

Lilia Shevtsova, a senior associate at 
the Carnegie Endowment for Interna- 
tional Peace in Moscow, said Mr. 

Yeltsin had made a "courageous and 
desperate" move by turning to the 


voting reformers. 

’ In the past, she recalled. Mr. Yeltsin 
had always played Kremlin factions 
against each oilier, a balancing act thar 
often led to paralysis and drift? But this 
time, she said, he gambled e\ervihiug 
on Mr. Chubais and Mr. Nemtsov. 

The officials are not alike, yet they 
depend on each other. The red-haired 
Mr. Chubais, 42, a fighter steeled by- 
five years of Kremlin re- 
' form battles, is one of the 
most disliked public fig- 
ures in Russia because of 
his early role in devising 
■ the sell-off of state prop- 
erty -— which many viewed as a 
giveaway. 

Mr. Chubais has no independent 
political base, but Mr. Nemtsov. 37. the 
former governor of the Nizhny 
Novgorod region, is an unabashed pro- 
vincial politician who was re-elected by 
a wide margin last year before coming 
to Moscow'. 

A pragmatist. Mr. Nemtsov ranks 
high in Russian popularity polls, and 
many see him as a contender to succeed 
Mr. Yeltsin. 



NATO Forces 
Intervene in 
Serb Standoff 


The Asmh-imcJ Press 

BANJA LUKA. Bosnia-Herzegovi- 
Aa — NATO forces moved to end a 
dangerous standoff between rival Ser- 
bian camps Tuesday, escorting dozens 
.of security men loyal to Radovan 
Karadzic from a hotel surrounded by 
their foes. 

Policemen loyal tp Biljana Plavsic, 
the Bosnian Serb president, blocked ac- 
cess to the Hotel Bosna in the center of 
Banja Luka early Tuesday, cutting tele- 
phones, power and water. Momcilo 
Krajisnik, Mr. Karadzic's top aide and 
the Serb member of Bosnia’s joint pres- 
idency, and several of his top aides were 
trapped inside. 

In an effort to defuse a potentially 
explosive situation, diplomats and of- 
ficials of the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization peace force negotiated with 
Mr. Krajisnik’s security men and Mis. 
■Plavsic ’s police to release him and other 
senior officials. 

• Shortly before 3 P.M., peace force 
troops escorted dozens of Mr. Krajis- 
nik’s security detail through a hostile 
crowd of thousands chanting "Thieves! 


Thieves!" and demanding the weapons 
reportedly found on the security per- 
sonnel. Mr. Krajisnik and his associates 
remained in the hotel, negotiating terms 
to allow them ro leave. 

The episode was one of the most 
humiliating for top aides to Mr. Karad- 
zic since they first came to power and 
started fomenting the war thai erupted in 
Bosnia in 1992. It w as also one of the 


few times they have been publicly 
jeered by Serbs. 

Earlier, Jovan Zametica. Mr. Krajis- 
nik’s political adviser, called the stand- 
off a hostage crisis and stressed that its 
outcome would have a "profound ef- 
fect” not only on local elections sched- 
uled for Saturday and Sunday, but on the 
future of Bosnia. 

Several thousand angry Plavsic sup- 


porters gathered in front of the hotel, 
chanting “We want the arms!” and 
“Go to Pale!" the Karadzic stronghold 
east of Sarajevo. 

In Pale, another senior man in the 
Karadzic camp, Aieksa Buha. and oth- 
ers in the ruling party told reporters that 
they would demand postponement of 
the' local elections because of the 
crisis. 


In recent months. Mr. Nemtsov and 
Mr. Chubais have chalked up a few 
victories, such as forcing Gazprom, the 
natural gas monopoly, to pay its back 
taxes. They also have* had failures, such 
as continued inability of the government 
to collect luxes. 

Bui the most significant battle of their 
short tenure broke out just recently — 
their conflict wjrh rhe tycoons. 3 busi- 
ness coterie whose dominance of polit- 
ical and economic life here has led to 
coinage of the word semibunkirshina. or 
the age of the bankers. 

Mr. Chubais and Mr. Nemtsov have 
served notice thar they have had enough 
of these business barons milking the 
state for their ow n benefit, often through 
insider deals. "We’ve hardened our 
line." Mr. Chubais said recently. 

Mr. Chubais and Mr. Nemtsov •'want 
to clean up the mess, and they don’t 
want to be hostage to the large 
bankers." said a political analyst. An- 
drei Kortunov. 

A source close to Mr. Chubais said: 
“We've reached a fork in the road. One 
way leads to a normal liberal state, like 
Europe and North America, where there 
are laws and clear rules. But another 
way leads to Latin America, to countries 
where barons have real power. We don’t 
want to go that way." 

The conflict first flared after the pri- 
vatization of 25 percent of the Svvazin- 
vest telephone holding company. One- 
banker, Vladimir Potanin of Unexim- 
bank. won the bidding for the shares, 
paying SI. 9 billion, with help from tbe 
international financier George Soros. 
Some analysts said it was a relatively 
fair sale because, unlike past tenders, it 
went to the highest bidder and earned a 
bundle of cash for the government. 

But it prompted howls of protest from 
the losers, including the media magnate 
Vladimir Gusinsky. who complained 
that there had been collusion between 
the buyers and sellers of Svyazinvest. 

Mr. Chubais also provoked bankers 
by nying to cut off the "easy money” 
they have been able to squeeze from the 
state. Soaring returns on government 
bonds, which reached 200 percent and 
buoyed most of the banks last year, have 
come down to about 20 percent. 

Meanwhile. Mr. Nemtsov has pushed 
the giant energy monopolies, Gazprom 
and Unified Energy Systems, an elec- 
tricity monolith, toward reform. 

Gazprom has been forced to accept 
more state oversight. A lucrative deal for 
Gazprom management is being rewritten, 
and the company paid the state 14 trillion 
rabies, or S2.4 billion, in back taxes. 

With the new cash. Mr. Chubais and 
Mr. Nemtsov paid the months-long 
backlog in pensions and military wages. 
But experts say that it was a stopgap 
solution and that Russia's fiscal woes 
are far from being solved. 


BRIEFLY 


Ihtican Toughens 
Death Penalty Hew 

VATICAN CrTY— The Roman 
Catholic Church has all but ruled" 
out the death penalty as an accept- . 
able form of punishment, according 1 ' 
to revisions to its official teaching' 
announced on Tuesday. 

In other changes, the acceptab- 1 ' 
ility of animal experiments is 
slightly narrowed, organ donation *. 
is encouraged and wording on ho : 
mosexualiry was changed to avoid" 
taking a stand on The cause. 

The revisions come in the defin-; 
itive edition of the catechism, the 1 
compendium of church teachings, 
issued Tuesday in Latin. 

Early versions of the catechism,, 
the first revision in more than four) 
centuries, were published in mod-, 
em languages in 1992. (APT 

Germany Orders :: 
Prison for \ Healer ’ - 

COLOGNE — A German faith, 
healer accused of causing the death 1 ' 
of three cancer patients by advising 
them not to see a doctor has been 1 / 
sentenced to 19 months in prison. . 

Ryke Geerd Hamer. 62, who was. 
barred 1 1 years ago from practicing", 
his form of medicine, w as involved 
in a high-profile legal battle waged 1 ) 
by the parents of an Austrian girl; 
Olivia Pilhar. 

She was noi allow ed by her par- • 
ents to undergo chemotherapy, fol-] 
lowing the healer's advice. 

She was later cured by physi- 
cians. On Monday, the court'; 
ordered the healer’s continued de : - 
tention after his attorney said he" 
would appeal. 

The prosecution requested a 28- 
month sentence. (AFP) 

Oslo Leader Sets 
Terms for Election ; 

OSLO — Prime Minister Thor- ! 
bjoera Jagland of Noway said • 
Tuesday that he was optimistic the ) 
Labor Party would win sufficient < 
support to stay in power in nexr ) 
week's election. 

But he repeated a threat that the 1 
government would step down if it 
failed to win the same share of * 
votes on SepL 15 as it did in 1993. 

The Labor Party polled 36.9 per- ■ | 
cent in the last election, winning 67,; 
of the total of 165 seats. ( ReuiersT 


o 

CEYLAN 

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PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1997 


international 


« ^ — 1 m ' ' 

fan Azerbaijan, Communist Glory Lies in Ruins 


g Destroyed Monument Celebrated 26 Martyrs to the Revolution 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Tones Service 


dren from Vilnius to Vladivostok- for control of the oil-producing Cau- 

Streets, squares, city districts, factories, casus. He sent one of his trusted ueu- 
housine complexes, ships and subway tenants, Stepan Shaumian, to Baku who 

. __ l, miccinn nf imnndno Sninfit DQWCf- 


o RUSSIA 


teli 


i of stone covered with cerarm^ Qut m of some sartiofront of aged to seize control of Baku. They 

• towers over one °f 9**" * Stout to the monument School classes and Com- imprisoned enemies, closed newspa- 

♦ parks looiung as if it ought be aw muni5t youth o^ps gathered to pledge pers, abolished the city council and 
I hftoff for a .jqumeyto ^ P Q^e a solemn loyaltytotL Bolshevik cause, stood by while Armenian militants 

i ' S? th^Jorshio of Soviet Visiting dignitaries came to pay tribute, killed thousands of Azerbaijanis sus~ 

i .shnne dedicated to the worship ot couples lcft Jg^n ^ peered of and-Communist beliefs. 

; «wun«nisra are was fore vernal flame, trusting that the But because Lenin was unable to send 

j front, where a a ndriie overeized bust of memory of the commissars would bring Mr. Shaumian militaiy support, his gov- 
i once mounted, the overe^o g enunent soon fell, replaced by a new one 

t a man that still stan ^ow die figures of the commissars, that proclaimed the independence of 

t ‘Merest of the monument has been once cast boldly in stone and metal, are Azerbaijan. The commissars were ar- 
t siMshed by exuberant gone. Their flame is out and nothing in rested, transported across the Caspian 

J Azerbaijanis in 1989 as the Soviet Union Baku bears their name. Sea and put aboard a tram headed id 

J SSnSmllMse “They came here to force an evil the desert of what is now Turkmenistan. 

! ™,n,nn B m=n<imy have had u even system on .us.” Yaar Kirniov a pen- ^.shortly boforeda^m on SepL 20. 


mmm 


GEORGIA 


AZERBAIJAN 

I 5£ 




TURKEY < 


NAKHICHEVAN ^ 
fAZERBAUW) IRAN 



circle. 

The rest of the monument has been once ■ 
destroyed, smashed by exuberant gone. 

Azerbaijanis in 1989 as the Soviet Union Baku 
began to collapse. * 

. This monumenimay have had an even sysla 


i ms monuincm»»“j 1 i — : , — . ... ,c 

deeper significance than the statues of sioner, said as he sunned himself near 

* H u... ...w, m rnmninn in thp mnnumcnt nn a IWenI fl ftp moon. 


,Marx and Lenin that were so common in 
the Soviet Union that many people 
stopped noticing them. It was dedicated 
to 26 young Bolsheviks who gave their 
Jives to establish Communist rule in the 
Oucasus. 

The legend of the 26 Baku commis- 
sars, as they came to be known, was a 
revolutionary epic of almost spiritual 
power, taught reverently to schoolchil- 


the monument on a recent afternoon. 
“Now they’re finally gone, and thank 
God for that” 

The story of the 26 commissars is at 
once a stirring tale of sacrifice and an 
object lesson in the use of history for 
political ends. 


Sea and put aboard a train headed into 
the desert of what is now Turkmenistan. 
There, shortly before dawn on Sept. 20, 
1918, they were marched onto a bleak 
hillside and shot. 

Independent Azerbaijan survived for 
just 23 months. Marxists re-established 
their power here and soon began to eu- 
logize the commissars as heroic martyrs. 
Blame for their deaths was laid on Brit- 
ish forces that had sought in vain to 


[IUUUUU GIIU9. “““(3 — 

In the months after Lenin’s seizure of prevent Bolshevism from taking bold in 
power in 19 17, he was engaged in a high- the Caucasus. 

stakes struggle with the Turks and Brit- Because Azerbaijan is a land of poets. 


it was inevitable that many poems and 
songs would be written about the mar- 
tyrs. One included these lines: 

“I recall how the British shot our men 
from Baku, 

“Those 26 commissars, brave men 
and true.’* 

Modern researchers have bad little 
success in their efforts to learn the truth 
behind the commissars* execution- The 
present British consol in Baku, Keith 
Oliver, said that all he had been able to 
gather from his readings was that ac- 
cusations of British involvement in the 
executions were false. 

One question that remains un- 


■ nnfrT| r .i 1 rr -m- x,„ Y.jATnna 

What remains of the monument to the 26 commissars who established 
communism in Azerbaijan sitting, mostly destroyed, in a square in Baku. 


answered is how a young Armenian 

Bolshevik named Anastas MSkoyan, who 
was imprisoned with the commissars. 


managed to escape death. Mr. Mikoyan 
went on to hold high positions under 
every Soviet leader from Lenin to Leonid 
B rezhn ev, confirming the reputation be 
first won in Baku as a great survivor. 


an article suggesting that Mr. Shamnian 


had also escaped the firing squad and 
made his way to India to take up a new 
life, but it offered no proof.' 

“Considerable mystery will always 
surround the last days of the Baku com- 
missars,” the historian Peter Hopkirk 
has written. To search for the full truth, 
he wrote, “is to enter a labyrinth of lies, 
evasion, missing telegrams, buck- 
passing and propaganda.” 


Chiapas Rebels 
Start Odyssey 
To Highlight 
Indian Rights 


The Associated Press 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, 
Mexico — Thousands of rebels and their 
supporters began a 450-kilometer (280- 
milej trip to Mexico City on Tuesday to 
publicize their demands for greater In- 
dian rights. 

- About 2,500 protesters, who support 
the Zapatista National Liberation Army, 
left San Cristobal de Las Casas in a bus 
caravan, leaving behind thousands of 
supporters. 

The caravan was to stop Tuesday 
night in Juchitan, a center of Indian 
culture on the Tehuantepec Peninsula. It 
is to arrive in Mexico City on Friday. 

The trip comes nearly four years after 
the Zapatista rebels began a brief re- 
bellion, promising an armed march on 
Mexico City. 

• The rebels say they are traveling un- 
armed to demand that the government 
improve the lot of Indians and remove an 
estimated 25,000 to 40,000 federal 
troops from their region. 

President Ernesto Zedillo did not 





ULSTER: Sinn Fein Renounces the Use of Violence 


refusing to talk to the British' government, the same coin.” 

, ,• D J.I - I .A...! . M. 


loyalists and the unionis ts, but that is not what this 
process is about.” 

Richard McAuley, a Sinn Fein spokesman, 
said die endorsement of die Mitchell Principles 
represented another step toward “removing the 
gun from Irish politics,” bur he acknowledged 
that much remained to be done. 

“We have to build cm it,” he said. 

But David Ervine, who represents another 


largely Protestant party, spoke for many on die 
other side when he said. “Signing op is one thing. 


other side when he said, “Signing up is one thing, to boycott' 
Irving with them is another." they were 

David Kerr, an assistant to the Ulster Unionist percentage 


1 jrixjHQP Rndvrfl.'Rrulii' 

Sinn Fein's leader, Gerry Adams, right, with his delegates, outlining a new policy on Tuesday. 


nonviolence, in part because the leadership had 
said it was not directly linked to the IRA and, as a 


resematives — their presence is likely. 
“We're not going to allow Sinn Fen 


political party, long have been committed to a graalize the unionists,” Mr. Kerr said. 


ISRAEL: On Eve of Albright Visit, Hard Questions in Israel as Netanyahu Faces Dissent GERMANY: 


Continued from Page I 


Mrs. Peled-Eicbanan’s sentiments 
clearly went beyond what many Israelis 
felt or thought, and there was no ques- 
tion that a good number of people felt as 
strongly that Mr. Arafat and his Pal- 
estinian Authority were responsible for 
die bombings because of the Palestinian 


Minister David Levy reportedly sur- 
prised the other ministers when he de- 
clared that he would not remain in a 
government that destroys the peace. 

“It may be there are those who be- 
lieve this process should be left to die,” 


Mr. Netanyahu of “shattering a sacred 
principle that has guided Israeli gov- 
ernments for the past 25 years at lease 
You do not reject the hand of an Arab 
enemy that is extended in peace.” 


Parallel with those reactions was a publicly called for- a withdrawal from commentators preferred- to focus on the 

- -• . . .. , i - 1 i: L, Ur Vfilil’e nlwic 


mention the conflict, which shook the leader’s failure to clamp down on mil- will happen without the Oslo process? 


the newspaper Ma’ariv. ‘Tm not one of ity of continuing to operate inside Leb- 
them. Don’t they ask themselves what anon, where Israeli troops have taken 


| nation in January 1994, in his State of the 
J Nation address a week ago. Rebels say 
1 their caravan and weeklong stay in the 
f nation's capital are aimed at showing 
“That they are still an important part of the 
" national agenda. 

The Zapatista uprising on Jan. 1, 
/fl.994, drew world attention for Mexico's 
! '^impoverished Indians. Fighting lasted 
- less than two weeks, and the two sides 
then began a series of off-and-on peace 
talks. In February 1996, they signed the 
partial accord that promised greater au- 
, tonoray for Mexico's Indians. But Mr. 
\ Zedillo later said autonomy would 
1 threaten national unity and has refused to 

• implement the accord. 

: The government has said it welcomes 

the gathering as a step toward turning the 
‘ rebel group into a legitimate political 

• force. Nevertheless, the newspaper La 
' Jornada in Monday's edition quoted po- 

• lice sources as saying thousands of of- 
; fleers would be monitoring the group’s 

activities in the capital. Most rebel leaders 
ore remaining behind in a remote comer 
of Chiapas, Mexico's poorest state. 


itant Islamic movements in areas under Won’t we find ourselves on a dead-end 


his control. 

Yet Mr. Netanyahu's readiness to 
seize on the bombings to cancel further 
troop withdrawals from the West Bank 
and thus, in effect, abandon the last 
vestiges of the Oslo accords seemed to 
confirm for many of his critics what they 
had long claimed: that the prime minister 
had been waiting for a way to get out of 
an arrangement he had held in disdain. 

Mr. Netanyahu himself spoke to the 
cabinet as if the process were finished, 
referring to the “agreement signed by 
the previous government” as a dead 
letter, and declaring that if negotiations 
resumed, they would be on a final status 
agreement, not on interim steps. 

But if Mr. Netanyahu now believed he 
could pursue the path be had always 


road? Will that stop the terrorism and 
attacks?" 


heavy casualties this year. The debate 
flared to new heights after a squad of 


ister in 1982 led the unpopular Israeli growth and employment. 


invasion of Lebanon. 

The dissension prompted a sharp re- 


naval commandos on a mysterious buke from Mr. Netanyahu, who told his 


night-time raid ran into a Lebanese guer- cabinet, “We must close ranks before 


Though the reactions of the left were riJJa ambush last week, with the loss of the public.” He probably also hoped that 


more predictable, they were also harsher 
than before. The daily Ha’aretz accused 


12 men. 

To many Israelis, the failure and the 


the government would close ranks be- 
fore Mrs. Albright’s visit. 


KOREA: Northern Soldier Gunned Down While Crossing Border 


Continued from Page 1 


preferred, public opinion polls showed 
that a majority of Waelis still want to 


ried to North Korean men to return home 
for short visits with their families. In 
return. North Korea hopes that Japan will 
soon resume food aid; the country is in 
die midst of a devastating famine. 

About 1,800 Japanese wives in North 
Korea have been barred from traveling 


The agreement reached Tuesday will 
allow lOto 15 women to visit Japan fora 
week in October. Because there have 
been so many obstacles to the women's 
visits, some officials cautioned that they 
would believe the agreement only when 
the women stepped onto Japanese soil. 
But for now, Japanese officials said, they 
have a written agreement and North 


that a majority of Israelis still want to 
continue the political process. 

The sharpest attack on the suggestion 
that the Oslo process was dead came 
from an unexpected quarter. In the 
course of the cabinet meeting. Foreign 


outside the country, as all ordinary North Korea has said other groups will follow 
Koreans are. The Japanese public and the first ser of wives. 


government have grown increasingly 
hostile toward North Korea over this 
issue. As a result, the usnally generous 
Japan has stopped giving food aid to its 
impoverished neighbor. 


As pan of the deal. Japan is to pay for 
the women's travel expenses. 

"This is a significant step.” said a 
U.S. official close to the negotiations. 
* 'The Japanese have been after this for a 


long time. Now we will have to see what 
tins means in terms of Japanese food 
aid.” 

North Korea marked the 49th an- 
niversary of its founding Tuesday, with 
more propaganda than usual from the 
Stalinist state. The official newspaper, 
Rodong Sinmura, praised the de facto 
leader Kim Jong D as “the ever-vic- 
torious, iron- willed commander" who 
has turned North Korea into an “in- 
vincible country.” 

Mr. Kim has srill not assumed the 
formal titles of state president and Com- 
munist Party chief. Has father, Kim II 
Sung, held those offices. 


REFORMS: Sidelining Marxist Dogma 


Continued from Page 1 


year even after 30 billion yuan in gov- 
ernment aid. 

In the next three years, the govern- 
ment hopes to shut down, sell off or 
merge 300,000 state-owned companies. 


the more successful Mr. Zhang points 
out while fidgeting with a pager and 
checking details of his compLiy’s new 
home page on the Internet. 

“We have to be flexible to keep good 
employees, ’ ’ Mr. Zhang said, noting that 
dozens of other state companies in the 


leaving just 3.000 productive enterprises dis trier have since been sold to em- 


aitogether. 

Up to 1 10 million jobs are at stake in a 
country that doesn’t have unemploy- 
ment insurance. 

Not that the party has much choice but 
to endorse the retreat from central man- 
agement of the increasingly market-ori- 
ented economy. 


The lightbulb worker, Zhang Delia, 
is been looking for work ever since he 


was laid off a year ago and joined some 
14 million Chinese unemployed 
He spends most days on a Beijing 


sidewalk holding up a “Work Wanted” 
sign. At night, he dodges police outside 
the capital city's railroad station trying 


ployees or other private companies. 

The local industrial bureau still holds 
a 20 percent stake in Aimer but has 
surrendered influence to the 120 -odd 
workers, led by Mr. Zhang, who own the 
remaining stake. 

Mr. Zhang expeas the party to re- 
pudiate Marxist dogma even further 
after the congress. 

In southern Jiangxi province, once the 
last hold-out of the besieged Commu- 
nists in the 1930s, leaders peddle prag- 
matism. 

“If it’s beneficial, we'll do it.” said 
Huang Xinlong, vice commissioner of 
Ganzhou county earlier this year. "It 



CHINA: Jiang Moves to Reform Industry 


Continued from Page 1 


Chen Xitong speaking in 1993. 


demic to the system. In the novel, one 
official says to another 

"The current battle against corruption 
is full of sound and fury, and there is 
plenty of action, too. But after a while 
there will be all sound and fury and little 
action, and by-and-by. not even any 
sound and fury will be heard." He ar- 
gues that the system depends on the large 
ranks of middle cadres who are corrupt 
and therefore have stakes in maintaining 
the system. "We may even say that 
corruption has made our administration 
more stable," he said. 

However, Mr. Chen’s waiting period 
appears to be coming to an end. The 
party's discipline inspection group said 


that “it has been established that Chen, 
taking advantage of his position, had 
accepted and embezzled a large number 
of valuable items and had squandered 
large amount of public funds to support a 
corrupt and decadent life.” 

The watchdog department said "he 
had also abused his power to help his 
relatives and aides to run businesses and 
seek illicit interests, and seriously neg- 


lected his duty, being responsible to a 
grave exrenr for the Jaw-breakine and 


grave exrenr for the law-breaking and 
criminal activities of Wang Baosen, a 
former deputy mayor of Beijing." 

Mr. Wang committed suicide in early 
1995, drawing attention to the scandal. 
Mr. Chen's son was recently sentenced 
to a long jail sentence. Mr. Chen’s mis- 
tress fled the country. 


KINGDOM: A Relaxed Scotland Prepares to Vote on Devolution 


to catch some undisturbed sleep on the doesn 't matter what share the state holds 
pavement. Occasionally, he picks up in a company.” 


Continued from Page 1 


drive away investment, make Scotland But even wealth may cause tensions. 


work on a construction site in exchange 
for a few cents per hour, food and a place 
to sleep. Other days, he begs. 

“If the government now says it’s mis- 
management that’s made all these fac- 
tories unprofitable, how come you don 't 


Jiangxi has now shed as many as 90 
percent of its small slate-owned compa- 
nies, local officials say. 

Those firms, from brickworks and or- 
ange groves to garment makers, have 
been sold or leased out in a bid to keep 


see those managers sleeping in the them alive. Sometimes the buyers are 
streets?” Mr. Zhang asks, kicking a clod workers, sometimes Chinese or foreign 


of earth in front of a passing car. 

Aimer Garments was the first indus- 
trial firm to experiment with privatiza- 
tion in Beijing's eastern Chaoyang dis- 
trict, a region where light manufacturers 
and shops are fast elbowing out refri- 
gerator-makers and car plants. 

Annual salaries of Aimer's employ- 


entrepreneurs. 


tional Parliament at Westminster. 

The second question is whether to 
grant the Parliament power to vary in- 
come tax by up to 3 percent and change 
local- business taxes. 

A previous devolution referendum in 
1979 failed to achieve the required sup- 
port of 40 percent of all registered voters. 
But this time, the proposals need only a 


poorer, and it will strike at the heart of Although Scotland’s per capita wealth is 


By comparison, about 40 percent of majority of those voting Thursday, 
mpanies nationwide have been sold With polls showing support for de- 


"^'the same, it is the Social Democrat 

Sa *M* n Glasgow on Tuesday. ing S wh£h KB 

Many in business share that view. is 25 percent above average Richard cm ui , J * reform ’ produemg a 

If (he vote is “Yes,” a Scottish Par- Mowbray, a leader of the°aiii-devS- ,ed e “Ptoy«$ tp 

iiament would inherit a strong economy ution Think Twice campaign sa id th-u 1 go . vernment “d opposition 

enjoying the benefits of a shift away difference could spark an English' back 1 ? p “f a,yi,s . . 
from such traditional industries as steel lash against devolution and lead to dan the F.S st ® lIsUc released Tuesday, 

and shipbuilding and into financial ser- gerous regional tensions like those- he w.- . S j alis,ic Office said inflation 

r-. - , UC- naa risen in AllOIICt _1T 


While negotiations between the gov- 
ernment and the opposition - Social 
Democrats on a tax refonn are to resume 
Thursday, said Gerd Hennemann. a 
commentator in the Saeddeutsche Zei- 
tung newspaper, “nothing in recent days 
suggests that there will be any progress 
at all on this decisive issue.” 

The Federal Labor Office in Nurem- 
berg said Tuesday that seasonally ad- 
justed unemployment rose in August to 
11.6 percent of the workforce, or 4.456 
million, 49,000 more than a month earli- 
er and a steeper climb than many analysts 
had anticipated. The figure is a post-war 
record for August, reflecting persistent 
levels ofjoblessoess that have not been 
seen in Germany since the early 1930s 
when Adolf Hitler came to. power. 

Even though Mr. Waigel forecast dial 
economic growth would rise to 25 per- 
cent to 3 percent this year, he acknowl- 
edged to Parliament that “the devel- 
opment in the jobs market and in tax 
revenues has been worse than should 
really be expected with such growth.” 

Some analysts blamed the unexpec- 
tedly high figures on the failure this 
summer of the tax reform negotiations, 
arguing that employers were reluctant to 
turn export growth into jobs until they 
could assess future taxation levels. 

Bernhard Jagoda, president of rile 
Federal Labor Office, said that "while 
the trough should now have been 
reached” in Western Germany’s unem- 
ployment because of the export surge, 
“in the eastern states the decline in me 
number of jobs continued.'’ 

Indeed, he said, unemployment in the 
former East Germany had reached a 
record 18.3 percent, compared with IS.’i 
percent in July and 15 percent one year 
ago. In other words, about 250,000 
people in Eastern Germany lost their 
jobs over the past year, bringing the total 
unemployed there in August tb 
1^80,600 — despite the hundreds of 
billions of dollars poured into the east 
since Germany’s reunification almost 
seven years ago. 

In Western Germany, by contrast, thje 
proportion of people unemployed is just 
over one half of that, ai 9.7 percent. 

"Unemployment remains problem 
number one for a federal govemmerit 
dial has grown tired,” said Ortmar 
Jchreiner, a senior Social Democrat of- 
ficial. \ 

At the same, it is the Social Democrat 
opposition itself that has blocked Chaq- 


U>;'; 


, 1 ‘Vm 


fin' ! ■ 


Continued from Pace 1 peaceful resolution of the sectarian conflict. 

^ “We don’t really believe it, Mr. Kerr said, 

believing the unionists and for nor being here, ” * ‘We would say that Sinn Fein and the IRA sire 
he said. “We could find lots of reasons for inextricably linked. They are two sides of the 


Mr. Kerr said that, given the history of IRA 
violence, Sinn Fein should demonstrate its com- 
mitment to nonviolence by surrendering some of 
its weapons; rather than simply making pledges. 

All of the parties who generally represent the 
Protestant population stayed away from the meet- 
ing, adding to the pressure on Mr. Trimble and the 
Ulster Unionist Party as they decide what form, if 
arrv, their participation might take. 


A decision by the biggest of the unionist parties 
to boycott would effectively kill the talks before 
they were begun. But with an overwhelming 
percentage of the party's leadership favoring 


Party leader, David Trimble, said his party con- some kind of participation even -if- that in- 
iinnwi to question Sinn Fan’s commitment to volves not mUcmg directly to Sinn Fein’s rep- 


“We’re not gomg to allow Sinn Fein to mar- 


Sb". 


re 


suicide bombings were seen as evidence EcOnOfI tV SlipS Agttin 
that Israel’s overwhelming advantage in * / . 7 . • 

power was up substitute for political . ~' ; " 

wisdom in the search for security. Four Contmued froin Page I ' 

members of Mr. Netahyaho’s cabinet ,.r 


Mr. Levy said, according to a report in new wave of questioning about the util- Lebanon, including Infrastructures Min- paralysis in Bonn over Mr. Kohl s plans 
the newspaper Ma'ariv. "I'm not one of ity of continuing to operate inside Leb- ister Ariel Sharon, who as defense rain- for a tax reform supposed to inspire 


' w';- . 


^ERif 

k'' 


OCi:- 

li;;. r 

| ^ 

• ‘Vi-.. 

G.s . 


7M 




7 


companies nationwide have been sold 
off. Yet the massive program still lacks 
official imprimatur. 

“The central government itself has so 
far published no documents saying this or 
that is okay." said Wu Tianlin. director 


volution running at nearly three to one, 
many opponents and some prominent 
business leaders have focused their at- 
tacks on the tax question, where polls are 


vices and electronics. 

Edinburgh is the sixth-Iargest fund 
management center in Europe after Lon- 
don. Paris. Frankfurt, Zurich and 
Geneva, and Scottish exports are 55 per- 
cent above the United Kingdom average. 


iwren Belgium's Flemish and Walloon " l Aug “ SI 10 a h ‘gh of 

regions. wn 9 ueslion s about The 

Mr. Mowbray and other "No" cam- iWCr “ f rata lfecd - 

paigners concede that they face an uphill ? cc . e,erated - i 

struggle. It was ironic that Lady Thatch- circle J*® a ,P° ,nt 10 a vicious Jt : 

ers intervention cheered devotetioY Siat ^ K ohL who insist 4 


- . 11 ( .r . . , r : • — , . L , — . — umuvii un, laAijuwiioii, wiiwviAiiisaic Luuauuvcuic uiuibu | tiieerea devolution lh«it , -.I. . 0 will* insists 

Annual salaries of Aimer s employ- that is okay," said Wu Tianlin, director much closer. They contend that higher The output of chips and personal com- supporters because she remains decolv ower taxes, jobs cannot be 

ees will top 15,000 yuan this year, close .general of the “experimenting depart- taxes will raise costs and make Scotland puters from Silicon Glen now rivals the unpopular in Scotland, having , m rr£ c^J!S’, evcn “ employment robs iht 

to double the city s average. That’s an ment” inside the State Commission for uncompetitive. importance of Scotland's whiskey dis- duced her government's hated poll tax for e ° f * aX revenue and forces it to look 

increase of 150 percent in three years. Restructuring the Economic Systems. "Devolution would destroy jobs, tilleries. there. ing nJJ rmow burde osome ways of rate- 







INTEBNATK' 


| (J4 \£L£* SEPTEMBER 24. 


PAGE 3* 



WEDNKsmv^ 1 HERAtD TRIBUNE, 

page 9 SDay ’ sept ember 10. 1997 


stage/entertainment 



■i‘ ‘.j" 






-5-*: x 


..;-V 






f; 




V ■ ; 


“n !! 

j.i 


■. 


\ 


t * 


*• The Eclectic Sounds of Esta 

: Israeli Band Blends Jazz, Folk Pots and Pans 


&y Blaine Harden 

JWr/Hjy,,/, p vil Sen-,,; 


N EW YORK — “Nobody 
wants to hear Israeli rock 
and roll. It is ridiculous.* ' 
So says SWomo Deshet, 
7h r Z r *?L dr ' im ™ T wh0 has joined 
ImT S?, ls C0Unlr ymen in cooking 
d y on ^ naI sound that is to 
formulaic rock and roll what 

boncht is to Campbell's 
chicken noodle soup. 

CaHed Esla * Wends 

■ 13k ifnfi? W,th BaUcan 

• ■ ■°cn,ff, 1 ds , c ® u nin , 'wesfem with 
stuff we stole from the Hasidim.” 

' irnrf^K^K Turkish banjo With the 
■ 2? £»**■ and somehow 
2S? e V musicaHy whole. At its 
. r BsIa 5 music has a raucous, 
root-stomping energy that's driven 
by Deshei. who happens to be a 
formidable rock drummer. 

■ Peo Pl e like to categorize mu- 
. sic. says Deshet. -“This is Irish 
music that is Middle Eastern music. 

. don 1 w ani to be obligated to 

. -any fomis or any traditions." 

With his fellow band members, 
ueshet admits to being an equal- 
opportunity thief, stealing from 
every musical tradition he has ever 
heard — if it suits the integrity of an 
Esta composition. 

The band, which played to a 
standing-room-only crowd at Blues 
■ Alley in Washington early this sum- 
- mer and is planning another Amer- 
-ican tour this month, has been pol- 
ishing its sound for the better part of 
15 years. 

Two of its members, Deshet and 
' .^ e guitarist, Ori Biushiok, began 
playing together in the late 1970s. 
when they were schoolboys in a 
-suburb of Tel Aviv. They mer the 
. two others when they were all 
• . serving their mandatory hitches in 
the Israeli military. (They all man- 
aged to avoid any fighting by play- 
ing in the air force band.) 


It was during long practice ses- 
sions in a bomb shelter in Tel Aviv 
in the 1980s that the band developed 
its distinctive sound. 

“We played literally under- 
ground for seven years.” says Desh- 
et. who like everyone else in the 
band is 32 years old. "When it is 
peacetime in Israel, which doesn’t 
happen too much, the city gives the 
bomb shelters to artists.” 

When they were above ground, 
the musicians often worked sepa- 
rately as accompanists to some of 
Israel's best folk and popular singers. 
Their period of apprenticeship ended 
in 1991, when the four ex-soldiers 
cast their professional lot together 
and moved to Greenwich Village. 

”We decided we had to come to 
New York and make our band a 
maner of death or life,” says Desh- 
et. ”If it was not going to be Esta. it 
was going to be nothing.” 

After six years in New York, 
when it was clear to the four ihat 
they had succeeded in becoming 
more than nothing, they moved last 
spring back to Israel. They say they 
are now prepared to help shape their 
young country's musical tradition. 

“We have been too dominated by 
Western influences. We want to get 
away from that,” Deshet says. "Is- 
rael is an evolving culture and we 
wan! to be part of the evolution.” 

The band's name, by the way, 
translates as “oom-pah’* in Hebrew 
slang. It is the simplest of folk 
rhythms, and the band builds on it 
with a seemingly infinite variety of 
sounds, rhythms and folk traditions. 

Just reaching back to the songs 
they heard as kids growing up in 
Israel with immigrant parents, they 
can plug into the music of Iraq. 
Poland. Bulgaria, Moldova, Ro- 
mania and Russia. To serve up this 
stew of musical influences, the band 
travels with a large and curious in- 
ventory of ethnic folk instruments, 
including conga drums. Chinese 


mouth organ, zoma (an ancestor of 
the oboe), dorbuka (a kind of drum), 
Irish pennywhisTle and several dif- 
ferent kinds of bagpipes, not to men- 
tion assorted pors and pans. 

During the last six years, while 
playing the downtown club scene in 
New York, making cross-country 
tours and recording a CD called 
“Mediterranean Crossroads,” the 
band has learned how to dress up its 
musicianship in an onstage perform- 
ing style that is both exuberant and 
embracing. 

During a New York farewell per- 
formance this spring, the band made 
a grand entrance to the whine of a 
bagpipe and the pounding of hand- 
held African drums. Such an en- 
trance is calculated to startle and 
disorient the audience, says Amir 
Gwinzman. the band's saxophonist, 
bagpipe player and master of nearly 
a dozen obscure wind instruments. 

"What we want to do is turn our 
concerts into a kind of Middle East- 
ern party." Gwinzman says. "We 
want to break down the wall be- 
tween audience and performer. 
First, people are surprised, and then 
we are closer to them.” 

T HE band then tore into a 
composition titled "Turk- 
ish western.” Musically 
speaking, it’s a song in 
which a whirling dervish runs head- 
long into the sound track from Ser- 
gio Leone's "The Good, the Bad 
and the Ugly.” Members of the 
audience, clapping and smiling, had 
a hard time staying in their seats. 

As infectious as the band's music 
can be with live audiences, Amer- 
ican buyers of CDs and record com- 
pany executives have nor been es- 
pecially excited by Esta. The band's 
recent CD has sold a few thousand 
copies in the United States. 

