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PAGES 


E, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER &tj 1997 


Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 




A. E* 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Dally Newspaper 


Paris, Wednesday, September 17, 1997 



Thai Economic Dive Exposes Social Crisis 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 


BANGKOK — As usual in Thailand, everyone 
was smiling: the demonstrators with (heir red paper 
flags, the police officers with strips of cloth pro- 
tecting their noses from pollution, die sidewalk 
vendors selling grilled pork and squid. 

But the slogan of the demonstration this weekend 
was an angry one: “Poor people pay off the debt 
while the evil capitalists sell off the country.” 

Anger has been building since the economy 
crashed this summer, jolting the country from a 
decade of heady growth and exposing deep and 
dangerous fissures in society. The baht bias lost more 
than a third of its value, prices have soared, banks are 
closing, people are losing their jobs try the thousands 
and a wave of bankruptcies has begun. 


Bangkok is on edge and military leaders have 
taken the extraordinary step of announcing tha^ they 
do not plan to stage a coup — once the standard 
procedure here for resolving government crises. 

“Please tell people not to panic/' a military 
spokesman said Monday, in announcing a plan to 
move tanks, heavy weapons and 3,000 soldiers into 
the city for a military parade this week. 

Most analysts are confident that the era of coups 
has passed since the last one occurred in 1991. But 
civilian governments since then have had little suc- 
cess in dealing with hard issues. 

Despite a recent pledge by the Internationa] Mon- 
etary Fund to provide Thailand with a $17 billion 
rescue package, a sense of crisis has grown. 

“Everything seemed so perfect,” said Ravivoag 
Sareecom, a public relations worker who was used to 
buying new shoes and handbags without a second 


thought “We didn’t expect things to come down so 
fast We believed, the government, you see.” 

The frustration with the government reflects an 
emerging social conflict in Thailand, where the polit- 
ical structure has not modernized along with the 
country's rapid growth. 

An increasingly influential middle class with new 
values of individualism and egalitarianism is chal- 
lenging the ruling patriarchy, which has in large pan 
degenerated into a culture of corruption. 

The flashpoint of this conflict, fueled by econ omic 
discontent, is a draft constitution that is due to be 
voted on by Parliament at the end of the month, 
following a no-confidence debate focusing on Prime 
Minister Chaovalit Yongchaiyut 

* ‘The stakes are life and deat h for Thailand,” said 


See THAIS, Page 8 


Declawing 
The ‘Tigers’ 
Of East Asia 

Cash Crisis Shatters 
Investor Assumptions 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


HONG KONG — East Asia's fi- 
nancial turmoil has overturned the as- 
sumptions of investors and economists 
about the region's “tiger” economies, 
forcing a broad reassessment of eco- 
nomic strengths and vulnerabilities. 

Put simply, the crisis has highlighted 
enough differences in financial vigor 
and regulatory policy from country to 
country to show that the tiger economies 
can no longer be lumped together so 
easily as a homogenous group and need 
to be assessed more discriminately. 

In fact, a new ranking already ap- 
pears to be emerging among these 
countries. Hard-hit Thailand dearly 



Eoqrl 


Indonesia moves to rein in its 
current-account deficit. Page 13. 


INDONESIA CUTS BACK — Scavengers sorting rubbish near a Jakarta building site. Die government said 
Tuesday it would postpone $14.3 billion in spending, delaying power plants, roads and oQ refineries. Page 13. 


has fallen to the bottom of the pile, and 
well-managed economies such as 
Hong Kong. Singapore and even China 
have stayed or risen toward the top, 
according to economists and analysts 
gathering here fra the annual meetings 
of the World Bank and International 
Monetary Fund. 

“The main lesson of the recent tur- 
bulence,” stud Andrew Freds, man- 
aging director at Bank of America 
Asia, “is that the tigers have to be 
looked at separately. You can't gen- 
eralize anymore.” 

Mr. Freris said he believed that eco- 
nomic growth and stability would 
eventually return in much of the re- 
gion. 

But he advises investors to be in- 
creasingly “selective” in their choices 
as to where to put their money. 

William Overholt, a senior econ- 
omist at Bankers Trust here, said that 
Thailand “has moved all the way into 


Jakarta Apologizes for Raging Fires 

Angry Southeast Asia Is Trapped Under an Umbrella of Pollution 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


SINGAPORE — Amid increasing 
concern from nearby countries. Pres- 
ident Suharto of Indonesia apologized 
Tuesday for a series of uncontrolled 
flies that have blanketed a large part of 
Southeast Asia in smoke (hat traps 
pollution and threatens the health of 
millions of people. 

But officials of die Association of 
South East Asian Nations warned that 


drought in Indonesia caused by the 

jEfh 


I atin America” while at the other end 


See TIGERS, Page 8 


i known as Ei Nino 
and difficulties in enforcing a recent 
Indonesian government ban on using 
fire to clear land meant that the problem 
could worsen and extend well beyond 
tiie normal end of the dry season 


next month, and possibly into 1998. 

They said that smoke and smog had 
affected up to 20 million people in 
Indonesia alone, with throat inflam- 
mations anrf diarrhea. 

The pollution issue threatens to 
strain the normally cordial relations 
among ASEAN members as Indonesia 
is pressured to take more effective ac- 
tion by other countries affected by the 
smog — Malaysia, Singapore and 
Brunei 

But the issue could also prompt 
closer cooperation and tougher action 
to curb pollution, analysts said. 

Opening a meeting of ASEAN en- 
vironment ministers in Jakarta, Mr. 
Suharto said that Indonesia was doing 
its ‘ ‘level best to prevent and overcome 
the ongoing bush and forest fires ra- 


ging in onr country.” He added: “To 
tides of neif 


the communities of neighboring coun- 
tries who have been disturbed by the 
fires in our territory, Indonesia offers 
its most sincere apologies.” 

The environment ministers from 
Malaysia and Singapore both called on 
outside countries with fire fighting ex- 
pertise to assist. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mo- 
hamad of Malaysia sent a letter to Mr. 
Suharto expressing deep concern about 
the fires, The Associated Press report- 
ed. from Jakarta on Tuesday. 

The smoke is also affecting air travel 
in the region, with right airports in 
Indonesia closed or suffering serious 
flight delays because of poor visibility. 


See JAKARTA, Page 8 


Diana’s Bodyguard Improves 

Hopes Are Raised He May Soon Shed Light on Crash 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 


I 


... 

20 - 


PARIS — The badly injured sole 
survivor of the high-speed car crash that 
killed Diana, Princess of Wales, here 
early Aug. 31 has recovered conscious- 
ness and should be able to tell inves- 
tigators what be remembers of the crash, 
a doctor treating him said Tuesday. 

Trevor Rees- Jones, a 29-year-old 
farmer British paratrooper who worked 
as a bodyguard fra the family of the man 
Diana was with in the car that night, 
Dodi al Payed, son of the owner of the 
Ritz Hotel, was in die right front seat 
wearing a seatbelt when the car hit a 
support psDar, killing everybody in the 
vehicle but him. 

French prosecutors have said the 
driver, assistant director of security at 
the Ritz, was legally drank and under 
the influence of antidepressant drags at 
the time of his death. . . 

- -' sn 1 a . Two investigating judges have 

>-^a42 m opened legal proceedings to find wheth- 

.. . ' ” er rimr photographers and a motorcyc- 

list attested after allegedly chasing the 







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Newsstand Prices 


Andorra . 10.00 FF 

AnStes 1Z50 FF 

Cameroon-. 1.600 CW 
Egypt -SESSD 


France. 


Gabon.' 1.100 CFA 

£800 Lira 


Lebanon .LL3,00q 

Morocco — — 16 Dh 

Qatar - 10.00 OR 

R6urton 1250 FF 

1050 FF Sam* Arabia. — .10 SR 

Senegal UOO CFA 

Spain 1 225 Ptas 


taxy Coast .1.250 CFA 

JonJan-. 1250 JD 

Kuwait 700 FIs 


Tunisia 1.250 On 

UAE. 10.00 Dh 

U.S-MMEur.)— SI-20 






couple in their Mercedes limousine, 
should be charged with manslaughter or 
failing to summon emergency aid after 
the accident. 

But tiie search for others who may 
share responsibility goes on, and de- 
tectives from Scotland Yard have joined 
the inquiry. A British Embassy spokes- 
man said dial officials would see Mr. 
Rees-Jones on Wednesday, presumably 
after the investigators have had a chance 
to ask him what be knows about why the 
driver lost control of the car in the 
underpass, and that there would prob- 
ably be a public statement after thaL 

Spokesmen for Pitie Salpecriere Hos- 
pital in Paris said that Mr. Rees-Jones 
would not be accessible except to his 
family and officials for the foreseeable 
future. But Dr. Pierre Coriat, chief of 
anesthesia and resuscitation at tiie hos- 
pital, said that Mr. Rees-Jones had be- 
gun a marked recovery from injuries 
that left him with a pierced lung and a 
shattered jaw and lower face. 

* ‘We have been able to rake him off , 
artificial respiration, and the infection 
of his pulmonary injury is under con- 
trol," a statement released in Dr. Cori- 
al’s name by Paris Hospitals Public Ser- 
vices said. "He is perfectly conscious 
and able to communicate, though he is 
easily tired. In the course of the next few 
days, he should make a full recovery.” 

If he remembers the events of that 
nigfat, Mr. Rees-Jones could tell inves- 
tigators whether he, Mr. al Fayed or 
Diana realized what state the driver, 
Henri Paul, was in, what made him go 

90 miles an hour on an uneven, curving 

emb ankm ent road where the speed limit 
was 30 mph. Crucially, he could also teU 
them whether photographers interfered 
with the driver’s ability to maneuver by 
blinding him with flashguns or 
swerving in front of the limousine. 


AGENDA 


Clinton Goes to Congress on Free Trade 


WASHINGTON (AF) — Setting 
the stage for a bitter fight within his 
own party, President Bill Clinton for- 
mally asked Congress on Tuesday for 
the negotiating authority he needs to 
expand free node with Mexico to the 
rest of Latin America and beyond. 

Bending to strong Republican ob- 
jections, the proposed legislation Mr. 


Clinton sent Congress does not seek 
authority to negotiate enforceable 
agreements protecting worker rights 
or tiie environment 
The president seeks approval of 
“fast track” procedures that would 
allow him to negotiate deals, and (hen 
get an up-or-down vote in Congress 
without amendments. 


Books— Page 7. 

Crossword — Page 10. 

Opinion ........ Pages 6-7. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


Push on Land Mines 


The Intarmari&t 


Pages 4-5. 


The !HT on-line 


The United States is engaged in a 
vigorous last-ditch effort to reach a 
compromise on a land-mine treaty, 
with President Bill Clinton phoning 
world leaders to seek support for tiie 
U.S. position. Page 1 1. 


Bid to Punish Serbs 
Overruled in Bosnia 


Western Officials in Dispute 
Over Move Against Karadzic 


By Lee Hocks tader 

Washington Post Service 


SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina 
— Fearing fra the safety of Americans 
and other election observers here, a top 
Western official has blocked stiff pen- 
alties against Bosnian Serb hard-liners 
fra maintaining ties to Radovan Karad- 
zic, the Serbian factional leader who has 
been indicted for war crimes. 

Robert Frowick, bead of the Bosnia 
mission of the Organization for Security 
and Cooperation in Europe, overruled a 
Norwegian judge's ruling late Monday 
that would have disqualified the entire 
slate of hard-line Serbs r unnin g in local 
elections last weekend in their own 
stronghold. 

Mr. Frowick said the rulin g could 
have sparked organized mob violence 
against hundreds of Western election 


Labor to Quit 
In Norway as 
Right Makes 
A Big Gain 


observers still in the Serb-controlled 
half of Bosnia, and would have ruined 
what be called “the potential for major 
progress'’ in the peace process from the 
elections. 

Mr. Fro wick’s decision triggered an 
immediate outcry among international 
officials and other observers in Bosnia, 
who said it meant threats of mob vi- 
olence by Serb and other hard-liners 
would render the international commu- 
nity here impotent. 

It further underlined the West’s di- 
lemma in dealing with Bosnian Serbs, 
who despite intense international pres- 
sure for the last two years continue to 
subvert the peace process and remain . 
loyal to Mr. Karadzic, a fugitive wanted - 
on charges of genocide and crimes . 
against h umani ty. 

Mr. Frowick reversed a ruling Mon- 
day by Judge Finn Lynghjem, who 
chairs the security organization’s Elec- 
tion Appeals Subcommission, a juridic- 
al body overseeing electoral conduct 
here. 

In a toughly worded decision, the 
judge said that the hard-line Serbian 
Democratic Party broke election rules 
by “willfully and defiantly” maintain- 


ing Mr. Karadzic in a leadership role 

iae 


By Charles Tmeheart 

Washington Past Service 


OSLO — The governing Labor Party 
confirmed Tuesday that it would step 
down after a weak showing in national 
elections that saw a rightist party make 
its strongest advance yet, according to 
nearly complete vote tallies. 

Prime Minister Thorbjom Jagland, in 
office since October, gambled the future 
of Ins minority government by saying 
repeatedly during the campaign that he 
would resign if his party's popular-vote 
total did not match the 36.9 percent it 
received in elections four years ago. 

With 97.1 percent of the vote from 
Monday's election counted. Labor 
garnered just 35. 1 percent of the popular 
vote, ana on Tuesday Mr. Jagland said 
that he would step down after his gov- 
ernment presented a budget Oct. 13. 

“We will be back,” Mr. Jagland de- 
clared late on election night after die 
results became clear. “We’re still the 
biggest party in Norway, perhaps twice 
as big as the second party-” 

A center-right coalition of the Lib- 
eral, Center and Christian People's 
parties probably will form the next gov- 
ernment with even less strength col- 
lectively in the Storting, or Parliament, 
than the outgoing Labor Party, which 
lost only two seats. 

On Tuesday, the leader of the Chris- 
tian People's Party, KjeU Magne 
Bondevik, said he expected to be the 
next prime minister. 

“It's completely impossible to say 
bow long a centrist coalition can last, 
but I don’t want to be responsible for a 
government if it’s only going to last for 
days and weeks,” he said. 

Mr. Bondevik said it would be about a 
month before his coalition government 
was formed. 

The most striking result of the vote 
was the surge in support for the populist 
Progress Party or Carl Ivar Hagen, 
whose campaign's critical focus on 
Norway's relaxed immigration policy, 
tiie Lapp ethnic minority in northern 
Norway and single mothers seemed to 
strike a chord. 

The 25-year-old Progress Party cap- 
tured 15.3 percent of the vote, its highest 
share ever, and will become the second- 
largest party in Parliament, with 25 or 
26 seats depending on (he final count 

“This was an extraordinary result” 
Mr. Hagen exulted, “when we know 
what forces were against us — all the 
parties and almost ah the media.” 

Yet die economic distress that in the 
past has propelled other rightist Etno- 


despite his indictment for genocide and 
crimes against humanity. 

The judge ordered that all 50 can- 
didates from the party stronghold in 
Pale, a mountainous area just outside 
Sarajevo, be disqualified. Although 
election results are still not final many 
of the Serbian Democratic Party can- 
didates there were sure winners. 

“Fra a person indicted for genocide 
and crimes against h umani ty to main- 
tain a position or function in one of the 


leading national parties shocks the con- 
sLynghic 


science.” Judge Lynghjem wrote. 

In his four-page decision, the judge 
cited mounting evidence, including 
llth-hour campaign posters that ap- 
peared on the eve of the vote last week- 
end, that Mr. Karadzic remained a major 
force in the party. 

In an interview Tuesday, Mr. 
Lynghjem said be would consider 
resigning as chairman and chief judge of 
the appeals subcommission. Describing 
himself as “disappointed,” the’judge 
said Mr. Frowick’s decision under- 
mines the subconunission’s authority 
by using its decisions as a “bargaining 
card-'* 

“We’re a juridical body, a quasi- 
court,” he said. 

Top U.S. diplomats, who consulted 
with Mr. Frowick on the decision, were 
particularly worried about tiie safety of 
17 American election supervisors stay-, 
ing in a hotel in Pale. About 36,000 
troops of tiie NATO-led Stabilization. 


See SERBS, Page 8 



See NORWAY, Page 8 


Sm Radovmovfc/nn Anodaed Pteai 

A German peacekeeping soldier at 
a vote-counting center near Sa- 
rajevo. NATO troops are facing 
growing hostility in Bosnia. Page 8. 


Investors Try to Hold Chi in Wall Streefs Wild Ride 


By David Baiboza 
and Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — With the stock mar- 


ket swinging more wildly this year than 
: in a long time, Billie Taylor is a bit 


it has — . 

more cautious about his investments. 

Although he still has 80 percent of his 
money in equities, he has pulled back 
from the market, gently tiptoeing away 

from stocks. ... ... 

“Right now I m sitting on as high a 
level of cash as I’ve had in 10 years,” 
said Mr. Taylor, 57, a retired school- 
teacher from Kettering, Ohio. I m 
somewhere on the fence because the 
pundits say that every time this happens 
tiie market’s in for a major change.” 

Like millions of other investors, Mr. 


jl The Dollar j 

NewYotk 

Tuesday • 4 P.M. 

previous doss 

DM 

1.7883 

1.7605 

Pound 

1.5955 

1.6063 

Yon 

121.225 

120.175 

FF 

5.9435 . 

5.9165 



IHMH 


Tuecdsy docs 

previous doss 

,+174.78 

7895.92 

7721.14 

j S&P 500 

change 

TuMdty 04 P.M. 

previous don 

+26.45 

945.86 

919.41 


in the stock market’s major in- 


So for this year, such fluctuations 
have accounted for almost three of 
every 10 daily changes in tiie Dow Jones 
industrial average, more than four times 
the pace of 1995. The broader Standard 
& Poor’s Corp. index of 500 stocks has 
shown the same volatility. 

And the even bigger swings have 
been spectacular. The Dow had a drop 


of 247 points, or 3.1 percent, on Aug. 
15, only to be followed two we 


Taylor has been watching the increas- 
ingly sharp day-to-day moves in the 
Stodc. market. Ups and downs of 1 per- 
cent or more have become common- 


i weeks later 
by a rise of 257 points, or 3.4 percent 
The Dow surged Tuesday, finishing 
up 174.78 points, or 2.26 percent, at 
7,895.92, as investors were cheered by a 
moderate increase in the consumer price 
index for August 

Thus, even though the stocks in the 


Dow and the S&P 500 are having a very 
good year, their gains have been coming 
in an increasingly volatile environment. 
While this volatility has been rising 
from very low levels since early 1996, 
by many measures it is now well above 
average, flashing warning signals even 
among seasoned Wall Street 
strategists. 

"Volatility tends to pick up when you 
,et to turning points,* ’ Robert Farrell, a 
ongtime strategist at Merrill Lynch, 
said. 

“Occasionally, high volatility does 
occur in an up year without a sinister 
result But a majority of your high- 
volatility years have been down 
years.” 


See STOCKS, Page 14 


1 


. t 


v 







bnternationai herald tri bune, Wednesday September u, im 

PAGE TWO 


Tr easure in the Caucasus / An Azerbaijani Secret _j 

Where the Shapeless Is Made Sublime 


2 Diet Drugs Pulled 

Off Markets Worldwide 


L 


L AHIC, Azerbaijan ~ The first due to what 
makes this remote Caucasian village so 
extraordinary is the gentle tapping sound 
that spills from workshops along its 
roughly cobbled streets. .. . . 

Inside, some of the world's most accomplished 
coppersmiths are using small mallets to decorate 
plates, trays, jugs, goblets and pitchers just as their 
ancestors have done for centuries: They are the most 
visible legacy of an extraordinary artistic tradition 
that brought Lahic worldwide fame-. 

The soaring peaks that surround tins village make 

fanning impossible, so local people turned very long 
ago to crafts. . Coppers mithing is only the roost 
famous. Almost everyone here can nun shapeless 
things into objects of quiet and even mystic beauty. 

In one smqii room facing the main square, two 
young men were hunched over a half-finished leath- 
er saddle. Nearby, several others were turning 

1 1 > Kninn fnr nwiiinMiuj'limhintr 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Times Service 




lambs' wool into linin g for mountain -climbing 
moccasins. Women were weaving brightly colored 


moccasins. Women were weaving bnghPy colored 
leggings thick enough to resist the snowy cold that 
eavelops Lahic for nine months each year. 

At a carpel workshop behind the square, women 
and girls chatted gaily as they sat at hand looms 
weaving subtle patterns from fresh-spun wooL The 
weavers do not converse in Russian or Azeri, this 
country’s two principal languages. Instead, like 
everyone else who lives here, they use an ancient 
Persian-based language called 
Lahic, which is spoken nowhere 
else. - ^ 

The language suggests that die GEORGIA 
first settlers on this spectacularly r S. — -Q 
beautiful but forbidding cliff were \ £ 

of Persian descent Nothing more is \armend 

known about their background or 1 

why they chose to come here, lURKEYp^V/ 
though they evidently placed great \ % 

value on solitude. 

Lahic is connected to the outside ^ i. Russia 

world only by a rugged dirt path that 4%. > 

winds its way around precipitous — V-. 
gorges and is closed by ram and ’ ‘" -NT; ' 
snow for much of the year. \ 

“Long ago it was almost im- \ % j 



By Gina Kolara 

New York Tones Service 


NEW YORK — The head of the 
Food and Drug Administration says ev- 
idence that two popular diet drugs cause 
heart defects is not ironclad, bat recent 
findings caused the agency to look se- 
riously at possible harm from their use. 

That approach led die makers of the 
drugs to withdraw them voluntarily 
from the U.5. market Monday. 

The decision prompted the French 
manufacturer. Sender, to pull both 
drugs off the market worldwide. The 


Associated Press reported. 

The drugs are fenfluramine , orPondi- 
min, and dexfenfhnumme, or Redox, 
and are often used in combination with 
phentermine, an amphetamine-like 
drug, part of a combination called fea- 
phen. 

New information indicates foe drugs 
may cause heart-valve damage in as 
many as 30 percent of the users. 

Dr. Michael Friedman, acting com- 
missioner of the agency, cautioned that 
die evidence implicating die diet drugs 
was not “absolutely concrete,” but he 
said it was nonetheless “a very con- 
vincing case.’* 

“We're encouraging patients to stop 
taking die drugs,” Dr. Friedman said, 
adding that no medical problems should 
result through abrupt withdrawal 

He said it was unclear what foe iong- 


R ttiurf'Thr V- YntTunrt 


1U&TA T® 


An artisan hammering a copper bowl into shape in Lahic, 
which is connected to the outside world only by a rugged dirt 
path that winds Us way around precipitous gorges. 


Broccoli Sprouts 
PackBigPunch 
In Cancer Fight 


term consequences of the drugs would 
be for people with valve damage, but 


AZERBAIJAN 


TURKEY , 


Moscow 

.RUSSIA 


possible to get here,” said Manaf 
Suleymanov. author of a book on 


Suleymanov. author of a book on j 
the town's history that was pub- 
lished several years ago in Baku, the Azerbaijani 
capital. 

“If you were running away from something or 
hiding from someone, this would have been the ideal 
place. Possibly people came here to flee from in- 
vaders, or perhaps (fey were sent by Persian kings to 
build a stronghold against the Russians. Ail we know 
for sure is tbar it is foe hearth of our ancestors, and that 
Lahic people have done great things in foe world.” 

Crafts from this village have long been treasured 
by collectors throughout foe Middle East and 
Europe. Traders discovered Lahic crafts many cen- 
turies ago, and sold them for high prices at bazaars 
in Baghdad, Shiraz and other great Middle Eastern 
cities. Today, Lahic crafts are on display in mu- 
seums from London and Paris to Moscow and 
Istanbul. 


■’r jr\ Inside dozens of work- 
er Z shops and private homes, 

men and women pull designs 
[ from foe recesses of their 

( N akhic hevan memories and transform 

] (Azerbaijan) them into objects that can be 

seen and held. Shelves are 
iran lined not only with new cre- 

ations, but also with artifacts 

o Maes ioo ^at can y sparks of this 

im town's unusual history. 

A shallow brass bowl dec- 
orated with a stylized hunting scene was carried in a 
woolen saddlebag by some solitary traveler who 
drank from it when he stopped by rivers or streams. 
A dusty oil lamp made m the 19th century is so 
evocatively shaped that one is afraid to touch it for 
fear that a genie might suddenly emerge. 

No automobile was seen here until foe mid- 
1960s, and although there is now electricity and 
telephone service, neither functions for more than a 
few hours a week. Maintaining foe utility wires 
from Baku, 125 kilometers (80 miles) away, is 
evidently not a high priority. 

It is this splendid isolation that has enabled the 
2,000 people who live in Lahic and surrounding 
hamlets to preserve their melodious language and 
age-old traditions. “Lahic. a precious living theater 
for ethnologists, has kept almost perfectly intact a 


microcosm of cultural features which has preserved 
its communal harmony and social cohesion across 
foe centuries,” according to a recent UN report on 
living conditions in Azerbaijan. “The spirit of foe 
Middle Ages still lingers there. * ’ 


B ut people in Lahic realize with mixed 
emotions that foe world cannot be held at 
bay forever. The population is slowly 
shr inking as young people seek their for- 
tunes elsewhere, and foe supply of copper and other 
raw materials has dwindled. Few dare to predict 
how much longer their idyll can last 

“Everything that has changed in foe world is 
changing here.” said Nagi Aliyev, a retired sev- 
enth-generation coppersmith whose six sons have 
all taken up the trade and whose four daughters are 
carpet weavers. 

“In foe time of foe czars, people here were 
millionaires,” Mr. Aliyev said, recalling foe days 
when Lahic crafts were prized by collectors 
throughout the known world. ‘ ’ What will happen to 
us now? Thar is up to future generations.” 

Within his own family, Mr. Aliyev may find 
reason to hope. As he was speaking, one of his 
dozens of grandchildren emerged from a candy 
store and stopped to greet him. Asked what he wants 
to be when he grows up, the boy smiled shyly and 
replied: “A coppersmith.” 


Japanese Warning 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELORS • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 
For Work, Ufe and Academic Experience 
Thraygh COnvBvert Home Study 
(808)597-1909 EXT. 23 

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Fa or send delated restra for 


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' 1210 Auata Street, Dept 23 
HonoMu, Hi 968144922 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — The Foreign 
Ministry has warned Japanese 
travel agencies not to arrange 
trips for tourists to the Kuril 
Islands, which have been held 
by Russia since foe end of 
World War II. The ministiy 
said foe warning was aimed at 
avoiding complicating possi- 
ble talks with Moscow over 
the disputed islands. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Air France to Skirt Guiana 


Are You Prepared ? 

1997 & 1998 Will Generate 
Major Currency Moves. 

Thijse moves will directly affect the value of 
your Portfolio. Prepare yonrr.ctf to take 
advantage of these moves by calling today. 


CAYENNE. French Guiana (Reuters) — Air 
France said Tuesday it was indefinitely suspending 
flights to and from French Guiana because of se- 
curity problems at Cayenne's international airport 

An Air France spokesman said the decision to stop 
service stemmed from violence linked to a two-week 
strike against a catering company. 

On Sunday, fistfights broke out at foe airport 
between passengers frying to board a Paris-bound 
flight and strikers seeking to halt traffic. 

New Kenya Airport to Open 

NAIROBI (AFP) — The Eidoret International 
Airport in western Kenya will open for foe first 


passenger and cargo flights Wednesday, the Kenya 
Times newspaper reported Tuesday. 

The weekly flights will connect the airport with 
Shaijah, United Arab Emirates, and Karachi. 
P akistan, the paper said, quoting a schedule re- 
leased by African Airlines International Co. 

The construction of the airport started in January 
1995. It was initially to cost more than $50 million, 
but foe project was scaled down at the insistence of 
the International Monetary Fund. 


A typhoon brought chaos to the Japanese island 
of Kyushu, snarling road, rail and air transportation 
Tuesday, the second day of disruptions. Airlines 
canceled about 190 flights to and from the island 
and train services were severely curtailed, with 
delays and cancellations on many lines. (Reuters) 


be for people with valve damage, but 
there should be no overt symptoms like 
shortness of breath or fatigue. 

“If these problems don t progress or 
if they improve, then the patients might 
be just fine,” Dr. Friedman said. “But 
we don’t know that right now.” 

Dr. Marc Deitch, senior vice pres- 
ident for medical affairs and global 
medical director for Wyeth- Ayerst Lab- 
oratories, which makes fe nflur amine 
and distributes dexfenflaramine, said 
foe company was conducting studies of 
foe association between foe diet pills 
and heart-valve defects, and was putting 
together a panel of 10 independent ex- 
perts to assess data. 

In the meantime, he added, foe com- 
pany decided that withdrawing foe 
drugs from the market wonld be a 
prudent step. 

Intemeuron Pharmaceuticals Inc., a 
small biotechnology company, makes 
dexfenfluramine. 

In recent years, foe dexfenfluramine 
and fenfluramine were hailed as miracle 
pills for obesiiy. 

American doctors wrote 18 million 
prescriptions for them last year. The 
drugs depress appetite, and phentermine 
increases foe rate at which calories are 
bumed- 

_ The agency had never approved foe 
fen-phen combination, but once the 
agency has approved a drag, doctors 
may prescribe it at will. 

It has been known for several years 
that fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine 
can cause an often fatal heart condition 
called pulmonary hypertension, but that 
complication was thought to be very 
rare. The agency approved dexfen- 
fluramine, saying foe risks from obesity 
far exceeded the heart risks. 

Last summer, the first hints of a new 
danger arose when doctors at the Mayo 
Clinic reported that the drugs might 
cause heart-valve defects. They de- 
scribed 24 previously healthy women 
who had developed an unusual and se- 
rious valve abnormality after using foe 
drags. The government then asked doc- 
tors to report other cases of heart-valve 
defects in people taking diet pills. As a 
result, said Dr. Friedman, “we now 
have something in excess of 90 cases of 


By Natalie Angier 

New York Tones Service 


NEW YORK — Scientists have bred- 
a novel form of broccoli that is 'tender,, 
rangy and richer by far in powerful anti- 
cancer compounds than axe foe familiar 
broccoli heads. The new rendition are 3- 
day-oid broccoli plants that look like 
alfalfa or bean sprouts but have a slight 
zest to them. a 

Researchers from Johns Hopkins' 
University School of Medicine in Bal- . 
timore have found that broccoli sprouts,^ 
grown in plastic laboratory dishes from- 
ordinary broccoli seeds, contain any- 
where from 30 to 50 times foe con- 
centration of protective chemicals^ 
found in mature broccoli. * 

These chemicals, called iso&iocy- 
anates, were already known to be potent ' 
stimulators of natural detoxifying en- : 
zytnes in the body, and are thought to, 
help explain why the consumption of' 
broccoli and vegetables like cauli- 
flower, cabbage and kale is associated" 
with a lowered risk of contracting can- ] 
cer. ; 

The scientists said epidemiological , 
studies indicate that to cut foe risk of , 
colon cancer in half, a person needs to- 
eat about two pounds of broccoli and 
similar vegetables a week. Given the-, 
chemical potency of broccoli sprouts/ 
the scientists said, foe same redaction in.’ 
risk theoretically might be had with a 
weekly intake of just a little over one 
ounce (28 grains) of sprouts. , 1 

Reporting in Monday’s issue of foe , 
Proceedings of the National Academy 
of Sciences, Dr. Jed Fahey, Dr. Yue-~ 
shing Zhang and Dr. Paul Talalay said 
that extracts of isothiocyanates from foe- 
sprouts markedly reduced the. incid-/ 
ence, size and number of mammary - 
tumors in laboratory rats exposed to a. 
standard carcinogen. 

Unlike other products being de-* 
veloped and known variously as de- 
signer foods or so-called nutracenticals, ■ 
broccoli sprouts are in no way genet- 
ically manipulated or enhanced — they 
are simply young plants .that until now 
had not been thought to have much^ 
culinary appeal. 

Dr. Talalay and his colleagues said-, 
they hoped to have broccoli sprouts in 
supermarket shelves by 1998. 




WEATHER 


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Opinions and Performance Records Call (24 hours) Toll-Free. 


Europe 


Forecast tor Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AocuWeather. Asia 



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• l 

patienK with symptomatic heart- valve 2 
abnonnalities. .• ' ■!« 

AftCT reports of these patients began 
coming in, doctors at five medical cen - . 
ters independently examined foe heart 4 
valves of 291 patients who were taking/ 
foe diet drugs and who had not com-., 
plained of symptoms, Dr. Friedman y 
said. Most were women and their av- k 

erage age was in the fflid-40s. 

Echocardiograms, which are images 
of a beating heart made with sound-, . 
waves, revealed that a third of those t 
paf ynht tested had abnonnalities in their , 
aortic or mitral valves of a type that 
would not be expected at that age. • T . 

Drug recalls 'are highly unusual. The., 
Food and Drug Administration say s that * 
just 12 drugs have been withdrawn from 
the U.S. market in foe last 17 years. . } 

No one initially thought to examine , 
patients* hearts. Dr. Friedman said, be- ■ 
cause studies with animals had not re- ' 
vealed heart abnormalities and heart-* 
valve defects are not normally asso- _ 
ciared with use of prescribed drugs. I 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WE DNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


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"N I 


Holms Wins a Battle , Not the Long Wav in the Republican Party 


By Richard L. Berke 

New Yori TJme.v Service 

WASHINGTON — In iheir final 
showdown on Capitol Hill last week. 
Senator Jesse Helms accused William 
Weld, the former governor of Mas- 
sachusetts, of threatening to “begin a 
war within the Republican Party. ’* Now 
Mr. Weld, the non ambassador, has wel- 
comed the battle, declaring, “To the 
extent that people are looking at Jesse 
Helms as the face of the Republican 
Party, 1 think that carries a certain 
amount of freight with it." 

The moment, in fact, is more like one 
combative day in the Thirty Years War 
or the Hundred Years War than Pearl 
Harbor or Fori Sumter. 

The ideological war in theRepublican 
Party dates back more than three decades, 
to 1964, when Barry Goldwater won the 
Republican presidential nomination. 

The spectacle of Mr. Weld's doomed 
guest to win an ambassadorship to Mex- 
ico was one of the most theatrical dis- 
plays of these deep hostilities. The 
Helms- Weld fight demonstrated — as 
did the coup attempt against Speaker 
Newt Gingrich earlier this summer — 
that the party that was so successful, as 
the opposition is still struggling to ad- 
just to its role as the congressional ma- 
jority and to the reality of a Democrat in 
the White House. 

Their personal collision reflected 
successful efforts by Mr. Weld and Mr. 


Helms to use each other to raise their 
profiles in the party. In quashing the 
Weld nomination, Mr. Helms asserted 
his power in the Senate and was cheered 
by social conservatives. 

By standing up to Mr. Helms. Mr 
Weld became a hero for Republicans 
who are conservative on economic is- 
sues but more liberal on such social 
matters as abortion. The ease and humor 
with which Mr. Weld carried himself 
and his terse, punchy answers in a news 
conference Monday may help Mr. Weld 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

set himself apart from other moderates 
willing to jump into a field of right-wine 
presidential contenders in 2000. 

In blocking Mr. Weld's move to 
Mexico City, Mr. Helms may have in- 
advertently helped Mr. Weld remain 
active in Republican politics. As he said 
in an interview days before he resigned 
the governorship in July. “If I get the 
nomination, obviously ir takes me out of 
national politics." 

That, of course, is no longer a pos- 
sibility. 

Indeed, at rimes Monday, Mr. Weld 
sounded almost as if be were trying out 
lines for the stump. He said ihar Re- 
publicans should “get government back 
to doing what it does best: defending 
public safety, educating the citizenry 
and helping those who cannot help 
themselves.” 


It was not likely lost on potential 
rivals that in the news conference, Mr. 
Weld emphasized his anti-Washington 
bona fides. saying more than once. 
“Washington sure is a funny town.” 

4 ‘This made him national, ' ' said Dick 
Morris. President Bill Clinton's former 
political strategist, who has also advised 
both Mr. Weld and Mr. Helms. 

Mr. Weld cannot win the party’s pres- 
idential nomination, Mr. Morris said, 
but he can be the “leader of the political 
faction" of liberal Republicans. 

Many Republican loyalists discount 
Mr. Weld's national potential, saying 
that they were unnerved to see a prom- 
inent Republican standing at a lectern 
with a White House seal as he ridiculed 
Mr. Helms — and spoke warmly of the 
Democratic president who nominated 
him. 

“I really think he’s marginalized 
himself," said Scon Reed, who ran Bob 
Dole's unsuccessful presidential cam- 
paign last year. "He stuck it in the eyes 
of conservatives all over the country and 
he has helped Clinton more than he has 
helped the Republican Party." 

Whatever the fallout for Mr. Weld, 
the drama over his nomination left the 
Republican Party looking particularly 
weak, with fractures that go far beyond 
ideological differences. 

“A number of Republicans still don't 
know what it means to be in the ma- 
jority." said Representative Christopher 
Shays of Connecticut, a moderate mem- 


ber of the party. “They still think they’re 
in the minority. And being in the minor- 
ity means just blowing up the place. " 

That is not only the view of a lone 
moderate: Mr. Gingrich has made a 
similar observation. 

Many Republican lawmakers said 
they were particularly concerned that, 
with Mr. Gingrich's wounded image 
and the failure of the Senate majority 
leader, Trent Lott, to become a com- 
manding figure, the party is floundering 
and unable to find consensus on an 
agenda of issues. 

, These lawmakers said they were in- 
creasingly worried about these conflicts 
as elections approach next year. 

The predicament was on display at 
the Christian Coalition convention in 
Atlanta last weekend, where the lack of 
a pony line was obvious. Some Re- 
publican speakers condemned die 
party’s leaders in Congress for working 
too closely with the White House, while 
others, like Mr. Gingrich, congratulated 
themselves for pressing Mr. Clinton in- 
to signing a tax-cutting package. 

“The leadership has allowed a va- 
cuum to occur where we don’t stand for 
anything," said Representative David 
McIntosh, a conservative Republican 
from Indiana. 

“If we don’t solve it by the 1998 
election, then we're likely to lose the 
majority in Congress. The polls show 
everybody still likes incumbents in Con- 
gress, but our base is very depressed." 



liUnde L-riTV •Vu-'rto'rtl IVr*, 


William Weld, withdrawing: “Washington sure is a funny town/ 


Pren liers Regroup on Quebec 

They Convene to Counter Independence Bid 


By Anthony DePalma 

Aten- Yuri Times Service 

CALGARY, Alberta — After two years of 
observing an edgy armistice over the most 
divisive of issues in Canada, the English- 
speaking leaders of the country are moving 
aggressively to counter Quebec’s campaign 
for an independent French-speaking nation. 

In negotiating sessions held over the week- 
end the premiers of nine of Canada's 10 
provinces, along with the leaders of the two 
northern territories, adopted the clearest re- 
cognition so far of Quebec’s unique character 
and the province's right to protect its culture 
and language. But they rejected any notion of 
granting Quebec special powers. 

Quebec's separatist leadership boycotted 
the meeting. But the nine premiers, hoping to 
send Quebec’s 7. 1 million people the message 
that there is a place for them in Canada, agreed 
to hold public consultations or referendums in 
each province except Quebec by the end of 
this year on how to recognize Quebec’s 
uniqueness formally. 

These steps could lead to a rebalancing of 
powers between the federal and provincial 
governments. Or, some think, Canada could 
try again to adopt a constitutional amendment 
on Quebec's unique place and role. 

The premiers of the other provinces ac- 
knowledged that reopening the debate over 
national unity was risky because it could 


further alienate people in Quebec and other 
provinces. Poll after poll has shown that Ca- 
nadians are profoundly weary of the unity 
issue. 

Still, the government of Prime Minister 
Jean Chretien has been under increasing pres- 
sure to settle die issue once and for all. In 1 995 
it was chastened by a referendum on sov- 
ereignty in which Quebec came within a hair 
of voting to break from the rest of Canada. 

And in national elections in June, the right- 
ist Reform Party, which argued that the unity 
problem could be solvetT tty giving more 
powers to all the provinces, gained enough 
seats in Parliament to become the official 
opposition. 

“This is a step in the right direction,” Mr. 
Chretien said in Ottawa on Monday. 

Despite a poor showing in the last elections, 
and polls indicating a heightened disillusion- 
ment with the campaign for independence, 
Quebec 's separatist leaders have threatened to 
hold a third separation referendum in 1999. 
When the Calgary meeting was called a month 
ago, Lucien Bouchard, the passionate sep- 
aratist who is Quebec’s premier, called it a 
"waste of time" and refused to attend. 

On Monday. Quebec's minister of inter- 
governmental" affairs, Jacques Brassard, 
mocked the premiers’ call for more discussion 
on unity. He told reporters in Quebec City that 
declarations about Quebec's unique character 
were far less than adequate. 


Fluttery Air Deflector 
Led to Stealth Crash 


By Matthew L. Wald 

New fork Times, Service * 

WASHINGTON — The crash of a $45 million Stealth 
fighter near Baltimore began with excessive flutter of a part 
that helps control the plane, according to U.S. Air Force 
officials. 

The problem occurred in an elevon, a movable surface that 
helps control the plane by deflecting the flow of air at the back 
of the wing. Excessive fluttering can cause the part to break 
off, as it apparently did before the crash Sunday, making it 
very difficult to control flight of the Stealth fighter. 

After the crash, the sixth for that type of plane, an F-l 17 A 
Nighthawk, the Air Force grounded its 53 other such planes 
until it had a clearer idea of what caused the crash, at an air 
show in Maryland. The crash set two houses on fire and hurt 
six people. The pilot was not injured. 

The elevon fell off the fighter and, one witness said, struck 
the plane’s tail, which could have caused further control 
problems. The elevon is similar to an aileron, a piece on the 
back of the wring of a conventional plane that makes it bank, 
and to an elevator, a part on the horizontal tail that pitches the 
nose up or down. The F-1I7A does not have a conventional 
tail, and thus uses elevens. 

In early tests of the plane, the elevons showed a tendency to 
flatter, and the plane’s speed was restricted until designers 
stiffened the part. The planes now flying have “a much 
sturdier piece,” said Lieutenant Colonel Virginia Pribyla, an 
air force spokeswoman at the Pentagon. 

It was not immediately clear whether the crash occurred 
because the problem was not fully corrected, or if something 
else had made the elevon flutter and then break off.. 


15 More iri Maryland 
III With River Microbe 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
doctor l eadin g an investiga- 
tion of bow a toxic microbe 
afflicting fish in Maryland 
rivers affects humans says 
that scientists have found ill 
effects in 1 5 more people who 
had contact with water infes- 
ted by the microorganism. 

Dr. Glenn Morris, who is 
leading an inquiry by state- 
appointed team of physicians 
from Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity and the Llniversity of 
Mary lan d, said they found 
symptoms among environ- 
mental workers, watermen 
and students exposed to Pft- 
esteria piscicida in the Po- 
comoke River and other East- 
ern Shore waterways. 

Although he did not 
provide details. Dr. Morris , 
said their conditions were i 


similar to those doctors pre- 
viously identified among 12 
people who had been exposed 
to the Pocomoke River before 
and during a fish kill in Au- 
gust. 

“The examinations on rn- 
day served to confirm our ini- 
tial findings," he said. 

The microbe has been 
blamed for rashes, flu- loke 
svmpotms and short-term 
memory loss amog some 
people who have come into 
contact with it- 


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Away From 
Politics 

• Watts Bar Nuclear 

Plant, a commercial re- 
actor near Knoxville, 
Tennessee, won federal 
approval to produce tri- 
tium. used to build nu- 
clear bombs. (AP) 

• Americans commut- 

ing to wo rk are more 
likely to be alone, aver- 
aging 1.14 people per 
auto, while dips to social 
and recreational events 
see 2.17 people per car, 
according to a study by 
the Federal Highway Ad- 
ministration. (AP) 

• O J. Simpson has 

moved to a gated com- 
munity with 24-hour se- 
curity guards on duty in 
Los Angeles, leaving be- 
hind the Brentwood 
mansion he had called 
home for 20 years, ac- 
cording to television re- 
ports. (AP) 

• A 43-year-old man 
fired from a plant that 
makes parts for lawn 
mower engines in Aiken, 
South Carolina, shot and 
killed four people there 
and seriously injured 
three others. (AP) 

• Fewer than one 

American in five could 
correctly answer at least 
eight of 10 basic ques- 
tions in. a survey on the 
U.S. Constitution, such 
as how long senators 
serve (six years) or who 
nominates Supreme 
Court justices (the pres- 
ident). (AP) 


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Campaign Inquiry, Part 2 

WASHINGTON — Congress's costly, polit- 
ically polarized inquiry into 1996 campaign abus- 
es will open a second front Wednesday when a 
House panel of 45 members begins public hear- 
ings into the same big-money bonanzas already 
under the microscope in the Senate. 

The rivalry between the Senate and House 
Republican panels, already acute, has been called 
“dueling comminees" by politicians who expect 
a cacophonous inauguration of the House Gov- 
ernment Reform and Oversight Committee. 

The inquiry competition promises to be at least 
as much an intramural Republican rivalry of 
Senate chairman vs. House chairmen as Repub- 
licans vs. Clinton-Gore fund-raisers-. 

In their opening, all 45 House committee mem- 
bers are to be allotted five minutes apiece to 
express their hopes, fears and partisan suspicions 
in an investigation that, unlike the Senate Gov- 
ernmental Affairs Committee's inquiry, is ex- 
pected to spill well over into the 1998 con- 


POLITICAL NOTE'S 


gressional elections and the political beyond. 

“We 'll be making some serious points but 
we’re not making Thompson’s mistake and rais- 
ing the bar out of reach,' ' said a Republican House 
staff member, referring to Senator Fred Thomp- 
son, the Tennessee Republican who opened the 
Senate hearings with a charge, unproved thus far, 
that China “affected the 1996 presidential race" 
with illegal contributions. {NYT) 

Whither Puerto Rico? 

