Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


PAGES 


°“I> hy B 


INTERNATK 


| jjc |).4X SEPTEMBER 84, 1997 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


■ v'-L 



Srib 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 




R 


Paris, Friday, September 12, 1997 


No. 35,624 


U.S. Weighs Jamming 
Pro-Serb Broadcasts 

Specialized Hanes to Fly as Bosnia Votes 


Albright to Israel: Take a ‘Time-Out’ 

Her Request to Freeze Settlement Activity Meets a Quick ‘ No 9 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribun e 

WASHINGTON — Wiih tensions 
in Bosnia peaking ahead of weekend 
municipal elections, the Pentagon said 
Thursday that it was sending three 
specialized airplanes to the area to 
broadcast messages in support of peace 
and possibly disrupt some pro- Serbian 
radio and television programs. 

Two of die EC-130E airplanes 
were en route Thursday to Bosnia 
from a special Air Force National 
Guard unit in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and a third was to leave 
Friday, said a Pentagon spokesman. 
Lieutenant Colonel Steve Campbell. 

The three planes, all modified Her- 
cules C-130 transport aircraft, are to 
be based in Brindisi, Italy, and will 
arrive in dme to fly over Bosnia dur- 
ing the two days of crucial municipal 
elections. Colonel Campbell said. 

The planes were requested by local 
NATO commanders in Bosnia “in 
response to the perceived pattern of 
vehement rhetoric and incitement to 
violence” coming from Serbian radio 
and television broadcasts, said an- 
other Pentagon spokesman. Colonel 
Richard Bridges. 


Officials in the Clinton administra- 
tion had warned that NATO might 
close down the Bosnian press, which is 
largely controlled by hard-liners, if it 
failed to tone down inflammatory rhet- 
oric aimed at President Biljana Plavsic, 
who has Western backing, and or 
NATO-led peacekeeping troops. 

But Colonel Campbell said the key 
mission of the EC-1 30Es would be to 

Russia warns NATO. Page 6. 

broadcast messages favoring the 
Dayton peace process. “They’re not 
necessarily going to jam everything,” 
he said. U.S. officials have blamed 
Serbian broadcasts for helping to in- 
cite recent face-offs between NATO 
troops and Serbian protesters. 

NATO has been increasing its pres- 
sure, in words and actions, on hard- 
line Serbian forces loyal to Radovan 
Karadzic, who holds effective polit- 
ical power in the Bosnian Serb en- 
clave. General Wesley Clark, su- 
preme allied commander of NATO 
forces in Europe, warned last week 
that “we will use all means necessary. 

See BOSNIA, Page 6 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Service - 

JERUSALEM — Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright called Thursday for a “time-out” in Israeli 
reprisal actions against Palestinians, saying that the 
reprisals diminished prospects for carrying out the 
Oslo peace agreements because the Palestinians re- 
garded them as “provocative.” 

[Israel, caught off-guard, responded with a blunt 
rejection, Reuters reported.] 

Mrs. Albright issued her appeal after a meeting with 
the Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat, in which he 
promised full cooperation in the fight against ter- 
rorism. 

Mr. Arafar “made what she regarded as the right 
kind of commitment,’’ a senior U.S. official said, and 
“she was encouraged.” 

In a nationally broadcast speech at a high school 
here, she listed 1 ‘land confiscations, home demolitions 
and confiscation of IDs” as Israeli actions that in- 
flamed Palestinian anger and inhibited the struggle 
against terrorism. 

She also called for a temporary halt to the expansion 
of Jewish settlements. 

[Asked if Israel would halt settlement activity, 
David Bar-0 an. Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu's communications chief, told Reuters: "No, we 
cannot freeze settlements any more than we can freeze 

[He disputed that Mrs. Albright had called for a 
freeze. “We don’t consider this a freeze or anything," 
he said. ‘ ‘We consider the ‘time-out’ as referring to the 
time after we see a complete turnaround of the Pal- 
estinian Authority and its treatment of the security 
question.”] 

In remarks earlier Thursday and on Wednesday, 



l .'.-.jng lmg LmwflV A V. mat'd fte» 

Leah Rabin, left, widow of Yitzhak Rabin, with 
Mrs. Albright at the prime minister's grave. 

Mrs. Albright urged Israel to ease the border closure 
that has kept tens of thousands of Palestinians from 
their jobs inside Israel and to deliver to the Palestinian 
Authority tax revenue collected on its behalf by Is- 
rael. 

“It is beyond my understanding where withholding 


money is a security issue,” she said at a news con- 
ference with Mr. Arafat in the West Bank town of 
Ramallah, north of Jerusalem. 

By the end of the day, her surprisingly direct lan- 
guage reflected what appeared to be sharp breach 
between the Clinton administration and the govern- 
ment of Mr. Netanyahu, whose election Washington 
opposed because he campaigned against the Israeli- 
Palestinian peace agreement. 

Mrs. Albright did not retreat from her endorsement 
of Israel's demand that Mr. Arafat make a credible 
commitment to eradicating terrorism as the essential 
condition for resuming the implementation of the Oslo 
agreements. 

“To be effective, the Palestinian Authority’s fight’ ’ 
against terrorism “must be comprehensive, relentless 
and sustained,” she said in Ramallah. “It cannot be 
pursued only when it is convenient to do so.” 

But once a credible commitment has been given, she 
said, Israel should respond by refraining from what the 
Palestinians regard as unfair punitive actions or uni- 
lateral acts that appear to prejudge the outcome of 
negotiations. 

Opposition to what Washington called unilateral 
actions by IsraeL such as the construction of Jewish 
housing near Arab neighborhoods in East Jerusalem, is 
longstanding Washington policy, but the Israelis have 
been trying to subordinate those questions to the 
terrorism issue. 

A senior U.S. official said that actions taken by Mr. 
Arafat in response to recent bombing attacks against 
Israelis had been inadequate and that Mrs. Albright 
was not taking his promise ro do more at face value. 

“We're in a ‘trust but verify’ mode,” he said. 

Mr. Arafat begin the joint news conference by 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


Scotland Votes on Creating First Parliament in 300 Years 




What Recovery? Downturn Stuns Japan 


lettm&iWam* 


Scots voted in a referendum Thursday on devolution of political power from London. Page 5. Above, a 
Scot of the Wallace clan enjoying the 700th anniversary celebrations of a battle victory against England. 


GDP Shrinks at 11% Rate, 
Worst Showing in 23 Years 


By Sheiyl WuDunn 

New York Times Service 


TOKYO — In a bruising wake-up call to economic poli- 
cymakers here, Japan's economy underwent its sharpest 
contraction since the oil shock 23 years ago, as growth in the 
second quarter fell at a startling 11.2 percent annual rate, die 
government said Thursday. 

The figure immediately dashed hopes that an early re- 
covery was in the works. Japan had strong growth in the first 
quarter, and so officials bad proudly suggested dial its long 
downturn was ending. 

The tumble was worse than even die gloomiest forecasts by 
economists in Japan, and it was sure to fuel friction between 
Japanese and U.S. officials, who have been urging Japan to 
pay closer attention to its domestic economy. 

As the economy of the United States gallops along, with 
Europe cantering behind, the drop in Japan stands out as a 
major policy miscalculation and underscores the enormous 
challenges that Tokyo still faces in crying to recover from its 
economic mess. 

“It is a terribly shocking figure,” said Masaru Takagi, 
chief economist at Fuji Research Institute. “I had a very 
negative outlook to begin with, but what happened was even 
worse.” 

The economy has dramatically see-sawed this year primar- 
See ECONOMY, Page 14 


Lockheed Bribe-Taker Named 
To Hashimoto’s New Cabinet 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Service 


TOKYO — In a unusual display of political brass. Prime 
Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto brought back-room politics out 
into the open Thursday by naming a convicted felon to a key 
cabinet post. 

Analysts said Mr. Hashimoto's appointment of Koko Sato, 
who was convicted of taking bribes in the Lockheed scandal 
of 1976, was apolitical gift to the conservative Old Guard in 
his Liberal Democratic Party, which bad lobbied vigorously 
for Mr. Sato. 

The support of that conservative wing, led by a powerful 
former prune minister, Yasuhiro Nakasone, is crucial to the 
success of the fiscal, administrative and defense reforms upon 
which Mr. Hashimoto has staked his political future. 

Critics have said Mr. Hashimoto lacks the political power 
to keep his ambitious pledges to streamline Japan ’s behemoth 
central government, open the country’s ovenegulated fi- 
nancial system and expand the role of Japan's military. 

Mr. Hashimoto has bet his job on success; failure would be 
devastating to his reputation in Japan and in the United States, 
which regards Mr. Hashimoto as an ally and sees his proposed 
reforms as pivotal to America's economic and military in- 
terests in Asia. 

By appointing Mr. Sato, 69, to head, the Management and 
See JAPAN, Page 14 


Chip Makers Unite in Project to Raise Computer Power to New Levels 


By Elizabeth Corcoran 

Washington Post Service _ 

SANTA CLARA, California — Three of ihe 
biggest names in the computer-chip industry 
announced a joint effort Thursday to shrink their 
products’ microscopic circuitry to the smallest 
scales ever,, making possible a degree of com- 
puting power that would be unthinkable with 
today’s technology. 

Much of the research in the $250 million 
project is to be handled by federal laboratories 
font have specialized in building nuclear bombs. 

Funded largely by corporate money from In- 
tel, Motorola ana Advanced Micro Devices, the 


project will rank, in dollar terms, as the largest 
US. oonwoodal research partnership to date 
between industry and government. 

If the work proves successful, it could make 
possible generations of memory chips that would 
store 1 ,000 times as much information as today's 
most sophisticated versions. 

Such microprocessors, which are the brains 
tha t run personal computers, could be 100 times 
as fast as current ones, turning the kinds of 
computers that children use to learn arithmetic 
and play games into machines more powerful 
than the supercomputers of the early 1980s. 

“This feels like the biggest bet that Intel has 
ever taken,” said Sunlin Chon, a vice president 


IRA Cool to Peace Plan 

Implied Threat Raises Doubts About Truce 


and director of components technology devel- 
opment at Intel's research facility in Hillsboro, 
Oregon. But “in a way, we don ’t have a choice, 
he said. 

By about 2007, the techniques that companies 
rely on to keep the power of computer chips on 
an upward curve will be exhausted. “We will 
need a different approach,” Mr. Chou said. 

For chipmakers, that prospect is as daunting as 
telling house-builders to find a substitute for 
cement 

Over the past eight years, the federal gov- 
ernment's huge collection of labs has spent about 
$800 million developing technology in con- 
junction with industry. 


AGENDA 


Those projects have a muddy track record. 
Many became mired in bureaucracy. Few pro- 
duced products that industry was eager to sell. 
And although the companies contributed people, 
materials and facilities, they have seldom helped 
pay the salaries of the government researchers. 

In this case, they are establishing a not-for- 
profit company called EUV LLC that is to 
provide $130 million to cover the salaries of 
government researchers as well as $120 million 
of noncash aid. 

The three national labs engaged in the project, 
Lawrence Livermore, Sandia and E.O. 
Lawrence Berkeley, will get rights to use the 
resulting technologies for their own purposes. 


The chip companies will get rights to apply them 
to the task of keeping up the relentless pace of 
creating faster chips. 

All research in the chip industry aims to 
exploit the fundamental paradox in electronic 
technology — that the smaller chips are. the 
more powerful they become. Thai is because the 
electronic signals that zip around the circuitry of 
the finger-sized slivers of silicon to solve com- 
puting problems have less distance to travel and 
therefore do the job faster. 

The touchstone for the industiy is something 
called Moore's Law. devised by Gordon Moore, 

See CHIPS, Page 16 


Rate of Middle-Aged AIDS Deaths Falls 


By James F. Clarity 

New Yort Times Service 

BELFAST — The Irish Republican 
’• Array said Thursday that it approved of 
• the pledge by its political wing, Sinn 
-• Fein, to adhere to principles of non- 
•. violence when it enters formal peace 
j. talks on Northern Ireland next week. ^ 

f. Bnt, in a rare statement of the IRA’s 
own intentions, a spokesman for the 
outlawed guerrilla organization said 


Andorra.-..., 


Cameroon. 
Esypt. — 

Ranee 

Gabon 

Italy 

ivory Coast 

Jordan 

Kuwait 


Newsstand Prices 

„„ 1 D.OO FF Lebanon J-L 3 . 00 C 

—.12.50 FF Morocco-..— 16 Dfi 

,. 1.600 CPA Qatar — , — 10,00 OB 

SB 5.50 Rendon 12-50 FF 

..“10.00 FF Saudi Arabia — 10 SR 

. 1 100 CFA Senegal 1.100CFA 

...2600 Lire Spain 225PJBS 

. 1250 CFm Tunisia- IJSOOn 

....1 250 JD tiAJE. 10-00 0,1 

.—.700 FUs U.S. Mil. (Eur.)-~$1-2Q 


that it “would have problems with 
some of the pledges of nonviolence that 
Sinn Fein subscribed to Tuesday It did 
so at a preliminary session of the ne- 
gotiations presided over by George 
Mitchell, a former U.S. senator and the 
chairman of the talks, for whom the 
principles are named 

Sinn Fein qualified for the talks by 
declaring itself committed to the prin- 
ciples alter the British government 
judged a restored IRA cease-fire, now u 

its eighth week, to be genuine. 

. in an interview with Republican 
News, a weekly newspaper published in 
Belfast and Dublin that regularly sup- 
ports both the violent campaign of the 
IRA and the peace efforts of Sinn Fern, 
the spokesman, who was not identified, 
said mat the IRA would not disarm 
except as part of an overall agreement at 
the endof the peace talks. 

His statements appeared to be an mi- 
plied threat that if the organization did 
not accept whatever peace agreement 
mightKHTie out of the talks, it would 
fee! justified in resuming ^mbm^ 
and shootings here and on the British 

See IRA, Page 6 


N8WY0IH 

DU 


The Dollar 


Tlwreday 9 < P 
• 1.7807 
1.56 
119.70, 
5.987 

Thu mtsa/dosa 
7660.98 


Thmtdfty C * P-M- 
913.40 


preMtoactoea 

1.7986 

1.5855 

119.135 

6.052 

previou s cbee 
771926 


pfBvtouBdono 

919.03 


U.S. Army to Train 
Recruits in ‘Ethics’ 

Responding to its worst sexual har- 
assment scandal, the U.S. Army said 
Thursday that it would extend soldiers' 

basic training to nine weeks from eight 

to emphasize “ethics and values." Ihe 
army also plans to add chaplains to 
training units and intensify training and 
screening of drill sergeants to weed out 
any with histories of sexual harassment 
or violence. Page 3. 


ATLANTA (AP) — AIDS in the 
United States is no longer the top 
killer of young to middle-aged adults, 
bumped down to No. 2 by a 26 percent 
drop in the rate of deaths between 
1995 and 1996, the government re- 
ported Thursday. 

Accidents are the leading cause of 
death for people between the ages of 

25 and 44, and cancer is No. 3, the 
Centers for Disease Control and Pre- 
vention said. 

The AIDS death rate in 1 996 fell to 
1 1.6 deathsper 100,000 people, down 

26 percent from a rate of 15.6 the year 
before, the Atlanta facility said. 


PAGE TWO 

Exposing o Double Image in Mali 

JttUMOFIC Pag**. 

China Revise* Nuclear Exports Law 


China’s Factory Cutbacks 
Feed Idled \$brkers’ Anger 



page 13. 


Page 4, 



Sports 

... Pages 22-23. 

Ttmbrtmmarket 

Page?. 

| The IHT on-line 

vvww. iht.com $ 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service 

BEIJING — Unpaid workers from 
eight ailing state-owned enterprises in 
Shanxi Province were so desperate 
earlier this year that they started stealing 
crops from nearby farmers. 

The farmers then came up with a 
plan: Lend the workers money to start 
businesses. But lacking special skills, 
the workers opened 39 karaoke bars in 
which women who had worked in fac- 
tories became prostitutes, charging $25 
a customer. 

This sordid tale from the frontier of 
economic reform was captured in a 
videotape account that circulated re- 
cently among China’s senior leaders. It 
is only one example of growing worker 
desperation here as Beijing begins shut- 
ting down money-losing state enter- 
prises and laying off the laborers who 
once were hailed as the “masters" of 
the Communist state, 

"Once the workers had the money, 
and now they are literally prostitutes to 
local farmers,” said a researcher and 
political analyst, Wang Shan. 


As a major Communist Party con- 
gress opens Friday in Beijing, the plight 
of industrial workers in China's state- 
owned enterprises has grabbed the at- 
tention of Chinese leaders. Protests 
have spread throughout the country, and 
several more ominous incidents have 
involved workers who feel cheated by 
the government and left behind by 
China ’s economic miracle — incidents 
that may portend what lies ahead as 
China continues restructuring state en- 
terprises. 

The spread of worker protests co- 
incides with the government's drive to 
get rid of the burden of money-losing 
state-owned industrial companies. 
About 70 percent of the country’s more 
than loO.OOO government-owned 
companies are losing money, and the 
losses have been growing steadily. 

Putting an end to the losses means 
cutting back on extra workers and trim- 
ming their costly cradle-to-grave ben- 
efits, known here as the “iron rice 
bowl.” Managers and economists es- 
timate that about 30 percent of China’s 

See CHINA, Page 14 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1991 

PAGE TWO 


Exposing a Tale of Woe / Seeing May No* Be Believing 

Is the Great Photographer Broke? Negative 


By Howard W. French 

New York Times Sente* 


AMAKO. Mali — Pictures can be de- 


• visitor finds sitting on J>rokefl 5' artJ V > ^ ^ 
courtyard in a crowded neighborhood here the pro- 
totype of the exploited aidst, left with nothing at the 

; end of brilliant career? . 

Or is he, in addition ro being a composer or 
uniquely stylized black-and-white portraits that 
have been shown and sold around the world, an 

■ unrecognized genius at acting? 

There is indeed a slightly rehearsed quality to the 
' stories told by Mr. Keita, 73, whose eyes twinkled as 
be recalled the day in 1935, when his uncle, re- 
luming from a trip to Senegal, gave him his first 

• camera, a crude wooden affair. 

Still, as one listens, it is not hard to share in the 
giddiness of a young man wbo began discovering 
his special talent by taking pictures of the car- 
penter’s apprentices in his uncle’s workshop, and * 
whose photos would soon make him a neighbor- 
hood celebrity and in time his country’s most 
renowned photographer. 

“By 1 949, 1 had become really famous, ’ ’ he said. 
“How did I know my work was special? Everyone 
wanted me to do their portrait, and everyone would 
come back afterward and say, ‘Hey 
Seydou, my personality really comes ~ 

out in that picture you took.’ " 

But to hear Mr. Keita’s explan- 
ations of his later fortunes is to enter a t it [ TV-" 

realm where each of his bracing ac- 
complishments has been followed by hlJh-' jj L. 
near-total loss. 

His long trail of setbacks began at Mauritania 
the height of his career, when, in 
1960, Mali's newly independent gov- BESS 
emment invited him to become the 
official state photographer, placing Y- 1 

him in a privileged position to capture S fj£i 

the new country’s early history on — L 

film. /*) 



German Army Battles 
Dark Enemy Within: 
Far-Right Extremists 


. jo 

M 1 ’ 1 - ,, Ha 


uert 




By William Drozdiak 
HcB/ungfoR Post Sente* 


BobrfT iriwqur'lt'Vii Inrk Haw* 


Everyone wanted me to do their portrait, and everyone 
would come back afterward and say, 1 Hey Seydou, my 
personality really comes out in that picture you took.' 


MAURITANIA 


BURKINA 

FASO 


Months later, however, the gov- 
ernment proclaimed a socialist re- 
gime and ordered the official oho- 


"■EArgSK 


gime and ordered the official pho- 
tographer to close his private studio, 
which was easily the city's most successful. 

“They said it was not right for a man like me to 
own a business.” Mr. Keita said. 

Grudgingly, the photographer boarded up his 
shop, only to have it broken into by thieves who stole 
nearly everything of value — except his negatives. 


A FTER he retired in 1977, Mr. Keita, who 
was refused access to his historic official 
images, began supplementing his small 
pension by dragging his old negatives out 
of storage and reproducing portraits from the 1950s 
for people who requested them. 

Word gradually spread of the resurfacing of his 
powerful old images, and one day a few years ago. 


as he was fixing machinery in his yard, Mr. Keita 
was visited by a couple of Frenchmen who asked to 


was visited by a couple of Frenchmen who asked to 
see the famous photographer named Keita. 

"l am Keita,” he replied, to which the visitors 
said insistently. “No, we don't mean the mechanic, 
we want the photographer.” Once the confusion 
dissipated, they asked to see some of his old neg- 


atives, and Mr. Keita 
^ J obliged, giving them 

s' \ J three full boxes. 

-ijjy — T\~n!ger “They opened one and 

VV inspected them and 

/ Burkina V. v f couldn't believe their 

/• FAS0 eyes,” Mr. Keita said 

kit this material all of these 
years? All I could tell 
them was that I knew my work was beautiful and 
that 1 should hold on to it” 

Before long, he was traveling to France for ex- 
positions of his work. Prestigious museums, like the 
Solomon R. - Guggenheim in New York, were fea- 
turing his prints. And in June, a highly successful 
- book of his finely reproduced images was published 
in Switzerland. 

What did Mr. Keita get out of all this fame? His 
answer, seemingly bolstered by an apparent life of 
near misery, is next to nothing. The S33.000 book 
fee, he says, was quickly swallowed up in expenses 
on a brood that includes 13 children and a large 
extended family. 

Although he was often promised one, he says he 
doesn't have so much as a camera any more to replace 
his old gear. “If I had some equipment I could at least 
start working again.” Mr. Keita said “If you trust 
people in this world they’ll just rob you.” 

Asked about his claims of poverty, however, 
Andre Magnin, a French art collector who helped 
promote Mr. Keiia's work in Europe and edited the 


book of photographs, howled before collecting him- 
self enough to tell a very different story. 

“Go and ask any French or German artist how- 
much money he has in the bank, and he'll slam the 
door in your face, ' ’ Mr. Magnin said in a telephone 
interview from Paris. “I would estimate that Sey- 
dou has already made at least 1 million French 
francs from his work” — about 5165,000 — “and 
between the book, his signed prints and exhibits. 


that figure is going up all of the time. The best proof 
is that he owns houses all over Bamako.” 


I F indeed few Westerners, jealous of their pri- 
vacy. would divulge their wealth to outsiders, 
some people explain Mr. Keiia’s apparent dis- 
cretion over his relative fortune in a country 
where average per capita income is well under S200 


as a symptom of sheer terror. 

“In Africa, wealth draws people ro you out of the 
woodwork, long-lost relatives, supplicants of all 
kinds, religious figures, you name it.” said Samba 
Toure. a Malian sociologist. "What is worse, is the 


BERLIN — A number of incidents of 
rightist extremism have damaged the 
reputation of the German Army and 
embarrassed efforts by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl’s government to move the 
military beyond the inhibitions arising 
from its Nazi legacy. 

The Defense Ministry aebnowleaged 
this week that 110 soldiere have come 
under investigation this year for extreme- 
rightist behavior in 80 cases — nearly 
double the number of cases reported by 
commanding officers last year. 

In recent months, German soldiers in 
uniform have firebombed a residence for 
foreign workers, gone on a drunken ram- 
page brandishing baseball bats at Turkish 
immigrants and been photographed stag- 
ing mock executions and rapes during a 
break in t rainin g exercises fra 1 peace- 
keeping duty m'Bosnia- 

The incidents have prompred public 
outrage and tarnished the army's image 
just as it was reaping praise for aiding 
flood victims this summer and helping 
sustain a fragile peace in Bosnia. 

Defense Minister Volker Ruehe said: 
“No one found to be a right-wing ex- 
tremist will find shelter with us. I will 
□ot allow any of these individuals to 
drag the s tandin g of the German Army 
through the mud.” 

Mr~ Ruehe vowed to stamp out ail 
neo-Nazi activities in the military and 
has issued dishonorable discharges to 
soldiers judged guilty of such behavior. 
But he sought to deflate any sense of 
alarm by attributing the high incidence 
of rightist extremism this year to the 
attention being paid to such behavior by 
senior officers. 

“ Thanks to the increased vigilance of 
onr officers, we are uncovering more 
and more about what's going on in these 
beads that are so full of hatred.” Mr. 
Ruehe said. 

After the collapse of Communist East 
Germany in 1990 and its subsequent 
merger with West Germany, the newly 
reunited country experienced a wave of 
xenophobic violence, such as arson at- 
tacks against hostels in which foreign 


workers or asylum seekers were .hying, . 
Many of the perpetrators were thought* 
to be East German youths whose up- 
bringing in the Communist system ne?i- . 
er ftziiy banished anti -foreigner or pr& 
Nazi prejudices. . 

But neo-Nazi incidents m the Gennafl . 
Army have not been confined to soldiers 
from any particular region. “Some df. 
the worst incidents, such as the firtt 


Hans-Dieter Wichter, a Defense Min- ■ 
is try spokesman, said, “but there ha$ 
been a lot of cases involving soldiers 
from Western Germany as well” . r 

In tile past, Mr. Wichter said, senior 
officers may have considered some|im 
stances of extremist behavior too trwiai 
to report But orders were issued this year 
to report all evidence of rightist beliefs, 
including music tapes containing neo* 
Nazi lyrics, paraphernalia bearing Na2t 
sium I trooper insignias and Third Reich 
arm salutes, even if performed in jest. 

While Mr. Ruehe has won prise for 
his stem treatment of neo-Nazi activity 1 , 
the incidents have shocked the country 
and dealt a setback to Mr. Kohl's fre 1 
quent appeals for the German Army to 
overcome its historically based hesit- 
ation and conduct the same kinds Of 


iis-- 
•ii>- .. . 

E- 


military operations as other members of 
the NATO alliance. 


the NATO alliance. ; 

Germany refused to take part in me 
Gulf War or send troops abroad on UN 
peacekeeping missions to Haiti and 
Somalia, After a political debate, it dis* 
patched soldiers beyond its borders for 
the first time since World War D by 
joining 30 other nations in the NATO-led 
force sent to keep the peace in Bosnia. \ 

Not until this year did postwar Get-. 1 
man troops fire their first shots in anger, 
while helping to evacuate foreigners 
from Albania during a phase of anarchy 
after Albanians rebelled against the 
government of President Sali Berisha.'*- . 

German officers say the restraints op 
their troops have hurt morale and con- 
tributed to the fact that large numbers <R 

- -* — «• — #v«\t tA fM * pflW ia 


young conscripts opt to perform ‘Civfl 
service instead of 10 months of tstikary 
durv. Of the 340,000 soldiers m'-the 
German Army, 150,000 are conscripts. 


very real fear thar if you do not spread what you have 
around, people will curse you, and you will lose 


everything, perhaps go blind, or even die.' ‘ 
For his pan. if Mr. Keita is as wealthy 


For his part if Mr. Keita is as wealthy as his 
promoters suggest, he is doing his best not lo let on. 
After several visits to his courtyard, however, a 
possible crack emerged as the artist abruptly ended 
an interview.and said he would not be available for 
several more days. 

Asked where he was going, he replied. “To my 
other house across the river. 


Cuba Arrests a Salvadoran in Bombings, / 
Alleging He Was Hireling of U.S. Exiles / 


Algerian President Says ‘No’ to Foreign Mediation of Crisis 


Ciwyafol hr Oar Stuff F rrvt Dupurrhn 

■ UNITED NATIONS, New York — 
The Algerian president, Liaraine Zer- 
oual, has ruled out UN and other foreign 
mediation to resolve the crisis in ms 
country, the UN secretary-general, Kofi 
Annan, announced Thursday. 

I* “The president did indicate that Al- 
geria has a means, has strong insti- 
tutions and capabilities to resolve the 
issue itself, which means that no ex- 
ternal intervention is acceptable to the 
government,” Mr. Annan said. 


He added that Mr. Zeroual, who 
spoke with Mr. Annan by telephone 
Sept. 2, "believes that his approach 
would work" and that “what is im- 
portant is for all parties to join in the 
democratic efforts he is making to re- 
solve the conflict in Algeria." 

Abassi Madani the former leader of 
the banned Islamic Salvation Front, 
who is now under house arrest, had 
asked Mr. Annan to have the United 
Nations mediate the crisis in Algeria, 
where perhaps 60,000 people have died 


in a five-and-a-haif-year insurgency led 
by Islamic fundamentalists. 

Mr. Annan declined to say whether he 
shared Mr. Zeroual 's belief. The sec- 
retary-general had said there was a need 
for a dialogue to resolve the crisis. 


In another development, an Algerian 
w spa per. AI Khabar, reported Thurs- 


newspaper, AI Khabar, reported 
day that Algerian security fore 


day that Algerian security forces had 
killed the leader of the Armed Islamic 
Group. An tar Zouabri, and 78 of his 
men in an operation south of Algiers on 
Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Zouabri, head 


of the Armed Islamic Group for just 
over a year, has been reported dead by 
newspapers before — the Iasi time after 
a two- week operation in July in which 
up to 300 Muslim extremists were re- 
ported killed. The authorities have nev- 
er commented on the reports. 

The Armed Islamic Group is seen as 
the most militant of the anti-government 
groups that took up arms shortly after 
die authorities canceled a general elec- 
tion in January 1 992 that was dominated 
by radical Islamists. (AP, Reuters) 


Tiie Assceiaud Press 

MEXICO CITY — Cuba has arrested 
a Salvadoran as a suspect in a string of 
Havarra-hotei bombings, .charging that 
he was a mercenary in the pay of a 
Miami-based exile group. 

The group, the Cuban American Na- 
tional Foundation, denied the accusation 
by the Cuban Ministry of Interior, call- 
ing it "ridlcnlous and absurd.” Bombs 
shook a restaurant and three hotels on 
Sept 4. killing an Italian tourist in the 
bar of one. the popular Copacabana. 

The bombings, like earlier hotel 
blasts, appeared to be intended to scare 
foreign tourists — the Communist na- 
tion's main source of hard currency. 

The Interior Ministry said Wednes- 
day that Raul Ernesto Cruz Leon, who 
arrived on a tourist visa, had confessed 
to taking 54.500 for each of the four 
bombings. The statement was carried by 
the state-run Prensa Latina news 
agency, monitored in Mexico City. 

“The investigation revealed, without 
the slightest doubt, a detailed operation 
organized and carried out from Miami, 


the United States, by a subversive struc-V 
ture under the direction of the Cubah 
American National Foundation' tbZ 
Interior Ministry declared^ . x 

Fernando Rojas, a spokesman for t£$, 
group, said, “This latest attack by the 
Cuban government is not only ridicu- 
lous and absurd but typical of the empS£ 
accusations that the Castro regime lias * 
launched against the Cuban-Americae 
community throughout the history df 
exile.” "... 

Cuban authorities also accused other 
exilegroups, including the Miami-based 
Alpha 66, of responsibility for 15 bomb :- 
anempts against Cuba since. 1994. 

According to Cuba, die suspect said 
he had served io the Salvadoran Army 
and received training as a sharpshooter 
and explosives expert at a U.S. Army, 
base in Georgia. His only motivatioQ 
was the money, he reportedly said. ] ' 

Police said traces of explosive were * 
found on Mr. Cruz Leon's hands and “ 
that he was carrying a bomb, a bomb 
diagram, electronics materials and a list 
of sites popular with foreign tourists. * 


Tobtlf >■ !>■ 


.s/ur • 


• *3 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


KLM Attacks Night Flight Ban SSKffltaKSSSJ a top quaUty Eo T£/<£E& -S 3* 


• AMSTERDAM — KLM Royal Dutch Airlines fears that 
measures at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport to meet the gov- 
ernment’s noise reduction limits could have “far-reaching 
consequences' ’ for it and other airlines. 

KLM attacked the plan to prevent noisy cargo flights from 
landing between 1 1 P.M. and 6 A.M. starting in October. Only 
quieter charter flights will be permitted to land during those 
Hmes, and flights not already scheduled won't be permitted ro 
land during those hours. 

■ The planned measures could bring "serious damage to 


Smokers have launched an Internet page about alternative 
routes to Scandinavia after Scandinavian Airlines Systems, 
the region's flag carrier, banned smoking on all its flights. The 
page advises travelers of smoking flights through stopover 
points such as Madrid or Moscow to the Nordic region from 
North America. (Reuters) 


Nearly 20 workers at an air traffic control center in Miami 
responsible for the skies over South Florida and the Bahamas 
went home sick Wednesday after paint fumes spread from 
another floor. Air traffic was not affected, (AP) 


A^orw) 

/VirHotrfcun 

ArJona 

iWwm 

Barcelona 

Ballade 

Beta 

Brussels 

Copontinrjon 

Costa Del Sol 
Duoan 

EMU^I 

Ftorense 

PranMurt 

Gemma 


Peter Catranis 

Pmsssumi Tti&i 
Fma aFumw Sweasw 


SUPERIOR 

OUTSTANDING 

EXCEPTIONAL 

FREE 

COMMISSION 

COMMISSION 


SeMttufl of Managed Accounts 
Analysis lor All tfyor Uar*0>S 
Execution Forex or Futures 
Trading Sottwtu$ & Prtce Data 
Spot FX 3-5 Pip Pnce Spreads 
Futures S12-SX Per Round-ftim 


The number of tourists visiting the Portuguese-run ter- 
ritory of Macau dropped 24.5 percent in July compared with 
a year earlier, a decline tourism officials attributed to a wave 
of gangster violence. (Reuters) 


1 800 125*14 Mm 
QMOllllXte Fimr 
HW&73N land 


0W01SKI fatf UBS 1 1921551: Dnul MHoLTl 
0800901116 Gmr 008001142 L<0I7 Oman 0I.W9K* 

it’iooouc bA irona uuinwn 


003HIWW haoxhmt 08QW5E W raw 9580087^118 KckritrJs OoOOT 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

For Work. Lite end Academic Experience 
Hragfa Comment Home Study 

(8082 597-1909 EXT. 23 
FAX: (3 JOJ 471 -€456 
ffSga http://vww.pwu-hi.edu 
SbhB? Fax or send detafed resume for 


Corrections 


A headline in Thursday's 
issue that should have re- 
ferred to Fidel Ramos, die 
Philippine president, incor- 
rectly named a predecessor. 
Ferdinand Marcos. 


Istanbul 

Hou 

Lbs Pafcnas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Mafarea 

Mfan 

Moaca* 

Munich 

Nca 

Ob) 

Pans 

Pr»*Je 

Boytsov* 

Riga 

Horne 

Si PomOMirn 
SKxAhofm 

Strasbourg 

Tatar, 

TWfc. 

Venice 

V»?nna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


Today 
LnrnW 
of cm 

25T77 Ifrfl pc 
MTM a^eh 
14-66 3 m a 
25T7 1MI s 
27I0O IP6»0C 
27-00 145? S 
S475 17I0T pc 
iwra *4* in 
2?TXi 1601 a 
21/70 1407 c 
27/00 1 7/02 pc 
13/55 WJ3 pc 
1M5 

27.-80 16/01 pc 
26/79 16/61 pc 
2679 15-54 pc 
1601 1457 , 
21 70 12.63 • 
1661 11154c 
MHW 23-73 pc 
20-66 1661 c 
1*« 7W pc 
JO* 1457 pc 
SUBS IW. pc 
2670 17/62 pc 
1457 7/M *i 

2475 12/53 n 
2*75 19/66 pc 

16- 61 11/aai 

17- 62 6M6 Btl 
27.WJ 1457 s 

3/37 -1/31 t 
1457 sh 
57/80 IWJa 
15/60 13-56 pc 
17'65 135S r 
27/80 16-01 pe 
17-02 1457 r 
10/64 *40* 

26- 79 15/56 pc 

27- BO 16/01 5 
22-7 1 14S7 i 
28/77 16/69 pc 


Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided by AcouWeather. 


High LowW 
OF OF 
3476 17/62 pc 
12/53 439 r 
2373 **3 s 
27-80 18/0* 1 
23/73 15/59 pc 
30/96 18/61 pc 
10.94 6*3 pc 

145.7 439 pc 

2SWM 15/69 pc 
1001 0/43 pc 

27-BO 10/64 pc 
12-53 643 c 
12 TO 3' 77 c 
2679 1659 c 
16/6* 4*«h 
1661 6*3 r 

IP -60 11-52 sh 

24- 75 1661 » 
23/73 1457 pc 
2*8* 22/7 1 3 
21CO 10,61 sh 
14-57 643 pc 

2677 13-56 c 
27/90 17-62 c 
24/75 1650 r 
14-57 12-53 sh 
1&5/? 433? 

2678 1601 pc 

1601 643 c 

1457 4-39 pc 
17-62 541 r 

S/41 2-35 K 

18 06 145T r 

25- 82 IT.X; pc 

1606 1661 sf, 
1684 7.44 1*; 

17/62 4-3Spe 
1*66 12U r 
18/64 0-40 sf, 
tyrj 14-57/ 
2676 1650 pc 
2577 13/53 sh 
1661 4*3 r 




— »• * •’ 

>~*-w -! / 


sac 


Jqlsfreairi W 

North America 


lUnaesaarBW, 

Icow 


1 Umaaaonafaly I 




Ho CN Uo*i 
Hong Kong 
Islamabad 


Europe 


Cloudy and remy wMthar CH-uds and ram tfvs week- 
m lha Pacilic Nunhweii ana will give way to ume 
m-s w«*eryj it win remain sunshine Monday across 
dry and warm across itie mucri D | Scandmaula. Very 
UidtvBsl. The hot and dr/ cdol wealhar In London 
weaihar will cortmue m Hi© and Pans lh-8 weekend 
Southwest. Cool wealher Rain will soak pant ot 
m the Nonhaasi mis week- Spam and Portugal. Very 
end ll will be cloudy and warm across Italy with sun- 
rainy m rhe Canadian Mar- shine and perhaps a Uiun- 
rt'rrws- detshower. 


Asia 

Typhoon O/l wa w.n be near 
soumem japan mis week- 
end. however, n should 
remain warm and hunsd in 
Seoul and Tokyo with the 
chance ol a lew showers. It 
should narnam hot and dry 
across southwestern China 
Bus weekand. bui rams will 
soak southeastern China 
wnh showers moving into 

northeast China. 


Karachi 
K Luiipur 
K. Kinabalu 
Mania 
New beta 
P1w»m Parti 
PhJkw 
Rangoen 
Sacii 
Shanghai 


, Today 
High LowW 
CW OF 
1 1/5? a 
30/86 20-88 * 
Wl 2*/75 pc 
21/70 14/B7 Bh 
a*82 23/73 r 
2*84 26/78 r 
31-58 21/70 r 
29/8* 24/75 pc 
-32019 26/75 pa 
32/88 23/73 pc 
28«( 24/75 pc 
39/102 23/73 0 
31/88 21/TDa 

33-91 ssmpc 

32/88 22/71 pc 
3056 23/73 r 
MW 2303 pc 
53-91 24/75 pc 
31-80 23/73 pr 
33.81 24/75 pc 
29(84 23/73 pc 
28/78 14/S7pe 
2WH2 22/71 pc 
30-68 22/71 pc 

29/0* 23-73 e 
26/79 22/71 ah 
«*86 22/71 c 


High LowK 
OF OF - 

28- 82 J2®J ** 

29/84 20*8 |S<* 

32/BB 23-73®. 
22/71 13*8 1* 
2BIB2 ZSmih 
3QW 24/7S r * 
30W 21/70 c* 

29- 84 24/75 p C 
81*8 26/77 re, 
Sa*4 23/73 to. 
29*4 24/75 pt 

38/108 24/764- 
29*4 21-70 ■- 
32/88 24/76 0/1 
52/89 22/nn 
300622/71 
30*0 aaffspe 
30*r 2srr7» 
31*0 23-73 pe. 
SJOt 23/73 BC 
■2S82 22/71 J** 
25/77 1355C.. 
29*4 22/71 C 
25/82 22/71 c 
29*4 asm it, 
2409 22ff1 r < 
29/84 22/71 pc 




otm 


* V/rtah 1 . 

« &7i • . 

iipii-. 

ShBci. V 


ifc: 

Ur c r ; . ' : - 


North America 


Today 

High LowW 
C/F OF 


XUi W flWQWWI Fowl 0501122 

tom <*mm sot *0 KSJW3JS 

S.vyrlMl OWlW-iy fated ooisnoi 193661? 

I'wlUwdm 080NMS VaatdSaaa I MWW57 


0301 12632 Support M0I3C5B1 i.Wro mfStf 

bsjwm 


Middle East 


Pacific Western University 

1210 Auahi Street Dept 23 

Honolulu, HI 968144922 


In some copies on Thurs- 
day, final stock tables were 
incomplete because of tech- 
nical reasons. 


Abu Dhabi 

B «to 

Cairo 

Dwnojoun 

Jan/salarr 

LirtOf 

Riyadh 


42107 2677 5 
2*79 ia*e» 
3391 18.64 s 
29*4 11/5J s 
2479 13*5 4 
39n02 17/92 s 
42/107 24/75 i 


43/109 25-7? s 
«78 fft'rids 
33-91 18/84 s 
32,'SS 11.62 4 
Ttm 14*7 s 
»-102 17-63? 5 
42.-107 24,75-1 


Anc-nraga 

Artama 

Bonn 

Crmcaaa 

DaTlaa 

r«r»ve» 

Demw 

HpnoUu 

Hwislon 

Los An* las 

Morn 


Tomorrow 
High LowW 
C1F= OF 
15-59 6-*3 pe 

2B*2 1H/04 pc 
32-71 14-67 sh 

23(73 14/07 pc 

w*e 19,-Mpc 
28*2 11*2 s 
24/76 13/55 pc 
32*9 23/73 pc 
1-WK pb 
33*1 18*4 1 
33*1 26/77 1 | 


Manapuh 

Monreoi 

Nassau 

Oriando 

Phoenn 

SanFrsn. 

SaafllA 

Tororta 

Vancouver 

W/aTwgjon 


Today 

High Loww 
C/F OF 

24/75 13-55 b 
1W« 17/62 8h 
31-88 24-75 pc 

26C7 10-04 ah 
32*9 23/73 pc 
40/104 25/77 | 
23.73 14*7 pc 

2»W ia*3s 

21/M 13-S5 ah 
14/37 8 MS * 

27-80 18)54 pe 


Tomorrow 
High LowlV 
C IF CIF 


Al^are 
dp* Twen 
Cawttanca 
Horaro 


34*3 21/70 pc 
2484 17/82 a 
24-75 17-02 pe 
21/70 10*0 pa 
28*2 22/71 E 
ZB/77 11/52 C 
2371s 


Latin America 


Buwioa 4ns 17*2 5/4.1 pc 
29/B4 21/70 pc 
22771 16/81 pa 
***** Cty SBf77 1#53 pc 
HwteJwwro 22/71 la/oec 
14*7 1/34 pc 


16/61 387 ■ 

28*2 22715*; 
21/70 17782 pe 
21/70 1315501' 
ZM2. ZSW fit 

izraa 2fflps 


\E0A2' ttv cl0uOy - c -CMu«t7. sn-tfww«9. i-BimdKaams. i-ron, gtanow Dumas 
wVsiwv. nca W-Weaiher. All maps, lor^casbi and data pnwViod by Aceu W«ahor. Inc. 0 199? 


Oceania 


16*0 lorao e 

18/88 *48* 


14/57 8M6 r 
19156 1050 pc. 


A two-month trial 
subscription. 
Save up to 60°/o 


Try a special, low cost 2-rnonHi trial subscription to the 
International Herald Tribune to enjoy delivery to your 
home or office every morning AND save up to 60% off 
the newsstand price. 


' COUNTRY, -CURRENCY 

2 MONTHS 
NEWSSTAND 
PRICE 

2 MONTHS 
OFFER 
PRICE 

DISCOUNT 

OFF 

COVER PRICE 1 

, AUSTRIA 

ATS 

1,456 

650 


' BEIGIUM/LUXEMB. 

BEF 

3,330 

1,350 

60% 

: DENMARK 

DKK 

730 

360 

54% ! 

l FINLAND 

FIM 

624 



1 FRANCE 

FF 

520 



• GERMANY 

DEM 

132 



GREAT BRITAIN 

C 

47 



! HONG KONG 

HK$ 

676 

284 

57% 

' ITALY 

in 

145,600 

53,000 

60% 


t 

26,000 

12,150 

53% 

MALAYSIA 

RfA 

132 



! NETHERLANDS 

NLG 

195 



NORWAY 

NOK 




SINGAPORE 

sS 

146 



SPAIN 

PTAS 

11,700 

5,000 



SEK 

832 

350 

58% 


CHF 

166 

66 

60% 


s 

78 

43 

45% 


1 Ves. 1 1 nxM tie to start receiving the Imemotianal Hemtd Tnburv 
I D My check is endowd (payable As ihe IHT) 


Chorgarriy; □ Amsx □ Dman O VISA DAecai □ MasterCard □ Ewocard 

far w-US and Asian prices, credit cards will bo charged in French Prams at cunwi r««. 


I Signature- 

| For business orders, indicate your VAT No. 


Exp Data. 


I Mr/Mn/Ms Fcmily Name. - 

| First Name 

I Mailing Address 


flHT VAT Number FR74 7 3202 1 1 2«“ 


Country 

Homely No 1 Brnins, V N* 

E-Mail Address- 

^^ |HT «OW d haeif "q oird/to CW 
□ I dc- not wish io roco^ uJonyt^ hern s/Hor co/ofullj, xreZSt 

„ to ' ,nt!m otional Herald Tribune 

18. 


— — r l 

I2.9SS- 1 


1 0 . Am. Omrte -fc Gaulle 92521 hJejiHv Cede, Fra™ 


” ’ * 'Sir' 


FOR OTHER COUNTRIES, PLEASE 


TOUR NEAREST IHT OFFICE 


l^~ : : - 


Imprint par Offpn/u. 7 i rue dr T Ewngile, ?*0Ut Paris. 






i " • »».i» 






i - 






■ •* 'a 

)> ‘.I . 




(NTERIVATI 



i.O, SEPTEMBER 24, lW 


PAGE 3* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 12. 1997 



PAGE :* 


THE AMERICAS 


/ : 

a —, 

W.'t • 

• ;■ ■„ *3 it... 

•-• -. 

‘ V:, • ' * 

• j Ht • 

: 

: ' v"; : V 
■ . r r - ?: Jt- 

• : ^ 


- 1 «v^.* 


r =»Jl 


Army to Teach ‘Ethics 
To Avert Harassment 

Basic Training Lengthenedby a Week 


By Brian Knowlion 

Intcnutiviul Herald Tribunt 


Washington —T he u.s. Amv, 

responding to its worst sexual haras's- 
men I scaD£ ^i said Thursday that if 
would extend soldiers* basic training by 
a week to emphasize “ethics and val- 
ues, add more chaplains to training 

“SS and 5“*"**^ training and 
screening of drill sergeants to weed out 
any with histories of sexual harassment 
, or violence. 

ft i'Jf 1 Pf esenlin g wo reports on theprob- 
* toe secretary of the army, Togo 

West, acknowledged that “sexual har- 
assment exists in the U.S. Armv across 
toe ranks, across the genders, across the 
units. 

.. But he said that the reports, one by the 
army s inspecror general and another by 
.an army-civilian group, had found that 
the abusive behavior that surfaced late 
last year at the Aberdeen Ordnance Cen- 
ter tn Maryland was an aberration. 

Pentagon sources told The Associ- 
ated Press that rhe army would rep- 
rimand Major General Robert Shadley. 
Who was commander at Aberdeen when 
ii was hit by the charges of widespread 
sexual harassment by drill sergeants. 

-■ Women who trained there said that 
they had been bullied, abused or raped 
by drill sergeants. 

\ ‘‘What happened at Aberdeen.*’ Mr. 
r jVest said, citing the reports, “was an 
aberration. Sexual abuse is not endemic 
throughout our army. Sexual harassment, 
however, continues to be a problem." 

. Mr. West and the army chief of staff. 
General Dennis Reimer, said that basic 
training would be extended to nine 
weeks from eight to better instil] values 
of respect for women. 

.. Prospective drill sergeants, they said, 
will undergo tighter screening, includ- 
ing psychological testing, in an effort to 
Eliminate those likely to abuse the ab- 
solute power they have over recruits, 
rpore than 20 percent of them women. 

• The army will “re-engineer" its 
Equal opportunity program * ‘from top ro 
bottom to make it responsive to leaders 
and soldiers,” said the plan made public 
By Mr. West and General Reimer. 

. The secretary said the general would 
be put in charge of overseeing training 
*■ policy at the Training and Doctrine 
Command at Fort Monroe, Virginia. 

Efforts were promised to make wom- 
en more aware of their rights to report 
harassment or discrimination in pro- 
motion. 

. Mr. West, in the army’s defense, said 




diat 25 years ago it became one of the 
first big U.S. institutions to create a 
formal equal opportunity program, but 
that there had been slippage since then. 

He said the two reports found that of 
all those who said they had suffered 
sexual harassment in the army, only 5 
percent said they would use formal 
complaint procedures, which he called 
grossly unsatisfactory. 

The military-civilian survey, the 
army's biggest ever on ihe subject, 
found that: 

• 72 percent of the women and 63 
percent of the men interviewed had ex- 
perienced “sexist behavior” and 47 
percent of the women and 30 percent of 
the men received “unwanted sexual at- 
tention.” 

• 15 percent of the women and 8 
percent of the men had experienced 
“sexual coercion” and 7 percent of the 
women and 6 percent of the men ex- 
perienced "sexual assault." 

Mr. West said there was a perception 
by far too many soldiers that there was a 
lack of equal opportunity in the ser- 
vice. 

The Aberdeen scandal, and others 
before it. have raised delicate issues, 
leaving the military in a sort of in- 
stitutional shellshock. 

The studies, carried out over 10 
months, have renewed debate on wheth- 
er women should train alongside men in 
the military. 

They have also raised questions about 
racism — the Aberdeen drill sergeants 
were all black men, accused by "white 
women — and about how far die mil- 
itary services can soften sometimes bru- 
tal training practices without sacrificing 
military readiness. 

. The army leadership has been en- 
gaged in an intensive self-examination 
since the first allegations of rape sur- 
faced last year at Aberdeen. More than 
35,000 present and former soldiers were 
interviewed as part of the two reports. 

The army charged 12 staff members 
at the base with sex crimes ranging from 
inappropriate comments to rape. One of 
the 12 was convicted of rape, four were 
convicted of other sexual misconduct, 
four agreed to be discharged, one was 
cleared of sexual misconduct charges 
and two cases await resolution. 

A national hot line, set up to record 
anny sexual harassment complaints, re- 
ceived 1 .288 calls in seven months, giv- 
ing rise to 353 criminal investigations, 
before it was discontinued in June. 
Armv officials said that it had * ‘done its 
job." 



Key Gore Issue: ‘ Intent ■ 

Uncertainty of Law May Offer a Way Out • 


By Guy Gugliotta 

HiuftiiMpufi Pinj Service 


l -ny , -ili— i Hi- V— - 

Vice President Gore: Did he know whether he was raising “hard' money? 

Clinton’s Security Team 
Failed to Review Donors 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Asked if his of- 
fice had been misused for political rea- 
sons, President Bill Clinton's national 
security adviser told investigating sen- 
ators Thursday that there were no clear 
procedures during last year's election 
tor handling Democratic donors seekin g 
While House access. 

Confronted by instances in which for- 
eigners got into the White House via the 
Democratic Party without national se- 
curity reviews. Samuel (Sandy) Berger 
testified at Senate fund-raising bearings 
that he has since instituted procedures ro 
avoid such problems in the future. 

“I felt very strongly that we needed 
to have a much clearer system, much 
more clarity for our staff people, so that 
there would not be any questions about 
how these things should be handled," 
Mr. Berger testified. 

Asked why such procedures were not 


in place under his predecessor, Anthony 
Lake. Mr. Berger said the National Se- 
curity Council “did not have this on our 
radar screen." 


Mr. Berger was also questioned why 
he attended weekly political strategy 
meetings during the 1996 campaign. At 


the time, he was the No. 2 official'll) the 
National Security Council. 

Mr. Berger said he was there ro make 
sure that campaign strategists, who 
would be making ads. did not distort the 
president’s foreign policy record. 

“Foreign policy realiy wasn’t dis- 
cussed in those meetings,” he said. “I 
was a sort of living stop sign." 

While acknowledging that some for- 
eigners, like a Chinese arms dealer and a 
Russian businessman with alleged mob 
ties, slipped into the White House, Mr. 
Berger said, "We did not see any in- 
stance of foreign policy being adversely 
affected.” 


WASHINGTON — What did Vice 
President Gore know and when did he 
know it? Even more important: Does it 
matter? 

Through testimony by the Democrat- 
ic National Committee’s general coun- 
sel, Joseph Sandler, and a careful review 
of committee and White House doc- 
uments, Senate Governmental Affairs 
Committee Republicans confirmed 
Wednesday that Mr. Gore's White 
House fund-raising telephone calls in 
late 1995 and early 1996 collected tens 
of thousands of dollars that were des- 
ignated by the Democratic National 
Committee as “hard money,*' which is 
subject to federal regulation. 

The solicitation of regulated money 
in or from a federal building may con- 
stitute a violation of the law.’potentially 
a crippling blow to Mr. Gore’s pres- 
idential ambitions. Bui anybody who 
investigates the case — whether it be the 
Justice Department, an independent 
counsel or a grand jury — will have to 
show that it was Mr. Gore 's ‘ 'intent” to 
break the law. 

Both senators and -legal authorities 
agree that the relevant law, which makes 
it unlawful for any person to solicit or 
receive any contribution “in any room 
or building occupied in the discharge of 
official duties, ” has been tested only 
sparsely through history and may not 
apply in Mr. Gore's case. 

At the very least, however, the com- 
mittee demonstrated that Democratic 
committee officials gave Mr. Gore 
ample opportunity to commit a felony 
by adhering to a fund-raising policy that 
automatically placed the first $20,000 
contributed by any individual into a 
hard money account. 

Under federal law, individuals can 
contribute up to S25.000 to political 
candidates and parties each year, and up 
to $20,000 to a political party orga- 
nization. These “hard dollars" can be 
used for direct campaigning. 

“Soft money" is not subject to fed- 
eral regulation, and can be raised in 
unspecified amounts from corporations 
and labor unions as well as from in- 
dividuals. 

It cannot be used on behalf of can- 
didates but it can be used to pay for 
grass-roots organization, administra- 
tion and other “party-building activ- 
ities." 

Hard money is harder to raise but it is 
more desirable because of its versatility. 
As an internal Democratic National 
Committee memo released by the com- 
mittee Wednesday put it: “Every effort 
should be made to maximize the raising 


of federal money." 

To do this. Mr. Sandler said, the 
committee had a policy of depositing 
checks from large donors in hard money 
accounts, then transferring the excess 
over 520.000 into soft money accounts! 
The committee asked donors for per* 
mission to do this, but only after it ha4 
already been done. 

Committee officials thus knew that 
Mr. Gore was going to be raising hard 
money as he began making the pub 1 
Hcized phone calls in late 1995. In all! 
The Washington Post reported early this 
month. S 1 20.000 went into hard-monev 
accounts. 

“The important question is whether 
they told Gore, and whether Gore knew 
it,” said an election law specialist, Keity 
neth Gross, who has represented both 
Republicans and Democrats. “My feel- 
ing about this is that ir is certainly cred- 
ible for Gore not to have known ’that.”- 

The Republicans on the Senate iity 
vestisaring committee went to great 
lengths Wednesday to demonstrate the 
contrary, by showing that Mr. Gore at 
least had the opportunity to know the 
policy, which was enunciated in a memo 
addressed ro him in early 1 996. 

Bui the majority counsel. Sandy Maty 
lice, acknowledged that the investiga- 
tors had not thoroughly plumbed Mr; 
Gore’s intent. “The question of Gore’s 
state of mind is a w hole different issue 
thai we haven’t gotten to yet." he said." 


Poll Shows Gore 
In Image Trouble 

. The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Fewer than 
half of those questioned in a new 
poll say that Vice President A1 Gore 
has the honesty and integrity if 
takes to be president, and a majority 
say a special prosecutor should be 
named to investigate allegations 
against him. 

The poll, taken Wednesday for 
ABC News, found 49 percent of 
those questioned now say Mr. Gore 
has the honesty and integrity to be 
president, compared with 59 per- 
cent in March. The number saying 
he lacks those qualities rose 32 per- 
cent to 40 percent. 

Mr. Gore's overall favorable rat- 
ing stood at 49 percent, down from 
53 percent in April. His unfavorable 
rating was 33 percent, up from 29 
percent in April. President Bill 
Clinton’s favorable raring was 57 
percent, down from 60 in March- 


POLITICAL NOTES 


• Tobacco Deal Earned Lobbyists 
■ $8 Million in Just 6 Months 

WASHINGTON — While the legislative battle over the 
proposed national tobacco settlement is just getting under 
way, Washington lobbyists have already hit the jackpot 

Documents show that they have pulled down nearly $8 
million in fees and expenses for pressing the industry's 
[_ views on tobacco issues during the first six months of this 
year. 

The industry’s multimillion-dollar payments to an army 
'•of nearly 30 law and lobbying firms come on top of several 
' million dollars spent by their own corporate lobbying of- 
fices. 

r Philip Morris Companies Inc., for instance, reported 
L lobbying expenses of $5.9 million at its Washington shop 
r during the same six months. 

Although a spokesman said the number includes pay- 
ments to outside lobbyists and work on nontobacco issues. 
R J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. spent nearly $1 million on its in- 
house efforts. ( W/P 1 


Clinton Rallies Trade Forces Campaign Reform Bill Pushed 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton has started a 
tough straggle with the nation’s labor unions and much of 
his own party in Congress over his authority to negotiate 
new trade deals that he declared are "absolutely critical for 
our world leadership." • 

Arguing for the authority to make trade deals that Con- 
gress can accept or reject but not amend. Mr. Clinton 
portrayed the stakes as far more than a dispute about job 
losses or die effect of trade on the environment. 

He said that without the ability to negotiate such accords, 
he would be crippled in conducting foreign policy. 

■ ‘This is about more than economics,” Mr. Clinton told a 
gathering of 100 executives of small and large businesses 
who are heavily dependent on export markets, and who were 
invired to the East Room on Wednesday to cheer on the 
president’s efforts. 

But even as Mr. Clinton argued that far more than 
economic pragmatism is at stake, his advisers struggled over 
how to word trade legislation to ensure majority votes in 
both Houses. [NYT) 


WASHINGTON — Hoping to put pressure on Repub- 
licans, Democratic leaders say that all 45 Democrats in the 
Senate are prepared to vote for a campaign finance reform 
bilL 

In a letter Wednesday to the Senate majority leader, Trent 
Lott. Republican of Mississippi, the 45 Democrats asked 
that Mr. Lott schedule a vote soon on the legislation intended 
to control the political contribution process. 

And to underline their effort to seize the popular issue. 
Democrats noted that with three Republican senators 
already co-sponsoring the bill, just two Republican votes are 
needed to move it through the Senate. (AP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Walter S. Scheib 3d, executive chef at the White House, 
on reports that the presidential kitchen is not always a 
peaceable place: “I’m still here, so I haven’t hobbled too 
many times.” (NYT) 


Away From 
Politics 

• A portable lead poisoning 
detection system that can 
analyze a blood sample and 
display the results in three 

■ minutes has won approval 

' * from the Food and Drug 
Administration. (AP) 

• William Esposito, 51, the 

deputy FBI director, will re- 
tire Ocl 1 after more than 33 
years with the bureau. He will 
become senior executive vice 
president and director of cor- 
porate security for MBNA 
America, a bank and credit 
card company. (WP) 

• Two reports expected to 
be published in a medical 
journal suggest that physi- 
cians over many years may 
have been inadvertently list- 
.iitg numerous cases of child 
abuse and infanticide under 

Sthe category of sudden i nfan t 
r death syndrome. (NYT) 

■ Years after a chemical 
plant explosion killed 23 per- 
sons and injured hundreds in 
Houston, plaintiffs accusing a 
tow firm of malpractice in ne- 
gotiating their mulnmilkon- 
dollar settlement have won 
fhe right to take iheir suit to a 
Jury. (NYT) 


Conservative Christians Showing Their Clout 


By Steven A. Holmes 

Ngvr York Times Serv ice 

WASHINGTON — The 
endorsement of the Freedom 
From Religious Persecution 
Act by the Senate majority 
leader, Trent Lott, and the 
House speaker. Newt Gin- 
grich, has given the bill 
enough momentum to create 
a quandary for the White 
House and its business allies 
who already complain that 
U.S. trade is too encumbered 
with restrictions. 

The bill would mandate 
economic sanctions against 
any country engaged in re- 
ligious persecution. 

Beyond the foreign policy 
implications, support for rhe 
measure provides further ev- 
idence of die emerging polit- 
ical clour of conservative 
Christian groups in an area of 
foreign policy that has been 
the preserve of human rights 
groups like Amnesty Interna- 
tional. 

The bill backed by the co- 
alition would establish an of- 
fice in the White House to 
monitor the treatment of re- 
ligious minorities around the 


world. It would also require 
economic sanctions against 
countries that abuse their cit- 
izens oo the basis of religion. 
And it would give those flee- 
ing religious persecution pri- 
ority over other refugees in 
gaining entry into the United 
Slates. 

Even though the Clinton 
administration opposes the 
bib in its current form, it is 
likely to pass, although with 
some amendments. 

"This is one of the rop pri- 
orities of this Republican 
Congress." Mr. Gingrich 
said Wednesday as he met 
with more than 30 leaders of 
religious organizations, 
which, with a few exceptions, 
represented Christianity’s 
fundamentalist and evangel- 
ical denominations. 

Stare Department officials 
have objected that the bill is a 
blunderbuss approach that re- 
moves their flexibility in 
combating religious persecu- 
tion around the world. 

They also complain that 
while the sanctions in the bill 
are relatively modest, their 
imposition could bans U.S. - 
relations with such key allies 


as Saudi Arabia and Egypt 

Administration officials 
say privately, however, that 
they would be willing to dis- 
cuss possible alternatives to 
the measure, including more 
monitoring of religious har- 
assment around the world, in- 
creasing reports to publicize 
the practice in such countries 
as Sudan. Iran. China, Egypt 
and Indonesia and insuring 
that current human right laws 
explicitly cover repression of 
religious minorities. 

In the last year, using de- 
nominational newsletters and 
broadcasts on Christian radio 
and television stations, such 
groups as the National As- 
sociation of Evangelicals, the 
Southern Baptist Convention 
and the Family Research 
Council have quietly built up 
a powerful grass-roots con- 


stituency that has pressured 
the Clinton administration 
and Congress into taking a 
number of steps. 

Last year, the groups pres- 
sured the White House ro 
agree to set up a committee to 
recommend ways to fight re- 
ligious persecution around 
the world. This summer, the 
State Department issued a re- 
port on me harassment of re- 
ligious minorities, with an 
emphasis on persecution of 
Christians. 

The groups also steered the 
debate over the trading status 
of China to include that coun- 


try’s persecution of Christi- 
ans. And now the religious 
persecution bill has picked up 
die endorsement of the leaders 
of both Houses of Congress. 

Leaders of the movement 
say their efforts are revital- 
izing what had become a 
moribund human rights 
movement. 

The new group is being 
greeted with both enthusiasm 
and wariness by traditional 
liberal human rights groups 
and mainstream religious or- 
ganizations that have nor- 
mally have been involved in 
foreign policy matters. 


UNDING POINT 

TO THE JAPANESE MARKET 


This way to 



English 
books 

to Jiior door 
in 7-12 dovw 

SGtfXl titles' not a dub 'free nfeioq 
Tel: +33 (0)1 39 0701 01 
Fax: +33 (0)1 3907 0077 



Don’t miss it A lot happens there. 


LASSERRE 

isopen 

since 2nd September 

r 17, avenue FfOflWIn-Roosejeit 

i M43S9 53 43 & 01 43596745. 


R INVESTMENT INFORMATION 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday in the IHT. 



m WQRU>ajAimiE3gSEtf ER 



■ Located just 5 minutes from 
Kansai- International Airport, the most 
accessible hub.cormecring to dries all over 
Japan and the Asia-Pacific region. 

Furnished office space at a most 
reasonable rent is available at Rinku 
Business Center (RBC) on the 14th floor of 
Rinku Gate Tower Building-the landmark of 
Rinku Town- to support foreign enterprises 
in their successful business operations. 

For further information 

hnp: // www. rinku. or.jp/invitarionJ 


Rinku Gate Tower Building Co., Ltd. 
Izumisano City, Osaka 598 japan 
Tel.: (81)724 601014 
Fax: (81)724 601002 

Osaka Prefecrural Rinku Center Foundation 

Tel.: (81)724 60 1502 
Fax: (81)724601510 




?- PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEM BER 12, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC " 


i 

Taleban Reneges on Opium Pledge 


By Christopher S. Wren 

Afrir Kw* Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The Muslim fun- 
HamAnraiia T Taleban movement has 
pledged to crack down on opium poppy 
cultivation in Afghanistan, but opium 
production there has jumped by more 
than 20 percent over the last year, with 
almost all of the increase occurring in 
Taleban-controUed areas, according to 
UN Drug Control Program officials- 

The agency's 1997 survey estimates 
that Afghan opium production rose to 
about 2,800 metric tons this year from 
2300 metric tons in 1996- UN officials 
report rhat Afghanistan now produces 
the raw Ingredient for nearly half of the 
world's heroin. 

Last year, Afghanistan ranked second 
to Burma, which produced 2300 metric 
■ions of opium, according to a U.S. State 

Department estimate. 

Pino Ariacchi, executive director of 
the UN Drug Control Program, said the 
increase could mean more heroin flow- 
ing into Europe at lower prices. Euro- 
pean heroin users consume about 80 
percent of the heroin refined from opium 
grown in Afghanistan. Part of the re- 
mainder reaches the U.S. market, which 
is dominated by heroin from Colombia 
and Southeast Asia. 

Mr. Ariacchi said he would raise his 
concerns about the output of Afghan 
opium at meetings Thursday and Friday 


with other UN officials in New York. 

“I want to inform them because we 
are very worried about the increase,” 
Mr. Ariacchi said. 

A U.S. counterdrug official in Wash- 
ington expressed no surprise at the UN 
estimate of Afghanistan's opium crop. 
“Production has skyrocketed, we know 
that, and production is sanctioned by the 
Taleban.” die official said. 

Officials say the Taleban, which has 
seized power in 22 of Afghanistan's 32 
provinces, controls 96 percent of its 
poppy-growing areas. The increase in 
output resulted from higher poppy 
yields, which were attributed to favor- 
able weather, improved cultivation tech- 
niques and the shifting of some farmland 
to poppy cultivation, the UN survey es- 
timated. The total number of acres under 
poppy cultivation increased by only 2.8 
percent, however, it added. UN survey 
teams based their estimate on visits to 18 
provinces. 

The report offered fresh evidence that 
the Taleban has not fulfilled its promises 
to crack down on opium production. 
Taleban officials say they cannot stop 
peasants from growing opium poppies 
without other crops to substitute, and 
argue that persuading them to switch 
depends on economic assistance from 
the international community. 

The United States and many other 
countries have kept the Taleban at atm's 
length because of its violent rise to power 


and repressive policies, like the relegation 
of women to inferior status. But inter- 
national officials and journalists traveling 
in Afghanistan reported that the Taleban 
is not just tolerating opium production but 
also taxing it for much-needed revenue 
and that Taleban militiamen have been 
seen guarding opium warehouses and 
helping transport the crop. 