''The live audience gets rhe pic- 
ture. They don’t need some neat 
description of what we do, but in the 



CeuU ilsnineju 


Esta on tour: {from left) Gwinzman. Binshtok. Gafni and Deshet. 

recording industry if you are your 
own breed, executives get confused. 

They don't know what to do with 
you.” Gwinzman says. 

In many ways, the sounds of Esta 
are as mixed up as life in Israel itself, 
with iis cacophonous mix of 
Ashkenazic Jews, most of them im- 
migrants from Europe, and Seph- 
ardic Jews, most from the Middle 
East and Africa. That mix is in the 


bloodlines of the band. Gwinzman, 
Binshtok and the bass player, Bentzi 
Gafni. are sons of East European 
immigrants. Deshet, the voluble 
drummer, is the son of Iraqis. 

Indeed, a kind of pan-Arab sound 
drifts in and out of much of Esra's 
music, a sound that would probably 
delight Islamic audiences — assum- 
ing they didn't know it was coming 
from veterans of the Israeli military. 


Shaw, Hare and Apocalypse at ‘Heartbreak House’ 


By Sheridan Morley . 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — As Britain 
starts to stumble back to life 
from a collective grief, this 
may be as good a time as 
any to revisit . Heartbreak 
House"~in a brilliant and breath- 
-taking new staging by David Hare at 
' the Almeida. 

Shaw started to write his play in 
1916, in a large country house in 
Sussex that allowed him to hear both 
The twitterings of the Bloomsbury 
v set, who were its residents, and the 
distant sounds of the guns in 
; Flanders as World War I reached its 
'climax. In that sense this is where 
■ Chekhov meets the Apocalypse, and 
what starts as a country-house com- 
edy of manners ends in Wood and 
bombardment and death. "The Cap- 
rain is in his bunk drinking bottled 
ditch water and the crew is gambling 
,in the foc’sie.* ' says Shotover in his 
last great speech. ’ ’She will strike 
and sink and split. Do you think the 
laws of God will be suspended in 
favor of England because you were 
■bom inir ?” 


It is such a good question, and 
eight decades later it still seeks an 
answer. Sure, there are always prob- 
lems with ‘ ‘Heartbreak House,’ ’ not 
least the fact that this Shan-advert- 
ised "fantasia in the Russian man- 
ner on English themes” may start 
outiik? rhe local "Cheoy Orchard” 
but very soon drifts into an Ed- 
wardian "Hay Fever” of which the 
real star, apart from Shotover. is the 
house itself. It has thus al- 
ways been a rambling struc- 
ture, and to people it with 
weekend and other guests 
Hare has assembled one of 
the starriest and most im- 
pressive casts that even the 
Almeida has recently 
known. Richard Griffiths, a splen- 
did mountain of a man getting to be 
very nearly as large in voice and 
circumference as Orson Welles, 
gives Shotover moments of unac- 
customed tranquillity and gentle- 
ness; Patricia Hodge cascades from 
great and chilly heights to offer a 
memorable and definitive Lady Ut- 
terword. and Penelope Wilton as 
Hesione and Emma Fielding as a 
waif like EUie Dunn do their best to 


LONDON 



keep the intellectual dry rot of an 
already collapsing house from total 
disintegration. 

The men are no less impressive: 
Peter McEnery. Hairy Landis , Mal- 
colm Sinclair and Simon Dutton 
have all understood that what we 
have here is domestic farce mas- 
querading as social history. You 
might, if you were very lucky, see a 
more firmly rooted production of 
"Heartbreak House” than 
this one in the next half- 
century, but I doubt you 
will ever see a more quint- 
essential^ or unmissabJy 
theatrical one, richly de- 
serving a rapid transfer to 
the West End. 

Arnold Wesker is also a dramatist 
unafraid of taking the national tem- 
perature theatrically, and it is good 
to have his "Chips With 
Everything” on the National's Lyt- 
telton stage in an energetic new 
square-bashing production by 
Howard Davies. Tnere is, however, 
now a problem with Wesker, as with 
John Osborne: The more their re- 
vivals improve, the shakier the plays 
themselves are apt to seem. 


This is the first major revival of 
"Chips” in London since it first 
opened at the Royal Court in 1962. 
At that time, the male audience was 
divided into those who had either 
been through a war or done peace- 
time national service and those bom 
.in or after 1941 who were the first 
generation this century never to 
have worn any kind of uniform. The 
issue of 18 months’ compulsory 
duty, and what it might do to the soul 
or indeed the ankles, was therefore 
still veiy hot And here, for the first 
time, was a play chat told us just 
what square-bashing was like and 
what it did to the individuality of 
young men trying to come to terras 
with the complexities of adulthood. 
It was raw. tough and ultimately 
heartbreaking. 

Bur time has not been altogether 
generous to the play, although it 
remains a savage indictment of air 
force regimentation. 

All the cross-sectional class and 
social stereotypes are here, from the 
upper-class misfit io the barely lit- 
erate hero, and although Harold 
Hobson once wrote that this was 
“the first anti-establishment play of 


which the establishment has real 
cause for fear.* ’ in fact the battle had 
already been fought and won on 
other territory: National service had 
been abolished two years before the 
first staging of “Chips-” 

What the play did achieve was the 
confirmation of Wesker’s real geni- 
us for dialogue and dialect and dia- 
lectic. and it still seethes with a kind 
of angry* vitality. 

The new revival has some great 
performances, not least Rupert 
Penry-Jones as the aristocrat who 
wants to escape down the class 
structure. In the role that made a star 
of Frank Finlay, James Hazeldine is 
a magnificently lugubrious Corpor- 
al Hill and Julian Ketridge’s Srniler 
could have wandered in from “Of 
Mice and Men.” On Rob Howell's 
brilliantly versatile wire-mesh set, 
Julian Glover is also hugely im- 
pressive as the wing commander 
who suddenly realizes, almost un- 
noticeably, that the world is about to 
change even on the parade ground, 
but it is in the end more as a cho- 
reographed dramatic ballet of bru- 
talization than as a drama that 
"Chips” remaias effective. 


BOOKS 


THE FILE 

By Timothy Gorton Ash. 257 
pages. $23. Random House. 
Reviewed by Dusko Doder 

L AST time I Visited Mos- 
cow, I took my wife to 
dinner at a restaurant we had 
frequented with considerable 
regularity when we lived there 

;■ ^during the days of Brezhnev, 
-Andropov. Chernenko and 
Gorbachev. The staff greeted 


us warmly, inquired about our 
careers and children. Misha 
the waiter fussed over as as 
before, laughing and relating 
the latest jokes. We were 
about the last guests ro leave 
when Misha, looking sheep- 
ish, mumbled something 
about wanting to apologize to 
us. He looked around to make 
sure no one was around to 
hear him and said that in the 
old days he had been under 
standing orders from the KGB 


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to place on our table a spe- 
cially wired ashtray each time 
we visited the estaMishmem. 
He felt bad about iL 

For someone who spent 
two decades working as a for- 
eign correspondent in Com- 
munist capitals, this was the 
only time that a reluctant 
secret-police accomplice had 
come forward to apologize to 
me. We knew that the police 
insisted on debriefing people 
who came into contact with 
foreigners. (My Russian sec- 
retary, at some risk to herself, 
bad made it clear to me and 
ray colleagues that she was 
expected to inform on us.) We 
knew that our phone lines 
were bugged; we had a pretty 
good idea that Big Brother 
monitored our apartments 
and offices. But the evidence 
of treacherous behavior — 
helping the KGB collect in- 
formation on the most inti- 
mate private conversations — 
that was something that re- 
mained elusive. And here was 
the genial Misha, who grate- 
fully accepted generous tips 
and who always reeled off the 
latest anti-goveramenr jokes 
( in retrospect, he did it as soon 
as we were seated and before 
he brought the special ash- 
tray). He was the last man I 
would have suspected. 

Timothy Ganon Ash was 
the first British exchange stu- 
dent in Communist East Ger- 
many in 1980. His one 
semester resulted in a Stasi 
file containing 325 pages of 
sossip and harmless political 
mattle. Considering the 
length of stay and the stand- 
ing of the subject, who was in 
his early twenties at the time, 
the file is a voluminous one 
indeed. With Germany open- 
ing up Stasi files to each per- 
son who is in them, Garton 
Ash had a bright idea. He 


asked to see his, made Xerox 
copies of relevant pages, then 
tracked down and confronted 
persons who had secretly in- 
formed on him and their Stasi 
handlers. 

"The File" is a skillfully 
construed and elegantly writ- 
ten personal memoir. It is also 
an honest, absorbing and il- 
luminating study about the 
sense and nonsense of spying 
that also deals with the trou- 
bling questions of spying in a 
free society. The story is 
presented so that Garton 
Ash’s own experiences cast a 
sharp light on the Cold War 
and its aftermath. 

L ITTLE escapes his eye 
and empathy. He is dis- 
missive of people sitting in 
easy judgment but who " nev- 
er themselves had co make the 
agonizing choices of those 
who live in a dictatorship.*' 
And he notes that Western 
fascination with espionage 
has distracted attention from 
the Communist political lead- 
ers who controlled the instru- 
ments' of repression. 

Iq confronting the former 
informers and Stasi officers, 
he says, he did not find "a 
single clearly evil person" 
but rather a gallery of weak 
people shaped by circum- 
stance. There was, he says, 
"less malice than human 
weakness” and “less delib- 
erate dishonesty than almost 
infinite capacity for self-de- 
ception.” 

The sum of all their ac- 
tions, however, was a great 
evil. The real victims were 
not foreigners — there was 
little chance they would suf- 
fer- serious damage — bur 
local people they came .into 
contact with. Stasi files may 
have a comic-opera texture 
for Ganon Ash, but they are 


deadly stuff for East Ger- 
mans. 

Near the end of * ‘The File” 
the author reports that — 
years after the end of the Cold 
War — he was approached by 
British intelligence with a re- 
quest to keep an eye on "stu- 
dents or visitors to Oxford," 
where he is now teaching. He 
had almost forgotten his use- 
ful fascination with the secret 
service; in fact he bad passed 
the exam to join MI5 just be- 
fore he went to East Ger- 
many. but at the last moment 
bad decided against joining. 
The same gentleman who had 
interviewed him for the MI5 
job was now asking him to 
spy on his students and col- 
leagues. In the process Ganon 
Ash discovered that the Brit- 
ish secret service had a file on 
him — he was down as hav- 
ing "assisted” them. 

Learning about the British 
file on him led Garton Ash 
into questioning the role of 
such services in a democratic 
society. He grapples with the 
question of whether "assist- 
ing" British intelligence — 


something he denies have 
done knowingly — is equiv- 
alent to knowingly informing 
for a Communist dictatorship. 
Ar the core of the issue is a 
paradox: The spies in a free 
country' infringe our liberties 
in order to protect them, while 
we support the system by 
questioning it. If the infringe- 
ment goes too far. it begins to 
destroy what it is meant to 
preserve. Reckless question- 
ing, on the oiher hand, may 
undermine our capacity to de- 
fend ourselves. 

Who is to determine what 
is too far or too reckless? The 
author provides no clear an- 
swer. But his book is a valu- 
able contribution to the de- 
bate in the West focusing on 
finding a new and different 
place for intelligence services 
in the new posr-Cold War 
world. 


Dusko Dodcr. whose most 
recent hook is "Gorbachev: 
Heretic in the Kremlin." co- 
anihored with Louise Bran- 
son. wrote this for The Wash- 
ington Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

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for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

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Now in 3-D: 
‘Nutcracker’ 

By Sarah Lyall 

New V eil Time’s Sen iVr 

L ONDON — Three-dimensional movies have 
come a long way since the 1 950s, when audiences 
in flimsy paper eyeglasses watched, mesmerized, 
as overgrown lizards in rubber suits seemed to 
leap straight from the screen and inro their laps. 

These days. 3-D films are shown on screens as tall as 
small apartment buildings, with spectacular, hyperreal- 
islic details ro go with up-to-the-minure technological 
innovations. Even the glasses are high-tech: every audi- 
ence member geis an enormous “'Star Trek“-styte, li- 
quid-crystal headset, more goggle than speciacle. with its 
own "fixed personal sound environment.” 

This fail, Imax. the company that has given us three- 
dimensionally swimming fish, airplanes that appeared to 
swoop down from the screen and skyscrapers that looked 
a little too close for comfort, is releasing "The Imax 
Nutcracker,’ ’ a 3-D version of the E.T. A. Hoffmann story 
that is most familiar in its ballet v ersion. 

The film, directed by Christine E dzard. best known for 
her acclaimed six-hour film version of Dickens's “Little 
Domt,” and starring the British actress Miriam Mar- 
golyes r'The Age of Innocence”) as a nondancing 
Sugarplum, will open in Imax theaters across the United 
States and abroad on Thanksgiving. Nov. 27. 

Until now, Imax has been known for documentary 
films like "Across the Sea of Time” and "Into the 
Deep. * * But the company, based in Toronto, is embarking 
on an ambitious expansion campaign. 

In 1995, Sony Classics brought out "Wings of Cour- 
age.” a 45-minute aviation drama starring Vat Kilmer, 
Elizabeth McGovern and Tom Hulce, using Imax 3-D 
technology. With "The Imax Nutcracker," which is 
costing about S8 million and is the company's most 
elaborate production, Imax itself is turning to drama, 
hoping to create a perennial holiday feature — much like 
the ballet that captivates children in concert houses each 
year — at its 150 or so screens around the world. 

"We had a real desire to create an evergreen for Imax. 
to create something that families could go to year in and 
year our that would be a good alternative to a S65 play or 
ballet,” said Andrew Gellis, Imax’s senior vice president 
for film and the executive producer of “The Imax 
Nutcracker.” "We wanted to broaden our audience, to 
reach out to a broader group of people who might not be 
aware of what Imax has done. 

And Imax wants to make more narrative dramas. * ‘This 
is a very good model for the type of film we could and 
should do,” Gellis said. “The demographics are good, 
it*s timeless and has universal appeal, and it's not the kind 
of film that will be released into 2.000 theaters, have a 
three-week run and then go directly into video.” 

The film is a rendition of "The Nutcracker,” the 
familiar story describing the adventures of Clara, a young 
girl who is presented with a soldier-shaped nutcracker by 
Drosselmeier. an eccentric inventor (played in the film by 
the British author, actor and playwright Headicore Wil- 
liams), and then slips into a dream world of adventures 
and toys that come to life. 

Bur while it is set to Tchaikovsky’s music and includes 
intricately choreographed action and tumbling se- 
quences. performed by circus performers, mimes, stilt 
walkers and performance anisis who help make up a cast 
of 150, "The Imax Nutcracker" is clearly a .drama, not a 
ballet There is only one dance scene, performed by 
Tamara Rojo of the English National Ballet 
How will "The Imax Nutcracker” translate onto the 
Imax screen? Partly because of the liquid-crystal headsets, 
it will look completely three-dimensional, "as if the audi- 
ence were in the room with the performers. Says Gellis*, 

* ‘This is the ultimate storytelling medium because it is so 
much more absorbing, immediate and experientiaL” 1 


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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PL'BLISHEU WITH TlU: >KV 


WTtimrs ^ hie 


| Albright in 

Regional Shifts 


the Mideast 


• Madeleine Albright could hardly 
hive found a dicier time to make her 
fiist visit to the Middle East as sec- 
retary of state. Not only has the peace 
effort between Israel and the Frales- 
tinians all but collapsed, but regional 
powers like Saudi Arabia and Iran are 
asserting themselves in ways that may 
undermine America's leadership in the 
area. As Mrs. Albright works her way 
through the region this week, she will 
need all her vaunted bluntness and de- 
termination to keep instability at bay 

• Washington's role in the Middle East 

has not been as problematic since before 

the Gulf War in 1 99 1 . The war made the 


UIC VJUri » • (U UI 

political and militarv landscape more 
favorable io peace by weakening Iraq 
and demonstrating die potential benefits 
of cooperation between America. Israel 
and leading Arab countries like Egypt 
and Saudi Arabia. But the Gulf War 
coalition, which indirectly opened the 
wav io peace talks between Israel and 
thePalesrinians (although Israel was not 
a member), has lost cohesion in recent 
vears The dvnamic works two ways. 
When peace 'talks falter, strains in the 
coalition increase, and when the in- 
formal alliance is divided, as it is today, 
the pressure for peace diminishes. 

Mrs. Albright can address the first 
part of the equation by getting Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu and Yasser Arafat 
Talking again. It will not be easy. The 
Israeli prime minister justifiably in- 
sists that negotiations cannot resume 
until the Palestinian leader cracks 
down on terrorists. 

Mrs. Albright properly plans to 
make plain to Mr. Arafat that his in- 
difference to terrorism has stunted the 
peace. She need not be tactful in de- 


livering the message. Mr. Arafat must 
understand thar any tolerance for ter- 
rorism is unacceptable and that his coy 
minuet with Palestinian terrorists will 
sink the peace effort. 

Mr. Netanyahu should recognize 
that Israel, although understandably 
anxious about its security, can be more 
selective in its punishment of Pales- 
tinians and ought io avoid provocative 
actions like new construction projects 
on the Wesr Bank and in Arab neigh- 
borhoods in Jerusalem. While there is 
□o equivalency between bombs and 
bulldozers, as Mrs. Albright said earli- 
er this summer, Israeli actions do in- 
fluence the overall climate for peace. 

A resumption of peace talks would 
help Mrs. Albright hold together the 
American-led coalition. Arab leaders, 
disturbed by the lack of progress, skep- 
tical of Mr. Netanyahu's intentions and 
doubtful that the economic benefits of 
regional cooperation will materialize, 
are drifting out of the American orbit. 
Saudi Arabia, for one, has threatened 
to boycott an annual Mideast economic 
conference supported by the United 
States and attended by Israeli repre- 
sentatives and instead may go to. a 
meeting organized by Iran. 

Some of this impatience is posturing. 

. No country in the region is more de- 
pendent on American military protec- 
tion than Saudi Arabia or more fearful 
of a resurgent Iraq. But the breakdown 
in peace talks between Israel and the 
Palestinians, coupled with the election 
of a more moderate president in ban, 
has created opportunity for mischief. ■ 

Mrs. Albright cannot untangle the 
problems in one visit. But if she fails to 
budge anyone, the decline of the peace 
effort and erosion of U.S. leadership in 
the Mideast could quickly get worse. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


A Palestinian State 


To induce Yasser Arafat to crack 
down on Palestinian terrorists is ne- 
cessarily the first purpose of the 
Middle East mission of Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright. There is 
also a necessary second purpose — to 
relaunch Palestinian-Israeli negoti- 
ations. And how? The Clinton admin- 
istration means to draw the parties 
back to putting into effect the terms of 
the Oslo interim agreement. 

The trouble is. Prime Minister Ben- 


jamin Netanyahu, who inherited Oslo, 
has always distrusted it; just last week 


has always distrusted it; just last week 
he suspended a bey provision calling 
for further withdrawal in the West 
Bank. Many Israelis, and oihers, won- 


der why Israel should return territory to 
a Palestinian Authorin’ that does less 


a Palestinian Authorin’ that does less 
than it must io check terrorism. 

The deficit of Palestinian will to 
check terrorism is inexcusable and 
must be reversed. It is in no way jus- 
tified by the reality of Israeli assert- 
iveness. But the political fact is that 
Israeli policies and actions are easily 
exploited by the Palestinians as a ra- 
tionale for the failure of their leadership 
to take a more uncompromising, anti- 
leuorist stand. Mr. Netanyahu made it 
easier for them, especially by unilat- 
erally expanding Jewish settlement in 
districts of Jerusalem that they regard 
as up for negotiation. This makes a 
freeze on new Israeli settlement in dis- 


puted territory an essential element of 
an effective anti-terrorist strategy. 

Palestinians cannot have it both 
ways: a wink at terrorism and the ac- 
quisition of more land. Nor can Israelis 
have tt both ways: more unilateral set- 
tlement and more security, too. 

Here we arrive at the salient flaw in 
American Mideast policy. The policy is 
explicitly pointed at delivering to Israel 
its main goal of peace and security, but 
it makes no similar deference to the 
Palestinian goal of statehood. In other 
words, the Israelis are asked to make 
concessions and are promised what 
they most want, even while die Pal- 
estinians are asked to make conces- 
sions with no comparable assurance 
they will get what they most want. 

The remedy is obvious: The United 
States should’endorse the goal of Pal- 
estinian statehood. In their hearts if not 
yet in their words and votes, many 
Israelis anticipate this result. Pales- 
tinian statehood would necessarily be 
conditioned on negotiated Israeli se- 
curity requirements. The veiy state- 
ment of die goal could give the ne- 
gotiation die impetus it now lacks. 

Secretary Albright will spend the 
next few days urging that the Oslo- 
implementation talks resume. We will 
know better then whether an American 
policy change is worth exploring in 
order to move the parties not just to- 
ward the next dead end but toward a 
negotiated peace. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


What About Privacy? 


That feelings must be outed, that 
privacy or grief is above all for public 
consumption, does not seem so sur- 
prising now; sometimes shocking, but 
not surprising. 

Where once ihere was reticence, 
there now has to be a talk show. The 
Queen’s decision to accede to the .pub- 
lic’s demand that she speak — to show 
and tell her feelings — may be an 
important moment in the wider back- 
lash against the idea of privacy. 

We are addicted to publicity now 
because we have a lingering doubt that 
there may be no such thing as privacy; 
that the protection privacy affords 
might be a protection racket for those 
who can afford it. It’s as though we are 
not sure what privacy is for anymore. 

And yet what could be more private 
than our feelings, especially, perhaps, 
our feelings of grief? 

Why was the silence of the royal 
family experienced by so many people 
as a betrayal, rather than as a dignified 
sign of respect to Diana? 

The public interpreted the silence of 


the royal family membere as meaning 
either that they don’t know what they 
feel, or that they are ambivalent — that 
they have mixed or contradictory feel- 
ings about Diana's death. 

And ambivalence or an uncertainty 
about what one feels — rather like 
indecisiveness in public life — is con- 
sidered to be a sign of weakness. It is 
virtually taboo now to acknowledge 
the complexity of feeling — that grief 
may not be sound-bite material. 

But the coercive demand that people 
should perform their feelings has be- 
come extortionate. It must be worth 
wondering what we are trying to add to 
our previously most intimate experi- 
ences, sex and grief, by making them 
public in these new ways. 

If emotions are considered to be real 
only when one is seen having them, 
preferably by people one doesn't 
know, it implies that for better and for 
worse we ao longer know what to 
make of what we once called privacy. 

— Adam Phillips, a child 
psychoanalyst and author of “ Terrors 
' and Experts " and "Monogamy." 
writing in The New York Times. 


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1997 


editorials/opinion 


The Ailing Asian Tigers Need Western Values 

^ ^ A x- 1 8 months ago, because too manywell- 

W ASHINGTON — East Asian cur- By Fred Hiatt through connected businessmen were profiting. 

rendes have plummeted and . These failures reflected 

high-flying stock markets have come the region, though, somebasi , of authexitarian governments tomaiwge 

tumbling after. Malaysia’s leader rails But they did not do it by trade alone, rural flaws have been exposed. a :nnRMIC ino!v complex economies. The 


By Fred Hiatt 


the region, though, some basic, struc- 

But they did not do it by trade alone, rural flaws have been exposed . 

■ , , . . *. . , — ,iu CmuluQcr A v; i an 


projections for economic growth. 


bubble early in this decade, a collapse 
from which that economy is still re- 
covering, the latest tuimoil raises big 
questions. Is the 4 4 Asian miracle" at an 


provide the other services upon which 
free markets depend. And they inves- 
ted in. public health (by providing clean 
water, for example) and in literacy and 
primary education. - 
That investment in people, espe- 


end? Was there ever really a miracle, or cially in rural areas, helped propel eco- 
were Asia’s “tigers" standing on nomic growth, and it also helped spread 


quicksand all along? 

And what does this crisis say about 
the “Asian values" debate — about 
the notion, championed by some Asian 
rulers, that economies grow best with- 
out democracy?. 

One answer comes easily . There was 
a miracle — or at least, as a new World 


the fruits of growth. 

The share of population living in 
what the World Bank calls absolute 


out democracy?. Economic success not 

One answer comes easily. There was . j j 

a miracle — or at least, as a new World only increases demands 

Bank study says, something "unprece- f demnrrarv it 

dented : “No other large group of J OT m y re aemocracy , II 

economics has sustained similar also increases a 


economies has sustained similar 
growth rates for three decades." 

From 1965 to 1995, Hong Kong’s 
annual economic output grew from 
$4,843 per person to 526 ,334, a level 
comparable to 'North America's. 
Singapore's grew from 52,678 to 
$23,350, Malaysia's from 52,271 to 
59,458. Thailand's average annual per 
capita GDP more than quadrupled, 
from $1,570 to $6,723. 

These nations grew in pan by open- 
ing their economies to trade and for- 
eign investment They were blessed 
geographically, both to be near trade 
■routes and to be among other traders. 
That is one reason why Vietnam may 
have an easier time overcoming its 
Communist past than, say, Mongolia. 


society ’s need for more. 


poverty — living on 51 a day or less — 
tell in Indonesia from 64 percent in 
1975 to II percent 20 years . later. In 
China, where the key was a shift from 
collective- to family-based fanning, it 
fell from about 60 percent to 22 per- 
cent In Malaysia and Thailand, almost 
no one still lives in such destitution. 

So what has gone wrong now? 

When the Thai baht took its nosedive 
this summer, initial explanations were 
technical — of pegged exchange rates 
and overheated real estate markets — 
and the solutions were seen to be rea- 


atiracted more investment and became 
more integrated into a global, fast- 
moving economy those institutions 
didn’r keep up. “They just didn’t up- 
grade fast enough,” says Tufts Uni- 
versity economist David Dapice. 

Thar was true first in education. Un- 
like South Korea or Taiwan, Thailand 
and Malaysia did not follow their in- 
vestments in primary education with 
similar devotion to high schools. 

Ar the low end cf the prodnet “food 
chain,” Thai workers can no longer 
compete; textile workers in Thailand 
earn S1.41 per hour, compared to 40 
cents or 50 cents in China. But South- 
east Asian school systems are not turn- 
ing oat enough workers with skills to 
move up to the next, more complicated 
level of business. Only 37 percent of 
high-school-age Thais are in high 
schooL As a result, investment is slow- 
ing down or even moving away, and 
inequality inside Thailand is growing. 

The failure to invest in education was 


grrHA.ua ui j _ . 

have been invested in roads or factories 
or education went into the pockets of 
corrupt businessmen and bureaucrats. 

“The crisis is a reflection of the lack 
of political accountability and transpar- 
ency,” says Kevin Watkins, an econo- 
mist at Oxfam International in London. 
Economic success not only increases 
popular demands for more democracy, 
in other words; it also increases a so- 
ciety’s need for more democracy. 

Will Asian governments now re- 
spond accordingly? Malaysian Prane 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad s ini- 
tial reaction to the crisis was not en- 
couraging. He blamed the financier 
George Soros, created a government 
fund to prop up the stock prices of weU- 
connected companies, and, along the 
way, launched an attack on the whole 
notion of universal human rights. 

But many other Asians have a clear 
understanding of the need for better edu- 
cation and more responsive governance. 
They may support "Asian values" 


I uc lOUlUb lu mvML in VUUV4IUV- ” J ~ -* 1 _ 

marched by other failures of gov- .when the term means social cohesion 

. _ - auw%A nafghVf* Anitnlirff IWT T\C%t WnfiQ \l IS 


emance. Corruption grew . Pollution and 
traffic became intolerable. Less money 
was invested in productive factories, 
and more in real estate and other spec- 
ulative ventures — often made prof- 


and relative equality, but not when it is 
used as a smoke screen to protect corrupt 
and authoritarian regimes. . 

Which vision prevails will go a long 
way to determining whether, and how 


mauve ventures — — uilvu umu*- « — \ — A - 

Liable only by virtue of connections to’ quickly, the Southeast Asian nations 
those in power. Thailand did not de- become nger-ish again, 
value its currency when it should have. The fttishmgiou Post. 


Ado About Diana: Viewed From Asia, It Looks Like Hysteria 


H ONG KONG — Viewed 
from this pan of Asia, Bri- 


JLTfrom this pan of Asia, Bri- 
tain. and perhaps the Western 
world in general, emerge dimin- 
ished by their response to the 
death of the Princess of Wales. 

The reaction here to the re- 
action in the West is one of 
astonishment at the volume and 
the hyperbole of the coverage. 

Immediately after Diana's 
death, the public response — at 
least as measured by callers to a 
prime time radio phone-in — 
was one of sympathy and sad- 
ness. A week later, the dom- 
inant theme was irritation at the 
adulation of Diana as though 
she were a figure of the stature 
of Gandhi or Kennedy. Chur- 
chill or Mao. 

The blanket coverage mean- 
while served to remind people 
here of die late princess's pub- 
licity-seeking, jet-setting char- 
acteristics, and of her close links 
to a tabloid press that was now 
engaging in self-flagellation. 

Glamorous, yes, deserving of 
sympathy, yes. But where was 
achievement to be admired, or 
example to be followed? 

Editorials in serious news- 
papers took a similar tack, con- 
trasting her contribution to the 
world with that of Mother 
Teresa, whose death, albeit not 
a shock, was so overshadowed 
by the attention to a princess 
whose charitable work was 
mostly in front of the cameras. 

Asians viewing the adulation 
pondered what sort of adject- 
ives would be used by the BBC, 
for instance, if Filipinos acted in 
similar fashion after the death of 


By Philip Bo wring 


one of their glamorous movie- 
star politicians. "HystericaL" 
"credulous." "irrational"? 

Parallels were drawn with the 
adulation of Imelda Marcos in 
her earlier days, when extra- 
vagance, jet-setting friends, an 
always ready smile and adept 
Qse of the media combined to 
make her the local equivalent of 
the “people’s princess." 


ode had a different message. A 
degree of distance and dignity 
was viral for a monarchy. Had 
not both Charles and Diana 


Some Indians recalled the was vital for a monarchy. Had 
embarrassment they felt at the not both Charles and Diana 
mass adulation given in death as brought it into disrepute by con- 
in life to M. G. Ramachandran, ducting Their squabbles through 
the film idol w ho became chief the media? 


travagant but often insincere ; 
media hype could liftindividu- : 
als temporarily in the popularity 
charts, but undermined the 1 
basis of the system. , 


A popular touch could be a 
us for royalty, but gravitas 


minister of Tamil Nadu. How 
did the foreign media treat that 
outburst of emotion? 

For the monarchists of Thai- 
land and Japan (republicans are 
rare in both countries), the epis- 


If royalty had a function it 
was as symbol of the nation. As 
such, it had to be divorced from 
personality. By definition it was 
old-fashioned. 

Soap opera stardom and ex- 


plus for royalty, but gravitas ■ 
mattered more. ) 

An inward-looking, self-ob- - 
sessed Britain had not just lost ; 
its last bit of empire. It had lost ! 
all sense of gravitas. 

lnremariunul Herald Tribune . . 


Such Worship of the Famous Can’t Be Good for Us 


W ASHINGTON— Ido not Bv David 

know how the social his- 
torians of the next century will - The Times published six staff 
interpret IMst week's news^but " storied 6n ; ihe London rites but 
they are certain to be intrigued barely found space on Page 6 — 


Bv David S. Broder 


5. Broder there are many who seek to ex- • 

ploit the public intoxication 

huge public jeac.tion jo Diana’s, with fame, .asking first "How . 
death, "the point Vas" made over " do I attract attention?” andonly ~ 


by its implications for the value 
system of our time. 


system o! our time. 

On the morning after the 
death of Mother Teresa, her 
photograph and the news of her 
passing occupied half the space. 
and a less prominent position, 
on the front page of The Wash- 
ington Post than a layout of two 
Stories and a photo about Diana. 
Princess of Wales, who had per- 
ished six days earlier. 

A day later, after Diana's 
burial ceremonies and on the 
second day after the death of the 
Nobel Prize-winning nun. who 
seems destined for sainthood. 
The New York Tunes gave the 
funeral of the former member of 
Britain's royal family two- 
thirds of its front page and three 
additional ad-free pages inside 
the main news section. 


next to a large ad for the fall 
designer collection at Henri 
BendeL a Fifth Avenue shop — 
for an Associated Pfess story 
from Calcutta reporting that 
“crowds of weeping people 
gathered in the rain here today 
to pay homage to ... the Roman 
Catholic nun who served as a 
tireless minister to the poorest 
of ihe world's poor." 

The disproportion was even 
greater in the Television treat- 
ment of the two deaths, leading 
Mike Bamicle of The Boston 
Globe to wonder aloud on * 'The 
NewsHour with Jim Lehrer” if 
the network anchors who 
rushed to London after Diana’s 
death would continue on to Cal- 
cutta for Saturday's funeral 
Mass for Mother Teresa. 

In the many analyses of the 


and over that in this media age 
those who gain feme of die kind 
that attended Ms. Spencer, from 
the moment she became die fi- 
ancee of the heir to die British 
throne, become larger-than-life 
figures. “Myth overwhelms 
everything,” author Sally Bed- 
ell Smith told CBS’s Martha 
Teichner. who in turn marveled 
ih3t Diana had been on the cover 


of People magazine 44 times. 
Ms. Teichner’s thoughtful re 


Strip- Searched, Jailed, Expelled 


B OSTON — Suppose an 
American business wo- 


-U American businesswo- 
man flew to Shanghai to buy 
Chinese goods for a New 
York department store. She 
has a Chinese visa, but at the 
Shanghai airport an official 
says she is trying to enter the. 
country illegally. Without a 
hearing, she is strip-searched, 
handcuffed, held in jail and 
finally sent home. 

A story like that would no 
doubt be seen in the United 
States as an example of the 
lawless Chinese system. It 
could not happen in a law- 
bound country like ours, Amer- 
icans would say. But it has. 

Meng Li, an executive with 
a real estate development 
company in Beijing, set out 
for New York in June to buy 
plumbing fixtures. She had a 
business visa issued by the 
U.S. Embassy in Beijing. She 
had used the same visa twice 
before, in 1996 and February 
1997. entering the United 
States at Detroit. 

This time the plane landed 
first in Anchorage, Alaska. 
There an agent of the U.S. 
Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service decided that she 
was trying to enter the country' 
by fraud or with improper 
documents. She was strip- 
searched, handcuffed, put in 
an Anchorage jail and told that 
she was bailed from the 
United States for five years. 

Ordinarily we would not 
have heard about her. Under 
the radical new immigration 
law passed by Congress and 
signed by President Bill Clin- 
ton last year, an alien found by 
an INS .officer ro be trying jo 


By Anthony Lewis 


pro-human-rights places, ' 
Meng Li said. "But they were 
so inhumane." 

Ms. Stock brought a suit 
challenging Meng Li’s exclu- 
sion. The government, in its 
answer, did not disclose its rea- 
sons. It merely said the court 
had no power to hear the case 
under the new immigration 
law, and the judge agreed. Ms. 
Stock appealed to the 9th U.S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals. But 
Meng Li decided to go home. 

"My client was in jail a 
month and the INS still 
wouldn't tell her what she did 
Ms. Stock said. 
"That is very scary." 

Meng Li flew home on July 
3. Just before leaving, she told 
the Daily News that she had 
lost all confidence in America 
and from now on would take 
her business elsewhere. 

Is this case unique? Not in 
Anchorage. Ms. Stock filed an 
affidavit in court in the Men® 
Li case about five other 
Chinese she had seen in the 
Anchorage jail. All were busi- 
nesspeople who had visas. 
They had been headed else- 
where in the United States but 
were stopped at the Anchor- 
age airport by INS agents and 
told that they were being sent 
back the next day and banned 
for five years. 

Meng Li and the others did 
not understand what was hap- 
pening to them. Do Americans 
know that the new immigra- 
tion law allows a single INS 
agent to decide that someone 
who has a U.S. visa is a fraud, 
to send him home and ban him 
from America for five years? 

The New Hi rh Times 


laces," 
rt were 


enter by fraud is subject to 
"expedited removal." She is 
sent home at once. 

Bur because of language dif- 
ficulties , it was thought site was 
applying for political asylum. 
So she was held in jaiL and an 
Anchorage lawyer, Margaret 
Stock, took up her case. 

Meng Li was never told 
what was supposedly fraud- 
ulent about her attempted 
entry. But Ms. Stock thinks 
that the problem was that she 
applied for another kind of 
U.s. visa last winter, one that 
would allow her to work for an 
American company while 
here. That application was 
first denied. Then in late May 
it was approved, Ms. Stock 
said, but Meng Li did not 
know that — and apparently 
neither did the INS agent in 
Anchorage. 

In any case, Ms. Stock said, 
it is legal for an alien coining 
here to use a valid visa when 
another has been denied, so 
long as the alien uses it for the 
designated purpose. 

A reporter for the the Daily 
News in Anchorage, Rachel 
D'Oro, interviewed Meng Li 
in jail after she had been there 
two weeks. She cried as she 
spoke of how humiliated she 
felt. Not only was she in pris- 
on, she said; her luggage had 
been seized, including £32,000 
for purchases in New York. 

Ms. Stock went to court and 
got an order letting her use a 
bit of the money to buy toilet 
articles. "People always think 
this countrv is one of the most 


Ms. Teichner's thoughtful re- 
port on CBS’s "Sunday Morn- 
ing’’ noted the parallels to the 
enormous grief expressed at the 
deaths of Marilyn Monroe, Elvis 
Presley and John F. Kennedy, 
all struck down early and un- 
expectedly. as Diana was. 

"The camera loved them," 
commemaior Richard Reeves 
observed, arguing that we now 
find our heroes and heroines on 
television or movie screens. 

Those who are loved by pro- 
ducers and editors for their abil- 
ity to attract a massive audience 
do not necessarily love the me- 
dia. That was notably the case 
with Diana, and as a result we 
have had an orgy of debate be- 
tween critics who accuse the 
press of invading the privacy of 
these glittering figures and 
those who say the stars damn 
well invite — and profit from — 
media attention. 

