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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




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The World’s Daily Newspaper 

Li Peng Warns 
Rich Countries 
Over Bullying 

He Demands Assurances 
it. Against Speculation 
A la Developing Nations 

By Alan Friedman 

Irutmatwmil Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — China warned at a meeting of the 
world's financial leaders Tuesday that rich countries 
should not bully developing countries in economic or 
trade matters. 

Championing developing countries. Prime Minister 
Li Peng said that their rise “has smashed the mono- 
poly of world affairs by a few countries and lent a 
powerful push behind the movement toward a mul- 
tipolar world.” 

In his speech opening the annual meetings of the 
World Bank and International Monetary Fund, Mr. Li 

■ The United States agreed to talks aimed at 
barring East Asian economic turmoil. Page 15. 

E! 

“ emphasized that the industrialized countries “must 
have markets for their goods, outlets for their capital 
and suppliers of the raw materials they need. To 
sustain their prosperity, he said “they must look to the 
developing countries for answers.” 

- Mr. Li demanded that the world’s governments and 
its financial institutions work to ensure that the free 
flow of capital across national boundaries did not 
make developing countries “easy targets of inter- 
national financial speculation.” 

He spoke during a series of meetings that focused on 
East Asia’s financial crisis. The talks were characterized 
by top financial officials here as being die most unusual 
World Bank-IMF discussions in recent history. 

Among the issues that came together were conflicting 
views over trade liberalization, the consequences of 
cross-border capital flows, the risks and benefits of 
unified financial markets and China's emergence as an 
economic power that is increasingly asserting itself 

See CHINA, Page 8 


Paris, Wednesday, September 24, 1997 





Women grieving Tuesday in a suburb of Algiers after gunmen murdered up to 200 chiUans. 
The attack, the second deadliest in five years, was thought to be tbe work of Muslim radicals. 

200 Victims in Latest Algeria Raid 

But Government Acknowledges Only * Residual Terrorism. 9 


By Charles Trueheait 

Post Service 

PARIS — As many as 200 Algerian civilians died 
early Tuesday in a suburb of Algiers at the hands of 
attackers presumed to be Muslim militants ded- 
icated to [he overthrow of the government. 

According to Ihe reported accounts of survivors, 
the massacre in the village of Baraki, a few ki- 
lometers east of the capital, bore all the trademarks 
of the near-nightly butchery of men, women and 
children that has plagued Algeria for tbe past several 


weeks: Armed groups of several dozen men enter 
villages, slit throats, disembowel pregnant women, 
behead children, shoot the survivors and bum their 
bodies, plunder and incinerate dwellings, and carry 
off young women. Police and security forces are 
seldom seen. 

The government, usually slow to acknowledge 
massacres and conservative in its casualty estimates, 
put the death toll in Baraki at 85. Sources at hospitals 
in the area said the number of dead was closer to 200. 

See ALGERIA, Page 5 


New Virtues for Greece About to Be Put to Test 


By John Vinocur 

. International Herald Tribune • 

ATHENS — Up above, on its hill, the Parthenon, 
eternal proportion and reason, lit up at dusk like a 
furniture showroom. Down below, at 9 P.M. on a 
Tuesday night, a traffic mess, a stalled, fetid post-dusk 
mix of soots and car exhausts and construction dust, a 
teachers union demo, barricaded streets, cops peering 
indifferently at such minor chaos, and a taxi driver 
turning toward the man hunched on his back seat. 

“You must get out here.” the cabbie says, deciding 
he will battle this piece of daily reality no further. * ‘But 
where ami?" the passenger replies. “You must ask." 
the driver answers, his arm sweeping wide to designate 
the dark world beyond. 

Greece and Athens have changed, goes the refrain 
these days. Fair-and- square winners of the compe- 


tition to stage the Olympic Games in 2004, candidates 
for the euro with a couple of years’ delay, the country 
and the capital's reputation for institutionalized in- 
trigue, unreasonableness, and futile excess has been 
replaced by a good scout's list of merit badges for 
lowered inflation, reduced deficits and all the other 
non-Byzantine insignia of straight-shooterism. The 
Greeks, a visitor is told again and again, are bringing 
order to their house. 

At the same time, no one is mistaking this place for 
Schleswig-Holstein. 

The government talks in self-congratulatory terms 
about its victories over inflation, but it spikes upward 
in August and will roll over the target figure for the 
year. A law provides that for every five public sector 
employees who retire, only one should be hired. But 
the Federation of Greek Industries insists that die total 
of state-paid workers is actually increasing. The coun- 


ay , 


No. 35,634 


Russia and the U.S. 
Point Finger at Iran 

Tehran Makes ‘ Vigorous Effort 9 
To Build Atom Arms, Gore Says 


ByDavidHoffman 

Washing, on Post Sarice Koptev, director of Ihe Russian Space 

MOSCOW— Vice President A1 Gore Agency. Mr. Gore, speaking cautioi^ly. 

said Tuesday that a Russian-American said after the meeting that ^ 

investigation had shown that Iran was and Koptev mvestigation was 
making a “vigorous effort” to obtain tremely thorough and ma .. . „ 
technology for building nuclear weapons fotroation hasj**“ 1 SK^eon the 
and ballistic missiles to cany them. Mr. Gore rc ^ us ^jP e . a j?°J]L« CO n- 

Tehran has denied that it is crying to findings when asked al :_ a 

build weapons of mass destruction. But ference with Mr. Chernomyrdin, say g 
the United States and Israel have in- the study * involves intelligen 
’ tensified a campaign to curtail what they mation in both countries ^and tor odvious 
contend is a flow of sensitive Russian reasons it cannot be made pubuc . . 
technology and expertise to Iran. “But I would say in i a gfWJ 1 "g- 

Russifwhich is helping Iran build a he added, “that one of the new lessons 
nuclear power plant St Bushehr. has of this report ts that « tsobvious th« 
denied that it is helping Iran with bal- there is a vigorous effort by nan to 
iistic missiles or nuclear weapons. But obtain the technologies that it neox 
U.S. and Israeli officials have said that build a ballistic missile and to build 
die Russian military-industrial complex nuclear weapons." 
and quasi-govemmental research insti- While Mr. Gore said the charge tna 
cutes — along with former scientists and Iran was seeking such technology is not 
mili tary specialists — might be con- new, “die kinds of details that we were 
tribunes to an Iranian missile program, able to share with one another 1 think 
Earlier this year. President Bill Clin- flesh it ont in a new way. ” It was n ot c lear 
ton appointed Frank Wisner, a former where the new information came from. ^ 
ambassador to India and Egypt, as his On Monday, Mr. Gore had u rg ed 
special envoy on the issue. Mr. Wisner reporters to ask Mr. Chernomyrdin 
has traversed tbe Middle East, and on about the results of - the investigation. 
Monday came to a remote government But the prime minister brushed away the 
resort outside Moscow to report on his question Tuesday, saying, “I won’t tell 
findings to Mr. Gore and Prime Minister 
. Viktor Chernomyrdin of Russia, who are See RUSSIA, Page 8 


try’s top anion official estimates that the country’s 
underground, off-tbe- books economic life represents 
about 4G percent of the nominal economy. But the 
minis ter of culture says this local particularity actually 
results in “more social cohesion’’ and Greeks living 
better than Britons. 

In the last week, air traffic controllers announced 
strikes, flight attendants at the bankrupt state-owned 
Olympic Airways said they would refuse to work 
overtime and demanded more staff, and the huge 
drilling-machine boring the tunnel for the Athens 
Metro hit subterranean problems, bringing Page One- 
type traffic chaos above ground. European Union 
statistics put 24 percent of Greek households below the 
poverty line, and the Greeks themselves, in a poll 
published in July, chose Nikos Konstantopoulos. head 

See GREECE, Page 5 






Dw*l BmriU/Tlk: A«*Ctal«l 

Mr. Gore greeting Mr. Yeltsin in Moscow on Tuesday. He said the U.S. 
and Russia shared concerns about the proliferation of nuclear weapons. 


^Surprisingly, Jospin Gives 
France a Mood of Hope 


AGENDA 


By Anne Swardson 

tkajjicgii M Pot! Sen ice 

PARIS — Four months after he un- 
expectedly came to power as French 
prune minister, Lionel Jospin is widely 
seen as a pragmatic, nonideological 
leader w ho is keeping most of his leftist 
campaign promises "but also nudging 
France toward modernization. 

The Socialist victory in June was 
A viewed by much of the outside world as 

sign that France remained unready to 

France changes its policy on Airbus 
manufacturing assets. Page 15. 

enter the world of high technology and 
global competition since Mr. Jospin 
during the campaign talked mostly 
about" public-sector jobs and shorter 
working hours. 

But he has picked his way through the 
traditional minefields of French politics 
— militant unions, a public wedded to 
generous benefits, widespread resis- 
tance to any change — without breaking 
•he budget or losing public favor. He has 
even proposed Internet-friendly 
policies, a large change in one of 
Europe’s least-wired nations. 

^ When Mr. Jospin lays out his pro- 
iGposed budget Wednesday, it will be 
sufficient to put France in shouting dis- 
tance of the fiscal criteria for joining 
Europe’s planned single currency. Few 

f Newsstand Prices 

I ~ ‘ — 

I Andorra . .. 10.00 FF Lebanon 113,000 

) Anafles 12.50 FF Morocco 16 Dh 

j Cameroon. 1600CFA Qatar 1000 QR 

Egypt £E 5.50 Reunion ...1Z50 FF 

France 10.00 FF Saw* Arabia. 10 SR 

I Gabon 1.100CFA Senegal 1.100 cm 

! tuty Z800 Lira Spam 535 Ptas 

| ivory Coast .1.250 CFA Tunisia 1550 Dm 

f Jordan 1250 JO OAE 10.00 Dh 

I Kuwait 700 Fils U.S. ML (Eiff) ..S1.20 



who added up the potential cost of his 
campaign promises last spring would 
have thought that possible. 

Mr. Jospin, running at nearly 60 per- 
cent approval these days, has achieved 
‘his successes by following what he calls 
a path of “leftist realism." 

He has nipped and lucked at areas 
relatively removed from the central con- 
cerns of French voters, such as pri- 
vatization of state-owned enterprises, 
while adhering to his expensive cam- 
paign promises on such red-hot issues as 
job creation. 

His path, for the moment at least, has 
achieved a swift result: The French, 
mired in pessimism for years, are be- 
coming more optimistic, according to 
opinion polls. 

“People had very low expectations, 
and they are discovering they have got- 
ten more than they expected." said a 

See FRANCE, Page 8 


Pollution Worsens 
For Malaysians 

The smoke haze over the Malay- 
sian state of Sarawak in Borneo rose 
again Tuesday to record danger 
levels, and officials weighing an 
evacuation said there was nowhere to 
send people. Thousands of fire fight- 
ers from Malaysia were reportedly 
leaving for Indonesia to help put out 
the fires that are causing pollution 
through Southeast Asia. Page 4. 

Clinton Demands 
Campaign Reform 

WASHINGTON tAP) — Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton threatened Tuesday 
to call Congress into a special session 
to address campaign finance reform if 
Republican leaders did not allow 
ample time to debate (he matter in the 
regular session. He said he expected 
afleasl a “recorded vote" on a pro- 
posed reform measure. 


Tbe Dollar 


Tuesday C 4 PJIL 
1.7936 


preWxadoae 

1.7905 

1.604 

121.825 

6418 


Tuesday 4 P.M. 
951.93 


pwwousdoM 

955.43 


PAGE TWO 

Manipulating the Aid Agencies 

ASIA/PACIFIC Pag* 4. 

Pi etc Lease of Life in Japan 

Books Page IL 

Crossword. — Page 12. 

Opinion Pages 10-11. 

Sports Pages 22-23. 


The Intermarhet 


Pages 4 and 9. 


The IHT on-line www.iht.com 


Albright Heralds New Era 
For U.S.- Japan Alliance 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Server 

TOKYO — The United States and 
Japan expanded their security alliance 
Tuesday to give Japan's military its 
highest profile in Asia since World War 
n, despite deep reservations from China 
and other Asian nations that suffered 
Japanese military aggression earlier this 
century. 

The new defense guidelines, an- 
nounced Tuesday in New. York by Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright, De- 
fense Secretary William Cohen and 
their Japanese counterparts, are inten- 
ded to upgrade the long-standing U.S.- 
Japan security alliance for a post-Cold 
War world. The review of the defense 
guidelines was ordered by President Bill 
Clinton and Prime Minister Ryu taro Ha- 
shimoto when Mr. Clinton visited 
Tokyo 19 months ago. 

“We have rewritten our partnership 


to meet the challenges of this new era," 
Mrs. Albright said at a news conference 
in New York. 

Under the new agreement, Japan 
would, for the first time since the war, 
engage in military activities outside its 
borders in military conflicts involving 
the United States. Japan would provide 
minesweepers and conduct search and 
rescue missions in international waters, 
use its military ships to conduct in- 
spections of ships at sea to enforce UN- 
sanctioned embargoes, and assist with 
communications and surveillance in in- 
ternational waters and airspace. It 
would allow its civilian airports, ports 
and hospitals to be used by U.S. troops 
and it would accept refugees from war 
zones and receive noncombarants evac- 
uated from areas of conflict. 

However, as required by Japan's con- 
stitution. which bans Japan's military 

See ALLIES, Page 8 



Is the Mir Safe? Next Astronaut Doesn't Flinch 


By Kathy Sawyer S™ 1 tf ! ey P 3 *** for » “d kt them live it with us.” Two of Ihe worst nonfatal cahmifi« ■ 

concern focused as much on the flight history - a fl^SdZSSSTL'l!!!^ 

recently edgy public response as about any dis- puncture —have f " - caused a 

HOUSTON — Dave Wolf seems to have it all: comforts or dangers aboard Mir. “If I tell you how flood of concern that hie nut th* M J l . r ; L f lggerm g a 
:’s a medical doctor with his own airplane, an 1 really fed, rather than jusi give you raw data, if I the U.S. and Russian snare 106 Credlbl ,ry °f b° r h 
•ctrical engineer honored for his inventions, a describe something as uncomfonable. I don’t want Managers at the NHtiiCn i P 10 ® 1301 ® on line, 
nfident, extroverted 41 -year-old bachelor. to be labeled as a complainer.” he said. “I'm Administration have- eiw!Kic:f r S n i! ulics and S P aCe 
Yet he has volunteered to leave all this and, for a trapped a little, here.” he added. "I've seen what alarming moments their Et des P‘ Ie some 

ril servant's pay, spend the next Five months on the media has done to other astronauts.” Mir remains safe enou h r U rev ' ews indicate 

tar one member of Congress has suggested is a The joint U.5.-Russian flights aboard Mir. punc- the inherently rklcv w»Ii sta ndnrds for 

uicide mission" aboard a temperamental for- tuated this year by at least two serious emergencies learning valuable lean ^ ,he y ore 



'Ml Kullr-'llr |V^> 


Vladimir Titov or the Russian Space Agency, 
left, with David Wolf, Mir’s next passenger. 


electrical engineer honored for his inventions, a 
confident, extroverted 41 -year-old bachelor. 

Yet he has volunteered to leave ail this and, for a 
civil servant's pay, spend the next Five months on 
whar one member of Congress has suggested is a 
“suicide mission" aboard a temperamental for- 
eign vessel that has become fodder for interna- 
tional headlines and late-night stand-up jokes. 

Mr. Wolf is to lift off for the Russian space station 
Mir iate Thursday aboard the shurtle Atlantis, along 
with an international crew of six others, to become 
the sixth American to live aboard Mir. 

Is he nuts? 

“I don't expect a pleasure cruise out of this.” 
Mr. Wolf said in an interview last week. ”1 intend to 
describe conditions aboard Mir as they really are. It 
warms me that the public is concerned, and we need 
to keep them involved in every step of rhe pro- 


I really feel, rather than just give you raw data, if I the U.S. and Russian space Droo^m ?v,° f , [x * h 

describe something as uncomfonable. I don’t want Managers at the Nation-,! on ,he lme - 

to be labeled as a complainer.” he said. “I'm AdmiK^EvVSi^T 1108 ^ Space 
trapped a little, here.” he added. *Tve seen what alarming moments their s * ome 

the media has done to other astronauts." i Rvie *i indicate 

The joint U.S.-Russian flights aboard Mir. punc- 2e Partis for 
tuated this year by at least two serious emergencies *ey 

and a string of tiresome problems, have b^ome a thatshouS i^ucert^riS 01 ” ? C Mir ex P e nenc e 
kind of Rorschach inkblot test in the sky. revealing space Sj2S ° F bilious future 
widely differing attitudes toward human space flight Someanrae thnt^I — nd ?f 

and the intimidating risk-benefit calculations it en- acranplislted ihefr^Sk ' ^already 
EF""" to extend its reach. flown bboard fif fit 5? Annuls have 

Mr. Wolf is eager to go. the White House is U.S. shuttles have ^„5S CU i T,ula * ed 22 months 
nervous, key members of Congress and others are scientists have SeJfS? **5 si * ‘imes ^ 
pressuring the soace agency to stop American space for lon° ^ U P °n how to use 

visits to Mir. and even some astronauts have ex- shut personnel S? Whi,e U S - and to 

pre^reservationsaboutthevalueofgoingahead ally Kprovri ?K^ d ^ n , ,he ground haw eradu' 
wi,h dtt remammg two scheduled America rips * F * ,he,r CTUCIa * wort™, 2"' 

to the facility, which was launched Feb 20 19&5 m ps. 

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BVTERNATIOIVAX HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 

PAGE TWO 






Puppets of War / Plundering the Aid Givers 

Agencies Caught Between Battling Factions 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Past Service 

G OMA, Congo — Rebel 
forces loyal to Laurent 
Kabila were plotting 
their attack on tbe 
southern Zairian city of Lubum- ■ 
bashi earlier this year when a 
glitch surfaced in their battlepbn: 
Mr. Kabila’s array needed fuel to 
airlift troops to the town, recalled 
a Rwandan officer who partic- 
ipated in the operation. 

They found it at a depot main- 
tained by the UN High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees, in Goma, a 
town that had already fallen to Mr. 
Kabila’s men. More than 15,000 
gallons of fuel were seized to ferry 
300 crack troops southward. Lub- 
um bashi was in rebel hands within 


The fuel theft was just one of a \ 

series of episodes that illustrate 
the unintentional, and central, role 
the UN refugee agency and other 
aid agencies have been playing in 
regional crises in the aftermath of 
the Cold War. _ 1 

Warlords, rebel leaders and im- 
ploding governments from Bos- 
nia-Herzegovina to Brazzaville 
now manipulate aid agencies as 
never before — using their food to 
feed troops, their fuel to power — — — 
airplanes and their logistical in- The UN rej 
frasrructure to conquer or occupy d j j 

vast territories. » /! • j 

Nowhere was this manipulation the United 

more visible than in the seven- 

month rebellion that toppled the 
longtime dictator of Zaire, Mobutu Sese Seko, and 
installed Mr. Kabila as the president of the country 
he renamed the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Marshal Mobutu’s army hijacked UN -chartered 
planes to transport guns for its futile fight against 
the rebels. Under the gaze of international aid 
workers, the planes flew into UN-run refugee 
camps where tne weapons were distributed to Hutu 
refugees from Rwanda — former soldiers involved 
in that nation's 1994 ethnic massacres — who had 
become Marshall Mobutu's first line of defense. 

At the same time, the anti-Mobutu rebel army 
flew on stolen aid fuel, rolled along in stolen aid 
trucks and grew strong on stolen aid food. 

In Congo and several other post-Cold War re- 
gional crises, humanitarian action has become a 
substitute for Western military and diplomatic in- 
tervention. Yet, the aid agencies lack the tools or the 
clout to handle tbe explosive situations they find 
themselves confronting. As such, the aid they bring 



Sst^iI tatm/TV Amcblnl fra* 


The UN refugee agency ; after trying to help thousands of Hutu from 
Rwanda, decided it would suspend its mission in Congo, stressing 
the United Nations’ frustration with its aid missions. 


equally — have been shaken in 
recent years, most notably by the 
killing of six Red Cross workers 
in Chechnya in December last 
year. Indeed, most aid agencies 
in Bosnia are working openly for 
unification of the country, in op- 
position to the separatist Serbs: 

Aid agencies nave been sub- 
ject to manipulation and intim- 
idation in the past But die logic 
of the Cold War often drew 
American or Soviet advisers to 
direct and control those conflicts. 
Today, the United Nations and 
other aid agencies more com- 
monly operate in a political, mil- 
itary and diplomatic vacuum. 

“The Zaire crisis signals that 
our tools are inadequate to deal 
with these types of crises, and 
these types of crises will be more 
likely in the future,’ ' said Lionel 
Rosenblatt, head of Refugees In- 
ternational, a humanitarian ad- 
vocacy group in Washington. “I 
unfortunately don’t see much 
hope for improvement-” 

He added: “Whole regions 
will go up in smoke with the 
international co mmunit y unable 
and unwilling to make any type 
of decisive action.” 

Mr. Rosenblatt said he be- 
lieved that given tbe unwilling- 
ness of Western powers to get 
involved in conflicts that do not 
directly affect their interests, 

4 ‘the only pieces that will be free 
to move on the chessboard will 


Q & A / Mary Robinson 

New Human Rights Chief 
Pledges ‘Bridge-Building’ 


Mary Robinson, 53, the former pres- 
ident of Ireland assumed her new po- 
sition as UN High Commissioner for 
Human Rights last week. Robert Kroon 
interviewed her in Geneva for the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


Q. Comparing your new function 
with your previous work, didn’t you opt 
for a mission impossible? 

A- Yes, it’s daunting and very dif- 
ferent from my previous position as the 
nonexecutive president of Ireland, 
where I was not involved in hands-on 
policy-making- But seven years of ob- 
serving, listening and doing tilings in a 
lateral way will help in my new job . 


Q. There’s a huge North-South gap in 
the perception of human rights, which 
many Third World governments see as a 
right to development rather than rights 
for die individual. Are those positions 
irreconcilable? 

A. As the UN’s High Commissioner 
for Human Rights, I want to see that gap 
closed- Collective and individual rights 
are not mutually exclusive. The scope of 
h uman rights is interlinked with social, 
cultural and economic issues and ihar 



fteidt 

Mary Robinson wants to seethe 
North-South gap on rights closed. 


requires a broad approach. 

StiH, my mandate is based on the 
Vi enna World Conference on Human 
Rights of 1994, which reaffirmed the 
universality and indivisibility of the orig- 
inal UN B irman Rights Declaration. 

And as an independent and credible 
defender of human rights, I also want to 
be the moral voice for tbe victims of 
violence, torture, abuse and exclusion. 
Human righ ts should be mainstreamed 
throughout the United Nations’ system, 
and Sis is also part of the secretaiy- 
generaTs reform package. 


often becomes a resource in a conflict, helping to 
fan its flames rather than damp them down. 


be the aid agency pieces.' 

“That means they will be at 
the front line of political, security and humanitarian 

crises for years to come,” he said. "They will be the 

substitute for political force. ’’ 

An indication of the extent to which the UN 
refogee agency and other aid groups have begun to 
usurp the traditional role of governments is in their 
budgets. In 1971, the total expenditure by disaster 
relief agencies totaled S200 million: by 1 994, it had 
ballooned to SS billion, with SI. 4 billion spent for 
Rwanda and what was then eastern Zaire alone. 

Another, grimmer sign of how the role of aid 
agencies has changed is the death toll of workers. 

During the Cold War, relief workers operated on 
the sidelines of conflicts, protected by an invisible 
shield of neutrality. Now, while no Arm statistics 
are available, it seems clear that several hundred of 
them are being killed each year. 

Combatants have come to view aid workers as 
participants in their wars, and their food, fuel and 
transport are seen as weapons. 


T HE Western reaction of deploying food and 
money — but not troops or diplomatic pres- 
sure — has become an important component 
hi the tactics of these local warriors, military 
scholars argue. It has also given aid workers cause to 
question two once sacred tenets of their trade: Every 
disaster deserves a humanitarian response and aid 
agencies must remain strictly neutral. 

On Sept 9, Sadako Ogata, UN high commis- 
sioner for refugees, announced that her agency was 
suspending its operations in Congo — a decision 
that highlighted the United Nations’ frustration 
with its aid missions. 

"We are being forced to pick sides in crises 
now,” said a senior official at the International 
Committee for the Red Cross, whose founding 
principles — that all sides of a conflict be treated 


Q. At the annual sessions of the Hu- 
man Rights Commission, China, In- 
donesia and other developing nations 
cite some individual rights as Western 
political or neocolonialist meddling. Do 
you agree, as some suggest, that the 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights 
needs to be rewritten? 

A. Absolutely not. Bat I welcome that 
debate as healthy and challenging. We 
most make it an article of faith that is 
understood. I have been in office for 
only a few days, but I have already met 
with all tbe regional groups and that gap 
in human rights perceptions came up 


immediately. There’s a great lack of. 
trust there. But don’r forget that ru fe 
West we take certain things for panted; 
like the social and economic develop/ 
meat Third World nations are dqxjved 
of. 1*. 

My priority is a bottom-up approach, 
and I intend to give leadership -here.! 'A 
want to be a hridge-buiider, bat hemg * 
Irish I have no desire to create an em- 
pire. 

Q. Yoor predecessor, Jose Ayah 
Lasso of Ecuador, favored quiet diplo- 
macy. Will you be moreoutep 6kea?\ 

A. I will certainly have ray ovrasfyk- 
Mr. Lasso took many good initiatives, 
but the structure of his office was not - 


good — not vety well drought through. 
The newly unified structure of the office 


of the Hijj^ Commissioner gives me a 
much better basis for promoting^ ami 
defending human rights. However, con- 
sidering all the high expectations, fransr 
say this office is underfunded 1 .. 

More governments should! give more 
voluntary contributions* and that will be 
one of my main concerns when I talk 
with government leaders at tbe General 
Assembly in New York this week. I will 
also make this point when ! see Sec- 
retary [of State Madeleine] Albtight and 
Ambassador (Bill] Richaidsoa-;. 


Correction 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Cairo Chides Media on Killings 


Due to an editing error, an 
article Tuesday on the Polish 
election incorrectly framed a 
comment by Poland’s Soli- 
darity leader. He chastised 
the Freedom Union months 
ago, not on Monday, for sup- 
porting a new constitution 
that did not ban abortion. 


2 New Runways Flights Limited 
Planned at Paris At Phnom Penh 


the collision last week of a 


passenger express and freight 
train that killed six people in 


west London. 


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PARIS (Reuters) — 
France announced Tuesday it 
would double the number of 
runways at the Charles De 
Gaulle International Airport 
outside Paris to four rather 
than build a third airport to 
serve the French capital. 

Transport Minister Jean- 
Claude Gayssot, announcing 
the decision at a news con- 
ference, acknowledged that 
people living in the Roissy 
area where the airport is lo- 
cated would be angered by tbe 
move, but he pledged to step 
up a battle against noise. 

The final decision was to 
be left to the Socialist gov- 
ernment 


PHNOM PENH (Reuters) 
— Cambodian aviation offi- 
cials warned airlines Tuesday 
not to land at the Phnom Penh 
airport in bad weather be- 
cause important equipment 
and lights were not working 
“We want the planes not to 
land during serious weatheT 
because we have lost our 
VOR, or very high-frequency 
omni direct-range beacon,” 
said Sok Sambaur, an official 
of the Civil Aviation Author- 
ity. 


six people in 
(AP) 


Maersk Air, a Danish air- 
line, has entered a code-shar- 
ing agreement with Air 
France. The accord will give 
passengers on Maersk’s two 
daily flights from Biliund in 
Jutland to Paris access to 189 
cities in France and the rest of 
the world. (Bloomberg) 


The main western rail 
line into London reopened 
Tuesday after workers 
cleared away wreckage from 


A hurricane, designated 
Nora, one of the most 
powerful of the season, could 
hit Mexico’s Baja California 
peninsula, the authorities 
said. Warnings were also pos- 
ted to residents in the neigh- 
boring states of Sinaloa and 
Sonora. (Reuters) 


The Associated Press 

CAIRO — The Egyptian Ministry of 
Tourism has accused international news 
organizations of wrongly linking the 
killing of German tourists last week to 
Islamic extremists, insisting that the at- 
tack was an isolated crime. 

Tbe accusation came in a statement 
from the minister of tourism. Mamdouh 
Beltagi. It was his third attack on the 
news'media since the attackers shot up 
. and hurled gasoline bombs at a tourist 
bus, killing nine Germans and their 
Egyptian driver, and wounding 24 
people. 

The attack on the bus drew inter- 
national attention because it occurred 
outside the Egyptian Museum, a major 
mid-Cairo tourist site, while the area 
was crowded with visitors. The assault 
raised fears of harm to Egypt’s crucial 
tourist business. 

In his statement, the tourism minister 
accused journalists of rushing to judg- 
ment in citing a terrorism link. 


Wlille an investigation into the crime 
is under way, he said, “Can anyone 
invest himself wife the right to mete out 
judgments and assessments?" 

“The answer,” he said, “is a definite 
no!” 

Some Egyptian newspapers have 
questioned the government’s assertions 
that the attack was an isolated incident, 
unconnected to a campaign of violence 
by Islamic radicals in Egypt over the last 
five years. 

Mr. Beltagi declared that the facts 
were: the only perpetrators of the crime 
were two brothers who were seized at 
the scene; they did not belong to any 
organized terrorist group, and one of the 
brothers had been judged mentally, ill 
and was committed to a psychiatric hos- 
pital. 

initiall y, die Egyptian police said die ' 
attack had been carried oat by “ ter- 
rorists, ’ ’ a word generally used in Egypt 
to describe Muslim militants fighting to 
overthrow the secular government 


Q. It appears that your office is ^ex- 
cluded from the secretary.-generaTs task ; 
force for die former Zaire. The new 
regime in Congo still refuses to allow, j 
UN inspectors in. What does char say i 
about .human rights promotion in that | 
part of tho world? v - * 

AJEt was underetood.and agreed both 
here and at New York headquarters that 
the High Commissioner tor Human 
Rights should not be part of what is 
essentially a political situation, despite 
the obvious human rights dimension. ; ; 

The Congo problem is the printe re- 
sponsibihiy of the Security Council' at 

somethings to say about this subject at 
the General Assembly in New York. ■ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGE 3' 



- zXT' 


THE AMERICAS 



Senator Wants Wide Clinton Probe 

Republican Calls for Independent Inquiry Into Fund-Raising 


4GE3 


iii \oi m 


i*) 


SliLM>W 


By Jill Abramson 

. ■‘ v ‘» Yerk Times Servh e 


* 


; -.WASHINGTON — Although Pres- 
. idem Bill Clinton says he is confident 
neifoer he nor his campaign broke “the 
, the law" in fund-raising, the 

■ chairman of the Senate committee in- 
swtigaiing the question says everything 
; he has found points toward the need for 
ah independent counsel. 

•- ,^f aator Fred Thompson. Republican 
of- Tennessee, who is chairman of the 
Senate Governmental Affairs Commit- 
*. ^ sa ^ d H 1 30 interview that his panel's 
investigation ultimately would demon 
■' sn ?ff “ le need for an independent coun 
■■ ,^ use “people with access to the 
■■ “ ous ® ' had engaged in the "rais- 
; ing of illegal funds. * * 

Mr. Thompson also said that the pur- 
view of an independent counsel inves- 
v tigation would almost certainlv be wider 
! than the narrow legal issue of whether 


counsel. The president vowed to cooper- 
ate fully with the Justice Department. 

"I wont to cooperate however 1 rrm 


cooperate however 1 cun to 
establish the facts." Mr. Clinton said 
Monday, "but I think it’s important that 
you and the American people under- 
stand that I believed then and I believe 
now that what we did was legal." 

Senate Republicans have intensified 
die pressure on Ms. Reno to appoint an 
independent counsel, particularly since it 
was disclosed that some of the money 
raised in telephone calls made by Mr. 
Gore ended up in the Democratic Party’s 
, • . — i so-called hard-money account for direct 

then2d U fo^‘^^ U i d demon ' sP^d^g on campaigns. The attorney 
the need for an independent coun- general has maintained that money 

raised for party-building activities, 
known as soft money, falls outside the 
reach of federal election laws. But hard- 
money solicitations would fall within the 
scope- of federal campaign finance laws. 

Mr. Clinton has said he cannot re- 
member making telephone calls to ask 


particularly in the area of soft money, by 
both parties as well as on legislative 
remedies to overhaul the election laws. 

Mr. Thompson said the shift would 
help efforts in the Senate to pass a bi- 
partisan campaign- finance overhaul bill 
introduced by Senators John McCain, 
Republican of Arizona, and Russell 
Feingold. Democrat of Wisconsin. Mr. 
Thompson, one of the only Republicans 
who has endorsed the McCain- Feingold 
bill, also said he thought there was a 
good chance the Senate would pass some 
form of campaign-finance overhaul. 

Mr. Thompson downplayed the im- 
portance of the shift, emphasizing that 
he always intended to explore broader 
campaign-finance areas and was simply 
accelerating his timetable. He denied 
that the change in agenda was influenced 
by public apathy. 

On a subject that has attracted con- 
siderable speculation in Washington, 
Mr. Thompson said it was likely that 


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: violated a federal law barring solicT w^a wte d W cWef of would to 

dial some of the donations would land in 
.dependent counsel Is appointed ” Mr. a hard money account. 


Thompson said, “it will be broader than 
me calls. Ii should be." 

Reno has ordered a preliminary 


inquiry to determine if any fund-raising 
calls made by the president and v ice pres- 
ident had violated a federal law barring 
fund-raising on federal property. The 3CL 
day review could be the first step leading 
to the appointment of an independent 


Mr. Thompson has called the White 
House's fund-raising efforts in 1996 
“unprecedented." but he, too. has bam 
on the defensive of late. His panel ’s hear- 
ings have failed to capture the public’s 
attention, and last week he and his Senate 
colleagues decided to change course. 

During the next few weeks, the Senate 
panel will focus on fund-raising abuses. 


testify- before the panel. 

"The theater of it may make him 
irresistible," Mr. Thompson said of Mr. 
Ickes, a feisty New Yorker. In private 
questioning. Mr. Ickes has been com- 
bative with Senate Republicans and has 
cited Republican fund-raising excesses 
when questioned about the zeal of the 
Democrats and the Clinton White 
House. Mr. Ickes was questioned in 
closed session by lawyers for the panel 
on Monday. 






■* ? >, 

X 



PAGE 5 







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J*V KUfi]uriie.Thr AiUia^J Pmi 

Harold Ickes, the former White House deputy chief of 
staff, leaving the Capitol after giving a deposition. 


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Tobacco Windfall? 

Cigarette Profits Would Soar 
Under U.S. Deal, Agency Reports 


POLITICAL NOTES 


By John M. Broder 

Nn,- York Time s Sen-arc 


% 


WASHINGTON — Tobacco industry profits would soar 
under the terms of a legal settlement proposed in June by 40 
stale attorneys general and cigarette makers, according to an 
analysis of the agreement by the Federal Trade Commission. 

The study found that the tobacco companies would have 
reaped as much as SI 23 billion in additional profits in the next 
25 years if the settlement plan had been adopted as drafted. 

The analysis, conducted in response to a request from 
Congress, also concluded that the $368.5 billion face value of 
tbe settlement was significantly overstated. 

The real cost to industry would have been about $207 
billion because tbe companies' payments were to fall as 
•- cigarette consumption -dropped, the commission staff report 
found. The cost to industry of the June agreement would have 
been about $100 billion in today's dollars, the study found. 

The settlement proposal is unlikely to be enacted by Con- 
gress without substantial changes, if at all. But the Federal 
■ Trade Commission 's findings are startling because the agree- . 
meat had been depicted as extremely costly to the cigarette 

* industry. 

- Instead, the agency found, the industry would thrive 13- 

• nancially while enjoying immunity from roost litigation. 

Scott Williams, a spokesman for tbe tobacco makers, said 
that the report was “highly speculative and misses tbe point ’ ' 
Mr; Williams, of the public relations firm Bozell Swayer 
Miller Group, said that the purpose of the proposal for a 
settlement was to reduce smoking by minors. 


Pork Barrel Goes Dot Com 

WASHINGTON — For years. Senator John McCain, 
Republican of Arizona, has annoyed his colleagues with 
speeches against the practice of pork- barrel ing — spending 
taxpayers' money on hometown projects that give law- 
makers something to brag about when the nexteleerion rolls 
around. 

This year is especially embarrassing, because Senator 
McCain for the first time has put his laboriously gathered 
pork research on the Internet (www.senaie.gov/inccain), 
where anyone can “scroll down and click on the pig" to 
access about 100 pages of items pointing at lawmakers all 
over the nation. 

Taxpayers, as “ Porky" discloses, will note that Senate 
appropriators have allocated “at least $180,000“ so the 
National Center for Physical Acoustics can continue its 
program to develop “automated methods of monitoring 


pejttpopulations." 


(ational Asian Pacific Center on Aging will get 
$260,000 to “link the Asian Pacific aging community with , / br- 
other semces and organizations." (WP) yuote/ Unquote 


pursue taxpayers "who can’t afford to fight back" to meet 
collection quotas. 

The IRS called the attacks misleading or unfounded. 

"We are holding these hearings because one thing is 
certain: We can't fix the IRS without knowing what ails the 
IRS." said the Finance Committee chairman. Senator Wil- 
liam Roth Jr., Republican of Delaware. 

He said he sought “constructive criticism — criticism 
with the intent to improve not destroy." 

“This is not IRS bashing," he said. “It is oversight" 

Senators, authors and tax-related trade groups were 
among the first witnesses called to describe the agency's 
troubles. 

But the hearings are generating quite a buzz over ex- 
pected whistleblower testimony later in the week from 
current and former agents, some of whom will have their 
identities concealed. They are expected to say that the 
agency unfairly singles out small taxpayers least likely to 
defend themselves for collections, an accusation that the 
IRS says is against its procedures. (AP) 



• /. ■ v v- • . ; : v - 

l - •A . ■• ■ • ri 

i ' ? -7* , , t- 


Senate Opens Audit of the IRS 

. WASHINGTON — Opening a three-day review of the 
Internal Revenue Service, a Senate committee chairman 
said Tuesday that tax collectors use false identification and 


Stephen Moore, an analyst at tbe Cato Institute, the 
libertarian think tank not known as an IRS defender, on the 
Senate hearings: ' T really believe tbe villain here is not the 
IRS. Tbe villain here is Congress, because the IRS has a 
hopeless task to administer and enforce a tax code that is 
ultimately unenforceable." (AP) 


Brazil Sifting a $4 Million Mystery 


Tie tobacco Fortune, Which May Be Nazi Loot, Kindles Interest in a Taboo Past 


quickly than its 

number of companies in the cigarette market and the millions 
of customers addicted to its products. 

But the FTC study may already be largely obsolete.because 
President Bill Clinton has rejected many parts of the June 
proposal, including tbe provision allowing the companies to 
pass along to smokers ail settlement costs. 

Under the president's proposal, cigarette prices would rise 
by as much as $1.50 a pack, but a large portion of the increase 
would be taken in penalties if smelting by teenagers did not 
drop sharply. The study also assumed that the cigarette 
companies would receive a $50 billion tax break approved as 
part of the balanced-budget accord in July. 

But both houses of Congress voted overwhelmingly in tbe 
last two weeks to rescind that tax break. 


Navy Bends Policy 
On DNA Samples 





f 


% 


By Bradley Graham 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. Navy has reinstated a 
sailor who was demoted and 
subjected to discharge pro- 
ceedings after he objected on 
religious grounds to provid- 
ing a. sample of his DNA for a 
military oatabank- 

The reversal is being hailed 
by critics of the Pentagon’s 
DNA program as the first 
time a member of the aimed 
forces has 7 been formally 
ited an- exemption from 
obligation to surrender a 
genetic sample. 

But tbe sailor, First Class 
Petty Officer Donald Power, 
says his one-and-a-half-year 
effort to avoid the DNA re- 
quirement turned into a per- 
sonal ni ghtmar e for which the 
navy has only partly sought to 
compensate him. As a result 
of his earlier loss of rank and 
pay, /Mr. Power says, he 
ended up losing his house and 
his credit rating and endured 
irreparable damage to ins 
prospects for advancement in 
the small community of naval 
technicians trained to work 
on nuclear reactors. 

The Defense Department 
i amassing a giant DNA 
on military and ci- 
personnel nve years 
ago solely, officials say. to 
assist hi identifying the re- 
mains of personnel killed in 


ty. 

Civil libertarians have ob- 


jected to the program, citing 
potential abuse of DNA in- 
formation and questioning 
the adequacy of privacy safe- 
guards. The concern is that 
the military databank could 
be used in criminal investi- 
gations, medical research, 
employment and health insur- 
ance actions or other pur- 
poses outside a donor’s con- 
trol. 

The Pentagon strengthened 
privacy protections last year, 
allowing donors to request 
the destruction of their DNA 
samples after leaving the De- 
fense Department. 

Last year, two Marines 
were discharged for disobey- 
ing orders to donate DNA 
samples. An air force ser- 
geant was demoted and his 
pay reduced for the same rea- 
son. 

And a female air force re- 
servist with 18 years’ service 
who refused to supply a 
sample was ousted from the 
reserve and fired from her ci- 
vilian adnunistrative job at a 
military base. 

Mr. Power, 32, belongs to a 
“medicine lodge,” a group 
that studies and celebrates 
American Indian beliefs not 
specific to any tribe. The 
lodge teaches that the body is 
foe only absolute physical 
possession and, as such, is 
sacred to the individual 

“My genetic makeup is a 
sacred expression of my di- 
vine purpose on this planet, 
Mr. Power stud. 


By Diana Jean Schemo 

Afir York Times Semcc 

SAO PAULO — Albert Blume died 
14 years ago, an outcast and a mystery to 
his relatives, buried in a poor man’s 
grave. As odd as his life was his legacy 
— a $4 million fortune in luxury 
watches, rings, .gold bars and gold teeth 
for which an aging aunt has been battling 
in court since his death. 

The case might have ended unnoticed 
this year, with a court-appointed ex- 
ecutor finally handing over the treasure 
to Mr. Blame's aunt, Margarida Blume. 
Instead, it has caught the attention of 
Brazil's first commission to investigate 
Nazi war criminals who fled here with 
looted Jewish property, as well as those 
who helped them flee. 

Rabbi Marvin Hier , head of foe Simon 
Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, said 
the Blume case “appears to be the first 
concrete discovery of a perpetrator’s ac- 
count, which is where we believe the 


how Odessa worked and why South 

Americans allowed it to work so well 

If the “final solution” was the in- 
dustrialized murder of European Jewry, 
the looting of tbe dead was no less sys- 
tematic. 

From August 1942 to late 1944, the 
Nazi SS organized scores of shipments 
— of currency , jewelry and gold teeth — 
from death camps to the Reicbsbank in 
Berlin, the journalist LadisLas Farago 
wrote in his 1974 book, “Aftermath: 
Martin Bormann and foe Fourth 
Reich.” 

With defeat imminent, senior German 
officials began hiding looted property in 
foreign accounts as part of a vast op- 
eration that the Allies code-named Safe 
Haven. Some of that money helped fi- 
nance Odessa, an underground railroad 
for Nazi officials who were fleeing Ger- 
many and expected arrest. 

Their escape routes crossed Spain, 
Portugal and Italy, with Argentina the 
most frequent destination. In Buenos 
Aires, President Juan Peron was openly 


lion's share of the Jewish wealth was 
hidden. " sympathetic and only too ready to accept 

Suddenly the bizarre details and con- rfazi gold, 
nadictions in Mr. Blame’s life are kind- 


ling interest among Brazilian* in a chapter 
of their past font once seemed remote, 
irrelevant or taboo — a South American 
counteroart to the scandal over Swiss 
T anks foal swallowed Jewish assets. 

Theories about Mr. Blume’s treasure 
abound, but for now are only theories. 

Some say that Mr. Blume, who lived 
out his life as a pawnbroker, fled to 
Brazil to escape Nazi persecution of 
homosexuals and that the gold was 
merely collateral for loans. 

But Rabbi Henry Sobel the chief 
rabbi of Brazil and the head of the 
Brazilian commission, and others con- 
tend that Mr. Blume never owned the 
fortuned More likely, they say, this Ger- 
man-born member of foe Nazi Party was 
sent to Brazil in 1938 as a spy and was 

later used as a conduit for stolen gold that 

now lies in a bank vault in his name. 

They believe that Mr. Blume was 
holding it for a similarly named war 
criminal in Argentina, whose Nuremberg 
death sentence was commoted in 1951. 

By raising these questions, the in- 
vestigating commission is challenging 
Brazilians to color in the pages of an era 
that has only been outlined until now — 
the history of Operation Odessa, a Ger- 
man plan devised in the final days of 
World WarU to smuggle senior Nazis to 
South America. 

The commission is reporting on stolen 
masterpieces, like a $1 million Madonna 
by Raphael that came here, "" 


Arriving in South America, the fu- 
gitives relied on Nazi networks built up 
throughout the continent before and dur- 
ing the war, said Stanley Hilton, author 
of “Hitler's Secret War in South Amer- 
ica," a 1977 book. 

Among the fugitives was Klaus Bar- 
‘ bie, the Gestapo chief nicknamed the 
Butcher of Lyon, who lived openly in 
Bolivia for years until he was finally 
extradited in 1983 for trial in France. 

In Brazil, Dr. Josef Mengele — the 
“Angel of Death" who selected victims 
for the gas chambers at Auschwitz and 
conducted medical experiments on hu- 
mans — picked up his scalpel again, ' 
performing illegal abortions without an- 
esthesia in the state of Parana. Although 
he used an alias, the Brazilian secret 
police knew of his past for 11 years 
before his death in 1979. the Brazilian 
press reported in the 1980s. 

In Chile, successive governments re- 
fused to extradite Walter Rauff, who was 
responsible for the mobile gas vans that 
killed 97,000 Jews in Eastern Europe. In 
Ri -nzil, courts turned down a West Ger- 
man request for Gustav Franz Wagner, 
second- in-command at the Sobibor 
death camp, in 1979. 

Only now are Brazilians bringing .to 
light official complicity in helping the 
Nazis, said Maria T ucci Cameiro, author 
of “Anti-Semitism in foe Vargas Era 
(1930-1945).” 

Despite foe interest overseas, which 
and on peaked with Adolf Eichmann's kidnap- 


while barring Jewish refugees, she said. 
“It was taboo." 

But with recent worldwide revela- 
tions of assets stolen from Jews, which 
led to foe establishment of the Brazilian 
commission, that is changing. 

“In 1989 and 1992,” said Otavio 
Costa, managing editor of Manchete, foe 
magazine that revived tbe questions that 
first surfaced in 1989 surrounding Mr. 
Blume ’s estate, ‘ 'there was nothing sim- 
ilar happening in the rest of foe world 
foal this was a part of." 

“Right now," he said, “it’s the op- 
posite." 

Marcelo Ponte, managing editor of 
Jomal do Brasil, a Rio daily newspaper, 
said that foe interest was more on foe 
level of soap opera. 

“Tbe Blume story has an element of 
mystery that fascinates people, that 
awakens their curiosity." he said. 

He pointed out that this is a country 
where crimes typically go unpunished 
because of connections or bribes and that 
there remains a tendency to view war 
criminals as just a variation on that 
theme. 

At foe same time, the Brazilian com- 
mission, with foe help of the World 
Jewish Congress, has identified 14 
dormant Nazi accounts worth $15 mil- 
lion and it has taken testimony from 
Brazil's Holocaust survivors about their 
losses. 


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after decades of public indiffer- dressed government policies that al- 
Se, isTtelated national assessment of lowed known Nazis to enter the country 


Away From 
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minated by apprehension," which 
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service," said a spokeswoman at 
Camp Pendleton, California. (AP) 

• American Airlines and seven 

other companies agreed to 
$110 million to settle lawsuits I 
bv relatives of 27 of foe 68 people 
killed when an American Eagle 
plane crashed into a field in Indiana 
in 1994. (AP) 

• A $64 JS million satellite — spin- 

ning slowly out of control since its 
launching last month — is expec- 
ted to foil out of orbit and bum up in 
the atmosphere this week, NASA 
officials said. (LAT) 


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PACE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Smoke and Pollution 
Worsen Over Malaysia 

Officials Weigh Evacuation of Sarawak 
As Danger Index Soars to Record Levels 


KUCHING, Malaysia — The smoke 
h*7i» over the Malaysian state of Sara- 
wak in Borneo rose again Tuesday to 
record danger levels, and officials 
weighing an evacuation said there was 
nowhere to send people. 

“Visibility is so bad that I cannot 
drive any more," said a motorcycle 
rider in die state capital, Kuching. “1 
cannot even see the lights ahead.” 

Brunei, Singapore, Malaysia, the 
southern Philippines and pars of the 
Indonesian archipelago have been en- 
veloped in smog caused by the burning 
of huge tracts of bush and forest in 
Sumatra and Kalimantan, the Indone- 
sian part of Borneo island. 

At least some of the fires have been 
set by plantation owners to clear land, 
officials in Malaysia said. Unusually 
dry weather resulting from the El Nino 
weather pattern has contributed to the 
problem, meteorologists said. 

The Be mama news agency said 2,000 
fire fighters from Malaysia, including 
medical and communications experts, 
were leaving for Indonesia in stages to 
help put out the fires that are causing 
pollution through Southeast Asia. 

Information Minister Mohammed 
Rahmar said the evacuation of 
Sarawak's 2 million people would be a 
final resort, although Prime Minister 
Mahathir bin Mohamad said he was 
uncertain where to send them. 

“To evacuate, we have to find a 
place, and that is not easily found,” Mr. 
Mahathir said, noting that the neigh- 
boring state of Sabah on Borneo was 
also affected. “But if we cannot, we will 
ask people to wear masks and things like 
that,” he added. “What we want to 
really do is to try and help put our rhe 
fires in Indonesia.” 

Residents of Sarawak rushed to 
stockpile water, rice and other staples, 
fearing an evacuation or curfew, and 
were told to remain calm. 

"Don 't panic, there are adequate sup- 
plies of everything," George Chan, 
deputy chief minister of Sarawak, said 
at a news conference. 

But in local newspapers Tuesday, the 
Kuching water board urged people to 
save water and warned that rationing 
might be imposed. 


The international airport in Kuching 
and other airports in the state remained 
closed, as did schools, businesses and 
factories. No curfew has been imposed, 
and people who wanted to work could 
do so. 

Newspapers reported Tuesday that 
more than 5,000 people in Sarawak 
alone had reported to hospitals with 
pollution-related illnesses. 

Thick smoke also hampered relief 
flights across the drought-stricken In- 
donesian half of New Guinea, a Chris- 
tian missionary group said Tuesday. 

“There are foes and smoke every- 
where we go,” said Wally Wiley of the 
Missionary Air Service, which delivers 
food, medicine and other supplies to 
more than 200 remote villages in the 
Irian Jaya Province. “Sometimes it's so 
thick we can't take off,” he said. 

Many communities face famine and 
disease. 

The Air Pollutant Index in Sarawak 
rose to 85 1 at 1 P.M. but improved to 
722 by 5 P.M. On Monday the index 
slipped to 366, a “hazardous" level, 
after a high Friday of 634. 

Sarawak declared a state of emer- 
gency Friday, ordering businesses, gov- 
ernment offices and schools shut and 
advising people to stay indoors. 

But the warning has been largely ig- 
nored by businessmen and workers who 
donned surgical masks against the 
smoke. Normally bustling Kuching has 
been quiet. Witnesses say visibility is 
only an arm's length. 

Health officials said ignoring the 
smoky haze could be hazardous. Ex- 
posure to an index level of even 200 to 
300 for a day would be like smoking 20 
cigarettes, they said. 

In the Philippines, haze was reported 
Tuesday across the southern island of 
Mindanao and as far north as Manila. 

“We received reports of haze from 
all our stations in Mindanao,” said 
Ricky Fabregas, meteorologist at the 
Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical 
and Astronomical Services Administra- 
tion. 

“We think it came from the Indone- 
sian fires.” Mr. Fabregas added, but 
meteorologists said it was unclear 
whether haze further north was linked to 
the fires. (Reuters. AP) 



Traffic crawling through the smoky haze along a road in western Sumatra on Tuesday. 


BRIEFLY 


Philippine Court Rejects 
Bid to Alter Constitution 

MANILA — The Supreme Court threw out a 
petition Tuesday seeking to allow a signature 
campaign to amend the constitution so President 
Fidel Ramos can run for re-elecdon. 

Voting 13 to 0, the court upheld a decision by 
the government’s Commission on Election to re- 
ject a petition by die People's Initiative for Re- 
form, Modernization and Action, for a plebiscite 
on lifting term limits on Philippine presidents. 

The court also voted, 8 to 5, that there was no 
need to review its two previous rulings that there 
is no law providing for a people’s initiative to 
directly amend the constitution. The constitution 
limits presidents to a single six-year term in an 
attempt to prevent dictatorships. The next pres- 
idential election is in May. (API 


Asian nation. Students, many n earing masks and 
dark glasses, defied laws banning protests in 
Ulaan Bataar’s central Sukhbaatar Square to 
parade a symbolic black coffin in front of Gov- 
ernment House. Mongolia's universities have 
raised student board and teaching fees in recent 
months, more than doubling education costs for 
many students. ( Reuters ) 

China Executes 9 Convicts 

MACAU — China executed Tuesday nine 
men for murder and armed robbery, a Chinese 
court official said. 

The criminals, aged 24 to 38, were executed in 
the city of Zhuhai. in southern China, adjacent to 
Portuguese-ruled Macau. t Reuters ) 

Marchers Denounce Li 


mm- r. . I n . HONG KONG — About 15 democracy cam- 

Mongolia otlluOntS tfOt€S t paigners marched to a building where Prime \fin- 
° ister Li Peng of China was giving a speech Tues- 

day and demanded he step down for his role in the 
1989 crackdown on demonstrators in Beijing. 

They denounced Mr. Li as “a criminal," 
accusing him of ordering the military to fire on 
the protesters at Tiananmen Square. * AP; 


ULAAN BATAAR, Mongolia — More than 
1,000 Mongolian students demonstrated Tues- 
day against soaring university fees, saying that 
increases rises in tuition and 'lodging could kill 
higher education in the cash-strapped North 


THE INTERMARKET 




GENERAL 


Legal Notices 


In tlw Circuit Coat ri the tlth Judi- 
cial Clituft in and fur Dad* County, 
Florida, General Jortodtctkm Division. 
Casa No. 97-4977 CA. Office of the At- 
torney General. Departme nt of legal 
Affairs, State of Raida, PiakrtOf. 

UNIQUE GEMS tHTL CORP., a Florida 
corporation, aWa UGl and ENRIQUE 
fflEA WhUwiy and as Prasidert 
of UNDUE GEMS BfTL COUP, 
Defendants. 

Notice of Gar Date. Lad day to fifcg 
al proofs at dams and prorata to 
defenrine vafid dams. 

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on June 
25. 1997, Oh Cout esued an Older 
Approvmg Owns Procedure. Approving 
Form d knee and SeflJrg Drafts to 
File Claims (the 'Procedure Order 1 ] 
wttdisel brtfi tf» blowing procata to 
determine the vaM claims against 
Unique Gems WlCorjx rusnandtof 
fee Hecekodfp's assets, as tolms: 
v The Notes .shall be ptfefished every 
day tar a period of for (4) weeks. 