Taleban officials, while denying any 
invol vement in the opium trade, concede 
that it is flourishing. “Huge areas of 
A fghanistan are u nder poppy cultiva- 
tion, and when we ban it. we will have to 
give the farmers something in return, 
and the Islamic state of Afghanistan is 
not in a position to do this,” said Abdur 
Rahman Hotaqi, Taleban’s deputy min- 
ister of culture. 

Mir Najibuilah Shams, secretary-gen- 
eral of Afghanistan's drug-control com- 
mission, said: “From an economic point 
of view, it is difficult to find an alternative 
to growing poppies. The seed is cheap and 
it is not necessary to use many pesticides 
or much water. And it is a robust crop.' ’ 

Afghanistan is one of six countries 
identified by the U.S. State Deportment 
as not cooperating sufficiently in the 
international fight against illegal drugs. 
The other countries are Colombia. Iran, 
Burma, Nigeria and Syria. 

The State Department report said, 

‘ 'While the Taleban banned opium pro- 
duction in late 1996, it made no effort to 
enforce this ban.” 



STREET HABIT — A youth taking a dose of heroin 
Thursday in Karachi, Pakistan. The authorities say the 
dty of 10 million people has 350,000 heroin addicts. 



E- Funds 

International Funds via E-mail 

A new service for IHT readers. 


SMfiWhat is E-Funds? 

E- Funds is a regular updates on the 

internationd updates are delivered 

automaticaJj^|^|^^#mail box daily. r , 


iftliHow 

To ad( 
the be 
For e| 
wouS 
listirS 
your| 
updai 




*group, send an^gagagdl message to @ iht.com 5 ' - in 

e message^flH^KRIBE foUog^^ the fund 
|p, to subscri^^^^^^^TO^al Asset IW^^^^aient fund- 
f faml codes next to the 

the Internat^^^^pnds page of the^^^^ 7 ithin 5 minij|||| 
iription will ^^gistered and you "^^^^in to receive- 


m to receive - 1 


Mmm. 


asan 


|How 9Niy funds majrPsubscribe to? 

You ma^^^^ribe but 

e-mail message to a; 

first text 


EX as the 




Brought to you in collaboration with NOKIA, the official E-Funds sponsor. 


Follow your funds 
via the 


it. ' ^ fern* 

v My 

^ ****** 

^ i Tf'i i T r rn 


ibunc 


>w> .. 


I UuiHI Sufi*** 9 

h***'*£?*‘“ : 


i. 


THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


TuAssacuteJ Press 

j BEUING — China issued 
i new rules Thursday !o restrict 
exports of nuclear weapons 
1 and technology, pledging not 
to transfer the materials to 
countries opposing interna- 
; tional safeguards, 
i The regulations, if stnee 
enough, would meei a key 
U.S. demand in negotiations 
to end a ban on U.S. compa- 
nies’ building nuclear power 
plants in China. 

* They would also counter 
persistent U.S. criticism of 
suspected Chinese nuclear 
exports to Pakistan and Iran 
and improve the atmosphere 
for President Jiang Zemin’s 
j meeting in Washington next 
I month with President Bill 
Clinton. 

The new regulations re- 
i quire all sales of nuclear tech- 
nology' abroad to be approved 
by the’ State Council, or cab- 
i ineL the Xinhna press agency 
i said. 

Exports will also be subject 
to- the supervision of inter- 
national nuclear agencies 
and, without government ap- 
proval, recipients may not 


■ third countries operating out- 
: side international supervi- 

■ sion. the rules say. 

i '“The government prohib- 
j iis provi ding help to nuclear 
•! facilities not subject to the 
- supervision of international 
: atomic agencies and will not 
i provide exports, personnel, 
: technical exchange or co- 

■ operation to those facilities,” 
: therules continue. 

Prime Minister Li Peng ap- 


S oved the regulations Thurs-. 
y, Xinhua reported. • - -• 
U.S. Embassy officials 
could not be reached imme- 
diately for comment ... 

State Department expats 
have held repeated meetings 
with Chinese officials - : 
the last year to help draft & ; . 
oroas nuclear export rutesu . 

Questions ' . perset, 

however, over Chinese noofe* 
ar exports, despite repeal . : 
commitments by Brijiag^jbt; \ 
to sell nuclear technology to 
countries and facilities, 2 
meeting International Atonp i 
Energy Agency guiddins^A 
The U.S, Arms Control 
Disarmament Agency t^d 
Congress last month tha&s: 

was uncertain whether 
was abiding by a pledge netfto 
provide technology tosuhpfe 
Pakistani facilities. - Tr. 

The United States has Asa 
pressured China nqrto.jK^/. 
Iran build a nuclear pousa: 
plant drat Washington fairs 
could be used to develop ' 
weapons. 

Prime Minister Beqpotia . 
Netanyahu of Israel said-fet 
month that Chinese offidaB ." 


stopped taking jXfft-m the 
project, but China has sot. 
publicly commented. - 
Such big U.S. nuclear 
vendors as Westinghouse ape? 
General Electric haveptishfed- 
hard far an agreement, which 
could bring them milannw of 
dollars in sales. >t 

Analysts say die accord 
will probably be die cetrtfcr- 
piece of the Clinton- Jiang 
meeting next month. - ' *'■ 





pj U>J fijM 




P r ■ 









’'Sc 








1 1 1 1 B ■ J L 

. * y ww* 

1 Jr* • (.-I* 




n k 

ETT^i 





Mother Teresa Tribute Begins S; 

CALCUTTA — Generals draped the Indian flag tiva£f 
the body of Mother Teresa on Thursday, beginning a stater- 
tribute to the nun who turned her good works in Calcutta’^ 
slums into a worldwide charity. 

About 100 nuns of Mother Teresa's Missionaries ^ 
Charity, wearing the order's blue and white saris, mur^ ! 
mured a prayer while the soldiers gathered for the five** 
minute ceremony in St. Thomas Church. . ■ ■ Sj. 

Six jenerals marched in carrying the saffr on; white an^ 
green flag, raised the banner over their heads, then lowered* 
it, leaving Mother Teresa’s feet and face exposed. . ! 5 A 
Three officers then took up positions behind the bodjf 
in a vigil that will continue until Mother Teresa’s body 
taken for a state funeral on Saturday. : . ■ (AP$ 

Chinese Release 111 in Tibet | 

’ r" - . .**■ f 

BEIJING — Chinese authorities in Tibet have granted 
early releases to 1 11 prisoners, including some jailed foes 
counterrevolutionary and separatist offenses, a court afs? 
ncial said Thursday. > 

The released prisoners were among 132 in Tibet whosi& 
sentences were commuted or who won parole for good-* 
behavior and a penitent attitude, said the official or thtf* 
L rf^- lnCenTiediar y Peo P !e "s Court. . 

Officials released two prisoners- jailed on counter-*'* 
revolutionary charges after their original sentences wer^P 
commuted by three months, the official said. /Reuters# 

■g£ 

Kashmir Protest Is Broken Up 

^ dia — Indian police detained thred^ 
SriSf; s main ^ParatiSTs riiiance anddozeh& 
against as . lhey remonstrated on Thursday! 

°The un ' ?' d ^ n ,L abl ^ es ' P 0110 ® and witnesses said. £ 
rnnfi? d A 0 /.^ 6 ^ Parties Humyai (FreedomH 
Mir-^i Lone, Yasin Malik and Javitg L 

Ix^riStaSStE!?" said S? demonstration. led by M&j 
four persons ° n pub ^ c gatherings of more thaffi 

«^„ P , r ° 4 eS M^.. carr ied placards reading^ 
witnesSTsil P itodia J ktilings and blasting housejs,^ 

(Reuters^ 

Ramos Appeals for Backing % 

hanging on to rower ^ cusaUo ^ that he was bentoo*: 

tite PhLpL^to a endS ^ ^ 

trying to punch holes in ft h & S ^ 1 ?' wllil ^ opponenw*A 
him or not FiUpS £ -^^^hethertfi^hated^ 
‘•because its the^hol^cah^?^ lp J«jP * e ship afloat-f 
million of us. ” ° caboodle that is on board — 7G^ 

— (Reuterspfl 





PAGES* 


INTERNATW 


*hina 

>n Atomic s p ^ 

Si 


**Vl ^ y,5~£> fca. SEPTEMBER 84. 1W 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY* SEPTEMBER 12,1 997 


PAGE 5 




1 * :i • ' * ■. . : 5 


~ \ ^ i I'"' * ! i j-l'-V ;•! 


Scotland Goes to Polls 
To Decide Its Destiny 




ByDanBalz 

. ^ Hitttoifffluti Post Service 

EDINBL'RGH — Kenneth Dal- 
i gieish. an' Edinburgh postman, emerged 
■ifrom the polling place at Dairy primary 
> school here Thursday morning after vot- 
ing to create Scotland’s first parliament 
m 300 years. "I want to see Scotland 
.'■sunning our own affairs/’ he said. "1 
- -Want to see us make our own mistakes 
. ‘•and blame ourselves rather than Eng- 
j-.land.”. 

Gail McNaughion emerged a few 
j . minutes later pushing a stroller, accom- 
; _'ji panied by her husband, Lawrence. Both 
1 1 had voted in favor of the referendum to 
■| ii establish a parliament and to give it the 
•- power to raise or lower taxes. “What 
*i made me decide was a future for my son 

• frr— hopefully a better future.” she said. 
■i.V Education, job prospects, everything.” 

With pre-election opinion polls pre- 
dicting victory for both sides of the 
'•^devolution referendum. Scotland on 
•^Thursday stood ar the edge of history — 
•iand possibly at the edge of the un- 

• 1 known. 

1 1 - ‘ The referendum Thursday to form an 
elected parliament in Scotland repre- 
j.isenrs the cornerstone of Prime Minister 
’-Tony Blair's agenda to devolve power 
!®way from the national government in 
'••London, an agenda that he said would 
.‘create “a menfem constitution fora new 
'■-.age” in this nation. 

It is also the first step toward re- 
lish aping the identity' of a nation. Op- 
^•rponents say that, eventually, it could 
Lvtear the United Kingdom apart. 

'• . The next phase will come on Sept. 1 8. 
-•when Wales holds a referendum on cre- 
ating its own assembly, which would 
1 have fewer powers than the proposed 
; Scottish parliament. Support for home 
o' rule there appears more tepid than in 
" Scotland. 

_ Public-opinion polls here suggested 
the Scottish parliament, which would 
IJecome operational in 2000, enjoyed 
r-strong popular backing. A more con- 
troversial proposal, also on the ballot, to 
;^give the parliament the power to raise 
taxes enjoys less support but appears to 
■'-be gathering momentum. 

Proponents expressed confidence 
i .-that both issues would be approved, but 
they were also pushing for a sizable 
turnout Thursday to show that there was 
r enthusiastic support for the new course 
!• -r.Mr. Blair hopes to chan for Britain. 

Final opinion polls suggested a 68 
^■percent turnout, but the BBC said fewer 

• .-people had been to the polling booths in 

the first few hours of voting than at the 
riMav 1 general election. Reuters report- 
red. First results were not expected until 


EUROPE 


late Thursday night. “This is on im- 
portant change, a real shake-up of our 
constitution." Donald Dewar, the sec- 
retary of state for Scotland and the La- 
bour Party government's point man in 
the campaign, said in an interview as he 
joined other pro-referendum forces in a 
last round of campaigning. “It is an 
attempt to see if the British Constitution 
can adapt to the 21st century." 

The parliament, if approved, would 
have responsibility for most domestic 
matters affecting Scotland, from health, 
education and housing to transportation 
and criminal justice. The British gov- 
ernment would retain responsibility for 
national economic policy and the cur- 
rency, national defense and foreign 
policy. 

Perhaps by coincidence, the vote 
Thursday came 700 years to the day 
after William Wallace led his Scottish 
rebels to victory against the English at 
the Battle of Stirling Bridge. It was 
Wallace's life and death that inspired 
the Oscar- winning movie “Brave- 
heart." which was as popular here as in 
the United States. Many people dismiss 
the “Braveheart” factor as "Holly- 
wood hype,” but there are clear echoes 
of Scottish pride and national identity 
wrapped up in the referendum. 

“We’re a nation." said John Gram, a 
warehouse worker who lives just out- 
side Edinburgh and strongly supports 
the parliament. “We’re not a region of 
the United Kingdom — we’re a coun- 
try/' 

Kendra Thompson, 28, a teacher, 
said: "We are a completely different 
country, with completely different 
blood, completely different thinking. 
We’re a completely different people.” 

But John Gunderson said he believed 
those in favor of a new parliament are 
about to make a huge mistake. “I think 
the heart is ruling the head,” be said. 



XiKlHT OfMiniK ^ 

A Boy Scout picking up teddy bears Thursday at St 
James's Palace in London as the cleanup of memorials 
began. Bears and toys will be given to needy children. 

Court Frees Krenz for Appeal 

Reuierj 

BERLIN — Egon Krenz, the last East German Com- 
munist leader, walked from a Berlin jail Thursday, 
pending an appeal against his conviction for man- 
slaughter. 

Mr. Krenz was found guilty Last month in connection 
with the killing of people as they tried to flee from East 
Germany to the West over the Berlin Wall or through the 
bonier zone. 

He pushed his way past television cameras and climbed, 
into a gray car that his son drove away. 

Mr. Krenz, 60, was jailed at once after his conviction on 
Aug. 25. even though the verdict was not yet legally 
binding, because authorities feared he would flee. 

His lawyers lodged a complaint and the court agreed. 


Protestant Leaders in Ulster Assail U.S. 


New York Times Sen ice 

BELFAST — Protestant political leaders have 
attacked the Clinton administration far its decision 
to suspend deportation action against six former 
Irish Republican Army convicts now living in the 
United States. 

The U.S. decision was announced Tuesday night 
within hours of the acceptance by Sinn Fein, the 
IRA political wing, of principles committing Sinn 
Fein to nonviolence. 

The acceptance, at a meeting in Belfast presided 
over by the chairman of the Northern Ireland peace 
talks, tiie former U.S. Senate majority leader 
George Mitchell, qualified Sinn Fein for a place at 
the table when the talks resume next Monday. 


The Protestant leaders saw the decision by the 
Justice Department, made at the acknowledged 
request of the State Department, as a payoff to Sinn 
Fein for its first formal acceptance of nonviolence 
in its efforts to change the political status of this 
British province at die talks. 

Most Protestant leaders here see the Clinton 
administration as favoring the Republican move- 
ment, which has many supporters in Washington 
and New York. The six had served jail sentences 
for terrorist offenses in the 1960s and 1970s. 

Ian Paisley Jr., an official of the hard-line Demo- 
cratic Unionist Party headed by his father, called 
the decision a "disgraceful act of international 
cowardice.” 


Diana Inquiry 
Seen as Lasting 
Well Into 1998 


Cimpi-'J-.n On’ SzifFi.tK Oi<pn. to 1 ? 

PARIS — The investigation into the 
crash that killed Diana. Princess of 
Wales, could take months and last well 
into next year, judicial sources said 
Thursday, ruling out no line of inquiry. 

While evidence against Henri Paul, 
driver of the car, appears increasingly 
compromising, detectives said they 
were determined to follow up ail leads 
to find out what happened in the minutes 
before the Aug. 31 crash. 

Three tests have shown that Mr. 
Paul’s blood-alcohol level was more 
than three times over the legal limit. On 
Wednesday it also was revealed that he 
had two ami -depressant drugs in his 
blood as well. 

If the investigation were finished by 
June 1998, it would be “an excellent 
result.” said a judicial source, declining 
to be more specific about when the in- 
vestigation may reach its conclusions. 

Critics, notably British tabloid news- 
papers. have attacked the apparent 
slowness of the French inquiry. But 
French judicial sources pointed out thar 
the average length of a criminal in- 
vestigation in 1995 was 16 months. 

A lawyer for the father of Diana's 
friend Dodi al Fayed, who also was killed 
in the crash, conceded Thursday that the 
drunk chauffeur bore some blame, but he 
said photographers bore more. 

Bernard Dartevelle, a lawyer for Mo- 
hamed al Fayed — whose Ritz Hotel 
employed the driver — said the hotel 
bore no responsibility, since manage- 
ment did nor know that the chauffeur 
was drunk and taking prescription 
drugs, including Prozac. 

Mr. Dartevelle repeated his conten- 
tion that primary blame for the accident 
lay with photographers. “If the latest 
blood tests are accurate. I can't deny 
there is responsibility of Henri Paul, 
who shouldn't have taken the wheel 
with such a level of alcohol,” he said. 
Yet, he added, "I would say it's almost 
a secondary responsibility. There is an 
initial responsibility of the paparazzi 
who led the aggressive chase of the 
Mercedes.” (AFP. AP) 

■ A Slovakian Apology 

Slovakia apologized Thursday after 
two of its citizens were jailed for stealing 
objects that had been left ourside West- 
minster Abbey as tributes to Diana, Reu- 
ters reported from London. Two women 
— Maria Rigolova. a 56-year-old tour 
guide, and Agnese Sihelksa, 50, who is 
unemployed — were each jailed for 28 
days after pleading guilty to taking 11 
teddy bears, flowers and other items. 


France Probes Sterilisations 

PARIS — The French government has ordered an 
investigation into a newspaper report that about 15,000 
French women deemed mentally or physically inferior 
have been sterilized without consent in recent years, 
French television reported. 

According to the investigative and satirical weekly 
Charlie-Hebdo, published Wednesday, the women were 
deemed unfit for motherhood. 

It is against French law to sterilize an individual 
withour consent. f AP) 

Turks Try Police Officer as Spy 

ANKARA— A Turkish military court began the trial 
Thursday of a former senior intelligence officer who is 
accused of having spied on the secularist army for the 
former Islamist -led government, the Anatolian News 
Agency said. 

Buieni Orakoglu is accused of taking documents and 
information gathered by a “mole” at the naval headquar- 
ters and passing them to the government w’hileNecmecrin 
Erbakan was prime minister. (Reuters) 

Italian Financier 1$ Extradited 

MILAN — An Iralian financier. Felice Rovelli. ex- 
tradited from the United States on suspicion of bribery, 
arrived home here Thursday and was detained, judicial 
sources said. 

Mr. Rovelli. 38. had been in jail in Rhode Island since 
May 30 on an extradition request by Italian magistrates, 
carrying out a probe involving the Rovelli family, the 
Italian bank IMJ and the family chemical company SIR. 

Milan prosecutors suspect that S40 million paid to 
three lawyers by Mr. Rovelli and his mother were bribes 
that helped his late father. Nino, win a S650 million court 
award involving IM1 and SIR. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

Norway's governing Labor Party surged ahead in 
opinion polls on Thursday, passing a barrio- of 36.9 
percent of voter support it says is the minimum it wants to 
stay in power. (Reuters) 


Do you live in Austria, 
Belgium, Luxembourg 
or Sweden ? 

For information about subscribing call: 

• .Austria 01891 363 830 
Belgium 0800 17538 (toll-free) 
Luxembourg 0800 2703 (toll-free) 

Sweden 020797039 (toll-free). 

Hcratb^Sribunc 

.D» r» I— “• ™ —* 

_______ TOE WORLDS mm NEWSPAPER 






'.h[i 

- f Js< 1 " 



A new force in 

Total Wealth Management 

We have brought together our private banks and their respective affiliates around the world under the 
EFG Bank Group name. The following name changes are taking place: 


Banque de Depots SA, Geneva 
Banque de Depots SA, Zurich 

The Private Bank & Trust Company Limited, London 


EFG Bank European Financial Group 
EFG Private Bank SA 
EFG Private Bank Limited 


llicruvfllti/aimwv r - J v T * J 

The Private Bank &c Trust Company (Guernsey) Limited EFG Private Bank (Channel Islands) Limited 

ti ■* i r a 


EuroMerchant Bank SA, Greece EFG Eurobank SA 

Banque de Depots (Luxembourg) SA EFG Private Bank (Luxembourg) SA 

Eurofinanciere d’Investissements sam, Monaco EFG Eurofinanciere dTrivestissements sam 

BDD Capital International Corporation, Miami EFG Capital International Corporation 

EFG Bank Group with its head office in Switzerland has capital of 1 billion Swiss francs and 15 biUion 
Swiss francs of clients’ assets under administration and management. We offer our clients a powerful resource 
in the management of private wealth. A dedicated team of experts with long experience offers a wide range 
of personalised services that include Private Banking, Asset Management, Trust Services and Corporate 

Advisory Services. . 


For more information, please contact: 

Zurich: Lawrence Howell (+41) 1 226 17 17 
London: Ian Buckley (+44) 0171 491 9111 


EFG 


0 


r „eva Zurich Lausanne, London, Athens, Luxembourg, Monaco, Guernsey, Jersey, Miami, Sac Paulo, British Virgin Islands, Bermuda 

TMs investment advertisement is approved by EFG Private Bank Limited which is regulated by IMRO 








JPAGE6 


INTEBNATIOWAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 

International 


_ »_ . — - 

As Bosnia Tensions Rise, So Do Western Calls for Decisive Force 

..... i Iflfi nercei 


_ , from positions seized earlier in die crisis, and 

By Chris Hedges many of the Bosnian Serbs who previously had 

- • New York Times Service appeared willing to defy the pro- Kara d zi c lead- 

Despite setback, for Serbian hard-Un^ 1 "'° ^ “ fl * d to *" 

Bosnia recent days, ^eis nsmg ^ Becau3c 0 f the West’s open support for Mrs. 

* amon § NATO cominaDders and senior ^ Plavsic the Karadzic leadership had also 
diplomats that more force will be needed to make ^ sterns* foe 


The offirials said NATO was considering shut- 
ting down Bosnia’s press, mostly controlled by 
ham-liners, if it does not curb its extremist ihetonc 


Bui as Karadzic forces oigarad mcreasing w** 1 ?- “ beM 


Despite setbacks for Serbian hard-liners in 
Bosnia in recent days, there is rising concern 

... ma , . 1 WKlpm 


uam-mins, u- “ . - 

and respect the demands of Dayton agreement. 
TheU-S- officials also said that they wot 


But as Karadzic forces organized increasing weea uuot«. will be no lackof 

opposition, mchidiiffi a mob assault on U.S- troops the 

Aug. 28 in the disputed border town of Brcko, rasoiw frra NATO. , . community 





TheU 5 officials also said that they would 
remove Momcilo Krajisnic, a Karadzic loyalist. 


Au* 28 in tbetfispnted border town of Brcko, b ie international conmumily 

NATO co mm a n de r s, always wary of casualties. The rmrerwi y orem i z3 ii(ms trying to 
began to get jittery, senior diplomats said. 


began to get jittery, senior dipionris said. hu arm SSSBe' 

In towns like Brcko and Byeljim, which are exan rale. areiK 


i the Dayton peace plan work. 

A series of tense confrontations between sup- 

_ , " j fc yilmno 


threatened to boycott mum 
this weekend. But die hard 


n. ««K3 Vi tw*"- wuuvu— - 

■ porters of the Bosnian Serb president, Biljana 

! Plavsic, and those of Radovan “f 

■ hard-liner who holds real political power in 1 me Werfnesdav and said they would oar- the neace agreement is to move forward. officers who once DacKefl tier nave wHDorawn sauu> *y** 7“ r f A Goober- ■ 

Bosnian Serb lenclave. has ticipaieK^g- A boycott wotod have (St ^‘^^U^goverament and the alliance ^wp^brauseof teats » themselves or drLmtedtSt itspoDwoS- . 

lomats here it tsma^l^ly^ ^ to toe faltering effort to build are stronger than ever in their comriction tefte di^ftimh^these offices ^bfSNATO^tection for the local / 

only way to make *e .^cords take common institutions in Bosnia. kev to all of this is die removal of Karadzic from U.S. troops have withdrawn in the. last few ers p arwkend. somethinn NATO, own- . 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


presidency meetings and c 
scuttle the peace agreement. 


^P, ^ |CO«nmail_ ^ t , • i- „ ' *££ to cany out its m an d ate to . 


> l - . " ^ . 


selves Wednesday and said they would 
ticipaie in the voting. A boycott would have 


only way iu un. - . , . 

NATO troops to arrest Mr. Karadzic, who has 

been indicted for war crimes. ATr > 

Mrs. Plavsic’s obvious dependence 00 NATO 
was illustrated again Tuesday, when altiaijai 
troops intervened in a confrontation between 

HW r° * . . , » _ ni cmnnrron: nf 


anomer DIOW IU LUC laiuiiug vuuu tu uuuu OlC suuugw — — — . — 

common institutions in Bosnia. key to all of this is the reinoval . ^? < T IC “ om 

“We have reached the Rubicon,” a Weston power,” said a senior official in Washington, 
diplomat said. “Either we are happy to pour mil- “Every step we’ve taken in the last few days and 
linncnf dollars into Bosnia and set nothin? ont of it. weeks has had that objective.” 


or we lake a step that may mean that some soldiers pie decision _by_^T^to_se. 2 e g bcesaUMS overseeing the peace agreement say 


tneiriamilies,ineseomciaissaaa. , ■ f uvm ' f nr the local 

U.S. troops have withdrawn in die last few ers be given NATO prot m atd 

days from a guard post at the bridge in Bidco elections next weekend, 

where crowds, many bused in from outside, the Office of dw* 

injured two soldiers with bricks and clubs. They UN officials and those . .... 

J . . ■ _ DanrAbmranvp the chiet civilian asenev 




'liners to make a humiliating withdrawal. But the Senior Clinton admdnistration t 

Success of that action did little to calm fears that Washington insisted this week tfr 
"Western resolve to weaken the power of Mr. policy to isolate Mr. Karadzic has n 
' Karadzic is faltering. and said this position was reinforcec 

In recent days NATO troops have pulled back level White House meeting Monday. 


avoid arrest. 


aL luc dim. ' — _ 

U.S. officials said they did not see these moves has left them dnwfconJess. 
as a retreat. “This is not some desperate effort to “We donotknow if we 

support Plavsic.” said a senior official in Wash- with the Karadzic officials or igi^ tei, sa^ . . 
ington. “She has a lot of popular support, and her an international official ® BrcI “- ^ 

side has made up a lot of ^ound in the last few Sarajevo seems able to make any decisions. 


for rti- 


Russia Denounces NATO on Bosnia 






BOSNIA: 

U.S. Sends Planes 


Alliance Is Warned Not to Attack Karadzic’s TV Station in Pale 


Continued from Page 1 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington post Service 


BRUSSELS — Russia delivered a 
- harsh warning to the NATO allies on 
■ " Thursday to stop putting pressure on the 


ticipating in the force, which is made up 
of some 31,000 soldiers from 30 coun- 
tries. 

In recent weeks, the United States and 


stop broadcasting anti-peace accord pro- 


its European allies have given open sup- 
prat to the Bosnian Serb president, Bti- 


Bosnian Serbs and said that any attack Jana Plavsic, in her power struggle with 


' against the Serbian radio and television 
! station in Pale would be an intolerable 

* use of force that could imperil the peace- 

* keeping mission. 

» The vehement criticism of Western 
; policy toward Bosnia was expressed at a 
three-hour meeting of Russian and 

* -NATO ambassadors, who gathered at 
; allian ce headquarters here to launch a 

* consultative council that is supposed to 

* serve as the cornerstone of a new se- 
- curity partnership between Moscow and 
; the West. 

Vitali Churkin, Russia’s envoy to the 
; North Atlantic Treaty Organization, said 
! jhe aggressive new western approach to 
the Bosnia peacekeeping mission was 
incompatible with its rules of engage- 
' ment. 

.. . He warned that using force beyond 
self-defense could destroy the fragile 
.. truce in Bosnia and further damage the 
i Russia-NATO relationship that Has been 

* strained by alliance plans to embrace 
Poland, Hungary and the Czech Repub- 

* lie as new members. 

■ H NATO and Russian foreign ministers 

* intend to meet later this month at the 
United Nations in New York to thrash 

. but a common strategy toward Bosnia 
•; and a possible “exit strategy” for peace - 

■ keeping troops there. About 8,000 
‘‘ Americans and 1,400 Russians are par- 


the hard-line faction in Pale led by 
Radovan Karadzic, who has been in- 
dicted for war crimes. The tactical shift 
has angered the Russians, who have re- 
cently drawn closer to Belgrade and 
Pale, according to NATO diplomats. 

NATO officials said they Hoped Rus- 
sia’s position would soften if elections to 
be held in Bosnia this weekend 
strengthen Mis. Plavsic’s hand and in- 
flict a setback on Mr. Karadzic and other 
figures opposed to the Dayton peace 
accords. But they voiced dismay at the 
Russian views as enunciated by Mr. 
Churkin on Thursday. 

“It turned out to be a very disagree- 
able meeting,” a senior NATO diplomat 


The United Stares announced that it 
was sending three aircraft with special 
equipment to jam radio and television 
signals and block the Pale broadcasts. 
Mr. Churkin called this action deplor- 
able because, he said, it violated freedom 
of the press. NATO diplomats said it was . 
an amusing irony to see a Russian envoy 
lecturing toe Americans about toe sanc- 
tity of democratic freedoms. 

Besides a potential showdown over 
Bosnia, toe meeting of foreign ministers 




"Cl 


in New York is expected to approve a 
wotk program for toe NATO-Russia 


work program for toe NATO-Russia 
council 

The agenda will cover toe future of 
peacekeeping arrangements in Bosnia, 
Albania and other hot spots, nuclear 
proliferation, terrorism and disaster re- 
lief as well as military doctrine and 
strategy in the post-Cold War era. 

Poland. Hungary and toe Czech Re- 


said. “There were a lot of complaints public are woiried that toe alliance's 


around toe table. This was not a good 
omen for toe future work of the NATO- 
Russia council.” 

Mr. Churkin complained that toe 
United States and its Western partners 
were “not acting in an even-handed 
way” in Bosnia. He accused them of 
violating toe terms of toe peacekeeping 
mission by pursuing Serbian war crim- 
inals. brandishing renewed trade sanc- 
tions if Slobodan Milosevic — the 


Yugoslav president and key power 
broker — does not cooperate, and toreat- 


- does not cooperate, and threat- 
ening to jam and possibly bomb the Pale 
radio and television station if it does not 


complex new partnership with Russia — 
which was conceived to defuse Mos- 
cow’s hostility toward NATO’s eastern 
expansion — will slow their own ne- 
gotiations with the alliance on toe terms 
of accession. 

NATO military, financial and legal 
experts opened talks with toe new part- 
ners this week with toe goal of concluding 
negotiations by the end of October. 

The final agreement spelling out how 
toe three will be incorporated into de- 
fense and political structures is supposed 
to be ready for signmg by NATO foreign 
ministers at a meeting in December. 


I ;'X'- 

{ * S- 
» ... 


SEr 


Ofcs Popcr»®nitert 

A Bosnian Serb woman walking her cow Thursday in front of Italian 
peacekeeping troops patrolling in an armored personnel carrier near Pale. 



Amid High Hopes, Rohatyn Takes Post in France 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


. PARIS — Felix Rohatyn officially 
took over as U.S. ambassador to France 
on Thursday, entering toe job at a dif- 
ficult moment when the two countries 
seem to have reached a new low in 
mutual misapprehensions and frustra- 
tion. 

The uncertainties have become so 
deep between toe two capitals that toe 
Clinton administration has urged Mr. 
Rohatyn to start his mission cautiously 
with what a senior State Department 


of the irritated tone that colors U.S.- 
French relations these days, even among 
elites that are usually more sympathetic 
to each other in both countries. 

Even before he presented his creden- 
tials on Thursday to President Jacques 
Chirac, Mr. Rohatyn had met unoffi- 
cially with prominent French people, 
including businessmen of toe son thai he 
dealt with as a banker. 

A French participant at one such 
meeting said mat Mr. Rohatyn reacted 
with diplomatic readiness to listen when 
he was assailed with complaints about 
alleged U.S. excesses and shortcomings 


entiai French connections arising from 
his role in facilitating deals between 
businesses in both countries as a top 


brings another precious asset for an am- 
bassador access to toe White House. 
Personal clout with President Bill 


executive in toe New York office of Clinton was a prime factor in the record 


official described as “trying to get a on a range of issues from aerospace 


Quota PUtim^men 

Felix Rohatyn lived in France as a 
youth and is fluent in the language. 


conversation going' ’ with toe French — 
a phrase that seems to underscore toe 
cool distance between the two govern- 
ments. 

Already, Mr. Rohatyn has had a taste 


competition and African affairs to 
changes in toe NATO alliance. 

A successful investment banker, cred- 
ited with saving New York city from 
bankruptcy in toe 1970s, he has infla- 


Lazard Freres, toe French-led invest- 
ment firm. 

A particular asset is Mr. Rohatyn’s 
excellent French, daring back to the 
childhood years he spent in France be- 
fore fleeing the Nazi occupiers and 
Vichy regime in 1942. Mr. Rohatyn’s 
family were Jewish refugees from Vi- 
enna. where he was born in 1928. 

Mr. Rohatyn’s arrival as ambassador 
was preceded by his reputation in polit- 
ical circles as a banker with a social 
conscience, an image stemming from his 
prominence in toe Democratic Party. 

That background plus his financial 
contributions over toe years to Demo- 
cratic causes ensure that Mr. Rohatyn 


including lethal means, to protect our 
forces and to continue our mission.’ * ' - 

In recent days, NATO troops have 
faced down ang ry Serb protesters, taken ' 
control of broadcast towers and dis- . 
amW paramilitary police. But faced by. 
mounting resistance from Mr. Karad-- 
zic’s supporters, they have also polled r 
back frran some positions taken earlier, 
including one television transmitter. - ~ - - 

Amid this dangerous uncertainty, ' 
protests have risen in the U.S. Congress 
over what seems a growing likelihood of 
casualties before toe announced with- 
drawal of American troops in June . . ; 

The mission of the EC-130Es is con- 
sidered low-risk. Colonel Campbell 
said. The turboprop planes fly at very 
high altitude, beyond the range of-sur-. 
face-to-air missiles, in circular or el- 
liptical “orbits” that are offset from toe •- 
area they target 

Each plane. Colonel Campbell said, . 
typically carries a six-member aew and 
five technicians to operate broadcasting 
and jamming equipment. The planes are 
being accompanied to Brindisi by a total 
of about 120 crewmen, technicians, lin- _ 1 
guists and support petsaqod. 

■ 2.5 Miflion Registered to Vote 

About 25 milli on Bosnian citizens 
are registered for the local elections Sal- r 
urday and Sunday, in which governing 
councils will be chosen far toe country's 
136 municipalities. The Associated 
Press, reported. About, 0,4 million voters 
are outside the country. 

Ninety -two parties, nine coalitions 
and 130 independent candidates are 
competing in the bailotmg.organizcd by - 
toe Organization for Security and Co- 
operation in Europe. 

But toe three major ethnic-based 
parties — toe Muslim-led Party 'for 
Democratic Action, toe Croatian Demo- . 
cratic Union and toe Serb Democratic . 
Party — were expected to sweep the vote- 
in most areas where their ethnic group 
dominates. As of Thursday afternoon, 
toe Croatian Democratic Union was 
vowing to boycott toe vote. 

About 2^500 international monitors 


of his predecessor, Pamela Hardman. About 2400 international monitt 
Since her death in February, ties be- are in Bosnia to ensure fair balioting- 
tween Washington and Paris have 

suffered from Mr. Chirac’s demands to " ““ 


take over toe U.S .-held NATO com- 
mand in Naples and from toe arrival in 
power of a Socialist-led government. 

With his stature in global economics. 
Mr. Rohatyn “will want to be involved 
in the dialogue’ ’ underway in France and 
little understood yet in Washington, a 
State Department official said. His back- 
ground apparently has tailored him to be 
an ideal interlocutor for toe French So- 
cialists as they grapple with the pres- 
sures of international economic com- 
petition. • 


ISRAEL: 

Albright Is Rebuffed 

Continued from Page 1 


„ IRA: It’s Cool to Some Parts of Peace Plan 


Continued from Page 1 


mainland. The statement was certain to 


The spokesman did not say which 
principles would cause problems. 

One calls on all participants to use 


cause an uproar of indignation frran only peaceful means to oppose any sec- 


Procestant leaders opposed to Sinn 
Fein’s participation in toe talks, and was 
immediately criticized by toe Irish prime 
minister. Bertie Ahem, in Dublin. 

It was not clear what effect toe state- 
ments would have on toe peace talks, 
which are schednled to start discussing 
substantive issues Monday. 

- The first issue to be taken up is dis- 
armament of toe IRA and Protestant 
paramilitary groups. 


non of a peace agreement it did not 
approve. Another calls on participants to 
oppose any group using violence. 

In the context of the principles it sub- 
scribed to Tuesday, Sinn Fein would be 
obliged to oppose ERA violence in all 
situations. 

Apparently to dispel speculation that 
there is a real split between toe guerrillas 
and Sinn Fein, toe spokesman added: 
“Sinn Fein is a political party with a 
very substantial democratic mandate 


Sinn Fein has said that while it ad- very substantial democratic mar 
Heres to nonviolence, it cannot order the What they do is a matter for them. 

IRA to disarm as toe talks progress, as “But I think all republicans should 
the Protestants insist understand and support them as they do 

In effect, officials and experts said, what they believe is right and necessary 
the IRA was repeating its commitment to to bring about a lasting peace. Sinn 
-toe traditional two-pronged policy of Fein’s stated commitment is to secure a 


what it calls “die aimed struggle” by toe peace settlement that both removes toe 


guerrillas and efforts to negotiate 
peaceful settlement by Sinn Fein. 


causes of conflict and takes all toe guns 
— British, republican, unionist, nation- 


The interview also sought to show that alist and loyalist — out of Irish pol- 
while the IRA and Sinn Fein have dif- itics. 


< jFerent approaches to peace, there is no 
significant split between them. 

Both insist that they are separate or- 
- -ganizations, although most oidinaiy cit- 
izens and officials in Northern Ireland 
'believe that they are virtually the same. 

The statements will give Protestant 
, ^unionists new grounds for saying that 
* -Sinn Fein cannot be misted to deliver a 
♦.’permanent IRA cessation of violence. 

.“As to the IRA’s attitude toward the 
►^Mitchell Principles, per se,” toe spokes- 
*.jman said, referring to toe pledge of non- 
-violence, “the IRA would have prob- 
lems with sections of the Mitchell 
^Principles. But then toe IRA is not a 
'participant in these talks." 


“The Sinn Fein position actually goes 
beyond toe Mitchell Principles. Their 


affirmation of these principles is there- 
fore quite compatible with their pos- 
ition.” 

On toe key issue of disarmament, 
which is called decommissioning here, 
toe spokesman said: “No, our position 
on decommissioning has not changed in 
anywayatalL 

“I don't think anyone has ever real- 
istically expected us to agree to de- 
commissioning this side of a political - 

settlement. There is no historical pre- DRY RUN — Jean-Loup Chretien, the French member of the U.S. shuttle team scheduled to depart for the 

cedent in Ireland for such a demand. Russian space station Mir on Sept 25, stepping into an emergency basket during training for the mission 

• pan The astronau ‘ s Dave Wo1f ’ left ' ard Wend y Lawrence also took part. Mr. Wolf will remain on Mir! 



accusing Mr. Netanyahu's government 
of failing to honor "agreements that 
were signed at toe White House.” 

In response, Mrs. Albright offered 
words of encouragement to the Pales- 
tinian people. 

“Your frustrations are understand^ 
able. This is not what peace was sup- 
posed to bring,” she said. 

She assured them that “the United 
States is committed to this process and 
will be there to help.” 

“We stand by toe Oslo process and 
implementation of its agreements withe 
basis of reciprocity,” she added. ‘ 

That, too, represented a split between 
her and Mr. Netanyahu, who has ef- 
fectively repudiated the Oslo agree- 
ment’s step-by-step approach and called 
instead for “permanent status” nego- 
tiations to settle toe future of the Oc- 
cupied Territories. 

A senior official said her messa ge to 
Mr. Arafat: “President Clinton and I want 
to help, but if you don’t we can’t” 


Apttrc Inn r IVw 


“Decommissioning on our part 
would be tantamount to surrender.” 


■ Jitters Over Iran’s Ar ming 

The United States and Israel voiced 
concern Thursday at the danger the y said 

■ Middle East by aiming 
itself with nuclear weapons and ballistic 
missiles, Reuters reported. 

. "j™ ** feverishly arming itself with ^ 
ballistic missiles and seeking also to -M 
develop nuclear weapons," Mr. Net- • 
anyahu said after meeting with Mrs. 
Albright. 

He said most of their meeting was 
devoted to discussing toe “common 
threat to Israel and the United States 
to« is posed by Iranian aims. 

-»ho»f Shm8t ° I i. ^ ^ concerned 
about reports that Russia and China were 

ntissilK 113X1 10 long-range nuclear 

" U e V? ted States has been con- 
cerned about Iran’s acquisition of 

jSESitSf desmiction and their 
81 tehavmr," Mrs. Albright said. 

nnrr^ 6 ha ? \ cUscussio " about toe im- 
ponance of what can be done to make A 

r , egiDn - which « so im- W 
poj'potobviously to toe Israelis and also 

she sa"d XpOSCd 10 greater danger , * * 


* VrVs- *, 




^AL 






:! ¥. Mm 




-eib 




I INTER'S ATH 


SEPTEMBER 21, 1W 


PAGES' 


sire ft 


° r c e 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FREDAS SEPTEMBER 12. 1997 


limit 


£4^ 


PAGE 7 


+44 171 420 0348 


% RESIDENTIAL real estate 


ITALY 


GREAT BRITAIN 


SPAIN 


U.S.A. 


FRANCE 


Completely restored 3 smri»H 
Venetian rethlr gyir ealacs of 
1,800 sq.m, on Canal Grande, 
between Rialto and S. Marco. 





"'^2® 

— '■ -DU/ 

— 1 *ri 


jr 

Sr.***- - 


iiinr 


hHAl'!-:. 


/+ ftf- 






I E.T.G. Immobili S.r.l. 
LPkczaEmncle RBxnoll^ 10122 Tirinlaiy. 

Beal Eslafe Service s 

YOU OWN A PROPERTY IN FRANCE 

Qjt smmr m.-er w -,w atsww 
wortenarM deanng. groemg. repair. 
W*3n-(4? (tf Ms nremrare saes. « 
—“•'Sc DO J foT HESiT^re tq 

covracr us for more details 

FAX t33 (0)4 50 95 94 34 
Tet +33 (0)4 50 95 35 35 
■ Donan* tie Cmr r -74:69 Bmtey 

Real Estate 
for Sale 


Canada 

ELEGANT COUNTY HOUSE in Private 

area o' lastaoratiie S; Severe Fore 
twtroaiB itvpt- catffMmj. sauna u*v 
iquippea beautfulic Jurr.istieq Only 5 
rr.ir.uiej tram local ski areas, ana 3! 
Piir,ul?5 from Ml TremOlan Village 
& va*atle tram omoer lift to Apil tan 
US52&OK-03 to* jeafon T«i 514 
'37-e«S0 Far 5i4-3w-39»j 


Caribbean 

MAYA MAGIC. Tr sad fta it* Tefcmc 
Currents, ai Qureana Hen y.tS cue any 
ill, physical or menial want 43 sq m 
studio, with terrace, fully equroped for 
sale. 50m from a pure wtiae sandy 
beach m ine Mexican Camtean 
U5S59.000 Pans Teh 33-14745 4145 
NYC Fax 1-212-24M501 


French Provinces 


LOIRE vateyCASTlE COUNTRY 

in a ctemmg village with a» ammifes 
19TH CENT. HOME irth Z tiling moms 
(900 sqJU audy. 3 bedroom,. 2 limits. 


central lemm. mint condton. tedettfiy 
decormed Can be sold f united or 
parthfy furnsfwd MUST SEE Encteed 
n&iden wto maniajred trees behing a 
Sencfi Iron gate Owner FFi^SaaR 
TeVFax +33 (0)2 54 20 19 74 
asktorCbude 


BUY WITHOUT COWtSSION 
Free! Retain regutary, ai yot tom e. a 
setactan of real 'estate correspontflng to 

B lemand. La Partenaks Enrapwn 
Montpellier eedaz 05, Franca 
Fax +33(OW63fB1IMwwJ»mLM|» 


MEMERBES LUBEB0N 
unique locailDri Hfetartcai ste, 160 sqm. 
living space, landscaped garden. Pod 
For (totals tax- owner +330)442263214. 


French Riviera 


CAP FERRAT 

Water edge vfe - FF10M 
Tuscan sfytp vfc - FF15M. 
Modem via fertasfc soawew • FF20M. 

NEAR MONACO 

Magnftert sewtew. damcal 
Style via - FF15M. 

Beauty setwien. medttiranean 
style via - FF16M. 

■Belle apoque’ House, 
dratf sea access - FF27M 

HAU6SHANN Group 

Tel: +33 (0) 4 92 00 49 48 
Fax +33 (Oj 4 93 89 40 88 


FRENCH RIVIERA 

ateude 500 meters 
Close fcaSan border 

EXCEPTIONAL LOCATION 

MGWG5DUIH 

OLD FARM HOUSE 

EnUrahy renovated 160 sqm 

* 50 sd.m. suBaWe tor renwann, 
Z toctares oft* taw. In* teas, 
vtoeytmte, spring. Mwwbt 


Tef+33(0}4S3M«1fi 


MCE ■ MONT BORON area 

Ifed investors, beautiul via. 300 sqm 
Mb 9 mace, mtrnntoB pool, 3<a 
S^ese ifly rented uA 0999. 
igZual rem Price FR1500.000. 

PARK AGENCEINTL MONACO 

& VIZCAYA IMMO. FRANCE 

+377 / 607 836 669 

ANISES, 100 sq m 2-flav toWM » 
350 sqm garden + paspawmi*: 
door + 3 parting spaces, n nsrewci 
6 torses Ion regg^t« lees. FF i at 
Cat 9anv7pm week +33 (0)4 91483330, 
weteent +33 W 01 59 36 85 


GENERAL 


Perso nals 

' MAY THE SACRED ffiAOT OF JESUS 
be adored, gbrfied. toved and preserved 
Iftnwqtoa the worfd. now and torwm 
SasraJ H»fl of Jesus, pray te i& S*t 
Jude, worker of modes, pay tor IK- 
• SanUiude hater of Btfl topdess. pray 
- fcmAronSaiifc Pray* 

a day, by the nirth day. 

be anwOTd. 8 te 

to bl PiAScaBon must b e pronteetf 

i THANK YOU SACRED HEWTrf^ 

ato Sam) Jude lor prayers answfw- 
JAS i S.BS. 


Legal Services 


DIVORCE VOAY 

- Cd or Fax i71«l 968^K5'. Wrte._w 
Beach Bhd 4137, Huntengtoei BmeA. CJ 
92640 USA- e-rnai ■ voormSpnawm 

DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. ^ « ***3* 
Bat 377. SufW. MA OlTiB USA T» 
9TBM43-8387, Ftoc 978WC163. 


Lateral penth'ouse flac with 
balconies. Exception^ open pkm 
living area; 2 bedroom suites, 
study, fitted kitchen. Lift, 
porters, cencral heating, 
constant hot water. Lease: 
Approx 9 years. Rene £35,000 
pa (renewable) exd. of service 
charge. £675,099. 

W A EBt (Ref GSD)- -M4(0) 0171 Sfll 7654. 

CAP^^ 

3 bedrooms. 3 baths, hmo • dmng 
room, fireplace, garden, hurte parting 
conewrge Tef r Mfl +33 (OM 93761028 


Greece 

VOULA (panoramic area), 25 ton liom 
wnens. 340 stun, vffla. exira lunury.lart- 
ty Onw tax -301 96495P4 


Indonesia 

LAND FOR SALE (MDOME51A] 16066 
sqm., direct in me beach near Sinqa- 
fcre Great pcsstarnes' Cost USS <17'5S 
per sum For deuJs call *3l -JS1- 
245754 itto ffaneriandsi 


Investor. Partner or posstole Buyer 
wanted for a beautiful 
COUNTRY ESTATE M TUSCANY 

HotetVterairi'Siafctes 
Vrondertui rural senng onlv 30 mn 
Pisa and 50 ror> FKvencf Rmwarcn 
and construcicm .«rh i'S complete 
Vir^yard m top ccnStton po&dng 
’Super Tuscan Wine" PartrrtiWStm 
US$ 900.0W ) ! Puchase USS SiOO.OOO. 
Far -41-61-283 1233 tor deals 


MONTEFKJRE ASO VALLEY 
From owner lor sale, anaera mansion 
ovn 12 n-jome. 4 hafts partly restored 
ivilb ham paintings and 0 Bcorailons. 
4500 sqm. garden and orange is l hour 
south of Ancona poftalrport. 7 miles 
from sea Please contact Mr Segatto 
Cmcieige, Surrena House. St More 
Fax: +41-61-633 85 U 
Teh +41-61-632 11 32 


PtETRASANTA-LUCCA-TUSCANY 
to Minuses him Pba. 

On itafen Rhvra arm Apuan Ate 
Altaic Cerate of Italy 
75 sqm hotse with 2 bedrooms, l U2 
bath, ivtog room aid 250 sqm garden 
USSlBOOoa Ettflbrt deal 
Tel: Italy 39 584 71517 
Tel: Canada 519 9696591 


London 

HOMESEARCH LONDON Let US 
search tor you. We find homes / flats 
to buy and ran and provide corporate 
relocation services. For indnxluals 
and companies. Tel -44 17! 633 
1066 Fax + 44 171 83B 1077 
toipy/tt**Jioineseanti co.iMom 

LONDON - beautful 3850 $qf! pent- 
house. Prime location on Part Lane. 
Magnficam vtoos at Hyde Park & loo- 
don. 2 recaptions. 5 beds. 5 bafts A 
sauna For sale £1,650,000 TaL « (0) 
171 493 5367 


Monaco 

IMMACULATELY REFURBISHED at a 
COM of FF7 Ufton - SPECTACULAR 
APARTMENT • 388 sqm wte panranc 
views ol the Uetfienanean, mountains 
and Uataca Ample paridra and storage 
ONE OF THE PREMIER PROPERTIES 
AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN MONACO 
TODAY Reduced transfer fees. For sab 
by wner ai e reabhc price. CaB- t 33 
I 08 3? 09 04 Or f0)6 60 96 08 OD 
« fax +377 93 25 75 36 


Panama 


TROPICAL ISLAND 
tao totes, unwanted Peradss only « 
miles from the mainland m the Bay ol 
Panama CWy 25 hr. ngrt torn Miaia 
Near perfed year-round weather. Plans 
include hotels. goB. ahport & approxi- 
malety 1200 resrdentiaf tots Prewcus 
naps 6 mgteering stuies avatotte. 
rS7f-M4M723 fec71437W2> US 
Contact R. Pwrthara or B. Trier 
Fred Sands Raradtee Raalry 


Paris and Suburbs 


TR0CADER0, 

near, new tojidass twttng. 

detwrabie end 1997 
Very beauUhi ‘pfed^erre 1 . 

37 atm (Wo - bedroom corer 
start price ffijzsojqoo. 

Vet dim decnaed apartment 
15 RUE FRANKUN 

CO GSM +33 10)145 24 e 66 

16th, LUXURY MODERN 2 bedrooms 
convened Into 1 vaM bedroom IKSlv 
restored back to 2 tedrooffS) Larqf 
Wtu room, dnmg aea, den aksve. Wa 
to wMl sUng $as tendorrs. Very bnghl 
and sunny Many custom closers Mr- 
rared hamy. 107 sq.m Hrgh secunty 
part ing and ester Tef |i))1 45 3? 90 Pi 

600 SQ.IL HANSON, 8.000 sum of 
land, near Eurotflsnay, sow by owner 
F5 Uo. Teh. +33 (0|1 60 09 It 82 


Auto Rentals 

BENT ADTQ DERGI FRANCE: 
WEEKEND FF500 - 7 toi. rrhOd 
Pans +33 (Oil 43 aaSS 

Ann ouncements 

OUR NEXT SPECIAL HSADJM3 

REAL ESTATE 
IN & AROUND PARS 

(Sates and Renss ; 

win be afpering on 

Friday, September 19ft 

For tixw '3sai5 ptese contact' 


MALLORCA 

palua. l* j+ two# y< ' *;v sq m. 5 iwa- 1 

I'J-iro 4 hlllf Uuqe Ir.'ing rivin KKj ;•> 
^•■VSJSOOOO- ' 

tSPOBLAS. =.• — o-3w jr. £55J sartl 

rvSVSe.Sofif' ror M ’ en ‘" 

ATTRACTIVE HOUSE on 3 H«. 5 tk» 
rowm onfl 4 Uaft Pm end bartucue. 

Price: S 825 000 - 

i',r fj,s j>s: 'ut. r.’JtF fro,; ir 

. Rlbm <te Hoyna-Rwal EsUt« 

■=. -U-T 1 .T»T 9 » C.ttv. 


PAHTLRS VHXAGE 

8 km from 8ARBIZ0N 

HACIENDA STYLE PROPERTY secftKted 
it 6.000 sqm part overioAmg Sane 
rwa 70 sqm verandah decorated with 
LeonGairthtof tame (i 860 ) 
large receptors. 10 bedrooms 
Caretakers nous#, garaqe. lams, mol 
MUST SEE - FF5 mfcn 
Trf ,33 ,0(1 64 71 OCi M 0«ce (H 10(1 
64 24 67 05 home, Fa (0;t 6471 DON 


8!Ji, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

and roe Fg Si Honoie. tor sale m 19ft 
cent Haucsmann style ctiaraaer budqhng: 
OFRCES a HIGH CLASS apartment to 
be reiflfid (presenty rated as orice&t 
About 300 sq m per fever Pamai sale 
foi5Me VERY GOOD OPPORTUNITY 
Coraaa twjwr dred on 
Fax +33 (0)5 56 20 01 69 
Tat +33 (0)6 07 65 65 19 


AVENUE D'lENA 

CORNER PUCE DE5 ETATS-UNIS 
270 sq.m hat ft periect conibon 
Tri sqm ptamed terrace tug recepwm. 
(filing room. 4 bedrooms. 4 bathrooms, 
oynttotong oanten 2 garaqes. Pmaw 
parties only. Tel: +33 (Q1 47 20 91 49. 


SAINT LEU U FORET. 12 minutes to 
La Detente, very targe estate tor sale, 
recent construction, Dadiinul ft tree- 
stone. 2860 sq.m landscaped part, pos- 
sibity to bJU pool and tennis coin 330 
sq m. Nvinq sulace Price FF3 B Mn 
Ttf +33 m 39 32 08 61 (In French) 

PARIS 6th. ST GERMAIN DES PRES 
Freestone tnfidlng. 6/7ft floor duptax 5 
rooms. 95 sq.m to renovate. Price in- 
cluding notary lees FF2.40Q.Q0G. 
NOTAIRE (011 40 06 03 20 

ST CLOUD, high class apartmera. 104 
sqm., south. Urge Mig 2 bedrooms. 2 
baths, equtoped kitchen. Parting. Ctosa 
■ml school, tennis, swimming pool. 
FR^SDAKIL Owner +33 (0)1 4602 2726 

SAMT MANDE. Metro Bne 1. 100 sq m 
flat, chared er, sunny, Uy renovated and 
decorated, torge living, 2 bedrooms, 
equipped ktthetv TeUFax +33 (0)1 43 74 
15 79 EmaL mnarchlNdub-WeiTWi 

16th, beautiful tBO sam apart mam to 
r&ski«*al greenery, quei. nice nceploa 
3 bedrooms. 2 baths, large betoony. 
FF5550 JOQ- Tel +33 |0)1 42 24 92 72 

PLACE VENDOME (near) deters 'pod a 
rorrs 1 56 sqm. axeeflsrt corefiton. Teh 
+33 (0)i 4260 3932 (answemg machine) 
or +33 (0)6 8W3 6180 lirvbfe). 

ST QBU1AW DES PRES top floor view, 
ran cert house. 3/4 rooms, calm, ratal 
possible. Ideal co«*». -33 (DI60B7S7564 

BUY DR RENT high class ap wtn rants. 

Tee me what your mm. i wtfl do Ihe 
reseanft tor you Tat +33 (0)136657688 

VAL DE GRACE 15th). double Hiring, 5 
bedrooms, contert. 5th floor, tt. beeuttoi 
btakfiig Teh -33(0)1 46 03 29 89 


IBIZA - FEET h SEA. DeSgtthi. axop- 
tnna! tocaiorc 24redrocm apanmert w#i 
100 sqm. treed garden mertooUng sea 
Direct access to private creek. 
USS13S.000. Fax *33 KW 53 40 63 92 
rtip:rwitw.iXoroute»^nJecheJi/-pro^ 


Switzerland 




[LAKE GBEVA& ALPS 


fsauftortzBd 
since 1975 


Attractive prapertia, overtorfite vlws 
1 » 5 berhxms toxn S=i 200 J00 
REVAC SLA. 

52, Uonttattant CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 

LUXURIOUS VUA1AXE OF GENEVA 
In the hStona) surroundlrgB d Caste Gf 
Btonay. baaaiU vie* of late A Ajps, 1 
hour Geneva airport and main sto re- 
sons. 5 bertaxns, 5 tahs, 2CO0 sqjn.. 

Mfinsf sarKfirte of amstotear 
PneesFr 1.700000. By owner. TellFw 
00 41 21 943 38 91 

IIQHTANA-CRANS, Valais, 1500m 
Ananmani 2 bedrooms 2 oaifs. $botf 
B0 sqm. 2hre Geneva akporv 5oufrem 
view ovtf Ate Sae to foreigners auto- 
rued. Indoor pool & garage. aQ amen- 
tes SFr 350.000 or best offer Deals: 

Owner, POBox 336, CH-1815 Oararts or 

Fax- "41-21-983 B S 02 

GftYONIVtLLARS (LES ARSETSL 
Elevadon 4,000 it. Carton Van) SE Late 
Geneva. 2 bedroom/2 bath 55nfi Cfafel 
Condo. 30 min. Mortreut 90 mh, Gene- 
va ftxeign (NorvSwss) Sale Aoftatead 
- S120J00 US. m best ofter^Owner 
(318) 2S4J700 USA 8anv5pm CST. 


USA Residential 


NAPLES, FLORIDA - GOWGUIR 
oudi tans. vaftL 9 bedroom, 3 Deft, 
metfaten 4 n wrfiij ro oms. USS1-**J 
Terry Warren ipom*^ J5"W T * 
941434J049 Fax 941-434-7324 
Brotors iveksma 


PARIS Tet +33 (0)1 41 43 93 » 

Sf«+33(0)1JM3«» 

E-maJ '/tw,ieeiWconi 


Employment 


General Positions Available 


SELL A WINNER!! 

hapitefiwJtotoiguWft* 

Fas f«t growing travel tHrectonf needs 
®SungNte«tft254»^ 
EwtVMh JHSS? 
opmngs. high earnings. wwi w M 

Sales experience necessary, totowteoge 

ol wei ftOuatyM ^- 

Rx tamedfite consxCTW. 
nai duntouten wise JneaSng 
a recert phnagrapj®,. 

THC - The Note) Grrttie AG 
AUn. Hr H.P Steffen 
Ha frirass a 34, Ptfilfa* 36 
S^umen - Swtzerienl 
« by +41 41 379 09 21 01 
wraft faShofetjute-ian 


4 East 79th. St. 
Manhattan 

This legendan - niansion in a 
most desirable position off 
Fifth Avenue is one of ihe 
most important private resi- 
dences in New York Ciry. 

There are over 20.000 square 
feet with superior Georgian 
architectural details on six 
floors. Many spacious rooms 
and. uniquely. ? exposures: 
south, west and north offer- 
ing oblique views into 
Central Park, combine to 
provide unlimited opportuni- 
ties for restoration. 

Very seldom does a house of 
this superior quality become 
available in Manhattan. 


Edward Lee Cave 212-772-8510 



NYC.NY 

SUPERB MANSION 
Fifth Avenue A low 60 s 
Eteoart 6- story Beam -Arts 25*100 tt 
(750 » 30 mt), tolly buffi Landmark 
Limestone Uartswi Entry through grand 
lots XV net* lobby ntf rrggnkoa 
ftrepbu 6 sweeping staircase. 

Composed of tnple* with 2 rezzanmes 
Date height 11? ft IHgtYS at) Living & 
Drag rooms, & (tenant: 2-story Lite). 
Master bedroonvdressing room suite & 
2-3 hertooms. Al mtft fwptocss. Sepa- 
rate servant quarters ptet an income 

R rattog protesaonal sule & a Boor 
jfi apaitmera which can also be in- 
oorporated Into ihe owner's prernses. 

Comprehensive restoration recertiy com- 
peted by wortHmmvd nfl archied. 
Immeddiefti avafette amply US SI 6 W- 
kxi firm price. Said by owner orty to <5- 
rectly interested parties or their autho- 
rized reprasentatees. 

Fax initial (nqufiy 10 . +1-212-2SW160 


DEFMTELY NOT FOR EVEHY0IE! 
36 acres bordering Nrtiona! Forest n 
Now Mexico's Rocky Mountains. Huge 
aspen pwe, ak trails, season a) creek. 
Powertut views, inctuQtog ski area and 
oof souse 

USS234B0tVtwm 
Caff today, gone tomunnrf 
Brim S Linda Cofanda I505i 3774Z10 
Land Properties, lie 
imi.imrnmmrKxi'tmfitml 


SOUTHAMPTON VILLAGE NY. Original 
house Qul 1680 's on jmSgtous site. 
Beautifully furrtshad. 5 OedrooiB. 4 VZ 
baths, main house. Enckraad garden, 
fa&utow. frees Also. 2 bed 12 Dm col- 
lage. Both Income baaimg Room tor 
pool or tennis court 5 tnnute walk to 
ocean beaches & acting shops S725K 
FIRM. Contact Margot Horn. Broker 
1-516-2834020 Fta 1-516-28MM8 US. 

HAW BRfCKELL Site* 1680 sq ft, 

3 bertooms. 3 haUmoms, all tong wa- 
lar and Key Biscayne Parking pool 
USS 189X00. Cortaa G Rfflsch Tet' 39 
55 282201 

BOCA RATON ROYAL PALM Yacht 
CUl. Charming, ifdatod three bedroom. 
Ideal remanent or second hone on 2/3 
vay private acre. Pool, wuerfafl, many 
aner£ee S425D00 561-301-615= USA 

HOSE SOUND, FL 33 mtes norm erf 
Palm Beach Yacrt & Tents commurtiy 
i532 sf, 4 V2 : 2 vi tfl Wocoastal 
oatorwn. Pool. 55' (toe k. fireplaca. solar, 
tfit W19.000. Tet 581-5463589 USA, 

NEW JERSEY LUXURY HOME 1 ACRE 
12 mins, from Lreoto Tome/. 16 roorra, 

4 HE bate. 2 Ratfaces, oversized gar- 
nans. 2 entices Beautiful residential ar- 
ea Photos waiatte Tel 201-472-7552 


USA Rancftes 

NOFFStNQER RANCHES 
WALDEN, COLORADO 
Over 10O000 arcs of lha rrust scenic, 
ptwtedve and spectacubr propertes ft 
Die Rocky McartaftS S2 K7D00 

OWN AN AMERICAN DREAM! 

21 ranch propertes flatten CO. WY. 
MT and OR Ktefmg CT.O® acr& 
priced tom SiffiK to S27M 

FULLER WESTERN REAL ESTATE 
Tat 97M4K644 USA 
ttpMtm tutewestemoiTa 


Dome stic Positions Wanted 

EXPEHENCED COUPLE - French, Por- 
tuguese. Spanish 6 soma Engfefi Fax 
Usbon. 351 1.4577352 


Real Estate 
for Rent 

Austria 

'AT HOKE IN VIENNA! New. hilly 
equpped 2-room apatmert. stfeue TV. 
near rtnm hm USS i.too per mmn 
Tel "-r43-l-5053255ipnvate 

VIENNA, Next to Opera: 1 bedroom, 
fivkig/dring room, eat In ttchea elegant, 
yrfty. shot term. Tef. 369 84 68. 

Holland 


RENTHOUSE INTERNATIONAL 
No i to Holtand 

tor (sami) twrtshed honsesMbls. 
Tat. 31-206448751 Fax: 31-206465909 
Khoren 16-21. 1063 Am Amstwdam 


HOMEFINDERS 1NTL Herangrachl 141 
1015BH AmaaidamTtf +31208382S2 
Fax: 6392262 E+naSTiQonseteaeBprf 


MUNICH, nwar cwwsr, otobedmom ftaL 
cornpletaly turns had, From private. Tat: 
00 43 6639200333 


toiKfon 


THE BEST ROAD LONDON HZ 
Execubre Detached House 
5 Bathooma 4 Recaptions 
2 Bath: Superb Garden 
-uft iHntanet- Garage: 

Close Tute; unturroshed. 

£4, SCO per month 
+44 (0)181 444 1166 

CAPITAL Apartments & houses tar rent 
sttntong pay U see rowJertngsxaiA 
or Wqrfione ++44 171 794 6702 

FULHAM-HAVE SUPERB HOUSE" 
Looking tor professional to share E250 
per welt Can 0171 37t 7425 


Paris Area Furnished 


CAPTTALE • PARTNERS 
Handtfcked quafty speraneres. 
al sizes Parts and stete. 
Tef +33 mi 42 68 95 80 
Fte +33 (0)1 42 69 35 61 
We help you beat! 


HOLIDAYS 


DISCOUNT TRAVEL 


S«r Saiaprfav'rt hriwimiritf* 

tor Ann, Frk-ndnhips. InrertwilnnaJ 
tii-fiing Runt* Vannfea & Dowmucs. 
To adrfriw 1 contact Sanh WmhnT 
nn 171 120 03‘26 
or +4-1 1?1 320 0336 
A GRE.AT DEAL HAPPENS 
AT TOE IMEMUWSCT 


THE INTERMARKET 
Continues 
on Page 13 


»ia 


Holidays and Travel 

VTSTT INDONESIA] Cheapest hotel rate, 
house tennis, yachts, etc INTERNET 
wwwjiktonnndttinBbaicarn 


Bed & Breakfasts 

MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 

stay luxury apartments, suparar B A B 
registry. many locations 
TeL 212-4754090 Fax. 212-477-042). 
wtw.irafftasantadghgscom 


Lebanon 

HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East oi BeW. 
5 star deluxe Exceptional totamn. seen- 
rity, comfort, flno oriatee. convenes, 
business sttvees, sateMa TV. IB iwi 
transfer tom airport trea. UTELL Far 
1961) 4-97209 l (+33) (0)1-47200007 


Swteeriand 

SWISS CHALET, NWunvGhnta, 70 ton 
S of ZuntiL BeaubW alp** ssnay 
Ideal tor luxtoa. biking, swimming and 
atome/nortfc sta xj. 3 twtexns. steps 


AT HOME IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

Apanmerts to rent hxnsted or nof 
Sales 3 Property Management Services. 
2 Av HoctV TsCCBPans FiD1-45£niQ2P 

Tel: 433 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


Embassy Service 

TO REAL ESTATE 
AGENT !N PARIS 
Td: +33 (0)1 47.20^0.05 

EXCEPTIONAL. 80 sqrtt , W 
Bparmem. cathedral cellngs, styfishty 
tumished, tutor BOUtoped. 20 rnnues 


timished, hiiy aqutoped. 20 rnnues 
west of Pan. St Gamato an Lays 
FF6900 charges included. Avalatte Oct 
97 to Jen 98. Tet +33 34 51 69 15 

6th SAINT GERMAIN. 65 sq.m . high 
standard. 1 tedrocm, Wy eqippad. Bp 
floor, orettooklm Saint SUpce. FF7JXXJ 
par montft Tet 33 pi 45 (Jt as 36 

CHAMPS ELYSEES - HIGH CLASS - 
EacaptbflBl urartmart lor bustoess use. 
50 aqm wlft tatoony on Chanys Elysere 
Cal now: +33 (0)1 4432 Q317. Fax 0319 

LEFT BANK- 13th - LARGE FIAT 3 
bedrooms, : baths, balcony on garden 
S2300/13500FF. AvaRalMe now. Tal 
Pans 43- 31-14-28 USA (508) 6459528. 

aYSS PALACE. Jack* soUh. mdorw 
2 rooms, toga bath, charm, otcmionai 
view. P9.000 n «. ( 0)1 47 42 10 66 

NEAR PANTHEON, Bfiactive 2-bedroom 
flat beams, prite garden, 2 haftrooms 
$2500 1 nurth Tet +33 pi 4331 6401 


Paris Area Unfurnished 

7th, ST. GERMAIN. 2 rooms to 17th 
cent. Bwftoust. 24 hr seaiity/cflietator, 
heated pafigynwautas, equqjpad ktehen 
martrfe baft cater FF 1 1.000 or Sate: 
mm Te! +33 ion 4Z220268 caruaH- 
w Taffax Spain +34 5 2B2 8989. owner 

LE DE LA ORE vary bright. IS sqm.. 
toga living i during, martrfe mors. 
Frenft doora, balcony reft view of Noire 
Dame. 2 bedrooms, 2 martrfe baths, 
equipped eat -In kitchen FT 1 3,000 + 
chargBx, parting Tal +33(0)386664021 

NBJLLY MAURICE BARRES. 4lh Sco^ 
aparmwt Wm dtong, 2 bedrooms. 2 
bate, equipped ttchen, parting tnaMs 
room pcBstite. Kay money: lease/fumt- 
rure FF200.000 Tef office Bill 450410 


/Intel 

ATALA 

1 I ’iinilis-TJ) <i'rs 

* * * * 


■iS refined rooms, fuBy equipped 
■ Air conditioned - Direct 
Telephone ■ Satellite TV - 
Seminar moms (lunch aivl- 
lablUn i ■ Bar • Private garden - 
Gestmnomfcal restaurant. 

