Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


'<?S«j>8S5'5s. 

3iS»^§85*' 



INTERNATIONAL 



(Lribu 


PUBLISHED VVITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON* POST 



Tfie World’s Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Friday, September 26, 1997 


He 
:h 


f bu '- £& r 

""'Si, 

. : v s?ssi 
StSSSS;* 

Vienna tlJ ^ SWe H. T 

"SsiSs 

3SaS5?S 

-■^sSjS 

"' ' ,?z :,edl °p,ck i"^ 


Fire Haze a Disaster, 
Indonesia Declares 

But No State of Emergency Yet 


■ Upjj, 


annj 


: C"^! of 

- 7 1 “ ' la * t 'd uun 

J /r,.m* yfsl , 
• *-; J Jjpanrcb® 

r, -» J ’.ov.ieiy 

- ’HUaif 
^Hpani,^ 

•- ' f’y . 

-• " “i* -Ji.- NrdcalL 


By Thomas Fuller 

Special to the Herald Tri bune 

KUCHING, Malaysia — As this 
smokebound city endured another day 
of choking fumes Thursday, neighbor- 
ing Indonesia declared a national dis- 
aster and called on “all levels of so- 
ciety” to mobilize against die forest 
fires that have left several conniries in 
the region under a thick, gray haze. 

But President Suharto of Indonesia 
stopped short of declaring a state of 
emergency, a move taken by Malaysian 
officials here last week that closed 
schools, businesses and nonessemial 
government offices. 

‘“Hie president has instructed offi- 
cials in the central government and the 
regions to mobilize to overcome the 
disaster,” State Secretary Murdiono 
said after meeting with Mr. Suharto. 


Astronaut 
Gets a c Go 5 
To Join Mir 

NASA Decides Risk 
lission Is Small 


He did not elaborate, but Environ- 
ment Minister Sarwono Kusumaat- 
madja said that coordination was im- 
proving among various ministries to 
deal with the situation, Reuters reported 
from Jakarta. 

The state of emergency continued 
Thursday in Kuching, capital of Malay- 
sia's Sarawak state. 

The city's main hospital continued to 
receive a stream of patients suffering 
from respiratory problems. More than 
10.000 people have sought treatment at 
government clinics in Sarawak forhaze- 
rebtexl illnesses since the state of emer- 
gency was imposed, according to the 
Malaysian medical and health services 
department. 

In Indonesia, where tens of thousands 
are reported to be ailing, at least two 

Sec SMOG, Page 4 



.**#* 




■:\;Sr 


wmm 

i&'-'-'-v" «v:j 






v. m, ■ ■ mmimm, & 




% i mm 


%9. 


Smoke rising from the jungle north of the capital of Sarawak, adding to the smog over the Malaysian state. 


QfMi 



By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


WASHINGTON — NASA’s top of- 
ficial said Thursday that be had decided 
to send the astronaut David Wolf into 
space for a four-month mission on the 
Mir space station after three separate 
reviews bad persuaded him that Mr, 
Wolf would face no unwarranted risks 
on the Russian station. 

Speaking only hours before the space 
shuttle Atlantis was to lake Dr. Wolf 
into space. Daniel Goldin, the NAS A 
administrator, said drat the safety re- 
views, and a 20-minute conversation 
with Dr. Wolf, had assured him that the 
mission would involve no “unneces- 
sary peril.” 

The National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration had never waited so 
long before making such a major de- 
cision about the nature of a mission. 

Mr. Goldin said NASA officials were 
“deeply touched" by die public con- 
cerns about the flight 
But, he added: “The decision to con- 
tinue our joint participation aboard Mir 
should not be based on emotion or pol- 
itics. It should not be based on fear. A 
decision should be based — and is based 
— on scientific and technical assess- 
ment of die mission safety. ” 

Mir’s crews have had a woeful sum- 
mer, including power failures, oxygen- 
pump problems, medical ailments, 
minor computer glitches and major fail- 
ures, and a collision with a supply 




; ■ is- 






ut Mr. Goldin and others who had 
reviewed this history said there were 
only two potentially life-threatening 
eventualities to be concerned about — a 
rapid fire on board, and sudden de- 
isurizatioo — and said they felt com- 
ble that the risks in both areas were 
now small. 

American participation with the Rus- 
sians, considered an important precurs- 
or to joint efforts to build a permanent 
international space station, will con- 
tinue “as long as it's safe and 
d active,” Mr. Goldin said in 
Canaveral, Florida. 

The Atlantis, which was scheduled 
for takeoff on Thursday evening, was to 
cany seven crew members into space, 
dropping Dr. Wolf off on Mir and hing- 
ing back David Foale, an American 
astronaut who was completing a four- 
aud- a- half-month mission. 

NASA officials have maintained that 
the experience with Mir is helping them 
lower the risks of more ambitions space 
operations being planned, including the 
construction of tne international space 
station and eventually a flight to Mars. 

But many members of Congress, dis- 
mayed by months of c h illi n g drama 
aboard Mir, have said that the lives of 
American astronauts are being placed 
needlessly at risk on board the 12 -year-, 
old Mir. 

Representative James Sensenbren- 
ner, Republican of Wisconsin, has been 

See MIR, Page 6 


Globalization Theory limits Into Reality 


By Alan Friedman 

International Undid Tribune 


HONG KONG — For years, the 
debate over globalization has seemed 
abstract, intangible and rather theor- 
etical, even to those who hold the reins 
of the world's economy. 

But in the past few days, as the 
currency crisis in Southeast Asia took 
center stage during an unusually in tense 
gathering here of the world's lop fi- 
nancial officials, the intertwined world 
economy of cross-border commerce, 
labor and capital flows became sud- 
denly plain for all to see. in real time. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

The trauma of Thailand’s financial 
crisis, and the contagion it spawned in 
equity and currency markets across 
Southeast Asia, forced the focus on 
globalization. 

A harsh rhetorical exchange between 
Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
of Malaysia and die international fin- 
ancier George Soros over die role of 
currency traders was the most stark 
example of the different visions of 
world economics and finance. 

Another was five resistance of some 
emerging economies to the U.S.-led 
drive to open up capital markets and to 
strike a trade accord allowing banks, 
security firms and other providers of 
financial services to compete freely 
everywhere. That injected a new and 
highly politicized dimension into what 
so far bad seemed an academic debate. 


To many of the finance ministers, 
central bank governors and other fi- 
nancial officials who gathered here, 
the annual meetings of the World Bank 
and International Monetary Fund that 


ended Thursday were a turning point in 
world financial history. Whai was 
most striking to bankers, officials from 
Asian and other developing countries 
and to representatives of the wealthy 



Talking Heads».»FaHing Ringgit 


. ' Ringgit stabilizes 
as Prime Minister 
Mahathir bin 
Mohamad, above, 
tries to soothe the 
market 




; V Rlnggft plummets • Deputy Prime Minister \ ■ 

after Dr. Mahathir * Anwar Ibrahim tries to ' 

• says currency trading reassure markets. ii’ j?**', 
•. ^ should be made illegal. ry?7/^rT7 FFTs — rr V~<2iJ8lL'< 
George Soros, above, ' 

feicV 

' • '• ='• vVvJf 


' ' ' \xH: 



Group of Seven nations who reviewed 
the lessons of the Asian currency tur- 
bulence was the way theory was trans- 
formed into practice, and on the spot. 

They met against the backdrop of 
real-time currency market volatility in 
East Asia, with investors moving money 
in direct response to the rhetoric emerg- 
ing from the Hong Kong meetings. 

“The most amazing aspect of all 
this," said the president of the World 
Bank, James Wolfensohn, “is that this 
meeting was set three years ago, at a 
time when the Asian economies were 
known for their economic successes. 
But we are now here' at a time of 
significant reappraisal and market ad- 
justment, and this new reality has been 
brought home to everybody I have 
talked to.” 

Several top financial officials, from 
the G-7 and Asia, noted that because 
the sharp-edged issues of globalization 
were visible for all to see, the Hong 
Kong meetings were the most extraor- 
dinary / the most fascinating and the 
most delicate they had experienced in 
many years. But they also agreed with 
Mr. Wolfensohn, who, in an interview, 
referred to the currency crisis as “a 
time of shock for many." Neverthe- 
less, he added, “I think it is healthy." 

The hope of many bankers and gov- 
ernment officials is that the lessons of 
the turmoil — that cuxrenciesneed to be 
more flexible, that economic policy 
needs to be less spendthrift ana more 
prudent and that banking systems need 

See MARKETS, Page 6 


Now, Malaysia Is Hit With a Lower Credit Rating 


Caa&lrdty Our S*& Finn Dupatrba 

KUALA LUMPUR — Standard & Poor’s Carp, 
cut its long-term ratings outlook for Malaysia on 
Thursday for the second time in six weeks, catting the 
country’s credit growth “unsustainable.” 

The move pushed the Malaysian ringgit to a record 
low against the dollar, as Southeast Asian currencies 
tumbled across the region. 

Meanwhile, in a run on one of Malaysia's largest 
savings banks, hundreds of people lined up to with- 
draw money after rumors that the financial institution 
might go under. 


The rumors about Malaysia Borneo Finance Lid. 
were denied by the nation's central bank. 

The downgrading by Standard & Poor’s, the 
American credit rating agency, will raise Malaysian 
companies’ borrowing costs. It reflected increasing 
concern about the soundness of the country's fi- 
nancial system, amid the region’s currency turmoil, 
profligate lending to the property industry and slow- 
ing economic growth, the agency said. 

‘ ‘It’s another shock after a series of shocks,’ ’ said 
Tan Yan Heong, of Kuala Lumpur Mutual Fund, 
which manages 2.4 billion ringgit ($787 million). 


S&P slashed Malaysia's long-term ratings outlook 
to “negative” from “stable” and warned that there 
was a growing possibility of a downgrade in the 
country’s long-term and short-term ratings. 

Across Southeast Asia, fears of an escalating 
banking crisis and more corporate troubles because 
of the region's currency turmoil also dampened 
sentiment for most currencies, dealers said. 

The S&P’s downgrading had been preceded Aug. 
18 by a rating cut to “stable" from “positive.” 

See RINGGIT, Page 6 


Palestinians 
Warn Israel 
Over New 
Settlements 

‘Thousands ’ Ready 
For Suicide Bombing, 
A Hamas Chief Says 

emptied hr Our Sa$ Fntn Pnjxzrbrs 

JERUSALEM — Palestinian leaders 
warned Thursday that the Israeli gov- 
ernment’s decision to build new homes 
in Jewish settlements would lead to 
more suicide bombings. Islamic mil- 
itants asserted that they had thousands 
of volunteers for such attacks. 

The decision by Prime Minister Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu was also criticized by 
the U.S. secretary of stale, Madeleine 
Albright, who repealed her call for a 
freeze on expanding Jewish settlements. 

“It is very important that there be a 
time-out,” Mrs. Albright said at a news 
conference after a United Nations Se- 
curity Council meeting on African is- 
sues. “I am calling across the board 
again for a time-out on actions that 
make it more difficult to have successful 
negotiations.” 

Mr. Netanyahu announced late 
Wednesday during a visit to the West 
Bank settlement of Efrat that his gov- 
ernment would build 300 more homes 
there. 

A Palestinian official, H anan 
Ashrawi, said Thursday: “This is an- 
other dangerously irresponsible de- 
cision bordering on insanity. I think we 
are rapidly hurtling toward the abyss." 

A senior leader of the Islamic militant 
Hamas group, Abdel Aziz Rantisi. asked 
by IsraelTetevision's Channel Two bow 
many young Palestinians were willing to 
be suicide bombers, said: “Thousands, 
thousands. And if I said tens of thou- 
sands, I’m saying the truth." 

Mr. Rantisi said Israel was provoking 
the Palestinians. ‘'Israel should not ex- 
pect us to dance to the tune of peace 
while they are bulldozing confiscated 
land and building settlements and 
strengthening the Zionist presence in 
Palestine,” he said. 

The U.S. ambassador to Israel, Mar- 
tin Indyk, also said Thursday that Is- 
rael's move to expand a settlement in 
the West Bank undermined U.S. efforts 
at the United Nations. 

“We are unhappy with that an- 
nouncement,” be said. “The secretary 
of state is up at the United Nations at tire 
moment, and she is engaged in an al- 
most fall-time effort to help Israel at the 
United Nations because there is an ef- 
fort under way there to isolate Israel. 
And it’s in that context that this an- 
nouncement comes, and it undermines 
her efforts.” 

The Israeli foreign minister, David 
Levy, said that building new homes in 
existing West Bank settlements was le- 
gal and that the Clinton administration 
would come around to agree. 

Mr. Levy, also in New York far the 
UN General Assembly session, said the 
construction simply accommodated 
“natural growth* ^ among tire Jewish 
families that live in Efrat, where the 
apartments are to be built. 

Although he praised Mrs. Albright’s 
peacemaking efforts, he challenged her 
criticism of Mr. Netanyahu's actions. 

“We find ourselves in a situation 
even if we sneeze we'U be told it's legal 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


British Plan Paparazzi Curb 

Press Watchdog Proposes a Broad Expansion of Privacy 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 



Newsstand Prices 

/ 

Andorra— 10.00 FF Lebanon LL3flOC 


ArtBes 12JSQ FF Morocco 16 Dh 


Cameroon- 7.600 CFA Qatar — : — 1000 OR 

■ ■ - 

Egypt-:. CE5SQ Rtonion 1&50FF 

L-. 

Franca 10.00 FF Saudi Arabia — 10 SR 


Gabon 1.100 CFA Senegal — 1,100 CFA 


Italy. ^. 800 Lire Spain...- 225Ptas 


ivory Coad.1.250 CFA Tunisia 1 .250 Din 


Jordan 1250 JD — 10-00 Dh 


Kuwait 700 FIs U.S. Mfl. (Eur.)__J1^0 


% 

2 


f 


$ 


It 



LONDON — In a sweeping move 
Thursday to tighten newspaper stan- 
dards following the death of Diana, 
Princess of Wales, Britain’s press 
watchdog proposed tough new curbs on 
photographers and a broad expansion of 
privacy to protect public figures and 
private individuals from news media 
prying. 

The proposals would prohibit the 
publication of photographs obtained 
through persistent pursuit or unlawful 
behavior — a direct response to the 
widespread public complaints about 
paparazzi pursuit of Diana. 

She died in a car crash in Paris Aug. 
31 month as photographers on motor- 
cycles followed her and an escort, Dodi 
al Fayed, from the Ritz Hotel. He was 
killed also, along with the driver of the 
limousine. , . 

The curbs also would make much or 
the traditional faze of Britain's racier 
papers suddenly taboo. Under the pro- 
posal, details of a person's health, per- 
sonal relationships and personal cor- 
respondence would be kept private in 
the absence of any overriding public 
interest, and public figures would be 
allowed to enjoy their privacy in a 
church, at a restaurant or even on a 
beach. 

School-age children and people in 

ief should be left alone, according to 


Andrew Marr, editor of The Inde- 
pendent newspaper, said that although 
many of the measures wan sensible, the 
commission’s attempt to define matters 
of public interest and places meriting 
privacy was fraught with difficulty. 

Last week. The Independent ran an 
article and a photograph about a meet- 
ing at the Spanish vacation home of a 
prominent Conservative politician in- 
volving former Prime Minister John 
Major and Chris Patten, the former 
Hong Kong governor. The paper spec- 
ulated that the men discussed tire future 
of Mr. Patten, whom some Conserva- 
tives regard as a potential party leader, 

See PRESS, Page 6 


j The Dollar [ 

New York 

Thuredoy O * PU. 

previous close 

DU 

1.7585 

1.7728 

Pound 

1.6285 

1.6138 

Yen 

120.825 

120.37 

FF 

5.9145 

5.951 

V 

Thundaydoee 

previous dose 

-5^7 

7848.01 

7906.71 

[ S&P 500 f 

ctMngo . 

Thursday 0 4 P.M. 

previous dose 

-6.55 

837.93 

944.48 



AGENDA 


Clinton, In Little Rock, Makes an Apology 


Books 

Crossword 

Opinion 

Sports 


Page 9. 

Page 1L 

Pages 8-8. 

Pages 20-2L 


7T» (mmmrftaf 


Pug— 4.12. 


Forty years after a national crisis in 
which U.S. airborne troops with fixed 
bayonets were ordered to tire Arkansas 
capital to escort nine black children into 
Central High School, amid jeering and 
taunting students and parents, a wel- 
coming President Bill Clinton was at the 
school door on Thursday. He held tire 
door open as the nine, who helped blaze 

Israel Urges Sanctions 

Israel is pressing a reluctant Clinton 
administration to impose economic 
sanctions on Russian organizations and 
companies reported to be supplying mis- 
sile technology to Iran. Page 7. 


a trail in racial progress, mounted the 
steps and entered the school. Amid the 
celebration, there were words of caution 
by the president and others that the U.S. 
still had a distance to go to win equality 
and opportunity for all people across tire 
country. “Segregation is no longer the 
law, but too often separation is still the 
rale,” Mr. Clinton declared. Page 6. 

PAGE TWO 

Egypt: King Cotton’s Realm 

THE AMERICAS Pag*3. 

Pendleton’s La u, a Century Later 


The IHT on-line v/ww. iht.com 


Illegal Aliens in U.S. Confront a Wrenching Choice 


By MirtaOjito 

Hew York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Before she boards a plane to 

* L. C*mka mi VI hnr 


Anthony, a tight hug and extract a promise that he will 
be good while she is gone. She will not tell him that, 
although she holds a return ticket to the United States, 
* * * - — "* * for a long, long time. 



grief sBOUIg re .cn to ShtokX if 

™<< have the bes, chaaee of 

holn«^ officMofpeople in die news, eventually returning as a legal testdent. 


Under two sweeping changes in U.S. immigration 
laws scheduled to take effect this month, tens of 
th mi sands of illegal immigrants, many of whom have 
been in the United States for years and have jobs and 
families, are faced with a wrenching choice. 

They are trying to decide whether to return to their 
homelands until they can get alien registration cards, 
known as green cards, giving them status as legal 
residents, or remain and face the risk that they mil 
never become legaL 

Lawmakers who favored the changes say the old 
rales rewarded people who broke the law, allowing 
them to stay illegally for years while they waited to be 
approved for green cards. 

The new regulations, these lawmakers contend. 


will encourage legal, and orderly, immigration. 

Bur many illegal immigrants, as well as their law- 
yers and advocates, said the new rules, which will go 
into effect Wednesday, could hurt illegal immigrants 
who are on their way to legalizing their status. 

The impending changes have sent immigrants 
scrambling for advice and immigration lawyers, them- 
selves often puzzled by the laws’ complexity, seeking 
guidance from national advocacy organizations. 

“I’m basically not recommending anything to my 
clients,” said Maria Dominguez, an immigration law- 
yer in Miami. 

“I just give them the facts and let them make their 
See IMMIGRANTS, Page 6 




.IWIWW'""""" woroeamoeesnnmmmwn- 


PAG 




1 

traJ 
Au: 
rou 
Six 
a a 
1 
eve 
$75 
vicl 
mei 
S 

Spa 
tool 
6-4 
cha 
the 
an I 
F 
reac 
mill 
nus 
Slai 
S 
afte 
Aus 
S25 
reac 
roui 
ro, J 
fenc 
6-3. 
Ger 
mer 


rop- 
smi; 
on I 
sets 
T 
her 
agai 
and 
B 
her • 
cisri 
agai 
wor 
A 
ing 
strai 
Ital) 
fifth 


min 


Vai 

Tal 


c 
Netl 
mar 
the 
his 1 
ling 

V 
bob. 
spec 
Lau 
Stef 
secc 

V 
lorn- 
gos 
min 

A 

mail 

secc 

carti 

T 

ciud 

Unu< 

ous 

Vail 

Rafc 


U 




*rt. ik. wraassoewdasL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 

PACE TWO 



Cotton, Not School / Child Laborers in Egypt 


Death Comes to the Delta 


By Douglas Jehl 

NmYorkTimes Service 


S 


UL HAG AR, Egypt — Here in the heart 
of this Delta, too, cotton is king, and in 
the early fall it rales absolutely — es- 
pecially over children, to whom it usu- 
ally falls to harvest the puffballs for the sake of 
Egypt’s economy. 