2. Al erectors ol UGJ feat desire to 
preserve sty clam against the UGI es- 
tate are reqitied to canptete a Prod d 
Qakn attached hereto as ExhH 'A 1 and 
attKfi copies at al documents tefcftW 
intends to rely upon to prove a datm 
against UGl and/or fee Receiverships 
assets. Any erwfitor who falls to limefc 
Be and serve fee Prod d Clam by fee 
Bar Date ehafl be (waver barrad and 
pematenfereryoined from assarting any 
ddra against UGJ. 

1 II you dam to be a vaid creftrd 
UGl. and you tasti to preserve you 
cbm agalnd fee assets d UGl, you are 
raqrtBd » Be a Prod d dam and aJ 
sivpartog dxunems before Friday, 
October 31, 1997, (fee 'Bar Deb*) by 
doing fee Mtowig. 

A Fn fee original Proof of Ctarm and 
of nil s u pporting documents 


lewis EL Freeman. Receiver 
32® Mot Sheet «03 
Coconut Grove, Honda 33133 

4. The ting d a Prod d Cttm shal be 
deemed consent id [urfsdfcrron by fee 
Goul 

5. You are wged to Be a Prod d Cbm 
in Ihe Recerversti® case. H you faS to 
Be a Prod d den. you wB nor be Ate 
to paitidpata in Urn distnbulion. It any, 
from the Receivership tor assets reoov- 
OTd ty fee Roarer 

6 Further, you are advised fed fee Re- 
cefver t nd providing legal advice or lax 
corauting services. You may wart to 
contact your own counsel In fttrtg this 
ctatai You may duo wait to seek fee 
advice of las Mnsdtens/aoartBte. 

7. To pertripae «t a cferttofion cf mon- 
ies recovered trim assefc oi IK3 or few 
parties, you must property f# out hs 
farm and atonti t as attested heron it 
a Andy owner. 

R Any Prod d Cbm nd undy saved 
■i be dsatowaj and any documents!* 
ded upon by the dahtart to support Is 
data® which are not timely Had and 
served to aaonJance nfh Din note wfl 
be nadmrutfe al any wdeitay hear- 
ing « Dial conducted m Ms mrawfoa 
THE DEADLINE TO FILE YOlffi 
PROOF OF CLAII B. FRDAY, 
OCTOBER 31, 1997 
DATED: 

U6HAN, SL0T0, GREENBERG & 
HELUNGER.PJL 
Attorneys tor fee Receiver 
2350 F»st iMon Hnardal Center 
200 South Becayiu Bodmad 
ubn. Ftorita 33t3i 

(305)378-1782 

By. Andre* a. HefSngs. ESQ. 

Fla. Bar No. 861553 


Announcements 


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New Lease on Life 
For Japan’s Old 

But Taking Care of Them Is Costly 


By Mary Jordan 

Washington Post Sen'ice 


There are so 
many old people 
here that 65 
is considered 
relatively young. 


Reparations Offered to Maori 

Reuter i 

WELLINGTON — New Zealand on Tuesday submined 
the largest ever offer of reparations to native Maori, coveting 
grievances that date from 157 years ago. 

The offer, which could redraw the map of the island, 
includes SI 08 million in cash, the right to name rivers and 
mountains and rights lo land and resources. 

It also includes a public apology for breaches of the 1840 
Treaty of Waitangi betw een the Maori, the original inhabitants 
of New Zealand/and European settlers. 

The tribe's 12.000 adults will vote on w hether to accept the 
offer, which came after six years of talks. 


TOKYO Toshii Takano zips around her village north of 

Tokyo on the back of a motorcycle, buzzing by buildings and 
stores she could not have imagined as a child bom 99 years 

ag As she nears her 100th birthday, a common milestone in 
Japan, Mrs. Takano has no plans id slow down. But she 
promises that, after a recent warning from a police officer, 
she’ll wear her helmet from now on. 

“I enjoy 

neighbors’ — . 

the motorcycle driver, hex 79-year-old 
the view as much from a car. 

Mrs Takano is the face of Japan, a nation whose people live 
longer than anywhere else. There are so many old people here. ' 
that 65 is considered relatively young. The term “elderly” is 
too vague for such a large and diverse group, so people talk 
about *e “voting old,'’ the “old old” and the “super-aged.” 
One in 6 people here is older than 65, compared to 1 in&in the 
United States. 

According to government statistics released earlier this 
month, nearly 8 JOO people here are older than 100. That 
number has doubled in the last five years, and it is the latest 
sign of just how gray the world’s most rapidly aging society 
has become. On average, Japanese women live to 83 and men’ 
to nearly 77, the world’s longest life spans. 

It is not known why people tend to live so long in Japan, but 
medical experts believe strongly that the Japanese diet, heavy 
on fish, rice and seaweed and light on beef, has somethingto 
do with it. _ • 

The implications of having 
an elderly population grow so 
rapidly are enormous, mainly 
because older people are 
more expensive to care for 
than the young. The govern- 
ment is m the midst of dif- 
ficult debates abour how it 
will pay for the medical treat- 
ment, nursing care and pen- 
sions of its aged citizens. Every day, radio and television talk 
shows focus on issues related to the elderly, such as whether it 
makes sense for people to retire at 65 or whether the gov- 
ernment should revoke driver's licenses of those in their 
nineties. 

Tour organizers have dived headlong into the “silver 
industry’," offering special travel packages for active seniors. 
Stores are filled with bigger and bigger sections devoted to 
products claiming to "fizzle" dentures clean instandy and 
■ 1 pep* * drinks that are supposed to make imbibers feel 10 years 
younger. Hair dye seems to sell as well as milk. 

“For the first time in our history, we think that if we take 
care of ourselves, we can have a very active life until the end," 
said Mariko Fujiwara, research director at the Hakuhodo 
Institute of Life and Living. Mrs. Fujiwara said many alder 
people are encouraged by seeing so many very active “super- 
old" people. 

"tthen you have 99-year-olds riding motorcycles, alder 
people feel they don’t have to be dependent on others," she 
said. 

More than half of the people in Japan who are 65 or older 
live with their children, a figure far higher than that of any 
Western country. Mrs. Takano lives with her son, her grand- 
daughter and her great-granddaughter, who will be married 
Iaier this year, in an old wooden house next to a rice paddy in 
Kita-Aizu, a village of 7 *500 people. Eighty percent of this 
small farming village is covered with rice paddies. 

• ‘A long time ago. on the way home from the hospital, l let 
my mother ride on the back of my motorbike,” said Kizo 
Takano. “She was so happy that 1 started giving her rides all 
the time.” 

Mrs. Takano said her secret to long life is to stay upbeat and 
curious. “I'm interested in a lot of things: Is there really only 
one sun? Is America vast in land?” she said. 

In nearly a century of life, Mrs. Takano said, she has never 
touched alcohol. She adores flowers and likes to tend the rice 
paddies. She’s basically healthy, except for sore wrists. She 
takes walks and sleeps well. She refuses to eat the soft food 
marketed to the elderly. “I like hard food.” she said. 

“She does what she wants to do, even if someone else tells 
her not to,” said her son. 

Mrs. Takano feels lucky. She lives with her son's family, 
and her three younger sisters, aged 84 to 90, are all alive. Her 
husband died nearly 30 years ago. in 1968, when he was 
“young,” she said — only in his 70s. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGE 5 




GREECE. Hard Fest Is Around the Comer for New Virtues Promoted by Government in the Cause of European Monetary Union 


;es 


i 


Continued from Page I 

of a leftist party emereins 
from the defunct Euro-Conv 
munists, as the. country's fa- 
vorite politician. 

Yet, the current upheai 
mood is such that a Greek 
businessman indeed spent 
time explaining to a visitor 
that when the Metro works tit 
has been planned since 1959), 
when Athens has a new air- 
port, and when a new north- 
south highway is completed it 
will mean fewer cars in the 
capital, meaning less conges- 
tion, signifying less air pol- 
lution, and, just perhaps, no 
more taxi drivers abandoning 
fares in mid-nowhere — a 
knee-bone-con nec ted- to- the- 
ankie-bone vision of an ala- 
baster future, downtown from 
the Acropolis. 

The essential force in this 
effort is the Socialist govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Cos- 
tas Simitis. which decided 
Greece would have to begin 
to approximate the standards 
of the rest of the European 
Union, meeting qualifica- 
tions for entrv into to its com- 
mon currency by 1999, or be 
relegated into a league of the 
economically irretrievable. 

This has meant a vast at- 
tempt to impose a system of 
new virtues on a country and a 
culture whose self-esteem has 
been deeply ded to resistance 
to state authority. The re- 
forms center on responsibil- 
ity, from enforcing tax laws to 
scrapping do-nothing jobs for 
political clients to requiring 
motorcyclists to wear safety 
helmets. All of this comes as 
part of an approach that is 
portrayed as breaking with 
the sometimes self-pitying, 
sometimes near hysterical in- 
coherence of Greek policy 
during the 1980s and early 
90s. 

4 ‘Greece had a bad name, a 
very bad name in 1993-94.’* 
Finance Minister Yannis 
Papantoniou said in an inter- 
view. “A very bad name. 
Nobody believed me when 
we said were going to try to 
achieve the EMU conver- 
gence criteria. Most people 
thought this was just another 
trick. There was systematic 
disbelief in what we said. The 
attitude was we were incap- 
able of being consistent or 
stable. 

“In fact, we had been a 
pathetic failure. We had one 
percent growth from 1976 to 
1 995 and 20 percent inflation. 
Now the impression has 
changed. Now my European 


colleagues take it as a serious 
possibility that we will join 
them in the EMU. And the 
same thing is true of the 
banks.. *’ 

The numbers that Greece 
reports these days to the Euro- 
pean Union are signs of real 
progress, but in no sense a 
guarantee that the country can 
achieve the Maastricht con- 
vergence criteria next year or 
in 1999. and actually qualify 
for the European monetary 
union after the initial wave. ' 

The primary goal is bring- 
ing the deficit toward the .1 
percent target by stages, with 
a movement from 7.4 last 
year to a planned 4.2 percent 
at the end of 1997. Among 
other things, this supposes 
real success in bringing down 
inflation. Moving upward at 
5.6 percent in August, it was 
running above the hoped for 
level, but Yannis Stoumaras. 
chairman of the govern- 
ment’s council of economic 
advisers, said in an interview 
that inflation would be about 
3 percent at the end of 1998. 

in the widest sense, much 
of these measures of success 
have been built on Mr. Sim- 
Ui's’s ability to convince the 
Greeks that Europe is their 
salvation, and that sonic sac- 
rifice is involved — and not 
necessarily, as Greek practice 
used to dictate, just for the 
other guy. 

JannivTriantafyUou. a psy- 
chiatrist who recently re- 
turned to Athens after study- 
ing and practicing in France 
and Germany for 24 years 
<yiid. “One of the most pleas- 
ant sides to my rerum is the 
feeling i have that Greece is 
moving Toward reasonability. 
Take the European Union and 
Greece, it used to be. ‘I grab 
the father’s money, and then 1 
go steal his daughter, too.’ 

“Not so much any more. 
Incredible things are happen- 
ing. They’re actually crack- 
ing down on drunken driving 
and not having a helmet when 
you ride a motorcycle. If yon 
hit exhibitionism and show- 
ing-off and irresponsibility in 
this country, then you are se- 
rious and can get results. ’’ 

But there is some sense that 
the government is running out 
of levers. Jason Stratos, pres- 
ident of the Federation of 
Greek Industries, feels bed- 
rock has been reached In 
righting inflation, and that die 
rest of the way will be very 
difficult The government’s 
bard drachma policy has 
helped, he said, but has also 
cut back the competitiveness 


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of the Greek private sector by 
20 percent. 

Now ihe most difficult 
steps are at hand. That me. ms 
privatization and ruthless job- 
cutting in an economy that 
Mr. Stratos defines as 60 per- 
cent wholly or partially in 
slate hands, including a bank- 
ing sector that is 70 percent 
state-controlled. 

A fortnight ago, the annual 
report of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and 
Development on the Greek 
economy commended the 
progress made since 1994, 
but said that the govern- 


ment’s strategy needed '‘ex- 
peditious decisions and swift 
implementation to remain vi- 
able.’* 

Much of the task depends 
on ihe unions, allies in theory 
of the Panhellenic Socialist 
Movement, or PASOK, Mr. 
Simitis' party. Christos Polv- 
zngopoulos. president of the 
Greek General Confederation 
of Labor, says that “the un- 
ions will support the 
Maastricht targets if there is 
social sensitivity." But then 
the caveats come. "At first, 
workers considered the 
Maastricht treaty as positive. 


But now they are more and 
more skeptical and could be- 
come opposed. Europhiles 
are disappearing because it's 

a development without social 

awareness.” 

Mr. Polyzdgopoulcs iteers 
around privatization and 
massive job cutting by say- 
ing, "if we could integrate 
half of our black economy 
into our nominal economy, 
we’d have no trouble at all"'* 
in making the Maastricht tar- 
gets. He put at 400.000 ihe 
number of workers who did 
not enter official accounting. 

In some PASOK quarter*. 


this ’■phenomenon” sifil 
finds friends and rational- 
izers. The most artful explan- 
ation comes from Evangelos 
Venizelos, the minister of 
culture, who said, "the main 
advantage of our country is a 
flexible frame of mind, a lib- 
eral approach. It's a postmod- 
ern approach. The Greek 
mentality had a lot of prob- 
lems with industrial society, 
but we're in tune with post in- 
dustrial society. We live bet- 
ter than they do in Britain, and 
we know how to preserve the 
social peace." 

Serving as Olympic host is 


a psychic boost, and an in- 
citation to finish a number of 
major infrastructure projects 
largely made possible 
through European Union 
funding. But the Olympics 
also emphasize the critical 
nature of the next two years 
for achieving the targets be- 
cause heavy expenditure for 
the Games will begin to kick 
in around 2000. bringing as 
many as 130.000 jobs, but 
also inflationary pressure 
from an estimated S 1 .6 billion 
in costs. 

Growth is currently at a 3.5 
percent rate, a good perfor- 


ALGERIA : 200 Civilians Are Slain in Escalation of Butchery Close to Capital 

Continued from Page I 


news agencies reported. By either fig- 
ure, the massacre was the second 
deadliest since the insurrection 
against the military-backed govern- 
ment began in Algeria in 1992. The 
most lethal night of killings took place 
Aug. 29 in Sidi Rais, also near Al- 
giers, where the government counted 
98 dead and hospital sources counted 
nearly 300. 

People in communities just outside 
Algiers, where most of (he recent 
killin gs have taken place, are reported 
to be abandoning their homes and 
forming self-defense squads to repel 
the nightly violence. In some places. 


according to reports, the technique 
has worked and lives have been 
saved. 

The state of siege felt in these areas 
is matched at the official level by an 
apparent state of denial. Only one day 
before the massacre in Baraki, the 
Algerian prime minister, Ahmed 
Ouyahia, appeared on state-run tele- 
vision to repeat the government’s 
contention that its uncompromising 
approach to terrorism was paying 

The increased vigilance of the pop- 
ulation, the determination of the se- 
curity forces and the end of political 
bargaining with outlawed Islamic 
political groupings. Mr. Ouyahia said, 


had left Algeria with only "residual 
terrorism." ~ 

The latter term has been used for 
month?. by the Algerian president. 
Liaminc Zeroual, even as hundreds 
more have died at the hands of 
Muslim terrorists, paramilitary 
forces, government-armed village 
militias and unuffiliaied gangsters 
posing as some of the above. 

Last v.eek. the U.S. government 
reiceraied its support for the Algerian 
government’s approach in a farew'ell 
lener presented to Mr. Zeroual by the 
departing U.S. ambassador. Ronald 
Neumann. 

Condemning the killings of Algeri- 
an civilians as “an outrage to all civ- 


ilized people," Mr. Neumann's letter 
expressed support for "military mea- 
sures, consistent with the rule of law. 
to protect civilians" and other polit- 
ical and economic reforms that Mr. 
Zeroual “has publicly chosen." The 
statement also encouraged “national 
reconciliation and the inclusion in the 
political process of all who reject vi- 
olence." 

The prospects for reconciliation 
looked slightly brighter in mid-July 
when the government released two 
leaders of the fundamentalist Islamic 
Salvation Front. But one of them, 
Abassi Madani, is again under house 
arrest, and the government has said it 
was not negotiating with the Front. 


mance reflecting the coun- 
try’s improving" reputation, 
but there are no new 1 money 
pots at the horizon. There is 
even the frightening notion 
that tourism, sometimes listed 
as the country's single largest 
money maker, is in deep trou- 
ble, with Lhe idea spreading, 
according to the publisher 
Antonis Liberis, that “Greece 
is a five-star site with two-star 
infrastructure and two-star 
service.” 

"This is not something that 
can be changed from one day 
to the next.' ’ Mr. Liberis said, 
"and there is the problem be- 
cause the big issue is service, 
and that means our mental- 
ity.” 

Even if the convergence 
numbers eventually add up at 
the key junctures, and die 
European Union, with a few 
years of common currency 
behind it, decides that Greece 
has demonstrated its ability to 
sustain its economy at the de- 
sired community level of per- 
formance. "who would say 
that we've reached Europe’s 
standard of living?" Mr. Stra- 
tos asks, sounding rather for- 
lorn. 

Then he brightens. He 
says. "We have strong family 
ties and don't have serious 
social problems. Nobody 
goes hungry m Greece. And 
the night clubs are packed.” 


Utter refinement of 
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a wristwatcb a perpetual 
equation of time - shooing 
the difference between 
mean time and true 
solar time - and a 
perpetual calendar. 



Invented for you 


Conceived by Breguet in 1780, 
the automatic movement featured 
an oscillating weight that - 
rewound the mainspring. 
Today the craftsman's band 
decorates the weight with fine 
gmOocbi engraving to 
complement the beauty 
of the movement. 




A 


Created in 178} by Abrabam-Unds Breguet, 



Breguet watch has a unique responsibility; it carries 
the name of Abraham-iouis Breguet, the greatest watch- 
maker ever known. And true to our founder’s indepen- 
dent spirit and genius for invention, the Breguet watch of 
today continues to delight and astonish. 

The Breguet you select will have its own strong charac- 
ter, based on features that have become legendary They 
include the Breguet hands, the shimmering guifloche 
dial and the finely Suted caseband, aD of which require 
rare skill to produce 

Most important, you will find the hand-finished move- 
ment, as inventive today as two hundred years ago. 
Inspired by an immense legacy of archives, our watch- 
makers constantly build new technical and aesthetic 
challenges into the design of our watches. 

When you live with such a watch, you wfli discover plea- 
sure in its smallest detail. But one detail may seem the 
most significant of all the in dividual number inscribed 
on ihe dial The practice of numbering the watches began 
with the first Breguet ever made. It is the ultimate sign of 
a most unusual devotion to perfection. Wear your Breguet 
with pride, you have chosen an exceptional watch. 



By imenting the totirbiUon 
device around 1795, 
Breguet eliminated the 
influence of gravity on 
*“ the accuracy of the watch. 
This pivotal invention 
is seen at its best m ihe 
current collection, urbicb 
has a number of fine 
tourbiUon watches . 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


international 


Dead Dolphins and Toxi 


By Joby Warrick 

W ashington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — When 162 dol- 
phins washed up on Mexican beaches 
last winter, the jpolice suspected drug 
gangs of dumping chemicals at sea. 
Only months later did they find the real 
killers: billions of toxic one-celled 
plants that formed a poison net across 
Mexico's Sea of Cortez. 

Farther north, the victims were hun- 
dreds of brown pelicans whose bodies 
littered beaches at Monterey Bay. Cali- 
fornia. over a few weeks in 1991. Thai 
time, the culprit was an ordinaiy diatom, 
a microscopic creature regarded as 
harmless until it suddenly exhibited an 
ability to manufacture toxins. 

And in Maryland and North Carolina 
this summer, thousands of fish have 
been stricken with a microbial afflic- 
tion, Pfiesteria piscicida. 

From killer algae to mind-altering 
microbes, coastal areas worldwide are 


facing an assault from some of the 
strangest creatures ever viewed under a 
microscope. A number of marine eco- 
logists see the attack as part of a global 
. epidemic of an uprising of seaborne 
saboteurs that are capable of wreaking 
havoc on coastal economies and eco- 
systems. 

Some, including Pfiesteria. are newly 
discovered species. Others are spread- 
ing into new territories or picking up 
nasty new habits. AH seem to thrive in 
waters that have become chemically en- 
riched by pollutants from the land. 

“Twenty years ago, these kinds of 
outbreaks were rare, ’ * said Nancy 
Foster, a marine mammal biologist and 
director of the U.S. National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration s na- 
tional oceans service. “When we did 
see them, they were smaller in scale. 
Now they’re all around the coast, and 
almost every stale is vulnerable. 

Indeed, few coastal states have been 
immune. Between 1972 and 1995, the 


number of U.S. beaches and estuaries 
with major, recurring attacks by harm- 
ful microbes more than doubled, from 
16 to 36, according to a 1995 study. 
Similar afflictions are plaguing coastal 
cities worldwide, scientists say, from 
Hong Kong’s polluted harbor to ihe 
industrial ports along the Black Sea. 

While scientists cite strong circum- 
stantial evidence that links human pol- 
lution to the recent outbreaks, they ac- 
knowledge dial the cause has not yet 
been established. 

Indeed, they say it is likely that the 
explosion of newly discovered toxic 
species is partly attributable to the in- 
crease in me number of scientific ob- 
servers. 

“Ten years ago, people started real- 
izing these things were out there, and so 
more grant money is being spent to find 
them,” said Stuart Hurlbert. a biologist 
with San Diego State University. ' ' It put 
people in a detective frame of mind.” 

But there also are clear signs that 


humans have reshaped coastal envir- 
onments in ways that favor some of the 
toxic creatures. Probably the biggest 
single change is the ever-growing 
volume of nutrients — waste from 
sewage plants and factories as well as 
runoff from farms, lawns and city streets 
— in coastal waterways. : 

The invaders belong to the invisible 
universe of algae, dinoflageliates and 
other one-celled organism chat form 
the base of the food chain in the world's 
oceans. A minute fraction are known to 
produce neurotoxins and other poisons 
that can harm higher animal forms. 

But in the last 20 years, scientists say. 
the natural balance seems to have shif- 
ted to allow' "hidden flora” to blossom 
in new and deadly ways. 

“In 1984, we knew of 22 species of 
harmful dinoflagellaies; now there are 
more than 60.” said JoAnn Burkholder, 
the aquatic botanist who was the first to 
link Pfiesteria to- dead fish along the 
North Carolina coast. “What we do 


know is ihev are cropping up mostly m 
poorly flushed bays and lagoons where 
there has been nutrient enrichment — 
from runoff with natural and artificial 
fertilizers from cities, industries, sub- 
urbs and farms. 

Some of the outbreaks, such as tne 
Pfiesteria attacks in North Carolina and 
Maryland, have kfilediarge numbers ot 
fish arid prompted the closure of wa- 
terways. As recently as last week, an 
apparently unknown species of toxic 
algae was suspected in the deaths oi 

thousands of reef-dwelling tropicalfish 

off the coast of southeast Florida. Many 
of foe fish were covered with sores 
similar ro those caused by Pfiesteria. 

Some microbes are a direct threat to 
people. In 1987, a sudden growth surge, 
or “bloom,” of a toxic diatom near 
Prince Edward Island, Canada, killed 
three people and sickened more than 
100 others who had eaten contaminared 
mussels. At least five kinds of seafood- 
borne illnesses are known to be caused 


by toxic algae, two of which are po- 
tentially fatal to humans. One of them, 
amnesic shellfish poisoning, can cause 
neurological symptoms such as disor- 
ientation and memory loss. 

Other toxic outbreaks have decim- 
ated wildlife populations. In Florida two 
years ago, for example, an enormous 
“red tide” of toxic one-celled dino- 
fiagellates wiped out 304 manatees. 

Concern about foe apparent escala- 
tion of microbe attacks led to foe recent 
creation of foe Ecology and Oceano- 
graphy of Harmful Algal Blooms re- 
search center, which is financed by sev- 
eral U.S. government agencies is 
investigating foe phenomenon. 

Some scientists suspect global warm- 
ing is increasing water temperatures, 
inviting microbes to move into new 
temtones. In addition, aquaculture, or 
commercial fish farms, and dam con- 
struction can cause a shift in the balance 
of microscopic species that compete for 
living space in every drop of water. 


In Israel, Tug-of-War Over Time 

Change to Winter Hours Stirs Resentment From Secular Jews 






By Joel Greenberg 

Ne w York Times Sen ice 

HERZLIYA, Israel — As the sun 
dipped toward foe horizon, Yaniv and 
Errar Peri hurried down to the beach to 
get in a quick walk before darkness fell 
on this seaside town north of Tel Aviv. 

With Temperatures here still in the 80s 
during Israel’s lingering summer, the 
country has suddenly gone off daylight 
time, moving into what Israelis call the 
“winter clock” weeks ahead of neigh- 
boring countries, Europe, and the United 
States. On Sunday, the Peris managed 
foeir first sunset walk after work since 
clocks were set back an hour on Sept ] 3. 
bringing dusk soon after 5:30 P.M. 

“What proper country is under such 
influence of the religious?” Mr. Peri 
said. “It’s simply a disgrace.” 

He was referring to the move by 
Interior Minister Eliahu Suissa. a mem- 
ber of Shas. a strict Orthodox party, to 
lop a month off Israeli daylight time, 
which began March 20 and was sup- 
posed to have lasted until Oct. 19. 

Mr. Suissa has defended his decision 
on religious grounds, adding to the sim- 


mering debate here over the role re- 
ligion should play in regulating every- 
day life. The debate has sharpened since 
the change of government after national 
elections last year, when Orthodox Jew- 
ish parties gained key cabinet posts in 
foe conservative coalition led by Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. 

Setting back the clocks has pushed 
the balmy Mediterranean evenings here 
into the "end of foe workday and rush 
hour, forcing commuters to drive home 
in twilight. Children leave playgrounds 
earlier to go home, lights come on soon- 
er, and air-conditioners are switched on 
earlier in foe morning to counter the 
effects of a stronger sun. 

The costs are significant Israel Elec- 
tric Co. says that it saved S3 million 
during the period of daylight time this 
year, and the Manufacturers Associ- 
ation of Israel has estimated total sav- 
ings for the Israeli economy at an av- 
erage of SI 14.000 a day. 

But Mr. Suissa says the change of 
rhythm is necessary' for foe approaching 
fast day of Yom Kippur ana penitential 
prayers known as selihot said by ob- 
servant Sephardic Jews at midnight or 


dawn during the month before the fast. 

Setting back the clock, Mr. Suissa 
says, makes selihot prayer times more 
convenient and hastens the end of the 
Yom Kippur fast, which falls on Oct. 1 1 . 
To Mr. Suissa. foe time change is an act 
of consideration for Israel’s religious 
minority, similar to allowances made 
for Israeli Arabs. “We demand at least 
the same rights given to another pop- 
ulation." Mr. Suissa said, arguing that 
daylight time has been delayed in the 
past to accommodate Ramadan, foe 
Muslim month of fasting. 

But Mr. Suissa’s move has brought 
down the wrath of secular Israelis, who 
accuse him of trying to run their lives 
according to religious dictates. 

“Minister Suissa thinks he is God.” 
Yossi Sand, a leader of the leftist Meretz 
party, said in remarks broadcast on army 
radio. “God says: ‘Let there be light,’* 
and there is light. God says: ‘Lei there be 
darkness.’ and there is darkness. Min- 
ister Suissa has delusions of grandeur. 
It’s not enough that he represents God. 
he is God himself. He says: ‘Let there be 
darkness’ in the middle of the summer, 
and he wants us ro live in darkness." 


sVs 





i . 


m 

t A 



Thr P— t, 

Deborah Parry, who was found guilty of mur- 
dering Yvonne Gilford, escaped becoming the 
first Westerner to be beheaded in Saudi Arabia. 


Nurse in Saudi Arabia 
Spared Death Penalty 

Caccpioi Ik Our Sufffnm Dnpaictn 

DUBAL United Arab Emirates — Deborah Parry, a 
British nurse found guilty of murdering a colleague in Saudi 
Arabia, been spared the death penalty by foe brother of 
her victim, her Saudi lawyer said Tuesday. 

The lawyer, Saiah ai Hejailan, said a settlement had been 
reached with Frank Gilford to “waive foe death penally.” 
He added: “It is signed and done and witnessed and au- 
thenticated.” . 

Lawyers for the family of Yvonne Gilford, an Australian 
nurse who was killed in December, said earlier that Ms. 
Parry. 38, had been found guilty of murder, which carries a 
mandatory death sentence by beheading. 

Under Saudi law, foe family of the victim can decide 
whether a death sentence should be earned out or commuted 
on payment of “blood money." If a single family member 
decides against the death penalty, foe sentence cannot be 
carried oul Mr. Gilford bad initially opposed commutation. 

Mr. Hejailan, foe lawyer, said: “The families of foe two 
nurses are pleased that Mr. Gilford came to his senses and 
made a proper response by signing the settlement agreemenL 
He has done foe right thing.” 

A second nurse, Lucille McLauchlan, 31, was found 
guilty of being an accessory; and was sentenced to flogging 
and eight years in prison. Ms. Parry and Ms. McLaucblan 
were arrested after Ms. Gilford’s body was found in Decem- 
ber with multiple stab wounds in her room at the King Fahd 
Military Medical Center in Dhahran. 

Ms. Party would have been the first Westerner to be 
beheaded in Saudi Arabia. ( Reuters. AP) 


Israel Names 4 of 5 in Blasts, 

Saying Ail Were West Bankers A Cmdi Slmcs v „„„ w „,- s Je , 2 Ue Clash chiapas 


.A-jf/jff I-'ranct-Prcssc 

JERUSALEM — Israel made public 
on Tuesday foe names of four of the five 
suicide bombers from foe Islamic 
Hamas movemem who carried out two 
attacks in Jerusalem in the last seven 
weeks that left 20 Israelis dead. 

The young men. who were being 
sought by both Israel and the Palestinian 
Authority before foeir suicide missions, 
were from the West Bank village of 
Asira Staamaliya. It is an area under 
Palestinian civilian control but security 
control by Israel, a spokesman for Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said. 

They were identified as Na lan 
Muwalia, Jarara Bashar Sawalha, Taw- 
fik Yassin and Youssef Shualy. 

The fifth suicide bomber had yet to be 
identified, Israel Radio said. 

Two men blew themselves up in a 
Jerusalem market on July 30, killing 15 
Israelis. The three others detonated 
charges in an outdoor Jerusalem shop- 
ping mall on Sept 4, killing five Is- 
raelis. 

The bombings were both claimed by 
Hamas, foe radical Islamic group op- 
posed to the peace process between Is- 
rael and Y asser Arafat's Palestinian Au- 
thority. 

Israeli officials said the fact that the 
five were from foe West Bank proved 
that the Palestinian Authority had failed 
in its commitment to fight terrorism. 

But Palestinian leaders immediately 
challenged the assertion, saying the five 


suspects had evidently come from areas 
still under Israeli .Army control, and 
might have traveled abroad before en- 
tering Jerusalem to detonate foeir 
bombs in crowds. 

Police officials said the identification 
of foe five was linked to a vast coun- 
terterrorism operation carried out over 
the last three days in areas of foe north- 
ern West Bank under Israeli security 
control. 

‘ ‘There is not a shadow of a doubt that 
these terrorists did not come from 
abroad.” Prime Minister Netanyahu 
said, rebutting repeated assertions by 
Mr. Arafat. “They were trained in the 
Palestinian territories. That’s where 
foeir leaders are.” 

Mr. Netanyahu said Israel had in- 
formation that militants were plotting 
further attacks. He renewed accusations 
foai Mr. Arafat was “embracing ter- 
rorists instead of fighting them.” 

“They are riding a tiger which will 
one day devour them, devour foe 
chances for peace and the Palestinian 
Authority itself," he added. 

Since the bombings, Israel has ar- 
rested 500 West Bank residents, scores 
in the last three days. 

Four of foe five suicide bombers were 
arrested by Palestinian police in March 
1996 but escaped five months later. 

The Israeli Army’s intelligence chief, 
Moshe Yaaloo, stressed that foe suicide 
bombers got their support and orders 
from areas under Palestinian rule. 


JERUSALEM — A cracked windshield in Prime Min- 
ister Benjamin Netanyahu's plane set off in-flight jitters 
Tuesday and forced the pilot to crave! low and slow ly on a 
journey home from Austria, witnesses said. 

The Boeing 707 carrying Mr. Netanyahu landed safely in 
Israel, but he was 40 minutes late fora meeting in Jerusalem 
with President Vaclav Havel of the Czech RepubUc. 

“My only thought was that this plane must be replaced 
— quickly.” Mr. Netanyahu replied when asked if he had 
been scared. 

Journalists traveling with the prime minister said the 
crack appeared about two hours after the plane left Vienna, 
causing cabin pressure to drop. 

The pilot changed altitude from 30,000 feet to 15.000 
feet and was forced to reduce speed. i Reuters j 

Body Is Sighted Off Namibia 

WINDHOEK. Namibia — A search aircraft spotted 
what appeared to be a second body from a suspected 
collision of two military planes on Sept. 13. but officials 
said Tuesday that shipsbad been unable to find it. 

Only one body has been found in the waters off Nam- 
ibia’s Skeleton Coast, where a German and a U.S. military 
transport aircraft, carrying a total of 33 people, apparently 
collided in midair in Namibia’s worst crash in 29 years. ' 

One of foe eight German, U.S. and South African planes 
still searching for survivors saw whai appeared to be a bv>dy 
from the air on Sunday. 

But neither a French frigate nor a Namibian patrol vessel 
helping with foe search could find the body on Monday, 
said Lieutenant Colonel Eddie Brown of the’South African 
Air Force. 

Faint distress signals were heard two days after foe 
crash. " (AP) 


SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS. Mexico — A 
clash in the southeastern state of Chiapas left at least two 
people dead in the first outburst of \ioience in foe region 
since Zapatista rebels marched peacefully to Mexico City 
last w eek 

The clash took place Sunday in Chenalho township 
between supporters of the rebels and of the governing 
Institutional Revolutionary Party, said a state prosecutor. 
David Hernandez. The bodies of two party supporters were 
found on a roadside, he said. They bad been shot. {AP) 

Montserrat Prods Villagers 

SALEM. Montserrat — Trying to force scores of res- 
idents to evacuate areas threatened by volcanic eruptions, 
officials said Monday they were prepared to shut off water 
and power to several villages on this Caribbean island. 

Disaster workers evacuated 80 people late Sunday from 
foe villages of Old Towne. Frith’s and Olveston after an 
eruption of gas and rock set afire the now-abandoned 
airport. 3K miles northeast of foe volcano. 

On Monday, another eruption sent volcanic material to 
within half a mile of foe towns, and scientists said future 
flows could devastate the area. A few dozen residents 
packed belongings in foeir cars and headed north Monday, 
but most appeared to be ignoring the warnings. (AP) 

For the Record 

The wall of a subway tunnel under construction in the 
Tehran carpet market collapsed Tuesday, injuring two 
persons and damaging four shops, officials said, and a 
spokesman for Metro Tehran said relief workers were 
clearing debris to see if anyone had been trapped. (AP) 


Serbs Attack 
NATO Troops 


Ream 

SARAJEVO, Bosoia-Hefzegovina 
— Serbs threw Molotov cocktails at 
N ATO-led peacekeeping troops and set 
a bus on fire outside foe north Bosnian 
town of Doboj on Tuesday, a spokes- 
man for the peacekeepers said. 

The crowd was demanding foe re- 
moval of a checkpoint set up by Scan- 
dinavian and Polish soldiers of the 
NATO-led force, at a bridge about 3 
kilometers (2 miles) north of Doboj, a 
spokesman. Jan Joosten, said. 

He said that civilians were blocking 
the road with about 100 vehicles, in- 
cluding buses, throwing rocks and Mo- 
lotov cocktails, and that one bus was on 
fire. 

Doboj police said NATO soldiers had 
been checking identity papers and con- 
trolling citizens at foe checkpoint, 
which they erected early Tuesday. 

Mr. Joosten confirmed that the 
checkpoint was new. but could not con- 
firm whether it had been set up to pre- 
vent hard-line Serbs in Doboj, loyal to 
Radovan Karadzic, an indicted war 
criminal, from heading northwest to foe 
town of Pmjavor where a stand-off was 
continuing between rival Bosnian Serb 
police forces. 

Mr. Karadzic’s forces had tried to 
take back control of foe police station in 
Pmjavor. taken over by police loyal to • 
the Bosnian Serb president, BiJjana 
Plavsic, at the weekend, but had failed 
in their attempt 


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BALLY 

SWITZERLAND 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY* SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGET 



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1 


Unionists Sit 
* With Sinn Fein 
Only to Insist 
On Its Ouster 


A fence Prunce-Presse 

BELFAST — Nonhem Ireland's 
Protestant Unionists and Sinn Fein re- 
publicans sat face to face at the ne- 
gotiating table T uesday for (he first time 
since the partitioning of Ireland in 
1921. 

The Ulster Unionist Party used the 
historic — and brief — encounter to 
demand the expulsion of Sinn Fein, the 
political wing of the IRA, from the 
a multiparty talks on the province's future 
▼ before storming out without waiting for 

the republican party’s response. 

David Trimble, leader of the unionist 
party, the province's largest, branded 
the Sinn Fein members present in the 
room as “godfathers of terrorism’’ and 
insisted that “there is no need for us to 
engage with Sinn Fein at all.'* 

Observers saw the move as a ploy to 
enable the unionists to enter the talks, 
and avoid being blamed for snuffing out 
another chance for peace in the em- 
battled province, while keeping their 
honor intact 

Mr. Trimble himself insisted after his 
parry’s walkout that despite their de- 
parture “we are determined to remain 
one way or another in this process and to 
represent the unionist cause." 

The British and Irish governments 
will consider the unionists' request be- 
% fore announcing their decision, possibly 
as early as Wednesday. 

But the recriminations did not pre- 
vent John Hume, leader of the moderate 
nationalist Social Democratic and La- 
bour Party, from saying before the talks 
began Tuesday that ’ 'the foundations of 
the peace process have been laid." 

Mr. Hume maintained his upbeat as- 
sessment even after the unionist 
walkout. 

“Wehave got to the stage now where 
all the major parties are here,” he said. 

* ’No one couid have forecast that just a 
few years ago.” 

Two fringe loyalist parties, the Pro- 
gressive Unionist Party and die Ulster 
Democratic Party, have also agreed to 
participate in the talks. Only Ian Pais- 
ley’s Democratic Unionists and Robert 
McCartney's UJC. Unionists are keep- 
ing up their boycott 

The Ulster Unionist Party’s decision 
W to meet face to face with Sinn Fein was 
seen as a recognition that Prime Min- 
ister Tony Blair is determined to 
achieve a constitutional settlement in 
Northern Ireland, whether the unionists 
like it or not. 




£ 



Milosevic Party Faces Prospect 
Of Sharing Power After Vote 


Aftlrtri AlWrnVApcr*-: frjikc-IV** 


GERMAN POST AL STRIKE — Postal workers in Berlin carrying placards Tuesday with names and dates 
of post office closures. They also protested a bill that would open package delivery to competition. 


The -4a sucuited Press 

BELGRADE — The party of 
Slobodan Milosevic will be forced to 
share power for the first time since 
Yugoslavia’s most powerful politician 
look control 10 years ago, according to 
near-complete Serbian election results 
announced Tuesday. 

With 236 of 250 parliamentary seats 
counted in the former Yugoslavia’s 
dominant republic. Mr. Milosevic’s So- 
cialist bloc had 98 seats and the ul- 
tranationalist Radical Party had 80. The 
opposition Serbia Renewal Movement 
had 45 seats and the remaining 1 3 were 
distributed among five smaller parties. 

The Socialists were expected to form 
a coalition with the Radicals, whose 
nationalism eclipses even the extreme 
views the Socialists propagated during 
the bloody breakup of the former 
Yugoslavia. 

Although Mr. Milosevic has moved 
away from nationalism to placate (he 
outside world and stay in power, his party 
has worked with the Radicals when both 
parties thought it politically expedient. 

The final' district to be counted will 
send 14 deputies to Serbia's Parliament, 
all of them certain to come from the 
Socialists or the Radicals. The district is 


in Kosovo, the southern region where 
ethnic Albanians, who make up 90 per- 
cent of the population, boycotted the vote 
because they want independence. As a 
result, a small number of Serb voters will 
decide the election in the district. 

In the presidential race. Mr. Milo- 
sevic’s protegd, Zoran Lilic. faces a 
runoff against the Radical Party’s lead- 
er, Vojislav SeseJj. Mr. Lilic failed to 
win the 51 percent of the vote required 
for a first-round victory, but he is ex- 
pected to win in the second round sched- 
uled for Oct. 5. 

Voter turnout was 62 percent, despite 
a boycott by a large section of the pro- 
democracy opposition. Belgrade ’s may- 
or, Zoran Djindjic, one of die leaders of 
protests last winter against the Milo- 
sevic regime, bad hoped that at least 51 
percent of the electorate would boycott 
the vote and render it invalid. 

His Democratic Party said the state 
media’s campaign coverage was heav- 
ily biased in favor of the Socialists. 

Monitors from the 54-nation Orga- 
nization for Security and Cooperation in 
Europe said the “process leading to the 
election was flawed," although “tech- 
nical" polling on election day was law- 
fill in most places. 


BRIEFLY 


Aznar Loses the Support German Far- Right Party 
Of Key Legislative Ally Contests Hamburg Tally 


MADRID — Prime Minister Jose Maria 
Aznar of Spain and his ruling Popular Party 
came under pressure Tuesday after one of 
their parliamentary allies said it was with- 
drawing its support 

The Basque Nationalist Party, which lent 
its backing to Mr. Aznar ’s minority gov- 
ernment to give it a majority in Parliament, 
said it considered its pact broken after a 
dispute over regional finances. The break 
between the two parties weakens Mr. Aznar. 
leaving him just a one-vote margin to pass 
legislation. 

“We will continue negotiating each issue, 
as one does in a party that is not in strict 
opposition.” Xabier Arzalluz. the Basque 
Nationalist Party leader, told Basque tele- 
vision. 

The Basque nationalists said the move 
would not affect the 1998 budget. Budget 
Secretary Jose Folgado said the government 
expected full support from the Basque party 
when it submits the budget later this year. 
Analysts said the move would not affect 
Spain’s possible entry into Europe’s mon- 
etary union since Mr. Aznar could still rely on 
support from Catalan nationalists. ( Reuters ) 


MUNICH — The far-right German 
People's Union said Tuesday that it planned a 
legal challenge against the Hamburg election 
resulr Sunday. 

The party was only 230 votes short of 
clearing a 5 percent hurdle needed lo win 
seats. 

The party’s national leader. Gerhard Frey, 
said at a news conference that the votes had 
been tampered with. The Union received 
4.97 1 percent of the vote. 

State election officials in Hamburg said 
that they had been extremely careful in count- 
ing the votes for the People 's Union because it 
was so close to the 5 percent threshold. 

( Reuters ) 

Russia Denies Losing 
Track of Nuclear Bombs 

MOSCOW — A Russian government 
spokesman Tuesday denied the existence of 
dozens of suitcase-sized Russian nuclear 
bombs and the implication that authorities 
had lost control of their weaponry. 


Hie spokesman, Igor Shabdurasolov. dis- 
missed the latest claim on the alleged missing 
bombs made by Alexei Yablokdv, a prom- 
inent ecologist and former environmental ad- 
viser to President Boris Yeltsin. 

Mr. Yablokov said Monday that some 
bombs may be unaccounted for. 

“Any assertions on the notorious nuclear 
suitcases do not correspond to reality." Mr. 
Shabdurasolov said at a briefing, according to 
Russian news agencies. (AP) 

For the Record 

A UJS. Navy plane skidded off the run- 
way at an American base on the Greek island 
of Crete on Tuesday, damaging the plane but 
causing no injuries. (AP) 

The European Commission has asked 
German federal authorities to close down 
an unnam ed German company by Friday after 
its inspectors uncovered evidence of fraud 
concerning British beef imports, a spokesman 
said Tuesday. (Reuters) 

The captain and crew operating the Es- 
tonia passenger ferry when it sank in a Baltic 
Sea storm in 1994, kilting 852 people, did not 
do enough to warn passengers before the ship 
went down, an expert said. (Reuters) 





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INTERNAIIONAUHKR AID TRIBIjNE~WEDNESDA3LSEETEMBEB-24- 19QZ. 





PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Crew Restarts Computer 
As Mir Awaits Shuttle 


amvMbrO* Stiff FnmUapart** 

MOSCOW — The crew of Mir re- 
started the space station’s bally com- 
puter early Tuesday and repaired other 
problems in advance of a rendezvous 
with the U.S. shuttle Atlantis this week- 
end. 

Repairing the main computer for the 
third time in as many weeks, the two 
Russians and one American on board 
replaced a faulty computer block, loaded 
software programs and restarted Mir’s 
gyroscopes, which point the space sta- 
tion toward the sun, said a Mission Con- 
trol spokesman, Valeri Lyndin. 

Tbe crew worked all night and went to 
sleep at 9 AJV1. Moscow time Tuesday, 
after ground controllers ordered them to 
take rest for about seven hours, Mr. 
Lyndin said. 

The team, Anatoli Solovyov, Pavel 
Vinogradov and Michael Foale, also re- 
placed a faulty fan in the carbon dioxide 
removal system. They planned to switch 
on most equipment later Tuesday after 
the gyroscopes were fully activated. 

When the computer goes down, - so 
does the gyroscope system that keeps the 
station in the right position for docking 
with other spacecraft, such as the space 
shuttle. The loss of orientation also 
means the Mir’s solar panels lose the 
best angle to soak up energy from the 


sun, which forces the crew to switch off 
most of the station's equipment to save 

The crew has reported no further leaks 
of a mysterious brown fluid, which were 
spotted twice Monday. Ground control- 
lers suggested the fluid might have been 
leftover fuel from an unused engme or 
some substance from the damaged Spck- 
ir module, but no definite conclusion has 
bin reached, Mr. Lyndin said. 

Atlantis, tentatively scheduled lor a 
Thursday launching, is due to dock with 
the Mir station Saturday to pick up Mr. 
Foale and dropoff his replacement, Dav- 
id Wolf. Senior managers of theNa- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration were waiting for one last safety 
report before giving final clearance for 
Atlantis's flight and for Mr. Wolf s four- 
month stay aboard Mir. 

NASA said it would continue to mon- 
itor the state of the Mir space station “up 
until the time of liftoff. ’ ’ 

Atlantis will deliver to Mir a variety of 
repair gear, including a spare computer. 
The 27-kilogram device arrived Monday 
at the Florida launching site from Rus- 
sia. It will be stowed aboard the shuttle 
Wednesday. 

Air force meteorologists forecast a 7U 
percent chance of acceptable weather for 
the blastoff Thursday. (AP. Reuters ) 



i MIR: Astronaut Is Ready to Climb Ab ™ rd 

*- ** . i ntviiii whether uk 

Continued from Page 1 stiUhi ^ ' 

^^rKTooeof 


But Mir is not the only issue, vne or nau* Russian space activities. « 
the lessons NASA flight managers have Wolf W M, L, 

learned is that, if they want to keep k a fon "f r 

putting humans on long-duration space ^ experienced shipboard 

Sigh* of any kind, they must not only pdot rg***V™^ ^ ot her h«- 
wiry about safety and .prodhctmty- ft*. form* astronaut who 

aloft but also face tbetough job of edn- ^^f^apped into the shuttle cockpt 
eating the public on the ground. 

That is because, they say. space is toe .see had |Q be shiit 

inherently risky and there will always be mg sbuftieMm investigate 

human and mechanical fallibility to con- /-^iieneer disaster, in which 

tend with, not to mention routine main- of seven perished, . 

T?e Mblic-s focus Stould not be 


also on me rcspuuw- , 
sonnel Mr. Culbertson said 
S5 Peopk asking the hard questions, 
but it Mothers me if *ey aren t hearing 

Even though “space flight has been a *eanswere. m ^ oritics 0 f late, he 

complex business for some years now. One other coun- 

Mr. Wolf said, “the feet is that both of said, has been tc » pern ad^ ^ be a 
us. Russians and Americans, are very tries that the Un 


space station, whose construction _ 
scheduled to begin nextyear in orbit, with 
more than a dozen countries taking part. 


f 


young, and just making the first baby 
steps toward living and working in 
space, as societies. Therefore we have a 
multitude of issues to work out.” 

The question is, if the American pub- 
lic does not understand, or trust, NASA's 
assessment of Mir’s problems today, 
how will the agency sustain its hard-won 


re director of!heRa ^ian 

agency (now a corporation 1 that built 
Mir. said here last week that the news 
media have exaggerated Mir s shortcom- 
ings. He suggested the Americans win 

look like “sunshine space explorers if 

they “head for the hills” whenever 


Wrn-Jrti LaweffRram 

Jean- Loup Chretien, a French astronaut who is a member of the 
Atlantis crew, arriving at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. 


how will tne agency sustain its nara-won urcy D v nmin 

support through the difficulties likely to something goes wrong Mr. y”"™*. 
bedevil the most ambitious international who faces aggressi ve °F po*j|j . . . . . 
engineering project in peacetime his- U.S.-Russian space parmerej^inade^ 
tory? Has me nation become too “risk own country, also suggeste d that a U.S. 
averse” io lead such an undertaking? 


CHINA: Li Peng Warns Rich Countries 


Continued from Page 1 


politically on the world stage. “What we 
are seeing here is that whether it is a 
Mexico crisis or Asia, it is no longer a 
■ regional affair, but a global issue in an era 
of globalized markets,” said James 
Wolfensohn, the World Bank president. 

“This new reality has been brought 
home to everybody I have talked to,” 
Mr. Wolfensohn said in an interview 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Li’s speech was accompanied by 
a warning from Mr. Wolfensohn that the 
gap between rich and poor nations was 
“a time bomb which, if ignored, could 
explode in our children’s faces." 

For this reason. Mr. Wolfensohn 
called for “a quantum leap” in inter- 
national development efforts and an- 
nounced that the World Bank was “scal- 


ing up its work to restructure banking 
and fins 


lancial systems in developing 
countries.” 

He pointed to the recent currency tur- 
moil in East Asia as evidence of the need 
for such increased assistance. 

Mr. Li, using fairly muscular lan- 
guage to portray China as a champion of 
poor countries, set forth “six propos- 
itions of principle” that he said were 
aimed at creating favorable conditions 


and helping developing countries to 
' i dei 


achieve sustainable development. 

Among these was a call for more 
financial and technical aid and a warning 
that if the international community 
wanted to see economic growth “in a 
peaceful and tranquil environment, then 
it cannot afford to ignore the reasonable 
demands of the developing countries 
and mast attend to their concerns over 
finance, debt, trade, environment and 
poverty issues.” 

Mr. Li also said that “trade discrim- 
ination and exchanges of unequal values 
in economic relations should be op- 
posed.” 

He added that “such practices as bul- 
lying the weaker or less fortunate by dim 
of one’s power of wealth should not go 
unchecked, still less should countries be 
allowed to impose sanctions, or threaten 
to do so, at every turn, against others.” 

Western officials said that some of 
these references reflected China's dis- 
pleasure at U.S. demands thatBeijinggo 
further in trade liberalization before it 


can be admitted to the World Trade 
Organization. 

Zhu Rongji. Chinese deputy prime 
minister, said Monday that it was un- 
reasonable to make “excessive de- 
mands” on Beijing before admitting it to 
the trade organization. 

Larry Summers, the U.S. deputy 
Treasury secretary, said in reply to Mr. 
Zhu that he was encouraged by promises 
of banking Teforms and a cut in taxes on 
foreign investment in China. But he in- 
sisted thar Beijing’s entry to the WTO 
“has ro be based on its accepting the 
norms of openness of the international 
system.” 

In his address to the thousands of 
bankers and government officials here, 
Mr. Wolfensohn singled out the fight 
against corruption, saying that the link 
between good economic performance 
and open governance must be 
strengthened, not simply to please the 
markets, but to build a broad social con- 
sensus in developing economies. 

“My bottom line on corruption is 
simple,” Mr. Wolfensohn said. “If a 
government is unwilling to take action 
despite the fact that the country’s de- 
velopment objectives are undermined by 
corruption, then the bank must curtail its 
level of support ro that country.” 

■ Hong Kong Policy Cited 

Mr. Li, who spoke during his first trip 
to Hong Kong since the July 1 handover 
from British rule, also said that China 
had kept its promise to allow Hong Kong 
a high degree of autonomy, Agence 
France-Presse reported. 

His assertion was derided by critics in 
Hong Kong, who charged him with de- 
liberately misleading his audience. 

‘ ‘As a Chinese saying goes, ‘Seeing it 
once is better than hearing about it a 
hundred times,’ ” Mr. Li told delegates 
as protesters gathered outside. 

“Now you are in Hong Kong, you can 
see with your own eyes that the Chinese 
government’s basic policies of ‘one 
country, two systems,' ‘Hong Kong 
people administering Hong Kong’ and 
'a high degree of autonomy* have been 
carried out in earnest.” 

His comments were disputed by 
people ousted from the elected Legis- 
lative Council, which was replaced with 
a body appointed by Beijing: 


uviu w , . 

default at this point could threaten the 
start of work on the new space station. 

The reason for the evident frustration 
among spaceflight officials was summed 
up in’ testimony before Congress last 
week by Marcia Smith, an aerospace 
analyst with the Congressional Research 
Service. “I think that because there has 
been so much press attention to Mir 
latelv. almost entirely negative, publio 
opinion is that Mir is a questionable 
place to send U.S. astronauts,” Ms. 
Smith said. “This may or may not be a 
justified opinion,” she added. 

If there were a tragedy aboard Mir, she 
said, “I think they would wonder why h 
was that NASA had sent an astr onaut op 
there — what was it that the astronaut 
was going to do up there that was so 
important and so valuable that they 
would risk his life.” 

Mr. Culbertson and his colleagues 
maintain thar nobody has more reasons 
to work to prevent the chances of a 
tragedy in orbit, with all its devastating 
consequences, than they do. and that 
they would be leading the demands to 
bring the crew home if there was aifareat 
ro their lives that they could not handle. 

Mr. Culbertson, Mr. Wolf and others 
said they felt that some of the worst 
possible emergencies that can befall a 
spacecraft, including fire and collision, 
have already occurred aboard Mk and 
been dealt with, as the training called for, 
without harm to the crew. 

Mr. Wolf said he was not enthusiastic 
about the idea of shuttle flights to Mir at 

— — rctctv first. But now he says, “I can’t imagine 

Prime Minister Li Peng of China, right, making a point during a chat Tuesday with George Bush, the former gang into construction of the new space 
VS. president. They spoke at a meeting in Hong Kong during the conference of international financial leaders, stanon” without the Russians. 



Jiang Will Get the 7-City Treatment During His Visit to U.S. 


Las Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President Jiang 
Zemin plans to visit seven cities this fall 
in the first trip to the United States by a 
Chinese leader in nearly two decades, 
according to U.S. officials. 

The itinerary for Mr. Jiang's state 
visit in late October and early Novem- 
ber. worked out recently by U.S. and 
Chinese officials, calls for him to stop, 
in order, in Honolulu: Williamsburg, 
Virginia: Washington. Philadelphia. 
New York, Boston and Los Angeles 
before he returns home. 

The trip through the United Slates 
will be the first of its kind since Deng 


Xiaoping came to the United States in 
1979, shortly after he established dip- 
lomatic relations with the United States 
and consolidated his control over the 
Chinese Communist Party. 