WASHINGTON — Sometime in the next few 
weeks, the House may pass a bill putting Puerto 
Rico on the road toward becoming the 51st state. 
It is not clear whether Puerto Rico wants this to 
happen, whether it ought to happen or whether 
more than a few dozen House members have a real 
opinion about iL 

But the United States- Puerto Rico Political 
Status Act is a big deal; One way or another it 
seeks to change the island's position as the last 
large jewel in America's colonial crown. 


Under the bipartisan bill, Puerto Ricans would 
be required to hold a plebiscite by Dec. 31, 1998, 
to stare their preference for statehood, indepen- 
dence or the current status, known as common- 
wealth. (WP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Senator John Warner, Republican of Virginia, 
after the crash of an F-l 17 stealth bomber at an air 
show near Baltimore: “We only have 53 left and 
they are needed for special missions in the na- 
tional security interests of this country, and I just 
do not believe that type of asset can be put at this 
type of risk." (AP) 

Daniel Kuehl. professor of military strategy 
and history at the National Defense University, on 
the same topic: “I'm reminded of the phrase, 'No 
bucks, no Buck Rodgers.' The American people 
need to put their hands on it, to see what it does, to 
see what they are paying for. Otherwise, you lose 
the connection.” (AP) 


Californians Fight Gangs of Little Toughs 


By Todd S. Purdum 

New York Times Smite ' 

LOS ANGELES — In the catalog of 
natural disasters. California can always 
be counted on to hold its own, from 
earthquakes and mud slides to brush- 
fires and floods. But in these hot, dry 
days of seemingly endless summer, the 
region is also dogged by a tinier terror, 
a black speck no bigger than this “l" 

The Argentine ant, an aggressive 
species that first landed in the United 
States in coffee shipments to New 
Orleans around the turn of the cen- 
tury, and then made its way west, has 
become the No. 1 household pest in 
Southern California, exterminators 
say. It is to Los Angeles what the 
cockroach is to New York: ubiquit- 
ous, annoying, impervious. 

The ants live in shallow nests just 
inches below the soil in colonies led 
by multiple queens capable of pump- 


ing out thousands of eggs a day. The 
creatures find their way through 
cracks and crannies into even the 
cleanest kitchens, in search of cooler, 
moister territory and the sweets they 
crave. A gang of them can cover a 
damp cutting board so thickly that it 
looks iike a poppy seed cake. 

■“It’s 40 to 50 percent of all our 
calls in the summertime." said Mi- 
chael Chapman, a staff entomologist 
for Western Exterminator Co., in 
Irvine, in nearby Orange County, one 
of the region’s biggest pest-control 
companies. “We do get some frantic 
phone calls, .where for whatever rea- 
son, people are literally inundated." 

But the ants, whose scientific name 
is Linepithema humile, are more than 
a mere annoyance. Because they love 
honeydew, the sweet substance 
secreted by aphids, the ants protect 
and cultivate those little insects, 
which suck the life from the leaves 


and stems of tomato and citrus plants, 
threatening agriculture. 

And because they are so aggres- 
sive, they have destroyed or displaced 
large colonies of native harvester ants, 
which help spread plant seeds and are 
a staple of the homed lizard, whose 
future may now be endangered. 

Researchers at die University of 
California at San Diego have strapped 
radio transmitters to lizards in coastal 
scrub areas to track their movements. 
They have found that when Argentine 
ants move in, the lizards move out and 
switch their diet to beetles, with un- 
predictable effects on the lizards' 
ability to grow and reproduce. That in 
turn could affect the diet of birds like 
roadrunners, and snakes, which both 
depend on the lizards for food. 

Ted Case, an ecologist at the Uni- 
versity of Califoraia-San Diego who is 
leading the study, said the Argentine 
ants were so belligerent that they might 


invade the nests of smaller rodents and ; 
reptiles and ear their eggs. In fights ! 
with other ants, he noted, Argentine • 
ants have been known to gang up “like 1 
a pack of wolves cm a moose, ' with- 
five or six Argentine ants gathering to 
pull the legs off a larger, native ant. ■ . 

The Argentine ants are especially ; 
bard to get rid of because, unlike other I 
ants, they have multiple queens in a-- 
s ingle mass colony, and keep their I 
nests much closer to the surface of the * 
soil, making them more likely to| 
come indoors when the temperatures ■ 
or soil conditions change. 

A variety of standard pesticides can ■ 
kill the ants, but those chemicals often ‘ 
kill other desirable insects as well,, 
and they require monthly applications-* 
in the hot season. For the longer term, 
scientists are studying the possibility- 
of using a South American fly, part oC 
a family known as phorids, which- 
preys on Argentine ants in the wild. ^ 




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’’New Partnership for Social Cohesion" 
Business and Social Challenges 
- a New Agenda? 

International Conference on the Social Commitment of Enterprises 
Copenhagen 16-18 October 1997 


Attitudes towards social challenges are changing 
Joining forces is better and more cost-effective than shifting burdens 
. How can this be done? Experiences - benefits and barriers? 

What is in it for business - for governments - for society? 

Who can do what? What are the next steps? 

Programme 

■ The Queen of Denmark will he present at the opening ceremony 
Prime Minister Poul Nyrup Rasmussen. Denmark and EU Commissioner Padraig Flynn 
• Top managers from British Telecom. Microsoft, Levi Strauss. 

ACCOR Group, Social Generate de Belgique. Omron Japan. Novo Nordisfc. etc. 

• Group sessions with 

BP. Bayer. Siemens: IBM. Philips, The Body Shop. Merck. 

Grand Met. Randstad. Shell. KPMG. etc. 

Danish top managers. Ministers. 

Leaders from international organisations and business networks 
• Business-to-business dialogue 

Focus issues 

• Corporate strategies, enterprise performance and social challenges 
• The changing role of public authorities 
• Balancing Reputation. Accountability and Performance 
• The role of financial actors 

• Corporate strategies in developing countries and transition economies 
• Closing the skills gap - partnerships for employability and qualifications 
■ What is on the minds of competitive companies, governments, and organisations 

• Follow-up initiatives 





Hosted by the Danish Government and The European Commission 
First international forum for the social commitment 
of enterprises initiated by a government. 

- a follow-up on the Uhl World Summit for Social Development 1995 

Visit our web-site hltpV/p artn e rship .5 m-Hfr or apply Tor registration at International 
Conference Service - Tel +45 3946 0500 Fax +45 3946 0515; e-mail: socco97@ics.Jk 
Limited number of participants. Registration fee: DKk 3.000.00 



L 


SAGE 4. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBERZ7^1997 


international 


Albright Gets 9 
p And Gives i, a 
Middle East 
■ Reality Check 


By Thomas W. Lrppman 

V/ashiniton Post Service _ 


BEIRUT — Secretary of Sate 
Madeleine Albright said she was com- 
ing to the Middle East to administer a 
“reality check” to Arabs and Israelis 
alike, but she also got one herself. 

The anger and recriminations sne 
heard on her first swing through die 
region as secretary of state indicate mat 
the situation “is probably even worse 
i thought," she told reporters 

ab hS. h Al£S£ who concluded her 
weeklong Middle East tour Monday, 
said she achieved “small steps, such 
as agreement by Israel and the Pal- 
estinians to send cabinet-level officials 
to Washington next week. But she ad- 


LU ----- 

ded: "I am not going to overestimate 
what's soins on here. We’ve got a long 


what's going on here. We’ve got a long 
way to go.” 

If the region’s leaders are not pre- 
pared to make the “hand choices” re- 
quired to achieve peace, she said, she 

has other things to do and will not allow 

the Middle East to dominate her at- 
tention. ^ 

“If I can make a difference, I will be 
there.” she said. “If there is not enough 
happe nin g for me to make a difference, 
•I’m going to concentrate on Cambodia 
or our summit with the Chinese or on 
Bosnia certainly, NATO expansion and 
meeting with the Russians in New York. 
The United States* responsibilities are 
so large, I can’t be occupied with this 
full time." 

This message that a U.S. secretary of 
stale is prepared to let the Middle East 
stew in its own juice for a while capped 
a tour that was aimed at shaking up the 
psychology of the Middle East. 

She said things that U.S. officials 
rarely say, in language diplomats rarely 
use, in what her aides described as an 
effort to overcome the pessimism and 
cynicism that have overtaken once- 



Debris Links 
U.S. Plane to 
Namibia Crash 


Congo Rebuffs UN 
On Grave Search 


BnaHatOamcAnadsedPiat 

HONORED JN ISRAEL — Christoph Meiii, the night watchman who was fired for reporting the Union 
Bank of Switzerland's attempt to shred 65 Dies of documents related to property sold by Jews In Germany 
under the Nazis, after receiving a “Righteous Gentile" award from a school in Jerusalem on Tuesday. 


bright prospects for. peace. In a region 
where it is often politically useful Co 
appear to be a victim, she told everyone 
to take responsibility for getting back on 
track. 

She told the Palestinians they had to 
get serious about fighting terrorism, and 
she cold other Arabs they had to do more 
to aid that campaign. 

She told the Israelis to stop provoking 
the Palestinians unnecessarily, ana 
Monday she told Syria and Israel, in 
effect, to get out of Lebanon. 

She said she used “on varnished lan- 
guage” because negotiations cannot 
succeed “if the parties do -not know 
specifically whai is expected of them or 
if too rosy a picture is painted or there is 
denial of certain facts. ' 

The leaders of several Arab coun- 
tries. including Egypt and Saudi Arabia. 


expressed satisfaction with her blunt 
approach; bat aides to Mrs. Albright 
said jt might be several weeks before 


they can assess her visit’s impact 
She ended her tour in dramatic fash- 
ion Monday with an unannounced visit 
to Lebanon, where she promised that the 
country would not be excluded from any 
regional peace settlemenL 

The United States is committed to the 
“territorial integrity, independence and 
sovereignty of Lebanon,” she said, de- 
livering a reassuring message to a small 
nation where 30,000 Syrian troops im- 
pose order and the Israeli Army oc- 
cupies a swath of land in the southern 
part of the country. 

Two years ago, when it appeared 
there was a chance for a peace agree- 
ment between Israel and Syria, the Clin- 
ton administration signaled that it might 


acquiesce in Syria’s role in Lebanon in 
exchange for a Syrian-Israeli deal 
Recalling Lebanon’s prosperous and 
ethnically diverse past in a speech to 
Lebanese political, business and reli- 
gious leaders, Mrs. Albright said: 

“We respect your vision of a Leb- 


anon rebuilt not according to any other 
model, not beholden to any foreign 


model, not beholden to any foreign 
power but rather a Lebanon by and for 
you, the Lebanese people. 

“And we share your support for Leb- 
anon that is folly independent, unified 
and sovereign, free from all foreign 
forces.” 

Her audience was assembled at the 
last minute by U.S. Ambassador 
Richard Jones, who invited individuals 
to a meeting but did not tell them that 
Mrs. Albright would be there, U.S. of- 
ficials said 


The Associated Press 

WINDHOEK, Namibia — Search 

crews found debris Tuesday from a U.S . 

plane in the vicinity of wreckage from a 
German craft, virtually confirming that 
the two military transports crashed in 
midair and fell into the ocean off Nam- 
ibia’ s Skeleton Coast 

The planes, carrying a total of 33 
people, vanished Saturday while trav- 
eling in opposite directions: die German 
Tupolev 154 from Cologne to Cape 
Town, the American C-130 from Wind- 
hoek, Namibia, to Ascension Island. 

The prospect of finding survivors at 
this point is “slim,” Lieutenant Colonel 
Eddie Brown of South Africa, over- 
seeing search efforts in Namibia, said 
Tuesday. 

“Tie water in the Beognela current is 
extremely cold, and I believe there arc 
also sharks in the area,” Colonel Brown 
said. - - 

Only one body — that of an uniden- 
tified woman — has been found and was 
being taken to an unspecified hospital 
for examination. 

Officials would not confirm if the 
body was of an American or German, 
but all those aboard the U.S. plane were 
men, while the German plane was car-. 
tying at- least two women. The German 
plane had 23 passengers and crew; the 
American plane had 10. 

Low clouds and fog were hampering 
visibility Tuesday as an international 
team of 230 personnel using 10 planes 
from Germany, the United States, 
France, South Africa and Namibia con- 
tinued searching. 

Two American C-130 planes carry- 
ing 80 rescuers arrived early Tuesday 
after an. 18-hour flight from Britain. 

Both were equipped with special 
night operations equipment, including 
“forward-looking infrared” that proj- 
ects an image in the cockpit from vari- 
ations in temperature. They were to be 
used Tuesday night 

A German investigative team was 
awaiting better weather to fly by heli- 
copter to the crash scene. 100 nautical 
miles west of Cape Fria. 


KINSHASA; Congo — Con- 
golese officials objected Tuesday 
to demands by United Nations in- 
vestigators for permission to search 
for mass graves of Hutu refugees in 
western Congo, a sign the probe 
would again be delayed indefin- 
itely, 

“You will not go to Mbandaka if 
you do not respect the spirit of the 
letter that Kofi Annan wrote to Mr. 
Kabila,” the government minister 
in charge of the issue, Etienne 
Mbaya, said as team members met 
with Congolese officials in hopes 
of removing the latest obstacles. 

Mr. Mbaya was referring to a 
letter sent to President Laurent 
Kabila fry Mr. Annan, the United 
Nations’ secretary-general, in July 
in which he sought to resolve some 
differences blocking the investiga- 
tion’s start Mr. Mbaya said Mr. 
Annan agreed to limit the team’s 
investigation to the far east of 
Congo. (AP) 


Turk Assures Cairo 
On Links to Israel 


CAIRO — President Suleyman 
Demirel of TUricey assured Egypt 
on Tuesday that his country’s mil- 
itary ties with Israel would not 
harm the Arab world; 

“Turkey’s relations with Arab 
countries are deeply rooted in his- 
tory," Mr. Demirel said at a news 
conference after talks with Pres- 
ident Hosni Mubarak in Alexan- 
dria. “Our relations with Israel are 
not against a third country,” said 
Mr. Demirel, who arrived in the 
Mediterranean port Tuesday for a 
one-day visit. 

The Arabs have complained 
about a joint Turitish-Israel-U.S. 
naval exercise planned in Novem- 
ber. Mr. Demirel said in an in- 
terview published Tuesday that the 
exercise was only for practice in 
search and rescue missions and he 
invited Arab states to join. (AP) 


Do you live in Austria, 
Belgium, Luxembourg 
or Sweden ? 


Rebuffing Netanyahu, Settlers Won’t Leave Arab House 


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THE WORLD'S turn SEWSBtfEB 


Agence France-Prtsse 

JERUSALEM — Caught between angry Pal- 
estinians and his own far-right allies. Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tried Tuesday to 
persuade Jewish settlers to leave voluntarily 
from an Arab house they occupied in annexed 
East Jerusalem. 

Officials in the prime minister's office said 
Mr. Netanyahu was in touch with the American 
: millionaire behind the occupation. Irving 
1 Moskowitz, but the businessman had refused to 
order the settlers to leave the house. 

Mr. Netanyahu said he was canceling a trip to 
Romania to deal with die problem but would go 
ahead later with visits to Hungary and Austria. 

Attorney General Elyakdm Rubinstein was 


studying whether the government had a legal 
right to evict the settlers, officials said. 

The Palestinian Authority called on the 
United States and the European Union to press 
Israel to force the settlers from the house, which 
they occupied Sunday night in the Arab neigh- 
borhood of Ras al Amud. 

* ‘The settlement of this home in Ras al Amud 
will have very dangerous and serious con- 
sequences,” said the chief Palestinian peace 
negotiator, Saeb Erakat, in letters to Wash- 
ington and the EU. “We ask for immediate 
intervention to stop these activities in Jeru- 
salem.” 

Mr. Netanyahu, according to several Israeli 
news reports, had advance knowledge of the 


settlers’ plan. He criticized their action as “not 
good for Jerusalem, not good for the state of 
Israel." 


Colombia Threats 
Deter Candidates 


The Israeli leader fears a possibility of new 
Palestinian rioting and further international iso- 
lation, notably after the U.S. secretary of state, 
Madeleine Albright, called last week for Israel 
to halt “ unila teral actions” such as settlements 
among Arabs. 

She criticized the Ras al Amud house oc- 
cupation as “not helpfuL” 

But Mr. Netanyahu has refrained from or- 
dering the eviction of the settlers, aware of the 
strong support for settlements, especially in 
Jerusalem, among the Israeli far right that 
provides essential support to his coalition. 


BOGOTA — Dozens of mayoral 
candidates from southern Caqueta 
stale have abandoned their cam- 
paigns for Oct 26 municipal elec- 
tions after threats and violence by 
leftist rebels. 

A gubernatorial candidate and 
42 mayoral candidates pulled out of 
the election and asked (he Inter- 
national Committee of the Red 
Cross to help them set up meetings 
with rebels in an effort to head off 
the threats. (AP) 


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Korea 3672 0044 Malaysia 221 7055 
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20 YEARS RE DELIVER 
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Automobiles 


AH mates and mocefc 
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ATK WORLDWDE TAX FREE CARS. 


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YOU OWN A PROPERTY N FRANCE 1 
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THE INTERMARKET 
Continues 
on Page 5 


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168i cert house. 3i4 rooms, aim. rental 
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Technology and the Environment 


Where Do Computers 
G o When They Die? 

Computer life expectancies are estimated at three to five years. 


M ost computer users have been 
faced with the problem of what to 
do with a computer that has out- 
lived its usefulness. The Gartner Group 
has estimated thai.by the end of 1 997, over 
100 million machines will have outlasted 
their primary function. 

More than just plastic and circuit boards 
Computer industry analysts estimate that 
the life expectancy of a computer is be- 
tween three and five yeans because of 
continuing advances in operating systems 
and applications. : 

Further complicating the problem is the 
fact that computers are more than just 
circuit boards inside a hard plastic shell — 
they contain materials that could be po- 
tentially harmful to the environment if 
handled improperly. 

“Customers are concerned about what 
happens to their jdd computers. Our job is 
to work with out customers to help min- 
imize the impact of the computer over the 
life cycle of th-i product,” says Hans 
Gutsch, senior vice president, human re- 
sources and the environment, for Compaq 
Computer Corporation, the largest sup- 
plier of personal computers in the world. 

The fate of unwanted machines 
According to the Gartner Group, the fate 
of some machines is already known, or 
guessed at j 

About two-thirds of obsolete corporate 
computers end up in a kind of computer 
limbo — not exactly trashed but no longer 
used either. They can be found under 
desks, in company warehouses or closets, 
or in unknown places. 

Of the remaining obsolete computers, 
half are resold, a small number are donated 
to charities like schools and die rest are 
recycled or end up in lan dfills . 

Take-back programs 
As most European countries avoid the use 
of landfills, Europeans were the first to 
raise the issue of computer scrap. 

Germany proposed a mandatory elec- 
tronics take-back program requiring that 
computers in particular be either refur- 
bished and resold, or broken down and 
recycled. 

The European Union is drafting similar 
legislation that could come into play next 
year. Called an ?‘end-o£-li£e information- 


itefaHMffaiaj 

i 

concerned abo r t 

what happens to 


for printers, have well-developed refur- 
bishment and reuse infrastructures. 

Toner cartridges can easily be returned 
to the manufacturer, refurbished to new 
condition and resold on the marketplace. 
This process can be repeated several times 
with the same cartridge, and each cycle 
generates revenues to pay for the refur- 
bishment process. 

Most computers can be refurbished and 
recycled, but not as many times as a toner 
cartridge because of changing power re- 
quirements, architectural incompatibilit- 
ies, technological advances and other end- 
user requirements. 

Designing for the environment 
Manufacturers like Compaq are now 
designing product features that will not 
only extend the life of a computer, but will 
also minimize the environmental impact 
of a computer during and after its useful 
life. 

Compaq’s “Design for Environment” 
guideline serves as a tool for product plan- 
ning, design and manufacturing, pack- 
aging and other environmental aspects 
when developing products that are energy- 
efficient, easily upgradable, recyclable 
and reusable. 

By the time prototypes are tested or new 
products come oft the production line, 
Compaq designers have taken into ac- 
count the entire life cycle of the 
products. 

Packaging and parts 

Today, with several milli on computers 
shipped annually, Compaq takes addition- 
al measures to reduce waste. 

All products are packaged in containers 
made of 35 percent recycled materials, and 
a significant effort has been made to re- 
duce the volume of packaging and ship- 
ping materials. 

Many parts of the computers Compaq 
builds can also be recycled because they 
are made of recyclable plastics, metals and 
other materials. All recyclable parts are 
labeled and installed in a manner that 
makes them easier to disassemble and 
recycle. 

In addition, the company’s award-win- 
ning energy conservation features help to 
lower die total cost of ownership for Com- 
paq customers. 

“We want to provide our customers 


Our job is to work 

i 

with om customers 
toBunimzethe 
enpactofibe ■■ 
cof&fKiter over the 


product,” saysHans 
Gutsch, senior vice 
president, human 



environment, for 
Compmi Compeer 
Cor p o ra tion, the 
largest suppSer of 
personal computers 
m the world, >i 





technology-equipment directive, it 

could make take-back programs mandat- 
ory throughourthe European Union. 

, I 

The market decides in the U A 
Unlike its European counterparts, the 
United States 'has chosen to allow die 
market to point the direction for recycling 
electronics. Although there is no legis- 
lation in place, many states are piloting 
programs for the recycling of used com- 

PU Anhmd P the- world, it is clear that both 
market forces and government regulation 
are driving the need for economically 

practical recycling processes. 

Some products, such as toner cartridges 


every opportunity to extend the life of the j 
product through upgradability,” says Mr. 
Gutsch. “When upgrade is not an option, 
then we design in features that wih max- 
imize our customers’ ability to refurbish 

or recycle the computer.” 

In regions where product take-back re- 
quirements do not exist, Compaq encour- 
ages customers to take advantage of re- 
cycling and refurbishing opportunities. 

“In the end, we are trying to provide 
solutions to our customers,” says Mr. ( 

Gutsch. . , , | 

“We are committed to developing 
products that will give both Compaq and 
our customers the opportunity to min- j 
imize the impact on the environment • 


In 1989, Compaq Computer Corpo- 
ration led the electronics industry 
with the publication of its environ- 
mental policy. A positive response 
from customers and stockholders re- 
sulted in a series of environmental 
reports that Compaq has continued 
to publish regularly. This type of vol- 
untary report has become standard 
for many companies. 

At first, the reports attempted to 
explain Compaq's key environmental 
accomplishments and activities. But 
that soon changed. 

“We wanted to share some of our 
strategy, goals and direction," re- 
calls Hans Gutsch, Compaq’s senior 
vice president, human resources and 


environment. This was es pec ially 
true in Europe and Japan, where 
Compaq wanted to satisfy custom- 
ers who had demanding environmen- 
tal expectations. 

The douiments, the latest of 
which is er oded Compaq's Environ- 
mental, He-.th and Safety Leader- 
ship Repor soon grew into a mar- 
keting tool. 

“Our cuv omers are integrating 
environmen jA stewardship into their 
buying programs," explains Mr. 
Gutsch. "Ifeyara telling us that they 
want to kne w what we are doing 
about the environment” 

Compaq wanted customers to 
know that Its products were meeting 




and even exceeding environmental 
criteria such as Germany's Blue An- 
gel, Sweden’s TCO ’95 and the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency's 
Energy Star. 

The public views the electronics 
industry as environmentally clean. “It 
is relatively clean.'' says Mr. Gutsch, 
“but this industry does have a few 
issues.” For computers, these is- 
sues include volatile organic com- 
pounds used in the manufacturing of 
personal computers, the logistics of 
product takeback programs and the 
lead that is used to solder compon- 
ents to printed circuit assemblies. 

“if handled improperly, anything 
can be a problem,” points out Mr. 


Gutsch. "We aggressively manage 
all materials. We have an exceptional 
environmental record, and we want 
people to know about it” 

Copies of Compaq’s EHS Leader- 
ship Report go to the company’s cus- 
tomers, suppliers and employees and 
also to investment organizations. The 
report is available on Compaq's Web 
site at http://www.compaq.com. 

‘ The. response has been very , very 
positive," says Mr. Gutsch. "Most 
everyone would prefer to buy a com- 
puter from a company that is a re- 
sponsible corporate citizen. The re- 
port makes it easy for customers to 
understand our commitment and our 
efibrtSL" 




They say 


computers make 


the world 


a better place 


We kind of like 


l \; the world 


■way it is. 


l.v-v. 



At Compaq, we believe in changing the world but we don’t believe in changing the Earth. Which is 
why we try to minimize the environmental impact of everything we do. From product design to manufacturing 
to recycling. Quite simply, success shouldn’t be at the expense of the environment. 

This year; we were presented the 1997 Wbrld Environment Center Gold Medal for International Corporate 
Environmental Achievement. Not for doing something extraordinary. But for doing something we believe in. 

COMPAQ. 


Writer: Malcolm MocPhomon^ dj 

Program Director; Biff MaMer. - 


i t TMinucfa pr regfrttmJ Imfcnwrfciprtkrir n«yill>v 



t* . 1 1 _ . 'll 1 





ft 


L 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 



EDtTORIALS /OPINION 


ftmlb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srtbunc 


ntLtSHED WITT1 THf SKW KMtK T|*HS A.VD TOE » VWISCTON TOST 


E’ 


j A Craven Performance 


In the view of the Senate majority 
Wilder, Trent Lott, the offending figure 
*"i the failed nomination of William 
v'eld to be ambassador to Mexico was 
ot Foreign Relations Committee 
'bairman Jesse Helms, who arrogated 
3 himself the constitutional power to 
dvise and consent and refused to grant 
4r. Weld even a hearing. Rather, the 
ffender was the nominee, who had the 
ffronteiy to suggest thar his arbitrary 
eatment at the hands of the chairman 
— the chairman’s abuse of the Sen- 
te's anachronistic traditions, the Sen- 
te's sheeplike failure to assert itself 
gainst him — was unfair. 

“The biggest problem right now is, 
iovemor Weld shot his foot off.” the 
najority leader said in late July. ‘ ‘Two 
veeks ago we might have worked 
omeihing out with die chairman,' but 
hen Mr. Weld “hurt himself by at- 
acking the chairman unfairly and with 
tolitical rhetoric that was just uncalled 
or." The rhetoric had consisted 
nainly of saying Mr. Helms was en- 
saged in “ideological extortion,” 
vhich of course is precisely what he 
vas engaged in, and what Mr. Lott, the 
.upposed leader, was caving in to. Mr. 
vVeld's offense was to speak the truth. 

His greater offense was to strip away 
he usual veneer and to force Mr. Lott 
ind the rest of die Senate Republicans 


to choose in public between a prin- 
cipled position and mousiness. They 
went for the mouse; they do it every 
time. Mr. Lott early on in his Senate 
career was heard to complain about the 
fusriness of the place, its omateoess and 
inefficiencies, so many of which derive 
from the power of individual senators to 
thwart majority will and the self-pro- 
tective deference of the majority when 
such events occur, lest its members 
threaten their own prerogative to stall 
the institution in turn. Mr. Lott is now 
the creature of the culture he professed 
to deplore, its spaniel-in-chief. Who 
would have thought he would become 
Mr. Washington Insider himself? 

Mr. Weld may or may not have been 
the perfect choice for ambassador to 
Mexico, and yes, he did his share of 
grandstanding in the affair. The pres- 
ident tried to make a political point in 
nominating him. and Mr. Weld tried to 


make any number of political points of 
' “ ' for the hearing he 


his own in fighting 
failed to receive. In 


1BUW _ the end, what 

Happened is not a commentary on him 
nor even, in our view, particularly a 
commentary on Mr. Heims, who be- 
haved so predictably throughout as to be 
almost a caricature of himself. The real 
rest here was of the Senate and its lead- 
ership. Their performance was craven. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Kabila’s Stonewalling 


Welcomed at first as a successor to 
he discredited Mobutu Sese Seko of 
Jien-Zaire, President Laurent Kabila of 
iow-Congo is coming under a cloud of 
lis own making. He is resisting in- 
emational inquiry into the fare of a 
large Rwandan refugee contingent that, 
under dire threat at home, fled to Congo 
ind is now unaccounted for. 

There seem to be several strands to 
Mr. Kabila’s stonewalling of the United 
Nations. He owes a political debt to the 
Rwandan regime that not only drove 
out the hapless refugees but helped him 
prevail over the Mobutu forces. And he 
is manifesting a distrust of the United 
Nations that has festered since the 
world body intervened in Zaire at its 
ndependence in 1960 and helped frus- 
trate his bid for power at that tune. 

The United Nations, through its sec- 
retary-general and its refugee agency, 
has pushed Mr. Kabila to permit the 
sort of open inquity that would abed 
light on the disappeared Rwandan Hutu 
refugees or, if the worst has already 
happened, relieve the survivors. But the 
Kabila government has repeatedly 
dodged and weaved, evading its clear 
obligation to respect its refugee com- 
mitments. Evidently Congo authorities 
believe they can simply deny charges of 


massacre and bluff their way through. 

This would be a disaster for Central 
Africa, for the UN system and for the 
whole idea of international refugee 
protection. The safety net for civilians 
caught in the path of deadly political 
tornadoes has been loose and inef- 
fective enough without there being a 
fresh example of calculated defiance. 

Fortunately, there are levers of in- 
fluence that could be brought to bear. 
Vast, broken Congo needs major sup- 
port, from international banks and for- 
eign governments alike, to rebuild. This 
support cannot be expected to flow to 
anything like the degree Congo needs if 
it continues to act the part of inter- 
national outlaw. President Kabila, suc- 
ceeding a man who had wasted his 
country's considerable potential, in- 
stantly" became the intemationai favor- 
ite. This is the valuable inheritance he 
now threatens to waste himself. “We 
very much wanted to give him the ben- 
efit of the doubt and to help him,” says 
Bill Richardson, American ambassador 
to the United Nations. “But when it 
appears that his government turns its 
back on important commitments made 
to tile international community, he 
leaves us with few options.” 

— the Washington post 


Back to Boot Camp 


America and its army have known 
for some time that the service has a 
severe problem with sexual threats 
against women in the ranks. But its new 
investigation found sexual harassment 
to be much more pervasive than pre- 
viously acknowledged, “crossing 
gender, rank and racial lines.” An even 
more important finding was that the 
problem existed because senior com- 
manders were not following the army’s 
doctrinal commitment to the integration 
of women. The report’s condemnation 
of “passive leadership" as a core prob- 
lem is its most noteworthy feature and 
one that offers some hope for reform. 

By stressing the leadership issue, the 
army is admitting that it is not just a 
few macho warriors who denigrate, 
harass or assault the women who now 
serve alongside them. 

The problem of sexual harassment 
and discrimination is clearly a systemic 
one, deeply embedded in the military 
culture, and one that the Pentagon brass 
has not pressed base or unit command- 
ers to correct- To its immense credit, 
the army is attacking the problem in the 
only way that holds any hope of suc- 
cess. it is revamping its whole ap- 
proach to leadership and training in an 
effort to ensure a safe and secure en- 
vironment and scrupulously fair treat- 
ment for all its personnel, of either 
gender. An enterprise that depends so 
heavily on teamwork and confidence in 
one's colleagues can do no less. 

The investigation was undertaken 
after shocking revelations of sexual 
abuse, including rapes and assaults, at 
the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 
Maryland. Although army officials de- 
scribed the situation at Aberdeen as an 
aberration, a survey throughout the 
army found that 7 percent of the female 


troops polled said they had been vic- 
tims of sexual assault, while 15 percent 
had experienced “sexual coercion.” 

The army has responded with proper 
severity to such criminal acts by court- 
martialing several drill sergeants at 
Aberdeen and delivering career-end- 
ing reprimands to the former base com- 
mander and several of his deputies. 

Now the army is moving on to cope 
with the much tougher problems of 
sexual harassment and discrimination. 
The survey found that 47 percent of the 
female soldiers polled said they had 
experienced “unwanted sexual atten- 
tion," as had 30 percent of the male 
soldiers. Few victims of sexual har- 
assment even bothered to report it. They 
assumed nothing positive would result 
and feared damaging their careers. 

The army’s “action plan" for turn- 
ing all this around looks sensible and 
comprehensive. The army is extending 
boot camp a week to give time for 
training in human values, tightening up 
its selection of drill sergeants by in- 
cluding psychological testing and crim- 
inal background checks, and enhancing 
sensitivity training for all division com- 
manders and corps commanders. A 
three-star general will oversee the train- 
ing efforts. All commanders will be 
required to assess regularly the human 
relations atmosphere in their units. 

To any die-hards who might still fear 
a feminization of the nation’s war- 
fighting machine. General Dennis Re- 
imer. the army’s chief of staff, offers 
the appropriate response; “This isn’t 
about going soft, this is about treating 
people with dignity and respect, and the 
two are very compatible. " All it takes is 
committed leadership at all levels of the 
command structure to make it happen. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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Traumatized, Hopeful, Ireland Turns a 



N EW YORK -L Anyone who has 
had an alcoholic in the family fall 
back into drinking- after a period of 
recovery will understand very well the 
feeling of destitute despair that over- 
whelmed Ireland and England in Feb- 
ruary 1996. The Irish Republican Army 
set off bombs in London's Canary 
Wharf that ended the first cease-fire. 

In those IS months of peace, there 
had been that ataosr-surreaJ sense of 
joy and possibility, a sort of innocence - 
newly tempered by the old fire of his- 
tory. 

England herself stood in a new light 
of co us inship and generosity. 

Ireland was to be at ease at last 
among the matiuer nations of die earth. 
New ties were soldered with the solder 
of surprising and deep affection. 

They were marvelous days, and the 
theater, where- 1 work, went into im- 
mediate and happy cahoots on both 
sides of the water. But the bombs ended 


By Sebastian Barry 


the process harshly. The terrible needs 
ofthedrink 


; drinker were to be met again with 
the ferocious and faithful depression, 
family. 


and sad attention, of the family. 

The IRA agreed to a new cease-fire 
in July, and this time the sense of joy 
is less. As new talks begin, there is 
traumatized caution. There does not 
seem to be any chapter in Irish history 
that presents one happy situation after 
another. 

Hope, the first cease-fire taught us, 
was merely the whistled overture of 
death. And death in Northern Ireland 
has no politics; It is the bullet in the 
breast of the child, the bomb dismem- 


if the real life that peace is and the crazy 
life that conflict is were but the dif- 
ference of a drink of whisky. 

Now the hope is that very different 
minds will set to a-taUdng, dancing, 
conjuring the future. If there is any true 
anchor to hold the- ship in harbor this 
time, it is the articles of faith, as, one 
might say, called the Mitchell prin- 
ciples. 

These have been drawn up by former 
U.S. Senator George Mitchell a' man . 
who looks as if he’s read next week's 
newspapers and whose neutral face 
suggests that -indeed all will be well. 
They are the wisest principles Ireland 
has ever had for her protection, I might 
hazard, as important as the constitution 
itself, ft is not exactly a poetic list — it 
would be hard to .sing it, and all the 
better for that Too much of Irish 
murder has had a tune put to it 

Pragmatic principles, in short. And 
Sinn Fein, said to be the IRA's political 
arm, has signed up for them. 

The truth is, we are all as Irish people 
curiously complicit in conflict and curi- 
ously compUrit in peace, ft is a choice. 

I do not know what lies in the heart of 


No force on ear* is more ancient, 
redundant, discredited and useless than 
murder done for political ends. 

The talks that began Monday are in a 
sense the sian of a fresh history, as if 
Ireland, a ot just Northern Ireland, was 
reinvented on the 15* of September. If 
hope has been seared and scarred, then 
let hope be honored for its lack 


No force on earth is 
more ancient, 
redundant, discredited 
and useless than 
murder done for 
political ends . 


fn these peace talks, the national- 
ists will want unity for the whole of 
Ireland, nor* and sou*. The unionists 
will want to keep the union between 
Nonhem Ireland and the rest of 

Britain. 1 

“Unity” and “union.” Aren’t *e 

words themselves in cahoots? 

Unionism is in m^ny of its aspects an 
extraordinary 1 tradition of .fait hf u ln ess 
and purpose, exactly as nationalism is. 
But the time of *e fcfcsolute natures of 

*ose two things is passed. - - 

True unity for foefractured people of 
an island-— or 4 fpr *at matter, *e 
unio n within two islands of a kind *e 
unionists will seek to preserve — 


surely begins with reco gn izi n g hatred 
as *e terminal em6tio 


ition that will de- 


of armor, its lack of cover, artifice and 


Gerry Adams, Sinn Fein's president. 
But the least that can be said is that the 


history of his 


bering the 5 o'clock shopper, ±e lover 
the beloved. 


erased at the side of *e 
Even after the cease-fire resumed, 
all the political faces of *e North 
looked drawn and palpably terrified, as 


rlicity in. violence 
^»ed his party to foe 
MitcneU principles. Whether the IRA’s 
halfhearted endorsement of the cease- 
fire last week is more than bewildering 
saber rattling remains to be seen. 

Ireland has changed so much in foe 
last 30 years that even history itself has 
been carefully rewritten, sifted 
.through, in order to understand the 
broken complexity of our inheritance. 


arms. 

Once upon a time foe island of Ire- 
land was in two halves, one at either 
side of *e proto- Atlantic. An older 
American continent closed with an 
older Europe, and as the seas a g a in 
parted to make the present Atlantic, foe 
tiny island was set adrift in foe South- 
ern Hemisphere. 

Then, through millennia, it drifted 
north across the Equator and docked 
where it lies now. ft is an old place, and 
half of it might be said to belong to 
America, certainly half to Europe. 

Certainly we must listen to the 
meaning of this enormous geological 
story — ■ we must listen to foe meaning 
of everything, down to foe last whistle 
of foe win* Everything in truth is 
temporary, certainly mere land itself, 
and all we have of eternity is human 
love, human peace. 


stroy everyone.- { 

Unity and union may also be not 
having to throw your child across a 
hedge to safety when the mob - is mut- 
tering at your door for foe blood of that 

child, as happened just recently in foe 

North. f ^ ^ 

It is time for gentleness, for foe voice 
of foe mother, foe stffc and foe daugh- 
ter, the father, foe husband and the son, 
foe gay couple and the single man, foe 
solitary woman. 

The dark bottles if hate, let them be 
pat up on the high s lelf. 

They have had th sir bleak day. 
Now, one day at a time, honor the 
sunrise, the sunset; * oothe foe souls of 
the dead and praise! foe courage and 
magnificence of *0 .living in foe ter- 
rifying innocence of this day. 


The writer, a dublin-based play- 
wright. is the authbr of "Prayers of 
Sherkin" and “ the Steward af 
Christendom." Hey contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


There’s No Need for Weapons of Slow-Motion Mass Murder 


^ EOUL — Very late in the 


.Jaay, 

joined foe Canadian-sponsored 
negotiations, currently taking 
place in Oslo, that seek to ban 
the production, stockpiling, use 
and transfer of anti-personnel 
land mines. Washington wants 
to exempt Korea from foe mine- 
ban treaty, which is to be signed 
in Ottawa in December. 

The majority of countries in- 
volved in the negotiations op- 
pose the U.S. demand. They re- 
ject the argument in principle, 
and also fear it will set a pre- 
cedent for others to demand 
exemptions. 

The case for a comprehen- 
sive ban on anti-personnel 
mines is compelling. Such 
weapons should be outlawed 
because of the horrific nature of 
the injuries they inflict; because 
at least 80 percent of victims are 
civilian, and because they con- 
tinue to cause death and injury 


By Ramesh Thakur 


for decades after being sown. 

Such mines are weapons of 
mass murder in slow motion. 
They are a humanitarian 
tragedy, a threat to peace and 
stability in many countries and 
an obstacle to reconstruction 
and development 

Up to 1 10 million land mines 
are deployed in about 70 coun- 
tries, killing and maiming some 
25,000 people each year. The 
mines are cheap and easy to 
make, but difficult dangerous 
and costly to detect and remove. 
Up to 2 million new mines are 
laid annually, far more than are 
removed. 

Traditional 


installations, supply routes and 
troop concentrations; as a 
“force multiplier” during close 
engagement with an enemy, to 
compensate for any deficien- 
cies in numbers and weapons, 
and in preplanned defensive 
maneuvers such as channeling 
an enemy into target areas of 
one’s own preference. 

In the traditional mjlitaiy 
view, land mines are legitimate 
weaoons of self-defense when 
properly. Their utility is in 


USi 


war-fighring 
doctrine incorporates three dif- 
ferent types of land mines for 
battlefield use: for offensive 
deep strike, when land mines 
are scattered behind enemy 
lines to destroy or disrupt key 


fact highly questionable. The 
delay and inconvenience 
caused to enemy forces is minor 
compared with the carnage 
among civilians. 

The International Committee 
of foe Red Cross published a 
study last year rejecting the mil- 
itary case for the continued use 
of land mines. The study fo- 
cused on 26 actual conflicts 


since 1940. The team that did 
foe survey included retired and 
active military commanders 
from several countries. 

The team concluded that 
even when used on a large scale, 
mines had little or no effect on 
the outcome of hostilities. 
They have hardly affected the 
outcome of minor skirmishes 
and never the course of a battle, 
let alone a war. In only a few 
cases did their use conform to 
intemationai law or military 
doctrine. 

In the case of the Demili- 
tarized Zone dividing Sou* 
Korea from foe North, the U.S. 
position does not bear scrutiny. 
Anti-personnel mines would be 
useless against a North Korean 
armored assault, especially in 
combination with common 
mine-clearing devices. 

Mines’ utility against “hu- 
man wave’ ' assaults is also lim- 
ited. A North Korean regime 


determined 1 enough to invade 
the South i could simply come 
through theL minefields and ac- 
cept the levfel of casualties. The 
few hours. pf delay this might 
cause does hot warrant foe ci- 
vilian misery being caused ext a 
daily basis around the world. 

Under the new U.S. position 
being pushpd in Oslo, a country 
would have foe right to with- 
draw frfonj the treaty bantling 
land , mines; if it found itself in- 
volved in an 'act of aggression as 
defined by; the. UN Charter, a 
dear reference to foe Korean 
War and probably to other in- 
ternational conflicts, br other 
words, a treaty is-not to be a 
treaty when it is most needed. 


The writer, head of the Peace 
Research Center at the Aus- 
tralian National University in 
Canberra, , contributed this 
comment to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


Finally, the Days of One-Party Rule Are Finished in Mexico 


G STAAD, Switzerland — 
Mexico’s ruling' Institu- 
tional Revolutionary Party is 
like a chicken with its head cut 
off. It keeps running around the 
barnyard not knowing it’s 
already dead. 

In fact, the party, called the 
FRJL, has been in its death throes 
for nearly a decade. The ax 
began to fall after the clouded 
presidential elections in 1988. 
The leftist candidate Cuauh- 
temoc Cdrdenas Soldrzano saw 
his lead in foe election returns 
fall victim to the PRI’s electoral 
“alchemy.” Its candidate, Car- 
los Salinas de Gortari, was 
banded the presidency. This 
triggered foe formation of a new 
opposition party, the Democrat- 
ic Revolution Party, or PRD. a 
fusion of ex-PRIstas, including 
Mr. C&rdenas, with a number of 
populist and Marxist groups. In 
this past summer’s elections. 
Mr. C&rdenas won a landslide 
victory as Mexico City’s first 
elected mayor. 

The National Action Party, 
or PAN, Mexico's oldest and 
strongest opposition party, also 
found new life after the 1988 


By Stanley A. Weiss 


elections. Established in 1939, 
the traditionally Catholic and 
conservative party now has a 
younger, more urbane, less de- 
vout wing attracted by its free 
enterprise, free elections philo- 
sophy. It currently holds six 
governorships in the largest and 
wealthiest states and mayoral- 
ties in 9 of the 1 1 most populous 
cities in Mexico. 

For six decades, the PRI 
ruled Mexico with a singularly 
successful formula; The PRJ 
controlled the government and 
foe president controlled the 
PRI. It sliU controls the pres- 
idency but no longer foe Con- 
gress. Its masquerade as a polit- 
ical ptuty is wearing thin. It was 
established by revolutionary 
generals in 1929, not to com- 
pete with other parties but to 
bring stability and order to a 
nation ravaged bv almost 20 
years of civil war. 

Although it alternately posed 
as a nationalist, populist, statist, 
leftist and free enterprise party, 
foe PRI has always been an 
“electoral’’ machine with onlv 


one purpose: undisputed power. 

The PRI began digging its 
own grave in 1964 with foe se- 
lection of foe first of three dis- 
astrous presidents: the butcher, 
the faker, the PRI-undertaker. 
President Gustavo Dfaz Ordaz 
< 1964-70) ordered the army to 
fire on striking students in 1 968. 
Several hundred were killed in 
this “cleansing operation.” 
known as the Massacre of Tlate- 
lolco. Luis Echeverrfa (1970- 
76}. Dfaz Ordaz’s top cop before 
becoming president, wasted his 
six years with self-promotion, 
deception and demagoguery, 
spending Mexico into its fust 
devaluation in 22 years. Jos£ 
Ldpez Portillo f J 976-82) bet the 
country on the price of oil. When 
prices crashed, so did Mexico, 
in 1982, he nationalized foe 
banks and mortgaged the coun- 
try. The PRI never recovered. 

President Miguel de la Madrid 
( 1 982-1 988) kept Mexico's nose 
above water when the country 
was drowning in debt He began 
to open its economy but kept its 
politics closed tight, stealing an 


Polluters: The Government Did It 


S POKANE, Washington — 
In northern Idaho's Silver 
Valley, the abstractions of foe 
Superfund hazardous-waste 
cleanup program ; — “remedi- 
ation,’ “restoration,” “lia- 
bility” — meet real life. 

For more than a century, the 
region's silver mines provided 
bullets for America’s soldiers 
and fortunes for some of its 
richest corporations. 

The mines also created a 
toxic legacy: wastes and tail- 
ings, hundreds of billions of 
pounds of contaminated sed- 
iment, leaching into a water- 
shed that is now home to more 
than half a million people. 