Yes, the school year has started, and in Egypt, 
education is supposed to be compulsory to the 
age of 15. But instead, thousands of young 
children — some as young as 6 — are spending 
these days barefoot in hot green fields dotted 
with spots of white, plucking the down with tiny 
fingers, ripping leaves with their teeth and stuff- 
ing the prizes into makeshift pouches fashioned 
from their tunics. 

The pickers, hired by die Agriculture Min- 
istry, earn no more than the equivalent of $1 .50 
for an eight-hour day. But in Sul Hagar, a town of 
50,000 people and rutted dirt roads where don- 
keys outnumber cars by at least 20 to I, even 
those wages are ones on which families rely. 

And so since last week, when 25 children from 
the town were among the 31 killed when a 
flatbed truck carrying them to the fields veered 
onto a narrow dirt path, then plunged into a 
canal, people here have been racked not just with 
grief but also with an abiding sense of power- 
lessness. 

“Someday, the children will have to go back 
to the fields,” said Said Ali Sayed Yughri, 75, 
who until last week shared his squalid eight- 
room house with his wife and their 27 children 
and grandchildren. “It will be against our will. 
But it will be a matter of necessity. ” 

The accident killed two in the family, a boy 
and a girl, both 17, who were cousins. Three 
other grandchildren were among as many as 150 
packed into the same track who were injured. 


A fter insisting that three visitors take 
seats on their only living-room sofa, 
Mr. Yughri and his wife, Tawhida 
Ibrahim, 65, squatted on the floor to 
talk of a plight they share with so many neigh- 
bors. 

The couple have four children, but only two 
are employed, earning less than $20 a month as 
street cleaners. 

More than 30 percent of adult males in Sul 
Hagar are unemployed and nearly ali those who 
do work earn low wages in the fields of rice, 
wheat and corn that surround the town in the 
fertile Nile Delta, some 120 kilometers (75 
miles) north of Cairo. 


When they are not harvesting cotton, many of 
the town's children are picking other crops, 
including jasmine and potatoes in fields many 
miles away across foe western branch of foe 
Nile. 

Mrs. Ibrahim insisted, in tears, that neither the 
three survivors nor any of her 14 remaining 
grandchildren would be permitted ever again to 
pick cotton. “We are going to eat dust or go 
begging in the streets/ ’ she said, “I will not send 
them. What has happened has. burned our 
hearts.” 

Mr. Yughri was more pragmatic- He said it 
would ultimately prove impossible for him, his 
neighbors and their children to resist the lure of 
cotton and foe cash it puts in their pockets. 

By law, no child in Egypt under 14 is 
mitted to work, except in agriculture, wf 
those as young as 12 may take seasonal jobs as 
long as it does not interfere with their schooling. 
No one younger than 15 is supposed to miss 
school. 


But these rules are routinely ignored even by 


the Agriculture Ministry, which owns some 
percent of the cotton fields in Egypt, where the 
crop is still picked by hand, and almost always by 
children who work for low wages. 



WInWn>r>n1U1lBa 


T; 


be ministry has begun to experiment 
with mechanization, but officials there 
say that Egypt's cotton fields are so 
densely planted that such a transfor- 
mation may be slow in coming and that for foe 
foreseeable future hand-picking will remain 
most economical. 

Prized worldwide for its high quality, Egyp- 
tian cotton has extra-long fibers that provide a 
fine sheen and smoothness. Of the nearly 2 
trillion pounds produced in the country each 
year, most is woven into textiles, but the 3 IS 
million pounds (143 million kilograms) or so of 
raw cotton that are sent abroad each year make it 
the country's No. 1 agricultural export. 

Still, that has come at a price. A report by the 
Egyptian Center for Social Research found that 
1 .5 million children in Egypt under the age of 14 
work — nearly one child in 10. They make up 
more than 7 percent of foe total work force and 
nearly all of them work in agriculture. 

While a national literacy campaign has 
brought improvements, only about half of Egyp- 
tians are literate, with the rate among women and 
girls at 34 percent. 

Schools opened in Egypt on Saturday. But 
even on this morning, the cotton fields 32 ki- 
lometers northeast of Sol Hagar were packed 
with children who had arisen at dawn, just as 


Education is 
supposed to be 
compulsory in Egypt 
to the age of 15. But 
thousands of young 
children are working 
now in the fields, 
picking cotton for 
$1.50 a day. 


Stetfitorrsnejifi Seat 



Sul Hagar 


V-'V | 


EGYPT 



Since that day, townspeople 
said, many of them have kept 
their children at home, refusing 
to allow them to risk a repeat of a 


1001 


NYT 


they had before the accident, and been packed 
once again into flatbed government trucks to 
pick as fast as their fingers could. 

“My parents didn’t really want me to come 
back,” said Hannan Ali, 15. the oldest of six 
children. She said she had never gone to school 
in her life. “But we’re poor: my father is un- 
employed, and so there is really no choice.” 

Less than a week ago. Miss .Ali and nearly 
everyone else in Sal Hagar watched and wailed 
as ambulances carried back the bodies of those 
who died when foe high-sided livestock truck 
that was hauling them to foe fields overturned, 
plunged into a six-foot-deep canal and left many 
children trapped beneath foe murky water. 


attributes to a careless driver and 
a hard-hearted government. 

The driver, who had veered 
from a paved track in an attempt 
to find a short cut to the cotton 
fields, survived the crash bat sur- 
rendered to foe authorities. He 
remains in custody. 

The office of Prime Minister 
Kama! Ganzomi has provided 
each family whose children wane 
killed with a cash grant of about 
$900. But the Agriculture Ministry, whose em- 
ployees supervise the child laborers, has done 
almost no thin g, parents of foe victims have com- 
plained. 

.Asked whether foe ministry had considered 
changing its practices since the accident, an 
official there defended the system, saying it helps 
provide for families that might otherwise have 
virtually no income. 

Although they don’t like it, many of the res- 
idents of Sol Hagar agree. 

“We need the children to work for us, and the 
government needs the children to pick,” said 
Safi Amin Amr, head of foe town's social affairs 
office. “So it ail seems very natural.” 



3 Youths Held 



Of Former U.S. 



By Blaine Harden 

Washington PostSerria 


NEW YORK —The body of Nelson ” 
Gross, a wealthy New Jersey baaness- 
man and former Republican Party ' 
power broker credited with, delivering ' 
the state to Richard Nixon is the I9cl ‘ 
presidential election, has been found 
here near the Hudson Rivera week after- 
Mr. Gross’s disappearance. ; # 

The police arrested three Manhattan 
teenagers Wednesday, af least one of -4 
whom they said had directed offices to ■■ 

the body. Officers said foe body had stab 

wounds and was found in a woods be- 
tweensome railroad traddsj®dtfe river * 
just north of the George Washington 
Bridge. 

U.S. Attorney Faith Hochbog in jfe. 
wark. New Jersey, citing a canfifen- 
tiality law regarding juveniles, refosed 
to disclose the names or ages oftSiftree , 


su 


spects. 

The n 


motive in foe Kiting of ^ 
Gross, 65, who wasfihnedwitfadiawiM 
$20,000 from a bank in Edgcwatex, New 
Jersey, on the day of his disappearance, 
was robbery, New York City’s police’ 
commissioner, Howard Sa&, safe. He 

• j t a . I:. .... - -■ . 1 


said Mr. Gross had not beat 
for ransom, as police suspected 
Narcotics detectives bared in the 


Washington Heights neighborhood .of -0 


L jfm.LH* 


upper Manhattan, where police found 



Are You Prepared ? 

1997 & 1998 Will Generate 
Major Currency Moves. 

These moves will directly affect the value of 
your Portfolio. Prepare yourself to take 
advantage of these moves by calling today. 


SUPERIOR Se/ect/on of Managed Accounts 

OUTSTANDING Global Currency Analysis 
EXCEPTIONAL Execution Forex or Futures 
MINIMUMS $70,000 fo S5.000.000 I US0)~ 

COMMISSION 2-5 FX Spreads Futures SI 2S3E 


For My Complimentary Services Guide, Latest Research Reports, 
Opinions and Performance Records Call (24 hours) Toll-Free. 


Australia 1800125944 
Colombia 980120837 
France 0800902248 
Hong Kong 800967209 
Japan 0031126609 
Mexico 
Portugal 


Belgium 08001 5880 Brazil 0008119215513 

Denmark 80016132 Hnland 08001110064- 

Greece 0800119213013 German i- 0130829668 
Israd 1771000102 Italy ' 167875928 

Korea 0038110243 Lmaubmug 08004552 

9580087 B41 78 Seiherlands 060220657 X. Zealand 0300441880 
050112632 Singapore 8001202501 S. Africa 0800996337 


Spain 900931007 Strvden 
Thailand 001600119216613 USA 


020793158 Swittdund OBOOB97233 
8009945757 I'K 0800666632 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • DUSTER’S • DOCTORATE 
For Work, Life and Academe Experience 
Through Convenient Home Study 
(808) 597-1909 EXT. 23 
Fax: (310) 471-6456 
http:/, ■www.pwu-hi.edu 
Fax or send detaied resinw tor 
EREJU3/ALUATION 

Pacific Western University 

1210 Auahi Street DepL 23 
Honolulu. HI 968144922 



TRAVEL UPDATE 


Smog Hurting Asian Tourism 

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) — Tourists are starting to 
avoid some popular sites in Southeast .Asia because' of 
choking smog from forest fires in Borneo and Sumatra, as 
health hazards cut further ima business, and tourist traveL 

The State Department has cautioned U.S. citizens 
traveling to Indonesia, Singapore. Brunei and Malaysia 
that air pollution had reached unhealthy levels. 

A leading British-based travel agent. Thomas Cook, 
said it was refusing to take new reservations for va- 
cations in affected areas. Smog has also spread to the 


U nited .Airlines win begin electronic ticketing service 
on trans-Atlantic flights. The service will begin Oct 1 
and be available for" travel on nonstop flights between 
London and Chicago. Los Angeles, New York, Newark, 
San Francisco and Washington starting Nov. 1. (AFP) 

~ Hundreds of tracks, buses and passenger earswere 
stranded on Greece’s northern bonders Thursday as 
customs officials began a 48-hour strike. (Reuters) 


US-Toli Voice Line +714-376-B020 US-Toll Fax Line +714-376-S025 


WHEN WAS THE LAST 

TIME YOU WER 



Stop 


a f y fn s _ 

Lowest Int’f Phone Rates 


Miph TZcrt&s/ 


Compare All Our New Low Rates 
Any P" 


_ hone. Fax, or Cellular 
24hr_Persona/ bsv tali* Easy bAffariL u 

^To c !o=/? ave 

Simple & Easy 



KALL 



to 25% Commission^ 
Agents Welcome! 1 

Fax 407-676-1483 I 

E-mail: agonic Ckartmart. com 


PSICE - QUALITV - SERVICE 

Tel: 1-407-676-1717 

Fax: 1-407476-5289 

E-maii: sales@ka1lmart.coni 

1819 Rlvorview Dr. 

Melbourne, FL 32901 USA 
Visit our Web Site: 

www.kallmart.com 


For investment information 

Read TOE MONEY REPORT every Saturday in the IHT. 


DEATH NOTICE 


TRAIN A. 

NICHOLAS JOHN STEEL 


In San Francisco, September 20. 
1997 after a long-time struggle with 
a lifetime illness and a valiant fight 
to the end. of an accidental 
overdose. Son of Danielle Steel 
Traina and John A Traina, Jr. of San 
Francisco. Nicholas was 19 years 
old t.I May 19"8i. He graduated 
from Town School and the 
VToodsidc International School and 
for the past 2 1/2 years was the 
lead singer, lyricist and manager of 
the rock band, Link 80 which had 
gained considerable acclaim 
nationally and internationally, 
mostly among teenagers. His C D 's 
and video's were being distributed 
internationally, a month ago he 
started a new' band of his own, 
’Knowledge'. Nick Traina was ebe 
bright star of his family and will be 
grrady missed by all. He Is survived 
by his parents, his eight siblings: 
Samantha. Victoria, Vanessa. Maxs, 
Zara, Trevor and Todd Tains and 
Beatrix Seiden berg. 

Friends arc invited far Visitation, 
Tuesday, September 23rd from >8 
pm at HALSTED N. GRAY-CAREW 
& ENGLISH. 1123 Sutler St.. San 
Francisco and to ■attend the Funeral 
Service on Wednesday, September 
24th at 3:30 pm at Grace Cathedral 
Episcopal Church, 1 100 California 
St.. San Francisco. CA. Interment 
private. Flowers or charfty of your 
choice. 


Thai resort of Phuket. 


i Reuters i 


British Airways* French units signed an agreement 
with American .Airlines that will allow passengers ar- 
ming in France to connect directly with Air Liberte and 
TAT domestic flights. - (Bloomberg) 


Gross's silver BMW car Saturday 
on a street not for from where foe body 
was found, broke the case, according to 
Mr. Safir. 

Mr. Gross was last seen Sept. 17- 
driving hiscar away from the parking tot 
of the Binghamton Ferryboat, his float- - 
ing restaurant in Edgewator. Two other 1 
men were seen with him in foe car. . * 
He later was caught on camera m an 
Edgewater bank nonchalantly with- . 
drawing money as one of the men stood 

nearby leafing through a newspaper, ac- ~ 
cording to The Record of Hackensack. 

Law-enforcement officials gave no . 
details Thursday of bow the apparent 
robbery had been conducted or why 
three teenagers from a part of Wash- 
ington Heights often associated with ihe 
narcotics trade allegedly would be in- . 
volved in foe abduction, robbery and • 
murder of a multimillionaire from . < 
Saddle River, New Jersey. 

Mr. Gross, a farmer chairman of foe 
Republican Party in New Jersey, once . 

was considered foe party's most reliable 
fnnd-raiscrin that stale in both statewide 
and national election contests. ■ 

His political careo’ ended in fo^ace 
in 1974, when he was convicted efiZfegi/ 
money-raising activities in foe" 1969 
gubernatorial race in New Jersey. A fed- 
eral grand jury charged him with ob- 
struction of justice and procuring perjury. 
He was found guilty on ali the charges, 
fined $10,000 and served five months of 
a two-year team in the mid-1970s. 




Baja Hurricane 
Loses Strength 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast lor Saturday through Monday, as provided by AoaMeeaher. Asia 




The Associated Press 

SAN QUINTTN, Mexico 
— A hurricane that 
pummeled Baja, California, 
with high winds and heavy 
rain was downgraded Thurs- 
day to a tropical storm. 

The hurricane, designated 
Nora, was downgraded when 
its sustained winds dropped to 
70 miles per hour (112 kilo- 
meters per hour). Forecasters 
said a further weakening was 
expected as it moves up foe 
Gulf of California. 

The storm is expected to 
move toward foe north and 
northeast, according to the 
U.S. Hurricane Center in 
Miami. It is likely to move 
into northern Mexico and then 
into southwestern Arizona. 


Correction 


An article Thursday incor- 
rectly characterized the num- 
ber of unemployed in France, 
which is 3:1 1 million, or 12.5 
percent of the working pop- 
ulation. 



Hlqti 

LowtV 

Hifi* 

LiwW 


OF 

CIF 

OF 

CtF 

Algarm 

2S-73 

13«fi=h 

21/70 


AmseHam 

S.TI 

1i55s 

2it: 

1253 s 

Araoia 

1461 

1X5 

15.W 

V34 p= 

AUwrs 

70^6 

11/67 j 

7I~ 

14/57 , 

Barcctona 

Jl'TC 

li55?7 

21.7C 

ism:* 

Bdsiada 

13/64 


2H-S0 

9'48 pc 

Bonn 


1T55S 


11/52 a 

Bniunts 

23.73 

1IVS5S 

22-71 

1355 a 

Budapest 

13/66 

9/48 pc 

r.7u 

6 48 PC 

Copen tuoan 

1M6 

11/52 s 

17<2 

IG'90 9 

Casa Dal Sol 35.77 

19-06 c 

7475 

ir.Xto 

CH&fin 

Itl/M 

1 lf 2 pc 

1854 

12/53 pc 

Edinburgh 

17.67 

»48 pc 

17«2 

1050 pc 

Florence 

2771 

11.57 s 

2+75 

1 s 


21 /TO 

SU48 s 

20*88 

a 

Genova 

23/73 

11 S7s 

2373 

1 1/53 S 

Hefemta 

12.^3 

5/41 pc 

10/50 

4.33 C 


16*1 

»46 1 

taw 

71/52 pc 

Kim 

HI46 

e/40 Sh 

10/50 

3T7to 

LoaFUnaa 

7+75 

1 BZU 6 pc 




21/70 

ierei c 

10/GO 



31/71 

13/559 

22/71 

14/57 pc 

Madnd 

21/70 

iSSSto 

23/73 1355 c 

Malorea 

75/77 

1355 pc 

ZVTS 



23/73 

ism pc 

76^5 



fl/46 

6/43 r 

7/44 



1B/S4 

7/44 B 

19*0 



22/71 

16/ni » 

7*^6 

17*02 , 


iwoi 

7/4« id 

10B1 



22/71 

12«3B 

22/71 

2/53 a 


1H/64 

7/44 a 

19«0 

8/46 S 

ftejiqav* 

10/50 

4/3SS/1 

7/44 

4«8e 


16/Sfl 

6/43 pc 




23/73- 

I1/&J s 

24/75 

+■57* 

Si Pmwbaa 12/53 

8/43 Bfl 

11/57 



13/55 

7144 pc 



Stambopg 

asm 

a Isa a 

23/73 

sms 

Teton 

13/65 

6/43 pc 

11/52 

4/39 c 

TMv 

18/64 

7/44 r 

lfi/64 

«Sr 

Vena 

21/70 

2/53 * 

23/73 

4/57 o 

Vienna 

10/64 

W4»pc 

70«8 

050 s 


I7«C 

0/43 pc 

15«S 

5/41 c 

and) 

22/71 

1/57 * 

22.71 

i/52 : 



qcJc«*j E2a»<J 

North America Europe Asia 

Sunny and nice In the Pleasant weather is in Plenty of sunshine and 
Northeast Saturday and store tor most of Europe warm In Beijing Saturday 
Sunday. A front causing Saturday to Monday. Lon- to Monday. Seoul will be 
showers and tnunder- don. Para and Berfln wtll partly sunny and comfort- 
s terms with heavy down- have plenty of sunshine able. Breezy wflh a shower 
pours will move from the with warm afternoons, possible in Tokyo Satur- 
Ptains Saturday to the Mid- However, a powerful day, then parity sunny and 
west on Sunday and Into Atlantic storm over Iceland pleasant. Soaking rein Is in 
the Northeast Monday. Monday will cause gusty store for northern Japan 
Sunny, vary warm to hoi winds and showers in Saturday. Cambodia win 
and dry ovoi most of the Scotland. Portugal will have heavy downpours. 
West. have soaking rain. 



T oto. 