Chinese officials are known to have 
worried about the possibility that dur- 
ing his time in the United States Mr. 
Jiang could face demonstrations from 
democracy activists, labor unions or 
supporters of the Dalai Lama, the ex- 
iled Tibetan leader. 

Some Americans privately cau- 
tioned Chinese officials against going 
to Boston, with its heavy concentration 
of college students, because of poten- 


tial demonstrations there. But Chinese 
officials decided that Mr. Jiang should 
include a stop in Boston, where he is 
expected to speak at Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

He will visit Washington on Oct 28 
and 29 for talks with President Bill 
Clinton and other officials. Adminis- 
tration officials hope the trip will pave 
the way both for better working ties 
with China and for greater acceptance 
by the American public of such a re- 
lationship. 

U.S. officials had been encouraging 
foe idea of a stop in some Midwestern 
city, such as Minneapolis or Chicago. 


But in the last few days, Chinese of- 
ficials rejected that idea. 

“They substituted Los Angeles for 
Chicago,” a U.S. official said. One 
factor was apparently a feeling among 
Mr. Jiang and other Chinese officials 
that he should see the West Coast. 

During his visit, Mr. Deng cam- 
paigned through the United States al- 
most in the fashion of an American 
politician. He was photographed wav- 
ing a 10-gallon hat at a Texas rodeo, 
staring up at the Harlem Globetrotters 
in Washington and taking the controls 
of a space shuttle simulator at the John- 
son Space Center in Houston. 


ALLIES: Albright Heralds New Era as U.S. and Japan Expand Their Security Alliance 


Continued from Page 1 


from all but defensive operations, no 
Japanese forces would be required to 
fight or even enter areas of combat, and 
Japan's logistical support to U.S. troops 
specifically excludes providing 
weapons or ammunition. 

The new guidelines still must be ap- 
proved by the Japanese Parliament, and 
may stir vigorous public debate. Most 


analysts say Mr. Hashimoto will be able 
* !le 


to push the legislation through because it 
has strong support from his Liberal 
Democratic Party and the main oppo- 
sition party, the New Frontier Party. 

With the Soviet Union gone, Amer- 
ican and Japanese military planners have 
focused (heir immediate thinking on a 
potential military crisis on the Korean 
Peninsula. Many strategists in both 
countries say a strong alliance is also 
prudent in the face of uncertainties posed 
by the rise of China. 

The new guidelines call for Japanese 


support for U.S. forces in conflicts in 
“areas surrounding Japan,” but those 
areas are not specified. Both sides have 
been purposely vague about the area 
covered by the pact, particularly whether 
it would cover a crisis in the Taiwan 
Strait. 

The United States and Japan have 
repeatedly assured China that their ex- 
panded military alliance is not a threat ro 
China, but officials in Beijing have been 
frequently bitter in their opposition to 
the pact 

The report itself stressed American 
and Japanese cooperation with China to 
ensure security in East Asia. “It is ex- 
tremely important for the stability and 
prosperity of the region that China play a 
positive and constructive role,” the re- 
port said. 

But the Chinese continue to see an 
expanding military alliance between Ja- 
pan and the United States as a threat. 
Chinese officials protested loudly this 
summer when an official of Mr. Ha- 


shimoto ’s government said the new de- 
fense guidelines would obligate Japan to 
become involved if a confrontation erup- 
ted between China and Taiwan, which 
Beijing regards as a renegade province. 

Earlier this month, Mr. Hashimoto 
went to China specifically to assure of- 
ficials in Beijing that Japan's strategic 
alliance with the United States did not 
mean that Japan considered China a 
threat. Mr. Hashimoto said the report did 
not specify particular locations, includ- 
ing the Taiwan Strait, which would be 
covered under the new guidelines. In- 
deed, the report issued Tuesday says the 
areas of military cooperation are “not 
geographic but situational.” 

The new defense pact has been hailed 
by Washington and Tokyo as a major 
milestone in military relations between 
the two nations, even though they call 
for only limited participation by Japan in 
the event of a Asian military conflict 
involving U.S. forces. 

Japan’s support for U.S. troops would 


not place a single Japanese in harm’s 
way, even in a conflict such as a new war 
on the Korean Peninsula, which poses 
perhaps a more immediate threat to Ja- 
pan than to the United States. 

But the items agreed to are remarkable 
in Japan, and have been described in the 
Japanese media as “drastic.” Attempts to 
send Japanese troops abroad, even un- 
armed soldiers on UN peacekeeping mis- 
sions, have been the subject of emotional 
debate in Japan, so the new guidelines are 
seen as groundbreaking in Japan. 

“Even though it looks minor from 
American eyes, this is a big step con- 
sidering Japan 's SO years of h is tory since 
World War II.” said Tomohisa Sakana- 
ka. a security specialist from Aoyama 
Gnkuin University in Tokyo. 

The security alliance is ihe United 


States’ most important military relation- 
sia. Ther 


ship in Asia. There are 47,000 U.S. 
troops stationed in Japan, the largest 
single grouping of the 100.000 or so 
troops in Asia. 


India and Pakistan 
Hold ‘Cordial 9 Talks 


Kcuters 

NEW Y ORK — The prime min- 
isters of India and Pakistan held 
talks Tuesday on their long-stand- 
ing grievances but did not nuke any 
specific decisions, Pakistan’s for- 
eign finister, Shamshad Ahmad, 
said. 

“The atmosphere was very warm 
and cordial, but of course the dif- 
ferences are there,” Mr. Ahmad 
said of tire talks between Prime 
Minister Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan 
and his Indian counterpart. Inder 
Kujmar Gujral. No date was set for 
for future contacts. 

Mr. Sharif offered Monday to 
start negotiations on a nonaggres- 
sion treaty between the two coun- 
tries, but Mr. Ahmad said this had 
not been mentioned at the meeting 
Tuesday. 


RUSSIA: 

United Front on Iran 


Continued from Page 1 


FRANCE: Surprisingly, Prime Minister and His Policies Inspire a National Shift to a Mood of Optimism 


Continued from Page 1 


issor of political science, Olivier 
Juhamel. 

Mr. Jospin’s popularity comes at a 
price, analysts say. By and large he has 
not undertaken the tough reforms that 
other European countries have accom- 
plished to prepare for global compe- 
tition. and he does not plan to. France 
remains a heavily statist country. 

His new budget raises corporate and 
investor taxes and relies on gimmicks for 
much of its progress in deficit-reduction. 
Mr. Jospin also has been aided by faster- 
than -expected economic growth, which 
increases government revenue. 

Nor has France's high unemployment 
raieof 12.5 percent yet come down under 
his tenure. France’s restive unions and 


;primei 

the Parliament have given him running 
room so far, but it may not last 

“He’s still in the honeymoon phase,” 
said Jean-Luc Parodi, secretary-general 
for (he French Political Science Asso- 
ciation. When people start focusing on 
unemployment again, he said, “then (he 
game will begin.” 

Still, public sentiment is far cheerier 
here than it was a year ago. Back then, 
(he talk was of "morosity" and whether 
France would ever recover from its fun- 
damental pessimism. 

From die point of view of the average 
Frenchman, there has been little material 
change since then. But people seem to 
fee/ better. A poll by the CSA orga- 
nization found that only 13 percent of 
respondents thought tilings were gening 


worse, while 33 percent saw improve- 
ment and 51 percent saw no change. A 
year ago, 54 percent were pessimistic 
about the future. 

“For the moment. France is breath- 
ing,” said CSA’s poll director, Stephane 
Rozes. “People luiow we haven't come 
out of our difficulties, but they also fee! 
the prime minister takes them into con- 
sideration. We are relaxing.” 

Mr. Jospin himself is riding high in 
the opinion polls. A poll made public last 
week showed his approval rating at 58 
percent, up from 44 percent when he was 
elected in June. President Jacques Chir- 
ac, a conservative who shares power 
with Mr. Jospin and who is fighting to 
remain relevant, was running a 1 46 per- 
cent, according to the poll by the IPSOS 
organization. 


Much of Mr. Jospin's success is at- 
tributed to his management style and the 
people he has appointed to cany out his 
policies. His predecessor, the tight- 
lipped. aloof Alain Juppe, appointed a 
cabinet largely of undistinguished yes 
men. In Mr. Juppe’s first six months, he 
qutckly became unpopular for issuing 
pronouncements unexpectedly, with no 
public debate. 

Mr. Jospin named the heavyweights 
of the younger generation of France’s 
leftists. He also put the chickens in 
charge of iheir chicken coops. So Domi- 
nique Voynet of the Green Party is en- 
vironment minister and Jean -Claude 
Gayssot. a Communist, is transport min- 
ister and thus inherits France’s left-lean- 
ing, strike-prone transport unions. Mar- 
tine Aubry. a well-known campaigner 


for big government, runs the Labor Min- 
istry and Dominique Strauss- Kahn a 
voice from the mainstream left, got the 
Finance Ministry. 

In cabinet meetings, ministers are en- 
couraged to speak their minds and argue 
issues out. As a result, when the final 
decision is made, ministers are less 
likely to criticize it behind Mr. Jospin’s 
back and rhose French citizens who are 
paying attention tend to Feel thar their 
views have been represented. 

People also like Mr. Jospin, who has a 
low-key manner and cracks a smile oc- 
casionally. “He is not a French politi- 
cian m the usual sense of the word.” Mr. 
Duhamel said. “Politics is not 
everything in his life*’— he seriously 
considered leaving it in 1992— “and he 

is personally happy." 


you anything at all.” After meeting 
President Boris Yeltsin here, Mr. Gore 
said that “there is no doubt in my mind' ’ 
that both the United States and Russia i 
“share the same concern about prolif- 
eration of weapons of mass destruction 
and proliferation of technologies that 
can assist in the delivery of weapons of 
mass destruction, such as ballistic mis- 
sile technologies.” 

Mr. Gore said Mr. Wisner and Mr. 
Koptev had started a “very intensive” 
process and would meet again within six 
weeks. “I can tell yon it is a very pro- 
ductive process,” he said, “ft is making 
a great deal of headway." 

Although the Russians have adam- 
antly denied selling missile or nuclear 
weapons technology to Iran, nonpro- 
liferation experts said the larger problem 
was with the vast, unprotected militarv- 
mdustrial complex. 

many research institutes, 
fabrication plants and storage facilities 
where rocket and weapons components M 
and nuclear fissile materials are kept. The “ 

h S.n'Uw? fhese plants have often nor 
peen paid for months, creating a powerful 
incentive to sell material or 

SnKti^ P ° 11 D by Center for Policy 
Sradres in Russia illustrated how 30 

gyroscopes used for guiding ballistic 

sb. Shipped to ^ Rus- 

wan*hn»f^ lda ? Ce Systcms cam e OUt of a 
warehouse and were sold to middlemen. 

11 ^ found that Russian 
expat controls ° n . lhe shi P*nent of such 
technology were nddled with holes. 

Gore announced 

aoLS ? *** United Steles had 

agreed not t 0 restart any shut-down re- 
s' 8 . 0,31 Produce weapons-grade m 
plutonium, and that Russia will convert * 
™U- S - assistance its three remaining 
ro *ey cease making weapons* 

grade plutonium by 2000 . ^ 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 21 . 1997 


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* Management 

• ITiT P-O. Box 443. 

• ViSSjY £304 ZUG - Switzerland 

• II Fn* ♦ +41 . 41 - 71050B4 
1\^ c ^ rno a <MV«ena*npany.ch 1 

Wp:WwijBl oaBipw |<fa* 

*••*••••••••••« 


Crnlrai EurnjM- 

Til.' *uiii K.\|iaiL«ion 

^ ^'elci'.ir uti«incr/ir:v-pf.ni-'r iu-r.- 
I"n. i<n]i .rii-v.:ini‘ :rt,hniu! idikn 
l! ’ I RoiiLii'i r- :>hiLmc 

i‘«r srni-.i: nren.Tjl.l-. mrn 

Uli. irn :.. nvjrkc: -*r 

cinjp I i'. i..r. jiul U i:vt.ti i vtj.e. 

•i 1 ! 1 ,,' " l '!’ ,l ‘" -Jli'. ru.iLlicJ 

'IiHi Mir S'iki.inri mevnieiif 
I' t.ij.'irvJ !•■ pirn.jjijh: 

-fiaxi.ti,, l->fl-IJ~<bor 1-1*121 2r4-|MR.l.- 


We sell 

Ibe following products: 

Ir-no v ll.idro. IVaterord. 

| VVeriy.-v. r.od, O'rijl-jtV. focf.-.ral 

Sw.+rnv.+n. Ko' <si Dou'ion. 


■ r sws. \wrr- ~ 

IN THE y l.89^ 1 U.3.A. 

Prated Your Persona) Assets 

• incorporate m any Slate inducing 
Defeaa re. Nevada A Wywnng 

• LLC 5 <umw LiaMNy Company) 

• m as bwe as os nows 

Corporate Agents. Inc. 

Fa* i302ia9a-7ore 
Concu Serve GO INC 
htw- Mw corporate com 


iiih m.r.i’ir.il >:iiijj/(es 

ra\: + 31 iOl 20 6330394 in 
The Netherlands 


■It to 




the gold machine 

T. iT.-a.TTO.vn^-.Ja.irjre; T^lWCTttSl 

>X>.C >no »PX -O-fc IT i-S 

Lpt*‘3T r, 2 TdSr- -+\. 3031^-3 
“ «»* t’ r.<-‘ ME:; y;i5 •• 

, an 9<ci| am »m in 
Us » X.j/j Uft-vjn sorts] ops* rf&nz 

KEMA PORTUkir SYSTEMS 

IHT 39 

mifaui. 


5|Mj MttTEBSON* UMITED 

i M \KHkl.l.\ SI*MN ) 

H.-Mt If, IUI^K.1 S4IIJU1I 

ta.fc- 1« i £ II I •■JU riiLii 
ifiat«e . jHuJi n'-'.Kn<if . r 
Jtr- |* •IIU.M vl 1.1 f | I Mlffwvr 

ruin' icn hchcmi^^bc'Cil 

■Ivl: ■*- 14 27tv4(i^N 
I ; jx: + *-15 J7(rl.*70 
f-'Liil iMiinma niruumn^} 


EMPSE STATE BUHDMG 
ADMBESS 

Gate* instant emCDblUty. 
EstaDUsh a NY presence m 
the worttfs best- known 
tXirkUng.MaitreceruBCf. phone 
enewenno. conference 
room, fumiaheo mMc« 
EMMffi STATE omceasmcEB 
JBtrwsMm • net »»s«4-ms 


JOINT VENTURE 

on the russian security 
maiket 


SPECIAL PROJECTS 


We look for 
partner who ts ready 
to start in Russia 
Fax: +7 3912 210595 


AUCTION 


Wednesday, Oct 8, 1997 

HW PM CDT in Louisiana. US.4 

Oil & Gas Production 
Mobile Submersible 
Platform 

208 ft. x 88 ft x 14 ft 6 in. 

Operates m water from 15 to 
35 It ; 13.20D barrel capacity; 

9- man quarter house; heliport. 

10- ton crane; complete 
production system. 

For more information cumuli. 

ServCqrp International. Inc. 1 
Tel: 504-847-1242 USA 
FAX: 504-847-1224 USA I 


S0CCe^ ^^^^^ ridC^>, 

Tee-shirt cofaured Htehotogragi K) tag. 
ffeBtonilM^ontafrier 
dlOaOWunh^ 

Contact: ftlA.L sa, 
Faxr+3223«6S3rai.: 43223414249 


Dan) miss nur coming Sponsored Section on 


International Franchising 


which will appear on 

Nov. 19,1996 

For further information, please contact: 
Judy KINC at I.H.T. .New York 
Tel.: (212) 752 3890 - Fax: <212) 755 87R5 


-ni -k 

■ i 

"- • i [£n*. T 
-p'-’haift 


: . v. t- 
' rct'JI . 

!!:;oe 

- . Mb’ jlc 

.’liircip! 

. '.:auie 

. •- VrMtf'A 


THE iNTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 4 


Import/Export 


WE EXPORT WORLDWIDE 

ALL AND ANY 
CONSUMER PRODUCTS 
NO MATTER WHAT 
YOUR NEEDS ARE 
Please contact 
'USA EXPORT CO.' 

Tel ZOI-ffitH&O, Fax: 201-896-1061 
t-roat 'CBTji 2^te0a3rpuseivaxcHi 


OVERSTOCK OF CONVERSE sneates 
available tor sale Serious Inquiries. 
No samples business please Fax. 
51&.9&7-8745 

WWW.TRADECHAIMLCOM 
Where mpmera and other large vobme 
buyers can source products and find 
supple** rarttao? 

CAN SUPPLY uNe War* T-Shfts al 
. sees, arcehenr pnc« S12-14 a rteen 
c 03 Fat enquiries ai (212) 39l 2635 
atn &Frwso 

DOMINICAN CIGARS. 9 styles, hand 
rolled, volume purchases only. 
Tdefex. USA+SW-474-3866 

LEVI 50fS. Used and New. Ouafty 
jeans (Wed bum the USA Honest and 
Reliable Far 5CMZW749 USA 

SMALL ARKS AMUUNmONMJTARY 
eqiwjnteni and si^pUes. lowest prices, 
vcWnr ortj. FAX USA +95W7WBK. 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 



Business Opportunities 


EAM MONEY. SAVE TAXES, 
SUY OfSTTNBUTXM RIGHTS 
Swiss Know-Hw Company seeks agents 
■aorklwide. More man 30 marketing op- 
poriunjpes (Heath & Beauty ! Housenokf- 
S Car AppTances). 

Fcr ambaton dease coriact 
l rear Praro^Pr^n 7. R-9490 
VadtC. LecNenslan . Phone |t) 41- 
75-232 71 72. Fax (♦) <1-75-233 16 67. 
e^. MB^ptona^gMfiHiMJ 


INTERNATIONAL MANUFACTURER of 

a REVOLUTIONARY PRODUCT for Ow 
auiormbte and are industry is seeking 
importer* and irtemafionM dtatrttforf 
Hdh sertuc financial and connedal ref- 
erences (or a lotah original and very 
fVD&ife concepl mdioul vrpertart conv 
petriwn in the toHomng aieas: Arab 
countries. South America, Pacific, Asia, 
Africa. Ausnafe. Eastern Europe S Rus- 
so, Western Europe: flaieka. UK. Italy, 
Smtmfanf Please foe ( 343) 4363443. 
emoi cosnueadv.es 

INTRODUCERS. Do you have a efiem 
based In Lafin a Souh America. Africa, 
and EaslOT Europe’ Do your cHerts 
trade toregi exchange, Wires, opMns, 
eq^uee’ You pmuide the efierts, we wfl 
do me rail and you can recene art ex- 
cetera remunerawn package. TEL/FAX: 
171 266 33H 

WT1 SOCtETY OF FMANCEIS 
Wmhn| far fi*time nofoesional s wfli 
pra(ecK ta twdmg cr taring for 
projects FREE Airmailed Report 
7W-2S2-590? Far 704-251-5061 USA 

2nd PASSPORTS I Driving Licencas / 
Degrees/Camouffege Passports/Secfet 
6m AccmmB. GM. P.O. Gen 70G0G. 

. Artwns 16610, Greece. Fax 8962152, 
hflrlAwvx^lobal^rxjneyj^ 

AAA SINGLE DISK SOFTWARE mafi 
order U.S. si20 io sort Into: 
DWunegsMSAg or cal 902-445^633. 

DIPLOMATIC PASSPORTS- lOCL Legal 
Honorary Consul EU passports. Escrow, 
ILS, Lid. htovmiw^riHassportsxom 
Ttt ♦3M90C9W' Fa -*3*^2883109 

CRUDE OL and 02 AVALASLE fort 
defdy for genuine buyers Eiffmpex, 
ASbb; Sreece. Fax *301890876. 

OXHS. Hgn grade, dued sale. 
UMJOO KT.aiteferu cotows. Fax Spaer 

34-7Sa«233 

(WSHOJC COWANES. Fortebro- 

.*«B»aa«eMLa*iM4Ai8i 741 
1224 F&r 44 IB) 748 B55S«338 


S'WYiar Ow Busness Hid USE J00 
®*nghto quay hand roBed Dominican 
Mr USA+964-47J-3866 


Aston Corporate Trustees 
Aston Hone; bougtao, Isis of Man 
Tat *44(0) 104 625591 
Pac *44 (Q) 1624 625126 

London 

Tat *44 p) 171 233 1302 
Fax: *44 (18 171 233 15M 

EMail: astonWenterprisejiet 

— IJ«t»Jl»llllWl ll»lfB I* 


RAieOROUGH LTD 
k an infi company seeing to appofei fo- 
dapandeni agerts m mainland Europe. 
We are a naw company «Nth a uriqua 
pnxkct wttibi the Ostrich industry us- 
ing a Hands Free Management Pack- 
age. We offer sucrassJJ agents an op- 
pomrity for stfostarfeai aammgs. f You 
have b euccesshi reecxti in sales aid 
marketing, *fh a dert base, reply to: 
RatobcrouohLiL 
347 Raghtwy Suicfeig 
tanngNag 34. 

1118 S. SchnM 2ukL The Netfcriands 
Tat +31 20 4057878 Fax 4C67880 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE CDs . FULL AOUM 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND UC 
BA7KWG & ACCOUNTING 
CWIA BUSihESS SERVICES 

Cortaa Steto Ho for mrwlate 
services A conyaw broc/xre 
MACS LTD, Room 1108. AUon Plaza 
28 GrarMBe Road. TST, Kknkm 
Hong Kong, wrait nacsMhkstperJiet 
Tek 852427241223 Fax Z7224373 


SURVIVE 2000, 93% of BM compatUes 
WONT. Wfl yours? FREE diagnostic 
software avitffitote from WWWjwyhra- 
2000 am or Ho from eeafisbbsxom or 
tax +6170-335570. National dtortwtors 
sougrt 

SWISS TRADHG COtopBDy is buyteF 
settn stocks d ooramoiUi manhoase 
af oum praoas for ognt Now avalabta 
2000 lades dressaa Tftt Bto* ares 
42« CODESCO RK +41 26 401 42 45 


Partnerships 

ARE YOU LOOKING TO START, BUr 
w eapandng business? wa you take an 
taesfog partner »Sh you dolm the 
work? 8)8663-2440663-2441 Fax USA. 

TUSCANY, few nfn, front Argenttrfo, 
baauful tarmhotse In the nuddle of a 
vain befnBn two rtrars - 12 bedroais 
(adacral 4 already pfcffiw^ suroufo- 
ocr by 5 acres of otwe and frtd frees, 
large courtyard wtth omamertaf frees - 
guaf how license - seettig partners to 
invest or buyers. Coniaa Mrs. M. Ro- 
mani Teh 39 564 616925. Ffox 39 564 
628418 


Business Services 


Swiss fradgmogy^B tarttog for 

PHARMACEUTICAL RAW MATERIAL 
AND - MEDICAL EQUIPMENT 
BARSQH AG 

EtalrttfstrasSB 44 - ChudSwteertand 
TW +4181 2553333 ffox +4181 S23340 


BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Alfenta- 
based ex-CEO seeks assureds. H^v 
lech background with 20 years towna- 
tfonal sales 8 marteling experience in 
Europe i Ada. Ffox: +1-770640-71 10. 

E-mat 743622 045QcopyxB8rvaxan. 

2ND PASSPORTS. Visa free travrt i 
banking back rioor to Spafo *EU. 
AgenS w welcome. Tat 372 5C683135. 
^972 <0643236 ' 

RUSSIAN Busaess Vtaaa Incfufng 
muBFenhy pk* ai ofter travel “J*® 
vta o u dowrtom **m rffoe i «+44 
(0)113 232 0062 Fax (D)113 232 OZB 

EUROPEAN UAiSOH AGBd 
Your siaiMy '■> the heart (9 
Ffox +3Z 5I338U2 Befgrmi 

UAJUNG LISTS by Seg* A Company 
Europe bwfrfess and eonsjjnw™ 
Tet <4 1312262966 Fax 44 1312257901 


WE ARE LOOKING FOR 
MERCHANTS TO SELL FRENCH 
PRODUCTS. CanaA usat 
htk&MKfceisntasiness-coa 
Fax: +33 (tjfi 61 14 85 29 


USA VISA LOTTERY. Anomay to help 
He enry. Low toes. Fax feswneMonrQ- 
tn» nr I -215-7+2-7727 USA 


YOUR OFFICE IN LONDON 
Bond Street - Mali. Phone, Ffox Tefex 
Tet 44 171 290 9000 Fax 17) 499 7517 


Business Travel 

Ist/Business Class Freqieni Travetes 
WorthHde. Ifoio 5fPi> on. No coupons, 
no restrictions. Imperial Canada Tel. 
1-514-341-7227 Far. 1-5U-34V78» 
e-mafl address: impenalS login iret 
hUp-JwwwJogiruie^rcpeflal 


Banking 

EUROPEAN BANKS issue for ycu UCS. 
SBLCs Paymed/Fmancial Guarantees 
Prod of Finds I Rndng Confrmafioa 
Fx +49-1611832858 ft +49-1728075517 


1-17280^517 


Capital Wanted 

SWSS ENTREPRBtEUR IN POLA® s 
fooling tor USS1 M caplof On 0» Pol- 
ish markffl since 2 years, successful & 
aaahfthed. capital needed for si gn fca t] 
expansion Sduadon 8 pubfcrww sector, 
high quBMy producL successhi ii Eu- 
rope sfcoa 15 years. SUstareU rehos 
■Nhin 3 years {30% dindands). Braress 
ptan n co-op with ’Big Sa' accounting 
Co Fax +41 55 241 26 )7. e-mail 
106640 I0440compts9ve com 


Capital Available 


CAPfTAL CORP. 

M4A 

Corporefe Fnarong 
Venture Cepta 
(Worldwide! 

Tel: 001-407-248-03®) 
Fac 001-407-248-0037 USA 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 
For tave&nen Progams 
Prod at Funds Avattfe . 
Through Accon H*tes at ' 
Sam US. & Euopean Bute 
(712] 7584242 Ffcc (212) 7581221 
wwwjolBitaTieyxoin 
AlwnaYs S Brokers kwied 
375 Park Aw, NY, NY 10152 USA 


COMMERCIAL FUNDWG AVA&ABLE 
astotts Fiance * Venue Capti 
Woridwida ' Broken welcome 


ETMC INVESTMENTS LTD 
FAX +44 10)115 942 7848 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

Far your towskned ftopam 
Hntoun tONOan 
tl USA 760 438 0653 
CASAVK MANAGEIENT 


BROXB4S 

Do yar own tratog transaefions 
You provide bank guarantee, n wfl 
pwide tart: endrace d turds In yon 
name. For nantad leasxn ccst 
Fac 44 (0)171 470 7113 


ARABIAN GULP Funders AraSabfa to 

fond viable projects ot minimum 
USS05M+. Ffox you mteresl ad a brief 
protact sunmeiy for free Mtal appaisl 
to fee 9714 86B8T8 Eagle Management 
Casflarts, PO Box 19283 Dd», UAE 
(Dubai Econ. Dept. Licensed Consul- 
tants) 

CAPITAL FUNDING AVAILABLE 
kfinfnun SIM USD Charges no retakier 
fees. Interest 4% S if- Contact Ms 
Jones Tet 604-734-4233 COTlfe 

COMMERCIAL/BUHNESS FINANCE 
ntfUte tor sry nade pnyeds worid- 
wfoe. Fax brtef synopss in Efl0sh to 
rapixate Adrances. (■+ >44-1 Z73-62 1 300 . 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Save rf85% On 

Internationa! Calls! 

kallback 

[Call To The U.S. From: ! 

Germany S0.31 

U.K. S0.19 

Japan S0.38 

Hong Kong S0.46 



AT&T Fiber Optic Networks ■ 24-Hour Customer Service 
he mired 6 Sac and Billing • Meal tar Home. Office, 
Holers and Ceu Ptiooes 


INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE COMPANY 

WORLDWIDE CALL BACK SYSTEM 

SAVE- UP TO 80% 


International Telephone Company 
290 Pratt Street. Meriden, CT 06450-2118 
1800-638-5558 ext. 91 ! 203-238-9794 Fax: 203-929-4906 


I -CoUers gal dapendaWa. hign-quolity Hmcr'l 

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Agents Warned 
CaH l-20fo-373-2SGt 


Tel: T. 206.599.1 991 - Fax: 1.206.599.1981 

<17 Second Avenue Wwt • Seattle. WA 38119 USA 
www.Aalttjack.coai • Email: lnfo9kantJKk.com 


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U telecom <4/nP)% / 

tr DIRECT ACCESS v PREPAID CARDS 
v CALL BACK - TRAVEL CARDS latef^Jw 

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Best Rotes & Commissions 




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See Friday’s Intfrmaritet 

Fur HuliiLn • a TrawL Reudenlkl 
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fn (u/rrrtiv rejuort Sarah Vicnritol 
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INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISES 


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No Start-up Fees * Muta-Lingual Operators Available 
Perfect for Home, Office, Hotel, Fax, or CeDuJar Phones 

5££ OUR INCREDIBLE RATES TO THE U.&: 


UJC. _S0.19 SWITZERLAND .$0.29 

FRANCE $030 ITALY S0J8 

GERMANY ^0^4 EGYPT $1.08 


Call: 201.287.8400 Fax: 201.287.8437 

e+natl: triiNine3enevnnjridteltt.com http://ivww.i>ttaiworidte)«xam 
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UNISHIPPERSi 


| ClO+Al iH/PWNO-*<»lO««UIZLO Vf tvret 


The world'* largest reseller of 
transportation services is now 
offering Master Franchise 
opportunities In Europe. 


To learn more about this 
incredible offer: 

Visit o, nt lh,- Nji’l tranchiu' 
Kvhiliiliun Dirniiu»hvni. I K Oil. 3-5 
Tel SO 1 .487.0600 
Fax 801.487.0623 

E-niai): v»vs\\.unishim>erx.cmn 


anclo American Group 
• PIC - 

PROJECT FNANCE 
VENTURE CtfiTAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO UAXMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Coipocae Brochure and 
itonreton peck 
Tef +44 19C4 am 365 
Ffox i44 1924 201 377 
You are adcome to rtsk us 


PROJECT RNANCING 

Venue CapkaJ - Jofrt Vertues • 
No ttaxmim - ftiAas Ptoiaaed 

RJJ. INTERNATIONAL 
Tel: 001-242-363-1 B49 
Fax: 001-71 6*779-82IX) 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING VEN- 
TURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENTURES- 
PRQJFCT FINANCING 


JUST PUBLISHED 

International Herald Tribune's 
International Franchise Guide ' 
INTERNATIONAL MASTER FRAN CHIS E 
& AREA DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

The definitive piiilr devoted s-oleK lo intemaiional franchising. 
Del ailed, up-to-dati- profiler, on lite woritTs leading imemarional 
&aiH'hwir>. I7n pages. US$3 1.45 (includes flipping) 

Send in IHT Guide. P.O. Bov I248S, LfoUiud. C\ (Mhf 4. Cash. Manes Order. Visa 
or M.T.: (fend Wl. *. Expir. Dale & .Approval Sisulnre).' 

Tel: (5 HD 830-5471 or Fax: (oTo) 547^3245 
E-Maif: •jOurceLookia'istrthlink.net ^ebkilerwwwJninchiseintLcom 

jicrall CS+ £ribmic 


' Master Franchise Opportunity 
BMS TECHNOLOGIES ' 


BMS Technologies is an established and successful 
American brand leader in Commercial. Residential and 
Insurance Restoration services, with a 50 year tract 
Teconi. Established in 20 countries. 

Now seeking applicants f.ar Master Franchise rights. 



Scott Mooring ||| 

t'f.V rrr!jh< : ez ' 3 


Oct. 6-12 

England, 

I Scotland. Wales 


■ Specializing in Indoor Environmental Services & 
Insurance Disaster Recovers 


Insurance Disaster Re coven 

■ Offering a proven system to build a Franchise network 

■ 22 Proprietary Patents &. 1 1 prolii Centers 
a Complete Training * On-going - Su PP on ^03nfi^| 

For an appointment to meet Scon while in Ir a 

London, call or fav Bill Sims. Principals Only. .... 

1 - 817 - 332 -1575 EAX: 817 - 335 - 51 18 .^ 


COM. REAL ESTATE 


National Sealed Bid Event 

32 Properties in 14 States, Mexico & the Bahamas 


Broker Participation Welcome 

Bid Due Date: November 14, 1997 • Noon, MST 

■ Spanish Cay, Bahamas 

163-acre island with resort and marinas 

■ Waikiki, Oahu, Hawaii 
76,234 sf 3-story shopping plaza 

■ Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii 
122,400 sf airport office, fee simple 

■ Southfield, Ml 

148,000 sf office - 95% occ 

■ Taxco, Mexico 

4-star hotel and restaurant on 7e ac 

■ Wildwood, NJ 
Boardwalk pier and retail 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


Tat +44 113 2727 550 Fas +44 113 
2727 560 Fas are not requested pnor to 
an o8et of fining bang made. 


Project CtDkaJ 
AvaBafata for Ffeot 
Unbanm iiw fin 
Marioum OSS lOffcn 
Renal costs vary weh 
Period money regtared 
Fax 44 (0)171 470 72S5 
Al Brokers wacome 


VENTURE CAPfTAL 
Mu> US5 3m from Principal 
Sait ups, dmtopmri, etc 
New Poof Avteabfe Sepfentoer 
Fae +44 (0)171 470 7158 
Atbc Corerte feence Director 
AS Broken Welcome 


“MEDIATE & UKLMTED " 
Capital evateWe for 
ALL bustoess projeds. 1 
MIN U.S. Si mA/no max. 
fnff Btmess Conatog 
(717) 357-7490 (US. FAX) 
nk^wawrtxBCMvajm (h smell 


SWISS FRANCS AVAILABLE Lm ta- 
leresi rale Information lax- 
+3) 206230004 The NeJhatentfc 


Financial Services 


mANCHG 

tor real estate, govemmert protects and 
businesses through Join Versure 
Partnasfilps. Brokars wkame 
LYONS CAPITAL WC. 
USA-tead Hemalonal financier, 
m (604) 645-0003 |F) (804) 643-0725 
lymsSiytnscapiaUsrn 
Ifljrfrmw tyonscapiaLoom 


RNANC1AL GUARANTEES 
ksxance / Reinsurance bated 
grantees tor quaffed 
txsress prqaas 
Tel 561-998-3222 
Fax 561-998-3226 USA 
n on toxp ^w PtteifeLga 


Comprehensive Brokerage Services 
Westminster Securities Corporelnn 
Wall Street beaten. Michael Woflocfi 
Tel 3*2-480-2500 Ffox 212-48D-2549 


for 

SOLUTIONS 

Ccrtar 


BANCOR 

OF ASIA 

Bantoble quararsees to seare hnfrg 
for vifflto pn(ects: 

VENTURE CAPITAL 

EQUITY LOANS 

REAL ESTATE 

Long lern roBaterai 
Sm»ied Guaranees 

Fac (632) 81(19284 
Tek (632) 884-5358 

(Coransson earned ori» tfotP Fining) 
Brokers Cowmssan Asswed 


WORLD WIDE RNANCWG 

*Connercal Mortgages 
■Venture CspfotJ 
•ax* Loans 
■Project Fining 
letters of Cre* 
■Accounts ReceivaUe Financing 
■Pifcete Placement 
•piaacsjwas 

Tel: (212) 75M242 

Fax: (212) 758-1221 

Brokers Welcome 
Park Are . NY. NY 10152 USA 
mwjotiivtameyooiri 
Refundapto Busier 

SontaHnes Reqwed. 


Diamonds 

ROUGH DIAMONDS We wfl pay ns&rJ 
cash tor ^m quafly African reign. 
«kme orty. Far 954 474-3666 USA 


Serviced Offices 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

is ready when you need it, 
eren tor a Cavite <f haus. 

* Fifly tunoional modem oScas 
and conference rooms to rem by the 
hour. (to#, morth et. 

• Yore tactical re penranen base 

■ Predige maUng adtass. AS ssrvtes 
BBE — 

91. Fg St-Honore 75006 Paris 
Tel+33 (0)144713636 Fax (DJI 42661560 


GENERAL 


Real Estate Services 


YOU OWN A PROPWTY « RttHCB 
Ore services cover In your absence: 
Martenanca. etaantag. tpuJoXng. repaks 
fobw-m d Mb, government taxes, efc 
PlEASB DO NOT HESITATE TO 
CONTACT US FOR UOR£ DETAILS 
FAX +33 $4 50 35 94 34 
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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 




Reralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



@ribuite 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TINTS ANO ™E WASHIIW.TON POST 


Medical Privacy 


Of all the threats posed to personal 
privacy by the new information tech- 
nologies, the threat to the privacy of 
medical records is by far the most 
urgent People may differ on how 
widely they want their income ortheir 
address known, or their shopping 
habits, bur little of that infonnation can 
be as disruptiveas medical information 
if it is released to the wrong people 
or, for that matter, if the wrong people 
come across it by accident 
The proposed guidelines on the sub- 
ject submitted last week to Con gress b y 
Health and Human Services Secretary 
Donna ShaJala are intended to mod- 
erate what could otherwise be the bad 
effects of a 1996 law that made health 
care coverage more accessible for mil- 
lions of Americans. Unfortunately, 
they serve mostly to underline how 
serious the problem already is, and 
how far beyond the point where mild 
measures can bring it under control. 
Getting in the way of a simple assertion 
of principle — your records are yours, 
period — is a long list of agencies and 
entities with interests to the contrary, 
from law enforcement to medical re- 
searchers, and none of them, evidently, 
has been persuaded to give ground. 

In attempting to “balance” the im- 
portance of medical record privacy 
against other interests — and specif- 
ically against “national priority ac- 
tivities” such as research, public 
health, health care cost containment 
and law enforcement — the guidelines 
end up swallowed by their loopholes, 
to the point where someone with (say) 
a drug problem or a venereal disease 


Justice Blew It 


Attorney General Janet Reno has 
opened the possibility that she may 
seek appointment of an independent 
counsel in connection with the fund- 
raising excesses that marred the last 
election. The ostensible trigger for the 
action was her discovery, in part from 
reading the papers, that the vice pres- 
ident and president both may have 
raised some money using their office 
phones, and thar some of the money 
may then have been deposited in a 
“hand" rather than a "soft" Demo- 
cratic National Committee account — 
no maner that the only real distinction 
between the two was on paper. 

There has been a flurry of reaction, 
some of it White Hou se-orchestraied, to 
the effect thar this is a ludicrous way to 
do business. The Issue is, or ought to be, 
the money, the critics say — how much 
was sought from and given by whom for 
what purposes — rather than the mean- 
ingless, almost clerical questions of 
which phones and bank accounts were 
used. But in fact it is not the phones or 
bank accounts that have forced Ms. 
Reno's hand. She was driven to act by 
revelations having to do much less with 
the president and vice president than 
with the Justice Department Her de- 
partment, on whose investigative ca- 
pabilities and integrity she had asked 
the country to depend, appears to have 
. been conducting a bumbling and less 
than fully competent investigation — 
call it what you vail, but certainly not 
one calculated to inspire confidence. 

There has been a certain amount of 
talk in recent days about which mid- 
level officials or which arms of the 
Justice Department might be at fault. 
The fault does not lie there. The at- 
torney general bears the responsibility. 
Ms. Reno's strengths have never run to 
management; nor in the relevant period 
did she have deputies officially in 
place to do the managing for her. All 
the more reason for her to have paid the 
extra heed she appears not to have done 
to an enterprise on which the cred- 
ibility of the executive branch in this 
matter depends. If we end up with an 
independent counsel in this case — in 
our judgment, not an altogether happy 
outcome — it will be not just because 
of how the money was raised last year 
but because on Ms. Reno's watch the 
Justice Department blew it. 

The broad outline of what happened 
in the last campaign is understood by 
just about everyone. Hie already weak 
constraints in the law on fund-raising 
were ripped apart by both parties. The 
principal evasion was to raise in the 
name of the parties, as soft money, funds 
that the candidates were forbidden to 
raise directly for their campaigns. Then 
the parties, which they controlled, marip. 
the money available to them anyway. 

An early question for die Justice 
Department was whether to treat just 
this, the basic scam, as a criminal of- 


fense sufficient to trigger the inde- 
pendent counsel statute. The decision 
of the career prosecutors on whom Ms. 
Reno was relying was no, on grounds 
that the relevant provisions of the cam- 
paign finance laws did not apply to 
contributions to the parties, only con- 
tributions to campaigns. Who knows 
whether that’s technically so? It none- 
theless illustrates the basic problem, 
which is not so much that the campaign 
finance laws are evaded as that they are 
weak. They were written to be evaded. 
The overriding need is to strengthen 
them, and some of the members of 
Congress most indignant about (he as- 
serted abuses of die law last year are 
among those least willing to change it 
so that such abuse could put a politi- 
cian clearly in harm's way. 

Ms. Reno has also been asked to 
seek appointment of an independent 
counsel on the basis of what the Demo- 
crats might have done — might have 
wittingly sought or accepted contri- 
butions from foreign or other illegal 
sources, might have altered policies in 
return for funds, might have done any 
number of forbidden things. Who 
knows? But of course she’s right that 
the standard for so consequential an act 
as seeking an independent counsel 
should be higher than that. 

There are two grounds. She has to 
seek such a counsel if she has specific 
and CTedible evidence that a covered 
official committed a prosecutable of- 
fense. She can seek such a one even 
without such evidence if she feels the 
department otherwise faces a conflict 
of interest in conducting an investi- 
gation and possible prosecution. Her 
position thus far has been that neither 
test has been met. Absent the triggering 
evidence that the statute requires, the 
career prosecutors and by implication 
she herself could be counted upon to 
enforce the law as vigorously as this 
case deserved. So said Ms. Reno. 

The department may yer be able to 
make the technical case, and perhaps it 
should, that the first test hasn't been 
met You* ve read all the arguments. The 
ban on solicitation of funds in gov- 
ernment offices wasn't meant to apply 
to phone calls like these. Neither the 
president nor the vice president knew 
how the money was being split up, etc. 
If a credible Justice Department said 
these things, most people would prob- 
ably say O-K. — even those who be- 
lieve, as we do, that the undo-lying 
system of campaign finance that Bill 


Clinton and A1 Gore so helped to perfect 
t. Who can 


last year is corrupt and wrong, wno can 
want an issue as important as this to 
come down to the wrong phone jack or 
deposit slip? But credible is the key 
word Ms. Reno says the department 
deserves the public's confidence. But 
that confidence has to be earned, and on 
this one it has been dissipated instead 
— THE WASHINGTON POST 


ENTERN A710N *L 


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editorials/opinion 


might plausibly be inclined to avoid 
medical care altogether. How else en- 
sure that they won’t nun up years from 
□qw — name and all — in a computer 
scan by an investigator of an unrelated 
crime or a researcher on a medical 
study? Even in cases where a patient is 
notified and objects, the holder of the 
infonnation can release it if the re- 
quester can demonstrate that 1 ‘the need 
for the infonnation outweighs the pri- 
vacy interest of the patient' ' — a for- 
mulation that leaves little of the 
concept of an actual privacy right. 

Loopholes aside, the guidelines lay 
down good basic principles on who 
should be able to see personal medical 
files and why: Essentially, they say, 
only “providers” and “payers” ought 
to have access to such records, and 
only if they are using them for those 
purposes. Employers, for example, 
would be barred from takin g infor- 
mation about health for insurance pur- 
poses and then passing it on to those 
involved in decisions about promotion. 
Passing on information inappropri- 
ately would carry heavy penalties, as 
would failing to safeguard it from free- 
lance snooping. Such punishment after 
the fact is all very well, but the whole 
point about breach of privacy is that 
once a secret is out, it's out. 

The new technology makes that first 
leak all the more likely. What’s needed 
are not safeguards for existing rights to 
snoop — by government or otherwise 
— but tough, simple rules that stand a 
chance of counteracting that growing 
danger. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Study in Madness by Inconsolable Republicans 

mnducted an 


W ASHINGTON — tf President 
Bill Clinton had some gumption 
and. maybe more important, a taste for 
confrontation, he would call in the 
press, order up the TV networks and 
announce he was pardoning both him- 
self and A1 Gore for anything relating 
to campaign fund-raising. He would do 
that, he would solemnly announce, so 
that Congress would write a law that 
makes some sense. 

The current laws do noL In fact, there 
is something downright absurd about 
marshaling the Justice Department and 
then maybe an independent counsel to 
look into whether Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Gore actually asked someone some- 
where to make a political donation. 
This, we are told, night be a felony — 
like, say, armed robbery. As anyone 
can see, it is actually an absurdity. 

What do we care — Mr. and Mrs. 
USA — whether Mr. Gore or Mr. Clin- 
ton was in the business section of the 
White House when he picked up the 
phone or upstairs in the private quar- 
ters? What do we care whether Mr. 
Gore was in his office or ducked across 
the street to a pay phone? What do we 
care whether he used a credit card or 
called collect? Yet these are some of 
the very issues involved in this mole- 
hill-into-a-mountain scandal 


By Richard Cohen 


As everyone but congressional Re- 
publicans seems to know, the law in- 
volved was designed to stop elected 
federal officials fronymtting the arm 
on their own staffs. Tms was once a 
routine practice anri ( indeed, is not un- 
known to this day. In some jurisdic- 
tions, county or municipal workers are 


the uncontested fact thar Mr. Clinton 
cheapened the White House with his 

greed for campaign bucks. The coffees, 

the sleepovers, the Lincoln Bedroom 
for the campaign version of frequent 

flier miles — alltiiese turned what used 

to be called The People's House into a 
bed-and-breakfast fin- fat cats. 

Sooner or later the public — but 
probably never the press — is going to 
understand that the Republicans are 


expected to make political donations to railing for an independent counsel for 
the reigning organization. Senate Re- what, in essence, may not be a crime 
publicans in need of some pointers can and should not be a crime anyway, 
ask A1 D’Amato how this is done. Back in 1975, that was the conclusion 
If Mr. Clinton or Mr. Gore had done of four Watergate special prosecutors 
something along those lines, an in- — Archibald Cox, Leon Jaworski, 
dependent counsel would be justified, Henry Ruth and Charles Ruff. In 2 
Or had either one of them — or anyone report, they said the law was so con- 
within a mile of Mr. Clinton — offered ' fusing and antiquated that Congress 
a job or a government program in ex- ought to change it Congress, of course, 
change for a contribution, that too has done nothing of the sort, 
would be serious stuff. Then it would What's more, if an independent coun- 

not matter ifihe call was made from the sel is summoned, the result will be a 
presidential shower or the Situation partisan donnyhrook. Attorney General 
Room — with a Donald Duck phone or Janet Reno will have to mm the matter 
the vaunted red one. A crime would over to a three-judge panel headed by 


have b een committed. 

But in the absence of any such ac- 
cusation, the Republicans press ah ea d 
anyway — and, in the process, do the 
Write House a favor. The question of 
who called whom from where obscures 


the toxically partisan David B. Sen telle. 
(He supposedly named his daughter Re- 
agan after you-know-who.) He is the 
same appellate judge whose panel fired 
Robert Fiske and replaced him with 
Kenneth Starr, a frank ideologue him- 


self. Mr. Starr has since 
open-ended investigation of Whiter a- 

ter/whkh has so for 
more than questions about his com 
petence. He seems lost in Arkansas. 
^The Republican Party has * 
make about the way this White House 
raised money. But for a party whose so« 

attribute isabeUef in less government, it 

is awfully quick to bring in the gov- 
ernment’s heaviest guns to swat is, 

after all a mere gnat of an aJ le S“ 
infraction. Once summon^ though, 
the Lord High Independent Counsel can 
do pretty much what he or she wants. 
That would mean, among other tilings, 
that Mr. Gore would have to spend more 

and more time in the attic, searching for 
old records, canceled checks and tugh 
school yearbooks. He has already had to 

hire two criminal lawyers. 

The whole thing is a study in dis- 
proportion, in a madness that, in other 
places, would entail an examination of 
ihe water supply. Campaign financing 
badly needs reform but rather than do 
that, congressional Republicans are 
trying to lynch Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Gore for what, it appears, is their most 
serious offense: winning the last elec- 
tion. No independent counsel is going 
to change that. 

The Washington Post. 




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# 4 


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In the Taiwan Strait, a Confluence of Dangerous Currents 


T AIPEI — In the 10 years 
since martial law on this is- 
land was lifted and relationships 
with mainland China were au- 
thorized, Taiwan has come of 
age politically. But so has the 
struggle for recognition and au- 
tonomy across the Taiwan Strait, 
which now threatens the peace 
of East Asia and will bedevil the 
forthcoming summit meeting of 
President Bill Clinton and Pres- 
ident Jiang Zemin of China. 

A week of discussions with 
senior officials and political 
leaders here suggests that 
Taiwan is preparing to continue 
and perhaps intensify its drive to 
expand its international accept- 
ance and connections, a drive 
that is infuriating to China. 
While hoping to pursue its goal 
without generating new Chinese 
threats or use of force, many of 
Taiwan's leaders are counting 
on the United States to back 
them up if the worst happens. 

With the exception of the 
permanently hostile situation 
on the divided Korean Penin- 
sula, no other problem has as 
much potential to involve the 
United States, China and per- 
haps Japan in a new war. Para- 
doxically. the high degree of 
tension is an unintended con- 
sequence of an unexpectedly 
positive development — the 
democratization of Taiwan. 

When I made my last visit 
here more than two decades ago. 
Taiwan was ruled with an iron 
hand by the Nationalist Party or 
Kuomintang, the political arm 
of tire Nationalist army that fled 
to the island when the Com- 
munists triumphed in China's 
civil war. Political opposition 
was suppressed, the press was 


By Don Oberdorfer 


under tight control and contact 
with the mainland was banned. 
All that changed d ramatically in 
1987 when President Chiang 
Ching-kuo, the son of the Na- 
tionalist leader Chiang Kai- 
shek, lifted mania] law and au- 
thorized cross-straits economic 
and cultural interaction. 

Today Taiwan is one of the 
world's great trading powers 
with fractions domestic politics 
and an uninhibited press. Its 
predominant political culture is 
that of native Taiwanese with 
fewer historical or emotional 
ties to the mainlan d. They have 
little interest in reuniting with 
the mainlan d in “one China," 
which is the consistent and ar- 
dent objective of the authorities 
in Beijing and which has been 
formally accepted by the United 
States as China's legitimate aim 
since 1972. 

T wo years ago. President Lee 
Teng-hui, the first native 
Taiwanese standard-bearer of 
the long-ruling Kuomintang 
and the first popularly elected 
president, used a U.S. public 
relations firm, Cassidy & As- 
sociates. to persuade Congress 
and the administration to permit 
him to visit the United States 
despite the absence of official 
diplomatic recognition. Main- 
land authorities, who saw Mr. 
Lee's high-profile visit as pan 
of a drive for permanent in- 
dependence, erupted with fury. 

The result was Chinese mis- 
sile tests in the waters near 
Taiwan in July 1995 and more 
menacing tests in March 1996, 
prompting Washington to dis- 
patch two aircraft carrier battle 


groups as a warning against es- 
calation. It was the largest de- 
ployment of U.S. naval power 
in East Asia since the end of the 
Vietnam War. 

To calm the waters, the Clin- 
ton administration warned 
China to back off, but it also 
asked Taiwan to avoid provoc- 
ative actions. China got the mes- 
sage, thnng h hard-liners (Ed not 
nice it and the incident mav have 
s timulated long-tom military 
planning to overcome future 
U.S. challenges. 

The parallel U.S. message to 
Taiwan was “not brought home 
too clearly to the top people," 
according to ftedenck Chien, 
speaker of tee National As- 
sembly and fo rmer foreign min- 
ister. * Several U.S. and 
Taiwanese offi cials told me the 
island's political activists and at 
least some of its senior leaders 
feel assured of U.S. military 
backing against China for almost 
anything they do short of of- 
ficially declaring independence. 

The opposition Democratic 
Progressive Party, making a 
strong bid for power largely on 
the basis of Taiwan ethnic con- 
sciousness, has won local gov- 
erning authority over more than 
half the island's people. Its 
probable presidential candidate 
in 2000, Taipei Mayor Chen 
Shui-bian, has been guarded in 
some of his public comments 
about the island's future but 
told me flady: “We should es- 
tablish a new and independent 
Republic of Taiwan. Taiwan is 
not pan of mainland China. 

Last week. President Lee and 
an entourage of 100 officials 


and business people returned 
from a 16-day tour of Central 
and South American nations 
that are among the 30 countries 
that .still recognize Taiwan as 
the legitimate government of 
China. Since the trip broke little 
new diplomatic ground. China 's 
objections were muted. 

Nonetheless, an elated Lee 
entertained Taiwan journalists 
along the way with on-camera 
bashing of the mainlan d as 


ivr : ' 

Trt.U is 


Many in Taiwan 
feel assured of U.S . 
military backing 
against China for 
almost anything 
they do short of 
officially declaring 
independence. 


“nothing to be afraid of’ since 
C hina is big but “just Stupid." 

Taiwan's incoming foreign 
minister, former unofficial 
Washington - .representative 
Jason Hu, said in an interview: 
■ ‘We need international breath- 
ing space for our survival and 
the development of our freedom 
and prosperity.” He and others 
said the drive for greater re- 
cognition will continue, though 
some officials also spoke ap- 
provingly of caution, especially 
in connection with future visits 
to the United States, and nearly 
everyone expressed the hope 
that the severed semi-official 
dialogue will resume. 

“We are not going to do any- 


thing that will sabotage your 
relations with the regime on the 
mainlan d." said Vice President 
Lien Chan, considered the 
likely governing party candi- 
date to succeed Mr. Lee. 

Another straw in the wind, 
however, was the signing of a ^ 
new contract on July 1 for three 
more years of the Cassidy & „ 
Associates efforts in Washing- 
ton at SI, 950, 000 annually. 

Asked what the lobbyists are 
going to do for Taiwan with all 
that money, Vice Foreign Min- ' 
ister Cben Chien-jen respond- 
ed, “We have nothing to do 
with them." Vice President Li- 
en disclaimed any government- 
al responsibility for the lobby- * 
ists but said die operations of 
the r uling party were a separate - 
matter, like “church and state” 
in Western countries. 

The fundamental problem is 
that many or most citizens of , 
Taiwan no longer believe in re- - 
union with the mainland and are 
eager for international recogni- ; 
tionin their own right. Taiwan’s 
politics cater to the popular - 
view. The United States, which 
officially endorses the 'tone' 
China ’ ’ policy’ but also believes . 
in democracy and the consent of _ 
the governed, is caught in the ’ 
middle. As a result, a time bomb : 
is ticking in tee Taiwan Strait. . 


41 * 





* 


The writer, a former Wash- 
the* 


ington Post Northeast Asia and • 
diplomatic correspondent, is ■. 
joumalist-in-residence at the . 
Foreign Policy Institute of 
Johns Hopkins University's 
Nitze School of Advanced In- ' 
temational Studies. He contrib - . 
uted this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


It’s Up to Kabila to Create the Centerpiece of a New Africa 


L OS ANGELES — When 
Mobutu Sese Seko seized 
control of Congo some three 
decades ago, Africa was emerg- 
ing into independence with an 


By Helen Watson Wintered tz 


uncertainty that made it prime 
" jnial 


territory for postcolonial ex- 
ploitation. Abetted by the CIA, 
be signed on as a Cold War 
client and, with the aid of the 
United States and former Euro- 
pean colonialists, grew to be a 
ruinous dictator. 