In none of these discussions 
have 1 heard it suggested that 
there may be a significant cost 
to the society for this worship of 
the famous. When glamour or 
charisma is valued over accom- 
plishmenL incentives and be- 
havior are distorted. 

In the two realms I know 
best, politics and journalism, 


later "What do I do with it?” 

Emotive power has become a 
key to political success. The 
empathy BUI Clinton can pro-: 
ject on command helped make 
him president he learned to do 
the job only after he was in it. 1 
Pat Buchanan’s capacity for 
verbal brawling made him a" 
more "serious" presidential - 
contender than Richard Liigar, - 
who has 10 times as much ca- 
pacity to run the country. 

Both parties currently are ’ 
hunting for celebrity candidates - 
for Congress in 1998, espe- " 


cially sports figures or TV an- 
chors, figuring that they can 1 
elect them firsr and instruct - 
them on the issues later. 

“Celebrity journalism” is 
also spreading. People who be- ; 
came familiar faces because of 
their government posts or their - 
penchant for self-promotion — ' 
George Stephanopoulos, Ariana 
Huffington and a host of others 
— become instanr authorities in •> 
print and on television. 

It was poignant to read in 
Katharine Graham’s appreci- 
ation of Diana (IHT Opinion. - 
Sept. 3} that as recently as two ' 
years ago, long after she was the 
best-known woman in the world, ' 
she was asking strangers for ad- ’ 
vice on "how she was going to • 
focus her energies." But she ' 
lived her Life backward. Mother • 
Teresa had been serving the poor 
in Calcutta for half a century - 
before she won the Nobel Prize. 

It honors Diana's memory - 
that she realized in time that " 
fame was a burden, not a fcoal in 
itself. But this society has yet to •• 
learn that lesson. 

The Washington Post. 


Stop 


rtv* 51 ' 


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UTTr 


9 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Visit to Tolstoy 

PARIS — Professor Lombro- 
so’s visit to Count Leo Tolstoy 


second, ro adopt a constitution, 
and. third, to restore order, ask- 
ing Parliament for any extraor- 
dinary powers dial may be nec- 


enabled the criminologist to be- essary: then to speed the work of 
me acquainted with the great reconstruction and restoration, 
writer. The professor found him , 

well and hearty. For some years a 


past the latter has been obliged 
to give up working in the fields, 
hewing wood and other manual 
labor, but he continues to devote 
three to four hours daily to writ- 
ing and following literature, and 
his odd moments to lawn tennis, 
cycling and bathing. 


1922: Irish, Program 

DUBLIN — The new Dail Ei- 
reann began with a theatrical 
ejection of the only Anti-Treaty 
member present, the aged 
Lawrence Ginnell, and wound 
drearily dirough a long session. 
Mr. William Cosgrave. its civil 
head, bravely asserted the pro- 
gram of the new Government 

first, to carry out the treaty; 


1947: Exodus Saga 

HAMBURG — Jewish refu- .- 
gees aboard the prison ship- 
Runnymede Park engaged in a 
two-hour battle with British sol- - 
diers, wielding fists, sticks and 
truncheons and frenziedly re- 
sisting landing in Germany,- 
while immigrants on the ship . 
Empire Rival signaled their bit- • 
temess by leaving a time bomb ■ 
aboard. This violence marks the 
temporary end of the saga of ihe ' 
Jewish immigrant ship Exodus 
1947. The Exodus passengers ■■ 
were placed aboard three prison 
ships that were to bring them ■ 
eventually to Germany after - 
their chartered vessel was cap- .. 

the British off the coast 
or Palestine. 



- • ^ , 

- In •• 


’v 



INTERNATK 


V) {. r y/T SEPTEMBER 3A.WK _ 

rvTF PMATTnNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 10, 1997 

OPINION /LE'lTERS 


PAGE 3 


PAGE 11 


tern („(, 


Stop Overusing Antibiotics While They Still Work 

SffijI-rA*, s assess sSlSSi 


Lpon^^nriT^ rc ' By Patricia Liebennan and Michael F. Jacobson tetrac)^ and oyt^ 
Mjch^an 1 nth . mai a over the counter, witfaou 

bv stSIiL? 1311 Was infect «d tuberculosis than with ordin- patient antibiotic prescrip- supervision by a veterinarian, 
resisrom foV? 0 ^ 115 ^ acter i a ary tuberculosis. In the tions are inappropriate, ac- Infectious disease experts long 
antibiotic tfle most P° werf ul United States, illnesses cording to the U.S. Office of have warned of the dan© 
vancnrnvr apprDVed for use ’ caused by antibiotic-resistant Technology AssessmenL The routinely using antibion 
fleetinc m ’ m §gered only bacteria .are estimated to cost drugs commonly are pre- livestock feed, but agn 
case anH £ 0vcr *Bp* That at least $4 billion annually. scribed to treat colds and flu ness has fought off appro] 
JercfT? 10 3 slm!a T one in New Despite the extraordinary — both are caused by viruses, safeguards. 

V reported ThllrcHau valiiA nf nnrihinrir« thft OVpt- u/hioK ora Vni on. TTvtftl rftffifltlv. CVCrV 


! & reponed Thursday 
should send shudders through 

S e med l Cal community and 
■he public. If those bacteria 
spread — as have many other 
pathogens resistant to aniibi- 
c ’r u s T llle mosl deadly type 
oihospital-acquired infection 
will become untreatable. 

At the turn of the century, 
bacterial diseases were the 
leading causes of death in 
America. But advances in pub- 
lic health and the discovery of 
antibiotics largely vanquished 
them. In 1 900, pneumonia and 
tuberculosis caused almost 
one-quaner of all deaths in the 
United States By 1990, those 
two illnesses caused less than 
4 percent of all deaths. 

When people are infected 
by antibiotic-resistant bac- 
teria. iheir illnesses are more 
deadly and more expensive to 
treat. It costs 1 5 times more to 
rreat a patient with resistant 


Despite the extraordinary — both are caused by viruses, 
value of antibiotics, the over- which are unaffected by an- 
use of these miracle drugs in tibiotics. Unnecessary pre- 
medicine and agriculture en- scriptions are worse than 
dangers their continued effec- wasteful, because they facil- 
liveness. The more antibiotics itate the proliferation of an- 
we use, the more likely it is tibiodc-resistant bacteria, 
that bacteria will develop Another problem is that 
mechanisms to evade them, physicians onen prescribe the 
For example, before 1987, strongest, newest, broad- 
antibiotic resistance was un- spectrum antibiotic, rather 
common in Streptococcus than taking a culture to derer- 
pneumoniae, a bacterium that mine if an older antibiotic 
causes pneumonia and blood- would suffice, 
stream and ear infections.. Broad-spectrum antibiotics 
Now as many as 40 percent of kill a wide range of bacteria. 
S. pneumoniae strains are res- But using the most potent an- 


tetracvcline and erythromycin dbiotic can cause resistance 
W ^7^y,n^r wirhour anv to others: Researchers at 
ovefto cMma.^owMiy ” State university have 

SSdi^e tSSmstong fonndSynercid-resisiant hac- 
l teria in mikeys that had been 
SSTSng antiSs in fed another anubtonc If that 
S B S? but agribusi- resistance jumps to bactena 


safeguards. 

Until recently, every nine 
we squandered an antibiotic 

Overprescription 
leads to the 
proliferation of 
antibiotic- 
resistant bacteria. 


The incidence of vancomy- 
cin-resistant staphylococcus 
should move the government, 
the medical community, drug 
companies, agribusiness and 
consumers to join forces to 
solve this complex problem 
before it is too late. Reforms 
should include: 

• barring medical and in- 
surance practices that lead to 
unnecessary prescriptions; 

• informing pauents that 
antibiotics are inappropriate 
for all colds and many sore 


istant to antibiotics. 

One major cause of exces- 
sive use of antibiotics is that 
when people go to doctors, 
they expect a cure. And doc- 
tors ail too often comply by 
immediately prescribing an- 
tibiotics. without determining 
if antibiotics will cure the ill- 
ness. 

As many as half of all out- 


tibiodcs when others would empty, because drug compa- 
do the iob jeopardizes the fn- .nies have shifted their re- 


there was another magic bul- antibiotics are inappropriate 
let on the pharmacist's shelf, for all colds and many sore 
But now me shelf is almost throats, ear, sinus and bron- 


do the job jeopardizes the fu- 
ture value of the newest ones. 

While medical use of an- 
tibiotics is the main culprit, 
their use in livestock also 
fosters the spread of antibi- 
otic-resistant superbugs. In the 
1940s, researchers discovered 


search' from short- term- use 


chial infections; 

• halting all uses of an- 
tibiotics in agriculture that 


antibiotics to more lucrative jeopardize the drugs efrec- 
drugs for treating chronic tiveness in humans; 


conditions such as heart dis- 
ease, cancer and AIDS. 

Unless we change our 
practices, even the occasional 


that chickens grew faster if new antibiotic will become 
small amounts of antibiotics obsolete. For instance, the 


were added ro their feed. 

Since then, almost half of all 
antibiotics sold in America 


new antibiotic Synercid is 
one of the last hopes against 
deadly antibiotic-resistant 


have been added to feed or bloodstream infections. Al- 
water given to poultry, catde. though it has nor been ap- 
pigs and fish to speed growth proved for use in humans, its 
and cut costs. Farmers can buy value has been compromised 
such antibiotics as penicillin, because resistance to one an- 


• adopting national targets 
for reductions in antibiotic 
usage. 

Without such changes, the 
crown jewels of modem 
medicine may mm to dust. 

Patricia Liebennan is se- 
nior science policy fellow and 
Michael Jacobson is execum e 
director of the Center for Sci- 
ence in the. Public Interest. 
They contributed this comment 
to the Los Angeles Times. 


Diana: Pushed Over the Limit 
By the Men Who Trailed Her 


This comment, republished in the In- 
dependent on Sunday on Sept. 7. was taken 
from a May 1997 article in the same news- 
paper by Marianne Macdonald, then a staff 
writer for the paper: 

L ONDON — Diana probably sees more 
of the five or six paparazzi who follow 
her than of her sons. like a fatal disease, 
they will be with her until death. 

There is no moment she can be cer- 
tain she is not being photographed. This 
is why she will not shower at her gym; 
why she rarely goes out at nighL She has 

MEANWHILE 

tried everything she can think of to stop 
them. She has worn the same clothes 
again and again. She has shielded her 
face with shoulder bags. She has stayed 
in. She has shouted, pleaded, lectured, run. 
She has given them the silent treat- 
ment, and, as her ability to bear them has 
given way, she has taken more violent 
measures. 

It is chilling to hear the sLang they use for 
photographing her. To take a number of 
pictures is to "hose her down." They also 
“blitz her," "target her" and “whack 
her." To do this they stick their cameras 
right in her face. 

When her father died five years ago, she 
was in Lech, in Austria. Glenn Harvey, a 
paparazzo, was waiting outside her hotel. 

"The door ... was thrown open and a 
hysterical and tearful Diana raced out," he 
writes in "Dicing With Di," the book he 


wrote with a fellow paper az 20 . Mark 
Saunders. 

“NO, NO. NO. NO. NO, NO, NO. NO. 
NOT NOW,” she screamed, as Glenn's . 
motor drive sprang into action. Diana*' 
crumpled ... Afterwards, for the only time 
in his career, he felt pangs of guilt . . . Glenn . 
decided to sell the pictures and within 20 
minutes every single frame had been.; 
sold." 

Saunders and Harvey also followed Diana " 
up the M4 after her Panorama interview. ; 
“She indicated left and pulled across to the 
middle lane, slowing down considerably and „ 
forcing me to pass. And then ... she in- 
creased her speed and lurched back into the 
fast lane, coming up directly behind me. 

*‘We were traveling at 90 miles [145.^ 
kilometers] per hour when I felt her bumper . 
touch the rear of my car. [Glenn] gestured.- 
wildly at her ‘Back off ... back off. But . 
Diana made no artempt to slow down. The 
cars carried on, bumper to bumper ... I 
could see Diana's face in the rear-view 
minor. She looked possessed. She was 
driving with only one hand, with the other . 
gesturing wildly at me ... I increased my, 
speed ... At about 120 miles per hour I lost . 
her and managed to slip into the middle 
lane. Diana sped past 

This is not an isolated incident. The 
book suggests that Diana often jumped 
lights and broke speed limits in a bid to 
escape her tormentors. They have then 
done the same. If this harassment contin- 
ues, her story could no longer just end in . 
tears. Someone could die. and it might 
not be a paparazzo. 


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your poor, HHr 

TO MAKE EWp, • 

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


On the Princess “ ,draw ’ h S^£ l 

I have been compelled to London, 

read hundreds of harrowwg The writer „ director of 

neW Kffi r a .h,TnP^of Di- public affairs for Harrods the 

department store owned by’ 

an^Pnncess of Wales, and f ± 


Dtrii^FaySid! but the rae Mohamedal Fayed 

W 7S en c- by /r Amid the outpouring of 

<’/ he F h U L L ‘tnf!hc Me r- grief over the untimely death 
Man in the Boi k o} the Me gj, Diana> i' m SQre there are 

cedes. Opinion. many who, like me, are dis- 

caused me the most distress. -. M masr 


caused me the most^es, hysteria 

To sugge^jishedoes, cmoid2ing this unfor- 

this appalling jragedv was nmate but foo |ish young 
caused in pan because Mr. al wornar , mr-mne her into a 


caused in pan because Mr. al 
Fayed failed to draw the lim- 
ousine's curtains is inane and 
simplv adds to the anguish of 
the families most intimately 
concerned and to millions of 
people worldwide. 

Mr. al Fayed and the prin- 
cess had been pursued relent- 
■ -i_. l. r nknmnnnhfirs for 


nmate but foolish young 
woman, turning her into a 
secular saint. 

She had a great job. She was 
to be a fairy princess, a queen, 
a mother of kings. With the 
job came strains; she couldn’t 
deal with them. Although she 
seems to have been a loving 


cess had been pursued relenr- ther< s he failed as a prin- 
lessly by photographers tor ce$s ^ a w ife. Admir- 
weeks. Well before me ^ her husband and in-laws 
irasedv, Mr. al Fayed s ta- wer ^ a disappointment, but so 
ther. Mohamed al Fayed, had m0ST women. Tra- 

instructed his French lawyers e - ica uy t ^ she developed a l 

to seek legal protection from for manipulating the 

the pestilence of the press medi& s h e became their 
which began when the aJ creature . in the end they de- 
Faved family and the pnneess ^ her _and perhaps the 
and her sons were on houaay British constitution as well, 
together in Sainr-Tropez in JOHN E. RAY. 

i,.Tv . Paris- 


v , together in Samr-Tropez in jOHNE.RA^. 

M July- . - n r Paris - 

harassment 'duty to There may be a way tofight 

Suet their lives in every ^ celebnty culture that t. 
detail to discourage the un- threatening to engulf us _aU. 
2JL. -nd unjustifiable at- and that is to ask yourself the 
rfa Story press ^estion: Would I want to go 

KgS.'SiKS noone _ dinner*!*^ Umct 

nor^w Safire himseIf Ferg ic * J i n,oldSc { , ^^ v toS 

“ould accept such a linut on «r, M^ 0 ™? ' * 
individual freedom. The ans ’ „ would 

Mr Safire compounds tne emphatic no. v ; n ‘* 

cedes was not armored. A 

Mr. al Fayed was a kind and 
gemlepereon,.and 4 inlOye^ Land Mines 

I never saw him ft™ ^ Reqar ding "In Norway . a 

“^th long-distance hind- Quest for a Land-Mine Ban 

a sight from W^hMon. Africa declared a mu- 

* -.‘-aS sSsasas 


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ev^iDgtogetoat^e^- Feb. 19, 

holiday. Mr. al ^y. 0 Before the mffoduenon 

in the movie busm« sss w South Africa had 

lived in k* and he issued a moratorium “ 

publicity is a way “ 0 b- ' oersonnel mines, as far back as . 

has never display^ , ^om south Africa’s rema^i' 

sessiveurgetoracea yfr® ^^wiU aUtave^ 

sssJ-s-s - Is 

teg for ii °f Africa is a 

suing profit at ^^personael mines is th 

^ ne^risSou'Hf'* 

not have happen^"'^ Jbassod°r to Norway- 
their provocation. * 










THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 






J 





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American-Built Cars Take to the World’s Roads 

The Cadillacs and Chevrolets that will be on view at the Frankfurt Motor Show are built for performance, safety and comfort — and for the world market . 

O ver the past decades. General Motors has transformed goal of selling 20 percent of the new Sevilles in its 40 non- weld-bonded upper body, a single-piece inner bodyside 
itself into one of the most international of all auto- North American markets. ring and other structural elements developed by GM for 

mobile manufacturers. The portfolio of new and To emphasize its commitment to making the Seville the use in all its cars. The high quality of these components — 


IP* 


O ver the past decades. General Motors has transformed 
itself into one of the most international of all auto- 
mobile manufacturers. The portfolio of new and 
relaunched Cadillac and Chev rolet models being displayed 
by GM Europe’s North American Vehicles group at Frank- 
fort's Motor Show' represents an ambitious attempt to in- 
crease the company's share of the key “LLL" (“luxury, 
lifestyle and leisure”! segment of the global automobile 
marker. 

• To that end. the company has outfitted the new models 
with die high-tech equipment the world has come to associate 
with Silicon America. The models also have features that 
have not always been part of U.S.-built cars, including 
precise, responsive handling and designs with dimensions 
and details that take into account the individual markets 
around the world. 

A matter of a millimeter 

The difference between the North .American car market and 
that of the rest of die world is literally a matter of millimeters 
] millimeter, in fact A car that is 4.999 meters long, like 
the “world” versions of the 1998 Cadillac Seville STS and 
SLS. can be sold anywhere in the world, but sales of a car 
longer than that are largely confined to the United States. 
Canada and a few other countries with parking spaces longer 
than 5 meters. 

The car’s “world appeal” is also enhanced by a chassis 
designed for either right- or left-hand drive, a sophisticated 
suspension system capable of instantaneously reading and 
reacting to all of the world's road surfaces, and in-car driver 
information and entertainment centers that can be pro- 
grammed in five of the world s leading languages. 

. The new Sevilles have all these world market features and 
rpore. This is no accident: Cadillac has set itself the ambitious 


goal of selling 20 percent of the new Sevilles in its 40 non- 
North American markets. 

To emphasize its commitment to making the Seville the 
“standard of the world” in the automobile market's luxury 
segment. Cadillac has broken with an 85-year-old tradition. 
For the fust rime in General Motors' history, a new model 
will not be premiered in the United States. The new Seville 
will debut abroad, at the Frankfort Motor Show. 

European launches 

The automobile exhibition will also be the venue for the 
European launches and relaunches ofthe Chevrolet Camaro, 
Blazer and 510 Pickup, as well as the debut of the Corvette 
convertible, a model that is bound to please sun-hungry 
Europeans. 

In their efforts to expand their non-North American mar- 
kets. Cadillac and Chevrolet can also rely on a number of 
other features that have been developed for all of their 
customers, in America and elsewhere. 

E\ eiyone wants an automobile that provides maximum 
safety, and all GM cars fulfill that requirement. Along with 
seatbelts and airbags for the driver and front-seat passengers, 
the ’98 Sevilles have side airbags m rhe front seat to protect 
against damage from lateral collisions. The cars come with a 
four-wheel disc braking system incorporating ABS and 
traction control, which combine to allow for ultra-fast, ultra- 
sure deceleration. 

Superior body 

Perhaps the most important safety feature is the Seville's 
body. Completely new. its rigidity and torsion stiffness 
are 50 percent greater than that of the previous model. 
This provides passengers with a much greater* "crash 
zone.” The new body's superior performance is due to a 


weld-bonded upper body, a single-piece inner bodyside 
ring and other structural elements developed by GM for 
use in all its cars. The high quality of these components — 
and other key items like rhe company’s new lines of 
engines and transmissions — comes out of a multibillion- 
dollar investment in new manufacturing equipment and 
materials. This large capital outlay was accompanied by 
a reorganization of working methods, with many em- 
ployees now operating in work cells. 

The new body's stiffriess also greatly improves the car's 
handling. Long gone are the days when a luxury automobile 
was expected to merely look impressive, perform reliably 
and be comfortably appointed. Today, owners expect their 
luxury cars to perform like sports models. 

No heaving or pitching 

To meet this expectation. Cadillac has created the Con- 
tinuously Variable Road Sensing Suspension (CVRSS) sys- 
tem. Comprised of a powertrain controller and sets of wheel- 
side sensors and microprocessors, the system handles 
changes in road conditions by adjusting the shock absorber 
settings as often as one thousand times per second. The result 
is an end to the heaving, pirching and rolling caused by swells 
and other road disturbances. 

This system is just one of 29 major innotations in- 
corporated into the 1 998 Sevilles. In addition to improving 
performance andor providing new capacities, the inno- 
vations are generally less bulky and lighter than the items 
they have replaced. lea\ ing much more space for passengers 
and their belongings. 

The lighter weight also explains why the Sevilles have 
comparatively good fuel economy figures, with the best 
value of any automobile in their class. The cars' other 
environmentally friendly features include expanded use of 


Ss^ae-'WSr.lW' 










The 1998 CacMac Seville SLS (above feti) was designed to appeal 
to the work! market Above, the plush interior of the Seville STS. 


recycled materials and new production procedures that allow* 
the reuse of parts and materials. * 

.*£ 

Powerful sound system ! 

The Seville also features an ultra-quiet engine and ride.* 
Drivers who find it too quiet will enjoy the car's en-1 
tenainment center, based on a Bose 4.0 sound system | 
According to GM. the Bose 4.0 is “the most powerful sound! 
system ever developed for a production automobile. " -J 
" Among foe Seriile's other entertainment-related feature^ 
are an in-vehicle microphone that picks up ambient noise and; 
adjusts the entertainment system's volume to compensate ftjri 
it." eight speakers (for wraparound sound! and antenna^ 
embedded in both the front and rear windshields, providing* 
perfect radio reception and preventing theft. 

Another innovation is foe Seville's "adaptive seating 
system.” with 10 air cells in the seat cushion and back rest! 
The sensors in each cell are linked to acentral control module 
and automatically adjust foe cells' inflation to foe drivers! 
v\ eight, providing maximum comfort. • . . 7 


tf. - /. *L- f > •- , 


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enins; in Hall 7 IAA Frankfurt Motor Show 


a qreru day for c\ 


' ‘ ^ jtcet; powcrl^xt ; ; rcypm : - and' intatuatir 

Hu ' W hr.-na Si- .... 


Chevrolet will unveil cwo new ’stars, each unique, and each offer 


!y new experiences 











EA.GE3 




UNTERNATI 1 


O* \£L£> wrawMit^ 

n trTRUiVE. yFnNES P^ SEPTEMBER 10, 1994 
INTERNATIONAL 41 n B— 


n 




U.S. Cars for a European Lifestyle 

_ .. - . _»• 




A- k Europeans aie exhibiting a new attitude toward American-built cars and a new feeling for individual style. 



£ 


E uropeans who love American-built cars arc those 
who have an affinity for the United States, a strong 
sense of individual style, adequate incomes and an 
inclination to purchase high-performance, fully equipped 
automobiles. 

In the past, the number of Europeans fulfilling this 
description provided General Motors Europe North Amer- 
ican Vehicles (GME NAV) division with a “steady if not 
spectacular level of sales in the 15 countries in which we 
distribute,*" says Susan Docherty. GME NAVs marketing 
director. 


The American-built automobiles are also > se P 

from the dominant trend on Europe's automobile 
ket: the move toward “lifestyle vehicles. 

“As is the case in America, people are 
increasingly selecting automobiles that 
relate. to how they live, what their 
lifestyle is. rather than ones 
sinctly defining which stratum 

of society they belong to." /"> ^rv''“ §|»p£jjy| Hi 


gSggjpQGffiBttsj. 






director. 

Over die last few years, there have been strong signs that 
this target group is poised to expand rapidly. 



The open road 

“Our European customers have always identified Cadillacs 
and Chevrolets with their image of America — its way of 
life, its open roads,” says Ms. Docherty. “Over the last 
decade, America has also become synonymous with high- 
tech, state-of-the-art computers and communication sys- 
terns, and now, increasingly, cars. The augmenting ot 
America’s ‘customer appeal’ will have a positive impact on 
our sales figures.” 

If Europeans now expect American cars to be as high tech 
as the country itself, the new Seville won’t disappoint them. 
The car has a full-fledged ICT (information and com- 
munication) network transmitting data at a rate of 10.4 
Icilobytes/second throughout the car. The data flows to and 
from the car’s traction monitoring and assurance, alarm, 
automatic air conditioning and 13 other grids forming GM s 
IJJorthstar system. 


says Ms. Docherty. 

“That's why we’ve been ^ 
seeing a strong rise in the sL.. 
number of recreational . 
vehicles purchased on the 
Continent. Our Chevy 
Blazer successfully serves 
this demand in North ^ 

America and on Chevrolet’s 
other world markets. We expect the 
BlazeT to follow suit in Europe," she adds. 


pill 

IN; 'M 




r.>. 

[i> 

mm 







77ie racy corvene nas «*« "7 

44 yea* Pfcluredi the 7998 Corvette Cabrto. 


Freewheeling good times #• mnrister 

“Another trend in Europe has been the return 
in all its forms — the car associated with ^ 
times. The American version of the roadster is musefe 
or -pony’ car, and it never really lost its 
United States. The Camaro has been j*enasthe most 
muscular of the nuncio cars since its mtroduction m ^965. 
We re relaunching the Camaro in Europe to cap mis jow 
ing demand for s^rty two-door coupes that «nd^er*e 
performance that Europeans expect. Ms. Docherty con 

™Such hiefHtnd vehicles ure never cheap. The 


Love at First Sight: The Corvette 

Europeans never hesitated rvhen i, came to this spotty- mode,, non- a collectors item. 

* « j «La pump \ 


W hen it comes to .American-built vehicles, it seems 
to take Europeans 30 years or so to turn a strong 

tog mSThot love affair. When they were 
iixmg hhu chew lmnalas and 


’ .. Such hiah-end vehicles are never cncap. » - 

Corvette drivers are provided with additional on-line data on ■ v '!— thc'tradition of p P urchasing 
(La imnrvrtnnt information in a car capable individuality and to break witn me nauiu k ■ 


tog SrHot love affair. When they were 
luung i lmnalas and 


made TV commercials and action turns j v 

collector's items. 


five seconds, a new iecnnuiogic.il iwwu. 

vette ridins smoothly in case it suffers a flat tire. The car s 

■‘‘enhanced mobility,” or “run flat," tires can drive 3-0 


i«." ■ 


, ennanceu mummy, ui iw. , 

kilometers even when deflated. This bit of high-tech wiz- 
ardry allows the ’Vette to dispense with a spare tire and all its 
accessories, freeing trunk space. 


nrosnenry or uie v_uiiuusui ^ - 

governments have been wrestling with budgeory con- 
straints. many of their citizens have seen theirmcornKn^. 
A propensity to travel is another manifestation of this nse in 

disposable income. 



Comfort and safety 

“Such buyers insist on having all me fea- 
tures mat make travel comfortable — and 
safe ” notes Ms. Docherty. ‘"That s why 
thev’re turning to our vehicles. Europeans 
have to come to expect fuUy equipped 
vehicles providing features mat are quite 
often extra in many of me other models 
offered on me Continent's markets^ 

There are practical reasons for this, ine 
offering of relatively few pactages is one 
way GM keeps the cost-benefit ratio high 
for its automobiles sold in Europe, despite 
the distances between the company s plants 
in the United States and its showrooms in 

EU Headquartered in Riisselshejm. a west- 
ern suburb of Frankfort GME NAV is 
responsible for coordinating super- 
vising foe public relations, marketing, 
sales? after-sales and financing 
its subsidiaries, and for serving as the in- 
terface between GM in Europe and in 


America. • 


Cadillac and Chevrolet 
At the Frankfurt International 
Motor Show 


FVankfurt, September 11 - 21, 19®7 
Hall 7 

Heading to the heart of downtown America: 5 

visitors to the Cadillac and Chevrolet hall at the Frankfurt 

Motor Show will be doing this year. The theme thlsyeans 

■■NewYork'sRWt Avenue." andthedlsplays-bothln® 

and virtual - show the sights and sounds i Jfms 
downtown New York's prime artenes. lined wrth GM 


'53 Buick: a design icon wh j c h 

SESSSSBrsew: 

2S»SSSSSstt«i 

sought after in Europe. 


For further information: 

GM Europe North American Vehicles 
General Motors import & Distribution GmbH 
Eisenstrasse 3 
065428 Russelsheim 
Tel.: (49 6142)60 22 59 

Fax:(49 6142)826 32 


gSgsaaSP- 


**c vdillaC and Chevrolet in Et'Rorc" 

i produced In ' 

the International Herald Tnbune.. 

Writer: Terry S^vreb^. ^ed m ^ ch 

Program Director: Bill Mahder. 













page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRI BUNE. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 


10, 1997 


$ m & the intermarket 





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GERMANY .$0.24 EGYPT S1.08 


Call: 201.287.8400 Fax: 201.287.8437 

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~ CALL BACK r TRAVEL CARDS 


Best Rates & Commissions 


888 S. Andrews Avenue, #2d5, fort Lauderdale. FI 33316 
Voice: 1-954-522-3300 Fax: 1-954-522-8242 
♦ Contnci: Wiilbm Ellis * 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 4 


USED LEVI SOI JEANS • All colors & 
grades ftr prce its FAX 801-561-3849 
USA. RECYCLEWEAB 


Business Opportunities 


Import/Export 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
f 14 MIGRATTON/PASSPORTS 


WE EXPORT WORLDWIDE 

ALL PRODUCTS, 

Consaner Goods rtgti Tech. 
Commodees etc. 

FOR ALL YOUR NEEDS 
Please contact 
USA EXPORT • 

TeL 2D1 -836-0550, Foe 201-896-1661 
E-mail. 103731 2066 ecorpusffvexoro 


Axon House, Douglas, We o< Hen 
Tet 444 (0) 1624 526591 
Fas; +44 (0) 1624 625126 


ACTIVE WORKOUT/SPORTSWEAR 
■You have volume sales & in need ol 
product" 1 "We have me capacity & the 
manufacturing lacatet We are a public 
COTpany tridt a cutting plant in Soulh 
Flonda & mamiaaureig plants in the 
Domrtan Repubfc A Ncaiagua. Raster 


London 

Tib #44 ffi) 171 233 1302 
Fate +44 p 171 233 ISIS 


E HaQ: BStoneenterpfise.net 

mw.amt-tamjdemoiua.uk 


imerwi tn acquisUms/nwraer. Contact 
on mr letterhead OLYMPUS USA FAX; 


on jar lewrtwad 
1954) 5©-86W 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 


- American Casket for export 
Become a represauadw 
For rtormaton tax n the US 
7603) 326-0690 


READY MADE CO'S. FULL ADMIN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND UC 
BANKING A ACCOUNTING 
CHINA BUSINESS SERVICES 


FRENCH WINES: dually French vanes 
on oHer at outstaying pncea (Brand 
redMtiM tom St.iSwrata. Starktws 
from Si 50). In 20 ft container. For 
quetw PTM France +33 (D|1 4640 0603 


Conact Stella Ho tor mmedae 
services & corpeny brochure 
MACS LTD, Room MOB. AMon Plaza 
241 Grande Road TST. Kowtoon. 
Hong Kong, +nst nacs©l*.supernel 
Tat K2 -27241 223 Fax 27224373 


SHALL ARMS AMMUNmONAUUTARY 


equlpmem and supplies, kwresi prices, 
volume only. FAX USA ♦354474-3866 


AUTHENTIC CUBAN CIGARS tor sale 
over the internet Visit our site: 
vnwcyterstogiescom 


FINANCE AVAILABLE FOR 
" LETTERS OF CREDIT 
’ STANDBY LETTERS OF CREDIT 
■ FNANCIAL GUARANTEES 
" PROOF OF FUNDS 
■ W VESTMENT LOANS 
Fax appkafions only to +90 392 2268291 


DOMINICAN CIGARS. 9 styles, hand 
rolled, volume purchases only 
Teletax USA+954-474-38S6 


LEVI 50VS. Used and New Ouafty 
jeans died from ita USA Honest and 
Relatfc Fax. MK2B-0748 USA 


YOUR REPRESENTATIVE W TOKYO - 
Husband of French ceil servant posted 
in Tokyo seeks companies rterested h 
Japanese makffl. An^ophone. 27 vre. 
professional experience. 10 yre in Asia 
! 5*i Fiance as tatependen) importer. 
Computer-wlsa Fax +33 (0)2 9972 2S39 


QUALITY T-SHIRTS tram Hamburg. 
Reedy stock, large quantities for sale. 
Fax Germany +49-KW71726. 


2ND PASSPORT S10K Also EU. 
Diplomatic, Drivers Licences. Email- 
cquMQunelnetpb Fax: 63-2-831 7552 


GENERAL 


Real Estate Services 


YOU OWN A PROPERTY IN FRANCE! 
Our senrices covar in your absence: 
Maftenanca. cleaning gardening, repaks 

fdtorup d m mmrm axes-er 
DO A0r HESITATE TO 
CONTACT (J5 FOR MORE DETAILS 
FAX 433 (0)4 » 95 94 34 
Tet; +33 f6J< 50 95 35 35 
7 Domame de Crevh P-74160 Bossey 


8th, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYSEES 
and we Fg a Horan, ter sate n 19th 
cent Haussmam style character M&ig: 
OFFICES or HGH CLASS apaitmert to 
be refitted (prasasty fined as oflfces) 
About 300 sam. per level. Patel sale 
possUe. VERY GOOD OPPORTUNITY. 
Contact owner *w on 
Fn +33 flffi 56 20 01 69 
Tet +33 m 07 65 65 19 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Austria 


VIENNA. Nad to Opera. alaganL fix- 
- rawed, aunny i bedroom. Snort Mm. 
7et 369 84 SB. (I U&317-421-9500 


Paris and Suburbs 


Paris Area Furnished 


PAHS X. lively area, up floor, view, 
charming studo tar sale, funehed Fax 
owner 1222302066 


19th, near 7Bi. 1 feu. 2 bemoms, Wf- 
raee, view gaden. cram. sun. equtaped. 


race, view gaden. cram. sun. eqJpped. 
radons, ffiikl t* +33 toje O 8 B 15126 


Hvu MMOURID CMS, VANS, 4 Wfft , 
I MM'S and SPICIAL HSUCOPTSM* 

I a nA used Eufflpe and US Models, very reasonably priao- 


INCORPORATE 


IN THE U.S.S. 


Protact Your Personal Assets 
■ mctxooratc m any at«e. ractadng 
Dataware. NevacM 5 Wyoming 
• LJ.Cs (Umtted LrahSty Compantes) 
. In as VttlB »1 hours 

Corporate Agent*. Inc. 

Fax 13021 998-7078 
CcmpuSlw GO INC 
hta wrww oorporati <»" 


302-998-0598 


business 

apartments 


business in 

BRUSSELS? 


For a week, a month 
or longer, 

business apartments 
with every facility. 


Contact Jacques at: 
Brussels Hilton 
Residence 
Square Ambiorix, 28 
B-lOOO Brussels 
Tel: <32 2) 743 51 11 
Fax: 1 32 2) 743 51 12 


“...your home for 
business" 


Minutes fmm the European 
Ctiminihsmn onrf Parliament 


ANONYMOUS BANK ACCOUNTS 
TRADE FINANCE 
3AIK NSTRUMEOT5 
Fax mquty only to +90 2S1 2288291 


CAR WASH, GAS & CONVENIENCE 
Sue * 3 rental properties. Fargo. N. 
Dakota. Excefienr'comer tacaoon. SacrF 
Ecg S6751t Also: Mmescte gas & con- 
vmnee stare Sacrifice. Lame w 1 & 
IBS to cal Tet 906-561-2887 USA 


WE REQWRE MTRODUCERS wUl coo- 
tadrin-SAnurka, Aina, and Eastern 
Europe. We wfl provide foreign ex- 
change. futures and options products. 
Hnb romresbon on an ongoing basts 
pcssHe. Taft* +44 (0) 171 m 3329 


SWISS TRADMG Company Is buyiig K 
seing stocks of commodai merchanifee 
al outlet prices tar opal Now naUrie 
2000 fames dresses 'Mrs. Big* sizes 
42-60. C00E5CQ Rax 441 26 401 42 45 


2nd PASSPORTS I Driving Licences / 
Degrees/Camoifiage Pas^jorts/Secrea 
Bank Accounts, dll. P 0. Bax 70302- 
Attwns 16610. Greece. Fax B962152. 
intLV www.gttakncwaycorii 


YOUR INDEPHDSfT PARTI®? n US 
GUf OSGA bgtstic hic-JJ Lalou - fmc 
4373. Tet 281 405 8756 fax 781 405 
8338. Freigta fcmnflng atr & ocean, 
packkig martie. sisuanwdiarteraig. 


■fn. SOCIETY OF HNANCIERS 
NetwotWng lor hUime professfcrieis wtfi 
projects for luting or fuming for 


projects FREE A Inna Had Report. 
704-252-5907 Far 704-251-5061 USA 


SHIP SUPPLIER COMPANY, loorfoon- 
tood. far sate. Gennsiy. For mere Wor- 
mattofi reply Bax 401, IHT, Frieditahsv. 
15. D80323 Frank&rtlfeh. Germany 


WOL EsOtflstied CaBomia Microbrew 
pub restaurant In BeQIng, China - for 
sate. For- delate Fax No. (86101 6485 
7832 Em&a agaw0Qnesafeaxo.cn 


WPLOMAHC PASSPORTS. 100% Legal 
Hanoaiy Consul EU passpots. Escrow. 
ILS, ud WtpJ/www 2 ndiHssportsxom 
Tfif +34-39042969 / Fax +34-52883109 


OFFSHORE COMPARES. For tree bTO- 
churs or advice Tet Londsn 44 181 741 
1224 Fax: 44 181 748 6558*338 
vrawaptfeWiauik 


AAA SINGLE DISK SOFTWAfE mat 
order US. 5120 to start. Into, 
vmwraeganets org or cal 9Q2-445-2E20. 