Hgfa 

Low nr 


OF 

OF 

AbMQ/ 

24/75 

12153 pc 

Bto 

sim 

1W8SB 

se* 

32/88 

28m 

24/75 r 
W48pe 


2S/84 

23>m to 

Colculbi 

som 

25/77 r 

ChtanflRM 

29/84 2Zm r 

CWon*o 

2W84 

24/75 c 

Hanoi 

asm 

21/70 r 

HoChiMWi 

Sim 34/75 1 

Hong Kong 

27/80 

2I/7D to 

Istontmd 

JIM 

13*84 » 


32 tea 


Kancbr 

33/BI 

2271 • 

KUmtvm 

32m 23/73 pc 

PC ton totoi 

31«8 23/73 pc 

Uanfoi 

31/88 23/73 pc 

Now LMV 

37/98 

asm s 

RuntPn* 

30*00 

24/75 r 

Pladur 

37/M 

24/75 1 

IMiggan 


Smxi 

21/70 

13«Sr 

Shanghai 

23173 

13156b 

5SJ” 

aim 22/71 pc 
28/79 21/70 r 

Tokyo 

24/75 2271 r 


Te 

Hgfa Lower 
OF OF 
04/76 HMD pc 
ao/ra imi 

31«8 24/75r 
74/75 1355 c 
asm 2atnpc 
2904 2475 r 

sons 21701 

ZM2 2475 r 

asm asm * 

SUn S4/75f 
29/77 same 
arm avro* 


re 


asm asms 
38» same 
arm same, 


sen 7 2i/7D* 

2KB4 24/75t 
31/88 247Br 


so/to asm r 


2008 BMP 0 
22/71 15/50 pc 
31/88 asm pc 
2B/79 tamp 

sons taw* 

27180 2271*11 


North America 


Today 

Mgfa LomW 
CIF OF 


Low W 
OF 


Middle East 


Abu Dhabi 
Mu 
Cako 
Damascus 


hhadh 


43109 24/7S s 44/111 26/79 s 
23/73 13186 pc 36/79 18/64 pc 
34S3 2068 9 *»7 13WS pc 

25/77 1 1/52 pc 30/88 l1.<Kpc 
24/75 13/55 s 2B/B2 13/65* 
38/100 1G*?1 , <1/106 17/82% 

41/100 S</75 , jw 06 2373 B 


Anchorage 

Altera 

Boston 

Otuago 

Daks 

Cwiw 

DeOM 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Leo Angeles 

Miami 


1 1/52 SMI pc 
28TIC 16*31 pc 
'9/66 liKSOpc 
22*71 12/53% 
32/89 1 7/82 s 
28/82 12/53 pc 
21/70 11/52* 
23/64 22/71 c 
31/68 16/61 s 
31/88 181*4 * 
31/88 24/75 I 


CIF 

11/S 4/39 pc 
28/82 17/62 r 
71/70 1263 pc 
28/70 IMS pc 
31/88 19/68 pc 
27*80 SMI ah 
74/79 12/53 pc 
31/98 23/73 pc 
31/88 15/86 pc 
36/97 19898 s 
32/89 26/79 1 


Utaespofe 


Today 

tflgli Loa/W 
CtF OF 
2079 1355a 
18/81 5/41 pc 

3289 H/79pc 
71/70 12/53 pc 
SIAM 23/73 1 


fflgb LewW 
CIF CIF 
27/90 12/531 
19158 11/52 pc 
33/31 26/79 pc 

asm ism ■ 

3*91 24/76 


To 
Vanoaurer 


32899 24/76 pc 38/100 24/73 pc 
25/79 14/57 a 2802 IflOOpc 
ism 10/30 sh IB/5* 12/53 ah 
17/62 7/44 a 22/71 13/55 pc 

KV56 8/46 ah 15*59 10*50 to 
22/71 13/59 a 24/75 14/S7 s 


Lcgand: s^utnv. (K-panly ctouoy. c-ctouiy. sn-snturere. HnmderaiDrms. r-ialn. stsnow BraHas, 
sn-snow. ns. W-Weaftar. Af mapa. toir ms ts and dtia pmvfclad by A nrrrWW har, Irw. O T887 


Africa 

Algin 

27*00 

16/61 pc 

29R4 18(565 

CwmTown 

2475 

ias>pc 

2am 11/Spc 

CnwiHanri, 

asm 

1«W1 C 

20ICB 14/67 pe 

(ton 

2079 

iiraa* 

2070 1X82 « 


29/84 

23/73 pc 

29/84 2373e 

IfeVob/ 

3000 

11/52 s 

30«6 1«52» 

Tunis 

2473 

15/59 c 

2679 15*1 pc 

Latin America 


16/01 


IBM 7H4 c 

Ctow 

31/88 21/70 pc 

30/86 22/71 pc 

Uma 

22/71 

17/02 sh 

20/BB 1W»8 

MaxiooCn 

24/73 

11/52 c 

asm iswspe 

RfodajBntoo 2577 

19m r 

22/71 awato 

"art',. 

tom 

8/46 r 

13/55 335 to 

Oceania 

Auddtand 



14*7 1309' 

Sytoay 

asm 

ia«pc 

2373 tMOt 


* A two-month trial subscription. 


a * m 




Save up to 60% 


| Yes, I would liku to start receiving the International Herald Tribune. . 

| □ My check is enclosed (payable to j/ie IHT] 

Charge my: □ Amex □ Diners □ VISA □ Access □ MasterCard □Eurocand 

[ for ex-US and Asian prides, credit earth will be charged in Fnandi Frants td current rales. 

| Coni Nor F«p Ontw 


Signature:. 


Fit business orders, indicate your VAT No: 


IHT VAT Number FR7473202I1 26 ) 







,* .Tt'W -V*.. 




*$** 'i.'v X: 

im 




Try a special, 

* low cost 

If -jp 2-month trial 

subscription 

to the 
international 
Herald Tribune to enjoy 
delivery to your home 
or office every morning 
AND save up to 60% 
off the newsstand price. 



2 MONTHS 

2 MONTHS 

DISCOUNT OFF 

! COUNTRY/ CURRENCY 

NEWSSTAND PRICE 

OFFER PRICE 

COVER PRICE 


Mr/Mrs/Ms Family Naims. 
First 1 Name" 


Job Title:. 


BELGIUM/LUXEMBOURG BEF 


DENMARK 

FINLAND 

FRANCE 

GERMANY 

GREAT BRITAIN 

HONG KONG 

ITALY 

JAPAN 

MALAYSIA 

NETHERLANDS 

NORWAY 

SINGAPORE 

SPAIN 

SWEDEN 

SWITZERLAND 

U5A 


1,456 
3,380 
7S0 
624 
520 
182 
47 
676 
145..600 
26,000 
132 
195 
832 
146 
1 1,700 
S3,? 
166 
78 


O50 
1.350 
3o0 
310 
210 
72 
22 
2.34 
58 000 , 
I2.15C 
101 
7£ 
2Q0 
82 
5.000 
350 
66 
A 2 


| J Mailing Address:. 

Qy/Gode: 

Counfry: 


*. a.: 


Home Tel No:. 


Business Tel Na_ 


E-Mcri I Address:. 


J 1 gaf tfu5 copy of ttie IHT ah □kiradc □ hate! □ airline Dclfier 
| □ I do nol wish to receive information lium other cgnduBy screened companies 

| Mai or fox ktt Intemctiional Herald ttbung 

EUROPE, MtoPLE EAST & AFRICA THE AMERICAS ASIA 

850 Third Are., New York 7/ 

N.Y. 10022-6275. USA 
, Fcrc+1 212 755 8785 
W: (toil (reel 1-300-882-2884 


2609-W 


181 Am. Charles da Gaulle 


92521 Neuilly Cedex, France 
Fqjc +33 1 414392 


50 Gloucester Rd 


10 


F»c +852 29221H 


r O : f OTH c lv COUNTRlF r , PLEASE CONTACT TOUR NEAREST IHT OPf’lCE 


■a: +33 1 4? 43 93 61 Tel: (tea free) 1-80CW82-2884 Td:' +852 2922 1171 

E-Maibsufcsefef.com Asks nAahk6Mdcxom | 

Offer valid far new subscribers only. HA5M J 


Imprimi par Offprint. 73 nut de tEvangUe. 7 50 /J? Paris. 











0r He r (5| 




j 


f' 1 '** Sea 

c,. 


1 - ‘^« 5: *K8TlD fl t 
_- ^-.h, or.jaajjp. 

: — ^.h * 

. ' ■. .Hi ‘ "O' " : *ena* 

V rcasai 

'“-•11; ta»j 

Cc * ^£p® 
-• -•'--'--'asofv 

-;/■■ J f^oUv 

■* r 

■ - •ylii; 

•• kc. nxbe, 

■-is.TJiaa'j 

- ■"■r ctiinnisr 
’ : N:a fc» ; 

••. rs-jr.’jMSLs. 

• ‘ .vs:»s. 

-. •_■«■. assise 

■ ■ ■. ■i: : 

t a i- 

Sr* Jsr» 

■■ ium •«: 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBITVE, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


r The Vagaries of Pendleton’s Law 


By Stephen Labaton 

Neu.- York Times Service 




iRX 
ai’i. , 

sS* 

Ge °*^ 

*s£?**&3Sl£« 

r- :au dBanS? 

r :;- r - Howard Safi? *1^ 

:ri:; jas P«ted2 

J'-‘ .^^Uie* 

• -"■ase.amn 


WASHINGTON — Waving a flyer 
from Republican leaders that levied 
‘'voluntary contributions’* from civil 
servants who owed their jobs to the 
party, an Ohio Democrat demanded in 
1882 that his fellow senators put an end 
to the practice. 

“Voluntary contribution!** mocked 
the lawmaker, George Pendleton, os he 
stood on the floor of the Senate urging 
passage of a law that has now come 
fro a t-aiid -center in the campaign fi- 
nance investigations of President Bill 
Clinton and Vice President A1 Gore. 

“Voluntary as the contribution the 
-.traveler makes to the pocket of the high- 
Twayraan when commanded to stop and 
hold up his hands: voluntary as the con- 
tribution which the man of the world 
makes to the harvest of the Great Reaper 
when he puts in his scythe." 

Persuaded by Pendleton's rhetoric. 
Congress acted a year later, passing the 
most significant civil service reform in 
.American history. 

Now, Pendleton's law has become a 
central issue as Attorney General Janet 
Reno considers whether to recommend 
that an independent counsel be appoin- 
ted to investigate the president and vice 
president for making fund-raising calls 
from their offices. 

The review by the Justice Department 
poses a classic issue of legislative in- 
terpretation*. 


Officials must decide whether to ap- 
ply broadly written legal passages that 
appear to prohibit any officials from 
trying to raise contributions from their 
offices, or to look more closely at the 
somewhat muddled congressional intent 
behind an act that was originally meant 
to protect low-level civil servants, not 
fat-cat donors. 

Congress has amended the provision 
many times over the last century, most 
recently in 19S0, when it rewrote the 
Federal Election Campaign Acl 

Justice Department guidelines make 
clear that the law can now be used when 
the person being solicited is a private 
citizen. Less clear is whether it applies 
when the fund-raisers are the president 
and vice president. Nor is it settled 
whether it applies when the person being 
solicited is not on federal property; in- 
deed, a 1907 opinion by Supreme Court 
Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes suggests 
that the place where the solicitation is 
received governs whether the law ap- 
plies. 

Ms. Reno is expected by Justice De- 
partment officials and aides to the vice 
president to elevate the review of Mr. 
Gore to a “preliminary inquiry" by next 
Friday, beginning a '90-day period in 
which she will consider whether to ask a 
special court to appoint an independent 
counsel. Ms. Reno has two more weeks 
to decide what to do about Mr. Clinton. 

While advisers to both the president 
and vice president say they intend to 
marshal the same legal arguments that 


the law does not prohibit what they did, 
the political imperatives of die two men 
are significantly different 

For Mr. Gore, the mere appointment 
of a counsel would be a sharp blow to his 
presidential aspirations. For Mr. Clinton, 
who has already faced an independent 
counsel for three years, the specter of 
another counsel, while troublesome, 
may have little effect on his remaining 
tenure in the White House. 

Two former White House counsels. 
Bernard Nussbaum and Abner Mikva. 
wrote in memos in 1993 and 1995 that 
federal employees are prohibited from 
fund-raising activities while on public 
property, including making fund-raising 
telephone calls that “emanate from the 
White House." But current and former 
administration officials said the memos 
applied to White House staff members, 
not to the president and vice president. 

At the heart of Ms. Reno's review is a 
provision of the Pendleton Civil Service 
Act that makes it unlawful “for any 
person to solicit or receive any con- 
tribution within the meaning of section 
301(8) of the Federal Election Cam- 
paign Act of J97I in any room or build- 
ing occupied in the discharge of official 
duties by any person mentioned in sec- 
tion 603.” 

Section 603 refers to “an officer or 
employee of the United States or any 
department or agency thereof, or a per- 
son receiving any salary or compen- 
sation for services from money derived 
from the Treasury.** 


'Bill for Campaign Curbs Gains Support 


By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — A long-stalled 
effort to rework the nation's campaign 
finance laws is gaining momentum on 
several fronts. 

Senate Democrats, who previously 
endorsed a broad campaign finan ce bill 


that included spending limits, said they 
would back a narrower version focused 
mainly on banning unregulated “soft 
money" in hopes it could be passed. 

In the House, the majority leader, 
Richard Armey, Republican of Texas, 
said he expected campaign finance le- 
gislation to be considered before law- 
makers quit for the year. 


Away From Politics 

• A federal judge in Philadelphia has 
sentenced. a former National Security 
Agency employee to 18 years in prison 
for selling secrets to the Soviet Union 30 
years ago. Robert Lipka pleaded guilty 

i in May to selling documents to Soviet 
agents. He was charged with photo- 
graphing the papers while working as a 
desk at the agency from 1965 through 
1967. (Reuters) 

• Investigators seeking the cause of the 
explosion that destroyed TWA Flight 


800 are checking to see whether an elec- 
trical charge could have ignited fuel 
fumes, the National Transportation 
Safety Board says. The theory being pur- 
sued is that an electrical charge jumped 
from a high-voltage wire to a low-voltage 
wire, which then carried the charge into a 
fuel probe in the nearly empty center fuel 
tank and ignited vapors. (AP) 

• The Dade County school district has 
become the nation’s largest to approve 
random drug tests for high school stu- 
dents whose parents agree. Testing in the 
345,000-student Florida district is ex- 
pected to be started in January. (AP) 


And a group of business leaders, in- 
cluding some major donors, followed 
the lead of the nation's largest union 
organization and called on Congress to 
ban soft money, the unlimited contri- 
butions from individuals, corporations 
and labor unions. 

Responding to the pared-down bill 
that Senate leaders have agreed to bring 
to the floor, probably next month, 
Democrats said in a letter to the minority 
leader, Thomas Daschle, Democrat of 
South Dakota — after expressing dis- 
appointment that such changes were 
deemed necessary: “We. nevertheless, 
remain determined to seize this oppor- 
tunity for reform." 

They called on Republicans to “de- 
liver a handful of votes" necessary to 
pass the legislation. 

The letter appeared aimed at clearing 
up questions whether all 45 Democrats 
would support the scaled-back version 
that Senators John McCain, Republican 
of Arizona, and Russell Feingold, 
Democrat of Wisconsin, have been 
pushing. 



[IhU Sampu.k'RrtBrri 

UP IN SMOKE — Brazilians ducking as a large cache of marijuana exploded while it was being destroyed. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Clinton Takes His Case to Labor 

PITTSBURGH — President Bill Clinton took his battle 
for expanded free trade to the most hostile audience he could 
find, defying hecklers at a union convention and imploring 
his estranged allies in organized labor not to punish Demo- 
cratic lawmakers for taking his side. 

In an unusually direct confrontation with a key political 
constituency, Mr. Clinton ventured Wednesday into the 
AFL-CIO's national convention in Pittsburgh to deliver an 
extended defense of his bid for more authority to negotiate 
treaties lowering international trade barriers. Labor has 
made its defeat a top priority. 

“I know we don’t see eye to eye on ‘fast track,' ” the 
president said, using the Washington shorthand for bis trade 
plan, “but I think I owe it to you to tell you exactly why Ifeel 
so passionately about it" 

At that point, a handful of union activists in the back of the 
convention hall interrupted with shouts of “No fast track! 
No fast track!" Mr. Clinton paused for a moment “I think 
I've earned the right to be heard on it," he said sharply. 

The response succeeded in silencing his critics for the rest 
of the half-hour address but did not win them over. 

While Mr. Clinton argued that he needed the power to 
craft new bade pacts to preserve U.S. economic dominance, 
labor leaders fear his initiative will accelerate the flight of 


jobs to foreign countries that do not enforce the same high 
level of wage and worker standards. ( WP) 

Highway Bill Parked in House 

WASHINGTON — In agreeing to put its highway spend- 
ing bill on hold for six months, the House Transportation 
and Infrastructure Committee ended the last big money 
fight of 1997 but set up the first big one of 1998. 

The committee’s action — extending the highway spend- 
ing law through March 3 1 while it works out its differences 
with House Republican leaders and the Senate over new six- 
year legislation — marked a victory for the speaker of the 
House, Newt Gingrich of Georgia, who defused a po- 
tentially embarrassing end-of-the- session floor fighL (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Dale Charles, president of local and state chapters of the 
Arkansas NAACP, com plainin g of segregation in little 
Rock to explain his boycott of the commemoration of the 
integration of the city’s school system by nine young blacks 
in 1957: “The Little Rock Nine should not have accepted 
the invitation to come into this farce. Very little has changed 
in this city." (AP) 




■ T - 


252 , 288,000 

reasons 


to bu 




i 




As appealing to the eye as this 
Lady Oyster Perpetual is, it's 
even more appealing and 
impressive on the inside. 
Consider, for example, the 
tiny balance wheel that is the 
heart of the Oyster, and oscillates 
more than a quarter of a billion . 
times a year. After being cleaned 



and tested, every balance wheel 
is individually equalized for 
weight, matched with its 
ideal hairspring by 
computer and individually 
calibrated. No wonder this Lady 
Oyster Perpetual can perform in 
the most trying conditions 
without missing a single beat. 


*>* [■. 




• L‘ 






ROLEX 

of Geneva 




®®^®^®®®*WW®****®*********CPES*PnBPBflBPi'pPi*e>MI‘3niS' 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 




ASIA/PACIFIC 


\ m ■ ' 



Burmese Strongman 
Steps Out of Shadows 

Ne Win, Last Seen in ’89, Visits Indonesia 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 


BANGKOK — Emerging in public 
from a long and enigmatic absence. 


entourage suggests that he is not a re- 
tired elder gentleman but still somebody 
of significance within the organization. 
I think this confirms the belief of many 
that the larger decisions that are being 


: 5™%T|eod^l£^ U Ne made probably include his consultation 
Win, is in Indonesia for a personal visit on them. . . , 

' at the invitation of President Suharto. . In Indonesia, UNe Win £ schednhs 



Bangkok Extends 
Debate on Leader 


Looking frail but smiling and ges- 

. turing, UNe Win, 86, arrived in Jakarta 

on Tuesday with an 11 -member en- 
tourage that included his eldest daugfr- 
; ^ Daw Sanda Win, and several mil- 
itary intelligence officers. 

On bis arrival, he was photographed 
in public for the first time since 1989, 

when he attended an Aimed Forces Day 

reception in Rangoon. 

That was one year after be stepped 
I down from 26 years of one-man lead- 
ership — a surprise move that led to a 

nationwide pro-democracy uprising that 

then was quelled by a military crack- 
down that took thousands of lives. 

Burma has been governed by a mil- 
itary junta since then, but many political 
anal ysts say they believe that U Ne Win, 
living in a guarded villa in Rangoon, has 
' remained a power behind the scenes. 
Josef Silverstein, a professor emer- 
itus ai Rutgers University and a spe- 
■ c ialis i on Burma, said the circumstances 
of his trip to Indonesia suggested that he 
was “still very much in communication 


includes dinner with Mr. Suharto and a 
visit to the grave of the Indonesian pres- 
ident’s wife, Tien, who died last year, 
Western diplomats said. He is to leave 
this week for Singapore for medical 
treatment before returning home. 

The Associated Press reported from 
Jakarta that U Ne Win looked pale and 
frail and made no comment when he 
arrived. An aide grasped his hand as he 
walked slowly across a hotel lobby, 
smiling and gesturing. 

The political situation is Burma re- 
mains tense, as a standoff continues 
between the government and its resolute 
pro-democracy opponents, led by Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi, winner of the 1991 
Nobel Peace Prize. At the same time, 
there are indications of dissension with- 
in the government involving hard-liners 
and a possibly more moderate faction. 

Nine years after seizing power, die 
militar y still has not neutralized its op- 





8 ANGKOK — Government ami 
opposition leaders agi^dThm^ 
dayto extend die no-confidence 
debate against Prime 
Chaovalit Yongchaiyut by one 
more day. through Friday. : . . 

The vote on whether to censure 
Mr. Chao valit is now to take place- 
Saturday, the same day a vote on a 
new constitution is sdieduled. At- . 
tacks on the prime minister, for. al- 
leged corruption and mismanage- . 
ment of the economy continued for 
a second dav Thursday, but the 
opposition did not present any 
blockbuster disclosures. 