When Laurent Desite Kabila 
toppled Marshal Mobutu this 
spnng, the continent was gaining 
a sense of its own Strength- 
Countries neighboring Congo 
swept Mr. Kabila into power 
with a speed that stunned the 
world. They wanted an end to a 
dictatorship that looked first to 
the interests of the West, rather 
than Africa, and an economically 
viable country in their center. 

The question no longer is 
whether the heart of Africa will 
go Communist, but whether Mr. 
Kabila can resuscitate it and 
pump fresh economic blood in- 
to arteries of commerce long 
blocked by a sclerosis of cor- 
ruption. The outcome will be 
critical in determining whether 
the country will become the 
centerpiece of a new, cooper- 
ative Africa run by a fresh gen- 
eration of leaders. 

The corollary is whether Mr. 
Kabila can fix Congo without 
sacrificing human rights, those 
of his 45 million citizens who 
suffered under Marshal Mobutu 
and those of Hutu refugees lost 
or massacred in central Africa. 

The swiftness of Mr. Kab- 
ila's success testified to the ut- 
ter rottenness of Marshal 
Mobutu's regime and to the ex- 
traordinary backing the rebels 
received from 10 African coun- 
tries. Such unanimity in altering 
the course of events within 
Africa is unprecedented. 

The rebels' foremost backers 
were Uganda and Rwanda, 
which supplied soldiers, 
weapons ana logistics. Unbe- 
knownst to most of the world, 
Rwanda had been helping 


design Marshal Mobutu's over- 
throw for two years. Rwanda's 
defense minister and vice pres- 
ident, Paul Kagame, collabor- 
ated in this with Yoweri Musev- 
eni, Uganda's president. 

They were joined by other 
neighbors such as Angola, 
which had suffered from the 
U.S. use of Marshal Mobutu as 
a Cold War pawn in a deadly 
game to destabilize its Marxist 
government. Political or eco- 
nomic backing for the rebellion 
also came from Burundi, Zam- 
bia, Tanzania and more distant 
Eritrea, Ethiopia. Zimbabwe 
and South Africa. 

The Democratic Republic of 
the Congo borders nine coun- 
tries, a fact that under Marshal 
Mobutu created a great eco- 
nomic hole in the center of 
Africa. A functioning Congo 
could provide a central infra- 
structure for business in a large 
portion of sub-Saharan Africa. 
The country's railways and 
roads, as well as its natural 
Congo River highway, could be 
the crucial link between Kin- 
shasa and Cape Town, Maputo 
and Luanda. Nairobi and 
Brazzaville, between economic 
centers north and south, east 
and west. If Congo's minerals 
could be mined efficiently 
again, the country could grow 
rich, its wealth a boon also to its 


trading partners. The harness- 
>f tf 


ing of the rivers' hydroelectric 
potential literally could light up 
the region. 

Now, however, the Congo 
centerpiece is little more than 
one of the most abused sites of 
the former Cold War. . Hie 
Mobutist name “Zaire” has 
been discarded, but the econ- 
omy remains in shambles; most 
bureaucrats are not getting paid; 
a Congolese cannot mail a let- 
ter, make a transcountiy tele- 
phone call or transport goods 
without getting mired in all but 
impassable roads. 

Mr. Kabila, generally, has 
been succeeding with his prom- 


ise to end the corruption on 
which the Mobutist system mal- 
functioned to such a degree that 
an invalid had to pay a bribe for 
a hospital bed. Citizens can now 
cross the capital without being 
robbed by undisciplined sol- 
diers, international travelers 
can pass through tee airport 
without being shaken down. 

Mining companies, based in 
tee United States, Canada and 
South Africa, are preparing ma- 
jor deals that should send 
money flooding into bankrupt 
Congo. This is but a first step, 
though, by an international 
community still wary of central 
Africa's new strongman. 

Mr. Kabila has stayed largely 
behind the scenes. He is a ten- 
acious strategist whose lifelong 
object was to overthrow Mar- 
shal Mobutu and whose goal 
now is to do a much better job. It 
seems he is doing just teat, but 
not without difficulties that 
could worsen as he tries to gov- 
ern the vast, fractious and eth- 
nically divided country. 

His method of dealing with 
the countiy’s pro-democracy 
movement, which also had long 
struggled against Marshal 
Mobutu, has been suppression. 

He quickly squelched 
demonstrations by democratic 
groups, his troops shooting at 
protesters in a few instances. 
Many thought tee wiser tactic 
would have been to incorporate 
the movement’s popular leaders 
into tee echelons of govern- 
ment, thereby neutralizing dis- 
sent and gaining a more satisfied 
populace in the capital, where 
Mr. Kabila is an outsider. 

Already, there is talk on the 
Kinshasa streets of an anti-Kab- 
ila backlash. He is called an- 
other Mobutu for his initial non- 
democratic stance, although he 
has sworn to hold national elec- 
tions. 

The tactic of Mr, Kabila's 
government for handling tee is- 
sue of the Hutu refugees, thou- 
sands of whom were slaughtered 


by Tutsi soldiers in his army or 
else disappeared into the central 
African rain forest, has been to 
stonewall UN investigators. For 
this, Mr. Kabila has garnered 
international disapproval but 
has not lost the backing of Af- 
rican allies who collectively 
have accused tee West of vil- 
ifying their colleague. 

U.S. policymakers have been 
trying to press the issue without 
losing Mr. Kabila and his cru- 
cial potential. They have been 
negotiating with him and 
dangling millions in much- 
needed aid monies as a carrot, in 
a way reminiscent of past de- 
cades when they tried to correct 
the tyrannical Mobutu while 
embracing him. 

Meantime. Mr. Kabila is 
looking Africaward. He is set on 
imitating Uganda's Museveni, 
whose country has working 
roads, a sparkling economic 


growth rate and the praise of 
in temational lending institu- 
tions. The Ugandan is poshing 
the idea of African common 
markets as pan of a post-post- 
colonial independence in which 
the continent is on a more equal ' 
footing with its former masters. •' 
“Africa is neither Anglo- ' 
phone nor Francophone’’ bur- 
“Bantuphone." Mr. Museveni - 
said at Mr. Kabila’s inaugura- t 
tionin Kinshasa, “because from . 
Cameroon all the way to South ' 
Africa, we speak Bantu lan- . 
guages. ' '.Mr. Kabila cheered the 
idea of a cohesive Africa, but tee 
task of helping create it will be a i 
lot tougher and more compli- ^ 
cated than riding the rebellion. 







xi,V 




' 1 ' jJW 




The writer is author of " East r 
Along the Equator: A Journey 
Up the Congo and Into Zaire. " 
She contributed this comment to . 
the Los Angeles Times. 



IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897; Hungarian Riot 


VIENNA — It is reported that at 
Sjenica, 4,000 peasants have as- 
sembled, armed and organized 
in military fashion. They are 
under the mistaken notion that a 
district judge and other officials 
who visited their parish have 
brought a Hungarian flag to 
hang it from the church steeple, 
and that when it has been there 
two hours all tee population 
which is Orthodox must become 
Roman Catholics and Magyars. 
They have already murdered the 
judge and two other officials 
with hayforks and have fired 
upon the gendarmes. 


himself quite safe. Associated 
with other fierce revolutionar- 
ies, Dzierjmski organised tee 
Extraordinary Commission for 
combating counter-revolution, 
which executed more than 
1,700,000 Russians durins the 


hfj?. I 9 1 0I | suspicion of ^ 


Harboring anti-Soviet views. 


1947; Sofia Execution 


1922: Soviet Murdered 


PARIS — Reports direct from 
Moscow claim that Felix Dzier- 
Jjnski was assassinated on 
September 21. H, e mimier ^ 
reported to have been plotted 
long ago and carried out at a 
time when Dzierjmski thought 


SOFIA — Nikola Petkov. Bul- 
garian opposition political lead- 
er convicted of treason, was ex- 
ecuted at midnight [SepL 23]. 
The trial of Petkov had resulted 
ui strenuous protests by the 
United States and Great Britain 
mat Bulgaria was violating pro- 
visions of the treaty of peace. 
Soviet Russia declined to sup- 
port tee protests on the ground 
that they represented interfer- 
ence in Bulgarian internal af- - 
fairs- Petkov was leader of the W 
Agrarian Peasant party — the 
main opposition to the dominant 
Communist party. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGE 11 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Has America Forgotten 
Jiang’s Dark Side? 


HPf2 


ftibue. 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


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' ' •-'•••! Ik I^RKSt 

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N EW YORK — Jiang Zemin 
is a very important man and 
gets more important all the time. 
Next month he will visit Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton in Washington 

So we really ought to do a little 
boning up on the man. 

True, the press and TV have 
been reporting about Mr. Jianc 
recently. They told us that ar 
the recent Communist Party 
congress he strengthened his 
position as president of China 
and leader oi the party. 

Bur there’s lots more interest- 
ing material about Mr. Jiang that 
would help us get to know him 
better. For instance, he is a killer. 

That is not new or surprising. 
Maybe that is why Mr. Clinton 
never mentions- it. Or maybe 
he forgot. 

After all. Mao Zedong killed 
off millions in his time. And 
Deng Xiaoping was responsible 
for the massacre at Tiananmen 
Square and for the deaths of so 
many Tibetans that their number 
will never be known. 

Still, it is interesting to know 
that after Tiananmen, Mr. Jiang, 
as Mr. Deng's chosen heir, 
carried on in his tradition. 
He began and supervised a 
crackdown that lasts to this day. 
A U.S. State Department report 
says the crackdown has wiped 
out the dissident movement. 

On Tibet. Mr. Jiang in his eight 
years of power before and after 
Mr. Deng’s death showed him- 


self at least as murderous as his 
mentor and master. He added a 
touch of his own — promoting 
and enriching Chinese officers 
and officials particularly effec- 
tive in the Tibetan genocide. 

William Triplett 2d, a former 
chief Republican counsel to 
the Senate Foreign Relations 
Comminee. reminds us of that 
in an op-ed column in The 
Washington Times of Sept. 12. 
Mr. Triplett is one of the small 
tribe that bos not been stricken 
with the amnesia that has gripped 
the White House. American 
politicians, business executives 
and much of American journa- 
lism about Mr. Jiang. 

Last year, according to 
Amnesty International. Mr. 
Jiang's police and kangaroo 
courts ordered a record number 
of death sentences and execu- 
tions. The Committee io Protect 
Journalists has named Mr. 
Jiang one of the world’s 10 top 
enemies of the press. He came in 
second, beaten byAntarZouabri. 
head of the Armed Islamic 
Group, which hunts down and 
murders Algerian journalists. 
(An Algerian newspaper recently 
reported that Mr. Zouabri had 
been killed by security forces.) 

Mr. Jiang is an enormously 
busy man. As president and head 
of the party he is involved in every 
major government endeavor. 
Perhaps the largest is the laogai. 
which is built into the Communist 


MOST 
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system as an important source of 
state income ana an instrument of 
national rule and control. 

The laogai, which stands for 
* ‘reform through labor," is a vast 
national network of more than 
1,000 prisons, forced-labor 
factories and detention centers. 

Hany Wu spent 19 years in the 
laogai for expressing “rightist" 
opinions. After making his way to 
America, he has spent his life 
trying to awaken the West to the 
existence of this Chinese super- 
gulag and to its importance to the 
Communist leadership. He told 
The Weekly Standard of Wash- 
ington that the present laogai pris- 
oner population was 6 to 8 million 
and that in the 50 years Mr. Jiang 
ancf his predecessors have run it. 


50 million Chinese have suffered 
in its cells. 

But most U.S. bureaucrats, 
CEOs and officeholders are 
not interested in ail that human 
rights stuff, not even when the 
persecution is directed at their 
fellow Christians. The only 
human rights policy they respect 
is Mr. Jiang’s warning to 
foreigners doing business with 
China: Open your mouth and we 
will shut your cash registers. 

Would Congress and the 
White House be interested in 
this item: Under Mr. Jiang 
the Chinese military has been 
enormously strengthened in 
military high-tech weaponry? 

No, 1 suppose not: they know it 
already and don't seem to mind. 


They even know, because the 
Chinese admit it, that under Mr. 
Jiang the Communist govern- 
ment lied when it denied that 
China had supplied special ring 
magnets to Pakistan’s nuclear- 
weapons program, and lied when 
it denied diverting American air- 
craft machinery and a special su- 
percompu ter from their supposed 
civilian-factory destinations 
straight ro military plants. 

This brief bio o’f Mr. Jiang-in- 
power might come in handy when 
he visits the White House or if, 
as he has asked, the president 
and the House speaker, Newt 
Gingrich, invite him to address a 
joint session of Congress, just 
like Lafayette and Churchill. 

The Sew York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


i’TjJ On Buying Voters 

V i Regarding “Anyone for a 
Campaign to Stop Financing 
TV?” ( Opinion . Sept. 20) b\ 
William Pfaff: 

•- The question of motive haunts 
• ;? 1 - every campaign finance system 
* L * that relies on private contribu- 
_. .. fions. Bur in very few areas of 
^ ,ai; American politics is there such a 
"^ cai c £> gap between what die public and 
• journalists believe and what the 
-dj 2 academic research demonstrates. 
Serious research using scientific 
measures finds thar money can 
■ ™ P L U *! probably buy access — die op- 


portunity to persuade and make a 
case — but only rarely can it be 
sbown to have bought a vote. 

In any case, the chances for 
successful persuasion depend on 
whether a legislator is already fa- 
vorably disposed toward an issue. 
Contributors contribute to like- 
minded candidates just as voters 
vote for like-minded candidates. 

In other words, does the money 
follow the votes or do the votes 
follow the money? The answer 
is not as clear as Mr. Pfaff seems 
to believe. 

Money is only one source of 
influence among man y others: 


ideology, party affiliation, local 
sentiment, presidential pressure, 
etc. In fact, political sentiment in 
the home district far outweighs 
contributions in determining 
votes in Congress. It makes little 
sense for a politician to take a 
stand on an issue in order to please 
a contributor if it produces even a 
small loss of voter support. 

Another area where a vast 
amount of research does not 
support popular opinion is the 
influence of television on 
voters. Citizens are smarter in 
recognizing their interests than 
the communication elite believes. 


Furthermore, research in 
content analysis shows that paid 
political commercials are far 
better at communicating issues 
and positions to voters than is the 
news. It turns out that the news 
overly emphasizes the "horse 
race" aspect of campaigns. 

A healthy suspicion of the role 
of money in politics is necessary in 
a democracy. This suspicion has 
led to reforms in campaign spend- 
ing that have progressively made 
campaigns in America more open 
and honest- Mr. Pfaff can gather 
a mmunit ion to attack politicians 
because campaign financing in 


the United States is so transparent. 

A more serious problem in U.S. 
politics is apathy and cynicism. 
Research also shows that journa- 
lism that goes beyond being 
responsibly vigilant to venting ex- 
cessive rage unduly undermines 
trust in elected representatives and 
government legitimacy. This, too. 
is dangerous in a democracy. 

STEVEN EKOVICH. 

Paris. 

The writer is associate profes- 
sor in the Department of Politics 
and International Affairs at The 
American University of Paris. 


S AN FRANCISCO — I grew 
up in Baltimore at a time when 
the tallest building was 29 stories 
high. 

In New York, a nondescript 
apartment complex was taller. 

We suffered from an inferiority 
complex. 

New York had the Yankees, the 
best in major league baseball, 

MEANWHILE 

and we had a minor league fran- 
chise in the International League. 
Then in 1954 we got the Baltimore 
Orioles, and they promptly lost 
100 games in their first season. 
We were very embarrassed. 

Before the next year began the 
Orioles traded a large chunk of the 
team to the Yankees in a 17-player 
deal. A con job, we thought — we 
got nine players for eight. Among 
the players we pawned off on the 
New York guys: Don Larsen. 

So what happens? In the annual 
Yankees vs. the World Series in 
1956 (that particular year, the 
world was represented by the 
Brooklyn Dodgers), Larsen pitches 
a perfect game. Then, as if to rub 
it in. Bob Turley, another of the 
players we sent to New York, wins 
the Cy Young Award in 1958. 

We were embarrassed. Again. 
As we rolled into the late 1950s 
and early 1960s, the Yankees 
had ail that power and we had 
the legacy of Vem Stephens, 
who had led our team in 1954 
with eight home runs. 

The Orioles could never beat 
the Yankees, and I suffered. That 
suffering included the indignity 
that my cousin, my favorite 
cousin, was a Yankees fan. 

We’d go to a.hotel in downtown 
Baltimore to meet the Yankees 
as they got off the team bus. 
Autographs of Mantle, Berra. 
Ford, Skowron — he got them all 
I just watched, bating every one 
of those talented legends. 

And then, in 1966, Frank 
Robinson came to Baltimore and 
everything changed Winning! 
Pennants! The World Series! And 
die sweet satisfaction that the 
Yankee teams were in the toilet 
Bnt nothing good lasts forever. 
When Reggie Jackson left Oak- 
land after the 1975 season he 
made a stop in Baltimore, but by 
1977 he had moved on to the 
Yankees, and again the Bronx 
Bombers were world champions. 


This time, though, we could 
live with it We were almost al- 
ways a team to be reckoned with, 
and we came back for another 
world championship in 1983. 

Now we nave a real rivalry. For 
the second year in a row, both the 
Orioles and the Yankees are 
headed to the playoffs. 

Baltimore, of course, has better 
fans — or more of them. The 
Orioles outdraw the Yankees by a 
million a year, and there must be 
30 million more New Yorkers. 

So baseball teaches us that 
times change, that the improbable 
has a way of coming to pass. 
Thai’s what happened on a night 
about two years ago. 

It was Sept. 6, 1995, and Lou 
Gehrig's unbreakable consecutive 
game record was about to fall 
Baltimore’s Iron Man, Cal Rip- 
ken, had tied the Yankee immortal 
the day before. I flew in from New 
York, where I was filming, to see 
the event. I sat in the box of Peter 
Angelos, the Orioles* owner, and 
in front of me was Joe DiMaggio. 

The Yankee Clipper was in Bal- 
timore. Someone asked if I’d like 
to meet The Man, and I was shak- 
ing his hand seconds later. We 
talked. Baseball stories. And then 
he handed me a piece of paper. 

"Take a look at this," he said. 
It was his speech for the Cal Rip- 
ken celebration. He asked what 
I thought, and I was completely 
taken aback. Joe DiMaggio — 
the man from the team I loathe, 
the man who is revered — was 
asking me for my opinion. 

I almost said, "I have to tell you 
that since I was a kid I've never 
gotten a Yankee autograph, ever; 1 
have always hated the Yankees." 
But 1 told him the speech was 
straightforward, heartfelt And he 
delivered it that evening with all 
die dignity that is Joe DiMaggio. 

Back at the hotel I saw him 
across the lobby and approached 
him. I told him how well the 
speech had worked. 

He smiled, and for a moment I 
was a Yankees fan to the core. But 
as I walked away I returned to my 
senses. I will always love to hate 
the Yankees. I will concede this, 
though: They have a better hat 

The writer is an author, pro- 
ducer and director whose films 
include "Rain Man ” and ” The 
Natural." He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


• ■-••• Zi "0IH: 

retow 

. - . ir. ih- 
- r^b*'Er 

-.7. - 1’ Star 


BOOKS 


New Ato 


b.*zr PRAGUE IN BLACK 
ml AND GOLD* 

Scenes From the Life 
77 »f a European City 

5v Peter Demetz. 411 pages. 
f ^2750. Hill and Wang. 

v Reviewed by 

Michael Henry Heim 

I N our desire to find a mul- 
ticultural society that 
works, we cast about through 
history for success stories. 
The advertising copy I re- 
ceived with "Prague in Black 
1 *\and Gold" shows just how 
• jdesperate we are. It makes the 
claim that the collaboration 
among Czechs, Germans and 
Jews living together in 
^ Prague from the Middle Ages 
' on produced a uniquely cos- 
mopolitan city, "one free for 
1 ,000 years from the nation- 
alism and xenophobia that 
mark many multiethnic soci- 
eties today." It makes this 
claim of a book whose author 
on the very first page depicts 
his Czech-speaking Jewish' 
mother going off to a German 
concentration camp. 

Moreover, what follows is 
an account of a thousand 
vy ears of ethnic strife. It is mit- 
Vigated, true, by relatively hal- 
cyon interludes. In fact, the 


author, Peter Demetz, owes 
his existence to one of them: 
He was bora just after World 
War 1 arid the formation of the 
First Czechoslovak (that is, 
multiethnic) Republic, bom 
of that Czech-speaking Jew- 
ish mother and a German- 
speaking Christian father. 
Until a postscript in which 
Demetz describes his 1990 re- 
turn to the country he had left 
50 years earlier, his account is 
more scholarly than personal, 
though the scholarly aspect, 
too, derives from his biog- 
raphy: He is Sterling Profes- 
sor Emeritus of German Lit- 
erature at Yale University. He 
thus combines personal in- 
volvement with the objectiv- 
ity that comes not only from 
scholarship but also from the 
distance of exile. 

Yet he does have an ax to 
grind. It is not against any of 
the ethnic groups involved. 
On ethnic matters he is scru- 
pulously fair, the result being 
an evenhanded evaluation of 
the interplay of Czechs, Ger- 
mans' and Jews (and Italians, 
for whom he makes a case as a 
fourth group of recurrent im- 
portance) that goes beyond 
the standard hi storiograpmcal 
clichd of Czechs as artisans, 
Germans as patricians and 
Jews as merchants. His ax 


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i strikes out at what he per- 
: ceives as another cliche, that 
I of "magic” Prague, the 
; Prague of legends, alchem- 
, ists, golems, baroqtie excess, 
i Kafka and Surrealists. He 
. plumps for a Prague that is a 

■ "city of analytic minds and 
rationalists." 

i Not surprisingly, his main 

■ target is a work actually called 
t "Magic Prague," an impres- 
; sionistic. highly personal 
, evocation of the city by the 
, Italian poet and scholar An- 

■ gelo Maria Ripellino. It could 
. not differ more from "Prague 

■ in Black and Gold." While 
* Ripellino rambles through the 
. city, focusing his erudition 
. randomly on random topics, 

i Demetz sets forth a detailed | 
: chronological narrative, and 
he is long on the earlier peri- 
f ods, leaving only 100 pages 

■ for the 19th and 20th centuries 
and ending his exposition in 
1939. His goal is to debunk 
legends, be they in the minds 
of the folk, the schoolmaster 
or the jingoisL 

In his zeal to exorcise all 
things magic, however, he 
gives some major phenomena 
short shrift Baroque archi- 
tecture, one of the glories of 
the city, receives a scant two 
pages, presumably because it 
exalts the irrational Even 
Kafka, about whom Demetz 
has written elsewhere and 
who appears often enough 
here as well, receives only 
two consecutive, concen- 
trated pages, and they deal 
with one of his stories rather 
than “The Trial” or "The 
Castle" and their covert ref- 
erences to Prague. 

Surely Prague is a city suf- 
ficiently rich in culture and 
tradition to be "rational” and 
"magic" at once. Although 
Demetz does not describe 
how the Germans bloodily 
cleansed die city of Jews (to 
make it Judenrein. literally 
“Jew-pure”) during the war 
or how the Czechs blood- 
lessly expelled the Germans 
(the official Czech term being 
w hostit, literally "host out") j 
at its end, from 1945 on I 
pi-ague has been virtually 
mono-ethnic. 

Is there then any hope for a 
multicultural society in the 
stories Demetz has to tell? 
“Scenes from the Life of a 
European City” they may be 
and worthy of leading as such, 
but they also speak by ana- 
logy to our own condition. 

Michael Henry Heim, a 
translator of East European 
literature who teaches at 
UCLA, wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 



-pm* * » 


-•* - -A* 


> 1 ' 





MIDDLE EAST 

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ABU DHABI 

ALAIN 

ALJI'BAIL 

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MANAGUA 

MARACAIBO 

MEDELLIN 

MEXICO CITY 

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MONTREAL 

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SAN FRANCISCO 
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fMTyftNATTONAT. tdf.RA LP TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


UGANDA: A REGIONAL POWERHOUSE 


,'\-V 

7 . 


A model for development 
In Africa: Having bid the 

foundations for a 
amvdtdog economic 
recovery, the 


to fold ways to sustain 
broad-based growth. 
Private capital is being 

attracted to key areas of 


and the focus on 
BberaBzationand 
modernization is 
accompanied by efforts 
to ensure that market 
devohpmeot can benefit 
aB sections of the 
population and ati 
sectors of the economy. 



Population (1996): 19.8 million 
GDP (1996): $5.7 billion 
GDP per capita (1996): $290 
Sectoral growth rates (1996): 
Monetary agriculture: 3.6% 
Mining: 47.7% 
Manufacturing: 14.6% 
Construction: 17.2% 


VALUE OF EXPORTS 

(1996, in million U.S. dollars): 

Coffee: 396.2 
Hstc 39.1 

Gold compounds: 30.9 
Gold: 18.4 
Maize: 17.8 
Tea: 17.1 
Beans: 16.1 
Cotton: 153 
Total exports: 665.3 



§ Source : Ministry of Finance, Government of Uganda 



Pro-Business Policies Fuel Growth 


Uganda is beginning to reap the benefits of economic reform. 


I n Uganda, a verdant and 
beautiful land at the heart 
of Africa^ the pace of 


X of Africa^ the pace of 
business is quickening. In the 
wake of the momentous 
changes in neighboring 
Congo and Rwanda, there 
are new opportunities for 
trade and investment in East 
and Central Africa. And, 
thanks to Uganda’s own rig- 
orous economic policies, the 
conditions are now in place 
for real advances in self-sus- 
taining investment within the 
country. 



Spearheading reform: 

President Yoweri Museveni 
and Ms teem of economic 
and financial advisers are 
widely credited with 
Uganda's push toward 
privateeector development 
and the quickening of trade 
and investment activity 


z in the country. 


Hard-working team 
The push to private sector- 
led development is widely at- 
tributed to Uganda’s no-non- 
sense President Yoweri 
Museveni and his hard- 
working team of economic 
and financial advisers. But it 
is also being given strong en- 
couragement by the increas- 
ingly independent legisla- 
ture, which, since it was 
elected last year, has subject- 
ed the most important eco- 
nomic measures to close 


scrutiny and. sometimes, 
modification. 

After taking drastic steps 
to change institutional ar- 
rangements for macroeco- 
nomic management in April 
1 992. following a fiscal crisis 
in the third quarter of the 
1991/92 financial year, Mr. 
Museveni told Parliament 
that inflation was indiscip- 
line and that if the govern- 
ment did not collect any rev- 
enue, there should be no 
expenditure. 

Since 1992, with Mr. 
Museveni’s firm support, the 


Ministry of Finance has im- 
plemented a cash budget rule 
that limits the current 
month's expenditure ceilings 
to the resources mobilized 
the previous month. Con- 
sequently, since 1992, the 
government has been build- 
ing up deposits in die central 
bank, and over the past two 
years, the government’s do- 
mestic recurrent revenue has 
exceeded its recurrent ex- 
penditure. 


Reputation for success 
The government is sustain- 



Ready for business: The conifflons an n place for sofkl and sustained economic growth. 


SUGAR DOES! Wh^Jkeeps the wheel^tuiS^ 

So does steel, soap, beer, cooking oil, tea, cardboard boxes, j-. ' .. ' 

glass containers, chainlink fencing and crown corks, In fact J&h g -■ • 1 £Lj» :i i jftijfe- . /ASjBi 

everything that is made in Uganda. 

The Madhvani Group believes that every product made, sold 
and provided in Uganda, builds Uganda. That’s why the 

Group has not only expanded many of these Industries,- but also " \ V 

entered into joint ventures to manufacture products such as 
Sukari Sugar and introduce new products like Rhizobium to 

help boost farmers’ pnxhictivity. ; 

The Madhvani Group also provides services to help build 
Uganda. New projects in tourism, a new television station, pro- 
viding comprehension insurance services and specialised computer 

software support, will all help boost the economy. ' , ty > 1111!® 

But the Madhvani Group produces not only products and services but also creates =' 

jobs. The Group directly employs over 1 3,000 people and carries extensive training programmes ' 

in many disciplines. It also provides the country with much needed tax revenue to help build the ■' ' *' 

infrastructure of the country. But most of all the Group provides quality products which lead to xlpi ' 
fewer imports and significant exports, providing precious foreign exchange. 

Next time you buy The Madhvani Group’s products and use our services, remember you too are helping to keep the 
wheels turning. So, build Uganda, buy Madhvani. 


The Madhvani Group 


P.O. Box 54 Aija. Uganda. Tetaptwne: (256-431 20511 . 21318 Fax (256-43) 20759, 20909 EMai: madhvariOsiHrcom.co.ug 


Kokina sugar. Nile Special . Club Pilsener, Madhvani lea. Madhvani cooking oil. Kongo soap. Star Blue soap. Sukari Sugar. Mulbox, 
Crown Corks. Channel Television, East A frican Underwriters, Sieel Corporation of East Africa. Industrial Security Services- Mweya 
Safari Lodge, Kalagala Falls Resort, Chabe Lodge. 


mg and deepening a reform 
process that has already 
earned Uganda a reputation 
for success in die face of the 
difficult odds that confront 
most African economies. Al- 
though, as one long-term in- 
vestor puts it, “90 percent of 
Uganda’s resources are still 
in the ground," the condi- 
tions for greater resource de- 
velopment are beginning to 
be met 

Stringent government 
spending ceilings are being 
deliberately imposed with a 
view to creating room for 
greater efficiency and an ex- 
pansion of private sector 
activity. Current investments 
in modem agricultural and 
agro-industrial projects are 
expected to reap large re- 
wards before the end of the 
decade. 

The macroeconomic in- 
dicators remain favorable for 
continued growth and low in- 
flation. Finance Minister Je- 
ll oash Mayanja-Nkangi be- 
lieves that last year’s 
economic growth of 5 per- 
cent in a year that was 
marked both by drought and 
an upsurge of security con- 
cerns. was an indication that 
much stronger growth lies 
ahead. “Ten years ago, such 
shocks would have had a 
devastating effect on the 
whole economy,” he says. 


*/ « 

hi 


Social Ambitions; 
Fiscal Prudence 






UGANDA 


A look at the country’s 1997-98 budget , ; 


teak,**:: 
W -.■H 


COKGO 


'taka , 
Mobnbf 


LakeKycga 


T he 1997-98 budget outlines the strictest measures' 
expenditure reduction ever proposed by a Uganc 
government President Yoweri Museveni's policy 


?.3a!s* 


RUWBfOOd.S 

5 ilfrafr 


Kampala 'ra 


X government President Yoweri Museveni’s policy of :' 
universal primary education has ushered in a social xeu& 
olution of sorts. Given the government’s long-standing^ 
policy of fiscal restraint the Finance Ministry had no dfflioe i 
but to order cuts in spendingelsewhere in order to povidefor 
die massive influx of new pupils, the expansion of the_ 
teaching payroll and die budding of new classrooms in every - 
school. • 




JSSWBft 


Not only have some regular budgetary spending items .. 
been reduced by as much as 30 percent in this financial year, ‘ 
but all officials, without exception, are now tequired to justify 
the smallest items ofexpendhure on a regular baas, since any ^ 
overspending today will inevitably lead to more severe ■ ti 
cutbacks tomorrow. 




?.:• i l 


aummis 


TMfZAMA 


Meeting its targets 
The secret of Uganda’s suc- 
cess lies in its ability to keep 
to its macroeconomic targets, 
says the World Bank's res- 
ident economist, Iradj Alikh- 
arii. “Government spending 
has not exceeded 1 8 percent 
of GDP ovct the past four 
years in a continent where die 
average government spend- 
ing is more like 30 percent of 
GDP.” 

The government has little 
room to maneuver, espe- 
cially in the light of its am- 
bitious development targets 


for die educational sector, for 
example. To have the money 
to meet such needs, the au- 
thorities depend critically 
upon efficient revenue col- 
lection. which saw some slip- 
page last year. But this was a 
one-off event, says Mr. 
Alikhani 

“The strengthening of 
value-added tax collection, 
combined with a recent 
shake-up in the Uganda Rev- 
enue Authority, is expected 
to produce a stronger revenue 
performance in the current 
year,” he adds. 


lished Uganda Securities Ex- 
change. ** 

Even before me current 
privatization round began. 
Mr. Mayanja-Nkangi esti- 
mated that privatization had 
already reduced government 
subsidies by more than SI 00 
million a year. For a poor 
country, such savings go a 
long way to reducing waste 
and promoting growth. 


On the spot 

International donors have also been put on the spot by the 
president’s introduction of an education policy that they 
support in principle, even if they had not expected to allocate 
additional resources for its implementation. [ 

Faced with such a challenge, the World Bank and other 
donors have now accepted it and will soon be making more ! 
resources available specifically for Uganda’s educational ; 
expansion. The principal longer-term concern is that the ‘ 
education system should not sacrifice its .quality for quan- s 

tity. ; 


When it comes to manipulating the Ugandan, govern- . 
merit's financial means to facilitate such an increase in * 


Privatization under way 
An immediate economic 
policy priority is to complete 
the privatization process, 
which is now widely praised 
for increasing output, em- 
ployment, wages and tax col- 
lection in most of the compa- 
nies that have already been 
transferred to private own- 
ership. 

Although there has been 
concern regarding the low 
market value of some assets, 
the argument is increasingly 
accepted, even in the 
Ugandan Parliament, that the 
massive inefficiencies in a 
number of the remaining 
public enterprises have made 
their sale to responsible in- 
vestors a matter of urgency. 
“There is broad agreement 
on the need to transfer the 
burden of public enterprises 
to the private sector," says 
the director of the govern- 
ment's pri vatization unit Mi- 
chael Opagi. 

Due for negotiation in the 
near future are sales of con- 
trolling interests in some of 
Uganda's largest enterprises, 
including Uganda Telecom- 
munications, Uganda Com- 
mercial Bank, the National 
Insurance Corporation, and 
important production units in 
the coffee, cotton and mining 
sectors. 

Some deals with strategic 
investors have already been 
signed, while final prepara- 
tions are being made for the 
sale of shares to the public 
through the newly estab- 


Debt reduction 
As an added bonus. Uganda 
has become the first country 
in Africa to win a substantial 
measure ofdebr relief undera 
special initiative designed to 
benefit highly indebted, im- 
poverished countries. 

The debt reduction 
amounts to $700 million out 
of Uganda’s national debt 
burden of S3.6 billion: it of- 
fers a valuable mechanism to 
reduce indebtedness to the 
multilateral organizations 
and thereby to reduce overall 
debt to sustainable levels. 

Helped by savings in pub- 
lic expenditure, the govern- 
ment plans to keep its overall 
fiscal deficit to sustainable 
levels, while raising ad- 
equate resources to finance 
essential government spend- 
ing and providing adequate 
incentives for private sector 
expansion. 


educational spending, foe credit for keeping control of the 1 
fiscal program is attributed to foe country’s respected Treas- ; 
ury Secretary Emmanuel Tumusiime-Mutebile. He has been \ 
so vigilant in curbing overall budgetary spending that there ■ 
should be no inflationary impact on the economy as a whole, r . 
In this respect foe formulation of foe budget for foe 1 997-98 " 
fiscal year is no exception and is probably foe toughest 
budget Uganda has ever seen. 

The setting for this year’s public spending restraint was' 
dictated not only by the demands of foe primary education - 
program, but also by a number of other national concerns — ' m 
not least of which was foe holding of both presidential and' 
parliamentary elections during 1996 and foe provision of 
allowances for foe elected politicians. In addition, there was 
urgent spending on defense and security to deal with rebel 
activity in foe north of foe country and in connection with the- 






IS* 


HA 



According to Treasury 
Secretary Emmanuel 
TumusuneMutebBei 
thetwoBnchphsof 


ans u pmdential 
fiscal management 


of aff sectors.' 


Private sector mobilized 
The response from the 
private sector has been ex- 
tremely positive. Companies 
are mobi! izing their available 
resources to develop existing 
and new businesses. The lar- 
ger investors are concentrat- 
ing on export-oriented ven- 
tures in farming, 
manufacturing and tourism, 
all of which show strong po- 
tential. 

“The private sector is 
growing by leaps and 
bounds,” says Sam Rutega. 
executive director of foe 
Private Sector Foundation. 
"Ten percent of our thriving 
businesses are new. Creating 
the right business climate can 
only trigger the development 
of more businesses." • 


changing situation in the neighboring Democratic Republic 
of Congo (formerly Zaire). To make matters more difficult 
laf year saw an unexpected $30 million shortfall in revenues, , 
which was widely attributed to weak administration by the • 
Uganda Revenue Authority. 

Loopholes at the URA have been tightened up by the 
appointment of a new board and executive. In keeping with ■ 
his reputation for rigorous management, Mr. Tumusiime- 
Mutebile has insisted that overspending carried over from foe 
last fiscal year has to be settled out of this year’s revenues. : 
The results are salutary and widespread. Public service , 
employees are not as envied for their status as they were intfae f 
past; even government ministers have had to reduce their . 
overseas travel to foe barest minimum necessary to do their 
jobs effectively. 

“We are finding ways to be more efficient, and gov-. < 
eiTurwat numstnes are also becoming more traiEparent,” - 
says Budget Director Damoni Kitabire. • 

Mr Turausiime-Mutdjile says that foe two linchpins of, 

*** managementandfoe ■ 
liberalization of all sectors." As foe refoimand liberalization 
processes proceed, he is anxious to see consolidation of the- 
nse in domestic savings and continued increases m the ratio 
of private investment to GDP — but he will never stop 

insisting that foe government live wifoin its means. •' 




was produced in 
It was si 


“Uganda; a Regional Powerhouse'" 

Wurras: Richard S\7lge a based in Cambridge. SkZJ 
Program Director: Bill hfahder . 












90s* 


international herald tribune, Wednesday, September 24, 1997 


n 


UGANDA: A REGIONAL POWERHOUSE 


5 <33Ss, ; i- c 
39€' r . 15 .^I W T;!il0n 
5apit3 (199s^. ^'_ 

r^; rates ' ; > 


-£*22*Ts 


, Major Enterprises 
Are Now on Sale 

Privatization has aroused international interest. 

Bank, National Insurance 
interest in Uganda Corporation. National Hous- 

nas begun in the j 

wake of the Tong-awaited 


With Monopoly Ended, 
Coffee Sector Perks Up 

The private sector has injected new life into the industry. 


A !3° f !i VfiSt ? r Bank - National Insurance 
interest in Uganda Corporation, National Hous- 

, . „ Jl^ t . bc f un ,n .*** mg and Construction Corpo- 
2 °^ long-a waited ration. Apolo Hotel Corpo- 
p^-liamentary_ approval of ration {which owns the 




A \ u 


■‘MBITIONS. 


TV. 

i:iU 


the Communications Act in 
August this year, giving the 
go-ahead for the privatiza- 
tion and rapid development 
of the country’s entire tele- 
communications sector. Not 
surprisingly, it is a process in 
. * which a number of intema- 
'■ tional companies have re- 
gistered strong interest. 

Coordinating the telecom- 
munications sale alongside a 
variety of other complex sell- 
offs means a busy schedule 
for the government’s Privat- 
ization Unit, led by its new 
director, Michael Opagi. 

The list of major Ugandan 
enterprises coming up for 
sale to investors includes a 
number of former monopol- 
ies and market leaders such 
as Uganda Commercial 


•rgr 


h^-sssmar?'- 


Kampala Sheraton), Uganda 
Dairy Corporation. Kinyara 
Sugar Works and the pro- 
cessing facilities of the Cof- 
fee Marketing Board. Once 
these sales are finalized. 
Uganda’s privatization pro- 
cess will be all but com- 
plete. 

Overcoming resistance 
Despite the procedural, reg- 
ulatory and political 
obstacles that have hindered 
the sale of Uganda's largest 
state-owned enterprises until 
now. Mr. Opagi is convinced 
that the government has 
overcome what he diplomat- 
ically describes as “psycho- 
logical resistance." Many 
doublets, including those in 
Parliament, have been won 


- ii/ 


H - ,,5 :*" Sv- 


T he shift from public to private sector coffees are a Iso becoming better known: one. 
management in Uganda is nowhere known as Bugisu, recently won recognition 
more marked than in the coffee sector, from the Specialty Coffee Association of 
The monopoly of the once-powerfol Coffee America. 

Marketing Board — which formerly bought. In place of the neglected coffee bushes of 


processed and exported all of Uganda's cof- the past, small formers arc enlarging their 


fee — was abruptly ended in 1990. 

Private sector companies were quick to 


reorganize the industry and turn its fortunes beans for the market 


plots, planting new bushes and learning how 
to ensure that they deliver the best quality 


around. 


There are also moves to establish larger 


At is a jotrt venture between the afrflnes erf South Africa, Uganthmd Tanzania. 


iu Although the move was among the first of farms: some as big as 300 hectares are 
s President Yoweri Museveni's economic re- already being planted, 
a forms, it was probably the most far-reaching. In place of the CMB, the largest compa- 
I The impact was immediate as the exporting nies in coffee are Nsamba Coffee Works, 
i companies starred to pay a foirer market price Kyagalanyi Coffee, Ugacof, Nile Commod- 
to the formers and to make their payments ities and Zigoti Coffee Works; each is fully 


L • 


measures it 
' f Lode 
policy J 
r rp. 

- -r,2-standia 
" ^irodwE 
rroudbc 
’---r.>:on of c 
.'nsineven 

item 

-•TraciaiieR 

r-L-idrcjusnr, 

• since a 

' “ snaft 


-*ro: h die 
.... sat the} 
allocate 

z\i ofeei 
: more 

. : ::u:2ttoid 
.- that dt 
_ ::-r qur- 

•:.-Lr p\» 
S. 'ZHi- ■ 

7k 



Michad Opagi, director 
of the government's 
Privatization Unit, 

Mil be coordinating 
the sale of the country's 
entke telecommunications 
sector as wefl as a variety 
of other complex setfofe. 


Annual percentage growth 


•••••.: 

m 

5.2 



5.3 

h 

■■ '• 

If 

3.1 

• *n 

;• 

1 

V; 

:r 



- 1 
r.h 

i 


‘,■6 

;'•* *. 


-1 

i*. 

* re 

. «.‘4 

In' 

’t. 

•• 

s. . 


„ 4 1 
% gf, 

j. y 


86/87 87/88 86 / 89 89/90 90/91 91/92 92/93 93/W 94/95 95/96 96/97 
Source: Ministry of Finance. Government of Uganda 


1 over by the idea of letting the 
t private sector instill effi- 
I ciency into state corpora- 
l tions. He attributes the rc- 
> maining resistance to 
■ individuals within the cor- 
- pontoons’ management who 
r are reluctant to dismantle 
i these enterprises, which have 
i enjoyed a monopoly for so 
long. 

The upcoming privatiza- 
tions are intended not only to 
introduce competitive prac- 
tices in the running of the 
country's most substantial 
businesses, but also to ac- 
celerate the launch of the 
Uganda Securities Exchange 
by offering government 
shares to the Ugandan public. 
During the first half of 1 998, 
the first flotations are expec- 
ted to include privatized en- 
terprises in manufacturing, 
telecommunications, media 
and insurance. 

Sources suggest that once 
a pattern of trading has been 
established, larger corpora- 
tions such as Barclays Bank, 
BAT and die powerful Mad- 
hvani Group will help to give 
substance to the stock mar- 
ket 

Tfeleconu and banks 
The sale to strategic investors 
of shares in Uganda Tele- 
communications will be 
closely watched at home and 
abroad. 

The government's inten- 
tion to license a- second op- 
erator before selling die in- 
cumbent operator, Uganda 
Telecoms Ltd. (TJTL), was 
thwarted when Parliament 
stipulated that the national 
operator be sold first, on die 
supposition that it would 
have a higher value while 
still holding a monopoly. 
Whichever course is taken, 
the way is now clear for a 
rapid opening up of die tele- 
communications market. 
Major communications 


companies from South 
Africa and France will be 
among those in the bidding. 

Another focus of attention 
will be the sale of Uganda 
Commercial Bank, which 
has a network of branches 
around the country and 
whose nonperforming assets 
have been hived off to clear a 
backlog of bad loans. The 
first round of bidding earlier 
this year included banks and 
investors from Malaysia and 
South Africa. 

Finance Minister Jehoash 
Mayanja-Nkangi says that 
the government, having 
borne the heavy cost of re- 
structuring the bank, is now 
“firmly committed to the pri- 
vatization of UCB at the 
earliest possible stage.’’ 

If privatization of services 
has taken somewhat longer 
than the government would 
have liked, there has been no 
such problem with its units 
for raw materials processing. 
Negotiations in recent 


pany, has raised S66 million 
in loans from South African. 
European and multilateral in- 
stitutions for the SI 25 mil- 
lion project Plant construc- 
tion is just beginning so that 
cobalt production can begin 
by the end of 1998. At frill 
capacity, the project will 
make Uganda the world's 


: companies starred to pay a foirer market price Kyagalanyi Coffee, Ugacof, Nile Commod- 
to the formers and to make their payments ities and Zigoti Coffee Worics; each is fully 
promptly, rather than after the months' or equipped to buy, dry, pack and ship tens of 
years' delay that formers experienced under thousands of tons of coffee every year, 
the CMB. These comDanies lead the 50 or so Drivate 


Potential for growth 

Since 1990. Uganda's coffee production has 
risen consistently from around 100,000 tons 
a year ro levels nearer the 278.711 tons 
recorded last year, and the potential is there 
for much bigger rises in the foture. Fred 
Kawuma. executive director of the Uganda 


thousands of tons of coffee every year. 

These companies lead the 50 or so private 
companies that together account for 98 per- 
cent of Uganda's coffee exports, leaving the 
state sector with the remaining 2 percent 
When the CMB’s assets, including a large 
drying and packing plant, are finally sold in 
the coming months, the slate's role will revert 
to that of regulator. 

Although other exports have grown by 
leaps and bounds, coffee remains Uganda's 


make Uganda the world's Coffee Trade Federation, says that although leaps and bounds, coffee remains Uganda's 
fifth-largcst producer of co- world coffee prices remain volatile, the eco- most valuable asset by far, accounting for 
bait. nomics of new planting in Uganda are en- well over half the country’s export earnings 

As Uganda gradually tirely favorable. and guaranteeing an income to an estimated 1 


bait. 

.As Uganda gradually 
achieves a higher profile, the 
finalization of each deal sug- 
gests a greater level of in- 
vestor confidence. • 


ely favorable. and guaranteeing an income to an estimated 1 

Uganda's robusta has a unique mild flavor million households. With each household 


much in demand among well-known Euro- 
pean buyers and roasters like Lavazza and 
Douwe Egberts. Uganda’s specialty arabica 


supporting an average of five people, this 
amounts to a quarter of foe country’s pop- 
ulation. • 


MONTHLY INlUTON AUSMSt JjMWiggs 




■ ■ » 




-i 

*'■**>» ll 


months have brought two ■£». tj f - * '••• •-'“T 'r 

more such ventures close to - 1994 '• 

final sale. A consortium of ' ’’ " .' 

investors is m the final stage . Jm ’ “ ■ 


.,.Aug.*e 


July 97 


of reaching agreement for foe 
purchase of foe largest coffee 
drying and packing factory in i 
the world, located at Bugo- j 
lobi, just outside Kampala. . 
Informed sources suggest j 
that foe selected investors are 1 
also interested in coffee 
growing and, potentially, in 
establishing an instant-coffee 
factory at the site. 

Mineral resources 
Another recently finalized 
deal concerns one of 
Uganda's most valuable min- 
eral locations at Kilembe, in 
the west of the country, 
where tailings of earlier cop- 
per mining activity contain 
valuable cobalt resources. 

Canada’s Banff Re- 
sources. which holds 55 per- 
cent of Kasese Cobalt Com- 


V'- *'•!*»>« 


'}■; - . ,** 


££3 


Source: Ministry of finance. Government of Uganda 




THE REPfBLIC OF IG.ANDA 




From Green Beans and Flowers 
To Agricultural Machinery 

The country s trade prospects are brighter than ei'er before. 


UGANDA: INVESTING IN THE PEARL OF AFRICA 


Over the past decade, Uganda has emerged as a symbol of development on the African 
continent. With an average growth rate of 8% over the last three years, the introduction this 
year of the Uganda Securities Exchange and stable, democratic leadership under 
President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, Uganda presents a wealth of opportunities for invest- 
ment. Uganda is now in the process of divesting its interests in a number of companies 

across a multitude of sectors, including: ^ 


'■3*' 

. £-riT- e 


■--f/ 


U ganda may be landlocked, but its spirit is outward- 
looking and its products are finding their way to 
select customers around the world. Ugandan coffee, 
fish, green beans and flowers are now increasingly rec- 
ognized for their distinctive quality. 

Much remains to be done, however. A major attraction for 
new investors, and particularly for those now beginning to 
arrive from South Africa, lies in the potential for agricultural, 
development and processing. “When my compatriots come 
here, they cannot understand why a country 
with such an abundance of fruit does not 
* £ make fruit juice," says a South African At the center of a 

diplomat, putting his finger on just one of foe rr mu 

many areas of potential growth. region anraamg 

Investors speak glowingly of foe pros- tremendous foreign* 
pec ts for entirely new crops, such as oil . 

palm, vanilla, spices and essential oils, and investor tmer&a, 
foe longer-term market for agricultural ma- Uganda Is 
chinery, agrochemicals and technologies ap- „ - 
propriate to Uganda’s climate and geo- DW 
graphy. private-set 

In foe export sector, foe traditional coffee , „ 

crop is already performing well, with foe operaoom 
volume exported last year reaching a record 
278,700 tons in 1996, and there has also 


the favored hub for 

private-sector 

operations 


Companies like the multifaceted Madhvani Group now 
find themselves a target for offers of partnership from foreign 
groups wanting to establish a foothold in Uganda. A recent 
bid by South African Breweries for a stake in Madhvani's 
Nile Breweries has already led to discussions on the es- 1 
tablishment ofa strategic partnership between foe two groups I 
in the regional beer market. I 

With no less than 24 subsidiary companies, foe Madhvani 
Group has long been a market leader in a range of domestic 
consumption products, including beer, sugar 
and soap, which it complements with pra- 
erofa duction activities in glass, packaging, 

matches and steel. In the country's rapidly 
eritotm developing, pro-business climate, Mad- 

s foreign* hvani’s current strategies are directed to- 
ward consolidation and expansion. 
erest, During a recent study of its options for 

seeming growth, foe Madhvani Group examined sev- 
eral areas of agro -economic potential and 
Ihub for concluded that it had a strong comparative 

^ advantage in foe sugar industry, says its 

project director. Farhan Nakhooda. With 
plans for foe expansion of Kakira Sugar 
Works, Madhvani is now working to acquire 
substantial additional sugar-growing acre- 


Oairy Corporation |r " * 
Kakira Sugar Works S 
Kinyara Sugar Works! 

Sugar Corp. of Ug^Sa Ltd. 
Uganda Livestocl«ndustries 
Uganda Meat Pacers 


Govt. Central PurcffiHfca Corp. 
Produce Marketing Boarafe 


National Housing & CcaKuction Corp. 
Uganda Clays Ltd#^ 


tons m two, ana mere iws aw ~ . — . _rr . - 1BfMl 

been a surra in the production and export of fish, cotton, tea, age in i Uganda and in neighbonng countries, starting with 
cereals, b eans, and hides and skins, all of which were still at. Rwanda, 
minimal levels in the_early years of he 1990s. ^ 


exports of flowers, fruit and vegetables have also seen 
dramatic growth. 

^'Quicknawnse , . , 

The doubting of foe value of both Uganda s exports and 


Foreign-exchange earners 

To stay ahead, foe Madhvani Group is both developing its 
established .strengths .and turning its attention to foreign- 
exchange earning activities, including flowers and tourism. 
With the gradual return of Uganda to foe world tourism 

. . , i.ji * — .nMKIioli o ill,/ inl^uratMi 


E ina jci. ce 
Bank tffl 
Barc®fs 
DevS>pr 
HotJong 
National I 
Uganda ( 


cgpSaroda, 
ms Bank Ltd 

ppment Finance Company 
fng Finance Company 
nai Insurance Corporation 
da Commercial Bank 


Other mining concessions- p^spLe and salt 


The New Vision Printing & Publishing^ 
Uganda Printing & Publishing Corp. 

I pjjii s jc n 
Apolo Hotel Corp. 

Nile Hotel International Ltd. 

Uganda Hotels Ltd. 

Uganda Wildlife Development Ltd. 


Transocean Ltd. 

Uganda Airlines Corporation 
Uganda Railways Corporation 


Ihedoubfing of foe vafoe AM ultras expu^ ^Ush a folly integrated 

imports over foe past four years a ,. circuit covering foe country’s prime areas of visitor interest 

Mitmuiiity-s quick respt^w^^heys^^y.^ art Mweya Safiri Lodge in the 


push the country through 
years ahead. 


1 U usvuiup U jv. — C r 

Kampala/Jinja region bordering Lake Victoria. 

..a , * 1 ^ 1 . ..'l.'ti null mu 


PiT1984 Uganda Ltd. 
pngo Development Co. Ltd. 
»apco Industries Ltd. 

SAIMMCO 

^M/U9ngineering Corporation 
BkoffiSpinning Mill/Lira 


U ti l itie s 

National Water & Sewerage 
Uganda Electricity Board i 
Uganda Telecommunicatig 
Second National Operator 

*The government is ct/m® 
for investors in the SNOm 

l JTi tn Zip availah/B hvt/Mt 


3 efp°rpo ration 

Ms Limited (UTL)* 
B License (SNO)* 

hly advertising 
md expects the 
[end of 1997 



prospects are considered to be m me ^nai!- Central Africa,” says Mr. Nakhooda. 

investmentrange, which puts foem i wifoinrMchofU^n passing year, foe business prospects m U^nda 

entrepreneurs who are already 1 ■ SSin are strengtheSTScated at foe center ofa region that ,s 

growing cotton, tea and lobam by attracting tremendous foreign-investor interest, now mclud- 

. agriculture, industry or services. ing foe Democratic Republic of Congo and Tanzania, 

^ eifoer foreign or Ugandan- Asian capital- : ’ ^ uinda is becoming the favored hub for private sector 

BchageaSd evolution.^ Sons that seek to invest in this rapidly developing part 
experiencing competition for their dom^tic market snare # 

a *ay that has never been seen m Uganda before. 


For More Information About Companies Being Privatised, Contact: 


Director, 
Privatisation Unit 
PO Box 10944 
Kampala, Uganda 


Tel: (256-41)250-108 

Fax: (256-41)259-997 

e-maii: pmu@imul.com 

VWWV page: http//uganda. privatisation.org 









r 


EVTERjVATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 
PAGE 12 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 





. .. w — '• _ i«Tf in^m i ' '■jiii’aJ >fc Pan, 

Sharon Sweet and Sergei Larin in Paris production of "Turandot. 


A New, Dark Vision 
In Paris ‘Turandot’ 


P ARIS — If Puccini's “Tur- 
andot ” seems to appear 
slightly more often on the op- 
eratic menu these days, it 
probably has less to do with the pop- 
ularity of a certain tenor recording of 
“Nessun dorma" than with the pres- 
ence of a handful of sopranos willing 
and able to take on the title role. 

The new production unveiled at the 
Opera Bastille on Monday is only the 
third m the Paris Opera's history. In 
1 92X. two vears after the Milan 


By David Stevens 

/nernaiiunal Herald Tribune 


P remiere, it vvas a vehicle for the great 
reneh tenor Georges Thill, but it did 


French tenor Georges Thill, but it did 
nut stay around long. A new one was 
mounted in 196S with the invincible 
Birgit Nilsson in the title pan and 
richly colorful sets by Jacques 
Dupont that also served for Mont- 
serrat Caballe 13 years later. 