COMPANY looking tar finance! partners 
for si & Important rtsmabona) tusinass 
transactions. Fax: + 33 (0)1 44 40 40 34 


Partnerships 


ARE YOU LOOKING TO START, BUY 
or exparabig business? WS you tale an 
investing partner with you doing the 
work? 916663-24408634441 Fax USA. 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 


FixnMwd apartmertE. 3 months or more 
or urfurtsbed, restdattel anas. 


Tel: +33 (0)1 42 25 32 25 

Fax: +33 P <5 63 37 09 


CHAMPS ELYSEES • HIGH CUSS - 
Exceptional apartment fer business use. 
50 sqm w» bataonyon Ctamps Bjwas 
Cal now +33 (DJI 4432 0317. Fft 0319 


ELYS2 PALACE, befog south, redone 
2 rooms, targe Baft, charm. axcepWial 
view FBflOO net (0)1 47 42 10 K 


b_E ST Logs, chamfeg studio, taige & 
hr grt. fireplace: FF5M pet imOi Tel 
(0)473 96 21 99 or {0)4 73 96 20 47 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


HE DE U cm. voy brigff. IS ana. 
large living & (fining, marble floors. 
Freisfl #m balcony wfo view of Notre 
Dame. 2 bedrooms, 2 marble baths, 
equipped wHn kitchen FF13.000 * 
charges, perking. Tel *33(0)386664021 


•UBCmEHSTBN*WO«£MI** 

• OPF8HORE COMPANIES J 

• • 0QMRWY RJfWWCW - f&Df* M«E g 
•-MWGEMBYT .AND ACCOtWWCY, 

WIERfWTWW WC LEGAL #0 TWof , 

• SOTflCES •BANK WTROOUCTWE. 

• t ABSETPROIEC1KN • TTMOEStPYW 
^•TREPHMEAMm. FORNW™ % 

• F?h Brochure swiWJle In Entfsh- 

• Qemwi and Russian 

■ intaroampany 


3£ 

CMORTJS 


Business to Business Services 


• Business Plan Preparation 

• Investment Prospectuses 

■ Project Studies & Appraisals 

• Business Reviews 

• International Promotion 


For further information call or write to 
Chorus Ltd, 28, Grosvenor Street, 
London W1X4FE 


Tel: 444(0)1719179620 
Fax: +44 (0)171 9176002 


Te/ecommunicatfons 


CTl - btonatioMt 
nemationat Prepaid Cards 



Business Services 


SELL & BUY 

al over Iha world Mh INTERNET 
www.nebeurotersinsssxorn 
Fn +M (0)5 61 14 86 29 


RUSSIAN BUSINESS Visas including 
muta-entry phis afi other travel semces 
va our downtown Moscow office Tet *44 
(0)113 232 0062 Fs (0)113 232 Q22S 


MAILING LISTS by Berger S Conpany 
European business and consumer data 
Tet 44 1312262996 Fax 44 1312267901 


YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 
Bond Street - Mai, Phone. Fax. Telex 
Tet 44 171 290 9000 ftx 171 499 7517 


YOUR OFFICE M NEW YORK 
MsilRnnefFax Service 
21240M515 - Mp-Jwwwjrjtearm 


Business Travel 


laUBashms Clan Frequert Travefas 
Worldwide. Uo to 50"“« riff. No coupons. 


Worldwide. Up to 50°b off. No coqxxis, 
no restrictions. Imperial Canada Tel: 
1-514-341-7227 Far 1-514-341-7998. 
e-mail address: impefialClogm.net 
hdpdflnrwJogfejnelflflSMrtal 


Banking 


EUROPEAN BANKS Issue tor you UCs, 
SBLCs Paymem/Finandal Guarartees 
Prod of Funds & Finding Confirmation, 
ft *48-1611832858 Tt +*9-1728075517 


Capital Wanted 


INNOVATIVE FRENCH COSMETICS 
Naiural unlqus + safe sMn Ightenas pro- 
ducer safe funds, dstiun tor wood 
demand. Fax *33(0)4 42 24 09 07 


51 mim PAYS BACK 515ty»0 M 
90 days hiy coBatarateett. No broken. 
Tet 818-683-2400 Of 91M71-1555. 


Capital Available 


CAPITAL C0RP. 


M & A 

Corporan Ffeorafeg 
Venue Ceptari 
(Worldwide) 


Tel: 00t-407'24M3W 



Fax: 001407-2484037 USA 


BROKERS 

Do you mm tracing transactions 
You provide bank guamhe. we wi 
provtaBbank erttence of funds In you 
name. For nominal taaang cost 
Fate 44 (0)171 470 7113 


WtflLiY MAURICE BMRE5. 4th hsor 
Nmnwtt. firing, rfiring, 2 bedrooms, 2 
btfs. aqupped Ntdben. parting, maid’s 
room possible. Key money: toaseJhani- 
tire rao.OCO. Tel dire A»1 45620410 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUMfflY FURNISHED apart- 
ments. From cutas to 4 bedrooms. Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 730 2671 


Employment 


General Positions Wanted 


BUNGUAL FRENCHMAN. 37. FOvfera- 
based. oqwtenced in oammuitatiaff a 
tourism, seeks job in Meml coTOMny 
yfSl Arad salary. Td *33(0)401945X4 


HEAD WAITER, 'CULSIHER'. MUtoual 
EngfislFPench. seeks postern In tSec- 
tor's rettauail Qher paiHfou or fol- 
time. TS +33 (0)1 48 08 13 48 




of watches: 

Cartier, Rolex, One©. Gucc 
Piaget, Tag Heuer, BreiOIng 
and many odiere. 


International supplies: 

: + 31 (O) 20 6330394 i 


fax: + 31 (O) 20 63301 

The Netherlands 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with correspondent relationship. 

Class A ccomnezcia] license. 
Immediate delivery. US $60,000. 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Tab (242) 384-7080 Ax: (242)394-7082 
Agents Wanted Wobldwide 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WORLD TRENDS: 


If you winr the very bes inrsdw 
’ convennowl intelligence. 
Contact: 

THE SPECIAL OFFICE 
UK Fax: 01608 650 540 

No pi jtmdJ. nc cuorfw 

Tvc i-.u nitdd Iroro rbe 



Anglo Ambhican Group 
— pic 


PROJECT FINANCE 
VENTURE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Cotporate ftadarre and 
tafotmatapask 

Tet t44 1S24 £21 3E5 
Far *44 l£24 377 

Ycu are TOCane to visa us. 


PROJECT FINANCING 


Wrture Cqaal - Jam '/enures • 
No Maxrmran - Botes Pratecaa. 


R.J1 INTERNATIONAL 
Tel: 001*242-363*1649 
Fax: 001-716*779-8200 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING VEN- 
TURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENTURES* 
PROJECT FWAtOiG 




IVT1IVITIUXU V| NTt'll! 


Tth +44 113 2727 550 Fax: +44 113 
2727 560 Fees are not requested prcr is 
an cBa of forcing tong cede 


COMMERCIAL FUNDING AVAILABLE 
Buslnsss Finance ‘ Ventura Capaai 
Wortdmde * Brokers wataome 


ETHIC OWESTHOnS LTD 
FAX +44 10)115 942 7B46 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 
For investment Programs 
Proof d Funds Aratebte 
Thraufo AcowX HoMas a 
Seven D.S. & European Banks 
(212) 75S4242 Fax: (212) 756-1221 
unrnfohntomeyxom 
Attorneys & BroHaR Med 
375 Prak Ave., NT. NT W52 USA 


Projeei Capital 
Available to Rent 
Mkrinunn USS 5m 
Madron USS 100m 
Rental arts vary wtfi 
Period money required 
Fax 44 (0)171 470 7205 
Al Broken W*ome 


•HtSAATE & UNLISTED 


ALL business projects' 

UW OS. SI nitoo max 
tier Business CoRSdng 
(717) 397-7490 {U5 FAX) 
rap-ywpwjmbuHmconi praemet) 


LOAN FUNDS I VENTURE CAPITAL 
Protect renews tar 4fti Ouaier frndmg 
now begkiwg. ktn USD 2M. Far sun- 
mery to COC fund managers & invest- 
tnert tortrara al 80M86-7056 


COHMERCIAL/BUSINESS FINANCE 
available for any viable prelects world- 
wide. Fax brief synopsis m Engfeh to 
Coporafe Advances. |+)44- 1273-621300. 


Executfves Available 


ENGLISHMAN Hrtig tn Paris fflW, 58. 
fluent French, ax-tfiractor of French com- 
pa* to 18 yrs. experience in aport and 
cortraa negrtfifflons with anglophone 
conpanfestoountnes end lafcon brewen 
Airman. Asian end French compares. 


Any oflef fat interesting work on a regu- 
lar basts contidsred. Compraer rserata. 
+33(0)1 3080 «74 Em* pmeadOcfelr 


Domestic Positions Wanted 


EXPSVBKED COUPLE • French. Ptr- 
tuguese. Spanish & sorb Engfish. Fax 
UStXXL 351.1 4577352 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


JJSO MA5TERS0N LIMITED 




teixM bpApi i ' tfe swanf 
uenJt +a'rtj viifc <cvf L’K' 4>TOJ-t 


ukt pw-TM] lows n (.'.wvswwnk* 
HpiVrniCThiAarasKLfa't'f- 


TlW 5 


EAtftNE STATE BUODMO 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
*fin USS 3n bom Principal 
Stot ape. de v ttopratrt, etc 
Hew PM AviflabJ# September 
Fmc +44 0QT71 47b 7158 
Attm CoDoate iirsace Bracte 
Al Bntere Wekaxae 


UNLBUTED MTL FUNDING . LOANS 
(conmrotaL prqeo fina rat devefop- 
menL venture rapial peicpatm acqo- 
sfions), Thrcutfijfl Stf! Saoraen ftran- 
aal Stxxces CROWN INST. toe. «a fax 
T 2IZS7MB37 ,LS& 


SWISS FRANCS AVAOABLE Loir x- 
tare si rate. Inlairraio^ lax. 
-51-20623)004 The Neflertands 


Financial Services 


SOLUTIONS 

Cssaa - 


BANCOR 

C? ASIA 


Earless pz&r&s tj sears tnfeg 
tr itat'e pajecs 

VS/7URE MPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 


irg sn rsce 


Fmc (632) 810-5284 
Tet (632) 8946358 


iCooxiibss! eame; cr‘ cpsr, TtaaSr^ 
&ckers Ccnsnastoi Assured 


WORLD WIDE FINANCING 


•Commercial Mortgages 
■VentfflH Czprtaf 
'Stock Loans 
■Project Fumfing 
*Lettero ol Cnx&t 
■Accounts flfcovatjJe Faumctog 
•Private Pbcenrent 
•Ptofc Sheas 


Tel: (212) 7584242 
Fax: (212) 758-1221 


Broket's Wefcane 

375 Park Ave. NY. NY 10152 USA 
vrewjDtwtameyxoro 
Refund^rle Ftoner 
Sometimes Required 


FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 

Instance .' Refosraance backed 
guarantees lot tpafifled 
busoess protects. 

Tet 561-998-3222 
Fac 561-9983226 USA 
northcapGwridnalatLnet 


Financial Investments 


OUTSTANDING IBIZA (Spam) propraty - 
Good location Seeks partners^ a buy 
Tef. *44 10) 171 229 5269 


Diamonds 


ROUGH We ml pay staan 

cash (w gem quslw. Atocai onmn. 
volume only Fax 954 474-3866 USA 


Serviced Offices 


cams 

D'AFFAIRES 


PARIS ETCHLE 


Facing the Arc de Tramphe 
^rasMwjs cfhces wtm services 
Tef +33 ffl)1 44 17 IB 44 
Fax +33 (0)1 44 17 IB 43 


INT'L FRANCHISES 


JUST published 

Bsswas,. 

^DEV^OP^-X^,^. 


HI* 



S teamatic of AnstraUa } 

"Sieamatic has provided us with many profit , 

centres to enable us io grow at a rate that « 

ranked us 84th in the fastest growing f 

companies in Australia in l 

continued research and development a the key * 
to our ability to stay ahead of our competition, j 
"Our tea veats has seen us grow to multi- - 

locations throughout: Australia and we look . 

forward co more locations." reuiriiTTm ‘ * 


USA FAX: 8 1 7-532-5349 & 


COM. REAL ESTATE 


National Sealed Bid Event 


32 Properties in 14 States, Mexico & the Bahamas 


Broker Participation Welcome 

Bid Due Date: November 14, 1997 • Noon, NIST 


Spanish Cay, Bahamas 
163-acre island with resort and marinas 
Waikiki, Oahu, Hawaii 
76,234 sf 3-story shopping plaza 
Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii 
, 122,400 sf airport office, fee simple 
Southfield, MI 
146,000 sf office - 95% occ 
Taxco, Mexico 

4-star hotel and restaurant on 78 ac 
Wildwood, NJ 
Boardwalk pier and retail 


Call for a free property catalog: 
Toll free: North America: 
Britain: 

France: 

1 Hong Kong: 
Japan: 

or Vtsit our Web Site: 


602-955-0505 

800-582-8492 • 

0500-89-2580 

0800-91-8344 

800-933-996 

0031-13-3095 

www.terrthinc.com 


NewAowoCM irtWT u rabmf 



Restaurant 

(one of die best) 
in Portugal's ALGARVE 
for sale. 


Very good value for money. 
Price ind. land (2,5 acres) 
& buildings.- £690,000. 


Dec R_ Neubersch, 

TaL- +35 1.89.390350, 

Fax 390369, 

e-mat neubentohQmal.tetepaqsi 


Offices for Rent 


BRUSSaS 0FFI&5 to rant 393 SQJJV 
4th Ikw. AT axxflfateng. iDcar garage.. 
2 Oi, caretaker, dose to subway, easy 


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bowfiooiL 5 mm- from lha akpori. Tefcf . 


bourhood. 5 mfo-'frwn the akpori. 
32-2-732 51 50 


CemfiL Investment 


Fully renred commercial Real 
Estate in the area of Aachen, 
Germany for Sale. 


Tel: +49 -211 -32 34 36 
Fax: +49 -211- 13 27 13 


CANARY BLANDS - South of Tenerife L: 
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hotel - apart-haM & residential ' , 
comptex tor sate 1,100 beds, ' { - J 
187 apartmeras, 106 bungalows. 

ExpUOtofl contacts wfo tour operatore 
gtoaneed. Or* dree? buyers. 

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to ready when you need ft. 
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165 other local ons woridwida. HQ 
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PAGE 3 


INTEBNATU 


gjf\ jjo 1mm. SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


stern I 


<ih 


% 


ISTER\\nOML®f ♦ 

dirt 


t *. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1997 


PAGE 33 - 


Intel Makin g PCs Roadworthy 


By Paul Floren notices. Some carmakers already 

; iraemmional Herald Tribune Offer computerized navigational 

• Zl *“*] Co . 1 ?- is tald ng its But Citroen’s also will incorDoraie 

’ from PSA PeugMt’cidSen s!? 6 ^ eech ', recognition Programs to allow 
Thf* ISJS® 601 Cl ? oen SA - the car s occupants dictate letters or 

JSSrftnt 1 Carmaker ' one of send electronic mail. 

® “"SB *?£■ Ttesday k "™* “ nor a fiiturisuc concept," 
; two Mr- Sm »th said. "This is the slime 

’ CoXSrert com P au * technology chat entertains us at home. 

• mdn ? aUow * e ^ s occupants makes our business competitive at the 

Z??5 y °o *e road that office, and allows us to stay ‘con 

A ™^ Wlt ?? Cirh0me . PCs - °***' while we travel. The au™ 
CitroS^vSS 6 ° f *0 • “wbUe is the next logical venue to 

• was unveiled Tuesday adopt this technology. ” 

i *** ^ow. It canies a Drivers will be able to use a satellite- 

Mmx *“ ^ te E“ n J um 200 ^0° navigation system, download 

*£? a Windows 95 weather data, check hotels and res- 
; ***** "[““J to taurants, and make reservations using 

CmiA ■ 6 car would cost, but Ron databases from auto clubs and travel 
l }?*? President of Intel’s Com- services. The onboard PC can keep 

■ ^comomS^ww 11 ^!! chiJdren entertained with movies or 

• u, e ?H* d t al5 ?T 1 ^.000 ro games, or enable them to complete 

'■ ;. e P 11 ®® to e vehicle. He estimated homework assignments using educa- 

Jere would be a market for 5 milUou of tional software or Internet-based ref- 
i m . J®. coming three years, erence sources. 

^ r° many things that But some analysrs said they doubted 

■ computers have been doing in cars for whether there would be much demand 

- " ra ° m tonng the engine, signaling for the new model, at least in the short 

malfunctions ana providing maintain- term, because of the added cost. 


^Drivers will be able to use a satellite- 
driven navigation system, download 
weather data, check hotels and res- 
taurants, and make reservations using 
databases from auto clubs and travel 
services. The onboard PC can keep 
children entertained with movies or 
games, or enable them to complete 
homework assignments using educa- 
tional software or Internet-based ref- 
erence sources. 

But some analysrs said they doubted 
whether there would be much demand 
for the new model, at least in the short 
term, because of the added cost. 


"There is always tremendous re- 
sistance on behalf of consumers as 
concerns cost," said John Lawson, 
automotive analyst at Salomon Broth- 
ers Inc. Because of this, be does not see 
its being adopted in Europe in the near 
future, "although it is getting near to 
that in Japan." 

Mr. Lawson said the system was 
most likely to be of immediate interest 
to truckers and other professional 
drivers, who would End the navigation 
and information capabilities of an on- 
board computer profitable. "I have no 
doubt that trucks and some commercial 
vehicles that cany high- value items 
will be run by these systems in the next 
five years.” 

Despite Mr. Lawson's reservation, 
Patrick HerbauJt, in charge of body 
electronics at Citroen, said the com- 
puter was targeted at the European 
market, which has a well-developed 
mobile-phone system that is necessary 
for digital networking. 

Mr. Smith admitted that an onboard 
PC would raise questions about safety. 
Drivers distracted while talking on cel- 
lular phones, for example, have been 
blamed for some accidents. 



Matfnd [Monffinmn 

The Formula One racers Mikka Hakkinen, left, and David Coulthard 
testing a Daimler-Benz three-wheeler project car in Frankfurt 


Chrysler ‘on the Verge’ of Building a Gar From Used Plastic 


1. ike Hysteria 


;H1 t B* * i ll.U'l? 


By Warren Brown 

1 Washington Post Service 

Save those plastic soft drink bottles. 
: Chrysler Corp. may need them. 

"We believe we're on the verge of a 
breakthrough in using lightweight ma- 
terials to make low-cost, lightweight, 

■ durable automobiles," said Ken Mack, 
, the executive engineer managing die 

development of Chrysler’ s Composite 
1 Concept Vehicle, or CCV. 

“We take material from pop bottles, 
add chopped glass and something to 
resist the effects of ultraviolet rays, and 
put in impact-resistant material such as 
rubber,” Mr. Mack said. “We form 
these materials into a four-piece body 
that we put on a frame. We don’t have 
to paint the body.’’ 

“We think it'll work," he said. 

The upshot is a car that would weigh 
1 ,200 pounds (540 kilograms), less than 
half the weight of the company’s smal- 

■ lest model. The car also would be cheap, 
about $6,000, largely because it would 


reduce assembly to a snap-together, ad- 
hesive process and eliminate the need 
for expensive auto-pain ling equipment 

But even more important, Mr. Mack 
said, "the body would be 100 percent 
recyclable.” That means old CCVs 
could be used to make new ones, he 
said, reducing materials costs. 

Chrysler exhibited a version of the 
car, called the Pronto, at the North 
American International Auto Show in 
Detroit An advanced model, meaning 
one in which the company has taken 
the concept several steps further, is on 
display this week at an international 
auto show in Frankfurt 

Such a car could help Chrysler eas- 
ily meet U.S. fuel economy standards, 
which require new-car fleets to av- 
erage 27 J miles per gallon (8.6 liters 
per 100 kilometers). The CCV car is 
designed to get SO miles per gallon. 

But Mr. Mack and other Chrysler 
executives said the car initially would 
be aimed atmarkets in China and India, 
where many people use bicycles and 


other kinds of manual vehicles for per- 
sonal transportation. 

"It's one thing to step up from a 
bicycle to a CCV in a country where a 
bicycle is seen as a luxury.” Mr. Mack 
said. "But we don't have that kind of a 
marker in the United States.” 

In other words, the CCV models 
under development may be to primitive 
and unappealing for American tastes. 

Certainly, the Pronto is no head-turn- 
er. It is a high-ceiling bubble-mobile. 
The body has a matte finish . Though 
fuel-efficient, it is low on power, with a 
two-cylinder engine capable of produ- 
cing 25 horsepower and a top road speed 
of 70 miles (1 IS kilometers) per hour. 

The car must go through extensive 
safety testing before it gets a produc- 
tion nod from Chrysler’s top execu- 
tives. Prototypes have fared well in 35- 
mph frontal crash tests so far. They also 
have done well in rollover, roof-crush 
protection tests and in rear-end col- 
lisions staged to test the durability of 
fuel tanks. But current versions of tire 


On-Line Value Shows Up in the Wires 


By Steve Lohr 

- New York Times Service 

—NEW YORK — Follow the money in 
Monday's big Internet deal — an in- 
tricate transaction involving World- 
Com, CompuServe and America Online 
— and it seems that the real value lies in 
the dull plumbing of cyberspace, not the 

glamour of new media. 

WorldCom Inc., 
^20001 America’s fburth- 
markets largest long-distance 
CT Tt phone company. 

/MmlJ agreed to pay about 
j& — 4 _ ■/ ) $1.2 billion in stock for 

T £3 CompuServe Crap. It 

will keep the "nnder- 
the-hood” side of CompuServe’s busi- 
ness, such as managing data networks 
and providing data services for cor- 
porate clients. 

But in the next step of the deal, 
WorldCom will sell CompuServe's 
well-known but struggling on-line ser- 
vice to America Online for the equiv- 
alent of $250 million. In short, the 
plumbing of CompuServe, which is 
controlled by H&R Block Inc,, is worth 
nearly $1 billion of the total price. 

Shares of WorldCom, which rose 
$225 Monday, gained a farther 90.625 
cents Tuesday to dose at 535.650-!. 
America Online, which awed $6,125 
^Monday, was at $76,875, up 81.25 

t cents. _ . 

The reason for the show of investor 
enthusiasm was not only that America 
Online had made a good deal on the 
network side but also that the acqui- 
sition should help it further a straiegy of 
becoming a genuine media aropany, 
one able to draw more revenue from 
advertising and electronic commerce 


such as on-line shopping. "The next 
stage of tire Internet economy is that the 
media companies will start to make 
money, not just the infrastructure sup^ 
pliers as has been dote case until now," 
said Kate Delhagen, an analyst at For- 
rester Research in Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

In the deal, America Online is in- 
creasing its focus as a media company 
not only by adding subscribers but also 
by selling its ANS Communications 
unit, which it bought three years ago for 
$35 million, to WorldCom. 

For ANS, WorldCom will give AOL 
CompuServe's on-line service and a 
cash payment of $175 million, putting a 
value on A NS of about $425 million. 

The CompnServe-WorldCom-AOL 
deal, executives said, is expected to take 


Little Change for CompuServe 


New York. Times Service 
NEW YORK — As America Online 
proceeds to acquire CompuServe, com- 
pany executives insist that things will 
not change much for CompuServe’s 2.6 
million subscribers — for now. 

America Online said that it bad no 
plans yet to merge CompuServe’s base 
of subscribers with its own membership 
of more than 9 million. 

Instead, America Online will con- 
tinue to focus on the consumer market, 
where it is particularly popular among 
families, and CompuServe will remain 
focused on small business and technical 
users, where it has a reputation as a tool 
for serious researches. 

"People chose CompuServe far a 
reason, and we want to make sure they 
still have thar reason,” said Stephen 


CiiPMMCY & INTEREST RATES 


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ratings; Ztoidfwttl New YatKopenino 


tDeci 

Sewacflanm. 


car fail to meet U.S. side- impact crash 
protection standards, Mr. Mack said. 

“If we get the go-ahead for pro- 
duction.” Mr. Mack said, “we could 
probably have a marketable, car on the 
ground in about three years." 

"But the key message is that I think 
we’re on the verge of a breakthrough 
here,” he added. "I think we have 
something that'll work.” 

■ Ford AG Predicts Turnaround 

The bead of Ford-Werke AG, the 
German unit of Ford Motor Co., said 
the automaker was poised to recover 
from a loss last year after company- 
wide cost cuts, news services reported 
from Frankfurt. 

The No. 3 German carmaker- posted 
a loss of 55 1 .6 million Deutsche marks 
($305.7 million) for 1996 as market 
share slipped and it fell behind such 
rivals as Volkswagen AG, whose cost- 
cutting efforts have allowed it to pack 
cars with extra options. 

“We continue to reduce costs,” 


Chairman William Boddie said. “As 
long as the market holds, we’ll do 
better than last year.” 

He did not say bow strong the im- 
provement would be or whether a re- 
turn to profit is within reach. 

Mr. Boddie was speaking at the 
Frankfurt auto show, where carmakers 
are unveiling a record 33 new models 
this year even though some industry 
forecasts predict European sales will 
decline between now and 2000. 

Ford can weather any slowdown in 
sales, Mr. Boddie said, because it is 
tackling its high cost base. 

An April agreement with labor un- 
ions m Germany will cut costs by $120 
milli on a year beginning in 1999. 

General Motors Crap ’s German unit. 
Adam Opel AG, said at the Frankfurt 
show that it would invest 17.7 billion 
DM by 2001 toward introducing 18 new 
passenger car models and eight com- 
mercial vehicles. Opel will unveil six 
models next year alone. Chairman Dav- 
id Herman said. (Bloomberg. AFX) 


three to six months to complete. It is ! 
subject to approval by the shareholders 
of the respective companies and to re- 
view by the U.S. Justice Department's 
antitrust division as well as the Euro- 
pean Commission, because both Amer- 
ica Online and CompuServe have hun- 
dreds of thousands of subscribers in 
Europe. The Justice Department con- 
firmed on Tuesday that it would review 
the proposal, Reuters reported. 

Stephen Case, AOL chairman, said 
be expected no challenge on antitrust 
grounds, as the Internet business was 
still young and relatively easy to enter. 
The list of current and prospective 
rivals, be said, includes such giants as 
Microsoft, Walt Disney Co., Tune 
Warner Inc. and AT&T Corp. "It’s a 
pretty daunting list,” he said. 


Global Private Banking 


Westin Sale 
To Create 
Hotel Giant 


Camf&dbf Our Staff F ran Dvfhixbn 

PHOENIX Arizona — Starwood" 
Lodging Trust said Tuesday it would i. 
acquire Westin Hotels & Resorts for ■ 
5137 billion in cash, securities and debt. ,' 
adding to a long list of recent hotel- v 
industry consolidations. ; 

The combination would create a com- 
pany operating 219 hotels in 38 states ; 
and 23 countries, with more than $4" 
billion in annual revenue. 

The company is to operate under the 
name Westin Hotels & Resorts World- - 
wide Inc. with the current Starwood;’ 
head, Barry Stemticht, as chairman. . 
Juergen Bartels. Westin ’s current chair- ’ 
man and chief executive, would be chief " 
executive of the new company. - < 

The deal would create the world’s' 
third-Iargest hotel company, behind 1 
Holiday Inn. owned by Bass PLC. and 
Marriott International Inc. 

Westin, whose luxury hotels include ’ 
the St. Francis in San Francisco and the ^ 
Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix, gives > 
Starwood Lodging a well-known up- ; 
scale hotel brand to franchise and attach \ 
to its string of more than 100 hotels, - 
which operate under the Sheraton, . r 
Omni ana Hilton flags, among others. 

What Starwood did not have was die ’ 
brand, said Brad Cohen, an analyst at * 
Sands Brothers. "This gives themprob- ^ 
ably the premier brand in die country," • 
he said, actually, one of the top hotels - 
in the world.” , 

Referring to Starwood, Steven Hash, ' 
an analyst at Lehman Brothers said,^ 

* ‘What the company has been lacking is 
a concise flag, and Westin is the best -> 
flag out there to operate in the upscale ‘ 
hotel sector.” The deal is expected to .= 
close by Jan. 31 . subject to shareholder ; 
and regulator y approval. Starwood said ‘ 
the acquisition was expected to add to j 
its 1998 funds from operations. ' 

Westin, based in Seattle, is owned by ■ 
investors including Goldman, Sachs & * 
Co. and Nomura Asset Capital Carp. . 
They purchased the chain from Aoki 
Crap, in May 1995 for $537 million. . 
The Starwood- Wes tin deal comes amid 
a wave of mergers in the lodging in-/-! 
dustry. Last week. Promos Hotel Corp. •;*- 
and Doubletree Corp. agreed to V 

See HOTEL, Page 14 


Truly exceptional service 


STARTS WITH CAREFUL LISTENING. 


Case, chairman and chief executive of 
America. Online, which is based in 
Dulles, Virginia. "The expectation is 
we will continue to manage Com- 
puServe with its own technologies and 
brand forever." 

But analysts said they thought Amer- 
ica Online would eventually decide to 
fold the CompuServe brand into its own, 
though possibly maintaining Com- 
puServe as a subordinate service. 

! In the short term. Case said AOL 
would continue with a planned face lift 
for CompuServe and “enhance it with 
some of AOL’s own technology.” 

Case said the merger was not expected 
to have an immediate impact on the price 
of a CompuServe subscription. At $24.95 
a month, it is more than the $19.95 of 
AOL and other popular services. 


Z/ifOi/ifWii riiirr of Uvpt **■&■ 
A/uUwJ RarJt of Nvtc Yort 
(AriuoJ jtM. m 


In private banking, as in every business, 
there axe short cuts. 

• For example, it may make sense to some 
banks to offer "standardized" service tliat 
meets tke needs of one and all. More or less. 

At Republ ic we prefer to custom-tailor 
our services. We assume tbat no two clients 
are exactly alike - and careful listening 
invariably proves us rigkt. 

It is wby your Republic Account Officer 
makes sure to obtain a precise picture of your 
financial goals, time frame, risk acceptance and 
other key factors. He keeps these constantly in 
mind as be looks after your interests. 

So year after year^ you can count on us 
for tke exceptionally complete, timely and 
personalized service tbat makes Republic truly 



unique. 


VT.irfJ 

Reputin' iV«|&nm/ Bunt of 
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Now Yack 324 jS0 324.10 -0-50 


|H Republic National Bank of New York” 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A Sjfrd llanlt ■ Ynrlt • tVincw • l/iixlim • • llvinil - IWfl* I lilU » Iiiumiii* Aim • L'miihii 1*I*ikIi> ■ I'.'iwiilu^rii * Lilliulur 

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rA.CE 14 


INT ERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, S EPTEMBE R 10. 1W7 

THE AMERICAS 




0°°° r 

XV i7 - 10 

m 

’ 6.70 

6400 v » 

< 6.30 



Dollar in Deutsche marks H Dollar m Yej} 


« yv 

130 

1w75 rtvjp 

f 120 

j a s 

■ 110 




1997 







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: &35£8, 

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^ilpot'cay /eotea-; . ■“ 


: B««no£ Aires Meiva} - ; 


$ 306*90 ' 1 PSAQ«^.- 

■ ■ SSSSMi :3SS9Ja : h:4Q^ 

■■ ■ KJt . ' ^0S56 .is- ? \ *-V • 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

laiemaiiuoa] HcnW Trtbuoc 

Very briefly: 


Campbell to Spin Off 7 Slow-Growth Lines 


CfepM b? 0 *r Sag Firm Duparte 

CAMDEN, New Jersey — 
Cam pbe ll Soup Co. announced 
Tuesday it would spin off seven 
slow-growing businesses, including 
Swanson frozen foods and Vlasic 
pickles, to focus on soups, cookies 
and its other most-profitable 
products. 

Campbell, the world’s largest 
soup company, said in July it was 
considering selling or spinning off 
the units, which have 51.4 billion in 
annual sales, or about IS percent of 
financial 1997 revenue of $7.96 bil- 
lion. The units will be spun off as a 
single company to be headed by 
Campbell's executive vice presi- 
dent, Robert Bemstock. 

Hie move will let Campbell focus 
on its namesake soup, Prego spa- 
ghetti sauce, Pepperidge Farm cook- 


ies and food service lines, which had 
sales growth of 10 percent and earn- 
ings growth of 15 percent in 1997. 
Shedding assets and building up its 
main businesses ar® part of a year- 
old strategy to make Campbell a 
do minant consumer goods company 
with reliable earnings. 

“Sp inning off these businesses 
allows us to focus on our most prof- 
itable businesses with die highest 
growth potential," said Campbell's 
chief executive, Dale Morrison. 

In the 1990s, the company has 
sold more than two dozen busi- 
nesses comprising $800 million in 
sales, which contributed 1 percent of 
Campbell’s earnings. At the same 
time, it purchased 20 businesses 
with sides of $ 1.2 billion, which; 
contributed 12 percent to earnings. 

Campbell Soup’s shares rose 3.5. 


percent to $52. 1 25 in late New York 
trading. 

The new company, which has not 
been named, will have two divi- 
sions: frozen foods, which include 
Swanson frozen dinners, and gro- 
cery, which will include Vlasic 
pickles. Open Pit barbecue sauce, a 
fresh mushroom business and Swift 
Armour meats, which is Argentina ’s 
largest beef exporter. 

Until the spin-off becomes effec- 
tive, the new company will be op- 
erated as a separate unit called in- 
ternational Specialty Foods within 
Campbell Soup, the company said. 

Some debt will be transferred 
along with the new company, al- 
though how much is not yet known, 
a Campbell Soup spokesman, Kevin 
Lowery, said Tuesday. Campbell 
said the spin-off to its shareholders 


would be completed by the end of 
February 1998, if approved by its 

board and granted tax-free status by 
the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. 

Its earnings, announced Monday, 
were buoyed by Campbell s sales of 
soups and sauces. Net income rosso 
percent, to $191.9 million, or 42 
cents a share, exceeding analysts 
estimates of 39 cents a share and up 
from $180.4 million, or 36 cents, in 
the like quarter a year ago. Sales 
grew 5 percent, to $1,725 billion 
from 51 .640 billion. , 

Campbell also said it was offering 
4 10 million Australian dollars ($305 
million) for the 30 percent of the 
Australian cookie maker Arootts 
Ltd. it does not already own and that 
it had divested its Spring Valley 
beverage unit in Australia on Aug. 
26. ( Bloomberg . NYT. Reuters) 


Schwab Gets 
A New Role 
In Deal With 

Underwriters 


By Edward Wyatt 

Sew York Times Service 


Dollar Tumbles Against Yen Amid Trade Jitters 


Probe Costs Hurt Columbia Profits 

Columbia/HCA Heath care Corp. estimated the costs of an 
investigation of its billing practices and a related restructuring 
at $60 million in the corrent quarter and said it would reduce 
.earnings per-share by about half, to 20 to 25 cents. 

Federal prosecutors, 1 1 states, the National Association, of 
.Securities Dealers and private insurers are examining the way 
the company does business, focusing mainly on its billi ng of 
the government 's Medicare insurance for the elderly. 

The nation’s largest for-profit hospital chain already has 
slowed down its acquisition program and halted construction 
projects totaling about $250 million. 

Cola-Cola Chief Hospitalized 

Coca-Cola Co. said its longtime chief executive and chairman. 
_Roberto C. Goizueta, had been hospitalized since Saturday for 
"a malignant tumor in his lungs. 

Mr. Goizueta, 65, has smoked cigarettes for years, a company 
.spokesman said. The spokesman said doctors believea that 
cancer had not spread to other organs. Mr. Goizueta plans to 
continue working while receiving radiation treatment. 

• United Airlines is asking the United States to revoke 
Russian carrier Aeroflot’s authority to fly to Washington, 
D.C., Chicago and San Francisco in response to Russia's 
.refusal to allow United to offer joint service to Moscow with 
its alliance partner Deutsche Lufthansa. 

• Burger King’s sales of the Big King, its newest assault on 
McDonald's Big Mac, are so brisk at its introductory price of 
99 cents that some restaurants are running out. Borger King 
had expected to sell 1 .8 million of the sandwiches a day but is 
^selling almost 3 million daily, company officials said. 

• IBM said it is abandoning plans to make a simplified 
•personal computer called a NetPC, though it said it would 
■offer the flexibility of the machines in its PC line. 

AP. Washington Post, NYT, Bloomberg 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Tbe dollar 
dropped against the yen Tuesday 
after comments by a top U.S. Treas- 
ury official triggered concern the 
U.S. might soften its support for a 
strong dollar. 

The dollar rose against the 
Deutsche mark as a bigger-than-ex- 
pectedrise in German unemployment 
and comments by Bundesbank of- 
ficials deepened expectation interest 
rates there are on hold for now. 

Deputy Treasury Secretary 
Lawrence Summers, in a published 
report, said Japan must work toward 
“domestic demand-led growth" 
and “avoid the export-led growth 
tha t has been a hallmark of many 
past Japanese recoveries." 

Mr. Sommers said he would press 


the issue at a meeting of officials 
from the Group of Seven leading 
industrial nations this month. 

“The concern is that trade is going 
to be a much more public issue, es- 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE - 

pecially with tbe G-7 meeting loom- 
ing," said Roger Chapin, manager 
of foreign exchange at Banc One 
Corp- in Columbus. Ohio. "In the 
back of everyone’s mind is how 
leaders tried to talk the dollar down 
in the past.” 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsn- 
zuka of Japan said that currency- 
market - developments would be 
closely watched. 

Mr. Chapin said, * ’The concern is 
that trade is going to be a much more 


public issue, especially with the G-7 
meeting looming. In the back of 
everyone's mind is how leaders 
tried to -talk the dollar down in the 
pasL" 

The dollar fell to 119.150 yen in 4 
P.M. trading from 121. 155 yen the 
previous day. 