Even if it made a strong case 
against Mr. Chaovalit, the censure 
motion probably would fail be- 
cause members of die gove mm etU 
coalition are expected to renam 
loyal and vote m his favor, f nr* 


Bangladesh Strike 


tsangiaaesn jitiki 
Leads to Fighting 


,TVi>|! 


Vietnam’s departing Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet, right, congra tulating his newly appointed successor, Phan 
Van Khai, on Thursday. Mr. Khai, a progressive southern economist, pledged quicker economic reforms. 


ponents despite its annulment of a par- 
liamentary election that was won by 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s party in 1990 
and despite its continuing arrests of her 


with the people at the top.” 

Mr. Silverstein added “The fact that 
' Suharto made a personal invitation and 
the fact that he comes with a military 


Hanoi Reformer Is New Prime Minister 


supporters since then. 
Her party, the Nati 


Fiji Is Readmitted 
To Commonwealth 


Reuters 

SUVA. Fiji — The South Pacific 
nation of Fiji said Thursday that it had 
been readmitted to the Commonwealth 
10 years after a racially based military 
coup saw its expulsion from the club of 
former British colonies. 

Fiji's readmission was announced by 
Prime Minister Sitiveni Rabuka, who 
led the 1987 coup but recendy oversaw 
the return to a constitution that does not 
discriminate against Fiji’s large ethnic 
Indian majority. 

Officials said Mr. Rabuka received a 
letter from Chief Eraeka Anyaoku, sec- 
retary-general of the Commonwealth, 
that confirmed Fiji’s readmission after 
other members of the 53-nation group, 
including India, agreed to the move. 


Her party, die National League for 
Democracy, has scheduled a congress at 
her house for this weekend, in defiance 
of the government. According to reports 
from Rangoon, more than 100 of her 
supporters have already gathered from 
around the country. The authorities have 
tried to prevent two previous congresses, 
detaining hundreds of party members. 

It was not clear whether the author- 
ities planned to allow this weekend’s 
meeting to proceed. 

The congress would mark the ninth 
anniversary of the founding of the Na- 
tional League for Democracy in 1988, 
the year U Ne Win stepped down from 
his official leadership position in the 
face of growing student protests. 

He seized power from a democrat- 
ically elected government in a coup in 
1962 and plunged the nation into iso- 
lation and poverty under a dictatorship 
he called “the Burmese way to so- 
cialism.” During his rule.' Burma, 
which had been one of the richest and 
most highly educated nations in South- 
east Asia, became one of the poorest and 
most backward. 


Reuters 

HANOI — Vietnam appointed a pro- 
gressive southern economist as its new 
prime minister Thursday. 

Phan Van Khai. 63. a Russian-trained 
technocrat and a leading figure behind 
Hanoi’s economic reforms, was elected 


unopposed as prime minis ter by 98 per- 
cent of the deputies in the National 
Assembly. 

Mr. Khai replaces Vo Van Kiet, 74, in 
a position that confers on him the task of 
steering a decade-old process of eco- 
nomic reform through Vietnam’s first 
serious downturn. Mr. Khai used his 
acceptance speech to pledge quicker 
reform in the face of tougher and more 
complicated challenges. 

“During the reform process the 
achievements that we have made have 
created great potential and opportunities 
for us,” he said. 

“However, development does not 
just move downstream.” he added. 

will ciir-lti Ka Kionpr Hiffirultipt 


“There will surely be bigger difficulties 
and challenges that need to be overcome. 
The demands of life that need to be met 
are higher and more complicated.” 


JERUSALEM 
THE CAPTIVE CITY 


" Britain made clear many years ago, as did the international community, that it 
considered Israel to he in military occupation of East Jerusalem and to have only de 
facto authority over West Jerusalem." 


Malcolm Rifkind, then Foreign Secretary, 23 May, 1996. 


One year ago Jerusalem rose up in protest after Israel opened a tunnel in the Old City, a 
reflection of Palestinian anger against Israeli policies. For 50 years, Israel has attempted to 
eliminate the Palestinian presence in Jerusalem, through expulsions, seizure of Arab land, 
settlement building, denial of family reunification and excessive taxation. These acts are in 
violation of the Fourth Geneva Conventions of 1949 which forbad physical and demographic 
changes to occupied territories. Such policies amount to nothing less than ethnic deansing. 


The families of 60,000 Palestinians expelled from West Jerusalem in 1948 have suffered a loss 
of property valued at billions of dollars. 


Since 1967, over 40,000 Palestinians have lost their residency rights in Jerusalem. These are 
people whose families have lived there for centuries. 


71% of East Jerusalem has been confiscated by the Israeli occupying authorities. Not one of 
the 38,500 housing units built on this land by the Israeli occupying authorities was for Arabs. 


Palestinians receive only 5% of munidpal funding, although Palestinians are forced to pay 
26% of munidpal taxes. 


Israel has dosed off Jerusalem from the West Bank. This denies the right for Palestinian 
Muslims and Christians to worship at religious sites and cuts off Palestinians from vital 
hospital and educational services in the dly. It causes immense damage to the Palestinian 
economy in the West Bank and Jerusalem. 


Jerusalem is a focal point for all three monotheistic religions inducting millions of Christians 
and Muslims worldwide. Yet Israeli excavations seriously undermine the foundations of both 
Islamic and Christian holy places in the rity, as reported by UNESCO. 


PEACE WILL ONLY BE ACHIEVED WITH A PALESTINIAN STATE AND A JUST 
SOLUTION TO THE ISSUE OF JERUSALEM. 


... there will be no peace with security for the Israelis if there is no peace with 

justice for the Palestinians. " 


Robin Cook, then Shadow Foreign Affairs Spokesman, 
Fringe Meeting, Labour Party Conference, September 1996. 


SPONSORED BY THE COUNCIL OF ARAB AMBASSADORS IN THE UK 

For farther information please contact: 


5 nS Iel “ ** London w6 OLT League of Arab States Mission, SZ Green Street; London W1Y 3RH 

TeL: 0181 563 0008 Fax: 0181 563 0058 TeLi 01716290732 Fax: 0171 493 7943 

email: lWZ3JM70c«np«ff MO® e-mail lasdjamu-uk.dei»oiLco nk 


His appointment followed dm on 
Wednesday of a Russian-trained geo- 
logist and party technocrat, Tran Due 
Luong, as Vietnam’s new president 
That leaves the third, and most senior, 
post in Hanoi’s ruling triumvirate — that 
of Communist Party secretary-general 
— up for grabs in the months ahead. 

There is still no date for the incum- 
bent Do Muoi, 80, to step down, but 
with no military figure currently hold- 


ing one of the top jobs, further changes 
are likely, politick! analysts say. 

One of Mr. Kbai’s first tasks will be 
to nominate deputy prime ministers and 
other ministerial posts for his new cab- 
inet- Although no names have been pub- 
lished, pro min ent among die candidates 
is a rising Politburo star and deputy 
interior minister. Nguyen Tan Dung, 
who is expected to be appointed deputy 
iTiie minister. 


DHAKA, Bangladesh — Mope 
than 100 people were injured ia - 
sporadic clashes between rival 
political activists during a daylong- 
opposition-led general strike that 
brought Bangladesh to a near stand? 
still Thursday, police and witnesses 

said. . ‘ 

More than 50 people were nun in 
the capital and 30 others in the 
southern industrial city of Khulna, 
the witnesses and police said. Other 
injuries were reported from the 
northern town of Jaipurhat. north- 
eastern Sylhet and Habiganj dis- 
tricts and the port city of Chit- 
tagong. 

Police said they had arrested •_ 
nearly 100 people. (Reuters) 




hvl 


n-m 


SMOG: Indonesia Declares a Disaster 


Taleban Orders 
Hospitals Closed 


Continued from Page 1 


deaths have been blamed on the pol- 
lution. Az Sarawak General Hospital, 
doctors were not the only ones wearing 
surgical masks in the emergency room. 
Patients and relatives also wore masks 
to help fend off the haze, which often 
penetrates indoors a persistent burning 
smell and causes eye irritation. 

But doctors in Kuching said that few- 
er people had been admitted for treat- 
ment Thursday; haze levels were low er 
than those earlier this week- 

Shops and restaurants remained open 
throughout the day, and the city's air- 
port. shut for most of the week, was 
reopened. 

Some 1,500 passengers, many of 
whom had been stranded for days, se- 
cured seats on flights leaving for pen- 
insular Malaysia and Singapore. 

“The air here is choking and making 
me sick,'* a German passenger, Tanja 
Ste inhart, told Agence France-Presse at 
the airport 

“We wasted a lot of money on food 
and hotel bills.” 

In addition to Sarawak, a popular 
tourist destination for its rain forests, the 
haze has spread to other tourist spots in 
the region, including the Thai resort 
island of Phuket and beaches in south- 


nparts of the Philippines. 
The United States, Britaii 


The United States, Britain, Germany 
and Denmark have issued travel ad- 
visories warning their citizens against 
traveling to countries affected by the 
haze. 

Officials in the region have lowered 
their estimates for tourist arrivals. 


which is bad news for Southeast Asia’s 
battered economies. 

Efforts to fight the source of the haze 
— fires burning out of control in In- 
donesia — continued Thursday. 

Jakarta announced that it had alloc- 
ated 3. 1 billion rupiah (SI million) to the 
cause and had deployed 8,437 fire fight- 
er throughout the country. 

They are joined by more than 1.000 
Malaysian fire fighters, who on 
Wednesday were sent to Sumatra, a 
center of forest fires. 

Indonesian officials have also an- 
nounced that Japan has offered to con- 
tribute 300 high-powered water shoot- 
ersto help extinguish the fires and that 
France has offered to send advisers. 

The World Wide Fund for Nature 
estimated Thursday that areas burned or 
afire in Indonesia totaled 500,000 to 
600,000 hectares (1-2 million to 1-5 
million acres). 

The end of the dry season has 
provided ideal conditions for fast- 
spreading forest fires. Farmers, too, set 
nre to large swaths of land as a quick 
way of clearing brush- 

Tbe haze in Sarawak stems mainly 
from fires in Kalimantan, Indonesian 
territory in the southern pan of Borneo 
island. 

The problems of both the haze and 
water shortages throughout the region 
should be relieved by monsoon rains, 
which are expected in mid-October. 

When ram fell in Kuching on 
Wednesday, however, residents were 
told to seek shelter because there was a 
risk that the rain could contain dan- 
gerous levels of pollutants. 


KABUL — Taleban authorities 
have ordered all private hospitals in 
Kabul to close as part of a plan to 
return Afghanistan's health sector 
to its pre -Communist form, . the 
Afghan Islamic movement's health 
minis ter said Thursday. 

The closure will lead to better 
service for Kabul residents. Mullah 
Mohammed Abbas Akhund said, 
because doctors have been more 
interested in treating private pa- 
tients than those in public hospit- 
als. {Renters*- 


Pakistan Criticizes 
New Delhi Over UN 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
Pakistan questioned India's right to 
seek a permanent seat at the UN 
Security Council, saying Thursday 
that New Delhi had faded to im- 
plement UN resolutions in the dis- 
puted Kashmir region. 

Rime Minister Inder Kumar 
Gujral said in a speech to the Gen- 
eral Assembly on Wednesday that 
New Delhi was prepared to accept a 
permanent seat in the planned ex- 
pansion of the Security Council. 

A Pakistan Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said New Delhi had not 
implemented long-standing Secu- 
rity Council resolutions, “which 
both India and Pakistan had ac- 
cepted" for a plebiscite in Jammu 
and Kashmir state aimed at resolv- 
ing die two countries’ 50-year-old 
dispute over Kashmir. (Reuters) 



RECRUITMENT 




You will find below a selection of employment offeis published in last Monday’s International Herald Tribune 
For a copy of last Monday's paper, please contact Sarah Wershof London: 44 171 420 0326 


MSXtVOW 


Vw'.iS - 




Classified Sales Executive 
(London based) 


International 
Herald Tribune London 


International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
Tel: 44.171.836.4802 


Fax: 44.171.420.0338 


Vice President 
bit Market Development 


Maximus 


36 Washington Street 
Suite 320 - Wellesley Hills , 

MA 02181 -USA 
Attn: Nick FigureUi, 
Director of Executive Recruitment 
Fax: 1.617,431.1319 


- tk 


'-■ V Mp, 
r-.v- 


Marketing Communications 
Manager 


The Body Shop 


Project Director for Hotel 
and Tourism Sector 
Development 


Lynn Beaumont 
The Foundry - 55 Neal Street 
London WC2H 9PJ 
Tel: 0171.240.5115 
Fax: 0171.240.5501 
E~mail:lnz@the-foundry.co.uk 


Lax- Development 


Business Development 
Manager 


Lux- Development 
Cloche d’Or - B.P. 2273 
L-1022 Luxembourg 
www.lux-developmenUu 






Apeco 


Apeco 

PO Box 2611, 
Datum an, Saudi Arabia 




Development Manager 


International 
Herald Tribune 
Paris 


Box 394 
1HT, 92521 
Neuilly cedex, France 


Ctsb Y-v-I/a) 








L\TERN AT10!YAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26. 1997 

~~ EUROPE 


PAGE 5 


>bt »»eo n /H 

- ' ' :; C 

■"itjSr.as 

. 

■-■■ r.SrSift* 

■ ■' ft 
_ V;<u, 'ft 

= l3 ^>h » ii 


■ - . .. Jla» a ■ n 

- ijftt 

• ■••:: »H 

. - • - rir -i p :W 


t.hderi 
U”"iiii<iis (Josh 


‘ V: : >!i v\ i villa 
V /#, iiii Ora 


Liberal Democrats Face Identity Crisis After Blair Victory 


«<* !Ul 


By Dan Balz 

I'lbfe n \;i&n /'l'U St 1 1 n r 

EASTBOURNE, England — Bri- 
tain's Liberal Democrats came to this 
seaside resort this week to celebrate their 
electoral victories of last spring and plot 
their future, but it was the long shadow 
of Prune Minister Tony Blair that dom- 
inated the agenda. 

The party's annual conference has 
featured the debates, disputes and panels 
common to most political gatherings, 
but there is really only one issue on the 
program: Will Mr. Blair and his ■’new” 
Labour Party swallow up the Liberal 
Democrats in an alliance of the left, or 
can the small third parry successfully 
carry off what its leader, Paddy Ash- 
down. calls ''constructive opposition" 
and expand significantly? 

In Britain's general election nearly 
five months ago. the Liberal Democrats 
had their biggest success in more than 
half a century, nearly doubling their rep- 
resentation in the House of Commons to 
46 members — a small number in com- 
parison with the 4 19 Labour members but 
significant in the history of the party. 

"Despite winning a majority of 179 
seats, Mr. Blair immediately reached our 


Is Britain’s Third Party an Opponent or an Ally of ‘New 5 Labour? 


to Mr. Ashdown, and the rwo men have 
formed a strong personal bond. The prime 
minister also took the unusual step of 
inviting Mr. Ashdown and other Liberal 
Democrats to participate in a cabinet com- 
minee that will draft recommen datio ns on 
political reforms that are at the heart of the 
smaller parly’s historical agenda. 

Everything was going smoothly for 
Mr. Ashdown until a few weeks ago. 
when, in an interview with the weekly 
New* Statesman magazine, he mused 
aloud that entering into a coalition with 
Labour at some point was “a possi- 
bility." Ever since then, the party has 
been going through an identity crisis. 

Mr. Ashdown's comments might 
make sense at some point well into the 
future. But he caught his membership by 
surprise. 

"It made people suspicious that there 
was a subplot to his relationship with 
Blair they know nothing about," Mal- 
colm Bruce, a Liberal Democratic mem- 
ber of Parliament, said. 

It was clear from the pre-conference 
shudders and the reactions here that 
many Liberal Democrats are more com- 


fortable being in opposition to Labour 
than cooperating with Labour. But Mr. 
Ashdown, in his conference keynote 
speech, suggested that the price of 
achieving long-sought goals that would 
expand the party in Parliament was co- 
operation and compromise with Labour. 
He urged his members to lake the risks 
necessary’ to gel there. 

■‘Because this is real politics, there 
will be real prizes to be won," he said. 
"The more we agree, the greater the 
chance that reform will succeed; and the 
more wc disagree, the greater the like- 
lihood it will fail." 

The Liberal Democrats’ ultimate goal 
is to replace the current election system 
in Britain with one based on propor- 
tional representation, in the belief that, 
under almost any system of that type, the 
party would elect more members of Par- 
liament than it docs now. Under such a 
system, they argue, they could replace 
the Conservatives as the second- largest 
party in the country. 

Mr. Blair already has endorsed such a 
system for elections to the new Scottish 
Parliament and Welsh assemble and has 


expressed willingness to consider ir for 
parliamentary elections. 

To Mr. Ashdown and his allies, that 
means working with Labour to enact the 
reforms. ‘*We can’t grow to our po- 
tential if there is no electoral reform,” 
Simon Hughes, a Liberal Democratic 
legislator, said, "and there will be no 
electoral reform without an ally. And 
Labour is the only potential ally.” 

The party is an amalgam ot' the old 
Liberal Party and the Social Democratic 
Party that flourished briefly in the 1980s 
as a reaction to the leftward march at that 
time of the Labour Party. Once, the 
Liberal Democrats described them- 
selves as a party equidistant between 
Labour and the Conservatives. Today, 
they have been drawn into Labour’s 
orbit in large part because Mr. Blair has 
moved his party to the right. 

Essentially, in fact, the Liberal Demo- 
crats now find themselves occupying the 
progressive end of the spectrum. "The 
party by and large is comfortable with 
that," Mr. Hughes said. "More com- 
fortable than die leader, who doesn’t 
want us to be seen as left-wing." 


Mr. Hughes -said the Liberal Demo- 
crats had become die principal defender 
of public services among Britain's polit- 
ical parties. Throughout the conference 
this week. Liberal Democratic officials 
have repeatedly attacked the govern- 
ment, accusing Labour of breaking its 
campaign promises to spend significant- 
ly more money on education and the 
National Health Service. 

"I've got news for *N’ew Labour.' ” 
Mr. Ashdown said. "We will continue 
to do it day after day after day." It was 
the biggest applause' line of his speech. 

The trashing of the Labour govern- 
ment from the Liberal Democrats’ po- 
dium this week drew a rebuke from Peter 
Mandeison. minister without portfolio 
in the Blair government and one of the 
prime minister's chief strategists. Mr. 
Ashdown and his party. Mr. Mandeison 
said, are playing “a dangerous game” 
that quickly could devolve into "op- 
positionitis" and wreck the relationship 
forged between the two parties. 

But some in the party say the greater 
danger may lie in the opposite direction: 
If Liberal Democrat cooperation with 
Labour persuades voters there is no real 
difference between the two parties, they 
may decide simply to vote Labour. 


London Expects Accord 
On Ulster by Next May 

« Full-Scale Negotiations to Start Monday 


Reuters 

BELFAST — The British prime min- 
ister, Tony Blair, said Thursday that he 
was determined to achieve an agreement 
on Northern Ireland's future by next 
May, now that the long-time foes have 
agreed to full-scale talks starting Mon- 
day. 

Hopes for a settlement were given a 
dramatic boost late Wednesday when 
the bitter rivals ended 16 months of 
squabbling that had been hampering a 
move toward full negotiations. 

The British and Irish governments 
bailed the breakthrough, achieved in 
seven hours of tense talks, as an un- 
precedented opportunity to seek peace 
after decades of guerrilla warfare in the 
British-niled province. 

Prime Minister Blair said. "I am de- 
lighted at the agreement in Belfast to 
launch formally the substantive nego- 
tiations on a lasting political settlement 
for Northern Ireland and set up the in- 
dependent commission on decommis- 
sioning.” 

Decommissioning is the term used for 
the surrender of weapons. 

“I now want rapid progress in the 
political discussions on the way for- 
ward," Mr. Blair added. "These will no 
doubt be tough but I remain determined 
to reach agreement by next May. That is 
what the people of Northern Ireland 
want.” 

The deal was backed by the powerful 
Ulster Unionist Party and Sinn Fein, the 
political wing of the Irish Republican 
Army's guerrillas. 