This lime, the ’icy princess of the 
title is sung by Sharon Sweet, who has 
taken on the dramatic soprano rep- 
ertory in leading houses over the last 
decade. Despite a shaky start and a 
stage demeanor more petulant than 
imperious, she gained in security, de- 
ploying brilliant top notes, and won 
an ovation in the curtain calls. 

As Calaf, the unknown prince who 
sweeps through Turandot s emotion- 
al armor with ridiculous ease, Sergei 
Larin brought a solid lyricism that 
lacked only a touch of brilliance in the 
famous third-act aria. Barbara Frittoli 
was touching as the slave girl Liu, and 
the veteran Robert Lloyd was a son- 
orous Timur. Georges Pretre, who 
conducted in 1968, was in solid mu- 
sical control of pit and stage. 

Whatever stage tradition there is 
for Puccini's final work, with its set- 
ting in an imaginary ancient China, 
went out the window' in the realization 
of Francesca Zambello and her de- 
signer, Alison Chitty. 

This was not a flamboyantly 
colored fairy tale with long vistas up 
sweeping staircases, but a dark, 
snowy and claustrophobic version of 
an imperial palace, activated by the 
high-tech possibilities of the Bastille 


stage. The colors w ere mainly black, 
gray, pale blue and off white, en- 
livened by brighter touches in Tur- 
andor’s vestments and the red hair of 
her female prelorian guard. 

Instead of the immobile ceremony 
of the three ministers, the first scene 
of Act 2 is set in the imperial kitchens, 
freshly equipped from some culinary 
supply house in Les Halles and with 
cupboards full of shriveled human 
heads — presumably the losers in the 
princess’s triple-enigma puzzles. 
Don't ask what is on the menu. 

Ping, Pang and Pong (Earle Pat- 
riareo, Doug Jones and Timothy 
Robinson* are kept on the move, re- 
calling their origins in the world of 
commedia del Carte and the Gozzi 
fable that Puccini borrowed. 

This effort io find a new vision for 
this imaginary world sometimes 
works and sometimes merely uses ef- 
fects without causes. When Turan- 
dot 's amazons ransack the city seek- 
ing the unknown prince's identity, the 
search seems to consist mainly of 
throwing mattresses and sheets into 
the courtyard. The purpose becomes 
clear when Liu kills herself not only 
with a knife, but by jumping from a 
balcony — onto the pile of bedding. 

"Autour de Turandot," an exhib- 
ition of material relating to the literary 
background of the work and to the 
two earlier productions by the Paris 
Opera, is at the Opera Museum in the 
Palais Gamier until Jan. 11. 


M eanwhile, the early 

days of the season are be- 
ing shared by a revival of 
Giorgio Strehler’s now 
historic production of Mozart’s 
“Marriage of Figaro." which dates 
from 1973. It has been revived a 
dozen times and now, realized with 
remarkable fidelity by Humbert Cam- 
erlo, Strehler's assistant of 24 years 
ago, it is back again. 

James Conlon is the conductor, and 
in a splendidly balanced cast Barbara 
Bonney's delicious Susanna and An- 
thony MiehaeJs-Moore’s unctuously 
indignant Almaviva deserve to be 
singled our. 


historic 


Shuttle Diplomacy for Vietnam Films 


T ORONTO — Dang Nhat Minh, 
Vietnam’s best-known direc- 
tor. wears the permanently jet- 
lagged look of a harried dip- 
lomat. He speaks French, Russian and 
Mandarin, and his incessant journeying 
represents an industry, bom in 1959, 
that still struggles to exist: Vietnamese 
studios rum out few films and movie 
houses show mostly foreign videos. 

Two years ago, on his way home from 
the Shanghai festival, the director had 
his passport confiscated in Hong Kong 
— 1 ‘They think we are all boat people,’ * 
he said. 

At the Toronto film festival, which 
has a strong Asian selection, Dang 
presented the world ■ premiere of 
“Hanoi- Winter 1946,’* the story of the 
last year before Vietnam’s war with 
France, when Ho Chi Minh sought to 
negotiate and was thwarted by the 
French military. The film, made for 
$300,000, was shot in Hanoi. 

“So many films have been made on 
Vietnam by the Americans and by the 
French — everybody knows Vietnam, a 
country that spent 30 years at war," he 
said, “but nobody abroad knows any- 
thing about what happened in that brief 
period when Vietnam didn’t want war. 
but only to win independence, the way 
India won independence from England. 
Richard Attenborough's film on Gandhi 


By Joan Dupont 

fnierrmrUmai Herald Tribune 


sages to Leon Blum’s government. As 
the sounds of war approach, young Vi- 
etnamese sing freedom songs, and 
identify with the French Resistance 
chanting, “We too are resistanls.” 

Dang feels that he depicted this his- 
toric moment without false heroics and 
without making villains of the 
French. Vet there are scenes 
that may make French people Xjmm 
cringe: the one of French of- >' 
fleers storming a peaceful ■Jp. 
cultural center, for example. 1 R' 9 ? 

“You never see any gen- 
erals in my film," the di- - 

rector said, “and there is no • j : A 
hatred. Our generation was : V 
deeply connected to French 
culture.” . m 

Dang, now 55, was living __ . , 

in Hue, when war with the L>ang A 
French broke out; he was 4 
when his family hid oui in the jungle. “I 
wanted to make this film in memory of 
my parents, who were young militan ts, 
educated La French culusre, ardent ad- 
mirers of Victor Hugo. It was a beautiful 


:*** 


Pang Nhat Minh 


period for diem. My mother was 3 
Buddhist; my father was a docior. a man 


Buddhist; my father was a docior, a man 
of science." 


A STUDENT between the wars, 
Dang went to Russia where he 
learned about Italian neo-real- 
ism and the French New- 
Wave. “When I got back home, I trans- 
lated dialogues for Russian films and 
fell in love with moviemaking. I am 
self-taught," be added. 

During the war with the United 
States, he was in Hanoi under the bomb- 
ing and worked as a journalist on the 
from. "The Americans came to Vi- 
etnam as soldiers, that's all — they left 
no cultural trace. Today, Hollywood 


touched me deeply, and I think that there 
is something or Gandhi in Ho Chi Minh, 
but I can only make a small movie with 
a small budget — few crowd scenes and 
a battle more heard than seen." 

In the film. Ho Chi Minh, sick with 
malaria, is a man with nothing of the 
guerrilla: he sends insistent peace mes- 


filras come to our theaters, but they are 
about a way of life, the consumer so- 
ciety, not a culture. Our experience was 
different with the French. 

In 1986, Dang won a scholarship to 
go to France where he haunred the cine- 
matheque. Since, he has kept up with 
every kind of movie — from 
Regis Waignier’s “Indoch- 
KL " ine," which he liked, to Tran 

RmX Anh Hung’s VCyclo,” which 

,>*»= puzzled timy he has seen the 
:£vf- Tateq from Chen Kaigfl, 
j W Zhang Yimou and Wong Kar- 
^ • Wai, and admired the crowd 
. scenes in Mabel Cheung's 

“The Soong Sisters.” 
“Crowd scenes terrify ms’- ,T 
mLJ he said. 

His films have always been 
at Minh marV in the image of con- 
temporary society: “When 
the 10th Month Comes” (1984) shows 
village life in a war-tom country; in 
"The Girl on the River” (I987J. a pros- 
titute shields a hunted Viet Cong soldier 
who rebuffs her after the war, when he 
becomes a government official; “The 
Rerorn” (1994) is about a teacher who 
goes south and feels shock waves from 
the economic boom; “Nostalgia for the 
Homeland” < 1995 Labour a 17-year-old 
boy's sexual awakening, takes place in a 
northern delta village' and was made 
vrirh money from NHK. the Japanese 
national television network. 

The director, who heads the Viet- 
namese Filmmakers Association, is not 
exempt from criticism, and in fact, the 
intrigue and back-biting in the business 
made him steer his daughter away from 
movies. She is a medical student in 
Budapest. 

“I was voted for a five-year term by 
my colleagues — my job is to defend our 


interests. In 1995, after the 
party congress, I was voted far 
anotherterm, but I have no special 
privileges. I remember whim .‘The 
Giri on the River* came out the audi- 
ences loved it, but the press said I treated 
the revolutionary soldier unfairly.” 

“Nostalgia for the Homeland" was 
also subject to die criticism that the di- 
rector was pessimistic aboui peasant life 

“There was too much solitude and 

sorrow in the movie, and the fact that I 
got funding from Japan was criticized." . 

“Hanoi-Winter 1946,” was made 
without foreign money, 4 ‘because it is a 
historic subject,” he said. “I didn't 
need more money, but one day, I would 
tike to make a movie that is technically 
perfect; the sound is so terrible in Vi- 
etnamese movies.” 


S HOOTING started the winter of 
1995, until snow fell, and re, 
sumed in Febnuay 1996. “We 
shot in only four locations and 
kept re painting ihe same house; .we re- 
built the tramway that went through old 
Hanoi" The script had been approved, 
but cuts were nude before post-pro- 
duction. “In one scene, a guard takes a 
letter from Ho Chi Minh and puts it in a 
pocket, low on his trouser leg — the 
censors said a letter from Ho Chi Minh 
shouldn't be treated like that. " 

Dang will take .his film to the Chicago 
festival next, and to Paris. In Hanoi, 
where Ho Chi Minh lies embalmed, there 
is one movie house, the Thang Tam, 
where the movie will run for a week. “In 
Vietnam, a 35mm film has a short life 
and we have few theaters," he said. “Of 
course, there are foreigners who want to 
invest — Singapore, Hong Kong, Amer- 
ica, France — they all want to put their 
own films in our movie houses. ' 


e 


Why Not Ibsen? Nunn Breaks With Tradition 




L ONDON — Trevor Nunn, who 
this week becomes the fourth 
director of the National 
Theatre, has also this week tri- 
umphantly broken the handover curse of 
the other three. Laurence Olivier. Peter 
Hall and Richard Eyre all felt the need to 
open their managements with a staging 
of “Hamlet," and in every single case it 
was a mistake. 

Nunn opened with what he has always 
done best, a stage community in ferment 
and at the barricades of some kind of 
civic disorder. Without denigrating the 
equally remarkable work he has done in 
chamter settings, notably the Ian Mc- 
Kellen "Macbeth” and las lago) 
“Othello." it still seems to me that if 
Nunn's reputation is to rest on any single 
achievement it will be the kind of crowd 
control and epic stage-management he 
brought to "Les Miserables" and 
“Nicholas Nickleby." And where better 
to try for the triple crown than with 
Ibsen’s “An Enemy of the People," 
one of the very few classic plays to have 
at its heart a sustained public meeting? 
Nunn has fervently and brilliantly de- 
clared his hand as both director and pro- 
ducer. This is precisely the kind of huge 
theatrical adventure that the Olivier stage 
most needs, and all too seldom gets. 

Christopher Hampton's new version 
of the text is also a revelation, taking us 
far away from the infinitely more 
simplistic adaptation by Arthur Miller 
in which Dr. Stockmann, the enemy of 
the title, becomes just another variant on 
John Proctor in “The Crucible." a man 
defiant and alone in front of the Mc- 
Carthyite mob. What Hampton suggests 
is considerably more disturbing; that 
Stockmann may in many ways be as 
dangerously fascist as all of his crowd of 
opponents. And when, in Ian McKel- 
len’s breathtaking and barnstorming 
.performance, he finally stands at the 
head of what is left of his family staring 
Fiercely into the furore, we are offered 
yet another chilling political and social 
image, that of the Lenin recruiting 
posters of the early Soviet era. 

Nunn has drawn on so many influ- 
ences here, from Dickens to D.W. Grif- 
fith, that at times there is the danger of 
simply having too much going on in too 
many comers of the community: but as 
the play's searchlight falls first on Mc- 
Kellen’s mad professorial evangelist, 
then on his corrupt brother and alter ego, 
the mayor and police chief (Stephen 
Moore in a splendidly Machiavellian 


By Sheridan Morley 

/nti- maturin' Herald Tribune 



Cones loe stage in a co-production with 
the Salzburg Festival) is the first since the 
current sequence of Shakespeare movies 
on the wide screen and in that sense it is 
in many ways post-HoDywood. TTiis is 
the “Othello" that Orson Welles tried to 
make and never quite succeeded; heavily 
filmic, dark as any French thriller, it takes 
place very. largely ai . night in .council 
chambers and airless bedrooms where 
Desderoona plays blues records on an 
ancient wind-up phonograh. 

The star of this "Othello” is, as so 
often, lago. on tins occasion Simon Rus- 
sell Beale in a magnificently sweaty, 
evil-genius performance that raises die 
questions of why on earth Emilia mar- 
ried him. Around him are ranged David 
Hare wood as a young, butch Othello, 
more at home perhaps in a wrestling 
arena than the Senate, and Claire Skinner 
as an upmarket Des- 
detnona. What works |M»»r»grai 
best in this minimal the at e r 
setting is the sense pf ■Mp[* E w K M 
heat and evil; Mendes Kg[°j[° 
keeps the production 
crackling along, some- ^ 

times at the expense of . 
the verse but never of the tension; some- 
how you feel that he, too. is desperate to 
find out how it will all end. 

And finally, to the Donmar Ware- 
house comesa score I first wrote about at 
this time last year, when it was named 
international musical of the year at a 
competition in Denmark; the American 
composer-lyricist team of Scott 
Wentworth. Craig Bohmler and Marion 
Adler have come up with “Enter the 
Guardsman," an enchanting, lyrical, 
jewel-box adaptation of a play by Mol- 
nar, who also gave us the classic "Ca- 
rousel” (based on “Liliom”). This 
time, we are dealing with only three 
principal characters, die playwright, the 
actress and her actor-husband, who de- 
cides to enliven a dull marriage by com- . 
ing to her in disguise, a plot not unknown 
to fans of Harold Pinter’s subsequent 
“The Lover." 

For this intimate musical version, 
Nicky Henson is superb as the wry, 
chorus-like dramatist, and Janie Dee 
and Alexander Hanson are charming as 
the odd backstage couple: in Jeremy 
Sams ’ agile production, songs run under 
and through the Pirandellian text in a 

f sntie, inventive and innovative show 
at, rather like “She Loves Me" 
grows on you by its own simple desire to 
entertain and amuse. This is precisely 
the kind of musical that the Warehouse 
should be staging, and it can never hap- 
pen too often. 


g 


Alexander Hanson in "Enter the Guardsman" at the Donmar Warehouse. 


cum), we begin to realize that everyone 
here has a tale to tell, and it is only the two 
most virtuous. Penny Downie and Lucy 
Whybrow as Stockmann’s long-suffer- 
ing wife and daughter, whose very good- 
ness makes them borderline boring. 

This is no longer the srory of the 
master builder as revolutionary hero; 
instead it is the saga of a town in crisis, 
and by giving us that. Nunn and Hamp- 
ton also give us back an amazingly 
topical piece, in which dialogues about 
press harassment, the morality of jour- 
nalism and the hopelessness of the soft- 
cenier liberal cause seem tom from the 
morning papers. If the test of a great 


play is eternal colloquiality, then Ibsen 
has given us that; if it is a play about the 
communal corruption of the common 
good, then that is here too. "An Enemy 
of the People" has been reborn as a 
passionately current debate about the 
value of the individual, even a dan- 
gerously deranged one, when his very 
nobility is up against the perceived good 
of the majority. There is vitality, vehe- 
mence and victory here against the odds, 
all of which augurs well for the Na- 
tional's fourth leadership. 

Meanwhile, its third is going out in a 
similar blaze of glory: Sam Mendes *s 
equally revolutionary “Othello" (on the 


• .■*>*.;£ 1.1! 

. is? - 


-A. 1 :. 


i,w 

A-.'-X-'r- 


. L - a 

-?*•***■ B 


mm 








Henze at 70: A Toast in Berlin 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 


a Some binary 
compounds 


By Paul Moor 

hncrnaiidnal Herald Tribune 


B ERLIN — For Hans Werner 
Henze's 70th birthday, he 
could hardly have wanted a 
handsomer tribute than his na- 
tion's capital has lavished upon him dur- 
ing the current Berlin Festival Weeks: 
two major orchestral world premieres 


SMALL LUXURY HOTELS 
OF THE WORLD 


and a stylish revival of an important 
early opera, plus additional events. 

He dedicates his hourlong choral 
Ninth Symphony (commissioned and 
performed by the Berlin Philharmonic 
under the Hamburg Opera's rapidly 
rising star Ingo Metzmacher) “to the 
heroes and martyrs of German antifas- 
cism’ ’ during “die time of Nazi fascist 
terror" as portrayed in “Hie Seventh 
Cross" by Anna Seghers, an early lead- 
ing intellectual light of Germany's Soviet 
zone of occupation. For Henze's choral 
purpose, he has set not original Seghers 


excerpts but lyrical paraphrases espe- 
cially written by Hans-Ulrich Treichel. 
Henze remains faithful to the atm 





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Henze remains faithful to the atonal 
Schoenbergian muse of his youth, but in 
this symphony he reverts to the outsized 
post-Romantic orchestra, including an 
important organ part It should hardly 
surprise that he does not shy away from 
violence: "Violence is what the piece is. 
I'm afraid, about, to a great extent.*' 
Regrettably, his manner of choral com- 
position makes it at times impossible to 
follow Treichel's texts.’ EMJ plans an 
early CD release qf this performance. 

Henze composed his atonally mel- 


lifluous Third Violin Concerto for Mi- 
chael Erxleben and the Berlin Sym- 
phony Orchestra,- which Michael 
Schonwandt conducted. The move- 
ments portray characters in Thomas 
Mann's “Dr. Faustus," the third deftly 

f attemed upon Mann’s composer Rudi 
chwerdtfeger (arguably, alias Arnold 
Schoenberg), who in the novel himself 
composes a concerto for a specific vi- 
olinist. Erxleben realized his virtuoso 
solo part with impressive ease. 

The Deutsche Oper marshaled its 
biggest guns for “The Prince of Hom- 
burg,' ’ based upon Heinrich von Kleisf s 
dramatic classic, with its gifted new mu- 
sical director, Christian Thielemann, 
conducting and its executive director, 
Goetz Friedrich, staging a production 
innovatively designed by Andreas Rein- 
hardt. Heading a brilliant cast, the 
world’s leading heldentenor, Rene Kollo, 
appears as Brandenburg’s Kurfuerst and 
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Business to c-Business : Banking 


Building Services, Not Just Branches 

Tiie nse of the Internet is changing the way banks earn ■ out their traditional ivies. 


John Smith is all SET to shop the Net. 


D 


^■rH , 

- i ^ 

■ 1 1, , • V 


oes the rise of the 
Internet signal the 
end of tanking as we 
know it? Is the briek-and- 
monar branch bank doomed 
to extinction in a world of 
bit-based financial transac- 
tions? 

"‘While banking services 
are necessary to a modem 
economy, banks arc not.” 
says Lode Snykers, manaeer 
of Payment Systems Solu- 
tions for IBM. His words are 
meant as a warning, not as a 
prophesy. 

The traditional roles of 
banks — providing loans 
and credit, holding deposits 
and investments." offering 


current-account and transac- 
tion services — remain un- 
changed by technology. 
What is different is the world 
and the way in which they 
are carried out. 

“We arc witnessing a con- 
vergence of banking, pay- 
ment and information indus- 
tries toward a common 
digiial-deli\cry platform." 
notes a recent study by PA 
Consulting, and the result is 
being felt commercially as 
well as technologically. 

.Analysts predict a rapid 
rise in transactions and value 
exchange on or through the 
Internet, ranging from low- 
estimates ofS 1 0 billion by the 


On the ‘Infovia’ 


A Secure Electronic Transactions pilot rewed upon Spain's 
information highway, or Infovia, in May 1997 with the first e- 
commerce transaction on the Iberian peninsula. 

Banesto Bank and IBM partnered the effort, with Ban- 
esto s private card, Virtu@ICash, as the payment mech- 
anism. Jos6 Antonio Arostegui. general manager of Ban- 
esto. kicked off the project by buying an IBM Aptiva 
Multimedia PC on-line from the Spanish dealer Dinsa. 

In the second phase of the pilot, scheduled to begin in 
October, all Banesto customers with Virtu@lCash cards 
will be able to buy items from Dinsa and 100 other shops 
over the Internet, using SET protocols to ensure security 
and confidentiality. 

"We expect this pilot to last three months. After this 
period, we will offer the solution to both shops and 
customers." says Nieves Feijoo, Banesto’s prefect man- 
ager for SET. 

Spain is one of Western Europe’s most advanced 
countries in terms of electronic payments. With one ATM 
machine for every 1 13 inhabitants, it has the highest ratio 
of ATMs per capita in the world. It also has the lowest rate 
of fraud per transaction in the world, according to Jos6 
Manuel Gabeiras. CEO of Visa Esparia. 

Nevertheless, security is a major consideration in the 
continued expansion of electronic banking. 

“We believe SET will become the standard because of 
the strength of its security.” says Ms. - Feijoo, “and 
because all the most important credit card companies are 
driving its development. We expect that SET expansion 
worldwide will increase the number of shops using the 
Internet as a channel to sell their products securely." 

Banesto has moved aggressively to exploit the Internet 
in other ways as well. It has had a Web site since May 
1995 and began offering its- merchants and suppliers a 
secu re-payment module based on SSL (Secure Sockets 
Layer, a security protocol predating SET? at the same 
time. It has offered on-line payment services since spring * 
1996. More than 20.000 transactions have been com- 
pleted to date, using both traditional credit cards and 
Banesto’s own Virtu<§HCash card. 

Currently Banesto is the only bank in Spain to have fully 
implemented SET, and it leads the market in the number 
of businesses that have signed up to offer on-line com- 
merce. The bank also has an assessment service for 
customers who want to open virtual shops. 

‘Technology is giving us new and powerful tools to 
optimize our banking infrastructure and to reach out to our 
customers in the very strong and competitive Spanish 
marketplace." concludes Ms. Feijoo. 


year 2000 to a hi ah estimate 
ofSSIXJ billion by 2005 . 

Forrester Research pre- 
dicts that on-line credit w ill 
grow from S32I million in 
1996 to $40 billion by 2001 
in the United States alone, 
with more than 525 billion of 
that from mortgages. 

Dutanioniior says the 
number of on-line banking 
customers in Western 
Europe will rise to 8 million 
by 2001. 

International Data Corp. 
(1 DC' I reports that more than 
40 percent of Europe ’s banks 
already have a home page on 
the World Wide Web. com- 
pared with a mere 1 3 percent 
for all industries in Europe. 

The advent of the Internet 
and associated technologies 
extends the reach and "de- 
livery capabilities of today's 
banks. Banks can use the Net 


Banks can use the Net 
to detivor services, 

conduct research and 

develop activities 
around e-commerce 


to describe and deliver tra- 
ditional bank services, con- 
duct research, learn more 
about their customers, and 
— most significantly — de- 
velop activities around elec- 
tronic commerce. 

John Geyer, research di- 
rector for the Gartner Group, 
says. "Banks can act as cata- 
lysts to bring e-commerce to 
a wider community of 
people. They can create a 
Web presence not only ro do 
banking but also to bring 
trusted third parties to the 
site to offer services to their 
customers, to sell computers 
and cars and vacations." 

This “brand extension” 
from trust in a bank to trust in 
its commercial partners is 
happening more in Europe 
than in the United States, in 
spite of the latter's head start 
on the Internet 

The role ofbank as "con- 
tent aggregator" will be in- 
creasingly important as the 
user base for the Internet ex- 
tends beyond today's users 
to the mass market — more 
than 140 million people in 
the next three years, accord- 
ing to some analysts' esti- 
mates. 

As the market grows, so 
does the competition. Banks 
face not only their traditional 
competitors (other retail or 


wholesale banks), notes 
Roberto Masiero, president 
of I DC Europe, but new ones 
such as retailers, technology 
companies and other finan- 
cial services organizations. 

In addition, new technol- 
ogies are giving nse lo sub- 
stitute products such as card 
services and derivatives. 
AT&T is one prominent ex- 
ample of an unexpected 
bank competitor: in four 
years it became the company 
w ith the second largest num- 
ber of credit card holders in 
the United Slates. 

Other new’ competitors in- 
clude the branchless “virtual 
banks” that exist only on the 
Internet. The world's first In- 
ternet-only bank. Security 
First National Bank, reports 
overhead costs of less than 1 
percent, compared with the 
typical 3.5 percent of tra- 
ditional banks. A Booz-AI- 
Icn study found that a trans- 
action costing 13 cents on 
the Internet leaped to SI. 08 
if handled in a bank branch. 

Advance Bank, the first 
“virtual bank” in Germany, 
was recently named the lop 
bank for customer service in 
the country. It was created 
two years ago to reach a 
younger, richer customer 
base by offering innovative 
services such as creative in- 
terest options, sweep and 
cash management, multiple- 
account management and 
multiple currencies. Many 
of its services are outsourced 
to other banks while it fo- 
cuses on its core compet- 
ency. customer service. Ac- 
cording ■ to Rosemary 
O’Mahony. a managing 
partner of Andersen Con- 
sulting. “We will see more 
of this kind of partnering in 
the future.” 

Banks may find them- 
selves forming partnerships 
not only with their compet- 
itors but also with technol- 
ogy firms, network operat- 
ors, service managers and 
service prov iders. 

That doesn’t mean that 
banks will disappear, but it 
does mean that flexibility 
and service will count more 
than bricks and mortar in the 
future. Technology will level 
foe playing field for them. 
Their challenge then be- 
comes “to redefine their role 
and position in this world,'* 
says Mr. Snykers. “They 
will need to learn new ways 
to create and maintain a 
competitive and differenti- 
ated position. ”• 



"Enclosed 
is t'ur customer's 
Jitutdl icrtiftcute. 
at well tit run Please 
open the envclrpts, verity 
our identifies ,unJ <•«■/ 
bank appn <val " 


Digital certificate 
A diriii/cd rJcmitv Jo ru- 
in cni iHji is uied (■> »ua- 
rj/nev (be aulbeniu'iB .if 
other diL’iul « 1 oluttk , M'. 
Alone with the* cryptogra- 
phy in SET. ii can he 
in ensure dun a iransucii.in 
is both pm .tie and iru-i- 
iMinhy fur all panics For a 
cardholder, it i;- :in electro- 
nic represenuuon of a cre- 
dit curd, with the num- 
ber and expiration date 
encrypted. A merchant's di- 
gital certificate contains 
identification of ihe mer- 
chant and information 
about the merchant's rela- 
tionship uuh his or her 
bank and u uh the certifica- 
te authority ■. 


SET components 


• r 1 «yc.'. 


LIT. 


Merchant server 
A computer sy stem — both 
hardware and software — 
that allows merchant* to 
carry mu e-conunerce Ii 
manages digital certifica- 
tes and orders. Merchant 
servers arc configured to be 
safe and highly reliable and 
to respond quickly . 


Certificate authority 
A trustworthy entity that 
issues a digital certificate 
after verifying the identity 
of the party who wonts il 
A certificate umhnmy has 
a “rooi certificate.’’ a trust- 
worthy digital idetHiiy docu- 
ment of its own. The au- 
thority may he a bank (as 
is the case with Banesto 
in Spain), an electronic- 
payments company Mike 
PBS of Denmark) or some 
other entity. 


Payment gateway 
The software for the pay- 
ment gateway receives the 
certificates from the mer- 
chant and the cardholder, 
then passes the relevant in- 
formation along 10 the cer- 
tificate authority and final- 
ly communicates approval 
of the transaction. The pay- 
ment gateway may lie with 
the merchant's bank (as in 
the French e-COMM sys- 
tem) or with an etectronic- 
paymenis company (as in 
the Danish PBS system l. 


Getting SET for Internet Security 


The Secure Electronic Transactions standard promises to make electronic commerce safe . 


T he greatest perceived obstacle to electronic com- 
merce today is security. Survey after survey suggests 
that “privacy” and “legitimacy" are concerns that 
need to be addressed before most businesses or consumers 
will pay for goods and services over foe Internet 
Consumers want to make sure that their credit card 
numbers are protected in electronic transactions. They also 
want to be sure that merchants are who they say they are. 

Merchants have similar doubts: Are foe customers who they 
say they are? Is the credit card or other payment mechanism 
legitimate? Banks, as foe intermediaries, want to authen- 
ticate the claims of both parties to the transaction. Both 
consumers and merchants want the assurance that the bank 
itself is a trustworthy financial institution. And everyone 
wants to ensure foe integrity of foe data so that it cannot be 
altered as it flows through the network. 

This seemingly complex problem is close to resolution: 

“As it is largely a technology issue, it is likely to be one of 
the most straightforward to resolve,” reports foe 1997 
European Information Technology Observatory Yearbook. 

The yearbook identifies foe SET (Secure Electronic Trans- 
actions) standard as “the best-known public-key encryption A -v T /’~YkT T T\TT TV /T A T T 

standard.” According to technology consultancy Forrester f-\ |\ V^/JN ™ I y|N K 1 y 1 | ,\ y 

Research, “Credit card transactions conducted using the 


Europe, encompassing 38 members representing up to 90 
banks in 1 6 countries. MasterCard is establishing pilots with 
up to 50 banks worldwide, and was used for the fust cross- 
border SET purchase in April 1997. Starting in September, 
post-pilot implementation of SET will begin, using foe final 
version of SET 1 .0. 

Looking beyond SET acceptance, IBM is developing 
what it calls SuperSET to accommodate a host of consumer- 
oriented electronic payments. Smart card capabilities will 
gradually be integrated with SET standards to improve 
flexibility, portability and security. 

Says Mr. Snykers, “With foe experience of our SET 
pilots all over foe world, we will continue to assist banks and 
their customers in developing and delivering services and 
products for foe emerging electronic-commerce market- 
place.”* 


For more information on SET, contact IBM by e-mail at 
khousquetfyefr. ibm.com or by fax at: +33 J 41 8852 50. 


Combining Smart Cards and the Net 

f 


ranee may be better prepared for 
electronic commerce than almost 


any other country in the world. 
France's Minitel sys- 
tem has given the coun- 
try 1 5 years’ experience 
with on-line services, 
and microprocessors 
arc incorporated into all 
its “smart” bark-debit 
and credit cards. 

Starting in Septem- 
ber, this lead will be 
taken a step further, as e-COMM, a 
French-based consortium, begins test- 
ing an advanced version of foe Secure 
Electronic Transactions standard. 

Launched in March 1 997. e-COMM 
brings together three leading French 
banks (BNP, Societd Gdn6rale and 
Credit Lyonnais, which together con- 



stitute 40 percent of foe French mar- 
ket), plus France Telecom, Gemplus (a 
leader in chip cards) and VISA In- 
ternational. It is predic- 
ated on IBM's Com- 
mercePOlNT software, 
which incorporates the 
SET standard. 

However. unlike 
SET, e-COMM ’s pro- 
gram is based on real 
plastic cards, not virtual 
ones. 

While SET provides security, in- 
tegrity and confidentiality in Internet 
transactions, says Herve Gouezel. 
president of e-COMM, the consortium 
adds non-repudiation, portability and 
micro-payment flexibility, features that 
are easily carried on foe chip ofa smart 
card. 


“Non-repudiation” should not be 
confused with the customer's right to 
return merchandise. Instead, rt ls a level 
of assurance for a merchant once an 
order has been placed electronically. 
The French threshold for non-repu- 
diation is higher than that of SET in its 
pilot form. 

Portability means that customers can 
carry foe software for e-commerce in 
their pockets rather than being limited 
to their home computers. At the outset, 
e-COMM will supply card readers for 
participants' home computers. Even- 
tually card readers will become stan- 
dard equipment on PCs, information- 
technology financial experts believe. 

Micro-payment flexibility allows 
customers to make purchases for very 
small amounts, a feature that not all 
credit cards offer today. • 


SET protocol can provide strong security on an international 
level.” 

Created by a consortium of companies led by Yisa and 
MasterCard, and including IBM. Microsoft, Netscape, 
GTE, American Express and VeriSign. SET uses encryption 
technology to safeguard credit card purchases over foe 
Internet and includes “digital signatures” that confirm the 
identities’of all foe parties involved in the transaction. 

These digital signatures and the mechanisms by which 
they can be verified to all parties in an Internet transaction 
constitute the major advantage ofSET over existing security 
systems, says Lode Snykers, manager of Payment Systems 
Solutions for IBM. “They prevent a level of fraud that 
previous systems do not address.” 

Both merchants and cardholders will apply for digital 
certificates from their bank, as card applicants and mer- 
chants do for credit cards today. A recognized Certificate 
Authority will check applications and issue digital cer- 
tificates, which cannot be altered after issuance. 

IBM was foe first vendor to have its products granted 
SET compliance by SAIC, foe company charged by Visa 
and MasterCard to determine whether vendor products meet 
foe standards. IBM’s wide-ranging CommerccPOINT fam- 
ily of hardware and software products has been used in 
many of the SET pilots now running. 

A Visa-led pilot effort for SET is currently under way in 


Debuts in Hungary 

i 


SET Firsts 


Tiny Denmark is a sophisticated payments market by 
international standards. On a per capita basis, its credit 
card system and its volume in electronic payments are 
amor® the largest in the world. 

So it is not surprising that PBS. the country's leader In 
electron inpayments processing, has been involved m both 
theworid'sfirst SET-secured transaction onthe Internet and 
the IVst crossborder purchase usirgthe SET protocol. 

The first transaction took place in December 1996, 
when CarkChristian Aegidius. general manager for IBM 
Nordic Region, bought Stephen King's novel “Rose Mad- 
der” on-tine with his MasterCard. The purchase was the 
resuft of a cooperative effort among PBS. Europay. IBM and 
MasterCard. Their solution consists of a Payment Gateway 
that links the Internet with PBS’s existing payment sys- 
tems, using the Secure Electronic Transactions stan- 
dard. . . 

“The Internet is perfect for electronic ' s 

very easily accessible." says Per Ledegaard, CEO of PBS. 
“Now. thanks to the SET standard. R should be possible to 

prevent misuse of cards used for this purpose. 

PBS was also involved in the first international SET 
transaction, when Mr. Ladegaarti himself boughtan airline 
ticket from the Norwegian airline 
Danish Eurocaiti/MasteiCard in Apni 1997. Before the 
endofthisyear.the SET system ^ll^ 0 P e ? t °£ , ? e J^ 
in Denmark, and PBS will be working closely with bante to 
help them understand this new payments environment. 


Web Venture Draws New Customers 


b 


arely seven months old, CERA 
Online, foe Internet-banking 
service offered by Cera, Bel- 
gium's sLxth-largest financial institu- 
tion, has already exceeded expecta- 
tions. 

In its first four months of operation. 
CERA Online attracted 5.500 sub- 
scribers, including 275 who were com- 
pletely new to foe bank. “And foe 
profitability of these customers is 3.5 
times that of the average Cera cus- 
tomer,” enthuses Rudi Peeters. elec- 
tronic-banking officer for the bank. 

The service is foe first in Belgium to 
offer full-fledged banking information 
and services to its customers over the 
Internet. Subscribers can look at their 
account balance, make transfers, con- 
sult exchange rates and request general 
information. 

A unique feature enables users to 
calculate the cost of a home mortgage, 
based on criteria such as loan rates, 
duration and type of payment. Outputs 
are displayed either graphically or in 
tabular format in three languages 
r Dutch, French and German, with Eng- 


lish to be added). The mortgage loan 
calculator makes use of an “applet,” an 
application written in Java software 
language that can be accessed over the 
Internet by just about any computer 
system. 

This feature has attracted particular 
attention, says Mr. Peeters. “Everyone 
who goes on our Web site pulls it down. 
Even people outside of Belgium who 
are not eligible for a mortgage from us 
take ^ look.” 

Customers who sign up for the ser- 
vice receive an Internet connection and 
one free hour on foe Net per month. For 
a small additional fee, they can use foe 
IBM Global Network at rates that are 
among the lowest in Belgium. “This 
was stipulated in our contract with 
IBM,” says Mr. Peeters. 

Only 10 percent of subscribers had 
been connected to foe Internet before 
signing up through CERA Online, and 
60 percent choose to buy additional 
monthly Internet access. 

Every week there are 2,000 users, 
conducting more than 5,000 transac- 
tions daily. 


Peak hours for CERA Online are in 
the evenings, with activity doubling 
after 7 P.M. 

Mr. Peeters calculates that foe ini- 
tiative will give Cera a marketing edge 
for only a year, but that it is enough 
time to gam a learning-curve advan- 
tage. 

“CERA Online is responsible for 1 0 
percent of all Internet connections in 
Belgium today,” he says. 

“Being an Internet service provider 
is not our core business, but we are 
playing a role in introducing technol- 
ogy to our society, and our customers to 
technology.” • 


n October, Inter-Europa 
Bank of Hungary will 
launch the first SET- 
based shopping mall project 
in foe country. 

Inter-Europa is a mid- 
sized Hungarian bank with 
16 branches, more than 
25,000 customers and sev- 
eral years' experience in 
various forms of electronic 
banking. 

It was the first Hungarian 
bank to offer elfectronic 
banking to businesses in 
1993, and foe first to offer 
home banking to individuals 
through an open network 
two years later. More than 60 
percent of its transactions 
currently flow through elec- 
tronic channels. 

“We undertook the SET 
shopping mall project to 
gain more familiarity with 
foe Internet and to attract 
businesses as customers,” 
explains Tamas Foltanyi, 
managing director of infor- 
mation technology and back 
office for foe bank. 

The mall will open with 
10 shops, including a mail- 
order store, a travel agent, a 
music store, a supermarket 
and a purveyor of Hungarian 
wine. 

Management of foe mall 
is being outsourced to IBM 
Hungary, leveraging foe lat- 
ter’s advanced e-business 
solutions for corporate cus- 
tomers. IBM will setup, cus- 
tomize and operate the com- 


mercial software, the SET 
Payment Gateway software, 
foe dedicated hardware and 
foe communications lines. 

“By outsourcing this ser- 
vice to IBM, we are free to 
concentrate on our core 
business — providing brand 
new services to customers 
and creating strong future re- 
lationships with them,” says 
Mr. Foititayi. 

Participating merchants, 
who are charged a manage- 
able monthly fee, will have 
foe opportunity to learn how 
e-commerce works without 
the major capital investment 
that would be necessary 
were they to venture onto tiie 
Web alone. They will have 
foe most advanced technol- 
ogy available through CBM. 

In foe long term, the bank 
believes that the Internet will 
dramatically alter foe rela- 
tionship between banks and 
their customers. 

“We see competition 
through programs like 
Quicken, as well as electron- 
ic agents, network service 
providers and others,” ob- 
serves Mr. Foltanyi. “Digit- 
al money may change the 
role ofbanks, and we run the 
risk of losing customers.” 

Mr. Foltdnyi notes that the 
Internet market in Hungary 
in the next few years will not 
be huge, but, be says, “It is a 
different market and we 
have to leam how to deal 
with it”# 


“Business to eBusiness: Banking” 

is the first in a series thai addresses the impact of electronic business on various industries. 

It is an IHT/7BM iniiiathv sponsored by IBM and produced by the JHT Supplements Department. 
A holt inked version of this page am be consulted at httpyMivKihLcunffHT/SUP/. 
Writer: Claudia Flisi. based in Monaco. 

Illustrations: Karen Sheckler-Wilson. 

Program Director; Bill Mahder . 


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HcraliCSlSnbunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


’AGE 3 


swisscar 

worlds most refreshing cm-line. 


PAGE 15 


By Joseph Fitcbett 

International Herald Tribune 


to Allow Airbus to Take Over Aviation-Manufacturing Assets 


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PARIS — In a turnabout, the French 
government has agreed to turn over 
French aviation manufacturing assets to 
Airbus Industrie, in an attempt to clear 
the way for the European consortium to 
become a fully independent company. 
European government officials and in- 
dustry executives said Tuesday. 

The move — intended to allow Air- 
bus to compete more effectively against 
Boeing Co. of the United States — was 
signaled to Germany during a summit 
meeting last week, the officials said. 

These sources said that France’s top 
leaders had agreed to try to force 
Aerospatiale, the French state-owned 
aeronautics concern, to shift its airliner- 
manufacturing work to Airbus. 

France's commitment — given by 
both President Jacques Chirac and 


Prune Minister Lionel Jospin to Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl during the meeting, 
but not reported at the time — should 
remove the biggest remaining obstacle 
to allowing Airbus Industrie to integrate 
its operations under a single manage- 
ment by 1999. The merged entity would 
be the biggest European multinational, 
with annual sales of $10 billion. 

For months, France has been the odd 
man out in a European effort to allow 
Airbustosiand on its own and turn to the 
marketplace — and not cash-strapped 
governments — for capital to finance 
ambitious new airplanes and avionics. 

French officials have lent support to 
suggestions oF greater autonomy for Air- 
bus, but they have never overruled ob- 
jections from Aerospatiale — especially 
under Yves Michoi, 58, who took over 
last year after a long career in the com- 
pany — to relinquishing control over any 
of its assembly lines or design teams. 


About 40 percent of Aerospatiale's 
work is Airbus-related, and nearly one- 
ihinj ol its 39.000 personnel work on 
Airbus projects, and the company's man- 
agement argued that shifting these in- 
dustrial assets to Airbus in exchange for 
stock would weaken France's indepen- 
dence in aerospace manufacturing. 

Critics have said unwillingness to 
turn assets over to Airbus would weaken 
France’s position in die consortium rel- 
ative to Germany and Britain. But 
Aerospatiale's trade union strongly sup- 
ported management's resistance. With a 
similar agenda, much of the country's 
nationalistic-minded aerospace in- 
dustry has sought to limit the power of 
Airbus while hoping to see France re- 
organize its own companies to be the 
leading force in an eventual Europe- 
wide defense sector. 

Germany and Britain had hinted (hat 
they could' proceed with bilateral alli- 


ances if France delayed any longer — an 
argument that apparently convinced Paris 
to accept the idea of merging the Airbus 
partners into a s t and- alone joint venture. 

The decision, by both the conser- 
vative bead of stare and the Socialist 
prime minister, should cany enough 
political clout to override resistance in 
France. Sources familiar with the dis- 
cussions said that Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of Germany brought up the Airbus 
question forcefully with both French 
leaders — and got affirmative answers. 

Mr. Jospin has the critical role because 
he is liable to face criticism from the 
unions and his Communist coalition pan- 
nets that he has sanctioned a backdoor 
privatization of part of Aerospatiale. 

The likely response by Mr. Jospin, an 
adviser said, is that strengthening Air- 
bus offers the best answer to the threat of 
U.S. hegemony in the aircraft industry. 
A Socialist cabinet minister recently 


said privately that the government 
would abandon its majority holding in 
Thomson-CSF. France's leading de- 
fense-electronics company, as it de- 
veloped into a multinational. 

Even if the Airbus-related work was 
hived off. the change would involve 
only a minority of Aerospatiale, most of 
whose work involves helicopters and 
regional airliners, missiles and satel- 
lites. The remaining assets would re- 
main state-owned — and theoretically 
committed to merger with Dassault Avi- 
ation, the warplane-builder. 

The deadlock in the government-sup- 
ported merger of the two French avi- 
ation companies has colored the gov- 
ernment’s thinking about Airbus, 
according to industry sources. Dassault 
has stalled for two years against the 
merger order, which was apparently in- 
tended to create a domestic defense gi- 
ant capable of dominating cross-1 


restructuring in Europe. With no pro- 
gress in sight, Mr. Jospin has been "un- 
der pressure to make the Airbus deal 
before France lost out," according to a 
Socialist adviser. 

Officials at Airbus and Aerospatiale 
said that they had not been informed of 
any conclusions reached at the summit 
meeting. Arguments about the value of 
the corporate assets each partner brings 
to Airbus — and thus the amount of 
shares and the controlling voice received 
in return — are likely to become a new 
ground for opposition to the deal 

The streamlined Airbus could expect 
to save op to 10 percent, roughly $800 
million, a year by eliminating duplicate 
jobs in construction, transport and mar- 
keting in the four owning companies, 
industry sources said. The exact savings 
are hard to estimate because Airbus 
does not have any publicly available 
central accounting. 


U.S. ‘Asia Talks Explore 
Barriers to New Turmoil 

Bui Washington Still Opposes Rescue Fund 


By Alan Friedman 
and Philip Segal 

International Herald Tribune 


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HONG KONG — The United States, 
while opposing a proposal to set up an 
emergency financial rescue fund in 
Asia, agreed Tuesday to schedule high- 
level talks with several East Asian na- 
tions aimed at helping prevent further 
economic turmoil in the region. 

"This puts us into a very constructive 
mode in dealing with Southeast Asia’s 
problems," said the U.S. Treasury sec- 
retary, Robert Rubin, after a meeting be 
and tiie Federal Reserve chairman, Alan 
Greenspan, held with the finance min- 
isters and central bank governors of 
seven East Asian countries. 

The finance minister of the Philip- 
pines. Roberto Ocampo, said: “We 
agreed to meet again as soon as pos- 
sible," although no date has been set for 
the meeting. 

Deputy . Prime Minister Anwar 
Ibrahim of Malaysia said die initiative 
for additional credit arrangements was 
an Asian one, and that the idea of a fresh 
round of discussions had beat warmly 
welcomed by Mr. Rubin. 

The new talks are likely to cover 
issues ranging from how to strengthen 
banking sectors, to ways of protecting 
them from the risks that come from free 
and open capital markets and the idea of 
setting np a regional bailout fund. 

But at the session Tuesday between 
the United States and seven of the nine 
members of the Association of South 
East Asian Nations — Indonesia, 
Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, 
Thailand. Vietnam and Brunei — both 
Mr. Rubio and Mr. Greenspan ex- 
pressed strong concerns over a regional 
fund for additional bailouts of troubled 
Asian economies. 

Other governments expected to be 
invited to join the talks include China, 
Hong Kong, South Korea and Japan. 

Since the Thai crisis erupted. Japan, 
which is beset by its own economic 
woes, has not played the sort of leading 
role many in the region had expected, 
and has deferred leadership to the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund. Now, the 
meetings with regional governments are 
likely to be spearheaded not by Japan, 
but by the United States. 

Since July 2, when Thailand effec- 
tively devalued the baht, currencies and 
stock markets there and in Malaysia, the 
Philippines and Indonesia have had as 
much as 25 percent of their values 
wiped out by jittery local and inter- 
national traders. 

On Tuesday, Michel Camdessus, 
managing director of the International 
Monetary Fund, tried to put a brave face 
on the crisis in East Asian markets. In 
his opening address to the annual meet- 
ings of the World Bank and IMF, he said 
he was confident that markets in the 
region would soon recover, "If I had 
only one message to leave with you 
today,” hesaid, “it would be titis: These 
economies will emerge stronger.” 

But other senior officials involved in 


the Thai rescue' and related attempts to 
steady regional markets said that they 
remained skeptical about the degree to 
which Thailand and other countries 
would be willing to close down in- 
solvent banks, force public sector lay- 
offs and put their electorates through a 
period of harsh sacrifice. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Moha- 
mad of Malaysia, who last weekend 
caused controversy by suggesting that 
currency trading should be banned as 
illegal, said Tuesday he was pleased 
with the new weaker level of the ringgit 
“We are happy with the ringgit" he 
said. “It is cheap. There will be certain 
problems but we will manage." 

News of the planned U.S. -Asian 
meetings came as Mb'. Anwar, the 
Malaysian deputy prime minister, tried 
for the second time in as many days to 
calm foreign investors. In a news con- 
ference in Hong Kong he again prom- 
ised no new restrictions on foreign cur- 
rency trading, in an apparent 
contradiction of Mr. Mahathir. 

“It is not a contradiction." Mr. An- 
war contended, “but a clarification." 



Ofcgi 


HEADY BREW — Guinness’s chairman, Tony Greener, holding an 
oversized glass as the company presented its earnings. Page 17. 


Telecom Italia Sale Fails 
To Attract Core Investors 


CcapddbrOarSeffFmmPapadrt 

ROME — The Treasury appeared 
Tuesday to have fallen sboit of its goal 
of selling at least 10 percent of Telecom 
I talia SpA to investors it deemed “stra- 
tegic," after most of the Italian tele- 
phone company’s international partners 
refused to participate in the placement. 

A group of Italian banks and insurers 
publicly announced bids for about 5 
percent of the company as the midnight 
deadline expired. Members of this 
“core" group must pay full market 
price for the shares and commit them- 
selves to keeping the stock for at least a 
year, obtaining the right to nominate 
eight of Telecom's 15 board members. 

The bidding, results of which will be 
made public Sept. 29, is a prelude to the 
sale of the remainder of the govern- 
ment’s 44.7 percent stake — now val- 
ued at 30 trillion lire ($17.17 billion) — 
in a public stock offering next month. 

A group of Telecom Italia's partners, 
including AT&T Coro., Endesa SA, 
Bony goes SA and ABN-AMRO Hold- 
ing NV, declined to participate in the 


rei 


group of controlling shareho 
“Ibis is a failure in the short term," 
said Alberto Ciucci, chief fund manager 
atEptafund SpA. “But, in the long term. 


this may be good news. Maybe, this 
way, Telecom Italia will finally become 
a real public company, without assur- 
ances of board control to selected 
minority stakeholders." 

Telecom Italia shares fell 50 lire, to 
close at 11.750. 

Individual investors are expected to 
obtain a discount of as much as 10 
percent in the offer, although only three 
board seats will be reserved for their 
ntatives. 

government had hoped to attract 
industrial companies such as Pirelli SpA 
or the Benetton family as core investors. 

Instead, the banking companies 
Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, Banca 
Commerciale I tali ana SpA, Credito 
Italiano SpA, Istituto Mobuiare Italiano 
SpA, San Paolo Foundation and Cariplo 
Foundation, as well as the insurer Isti- 
tuto Nazionale delle Assicurazioni SpA 
and Ifil SpA, the finan cial vehicle of the 
Agnelli family, said they each planned 
to buy 0.25 percent to 0.7 percent of 
Telecom. 

Assicurazioni Generali SpA applied 
to become a core shareholder of Tele- 
com, but the insurance company will not 
decide how large a stake to take until 
Thursday. ( Bloomberg . Reuters . AFX ) 


MEDIA MARKETS 


At Start of a New Season, 
Networks Study Darwin 


By Bill Carter 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — For the network 
executives who program the prime-time 
schedules, the new television season 
that started this week was a D-Day of 
sorts: A long-planned invasion whose 
coining was marked by feelings of 
giddy excitement and abject fear. 

Programmers always enter a season 
worried about die future of specific pro- 
grams, but never before have so many of 
them entered a season so worried about 
the future of the entire business. 

The list of concerns is almost as long 
as the list of situation comedies — in 
fact, at 62 and counting, the number of 
sit-coms is one of the concerns. 

At the top of the list is the biggest 
issue of all: Is American network tele- 
vision destined to be a business con- 
tinually diminishing inward from the 
edge, with viewers defecting to cable, 
syndicated shows and the Internet? 

Monday night was the first night 
since May when viewers could see a full 
complement of new programming, after 
the grim summer diet of repeats. 

Peter Roth, president of Fox Enter- 
tainment, has been the most vocal in 
saying the networks can no longer af- 
ford to take die summer off, counting on 
viewers to return in September like 
good schoolchildren. 

Fox tried a few new shows this sum- 


mer, with modest success. Overall, 
however, the four networks* share of the 
summer audience fell to an all-time low. 

The networks have spent millions of 
dollars in advertising in other media 
over the last few weeks trying to reach 
viewers who have not been watching 
network television since May. 

“The thing to look at early this sea- 
son is: Do die shows get sampled?" 
asked Ted Haibect, an executive with 
DreamWorks SKG but a longtime ABC 
programmer before that. "That’s why 
they had to spend all that marketing 
money this summer." 

Putting on new shows that stick is 
more than ever a survival test for the 
networks. Advertising rates for televi- 
sion’s biggest hit shows, like “Sein- 
feld" and “Frasier," are at best just 
slightly up. while the rates for second- 
year shows considered incipient hits, 
like “King of tire Hill” on Fox and 
"Everybody Loves Raymond” on 
CBS, had die biggest increases in av- 
erage price per commercial. 

For example, according to Adver- 
tising Age magazine, the price of ad- 
vertising for 30 seconds on "Everyone 
Loves Raymond" jumped to $215,000 
from $1 10,000 the year before. 

So far. the overall commitment of tbe 
ad industry to network television has not 
waned, but the networks are already wor- 

See TV, Page 16 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

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PAGE 16 


r 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 



flnvestor’s America 






The Dow 


8000 ^ 
/t 


7200 

l 6-70 


! &30 



Dollar in Deutsche marks H Dollar in Yen 



Very briefly: 


Bertelsmann Seeks a U.S. Publisher 

GUETERSLOH, Germany (Bloomberg) — Bertelsmann 
AG said Tuesday that it hoped to buy a U.S. publishing 
company in the next few months. 

“For the next few months, we’ll be looking out for a middle- 
of-the-road publishing group in America," Chief Executive 
Marie Woessner said, refusing to confirm or deny German 
reports that the German media giant was in negotiations to buy 
News Corp.'s HarperCollins or McGraw-Hill Cos. 

• Delta Air Lines Inc. and AMR Corp.’s American Airlines 
cut travel-co mmiss ion rates to 8 percent, matching a move last 
week by UAL Corp.’s United Airlines to cut costs. 

• McKesson Corp. agreed to acquire the rival drugstore 
owner AmeriSource Health Corp. in a stock swap valued at 
$2.25 billion that includes the assumption of about $5323 
million in debt. 

• US. food prices will likely rise less than 3 percent in 1998, 
the Agriculture Department forecast 

• Morgan Stanley, Dean Witter, Discover & Co.’s third- 
quarter net profit rose 51 percent to S678 million, as its 
securities and asset management businesses posted record 
earnings on rising stocks and a surge in mergers. 

• McDonald’s Corp. plans to spend more than $500 million 
in the next four years to double operations in Brazil. It now has 
270 restaurants and 130 satellite locations in Brazil and is 
expected to reach annual sales of S300 million this year. 

• B.F. Goodrich Co. agreed to buy Rohr Inc. for Si .3 billion 
in stock and assumed debt, expanding its aircraft-parts busi- 
ness as jetliner sales continue to boom. 

• Brazil has dismissed the top directors of its state-controlled 
postal service in preparation for its restructuring and sale, the 
Communications Ministry said. 

• General Electric Capital Corp. agreed to bay Wood Chester 

Investments PLC for 591 million Irish punts ($864 million), 
bolstering its presence in the European consumer finance mar- 
ket. Bloomberg . Bridge Sews. Reuters 

_ — — AMEX 



Texaco, Late but Eager, Joins Caspian Race 


By Steve LeVine 

New York Tunes Service . 


ALMATY, Kazakstan — Texaco Inc. has 
reason to crow about its latest deal. In one 
stroke, its reserve base swelled nearly 20 per- 
cent and it became a major participant in one of 
the world's most coveted energy-producing re- 
gions. 

But that has not prevented some gentle rib- 
bing. 

One gag asks the name of the most grateful 
party in the deal, in which Texaco recently 
bought 20 percent of Kazakstan’s second- 

. .i i J nwu iai t u Hu onnuar' Rrit. 



nies dial sold off part 

“It seemed like a headache toBG and Agip,” 
said a Western oilman in Moscow who spoke on 
condition that be not be identified. “I should 
think they should be pleased to get rid of 20 

percent.” . 

Texaco acquired a share m Karachaganak, a 
vast oil and natural gas field in the steppes near 
the Russian border and the most troubled major 
energy project in the Caspian Sea region. 

The field could add an impressive 700 mil- 
lion barrels of oil to Texaco f s reserve base of 
3.7 billion barrels. 