950 If to 1400 Jf a day 

10, rue Chateaubriand 
75008 Paris 

TW: +33 (0)1 45 62 Ol 62 
Fax: +33 (0)1 42 25 66 38 

Holiday Rentals 


BREATHTAKING VIEW OF NEW YORK. 
20 tt. glass wait: Central Part A Cly. 
LuxuriXfily turns had: piano, tax. cable 
For business, musenn or twmooh 
coutfs i block to Camegfe Hal 2 to 
UtBrnan. 5 to LtoRrfn Cam. Muse- 
ums. Theaters. Weekly. Ntorthly. 3 day 
ireskoflds fnrfnmun) w tong term. 
T& 212-262-1561. Fte 71M8W142 


Caribbean 

ST. BARTHELEMY, F.W.L OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beach- 
front to Wfeide sfih pods. Our agate 
have inspected a* vtes personally For 
mservalions twSL Bate. 9. Mania An- 
gtib, Barbados, Mus&jjb, the Vrgto Is - 
fends... Call WIMCOI/SIBARTH ■ U.S. 
l4flt)B49-B0l2/tax 847-8290, from 
FRANCE 05 90 16 20 - ENGLAND 0 
-80O-8WS18 


REAL ESTATE AUCTION SALE at Palais de Justice Ar^entan (Ome) 
MONDAY, OCTOBER 20th. at 2.00 pan.' 

1 ONE CASTLE 

1 town OFCHENEDOUIT 

Wf? [ [ Built in the .WHth a*nt around a 

» - ■ ' B main courh'ard and surrounded 

rffi lVf ' £ ; v ■! , B bv a moat - outbuildings, garage, 

■ Mnn-"! stables - St Julion chapel - 

presbvtery - cemeterv - garden - meadow - & fittod - Farm 
called “La grande "Ferme" including: fanner's house, 
outbuildings, stables, bams, shelter, grounds & meadows - 
TOTAL: 4Kha Ola 59ca. 

STARTING PRICE: FF 1.200,000 

Possible odjundion of extra 40ha 39a 1 Oca 
Bv obligation bids made by Lawyers inscribed at Barceau Argentan 
At niivrmifb'ti contact: Mailres MARIN - GKOT, lawners 
ARGENTAN Tet +33 10)2 33 6781 20 


18 rue Jacob 
Saint Germain des Pres 
Palis 6 th 

Luxurious apartments under construction. 

A wide range ol apartments from studios to 4-bedroom duplex 
offering top quality appointments with basement parkings. 
Several apartments with terraces and private gardens. 

Delivery 4th quarter iw>8 

Develop er Real Ewacc Ageat: 

Olympia France F6au Saint Germain 

1 12 avenue Kleber Parts I6tb 21 rue Bonaparte Paris 6th 
tel: 33.1.- 47 5 5.30.68 tet 33.1.44.07.30.00 


^ A.B.V.L. 
Gerald kroiner 

MJMdxhftWMhll 

Will 1 In iltr n-si-i+rili (nr miii 
U til t-»l|||Mll.- Ill*- |l|1i|HT|V 

TH.: 33(0) 1 Ji 20 08 Sll 
Lit lit) 1 Ti.T 20 (IH Wl 

^ ■ (,i llrl.il: r a 


■ — i*o*****r^ 

TRIANGLE D ' OR 

1 Bedroom apartment plus fcrtng room 
wdh hieotace: kitchen, bartnoom 
and m rod’s, room. 

4 Avenue Ntattgnon, 5th Floor. 
C&mBCT oorefl roe Mme Roux 
or caSMme Patncta on: 
tOOLSa.IAOS^SM (ArgerrtlM) 

■ - _ Price on application d 


EXCBPTIOHAL 

PARTIAL OWNERSHIP 
in HOLIDAY RESIDENCE 
— AUCTION SALE — 
on September 22nd, 
at 9-30 ajn. & 230 p Jn. 

TOTAL of 79 periods 
at MARINA 
RA1EDES ANGMS 
anwf AUROM 

Sfucfios, 2-room & 3-raom 
npcrhnenfs 

STARTING PRICE 
PF 3300 for a week 
FF 31300 for a fortnight 

Inturmiticn. 

Maitn de La Have St Hilaire 
TeL: +33 (0)1 53 57 21 © (Mrs Detame) 
I'm!* 

Or appointxnent on +33 lOH 93 22 10 10 
(Marina Service) 


YACHTS 




■ 





87 Ft / 26.50 M PILOTHOUSE CITTER 

De«lgn«J by Rod Holland & bolif of .VumiflJum, mglslfjwl Id iMfi, 

Tftln Detroit 1 19 Hp Diesels with bunderstad variable pUrh propellers 
Dm .Yodfaen UfiWs Ceaeralors 
Afconi - 9 in three cabins plus 3 rrew In two cabins 
A verv nell-eijuipped ocean musing yachL lying for sale in Mallorca. Spain 

Fur more information please contact: 

Tbe Yetwort Group 

TeL m 71) 403903 - Fa\: 134 71) 400216 
_ E-Mall: netwnrk@arlais-lap.es . 


PARIS 7th - RUE DE VARENNE, 

2 rooms. FF6.120. 3 rooms FF9.952 

3 rooms FFiz,«* 4 rooms FF13J50. 
Rents TTC Tot +33 W « 3» « ^ 


Switzerland 


GENEVA LUXURY FURNISHED ajKut- 
ments. From ante 10 4 bedrooms. Ttf 
+41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 736 2671 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. I 
week 10 1 year. Great Locations. Cal 
PfiCrikjur 21244M223. F»- 212- 
4489226 E-Waft. aftcftietmfiaoLoom 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


HOTELS 


PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

★★★★ 

13, rue ITAguesseau, 75008 Paris 
Just off the Faubourg Saint-Honore and The Elysee Palace 
A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 

Very exclusive, located in one of the most prestigious neigh- 
bourhoods: Faubourg Saint-Honore and Champs 0ysees. 

.... . . irerin r * 


living-dining rooms, as well as one or two bedrooms, one or 
two marble bathrooms and some with studies. 

Weal for both family holidays and business trips, a perfect 
"pied-a-terre". 

All hotel services. Daily maid service. Air conditionning. 
Underground parking. Complete security. 

For more m formation or reservations, please fax directly to: 

+33 (6) 1 42 66 35 70 or cal? +33 (0)1 44 51 16 35 


GOLF 


SANTA UOWCA 
For October and Horen** 
26 Bedroom 

Bajart, tumetsd towtouse 
Secure etwronmart 
Gym Pool Tennis el Said 
SSsQQffflO. Tel: 31K5M161 


Bnnd new mens set of 

KING COBRA GOLF CLUBS 

careen shr.fa & LON CHAM PS 
BAG. USS2.990. Also founding 
mcmbcrshiD Saun 'rare Gcir dub 

FF 25 , 000 . 

Fax +33 (0) 4 90 75 99 85 


f 




,EAG £8 


jtrJDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 

editorials/opinion 


lleralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PLBLIHHKD with 


THE NF.W YORK TIMES AND TUB WASHINGTON POST 


Rights for Religion 

- C orlirAi 


• ' ' Among those persecuted by aurhor- 
, itarian regimes today are millions of 

I Christians denied, often brutally., the 
freedom to practice their faith. This is 

- so in China, where only the "official 
^church is tolerated and where inde- 
' pendent bishops and believers are har- 
■ assed and imprisoned. It is so in some 

• — but by no means ail — Islamic 
"countries, including some that are 
, harshly criticized by the U.S. govern- 
ment. such as Sudan and Afghanistan, 
‘ahd others that remain close allies, 

* such as Saudi Arabia. 

II Reports of this harsh persecution 
have provided the impetus for a bill 

' now gathering steam in the U.S. House 
‘of Representatives. The Freedom 
-From Religious Persecution Act of 


Some longtime advocates of reli- 
gious freedom around the world raise 
objections to aspects of the bill while 
Supporting its goals and intentions. 
There is concern, well-founded in pre- 
cedent, that a separate White House 
office removed from State Department 
and National Security Council poli- 
cymakers could end up marg i nalizing 
the issue rather than elevating it. Nam- 
ing some persecuted groups while neg- 
lecting others could send a message 
that Congress values Baha'is in Iran, 
say, more than S unni Muslims there. 

More broadly, singling out the free- 
dom to worship risks sending a mes- 
sage that some human rights are more 
cherished than others. Proponents be- 
lieve char they are simply righting past 


from KCU£iuua rwavvMMv*- - — - — " — _ _ - . . * / « * . 

1997 sponsored by Virginia’s Rep- imbalances, but it is important that 
resentanve Frank Wolf and Senator China understand that a brave political 


Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, would 
create a new Office of Religious Per- 
secution Monitoring in the White 
House. The director, subordinate only 
to the president, would be charged with 
'reporting on abuses against religious 
- minorities. Serious abuses would trig- 
ger automatic economic sanctions. The 
bill would have the director examine 
' fust and foremost the treatment of 
Christians, Tibetan Buddhists and 
Baha'is, but then the office could move 
on to other faiths. Those fleeing re- 
■ iigious persecution would get special 
treatment from U.S. asylum officers. 

The bill, opposed by the Clinton 
'administration for. among other 
"things, restricting its flexibility in for- 
' eignpolicy matters, has attracted sup- 
port from a wide spectrum, ranging 
from liberal Democrats to conservative 
' Republicans. Some welcome it primar- 
ily as a vehicle to express displeasure 
' with China, others as a means to force 
more attention to human rights matters 
in general, and still others primarily as 
a defense of the Christian groups that 
provided the initial inspiration for it. 


dissident like Wei Jingsheng is no 
more, nor less, important to Americans 
than equally courageous Catholic bish- 
ops or Tibetan Buddhists now suf- 
fering in labor camps. This potential 
hierarchy is particularly troubling in 
the area of granting asylum, which 
should be made more accessible for all 
who are persecuted 

The narrowly drawn sanctions con- 
tained in this biU would actually provide 
“less rather than more protection than 
existing human rights law,” according 
to a letter signed by the heads of Am- 
nesty International, H uman Rights 
Watch and a han dful of like- min ded 
organizations. The difficulty is that 
neither the administration nor Congress 
has shown die political will to enforce 
existing law when it comes to close 
strategic or commercial partners such as 
China and Saudi Arabia. 

The proposed legislation is flawed. 
But if, as it moves through Congress, it 
elevares the role of human rights in 
U.S. foreign policy, it will represent an 
achievement. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Keep Medical Secrets 


“If we act now." says Health and 
Human Services Secretary Donna 
Shalala in written testimony prepared 
for a Senate hearing this week, “we 
still have a golden opportunity to safe- 
' guard our age-old right to privacy in a 
■brave new world of computers and 
biology.” She adds: "Nowhere is that 
more important than with our most 
' personal information, our family 
secrets: our medical records.” 

Not many Americans would dis- 
‘ agree with the secretary that private 
medical records are unusually sensi- 
4ive. Nor would they dispute the need 
for strong legal safeguards to limit 
access to and the possible abuse of 
Psychiatric, genetic and other data. Un- 
fortunately. the administration's pro- 
posal on medical privacy is danger- 
ously defective. In an effort to assist 
investigations into suspected medical 
-and insurance fraud, it would grant 
police officers broad access to pa- 
tients' medical records, with scant re- 
strictions on how the infonnation gets 
‘•distributed and used. That violates fun- 
damental notions of privacy. 

“ - Congress required the secretary to 
develop comprehensive recommenda- 
tions on medical privacy as part of a 
1996 law that made health care cov- 
erage more readily accessible for mil- 
lions of Americans. On the plus side, 
the administration's plan would put in 
place new safeguards to limit access to 


medical records by employers, drug 
manufacturers and direct-marketing 
companies, among others, and would 
establish civil and criminal penalties 
when the rules are violated and the 
records are misused. 

But the exemption for law enforce- 
ment agencies is a huge loophole. The 
agencies would not be required to get 
court orders or to notify patients when 
they seek medical records, which could 
then be used against those patients in 
investigations or prosecutions. 

The need to combat fraud in Amer- 
ica's trillion-dollar health care industry 
is indisputable. But it hardly justifies 
granting less privacy protection to the 
intimate information contained in med- 
ical records than existing federal stat- 
utes now extend to the records of banks, 
cable television, video rental stores or 
e-mail users, as the administration’s 
plan bizarrely contemplates. 

It is true, as the secretary has said, that 
existing law allows law enforcement 
authorities to obtain health information 
without a patient’s consent, and more or 
less use it as they see fit. The mystery 
here is why she would pass up an op- 
portunity to change that. Creating 
stronger protections for medical privacy 
is supposed to be the whole point of this 
exercise. Even if the administration 
does not fully get that point, it should 
not be lost on Congress. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 


Teresa and Diana 

For all the accolades now -laid at 
Mother Teresa's bier, her presence was 
not universally comforting. Indeed, 
not the least of life's little ironies was 
the distinct unease that this frail. Al- 
banian-born nun occasioned among 
otherwise worldly people. 

No doubt her defiance of accepted 
cliche had something to do with it For 
all her commitment to the poor, she 
never attacked the rich. For all her love 
of her adopted India — it was no co- 
incidence that her Missionaries of 
Charity took the sari as their habit — 
she remained resolutely orthodox in 
her faith. And for all her good work, she 
insisted that she was no social worker. 

In the poor whom they served. 
Mother Teresa and her sisters saw the 
Christ whom they worship. The poor 
consequently were not their duty but 
their privilege, which explains the pe- 
culiar joy that attended the white-and- 
blue sari of their order. 


Most of what Mother Teresa had to 
say were platitudes. But she lived those 
platitudes, and showed what potency 
they might acquire when taken seri- 
ously. Iris one sign of hope that despite 
offering her charges a life dedicated to 
sacrifice and derual, her Missionaries 
of Charity never had trouble attracting 
novices at a time when more trendy 
orders were starving for vocations. . 

Given the extraordinary timing of 
her death, comparisons between Moth- 
er Teresa and the Princess of Wales are 
entirely understandable. A world 
which will find it harder and harder to 
recall Mother Teresa’s face will ever 
have before it the image of a princess in 
all her youth and beauty. But a century 
from now, wben Diana will be no more 
than an icon, the beauty that was Moth- 
er Teresa’ s will continue to be reflected 
in the thousands of nuns in the hun- 
dreds of slums in all parts of the world, 
doing small things with great love. 

— Far Eastern Economic Review 
(Hong Kong). 


4 V LVTERMTTONU. » | 

Itcralds^enbuitc 


RKMIP *1111 l» *■** xws 1TV l 


ESTABLISHED IS87 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chtiirmen 

KATHARINE P. D ARROW. Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher & Chief Execum c 
MICHAEL GETLER, Executhv Editor 

■ WALTER WELLS. Managing Editor • PAUL HORVTTZ, Deput\ Managing Editor 
* KATHERINE KNORR and CHARLES MTTCHELMORE, Depm Editas • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWIRTZ. Asuvrune Editors ■ ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Editor cf the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE. Business and Finance Editor 
• RENfi BONDY. Deputy Publisher 

• JAMES McLEOD. Advertising Director • DIDIER BRUN, Circulation Director. 
Dhrcteur de la Publication: Richard McChtan 


International Herald Tribune. IS! Avenue Oariewk-Gaiille, K521 Neuflh-sur-Seine. France. 
TcL 1 1 Ml. 43.95.0ft Frc Sotecrijawns. iIi41.43JG.I0; Adwnsmg. (1)41.4352.12 News. ( 1 1 41.435338. 
Internet address: hnp^/vwvi-jfiixoni E-Mail: ihuZZihuom 

\EJitorJi<r Asia: Michael Ridunban 5Catmhur\ Rd..Smxafwr 1 19800. Tel ,63)J72-776fl Fas. ;6fi274-DU 
Uh; Dir Ada. Af D k'rjtujvh/. 5fl Chin nier (hi . Hrmg Kong. Tel S52-2922-1ISS. Fas. 8*2-2922-1190 
Gen Mgr Cemam • r.ScMner.FntJridm. If.tO&FnnifurvM Tel +49(09712 SM Fac -49 ffW 12*0-26 
Pits VS Mu hod Comm 8*0 Tinnl A\t.. Sn YnLSY 10022 Tel. l2I2\ 752-J896 Far. i212i 7**S785 
i.K. Advertising Office: 63 Long Acre. London \YC2. Tel. ( / 7/ 1 836-4802. Fas: il?li 240-2254 
SA.S an capital dc / 000 F. RC5 Nantem B 732021126 Commission Pan wire No 61337 

plW~ bnernanmul Herald Tribune All rights reserved. ISSN. 0294-80*2 



Hear the New Message From Neglected Africa 

„ _ i m reverse Africa's dec 


M APUTO, Mozambique — There 
is increasing, desperate aware- 
ness among Africa’s modem-minded 
elite that nobody is paying much at- 
tention to their continent any more. 

The combination of galloping glob- 
alization in the rest of the world and the 
end of the Cold War, canceling the 
claim to strategic importance, has left 
the sub-Saharan, mass of Africa * ‘mar- 
ginalized,” to their distress. 

What can be done about it? That was 
the theme of a mating organized here 
by the African Leadership Forum. It is 
a nongovernmental organization, but a 
lot of prominent politicians, officials 
and academics from a large number of 
countries are involved 
And while points of emphasis differ, 
there was remarkably wide agreement 
that Africans themselves must take the 
initiative to propel their countries into 
the mainstream, if the 2 1 st century is to 
offer them hope. 

“I am young, getting old, and I'm 
impatient,” one delegate objected 
when an economics professor of Indian 
origin from Zimbabwe sought to rouse 
them against the dire menace of “in- 
ternational capital" and the World 
Trade Organization. “You have the 
mind-set of the ’70s." Several others 
echoed him. 

The professor, Yash Tamion, tnan- 


By Flora Lewis 

aged to sound both painfully anachron- 
istic and madly futuristic wheat he said 
that "globalization equals recoloniz- 
ation/and that the WTO's protection 
of intellectual property rights would 
mean “colonization of women’s 
wombs” by endorsing biotechnology 
and genetic engineering. Innate Afri- 
can courtesy saved him from ridicule. 

The focus was on how to promote 
peace and security for creating the re- 
quisite conditions for development. 
Candor, which traditionally outraged, 
is now appreciated in this setting. 

Corruption, misgovernance and ir- 
responsible power greed were identified 
as the plagues Africa must overcome 
even to start catching up with the rest of 
the world. The mode was realism. 

Ghana’s lucid Lieutenant General 
Emmanuel Erskine, a farmer com- 
mander of United Nations forces in 
Lebanon, called for formation of a 
standby African intervention force to 
deal with conflict and disaster, along 
lines suggested last year by then U.S. 
Secretary of State Warren Christopher. 

General Erskine interpreted that pro- 
posal as the other side of America's 
pronouncement that it would intervene 
only in situations it considered of “vi- 


essential to reverse Africa s decline. 
Certainly outside help and investment 
are needed, including removal of the 
debt burden incurred by despots. But 


tal national interest" Therefore, he 
said, Africa must take the initiative. 

Americans and other Western coun- 

gKSa«.vsss: 

The role of women must be re- 
cognized as a major factor in social and 
economic advance. - . 

The attitudes expressed here are far : 
from reflecting the outlook of most r 
■ Africans in power, but they are spread- = 
ine. The Leadership Forum has be- - 
come a source of research and inspir- 
ation for governments. 


itarian problems,” he said. The shib- 
boleth of national sovereignty must be 
set aside when millions of people are 
hurting because governments fail to 
discharge their responsibility and re- 
fuse to call for international help. 

“If you want to protect your sov- 
ereignty and avoid intervention, look 
after your people,” be warned African 
potentates. 


sanjo, the tormer president 
who stepped aside for an elected ci- 
vilian government and was his class- 
mate as a cadet 'at military academy. 
General Obasanjo, founder and chair- 
man of the African Leadership Forum, 
is being held inc ommuni cado for the 
third year in a Nigerian prison. 

When ex-President Jimmy Carter 
appealed for his release recently. Ni- 
gerian President Sani Abac ha snapped, 
‘ ‘He should have been shot 
This group accepts that accountable, 
responsible government, concerned 
with education, health, ‘rule of law, is 


[DC mumuioi wui**^*—* ' — — - — ■ ' 

and find ways to support, so that the 
vicious circle of misery, war and dis- 
aster in Africa can be reversed. 

Africa may suffer most from being 
left out of world development, but the 
rest of the world cannot be insulated 
from disease, environmental degrad- 
ation and population pressure that is the. 
menace from a hopeless Africa. 

The message from Maputo is that 
willing, competent, energetic partners 
in Africa know what needs to be done 
and could put help to good use. 

9 Flora Le* is. 


Tell the Mideast Squabblers to Grow Up and Behave Sensibly 


J ERUSALEM — On my way 
to Israel to watch Madeleine 
Albright’s inaugural Middle 
East tour, I ran into a friend who 
said to me. "Boy, she has really 
put her credibility on the line 
with this trip." I thought about 
that for a moment, and without 
even knowing why answered, 
“f don’t think so.” 

There was a time when sec- 
retaries of state were measured 
by whether they made progress 
solving the Arab-Israeli con- 
flict. Henry Kissinger was the 
model. To be a successful sec- 
retary of state you had to shuttle 
successfully at least once be- 
tween Arabs and Jews. “I 
shuttle, therefore I am.” 

The Arab-Israeli problem 
provided this test because of a 
combination of attributes. Vital 
U.S. interests were at stake. 
U.S. diplomacy was indispens- 
able for a solution, and at dif- 
ferent key junctures — after the 
1973 war. after Anwar Sadat’s 
visit to Jerusalem, after the Oslo 
breakthrough — the region was 
ripe for diplomacy. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


ft 


But that combination isn’t 
uite there anymore. Indeed, 
arren Christopher’s tenure as 
secretary of state will best be 
remembered for his failure ro 
understand this. 

Like his predecessors, Mr. 
Christopher wanted to emulate 
Mr. Kissinger and leave his 
mark on the Mideast. But 25 
trips to die region left him with 
only Hafez Assad's boot marks 
on his back. Mr. Christopher's 
credibility was damaged by 
Arab-Israeli diplomacy be- 
cause he made it more impor- 
tant than ir was — more im- 
portant than China, Russia. 
Germany or Japan. 

What he failed to understand 
was that resolving the Arab- 
Israeli conflict was a vital U.S. 
interest during the Cold War. 
because this conflict could al- 
ways escalate into a U.S.-Soviet 
nuclear war. Today it is an act 
of kindness. 

Today the greatest strategic 
danger " to America in die 


Middle East comes from Iraq or 
Iran acquiring nuclear or bio- 
logical weapons and threaten- 
ing the flow of oil from the Gulf. 
Palestinian terrorism is terrible, 
but it is not a strategic threat. 

Israel and its -Arab neighbors 
can be relevant to the United 
States to the extent that solving 
their own problem better en- 
ables the United States to pro- 
tect and promote its interests 
elsewhere in the region. But as 
long as they want to just fight in 
their little sandbox, aQ they 
need is a baby-sitter. 

If they are really ready to 
work with each other and with 
America to help create a new 
future focused on growth, in- 
stead of mntual destruction, then 
they need a secretary of stare. 

Mr. Christopher gave off the 
sense that he wanted a deal, a 
trophy, more than the patties 
themselves did. so he ended np 
as their baby-sitter. No job was 
too small for him. He was re- 
duced to a messenger because be 


bad no message of his own. 

He didn't know that he could 
say "no” to them and their am- 
bivalence. and so they fell no 
compulsion to resolve their am- 
bivalence. As the Middle East 
expert Stephen P. Cohen notes: 
"Unless there is an ability for the 
U.S. to say ‘no/ it can’t expect 
the parties to say 'yes.' ” 

Which brings us to the 
present The mood in Israel is 
really grim. There is a sense that 
the peace process is now an 
impossibly tangled knot which 
cannot be unraveled by pulling 
on a string here or there. 

That was why Israel’s pres- 
ident Ezer Weizman, practic- 
ally invited Mrs. Albright on 
Wednesday to pressure the 
parties into a deal. He knows 
that the knot will be untied only 
by a supreme act of diplomacy 
or a new act of war. 

If Mrs. Albright gets “Chris- 


Bibi and Hafez offer, she is 
doomed. She needs to make 
clear that she doesn’t do doors. 


The British Monarchy Is Unstated to Modern British Society 


P ARIS — The crisis of the 
British monarchy is rooted 
in its psychological relationship 
to society. Since the weekend, 
the royal family has been ad- 
vised on all sides to become 
closer to the people, more open 
in how it acts, less arrogant. 
That is superficial, and conceals 
the real problem. 

The monarchy’s established 
relationship to the public as- 
sumes a deferential and largely 
uneducated population. This is 
responsible for a monarchical 
remoteness from the public, and 
a certain infantilism in the at- 
titude of public toward mon- 
arch, quite unlike the relation- 
ships that exist in such other 
European monarchies as that of 
the Netherlands. 

The British situation also dis- 
plays the influence of class at- 
titudes and assumptions that 
survived in England long after 
they were overturned by rev- 
olution or war in the rest of 
Western Europe. 

These are ultimately unsus- 
tainable in a Britain in which 
more equitable income distri- 
bution. mass education, televi- 
sion, immigration and the de- 
cline of traditional industry and 
the rise of the service sector 
have altered class structures and 
discredited class privilege. 

British elite education has al- 
ways been excellent, but ordin- 
ary primary and secondary edu- 
cation was in the past much less 
extensive than in most of the 
other Western countries. As late 
as 1995-96, full-time students 
in higher education amounted 
to little more than 1 percent of 
the British population, while in 
France the comparable figure is 
above 3 percent, and in the 
United States above 5 percent 
The attitudes of the British 
popular press are also instruct- 
ive in this respect An implicit 
contempt for readers has always 
been evident in its cynical ed- 
itorial mixture of sex. scandal, 
chauvinism and xenophobia. 

A servile and sycophantic 
treatment of the monarchy is 
accompanied by hypocritical 
exploitation of the royal fam- 
ily s troubles. 

The British tabloid has never 
resembled the traditional big- 
city American tabloid, which 
assumes a sophisticated audi- 
ence composed of wised-up and 
worldly readers, who expect ex- 
poses of crooked politicians, 
corrupt bankers ana high so- 
ciety fraud. 

The Netherlands and Scan- 
dinavian monarchies have de- 
veloped a relationship with the 
public that may best be de- 
scribed as professional. There is 


Bv William PfafT 


popular deference to the royal 
family and to certain royal 
prerogatives, but the monarch is 
in contact with the ordinary life 
of the society. 

This has less to do with riding 
bicycles than with the mon- 
arch’s background. Queen Be- 
atrix of the Netherlands is a 
highly intelligent, university- 
educated woman with a law de- 
gree, who is at ease nearly 
everywhere in her socially ho- 
mogeneous and essentially 
middle-class country. Neither 
her education, the ceremony of 
her public functions nor her 
manner of life creates barriers 
like those which separate Brit- 
ish royalty from its subjects. 

Princess Diana’s achieve- 
ment was to challenge the in- 


fantilism implicit in the tradi- 
tional British relationship to the 
monarchy. The fundamental 
reason for her popularity was 
that by origins and instinct she 
was not "a royal.” 

She was from an aristocratic 
family but a broken marriage. 
She did not have much of an 
education, and charmingly ad- 
mined iL She roomed in Lon- 
don with girlfriends, went to 
parties, bad a job cooking, and 
taught in a kindergarten before 
her marriage. She had lived a 
life which, while it was cer- 
tainly privileged, was one with 
which young women and men 
in Britain could identify. 

Her troubles with the royal 
family came from the clash be- 
tween the outlook produced in 


her by this experience, and the 
established attitudes, habits and 
hypocrisies of the monarchy. 

When those conflicts became 
known, the public sympathized 
with Diana because people 
could identify with her, and be- 
cause she could speak naturally 
ro them. The royal family could 
never find appropriate words. 
They could only speak down to 
the public, from a distance. 

It was not simply a question 
of style. It was the product of 
long-established institutional 
and personal assumptions 
which served the royal family 
well in the past. That was a 
Britain with a circumscribed 
and hereditary ruling class, a 
rising entrepreneurial class 
eager to emulate the ruling 
class, and an ignorant and in- 
sular population. 


Alas, Celebrity Shots Pay Much Better 


N EW YORK — I had to 
defend myself to my moth- 
er the other day. The rerrible 
feeling I had when she told me 
that the Princess of Wales had 
died was compounded by the 
realization that my career and 
my mother's interests had sud- 
denly converged. 

Why couldn't those photo- 
graphers have just left her 
alone? my mother asked. It's 
those horrible tabloids, she ad- 
ded, staring a hole through me, 
her photographer son. 

I put up an ineffectual de- 
fense, mumbling something 
about the difference between 
American and European pho- 
tographers. It’s not that I didn’t 
feel I had much to defend, just 
that with your mother you pick 
your battles. 

Were I to do it over again. 
I could say any number of things 
to defend my profession. 

I could rell her that the people 
following the princess the night 
she died were just paparazzi, the 
dregs of the media world who 
have only a camera in common 
with real photojouraalists. 

Or I could say you can't con- 
demn an entire profession on 
the strength, or weakness, of a 
few individuals. 

I could add that the paparazzi 
only give the celebrity-starved 
public what it wants. 

But if I were to tell my moth- 
er those things, I would have to 
leave out a few pertinent facts: 
tbat L too. had taken pictures of 
Princess Diana, earlier this 
summer, at Christie’s when she 
auctioned her dresses. I, too, 
had even ambushed a celebrity, 
waiting outside a young star's 


By Porter Gifford 


house for two days, on assign- 
ment for a celebrity ma gazin e 

I would have to leave out the 
four days I stood amid the me- 
dia on Fifth Avenue outside 
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’s 
apartment three years ago. 
cashing in on the death of a 
woman I had been too young to 
coyer in life. And I would have 
to ignore the time I happened 
upon John F. Kennedy Jr. at a 
ski resort and surreptitiously 
snapped a few frames. 

Therefore I couldn’t tell her 
that the story on homeless drug 
addicts I worked on for a year 
earned me a tenth of what the 
photos of Jackie O.’s fiineral 
did, nor that the three months' 
work in Russia I did in 1991 
earned less than the few frames 
I took of John Jr. 

My mother knows about the 
afternoon I spent in the home of 
a famous fashion designer sev- 
eral years ago, but she doesn’t 
know that I earned more from 
one sale of those photos in Ja- 
pan than I did from all my sales 
of photographs from the Mil- 
lion-Man March and World 
AIDS Day combined. 

Telling my mother this might 


have made the reality that I can, 
and occasionally do, earn con- 
siderably more money through 
my brief forays into celebrity 
photography seem somehow 
linked with the reality that 
while my mother doesn’t buy 
tabloids, she has had a keen 
interest in Diana. As I said, vou 
pick your battles. 

The writer, a free-lance pho- 
tographer. contributed this to 
The New York Times. 


Such is not Britain today. The 
public can no longer be talked 
down to. It has to be talked to. 
The prime minister, Tony Blair, 
understands thaL 
He saved the monarchy last 
week from an even worse fiasco 
by insisting that Prince Charles 
and the Queen come back from 
Balmoral, speak to the people, 
visit Diana's bier, reroute die 
funeral cortege, and take larger 
roles in the funeral itself. 

Can this family and the elab- 
orate institution of the royal 
household, with its ingrained 
prejudices and prerogatives, 
really change now? Marrying 
Charles to Diana, and Andrew 
to Sarah Ferguson, was the roy- 
al establishment's attempt to 
make the needed change., 
Those marriages were sup- 
posed to open out the royal fam- 
ily. Instead they revealed this 
institution's imperviousness to 
change, evident in its rigid in- 
sistence that Diana conform to 
its norms and even accept its 
hypocrisy concerning Charles’s 
long-standing and well-known 
adulterous relationship. 

If the royal family could not 
change with Diana, making use 
of the spontaneous popularity 
she won, now can it change with- 
out her? The monarchy ’s crisis is 
part of the social mutation of 
modem Britain, but it is rooted in 
the failure of a family and the 
decadence of an institution. 
International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 



*1 4 


she doesn’t do windows, she 
doesn’t do cease-fires, and she 
doesn’t do small concessions/ - 

Neither her credibility noir 
America 's vital interests are de- 
pendent on whether any of these 
gentlemen throw her a bone. 
She should insist that they pro- 
pose realistic solutions to -the 
core problems: if not, she will 
walk, and they can have then- 
little war in peace. . 

Secretary Albright is doing 
the parties here a huge, morally, 
responsible favor by trying to . 
help resolve their feud so that 
they can get on with life and 
development. If they have other 
priorities, if they want to play 
out their tribal thing, if they 
prefer to manipulate the U.S.. 
Congress or media to score 
small victories, welL good-bye, 
good luck and God bless. 

Great powers should never 
get involved in the small pol- 
itics of small tribes. Mr. Chris- 
topher got addicted to the drug 
of small successes. Mrs. Al- 
bright needs to just say “ho/’. 

The New York Times. 


4>\ * 






* 



4 «g s- 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGtf 
1897: Verona Myth 


PARIS — Travelers in Italy are 
bound to pass Verona. They are 
nchly rewarded. There remains 
the domain of fancy, for Verona 
is the home of Shakespeare’s 
“Romeo and Juliet.” And it is 
the house of the Capuiets.and 
Juliets grave, which attract 
most English-speaking visitors. 

On the third story can still be 

seen the mythica 1 balcony from 1947: Religious Call 

which Juliet looked out for the 
coming of Romeo. Thus is myth 
ever mixed up with poetical 
fancy and doubtful facts. 


his employes to operate at the 
Bourse. The speculative engager 
meats of his staff had taken such 
gigantic -proportions that he had 
to spend several hours a day 
checking them, and that no other 
way out was left to him than to j 
cut down the borrowed sumS ^ J 
considerably in the interest of the ’ l 1 

safety of his banks. 1 



Letters intended for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
" Letters to the Editor " and 
coma it i the writer’s signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We caimot be re- 
sponsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


— . 1922: Gambling Graze 


ROME — lieutenant General 
John C. H. Lee, whose a dmin 1 
istration of American Army 
forces in Italy has been under 
fire recently, announced that he 
us returning to the United States 
for discharge to take up a career 
as a religious worker. General 
disclosed that he has 
offered his services “to the 


VIENNA The gambling 
craze has seized all classes, from 
the taxi driver to the shop girl and 

the Government official Everv- „ -j- "jt , «« 

body tries to combat the desrruc- b ^ h °P’ ’ ofhi * church 

non of monetary values bv this ? ■ w \? rk - General Lee is an ^ 
means. Some humorous ex Episcopalian. He has made re 1 w 
amples of the craze are recorded. Po Pe Pius * 

A bant manager bad p™** 


Zr, 


or.. 






» 1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEPNESDAA. SEPTEMBER^- 


PAGE $ 





% 


im y>». HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAA; SEPTEMBER 1A 1997 

OPINION /L ETTERS 


PAGE 9 


i p ami Beha 




The U.S. Can’t Demand a Bigger NATO 
While It’s Turning Tail in Bosnia 


W ASHINGTON — A 
bunch of guys (and 
some gals) ibis week signed 
a statement supporting the 
enlargement of NATO. The 
signatories were mostly 
what the Brits would call 
worthies — former secretar- 
ies of state and the like — 
but they included some 
people who seem to want 
their cake and to eat it too. In 
other words, they want a 
strong and expanded NATO 
but they also don’t want it to 
do much — especially in 
Bosnia. 

For instance, included on 
the list assembled by the 
New Atlantic Initiative were 
the likes of Colin Powell. 
James Baker 3d. Warren 
Christopher and Tony Lake, 
who. either in the Bush or 
the Clinton administration, 
were known for wanting to 
steer as far away from Bos- 
nia as possible. For a while, 
they got their way and the 
United States left the prob- 
lem of Bosnia to the Euro- 
peans to solve. Things soon 
went from bad to worse. 

Now, though, the United 
States has troops in Bosnia 
as pan of a larger NATO 
force — and a determination 
on the part of the Clinton 
administration to stop a 
bunch of Liars and oppor- 
tunists from making a mock- 
ery of the promises they, 
made in signing the Dayton 
peace agreement. They all 
have scores to settle. 

It could be that nothing — 
not reason, not logic and not 
even the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization — can 
stop the Bosnian war from 
resuming. But the least the 
Unired States can do is insist 
that NATO give it the old 
college try. NATO cannot 
— as it jolly well might — 
simply stay awhile in Bos- 
nia. go home and later argue, 
at some portentous interna- 
tional conference, that noth- 
ing in die world is as im- 
portant as NATO expansion. 
It is then, of course, that 
one might ask: For what 
• purpose? 

It would be a good ques- 
tion. At the moment, every 


Bv Richard Cuheu 


Clinron administration 
spokesman who goes up to 
the Hill tells Congress that 
U.S. troops are coming 
home in June — no matTer 
what. This is the dale of 
which much of Washington 
is so enamored, since it sug- 
gests an all-important exit 
strategy. But there is no exit 

If America 
leaves Bosnia 
without finishing 
the job , how can 
it be taken 
seriously 
anyichere else? 

strategy .just a determination 
on the pan of the Pentagon to 
get out of Bosnia before the 
United States gets sucked in 
and Americans are killed. 

That's understandable. But 
fear of taking casualties is not 
a strategy nor should it be the 
sole basis for making policy. 

Nonetheless. June 1998 
seems set in srone. It was 
reiterated this week by H. 
Hugh Shelton, the army gen- 
eral nominated to be the next 


ISCHRANK | 
l,WA0fi*AB5.wi 


chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff. 

Someone is not being can- 
did here. U.S. troops cannot 
pull out by that date since, if 
they do. the entire NATO 
effort is likely to collapse. If 
there is one thing the Bos- 
nian conflict has taught us 
it's thai there is no NATO 
without the United States. 
No other country can exer- 
cise leadership at least 
none did so in Bosnia — if 
only because no other 
NATO member has the 
United States's firepower. 

Given that, it would be too 
risky for the Unired States to 
simply wave good-bye to its 
allies" and sail for home 
come June. 

Thar’s especially the case 
if the Bosnian Serb leader 
and sociopath Radovan 
Karadzic remains on the 
loose. He is wanted by die 
war crimes tribunal in The 
Hague and his days ought to 
be numbered. 

If Mr. Karadzic remains 
free, if he and his henchmen 
return to political power, if 
the United States leaves 
Bosnia on schedule and 
NATO more or less follows, 
then what is the point of ex- 
panding NATO? What, pre- 










In Pakistan, the Corruption Is Lethal 


ciselv. will be expanded — a 
toothless, spineless version 
of the Washington. D.C.. 
motor vehicle bureau, a bu- 
reaucratic labyrinth in which 
paper goes in and never 
comes out? 

What is NATO if it cannot 
bring one man injustice and 
end 'a war in a small coun- 
rrv? 

’ In fact, the future ot 
NATO — whether expan- 
ded or static — is inextric- 
ably linked to what happens 
in Bosnia. And that, in turn, 
is linked to what the United 
States does. If it leaves Bos- 
nia without finishing the job. 
with homicidal maniacs just 
waiting to crawl out ot their 
respective holes and the war 
just waiting to resume, then 
how can NATO be taken se- 
riously anywhere else? After 
all. the immediate threat to 
European peace is not an im- 
perialistic Russia, but age- 
old ethnic rivalries — like 
those in Bosnia. 

Whether the United States 
likes it or not. the stakes in 
Bosnia have been raised. We 
cannot have it both ways: an 
expanded and still-impor- 
tant NATO, and a failed ef- 
fort in Bosnia. Something 
has to give — and it ought to 
be the June deadline. 

The Post 


B ALTIMORE — One day after 
Pakistan rather sullenly marked its 
50th anniversary last month. 1 was 
bumping along a stretch of broken con- « 
crete and din about 200 miles south of t 
Islamabad, the capital. I 

The Pakistani driver, who would i 
eventually become my close friend after 
another 1,000 miles 1 1 .600 kilometers. i. i 
' turned to me with a question. 

“You know,” asked Ahmad, 
swerving around a crater that could have , 
swallowed his little taxi, "how Pakistan 
was No. 2 in the world in corruption?" 

I said I'd heard something about it. 
Pakistan had been ranked second only to 
Nigeria in a 1996 "global corruption 
index” by an outfir called Transparency 
International. 

“Actually.” Ahmad went on. "we 
were No. 1. But we bribed the Nigerians 

to take first place." 

1 laughed aloud, even as mv stomach 
lurched from potholes and a noxious 
cloud of road dust and diesel fumes 
seeping through the windows. Outside, 
mrbaned men were sawing up unplanted 
drainpipes and cannibalizing the idle 
road-building equipment of an absent 
construction crew. Officially, it was a 
work day in Pakistan, but the only 
people who seemed io be working were 
the thieves. 

I've been to some countries where 
corruption is notorious — Vietnam. 
Thailand, Mexico and Jamaica, for ex- 
ample. My personal encounters with 
corruption* merely meant slipping a $20 

bill into my passport to ease customs 
"problems" or handing over a few bills 
to slimy policemen at a “roadblock. 
Otherwise, corruption was something 1 
read about in the newspapers w ith every- 
body else. 

But in Pakistan 1 encountered a kina 
of everyday, pervasive corruption that 
was astounding in its audacity. It 11 e\en 
make you sick. But at least you get to go 
home. The poor Pakistanis have to live 

with it all the time. 

Like most foreigners who sample the 
local food, I came down with an in- 
testinal "problem" by my third day in 
Islamabad, the grandiose capital thrown 
up on the dry north-central plain in the 
early 1960s. It this case, the food was a 
delicious sampling of lamb and beef 
kebabs at a local restaurant introduced to 
me by a pair of hospitable military at- 
taches from the U.S. Embassy. 


taches from the U.S. Embassy. 

“It's pretty safe here,” one of them 
told me. "But everybody gets sick at 
some point. It’s usually not too bad. He 
then went on to tout the efficacy ot 
certain antibiotics. 

And it wasn't too bad. even when l 
came down with the inevitable diarrhea. 
What made my problem exponentially 
worse was, just as I'd cured myself with 
a diet of caution and Cokes, and mineral 
water, I found myself unknowingly 
drinking bad water again. 


By Jeff Stein 

"That’s no good,” Ahmad said, ^ 
snatching a bottle of "pure spring wa- s 
ter" out of my hand. The water, he said, * 
had most likely been drawn from the 

UP- . , 

One of Pakistan s cottage industries, 
it turned out. is filling empty mineral ' 
water bottles from the lap — a bacteria- 
fllled tap — and passing them along to < 

MEANWHILE j 

unwary or uncaring retailers. Here was I 
corruption's unseen hand. 1 

That incident prompted Ahmad, a 40- 
year-old. coliege-educated father who’s 1 
been driving a taxi for the past 1 1 years. ' 
to tell me a string of stories far worse. 

A friend of hfs felt sick one day and 
went to a clinic in Rawalpindi, the old 
capital city adjacent to IslamabacLThe 
doctor told him he was dehydrated and 
needed to be put on an intravenous hook- 
up. The problem was. the doctor said, the 
clinic was out of saline solution. He 
advised Ahmad's friend to go to a phar- 
macy. buy a half dozen plastic bags on 
his own and come back. The friend did as 
advised, returned to ihe hospital and was 
put on the IV. 

An hour later he was blind. As Ahmad 
explained, scavengers commonly col- 
lect emptv solution bags from medical 
waste bins, fill them with tap water and 
sell them to neighborhood pharmacies. 

"He was an accountant,” Ahmad 
said. "Now he cannot work- He has to be 
led around by a nephew.' ' 

Corruption touches all facets of 
.Ahmad's life. The month before we met, 
he got an electric bill for more than 3,000 
rupees (about S75>, which was many 
rimes more than his usual bill. He went to 
the company and complained. Finally, 
the clerk offered him a solution: a small 
under-the-table payment each month, 
and the bill would go back to noimal. 

Of course, he paid. He had to. "Tne 

- same thing happens with telephone bill, 
and with water bill,” he said. 

i What would happen if he went to the 
i police, I asked. 

► -Police?’’ he stammered. Police/ 
l You can kill someone here, and all you do 
F is go to the station, pay maybe a half 

> million rupees and you get off. Easy as 

- that. The police are not interested in my 
water bill. All the police would want is 

l more money to put the bill back down, 
t Indeed, police are the most visible 

s practitioners of corruption. 

f They make their money the old-fash- 


Ahmad didn't give it a second 
thought. He blew' right by the cops. 
Horrified, I turned around, expecting to 
see drawn guns, barrels jerking, bullets 
whizzing by. 

He glanced at the rear-view minor. 
"Nobody coming." he grunted. 

"If this was Virginia," 1 said, "we’d 
be dead by now." 

"They don't have the authority," he 
declared. "Only highway police have au- 
thority TO Stop us on this road. These other 
<, U y S local police, different color uniform, 
bad guys. Boss sends them out to collect 
bribe. They come back with money', he 
takes some and they keep the rest.” 

Corruption’s persistence was one of 
the main reasons Pakistanis had little to 
celebrate on Aug. 14. the date it was set 
free by Britain — • and severed from India 
— 50 years ago. . 

But pointing the finger at Pakistan — 
and other developing countries — alone is 


ioned way: setting up highway road- 
blocks to stop and harass motorists until 
they cough up a bribe. 

Ahmad had long ago figured out this 
scam. One morning we were speeding 
along when I noticed a gaggle of cops 
extending their sawhorses into the high- 
way and waving ‘at us to pull over. 


Beware of drinking 
anything labeled * pure 
spring icater." and mind - 
the police roadblocks . 

unfair, savs Peter Eigen, chairman of the 

Berlin-based Transparency International, 

which gathers the "perceptions” of busi- 
nessmen. officials and scholars to publish 
its annual index of corrupt countries. . 

The media focus on the developing 
countries of the world because corrup- 
tion is perceived to be greatest there, Mr. 
Eigen said in a foreword to this year s 
report, but he urged the public to ‘ ‘rec- 
ognize that a large share of the cor- 
ruption is the explicit product of mul- 
tinational corporations, headquartered 
in leading industrialized countries, using 
massive bribery and kickbacks to buy 
contracts in the developing world and 
the countries in transition.” .... 

Ahmad, however, can’t see that high 
from the window of his taxi. 

He just sees the outstretched palms of 
Pakistani police and bureaucrats and die 
phony saline solution that made his 
friend go blind. For Ahmad, a devout 
Muslim, the only answer to such crimes 
is to bring back sharia, the draconian 
canonical law of Islam, which includes 
cutting off the hands of thieves. 

"A few hands cut off, things much 
better.” he says. . 

Meanwhile, things are looking up. In 
this year’s corruption index, Pakistan 
improved, coming in fifth behind 
Bolivia, Colombia. Russia — and still 
No. I — Nigeria. 

The author is a free-lance writer whp 
recently went to Pakistan on an assign- 
; mem from Gentleman's Quarterly 
. magazine. He contributed this comment 
to The Sun in Baltimore. 


m Si- 


letters TO THE EDITOR 


, si:.' !•■■■■ r 


Mideast Mistrust 


■ Once again, the fear and mistrust 
shared bv Israelis and Palestinians have 
enabled 'the enemies of peace to be 
heard, through the only means of com- 
-municatioo they know — killing civil- 
ians. But this time we must acknowledge 
ihat they are not the only ones to 

^^Lnstead of cooperating to eliminate 
-terrorism, both Benjamin Netanyahu 
land Yasser Arafat have given in to ter- 
ror each in his own way. How are we to 
-ever have peace in the Middle East if 
, nobody is willing to renounce hatred and 
Suspicion once and forall?^ H£NRY 

G arches, France. . 


and those images have remained seared 
on the minds of successive generations, 
indeed have changed the course ot 

lives. „ . 

The naked little girl, fleeing in terror 
in Vietnam; Jacqueline Kennedy 
spattered with her husband s blood, an 
Iraqi soldier, his face fused to the wind- 
shield of his burned -out tank. 

Just this week we have seen pic- 
tures of grieving people trying to identi- 
fy relatives who were massacred in 

Algeria. . ,. 

Death is a tragedy, but its recording 
can also be the last link with the event, 
the life and the very significance of mat 
life. We should perhaps be cautious 
about shooting the messengers. 

FELICITY ARBUTHNOT. 

London. 


t Shooting the Messengers More ^han Bad Behavior 


In the aftermath of the tragedy 
-of voung lives cut short in the car crash 
-St 'Paris, and in the savagery that 
.has been vented on photographers, 
■one thing is being overlooked: Images 
of historic tragedies have been 
•recorded on film since its inception 


- ACROSS 

'l Honey badger 

?' • Drivel 

itefecole attendee 

is Vacation 
' lootage.e.g- 


it Microscoptet's 
reagent 
ie Smithsonian 
specialty 
is Oboe desserts 

21 Cinnabar at al- 

22 Shiraz resident 


Contact 
Marco Recchia 

Tef.:1?593 1 633-|33 
Fay 33 4-93 633-63^ 


Regarding " Post-Communist Ex- 
cess" (Editorial. Aug. 29): , 

The editorial writer says iniorm- 
m» was not a crime," calling it, 
quaintly, /’bad behavior under com- 
munism.” 

CROSSWORD 


What about informers under Hitler? 
Do we remember them for their ' bad 
behavior under the Nazis?" I beg to 
differ. Most thinking Europeans will 
agree that the Holocaust would have 
been impossible to organize without in- 
formers. 

More recently, in Communist times, 
informers were hardly the innocent 
school pranksters the writer would sug- 
gest. Because of informers, in Poland 
alone hundreds of thousands of people 
were jailed, shot, had their family and 
professional lives ruined and died m 
forced labor camps. 

As to "screening courts, the wTiter 
need not fret. They don't yet exist. Few 
Judges have volunteered to sift through 
the semiliterate drivel that the departing 
police state did not bother to bum or ! 

And in any case, hardly anyone 
wishes to punish even the most ded- 
icated informers of our bleak l 351 
years. But do they have to be rewarded 
wiih top government jobs and supported 
bv our taxes? 

y STASH PRUSZYNSKl. 

Warsaw. 


THE INTERMARKET 





23 Like some paint 

25 Armenian 

President Levon 
Petrosyan 

as First name in 
humor 

2 aL-A.-baeed 
petroleum giant 
» D.C. summer 
hrs. 

eo Freshman 
language 
course 

32 Stutters 

33 Cafeteria wear 

34 T Bxas A & M 
rival 

n Register 
38 Spotted 
amphibian 
« Egypt's — 
Church 
«3 Quarries 
4S Windswept spot 

44 Not aching 
47 Marine 
phosphores- 
cence 

43 Grande. 

Fla. 

so Tropospheric 
current 

32 San Antonio 
arena 
35 1964 #1 
56 Energy-saving 

cooker 

it Grant portrayer 
58 Most dement , 
58 Jurors 


1 Timeout 

2 Not in its 

original form 

a server's troOay 
4 Lake Geneva 
spa 


5 'Of Mice and 
Men" character 
s Flexible armor 
7 Togo's capital 
a Home of the 
N.CAA's 
Cyclones 
• According to 
io Pa- nuke plant 
it Post-Baroque 
12 Profiteer's vice 
is It helps you get 

a grip 

14 Canvas supports 
20 Lingo 

23 Crescent- 
shaped 
windows 

24 Module 

27 No longer 
anchored 
31 Hard to brush 
off 

33 Scion 

34 Takes a dive 

35 ■Hamlet 1 
hig Wight 

34 Swank 
38 French 

ptskaophBT 

Gilson 

atOne 

rummaging 

about 

40 Aftershocks 
42 unanimously 
44 Despotic 
governor 

48 Thick 

upholstery 

fabric 

58 Roman Zeus 
51 Scottish 
uncles 

53 Scrap 

54 It makes 
a lot W 

cents: Abbr. 



!!■■■■ !■■■■■■■■■ 
iiiiiiin mi 

SEBSESS «■■■■■ 


B* JBBSH d " 

gklP SL S 

j!!! aa ^>iSn» 

jSSSSBESS *■■■■ 
gSBBBBBBB ami 


ByChuCKO—d — 

Oifar York raneilEdHed by Fill Shorto. 


GENERAL 


THE IMTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 7 

Business Opportunities 

OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
IMMIGRATION/PASSPORTS 

B^iroAcounang-Sacreianal 
Va Re^raron-invoiciig 
Uajfliooe-w Swrtss WwWwtte 

Aston Corporate Trustees 

Aston House. £ Man 

- Tel: 444 (0) 1624 626591 
F*5C +44 (0) 1624 625126 

London 

Tot +44 (01 in 233 1302 
Ftoc *44 (0) 171 233 1519 

E mail; aston ©enterprise j»et 
w*w«toiHomd«i»ftxoj* 

OFFSHORE COMPANIES. Rx tiw bro- 
chure cr advice Tat London 44 iBi _ <4i 
1224 Fax' 44 1B1 T4B 655ft'6338 
wwr^ppMoncoult 

U.S. COMPANY looking tor marking 
rep&vlrtual ischnotogy email tar into 
smeecompusawam 


Snliition to Puxrie of Sept. 1 1 



Business Services 


YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 
Bond Sired ■ Man. Phone. Fax T«ex 
Td 44 171 290 9000 F» 171 499 75n 


with correspondfitn relationship. 

Class A commercial license. 
Immediate delivery. US $60, OM. 

Nassau, Bahamas 
Tel |242) 394-3080 Fax [242) 304-70 82 
Agents Wanted Worldwide 


SELL & BUY 

al over the «orW wBi INTERNET 
mra webeudxBifBS&aHn 
Fax +33 10)5 *1 14 85 29 

YOUR OFRCE IN NEW YORK 
itaOPhumlha Savt» 

212-909-0515 ■ WpJtomi nytecom 

Business Travel 

isHBualnws Ctae Frequent TtaxelfflS 
Mrttevfc Up to 50% itf No capons 
x roantluns imperial Caredam 
1-514-34I-722T Far. 1-514-341-7998. 
e-mail address- Imperial 6 login net 

Banking 

EUROPEAN BANKS issue tor you UCs. 
SBLCs Paymert/Fmancral Guaramess 
Prrd d Funds & 

F t ^5-1611832958 T1 445-1720075517 
Telecommunications 


OR - International 
intentional Prepad Cams 
Extremely Compeuwe 
Tet 39 - 01 -5096243 Fax 33^-5®6272 
34 Z? 0U CoOt3l Trail. Suite B7Q. 
WOmngon. Defcr.sre 19006-6 IK!. USA 


dining out 




PARIS 17th 


LE BILBOQUET 

AtantmrlBsInca 1947 

which 1 gree ted gag 

Alfa hot of Sonrtemne** 
farchnwora *mfc 


ta, RIB SataMwca. T. 01 


ALGOLDENBERG 

ad |as|»MD(sii -dam n*#* ■ mi hoi 
11.84. TaUai«m3OT.E<«y*yivlaRRfaV* 


(%• yiiguraj § kirane's 


ijey.orcnpfl cMndo ori New 
mi mat « Frown- Sagli 


ifcto tod an nwa img rog« "T 
T4,'!SrD^^0l«^9t 
PAMSIHh 




.ttaSrFIHtoFflW _ 
85, w. das Tame*, ■ T«t 01 45 74 40 21 


KERVANSARAY 


8, Bid Mortmain Tab OT 4770 27» 



New Lower 
International 
Rates! 

Germany.... 31 e 
Japan. — .... 380 

France 330 

UK 190 

• NO Set Up Fees 

• NO Minimums 

• Six-Second Billing 
- AT&T Quality 

• 24-hour Multi-lingual 

Customer Service 
TTMOrigto*! . 

kallback 

W lw Sttndwca w S*. nol iletl 
Come see us at Telecom 1 
Interactive, Booth #1633 
Geneva - S ept 8-14 ] 

Tel: 1.206.599.1991 
Fax: 1.206.599.1981 
Email: infoekallback.com 
www.kallback.com 
417 Second Avenue West 
Seattle, WA 0811S USA _ 

Capital Available 


PROJECT CAPITAL 
AVA1ABLE NOW 
N0LMT 
NO SECURITY 
FAX: rt4 (0171 470 7213 


Internationa) 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


Financial Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 

tor i 

SOLUTIONS 
Contact 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA 

Bantatte guarartaes to scene lining 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Long tern coffioaal 
Supported Guarantees 

Fas (63Z) 810*784 
Tet fB2} BM-53S8 

(Connesim earned orty upon Fuming) 
Graters Commisscn Assured 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANTEES 

Vaflure Capol Fience AraiEttB 
tor Gwemman Projects and 
Gmemmera Conpeftes 
thal are tor sate 
Large Projects cm Spedeffly 
Abo, Long Tern Finance tor 
Lane and Small Caipanes 
No Mdirtsstoi Unfl Funded 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Needed to aa as Uatoi 
Please reply n Engdsk 

■VENTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
krvratment bankers 
16311 Ventura Bhd, Sute 9W 
Encino, Cafiferaia 91436 USA 
Fax No: (BIB) 905-1698 
TeL: (818) 789-M22 
Huflawt Si Assoc. Deta 0.G lOfitao 


flcralbSfcSribuitc 

TffF gnBlift DAlU'XEVSPlPfcR 

PLANNING to run a ciassified ad? 


EUROPE 

WWEHflfcW* 

(01)4! 43 9385, 
fee (01) 41 <3 «3 70. 

E-mJ OowBfldfftaMm 

GSMANY. AUSBtA&ffl’HBAL 
BJROftFnridifi, 

*i: (0d9) 971 2500. 

Fk (069} 97125020 

UNTIED BNGDQM: London, 
feL (0171) 836 4802 
Tetec 252009 
fee {0171)2402254 


EUROPE 

SWnTBBAND: My. 

■feL (021)726*21 
fee (021) 728 * 91 

NORTH AMERICA 

NEWYOBt _ 

H 12121752-3890. 
tfl few (BOO) 572-721 2 
Fat [212)755-8785 

ASA/MOHC 

HQNGkONGf 

U.: 1652)2922-1106 
61170 IHTHX. ■ 
fee [6521 2922-1 190 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 




the Relaxed Charm of Switzerland’s Lake Lugano 


By Marlise Simons 

AW York Tines Service 


L UGANO. Switzerland — Floating on the 
green mim>r of Lake Lugano, with rhe gum 
chartering above the deck and the waiter 
delivering a salad planer S P*^ *5 . 
ula. I become persuaded that places of brea o 

natural beauty do not always require a mcaMueof 

phvsical hardship. Some deliver even mom than 
splendor and comfort; they add a nch ^stoo-fihe 
food, museums and cultural events. Lake Lugano, 
with the city of Lugano punctuating its northern 

shore, is such a place. _ . „ _ „ j 

ft is one of the three large lakes — Como and 
Ma^iore are the other two — that hug the Swiss- 
Italian border. lined up in neat and 
parallels. All three became legendary resorts al _ the 
rum of rhe cemury after trains began to deliver 
travelers from the grayer north through the St. 
Gonhard railway tunnel, completed in 188- 
From then on, visitors could marvel al snow and 
at the same time stroll under palm trees and sail and 
*wim or clamber up into the forests. 

Hemingway loved the region. He wrote about it 
, n • • A Fare well to Arms, ‘ ' which is set around 1 9 1 8 
and includes Lake Maggiore. He spoke of the stone 
houses and the village roads that skirt the shores 
■rnd above them the church steeples and terraced 
wardens. Thev are all still there, although some of 
The ualier concrete concoctions on the slopes are 
unmistakablv post-Hemingway. . , 

Lake Lu«ano is rhe most seductive ot the three 
lakes, perhaps because it is both intimate and grand. 
The water drifts between the sheer granite walls of 
rwo mighty’ triangles. Mount Bre and Mount San 
Salvatore. Together they form the stunning frame 
through which you look south from the town of 
Luaaiio or. if you choose well, from your hotel 
balcony. WhenGoethe spoke of the amazing com- 
bination of the “the colossal and the well ordered," 
he referred to Switzerland at large, but his phrase is 
particularly apt here. 

Reminders of an Italian Past 

You are, of course, in the Italian pan of Switzer- 
land. still permeated by its Italian past. It is present 
in the language, with its soft lilt, in the Renaissance 
churches of Lugano, and the piazzas and cam- 
paniles of the villages. The whole canton of Ticino, 
Sf which Lugano is part, is peppered with castles, a 
reminder of a stormy past when the dukes of Milan 
and the bishops of Como variously lorded it over 
the region. Ticino only joined the Swiss confed- 
eration. by choice, in 1803. 

The amalgam of the two nations has spawned its 
own appealing hybrid. Lugano is laid-back, with- 
out the rigors of Zurich, but the boats and the 
funicular have schedules and stick to them. The 
people do not live by the gentle anarchy of Italy, bur 
ihey have their neighbors’ spontaneity and their 
comfort food, the pasta and the risotto. 

The best way to explore the land is by water — 
hopping on the regular boat that like a water bus 
chugs along the five arms of the lake. It stops at 
almost every village, and passengers can get off and 
pick it up again later. Leaving Lugano, at first you 
kand on deck incredulous, the mountains like a 


nemisre. a Swiss industrialist, and his family sent 
800 paintings and other works of an to Madrid. 
Many of the Old Masters found a home there in a 


phalanx of upright knives before you, their blades 
almost touching. Then, as you glide along, they 

recede and let the lake widen. Tne walls on both - . . _ . , 

sides are far too steep and rocky for skiing, which new museum of the same name. But the family 
means that the vegetation has not been stripped, renovated this villa s gallery and kept some 150 
l houses and apartment buildings paintings and watercolors here. Its large array of 

19 th-century American Impressionists and artists 
from the Hudson River School is unusual for a 
private collection in Europe. From the 20th cemury , 
there is work by Leger. Malevich and Pollock, not 
to mention the striking outsize portrait of the pater 

familias by Lucian Freud. 

The oldest pan of the collection includes re- 
markable pieces of furniture and tapestries, in- 
cluding a generous Tyrolean carved Gothic chest of 
around 1500, a 16th-century French cabinet and a 
deep Florentine wall bench from around 1550. 

A separate masterpiece is the museum’s grear 
garden, which edges the lakefronL It is a meticulous 
arrangement of almost 100 species of shrub, flower 
andtree. The villa’s previous owner. Prince Leo- 
pold of Prussia, had a lane of cypresses planted 
along the water and they are now lined up like 
sentinels leading to the indoor artworks. There is a 
strange and double pleasure in savoring this ex- 
tremely well kept garden with its manicured hedges 
and statues in the midst of the extravagance and 
might of unbridled nature all around. 

Glorious Spring, Balmy Autumn 

From spring to late autumn, Lugano offers con- 
certs and other events, many of them free in the 
town piazzas. Through Nov. 2, the Thyssen mu- 
seum has an exhibition of work that was previously 
here, covering a range from Canaletto to Kand- 
insky. On the first Monday evening of every month, 
the museum holds concerts, and patrons can also 
roam around the exhibitions. 

Lugano’s Modem An Museum normally dis- 
plays its permanent collection, which includes 
Chagall, Miro and Emil Nolde. but it is currently 
showing works by Fernando Botero, whose giant 
bronzes are also scattered on piazzas and pedestrian 
streets downtown. 

The Cantonal An Museum usually shows con- 
temporary work in an ancient place, a fine cluster of 
restored downtown buildings of which the oldest 
part is a 1 4th-centuiy convent B ut through Nov. 1 6 
it is showing 150 engravings by Rembrandt The 
Villa Ciani museum is undergoing restoration and 
will reopen sometime this month or next with work 
by regional artists. It is worth a visit if only to see 
the classic Italian villa housing the museum, the 
municipal park in which it stands and the nearby 
Cassarate River that feeds Lake Lugano. 

TTie best time to visit this easygoing place is 
April through June, when it bursts into flower, or in 
the balmy autumn. If possible, avoid July and 
August. when Lugano's 29.000 inhabitants can 
inflate to 100,000. You can also eat better in the 
spring and fall, when the kitchens are not distracted 
by churning out pizza and spaghetti for the un- 
demanding'summer crowds. The fall is the season 
for mushrooms and venison, or spicy beef with 
roast potatoes or the local polenta and veal, not to 
mention the ever-present pasta with eggplant and 
the lake fish. Any of these slip down easily with 
merlot. the Ticino’s own fruity wine. 


although vacation houses and apartment buildings 
are encroaching. 

Soon there is Gaadria, a pretty stop. The village 
has no ledge along the shore, so that the houses 
tumble down onto the water. From die tiny dock, a 
few minutes’ climb will take you away from the 
postcard and pottery trade lining the waterfront and 
will reveal how the village fits together like Lego 
pieces, houses, alleys and stairs all interconnected 
and carved from the granite of Mount Bre, to which 
rhe village clings. There is not much flat soil, but 
every bit of it seems devoted to oleanders in big 
bushes of red, pink and an unusual salmon tint. 

stuccoed angels Up on a higher tier, the 17th- 
century church is a study in contrasts, for its dec- 
orators were clearly seduced by the softness of 
stucco in this world of granite. Stuccoed angels, 
lions and grapes burst from the trompe^Loeil 
columns and side altars, as if brought forth by an 
invisible, fecund energy. 

Farther on, Morcote also begs for a landing. 
Sitting on a longue of land, it has handsome walks 
and views on three sides. A 10-minute climb takes 
you up to the church with worthy 16th-century 
frescoes and clerical statuary. In this terraced vil- 
lage, the oddest feature is Scherrer Park, which 
includes exotic fantasies like a teahouse from Siam 
and a temple of Nefeititi. 

On the shore just across from Morcote is Porto 
Ceresio in Italy. The boat stops here. But you need 
your passport to get past the Italian customs rep- 
resentatives. who look like stiff uniformed ca- 
ricatures in this grand and fluid world, as stem as 
Hemingway’s 70 years ago. 