But the deal infuriated a hard-line 
Protestant leader, Ian Paisley, head of 
the small Democratic Unionist ’Party, 
who is boycotting the talks because he 
fears an end to British rule. 

"I resent a British prime minister 
saying that he’ll see that be has this 


settled in May,” Mr. Paisley said. 
"Who does he think he is? How does he 
know what the people of Northern Ire- 
land are going to vote about?* 1 

The Irish justice minister, John 
O’Donoughue, said after the long- 
awaited breakthrough: “Tonight, a ray 
of sunshine shines across the entire is- 
land of Ireland, which will lift the hearts 
of all its inhabitants.” 

The decision means that the process 
of preliminary’ talks, struggling for sur- 
vival since June 1996, will move Mon- 
day into full-scale negotiations on how 
the province should be governed. 

Sum Fein denied that the break- 
through meant it was moving toward 
acceptance of British rule over Northern 
Ireland. 

The chief Sinn Fein negotiator, Mar- 
tin McGuinness. dismissed an assertion 
by the Ulster Unionist Party leader, Dav- - 
id Trimble, that Sinn Fein had taken 
"the first faltering steps” toward ac- 
cepting a partition settlement that fixed 
British rule over Northern Ireland in 
1921. 

Mr. McGuinness countered Thursday 
that his supporters backed Sinn Fein’s 
demand for an end to British jurisdiction 
and for the creation of a united Ireland. 

“We will go to the negotiating table 
on that basis," Mr. McGuinness said. 
Referring to Mr. Trimble, he added in 
remarks to BBC, “He knows now that 
when we sit down at the negotiating 
table, there will have to be fundamental 
political and constitutional change on 
tiiis island.” 

Politicians said an all-party * 'business 
committee” would convene Monday to 
map a program for wide-ranging dis- 
cussions on easing communal tension. 

In July, the Irish Republican Army 
announced a cease-fire in its 28 years of 
violent struggle to end British rule. 



Jnhmy Eggiu/Accace Raucc-Pmc 

SIOUX WARRIOR GOING HOME — The body of Long Wolf, a Lakota chief who fought id the Battle of 
Little Big Horn, beginning the trip from London back to his ancestral burial grounds at Wounded Knee 
in South Dakota on Thursday. He died in 1892 while traveling with Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show. 


Scandal Rocks 
A Game Show 
On French TV 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Just before Henri-Desire 
Landru, a convicted murderer, was sent 
to the guillotine at the Versailles prison 
in 1922, what was his final request: 1 ) a 
haircut, 2) a toothpick or 3) a foot bath? 

A ream on the popular French game 
show "Intervilles ’ correctly answered 
"a foot bath,” but had its players been 
prompted? Grainy photos of the show's 
referee. Olivier Chi abodo, holding three 
fingers on his thigh appear to indicate 
the answer is yes. 

The scandal over Mr. Chiabodo’s ap- 
parent trickery has shaken France's 
leading television network and set off a 
storm of lawsuits. The question about 
the murderer's final request was asked 
July 2, when contestants from the town 
of Puy-du-Fou beat a team from An- 
cenis, then went on to win the cham- 
pionship this month — for the second 
year in a row. 

The furor is reminiscent of the scan- 
dal that hit the U.S. television game 
show "21" in the 1950s. Charles Van 
Doren. a Columbia University instruct- 
or from a distinguished academic fam- 
ily. fell from grace after admitting that 
he bad been given answers to questions 
in advance. 

The final competition of "In- 
tervilles," in which teams run grueling 
obstacle courses, dodge cows and per- 
form other stunts, drew 7 million view- 
ers to the TFl network. Then last week, 
a muckraking newspaper. Le Canard 
Enchaine, reported that Mr. Chiabodo 
had prompted the Puy-du-Fou t eam . 

On Friday, the newspaper Le Parisien 
ran grainy front-page photos showing 
what it said was Mr. Chiabodo signaling 
the Puy-du-Fou team in July and during 
another contest last year. 

Newspapers have suggested that Mr. 
Chiabodo favored Puy-du-Fou because 
of his close ties to Philippe de Villi ers, 
political chief of the Vendee region that 
includes the town. TFl fired Mr. Chi- 
abodo and filed a lawsuit against him. 
The town of Puy-du-Fou sued Le Canard 
Enchaine for defamation, and Pont Saint 
Esprit, the town that lost in the finals last 
year, also sued Mr. Chiabodo. 

The mayor of Pont Saint Esprit, Gil- 
bert Baumet, accused the referee of sab- 
otaging his town's contestants. “The 
captain of our team told me during the 
contest that Chiabodo kept trying to put 
us off balance, saying thing s like: ‘You 
guys are lousy,’ " Mr. Baumet told the 
newspaper Liberation. 

Mr. Chiabodo has denied the accu- 
sations. 


Hungary and Slovakia Both Broke Law on Danube 


The Associated Press 

THE HAGUE — Hungary and Slov- 
akia both broke international law in 
their feud over a Cold War deal to build 
a hydroelectric station, the World Court 
ruled Thursday in a case that bitterly 
divided the East European neighbors. 

The two countries turned to the court 
in 1993 to settle their quarrel over a dam 
on the Danube River. 

In its ruling, the court — the United 
Nations' highest judicial body — said 
that Hungary's environmental concerns 
were serious but not enough to justify 
pulling oat of the deal and violating 


international law. But Slovakia, it con- 
tinued, broke international law when it 
went ahead and dammed the Danube, 
eastern Europe's largest waterway, any- 
way. 

The presiding judge, Stephen 
Schwebbel of the United States, reading 
from the ruling, said that both countries 
must now operate the Gabcikovo Dam 
jointly and take environmental issues 
into account when doing so. 

“Both parties committed internation- 
ally wrongful acts," he said. 

Hungary and Slovakia have each de- 
manded financial reparations from the 


other, a situation that could be easily 
settled if both agree to drop their claims, 
the court said. 

Hungary, however, must help pay 
pan of the cost of building and operating 
the dam, the court continued. 

“For Slovakia, this is a success.” 
said Peter Tomka, who headed the Slov- 
ak delegation. "Both countries will be 
able to resume operation” of the dam. 

“I am confident agreement can be 
reached.” he added. 

Gyorgy Szenasi, the head of the Hun- 
garian delegation, called the ruling 
“positive for Hungary” and said that it 


could help the two countries settle their 
other differences. 

Hungary said it abandoned plans to 
dam the Danube after it learned that the 
project would damage the river’s flood 
plain. Slovakia countered thai the en- 
vironmental argument masked Hun- 
gary’s unilateral decision to drop the 
multuniUion-dollar project 

The dam was commissioned in a 
1977 treaty between Hungary and 
Czechoslovakia, both then allies in the 
Soviet bloc. 

Slovakia split from the Czech Re- 
public in January 1993. 


Russia Defense Official Denies 
Existence of ‘Suitcase 9 Bombs 

MOSCOW — A top Russian Defense Ministry official 
denied Thursday the existence of suitcase-sized nuclear 
bombs, saying such devices would be technically possible 
but too costly and inefficient to produce. 

The statement by Lieutenant General Igor Volynkin 
followed claims by former government officials that 
Moscow possesses die miniature bombs and has lost track 
of some of them. "We felly control the production, 
main tenance and storage of nuclear weapons in Russia,” 
said the general, who heads the ministry’s department in 
charge of nuclear security. 

Warnings about suitcase-sized bombs were first voiced 
earlier this month by General Alexander Lebed, Russia 's 
former security chief. He asserted that of 1 32 such bombs, 
84 were missing. Both the White House and the Kremlin 
have discounted his claims. (API 

Yeltsin Pays Tribute to Chirac 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin paid unusual 
tribute to France on Thursday for helping gain Moscow a 
voice in NATO and a seat with the Group of Seven, 
awarding President Jacques Chirac Russia’s top state 
honor. 

Mr. Yeltsin presented Mr. Chirac with the Order for 
Service to die Fatherland after his arrival at the Kremlin. 
No agreements are expected to be signed during Mr. 
Chirac.'*; two days of meetings with top Russian officials. 
French officials said his visit was intended as a show of 
support to Mr. Yeltsin as Russia tries to secure a more 
prominent place in the international community. (AP ) 

Dutch Addicts to Get Free Drugs 

AMSTERDAM — Dutch lawmakers have approved a 
p lan to supply long-term addicts with free heroin, of- 
ficials said Thursday. 

The. three-month experiment, which will involve 50 
addi cts, aims to improve their health and curb drug- 
related crimes. It will begin in March. (API 

For the Record 

The European Commission said foodstuffs produced 
from geneticaUy modified soybeans or maize would have 
to be labeled as such from Nov. 1. (Reuters) 

A 45-year-old Frenchman who threw himself out of 
an 1 1 ib-floor window survived after he landed on a sheet- 
metal roof below, police in Nantes. France, said. (AFP) 


Croatia Dismisses Warning on War Criminals 


Reuters 

ZAGREB. Croatia — The Croatian 
authorities shrugged off Thursday a U.S. 
wanting that the West would act soon to 
arrest Bosnian Croat war crimes sus- 
pects unless Zagreb extradited them to 
international war crimes tribunal in The 
Hague. 

NATO-led peacekeepers in Bosnia 
recently moved to seize some indicted 
Bosnian Serb war criminals and "we're 
going to get some Croats, too,” a U.S. 
official said Wednesday. He added that 
action was expected in the "next couple 
of weeks.” 

Dismissing the threat, a Croatian For- 
eign Ministry official said: "There is 
notiling new in this threat. They have 
been at it constantly.” 

The International Criminal Tribunal 
for former Yugoslavia, set up in May 
1993 in The Hague, has publicly in- 
dicted 78 suspects — 57 Serbs, 18 
Croats and 3 Muslims. It has so far 


sentenced one Serb and one Croatian, a 
member of the Bosnian Serb Army, to 
prison terras. 

“We do have some objections to the 
work of the tribunal, but we have also 
made it very clear that we would co- 
operate." the Foreign Ministry official 
said, speaking on condition of anonym- 
ity. 

"In fact, we are the only ones co- 
operating and the world keeps putting 
pressure on us,” the official added. 

Croatia bas extradited Zlatko 
AJeksovski. a Bosnian Croatian, to the 
tribunal and is holding another indicted 
suspect — a general, Tihomir Blaskic. 
who surrendered last year. 

Seven more Bosnian Croats offered to 
surrender this year on the condition that 
they are guaranteed a fair and quick trial. 
But their surrender would only underline 
the tribunal’s lack of real power and its 
incorrect approach, the Foreign Ministry 
official said. 


“If all seven go to The Hague, with 
Blaskic and Aleksovski there will be 
nine Croats there. And a question arises: 
What is the point of the tribunal if it 
holds only nine Croats and no one 
else?” 

U.S. officials have been pressing 
Croatia, which exerts considerable in- 
fluence over pans of Bosnia, to turn over 
Bosnian Croat suspects to the tribunal. 

Citing noncompliance by Croatia, 
Washington has blocked international 
loans to tiie couuoy and insisted that it 
will be isolated diplomatically and eco- 
nomically until it complies. 

Last week, Washington urged the 
government to extradite two suspects, 
Dario Kordic and Ivica Rajic, or free 
further economic retaliation. 

The warning drew an angry response 
from Prime Minister Zlatko Matesa, 
who said that Croatia would not "trade 
anyone am- shall we extradite our people 
for loans. " 


Bosnian Serb President Set 
To ‘Let the People Decide’ 

The Associated Press 

BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina — Biljana Plavsic, 
tire Bosnian Serb president, said Thursday that she was ready 
to face her bitter rival, Radovan Karadzic, a war-crimes 
suspect, in elections this fall designed to test Serb loyalties. 

"I am not afraid of the elections,” Mrs. Plavsic said here 
upon her return from Belgrade. "Let it be the way the people 

decide.” J 

On Wednesday, Mrs. Plavsic agreed with Momcuo Krajis- 
nik. the hard-line Serb member of the joint Bosnian pres- 
idency and a senior aide to Mr. Karadzic, to hold elections and 
thus resolve the bitter Serb power struggle that has threatened 
Bosnia’s fragile peace. ... 

Parliamentary elections will be held Nov. 15, and elections 
for Mrs. Plavsic’s and Mr. Krajisnik's offices will take place 
Dec 7 

If Mrs. Plavsic loses, she will most likely will be doomed 
politically and face possible danger, while the U.S.-sponsored 
peace deal for Bosnia will be in jeopardy. Unlike Mr. Karad- 
zic, Mrs. Plavsic has pledged io honor the Dayton accords and 
cooperate with Bosnia’s Muslims and Croats. 

The Bosnian Serb president clearly was .taking a nsk in 
agreeing to the elections, but she soil praised them as the best 
wayom of the deadlock. "The elections will show the nght 
way and clear the situation,” she said. ‘ We shouldn t run 
away from the elections.” 


fVeefotut 

l i OPTIONS' 


Barcelona from PTS 12J500 per night. 

Enjoy a little luxury this wcehcad with Heart cf the City 
WhJsincf Options tom Inter-Continent*!, oivr tyO hotel# 
at the heart of 50 of Europe** most beautiful cities we’ll ensure 
you have {he perfect escape. For information or reservation# 

contact u«t from the UK on 0345 581444, from France 
on 0800 908555, or from Germany on 01 30 853 C| 55. 


INT ER-CONTINE NTAL 

HOTELS AND RESORTS 
E*.,. ■ n. fcul ■ Aim ■ hu r-.k ■ Tk t~n.« 


Rile* jwr n«>m prr LumirJ nwlabilin V*W unit. 






0 -3 0 * OS 


Tit 


IS 

I In 


PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 



INTERNATIONAL 


Little Rock 40 Years Later: Clinton Opens the School Door 


The Associated Press 

LUTLE ROCK, Arkansas — Forty 
years ago, Dine black students entered 
the all-white Central High School under 
armed escort 

On Thursday, it was President Bill 
Clinton holding the school door open for 
those civil rights pioneers as he asked 
Americans once again to push back the 
barriers of racism. 

From the steps of the imposing brick 
school, Mr. Clinton and the * ‘Little Rock 
Nine” who integrated the school staged 
a symbolic break with the past, even as 
they said with regret that true racial 
harmony remained elusive. 

“ 4 Segregation is no longer the law, but 
too often separation is still the rule,” the 
president said. "We have to keep work- 
ing on it — not just with our voices but 
with our laws.” 

Under a nearly cloudless sky, Mr. 
Clinton led the nine former students up 
Central’s grand stone steps and held 
open for them the heavy glass-paneled 


doors. He shook hands and gave each 

one a pat . . 

"Forty years ago today they climbed 
these steps, passed through this door and 
moved our nation; and for t hat , we must 
all rhnnlc them,” he said to a roar of 
applause. 

In 1957, while Mr. Clinton, then 11 
years old, was attending segregated 
schools 50 miles (80 kilometers) away in 
Hot Springs, Governor Orval Faubus 
ordered the Arkansas National Guard to 
prevent the black students from en- 
rolling at Central 

A showdown ensued. President 
Dwight Eisenhower sent in 1 ,000 mem- 
bers of the 101st Airborne Division to 
escort the students into the school on 
Sept 25. 

The teenagers were jeered, threatened 
and spat upon in school hallways. 

“What happened here 40 years ago 
was simply wrong,” Governor Mike 
Huckabee, whose daughter is a Central 
student, said Tbursday. 


4 ‘It was evil, and we renounce it. 
Never, never, never, never again.” 

{ Hilar y Ro dham Clinton recalled an 
early lesson in courage as she watched 
the crisis on television "from my suburb 
outside of Chicago where I went to 
schools that were all white, where I lived 
with only white people. ” 

The president, too, regretted that he 
was educated in segregated schools until 
he went to college at Georgetown Uni- 
versity in Washington. 

But he said he was impressed as a 
young boy by his grandfather, who 
owned a grocery store that served both 
black and white customers. 

"I learned America’s most profound 
lessons,” the president said. “We really 
areall equal. We really do have the right 
to live in dignity.” 

The Cental High crisis, be said, left 
him with a “driving passion” to help 
improve race relations. 

From the back of the crowd, 10 people 
holding signs tried to interrupt the pres- 


ident's speech, but Mr. Clinton just 
talked louder. One of the signs read, 
"Justice for All." 

White House aides said the disruption 
was aimed not at Mr. Clinton but was a 
protest against problems over handi- 
capped access. 

Attorney General Janet Reno and 
Thurgood Marshall Jr., son of the late 
Supreme Court justice and its first black, 
were among the 2,000 who filled the 
school's front lawn. 

Fatima McKindra, the first black fe- 
male to be elected Central’s student 
council president, introduced President 
Clinton. 

Too many minority children are 
threatened by drugs and too many 
minority groups live separate lives in 
separate communities, Mr. Clinton 
said. 

"Too many Americans of all races 
have actually begun to give up on the 
idea of integration and the search for 
common ground.” he said. 


IMMIGRANTS: 

A Wrenching Choice 

Continued from Page 1 




..DP! 


fW" 


Ernest Green, one of the teenagers 
who integrated Central and became its 
first black graduate, saluted the parents 
who stood behind him them- 

“They were able to see the difference 
between the American dream and the 

mmfbrt to derail card, eliminates a three-year-oid . 

sffiSKjpsa"* 


own choices,” she said. '‘But these are 
tough choices.” • ••-• 

The first, change, which directly J- * 
fects thousands of immigrants li ke Ms . 
Smiba who were close in line for getting . 


fledgling national dialogue on race re- 
lations. 

Privately, some top aides have com- 

J iornpd that the initiative launched in 
line has, up to now, lacked clear focus 
and direction. 

“He should set a tone, provide di- 
rection, influence, as far as possible,' 
said Terrence Robots, one of those 
long-ago students who braved white 

hostility. , 

“To the degree that he does not do 
that , he will. have failed, in my opin- 
ion.” 


MARKETS: Theory Vaults Into Reality 


Continued from Page 1 


better supervision, greater transparency 
and more cautious lending — will take 
root in the weeks and months to come. 

Yet, added to this exercise in trying to 
rectify past errors and lay the ground- 
work for closer financial cooperation is a 
new set of economically driven political 
dynamics that many experts believe will 


their concerns about the idea of setting up 
a new emergency rescue fund while, at 
the same time, they had to urge their 
Asian colleagues to reform and 
strengthen their fragile banking systems. 

Japan, meanwhile, which is both a big 
lender and exporter to East Asia, tried to 
voice support for the rescue fund, but 
officials from Tokyo appeared deliber- 
ately vague, perhaps because the proposal 


shape the global debate for years to was the subject of a contentious discus- 
come. sion during last weekend s_G-7 meeting. 

For example, China, having just 
signaled far-reaching refonns of state 


industry and banking that if successful 
will consolidate its position as the fastest- 
growing major economy over the next 
decade, asserted itself as the champion of 
developing countries and announced the 
dawning of a new and "multipolar 
world" that would resist “bullying” by 
more developed countries. 

Japan, its economic recovery strategy 
still in doubt, came under fire from the 
United Slates for not doing enough to 
bring down its soaring trade surplus. But 
Tokyo was also forced to tread warily 
between the need to assuage Washing- 
ton and assume its responsibilities as the 
world's second most powerful economy, 
and the need to curry favor with other 
Asian nations that are among its most 
important export markets. 

The United States, meanwhile, was 
preaching the gospel of opening finan- 
cial markets while nudging Thailand and 
its regional neighbors toward painful, 
and unpopular, reform and austerity pro- 

E ams — all to solve the crisis that some 
ist Asians associate explicitly with 
market liberalization. 

At the same time, the United States 
also had to work alongside the IMF and 
World Bank to restore investor con- 
fidence and contain the regional crisis, 
with the U.S. Treasury secretary. Robert 
Rubin, cast in the difficult role as the 
understanding partner of several of his 
Asian counterparts. 

This meant that at a meeting Tuesday 
with the finance ministers of Indonesia, 
Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, 
Thailand. Vietnam and Brunei, Mr. Ru- 
bin and the chairman of the Federal Re- 
serve Board, Alan Greenspan, said they 
had confidence in East Asia's recovery 
potential- But they also had to express 


The tendency to blame financial spec- 
ulators for the region ’s currency crisis — 
and to seek a way of being indemnified 
from the adverse effects of globalization 
— reached its zenith Saturday, when Mr. 
Mahathir proclaimed currency trading 
“unnecessary, unproductive and immor- 
al” and said “ii should be made illegal. 