Texaco's president of worldwide explora- 
tion, C. Robert Black, calls it the “hub” of a 
p lan to play a leading role in the Caspian 
region. 


stable Chechnya. - 

1 he pipeline, Mr. Nemtsov said, in- 
tended k> ensure that Moscow could fid fill a 
guarantee to a consortium led by British Pet- 
roleum Co. to ship oil from Azerbaijan to a 

for an even further unlockmgof 

Caspian energy exports has come with me 
recent appearance erf two surprising potential 
new channels — Chi n a and Iran. 

Worried about future oO supplies to nswest- 
ern province of Xinjiang, Bqjing has bid for 
and won two large Kazak ofi deals. 

It triumphed by agreeing to build a 53.5- 
‘ “Acoiiple of years ago, it looked like abright billion, 2.000-mile oil pipeline from Kazakstan 
deal,” Julia Nanay, an analyst with the Wash- to Xinjiang, oilmen say. • ■ 

- ■ -• - iren borer into the regional equation when 

Washington unexpectedly lifted its opposjoa 
to a Turkmenistan natural gas export pipeline 
traversing Iran. Many Western oilmen regard 
Iran as die most commercially feasible export 

route. ... 

The trouble for Karachaganak is mai while 

• miarMl ireanitiufe toward Caspian 


“We are a latecomer,” he said, “but I very 
much believe we will become a big contrib- 
utor” to the region. 

Five years after the European investors 
began negotiating for Karachaganak, the proj- 
ect has been all but crippled by a Russian 
blockade on energy exports from the region. 

Its developers do not even speak of reaping 
the market rewards of 62 percent of 
Karachaganak 's resources — 18 trillion cubic 
feet of natural gas, equivalent to 3.3 billion 
barrels. Rather, they focus on the third of the 
field’s riches that remain in 2 billion barrels of a 
prized tight crude called condensate. 


ingtoc-based Petroleum Finance Co., said of 
the Europeans’ efforts to sell part of 
Karachaganak “Now, it's a lot trickier ques- 
tion.” 

The Stale Department estimates that Kazak- 

billion barrels of proven and postnbfe^ti re- 
serves. If so, the region would be on a par with 
the richest Gulf states. 

Western energy companies face many perils 
in the region, but there has been an encouraging 
change. The Texaco deal coincided with a 
weakening of the Russian blockade. 

Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov of 
Russia said Sept. 17 that Moscow was p lannin g 
a bond issue to build a 5220-million, 176-mile 
(28 2 -kilometer) pipeline that would bypass un- 


amrai gas aiawu- 

Rem Vakhiiov, the chairman of Russia s 
natural gas monopoly, RAO Gazprom, s aid he 
was protecting the export market for his coun- 
try's own considerable reserves. • - 

Mr. Vakhirov has been quoted as saying that 
no Kazak natural gas would be permitted in 
Gazprom’s export pipe line s. 


On Profits t 



Mark Slips on Reports of Falling Prices in Germany 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the Deutsche mark Tuesday 
after reports of falling prices in Ger- 
many’s two biggest states eased 
speculation the Bundesbank might 
soon raise interest rates. 

With German unemployment at a 
post- World War II high, an interest 
rate rise could brake the country’s 
nascent recovery from a five-year 
economic slump, analysts said. 

* ‘The sentiment is changing as far 
as Germany’s ability to hike rates,” 


said Bob Fakhonri of Generate 
Bank. 4 ‘We could have a big dollar- 
mark rally.” 

The dollar was quoted in late trad- 
ing at 1.7936 DM, up from 1.7905 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

DM at the end of the day Monday. 
Mr. Fakhouri predicted die dollar 
could reach 1.8250 DM by the end 
of the week. 

The dollar was little changed 
against die yen. trading at 122.020 


yen, compared with 121.825. Mar- 
kets in Japan were closed for a na- 
tional holiday. It had fallen earlier 
after Deputy Treasury Secretary 
Lawrence Summers said Japan’s 
rising current account surplus re- 
mained an “important concern.” 

The dollar’s strength against the 
yen can help widen the U-S. trade 
gap by making U.S. exports more 
expensive. 

In Germany, prices in North 
Rhine -Westphalia and Bavaria fell 
03 percent in the mondr to mid- 


September, brin ging down both 
States’ animal inflatio n rates. That 

suggested inflati on in Germany as a 
whole may be waning enough to 
stay die central bank’s hand. 

Traders will get a fuller reading 
on German prices later this week 
when the West German consumer 
price index is released. 

The dollar rose to 6.0286 French 
francs from 6D180 francs but 
slipped to 1.4700 Swiss francs from 
1.4/10 francs. The pound rose to 
S 1.61 40 from S3.< 


TV: For the Networks, Giddy Excitement and Abject Fear as a New Season Opens 


Continued from Page 15 

rying about what might happen if the economy 
goes into a downturn. 

NBC’s competitors see in that leading net- 
work’s strategy a kind of Darwinian approach 
intended to ensure NBC’s survival even if its 
competitors slide toward extinction. 

Defying previous network wisdom, which 
counseled avoiding direct challenges to hits, NBC 
has begun to schedule successful shows against 
hot shows on other networks, looking to steal 
viewers rather than pull in alternative viewers. 


Steve Sternberg, a senior partner with BJK&E 
Media, which buys commercial time for ad- 
vertising clients, said the television landscape had 
changed so much that networks simply do not see 
their market in the same terms as they once did. 

“Networks have their own cable interests 
now/’ he said. “They see things in terms of how- 
well all their assets are doing.” For example, 
NBC regularly promotes its cable networks, MS- 
NBC and CNBC, on its programs. 

Fox does not worry much that repeats of its hit, 
‘ ‘The X-Ftles,” run every- week night at 8. pulling 
away viewers that might otherwise be watching 


network television, because the cable charnel 
they are going to, F/X, is also owned by Fox. 

Still. Mr- Sternberg wondered how viewers are 
helped by five networks placing high-profile 
shows head-to-head, as is the case now Wednes- 
day nights, when “Third Rock From the Sun” on 
NBC and “The Drew Carey Show” on ABC are 
joined at 9 P3L by Fox’s youth hit “Party of 
Five.” the new CBS newsmagazine “Private 
Eye” with Bryant Gnmbel and “Star Trek Voy- 
ager” on UPN. 

“Nobody has dial many VCRs,” Mr. Stem- 
berg said- 


Micron Technology 
AndDeltaDismay 

CoufMbrOnr StgFnieiOapudUi 

NEW YORK — Stocks were 
mixed Tuesday as Delta Ai r and 
Micron Technology reported profit ... 
weakness, renewing concerns 
among investors that corporate earn- ‘ 
mgs ' will fall short of expectations. 

“There’s still a risk for a another 
week or so of disropointments,” 
said Ted Bridges ' of Bridges In- . 
vestment Counsel. With earnings 
reports coming up, besaid, “you’ve 
got to own the names that are going 
to make or exceed their numbers.’ 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age finished down 26.77 points, at . 
7,970.06. The broader Standard & 

U^. STOCKS " 

Poor’s 500-stock index fell 3.50 ; 
points at 951.93, while the tech- 
nology-ladcn Nasdaq composite in- . 
dex rose 7.90 to 1,697 35. 

Bonds dropped, with the bench- 
mark 30-year Treasury off 12/32 at 
10010/32, raising its yield to 638 - 
percent from 635 percent Monday: • 

“The fact that long-term rates are - 
approaching 6^5 percent is more of 
a positive sign than individual 
companies not meeting expecta- 
tions,” said Peter Carditio of west- 
falia Investments. 

But other investors were preoc- 
cupied with tire disappointing re- 
sults issued Tuesday. 

‘Delta plunged 436 to 102 1/16 ' 
after it said <*arning« for the current 
quarter would not meet analysis’ ex- , 
pectations. Micron Technology said 
it earned 33 cents a share in the 
quarter ended Aug. 28.. While the 
profit was quadruple what the chip- 
maker earned a year earlier, the re- 
suit was shy of analyst forecasts, and ■- 
the stock sank 316 ft>37. _ 

Aetna feQ 9 1/16 to.93 11/16 as a -’ 
large investor sold 139 million 
shares. 

Rohr gained after not trading 
Monday, when it announced that it 
would be bought by an unnamed 
company. BJF. Goodrich has since . 
said ft had agreed to buy the maker - 
of jet-engine housings for $13 hik 
lion m stock and assumed debt 

BellSouth rose after saying it 
would buy back up to $1 billion 
worth of stock by the end of 1998. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


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son Hgk to* ititai age Indexes 


Most Actives 


ncHV 

befilg 


iT:H 


Dow Jones 

Ow Nik L*» Mat Oe- 

InOB JW9J3 1005.1* 7729.05 T97QJM -2177 
Train 317101 31B129 3M1 M 3154JB -315* 
Uli 341.99 7CLU 34007 24193 -1J* 

Comp 25027 255710 253175 2S41J5 -14.99 


Standard g^oors^** 1 ^ 

InOUSWab 1 12036 7 102JW 1107^5111134 


4 ML 


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UTIUties 

Finance 

SP500 

SP100 

NYSE 

Cempasin 

liKhnMati 

Traop. 

umy 

Hnancs 

Nasdaq 

Bra ite 

insurance 

Rnonce 

TmwpL 

AMEX 


70117 <0457 70057 673.15 
207 Jit 206.00 206.45 206.88 
113.14 111.39 I1I2S 111.78 
958.19 943-00 94729 951.93 
92497 91074 912J3 919.73 


NYSE 

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tISM 67X62 OSM 
4*111 4S8J2 439-93 
2974S 29596 272-06 
471JD 467 JM 461*3 


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36486 71«3 

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120934 20 
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Sept. 23, 1997 

Hgn Low Latex: Cqe Open 

Grains 

CORN (CBOTJ 

5,000 im miniiinim- cents per bushel 
Dec 97 163 260 247. bocH- 191,343 

Mot 93 2711* 268 “I 271 irach. 5&1S0 

May 99 276U 27315 276 undL 1A474 

Jid 99 281 277a 279=, until. 2S7C2 

Sep 98 274>i 271 272ft -1W V869 

Dec 98 272*4 268 270ft -11* 14*19 

M99 283ft -ft 122 

Est whs 44000 Morrs sates 65427 
Mara open M507J14 up 20Z177 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTJ 
100 tuns- OoOara per too 
Od 97 22X80 21930 22040 -330 24408 

Dec 97 207.40 20410 20470 -260 44954 

Jaa 98 20330 2D0J0 201 JO -0.60 1242D 
MOT 98 19830 19650 197.40 -*70 11^31 

May 98 197-20 19530 19550 -1JJ0 11.108 
Ju198 19830 19650 19750 -050 5552 

Est softs ISOOO Mon sates 22540 
Mars opm M 111580. up 538 

SOYBEAN OIL (C80T) 

60000 lbs- cents por lb 

Od 97 2345 2338 2354 -021 14052 

Dec 97 2400 23J6 2339 -023 52557 

Jan 98 7420 23.97 23.97 -027 14815 

Mar 98 2443 2417 2421 -023 &S02 

Mayrn 3450 2433 2433 022 5.150 

Jul 98 2450 2443 2443 021 4914 

EaL sales l VXD Mom softs 14427 
Man open H 101,121. up 1-237 

SOYBEANS (CBOTJ 

S000 bumlnlnwit- Cento par bushel 

Not 97 636 629 «31 -4ft 94247 

Jan 90 639H 633 635U -3ft 24310 

Mar 98 647 641 643ft -2U 10206 

Moy 98 654ft 649 650ft -2ft 8.939 

Jul 98 861 655 657V -IN 9546 

EsL sales 334)00 Mom softs 37,652 

Mars apan bit 15X775. up UM8 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

4000 bu mbilmum- amts par bushel 
Dm 97 367ft 363ft 367 +2ft 591623 

Mor98 383 377ft 381 +2W 24707 

May 98 389 38SH 388ft +3U 4794 

Jul 98 389 385 388ft +216 10063 

EsL sate 1X000 Mam sate 14710 
Mam open Ini 100867. afl 524 


Hip L»* iafts* Ow» 0P“* 

0 RANGE JUICE (NCTN1 

14300 ti- caras per El 

No* 97 7430 6850 6935 •CSS 0803 

Jen 98 7330 71 JO 7225 -C40 9-C2 

Msr« 747! 7475 7E3S5 +C50 6.142 

May 98 7330 78.53 73.50 *C£S L523 

EsL sales HA. Kan safes 1.186 

Men open int 36516. up 37C 

Metals 


BOLD CNCM30 




TOO Boy dodors per tor cz. 



Sep 97 


3Z2J0 

♦180 

46 

0097 

32270 32170 322J0 

+un 

7601 

Not 97 


323JD 

♦ L00 


Dec 97 

32640 32266 32430 

♦1.10 117*134 

Feb 98 

32600 32460 32580 

♦L20 

16374 

Apr 98 

32760 32650 

32760 

*180 

6735 

Jun 98 

329 JO 327 JU 329 JO 

+130 

8732 

Aug 98 


331 JO 

*130 

4687 

Oct 98 


33360 

♦ 130 

350 

EsL ides 15800 Atom 3 

edn12822 


Mors open fad 202-384 ofllOt 



HI SRAJ3E COPPER (NCMX3 



25JX» fti- cents per te 




Sep 97 

9450 9360 

9380 

-085 

1811 

Oa 97 

9465 9380 

96.10 

-0.10 

0088 

NOT 97 

9610 9475 

9480 

-0L20 

1797 

Dec 97 

95.90 94J0 

9620 

-035 

27633 

Jan 98 


9630 

-as 

1835 

Fab 98 


9620 

4135 

I860 

Mar 98 

9580 9SJZ5 

9630 

-azs 

4603 

AprtS 

93.90 9SJ0 

9630 

-035 

848 

(May 98 

9S80 9570 

9620 

-035 

2345 


Dividends 

company 


Per Ant Rec Pay Company 


IRREGULAR 

Alliance AMAk _ .7433 9-29 10-10 


MiBan OoftSa 
Cctsn Assetlnv 
Putnam InttOwIti 
Putmn IntIGwih 
ZweigFund 


_ .015 10-3 10-15 
- 24 10-7 10-22 

_ .092 9 22 9-30 
_ -003 9-22 9-30 
. 32 10-10 10-27 


ASB Pnd 
Ado bo Systems 
BellSoatti 


STOCK SPLIT 

GOTjWBlEm g BTgnwrf3far2spW. 


r2 split. 

tSt 




T*t* 

t3m 

W 

TnsFad 




Hft lift 
ft 


NFOReseai 

Noel Grub 02 shams at HeaimPtan Ser- 
vices Cp for each Shan- hdd. 

Sunpoinl Secs 2 for 1 spin. 

ThemMOptek Cpl Ttienno Vision share hr 
erenr lOTherrna 0 bW< shores hekl. 

REVERSE STOCK SPUT 

C-TEC Cap 2 far 3mwrse spB. 

INCREASED 

Aquation Co q .41 10-10 10-30 

SPECIAL 

HoiWfcJwiBfsl - JO 104 10-16 

Cmtrpe LODanere q .IO 1O-I6 11-6 


Disney, Walt 
PreshstartVentuiT 
Hardin Btiqt 
Hn tsenC oip 
Horizon Group 
Hmiinoerlncg 
IdexCarp 

Long Island Bncp 
MIK Com 
aSovfce 


NoU 

Nippon To) AOS 
PutnmCon 

Putnm Con 

Second Bncpl 
SonttiwestCA . .. 
USF&G Podnlder 
Warner Aambetri 
Winton Fftd 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

REGULAR 

0 .10 10-15 10-31 

0 35 10-1 10-15 

O 36 1(49 11-3 
O J5 9-30 11-6 

0 37 M0 10-14 
0 .1325 10-17 11-21 
Q .11 10-10 10-23 
0 -12 10-3 10-17 
Q 30 10-15 11-14 
O 35 9-30 10-10 
Q .IS II 25 12-10 
O .12 10-15 10-31 
0 AS 10-15 11-14 
Q 4725 10-1 10-21 
Q .30 10-3 10-14 
b .1025 9-29 - 


J6.99S 

31952 

15*825 

9301 

4477 

1326 


1,954 

7304 

3888 

3135 

1*751 

598 


I OH. 
IFn 


20 9 22 
Jl2 9-22 


MO 

- - - 9-30 
.12 10-15 10-31 
.10 9-30 10-31 
425 9-30 10-10 
•38 11-7 12-10 


0-1154 9-30 10-14 


MUttb-appntfnMteMHNmtpn- 
sUaf»/AD R; f-paynto iti CnamHoa fuads; 

mnnanMy; im a a letty ; s^a mi - u iBMel 


TOMB 

USFCP 

UTlEmi 


usi 

UlMV 

VKMM3 

l tew 

Vtxra 

VtaB 

VHKfllE 

Vtar 

vkftGg 


mu 


WIPE! 


mnmiT 

WEBHK 

wEiim 

WEBSwt 

xaua 


uu 

14 

fit 


IS 

tft 

m 


lu 

w 

in 


4J0 

949 

■ft 

tta 

11411 

23 

22ft 


m 


17ft 


14X4 





III 



» 

4ft 




lft 



1J06 

Hto 



441 

34 

23ft 

2W 

172 

l« 

nw 




in 


IM 

SA 







11499 

9 



m 

ft 




ht 

7 - 


1577 

ft 

h 


259 

lft 



HC 

IS"* 

14h 

14ft 

744 

lift 

lSft 


155 

12ft 

13ft 

13ft 

169 

n 

Jte 







15 

lift 






2S7 

12te 

llte 






Sit 

liw 

15 


21441 

te 

ft 

te 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMEU 
40000 lbs.- cools per B>. 

Od 97 6842 6762 67.95 4L35 

Dee 97 68.90 6825 6867 4L15 

Feb 98 7147 TO P5 7120 4)27 

AOT98 7427 7175 73.97 -020 

JW19B 7DM 7025 70J0 -OL37 

Aug 98 7052 7007 78.02 -052 

Esl. sides 14870 Motrs sties 11.172 
Mamapen M 9423A up 1235 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

3UKKI Bn.- carta per B}. 

Sep 97 7955 7925 7945 4U5 

Od 97 8025 7925 7945 -022 

Nov 77 81.15 8025 8047 -077 

Jan 98 8120 8125 81*47 -055 

Mar 98 81.40 81.10 81.15 -0.45 

Apr 98 0140 81.10 81.12 -050 

Est sate 1291 Man sate 2241 
Mm apan ba 19,729. up 369 


HOCS-Letm (CMER] 

40*000 8) s.- cents par Bl 

Oct 97 70.17 6875 70.05 +045 11,920 

Dec 97 65.90 65.05 £590 4Ll7 10597 

Ffib 98 65 .02 6407 6490 +001 3917 

Apr 98 61.95 61.20 6182 +017 1469 

■km 98 6720 6640 67.15 +0.05 1409 

Esl sales N A. Man’s safes 4962 
Mom open M 3031 0 oH 473 

FORK BELLIES (CMER7 

40LO0Q 0)4- ants par Ok 

Fab 98 64C« 62.00 6307 -1.17 4974 

Mot 98 6190 6225 6242 -127 461 

MayPB 6540 6340 6340 -145 109 

EsL sales 2.914 Mans sales 1,092 

Mon apan M 3600 up 88 


Food 

COCOA (HCSE) 

10 metric tans- 5 per ton 
Doc 97 
Mar 98 


EsL cates MOO Mars sate S028 
Mam apan bd 53254 oH 326 

SILVER (NCMXt 

5400 tiay at- cants par troy az. 

S 97 46640 46400 46*30 +240 167 

97 465.90 ISO JB 

Not 97 46720 +33) 

Dec 97 47020 46540 46920 +320 53387 

Jon 98 47140 +220 22 

Mar 98 47620 47300 47520 +340 U091 

May 98 47920 47840 479 JO +2J0 31265 

Jul 98 48390 *350 3363 

Est solas 9400 Mon sales 4848 
Mom open Inf 77479. off 369 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 hay at- dolors per bay or. 
Od 97 44300 43340 435 J- f 

J* 98 43320 41140 42350 

Apr 98 <1350 

Jul 98 40820 

Est. sales N A Man sales 3168 
Mom open lid 1198a up 555 


Ktgti Law Urtest Cbga CpM 

18-YEAR FRENCH 60V. WlffOS (MATU1 

Fnoaooo-phanaqncf 

Doc 77 992B 9958 9924 Unch. 01698 

Mar 98 9946 99.00 99.02 + 0412 3130 

Jan 98 9868 9MB 9828 Unch. 0 

Esl saftr 84866 

□pan K: 133828 UndL 

7TALIAN COVERNMEJfT RONS OJFFE) 
m.3O0nHan- pftaflOOpd 
Cftc 97 TI130 TTL76 11124 -021 119163S 

Mar 98 11120 11120 11174 —071 980 

EsLsafts: 4&70S. Pim soles: 59269 
Pm.opminL: 120615 up 1204 

UBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

SadBoo- pftaflOOpd. 

Oct 97 9437 9426 9437 unch. 28,183 

Not 97 9434 9473 9473 undL 29.143 

One 97 9418 9417 9417 unch 7710 

Est softs 3956 Mam sides 1JBZ 
Mon apan W 69.163 up 441 

EURODOLLARS ICMEID 
si nBaivpboriOOpct 
Od 97 9426 9425 9425 unch 23982 

9419 9418 9418 unch 584909 

9414 9411 9412 -OJ»2 394160 

9406 9600 9403 '132 305548 

9378 9394 9395 -023 23&8SZ 

93 27 9323 9324 

9386 9382 9383 

9320 93.77 9378 

9376 9373 9374 

9370 9367 9368 

9370 9347 9348 

9347 9344 9344 -024 56,925 

Est sales 224139 Man sales 153606 
Mam open H 2433409, up S344 


Doc 97 
Mar 98 
JWI9S 
Sep 98 
Dec 98 
Mar 99 
Jan 99 
Sep 99 
Dec 99 
Mar 00 
Jun 00 


BRITISH POUND (CMER) 


-520 


0764 

4548 

665 

3 


Pnvtous 


Ctee 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

Dollar, pa- metric ton 
Atedara (MqbGraie) 

Spot 165480 165580 165480 165580 

Forand 165980 166080 165280 165380 

Qdlndta (M|h Craft) 

2071ft 2072ft WZBO 207380 

2W6 2101ft 209980 210080 


Lead 

Spot 


MdM 

Snot 


62780 

63880 


62880 

63980 


61780 

627ft 


61880 

62880 


Tin 

Spot 


637580 638580 638080 640080 
647080 64080 648080 650080 


457080 558020 558020 5JB020 

_ - 562580 5630.00 563080 563580 

Obc OpecM Hlab Grate) 
ppm 170580 171080 165280 1657.00 

146400 146520 142180 142220 

Hl£i Law dose Otge OpH 


4829 

JjCO 

100 


•ft 

-ft 

■lft 

•ft 


Stock Tables Explained 

Seta figures «e umffidaL Veody Mshs and ksas neflecfltie previous S2 weefs plus the ament 

wee h bi n r« me Itaesnratfing day VYhereaspaorslOCfcaftdendomixi nting to 2SperaedOTfTxxe 
habeen paid, me yean high-law range and dhMend or ilMwn far he new dado only. (Mess 
ofherwte noted rates ol tfivMaiita or annual tSsbusemanlsboaed on flte latesldedonittan. 

8 - dvidend also extra (sj. b - annual rale of tfivfdend plus stock dividend, c - liquidating 
aivi deriilc c-P^ exceeds 99-dil -colled, d- new yeorty tow, ltd- toss in the kid 12 months. 
• - dividend dedarod or paid In preceding 12 months, f - annual rata. Increased on last 

dedaraltotLg- dividand In CanatSan funds, subjed ta 1 S% non -resideitee tax. i - dividend 

declared after spllt-up or stock ifividemt J- dividend paid this yeor, omiltwt deferred, « no 
adton oaken of laiesf tfivfdend meeting, k - dividend dectored w paid this year, an 

accumutoHve ftsue wiftt dividends in arrears, m - annual rate, reduced on ktsl dado ration. 

n - new issue in fhe past 52 weeks. The high-tow range begins with the start of trading, 
no- next day deflvery. p • initial dtvfafemL annual rate unknown. WE- prtce^amfngs ratio, 
q -dosed-end mutual fund. r> atvfdend dedaredorpold in preceding 12 manms. plus stock 
dividend. $• stock spGLDhridond begins with date ot sp«. sft- sales. T-dhridend paid in 
stock in precetfina 12 months, estimated cash value on eat-dhridetid or es-dMrtbutlon dale, 
u- new yearty high, v- trading haded, vt - In bankruptcy or recstverehip or tiefng reatgantred 
underme Bankruptcy Act, or secunries assumed by sudiconq>anles.vrd- when dtsmbuted. 
wi - when issued/ ww - with warrants, x- ex-dividend or en-rfgtits. «fts - w-distribuliofl. 
w - wtthout warrants, y- os-fflvKJerd and soles In hilL yld - yield, t - sales in too. 


1444 

1447 

I4S8 

+15 

40330 

1497 

1483 

1487 

+7 

39306 

1714 

1704 

1708 

+7 

12308 

172* 

1727 

172* 

+7 

3643 

1747 

1743 

1747 

♦ 7 

4.730 



1754 

+7 

1+487 


JUVB 
Sap 98 
Ok 98 

EsL late 5148 Mom met 4646 
Mon sapor Inll 0&44& off 779 

coffee c.mesE) 

37J0D Bm. ■ cents per B>. 

Dec 97 17320 1655D 16825 -120 


11996 


Mar 98 

1S9J0 1S4JJ0 

154.90 

6.90 

6703 

Mcy98 

jrire 

15280 148J0 

15150 

4.75 

1.742 

)4680 14560 

J4A.OO 


1684 

Sop 98 

14050 13*80 

140 JO 

♦0.7S 

474 

EsL safes te 780 Mon* tales 4403 


Man ddoi fad 22A4. of! 100 



SUGARWORLD 11 (HCSE) 



11 2600 Bn.- cant* per It. 




00*7 

11.11 10.45 

10.98 

•007 

34315 

«nr«S 

1167 I1JU 



*7.731 

May 98 
Jul 98 

11.77 1167 

1168 

unch 

20881 

1163 1153 

11J4 

481 

1A.1B7 


gfgW 94.97 WKh 

«» W 9496 9496 9496 4121 
Jun ™ 9C90 4)21 

bt M ies 429 Mans sates 186 
Mam upon Inr 7268. up 8) 

klauno win- pte & 640IS or 100 pd 
Dec 97 107-35 107-26 107-27 - 09 23ai23 

21800 660IW sates 14599 

"tom opwi im 232,254 up 3257 

*™!REA,URY (CBOT) 

JWMO prer- pta & 32nds otlOO pd 
Drew IIO-15 110410 H04R -08 367298 

Mor98 1104)1 109-30 109-X -07 U292 

llwi !!i5 :\l^ 

114-19 .13 

“Lwtei 284000 Mom sates 174613 

Mows OTten ml 634174 oil 6491 

UMBW.TUPFD 

tow 0 f?l *»!*«! 100 pa 


4123 203969 
4182 144807 
4)83 113210 
4)83 97293 
-083 84795 
-083 69239 


Dec 97 1-6064 12976 12076*4)8092 28285 
Mot 98 12020 15990 150)2+08092 236 

Jun 98 1595] +08092 27 

Est. sales 4770 Mam sales 3.984 
Mows open lid 2&74L up 328 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100000 donors. SperGdn.dk' . 

Dec 97 .7242 -7225 .7228-08008 47,718 

Mar 98 .7272 .7258 .7261 470008 1520 

■ten 98 .7302 5284 J2844L0008 406 

EsL sate 3506 Mam aales X141 
Man's Open M 41,766. up 977 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) ’ 

124000 nates pw muk 

Dec 77 5634 5580 5607418007 54290 

Itow 5638 5613 5637410008 1242 

-ten 98 5666418008 2513 

Eat. sate 21508 Mem sate 31.401 
Mam open ba 61164 up 1547 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

125 ndHon ren. S par 100 ywi 
Dec 77 8348 8280 82994)8001 76525 

MarM 8450 8396 8410-08001 m 

■tea 98 85224)8001 165 

sate 14176 Mom sate 19588 
Mam 4HR M 77.1 )a up 1636 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

124000 francs, S par franc 
H^SZ -S5 ■ 48M -4067 +08001 37,975 

MotM 8940 8905 8936+08001 U12 

tea98 Jd03+080m 175 

gd. sate 11.137 Mam sate 13505 
Mom apea Ini 39^64 up 291 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500000 pesos, S par peso 

5*2 -IS? - 12 ” 0 '12402 *-00582 25301 

Mor 99 .128BS .11960 .11480 -80426 7593 

Jun 98 .11710 .11610 .11610-80313 U8Q 

EsL sates 11567 Mom tote 4799 

Mom apan M 34431 19 392 

UWONTH STERLING UJFFEJ 
ESOftaoo - pft at 100 pd 

OK 97 92 59 9256 P2J4 —0.07 134846 
Mor 98 9259 9255 9256 — a 03 101567 
■ten 98 9289 «163 9284 -085 9M99 

5-2 55 67867 

pec 98 9197 9289 9280 —007 54505 
Mar 99 9389 9102 9383 -086 61,747 
Jun 99 9117 9111 9112 —085 39530 
Esf. sides: 81724. Pm. sates: 91836 
Pm. open 639.125 up 3.2S6 


wpb Low Latest Chga OpM 

JUD 98 95.16 9585 9586 -084 7L129 
SspM 95.17 9589 95.12 -083 5L280 
DM 98 95.17 9587 95JO -4UB 40909 

Eat sates: 104275. Pm. sates: 16412* 
Pm.opsn MfJ 380565 A8I0 - 


industrials 

OOTTOR 2 (MCTN> 

SQ800 lbs.- rente parte- 

Od 97 7124 7180 7ZS9 +093 2,272 

Doc 97 7470 7257 7442 +181 49,989 

Mot 98 7573 7400 7551 +148 14383 

May 98 7SJ0 7460 7680 +175 4293 

Jtf 98 7675 7570 7675 +UB 4039 

Ed. arias KA. Man sues 12.124 
Mocrs apan Iri B2A9& up 669 

HEATINC OIL (NMER) 

42800 gal cads par gal ' 

Od 97 5135 5440 5464 -009 29,W 

Not 97 5670 5570 5550 -0.07 37.756 

Dec 97 57.10 5430 5640 -002 24422 

JanW 5786- 5785 5785 +003 21.154 

Fri>98 5780 57.10 57JD +003 11171 

Mot 98 5780 5455 5455 -0.48 9.115 

Apr 98 56J5 +003 4784 

EsL sriea NA. Mom sates 44980 
Man apm bit 153732, up IrtM 


‘ HUfM. 






i- 

■ii a , 


USHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1800 ML- dDfcm par DM. 

No» 97 I9JP8 19.75 1979 +005100850 
Dec 97 2QJM 1984 1987 +003 61.078 

Jon 90 2087 1989 19.91 +004 .76, 5 4 6 

Feb 98 2085 19.91 19.92 +004 14538 

Mar« 2085 1982 19.92 +084 I033T 

Apr 98 2085 1972 19.92 +003 9.17? 

Eli. ante NA Mam sates 120320 
Man apan Inl 4001 54 ofl 4029 

NATURAL BAS (NMER) 

10000 nan Mm S per mnbtu 
MW 3880 1980 3845+0052 41212 

NO* 97 1140 3.000 1090+0828 44735 

3210 1135 1180 +0037 27,370 

1180 1100 1150 +0036 24837 

1M5 2.765 2780 +0802 17.069 

3-510 2465 2480+0010 11328 
Est- sate NA Man sates 73,973 
Man open bd 247791 up 1849 

UNLOADED 6ASOUNE (NMER) 


Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Fob 96 
Mot 98 


M 97 5985 57.90 58J6 -022 22784 

N«97 STAS 5660 5678 -0.07 32,231 

S684 56J0 5680 undL 14753 

Si 0 5645 5US “«*• 

u?,S SbJBi 4241 

Mar98 57 AO 57.00 STM +005 S7V5 

JfrW 6065 6045 6045 +005 4024 

May98 6025 +0JJ5 2.181 

BsL sues N A Mam sates 37,564 

Man open fad 101382, up 15 
GASOIL OPE) 

t^dOtarspOTnuMc ton - lots or 700 tens 

M 92 17185 169.73 170 JO +0.75 21188 

NavW 17150 171 JO 17175 +075 15,966 

DocW 17375 17375 17125 +075 17.275 

Jar« 17525 17450 17475 +075 12849 

17575 17475 17580 +0.75 7846 

M»98 N.T. N.T. 17175 +1.00 

April N.T. N.T. 17125 +1.00 

EgL sates: 11400 . Prw. nles :11703 
Prev. open InL; 946S) an 325 

BRENT (ML (IPE) 

UAdaBas par barni- kns ri 1800 banris 

1682 1063 1064 +001 7J.H1 

IkH low IS* +ain 2&9ae 

1874 1879 1879 +083 *»6 mo 

J8-W 1880 1878 +ara tms 

18U 1076 1873 Jam W 

N.T. N.T. 1068 +002 2323 

EA takas: 40406. Pre*. sales : 31607 > 
Prw-Open ML 148679 up 4249 


4813 

2821 


Nov97 

Dec97 

Jon98 

FftriB 

MarH 

Apr98 


1,90« 


XMONTH EURO MARK OJFFE) 
DMInriteon - pfs of 100 pet 
OdW 9662 9659 9661 +083 

Nov97 9653 9651 9653 +081 
Dec 97 *' 

Morn 
Jun 98 
s«p 98 
Dec-98 
Mar 99 
Jun 99 
Sep 99 


6239 

471 


eurflUB. Stack Indexes 

w COMP INDEX (CMBR) 

8)0 Kindest 

S 7 - 45 9 S 6 M 962.70 3JQ 187845 
MJW 97600 968J0 TO80 .1*5 

W-M unch. 710 
Bw. sates M a Mom sate 52703 
™r»epen w 227,130 afl 1889 

118 OJFFE) 

QSperlnctepoW 

51878S17M 51188 -478 64830 

N.T N.T 51628 -478 UlS 


j 

f 


«h46 9640 9644 +084 291153 MarW 

«« 

9581 9675 9679 +004 176396 Prev - “Pe* 1 WL: 66835 up 741 


95At 9i5* 9659 +083 15054 

9J41 9643 +OJI2 UB.772 

9531 9126 9528 +08? 74384 

9117 9113 9114 +081 61264 

Est.sates.- 212887. Pre*. sates: 220486 
Piw. apan Ini- L56&7T5 up 6249 

WftOICTM Pf BOR (UAT1P) 

FPS ir ‘ "" 


SSS ! ,# - 14 iiwo 1 tms -+ni riju,, 

tes SS SS 'is 

gs «S;|M» Bjg 


«C49(MA T| n. 

pa- Index pare 

S 30249- 

N»n SSi 221^ ’ B - 5 ti^oi 

rw« 35,710 5020 - s —233 4286 

««97 30460 30138 30265 — JJ* 7,(37 

£“■ fries: 344S1. 

Open faiUBM14up 2)959. 


Esl. sales 24555 Man sates 3&4S6 
Man open Ini 1)4781 afl 1755 


Dec 107^8 in AO imra llavvt narei 

MOT98 I01.M ,01 W JoLW uS^ ^ 
Ed- rates: 101VS9. Piot. safer. 13414, 
1«U96 uplMO 


Ea. ufeK earn 

Open tntj 206076 of, 1 * 20 . 

gfsarBiaig*' 


Commodity Indexes 

Oe» Prevtaus 

1JS4SL30 1J6U0 

1,93180 1,917.90 

' 16689 

, 240.91 

im^^3^ ts0 ^F pn>!SS ‘ Um0t >n 


fas? 

^..Futures 







INTERNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2L 1997 


PAGE 17 


EUROPE 


: ,v ° *>! uh-ch 

as sk 

•- u; sfM ~ e,; * dino. 
u-. ihe aJ^natwis. 

... .:. a pPoreni e *-,i 
"p '“ to there- 3 ' 
and 

v * 

; - . . •- ^ con. 

' ••■•- :• t'-. .,' ^ • > ‘ , *an w 
'■j^peic f Mr 
=•■-■■ ' A ater. 


Fiat Plans 
Deal With 
Russia’s Gaz 


EU Leaves Small Producers Reeling 

Lard Makers of Colonnata Feel Heat of Sweeping Health Regulations 


FrarttfUrt 

DAX 


Bloomberg News 

TURIN — Rat SpA said it was in 
talks to form a joint venture with 
Russia's AO Gaz that would make 
Russia the 10th emerging market in 
which Rat would produce its Palio 
senes of cars. 


Bloomberg New i 

COLONNATA. Italy — Venan- 
zio Vannucci lifts a wooden slat 
covering a marble cask in the cellar 
of his 200-year-old home. 

Inside the cask, under an inch of 
brine turned black with spice, am 
stacked nine layers of lard collected 


rants — unless they install bath- stones, is now available only in the 
rooms and refrigerators and make Piedmontese pastures near the 
other costly improvements to their nonhem Italian town of Monte- 


stones, is now available only in the but it's what they wanted, so here it 
Piedmontese pastures near the is," he said 


simple production facilities. 
Enforcement of those I 


Enforcement of those hygiene 
laws has become particularly rig- 


magno where it is made. 

European Union laws regulating 
traditional food producers have 


f , - c ... — uuuau 

rrom the spines of EuuJian hogs, was found to be infecred with a 
nus£u in the Emilia-Romafina re- bnun-wasrinp pjiIM K^vim* 


orous since the "“mad cow” scare of been on the books in Italy for years. 
1996, in which some British beef Yet only with the approach of eco- 


cw aner 31 years ,‘ “Here you have the world's 

Ivan Sklarov, governor of Nizhni finest lard, and because of Furr™™ 


’ s ° ven,< * of Nizhni finest lard, and because of European 
- wh *f* Gaz . is bureaucracy, you’ll never legally 


based, said the 1.5 trillion lire 
($858.5 million) venture would be 
partly financed with $240 million 
from the European Bank for Re- 
construction and Development 
Fiat said a contract would be 
signed in the next few weeks. 

The joint venture is pan of the 


bureaucracy, you 11 never legally 
taste it in Paris, New York or even 
Milan, ’ ’ said Mr. Vannucci, one of a 
handful of people making lardo di 
Colonnata, a fatty delicacy famous 
throughout Italy, where it is served 
on toast with a slice of tomato. 

Mr. Vannucci's lamentation 
echoes those of many other 


automaker’s plan to begin produ- homegrown producers of tradidon- 
Cu ?§ i?* 1 ? raoc ^ caTS by 2000 in the al, regional foods across EuroDe. 


illness in humans who eat the tainted 
flesh. Most British beef was with- 
drawn from the market and thou- 
sands of cows were destroyed. 

The European Commission, the 
EU’s executive arm, was rebuked 
for not responding swiftly to the 
food scare, and so it tightened hy- 
giene regulations and set up a new 
unit to monitor food safety. 

“Even if it causes a problem for 


nomic and monetary union have the 
Italian authorities started to enforce 
many of them. 

In Colonnata’s case, inspectors 
from Lhe Health Ministry's office in 
Carrara wound their way up the steep 


incline past deep marble quarries to 

seize 200 kilos (441 pounds) of Mr. 
Vannucci's lard in 1995. Fausto 
Guadagni . another of the town’s lard 
markers, with his own restaurant, 
had IS kilos of his fatty victuals 
seized by the health officials. 

At issue is Lhe way the lard is 
produced in Colonnata, a process, 
its makers say. that has not changed 
in more than a century. The EU law, 
they add, implies that the traditional 
ways of their lard-making ancestors 
arc unsanitary. 

"If you ask me. it’s kind of dis- 
gusting to have to put a bathroom in 
the place where we make the lard. 


Fern* sik 


•' ■- Pjm 


•- • «ty. j 

Saudi 

* of 


■ ■ - been 


' r ‘- *'DJ j(j. 


- -uiwri 


world's largest developing econo- 
mies. 

The Palio series, which includes 
hatchbacks, minivans, pickups, sta- 
tion wagons and sedans, is produced 
in several countries, including Brazil, 
Venezuela, Poland and Argentina. 

Rat is also completing plans to 
make them with local partners in 
South Africa, Turkey, China and 
India. 

The move will also give a boost to 
Russian auto. production capacity. 
Last year, 868,000 cars were pro- 
duced in Russia, which is less than 
Fiat's production in Italy. 


*u, regional iooas across Europe. 

Under European Union health 
laws, small makers of specialty 
meats and cheeses like Mr. Van- 
nucci can only sell their products 
directly to consumers — no super- 
markets, delicatessens or restau- 


producers, our first consideration is 
for people's health.” said Johan 


for people's health.” said Johan 
Reyners, an agriculture spokesman 
for the commission. 

Mr. Vannucci’s lard is not the 
only dish in danger. A sheep's milk 
cheese, for instance, made in dark 
caves that are sealed for months by 


In addition to the shiny new bath- 
room, which Mr. Vannucci said be 
has yet to use, the health authorities 
required him to install a galvanized 
steel sink, an electric knife cleaner 
and a refrigerator, even though the 
lard need not be chilled. 

To sell his lard to the local Eur- 
omercato supermarket chain or to 
restaurants, Mr. Vannucci said he 
will need to invest another 50 mil- 
lion lire t.S28,600). 

Thar would require that be open a 
space with separate exits and en- 
trances from his restaurant, refit his 
home production site and buy a 
freezer. 

Rather than make the investment, 
Mr. Vannucci said the rest of the 
world will have to trek to his town if 
they want to taste the nation's most 
delectable fat. Notwithstanding the 
winding drive to Colonnata and the 
El) food laws, Mr. Vannucci is con- 
fident people will make the jour- 
ney. 

After all, he said, "If we can 
survive health crazes, we can cer- 
tainly beat bureaucracy.’' 


4 S00- — — 

4250 - -A— 

4000 1 -W 

3750 -J- - 

»»-/=■ 


* A M J ' j A S 

1997 


London 
FTSE 100 Index 

. 5200 

5000 jr/Uf 

400 AT~~- 

4600 -pV^ 

4400'-/- 

4203 aITj'j’a s 

1997 


■CAC-40;-.. 

325Q — - — 

3100 — 

2650 _JV- 


2sm*Y 

M J J A S 


1997 


Amsterdam. AEX .• V WM 4 SUM* - 0 . 14 ; 


Copenhagen .Stack Matte * • 
Helsinki HEX General : 

Oslo . OSX 

London RSE10Q , - 

Madrid Stock Exchange 


m?-82 +5.1 e 

, . • 3,35*03 -.+0434 

-. 30 * 37 .;.. . 702 #*' - 054 . 

. SJ)2?5fi S#75.7G -O0S 

~~ 621 . 4 * 60 &*t- - - 0.15 


Stockholm SX 16 
Vienna ' ATX = 
Zurich SPI. 

Source: Telekjjrs 


3AS3A? 3,45443 +827 
t,4f644 : : 1,^0a39 V +Q56 
.. '3,65512* '' ^64^ +023 

bienuflisul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• BertelSTnann AG, the German media conglomerate, said 


Russia Budget Lifesaver: Privatization Funds 


favorable exchange rates helped net profit rise 13 percent, to 
1 .02 billion Deutsche marks (5569.5 million) in the year ended 
June 30; sales rose 4 percent, ro 22.437 billion DM. 


By Alan Friedman 

Iruentotionil Herald Tribune 


•-cdji 

i>nuJcd 


LVMH’s Net 
Increases 10% 


HONG KONG — Beset by a se- 


and media tycoons, some of whom 
have attacked him over awarding 
the sale this summer of 25 percent of 
Svyazinvest, the Russian lelecom- 


rious shortfall in tax revenue, Russia munications giant, to the top bidder, 
hopes to raise an extra $2 billion 


would have to learn to play "by the 
rules of the game." 

He said the tender had marked * 'a 
new stage of transparency and new 
rules of the game.” 


of the year, Deputy PrimeMinister Calls for European Labor Reform. 


Cariftkd byOlif5taffFwaDispatcke% 

PARIS — LVMH Moet Herwessy 


Anatoli Chubais said here Tues- 
day. 

Mr. Chubais said the sales should 
bring total 1997 proceeds from pri- 
vatizations to about $4 billion. But 
he said plugging the gap in tax col- 


Louis V nitron SA said Tuesday that lection with such sales “is not a 
first-half net profit rose 10 percent, long-term solution and we cannot 

u,.i j.. i , j . ... _ . 


but said the yen's weakness slashed completely compensate with pri vat- 
profit at DFS Group Ltd, its newly ization proceeds for the shortfall.’’ 


International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Three leading 
international financial officials on 
Tuesday urged European govern- 
ments to make the reform of rigid 
labor markets a top priority alongside 
the race toward monetary union. 

Michel Camdessus, managing di- 


while. said, “It is vital that the focus 
on preparing for EMU does not dis- 
tract them from the structural re- 
forms needed to add dynamism to 
their economies.” His remarks were 
unusual in that U.S. officials are gen- 
erally reluctant to comment on the 
view in Washington that European 


‘ * Not everybody was happy about 
the auction, and those who lost made 
a protest against the rules of the 
auction,” Mr. Chubais said. “They 
blamed me because they did not 
win. But I said, and I say, that I will 
protect the winner and that the only 
winner is the one who pays the 
highest amount" 

Mr. Chubais said Russia's infla- 
tion rate in 1997 would be between 
12 percent and 13 percent, com- 
pared with 22 percent last year. In- 
flation will be between 5 percent 
and 7 percent next year, he pre- 
dicted. 

Mr. Chubais also said that gross 


• Deutsche Lufthansa AG will set aside 1.4 million shares 
for its employees as part of plans by the government to frilly 
privatize the airline. The shares represent about i percent of 
the 5 billion DM sale of Bonn's remaining 35.7 percent stake. 
Employees will get a 10 percent discount. 


• Usinor SA, Europe's second-largest steelmaker, said first- 
half profit fell 4 percent, to 801 million French francs ($133 
million) as imports from Eastern Europe and a supply glut 
caused a 6 percent decline in prices. Sales in the half rose 3 
percent, to 38.5 billion francs. The company said it expected 
results to improve in the second half. 


• KJLM Royal Dutch Airlines confirmed it would sign a new 
cooperation pact with the U.S. carrier Northwest Airlines on 
Sept. 29. Separately, the European Commission cleared 
KLM's takeover of Air UK Holdings Ltd. 


acquired 

Strons 


duty-free retailer. 


Thus, he said, the government of Fund, called upon Euro; 


rector of the International Monetary governments are not doing enough to domestic product would be un- 


Strong leather-goods sales lifted President Boris Yeltsin would make 
profit to 1 .7 billion francs (S282L2 a renewed effort to press the Duma. 

\ i rs i p - .t . i i f n . - 


million) from 154 billion francs in die lower house of Parliament to 


% f f o 1- 

Troops 


the year-earlier half. Income from approve sweeping tax reforms. “high-quality growth.” 
operations jumped 26 percent to Mr. Chubais called the official As Europe continues its “mo- 
336 billion francs. 1997 budget few Russia “absolutely mentous journey toward EMU,” 

Profit was flat at LVMH’s wines unrealistic,” saying that the gov- Mr. Camdessus told the opening 
and spirits divisions, which the com- eminent was therefore operating on session of the annual World Bank 
pany wants to merge with those of the basis of what it considered “a and IMF meetings here, it should 
Guinness PLC and Grand Metro- real budget.” “give at least as much attention to 

pohtan PLC. Guinness said its first- Tax collection receipts, which the urgent tasks of reforming social 
half profit rose 4 percent, to £255 were expected to average $3.4 bil- security systems and labor and 
million ($408.7 million), on in- lion a month this year, have ran at product markets” as to the fiscal 
creased sales of spirits even though just $2.8 billion a month, he said. targets for monetary union, 
the pound's increased strength “Sad Mr."ChuBais"aB6'sai3 that Rns- ' ' Lawrence ' Summers, the U.S. 
cut earnings. (Reuters, Bloomberg) sia’s small group of new banking deputy Treasury secretary, mean- 


Fund, called upon Europe to address 
the problem of its “malfunctioning 
labor markets,” and said they were 
standing in the way of achieving 
“high-quality growth.” 

As Europe continues its “mo- 
mentous journey toward EMU,” 
Mr. Camdessus told the opening 


battle unemployment by making 
their labor markets more flexible. 

Hans Tietmeyer. the Bundesbank 
president, said he thought die launch 
of the euro could improve Europe's 
“competitive growth and employ- 
ment chances" as long as the new 
currency were stable. But he warned 
that Europe had not done enough to 
fight unemployment, which he said 
had increased because of structural 


,r. '.r.: 

. jl 


the urgent tasks of reforming social rigidities. European monetary union, 
security systems and labor and he said, "is neither a substitute for 


the pound's increased strength Had 
cut earnings. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


targets for monetary union. 

Lawrence ■ Summers, the U.S. 
deputy Treasury secretary, mean- 


nrgently needed domestic flexibility 
and reforms, nor does it autoraat- 


and reforms, nor does it automat- 
ically solve die growth and labor- 
market problems" Europe faces. 


changed for 1997, ending 10 years 
of decline, and would grow in 1998. 
"In the last 10 years our GDP has 
fallen by more than 50 percent,’* he 
said. 

The deputy prime minister said 
much work remained to be done to 
strengthen the banking system. 

“The banks need to restructure 
themselves,” he said. “They need 
more trained personnel.” 

Commenting on the protection of 
private property from criminal ac- 
tivity, Mr. Chubais said, “We are 
deeply unsatisfied. We plan to in- 
crease our 1998 spending ou law 
enforcement by 60 percent.” 


• Britain revised its final estimate of second-quarter eco- 
nomic growth loan annual rate of 3 5 percent from its previous 
estimate of 3.4 percent growth. 

• IPB AS, an investment vehicle controlled by Nomura 
Capital, said it would offer to buy. the shares it does not already 
own in the Czech brewers Plzensky Prazdroj and Pivovar 
Radegast, which control 40 percent of the Czech beer market; 
tiie announcement comes after Bass PLC said it would offer to 
buy out IPB.. 

• Saudi Aramco canceled plans to buy a stake in Petrdeosde 
Portugal SA to concentrate on opportunities in East Asia and 
South Asia. Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil company had 
signed an accord in June to buy 10 percent of the company 
from the Portuguese government and 17.5 percent from a 
holding company of private shareholders. 

• Muenchener Rueckversicherungs AG plans to buy a 20 


percent stake in Reale Riasskurazioni SpA, Italy's second 
largest reinsurer, this year. The German firm, known as 
Munich Re, said it may eventually take majority control of the 
company. Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High bow Claw Pro*. 


Mgfe Law Owe Prav. 


High Law das* Pnw. 


I The Trib Index 


Prtaes as at 3:00 PM New Vort 


Tbesdafc Sept. 23 

Prices In local amendas. 
Tetokurs 

Nigh Low Claw Pm 


wan Law 


ABfanzMg 

Attain 

BkBertn 

BASF 


Amsterdam aexmkw.m 


Bayw 

Befemtoif 


ABN- AMRO 

Aegon 

AhoU 

AboMabd 

Brandi. 

Bab Wen an 
CSMan 
DortftnteM 
DSM 
E feeder 
FortiBAinev 
Gdrenks 
G-Broc an 

Sr 


Hooaownam 

HuntDoB^as 

I NG Group 

KLM 

KHPftT 

KPN 


I®* 


Oce&brtai 

PftllpsEtec 


UnBeverara 

VendtxM 

VNU 

WofefSKIcn 


4LB0 41.40 
1MJ0 1*J0 
SB 5540 
33240 331 

138 13248 
&B0 3540 
9350 9180 
109JO 11130 
189 JO 189 

3240 3V«i 
82J» B3.10 

fi-.fi' 45.10 
54.10 SL40 
10230 10220 
347 JO 348 

12770 127 JO 
87 JO 88 

9U0 92.20 
070 71 JO 
5040 50.90 
74 74J0 
65.J0 45 

4070 4230 
HI 3 

157 JO l___. 
11370 11150 

19540 19270 
41 JO -4170 

m 

11770 mjo 
NSJO TKM» 
427 424J0 
11770 11433 
4180 44 

244.10 241 JO 


429 421 

im» 134 
4470 4440 
4425 6320 
BiC 7185 7290 
tank 9450 9580 
7178 7080 
79 77 

3950 - 38 J 0 
1396 1387 


CKAGCoMa 14250 141 

Caauaeotank 6405 4330 


Wirier Benz 14090 13970 


DeobdwBro* 11450 Tl&fi 
DeutTctrinm 3380 3333 


421 42070 
13440 139 

4485 4440 
6320 42A5 
7320 7140 
9620 MW 
71 025 
7050 7680 
39.10 3070 
1390 1362 

14150 161 

6330 5320 
13970 13950 
9730 1MJ0 
114.15 11575 


AnglaAnCbri 

AftqloAx*-Cnrp 

AngiaAin Grid 

AnglaAaM 

AiStaAMPkd 

AVMIW 

Bartow 

CG.Snriti 

Deflem 

DriefooWn 

FttNolBk 

Gencer 

GF5A 

bar 

Joinrieslnd 

LBKriyHdBS 


UresdnefBank 8240 8U0 
FKaeriia 315 314 


FroseniiaMed 
Fried. Kropp 
Gete 

HridribgZatf 

HmkripM 

HEW 

Hoddtaf 

HoedKl 

Kandadl 

Lrineyer 

Unite 

LuHhamOK 

MAN 

Mameanann 


132 12920 
30 

103 101 

UT 14050 
10050 10520 
485 -05 

83^J 8355 
77 7640 
459 641 

W 9060 
1290 1235 

3J70 3*40 
567 557 

887 872 


Mririaaefcdiattttg 3885 
Metro 8070 8» 

MoodiRuecXR 597 580 

Pieuxsoo 617 .608 

TONE 8495 M.10 

SAPpfd 44259 43920 

Sdnfng 18550 183 

150 246 

Stemen 12285 12120 

Swa&doar 884 880 


Bangkok 


SET Mac 53487 
PnrianmN 


VEW 

XiP n 


4T1 40950 
102 10070 
572 572 

748 759 

1216 1201 JO 


81 JO 81 JO 
31450 313 

12920 12950 
375 36620 
102 10340 
141 140 

18530 10650 
485 480 

83iS§ M 
7640 7*25 
641 '659 

0 98.90 
1236 1277 
3480 3550 
557 554 

872 84950 
3885 3925 
8050 BOSS 
51® 594 

51® 513 

8495 83J85S 
442 440 M 
183 179.10 
24750 29) 

171-40 1J1.80 
1535 TSD0 
883 880 

JJ® 409.10 

10020 16925 


Liberty Life 
UbUteSral 


NedMt 

RerahroodlGp 

RHmiiort 

SABicwedea 

Soramcar 

SdEOl 

SBIC 

TVgaOrii 


277 JO 279 

232 240 

237 JO 238J0 
182 182 

SMS S92S 

7120 11J5 

5X50 5450 

22.10 2240 
mso 740 

29 JO 2920 
36 3725 

iau laio 

9X50 95 

6225 6225 

21.90 
325 

6820 <025 
341 348 

13625 73825 

14.10 16 
101 100 

17.10 T7J5 

1® 10225 

MM 41.10 


4325 4425 
130 13125 


130 13125 
34 SO 3460 
4350 4450 
20475 20425 
tlW 0J5 


ftMMfGan • 

PanrierFrindl 

Pnidenflal 

RadtrodiGp 

Rank Group 

RedcBtcrim 

Redkuri 

Reed Inti 

RHMSU&ri 

ReuienHdgi 

Renan 

RTZim 

RMC Group 

HoSs Huyce 

Royal Bk Sad 

Rmri&SwAll 

Safnroy 

Sriiwtaif)' 

Sdmaters 

Sad Nmcastte 

Sen* Power 

Seantar 

Swero Trent 

SIWfl Troup R 

sfeta 

SmOhNeplMw 

SbHiKBm 

SnritBbid 

Sthem Elec 


Kuala Lumpur 


AMMBHdgs 
Genflna 
Mol Booking 
MrihdSHpF 
PabmuGn 
Protan 
PuMcflk 


RasoraHtarfd 

RottanonsPM 


74150 756 

mi U78 


8.75 850 445 

1020 985 1020 

1420 1580 1590 
565 515 J® 

9J5 825 925 

825 005 825 

2JW 269 228 

322 11* 322 

7.15 62J 7.15 

2725 2650 27 

420 585 6)0 

9.15 B8S 985 

US 7.15 750 

1120 110 1080 
128 188 


Stand Charier 
TataLLyte 

Tesca 

TtonesWMw 

31 Group 

T1 Group 

TariUm 

UnBever 

IfM Assumed 

UM News 

UWUiOfiu 

VendaneUuts 

itadatane 

Wlribreod 

WBunHdgs 

WPPcSmv 

Zenecn 


759 7.79 

527 525 
628 422 
857 853 

145 155 

9.48 9,75 

281 283 

581 528 

255 254 

485 6.91 

323 326 

982 9.90 

10.03 1018 
2JC 225 
439 442 

527 542 

385 196 

458 444 

IB-08 18 

728 743 

450 454 

245 270 

057 0*4 

445 457 

1159 118® 
186 187 

559 5J6 

885 8.94 

453 455 

657 6*9 

888 045 

428 428 

471 476 

822 823 

5.14 M0 

408 412 

329 329 

17.72 1788 
484 482 

780 782 

7.15 7.17 

471 468 

325 324 

7.85 7.93 

383 384 

494 JL03 
285 288 

19.65 19.75 


Mantedtaon 

OMO 

Pamukrt 

PrreSl 

RAS 

Rata Banco 
S Paolo Tate 
TetacnattaSa 
TIM 


13990 14150 
13 M 1320 
921 934 

2870 2865 
5070 5180 
15325 15550 
24600 24600 
13100 12720 
11750 11800 
6925 7100 


SMNadonaf 

Smmi Cm 

TstafansPfd 

TetemlB 

Trial 

TriespPM 

l/ntKBKO 

UsMnnsPfd 

CVRD PH 


4280 4280 
1030 1030 
136 JO 13750 
16281 16281 
14080 14380 
32280323990 
3400 39,010 
1189 1220 
27.10 27.12 


| Jan i. 1932= 100. 