In 1996, 13 years after the 
area was declared the nation’s 
second-largest Superfund site, 
the Justice' Department filed a 
$600 million lawsuit against 
the surviving mining compa- 
nies. Estimates of foe cleanup’s 
cost range up to a billion dol- 
lars. The government sued 


Bv Mark Solomon 


after rejecting the companies’ 
laughably low settlement offer 
of SI million. If foe companies 
don't pay, The federal taxpayers 
will have to pick up foe lab. 

The companies, however, 
have countersued, aliening. 


among other things, that the 


government itself should be 
held responsible. Why? Be- 
cause it failed to regulate foe 
disposal of mining wastes. 

Do I believe my ears? In this 
era of deregulation, when in- 
dustry seeks to replace envi- 
ronmental laws with a volun- 
tary’ system, are foe companies 
really saying that if only they 
had been regulated more they 
would have stopped polluting 5 ? 
I’ve heard the government 
blamed for a lot of things, but 
regulatory laxity was never 
one of them — until now. 

In fact. Idaho’s mining in- 


dustry has long fought every 
attempt at reform. In 1 932, for 
example, a federal study 
called for the building of hold- 
ing ponds to capture the 
mines' wastes. The compa- 
nies fought that plan until the 
Clean Water Act of 1972 
forced them lo comply. 

Now Congress is debating 
the rcauthorization of foe Su- 
perfund, and industry wants to 
weaken the provision on dam- 
age to natural resources. If the 
effort succeeds, what will 
happen in 50 years? Will the 
polluters sue the government, 
blaming it for failing to pre- 
vent environmental damage? 

Quick, stop them before 
they kill again. 


The writer is ejerutive di- 
rer/. »r of the htlund Empire 
Public Lands Council, <j cott- 
sen'niion group. He contrib- 
uted this comment to The New 
York Times. 


important gubernatorial election 
in I9S6 and two years later, 
many believe, the presidency. 

The tenure of President Sa- 
linas ( 1 988-94) played out like a 
basic law of physics: For every 
action there is an equal and op- 
posite reaction. When he per- 
mitted the election of the first 
non-PRI governor ever, in 1989, 
tiie reaction was intense pres- 
sure for more free elections. The 
more he privatized foe ineffi- 
cient state corporations, foe less 
patronage there was to dispense. 
And the more he followed his 
burning desire for an interna- 
tional free -trade agreement with 
foe United Stares and Canada, 
the less freedom of action he had 
at home to intimidate either foe 
parry faithful or his enemies. 

But it was Luis Donaldo Co- 
losio Murrieta and Ernesto Ze- 
dillo, Mr. Salinas ’s hand-picked 
choices to succeed him, who 
delivered the coup de gr&ce. On 
March 7, 1994, Mr. Colosio 
promised to separate the PRI 
Prom foe govemmenL Two 
weeks later he was shot dead. 
Mr. Zedillo, who replaced Mr. 
Colosio, on becoming president 
declared he would not exercise 
absolute control of his party. 

In foe next election, Mexican 


voters will have a chance to 
choose focir president for foe 
first time. The campaign for the 
year 2000 ip already under way. 
Mr. CSrdenas will almost cer- 
tainly be foe PRD’s candidate. 
He will have to be a magician to 
rescue Mexico City from 70 
years of corruption, central 
planning ajid virtual dictator- 
ship. Vincente Fox, the popular 
PAN governor of Guanajuato 
state, is foejonly declared con- 
tender for the presidency. He 
will have tojkeep his extremists 
under conirol. Both parties, 
joined by many PRI deserters 
and newlyj energized voters, 
will do very well. 

And foe PRI? Former Pres- 
ident Ldpefe Portillo recently 
gave its obituary. “The conduct 
of the PRI island always has been 
democratic.V he said. “Pure, di- 
rect demoefacy doesn't need 
Most Mexicans 


elections." 


wpuld disagree. 


The writer, who lived and 


worked in Ai'j 
20 years, is j 


National Se ■ 


•xico for more than 
bunder and chair- 


man of Business Executives for 


|anry, an organiza- 
tion of US. business leaders. He 
contributed this comment to the 


Internationa | Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Mexico Attack 


CITY OF MEXICO — An un- 
successful attempt was made to 
assassinate President Diaz of 
Mexico as he was distributing 
medals to foe war survivors on 
the occasion of the anniversary 
of the declaration of indepen- 
dence. As foe President entered 
the Alameda, a man named Ar- 
royo, who is supposed to be an 
Anarchist, sprang forward with 
a long knife and made a des- 
perate lunge at him. He was at 
once arrested and disarmed. 


• i ■ 

befell foe Continent in 1914. The 
British Government has given 
close attention to foe approach of 
foe Kematist . forces to Con- 
stantinople and foe Dardanelles, 
and regards foe freedom of the 
Straits as a vial necessity. 


1947: Auschwitz Gas 


1922: Dire Intimation 


LONDON — The British Gov- 
ernment will use all the strength 
of the Empire to defeat the 
Turks, and it has intimated to 
France that the Kemalists’ suc- 
cess will inspire Germany to 
strike again, not only wrecking 
foe victory won in foe war, bui 
also throwing Europe into an- 
other catastrophe like thar which 


NUREMBERG — The 1. 0 
Farben chemical combine in 
venred a special poison gas tha 
was used to exterminate mil 
lions at foe irifamous Auschwit 
concentration camp, the Wa 
Crimes Tribunal was told. / 
statement by a witness brough 
by foe United States prosecu 
tion, Georg von Schnitzler, sail 
foal he learned of this L 
November 1944 from a Farbei 
chemist, Thi Anorgana com 
pany, a subsidiary of I.G 
Farbenindus^rie, perfected thi 
gas and produced it in Largi 
quantities, Schnitzler said. Hi 
claimed that it was known to al 
the I. G. Fartien directors. 


i 













i 



O* \ Je, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGE S 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, W EDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 7, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PACE 7. i 


The Performance Art Bug 
Bites American Public Life 


By Meg Greenfield 


W ASHINGTON — For the past 
couple of weeks everybody has 
been talking about the existence of the 
“celebrity culture” as if it were some 
separate, freakish phenomenon in 
American (and international) life, in- 
volving rock stars and movie stars nnH 
social and fashion elites, and the single- 
minded. mercenary media that cover 
them. The rest of us, the thinking goes, 
are implicated mainly by our insatiable 
interest in it all, by our own incorrigible 
and guilty voyeurism. 

1 think the connection is very dif- 
ferent from that. For in innumerable 
other sectors of American life, un- 
beautiful, ungiamorous and unfashion- 
able people are nowadays living ami 
behaving in the same distinctively 
strange and showy ways that mark the 
so-called “celebrity culture.” 

What has happened is not that a 
bunch of enviably thin, rich and well- 
coiffed people have taken to living life 
in a kind of image-driven way. as if 
continuously onstage or under the lens. 
More important is that so have a lot of 
other people — in the press and politics 
and government, to name a few. 

This awareness of and catering to the 
assumed presence of a watching audi- 
ence at aU times is, in my view, a central 
feature of our modem life and has had a 
huge and truly unfortunate effect on it 
The self-aware staginess that affects the 
way people behave in every walk of 
professional life is far more important 
than the glitz subculture. It has tended to 
drain what immediacy, sincerity and 
seriousness there were from a wide 
range of transactions that now purport to 
be one thing but have become another. 

1 have beea trying to remember, 
for instance, the last time I beard a 
member of a congressional so-called 
inquiiy ask a question of a witness to 
which he or she did not already know 
the answer, an answer the opposition 
was also prepped to put down with a 
smart sound-bite riposte. The best I 
could do was the electric moment in 
the early 1970s when the cabinet sec- 
retary Alexander Butterfield revealed 
the existence of the taping system 
in Richard Nixon’s White House. 

More usually the ritual of inquiry and 
response is sham. What is going on is a 
stage production for the benefit of an 
unseen audience, either televised or to 
be reached via the press. 

The phenomenon, of course, hardly 
originated in the '90s. As long ago as 
the ‘50s, with the televised Kefauver 
inquiiy into organized crime and 
the airay-McCarthy bearings, this 
competition for the sympathy and sup- 
port of an unseen audience at large was 
in play. And so was a certain amount of 
playacting. But neither was anywhere 
near so comprehensive as today. 

The same is true when you put 
journalists asking their questions 
onstage — true for both the journalist 
and the one who is being asked the 
question. The test often becomes which 
of them comes off best in the view of 
the presumed audience. 


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It is as if everything we do in our 
professional lives these days, we do in 
full view of a sea of undesignated others 
whose good opinion we are eager to 
win. I do not mean to suggest chat our 
behavior has become image-driven to 
the exclusion of all else. It is just thai for 
everyone who operates even at the mar- 
gins of public life these days, there 
seems to be a monitor working at all 
times that asks; How is this going to 
sound, how is this going to play — not 
with whomever the person is pur- 
portedly dealing with, but rather with 
the great “out there.” 

I think this has had an unhinging 
effect on people. And it has also over- 
whelmed their sense of responsibility to 
the primary role they are meant ro play, 
if not their memory of it altogether. 

As an example 1 would offer the O. J. 
Simpson trial. Yes, it was in the first 
instance the jmy that the lawyers were 
trying to win over and the judge to guide 
and instruct. But could anyone who 
watched any pan of it doubt that it was 
equally a public pitch by prosecutors, 
defense lawyers, witnesses and judge 
for the admiration of the watching 
audience, an effort to project some kind 
of dazzling personal image? 

As one who favors the admittance 
of television cameras into the 
courtroom. 1 realize I am skating pretty 
near ro the abyss here. Still, even though 
television plays a large pan, 1 do 
not think it is merely the presence of 
TV cameras in so many situations that 
is responsible for the onstage quality 
of so much of our public life. 

People who are rarely under the gaze 
of a television or other camera are hiring 
public-relations consultants to guide 
them in what to say and bow to try to look 
and be perceived by that ever-watching, 
unknown audience'. And often, even as 
they are doing something else — or at 
least seeming to — they will be viewing 
themselves on a split screen as they 
believe they are being seen by others. 

In Washington, there is a saying that 
is thought to be a piece of particularly 
useful wisdom: “I never say anything in 
private conversation that 1 would not 
want to read in the papers the next day.” 
It is wise, in a practical sense. And 
it does come from a long lime ago, 
when it was thought to apply mostly 
to important political figures. 

But there is something creepy and 
revealing about it, too. It has become a 
saying of people who are not center stage 
in American politics, just people who are 
willing to self-censor their conversations 
with professional colleagues and friends 
on the theory that protection of their 
image comes first - 1 do not think this is all 
the doing of TV. in other words. I think it 
is something that has come over us. 

What is important and discouraging 
about the “celebrity culture,” finally, is 
not that in its narrowly defined incarn- 
ation it exists. What is important is that , 
it is but a small and exotic component of 
a much larger descent of so much of our 
national life into performance art 
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


German Pollster Replies 

Regarding “Do Her Nazi Days Skew 
German Pollster's Work?" (Aug. 28}: 

The article refers to reports that I 
worked for the Nazis' propaganda min- 
ister. But I never worked for Josef 
Goebbels, the ministry for propaganda 
or any other government body. 

On the contrary, Goebbels took of- 
fensive action against my work three 
times between 1940 and 1943, when I 
worked as a journalist I was tried before 
the Nazi press court, fired from the 
weekly Das Reich and struck from the 
list of accredited journalists. I was work- 
ing as a contributing editor for the Frank- 
furter Zeitung in August 1943 when it 
was closed down on Hitler’s orders, and 
I finally gave up trying to work as a 
journalist under my own name. 

ELISABETH NOELLE-NEUMANN. 

AUensbach am Bodensee, Germany. 

I was surprised to see Ms. Noelie- 
Neumann quoted as saying that 
Goebbels had “stopped the presses ’ 1 of 
his weekly Das Reich in order to prevent 
the publication of an article she had 
written about Franklin D. Roosevelt 

An article on Roosevelt by Ms. 
NoeUe-Neumann was in fact published 
in Das Reich on Nov. 15, 1943. 

WILLY NIESSEN. 

Cologne. 

Indonesia in East Timor 

Regarding “ Notables Seek Solution 
to East Timor Rebellion ” I Sept. 11 ): 

The article said that “Portugal aban- 
doned East Timor after Indonesian 
forces invaded in 1975.” In fact, 
Portugal irresponsibly abandoned East 
Timor in August 1975, in the midst 
of a bloody civil war, while Indonesia's 
involvement to restore order in East 


New York Times 

This list is based oo repens From more 
than 2.000 bookstores threughoat i he 
United Stales Weeks oa list sre net 
necessarily consecutive. 

FICTION 

TM* IuWhIi 

Wrrt M mUa 

1 COLD MOUNTAIN, by 

CbaHes Frazier 1 '0 

2 UNNATURAL EXPO- 

SURE. by Pamtia 
Cornwell - 7 

3 SPECIAL DELIVERY. 

bv Daroeile Steel 5 10 

4 If THIS WORLD WERE 

MINE, bv E. Lynn Hams ■ 7 7 

5 PLUM ' ISLAND, by 

Nelson DeMiHe 4 15 

6 THE NOTEBOOK, by 
Nicholas Sparks b 47 

7 THE GOD OF SMALL 
THINGS, by Anmdbari 

8 TrfE PARTNER, by John 

Grisham — 8 -» 

9 LONDON, by Edward 

Riuberfurd — 10 15 

10DEIA DEAD by Kaiby 

Reich*. — 1 

1 1 DEAD IN THE WATER. ' 

bv Stuan Woods 13 ■ 3 

12 UP ISLAND, by Anne . 

Riven — - V M 

13 CIMARRON ROSE, ty 

James Lee Bntke.„. 14 3 

14 CHASING CEZANNE. 

Peter Mayle H '2 

is fat Tuesday, by 

Sandra Brown — — L- l~ 

NONFICTION ■ 

1 ANGELA S ASHES, by 

Frank McCouit. I « 

2 THE MAN WHO 
LISTENS TO HORSES. 

by Monty Roberts — 2 * 


3 THE PERFECT STORM, 

by Scbasnan Junzcr 3 

4 INTO THIN ADI by Jon 

Krataner 4 

5 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD- Bock l. by 
Neale DoaaU Walscb — .. 7 

6 BABYHOOD, by PSud 

Reiser — - ’■ 10 

7 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EVIL, by John 
Beicndi 5 

8 THE BIBLE CODE, by 

Michael Draudn 6 

9 BRAIN DROPPINGS, by 

George Carlin. 8 

10 THE MILLIONAIRE 

NEXT DOOR, by Thomas 
j. Stanley and wiffiam O. 
Danko 9 

11 EVEN THE STARS 

LOOK LONESOME, by 
Mava Angelos... 11 

12 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH coa Book 2. by 
Neale Dona ld Walach — 12 

13 THE GIFT OF FEAR, by 

Gavin de BeckeT 13 

14 JUST AS I AM. by Billy 

Graham — 14 

15 BILLIONS AND BIL- 
LIONS, by Cart Sagan.... 15 

ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 SIMPLE ABUNDANCE, 
by Sarah Bn Breadmack 1 

2 MEN ARE FROM 

MARS. WOMEN ARE 
FROM VENUS, by John 
Gray 3 

J EIGHT WEEKS TO 
OPTIMUM HEALTH, by 
Andrew Weil 4 

4 THE ZONE, by Barry 
Sears aid? BiD Lauren.— 


HITLER’S AIRWAVES: 
The Inside Story of Nazi 
Radio Broadcasting and 
Propaganda Swing 
By Horst IP. Bergmeier and 
Rainer E. Lotz. Illustrated, 
yiith CD. 368 pages. 540. Yale 
University Press. 

Reviewed by 
Herbert Mitgang 

C AN words and music be 
weapons of war? That 
question hovers over a well- 
documented book about Nazi 
Germany’s propaganda 
broadcasts. The new study in- 
cludes twisted song lyrics and 
radio talks from Berlin and 
Hamburg by American and 
British traitors. These official 
programs were authorized 
and" financed at die highest 
levels of the Nazi hierarchy. 
They were intended to de- 
moralize and destroy the will 
of the Third Reich's British 
and American enemies: us. 

“Hitler's Airwaves,” by 
Horst J.P. Bergmeier and 
Rainer E. Lotz. who are ex- 
perts on wartime recordings 
in Germany, examines the 
criminal culpability of those 


responsible for “Nazi radio 
broadcasting and propaganda 
swing." The swing was 
mostly American: standards 
by Irving Berlin, Cole Porter 
and others. This fascinating 
account tells how scores of 
musicians worked for Joseph 
Goebbels, the powerful chief 
of the Reich Minisuy for Pub- 
lic Enlightenment and Propa- 
ganda. 

We know from such author- 
itative works as William L. 
Shirer’s “Rise and Fall of the 
Third Reich” that the Hitler 
government gained die co- 
operation of opportunists as 
well as true believers from 
eveiy segment of German so- 
ciety: militarists, industrial- 
ists, bankers, lawyers, physi- 
cians, professors, journalists 
and people in the arts. Many 
artists and writers emigrated, 
but, as Shirer noted, “Most of 
the great figures of the German 
music world chose to remain 
in Nazi Germany and indeed 
lent their names and their tal- 
ent to the New Order.” 

A part of “Hitler’s Air- 
waves” describes the orga- 
nization of Goebbels's broad- 
casting division and the role 
played by its foreign propa- 


BOOKS 


California's Middle Name: _ 
The End of the World i 


By Steve Erickson 


Timor began only in December 1975. 
Indonesia’s move took place after 
Portugal flatly rejected Indonesia’s 
plea that Portugal return to complete 
the decolonization process. 

Facing the carnage wrought by Por- 
tugal's actions and the instability on the 
island, Indonesia had no alternative but 
to respond positively to the appeals of 
the East Timorese to proceed with the 
peaceful process of decolonization in- 
terrupted by Portugal's departure. Its 
aim was to ensure that the democrat- 
ically expressed will of the majority in 
East Timor would not be overruled by 
the tactics of a ruthless, aimed minority. 
It is therefore absurd to suggest that 
Indonesia invaded East Timor. 

GHAFFAR FADYL. 

Jakarta. 

The writer is director of foreign in- 
formation at Indonesia's Department of 
Foreign Affairs. 

A Colored Headline 

Regarding “Maybe That's Why They 
Spell It ‘Colour’" (Sept. 13): 

1 would like an explanation for this 
headline for an article on illiteracy in 
Britain. The implication that illiteracy 
has something to do with the accepted 
spelling of 3 word in British English, 
also used in Canaria and other former 
Commonwealth countries, is offensive. 

CARL FREDRBC SVENSTEDT. 

Paris. 


Leners intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the Ed- 
itor" and contain the writer's signature, 
name and full address. Letters should be 
brief and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


L OS ANGELES — 1 live in a canyon 
outside Los Angeles. The house 
launches itself out from a hillside and 
over a chasm below, away from the land 
and into the air. 

A few years ago. before I moved here, 
this canyon was razed by a terrible and 
spectacular fire; that was before the 
earthquake and after the riots. 

Every autumn holds the potential 
for such a disaster, when the hot 

MEANWHILE 

Santa Ana winds blow and everyone 
from Malibu to the Palisades to the 
Hollywood Hills holds his or her 
breath waiting for the wrong match 
struck at the wrong moment. 

California lives in the Moment of the 
Held Breath. These past few weeks, 
ahead of the Santa Anas and in the tail 
wind of an utterly freakish hurricane, 
what blows through the canyons is the 
news of Ei Nino and its relentless rains, 
approaching like an armada. 

The question is whether these rains 
will amve before the fires, in which 
case there may be no fires, or after 
the fires, in which case the scorched 
soil of the hills will turn to black 
mud and slide to the sea. 

Of course, navigating catastrophes is 
our stock in trade in California. We have 
cornered the market oo chaos, and for 
nothing else other than its complete un- 
predictability. El Nino is the roost per- 
fect of chaos’s creations: Notwithstand- 
ing thousands of words about it in the 
media this summer, do you understand 
it? Notwithstanding all its very dramatic 
and biblical imagery, do you know any- 
one who understands if? Notwithstand- 
ing all the technical explanations of 
tropical weather patterns, do you believe 
for one moment that the people whose 
job it is to understand it understand it? 

Rising from some elusive and over- 
wrought part of the equatorial sea at least 
five degrees hotter than it is supposed to 
be. EI Nino is a mysterious unidentified 
flying object of rain and wind thousands 
of miles wide hovering mysteriously out 
in the Pacific, the monstrous meteor- 
ological butterfly that flaps its wings on 
the other side of the world and gives 
Manhattan a balmy winter. 

The East Coast is particularly fas- 
cinated with El Nino. In part tins is 
because it is pleased, for once, to reap 
the better end of winter as the West 
Coast braces for the torrential worst But 
more than this, the debauched Cali- 
fornia paradise that has come to teeter so 
precariously in the 1990s finally 
threatens to plummet into the vortex of 
the millennium, as is its just due. 

Stories of El Nino abound in East 
Coast papers. Tremulous hopes of Pa- 
cific disaster spring eternal in East Coast 
hearts. We know this; they hate us; it’s 
O.K. In the Moment of die Held Breath, 
we have lived with the resentment of the 
age as routinely as we live with the news 
of El Nino because our own particular 
narcissism is such chat we not only 
expect El Niflo, but also hope for it 


Somewhere deep in our hearts we 
positively swoon at the prospect of be-- 
ing swept right off the map. Somewhere 
deep in our hearts we positively resent ; 
the idea that such a tide could come for ' 
anyone else instead. 

The End of the World is California’s 
middle name; it is in our job description 
as a place: “Must produce inane TV 


and provide a suitable ambiance for the 
demise of civilization as we know iL";- 
Where else are they going to end the 
world, Wisconsin ? Living in California; 
we define ourselves by chaos; the 
pending cataclysm, whatever it might, 
be, reminds us who we are. 7 

As with the house l live in. the 
very occupation of California — 3 
fractured, partially liquefied terrain of 
arid deserts, hostile mountains, dense 
woods and craggy seashores — is ait 
act of recklessness. It is ntotivared by 
both the hubris of transcendence and 
the rapture of self-annihilation. 

More than merely believing we are 
the only ones who actually deserve El 
Nino, we need El Nino. Take our apo= 
calypse from us, and we are nothing. 

In the meantime, we will accomiru>; 
date El Nirio’s chaos as we have ac*. 
conamodated aU the more banal forms of 
chaos that preceded it 
My wife and I are expecting our fust 
baby in two months. A few weeks age* 

We have cornered the 
market on chaos , of 
whose creations El Nino 
is the most perfect. 


we both stopped to ponder the crazed 2 - 
in-the-moming jauot to die hospital 
some stormy night this November, down 
canyon hillsides and our coastal high- . 
ways, dodging landslides and tsunamis 
and the sort of wind shear that routinely 
drops jumbo jets from the sky. 

As it happens, maternity wards report 
that veritahle monsoons of babies are 
born during storms and full moons, and 
since our child’s due date coincides not 
only with the rains but also with the 
full moon, we are preparing for him to 
come blowing out of my wife in a full- 
force gale, whipping around the 
delivery room in such a gust that it will 
take tire combined efforts of doctors^ 
nurses, midwives, orderlies, physical 
therapists, security guards, parking 
attendants and previously comatose 
patients to lash the tittle sucker down. .• 

He will be an El Nino baby lit with 
demon moonlight, a child of chaos like 
the rest of us, counting down the 
minutes to the end of the world like the 
drops of rain that would wash us away- 

The writer, the author of se\en books 
including "Arc eTX." "Amnesias cope :■ 
A Novel" and "American Nomad." 
contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


ganda section. The authors in- 
clude the backgrounds of the 
dozen or so British and Amer- 
ican traitors who wrote and 
broadcast for die Third Reich. 
William Joyce (Lord Haw- 
Haw) and John Amery were 
the most infamous of the Brit- 
ish traitors. 

In the most original parts of 
“Hitler’s Airwaves,” the au- 
thors have unearthed fresh 
material about a popular Ger- 
man swing band, Charlie and 
His Orchestra, that beamed its 
music at American and British 
listeners, especially those in 
die aimed forces. The music 
was intended to make soldiers 
nostalgic for home, where (the 
lectures between the songs 
claimed) President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt and Prime Min- 
ister Winston Churchill had 
betrayed them and their wives 
and girlfriends had deserted 
them. The broad aim was to 
make Allied soldiers lay down 
their arms and surrender to the 
nice Nazis, wbo would treat 
diem kindly in Germany. 

Such blatant propaganda 
must have sounded as far- 
fetched to the Wehrmacht as 
to their British and American 
opponents in North Africa 


and Europe. Those of us in the 
army in North Africa who 
listened to “Axis Sally" 
liked the familiar jazz record- 
ings but laughed at her phony 
blandishments. It is often 
claimed that “Lili Marlene,” 
the most popular World War 
II song, was ‘ ‘captured’ ' from 
the Gomans by the British 
Eighth Army. We leam here 
that Goebbels found the song 
too mordant and tried, unsuc- 
cessfully, to stop it from be- 
ing broadcast Charlie and 
His Orchestra changed the 
lyrics of plagiarized Amer- 
ican music into propaganda. 
For example, here's how the 
lyrics of Cole Pewter’s 
“You’re the Top” were re- 
vised and broadcast: 

You're the top — 

You're a German flyer. 
You're the top — 

You're machine-gunfire. 
You're a U-Boat chap 
With a lot of pep. 

You're grand — 

You're a German Blitz, 

The Paris Ritz. 

An army van. 

Predictably, the musicians 
working for Goebbels’s min- 
istry far “public enlighten- 
ment’ ’ played lyrics that were 


sneeringly anti-Semitic (I’m 
fightin’ for the Jew”) and 
racist (“French Negroes on 
the Rhine”). The words con- 
tinually held Churchill. 
Roosevelt and the Bolsheviks 
responsible for causing the 
war and resisting the superior 
way of life in Nazi Ger- 
many. 

The propaganda ministry 
fort* ade the use of the word 
“jazz” because it was con- 


sidered “a Jewish-Americari 
invention, which one could 
call musical Bolshevism.” 

In 1941 Goebbels decided 
to establish a pure German. 
"Dance and Entertainment 
Orchestra.” The new etches-- 
tra was supposed to have the 
status in popular music that 
the Berlin Philharmonic had 
in the classical field. That ne\v 
er came close to happening. 

New York Times Service . 


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PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


^ a 

Amid New Accusations, Mrs. Mandela Still Campaigns for 


By Suzanne Daley 

New York Times Service 


JOHANNESBURG — President Nel- 
~son Mandela’s farmer wife, Winnie 


$gii lvidiiuvia a iimujm nuv, »* 

^MadUdzela-Mandela, is facing new ac- 
.tosadons about her role in the 1988 
^<Jeath of a 14-year-old activist and is 
(■about to be subpoenaed by tteTru* and 
.Reconciliation Commission. But she 
'isn’t letting any of that get in the way of 
Jier political aspirations. 

Ih a move that could well end up 
/ embarrassing the governing party, die 
■Afiican National Congress, she has 
| entered die race for South Africa s 


second-highest office, the deputy pres- 

id Inrecent years. Mrs. Mandela — who 
was a tireless campaigner for her hus- 
band's freedom before he was released 
from prison in 1990 — seems to have 
stumbled in myriad ways, frombeing 
dismissed as the deputy minister for arts, 
culture, science ana technology to rack- 
ing up huge debts. 

But throughout, Mrs. Mandela, 60, 
has held on to her post as head of the 
ANC’s Women’s League and, some say, 
her popularity among the poorest, most 
r piiiiant South Africans. On Sunday the 
league announced that it had formally 


nominated Mrs. Mandela to the deputy 
leadership of the party. . 

If she wins this post when the- party 
meets in December, she would probably 
become the country’s next deputy pres- 
ident. At the meeting, Mr. Mandela is 
expected to step down as die African 
National Congress president, and his 
current deputy, Thabo Mtoki, will al- 
most certainly succeed him. This would 
leave the deputy presidency up for 
grabs. 

Some political analysts say there is 
too much bad blood between Mrs. Man- 
dela and the ANC’s inner circle for her to 
stage a big political comeback. But oth- 


ers say she may have the support to, if 
not get the job, at least come close. 

While Mrs. Mandela generally re- 
fuses to speak to the. press, she is a 
tireless campaigner, often making ap- 
pearances in even the country’s most 
remote areas. 

But her nomination comes .at a time 
when she is embroiled in new contro- 
versy. 

A former member of her entourage, 
Katiza Cebekhulu, appears prepared to 
testify that he saw Mrs. Mandela stab a 
14-year-old activist, Stompie Moekhetsi 
Seipei. Mrs. Mandela was convicted in 
1991 of assaulting and kidnapping the 


boy. But the assault charge was later put 
aside, and her prison sentence was re- 
duced to a fine. . 

In “Kanza's Journey,” a book writ- 
ten by a British journalist, Fred Bndg- 
land, and published last week, Mr. Le- 
bekhulu also says Mrs. Mandela ordered 
the trilling of a Soweto doctor who 
would not cooperate with a plan to em- 
barrass a white priest by accusing him or 

homosexuality. She wanted the doctors 

certify that Mr. Cebekhulu had been 
raped by the priest, but the doctor, Abu- 

B taadfiS, several other members of 
her entourage who have been charged or 


arc serving sentences far various crimes 
have said they intend to make disclos- 
ures about her when they apply for am- •' 
nestv from the Truth Commission. The 
commission, set up to look into past 
atrocities, has the power to grant, a*- 
nesty to those who confess alL 

Regardless of that testimony, a, sep- 
arate committee of the commission has- 
been investigating Mrs. Mandel a on u s _ 
own and has subpoenaed her to testify at 
the end of the month. 

In recent days, Mra. Mandela has 
lashed out at her accuses, denying their 
charges and threatening to ignore the 
subpoena. 


Peacekeepers in Bosnia 
Face Growing Hostility 





THAIS: 

Facing Social Flaws 


; Angry Serbs Step Up Pressure on Troops 



>*. V '-V. 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Tones Service 


t ZVORNK, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
v When the last voters had departed in 


^ convoys of buses and a company of 
f bone-tired American soldiers had begun 
£ the unenviable task of picking up scores 
-of rfjgrarrieri plastic water bottles, it 
* began to rain. 

I The gray clouds crowded out the late 
■afternoon light Monday and the two 
I green army field tents, where Muslims 
- displaced by the war had cast their bal- 




Jo--* 


i; 


r BOSNUMum: 






i» 


. ^ Under li.fi. administration L 

*1 Q Bosnian Serb republic L>, 
i If ^ Muslim-Croat federation m 


\ SERBS: 

; Conflict on Karadzic 

r Continued from Page 1 


JForce for Bosnia are in the country to 
provide security, including for the elec- 
tion observers, but the soldiers them- 
selves have been attacked by stone- 
throwing mobs. 

’- Mr. Frowick, an American diplomat, 
insisted that he had to be concerned 
about the election monitors. 

“That’s a realistic operational im- 
'^ierative,” he said. 

y But he expressed intense frustration 
T|ial Mr. Karadzic, a main protagonist in 
.die 1992-95 war in Bosnia, continued to 


lots, and the somber mood of the com- 
pany seemed to deepen as the soldiers 
acknowledged that the next few weeks 
may be the most difficult and dangerous 
of their six-month deployment 

These soldiers, who patrol in small 
units through the Serb-held region of 
Bosnia, have borne the brunt of the de- 
cision made in Washington to isolate 
Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb 
leader, and -promote his rival, the Bos- 
nian Serb president Biljana Plavsic. 

The soldiers have been jeered, 
taunted, doused with beer and in one 
incident kicked and punched by angry 
Serbs until they loaded their weapons 
and threatened to fire on the crowd. 

“They shout ‘Vietnam] Somalia!’ ” 
said C a p tain Mitchell Rambin, 3 0, the 
company commando:, who is from 
Shreveport, Louisiana. “We try not to 
take it personally. ’ ’ 

The carefully cultivated image of the 
34,000 peacekeepers in Bosnia as even- 
handed arbiters in the dispute among 
Croats, Serbs and Muslims has van- 
ished. At best it has been replaced 
among the ethnic Serbs by distrust and 
tension. And many here expect that if the 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
makes another move to clamp down on 
Mr. Karadzic, who has been indicted on 
war-crimes charges, the NATO peace- 
keepers who work in the Serbian area 
will suffer the consequences. 

“It’s frustrating,” said Private Ed- 
mund J. Davies, 1 9, from Salt Lake City. 
“You try to help them, and they throw it 
back in your face. It makes us feel like 
what we are doing is worthless. If we 
take Karadzic, a lot more Serbs will have 
demonstrations. They could attack us. It 
could get crazy.” 

Many Serbs swiftly soured on NATO 
troops after they had seized a Bosnian 
Serb charged with war crimes in July 
and killed another who had resisted ar- 








Continued from Page 1 



Aeence htaec^Pltne 

Centrists Kjell Magne Bondevik, left, and Valgerd Svarstad Haugland expect to form a coalition government. 


NORWAY: Labor to Give Up Power as Rightists Make Big Gain 


Continued from Page 1 


pean parties to comparable vote totals, 
most notably in France, was almost en- 
tirely absent here, leading some Nor- 
wegian analysts to suggest that such 


comparisons are misleading. 
The discovery and exploit: 


- operate freely from his base in Pale. 
’^Someone in the international com- 


munity must take responsibility for 
bringing Mr. Karadzic to justice,” he 
said. 

- Top Western military officials are at 
‘ odds about whether to attempt to seize 

- Mr. Karadzic by force, although there 
' have been increasing suggestions in re- 
cent months that they have plans to do 

‘ so. Under a U.S. -brokered deal struck in 
July 1996, Mr. Karadzic agreed to step 

- down as head of the Serbian Democratic 
Party and president of lhe Bosnia Serb 

- Republic, as the Serb-controlled half of 
Bosnia is called. 

He stayed out of sight for a while after 


that, in compliance with security or- 
ganization rules that indicted war crimes 


ganization rules that indicted war crimes 
suspects have no role in political party 
activities. But his continuing influence 
has been obvious. 

Mr. Frowick 's decision to block sanc- 
tions against the Serbian Democratic 
Party caused an uproar here. Hrair Bah- 

• an, director of the Bosnia Project of the 

• International Crisis Group, a think tank, 

• said Mr. Frowick had violated the Euro- 

; pean security organization’s own rules. 


In the second week of August NATO 
troops seized police stations in Banja 
Luka and gave them to followers of Mrs. 
Plavsic, further angering the hard-liners 
around Mr. Karadzic, who was ha pre- 
decessor as president of the Serbian re- 
public in Bosnia. 

The attempt to seize more stations in 
towns like Brcko on Aug. 28 collapsed, 
however, when U.S. soldiers abandoned 
positions rather than confront crowds 
organized and directed by supporters of 
Mr. Karadzic who threw fire tombs and 
beat soldiers with thick wooden 
planks. 

The crowd violence saw the army 
hand out five Purple Hearts and about 30 
commendation medals. One soldier, 
who assisted a friend under attack, was 
awarded the Soldier's Medal, one of the 
highest peacetime awards. And all 
troops are now equipped with nonlethal 
crowd control equipment 

The last two weeks, since the retreat, 
have been an uncomfortable stalemate 
that soldiers say they expect will soon 
have to be resolved. 

Serbs remain openly hostile, throwing 
rocks at military vehicles. 

“It is going to be bad news if we take 
another war criminal,” said Captain 
Rambin, who said he had to restrain his 
soldiers when they were assaulted by a 
Serbian mob on Aug. 28 in Zvornik. 
“My problem is trying to calm my guys 
down. They are itching for a fight. 1 have 
to demotivate them. A lot of them are 
young and do not understand the null- 
ifications of a fire fight.” 


The discovery and exploitation of oil 
deposits along the Atlantic coast a 
quarter-century ago have made Norway 
the largest petroleum exporter in the 
world after Saudi Arabia. That has trans- 
lated into a hnge budget surplus equiv- 
alent to nearly 7 percent of the gross 
national product and has shrunk unem- 
ployment to less than 4 percent, a neg- 
ligible number by current European 
standards. In part because of Norway's 
privileged position, voters have twice 


rejected membership in the European 
Union, most recently in 1994. 

The way the Labor Party government 
managed its prosperity — by investing 
its oil income in international capital 
markets — may prove to have been Mr. 
Jagland’s undoing. 

Mr. Hagen, who comes across well on 
television, was taigeted by Mr. Jagland 
as his chief adversary in the campaign. 
Mr. Hagen called for freeing a portion of 
the oil revenues to improve health ser- 
vices and to expand aid to the elderly- — 
both lean by the standards of Norway's 
Scandinavian neighbors. 

Mr. Jagland retorted that prudence 
required Norway to save during its boom 
times to be able to provide for an aging 
population while looking to the day 


when the oil dries up. He also expressed 
fears that new state spending would 
overheat the Norwegian economy. 

Mr. Hagen exploited that cautious ap- 
proach in his campaign. “Norway today 
is ran like a corporation; all the money 
goes to the state,” he said. “A lot of 
ordinary people, especially die aged, are 
sick of hearing that we are one of the 
richest countries in the world but that 
there isn't enough money for them.” 

Opinion surveys during the campaign 
confirmed that this message was the one 
Norwegian voters responded to, said 
Bemt Aareal of Norway’s independent 
Institute for Social Research — and not 
Mr. Hagen’s controversial opinions 
about ethnic minorities, restricting im- 
migration and cutting foreign aid. 


The Nation newspaper Monday ina com- 
ment typical of the heated rhetoric here. 

Though it would be the 17th charter 
since Thailand became a constitutional 
monarchy 60 years ago, it is the first to be 
drawn up with extensive input from die 
public and the first to stress civil liberties 
and government accountability. 

It challenges directly a political sys- 
tem in which parliamentary seats are 
bought in a highly refined system of 
payoffs and in which, government is run 
by patronage rather than policy. 

‘’The draft constitution is a metaphor 
for all the dramatic cultural changes that 
are occurring in Thailand,” said an ex- 
perienced foreign analyst, speaking on 
condition of anonymity. 

“On one side you have the pressures 
for transparency, accountability, popu- 
lar participation and opening up the bu- 
reaucratic decision-making process, ” he 
said. “On the other you have the desire 
for control. You can see these changes In 
every aspect of Thai culture.’' 

Mr. Chaovalit’s handling of the eco- 
nomic crisis is criticized in the press here 
as an example of the inability of recent 
gov ernme nts to manage the country’s 
affairs. His weak and fractious govern- 
ment ducked and dodged as.theprob- 
l«ms emerged in recent months, offering 
vague assurances that all was well. 

Economists say its main action — 
exp ending most of the nation’s foreign 
exchange reserves in a futile effort- to 
shore up the weakening baht — only 
served to make thing s much worse. 

A n amber of political analysts do not 
believe that foe prime minis ter can sur- 
vive the current crisis. While business 
groups, labor unions, student activists 
and even foe politically crucial military 
are strongly backing foe constitution, 
many powerful politicians oppose it 

A key opponent is Interior Minister 
Snob Thienmong, whose support is cru- 
cial to the survival of Mr. Chaovalit’s 
fragile coalition. A member of foe old 
guard whose patronage controls local 

f avemments around the country, Mr. 
□oh has called foe draft constitution 


JAKARTA: Indonesia Is Pressured to Get Fires Under Control 


Continued from Page 1 


Hundreds of forest and scrub fires, 
many of them deliberately set by compa- 
nies that want to clear land for plant- 
ations and industrial estates, have been 
burning out of control for weeks, mainly 
on Indonesia’s two largest islands, Ka- 
limantan and Sumatra. 

Indonesian officials estimate that 
300,000 hectares (740,000 acres) have 
been blackened, further depleting the 
country’s tropical forests, the largest in 
the world outside Brazil. 

Huge clouds of smoke have blocked 
out the sun in some parts of Indonesia and 
prevailing monsoon winds have carried 
the haze ova Malaysia, Singapore and 
Brunei, where it has prevented transport 
and industrial pollution from dispersing, 
causing air pollution levels to soar. 

The Malaysian Environment Depart- 
ment said the pollution briefly reached 
hazardous levels in Knala Lumpur on 
Tuesday. Residents walked the streets in 
an eerie twilight with handkerchiefs and 
masks pressed to their faces. 

The U.S. Embassy in Kuala Lumpur 
has set guidelines fa its 200 employees 
and their dependents, and some 3.000 
Americans living in the capital area. 

It encouraged people to stay indoors, 
limit exercise, wear surgical masks and 
drink plenty of fluids. 


Singapore has warned the elderly and 
the ill to stay indoors. 

The Indonesian environment minis- 
ter, Sarwono Kusumaatmadja, has 
blamed big forestry and plantation 
companies, as well as settler farmers, for 
lighting foe fires. 

The forestry minister, Djamaludin 
Suryohadikusumo, said the government 
conld revoke the operating licenses of at 
least 50 companies it suspects of starting 
fires. 

But critics said that foe Indonesian 


New Joint Chiefs Head 


Rearers 

WASHINGTON — The Senate on 
Tuesday unanimously confirmed Gen- 
eral Henry Shelton of foe U.S. Army to 
become chairman of foe U.S. Joint 
Chiefs of Staff. 

The general, a 55-year-old Green Ber- 
et paratrooper who led U.S. forces in 
Haiti, will serve for two years. He re- 
places General John Shalikashvili, who 
is to retire at the end of this month. 

General Shelton will be foe third army 
general in a row to fill a job that tra- 
ditionally has rotated among army, navy 
and air force officers. He is now head of 
the U.S. Special Operations Command 
based in Tampa. Florida. 


authorities had been ineffective in halt- 
ing the fires partly because many of the 
companies involved in the burning to 
clear land for development had close 
connections to the government, armed 
forces and bureaucracy. 

The Jakarta Post has reported that 
there were hundreds of forestry compa- 
nies in Kalimantan and Sumatra, “but 
until now only two have had their license 
revoked” despite foe fact that such of- 
fenses had been committed since 1994. 

“These companies must possess in- 
fluence to challenge the authorities,’ ' the 
paper said. “Their influence could only 
come from political connections.” 

Mark Harrison, business services 
manager at the Regional Institute of En- 
vironmental Technology in Singapore, 
said the smoke pall from Indonesia was 
only one more factor to aggravate pol- 
lution arising from Southeast Asia’s rap- 
id industrialization. 

“What we're dealing with is a photo- 
chemical smog.” he said in an interview 
with Reuters. “Calling it a haze as we 
have done for so long is the typical 
softly, softly Asian approach. I think it's 
time to be more robust about dealing 
with the problem. We're probably look- 
ing at a pollution problem in Asia like we 
had in Europe in the 1950s and '60s 
which promoted various Clean Air 
Acts.” 


cotnmnmsL 

“Do we really want to see foe country 
in chaos?” he said this weekend. “The 
economy is felling apart and it's all 
because of foe word ‘freedom.’ ” . 

People who support foe new consti- 
tution disagree. The old way of doing 
things no longer fits an increasingly urb- 
an and sophisticated nation, they say. 

“It's like you’re a kid who has out- 
grown his clothes,” said Ampora Tan- 
tuvanich, a music promoter. 1 tJow they 
come and say, ‘Hey, you can't grow 
anymore.’ Actually, they should make 
bigger clothes.” 

This weekend’s demonstration, in- 


volving about thousand factory workers 
as well as several hundred railway, airline 


as well as several hundred railway, airline 
and electricity workers, was only foe 
latest in a series of public rallies. 

Street demonstrations have become a 
cause for some nervousness here, calling 
to mind huge rallies that ended in a mil- 
itary crackdown, widespread bloodshed 
and the fall of a government in 1992. 

It was a warning about civil unrest by 
the army commander, General Cbettha 
Thanajaro, that persuaded the prime 
minister to support foe constitution last 
week and back away from plans to re- 
move its anti-corruption measures. 

But Mr. Chaovaut has equivocated so 
often that few people here believe that 
this was his final word on foe issue. 

More typical was his comment in a 
television interview when asked if he 
was for or against foe draft constitution. 

“I am 100 percent,” he declared, 
smiling as always — leaving viewers 
still guessing which side he was on. 


TIGERS: A New Pecking Order Emerges in East Asia as the Currency Crisis Shatters Investor Assumptions EU to Warn Britain 


Continued from Page 1 


of the spectrum ‘ ‘the superior economic 
management that you are getting out of 
Beijing, Hong Kong and Taipei means 
they will greatly outperform the rest of 
the region for some time to come. ’ ’ 

The ranking, like the crisis that 
fostered foe reassessment, said John 
Strickland, chairman of Hongkong and 
[Shanghai Banking Coip„ has come about 
because “some of die regimes in South- 
east Asia began to think that they could 
ignore fundamentals, such as balance of 
payments and budget deficits.” Now, to 
said, those governments “are being 
brought back by a short, sharp shock.” 

The cycle of crisis began this summer 
as equity markets and currencies 
slumped. But the problem goes well be- 
yond exchange rales. When some gov- 
ernments reacted by increasing interest 
rates to protect their currencies, they ex- 
posed many bank borrowers to hardship 
or even bankruptcy, especially in the 
Moated real-estate sector. The bubble 
burst, usually in systems where regulation 

is lax, corruption is rife and bank loans are 
often the result of what the World Bank 
has called “perverse connections” be- 
tween borrowers and lenders. 

Yet, not all the tigers will lose their 


claws. With foe possible exception of 
Thailand, economists say that a relative^ 
rapid recovery and renewed stability is 


Thailand: Bangkok, now the recip- 
ient of a S17 billion bailout from the 
IMF, is clearly ax the bottom of foe scale. 


attainable. After all this is still a region of The problem was not just a currency 


high savings rates, long working hours 
and labor costs that are significantly Iowa 
than in Europe or the United States. 

Nonetheless, foe recovery of all may 
be based on the stability of foe region's 
weakest link — 


g hours crisis, which on its own might be rec- 
[y Iowa tified by improved fiscal and monetary 


temational speculators for its woes and 
threatened to arrest those who “sab- 
otage” its economy. But in receni days 
foe prime minister has conceded that 
Malaysia may have made mistakes and 


policies. The problem was and remains 
foe huge insolvencies in foe banking and 


foe huge insolvencies in foe banking and 
real-estate sectors, and a complete crisis 


has begun trying to woo fund managers 
back to Kuala Lumpur. Mr. Strickland 


Thailand. It is im- 1 1 

possible to know ‘The mam le 
now markets . , , , , 

might react should *0 looked 
the weakened Thai — 

government fell, which is at least pos- 
sible in coming days and weeks. 