It was also at 1.8144 Deutsche 
marks, up from 1.8078 DM. 

The dollar was also quoted at 
1 .4885 Swiss francs, up from 1 .4850 
francs, and at 6.0980 French francs, 
up from 6.078 1 francs. 

The pound was at SI. 5895. up 
from $1.5839. 

The dollar gained against the 
mark in European trading as the 
Bundesbank left its benchmark se- 
curities repurchase rate unchanged 
at a historically low 3.0 percent, and 


as Germany repotted the number of 
out-of-work Germans rose by 
49,000 in August from July. 

The bigger-than-expected gain 
reinforced expectations that die 
Bundesbank would not raise lending 
rates soon. Higher rates would make 
corporate borrowing more expens- 
ive and could discourage expansion 
and jobs creation. 

Fueling that expectation, Bundes- 
bank council member Ernst Welteke 
said he saw “no reason” for a rate 
rise and that the dollar at its current 
level presented “no danger” of in- 
flation. 

Another council member, Reimut 
Jochimsen, added to that by sug- 
gesting tbe dollar’s recent decline 
against the mark was warding off 
inflation. 


HOTEL: $1.57 Billion Purchase of Westin to Make Starwood 3d Largest 


Continued from Page 13 

merge in a $2.14 billion stock swap 
to create the world’s third-largest 
hotel company. 

Also, last month Starwood com- 
pleted the purchases of 15 hotels in 
New England for $470 million and 
three luxury resorts in Mexico for 
$133 million. 

Starwood Lodging of Phoenix is a 
real estate investment trust. Its 
shares are paired and traded with 
Starwood Lodging Corp., a hotel 
operating company. 

The trust's shares rose 1.6 per- 
cent, to $50.25, in late trading. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters) 


■ Wall Street Heads Higher 

Stocks rose after government re- 
ports showed unexpectedly strong 
productivity gains and the smallest 
labor-cost rise in three years, sig- 
naling that strong profits are on tap, 
news agencies reported. 

“The backdrop for the economy 
is as solid as we have seen in many 
years,” said Jeffrey Eglow, pres- 
ident of Highlander Capital Man- 
agement “This market is in good 
shape.” 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
rose 39.26 points , or 0 .5 percent to 
7.874.44, The Standard & Poor's 
500-stock index rose 4.44, or 0.5 


percent to 935.64. The Nasdaq 
Composite Index gained 833. or 0.5 
percent to 1,653.68, on track for its 
third straight record. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond price fell 6/32 to 96 24/32. 
taking the yield up to 6.63 percent 
from 6.61 percent. 

The Labor Department reported 
second-quarter productivity rose 2.7 
percent, above the 2. 1 percent fore- 
cast. Higher productivity means 
businesses are getting more for their 
spending on labor, their biggest 
cost 

Unit labor costs rose at a 0.5 per- 
cent annual rate in the quarter, the 
smallest increase in three years, sig- 


naling dial inflation is not enough of 
a problem to force the Federal Re- 
serve to raise interest rates. 

“When everything is said and 
done, there’s not much pressure on 
inflation.” said Joe Joshi, chief in- 
vestment officer at Systematic Fi- 
nancial. 

Mr. Joshi said be was buying 
computer-related shares, which are 
the driver of productivity gains, in- 
cluding Compaq Computer and Son 
Microsystems. 

Intel rose and was among the 
leaders alter it introduced a new 
product to link computers that im- 
proves efficiency 30 percent. 

( Bloomberg . AP) 


NEW YORK — Charles Schwab 
& Co the United States' larg«t 

discount brokerage firm, has s igned 

a deal with three Wall Street films 
to help them underwrite public 
stock offerings, a move thai ton® 
Schwab into a part of the financial 
markets that it had avoided. 

Under the agreement, customers 
of Schwab's retail brokerage ser- 
vice will get an opportunity to in- 
vest directly in public stock offer- 
ings led by the Credit Suisse Fust 
Boston unit of Credit Suisse Group, 
Harabrecht & Quist or J.P. Mor- 
gan. 

The agreement, announced Mon- 
day, is a huge departure from 
Schwab’s traditional business of 
matching customer orders to buy 
and sell stocks and bonds. j 

As an underwriter, Schwab will 
be patting its own capital at risk, at 
least theoretically, and will be tak- 
ing a direct role in helping cor- 
porations raise money. 

Schwab’s arrangement is there- 
fore broader — and riskier — than a 
similar deal announced in January 
by Fidelity Investments and Sa- 
lomon Brothers, in which Fidelity 
agreed to act as a distributor of up to 
10 percent of all Salomon-managed 
equity offerings. . 

Both deals serve to give retail 
investors greater access to initial 
public offerings, in which compa- 
nies raise money by selling an own- 
ership stake to the general public. 

Traditionally, those offerings are 
sold exclusively to institutional in- 
vestors, which can reap greatprofits 
by reselling shares of hoi offerings 
once formal trading of the shares 
begins on. a stock exchange. 

The agreement by Fidelity, 
which is a unit of FMR Corp- and 
tire operator of the country’s 
second-largest discount brokerage 
business, makes it a sales agent in 
offerings in which Salomon serves 
as the lead manager. 

Fidelity will take orders from its 
retail customers for shares of an 
offering, earning sales commis- 
sions, but it is not required to first 
buy the shares itself, which would 
put its own capital at risk. 

In contrast, an underwriter buys 
at a discount and then resells at die 
stock's offering price. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

THe top 300 most active shores, 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 
The Ass oared Press 


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Dow Jones 


HftO 


MIS 7127 JS 7B99JM 7777J9 785151 +11 
Tnm5 201130 312625 2WJJ30 JO 1 140 -14/ 
UB 235-96 237.96 735J5 237.52 +1.1 

CM 247158 2492215 2466.17 2481314 +1.1 

Standard & Poore 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


CotHCAS 
Com login 

mays 
Compoq l 
IBM! 
rSbc 


Ttoo» 

•Ugh lav Oat* 4KM. 
Industrials 109970 109 1 .S3 1091 -S3 1094,66 
Troop. 66948 658.02 66X54 66354 

lltmes 20276 20093 20154 203.18 

Finance 10088 10776 10851 108.96 

SPSOO 93LS0 92905 93170 93353 

SP100 90953 90155 90140 906.19 

NYSE 

MMl law *44 O*. 

Connote 489X1 483.81 489.01 +123 

UnScWah 617-58 61057 61758 +4.17 

tramp. 44503 44153 44410 .0.91 

granr 7 * 1.10 2M.15 29i.ia +2X6 

hnanca 4SR54 45136 *5X54 +274 


y. 3 Nasdaq 

r -ft •“** 


Composite 


ipjh. a*. 

1654.40 1665X3 16SL40 +13X5 

1332.12 I3KJ0 133112 +443 

169JX3 178724 179744 +910 

J751-5B 174140 17*47 


VSti m 


4147 
+ 1441 
+0J8 


AMEX 


Mp Um 3*44. a* 
6712* 669.16 67125 +069 


Dow Jones Bond 

_ . 

Totoy 



K<na 

30 Bonds 

10175 

ia3x» 

lOUtatles 

10155 

101J4 

10 Industrials 

10656 

105B7 


FDafa* 

WDtgffls 

NosmFks 

PMMgrs 

OcnEias 

Cocoa 

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38669 54<tet 
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115665 1996 
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47739 140ft 
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Sept. 9,1997 

Kflqti Low Latest Chge Dp rat 

Grains 

CORN (CBOTI 

£000 Da mntaium- cents per bushel 


Sep 97 

368 

2*5 

267H 


9*82 

Dec 97 

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271 

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276 

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: NYSE- 

Mmcai 
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3414 3403 

263 277 

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302 321 

262 270 

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Unchangeo 
Total ana 
NeaKIpa 
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Market Sales 


NYSE 

Ante* 

Nasdaq 

Inmfflam. 


1873 2360 

1 «S i^S 

45 32 


506J8 57593 

23^1 2129 

67044 64843 


Est. soles 52.000 Mars sale, 56192 
Mars open M 298,908, off 1 .31 7 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTI 

100 fans- dooms per ion 

Sep 77 27450 26750 272.20 -0.90 6J54 

Oct 97 233 JJ0 22850 232.70 +1.90 24J18 

Dec 97 21830 21450 217.10 +2J0 44873 
Jan 98 21330 21800 212.80 + 3J0 18931 
Mar 98 20750 20450 20750 +250 10276 
May 98 305.40 20250 20470 +2 20 8514 

Esc sale* 25000 M am tales 24559 
Mans open ltd 111.329. off 1.281 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOTI 
60000 fas- cents per lb 

Sep 97 2140 2122 2134 -801 1306 

Od 97 2357 2253 2U6 unch 20588 

Dec 97 22.94 2268 2258 +0.05 40873 

Jan 98 2315 2190 2114 +014 11,909 

Mar98 2359 2316 2137 +0 12 7,707 

May 98 2350 23 JO 2350 +007 1227 

Est. sMes 17500 Mam sales 20276 
Mom open W 91.166. Ofl 163 

SOYBEANS (CBOTI 

MOO bo jntnbnun- cents per tuM 

S+P 97 716 699 713 +13U MOD 

N<7» 97 *49 637VI 645ft +81* 90953 

Jan 98 650 629ft 646ft +Jft 20720 

Moris 65416 645 651ft +6V 9513 

EsL sales 36000 Mom sates 31.179 

Mem open 143 790 off el 2 

WHEAT (CBOTI 

6000 bu mlwmum- cents per bushel 

Sep 97 369ft 363V, 368 +3 1.638 

Dec 97 384 377ft 382ft +3 66545 

Mar 98 396 390 395ft +4 21813 

May 98 398ft 392ft 397ft +2ft 3875 

Esl serial i500 Maas lotos 29.732 

Mom ^en M 1 04994 ad 1 194 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

AMI lbs.- cents par te. 

Od97 69.10 6820 6852 +0 32 

Doc 97 6950 6955 69.65 4102 

Feb 98 7155 7320 7145 4LQ5 

Apr 90 75 00 7460 7480 4X05 

Junto 71 JO 77 20 71 J7 -OM 

Aug 98 71.15 7095 71X10 +0.05 

Esc sales 16970 Mom sales 16210 
Mans open M 96771. up 578 


Metals 

COLD (NCMX3 

ICO m?y a:.- &iUzr, per l.trv s: 

Sep 97 iiT 75 46 

Od »7 3 ^lt; r -xsj i6i56 

no. 47 in.:: -ojo 

Dec! 7 324«9 r>C3 7241C -050 111.822 

Feb « 3I+.H 325 i? 325^ -0 50 11487 

Apr 95 327 40 -050 5J97 

Jim 98 330 00 1*9.73 379 30 4IA1 623! 

Esl. sales 1 1.000 .Vans sales 17.5*7 
Mon's open int 201.51*. of! 26 i 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX1 
25/100 lbs - cents per fa 

5ep97 9*50 9550 04 . to 4.05 16U 

00 97 97 00 96 00 9*55 4110 1743 

Nov 97 9750 9650 9715 -0.15 1JBS 

Dec 97 97.75 96-20 97 fi 4.05 24 O&S 

Jan 98 97.15 97.00 97.15 -005 814 

Feb 98 97.15 9? JM 97.15 -0.05 759 

Mar 98 07.40 96 JO 97 05 unen. X263 

Apr 98 97 . 0 c 9680 97.00 +0.10 SS4 

Esl. sales 7.000 Mans sates 4138 
Mnm open Inl 44331. rtt 66 

SILVER (NCMX) 

5000 Iray 02 - cents per lrov «. 

Sep 97 471 JO 4+3J0 JTQ40 * 59(1 1.023 

Gel 97 471.70 -iJO 78 

No* 97 47SI0 -5 00 

Dec 97 477 JO 46&0Q 476 00 *500 51804 

Jan *8 477 50 +580 20 

Mor98 483.00 47600 48280 +5.80 11,734 

May9B 43680 480.00 486 00 > 580 3.209 

Jut 93 490 90 * 5J0 1380 

Es>. uriev I LOOO Mon* sales a SI* 

Mors op«n mi 7+.07R jj; 

PLATINUM INMER) 

50 Irov w.- dollars per Iroy u: 

Od 97 425 00 JlftlO «2. 70 +620 9.913 

A*i9$ 41770 40900 JliHJ >670 3J48 

Apr 98 409 70 407 10 418.70 * 5.20 426 

■MI98 40470 +520 2 

Esl sates N A Mors sales 1.400 
Mrais open im 1X689. up 27* 


«9h Low Latest Otge Optnt 

IP- YEA H FRENCH COV. BONDS (MATIF) 

FFjnoaoo-ptscfioopa 

Sep 97 13026 129.96 13034 * 034 141324 

Dec 97 99J» 9672 9900 +030 4MHS 

Mjr98 9626 9620 9840 +020 3 

Est sales: 18605D 

Open int: 183^fl2 ofl 590. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 

m.7tXB*uan -pbenoopa 

D«c97 109.98 10MS 10951 -025 107506 

Marta N.T. NX 10941 -025 5 

Esl. sales: 4X319. Pm*, sales 41^5 
Pie*, open InL: 107511 up <609 

UBOR 1-MONTH CCMEIO 

S3 mMon- pis of 100 pa 

Sep 97 9434 9434 9454 UKCh. 14054 

00 97 9433 9432 9433 unefl 11645 

Nov 97 9428 9427 9427 unch. 124Z7 

Esl. sales NA Marrs sates 1327 

Matrsqpat hf4S32i up 1,135 

EURODOLLARS (CMER} 

SI mUan-pb at 100 pd. 

Sep 97 9427 9426 9426 unch. 430898 

00 97 9418 9417 9418 unch. 10,773 

Dec 97 9409 9406 9408 anch. 547,210 

Mar 98 9400 9197 9199 unch. 367J02 

Jon 98 9309 9186 9308 -0.01 279517 

Sep 98 9139 9176 9178 -001 220853 

Dec 98 9166 9164 9166 -0.01 191596 

Mar 99 9164 9162 9164 -OOI 135011 

junto 9160 9157 9160 itodl 106075 

Sep to 9355 9353 9155 4L01 86255 

Dec 99 9148 9146 9XM OJIl 7490? 

Mar CM 9148 9146 9148 -001 66037 

Esl. sates NA Mam sales 245610 
Mors open Ha 2055091 up 115*5 


Wgft Low OSes? aige OpW 

Doc 97 9160 9152 9353 —006 101034 

Mar 98 9408 93.99 9400 -006 64097 

Junto 9458 9438 9450 -0.04 56017 

Sep 98 9469 9460 «461 -004' 38509 

Dec 98 9400 9471 94 T! -004 30374 

EsLsdK. 67560 Prev sates: 61960 
Prev. open bit.: 394246 up 10C 

Industrials 

COTTON 7 (NCTN) 

50000 fas.- cents par lb. 

Oct 97 7110 7137 72.79 -018 4875 

Dec 9 7 7125 7145 72.90 0.22 48525 

Mar 98 7450 7175 7425 -023 11662 

May 98 7110 7450 7488 -0.12 &0W 

Julto 7570 75.15 7545 4L15 4105 

Esl. sates NA Mbn sales 6,291 
6tom Open mi 88,967. up 869 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 


41367 

24909 

21270 

21,227 

11.772 

7-«0 

4101 


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14 

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Dividends 

Campror 


Amway Japan LM 
Burmoti Cost ADR 
KaortMus 
North CarolRaa 
Seted AppoMm 

STOCK SPUT 
AKeaiant Banco 5 *or4 spit 
Herfey in<8» 4fcrJ spot 


Per Aral Rec Pay 
IRREGULAR 

b 205 9-12 12-5 
b 5532 10-10 1 - 1 ? 
0 .199 9-22 10-21 
_ .91 9-22 10-15 

b .047510-10 11-10 


Company 

Household imt 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
O 52 9-30 10-15 


SPECIAL 

Royal Avbffon 0 55 900 10-15 

REGULAR 


US Res* Props 3 tor 2 Spfit 
Atm Corp C 9-18 9-30 

c- one Shore ttfOescendo tor every to 
shoes of Aha common held. 

C-TEC Corp d 9-19 940 

d- one share at RCN Corp for each shoe 
held rod am share el Cable Mich, 
for entry four shares heM. 

C-TEC Corp B d 9-T9 9-30 


Am Vectors Fnd 

Apes Muni Fd 
CFXCap 
can Paoflc Ltd g 
Commercial Ass 
Consol NfltwalGas 
Corparote HiYldFd 
Corporate HiYld 1L 
Fdl Home Ln Mtg 
Fst Indus Retttty 
Granite StateBk 
Greater Bay - 
HeritoaaUi 
Hast Pundit., 
Mcmaoed Hh 


_ Grlrn 

llnp 


Atah 

MoMeGOSSvc 


Lake Arid Bcp 


STOCK 

_ 5^, 9 19 


10-1 


INCREASED 

a .0625 10-15 10-31 
0 .12 10-1 10-10 


MoniAssebFd 
Nicer Inc 
Redwood Tnist 
TnN^ Cora Retrify 
US FiBigtimmys 

a-anMObfrappmfraaftamaeiilrar- 
shert/ AD R; g-peya Me In Canadian (onto; 
aMoaMy; q-quwterty: vseari-araiHI 


O m 9-18 9-26 
M XI 529 9-18 9-29 
0 22 9-19 10-17 
O .12 9-26 )&2S 
Q .17 9-1B 9-30 
0 585 10-15 11-15 
M .1108 9-18 9-30 
M .1035 9-18 9-30 
Q .10 9-lS 940 
505 9-30 10-20 
.11 9-19 10-3 
.15 9-30 10-15 
JJ77 9-15 9-23 
M 9-13 9-23 
.105 9-18 9-30 
- JO 9-19 l(H 
M .0739 9-18 9-29 
J5 V-30 11-1 
M 9-30 10-21 
0 53 9-30 10-15 
QJ7833 9-19 10.3 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER} 

50000 fas.- CBrti per tk 
Sep 97 8040 79.92 80.00 4)45 

0d 97 80.90 8030 80.60 +010 

NO* 97 81.97 8145 81A5 4102 

Jan to EL85 8250 3272 4135 

M»« 82.70 8230 R2-SS 4105 

Apr 99 82.70 8335 826S +0.10 

EsL late* 4619 Mart* srrie* S7V7 
Mam men fat 19.1 *4 up 19S 

H0CSXN8 ICMEW 
40.000 lbs.- cents per S>. 

Oct 97 69.95 68.95 6937 4® 

Dec 97 6680 65.90 65.95 -105 

Feb to 6530 6450 6482 -0.85 

Apr to 62A0 6135 6135 4L47 

JIM98 66.95 6445 66A2 4132 

Esl tales 1 1.228 Mam rates 45*9 
Mom open fat 33A6& up 146 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

41000 fcs.- cents per ft. 

Feb to 6460 6470 6522 -160 

Nlarto 66 80 6490 65-15 170 

Marto 6537 .1.39 

E*l. sates 1079 Man* sales 1.191 
Mans apan Inl 4629, up 107 


40.203 

26J85 

15.017 

7-042 

&84* 

1.166 


1115 

4*41 

4306 

2-51* 

1-571 

459 


r r.Bft 

8353 

3.748 

1 ^i« 

943 


4038 

459 

65 


Close Previous 

LONDON METALS ILME) . 

Dollar* pvrnvIrK Ion 
Alwranwn (Higb Crad+t 
Spot 1593 00 15*400 ISB3'+ 

ForwronJ 1*1300 ttIJ.OO IsOJ 1 - 
Coppe> Cntbode* (Higti Grade) 


1584ft 

i*05ft 


Spal 
Faneaiil 
Lead 
Spur 

For* or d 

NkM 

Spot 

Forward 

Till 

Sool 

Fonwjjil 


712500 2177 00 2146.00 
2140 00 214380 2155.00 


*45X10 
*55 00 


646X10 

*5 5 ft 


*46.00 

*58.00 


6530 CO oSJO J00 *59000 
*635 00 6*4000. *690X10 

5-7000 5400 00 SISOjOO 
5510.00 551500 50009 


2148X10 

21S7B0 


*47X0 

*59X0 


6*00X0 

6*95X0 


5460.00 

549000 


37.041 

24087 

896 


9*102 

3a989 

1 A &6 


82^447 

40522 

700 


166900 

148400 


COCOA (HCSE1 


Food 


Sfodt Tables Explained 

Salas figures are unofftdaL^ Yearly highs raid lows refletJIhe previous 52 rrcete pbn 1t» cunenl 
Mieefc.lwtraBBielote Mbu «8 n gdoy.Wiieico5(iaor5fad*i&ddenriamoi»n8nBlB2SpeicentQiii sj ie 
has ban pirid. die kots hMi-tawiwige raid tWdmd ore shown far Ihe new stocks only. Unless 
odMiwin rated rales of dividends ore onmxd (fcbwsemerts based on #* Intel doderaSon. 
o - dividend oteo ratio (s). b • annual rate of dwdend plus stock dividend c - Ihjvidaling 
dividwd ec- PE exceeds 99.eJd- colled- d - new yearty low. rid- loss Hi Ihe lost 12 months, 
e - dvidend dedaretf or paid in preceding 12 months, f - annual rata increased on last 
dedaratkm. g -dividend in Coudian hinds. Subtecno 15% non-residence tax. ■ - dividend 
deeda red offer spM-up or stack dividend | - dividend paid this year, amlned deterred or no 
action token at fa lost dMdend /neeffnp, k - dividend frcJorvd or paid IWs yr or, an 
arcurnulafiw issue with dhridends in airears. m - annual rata reduced on last declaration, 
n - new issue Hi the post 52 weeks. The high- tow range begins with the start of trading, 
nd - nw( (Joy deBrny. p - i nit cl dividend annual rate unknown. P/E - price-comings ratio, 
q ■ dosedend mutual fund r -.dividend drdantd or paid in preceding 1 2 months, phis stock 
dividend s - stock ipIdDhridend begins with dote of spIB. U» - soles. I - dmdend paid *> 
stock I nproce fllng 12 monlhs. cstlmaicd cosh value on ex-dMdwid or u-<fistribufion ante, 
u - new yearly high, v - tracing halted, vi- in bankruptcy or recehrerehip or being rrorganixed 
under me Bankruptcy Actor securities assumed by such companies, wd » when distributed, 
wi - when ssuecV ww - with warrants. * - ra-rihiidend or ex-rights, idis - ex-disirijuikni. 
nr - without warrants, y- e* -dividend ond sales m tulL yid - yield. ? - soles in fua. 


Sep 97 1 652 1647 1647 +4 1 »S 

Doc 97 1688 1*55 I 66 S +3 

Marto 1715 1 * 6 * 1695 

May 99 1718 1714 1714 +3 12^39 

Alto 1745 1732 1732 *4 1889 

Septo 1749 1749 1 749 <5 4&*3 

EU soft* 5.259 Morrtsates 6.284 

Atom open in) 108.15a up 161 

coffee cokxi 

37300 fas. cents per lb. 

Sep 97 20535 10135 201.25 -*3S «6 

Dec 97 187 75 182 J5 18150 -420 11887 

Altai to 169 50 16600 16635 -3.7S 4603 

May 98 16250 laOXU 1*0.05 145 lJ>» 

Ales 157.00 15400 15405 -145 1.309 

Est sd« 5,574 Mom sate* 4689 
Atom open inl 22 ^ 59 . up 205 

SUCARWORLD 1 1 (NCSE) 

112.000 Rk ■ cents per lb 

OdW 1137 1)49 11.50 O.OI 80841 

MoiPt 12 04 1199 12.01 unrtl 71X1*7 

AAa»9i 11.99 1194 It 95 4.01 18397 

JUI98 11.79 11 73 11.73 -004 11817 

Ed. ides 1*227 Man sates I %?72 
Mars open lot 20 * 79 * up 470 


Zhe (Special High Grfttej 
Spol 1658.00 14*0 00 166*00 
Forward urea) 147900 148300 

Hnh Lo« Ouse Citge Opmi 

„ Financial 

us T BILLS ICMEP) 

51 IDJlIlan- pK rt TOO K1 

Sep97 9501 949H 9501 +002 4947 

*4M 9483 9484 until. 3*42 

MW 93 94 87 ->480 9481 linen IJM 

Esl. jdrt NA Mon; ides 3903 
Won , open inl 9.to?. up 1.0*6 

SYR TREASURY (CBOT) 

SI 00.000 prtn pis A 6Jlrr, rA 100 pci 

97 ICk-48 106-41 106 40 -07 6S3B6 

Prc97 104-27 106-19 106-75 -« 171JB3 

Esl uMiK «^<M0 Mons sates S8S81 
Wars opm mi 237.2*». up uu* 

10 YP TREASURY (CBOTI 

I'aAawpnn- pu 4 (oopet 

52 n', ~ -,W IW Ja 10, 02 01 86.763 

Doc*/ 108 35 106 IB 108 J3 -01291873 

AAar-W I Oh- 12 108 08 IDS I? un* 1794 

ESI saiei 100.000 ■tons -jrfi-s 71183 

Worn open .m 3 Si 43 n „ ujp 

US TREASURY BONDS iCBOT) 
re Drt-siaaoao.pts i Jimt m iou oai 
5+p97 11347 117 113-0S -01 147,239 

Dnc 97 H7-n II7-I) 1I2-7S -02 404.831 

M<* 98 117-14 1174* IIJ IJ ft} 

/Unto 112 02 -o: 2340 

Esl «8os Jaood Mom -4H(r, 7213(0 
Nkmsopenuil 594 7 77 oil IK4S 

LONG GlLTlLIFFE) 
tMXWO pis % 37 nds o( 100 pd 
S»p*/ IIS-21 11543 IIS- IS -aor. ?J4C 
Do> 4' 11*48 114 II II J » 0 06 149.390 

E-J saks ;f.J76 Pl +9 lOte-. 37.973 

Pm upon ml I S' 7T9 Jl 5.0*7 

GERMAN COV. BUND (UFFE l 
DM354000 pis of 100 pci 
DOC VI 10173 10147 101 n -0 13 J.U.43S 
WUjr 9B N I N I 10081 -0 13 196 

Esl -41ft, 133.840 Pl-» 4IS.-S W893 
P 10 . dpwi nl 255+31 up J.72S 


BRITISH POUND (CINER} 

*1500 pounds, s per pound 

Sep 97 1.5916 1J790 1J896+ 0X»60 3&XU1 

Dec 97 ljasS 1-5726 1-5836+0.00*0 1&948 

Marto 15790 15750 15782+40066 211 

Esl. sales NJL Mon sales 3Z32S 

Mom open fat 57,201, up 74« 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

1 00.000 dolkns par Cdn.dte 
Sep 97 -7243 .7224 .7228 -03X314 

Dec 97 J782 .7361 .7365-00013 

Marto .7303 .7295 7297-0X1013 

£*. a*< NJL AAom lotos 17.773 
Atom open ha 62501. up 2408 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 25JJ00 dxuIo. s per mod 
S«P 97 5549 5512 551341X1073 

0*97 JSg 5545 5546-0XW23 

Marto JW2 5579 557940073 

E*L sates NA Atom sates 57.749 

AAom Open fall 7^927, up 1 7A1 3 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

115 pMim Kasper MO jm 
s taW -riRte+RiAa 

Dec97 ,BM 5360 8 SIS +4145 

Mai 98 .8640 5630 5630+4147 

Esl. sates NA Mom soles 47491 
Mam open 14121*71 up 1S770 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

125000 francs, * per (rone 

S? -1ZL 7 . -«*l-OJ»21 46.17* 

US fZ?f -6791 44X121 71.1*5 

Marto 5885 M61 *8*1 40021 1.079 

Esl. sales NA Mom vales 49 . 1 0 * 

AAom open Im «&*?!. up iojji 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

5004W) pesos. S per peso 

1S!2 ISI? 1257*40071 19479 
Dec 97 12365 .12330 .12350+ .00085 1*228 

Marto .11910 .11890 .11005+40171 
Evt, sates NA Atom sates HUBS 
AAom open IM 4X97* up 2505 

3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

C5WM0 ptsoflOOpd 
Sep 97 92.74 92 71 

Dec 97 92*7 92*2 

Altar to 9167 92.40 
Junto 911 0 92*2 
Septo 92.7* 92*9 
Dec to 9285 9277 
Marto 92VJ 9184 
Esl. sates- 79-2*0 Prev. sates: ra*48 
Prw. open Inl.- *71.984 oH 97 3 

3-MONTH EURO MARK (UFPE) 

DMr_minon pisn 100 pci 

96.73 undi. 202925 


NOV 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Feb 98 
Morn 


Od 97 S3J5 5255 5253 -031 

Noe 97 S455 5350 54.19 -0.19 
Dec 97 55 AS 5495 5129 4.14 
Jan 98 56-40 55.85 5444 4.14 

Feb 98 5*50 5*55 S6J9 4.14 

Ma-to 5*A0 55.94 55.94 457 

Apr to 5505 54J9 54JV 419 

Est sates NA Mens sates 25330 
AAoas open Inl 148,921, up 258 ’ 

H£MT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

WWW*- dorian per bt rt 
0077 19A1 19.37 19 « 403 9frl0t 

19.74 1954 1958 4X12 54611 

US 1963 1967 402 51071 

w n 1972 -o-® 31 ^ 1 - 

SS ,9 ‘ M 1974 16-12C 

1990 19.76 19J6 481 Idtoi 

EsL soles N A Morn sates 7 i 2 so 
Mom open in! 409 . 54 a up 68* 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10400 mm bhT4 S per mm btu 
ocr 97 27*5 2*70 2710 +4422 58*6* 

2.900 1810 2442 +0414 2A192 

I' 907 2-928+0415 22M4 
2 toO 1905 2971 +0010 22504 

2*95 2645 2*60+0407 15535 

2^30 2585 2*00 +0402 10507 

EU. sdes NA Mom sates 47.206 
Atom open Inl 22 S, 385, up 4720 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

■0400 gaL canls per gal 
Od97 *0*0 99.10 59.49 +417 41585 

f *0 58.41 57.(5 +tt14 16517 

56.to 5655 5*45 +004 14534 

56.70 5640 56 Al +004 13.231 

5*75 S6J0 5*75 +004 1734 

5750 5730 5750 +0.04 1087 

6040 +004 2*06 

spas -him an 

Esl. sates N A Mom sates 21772 
Mon-s open bit 102,907, up 9*2 

GASOIL OPE) 

U S. dollars per metric ion - lots 01 100 tens 
Jtep97 14175 >02-25 14355 +050 10105 
00 97 16555 1*3 75 1*555 +025 24507 

Nov 97 1*740 1 66.00 1*7 00 Unde jrjng 

DecW 168.75 1*840 16855 -025 ltu! 
^ito 17055 1*955 17055 JS* 

Fteb98 17055 1*9.75 17030 I 025 'JS 
AAOT98 16900 1*855 1*9 50 Ip.H nfS 

BJ-idciil&llt. Pres. sates. 17 149 

Pi«v. open eil- 02^59 up 1.152 ‘ 41 r 

BRENT CHLUPE) 

Ui daHara per barrel . loti pn.im, 

^ 5£ 

iss \i% zjg {j-a 

18.6? 18*9 18*1 13 01 7*S; 

18*3 18 S3 1056 1^41 lS 

EM sdm: J5II3. ftw sate • 20510 

Pres, upon InL. l*l,954off 2284 “ ,51 ° 


No* 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Febto 
AAarto 


NovV7 
Doc 97 
Jan to 
Feb 98 
Mar 9g 
Aw 98 
May 99 


DPC97 
Junto 
FeU9B 
Mar 9* 


9273 -OOl 
91*4 —041 
92*3 -001 
92*5 -0.02 
9252 -002 
9240 -042 
925* -0.03 


99.936 

129*25 

10*495 

71803 

59,155 

782 

47.102 


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PAGE 3' 


INTERNATld 


o* \:X£> |)AV, SEPTEMBERS. !99T 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUN E, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 1$ 


IP*? 


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Thomson Multimedia \„ DT D , r/ , 

To Gain From Sale HPI Plans ° Bld J or Val entirw 

' ^”v a r*ri __ o»m*initr, o*r$vtfFr>*n&ipititK> “We have been long studying owned clothing manufacturer and 

I It I Al MILAN — Holding di Pane- strategies ro f „P er P?S r ate 4 -. ±e renter Mareotto SpA, but the 

V/JL lCIr(!niTl I lllJlPPW cipazioni Industriali SpA, a hold- Valentino label, said Mr. Gtam- project folded when the Marzono 

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CnotpUrd by Oar Suff Fran D)y*ar*»r 

PARIS — Finance Minister 
Dotrmucjuc Strauss-Kahn said Tues- 
day that Thomson Multimedia would 
-receive part of the 40 billion French 
‘ !Su CS billion) die state expec- 
1 ted to raiseby selling France TekSxn 
bA shares and reiterated that Thom- 
pson would remain state-owned. 

’ , Mr- Strauss-Kahn also made it 
.clear that he saw partial privatiza- 
tions as the future course for major 
^state-owned French compan ies sie- 
-nalmg a partial sell-ofFof Air France 

Utility to Sell 
CGV Cable Unit 
To Canal Plus 

1 i Bloomberg News 

• ' PARIS — Coropagnje Gen- 
■ . erale des Eanx S A said Tuesday 

■ it planned to sell control of its 
cable television unit to Canal 
Plus SA, Europe's biggest pay- 

• television company, which in 
* turn will seek an international 

■ partner for the company. 

The sale of Compagnie Gen- 

■ erale des Videocommunication 

> ispart of Generale des Eaux’s 
effort to focus more closely on 

i its water, media and construc- 
1 ■ tion businesses and reduce its 
debt. General des Eaux also said 
- . it was selling its laundry-ser- 
vice businesses to Rentokil Ini- 
- . tial PLC for 642 million French 
francs ($106.1 million), 
t The cable-TV agreement 
calls for Canal Plus to lift its 
stake in CGV to 76.6 percent 
from 20 percent, while Gen- 
erate des Eaux maintains a IS 
percent stake. Financial terms 
were not disclosed. 

Shares of Canal Phis closed at 

■ 1,045 francs, down 3, amid con- 
cern that the investment could 
weigh on earnings. CGV is ex- 
pected to lose 300 million francs 

> this year and is not expected to 
become profitable for two or 
three years, analysts said. 


next year a day after announcing 
plans to list 20 percent of France 
Telecom on the Bourse. 

Analysts said the government 
may have to price its public offering 
of France Telecom at a hefty dis- 
count because of its decision to keep 
control of the phone company in 
state hands. 

Thomson Multimedia, which 
makes RCA brand televisions in the 
United States and Telefimken brand 
products in Europe, is expected to 
receive 1 1 billion francs in new cap- 
ital from the state. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn said in a radio 
interview. “The 40 billion francs 
will help recapitalize other state- 
owned companies, most notably 
Thomson Multimedia, which, con- 
trary to the former government, we 
want to keep in the public sector.” 

A unit of the state-owned holding 
company Thomson SA, Thomson 
Multimedia has posted losses for 
more than a decade and has accu- 
mulated debts of 16 billion francs. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn also said the 
insurer GAN and its regional bank- 
ing network CIC would be fully 
privatized in the next few weeks. 

(Bloomberg, AFP. Reuters ) 

■ Casino and Rallye Soar 

Shares of Casino Guichard-Per- 
rachon SA and Rallye SA soared on 
their first trading day since Pro- 
modes SA made a $4.6 billion bid 
for the two French retailers, indi- 
cating the offer might have to be 
raised, B/oomberg News reported. 

Promodes said it would not raise 
its price, although analysts and in- 
vestors have said it might have to 
sweeten its bid for Casino by as 
much as 18 percent — to 400 francs 
a share from 340 — if it wants to 
turn itself into France’s No. 1 su- 
permarket chain. 

Analysts expressed doubt that 
Promodes would have to raise its 
offer of 420 francs a share for Rallye, 
which owns a third of Casino. 

Rallye shares soared 54 percent 
before being suspended for exceed- 
ing daily price-swing limits. They 
closed at 389.20 francs, still up 
137.10, cm - 54 percent. 

Casino shares rose as much as 16 
percent, to 349 francs, before clos- 
ing at 337.40, up 35.40. 


Cmftinl br Our ftuGTnim PopJk fen 

MILAN — Holding di Pane- 
cipazioni Industriali SpA, a hold- 
ing company controlled in pan by 
the investment bank Mediobanca, 
said Tuesday that it planned to 
acquire a controlling stake in the 
fashion house Valentino. 

HPI, whose interests are con- 
centrated in the textile and pub- 
lishing sector, gave no financial 
details. 

But Valentino Group, which is 
65 percent controlled by the fash- 
ion designer Valentino Garavani 
and 35 percent by his partner Gi- 
ancarlo Giammetti. is estimated to 
be worth more than $400 million. 

The expected turnover of the 
fashion group, including licenses 
on its label, is expected to reach 1 .5 
trillion lire ($852.2 million) this 
year. Valentino and Mr. Giam- 
metti started their business in the 
1960s and said this year they 
wanted to sell the fashion bouse to 
secure its future. 


“We have been long studying 
strategies to perpehiate the 
Valentino label,” said Mr. Giam- 
metti, managing director of 
Valentino Group. 

“We needed an alliance with 
groups which can guarantee im- 
portant synergy-" 

He added, “We are deeply com- 


mitted to acting in a such a way 
that the name ofV aientino remains 
entirely Italian.”. 

Analysts generally viewed the 
news as positive for the company, 
although they said they would 
need more financial data before 
they could make a full assessment 
of the alliance. 

Milan-based HPL which is con- 
trolled by Fiat SpA as well as Me- 
diobanca, said it was making the 
usual preliminary examinations 
before completing the accord. 

HPI already has seen the col- 
lapse of one potential alliance in 
the fashion field this year. It 
planned to merge with the family- 


owned clothing manufacturer and 
retailer Marzono SpA, but the 
project folded when the Marzono 
family decided it would not have 
enough say in managing the re- 
sulting conglomerate. 

Valentino Garavani said the 
preliminary accord with HPI also 
envisaged * 'a significant exchange 
in stakes” that would “determine 
our intervention in HPI’s capit- 
al.” 