%ctanga 


Montreal 


Seoul 


MteMrisindtt 367686 
Piernos: 370181 


OHapHta Won 65437 
Previous: 44445 


Bee Mob Con 

Ota The A 

CdnUBA 

CTFMSvc 

Gaz Meta 

Gt-Wferi Utaai 

kaasa> 

bncrionGrp 

LdWowOb 

NoflBkConcuto 

Power Caro 


Power Caro 
PonerFW 
QurixicorB 
Ropere Conans 
RayriBkCda 


SOM 0.90 
2985 2916 
3 ff 4 30 
4416 44 V, 

1880 18 W 

3248 32 V| 

4120 4080 
43 4114 

2120 2120 
W* 19.10 
3920 3 &B 0 
39.90 3855 
2485 25 U 

8M 

6820 6750 


0.90 5 D’A 
29*8 2933 
38.15 3885 
4416 4430 
KUO 1820 

WW 32*0 

4120 4055 
4285 41 

2120 21.10 
VP* 19.15 
3985 39.10 
3980 38 ** 

25.95 26 

855 
0 < 7.95 


Doeeco Heavy 
Hyundai Enp. 
KnMrioro 
Karoo El Pwr 
Korea Eadi 06 
LGSmntaan 
Pahang ban 5S 
Samsung DWay 
Samsung Eled 
SMnfmnBank 
SKTrieeam 


85200 83100 83500 85500 
7050 4900 4970 7050 
18400 18000 1 B 300 18300 
8930 8930 B 9 » 8990 
20408 195 ® 195 ® 20400 
4958 4890 4 V 00 48 ® 

241 ® 353 ® 35*00 340 ® 
565 ® 543 ® 544 ® 545 ® 
4500 444 ® 445 00 450 ® 
490 ® 667 ® 667 ® 47801 
8550 8210 8710 86 ® 
4200 ® 395000 39 ®® 4220 ® 


World Index 

Regional Index** 

Asla/PadUc 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 

Industrial Index** 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
MbceBaneous 
Raw Materials 
Sendee 
Utilities 


year to (tat* 

% chang* 

+17.69 


Singapore strata timk 1914.10 

Protista; 190823 


OBXhatae 69827 
pterion 7V287 


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44450 440 445 l 50 441.75 

104 101 11075 TOOTS 

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25725 25125 25725 255 

34125 33635 34150 336 J 0 
277 271 277 27025 

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32425 313 32025 37150 


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0.10 050 
7250 7250 
SMJ 2220 
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4850 4820 
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464 467.10 
183 183 

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FT-SE 10058275 * 

PretiatR smn 


Abbey Mrit 
medDonet 


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AngSae Wrier 


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MC Group 


Hong Kong H-ggg{S«S 


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Sac Gen Brio 
SllWP 
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1615 1550 1565 1610 
7320 7270 7790 7250 

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313 ® SD 73 3080 , 31 ® 
18425 18275 18350 18375 
1825 1805 1830 S 32 S 

77 ® 7623 ?S 40 7460 

305 3430 3 £» 3415 

7370 7260 73 ® 73 ® 
3125 3070 30 S® 31 SS 

5750 Sfiffl 5670 .5670 
14750 -14575 14725 14425 
14725 14575 144 ® M 750 
143 ® 14173 14175 10 ® 
035 020 030 020 
' 9290 910 91 ® 92 ® 

SK 33 ® 3395 3450 

7195 2145 2170 2185 

1000 14825 14850 14850 
12500 123950 I ?4100 1243 ® 


»*£ 2*3 £3 
1120 11 ® 11 ® 1280 
8175 8150 g 83 
2280 21 J 5 2135 22 

4180 39.70 4070 058 
4110 41 J® 4230 a 

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CannriUrion 

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Ocbd Wrflcome 
GnamtaCp 
Grand Mri 

GRE 

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BG Barit 377 372 37427 37421 

SctitaU 374 367 372 34752 

SKES 914 915 MS 91614 

Darias 373 341 343 349 

Den DondeBk 492 678 478 687 

Q*5wndbfVB 420000 4095 ® 0O®O4 1WM 

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BfcMIlndqn 
Bk Negara 
Gukero Gantt 
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TeMMmvnansi 


32® 3TOO 

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^ 3850 3850 MO 

8075 7925 7W0 

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3075 3025 M® S5 

3525 3425 3500 MM 




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Pmtiu: 408 U 2 


15® 15® 15® 

238 23ZJO 232J0 23525 


Johannesburg "J££*J?sm2 

wnrigonitdfita Sl» ** ““ 


Load Sec 

Losrao 

Legal Gml Grp 

UaydsTSBGp 

Luan Vari t y 

Mnfci5peneer 

MEPC 

Mercury Asset 
NaflonriGrid 
NaH Power 
HriVfcri 
Nad 

NantidiUnkB 

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P40 

Peart® 

Pawagtaa 


9 175 

485 4.73 

8.12 8 

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183 159 

586 5L51 

SJ3 555 
1555 15.15 
8J4 852 

534 522 

483 456 

354 350 

>48 ^ 

350 385 

16® 1683 
682 683 

284 252 

3 3 

454 6® 

151 156 

4.15 4.10 

285 257 
10.73 S&50 

129 127 

527 521 

585 580 

5.13 4.95 

724 782 

650 685 

383 323 

626 657 

l» 467 457 

558 520 

484 641 

680 653 

1.77 125 

9® 928 

355 359 

1328 13.11 
1527 1353 
889 883 

652 557 

Z92 258 

455 488 

5.95 525 

681 657 

666 658 

16® 1887 

954 951 

388 384 

8.06. 7 SO 
270 281 

955 982 

270 264 

460 454 

7-79 761 

224 222 

610 6 

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852 855 

474 476 

U4 8.15 
a.97 684 

183 180 

557 544 

5J8 522 

1524 1584 
854 B64 

525 531 

481 454 

383 353 

II® 1126 


Aoritanx 


BcoOntro Hfep 


CEWA^ 


SStari 


387 20 

1651 1678 
60 682 
261 263 

is « 

ts iS 

413 412 

228 242 
1054 1028 
129 127 

523 534 

564 565 
497 512 
755 759 

647 687 

326 329 

417 425 
458 486 
579 586 

464 443 

455 458 

126 126 
952 928 

271 193 

1321 1212 
1256 1381 
047 044 

5.90 55S 

2® 286 
450 448 

525 585 

471 474 

663 459 

180 1825 


SerilenaEJec 
TriMCahsa 
Ttiefaata 
Unton Fcnasa 
IMenc Cement 


275® 27950 
1975 2005 

5920 5990 
8640 8440 

44® 4405 

1555 1540 
S3® 6430 

6150 67® 

96® WW 
4675 43® 
476B 4750 

29® 3690 
as® sa» 
30® 3115 

ISK 1310 
7800 790 

17® 1815 

1750 2725 

63® 6420 

103 1430 

107CU 10130 
45® 44» 

MSB 12® 

29® 2885 


134 137 

21150 207 

2520 2420 
XJ0 2950 
127 JO 121 JO 
44 43 

416 411 

422 416 

262 258 

149 167 

590 585 

464 457 50 
14750 146 

125 12250 
N.T. N.T. 
52 51 JO 


Manila 


PSE tide: 284987 
previous 2094JZ3 


Ayntitt 

AmtaLand 


C8P Homes 
Mania Elec A 
Metis Baric 
Prim 
pciBcnL 
PhB Lota Dtat 
SanMigariB 
SM Prime Hdg 


1175 13 11® 

16 1650 1650 

97 JO 102 103 

385 1® 165 


Actor 

AGP 

MUauide 

AkaM AMD 

AM-UAP 

Baneatre 

BK 

BNP 

Canal Plus 
Csretauc 
Coslna 
CCF 
Crietem 
Qvt'ian Dior 
CLFDetia Fran 
Credit Ajpfcole 

Oaw«K 

EB-Aquflaine 

EiWantaBS 

Eurodhnev 

Ewriumri 

GeixEaux 

Havas 

tawdal 

Ln8ags 


KCO 998 
345.® 24720 
949 939 

789 774 

401-80 397.10 
754 737 

47450 46520 
29630 29180 
1076 1059 

3640 3566 
um. sum. 
329.® 324 

642 626 

80 816 
554 540 

1320 1305 

910 


74 74 763 

330 335 3S75» 

485 450 480 

139 144 146 

9® 935 955 

535S 54® 55 

5.® 6.10 610 


Ltmal 
LVMH 
AUdieOnB 
ParibasA 
Pemod Hand 
Peugeot CD 
PImijH- P rint 
Piunodes 
Renault 


Mexico 


cfca tide* 3250. 16 
Piwtiu 523EJ3 


Alto A 

BanoodB 

CamsCPO 

QfraC j 

Emp Modem 

GpoCotsoAl 

GpoFBcnmer 


TetntaCPO 

TriMotL 


a g 

7J2 782 

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A.94 677 

1J1 784 

1J6 1J1 


386 385 

7.94 807 

284 282 
951 980 

287 283 

456 457 

784 789 

224 725 

601 608 
A® 4 L 91 
1159 1257 
257 257 

584 589 

880 171 

750 751 

138 3 M 
121 223 

679 689 
720 784 

1 J 6 1 J 2 


70.00 7020 7150 
2420 2470 2420 
4050 40.90 4150 
16® 1616 1558 
4280 4280 4250 
6450 6550 6550 
059 380 170 

3450 3550 3460 
36® 3750 3720 
l *.00 148.® 14850 
19.74 19.78 1950 


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SGS Thomson 
5te Generate 
Sododro 
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913 
SM 
US 630 
702 m 
409.70 40250 
779 743 

45420 439.10 
1235 1210 

2337 23# 

1310 1283 

mm 322.10 
43550 42820 
29250 28610 
804 783 

7687 

17750 irJJO 
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631 
363 347 50 
862 846 

615 581 

852 832 

2879 2765 
917 905 

660 6* 
729 706 

17640 17350 
703 683 

11610 107 

378 36410 


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Pratiao* 381745 
28 1010 1000 

» 245 24850 

19 935 956 

74 782 795 

10 399 

17 752 750 

» 47450 470.® 

SO 224 29550 

59 1050 1065 

S6 3615 3600 

B aum 332.10 
32633 327 JO 
M 631 630 

16 825 872 

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B 13051301.10 
895 901 

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10 1230 1229 

D 23*2 2346 

0 1294 1375 

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17 2714 2676 

I 2262 2246 

0 17550 17550 
15 1618 1634 

□ 236.10 238-70 
3 635 636 

0 351 364® 

16 855 m 

II 582 545 


Asia Pnc Brew 
CorotoPac 
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, Farm bd 9 

DBS foretan 
DBS lam 
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HKUmd" 
JonfMotaesn 
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Kenpetr 

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KsppetFefc 
Kenwt Lund 
OCBCfaraitm 
OSOntanlkF 
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SembarHing 
Sing Afefarot^i 
Stag Land 
Stag Press F 
Stag Ted) tad 


77 w International Herakt Trixne Wortt Stock tadnO tracks the US. doBar values at 
280 mtemaionaHy kwessabte stocks from 25 cumtrtos. For more Wamatinn, a few 
booklot iaavaMSe by vritrig to Thg Trib bi06x.iai Avenue ChadesdaGaiOe. 

32521 NeuByCedBK France. Compdod by Bloomberg News. \ 


5 JO 5J0 
555 620 

97® 955 


9.® 955 

093 092 


1530 15 

U0 2JR 


9 8.70 

3J0 112 


7/S 720 

352 170 


5l® 575 

130 3.14 


02 412 

186 100 


StagTrieconitn 

ToHaeBcmk 


TolLeeBoik 
UMlndutirful 
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rtn US-dcSors. 


50J0 10.10 

6J5 650 

570 £B 
7J» 675 

12J0 IT.® 
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22J0 21.® 

254 2J8 

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1 ® 3 ® 

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114 3 ® 

416 428 

382 3 SS 
10 J 0 1040 
655 655 

5 JO 555 
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’? 'M 

2150 22® 
250 253 

138 224 

182 280 
1.06 183 

11.10 11.10 

102 11U 


High Low Oow Pnw. 


High Lav 


Taipei 


Stock Makettidra: 907177 
Pretiow 922099 


Catttay LHr In 
CrifewHumBk 
CUuDTmBk 
China Daveknit 
Chian Steel 
FiretBank 

Formnw Ptastld 
HuoNanBJc 
Inti Comm®. 
Man Vp Ptaslks 


ShkiKoogLHe 

TaManSml 

Tnhmo 

Utd Micro Elec 
UttVtoridOUn 


135 135 

107 105B 
7950 7950 
11950 120 

ZB 28.10 
105 103 

co m 

11650 1» 

55-50 5650 
70 7050 
88 8850 
10 10 
45 45J0 
050 ® 

6150 63 


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SnaCdoA 

Suncur 

TaHsnunEny 

TedcB 

Teteglobe 

Trim 

Thomson 
TarDora Ban* 

TramM 

TransCdoPipe 

Tti Boric FW 

TriscHahn 

TVXGaid 

Westamti £119 

Weston 


S 0.10 49 W 

2339 2115 
45.70 4545 

41 m m, 
25 VS 25 U 
5016 50 

2 W* 2940 

3* m 
4725 47.10 
18 <* 18.10 
2720 2680 
82 81 
3556 3 A 
7 680 

2855 28 M 

108.10 107 


Vienna 


ATX betas: 1 41 6 J 4 

PTStioas: 148839 


Market Oosed 


Stockholm 2 XJ 6 tad*e 303 fi 
Prawn: 3484.11 


The stock market in Tokyo 
was closed Tuesday for a hol- 
iday. 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsriDomon 

Astra A 

Aflat Ccpco A 

Autota 

EtedrotaxB 

Ericsson B 

Henna B 

JncenBveA 

tmmstarB 

MoDaB 

Nanibankea 

PharnTUptaha 

Santtafta 

ScantoB 

SCAB 

S-E Batten A 
SkancBaFon 
SbmshaB 
SKFB 

SSOTteritEaiA 

Stern A 
5 v Handels A 
VUuaB 


11850 121 JO 
111 112 
20 JO 2050 
138 1 3550 
20 251 

338 34250 


BaehleMIddeh 102980100450 10141021.10 

Crediaral Pfd 63040 63 U 0 638 635 

EA-GenaaH 3199.15 3121 31 ® 3150 
EVN 157614 ®I 0 T 49780 1495 

Ffuahafco Wien 523.15 SOS 52 X 10 50450 
OMV IBM 1825 18431839 .® 

Oeft EWdriz 87750 87250 87650 874 

VA StoW 60150 573.50 59420 576 

V A Tech 2640 2626 2640 2650 

VAencAxag Bao 2618 J 0 2560 2610 2 S 67 


Toronto 


567 577 

36250 -TW® 
320 318 

725 727 

404 406 JD 
278 285 

2563 257 

27550 282 

250 255 

229 22950 
194 J 0 197 

® « 


TIE tndastriata: 7867J1 
Previous: 781 5. IS 


AbBBtiCam. 
Alberta Ener® 


332 33450 
750 32150 


31950 32150 
225 22650 
185 18750 
12850 IS 
255 253 

210 211 


Sydney 



2801 2076 

914 914 

657 660 

715 7 X 
17430 1 « 

699 TOO 
111 ® 11050 
367 JO 376.70 


Ameer 
AN? Sting 
BHP 
Bari 

Bramfciestad. 

CBA 

CCAmatfl 
dries Myer 


M 1 B Tetaradttco: 1 ST 6880 
Pravtoas; I 5 MZ 50 


AieansiAssic 

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FMewram 
Bcocfl Rbcod 
B enetton 

Cretfita lUtano 


16940 16945 
080 497 S 
7530 7295 
1675 1674 

29250 28950 
4230 4285 

9435 9055 
10850 10900 
6160 6300 
39950 40600 
191 ® 18595 
2760 2765 
5885 6060 
9020 9295 


Sao Paulo 


Fosters Brew 
GoodmonfW 
ICI Australia 
Lend Lease 
MIMHdro 


BmdeuoPM 1078 
BralunaPH 835 JB 
CeratoPW 5980 
CESPPfd 87 ® 
Capri 17-88 

EMtabrtB 578 ® 
tetfesneu PW 610 ® 
LigWSenrtdas 475 ® 

& 

PradetaLuz 19X® 


1040 1045 ML® 
820 ® B 20 .W 837.99 
SOM StM 59 ® 
85-50 8406 87.10 
17.78 17.780 17-70 


569 ® 570 ® 58400 
Ml® 610 ® 605 ® 


Ml® ••>•» — — 
471 ® 471 ® 480 ® 
370 ® 381 ® 373.10 
W7W597B10 304® 
10 ® 10 ® 193 ® 


MIMHdro 
NriAastBitak 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
News Coro 
Pacific Daring 
Pioneer tall 
Pub Broadtad 
fSoTlnto 
51 George Bank 
WMC 


8 ® 8 J 7 

II® 11® 
1509 1538 
412 413 

2924 3025 
1728 1728 
I 486 1505 
7.12 6 .® 

6J1 6.10 

5.77 5 ® 

2.97 2.90 

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12.96 12 ® 

I Al L 63 
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6 ® 641 

3 ® 3.79 

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8 . 9 ft 8.78 

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6.14 6.21 


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48 ® 48 ® 4845 48 M 

17 ® 17 17.10 16.95 

0® 0.10 0® 0® 

65 ® &5JS 65 ® 6 5 V 4 

3 Ol 20 0 ® 30.15 29 ® 
42 ® 41 .® 42 J 0 42 ® 
3559 35 ® 3570 35 .M 
4165 4145 4145 4165 
28-10 27.13 27 ® IMS 
« 46 M 48 46.95 

-ms 4020 40 H 4065 

72 «i 72.10 7214 72*4 

4.15 4155 42.15 4215 
37 J 5 37.15 37 »» 37 W 

42 ® 42.15 42-20 4235 
33 ® 32 ** 32 ® 33 ® 

28 ® 28.05 2830 2835 
12 ® 1205 1205 12 ® 
33 32 ® 33 3 * 

34 ® 34 34 V* 34.1 

24 21 ® 21 ® 23 ® 
Z 3 V* 22 V* 22 ® 23.10 
394 388 393 395 

25.70 25.10 2135 2505 


Wellington 


AirMZeaMB 4.18 4.15 4.15 4 Z 0 

Briefly liwl 134 103 U 3 134 

GaflarHottord 3 ® 3 ® 3 ® 3 ® 

Ftefc* Ol Bldg 402 403 408 4 ® 

Ftatdl ChErtr 7.15 6 J 2 7.14 492 

FWdta Fdrst 203 i.w 1 ® 104 

FMthCh Paper 331 3.17 117 132 

Uan Nathan 301 178 301 179 

TetecranNZ 8.17 112 112 8.17 


Hi** Ql BL 
FtattftChEr 
HridtChFb 
FMthQiPa 

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TeteaamNZ 


WBsan Natan 11® 11® 11® 11 M 


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SPI M*K 345534 
PretiMK 364506 


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taetaewB 

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7159 22 ® 2163 
571 571 S 3 

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as 23 ® 2340 

841 “ 



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XP* 

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lift 

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904 a.® 

1255 1250 
401 450 




90® 88.10 
2705 24® 
35*4 35® 
147ft 145-30 
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36 SA* 
76.15 25.® 
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13® 131* 
105 103ft 
35® 31)0 
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8855 90.95 
2405 27 


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11 ® 11 ® 
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21 ® 26 
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2205 21M 
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10455 104® 
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HoidatariLB 
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PM 8 PC 
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5 BCR 
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UBSB 
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1150 1181 
141.75 143® 
II® 110 
S53J0 195® 
535 535 

6900 6905 

3960 4000 

1316 1325 

570 570 

1982 2041 

2275 2295 

184® 186 

1840 18® 

901 906 

1945 WTO 
330 332® 
132® 13370 
387 30 

1810 IBM 
2470 2530 
01 870 

10 ® 1070 

2182 2195 

1900 1918 
1629 16® 
1390 1406 
622 621 








ms 



PAGE 18 


r 




1997 


NASDAQ 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. 

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Starbucks 
* Sets Plans 
For Asian 
Expansion 

If 1 1 lumber s .\Vit s 

TAIPEI — Starbucks Corp.. 
which brought cafe lane to 
Main Street U.S.A. announced 
ambitious plans Tuesday to ex- 
pand its Asian operations. 

The Seattle-based company 
plans io open as many os 2CK) 
cafes in Taiwan, its fourth mar- 
ket in the region. It is teaming up 
^ with the island's President 
X* Group, which runs 7-Eleven 
stores. The first Starbucks is to 
open early next year. 

Coffee drinking is set for 
"tremendous growth" in 
Taiwan and the rest of Asia as 
consumers become more afflu- 
ent. said the president of Star- 
bucks. Orin Smith, who was in 
Taipei to announce the venture. 
Howard Behar. the company’s 
head of international business, 
predicted consumption in the re- 
gion would rise by between 1 0 
percent and 20 percent a year. 

Taiwan is the companv's 
fourth overseas marker it cur- 
rently operates in Japan. Singa- 
pore. and the Philippines. 

"Our earnings from Japan 
have topped our targets, and 
^ we’re quite successful in Singa- 
pore.” Mr. Smith said. 

In Taiwan. Starbucks plans a 
5>6.9 million joint venture — 
President Coffee Corp. — in 
which it will take 5 percent. Its 
coffee will also be sold in the 
group’s 7-Eleven stores. 

Starbucks earned $42. 1 mil- 
lion. or 55 cents a share, on 
sales of S647 million for the 
1 996 financial year. 

■ Strong Sales Forecast 

Starbucks, which has projec- 
ted sales of $950 million to 
$980 million in the financial 
year ending Sept. 30. expects to 
continue revenue growth of up 
to 40 percent annually in com- 
ing years, the company’s chair- 
man said, according to a Bridge 
News report. 

IK Howard Schultz said Star- 
bucks could sustain its current 
growth rate of between 35 per- 
cent and 40 percent “for quite 
some time.” 


INTERNATIONA L HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 21, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 19 


Thais Slash Budget to Meet IMF Goals 

By Thomas Crampiiin ~ ” year, the squeeze has be* 

—ycy-y y'—r Jakarta Lists Projects to Be Delayed EMSSM 


BANGKOK — Thailand will 
slash on additional 50 hilhun to M» 
billion baht tS 1 .39 billion | U $1.68 
billion) from its budget lur the year 
that starts next week. Prime Minister 
Chaovalit Yongchaiyui jnnounced 
Tuesday, even as the cash-strapped 
government is delaying Mime pay- 
ments due in the current n car. 

The new cuts from the ^23 bil- 
jion-bahi budget are aimed .n meet- 
ing Bangkok’s obligations under a 
SI 7.2 billion bailout ■sponsored by 
the International Monetary Fund. 
Thailand musi limit Jhe budget def- 
icit for the current year to 1.6 per- 
cent of gross domestic product and 
record a budget surplus of 1 percent 

next year. 

Mr. Chaovalit said the cuts would 
not affect spending on public health 
or welfare and would allay any in- 
crease in taxes. 

But analysts said the cuts were 
unlikely to make up the effect the 
slowing economy will have on tax 
revenue. They also voiced concern 
that Bangkok had found it necessary 
to delay payments into the new fis- 
cal year. 

“When corporate Thailand re- 
cords a big loss from unhedged for- 
eign currency debt.” said Barry 
Yates, head of research at Seamico 
Securities, “it will bring in no tax 
revenue next year.” 

Consumption lax revenue will 


» |«I j S > V 1 iirf Pnw, fvifMlh-. 

JAKARTA — Indonesia listed in detail Tuesday the projects that it is 
delaying — and those that it is reviewing — to reduce pressure on the 
current -account deficit and the rupiah. 

A total of SI projects worth 49.57 trillion rupiah 1516.7 billion) have 
been delayed, according to a presidential decree that followed upon a more 
general tmnouncemem made last week. Under review are /5 projects 
valued at 61.62 trillion rupiah. 

Projects led by PowerGen PLC. Unocal Corp., Enron Corp.. and 
Mitsubishi Corp. are among those to be postponed. PT Bimantara Citra. a 
publicly traded holding company controlled by President Suharto's second 
son. is an investor in the Mitsubishi project. 

Also delayed were 13 power plants. 36 toll roads and such items as the 
Manggarai intercity terminal in central Jakarta. Lombok airport. Polonia- 
Med:u> airport and many rail and cargo terminals and sea transport projects. 

On the list of projects to be reviewed is a 1 .5 trillion rupiah agreement to 
build a shopping mall between a state company and PT Duta Anggada. 

Among projects to be continued, the government said, are the “triple 
deckel’* railroad transit project, controlled by President Suharto's eldest 
daughter, and PT industri PesawatTerbang National's development of the 
N-250 jet plane. ~ (Bloomberg. AFX i 


also sluv . he said, thanks to an in- 
crease in the value-added tax and 
interest rates. 

Arporn Chewakrengkrai. chief 
ccunomisr at Deutsche Morgan 
Grenfell, said the revenue shortfall 
next year would exceed billion 
baht. 

Ms. Arporn said the govern- 
ment's current freeze on payments 
was a worry, especially since it 
comes just before the IMF’s first 
review of the bailout. 


A positive review would increase 
Thailand's chances of gening a 
second $800 million tranche of the 
fund’s $4 billion in standby credit. 
Thailand obtained the first $1.6 bil- 
lion tranche in late August. But with 
the deficit already a? 30.7 billion 
baht at the end of July, analysts said 
the government would have diffi- 
culty holding the deficit within the 
IMF guideline of about 50 billion 
baht. ~ 

In the final week of the fiscal 


Nike Sanctions 3 Firms for Labor Abuses 

Indonesian Manufacturers Are. Accused of Violating Company's Code 


fa l Sir i DlV’Hi /ni 

PORTLAND. Oregon — Stung 
by accusations that many of the em- 
ployees of its Asian subcontractors 
work in sweatshop conditions. Nike 
Inc. said it would sever ties with four 
Indonesian factories for violating 
the company's labor standards. 

In the announcement, made at its 
shareholder meeting Monday. Nike 
said it was the first time it had 
stopped using a contractor as a result 
of a review of compliance with its 
code of conduct. 

Separately. President Tom Clarke 
confirmed that Nike's growth fate 
would slow this year, reflecting 
weaker U.S. footwear sales. 

Chairman Phil Knight said factory 
conditions have improved dramat- 
ically since Nike began as a small 
maker of athletic shoes 25 years ago, 
and violations of working conditions 


and wage levels were exceptions. 

“Good shoes are made in good 
factories.” he said. “Good factories 
have good labor relations." 

Nike said the move involved three 
subcontractors who manufacture 
products for Nike and other clients 
at four factories in Indonesia. 

Nike said it severed its relation- 
ship with one of the subcontractors, 
which it identified as Seyon. because 
the company had refused to meet a 
10.7 percent increase in the monthly 
minimum wage mandated by the In- 
donesian government in April. 

Vada Manager, a spokesman for 
Nike, called Seyon “a good com- 
pany” and said Nike could sign a 
new contract next year if the In- 
donesian maker of sports gloves met 
the wage requirement. 

Mr. Manager declined to identify 
the other three factories but said 


Nike was ending its relationship 
with them because they had failed to 
comply with Nike's standards for 
overtime and physical environment 
The company said that at one of 
the factories the average work week 
was 60 to 70 hours. 

Global Exchange, a human rights 
group, repeated its accusations that 
Nike's contractors operated facto- 
ries similar to prison camps, paying 
below the minimum wage, hiring 
workers as young as 13 and vi- 
olating its own code of conduct 
Medea Benjamin, a spokeswom- 
an for the group, said conditions at 
two Chinese factories violated both 
Chinese law and Nike work codes 
and that employees over the age of 
25 were routinely fired. 

Nike denied the charges and said 
it paid salaries well above the min- 
imum wage in China. 


year, the squeeze has been put on 
nuny government departments. 
Provincial construction contractors 
h.:vc been complaining that pay- 
ments from the government have 
si- pped over the past two weeks. 

"Can you imagine if they post- 
pone all ihe payments for 15 days?” 
Mv Arporn said. 

An executive from one of the 
country's largest contractors said: 
“First they slowed down giving us 
payments about three months age. 
Now they have told us to wait for our 
moiiey.” 

The executive said the company 
was paying an interest rate of 16.5 
percent onfunds borrowed to cover 
the payment gap. 

The governor of one province 
said the order for a payment freeze 
had been sent out by the central 
government in mid -September. 

We were told to delay by asking 
for a double confirmation or all doc- 
uments.” he said. 

■ Bangkok Wins Praise 

The IMF praised Thailand on 
Tuesday for implementing its eco- 
nomic adjustment plan. Agence 
France-Presse reported from Hong 
Kong. 

Stanley Fischer, rMF first deputy 
managing director, said the IMF- 
imposed program was being imple- 
mented “extremely rapidly" by 
Thai authorities. He said they should 
"get some respect on the' speed ” 
w ith which they are moving. 



John Ctm/Thr Winrd hm 

Nike’s chairman, Phil Knight 

Mr. Clarke said Nike would over- 
come its difficulties in U.S. foot- 
wear sales, which he said would 
decline by less than 10 percent over 
the next two to three quarters, and 
over the long term would continue 
to expand the category by 7 percent 
to 1 2 percent a year. (AP. Reuters) 


| Investor’s Asia | 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

Tokyo ■ 

Nikkei 225 

17000 

2200 - - - 

22000 

icooo -n 

2100 v/v _ 

21000- - 

15000 lpT-L.- 

2000 r Hu 

20000 irt^V l 

14000 - Ji - y 

1900 - 

19000 | V- 

13000 / 

1800 - — V-- 

1800Gy - ™ 

12000 A M J ' J A S' 
1997 

1700 a’m j' j a s 

1997 

17000 A MJ'JAS 
1997 


Exchange 


Hong Kong Hang Sang 

Singapore Straits Times 

Sydney Afl Ordinaries" 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 


Bangkok 

Seoul 

Taipei 


SET 

Composite I ndex 


Stock Market Index 9,073.77 


Tuesday Prev. °; 0 

Close Close Change 
14,09438 14.108.58 -0.10 
1,916.10 1,908.23 +0.41 
V76JM 2.7BA90 +0.43 
Closed 16.201.32 - 

781.29 760.50 +2.72 

536.03 523.80 +2.33 

65A37 668.45 -2.11 

SL073.77 9.220.99 -1.60 


Uamta 

PSE 

2,049.67 

2,096.23 

-2.22 

Jakarta 

Composite index 

539.48 

535.60 

+0.72 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2,566.45 

2,573451 

-0.28 

Bombay 

Sensitive index 

3,822.42 

3.770.99 

+1.36 




MlhuimiuI Urn 


Very briefly: 


• Ssangyong Group, South Korea’s sixth-laigest conglom- 
erate, said it had begun receiving millions of dollars in loans it 
had requested from commercial banks to help it overcome 
cash-flow problems. The group said its main creditor bank. 
Cho Hung Bank, approved loans of 130 billion won »S142.5 
million ) last month, while other commercial banks had agreed 
to extend an additional 280 billion won. 

• CITIC Guo'an Information Industry Co. has issued 50 
million A shares restricted to domestic investors on the 
Shenzhen Stock exchange, becoming China's first satellite 
communications firm to list. 

• Broken Hill Pty.. Australia's largest company, is relying on 
7.5 billion dollars (S5.41 billion) in new' projects to increase 
profit and reverse a decline in its share price. Chairman Jerry 
Ellis said. 

• Mitsui & Co. and Mitsubishi Corp. plan to invest at least 
100 billion yen f$S16.6 million) to buy 10 percent of the 
liquefied natural gas in a field on Alaska's North Slope being 
developed by a group led by Exxon Corp. The Nihon Keizai 
newspaper reported that (he trading companies planned to 
supply Japan with 7 million tons of gas a year, or 15 percent of 
its annual demand, by 2007. 

• Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Ltd. ap- 
pointed John McFarlane. an international banker, as its new 
chief executive, replacing Don Mercer. 

• Daewoo Corp. of South Korea could be interested in buying 
a former Renault SA car factory at Setubal in southern 
Portugal, the Diario Economico newspaper reported. 

• PSA Peugeot Citroen SA of France and Malaysia's Per- 
usahaan Otomobil Nasional Bhd_, or Proton, signed an 
agreement for the manufacture, assembly and distribution of a 
new Proton model based on an existing Citroen car. • 

• Hong Kong’s key inflation indicator, the consumer price A 
index, which tracks the 50 percent of Hong Kong households 
that spend between 2,500 and 9,999 Hong Kong dollars ($320 
to $1,290) a month, rose slightly in August to 6.6 percent, 
compared with 6.5 percent in July. AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg 


; Aircraft 


Helicopters 



25% 

47% 

50% 


Orders iv l half 1997) 
Total; FT 2 T 2 billion 


in FF bn 


l s: half I99B l s! iiBlf 1BS7 
Sales 



Net profit 


] :i fisif i 39 6 r ; half 1S97 
Net debt 


For further information 
l f tip ://wwi a a ewspa ti cile. Jr 
57. boulevard de Alontniorcncy 
75016 Paris 
FRANCE 


Targets met in first half 
Net profit: FF 608 million 

75% of sales achieved in export markets 

Orders booked fo 30"' June, 1997 rose by 8.5% to 
FF 25.2 billion , up from FF 23.3 billion at 30* June, 1996. 
Exports account for FF 1 7.4 billion or 69.2 % of this figure. 
Orders were driven by commercial successes in the. tactical 
missile business [with the first export orders for Aster missiles), 
good order levels for heavy helicopters and the very favorable 
reception given to new models (the single-engined EC 120 
Colibri and twin-engined EC 135 light helicopters). 

Sales to 30* June, 1997 increased 11. S% to reach 
FF 25.8 billion, with 75 % of sales (FF 19.4 billion) achieved 
in export markets. Aircraft business billings in particular w cry 
up 27%, helped by growth in Airbus deliveries. 

Net attributable profit jumped 122% to reach FF 608 million 
at 30 * June, 1997, compared with FF 273 million for the same 
period a year earlier. First-halJ operating profit also rose to 
FF 371 million , up from FF 1 million in the first half of 1996. 

Balance sheet. Net debt has Iteen reduced by FF 2.1 billion. 
This has brought it down io FF 835 million at 30* June, 1 997, 
compared with FF 3.6 billion at 30* June, 1996 and 
FF 2.9 billion at 31* December, 1996. Net debt now represents 
only 15% of the group's consolidated equity. 

*** 

Prospects. In his comments on the results, Chairman 
Yves Michot noted: "The current trends on Aerospatiale's main 
markets indicate tha t performance, in terms of orders booked, 
should be equivalent to 1 996, while sales should advance 
significantly. Prospects for profits are in line with forecasts. 

The Aerospatiale group's balanced portfolio of businesses and 
consolidated financial potential are proof of its ability and 
determination to continue to help build the European civil 
and military aircraft and space industry. " 


AEROSPATIALE 

Taking Europe further 







E4GE20 


4hi 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


TECHNOLOGY 


Founder of Gateway Keeps the Door Open 


By Sieve Lohr 

Nn, ‘ Titles Service 

endlSs^ hoursani 1J? 5 ° f Ut 1 ^ c ?^ e 8 e * stait a company, wort 

and some awe 3 success : X ou ™ axch pride 

familvSnipf-,™ ■ ? sianed in a liny office on the 
va^iniorh^n Iow ?\g rows astronomically in size and 
, m ^ ,oas of dollars and then billions. 

the ttSllr* to Sj*? ider st W n « back a bit from 
^workload and responsibility, cashing in and spending 

. wtth y°« r four children. ^ g 

I!?—??’ the Jdlionaire chairman of Gateway 2000 Inc. 
knoJ^^" 1 '^ 10 ^ mariceter of personal computers. 

adverttsin S and cowhide-patterned 
overthe years° Wed8eS that he 1x355 had some “““d thoughts 
One proposal, Mr. Wain recalled, came a few vears after 

SK 1 ^* 1985 - he w “ ofWab ° ui «° 

'H* 1 ® David, a commodities broker, a man 
SiL 0 '?^-" 18 ^ 18 swings of the agricultural business. 
His uncle s advice: Sell the business while it was hoL “He 


GROUPE INDOSUEZ FUNDS 
managementcompany SJL 

Registered Office: 39. Al£e Scheffer 
L-250 Luxembourg 
RC Luxembourg B. 22.747 

TO THE UNITHOLDERS OF THE 
GfcOUPE INDOSUEZ FUNDS 

DIVIDEND ANNOUNCEMENT 
The Board of Directors of the Groups Incfosuez Funds 
Management Company S.A. acting for and on behalf 
of the Group© Indosuez Funds, has decided on 
September 18. 1997 to distribute, according to the 
Prospectus, the following cfivfdends: 


said, ‘Don’t walk away from it. run,’ ” Mr. Waitt said. 

Mr. Waitt, 34, also apparently entertained some second 
thoughts about Ids future and Gateway's earlier this year, 
when he talked to executives of Compaq Computer Corp. 
about acquiring Gateway for roughly $7 billion. The merger 
talks collapsed in mid-April. But those reports, word that Mr. 
Waitt paid $14 million in July for a seaside mansion near San 
Die^o (far indeed from Gateway’s headquarters) and a sur- 
prising drop in Gateway’s earnings raise the issue of whether 
Mr. Waitt 's focus has strayed from the business recently. 

“I’d be lying to yon if I said f had not done some soul- 
searching," Mr. Waitt said in an interview recently in his 
hotel suite in Manhattan. 

“But that is also something I've done at various stages in 
my career," he continued. "Every time. I’ve come back and 
recommitted myself to the business. And that’s where I am 
now." 

He has not commented on reports of the talks with Compaq 
and he would not do so directly in the interview earlier this 
month. "But I will say that I never looked at a transaction with 
the intention of getting out of the business," said Mr. Wain, 
who was in New York to introduce Gateway products and 
meet with securities analysts. 

The Compaq-Gateway deal that was considered, according 
to one person close to Compaq, would have made Mr. Waitt, 
who owns 46 percent of Gateway, the largest single share- 
holder in Compaq and a member of the Compaq board. In 
short, he would have stayed in die business, but he would have 
been a high-level underling at Compaq, the world ’ s largest PC 
maker. 

Mr. Waitt also had qualms about Gateway's being con- 
trolled by a faraway corporation, this person said. He may 
have some ambivalent feelings about his hometown com- 
munity of Sioux City, Iowa, but his roots there are deep and 
loyaL “Both Gateway and I are products of Sioux City." Mr. 
Waitt observed. 

His period of personal reflection behind him, Mr. Waitt 
must now lead Gateway through a tricky corporate transition. 
Gateway is trying to move aggressively beyond its consumer 
business into the lucrative corporate market. In the early 
going. Gateway’s corporate campaign has faltered 

On Sept. 3. die company warned that its operating profits 


for the third quarter would fall sharply — 
not much above the break-even point. 

The reason: an overly optimistic forecast 
of how quickly it could make inroads in 
the corporate market has left Gateway 
saddled with a costly inventory of chips 
and other PC components. 

The company overreached. Gateway 
executives say, not because its forecast- 
ing model went awry but because sales 
targets were set above the level in the 
forecast. Gateway, to be sure, is growing 
at a rate of some 30 percent a year, weU 
ahead of the PC industry as a whole. 

Yet its mirror-image rival as a direct 

on’S’erar^rat'e Ted Waitt, right, Richard Grasso, pttstot oflhe Nw Vwka*^ 
market, is growing at twice the rate of Exchange, and the Gateway mascot cow when thestock was first post ■ , 

Ga, Tpu y shed the forecast because I fell that we had become lively acerbic sense of humon.wiihWsjokes “su^y cuttinj 
complacent, that we weren’t growing fast enough,’ ’ Mr. Waitt remarks about compemore. from a prof^J , fc 

i^^ y ° U ‘ Ve80t ^ CUPP “ g ^ n ^ a “ Pereen ' ' 

are led bv college dropouts - now both billionaires £*eir consumer PC market, while Mr. Dell would favor aetw 
early 30s — who resized the power of the direct-sales porate market Today, it seems, Mr, Dell made . 

approach, bypassing retail middlemen to offer customers choice-Dell Computer s S ra y t *L .. „ iarime am'on° f 

more powerfulPCs for less money and enabling producers to profits higher and its stock is the Wall Street darling amon* . 

build direct marketing relationships with buyers. PC companies. . . - .mrL-et 1 

Yet the two men at the top seema study in contrasts. ^ Gateway has begun pushing hard “ ‘* e c J’S^^Srffer ‘ 
Lanky and informal, his receding hair pulled back in a doubling its corporate sales force in the . .-jons ■ 
nvtail, Mr. Waitt drapes himself over a chair and lights a this month introducing a full line of po , , ^ ‘ 

;arene after retrieving a soap dish to use as an ashtray and servers, the machines that distribute data to desktops in ; 

imething he says he has done “in the best hotels in the computer networks. n : 

>rid”). The focus on corporate business, though, does not mean . 

His manner is welcoming, he looks people in the eye, and Gateway is pulling back in any way from its consumer 

speaks with a voice rbar suggests sincerity, even to the hotel business. ...... . . in ; 

iff. By temperament and instinct, he is a consumer mar- market research suggests that the penetration of . 

teT American households will move from 40 percent to to . 

Michael Deli, 32, is heavier set and more formal in manner permit over the next three years, as lower-income families r 

d aDDearance. A no-nonsense businessman, he also has a and the elderly join the computer age. . v. 



fa Ft 


ponytail, Mr. Waitt drapes himself over a chair and lights a 
cigarette after retrieving a soap dish to use as an ashtray 
(something he says he has done “in the best hotels in the 
world”). 

His mann er is welcoming, he looks people in the eye, and 
bespeaks with a voice ibar suggests sincerity, even 10 the hotel 
staff. By temperament and instinct, he is a consumer mar- 
keter. 

Michael Dell, 32, is heavier set and more formal in manner 
and appearance. A no-nonsense businessman, be also has a 


G.L Asia Pacific 

USD 

aoi 

6.1. Pacific Income Bond: 

USD 

0.08 

GX Deutsche Marie Bond: 

DEM 

0.25 

.G.l. Deutsche Meric Reserve: 

DEM 

0.09 

?GX Diverbond: 

CHF 

0.12 

61. European Bond: 

XEU 

0.06 

“'G.l. French Fkxtc Bond: 

FRF 

0.63 

61. DoRcv Reserve: 

USD 

0.10 

61. Global Bond: 

USD 

0.12 

GJ. Dollar Bond: 

USD 

0.15 

61. Italy: 

m. 

147.00 

G.l. ItaBcn Lira Bond: 

m 

382.00 

G.l. United Kngdom: 

GBP 

0.03 

G.l. GBP Reserve: 

GBP 

0.04 

G.I. FRF Reserve: 

FRF 

0.37 

G.l. Eastern Eiaope: 

USD 

0.01 

G.L Span: 

ESP 

1.00 


Free Service Tries to Lure New Internet Users From AOL 



By Rajiv Chandrasekaran 

Washington Post Service 

A fast-grouting West Coast technology 
firm, in partnership with some of the nation's 
largest telecommunications companies, has 
begun offering a free service this week to lure 
novice computer users directly to the Internet 
and away from America Online Inc. 

The service, run by CNet Inc. of San Fran- 
cisco, is based around a World Wide Web site 
(http://home.snap.com) that organizes con- 
tent on the sprawling global computer net- 
work into "channels" for news, sports, en- 
tertainment and other topics — a format 
similar to those of AOL and the Microsoft 
Network. 

But what makes CNet's Snap Online ser- 
vice different — and why some industry ana- 
lysts contend it stands a chance to compete 
against AOL, with its 12 million customers — 
is a CD-ROM tutorial that coaches neophytes 


through their first steps in cyberspace. 

Signin g up with an Internet service pro- 
vider typically has been complex, requiring 
customers to make detailed adjustments to 
their computer's software. AOL has long won 
praise for its simple installation process, 
which requires only basic computing skills. 

Snap “will give consumers who use an ISP 
Internet service provider a much more 
friendly experience. " said Kate Delhagen, an 
analyst with Forrester Research Inc. in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. “That in itself is a 
challenge to AOL, which today has the single 
easiest way to get on the Internet." 

“The process has been very daunting.” 
said Halsey Minor, CNet’s chief executive. 
CNet, which stands for the Computer Net- 
work, is best known for its technology-related 
Web sites and for running tech-focused tele- 
vision and radio programs. 

Another issue for Snap: Where will the 
money come from? AOL gets monthly fees 


from its subscribers. Snap’s creators hope it 
will support itself with ads, a business model 
that has not yet been profitable for most Web 
ventures. 

CNet intends to have the Snap CD-ROMs 
distributed by its business partners, which 
include Internet access services tun by the 
telephone giants AT&T Corp.. Sprint Corp., 
Bell Atlantic Corp. and BellSouth Corp., and 
smaller ones such as Earrhf.ink of Pasadena, 
California. 

“We want to take Internet access to a whole 
new set of customers that heretofore would 
have gone to America Online.” said Sky 
Dayton, founder and chairman of EarthLink. 
which has 350.000 customers. 

The service also wiO be distributed through 
such non- Internet companies as Hilton Hotels 
Corp. 

Although CNet has simplified the sign-up 
process, its content has a long way to go 
before it rivals that of AOL, which has tens of 


thousands of screens of its own original ma- 
terial in addition to connections to material on 
the Internet. Snap also will require people to 
use another piece of software to send and 
receive electronic mail. 

“Snap looks like it’s going to attract lots of 
“newbie' customers, but it doesn’t appear that 
AOL is going to be in trouble because of 
this,’ ’ said Patrick Keane; an analystat Jupiter 
Communications, a market research firm in 
New York. 

Snap's channels contain links to relevant 
material on other Web sites, regularly updated 
by CNet's staff. The sports channel, for ex- 
ample, includes connection to stories from 
various newspapers, a personalized listing of 
game scores, and information culled from the 
ESPN SportsZone and CBS SportsLine 
sites. 

* ‘The Web can be incrediblecomperition to 
AOL," Mr. Minor' said. “But it can be an 
unruly medium. It needs to be packaged." 



w '**• 








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/ 


PAGE 22 


It’s Still Bangkok 


ASIAN games The Olympic 
Council of Asia decided Tuesday to 
allow Thailand to continue prep- 
arations for die 1998 Asian Gaines 
but gave it two months to show 
progress in solving organizational 
problems surrounding Asia’s 
premier sporting event 
Sheikh Ahmad Fahad Sabah of 
Kuwait, president of the council, 
told of the decision after a meeting 
in Kuwait to review Thailand’s 
handling of the event. 

He added that he would head a 
follow-up committee that would 
meet in Bangkok in two months to 
review what has been done. A final 
decision on the fare of the Games 
will be made by the general as- 
sembly of the council in December. 

“As long as Bangkok manages 
to solve the problems, the Gaines 

will stay in Bangkok.” Sheikh 
Ahmad said. “If not, there will 
always be a solution. There will 
always be a replacement" 

He said four cities were inter- 
ested in playing host for the Games, 
but declined to identify them. 

He said the Bangkok organizers 
had still not resolved problems of 
accommodation, transportation, 
ticketing and security. 

The competition is scheduled for 
Bangkok in December 1998. (AP) 






Sergi Bruguera of Spain, who 
was unhappy with his racquet. 


Kafelnikov a Winner 


tennis Yevgeni Kafelnikov 
swept to an easy straight-sets vic- 


tory over Sergi Bruguera of S 
on Tuesday as the world's too e 


on Tuesday as the world's top play- 
ers started the hunt for the richest 


prize in tennis at the Compaq Grand 
Slam Cup in Munich. 


Slam Cup in Munich. 

The Russian blew past Bruguera, 
6-4, 6-3, at the 56 million tour- 
nament, which has a first prize of 
S1.5 million. Cedric Pioline of 
Fiance also won his opening match 
when Filip DeWuli of Belgium 
withdrew in the second set with a 
twisted ankle after stepping on a 
ball Marcelo Rios of Chile also 
won, beating Mark Woodforde of 
Australia, 6-7 C2-7), 6-3, 6-1. 

• Niki Pilic announced Tuesday 
that he planned to step down at the 
end of 1998 as Germany's Davis 


Cup coach, leading to speculation 
that Boris Becker would be his suc- 


that Boris Becker 
cessor. 


An Encore for Svorada 


cycling The Czech Jan 
Svorada captured the 17th stage of 
the Tour of Spain on Tuesday, 
edging the Germans Marcel Wust 
and Sven Teutenberg in the sprint 
finish. It was his second successive 
stage victory and third in the tour. 
AJex Zuile of Switzerland main- 


tained his overall lead over 
Fernando Escartin of Spain. (AP) 


2 Sides Are onNotice 


rugby Stung by $50,000 fines 
for an on-field brawl last week, 
Pontypridd and the defending titlist 
French club Brive will be thrown 
out of rugby union's European Cup 
if there is a violent repeat when they 
meet again Saturday in Wales. (A/ 3 ) 


Sports 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 1#>7 


World Roundup 


Golfers Getting the Feel 



Of Valder r ama’s Carpets 


Tiger Woods Can Be Beat, Ballesteros Says 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


SOTOGRANDE, Spain — Valder- 
rama is one of those places that has 
nothing to do with the rest of the 
world. 

It is the private golf course where the 
32d Ryder Cup match will be played 
over five rounds Friday through Sun- 
day. It swallows you up as you walk 
within the gates, like a jungle or a casino 
in Las Vegas. You keep having to re- 
mind yourself where you are today. 

In Spain you are near the southern 
coast, but with no sight of. the ocean — 
the only clues being the breezes and 
bursts of wind that may influence play 




more than either of the team captains. 
The code trees would be another sign, if 
they weren't planted with such artificial 
perfection, in rows hugging the fairways 
and in other purely devilish positions. 

“The fairways are like carpets," said 
the American player Mark O’Meara, 
and the bunkers are splattered whiter 
than eggs without the yolk. 

All of this in a country that doesn't 
much like golf; Valdenama might be 
Area 51 for all the Spanish know. It 
should be the setting for a strange, Alice 
In The Looking Glass story in which 
nothing is as it ought to be, and that is 
exactly what it will become this week- 
raid, or maybe it won’t. 

The American and European teams 
had their first full day of practice on the 
6,734-yaid (6,156-meter), par-71 

Valdenama course Tuesday. They wore 
uniforms. Each of die 12 Americans had 
his name stitched in capitals on the back 


of his baseball cap. They carried on not 
wanting torcalize that they were being set 
up, targeted, that they’ve been trough! id 
F&ntasy Island for a reason, and to play a 
typical golf tournament is not it 

Seve Ballesteros, the European non- 
playing captain, tried to many himself to 
the abnormal laws of Ryder Cup physics 
when Tiger Woods' name came up at a 
news conference Tuesday. Ballesteros 
praised Woods; then he stopped and 
said, “Tins is the going to be the first 
time he plays in a Ryder Cup." 

As a prologue to Ballesteros' con- 
cluding statement, note that his 12 Euro- 
pean players include Lee Westwood of 
England, Thomas Bjorn of Denmark, 
Darren Clarice of Northern Ireland and 
Ignacio Garrido of Spain, whose Euro- 
pean victories taken altogether are few- 
er than the six titles Woods has won 






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since joining the much more compet- 
itive PGA Tour just a year ago. 

“I thinlc any of my golfers canplay 
against Tiger Woods and beat Tiger 
Woods,’’ Ballesteros said. 

“It's true,” Woods responded later 
in the day. “They can beat me. That’s 
just the way it is, it’s match play.’’ 

Woods, apart from being the messiah 
of golf and a potential rival to Jade Nick- 
laus*s records, is also the king of match 
play. He won three U.S. Junior Amateur 
Championships in a row followed im- 
mediately by three U.S. Amateur titles 
through last year, which is to say that he 
didn't lose a match in six years. 

The distinction is that those were in- 
dividual titles. In the 1995 W alker Cup, 
however, which is the amateur equiv- 
alent of die Ryder Cup, Woods played 


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Mark O'Meara of the U.S. team hitting chip shots over trees as Phil Mickelson, left, and Tiger Woods watched. 

Mtiwif U hiowr 


team lost to Britain and Ireland. 

“I’ve alone on one and anyone can 
win, that's ways preferred match play 
over stroke play," woods, 21 , said. “It’s 
one on one and anyone can win. That’s 
what makes it so great. The other guy can 
get hot but you' can counter. If you get the 
momentum on your side, you can ride 


that wave. It’s a great feeling. It takes 
more courage to play match play.' * 

One of the crucial punishments at 
Valdenama is the tight fairways and the 
soft, lush Bermuda rough, which is like 
paradise for the barefoot and exactly the 
opposite for errant golfers. 

It might seem like a difficult venue 
for Woods, but it doesn't give him much 
credit to imagine that he can’t adjust 
tactically in response to his opponents. 
If anything, he might have a worse time 


the rood poisoning he contracted upon 
arriving in Wales. In a rare upset the U.S. 


with the greens, which aren’t as fast as 
those at Augusta National, but are much 
softer. 