A day later, Mr. Soros, smarting from 
being railed "a moron” by the Malay- 
sian leader, replied that Mr. Mahathir 
was * ‘a menace to his own country” who 
should not be taken seriously. 

The World Bank- IMF meetings were 
not only overshadowed by the Mahathir- 
Soros exchange, but immediately cur- 
rency markets reacted. When trading 
opened on Monday, the Malaysian ring- 
git fell to a 26-year low against the dollar, 
only showing some recovery a day later, 
after Deputy Prime Minister Anwar 
Ibrahim tried on two consecutive days to 
limit damage by pledging there would be 
no restrictions on currency trading. 

Another example of how real events 
helped bring the risks and benefits of 
globalization to the fore in Hong Kong 



so, die applicants, many, of whom hold--, 
jobs at America* companies or cave * 
close relatives who are citizens, snnpiy 
paid a SI, 000 penalty. 

Under the new rule, most applicants . 
must return to their home countries abd • 
wait there until, their applications art t 

approved and tiiey get the caids. . .... 

The second change could affect far - 
more people, including those who have t 
not applied for a green card but may 3 
hope to some day. Under this change, . 
immigrants who have been in the cour- ; 
try illegally for at least six months, and ■ 
then leave for any reason — includaig 
going back to their homeland to get a 
green card — can be barred for up to 10' 
years from coming back. 

The new laws are not expected to 
affect the large number of illegal im- - 
migrants who have no hopes of applying , 
for a visa and who remain underground, 
working without permits. 

But already they have affected people - 
like Julio Sandor Sandoval, a 30-yew- 
old Argentine who lived in the United 
States for eight years. Until recently Mr. 
Sandoval was a cameraman for WF0R- 
Channel 4, the CBS affiliate in Miami. 

He lived in an apartment two blocks . 
from his only sister and picked up to t 


f MU' 

' r?? i*' 

f . 


nephews from school each day. 
Worrie 


EUcSMbtaKHritai 

PAY UP — Students from a private elementary school protesting in Taipei on Thursday, demanding that 
the government restore the legal guarantee that 15 percent of Taiwan's budget be earmarked for education. 


orried about the implications of the . 
law, Mr. Sandoval, who is waiting fora 
green card his U.S. -bom -sister peti- ~ 
turned for on his behalf in 1989, returned 
to Buenos Aires. He now shares a tiny - 
apartment with an aunt and- roams , die 
streets looking for a job. 

“My world is in the United Stale,” 
Mr. Sandoval said from Buenos Aires 
this week. ‘ ‘It’s where I made my career. 
It’s where my family is.” 

Ms. Struba fears a similar fate. She is ■ 
a dance teacher who lives in Spring 
Valley, New York, with her mother, a . 
legal resident, and hex son, Anthony, an 
American citizen. In Germany, she will 
share an apartment with childhood • 
friends. She said she has no idea how she • 
will support herself in Germany. 

“I’m trying to keep a positive at- .-, 
tirade,” Ms. Struba said. "But Fm bav- . 
mg' a hard tone. Actually, I’m desper- 
ate." 

“What do I tell her now?" said Ms. 
Stiuba’s attorney, Andrew Lerner. ; 
“That because she is playing by the ■ 
rules, she will be punished? Tins law 


1 ?. 


. *t^ V-m 


Continued from Page I 


RINGGIT: Rating Cut Sparks a Plunge 


Continued from Page 1 


S&P’s ratings are one of the gauges of 
risk used by investors' looking to put 
their money in Malaysia. 

S&P said it expected the counuy's 
bank-asset quality to deteriorate in 1998. 
It also said the boom in investment, now 
more than 40 percent of Malaysia's 
gross domestic product, was excessive, 
and that there was "evident reluctance” 
on the government's part to rein it in. 

S&P said inflationary pressures were 
rising and that it expected Malaysia’s 
current account deficit — a measure of 
the imports of goods and services minus 
exports — to grow to 6 percent of gross 
domestic product this year. 

Restrictions on stock trading that 
Malaysia put in place last mouth — and 
lifted less than a week later — under- 
mined foreign investment, S&P said. 


Malaysia’s future ratings now depend 
ou steps the government may announce in 
the 1998 budget on OcL 17 to slow de- 
mand, S&P said. The latest downgrade 
could put pressure on the government to 
raise interest rates to cool growth. 

“What’s negative is that Malaysia is 
the second country after Thailand in this 
region whose ratings outlook is cut,” 
said Chia Woon Khieo, head of Asian 
economic research at Skandinaviska En- 
skilda Banken. 

Thailand is experiencing its slowest 
economic growth in more than a decade 
amid mounting bad loans and excessive 
lending to the property industry, which 
led to the country’s accepting an In- 
ternational Monetary Fund $ 17-billion 
rescue package. 

Malaysia has tried to maintain its eco- 
nomic growth. The Malaysian economy 


has expanded at more than 8 percent a 

zhich ana- 


U.S. Pulls Back 
Flawed $50 Bills 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Thirty mil- 
lion newly designed S50 bills are 
being held out of circulation be- 
cause of a smudge behind the por- 
trait of Ulysses S. Grant. 

Normally, the flaw would not be 
enough to keepthe bills on the shelf. 
But Treasury Department and Fed- 
eral Reserve officials said they want 
die first copies the public sees to be 
near perfect. 

The new design, being intro- 
duced a year and a half after a new 
$100 note, is packed with features 
designed to thwart counterfeiters. A 
decision has not been made yet 
whether to destroy the flawed bills, 
which cost $1.44 million to make. 
They may circulate later. 

“The notes that were produced 
are clearly functional notes,” said 
Larry Felix, a spokesman for the 
Treasury Department’s Bureau of 


Engraving and Printing. "But 
clearly, if y 


clearly, if you’re going to introduce 
notes for the first time, you ’re going 
to make sure the notes are as flaw- 
less as possible.” 

He said the flaw, a small break in 
the fine concentric lines behind the 
portrait of Mr. Grant, is not unusual, 
even in bills the bureau has been 
printing for decades. 


year in the past nine years, wl 
lysts said is too fast to be sustained. 

S&P also cut the ratings outlook for 
some of Malaysia’s biggest companies 
■ — Petroiiam Nasiooal Bhd., Telekom 
Malaysia Bhd- and Tenaga Nasiooal 
Bhd. — to “negative” from “stable." 

The Malaysian ringgit fell after S&P 
released the statement. The ringgit 
weakened as much as 3.2 percent to a 
record low of 3.1425 to the U.S. dollar 
from Wednesday’s close. The ringgit 
was quoted at about 3.07 before the news 
of the downgrade. 

The benchmark stock Kuala Lumpur 
Composite Index pared its gains. It rose 
9.92 points, or 1.27 percent, to close at 
789.33 points. 

That was down from a high of 793.62 
points earlier in the day. 

Meanwhile, hundreds of people lined 
up in Malaysia at branches of one of 
Malaysia's largest savings banks for the 
second day Thursday, heeding rumors 
that its president was ill and that the 
Company was about to go under. 

Bank Negara, Malaysia’s central 
bank, said that Malaysia Borneo Finance 
Ltd., which has 2 million customers, was 
sound and that the- bank would meet any 
depositor demands. 

In Taipei, the government said Thurs- 
day that Taiwan had spent $ 1 .4 billion to 
defend its currency since Aug. 1 . 

The bill drove the island's foreign- 
currency reserves to a nine-month low of 
$87.79 billion, the government said. 

It may have been money well spent, 
analysts said, because Taiwan was able 
to insulate itself from the turmoil that 
ripped through other financial markets 
in the region. (Bloomberg, AP, AFP) 


but unproductive," Mr. Levy said. 

The announcement of more govern- 
ment-built housing came less than two 
weeks after Mix. Albright, on a trip to the 
Middle East, urged Israel to take a "time- 
out” from settlement expansion and oth- 
er measures that arouse Palestinian anger 
so dial the peace talks could be revived. 

The action Wednesday evidently 
caught Mrs. Albright by surprise. Her 
spokesman, James Rubin, said that she 
had spoken by telephone with Mr. Net- 
anyahu at midday Wednesday, and that 
he had made no mention of new settler 
housing, even though they discussed the 
Jewish occupation of a house in the Arab 
Jerusalem neighborhood of Ras Amud. 

Mr. Rubin said the secretary did not 
regard the announcement of new settler 
housing “as consistent with the envir- 
onment she hoped to create.” 

A spokesman for Mr. Netanyahu, Shai 
Bazak, said the 300 housing units the 
prime minister promised for Efrai had 
been approved under the government of 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. Mr. Ra- 
bin froze most settlement construction 
after the 1993 peace agreement with the 
Palestinians, but be made some excep- 
tions for settlements around Jerusalem. It 
was not clear whether the new housing 
was covered by the freeze. 

The settlements are part of a chain of 
Jewish colonies around Jerusalem that 
have long been considered by Israeli 
governments as comprising a strategic 
extension of Jerusalem. 

As the war of words between Israel and 
the Palestinians escalated. Ambassador 
Indyk, who is due to return to Washington 
by next week, said in a farewell speech 


was the increasing reluctance of some 

ment that opening their capital mar- ISRAEL: Palestinian Leaders Warn of Attacks Over New Housing will take away the incentive to do things . 

Nevertheless, Mr. Lerner advised A&. - ■ 
Struba to leave. 

Since 1994, people like Ms. Struba ' 
did not have to leave the country to i 
adjust their status. By filling out an ap- t 
plication and paying a one-time $1 ,000 I 
penalty fee, they were allowed to remain J 
in the United States, waiting for res- ; 
idency documents, without returning to * 
their countries of origin. \ 

But the law that allows them to do that * 
is scheduled to expire Tuesday. After '• 
that day — unless Congress has a change \ 
of heart — people who are in the process ■* 
of becoming legal residents will have to * 
leave the country to qualify to receive - 
green cards. * 

Advocates for immigrants estimate * 


•V- . 


ets and financial services sectors to 
competition would actually help to 
strengthen the world financial system. 

Although some of his neighbors kept 
their distance, notably the Philippines, 
Mr. Anwar said Wednesday that Malay- 
sia would not agree to a deal in die World 
Trade Organization's current round of 
financial services talks unless it contained 
guarantees of protection from what he has 
called "unscrupulous speculators.” 

Prime Minister Li Peng of China also 
demanded action to protea developing 
countries from becoming “easy targets 
of international financial speculation.” 


that “the dream of peace some days 
seems to be turning into a nightmare." 

Speaking at the Council for Peace and 
Security, a Tel Aviv group largely made 
up of former Israeli generals. Mr. Indyk 
said that "it is clear to all of us that 
something is fundamentally wrong" 
with the peace process. 

"We leave Israel with a heavy heart, 
for the dream of peace on some days 
recently seems to be turning to a night- 
mare." said Mr. Indyk. who is awaiting 
Senate confirmation as the new assistant 
secretary of state for Near Eastern af- 
fairs. "The great sense of hope that 
marked my arrival here two years and a 
half ago seems to have been dashed on 
the rocks." 

Mr. Indyk said the peace process had 
deeply disappointed both sides, men- 
tioning the continuous attacks by Islamic 


radicals and “unilateral actions" by Is- 
rael, such as the construction of Jewish 
settlements in occupied areas where Pal- 
estinians hope to create a future state. 

In another development, Hamas 
vowed Thursday to hit targets inside and 
outside of Israel over an attempted attack 
on one of its political leaders in Jordan. 

"The Zionist enemy will pay a river 
of blood for one single drop of blood 
from one of our fighters.” Hamas said in 
a leaflet. It said the attack took its fight 
with Israel outside the "holders of the 
homeland." 

The Hamas branch in Jordan said 
Thursday that KhaJed Meshai, head of 
its politburo, was attacked on an Amman 
street as he walked with his three chil- 
dren. Mr. Meshai was not hurt. It blamed . 
Israel's Mossad secret service. 

(AP, Reuters, AFP, NYT) 



Deal Under Discussion for Nurse in Saudi Killing 


The Associated Press 

ADELAIDE, Australia — The fam- 
ily of a nurse murdered in Saudi Arabia 
has discussed terms for a deal on the 
fare of a British nurse accused of the 
killing, but has not waived its right 
under Saudi law to call for the death 
penalty, lawyers said Thursday. 

While negotiations are continuing 
between the parties’ lawyers, the vic- 
tim's brother. Frank Gilford, has not 
changed his position on supporting the 
death penalty, his lawyers said. 

They said comments that a $ 1 .2 mil- 
lion clemency deal had been struck 
were unauthorized and threatened fu- 
ture negotiations. 


"There have been, over the last two 
weeks, ongoing discussions between 
the lawyers for the nurses and the law- 
yers for Frank Gilford and his family,” 
said a lawyer for Mr. Gilford, Michael 
Abbott. "From time to time various 
working documents have been pre- 
pared and discussed." 

It was the first confirmation from the 
victim's family that they had been in 
negotiations with lawyers for the two 
nurses accused of (he killing. 

Lawyers in Saudi Arabia disclosed 
Tuesday that one of the nurses, De- 
borah Pany, 38. had been convicted of 
“intentional murder” in the death last 
December of Yvonne Gilford, 55. 


Under Saudi Arabia’s strict Islamic 
law, such a verdict carries the death 
sentence, generally public behead- 
ing. But the family of the victim can 
have the sentence commuted to a pris- 
on term by seeking clemency. 

Ms. Parry's Saudi lawyer, Salah 
Hejailan, said Wednesday that Mr. Gil- 
ford had agreed to a clemency deal 
involving “$500,000 for himself and 
$700,000 for a charity in Australia.” 

But Mr. Abbott said Thursday that 
his information was that the Saudi law- 
yer’s comments had been made without 
instruction from his clients or theirf am- 
ities, and that they had now disasso- 
ciated themselves from the comments. 




So 


Trad 






MIR: A ‘Go* for Astronaut to Join Russians 


Continued from Page 1 


among the most vocal critics of the pro- 
gram. As chairman of the House Science 
Committee, he criticized Mr. Goldin’s 
decision to send Dr. Wolf into space. 

Mr. Sensenbrenner said he hoped the 
evaluations were "not a NASA white- 


wash of the many significant safety risks 
aboard Mir.” 


■ « • ^ _ Hnui' liiiiiip# K. n[ lT , 

Daniel Goldin of NAS A, left, with Thomas Young, who led a review team. 


Although admitting that he had not yet 
read the reports, Mr. Sensenbrenner 
noted 1 that one of the Mir review teams, 
headed by Thomas Young of the Na- 
tional Academy of Engineering, had 


PRESS* British Propose Curbs on Paparazzi by Widening Privacy 


Continued from Page 1 


but an avid regulator could have re- 
garded the piece as intrusive, he noted. 

“The definition of what the public 
have a right to know should be left to 
editors," Mr. Man- said. 

Unveiling the proposals. Lord Wake- 
ham, chairman of the Press Complaints 
Commission, said: "It has become so 
much received wisdom that 'everything 
changed' that dreadful night in Paris 
nearly four weeks ago that I do not need to 
debate it." In a sign of how much Diuna's 


death has affected opinion here, many 
leading editors adopted a similar attitude, 
voicing general support for the proposals 
at a meeting with Lord Wakeham. 

The proposals also drew a warm wel- 
come from the Labour government, 
which, in a country with no laws on 
either, has been urging the media to 
police themselves. 

Chris Smith, secretary of state for 
culture and the media, said the industry 
should "lake the process of seti-reg. 
ulation further so as to give full pro- 
tection to people in all walks of life, and 


been given only a week to do its work. * 
Another team, led by Lieutenant Gen- .. 
era! Thomas Stafford, a former astro-. - 
naut. included several members with * 
past or present ties to NASA who, as a * 
result, “may not have been totally can- * 
did,” Mr. Sensenbrenner said. 

Dr. Wolf. - 41, a medical doctor and ] 
electrical engineer, was ro become the l . 
sixth American astronaut to spend time • 
on Mir. Dr. Wolf, who has spent the last * 
year training for the flight in Russia, said ■> 
this week that he was not expecting "a " , 
pleasure cruise," but added that he was I m 
comfortable with the levels of risk. • * 

A former Gemini and Apollo astro- 
naut. General Stafford, who had headed * 
one of the studies reviewed by NASA. * 
and Mr. Goldin expressed confidence in - 

“• h - -ho are famous or ,em- ’ 

General Stafford noted that although " 
to new ****“* the Wow ** frequently be?n I 
far ST 2° £ ncerned npow of computer break- 

ana pumng at risk the ability of the downs or oxygen failures, Mir has “five ; 

levels of redundancy” in its life-support - 
systems. He added, “That’s more than I ; 
ever had on Gemini or A potio.’’ ■ 

Amid growing criticism of the Mir 
_ project in Congress, proponents of U.S.* 
Mediterrfrf 601 *f uss |f n space cooperation have say con- - A 
beach.' A secluded b^ch in Cornwall^ j* Cn £ ia i * wo * • 

Scotland, he said, would be different. SmceSt T he pIanned lntei ™HK>nal - 



press to uncover corruption, political in 
m ! UC ^ r Sl h f r f m,neis of public concern. 

V ^ ak l ham S ave 3 him of the 
difficulty by first suggesting a blanket 
ban on beach photographs but then al- 
nebrities cm 


lowing that celebrities could not expect 
privacy on a crowded, " 




V 





i 


m 

M mm 






PAGE 7 




renc/ >w< 




S>: 

icp 

?Y.4»^»£Si 



*?^8ecJS*- 


SfSJSSai 


a .■-...*■. 4 2reen r r. w w)t 




• • * : * >£aai<,,, 

■■ ^.•t;r^ s «sS 

yssSfts 

..^inifciC 

*-*~£c5sS?&i 

•:. ^ :■■£***; 

• ' > .„- \~‘ ‘\ ~- , 5‘P‘ J ‘ ; 3 | iattfl[. 

- ••" . ‘ l 1 ' I 1, v* l - - “amnot 
■.■■ bora «? f 

• *i 

■ .. siuuj.. 

. .. "‘r ^roant 

■ - ' - - -.:hs Iw-iStt 

V.' '•“• '•; 

.’ ...' - 'L " r *T™ m *«a : 

• • • — •• A 'iTLlii? :i-f .J 

-'aafc 
' ' - : '*• •’ :.r afe 

■ :;: JS3 


2* 


INTERNATIONAL 


Citing Supplies to Iran, 
^Israel Pressures U.S. 
To Penalize Russians 


By Thomas W. Uppman 

Washington Post Service 


nerable to Iranian missiles loaded 
with chemical or biological agents, 

, Israeli officials said. 

WASHINGTON . With the While the Clinton administration 
support of pro-Israeli groups in the agrees the Iranians are making swift 
United Stales and many members of progress toward self-sufficient mis- 
^ Israel i s pr essing sile production with Russian help. 


tbeU.S. 

a reluctant Clinton administration to 
impose economic sanctions on Rus- 
sian organizations and companies 
reported to be supplying ballistic 
missile technology to 'Iran. 

Iran is a year or less away, with 
% foreign help, from being able to pro- 
~ duce loog-range missiles, according 
to Israeli intelligence reports that 
have been substantially confirmed 
by U.S. officials. 

Private and state-owned Russian 
firms are described as providing 
gyroscopes, which keep miss iles on 
course to their targets; electronic 
components; wind tunnels, guid- 
ance and propulsion systems, and 
the equipment Iran needs to produce 
such componenrs. 

Withrangesof700to 1,200 miles 
(1,120 to 1,920 kilometers), these 
missiles would enab le Iran to hit 
targets in Western Europe, North 
Africa and South Asia, shifting the 
Middle East balance of power sub- 
stantially toward Tehran, analysts 
said. 

Israel, which has largely neutral- 
^ ized the military threat from its im- 
mediate neighbors, might be vul- 


officials say they have been reluc- 
tant to impose sanctions on sus- 
pected Russian firms — some of 
which have or are seeking U.S. con- 
tracts — fearing that strong mea- 
sures might strain President Bill 
Clinton’s relations with President 
Boris Yeltsin of Russia. 