There are. naturally, other perspectives. Leafy 
paths gird the Lake; one takes you from Gandria to 
Lugano in less than an hour's walk. A funicular lifts 
you up the 3,061 feet (933 meters) of Mount Bre 
and another climbs the 2,992 feet of Mount San 
Salvatore. From here there are magnificent walks 


through the deciduous forest and^pines, some for 
almost any condition. 


the very fit and some milder ones for a wayfarer in 


By no means overlook the town of Lugano. If you 
cannot linger, there are some places not to miss. 

O NE is along the waterfront, the unobtrusive 
but superb little church of Santa Maria 
degli Angioli, built in 1499. its facade is 
austere and pure, and then, as you go through the 
fine wooden doors, you will be astonished. On a 
transverse wall that cuts the church in half is an 
enormous, wonderful fresco dated 1529 by Bern- 
ardino Luini. It depicts the Passion of Chnst, and 
consists of numerous separate scenes with dozens 
of figures, all in remarkable balance. The details are 
absorbing — the grief of the mother, the soldier on 
his horse, looking bored and leaning on his elbow. 

The other jewel is the Thyssen-Boraemisza Mu- 
seum on the outskirts of the city in the Villa 
Favorita. It was the scene of one of the most 
extraordinary art transfers in peacetime when, in 
1992. Baron Hans Heinrich von Thyssen-Bor- 


Hiking the Alps Till the Cows Come Home 


By Marcia R. Lieberman 


A PPENZELL. Switzerland — As dark- 
ness fell in Appenzell. a farmer standing 
at an open window raised a sort of 
wooden megaphone to his lips and called 
out the Alp Segen, an evening prayer begging 
protection for beasts and people: Ave Maria. God 
save and bless the cows and all our friends and our 
country. The blessing is an old custom still ob- 
served in Appenzell. one of the most traditional of 
Swiss cantons. We had come to explore this sur- 
prising region on the eastern edge of Switzerland by 
walking from inn to inn in August of last year. 

! Appenzell has a remarkable number of inns, each 
stamped with the personality of its owner — so 
many that hikers often don’ [ bother to pack a trail 
lunch. There’s usually a berghotel or berggasthaus 
for their midday stop. Generally simple, chalet-style 
places with dormitories and, in some cases, private 
rooms and shared baths, they serve hearty country 
food and make welcome mountain lodgings. 

■ Tucked in just beside the Austrian border, yet not 
far from Zurich. Appenzell consists of two half- 
cantons, Ausser Rhoden and Inner Rhoden, the outer 
and inner districts. We started our tour in Appenzell 
town, the tourist hub of Inner Appenzell, which 
manages ro be picturesque without being quaint. 
Houses with painted panels on their facades and 
shops displaying fanciful wrought-iron signs sur- 
round the town’s central square, where the canton's 
citizens gather annually in the open air to vote. 

farmhouses dot the hills Before setting off 
on our three-night inn- to- inn walking tour, we 
began with an easy day hike through a landscape of 
green hills, woods and farmhouses. It is an in- 
tensely human landscape. Farms are small and 
family owned, and the crisp, sharply defined hills 
are doued with farmhouses and cows. The Ap- 
penzell farmhouse is itself unique, the bam joined 
flush with the house but at right angles, so (hat the 


perspective seems to play with your perception, the 
Long bam roof extending from the house facade. 

To start our first day’s walk, we took a train — a 
chain of cheery tittle red cars — from Appenzell 
town about 10 minutes to Jakobsbad. then a cable 
car to the top of the Kronberg hill, and followed a 
generously signposted, rolling trail through the 
undulating landscape to the village of Weissbad. 
from which we later returned by train to Appenzell. 
i See map at right). A goblet on trail signs indicates 
an inn; we passed two inns during our walk. 

_ Our weekend walking tour began at Wasserauen 
( i 1 minutes by train from the town of Appenzell). 
where we took a cable car to Ebenalp, at the edge of 
the northern chain. A 20-minute walk leads down 
through the Wildkinchli — a large, electrically 
lighted cave containing a hermit's hut with a tiny 
museum displaying relics of prehistoric cave bears 
— to the minute Berggasthaus Aescher- 
Wildkirchli. This extraordinary inn is perched on a 
ledge below a towering cliff that constitutes its back 
wall, with just enough space for a little terrace. 

We returned to Ebenalp and continued along the 
ridge about an hour to Berggasthaus Schafler (an- 
other pleasant inn), then along the Hohenweg or 
high route, a narrow trail that snakes along the 
ridge; about 40 minutes beyond Schafler we had a 
moderately steep descent to Berggasthaus Mesmer, 
an inviting chalet-style inn prettily set in a green 
valley. There we stopped for a good, simple lunch 
on the terrace, across which goals occasionally 
wandered while the family worked in the kitchen. 

From Mesmer, an easy, two-hour descent leads 
to the serenely beautiful Seealpsee, with two hotels 
set discreetly among a grove of trees. We took a 
room at Berggasthaus Fore lie, dropped our packs, 
and before dinner strolled across the meadow to an 
inner valley folded within the steep crests of the 
north and middle chains. 

Behind one farmhouse, standing atop a big rock 
slab, a farmer played an alpbom whose melancholy 
tones floated over the meadow. At another house 
we fell into easy conversation with the family in a 


mixture of English and German. While the farmer, 
in black skullcap and curved pipe, milked the cows, 
his wife invited us into the byre to see the pigs, then 
into the snug little house, where she modeled her 
traditional dress for us. a colorful apron and bodice 
laced with silver chains and ornaments. Across the 
lake, ax the meadow's edge, a rugged mountain 
barrier abruptly rises, perfectly reflected in the 
clear water. In the mild evening we sat on the hotel 
terrace facing this stunning view and dined on fresh 
trout in white wine sauce. 

Two Hours Uphill, an Inn 

We reached our next stop, Berggasthaus Meg- 
Iisalp, in only two hours of uphill hiking. This 100- 
year-old inn has been in the same family for five 
generations; the building materials were carried up 
on men’s backs. Our room had two high, old- 
fashioned twin beds with plump down quilts and 
wooden headboards, pine walls scrubbed spotless 
and a marble washstand with a pair of pitchers and 
basins; not a new room playing at being antique but 
the real thing, yet smelling fresh and sweet. 

After a breakfast of bread, jam, alp cheese and 
coffee or tea, we hiked across a notch in the middle 
chain to the Fahlensee, a fairly steep up-and-down 
hike of about three hours. At the eastern end of this 
lovely lake is Berggasthaus Bollenwees. Our stay 
there was adequate, but we wished we had con- 
tinued on to Fahlenalp, where guests eat with the 
farmers and sleep in a loft in the barn above the 
cows. There we watched the farmer’s wife knead 
butter in a wooden bowl, looked on as her son made 
alp cheese and enjoyed the raucous spectacle of 
feeding time for the pigs. The setting for the fann- 
er's evening blessing here is spectacular, in a 
narrow green valley between mighty walls of sheer 
rock, 2,000 feet high, overlooking the lake. 

Marcia R. Lieberman, the author of "Walking 
Switzerland — The Swiss Way" tThe Mountain- 
eers. Seattle), wrote this for The New- York Times. 



C-. ...... , ... U TnnciirEi|inr lVVw VndEltav ! 

Switzerland lakeside and mountainside: Villas rising up from Lake Lugano, a city ' 
cafe, pedal boats on the lake, and a cluster of Alpine villages around .Appenzell. ’ . 


Appenzell. 


nightlife 


Rum’s the Word: Just a Touch of the Caribbean at Valencia Club 


By Al Goodman 



' ALENCIA — Spain’s third- 
largest city is known for 
paella and oranges, so visitors 
may be surprised that it also 
has a varied club scene worthy of its 
brawnier rivals. Madrid and Barcelona. 

■ Valencia’s signature fruit figures 
prominently in its most popular evening 
drink, agua de Valencia, which does not 
contain water as the name suggests, but a 
thirst-quenching mixture of fresh- 
squeezed oranges, sparkling wine and a 
dash of sweet liqueur. 

Nighthawk Heaven 

It can be found easily at more than a 
dozen clubs and evening cafes along 
Calle Caballeros, the prime street for 
nighthawks in the histone Carmen neigh- 


borhood. near the medieval cathedral. 
Even the Caribbean-type club called 
Johnny Maracas, at 39 Calle Caballeros, 
serves agua de Valencia ( 1 ,800 pesetas or 
$1 2 for a small pitcher for two). But here, 
the star drink is made with rum, a tribute 
to one of the owners' favorite places in 
the world, the old Hemingway hangout in 
Havana, La Bodeguito del Medio, and its 
famed cocktaiL the mojito. 

A far more complex concoction than 
agua de Valencia, the mojito contains 
rum, lemon juice, sugar and mint leaves. 
While it is often served in Madrid in a tall 
narrow glass that can squeeze the life out 
of it, at Johnny Maracas it comes in the 
traditional wide. low cocktail tumbler. 
That makes it easy to grip, and also 
allows the proper contemplation of the 
ingredients. 

The first is a bedof crushed ice which 
forms a cap at the top of the tumbler, 
floating over a sea or light rum. fresh- 


squeezed lemon juice and sugar — the 
combination well mixed to reveal no 
fissures between its distinctive parts. 
The final touch is a tiny forest of fresh 
mint leaves, swaying vertically from the 
bottom of the glass and tickling the 
undersides of the ice above. 

tour choice of rum The taste is 
smooth and refreshing, like Valencia's 
Mediterranean climate. The club makes 
its standard mojito (700 pesetas) with 
Bacardi Superior light rum, because the 
club insists dial is the traditional choice 
in Havana. But for drinkers with other 
preferences, the club readily substitutes 
Bacardi dark, eight-year reserve rum, or 
any of 60 other rum brands cm its 
shelves, although the rarest ones can 
provoke a price increase. 

The rums complement 40 brands of 
whiskey and 100 other liquors, wines 
and beers, and one can easily expend the 


first visit to Johnny Maracas trying to 
decide what to order. 

There are also seven types of Cuban 
cigars, including Montecristos and 
Cohibas. priced from 500 to 2,300 pe- 
setas, and kept in a humidor behind the 
bar. 

To further the feeling of the Carib- 
bean, the club's disk jockey plays a near 
continuous stream of salsa, merengue 
and other Latin sounds, with just a smat- 
tering of flamenco-inspired tunes from 
southern Spain. 

Then there are the tropical fish. They 
used to be in die aquarium built into the 
length of the bar, visible under glass and 
set back slightly from the blond-wood bar 
front. But the club, which opened in June 
1993, struggled to keep the fish alive and 
finally gave up last year. 

It has replaced them with freshwater 
fish that are easier to care for in a smoky 
nightclub atmosphere. Human barflies 


can now gaze upon goldfish in the bar 
aquarium. 

The remaining tropical fish have re- 
grouped in two .mailer aquariums in rhe 
women's bathroom, while the men s 
room has a batteiy of color TV monitors 
showing iaped videos of sea expeditions 
by the late Jacques Cousteau. 

The long rectangular club has various 
mini-ambiences. broken up by broad 
columns, some of which are decorated 
with scribbled graffiti, like the Bode- 
guito del Medio in Havana which in- 
spired the decor at Johnny Maracas. 

T HE name Johnny apparently refers 
to no one in particular, bui the 
second parr of the club's name is 
shown by six pairs of maracas hung on a 
rear column. These hanging gourd -type 
percussion instruments seem to stay put 
but every so often one is pulled from 
behind the bar so a staff member or 


patron can add extra rhythm to the re- ! 
corded music. 

The round wooden dance floor is , 
small, but there is ample room to dance ; 
elsewhere on the club's polished green J 
stone floor. The clientele ranges in age * 
trom twenties to fifties. Bamboo adorns ' 
the back wall, set with inviting round « 
tables and wicker chairs, which are dec- : 
orated with floral-print cloths. ! 

Johnny Maracas is open seven da vs a 
week, from 7 P.M. to 3 A.M., and' an 
hour or so later on weekends. Valencia 
locais tend to crowd in after 12:30 A.M., 
w mch often leaves visitors a relatively 
calm field to do research on mojitos 
earlier m the nighr. 

Johnny Maracas. 39 Calle Caballer- 
os. (34-61 391-5266. 

Al Goodman, who writes for The New 
orK times jrom Spain, wrote this for the 
International Herald Tribune. 








THE r K E M v ■ ■ ftft w M 

The ‘City Airport’ Comes of Age 

. . . . _ nnnv wav'! 31 lx 


By Roger Collis 

/nnTffjfionnf Herald Tribune 


I CANT think of many airports 
where I would welcome news of a 
record increase in passengers — 65 
percent more in the first half of this 
year than in the first half of 1996. The 
thought conjures a nightmare of crowds, 
congestion and terminal misery. 

What makes this news welcome to 
business travelers is that it reflects the 
coming of age of London City Aiiport, 
which by the end of July had handled a 
record l" million passengers (80 percent 
traveling on business) in the previous 12 
months, with 1.2 million pas- 
sengers forecast for 1998. 

More passengers at London 1 


Cdpd^uy. wudL IL la uiai . 

airlines will be encouraged to || 
operate more flights to more il 1 
destinations. When it opened in 
1986. London City was widely seen as a 
white elephant. Today it seems set to 
become a major hub in a network of 
similar city-center airports across 
Europe. There are currently 10 airlines 
operating high-frequency business ser- 
vices from London City to 18 European 
cities. 

Traveling from London City is the 
next best thing to having your own cor- 
porate jet. The airport is built on the old 
Royal Docks only six miles (10 kilo- 
meters') — or about 15 minutes by cab — - 
from the City, and it has already fulfilled 
its promise as a business traveler’s 
dream. The airport is like one big ex- 
ecutive lounge, with all the usual amen- 
ities, state-of-the-art business center 
with on-line financial information, car 
rental and a civilized restaurant. 

You can check in 10 minutes before 
boarding and walk 40 meters to the 
plane. Fly from London City and you 
could arrive in Paris. Brussels. Antwerp, 
Bern or Rotterdam at the very time when 
you would be boarding the plane if you 
had gone via Heathrow. 


in Europe between major hubs, actual succeeds in ttmy ^^g'^ices 
flyingmne can be as little as 20 percent things to t0 

of total door-to-door journey time. across sp^rurn ^ cQ _ 

The City Centre Airports Association leisure travel, semew L w£o want value 
was formed in 1993 to promote the ben- nrely focused onpeog n0 ms - 
efits of downtown airports. Members for on ihe upper 

include London City Airport, Stock- then peopled 

holm Bromma. Belfast City Airport, end of the business n^t ^yr^chote, 
Berlin Tempelhol. Tel Aviv Dov Hoz, whom tune aw aluabl wonders foT 

Toronto City Center A upon. Edmonton this segmentation. is | ,. 

Municipal Airport. Detroit City. Kuala London's role as a world city. 

Lumpur City Alrpon and Florence's MA „ Gooding says that Lon- 

A ^ 8 norat?e airpon. four rnilesfrom don | llSSit 

Florence by air you used to around 1 . 5 milhonpasseng C i a . 
have to fly to and from Pisa — a become the ;uj«rtof cho^e ror o 
55-mile iain ride away. Now pameubr Son City.’ 

Meridiana flies between Ho- perhaps 1 can g Heathrow, 
rence and Amsterdam, Bar- haying fiKt conadaedH^^ ^ 
celona, Frankfun, London and For the -intentt already are the 

Paris: Cro&sair has daily flights Continent, we think Iias M ‘,nmi>nfiF 

. _ • futirh 






to Lugano. Switzerland (with 
onward connections); Air Lit- 
toral flies daily io Nice, and Tyrolean 
Airways to Vienna. 

Bromma. four miles from the center 
of Stockholm compared w ith 24 miles 
for Arlanda. the main international air- 
port. has services to Gothenburg. Malmo 
and Lidkoping in Sweden. Aarhus in 
Denmark and London City. 


B ERLIN Tempelhof was Europe's 
leading airport in 1938. handling 
a quarter of a million passengers a 


HUMAN AND HIGH-TECH We re talk- 
ing about the convenience and comfort 
of the old days, when flying was human 
and before airports had moved out of the 
city to’ the next county or beyond and 
become megahubs where you have to 
fight your wav through endless shopping 
malls to the gate. But this rime it s with 
high-tech equipment like the four-en- 
gine BAe “Whisper Jet,’ said to be the 
quietest in the world, capable of landing 
on short runways in built-up areas: the 
Boeing Dash 9, the Domier 328. the 
Fokker 50 and the new "third gener- 
ation" turboprop, the Saab 20UO. 

What the business traveler wanis* 
choice, convenience and comfort, l nis 
means choice of » “nvaroaW aj^nas 


mmm , u quarter of a million passengers 
year flying to 70 destinations. Now su- 
perseded by Tegel as Berlin’s main in- 
ternational airport, Tempelhof, a 10- 
minute cab ride from the city center, has 
become a minihub wilh services t° -5 
destinations including Bern, Copenha- 
gen, Geneva, Lugano, Luxembourg, 
Oslo and EuroAirport Basel- 
Mulhouse-Freiburg. 

EuroAirport tit’s actually 
right on the border between 
Switzerland and France ) serves 
around 3 million passengers a 
year from Switzerland. Ger- 
many and France. Crossair 
'the regional subsidiary pi 
Swissair, serving 76 destinations m -- 
countries — plans to exoand the 


countries — — . 

EuroAirport as a regional hub for people 
wishing to travel between, say, Stock- 
holm and Madrid, and eventually from 
EuroAirport to Moscow City Airport. 

Richard Gooding, managing director 
of London City Airport says; "The avi- 
ation scene in London has changed dra 


airport of choice. 1 spoke to someone 
who had flown overnight from bin^a 
pore into Amsterdam with KLM- 
something like a 50 -mmure connwiion 
on the Air UK service into bere and he 
was at his meeting in the City by a 
quarter to nine. He could nothave done 
that bv going via Heathrow. 

Gooding also serves as chairman or 
the City Centre Airports Associaaonim 
informal group of airports with sundar 
characteristics: They are in built-up urb- 
an areas with short runways requinn 0 
steep approaches, and face severe en- 
vironmental. operational and planning 
restraints. Associate members include 
aircraft manufacturers such as Bom- 
bardier. Domier and Saab, and ground- 
handling companies like Servisair. 

“Citv-cenier airports are character- 
ized by aircraft of up to 100 seats, and 
quick ground handling, 
Gooding says. “We do achieve 
a very short corridor between 
your taxi and the plane. Small 
planes mean you can get on and 
off quickly. 

“There should be a much 
wider range of aircraft, espe- 
cially jets, capable of coming in 
to city center airports, such as the Mc- 
Donnell Douglas MD95 if it is ever built. 
We are trying to raise awareness with 
manufacturers that this is a growing mar- 
ket Some of the newer models ofthe 
Boeing 737 and Airbus A3 19 can almost 
make it. They need, say. another few 
meters of runway or are one or two 


EviirrHoRixoN 

Directed bv Paul Anderson. I S. 

Tn the sciehce-Fiction wars to determine 
who can outdo whom in imagining the 
improbable, "Event Horizon" has come 
up with a lurid new iwisl As die rescue 
nJrtv dispatched to locate the Event Ho- 
rr* - _ £ rhai hn* mvsienauslv 


dialogue, he seems grimly aware that he ^ ^ Sith 1 ^ sweet smile and 
made^a -nous intake-. This Jemon gjgjg. may not be, too 


of a movie is not about to catapult 
him into William Shaw s exaUed 
shoes. (Stephen Holden, ATT) 



Gravesend 

Directed bv Salvatore Stabile. US. 

If there’s a sure-fire formula for the ; as 


self-effacine manner, may not be too 
swift as a detective, but he is nimble in 
combat. When hostile townspeople, in 
thrall to a smug magnate named Onn 
Hanner tKris Knstofferson), mm belli- 
gSnt. Jack does not h^itaie io i stnke 
back. Before he has finished. Jack — 


» 

discov ere. vouhad better be< — — — — 

vou’re flying around in the void, or your 
™hide MUld end up literally S omg » 
hell This unwieldy amalgam of science 
fiction and honor, directed by Paul .An- 
derson douses almost every scene with 
aSzv special effects in a futile attempt to 
of rhoiioht. Even - sci- 


co^r up a paucity of ihoughr Every sci- 

*- has its own favorite visual pick. 


fi romp has its own fayonte insuai trv^. 
and ‘ 'Event Horizon . much of which is 


jcu^roM^I 



meters oi ruuwaj « — . - - w „ 
decibels out on thenoise requirement. We 
i - US« ripVP.lODineDl. 


well as an airline. For short- 


tts 


is™ scene in Won 

matically over the last ^ 1 * *There's a growing role for city cen- 

wanted to travel on business it ^as a^its,” he adds. "There are 
Heathrow, take it or leave it Totky. the £r wpon examp les emerging around 
top six or seven destinations in Europe ,, Sheffield Airport in 

7c served from all five airports around world The new > fee's 

London: Heathrow, Gatw.ck, Luton. ^“ braeL John Wayne Atr- 

S ^!fha« choic%. theydidn, 

asSbsisssEsas asss—- 


in wuai “ r - . — r , ... 

Gothic greenhouse, relies fejwo [ 
on that old low-budget standby . the elec 
trie* explosion that produces a shower 
of sparks The story, setm *e ye^ 2047; 
follows the rescue party led by Captain 
Miller (Laurence Fishburne) on a secret 
mission to find out what became of *e 
Event Horizon, which disappeared seven 
years earUer. Invited along for his tech- 
nical know-how is the lost vehicle s 
mad-scientist designer. Weir (Sam 
Neill), who figured out how to travel 
zillions of miles in an instant through a 
magnetic space-folding device similar to 
the one in “Contact," During thejour- 
ney, the crew members begm having 
tenifying hallucinations of loved ones 
thev have left behind. When the missmg 
spaceship is discovered, n nuns outto be 
a fiendish, mind-reading techno-monster 
that confronts them with their worst 
nightmares. Although the concept offere 
plenty of food for horror. Event Ho- 
rizod' contents itself with dishuig out 
nm-of-the-mill shock effects and some 
jolts without ever probing ns characters 
inner Uves. The movie is Fishbume s bid 
to become a sci-fi acnon hero- 
glowers through his leaden comic-book 


It mere s a sure-mc — ----- feet and buuets — n» uc- 

piring filmmaker hopmg to grab Hoi- septums, fractured enough 

Ivmd bv the nose. U might weU be viated imemal injuries 

one followed by S^vaxore Stabile , Cd i«^Sd Vnoush heads to surely de- 
budget movie, Gravesend m nUshSe budaets of health maintenance 

hand-held cameras fi ^ b ^ n ch ^ f e °^" f Srsanizations throughout Appalachia and 
mouthed teenage lowlifes on i some ot orga^ ubl es of many an 

Brooklyn's meanest streets, crank up *e § The smpnse. 

macho violence to a s 5^J“l| 11 fh av e though is that "Fire Down Below, dir- 
ihenlettheprofamrynp.Pres ^>ouha % e tho Enriquez Alcala. tumsout 

that most precious of HoUywood es eci y . QT Seagal fijm, a smooth 
sences. Eau de Street Lite. j>n ethei aJbon. character and noble en- 
and volatile that once inhaled u can turn a b ena Credit is owed to 

mouse into a Tarantino. “Graverend a Stuan and PhUip 

.tssrgsSSSS “U • — 


raSe streets for only S5.000, has done 
extremely well for its director even be- 
fore its release. The movie, which ls 
beins “presented" bv Oliver Stone, has 

S S bee P n blessed by' Steven .Mn ^^atmWm Nick Glenrue- 

who helped the 22-year-old director M hich is ann ^ doing God s 

a two-picture deal widi Ure^iwoAs. Strain. t j ^ ^ he arnves in 

That’s a lot of hype and 25595S SS5». Kfntucky, in the guiseofa^- 


Morton. which provides strong suppos- 
ing roles; the photography, directed by 
Tom Houghton, which bnngsout me 
beauty of me landscape violated b> the 
vSaSs. and the livet? country = 


: hype and encouragement wort. « £88“-^ ±c guise of a car- 
based on such a tiny if undmably prom- Mcso . charila ble repairs while Uv- 
ising debut. How talented is Stabile Jts ^ wing of local preacher 


pemer oouig liuu * w r — , 

isms uwui«- . . : n „ under the wing of me local preacher 

hard to say. "Gravesend ^sucham^ Few people are deceived, 

*at you can see me slod rmrks left prompts me less hospitable among 

behind by its cruder scenes3ut it ^ohas a ranlesnake in his bed- 

some gripping moments, a sharp sense^ mrat pickup truck off 

humorand some ESS&\ tractor-Sailer. But Jack 


ir ana mhik ---- * , 

vised performances, particularly ihatof 
Tony Tucci. (Stephen Holden, NYT ) 

Fire Down Below 

Directed by Felix Enriquez Alcala. US. 
Something is rotten in me stare ofKen 
rocky. Fish are dying. Little cbddmi are 
sick. And federal agents whoaresentto 


room ana ay w »u*. — - 

me road wim a tractor-ftailer. Bur Jack 
manages to make a few fnends, like * Cot- 
ton (Hany Dean Stanton), a local handy- 
man, Sarah Kellogg (Marg Helgen- 
berger). the pretty local outcast whose 
bromer, Earl ( Stephen Ung), is so^ne 
out of a family nightmare. Fire Down 
Below’* may have a few too many cb- 


'sickTMd federal agents whoaresentto eeio^ *6 end, -it manages to 

find out why are being murdered- En _ \ ^ ^ garbage in satisfactotyF 

“ Tss - SK- ,ij ™™ rfVa " Cl 


http ;//www. iht.com 



Visit us on our site on the 

>• World Wide Web. 



ePAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL H ERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 

LEISURE " 


The Ford Puma Coupe: Not Just a Sedan in Sports Car Trappy 

ti*Tvoer. to sive extra knee room. The * . * _- nnds - m Europe, has attract 




— costs that make coupfis cost-effective to 

By Gavin Green make.) _ . . . 

IT — The latest is the Ford Puma. It is based 

nuPES are fashion items They on the Fiesta, Ford’s inoffensive and 
m sensible little nmaboitt. but wean a 
’ hnnpht bv the style-conscious much more aggressive and eye-catching 

ttev’re afewyears set of clothes. Unlike most coupds, this 

s;d£s ^ssstsssss: 

Sh rsl “^- g 5: n»edl"nr 1 ^ 

s^^ssaaaifs 

SSStoT^^oSS-W S %totty. and ttied to ma.ch i(s 

^°Coup 6 s make no sense. They ore in- The Car Column 

TSSS SitowT* melody. Prod the right pedal hard, and 
iSi ™v« thev cost more — there’s a veritable orchestra of growls 


senger. to give extra kns 
major change is the silver- 




Th,. non. Tlie Steve McQneen Puma TV" ad, M 
i knee room. The J the roun ds in Europe, has attracted w 
lilver-foil « SSf SEffio. The wonders ofmod- 

emcS4nter-get.era.ed iroagayb* 

iJffir ltePW bronghthun back to life, standing along- . 
i peel ott. UKe J* _ even dnvmg tl ; 

‘“JS'.SdjS “nIZSS between Abroad*, 

S 5 SS 2&3 ™ -- -a- 


qoalit>- "house paint ii Ac i «■ W 

insists that itwtll last as lon = as th Mnstane that McQueen drove in 

Of the car. The gear taob is machmed Mustang, tna ^ ^ 

a luminum, a nice tonch. p lBnaarea l SOi itmustbesaid,ratherfar- 

MlNIMAL SlATlNO ICl ^imd you. there’s nothing new in ihc 

Like most mo-door cars, there are useofbizaneOTOver-ft^Mj^w 
-paii., oniv two seats. Sure, there are a promoting a product mat s an apoat 
couple of exiguous rear chairs, fine for emotion, rather than common sage, 
children and for those adults of a mas- nm's ihe fashionbusm^fOTyo^_ 
ochisne disposition, but they are more • Ford Puma: About $.Q,QOQ.3>or- 
usefol for earning odds and ends than cylinder, 1679cc eng^i 
ti.> r-r-Tini- cmnii too. So it s nup nr fi_3Q0 ram. Top speed. 198 sofa 


JJTSK aid rarely go ~ fc T [T— ~ ftrE£g odds and ends to ^er, 1679cc engine, 16jralves, 

Lfaster or handle better than the sedans melody. Prod the ngh ^ Fiesta rides broken British blacktop are steering response of the little sporty people. The trank is small, too. So it s 3 HP at 6,300 rpm. Top speed^98^ 

iiiheyare based on. Y« they coj more- Peugeots. But K» less fan to Sti ^much of a canj^aU, the Puma- (123 m P hj. Acceleradon: ^100^ 

r.both to buy and insure — and foe .are J^toS^Tto^s^SaplSSftgSwence Hie springs suppress the bumps, without and a good deal less frenzied. The Puma Rather, it’s a ftm-to-dnve, bnskspons 8.8 second^Average fuel consumption., 
vless roomy and less practical than their P pe_ wW 8 f 0 Hhe new Ford upsetting die stability of the body, and doubles as a relaxing mode of transport, car. Ifs one coupe that serves ;up more 9.7 hters/lOOkm. 
rfour-door equivalents. enSie^s TreiinoJ unit — unlike most the little Ford just powers serenely on, when you’re not in the mood for dare, driving entertainment jhan its sedan Netf; The Citroen Xsara. 

}" ooic it is old Ford four-cylinder engines that, far like a liner dealing with a minor ocean devil driving. equivalent, a car mar doesdeu \ - 

^BM^iRS^P^iNct I being orchestral, .sounded like a swell. And it handles high-speed smooth The cabin is very Fiesta-like, which car spirit rather than merely sports car Gayin Green is the editor in cMef of 

t impossible » „ J^F„r«n* ar bag of bolts. roads with almost race-car agility means it’s good. There is the unusual pretensions. rn _ Car magazine. . 

Fold has not only made big strides in It really is a lot of fun to drive, helped scooped-out dash in front of the pas- Not thau it s free from s ome preten 

i,, anitinv »firo»mi»nl hut more than anv bv nleasinelv linear steerinc and a good ! — - i 


. HnpossiDie iu iiwi» « — 

only made big strides in Ji realty 

market wi th newm od els . (There’s a host its engine refinement but, more than any by pleasingly linear steering and a good 
— but™ mainly comes down other European carmaker, it has also gearshift. It doesn’t have quite the slrng- 
JfJS?- wMdng^toviduar cars, made huge gains in ride and handling. It shot acceleration of the best Peugeot GTi 
Mdihe rapid reduction of production needed to. The Puma — as with the models, nor quite the wrist-flick-accur- 


9 J liters/1 00km. 

Next: The Citroen Xsara. 


Gavin Green is the editor in ddtfqf 

Car magazine. - 


j ■ AUSTRIA 

I Krems 

i KunstHalle, tel: (0) 2732-82669. 

! open daily. To Nov. 23: "The Grav- 
i ity of the Mountains: Mountains 
I and inner Worlds from the Ro- 
‘ mantic Period to the Present Day." 
i The exhibition documents the tra- 
{ dibon of mountain painting in 
1 Europe, often as an expression ol 
1 the inner world. Features paintings 
J by Caspar David Friednch, Ferdl- 
I nand Hodler. Ernst Ludwig Kirch- 
nerand Meret Oppanheim. as well 
: as works by contemporary artists 
j including Joseph Beuys. Richard 
j Long and Cy TWomWy. 

i Vienna 

I Kunstforum der Bank Austria, 

I tel: (1)711 -91-5737. open daily. To 
I Dec. 8: "Kunst und Wahn." More 
i than 350 works showing the in- 
j fluence of madness on art. Fea- 
j tures representations of mental 
I hospitals and patients by Rubens. 

1 van Gogh. Dix and Kirchner as well 

| as works created by psychotic or 
j schizophrenic artists. 

! KunstHausWien, tel: (1) 712- 
0495. open daily. To Jan. 1 8: "Herb 
Rrtts: Work." A photographer of 
fashion and celebnty. Ritts (bom 
j 1952) is drawn to pure lines and 
[ strong forms. The 200 photo- 
graphs include stuebes of the hu- 
man body, African images and por- 
{ traits of celebrities. 

■ BIIQIUM 

Brussels 

Hotel de Vllle, tel: (2) 279-6438. 
closed Mondays. Continuingfio 
“Nov. 12: “Alfons Mucha: L'Esprit 
;<fe 1 'Art Nouveau.” More than 140 
fworks by the Czech painter (1 800- 
9^944). 

"GHENT 

’Musee dea Beaux-Arts, tel: (9) 
222-1703, closed Mondays. To 
-Dec. 14: "Paris-Bruxelles/Bru- 
.xelles-Paris." A confrontation of 
.French and Belgian art in the 
' Second half of the 19th century. 
■The exhibition documents all artist- 
ic disciplines: painting and sculp- 
itiire, graphic art literature, theater 
<4nd music, photography, archrtec- 
,&ire and urban design, and dec- 
orative arts. Among the artists who 
'played a leading part, are Victor 
'Hugo, Baudelaire, Courbet, Zola. 
'Manet Ensor, Seurat, Van Rys- 
selberghe, Khnopff. Redon, 
-.Gauguin, Rodin. Horta. Van de 
•Velde and Lalique. 

BRITAIN 

Bath 

‘The Royal Photographic Sod- 
-ety, tel: {225} 46-28-41 , open daily. 
JToOct. 11: “Edge of Madness: Sa- 
. cajevo. A City and Its People Under 
.Siege." Photojournalist Tom Slod- 
nlart, and advertising photographer 
Alastair Thain exhibit more than 
-100 photographs that provide a 
•idramatic insight into the lives of the 
. people of Sarajevo during the 1 994 
^piege. 

'Edinburgh 

Scottish National Portrait Gal- 
-fery, (31) 332-2266, open daily. To 
JVov. 16: "Eve Arnold: fn Retro- 
spect." More than 200 photo- 
graphs ot major figures and events 
: in the latter half of the 20th century 
)by the Magnum photographer. 

HLondon 

'.Barbican Art Gallery, tel: {171} 
.638-8891 , open daily. To Dec. 14: 
,:‘James Ensor." The exhibition 
traces the Belgian Expressionist 
'artist's development taking the 
"late 1 880s as a turning point when 
the artist produced visionary land- 
scapes and expressionist works 
laced with religious themes. Fas- 
'clnated by the macabre, Ensor 
used the carnival theme as a 
vehicle for his criticism of Belgian 
-society and an expression of his 
.preoccupation with death. 

Tate Gallery, tel: (171) 887-8000. 
open dally. Contlnuingn'o Nov. 
'30: "Mondrian: Nature to Abstrac- 
tion." More than 80 works tracing 
.the artist’s evolution from his early 
•atmospheric paintings to full ab- 
straction In the 1 920s. Also, to Nov. 

.SO: "British Watercolours from the 
Oppe Collection." A collection of 
•100 wateredors, oil sketches on 
papers and drawings gathered by 
a British collector during the first 
halt of the century. The works in- 
clude Jacobean portrait miniatures 
and Romantic landscapes by Turn- 
er and Fuseli. 

Whitechapel Art Gallery, tel: 
(171) 522-7878, dosed Mondays. 
To Nov. 2: “David Alfaro Siqueiros: 
Portrait of a Decade. 1930-1940." 
A member of the Mexican Murallst 
movement with Diego Rivera and 
'Jose Clemente Oro 2 co, Siqueiros 
was politically very active and 
spent many years in exile. The ex- 
hibition features 70 pain tings rang- 
ing from portraits of leading intel- 
lectual figures of the time to anti- 
fascist allegories. 


ARTS GUIDE 


■ 

r §Jt 


aTiS* 
& aV' 




Y- w.ij 


Jt. Mr 



laf 'f 








Ruhens s “Seated Nude Youth." exhibited in Atlanta. 


MailrUEttTl-D 

The Whitworth Gallery, tel: (161) 
275-7450. open daily. To Nov. 16: 
"William Hogarth: The Artist and 
the City." More than 100 prints 
chart how London life, from street 
to intenor scenes, inspired Ho- 
garth's works. 

■ FRANCE 

Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01-44-78-12-33, closed Tuesdays. 
Continuing/ To Sept, 29: 
"Fernand Leger.” More than 200 
paintings and drawings highlight 
Leper's affinity with architecture, 
ballet and literature, as well as his 
strong political commitment. 
Musee du Louvre, tel: 01-40-20- 
51-51. dosed Tuesdays. To Oct. 
13: "Kudara Kannon: Une Sculp- 
ture du Japon Anaen." The per- 
sonification of infinite compassion, 
this representation of the Bod- 
hlsattva Kannon, meaning “the 
one who hears their cries," is a 
National Treasure and is usually 
kept in a Nara temple. The statue is 
2 meters high and made from a 
single block of camphor wood. 

■ BEIHAHT 

Berlin 

Kufturforum Tiergarten, tel: (30) 
266 -21 90, dosed Mondays. Con- 
tinuing/ To Oct. 31 : ‘The Franks: 
Precursors of Europe." More than 
1 ,000 glass Hems, jewelry, 
manuscripts, weapons and funer- 
ary pieces document the origins of 
the migrating tribes known as the 
Franks, the emergence of their 
kingdom, and their daily life and 
religion. 

Cologne 

Wallraf-Richartz-Musoum, tel: 
(221) 221-2382, closed Mondays. 
To Nov. 30: "Pointillism us: Aufdsn 
Spuran von Georges Seurat" 
Documents the 19th-century style 
of painting with more than 150 
works by Seurat (1 859-1 891 ) „ Sig- 
nac and Pissano. Seurat de- 
veloped "objective painting," gen- 
erally known as “pointillism" 

because of the use of dots, and his 
career was a senes of Investiga- 
tions into form, color and line. 

DUSSELOORF 

Kunstsarnmlung Nordrhein- 

Westfalen, tel: (211) 8381-0, 
dosed Mondays. To Nov. 30: "Max 
Beckmann." Paintings, drawings 
and lithographs by the German 
artist (1884-1950). Beckmann 
drew upon his experience ol the 
operating theaters of the Western 
Front, and his observation of the 
collapse of social order which fol- 
lowed Germany's defeat in World 
Warl. 

■ ISRAEL 

Jerusalem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 670- 
8811, open daily. Continuing/ To 
Dec. 30: "Harold Edgerton; In a 
Hash." Works by the inventor of 
stroboscopic photography. 

1 ITALY 

Venice 

Palazzo Gressi, tel: (41) 522- 
1375. open daily. To Jan. 11: “Ex- 


pressjomsmo Tedesco: Arte e So- 
cieta. 1909-1923." More than 200 
works by German Expressionist 
artists, rnduding Beckmann. Dix. 
Grosz. Kokoschka. Kirchner. 
Pechstein and Schmidt-Rottiuff. 
The works are on loan from 50 
American and European mu- 
seums and collections. 

■ JAPAN 

Tokyo 

Sezon Museum of Art, tel: (3) 
5992-0155, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Sept. 23: "Gilbert and George: Art 
tor All." Approximately 1 00 works, 
created over the last 25 years, by 
the duo of contemporary artists, 
who use their own persons as art 
material. 

1 N ETHER LAN PT~ 
Amsterdam 

Stedelijk Museum, tel: (20) 573- 
2911, open daily. To Oct. 19: "Jur- 
gen Partenheimer: "Cantos." 
Paintings and Works on Paper." 
Approximately 50 abstract paint- 
ings, drawings and watercotors 
created by the German artist (bom 
1 947) during the last five years. 
Van Gogh Museum, tel: (20) 570- 
5200, open daily. Continuing/ To 
Oct. 12: "Vincent van Gogh: The 
Drawings." Landscapes and peas- 
ant figures created between 1883 
and 1885. 


Valencia 

iVAM Centre Juiio Gonzalez, tel: 
(6) 386-3000, dosed Mondays. To 
Dec. 14: “Joan Mitchell." More 
than 40 paintings document the 
evolution of the American artist 
(1926-1992). Inspired by the 
French Impressionists, she settled 
in Paris in 1959, started painting 
landscapes but later evolved to- 
ward abstraction. 

1 SWITZERLAND 

Lugano 

Villa Favorite, tel: (91) 972-1741. 
open Fridays, Saturdays and Sun- 
days. To Nov. 2:- "A Passion for 
Art." An exhibition of 120 works 
from the collection of Carmen 
Thyssen-Somemisza, including 
paintings by Giordano, Guardi, 
Canaletto, Boucher. Fragonard, 
Goya and 20th-century artists. 

B UNITED STATES 

Atlanta 

High Museum of Art, tel: (404) 
892-4444, dosed Mondays. To 
Sapl 28: "Masterpieces from the 
Pierpont Morgan Library." More 
than 150 rare works from the Li- 
brary in New York. Features Old 
Master drawings, illuminated 
manuscripts and authors' and 
composers' original manuscripts. 

Boston 

Museum of Fine Art tel: (617) 
267-9300, open daily. To Jan 4: 
“Picasso: the Early Years. 1892- 
1906." A collection of 150 paint- 
ings, drawings, pastels, prints and 
sculpture created by Picasso be- 
tween the ages of 11 and 25 prior to 
the advent oi Cubism. It includes 
works from his famous Sue and 
Rose periods. 


Houston 

Museum of Fine Arts, tel: (713) 
639-7300. dosed Mondays. To 
Nov. 16: “Roy DeCarava: A Ret- 
rospective." More than 190 black- 
and-white photographs created by 
DeCarava between the late 1 940s 
and the mid-1990s. They indude 
his series on legendaiy jazz artists, 
photographs of everyday rife in 
New York and images of civil rights 
protesters from the 1 960s. The ex- 
hibition will travel to other Amer- 
ican cities. 

Los Angeles 

Museum of Contemporary Art, 
tel: (213) 626-6222. dosed Mon- 
days. To Dec. 14: “A Lasting Leg- 
acy: Selections from the Lannan 
Foundation Gift." Spanning awide 
range oi international art move- 
ments from the 1950s through the 
1990s, the collection brings to- 
gether more than 1 00 works by 52 
artists who emerged in California. 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Yale Center for British Art, 'tel: 
(203)432-28-53. dosed Mondays. 
To Nov. 9: "Humanist Landscapes: 
Humphrey Spender’s Photo-Doc- 
uments. 1932-1942." In that de- 
cade, the British photographer pro- 
duced works teat played a key role 
in the development of British docu- 
mentary and photojournalism. 
More than 70 works embody the 
complexity of social relations in 
Depression and wartime Britain. 

New York 

China Institute in America, tel: 
(212) 744-8181, dosed Sundays. 
To Dec. 13: "Powerand Virtue: The 
Horse in Chinese Art." Believed to 
be the dose kin of dragons, the 
horse was endowed with an almost 
mythic potency in Chinese art and 
literature; 30 works, induding 
sculptures, scrolls and album 
leaves — from tee Han to the Tang 
dynasty — reveal the horse as a 
symbol for tee empire itself. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3791, dosed Mondays. 
To Nov. 23: "Wordrobe." An ex- 
ploration of the intersecting worlds 
of words and wardrobe, i.e„ the way 
in which letters, numbers and words 
are incorporated into fashion. 

Washington 

Corcoran Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
639-1700, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Jan. 11: “Half Past Autumn: The 
Art of Gordon Parks." Parks is best 
known as a photojoumallsL he was 
on tee staff ol Life magazine for 
more than 20 years. The exhibition 
presents more than 220 photo- 
graphs produced between 1940 
and 1997, as well as films, poems 
and music. • 

CLOSING SOON 

Sept. 13: "Visionary Daughters of 
Albion: A Bicentenary Celebration 
of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary 
Shelley." New York Public Li- 
brary. New York. 

Sept 14: "L'Art Gourmand: Stil- 
leben fur Auge, Kochkunst und 
Gourmets von Aertsen bis van 
Gogh." Wallraf-Richartz-Mu- 
seum, Cologne. 

Sept. 14:"Lux/Lumen." Fundacio 
Joan Miro, Barcelona. 

Sept. 14; "Cobra: Art Experimental 
1948-1951." Musee des Beaux- 
Arts, Lausanne. 

Sept 14: “George Grosz: The Ber- 
lin Years." Museo Thyssen- 
Bomemisza, Madrid. 

Sept. 14: "Printmaking m Paris: Pi- 
casso and his Contemporaries." 
British Museum, London. 

Sept. 14: “Themes and Variations: 
Sleep." The National Gallery, 
London. 

Sept 14: "Markus Lupertz." Kun- 
sthalle der Hypo-KuRursttftimg, 
Munich. 

Sept 14: "Acrobate Mime Parfart, 
L’Artiste en Figure Libre." Musee 
Zadkine; Paris. 

Sept 15: "De Cezanne a f’Art 
Negre: Lb Parcours d'un Collec- 
tionneur." Musee Barbier- 

Mueiler, Geneva. 

Sept. 15: "Visages du Grand 
Siede: Le Portrait Francais sous le 
Regne de Louis XIV." Musee des 
Beaux-Arts, Nantes, France. 


EUROPE-YQUR PERSONA!, TRAVEL CHIDE 
A S*aM< Cnn rf aeswrownt you gn yow> 
«ubt»a ittj mraugr TouMuieMiapw- 
scmal rnlabon to me VtanooM Op*m BiL 
R«d Cross Bv n M?4a Cjrtj ut ?.e Flm Bil <r. 

UjflcH 

T* bA on p«r a nra aotoia soon 

mMjdoWEurca* 

Tou ins,: bgKKblT AM DIM VI ** TO 

MifuahM ■•nunns or DM but ubtea 
You wD Say* nil fuml hotn rape M ■**" • 
m i usOe or on a pnttfs eland 
You anid ite msUsns to iwnoHOB. MA pla 
IX' 1 Ysi wgti la mat epm 2 nd W padft- 

™ W(t W*d! ima TO IPO DM mourn? 
Aral BmoBaifen Pars Fennur.UuPcn.MaRi 
CM3 &HXM9 Mna Verjrjiffi 

'"in «* m* as MS taro! m a. 5 ** lav 

1 esidKof yeuwid nmuyornMSDMmly’ 
A«a!eaF Court si Lrfnwr ina rtann v, etyxir 

POYviiaiE«te& 

Phan Canary; -AMI WWM57 
-4H WWtig 
tm Otnrany -M-TIl-MMST 
r. HUM mem: 0IT27II7«1B * 


The 

wOrld’s mOst 


Gathering 

Network 


The International Herald Tribune 
is owned by The New York Times and 
The Washington Post. America’s two 
most prestigious newspapers. 

In addition to having instant 
access to their coverage, we have 
assembled a staff of selected journalists 


Hera 


„ Mlii..|" ■ . I *■ II:-, I ill:. f.\ \,i, l U -il.L.i,. . I:...- I U 

"-n ! I'.-V!- 1 "I i I ">r.l.':> ' ll|..- Till. II Ml.ml;, .'irfU.ijHi.— i h ,» ll.i-.r.-ir II 

I* '•I."", ' i f 1,1 ’ll' r '-l li I-: ' l l. KJl.,1 l,-r,.i, |„ rl „ v,..,,,,, II.,,, 

"-•'I"' I' I'"-' l i, T.-i.|.li' i.Im.'.'. 1 1;,.,-ili., '/..;ri'!i li, 1 

,L,M. r.,-1 I ■■ li.* r:i ,J 'I: 'ijli:i. S..|l[.~ Mi.l.r!,. 

,-l rv.-li'.i.i I', ..,..11.. I T.'l \>r. 1 .......... I , ■ ,ri- 1 ';i . ,| , i. :, I'.;,.,.; M:,n|t...:l : 

'■ rii-il rn I' In- ' i:,l[i. ; I rl, ( .,. ',ir„nr., I I:, .in, , 11, ,. 

M.ln. M.I.-I. . il.:-ui">T '... 1-1 If- .ini-. i. Kli.n r. inn (1,1.. \ 1,1.1 -., 

t-lin-Lfifilrii Kii.ti'-. Iui- Im I-T: 

1 .rn— K i . r., .... 

Ill ll. -i V.iiuifi i.'l III! /i.ml'.i iJ.m I 1 

‘" I'J"' ' , '""'ii . ,"i i r".\. i i (j'.liM I., I'M.ii, <- 

kimt", |:.|.-,.|- (iff. i'-ijrillln M... ...... I , ,:t . I. V-v. 1 1 . I, MI|-m- I! 



I.ul k.s 

:i. ; fil l- j'i*« j 

i. . i » 

Kr:. : |.i 1 • 

.iiiii'jr ? .-dnui'T. 

11 . 4 . 


n , t., 

i Wiwnj. 

.1-,. 

r iY,,|, "| juif.im • . 

I>i*l *. 

• ik :.i,. 


-.f ■•; .*.. 

.Urn 1 -* ' 

i’ ■« |i rn - . . 

\ lrlil|iur ' 

• m*. n.iiuiH-rj: 

l/.-n.Ti.. 

, [..-iji/.-- '? 

••kxii \ui.|. ! 

lluv.i. 

IVH. i I. 

uikiMj: j:-.!.;.,,..,: 

|.*L,.ri 

|' "ar.ijn 

:• Ni.lvii 

I..I X .i 

r. Lii|i!.. ' 


|.|L: 1 j i 

ni'uir l . ' 

K.:,„l.„ 1L -: 

Jf.n 



1 *1 1 1 1 ■ i 

*V;!i: hf. 


J.ik..r: 



••1 K.i 

Ml,,. 4/. < 

■I..'.'.-.*. |.ri|.,.fj 

rj-. 

r;'|uir 1 i-v 

>».■!«•, i r. 1 1. • i .I'm r 

Im.ili.i 

t nj./ij 1 

'•U\|| \HMn.l :;|f j 

J-IjUu:. 





Clearly you are. Y&u tell us in our 
1996 Reader Survey that collectively 
you take over 5 million air trips in 
a year and that individually you 
average eleven on business. 

You're obviously very worldly 
people, and you choose to spend an 
illuminating half hour of your day 
staying that way via the EHT 

For summaries of the surveys from 
which these facts are taken, please call, 
in Europe. James McLeod on (33) f 
41 43 93 81; in Asia, Andrew Thomas 
on (65) 223 6478: in the Americas, 
Richard Lynch on (212) 752 3890. 


E 


u, . 






■I II... Kir I.I : MMij.i.r i .".;,IJ|..„ ;i t.„rv -„„ Lr,.,[ m j ; , 

-., 1 / 1 - j.-.U;,l lrr,l.-, M. 1.1 . : „ : v. . I.I,, 


' v r ' 


4 



> ' m <. ' 






. \.l., 




THE VVORI O’S 
P VILY NEWSPAPER 







Ca r 








***** 


INTKKNAT10N.il HEKAU) TRIBUNE, VEl»ES0 ^; SEPTEMBER 24* \<W 

INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PAGE 3 


Burgess Meredith, Versatile Actor, Dies at 89 


i. By Mel Gussow 

i _ _ New York Times Service 

" oft NEW YORK — Burgess Meredith, 
5y » a vinuosic actor whose career 
spanned most of the 20th century and 
.> a multitude of performing arts, died 
" f f ^f ay at ^ ° ome 1° Malibu, Cali- 

- _ . 1 ? ^ MM* be was hailed for his 
parormances on Broadway in “Win- 

v two other Maxwell An- 

v OWSOT plays. Through his lifetime he 

i. ffL < i°* v 5" 1 rediscovered in 

* nuns as well as on stage. One of his 

' reostno^temovie^Swa^GS! 

- the guardian of the dimwitted Lenme 

r Chancy Jr., in Stein- 

rt ° ot * * Of Mice and Men*’ (1939). 

. „ on Broadway and in 

!; Bollywood, he gamed new celebrity on 

• television in the 1960s as the Penguin, 
tnearchcnminal in the “Bamsan’ 7 tde- 
vision series. His rote as the crustv 
trainer in the film “Rocky” (1976), 
wot him an Oscar nomination. 

Although those performances re- 


newed his popularity, they represent- 
ed only a small part of a richly varied 
career in which he played many of the 
more demanding roles in classical and 
contemporary theater. 

He did “Hamlet” on the radio, was 
M archhanks to Katharine Cornell's 
Candida and played Christy Mahon in 
-7"® .Playboy of the Western 
World. In 1939, Orson Welles and 
Mr. Meredith shared the stage as Fal- 
staff and Prince Hal in a collage of 
Shakespeare. “The Five Kings ” The 
production, however, closed in Bos- 
1®°- die collaboration, Mr. 
Meredith said, “We thought we’d 
combine our immortal talents, but we 
shared colossal disaster instead " 

te Ptoyed the title role in the 
IJw Broadway revival of Molnar’s 
Lihom” opposite Ingrid Bergman, 
Brooks Atkinson wrote in The New 
York Tunes: “His swapper is genu- 
ine; h arises from real strength of mind 
and spirit, and since it is obviously 
doomed it is profoundly moving.” 

In his earliest days his performanc- 


es were marked by a youthful ex- 
uberance. Gradually — or maybe sud- 
denly — he mellowed into a character 
actor, one who could, with equal ease, 
be lovable or villainous. To admirers, 
it always seemed as if he enjoyed 
acting. 

Mr. Meredith was also acclaimed 
as a director. He staged the dramat- 
ization of Joyce's “UJysses in Night- 
town” with Zero Mostel (and later 
played opposite Mr. Mostel in a Tele- 
vision version of Bee ken's “Waiting 
for Godot”). Later, he directed James 
Baldwin's “Bines for Mr. Charlie” 
for the Actors Studio Theater. To- 
gether with Jean Renoir, he wrote and 
produced the film “The Diary of a 
Chambermaid,” starring Paulette 
Goddard, his third wife. 

The actor’s distinctive voice was 
heard for years on radio. Frequently be 
was a narrator on radio and television. 
Larer he also worked on television 
commercials, as the voice of United 
Airlines and Skippy Peanut Butter. 

If he took roles that seemed beneath 


his status, be took it in stride. “If i 
spent all my time in Shakespearean 
companies and only did art movies like 
Olivier, my position would be more 
dignified and more serious, I might 
even be a bener actor,” he said. “But 
this is America, and I’m a man moved 
by the rhythms of his time, so I'll just 
take amusement at being a paradox." 

Kaar en Erickson, 44, a soprano 
who was on the roster of the Met- 
ropolitan Opera for the last 12 years 
and whose repertory ranged from 
Handel oratorios to Philip Glass's 
most recent opera, died of cancer Sat- 
urday at her home in Maryville, Ten- 
nessee. 

Edwin Maurice McConnell. 76. 
the last of the three “Flying Mc- 
Connell Brothers” of World War n 
whose name was given to an air base 
in Kansas, died Monday at his home 
in Englewood, Colorado. He had 
suffered for some time from leukemia 
and Parkinson’s disease. 



PAGE 13 


Turkey Widens Bah 
On Cypriot Ships 

ANKARA — Turkey has barred all 
commercial ships belonging to resi- 
dents of Cyprus, except those in the 
Turkish- held north, from entering Turk- 
ish ports, the Anatolian News Agency 
reported Thursday. 

The move extends the scope of a ban 


oo Cypriot-flagged vessels, officials said, 
and was in reta li a t ion for the economic 
embargo imposed by the Greek-Cypriot 
government on Che Turkish-held part bf 
the island. It does not affect vessels with 
the flag of Cyprus traveling through the 
Turkish strait between the Black Sea and 
the Mediterranean. 

In Nicosia, the Russian ambassador 
said that Moscow would be ready to 
deliver surface-to-air missiles to Cyprias 


Vj-twt- Frani ■ Ui « 

Burgess Meredith as he appeared in 1979. 


in a year unless a decision was made on 
the island’s demilitarization. “The only 
fact that can cancel this contract is an 
agreement for the demilitarization of 
Cyprus,” said Ambassador Geoigi 
Muradov. Turkey has threatened to take 
military action to prevent deployment of 
the S-300 missiles. (AFP. Reuters) 


\;(> 

SXSIYE 

H\\ S- 


(IX( 


T\\ '■ )!’a 


all over the world to bring you a view that 
is distinctly multinational. 

And with the availability of every 
newswire service, it all adds up to the 
world’s most extensive news-gathering 
network. 

No other’publication can match our 
resources. 

So if you’re interested in commerce, 
in finance, in industry, in politics, or if you 
need to know what the world’s strongest 
economy thinks about events in the rest of 
the world, make sure you get your copy of 
the International Herald Tribune. 

Every day. 

To subscribe, call us at: 

Europe/ 

Middle East/Africa : + 33 141 43 93 61 
Asia : +852 29 22 11 88 
The Americas : +800 882 2884 


Herat 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune 


published with the new rosjr times and tbs Washington tost 

THE WORLD S DAILY NEWSPAPER 



E- 


ds 


Intel 
A r 

(^Whal Is E-Funds? jj 
. E- Funds is a service that a® 
interest you. These updat || 

j|||§Haw do I subscribe? Jj 
To add a fund group, sendl 
SUBSCRIBE followed by fl 
you would type SUBSCRIB 
Funds page of the IHT). Wi 
daily updates on the fund. 


^mrundsvla En 
Tvice for IHT read* 


lyou to re* 
f delivered 


] rally to youd 


finternatiJ 
1 box daily] 


mail mesl|po * > e-fuDds@i ^gr - in tbe 1 
rod code. H||xample, to suHQP to tbe Gloj 
76 {The firod codes appear next to the fu ndsjj 
is minutes, your suhsAgon will ber^rig 


ad groups that 


M the message, type 
W/et Manag ement fund, 
in the International 
[you wifi begin to receive 


■fa™* many funds may 1 b must ^ m individuaI SUBSCRIBE message for 

You may subscribe to as nmy {] ft Intemat^AFunds page, or by sending an e-mail 
eadifund- Receive a fiifl Ust of ftj|good« o in thr. body of the message. 

message to “e-funds@ihtcoai 

I. -I*-* - NOMA. 4..-W Hta* V— 


Follow your funds 
via the 






TTv ^RLD'S DAI1Y NEWSKAP M 


Canada to Destroy Land Mines 

TORONTO — - Canada will destroy all its land mines rhig 
fall in hopes of prodding other countries involved in ne- 
gotiating a worldwide ban on the weapons to do the same, 
Foreign Minister Lloyd Axworthy said in Oslo. 

Government negotiators are meeting in the Norwegian 
capital to prepare a draft treaty proscribing the manufacture, 
sale and use of anti-personnel mines. Scattered by die 
millions in Afghanistan, Cambodia, Angola and other coun- 
tries, they wound or kill about 500 people each month. 

Mr. Axworthy has been a leader in formulating the treaty, 
and Canada destroyed two-thirds of its stockpile of mines 
last fail to underscore its commitment to their elimination. 
The minister said Canada would destroy its remaining 
mines before the scheduled treaty signing in December. He 
urged other countries to do the same. (WP) 

Kenya Panel Pushes for Change 

NAIROBI — Kenya's legislative committee on consti- 
tutional reforms adopted watershed changes Thursday de- 
signed to avoid bloodshed ahead of elections later this year. 

The Inter-Parties Parliamentary Group agreed to repeal 
laws that allow detention without trial, and to expand the 
composition of the electoral commission by bringing in 
members nominated by the opposition. The present com- 
mission is made up entirely of members appointed by 
President Daniel arap Moi. The Inter-Parties Parliamentary 
Group comprises legislators from Mr. Moi’s ruling Kenya 
African National Union and the opposition. 

The proposals include an end to discrimination against 
women. The parliamentary group also agreed to repeal 
sections of the Public Order Act that prevent political rallies 
without a formal license. “This is a reform package, a 


package owned by all political parties,” Vice President 
George Saitoti said. “The government will talc* the report in 
full The president agrees with this. ” ( Reuters h 

Anger in Haiti on Ferry Recovery 

MONTROU1S, Haiti — Hundreds of people mourning 
those killed in a ferry disaster blocked Haiti's main high- l 
way, building barricades of burning tires to protest delays in. 
recovering dozens of bodies from the underwater wreck. T < 
Authorities suspended efforts to retrieve more victims 7 
from a ferry that sank Monday off Montrouis, killing ant 
estimated 200 people, pending the arrival of more divas' 
from the United States. Relatives feared that they would not ■> 
be able to identify their loved ones if the recovery operation - 
was delayed further. Divers have recovered 79 homes, plus 
a corpse that surfaced on its own. 

The U.S. Navy took over the recovery operation, which 1 : 
was hampered by murky water, die ferry's narrow pas- ' 
sageways and its position on a steep sea slope. (AP)„ 

*■ 

Mandela Urges Role for De Klerk ? 

CAPE TOWN — Frederik W. de Klerk, South Africa’s; 
last white president and the recently retired leader of the ., 
opposition National Party, should not be allowed to fade, 
into political obscurity. President Nelson Mandela said. 
Thursday. ■* 

Asked by reporters if Mr. de Klerk still had a role toplay'j 
in South African politics, Mr. Mandela said Mr. de Klerk? 
deserved recognition for his role in dis mantlin g apartheid ! 
and clearing the way for all-race elections in 1 994. ; * 

Mr. Mandela said the nation should “give him something,, 
where he can use his talent, not as a leader of a political party,!, 
but as one of tbe most eminent of South Africans. '(Reuters)^ 


BOOKS 


OFF THE FACE OF 
THE EARTH 

By Al jean Harmetz. 286 pages. 
$22. Scribner. 

Reviewed by 
George Stade 

A XJEAN Harmetz knows 
her movies. As well as 
reporting on Hollywood for 
The New Yak Times, she has 
written books like the prize- 
winning “The Making of 
‘The Wizard of Oz_”’ 

But in her first novel, she 
seems to have set her sights on 
the kind of movie shown on 
television opposite Monday- 
night football. In such movies 
the heroine, who needs to be 
both indomitable and vulner- 
able, is all Hannetz’s version 
is Drew Greene, whom I see 
being played by Patty Duke, 
Lindsay Wagner or one of the 
ex-Charlie *s Angels. 

Drew Greene, in her 30s, is 
a graduate summa cum laode 
and Phi Beta Kappa from 
Stanford, as we are often in- 
formed On emergent occa- 
sions she quotes the classics, 
from “The Waste Land" to 
• ‘Invictus.” She is terrifically 
intelligent and terrifyingly 
competent 

She is not a feminist, but a 
womanist: She believes that 
women have a better grip on 
reality because they are tbe 
ones who have to get things 
done. She is good at her work, 
which she does at home so she 
I can be there for her two sons. 

From what she say s and 
does and from what we are 
told she feels, I gather that 
Drew Greene is entirely sex- 


By Alan Truscott 

M ICHAEL Levinson, a 
former Life Master 
Men's Pair champion, is al- 
most blind He can barely see 
his own cards, and has to 
memorize the dummy after it 
is announced to him. 

Sitting South on the 
diagramed deal from the Blue 
Ribbon Pairs at the Fall Na- 
tionals be embaiked on an 
imaginative line of play that 
few would consider but wound 
up with a disaster. North- 
South lave a reasonable play 
for game in either major suit, 
bat landed in hearts after loc- 
ating the spade fit. On die face 
| of it, four hearts is slightly 
superior, because a heart ruff is 
more likely in a spade contract 
than vice-versa. 


less, although Harmetz tells 
us that “the sexiest thing 
about Drew was her voice,” 
which the reader, however, 
cannot hear. Though her cre- 
ator (I mean Harmetz) ad- 
mires her immensely, the 
reader may well sympathize 
with her husband who has 
flown the coop. 

This husband this softy, 
this klutz, this incompetent at 
everything but his job, has 
flown into the arms of a 
younger woman, a college 
dropout named 1130111. no 
less. She is described as a Val- 
ley Girl with a heart-shaped 
face and “overiarge breasts. ” 
Given this distraction, and his 
overall incompetence, the 
husband is of no help to Drew 
whoa the crisis occurs. 

The action begins when 
their son David a brat with an 
IQ of 168 (be takes after bis 
mother), decides in a suit to 
run away. He expects and 
hopes that as on prior occa- 
sions of this sort he will be 
found before nightfall Instead 
he is abducted by a psychopath 
who entices him with baseball 
cards. (The action takes place 
right outside Los Angeles.) 

At first the police are of no 
help, because they do not 
know about the psychopath; 
later they are of no help be- 
cause they believe that David 
is dead. One exception is An- 
gus West, the star of the Sher- 
wood Police Department. He 
has retreated from Los 
Angeles, where he saw too 
much, where had he listened 
to a mother's intuitions that 
he might have saved her 
daughter from death at the 


hands of a psychopath. An- 
gus, in short, like every char- 
acter of this sort since Jake 
Barnes, has a wound He 
treats his wound in the usual 
way, with alcohol and 
Weltschmerz. 

Angus’s chief is the usual 
time-server and blowhard; in 
the usual way he suspends 
Angus for insubordination. 
Angus is ft us free, in the usu- 
al way, to spend all his time 
oo the case that obsesses him, 
that can heal his wound The 
thing is, he has little to do but 
offer moral support — his in- 
tuition tells him that David is 
still alive — and stand around 
looking decorative, for Drew 
has taken charge. She pulls in 
her difficult mother to baby- 
sit the unkidnapped son. She 
gets her husband to man the 
phones. Tiffani, like others of 
her generation, is good with 
computers. 

D REW’S friends are sent 
out to canvas stores that 
sell baseball cards, each one 
to a different zone along a 
grid drawn up by Drew. Even 
■one of mother's golden re- 
trievers is drafted as a tracker. 
Then Drew and Angus begin 
to find evidence that David is 
leaving clues (baseball cards) 
to his whereabouts. 

David’s tribulations; as it 
turns out, are having a good 
effect on his character. He 
resolves that if rescued, he 
will cease to be a brat. Their 
tribulations are also having a 
good effect on the rescuers. 
Drew and her mother are at 
long last reconciled. Angus 
stops drinking. He and Drew 


get to the point of holding 
hands. And she learns how to 
put up with Tiffani, in spite of 
the overlarge breasts. TJje 
psychopath, however, is not 
doing well. ** 

He is not, you will be re- 
lieved to know, a sexual pred- 
ator but a sad case who wants 
to establish with David tjbe 
idyllic father-son relationship 
he missed out on. His own 
father, you see, like Drew's 
husband, like mother’s hus- 
bands, but unlike Angtjts, 
walked out on his famflj. 
(Angus’s wife walked out oa 
him, taking their son.) ^ 
There’s a moral here for 
adults, as there’s a cautionary 
tale for children: Don't run 
away or the bogey man will 
get you. As Our Gang closqs 
in, the psychopath begins , to 
fall apart, to become rnnrder- 
ous, but without the bravura 
style that makes the psycho- 
paths of Elmore Leonard and 
Thomas Harris so much ftu), 
It’s no knock against ia 
work of popular fiction — or 
craft fiction or more invidi- 
ously formula fiction — that 
all the characters and actioqs 
are conventional A conven- 
tion is not a cliche; a con- 
vention is shaped by the fears 
and desires of its consumers’. 

In the movie version, 
Drew's female friend arifl 
confidante will be ditsy and 
wisecracking and killed by 
the psychopath. And oncebs 
learns that Drew is after him, 
he will go after her, and so on 
to a gripping conclusion .2 
probably will miss, for I ex- 
pect to be watching football 

A few Rjnfr Times Service ?. 


BRIDGE 


West led with a singleton 
spade. This obviously 
threatened a ruff, and South 
found a clever way to cut the 

NORTU(D) 

*09894 

OK108B54 

*5 

♦ 2 


WEST 
*3 
9 A3 
O KQ976 
+Q97S4 


EAST 
* UO 5 

O 10 4 2 
A A K 10 8 3 


SOUTH 
♦ AK 72 
OQ?2 
$ A JB 3 
AJ 8 

' North wid South were vulnerable. 

South West 
Pass. Pass 1 * 2 * 

DM. RdbL 2 * Pass 

Pass 3 A 3 V Pass 

40 pass Pass Pass 

West led the spade three. 


enemy communications. He 
won in his hand, cashed the 
diamond ace and led the jack. 
When West covered with the 
queen he threw dummy's 
club, making it impossiblefor 
East to win a club trick and 
return a spade. 