The acquisition would form part 
of HPI’s strategy of creating an 
Italian fashion house capable of 
competing in global markets. 

HPI controls the sportswear la- 
bel Fila Holding SpA, the clothing 
manufacturer GFT and the pub- 
lishing house Rizzoli Corriere 
Della Sera. 

“This project fits in with the 
industrial strategy of GFT." said 
Marco Nasctmbeni, an analyst at 
Merrill Lynch Capital Markets in 
Milan. “It goes in the right di- 
rection.’ ’ (AP, Reuters ) 


Biocompatibles’ Shares Drop 36% 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Biocompatibles In- 
ternational PLC’s stock lost a more 
than a third of its value Tuesday 
after the company said a long- 
awaited licensing agreement with 
Johnson & Johnson Co. could be 
delayed indefinitely. 

Biocompatibles’ shares fell 415 
pence ($6156), or 36.2 percent, to 
732.5 pence, pulling down other 
biotechnology companies, includ- 


ing British Biotech PLC, Celltech 
PLC, Scotia Holdings PLC and 
Chiroscience Group PLC. 

Hopes bad been high that 
Biocompatibles, which has de- 
veloped a coating to reduce adverse 
reactions to foreign bodies like con- 
tact lenses and coronary stents, was 
on the point of announcing a wide- 
ranging accord with the U.S. com- 
pany. Stents are a kind of scaffolding 
inserted into arteries and blood ves- 


7- Up in U.S. Will Get Less Sweet 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Cadbury 
Schweppes PLC’s Dr. Pepper/S ev- 
en-Up beverage unit will change the 
recipeforits 7-Upsoft drink to make 
it less sweet, a company executive 
said Tuesday. 

The move comes as 7-Up sales 
continue to lag behind those Coca- 
Cola Co. 's Sprite. In the first half, 7- 
Up sales fell 12 percent, which ana- 
lysts blamed on distribution prob- 
lems and Sprite 's snappier marketing 
rather than on a difference in taste. 


“Even with the reformulation, 
they have a very rough road to come 
back from,” said Martin Romm, an 
analyst at Credit Suisse First Bos- 
ton. 

The company is expected to an- 
nounce the change next week in San 
Antonio at its meeting of U-S. bot- 
tlers, company executives said. 

In New York, Cadbury’s Amer- 
ican depository receipts fell 31.25 
cents, to $38.0625, in late trading. 

A new taste for 7-Up would affect 
the brand only in the United States. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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12J9 12*2 
2*4 245 

5*3 5*3 

8X5 &U 
7J4 7J6 

3*3 3*7 

214 216 

6*9 4TO 
7*4 7*8 

1*3 1*5 
7J3 7.76 

535 537 

633 637 

7*5 7*7 

350 3*6 

I* 3 

2X8 2 .94 
573 SJ 8 
116 226 
6*4 6*7 

293 2.W 

10*7 10XP 
10*5 18« 
238 230 

595 599 
512 516 

190 192 
418 4-18 
1210 1210 
735 7*2 

465 469 

263 264 

8*7 857 

432 434 

HXJ 11*7 
1*3 1*5 

5*5 5*1 

855 860 

458 463 

465 471 

7*8 80S 

4JM 404 
422 428 

7.90 7.91 

486 491 

598 411 
3X9 110 

17*S 1811 
435 437 

7.11 7.16 


UUUWfcs 

VeodoDtoUuts 

Vodafone 

Whttnsx) 

WEtacrshdqs 

vTuoewy 

WPP Gnxjfi 

Zeneca 

Madrid 

Acedme 

ACESA 

AguasBmcetan 
Araentaria 
BBV 
Baiesto 
Bantorter , 

Bcd Cento Hisp 
BcoPopota 
Bco Santander 
CEPSA 
CDrfnerta 

I SS’ 6 ' 

FEC5A , 
GasNafert 
Hsentofa 
Pircn 


Telefonica 
Union Fotoeo 
VO tancCcmat 


High Law Oose Pnw. 

497 485 490 497 ' 

, 472 4*4 465 453 

334 116 334 337 

817 BX3 804 134 

335 366 172 3*5 

*67 460 463 470 

28S 278 2J9 285 

1937 19JB 19.17 1939 

Betas tadaKOJi 
P nwta rt- 59390 

24490 24310 24450 24150 
1900 1870 1895 1880 

5740 S6A0 5770 ‘5640 
7790 7750 7770 7750 

4200 4170 4195 4180 

1480 1460 1470 1470 
8290 8190 8250 8150 

I 5930 5890 5730 5900 

89« 8780 8880 6800 

4365 4320 4320 4360 

4500 44TO 4470 4495 

X60 3035 3050 3030 

8550 B310 BS40 830 

3240 3175 3185 3315 

1220 1305 1220 1220 
7330 7250 72*0 7220 

ITS 1740 1750 T7S5 

2750 2770 27X . 2705 

6190 615Q 6180 8190 

1350 1335 ISO 1350 

8250 8128 8250 6180 

4315 4290 4310 4315 

1735 1215 1220 1225 

2845 2835 2835 2815 


Manila 

Aytaa8 

&rs£& 

C&PHoairt 
AtataeEtocA 
MetoBoa* 
Petmn 
PCIBank 
PMI Long Dist 
SanMtauarB 
5M Prime Hdg 

Mexico 

Ada A 
Banned B 
CbbmCPO 
OfraC 

ErnpWtodwriD 

Gpo Carso A 1 

Gpo F Bamer 

GpoRnlnswso 

rtebOari./Kw 

TdwfcnCPO 

TdMescL 


PSEtadHc 2228*6 
PrtvieaS: 2116*8 

15 1SXD 14J5 
18 18.75 17*0 

123 123 131 

4.10 4J0 190 

» 78 73 

365 387*0 355 

4*5 *95 4*5 
153 161 152 

180 880 895 

S3 56*0 52*0 
6X0 7JD 6X0 


D o h a ind rt.- 49W*8 
Pw i — ' BM 
63*0 6170 6430 
22*0 22X5 22.70 
39X0 39X0 39X0 
14*0 14*0 14*0 

40JO 40JC 41X0 
60X0 60*0 59.90 
3*6 3*6 3*8 

02X0 32.60 32J0 
36*0 36-70 3690 
145*0 145*0 145*0 
18*2 1858 1870 


Hite Low Close Prev. 


Paris CAG48S291M3 

PlMtaBK 394889 

Acor 969 956 95B 967 

AGP 235.90 22860 230 236 

Air Lkrukta 933 922 925 937 

Alcrtd AUrt 807 797 805 805 

AttMJAP 400X0 395J0 396*0 401 

B®*r)rt ■ 744 730 741 737 

B1C 437 422 424*0 ^4 

BNP ; ■ 292X0 28730 288 29? 

Conor Plus 1W 1031 1045 1048 

Conofcur . - 3550 35X 3532 3SX 

Gatao • • : 349 357 JO 337*0 372 

C0= 335 329.90 332JO 331.90 

Cefotaro 637 *17 620 62H 

OmstaDtor B53 IG 845 847 

CLF-Drtta 581 5*4 564 582 

Fm 

Cmff Agrieota 1305.10 1305.1 01385.10 13Q 
Donone 876 862 866 879 

Elf-Arottatoe 757 736 741 7M 

ErtdentoBS 845 827 834 MO 

Euradotwr a60 SJ 0 8*0 8X5 

Eurotemel 6X5 6J0 6J0 6 JB 

GeaEoa* 730 715 723 TD 

Hwas 406 400 JO 402*0 4065C 

' - 870 330 S30 860 

Lfltartta . 436*0 430J0 434*0 437 

L»»nad 1235 1181 12£ 1 S3 

LOrata- 2310 2251 ZZ72 2290 

LVMH 1307 1283 1290 1298 

MfctelnB 360 351 355*0 35120 

Paribas A 451X0 445.10 447X0 446 

Pemod RWm 294 290.10 290 JO 29X90 

Ptoseoidl 745 749 751 .759 

PtoamW>rin! 2630 2537 3550 2623 

Promodes 2214 8136 3148 »64 

Rettaad 170*0 166 JO 169 17X40 

Rad 1660 1601 1619 1689 

rav Poulenc A 239X0 Z34 235*0 237*0 


w? 

LVMH 

MWielnB 

PoriboJA 


Afeeama Assic 

BcaOwmifed 

Baa Hdearani 

BcaiSReaa 

Beneton 

Crafito ttafiano 

Edison 

EN1 

RaT 

Gwtendl A»t 

Ml 

INA 


Medtaixmco 

AtontedJsor 

OOvera 

Paimakri 

Pin* 

RAS 

Rata Bancs 
SPoalo Torino 
Tdecoanlfeda 
TIM 


MIBTetaWSfiCK 14477 J9 
Pre*ie«K M243J0 

14990 1475S 14890 14950 
4650 £75 4*25 *440 

42TO 6110 4200 6240 

1710 16*2 1665 1774 

27400 27050 27400 Z72SO 
2605 3560 3590 1595 

fWJJ 8300 8410 8325 

10095 9915 10030 1 0020 

5775 5600 5660 5750 

37950 37550 37850 37850 
174*5 14910 17W5 17535 
2*45 2605 2620 2645 

5635 B10 5535 5615 

8045 7910 8000 7995 

1234) 11900 12200 12280 
1179 TJS1 1158 1174 

925 850 651 916 

27» 2685 2725 2740 

4785 4695 4730 4710 

14890 14720 14730 143M 
23053 22650 22650 22750 
13200 12760 13000 13115 
11330 11090 11130 11240 
*380 6180 6250 6305 


Sanafl 589 577 579 590 

Sdmetaer 344.70 33X10 342*0 332 

SEB 875 831 848 830 

SGSTOcm** 529 51* 535 545 

SteGenen* ”5 Jib 7 V 7B6 

SodndH TJiS 2693 7TO3 2730 

SI Gctwto 909 896 907 905 

SvezCO) 15J5 15.10 1510 1510 

Suez Lnn Eaux 683 £2 «l 

Snteefabe 715 703 70 S 71 A 

Thomson CSP 16S 164*0 1 65*0 166.90 

Total B *53 633 645 653 

U^pr 111X0 10930 1)1*0 imo 

Sao Paulo 

Cud gPfo 56X0 5190 56X0 55*0 

cIsPPM 84X0 81*0 82*0 83X10 

Cope! 17.90 17J0 17J0 17310 

Efelbras 585X0 549X0 57499 575X0 

tttJubcncoPM B5X0 581X0 5E4X1 *0X1 

LjsMSentdK 507X0 481X0 41X0 507X0 

LiSripw 37QX0 356X0 356X0 37X00 

PSSrasPfd 303X0 294XO 300.M 2W.0O 

Puu&taUE 193X0 189*0 189*0 189X0 

StaNndcnoJ 42*0 41*0 41*0 42*0 

sSaoCraz 1X10 10X0 1X10 10.10 

TetatomPfd 144X0 140*0 14330 142J0 

T^ta 1”X0 170*0 170*0 172.99 

Trial 1S2X0 151X0 151X0 151*0 

TriS»PM 335X1 326.96 OTXO 332X0 

Unrtanco 38X0 37X0 38X0 38X3 

ItakntaosPfd 11.90 11J0 11X0 11X6 

CVRDPfd 28*0 27X0 2X10 2X20 


EhcMuxB 
Ericsson B 
Hennas B' 
InceirthieA 
tawstarB 
M0O0B 
Nardbcrtcwi 
PI«M L^Ugyton 

Sc* C B 
SCAB 

5-E Banten A 
SktodtoFcxs 
SkunskoB 
SKFB 

Spartan ten A 
aorn A 
SvHandksA 
Volvo B 


Sydney 


ANZBtang 

BMP 

Boral 

Bumble* tad. 
CflA 

CCAmoS 

CitaMp 

Corrico 

CSR 

Fasten Brew 
Goodman Rtf 
pa Ausfntaa 
Lend Lease 
MWihdas 
Kal Ansi Bank 
Nal MutixdHdg 
News Carp 
PaefficDnrtop 
Ptamwi InM 
Pub BfDodcasl 
RtaTinto 
SIGeorye Bank 
WMC 


Dacaai 

OoewaoHeavr 
Hyundai E»9. 
WoAtotorj 
Korea DPwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
LGStmfcon 
PohcmglranSt 
Samsung Oistoy 
Samsung Etoc 
S*rtonBor* 
SKTetecon 


CMte Ntetete jgS 

Pitawtail 
87000 85100 eno 86000 
7450 7110 7790 7 S 0 

19000 18600 18600 ITOO 
11600 10800 10900 11TO0 
23200 22600 22900 23300 
5300 5110 5120 000 

42000 40500 40900 42000 
58900 57600 57W0 58900 
46400 45100 4MOO 46400 
69000 67900 68200 69100 
3720 8620 8640 8 7 20 

47K)00 440000 451000 477000 


Montreal 

Bee MdO Cart 

CdnTrtA 

CdnlillA 

CTFrrtac 

GazMdra 

Gt-Wesi LBecD 

tattoo 

hMSMRCip 

LsUmQx 
NaB Bk Canada 
Power Carp 
Power FW 
QuefaeaxB 
Rogers Caram B 
ReydBkCda 


AJterA 

BeranenDr A 
OnSMaBk 
DennenfeeBk 
EJtaffl 
Hafshind A 
KneretrAsa 
Norsk IMs 
Haifa SwgA 
NrGonndA 
OtUoAsaA 
PtffenGeaSK 


Twnica w OB 

StoreteondAsn 


rtririrti tadwe 3630X8 
PwriartK 34J1X9 

50** 5W 51 

2755 27 S 27H 
37 JO 3740 37X1 
a* 4170 43W 

1BI* 1X35 1X30 

32* 2* 22*5 
29 A5 39.70 39X0 
33ta 33V 3340 
2030 20X0 2035 
1745 17X5 17X0 
38W 3195 38X0 
2*95 3645 3630 
2*55 2*20 ZSfe 
945 945 9.95 

6540 6*90 65V 


OBXteteTMJI 
Pu lllB X 78237 

125*0 127 126 

300 202*0 201 

25 2*10 24.90 
30.10 30.10 3040 
131 132 133*0 

45 45 4*50 

37850 390 381 

431 432*0 433 

269 271 273 

157 M0 159 
565 587 568 

461250 461 461 

15741 1S8 162 

123 mxo 122 
N.T. N.T. 690 
51*0 S3 52 


Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew *40 

CerebasPoc . 6J0 

OiDevfls 1140 

CyaeOntete 9.90 

080 
1130 
434 

. ._ A N a cre 940 

HKLnnd * 3X8 

JartfMfasn* 7.90 

JvdSMetfc' 186 

KeooeiA 1,R 

kSpSbot* 

KfiSPdFeb 

“ — ‘Laid 


6.10 
338 
' 4X2 
436 

1110 

CSOntanikF 8X5 
PrrtwHd) 
Senbawam — 
Sing Air foreign 1320 
Stag Land 7X5 
Sing Press F 24X0 
SmTedHad 2X2 
Tetcamm 240 

ee Bank 290 

UMMHfeM 1X7 
UUOSeaBkF 13 
WtagTtaHdgi 3*8 
nmUSiOBa. 

Stockholm 


SlmtoTrew; 1919^ 
NtaWB H9M3 

*35 540 *35 

no 545 WB 
1020 11.10 10.10 
940 975 935 

0X6 0X7 0X6 

16*0 17.10 16JS 
4X6 4*2 4 

9.10 9.10 9.10 

1X2 3X6 3 

775 7.90 7.90 

3X2 3X2 3X2 

540 6 540 

330 332 3J0 

190 198 194 

416 436 416 

1140 12 11*0 

773 7.95 7.75 

435 645 645 

U5 635 625 

1170 12.90 1240 
7.15 730 7.10 

3410 2450 23*0 
248 248 2J7 

2J2 240 230 

2X2 290 179 

1X2 1X5 1X1 

1230 12X0 12-10 
338 3*2 33B 


Taipei 

CnShorUtolm 
rhmr, Hhc Bk 
. fwgBk 
OWaDevetaod 
□too Steel 
Hist Bank 
Famaso Ptosltc 
Huo Man Bk 
fedtCanraBk 
NonYoPtotoa 
Shin Kong Life 
TahwnSwnl 
Taking 
uw Mian Elec 


Tokyo 

Afenomab 

ABHtaponAlr 

Anrway 

Arete Bank 
AsaNOwn 
Asahi Gkn» 

«7 c*ro«a» 

Bk Yokohama 

Bridrosterie ‘ 

Canon 

QmhuEtec 

OwgrtuiETec 

DdHtapPrafl 

Dotal 

Dar-ldd Kang 
Dakva Bank 
Doiwo House 
Down Sec 
DDl 
Denso 

Eire Japan Rf • 
Etui 
Faroe 
Fufl Bank 
Ffli Pterin 


Stoekhrim «^aESg|» 

SI Si H Si I 

AssOamn 245*0 240 244*0 241 

AteiiA 135*0 132*0 135 134 

AlasCcteoA 9Q<n Ml*0 25150 251 

XSdte 317 311 317 310*0 


HachiuniBk 

Hftadil 

Hondo Motor 

IBJ 

1H1 

ttadiu 

BtJ-Yckalto 

JAL 

Japan Totemo 

Jim 

Kopra 

KwisalElec 

Kao 

KnwasrtdHrir 
tore Steel 
KinUNwRy 
Kirin Brewery 
fate Steel 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 

Kyushu Etec 

LTCB . 
Merufaen 
Marti 

AtafsaCaaw 

Matsu Etec tad 

Matsu Etas Wk 

Mdsuttote 

MfllfasMOl 

MXsutesMEI 

MflsubfaMEst 

MdwtetMHvr 

NUtreteiNMa 

MXretesfii Tr 

wisu 


Fran^ni 

dax : . ..: 



■.■'.tjgdbn- : •. Paris .■ 

.. fJ&.VBQ Indek ' CAC 40 ■ 

: 5200 3230 

■ 5000 JL, 3100 
- s «00 af* 2950 

4600 m 2800 J 

- : 4400 / 2650^ /if 


mj as. 

19V7 

'Btchange - . 


A M J J A S 

1897 


AtnaterriBTO ■' ASX . ‘ ‘ - 

Brossei^':’ • sa^ag 
mmot :V 

Ofiipwi55Sn StooMteio^ 


885.1? : 905-20 ' 

2j«».42 2,42827 
A$M39 ;4.06a0J 

mw «&<?■ 


Oslo <■ 
London* 


! ;VQQX. ; ■ :V '"Wa": 

FTSE/tOO; ■.-• 4»50 . . 4^85^'. 

r Stock ^tclmge ' HAi ' . &&&*■': Jv * " j 
1 -,#ijra-"v ' J ". ■1^.' W43::.'.....^.45 


sels to stop them from collapsing. 

Biocompatibles said Johnson & 
Johnson, which controls 70 percent 
of the S800 million market for 
stems, was still interested in using 
the technology. 

But Biocompatibles also said it 
was in talks with five other compa- 
nies to distribute its own stents and 
use the coating in grafts, urology, 
gynecology and heart valves. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters ) 


PepsiCo Inc. holds the rights to 
make and sell the beverage else- 
where. 

Like most sodas, versions abroad 
have undergone slight taste 
changes, PepsiCo said. 

PepsiCo, which has many bottlers 
that distribute 7-lIp in the U.S.. is 
considering introducing a lemon- 
lime-flavored soda of its own do- 
mestically. 

That could result in Seven-Up’s 
exit from the Pepsi bottler system, 
thus hurting its sales even more. 


Stockfrqfrft- jSX tg . . ' 3,40249 3,363-H : +t.1S 
Wewttr ' •' -ATX: 1 • " l^t-06 1^9t,40 ' 40,f^ 

Zurich gpr • •••• ' • 3£o4aa 3^37.83- -OJ93! 

Source: TeJokurS JpfcmjavjjJ T/ihuac 

t 

Very brief lys 

• Poland is likely to sell a 49 percent stake in the national 
phone company, Telefcomunifeacja Polska SA, in the first 
half of next year, the government’s economic council said. . 

• ABN AMRO Bank, based in Amsterdam, is in negotiations 
to buy Banca Comerciala Ion Tiriac SA, an official at the 
Romanian bank said. 

• Economics Minister Guenter Rexrodt of Germany ac- 
knowledged a ruling by the World Trade Organization that 
the European Union's banana-trade regulations violate in- 
ternational agreements on free trade to the detriment of 
American producers. 

• Dresdner Bank AG, Germany’s second-largest bank, said 
its chief executive, Juergen Sauazin, will step down after the 
bank's annual shareholders meeting in May 1 998. He is to be 
succeeded by Bernhard Walter, a member of Dresdner’s 
management board since 1987. 

• RJB Mining PLC, Britain's largest remaining coal-mining 
company, said pretax profit for the first half rose 1.3 percent, 
to £87.2 million ($138.3 million), and it announced a 25 
percent rise in the dividend to 10 pence a share. 

• The Bank of England will leave its base rate unchanged at 

its monthly monetary policy meeting later this week. ecoi> 
oraists predicted, in the light of Inflation figures. Inflation for 
the month of August was up 2.8 percent from a year ear lief, 
and up 0.4 percent from the previous month. . 

• Vendex International, the Dutch retail group, said net 
profit in the first half increased more than fivefold to 813 
million guilders ($400 million), because of a large extraor- 
dinary gain. 

■ Spain's unemployment rate fell to 12.38 percent in August, 
down from 12.5 percent in July, taking the number of un- 


re Spain's unemployment rate fell to 12.38 percent in August, 
down from 12.5 percent in July, taking the number of un- 
employed below 2 million for the first time since November 
1982, the Labor Ministry reported. Bloomberg . Reuters. AFP. AP 


I 556 572 

I 329 334*0 

335 340 

I 718 724 

399 405 

166 267 

253 255*0 
275 277*0 
249*0 254 

215*0 219 

18*50 185 

B6*0 >8*0 
335 348*0 
317 321*0 
219 221*0 : 
1B1 182*0 
129 131 

244 256*0 

305*0 207*0 : 


AlOnSrirttaS: 267458 
PlrtftaK 2656X8 

848 848 8.79 

10X1 10.14 9X9 

17X5 17X6 17X5 
4.10 4.15 4X9 

27.19 27X5 Z7.1B 
1541 15X5 1540 
1445 1470 1640 
440 642 6*7 

7 JO 771 725 

5J1 *25 5J3 

248 272 2*9 

no 113 114 

1273 1244 1244 

30X0 30X0 30X5 
147 1.70 1*7 

1940 19*5 1942 
119 120 118 

633 635 US 

171 172 174 

AS 443 4*3 

8*3 8*5 8*0 

20J5 2047 20.17 
B.IB 8421 8.15 

6X6 6.97 6X6 

7.99 8.09 7.98 

1142 1149 1145 
4X4 470 4 . 1 S 


Stock Mrtfaf tads: 9079X6 
Pm ink 914919 

133 131 131*0 131 

>01*0 1D0 100 100 

85 82 83*0 83*0 

122 118 120 120*0 
2*90 28*0 2840 28JD 
102 100 101 100S1 

61 57*0 58*0 60 

110 107 107 109 

55 54 54*0 54 

71 49 69 70*0 

89*0 87*0 87*0 87*0 
150 145 147*0 ISO 

4*60 45 4*10 4*10 

12*0 106 108 113 

64 63 6150 63*0 


NMwi22£ 1B69&97 
PrwriMK: 1B633J4 

1080 1100 1090 

706 707 m 

3570 3S» 359(1 

850 850 866 

606 614 618 

930 939 927 

2120 7140 3140 
526 528 5Z4 

2760 2800 2780 

3440 3490 3480 

2040 2060 2050 

I960 1980 I960 
2430 2670 2630 

740 746 785 

1390 1410 13«0 

591 591 599 

1390 1380 1370 
706 710 710 

6030a 6081b 5970a 
2840 2900 »» 

5580a 5610a 5$90o 
2330 5-00 2350 

49® 4990 4990 
1480 1500 1490 

4700 4740 4700 

1450 1480 1460 

1190 1190 1210 

1MD 1050 10® 

3830 3900 3910 
1580 1590 1610 
359 363 378 

500 502 ®6 

63® 6420 6400 
497 507 500 

9330a 9«0a 931 0a 
3070 3090 3070 

609 609 613 

2200 2340 2220 

1680 1680 1710 
450 455 450 

27B 281 285 

686 689 686 

1050 1070 10® 

1® 16» 1® 
746 736 730 

479 482 481 

8140 8340 8170 
1990 2000 2000 

570 576 573 

422 426 426 

1920 i960 19® 

3690 3760 3860 
2170 2190 2W 
12® 12® 13® 
1120 11 ® 11 ® 
316 371 317 

518 S?7 517 

1640 1«60 16® 

778 794 780 

683 695 690 

U90 1710 I MM 

982 988 994 


The Trib Index Prlcss 83 ^ a0 ° PM - ' Ntew York ^ 

Jan. 1 , 1993-100 Level Ctianga % change year to date 

It change- 

World index 173.84 +020 +0.12 +16.56 

Regional btdexos 

Asta/Padfic 122.79 +1.81 +1.50 -0.52 

Europe 163.51 -1.50 -0-81 +13.64 

N. America 208.14 +1.25 +0.60 +28.55 

S America 168.72 -1.01 -0.60 +47.44 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 22455 +0.63 +0.28 +31.55 

Consumer goods 188.64 -0.12 -0.06 +1636^ 

Energy 202.60 -0.59 -029 +13.68< 7 

Finance 128.97 +0.31 +0:24 . +10.74 * 

Miscellaneous 185.40 +1.36 +0.74 +14.60-; 

Raw Materials 186.72 +0.64 +0-34 +0.47* 

Service 164.48 +0.50 +0.30 +19.78-- 

Utilities 169.98 -0.30 -0.18 +18.49- 

Trie inwnaww HeraM Triune Worm Slock Max C tracks me U.S doBar values o( 
280 nemaoanaPy mvestable stocks bom 25 countries. For mote Information, a hue-, 
bookku Is available by writing no The Trib indm. 181 Avenue Crurfes de QauSe. 

92527 NetMy Cedex. France. Compiled by Btcmeerg News. 


MBBrtFudore 
Mitsui Trust 

MutntalMfg 

NEC 

NttoSec 

Nkan 

t&rtendo 

KKSSf” 


Noun Motor 

NWC 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 


Osaka Ges 

RJa* 

Rohm 13600 

Sakuiatt 
Scnkro 
Samoa Bank 
Santo Elec 

Socora 

SeibuRwy 
SekisrtChen 
Sefcbui House 
Sevwi-Eiewn 

Start 

SMrakuBPwr 1980 
Shimizu 
SMn-ebudi 
Sttoeao 
SWiuateBk 
Softbank 

Sony 11500 

Sumitomo 
SunflotnoBk 
SutritChem 
Sumitomo Bee 
Sum ft Mekrf 

Suart Trad 

Taebo Phamt 
TotedoCnefn 
TDK 

Tofofcu El Pwr 
Total Bank 
ToMo Marine 

Tokyo El Pwr 

Tokyo Electron <1910 

Tokyo Gas 296 

TckyuCare- 628 

Tonen II® 

Tcppan Print 1770 

TtroflnU 


Tastera 
Taya Trust 
Toyota Motor 
YonwKxidtf 
O'XlOCk b: jr IJKO 


Toronto 

AbMiCanC* 
ABerta Energy 
Alcan Atom 
AndenonEnpl 
BkMartrtol 
BkNowScoUa 
BarickGM 
BCE 

BC Tetetwnm 

BioehanPtMnn 

BonfeonflerB 

Camera 

CIBC 

CdnNatlRal 

CdnNdRes 

CdnOendPet 

UnFadflc 

rnnrinm 

Oataxo 

Oantof 

Donohue A 

DuPont Ota A 

EUperBrasran 

EiriDNayMirg 

Fairfax Fin) 

Fakntaridge 

FteteherdwlA 

Franco Newrita 

CWf Cdo Res 

Imperial 08 

Inca 

IPL Energy 
Iflfabw 8 
LMWHGnup 
MoanN BU0 
Magna tall A 


1400 1400 

S»3 615 

J3HJ 5230 
1390 1400 

1910 1990 

547 551 

10600 10800 
803 798 

520 519 

297 295 

748 7® 

195 1B9 

1580 1590 

UlOb 1120b 
5300b 5340b 
609 402 

285 782 

1720 1720 

13600 13900 
720 725 

3970 3950 

1560 1580 

424 422 

B510 8450 

5731 5750 

996 1010 

1130 1140 

8970 8970 

1170 1150 

1980 1970 
600 611 
3300 32B0 

2020 1990 

1290 1300 

5230 5310 

1J4» 1)500 
968 960 

1710 1710 
466 457 

1820 1810 
281 284 

1220 1240 

3010 3000 

3510 3470 

9950 9990 

1970 I960 

1030 1030 

1390 1400 

22® 2270 

6790 6830 
296 290 

628 618 
1160 11® 
1770 17® 
7BS 796 
688 ft81 
2500 2470 

990 990 

3330 3320 

7010 7050 


TSE ImjDdrlafc: 6791.16 
PrOfkWS: 6764X8 

40 22>* 23.10 2340 
35 31.05 31X0 31X5 
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18 171* 18 17.TO 

40 52X0 53X0 5110 
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Nawbridqe Net 
Norandamc 
Naroen Energy 

KtheraTderoro 

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FVtroCita 
Placer Dome 
Poca Pettm 
Potash 5ask 
Rentusumce 
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Rogers CrrtelB 
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TTiossaa 

T aOomB ank 

Timsatta 

TiansCOo Pipe 

TrimteFtnr 

TitBcHahn 

TVXGold 

WestooasiEny 

Weston 


Vienna 


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Cmfitonst Pftf 6S0 
EA-Genemfl 3122 
EVN 1569 

FbrtwtenWIen 497 
OMV 1812.90 

OeslElekfete 878*0 
VA Stahl 541 

V A Tech 3S0S 

Vflenertwrg Bau 26® 


77*0 79*5 
26*5 26*0 
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14(HA MOJO 

11X5 11X0 
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ATX tadac 1394*4 
Previews; 1391*0 

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1*4 647 647*0 

3030 3120 XW) 

1545 1545 155! 

492.10 494*0 49645 

1791 18001802.10 

870.10 875 875 

534.10 537 S% 

7466 2499 2453 

7610 26X 7610 


Wellington 

flsvef 1 « «a ts s 

Carter HaB orel 3X» 3J9 XM 

FteKhCh BUg 4*2 4X7 **2 4*2 

Retch OlEiry 6J6 610 feJS 60S 

Retch Ch Fast 1.92 190 1.92 1.91 

RetdiOi Paper 3.14 3X7 ill 114 

Uon Nathan 3X0 175 375 175 

Telecom NZ 7.75 7*1 7.75 7.70 

WHsanHortai 11.® 11*0 11*0 11.® 


Zurich 

ABB B 

AdecaB 

AtaMbneR 

Am-SeranoB 

AieIR 

BoerHOgB 

BakxseHdgR 

BKVhion 

caxtSoecOKffl 

CWontR 

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Sober P. 

Stoss Reins R 
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Fmtare: 3537.9) 

(132 2167 2163 
564 566 565 

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330 330 332 

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364 366*0 367*0 
1915 1944 1889 

2710 2715 2 7® 

884 893 884 

1041 1041 1077 

2032 2049 2080 
1820 1829 1830 

1499 IS07 1517 
1296 1304 1319 

599 403 607 







PAGE 16 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

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IHT Technology 
Index 


All of the past month’s technology arti- 
cles from the IHT, now available on our 
site on the World Wide Web. 


http://www.iht.com 


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PAGE 3 


INTERNVTH 


00 fcT fi 1 ).tt, SEPTEMBER 24» 1997 


'M 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD T RIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 199 7 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 17 




: -0"' Ufc 


N tithe 

,;r' ^v Mhn 

tithe 



i. * 


Spotlight 

On China 
As Utility 
Revamps 

Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — China 
Light & Power Co. said Tues- 
day it planned to split its busi- 
nesses m Hong Kong and 

.ujrfenmng the list-growing 
. operations that hold 

*e key to the utility’s future. 
The move was the latest in a 

MTiM of steps taken by Hong 

Kong s biggest power producer 
Sl0wing growth in 

.^nand for power in Hong 

China is our obvious target 
| ■ for expansion.” Sandra Mat a 
company spokeswoman, said. 

Hus new structure will allow 
onr investors to clearly under- 
stand oar operations and know 
where our growth potential 

hes. China Light said it had no 
immediate plans to spin off its 
’utility and property businesses 
. in China. 

‘This structure allow us to 
look at different flotation pos- 
• sibUities in the future,” Miss 
Mak said. “There’s no such 
plan at the moment.” 

China Light ’s shares jumped 
.2.40 Hong Kong dollars (31 

■ U.S. cents), or 5.9 percent, to 
close at 43.10, their highest 
close since Aug. 13. 

The reorganization will cre- 
ate a holding company, CLP 
Holdings LttL, to oversee all the 

■ utility’s interests. Splitting its 
businesses may help China 
Light raise capital for its op- 
erations outside Hong Kong, 
analysts said. 

‘ ‘They have all this growth in 
1 China, ’’said Leon Chile, an ana- 
lyst at HSBC James Capel Asia 
Ltd. “This restructuring is go- 
ing to help them realize their 
China potential; their asset value 
will be greatly enhanced.” 

In Apri] , C hina Light entered 
into a $900 milli on gas project 
in the southern Chinese city of 
Shenzhen. In May, it signed an 
agreement feu: a $2.3 billion 
joint-venture power project in 
Shangdong Province. It also 
has a 25 percent stake in the 
Daya Bay nuclear power station 
in Guangdong Province. 


In South Korea, More Signs of Weakness 

6 Jinro Units Declared Bankrupt Traders Say Seoul ‘Suggests’ Buying 


CenpiMtn Our Slag Fnw CHjfu* 

SEOUL Six main subsidiaries 
of Jinro Group, South Korea ‘s 19th- 
largest conglomerate, were declared 
bankrupt Tuesday after months of 
efforts to revive the nation's leading 
alcoholic beverage maker. 

The country’s biggest liquor 
maker missed 3.2 billion won ($ 3.5 
million) of debt payments, for a 
second day. Under Korean bank- 
ruptcy laws, that allowed creditors 
to declare it bankrupt. 

But crediiors said they were will- 
ing to delay collecting loans and 
provide funds to save two of the six 
companies — Jinro Ltd., the coun- 
ty’s No. 1 whiskey distillery, and 
Jtnro-CooTs Brewing Co., a beer- 
making venture with Coors Brewing 
Co. of the United Slates. 

In April, Jinro Group said it was 
trying to sell real estate and some of 
Jts 24 subsidiaries to ease a cash 
shortage. But it could not unload 
them quickly amid an overall eco- 
nomic slump. 

Euro’s total debt amounts to 
53.85 billion, mosrof it in bank loans 
that fueled its rapid expansion. Jinro 
ventured into food, construction and 
retail businesses in the early 1990s. 


South Korea's slowing economy 
has left vulnerable many companies 
that expanded too quickly and bor- 
rowed too much during the nation's 
boom years. This year, two steel- 
makers and a major carmaker have 
collapsed or come close to bank- 
ruptcy. 

' ‘Jinro will not be the last one to go 
under,” said Lee Keun Mo. research 
head at ING Baring’s Seoul office. 
“There are fundamental problems 
that cannot be fixed by temporary 
bailout measures by banks.” 

(AP. Bloomberg ) 

■ A Lifeline for Asia Motors? 

Kim Woo Choong, chairman of 
Daewoo Group, said his group 
would consider buying Asia Motors 
Co., part of the debt-ridden Kia 
Group, if it were asked to, 
Bloomberg News reported. 

Mr. Kim’s remarks appeared to 
increase the chances that Asia Mo- 
tors, a maker of trucks and buses, 
would be separated from Kia Mo- 
tors Co., Korea's third-largest auto- 
maker, over the objections of Kia's 
management. Kia Group is under 
bankruptcy-law protection from its 
creditors. 


C’sv»W^(V-Sft#f'n»,£to^»or*n 

SEOUL — The government at- 
tempted tohaltastockmarketslurap 
Tuesday by telling finance compa- 
nies they should buy stocks, traders 
reported. 

A fund manager at one of South 
Korea’s top two investment trusts 
said the Ministry of Finance and 
Economy had issued^ what was 
known as a “buy more” instruction, 
ratling on financial institutions to 
buy more stocks than they sold. 

The manager said his company 
and other financial institutions 
would oblige, “as usual.” until the 
stock market began to recover. 

A Finance Ministxy official 
denied that it had given such an 
instruction, but brokerages and trust 
companies confirmed receiving it. 

The benchmark index for Seoul 
shares recovered after the reported 
move, finishing 0.14 percent higher, 
at 698.97 points, even as six Jinro 
Group units missed debt payments 
and were declared bankrupt The in- 
dex has fallen 15 percent since early 
Jane amid concern that mounting 
debts would cripple some of South 
Korea's largest companies. 

Companies also have suffered as 


Exports Offer Southeast Asia Salvation 

As With Mexico, Tumbling Currencies Should Fuel Demand for Region’s Goods 


tJongKont 
Hang Sang, 

17000 

16000 j 


ipore : : ■ Tokyo • 
iTtaes: ' NMs0i225 . 


the won has declined in value. The 
dollar rose to a record 909.00 won 
Monday but retreated Tuesday to 
908.70 won. The weak won also has 
undermined won-denominated as- 
sets, leading foreigners to take their 
money out of South Korean mar- 
kets. 

The South Korean government 
often uses its authority to influence 
the stock market and financial sec- 
tor, analysts said, adding that fi- 
nancial institutions fear they will be 
penalized if they do not follow gov- 
ernment “suggestions.” 

The government's last foray into 
the market came in March, when the 
benchmark index fell for more than 
a month as Hanbo Group crumbled 
under debts of 5.7 trillion won. 

Trades by local institutions make 
up about 20 percent of the Seoul 
market’s daily volume. 

Asian stock markets in general 
were mixed Tuesday, although the 
benchmark index in Manila soared 
5.8 percent, to 2^28.86 points. 