The Israeli prime minister, Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu, urged Secretary 
of State Madeleine Albright to take 
stronger action against the Russians 
when he met her in Jerusalem earlier 
this month. This week, Israel sent its 
senior Foreign Ministry arms con- 
trol official, Shimon Stein, to press 
the case in Washington. 

Israel is not alone in its alarm 
about the Iranian missile potential. 
U.S. officials said the foreign min- 
isters of Saudi Arabia and the small 
Arab sheikhdoms of the Gulf Co- 
operation Council had expressed 
deep concern about the issue when 
they met Mrs. Albright during her 
Middle East trip. They reportedly 
fear Iran’s growing ability to in- 
timidate its Arab neighbors and con- 
trol the vital Gulf waterway. 

But when it comes to disco ur- 



A|mcr Fawtai 

IRAQIS FREED — Some of the 46 Iraqi soldiers who were taken prisoner in the 1980-38 Iran- 
Iraq war lining up to kiss the chief of Iran’s POW commission after their release on Thursday. 


aging Russian firms, a senior Clin- 
ton administration official said, 
“our preference is for diplomacy 
rather than sanctions.* * 

Mr. Clinton, Mrs. Albright and 
Vice Resident A1 Gore, who has 
been visiting Russia, have had sev- 
eral opportunities to pursue the issue 
with Russian officials. “The Israelis 
are not in as close touch with the 
Russians as we are, so they think it’s 
not going anywhere,’ ’ a senior Clin- 
ton administration official said. 
“But my sense is that we have the 
opportunity to make some pro- 
gress.” 


Under the Gore -McCain Act — 
named for its sponsors, then-Sen- 
ator Gore and Senator John McCain, 
Republican of Arizona — sanctions 
are mandat cay against any private or 
state-owned company or govern- 
ment organization that helps Iran 
acquire missile technology. Sanc- 
tioned organizations are excluded 
from doing business with the U.S. 

g overnment, a potentially lethal 
low to Russian contractors who 
have or want deals with the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administra- 
tion and the Pentagon. 

According to Israeli intelligence 


In Big Offensive, Turkey Bombs Kurdish Rebels in Iraq 


DIB Is 


-.r.i ;• 

. . -..izLWi’&l. 


* 


By Kelly Couturier 

Washington Post Service 

ANKARA — - Turkish warplanes 
bombed suspected positions of rebel 
Kurds inside Iraq on Thursday amid 
a new Turkish cross-border offen- 
sive that officials said was aimed ai 
preventing the rebels from regroup- 
ing in camps along the border. 

The offensive, begun earlier this 
week and reportedly involving an 
estimated 8,000 ground troops and 
100 tanks and other armored 
vehicles, is the latest in a series of 
Turkish cross-border attacks against 
Kurdish 'Workers Party guerrillas 
over die past few years. 

The latest operation was 
launched, accordiii g to a Foreign 


Ministry spokesman, because the 
guerrillas who had been cleared out 
of the area last summer were trying 
to retrench in camps along the 
mountainous border before winter 
set in. 

The rebels have been waging an 
aimed separatist insurgency in 
southeastern Turkey since 1984; in 
the past, they have staged raids in 
Turkey from bases in the Kurdish- 
controlled area in northern Iraq. 

Military spokesmen were un- 
available for comment The Anato- 
lian News Agency repeated that 
Turicishjets had bombed 15 guerrilla 
positions near the Iranian and Syrian 
borders, where the guerrillas had re- 
j a large-scale 
i operation in May and June. 


The rebels reportedly had made 
inroads back into die area despite 
efforts by an armed Iraqi Kurdish 
faction allied with Ankara, the Kur- 
distan Democratic Party, to keep 
them out. The Turkish military of- 
fensive was reportedly intended to 
sisnramnn 


stop the rebels ; 
Iran and Syria. 


i moving toward 


great success in clearing the ' 
area last Jane, saying it had de- 
stroyed die guerrilla’s command - 
and-control installations at the bor- 
der and had killed over 2,000 
rebels. 

Turkey has barred journalists 
from entering northern Iraq since 
early this year, making it virtually 
impossible to independently con- 


firm the Turkish statements about its 
latest operation. 

“We regularly take measures 
deemed necessary for our security,” 
the Foreign Ministry spokesman. 
Sennet Atacanli, told reporters. He 
described the latest operation as 
“routine and limited.” 

Bat Baghdad, which has strongly 
criticized past Turkish incursions, 
protested the military operation. 

“The Republic of Iraq strongly 
condemns the new Turkish military 
aggression which represents a flag- 
rant violation of Iraq’s sovereignty 
and territorial integrity,” an Iraqi 
Foreign Ministry spokesman was 
quoted as saying by Adi Thawra, a 
newspaper controlled by the ruling 
Arab Ba’ath Socialist Party. 


reports confirmed by U.S. sources, 
such Russian organizations as Ros- 
voorouzhenie. the state aims export 
agency, and NPO Trad, a maker of 
rocket motors, are exporting to Iran 
while having or seeking U.S. con- 
tracts. 

Supporters of sanctions, includ- 
ing the American Israel Public Af- 
fairs Committee, the chief pro-Israel 
lobbying group, argue that those 
contracts give the Clinton admin- 
istration leverage over Russian or- 
ganizations violating the 31-nation 
Missile Technology Control Re- 
gime, a treaty regulating missile ex- 
ports. that the government does not 
have over Chinese companies fa- 
cing cfmilar accu s ations. 

Frank Wisner, a senior State De- 
partment diplomat, has been in Rus- 
sia seeking a crackdown on the ex- 
ports. He reported Tuesday to Mr. 
Gore, who is in Russia for meetings 
with Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin. 

“There is no doubt in my mind,” 
Mr. Gore said, “that Russia is se- 
rious about wanting to rein in any 
unauthorized missile technology ex- 
ports.” He said Mr. Wisner and his 
Russian interlocutor, the director of 
space agency director, Yuri Koptev, 
have a “very intensive” investi- 
gation underway and will meet 
again within six weeks. 

Israeli officials said that pace is 
too leisurely. “Either you act now or 
you soon have a fait accompli,” a 
senior Israeli official said. Once Iran 
is self-sufficient, he said, diplomacy 
with the Russians becomes irrel- 
evant. 


BRIEFLY 


12 Hurt in Crash of French TGV 

PARIS — A high-speed passenger train crashed into a road 
maintenance vehicle near die northern French port of Dunkirk 
on Thursday, slightly injuring 12 of the 82 people on board, 
thepolice said. 

The engine of the TGV train was derailed alter hitting a 
asphalt-laying machine, said the French railroad company, 
SNCF. The vehicle’s driver fled before the crash and was not 
injured, fire department officials said. 

The TGV can run at speeds of up to 280 kilometers an hour 
(160 miles an hour), but was traveling much slower because it 
was on an older rail line, an SNCF official said. (AP) 

Algerians Reject Outside Help 

ALGIERS — The Algerian government has rejected any 
help from the international community to end tire slaughter by 
aimed groups fighting a bloody civil war, saying such calls 
were pan of a plot by enemies of the nation, newspapers 
reported Thursday. 

A series of massacres has brought a flurry of calls from 
international quarters for outside help in ending the killings, 
which have left mare than 500 people dead since Aug. 29. 

But the government has repeatedly rejected outside me- 
diation as interference in the nation's internal affairs. A call by 
the secretary-general of die United Nations, Kofi Annan, to 
find a solution to the crisis drew a rebuke. 

An offer by the Islamic Salvation Army of a cease-fire, 
made public Wednesday, turned up the spotlight on the 
situation. The group, one of the two main insurgency or- 
ganizations, called for a trace to start OcL 1. There was no 
official reaction to the move, but the call was published 
Wednesday in pro-government newspapers. (AP) 

Rebels Attack Towns in Colombia 

BOGOTA — Rebels attacked two towns in eastern Colom- 
bia at dawn on Wednesday, killing a policeman, a soldier and 
a 9-year-old girl, and wounding 1 1 civilians. 

In an apparent effort to head off a big army offensive in a 
nearby jungle region, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of 
Colombia. Latin America’s oldest and largest rebel force, 
simultaneously attacked police stations in Castillo and La 
Uribe, both in Meta Province. 

Two civilians were killed in a separate rebel attack in 
southwest Colombia, while a rightist paramili tary death squad 
murdered four people in the north. (Reuters) 


■ Is it safe to do business on the Internet? 

■ Are there broadly accepted standards? 

■ What is the role of banks in electronic 
business? 

If you mfcscd the DfTs recent sponsored page on 

Business to e-BusirvESS: 
Banking 

Fax or e-mail for a free reprint, 
and learn the ins and outs of on-fine transactions. 

Fax: 4-33 1 41 43 92 13 / E-Mail: 6upplemenls@ihLoom 


THE WOBUTS DAILV NEWSPftPEB 


• -v ,• :■:« Mi 


v*T ■* 


—i 






■ . • 1 ■'* 


!»autli Kill® 


Southern Africa 
Trade ft Investment 
Summit 


. :p ft*# 




Botswana, November 18-19, 1997 

President Ketunule Masire and fellow heads of state from the region will lead discussions 
at the International Herald Tribune’s third Southern Africa Trade ft Investment 
Summit to be- held in Gaborone on November 18- 19. The Presidents will be joined by 
business and finance leaders from the region, as well as renowned international figures 
and senior representatives from some of the world’s leading companies currently 

investing in Southern Africa. 


Summit Sprmsor. 



BLACK & VEATCH 



Ovpotate Sponsors 



o 


BOTSWANA DEVELOPMENT 
CORPORATION LIMITED 




BOTSWANA TELfCOMMMCXnONS 
CORPORATION 



As last year's highly successful summit in Harare was oversubscribed, to ensure you are able to 
take part we surest you contact our conference office as soon as possible for Anther detarls: 

""" A 1 ‘ 



hue iroja 


_ DO YOU LIVE IN 


< FRANCE? 


Subscribe and SAVE up to 60% 
off the cover price. 

Also available: PAY MONTHLY 
by easy, low cost, 
direct debit. 

EARLY MORNING DEUVEFY TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE 

A cosmopolitan, comprehensive and concise newspaper delivered every day to your home or office. 

In and around most of Paris the International Hera/dTribune offers early morning hand delivery on the day 
of publication, Monday through Saturday. And, because it ts printed in Paris,Tou]ouse and Marseille, it can be 
sent by post to arrive on the same day in most of France at no extra cost 
The result ? 

Unique coverage of the world you live in, brought to you as rt changes — daily. 

For more information about easy ordering and availability of hand delivery 
call our Subscriber Customer Service Unit: 

Toll free: 0800 437 437 
or Fax: 01 41 43 9210. 



□ YES, I'd Eke to subscribe and have my bank account 
FFI62 

Please start my subscription and send me a bank 
form .to arrange my payment. 


□ YES, I’d like to subscribe and pay for the following 
term: 

□ 12 months (+ 2 months free): FF 1,950 
(Saving off overprice: 46%) 

□ Special, 2-month trial subscription: F F2 1 0 
(Saving off cover price: 60%) 

Q My check is enclosed (payable to the IHT) 

□ Please charge my. 

□Access □Am ex □ Diners 

□ Eurocard □ MasterCard QVisa 

Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at 
current exchange rates. 


Family Namei. 

First Name: 

Job Title:. 


Mailing Address: □ Home □Business 


Postal Code:. 
City 

Tet 


.Fax:. 


E-Mail Address:. 


YourVAT N° (Business orders only) 


Card Nh_ 


.Exp^. 


Signature:.. 


□ Please start delivery and send invoice. 


(IHTVAT N- 747 320 2 11 26) 

I got this copy of the IHT anO Joosk □ hotel □ airline □ other 
□ I do not wish to receive information from other canduily 
screened companies. 26-9-97 

This offer expires on December 3 1, 1997 
and is AVAILABLE FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY. 

Return your completed coupon to: 
Subscriptions Director. International Herald Tribune, 
181, Avenue Charies-de-Gaulle. 9252 1 Neuilfy Cedex. 
FaxOI 41 43 92 10 E-Mail: subs@iht.com fru 


READERS IN OTHER COUNTRIES CAN SUBSCRIBE BY CALLING: 

EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA THE AMERICAS ASIA 

Tel: +33 ) 41 43 93 61 Tel: (USA toll free) i -800-832-2384 Tel: +352 29 22 1171 

Fax: +3314143 9210 Fax: + 1 2 I 2 755 8785 Fax: +352 29 22 I I 99 










siSEfffffffiSjSiFiwisjMsjaiaafffjse'pes'fiQpaaos'pppc'na'aisi: 



PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


editorials/opinion 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



IT WISHED wmi Tilt NtH lORIL T1U»S AND T1IE WASHINGTON' ?OST 


tribune I What Makes a Legend? Some Foreign Policy Tip 

T1IE WASHINGTON POST C7 ' Failure bV JUlV DSHV tO BWCl MIX 




ffl* 


A Bosnia Exit Strategy 


W ashington — boi ciimon u 

said to be increasingly preoccu- 
pied with bis legacv. 

If so. and if he’s counting on foreign 
policy to help, he’d better huny. Time 
is running out 

In the aft erma th of the 1998 mid- 
term elections, the president will truly 
begin to turn into a lame duck. 
Moreover, Mr. Clinton may have his 
hands full just reacting to events. 

There's sure to be a difficult situ- 
ation in Bosnia come the summer of 
1 998, the arbitrary date selected for the 
departure of the current multilateral 
force. A violent breakdown of the Is- 
raeli-Palestinian peace process is one 
possibility, while a crisis on the Korean 
Peninsula cannot be discounted. 

If the president is to leave a lasting 
and creative imprint on foreign affairs, 
he must act now. But act where? 

The first post -Co Id War president 
has so far devoted most of the limited 
time given to foreign policy in his 
second term to the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, a child of the Cold 
War. The problem is that making 
NATO bigger is not all that important. 

Wherever one comes out on the wis- 
dom of enlar ging NATO, the reality is 
that expansion is not a modern-day 
equivalent of its creation. A NATO of 
1 9 states will be more a political than a 
military grouping, its role increasingly 
that of a bolding company that provides 
some support for those members will- 
ing to act in particular situations. 


Having already stretched America’s 

troop commitment in Bosnia from 12 
to 30 months, the Clinton adminis- 
tration has begun an effort to prepare 
public opinion for the possibility of an 
even longer stay. 

That is the way to read Samuel Ber- 
ger’s speech at Georgetown University 
on Tuesday, when he linked the dur- 
ation of American involvement to a 
notably ambitious set of policy goals. 
Mr. Berger, the president's national 
security adviser, is too hasty.Instead of 
managing the public relations of a 
longer stay, he should be using that 
time to try to produce a workable exit 
strategy by the June deadjine. 

Everyone wants a unified, demo- 
cratic and prospering Bosnia. But con- 
gressional Republicans are right to 
warn that American soldiers cannot 


remain deployed until that goal is fully 
achieved. What was regrettably absent 
from Mr. Berger's speech was any 
sense of driving toward departure. It is 
clear from the speech that Mr. Berger 
and Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright plan to spend the time between 
now and June urging President Bill 
Clinton once again to push back the 
withdrawal deadline. 

Lack of an exit strategy has been a 
consistently troubling omission ever 
since President Clinton first sent 
American troops into Bosnia at the end 
of 1995. On Tuesday, administration 
officials spoke about the need to begin 
planning by February for the next 
phase of military involvement. 

By our calendar it is still September, 
and such a focus on the hypothetical 
future is premature. The administration 
has nine months to clarify' the specific 
military tasks that need to be accom- 
plished before Bosnia is secure enough 
to allow a frill American withdrawal. 

Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison 


extended presence. But the adminis- 
tration is tilting the wrong way, and the 
current mind -set of Mr. Clinton’s for- 
eign policy team suggests that it will 
not discover a way out in the absence 
of a congressional revolt. 

When Mr. Clinton first proposed 
sending American troops to, Bosnia, 
skeptics argued that guaranteeing full, 
respect for the Dayton peace agreements 
could take decades. The administration 
countered that all it meant to do was give 
the Bosnians a year to build the peace 
outlined at Dayton. As that one-year 
deadline approached, the White House 
gave the original mission a new name 
and extended it for IS months. Now, as 
the administration seems to be preparing 
for yet another extension. Congress may 
have to force it to show that fundamental 
American interests require a continued 
military presence in Bosnia. 

The two strongest arguments for 
staying are the persistence of deadly 
hatreds that could spark renewed hos- 
tilities once outside troops withdraw 
and the statements by various Euro- 
pean governments that once American 
troops depart, their troops will be with- 
drawn as well. But the irresponsibility 
of Bosnian factional leaders and Euro- 


pean allies should not push Washing- 
ton into an expanded definition of 


speaks for many Republicans and. no 
doubt, a number of Democrats when 


doubt, a number of Democrats when 
she warns the White House that with- 
out such an exit strategy. Congress will 
fight any extension requests. 

Common sense argues against ig- 
niting a renewed war in Bosnia by 
precipitously withdrawing NATO 
troops. We readily concede that with- 
drawal deadlines cannot be set in ce- 
ment without regard to protecting the 
;s that has alreadv been made. 


progres: 
Future i 


events could even warrant an 


America’s own vital interests. 

The United States has all along had a 
limited interest in Bosnia, consisting 
mainly of preventing the slaughter of 
civilians and preserving the unity and 
effectiveness of the NATO alliance. Be- 
yond that there are some desirable goals, 
like bringing war crimes suspects to trial 
and allowing refugees to return to their 
homes. These warrant strong diplomatic 
exertions, supplemented, at least 
through June, by carefully planned mil- 
itary actions. There is a lot NATO troops 
can still do in this regard before their 
currently scheduled withdrawal dare. 

Building a united and peaceful Bos- 
nia is ultimately up to the people of 
Bosnia. Policing Europe in the absence 
of acute threats like shooting wars is 
primarily the responsibility of Euro- 
pean nations themselves. If the Bos- 
nians will not work together and the 
Europeans will not shoulder greater 
security responsibilities on their own, 
the breach cannot be filled indefinitely 
with American troops. 

— THE \£U' YORK TIMES 


Polish Democracy 


If Poland is soon to become a NATO 
ally like Germany or Spain — and we 
hope it will — its internal politics are of 
more than passing interest to Amer- 
icans. In that context. Sunday's par- 
liamentary election is encouraging. 
This is so in part because democracy 
has become entrenched — so en- 
trenched, in fact, that it would seem 
condescending even to say so were it 
not for the fact that only eight years 


have passed since communism gave 
way. The elections are encouraaina. 


way. The elections are encouraging, 
too, because they seem unlikely to 
affect the basic principles of Polish 


affect the basic principles of Polish 
policy: the desire to join NATO and the 
West and the commitment to free mar- 


kets and a civil society. 

But the actual results of Sunday's 
vote are heartening as well. For the past 
four years, the post-Communist 
Democratic Left Alliance has been in 
charge. Despite the post-Communists’ 
competent governance, and the steady 
economic growth under their rule, they 
were defeated Sunday by Solidarity 
Election Alliance, a grouping of three- 
dozen parties growing out of the demo- 
cratic movement that toppled com- 
munism. Although no party won 50 
percent of parliamentary seats, the 
post- Solidarity movement seems 
likely to form a coalition with Freedom 
Union, another Solidarity outgrowth. 

Despite the historical resonance of 
the names, the fault lines here are not 
democracy vs. dictatorship or reform 
vs. reaction. If anything, in fact, the 
post-Communists are more clearly 
committed to free- market economic 
reform than many elements of the Soli- 
darity coalition. But many Poles feared 
that the post-Communists, if given a 
second consecutive term, would 


Solidarity’s support comes from the 
giant, and still state-owned, shipyards 
and coal mines that cannot survive 
without huge subsidies — subsidies 
Poland cannot afford. But Solidarity’s 
credibility with the workers of those 
enterprises may make it the only party 
that could convince them of the need to 
continue reform, with appropriate 
safety nets in place. Freedom Union, 
led by the architect of Poland’s original 
shock therapy, will also tug toward 
reform if it emerges as a junior co- 
alition partner. And Poland’s desire for 
integration into the West also will help 
keep it on track. The key now is for the 
West — including both NATO and the 
European Union — to welcome Poland 
as the democracy it has become. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Privatizing Chinese Life 


harden their grip, on government ad- 
ministration and privatized industry. 