West played a third dia- 
mond, which was ruffed in 
dummy, and a heart was led to 
tbe nine, queen and ace, 
reaching the position shown 
aL right; 

West led the diamond king, 
and South had to guess. If he 
bad gnessed to ruff high in 
dummy and lead a trump, be 
would have made his game. 
But be ruffed with the ten, 
which would have brought in 
an overtrick if the defenders’ 
hearts had been the other way 
round. Now he was down one, 
for East scored the heart jack 


and returned a spade to defeat 
the game. 

Levinson would have 
made his game easily by lead- 
ing a tramp at the second 
trick. East would have gained 
the lead to give his partner a 
spade raff, but that would 
have been three tricks for the 
defense, not four. ^ 

c 

NORTH f - 

♦ Q 9 8 0 

ORlOBfi ■£ 

0 — •* 

A- % 


WEST 
A — 

02 
o K 9 
A Q 9 7 5 4 


EAST 
A JS 
J 

0 — 

+ AK 1 QI 


SOUTH 

* K 7 2 
073 
*8 

* J« 


4 




PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


CHINA: Workers’ Resentment Is Rising 


Continued from Page 1 


113 million industrial workers are no 
longer needed During China's current 
five-year economic plan, those mostly 

urban laid^wxkers will have to com- 
pete with 72 million new job-seekersand 
40 millio n rural laborers flooding into 
dw cities from die countryside, accord- 
ing to Chinese government labor fore- 
casts issued in May — adding to what an 
official newspaper called the country s 
“grave employment situation.’’ 

In March, in die Sichuan Province 
town of Nanchong, about 20,000 work- 
ers held a textile plant manager hostage 
until the government ordered a locai 
bank branch to pay months' worth ot 
back wages. In July, paramilitary troops 


were summoned to Mianyang, also in 
Sichuan, to put down protests that start- 
ed when dte town’s mayor failed to show 

up at a meeting where about 700 anxious 
wor kers from the Mianyang Silk Print- 
ing & Dyeing Factory were waiting to 
hear how the company’s impending 
bankruptcy would affect them. Irate 
workers set up roadblocks and other 
angry citizens joined diem in smashing 
bus windows around Mianyang, which 
had been part of a 56-city enterprise 
reform experiment As many as 100 
people were injured, human rights 
groups said 

Trouble broke out again last week in 
Sichuan, this time in Dujiangyan. State 
enterprise workers forced into early re-, 
tirement on meager pensions had gone to 


The Party Congress: 
When, Where, What 


work as porters pedaling flatbed tri- 
cycles. When local authorities confis- 


When: Friday through Sept. 18. 

Where: Great Hall of the People, 
Beijing. 

Delegates: About 2,000, repre- 
senting 58 million party members. 

Keynote speech : President Jiang 
Zemin speaks Friday. Praise of 
Deng Xiaoping expected. 

Agenda: Set China ’s direction 
for the next five years, including 
endorsement of a plan to transform 
the system of state ownership by 
partly privatizing state enterprises; 
review anti-corruption efforts; elect 
a new Central Committee (the last 
one had 188 members); discuss a 
party constitutional amendment, 
which may toughen anti -corruption 
powers. TTie future of Prime Min- 
ister Li Peng will likely be decided 

Aftermath: Newly elected Cen- 
tral Committee will meet immedi- 
ately after the congress and appoint 
a new Politburo (the last one had 21 
members), a seven-member Polit- 
buro Standing Committee and a 
party general secretary, which has 
been Mr. Jiang since 1989. The 
Central Committee must also re- 
constitute the powerful Central Mil- 
itary Commission, of which Mr. Ji- 
ang 15 also chair man 

Analysis: Political reform likely 
to take a back seat to economic 
reform; genuine debite will be kept 
out of public view in a tightly con- 
trolled agenda; Mr. Jiang will seek 
to solidify his standing as country's 
supreme leader. 

Last Congress: 1992. 

(AFP, AP. Reuters) 


cycles. When local authorities confis- 
cated some unlicensed tricycles, hun- 
dreds of the workers staged a sit-in 
outside the city government buildings. 
When city officials failed to show up for 
a meeting on Sept. 3, clashes broke out 
between protesters and about 100 anti- 
riot policemen, exiled human rights 
groups said. 

According to the World Bank, about 2 
milli on surplus workers were laid off 
during 1996 in cities with pilot programs 


on enterprise reform. Total unemploy- 
ment in all urban areas stood at 20 mo- 


ment in all urban areas stood at 20 mil- 
lion people, the bank said. Government 
estimates put the urban unemployment 
rate at 3 percent, but most economists 
believe a more realistic estimate would 
be about 7 percent to 8 percent. 

“The big issue is how to take care of 
these people," said an economist. Fan 
Gang. Despite the expected endorse- 
ment of accelerated reform of state en- 
terprises at the Communist Party con- 
gress, Mr. Fan said “there will be a lot of 
things you can’t do because you can’t 
deal with the labor issue." As a result, 
small- and medium-size state-owned 
companies will be the first to be re- 
structured, while action on industrial di- 
nosaurs with more than 10,000 workers 
will be delayed, Mr. Fan predicted. 

Caution and a booming economy 
have largely prevented labor protests 
from becoming something worse. Some 
plant managers say they try to avoid 
laying off more than one person in a 
family; frequently, two or three family 
members work at the same factory. 

Chinese leaders have promoted job 
retraining for the unemployed, but this 



JAPAN: Lodtheed Bribe-Taker in Cabinet 


Continued from Page 1 


Coordination Agency, which is over- 
seeing die bureaucratic st reamlini ng, 
Mr. Hashimoto may have hired the 
muscle he needs to attack the bureau- 
cracy from wiihiiL Mr. Sam represmts a 
Liberal Democratic Party establishment 
with great influence over bureaucrats 
who want to block the reforms. One 
analyst said Mr. Sato will be grateftilto 
Mr. Hashimoto for a second political bfe 
and wiU “work like bell” to push his 
reforms. • 

Analysts Thursday said that Mr. na- 
shimoto is gambling that his personal 
nnmilaritv and the strength of the party, 





Stephen Shron/Agoicc FoncoPrcsw 


HONG KONG GETS READY — A security policeman rappelling 
Thursday from the root ot Hong Kong’s Convention Center, the venue 
of next week’s annual meeting of the World Bank and the IMF. 


may prove difficult. More than 70 per- 
cent of unemployed workers have less 


cent of unemployed workers have less 
than a high school education, according 
to government figures, and more than 30 
percent have been out of work for at least 
a year. 

Even among people still working for 
failing state-owned enterprises, anger is 
rising over wages that frequently go 
unpaid. In Tianjin last year, there were 


about a dozen serious instances of work- 
er protest, including a sit-in by 300 
workers that closed down a major road- 
way, one government source said. Na- 
tionwide, labor arbitrators handled a re- 
cord 9,737 disputes last year, more than 
double the number in 1995. The most 
rapidly rising area of complaint was in 
government agencies or state-owned 
businesses, an official newspaper report- 
ed earlier this month. 

It is an indication of the gravity of the 
financial and management problems in 
state-owned enterprises that China’s 
leaders are willing to risk labor strife 
despite their desire to maintain stability. 
The tide of red ink from those firms 


threatens to overwhelm the banking sys- 
tem with bad debts and the government 
budget with deficit spending to help 
cover subsidies. State-owned enter- 
prises also are draining investment away 
from more robust parts of the economy; 
the state sector accounts for less than 
half of total output but gobbles up about 
three-quarters of domestic investment 
The Marxist ideologues remaining in 
the Communist Party leadership com- 
plain that the party is abandoning a key 
constituency and betraying its roots. At 
die other extreme, democratic reformers 
point to labor discontent as a sign that the 
people need more representative gov- 
ernment and outlets for free expression. 


enough to withstand the public criticism 
he will receive for the appointment of 
Mr. Sato. , 

“It’s a of strength that Hasm- 
moto can do this," said political analyst 
John Neoffer. “He’s going k> take sane 
hits in the media about this, but he’ll 
keep Nakasone and the Old Boyshappy, 
which is more important to him.” 

Mr. Hashimoto is riding high as one of 
the most effective prime ministers in 
Japan's recent history. The cabinet re- 
shuffle came on the same day he was 
elected to a second two-year term as 
Liberal Democratic Party president He 
ha«; also overseen the resurrection of his 
party from its low point in 1993, when it 
lost the one-party lock it had held on 
power for almost 40 years. On Friday, 

the party regamed an outright majority in 

the 500-seat lower house of Parliament 
when an opposition lawmaker defec- 
ted. 

Mr. Hashimoto also flexed Ins polit- 
ical muscles a bit by retaining Finance 
Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzoka. and De- 
fense Agency chief Fumio Kyuma. Nor- 
mally, prime ministers like to make a 
clean sweqp in their mid -term cabinet 
reshuffles, handing out the top jobs as 
political perks. By choosing to keep Mr. 
Mitsuzoka and Mr. Kyuma, who are key 
to his financial and defense proposals, 
Mr. Hashimoto was choosing policy 
over politics — a gamble that a weaker 
prime ministermighr not have the luxury 
to make, analysis said. 

But the Sato appointment was Mr. 
Hashimoto’s most raw power play of the 
day. In 1986, Mr. Sato was convicted of 
accepting about $15,000 in bribes in a 
scandal in which the Lodtheed Cor- 
poration was attempting to influence 
Japanese lawmakers to purchase aircraft 
for its civilian fleer. Mr. Saio, who ac- 
cepted the bribes when he was deputy 
minister of transportation, was given a 
suspended jail sentence. He also paid 
about $15,000 in fines. 

“My position is to forget about the 
past and concentrate on the present," 
Mr. Sato said at a news conference 
Thursday. 



Koko Sato, the Lockheed figure, 
was given a key post In the cabinet. 


The New Cabinet 


Reuters 

TOKYO— fti flw newenMiwfawWKWl 
tty Prime Mii«ar Ryrtore HosWnoto: 

Finance: HhwN MBsuzvta Fon*Qrc Keizo Obu- 
cbfc jn&wwttanal Trwte and kidurtry: Mflsuo Horodic 
jjm tff B KoUcU StHBOtnobcE Constoudton: Tsutanu 
Knwonr Transport TotooFaS; 

Pests rod Ts te uwBHUitodtons; Shcnnbmo Junfc 
Lobar: Bumnei Ibofct EduartJora IWwkto 
Maddmuns Asricutton* Forestry and FfclwJes Hi® 
OdB Health end WWtare JmfcMro Kotrerab Home 
AffebvrlWnsoWra Uesugfc Environment: hflro*h,Okt 
Chief Cabinet Setaiehsv: KonewMtnrotaMfln- 

a«menfc Koto 5afcs Detail Potato Kjroia - Sd«n« 

SadekozD Tarogaid ; Economic Ptam**F Kbp Oiw 
Hokkaido and OWnawtc Maneo Suzuki; Hfflfanof. 
Land- HtsaoM Kamet 


The Lockheed scandal resulted in the - 
indictments of 2 7 Japanese political and : ; 
business leaders, including Prime Min - j 
ister Kakuei Tanaka. It became syn- 
onymous with the dirty-money politics 
that plagued the Liberal Democratic'- 
Party through the 1970s and 1980s.'' 
When voters voted the Liberal Demo-v 


cratic Party out of power in 1993, it was 
largely because of those decades of ar- .* 


largely because of those decades of ar- ■’ 
rogance and corruption. 

But time has healed some wounds; - 
Last year, Mr. Sato was re-elected to : 
Parliament from his home district on the j 
northern island of Hokkaido. Since then, ' T . 
he has been quietly helping Mr. Ha-~. 
shimoto with his government reforms. 

Mr. Sato’s appointment set off a broad ' 
debate over forgiveness and redemption, j 
W hile many people felt Mr. Sato bad no 
business in the cabinet, others were won- j. j 
dering whether Mr. Sato bad paid--’ i 
enough for his crimes. Japanese society 
places a high value on forgiveness.- - t 


- w 

ECONOMY: Japanese Recovery Proves Elusive 


Have you missed any of the 
International Herald IHbune’s 


Continued from Page 1 


Sponsored Sections 


this year? 


ily because the government increased the na- 
tion wide sales tax in April to 5 percent from 3 
percent. 

In the first three months of this year, the 
economy — Japan's real gross domestic 
product — leaped ahead, growing by 5.7 per- 
cent over the like quarter a year earlier, ac- 
cording to revised figures released Thursday by 
the government’s Economic Planning Agency. 
Much of thai growth, however, was the result 
of frantic buying ahead of the tax increase. 

Thus, the’ sharp contraction in the second 
quarter was partly the result of the tax, which 
essentially chased consumers out of the stores 
and led companies to tighten Their purse 


strings. 

“Complete uncertainty prevails," said Jes- 
per Koll, an economist at JJP. Morgan Se- 
curities Asia Ltd. in Tokyo. "It's such a yo-yo 
pattern, such a stop-and-go. And that’s the 
problem for the recovery and for anyone 
dealing with Japan. 

“Every other quarter the bulls are right,” 
he said. "And every other quarter the bears 
are right.” 

The figures are particularly embarrassing 
for policymakerc because the government had 
repeatedly insisted that the economy was 
strong enough to bear the sales tax increase. 
Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto and the 
Finance Ministry have argued constantly that 
only by raising taxes can they put the gov- 
ernment on a sounder fiscal footing. 


Auctions in France 
Bavaria 

Built for Business: Bangladesh 
Built for Business: China 
Built for Business: Indonesia 
Built for Business: Japan 
Built for Business: Philippines 
Built for Business: Singapore 
Built for Business: South Korea 
Built for Business: Thailand 
Business Education in France 
Business Education in ttie US 
Business Locations in Germany 
Business Locations in Vienna 
By Spain: Cathedrals 

By Spain: Gastronomic Bounty of the North 

By Spain: Museums 

By Spain: World Heritage Cities 

California Wines 

Czech Republic 

Dubai 

Eco-Efficiency: Business and the Environment 
Egypt 

Emerging Markets in Central & Eastern Europe 

Euro & Financial Markets 

European Fine Arts 

Fast Track 97: Asia Business Outlook 

Frankfurt's New Congress Center 

Greek Telecommunications 

Holidays in Europe: European Drive Around 

Holidays in Europe: London& Paris Shopping Breaks 


Holidays in Europe: UK Fly and Drive 

Hotel Renaissance 

Hungary 

IFA: Advanced Electronics Showcase 

international Business Education 

International Education in Benelux 

Internationa Education in Germany and Austria 

International Education in Switzerland 

International Franchising 

Investing in Austria 

Investing in Austria: Vienna 

Investing in Poland 

Luxury Real Estate 

Mauritius 

Mitsubishi 

Mobile Communications: GSM and Beyond 
Multilingualism in Europe 
North America Summer Camps 
Office Equipment 

Portugal Update: Lisbon Stock Exchange 
Portugal Update: Telecom 
Summer in New York 
Tanzania 

Technology & The Environment 
Thailand 

Trade Fairs & Congresses in Germany 

Travel for Knowledge 

Travel in Asia: Best Beaches 

Travel in Asia: Festivals 

Travel in Asia: Golf 

Yachting 


But economists said policymakers clearly 
misjudged the impact of the increase, and the 


deputy minis ter of the Economic Pl anning 
Agency, Shimpei Nukaya. acknowledged that 
the contraction had been larger than initially 
anticipated. Even so, government officials 


tried to dampen the impact 
As recently as Wednesd 


As recently as Wednesday, Finance Min- 
istry officials were declaring that Japan's 
economy was on a mild recovery trend. Even 
after the figures were announced Thursday, 
Deputy Finance Minister Takeshi Komura 
gave an optimistic view of the economy. 

“The tempo of economic recovery has 
slowed down temporarily in reaction to a 


buying rush ahead of the April 1 consumption 
tax hike," be said. “But the government has 
not changed its view that the economy is 
slowly continuing to recover." 

But Mr. Takagi of the Fuji Research In- 
stitute warned that Japan's economy was 
standing on a fragile base and might be en- 
tering a recession. Several other economists 
said the economy was unlikely to match the 


- government’s growth target of 1 .9-percent for^ 
the year through March. 

. Still, some economists said that Japan's 1 : 
recovery had not yet fizzled and that the 
second quarter probably represented the bot-' 
tom of the economic cycle. 1 

“Delayed is the right word, not derailed,” - 
said Robert Alan Feldman, chief economist at •: 
Salomon Brothers Inc. in Tokyo. “But the* 
Japanese government has a lot of work to do, * 
and the Japanese prime minister would be the 
first to admit that." v 

Japan is likely to be severely criticized at" 
the upcoming meeting in Hong Kong of the*' 
Group of Seven leading industrialized court- 
tries. Mr. Hashimoto and other Japanese of- 
ficials have personally told U.S. officiate,'' 
including Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin 1- 
and Deputy Treasury Secretary Lawrence 
Summers, that Tokyo will not export its way’ 
out of its economic woes but instead will rely ‘ 
chi growth from the domestic economy. 

But the data Thursday suggested that the-- 
only bright spot in the economy was exports, 
which added a percentage point to growth for " 
the quarter — while all other areas of potential *■ 
growth, from consumer buying power to cor- 
porate and bousing investment; were in re-' J 
treat ■ 

Trade figures also released Thursday 
showed that the current-account surplus, 
measuring the flow of goods, services, in-T 
vestment income and other transfers, surged' 
by 63 percent in July against a year earlier, to ' 
906 billion yen ($7.59 billion). 

This was the fourth straight monthly in- 
crease in the current account surplus and 
raised new concern about Japan's trade re- 
lationship with the United States. A key 
benchmark — the ratio of the surplus to gross * . 
domestic product — rose to 2.6 percent, above? 
the target that U.S. officials have said they feel 
comfortable with. That growth is likely to - 
raise trade frictions between Washington and' 
Tokyo. - 

Perhaps in anticipation of the American-'' 
respo nse. Mr. Komura said, "We are ready to' 
promote domestic demand-led economic ■ 
growth through further deregulation and fis- 
cal structural reform." 

Indeed, some economists said that the fig- 
ures could prompt the government to abandon 


tv tcr-ro 


u'l .■ V- •• 

fist- 

•taut: ---• 

Jfr 




Publish 


OKAiAUin 


er \\ £ 


avc 








its austerity program and perhaps even cut' 
corporate taxes, a move that has been en 
conraged by a number of government min- . 
isuies. 2 

e global citizen,” i; 

K .° U of - J-P ', “it needs ad- • 

ditional policy stimulus.” 


Now available on the IHT Web site: 









Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 


Forinvesimew 

information 

Read 

THE MOI«Y REPORT 

every Saturday 

in the IHT. 


THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


1 - 800-882 2884 




HWWttflHHMI. 


, THK WOltURi IMII? MfcWSflil*KH . 








PAGE 3' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBINE, 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 34, 1997 


Think big? 

You wish to finance > large-scale international project? 

nordlb 

NORDOEUTSCHE LANZjLSBAKK cirot.fntrale 

Kmib‘Z$riiraiu 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

Think twice! 

A second opinion is always smart. 

From a nujor German bank with international experience. 

NORDLB 


ft FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 PAGE 15 

sOjinoEiTst-nt nvrji - BAs:i: oir'i.hstiiic 


U.S. Urges 
EU to Back 
Air Merger 

Official Cites Concern 
At BA-AA Objections 

CoufiHtvOurSi&F™ Uu ^ 

~~ ^r toP U S - offi cial 
urged the European Union on Thursday 

to approve the planned alliance between 
British Airways and American Airlines 
warning the EU not to tie its clearance to 

impossible" conditions. 

Stuart Eizenstat, the undersecretary 
of state for economic, business and ag- 
ricultural affairs, said be had told the EU 
competition commissioner, Karel van 
Mieru that the United States was con- 
cerned about the EU’s objections to the 
alliance. 

We expressed the hope that the mer- 
ger would be approved and conditions 
would not be imposed that made the 
merger impossible,” he said at an 
American Chamber of Commerce 
luncheon in Brussels. 

His comments marked the most vocal 
U.S. support yet for the revenue-sharing 
plan to unite fares and flights across the 
Atlantic. Still, analysts warned they 
could fuel another dispute between Mr. 
van Mien and U.S. officials just a short 
time after the tussle over Boeing Co.’s 
purchase of McDonnell Douglas Corp. 

A European Commission source 
warned against reading too much »nrn 
Mr. Eizenstat’s comments, saying that 
Washington so far had agreed broadly 
with the EU's approach. 

The commission, the executive 
agency of the 15 -member EU, has called 
on the two airlines to cede rivals enough 
access for 25 daily round-trip flights at 
London’s Heathrow Airport and to cut 
the frequency of some flights. The com- 
mission also opposed the two carriers' 
request to unite frequMit-flier programs. 

The demands, which came in a pre- 
liminary review, underlined die com- 
mission’s tough stance toward die pact 
and raised fears it could seek such 
strong concessions that the carriers 
might call off die plan. 

Official authority to approve the pact 
rests with the U.S. Department of Trans- 
portation, which relies on antitrust spe- 
cialists in the Department of Justice. 

Talks aze expected to continue until 
next month, when the issue will be 
submitted for the opinion of a com- 
mittee of . national antitrust specialists . 
from the 15-nation EU ahead of a final 
EU recommendation by late October. 

British Airways shares closed in Lon- 
don at 664 pence ($10-53), up 1.5. 
Shares in AMR Corp., the parent of 
American, were at $1 15 JO, up $1,625, 
in New York. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 

■ Total’s Iran Han Is Questioned 

Mr. Eizenstat also said Washington 
was concerned about reports that die 
French oil company Total SA planned 
to invest in Ban’s oil industry, Reuters 


: said Washington remained firmly 
sed to the EU’s policy of “critical 

gue" with fran- 

The United States has made it illegal • 
t American companies to invest in 
an a nd has enacted legislation drat 
eks to prevent other countries from 
vesting in Ban. 

Total is engaged in talks with Tehran 
ir the rights to develop Ban's huge 
Midi Pars gas field. 



Hal Krisbergh, chief executive of World gate, and his Internet-TV service's ma i n menu screen. 


Upstart Takes On Gates’s WebTV 


By John Markoff 

New Vert Times Ser icc 

LOS ANGELES — A powerful 
team of companies is mounting a 
direct challenge to a plan by Bill 
Gates, chairman of Microsoft 
Corp., to use cable television to 
dominate tbe'Internet. 

While attention has focused on 
Mr. Gates's big financial bet on 
blending the two technologies, key 
members of the cable industry 
have been developing a system that 
may bring the Internet to millions 
of TV households far more quickly 
than Mr. Gates has envisioned — 
and at lower prices. 

“If they pull this off, they will 
blow apart the current Internet 
price curve and change Internet 
culture at the same time/’ said 
Andy Semovitz, president of the 
Association for Interactive Media, 
a Washington trade association. 

It is no secret why so many big 
players are angling to tap the rich 
information of the Internet and 
make it accessible to the portion of 
the population that is not com- 
puter-literate. Only about 40 per- 
cent of American households have 
personal computers, but approx- 
imately 65 percent have cable TV, _ 
‘ The blending of the Internet and 
television advertising also bolds 
out a potentially huge source of 
new revenue. 

The cable industry’s new 
strategy has been developed by a 
small start-up company. World- 
gate Communications of Bens- 
alem, Pennsylvania, but it includes 
a number of big backers. In a sym- 
posium held here Wednesday and 
attended by Hollywood producers, 
television executives and the ad- 
vertising industry, Worldgate. 
which has backing from two big 
makers of cable television equip- 
ment — Nextlevel Systems and 
Scientific- Atlanta — sketched its 
plans. 

Other backers include Citicorp 
and the computer chip and cellular 
phone maker Motorola, as well as 
cable system operators and major 
advertising agencies. 


Several industry executiyes said 
that Worldgate had also recently 
closed a deal with @Home, a Sil- 
icon Valley company that is 
already developing a national In- 
ternet-access network for cable 
systems. Worldgate and @ Horae 
executives, however, declined to 
comment. Worldgate has raised 
$11 million and is seeking addi- 
tional private investors. 

The system as envisioned by 
Worldgate would be faster, cheap- 
er and less demanding of die con- 
sumer than Microsoft’s current ca- 
pabilities. 

At a suggested retail monthly 
fee of $12 or lower, Worldgate 
plans within a few weeks to begin 
offering Internet service through a 
set-top cable converter box, the 
existing TV set and a remote con- 
trol. A wireless keyboard would be 
optional. 

The service will be offered first 
in a Philadelphia suburb and in St 
Louis, with other cable companies 
and cities to be added in the next 
year. 

The assumption is that the cable 
company would provide the con- 
vener box as part of normal ser- 
vice. The customer would not need 
a PC or any additional equipment 
— unlike Microsoft's Web TV ser- 
vice, which requires the user to buy 
a special $200 set-top device and 
pay a monthly fee of $20. 

Moreover, Worldgate’s service 
would offer data speeds of 192,000 
bits a second — four times as fast 
as the fastest modem connections 
over conventional telephone lines, 
which is the way most home PC 
and Web TV users reach the In- 
ternet. 

“Worldgate is Web TV and Mi- 
crosoft's worst nightmare.’’ said 
Richard Doherty, president of Eo- 
visioneering Inc., a consulting firm 
in Seafozd, New York. 

* ‘They have the cheapest cost of 
infrastructure, and they can switch 
the Internet on for more Americans 
than anyone in the country.”. 

Microsoft is not standing still, 
however. Its Web TV subsidiary is 
scheduled to make an announce- 


ment about a new generation of 
technology next week in New 
York. 

And Steve Perlman, president of 
Web TV Networks, which Mi- 
crosoft acquired for $425 million 
this year, said that Worldgate was 
understating the real cost to con- 
sumers of its system and overstat- 
ing how quickly local cable sys- 
tems would be upgraded for 
interactive service. 

‘ ‘Cable operators are upgrading, 
but to think that this will happen 
overnight is wishful thinkin g," he 
said. . 

Currently , a few cable television 
companies in selected metropol- 
itan markets offer high-speed In- 
ternet access to PC users over spe- 
cial cable modems. But unlike PC 
cable modems, which compete 
with conventional video program- 
ming for the cable system’s car- 
rying capacity, Worldgate would 
employ a largely unused portion of 
the video spectrum called the ver- 
tical blanking interval. That means 
that a cable system will be able to 
deliver its existing channels. 

In a difference with Web TV’s 
technology, which amounts to a 
television set-top computer, virtu- 
ally no computing takes place in the 
consumer’s set-top box in 
Worldgate's system, instead, the 
processing occurs at the cable op- 
erator’s site. Ooly a relatively com- 
pact video stream is sent down to the 
home and only simple commands or 
keystrokes are sent back npstream. 

‘ ‘We thought. ‘Why pur the com- 
puter in the home?’ "said Hal Kris- 
bergh, Worldgate founder and chief 
executive, who ran the cable busi- 
ness of Nextlevel — the framer 
General Instrument Corp. — for a 
decade. “We realized if we did this 
we could offer very broad access.” 

For all his optimism about 
Worldgate’s prospects. Mr. Kris- 
bergh acknowledged that Mr. 
Gates remains a daunting compet- 
itor, given Microsoft's formidable 
marketing and technology skills. 

* ‘I feel like I’m in the swimming 
pool” he said, “and there’s this 
big dorsal fin in here with me.” 


World Bank Raises Alarm 
On East Asian Economies 


‘ Fragile Banking System ’ at Risk, Study Warns 


By Alan Friedman 

International Her aid Tribune 

PARIS — The World Bank called Thurs- 
day for urgent and sweeping reforms of the 
banking system and financial markets of East 
Asia, warning that radical steps were needed 
in order to make sure the present economic 
turmoil is just temporary. 

In an unusually blunt report, the World 
Bank blamed inadequate bank supervision, a 
lack of transparency, state-directed lending, 
political pressures for loans and “perverse 
connections between lenders and borrowers" 
forbad loans in the region that “could total as 
much as $660 billion.” The report said that 
Thai banks could account for as much as 20 
percent of the problem loans. 

“In a world that is increasingly integrated 
financially. East Asia can no longer postpone 
difficult choices — the penalties of a fragile, 
underdeveloped banking system are severe," 
the bank said in the study titled "Are Fi- 
nancial Sector Weaknesses Undermining the 
East Asian Miracle?" 

Slijn Claessens, a World Bank economist 
who helped to write the report, said Thailand, 
which is suffering an overall financial crisis, 
needed to do the most of any country in the 
region. 

He was especially critical of the banking 
sector in Thailand and elsewhere, saying that 
much lending “has not been done on market 


principles” and describing “perverse link- 
ages between companies and bank lenders, - 
both in personal terms and in terms of share- 
holdings links.” 

Mr. Claessens noted that there had been 
“exaggerated” short-term borrowing in dol- 
lars by East Asian companies seeking funds 


Bangkok upsets foreign traders. Page 20. 


offshore. The currency weaknesses in the 
region, he said, were therefore caused not 
merely by speculators but also by “local 
companies trying to cover their positions and 
buying foreign currencies like dollars.” 

In Washington, meanwhile, the World 
Bank's board was considering a 515 million 
technical assistance loan to help Thailand to 
reform its financial sector. 

The World Bank report also noted that 
while equity markets had developed rapidly 
in recent years. Easi Asia still lacked adequate 
bond and other security markets vital to help 
finance infrastructure projects and housing. 

The region's huge need far energy, trans- 
portation, water and telecommunications will 
cost an estimated $1.2 trillion to $U trillion 
over the next decade, according to the report, 
and private sector funds will be critical. 

Several countries in the region need to 

See TURMOIL, Page 20 


A Crackdown in Hong Kong 

Exchange Forbids Company to Issue More Shares 


Blocmberg News 

HONG KONG — CIL Holdings Ltd. is 
what regulators in Hong Kong like to call a 
UFO: a stock that has soared without ex- 
planation and needs to be shot down. 

And that is just what the Stock Exchange of 
Hong Kong did Thursday. It refused the small 
construction company permission to sell new 
shares, making it the fust public company in 
the former British colony ever barred from 
raising funds as punishment for poor dis- 
closure. 

Asia’s second-largest stock market is in the 
throes of a crackdown following a month in 
which the benchmark index rose to record 
highs and then lost a fifth of its value. 

“Simply, our mandate is to protect share- 
holders,” said Henry Law, a spokesman for 
the stock exchange. “When we see unusual 
price movements we have to suspect it could 
be a sign of insider trading or price-rigging.” 


Almost four-fifths of Hong Kong's so- 
called public companies are still controlled by 
local families who are required to sell only a 
quarter of their shares to gain a stock ex- 
change listing. Companies are required to 
report earnings only twice a year rather than 
quarterly, as in the United States, and they do 
not have to include a balance sheet. 

“This is pretty ironic considering Hong 
Kong's supposed to be the financial capital of 
Asia.” said Malcolm Robinson, manager of a 1 
pan-Asia hedge fund at Richmont Asia-Pa- 
cific. * ‘Take an annual report from a company- 
in die Philippines, in Indonesia, in India or 
even Thailand and I guarantee you you'll get 
more information.” 

In the case of CEL, which has been losing 
money for iwo years, the company’s stock , 
rose 29 percent without explanation in the ; 
week before it announced its second new . 
share sale of the year in August. 


Hints of Trouble Hurt U.S. Stocks 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Stocks slipped Thursday 
for a second straight day, despite data show- 
ing a modest improvement in the U.S. trade 
balance in the second quarter, amid troubling 
hints of disappointing profits and inflationary 
pressures in toe economy. 

The Commerce Department said the deficit 
in the broadest measure of U.S. trade declined 
slightly to $39 billion from April through 
June as toe growth of exports outpaced toe 
increase in imports. 

But (be Labor Department reported that the 
number of first-time claims for jobless ben- 


efits fell by 14,000 last week to 3 10.000. 

The data, which far exceeded analysts' 
average forecast for a fall of about 1,000 
claims, aggravated fears that had been build- 
ing in advance of Friday’s readings on whole- 
sale price levels and retail sales for August. 

Although recent measures of inflation have 
remained tame, economists contend that a 
strong job market will eventually force em- 
ployers to pay more competitive wages and 
then raise prices to compensate, particularly if 
signs of brisk consumer demand continued. 

See STOCK, Page 15 


international manager 


Publisher Waves Digital Wands at Packing Costs 


By Doreen Caryajal 

New York Times Service 

G ordonsvrjle, 

Virginia — Hard by 
a turkey farm and 
the brittle blond 
cornstalks of this somnolent 
Southern community is a 
gleaming new automated dis- 
tribution center whose digital 
efficiency and laser wands are 
the German answer to some 


of the problems of the U.S. 
publishing industry. 

Verlagsgruppe Georg von 
Hohzbrinck GmbH-'s $30 
million investment in a high- 
technology warehouse along a 
country road is the media con- 
glomerate’s bet on the future 
of toe U.S. publishing market, 
which has struggled this year 
withi flat hardcover sales and 
returns of unsold bodes av- 
eraging almost 45 percent. 


“I simply believe in Amer- 
ica,” said Dieter von 
Holtzbrinck. the chairman 
and son of toe founder of 
Holtzbrinck. one of Ger- 
many's largest media compa- 
nies, which owns the Amer- 
ican publishing houses Farrar 
Straus & Giroux Inc., Henry 
Holt and Sl Martin's Press. 
“I don’t really look at what’s 
going on in toe short term, 
he said. “But in the long term. 


America is toe most impor- 
tant market in publishing.” 

To lay the groundwork for 
a profitable assault on the 
market. Holtzbrinck is apply- 
ing advanced technology to 
the back-office function of 
packing and shipping a book 
— a job of increasingly crit- 
ical significance for publish- 
ers looking to squeeze costs 
from a notoriously inefficient 
distribution system. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Sept 11 

s $ s § § i Z I §• s S 

is as ™ »; » g.S £ 

j vj 92 ZSB U® irwi 0J7W’ 

BSSSffSsjssjjs 

^nAmillitmktjnaaat^P^mdXatdyMi^^Nhacsntm. 


Libid-Ubor Rates 

Swiss Pftndi 

Dolor D-Moit Franc Sl«f*sg Franc T « 


Sept. 11 
ECU 


id) 


rwto} 


i H. ih.u, 1 W - 1 V* 7 Vb - 7V» 

Smooth Hi-OTT* 3V»-3V* 3ft* -ft* 7V»- 7ft* 
l-ygor Sft*-6ft* 3ft-3ft H*-!** 7ft -7ft 3*»-3% 4ft* 

tfs of SI mttai mMtwrn (oreqvMmt). 


Key Money Rates 


emftdnc. 

H«S k«»$ 
Hun* MM 

hMn* 

lndo.n*Ml 

Wsbfi 

Hnal*»k- 

Ku**w 

ftMur-nw- 


MS 

MMS 

7744 

197-33 

3654 

293400 

<um 

15107 

1X3025 

2.9365 


tamer 

Mttpna 

tLZMttdS 

NanctoaM 

na.p*s» 
PoMiXMr 
Mi bo* 
toss ruble 
Start itfrf 

sw-s 


MS 
7763 
1.303 
778 
32-25 
149 
181.96 
5841 JO 
3.75 
1.5092 


termer 

XAfr-nsd 

S.K 0 MW 0 

Simd. kroon 

ToMBS 

TtKd&oW 

dkfWJn 

VUnaz-baliv. 


M* 

470 

90870 

77963 

2851 

3415 

161985a 

1671 

49575 


ff »day 9May Canaaer 

4 7.583? UEM OoponmaM 

8 17815 17792 Satotmac 


UHftT 9 Wbt 

naio nag 

M744 }^T38 1-4718 



UatodSlrtm 

Dbcauntrata 

Prime rate 
Feted ft** 

TO** CDs deters 
IKHJojr CP deters 
3^nontoTTe«*7b« 

1 - year Treasury trt 

2- yMrTnmmyoBi 

5- yeST TiMtay Ml* 

7-jw Treasure no* 
WyoorTrasswynte 

30*ear Treasury bond 

M«iW Ufncli SOrtnrRA 

Japan 

Dacoaatnft 

CaSmoner 
I -warm feWflaak 
Xaentt Merton* 

6- owrtti krfarbasfc 

lO-ftorCrninoad 

Mag 
Laatnrdfflte 
Crt aioney 
1 -taaan Uertnali 

3 - aanib mterwai* 
t-taerfti erfortank 
iO-yc«rB«<4 


dan Prev 

SJ» 5.00 


8h 

Sffi 


8ft 

5ft 


551 551 

SJ1 5J1 
499 497 

570 570 

5.99 5.97 

677 675 

633 679 

679 675 

6J8 646 

579 *■ 549 


0J0 0J0 

042 042 

ass as* 

053 054 

054 0-54 

276 274 

450 450 

3.12 3.12 

370 370 

331 371 

342 342 

571 555 


Brtrta 

soak bow rats 

7.00 

QdlBMOW 

7 DO 

1 -mmialMtaflk 

7ft 

3 miitti bimnwit 

7V* 

tamttiifltHMk 

7¥k 


4» 

ftana 

MMMtoama 

110 

Cld BM*y 

3ft» 

l-awatti tahrtoflk 

3ft 

Moth tofcffcnk 

3 ft* 

tmtoiatiffcanfc 

3ft 

iB-fwrOAT 

556 


7VU 
7ft 
7ft 
7 Vis 
496 


3ft 


3ft 


Sotmm ttoutm B — 

Lynch. Bankot Tokya-Mtliiibtitii, 
CaaipeaoaM Ctt& 


Gold 


AJHL PM. Qrige 


Zorich 


32175 32178 +078 
321-05 32155 +075 

Mew York 32440 32650 +250 

US. dooms poramce. London affieU 


Idostaq prk£S; New Yottl 

(Dec J 

Source fteutefi 


Holtzbrinck has opened a 
435.000-square-foot (39,000- 
square-meter) warehouse here 
that will distribute books for 
its American book houses. It is 
a gleamiqg industrial jungle 
gym of chutes and rollers and 
dangling boxes and small laser 
wands resembling hair dryers 
for travelers. Warehouse 
“pickers,” as they are called, 
will “harvest” books, waving 
the wands over inventory to 
conjure up digital instructions 
as basic as box size selectioa. 

The wands are a key ele- 
ment of a laser-guided pack- 
ing system known as Pick-to- 
Light that no other major 
American publisher has tried. 

The blinking Pick-to-Ligbt 
system has dazzled Holtz- 
brinck with its promise of ef- 
ficiency and of labor demands 
so low that its warehouse will 
need fewer than 300 employ- 
ees to ship as many as 59 
million books a year. 

A book’s packing starts at a 
device that measures and 
weighs a book and notes its bar 
code. The data are recorded by 
a computer (hat calculates the 
number of books to fill a box, 
with blinking lights cm shelves 
signaling employees which 
book and how many copies to 
select to fill each order. 

Boxes are then collected by 
forklifts, which are operated 
by radio frequency and travel 
along a narrow magnetic strip 
etched in the concrete floor. 

Holtzbrinck says the effi- 
ciency of consolidating dis- 
tribution will cut unit costs 35 
percent, for annual savings of 
almost $6 million. 




OPEN 24 HOURS 


With more than 850 locations 
worldwide, Kinko's provides business 
services just about anywhere you travel. 

• Black & white copies 

• Full-color copies 

• Color laser prints 

• Oversize copies 

• Presentation materials 

• Computer rental stations 

- IBM ‘ /Macintosh ' 

• Major credit cards accepted 

• Videoconferencing 

- Schedule your next international meeting 
with Kinko’s worldwide videoconferencing 
network and save yourself time and airfare. 


kinko's 

The new way to office. 



CaU the number fisted 
below to find the 
location nearest you. 


AUSTRALIA 

TEL: 61-2-9267-4255 

CANADA 

TEL: (416) 928-2745 

THE NETHERLANDS 

TEL 31-20-589-0910 

KOREA 

TEL: 82-2-566-9768 

JAPAN 

TEL: 81-3-3507-0009 

CHINA 

TEL: 86-10-6595-6388 

UNITED STATES 

TEL: 1-800-2-KINKOS 
(from U.S. & Canada) 

Opening soom 

THAILAND, ENdAND, 
ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, and 
UNTIED ARAB EMIRATES (Dubai) 


■ 1W WtoV Ik. M nght» •KmM. Wrt art new not a qflStB 
K tqntcwd liArr*- at Urirt Man. lit Md m uvd ky 

pmnafi. Oto'i iwb prrKiWm tnm itr hofclrt 

* tKfci ic Kinau ra, trwytti mrt. 


I 




R 


EAGE16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 199- 

THE AMERICAS 



I investor’s America 



Dollar in. Deutsche marks B Qollar.in Yen 



130 
120 

a'm T T a s 
1997 

r P&t\ - 



7648-37 ; .• J&St 


-rajww+r-.''- ■ 

mgr. r 

- SAP 506. ; " 

" 911.45 ■„ : pS;. 


•S&PfflO;. - "... 

55X86,.:- 

WtSBi':*/ 




■ p^aqComposSe 

IS^^S 1639^7 ..■V:‘O^0> 


.Maifcst yak»_ 

■666.76 •- .•"■■67036.. 


TSE fndsx 

'6736.10 GrS&to-..- 4*8 


Bovefepa' '• 

1Q940l5» 

;««xjco City Bofea 

4737 st -m" 

;■ 0u«tos Aides Menial ■ 

79058. 8^28 - 

Safttiago 

iPSA General 

S5Z7.65 5SZ738 ■ 

Caracas 

Capital General 

fiA, 10«953 * 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

imcnututaul HcnU Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Pillowtex to Buy Fieldcrest Cannon 

• ' DALLAS f Bloomberg ) — Pillowtex Corp. said Thursday it 
had agreed to acquire Fieldcrest Cannon Inc. for about $700 
million in cash, stock and assumed debt, or 534 a share in cash 
and stock, to create a leading company in bedroom and 
bathroom textile products. 

’ - The new company is expected to have annual sales of more 
than 51 -5 billion and would own many well-known brands, 
including Royal Velvet, Cannon and Charisma as well as 
Pillowtex’ s Ralph Lauren, Disney and Martha Stewart lines. 

Magellan Bought Techs in July 

-• BOSTON' t Bloomberg) — Fidelity Investments' flagship 
Magellan Fund increased its stake in computer-related stocks 
in My and reduced its cash position, the largest U.S. mutual- 
fund group said Thursday. 

The S60 billion fund, managed by Robert Stansky, had 16.7 
■percent of its assets in technology stocks at the end of July, up 
from 14.4 percent the previous month. Fidelity said. Magellan 
cut its cash position (o 3.9 percent as of July 3 1 from 6 percent 
on June 30. Fidelity plans to close Magellan to new investors 
at the end of this month. 

• Rohr Inc. said it was discussing being acquired by a 
company it did not identify in a transaction that it said would 
be worth about $847 million, or about 530.23 a share, com- 
pared with Thursday's close of S28.30. 

• Sun Microsystems Inc. agreed to acquire closely held 
Chorus Systems SA, a French developer of telecommu- 
nications software. Financial terms were not disclosed. 

• Banco Santander SA of Spain, the biggest investor in First 
Union Corp.. will sell its 8 percent stake in the sixth-largest 
-U.S. bank to the public to strengthen its capital base. 

• 15. commercial banks posted record earnings of S14.6 

billion for the second quarter, their third straight record 
quarter. Bloomberg, Reuters 


An Awkward Tangs 


By Calvin Sims 

New Vont Times Service 


BUENOS AIRES — When 
AT&T Coro, announced last week 
that it would not compete for li- 
censes to provide Argentina with 
the next generation of wireless 
communications services, it 
offered little explanation. * 

It uow appears, however, that 
AT&T withdrew from the bidding 
after learning that someone had 
tapped its telephone lines in 
Buenos Aires and provided news 
organizations with recordings of 
conversations suggesting that 
company executives had held too 
much sway with government of- 
ficials overseeing die auction. 

The. incident underscores bow 
fierce the competition has become 
among 17 bidders for one of Latin 
America’s largest and most poten- 
tially lucrative markets for person- 
al communications services, new' 
cellular-phone technology that op- 
erates at a higher radio frequency. 

The government plans to sell two 
licenses, which analysts estimate 
will fetch about 5400 million each, 
to the highest bidder. Argentina, 
with 35 million people, is one of the 


fastest-growing markets for wire- 
less telephone services. 

But bidding for the licenses was 
thrown into jeopardy after prom- 
inent Argentine legislators called 
for a halt to the sale and top of- 
ficials of the National Commn- 
ni cations Commission resigned. 
According to the recorded con- 
versations, these officials assured 
the president of AT&T Argentina, 
Luisa Cerar, that the government 
would make changes in bidding 
requirements that the company 
had requested. 

Specifically, AT&T pressed of- 
ficials to twice change the final 
bidding date to allow its staff more 
time to prepare a bid. 

Adriana Vaccaro, a spokes- 
woman for the secretary of com- 
munications, said the original bid- 
ding solicitation had not been 
altered to benefit AT&T. But she 
acknowledged that the government 
had pushed the deadline back to 
next Thursday at the request of 
AT&T and three other companies. 

“This kind of wiretapping 
shows that there is clearly extor- 
tion among companies and that the 
rules of fair play among bidders 
have been broken," Ms. Vaccaro 


said. “We are very concerned be- 
cause this has tarnished the- image 
of the government, w hich was only 
seeking to get the highest possible 
bid. Clearly, whoever made these 
recordings was listening to see 
how hi gh AT&T planned to go. ' ' 

• An executive of another bidding 
consortium said it was not uncom- 
mon for bidders to lobby with gov- 
ernment officials to change a so- 
licitation and thar the tapes proved 
little except that AT&T executives 
had been “very aggressive." 

The recordings were disclosed 
by a prominent Argentine journa- 
list, Jorge Lanata, who broadcast 
excerpts from them on his invest- 
igative news program Sunday. In 
an interview, Mr. Lanaia said the 
recordings had been provided to 
him by a rival of AT&T that he 
declined to identify. 

He said he' had broadcast the 
tapes because they demonstrated a 
clear case of “industrial espio- 
nage’’ and possibly “undue gov- 
ernment influence" on the part of 
AT&T. So far, no one has ques- 
tioned the authenticity of the tapes, 
and members of Congress are 
pushing to stop the bidding be- 
cause of them. 


Japan Slowdown Hurts 
W hile Mark Gains 


Crararfiy Or ScfFrnn Dbiuubfi 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the Deutsche mark but 
finned against the yen Thursday as 
traders anticipated a rise in German 
interest rates and digested the steep 
decline in Japanese second-quarter 
gross domestic product 

In late trading, the dollar was at 
l .7807 Deutsche marks, down from 
1.79S6 DM on Wednesday. But it 
rose to 119.700 yen from 119.135 
ven. 

’ The dollar also fell to 5.9870 
French francs from 6.0520 francs 
and to 1.4745 Swiss francs from 
1.47S5 francs. 

The pound fell to $ 1 .5600 from 
SI .5855. ^ „ 

Discordant remarks from offi- 
cials of the Bundesbank and seem- 
ingly contradictor,’ economic data 
from Japan sent the market mixed 
signals, traders said. 

The German central bank’s chief 
economist, Otmar Issing, said the 
trend of declining inflation bad 
ended. Analysts interpreted his 
comments as an opening to an in- 
terest-rate rise, which would benefit 
the mark. 

But a Bundesbank central council 
member, Hans-Juergen Krupp, said 


STOCKS: Dow Slips on Data Hinting at Inflation Pressures and Lower Profits 


Continued from Page 15 

For now, few expect the Federal 
Reserve Board to slow the economy 
by raising interest rates, a move that 
would help ease inflationary pres- 
sures, but could hurt company 
profits. 

The imbalance in the U.S. current 
account was down 2.4 percent from 
a first-quarter deficit or 540 billion. 
The decrease reflected a 5.5 percent 
increase in merchandise exports to 
$171.5 billion. At the same time, 
merchandise imports registered a 
2.9 percent gain to 5218.4 billion. 


The U.S. current account is the 
broadest measure of foreign trade, 
tracking not only sales of goods but 
also services, investment flows and 
foreign aid. 

The improvement in the current 
account deficit helped mute an over- 

US. STOCKS 

all economic slowdown in the 
second quarter. The gross domestic 
product grew at a healthy 3.6 per- 
cent pace, after a relatively heated 
advance of 4.9 percent a year in the 
first quarter. 


The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed Thursday at 7.660.98, down 
58.30, extending Wednesday's 132- 
point slide. Dec linin g issues out- 
numbered advancing ones by more 
than a 2-ro-l margin on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Broader stock indicators also 
sank after the release of the jobs data 
and some discouraging news regard- 
ing profits at two companies. Com- 
ing and Ascend Communications. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index finished at 913.40. down 5.63. 
and the Nasdaq Composite Index 
was down 0.62 at 1. 639.87. 


Coming was lower and was the 
most active issue on the New York 
Stock Exchange after the company 
issued a reduced profit forecast, 
blaming disappointing growth in its 
optical-fiber and cable businesses. 

Ascend fell and was the most 
active Nasdaq issue after several 
leading brokerages lowered their 
earnings estimates for the computer 
networking concern. 

Bond prices fell after the release 
of the jobs report, pushing up yields 
on 30-year Treasury bonds to 6.68 
percent from 6.65 percent late 
Wednesday. 


CHIPS: Big Makers Unite in U.S. Project to Shrink Computer Parts and Take Power to New Levels 


Continued from Page 15 

co-founder of Intel. It holds that 
every two years, the number of com- 
ponents on chips will double, even 
as the chip size stays the same, and 
by and large the industry has kept to 
duu pace. 

Since the early 1990s, U.S. na- 
tional laboratories have spent about 
S25 million working on advanced 
lithography with companies includ- 


ing Intel. In September, the gov- 
ernment, facing budget pressure . cut 
off funding for the work. Intel first 
tried to persuade other chipmakers 
to share the costs with it. When they 
proved reluctant. Intel executive's 
came up with a novel plan to create a 
limited-liability company and sell 
stakes in it to other companies in the 
industry over time. So far. only Mo- 
torola and AMD have joined. 

The company's name, EUV. is 


the same as the acronym for the 
technology' it hopes to promote — 
extreme ultraviolet. 

“Whoever controls the intellec- 
tual property will have a significant 
competitive advantage." said Sander 
H. Wilson, an Intel manager v. ho also 
is the business director for ELY. 

Whatever technology EL*Y does 
use, deuces would be licensed to the 
companies that make equipment for 
building chips. Then Inie'i and the 


other ELY stakeholders would have 
first call on buying that new equip- 
ment. a crucial' advantage in the fe- 
verish competition to build the best 
chips. 

So far, Mr. Wilson has not tried to 
recruit any non-U.S. companies into 
EUV. But if the technology proves 
successful, big European and Asian 
companies may want a role. Only 
three of the top 1 0 chipmakers in the 
world are based in the United States. 


International participation in, 
EUV. however, is likely to be ai 
politically charged topic in Amer-; 
ica. Mr. Wilson hopes to skirt that 
problem by requiring that Compaq 
nies that license the technology use] 
it only in the United States for two 
years before taking it home. 

“We can’t have only U.S.. 
companies benefit, but we can try' to 
provide an opportunity that doesn’t 
disadvantage the U.S.,” he said. 




the economy was “very fragile" 
and added, "We must see bow it 
develops." He also said the dollar 
had stabilized and al current levels . 
was more fairly valued than u was a 

year aso. ■ , 

H ^comments were interpreted 

as putting the brakes on enthusiasm 

foreign exchange ~ 

over Germany’s economic picture, 
which would be bearish for the 

mark. . , . 

John Rothfield. an economist at. 
NationsBank, said Mr. Issing’s cora- 
menis were the main reason the dol- 
lar fell against the mark.' as- the - * 
Bundesbank had “let the nwiket be- | 
lieve it could raise rales. * He said 
that ‘ ‘people are starting to talk about - 
a 1.7650 DM level” for the dollar. 

But Jeremy Stretch, an econo- 
mist for NatWesr Markets, disputed 
that view, saying: 1 ’ It is pretty much 
accepted that German inflation is 
likely to pick up slightly. But in the- 
near term, we still view a German 
rate hike as highly unlikely while 
the labor market remains so de- 
pressed.” 

Meanwhile, Japan reported a sub- 
stantial rise in its current-account 
surplus for July, a development nor- 
mally seen as aggravating trade ten- 
sions with the United States and 
likely to hurt the dollar. 

But Japan also reported a notable* 
decline in second- quarter gross do-, 
mestic product, which suggests that | 
its interest rates will need to remain, . 
low, and that is bullish for the dol- 
lar, traders said. • 

Despite the dollar’s vulnerability- 
against both currencies, it was ex-; 
peered to benefit in the long term 
a on ins t the yen because of Japan’s 
economic troubles, although the! 
threat of higher rates in Germany; 
still might weigh on the dollar, John' 
Gariano. a currency trader at Sum- 
itomo Bank. said. 

(AFP. Reuters. Market Nens). 


it 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET MARY 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top jOC must active shares 
up to the dosing on Wall Street, 
rw Assaoaied Prpss. 

I!«* isle Hi f. LUf 15TW C*Qf 




£ 

Kh lift 
ir-i i?** 
To Jt 
?•/. i 
U'J 1 7*m 
lift lO’V, 
It'* I To 


4!* 


fll 


SVl 


JSrt 37*% 
12 

in. is 
ita* im 
n* 7* 

-Ift 4'. 


» 2 

IM I5’l 

m on 

P* 5 

3* 3!!. 

M 9ft 
1ft 8ft 
lift 2S 
41** lift 
1ft V. 
Sft Pa 
71V, JBYi 
l»4 178* 


111* lift 
lft in 
Tft Tl 


Bft 711b 
in* wa, 
HI l** 


Pi 


If * lift If. 


SM 


leWSC 

irbst'.M 

'cr-Ute! 

IraCS 

JfcCOp 

MPhfc 

Km=s?n 

'ems 

Htgw 

LaBarg 

ttHIH 5 VI 
M5R 

UapHivI 

tMMI 

M 


HaanPM 

Mttfc 

Mdom 

r*e*q 

Mean 

MLEuWJn 

MLTTYM 

IMtaftl 


Mm pi 

MJdlAJd 

MfelABc 

NUtaRtr 

MMctIEji 

UanUMfl 

Moths! 

NTWQwi 

Natal 

WPttrf 

tetania 

WYTkres 

NMfcal 

NAWw 

Hmk 

OmrtMm 

OOOT 

QOOWM 

Oraaaqat 

OdtftTn 

PCQtae 

PnAnCn 

essoac 

MW 

PwffiVd 

Pioltaf 

PWSc 

Pod'Kd 

Mfwn 

as? 


£3%. 

RFPow 

fboGdtf 


TofcP 

TetfWCh 

Item 

TDCmfc 

Two* 

TftOOft 


TTmfiun 

TMHSI 

TOlMb 


w 


» 

Tnaufttt 

TmMrt 

nwuai 

TnWto 

USUan 

USFGA 

uTIEngi 

Umph 

lit nob 

Utknor 

UtfqMH 

UFmB 

IK BUM 

inund 

US CM 

BCVKHI* 

VMdIH 

VKS*G 

Vtaun 

VtaEfl 

Wats 

VUoGg 

Vfetac 

VhCO 

irtFr 

WHKMM 

WtIM 

WMsftdn 

WWET 

rwrt 

WfthBT 

BAdB 

WE0GV 


s 


AS 


Nn 
Nft 
Sing 

WEBS»r 
WEB Ut 
xauii 


son Men u*» ism oge Indexes 


Most Actives 


Sami 

tens 

Sdfcae 

ScrtnTi 

5b*HPtn 

SMIOn 

Sonin 

ecM oea 

STOH 

5PMM 

tattoo 

Station 

StaMA 

StUMlM 

Sofcn 


1: 

t;: 

5<! 

VV, 

l* 

70ft 

1-. 

»■ 


I* 

* 

•I*. 

1 

ft 

r.* 

1.* 

s 

161* 

w. 


6 *. 
lift 
3' l 
V* 
ft 
S’l 


S4J* 

za 

lit 

isu 

560 

311 

m 

41* 

Ml 

307 

6584 

2N 

863 

UM 

42b 

Bit 

3329 

IS 

1577 

274 

413 

237 

M3 

1500 


307 

128 

434 

M 

178 

2HI 


114 

IN 

in 

262 

241 

1019 

1115 


326 

ant 

263 

247 

116 

in 

270 


2095 

1W7 

422 

w 

207 

218 

1246 

110 

39) 

428 

563 

14197 

312 

m 

1087 

*3 

in 
M n 
IS 

«n 

310 

850 

210 

112 

Ttf 

IDS 

in 

744 

w 

a 

5245 

TO 

me 


■ 550 
116 
nt 

ra 

477 

1243 

4 ns 


5ft 
15ft 
74 
I 

Oft 
r.t 
5ft 
6ft M 
IT* 11 
4ft 1H 
39V. 38 
2‘. 2V. 

7W« 7ft 
ft ft 
9ft 9ft 
12ft IT. 


7* 3 

30ft 

12 T* 12ft 
21ft 20ft 
1th 18ft 
Ifti 9ft 
2ft 2ft 
30ft 36ft 
12ft 12ft 
4ft 4ft 
4tft 481ft 
7ft 7 
23ft 23 


5ft 


5V. 


7: 

2*ft 

Hi 


7ft 

lit 

S: 

29-! 

V% 

'T3 

6 

15ft 

3ft 

Ift 

•t 

75 


38ft 

21ft 

7ft 

ft 

9ft 

lTft 

1 

lift 

511ft 

3ft 

nvt 

129ft 

21ft 

189ft 


-ft 


•’.ft 

•ft 

-ft 

-ft 


49ft 41ft 
79ft 7ft 
aft 22ft 
249ft 24ft 
2ft 2 
UVk 144ft 
64ft 6ft 
lift lift 
41ft 44ft 
3ft 3 
116 1ft 
1716 17ft 
12ft lift 
19ft 19ft 
4ft 4ft 
27ft 26ft 
0 79ft 

Sft 8H 
14 lift 
61ft 5ft 
6ft 6 aft 

5ft. 5 
*ft» 6 
h ft 

299ft 291ft 
13 lift ' 

1» lift 

2ft 19ft 

Uft 13ft 
7ft 7ft 
lift lift 
1216 T2h 
3 29ft 

24ft 2H 

UVft 1 3ft 

nth inft 

6* ft 

BWn W» 
631ft 6201* 
14ft 11 
25ft 25ft 
2V. 1ft 
20ft 21ft 
2 19ft 

9ft 9ft 
4ft A 
n in* 
3M :m 

42V. 41ft 

5ft 5ft 

lift U 
n* an 
419ft 41 

17ft 17 
II 164h 
lift lilt 
lift Uft 

27ft 24h 
lft 1ft 
Ift I 
Ml 1M 
1514 lift 
Ift 714 
am iw 
s-sa jan 
H 179 
339 30 

A ift 

199 190 

£"• 

7u nw 
TV* Jft 
Ift lit 
10V) low 
J2Vh 31*1 
4V. 7h 
12ft 17ft 
119. lift 
37* 32ft 
33V. 12ft 
7ft 6ft 
h ft 
111 19h 

lift, in* 
16ft 164h 
79h 7ft 
5Vh 96 
1S1* lift 
13ft HVh 
W* 49* 
lift lift 
1IM 101* 
UW 1 1th 
JWh 149* 
« 1|H» 
159 15 

17h 169. 

17ft 17V* 
09* Bft 
13ft 194 
2191. 71th 
til 9V, 

«!? !a 
rrm m 
Ifrft 164* 
Vh w 


'A 


Dow Jones 

Ooon M*gh Lao cat. 

man 76H3S 7716.9a 758085 istats -sbjo 

TICTS 301 1J4 304049 3002.99 3027 XI **.72 

UTS 23SJ0 236.01 23160 23677 -0J8 

Comp 244781 2457.09 242684 244867 -934 


Standard 8> Poore 


Industrials 

Trarap. 

UtBftles 

Hnonce 

SPOT 

SP100 


-9u NYSE 


Mlgii la Odw 
1 0944V51077.121 077 J5 
(MSB 654.16 663.10 

203.18 201JU 201.98 
10896 107.01 107 US 
93362 918.76 919.03 

906.19 89152 891 J5 


4pK 

1072.12 

663.96 

201.26 

105.74 

913*40 

886.18 


**ft 

-1 
♦ ft 
-ft 

.■8 


Composite 

IMIISMUS 

Tratsu- 

UWY 

Rmmce 

Nasdaq 

Con port* 
Mudnok 
Batts 
Iraurance 

Hnonce 

Transp. 


■it* 


1ft 

J69h -91 . 

121 * -ft AMEX 

416 
49ft 

71* 

27ft *16 

Sftt 

I *ft 
Aft **» 

T9ft 4Vh 
24 +9ft 
Mft *lft 
21* -ft 
15 -V* 

M *9* 

lllh -I* 

41* *lh 
TV* 9h 
Ift +M 
17ft 41 
lift -It 
Ift 
Ik 

27 -ft 
74* -1* 

■9ft *«h 
ID* -1 
5ft -** 

Hft -ft 
Rft -1ft 
4ft 4ft 
4ft 

2W» -V* 

12ft -ft 
It* -1* 

7ft -ft 
lift -Vh 
7ft -V* 
lift -ft 
1216 -II 

a -n 

21k <ft 
IS* -ft 
106h -ft 
9k -ft 
91V. ft ft 
Wl -ft 
►IVh 


48083 <727? 477.06 
60688 996.90 60289 
44115 43BJ1 441.44 
207 JW 28437 28582 
45(02 44189 4«J6 


Nftti Low Last 

164089 162086 143988 
132422 131484 132422 
| 7V&« 178489 179149 
174387 1735J7 1739.75 
2124.16 210987 211424 
106117 105Q86 105484 


-157 

-419 

4LB6 

•180 

-496 


-083 

0.74 

-786 

-083 

-13.13 

-580 


67038 6&SJ4 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
lOUStfes 
10 Industrials 


10383 

10U4 

105.93 


Toft? 

Mom 

10385 

101J6 

10594 


NYSE 

Canlnaln 

AT&T s 

Cocoa 

PtltUVUVS 

ColHCA s 

Compaq s 

v) Lewtn 

GeaElecs 

IBM s 

OiiOCftj 

Bw*to» 

& men 

Iomega 

MtanT 

TeUtot 


Nasdaq 

Ascend 

Uriels 

Cbco 

TeOams 

KLATenc 

MfcnHli 

TofTOAn 

ApMMal 

Scow* 

Palmrwn 

Orodei 

WotldCm 

3Com 

Natal 

AdoooSr 


AMEX 

SPDR 

TWA 

JTSCorp 

M Bmmpt 

Moramoa 

BanoCotd 

Hatan 

THlnd 

FAusPr 

Heart 


VoL High 
141479 43ft 
125016 43hi 
72491 5716 
45S40 43»h 
61955 29*4 
60552 67ft* 

60442 <4 

58109 65H 
57564 9Ul 
54KM 4 
jsno at, 
terns id* 
<5326 77V, 
38225 «tV. 
37019 <5t* 


VM. HWI 
770359 381* 
124035 M 
105467 77(* 
83193 54ft 
82370 73ft 
74927 137ft 
65029 TOM 
59647 95ft 
54725 25ft 
56450 2ft 
54952 39V» 

0580 35V* 
49251 4W4 
47461 9ft 
47061 45 


LOW Ltat 

40** 42 

41ft 43 
55ft 5*v* 
43V* d. 
2Bft 28ft 
6514 66G 
ft> ft 
Oft 65 
96ft tTi 
44ft 44** 
51»» S1A* 
14ft U>* 
7512 77ft 
40ft 42ft 
449h 45 


36ft 38V 
93V 9J*h 
709k 72ft 
50ft 53ft 
_67 22 

132ft 136ft 
1VV* 20V* 
tQft 95V 
24V 25V* 
l»ft Ite 
37V* 38ft 
34ft 35ft 
41V 49V* 
Bft 9Vo 
lift 44V 


VM. HU Low 


68484 91Wn 
14197 M 
12479 V 
12085 Sift 
11085 lift 
10M2 4V 
10042 6». 
9898 64* 
9066 8ft 
8607 2ft 


90V 91 Vh 
5 «4k 
ft V 
51 51V* 
lift lift 
3** 4 

6V* 64* 

6ft 69k 

A fS 


-ft 

-V* 

+v» 

♦ft. 

-ft 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


TOW 

KSiSS 

AMEX 


UncAanaed 
ToW Issues 
NewHigns 
New Loan 


1098 

1274 

511 

3790 

143 

27 


790 

175 

734 

44 


Nasdaq 

1054 Adwrad 
1786 OecMnnl 
Mt Unmnqed 
3391 Total Isms 
271 NewHtgtB 
9 New Lxiws 


Madcet Sales 


S4 NYSE 
Amex 


Nasdaq 
6 InmKons. 


1415 2068 

1917 2124 

2047 1542 

5399 5734 

174 357 

V 43 


Tatar ftw. 

VO Bta 

5S5.18 641.06 

3086 3888 

63220 72420 


Dividends 

Comjwiy 


26* -V* 

7M -ft 
2 

916 t4k 

4N -ft 

11V 

76 -V* 

42ft -ft 

5ft 

181k -ft 

Zfi* At 

4M -ft 

ITVi -Ik 

11 -I 

1U* -A 

in 4k 

2M* -ft 

IV -ft 

Ift -ft 

It 41 

15ft -ft 

8ft -II* 

m* -t* 

im* ->* 

T7A -ft 

s * 

lift 

4ft 

TV* -ft 

2Y» rft 

IV «ft 

im -Vh 

32ft -V 

4ft -H 

12ft -ft 

lift -H 

33ft 41 

3am* -ft 

7 ft ^ 

ift* 

nt* -h 

MM -ft 

2ft -ft 

5ft 
14V 
lift 

s 

lift -V 

IK. .1* 

■Ift -« 

14k* -ft 

lift -ft 

BK jS 

12ft -tt 

K* 46 

15V -Vh 

71ft -V* 

th .14 

19V. J* 

It -tl 

14 -v 

16V -V 

Vh -ft 


Per Amt R*c Pay 


IRRECULAR 

Capsure Holdings - .063 9-29 104 

Mexico Fund - 24 M0 1M1 

Vino Concha b .1331 9-24 10-7 

STOCK SPUT 
Fluke Coni 2 fori spot. 

Movado GrcruB 3 for Zstfflt. 

VblkswogavAG lOferlsoffl. 