Philippine stocks rose because of 
lower domestic interest rates and 
waning concerns over the country’s 
political stability, traders said. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


A M J J 
1997 


Hong Kong 

i 

Sydney ' 
Tokyo " 
Kue&Unnp 
Bangk ok* . 
Seoul . 
.Taipei 


A S 1700 A M J J A S. l7M0 A UJ JAS 
1997 1»7 

index • • Tuesday. Pro* . 

, < 3 oae v - Ctoss 

: i4hgSenig- ' “ "H99&86 ttjofc&v UK 
.•swasiimse v lyaiaaa < mat -93 . >148 
AS OrdinaftES " ZSS&& - 46.89 


SET '• ••; 57&30;: 


By Paul Lewis 

New fort 77 mm Service 

NEW YORK — Now that nearly 
all the countries of Southeast Asia 
are reeling under a wave of currency 
losses, how will they extract them- 
selves from their economic mess? 

Probably in the same way that 
Mexico did soon after it was hit by a 
devastating currency collapse — in- 
creased exports. 

Already, the economic crisis in 
Southeast Asia is threatening 
growth there and raising questions 
about the sustainability of the suc- 
cess these nations have generally 
enjoyed over the last decade. 

Even under the best of circum- 
stances, countries such as Thailand, 
Malaysia, Indonesia and the Phil- 
ippines are going to have to cut back 
their domestic growth to reinforce 
the advantage that a cheaper cur- 
rency will provide them in selling 
goods abroad. 


“A decade of boom is ending in a 
bust,” said Allen Sinai, chief global 
economist at Primark Decision Eco- 
nomics in Boston. “There is a big 
question mark over the Asian region 
and a big risk for the world econ- 
omy.” 

Almost any expected outcome 
will deliver at least a dose of bitter 
medicine to the rest of the Asian 

"news analysis 

continent and the world. As aus- 
terity takes hold, Japan is expected 
to suffer the most, because South- 
east Asia takes about a quarter of its 
exports. 

Moreover, as the other countries 
adopt Indonesia's announced pre- 
scription last week of fostering ex- 
port-led growth, renewed trade 
squabbles with the United States 
and the Europeans are likely to 
break out in certain industries. 

But these will probably be man- 


ageable, a number of analysts say, in 
part because the Southeast Asian 
economies are still not large enough 
to disrupt prevailing patterns of in- 
ternational trade. 

Together, Indonesia, Malaysia 
and Thailand — three of those hard- 
est hit — account for only 3.2 per- 
cent of the world's exports. That 
compares with 2.8 percent for the 
United States alone, which has sus- 
tained an export boom despite in- 
creases in the value of the dollar. 

The United States is not the dom- 
inant market for these economies. Jt 
absorbs 17 percent of Malaysia's 
exports, 11 percent of Thailand's 
ana 7 percent of those from In- 
donesia and the Philippines. 

The biggest question facing the 
fast-growth nations of Southeast 
Asia is whether they will emerge 
from this crisis permanently dam- 
aged or will use the opportunity to 
improve their ability to compete 
with China's giant economy. 


Stock markets in the region, after 
repeated blows, improved at the end 
of last week and generally were 
higher again Monday but showed 
little change Tuesday. Indonesian 
stocks, which rallied Monday on 
hopes that last week's deregulation 
might allow interest rates to come 
down faster than expected, fell 
slightly, as did Thai shares. Malay- 
sian stocks added modestly to Mon- 
day's rally, which came after Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
ended stock-trading restrictions im- 
posed late last month. 

Many economists say the region 
will recover from the current crisis in 
a relatively short time. “Experience 
elsewhere of falling currencies and 
higher interest rates points to slower 
growth,” said Desmond Lachman, 
director of emerging-market research 
at Salomon Brothers. “But this could 
be beneficial if they take all the steps 
needed to restore competitiveness, 
especially against China.” 


• • • • "s&m* 

' Bombay : '■ Sensitive thdeb? ' ■ ■ '483TJ5S 4.98X30 >1.36. 

Source; felekuts lnb.ni«i.*nl Herald Tnbunc 

Very briefly: 

• Volvo AB is to scop production for five weeks ar its Thai 
assembly plant, which makes Volvo cars and Chrysler Corp. 
jeeps, because the nation's currency crisis is sapping demand 
for large cars. Thal-Swedish Assembly, which is 56 percent- 
owned by the Swedish car maker, expects to sell 2,800 Volvo 
cars in Thailand this year, down from 4,900 last year and 1 .200 
Cherokee jeeps, compared to 3,200. 

• Hitachi Ltd. said it has developed technology to nearly 
double the capacity of its DVD-RAM storage system for 
recording and playing video, music and data. The technology 
will allow a double-sided computer disk to store four hours of 
video. 

• Seven Network Ltd., one of Australia's three commercial 
television networks, said second-half earnings rose 11.67 
percent: to 25.95 million Australian dollars ($18.92 million), 
taking earnings in the year to 88.94 million Australian dollars, 
a fall of 22.7 percent 

• China's industrial output in August grew 10.9 percent from 
the same month last year. Output last month totaled 162.1 
billion yen ($19.5 billion), the State Statistics Bureau re- 
ported. Industrial output grew 1 1 .6 percent for the wholeof the 
first half. 

• South Korea’s shipbuilding orders jumped 152 percent 
from a year ago to 6.78 million gross tons in the first eight 
mouths of this year following rising oil taker demand. In 
August, new orders totaled 262,790 gross tons, or 8 ships, 
bringing accumulated orders for 1997 to 123 ships, the Korea 
Shipbuilders’ Association said. 

• South Korea's high-speed railroad authority has finalized 
plans for the country’s problem-plagued high-speed train 
project, with operations due to start in 2005. The overall cost 
of tiie project has risen to about $19 billion. 

• Japan's private-sector machinery orders in July rose 03 

percent from a year earlier following a 5.6 percent climb the 
previous month. Machinery orders in the manufacturing sec- 
tor rose 153 percent year-on-year, and increased 3.2 percent 
from the previous month. Bloomberg. AFP 


vfj ■ 




4 





this year? 


Auctions in France 
Bavaria 

Built for Business: Bangladesh 

Built for Business: China 

Built for Business: Indonesia 

Built for Business: Japan 

Built for Business: Philippines 

Built for Business: Singapore 

Built for Business: South Korea 

Built for Business: Thailand 

Business Education in France 

Business Education in the US 

Business Locations in Germany 

Business Locations in Vienna 

By Spain: Cathedrals - K1 

By Spain: Gastronomic Bounty of the North 

By Spain: Museums 

By Spain: World Heritage Cities 

California Wines 
Czech Republic 

Eco£fficiency: Business and the Environment 

King Markets in Central & Eastern Europe 
Euro & Financial Markets 

European Fine Arts ^ 

Fast Track 97: Asia Business Outlook 
Frankfurt's New Congress Center 

Greek Telecommunications , 


Holidays in Europe: UK Fly and Drive 

Hotel Renaissance 

Hungary 

JFA: Advanced Electronics Showcase 

International Business Education 

International Education in Benelux 

Internationa Education in Germany and Austria 

international Education in Switzerland 

International Franchising 

Investing in Austria 

Investing in Austria: Vienna 

Investing in Poland 

Luxui 7 Real Estate 

Mauritius 

Mitsubishi 

Mobile Communications: GSM and Beyond 
Multilingualism in Europe 
North America Summer Camps 
Office Equipment 

Portugal Update: Lisbon Stock Exchange 
Portugal Update: Telecom 
Summer in New York . 

Tanzania 

Technology & The Environment 
Thailand 

Trade Fairs & Congresses in Germany 

Travel for Knowledge 

Travel in Asia: Best Beaches 

Travel in Asia: Festivals 

Travel in Asia: Golf 

Yachting 


Now available on the IHTWeb site: 


#cra%! 




nMmsssrn&ssssm 





NATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK 
FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT SA 

An Affiliate of the National Bank of Greece 

INVITATION TO EXPRESS INTEREST 

FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF A PROJECT PERTAINING TO THE STUDY AND 
PROVISION OF EXPERT OPINION ON THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE TERMS FOR 
THE CONCLUSION OF A CONTRACT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A POWER 
STATION PRODUCING THERMOELECTRIC ENERGY COMBUSTING LIGNITE 

The NATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT S A (■ETEBA») which by virtue of a resolution of the 
Governmental Committee dated August 1 . 1997 has been appointed by the Ministry of Development as advisor (hereinafter 
to be referred to as -the Advisor-), hereby invites whoever is interested (hereinafter to be referred to as «the Interested 
Parties-), having the qualifications mentioned in the present invitation, to express their interest for the assignment of a study 
and provision of an expert opinion (hereinafter to be referred to as «thB Expert Opinion-) as to the competitiveness of the 
terms of a contract to be concluded for the construction, on a turn key basis, of a specific power plant of a capacity of 330 
MW combusting lignite (hereinafter to be referred to as -the Protect-), taking into consideration given technical and 
commercial specifications. 


• Details regarding the experience of the Interested Parties evidencing each Interested Party's knowledge and expertise in 
connection with cost evaluation of. studies, constructions, procurements, installation and delivery on a turn key basis of power 
stations of a large size and complexity generating thermoelectric power combusting, by preference, solid fuel of low calorific 
value (lignite), as well as any other details evidencing their ability to respond to the requirements of the Expert Opinion. 

• Information regarding any participation of each Interested Party or of its affiliates and/or associates In infrastructure projects in 
Greece and/or abroad, related to the energy sector (for procurement of material, as contractor, in preparation of studies . etc .). It 
is clarified that any existing or under negotiation contractual relations of an interested Party or its affiliates and/or associates, in 
projects (wherever executed} in which protects are involved third parties linked in any manner whatsoever with the Protect, may 
lead to the exclusion of such Interested Party, if the Advisor, acting at its absolute discretion, decides that said contractual relations 
are incompatible with the assignment of the Expert Opinion. 

• Reference to any relevant experience of each Interested Party and of its areas of expertise, evidencing its knowledge of the electric 
power market and particularly of the European one. 

• Any other information which in the opinion of each Interested Party, will assist In the evaluation of its International reputation and 
objectivity as an independent firm in order to meet satisfactorily the requirements of the Expert Opinion. 

The interested Parties are invited to submit to the Advisor details regarding their experience by specific reference to the nature and 
size ot the projects undertaken by them up todate. as well as to their role in connection with such projects and details of the clients 
on behalf of which they have acted, ft is clarified that the Advisor may ask for references as regards each Interested Party. 

The Interested Parties are kindly requested the text of their Expression of Interest which they wfil submit not to exceed fifteen (15) 
pages and to be submitted until September 22, 1997 and at 17:00 (local time), at the Advisor's offices at the following address: 

ETEBA 

12-14 Amalias Ave. 

102 36 Athens 

Attn: Mrs A. Boumi 

The Advisor will contact those Interested Parties which it considers as possessing the required qualifications for the provision of the 
Expert Opinion (hereinafter to be referred to as -the Selected Interested Parties*). Following completion of the preselection phase, 
the Advisor shall make available to the Selected Interested Parties additional information regarding the Project in order to enable 
them to bid. One of the most important criteria fbrthe evaluation of the bids and final selection of the successful bidder, is the element 
of the time required for the provision of the Expert Opinion. However, said time element must not affect the completeness and quality 
of the Expert Opinion. 

The Interested Parties are not entitled to any right claim or demand for compensation against Ihe Ministry of Development and/or the 
Advisor for any reason or cause whatsoever in connection with the present Invitation. 

The present was drafted In the Greek language and translated in English and in any event the Greek text prevails. The Interested 
Parties may contact exclusively the Advisor tor any relative information, as follows: 

ETEBA 

12 - 14 Amalias Ave. 

102 36 Athens 

Responsible: 

Mrs A. Boumi Mr. G. Coutsoudakis 

Tel.: 32 42 883 32 96 470 

Fax: 32 96 221 32 96 393 







































































































































pages 


inteknati 



AV.SEPTEMBHR 24^1997 


INTERNATIONAL HER-ALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 1997 


PAGE 19 


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PAGE 20 


^ IfrratoSSribuM 

Sports 


World Roundup 


■ Spaniard Victorious 
In Vueha’s 4 th Stage 

CYCLING A Spaniard, Heuterio 

; Anguita, won tbe fourth stag*; of die 

| Tour of Spain on Tuesday, with 
Fabrizio Guidi of Italy ta kin g the 
, leader's yellow jersey. 

Claudio Camin of Italy came m 
second, and Jan Svoraaa of the 
, Czech Republic finished in third 
place. 

Lars Michaelsea of Denmark, 
who had been in the lead since the 
i opening stage, tumbled with sev- 
eral other riders as they neared the 
finish line. Michaelsen finished 
with the same time as Guidi but had 
to give the jersey to him because of 
bonus seconds. 

Tuesday’s stage covered 193 ki- 
lometers (119 miles) from Huelva 
to Jerez de la Frontera. It was an- 
other flat stage dominated by the 
sprinters in a mass finish. Marcel 
Wost of Germany won the second 
and third stages on Sunday and 
Monday. 

Anguita, who reached the third 
position in the overall lead, sprinted 
in the final kilometer to pass Marco 
Zauotti Aan Viexhouten and 
Laurent JalaberL Anguita’s was the 
first stage victory for a Spaniard in 
this year’s race. 

On Wednesday, the tour is to 
cover the longest stage, a 229-ki- 
lometer path from Jerez de la 
Frontera to the southern coast city 
of Malaga, ( AP ) 

Fittipaldi to Have Surgery 

motor racing The auto racing 
champion Emerson Fittipaldi, who 
fractured his lower back in an ul- 
tralight plane crash in Brazil, was to 
travel to Florida to undergo sur- 
gery, his spokeswoman said Tues- 
day. 

The 50-year-old racer was 
scheduled to fly late Tuesday night 
on a commercial flight to Miami, 
where he was to check into Jackson 
Memorial Hospital, Kika Concheso 
said from Fittipaldi’s office in 
Miami 

Fittipaldi, one of Brazil’s most 
revered athletes and a two-time In- 
dianapolis 500 winner, fractured 
his back on Sunday when the small, 
ultralight plane he was piloting 
from his family's citrus farm 
plunged into a swamp in 
Araraquara, 350 kilometers north- 
west of Sao Paulo. 

• His 6-year-old son, Luca, the 
only other person in the plane, re- 
ceived minor scratches. 

A spokesman at Albert Einstein 
Hospital in Sao Paulo described 
Fittipaldi’s condition as “favorable 
and improving.” 

Wilson Fittipaldi, the racer’s fa- 
ther, told reporters that his son was 
in an “excellent mood, better than 
mine." (AP) 

Boeuf Favored for Mount 

horse racing The French 
jockey Dominique Boeuf looks set 
to be reunited with the Prix de 1* Arc 
de Triomphe winner Helissio when 
the colt bids for a repeat victory at 
Longchamp next month. 

Bruno Ridoux. the racing man- 
ager for the horse’s owner, Enrique 
Sarasola, said Tuesday: "We have 
yet to make a definite choice, but 
Dominique Boeuf is in pole po- 
sition at this point in tune. ' 
Another jockey. Cash As- 
mussen. Lost die mount on Monday 
after taking over earlier in the year 
from Olivier Pes Li er, who had other 
commitments. Boeuf rode Helissio 
in the early part of last season but 
. was replaced by Peslier after the 
French Derby when the horse 
placed only fifth. 

Boeuf was the French champion 
in 1991, but ran into trouble over 
drug-related offenses two years 
ago. He has fought his way back 
and is currently in third place in the 
French jockeys’ standings with 83 
winners. ( Reuters ) 


Truly ‘Open’ Tennis 

Grand Slam Events Are Up for Grabs 


By Christopher Clarey 

Special tv the Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — “I’ve just starred 
realizing it," Patrick Rafter was saying 
the morning after giving Australia its 
first Grand Slam singles victory in a 
decade. “And when I do actually think 
about it, it’s like this is crazy. I’ve won 
two tournaments, two tournaments in 
my life, and one of them is the U.S: 
Open. That stuff just doesn’t happen.” 

Sony, mate. It does. This is men's 
tennis on the eve of the 21 st century, and 
anybody who tells you he knows what is 
going to happen — except when Pete 
Sampras is gliding about on grass — is 
to be ignored. 

Think about Gustavo Kuerten, the 
improbably thin, improbably unflap- 
pable Brazilian who transformed Ro- 
land Garros into Carnival in June. Kuer- 
ten had never won a tournament on the 
main tour, but he won the French Open, 
beating nearly everybody who has been 
anybody on red clay in recent years. 

Think about Filip Dewulf, the BeJ- 
gian qualifier who reached the semi- 
finals of that same tournament. Think 
about MaliVai Washington, who 
reached the finals of Wimbledon last 
year, or Cedric Pioline, who reached the 
finals there this year. 

Think about it all, and you conclude 
that when Sampras is nor playing with a 
purpose, the Open era has never been 
more open. 

Consider this: Since open tennis 
began in 1968, there have been 18 un- 
seeded finalists in Grand Siam singles 
events, which averages to far less than 
one per year. This year alone there have 
been four unseeded finalists: Carlos 
Moya, who lost to Sampras at the Aus- 
tralian Open: Kuerten: Pioline, who lost 
to Sampras at Wimbledon; and Greg 
Rusedski, who lost to Rafter in four sets 
Sunday in the U.S. Open final. 

“It's getting like golf,’' said Patrice 
Clerc, the French Open tournament di- 
rector. "Ten or 15 years ago, when the 
best players started out in a Grand Slam, 
there were one or two men they were 
afraid to play. But without a tough draw, 
they basically could look ahead to the 
second week. Now, they all know they 
can lose in the first round." 

Even superstition seems to be suf- 
fering. Until the handsome, swashbuck- 
ling Rafter came along, holding serve 
and breaking young hearts, no 1 3th seed 
ever had won a Grand Slam singles title 
in the Open era. 

Of course, there are reasons for all 
this madcap egalitarianism, and some of 
them have to do with madcap capi- 
talism. 

“ There’s so much more money in the 
game,” said Rusedski's coach, Brian 
Teacher. "I think with the money, more 
kids want to play tennis. I mean we have 
probably 500 to 1.000 guys on the tour 
between the satellite players and every- 


body else. You have guys coming up 
from the satellites that beat guys on die 
regular tour fairly consistently. It's a 
revolving door now.*’ 

Increased prize money has had a 
trickle-down effect In the past, only the 
stars could afford to hire a full-time 
coach or physical trainer. Now, most 
members of the top 100 can give them- 
selves that edge, and successful training 
and conditioning techniques are quickly 
imitated. 

The ATP Tour, where most matches 
are best-of-three sets, has long been 
something of a spin of the roulette 
wheel. There were 47 different winners 
in 84 tournaments last year (up from 37 
in 89 tournaments in 1994). But the 
Slams, in which matches, are best-of- 
five, were always better at separating 
the wheat from die c haff . 

Not anymore, and the issue that 
Grand Slam officials are debating with 
increasing fervor is whether there is a 
better way to seed the wheat. Bill Bab- 
cock, chairman of the Grand Slam Com- 
mittee that administers the four majors, 
believes '‘all tournaments should seed 
independently" instead of following 
the computer rankings, which are based 
on players’ best 14 results over the last 
52 weeks, but do not necessarily reflea 
who plays best on different surfaces or 
who is playing best at a give moment. 
Wimbledon, one of the rare grass court 
events, already seeds independently, 
and the U.S. Open tried it last year. 

‘‘Seeding is going to have to go fur- 
ther up on the agenda,” said the U.S. 
Open toumamenr director. Jay Snyder. 
* ‘We obviously took a hard look at it last 
year and tried to base our settlings on 
some of these variables, and to be honest 
we proved -to be pretty accurate.” 

U.S. Oi 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTE MBER 10, 199? 

Chiefe Shock 

Raiders With : 

80 - Yard Drive! 
In Last Minute 


John Vaban^o/^paKr France- Prr«* 

Elvis Grbac of the Chiefs throwing a pass over the Raiders' Mike Morton. 


SKs Indians Keep On Rolling 


Last year's U.S. Open men’s semi- 
finalists were seeded first, second, 
fourth and sixth. The problem was that 
the USTA compromised die integrity of 
its draw by announcing the seedings 
after the bulk of the draw had been 
completed. This year, a chastened 
USTA followed the rankings scrupu- 
lously, and the rate of attrition soared. 

“I think they should -seed 32 play- 
ers," said Andre Agassi’s coach. Brad 
Gilbert, a former top 10 player. "That 
way they would eliminate some of the 
spots in the draw that end up being a 
little soft” 

"We’ve talked about that seriously,’ * 
Snyder said. “It seems to be the fair 
thing to do because these guys are play- 
ing all the time and there's not much 
difference between most of them.” 

Last week at Flushing Meadows, 
there was a difference between Rafter 
and the others. But with the current state 
of affairs in men’s tennis, die odds are 
good that when the Australian Open 
comes to a dose next January, some 
other young and very gifted player will 
be the one lying flat on his back in 
joyous disbelief. 


The Associated Press 

Omar Vizquel’s two-out single in the 
seventh drove in Pat Borders with the 
go-ahead run as the Cleveland Indians 
beat the Baltimore Orioles, 2-1, for their 
ninth victory in 11 games. 

Borders lined a one-out double off the 
wall in right field against Alan Mills (2- 
2) in Monday night’s game. 

Marquis Grissom struck out before 
Vizquel stroked a single that scored 

Baseball Roundup 

Borders easily, even though he 
stumbled around third. 

Paul Assenmacber (5-0) struck out 
Brady Anderson on three pitches with 
two on to end the seventh. He combined 
with Mike Jackson and Alvin Morman 
on a scoreless eighth. Jose Mesa pitched 
the ninth for his 1 3th save. 

Tigars 6, Rangers 2 Darmon Easley's 
two-run homer powered Willie Blair to 
his 16th victory as host Detroit handed 
Texas its fourth straight loss. 



Richie Ashbum Dies at 70 


IV ^pNNtalrd IW 

Richie Ashbum in 1955 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Richie Ashbum. 
the Hall of Fame center fielder for the 
Whiz Kids of 1950 and one of the 
Philadelphia Phillies' most popular 
players, died Tuesday of a heart attack, 
just hours after he broadcast a game for 
the team. He was 70 years old. 

Ashbum, a classic leadoff hitter who 
played for the Phillies from 1948 to 
1959, was a broadcaster for the team for 
the last 35 years and worked Monday 
nigbi’s Phillies-New York Mels game. 

Twice a National League batting 
champion. Ashbum finished his play- 
ing career with the Chicago Cubs and 
the Mets. He was elected to the Hall of 
Fame in 1995. 

For the generations unfamiliar with 
his performance on the field, Ashbum 
was beloved for his dry wit as the 
Phillies’ color man on television and 
radio. 

Ashbum was a 21 -year-old farm 
boy from Tilden, Nebraska, when he 
signed with the Phillies in 1948. He 
ended that first season with a .333 
batting average and Sporting News' 


Rookie of the Year tide. A line-drive 
hitter with good speed, Ashbum also 
showed great range in the outfield. He 
led National League outfielder; in 
putouts nine times, tying a major 
league record. 

He won batting titles in 1955 (.338) 
and 1958 (.350), finished second three 
times and batted over .300 nine times. 
He led the league in hits and triples 
three Limes and walks and runs scored 
four times. 

He played in six Ali-Sfar Gaines and 
one World Series, when the Phillies' 
Whiz Kids — so called because of 
their young ages — won the pennant in 
1950. He holds team records for con- 
secutive games (731) and singles 
(1,811). 

Because he played in an era when 
other great center fielders — Willie 
Mays, Duke Snider and Mickey 
Mantle — excelled, Ashbum was 
denied entry to the Hall of Fame until 
he was chosen by the veterans com- 
mittee in 1995. 

His broadcast career started when 
he retired after the 1 962 season. 


By TJ. Simers 

[m Angel rs Times Service 


OAKLAND, California — So much 
for the Oakland Raidas 7 return to glory. 
With oaly 58 seconds to go i m 



Ivan Rodriguez hit a two-run homer 
for the Rangers, who have dropped 14 of 
22 overall and are 10-3 in their last 13 
road games. 

Royals 9, Mariners 2 Ken Griffey Jr., 
1 1 homers from matching Roger Mar- 
is’s major league record of 61 in a 
season, failed to go deep as host Kansas 
City routed the Mariners. 

Griffey, who homered four times dur- 
ing a four-game series at Minnesota to 
become the 15th man to hit 50, reached 
base his first three plate appearances 
with a walk, a single and a hit-by-pitch. 

Blue jays 12, Angola 10 Joe Carter had 
five RBIs and scored die go-ahead run 
on Gary DiSarcina’s error in a four-run 
eighth as host Toronto beat Anaheim. 

Rich Delucia walked ibebases loaded 
with one out. and Carter followed with a 
two-mn single off Mike James (4-S). 
Carlos Delgado added a run-scoring 
single, and Carter was struck in die back 
by DiSarcina’s throw. 

TWin« 7, Athletics 2 Brent 8 rede went 
4-for-5 with his second career home run 
and Dan Serafim pitched a five-hitter 
for his first victory in the major leagues 
as Minnesota beat visiting Oakland. 

Serafini ( 1 -0). malting first start of the 
season after being recalled from Triple- 
A Salt Lake on Aug. 2, retired 17 con- 
secutive batters before giving up a two- 
out single in the ninth inning. 

Brewers 8, White Sox 5 Jeromy Burn- 
itz singled in the go-ahead run in the 
10th inning as visiting Milwaukee beat 
Chicago to remain 516 games behind 
first-place Cleveland in the AL Cen- 
tral. 

In the National League: 

c«bs s. Reds i Mark Clark became 
the first Cubs pitcher in six years to 
throw back-to-back complete games, 
pitching a three hitter againsr host Cin- 
cinnati. 

Phiiims 13, u«ts 4 Kevin Jordan 
capped a 15-pitch at- bar in the sixth 
inning with a pinch-hit two-run double, 
and Scott Rolen drove in three runs as 
Philadelphia routed host New York. 

Philadelphia’s third straight victory 
and seventh in eight games improved the 
Phillies to 33-22 since the All-Star break. 
Rolen reached base five times, scored 
four runs and hit his ISth homer. 

MarlimS, Dodgers 4 Moises Alou and 
Jeff Conine hit three-run shots and Flor- 
ida scored all its runs on homers as the 
Marlins beat host Los Angeles to avoid 
a four-game sweep. 


OO was ulv 

from moving 80 yards with no timeouts 
re maining - ’ 

But &e Chiefs would require only 55 
seconds, six plays and a final 33-yaip 
touchdown pass from quarterback Elyx? 
Grbac over a pair of flailing Raider 
defenders to Andre Risen to steal a 28- 
27 victory on Monday night. 

football!" Grbac said^Amire made a 
great move. I couldn’t believe the safety 
sat down on the play. Andre made -a 
second move and I was in shock. I just 
wanted to get the ball up as soon as I 
could.” 

Grbac, looking more- like Joe 
Montana than Steve Bono, had come 
from the San Francisco 49ers like his 
predecessors as part of the Chiefs’ off- 
season offensive makeover. Slow to 
start, the Chiefs could not find the end 
zone last week in a loss to Denver, but 
the Raiders were a more obliging Iol 

Meanwhile, the Raiders keep finding 
a way to lose. They stand 0-2 in the Joe 
Bugel coaching era, not a whole lot 
different than the Mike White, Mike 
S hanahan or Art Shell reign of mis- 
takes. 

Bugel, who should be experienced 
now at losing after going 20-44 as coach 
of the Arizona Cardinals, failed to ap- 
pear for a' postgame news conference. 
At the same time, die Raiders closed 
their locker room, and the players 
with die exception of comerback Albert 
Lewis — found a back door to escape 
any inquisition. 

The answers should not have been 
that elusive. Staked to a 27-13 lead, the 
Raidas simply collapsed under the di- 
rection of a new quarterback, Jeff 
George, just as most NFL students of 
George had predicted. ■ * 

Bothered by pressure, George threw a 
shovel pass up for grabs in the third 
quarter to avoid being , sacked and a 
Kansas City comerback, Darren Ad- 
derson, returned it 55 yards for a touch- 
down. 

Under fire once more, And clinging 
now to a 27-22 lead; George agaun 
ducked for cover in the fourth quaneh 
but not before throwing the ball to an- 
other Kansas City comerback, Dale 
Carter. The Raiders were forced to ptey 
on, fortunate to stave off ultimate hu- 
miliation for George in his Raider home 
debut because of Darrell Russell’s hero- 
ics. 

Russell shredded the Kansas City of- 
fensive line and sacked Grbac for a 12? 
yard loss on third down and a little more 
than five minutes to play. 

George had a reprieve and all he had 
to do was grind it out against the Chiefs, 
hug the ground and run out the clock. 
Just good old-fashioued Raiders' 
smash-mouth football. 

But with about a minute to play, the 
Raiders could nor close the deal. Forced 
to punt from the Kansas City 39-yard 
line, they could not pin the Chiefs deep 
and instead kicked the ball into the efid 
zone, bringing it out to the 20-yard 
line. 

On firsr down, Grbac went to Rison 
for 21 yards. All night long Oakland 
could not find anyone to cover Rison. 

Breaking from the huddle with only 
11 seconds to play. Rison took off run- 
ning for the end zone, leaving two de- 
fenders, Terry McDaniel and Eric Tinjn* 
er, behind, free to haul in Grbac ’s well- 
aimed pass. 1 

No longer did it matter that a former 
Raider, Marcus Allen, had frimbledlo 
set up a Kansas City score. No longer 
did it matter that George hnrf thrown a . 
pair of touchdown passes to tight end Jr 
Rickey Dudley or that Napoleon Kauf- - 
man had run 1 0 yards for another Raider 
score. 


$ 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


. Major League Standings 


Casanova. W— Blair 1&4. L— Win II -la 
HRs— Texas. I. Rodriguez 06). Detroit 
Easley (20). 

Bdfiawre 010 fiOO 000-1 6 0 

Onvekmd DM 001 10X— 2 10 0 

KomteflJcckL Mils |7X Dnsco (7). 
Te .Mathews (B) and Hoiles Hers Inset 
Asronmacher (71. M. Jackson (IQ, Mormcn 
(8}. Mesa (9) and Barters. W— Asscnmacher 
£-0. L— Mlfls 2-1 Sv-Mesc 113). 
HR — Baltimore. Bairns (15). 

Oakland 101 000 000-2 5 0 

Minnesota 210 310 60t— 7 IS I 

Teigftedet, KuMnskl (41, Mohter (7). A. 
Small (8) and Moflna; Serafim and □. Miller. 
W-Seraflni 1-0. L-Tetgheder 2-5. 
Hfa— Oakland. Spierio (12). Minnesota 
Brede (21. Statovtak (10). 

SMIM 10a 001 000—7 6 0 

Kansas aty 304 000 02k— 9 15 0 
Olivares, B. Wells (3), Spal|aftc 16), 
Chadian (7) and Da. Wilson; Pittefey, Haney 
(61, J. Montgomery (9) and Modarione. 
w— Ptttstey 4-7. L— G Eva res 6-1 a 

HRs— Kansas City, CDavts C*). JKng (22), 
R.DJAre»n). 

Anaheim 301 030 030-10 12 2 

Toronto 004 102 05k— 12 14 1 

DaJAay, P. Harris (4), Cadaret (6), 
DeLuda (8). James (81. Holtz (8), A. Chavez 
(8) and Kreuter, Eneamodan (SX- Person 
Daal (51. Ouantrill (71, Pteoe (8), Escobar 
(0) and B. Santiago. W— Ptosae 1-1 
L— James 4 5 S*— Escobar (12). 

HRs— Anaheim, Erstod 2 (161, Salmon (301. 
Milwaukee 010 004 000.3-8 14 3 

Chicago 201 001 100 0-5 7 2 

Kart, Fetters (6), Daws (7), WicJunan (8), 
DoJones (10) and Morteny. . Levts 19); 
Navarra. FouUte fcj, McEiray (9). Kaichner 
(101 and Machado, KareovK* (8). 

W— Wkkfmm 7-6. L— Karehiwr 3-1. 

Sv-OaJones (371. HRs— MHwwfcw, 

Js. Valentin (16), Clitlla (9). Chicago, F. 
Thomas 2 (33). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Chicago 000 00? (32-0 12 0 

CtadnaO 000 001 000-1 3 1 

• Wilt, Gunderson (7). Whiteside (7) and I. MXIortc and Setvqiy Tomlin, G. While (71. 
Rodriguec Bkrir, Brocail (SI, Mlcel' (?) and Sullivan (7). Fa.Rodriguei (81. Winchester (?) 



EAST DIVlStON 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Baltimore 

88 

53 

-624 

— 

New York 

30 

67 

-567 

8 

Boston 

69 

74 

.463 

20 

Detrail 

69 

74 

.483 

20 

Taranto 

69 

74 

483 

20 


CENTRAL DteBION 



Cfereland 

76 

63 

347 

— 

Milwaukee 

72 

70 

307 

S'h 

Chicago 

y> 

74 

383 

9 

Minnesota 

59 

83 

MS 

m 

Kansas Clly 

58 

83 

All 

19 


WEsramsioM 



Seattle 

79 

65 

.549 



Anaheim 

75 

69 

J21 

4 

Texas 

67 

77 

465 

12 

Oakland 

57 

87 

396 

22 


EAST DIVISION 




111 

L 

Pa. 

GB 

Atlanta 

8* 

54 

422 

_ 

Florida 

84 

58 

-592 

415 

New York 

77 

65 

■542 

list 

Montreal 

71 

71 

JXn 

179, 

PhikuMpNa 

57 

B3 

■407 

30V, 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Houston 

72 

71 

■503 

— 

Pittsburgh 

70 

74 

■486 

Vh 

fLLoute 

66 

77 

462 

6 

Cinctonatl 

64 

78 

451 

VS 

Ohcago 

60 

84 

.4)7 

12'A 

, 

WESTDMSION 



Am Angela 

81 

63 

J63 

— 

£an Francteai 79 

64 

■552 

I’4 

Colorado 

73 

71 

507 


3an Dtego 

67 

77 

465 

14 

MOMDAT’S UlZUCOHS 



AHEnCANUACUE 



/an 

009 

020 000—2 

S 2 

fietnitl 

320 

000 10k— 6 

1 0 


and J. Oliver. W— M. dark 12-7. L— Tomho 
104. HR— OndfinaH, N umwtfy (97. 
PtriknMpfcia ON 403 510-13 13 2 

New York 010 300 000-4 B 3 

Mi -Groce, Karp (6), SpndSn (7L Games 
(8). Ryan m and Lieberthal Estateflo IB); 
Isrfnghtnrsen. Kashhvada (61. Wended (7J, R_ 
Jordan (7), Acevedo (7), Cranford 18) and 
Hundley, Pratt (8). W-MiGrace 34). 
L— Isrntflhousen 2-1. HRs-Pftfladelpttii 
Rolen na.N.Y, Otenid (181, Hundley (30). 
Florida 401 000 003-0 9 2 

Las Angoios oei no diim ts o 
KJ .Brawn Coo* (8>, Powell (8), Men (?) 
and CL Johnson; Nemo, D-Reyes (51. HaiVey 
(6), Guthrie (9) and Piazza W— KL J .Brown 
134L L-Nomo 13-11. HRs-Florida 
SfteffjaM Oft Dmrfhrn (137, Coning (T4J, 
Alan (20). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
F Thomas CMV 128 406 TOO 166 356 
Justice Cte 119 419 77 141 337 
BeWIHaim NVY 111 437 93 145 332 
E Martinez Sea 141 402 96 163 331 
Ramirez <3* 130 479 86 ISB 330 

S Alomar Oe 111 408 SS 133 326 
WOartTex 110 393 » ■« 326 
Greer Tex 140 S36 9S 173 223 
CWhHBKVY 132 493 79 158 320 
M Vaughn Bos 123 456 85 145 318 
RUN5— Grifley Jr, Seattle. life 

Gaitidpaira, Boston, ill; Knabtoiidv 
Minnesota. 107; Jeter, New tork, ids 
BLHuntez. Detroit 100; F, Thomas, Chicago, 
lift Erstod. Anaheim 96; TaCtarit Detroit 
E. Martinez, Seattle. 96, 

R6 {—Griffey Jr, Seattle, 134 T. Martinet 
New York, 127; Salmon Anaheim, 116- P. 
Thomas. Chkagoi 114: JuGonzalez, Texas. 
llttT.oOart, Detroit ll»it>Ne«t New Ya ris. 
107. 

HITS— Garoaparra Boston, 187; Greer. 
Tews, 173; Jeter. New Yhrk. 169; Gflftey Jr, 
Seatfle. 167; JhVatenKn, Boston 166; I. 
Rodrifloet Tews. 166; FTfmmos, Oncsga. 
146. ^ 

DOUBLES— JhVafentln, Boston 44 

CiriBo, Milwaukee, 40, Cora Seattle. 39, Q. 


-Neat New York, 39; BeMe. CNcaga 3ft 
GareJopffrrn, Boston ARortrfgtfa. 

Seattle. 36. 

TRIPLES— Gardoparm Boston 1ft 
Knoli touch. Minnesota ft Damon Kamos 
City, 7i Met New York, 7; fi. (.Hunter, 
Detroit T. BumUz. Milwaukee, ft ABcea 
Anaheim. 7; ByAndenoa Baltimore, 7. 

HOME RUNS— GrWey Jr. Seattle, 5ft T. 
Martinet New York, 4); Thome, Oevekmft 
37; JuGonzalez, Texas, 34- McGwire, 
Oakland. 34 F. Thomas. Qncofla 31 
Buhner. Seattle: 33; R. Palmeiro. Baltimore, 
33. 

STOLEN BASES— 8. LHunter, Detroit «; 
Krubtoudv Minnesota. 5& Nbcon. Toronto. 
47; TGoodwIrt Tons. 44- Vizquet Cleveland, 
4ft Durham, Chicago, 31; A. Rodriguez, 
Seattle, 29. 