The ranking of key Asian economies 
by analysts is based on their prospects 
for overcoming the turmoil, grappling 
with loan losses in financial anaproperty 
sectors, and recovering or maintaining 
their economic growth potential, which 
even after the crisis passes will probably 
remain much higher than growth rates in 
Europe a North America. 

In ascending order — from worst to 
bat — economists, bankers and finan- 
cial officials agreed foal foe new pecking 
order is Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia. 


back to Kuala Lumpur. Mr. Strickland 
said" that in cutting back on costly proj- 
ects and pledging to tackle its deficits. 

Malaysia may be 


The mam lesson of the turbulence is that the tigers have 
to be looked at separately. You can’t generalize anymore.' 


of confidence among investors and busi- 
nessmen. Growth thisyear is expected to 
drop dramatically, perhaps to zero. 

Indonesia: Jakarta has earned praise 
from investors and analysts for a more 
market oriented response to the crisis 
than Thailand. The government removed 
limits on foe foreign ownership of shares 
and let its currency, the rupiah, float. 


a tei us currency, tne rupiah, float. 
But a vast expansion of the Indonesian 


banking system in recent years com- 
bined with relatively weak supervisory 
standards means there is no quick fix. ’ 
Malaysia: In the wake of currency 
and equity market problems, foe gov- 


_ on its way to mak- 

e tigers have mg amends with fi- 

. nancial markets, 
ze anymore. South Korea: 

~ The prolonged 

banking crisis caused by overextended 
lending to chaebols at a time of eco- 
nomic difficulty last year means there is 
a question mark ova foe banking sys- 
tem. Korea remains a major playa in foe 
world economy, but Mr. Overholt and 
others said that foe financial crisis could 
persist. 

‘ Philippines: Manila earns higher 
marks for having a relatively well su- 


pervised banking system, for cooper- 
ating quietly with foe IMF and for hav- 


Soufo Korea, foe Philippines, Japan, eminent of Prime Minister Mahathir bin 


Singapore, Hong Kong ana China. Mohamad blamed George Soros and in- 


ating quietly with foe IMF and for hav- 
ing a much smaller real-estate bubble 
than others in the region. But investors 
are concerned about political uncer- 
tainty stemming from foe risk that Pres- 
ident Fidel Ramos might try to force a 


change in foe constitution simply to run 
Ofor a second term next year. 

Japan: Tokyo’s headaches are far 
from over. Although foe bubble econ- 
omy of inflated real-estate prices backed 
by excessive bank lending crashed more 
than Five years ago, problems persist. 
The economy contracted by 1 1 percent in 
the second quarter of the year, and import 
demand was stopped dead, contributing 
to a soaring trade surplus with foe United 
States that is worrying Washington 

Hong Kong and Singapore: At the 
top of scale in investor confidence are 
these .highly competitive economies, 
blessed by fundamentally sound finan- 
cial systems and excellent policy man- 
agement. There is no lack of irony in the 
fact that Hong Kong, less titan three 
months after being handed back to 
China, has become a safe haven for 
many investors in foe region. 

China: The restructuring of state en- 
terprises will be costly in terms of money 
and unemployment, but the consensus 
on China is that the just announced eco- 
onuc liberalization steps, together with 
he tough policies of the deputy prime 
mimster and economic czar, Zhu Rongji, 
should kpep Beijing on track to become 

? l "n.^? n ° rn,C su P er POwer in foe 2 1st 
ttnuiry. 


About Beef Exports 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Union decided Tuesday to begin 
legal procedures against Britain for 
failing to control beef exports after a 
worldwide ban was imposed in 
March 1996, EU sources said. 

The European Commission, 
meeting in Strasbourg, decided to 
nutate an “infringement proce- 
dure against Britain following the 
discovery this summer of thousands 
of tons of illegal British beef in 
Belgium and Germany. 

has been an agreement to 

AMI i HA 


open an infringement procedure,” 
an EU source said. “It’s like a warn- 

inn 1 * 


The procedure will take the form 
of a letter to London detailing the 
CtittimiSSion’s findings and telling 
tit® government to tighten its checks 
on fraudulent exports. 

The other party usually has 30 
days to answer the letter. 

Failure to comply could see the 
issue going to the European Court of 
Justice, although this was regarded 
as highly unlikely. 


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E, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 24> 1997 


PAGE i 


•)n4MA<eeMihV« 


COM. REAL ESTATE 


National Sealed Bid Event 


- v P'^poriie-s Jr States. :.\\*xicv c« rihr-rras ■ 


Broker Participation Welcome 
Bid Due Date: November 14, 1997 • Noon, MST 


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B0 sqjn. office - 3rd floor 
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£AGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 


(China Wavers on Brink 

Of Old and New Ways 


K Path of Economic Transition Is Unclear 


By Seth Faison 

iVpH' York Tima Service 


I BEDING — There is a joke widely 
•circulating around town that may sum 
'up how people here interpret the events 
■at the Communist Party congress under 
•way. , 

Three presidents — Bill Clinton of 
•the United States, Boris Yeltsin of Rus- 
sia and Jiang Zemin of China — are 
■each driving down a road, the story 
'goes, and their three cars approach an 
.'intersection. 


Mr. Clinton turns right, as does Mr. 
I Yeltsin. But when Mr. Jiang reaches the 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


•crossroads, he hesitates and asks his 
! passenger, China’s former leader, Deng 


.passenger, umna s ionncr ic 
•Xiaoping, which way to go. 

| “Signal left, and turn right," Mr. 
•Deqg replies bluntly. 

* The clear trend in China tc 


1 The clear trend in China today, as the 
I tellers of this joke know well, is to push 
'forward with reform toward a market- 
! oriented capitalist economy, while in- 
sisting that such moves are a way to 
! better achieve socialism. 

• There is a remarkable split in China 
.'today between theory and practice. 
•When Mr. Jiang unveiled the party's 
‘plans for the coming rive years at the 
'congress opening last Friday, a breath- 
•taking chasm emerged between his pro- 
nounced embracing of socialist superi- 


Stabbing of 2 Indonesians 
Sparks Anti- Chinese Riot 


Cmpdai by Our Sag firm Ddpaxha 

\ UJUNG PANDANG, Indonesia — 
'Rioters angry about the stabbing deaths 
•of two Muslim sisters killed the victims' 
.’alleged attacker and set fire to stores, 
•houses and vehicles owned by ethnic 
'Chinese, the police and residents said 
■Tuesday. 

; Unconfirmed reports said two other 
Jpeople died in a fire Tuesday during a 

• second day of rioting alter the stabbings 
iin Ujung Pandang, about 1,400 kilo- 

• meters (900 miles) northeast of 
^Jakarta. 

• The rioting was the latest in a series of 
'ethnic disturbances in Indonesia during 
•the past year, with Muslims attacking 
'properties owned by Christians and eth- 
Jnic Chinese. 

• The police said the two sisters, a 19- 
'year-oia and a 9-year-old, had been 
•stabbed as they walked home Monday 
'from a religion class. The assailant was 
•identified as a 23-year-old ethnic 
((Chinese man. * 

• The 9-year-old was killed instantly, 
(and her sister died later in a hospital, 
.'said Major General A cum Gumelar, the 


. said Major General Agum Gumelar , : 
regional military commander. 

The police said that a mob had bea 


The police said that a mob had beaten 
the stabbing suspect who died Tuesday 
in a hospital. They said he had been 
diagnosed earlier as mentally de- 
pressed. 

»• The police chief of South Sulawesi 
Province, Brigadier General Aii Hanafi- 
ah, said Tuesday that 79 people had 


been arrested and that security forces 
were trying to restore order. 

The police said rioters, mostly young 
Muslim men, bad thrown rocks at about 
250 Chinese-owned houses and busi- 
nesses. Thirty-eight automobiles and 27 
motorcycles were smashed. At least 
three cars were burned. 

Ethnic Chinese made up about 4 per- 
cent of Indonesia's population of 200 
million, but are believed to control more 
than half of the country's wealth. Many 
of them are traders or store owners. 

Businesses were closed Tuesday in 
Ujung Pandang, a port and trading town 
that is the center of the cocoa and coffee 
business in Indonesia. 

“No one has gone outside their 
houses today,” a trader said. "There is 
no business happening, especially in 
cocoa.” 

Others said the town remained tense 
late into the afternoon Tuesday. 

“People, especially the Chinese, are 
scared to go out." a Chinese woman 
said. “I see smoke everywhere in the 
city, and I keep hearing the sirens of fire 
engines." 

“People are there on the street and 
security forces seem to be having trou- 
ble containing the people," she said. 

The Sulawesi military commander, 
Major General Agum Gumelar, de- 
scribed the riots as purely criminal ac- 
tions and called on the people not to be 
easily provoked. 

(AP. AFP, Reuters) 


South Pacific Isles 
Hit Financial Rocks 


SUVA, Fiji — Extreme isolation, 
lack of natural resources and mana- 
gerial inexperience have driven most 
of the South Pacific Forum’s 14 is- 
land-nations to the brink of financial 
collapse. The economic blight afflict- 
ing 11 of the countries is the major 
agenda item for the forum's three-day 
summit opening Wednesday on Raro- 
tonga in the Cook Islands. 

The Cook Islands economy is dan- 
gerously close to collapse. Last year, 
two- thirds of its public servants — 
18,000 people — were dismissed and 
businesses were closed because of 
crushing national debt, $70 million. 

The Solomon Islands, Nauru, the 
Marshall Islands, Vanuatu, and the 
Federated States of Micronesia also 
are shaky economically, while Papua 
New Guinea, Tonga and Fiji have 
worrying debts and deficits. 

Only Western Samoa, which at the 
beginning of the decade was rated by 
international aid agencies as the 
South Pacific's economic basket 
case, is doing well, with an annual 
growth of 6 percent. It is held up as an 
example that large cuts in government 
spending in addition to increased pri- 
vatization can work. (AP) 


tional League's executive committee, 
were to have been held at the request 
of General Khin Nyunt, who is Sec- 
retary One of the ruling Slate Law and 
Order Restoration Council. 

The official said Aung Shwe said 
he could not hold discussions with the 
government without Daw Aung San 
Suu Kyi, the party’s secretary-gen- 
eral, being present. ( Reuters ) 


Doubts Over Toll 
In Korean Famine 


SEOUL — Experts on North Korea 
cast doubt Tuesday on an estimate 
from an international charity that 
500,000 to 2 million of its people have 
died in a famine. 

While the experts, from South 
Korea, agreed that North Korea was 
in dire straits and had suffered deaths 
from food shortages caused by two 
consecutive years of record floods, 
they challenged the figures presented 
by World Vision, a Christian group. 

“We can only guess at how many 
North Koreans have died of starvation, 
but a figure of 500.000 to 2 million 
deaths seems to be an exaggeration." 
said an official of South Korea’s Uni- 
fication Ministry, which monitors 
North Korean affairs. (Reuters) 


Burma Opposition 
Calk Off Meeting 


Gay Rights Ruling 
Is Upheld in Tokyo 


RANGOON — Burma’s opposi- 
tion party, led by the Nobel Peace 
laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, 
called, off a meeting with one of die 
country’s most powerful generals, a 
government official said Tuesday. 

The official said the chairman of 
the National League for Democracy, 
Aung Shwe, decided not to attend 
talks with the military intelligence 
chief. Lieutenant General Khin Ny- 
unt, moments before their planned 
meeting Tuesday morning. 

The talks, which were also to in- 
clude two senior members of the Na- 


TOKYO — A Japanese court on 
Tuesday upheld a lower court ruling 
that ordered the Tokyo government to 
pay compensation for barring homo- 
sexuals from staying at a hostel ran by 
the local government. 

In Japan’s first court battle over the 
rights of homosexuals, the Tokyo 


High Court supported a decision on 
March 30. 1994. by the Tokyo Dis- 
trict Court. 

But Judge Hideichi Yazaki said the 
compensation must be cut to 160,000 
yen ($1,335) from the 260.000 yen 
that the plaintiffs had originally de- 
manded. {Reuters I 


asia/pacific 




v-iej,: 


Parliament Rebuffs Hun Sen, 
Rejecting Cabinet Reshuffle 

** •wrgin'Et seven absten 


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ill' 11 


oritv and the plans he outlined to unload 
the ’bulk of China's state-owned en- 


terprises. 

But woe to anyone who thinks that 
m^ina fliat China will make a seamless 
transition to a capitalist economy any 
time soon Mr. Jiang may have turned 
right, in the popular joke, but his dar is 
still for behind the others, and his road is 
full of potholes. 

A common mistake that outsiders 
nt«h» in China, particularly foreign in- 
vestors, is to think that ideology and the 
old socialist way of doing things have 
disappeared. Even though few people 
here still believe in socialism, nearly 50 
years of Communist Party rule has left a 
heavy legacy of dilapidated factories, 
millions of poorly trained workers and 
heavy-banded bureaucrats. 

The long-term implications of the 
party’s plans to convert ownership away 
from state control are aggressively capi- 
talist, in that they seem destined to draw 
corporate decision-making ever more 
toward what makes sense for business, 
and not for the government 

The p lans also draw an enormous 
question mark about the ultimate vi- 
ability of the Communist Party itself. 
Once a company's shareholders can le- 
gally define the limits between them- 
selves and a government authority, it 
may not be a big step to start making 
political demands to serve the com- 
pany's interests. 

In the more immediate future. 


Gtc| AwictnnJ Pro, 

WINDSWEPT — A worker in Tiananmen Square on Tuesday 
trying to untangle flags marking the Communist Party Congress. 


The Associated Press 

PHNOM PENH — In the first parliamen- 
tary setback for Han Sen since the July coup, 
the National Assembly rejected a proposed 
cabinet reshuffle Tuesday that would have 
rewarded his loyalists with senior government 

Merc 

The National Assembly had been con- 
sidered a virtual rubber stamp for Mr. Hun 
Sen’s decisions since the coup, and its re- 
jection of his cabinet agenda came as a sur- 
prise. 

Mr. Hun Sen tried to characterize the vote 
as an example of democracy in action. 

“This shows the Cambodian Parliament is 
democratic and sovereign without any in- 
timidation," Mr. Hun Sen said. “This is what 
dem ocracy is all about” 

Although 67 members of the 120-seat as- 
sembly voted for Mr. Hun Sen’s choices for 
seven ministerial posts and nine secretaries of 
state, the vote fell far short of the two-thirds 
majority required for confirmation. There 


were 14 votes against, seven abstentious and 
nine invalid ballots _ 




IS who fled abroad-anerMT. nun a™ roppwa 
hk co-prime minister. Prince Norodom 
finridb. in July*. Forces loyal to Prince 
Ranariddh are resisting Mr. Hun Sen s troops 

in northern Cambodia. . 

The vacant cabinet slots had mostly been 
held by Ranariddh loyalists who are now in 
exile Mr. Hun Sen had fried to fill them 
primarily with members of. factions that had 
broken from Prince Rananddhs party and 
other groupings who had pledged loyalty to 

him before the coup. 

Three of the ministerial posts were to nave 
been filled by leaders .of a faction that broke 


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liamentaiy balance of power in favor of bis 
formerly Communist Cambodian People’s 
Party. 


however, lies a bundle of confusion. 

No one, least of all the company 
managers who have to cany out the shift 
in ownership, seems to know exactly 
what lies ahead over the next five to 10 


years. 

When an old factory, with a manager 
appointed by local officials, is conver- 
ted to a shareholding corporation where 
a manager answers instead to a board of 
directors, the new bosses may want to 
lay off excess workers and re-tool an 
inefficient operation into one that can be 
competitive. 

As they try to implement their 
strategy, however, will the local Com- 
munist Party chief sit by idly as hun- 
dreds of workers are sent home? Or will 
the party chief say that unemployment 
in the area is already too high and mat 
layoffs threaten “stability’ ’ since China 
has no social security net ? 

And what will the lemons of tax col- 
lectors and local administrators who 
have seemingly limitless authority over 
companies do? 

No one has the answers to these ques- 
tions. 

But it is clear that China’s leaders 
have been talking for years about sep- 
arating government from business, and 
have repeatedly been stymied by the 
difficulty in persuading officials and 
workers to adapt 

Wary of the Russian example of 
shocking a system into sudden privat- 
ization, Chinese officials say rhey will 
make the switch more gradually, 
through a combination of mergers, 
shareholding systems and public listing ! 
of shares. 

Yet, the legal framework to set up | 
even the most basic guidelines for a new 
corporate system is still being put in 
place. 

Even deeper obstacles may lie in die 
mindset ana bureaucratic complexity 
that is deeply ingrained in the old way of 
doing things, combined with a lack of 


f 

HYUNDAI 

SWlMM 


responsibility to shareholders. 

Company managers who raise cash 
by selling an enterprise either on a stock 
market or by selling shares to employ- 
ees may not feel compelled to invest the 
money in what the company needs. 

“I’m still pessimistic that a share- 
holding system by itself will solve the 
problems at most companies.” said Li 
Xiaohong. a securities executive in 
Beijing. 

“You make a company efficient by 
making the managers care about wheth- 
er they sell anything or not,” he said. 
Selling stock just puts a lot of cash in 
their hands, and most of them will use it 
to buy cars or hotels.” 


India Resumes 


Pakistan Talks 


Gvnpicri Irt Our Stjff Ft * n Dapah ha 


NEW DELHI — The foreign min- 
isters of India and Pakistan, divided by a 
dispute over Kashmir, started a round of 
talks Tuesday in an attempt to rein- 
vigorate peace efforts. 

“Both the sides expressed the deter- 
mination to carry on the dialogue,” For- 
eign Secretary Shamshad Ahmed of 
Pakistan said at a joint news conference 
after the first three-hour session. 

Mr. Ahmed and India's foreign sec- 
reiaiy. K. Raghunath, described the first 
day's discussions at Hyderabad House 
as “frank and cordial” and said they 
would resume Wednesday. 

“We have had a first round of talks 
which were short of one hour in the 
plenary and two hours of informal dis- 
cussions,” Mr. Ahmed said. 

The foreign ministers declined to dis- 
close the content of the discussions. 

The talks, slated to last until Thursday, 
are expected to lead to a meeting between ] 
Prime Ministers Inder Kumar Gujral of ! 
India and Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan in 
New York next Tuesday. 

India has said the dialogue would 
strengthen “confidence-building mea- 
sures” between the two countries, 
which have gone to war three times 
since their independence in 1947. 

The prospect of a resumption in the 
talks had been hindered by artillery duels 
between the two countries in die dis- 
puted Kashmir region last month and by 
allegations of spying and an exchange of 
diplomatic expulsions. But the foreign 
ministers said upon arriving for these 
talks that it was time for India and 
Pakistan to put aside their differences 
and work to improve their relations. 

“Notwithstanding the complexities 
and difficulties which might present 
themselves, from time to time, we are 
clear in our conviction that India and 
Pakistan should persevere in the shared 
task of establishing a relationship of 
tnist, friendship ana cooperation.” Mr. 
Raghunath said before the talks. 

, The meeting was the third since Delhi 
and Islamabad resumed their dialogue at 
the foreign minister level in March after 
a three-year break. r Reuters. A FPi 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 



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EUROPE 


Bomb in Ulster Town Shakes Peace Negotiations 




By James F. Clarity 

_ New York Tunes Service 







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A Cerroriat bomb was 
asonated m a town west of Belfast on 
Tuesday, disrupting the Northern Ire- 
land peace negotiations that got under 
way Monday with the entry of Sinn 
£ em » fe political wing of the Irish 


1 political leaders who 


joining the talks, immediate! 
the IRA of die blast, which 


splutter group that is not observing the 
IRA cease-fire that was restored July 20. 
Their objective would be to embarrass 
Gerry Adams, the Sinn Fein president, 
whom they do not trust, feeling that he is 
too soft and moderate to deal with the 
PTOtostants and the British. 

Sinn Fein was admitted to the talks 
after the IRA renewed its cease-fire, 
which was judged genuine by the Brit- 
ish government, and after pledging to 


accused 
:ed a 


adhere to principles of nonviolence. The 
labile support in e the political ac- 


‘ J UUIUCS, out 

no one. in Marketfaill, 25 miles 
(40 kilometers) west of here. 

..The overwhelmingiy Roman Cath- 
mic IRA denied responsibility. The 
ftotestam leaders ignored the denial. 
Northern Ireland, for a day at least, had 
returned to a familiar pattern of violence 
and rec riming tin g 

Officials and experts said the bomb 
was probably placed by a Republican 


IRA, while supporting the political ac- 
tion of Sum Fein, indicated clearly last 
week that it was not bound by the non- 
violence pledge. 

David Trimble, head of the Ulster 


Unionist Party, the largest party in this 
Protestant British prov- 


iso pro\ 

soiateiy accused the IRA and 
the chairman of the 


predominantly 
mce, immediate 1\ 

called on the chairman oi the peace 
negotiations. George Mitchell, the 
former U.S. senator, to expel Sinn Fein 
from the talks. 

Mr. Mitchell denounced the bomb- 


ing. A decision to expel Sinn Fein would 
come from the British and Irish gov- 
ernments. which were not considered 
likely to do so. The two governments 
have worked for three years to bring 
Sinn Fein and the Protestant parties to- 
gether, and would require evidence of 
direct IRA involvement to justify ex- 
pelling Sinn Fein. Without Sinn Fein, 
the negotiations would have virtually no 
chance of producing an agreement that 
would end the 28 years ofviolence that 
has killed 3,225 people in the North. 

Still, the bomb provided Mr. Trimble, 
and other Protestant leaders, with a rea- 
son to delay their entry to the talks. On 
Monday, Mr. Trimble said he wanted to 
join “as soon as possible," and before 
the bomb went off at Tuesday, there 
were repots that he would begin par- 
ticipating on Tuesday or Wednesday. 

Thatnrospect now seems delayed, but 
most officials felt that when the furor has 
subsided, the Ulster Unionists and two 
smaller Protestant parties with links to . 


Mr 


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Summits ft 
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Financing for the Future Istanbul 

September 30-October I 

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October 29-30 


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November 78-19 


London 


As an extension of the news and 
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paramilitaries would take their at 
the negotiating table with the five parties, 
including Sinn Fein, already there. 

“The overwhelming probability," 
Mr. Trimble said, was that " there’s IRA 
involvement. " He added that the British 
secretary of state for Northern Ireland 
“should now seriously reconsider Sinn 
Fern’s participation.” 

Mo Mowlam, the secretary of state, 
said the attack was “pointless terrorism " 
and “may well have been a deliberate 
attempt to sabotage the talks process." 

Mr. Adams said the Protestant leader 
was using the bomb as a pretext not to 
face him and his party across the ne- 
gotiating table in Castle Buildings, in 
the Stormont area of Belfast 

Seamus Mallon, deputy leader of the 
moderate, predominantly Roman Cath- 
olic Social Democratic Labor Party, and 
a resident of the town where the bomb 
went off. said: “This is very disturbing 
news. It is very obviously aimed at the 
political process here." 



Paul McEitec/Tfae Anodaod Prcn 


David Trimble, Ulster Unionist 
leader, accused the IRA in bombing. 


The Mitchell statement, issued by his 
office, said: “It is obviously an effort to 
blow up not just a police station bat also 


the talks process, ft cannot be permitted 
succeed. The pa 


to succeed. The participants to these calks 
are determined to make them work.” 


Clinton, on Phone, Leads 
Lobbying for Land Mines 

Some World Leaders Support Delay on Ban 


By Raymond Bonner 

New York Times Sen-ice 


OSLO — Faced with overwhelming 
ition from nearly 200 countries, 
ie United States is engaged in a vig- 
orous last-ditch effort to reach a com- 
promise on a land-mine treaty, with 
President Bill Clinton phoning world 
leaders to seek support for the U.S. 
position, diplomats said in Oslo on 
Tuesday. 

What was to be have been the last 
session of a conference that has been 
negotiating a treaty to ban land-mines 
began here shortly after noon with a 
request by the U.S. delegation for a 24- 
hour delay to explore the possibilities of 
a compromise. 

The request, which was granted, was 
a tacit acknowledgment that the Clinton 
a dminis tration did not have Support for 
the compromise proposals it floated 
during the weekend. 

These would have allowed the de- 
ployment of anti-personnel mines in 
connection with anti-tank mines, per- 
mitted a country to withdraw from the 
treaty in time of war and postponed the 
effective date of the overall baa for nine 
years. 

The proposal far a delay has become 
the most contentious, and die senti- 
ments against it were strong Tuesday. 

“If you baa something because it is 
inhumane, barbaric, beyond the pale, 
yon cannot then say you can continue to 
use it,” said Louise Doswald-Beck, 
head of die delegation from the In- 
ternational Committee of the Red 
Cross. 

Still, several diplomats, who asked 
that their countries not be identified, 
held out the possibility that some com- 
promise might be acceptable. 

Washington is drafting a new com- 
promise offer to the conference and has 
escalated the lobbying. 

“The discussions to explore the pos- 
sibility of a compromise are being con- 
ducted largely at the highest levels in 
Washington," said Eric Newsom, head 
of the U.S. delegation. 

In an effort to gain support for the 
U.S. position. President Clinton spoke 
late Monday evening with Prime Min- 
ister Jean Chretien of Canada and Pres- 
ident Nelson Mandela of South Africa, 
American officials said. 

The treaty negotiated here is to be 
signed in Ottawa in December, and 
South Africa is chairman of the Oslo 
conference. 

Mr. Mandela told Mr. Clinton “no 
exceptions,’ ’ according to Jackie Selebi, 
a South African diplomat and chairman 
of the conference. But Mr. Selebi al- 
lowed that there might be some room for 
negotiation on the issue of postponing 
the effective date of the treaty. 


Canada also supports some delay. 
North American diplomats said. 

After speaking with Mr. Clinton, Mr. 
Chretieu relayed the U.S. position and 
the Canadian support to President 
Jacques Chirac of France, Canadian 
diplomats said. 

And the head of President Clinton's 
National Security Council, Samuel Ber- 
ger. has lobbied his counterpart is 
France, a French official said. He added 
that the French were generally in tune 
with the U.S. position. 

Since Canada was the champion of a 
tough treaty, its support for the United 
States generated surprise and no small 
amount of anger here Tuesday among 
diplomats and advocates of the ban. 

“It has been met with extreme alarm 
and incomprehension," said Ms. 
Doswald-Beck, a lawyer with the In- 
ternational Committee of the Red 
Cross. 

Several diplomats said that Ottawa 
was going to rind itself alone, except for 
sharing the criticism that had been con- 
centrated on Washington. 

The overwhelming sentiment of the 
governments that have attended the ses- 
sions is for a comprehensive treaty that 
bans all use of land mines as soon as 40 
countries have ratified the treaty, which 
would probably be in less than two 
years. 

Diplomats from several countries 
said they expected the Americans would 
back off their insistence on a provision 
that allowed the deployment of anti- 
personnel mines ana the right to with- 
draw during a conflict. 

But the United States was still ex- 
pected to press for a delay in the im- 
plementation of the treaty. 


Mir Crew 
Scrambles 
As Satellite 
Brushes By 


Ctm^kdbfOmSKffFamDapmhts 

MOSCOW — Already dented « 
from one collision, die Mir space, 
station got another scare when an • 
American satellite whizzed by, for- 
cing the crew to flee into an escape 
capsule for 30 minutes until the ■ 
danger passed, officials said Tues- . 
day. 

According to Vera Medvedkova, 
/ornan at Russia’s Mission 
mol, the U.S. militar y satellite ' 
within 470 meters (517^ 
yards) of Mir on Monday night, its 
closest brush with an unrelated 
spacecraft in its 1 1 years in orbiL 
The speed of the American satel- 
lite and the reason it had shifted into ! 
an orbit so close to Mu’s were not 
immediately known. She said die , 


crew were sitting in the 
sole in case the satellite “grazed 
station." > 

In Washington, a U.S. military 
spokesman said the object that 
passed near Mir was a ballistic- 
missile-defense satellite put into 
orbit by the Pentagon in 1994. 

NASA officials said they had 
given their Russian counterparts 36 
hours' notice that the satellite was 
expected to pass within 950 meters 
of the orbiting Russian space sta- 
tion. 

During a recent series of acci- 
dents on Mir, Russia has often 
played down the danger to the crew 
while some American politicians ' 
and other officials have questioned 
the safety of the Russian space- 
craft. 

Before Monday night, the closest 
Mir had come to a foreign space- ' 
craft was when an unidentified ob- 
ject passed 2.3 kilometers (1.4 
miles) from the space station, the 
spokeswoman said. 1 

The Mir was involved this year 
in the worst space collision ever, .. 
when a cargo ship rammed into it 
during a practice docking session in 7 
June. Mir's Spektr module was; 
punctured and lost air pressure and 
has been sealed off from the rest of ^ 
the station ever since. 

Meanwhile, the three-man crew 
on Mir solved yet another problem 
Tuesday, taming the aging craft;, 
back to face the sun after a weekend 
computer failure, a Mission Con- 
trol official said. 

“The orientation is stable now, - 
the situation is normal," the deputy >, 
flight director. Viktor Blagov, said 
by telephone from Mission Control., 
near Moscow. 

He said all Mir’s batteries had.'; 
been fully charged and said the 
automatic orientation system was' 
due to be switched back on later 
Tuesday. (AP, Reuters, AFP ). ; 


Blair Rejects a Full Pay Raise 

As 2 Unions Protest Increase, He Accepts Only Part of A 


Agence France-Presse 

LONDON — Prime Minister Tony 
Blair moved quickly Tuesday to stop a 
dispute over a £41,443 pay increase he 
was due to get next year, which would 
have taken his annual salary to 
£143,860. 

Leaders of nurses' and teachers' on- 
ions criticized the raise, noting that it 
was scheduled while British public sec- 
tor workers are limited to inflation-only 
increases. The 40 percent increase 
would have given Mr. Blair 
equivalent to $213,000. 

“I have decided not to accept it in full 
because 1 have done this for the last 
three years and I think it is the right thing 
to do," Mr. Blair said. 


a salary 


A Downing Street spokesman con- 
firmed that, for the fourth year, Mr. 
Blair, who became prime minister ip 
May, would not take his full salary. But 

.paylSr. Blair i intended to tike. . 

Nigel de Grucby, the general seej- 
retary of tire National Association of 
Schoo hnasters/U nion of Women 
Teachers, condemned a wage freeze on 
public service workers. 

His protest followed a plea from 
Christine Hancock, general secretary °f 
tire Royal College of Nursing. In an 
article Tuesday in the Mirror, she told 
the prime minister: “Your wage rise 
would pay the salary of two senior 
nurses.' 


BRIEFLY 


Shaky French Tower Evacuated 


LILLE, France — A shopping and office complex in the 
center of this noithem French city was evacuated Tuesday 
for the second time in two days after one of its 12-story 
towers inexplicably started shaking. 

The police sealed all entrances to the glass-and-steel 
EuraKQe complex after clearing it and called in engineers to 
examine the building’s foundations. The complex was reopened 
two hoars later, but die tower itself remained closed. 

Thousands of people had to leave tire complex Monday 
afternoon when the strange vibrations first appeared in one 
of the three towers. 

The complex contains a shopping center, offices, apart- 
ments and a parking garage. 

The mayor of Lille, Pierre Mauroy, said he had found no 
reason for the vibrations and could not spot any abnor- 
malities in the structure. (Reuters) 


“We need to get away from the myth of bare flesh being 
the best advertising medium," Marlene Lenz, a German 
Christian Democrat and author of a parliamentary report on 
women in advertising, told the assembly. (Reuters) 


Welsh Vote Could Go Either Way 


EU Calls for Ban on Sexist Ads 


LONDON — The vote Thursday in Wales on the creation 
of the nation's first Parliament in almost 600 years is likely 
to be close, according to the latest opinion poll. 

The survey, conducted during the weekend for the Welsh 
television channel HTV, showed that 37 percent of re- 
spondents backed the so-called Welsh Seneda, compared to 
29 percent against But a third of the 1,061 people ques- 
tioned described themselves as “don’t knows" and only 
half said they were certain to vote. 

‘'With three days left before polling, tire outcome is still 
uncertain because of tee high number of undecided voters,’ ’ 
said Denis Balsom, a political analyst at the television 
station. Last week, Scots overwhelmingly voted in favor of 
creating a Scottish assembly. (Reuters) 


STRASBOURG — The European Parliament on Tues- 

indnstry to outlaw** offensive and degrading stereotypes of 
women in advertising. 

Countries in the 15-member Union should bring “stat- 
utory measures to prevent any form of pornography in tee 
media and in advertising," the elected assembly said, 
adding that it also supported “a ban on advertising for 
pornographic products and sex tourism." 

European deputies said tee EU’s Executive Commission 
should help the advertising industry draw up a voluntary 
code of practice and propose tougher European-wide ad- 
vertising standards. 


For the Record 


An Iraqi Kurdish group has lulled 15 more Turkish 
Kurdish rebels in fighting in northern Ira] near tee Turkish 
border, the radio station of tee group, tee Kurdistan Demo- 
cratic Party, said Tuesday. (AP) 


Striking bus and tram drivers in Belgrade stranded 
thousands of commuters for tee second day Tuesday in an 
actios widely seen as an attempt to discredit the opposition- 
led local government before national elections. (Reuters) 


sexually and economically subordinated to men, contrib- 
uted to violence against women and tee endoripg lack of 
equal opportunities, tee Parliament said. 


A French Education Ministry inspector was placed 
under investigation for not turning in a teacher who was 
later accused of sexually molesting about 50 students, a 
prosecutor in Besancon, France, said Tuesday. (AP ) 


Y\ 


£?■ 


i 



international herald tribune, 

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 

PAGE 12 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 



Adrift From Pop, Billy Joel Takes a Classical Turn 



By Stephen Holden 

New York Tones Service 


N EW YORK — When Billy 
Joel released his third volume 
of greatest hits last month, 
many of his fans were sur- 
prised that die album’s three new cuts 


were written by other people. 

Had Joel, the voluble singer-song^ 
writer whose brash, newsy lyrics chron- 
icled the mood swings of baby boomers 
for the last 25 years, suddenly gone 
silent? 

Yes and no. It was two years ago that 

Joel sat down at the piano at his house in 
die Hamptons and started to write one of 
his saddest songs. He was feeling blue, 
he said recently, because his daughter 
Alexa, who is now 11, was leaving to 
join her mother, the model Christie 
Brinkley, from, whom Joel had recently 
been divorced. 

“Divorced fathers usually don't get 
to spend much time with their chil- 
dren,” said the singer. “I had this ter- 
rible feeling every time my daughter 
would leave, and I started to write a 
four-note motif based on the words, ‘We 
say good-bye.’ The music was so evoc- 
ative and expressive that 1 decided I 
didn’t need words, and so I kept on 
writing, and it tinned into a Rach- 
maninoffesque piano piece I called ‘So- 
liloquy.’ ” 

“Soliloquy” became one of the first 
pieces Joel wrote in what has become an 
expanding repertory of original clas- 
sical compositions. His oeuvre now in- 
cludes a number of orchestral pieces and 
works for the piano and small instru- 
mental ensembles. 

In fact it has been four years since 
Joel, now 48, completed a pop song. In 
“Famous Last Words.” the final cut 
from his 1993 album, “River of 
Dreams,” he wrote: “And these are the 
last wends 1 have to say/ It’s always hard 
to say good-bye/ Bat now it’s time to pat 


Joel's recent works include orchestral pieces, but no pop songs. 


this book, away/ Ain’t that die story of 
my life?” 

Since then, he says, he hasn’t finished 
a song lyric. To not saying that I 
won’t write songs anymore ever,” Joel 
said. “It’s just for the foreseeable fu- 
ture. Right now, my heart is in classical 
music. Actually, it always has been.” 

Although Joel has probably written as 
many rock-era standards as any other 
living songwriter, the words, he said, 
have always been problematic. 

“My modus operand! has always 
been writing the music first, then trying 
to break die code of what’s emotionally 
in the music,” he said. 

Joel isn’t the first successful song- 
writer to strike out in a more serious 
vein. George Gershwin, who began 
writing concert music in die 1920s, re- 
mains the most famous example of a 
pop composer crossing over into die 
classical realm. More recently, Andrew 
Lloyd Webber and Paul McCartney 
have done the same. If their pop no- 
toriety enabled them to get their concert 
music performed and recorded, the crit- 
ical response has been polite at best. 
Tmitaring a classical “sound” is one 
thing , but finding a classical structure is 
quite another. 

It is Gershwin whom Joel cites as a 
roie model “I think George Gershwin 
wrote some of the greatest popular mu- 
sic of his time, but he also revolu- 
tionized how people perceived classical 
music by bringing his popular music 
and Afncan-American influences and 
blues into the genre,” Joel said. “He 
infused classical music with a whole 
new style and made Europeans look at 
American composers in a different 
way.” 

Stylistically, Joel describes his piano 
pieces as “derivative of Rachmaninoff 
and Chopin and late- 19th-century com- 
posers” and his orchestral pieces as 
“more early 20th century, more like 
Copland.” But his classical idol is 


Beethoven because “he shows you his 
$tunn und Drang, Ms straggle, his tur- 
moil, which is to me what human life is 
about” 

Joel’s piano training has given him a 
more solid grounding in classical dunk- 
ing than most rock musicians who grew 


up playing the guitar. He studied the 
piano from his early childhood, reach- 
ing his raebqical peak at the age of 12. 
Back then, Ik was an adept sight reader. 
But since converting to rock *n f roll at 
the age of 13 (the catalysts, he recalls 
were “ a temptress in fishnet stockings” 
who was into rock ’n’ roll and Dion's 
“Wanderer”), he has lost many of his 
musical skills. 

Today he can barely read music and 
plays die piano mostly by ear. As a 
result, his composing technique is heav- 
ily reliant on technology. “I compose at 
the piano, and if there’s something I 


first time on National Public Ra-^Bj 
dio in a concert broadcast from ^ 
Tanglewood. They will be P^yedby - 
students participating in a k^Joard 
scholarship program sponsored byi 

^°Tfae elegy will be one of the first of 
Joel's instrumental compositions to be 
presented to the public next year, when, 
itis included an an all-star album Mat ; 
Don Henley is producing as part of Jus 
Walden Woods Project, an organization 
working to preserve Walden Pond and 


like, I’Uput it on a tape recorder,” he 
said “Toea I play it on a synthesizer, 
which records it digitally and puts that 
in a computer, which prints out the notes 
exactly as I played them. Then I sit with 
an arranger and get all the nuance.” 

He is just now studying the rudiments 
of orchestration and die ranges of sym- 
phonic instruments. 


T HE longest piece Joel has writ- 
ten to date is a 40-tninute or- 
chestral suite, “The Scrimshaw 
Pieces,” which evokes the his- 
tory of Long Island, where he grew up. 

“I wanted to write music about where 
I came from,” be explained. 

“We start with die early Long Island 
and die landing of the first settlers who 
were refugees from the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony. The second movement 
evokes the baiiding of the place, and the 
third is an elegy I call ‘The Great Pecon- 
ic." ” Joel hasn’t decided whether to add 
a 20th-century section. 

Next month, one or two of Joel’s 
piano pieces may also be heard for die 


wodring ro preserve Walden pom ana 

its environs. . _ . . , , ■ 

Joel has also recently finriwd «>1- . 
^berating an a book oiled Taking 
Notes^with Anibony J. Rwfei, the vice 
president for classical programming w 
die SW Networks, a division of bony 
Carp In it, Joel discusses his musical , 
influences and the classical and pop . 
music businesses. 

“I’ve heard him play his classical . 
music on die piano,’ Rudel said. ‘‘Al- 
though it’s not groundbreak ing .2 0th- 
century atonal music by any stretch of 
the imagination, it’s gorgeously melod- 
ic with these big, flowing romantic , 
phrases.” 

But if Joel has suspended his pop . 
songwriting, he hasn’t given up pop . 
performing. In early 1998, he will em- 
bark on a world tour with Elton John. . 
And the three new tracks on his latest . 
anthology were all co mpose d by song- 
writers he has long admired. 

“To Make You Feel My Love is a 
previously unrecorded ballad by Bob 
Dylan that Joel described as “a jewel 1- 

that nobody had ever heard.” 

“Light as the Breeze” is a Leonard , 
Cohen song Joel discovered on a tribute 
album to the Canadian songwriter. 

“Hey Girl” by Carole King and ; 
Gerry Goffin, was a 1963 hit for Freddie 
Scott. * ‘When it came out, I was 13,” he 

said. “It had a big impact on me because 

it with my first breakup with 

my first girlfriend- ’ ’ 


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Jan Pearson andAlastair Galbraith in Anthony Neilson's “ The Censor 


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Nell and Company: 
17th-Century Backstage 


L ONDON — At the Old Vic, April de 
Angelis’s “Playhouse Creatures” 
is a wonderful idea gone sadly adrift. 
The creatures of her title are Nell 
Gwyn and the actresses who were for the very 
fust time in 1660 allowed to take their place 
on the stage alongside the men who had been 
playing their roles in drag for more than a 
century. 

Angelis sets out to do for this fascinating 
historical period of theatrical change exactly 
what Pinero’s “Trelawny of the Wells ’’does 


By Sheridan Moriey 

Imernoiional Herald Tribune 


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of social and royal and political and theatrical 
change through which they were trying to 
cany on their rehearsals. The result is a drama 
as unkempt and unsure as its leading players, 
and though Lynne Parker’s production on 
Geoff Rose’s brilliantly seedy backstage set is 
both energetic and hugely inventive, it too 
finally runs out of steam along with the drama. 
“Playhouse Creatures” always drifts when 
and where it most needs to be driven. 

“The Censor" {Ambassadors] is also con- 
cerned with what goes on just out of reach of 
an audience, but now we are in the con- 
temporary cinema rather than historic theater. 
Anthony Neilson’s brief, haunting character 






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for a similar period of backstage revolution sketch concerns a maker of pornographic films 
200 years later, but whereas “Trelawny” and the man who stands between her and any 
remains even after a century a magically kind of distribution for her latest movie. Film 
touching drama of love and loss and censors lead as carious a life as critics; 

rebirth behind the greasepaint and the they live in the darkness watching 

scenery. "Playhouse Creatures" is an the ateb flickering images on a sawn of a life 

I in,;. -I, i nmkl, arnnnfl ilia .W.:.. I I ,V . 


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untidy ramble around the dressing they can never 

rooms that ends up oddly unable to RV p¥o required to asse 
make us cure about the actresses or Mpjbl ) Neilson's pi 
their writers. ^ odd-couple lov 

True, there are one or two mag- unexpected la 

nificent character sketches here, primarily Li 2 “The Censor” is a del 
Smirh’s as a vintage Doll Common, the theat- verging on the icy, beti 
er’s housekeeper. We also get Stephen Noon- fessional moralist and ti 
an as Thomas Otway, forever trying to pinch a him the troth about hi 
plot or two from the players: Saskia Reeves as ation. In a very stron 
the indigent Puritan who, as. Mrs. Fariey, author. Jan Pearson and 


*w**l they can never share bat are forever 
0 li°J required to assess. 

*&==* J Neilson's play is essentially an 

^ ' odd-couple love story; except for an 
unexpected last-moment tragedy, 
"The Censor” is a deliberately cool debate, 
verging on the icy, between an insecure pro- 
fessional moralist and the director who shows 
him the troth about his own romantic situ- 
ation. 2h a very strong production by the 
author, Jan Pearson and Alastair Galbraith set 


precedes Nell Gwyn (Jo Mclnnes) as die up a powerfully antagonistic odd-couple con- 
“ "6 * l u f ends “P ™ better than she flict about personal betrayal and public mor- 

sbould be; Ah White as Mrs. Barty, who ends alily in the movies. r 


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up running the theater and taking its profits, 
and Sheila Gish, whose infinitely touc hing 
Mrs. Betterton fades gently away as her oddly 
unseen actor-manager husband goes after 
younger partners. 


And finally, at the Hampstead, is “The 
Prince of West End Avenue,” Kerry Shale’s 
one-man adaptat ion of Alan Isler’s hilari ously 
touching noveL This is the one about die 
inha b i t ants of the Emma Lazarus Home in 


a-ST-Tr . . . .. . ui me emma Lazarus Home in 

brought all these disparate and New York for the terminally bewildered and 
often dissolute and disillusioned characters their increasingly frantic aLerrmts to stane 
together in the Green Room. Anuelis seems 


lying, but also an ini- 
aftereffects offoeHoio- 


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about feminism and theatrical power and foe portant story about me nf rtw» Hnln. 

offstage history of our 17tl«emury theaters ^ fceHoio- 

but ii is fragmented, untidy end We TpStafffcSSS 

are never ready allowed tb care oreven think stage vaSnVT TiT 
forlongabou'whetherNeUCwynwouidbs.e Sirlon WSinin wjS 

king;s mistress, and although Smith has some Sfafe SlSSSSS 

hilarious backstage observations thpv are j ^8S, but there are some won- 

nearly ad our of WfSSJSLS ^ 

romsttc You ache to cane for these mag- 




nificent gypsies in all their theatrical glory and retirement k 1 * ™ ui f rcUlTCnts of a Jewish 
absurdity, but the writing is deliberatel^anti- loathful borne foil of dear old couples who 
heroic, and by giving S s nob^Sl dl ES52?"*® this is a kind of 


heroic, and by giving 5s nob<*y £uiy de- period nS^SSi' ^ dy “ a “ of 
veloped enough to my about, foe dSLSsi £2 1950s, but Shale 

also fads to make us care about or even fuilv even an d sometimes 

understand .he fervent andfearinatUig period wha ‘ “ best solo 


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24. 


1997 


PAGE 3* 


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Indonesia 
To Curtail 
Spending 

Projects Put on Hold 

To Save $14.3 Billion 


:2i<yocER a 




PAGE 13- 




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JAKARTA — Indonesia said Tues- 
day *at it would postpone 42. 1 trillion 
rupiah ($14.3 billion) in government 
spending — including power plants, toll 
roads and oil refineries — to rein in its 
current-account deficit. 