INCREASED 

Am Gen Hospital Q 4275 10-15 10-30 

Bull Bear Mind O jt 9-19 9-30 

Cmuimn Water O J05 11-10 11-25 

Heinz, HJ, 0 Jis 9-23 10-10 

INITIAL 

TXRaqkmalAn _ .11 10-8 10-lS 

REGULAR 

AtamtaamCaAm Q js 11-7 T1-2S 

Amerlvest Prep 0.1125 9-25 10-9 

Auburn Nil _ .12 9-10 9-25 

Bull Bear Gib lira M JJ7 9-19 940 

Bull BeorUS Got Q .19 9-19 9-30 

CekmeeCttag Q 20 9-22 MM 

Commd Fadi B JB » 10-14 

Dowawm a jo 9-30 10.30 

Enow West Q .11 W9 9-24 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

O .1SS 10-15 11-3 
IW 235 9-15 10-1 
Q m 10-1 10-15 

" .12 9-23 10-6 

.55 9-22 9-30 

.12 9-19 10-1 
.IS 9-19 ' 


Company 
Ennis Business 
Equrty Into AT&T, 

Excel Really 
Flossied lnd 
Generalize 
Grerf Bros A, 

Crisis Bras a 
HaneockJ Inn 
Hancock Jlnv 
Hfgn Inca Opport 
High loco OppoiT 
High Inca Opport 
Jadtsonvffle Bngi 
Jachsomaie Sv Bk 

Lananspari Rn 
MidOcKmLta 
MoraanJ odaif A 
Old Second Bnqp 
OwossaCoip 

Piedmont Bnq> 

sportecftCWp 
SptefcjrPTDP 
SratePinSkcA, 

SI ewart Steven 
Titan InB 
Til Mas Corp 
VestaurSecur 
Washington Past 

Q-amuni- I mu p nutaw hi croougt per 
liiare/ADR; t-parebie InCesrodian (andv 
■wwwHrtp o^wtety;s^«iii)4Wid 


10-7 


a 
0 
Q 

Q 

□ 20 9-23 9-30 

Q 2975 9-23 9-30 

M 293 10-28 1021 
M -093 11-24 11-28 
M jm 12-22 12-26 
.125 920 10-13 
.10 9-24 IM 
.10 9-22 10-10 
.075 9-22 10-9 
125 9-22 9-30 
20 9-22 10-1 
.09 10-6 10-23 
.10 9-30 10-15 
JB 9-25 IM 
■47 9-30 10-20 
.12 9-23 IM 
JIBS 10-31 11-14 
J15 9-30 10-15 
27 10-10 11-10 
27 9-25 10-16 
120 10-3 117 


Stock Tables Explained 

Soles figires ore imoffidalY rorty highs and taws refled ffie previous 52 worts phis tae ament 
weeklwlnutRtalBte3lbudtag8cy.Wliemo5pBirsacfcdMdBi»lreiiMinltaBta25paca i rfiirniam 
hm been paid. Ore yaas high-low range and iMdend ore shewn tar Vie new state only. Unless 
oAcfwfce noted. irtKafrividereis openmualtflslxnsemerts based an Itie UestdKteatlon 
a • (Svhtond ols) extra (s). b- annual me of dhidend plus slock dividend, c- liquidating 

«■ PE ettMds 99xM - artted. d - new yeoify hw, dd - las* in l»» »sl 12 monltts. 
o-dMdend declared or paid in precetfng 12 memftes. f - annual rote inemssed an last 
dedoreltaiy-avldottd in Canm&n funds, subiect to 15% non-fesltfence tax. t- dividend 
tfoctared after wljMtp w steefc ifivldend. | - dividend patd1hbyear.on4tteddefHTHl.orno 
°™ fl jS” ■ "*** tftvWefld meettao. k - dividend doctored or paid this year, an 
occumvtofiw Mue with dividends fn arrears, re. annual rate, reduced on last declaration, 
n ■ new b*ue In Ifw past 52 weeks. The hioh-taw range begins with the start of trading. 
m - not day Mnent. p - initial (fividend. annual rote unknown. P/E - prioe-eanrings ratio. 
0 -aosea-end mutual fund, r- dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months, plus stock 
avnend. 5 -stack spar. Dividend begins wnti date of split ris- sales, t- dividend paid in 
stock in jnecMang 12 months, eslknoted cosh value on w-tPuidend or e*-distfSbutiw data. 

u - rwwye^ hlgn. v- IratSng teHed. vl -hi bankniptcr or reoeiveniiiporbeing reg^anind 

underfhe Bankn^tcy Ad. or/4)cwffies ossimed bf such companies. distributed 

wl ■ when Issued/ ww - with wommis. x - e* -dividend or Heights, ufis - ex-rUsMbuttan. 
xw * wtttxwt warrants, y- ev-dividend and sales n futt. yu - yteid. 1 - soles in fufl. 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Sept. 11, 1997 

Http Lon. Lotos! COge OpiM 


a*. 

4ft 

-Hi 

• 11 * 

-iv 

-»1 

*■■* 

M 

4-1 

+1V. 

-1 


-IV 

♦ft 

-M 

• IV 
-Ift 

• lb 

• ft 

• k 

• IV* 

+v* 

•Vi 

-■ft 

-ft 

-Vn 

•3V 


Grains 

CORN IC8QT1 

5.000 bu nunimum- cmas orr tontiel 
Sep 97 274 247; 272'; -V, 

~ ~ 273 266-'. W: -4'. 


Dec 97 
Mores 


MoyTS 285-r 
AriVB 138 . 
Sep 78 


31 27T: 280"t -f r 


so as-. 

283 2S? . -4 

277 273 274 »3 . 

Deces 274 7 770'. ~.rr, -j , 

Est. soles N A -Weds sotos «.:is 
Weds open irrt 298766. c3 T34 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 tons- doflorsperlon 

Sep «7 771 J6800 270.00 -100 

Oct 07 73080 22320 230.70 -OM 

Dec 97 21620 21130 21140 -l.M 

Jan 98 211-50 7QSJ0 211.00 -1.60 

Mar 98 205 SO 202J0 205J0 +1.60 

May 98 204JH 20050 203.10 ,1.90 

Est. sales NA Wetfs soles 20,301 
WecTs open Int 110585 up 790 


1£1417 

13.353 

11735 

1.651 

13-454 


5.512 
:ti23 
4A150 
11209 
10. Ti! 
8516 


LT6 LstoS 'JKse Dp«1 

C RANGE JUICE 

i:7X r - t*L- n~! - 

i{S5 77 ~.ri is. 5 -! "Z~: -“.’I 1i5£7 

jK-cs 3.-: "35: eac 

Vcr-s 7t.,: -i=: -fc - t. tee. 

vot- 8 “•_: rr :: 225 

Esl sslM *SA -'-CJsk-kC'T; 

'.••eJs csk -r ‘J Zjt .7 

Metals 

COL 3 INCVJC 

IX^rr = :fT. “ 

tr;4: ::tK r-ii ::4.:: -lx u> 

zc. *r r.‘i: m'i -is: i=E4e 

LK 57 

rft- 

**':• 

Jj r. -j 
Al-c re 
o=vi 


Jj 


-le: 

: ■ ; : 342-3 :: -ii: 'i-3 

s-j Siis rs>: +35c 
i - . 221 52 -is 

Es; ssiksz;:-: s ir-^si 

'■Veds c;er. -r,: IMISC v; 1.9K 

HI CRACE COPPER CNCMX1 


L2T6 

A21P 

:i5 


Wjh Low Latest CBge OpW 

IO-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF1 

r rSOTLQOO - ptx cf 100 pd 

Us»~ 13SJ6 127.96 130.12 — 0.18 121,079 

Dec 97 99.16 98.78 98.94 - 0.14 7U79 

MerflS 9E-S 9SJ0 9834 — 0.14 25 

EsLsCtoS;26AS19. 

Csenlrf.- 191983 cp4525. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 

' ■ L 200 rffiCn - SB Olioo pd 
Dec 97 1C?. 65 1C9.T3 10943 *0.14 101319 

V«r93 N.T. N.T. 109J3 ratJ 

Es.ssIte 41227. Rwv.stttes; 55.105 
p.-ev. epen WL- 703.314 off 1340 

LIBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 

S3 TL^cc- pts onoo pet 

Sep 97 9434 9434 9434 oncfi. 18958 

Cd 97 9433 9432 9433 undl. 14988 

NW.P7 94JS 9437 9437 UDCtv 14305 

EC soles NA Weds soles 6387 

'.Veds epen im 51.706. up 1309 


High Low Latest Chge OpbU. 

ion 98 94A4. 9436 9443 -0.08 S8.M 

Sep 98 9A49 9460 <U£7 *0.06 flj«3 

Dec 98 U81 94.72 9437 *005 31,962 

Mar 99 9474 9465 9471 -005 17JB1 

Jim 99 9161 ' 9455 9460 •005 10007 

Es4 sales; 66.372 Ptev. sates- .D052 
PlEv.openutt. JQ9.172 up 7053 - 


Industnals 

COTTON 2 INCrtt) , 

50000 IPS.- «nl: ter lb 

00197 72.70 7239 7235 -028 4776, 

Dec9? 77 Bo 7245 72.70 -030 48,29? 

Mar 98 74JJE 717Q 7389 -031 1MW 

May 98 74.70 '450 74.70 -OI5 0048 

Jul9fi 7530 75.15 75 T9. -031 6055 

Est wses N A Wed: '.ales 4.55J 

Weds open int 98.731. ott 2ft 


SOYBEAN OIL (C80T1 




Se'p ’7 

«6-J 

r 

r- 

.“22 


40000 lbs- cenis per lb 




UC97 

*5 4: 

^ TO 


7£ 

MIS 

Sap 97 

22.60 

2147 

32-57 

4.07 

\MU 

17 

::;c 

;j:c 

tfc-: 

-140 

1.59* 

Od 97 

22.70 

7254 

21*6 

4.IW 

17.746 

Dec 97 

97.90 

9443 

94 «. 

-145 


Dee 97 

3104 

2258 

3100 

4.06 

40-J83 

Jan 93 

9550 


0- 2Q 

-2.2P 

334 

Jan 98 

2123 

2113 

2127 

4.06 

ULJ98 

Fob 78 

45 ’5 

5550 

■■.5 :c 

•I. 85 

T&9 




2350 



Mar 90 

» 

aSOO 




May 98 

7367 

2355 

23*5 

4JM 

1331 

Apr 98 

9555 

95 2? 

IS x 

-1.6! 

SbI 

Est rales NA Warn sales lifts? 


May 98 

94 iW 

95 M 

95.20 

-145 

1.907 


4529 


weak open Uri 8&1 71 , aft 91 1 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

SHOO bu mlnlmm- ankptrbmM 
Sap *7 723 NIB h 73|6- * ]2 4^7 

NOV 97 644 636‘S 643V +4Vi 90817 

Jan 98 646V! 639V, 645'4 +4V- 21.470 

Mar 98 653 645 657h •SM 9,059 

May 99 659 652 658V +5J* 7.031 

EsL sates N A Wed* sales 31,174 
Weds open tail 43L325, off 6J9 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

5JH0 bu mtatmom- cents per bushel 

Sep 97 366V* 362 364 -2M 14H2 

Dec 97 381 376 37BV -IV 64204 

Mar 98 393 388V) 390V -2V 22«78 

May 99 395Vi 392 39315 -2 4020 

EH. sates NA Weds sola 14282 

Weds open Int 10495& up els 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

41000 lbs.- cents per Bl 
00 97 69.55 69.10 69.20 0 27 

7005 69J5 69.92 +002 

7265 7232 7247 -0.10 

71J7 7135 71-47 -007 

Aug 98 71.10 70.90 70.90 4.15 

OCJ98 73.75 7375 73.75 0.10 

Est. setas 11,745 Weds soles !So46 
Wkds open M 93J04 ofl 597 


Dec «7 
Feb 98 
Junes 
198 
198 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

504100 Bn.- certs par b 
Sap 97 80.70 80J5 8042 +002 

Od 97 80.92 StLM 8050 -027 

Noe 97 8Z00 81 JO 81-15 -OJ7 

Jon 98 82J1S 8120 0227 -045 

Mar 98 83.40 81.90 8210 4L40 

Apr 98 8252 87 JO 8212 4L47 

EsL sales 2*!7B Weds soles im 
Weds upon let 10996. op 23 

HOGS- Lean (CMER) 

41000 fcs.- cants per lb. 

OdW 70.10 68.92 70JB +0J7 

Dec 97 66^5 65J0 66J» +042 

Feb 98 6530 6425 6515 +040 

Apr 98 <215 6120 <1.95 VO30 

Jon 90 66.90 4610 6647 +035 

Est- ten 9,759 Weds softs 4577 
Weds open W 32.980 up 403 

PORK BELLI E5 (CMER) 

404)00 lbs.- cents per to. 

Feb 98 6630 6445 66J0 +0.75 

Mor9B 4625 6445 46-07 +063 

MoyW 65JS +018 

Est sates 2373 Weds sofa* 1,654 
WeA open Int & HU. up 223 


34.848 

70741 

154M9 

64)59 

1411 

14 


2093 

6455 

4179 

2473 

1,706 

489 


10158 

9,291 

3,739 

1.716 

V<9 


4531 

439 

GS 


COCOA (HCSE) 


Food 


Sqi97 

1635 

14(15 

1*05 

-45 

Dec 97 

1648 

1615 

1626 

-45 

Mar 98 

167B 

1650 

1657 

-43 

May 98 

1691 

1676 

1676 

-43 

Jut 98 

1708 

1694 

1694 

-43 

S«P W 

1730 

1712 

1717 

-42 


Ett saws 9,1 SB wws sates 2*52 
Wed* open Ini 107,701 oil 281 

COFFEE CCNCSE) 

37,500 Rts.- cents par b. 

Sap 97 20775 70075 207J0 +8-50 

Dec 97 189 AO 181 JX) TOM +125 

Mar 98 171 .00 16400 17065 +5.15 

MayM 16400 IS9.00 16400 >500 

Jut 98 157-50 15150 157 -SO +475 

Est satasoiSJ Wads, sabs 4558 
Weds open bit 234X5. up 32* 

SUGARWORLD II (NCSE) 

1 12000 lbs.- cants per Bl 
O d 97 1142 IIJ9 llje +8.16 

Mar 98 1215 11.90 1212 +0.19 

May 98 1208 1188 1208 +0.18 

M98 11M5 11.66 1145 +4TJ 

Esl. sales 32362 Weds sates 36,101 
Weds open bit 194140 ait 6.973 


66 

44894 

774)39 

124)74 

2948 

4678 


441 

14206 

4831 

1.659 

1-366 


*9,119 

79-660 

19.374 

14442 


Esl. sales 16.C00 \\viz setes 413 j 
W eds open ml 45.S4L up ;8J 

SILVER fHCMX} 

5,000 I ray o:.- cenls per irw k. 

Sap 97 473.03 470-S0 >r]jK -1 j? 387 

Od 97 473 JO -1.70 7S 

Nffr97 475.60 +1.70 

Dec 97 435.00 47150 47*50 +1.70 51454 

ten 9fl 478.00 -T.70 20 

MOT9S -M3 AK 48a 00 48330 +1.70 11.909 

May 98 49050 48730 J87 30 +1.70 1310 

■iml* 49i.«0 -1.70 2330 

Esl sales 1 6.000 Weas sates 4352 
W«rs open tel 77,;j7, gfl e_ii 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 troy ol- dolbrs perlrav at. 
vd 97 43100 425.10 428.40 +220 iai*7 

Jar 9B 42150 41».« 418 40 *2.20 X4« 

Apr 98 411.40 +0.20 437 

Jul98 407.40 +020 2 

Esl sales N A Wca* sales 2^94 
Wed's open mrUT02offS5 

Close Previous 

LONDON METALS HJWEJ 
Dollars per metric km 
Aluminum (HlgU Grade) 

Spal 16CB.-I 1609*1 160900 1610.00 

Fonmra 162200 1*2100 167700 162100 

Capper Cathodes (High Grade) 

Spoi 2060.00 208200 21I8 ’.t 213017 

ForwarU 710UJ0 210200 114700 214800 

Load 

Spot 434 't 4351? 636.00 63700 

Fatward +45 JO 64600 646 00 647.00 

rackai 

Spot 653500 654500 657000 658000 

Forward 663000 660500 6675.00 668000 

Tin 


HEATING OIL (NMER) 

42000 got cents per aal 
Od 97 52.50 SI '70 5205 +048 

Na*97 5355 53 25 5355 +033 24632 

Dee 97 55.15 M55 54.70 +023 23591. 

Jan 98 5600 5S50 55i5 +ttl8 2L637 

^*-1? S6SS 55913 is 95 +018' IK»f 

94.0/ 9A.06 9407 -0O1 E4L228 Mnr9fl 56.15 SS*4 5464 +41 IS *jC7 

91i6 9194 9295 -0-01 381,184 
9304 9181 9283 -Dili 289,151 
9275 9271 9173 -0.02 277.313 

9362 9360 9241 4)02 1M728 

9260 9258 9XS9 4103 13*087 
7U5 93-53 9254 4MQ 104234 
93J1 93.49 « 250 -002 90338 

9244 9242 9143 4U)2 77,149 
9241 9242 9243 -002 62687 
Est. sales N A Weds sales 339484 
Weds open M 2890292 op 36673 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

Si miQian-iits cf 100 pcL 

fep97 94J7 94J6 94J6 undL 477407 


Mar «l 
Jun9S 
Sep <8 
Dec 98 

77 JH 99 
Jim 99 
Sep 99 
Dec *5 
'Aar 00 


Apr 98 55 JO W4.S 54AS -213 

EsL ten N A Yiras sales 56,021 
Wtes opwi inti 564)1 ■». up *670 


BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62500 pounds. S per pound 

Sep 97 1404) 1.5852 T6010 +0152 3a 143 

Doc 97 1J990 1.5792 1J950 +4)152 2<978 

Mar«8 1 J970 1-5750 1.5698 +0152 212 

Esl. sate* NA Weds sales 12,700 

Weds open Int 5&34G ofl 7,039 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100000 dodors. s par Cdn. dr 

Sep 97 .7219 .7181 -7184 4L0C34 2A926 

Dec 97 .7255 7220 . 7231-041034 32543 

Mar 98 .7279 7255 .7255 4)4)033 982 

Est. sales NA WedS sates 1 1J87 

Weds open M *0.738. aH 14H8 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

12&Q00 raariz. s per mart; 


NOV 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Feb VS 
Mat 98 


-04M 85J5T2 
4X07 0444 
4)12 SUM, 
4L04 WSJ 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 
IJtaObM.-doOanperUil. 

OCt 97 19.87 19.28 1938 

19.82 19 43 1950 
19 9i) 1950 19-54 

19.9? 19.6) 1957 ... 

1 9.89 JOj'J 1955 -ai8 1&4I8 

19-38 |9^« 1977 +002 101*3 

Est sates N A Weds sales 84192 1 

Wtads opan im 413.014. up 7-440 

l 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) J 

10.000 mm bh/s, S per mm Nu 
get 9? 2.788 1 631 27t6 +OJM4L 5H5T 

Nov 97 1910 1 780 290B +04)63 31.147 

D«c97 3 000 2470 2 997 +o«9 23,964 

Jan 98 2.980 ifi*9 2.979 +0.063 22.979 

2.700 1:20 27M +0JM3 15,716 

Mar 98 2.430 2 170 1430 +0 033 11525 

Esl. sates N A Weds sales 41892 
W«rs open ml 23EIM1. up 1,912 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

424XH gaL cenis per gal 
0*397 99»0 5430 58 78 *045 38306 


as™ _ 5«7 is jesss: is sss its sss its a ’as 

Mor98 58.10 57 DO 5700 4L45 S.033 1 


Est sales NA Weds sales 51,504 
weds open ml 1 1 7.549, on 5^ 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1 15 nriMon yen. Spar IOOjhi 

Sep 97 4428 4340 A364 4L0019 571VU 

Dec 97 .8544 JUS2 AC2^ono mm 

Mar 98 A625 .8585 J1S07 4UM2O 7*7 

E sl. te es NA weds sate 38J94 

weds apan tad 1 16,951 aft 8^68 


Apr 98 99.70 4L14 

May 98 S3 M -0.09 

EsL sales NA weds sates 2 7. 232 
Weds open Ml ail 58. off 14)06 


2A7V 

Lflia 


F 


GASOIL OPE) 

U4L daftos per medic ton ■ laKaf 1 00 tons 
Sep 97 161.25 199,50 161 J5 —750 5705 

Oct 97 16*50 16125 164J5 —1.00 27JS7 

Nov 97 I6&25 144.50 166.00 -1JM 14.274. 

Doe 97 1 68 00 16 625 leflJJO — Q75 16.739 

Jan 98 149JS leSjM 1 69.75 _ojo ]twi j 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

lliOoa (rancs. i per franc 

SPOI 5415.00 542000 543000 5435JM SjS 'Sf 27MB F^W {TOTS i«S) ITOJS 7o^ 'i770 

Pannard 5459 00 546000 547 500 548000 JSt -$55 ^7+0DO2B 30380 Mar98 17050 16825 T7025 +075 4169 

Sm: Special Higta Grade! -W38+0JJ028 U53 Esl. sates- 2ft 7S1 . Prey, sates : 30484 

Spoi 1429 DO 163400 1*15.00 1*40.00 EsLsaies NA. W«is uMn 2i6i i Prov open hi: 9iT» up 1.20s 

fa-hard 1439 0(1 1441.00 I 454D0 145500 W*dS OOen ml 99,1*2. off 4J4 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) U5. dollars per barrel . Ms om.ooo aortas 

500000 pesos. S per pea Od97 1853 18 '7 

Sep 97 .13850 .12815 .12832-.00106 14831 Mortf “*■ -- Lndl 

JSS -12337 -.00191 19 Ate OeC?7 

Mar 96 .11900 .11860 .11883 -.00327 *.253 


High Lm» Oose Chga Optnl 


Financial 

(1ST BILLS (CMER) 

SI mHun- 015 0(100 pet 
Sep W 6S.CC iincti. 

DM9? <UJ8i 9454 9L&5 unch. 

MoitB 94 60 94.70 9480 imct) 

Esl sates NA Weds solos 2.011 
Wetfs epen ini 7^54 rfl 779 


1-850 

4.137 

1-667 


Esl. sates NA weds tew 11S59 
Wed's open hi 424S& up 1 1 7 


1867 J5 34 -^D 3 SaSM 1 

{Ha JS-S IS -0.03 20499 1 

IKS !sJ; IIJ? zj« «$£ 

Mnr«8 18-65 1850 isti IjOT 

Esl. sales; Jlim Pt-a sates -44,500 
Prev. open (m. it«.35l up i.jjo' > 


Jan98 

Feb98 


5 YR TREASURY (CflOT) 

sioaooa pm- 01s & 64ms 01 100 pd 


3- MONTH STERLING (UFPE) 

£500000 -Pts <4 lODpd 
Sep 97 92-73 93.70 93L71 —0.01 91568 
Doc 97 92-65 93L62 92A4 +0JI1 130,260 
Mar 98 9144 92 m> 9U3 +0JH (OftiS 

Sep 97 106-41 I0te33 IO»,39 ”~ID 51660 SopW 92J1 92J0 uSS »7W 

Dec 97 1M-2I 106-T0 w-l* -04 190.970 OK* 92.7V 72-76 92JH u5S- 
Esl. tee, N A W«fs sales 55A14 M»99 92J6 9183 9JJB UiKfi. 

Weds open mi 24463ft uo 1209 Esl. sales. SX531. Prev. tees.- 44*34 

10 YR TREASURY (CBOT) Ptnr open M. 677.2W up 

sTiffis"® iffK- E “S’StS , iS ,Frel 

p SSSlgssiWA 3 


<1 


---Jssaar- ; 

2JWS (); 

. 935 OS unetL 1436 / 

sate N A Weds 135^4, 

W^fs open ml 219.034 up 7^^ 

FTSE lOO(UFFF) i 

05 per indei pdnl 


Wads open W 384.311 on S74 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 


L81Q 


rabd^lWLOM-Blse, 32ruh oHOO pdl Sep« 95.98 ?i90 95.92 -Dm Tn im CAC 4* (MATin 

Dee 98 95 73 95*5 V5*n —am ia.n FFTan . 


Sep 97 112 2* 112-11 113-U 
Dec 77 117-16 111 -30 11745 
Mar 90 m-29 111-21 111.2* 
JunW 11114 11149 111-14 
Esl. teas N A Weds sales t J1841 
Weds open ml 5W37 & oil 1. 536 


?! 119,907 
17 426JH0 

17 34.198 one <’■*•*• «U1 a 02 7174+ 

13 L568 Est sales: 215589 Pm.setev I49J58 
Prev. open bit4 usuii off 7 JW 


BSSfiSS gnSsaSBrBffi 

aec97 2886.0 iiu .1 n zrz rili 


LONG WLT (LI FFE) 

CM 000 - pH & 12«H6t 100 pd 
Sep'? M5-19 115-13 115-19 +045 6,943 

Dx»7 115-04 114-27 11547 * 044 154.997 
Mar 98 NT NT 114-27 +044 141,935 
Esl. sates; 35.959 . Prev. sales. 36550 
Prev. Open ml . U1.935 up 53 


WMNTHPIBOR(MATIF) 

FFdmOaan -pK« lOOpd 

SS 2!^? !«! Undi. 411M 


=5 SSSSf&zS 22 

Esl latoi- 20403. 

Open Int. 71.51 7 up 1.78O. 


^P98 960, 954 Sti?zS5f 

Est. sate* 57^36 1 

Opan tat: 251599 up 4934 


Commodity Indexes 


GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE) 

DM75QJM0 - ptSOl lOOpd UWONTH EUROL1B* « we. 

cw 97 lows ioi £3 101 yi -4i9U»jrn fi7i 

Mur 98 MU* '«» *3f _ 

Esl. sateii 121587. Prev. tees. 111.051 Doc 97 93JS *1 Js S?! *?-°2 20,077 

Prev, open Ini 260 508 up 5fc41 


Dec 97 
Mar 98 


Moodvrs 
Reuters 
Futures 

CRB 
Scmces: Motif. . 


CKkc 
1.570 20 
1,932.00 
154.50 
343.20 


Previous 

NAj 

1.934.9a 

J49.79 

242-27 










\yt c** f 



*' Mar - '< 



. i i 


~*fr' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBliNE, tt EPNESP.4A; SEPTEMBER 24* 1997 


PAGE 3' 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY- SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 


PAGE 17 


EUROPE 


BNP’s Net Rises 75% 

* F renc h Banking Slump Seems Over 


G-VHW* Ow SstfFnm, Di^xa fa, 

‘~ J B ^ ue Narionale de 
Pans SA said Thursday that first- 
M profit rose a larger-than-expec- 
ted 7 5 percent as domestic retail 
banking emerged from a three-vear 
slump while trading and forehm 
ranking income surged. 

-JUS 1 *? 1 f rance s lar g«t cora- 
2?* to 3 04 billion 

francs (5500 million; from 1.74 bil- 
lion francs a year earlier. 

TTie profit surge beat 'the highest 
predictions of investment analysts 
gave the shares a big lift on the stock 
market and prompted BNP's chair- 
man, Michel Pebereau, to admit that 
even he was a little surprised by the 
pace of the bank's rise since it left 
stale ownership in 1993. 

■'This is an incontestably good 
result, one which we had not fore- 
seen at the time of our privatization 
in the first half of 1 997. ’ ' Mj. Peber- 
eau said. “We are in advance of our 
game plan.’* 


Renault Profit 
Beats Forecasts 

C.mpJnlfn Our Sup Fnm Dupuh hi 

PARIS — Renault reported a 
big jump in its six-month net 
profit Thursday, to 1.67 billion 
francs (S276 million ) from 138 
million francs a year earlier. 

The result, much higher than 
forecasts for the company, in- 
cluded im exceptional gain of 
419 million francs from the sale 
of Elf Aquitaine shares held by 
Renault. 

Tbe automaker said the high- 
er profit also was due to im- 
provements in “the auto 
branch's operating result." 
That division recorded an op- 
erating loss of 162 million 
francs for the half , compared 
with a loss of 91 1 million francs 
a year earlier. 

Renault said it would prob- 
ably be profitable for the full 
year, reversing a loss in 1996. 

‘‘These figures are absolutely 
not disappointing," said Martin 
Ziegenbalg. an analyst with 
Dresdner Klein wort Benson in 
Frankfurt. “Renault’s still los- 
ing money in the automobile 
unit, but a lot less than last 
year.” (AFP. AFX. Bloomberg) 


BNP's shares closed at 288.30 

ttv 5 ’ U -^ ' 01 3-3 percent. 

The rise in earnings came amid 
soaring profits in the French banking 
industry after stock markets rallied 
in ihe first six month* of the year 

lifting commissions and n rc fi rs fr om ’ 
trading. 

A fledgling economic recovery is 
also fanning demand for consumer 
and housing loans, offsetting weak 
corporate lending. 

“These are good-quality results,” 
said Benoit Vincenzi, a banking ana- 
lyst at the French brokerage Leven 
“wiih hardly any artificial boost 
from one-time items." 

Mr. Pebereau predicted a sub- 
stantial rise in full-year profit, even 
after BNP’s profit doubled in 1996 
to 3.86 billion francs. 

“At the time we were privatized 
four years ago, we would not have 
imagined this kind of half-year re- 
sults," he said. Bui he said second- 
ly profit would noi match that of 
the first half, which he said had 
benefited from “a conjunction of 
favorable factors.” 

He cited the higher dollar, buoy- 
ant stock markets and the reimburse- 
ment of sovereign loans. There was 
also a capital gain of around 400 
million francs on the sale of 4 percent 
of Compagnie de Suez, as the hold- 
ing company merged with the utility 
company Lyonnaise des Eaux. 

Mr. Pebereau said the rise in earn- 
ings in the first half was weJJ groun- 
ded. “The French network, after two 
years of losses and barely breaking 
even in 1 996, is again profitable." he 
said. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 

■I France May Keep Tax Break 

Finance Minister Dominique 
Strauss-Kahn said the government 
might retain income-tax breaks for 
around 100 professions, including 
journalists, that the previous con- 
servative government planned to 
scrap. Reuters reported from Mont- 
pellier, France. 

The former government intended 
io eliminate over five years a de- 
duction that can amount to as much 
as 30 percent for the professions, 
which also include airline crews and 
fashion models. 

“If we don’t go ahead with in- 
come-tax cuts,” Mr. Strauss-Kahn 
told Socialist legislators, “we will 
delay until later revising the tax 
breaks involving 104 professions 
that had been decided by the pre- 
vious government’’ 


BTR Set to Sell Raft of Assets 


CtVijikilfo iV f nwi liiijiift to* 
LONDON — BTR PLC said 
Thursday it planned to sell assets, 
including packaging and building 
materials, and to accelerate its shift 
toward engineering, which it said 
offered more “dynamic" growth. 

The company, which also said 
first-half net income dropped 8 
percent, said assets now on the 
block generared sales in 1996 of 
£2.8 billion ($4.44 billion), or 
about a third of its total revenue. It 
said it would reinvest the proceeds 
into engineering businesses while 
giving a "significant portion” 
back to shareholders. 

• BTR has already largely com- 
pleted an earlier wave of sales of 
businesses that represented £2.3 
billion in sales. 


Analysts said Britain's largest 
diversified industrial company 
seemed to be making the right 
moves in focusing a sprawling 
business with, more than 1.000 
subsidiaries that make items rang- 
ing. from mattresses to aerospace 
components. BTR has been strug- 
gling in recent years to generate 
growth and investor confidence in 
the face of slower market con- 
ditions in key maikets in Germany. 
Australia and elsewhere. 

BTR said the businesses to be 
sold include packaging, materials 
and building products, which gen- 
erated 36 percent of 1996 sales. Ian 
Stracban, chief executive, said he 
would consider any and all means 
to sell the businesses, including 
spin-offs. 


"We will consider all altern- 
atives with the objective of max- 
imizing shareholder value.” Mr. 
Strachan said. “This will be the 
key issue over the next 15 
months." 

BTR said net income in the first 
half dropped to £370 million, from 
£400 million a year ago. Sales 
dropped 10 percent, to £4.12 bil- 
lion. in the period from a year ago. 

The company warned in May 
that the strong pound and difficult 
trading conditions in some mar- 
kets would affect performance. 
Mr. Strachan said he expected a 
“significant improvement" in the 
second half. 

BTR shares rose 16 pence to 
close Thursday in London at 234 
pence . r Bloomberg . Reuters > 


Factory Closing Gives BAe a Loss 


Ciwyuliil M rtir Jiff/ From ftuiunfai 

LONDON — British Aerospace 
PLC said Thursday it had a loss in 
the first half because of rhe costs of 
closing a commercial aircraft fac- 
tory. and it warned that hopes of 
rapidly reforming the aerospace 
industry faced “barriers." 

BAe. Europe's largest defense 
company and the maker of Tor- 
nado fighters and of wings for Air- 
bus Industrie jetliners, had a loss of 
£61 million 1596.7 million > after a 
pretax charge of £250 million to 
close the plant where it made Jet- 
stream propeller-driven aircraft. A 
year ago. BAe had net income of 
£144 million. 

For BAe, still rehabilitating its 


finances after a close brush with 
bankruptcy five years ago, the fig- 
ures showed that the closing of 
Jetstream announced this year was 
one of the last major hurdles to be 
cleared before its commercial 
plane-making operations, which 
include Airbus, turned a profit. 

"The order book is good within 
both defense and commercial 
aerospace and underpins our con- 
fidence in increasing our dividend 
per share for rhe half-year by 25 
percent." Sir Richard Evans. 
BAe's chief executive, said. 

BAe’s pretax profit before ex- 
ceptional items rose 29 percent to 
£278 million, reflecting cosr-cut- 
ting programs in its commercial 


aircraft-building operations. Al- 
though these figures were srrong. 
highlighted by cash reserves of 
£770 million, the company said it 
had made little progress in forming 
alliances in Europe. 

BAe shares fell 51 pence to 
close at £15.02. 

Sir Richard reiterated the BAe 
view that .Airbus Industrie, cur- 
rently a loose confederation of 
four "companies including BAe. 
first had to be transformed into a 
single entity before Europe’s de- 
fense industry could be reconsti- 
tuted. 

“Airbus is the key to major 
moves on the European scene." he 
said. ( Bloomberg . AFP. Reuters ) 


Dresdner Sees New Era for German Banks 


(Trey */ ,*] by Our Sufl F rum Pty *n. tat 

FRANKFURT — Juergen Sar- 
razin, chief executive of Dresdner 
Bank AG, said Thursday that the 
landscape of Germany's banking 
sector would look “totally differ- 
ent” in five years. 

Mr. Sarrazin. who will be suc- 
ceeded as Dresdner 's chief executive 
in May by Bernhard Walter, said that 
mergers in the banking sector would 
not be confined to the private bank- 
ing sector and that the number of 
bank branches in the country was set 


to decline significantly. 

"What has already happened is 
just the beginning," be said at a 
business conference. 

He noted that Dresdner had 
already shed around 15 percent of its 
staff in the past three years. 

Meanwhile. Bayerische Vere ins- 
bank AG said early reports showed it 
would receive more than 40 percent 
of Bayerische Hypotheken- und 
Wechsel-Bank AG, paving the way 
for the 41 billion Deutsche-mark 
($22.79 billion) deal and encour- 


1 1 .. 


— 

II Investor’s Europe ] 

Frankfurt :. 

London 

Paris l\ 

DAX 

\ RS£ too Index CAC40 

4500 

JMl — , 

‘ 5200 — ■ 

SB- - 

sao 

4ooo r 

27% J 

-¥-"4000— r 
djnn flrt/i 

j*T A, 

*¥win — 

AM J 


3 VUV 

ionn^ — - 


A MJ JAS A MJ 

JAS ^A M J JAS 

1987 

1997 

1987 

Exchange. . 

Wax 

Thursday Prev. % 


Close Close Change 

Amsterdam 

.AE* 

85&02 877.56 -2^5 

Brussels 

BEL20 

Z«31SL74 2,3KJ,77 -2.T2 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3372.55 4,050.14 -152 

Copenhagen 

Stock Maricel 

611.37- -Q^l 

Helsinki 

HEX'Genesal 

3^91.32 3.435JM -1^7 

Oslo 

OBX 

697.72 701.35 -0^2 

London 

FTSE.1QO 

4,854.60 4,905.20 .-1.03 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

585.85 589.72 -0.66 

man 

ftflSTEL 

14396 14543 -t.Ol 

Paris 

CAC 40 

2,843.60 2^74^7 - -1.08 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

3,321.19 3,377^4 -1^6 

Vienna 

ATX ' 

1^37.19 1,371.11 -2.47 

Zurich 

SB 

3,41227 3,458.89 -1.35 

Source. Te/ekurs 


Utumui-Kil HuroU T nhww 


Very briefly: 


agi ng more of the same in Germany's 
overcrowded banking industry. 

Analysrs bailed the swap's suc- 
cess as a sign that consolidation in 
German banking would continue. 

“The was the first time a trans- 
action of this son has been done 
here, and it is certainly encouraging 
to see that deals like those done in 
Great Britain ‘and America are also 
possible in the German market," 
said Christian Heger, a fund man- 
ager at Trinkaus Capital Manage- 
ment. f Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


• Vickers PLC’s first-half net income fell 69 percent, to £6.5 
million (S10.3 million), as it took a charge for the sale of a 
medical unit and faced lower margins in the auto-parts in- 
dustry. Vickers, which makes Rolls-Royce cars, also sold its 
Vickers Medical Ltd. and S&W Vickers Ireland Ltd. units to 
Instrumentarium Corp. of Finland for £4.5 million. Lazard 
Brothers & Co. is exploring options for the sale of the rest of 
Vickers’s medical business. 

• Adtranz, a joint venture of Daimler-Benz AG and ABB 
Asea Brown Boveri Ltd. that is the world's largest maker of 
railway equipment, will cut its European work force of 25,000 
by 25 percent because of weak market conditions. 

• UBS Securities will is to become the first foreign brokerage 
to join the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange. UBS has been trading 
securities on Che Israeli exchange since f 994. 

• TabacaJera SA, Spain's state-controlled tobacco company, 
will spend S367 million to buy three cigar companies in the 
United Stales, Honduras and Nicaragua, making its inter- 
national unit the largest U.S. premium and mass-market cigar 
manufacturer and one of the world’s largest 

• France’s employment total rose by 36,000 jobs, or 0.3 
percent in the second quarter, the Labor Ministry said, but the 
jobless rate remained at a postwar high of 12.6 percent. 

• Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products NV said Microsoft 
Corp. planned to buy a S45 million stake in the Belgian maker 
of computer speech programs. Lemout will develop ap- 
plications for currently available and future versions of Mi- 
crosoft’s talking-computer program. 

• The European Commission said Carlsberg AS must rid 
itself of its 37 percent holding in Jyske Bryg Holding and its 75 
percent stake in Danske Cola Dirk as a condition of approval 
for an alliance with Coca-Cola Co. An analyst said the ruling 
represented a chance for Carlsberg 's Dutch rival Heineken 
N V to gain a foothold in the Danish market Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


,rxX rr 


m* v* 


Thursday Sept. 11 

Prices hi local currencies. 
Tetekvrs 

High taw Clow Pro*. 

Amsterdam ABOjgwsMtg 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AknNoM 
Boon Co. 

Bob Wessm 

CSMeva „ 

DwdtodwPtf 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fate Aim* 

Getronks 

G-Brocaro 

Haaemeyer 

Hewetam 

HoMOKSttCW 

Hurt Douq lea 

IMG Grow 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NwrtojfdGp 
Nufrida 
QceGrtnten 
Philos Elec 

sssh*. 

ftobeco 
Rodomco 
Rnli non 
Rorento 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever evo 

Venflex Infl 

VNU 

WottmKlcva 


39 JO 
l SOSO 
5000 
315-30 
13440 
33 
9400 
10500 

188.70 
31 JO 
80.90 
4020 
5190 

1D1 

317.70 
1T6.W 
8840 
8980 
7170 

43 
71 JO 
6120 
60 
231 
147.41 
10600 
8150 
191 
51.70 
190.30 
117.40 
IDS JO 
42200 
11170 
43.30 
237 A0 


37 JO 
149 
47.50 
308 
123 

31.90 

93.10 

raio 

179 

30.10 

78.70 
58J0 
5130 

98.10 
30BJO 
11150 

85.70 
87 JO 

70 

41.90 
59-30 
50 JO 

58 

225 

144 

103 

7850 

189.10 

50.90 
18950 

117 

103 

41170 

110-20 

4270 

22850 


3750 3950 

149.10 15150 
4830 5050 

309 319.80 
128 12850 

31.90 3150 
9430 9450 
10450 10750 
17930 18950 

30.90 31.60 
7950 81.70 
5950 5950 

53.90 54 
9970 100.90 

317 313 

175 77750 
8550 8850 
8850 9050 
7270 72.10 
4140 4250 
70 7150 
6150 67.® 
5850 5950 
226J0 232 

14540 14830 
103 107J5J 
8050 84 

189.10 19450 

60.90 6130 

18950 195 

117 11750 
103-70 1 0450 
41650 42430 
11040 11410 
4270 4350 
230.90 238 


Bangkok 

AtfvWaSvc 
Bangkok Bk F 
Kruno Thai Bk 
PIT Exp tor 
Ston Cement F 
SJmo Com BkF 

THeawnaaa 

ffi3S7S,F 

UtdComm 


230 

185 

2575 

390 

617 

111 

31 

4825 

109 

122 


SET tadn: 55209 
Previous: 54 1J5 
208 224 215 

175 175 175 

2350 25.50 2450 

376 384 382 

600 608 

104 108 

29-25 3050 

4250 47 

105 107 

119 120 


600 

108 

30 

45 

105 

123 


Bombay 

Hindus! Pettrn 508 492 49775 49575 

IntfDwBk T« 10450 70550 J&S30 

ITC 562 547 JO 54775 551 

Mahanagor Tel 271-25 266 26650 269.75 

Rrfance Ind 35075 343 344 343 

State Bh India 29975 283J0 28350 28575 

SteriAirttorty 1875 1835 1BJ5 1&|5 

Tata EngLnen 356 351.50 35125 353J0 


Brussels 


Almanfl 

Bareolnd 

BBL 

CBR 

CMiiiyi 

Demote Lion 

Eledrabd 

Electmflno 

Forte AG 

GflTOH? 

GBL 

GeiBanttue 
KredtaUwr* 
Petroftno 
P o— l il t 
Sop* Setae 
Sac Gen Bag 
5dWy 
TracWwi 
UCB 


BEL-20 todec 131374 
pmfoas: 236277 

1635 1590 1670 1 640 

7400 7120 7220 7510 

«S0 9050 9080 9350 
3050 3M5 3040 3110 

17150 16825 17025 17550 
1680 1620 1635 1690 

7420 7341 7370 7510 

3480 335U 3450 3480 

7090 6920 6940 7060 

3210 3110 3170 32M 

5660 5470 5420 56» 

14250 14025 14225 14300 
14250 13800 14150 14375 
13600 13325 13600 I3M» 
4905 4880 4895 4900 

10200 9950 1M0O 10275 

3225 3105 3160 3330 

■MS 2040 2080 2120 
16775 14700 14775 14775 
119700 115100 116900 121250 


fc Copenhagen 

* ... TIC 


BGBonfc 


Darius 
Den Danske Bk 
W5 SvemftrB B 
0*19120 “ 
FLSIndB 
Kob Lrfttuvne 
NwNorfbfcB 
Sophus BerB 
Toe Dam* 6 
Tiyg Baltks 
UnUmmaritA 


370 364 369.63 375 

347 339 339 344 

930 930 930 WO 

a 

% s>s>s 

ffll ® 

988 980 M3 990 

372J5 359 359 370 

3J9 »0 391 

607 401 404 406 


High Low Oom Prev. 


Deutsche Bcirt 107 JO 106.70 
DeuiTeMera 3740 36J0 
Dresdner Bank 75.70 74B0 
Freswrka 300 297.50 

FresanhnMed 12BJ0 127 JO 
Fried. Knipp 37620 37SJ0 


Gehe 
HekMbgZmt 
Henkel phi 
HEW 
Hochtief 

Hoodtd 

Krutedt 

Lnltmeyer 

Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mmwvnam 


106JO 103 

146 143 

99 98 

475 450 

B4 8150 
75.95 7465 
655 646 

09 JO 87.75 
1228 1202 
N.T. N.T. 
511 9M 
847 836 


107.10 108.05 
37.05 37.15 
75.15 7680 
300 301 JD 
128 13020 
37620 38150 
KEL50 108 
146 149 JO 
98,90 101.70 
460 475 

84 85 

75 7760 
65350 454 

89 8840 


MotoUgwetechoft 40.95 40J5 
Meto 83-40 8C20 

Munch Rueck R 581 569 

Preussog 
RWE 
SAPpfd 
Schema 
5GL Carbon 
Stemen* 

Springer [A*n 
Suedzucfcer 


T2Z4 

N.T. 

SOB 

841 


sr 

VEW 

Vkw 

Vofeengen 


489 482 

B2J0 81 JO 
412.70 415J0 
ISO JO 178J0 
241 JO 237 JD 
113-31 HOG 
1470 1450 

869 855 

419 417 J® 
98 JD WJ0 
573 560 

780 767 

1167 JO 1155 


Helsinki 

HEX Gwwreltotoc 339102 
PlWlMIK 3*350* 


47.90 

47S0 

4700 

48 

Huhtomaill 

US 

210 

m 

21B 


46J0 

46 

46 

4070 


70/40 

69 JO 

69.90 

71 JO 

Merita A 

2200 

21 JO 

2100 



155 

153 

153 

liAJU 

Meteo-Seria B 

46 

45 

15.10 

45J0 



135 

r.is 

\3S 

NoUa A 

443.10 

400 

441 

44V JO 


173 

172 

172 

174 

Outotanreni A 

lS 

88 Be 

1305D 131 JO 

132 

Vaknet 

79.90 

7V 

79 JO 



Bk East Asia 
Camay POCfflC 

ck iimranra 
China Light 
CMc Pacific 
DaaHenaBk 
Frd Podftc 
Hang Lung Dev 


Hong Kong 

720 
27.90 
1280 
6550 
24 
42.10 
45J0 
3780 
820 
14 
9475 

Hendesah Inv 825 
Henderson Ld 6525 
HKCMnoGos li« 
HX Electric ?9-K 
HK Telecomm 17^ 
HapewehHdgs iK 
HSBCHdge 2S 
HutcMsanWh 72 

NwwlSf^Ow 4780 
Oriental Press 
Peart Oriental 

iESffid* 

Sbto Land Co. 

Sth China Post 
SwfrePacA 
WhortHdgs 
Wheeta* 


260 

127 

8925 

463 

7 -S 

6J0 

63.75 

2885 

16J5 


HoogSeag; 143043# 
Preview 1480564 

7 JO 7J5 7^ 

2690 26.90 28 

1225 12JS 13 
83 83J0 87 

2280 22.95 2460 
39.90 4060 4260 
44 4420 4620 
36J30 36J0 38 

B 885 8J5 

TITO J3.7J 1410 
91.58 92J® 96 

8J0 B.50 8-75 

64 64J0 6650 
15 15J5 1560 
2430 2B.45 29J0 
1660 1620 17J0 
425 425 440 

227 227 235 

70 71 7325 

2220 23 2160 

20.95 ZI 2120 
18.75 18.75 1885 
4630 4620 48.70 
2J5 260 260 

1.19 125 124 

87.25 87 JO » 
450 450 458 

785 720 7 JO 

615 615 ,6^ 

61J0 6225 45J0 
2785 27J0 2860 
1605 1650 1440 


Jakarta 

AstroW, 

Bklrtihidan 

BkNe»m 

GudongGorm 

Indocenenf 

liutotood 

lndasal 

Sampoerno HM 

Semen Grtsfli 
refekanMmgssI 


ConrosKe iodcc 55614 
57582 

3B25 3550 3700 3725 

11MB 925 925 10® 

1025 -W 975 IKS 
9925 9700 9800 1012S 

2550 2350 2450 2525 

3925 3800 3900 ^2* 

7675 7475 75W JJ® 
8000 7400 7400 8^S 
3375 3275 3325 

2S5D 3400 3475 36°0 


Frankfurt 


AMBB 


645 451 657 - - - 

IgSSfflSS Johannesburg 

' M -* W-MBU 1U» “S Jg 

191 JO TJJ 

56 a S3® 

3085 308S 33 

39-25 


JffimuHdB 

Alim 

WBerfin 

BASF 

iowHypgBk 


BMH 

CXAGCntofikJ 


M J8 iB 1 

jflB JO 402 407 }1 j 

'S 4^ JS M 

a si i| 

Si as S 3 ”1 

80JO 78.20 n W 

^ l»» 

s « fS 


AVM1N 

Barlow 
CG. Smith 
DeBeos 
DitefanWn 
Fd Natl Bk 
Gencor 
GFSA 


M 3W0 38^0 3?^ 
1195 1185 1185 11-50 
99J0 W-® 'SijS 


GFSA _ IJ180 99J 

ss “8 nSuxW 


8 

js 43 & ^ 

uijo S .jS 

I “8 

1U5 17-A 17-tS IHjj 

s 2 » 1 

RKfemoM go 80 ® 

Rost Ptofcwm 


iscor 

fflS 

Minor™ 

Nam pat 
Nedcnr 


. High Low Close Prev. 

SA Breweries 134 130 134 13425 

5am*MJ r 3fL90 X 38 39.10 

5asol 61.25 60 60 61.75 

SBK 210 20125 20825 210 

Tlgef Orris 72 69 70 72J0 


Kuala Lumpur 



High 

Low 

Close 

Ufa LIU flics 

6.90 

6.83 

506 


4J5 

4.70 

4.72 

Vadafons 

xto 

3.04 

309 

WhHbread 

703 

705 

705 

Wiliams Hdas 

U7 

34H 

3^9 

Wobeley 

473 

4.70 

4.70 

WPP Group 

202 

276 

281 

Zsmai 

19.18 

18J0 

1850 


High Low Oose Prev. 


High Low Qoso Pm. 


4L74 


JJ9 


1X15 

3785 

516 

B62 


4085 4080 
IO^B 8330 
573 607 

483 487 JO 
82 8445 
417.70 425J0 
18080 181 JO 
238 241 

llli-i 11120 

1450 1500 

855 B69 

419 425 

9650 1»59 
573 560 

777 7B6 

1162 1165 


AMMBHdgs 
GfflDng 
Mol Bonking 
Mol Inti SNpF 
PetrarasGas 
Proton 
PuOflcBk 
Ronong . 
Resorts Worid 
Rothmans PM 
Slate Doris; 
Telekom Mol 
Tenagtr 
UM Engineers 
YTL 


IOlSO 
mw 
1840 
535 
960 
9-« 
2.99 
126 
7 JO 
26 
7.10 
980 
S.W 
13J0 
480 


985 

10JD 

1760 

5 

9.10 

880 

285 

116 

690 

2575 

665 

9.25 

125 

nm 

428 


940 1080 
ia7D JDL90 
1B20 1140 
130 150 

9.20 940 

9 9 JO 

285 2.99 

3J6 3Jfl 
735 7.10 

25.75 26 

7.10 7.10 

9JS 980 
835 9 

1240 1380 
438 645 


London 

Abbey Natl 841 

Ailed Daqtccq 464 

Angtiwi Wrier 8 

Argos 

Asoa Grows 
Assoc Br Foods 
BAA 
Barclays 
Bass 
BAT M 
Bank Sariland 
BluoOrde 
BOC Group 
Boats 
BPfltnd 
Brit Aeroip 

Brit Airways 
BG 

Brfl Land 
BrttPeflm 


Bril 

Brfl Telecom 
BTR 

Burmah Castro! 10-95 

BwfcnGp JJT 

Cable Wbetess 
Cadbury 5ctw 
Carlton Comm 
Comml Union 
Compass Gp 
CourtmrtcJs 

Dixons . ™ 

Eledroconnwnents 480 
EMI Group 589 

Forn {Mortal 1-73 

Genl Acddent 9J2 

GEC 3.97 

GKN 12.M 

Gtooai WeBcome 12J9 
GrarradaGp 802 

Grand Met 
GRE 

GmenallsGp 
Guimess 
GUS 
Han 
K5BC 
ICI _ 

Imp! Tobacco 


1 Hldgs 


oke 

Land Sec 
Cosmo 

Legal Gad Grp 
Lloyds TSBGp 
LrarsWnfly 
Marks Soencer 
MEPC 

Mercury Asset 
National i 



241 

BJ7 

436 

1)83 

187 

132 

877 

444 

482 

7.99 

4115 

439 
7.93 
<97 
609 
124 

17.66 

440 
7JD 


FT-SE 100:485480 
Pifltan: 498530 


Madrid 

AcerfiKK 

ACESA 

Aguos Bracehm 

Anjentarta 

BBV 

Banesto 

BanUmer 

Bco Centra Hisp 

Bar Papular 

Bco Santander 

CEPSA- 

Contlnente 

FECSA 
GOS Natural 
Ibenlraia 

Prytn 

Repsal 

Sevklana Elec 
Tabacatero 
Tehrtnrjlco 
UnkmFenosa 
Vcrienc Cemenf 


Bohn bnhnc 58185 
Prevtous; 58932 


1920 

1885 

1895 

1915 

5660 

5560 

5610 

5650 

7700 

7610 

7690 

7700 

4130 

4060 

4090 

4140 

1455 

1440 

1415 

1460 

8070 

7930 

7930 

8030 

5820 

5740 

5820 

5820 

8050 

8730 

8820 

8860 

4270 

4205 

4270 

4260 

4440 

4390 

4440 

4430 

2930 

2860 

2880 

2930 

B480 

8360 

8390 

8460 

3165 

3120 

3135 

01*0 

1305 

1185 

1200 

1200 

7100 

7010 

7070 

7120 

1760 

1740 

1750 

1760 

2605 

2635 

2665 

2685 

6U0 

6100 

6110 

6160 

1370 

1350 

1370 

1370 

8190 

B120 

8150 

B1«0 

4260 

1225 

4220 

1210 

4220 

1225 

4295 

1225 

2045 

2B30 

2840 

2835 


Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

Ajt Ugutde 
Alcold Alsth 
Awi-UAP 
Barren ire 
BIC 

BNP _ 

Carol Ptos 

Currefour 

Casino 

CCF 

Crtelem 

Christian Dior 

CLF-DexJa Fran 

Credit Aflricde 

Danone 

EB-AqUIataw 

Ertdanki BS 

Eurodfcuwy 
Eurotunnel 
Gen. Earn 
Havas 
Imctal 
Lafarge 


CAC-40: 2B4160 
Previous: 217457 


Leqrtmd 119 

L-fteal 221 


PSE index: 21 4539 
PiaMoUS! 221277 


1450 

1425 

1405 

18 

17 JO 

17J0 

121 

117 

119 

410 

305 

405 

77 

76 

77 

197 JO 

387 JO 

39 250 

475 

455 

460 

160 

150 

160 

890 

860 

885 

56 

5450 

55 

600 

6 JO 

6.60 


LI 

LVMH 
MfcheSnB 
Parfljas A 
Pernod Ricard 
Peugeot Ot 
Ptaairtt-Print 
Pramades 
Renoult 
!5 *mI 

Rh-PmnencA 

Sanafl 

Schneiitef 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
StGobain 
Suez (Oe) 

Suez Lyon Earn 



Baba tedn: 474628 
Prevtoss; 4822.11 

6150 6240 6330 
21 JO 2230 2200 
37 JO 3745 3840 
14J0 14.40 1440 

3480 38.90 3940 
5BX® 58.90 &.W 
125 3J2 138 

32J» 32JO 3280 
3U0 3480 3405 
14180 141 JO 1C JO 
17 JO 17J8 17.92 


ReddflC 
RMflond 
Reed Inti 
RentokfllnW 
Reuters Hdgs 
Rewm 
RT2 W 

RMC Group ^ 

Rnfls Royce <-24 

SSWil *» 

Rpwl & Sun Al 
Saffwov 
Sobtsbuey 

Schrorteis --- 

Scot NewoEtfe 
Sort Power A* 2 

Seairicot 

Severn Trent 

SheUTronspR 

Smtlh Nephew 
Smith Kine 
Smttfts Jred 
Sft»fnEI« 

Siogeapch 
Stand Chester 
TrdeALyte 
Testa 

Thames KlWer 

31 Group 

TI Group 
Tomkins 
UmteWf . 

Utd Assurance 

Wtfhletss 



964 
224 JO 
913 
784 
388 
711 
41690 
293 
1045 
3488 
33-IJO 
333 
604 
832 
558 
1296 
834 
749 
830 
BJ0 
670 
704 
401 JO 
848 
437.70 
197 
7 

.1265 

34690 

442 

29650 

743 

2540 

2147 

16690 

1573 

232J0 

570 

33190 

839 

528 

820 

2680 

902 

Susp. 

645 

706 

168 

623 

108.90 

364 


9C 

22110 

884 

766 

38120 

698 

403 

28160 

1022 

3392 

328.10 

327 

590 

823 

544 
1296 
808 
725 
801 
8.10 
640 
690 
39160 
830 
427 JO 
1176 
2137 
1242 
336 
420.90 
28620 
722 
2509 
2095 
162J0 
7555 
2203 
557 
32630. 
82e 
505 
796 
2645 
891 

695 

164 

609 

iosjo 

35650 


962 964 

22940 22940 
889 912 

776 789 

385.90 388.70 

705 715 

410 414 

288J0 279.10 
1037 7034 
3398 3500 

33110 334 

332 327 

595 602 

825 832 

553 562 

12961335.10 
809 840 

747 735 

807 825 

8.10 845 

645 6.70 

694 709 

395 400 

830 848 

479 435J0 

11B? 1202 
2)40 2225 
1244 1273 

340.90 347 

421 JO 44340 
29650 287 JO 
1 743 748 

2535 2529 
2119 2130 

165 JO 16690 
1557 1558 

230 234.90 
561 520 

331 JO 334 
827 840 

506 840 

809 786 

2657 2684 

896 901 

15.10 


Electrolux B 
EncssonB 
Hemes B 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
MoDoB 
Nordbanken 
PtranrVUpiohir 
SandvtkB 
Scania B 

SCAB 

&-E Barken A 
SkamUa For* 
Skanska B 
SKFB 

SpabankenA 
SJwdA 
Sv Handles A 
VbhroB 


572 
331 JO 
334 
. 717 

402 
263 
256 
272 
248 
216 
185 
8&50 
322 
31650 
220 
180 
127 JO 
248 
205 


561 572 

337 JO 33050 
321 JO 324 

718 710 

393 399 

25650 25650 
253 254J0 
267 270J0 

244 247 
214 71530 
180 18450 

87 JO 88 

324 W JD 
310 311 JO 
21 7 JO 220 

176JQ 179 

125 126 

245 24650 
201 JO 20150 


572 
335 
33650 
716 
404 
266 
256 
274 
250 JO 
216 
184 
89 
337 
31 7 JO 
220 JO 
18250 
12850 
252 
206 


498 

167 

623 


i.10 

655 

707 

166 

622 


1065® 109.70 
36QJ0 36050 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ Bklng 
BHP 
Borol 

Brambles Ind. 
CBA 

CCAmatll 
Coles Myer 
Comalco 
C5R 

Fasten Brew 
Goodman Fid 
ICI Australia 
Lend Lease 
MiMHdgs 
Nat AustBcmk 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
News Corp 
Podfic Dunlop 
Pioneer Inf* 

Pub Broadcast 
RroThrto 

StGeaye Bonk 

WMC 

B rcBUnp 
riePet 
WOCtWWItK 


All OrtBwirfes: 266UW 
Pltvkm - 266658 

8J6 641 BJ2 8J2 

1018 10JBS 1015 10.19 
1685 1668 1611 16.90 
4.16 407 415 413 

2730 27 J7 2730 2739 
15.93 1558 1691 1513 
1490 U50 1485 1485 
654 446 6^9 657 


690 

J06 

163 


7.10 

5.15 

164 

2.14 


7.15 

5.15 
170 
115 


7.T0 
616 
166 
114 

1148 1238 
30.90 30 

1.70 1.66 

1935 19J1 1934 1931 
120 117 120 124 

640 629 

168 165 

478 468 
8/42 835 

20.95 2035 2032 2065 
835 BJO 832 837 

691 6W 685 496 

0.13 002 8.10 008 

11.77 1153 11J1 1165 
4.17 407 415 412 


1141 1150 

3074 30-60 
169 1-69 


640 636 

165 170 

475 469 

040 045 


Sao Paulo Taipei 

rnmmr. iiaai.iv 


Stock Market fadac 9115.10 
PrMovk 9145.18 


CemlgPfd 

CESPPM 

Copel 

Etetrobrus 

flaubancoPW 

UgWSenfcbH 

pfficPM 

rtVkMTB rTO 

PauBsfa Lin 

Sid Nodonal 

SausiCniz 

TefeSuwPfd 

Teton Ifi 

Tetot 

TetespPH 

UaibatioQ 

UsfinhrosPW 

CVRDPfd 



GaaptUte index: 69537 
Previous: W162 

86000 HS2DQ 85600 R6000 
7440 7260 7440 7050 

19200 18800 19200 IWl 
9400 9300 930C 10100 

23000 22500 22600 23000 
5300 5-20 5180 5120 

41300 39500 40400 41300 
59000 57500 59000 58000 
46100 45580 46000 46000 
70900 68200 70900 60400 
3800 B££Q 9700 8U0 

455500 641000 442000 442000 


Qiuoofcu Elec 
Dor Kipp Print 


Singapore 


Straus Times: 192738 
Previous: 194443 


1735 1739 
737 7^0 

453 453 

158 159 
852 856 
426 429 

11.60 11.7? 
135 1.87 

5.17 5.29 

B50 875 
455 162 

67J 178 

732 7.^ 

4 402 
JJ4 436 
7J>7 735 

490 493 
5.96 5.96 

3.15 123 
17JS 17/47 
432 432 

740 737 


412 
5.11 
3.96 
426 
1735 
7J9 
160 
251 
157 
437 
1151 
137 
SJ2 
163 
458 
475 
812 
405 
M3 7 
734 
496 
6.13 
3.18 
1745 
435 
7/46 


Power Rn' 
OuebworB „ 
Rogers Comm B 

Royal BkCda 


Oslo 

Aker A 

BergesenthrA 
ChnsSania Bk 
Den itorske Bk 
EKan 
HakhmtA 
KvoemerAsa 
Norsk Hydro 
NanlwSkoflA 
NyamedA 
OMaAsaA 
Pettrn DeoSvc 
Pettar A 


S0'4 5060 50.90 
.. . 2 r« 27*c 2735 

3740 3740 37M 3711 

43/40 4340 43.J) 43.70 
1040 1105 1115 18'i 

32'^ 33': 32'r 

38'M 3860 3930 
34.S 34« 34** 
2030 7080 2095 
115 17.95 1110 18J0 
1.95 3850 38W 3835 

3t* 36tt 36 1 : 3695 

2690 2640 2619 26.90 

9.10 9 9.10 930 

64 'a 63.45 6180 64.70 


DBX index: 697 J2 

PreMeuSi 70135 



DBS Lam 

FisserlNeave 

Hiuind' 

JonJ Moihesn " 
Jart Strategic ■ 
Keppd A 
Kernel Bank 
KappelFeta 
Kernel Land 
OCBC foreign 
OS Union BkF 
Parkway Hdgs 
Sembawan 


Traiemcean Oft 
Storebrand Asa 


1X7J0 

125 

126JD 

127 JO 

19SJ0 

197 

198 

198 

27 70 

2460 

25 

24 JO 

30J0 

2900 

2900 

30 

133 

127 

129 

131 

45 

44 

44 

45 

397 

390 

395 

396 

430 

424 43 7 JO 

428 

268 

261 

262 

269 

163 

161 

161 

161 

588 

SO 

568 

585 

480 

462 

464 

464 

154 

151 

151 

156 

122 

110 

119 

122 

670 

670 

670 

670 

53JQ 

53 

53 

5150 


SStStr 

Sing Tedt Ind 
SlngTeteconta 
Tat Lot Bank 
VMhidirsmd 
UtaDSea BkF 
tMngTaiHdgs 

’in US dates. 


500 

500 

500 

SJO 

5J5 

5JQ 

505 

5J0 

10.90 

10.10 

1000 

11 

1030 

905 

1000 

10/40 

SJ8 

006 

006 

008 

1600 

160Q 

1430 

1700 

412 

402 

404 

400 

9.15 

800 

9 

MO 

110 

104 

no 

118 

7.95 

700 

700 

7.95 

378 

lw 

166 

178 

50S 

5JS 

5.90 

6 

304 

304 

304 

304 

402 

394 

402 

3.92 

418 

410 

414 

130 

11J0 

1100 

1TJQ 

11.9D 

700 

7 JO 

7JS 

700 

640 

605 

6.40 

6J5 

6.25 

605 

6.15 

M5 

13 

1170 

1180 

1110 

7.10 

6.95 

7.10 

7 

2130 

24 

2430 

24 JO 

172 

163 

2J4 

170 

124 

116 

2.17 

205 

206 

202 

202 

207 

1.04 

1.01 

103 

106 

12.70 

1240 

1260 

13 

152 

340 

3.48 

3J4 


Stockholm sxHjgKxaiM 


AGAB 

ABB 


Astra A 
Altai Copco A 
Autoliv 


113 11150 112 11350 

10950 10750 10? Ill 

240 236 236 240 

132 ‘ 129 130 13350 

249 246 247 _ 251 

314 312 313 31650 



NiU» 22* 1828207 


Prindws: 1870477 

1100 

1060 

1070 

1090 

712 

705 

705 

714 

3500 

844 


35UU 

824 

3580 

848 

599 

586 

586 

609 

933 

915 

922 

951 

2150 

2110 

213U 

2160 

523 

517 

522 

W4 

7810 


2800 

781U 

3520 

3410 

3480 

356U 

2060 

2040 

2050 

2060 

1990 

1970 

1980 

1980 

2650 

Tiro 

3610 

2670 

750 

738 

738 

750 

1390 

586 

IB 

1360 

980 

1400 

1370 

I.UU 

1370 

1450 

697 

686 

690 

700 

6790a 

6450a 

6530a 

6&20a 

2880 

2890 

7HM) 

2B7Q 

5690a 

5600a 


U9lla 

7490 

2400 

74011 

2510 

4940 

4810 


4940 

140 

1440 

1460 

1490 

4800 

4730 

4730 

4U» 

1460 

1440 

1490 

1460 

1180 

1150 

1150 

1190 

1050 

11)40 

1090 

1060 

3810 

3740 

3770 

3840 

1570 

1550 

1530 

1590 

365 

351 

352 

464 

493 

481 

41 

904 

6400 

*9sn 

6340 

6390 

900 

490 

496 

495 

9480a 

VErifl 

94I0Q 

94300 

3100 

3070 

3020 

3130 

610 

600 

600 

*19 

7230 

2190 

2200 

2220 

1670 

1690 

1660 

16H0 

455 

490 

455 

4,91 

27fl 

270 

270 

2/8 

686 

680 

682 

690 

1070 

1030 

1050 

1100 

166 

167 

164 

166 

751 

730 

nu 

751 

475 

8140 


455 

8110 

472 

R3?0 

TWO 

1990 

3000 

2020 

572 

554 

hM 

5/6 

423 

418 

418 

473 

7060 

2010 

Tim 

2010 

3770 

3700 

3730 

3R0U 

7WI 

3131 

2150 

2188 

1260 

1J4W 

1250 

1260 

1130 

312 

X 

1120 

300 

1130 

318 

5T4 

SO 6 

506 

519 

1651) 


1670 

1660 

776 

765 

767 

785 

695 

684 

686 

700 

1730 

inn 

1710 

1740 

964 

951 

958 

968 


The Trib Index 

Prces as d 3-00 P.M. New York wow” 

Jan 1. 1992 m 10a 

Laval 

Chan go 

%ctungs 

ysartodats 
% change 

+13.57. 

World Index 

169.38 

■2^1 

-1.63 

Regional Indaxws 

Asla/Padffc 

119.28 

-2.79 

-2^9 

-3.36 

Europe 

180.99 

-1.14 

-0.63 

+12.28- 

N. America 

201.69 

-3.56 

-1.73 

+24.57 

S. America 
Uutouwrtol Mans 

159.13 

-8.12 

—4,86 

+39.06 

Capital goods 

218.55 

-1.59 

-0.72 

+Z7.87 

Consumer goods 

183.74 

-2.77 

-1.49 . 

+13.82 

Energy 

196.96 

-4.02 

-2.00 

+15.38 

Finance 

126.15 

■2.10 

-1.64 

+8.32- 

Miscellaneous 

181.14 

-2.51 

-1.37 

+11.97.. 