PITCHING 06 oeawmsl— ftaJohmon. 
ScatBe, 1 7-4 31 ft 23ft OcmeiH. Toronto. 21- 
5, JOB. 1 J5b- Moyer. Seattle. lS-4 789, 3.94 
Erickson, Baltimore. 16-5. .76Z 330; Blair, 
Detroit 1 6-4 .727, 3.9& Henhiscr. Cleveland. 
13-i .722, 442; PotHte New York 16-7, m. 
2.9a. 

STRIKEOUTS— RoJohnson Seatfle, 264 
□emens. Taronia 258; Cone. New Yorto 21S; 
Mussina BatHmore. 197; Fassera Seattle, 
169; Applet, Kon, City, 16ft CFWey, 
Anaheim, 155. 

SAVES-RoMycn. Baltimore. 41; M. 
Rivera New York# 4ft DoJones. Milwaukee, 
32; Wettetand, Tran 2ft TaJones. Detroit 
27; R. Hernandez. Chfcoga 77; Pcrchrot 
Anaheim 23 1 Aguilera Minnesota 23. 
NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS - 
G AB R H Avg. 
L Walker Cot 13B 512139 192 375 

GwynnSO 134 534 83 197 369 

Piazza LA 134 486 «l 174 358 

Lofton All 105 436 82 151 346 

Joyner SD 118 407 S3 138 3» 

AHhuoNYM 131 449 7J 146 325 

MaGraceOhC 134 495 7B 160 323 

Gdantwa Cal 137 53$ 106 170 318 

Bichette Col 134 509 71 158 315 

BtmfeHOU 143 561 125 174 310 

RUNS— L Walker. Comrade, 12ft Blggla 
Houston lZ5e Galairega Colorado, I06e 


Bonds, San Franctoav 102; ECYoung, Los 
Angeles. 9ft Bagweft Houston 9S ; Piazza, 
Las Angeles, 91. 

RBI — Galarraga Colorado, 126.- Bagwell 
Houston 116; l_ Walker. Colorado, 113.- 

Gwyna San Dfe^a 1 1ft Sosa, Oftoga 10ft 

Chjorws. Atlanta 10ft Kent San Francisco, 
107; Atou, Florida, 107. 

HITS— Gwyna San Diego. 197; L. Water. 
Cirhrada 192; Piazza Los Angdet 174 
Bigflto. Houston 174 Galarraga Colorado. 
170; Mondesi, Las Angeles, 16ft Ontora 
Cokrodai67. 

DOUBLES— Gradztetonefc Montreal 4ft 
Gwyna San Dtega 43; Lansing, Montreal 
42; L Worker, Colorado. 42; ChJones, Atianta 
3ft Mondesi Los Angetes, 37; Mora nd tot 
Phnadeiptea 37. 

TRIPLES — DeShields. St. Louts, 12, W. 
Guerrero, Los Angeles, ft Rondo. Pittsburgh, 
ft Womack, PtttsttJrgh, ft ECYoung, Las 
Angeles, ft DoiHJoa Florida ft 5 are lied with 
7. 

HOME RUNS— L. Water, Cotoroda 42- 
Casltna Cohradd IftBagwefl. Houston 3ft 
Galarraga Cotoredo, 3& Piazza Los Angeles. 
3ft Sosa, Chicago, 32 Bands. San Frandsca 
33. 

STOLEN BA5E&— D. Sanders. Cincinnati 
56; Womack. Pittsburgh, 51; 0- eShleids, St. 

Lmjls.zijEcYotmg, LnsAngeJen42filggki, 
Houston, 3ft O. Verm. San Dtega 31; L 
Walker, CoL 31. 

PITCHING 116 DedteonW—N eagle, 
Allan la JM 370. 242 Estes. San 
Frond sea 18-ft .818, 3U7! G. Moddux. 
Atlanta iu, .bis. 131; Kite, Houston 1 7-6, 
.739, 142 P. JMartlneL Montreal 16-7. Mi. 
1.7ft Judea Montreal n-5, 687- 432 Park, 
Los Angeles. 134.484.331. 

STRIKEOUTS— sehusna PhllaiMphla 
29ft P. J Marti net, Montreal 266; Smoltz. 
Atlanta 20ft Noma U» Angeles. 207; 
KJ Brown, Florida 189; M& Houston 184; 
AnBenes. Sl Louis. 175. 

SAVES— Beck. San Frandsca 3& 
JoFranca New York 35r T. o Women. Lm 
A ngela. 3* Hoffman Son Dlega 3ft Shaw. 
Cincinnati. 3ft- Eckmiey, SL Louis. 3ft- Non 
Florida 32 Wohler, Atlanta 32. 


Japanese Leagues 


<3HWU, UEAOUI 



w 

L 

T 

Pd. 

GB 

Yakut! 

68 

45 

2 

402 



YokahariMi 

62 

50 



■554 

5-5 

Hiroshima 

58 

S3 



423 

9.0 

Hanshln 

52 

63 

1 

-452 

170 

Yamton 

57 

64 

— 

MS 

17.5 

Chunfchl 

50 

67 

I 

■477 

30.0 

MOHCUAon 



W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Setbu 

tA 

46 

7 

-58* 



Orix 

58 

48 

3 

in 

5.0 

KJntetsu 

56 

58 

3 

■491 

HO 

Date! 

53 

60 

1 

469 

13JS 

Nippon Ham 

S3 

63 

1 

457 

15X1 

Lotte 

49 

60 

2 

450 

155 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yati/ir 7, Chumcfii 2 
Yomhrri 4 Yokohama 3 
Harehto & Hiroshima 3 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 
Sctbu 5. ttnlefeu 4 
LottCft Orb 1 
Dalai 7, Nippon Ham 3. 


Tour of Spain 


Looting ttiedngi In IbesCtoy'e ISOLS-km 
am eugatram HuoIvk 

1 , EleuterioAngulta Spain, Eslepgna 4hauia 

It minutes 38 seconds. 

2. CkrurfloCmida tidy. Brasdakrt 
ft Jan Svorada. Star., Mapei 

4. Maroi Zanam. Italy, aki 
4 Mirta Rossofa ftoly. Safgna 
ft A art Vtertwu lea Neth, Rabobank . 

7, Gnntuca GortnL Italy. AKI 
ft Laurent Jntobcrt France. ONCE 
9, Ortarxta Rnftigue* Portuqat Bancsto 
MX Federico Cotorma Holy. Asks, an s.r. 

ovsmalu l, Fabrizio Guidi Holy, Scrig- 
no-Gacfira 18 hours 29 minute. 1 2 seconds. 


Z Lots MKbaetsoa Denmark, TVAft some 
Ihms ft Eteutcrio Anguflo, S seconds boton* 
4. Claudo ChiapuccL Italy, Asics-CGA ft ft 
Laurent Jalabert, Franca ONCE, II. ft An- 
gelo Canzonim. Italy, Saeca, II; 7. Maura 
Baltin Italy, Refin-MoUlvetta 11 ft Fran- 
cisco Cereza Spain. Estepano-Tosart 14. 9, 
Claus Motor, Denmark, Estepano-Toscol 1ft 
10, Santiago Batera Colombia, Kelme-Costa 
BkUKO, 14 


SOCCER 


WMttRUTHVIHON 

Valencia ft Barcelona 3 
sTAMHNGSs Barcelona ft AKetSca Madrid 

ft Compostela 4. Oviedo ft Rea! Bette ft Es- 
prmyol ft Real Madrid ft Tenerife ft Cotta 
Vigo ft Mallorca 4; Racing Santander ft Real 
Sodedad 3i Departhn Coruna Z Zaragoza 1, 
Merida l. Athletic Biboo 1,- Salamanoo ft 
Valencia ft Sparling Gl)wi ft VaUadaSd ft 
WffM WU T Dt V m oa 
MW MaoslricM 0 N AC Bredp ? 
•TKN0IM09; Ala* Amsterdam 9, Fc^m- 
ord 9, Hcerenvecn 9j PSV Eindhoven 7 . 
Twento Enschede 7; Rada JC Kertuode 
ftNEC NiifflWieflftGrwiirtSerrft Graafschap 
Docflnchemft RKCWodwfVft nac Breda ft 
yneue Arnhem ft- utredti 3; Votendom l 
TObumaww 

Moa**rKhfftFortuna5ttfcBd0.wr 


American league 

-Signed OK jiretm Crisafufli 
to mtoor-feague cantarf. Named swJS 
ncy area scovi. K ^ 

BETSoiT — Evtcnoed cuntrad of ***, 
Smith, gen. manager, toraugh 2001 season. 


MILWAUKEE -Adtotsted RHP Bn 
from 15-day disabled tist 
OAKLAKD -Activated RHP Dave 
er ham 60-day disabled Gst. 
sea me —Agreed terms with L) 

Andetna Traded INF Brian Raaba 

tes ter RHP Dannte Schmidt 
TEXAS —Activated LHP Eric & 
from 15-day disabled fat 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

~ s,xm 9d RHP Tod 
from Mobile, SL, 

■ASKtenUUJL 

NATXMAL BASKETBALL ASSOC 
oK toGai “^Bil 
CKARLDTTE -Pnjmated Bob Ba 
vice president and signed hi 

'f** i « n * F Meat Bun 
^HDWNA-Signed FMarkttestani 

OSLO n do — signed F^ Hm Kemp 

V^ronSS: M5nedGJ ^ Hon » e 

FOOTBALL 

"ATIOIIAL FOOTBALL LEAGt 
DE Brent & 

sXSStSiS DT 

ro 1 -year contract Waived G Donald 
mhwabcbco - waived (JBAWk 

moot 

NAT16HAL HOCKEY LEACUf 

C. , SSS l,nMOBolB “s , «» 

*> tern* *m,D 

estov Fetisov onl-ywr contract 

ansgles -Agn^d towwmo 
Tommy Sato im 1 te ram 

’WS^setS “ 


l 





PAGE 3' 



INTERNVTI 




1 ijo IW SEPTEMBER 24. 1997 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10, 1997 


PAGE 2* 


„„ tell HijncVApacG Fnme-Pinne 

PUNCHING FOR PARKINSONS — Former boxing champion 
•i | Mu ham mad AE showing his form as his wife, Lonnie, watches at a 
- conference on Parkinson’s disease in Chicago. All suffers from the malady. 


SPORTS 


Jordan Eager for Next Challenge: Sportswear 


By Mike Wise 

New York Times Sen icr 


NEW YORK — Michael Ionian 
spent part of his summer vacation in 
Maui being thrashed by large waves. He 
did not have a $33 million contract at the 
time and. even now, he laughs at the 
wisdom of his decision to body surf for 
the first time. But the ocean was in- 
viting, his children were urging him on 
and, always paramount with Ionian, a 
challenge was calling. 

“I was scared to death, but I was out 
there,'’ he said Monday. “That’s the 
highlight of the summer for me. People 
know how fearful I am of water. But 
there I was. No life jacket or nothing." 

He paused and added, “I could still 
stand up, though." 

Jordan was sitting in the suite of a 
Manhattan hotel. Realizing that he can 
conquer the basketball universe for only 
so long, he was in New York promoting 
a new clothing and shoe line — the 
Michael Jordan line. 

It still falls under the Nike umbrella, 
but the shoes are uniquely Jordan. He 
helped design them, and they feature the 
jump-man logo, Jordan’s famous 
spread-eagle insignia. 

Like everything surrounding his like- 
ness today, it is commercially huge. 
Stars like Eddie Jones and Vin Baker, 
who could have their own sneaker line. 


am wealing and endorsing Jordan’s. 

“It’s a part of me, it’s a pan of the 
creative personality I have," Jordan 
said. "When I walk away from the 
game, this is my means of staying in 
tune with the game. Not coaching, not 
commentary. Those are things that I 
chose not to do, and I don’t want to do. 
But these are things I enjoy doing.” 

Jordon hawking sneakers does not 
have the same appeal as Jordan taking 
flight toward the basket But here be is, 
at 34, with one foot in the United Center 
and another in a corporate boardroom, 
letting all tbe suits in on his vision for the 
company. In fact, a commercial is due 
out soon featuring Jordan leaving a game 
at halftime to attend to CEO duties. 

Ir hardly seems real, Jordan preparing 
for life after basketball. 

“I really don’t know how long I’m 
going to play,” he said. ‘Tcouldn’rgive 
you a concrete time frame or whatever. I 
like to think that each and every year we 
keep winning championships and 1 keep 
playing. 

“Knowing at some point and time 
that management is going to change 
direction and I don’t fee] it's favorable 
in my direction, then I won't have a 
problem walking away.” 

He is reminded of the opinion that be 
is too competitive to stop playing, that 
he will play far beyond his prime and 
camper with his legend 


“1 can give it up if I lell myself that’s 
it," he said. “I’m not afraid id walk 
away. Some people think i am. That's 
someone's perception of me who 
doesn’t know me. I never think about 
the negative. I think about what’s hap- 
pening now. I’m still playing. 

"We still got a chance to win a cham- 
pionship. That’s how I look at it.” 

Along those lines, Jordan tried to stay 
away from the business of basketball as 
much as possible this summer. 

“1 got away from the game, I got 
away from the city a little bit, I got more 
into things like this,’ ' he said, surveying 
his own line of sneakers in front of him. 
“2 did a lot of basketball camps this 
summer, staying in tune with tbe kids 
who love the game. I think that's fun.” 

He also played a lot of golf and 
worked at a 35-and-older fantasy camp 
in Las Vegas, taking one day off to hash 
out tbe details of the one-year, 533 
million contract offered by the Chicago 
Bulls' chairman, Jerry Reinsdorf — the 
richest one-year salary in team sports 
history. 

Aside from that deal, Jordan said he 
did not think about the inner working of 
the Bulls very much. He knew the de- 
tails would be taken care of eventually. 

“I detached myself for a while, did 
things that I felt were important,” he 
said. 

Establishing a balance between being 


the world's greatest basketball player as 
well as a purveyor of cologne, footwear, 
briefs and motion pictures has been j& 
chore at times. 

“As you look at my career, those 
things haven't defined Michael 
Jordan,” be said. “Michael Jordan's 
basketball skills defined him. Thar’s the 
danger that these kids have today. A lot 
of these tilings have been given to 
them. ; 

“If they don’t use the tools to justify 
the things that have been given to them; 
then that can be very dangerous for fee 
game of basketball. ' ’ 

Finally, he again spoke of retirement^ 
of an adjustment period he is no longer 
afraid to confront. ! 

“Actually, I’m looking forward to it 
because the way people have made it a 
challenge for me, ’ he said. 1 

Without realizing it, Jordan some* 
times speaks about bis basketball career 
in the past tense. But then he issues a 
declaration to his friend Patrick Ewing; 
the close-bur-no-cigar Knicks, Charles 
Barkley and every other contender. 

“You had your opportunity to win 
when I was out of the game,”' Jordan 
said, referring to his brief run at pro^ 
fessional baseball a few years back. • 
“The next opportunity is when J 
leave fee game. I don’t see Patrick win- 
ning. 1 don’t see Charles winning. I 
don ’t see anybody winning but us. ” ! 


Back to Work for England (In Soccer, That Is) 


> 


:c;± 
£T:i$ 
'-nzs\ 

»fc 
Hoc 

i-.i . 




International Herald Tribune 

T HE STIFF upper lip has trembled, 
and fee English haven’t finished 
yet. On Wednesday. England's 
soccer team plays a World Cup qual- 
ifying match against Moldova in Lon- 
don. Some people think it a match too 
soon, as if the players risk trampling 
over fee flowers. 

.. It is the nation's first major sporting 
exercise since their Princess died, and 
the Football Association is uncertain 
how to play things. 

' The rest of Britain is back at work 
after the most extraordinary outpouring 
4>f emotion in peacetime. But although 
. soccer was not on this remarkable 
young woman's list of causes (rugger 
. was more Diana's type), fee sport asks 
aloud: How shall we honor her? 

Each England player has pledged his 
$3,500 match fee to the memorial fund; 
!#rops in fee ocean of an already gar- 
gantuan sea of sentiment - 
. Each player will wear a black ribbon 
sewn onto the breast of his team shirt 
And England expects Moldova to do the 
same. 

One thing will be conventional' Eng- 
land’s finest will try to run tbe op- 
position off its feet They seek triumph 
3n memory of her, they seek to nft 
national morale; and fee points are im- 
portant too. 

. But have they got it right? The FA. 
frets over fee; dung Great Britain is 
‘noted for — pomp, circumstance and 
ceremony. 

" Should the team gallop onto the field 
accompanied by the strident chimes of 
“Football's Coining Home,” fee eu- 
phoric ditty that smothered fee 1996 
European Championships? 

Or should it be Elton John’s rewritten 
homage, “Candle in tbe Wind?” 

Tony Banks, the new sports minister ■ 
of New Labour, has spoken before any- 
one paused to think. He wants the 
77.000 spectators each to light up a 
^candle to make Wembley Stadium glow 
"as never before. 


International Soccer/M . OB HUGHES 


Somewhere, amid all this, there is the 
purpose of a sporting contest set in the 
climate not just of a nation trying to End 
its feet, but of soccer realm in which 
England is trying to reach a World Cup 
for fee first time since 1990. 

Somehow, we have to remember that 
lighted matches in so many thousands of 
hands, in an old arena earmarked for a 
$320 milli on renovation, may not be 
appropriate, whatever the imagery at 
play. 

The latest thinking at Lancaster gate, 
fee august F.A, headquarters-, is that 
flags will be at half mast and fee game 


England's finest will try 
to run the opposition off 
its feet. They seek 
triumph in memory of 
Diana; they seek to lift 
national morale; and the 
points are important too. 


will commence after God Save fee 
Queen. Elton John has had to decline a 
personal appearance due to prior en- 
gagement, but he might be heaid at half 
time. That way, fee players will be 
downstairs in fee dressing rooms, not 
open to fee emotive effects of remem- 
brance. 

One begins to Think that footballers 
might be tbe very creatures to whom fee 
Princess of Wales would have related. 
They depend on the spotlight, as she did; 
they appear vulnerable, as sbe did and as 
fee whole nation does in fee shock of her 
passing. 

David Seaman, for example, is re- 
garded as possessing tbe safest hands, 
fee most dependable temperament in' 
English sport. He is fee goalkeeper who 


stood, sometimes alone, for England in 
Euro 96. 

He is to captain the team on Wednes- 
day, becoming fee fifth goalkeeper in 
100 years to do so, partly because other 
captains of England are injured or sus- 
pended, partly because fee nation needs 
right now an upright citizen of unques- 
tioned propriety. 

Seaman joined the mammoth queues 
in London last Friday to sign the book of 
condolence. He felt fee strangeness of 
fee hour, was moved by fee fact that 
people recognized him, but did not 
come up to talk about a mere thing like 
sport 

He has a message of calmness to his 
team mates. “Once fee- National An- 
them has been played, it will be back to 
work for us,” says fee skipper. “We 
will show our respect, but we’ve got a 
serious job to do. 

A serious job. No joy in the prospect. 
No arrogance in the expectation of con- 
quering Moldova, a small, emerging 
nation already beaten 3-0 by England on 
its home soil No sense of perspective or 
thought that this IS only a game. 

A ND OF COURSE h is not Qual- 
ifying for a World Cup is big 
business, and Moldova, al- 
though it has not won a match in fee 
qualifying round, comes dutifully to 
defy England in its castle. 

There has been talk that Moldovans 
— many of whom struggle through 
harsh winters just to subsist — can be so 
emotionally overcome feat their knees 
buckle. Ion Caras, the Moldovan coach, 
catches fee mood of England when he 
says: “The whole world regretted and 
bereaved tbe loss of Diana. We express 
our shock and sense of grief, too, but we 
come to play as honorably as we can.” 

He looked, as some of us feel feat the 
time and fee place for public spectacle 
has come and gone. Wednesday is a 


matter of sport, a soccer match that 
would have been of no consequence to 
Diana. 

But England expects. It expects to go, 
forward without too much trouble.' 
Glenn Hoddle, fee national team coach, 
even contemplates weakening his team 
to prepare for another day. Senior play- 
ers such as Alan Shearer, Tony Adams, 
Teddy Sheringham and Paul Ince are 
absent, yet Hoddle may play safe and 
omit Manchester United’s creative 
spark, David Beckham. 

Tbe reason? Beckham is fit and well, 
but he has a yellow card against him and 
fee coach, rather than risk him getting a 
second yellow and a suspension, will 
save him for the vital and more exacting 
match against Italy in Rome next 
month. 

Sparing nothing, and holding nothing 
back, ought to be Germany. Its habit of 
doing just enough until fee chips are 
down resulted in another drawn game, 
in Berlin against Portugal last weekend, 
which means fee Gennans must now 
win in Dortmund against Armenia and 
later against Albania to qualify. 

Jurgen Klinsmann, Germany’s cap- 
tain and once talisman, is desperate to 
score. More than eight games have gone 
wifeour him hitting a goal, a' record 
formerly held by Kari-Heinz Rum- 
menigge. 

Coach Berti Vogts, faithful as an old 
sheep dog, keeps picking him, and 
Klinsmann thinks, as goal scorers do, 
that all that is missing is a change of 
fortune. It is his 100th cap. He has to add 
to his 41 goals or else Germany will 
have to look co another figure, fee 33 
years on his calendar. 

For Klinsmann is a player dependent 
on physical brilliance, on effort and 
timing and sharpness. If those attributes 
have left him, he has had a marvelous 
century, but time is pressing. Score or 
go is the cruel, bat not killing, message 
of sport. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London . 


FIFA’s Balancing Act 

Association Jfkighs Palestinian Membership 


By Alex Johnson 

Washi ngton Post Service 

Regardless of what else you may 
think about FIFA, you can’t say it 
ducks controversy. 

Last week, the world organizing 
body of soccer decided to step knee- 
deep into fee Israeli-Palestinian peace 
process, announcing that it was con- 
sidering fee Palestinian Authority’s 
application for membership. 

Meeting in Cairo before the start of 
the under- 17 world championships, 
FIFA announced that it would send a 
delegation to inspect stadiums, infra- 
strnctnre and organization. Setting 
aside the obvious diplomatic ques- 
tions involved, FIFA has squarely put 
itself in a spot where it will have to 
move very carefully, because its even- 
tual decision will have ramifications 
well beyond the sporting field. 

The difficulty for FIFA is that its 
admission of the Palestinians, which 
is considered likely, would set a pre- 
cedent that could cause difficulties for 
years. Wife a few notable exceptions 

— the expulsion of South Africa in 
the 1970s being tire most prominent 

— FIFA has sidestepped world pol- 
itics over fee decades; for example, it 
chose to recognize Lithuania, Latvia 
and Estonia as separate federations 
throughout the Cold War in spite of 
arguments that they were merely So- 
viet puppet repnblics. 

But fee Palestinian Authority rep- 
resents a political movement rather 
than a formally recognized country. 
Some in Cairo for fee meetings fear 
drat by admitting fee Palestinians, 
FIFA would implicitly be recogniz- 
ing Yasser Arafat’s administration as 
a formal government of Palestine, a 
move they say would bring non-na- 


tional organizations of all stripes to 
FIFA seeking recognition. 

A clue to bow FIFA sorts 
everything out may be found in its 
deliberations over Hong Kong. The 
reversion of fee farmer British colony 
to Chinese rule leaves fee Hong Kong 
federation in limbo, since China 
maintains rhar adminis t rativ ely at 
least, Hong Kong is a province sub- 
ject to decision-making from Beijing. 
Accordingly, FIFA officials said last 
week that they planned to conduct a 
formal review of Hong Kong’s con- 
tinued eligibility for independent 
membership. 

The guess here is that FIFA will 
play a delicate political balancing act, 
revoking Hong Kong's independent 
status while recognizing that of the 
Palestinian Authority's. For one 
thing, FIFA is eager to expand its 
influence in fee huge Chinese market, 
where fee game is talcing off. 

At the same time, rejecting the Pal- 
estinians' application while continu- 
ing' to accommodate Israel's mem- 
bership would seriously antagonize 
Middle East federations that FIFA 
also wants to keep on its good side. 

Snch a move would jeopardize fee 
diplomatic gains FIFA has made by 
bucking fee international community 
to reintegrate nations like Iran and 
Iraq, which have returned to full par- 
ticipation in FIFA-sanctioned com- 
petitions. There is opposition to fee 
idea within FIFA, where some of- 
ficials do not want to get into fee 
business of deciding what is and is not 
a real country. 

The question is an important one, 
perhaps more vital than FIFA may 
itself recognize. Everyone involved 
knows feat taking on this issue means 
diplomatic toes will be stepped on. 


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OBSERVER 

j Stoles of the Game 

L. fl y fa sten Balc*^ . ball several dozen men of ab- 

“ — — normally great weight, so 

YX/ASHINGTOn' ' e. aeaviiy masked and armored 

:W Boxes, 11111 Wy look, inhuman, 

I^rteasjhjmA^ .* v " . SInj ggle to advance an oddly 
' °fca paia^Q i r , I y n ^ P nce shaped, air-filled ball along a 
poratiou folk arwt SS®',. 0 ®" grass fieId < or sometimes a 
°^K;? S - 0W ' plastic rug. The game must be 
chambers with ?FY ai * played within one hour and 

“«"% ®kfi s three hours to 
Wa ilcaroetin^iiif d '^u“ K> " ^nish. It is customarily wonin 
televS^f ^ vSf J he two minutes (which 

inn plaved & hist 20 minutes J, when a play- 

t ^ w ““*« w unbelievably 

«ena, anSwL 2« ciacular last-second catch. 

cj0s ' ^ most imponant plavers 
SKdaSE? shuT °, ut 316 «“* **» " quarterback" 
blinds rhSf‘ By ^wtng the and the "unbelievably spec- 

pWhl^ #**» Iacular JasMeconcl catcher. " 

Go Fish without .America’s Other Game: If 

S Sdv?!Si OUSpaUp,frS yousee 10 incredibly tall men, 

w. women, in baggy union 
neny Crocker Stadium: suits, racing hither and von on 
cor Porations, always a hardwood floor and thiow- 
2™J “ ^nising advan- ing a big round air-filled ball at 
jage, now pay the Masters of a hoop every- 20 seconds, you 
oporthuge sums of money for are witnessing basketball 'Put 
me right to put their company the ball through ihe hoop more 
names on the sports-industry often than the other team and 
£r This brings diem you win. 

F®® .Tv plugs galore as The National Pastime: 
Broadcasters repeat that they Whiskery men throw balls 
are coming to you from the hard as rocks right at you. as 
rrogresso Soup Bowl, state- hard as they can. Instead of 
ot-tne-arr Desenex Arena, the running for your life, you are 
Mueller Macaroni Sports supposed to hit them with a 
'•onxm, etc. small rounded piece of wood. 

Masters of Sport: So deep Most people usually miss, 
is the sports fan's devotion to Men think a lot and scratch 
teams bearing the name of his themselves. Gray beards walk 
place of residence that owners onto the field, stand around, 
of these teams are able to think, then walk off. 
gouge the poor dolts, and The clock stands still. Sky- 
even people who hate sports, box plutocrats, behind drawn 
for millions. By threatening blinds, are playing Chinese 
to move, say, the beloved old checkers for excitement. Beer 
Toledo Wet Hens football is being bought for S3 .50 a 
team to Medicine Hat. which bottle, hot dogs for S4 an 
is promising to build him a ounce. A Master of Sport is 
new $500 million stadium — telling the mayor he will 
with sky boxes! — the owner move” the team to Natchez un- 
may persuade Toledo to build less the town comes across 
him a new S60O million sia- with some real scratch. The 
dium. Imagine dozens of such players are earning an aver- 
people putting on the squeeze age salary of S 1 million. The 
all across the continent. They night is rich with the sound of 
are Masters of Sport. money. 

America's Game: In foor- Srv York Times Sen ne 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1997 


Voices From a Dark Past: A Hungarian Epic 


By Jane Perlez 

Sew York Times Service ^ 

B UDAPEST — More than a decade after his epic novel 
appeared in his native Hungary and six years after it 
dazzled Germany's reviewers, Peter Nadas’s "Book of 
Memories" arrived in the United Stares this summer to the 
kind of acclaim usually reserved for big names. His work has 
evoked comparisons- to the poetic traditions of Thomas 
Mann, the sexual explicitness of Jean Genet and the stream- 
of-consciousness of James Joyce. 

Of far more satisfaction to the 54-year-old Nadas, who is 
as precise in person as he is supple in prose, was die admiring 
note from Susan Sontag. "She said she was reading it foe a 
second time," he said in the sun-filled writing room of his 
handsome apartment overlooking the Danube in the old 
quarter of Budapest. 

Since communism evaporated in Central Europe, there has 
been a long wait for a splashy new work, something that would 
sear the imagination now that the Iron Curtain is down. 

For many critics, Nadas’s novel seems to fill the void. 
Though written between 1973 and 1985, during some of the 
darkest years after the failed 1 956 uprising, when all hope for 
liberty was extinguished, **A Book of Memories" finally 
brings to the English-speaking world one of the most im- 
portant Central European writers. 

The book took a while to surface because of a tenured 
publishing history in New York City, where it was sold ro 


Pantheon in 1986 and after several twists and rums ended up 
at Farrar, Straus & Giroux. There it was finally given a well- 
received translation, by Ivan Sanders with Imre Goldstein. 

The novel is not easy. Nadas approves of Soniag's ap- 
proach because, he said with a twinkle, through an interpreter, 
"you either read it in a night or you read it twice." 

The most accessible strand of the novel's labyrinthine 
story' is the voice of a young Hungarian writer as he struggles 
against Stalinism and, as a schoolboy, participates in the 
1956 street demonstrations. He moves on to East Berlin in 
the early '70s and a love triangle involving himself, an older 
actress and her younger lover. 

A second voice is that of a ficrive alter ego of the first, a 
writer in tum-of-foe-century Germany. A third is that of a 
boyhood friend who meets the writer in Moscow when they 
are adults. 

The novel’s maxim, from John 2:21 in the New Testament 
— "But he spoke of the temple of his body" — gives an early 
clue to the intense sensual and erotic writing to come. One 
reviewer, the author Thomas McGonigie, commenting on the 
book’s sexuality, wrote in The Washington Post that "never 
has instinctive male power been so honestly disturbing." 

1 ‘There is nothing that is not connected somehow with my 
biography," Nadas said of the novel. "Bur imagination 
changes things in such a way that it is not biography but 
rather a biographical sense." 

Like the main narrator, Nadas ’s father was a hard-line 
Communist. But unlike the narrator’s father, who is a state 
prosecutor. Nadas 's father was a boss in the telephone 
system, dealing with wiretaps, among other things. 



Nadas’s own rebellion against Central 
. and sprang, in common with many «> a t home. 

European Jewish intellectuals, Crpm what he sa ^ ^ 
"Communist parents were involved a it was 

justices that they couldn r explain ro tbenr cmi f 
natural their children would fall out wtfoi for their 

At school, he said, the amount 
lunches was calculated aeconimg to b f™r^ u c^v 
earned. “I was always embarrassed by Jf .Ser’s 
parents earned.” He was outraged, he said, y, . Com- 
coming home from work and telling how pnvti S 

» * a 

writer. He dropped out of high school took a 
course and then got a job on a magazine taking p 

and actions. Unlike George Konrad, a well-kno Ji 
garian novelist who became one of the high-pronie ois 
sidents, Nadas retreated to the countryside 
For a while, be existed m a kind of a shadow society, 
where, he said, he subsisted on beans brought to tore oy 
peasant women. Magda Sal acton, a journalist 11 
senior, whom he later married, visited him from Budapest at 
weekends. But in that extreme isolation, he said, ne rouno 

enough space to write. . t 

"I was well aware that this small space I had — wnai 


Mi ff-flixJt'TI'" Wk Tim 

Peter Nadas, author of “ A Book of Memories.' * 

In 1958, his father, personally and politically defeated, 
committed suicide by shooting himself on the bank of the 
Danube just outside the .family apartment. The narrator’s 
father commits suicide, too, one of only two situations in the 
book described precisely from real life. Nadas said. (The 
other, he added, will remain a secret.) 

But some passages ring so eerily true that it is hard to 
believe they were not taken straight from real life: the drama 
of the narrator and his pal rummaging through his father’s 
papers in the early 1950s. looking for incriminating doc- 
uments: the sexual taunts of schoolchildren in a Budapest 
playground, girls against girls and boys against boys; the 
narrator’s grandmother, a remnant of die Hungarian upper 
class, dealing with the communist household in which she 
was forced to be a tenant. 

In real life, Nadas’s parents were Jewish and poor, though 
his father had a well-io-do pedigree. They survived the Nazi 
occupation of Hungary in the cellar of his grandfather's 
chemical workshop, where they printed forged papers for the 
Communist Party. 


express waai i was willing, hiajui, u. 

"You have to be very egotistical to keep up that space, inert 

was no sense of community anymore: -it was only wnar on 
person could do for himself.’* ^ 

He remained a member of the writers' union and leapeo at 
a theater scholarship offered for East Berlin in 19/1. 
"Nobody else was interested,” he said. "For me German 
literature was so important I thought it would do just ™e. 

When he started "A Book of Memories,’ * in 1973. Nadas 
was in a virtual no-man's-Iaad. Though a collection of short 
stories had been published in 1967, his first novel. The End 
of a Family Affair,*’ was submitted to the censors m 1972 
and sai there in limbo for five years. It will appear in English 
next year. . . , , . 

By 1986, “A Book of Memories" sailed through the 
Hungarian censors. 

The censors and the Hungarian reviewers chose to ignore 
the mix of eroticism and politics, the subject of the book rhai 
is closest to him. He was disappointed.- too, he said, that of 
the many rave reviews in the United States and Britain this 
summer, only one, in a British newspaper. The Independent, 
appreciated this major thread. 

The eroticism of * ‘A Book of Memories' ’ was one of the 
reasons, along with stylistic echoes of Thomas Mann, that 
the novel was such a success in Germany, he said. 

For German readers, the eroticism represented a welcome 
counterpoint. "German literature is a very clever literature, 
but in it, humans don't exist from the chest down,' ' he said. 


PEOPLE 




.Frol PT>«nerRev«T. 

GAME TIME — Sean Penn, left, Deborah Kara Unger and Michael 
Douglas at the Hollywood premiere of their new film, “The Game.” 


, ; , i. , 
r-t-'J, 


r pHE memoirs of Sir Georg Solti will 
X be published next month on what 
would have been the conductor’s 85th 
birthday. Alfred A. Knopf, the pub- 
lishing house, said Solti’s "Memoirs" 
was completed shortly before he died in 
his sleep Friday while on vacation in the 
south of France. Solti, bom in Hungary 
and considered one of the 20th century' s 
greatest conductors, writes about his 
encounters with Bela Bartok, Richard 
Strauss, Arturo Toscanini and Pla- 
cido Domingo. He also evokes the art of 
conducting, including his interpreta- 
tions of Wagner's "Ring" cycle, op- 
eras by Mozart and Verdi and sym- 
phonies by Mahler and Bruckner. The 
publication date is Oct. 21. 


Larry King is doing fine at New 
York Hospital in Manhatran after an- 
gioplasty to unclog two coronary ves- 
sels. "His physicians say he is in ex- 
cellent condition." a spokeswoman for 
the CNN talk-show host said. The pro- 
cedure came three days after King. 63, 
wed the singer Shawn Southwick, 37, 


in a Los Angeles hospital room. Some 
20 relatives and friends attended the 
nuptials. After the marriage, the new- 
ly-weds flew to New York on a Medevac 
plane, where King checked into the hos- 
pital and his bride into a hotel. An L. A. 
party and a Paris honeymoon have been 
rescheduled for late October. 


Following in the footsteps of Jimmy 
Carter, Nelson Mandela and Corazon 
Aquino, Vaclav Havel is receiving the 
J. William Fulbrighr Prize for Inter- 
national Understanding. The Czech 
president picks up the $50,000 prize 
Oct. 3 in Washington in a. State De- 
partment ceremony, in recognition of 
"having promoted liberty and human 
dignity worldwide and ushering in de- 
mocracy in the Czech Republic." 


Gianni Versace's family and friends 
have commemorated the slain designer 
in a strictly private gathering at foe 
Metropolitan Museum of Art in New 
York. The police turned away reporters 


and photographers as hundreds of 
guests arrived for the event, entering the 
building via an awning that stretched 
from the street to the museum entrance. 
An exhibit of clothing by foe Italian 
designer, who was shot to death in 
Miami Beach on July 15, will be dis- 
played at the Metropolitan's Costume 
Institute beginning Dec. 11. 


Chiara Mastroianni says that a film 
on her father’s life by his long-term 
companion is biased and inaccurate. The 
daughter of Marcello Mastroianni and 
Catherine Deneuve told the French 
daily Liberation that Anna Maria 
Tato’s film-souvenir skipped "whole 
sections of his life, notably about my 
mother, my sister, his wife Flora and 
myself, which I find a bit mean.” The 
film was shown last month at the Venice 
film festival. In another swipe at Tato, 
who has announced the creation of an 
annua] Mastroianni prize, Chiara said 
that her father detested awards, kept his 
prizes "in the toilet" and had hung his 
Legion of Honor on his dog’s collar. 


Julio Iglesias and his companion, 
Miranda Rljnsburger, have a new son. 
The 7 -pound, 10- ounce boy was bom in 
Miami Beach, Florida. No name was 
immediately announced. Iglesias, 53, 
has three children with his former wife, 
Isabel: Chabeli, a Spanish-language 
television personality; Julio Jose, a 
singer and model, and Enrique, a 
Grammy-w inning Latin pop rocker. 


The rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix and 
Georg Friedrich Handel, miles span 
musically, were next-door neighbors in 
London. A blue plaque will be unveiled 
Sunday commemorating Hendrix's stay- 
in 1969 in a flat in Brook Street, central 
London next door to die house where 
Handel, composer of “The Messiah.” 
lived from 1723 until his death in 1759. 
The Handel House Trust said it was 
delighted that the plaque to Hendrix, 
whose bits included **Hey Joe” and’ 
"Purple Haze," would hang next to. 
Handel’s. Hendrix, who was bom in 
Seattle, died in 1970. Handel was bom 
in Germany. 


■ ■ r-V V ' •: 


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