Indonesia’s goal is to reduce the def- 
icit to 3 parent of gross do mes tic 
product within the next two years. Fi- 
nance Minister Mar’ie Mohammed 
said. The current-account deficit was 
$8.1 billion in the last financial year, 
about 4 percent of GDP. 

The move comes as- the weakened 
rupiah makes imports expensive, threat- 
ening to widen the deficit, or the gap 
between the imports and exports of 
good and services. 

Mr. Mar’ie also said the budget might 
run a deficit of 93. trillion rupiah this 
year because of a reduction in private 
business activity and numerous losses 
experienced by private businesses. 

The planned cuts weighed on shares, 
pulling the Jakarta Stock Index down 
16.93 points, or 2.9 percent, to 534.83, 
amid concern lower spending will result 
in weaker profit growth for companies. 

“In the short terra this leads to slower 
growth,” said Guha Roy, who manages 
Indonesian stocks for Koeneman Cap- 
ital Management in Singapore. 

The cuts were, however, viewed as 
fulfilling a government promise two 
weeks ago to slash spending and reduce 
the deficit “This is a good first step,” 
said Sani Hamid, a currency analyst at 
MMS, a research unit of Standard & 
Poor’s. “If done properly, it probably 
will cut the current account and it’s what 
the market’s been expecting." 

Thai stocks fell amid reports that the 
International Monetary Fund might 
withdraw a rescue package, althoug h 
the Bank ofl liailand said Bangkok was 
continuing to meet targets set by the 
lending institution. The benchmark in- 
dex for the Stock Exchange of Thailand 
finished down 9.15 points at 527.21. 

Malaysian stocks also fell, with the 
composite index ending down 16.98 
points at 827.08, as concerns mounted 
that earnings growth would slow as the 
i government took stem to shrink the cur- 
. rent-account deficiL ButrPrime Miiiister - 

.Ji'~ Mahathir bin Mo hamad ruled out delay- 

ing a major high-technology project, the 
Multimedia Super Corridor, saying it 
was not affected by the currency crisis. 

“We believe it will not affect die 
MSC,” he said, “simply because the 
; ’ MSC is going to be an area to be de- 

' veloped by investors. We will put in the 
•_ . infrastructure. Even then, it will not 

V : always be die government.” 

{Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP ) 



HJI/ITk Nr» Vori Tin 


A BATTLE IN RUSSIA — - A worker wearing heat-protection equipment at a Norilsk smelting plant 
The company was the object of a fight between a powerful bank and Western investors. Page 15. 


Adidas to Buy Salomon, 
French Ski- Gear Maker 

$1.35 Billion Deal to Create Sports Giant 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — The German; 
ing-goods maker Adidas AG said 1 
day it would acquire control of Salomon 
SA, a French maker of winter-sports 
equipment, for about 8 billion francs 
f$I.3S billion), uniting two of the best- 
known brands in the business and cre- 
ating the world’s second-largest 
sportswear maker. 

In an industry that has become as 
competitive as the basketball courts and 
running tracks where its products get a 
workout, Adidas-Saiomon AG, as the 
new company is to be known, would 
overtake Reebok International Ltd. of 
the United States in the No. 2 spot 
behind the U.S. giant Nike Inc. 

For the tradition-rich German com- 
pany, which began making athletic 
shoes after World War L the move 
vastly diversifies its product lineup of 
footwear and fashion apparel into “in- 


In Japan, the Hardy and Weak Grow Farther Apart 


By Sheiyl WuDunn 

New fort Times Service 


■ “is 


.’ I*,— ■ 


OME, Japan — The giants of Japan 
Inc. may be Ml of vitality, but they 
increasingly resemble oases in a waste- 
land. 

Take Toshiba Carp., which chums 
out some of the world’s most advanced 
laptop computers, compressing 2,000 
tiny parts into a machine in a dozen 
hours, start to finish, at its sleek factory 
here oa the far outskirts of Tokyo. 

But once those laptops enter Japan’s 
labyrinthine distribution network, they 
can still take three months to reach store 
shelves in a major shopping district in 
Tokyo, a two-hour train ride away. 

This is especially painful for a com- 
pany like Toshiba, because the life cycle 
of a given model of, say, a laptop com- 
puter may be only six months. 

But such is the divided nature of the 
Japanese economy, where the strong 
and the weak, the export powerhouses 
and die domestic sluggards, the highly 
efficient manufacturers anH the feather- 
bedded service sector often operate side 
by side. That is why it is so hard to 
respond when asked: Is the Japanese 
economy staging a comeback? Ur is it 
withering away? 

The answer is yes — to both ques- 
tions. 

Japanese companies that are house- 
hold names around the world, such as 
Toshiba, Sony, Toyota and Fuji, are 
muscling their way once again to the 
forefront of the global marketplace. 
Forced to battle with American and 


European companies in open markets 
with volatile exchange rates and fickle 
consumer tastes, these companies have 
been bruised and battered but remain 
perhaps the toughest competitors in the 
world. 

At the same time, the cosseted pillars 
of the domestic economy — retail 
shops, distributors, utilities, brokerage 
firms and banks — are limping along or 
falling through cracks in fee road. 

“The polarization of the economy is 
deepening.” Osamu Watanabe, the top 
bureaucrat in the Ministry of Interna- 
tional Trade and Industry, said at a news 
conference last week. 

The government is trying to fix the 
gap with a deregulation program that it 
hopes will nudge competition and ef- 
ficiency into the slumping sectors of the 
economy. In the meantime, the duality 
is making economic recovery more elu- 
sive for Japanese policymakers because 
the same bag of economic tricks will not 
work far everyone. 

In the past, when Japan’s brand-name 
exporters did well, they acted as a lo- 
comotive, pulling the entire nation 
along with them. Partly because ex- 
porters now make their products with 
parts from all over the world, that for- 
mula no longer works so welL 

Even as the exporters are getting 
leaner and richer, companies in more 
conservative, protected industries are 
becoming fatter and poorer, creating an 
increasingly stratified business system 
in a country that prides itself on egal- 
itarianism. 

And the government often makes 


things worse. An increase in the sales 
tax in April, for example, added to the 
zigzag nature of the economy. Con- 
sumers and businesses went on a spend- 
ing spree ahead of the tax increase, 
pushing the economy ahead at an annual 
rate of 5.7 percent in the first quarter, 
only to see it fall sharply in the second 
quarter, actually shrinking at an 11.2 
percent annual rate. 

But even as the economy struggles to 
emerge from the long period of weak- 
ness that has followed the bursting of its 
speculative bubble in the early 1990s, a 
hardy corps of companies has emerged 
from the muck. 

This year, Sony Carp., Honda Motor 
Co.. Canon Inc., Sharp Corp. and Sum- 
itomo Electric Industries Ltd., among 
others, announced record profits for the 
year that ended in March. Now, Sony, 
Honda and Canon are poised to post a 
second year of record profits. 

Production of Japanese personal 
computers, mobile telephones and other 
telecommunications products rose in 


the first half of this year, compared with 
a year earlier, at the fastest rate since die 
industry emerged from recession in 
1994. Electronics companies, analysts 
say, could see profit increases of nearly 
20 percent this year, mainly because of 
strong exports. 

But at the same time, Japanese fi- 
nancial ins rihitira ns, unable OT un willing 
to write off losses from the past, are 
wading through debt Nippon Credit 
Bank Ltd., one of the nation’s largest 
banks, was essentially rescued by a gov- 
ernment-orchestrated bailout. 

For the first time since World War Q. 
a Japanese life-insurance company, 
Nissan Mutual Life Insurance Co., went 


to report losses for the first half of this 
year, and oil companies, electric compa- 
nies, airlines and paper companies are 
barely keeping afloat. 

“This is not a good phenomenon,” 
said Masaru Takagi, chief economist at 
Fuji Research Institute. “We need ho- 
mogeneous economic expansion.” 


line” skates, skis and bindings, snow- 
boards, golf equipment, and winter 
sportswear. 

In an. era when athletic shoes have 
become status symbols and logotypes 
such as the Nike r ‘ swoosh’ 1 or the three- 
stripe Adidas emblem adorn track suits 
and designer bags, the field far sports 
articles already is crowded with big- 
name players and celebrity endorse- 
ments, analysts said. 

Rainer Kensy of Salomon Brothers 
Inc. in Frankfurt said Adidas figured it 
could expand more quickly by moving 
into new lines of business while de- 
fending its top ranking in its traditional 
businesses of high-performance foot- 
wear. 

“It is a big addition but a good ad- 
dition,” Mr. Kensy said. 

“It makes sense from a strategic 
view.” said Thomas Joekel, an analyst 
in Frankfurt for Bank Julius Baa 
(Deutschland) AG. The mainly sum- 
mer-sports equipment at Adidas has al- 
most no overlap with Salomon’s cold- 
weather gear with the exception of hik- 
ing boots, which both companies offer. 

Outfitted wife a new range of 
products, Adidas can expand without 
investing in costly new technologies or 
carving out new brands. Mr. Joekel said. 
The combination will form the biggest 
sportswear company in Europe, wife 
about $5.08 billion in annual sales. Nike 
has $9.2 billion in sales, and Reebok has 
$3.5 billion. 

Wife more diverse products than its 
rivals, Adidas stands to benefit, analysts 
said, adding that Reebok and Nike dom- 
inated their home market, the biggest for 
sporting goods. Adidas wants to expand 
in fee United States, where it had an 
unrivaled position until the 1970s. 

Keeping its foothold in its shoe mar- 
kets, fee ergonomic “Feet You Wear” 
series has kept Adidas in fee global 
ition to update technology in 
The company has forecast 
sales of 3 million pairs of Feet You 
Wear shoes this year and double that in 
1998. 

In Frankfurt, Adidas shares finished 
down 2.30 Deutsche marks, at 215.50 
DM ($122.40). 

Salomon, the world’s biggest maker of 
ski bindings, has suspended trading in its 
stock since fee beginning of fee week. 


There’s Big Bucks in That New Gizmo 


By Louis Uchitelle 

New for* Times Service 


N EW YORK — Ellen Elias has 
not yet seen the latest General 
Electric Co. refrigerator, fea- 
turing a filter to purify fee 
chipped ice and chilled drinking water 
that flow at fee touch of a button from a 
spigot on fee door. But she already 
knows fee sales pitch she will use to get 
shoppers who visit ha Manhattan ap- 
pliance store to buy fee $1,800 refri- 
gerator — roughly twice the price of a 
standard one. 

“I’ll go right to my bottled-water 

question,” she said, “and if they tell tne 

they drink it, I’m off. Fll point out they 
no longer have to tug home bottles from 
fee supermarket And if they counter 
that the honied water is delivered to their 

doors, then I’ll point out that they will no 
longer have to waste valuable space in 
crowded apartments on storage. ’ 

More dan ever in recent years. UB. 
companies are pushing the sale of high- 
er-priced, higna-profit merchandise. 
Responding to the income inequality 


fear increasingly divides the population, 
they are successfully aiming at fee 
growing percentage of households with 
annual incomes of $75,000 or more. 

They do so for a practical reason. In 
this era of too much merchandise com- 
peting for buyers, companies say they 

MARKETING 

pann ot raise prices for standard 
products. 

So they are adding 
for which millions o 

willing, or can be r — t . 

extra — usually on fee grounds feat it is 
useful or practical and not just lux- 
urious. In each of these higher prices, an 
extra profit is embedded. 

The process is railed product dif- 
ferentiation, which is hardly new. But 
more than in fee past, marketers are 
addressing one segment of the popu- 
lation: households on fee upper end of 
the income spectrum, those e a rnin g 
$50,000 or more, andpaiticularly those 
earning above $75,000. 

This upper group also tends, more 


[gas or twists 
consumers are 
ided, to pay 


than others, to invest in fee stock mar- 
ket, and after six years of economic 
recovery and 15 years of rising stock 
prices, polls show them to be unusually 
confident feat their good fortune will 
continue. 

“They feel they have done well after 
surviving fee worst of times — reces- 
sion, downsizing, fee 1987 stock-mar- 
ket crash — and they want to reward and 
indulge themselves,” said Madelyn 
Hochstein. president of DYG Inc., a 
polling company in Danbury, Connecti- 
cut, that mainly surveys pnblic opinion 
for corporations. 

“They are sensitive to quality and 
utility and to being able to buy what 
others can’t afford. What they buy has to 
be fee best and differentiate them.” 

Corporate America has noticed and 
responded. Genoal Electric, which did 
not introduce its current series of high- 
end refrigerators until 1992, is now up- 
grading fee already expensive line 
(which cost $1,400 in 1992) every year, 
with each new version adding at least 

See LUXURY, Page 14 


W.-n- 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Bioods 
Frankfort 
Louden fa) 
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NawYMO} — 
Port* 

Tokyo 


Sept 16 

F r u, an u in n « m* 

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Key Money Rates 


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Other Dollar Values 


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AastreSoaS 1JM7 
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Brad not 1.0921 
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London 32140 32150 —150 

New York 322.90 32250 -2J» 

US. OcBna per ounce. London offktat 
ftings/ZuMandNewYMtarnttoe 
anti dosina prices New York Coma 

(Dea 

Sears! Beauts. 


Global Private Banking 


Se 


CURITY IS THE MAIN REASON 


WHY SO MANY CLIENTS BANK 
WITH US. AND STAY WITH US. 



Hcaifiuirlert of f&ipn&ftr 

Xational Rank of Now lorfc 
(SumoI 5 ./X m Grncpa. 


Many private tanking clients split tkeir 
assets three ways. They keep a part for special 
opportunities. Another part for longer-term 
growth. And, very importantly; a part they 
know is absolutely secure. 

At Republic we are well equipped to 
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are AA. 

Clients sense this security in the quality of 
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and stay with us. Security and service, after all, 
are the heart and soul of Republic. 





VorlJ HtaJqmartrrr of 
Republic Nutieual Rank of 
New York in Nate Vort. 



Republic National Bank of New York” 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A S*fra Banlc ■ N<ri* Ymfe ■ Gmww • Lnntlon - Hcijin* - BeiroC - Beverly Hitlo - Buenos Aire# ■ Cayman l#Lml> * Copenlutfni - Gibraltar 
Guernsey ■ I lon(4 Kootf - JaLarta.* I^»* AnrfeL# ■ Lurfjno - Laxembmir^ ■ Manila • Mexico City - Miami - Milan ■ Monte L aria ■ Munlrvidw 
Montreal ■ Hwmr - NaeMii ■ l^ria - Perth ■ Pnnla Jrl E»lc • Rio Je Janeiro - Santiago - Singapore ■ Syonejr • Taipei - Tokyo • Toronto • Zurich 

p R.y, 4 >lu Mats HU I Banl 1 1 Nr* Wfc 1 





L 


PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNE SDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 , 1997 

THE AMERICAS 




f 7200 --***- 


• 7.10 


Ooiter i/i Deutsche marks 



Apple Names Jobs as Interim Chief 


STOCKS: Wild Swings on WaU Street 


Continued from Page 13 


•1.85 


— ! i3o--—- 


’'T^TTfT 

1997 i .«* 






SS§S 


•.f«."v>.A;:;4 


pii£v.: 


iftg 


SujfFma Oopatcket 

CUPERTINO, California — Apple Computer Inc. 
named its co-founder, Steve Jobs, as interim chief 
executive Tuesday and . promised to fill the post 
permanently by the end of the year. 

The snuggling computer company has been with- 
out a chief executive since its board fired Gilbert 
Amelio on July 9 for failing to reverse Apple’s 
declines in market share and sales. 

Mr. Jobs has refused to take over permanently. A 
reshuffling at Apple led to the replacement of most of 
the company’s board last month. 

The new board held its first regularly scheduled 
meeting last week and named Mr. Jobs as interim 
chief executive. 

The company also said the board had recommitted 
Apple to its “original mission” of bringing the best 
personal-computing products to students, educators, 
designers and businesses. 


Mr Jobs who co-founded Apple with a friend, 
Steve Wozniak, in 1976, left the company in 1985. He 
returned in December as an adviser when Apple 
bought Next Software Inc., the company that Mr. 
Jobs founded after leaving Apple. 

Mr. Jobs remains the head of Pixar Animation 

S *Siiice Mr. Ametio’s ouster. Mr. Jobs has cut off 
executive bonuses, reduced severance pay and elim- 
inated sabbaticals. . 

Among the new cost cuts Mr. Jobs has imple- 
mented, the company now is paying only for coach air 
fares for employees on trips shorter than 10 hours. 

In addition, Apple under Mr. Jobs has fought com- 
petition by limiting the licensing go clones of its 
Macintosh personal computers and has framed an 
alliance with Microsoft Corp~, its long-s t a ndin g nvaL 
Apple shares rose 43.75 cents to close at 
$21 .9375. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Numerous Wall Street analysts 
are still relatively unconcerned 


which is one reason the stock market 
has recently made very sharp moves 
near the end of the trading day. • 
Experts also dte the shift lo al- 
lowing price changes of as little as 


Joseph Cohen, a strategist atGokJ “f^saoding one-aghth- : 

man, Sachs & Co., Still others say the rise in volat- 

current volatility is sail not fer atove Stm Mt ^ veiy 

KvoS&l and 1995^ 


gfepi 


Dollar Rises as Bonn Blurs Rate Forecast ^ 




Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 

Very briefly: 




InicreasioaBj Herald TrAvnc 


Kodak Warns of Weaker Earnings 


ROCHESTER, New York (Reuters) — Eastman Kodak 
Co., struggling with intense competition and the impact of a 
strong dollar, said it expected to post lower sales and earnings 
for the third quarter. 

The photographic-film giant, which also posted weaker 
results in the previous quarter, said Monday it planned to lake 
“strong action” by e liminating "money losers” and non- 


NEW YORK — The .dollar 
gained against most other major cur- 
rencies Tuesday after a German cen- 
tral banker indicated that an increase 
in interest rates was not certain. 

Olaf Sievert, a member of the 
Bundes bank ’s central council, said 
higher rates were not inevitable as 
long as wage pressure remained 
“reasonable." 

Expectations of higher German 
interest rates have weighed on the 


dollar for some time. A currency 
usually benefits from higher rales 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


as investors move funds to higher- 
yielding markets. The market had 
little reaction to a report showing 
moderate inflation in the United 
States, said Dennis Pettit, foreign- 
exchange manager at Long-Term 
CreditBank of Japan. 

Richard Vullo, vice president of 


corpo rat e sales at Hypo-Bank, said 
underlying pressures in employment, 
wages and economic growth would 
hold more interest for foreign-ex- 
change operators. In late trading, the 
dollar was at 1 .7693 Deutsche marks, 
up from 1.7605 DM on Monday. It 
also rose to 121.225 yen from 
120. 175 yen, to 5.9435 French francs 
from 5.9165 francs and to 1.4505 
Swiss francs from 1 .4455 francs. The 
pound fell to $1.5955 from S1.6063. 

(Market News, AFP) 


man, Sachs & Co., argues mar me 
current volatility is still not far above 
normal and dw UJJ. economic fun- 
damentals — steady growth, low 
inflation, moderate interest rates — 
reraaic positive and thus dampen die 
risk of a significant downturn. 

But many' others — while not 
necessarily saying that a big down- 
turn is just over the horizon — are 
growing increasingly concerned 

“Does this parallel to 1987 sug- 
gest market action will play out the 
same way as 10 years ago?” Gail 
Dudack, the chief investment 
Strategist at UBS Securities, asked 
in a recent report. “Not at all,” she 
answered “But this is a warning 
that should be heeded.** 

For investors, the increase in 
volatility can- have two contradic- 
tory effects: lit can make some 
nervous enough to change their out- 
look and their investment strategy, 
while others may be lulled into 
complacency. 

On one hand, “volatility makes 
people think about the market again 
and makes them reconsider their 
positions,” said Robert Shiller, a 
professor of economics at Yale Uni- 
versity and a specialist on investor 
behavior. “Volatility is a clue that 
other people are re-evaluating, and 
so investors have a rule of thumb: 
When in doubt, imitate others.” 

On the other hand, increasing 
volatility as the market is still rising 
can lull investors. They may see a 


As for Mr. Taylor, the retired 
teacher, be is content to just wait on 
the sidelines and let the market run 

its coarse. . 

“Sometimes, my daddy used to 
say, you need to just lie back in (he 
weeds and wait a while,” he said. 
“And that’s just what I’m doing.”' 

■ Price Data Cheea-Jtfarkfits 

U.S. bonds soared and stocks 
rose after government reports. 


showed a surprisingly low rate of 
inflation for August, news services 


LUXURY: NdV Consumer Features 3 4re Yielding Big Bucks 200 -paint fell one day only as volat- out,”said cams Rnpkey 

0 " ffity that will be followed by a sharp idem and nnancial-ecx 


strategic units to reduce its cost structure. 

"The negative factors experienced in the first half of this 


AMEX 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close ffL,. 

The top 300 most active shares, 

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The Associated Press. 


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Continued from Page 13 


year continue to put pressure on tbe company's performance 
as we move through the third quarter,” Chairman George 


Fisher said. 

‘"If the weak operating performance in July and August 
were to continue through September, earnings would be 


$150 to the price, bolstering profit in the process. The 
latest model has (he water filter. 


“More people are using frequent-flier miles to up- 
ade,” said Christopher Chiames, an American Arr- 


• A.G. Edwards Inc's second-quarter earnings rose 33 per- 
cent. to a record $69.2 million, led by commissions as stock 
trading soared. 

• Goldman Sadis Group LP’s third-quarter pretax profit rose 
58 percent, to a record $932 million. Sales in die quarter ended 
in August increased 52 percent, to $2.23 billion. 

• WebTV Networks, a unit of Microsoft Corp. that designs 
.set-top boxes that bring Internet services to the television 
screen, introduced an upgraded version melding live television 
programming with related pages on die World Wide Web. 

• Marvel Entertainment Group’s lenders, Highgate LP and 
Westgate International LP, reached a tentative agreement 
with foe bankrupt publisher that will have to go to a judge. 

« Royal Bank of Canada and the Canadian unit of AT&T 
Corp. said they had formed a venture to provide Internet 
access and other services to foe 400,000 corporate customers 
of Canada's largest bank Bloomberg. WIT 


latest model has (he water filter. 

Sport utility vehicles have become a classic, high- 
prome example of this dynamic. Ford Motor Co., for 
example, is doubling foe production of its Expedition — 
price tag $3 1 ,000. well equipped — while discontinuing 
four lower-priced cars aimed at the less affluent 

“Most of our profit comes from less than half of the 
vehicles we sell,” Ford's chairman, Alexander Trot- 
man, said, referring to the Expedition and other higher- 
priced vehicles. 

Tbe upscale phenomenon seems ubiquitous, show- 
ing up. for example, in special features on digital 
cellular phones, each with a monthly charge, or in new 
lines of elegant kitchenware, or in a recent surge in 
construction of larger, more expensive homes, or in 
television sets with ever larger — and more profitable 
— screens, or in Jacuzzi foot-baths, or in electric 
toothbrushes that, for an extra $20, include a timer that 
runs the brush for two minutes and then turns it off. Two 
minutes is the amount of brushing often prescribed by 
dentists. 

Airlines now get more than 22 percent of their 
domestic passenger revenue from the sale of first- and 
business-class seats, up from 9.S percent in 1987, the 
Air Transport Association says. 


tines spokesman, “and when they get up there, they like 
it, and they want to do it again. Ami they are willing to 
pay for it” 

Even those who make low-priced goods for the less 
affluent are tapping into the trend, counting on the easier 
spending of the affluent to rub off on lower-income 
households. Rubbermaid Inc., for example, recently 
added an $18 water filter — one that filters water poured 
into a pitcher — to its line of plastic housewares. 

“Iris aimed at consumers who will spend a bit more 
to get value, which is in contrast to the early '90s, when 
consumers only wanted to spend less,” William Pfirnd, 
a Rubbermaid vice president, said. 

As upscale marketing spreads, critics warn of its 
consequences. A falling stock market, for example, 
could seriously curtail consumption. “The stock mar- 
ket wealth factor on upscale purchasing is huge,” said 
James Smith, an economist for foe Rand Corp. 

Others argue that the growing disparity in income, 
exacerbated by upscale marketing, adds to social ten- 
sions. 

And in a variation on the wide-ranging debate about 
how to use America's new wealth — in consumption or 
in investment? — there are those who wonder whether 
foe money should be channeled into spending for foe 
public good rather than into upscale purchases. 


flity foai will be followed by a sharp 
rebound. This means it could take 
investors longer to spot a change in 
foe market's randatnenral direction. 

Some of this contradictory im- 
pact can be seen in foe ebb and flow 
of money into stock mutual funds. 
Despite foe rise in volatility this 
year, the S150 billion flow into 
stock funds through August is just 
6.6 percent behind last year's re- 
cord-setting pace and is the second- 
highest ever. But weekly figures 
from AMG Data Services show that 
in two weeks in August when volat- 
ility was high, investors withdrew 
more money from stock mutual 
funds than they put in. 

Analysts offer many reasons for 
foe higher volatility these days. 

Some argue that the market is 
jittery because of the high juices 
investors are paying for stocks com- 
pared with their expected earnings, 
so that even a whiff of unexpected 
news about a particular company 
can send certain stocks reeling. 

Others say it flows fromasurge in 
computer-aided program trading. 


inflation for August, news services 
reported from New York. 

Bonds had their biggest rally in 
more than three years as the con- 
sumer price index rose just &2 per- 
cent last month despite the biggest 
jump in gasoline prices since the 
Golf crisis in 1990. Excluding food 
and energy, consumer prices rose 
0.1 percent in August / 

“Year-over-year, foe core rate is 

23 percent,” said David Sloan, chief 

economist at IDEA, “which is' foe 
lowest in 30 years. This is not just 
soft — inflation is foiling; which is 
pretty significant in this economy J 1 ' 
Hie price affoeberK&mark30- 
year Treasury bohdrose27/32 to 99 
21/32, reducing its yield to 6.40 
percent from &37 percent Monday. 

“We were already off to, the 
races before today's data came- 
out,” said Chris Rnpfcey, vice pres- 
ident and financial -economist' at 
Bank of Tokyo/MRstibuhi. : "; =r 

Among broader stock indexes, 
tire Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index gained 26.09 points at 
945.86, while die tedmofogy-laden 
Nasdaq composite index gamed 
33. 68 tol, 668.60. - 
“Lower interest rales with mod- 3 
est inflation are just a great com- 
binationf rathe stock market,” said 
Garrett Nagle, president of his. own 
$200 nriTHo n money-management 
firm in Boston. “If you can oolyget 
6 percent oa the longhand, that’s not 
very strong competition foramaricet 
that's up 10 percent on average.” 

Microsoft gained 5 11/16 to 
136%, rebounding from a sharp 
drop Monday, after it said it would 
introduce an improved product .for 
delivering World Wide Web con- 
tent via television. 

But several blue chips foil after 
warning that profit would not meet 


forecasts, including foe photo rivals 
Kodak and Polaroid and American 


Kodak and Polaroid and American 
Pad & Paper and Bell & HowelL 
(Bloomberg, AP) 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Most Actives 


Sept. 16, 1997 


Htfv tow Intel Chga Optnt 


Hkjb Low lldad ChB» OpW 


Hlflli toil Latest Os* OpW 


Dow Jones 

o»m 


Wgh Low Latest Chge OpW 0RAN6E JUICE OiCTTO 


W-YEAfl FRENCH GOV. BONDS OMT1FI 


a»M MW Low LOW Ckg. 

Indus 778446 7911163 7722.09 789SS7 +174.78 

Tims 3109 JQ 3127-67 3075J4 3122.13 +*t87 

Ull 2414! 747.92 74029 742.92 +2A3 
Cmp 24WL90 2527.49 2477 JW 2S23JB3 +46JD 


Standard & Poors 


Hftk Low Qow 4 Pi*. 
Industrials 1 089J01 077 J» 1077 J3 1106/6 
Trnirso. 679 M 672.15 67HAS dM.75 

Unties 206.17 204.19 204.94 207.04 

Finance 107 .69 106.96 107-07 111.6 

SP500 •msa WUI 919J7 945.86 

SP100 899.56 B 68 JK 888.25 911.93 


EKodak 

C elHCA s 

Condngln 

mcMart 

GenEleci 

Bay MM 

Luamt 

MMPTTAP 


VoL HUH 
165979 68 ft 
135575 70 
86208 *5V» 
79776 28U 
73014 431* 
65316 47«t 
59649 69 
59306 38ft 
55163 TWt 
54806 22V* 
52175 4BV 


taw Lai Oft. 
56ft 57 -3 

65 69*1 +51* 
43V* 44ft +*1 
26V* 27ft -1V» 

41 V* ,11*1 


41 V* 43'»* + lftk 
4T«t 47*1 *[ 

47v» tvn *»■ 
36ft 3Bft +2ft 
74ft 7784 43ft 


Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

MOO til mi nim u m- conb par twshal 
Sep 97 270ft 262ft 262ft -4ft 3331 

Dec 97 268ft 363ft 263 ft -2« 18WW 

Mar 98 279 272ft 272ft -2 S6JW 


14000 Bm,- cents per Rx FK5oaooo -pt» rf ioo pet 

Nov 97 69J5 6930 -U05 1&4SB Dec 97 9936 99J0B 99^6 +0.18 126,719 

Jan 98 7230 72.15 7230 4005 &985 Mar 98 9060 9030 9052 +0 j04 528 

Mar 98 7330 7330 7SJS 4 «I 0 £676 Jus« «30 «30 9832 —036 0 




May 98 282ft 277ft 777ft 

JUI98 285ft 280ft 28l» 

Sap 98 277ft 273ft 273ft 

Dee 98 775 271 271ft 

Est ades N A Mom sates 41.987 
Man open M 303258. off 2313 


50037 15»* 
49209 £M 
48793 60ft 




2ft 188410 
■2 56009 
1H 13657 
-2 2-4059 
-ft 1,717 
-ft 14700 


Jan 98 7240 72.15 7230 +005 8355 

660-98 7540 7X20 7530 40.10 £676 

May 98 78JS 78.15 78.15 40.05 M71 

Est sales HA Mon solas 1399 
Mon open W 35564 oB 287 


ECL sates: 122385. 

Opwa tot: 127347 Oft 56.26S. 


Sep 98 95.14 94.98 9508 4004 48491 

Doc 98 95.15 9*39 9509 4001 31493 

Mar 99 9503 9409 9*38 -+O02 14989 

EsL sates: 17X469. Praw- salBs: 177^40 
Pm.apMM: 420754 up 12JQ3 


GOLD INCM30 


100 nay at^ doOan per Hoy st 
Sop 97 32100 -130 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONO CUFTO 
JTL 200 mWcB-pD of 1 00 pd 
Dec 97 11038 T1Q33 IW1 4038111394 
A6ar98 11050 11050 11061 4038 8 

EsL sates: 5X671. Pm. sates: 65608 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 
100 Ions- dodon per ten 


Oa97 32350 31940 221 -150 11399 Pm*, opeotatj 111002 up 7,917 

Nor 97 321.90 -150 


Nasdaq 


49*54 425D 49369 411.09 
62351 60937 62240 +1113 

4».14 451.79 *5155 +734 

y ut mn twjs +637 

*&Xj5 4513* 4643# +13.12 


Nasdaq 


116741 136ft 
92735 74 
87918 93ft 
7B33S 49ft 


i Law aw- 
IU 6 V* +JM 


Sep 97 27300 26900 271.90 +190 3038 
0a 97 23150 22700 23930 +180 21029 

Dec 97 216.90 21100 21110 +200 44380 
Jon 98 21100 20700 208.00 + 1.00 12373 
Mar 98 20650 20150 27260 +1.10 10741 
May 98 203.00 19900 20030 4-130 9013 

Est. sates HJL Man sates 19346 
Mon open IM 10M5& up 208 




144901 IsalO 64850 *33M 
134736 133750 3*7 JS +14.07 
183904 181165 83601 +2622 


1796^ W7J8 179491 +&.» 
1181J1 715137 218138 +3115 

107301 I8M0I 107304 +406 


Si® 

15792 9to 


35015 SDH 488ft 


9Wft +4JV+ 

2H* +1H 

91$ +3S 
Si +H« 

SBft 35 


Dec 97 324J0 37100 3Z2JB0 -150114594 UBOR T-MOWTHJCMeiQ 

98 32550 32240 374.30 -100 1&4Q6 S3 owOon- fdsallOu pa. tst uwei ri-«. man scan /, 

Apr 98 32650 32400 325J0 -?.W £423 0d97 9437 9435 9437 +002 34333 M«» Open IMB457&-O0 812 


tnduBtrtats 

corrojii weno 

50000 Rhl- cents ptrte. __ - 

Oct 97 7153 7100 7330 40.12 &027. 

Dec 97 7303 7331 7357 +014 47M2 

Mar 98 7495 7458 7430 +012 14011 
Moy98 7345 7500 7538 -002 6312 
JWW 74J0 7UJ 7X74 +011 £dS1- 
EsL saleillA. Men sides 7.W5 


Jun 98 32850 32750 32750 -100 MW MW97 9434 9451 9433 +002 21016 

Aug 98 33000 32950 32953 -1J0 4327 Dec97 9419 9411 9418 +006 £706 


Oarn 33150 -170 

Est. sales 45000 Man sates 401*2 
Man eywi M 20U54 afflUIO 


HEATING OIL <NMEW 


EsLeates HA. Alan sates 14195 
Man opaa bit 70530 up 9538 


rfUOO gaC owOT per aol 
Oct 97 5435 5235 5305 +133 40753 

No* 97 5545 S3J5 5499 +177 3U58 

0ec97 5640 SLS5 5602 +100 2X713 

Jm98 ' 5705 SU5 56-77 +1.15 22093- 

Feh98 5775 5500 5677 4-105 12573. 

Mar 98 5680 5550 5652 4-100 1730. 


68037 <7457 680.05 +139 


Dow Jones Bond 


IM Warn c am uot 
68917 SWb 93fti 95 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

6 (XOOO Bn- cans per Hi 

Sep 97 USB 097 Z3SS +OW 530 

Od97 2346 2300 2366 +875 17^52 

Dec 97 2405 73-36 2403 +074 42.136 

Jan 98 74J0 23J55 2420 +0.73 13060 

Mar 98 2446 2305 2446 +073 7083 

May 98 2460 23.93 2460 +005 3093 

Est Hdes NJL Men tees 14965 
Man open IM 90290, up 2.147 


HI GRADE COPPER CNC7AX} 
2£000 Si 4 - ante per b 


Sep 97 9170 9200 9X40 4L90 
Od 97 9X75 9200 9X75 *85 


EURODOLLARS (CMEK) 

81 mflfcrs-pfs of 100 pcL 

Od 97 942* 9433 9476 +004 3lMt 

Dec 97 9419 9411 9419 +007 574016 


Mar 98 9413 9407 9412 -rfM® 399088 ART* 5*45 S&32 +005 4295 


Nov 97 9445 9X10 9445 -085 U7B Jon 98 9405 9192 9405 +0.12 287407 EsL sate* HLA. Man sales 2 XT« 


DK97 9600 9X50 9485 -105 28J66 S«« 

Jan 98 9505 9470 -95.05 -10S 944 OecW 

F» 98 9535 ASS 94 S Ala r 9f 

MarSB 95.90 9450 9545 4195 4173 

Apr 98 9545 0.95 695 SepW 

May 98 95JO 9500 0SJ5 005 1163 OecW 

EsL sates 9000 Mon sates 4307 
Man open JM5U34 W 992 J ™ 100 


20 Bonds 
lOUHBtles 
10 Industrials 


273*0 1ft ft 8 ft 

«ji n; to TV* +* 

3S46 17ft 16U 16ft 

3153 1+ft lift 161ft +Vft 

tot OSi ^ iS 

1442 34ft 34ft 34ft +ft 

«?4 g* Oft Aft +ft 

9701 8 ft BVft 89ft +Vft 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

£000 bumtefcoom- oents per budiel 
Sap 97 783 738 782 +47H 1753 

Nov 97 650 637 646ft +12 93476 

Jan 98 657ft 641 &4tt* + 10 ft 21911 

Ate 98 658ft 548 654ft +11 *457 

Mot 90 465 655ft 640 +10ft 7053 

EsL sates HA Man sates 31007 
Morn open M 14&204 up 1712 


SILVER CMCMX) 


•564 S*P« g*r W7 +O.U mi31 Monop«ilnn5£724 up 1.161 

944 D»C 98 9X86 9170 9X85 +0.15 201000 

945 Mar 99 93M 93M 9SJB3 iigHT-SWEET CRUDE (NME ln 

,173 J00 99 9X80 9X65 9179 .15 111001 {So b^- p« bttL^ 

495 >P99 9X7S 9X60 9X75 +0.15 917*1 M97T9XT924 19JI *03* 763 U 

,163 Utcg 9X70 9X54 9X69 +OJ4 77 S73 ^57 • 

Mar 00 9370 9X54 9X69 +0-14 67479 KcW 998 1945 ig» ' 

te. 00 9167 93J0 9304 +017 5*412 ^98 19.W JPJ0 

Est. ntesNA Man Bates 237078 Feb 98 19-95 19-55 1904 +000 1 M 49 

Mon open M 1941216. up £392 Mar98 1904 19J7 1905 +029 10043 


U6HT0WEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1000 bbL- dalan per bbL 

Od97 . 1905 1904 19-61 +0J4 7*594 

KS 12-3J 49032. 

D*c97 19.98 1945 19.79 +0X1 5*131 


Sep 97 46300 4S£00 45*50 -1*00 361 BRITISH POUMD tCMER) 

Od 97 45730 -14X& 78 61500 pounds, J pw pound 

wa»9 7 46040 -1430 OecV7 16008 1-300 10902 00096 21185 

Dec 97 47700 45800 461.59 -1*20 51193 Mar 98 1J84600SM 226 

JOT 98 46300 -1*20 22 Jan98 1079400094 27 

Mot 08 48000 44500 46X20 -1*30 TI795 Esl. salts £037 Mon sedes 8061 

Sir S3 as :!*S ISo 

EsL sates 30000 Aten soles 4462 CANADIAN DOLLAR flCMERI 

Man open bit 76.74* aR 1418 100000 doOan, SperQfn.<» 


Trading Activity 


MNKHI 

DwAned 

VSM 

ffewHiens 

New Lews 


a™ Pirn. 

2M2 1545 

7SS 1291 

3403 ^ 

4, ,I "B 


Nasdaq 


Adnana 

D nttte 

UlKftngM 


is? as 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

£000 bu ndnbnum- cants per binhol 

Sep »7 359 3S6 358 +2 318 

Dec 97 374ft 369 « 372ft +3 61,101 

Mar 98 388ft 383ft 386ft +3H 2*089 

May 98 394 389ft 392 +2ft A07B 

Est sates HA. Mom sates HUTS 
Mom open kit 10 X 206 , off 1096 


J2-® 5 3!-“ 1M4 +030 76449 
Mr 98 1904 19J7 1905 +029 10043 

6st sates NA. Man safes 6*001 
Man open bd 41 1030 atTL394 


PLATINUM (NMER) 


50lnftrar.-*dtasp*rBoyar. Mar 98 J7B3 .7253 7278+0J 

0*7 97 43BJ» 41060 421J0 -530 9.259 Est sates &J08 Aten tees 12769 

Jan«i 42100 41000 412.00 -L80 3440 Mon open M 6USJX off 1776 

Apf9H 405.0} -400 612 

Jutw 40300 40 100 40100 -too t GERMAN MASK (CMEK) 

Est sale, Ma Mom sates 1060 12£000 nwta. spermOTt 

Man open lot 1X41XOT710 Doc 97 0714 0664 068500025 5X356 

Ctese Pievtaus Mar« -5728 -S7OT 471500025 £170 

LONDO N METALS (LME) Tun 98 J7SS 4755 4745 00036 2477 

Dcdte per metric ten Esl. sates 2£375 Mon sates 47,955 

^T^^ft 159800 1599.00 ■“ 

'*Wft 161400 141500 JAPANESE YEN (CASES) 

Hi »AT2 


CANADIAN DOLLAR tCMEHJ 
100000 ttoflan. S per Cdn. dr 
Sep 97 .7183 -7174 .7137 00003 15342 

DecW .7 U7 .7212 .7244+0.0021 48066 
Mar 98 J7SJ .7253 7278+00021 1367 


mwMgta 

Nwlows 

Marker Sales 


- 


365 306 

221 27? 

163 161 

756 Til 

73 64 

6 4 


NYSE 
Ajnex 
Nasdaq 
In minions. 


61705 572.12 

3542 3346 

66X75 66347 


Dividends 

Company Per Ami rk Pay 

IRREGULAR 

FAI InsvrLM _ .1442 9-23 10-14 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMEK) 

40400 tes.- conb per te. 

Od 97 6807 6820 6822 075 32456 

Dec 97 6945 6900 69.22 040 31,3ft! 

Feb 98 71.97 7140 71.72 -035 15.323 

Jun 98 7140 7003 7125 007 6404 

Aug 98 7 002 70.40 70JS 02 S 1-534 

0090 7X80 7X50 7180 005 20 

EsL sates 19.716 Man sates 1&S2" 

Man opest inf 9*921. up 222 


NATURAL GASOIMER) 

IIMOO mai Mi/x S per nen Uu 
Del 97 2385 Z720 2722 0064 53377 

JS2 2^39 0073 37412' 

Dec97 3005 2.935 2.944 0064 28S16 

SS VOS 0057 S»2 

Fell 98 2720 2375 Z600 -OOQ 16.068 

Mar 98 2435 2410 2410 0027 107^ 

sates TLA. Man sates 30019 
Man open tel 242049. 1*767 


UNLEADED 6ASOUNE (HMER) 


6ERMAN MARK (CMER) 

12 X 000 marts. % per made 

Doc 97 4714 4664 468300025 5X356 

MarTC -5728 J7OT 47150OOZ5 1170 

Jim 98 4755 -5755 4745 00026 2A77 

EsL sates 2£375 Man sates 47,955 

Mon open W 103488 aH 8230 


OdV7 5940 57.60 9704 +002 32091 

SS 56 - n +aW 24.706 

*£?£ S 20 “J" >«92 

Jan 98 55.91 S5L30 **an +005 TX892 

FOT W S630 4SJ0 S6J4 SS XW 2 

T ar £ t 54JB 57:39 +0 -® wm 

fP* 88.14 39J5 60-14 +009 JUU 

««»W 6004 +009 1055 

Est soles TLA Man sates 21 A» 

Mots open lilt 102472 . an 14*6 






Jedetsan Simrmt 
Mltmco ADR 
PMCCommd 
TadiranLM 


- 3310 9-19 11-7 

- 32 9-26 110 

- .42 9-30 10-14 

- 0568 10-31 11-13 


STOCK SPLIT 
Frfcde Goldman 2 foil spin. 
GtotaffMUsf 2 for J sptff. 
Orarkam Group ? tor 1 sp8t 
Poe Sunwear 3 for 2 spa 


INCREASED 

Cofi Reedy 0 JO 10-3 10-17 

Irwkeepere USA. □ 36 9-26 10-21 

Omnteom Group O 35 9 26 10-9 


Company 
AmMunlTefmlL 
Am Muni Tem It, 

Am Muni term lit. 
AmOpportlnca 
AatSetecfPort 
Americas IncoTr 

aWiAHiinn> 
CKE Restaurants 
Capital Re 
Chase MaihoHon 
CHago Bridge 
OrmBeA 

CounbyiiWe Credit 
Enterprise Fedl 
Fst Defiance 


Pit Amt Rk Pay 

M .0517 ID-3 1079 
M -0517 11-5 11-25 
M .047 10-3 10-29- 
M .037 IO-3 10-15 
M .085 10-3 IO-15 
M .055 10-3 10-29 
M .0675 9-26 10-10 
S JU 163 10-31 
Q .07 9-23 9-29 
Q 42 10-6 10-31 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

SHOW * 15 .- cents per A. 

Sop 97 80.75 8040 S0.7Q 012 

Od 97 SI AS 8040 B0.90 087 

More/ SZ-20 Bins 8TJ0 067 

JOT 98 8200 8175 8240 072 

Mar 98 8201 81 A0 81.95 045 

Apr 98 82.10 8145 81.95 057 

EsL sates *388 Aton-s sates £396 
Man open 8020401, up 1052 


207X00 207300 210100 210500 Mot98 051 S 3* SO JU»0Aff4 
JOT 98 0615 0574 0574-00074 


631.00 63200 63200 63300 CsLaOTslAAlANum wu-wm 
64iJ» «ift 64X00 64*00 ^SSStmaniSr 


y^wion ;per imMc ten - tab ef 100 tens 
Od97 16800 16340 16700 +X2S 28.344 
NOT 97 16975 I6S7S 168.75 +X2S 1*148 
Dec 97 17105 16705 1TOJ5 +300 1*585 
JOT 98 17240 16900 17235 +2-7J 12^35 

FOT98 (7175 1 7025 17125 +275 6058 

Mar 98 1OTJ5 14075 17240 +2SD 40SO 
Api98 169.75 16975 17240 +250 *820 ' 

Est soles: 1*116. Prew. sales : *912 
Pier, apeo ML: 9*269 off 270 


, MJJ08 632800 638000 639800 SWISS ERAHCICUEM 
Fanpwnl 641500 642800 648000 649800 iSaMnawTsper tone 


Spot 544500 545500 542500 543000 2£o« "25! 096500020 36«71 

PWOTd 550000 551808 5*kiM 549800 WHS J033 7,315 L1R2 

OOTCSpedteWOTcna*) {“"98 710400027 ill 

162500 163800 159300 159800 Est SM» NA Mnrs sales 41094 


FtegHnej 
Pan Thomas Fnd 
H+nimPlan Svcs 
HIYUPIwFU 
Hondo Motor 


Great Wo8£lec 


SPECIAL 

F 01 T Thomas Pd - ,05 10-2 10-14 
Peoples Rnd Coni - S.00 9-22 9-30 


Kmoo Realty 
Kubota ADR 
Nike Inc B. 