Raw Materials 

182.83 

-3.75 

-2.01 

+425- 

Service 

159.93 

-3.64 

-2.23 

+16.47 ‘ 

Uniities 

165.13 

-3.99 

-2.30 

+15.11- 

The tmemabonalHenM Tribune WMd Stock inoexO tracks trie US. dorior values oi 
280 /ntemotfonafy tovestabto stocks from 25 countries. Formers information, a fro 0 , 
booklet « flva*rW3 by writing fo The Trib tndex.181 Avenue Charles OeGauBe. 

82521 Nauity CeOex. France. Compiteri by Bloomberg News. 

High 

Law Oom Prev. 


High Low 

Oom Prey. 


MltsuFudasn 
Mitsui Trust 
MurataMfg 
NEC 

NOAoSCC 

N*an 
Nintendo 
Nlpp Era less 
NtoponOI 
Nippon Sletd 
Nbsao Motor 

NKK 

Nomura 5ec 
NTT 

NTT Dote 
Ofl Paper 
i Gas 


Rohm 

Satan Bk 

Saniya 

SanwaBairk 

Sanyo EtoC 

Secom 

5elbuRwv 

Se«ad Orem 

Soldsui House 

Seven-Eleven 

snare 

Shikoku ElPwr 
Shimizu 

SfeHjssaCh 

Shfeekto 

SMinokaBk 

Softbank 

Sony 

5wnUDfno 
Surnltano Bk 
Swnlt Own 
Sutnltamo Bee 
SimrtlMehd 
Sumtf Trust 
Tohho PTramr 
Take* Own 
TDK 

Tnhatar ElPwr 
Total Bant 
Tofuo Marine 
Tdcyo ElPwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Go* 
Tokyo Carp. 
Town 

ToppanPibM 
Tanry Ind 


Tuny Im 
Toshiba 
Tostem 
Taya Trust 
Toyota Mn«r 
YantarwucW 
a: Jt UXkb:x 1.000 


1390 
591 
5220 
1370 
2070 
525 
10500 
803 
520 
W 
713 
194 
1550 
lOfifflr 
529Sb 
601 
' 288 
1690 
13300 
699 
3RK 
1SB0 
424 
8400 
5640 
1000 
1130 
8910 
1150 
1990 
606 
3710 
7100 
1270 
5490 
11100 
945 
1740 
461 
1730 
287 
1210 
ms 

3530 

9780 

1990 

1020 

1360 

2280 

6900 

296 

620 

1170 

1740 

769 

67B 

im 

998 

3350 

3050 


1340 1350 
5® 591 

5240 5270 

1350 1360 

1960 1990 

513 520 

1C«HI 10000 
765 795 

. 510 514 

290 290 

697 703 

190 194 

1530 1550 

1060b 1060b 
5260b 5280b 
588 591 

283 284 

1660 1670 

12900 13900 
678 685 

3760 3790 

1550 1540 
418 418 

8300 8320 

53JJ 5330 
993 994 

1120 1130 

0770 BHDS 
1130 1150 

1970 »970 
590 594 

3120 3170 
2050 2060 

1360 1360 

5350 5400 

107H) 11000 
925 926 

1700 1700 

449 450 

1700 1710 

275 280 

1190 1190 

3970 3985 

3430 3450 

9700 9710 

1970 I960 

lOQD 1000 
133B 1340 
2260 227U 

6800 6850 

290 290 

608 609 

lies 1120 

1700 1710 

760 761 

STB 675 
2460 2«9® 
970 WO 
3260 3380 

3000 3070 


1400 

583 

5400 

1380 

1970 

523 
10700 

801 

524 
296 
?30 
192 
1570 

1100b 

S3J0b 

601 

286 

1700 

13600 

704 

3850 

1570 

422 

8440 

5650 

1010 

1130 

8910 

1140 

1980 

610 

3210 

2070 

1270 

5490 

11300 

960 

im 

462 
1790 
283 
1230 
2960 
3540 
9840 
1990 
1030 
1380 
2 27» 
6960 
398 
624 
1190 
17 m 
77B 
685 
2510 
1000 
3350 
3060 


Toronto 

AbiNbICoas. 
Alberto Energy 
Alan Alum 
AndenanExpi 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nmro Scotia 
BanfcfcGaid 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
Btochem Phturn 
Bomba rtfeer B 
Cameco 
□BC 

On Natl Rail 
CdnNatKes 
Cdn Ocdd Pet 
Cdn pacWc 

CcmJnaj 

Dohuco 
Doratar 
Donohue A 
DuPontCdaA 
EdperBrauan 
EuioNev Mng 
FaWtaFinl 
Faleonbndge 
Fletcher OwflA 
Franco Nevada 
GuttCda Ras 
Imperial 0* 

Inca 

IPLEn 


Loevwn Group 
MaanUlBldi 
Magna MIA 


TSE ladntriato <71447 
PreviMK 476946 

2.145 

2245 

3214 

23'a 

31 

3090 

31 

31.20 

4BJ0 

48 

48.10 

48.7V 

1790 

1/711 

17 JO 

1785 

53.15 

53,70 

5110 

53 

60.R& 

6040 

6UJ5 

tSLW 

3145 

29.60 

V9.VU 

1045 

40.70 

3900 

40 

aOVi 

34.35 

xi av 

3tlS 

34.45 

3840 

J 8 

3840 

4(1 

771* 

27Vi 

2705 

2740 

4* 3k 

4515 

46 

45V 

3705 

37.10 

370U 

37.90 

70'* 

69.15 

TUta 

69.90 

40W 

3940 

SO'u 

:»'« 

3700 

37 

37'^ 

37.15 

41 

6015 

6045 

40.W 

.1605 

3.US 

30M 

36’* 

27H 

27.05 

2/'4 

27.15 

m 

11V* 

1145 

114U 

m 

3360 

.131* 

12V 

.13 

33t* 

33 

33 


mu 

23 k 

23Vt 

21 

2200 

22V 

2205 

394 

m 

394 

m<b 

2545 

2440 

250(1 

34.90 

21h 

23 

2105 

21110 

11 

n 

31.15 

31 1* 

11.70 

11J5 

11J5 

m 

7705 

7600 

7601.1 

7700 

3700 

36.68 

36V 

3/JU 

5340 

5,170 

5105 

5145 

21.70 

20 . m 

2D.9U 

3115 

47.15 

4140 

41V 

42 

1760 

17 

1745 

17.1 II 

97.60 

951* 

9600 

9745 

m 

1100 

1105 

1145 


Mum 

Nat* ridge Net 
Nanurdalne 
Normr Energy 
Nthem Tefacam 
Nora 
Onex 

Poncdn Pettrn 
PetroCda 
Placer Dame 
Paco Pettm 
Potash Swk 
Ranabamnce 
Rio Algorn 
Rogers Cartel B 
Seagram Co 
Sheficdo A 
Suncor 

Tateman Eny 
TKkB 
TafeuWbe 
Tetus 

Thomson 
TorDom Bank 
Transn#a 
TronsCdo Pipe 
Trimark Finl 
TriucHahfl 
TVXGaM 
WerdaiastEny 
Weston 


29k. 

75.15 

26J5 

3000 

133 

11.65 

32-48 

25U 

24.60 

22.10 

1300 


29-40 29.15 
7605 7A» 

26J5 26^ 

3705 3155 

135.70 13105 

1105 11,60 
3240 32 '* 

25"* 2 S'* 

2400 2405 
22J0 2100 
1195 13te 

107.20 106.15 106.15 
3045 3505 35JC 
30 JO 30H 30-30 
36V> 36 26V» 

47.ro 47 47/15 

2205 2255 2205 

47 4665 4690 
4805 47Ni 48 
2S.15 m 241a 

48 479J 4700 

2805 2065 2800 

32.70 32V< 32^8 

4190 43^8 4305 
17/45 IT* 17.33 
264 2655 2665 
6900 69 6940 

31.40 31U: 3105 

7.10 4.90 7 

2840 28-20 2030 
107 98W 107 


2900 

7695 

2605 

3714 

136 

1100 

3240 

25JD 

24>* 

2205 

1190 

107% 

35.05 

ras. 

263* 

4740 

72'* 
4705 
48Vr 
25.15 
4015 
2800 
3216 
44 
1705 
261* 
69 JO 
3105 
7 

2055 

9SV4 


Vienna 

Bo wder-Ud deh 
CredBonsI PW 
EA^enunfl 
EVN 

RugrtofentMen 

OMV 

OMEfeUU 
V A Stahl 
VATech 
WlenertrergBim 


ATX Ind cc 1337.19 
ff nWMW l l373.lt 

1000 96150 968100205 

634 619-10 623 JO 641 JO 
3070293125 2955 3090 
1520 1493 1504 1530 

490 479 JO 48X45 490® 
1756 1730 1730177195 

871 JD 864 870.70 869 JO 
538 50X50 507.90 531 JO 
2375 2330 2355 2398 

2544 2487 JO 2492 2520 


Wellington 


4J0 4.16 4.18 405 

109 107 108 109 

305 130 105 303 

4.50 4.43 4 JO 409 

6*2 603 662 606 

1.96 104 1.95 1.94 


AlrNZeafdB 
Briefly hurt 
Carter Ha# art 
FMchChBldfl 
HerchChEny 

Fkfch Or Fwri ... .... .... 

ReichCh Paper 105 303 303 109 


Lton Hattran 
THecaaiNZ 
iVBsarr Horton 


302 178 300 175 

703 7J6 702 7 JO 

NT. NT. KT. 11 JO 


Zurich 

ABBB 

Adecco B 

AlusubseR _ 

AresrSeronoB 

AMR 

BaerHdgB 

BakrtseHIdgR 

BKVUon 

OnSpecChnn 

OaitanlR 

W Suisse GpR 

EleUrawaitB 

Eihs-Chemie 

ESECHdg 

HoiderOankS 

UecMemtLBB 

Nestle 

NowytteR 

Qerfikn BuehR 

rOSyewJ tod 

PharmVlsnB 

RtohemornA 

HrelBPC 

RodwHdgPC 

58CR w 

SchWterPC 

SGSB 

SMHB 

SUzerR 

Swiss Reins R 

Stor Group R 

UBSB 

WVnarthwR 

ZunchAssurR 


SPIlndec 3412.27 

Previous: 345009 


2137 

558 

1318 
' 2410 
842 
2060 
1990 
1040 
141.75 
1080 
181 JO 
S36 
6B00 
4320 
1283 
580 
1802 
2130 
17BJ0 
I82S 
870 
1980 
32B 
12895 
162 
1930 
2675 
870 
1004 
2003 
1805 
1497 
1315 
583 


2095 

535 

1290 

.2350 

840 

2040 

1930 

1010 

139 

1053 

17575 

535 

6730 

4280 

1245 

580 

1768 

2080 

177 

1803 

860 

1900 

320 

12600 

355 

1880 

2600 

858 

972 

1976 

1771 

1472 

1270 

570 


2115 2153 
535 563 

1298 1 330 
2410 2415 
840 847 

2045 2070 

1940 2005 
1040 ioa 
141.75 141 JO 
1040 1097 
180 JO 178 

535 525 

6800 6800 
4200 4320 
1270 1266 
580 584 

1789 1815 
2094 2145 
178 178 

1803 1825 
869 880 

TO 2000 
325 325 

12690 12950 
358 354 

1910 1942 
2634 2602 
B6Q B77 
976 1008 
1993 2021 
1800 1828 
1495 1494 
1305 1293 
583 588 

















































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRUftlNE, WED NESDAY SEPTEMBER 2*. 1W 

INTEBIVATiONAL ffKRATJ* TRIBUNE, FRID AY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 


PAGE 3 


PAGE 19 




J4VU PV, 

I pi lira 

w 

II 

sa S'" 

Mi) <1 

m buj. 

jVm Ittn 

am* a 

SB*. 7SW 

Si liv, 

HA W! 

3* % 


Si: 

. ft-kj 

7*fc« _ 

3» ‘ J»W 4ri 
S'l w«. .ita 

g*. R3 

in. iti) <n 

ll*. 7 A. 

V. & 

VC*. 14V. -V. 

©■„ & -ft 

?7k ». .v. 

SI &• .-£ 

mi .n. .v. 

IMfVl IK ,|l. 
Ml. J7I. -V. 


r ■’w r 


a, *3 _ 

•2 *5 n 

fi fi ffi 

.17 IS U 

a j a 

« ij ii 

S 3 fi 

>40 U 14 
SAM 

S i * 

|g! 

lii! 

S8 d = 

8 3 : 

ih a : 

$ 9 ? 
*9 l 

1 n 
Bl _ so 
M l 3 ll 
I VI ll ~ 


i2 3 a 
** “ * 

» « g 

« a 

JO 14 3J 

JB 35 Jo 
IB U - 
i!T» 14 - 

fi 3 - 

iSS r 

: 

S fi ll 

s i* i* 

.« 15 0 

7 

.Ml 13 - 

S 'i 

5 il 

a p 
S8 i 
8 

i H 55 a 

6 a a 

i>n ae n 
,* 73 W 

'« ? ” 

3 S a 

1 “ ® 
1 H i 

j5 3 fl 

a 8? 

ifi » = 
■fi U r 


d? 3 ^ 
1 T! 
S »! « 

1.19 74 S 

4 'I S 
? « 8 

^ g 

1441 73 IS 

£13? 

,4* " g 

1M 

Sfl B 
fl fl g 

. - 27 
- I* 
JO U - 

s ti I 

% of - 
*'* 8 
d 4 | 

30 1 1 7 

,34 7A 


•f » 1 

140 14 1W 

’IB 


*18 ■ SB 


44 I4«fc 

: '!& 


*5 H - JU 

’fils 

as «cjj| 

8 ft 

ll# 


Pi# 

a J? ft*. 


fe g 

WR» 

ll 

g£ #5 

«* 77V. 


MO 14V. 

l tit 
£ 


18 fi " & gS 

fi ■* | .'I h 
13 8 1 11 
ii! is 

l|i?| 

* 11 z ^ ^ 
ZM I0J I ]4 Jr* 

’il § o 

we ; II 

1 47 si § 1 fie jiS* 


11? 


UR 

Si 
* oS 


« s s ,| IE 

,«s 21 

58 j 3 5 i ft 

JAa u . Mini 

«■ 4l = ^ lijl 

aoi 

liSJI 

M 73 E ^ K 
jb 3 £ -! J?e 71 W. 

i||i| 

’3 fl 3 i §8 

iS ? 3 1 1 

Si 5 31 


!i « 

□ fl vn« 


^ s 
^ *'S 

2 JH ■VR | 


nig 


B - 
£6 


■*!? JS rt 

; S 

S iJ is 

“ 8 
»K 7^ f 

4 y 1 
8rr 

«- J M j 


“s n st 
li : 


Pi 

S %: S 
E 

4707 37 2s* 

ii'I 

iff" § 

IIP 


ff* *2 

now -V. 

1 ss a 
W .s 

47* 

r .5 


J - I*l£ 

j JO© ^ Tg ^ 

liflf 

lilli 

iniiff 

Jtd 1 afim 


I I ' f 1 

Am 

: Jill 

lJS 1 £ 4 

^ s » 

* >j E I* 

im J K 13 

fi S a 2 

ijill 

!ll|j 

diji 

* h -.t li 

■| i 14°\ 

ft 

mi\ 

^5 A Z 

is § s ft ! 
*3 ’3 i 3 

Jt. a j? ^ 
Ifl » g ffi 

dfl ? ^ 

III ft- 

'23,i 

* » « ft 
Ja : 1 

.as = 3' 

' 4* si - S 


^ ill Og 

* '* fi 4 

[ ‘1h z A 

■* “ is « 

^iS?i 

^ Q Q ” § 

JO >3 “ fi 


IJ 


fill's * 
£E? 

111 


pF 

»Nh 

S' 1 sv 

2 .VW F>. 


7 S 1 a 


WAS IT THOSE HEADY 

VANILLA-SCENTED DAYS IN TAHITI? 
OR JUST SOME STRANGE MAGIC IN 
THE WOODWORK OF RAFFLES HOTEL? 

Either way, when Signor Gambicini and his bride-to-be ended their 
world tour in Singapore, they approached the concierge with an urgent 
request. They absolutely, definitely, simply had to be married before 
the end of the week. One glance at the bonfires raging in those dark 
Mediterranean eyes and the concierge knew that here was a passion 
that would brook no denial. “I’ll attend to it," he murmured. And then, 
whilst summoning up his strength to maintain the calm composure for 
which he was famous, he launched into a spate of frenetic activity. 
Phone calls were made to Milan, London and Paris. Guest lists drawn 
up. Air tickets arranged. Even a church was found in Singapore with an 

Italian speaking priesL Cupid himself could not have done 

better. So, finally, as the la* P eai of weriding bells 

faded on the evening air, ( tfjggggH J a question was put to the 
redoubtable conderge. Did these tireless ministrations 

of the past week indicate the presence of a romantic streak 

lurking beneath that carefully composed exterior? The concieige considered 
for a moment, then casually flicked a sliver of confetti from his tunic 
‘Let's just say," he smiled, ‘that I’m a great fan of Luciano Pavarotti. 

A RAFFLES INTERNATIONAL HOTEL 
Rdfle. VW. I Beach MSiw«t IWfc7J.Tet (6S) »37 1886. Fax: I65)33^76». Inirmtt aHeril [ -dfi t ne.4B 


D* VM PE MfcM* Ua U« CW» 


M ll fi IS jSv 

MB*!®? 


4 i> 


- * as % 

& 8 - sra as 


2 j gjji 

HO 34 77 3*3 W* 

ip 

43S- a5 - J gJS 

JlH "8 «S 

’j| H 8 J 

mw 

- ? J 3£ 


n, VM PE MfcH 


LIB 13 H 4*1 


M I 

M = 4 
a : *a 


S = J.iv. 

bn 

B i Hflfe 


di' tfi : 

«a 40 - 


U0 *3 r gf 

!fji 

si s j 

Is? i 
*“•1 
18 !J 
iSi 1 

W M 8 

si !i 

14 3 | 

31 8 I 

JBf IJ *1 4g 

BS =» 

S 3 i 4 .. 


I air 



B 

t* 

I5£k f* 
IM g S 

sl 

€% 
£ ip 

£b 

ift 

g g 

47*^ iS? 

fin ^ 

S S! 


S3 B 

ll 


avi w 

st st 


nm ive i 

ja £i 

BE! 


% £ 


«i Bl 

•h 


18 = 


Su M 
ng ** 

it II * 

a s* ® .« 


a »*i»vi 
, U 1 } ti S * 55 . 


iij! || 
as Big 


: 

toil = 

su 4.1 r 

,J 4K » 


3 S » S 

fi H » 3 „ 

igi “ S !S? «* 

*» :^fc 

“ a S 'S 

ZM M 11 .IBM 


an u li idw 

* « ; i 

1311 


ii « H 


S fci 5 w » K. 
a -% 

ilOft 

dilft 


s fi j 

no it & 


■*» «J£H 
1 H - II t S 


1 JB ID JU mi iT 

oi al B 17® ^ 

4» i» 3 an S » 

11 1 1| I 

I S 1 Jfil § 

irik 

as la }| H ^ ^2* 

* « l 4fi # 
•I 8 ■ «C I 


4 9 


*« a ■ s 


piMgf 
s “ : sS^g ft 

' u ” S 1) sSi Hi 


SB ’18 















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 199: 



Outlook 
Cloudy 
For Rio 
Unto 

CaKpMhtOw Staff Firm ttqmtn 

LONDON — Rio 
Tinto PLC, tiie world’s 
biggest mining com- 
• pany, posted a 7.8 per- 
cent rise in first-half 
profit Thursday but said 
die .recent financial tur- 
moil in Asia was cloud- 
ing its expectations for 
strong demand for min- 
erals and metals. 

Rio Tinto, which has 
mines on six continents, 
had a net profit of $595 
minion for the first six 
mouths of 1997 and said 
the modest rise in earn- 
ings hid an improved 
performance among its 
major metals operations 
— copper, aluminum, 
iron ore and coal — in a 
period that saw little 
change in prices. 

Sales in the half rose 
14.2 percent, to S4.57 
billion. 

Rio Unto blamed non- 
mining costs, including 
write-offs for repairing 
its Kennecott copper 
smelter in the United 
States and for its group 
pension plan, for inhib- 
iting profit. 

It also said a recent re- 
structuring of its world 
empire to de-emphasize 
regional offices in favor 
of its London headquar- 
ters would help lift full- 
year profit by around $60 
million. 

Rio Tinto said full- 
year profit would be 
buoyed by an expected 
profit of about S 1 00 mil- 
lion on the sale of what is 
said to be the world's 
biggest zinc deposit. 
Century, in northern 
Australia. 

Rio Tinto said it would 
keep its dividend un- 
changed at 16.5 cents a 
share. Rio Tinto shares 
closed Thursday in Lon- 
don at 998 pence, 

(S 15.82), down 29. 
(Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


Thailand’s Rules Rankle Foreign Investors 


By Thomas Crampton 

W ft» rhe Henild Tribune 


BANGKOK — A Thai economic 
recovery will not be possible if the 
government continues to undermine 
•the trust of foreign investors, bankers 
and analysts said. 

While some of Thailand’s neigh- 
bors. such as Malaysia and Indonesia, 
have softened their stance against for- 
eign investors. Thailand is taking the 
opposite tack, they said. 

On Monday , the Bank of Thailand 
said foreigners would not be allowed 
to hold a majority stake in Thai fi- 
nancial institutions for more than five 
years. 

“Wouldn’t it be advisable to make 
it clear that foreigners are welcome in 
the country at this time?” asked 
Bruno Schricke. country manager of 
ABN-AMRO Bank Thailand. 

Since Thailand let its currency, the 
baht, float freely against the dollar 
July 2, currencies across the region 
have rumbled, pulling stock markets 


down with diem, and many countries 
have blamed foreign speculators. 

But last week, Indonesia relaxed 
limitations on foreign ownership of 
public companies, and Malaysia this 
week announced budget cuts and other 
measures to tiy to smooth its transition 
from a period of high growth to one of 
more moderate expansion. 

In Thailand, however, a constitu- 
tional crisis and opaque policy mea- 
sures are driving investors away, 
some economists and analysts say. 

“Thai financial institutions need 
foreign help in terms of management 
and for fresh money to raise capital,” 
said Arpom Chewakrengkrai, chief 
economist here for Deutsche Morgan 
Grenfell. But she said foreign par- 
ticipation was unlikely if the restric- 
tions announced by Thailand this 
week remained in place. 

Bankers in the middle of nego- 
tiating deals in Thailand say the new 
rules contradict the spirit of a decree 
issued in late June mat lifted the 25 
percent limit on foreign ownership. 


Placing no upper limit. Finance Min- 
ister Tbanong Bhidaya said increased 
levels of foreign ownership — up to 
100 percent — would be considered 
on a case-by-case basis. 

“It is ironic that Thailand wel- 
comes foreign capital to bail out the 
finance sector but expects foreigners 
to sell out within five years, when 
there is no guarantee of any returns,” 
said Barry Yates, head of regional 
research at Seamico Securities. 

David Proctor, president of the For- 
eign Bankers Association and country 
manager here for Bank of America, 
said bankers also were concerned 
about apparently arbitrary guarantees 
given to creditors of some finan cial 
institutions that were shut down, os 
well as about treatment of foreign 
creditors. 

But it is not just Thailand's finan- 
cial system that is making foreigners 
feel less welcome. An amended ver- 
sion of the new Alien Business Law 
that was leaked to foreign executives 
appears to .close a loophole that al- 


Australian Dollar Falls on Jobs Data 


OnirtlrJ h-. <_W Svt! Fn-m Oapatrhr' 

SIDNEY — The unemployment 
rare stayed at 8.7 percent in August, 
the government announced Thursday, 
sending the Australian dollar lower 
and leaving financial markets calling 
for another cut in interest rates to 
stimulate the economy. 

The government said the number of 
jobs shrunk by 38,200 in August, sur- 
prising analysts, who generally had 
forecast an increase of at least 20.000. 
The report was a setback to hopes that 
a long-awaited recovery had finally 
taken hold, as it showed instead that 
total employment was at its lowest 
level in 1 1 months. 


“That one number has wiped out 
all the signs of growth on the em- 
ployment side over the last few 
months,” said Stephen Roberts, chief 
economist at UBS Australia. 

Employment Minis ter Amanda 
Vanstone insisted that the government 
was still on track to meet its forecast of 
2 percent growth in employment in the 
1997-99 period, but she also showed 
signs of mis (ration at bow long the 
pickup was taking. 

“I feel like a farmer that's watching 
the clouds and saying, ‘This drought 
is going to break,' " she said. 

The central bank cut its target rate 
for overnight bank lending by 0.5 


, on July 

'iO to try'to'stimnlate employment. It 
was the Reserve Bank's fifth such cut 
in 14 months. 

Australia’s unemployment rate has 
been above 8 percent since 1990. 

The U.S. dollar rose to 1 .3854 Aus- 
tralian dollars from 13755 dollars 
Wednesday. The Australian currency 
has fallen more than 8 percent this 
year as interest rates have tumbled. 

Stock prices in Sydney finished 
marginally lower, with the Australian 
Stock Exchange's benchmark index, 
the All Ordinaries index, easing 0.70 
point to 2,665.80. 

f Reuters . AFP. Bloomberg ) 


Bankrupt Dainong Group to Be Dissolved 


Bloomberg Sen s 

SEOUL — Dainong Group, a tex- 
tile maker reeling from S 1 .5 billion in 
debts, w ill be dissolved by a Seoul 
court in what could be a' test case 
among South Korea’s growing roster 
of bankrupt companies. 

The group's application for court 
receivership Thursday followed a de- 
mand by its creditors, led by Seoul 
Bank, for a solution to its crisis. 

The court and creditors will over- 
see the sale of all the group's busi- 
nesses except its Midopa Co. depart- 


ment-store unit. Management would 
ger a chance to turn around the high- 
end retailer, whose debts are now 
frozen by creditors. 

It is the first time in South Korean 
history that a major conglomerate has 
been broken down by creditors while 
the owning family has kept part of it. 
Creditors have for months tried to save 
the group, fearing its bankruptcy would 
lead to still more problems for the 
economy. 

“Compromise is the only way out of 
this current mess,” said Kim In Gey, 


who manages a S100 million fund for 
Daefaan Investment Trust Co. A com- 
plete breakup “would have too grave 
political consequences.” he said. 

A Dainong spokesman said the 
group would be reborn as a “smaller 
but more focused” retailing specialist. 

Shares in Dainong and Midopa 
were suspended by the Korea Stock 
Exchange, but trading in Midopa re- 
sumed after Dainong blocked 
Midopa 's application for court pro- 
tection. Midopa shares tumbled 7.9 
percent to close at 4.190 won <S4.60). 


The IHT Pocket Diary 
Fits In The Palm 
Of Your Hand. 



Year after year — even at a period when 
diaries abound— the International Herald 
Tribune flat, silk-grain leather diary is the hit of 
the season. 

Ingeniously designed to be thinner-than- 
thin, it still brings you every thing... including a 
built-in note pad with always-available jotting- 
paper Plus there are conversion tables of 
weights, measures and distances, a list of 
national holidays by country, a wine vintage 
chart , and many other useful facts. All in this 
incredibly flat little book that slips easily into a 
pocket. 

The perfect gift for ahnost anyone... 
including yourself. 

- Please allow three weeks for delivery. 


Please send me 1998 IHT Pocket Diaries. 

I Price includes initials, packing and postage in Europe. 
1 1-1 diaries UK £22 <U.S.$35i each 

5-9 diaries UK £2030 (U.S.S32) each 
| 10-19 diaries UK £18 tU.S.$28> each 


INITIALS 
up to 3 per diar> 


•Measures iSxScmlS^xJio.). 

• Black leather cover 
with gilt metal corners. 

• Personalized with gilt initials. 

• Week-ai- a-glance format, printed on 

French blue paper with gilded page 
edges. 

• 1998 notable dates and national 
holidays in over 90 countries: world 
time-zone table: international telephone 
dialing codes and country prefixes: 
conversion tables of weights, sizes, 
measures and distances. 
• Blue ribbon page marker. 
• Includes removable address 
book that fits snugly into its own silk 
ptxkeL No need to re-write your most 
important phone numters — the 
address book will fit right into next 
year '5 diary. 

• Each diary packed in a blue gift box. 

• Corporate personalization and 

discounts are available. 
For details, fax Paul Baker at 
(44-181)9448243 
or E-mail: pBulbaker@bdntemef.com 



I □ Additional postage outside Eurooe £430 tU.S.$7). 

! D beck here for delivery outside Europe bv registered or 
j certified mail: £5.75 ( U.S.S9.20 J per package plus postage. 

Payment is by credit card only. AD major cards accepted. 
■ Please charge to my credit card: 

| □ Access Q Amex d Diners O Eorocard HU MasterCard CH Visa 


CardN^ 

Exp 

Name 

Address_ 


.Signature . 


I City/Code/Country, 


Tel ./Fax , 


I 
I 

| Company EU VAT ID N° 


< FOR CORPORATE PURCHASES ) 


12-9-97 


• Blue notepaper sheets fit on 
the back of the diary — a 
simple pull removes top sheet 
100 refill sheets included. 


I 


“ a l 


Htratt^Srilmuc. 

TaEB WmisiH mwBftfa 

Mail or fax this order form to: 
International Herald Tribune Offers. 

37 Lambton Road, London SW20 0LW U.K. 
Fax: (44 181)944 8243. 

E-mail: paulbaker@ bli niemei.com 


lowed foreigners to control the man- 
agement of Thai companies. 

Concern about the new law, which 
could tighten restrictions on almosi 
all foreign joint-venture investments, 
has pushed the Joint Foreign Cham- 
bers of Commerce to complain to the 
commerce minister and the Board of 
Investment 

■ Taiwan Eases Investing 

Taiwan’s central bank loosened 
rales Thursday to encourage foreign 
investment in Taiwan stocks after a 
record capital outflow this month, 
Bloomberg News reported. 

Foreign equity investors took 
S395.7 million out of Taiwan in the 
first nine days of September, surpass- 
ing a - record of 5392 million set in 
May, the central bank said. 

Patrick I Jang , deputy governor of 
die central bank, aid foreign insti- 
tutions p lannin g to invest S50 million 
or less in Taiwan stocks no longer 
needed approval from the central 
bank. 


Bank of Tokyo 
Forecasts Loss 
Over Write-Offs 

CnupM ty Oar Dojxsrwi 

TOKYO — Bank of Tokyo- 
Mitsubishi Ltd. said Thursday h 
expected to post a consolidated 
pretax loss of 750 billion yen 
(S6.28 billion) for the year end- 
ing in March, largely on write- 
offs of nonperforming loans. 

The company, the world’s 
largest banking concern in terms 
of assets, said it planned to write 
off 1 .2 trillion yen in the first half, 
which would result in the full-year 
loss. The write-off includes as 
much as 100 billion yen in aid to 
Nippon Trust Bank Ltd., the smal- 
lest of Japan's seven mist banks. 

The move was a “clear sign” 
that Bank of Tokyo-Miisubishi 
plans a “decisive solution of the 
bad-debt problem on a group 
basis.” said Koyo Qzeki asso- 
ciate director ai die European 
credit-raring company LBCA Ltd. 

Tokyo-Mitsubishi’eariier fore- 
cast a full-year pretax profit of 
190 billion yen on operating In- 
come of 5.5 trillion yen. and a net 
profit of 70 billion yen. 

Bank of Tokyo shares fell 30 
yen to close at 2.130. Nippon 
Trust rose 1 to 320. The an- 
nouncement came after the close 
of trading. iAFP. Bloomberg} 


Investor’s Asia 


Hons Kong 
Hang Seng 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 2^ 


Singapore 

Shafts Tunes. 

23JG — — ~ " 

21000— — ; — . 




'A M J J A S 
1937 


Exchange 
Hang Kong 


index 


fEOOGi 

®r«TjTf; JAS 

1997 1 ”.. . 

J™- 


Hang Seng . . WWW 1 


Sydney 

Tokyo 


Sha fts Times ‘ 
AHOitgnaries 


Nikkei Z25 


1,927.68 : T, 944.63' -O-S? 


-2.66 &S0 -&ft3 
18,704,77 



Seoul 


9» TtS.lP ■ 3^45-18 433 


Manila 


PSE 


• ■■3^*30 g£1gJ7 . -3.05 


Jakarta 


index-, 555,34.. ; 575.Q2 ; . .^•28 


Wellington . NZSE-40 


Bombay 


Sensffltfe index 


Source: Taiekurs 


AjmtS T. 4,045^1 • .-&S8 

lucauiixul HcraM TnNae 


f 


\ i • 


Very briefly: 


• Credit Agricole Indosnez Bank in Bangkok filed a civil 
lawsuit seeking to require Alphatec Electronics Thai- 
land's largest memory-chip assembler, to repay an $8.2 mil- 
lion loan. The Thai company’s expansion plans have been set 
back by difficulties associated with the Thai economy. 

• Telewav Japan Corp^ a long-distance domestic telecom- 

munications operator, plans to issue new shares by March 31 
to allow Toyota Motor Corp. to take a stake of more than 50 
percent in the company. . 

• Commerzbank AG plans to increase its staff and sell A 
mutual funds in Japan. The bank, which acquired a license to 
manage pension funds in Japan in 1994 and now handles more 
than 400 billion yen ($3.36 billion) in such funds, expects to 
acquire by early next year a license to sell the funds. 

• Kia Group of South Korea said more than 6,000 workers 
had quit since the company was placed under bankruptcy-law 
protection in July. The exodus came after the government 
revised bankruptcy laws to cancel a bankrupt company s 
obligations to pay workers' severance packages before paying 
other debts. 

• India plans to sell a 20 percent stake in Gas Authority of 
India Ltd., lowering its share in the country's largest natural- 
gas company to around 70 percent. 

• Tokyo Telecommunications Network Co., a unit of Tokyo 
Electric Power Co., plans to start a local service beginning in 
January’ to rival Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. 

• Broken HOI Pty. said it would cut 800 jobs al five coal 
mines in eastern Australia over three years. 

• Japan's Finance Ministry said foreign baying of Japanese 
«n 1.25 trillion yen in June to 889 trillion 


securities shrank from 1.25 trillion yen _ _ 
yea in July. Japan's net purchases of foreign securities also 
declined in July, falling rrom 1.27 billion yen to 674 billion 
yen. the ministry said. 

• Two of Australia's largest casinos, the Crown in Mel- 
bourne and Bnrswood in Perth, said the currency turmoil in 
Southeast Asia had begun to harm their results, with gamblers 
coning their casino visits and spending. Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP 


TURMOIL: World Bank Details East Asia Risks 


Continued from Page 15 

liberalize markets in order to 
! achieve more competition ar.d 
less government intervention. 
Mr. Claessens said. The report 
called for improved corporate 
governance and disclosure of 
financial statistics in both the 
private and public sectors. 

“Equity markets in East 
Asia still lack transparency 
and play a Limited role in cor- 
porate governance where fam- 
ily control over firms often 
dominates,” the report said. 
“Better securities markets are 
needed because they can be a 
competitive force for improv- 
ing banking systems and be- 
cause banks and sec unties 
markets are complementary 
sources for finance.” 

The report described the 
currency turmoil since Thai- 
land floated the baht July 2. 
the “large-scale” financial 
crisis in Thailand, corporate 
failures in South Korea and 
World Bank fears about weak 
and poorly managed financial 
systems. 

The study urged East Asian 
governments to adopt inter- 
national standards in banking 


supervision and to improve 
capital adequacy require- 
ments and risk measurement 
techniques. 

The report also said that 
regulator}' and legislative 
frameworks in many East 
.Asian countries needed to be 
modernized, and it noted that 
Cambodia and Vietnam were 
only now introducing basic 
accounting standards. 

Indonesia, the Philippines 
and Thailand were described 
as having “extensive gaps” in 
their frameworks on regula- 
tions. supervising, accounting, 
auditing and disclosure rules. 

Mr. Claessens said that too 
many economies in East Asia 
had erected barriers to foreign 
financial service companies 
and should open their markets 
in the sector to gain better 
access to foreign capital. 

The report noted that some 
governments feared that 
lowering financial services 
barriers would have economic 
and financial sector implica- 
tions. including possibly lower 
profits for domestic firms. ‘ ‘If 
these political economy issues 
can be overcome," it said, 

‘ ‘further internationalization 


of financial services should 
occur and generate significant 
net benefits.” 

Asked to sum up the re- 
port’s recommendations, Mf. 
Claessens said, “We are re- 
commending that govern- 
ments in die region present to 
the public a consistent and 
credible financial sector re- 
form strategy.” 

While noting that reform 
cannot be done overnight, he 
said several governments 
were aware of the need to 
reform their systems. 

“We have seen in Indone- 
sia, Korea and Japan that they 
are increasingly aware of the 
need for good and efficient 
financial systems," he said. 

‘ ‘What countries now need to 
do is accelerate those trends 
and convince external in- 
vestors that they are commit- 
ted to a reform strategy.” 

■ Woes Forecast to Last 


t f 


i i 

■ i 

: i 


Resolution of the Board of Directors of 
Pharma/wHealth Management Company SJL 
concerning the Fund 
Pharma/wHeafth 
(W KN 973 0 39) 

^ ilh reference to article 3 of the management regulations of 
ihe fund and with the agreement of the custodian the 
depositary hank shall be entitled to receive out of the assets of 
the fund a custodian fee of 

$ 9.000 per month 
and 

0.015 %pUL 

calculated on the basis of the net assets at the end of each month 

The custodian fee is valuable from Julv 1. 1997 and is payable 
monthly. ' 

Unitholders, who do not agree therewith, can give back their 
unit# anytime. 

Lnxembonrg, July 1997 


The Power of Knowledge " v 

Knowledge of its markets combined with 
creative financial ability makes 
Rabobank International your natural partner. 


Rabobank international Corporate and Investment Bhnkinei 
9 Tel. (+31-30) 216 28 W. Fax 1+31-30) 216 19 76 


Rabobank 



Salomon Brothers Inc. said 
Thursday that it would take a 
few months for funds to begin 
flowing back into Southeast 
Asian markets following a 
shakeout across the region, 
with currency instability, 
likely to persist, Reuters re- 
ported from Hong Kong. 

“What we are seeing this 
year is a withdrawal of funds 
from the region," saidTrevor 
Rowe, chairman of Salomon 
Brothers Asia Pacific. 

Regional currencies were 
likely to remain fragile for 
some time yet, Mr. Rowe 
said. 

“That is going to lead to a 
weakening in GDP over the 
next 7 to 12 months as a result 
of high interest rates flowing 
from the currency instabil- 
lty, he said, referring to 
gross domestic product. 

Thailand and Malaysia re- 
main vulnerable, Mr. Rowe 
said, while Indonesia and the 
Philippines have better fun- 
damentals. j 

I t h i nk there should be 1 
opportunities in all these 
countries.” he said. “It is just 
~ of when they bottom 

Shares in much of South- 
east Asia took a beating 
Thursday. In Malaysia, the 

benchmark composite index 
tumbled 28.91 points, or3 35 
percent, to 834.17, while 

slid 28.88 points, or 3.28 ner- 
cent, to 556.14. ^ 

In the Philippines, the com- 
posite rad«Sll 67.48 points, 

P 610 * 01 , to 2.145 *>o v-‘ 
SjJ* Kong's Hang’ ^ 

497 8 id“ d?X Cnded do wn 
‘"7.14 points, or 3.36 ner 

cent, at 14,30830. P ^‘ 


i 1 


i'. * 





PAGES 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3*. 1997 


WfEDEMLCHprTALIHC 


M C0MGE5T PJ-1 


m T "eVWnotn Frontier Fung | 10*4 

M» FLEMING FUND 6IANAGEMEMT 

■ inrenwionni Eauffy Puna | mgr? 

“W?» EHE » 5 ™ LT5 

i> AiwHikntan Inwv u Stay I *1 0x1 

a Brramin mmacoSton 1 su) 

" LohHntwn IIDHI Co 5w» 
a (now WrtWCifcan 
<* Uattn Anne Earn rwta Pd 
Ameflean invM Co 
an inns, ca iieov 
» yrurton hnrou Cb Jew 
3 PHshinnuC 
i TetusnUM CB 
J 

•10 FORMULA GROUP 

J Formula Puna NY 5 I1L4J 

» PmidBMg Cummer 1 7i37fl 

■ FltoOMB Pwo rncomo S 10QJ15 

■ Prloatiwj Emiliy hbobb j ICO** 

* Fnteoerg Nest Jeatona 1 I06&97 

* PrtodDOTj GlMxnOPP Fd Ua i 116000 

MUD) 



> Atocjo USA Fund _ I IMJX 

J Aaaci a UM Crwvm Pima i IXMF 

rr CmmaoB Cap hn LM fJIMoWP 

J U«s investments A US V 13*Uflg 

» '^waaKtt lim LM UtiME 

* nuofea Fund Ltd I «1 tl 

■ tE Piiefi group ms lw sinuaoiE 

? W?»" \ 1832 

t Cats Guarantoed CL |t I 7B.lt 

|76 GEF1N0R FUNDS 

Cousin foul -37 7 1SSU0 Ffluxl-n 7860105 

> SnS^lorta Puna ? 6S7 0l56 

B7S GENESEE FUND LM 

mr lAi Gannos Eagla 4 751*5 

■“ 174 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

QfF.HOBE FUNDS 

It Am SLPougtal,! Bl Mon 461 638*34037. . 


ft GAM rsuodw Bonn 

• GAM AJ Humor Rj 

: £tSOT° , _ 

: sassM"*’ 1 1 

• CAM Bona £ I i*64T 

: i&s 

IV CAM Bond USJOiti 1 16197 

r ^ 5 ^^ \ tss 

? 1 ;p 

rr GAM Cron-Marker 1 167.5* 

■ CAM DMTSIIV 1 2WB0 

• cam Denar poo iiDBrnonoiiai 1 mw 

» CAMEptlAM _ l 703 p 
m gam Eirsn MHS Mltl-Fa 5 Ju*t 

• CAM 'tones FF SUM 

ft GAMCAMCO 5 4»43 

o CAM High VMM S 2I8.B5 

a GAM Hong tang S 10.17 

• CAM JfrtcTMf Tiund Fd 11K 4 'SJM 


w CAM Mm-Esrope USi 
it CAM Mott It 5. DM 

• CAM MMIIU.i. USt 

■ CAM Pscne 

iv GAM Pan gurooa 
■r CAM Pan EunKuan 

0 GAMSCWKB 

■r GAM SR-flon 

M GAM SF Spfcsn Bond 
P GAM Slngosoni Maanlo 
m CAMTeiS* 

» CAM Tnuinp DM 
p CAM Trnqplg Css 

: affiSte 

■ GAM TiawgltUSDO 

• Sam uiiiwui jss 

1. uAM Wantnwdo 

1 SOTc'MSS* 

w GSAMlMIBOJM 
It GSAM <m tompPUN 
V DSAMGBP GmpcUB 

• GAMSAM OnasciPfl Inc 
m GSAMDmcIt 

d G4AM Money AUOS DM 


SWBSREGlS^iP^NDS 41- 1 -& 2636 
MijnMmdwtTBMelTACH BKliZuOd' 


MunWiadvtmHe)7iCH BO^ZurK>< , _ 

a GAMtrtgujye fp Ig^o 

1 GBP Q Ad L JeSs 

* DM 217-91 

DM 17J^ 

» l DM ACC DM 141B1 

DMAcx DM MaJ 7 

acc s loan 

FUNDS 

SF 1397 




BNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDA*, SEPTEMBER 12. 1997 


Advertisement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS September 1 1 , 1 997 

available on Internet: http://www.iht.com/IHT/FUN/funds.html 


Ouoaroorra gap plMby tviul groups » Mfcwpal Pnhn t **! 3 3 -^ a ° 28 ” 09} S&ViCS Sponsored by 

For lrrtormaUononhowtolhstyoortunO,faxKoty Hourlat(33-l)Al 43 B2 13 orE-moB ; tuncteeihtcom m ja 

To rseelvoiTiee dally quotations tor your funds by E-mafl : suscrlbe at e4un<*»®* 1ltI5om lAlLJtx.lAV 

EUPDFcnft 50NO PORTFOL.!!} OJitl 

g cassA-i f |.I3 

s 

PQPTFCUG ® “ 

-■ iW A J 

INVESTMENT GRADE PTF 1 * - * 


r III FuM Ud Httoi 


* 15IA9J 
5f 141 IB 

s mot 
DM I76J9 
l naro 
S 11049 
DM M 


nt pEMMUpiMr-CHFCI . SP . ^J5 

* asr 

• gnTgirUNCMANACtME^ ^ 


btnii Esunv Fa s i*»40 

INDCSUJIZ FUNDS 1GW/97 

■j k 

in Bond Lft 171 ?0m 


i m 

01 


» SSSSW" "km 

rp^nnli 

" — IRS HORIZON 


nS« JF 


: assets®,, 1 11 

: SBs!;a% M t las 

i sassay Dk 


•> Sit3W« SMflvCotW S 1*500 

« Cjia'iriiFnij n.V. 4 377 00 

* GW s FuWNii i j*; 0 0 

1M REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

- ;5i>ees»=a s in.;i 

- !»cnv3iv« _ 5 

■"» sc.iam E jtxh) Ton Fa i 

- EKirr EprsHi utiii I 

^ Ciml Emrt.na 'wue F* S 5 7900 

" &«*■ Tiget ri.'TC S JU 

, N9« ftjrfcp StpiltH Fd 4 6-75 

b R=. 1i:A.*3KR3RCc J 1029 

« £eWr; aijiinj * ca ub_ y 

« s AScn’eo--KrLM*r De« S ioiit 

b R«B“ « iiC>jsw 3ca S hsb 

r PHW.trlTCUAranwBOFo J li 1C 

» Rnjct.: Mnsrui Fa lAJ s Slj 

- SjiiW Fatife trwjo 5 m*T 

7 -±C«ll5?jl1lASi0n3 S 3 77 

«• tejsra&n LsnunFo S i39 

- gwi ‘.liSivFS $ 

n SvMIflr. DW! Fpna S !L3B 

” iC-asnAnwired s us* 

7 I.TCWW1 Am TS/ABIl s«3 S law 

■" UnCefSCIUCASXYiAl^a I 

- uncar.s^eAuFtC4; Rp 5 1963 

•* jrorrrorjmo iisrn 7 tv i 1 jpj? 

: U'TM'cAiCi Prapia: i a. 74 

~ 9U9.-GCI 1 42-93 

9*5 Ty 4 S» 13 

r „ “jit i <gcr m lo Ltc I silt 

l-TBEIG GLOBAL FUND 
J, i N CpcrFvTKi POs Ptm law 

» Sc-jCitci.FjnsEeus E:u nzej 

IMREPUBUC FUND41FAABJSW 

; gmKefiaRS, \ 

<- 13 Asw AlMCJlfiM fs 1 illtJ 

r A»;vU-: w'G .VdJV) .',’jnVBt 5 llijj? 

5 4esL<»i: US FimaincFfl i 107.» 

5 «.ci; Gcaa c .un i loovf 

: 5 *D 5 n:rt 7 «TnMien'i'«IS * 110*6 

J =*3 Snj- Tern H.&view ;p «J7 

7 SeicrwcMoreei Dfciep t Matt 

3 Po= LT-^torm coil Fcr Inc 5 10198 

•: jBSvteC Alenin riui Fd 4 10171 

3 Btpeti.; OeBCICCeRy 4 11053 

3 tetS-CDauiteflKH S IOL£ 


b jFJQCcmfHy 

S SSSMlf 

4 JF TMiUM Trutf 

MJUUUS BAER GROUP 

a BCWiWnp 

a Connor _ 
j EvtWArEwspo 
0 ftKUnr 
c Sistwnar 

j tuS»?£arfl Funs 
a Dollar Bona pyna 
a Ajjiais Bond haa 
c ^vrJMBgiJ^rwa 

s iSolBofl&iina 
j Eura Sloci Mjnfl 

? ^S^tnd 
fi lulls Stack Fupo 
u Sperm! 5 *.pv E toe» 
a Japan S^c^Fun d^ 

j sr.it, FnmeuAli 

5 DM Cod' Fa 10 
e ecu Coin Fima 

j ggu n^.CtBn.Fww 

j KSSifiSw cam 


SP »7i9 ( 
SF mslt: 
SF 300* 93 
St oust 
SF »5™ 
s »j**s- 
E«a 301.91 


It rsa 

y lose on 
DM J0ti3 
DM 137 24 
SF I3'2YI 
DM ICV *1 
Ecu 1«4 n 


SF To* I? 

All 231*. W 


a SSSnl £vmtia aae« Fd Alt 231*. w 

% j vssffiffi* * iy.s 

: liEsffWs. ft Si 

l jt&Ss a ,s nfs 


is 

j JS oamAa anas* Dt* u:n 

a IB intMTKMomi Bonn Fa DU 17393 

m fSSSM. 1 \ S“ 

in ao, Heape Fondmc s Jl7 SS 

s fsrsfes 5 ^ ? flfl 


■7 Ugri.SNM Fd NV A 4 

a MuH I- Strategy Fd NV S 1 

a pionw FiXitloSMt AB 4 

I0Q UBERAL BAS. FUNDS 
T(I:SS21 JlJWiFaur HJt J42 7250 
O A M S.F FdtH j 

a ? ILI.VI Fund S 

J FlLU.HhlM S 

o F 15 T I Ctmp t 

e SJLFE Fd 4 I 

3 S T.i B Fund , S 

r Liwral "e*»e on Fa i 

(It UPPO INVESTMENTS 


miXOVD GEORGE MNGMT 1*55) 7S45 UU 
m LGtnnmFumi s i*SJ 

r. LGAnanSnipnar ^sFd S J* 1*43 

» LG liiffia Funa La 5 1C 32 

IV LG *xna Funa Pc S S271 

ID LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) LM 
b uayes Amattan PortaM S 11!« 

fw WM5SlSS^fep l 'SpPORTt.iNF?Y 1 515 1 3 
: SaiBTMBnd SF 647 n 

a Franoi FF 720*1 

a tinned Kingdom 4. rreftma £ 14745 

j itmmrfAmtna DM mm :s 

a Sdutnem Eurape 5F ;n m 

s 6 um.c, sF 


0 Doi& Long term S 363 

a jtBKiiwre ftm v 58790: 

a Pfinrd SKHllnq £ iiot 

r DeitTscne MnC DM Z2« 

a Dutrn Ftorm B 31*. 

c hi Euro Current lei Feu 721. 

tf StrilS Franc SF ?su 

a US DoOat SMrl Term S 1511 

tf Hf‘ Earn CorrDIvia POT Ecu IriL 

s kassWiRK? £ U 

J gatpfcn^raic BF lujl 

S FwtSi'Rwv M03I 

1 S^JlMura-DMloena SF 10 01 

a 5«tss Fionc snotr-Term SF iun 

a Canadgn Dollar CS l»0i 

a Diltdl Flom Ml4« H 30.31 

j swim Franc Dndd Pay SF iTi 

S jSBSBST^ If ts 

s wrr in 

a Duiai c-uaoer smn Tern n ojh 

a Bw^vbnrCHF^Birfctir SF if] 

a Mean Cur DWixirnfl SF 1|C 

a NLG MwlOCwT Dtr R i E3t 

1 U LOMBARD QDIEP INVEST 
a Goilor O loc Bond Fund S 102t 

j SmaMrEiHwMOnCaps DM 44jt 

a NuiviAiMttS I 1*4 

a PocMc ibm „ s 

J Japan OTC Yen 1132.00 

2 Bu lo^l 

^^^Mf, KTERPRI5El,n ?- LT l D 04 4 M 

ltl MAGNUM FUNDS 

■npvTwmjaqgnwmunaxan; Fan w- j s* se j o 

• Moanum Aapns Cum Fd > 17*0 

• Magmim CaanSI Omm J 125-SS 

• Magnum EdpoFa S 13101 

rr WKnumFune ’ 16391 

v Magnum Gbbai Ea S 1J2*S 

: ^jiris^Fund i iis-3 

S B^Kfo I 

: issssssffiit i ^ 

Maararai Spec spuanoim S uajj 

» IMgnum i«n KyiW S 11431 

• Mnoiwm Turtia OtuttBi 5 1W-5' 

: alSasL 

e fes&2r^ toC0 S 'M 

■V GONMOmmSirfi 5 

0 Lonatf VwwW fund S 104. W 

I NilDlOnwPtl _ J lJi-30 

RnMwCnltolDnwni k lsj^ 


^ yip SkMtf Rind 5 11104 

107 MALABA8 ULP WGMT PnimM LTD 
m Mautmrinil Fund * I9A7 

,40493 

H 1 

5 SSSfiS^ad 1 |Sg 

a ftoerpRnW S 23*0 




ml5lo5A * 

^s!^ K ^a? maww r , ^ 


u . 1 ^ 
Gnwtn Fd N.V. j aoW 

\ ’41 
| ss 

n 1*6.05 

LYNCH BANK {SUISSE) SJL 

J W 

I 1R63 94 


1 1394 

5 5 ^ 

SF s i°JS 

? 'SS 

1 ial? 

RNDWEttn 

e chub > 'Jm 

114 ME8RIIX LTIHSHEflUnY / CONVERTIBLE 

SlSfTlmWK?B8mi9nn. 

; f5S? I l£m 

IaSKvAUjE portfolio 

i SSf Sn 


3 0056 A 

iu3B.PORTFOUO 


*BLE SECURITIES PTFL s 
JtLOCATION PTFL lUSB 


caffiAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

i fsgs S It li 


S mi » VII 

a aSo _s iiz 

CLO^LSMALLCAP PORTFOLIO 

a SSI * nii 

VALUE PORTWHja 

2 * 9J: 

luffireiWroRTFOUD 


j mm « 

Ja-I^MERICA PORTFOLIO 


PACW &QU1TY PORTFODO 

i 

¥eoS< 0L«SY PORTFOLIO 

| SB| j 

Sis^lv PORTFOLIO s 

ftoR^MTUftALggSOUKES F?FL 


3 LUMA f 

a cum B - 

Its MEBBIU. LYNCH fiUJBAL CURRENCY 


e nssj 

fEifpoRjFCUO 


Su^^REncy bond PTFL 


US ^EOfcwL SECURITIES PTFL 4 

e CUSIA I 

3 CWSB s 11 

,u ffl? 1 LTNCM 1 w PO#TF0 4° i 

i cot? I I 

H7 MLRR/L1 LYNCH MEXICAN IMPORT 


a ft'* flkicah IK Fko ftt 0 0 3 

, ; 8 r^^ c « ,5d,,w ) ,n 

DOU-ARA5ScT?POR FGUC 


DOLLAR e i u riJ k 
d uHMuaenai j Spirt 
a NMUuiMnU&nma 
r UffitSSnant _ 




11* MILLENNIUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 

rr MiTgbdoI MVts 1CU r* 

TI LUI Ouanr LAMSgin SF tier 07 

nrUnioveraaea SF mil 

SF 113197 

5 i3a*i 

. ___ 5 IZSSe: 


<» UnlMroo 
-> Tne ys SGufcImK 

-I '.'SS uM Ciffi Fa 


y^T^r.r ! fltifeW 0 

I SteSSJ 1 I • SS£Ssnfi»Ji3a4! 


Uoman US Enrrepns* 

Mcntan 'JS MotBBr 

n AUtmMm AD HWinar 5 >:aw 

ti KlMimtoum AMHmmtt ISP 1 
ltsotf 

T> rjtomanrjni Atsetnoilci 

rr momontm Deonmasef 
n S'jmentum EmrroM 

ItoOMIW 

Na*Bm#rPert S I3.M. 

women am Ptict - Ppirws s i«s *i: 

A'anignuim ficinMw .a ; nsas 

“J U mettltn 1 SanUircod S 12* TS 

n rynttonljm SMevmtniM 4 265 ltc 

m Aicnwinini TeJCDni Prnert 5 195 85: 

rr Alamtatiun Un^rs rwifl.? 4 >7129: 

v 'rTamintitiii us Sd 6 cioi.ii 
v Atamentun 'tWuanastor 
IBMULTHMJIAGERILV. 

■n jonwasn Eaeeiei t *C3 

~r Emening Mortals 5 25(7 

- ZramasB 4 ii t: 

Madge 5 i«M 

It! NAM FOREX MANAGEMENT _ 
m Nev'A MU9 rtodfB SP ‘IBS 

t m « 

3 riASTO’OPfianvn.twUe I IRC* 

1 NA Fid uM> Granin ra I S27C 

4 NA Hedge Fima s l&U 

12S NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG] LTD 

3 MNnOE JOkaflC ejno 4 666 

174 NORTH STAR FUND MANAGEMENT 

T*. .4MJ321J I1 to. *450332,717 

* NS lmcsm>«TTt Fwtia _ ?■> SJSK. 

. N4 Nigfi PcrJanmnc* *£ p»» 5*SfC. 

rr ns rj£a unHnKrcna e.j Dr.t iSr'lO- 
m NSCsneoni Fjna Or. 23350. 

« NS imrolonoi Cuff F3 S B70- 
a NS Be 8. ■AottgaO* Funa DU l41C0« 
“• 127 OLD MUTUAL INTL (GUERNSEY) LTD 
.- u» HwsiKmi £ 5x31 

: isis^e^r i 

, swilng S^cal M3IMI £ 166' 

i mn raw inures S a 2® 

. Donor vonogaa S 1*0 

/ £wr lUm s ;ii5 

“ b^P^SwSrtJJI 5 “028 

^ 5 .205 

6 US .YmdvSae Fund S Ul Si 

it RnsDnrv Group S ,21124 

r CimplD Elwrglno MW S 127«J3 
a rtiiet. Eosaem Dragon % irii 

4 omen Fiomw* S S027S 

e Clvmtfo Slot Senas 4 2lfi_ra 

« armoiaSiarFF HtogeSar FF 36i4JB 
Jr ClytnpiaSior FF Aingrd S«r FF 336*71 

~ k-.-rnchCmooi Moortmon, dot Uffin 

r vvinoi M'Op mn ptaalson Ecu 1738.17 
4 g.incn HWginn StwD Bfu l«t737 
•v Vjiiei HiOa inn Sar F Ea 1983 C 

s «&k bc I ,3 p 

* CtvtiKJia uni Aramaoe s vwig 

a Otvnqaa Narural Reroute* I 60083 
II* OPPEHHE IMER A CO INC Fds (find pavl, 

: Artumige inwnunanal 4 i«C6 

i EmaraMkRlniril S 25*« 


" se; S-.r^vcijer Atc r 1 4 127 61 

- !m 5.^1 SEiBTOl Snyon^n S 1 S 1 J 1 

- Pesto-lrAaiirinGai Jtir S II 157 

» TreMenr.-SgeFxia 4 S«K. 

W8KHCOUBT 

T»t 31 70 676*411 FOE 21 M 575 Mr 

• S.g 5 =ur AironsaiK S 7 MB 4 F 

• 6iaic=jr?Ss < iaTinc 4 •- 71**5 

r FWITSun Ftllum me 1 *V5 67E 

• a.sisjr: Qosan B in; S 149245 

» 9'Om.n Gnaft Line S lyS4SE 

, p.jisLnOpesffi ■•« s 2&70JE 

?GB?^CS?£^ercom.QniO B*IEi 

Z »5 AroncjFima FI 298 00 

5 OSE.-ssoFgnr 71 744.50 

3 PCB^pS^lNLpJA R lia£ 

i e (£3 


1 *:■ ■.":ne t Pi.*Ffl (USDI 5 Pi 
3 SG Bans Fiji Fa iCmF) SF 99 ( 
; S5 9« PijsPdlUSty S 1073 

2 KSzxz*tn Fs'aEFl BF UX&i 
\‘m Rsotca mb AntSKrxn Seas 

lH ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
GROUP FUNDS 

lAUir 3«0 »M FD. M 171 340 3129 
A ten Gwei rtsioi"j« Fa S 604 
r Lfte-^ea r= rtMUinas 5 IpJj 
- Bw^^itiee Mtfngs I )l£il 
^AhAuE-/ 

-ft, 1*247714,1 Fai 152 <72 « 6 

S fePSnTSfMnffjHF SF IDY.iJ 
r Psa lash Tr9enmn«l fir." DM I0S51 
i Ftt* LjNi Taaiiatnei uss 4 U4 j 


, PrTEnsi.miee Sens Funo SF 1 3*^*7 

S Prttnni Fc rfr EmcrMKts _ 5 Ifljl* 

? Pnscnd Fund Ecu Em IsLajO 

; Prt gyj i-tma uji S 13*070 

e Pneaunr FunoEuropo Ecu 174067 

: Pitaaui-Y Funa HtOM SF 1*ASM 

, Prvjjron Lla 7 TOJS4OO 

* Vanrasiy* Ecu 110833 

a gsodi cut. Parai. mw Tn Ecu &m 

* SunpemSirai m» Fd Ecu lluio 

, lG ino Fa Allan Gttmm S 1Z4J737 

J PtaM: Mes Fuiui J t*2 

0 SMccdte irnmi SA S ,332.736 

= s 

f ?S55^ffiS!KBv I ISISS 

IB SANTANDER NEW WORLD IN*, 
m Emerging 7AXT Curr Pa S .105.84 

r Cam^nCer Fund S 1M577.TO 

r- Eipiom Rina S 2S6165A3 

155 SKANDINAV1SKA EHSKILDA BANKER 

1 

3 . s 

3 LssSrnttM Inc J rAs 

a Vataenln S ’amt 

3 jmwkie y muffin 

0 tAiBp Ine 1 l.iUS 

0 UoHlnc Set 71 7074 

1 Me.. .4 M 


• mn HtnianFuna II 
Dpnen COMyCi ini Ua 

t op pen mi Eauliv Ltd 

• Ocoen Fora gan KOI Ud 
.* ap»m value inn ua 
1H0PTIGE5TI0N PARIS 


S 254*4 
S 13723 
4 14694 

4 UG4J 
1 149.10 

l 132.10 


; ggSSSiW^u* I \\i 

t ortimo Alternallvn 5mn S 13J 

: »^r* 1Faud i ^8 

: assy's? MLM 1 % 

Z Tfo PtmUUi Fdud s lax 

132 ORRIS INVESTBMH* (44T J 2H 3M0 

: $ 

c oroc Limragml (2* Aug) * 36.1 

!^s2SI7S2^Fa s i4iqi 

toTediFd J 

* I 9k 

jWm^EmnrPd | ^ 

j omnu Lpno-Stwiv Pp 
0 DiMm Nniml RM Fd 
13* FACTUAL 

BnnltWtrtSSTl 13771 IMMtDclSn 1)53316* I .. 


srwaft- 

a Eouiyinninc 



•mtSsB Kroner s* 


s ss^ssSL 1 ! ! MB 

0 Twtreutr F8gh Yield Fa S 1' 425*5 

“MS A ™“ anJ, ‘ 0 S 148799 

WET _ 5 725; 


S 6134 
1 7866 

BF 1257.00 

m ifta 

FF 1(74.90 
DM 470* 




NO ERE PRIVCE. GENEVA 
N TEL +41 22 B1.B31 II 


untie PctltnBo ( 119163 

J5EMBNT F33 1 «2 18 78 S6 

FRF Die FF 45412 
Eur DEM OJ7 


B SofiMbF 

S 

a Saginf 


SF 31174 
DU 723197 
DM 471X3 


Gulden B 

Urn B 
S uui rl t Ki w oB 


&efbbe| 

W K 


s Bi 

S I &££ 
% 


gLtotiAm 
I Goto Mines 
SttonSuDecM 

SS-W 


noil USD 

pSrjSBuboUuiB 

yam s&*ws sl t- ra i{2i 

; dm & 

j piSr:"* j-sa 

HVB DM 

I FGBimnelaNl Fell 
1 urcnriN v. , 


i ttHBggS’ ]£ J 

I r&S 

IS7 50 Dm C ASSET MANAGEMENT INC. 
v IaM PMltitaa | 

e I 

mi 5AM Samn USi 9®* ' 


0 GSAM Money Mlti! 

a UAMMonriittis! 


SSI 


tom Dew HUgi NV 


5 106003 

I 2B34S0 
LTD 


nr AtpnaiAM 
IN SOFA FUND U MIXED 
vi CitojA 
n, 00550 
m COtaC 
m Doss o 
m metyprui Fond 
15950FAER CAPITJU. INC 
■> Amerunn aunrtFnno 

: 

160 5R GLOBAL FUND LTD 


PAGfi?l 



SF 64250y 
S 487087 


Ea In* Smal COM I69930y 
Eq In Sm C SF I33320» 






AS ■ Aunmn Dohrs; AS - Aumlan SdUUngs: 
BF ■ Betgan Fmntt: CS ■ Cmmlian Dollvsi DH - 
DouBd* LSrrta. DU-Dsnisli Kxoneri Do -US 
DeflsrR ECU - Europeen Cumtncy Una; FF - 
R*ndt Francs FU • FMth ib* a - Durdt 
aftorirulDft-WontWnaupGhj Ul-kaUan ta 
LF - Luambourg Francs; (Hpence: UYfl - 
Ebtoyshn RnggR; has ■ Panto* 80S ■ 
Sngapgn Dotoic Sf ■ Sofas Fiance Set • 
Sndisti Knnor. THB ■ Tin Bard; V ■ Vmc 


B ■ Bated • - Oder Pttns; N A ■ Ngl AniUle: 
NX. - Not CaMUHcsttK o- Nav; S - 
(uapandM W9-«cli Sp/i , -E*OMd«id;"- 
EsHb; ■ 8 0 «m Prtaa MCL3 1 !. ptefct. cnargi; ■ 
■ Pane wshangw +* ■Amslefda™ ereftanga; 0 - 
misquoted etrtut wnt (flSteend *flli 


pries, h aswofad puce r- priM catatetod 2 
d*T4 pH* » pubfcauon; c W prtw. 


The nwgliiBl srnbgk indicatt frequency of 
qtK»s(B [ifl ■ ftf. 

PHWtfilv; ffl • tomaaBly. (rj- legubrir if) * 
to*»meitfy;(inJ-inflrtWy. 


The Communicator. 


NOKIA 
































































PAGE 22 


lietalb^gSfeEribttttc 

Sports 


FRIDAV. SEPTEMBER 12, 1997 


World Roundup 


A Return for Rose? 

BAS EB ALL Lawyers for Pete 
! Rose and Major League Baseball 
; have discussed reinstating tne 
- former star after this season, a first 
'Step toward removing a lifetime 
■ ban for gambling and make Rose 
'eligible for the Hall of Fame. 

* A representative of Rose, me 
game’s all-time leader in hits, and a 
lawyer for baseball held prelim- 

* inary talks in the last week, a major 

' league spokesman. Rich Levin, 
said Thu^day. The two sides plan 
"to meet again in two weeks. 

Rose, who spent 24 years in the 
1 majors and then managed the Cin- 
' cinnati Reds for more than five 
years, accepted a ban imposed in 
' 1989 by the commissioner, A. Bart- 
lett Giamatti. Rose contends he 
never bet on baseball. The follow- 
ing year, the Hall of Fame's board 
voted to exclude banned players 
from the writers' ballots. 

Rose, who played almost 19 sea- 
' sons with the Reds, had a,. 303 
average and 4,256 hits, 65 'more 

* than Ty Cobb. Rose, 56, now owns 
' two restaurants in Florida and has a 

syndicated radio show. (AP) 

, Ban on Pierce’s Dad Ends 

tennis The father of tennis star 
jMary Pierce will be allowed to 
coach on the women's tennis tour 
next year, ending a four-year ban 
'for abusive behavior. 

The WTA said the ban would be 
1 lifted for one year on Nov. 24, the 
day after the end of die seasou- 
’ concluding Chase Championships. 

' His return is to be reviewed by the 
Corel WTA Tour’s board of di- 
rectors in November 1998. 