Someone who knows the course well 
predicted (or hoped, for this was a Euro- 
pean perspective) that Woods might 
have trouble stopping his ball near the 
holes, that the fantastic backspin he 
applies might spin him off of these 
yielding but quick greens. 

But it will be silly to expect anything 
less than Woods at his best this week. 
He seems to have prepared himself for 
all the pressures of the Ryder Cup — he 
stud he was even looking forward to the 
galleries rooting against him, because 
that’s what baseball and football players 
go through. '*1 think that’s cool,’ he 
said. 

He also seemed especially relaxed. 


perhaps because this event is bigger 

Sanheis. He is pan of a team and toe 

teammates were saying nice things 

about him. _ . . 

“It’s good for Tiger to get to know 
the other players on the team, said tus 
friend O'Meara. “I think he realizes 
he’s going to be around a long nme ; and 
there’s no reason all of us can t be 
friends — and he wants to be friends 
with everybody." 

■ Spaniard Joins the Europeans 

The nasty confrontation between the 
European Ryder Cup team and its ous- 
ted membra, Miguel Angel Martin of 
Spain, ended peacefully Tuesday when 
the player agreed to join the squad at 
Valderrama as a nonplaying member. 
The Associated Press reported. 


Golfing in Vikings 9 Normandy Haunts: A Test of Valor 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — In golf, you never know 
what’s going to happen next For 
amarenrs, tins is the sometimes 
joyous pain of the game. As for the 
pros, well, they’re mostly getting paid 
to suffer. AH golfers, however. Know 
the golf gods are to blame for this state 
of affairs — and are duly humble when 
swinging through these ratified ter- 
rains. This, however, doesn’t always 
save the day. 

I invited a friend out into the Norman 
countryside to play golf at a coastal 
town called Etretat It’s known mostly 
for its towering chalk cliffs and Chan- 
nel vistas. It also has a well-known golf 
course, established in 1908, overlook- 
ing the sea. 

Normandy begins not far from Paris. 
In fact, you arrive there in a little more 
than half an hour. You cross the his- 
torical “border” at the River Epte, and 
plunge into ancient Viking temtoty. 
I’m intrigued that my friend claims to 
know the etymology of village names, 
such as Le Thilliers, derived from die 
word for linden tree, and Elbeuf, 
which just might be the Norse word for 
a ford in a stream. It’s a light little 
discussion that golfers typically fall 
into on the way . to battle; anything is 
better than thinking about toe game 
ahead. 


Etretat is two and a half hours out A 
quick tour of this rocky beach town, 
where it's lunch and packs of tourists 
are milling about with dripping ice- 
cream cones, is quite enough. Five 
minutes up the hill, we escape into toe 
woody confines of the Golf d’Etretat 
and have a clifftop lunch of mussels, 
fries and beer. The weather is perfect. 

The golf, however, isn’L we duff 
shot after shot, learn new meanings for 
the word “rough,” and that, yes, it is 
possible to actually lose your tell in the 
open fairway even though you and 
three other intelligent human beings all 
saw exactly where it landed. Twixt the 
misery, we marvel at the white sail- 
boats on toe channel, gaze at the tour- 


Vantage Po i nt/KYLE J arrard 


ists walking safely beyond the course 
on the splendid cliffs. Below, on the 


on the splendid cliffs. Below, on the 
beaches, hundreds of tethers are soak- 
ing up toe sun and raising a din louder 
than swooping gulls. 


A ND SO it goes for six holes or 
so, then we’re finished with the 
front nine. No one in our little 
foursome — we’re playing with two 
Frenchmen who give new meanings to 
the words “slice” and “top” — both- 
ers to tally his score. Ana with good 
reason: Looking back won’t loll toe 
monster ahead. 

The No. 10 teebox rivals Olympus. 


Far. far below lies the narrow crook of 
an uphill par-5 dogleg. Suffice to say 
only one of us managed to get a ball 
down there in play. 

The rest of the hole is even worse, 
thanks to the long rise to toe green and 
toe tourist gallery’ that forms alongside 
toe fairway. Most spectators shake 
their heads in sympathy as we fling our 
second and third shots into knee-high 
brambles. Others laugh out loud, 
rightly, when one ball after another 
lands on toe front of the green, only to 
roll back to the fairway. 

It couldn’t be much worse, right? 
Yes. it could. For when we tee off on 
No. 1 1, one ball after another is sucked 
up into the clouds. Or, more precisely, 
into a bank of fog. A little amused, we 
trudge up the fairway to look for our 
first shots. After a few endings, all of 
them are found. . 

Then toe fun begins, as the fog drops 
down upon toe course. We try to figure 
out where toe green is. and can just 
make out a couple of flags up ahead. 
But it's unclear which one is the right 
one; what’s more, there’s no telling the 
distance; worse, if you knock it up 
there, you 'll never find your ball again. 
Wechuck aside reason, take aim and go 


for it anyway. 

A foghorn sounds in the soup. A 
ship? Or a signal from the clubhouse? 
Spooked golfers stand around like 
steep. Does this mean we can’t play 
anymore? Heck no, some say. It sure 
toe hell does, others insist; what do you 
warn to do. kill somebody? Yes, I feel 
like saying, starting with a golf god. 


W 


E FEEL our way to the 11th 
green, where only a couple of 


T ▼ nsftndourtells.We’reonlya 
few feet from the sea, but you can’t see 
iL I remember that there is afence at the 
edge of toe course and take heart know- 
ing it would be hard to walk straight off 
into the channeL Still, we’ve been zig- 
zagging all over the place out there, ami 
so: Where is the clubhouse? Laughter 
breaks out in our little foursome. No 
one has toe slightest ideau 
One of the Frenchmen seems not to 
care. He tromps over to toe No. 12 
teebox and says, “This one’s a par-3. 
Who’s game?” We look for the green. 
All is void. ‘ ‘Look,” toe guy says. “I'll 
hit one up there and if someone yells, 
then we’ll know it's not safe.” We 
quickly talk him out of it 
Disappointment seeps in. liven a 


twinge of fear: We’ll never find our 
way back. We will have to stand out 
there, lost, helpless. We look at toe 
other golfer-sheep a while. I talk about 
how my brother and I used to stop 
along a mountaintop course we liked to 
play and fire teeshots off toe cliffs 
when no one was looking — and, boy. 
was that fun! Everyone yawns. 

Then ray partner has a flash' and 
yanks out his soggy scorecard. It’s got 
a map of the holes. 1 All we have to do is 
get to the No. 18 tee and follow it 
home! Of course! toe Frenchmen cry, 
and start off into toe unknown. 

“There they go,” I say to my part- 
ner. “Quick, follow item,” he 
replies. 

It’s a quick pace; eyeglasses drip; 
sounds ore dulled. Ghostlike, golfers 
and all their gear move this way and 
that. all searching. Not sheep, but ma- 
rauding Vikings. 

A good half-hour later, we make it. 
Inside toe clubhouse at toe 19th hole, 
we sit and look out toe windows at toe 
fog, half-heartedly lament the holes 
that didn’t get played, and rumble fa- 
cetiously about how we’re due a “fog- 
check.’ ’ Then, like good golfers every- 
where, we cede to the powers thar be 
and lift our glasses high to toast the 
low, Norman cloud. Any second now, 
it will clear off, right? 


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Good Times, Bad Times: Love of Sport Triumphs in the End 


•••• : ’ ’ ' 


International Herald Tribune 

H ELSINKI — The course of true 
love — between a man and his 
sport — seldom runs true. One 
week ago, this correspondent fell again 
under the spell of beauty in the Bem- 
abeu. There, Real Madrid’s young play- 
ers paraded skill and movement that it 
seemed toe game of lost innocence was 
back. 

There was joy. There was freedom. 
There was expression. And there were 
four goals turning art into effect. 


Now comes the awakening. Moving 
on to Helsinki, where delegates of 50 
European soccer federations meet this 
week, idealism takes a kick in the teeth. 
The very same UEFA overlords who 
ask why a writer’s pen dips so often into 
negative ink, face the ugliest thing in 
sport — corruption by an arbiter. 

On Tuesday. UEFA confirmed a 
year’s ban on Royal Sporting Club An- 
deriecht from any European competition 
it may qualify for, UEFA suspects that 
Anderiecht tried to bribe referees in 1983; 


World Soccer/Ron Hughes 


it knows toe club succeeded with a mil- 
lion Belgium franc ($27,000) payment to 
a Spanish referee to allow Anderiecht 
deceitfully to beat Nottingham Forest in 
the 1984 UEFA Cup semi-final. 

Thar match had the stench of cor- 
ruption at the time. The English team led, 
2-0, after the first march in Nottingham, 
but “lost” by 3-0 in Anderiecht where 
Guruceta Muro, the bought referee, 
awarded Anderiecht a blatantly contrived 


penalty and disallowed a perfect headed 
Nottingham goal in the final minutes. 

Alas, UEFA was then under the blus- 
tering control of Jacques Georges. The 
Frenchman, who remained president 
until 1990 despite the Heysel Stadium 
atrocity in Belgium in 1985. threatened 
to sue journalists who investigated 
match-fixing. 

Georges is still “honorary president” 
of UEFA. He stands in toe shadows 
while Lennart Johansson, his successor 
at UEFA, takes the weight of this be- 
lated scandal. 

UEFA has no option but to acknowl- 
edge now that Nottingham Forest was 
robbed. The million-franc bribe was re- 
cently admitted in a Belgian civil court 
by Constant Vanden Stock, former pres- 
ident of RSC Anderiecht. 

Vanden Stock, out of soccer, is un- 
touchable by UEFA. Raymond De Dek- 
en, who acted as referees ' liaison officer, 
has been declared persona non grata. 

And the Spanish referee? Why, asked 
one journalist, is there no punishment 
against him? “The referee is dead,” 
responded Johansson, “may he rest in 
peace.” Muro was killed in a car crash 
in 1987. 

And, worrying for Johansson who 
hopes to become president of FIFA, the 
world governing authority, next sum- 
mer, the affair was brought to life in 
1992, but the evidence was missing. 

”1 am told a package of documents. 


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JOHNNIE 


addressed to me. was sent to UEFA from 
the Belgian football association in 
1992.” Johansson said Tuesday. “I nev- 
er saw it, nor heard about it until a few 
days ago. We have to clarify the situation, 
and the executive committee will make 
an internal in q uiry as to the reason why 
the relevant L/EFA bodies were not in a 
position to deal with this case earlier." 

Johansson earlier this week spoken of 
soccer's need to * ‘clear toe table’ ’ and to 
make sure the sport is not allowed to be 
seen as “rotten.” 

He acknowledges thai today’s An- 
deriecht players, none of whom could 
have been involved in 1984, are victims. 
“As always,” the president said, 
“somebody suffers. But we have also to 
decide what to do about Nottingham 
Forest. They are the victims.” 

Tuesday, Forest suggested it wanted to 
replace Anderiecht, should the Belgium 
club ever qualify. No chance. Instead, toe 
Nottingham club's lawyers are preparing 
a S2.3 million civil case for damages. 


this week for moral and ethical rea- 
sons," Johansson said, “and not as a 
legal action.” And he sighed, knowing 
that should Anderiecht claim its rights 

nlail frtp .L <L« 


to play for European cash, there might 
be judicial bands to feed the v illains and 


further frustrate the good of the game. 

Which leaves one exasperated, but >■ 
not lost. Go back in time, not to Bel- 
gium’s devious deeds, but last week, to 
Real Madrid’s briefly recaptured glory. 

Playing Rosenborg of Norway in the 
Champions League, Madrid turned our in 
virginal white. Its squad embraces trine 
nationalities; its players feel liberated 
under their new coach, Japp Heynckes. 

Being performers of mgh technical 
quality, being freed in their minds, they 
allowed ait to breathe. The Rosenborg 
goalie handed them much charity, but so 
complete was toe Madrid mastery that it 
spent the final third of toe match en- 
tertaining rather than doing a job. 

Supreme was Roberto Carlos, the 
Brazilian left back, wine back, or wing- 
er. One moment he was reaping five feet 
in toe air to head the balLThen he was 




A dditionally, sieve Hodge, 

a talented player unfulfilled, 
seeks damages for lost earnings 
and prize money all those years ago; 
Paul Hart, who headed the goal thas 
Muro annulled, is similarly convinced 
mat there may be legal redress. 

They should not bank on it. The courts 
in Belgium, and indeed in Switzerland, 
where : UEFA is housed, recognize no 
such thing as a criminal action relating to 
■*i l ^i 0r cliealin 8 in sports. 
i! 1 ?°^ S . Seem anomalous,” admits 
2“**"*. ^A’s general sec- 
. , lhat , *e lawyers have dis- 


in me air TO nead the ball. Then he was a . 

racing back to dispossess an opponent H \ 

with the cleanest of tackles. r - v 


.* 7 or soon 

if a area to them, whereason 

the field it is not a crime to cheat.” 


me neio it is not a crime to Cheat.” 

„j! h n as m ? ecn 50 si nce 1980 when an 
Iralian magistrate ruled that sporting 
fraud is not a crime. “We took action 


Then, standing on the wing, wafting i- 
first his right, then his left foot over the 
ball, he teased Rosenborg’s defense be- 
fore curling a low, slightly deflected 
cross for Raul to score. Ole! Soccer ted 
triumphed. Goodness had won. The 
love affair was reignited. 

Afterward, a stocky, elderly figure 
moved almost unnoticed through toe 
mixed zone" of players and iouxtm- 
lists outside Real’s dressing room. Al- 
fredo di Stefano, who laid toe foun- .' 
fktjote Real Madrid's playing style • 
m the 1950s, looked content. . .. - - . 

His game had a night of illumination, 
away from the darkness that attempts .to • ; T. 
put out toe light of soccer's allow it 
needs many more. 







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PAGE 23 


PAGE 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 

SPORTS 


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Griffey Wallops 2 More 

Mariner Now Within 6 of Homer Record 


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Tbe Braves Greg Maddux winding up in the second inning in Atlanta. 

Braves Seize NL East Title; 
Giants Widen Lead in West 


The iUstviji.-d P ms 

The Atlanta Braves are division cham- 
pions, again. And the San Francisco Gi- 
ants. helped by another home run from 
Barry Bonds, might soon join them. 

The Braves became the first team to 
clinch six straight division titles, win- 
ning the NL Hast on Monday niehr. 

“It’s hard to put six in perspective.' * 
Tom Giavine. the Braves’ pitcher, said 

Ni Houhpup 

after a 3-2 victory in 1 1 innings over 
Montreal. * ‘It certainly puts this team in 
a special place in history.” 

The scoreboard at Turner Field 
flashed *‘1997 NL East Division — 
Champions” after the Braves' division 
championship became official with 
second-place Florida's loss. 

Atlanta won when the Expos’ reliever 
Stove Kline threw a bases -loaded wild 
.pitch to Mike Mordecai, allowing Danny 
-Bautista to score ihe winning run. 

; Giants 11 , Pathos 5 The Giants, 
■meanwhile, are crying to win their first 
."NL West championship since 1989. 
They increased their lead to 2VS games 
;over idle Los Angeles with their victory 
at San Diego. 

Bonds bit his 38th home ran, and fifth 


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in six games. The victory cut San Fran- 
cisco’s magic cumber to four for win- 
ning the West. 

Mats io, Martins a Florida failed for 
the third straight day to clinch its first 
playoff spot, losing to New York in its 
final home game of the regular season. 

Not much went right for the Marlins. 
Their pitchers walked eight — three 
with the bases loaded — and third base- 
man Bobby Bonilla’s error keyed a six- 
run third inning for the Mets. 

Astros 6, Rods 3 Jeff Bagwell became 
the Astros' first 30-30 player as Hous- 
ton cm its magic number for clinching 
the NL Central to three. 

Bagwell, who has hit a ream-record 
42 home runs, stole his 30th and 31st 
bases. He became the first fuU-time first 
baseman to join the 30-30 club; Clev- 
eland’s Joe Carter did it in 1987 while 
splitting time between first base and the 
outfield. 

Pirates 3, Cardinals 1 Jason Schmidt 
pitched four-hit ball for seven innings 
and contributed a key double as Pitts- 
burgh won at home. 

Mark McGwire, who has 54 home 
runs, went 0-for-4. He needs seveD 
home runs in St, Louis’s last six games 
to match Roger Maris’s mark of 61 
homers in 1961. 


The Associated Press 

Ken Griffey Jr. pulled within six of 
baseball ’s most-cherished record by hit- 
ting his 54th and 55th home runs. 

Another number brought him more 
pleasure — one. 

Thai’s the magic number for Seattle 
to clinch its second American League 
West title in three seasons. 

Griffey overtook Mark McGwire for 
the major league home run lead by one 
as the Mariners clinched a tie for the 
division crown by defeating the Ath- 
letics, 4-2. on Monday night in Oak- 
land. 

Al. Roundup 

Griffey now has the seventh-highesi 
season-homer total in major league his- 
tory, trailing only Roger Maris (61 in 
1961), Babe Ruth (60 in 1927), Ruth (59 
in 1921), Jimmie Foxx (58 in 1932), 
Hank Greenberg (58 in 1938) and Hack 
Wilson (56 in 1930). 

Griffey’s 55 homers are the most in 
the major leagues since Maris set the 
record in 1961. The Mariners' star has 
five games left, all ar Seattle's King- 
dome, to match Maris. 

Joey Cora added a two-run homer as 
the Mariners increased their division 
lead to 5 Vi games over Anaheim. 

The three homers gave Seattle 257 
this season, tying the major league mark 
set by Baltimore last year. The Mar- 
iners, who hit 245 homers in 1996, 


Eddie Sawyer Dies; 
Managed Phillies 

The Associated Press 
PHOENIX VILLE, Pennsylva- 
nia — Eddie Sawyer, 87, manager 
of the Philadelphia Phillies “Whiz 
Kids” team that won the National 
League pennant in 1 950, died Mon- 
day after a brief illness. 

Sawyer was hired as the Phillies’ 
manager in 1948. Two seasons 
later, his young team won the pen- 
nant but was swept by the New 
York Yankees in the World Series. 

Sawyer ranks fifth among Phil- 
lies managers with 390 victories, 
and was the only one to serve two 
terms. 


became the first team to top 500 homers 
in consecutive seasons. 

It was the eighth multi homer game of 
the season — and the fourth this month 
— for Griffey, He now has 293 homers 
and 29 multihomer games in his ca- 
reer. 

tekM s, Him Jay* t David Wells, 
trying to secure a spot in the Yankees* 
postseason rotation, won for the first time 
in nearly six weeks as New York pulled 
closer to Baltimore in the AL East. 

The Yankees, who have already 
clinched at least a wild-card berth, trail 
ihe Orioles by three games with six 
games remaining for both teams. 

Wells (15-10) was 0-5 in six starts 
since his previous victory on Aug. 14. 
He pitched eight innings and allowed 
seven hits, striking out seven and walk- 
ing one at Yankee Stadium. 

Bemie Williams’s two- run triple was 
the highlight of a four-run fifth inning 
against Pat Hentgeo (15-10). Hentgen 
gave up five runs and seven hits in five 
innings. 

Tigers s. Orioles 4 Bob Hamelin hit a 
two-run homer to cap a four-run eighth 
inning that carried Detroit past the 
struggling Orioles. 

The victory pur the Tigers at .500 ( 78- 
78) for the first lime since April 15 and 
kept the Orioles' magic number to 
clinch the AL East at three. 

Rafael Palmeiro hit his team-high 
37th homer for the Orioles, who have 
lost 9 of 14 and 11 of 17. Baltimore 
closes the season on the road after a 5-9 
homes land that included three losses in 
four games against Detroit. 

The Orioles were 77-3 when taking a 
lead into the eighth inning; the Tigers 
had won only 6 of 69 games when 
trailing after seven. 

Brian Hunter had three hits and stole 
his major league- leading 72d base for 
the Tigers, who won their first series in 
Baltimore since 1994. 

twine s, Brewers 2 Damian Miller hit 
his first grand slam and Travis Miller 
earned his first victory of the season as 
Minnesota won its filial home game. 

The loss left Milwaukee on the brink 
of being eliminated from the AL Central 
race. Tlie Brewers will be knocked out 
with either one more defeat or one vic- 
tory by first-place Cleveland. 

Damian Miller, a rookie whose only 
previous homer came Aug. 19, lined the 
first pitch he saw from Jeff D’Amico 
over the left-field fence for a 4-0 lead in 
the second inning. 



Cbrt* 4Moci«rd Pm* 

Pittsburgh's Norm Johnson watching his game-winner go awry. 

Steelers Blow a Kick, 
And Panthers Pounce 


By Thomas George 

\«r* Ycc Iikcs Str.icv 


JACKSONVILLE, Florida — 
What is this thine uith football and 
field goals and Monday nights? Such 
drama. 

Last week. Philadelphia, this 
week. Pittsburgh: Winning kick in 
the last seconds turns into gloom and 
doom for the visiting team. But this 
time, the Jacksonville Jaguars added 
a little flair, scoring off the Sreelers' 
failed kick. 

The Philadelphia Eagles know the 
story after lining up for a winning 
field goal a week ago and watching it 
crumble into a Dallas Cowboys vic- 
tory before even getting off the at- 
tempt On Monday night, trailing 23- 
21 with four seconds to play in Alltel 
Stadium, the Steelers lined up for a 
40-yard artempr which would have 
won the game. 

The snap was low. It skidded along 
the grass and was hobbled by the 
holder, Mike Tomczak. Norm John- 
son kicked the ball, but Clyde Sim- 
mons blocked it, the 12th of his ca- 


reer. Safety Chris Hudson scooped 
up the ball and sped down the ri ght 
sideline for a touchdown. 

A game that Pittsburgh thought ir 
would win on the game’s final play 
turned into a 30-21 loss. The Pan- 
thers remained unbeaten (3-0) and 
won their eighth straight regular-sea- 
son game. Pittsburgh slipped to 1-2. 

Jacksonville’s Mark Brunell, back 
for his first action of the season after 
major knee surgery, completed 24 of 
42 passes for 306 yards against a 
team that had not allowed a 300-yard 
passer in nearly two years. 

Kordell Stewart, the Pittsburgh 
quanerback. matched Brunell in big 
plays and in leadership. He com- 
pleted 1 1 of 16 passes for 155 yards. 
The Steelers’ Jerome Bettis carried 
21 times for 1 14 yards. 

Stewart threw a 1-yard pass to 
tight end Mark Bruener only four 
seconds into the final quarter that 
gave Pittsburgh a 21-20 lead. 

Brunell brought Jacksonville back 
with a 14-play. 72-yard drive that 
ended when Mike Hollis's 27-yard 
field goal put Jacksonville up 23-21. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


EteraVMON 

w U PCI. GB 
.y-Bnfflmow H « HD — 

NewYort 91 66 583 3 

Detroit 78 78 500 16 

.Barton 76 n 47 II 

Toronto 72 84 562 22 

CENTRAL DIVISION 


Pittsburgh 

77 

80 

590 

3* 

Cbidnnad 

71 

85 

.455 

9 

St Louis 

71 

85 

ASS 

9 

Chicago 

‘ 66 

90 

JO. 3 

U 


WEST ENVISION 



San Francises 

87 

n 

554 

— 

Las Angeles 

84- 

72 

538 

Vh 

Cotorado 

81 

75 

519 

FA 

San Diego 

74 

83 

471 

13 


x<andjed dWston fflte 


71 

78 597 


539 — 

Oh 

8 

90 AM 19 
W .413 19% 


79 -487 


•OrwetamJ 83 

CMCOQD 77 

-Milwaukee 75 

Kansas Gty 64 

Minnesota 64 

WEST HVUIOH 
Seattle 88 49 -S61 — 

•Anaheim 82 74 526 5% 

•Tew* 72 84 .462 15% 

•Oakland 63 94 >401 25 

y-dfldwd postseason berth 

mnoMMiUMK 


IlLLSNW' 


•.-■VI 


* 



EASTDmSION 



W 

L 

Pet. 

*-Affanta 

98 

58 

528 

Florida 

90 

66 

577 

ttewYorli 

85 

73 

541 

Wontreol 

76 

80 

487 

PhflarMphfa 

64 

92 

A10 


CENTRAL INVISION 


Houston 

80 

76 

513 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

000 000 200-2 6 1 
Minnesota 040 81 0 00*— 5 6 0 

»4n*a V*orw « cbxI Stawett UsA CBfc 
TraMfet Richie C®, Agu8wa W aid D. MBer. 
W-TittMfct 1-4. L— DAmfcft 9-7. 
Sr-J^uton QO.HU > M tow o ka, Js.Vrtertln 
t«). Mswiesda D. Mtfler O. T. IIMv {JL 
Taranto 000 000 010— 1 7 1 

Hew York 110 040 «*-» It 0 

Hemgerv Hanson (6) and B. Saratoga 
O.Wefls. Mendoza (9) and Girard. 
W— DWefa. 15-10. L-Hentgen, 15-10. 
Detroit 001 000 040-5 9 I 

Bofflam 201 100 000-4 9 I 

Moetrler, Doran (6), Gafltont (7). BrocnH 
(8),ToJone3 (9) and Casanova; Erickson. A 
Benitez 18), Mils 9), Chasm (9) and 
Webster. W— GaWant 1-0. L— A. BenBez, 4- 
5-Sv— ToJones (31i. HRs— Detroit Homeffn 
(18). 8ottimom R- Potmebn 137). 

Seattle - 000 130 066-4 9 0 

Oakland 100 on 000-2 10 0 

Fassem Ayala (A Stocumb (9) and 
Da.WBsore Lutfwlc*, Groom (53. A. Sntett), 


Lnmrine (7), Taylor 18) and Mofina. 
W— fassera 16-9. L-LudwUc 1-4. 
S*— Stocumb (26). HRs— Seoffte Cora (it), 
Griffey Jr2 (59. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Houston 100 100 040—6 II 2 

-andnatt 001 001 100-3 8 0- 

ReynaUbMopnante (7L R. Springer (7). B. 
Woqner TO and Pena Ausmus (81; 
Remllnget Belinda (6), Shaw (B). G. White 
(8) and J-OBvar. W-R. Springer, 3-1 
L— Befinda. 1-5. Se-B. Wagner (211. 
HR— Houston, Hidalgo (2). 

St. Laois 000 001 000-1 4 0 

Pltfcboi* OI« 828 00s— 3 7 a 

Moms and DMsfcA Lampkin (7); Schmidt 
Rincon m, M. WBdns (8), Christiansen QQ. 
Labette (9) and Kendrfl 9»— Schmidt 1M. 
L— Morris 1 1-9. Se-Lobe8e (27). 

Mew York 306 000 001—10 11 0 

Hflride 100 010 001—3 7 1 

BJ Jones. Crawford » md Ptatt. A. Cnflfc 
(9k LKemcmda F-Hwedn C3J. Adarara CO, K. 
Mter (fit itaurg 08, Cook TO aid C Jotem 
Ndte (7). W— B. Uoms 159. L— U Hemondm 
93. HRs— New York, Boerga TO Odrao CD. 
Flaida Natal (1). 

Montreal 000 200 000 00-2 13 1 
Atlanta 101 000 000 01—2 12 ! 

M. Valdes. DeHart (61. □. Veras (7). 
Bemaff TO. KBne (11) and WJdgec 
GJ6adduvWoHera TO. Ewtoree O®. Ctfher 
(11) and J. Lopez. W— Catfwrl^tL— Bemeft 
0-1. HR— Montreal Futtfflra (3). 
SrreFraadsa *14 90S 051-11 12 • 

Sob Diego 010 000 480—5 11 0 


Riwter. D. Henry (7). R. Hernandez (7). R. 
Rodriguez TO and BJofmsoa Benytifll TO; 
Ashby. H. Murray (8), D. Veras (8), Erdos (8), 
C undone |9) and C Hernandez. W — R. 
Hemandes 6-2. L—H. Murray 1-2 HRs— San 
FmncbcA Bomb (38), Snow 07), G. HH 
(11). San DlegaG. Vaughn (IS. 

Japanese Leagues 


FOOTBALL 


NFL Standings 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

-GB 

x-Ynkutt 

76 

47 

2 

516 

— 

Yokuhatna 

66 

55 

0 

54S 

9 

Htrashima 

62 

60 

0 

508 

13% 

Yairturi 

57 

69 

0 

552 

20% 

Hanshin 

55 

69 

1 

544 

21% 

ChutecM 54 70 1 

x-dlnched league We 

MOKUMW 

536 

22% 


W 

L 

T 

Pel 

.GB 

Setou 

70 

51 

3 

577 

— 

Orix 

62 

54 

3 

534 

5% 

Kintetsu 

63 

59 

4 

516 

7% 

Nippon Ham 

59 

67 

1 

569 

13% 

DoW 

56 

65 

1 

563 

14 

Latte 

52 

66 

3 

546 

16% 


CENTRAL LEACUE 
Hiroshima 4 Yafcult 3. 10 inntogs 
HansMn & YaraJuri 4. t T tarings 
Yokohama w- CtnmtcH. pad. rota 
PAORC LEAGUE 
Ktateteu 8. Seftw 0 
Ort*7, Dcie(3 

Nippon Ham X Lotte 2 


New England 
Buffalo 
Miami 
N.Y. Jots 
Inrfionraralis 

J odBom ate 

Botflmnre 

Ctadrmatt 

Pittsburgh 

Tennessee 

Denver 
Kansas Cdy 
Seattle 
Oakland 
Son Diego 


Dados 

Washington 

Arizona 

PMadeipNo 

N.Y.Gkmti 

Tampa Bay 
Green Boy 


EAST 

w 

4 
2 2 
2 2 
2 2 

0 4 


LTPd. 
0 Q 1.000 
0 500 
0 500 
0 500 
0 500 


CENTRAL 
3 0 0 1500 

3 1 0 J50 
1 2 0 533 
1 2 0 J33 

1 2 0 333 
WE0T 

4 0 0 1500 
3 I 0 .750 

2 2 0 500 
1 3 0 250 
I 3 0 250 


EAST 

W L T Pet 
2 1 0 567 

2 1 0 567 
1 2 0 533 
1 2 0 533 
I 3 0 250 

CENTRAL 

4 0 01.000 96 

3 1 0 .750 108 


PF PA 
130 4a 
94 113 
71 77 

no oa 

54 115 

98 40 
110 7) 
54 82 
42 80 
47 73 

127 SI 
88 76 
74 tor 
106 106 
56 99 


PF PA 

BO 52 
56 37 
W 65 
<7 61 
70 94 


Detroit 

Minnesota 

Chicago 

Son Francisco 
Caron no 
St Louis 
New Odea ns 
Atlanta 


2 2 
2 2 

0 4 
WEBT 
3 I 
2 3 
* 2 

1 3 
a 4 


500 

500 

JX0 

JSO 

500 

500 

-250 

000 


94 83 
107 103 

58 128 

88 39 

59 .73 
77 77 
72 108 
61 107 


6:17; A Mamas Serrano. Spain, Kelraie, 
7:1 (k 7, Ckrrwa 729; & Jctaberi, 956; 9, 
Gianni Faresin, Italy. MapeL 11:1ft 1ft 
Ledomw. 1122. 


TRANSITIONS 


MONDAY'S mnt 

Jacksonville 3(L Pittsburgh 21 


84 


CYCLING 


To«m of Spain 

Leading fMahero after the 182.7-km 17Vi 
stage at die Iburot Span ftooi&wnendBr an 
lUeertay; 1, Jan Svorada Czech RepubBc 
Mn»N 4 hour& 16 irdnates and two second? Z 
Marcel Wust Germany, Lotus. s-L 1 Sven 
Teuknberg, Gemxny, VI 5, Postal, IX, A Fab- 
rtao Gaidl Ikdy. Sotgna tL 5 Leon wm Ban 
NWhertands, Rabobank, it 6 AiesdorSBasca 
Ikdy. Saeca si, 7, Lars Mkhaefcerv Denmad. 
TVM.it. & OauiioCamlrv [fcrijcBfesdteot fiJ. 
9, Moure Betitn. tfedy. Min, si, 1ft Jurgen 
temec GermanK Reflrv si 

OVERAU. STJUDtM*: 1, A tax Zudfe 
Switzerland, ONCE. 73 ham 6 intavies and 
4 seconds; 2, Fernando Escortn Spoia 
Keta>& 2 M behimt X Laurent Oufaux, 
SwtTzertond, Lrtusi39; 4. EnrtcoZaina Holy!, 
Asics, sn?s & Roberta Hems, Spain, Kelroa 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

NL-Suspended Ron McClola Mardreat 
Expos head trainer, for 7 gamesond fined him 
umHsdosed amount tor using profane and 
threatening language tawr ris umpire in 
SepL 14 game. 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
CHicASo-Traded F Dldcey Simpkins to 
Golden State tor F-G Scott BunelL 
Cleveland — S igned F Henry James. 
la. lakers— S igned F Mario Bennett 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Philadelphia— S igned K Loony CMcdiio 
to practice squad. 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
AJUHEHN— Assigned C AnW Aaltoand J.F, 
Jomphe, D Mike Croutey, D Marc MfiTO and 
D NBcoW Tsuiyala RW Jeff Nielsen and RW 
Igor Nftuftn to CtactmaTl AHL 
us AdGELES-Assigncd L« Sean OBiten 
and D Jarasiov AAodry to Utah, 1HL Assigned 
G Brad Garda to Lang Beach, IHL. 

AsBigiKd LW Jeff ShmaUef and C Jason 
Morgan to Springfield, AHL 


new jersey— A ssigned G Frederic Henry. 
G Peter Staorkfewla, D Paul Traynoc □ 
Sergei VyshedUvtdi, F Jsri Btcek. F David 
Cuntff, F Bobby Hausa F Wes Mason, F 
Richard Rochefort. F Rob Skriac and F Jeff 
Wllilants to Albany, AHI— Relumed □ Lucas 
Nehrfing to Sarnia, OHL D Lance Ward fa 
Red Deec WHL F Piene Dagemisto Rovyn 
NorandtaGMJHL, F Bryan DucefaKBctmei, 
DHL Stnrasknr Gron to Seattle WHL and 
Scott Parker hi Kelowna. WHL 
ptttwursh -Assigned D Stolon 
BErgkvistandD Alexei Krfvchenkev toOeve- 
(aitd Lumberfocks. IHL Assigned C Brim 
Bonin, C Serge Aubla RWJanHnInaandG 
Jean Sebastian Aubln to Syracuse, AHL 
SAN jose —Assigned D Peter Alert. D 
Alexandre Botov, G John Nabokov and D 
Fredtft Oduyg to Kentucky of the AHL 
TAMPA Bay -Signed RW DtooClccntemto 
1 -year contract extension. 

TORONTO— Assigned C Mart Deyell D DJ. 
Smtth and D DaruD Markov fa St Jahn% 
AHL 

VANCOUVER— Assigned LW Lnny 
GounriHft LW Paul Foam, LW Peter Sdue- 
fet C Robb Gordon, C LubamtrValc, D Bert 
Robertas*!. D Brent Sapel and G Tim 
Keyeslo to Syracuse. AHL 


Kansas— S uspended treshman TE Jason 
Gulley and senior DB A very Randle 1 game 
each torvfatotton of team rales. 

Minnesota— A rmouncBd that F Coartney 
James has left basketbeS team. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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PAGE 22 







WEDNESDAY SEPmfi^^.199^ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1997 


PAGE 24 


OBSERVER 


The Real Scandal 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Washing- 
ton's forces of piety want 

us to feel disgusted with Al- 
bert Gore. He used the office 
phone, it is said, to solicit 
campaign funds. That s 
against fee law. So is doing 35 
miles an hour in a 25-mile-an- 
hour zone, and anybody who 
does so ought to be given a 
ticket. That’s the way to deal 
with Gore’s telephone viola- 
tion. Give him a ticket. 

This solution will not satisfy 
the forces of political uplift- 
They want us to feel loathing 
for our vice president, the low- 
down law-breaking rat Of 
course it’s terrible. That office 
telephone he used was the 
people’s telephone. It was your 
telephone, my telephone. 


phones are all tied up by drag 
dealers, the way pay phones 

tend to be, they drive home to 

phones of their own. 

The authentic money scan- 
dal in Washington has to do 
with the price of television, 
pay up, or you are almost 
certainly not going to be 
elected; Le., public office has 
to be bought. Washington 
people have been saying this 
for years, and only old fuss- 
budgets see anything wrong 
with it. 


□ 


□ 


As you can see. I am strug- 
gling to feel the loathing for 
bore that seems to be expec- 
ted. Yet I cannot. 

It's no secret that eveiy 
politician in Washington with 
only three exceptions — pos- 
sibly four — spends most of 
his life asking people to send 
him money. 

Putting the arm on the well- 
to-do is basically what politi- 
cians do in Washington, and 
for good reason. Unless they 
pile up the millions needed to 
buv television ads for their 
next campaigns they will not 
be re-elected. 

"Yes, yes.” you say. “but 
does one single one of them 
ever use the office telephone 
to call for money?” The an- 
swer seems to be. “No. nev- 
er.” Or so I conclude from the 
cries of shock coming from 
politicians of all persuasions 
about Gore's free and easy 
way with the office phone. 

All others presumably go 
out to pay phones when seek- 
ing dollars, and if the pay 


Every citizen has the right 
to use whatever influence he 
can exert to have his way with 
politicians, say political sci- 
entists, and no influence can 

match money's for persuad- 
ing a politician to see things 
your way. 

Periodically dreamers and 
fools propose schemes to 
make television available to 
all. rich or destitute, or to for- 
bid politicians to use TV to 
peddle their virtues. If you find 
either prospect likely to occur, 
you are probably also disgus- 
ted by the thought of Gore 
soliciting on the office phone. 

But before being carried 
away by the farce. let me ex- 
plain how to eliminate the 
money problem in our pol- 
itics. Permit everybody, no 
matter how rich, to put money 
into political campaigns. This 
would go into a Universal 
Campaign Fund, but could 
not be earmarked for any spe- 
cific candidate. 

Money to finance all cam- 
paigns would be drawn from 
the Universal Fund and 
passed around in equal 
amounts to each candidate. 

No longer able to buy in- 
fluence. contributors would 
surely feel rewarded, never- 
theless. by the knowledge that 
they were saving democracy 
from people like themselves. 

; Vw York Times Service 


; Lolita,’ the Remake, Panned and Snubbed 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Service 


S an SEBASTIAN, Spain -- 
Americans read “Lolita, the 
book, in the 1950s, and saw “Lol- 
ita,” the movie, in the 1960s. Now, 
decades after it first became a test 
of both artistic license and free- 
dom, “Lolita," the film remake, is 
about to open across Europe but not 
in the United States, where major 
distributors have so far shunned 
Vladimir Nabokov's disturbing 
story of an older man’s passion for 
a prepubes cent girl. 

The new “Lolita," a lavishly 
faithful production directed by Ad- 
rian Lyne and starring Jeremy Irons 
and Dominique Swain, made a crit- 
ical debut on Friday and Saturday 
to. at best, mixed reviews at the San 
Sebastian film festival. (Its public 
premiere is to be in Rome on Thurs- 
day.) There were no controversies 
here, no protests, not even debate 
about the film’s treatment of pe- 
dophilia, an explosive issue in 
Europe as it is in the United States. 

If there was any talk of scandal 
here, it was not about the film itself 
— which is probably one of the 
least explicit treatments of a sexual 
passion, licit or illicit, to be 
screened in recent years (certainly 
under Lyne’s direction), but about 
Hollywood’s reluctance to deal 
with a troubling subject, not out of 
moral outrage but for fear of con- 
troversy. 

Both Lyne and Irons, who plays 
Humbert Humbert, the angst-rid- 
den yet besotted professor-rum ed- 
seducer, talked ominously, indig- 
nantly and at length about their 
concern that this version of “Lol- 
ita” — unlike the novel and earlier 
film — is being given a silent burial 
on the other side of the Atlantic, a 
victim of the timid tyranny of 
“political correctness.” 

In Hollywood, several execu- 
tives, speaking on condition of an- 
onymity, said the movie would 
have been picked up for distribu- 
tion if it had been a better movie. It 
was long and undisciplined, one 
top executive said, adding, “We 


didn’t see an audience for this at 
alL” 

Another executive said that fee 
American distribution rights would 
have cost at least $30 million, and 
added simply, “It was not a good 
movie." 

Nonetheless, at a news confer- 
ence packed wife journalists asking 
about the "censorship” of the film 
in the United Stales, Lyne insisted 
that Hollywood was frightened by 
the subject mans'. 

"It is a country where 6-year- 
olds are sent home from school for 
kissing their classmates," he said, 
4 ‘ where in Oklahoma, police raided 
video stores, seizing copies of ‘The 
Tin Drum,' so I am not altogether 
surprised. The atmosphere in 
America has become very moral- 
istic in the last three years, similar 
to the way it was in the 1950s.” 

It was' then feat “Lolita” te- 
came a literary cause c£l£bre on 
bofe continents. Tire book, seen by 
critics as a masterpiece by fee Rus- 
sian-bora writer, was finally pub- 
lished in the United States in 1958, 
the same year that a French court 
lifted a two-year-old ban on its 
publication there. Stanley Kubrick 
made his film version in 1962, but 
it dealt only obliquely with the 
troubling sexual relationship be-, 
tween. Humbert Humbert and his 
stepdaughter, Lolita, who was 12 
going on 13 when he first seduced 
her. 

But in the last few years, sexual 
abuse of children has become a 
matter of grave social concern, the 
most alarming crime of the fin de 
sifecle. Belgium has been horrified 
by the gruesome murders commit- 
ted by a pedophile who preyed on 
young girls; in France this summer, 
the police staged a nationwide raid 
on a child pornography ring, seiz- 
ing thousands of illegal video cas- 
settes and arresting several hun- 
dred people. Cases of sexual abuse 
of children have also made news in 
both Spain and Italy, with cases 
involving teachers, a priest, a shop- 
keeper and a well-heeled Roman 
lawyer caught luring children off a 
Sardinian beach. 



Dimitri Nabokov,, fee Writer's 
son, is expected to attend tjhc Rome 
premiere as a reminder of fee. 
movie’s literary origins aatfaaen- _ 
dorscment of its faithfulness to the-. 

novel. .. . „ V • V: 

“‘Lolita is a challenge we are = 
willing to take," said Jose Vienna,^ , 

president of Sogepac, fee Spanish , ■ - 
distributor. “There have beed^-; 
scandals in Sjxun, hxj, but feat “■*/ 
not the point. Nobody likes watf ~ 
and yet there are thousands -tigi 
movies about war. From feat poaft' 
of view, in Spain, people are oof 

moralistic.” „ L*-* 

Lvne and several European du&lg. 
tributors disputed fee notion ^ 1 * 7 
American- distributors had to 
fee film down because its price-*,, 
been set too high lo.offsci a pfeK 
auction cost feat went over SSK 
million. “It was a cuamiativbL- 









Irons and Swain at the San Sebastian film festival 



And yet movie distributors in 
these countries have shown little 
hesitation in taking on “Lolita.” 
even if some admit that fee timing 
of the film’s release is not par- 
ticularly opportune (it opens first in 
Italy, then in Spain this fall; French. 
German and British distribution is 
scheduled for early next year). The 
lack of a venue in fee United States 
is nlw a problem, the distributors 
say, because it means there is no 
playback from the roar of the 
American publicity machines. 

The new “Lolita" started as a 
project at Carolco, a production 
company that went bankrupt about 
two years ago, wife money from 


Chareeuis. a French industrial 
group, without an arrangement for 
American distribution. Lat e last 
vear, Lvne shewed seme exceipts 
to Hollywood studio executives but 
failed to find a distributor. 

‘"Usuailv. it is better if it opens 
the U.S .'first.” said Marehenta 


m 


Padranzini. communications direc- 
tor for Medusa, the Italian distrib- 
utor. “But we believe in this 
movie, and we decided to open in 
September, which happens to make 
us fee first. When all this started up. 
the reaction of the Italians was 
funny. We are not so prejudiced: 
we have to see fee movie first, and 
‘Lolita/ after alL is a classic.” 


think fee financial issue was an 
issue in fee end," 

The real difficulty’ for fee finely 
timed American sensitivities, sane 
said, is not that “Lolita" deals wife 
pedophilia — Oprah Winfrey -dss~ u 
cusses that — but that it 
multidimensional portrait of ape-/f ' 
dophile, trying to explain 
mud-mannered intellectual c 
become fee servant of such a 
verted passion, knowingly des 
ing his own life as well as feat ' 
voting charge. . . 

“What people find trou _ 
America is feat they like Humbert? 
Humbert and they don’t want to,” 
said Lyne. “They woutdbemucb 
happier if they could' hate him. 
They’ want black and white.but in 
fee end, he is a tragic figure and fee 
movie is in shades of grey." 

'Early reviews in fee European 
press this week were mixed. Derek... 
Malcolm, a well-known British- 
critic, said: * ‘He gets nearer to what 
the book was about. Even if yoii 
think it fails, you can’t say it 
third-rate. It is an honorable effort/ 
and at times, even successful." '■} 
Carlos Boyero wrote in H 
Mundo: “It is not a good film. 
Neither is it bad. It is nothing.” 




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PHOTOGRAPHY 


PEOPLE 



Gordon Parks: Beauty in a World of Poverty and Violence 


By Vicki Goldberg 

New York Tunes Sentcc 


W ASHINGTON — 

Gordon -Parks at 
fee age of 84 has already 
had more experience, 
more lives, and a lot more 
professions and honors 
than Methuselah had in 
969 years. The youngest 
of 15 children of a din 
farmer in Kansas, Parks 
never finished high 
school but has been given 
30 honorary doctorates 
for his various achieve- 
ments: Fashion photo- 
grapher and noted pho- 
tojoumalist who worked 
for Life magazine for 
more than two decades; 
film director; writer of 
technical manuals, nov- 
els, memoirs, poetry and 
screenplays; composer of 
symphonic music, film 
scores and a ballet, pi- 
anist and painter. 

Now, fee Corcoran 
Gallery of Art in Wash- 
ington has mounted 
“Half Past Autumn: The 
Art of Gordon Parks," a 
220-photograph retro- 
spective on view until Jan. 1 1. (The 
exhibition travels to nine cities, ar- 
riving at the Museum of the City of 
New York in July.) 

Parks is best known for a 1942 
photograph of a black cleaning wom- 
an in front of an American flag in 
Washington, which expressed his an- 
ger at rank discrimination in fee coun- 
try’s capital, and for a 1961 Life essay 
about a sick and poverty-stricken 
Brazilian boy named Flavio, but 
many of the photographs on view will 
be a surprise. 

“Half Past Autumn” (Bulfinch), 
the accompanying book, is fee I6fe 
book by Parks and his fifth inves- 
tigation of his own past, if you include 
fee autobiographical novel “The 



Gordon Parks’s “American Gothic,” made in 1942. 


Learning Tree” and a documentary 
he made about his life. 

His apartment bristles with awards. 
Honors from the NAACP and fee 
Urban League share pride of place 
wife fee National Medal of fee Arts, 
presented by President Reagan. On a 
personal level he has certainly won 
big. but he has done so against major 
obstacles, battles he has fought all his 
life: poverty, racism and — their fre- 
quent companion — failure. 

In “Shaft," the hugely successful 
1971 movie that he directed and that 
established the first black hero-de- 
tective, fee private eye’s girlfriend 
asks worriedly, "You got a problem, 
baby?" “Yeah, I got a couple of 
them/’ he answers. “I was bom 


black, and I was bom 
poor.” Like Parks. 

When he was 16. his 
dying mother arranged 
for him to live with a mar- 
ried sister in Sl Paul so he 
could escape the racism of 
Fort Scott, Kansas. Fort 
Scott was so segregated 
that the high school did 
not allow blacks to play 
on the basketball team, so 
they formed their own and 
won the Kansas-Oklaho- 
ma- Missouri champi- 
onship. At 12, Gordon 
was beaten up for walking 
wife a light-skinned cous- 
in. Three of his friends 
were killed in their teens. 

When Parks later 
worked as a dining car 
waiter, a steward hurled a 
racial epithet at him and 
he threatened fee man 
wife a knife. (Before be- 
ing dismissed. Parks read 

behind "and saw ^photo- 
graphs by Farm Security 
Administration photo- 
graphers like Dorothea 
Lange and Walker Evans. 
He was so impressed he 
bought his first camera.) 


When he covered the first black 
fighrer pilots in World War II, he was 
prevented from going overseas with 
them by politicians unwilling to give 
blacks publicity. Then Alexey Bro- 
dovitch, the an director at Harper’s 
Bazaar, told Parks his fashion pho- 
tographs were marvelous but Hears! 
had a rule against hiring Negroes. 
Conde Nast had no such rule; Parks 
went to work for Glamour and then 
Vogue. 

Violence did not stop at fee color 
line either. When Parks was a child, 
every month on payday a brother-in- 
law got drunk ana chased his wife and 
children to the Parks home with a gun; 
his mother regularly prevented 
murder. 


When Parks ’s first marriage was 
breaking up, his father-in-law put a 
gun to his head. Covering a Harlem 
gang for Life put him in gangland 
danger. When his story on fee black 
Muslims was published. Life learned 
that there was a contract on his life 
and sent him abroad with his family. 

For years Parks endured hand-to- 
mouth poverty. The brother-in-law in 
St. Paul threw him out in the middle of 
fee night during Christmas vacation in 
subzero weather. For a couple of 
weeks fee teenager stayed in a pool hall 
by day and rode a trolley all night to 
keep warm until school opened again, 
then got a job playing piano in a brothel 
till a man was murdered there. 

He rode the rails to Chicago, 
worked as a janitor in a filthy flop- 
house, worked as a bus boy in a hotel 
until fee band leader heard him play- 
ing liis own songs and made him the 
only black musician and vocalist wife 
his band. Then when the band reached 
New York, the leader ran off with fee 
take and Parks was homeless and 
broke again. “How do I get to Har- 
lem?” he asked the drummer, who 
answered, * ‘Take fee A train. ” He did 
and soon discovered there were no 
jobs for blacks. For a while Parks was 
reduced to running drugs. 

Yet in 1941, he received the first 
Julius Rosenwald Fellowship ever 
given for photography and with it 
became fee FSA’s first black pho- 
tographer. Roy Stryker, head of fee 
agency, took Parks with him when it 
folded and made him the first black 
photographer at fee Office of War 
Information and at Standard Oil. 
Parks broke fee same ground at 
Vogue and then at Life. 

In 1969, he became fee first black 
director of a major-motion-picture 
studio film, “The Learning Tree" 
(Warner Brothers), adapted from his 
own novel. (He also wrote fee screen- 
play and score and produced the film.) 
“I wasn't so proud of being fee first 
black at those places/ ' he says. “I felt 
blacks should have been hired be- 
fore.” 


P hotographers re- 
fused to shoot pictures of 
George Clooney ai the open- 
ing in New York of his movie 
“The Peacemaker." sanding 
together quietly to protest fee 
actor’s criticism or’ paparazzi 
who chase stars. Only a few 
flashbulbs — racs: front fans’ 
cameras — went off as the 
"ER" hunk and “Batman and 
Robin” star strolled down fee 
carpet, bypassing about 60 
photographers at fee Ziegfeid 
theater. The actor had com- 
pared tabloid journalists to 
crack cocaine dealers after 
Princess Diana died in Paris 
when fee car she was in 
crashed as it sped away from 
paparazzi, “w’e boycotted 
him to show feat we have 
some restraint and feat we’re 
not a bunch of idiots running 
around wife cameras and caus- 
ing accidents," said Stephen Trupp, who has 
photographed stars, sports and public events 
for the last eight years. Clooney’ is at least the 
third star to be boycotted for bashing pho- 
tographers. They snubbed Sylvester Stallone 



RMonl Lw-’B'Wt* 

Clooney at the premiere. 


locals m Montana over hisnew 
movie. Seagal is sdtedtiled to 
begin rehearsals for ‘‘The Pa* 
niot” this week, SfitfUm crew 
members say feepiaxt. re- 
ceived threats frefe callers ~ 
identifying themselves as mi- 
litia members. In "Tie Pa- 
triot,” a renegade goVeaunear 
lab worker steals adeacflyhioK' 
chemical, which axnraow. 
falls into fee hands ofanuKtiir •' 
killing militia members md 
townspeople. But early nrdia. 
repots incorrectly said the 
script has die militia steaks 
the toxin and deliberately un- 
leashing it on fee town.. A 
member of a militia-affiliated 
group denied that anyone in 
her organization would 
threaten the filmmaking. “But 
anyone can say they belong to 
the militia and make a threat,” 
said Kamala Webb, member 
of Citizens for a Free America. 



□ 


The country singer Jett Williams spent eight 
years in court proving she was fee illegitimate 


at the opening of a Planet Hollywood in Rome ■ daughter of Hank Williams Sr. Now she has a 

memento from her family. Harold and Betty 
Ehrlich, pawn shop owners in Montgomery, 


and Fran Drescher at the Emmy ceremony. 

□ 

A neighbor who has tended to Jacqueline 
Kennedy Onassis’ house in Bernardsville, 
New Jersey, since Onassis’ death in 1994 now 
owns it The secluded two-story converted 
bam was purchased by a longtime friend. 
Marjorie McDonnell Walsh for $1.47 mil- 
lion on July 27. according to deed records. 
Onassis bought the house in 1974 for 
$200,000 and used it as a weekend home. 


Alabama, gave her a china tea set that her 
grandmother. Lillian Williams, had been mak- 
ing payments on before she died in 1955. ‘ ‘This 
is fee first thing and only thing I'll ever get from 
my grandmother," Williams said * This is one 
of those things you can't put a price on.” The 
$14.95 tea set was never sold because the 
Ehrlichs had hoped to donate it to a Williams 
museum, but feat never materialized. 




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The Cat in the Hat, Horton. Yertle the 
Turtle and other fanciful creations of Dr. 
Seuss will be pan of a memorial to the chil- 
dren's aufeor. Springfield. Massachusetts, fee 
hometown of Theodor Geisel. known to mil- 
lions of children as Dr. Seuss, will create a 
memorial populated with six sculptures of 
characters from his books. Geisel’s step- 
daughter, fee sculptor Lark Grey Dimond- 
Cates, will create the bronze works, which 
will encircle the town librarv. 


□ 


Steven Seagal is having run-ins with some 


For the second time this year, a Canadian 
beauty pageant winner has been dethroned- 
Organizers of fee Miss Canadian Interna- 
tional pageant said Gabriella Petivoky had 
breached her contract when she posed for 
promotional photos for Hooters, an Ame rican 
restaurant chain which features waitresses in 
high-cut shorts and tank tops. “We want a 
young lady people can look up to and be proud 
of,” said Michelle Jacobson, president of 
Models Club Canada International, which or- 
ganized fee pageant Earlier this year, Dani- 
elle House lost her title from the Miss Canada 
International, a separate pageant, after she 
was convicted of assault 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to other countries really easy. 
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calling from and you'll get the clearest connections 
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AT&T Access Numbers 



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calling worldwide: 


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for ihi • faint* inu an: calling from 

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1 ''-I il* callinu anl number listed 

if..'.. 


our name. 


EUROPE 

Austria*o 

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. 0-800-110*18 

France 

0-608-98-0011 

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.. 8130-0818 

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172-1811 

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Russia *a(Mdscow) ». . 

756-5H2 

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880MM811 

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6888-89-W11 

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Saudi Arabia o 

1-880-ID 

AFRICA 


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Ghana .8181 

South Africa O-WO-W-flttJ 



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