Really Income 
S4T Bancom 

s«3Si« tg<» 

ShmottCmp 


REGULAR 

Am Gar Inca Port M JJ3S ID-3 10-1S 

Am Mind Inca Pf M .063 10-3 10-29 

Am Muni Term M .0542 10-3 10-29 


S A2 106 10-31 
.06 9-19 9-30 
□ .10 ID-1 11-3 
O OB 10-75 10-31 
Q Z MO 10-15 
O 0B 10-10 ID-24 
a 085 9-24 10-1 
Q sms 10-2 10-14 
- .125 9-26 10-15 
At .07 9-30 19-10 
*.1494 9-29 — 

Q A3 10-1 10-15 
* 092 9-29 - 

O .10 9-22 10-6 
MASTS 10-7 10-15 
Q JB 10-1 10-24 
Q .05 9-30 10-15 
Q JOS 17-17 12-1 
O 0625 9-30 10-15 


HgfiMOTte tCMER] 

40000 bv- cents per *1 
0097 71.77 7100 71 32 *432 

Dec 97 67.60 6700 67 J5 +347 

Ft* PS 66.20 4540 66.17 +837 

Apr 98 42.75 6125 6205 +035 

JOT 98 07.95 6750 67 J7 +025 

Est sates 7,161 Mon scon £508 
Mars open Ini 32.211. ofl 506 


141500 141400 140009 I401JB M«l7»op«lBt 504,27, alt 7P6 
High Law Qosa Chge OpW MEXICAN PESO {CMER] 


nnn n_n ~nl .IMM .17370 .12417+ 

U*TBIU3KMPm anC * al .11960 .11935 .11960+ 

G #£ 97 9*97 9409 M.9* +bjb i»« &t- sates NA. Man sales X333 
MarW 9*97 9*M at* Isao LU Mow opmM 41,15ft Off L29D 


MEXICAN PESO (CMER] U0. dt 

tePW Ptta. I per peso OefW 

Dec 97 .12*20 .12370 .12417+08355 2X950 Not 97 
*tor9B .11960 .11935 .11960+00319 £219 PoC?? 
An 98 .11580 .11560 .11580+00426 1067 


PORK BE UUES (CMER) 

40000 Rh.- cents per IB. 

Feb» <670 47.70 AS. 17 +0.22 
MOT 98 6840 6765 6X30 +0-SS 
May 98 6B.15 68.10 68.15 +005 

Esl. tea 1,983 Main stem 1.322 

Mmrs open M SMff, an is 


MOTW *4.97 8*92 8*96 1064 

9406 +813 

EPjafes KJL Mam sales 649 
Mon open M *249, efl 70 


BRENT ML. aPO 

mrenararu 

S }g K 1876 35 

MOT99 N.T. N.T 1806 +422 ?.»>T 
» aides: 37000. Pr». soles ■ 420U 

Pott, open tel: 139034 off 1R7Q4 


SYR TREASURY (CBOT) 

BTHwasssT-,* 

Dee 97 107-37 106-42 187-28 , 43 

Ert. sates N a Mon sales 1 An 
Men open m 4AH* on 202.91 5 


a-amoaLl7-OTWMdnatea«ioowIp#f 
tlwrc/ADjfc g-payeMe la camRas fmusj 
■HmatMy: inmlettr teuari«mual 


COCOA (NC5E1 


Stock Tobies Explained 

Sates figures ore uncfflbtf. Ycsrfy highs and taws retted the previous 52 weeks plus me current 
Vrtek, but ortlhelalesttroSng day. Where a 3pSt or stoCK dividend amounting to 25 pcroenl or more 
to Own pail aicjpareliigMag.-CT3C' and drMend on: shown ferftw new sfosfo only. u ntess 
orafwtsc noteq, ittfc or cwnSsrafc ere emud tSObmamte based on the Jotest dcdorolm 
a - tfvitend Mw extra is), h . annual rale of mane plus sock dMdemt e - UgtfJdattng 
dhrifcnd. a - PE oseeris W.eld - aWed. d * new yearly law. ffd . lass Inltie tastl2 months, 
c - dividend factored w paid in preceding 12 monttis* f - annual rate increased on last 
rJedarofion. g ■ -Svidend to Conodion hinds, subject to 1S% noiwesidMce tax. i . dividend 
declared otter spw-op or stack dividend. I- dividend paid fil'd year, ornmed. deferred, or no 
aetferr taken af krtesf dlindend meeWng. k - dhtidend declared or paid this year, an 
aeeumtutairve issue wiiti dhridanris in arrears, m - annual rate, reduced art lost aoctanrikm. 
n- nw issue m me post 57 wwks. Tfw high-tow rtm^e begins wflh the start at tmrjtng. 
no -nod day delivery, p* bnrtni dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - price-earning* rotto. 

mndHti, s - Wetc split CNftdMKJ begins wth data at split- Us ■ sales, t . rfivWend paid In 
wooUn preceding 1 2 months, aali value on ex-divtoeiidl or exrfstribution date. 

1 Hqn ^r * ■' * ta^nipfcyi or rmiverslaiper being tiaraonlied 
undertac Bantaoptay AcL orsiiciintwMasMwiiid by sudi compantex wd - when rfistributed. 

*!*" ■ —* y ' '* Jt1 HWMht * ■ M-tovkteMl or « -rights, aft - ex-nsmanon. 
W • wntravil wcuranta. y-ex-dnndendand sales In taL yta - yield, z - sates in fufl. 


10 metric tons- S per Ion 




DOC 97 

1702 

1611 

1699 

+4B 

42J5S 

Mores 

1735 

1641 

1732 

+® 

28.952 

Mayes 

1750 

1688 

17® 

+48 

12471 

M9S 

1770 

17)0 

1770 

+48 

1013 

Sep 98 

1768 

1725 

1728 

+48 

4099 

Dec 98 



lias 

+48 

*546 


«™TRE«URYICB0T1 

STHfenafttirff, „ 
S5S KK!!SS:ii^ 

E4. safes RA. Man vjkn 47^98 

Mans OTM9I M 3RL83& off l^os 


Pier, opal Wj 139. 334 offlftRyi *** 1 

^.Stoek ItidaxiM 

Mot 98 9200 9Z69 9Z78 +009 WM47 iWJEX (CMER) 

Jun 9a 9190 9273 9188 +0.15 7X008 I 80 **"*® 

i-W* S«» W0O 9200 92JW +8.19 61017 9»-50 92800 99100 +2825 7A«* 

r 7» Dec 98 9307 9209 9107 +070 57096 «O0O 930JD M 

M0TV9 9115 92.97 9X1 S *4*1 50301 Mor98 969J5 IvaL 

W. sates: 23*696. PtbkscNk 802» Est sofesNA Man sate 1748 

IftOT.aoOTlnL: 690294 up 550 ten in BOSUM' Sff* 


2-MOHTH EVR0MAHC OJRB 

« gF&biKr 

2^2 2X1 4441 «M* UndL 301077 EsL steP^wT^? M * ’-«» 
9604 96J0 9603 UnCtL 297. 17B Pnw. safes; 2*305 

JOTW W01 95.96 9600 UMl 24&45B ' ° VQr « 2257 

Sep * 9503 9578 9501 -001 165063 

DSC9B 9503 9S07 +O0I 161,24? 


5^5tO«<UFFEJ 


Est sates 1 5.062 Mom safes 4476 
Mem open IM 107.729, up 17 


IPJEMURY BONDS {CBOT) 

Sfm* & ® BflS 


OCWttMTlR 


COFFEE CWCSE) 

37000 Bis., oenls per Ut 
Sep 97 107,70 18500 18500 -1-50 225 

OK 97 17*25 16700 16770 120 11460 

Mores 15900 15*50 155.00 -125 4097 

May *8 15200 14800 14&QS -170 1,730 

Jules 14775 14075 14US -190 U56 

Est. steas 7.223 Mom ufes 4051 
Mam open ini 2205* off 440 


§ *v, ilSSIggJgfi is «" Ss gs ™i*hd«paw 

Mterw Iitm l!5*I2 +129 447,940 JOT99 *£32 9577 9S31 +043 71840 ■*0 9? *95*0 28860 2W0 +30 n jh. 

MOT9S ITHHIKHte Mg *737 3xm Ssp» «fcM W « % »&£ M 3SS $2 « 


W. sides NAM-n»totS.to 31 tfte-sote* 267.11SL her. sates SI: 

S?l??V-“*!5OTl?to“ , . 1 K0lB Pier, open IteJ 174*356 im wjt 


Mam open MS97,i3*effl£60e 
LONG SILT (UFFQ 


Kte 511201 
Up 71072 


J i-2 117-21 +1-11 £959 

KZ 'W "S’? 33T» ♦I'M trim 


3-MONTH PIBOH (MATlF) 
FPSjrtBofi-pbonOOpd 
Dec 97 M^65 96-41 9*43 + QJ)| 

MOTK 9*26 9*20 9*a_o3a SJm 


a * 0 £ u 2Si%8 JS 

JJK97 297*0 291*0 2V71A t* - ? J 277 

W o 2mo m*0 I 4 S 0 |?I£ 

&L Wes: 28,125. 4483 


SUGARWORLD II WCSE) 

1120001 ft.. cents per®. 

Oct 97 1102 1175 11J9 -003 59,773 

Mar PS 11.9) 1176 1101 406 K97} 

Mayes n.ei nsi nn 002 2UI24 

Jules 11.71 1164 1149 -002 1£1 1* 

Est sum W.AMMOirj saw 5*876 
t«em opwi M 200263. off £195 


M.P* NT. NXIIMI ‘-ti gs ^ S-M» S»M 

BLsi™ *=■« 

op OT ML: 207,918 OH 47,127. 


Commodity Indexes 


GERMAN MV. BUND (LiFFEJ ° r>m 207,918 eH 47,127. 

Dec 97 10237* ?mw^ni-u +046 25L647 EU ®0U,?A (UPFB 

Mares MT. N.T. 10143 +046 1x1 


Mares MT. N.T. 10143 + 04 * 
Est sain.- min fsw.soka- 134,905 
Pie*, open W.- 359402 up 7946 


ITL 1 raflikm - pis el 10Q pel 

□•C97 9X03 93,75 91S7 +0/U 

T.s rms xh 7 tSJf ’Sgs 


Moody's 

Refers 

D-L Futures 

CRB 


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U?XiCC 


PAGE IS 


I 


Asia Deals 
Michelin 


EUROPE 


Western Stockholders Win a Battle in Russia 




Body Blow 

Currency Crisis Cuts 

Into First-Half Profit 


Uneadmbank Helds to Demands of Foreign Investors in Takeover of Nickel Concern 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Times Service 


r Dtiparba 

PARIS — The tirenuker Mich- 
eiin said Tuesday its first- half net 
profit rose a small er-than-ex pec ted 
4S percent, as the currency crisis in 
Asia affected its results there. 

Compagnie Generale des Etab- 
hssements Michelin posted a profit 
of 1.87 billion French francs ($317 
million), but its shares fell in Paris. 
finishin g at 326.90 francs, down 
J 6. 1 0, because the earnings report 


fell short of predictions that had run 
as high as 2.05 billion francs. 


as high as 2.05 billion francs. 

“The net-profit figure was dis- 
appointing,” Jean-Piene Viteanz, a 
fund manager with Ferri SA in Paris, 
said. “Also, operating income as a 
percentage of sales fell, which isn't 
very encouraging. To rop it all off, 
Michelin is focusing on Asia. The 
market's not too thrilled by that, 
given the problems that have hit the 
region of late.” 

Michelin said it expected profit 
growth to continue for the full year. 
'‘Overall demand re mains good,” it 
said, "growing in Europe, holding 
up in North America and still high in 
emerging markets.” 

Faced with a slowdown in 
Europe, which accounts for more 
than half of its revenue, Michelin 
has trimmed costs and improved 
productivity at home. It has also 
expanded in faster-growing emerg- 
ing markets such as Brazil and 
China as currency turmoil in South- 
east Asia has threatened profit from 
that region. 

The company’s finance director, 
Eric Bouidais de Charfoonniere, es- 
timated that the drop in the value of 
the Thai baht, which was floated. 
July 2, would reduce earnings by 50 
million francs. Michelin has had a 
joint venture in T hailand since 
1987. 

The company’s annual Asian 
sales total $1 billion, or around 15 
percent of global revenue, he said, 
adding that the currency crisis had 
yet to force Michelin to re think its 
development strategy there. 

“The Asian currency crisis isn’t a 
good thing for us, but we’re not 
worried by the region's prospects.’ ’ 
Mr. Bouidais de Charbonniere 
said. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


MOSCOW — - When Uneximbank look con- 
trol cfRAONorilsk Nickel last month, it did not 
look like a banner day for shareholders’ rights. 

The Russian bank decided to raise $625 
million in badly needed capital by doubling the 
shares in the huge metallurgical company. To 
the disma y of ^ Western investors, however, the 
holders of preferred shares were excluded from 
the offering; and no prospectus was issued to 
explain what Uneximbank intended to do with 
themoney. 

Bot in a stunning last-minute turnabout, die 
powerful bank yielded Monday to die entreaties 
of Western investors and agreed to rewrite its 
stock proposal. 

Over the past few years, Russian companies 
have developed a well-deserved reputation for 
cavalier treatment of stockholders, diluting 
their stakes with new offers and ignoring ob- 
jections from minority stockholders, including 
Western investment funds. 

That makes Uneximbank’s change of heart 
all the more striking and underscores the bank’s 
growing awareness of the importance of West- 
ern capital. 

“It is a milestone in the development of die 
Russian capital markets,” said Rozhet- 


skin, co-head of investment banking at Renais- 
sance Capital Group of Moscow, which advised 
Uneximbank on the plan. “As people under- 
stand they need access to capital for a long time 
to come, the law of the jungle will give way to the 
conventions of the international marketplace.” 

Many Russian companies, however, still turn 
a deaf ear to shareholders. On Monday, Renais- 
sance Capital and Credit Suisse First Boston 
lost a battle over the rights of minority share- 
holders ar Yuganskneftegaz, an oil company in 
western Siberia. 

But the case involving Norilsk Nickel is a 
highly visible one with the potential to in- 
fluence that of other enterprises. 

A sprawling, aging complex in the Siberian 
Arctic, Norilsk Nickel accounts for 30 percent 
of the world’s production of nickel and 30 
percent of its platinum-group metals. It also 
mines cobalt, copper and other metals. 

The former Soviet enterprise was acquired 
by Uneximbank under die "loans for shares” 
privatization plan, a controversial arrangement 
pioneered by Uneximbank’s 37-year-old pres- 
ident, Vladimir Po tanin . 

Under Lhe plan, banks lent money to the 
Russian government in exchange for custody of 
shares in some of the country's most valuable 
assets. The banks later took tide to the shares 
when the government proved unable to repay 


the loans, and Uneximbank now owns 51 per- 
cent of Norilsk Nickel’s common stock and 38 
percent of all its shares. 

Privatization has been hard fought in Russia. 
In recent months, the infi ghting has been in- 
creasingly rancorous as the nation’s new fi- 
nancial oligarchy has battled over the privat- 
ization of S vyazinvest, the State cn nmniinicntirvic 
monopoly, and the impending privatization of 
AO Rosneft, the state oil company. 

Uneximbank’s Mr. Potanin has avoided run- 
ning afoul of President Boris Yeltsin, who on 
Monday reprimanded several h ank ers for squab- 
bling among themselves and with the govern- 
ment. But Uneximbank’s initial p lan to issue 
new shares in Norilsk Nickel was a sore point for 
Western investors. 

The plan sought to double the company’s total 
of 126 million shares outstanding. The new 
common shares were to be sold for 30. 000 rubles 
($5.13), far below die current market price of 
73,000 rubles. Preferred shareholders would not 
have had the right to buy common shares, which 
would have diluted their stake in the potentially 
lucrative company. The Westerners also com- 
plained about die absence of financial data 

“The investors' stake was being diluted, and 
it looked like no one knew where the money 
was going to go,” stud one Westerner, who 
asked not to be identified. 


t 5200 

is : 5000 

/ VV 'i 4800 
/ - - j 4600 

14400 


fTTrTXT* 




^Ta s ■ ™'A m j j a s 

;■ 1997 


- \ 3250 
2950 

Tf' 2500V4r- 


““A M J J A S 1 
1997 j 

•AtfcC.-iSEktf . I?'*#! 






ggp 






Source: Telekurs 


Inenutidnal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Vereinsbank Expands Planned Capital Increase 


Q»vad bf Otar Stt^f From Dopodta 

FRANKFURT — Bayeriscbe 
Vereinsbank AG said Tuesday it 
wo aid sell 36 million new shares, 

expanding its o riginal sale plan, to 

raise an estimated 3 billion Deutsche 
marks ($1.7 billion) for its planned 
consolidation with Bayeriscbe Hy- 
potheken- & Wechsei-Bank AG. 

Vereinsbank said it would sell 19 
milli on shares in a rights issue and 
17 million in a global placement led 


by a group including J.P. Morgan & 
Co. The banks will have the option 
of selling 3 million more shares if 
demand warrants. 

Vereinsbank’ s planned capital in- 
crease follows similar plans by 
Dresdner Bank AG, Deutsche 
Lufthansa AG. Thyssen AG and 
Volkswagen AG, which recently 
announced share sales after steady 
increases in their stock prices this 
year. The sale includes at least 6 


million more shares than Vereins- 
bank originally said it would selL 

“The extra money could have to 
do with technical reasons related to 
the merger,” said Pierce Brown, an 
analyst at UBS Securities in Lon- 
don. “But alternatively, they’re 
probably doing what Dresdner and 
Commerzbank have done, and 
that’s taking advantage of current 
high prices.” 

Vereinsbank ’s shares fell 1.10 


DM to close at 92.80. But the stock 
has risen nearly 50 percent since the 
beginning of the year and 5 percent 
since July, when it announced the 
deal with Hypo-Bank. 

Albrecht Schmidt, CEO of Ver- 
einsbank, was nam ed chief exec- 
utive of the combined bank, which is 
to start operations this month and 
will be the second-largest German 
bank, after Deutsche Bank AG. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


Dresdner Bank’s Chairman Quits Amid Tax Inquiry 


Bloomberg News 

FRANKFURT — Dresdner Bank AG, cur- 
rently Germany's second-largest bank, said Tues- 
day that Wolfgang Roeller had resigned as chair- 
man of its policy -making supervisory board amid 
an investigation into allegations of tax evasion. 

“Dresdner Bank takes notice of Roeller’s de- 
cision with deep regret,” the bank said in a 
statement 

Prosecutors said Monday that they were 
investigating Mr. Roeller, who is alleged to 
have steered his own money into a trust in 


Liechtenstein to avoid German taxes. 

The investigation into Mr. Roeller’s personal 
finances comes amid a three-year investigation 
into whether employees at Dresdner and other 
German and foreign banks illegally advised cus- 
tomers on bow to avoid taxes. 

Mr. Roeller’s home was searched Sept 2 after 
allegations were made by an anonymous source, 
according to a spokesman for the Duesseldarf 
prosecutor’s office. 

His resignation ended a 40-year career at the 
bank. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Ttiesdai&Sept. 16 

pitas In local cunandes. 

Telekurs 

K<£ Low Owe Pm 


High Low dam Pm 


Amsterdam aex **«=*»-« 


ASH-AMRO 

Aoflon 


Akzo Nobel 
BoonOv 
Boh Wots cm 
CSMan _ 
DoribdwM 
DSM 


Forts Ainer 

Gdranta 

G-Bmcan 


Essr 


HoooownKcva 

Htrt Dougtas 

I NG Grasp 
KLM _ 
KNPBT 
KPH _ 

est* 


RofeKD 
Rorento 
Ural tMeh 
UnJcvwno 
Varies US 
VNU _ 
VMBsNcra 


3? JO 38X0 
147X0 M7J0 
SOM MM 
220 31440 
171 12440 
3120 3110 
93X0 93L2D 
107 JO 104 

190 18450 
3140 31.10 
8030 79 JO 
iOJO 40.30 
53 53 

9940 100 

34940 303 

11X30 11X50 
6470 8110 
9030 8920 
72-30 7140 
4830 4420 
7480 7290 
5920 «U0 
57 JO 5740 
23640 72150 
14430 VS 
TU5D 11230 
8130 87 

186.10 187 JO 
41J0 6140 
196.90 19630 
117JD 11740 
1UB 10530 
41420 40820 
IMJO ITZ30 
4290 44.10 
241 JO 24240 


Bcfenrfnf 75JD 
Bang 3930 

BMW 1155 

CKAGCotonta 15230 
Coraruenbank 6030 
□aknierBanz 13030 
Depiwa 9030 

DenfcdwBanfc 10650 
DeutTetatow 3545 
Dresdner Bra* 7730 
Froserias 305 

Frreerius Med 13230 
Fried. Krapp 359 
Gehe 9630 

HefcfcflvjZml 140 

HarkripW 99J0 
HEW 460 

h«mw at 

Hoectal 7220 

Koriofl 617 

Lnbmerw 9230 
IMe IMS 

UrttmcaR 34J0 
MAN 526 

Mannesman 856 
MeUg«se«sdisri394D 
Metre 7938 

AAundi Rneek R 564 
Pleossng 4*450 

RWE «J5 

SAPpM 413 

SdiertW 18040 

iSM* 0 E 
vXzr « 
S % 

Vofenogai 1W 


75.10 7540 
3670 3675 
1350135230 
150 15230 
5625 60 

12670 12670 
8618 9030 
10515 10SJ0 
3470 3435 
74 77.10 
299 305 

130 13230 
35230 357 30 
97 97 

140 140 

9620 99 JO 
450 450 

7730 79 JO 
7075 7245 
607 61330 
88 9230 
1190 1201 

3430 3435 
S21 525 

843 843 

3920 3920 
78 7650 
545 560 

476 48430 
7930 8030 
40650 411 

17480 17940 
230 23130 
11130 11540 
1420 1420 

835 825 

398 40020 
93 9430 
562 550 

759 759 

1135 1157 



Higtb Law 

Oom 

Piet. 

Hear 

3.14 

115 

115 

115 

Jobredutad 

632S 

030 

63 

6330 

Liberty Hda 

377 SC 

376 37730 

377 

Lfliefty L3e 

14225 

141 

14)25 

142 

LfcU&Sbri 

16 

1520 

1610 

16.15 

AUaoroo 

9930 

99 

9930 

99 

Hamnak 

17JS 

17X5 

17X5 

18.10 

Nedcor 

9825 

9625 

9825 

9825 

Rembrandt Gp 

4130 

4030 

4120 

41X0 

Rfcbemort 

612S 

6025 

<1 

6175 

RudPtafinun 

8030 

80 

BO 

8030 

SABiwerire 

13330 1 31 30 

1322S 

133 

Sanmar 

3810 

34.10 

36.10 

36 

Sasot 

6125 

60 

a 

6075 

SBK 

20630 20430 

205 208.33 

TigerOal* 

72 

69 J5 

7130 

7025 


High Low Close Pros. 


Mg* Low Qua Pm 


Srnftfr fl fmj 

Sftnii Bee 
Stogecoodi 
Shwxl anttr 
Lite 

Tesco 

Thames 9Wer 
31 Group 
T1 Group 
Torefctas 
IMm 
Utt Assurance 
UM Mean 
um unites 
Veodcme Lxute 


1X8 

1X5 

1X7 

1X7 

AkerA 

12830 

125 12830 

126 

5X7 

8X0 

522 

8X7 

5X5 

877 

5X3 

8J0 


1963D 

24X0 

192 

24 

19450 

24 

194 

24X0 

4X8 

460 

4X1 

4X5 

Den nook* Bk 

2930 

2920 

29X0 

29 XU 

6.78 

677 

476 

679 

Eksre 

12730 

123 12730 12330 

110 

7X1 

7X6 

7X4 

H&stuniA 

44 

4330 

44 

44 

4X6 

4X1 

404 

403 

KraerrarAsa 

41730 

398 

416 40130 

4X3 

427 

438 

4X6 

NcnkHptaj 
Hanie Stag A 

433 

427 

433 43030 

US 

7.95 

8X5 

291 

251 

745 

2 S0 

248 

494 

4X9 

49? 

492 

Nycoaed A 

161 

159 

160 

161 

407 

586 

5.97 

5X8 

OrUaAsaA 

576 

570 

573 

577 

327 

323 

127 

326 

PtraGeaSw 

469 

462 

465 

463 


Kuala Lumpur 


AMMBHdgs 
Goring 
Md Booking 
MoltaUSNpF 
PetawaGas 
Profcn 
PriricBk 
Rwm 
R ents World 
— PM 


Tefctaw..- 
Twrejo 
Uri EosAneara 
YTL 


9X5 

9X0 

9X5 

9X5 

10X0 

10X0 

10X0 

1080 

1820 

17X0 

1770 

1110 

S4> 

520 

5X0 

5X0 

9X5 

970 

9X0 

92S 

920 

US 

9-05 

920 

2X7 

277 

277 

2X8 

146 

3X2 

136 

346 

725 

7 

7.10 

725 

26 

2530 

& 

26 

720 

480 

42S 

725 

733 

7 

930 

9X0 

870 

820 

830 

870 

II 

12X0 

12X0 

13 

4X8 

4X8 

4X8 

456 


WBtauHrig* 

Wofader 

WPPGWup 

Zeneca 


1722 1747 
443 430 

732 738 

6*5 488 
473 473 
3.14 323 

787 7.98 

OS3 333 
484 496 

3-77 2X0 

1665 1925 


TtnnsoaranOR 

StorebaidAM) 


14738 14458 
121 117 

ALT. N.T. 
53 52 


144 !47 

120 117 

M.T. 690 
52 54 


Astro A 

ASasCopcoA 

Auk* 

BeefrriusB 

Ericsson B 

HewesB 

InaefiBre A 

tmeslarB 

AtoDoB 


CAC-4B; 294833 

PlMtoKsima 


Madrid 


p|Mi«WrMBg 
PrarioKB 59229 


ACESA 

Agons Breeden 

Amrtnrio 

BoV 


B OTkriter 
BCD Cento Hhp 
Bo Popular 
Bco SonfcHrier 
CEPSA 


London 


FT-SE 108:487640 




682 

6& 

AjSoGreap 1-49 

Assoc Br-HOOdS 522 

BAA 547 

Bairioys 1492 

Bass 845 

BAT tad 522 

Bcmscotari 449 

BlueCkde 403 

BOC Group 1080 

Boats 123 

BPS lad .340 

Bit Aarosp 1640 

3dJ Airways 7.os 

BG 2.71 

K &a 

^ ft 

BrtTdecasj 441 

BTR 2Ji 

BuratiCdstroi loss 


Helsinki 


Bangkok 


SETtadCC 

PmtaB 


AdvtabSK 

Bffii^akBkF 

KiungThM Bi 

PTTExptar 

StaBCaottUF 

Stare Core BkF 

Tetacomasta 


TMAtamv , 
TMFanSkF 
IlMCMnre 


2U 222 224 

160 165 160 

24_25 2430 25 

372 m m 

580 580 590 

102 105 105 

2673 29J3 29 

4425 4730 45 

100 101 101 

105 187 112 


Kendra 

Kesko 

Merita A 

Metros 

Mriso-SataB 

Neste 

NoktaA 

Orton- Ytayraoe 

OutotampaA 

UPMKwnmeoe 

Wato 2 


4750 4730 
197 200 

4630 4550 
70 6930 
2150 2130 
152 152 

45 4430 
13730 13630 
436 434 

172 170 

90 8450 
1 3410 13230 
79 7840 


Bombay 


E 38 tadUC 401239 
Prw ta r: 401842 


KtoduriPrtro 
tad Dei Bk 

rrc 




Rdkncelnd 
State Wctada 
Sted Authority 
Tata Eng Una 


54530 55530 553J5 
14171423J5142730 
475 47425 47335 
10530 106 106 

56630 57230 573 

26475 365 M9J5 

348 35450 34730 
28735 289 28830 

1630 17 17 

352 35630 3S7J5 


HreigSwgBk 

HeJwwiliw 


Brussels 


De&atoUcn 

EJedroW 

Bedrofino 

Forts AG 

Geroert 

GBL 

GaaBanque 

KmMroak 

Petrofina 
Ptmafti 
Royrie Betas 
Sac Geo Bag 
§9»«Y. . 


BEWBrertroOr^C 

Praffaesr 2SJIJ0 

1520 1590 1680 W0 

7580 7230 7M 

9700 9360 W00 9400 

3280 3080 3240 3I7S 

17650 17200 17625 17550 
1745 1695 1740 1710 

7490 7430 7470 7440 

3415 3360 3400 3365 

7050 6840 7050 6910 

si* 

gjai SflO 5820 5720 

14475 14100 14475 14200 
USD0 14050 14350 14175 
1«0D I3S50 13» WOO 
4910 4B6S 49M 4^ 
un 9350 9480 9400 

M0 11» 31B 

712 2090 2130 7100 

USOQ 14725 14800 14775 
120500 115550 120000 117300 


Hong Kong H-&ES&2 

Ms assa 
Sr ss si ift ss- 
S 3 ss ss 

DooHeooBk *38 25M 3iM ®J0 

uA ift a is 

Wp ^ "H ’ft 

£4 6430 65 

1530 1535 1540 1555 

2230 2835 2885 2850 

I7JQ 1630 T5J5 1730 

4J2 ^ ^8 

226 226 231 

HnkNuiVh 13 71175 71 72JS 

HSmDw 2140 23 2110 2235 

IS IS IS 

PeSfttenW 9135 92J5 

IS^^W 1 1 

On Lend Co. 730 7.15 7^ 7^ 

635 530 630 

S0JS 6230 62 

2740 27 2735 2730 

1640 1635 163S 1655 


830 BJO 
448 4-77 

7J7 ' B32 
63S 663 

145 148 

118 12B 

153 546 

14.40 1430 
837 845 


recsA , 

Gas Natural 


a 

SmttntQee 
Tobocctou 
TeMonica 
Union Fencso 


113 1» 

497 433 


24750 24750 
1925 1985 
5600 5750 

7770 3000 

4160 4275 

1445 1465 

7B60 8110 

5850 5960 

5710 9030 

4465 4540 

4400 4595 

2870 2960 

8260 8550 

3075 31 W 
1505 1235 
7250. 7400 
1760 . 1780 
2690 2760 

6110 6230 
1355 1375 

9100 9300 

4230 4335 
1210 1265 

2750 2820 


Acoor 

AGP 

AirUqukJe 

AlcrtdAif* 

A*-UAP 

Bmcalre 

sic 

BNP 

Cand Plus 

Cwrefour 

Cosmo 

CCF 

CHdan 

ChrisSonOior 

CLF-Oesta Fron 

OecBt Agtade 

Danone 

ar-Agdtatae 

E rid onto BS 


975 947 

23830 22690 
934 896 


393J0 386 

706 690 

42S 408.10 
292 28130 
1060 1037 
3570 3454 




810 

556 543 


973 959 

23730 23170 
933 904 

823 807 

39230 386J0 
699 705 

420JD 404 

29030 28450 
1059 >050 

3569 3456 

Soso. 332-10 
32730 33130 
671 596 

821 814 


SKST" 

ScrniD B 

SCAB 

S^BocAHlA 

SkandoFoo 

SkonikaB 

SKFB 

SprtHjnken A 
sfcrn A 
SvHandetsA 
VWvoB 


Sydney 


Mtaufes:26SlJ8 
PrevtoaK 266230 


EurorUsney 
Earatunnd 
Gen. Earn 


1SS 

1285 

12851286.10 

8SB 

827 

-83 

835 

FI 

771 

BOO 

8 

786 

814 

784 

806 

115 

4.10 

825 

6X5 

6X5 

Til 

6X0 

6X5 

7*1 


Burton Gp LIP 

Cat* Wkriess 644 


CaSxjtySdWf 672 

CcrtcnCaroai 5.12 

Caawnl Union 744 

IS 

DbCUCB . 

Bectraamponents 4.70 
EMJ Group 5)3 

EnefW Group 643 


427 __ 

3X1 356 

1038 1064 

8.15 823 

149 335 

15X5 1553 
580 7X4 

2-67 239 

5X5 599 

143 8X1 
434 440 

tn ijs 

3X9 3J5 

227 238 

1053 HUS 

1.16 1.17 

51 B 540 
537 572 
5-03 507 

7.47 740 

595 501 


Manila 


PSEMK210M3 
PiavtaKE 2I22LM 


Lafcrge 

Larerod 

LStal 

LVMH 

Mfcheio B 

PreftraA 

Pernod Rlcart 

Pwgratca 

Ptaoutt-Prlrt 


401X0 39230 39940 398J0 
869 8Z7 867 845 


AratoB 

Ay* Lnnd 

BkPWpbi 

CAP Homes 

MonOoEtocA 

MdroBre* 

Pdion 

POBcrtl 

PHI Long DU 

SaaMlouelB 

SM Prime Hdg 


14 1330 14 1175 

1575 155D 1630 17 

111 9930 100 114 

190 375 IBS 190 

M ,73 73 7630 

390 370 385 375 

420 4.10 4.15 410 

144 156 156 160 

920 89S 900 890 

5930 5830 5530 5830 

540 620 630 540 


RtKPouJencA 

Sanofl 

Sdwekter 

SEB 

SGSTlwnoo 

Sie Generate 
Socfestao 
5t Gabata 
SuezLyooEoux 


442X0 4341 D 
1229 1192 

2278 2768 
1310 1216 
338 31520 
419 41130 
31180 XI JO 
777 764 

2637 2S5 
2774 2082 
177 171X 
1643 1595 

23730 22730 
596 575 

353 34170 


437 438.10 
1212 12W 

2247 2197 
1298 1275 

32590 3£J 

415 417 

313.10 306 

776 770 

2618 2570 

2133 2090 
17530 175 

1643 1625 

237 229.40 
595 sn 
350.90 34430 


ANZ Bring 

BHP 

Bond 

Brambles tad 

CBA 

CCAraatB 

Cotes Ww 

CamalcD 

C5R 

FodereBraw 
Goodman Rd 
laAurinria 
Lend Lease 


AUMHdra . 
Hat Amt Ire* 
Not Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
Parte Dunlop 
Ptaneerbdl 
PubBroodant 
Ho Ttato 
St George Bank 
WMC 

WeripacBUng 

III i^J- u 

nTOOBOB rvl 

Iftataarifts 


Markets Closed 


509 496.10 
838 817 

2635 2603 

925 90S 

665 641 

718 696 

17490 169 

646 627 

10930 10450 
362 357 JO 


500 510 

831 825 

2625 2633 

922 914 

652 644 

715 696 

17470 169 JO 
645 634 

109J0 10530 
399X0 361 


835 838 

1031 1036 
1610 1636 
4 404 

29X5 2SJ2 
1602 1SJ7 
1470 1610 
644 638 

680 6X7 

616 615 

177 2-70 

lit 114 
71J7 1214 
3030 31X3 
1-52 134 

2040 20X3 
118 115 

638 632 

339 335 

449 474 

842 845 

20-10 20X5 
6.19 620 

6X5 636 

BJ9 8J6 
12 11J5 
4.14 4.13 


Tokyo 


NBM225: 17974M 
PmionKlTNSje 


% a 


bb a 


HKOtaGos 
HKBecWc 
HKTdeaw 

HotchaonWh 

jaesw 

Oriental Press 
Peal Oriental 


5tnoLaadCa 


SwOePoeA 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wbeekxk 


Copenhagen 


Start tadtt 0547. 
Pr wtaas i l MJ* 


Jakarta 


BG Baric 371 

CretabenB 356 

nwikm 363X7 

OenOeosteBfc 
ivcbMiMiit 413000 


RAMS' 12 

jtob LuB h oyne 760 

““ 985 

355 
390 
415 


3&2 36457 31610 

346 3 M 30 

930 9M 930 
354 3M 355 
^ 648 660 

413000 413W0 413W0 
284500 285OT 286»0 

187 191 190 

755 755 755 

651 640 452 

975 985 971LM 

348 353 M7 

374 382 385 

407 408 409.27 


mi 


WBr I i i I 

52^ 7600 7475 7^ 76® 

sSwennHM 7375 7175 722S 72g 

SgwT 3200 3075 3100 3150 

TtlrTnen ^^ 3®° 3275 3275 3425 


Johannesbutg “JJggSgS 


Font CotonU 1J2 

Getft ACEfcfefri 930 

8S P 

GkuiWrtame 13JH 
Granada Gp |W 

GrondMet 

GRE l» 

GreenolsGp 4 SS 

Gotaness 145 

GUS 644 

ifiu M 2j65 

LeadfigriOp 656 

i 

Mereucyteel 1 247 

National Grid 

mapvwtr 5|0 

NflWest 8X4 

SSridiUnton XS 

e | 

BSLa £ 

SSS-GP ft 

i 

Reed bin P 7 

RwbkfltatW 241 

RsutareHtfgi Uf 


6 6)0 
6X8 6X9 

665 668 

1J0 1-72 


9X0 8g 


Stock markets in Mexico. 
Seoul and Taiwan were 
closed Tuesday for local hol- 
idays. 


Sao Paulo 


Frankfurt 


SSS- B % 

BkBetfio 63^ 

BASF 6130 

lass* » 


PraSSigg 

'n? 23MO 

392 401 38450 

03 13890 13230 
J2J0 43-W g 
*ncn 60-95 4001 

Sjo g-g S-JS 

a\M 92X0 91S0 
MLfS 4M5 6640 


AmtanMn "il? ’ot 

agr - 

gsr mn® 

rjsisssi 


*1 1 oS ss 

gg-H*. al A n» 7m 


IS 

SffiBw B 
BUBS, s 

3^““" a 

8SB- ig 

ScotNerecasas 740 
SdriPtwer 

Camr imr &* 

Sevan Trert 845 

iS 


3J4 — 

1277 12-92 
1240 13X4 
7J3 109 

5J5 5X2 

2X0 287 

452 4S2 

535 545 

651 662 

626 642 

1120 1167 
9J5 1005 
175 3X3 

746 7X3 

237 266 

8J1 9.18 

240 244 

442 456 

731 748 

212 118 
5X3 5.93 

445 471 

1217 1247 
27 2 177 

545 174 

844 840 

737 7X1 

3X2 136 

215 22D 

674 686 

745 737 

144 148 

7JS 736 
523 527 

626 6X8 

740 7X7 

1M 159 
938 9X5 

2X0 2X5 

543 5X7 

2X3 2X7 

646 6X1 

3X7 3X0 

936 9 JO 

1020 lOrt 
220 229 
609 620 

520 525 

179 3X3 

473 42S 

1740 17X5 
7X2 7X6 

445 450 

255 156 

860 844 
437 455 

11X7 1125 


MIBT l taatta l 1*67400 
Prerfras 14*7749 


AflereaoA^c 
Sen Cons U 
Ben FtdwfODi 
Ben eS Rcrea 


Edison 

ENI 

SUrriAsric 

INK 

INA 


16050 16050 
4825 4700 
6513 6360 

1601 16*0 
27250 27500 
3590 36H 

8610 8595 
10205 10200 
5905 580 
38600 38300 
17570 17050 
2630 2610 

5780 5710 


PM 

RA5 

Rota Booed 
SPooto Torino 
Telecom IMta 
TIM 


13850 12390 
1245 1261 
881 BBS 
2720 26g 
<780 <700 
14730 14890 
own 22250 
12360 13060 
11000 11M0 
6385 6425 


BredeecoPfd 1801 9X0 1000 9 JO 

Brobma Ptd 775X0 78SX0 795X0 78601 

5530 5400 5530 5410 

B400 8049 8230 82X0 
1650 1530 1440 7640 
52100 50800 SZ7.0O 515X1 
OaubancoPM 551X0 548X0 5580 5«X0 

Ijgtri SecvidM 46202 457,98 458-00 461X0 

^ - 331J0 325X0 331X0 33499 

281X0 27000 28000 273X0 
18530 18400 18530 1K02 
39X0 3000 33X0 39.00 
50C2SUU2 1011 10.10 10.10 ws 

TetetensPW 137X0 13150 136J0 3X0 

Tetamtg 167X0 162X0 16289 ltfXO 

TM 129X0 125X0 12546 128.99 

mnnn 286X0 29400 299X1 
3670 35X0 3670 3650 
1140 11.15 11X6 1120 
CVRD Ptd 2651 25.10 2650 2540 


Ajtaonota 

AllNippoaMr 

Arnwy 

AM Bar* 

AsdriOiefn 

AsahiGtaa 

Bi Tokyo MBtu 

BkYokorana 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

ChutaiBee 

Ctwooku Bee 

DdMppPitat 

DaW 

DaMchllCang 
Dobra Bank 
Dcritm Haase 
Dobra Sec 
ODt 
Darso 

EoriRroanRy 

Elsat 

Foduc 


IWbanenl 


UsMnasI 
CVRD PH 


Singapore 


StnrtsTtaHsriraif 

Prerisus: 193270 


AstaPocBmw- 540 
CertmPoc 5X5 

OtyDerfb 10J0 


Montreal 


Canto* 10X0 

Fareiu- 0J2 

1680 
412 

920 

HKLrevI* 320 

JonJMataesn- 820 

JredSIrotegie- 346 

KrtpdA SJS 

Keppd Book 324 

feppefFfeft 440 

KapdLaMl 404 

KBClorejgn uxo 

OSUrtmKP 725 

PatowryHdgs 620 

TiiHiWimn 645 

Stag Air foreign 1270 

Stag Land 7X0 

Sing Press F 2410 

Stag Tech tad 233 

StagTetacoatB 229 

TdLeeBank 2X4 

UtdtaMM 1X4 

UN OSes BkF 1210 

1Wng Toi Hdgs 342 

nb-UJLd albrs. 


Bta Mob Can 
Gin Tire A 


CdnUWA 
CTFW&hc 
G az Meta> 
tt-West LBeoo 
hanca _ 
bmstaqGrp 

NedBk Canada 

Ou e t e ar B 

RagereCreredS 

RayreBkCda 


51ft 51ft 
27 JO 2740 
3720 3720 

4i »c 4345 

13X5 18.15 

3610 38 

2120 21 
18JS 1835 
38 Vi 3845 
36ft 34X5 
2665 2635 
8X5 *90 

5495 6455 


«Xta*K4*ZJ! 
Piaiaas 69147 


5X0 6X0 545 

125 5X0 5X5 

9X0 9X5 1020 

W iaio 10X0 

ilbb ojo an 

1530 1540 1540 
131 192 414 

SJS 9 9.15 

112 112 3.1* 

7 JO 8.15 735 

340 342 158 

690 SJS 6 
116 11B 326 

434 440 <n 

3J0 3J0 3J3 

11.10 11.10 11» 

6X5 695 7X0 

610 610 640 

6X5 640 640 

1250 1250 12J0 
7.10 7X0 725 

23 2110 23.90 

L3 258 140 

221 227 232 

2X3 2X3 2X4 

1X3 1X3 1X4 

1140 1140 U 
324 328 34? 


Honda Motor 

EJ 

Ml 
Dochu 
to- Yoke do 
JAL 

JapanTubc m t 
Jusca 
Krfhna 
Kauai Elec 
Kao 

KcmaUHvy 
Kono Steel 
KtaUWppRy 
Ktrtn Brewery 
Kobe Seel 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 


LTCB 

Marubreri 

Moral 

MatwCarnm 

MAO EleC IM 

Mate Bsc Wk 

AMsubWri 

MsubtsHOi 

MasuttshiB 

muUaNEH 


MBubUdMli 

MhMNTr 

Mai 

MBsui Fretasi 

MfcoiTrerf 

MunrisAWg 

NEC 

NBdaSec 


1040 1060 
69 S 698 

3380 3390 
797 800 

561 569 

913 914 

2740 2790 

492 4H 
2760 2810 

3X70 3440 

2050 2070 

I960 1970 
2440 2450 

720 720 

1330 1340 

540 544 

1370 1390 

662 680 
6260a 6260a 

2870 2900 

5670a 5750a 
2290 2300 

4760 4770 

1370 1 370 
4650 4750 

1430 1440 

1110 1150 

1010 1010 
3760 3820 

M6Q 14B0 
326 327 

459 459 

6100 6120 
486 490 

9400a 940a 
2970 3030 

568 574 

2190 
1650 1660 
44S 451 

251 251 

676 683 

1010 1030 

IS 
892 
448 465 

7710 7800 

1980 2000 

530 535 

400 403 

1990 3070 
3470 3470 

2090 2110 
1260 1260 
KUO 10C 
194 294 

SOD 500 
1610 1630 

725 725 

665 669 

1690 1720 

925 929 

1370 1390 
991 606 


SIX 5150 
IDO 1360 


Mr. Roeller, 67, was chief executive of the 
bank until 1993 and is chairman of the su- 
pervisory boards of Deutsche Lufthansa AG and 
the utility company RWE AG. In Germany, 
supervisory boards play an oversight role and are 
not involved in day-to-day management 
Separately, shares of Dresdner Bank rose 3.90 
Deutsche marks, or 5.3 percent, to close at 77.10 
DM ($43.79) after Albrecht Schmidt, chief ex- 
ecutive of Bayerische Vereinsbank AG, said he 
would not rule out future cooperation with 
Dresdner Bank. 


• Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux SA, France’s second-biggest 
traded utility, offered 1.05 billion francs ($175 milliofl)far the 
28 J percent of the shares it did not already own in Degreraont 
SA, a water-treatment company. Suez Lyonnaise said Tues- 
day it would offer Degremont shareholders 500 francs a share, 
a 19 percent premium over Monday's closing price. 

•The European Parliament approved plans to open postal 
services in the 1 5-member Eurc»ean Union to competition . But 
it said post offices should be allowed to keep their monopolies 
over nuil weighing less than 350 grams (about 12 ounces). 

• British Airways PLC’s French subsidiaries, Air Liberie and 
TAT, said Marc Rochet, the chief executive officer of the two 
units, would remain at his job, meaning he was not expected to 
leave to ran Air France. Paris newspapers have called Mr. 
Rochet a top contender for the Air France vacancy: 

• Premier Oil PLC said it would drill a well to search for oil 
in Cuba this year and said higher oil prices and production 
pushed up its first-half profit by 37 percent The British otl 
producer said its profit rose to £26. 1 million ($41 million), or 
2J5 pence a share. 