A tour spokesman, Joe Favorito, 
said Pierce must be coaching a 
player to appear at a tour event. 
'Pierce and the player must first 
notify the organization that he is the 
player’s coach. 

r Pierce has been barred from at- 
tending women’s tour matches 
since June 20, 1993. He punched a 
spectator at the 1993 Bench Open, 
and he has been accused of having 
an abusive relationship with Mary, 
his ex-wife, Yannick, and his son, 
David. 

Mary Pierce, ranked eighth in the 
world, sought protection orders 
against her father in New York, 
New Jersey, California and Florida. 
He sued his daughter for breach of 
contract in December 1996, con- 
tending be was promised 25 percent 
of her career earnings. (AP) 

A DeaJ for Camby Agent 5 

BASKETBALL The lawyer ac- 
cused of trying to blackmail former 
.UMass All-American Marcus 
Camby into making him his agent 
.reached an agreement Thursday un- 
der which charges eventually will 
be dropped. 

Wesley Spears agreed in Super- 
11 ior Court in Hartford, Connecticut, 
"-to perform 30 consecutive days of 
community service in each of the 
.^next two years, as well as an ad- 
ditional 100 hours at his discretion. 

- Charges will be dropped as long as 
,be fulfills terms of die two-year 
probation, Spears was accused of 
giving Camby gifts and arranging 
sexual liaisons for the basketball 
star and bis friends. (AP) 


World Cup Heats Up 

19 Berths Remainfor *98 Finals in Frame 

groups will qualify automatically, 
group runner-up will also qualify 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

The World Series will occupy Amer- 
ican baseball fans next month, but their 
cheers and complaints are going to seem 
mild, if not innocent, compared to the 
fevers bursting in soccer stadiums and 
in front of TVs around the world. 

The most obvious example will be in 
Rome on Ocl 11, the final day of Euro- 
group qualifying, when Italy will 
ive to beat England to be assured of 
qualifying for the 1998 World Cup fi- 
nals. In all, 32 nations will qualify for 
those finals, to be held throughout 
France next summer. After 17 months of 
qualifying rounds, only 13 places have 
been filled. 

The Italian parade toward those finals 
struck a pothole and suffered minor 
damage Wednesday night in a scoreless 
draw at Georgia. Until then, Italy 
seemed fairly in control of its World 
Cup qualifying group. Months ago Italy 
had beaten its Group 4 rival, England, at 
Wembley, a victory preceded by the 
replacement of coach Arrigo Sacchi 
with Cesare Maldini, Sacchi's firing 
had come as a relief in his country 
because he never could seem to do 
things the easy way. 

But now it might seem as if nothing 
has changed. Italy's scoreless draws at 
Georgia and at Poland — England won 
its matches in those countries by a com- 
bined 4-0 — has left the stagnant Itali- 
ans in a panic. For the decisive match, 
they will be lacking midfielder Roberto 
Di Matteo, who earned his second yel- 
low card of the qualifiers for a late tackle 
Wednesday. 

England will have to do without Alan 
Shearer, an injured striker, but that loss 
is acceptable now that the English pri- 
ority will be changing from attack to 
defense. England hasn't won at Italy 
since 1961, but that warning too has 
become irrelevant 

Of the 15 European teams that will 
meet in France, only four have been 
determined: the bost nation, which has 
been invited outright, and Romania, 
Norway and Bulgaria, the latter’s play- 
ers having earned a $1.2 million bonus 
for their clinching 1-0 victory against 
Russia. 

Austria and the Netherlands have all 
but qualified, since it would take a 
bizarre series of results to knock out 
either of them. 

The winners of the nine European 


. One 

group runner-up will also quauiy out- 
right. At the moment, Italy is the leader 
among the second-place contenders. | 

But the outcome is difficult to predict 
because these particular standings are 
based on a complicated format, one 
which, albeit, vriS lead to a lucrative 
series of home-and-away playoffs be- 
tween the other group runners-up in 
November. The system may look stu- 
pid, but everyone will be richer because 
of 1 L 

Denmark can avoid those playoffs by 
winning Group 1 with a draw at Greece, 
which is the current runner-up in the 
group. Germany should also advance 
with a finishing victory against last- 
place Albania. The larger German 
hurdle was cleared Wednesday night 
when the team’s captain, Jurgen Klins- 
mann. ended bis 854-minute scoreless 
drought with two headed goals in a 4-0 
victory against Armenia. Klinsmann. 
33, had been on the verge of being 
benched. 

“It was a relief,” Klinsmann said. “I 
knew the expectations were high and I 
had put myself under a great amount of 
pressure. I simply had to score again.” 

The known qualifiers outside Europe 
are: Brazil, invited outright as the de- 
fending champion; Tunisia; Morocco; 
Nigeria; Cameroon; South Africa, mak- 
ing its debut in the World Cup finals; 
Argentina; Colombia and Paraguay. 
The latter three qualified Wednesday. 

There is room for one more team 
from South America, and Peru is tenu- 
ously positioned to claim it after a 2-1 
triumph against Uruguay. 

Three teams will advance from North 
and Central America. Mexico, the 
United States and Costa Rica are the 
leaders, bnt each still has three to five 
matches to play over the next two 
months. 

The most fascinating skirmishes will 
be in Asia, which will send at least three 
teams to the finals. The second-round of 
Asian qualifying begins this weekend 
with Japan and South Korea — the 
unlikely co-hosts of the 2002 World 
Cup — having been drawn to the same 
group. 

The No. 4 team from Asia will meet 
the Oceania qualifier, Australia, in a 
playoff. The winner will be promised a 
trip to France for the finals, which start 
June 10. The trophy will be awarded on 
July 12 at the new Stacie de France, just 
outside Paris. 



I>n\ P.hdW .Ip-no- {Vmu'»-/Vow - 

England’s Paul Scholas, left, winning a midair tussle with Moldova’s Ion UstiroitstaniL England triumphed, 4*0.j 

England Rises to the Occasion, 4-0 


The Associated Press 

England took advantage of Italy’s 
scoreless tie against Georgia to jump to 
the top of the Group 2 standings with a 
4-0 victory over Moldova in a World 


Cup qualifying match. 
Two goals by the A 


Jalabert Takes Vuelta Lead 


Reuters 

GRANADA, Spain — Lament 
Jalabert of France snatched the yel- 
low jersey in the Tour of Spain on 
Thursday after a short but tough sixth 
stage. 

The Frenchman, bidding for his 
second triumph in the race, won the 
147-kilometer (91 mile) stage from 
Malaga to Granada by outsprinting 
Laurent Du faux of Switzerland, who 
finished second. Fernando Escartin of 
Spain was third, and Alex Zuelie, last 
year’s winner and Jalabert’s team- 
mate, was fourth. 

Jalabert is now 16 seconds ahead of 
Dufaux with Escartin a further five 
seconds behind. ‘ ‘Our team’s strategy 
was to get as much time as possible bn 
the time trial specialists,” said 
Jalabert 


“Every stage is very important for 
me because I am not a time trial 
specialist I saw ray chance to attack 
when I realized how the others were 
suffering on the climb.” 

The Frenchman struck on a 24- 
kilometer climb to the 1,270 meter 
summit of Alto Mirador de la Cabra 
Montes. He was joined for the final 40 
kilometers by Dufaux, Escartin. and 
Zuelie. 

Lars Michaelsen of Denmark, who 
held the lead for five days, finished 
12:17 behind Jalabert as Thursday’s 
stage scattered the field of 182. 

On Friday, the route takes the riders 
over three mountains to Siena 
Nevada, which at 2,520 meters is the 
highest challenge in the Vuelta. There 
are still 17 days to race before the 
Madrid finale. 


Arsenal striker lan 
Wright and strikes by Paul Scholes and 
Paul Gascoigne gave England the 
shutout victory in London on Wednes- 
day night. Playing against a team that 
had lost all five of its previous games. 
England’s midfield ran die game and set 
up plenty of chances. England forced 2 1 
comers (to none for Moldova) in the first 
half, with Gascoigne and David Beck- 
ham continuously creating danger. 

The fust goal came in the 28th minute 
when Beckham collected a punched 
clearance from goalkeeper Denis 
Romanenko, wide on the left, and 
floated in a cross that Scholes guided in 
with a diving header. 

The second half was only 54 seconds 
old when England went further ahead. 
Gascoigne created the goal with a run 
through the middle and he released a 
well-timed forward pass to Wright, who 
smashed in the ball with his left foot, 

England’s goalkeeper, David Sea- 
man. named captain in die absence of 
the injured stars Alan Shearer. Tony 
Adams, Stuart Pearce and the suspen- 
ded Paul Ince, had two easy saves to 
make from long range on’ shots by 
Sergei Rogachev and Ion Testunitanu. 

England now needs only a draw 
against Italy in Rome next month to 
qualify for the finals. 

Germany 4, Armenia 0 In Dortmund, 
Juergen Klinsmann snapped his goal 
drought and celebrated his 100th cap by 
scoring twice in Germany's 4-0 victory 
over Armenia that put the European 
champion atop its World Cup qualifying 
group. 

Klinsmann, the German captain, 
scored in the 70th minute, his first goal 


after eight scoreless games. His last goal 
had come in a 5-1 victory in the first leg 
over Armenia. 1 1 months ago. 

Oliver Bierfaoff. a late substitute, 
headed (town a cross and Klinsmann 
broke free to slot the ball home from 
close range with his left foot. 

“We more than deserved this victory 
— we created many chances,” said 
Klinsmann. “We tried to keep the pace. 
I was under a lot of pressure, a lot of 
things were on my mind. Bnt the first 
goal was a relief. After dial, I knew my 
scoring touch would continue. I won’t 
forget this game.” 

Klinsmann headed in his second in 
the 84th off a comer to bring his national 
tpam total to 43. The victory gave Ger- 
many 19 points to Ukraine's 17, with 
both teams to play one more match in 
Group 9. 

Denmaj-fc 3, Croatia 1 1n Copenhagen, 
the Laudrup brothers scored one goal 
each as Denmark beat Croatia in a 
Group 1 qualifier. 

The Danes now lead the group with 
16 points and need at leasfa draw in 
their next game against Greece next 
month to qualify - . 

The Danes, who had disappointed 
two weeks ago in Sarajevo, when Bos- 
nia beat Denmark. 3-0, played with dis- 
ciplined and structure and dommaied 
the first half. Brian Laudrup of Glasgow 
Rangers opened the scoring in the 17th 
minute, tipping in a shot by Thomas 
Helveg. Michael Laudrup, Brian ’s older 
brother, added a second goal in die 35th 
minute. 

Six minutes later, the Danish forward 
MikJos Molnar took a chance and 
gunned a fiat ball past the Croatian 
goalie, Tonci Gabric. 

In the second half, the Croatians were 
more aggressive. The game, before 
41,381 rans at the Parken stadium, be- 
came rougher, and the referee, Sandor 
Puhl of Hungary, booked seven players. 


Hungary 3, Azerbaijan 1 In Budapest, 

Hungary downed Azerbaijan, 3-1, in a. 
Group 3 qualifier to keep alive its hopes > , 
for a berth in the finals. 

After a minute of silence for Zoltan, 
Czibar, a member of Hungary’s Us-, 
gendary Golden Team of the 1 950s who _ 
died this month, the home team im- 
mediately went on the attack, cheered • 
on by 8.000 fans in the Ferencvaros 
stadium. 

The Azeri goalkeeper, Alexander* 
Zhidkov, barely saved a shot from" 
Zoltan Kovacs, powered in from 20,.- 
meters in the 4th minute. Four minutes*! 
later. Kovacs again narrowly missed., 
hitting the post. But Laszlo Klausz- 
scooped up me rebound and made it 14) 
with a shot from seven meters out. 

A minute before halftime, Zhidkov 
abandoned his post after a corner from’ 
Andras Kereszturi and Gabor Halmai-. 
headed the ball Into the net. 

Norway 5, Switzorfand o Switzerland' 
was eliminated from contention for the; 
finals by lasing, 5-0, to Norway in Oslo. 
Norway, on the other hand, had already 
won Group 3 after beating Azerbaijan. . 
1-0, last Saturday. Switzerland played 
75 minutes with only 10 men after 'Sc- / 
bastian Fournier was given a red card 
for lacking Norway’s Jostein Flo. 

Jahn Ivar Jakobsen made it 1-0 when 
he headed the ball into the goal after a 
pass from Petter Rudi in the 46th. Stale 
Solbakken scored the second in the 50th 
minute and Dan Eggen made it 3-0 in the 
65th when he headed in a corner from 
Sug Inge Bjomebye. Nine minutes later, 
Egfl Ostenstad made it 4-0, and four • 
minutes after that. Tore Andre Flo 
notched the final goal. 

Bosnia i Slovenia o In Sarajevo, Bos- 
nia scored an early goal against Slov- ' { 
enia, canying it to a 1-0 victory in their 
Group 1 match. Elvir Bolic scored in the"' 
23rd minute off a pass from Elvir 
Baljic. 


LONG RANGE AIR RACE 


September 10th - September 21st 1997 

Reykjavik • Suasboutg ■ Sevilla • Roma • Tel-Aviv • Amman • Trabzon • Izmir. 

official sponsors 


T 




WORLD 

GAMES 


World Air Games' 

Long Range Air Race starts today . 
with difficult weather conditions. 


Strasbourg, France, Sept 11th. 

The race starLs today, as competitor* 
have taken off from Reykjavik this 
morning. The first arrivals in Strasbourg. 
France, are scheduled for this 
afternoon, with the two Citation 525 jet 
aircraft competing: “Dream Machine” 
(Jim Knuppe and Gene Paul from USA), 
and “Young Turks' (Sozer Ozel and 
Erdngan Menekse from Turkey). Four 
categories of aircraft are engaged in the 
race: jets, turbines, turbodiangetl and 
piston engines. 

This means a very wide range of 
speeds, with the Citations flying at 350 
knots, whereas the T1J20 “Ikarios" 
flown by the Greek team goes at 150 
knots. 

This is a speed race, and each one 
of the 19 aircrafts actually completes 
in its category “against" its optimal 
speed, as defined by the manufacturer 

9cralb^^j£ribune 


on an ideal direct routing. 

Realiiy is very far from the envisioned 
flight: weather conditions, Air traffic 
Control, the inevirabble trade-off 
between .speed and range, the time lost 
during refuelling stops, all this conspire 
to keep pilots on their toes, both before 
each flight and en route. 

This Is why the atmosphere was very 
tease and excited yesterday evening, 
when Bernard Lamy, the Race Director, 
announced during his briefing a kx of 
rain, low freezing level, douds and light 
tailwind. Carolina Belle, who already 
had trouble with their engine on 
Tuesday while flying to Reykjavik, has 
to flight against had luck as their 
propeller broke this morning. 

Bur the weather is fine in Strasbourg, 
where competitors will receive a warm 
welcome from the City and the 
Chamber of Gimmerce upon arrival. 


A TIMC5 MlRRBH COMPJUTi' 


Vi-Mt our web site at: 

httpi/AHiiTvorld.oJnipusm'c.com/brjinepagcs/tair.iuli/ 


Ballesteros Nails 7 Birdies to Share Lancome Trophy Lead 


Reuters 

SAINT NOM. LA 
BRETECHE, France — 
Europe's Ryder Cup captain, 
Severiano Ballesteros, found 


his old form on Thursday, 
shooting a flurry of birdies 
that took him to the top of the 
Lancome Trophy's first- 
round leaderboard. 


After missing 14 cuts in 16 
European starts this year. 
Ballesteros produced a vin- 
tage display of iron play, in- 
cluding a trick-sbor from his 


knees from under a tree, to 
pick up one of seven birdies in 
a six- under- par round of 65. 

He was tied for the early 
lead with Peter O’Malley of 


Escorts A Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON ■ EUROPE 

THE FHEST & THE HOST SINCERE 
H - 38t WIEfflATlOM. 
BEAUTIFUL t> ELEGANT STUO&TS 
SECRET ARES, AIR HOSTESSES & 
MODELS + 

AVAILABLE AS YOUR COHPAMXM 
Escort Agency Credi Carts Wacom 

TEL LONDON ++44(0) 

0171 589 5237 


NIERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

Wxtfs Fksf & Most Botovs Service 
Bod*, Beaty Queens, , 
EntenMnera, Hoswrn, s 


Murtffhguai Travd Companfcnji 
•Ran* ‘Bestin Nov York 1 by few 
Yak Mag. featured n international tec 
Ueda S TV. Video tapes & Photos av* 
able for sakdion. Credi cards accepted. 

1 


USA & W0RLDMDE 


AOSTOCATS Escort Service 
3 ShonkBnra St London VI 
fffFI 25S0O90 


THE ROYAL PUT MW SERVICE 
EXCLUSIVE TOP FASHION MODELS 


ATLANTIC 

LONDON PARIS NEW YORK 

ALL MAJOR CTTES K EUROPE 

++44(0)7000 77 04 11/22/33 

USA & CAHAQA212 73S 1919 
INTERNATIONAL ESCORT SBWICE 


VENUS IN FURS 

04HR WORLDWIDE ESCORT SBMCE 

LOMKW om 362 70M 

A* tads. Advance bookings vratane 


HIGH SOCIETY 

Eseeoiive Escort Santee 
WMfMtfe 

Tefc *44 fflITi 266 1033 
07000 4444 76, 6ligl>socie)y-net 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Boocfonp Mace, London Sift 
Teh 0171-584 6513 


PARIS 

APOLLO ESCORTS 

senfcaNapoftHxinaJlantsooni 

++J1&-5422B-134 


HEWS HK5H SOCCTY’VBfflA'PARtS 
COTE DAZURTURKJfGENFIflJMCH 
ttemaknal Esron 8 Travel 
Vienna *9491/535 41 04 afi crafi cards 


WARSAW MODEL ESCORT 

AW TRAVO. SERVICE 
CBI *48 22 6710648 Or *48 602 224145 


•GUYS A DOLLS ESCORT SERflCF 
UlLAN’ROME'nALY'LONDOirPARIS 

BENaUXlUGANtyGERHANrSPAIN 

COTE DAZUVSCAWWAVttTOKYO 

Tet +39 (0) 335 619 0438 Creffl Cads 


BUN ' RONE * PARB-T0P CLASS 
Juh escort sanfce ♦39fO£&£llD9SS 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
Call 022 / 34fi CO 89 Earn 
UUSAtWE-MONTRBJX- _ 

ZURICH ■ CREDIT CAROS 


BLACK BEAUTY ESCORT SERVICE 
Exctave Elegant Eduraial 8 ftiendy 
Union & Keattnwr. Oiei 9062261 .Carls 


Do you live in Athens? 

For a hand-delivered subscription on the day 
of publication, tall 00 33 ] 41*13 9361 

itcral b^aSSJ Eribttttc. 


,nir. wwurs min %ptrsiw*KB . 



CARIBBEAN BEAUTY * UtA ■ 

n*?. L't*** 1 Service tor VIPs. 

TflLAN LUGANO - *39 10)3474244626 

CHAMPERS ran EXCLUSIVE 

serrice ■ Lon*in 
TH/FAX 0171 48G 1)545 

DANISH ESCORT, GUIDE 

Cm ratafee Tone) Agency 

‘ ' DUSSEUJORf ■ ELEGANCE * * 

PWale Escort *■ Tiwal Service 

Tet 0?1l - 435 06 97 

“EXECUTIVE CLUB** 

LONDON ESCORT SERVICE 

TB.: 0171 722 500B ClHt Cans 

ffiATHBt BEAUTIFUL BLOW) private 
® e ™'ce. Kennsifioion 

Ttf 0171 835 leas or 0171 259 2SZL 

WWUE' VIENNA * 24 hre. 

MOST EXCLUSIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
VB«A *443-1 -3675680 *1 avS arts 

JULIETTE (Blood Glamour Model) 
Educated Oisasei Escort Service 

VPs only. Cal 0956 545 922. 

HONOPOL FRANKFURT 

THE LEAONG ESCORT SERVICE 

OFFICE NUMBER 069 1 955 20 774 

NICOLE VERY PRETTY AND SHAPELY 

Young Blond Private Escort Sendee 
London Tet IKTQ 793 253 

VALEHTMES INTERNATIONAL 

VIP Escort Seme photos to vn central 

London office 0171 B35 0005 ai cads 

AMSTERDAM SOPHIE 8 HEAVEN 

Dwreet & frtenty Escort Sente 

Cal 0H56225859 1 leave phone ml 

* ZURICH 1 CAROLINE 1 

Escort Savice 

Tet 01/26149 47 

ANQHJQUE & fflJENDS 

atrtrm Bsfl Escort Semes 

London 24 hra 0171 506 00S9 


Australia, two strokes : 
of Jose Coceres of Arge 
Tony Johnstone of Zin 
we, Michael Jonzor 
Sweden and Paul Affle- 
Wales. 

The 40-year-old Spa 
revived memories of his 
years when he won three 
ish Opens and two U.S. 
rers titles. 

On the 15th, Balies 
found himself behind 
and bushes after his t 
Pulling out a four-woo< 
shot from his knees ant 
ball nearly reached 
green. 

"I had 185 yards and 
going to hit the ball 
which would have mean 
coming up well short ” 
Ballesteros. “But I ’sa 
hale gap between branc 
with my practice sv 
though, I couldn’t take 
club back because 
branches, so 2 decided ti 
on my knees. The ball c 
out perfectly with a ! 
draw ;" He holed a 15- 
putt for the birdie. 

Using a stellar appr< 

game, Ballesteros then 
ceeded to birdie the final tl 
holes, just missing an e 
on the 17th. 

“When 1 walked to the 

today I told my caddie I 



1 gam 


ti 


’Me** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TMBfcNE, WEPXESPAV. SEPTEMBER 24 , 1997 


PAGE i 


"y 8 ai,r 
lstt < 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRJDAi; SEPTEMBER 12. 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 


■ 'T..'S 

"Thi- ,j 

. ' i “ ^ 

- ■•Sfti - 

rw 


. - 

- Vk 
■ ^ • 


Waltzingfor Gold? 

IOC Swings Toward Ballroom Dancing 


By Jim Litlce 

The AsMiciaieJ Pre ss 

Business at the Chicago Dance Stu- 
dio — the one stop for all your ballroom 
‘.ancing needs — is up noticeably the 
-ast few days. People couldn’t be much 
happier about the news: They are going 
to the Olympics. 

"We are," said the studio's owner. 
Bob Urbon. “Aren't we?" Maybe. 

Urbon and his staff wouldn't be the 
ones going in any case. As professionals, 
they are barred from competing. And if 
you* ‘ant to get technical, ballroom dan- 
cing can’t even become a full-fledged 
Olympic sport for at least a decade. 

> But the champions of cha-cha do not 
discourage easily. Like converts to any 
cause, they’re sure time is on their side. 
The funny thing about this cause is that 
they might be right. 

Last weekend, the International 
Olympic Committee extended full re- 
cognition to the international federa- 
tions governing ballroom dancing, 
rugby and surfing. That means those 
three sports now join a club that already 
includes two dozen others, among them 
billiards, golf, water skiing, orienteer- 
ing and something called korfbaU. 

Practically speaking, there are only 
two ways onto the Olympic program. 
The first is for a sport to get hot. The 
second is for one or its guiding lights — 
an anonymous patron, say — to pur- 
chase a major American university and 
(coincidentally) set up a scholarship 
granting every child of every IOC mem- 
ber free tuition, as well as room and 
board, for life. 

Being mostly earnest folks, the ball- 
room-dancing people steer the argu- 
ment toward choice No. 1. 

“The IOC favors emerging sports 
practiced by young people and wom- 
en.” said Steve Halasz, who heads the 
Chicago chapter of ballroom dancing's 
national governing body. “A lot of 
people think it's an older people's sport, 
but that’s not the case. There’s an ex- 
traordinary movement by young people 
involved in competitive ballroom dan- 
cing all over the world.” 

Consider also: Brigham Young Uni- 
versity is the national powerhouse 


among the two dozen or so colleges that 
actually compete in ballroom dancing: 
and only last May, the International 
Dance Sport Federation hired the su- 
peragent Mark McCormick and his 
company. International Management 
Group, to further their cause. 

In fact, the ballroom-dancing people 
do a nice job. They already stage several 
hundred nice little events each year and 
even a few “majors. " The biggest in the 
states is the Ohio Star Bail. Interna- 
tionally, the big to-do is in Blackpool, 
England, where the legendary husband- 
ana-wife team of Corky and Shirley 
Balias come out of retirement and per- 
form for a few numbers. 

The true believers are not dissuaded 
by 'the fact that there are enough bad 
costumes in the Olympics already. Nor 
by the argument thar ballroom dancing 
is an exhibition — no wagering please 
— not a competition. 

“We hear that a lot," Halasz said. 
"Most people's first reaction is, "That 
doesn't seem like a sport.* But until 
they've acraaily seen it, they can’t ap- 
preciate how athletic it is. It’s at least as 
athletic as ice skating. There are even 
physiological studies showing that the 
competition at the highest level is com- 
parable with anything." 

He does not say who did these stud- 
ies, but the athletic component is le- 
gitimate, just as it is in skating, gym- 
nastics, synchronized swimming and a 
whole lot of other alleged Olympic 
sports. A couple might have ro dance as 
many as 20 heats — each lasting be- 
tween 90 seconds and rwo minutes — 
over a 12-hour period at a major ball- 
room competition. 

Ballroom dancing enjoys the occa- 
sional spike in popularity. Ir got a big lift 
a decade ago when Patrick Swayze 
mamboed in “Dirty Dancing." It is 
experiencing another one now. But the 
US. federation estimates the number of 
competitive ballroom dancers at only 
about 3,000, not enough to exert the 
kind of influence required to become an 
Olympic sport. 

Of course, it’s always foolish to un- 
derestimate the IOC. Choral singing, 
dumbbell swinging and still fishing 
were all Olympic sports once, too. 



I— g- L .1 

FrrAvi'- Uml-Hi' Vwvitn-d llm» 

The St. Louis Cardinals* Mark McGwire connecting for his 50th home run of the season against the Giants 

Look Out Babe, Here Comes McGwire 


The AsiiKutieJ Press 

Mark McGwire joined Babe Ruth as 
the only players to hit 50 homers in two 
consecutive seasons, but the St. Louis 
Cardinals lost to the San Francisco Gi- 
ants, 7-6, on Damon BerryiulTs single 
in the bonom of the 1 0th inning. 

McGwire, who hit a major-league- 
leading 52 homers for Oakland last sea- 
son, became the first player with back- 
to-back 50-homer seasons since Ruth 
did it in 1927 and 1928. Ruth also ac- 
complished the feat in 1920 and 1921. 

Braves 7, Dodgers O Tom Gia vine (13- 
7) pitched a four-hitter and Ryan Klesko 
homered and drove in three funs for the 
visiting Braves. 

Rockies 9, Astros 7 In Denver, Dante 
Bichette hit a grand slam and Lany 
Walker got his 43d homer, sending the 
NL Central leaders to their 10th loss in 
13 games. 


Expos 5, Pirates 4 Pedro Martinez 
(17-7) allowed three runs, two earned, 
and seven hits in seven innings and 
struck our eight for host Montreal. 

Padres 4, Martins 3 In San Diego, 

Tony Gwynn singled home the winning 
run off Ed Vosbery (1-1) in the ninth 
inning, sending Florida to its fifth defeat 
in six games. Gwynn is batting .369. 

Mots io, PhiHios z Butch Huskey and 
A lex Ochoa each drove in three runs as 
the host Meis averted a three-game 
sweep. 

Cubs 3, Rods 1 Kevin Tapani (6-3) 
won his fourth consecutive start, al- 
lowing one run and rive hits in IVi 
innings. Mark Grace had three hits as 
the visiting Cubs won for the sixth time 
in eight games. 


In the American League: 

Red Sox 5| Yankees 2 Aaron Sele 

broke a three-game losing streak with 
bis second consecutive strong start and 
host Boston beat slumping New York. 

White Sox 3, Browers 1 In Chicago, 
AJben Belle and Robin Ventura each 
homered, leading the White Sox over 
Milwaukee. Belle hit his 28ih home run 
in the second inning and Ventura hit his 
fifth of the season in the fifth. 

Mariners 10 , Tigers 0 In Seattle, Ken 
Griffey Jr. failed to homer for the third 
consecuti ve game, bm Jamie Moyer ( 1 6- 
4) won his fifth straight. Griffey, who 
has been stuck on 50 homers since Sun- 
day. went 0 for 4 with a walk. 

Athletics 3, Blue Jays 2 Pinch-hitter 
Brian Lesher singled home the winning 
run in the ninth before a paid attendance 
of 4,764, the smallest Oakland crowd 
since 1986. 


Ashburn Left 

Many Friends, 
Many Laughs -?i 


By Buster Olney i 

,V«w Yurt Times Sen-ice ! 

NEW Y ORK — Richie Ashburn is ini 
the Hall of Fame for his 2,574 hits, 2* 
batting titles and .308 lifetime batting! 
average. But the longtime Phillies play-t 
er and broadcaster, who died Tuesday, 1 
after an apparent heart attack, was re- 
membered by friends for his ability to} 
generate laughter. i 

Bob Murphy, the New York Mets] 
broadcaster, remembered thar it was! 
Ashburn, 70. who spent bis last season 1 
as a member of the legendary 1962! 
Mets. who gave Man* Thronebeny the; 
nickname, Marvelous. \ 

The P hillie s pitcher Cun Schilling: 
joked loudly with Ashburn about; 
whether Schilling, who leads the majors ■ 
in strikeouts, had enough stuff to strike) 
out Ashburn. one of the game's great, 
contact hitters in his time. 

“I know I never could've done it,”! 
Schilling said softly Tuesday before the; 
Phillies played the Mets. 

Tim McCarver, an analyst for Mets- 
television broadcasts, shared a broad-; 
cast booth with Ashburn when he first- 
began in the business. Ashburn asked; 
him directly and on the air. “Are you. 
nervous?" 

“Baseball lost its Will Rogers," Me-! 
Carver said Tuesday. 

Schilling added: “When you hear) 
Richie Ashburn 's name, you think Phil- 
lies. Baseball can't afford to lose its- 
vessels of good faith, and he was cer-'. 
tainlythat." 

Harry Kalas, who shared his Phillies! 
broadcast booth with Ashburn. said:- 
“He was Mr. Baseball in Philadelphia;! 
he was always so gracious with fans.. 
They'd come up, asking for autographs.; 
He'd sign all the time, saying, TIL" 
waive my usual honorarium. ’ ” 

During Monday's game at Shea, a! 
Philadelphia pinch-hitter, Kevin- 
Jordan, fouled off 10 straight pitches; 
before he lined a two-run double. Kalas. 
recalled that Ashburn took particular 
delight in the at-bat — when Ashburn! 
played, he played like that 


Scoreboard 




.1 in Bombins 
>. Exits 


Major League Standings 


JLAUmCAN LUOUI 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Baltiraore 

89 

53 

.627 

— 

New York 

Bl 

62 

J66 

814 

Boston 

70 

75 

.483 

2016 

Detroit 

70 

75 

,483 

2C/. 

Toronto 

70 

75 

483 

20W 


CENTTIALDIVWON 



Ctevetand 

w- 

«- 

-543- 

— 

Milwaukee 

72 

72 

500 

6 

Chicago 

71 

74 

.490 

7W 

Minnesota 

59 

84 

,413 

18‘A 

Kansas Oty 

58 

84 

408 

19 


WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

81 

65 

J55 

— 

Anaheim 

75 

70 

-517 

SVi 

Terras 

67 

78 

462 

13’6 

Oakland 

59 

87 

Mi 

22 

Hciotuu. morn 



EAST DIVISION 




W L P 4 « 

AttonfD 91 54 -6M " 

Florida 84 60 -583 6V, 

NewYork 78 ' 66 .542 1211 

Montreal 73 71 -507 17% 

PhfkuMphla 58 84 .408 31 -4 

CENTRAL DIVtStON 

Houston 73 72 -503 — 

Pittsburgh 70 74 479 J4 

St. Louis 67 78 .462 . 6 

Cincinnati 45 79 451 7W 

Chicago 61 « S .418 IZfc 

WEST DIVISION 

Los Angeles B1 65 J5S — 

. . Son Francisco 80 65 -H2 W 

v Catorato 74 72 J07 7 

F Son Diego 


77 473 12 


wnHin»-i miucotu 

AMERICAN LEAOUE 

Now York 100 000 100—2 6 0 

Boston 000 021 20* — 5 12 1 

D.Wefls, Nelson [8> and Posada; 5ete 

Coni U), Mahay OT, Gordon IB) and 
H Kalman W— 5Hc, 13-12. L— D. Weds. 14- 
10. Sv— Gordon (5). HR— New York. Boggs 

M. ■ 

MDwaotae 010 000 000-1 5 0 

□doge 010 010 IQs— 1 7 0 

E fared, Adamson 17) and Levis; Sere, 
Ford ham (6). McEboy (91 and Fabrcgos. 
W— Bore. 4-1. I — Eld red. 12-11 

.Sv-rMcEJmy O). HR^-CWcngn BeUe (281. 
Ventura (51. 

Toronto 000 000 Ml-2 3 1 

Oakland 002 000 B01—3 6 0 

W.WIfflam* Ptesac (9>. QuanWIl 19) and S. 
Martinet; Oqufst TJ-MoHmws (9) and 
Mayne. WL-TJ .Mathews, 5-2. L— Ptesac, 1- 
4. 

Detroit 00# 000 000-4) 6 1 

Seattle 000 123 04D-10 10 D 

Ja.Ttnmpson, Golfcid (61. Duran (BJ, 
Mkxril (5) and Casanova Jensen U); Mayes 
Timlin (8), Carmona (9) ond DaWRwn. 
W— Moyer. 16-4- L-Ju.Thompsorv 13-11. 
HRs— Seattt&A. Rodriguez (23), DfcWItson 
113). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Houston 301 000 210-7 11 1 

Colorado 100 210 5Bt — 9 11 1 

R-Garcfa J. Cabrera LSI Uma tO. 
Mognanta (7), B. Wagner (7), Hudek (7) and 
Ausmirs F.Costfllft Leskanic (7), DeJean 
(«, ML Munoz (ffl, Dipate (91 and Je-Reed. 
W— Leskanic 44). L-Magnanta, 3-1. 
Sv— Dlpoto (13). HRs— Co torn da L Wolker 
(43). Bichette CM. CasttBo (39), Putnam 
0 ). 

St Loots 021 009 300 0-6 9 0 

5aa Francisco 201 000 111 1—7 12 2 
(10 lrmings):Beitraiv Frascatore (61, Fossas 


(7), C King (BL Eckentty (9), Pam** (io> 
and Dlfetlee Estes. D. Henry (7). C. Bailey 
(7), R. Rodriguez (7), Beck (9) and B. 
Johnson MJrabelfi (9). W-Beck. 5-3. 
L— Painter, CM. HRs— Si Louis, McGwire 
(16). Son Francisco. Bonds (331, Javier (8). 
Chicago ooo no loo-a ii a 

andimtf BM 900 010-1 6 1 

Tapani Patterson (0), Pfccrotto RQ, T. 
Adams (SO and Senate Mereker, Sullivan 

(5) , Graves (6), Fe. Rodriguez 19) and J. 
Oliver. W— Tapwi 6-3. L— Mereker, 8-10. 
Sv—T. Adorns 05). 

PimtHirgh 000 010 210-4 10 0 

Montreal ' 012 IT0 0flM-£ 0 T 

Ueber. Peters (5), Desserts (5), Sodowsfcy 

(6) , Christiansen (7). MLWHklns (7) and 
Kwdnfc PJ-Marttatez, Kline (8). Teffotri (Bl, 
Urfalrxr (8) ond Ftefcher, WkJger (8). 
w—pj .Martinez, 17-7. L-Ueber, 9-14. 
So— Urbina (25). HR*— Montreal Lansing 
(19),S1range (12). 

PhfladetpNa 200 000 000-2 7 0 

New York 112 000 24X-T0 16 I 

Beech. R. Hams (3). Btazter (4), Ryan (6), 
Winston (B) and Lieberthal Bohanon, LMie 

(7) , R. Jordan (9) and Pratt W— Bohnnaa 5- 
4. L— Beech, 4-P. HR— New Ytok, McRae 
W). 

Atlanta 000 520 000-7 8 1 

Los Angeles 000 DM 000-0 4 1 

Gkwine and J. Lopes RJIAarilnez, D. 
Reyes (5), Hotkey (7), Garedd (9) and 
Piazza, Prince (8). W— Gtavhre, 13-7. L— R. 
Martinez, 9-4. HR— Atlanta. Klesko (22). 
Florida 100 010 810-3 8 1 

Sim Diego 201 000 001-4 10 1’ 

A-Femrerdez, PoweB (8), Vbsberg (9) ond 
Zaun; P JmBtv TLWorreti (B). HtKhcock (8), 
Bruske (9) and Flaherty, C Hernandez (9). 
W— Bruske, 4-1. L— Vasberg, 1-1. 

HR— Florida D. White (4). 


Japanese Leagues 

CIHT1AI UAOUE 



w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Yakult 

69 

45 

2 

MS 

_ 

Yokohama 

62 

57 

— 

544 

7J1 

Hiroshima 

59 

54 

— 

522 

95 

Yomiuri 

54 

64 

— 

458 

17j# 

Hanshln 

53 

64 

1 

453 

175 

Chunichl 

50 

68 

1 

424 

21 J> 


MOPKUAOUI 




W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Setou 

66 

•47 

3 

584 

w 

Orix 

59 

49 

3 

546 

45 

Klntefcu 

57 

58 

4 

496 

10J) 

Daiel 

54 

61 

1 

470 

1X0 

Nippon Han 

1 54 

64 

1 

458 

145 

Lotto 

50 

61 

2 

450 

15.0 

THURSDAY'S KJESULTC 



CENTRAL LEAGUE 




Yamiurt 7. Yokohama 3 
Hiroshima 7. Konshin 6 

Pacific league 
Kmteteui Setbo 3 
Orix 9, Latte 0 
DaWri 4, Nippon Ham 3 


Tour of Spain 

Renats Thuiedey of 147-fcUomaMr (01- 
mfle) Orh stage between Metoge end Grena- 
de: 

l, Laurent Jotaberf. France. ONCE.3h.36m. 
and is. 

Z Laurent Ocitilux. Switrwtoml tofus, sJ. . 

X F. Escarttn. Sp- Kalme^asta Blanca, s-t. 
A, Alex Zucfle. Swltzeriand, ONCE, s.L . 
5,Sergud Ivanov, Rus<TVM,at1 m, 57 s. 

6. Bo Homburger, Denmark, TVM, s.1 

7, David Garcia Sa. EuskatoLEuskadl s.t. 


& ClauiSa ClUappucA Italy. Ask&CGA. s-t 
9. Oaus MoDer, Den. Estepono-Toscat s.t. 
IR Tony R wringer, Switzerland, Cofldte s.t. 

overall: 1,Jalabett27h«48m.and34 
sj Z Du faux, at 16 Li Z Escarttn, 21 s. 4. 
Zuette, 26 sj 5. CMaptfcd 2 m. (3 sj 6. 
FnmdscoCeiezo. Spain, Estepono-Tascaf.2 
m. 19 s.- 7. Mailer, 2 m. 19 s« B, Yvon 
Ledanois. Franca, GAN, 2 m. 23 sj 9, Abra- 
ham Otarto Spain, Banesto. 2 m. 23 sj 1& 
l bon Aiuria, Spctiru Euskatel-Eu6kadl 2 rru 
23 s. 


WORLOCUP 

■UkoeUK ZONE 

GROUP ONE 
Denmark 1 Croatia 1 
Bosnlo4tetzegovina 1, Slovenia 0 
STANDnas: Denmark 16 points Greece 
11- Croatia 12; Bosnia K Slovenia 1. 

anoupTWo 
EnolandAMoidavaO 
Georgia 0, Italy 0 

btandmosc England 18 porrhshaiy 17; 
Poland 7.- Georgia 4 

Moldova a CROUP THREE 
Hungary 3, Azerbaijan 1 
Nareray 5, Swifaeriand 0 
WAM Pms i q-Norway 20 ptei Hungary 
11; Finland IDs Switzerland 7; Azerbaijan 1 
q -qualified tor 1998 finals In France. 
CROUP FOUR 
Austria l.BekvusD 
Sweden 1, Latvia 0 

stamhnocc Austria 22 pin; Scotland 2ft 
Sweden 1&- Latvia 1ft Estonia « Bdonw 4. 

GROUP FIVE 
Bulgaria 1, Russia 0 

STANOWast q- Bulgaria 18 points.- Rus- 


sia 14; Israel IX Cyprus 7: Luxembourg 0. 
q -qualified tor 1998 finals in France. 
CROUP SR 

SlovoUo 1, Yugoslavia 1 
stamdbmMi Ybgostovld2Q;Spato2ft5to- 
vakla 16; Czech R. lft Foem l. a Malta 0. 

GROUP SEVEN 
Turkey & San Marina 0 
stand mast Netherlands 18 points; Bel- 
gium 1 Sr Turkey 1 X Wales 7; Son Mrafno 0. 

GROUP EIGHT 
Romanian Iceland Q 
Ireland Z Lithuania 1 

9T«NDmaL q-Romanto 27; Ireland 17; 
Ltthuonto i« Macedonia IX Iceland ft 
Liechtenstein O: " 
q-quafifled tor 1998 finals In France. 
CROUP MNE 
Albania 1, Northern Ireland 0 
Germany 4 Armenia 0 
STUSimt: Germany 19 points; Ukraine 
17; Portugal IftArinerttaft NJrt 7; AtowiloA. 
SOUTH AOUUUCAH EONS 

Argentina Z Chile 1 
Peru Z Uruguay 1 
Paraguay Z BoIMaT 
Colombia t, Venezuela 0 
STANUNOSi q- Argentina 28 points; q- 
Cotomfaia 27; rH’araguay 2ft Peru 2Z Chile 
19: Ecuador 1ft BaHvto 17; Uruguay 17; 
Venezuela 3 

Q-quaWVed far 1998 finals In France. 
MAJOR UAOOI SOCCOR 
Uk Angeles Z Colorado 0 
STANDfHOS: EafMm Oenftreacn X-O.C. 
48 pohite- Tempo Bay 3ft Columbus 32; NY- 
NJ 31; New England 28. Western Confer- 
ence: x- Kansas Cffv 46 points Dados 3ft 
Catorado 35; Lns Angeles 3Z San Jose 27. 
x -clinched playoff spat 

SOUTH ASIAN CHAMMONMP 
MahtivesZSit Lanka l 

BfTnUUunOHAI molDLY 
BrazO 4. E aw dw 2 


BAS8BAU. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

AL— Suspended Detroit pitching coach Rich 
AdalrtorS games ond OF Bobby Hlg0in*on2 
games tor pastgome amtnuil u tton with um- 
pires alter Sandaye game with Anahehn. 

DETitorr —Bought contract of OF Jimmy 
Hunt ftnm Toledo, IL Deslg noted INF Jody 
Reed tor assignment 

MbWymk— B ought contract of RHP Willie 
Banks Tram Columbus. IL Moved INF Gabby 
-Mnrttnez to 60-day cfisabled list. 

MTtOKAL LEAQUE 

aNCWNATL-Acttvated 1 B Hal Morris from 
15-day disabled list. 

UK ANGELES— Recalled RHP RicK Goredd 
tram San Antonin TL 

Philadelphia— B ought contract of LHP 
Darrin Winston from Scranton Wilkes-Barre 
IL Transferred LHP BUy Brewer to 60-day 
disabled list 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

cm a Rums— Signed F Travis WDHams and 
F Tony Former. 

Miami — S igned G Eric Munlocx. 

Vancouver -Signed G Marcus Brown to 
2-year centred. Named Jim Boytan and Jack 
Nolan assistant coaches. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTHAU. LEAGUE 

Chicago —Signed G dirts Gray and CB 
Ricky Befl- Waived TE Tremayne Allen ond 
CB Corey Dowdea 

Cincinnati —signed CB Tito PouL Re- 
leased CB Roger Jones. 

DENVER -Re-signed OT Gary Zlmmer- 
man. 

Washington -Waived DT Keith Rudcer. 
Signed DT Ryan KuehL 


HOCX8V 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
CAUtARV— Re-signed FMcrtyMdmis. ■ 
CARO UNA— Signed G Trevor Kidd to tmrf- 
ttyeor contract. 

Montreal— S igned F Aartm Ashamand 0- 
Bnrtt Clark to 3- year contracts, D David WBkle- 
and Alesd Lolkln to 2-year contracts, and O 
SabasnenBarrMeou to 1 -year contract. ■ 

N ew jersey ^Signed C Brendan Morrison- 
to multiyear con tracL 

K-Y. islanders— A greed to temrs with C-’ 
RW Bryan Smoflmkl LW Ken Bekmgerand' 
RW Warren Luhrdng. 1 

N.Y. RANGERS— Agreed to terms with O' 
Alexander Karpavtsev and F Vladimir Vom 
bfev and with RW Alexei Kovalev on 2-year* 
contrad-Named John Paddock director of 
professional scouting. Announced that Mar- 1 
tin Madden Jr. has been promoted to scouting' 
staff on o fan-time basis. 

OTTAWA -Re-signed D Stan NecAorto 1-‘ 
■year contract. 

pmoen iX-Sent D Curtis Suterto Spokane, - 
WHL, RW Les Borsheim (o Brandon, 1/VHL,' 
LW Bobby Russell to Portiand. WHL, Ben' 
Gimtavson to Ottowa, OH L RW Brad Lerto to’ 
Red Deer. WHL D Scott McCollum to Tri-‘ 
Qty. WHL D Alex Andreyev to Weybum,' 
SJHl RW Wes Goldie to Owen Sound, OHL 
LW Michael Hanson to Sanaa OHL and □; 
Per Anton Lundstrom to Mo Do Ot Sweden. , 
Pittsburgh— Signed LW Joe DzJedzlc. _ 
TAMPA SAY— Agreed to terms with RW DI-, 
no Ocaaredr on I -year contract extension 
through 1998-99 seasoR 

fTMll WTff 

NCAA-Refused Miami Hurricanes WR, 
Jamml Germaits appeal to play his senior, 
season. 

Florida— Signed Steve Spurrier. foalbaB. 
coach, to 6-year contract 
Stanford— Signed Tyrone WBUnghare, 
footbas coach, through 2001. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 

Tr3 -T SSHT _ 3T1 As she said, “Goodbye" I He was “Oh, well” he Little did he know, 

„ BSg 3 j and ran up the steps, heartbroken, thouqht.* I * his doa had been 

— a -| lit knew he "would still nove $ plflnnirujtoteflvc nim. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


wTcSmT' 

GET MV BAIL 
OUT CF THE 
GUTTER AGWN? 


THE B THE TWRD TIME TWS 
AFTajNCO^i ITHOUGHVI 
TOD WTOPlASCWTBfa.! 





never see her aqain. 
® 


GARFIELD 


HWNSXTGUeST BA ' 
PREHISTORIC MONSTER 


my dog." 


RELAX. DAD. ITS -PJST A 
BUL SH TWE. GUTTER- ITS NOT 
fG IF EVE BSN EMBEZZLING 
OR WLUN5 TKPLE. 
RIGHT? AREKT W GLAD I’H 
NOT STBUNG WffiHUWEBNGr 






I MMMS W*IE 

ESTABLISH THE 
PROPER 
CONT > 




WIZARD of ED 


JMKB THAT TWO 


*Mom swdio go ansrtJE, Mtpvp H 
sanETHiNfi fun, so tm iwtcwn TV. 




A UART OF 

&1N wmf a 

■STRAW IN rr 























PAG 




: Rr 
*ha 
-fo 
.'sts 


'eh 


ga 

la 


in 

"le 

sa 

"to 


■ m 
'cu 

lei 

ne 

in 

vc 

fn 


B 


re 


sa 

■?! 


□< 

pi 


te 

si 

SF 

ax 

ax 

lu 

D 


w 
at 
N 
H 
c< 
! te 
oi 


-A 


J 'Cl 

U 

JC 

K 
j di 

b- 


" ic 
,r tt 
a 

n n ‘ 

d 

r C 

-b 

P 

-S 

si 

SI 







RAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12. 199; 


POSTCARD 


The Microwave Is 30 


The Associated Pm* 

A MAN A, Iowa — Eleanor 
JTxVsvricek remembers the 
day she came home from work 
and laid her eyes on the brand 
new, boxy-looking contrap- 
tion on her kitchen counter. 

~ "I thought ‘What is 
that?/ ** she said. “ ‘What in 
the world do I do with 
that?’ ” 

. Cook, that’s whaL Like 
never before. 

. The newfangled gift from 
her husband made Vavricek 
one of the first owners of the 
Amana Radarange mi- 
crowave oven, which made its 
debut in American kitchens 
30 years ago this, month. 

"It made my life a lot easi- ■ 
er — and simpler, ’ ' said Vav- 
ricek, who worked in a res- 

tanrant at the time. 

Many still feel that way. 
Americans rank the micro- 
wave oven as the No. 1 tech- 
nology that makes their lives 
better, according to a survey 
by Yankelovich Partners. 
That puts the microwave 
ahead of the telephone an- 
swering machine and the auto- 
matic teller machine, which 
ranked second and third. 


rime buyers install the con- 
traption and cook the family s 

first microwave meal. 

Those home economists, 
all women, were on call 24 
horns a day for each client for 
the first year of the project. A 
serviceman was also on call, 
guaranteed to arrive within 
one hour in case of trouble. 


Beneath the Glitter, the Dark Side of 1950s L. A, 


By Bernard Weinraub 

Ne h 1 York Times Sen-ice 


□ 


□ 


Yet Amana officials were 
nervous about introducing the 
microwave technology in 
1967. Even in an age of as- 
tronauts and TV dinners, they 
did not think the unusual 
product stood a chance with- 
out proper customer prepa- 
ration. The company spent a 
year educating wholesalers 
and retailers, then launched 
the Radarange with a nation- 
wide media blitz. 

In the Chicago area, 
Amana invited reporters and 
homemakers to homes where 
Amana hosts served coffee, 
reheated meals and made 
popcorn. The company even 
hired home economists who 
made house calls to help first- 


Lyle Bischof remembers 
those days, especially the 
cooking demonstrations 
every Saturday morning at 
the Amana General Store, 
where he worked. 

“It was a situation where 
you had to explain to cus- 
tomers because they didn't 
know much about it,” re- 
called Bischof, who is now 
the store’s appliance man- 
ager. “They’d say, ‘Gosh, 
what is it going to do?’*’ ' 

“We’d put a potato in there 
and show them, like four 
minutes for a potato, or a bowl 
of soup in a minute and a 
half,” he said. “A lot of 
people at that time, both the 
husband and wife were work- 
ing. It was such a time-saver 
and snch a convenience.” 

“It didn’t take me very 
long to get it figured out; ic 
was pretty simple, ’ ’ said Vav- 
ricek, 78, who won Amana’s 
“Oldest. Microwave Con- 
test” last spring. 

The new Arriaga has 1,000 
wans of cooking power and 
electronic controls with pre- 
programmed touch pads. It 
cooks food in half die time of 
the original model. 

The number of American 
households with microwaves 
has grown from about 10 per- 
cent in 1977 to nearly 90 per- 
cent today, Dixie Trout, an 
Amana spokeswoman, said. 

Still, for all the popularity of 
microwaves. Trout said, it did 
not do what many Amana en- 
gineers had envisioned — re- 
place the conventional oven. 


T OS ANGELES — Los 
I v Angeles in the early 1950s. “It 
was the era of mystery and glam- 
onr, an era when everything started 
in that postwar boom that’s still 
very much with us — the free- 
ways, the idea and growth of sub- 
urbia, television, die start of the 
tabloid press,” said Curtis Han- 
son, the director of "L.A. Con- 
fidential” and a co-author of this 
much-anticipated film adaptation 
of James Ellroy’s celebrated. 1990 
noveL ■* 

It was also a seemingly innocent 
era when the sunshine, seductive 
ocean breezes and gleaming streets 
obscured the city’s corrupt and vi- 
olent underbelly. "Is there any city 
where image and reality are at such 
cross-purposes?” the 52-year-old 
Hanson, who grew up in Los 
Angeles, asked almost in wonder- 
ment. 

“L.A. Confidential,” which 
miens Sept 19, emerged from the 
Cannes International Film Festival 
in May with such a strong positive 
response that it has already greatly 
enhanced the careers of Hanson, 
whose previous films include * ‘The 
Hand That Rocks the Cradle” 
(1992) and “The River Wild” 
(1994), and the principal actors in 
its sprawling cast 

These actors include Kevin 
Spacey as an opportunistic police 
detective who serves as technical 
director to a television show very 
much like “Dragnet"; Kim Ba- 
singer as a high-class prostitute 
who allows her clients to imagine 
that she is Veronica Lake; David 
Strathaim as a mysterious million- 
aire on die order of Howard 
Hughes, and Danny DeVito as the 
sleaze-mongering editor of a Hol- 
lywood tabloid. 

But most prominent among them 
are two relative unknowns, whose 
performances are likely to trans- 
form them into stars: Russell 
Crowe, a New Zeaiand-bom actor, 
who plays Bud White, a dogged,, 
violent policeman who’s smarter 



lire late 1970s, started writing, Alt 
his novels are variations on the 
same theme, he once said: “Bad. 
white men doing bad things mfoe 
name of authority.’ . 

The Los .Aneeles of EHroy’s 
i magin ation — the city of the 50s 
and '60s — is goiie. of course, and 
although he remains obsessed wirit 
the city, he hasn’t resided there 
since 19S1. 

“In some ways LA is a life 
sentence.” Ellroy. who lives in 
Kansas City with his second wife, 
said recently. ‘ ‘I always think F at 
done with LA. but then J keep 
corninq back. I keep getting sucked 
back m to do some research/. io 
promote this film. T don’t know 
what modern-day LA is. In some 
ways, it’s about’as far away from , 
me as Mars.” 

The film, adapted by Hanson and 
Brian Helgelaad. weaves many of 
the plot lines and characters in. the. 


novel, Ellroy 's most complicated 
“ "ows three 


Kim Basinger in Curtis Hanson’s “L.A. Confidential,” based on James Eliroy’s 1990 book.- 


than he seems, and Guy Pearce, an 
Australian best known here for por- 
traying a young drag queen in * ‘The 
Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of 
the Desen.” He plays Ed Exley. a 
prim, ferociously ambitious police 
officer loathed by his colleagues. 

Why did Hanson give these two 
actors the most important roles in 
such a quintessennally American 
tale about the conflicting mgs of 
loyalty, honor and ambition? 

“I wanted actors about whom, 
the audience has no preconceived 
notion.” explained the director, 
who is wiry, bearded and intense. 

‘ T wanted the audience to accept 
these two characters, at face value 
and not make assumptions about 
them based on roles the actors had 
played before.” 


Indeed, if there is a dominant 
theme in foe movie, it is that noth- 
ing in Los Angeles — or, by ex- 
tension, foe United Stares — is 
quite what it seems. “Each char- 
acter appears to be one thing when 
you first meet him or her. but is, in 
fact, something else.” said Han- 
son. “This is also my feeling about 
Los Angeles. U was foe opportunity 
to deal with foe characters and the 
city this way that attracted me to 
Eliroy’s novel.” 

No writer has illustrated foe dark 
side of midcentory Los Angeles 
quite like Ellroy, the 49-year-old 
author whose often harrowing and 
complex best sellers also include 
“The Black Dahlia.” “The Big 
Nowhere.” “White Jazz” and 
“American Tabloid.” 


As readers of his recent memoir, 
“My Dark Places,” know, Ellroy 


knows foe u|dy side of Los Angeles 


firsthand. His parents divorced 
when he was 4. His mother, an 
alcoholic, was found strangled to 
death in 1958. when be was 10, 
apparently after picking up a man 
in a bar.* (The crime was never 
solved.) He moved in with his fa- 
ther, an accountant and "Holly- 
wood bottom feeder.” as he puts it. 
and experienced “a genteel white- 
trash existence.” The father died 
when Ellroy was 17. and in the two 
decades that followed he plunged 
into a whirlpool of drugs, booze, 
petty crime, fistfights and 
poverty. 

Evenrually he attended Alcohol- 
ics Anonimous meetings and. in 


The central story follows three po- 
licemen (the Spacey, Pearce and 
Crowe characters) as they edge into 
a spiral of corruption and retri- 
bution that joins the worlds of Hol- 
lywood, local politics and organ- 
ized crime. 

“I wanted to rewrite foe secret 
history of Los Angeles to my own 
specifications,” said Ellroy. “I 
wanted to write a book that was so 
deep, so dense, so dark it would 
stand as an alternative history. I 
wanted people to say and feel that 
this is how it was at foe time, this is 
foe secret scoop foe newspapers 
never told us.” 

How does Ellroy feel about the 
film? “It’s startling to see how 
they've telescoped my book,” he 
said. "It's startling that Curtis and 
Brian took a book that was so 
damned complex, so multilayered 
and densely plotted and adapt ed it 
so successfiiUy.” 

Warner Brothers had bought the 
movie rights to "LJA, Confident 
tial” in 1989, but no one could 
quire figure out how to make sock a 
brooding, complicated drama until 
Helgeland and Hanson teamed 
up. 



HOMES OF THE RICH AND FAMOUS 


PEOPLE 


Mr. America? Bob Vila Builds a Dream Persona 


By John Marchese 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 


O STERVTLLE, Massachusetts — 
Ima gin e a marginally more re- 
laxed Martha Stewart with a beard. Is 
America ready for that? 

Bob Vila is moving around a huge 
and impressive kitchen erf one of his 
four booses, dressed in sandals, khaki 
shorts and a tan Lacoste shirt, su- 
pervising preparations for a summer 
seashore cookouL The kitchen con- 
tains polished granite counter tops 
and industrial-strength cook tops. Di- 
ana Barrett, an adjunct professor at 
foe Harvard University School of 
Public Health and Vila’s wife of 22 
years (they have three children), is 
vying with him for control over foe 
proceedings. 

, They have short, cheerful arguments 
about preparing clams and swordfish 
Steaks that sometimes end with Vila, a 
Florida native of Cuban heritage, ex- 
claiming something in Spanish. It 
seems a well-worn routine. 

"If you had told me 20 years ago 
that my husband would be cutting a 
cheesecake in half with a reciproc- 
ating saw — I don’t know what I 
would have thought,” said Barrett, 
referring to one of his recent pro- 
motional appearances for Sears, 
Roebuck & Co. 

!' "From the most recent surveys 
we’ve done,” said Andy Ginger, a 
Sears brand manager, “Bob Vila is 
recognized by 73 percent of all foe 
living, breathing adults in America.” 

To which Vila, 50, responds, “It’s 
kind of frightening, isn’t it?” 

He is a man who gets obvious sat- 
isfaction from a lifestyle that is far 
ipraoved from that of most folks who 
wear tool belts. For 10 years, Vila was 
foe host of public television’s phe- 
nomenally popular “This Old House’ 
now he is the host of the syndicated 
show "Home Again With Bob Vila." 
He appeared regularly on NBC’s 
"Today” show for four years, where 
he showed Bryanr Gumbel and Katie 
Couric how to fix their leaky faucets. 



it is a magazine that is selling celebrity 
as much as home repair advice. 

It is John Mack Carter. Hearn’s 
director of new magazine develop- 
ment. who compares Vila with 
Martha Stewart. Though Vila down- 
plays foe comparison, he does say, 
“It’s inevitable, isn’t it?” 

Vila is a partner in foe new venture, 
sharing in its overall success, says foe 
editor of American Home. Michael 
Chotiner. Vila has also managed foe 
tidy tax-deductible trick of turning his 
entire life into his business. “It's won- 
derful that I can follow my enthu- 
siasms, and turn a profit,” Vila says. 

Vila went into home renovation 
with a degree in communications, two 
years in the Peace Corps and a short 
stint studying architecture. After do- 
ing a handful of restorations around 
Boston in foe early 1970s, he was 
cited by House Beautiful for renov- 
ating his home. The article caught foe 
attention of the public television pro- 
ducer Russell Morash. who virtually 


S PANISH celebrities in- 
cluding Julio Iglesias led 
an event in homage ro foe 
Basque politician Miguel An- 
gel Blanco Garrida. who was 
slain by ETA separatists in 
July. Princesses Cristina and 
Elena de Borbon were 
among 14.000 guests clapping 
alonelo songs a: foe jubilee < 


music, poetry readings and 
Las Vi 


dance at Madrid’s Las Ventas 
bullring. Iglesias sang against 
a backdrop of blue ribbons — 
a symbol of peace adopted in 
foe’ face of ETA violence — 
and recounted how he had 
named his newborn son 
Miguel, after Blanco. 


Li 


S ro- 
d's 


gram in foe ’60s with Julia Chun s 
"French Chef' series. Morash re- 
cently told The Los Angeles Times. 
“He had a glib way about him. Didn't 
know anything about building or con- 
tracting or anything else. But he was 
certainly a talker.” 

Vila, who says he was paid S250 an 


episode when he signed on with 
“This 


Ed ijolrin'l'i* V. WkTImr. 

Poised to become America’s taste maker: Vila at home on Cape Cod. 


In a world where ubiquity begets 
authority. Bob Vila is established as 
America's Handyman. Now, he is 
poised to become America’s Taste- 
maker. There's foe obligatory Web 
site (www.bobvila.com). And per- 
haps most significant, last month 
Hearst Magazines shipped foe third 
test issue of “Bob Vfla’s American 


Home,’ ’ which tries to meld the gritty 
advice of a men's how-to magazine 
with the highly styled dream-house 
pictures that have long been foe staple 
of women’s decorating magazines. 
From the title to foe cover picture of 
Vila to cover lines that include 
"Bob’s Perfect Patio” and "How We 
Got Our House on Bob's TV Show," 


Old House," quickly learned 
that the real money was in endorse- 
ments. And the success of the show — 
it won 14 Emmys — gave him a high 
level of authority and recognition. 

Ii is true that Vila is a talker. He 
brags that in 20 years he has never 
used a script. During foe evening. Vila 
might describe himself several ways. 
"I'm 80 percent a real estate de- 
veloper." or, “I’m an entrepreneur at 
hean.” Or even, “I’m a pop figure.” 

The latter seems most accurate. 
Vila may have several related oc- 
cupations, but his most important is 
playing Bob Vila, foe persona he cre- 
ated — the one that foe people around 
him call “the Franchise.” 


A Paris square to be named 
after Maria Call as will re- 
main anonymous — for now. 
Paris officials have post- 
poned the inauguration be- 
cause foe site is so close ro foe 
underpass where Diana, 
Princess of Wales, had her 
fatal accident. "It’s a place of 
sadness.’ ’ said a city nail rep- 
resentative. "We would have 
had difficulty celebrating, 
and we didn’t want to offend 
people who had put flowers 
there for the princess.” 

□ 

Japanese film fans are lin- 
ing up from as early as six in 
the morning to see an an- 
imated feature whose produ- 
cers expect to break national 
box office records estab- 
lished by Steven Spielberg’s 
“E.T." “The Princess 
Mononoke," by foe re- 
nowned Japanese animator 
Hayao Miyazaki, is set in 
ancient Japan and tells foe 
story of a girl raised by 
wolves. It will be distributed 
globally by Walt Disney Stu- 
dios from March next year. 

□ 

Howard Stern to Canada: 
Lighten up, eh. The radio host 
refused to apologize for in- 





DummHjuj FjjnavApcfKM FraM-ft**.' 


Princess Elena de Borbon and her husband, Jaime de A 

to Blanco in Madrid. ' 


Marichalar, at the tribute 


suiting French-speaking Que- 
beckers on his show, saying: 


“I can't imagine anybody 
i nai I say seri- 


would take w! 
ously." Stem made his Ca- 
nadian debut last week when 
his New York-based program 
was broadcast in Montreal 
and Toronto. He used insult- 
ing words to describe Fran- 
cophones and charged that foe 
French had collaborated with 
foe Nazis during World War 
II. The broadcast prompted 
the Quebec government to 
suggest Stem was violating a 
law against stirring up ethnic 
hatred. At a news conference. 
Stem said: "The reason you 
guys have put me on the from 
page of your newspapers is 
because I'm foe freshest, 
wildest radio host in the 
world. You’ve now been in- 
troduced to good radio.” 




■ t 


Luciano Pavarotti per- 
formed a new role at the Met- 
ropolitan Opera: He unveiled 
U.S. postage stamps honoring 
four legendary opera stars, 
Richard Tucker, Lily Pons, 
Lawrence Tibbett and Rosa 
Ponseffe. The stamps went on 
sale nationwide Thursday. 

□ 

More than half a century j 
after he brought Al Capone to 
justice, Eliot Ness finally re- 
ceived a hero’s funeral. A 
black 1938 Buick carried foe 
former T-man‘s rem ains to ■ 
their final resting place in a ^ 
Cleveland cemetery. As lead- 
er of "The Untouchables' ' 

Ness helped convict Capone, 
foe legendary Chicago gang- 
ster, on tax evasion charges. 

Ness died broke, of a heart 
aoack at age 54 in 1957. 


■•'"A/v *?ni j 

.?72.-.'3S S fcS 


i»: 







& mk 


% 

: * •. 




WA 

* - • -• '•52- 


1 love 0-800-99-0011 


Even’ country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to otiier countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you're 
calling from and you’ll get the clearest connections 
home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 
Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone 
charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 
{up to 60%*). Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 




833= \ 


BM DOG 87*0 till 


Steps to follow for easy 
calling worldwide: 


1 .last dial the AT&T Access Number 
for the ffiuntn you are ailing trim. 

2 Dial dw [iliiine number vou'rt calling 

5 Dial the calling card number listed 
aboie ’numane. 


EUROPE 

Austria *o 

022-983-111 

Belgium* . . 

0-800-100-10 

France 

0-808-99-6011 

Germany ... 

0130-0010 

Greece* .. 

00-808-1311 

Ireland^ 

1-880-550-000 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Nattierfanits* 

08W-022-9111 

Russia **{Mo 5G0W) » . 

.755-5042 

Spain.. . 

900-99-60-11 

Sweden 

020-795-611 

Switzerland*. 

0808-89-0011 

United Kingdom* . . 

0580-89-0011 


0800-09-0011 

KIDDLE EAST 

egypt* maim)' 

. 510-0200 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Saudi Arabia * 

1-800-10 

AFRICA 

unana . . 

0191 

South Africa 

0-800-99-0128 


in the springtime. 




(Jaw aaurOME' fro Minute * 1 th wJw jswnpb wapamlta mix Li. antes cn calk & I'S □essbHdonoSRSBpRMiRKe WWR "Cr^rndwanjin Ivsdi&jtirair Cun#* wall 1 utiiel $ is 'sm-nSe it**, tool u'lnpmj' be higher "t kTOii^wddns nkdoxl. iww 

dal fcngftqrislf h fcati twiiiii tran *iK± twine aftmc R^tirioiifittopernifcosrto-iKJM'to arl'j, Giltaalim: u j'jlljMeh.rfir fs cvrtr 4K»mtr wc' 0 «el'i| ihciR'-r J«ltviiref i.ptiBMoJu'iiiiJ.'atdijip'tortfuirtfccnoaip-.iiu.tn.-afi- 

Irf. lou anoints I'-* TmcullC'-rniEMlWl*** •PuNfcpLimia^todepninircntaarrtoaranrdlijriiLiJ unc. jUmjMhbir lidcypMKovjrJr^'injT *LM>oJ naLSInvchiblli pfvnr rwuui kol o«n pi-mail dunn.: 4>?eJI. uT 

ai.se ^ «*» marlw in X tafand 1 Lw P»‘ m Pwmi C t«iOe^irf * Co ■ TOPi cw oaT 



AT&T 


X Cl; 
r-i ii 


m