• Advanced Micro Devices Inc. said production at a $1.9 
billio n microprocessor plant in Dresden would start as planned 
in 1 999 and would reach full-scale level in 2001 . 

• Germany’s car production dropped 9 percent in August 
from a year earlier, to 235,200 units, because of a drop in work 
days as well as model changeovers, the German automobile 
industry association said. Total vehicle production, including 
cars, tracks and heavy commercial vehicles, was 259,900 
vehicles in August, down 8 percent 

• Edison SpA, Italy’s largest private electricity comfnny, 
filed a lawsuit against Enel SpA, the state electric utility, 
demanding payment for surplus energy fed into the national 
power grid since July. 

■ IG MetaO, Germany’s largest union, reached an agreement 
with steel- industry employers in Saarland guaranteeing new 
jobs through cuts in overtime. Bloomberg 


Hto* Low Claw Pw. 


The Trib Index 


Prices aat* £00 PM Norn Yak ama. 


Stockholm s xuran BTOJs 

Pimfcnt: 3350X7 


Jan. 1. 1992= IDO. 


i 1)9 11530 
70B-5D W7JD 
244 23830 
135 134 

24930 249 

322 31830 
536 580 

33630 33130 
32930 32931 
699 497 

399 39430 
251 245 

25630 25630 
27530 271 

247 24630 
23130 22530 
190 78630 
9030 • 91 

330 33130 
31150 309 

21430 215 

18030 18130 
122 122 
2*4 24130 
20450 200 


World Indax 172.52 

Regional Induces 
Asta/Padfic 117.01 

Europe 186.20 

N. America 207.48 

S. America 161-05 

Mielrlal IndaxBB 
Capital goods 220.59 

Consumer goods 189.13 

Energy SD3JE7 

Finance 127.91 

McsceAansous 182.56 

Raw Materials 181.88 

Service 162.17 

UWtias 166.29 


Level 

Change 

%changa 

year to date 
% change 

172.52 

+1.56 

+0.91 

+15.68 

117.01 

-155 

-1.31 

-5.20 

186.20 

+1.99 

+1.08 

+15.51 

207.46 

+3-98 

+1.96 

+28.15 

161.05 

+1.39 

+057 

+40.74 

220.59 

+2.33 

+1.07 

+29.06 

189.13 

+2.91 

+1.56 

+17.16 

203.87 

+3.08 

+1.53 

+19.42 

127.91 

+0.58 

+0.46 

+9.83 

18256 

-1.03 

-056 

+1254 

18158 

+050 

+0.44 

+3.71 

162.17 

+0.19 

+0.12 

+iaio 

16659 

+1.30 

+0.79 

+15.91 


TbabtlatmtionMHBtMTtajunoWotU Stock Index O backs the US, cbOorvotuss a! I 


1280 fccamatfcnaW taveetaWe stock* from 25 countries. Far more Mentation, a Ima 
| booklet is avaatafite by writing to Tim Trib Indax. 1B1 Avenue Charles de Saufe. 
B2521 NeuUy CadBX, France. CampOed by Bloomberg Atone. 


KteanMofcr 

NKK 

Naaura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 

OpPopw 

OsrimGas 

Rkrt 

Ra|uh 

Know 
SrtucaBk 
Saifcyo 
Sanaa Bask 
Sanyo Else 
Secure 


High 

LOW 

dree 

Pieu. 


High 

Law 

Close 

Pnra 

491 

479 

481 

501 


3620 

35ft 

3410 

3410 

10600 

10500 

10600 

10500 

Nlhern Tataeom 

143ft 

137 

143ft 

135ft 

7VB 

7/7 

in 

7» 

How 

11X5 

1155 

11X0 

11X5 

509 

500 

30/ 

500 

Ones 

33 

32X0 

BM 


280 

2/1 

271 

176 

Ptmata ratal 

26 

25X5 

26 

25ft 

730 

494 

721 

484 

Mid Ota 

1SJ0 

2U0 


2405 

191 

187 

188 

192 

Placer Dore* 

21.15 

20.90 

20.95 

21ft 

1500 

1470 

1490 

1500 

PocoPetae 

13X5 

.! w 

13X0 

13X0 


STrimizD 

Sbta-etwOi 

Strisrtto 

ShOuakoBk 

Soflbank 


579 
3060 
I960 
1270 

5400 

Seer . Kan 

SuDttocw 690 

SumtomoBk 1750 

Surat Chere 442 

SumtoreoEhc 1700 

SundMeM 261 

SuaritTrad 1170 

Tataba Phams 2980 

TatadaOwm 3450 

TDK 9950 

TohokuElPrer 1990 

Total Bonk 7000 

Tokto Marine 1380 

Tokyo El Pwr 2330 

Tokyo Etacbaa 6960 

Tokyo Gai 
TefeyuCorp. 

Toners 


1020b 1000b 1000b 1030b 

53006 5220b 5300b 5270b 

»1 579 584 579 

301 289 300 m 

1710 7660 1680 1640 

Rohm 12500 12500 12500 1 

»-* nt 652 633 637 

3790 3720 3790 3710 

1550 153D 1540 1540 

420 <12 413 4T7 

8630 7B90 7960 8100 

SdbuRwr SHO 5C0D 3X0 am 

SeUssriChein 1000 9B5 985 993 

Sefcbui House 1790 1170 1190 1170 

Sows-ElflVBn 8730 8630 8700 B7W 

Sharp 7150 1130 1150 1140 

SMtataElPW 1990 i960 1970 1970 


Potash Sort 
RenabsaiKb 
RtoAJgora 

RogmCanMB 

SeagnaCo 

SteflCdaA 

Suncor _ 

raftsman Eny 

TertB 

Tetogkibe 

TehH 

Thomson 

TorDora Bank 

TnMsafln 


107 10545 105-45 
37.10 34-55 3614 

30X5 29 JO 30 
26ft 26 26ft 
4930 49 49ft 

2330 2X45 2330 

47 4145 4635 

48JS 4835 4X95 
2*30 23M 2195 

4814 47.90 48 


TroresCdaPtoa 
Trtmfc Rnl 


3060 3060 
1940 2010 

1270 1260 

5300 5300 
10600 10800 
866 885 

1740 1720 
442 434 

1690 1680 

258 264 

1160 1180 
2980 2940 
3440 3330 


TrfKCHrte 
TVXGaM 
Westerns* Eny 

WcfiMJIt 


30.10 29X5 
33 3235 
46ft 45ft 
1735 1735 
26.90 2660 
74ft 71ft 
32X5 32X5 
630 6ft 
28X0 28ft 
107ft 106 


Vienna 


ATX tabot: 1369X0 
Prevtaere 132437 


Tepp an Print 1630 


1970 1990 

993 990 

1380 1350 

2330 2320 
6920 600 
287 294 

578 587 

1050 1110 
7580 1640 
751 755 


Boetder-Utbfcb 
CrHftaKf Ptt 
EA-Genaal 
EVN 

Ftugbafen Wien 
OMV 

OestEtaUrt] 

va stare 
V A Tech 
Wtonerbag Bau 


963X0 94330 95830 946 


630.90 611X5 630.90 618 

3010 2930 2964 2940 

1480143520 1472 1445 

484 47560 480 «0 

1732-901689.10 17001727.90 

873 B69 87130 869.10 

537 530 535 SJ0 

2528238230 2515 2*00 

2504 2460 2502 2467 


Wellington waBgggg^g 


Tostern 

Toro Trust — 

ToyctaMator 3360 

y fiaan o u cM 2970 


2080 2480 
946 955 
3360 3320 
2968 2980 


AXNZertdB 
Bftorty Irwt 


orrmtexim 


Toronto 


TSE IbdBtltob: 68NJ4 
PiretoOK 087X9 


LionNataan 

TetacwnNZ 


4X5 

4X2 

4X1 

4X5 

1X1 

129 

1X0 

129 

143 

3X6 

141 

3X6 

4X0 

4X5 

4JJ0 

4X4 

6X3 

6X0 

4X1 

6X5 

1X5 

1X4 

134 

1J3 

106 

2.94 

1Q5 

2.93 

3X1 

175 

3X1 

374 

8.16 

7.97 

M6 

7J6 

I1XD 

11X0 

11X0 

11X5 


AbBUCaas. 
Ataerta Energy 
Akrm Akan 
Andenrei Bqjf 
BkMartani 
BkHoraScaba 
BarirtGdd 
BCE 
BCTetecareai 
BtadanPfNne 
BasbcafierB 
Crmeco 
OBC _ ^ 
QtnNattRoi 
Cdn Nature: 
Din Ootid PW 
Ota Parte 
Corotaai 
Do fovrn 
Damtar . 

Donohue A 

Da Pori Ota A 
EdperBMMBi 
EnaNreMog 
FoWaxFW 
Frioonbridge 
FWdtorOMBA 
Fnetco Nevada 
Gulf Ota Rre 
Imperial 09 
Iks 


IPL Energy 
Lai daw B 
Laewen Group 
Maori! Bid 
MognatnS A 
Menano 
Moore 

Newbridge Net 
NoraMtalne 


24 21S 
31ft 3130 

48 4730 
1X18 17.90 
SJ0 5160 

63.10 61 JO 

29.10 2935 

41X0 -- 

34 _ 
42.15 42.10 
2B.95 28X5 

49 4Bft 

39.10 38ft 
71X0 7130 
4220 41ft 
37X0 3730 
4135 4080 

32.90 33.15 
28X5 27.90 

"3 3230 
33ft 33 

22.90 23 
22X0 22.10 

390 391 

2455 2195 
22X5 22JB 
29X0 29 JS 
1120 lift 
7735 7130 

35 35.10 
53ft 5155 
21X0 2130 

37ft 38ft 
19 1U0 
97 97ft 
lift 11J0 
29X0 m S 
7530 76X0 
2115 26X5 


Zurich 


5PliB*K 3481.16 
P lerire e ; 302 35 


AtawtoeR 
Aire-SeronaB 
AMR 
Bare! 


2098 2010 2072 2095 
538 531 534 

1317 1285 1301 I.™ 

2400 2350 2350 2400 


BKVbtan 
Oba Spec Chen 
OmtariR 
Qtf.fc^eC pR 
Etdamm b 

SSSSlBB 


SSSS&mr 
SSKS-b® 

Be 

SdUmflerPC 
SGSB 
SMHB 
SutzerR 
StasiRfirtjR 
SAIr Group R 
VBSB 
WtatoritaurR 
Zurich AnurR 


2040 2000 
2008 1969 
1100 1062 
14075 141 

1098 1071 
190 18630 
536 536 

6860 6605 

4260 4230 

1310 1306 
578 575 

1836 1803 

2153 2110 
11975 18050 
1830 1820 
DO 860 
1900 1890 
328 323 

12900 12675 
380 366 

1875 1885 
2617 2610 
900 05 

1025 1030 
2023 1994 
1849 1810 
1547 15D6 
1373 1353 
50 577 


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INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, WEDNESD AY, SE PTEMBER 17. 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 



1 ‘Virtual Pet ■ 

Z To Help Lift 
1 Pretax Profit 

i 

! AtBandai 


TOKYO — Bandai Co., buoyed 
by runaway sales of its Tamagotchi 
“virtual pet" toy, said Tuesday its 
fuli-year current, or parent-com- 
pany, profit would be much higher 
than previously forecast but that its 
net profit would be much lower. 

Bandai forecast that current profit 
for the year ending next March 
would be around 10.5 billion yen 
($87.6 million). comjjared with its 
May estimate of 7.6 billion yen and 
with current profit of 8.6 billion yen 
in the previous year. 

Current profit is pretax earnings 
and includes gains or losses on non- 
operating activities, such as invest- 
ments in stocks. 

The company also raised its rev- 
enue forecast to 260 billion yen 
from 230 billion yen. 

But net profit probably will be 1 
billion yen instead of the previously 
forecast 2.5 billion yen, Bandai said, 
because of poor sales of its Pippin 
compact-disk computer equipment. 
The company had a net loss of 7.98 
billion yen in the previous year. 

“Sales of Tamagotchi toys sur- 
passed 10 milli on units in the middle 
of July and are expected to reach 13 
milli on units by the end of this 
month," a Bandai representative 
said. “Since April, we have boosted 
production to 2 million units per 
month, but still the Tamagotchi toys 
were sold out immediately after ap- 
pearing in shops," she added. 

Owners must feed, groom and 
play with their Tamagotchi toys or 
the virtual pets will “die." 

(Reuters, AFPi 


Unilever Sees Silver Lining in Thailand 


By Thomas Crarapton 

Special to Herald Tribune 


“The slowdown will strengthen the position access to. capital from banks or parent compa- 
of those who are long-term investors because nies to build market share.” 

you can consolidate your business.” he said. He said die shortage of nio/iey available to 

. . _1_- ... 


Special io m e ticraia irumn* YOU CM Consolidate your PUbiii&M* Iiw poiu uiv oumiajv WA - — - 

• — 1 ' . -a, __ j .‘Weaker comnetimr*; sometimes go out of carry smaller local companies tnrougn me 

BANGKOK — Gloom has bns - mess w ho have been continu- slowdown was particularly severe in Thailand 

deep about the grow* ously unresting in their business find that they because many smaller Thai companies twkow 
Asia s stumbling economies, but not e eiy nnbejdjy business that cannot stand up loans with some of the country s 91 finance 

is crying. . . _^ t to the uressures " companies rather trying to meet the more strin- 

In Thailand, epicenter of the crisis that sent to the pressures. gent loan requirements of commercial 

.... — i-t banks. More than half of the finance 

companies have been shutdown by the 
government in the past three months. 

Unilever's sales in Thailand grew 15 
percent in 1996, to 13 billion baht 
($370 million), but Mr. Fitzgerald said 
he expected growth to slow to single 
digits this year. He predicted that con- 


regional currencies tumbling last 

the This is going to be a classic care of the big 

Anglo-Dutch consumer-products swallowing iVipi ones, the head of 

nonmesiowdown? Undeve/sells such regional research for a securities firm said. 

household products as ice cream, laun- — 

dry detergent and skin cream. 

“I won’t say we welcome the eco- 

. « a * tv w- cai 


uij — — .. __ Mr. Fitzgerald said Unilever conld increase uigu& uu* y&u. 

“I won’t say we welcome • “ but the pressure on competitors by reducing prices. sumerewouldretirato the stores in 18 monthsm 

nomic slowdown, u r value-for-money equation changes and two years and said the company should beable 

we can use die people have less money, we have to adjust to to build sales here to 20 biffion baht by 2000 

business, and we wdl almort mev ^D>y come ^ ^ “We operate in 100 countries,” he said, so 

through it stronger man when we suitol Barry Yates, head of regional research at we have seen these sort of fluctuations in omer 

The company, which has an™ ctrenrth io Seamico Securities, said: “This is going to be a places. We know what it is that needs robe done 
sales in excess of $52 billion, has the s gtn classic cas& of ^ big boys swallowing the and we know how to do it.” Beyond Thailand, 
finance long-term inviwtraentevMi sm ^ ones Mnltinationals like Unilever and Unilever’s biggest Asian investments are m 

turn sour in one country or region, Mr. S rfva | & Gamble will have ready China. India and Indonesia, Mr. Fitzgerald said, 

aid said. 

Baht 9 s Bumps Brake Thai Automobile Sales 


Bloomberg Nn-s 

BANGKOK — Thai car sales 
have taken their biggest tumble m 
more than a decade as the country’s 
slumping currency throttled the 
Detroit of Southeast Asia. 

The 38 percent slide in August 
shows consumers were dealt a 
double blow by the devaluation of 
the Thai baht in July and a tax 
increase last mouth. Even with help 
from the International Monetary 
Fund, Thailand will have a tough 
time shoring up its economy. 

“People don’t have money to 
buy now,” said Jiradech Sompo- 
pnmgroch, deputy managing di- 


rector of Toyota K. Motors Co., 
Thailand's largest car dealership. 

The sales figures, compiled by 
Toyota Motors Corp. and the Thai 
government are a bitter pill be- 
cause Thailand is Asia’s largest car 
market outside Japan. Not only are 
sales sliding, but also reposses- 
sions are rising. 

Carmakers have a lot riding on 
Thailand. The country is the Asian 
headquarters for Honda Motor Co. 
outside Japan. Over the next two 
years. Ford Motor Co. and General 
Motors Corp. both plan to invest 
more than $600 million in Thai 

plants. 


For August, sales totaled 
30.866, down from 45,887 in Au- 
gust 1996. Compared to July, sales 
rose 5.4 percent, because some 
people bought cars before an in- 
crease of the value-added tax Aug. 
16. The government raised the 
VAT to 10 percent from 7 percent 
as part of an agreement for emer- 
gency credit from the IMF. 

Sales in the first eight months 
plunged 20 percent from a year 
earlier, to about 308,000 vehicles. 

The biggest declines among the 
major carmakers were posted by 
Mitsubishi Motor Co., whose sales 
tumbled 66 percent on-year. Nis- 


san Motors Co., down 58 percent; 
and Toyota, down 50 percent. 

For the first time in more than 
two years, Toyota did not have the 
largest market share. It was out- 
paced by Isuzu Motors Ltd- 

Repossessions are also rising. 
Many Thais are having a harder 
time malting their car payments 
because the economy is growing at 
its slowest since the 1960s. 

Among the few car makers 
whose sales rose were Daimler- 
Benz AG’s Mercedes-Benz unit, 
whose sales tripled to 832 vehicles. 
People “rushed to buy before taxes 
went up," Mr. Jiradech. 


■ 171100 
*16000 
^ 15000 
?: 14000 --, 

; 13000 --/ • ■— ; <7fW .- 

j j * ,ra ^ 


IotVV >»• 

:■ 1900 19000 




Source: Tetekurs 


Very brieflys j 

• NCR Corp- will takea 70 percent stake in a $ 19 millionjoint • 
venture with Beijing Wire Communications Factory to . 

build automatic-teller machines in China. 

• New Zealand is likely to break np Electricity Corp-* its I 

dominant electricity generator, into smaller , 

owned companies to force wholesale electricity prices down. 
Energy Minister Max Bradford said. 

• Japan’s corporate bankruptcies rose 143 percent in August, 
to 1J289 casesTwith the increase being led by construction 
companies. 

• Thailand created a committee to rein In government spend- 
ing and try to achieve International Monetary Fund targets 
under a $17 2 billion rescue deal. Finance Minister Thanong 
Bidaya said. 

• The Philippines' trade deficit narrowed try 5.6 percent in 
the first seven months of 1997, to $6.7 billion, because of 

rising exports. Reuters. Bloomberg, AFP. AP 




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I 


Will Hanoi Heed Warnings? 


World Bank ‘Signals ’ That Reform Effort h Lagging 


Reuters 

HANOI — A World Bank warning that 
donors are reviewing rheir policies on Vi- 
etnam demonstrates a growing frustration 
with the pace of reform here and could prompt 
the setting of conditions on aid, economists 
said Tuesday. 

“These are serious signals that they want to 
send the new government of Vietnam," a 
senior Hanoi economist said. "Some people 
— the reformers — will take it seriously. 
Others will see it as pressure." 

The World Bank’s vice president, Jean- 
Michel Severino. said Monday that the market 
reforms Hanoi undertook at the end of the 
1980s were slowing. 

Mr. Severino’s remarks were an unusually 
stem critique of Vietnam, which had been a 
darling of donor nations and agencies for half 
a decade. 

The warning came just days ahead of a 
reshuffling of the country's Co mm u n i s t lead- 
ership thal analysts said could open the way 
for a renewed reform effort after more than a 
year of policy drift. 

Ari Kokko. a specialist on Vietnam at the 
Stockholm School of Economics, said the 
World Bank's tougher rone probably had been 
driven by both political timing and an ac- 
knowledgment that the country’s economic 
policies could not be sustained. 

“The consensus has been building over 
time — it is now more difficult for Vietnam to 
continue along the same lines," he said. 

Vietnam’s economy has grown at more 
than 8 percent a year since reforms began to 
take effect in 1992. aided by flows of foreign 
direct investment and official development 
assistance. 


But in recent months the economy has 
shown signs of slowing, with debt problems 
emerging in the archaic banking and state 
sectors and output growth declining. 

Undersupply in some areas and a surplus of 
key commodities in others have been blamed, 
and economists such as Mr. Kokko said the 
benefits of past reform efforts were wearing 
rhin He said the donors' review of Vietnam 
could bring stricter conditions rather than 
fewer pledges, with payments being made 
when action was taken. 

Economists said that to sustain rapid 
growth and remain globally competitive, the 
government needed to bring sweeping change 
to the state sector and to its trade policies. . 

But they said reform could be politically 
difficult in a country whose economic model, 
was “a market mechanism managed by -the 
state according to a socialist orientation.” ^ . 

One Western economist said: "I don’t 
think there’s any diminution in admiration for 
what Vietnam has done in the last decade. The 
sustainability of tins trajectory, however, does 
require further application of reform and a 
deepening of reform.” 

Donors pledged a record $2.4 billion in aid 
to Vietnam last year, bringing the aid com-j 
mitments since the country rejoined the in-i 
temational financial community in 1993 to 
$8.5 billion. 

The World Bank has been one of Hanoi’s; 
biggest donors, disbursing $370 million ini 
loans and grants since 1994. 

Vietnam currently is negotiating a so-called; 
structural adjustment credit from the bank of. 
about $ 1 35 million that is to be conditioned on 
a policy statement from the new government 1 
and an indication of the steps it will take. ! 


Asia’s and Europe’s Finance Ministers to Gather! 


Reuters 

BANGKOK — Finance ministers from 
Europe and Asia will meet here Thursday and 
Friday to discuss the currency crisis in South- 
easi Asia and improved cooperation and in- 
vesimem between the two continents. 

Tiie meeting will be the Fust that European 
and Asian finance ministers have held under 
the auspices of the Asia-Europe Meeting, 
whuh is known as ASEM and was set up to 
strengthen what was seen as a weak link in the 
three-way relationship among Asia, Europe 
and North America. 

An official at the European Commission 
office in Bangkok said the ministers would 
discuss Southeast Asia’s currency turbulence 


and financial crisis, the planned introduction 
of a common European currency and the 
annual conference of the World Bank and the 
International Monetary Fund that began this 
week in Hong Kong. 

A Thai official said the meeting would focus 
on ways to improve cooperation between 
Europe and Asia as a sequel to last year's; 
inaugural meeting of the group here. 

Pongpanu Svetarundra, an official in the 
Ministry of Finance, said the ministers were 
expected to discuss ways to increase invest- 
ment between Europe and Asia, European 
financing for infrastructure development in 
Southeast Asia, and cooperation m devel- 
oping Asia’s financial sector. 


FIDELITY WORLD FUND 

SiK-iete d'lnvestisseinent u Capital Variable 
Kansullis House - Place de l'Eloile 
B.P. 2174. L- 1021 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 9497 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

Niuici.- is hereby given that an Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of Fidelity 
Wiirkl Fun.l Sieav tihe "Company" I will be held at the registered office of the Company 
m Luvi-iiihuurg on September 26. 1997 at 1 1.00 a.m. to consider the following agenda: 

I. To hear the report of the auditor io the liquidation. 

2 T«i approve the report of the liquidator and to die auditor to the liquidation 
’ To -runt discharge to the liquidator and to the auditor to the liquidation. 

J To arant discharge to the Directors in office at the dale .»l' liquidation. 

- s To resolve the close of l lie liquidation of the Company. 

"■ Tl ’ resolve I., keep the records and books of the Company for a time of 5 years at the 
rccisicrvd office of the Company. 

7. To note ihur pnH;ecds which have not heen distributed will be transferred to the Caisse 
Oi s Consignations to be held for the benefit of the persons entitled thereto. 

!' > ” u ^ ,u V blc :,1,cnd lhe a ^ ve Extraordinary General Meeting, you are ureed 
; r £ 1,rn a P mx >’ ' h y registered office of the Company prior to the date 

L Mcum *- pl,, ' lo ‘ c;m ,H -’ obtained front the registered office of the Company. 


Fidelity 



Investments 









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Advertisement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS September 1 6, 1 997 

available on Internet: http://www.iht.com/IHT/FUN/funds.html 

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Sports 


I ^GE 20 


L 


TPEDNESDASf, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 


— r 1 


Eagles Lose Heartbreaker to Dallas 


j " ~Z T Philadelphia Outplays Cowboys, but Blows It in the Clutch 

. _ . . « ■ i* i . « ■ « ■ ■ _ - ii 


1 rugby European Cup organ- 
J izers will hold an emergency meet- 
i ing in Dublin on Wednesday to 
! discuss brawls last weekend in- 
! volving players from the French 
! rugby union club Brive andPontyp- 
1 ridd of Wales. 

1 Representatives from both clubs, 

| the match referee and both touch 
> judges have been invited to attend. 

| A post-match brawl in a pob in 
, the French town followed a match, 

1 marred by constant fighting, that 
I saw one player from each side sent 
1 off Brive, the cup holders, won by 

; 32-31 with a controversial injuiy- 

, tune try. The off-pitch brawl sent 
1 three French players to the hos- 
pital. (Reuters) 

• The former international cen- 
| ter Clive Woodward, 41, was 
named England’s new coach on 
Tuesday, less than nine weeks be- 
fore the team plays the first of four 
tests against top Southern Hemi- 
sphere sides. He takes over for Jack 
Rowell, who resigned. (Reuters) 


By Thomas George 

Hew York Tima Service 


IRVING, Texas — Field goal, field 
goal field goal, field goal field goaL 
That is all the Dallas Cowboys’ of- 
fense could manage for more than 59 
minutes of football against a pesky Phil- 
adelphia Eagles defense. 

Finally, the Dallas offense scored a 
touchdown with 47 seconds rem aini n g 
that gave the Cowboys a 21-20 lead. 

Philadelphia took the ensiling kickoff 
but could only reach the 16-yard line. 
Cm you believe it? There were only 
four seconds left and quarter back Ty 
Decmer had driven the Eagles, remark- 
ably, to the Dallas 4. And now Phil- 


A Novel All-Star Game 


HOCKEY The National Hockey 
League announced that its all-star 
game next year would pit the top 
NHL players of Canada and the 
United States against players rep- 
resenting countries from the rest of 
the world. Eight countries will be 
represented on the World All-Stars 
team for the game in Vancouver, 
British Colombia, on Jan. 1 8 — the 
Czech Republic, Finland, Ger- 
many, Lama, Russia, Slovakia, 
Sweden and the Ukraine. ( Reuters ) 


Victory for Czech Rider 



adelphia lined up to kick the winning 
field goaL Chns Boniol the former 
Cowboy, would bum his old team- 
mates. 

One more field goal in this game that 
had featured seven of them. 

There went the Eagles' snap. 
Grabbing it was holder Tom Hutton. 

Hutton hobbled it, dropped it, 
bobbled it Boniol stopped midstride in 
his kick attempt No try. Now Hutton is 
running toward the end zone with the 
ball. He drops it. Game over. 

Bizarre. Dallas 21, Philadelphia 20, 
in a £ame that D allas had no business 
winning and that Philadelphia seemed 
to have little chance to-lose. 

“Sure, it was a chip-shot field goal." 
said the Dallas coach, Barry Switzer. "I 
look up and I can't believe iL I’m think- 
ing we’re beading for a 1-2 record. Nice 
to be 2-1 though.” 

Instead, Philadelphia fell to 1-2. 

Dallas had taken the lead, 21-20, on 
Troy Aikman's 14-yard scoring pass to 
receiver Anthony Miller. But De truer 
showed great poise and decision-mak- 
ing, ripping the middle of the Dallas 
pass defense in die final seconds to 
move Philadelphia so close to victory. 


Da l l a s. It made toe Dallas offense look 
lethargic and confused. It made toe Dal- 
las defense play on its heels, and it kept 
making big third-down plays. 

Boniol who used to kick for Dallas 
but leaped to Philadelphia as a free 
agent during the off season, got thing s 
going with a 49-yard field goal six 
minutes into toe game. The new D allas 
kicker, Richie Cunningham, tied the 
game at 3-3 with a 46-yard field goal 
four minutes later. 

Philadelphia had a chance to bury Dal- 
las m toe half. It led by 17-3 after Dettner 
passed 12 yards to tight end Chad Lewis 
on third-and-5, and seemed headed for 
more before its Dext drive stalled at toe 
Dallas 27. Boniol then missed a 45-yard 
field-goal attempt wide left 

On Dallas’s next drive, the final one 


to 17-6 on Cunningham’s 48-yard field 
goal Aikman’s numbers were partic- 
ularly glaring: 4 of 16 passing for 42 
yards with two sacks and a long pass of 
only 18 yards. And the total yardage in 
the half reflected toe score. For Phil- 
adelphia, 141 yards; for Dallas, 76. 



Emmitt Smith running behind the blocking of Larry ABen in the first half. 


The big play for Detmer was a 46-yard 
pass to Freddie Solomon that the re- 
ceiver took to toe Dallas 4. 

That set up toe finish. One that Dallas 
won’t soon forget. One that might haunt 
toe Eagles for toe rest of this season. 

Dallas was making its 51st Monday 
night appearance, second to toe Miami 
Dolphins' 54. Dallas is now 30-21 in 
these games, having won eight of its last 
nine. This was its 76th meeting with the 
Eagles, its most against any team. And 
Dallas has controlled toe Eagles with a 
47-29 series advantage. 

But in the first half, toe Eagles tried to 
toss that history aside, turning the game 
their way early. Philadelphia led, 17-6, 
at halftime after thoroughly outplaying 


. cycling The Czech Jan 
■ Svorada sprinted to a close finish 
with a cluster of other riders to win 
the 1 1th stage of toe Tour of Spain 
on Tuesday as Alex Zuelle kept his 
overall lead. Svorada, of toe Mapei- 
GB team, finished toe a 198-ki- 
lometer (123-mile) race from AI- 
■ ■’mendralejo to Plasencia in 4 hours 
21 minutes 33 seconds. Switzer- 
land’s Zulle maintained his overall 
Tlead of 32 seconds over his coun- 
tryman Laurent Dufaux. (API 


Anthony Miller, left, and Troy Aik- 
man celebrating the winning score. 


England Hits Commonwealth Cricket for Six 

U nn/f PA am nra * ! 


The Associated Press 

SYDNEY — Cricket’s debut as a 
Commonwealth Games sport would 
be a “disaster” if Australia followed 
England's lead and refused to send a 
full-strength team, a leading official 
said Tuesday. 

England stunned Games officials 
by offering up an amateur team, which 
was refused, when told Games or- 
ganizers would not pay the players. 

An Australian Cricket Board 
spokesman made it clear that a frill 
Australian team was no certainty. 

“We will be participating but we 


haven’t decided whether we will be 
sending a full-strength team or not," 
toe spokesman said. “That may be 
decided at a board meeting on Fri- 
day.” 

That was news to the Australian 
Commonwealth Games president, 
Ray Godkin, who returned from a con- 
gress in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday. 

“As for as we’re aware, going back 
a couple of months, we were assured 
we would have the top team there and 
we’re pretty happy about it," Godkin 
said. “They are coming from a tour in 
Pakistan to toe fiannes and they’re 


very excited about it and so are we.” 

He said he would be pursuing toe 
matter following the spokesman’s 
comments. “That’s a surprise,” 
Godkin said. “We arrived back today 
and after toe disappointment we've 
got from England we’ll certainly be 
talcing it up with our people. If Aus- 
tralia does something similar it will be 
an absolute disaster for toe Games.” 

Meanwhile, toe chief executive of 
New Zealand Cricket, Christopher 
Doig, said his country would scad a 
full team but that toe players would 
not be paid. 


Madrid Can Have Only One No. 1, So Rivals Up the Ante 


Spaniard Withdraws 


golf Miguel Angel Martin of 
•S pain has withdrawn from ibis 
"week’s British Masters, which starts 
••at toe Forest of Arden on Thursday. 
iMartin, an automatic Ryder Cup 
-•qualifier, was replaced on the team 
. by a compatriot, Jose Maria Olaza- 
bal after refusing a fitness over his 
injured left wrist The withdrawal 
may end speculation about his fit- 
.ness to play in Europe’s defense of 
toe biennial match at Valderrama 
next week. (Reusers) 


IruernazionaJ Herald Tribune 

M ADRID — For all its culture 
and its commerce, Madrid is a 
soccer city. Indeed, it shaped 
European club soccer from the start 
when Real Madrid won toe first five 
European Cup seasons from 1955. 

As autumn falls, as the European 
lights pick out their proud colors, there 
are TWO Madrids risking bankruptcy to 


World Socc.er/RoB Hughes 


On Tuesday, Club Atletico de Mad- 
rid, clothed in red and white, began toe 
UEFA Cup quest with an extravagantly 
recast team in which Juninho, a mar- 
velous Brazilian manikin, and Christian 


Vieri, a strapping Italian front-runner, 
each cost $20 million. 


.The Last Word 


baseball Richie Ashburn, toe 


“great Philadelphia Philly lead off 
* hitter who died last week, hit .350 


hitter who died last week, hit .350 
to win toe 1958 National League 
batting title. That offseason he re- 
ceived a contract offer from Gen- 
eral Manager John Quinn that in- 
cluded a $2,500 pay cut “You 
don’t hit your singles far enough.” 
. Quinn said. Replied Ashburn: “If I 
fut those singles any farther, they’d 
be outs.” (LAT) 


each cost $20 million. 

Put toe darting Juninho behind Vieri 
and Francisco Kiko, another (all man as 
willing as a young horse, and you have 
movement to test toe mighty. You 
should have, given the femme paid on 
the supporting cast 

The team can be coarse and cunning, 
delicate and determined. It means to be 
THE power in toe capital, toe land, toe 
continent. 

Alas, poor Atletico. Its paymaster — 
toe president, Jesus Gil y Gil — is as 
generous as he is impatient — and 1997- 
8 is a season of paying to play catch-up. 

Atletico strives to evict Leicester City 
of England from toe UEFA Cup, bat Real 
Madrid marches to the tune of toe Cham- 


pions’ League. For better, for worse, toe 
burgeoning of this prime tournament, 
unrecognizable now from its origins, 
monopolizes the wealth. Ultimately and 
inevitably there will come a separate 
elite; and either you invest to be in on toe 
concept or you will be left behind. 

Real Madrid on Wednesday resumes 
its love affair with what used to be toe 
European Cup — and while heeding the 
warning that its visitor. Rosenborg of 
Norway, last season brought down AC 
Milan, must expect to crush the upstart. 

It isn’t enough that Real players wear 
those celestial all-white uniforms 
which, for toe first five seasons of Euro- 
pean Cup soccer were toe unrivaled 
symbols of sporting aristocracy. There 
is, behind Real Madrid’s craving to re- 
capture toe prize jewel it last held 3 1 
years ago, a mountain of debt 

When Atletico won the Spanish 
championship toe season before Iasi, it 
came when Gil, always a spendthrift, 
stopped his self-destructive habit of hir- 
ing and firing four coaches per year. He 
had eaten 27 of them for breakfast in 
seven years; toen came Raddy Antic, a 
wily Serb who looked toe big man in toe 
eye and built for him a moment's su- 
premacy over Real. So Real Madrid, 
despite acrimonious mistrust between 


its president and its I talian team-builder 
Fabio Capello. bon-owed toe cash to 
reclaim Spain's title. Its team, too. is 
expensively cosmopolitan — from the 
Italian Christian Panucci and toe 
Brazilian Roberto Carlos on toe wings 
to Clarence Seedorf displaying surging 
Dutch midfield craft, to a goal-hunting 
duo that ignores Balkan differences, 
Croatia's Davor Suker teamed with Ser- 
bia’s Pedrag Mijatovic. 


A nd, the twist in toe Madrid plot, 
Raul Gonzales, simply known as 
Raul has blossomed into toe 
most prized Spanish youth of his time. 
Raul was bred to be a red-and-white but, 
when Gil decided youth schemes were a 
waste of time and money, he slipped 
across the city to Real Madrid. 

Gil has shrugged that small embar- 
rassment off, and paid for iL His equiv- 
alent now is Juninho — El Nino, the 
Little One, as toe Madrilenos have re- 
christened him. 

As it happens, Leicester, the visitor 
few Atletico fans know much about, 
comes with an import of its own. Pontus 
Kaamark, Swedish and adept at policing 
the elusive Brazilian, twice supressed 
Juninho last May, and twice over as- 
sisted Leicester City to this unaccus- 


tomed European height. 

Kaamark- is no killer. Indeed, when 
first requested to shadow toe little man’s 
footsteps, to play a role of total denial 
toe Swede protested that he doesn’t like 
being a killjoy. Soccer, he reasoned, is 
spore and sport is expression, and he 
(Kanmaik). let alone J uninh o. ought to 
add to toe sum of entertainmenL 

Right, said Martin O’Neill 
Leicester’s garrulous coach. Now do 
your job; stick to Joninho closer than a 
brother, mark him physically and men- 
tally until he has nowhere to run, no will 
to create. Do it far toe team. 

Kaamark did his duty in England’s 
Coca-Cola Cup final did it again in the 
replay after toe first match was tied, and 
did as much as anyone to win 
Leicester’s first place in Europe since 
1961. That year it came to Madrid and 
lost 2-0, and one wonders whether ven- 
geance is a force after all those van- 
quished players retired? 

Not vengeance, O’Neill will respond. 
A chance for recognition, for toe un- 
derdog to show its bite. O'Neill was 
once a player, too, a member of toe 1982 
Northern Ireland team that astounded 
everyone by defeating Spain 1-0 at 
Valencia during toe World Cup here. 

The Irish were not a pretty team. They 
ran until they dropped, until more gifted 
opponents dropped. They persevered, 
and they put their colors in the television 


spotlighL The color is like a badge of 
courage. It is toe symbol of wboyou are, 
where you come from, what hearts beat 
beneath toe cloth. ... 

How strange toatAtietico.de Madrid, 
after all toe decades chasing Real, all toe 
pull on people's allegiance and money 
and pride, should run today in shirts 
adorned across toe chest with an alien 
word. 

It reads MARJBELLA . 

The explanation, as with all tilings 
soccer these days, is money. Jesus Gil 
may be 10 years the president of At- 
letico Madrid, but he also goes back a 
long way as mayor of toe southern 
Spanish resort of Marbeila. 

Presumably, he drove a hard bargain 
when wearing his Madrid hat to extort 
the right price out of his Maibella treas- 
ury for this advertising stunt It is un- ; 
precedented. so far as I'm aware, for a 
team to play in one city and sell its color 
to promoting another. 

Why blame Gil? The new Cham- 
pions’ League is counterfeit embracing 
Paris St Germain. Newcastle United, 
Barcelona and Parma, who are cham- ‘ 
pions of nothing. 

Madrid, home of toe first prophets of 
toe European game, has taught UEFA 
that expediency increases toe profit. 


Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


September 10th - September 21st 1997 

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Seville, September 14 

The race from Strasbourg to Seville was 
well-fought yesterday in spite of had 
weather. 

The results of this leg have proven that 
the reference speeds of each aircraft 
were accurate, and the jostling of 
positions shows that it could be 
anybody's race. 

The Americans Karole Jeansen and 
Jeanne Cook, flying the “Carolina 
Belie," have shaken off their ted luck 
and are hack in the race in category 2 
(turbocharged! with their borrowed 
propeller (the owner still doesn't 
know!.). 

The British team, “VFelleshourne 
House," has scrambled back into 2nd 
place in Group 2. This Is a feather in 
their cap in view of the fact that they 
had little support from the British Rural 
Aero Club. “TBM Knight Flight" 
(Group 3: turbines) has moved into first 


place, its usual spot in past races. 
The "Young Turks’ beat “Dream 
Machine’ to reach first place in the Jet 
category for this leg. although they 
remain second in the overall standings. 
The “Dream Machine" team is 
apparently thinking of offloading their 
wives to save weight, and the “Young 
Turks" are gallantly offering to carry the 
ladies for them! 

“Rectimo," the efficient German team, 
has battled ks way into first place in its 
Bnnenza piston-engine aircraft (Group 
1), This is still anybody's race. The 
constantly changing positions are 
keeping the pressure on. leaving no 
room for complacency. On arrival in 
Seville yesterday, the competitors were 
greeted by toe city’s mayor. 

Tomorrow, on the Seville-Rome leg. the 
weather Ls expected to he fine, with 
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Reuters 

MARIBOR, Slovenia, — 
The Slovene team Maribor 
Teatanic held toe former 
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the fust leg of their UEFA Cup 
first round match Tuesday. 

Although Ajax dominated 
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■ 2 Coaches Out in Spain 

Jorge VaJdano of Valencia 

and Vicente Cantatore of Val- 
ladolid were dismissed within 
hours of each other on Tues- 

Spanish 

coaches to lose their jobs this 
season. Reuters reported. 

Valencia confirmed Tues- 
day that they had dismissed 
Jorge Valdano as coach on 
Monday night, while Vallad- 
ohd announced toe dismissal 
J > / ler CantoK,re a few hours 

Vaidano became the fW 
Spanish first division coach- 
wg casualty just three weeks 

after toe start of toe new sef 

son. He was told of the 
crsion Monday nighL a a 
after he pul >oi mjiy fo 

players on toe field. y ° re, * n 



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E, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGES' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 


PAGE 21 




rw 


SPORTS 






.r** * \'&rZ' 





( nrl;etf/ ) rSj 1 


* T JL'-W ^ 



Ttd Marius/ A^ate France -Prate 

Brian Giles of the Indians snaring 
a fly by the Orioles' Jeff Reboufet. 

Angels Bedevil Disney 

Los Angeles Times Sen-ice 

ANAHEIM, California — The 
Walt Disney Co. expects to lose at 
least $25 million in its first two 
seasons operating the Anaheim An- 
gels and could spend an additional 
$90 million to renovate Anaheim 
Stadium, Tony Tavares, president 
of Anaheim Sports, said Monday. 


Orioles First Into the Playoffs 

Griffey Hits 51st and 52d Homers to Pace the Mariners 


The Ass.tciMed Press 

For the Baltimore Orioles, the race 
for a playoff spot is finished. For Ken 
Griffey Jr., the chase for history is hear- 
ing up. 

On the day that the mighty Orioles 
became the first team in the majors to 
clinch a postseason berth, Griffey riv- 
eted attention on his pursuit of Rocer 
Maris. 

The Seattle Mariners’ outfielder hit 
his 51st and 52d home r uns Monday 
night, moving closer to Maris ’s mark of 
61 in 1961. Griffey has 1 1 games left in 
the regular season. 

“I just go out and try to hit the ball 
hard,” Griffey said after a 7-3 victory 

Baseball Roundup 

over Toronto. “I don’t look at records 
and I don't look at the record book. 
There's still two weeks left.” 

Griffey, who had not connected for 
eight games, hit a two-run homer in the 
first inning. He hit a drive that barely 
hooked foul in the third and came back 
with a home run in the fifth at the 
Kingdome. 

Griffey , batting .304 and leading the 
majors with 139 RBIs, look over base- 
ball ’s home run lead with one more than 
Mark McGwire of (he St. Louis Car- 
dinals. 

Griffey, who hit 49 homers last sea- 
son, became the sixth major league 
player to hit 100 or more home runs in 
two consecutive years. McGwire also 
accomplished the feat this season. 

Orioles 6, Indians 5, fist game)! In* 
dians 4, Orioles 1, [2d game) The Orioles 
assured themselves of at least a wild- 
card spot by beating Cleveland in the 


opener of a day-night doubleheader. 

Jeffrey Hammonds’s 460-foot home 
run in the seventh inning overcame 
Cleveland's 5-4 lead. In the second 
game, Chad Ogea pitched six shutout 
innings and Marquis Grissom ho me red 
for the Indians. 

Cleveland leads the AL Central by 
seven games over Milwaukee. 

Angels a. Twin* s Garret Anderson 
fouled off seven pitches from Rick 
Aguilera with two strikes, then hit a 
three -run homer in the ninth innin g that 
sent Anaheim over Minnesota at 
home. . 

Yankon 7, Red Sox 6 Derek Jeter’s 
two-out single in the bottom of the ninth 
lifted New York over Boston. The Yan- 
kees' number for clinching a playoff 
spot is six. 

Paul O’Neil] drew a leadoff walk, 
moved up on a long fly ball and scored 
when Jeter’s single fell in front of diving 
center fielder Michael Coleman. 

Brewer* 11, White Sox io In a game 
dominated by hitters, soft-tossing Doug 
Jones was the difference at County Sta- 
dium. He struck out the final four batters 
and tied Dan Plesac’s team record with 
33 saves. 

Royals 11, Rangers 9 Jeff King hit a 
two-run double in the ninth, giving Kan- 
sas City the victory on the road. 

Tigers 6, Athletics 3 A Crowd of Only 
4,65 1 , the smallest to see the Athletics at 
home since 1986, watched Bobby Hig- 
ginson hit a three- run homer for Detroit 
as the Tigers won for the 10th time in 13 
games. 

In' the National League: 

Dodger* 7, Cardinal* 6 After squan- 
dering a two-run lead in the ninth, the 
Dodgers came back with three runs in 


the 15th to beat St. 

Louis at home. 

Brave* 5, Giant* 4 The Braves battled 
back at home against the Giants with a 
four-run rally in the ninth against San 
Francisco's closer. Rod Beck, finally 
prevailing on Fred McGrifTs two-out, 
two-run homer. 

Rockies 7, Marlin* i At Miami. Larry 
Walker hit bis league- leading 44th 
borne run and Andres Galarraga fol- 
lowed with his 37rh' homer in the sev- 
enth as Colorado won its fifth straight. 

Padre* 4, Astro* 3 Reliever Jim 
Bruske escaped a seventh-inning jam as 
San Diego won at Houston, reducing its 
lead over Pittsburgh in the NL Central to 
3V4 games. 

pbeto* 5, Expo* 4 At Pittsburgh, Kev- 
in Young homered in his first at-bai 
since Aug. 2 as the Pirates rallied to beat 
Montreal. 

Young’s 10th -inning homer came a 
day after he angrily challenged his 
teammates to get back in the NL Central 
race following a ninth-inning loss to the 
Cubs. He was sidelined for a month 
because of an injured thumb. 

R*ds 4, Cubs i Eduardo Perez hit a 
home ran and an RBI single as Cin- 
cinnati won at Chicago. 

Met* 10, Phillies 5 (1 st game), Phi ID os 
2, Mot* i (2d gam*) Darrin Winston, a 
31 -year-old rookie making his first ma- 
jor league start, allowed only one hit in 
seven innings as Philadelphia beat New 
York in the nightcap for a doubleheader 
split. 

The visiting Mets won the opener 
behind Bern aid Gilkey and Batch Hus- 
key, who each hit two home nuts and 
then each added RBI singles in the 1 0th 
inning. 


Davis Returns 
To the Orioles 
And Ovation 


By Mark Maske 

B'jsh'iiffafl Post Service 

BALTIMORE — Eric Davis made 
an emotional return to the lineup, and 
immediately good things happened to 
the Baltimore Orioles, who won the 
game. 

Playing for the team for the first 
time since he underwent surgery for 
colon cancer three months ago, Davis 
went 0 for 3 during a five-inning stint 
Monday at Oriole Park at Camden 
Yards. 

He hit the ball hard a few times, 
contributed some superb defense in 
right field and made the day a mem- 
orable one. 

Davis was merely a spectator in the 
second game of a doubleheader with 
the Cleveland Indians, but this day 
still belonged to the 35-year-old out- 
fielder. “It was better than I imag- 
ined." be said. 

Before his first at-bat, Davis doffed 
his baiting helmet when the crowd of 
4 1 ,602 — including his wife, Sherrie, 
and his mother, Shirley Frazier — 
gave him a standing-ovation. 

“1 was kind of numb from an- 
ticipation,” Davis said. “It made me 
teary-eyed a little bit. That’s when I 
tipped ray hat to the crowd to let them 
know I felt what they were giving me. 
That’s why I wanted my first game 
bark to be at home.” 

His return from the disabled list, 
following 7 of IS scheduled weekly 
chemotherapy treatments, was post- 
poned when he left the (Moles for a 





Ted MMNa/Agcncc R*ncr-Preac 


Eric Davis acknowledging the 
cheers of the fans at his return. 

week earlier this month after learning 
that his brother, Jimmy, had died of a 
heart attack at age 36. 

Davis hit the toll hard in his first at- 
bat, but his line drive to deep right- 
center field was caught by right field- 
er Manny Ramirez. Davis grounded 
out to third baseman Matt Williams in 
innings two and five, nearly beating 
out his fifth- innin g bouncer down the 
line for an infield single. 


Scoreboard 


• p iiu j Ante 


f 


U.An 

t ' J 

y, ■: lira*' 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


EAST DIVISION 


■ Boston 012 003 000-6 12 0 

Crawford, McMJchaet (7) and Pratt 

Oleary Bas 

133 

453 

61 

144 

518 

MaGraceChC 

140 

515 80 

167 

524 

Japanese Leagues 

Green Bay 

2 1 

0 

567 

567 

70 

75 

52 

65 

TRANSITIONS 1 

1 New York D04 IDT 001—7 11 0 

Winston, Gomes (8), Karp (8), Battalia (9) 

ONeflINYY 

139 

SIS 

B6 

164 

517 

Galairaga Col 
Bichette Col 

143 

557112 

178 

520 - 

- Minnesota 

2 1 

0 

3 Sabertiogen, D. Lowe (5), Mahay (6), 

and Estatetia. W— Winston 1-0. L— Crawford 

M Vaughn Bos 

128 

479 

86 

151 

Jlf 

139 

520 75 

163 

513 


Chicago 

0 3 

0 

500 


97 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

y- Baltimore 

91 

57 

515 

_ 

New York 

B5 

63 

574 

6 

Detroit 

74 

76 

393 

IB 

Boston 

73 

76 

390 

1816 

Toronto 

71 

79 

373 

21 


CENTRAL OVISIOM 



Cleveland 

79 

67 

541 

— 

Milwaukee 

73 

75 

393 

7 

Chicago 

73 

77 

387 

8 

Kansas Oly 

61 

86 

315 

18% 

Minnesota 

60 

88 

305 

20 


WEBTDIVISUM 



Seattle 

84 

67 

556 



Anahehn 

78 

72 

520 

SV, 

Tens 

70 

80 

367 

13'A 

Oakland 

61 

90 

304 

23 

y-cfindied postseason berth 



mnoimuww 

EAST DIVISION 

W L Pet 
Atlanta 97 57 M7 

Rod da 86 iU SSI 

New Yarik 82 68 -547 

Montreal >74 IS J97 

Philadelphia 60 89 MB 

CENTRAL DIVISION 


Houston 

75 

74 

503 

— 

Pittsburgh 

72 

78 

380 

3tt 

Cinckmoii 

69 

80 

363 

6 

St Louis 

69 

80 

363 

6 

Chicago 

63 

87 

320 

12W 


WEST DIVISION 


,, 

LosAngetes 

83 

67 

553 

— 

- — 

San Frandsca 

82 

68 

547 

1 


Cotorado 

78 

72 

520 

5 

■ ' * ".JT.zl 

Son Diego 

71 

79. 

373 

12 


woiiwri tmeom 


•p. 

AIERtCAN LEAGUE 



- •- 

□mretasd 

Ml 

030 100-5 

8 ! 

. - 

Botthnnre 

220 

000 70s— 6 

6 1 


Rliuciauk riwm Vl/mw Wf — — 

Borders. Alomar (81; Yon. Baskle 15). Rhodes 
(6), Benitez (73# Myers (M nnd Webster. 
Holies 19). W— Benitez. 4-4. L-Ptank, 4-5. 
5 v— Myers (42). HRs-Clevekmd, Vbqwet 
(5). BatflmorL Hammonds (20). 

Second hub 

aerated 080 020 101-4 10 0 

BatHnon 000 000 100— 1 10 1 

Ogea M. Jocteon (7). Assoimachar (8), Mina 
cm ond S. Atanac Krivda, Mfe C71. OnSCP (8V 
TeMaftiews 0) aid Webster. W-Ogea T9. 
I— Krfwte 4-1. Sv M esa 04). HRs-CtevetaicL 
Grissom (12). BaBmore Benoa OS. 


Brandenburg (7). Corel (8) and Hoselmanr 
D-WeUs. Boehrlnger (6), M. Rivera (0) and 
Posada. .W— M. Rivero 5-4. L-Corsl 3-2. 
HRS-N.Y. Rakes (3), T. Martinez (42). 
Chicago 100 021 020-10 (4 0 

Milwaukee 420 032 0S« — 11 13 1 

Eyre, Levine (5). NL Cruz (6). T.CasHto (7) 
and Fab regas, Machado (6); Ekfced, Davis 

(6) . Feltere (7). DoJones (8) ond Stinnett. 
W-Eldted 13-13. L— Eyre 3-4. 
Sv— DoJones (33). HRs-Chtarga Abbott 
(1VM. Valdez (1).0. Guinea (4).M9wuukee, 
Voigt (8), DrJackBon (4). 

Kansas Ofy 133 IN Wtt— n 19 2 

Taws 202 310 110-9 It 1 

Rusdi Bones (4). Whisenanl (7). Pichardo 
(8). J- Montgomery (9) and MLSwwney: 
Henna, W. Heredia 0), Whiteside (6). 
Patterson (8) and I. Rodriguez. W — Pichardo 
3-5- L— Patterson 9-6. Sv-J. Montgomery 

(13) . HRs— Tec. Ju. Gonzalez 08), F. Tats 

(7) . 

Detroit 000 002 400-6 11 0 

Oakland 000 01 a 020-3 10 0 

JlLThorapsarv BracaO (8). M. Myers (S). 
TaJanes (8) and Casanowc Oqutt WHasick 

(7) . Lorraine (8), T. jjWathews (9) and 
Mafitn Moyne (9). W-^Ju. Thompson 14-11. 
L— Oguist 3-4. Sv— ToJanes £30). 
HR— Detroit Higglnson (26). 

Toronto 000 OM 100-3 9 0 

Seattle 210 031 00K-7 10 1 

W.WWams, Janzen (St Abnanzar (71. 
Robinson CD and B5anfiaga; Cloud* 
Spa Baric (7), Ayala (7). Qvutton (BLStoarmb 
m ond DaWOsan. W-CSoude 3-Z L— W. 
Wfflams ftU. Sv-Slocumb CSV 
HRs— Toronto, Cruz Jr 04). Seatthv Coro 
(10), Griffey Jr 2 (52V Sorrento (29). 
Da Wilson (14). 

Minnesota 200 M2 010-4 8 2 

Anehmm 000 103 M3-8 9 2 

Hawkins. SwtadeO (6), Trombley (ffl, 
Guardado C9), AgoBero (9) and Steinbbctv 
D-Spitngef. Holtz (8). P. Hants (8) ond 
Kreuter. W— P. Harris 4ft L— Trombley 2-3. 
HRs— Anaheim. G. Anderson (8). HoBte 

(14) . Howe! (12). 

NATIONAL LEAGHJE 

NewYort 000 1» 220 5-10 14 1 

PUadelphla 201 011 000 0-4 10 0 
(10 inn'mpsVBohanoa Acevedo (6). Lkfle 

(8) . Rain CIO) ond A. CasttBa Pratt (7); 
Baectv SprodSn 18V BottoBco (9), Karp (10). 
Ryan (10) end Lieberthal. W-Udte 7-1. 
L — Kanv 1-1. HRs— Hew York. McRae (9), 
Gilkey 2 08). Huskey 2 (23). 

Second game 

New York 000 100 000-1 3 0 

PMmMpUa 020 000 Oto-2 6 1 


2-1 Sv — BottoBco (30). 

Montreal - 000 1M 003 0-4 101 

Pittsburgh 013 000 000 1-5 M2 

PJJAorttaet Bennett (81, Kline (8), 
TeHord 19} an d Fletcher, Chavez (9); Loaba, 
Wafloce (7). LofseOe (9). Rincon (10). 
M-WIDdns (10) and Kendal W— AL Wilkins 
9-5. L— Teffbrd 4-4 HR — Ptttsbuigfe K_ 
Young (17). 

Cotorado 000 100 240-7 7 0 

Florida 100 ON 000-1 11 2 

Jm-Wnghl M. Munoz (7). S. Reed (7). 
McCurry (8). Lesknnie (9) and JeJteect 
A-Femondez, Vasbem 18), SfcnJfer IB), K. 
Miller (?) and C. Johnson. Natal (9). 
W— Jm.WrfgM 7-1 1. L— A. Femondei 17-11. 
HRs— Colorado, Weiss (4). L Water (44). 
Galarraga (37). 

Cnrinafl 002 001 100-4 9 0 

Chicago 010 OM M0-1 6 1 

Morgen G. While (8). Show (9) and J. 
OBvee JeXtoazniaz. BattenfleM (7), □. 
Stevens (8). Morel (9) and M- Hubbard. 
W— Morgan 8-11. L— JeJ3onztaoz n-ft 
Sv— Show (38). HRs— Cincinnati, EdaPerez 
(16). Chicago, Sosa (33). 

Sen Dtoga 110 110 000-4 11 0 

Houston Ml 0M 200-3 7 1 

P-Smfth. Erdos (7). H. Murray (7). Bniske 
(7). Hoffman (8) ond CHenemdec 
Homptan. Hwtok 15V T. Martin (8) and 
Ausmus. W — P. Smith 6-5. L— Hampton 13- 
10, Sv—HoBnun 04). HR— San Diego. 
Cr Jones (7). 

San FrandscD 2M 002 BOO-4 5 0 

Attanta 0M 0M 104-5 8 2 

Estes. R. Hernandez (8). Bedi (9) and B. 
Johnson; Gtavine. Embree (8). Ugtenbarg 
(9) and J. Lopez. W— Ugtenberg 1-0. 
L— Beck 5-4. HRs— Son Frandsca, Kent 
(28). Atlanta, McGrtff (22). 

UL 000 M0 000 KM 003-7 11 3 

SLLoa TOO (HO 002 BOB 002-4 12 3 

L Valdes, Rufinsky (8V Oeuna (SV 
Ta-Worrefl (9). Guthrie (9V Hall (9), D. Reyes 
(11 V Hrrrkey (14V Dreflbrt (15) and Prince 
Beltran. Frascatore (A). Bautista •(». 
Eckeoley (10), Pettmwek 01). RMBio D4) 
ond Dtfehce. LflmpMn (10). Marrero (15). 
W— Marker 14). L— Ragglo 1-Z Sv— Dreifart 
(4). HRs— SU, Lankford (29). Goeitl 07). 
AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 

FThomosChW 135 490103 172 351 

Jefferson Bos 123 441 72 148 .336 

BeWBDomsNYY 118 445 99 155 333 


Ramirez de 
Justice Oe 
EMarttnezSea 
Greer Tes 


137 508 91 168 331 

125 444 77 147 331 

148 517 99 171 331 

145 556 100 179 322 


RUNS— GaiEiapana Boston, 117; Griffey 
Jr. Seattle, lie Jetec New York. Ill; 
Knobtaudv Minnesota. 109: B. LHunter, 
Detroit 105; F. Thomas. Chicago, 103; 
ToCkrk Detroit 10ft Greer. Texas. 100. 

RBI— Griffey jr, Seattle 139; T. Martinez, 
New York, 137; Salmon. Anaheim, lift F. 
Thomas. Chicago, H6; Ju Gonzalez, Texas, 
lift O.’Ntdft New York, llZ-ToCtark, Detroit 
111 . 

HITS— Gadopana Boston, 19ft Jeter, 
New York, 179; Greer, Tens, 179; JhVIdentrni 
Boston 173; Griffey Jo Seattle. 173; I- 
Rod/feuez, Tew* 17ft FThonw* Chicogn 
171 

DOUBLES— JhValenrin, Boston 4ft Befle. 
Chicago. 4ft Grillo, MUhuaukee, 4ft Con. 
Seattle, 4ft o. ■NelU, New York. 4ft 
Garcia parra, Boston, 38; Giambi, Oakkmd, 
38; Greer, Texa* 38. 

TRIPLES— Garcia parra, Boston, 1ft 
Knobtaudv Minnesota, 9; Burmtz. 
MOwoukea & Damon. Kansas City. 7; Jeter, 
New York, 7; 8. LHunter, Detroit 7; A Been, 
Anaheim, 7; By Anderson, Baltimore. 7. 

HOME RUNS— Griffey Jr, Seattle. 5 ft T. 
Martinez. New York. 4ft Thome. Clevelond. 
4ft JuGonzDle& Texas, 3ft Buhner, Seattle. 
3ft R- Pa b ne tr a Battimoiw 34; McGwim 
OoUand.34. 

STOLEN BASES— a LHunter, DehoR, 7ft 
Knoblauch, Minnesota 5ft Nixon, Toronto. 
47; TGoodwin Texas, 4 5i Vowel Cleveland, 
4 ft Durham. Ch tango. 31; A. Rodriguez, 
Saattte, 29. 

PITCHING (17 DecriJoos) — RaJotvaon, 
Scattte 17-4,311235; Moyer. Seattle, 144, 
M 3J1 Oeroens, Toronto 21 ^ JTft 2.0ft 
Erickson, Baltimore. 16-ft J73. 3A1; Pettate, 
New York, 17-7, .70ft 2B9; Btaio Detroit 16-7, 
49ft 4.01; C FMey, Anaheim, 13ft A 84 
433; Hershiser, Ctewianft 13-ft A84, 44& 
STRIKEOUTS— RaJohnson, Seattle, 27ft 
aemenb Toronto 263; Con* Now York, 21 & 
Mussina, Battinrora, 20ft Fassera Seattle. 

1 75; Appier, Km City, 175? Rodkft 
Mirmnsota, 158. 

SAVES — RaMyer* Baltimore, 4ft M. 
Rivera New York, 41; DoJones, Mlkwuhee, 
3ft TrUones, Detroit 3ft Wrttetand, Tew* 
29; R. Hemrmdez, Chicago. 27; Perdvat 
Anaheim, 2£ Stoaimb, Seattle. 25. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
LWaflterCol 144 535 134 198 370 

GwynnSD 139 554 88 203 366 

Piazza LA 140 504 94 180 357 

Lofton Att 111 460 86 156 339 

Joyner SD 124 425 55 142 334 

AHdnzoNYM 139 483 B0 157 325 


B tenser Atl 143 496 83 153 308 
RUNS — L. Walter. Cotorado. 134; Bigg to. 
Houston. I3ft Galaitaga, Cotoroda lift 
Bonds. Sat Francisco, 109; EcYounft Las 
Angetes, 10ft BagwWL Houston 99; 5. 
Finley, San Diega 95. 

RBI-Gatorruga Colorado, 13ft Bagwell. 
Houston 122; L Walken Cotoroda lift 
Bichette, Cotorado, lift Sosa Chicago, 113; 
Gwynn Sa n Dtegn 1 lft Kerft Son Frnncbca 
112 . 

HITS— Gwynn San Diega 203; L Walker, 
Cotoroda 19ft Piazza Las Angeles, IBft 
Biggin Houston IBft Grdarraga Colorado, 
17ft Mondesi Las Angela 17ft- CataBta. 
Cotoroda 174. 

DOUBLES— Grudzielanek, Montreat 51; 
Gwynn. San Diega 4& L Walker, Cotoroda 
4ft Lansing, Montreal, 4ft ChJanen Atlanta, 
3ft Mondesi Las Angeles. 3ft Moranrflnt 
Philadelphia. 3& 

TRIPLES— DeShUds. St. LouK 1ft W. 
Guenera, Los Angeles, ft Randa Ptttsburgta 
ft Womack, Pittsburgh, ft N Perez. Cotoroda 
ft E. c Young. Las Angeles, ft Daulton 
Florida 8. 

HOME RUNS— L. Walker, Cotorado, 4ft 
CastBta. Cotoroda 3ft Bagwell Houston 3ft 
Gakuraga Cotoroda 37; Piazza Las Angeles, 
35; Sosa Chicago. 3ft Bonda San Fttmdsca 
33. 

STOLEN BASES— D. Sandere. Cincinnati, 
5ft Womack, Pltlslwrgh, » D. eShlelda St. 
Louis. 47; EcYoung, Los Angeiea 42t Bigg la 
Houston 4ft Mondesi Los Angeles, 32; Q- 
veroaSun Dtoga 3l;LWafter, Cotoroda 31; 
Bands, San Froncisca31. 

PITCHING 07 Deastoas}— Neogle. 
Atlanta 203, 37ft ft67; Estes. San 
Frondscn. ISA 31ft 33ft G. Maddux. 
Attanta 1S-4L 3lftZ2ft KDe, Hoaston 186, 
35ft 23ft P. JMmtinez, Montreal 1 7-7. 30ft 
131; Rodeo Sun Frandsca 126, 367, 35ft 
Ratio Los Angeiea 13-7, 35ft 33ft M. Claift 

CWcogo. 13-7. 350, 334 Gtavine, Atlanta 13- 
7, 35d 339. 

STRIKEOUTS— SchUUng, Philadelphia 
296; P. J Martinez, Montreal 28ft Smodz, 
Attanta, 226 Noma Los Angeiea 21ft Kfie, 
Houston 1 97; K.J Brown Florida 19ft Estes. 
San Frandsca 175; AnBenes, St. Lauia 
175. 

SAVES— Shaw, anctanaft 3ft Bedo San 
Frandsca 37 > JoFranca New- York, 3a 
ToWorreJl Lob Angeiea 3 & Eckeniay, SL 
Louis, 35 Hoffman San Diega 3ft Nero 
Florida 3ft Wohlers, Attanta 33. 


Yakutt 73 45 2 319 - 

Yokohama 65 52 — 356 75 

Hiroshima 59 57 - S09 I3JJ 

HansNfl 54 66 1 350 200 

Yomluri S4 67 - 346 203 

ChurtcW 51 69 I 325 230 

PACIFIC IUOUB 


CaroRna 2 1 0 

San Frandsca 2 10 

SL Louis I 2 0 

Attanta 0 3 0 

New Orleans 0 3 0 

MONDAY'S ttl 
Dallas 21. Philadelphia 28. 


367 45 37 
367 54 32 
J33 64 74 
•OOP 54 71 
JOM 37 91 
■nr 


NATIONAL LEAQUE 

NL— Reduced suspension ol Tyler Houston 
ofChtaogo CutatramS gainestoLforflgtit- 
(ng in a game agatist San Fhmdsai Aug. 13. 


W L T Pd. GB 
SeSxr 68 48 3 586 — 

Ollx 60 51 3 541 55 

Kintetsu 59 59 4 500 KLO 

Dare! 56 61 1 J79 125 

Nippon Ham 55 66 1 355 155 

Lotte SO 63 2 342 165 

TUnOAV'S w*us 
CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yakalt ft Hcnstiln 2 

PAQFK LEAGUE 
Datoi vs- Selbu ppd, rata 
Latte vs. Kintetsu ppd rota 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


| FOOTBALL 

J 

NFL Standings 


EAST 

W L T Pd. PF 

PA 

New England 

3 o oum 

99 

37 

Miami 

2 1 0 567 

SO 

46 

Buffalo 

1 2 0 533 

57 

78 

N.Y. Jets 

1 2 0 533 

87 

SB 

Indianapolis 

0 3 0 500 

19 

78 

Jacksonvflte 

CENTRAL 

2 0 0 1-000 

68 

40 

Baltimore 

2 1 0 567 

74 

61 

Clndtmail 

1 1 0 500 

34 

44 

Pittsburgh 

1 1 0 500 

21 

SO 

Tennessee 

1 1 0 500 

37 

37 

Denver 

WEST 

3 0 01.000 

89 

31 

Kansas City 

2 1 0 567 

53 

62 

Oakland 

1 2 0 533 

84 

83 

San Diego 

1 2 0 533 

34 

73 

Seattle 

1 2 0 533 

48 

79 

MxnoMAL connnw 

■ 



EAST 

W L T Pet 

PF 

PA 

Dallas 

2 1 0 567 

BO 

52 

Washington 

2 1 0 567 

56 

37 

Arizona 

1 2 0 533 

59 

65 

N.Y.Gtreris 

1 2 0 533 

67 

81 

PhfladelpMa 

I 2 0 533 

47 

61 

Tampa Bay 

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3 0 0 1-000 

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2 1 0 567 

77 

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standmos: Barcelono ft MaOorcn 7, Real 
Madrid 7. Cetta Vigo 7, Tenerife 7; Racing 
Santander & Oviedo 5, Espanyol ft Attetko 
Madrid 4, Compostela 4, Zaragoza 4. AlMeflc 
B3boo ft Satamonca ft Real Sodedad 3; De- 
parttvo Coruna ft Nlerida IrValen da ft Sport- 
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ft Mo urtztoFon driest Italy. Cofltfis 
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ft Sergei Iwonov, Russia, TVM 
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NATIOIIAL BA8KETBALL ABSOCWnOH 

TORONTO -Signed F Tracy McGrady to 3- 
year contract 

VANCOUVU -Signed C Ivano NewbOL 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Indianapolis —Signed C Jason Johnson ‘ 
to practice squad. 

HOCKEY 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

DALLAS — Aligned D Frederic Beuchord,'. 
RW Marty Rkhel D Joel Kwfatkewsid and D 
Mark Pivetz to Michigan, IHL; and LW Nick'. 
Baattand. LW Ryan Chrfstte, RW Mike Hur-‘ 
ley. D Richard Jackman, G Eoin Mdnetney, 
ond D Evgeny Tsytwk to their luniorclube. 

flori da —Assigned F Ashley Budcbergec, 
D Wes Swfnsan imd G David Lemrmowiata. 
New Hawn at theAHLD Chris Armstrong to 
Fort Waynft IHb D Gaetrm Poirierto Cana- 
dian National Team; F Mte Brown to Kam- 
loops. WHU D Joey Tetorenko to Portland, 
WHLj and F Ketth Delaney, F Nick Smith, F 
lvon Novaseltaeft F Andrew Long, D 
Vraffstav Cedv D Chris Allen, and D Mike 
Lnn kshera to Iheir junior dubs. 

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KaKhw RW Marian Cfeor, D Richard Seeley. 
RW Greg Phillips. D Konrad Brand relumed 
to their lureor dubs. 

Main real— A ssigned D Denick Wafeec 
D Jari-Espen Ygranes. LW Michel Tremblay 
and RW Francois Page to took Junior dubs. 

Philadelphia— S igned D Chris Tlwrien to 
multiyear contract 

TAMPA BAT— Re-signed LW Jeff Tom*. 

Toronto— Assigned Greg Smyth. Nathan 
Dera psey.ShawnCoTteb Rob Bote, Greg Bul- 
tedc Mike Burkatt Scott Pearson. Ryan Pep- 
perail Kelly FalrdiDd. Warren Norris, Aaron 
Brand. Joseph Cnrigen, Zdenek Nedved. 
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Johns. AHL 

Vancouver -Re-signed F Scott Walker 
and F Donald BrashearJD Ryan Bamft G 
Matt Cocked C David Darguza* C Herald 
Drukeri LW Kyle Friedrich, RW Darey Harris, 

G A ken HUdven, D Rod Loraw. RW Lory 
Shop toy. LW Jonas Sating, c Chris Stanley 
returned to luntar dubs. 

WAS H INOTON -Signed D Rick Mrazfk. 


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nVTERNArrONALBERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Giving It the Old College Try 


■ary Bombshell 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Here’s why Amer- 
icans no longer have big families: 


J/N jeans no longer have big families: 
' college. 

Suppose you had 12 children — 

Ah, but you are laughing. “Twelve 
■ children,” you are laughing. “Hah hah 
hah.” 

■ Well, you are laughing at my grand- 
mother, and if she were here at this 
moment you would regret giving your 
laugh muscles such free play. All but 1 


draw the curtain. If yon-have tears you 

money? They certify. As the United 
Stales is now organized, people not cer- 
tified by colleges don ’tbave a loi to lot* 
forward to except that blessed happiness 
that cannot be bought with money- 
Wben seeking work, youth is asked by 
corporate interrogators, “Are you cer- 
tified?” If not, alas! 

The essential certifying is done by 
colleges of what is called “higher learn- 
ing.” the highest form of learning being 

.. Itc.j Hnn't or* far. The 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pox Sennet 

ERUN — Among the gfe 


kesskksss- a-gwjsjr’asr* 

t^r^-srssrsS £*s sisse 

> 2Z, you had .2 childjn, 


whom the oldest is about done won high 
school. You would be studying the col- 
lege survey just published by U.S. News 
& World Report. 

Having skimmed the contents, you 
would immediately (.1 > swear never to 
have 12 children again, and (2) tell the 
entire brood, “As of right now, you are 
all finished with school and will start 
tomorrow learning honest trades.’ 

□ 


U.S. News reports that the price of 
sending one — just one child! — to 
college for one year — just one year! — 
is now more than $20,000 atmost of the 
flossier academies. Add $7,000 for 
room and board, and go figure: 

Twenry-seven thousand dollars a 
year for four years comes to $108,000. 
Twelve children at $108,000 a child for 
four years runs to $ 1 .296,000. Toss in 
inflati on — and nothing inflates faster 
nowadays than college costs — and you 
can round the number off at $1.5 mil- 
lion. give or take $ 1 00,000. 

' That’s why nobody has 12 children 
anymore. Having one in college is 
enough to keep Mom and Dad in penury 
until they're old enough to be wrapped in 


In the past generation or two, too 
many people have been certified. The 
employment market is glutted with cer- 
tified job applicants. Employers can af- 
ford to be picky. . , 

“So you're certified, and who tsn t 
these days?” they yawn. “Being cer- 
tified cuts no ice here, kidL The big 
questioo is how much did the old folks 
pay to get die certifying done for you." 

So Moms and Dads now pray that 
their produce will be acceptable to col- 
leges notorious for their bankruptive 
tuition costs. 

Applicants for admission to these top- 
dollar certifiers are so profuse that being 
accepted to one coolers a singularity in a 
category with tite Hope Diamond and 
the World Series victoiy of the St Louis 
Browns. Parents pining for poverty 
dream of having just one precious child 
accepted by a college that rejects 999 of 
every 1,000 applications. . 


B ERLIN — Among the giants of 
literature, Johann Wolfgang v p° 
Goethe remains unique. One of his- 
tory’s great Renaissance men. he 
achieved Olympian feats during his 83 
years as a critic, journalist, painter, 
statesman, scientist and philosopher. 

No wonder he is hailed as the ul- 
timate European, a man who felt at 
ease in many cultures and lived life to 
the full extent of its possibilities. 

Goethe’s relations with women are 
often died as a p rimar y inspiration 
behind his extraordinary achieve- 
ments. He fathered five children with 
Christiane Vulphis, though only one 
survived past birth. 

He counfid many beautiful and in- 
telligent women throughout his life. The 
writer sealed his masterpiece “Faust” 
with the final couplet, “The Eternal 
Feminine draws us on,” which seemed 
to extol the opposite sex as the focus of 
man’s noblest creative energies. 

But a new study of Germany’s most 
famous writer has shaken the literary 


establishment by declaring the poet’s 
life and work were really shaped by his 


life and work were really shaped by nxs 
suppressed homosexuality. 

In a nation that reveres Goethe as 
much as, if not more than, the British 
do Shakespeare, the author Karl Hugo 
Prays hopes his biography will cause 
readers to see Goethe in a new light. 

“I have broken one of our greatest 
taboos.’’ Prays said in an interview. 
“Goethe's homosexuality is unques- 
tionably central to his . life and work. 




- mmmi 

EM 


But there has long been a conspiracy 
to cover this up because of the con- 


other young men in die lake^ of 

Switzerland. , . . . . • 

The defining relationship in 

Goethe’s career as a writer. Prays says, 
was an intensely passionate liaison 
with the- Dusseldorf ; philosopher < 
Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi. - 

In response to a letter from Jacobi,, 
who said he was “tenderly and deeply 
in love” with Goethe, Prays quotes 
Goethe as expressing his “rapture and 
bliss” at being treated as die love _ 
object” of his philosopher fnend. 

Goethe concluded many of his to- 
las to Jacobi and tidier. close male 
friends with toe signature “wannest 
kisses" and other expressions of pay s- 

^^chaUragmg the received wisdran 
about Goethe, Prays baa attracted a 
good deal of criticism. Lofear Ehrlich, 
one of Germany's top literary histor- 
ians, from Goethe’s home town of 
Weimar, calls the book “wrong-; 
headed” in its conviction that the cul- 
tural icon, was masking his true sexual- 
orientation from the public eye.. 

“Goethe lived in a uniquely sen- , 
timental age; what be wrote about men 
was not necessarily signs of h omo- 
philia but merely the spirit of the Storm 
anri Stress movement of his ti m e,* 
Ehrlich said 

“It’s true that Goethe may have . 
been confused about bis sexual identity 
in his younger years, but it is foolish to 
conclude that passionate love fcr other 
men was the driving fence in his life 
and work.” • 

Prays, who wrote an acclaimed bi- 
ography of Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
sayshis critics are upset because he is 

_1 ,1 2 — _ nuriu'i. nrolimw rvf vfr- 


victioo that Germans would sever ac- 
cept that their favorite national poet 
was gay.” 

Prays, a historian who spent a de- 


These elegant academies, as might be 
expected, tend to breed killers — cor- 


cade scrutinizing Goethe's writings, 
argues in “Die Liebkosungen desTi- 
grers" (The Tiger’s Tender Touch) 
that the 18th-century genius harbored 
serious phobias about women and 
found his greatest artistic and personal 
fulfillment through relationships with 
men. 

Prays said Goethe’s reputation as a 
dashing Don Juan is largely a myth. He 
insists the poet was actually afraid of 


U1IUIUU.J IVUlUVlIVUoUB-U. I - . . . 

shawls and kept in rocking chairs. If they poration lawyers, merger-acquisition- 
can afford $27,000 a year for college and -downsizing wizards, Washington 


they are probably in a tax bracket that 
licenses various governments to ravage 
maybe 50 percent of their salaries. This 
means they have to earn about $54,000 
before taxes just for tuition and board. 

That’s for one child. For two, it’s 
$108,000 a year. For three — But let us 


and -downsizing wizards, Washington 
string-pullers, etc. The kind of people 
you don’t mess with if you know what’s 
good for you. Killers. 

No wonder. After paying those killer 
trillions, their parents would probably 
kill them if they didn’t become killers. 

New York Times Service 


ography or cnanceuor neunui js.om, 
sayshis critics are upset because he is 

The many feces of Goethe: Clockwise from top left, at 16, 23, 77 and 41. challenging Goethe s prete nse of v ir- 

r ility whereas he is more interested in 

women and never touched one until the “We need to take Goethe down exploring whether Goethes hidden 

ripe age of 39, when he was seduced by from his pedestal and see him for what sexual procl ivity might have somc- 
Christiane. And Prays claims the nu- he really was. Then we will have a thing to do with _ the nchness_qf- ms 
merotis love letters Goethe wrote to better understanding of his work and imagination and literary canon. - - — 
women were simply sentimental af- his times.” “people do not like to bear that their 

fee tali ons of his time, not true pro- Prays says Goethe married Chris- heroes are subject to the same habits 
fessions of amorous d es ire. tiane, who was 16 years his junior and and foibles as normal humans. Prays 

“Goethe was by no means a wo- often slept in a separate room, as a said. “The image of Goethe has been 
manizer. He was a natural actor who reluctant favor. carefully cultivated over the y ears as 

loved the disguise,” the author says. In contrast, he says, Goethe con- cultural version of the Gennan super- 

“So what if he was manied? Oscar ' ~~ "" 

Wilde also married and had two kids, 
but that does not preclude the feet he 
was gay. 


exploring whether Goethe’s bidden 
sexual proclivity might have some- 
thing to do with the richness_qf his 

imagination and literary canon. . 

“People do not like to bear that their 
heroes are subject to the same habits 
and foibles as normal humans,” Prays 
said. “The image of Goethe has been 
carefully cultivated over the years as 
cultural version of the Gennan super- 


111 UJUUiUl, UC W4LU1IU v* ™ 

Qded the joy of physical love in let- man. I am just trying to tell people me 
ters to male friends and said his truth about the man’s real nature. It’s 


most sensual experience occurred 
when he went swimming naked with 


no reason for them to feel so uncom- 
fortable.” 


TABLOID BIOGRAPHY 


PEOPLE 


The Unauthorized Kitty Kelley Takes On ‘The Royals’ 


S EVERAL of Britain's top 
musicians performed in a 


By Paula Span 

Washington Fast Service 


N EW YORK — Kitty Kelley and her husband 
were at their Virginia country home on the 


IN were at their Virginia country home on the 
Shenandoah River a few weeks ago when the call 
came: "Turn on CNN right away.” She watched 
for three hours as information about the fatal ac- 
cident in Paris dribbled in. “I was sick about it,” 
she says. 

• And for more than the usual reasons. Aside from 
her shock at the violent death of Diana, Princess of 
Wales, there was the matter of Kelley’s latest 
celebrity biography, “The Royals," a hefty group 
portrait of the Windsor dynasty that the Wash- 
ington writer had spent four years researching. It 
was to be shipped to stores in three weeks, and now 
it might face even more carping and catcalls than 
Kelley’s exposes usually provoke. 

“It gives a very inside, unvarnished look at tile 
royal family,” Kelley says. “And I don’t know 
how that will play." 

Given the weeks of televised pomp, the tributes 
floral and verbal, the general gushing, is there much 
appetite for Kelley’s contention that King George 
VI and his wife conceived both Queen Elizabeth 
and her sister, Margaret, through artificial insem- 



ination? Her discussions of Prince Philip's rumored 
affairs? Her characterization of Sarah Ferguson as a 


affairs? Her characterization of Sarah Ferguson as a 
diet pill user? Or of the not-yet-canonized Diana 
Spencer as a woman who could be petty, shallow 
and manipulative as well as gracious and glam? 

• Her preference, Kelley says, was to delay the 


book until January. Warner Books decided topro- 
ceed, but Larry Kirshbaum, chairman of Time 


ceed, but Larry Kirshbaum, chairman of Time 
Warner Trade Publishing, initially said the Sept. 23 
publication date would not be pushed up. “We 
didn’t want to appear to be exploiting a tragic 
situation about which we all feel terrible,” he told 
the Washington Post reporter David Streirfeldafew 
days before Diana’s funeral. 

But reports of customers flooding bookstores in 
search of royal-related literature effected a cor- 


SLan WntoinUfr^lif Wcuml Pre»» 

Publication of KeDey’s book was moved up. 


porate change of heart. So here is Kelley’s “The 
Royals,” going on sale in a welter of 'daunting 
statistics: 600,000 shipped copies of a 502-page 
tome based on 800 interviews. And here is its author 
in her black Chanel suit with its trademark white 
camellia, holding court in the Four Seasons hotel in 
Manhattan, receiving a dozen journalists on the first 
day of a promotional marathon. 

. The Windsors, whose reign she chronicles from 
1917 — when King George V began to downplay 
the clan's Germanic origins, renaming it after a 


storied castle — are “probably the most powerful 
family in the world and they hold themselves out as 
unique, special: they put themselves forward as a 
symbol of rectitude,” Kelley says. “I looked to see 
how they represented family values and how they 
didn’t” Her unsutprising conclusion: “I couldn't 
say they fare well at all. ’ ’ 

A new Kitty Kelley book presents a conundrum 
for the media. Her huge sales numbers — Warner 
Books expects the copies in print to jump to a 
million veiy shortly — turn publication into an 
event. Her disclosures have frequently proved too 
entertaining, and occasionally too important, to ig- 
nore. Yet they also make mainstream journalists 
uneasy because they are often impossible to verify. 

Her subjects or their allies protest loudly that the 
books are too tawdry to merit attention. “Trash and 
fiction,” was how former first lady Barbara Bush 
called Kelley’s previous offering, * ‘Nancy Reagan: 


The Lfnauthorized Biography.” That 1991 book 
posed ‘ ‘the same problem there is with gossip of all 
kinds — some of it’s true and some of it’s not and 
you don't know which is which,” said Jonathan 
Alter, who led a team of Newsweek reporters who 
looked into the Reagan book after publication. 
Their cover story dismissed Kelley's suggestion 
that Mrs. Reagan had White House assignations 
with Frank Sinatra. “There was just no sourcing at 
all,” After said. 

Kelley now says she didn't “make a judgment” 
on whether Reagan and Sinatra were White House 
intimates — “I said she had private luncheons in the 
family quarters” with Sinatra, “not to be disturbed 
by anyone, including the president.” A disingenu- 
ous response — in her book, the word lunches was 
in quotation marks — but Kelley maintains “there 
were no mistakes: the book was documented.” 

The Newsweek group conceded that “despite 
her wretched excesses” the core of Kelley's book 
“was right.” Is that enough? It isn’t. Alter thinks 
now. because errors in fact or context and in- 
adequate sourcing would mean "she can’t be trus- 
ted. Yet Alter acknowledges, “It’d be easier if 
you could say, ‘It’s all made up' — but it’s not” 

Several British journalists woo helped Kelly gain 
access to the right circles offer testimonials to her 
indefatigability as she attempted to track 80 years of 
royal rumors. "She worked jolly hard over here, 
spent ages and ages speaking to everyone she could 
lay her hands on,” said Francis Wheen. He's a 
columnist for the Guardian, which last week ran a 
front-page headline warning, “U.S. Blockbuster 
Threatens New Royal Crisis.” with a photo of 
Kelley, “the notorious American author.” 

“I’ve seen her at work,” said Anthony Holden, a 


O musicians performed in a 
charity concert for the 
stricken volcanic island of 
Montserrat. “This concert is 
just a gesture to show the 
people of Montseirat that 
somebody is thinking of 
them.” said Sir Paul Mc- 


Cartney. McCartney joined 
Elton John, Eric Clapton, 


royal biographer and columnist for the Express. 
Holden, an ana-monarchist, save two dinner 


Holden, an anti-monarchist, gave two dinner 
parties so Kelley could meet useful people. “She, 
amazingly, gets her notebook on the table during 


Elton John, Eric Clapton, 

Phil Collins, Sting, Mark 
Knopfler, Mick Hucknall 
and Montserrat’s most pop- 
ular singer. Arrow, at the 
Royal Albert Hall for the con- 
cert before an audience that 
included Prince Andrew. 

The performers hoped to raise 
more than SI million. TV 
companies from more than 40 

nations have bought broad- i 

cast rights. The concert was 
organized by the former McCartney in concert 
Beatles producer Sir George 
Martin, who built his own recording studio 
on a Montserratian hilltop in 1979. 

□ 

John M. Goshko, The Washington Post’s 
correspondent at the United Nations, has won 
the 1997 Kom/Feny International Journalism 
Award for Excellence in UN reporting. The 
$5,000 prize is sponsored by Kom/Feny In- 
ternational. an executive search firm, in co- 
operation with the Business Council of the 
United Nations. . . . Enrique and Hernando 
Santos Castillo, editor and chairman of El 
Tiempo, a Bogota, Colombia, newspaper, re- 
ceived a 1997 Maria Moors Cabot Prize for the 
paper's reporting “despite constant threats by 
the government and drag cartels.” The awards 
are given by Columbia University for con- 



Danny Saber — are imme- 
diately evident: The -album's 
first single includes a sample 
of rapper Biz Marine. There 
are dram loops and computer 
edits and overdubs all de- 
cidedly un-Stonesy touches. 
“I don’t work thar way,” 
Richards said bluntly. “I’m . 
going hands on — you’re go- 


ing synthesized. I don’t get a 
buzz from that kind of re- 


buzz from that kind of re- 
cording. At the same time, I 
tike the songs.” 


The Clintons took their 
daughter. Chelsea, ont for a 
three-hour going-away din- 
ner at an Indian restaurant 
two blocks from the White 

House. The Bombay Club is 

Robnxs ?udeo/.\FP one of Chelsea's favorite res- 
i concert. taurants. It was a farewell 
dinner for the fust daughter 
before she departs Thursday for Stanford 
University in California. The Clintons 


played host to two other couples and their 
children, who were schoolmates of Chelsea’s 


children, who were schoolmates of Chelsea's 
at Sidwell Friends School in Washington. 

□ 

Pablo Picasso tops a list of artists best 
known to Germans but only half of them love 
the Spaniard’s paintings, a survey published 
Tuesday by a Cologne institute for empirical 
psychology found. Picasso, with whom 93 
percent of 900 German respondents were fa- 
miliar, was followed by Rembrandt (92 per- 
cent), whom 58 percent found acceptable. 
Sixty to 70 percent of -those polled knew 
Salvador Dali, Claude Monet and the Aus- 
trian painter Friedensreich Hundertwasser. 


tributions to inter-American understanding Only one in five Germans was found to like 


dinner and charms and flatters people, particularly 
men, in the most shameless way,” Holden reports. 
"It’s always fun to watch.” 

The result is a grab bag: some well-worn history, 
numerous episodes already reported, various scan- 
dals widely gossiped about in Britain but unpub- 
lishable there because of strict libel laws, new 
allegations that will raise eyebrows but probably 
not foment revolution. Much must be taken on 
faith, since many sources (but by no means all) are 
unnamed. At Buckingham Palace, a spokesman 
declined to respond to Kelley's book with a polite. 
“We never do offer comment on those types of 
books or articles.” 


and press freedom. The recipients also in- 
cluded Jose de Cordoba, The Wall Street 
Journal’s Miami-based senior special writer, 
and Julia Preston, The New York Times’ 
correspondent in Mexico for the past two 
years. 


modern art while 37 percent favor traditional 
paintings. 


Ted Turner says he’s through with ex- 
. paneling his empire. “I’m so businessed- 
out,” Turner said after he had delivered a 
speech to the Commerce Club in Atlanta. 

1 m in the timber business, bison hnsin^cc 


into tot h drags** Keith Richards *Tm m the timber business, bison business, 
mro the 21st century, musically speaking, magazine business, TV business, TV pro- 
Jagger persuaded a reluctant Richards to bring duction business, movie business, real estate 
m some young producers to add some new business, sports business, news business,” he 
studio tncks to the Rolling Stones 39th al- said. “It's like having 30 children, 100 chiF 
bum. Bridges to Babylon. Touches from dren, and you don’t even know all -their 
the producers — The Dust Brothers and names." 


Every country has Its own AT&T Access Number which 



makes calling home or to other countries really easv. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country- you're 


AT&T Access Numbers 

EUROPE 

Austria »o Q22-40 


■>» :--aaa5 


aeo iw'nw 




calling from and you'll get the clearest connections 


home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 


Steps in follow For asy 
calling worldwide; 


Mglooi* 

Frenca 

sanmoy 

Greses* . — 

M s«»o. ........ 

Italy* *"* 

Nettiarfawtss 
Russia •A(Ho*ttw}», 


022-903411 
B-800-1 BO-io 

0- 800-99-flflli 

0130-8010 

.AO-MO-iaii 

1- 880-650-080 

172-1011 

0800-822-9111 
755-S0« 


Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone 


love 0-800-99-0011 


charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 
(up to 6oV). Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


1. Just dial the AT&T Access. Number 
for the country jvu are calling fan. 

2. Dial die phone number you're calling 

5. Dial the calling card number listed 
dhow your name 


Sand,.;;.. 

Unftfld Kingdom* .. ' ..iiSSSSl 


MIDDLE EAST — 

?■ 

sr=- AFRICA 


South Africa 


in the springtime. 


Cant find the Access domber for die cooiuy joo're calling from? lr*, 


r-«. - i',‘. irHjrwl -| ii/.,; fev" if. Piftr) t) ! ^ Qu^*! A On lVh'.C'i ■SI'^/IST 


r. t* liutttJ ur t"** ‘fcp'adi'W njv«i ywif h»rtR n.itmd, rtr* 

I ^ir. in 1a 1 duitx "« uni ire ail- 

UdittiiulduiVA^Vf'. "UUdrftMa. *L>ul "tU" ln-r. iilllUc 


AT&T 


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