To prevent that and to foster a healthy 
exchange of power, voters took a 


exchange of power, voters took a 
chance on a less-experienced team. 

The prospect of a post- Soli clarity 
coalition is not without risks. One is of 
inconstancy, given how many small 
parties are included. Another is of re- 
sistance to further reform. Much of 


Even when Jiang Zemin wins, he 
loses. In the run-up to the 15th Party 
congress, the Chinese president had 
been compared unfavorably with his 
predecessors for his ability to dictate 
the direction of both China and its rul- 
ing Communist Party. The irony is that 
if Mr. Jiang succeeds with his economic 
reformr, he and his successors will find 
themselves with even less power. 

The substantive achievement was 
die party’s decision to sell off all but a 
few of the estimated 1 1 8.000 industrial 
stare enterprises. No doubt the absence 
of any parallel moves toward a more 
open political system explains the half- 
hearted namre of the applause. Our 
own guess is that trying to confine 
reform into neat political and economic 
categories misses the point. In China, 
economic reform is not simply a spur to 
greater productivity but a means of 
privatizing life. The more enterprises 
are taken out of state hands, the more 
decisions are returned to the people. 

— Far Eastern Economic Review 
(Hong Kong). 


IVTtRNVnoNU. 


fwwHB ■m m. h» tufts iranvnB ausmni imr 


ESTABLISHED IS87 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


KATHARINE P. D ARROW. It* Chairman 


RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher & Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER. Executive Editor 


• WALTER WELLS, Managing Editor • PAUL HORVITZ, Depun Managing Editor 
1 KATHERINE KN0RR and CHARLES MITCHELMORfi. Deputy Editors • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWIRTZ, .Associate Editors • ROBERT J. DONAHUE Editor of the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE Business and Finance Editor 
■ RENE BONDY. Deputy Publisher 

■ JAMES McLEOD, Advertising Director • DUXER BRUN, Circuiawfl Director 
Direaeurde la Publication; Richard McCIcan 


International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Onilevde -Gaulle. 92521 Neuilly-sur-Seine. France. 
TcL.lI) 41.4193.01 Fax: Sotaiptio*. Advcrtur*. f IM14UCJ* New*, i J)4U19*.3S. 

Internet address: httpr//wwwjbi£wn E-Mail: flt@ita.coni 


Eduirfnr Asti: Meted Rkkndson.5 Ctatrrhay Rd..Swgapon ll<m. Tel (65J 472-77M. Fox: it?5J 274-23M 
Vag Dtr A sw.Rctf D KrancpuM. 50 Qeuasur Rd„ Hmg Kung. Tel S52-2922-II8R. Fax. &S-2K2-IIW 
Gen Mp Genmt: T. ScNUter. FntdnchOr 15. tf52J FnmlfinfU. tel. +4V t&9?l2SOO. Fax; *-f9t&97}2$L20 
Pns VS.: Michd Cun*?. Kft Tknl toe. *.'« ftvfc, N.Y 10022. Id l2J2l 752-5890 Fax i2I'i W &85 
UK. Advertising Office - 63 Am. London WC2. TeUITIi S3ti-4S02. Fax- 1 17 1 1 240-2254 

SAS. au capital de 1200.000 F. RCSNamme B 73202112b. Commission Paritain Na 61337 
0 / W7. Imenmonqi Herald Tribune. All rights ramnl. I55X 0294S052 



Bv Richard N. Haass. ^ 

Alliances depend on clear foes and should ftxmsOTis trade. “j whether Mr. Clinton will choose fe 

obvious scenarios for their cohesion, filsMerm. tackle This agenda is anybody’s guesw 

■“SHSiSSSJS. 

as?-- 3 -«■ » asssaasasss 

Whai is more, shepherding NATO 10 in clnde O nfc^d erthoy. acceler- poto 

enlargement through a critical Senate atn« reforms m (Mr Asia-Pacific, pm- anaDOffid ttaMgue o S 
demtmds enormous time and energy — posing a fiee-hadeatoa with Europe StateS S 


Allianc e depend on clear foes and 
obvious scenarios for their cohesion. 
It is precisely the absence of such clar- 


emer gin g namre ot posw-oia war 
politics. 

What is more, shepherding NATO 
eniaigement through a critical Senate 
demands enormous time and energy — 
despire the reality that Europe and the 
Atlantic will nor be as central to the 
world of the next cenrurv as they were 
to this one. 

The post-Cold War world will be 
dominated by events in the Asia-Pa- 
cific. More major powers will confront 
one another in the Far East than any- 
where else. 

• With that in mind, priority one for 
the administration in its second term 
should be China. There is an emerging 
consensus of left and right that 
threatens to base U.5. foreign policy 
toward China on haman rights, trade or 
both. This would be a strategic error. 

Liberalism in China is most Likely to 
be the product of economic growth — a 
policy of sanctions will only work 
against what it is .America seeks. 

Moreover, the United States has 
multiple interests ai stake, including 
deterring any use of force against 
Taiwan, discouraging the provision of 
nuclear technology to Iran and eliciting 
help vis-a-vis North Korea. Only de- 


Failure by any party to meet any of v 
these standards ought jto.-aaeei wHfc - 
clear and consistent critirianifrom fot 
Oval Office. 

Whether Mr. Clinton -will choose t* 
tackle this agenda is anybody's goes*/ 
He would nave io lake to- the tolly 
nulpit with a fervor he has shown _ihgv 


and reforming foc.WTO. 

Nothing wifl happen, though,' with- 
out both a conceited "push for "‘fast 
track” authority -without which it 
will prove impossible to negotiate ac- 
cords free of the danger of ruinous 
congressional amendments — and a 
detailed road map:. ' 

* A third focus for the White House 
should be the Middfe East, It is a focus 
bean less of choice than necessity. Up 
to now\ Mr. Clinso&fias garnered con- 
siderable credit area though -he has 
done little more dutohe a host at events. 
The time has long since arrived for the 
president to start « *ang his voice — 
publicly if need be -r- to pressure the 
local parties to act responsibly. 

Israel should be encouraged to be 
mere generous in what land it returns, 
more forthcoming in economic 
policies affecting Palestinians, more 
restrained in any settlement building. 
Palestinians need to be pushed to re- 
write their covenant and rein, m vi- 
olence and terror. - 


with the world. 


And it would mean that the pt e&ufafr 
was willing to adopt some controvert 
sial stands that would weaken 
term support for his admimstratiOT Stat; 
create problems for a White House bid: 
in 2000 by Vice President Al Gat^r . 

Would it be worth h? The short 
answer is yes. China, trade, the Middle- . 
Hast-— all have more potential to shape- 
die next century than NATO enlsMfc,: 
meat They also have more potential!^ 
shape a legacy. - . 

During the Last campaiga, Mr. Cat- 
ron made much of his wish to b£ « ' 


bridge io the next century. Absent* , 
more ambitious foreign policy. the risk 
is that he may turn out io be just Aim. ~ 
and nothing more. - ■ ' 


The writer is director of foreign potity 
studies at the Smokings Institution. Thsg 
article, distributed by the New tfcrti 
Times Syndicate, was adapted frstnyt- 
piecc that appears in the FtMJ997 fasar. 
of-Foreign Policy magazine. i- 


The Focus Now Should Be on Getting Mines Out of the Ground*) 1 


P ARIS — It is a mistake for 
the United States to refuse 


Bv Flora Lews 


endorsement of a formal ban on 
land mines that nearly 1 00 coun- 
tries have pledged to sign in 
Ottawa in December. The pact is 
a disarmament milestone seek- 
ing to end a plague that kills and 
maims mostly unwary civilians, 
especially children, for many 
years after a war has ended. 

The United States wanted to 
include some unnecessary ex- 
ceptions, but other countries 
rightly insisted that this impor- 
tant humanitarian advance 
should not be diluted with loop- 
holes. The bulletin of the Amer- 
ican Arms Control Association 
said that “if the United States is 
not there" when the pact is 
signed, “it will ultimately be 
more of a problem for the 
United States than for the land- 
mine convention." 

The bulletin called the agree- 
ment cm the ban “an extraor- 
dinary moment” in the history 
of aims control, reflecting the 
fruition of a long and arduous 
grassroots campaign. But it is 
not enough. Recent estimates are 
that there are now some 150 


million mines laid in many coun- 
tries around the world. Even if 
deployment is completely 
ended', it would take more than 
100 years to clear them with 
current techniques, at a cost that 
runs to some SI .500 per mine. 

Mines are very cheap, as Little 
as S3 each. In addition to the 
United Stares, which did a: las: 
ban the export of mines in 1992. 
countries that do not accept the 
Ottawa initiative include Russia, 
China. India. Pakistan. Greece, 
Turkey, North and Sonth Korea 
and most of the Middle East. 

Diana, Princess of Wales, 
adopted the cause of the anti- 
land mine campaign and traveled 
to Bosnia and Angola to pub- 
licize it not long before her death, 
one of the gestures that won her 
so much affection and admir- 
ation. It would be w ell fitting for 
some of the funds that have been 
collected to honor her memory 
— reports say SI billion — to be 
used for the next essential step. 

That is detection and clearing. 
The difficult and dangerous 
techniques now in use have 


scarcely changed since World 
War L* w hen mines came into 
widespread use. Some of those 
old ones still go off. With all the 
high-tech advances in munitions 
and weaponry since then, there 
has never been a determined ef- 
fort to devise more efficient 
techniques. In fact, detection has 
become hairier because of the 
use of plastic mines, which can't 
be found with a metal detea or. 

Bui the scientific principle of 
a much better way to find the 
mines has been " established. 
What is lacking is adeqeare re- 
search on design- engineering 
and production of mine-clear-, 
tag devices. Some years ago. 
British experts told me tbey 
were convinced that some SI& 
million and three or four years 
w ould be enough to mm out 
effective systems at a reason- 
able cost. Even if it took three or 
four times that much funding, it 
would clearly be an invaluable 
boon to humanity. 

The lack of research has been 
due to lack of motivation. 
Powerful and rich military re- 


search programs haven’t been 
interested because the military 
can satisfy its own needs, quite 
different from those of civilians- 
There has never been a . big 
enough buying-power market to 
interest commercial investors. 

Until now. by far the best 
. detection method.is using dogs 
trained at sniffing explosives. It 
is obvious that a chemical re- 
action device coold be designed 
to do what the dogs do. There 
have been some promising ex- 
periments. but they haven ’t had 
enough resources to solve the 
problem and find a way to re- 
duce costs. 

And yet the cost of the dam- 
age mines do is in foe billions. 
In addition to death and injuries, 
which require rehabilitation, 
prostheses, lifelong care, the 
deployed mines deny foe use of 
vast tracts of arable land to 
peasants who need to get back 
to fanning in the afteroiath of 
wartime destruction. ■ > . 

Africa has more mine-infec- 
ted territory than any other con- 
tinent. tot foe danger lies in 
many places. Even foe Falk- 
land^ still harbor fields of un- 


exploded names, left front ^ foe 
brief British-Argentine waf 1 
there. -•'• ! 

The decision to slop foie pro- 
ducticm and sowing of mines, if 
it is truly observed— and lhatil 
far from guaranteed — wilt 
keep the rate of casualties from 
increasing. B ut only clearing 
will end than. - - * 

To find foe way. to gel this 
done reasonably soon would be 

for foe^Prino^ Diana InntUt 
could become a self-supporting 
investment in care for mine vicr 
turn. When an economically at 
fordable device has been par- 
ented, royalties could be 
earmarked for care for foose^ 
now suffering and foe hundreds W- 



~ now suffering and tto hundreds 
of thousands who win suffer 
between now and then. . 

It is incredible foal so little 
has been done as yet. The at- 
tention .gcaaated by focrcanti 
paign to ban mines must also: 
and urgently,, be turned to the 
quite feasible task of getting nA 
of those already lurking in the 
ground. and threatening unborn, 
generations: ‘i 

e Flora Lewis r 


Quit Hammering the 



G ENEVA — There is a 
struggle going on in 


VJ snuggle going on in 
Switzerland today. It is a 
struggle between fury and 
shock. It is important that shock 
wins. It's not clear that it will. 

The fury here emerges from 
a widespread feeling that 
Switzerland has been unfairly 
singled out for profiting from its 
neutrality in World War II. This 


Bv Thomas L Friedman 


their grandparents. Rather it 
was an ambiguous cocktail of 
resistance, profiteering, self- 


serving neutrality, help for 
some Jewish refugees, inoiffer- 


fury lurks just beneath the sen- 
tences of any conversation 


tences of any conversation 
about foe Swiss-Holocaust- 
gold issue, and it occasionally 
bursts forth in anti-Semitism or 
anti-Americanism. 

The shock is foe shock of 
discovering that some of foe 
Swiss people's most cherished 
national self-images were 
myths: Their stand against the 
Nazis in World War n was not 
entirely the heroic saga, with 
pitchforks and rifles, related by 


some Jewish refugees, indiffer- 
ence to others and obstinacy by 
Swiss bankers when asked after 
the war to return money be- 
longing to Nazi victims. 

Analysts here acknowledge 
that without the sledgehammer, 
and shock treatment, from foe 
U.S. and Jewish organizations 
to get foe Swiss to confront these 
truths, Swiss banks would never 
have come clean. “You have to 
understand foe mentality of the 
bankers," says Guy Mettan, ed- 
itor of the Tribune de Genfcve. 
“It's not a robber mentality. 
They just lived behind the fron- 
tier that separated Switzerland 
and the rest of Europe. They 


never took consciousness of the 
Holocaust — so they could not 
recognize foe legitimate de- 
mands of foe survivors. But foe 
Swiss are not bad people. They 
needed an emotional shock, but 
now' what they need are just 
facts, presented coolly, with 
deadlines for responding." 

Though belated, the Swiss 
government response has been 
largely one of shock, not fury, 
and it has moved substantially 
to make amends. It established a 
5140 million fund from leading 
private banks; a government 
commission, led to foe Amer- 
ican Paul Volcker, to investi- 
gate the banks, and a commis- 
sion to investigate the Swiss war 
record. The government is hold- 
ing off. though, on a national 
vote on whether to set up a $4.7 


The Long Road From Little Rock 


W ASHINGTON — Forty 
years ago Thursday. 


yv years ago Thursday, 
nine African-American stu- 
dents took a long walk down a 
short block and integrated 
Central High School in Little 
Rock, Arkansas. 

I was 2 years old when those 
brave students walked through 
angry, jeering crowds, past 
armed soldiers to the front door 
of foe all-white Central High. 
h was not until years later that, 
as an African-American teen- 
ager, I had foe occasion to go to 
school with white children, in 
Marianna, Arkansas. 

And still it was not easy. 
After my school canceled a 
program celebrating the Rev- 
erend Martin Luther King 
Jr.'s birthday, students staged 
a sit-in. They were chased 
from the school grounds by 
firemen spraying high- 
powered blasts of water, The 
student officers, including 
myself, who had been meeting 
in the principal’s office were 
taken to the police station. We 
did not go rack to school that 
year. And when I did go back, 
I was not allowed to play 
sports, a severe penalty for 
someone who later went to 
college on a football and aca- 
demic scholarship. 


By Rodney E. Slater 


We have come a long way 
since then. Our economy is 
healthy, unemployment is'low 
and foe African-American 
middle class has grown sub- 
stantially. 

But despite our progress, 
we are slowed by unfinished 
business. We still are wary of 
those different from us. Too 
often, we talk less to each oth- 
er and more at each other, if 
we talk at all. As terrible as 
things were 40 years ago, at 
least people knew exactly 
where they stood. Things 
were out in foe open and on foe 
table. Ironically, racism clad 
in a hooded sheet was much 
more identifiable than much 
of the racism of today, which 
often wears a smile and a 
business suiL 

And tensions now go be- 
yond foe conflict between 
black and white; the vile burn- 
ing of churches, a resurgence 
of anti-Semitism and hostility 
toward new immigrants. 

But we have to learn to live 
together, because foe face of 
America is changing. Today 
in Hawaii, everyone is a 
minority. 


Soon this will be true of 
California. And 40 years from 
now, there will be no majority 
race in America. 

We can look at statistics 
and know what America will 
look like in the 21st century. 
But we have to look inside 
ourselves to determine what 
America wiU be like in foe 
'21st century. 

The president is asking all 
Americans to join him in a 
national conversation about 
race to face one another hon- 
estly across lines that still di- 
vide us. Clearly, now is foe 
time for honest dialogue, foe 
time to build a society that 
recognizes foe worth of all 
people and honors foe dignity 
of every person. 

Until eveiy American has 
real economic opportunity 
and first-rate educational op- • 
pomimty, there will be disr 
panties that will look like ra- 
cial discrimination, whether 


billion fund, foe interest from 
which would go to humanitari- 
an causes. Officials here fear 
that right now the Swiss public 
would vote it down. 

Which brings us bade fo fury. 
While foe official- response is 
impressive, the public mood is 
moving foe other way.' Many 
view the humanitarian funds as 
just another deal by the bankers 
to get the world, and foe Jews, off 
their backs. What is still seeded 
is a Swiss accounting with them- 
selves — one in winch they ac- 
knowledge that just because they 
host the Red Cross and foe UN 
doesn't absolve them of moral 
responsibilities in the world. 
That is a tough discussion which 
is only just beginning. 

' ‘For the first time. ' ' Francois 
Garai, a leading Geneva rabbi, 
told me, “there is a sense now 
that Switzerland was not quite 
clean at that time of foe war. I 
have contacts with other clergy. 
Before. we never spoke about the 
actions of Switzerland and foe 
banks during foe war, and now 
people bring it up with me.” 

The world has an interest in 
that discussion’s flowering, and 
not having it postponed or abor- 
ted by an upsurge of popular fury 
and defensiveness here. That is 
why it would be best now that 


everyone, inducting grandstand- 
ing U.S. politicians (read Sea; 
ator AlfbnseD’Amato), take one 
step back, put down- the ema= 
tional sledgehammers and just 
let the cool facts do foe talking^ 
“The Swiss government has 
done so much and gotten so little 
credit that more threats now^ 
would really be counterproduc^r 
tive,” says Undersecretary of 
State Stuart Eizenstat, who' has 
overseen foe U.S. investigation 
into the Swiss gold affair. f 
'Che Swiss will never open up 
inside if they think there win 
never be closure from the out* 
side. They will never focus otj, 
foe past if they feel perpetually . 
besieged in foe present Said 
Bernard Ziegler, former go\£ 
emor of Geneva and a director 
of one of foe Holocaust aid 
funds: “People here always 
thought that we were better than 
all others. This debate bow » 
good because, it shows the 


Swiss that they are not bettef .m 
They did good things and bad^ 


They did good things, and badf 
things. And if all of this is " 
handled right, something good 
may come out of. it It might 
bring the Swiss out of their iso- 
lationism and teach them to# 
they have to show more soli- 
darity ytith other people. * ' -,-j. 

The New York Tunes. i 


IN OUR PAGES; 100. 75 AND SO YEARS AGO 


1897: Clouds Looming 


Paris - — [The Herald says in 
an Editorial:] Two storm 
centres, bringing threatening 
war clouds to America, are vis- 
ible on the horizon of foe West- 

Pm h^TYIlCnhara ftn.* »L. 1 4- 


— vu^ tt car 

cm hemisphere ami the diplo- 
matic barometer is falling. One 
comes from Japan and presages 
a disturbance over the Hawaiian 
klands. The other comes from 
Spain and portends a cyclone in 
the West Indies over Cuba. Per- 
haps both may burst at once. 
However, as to Cuba, there is 
perhaps less danger, because 
foe diplomatic resources of 
Spain and foe United Stales 
have not yet been exhausted. 


they are or not. 
Laws can H 


Laws can change institu- 
tions, but they cannot change 
whar is in people’s hearts. 


Kemal. This is foe alarming 
news which the British Govern- 
ment communicated to Lord 
Balfour to-day [SepL 25], with w 
request that he should make an 
appeal to the nations assembled 
h^e to double their collective a 
effom to remove foe refuge^F- 

nom the devastated city and fin:- 
nrsh them with food. 


1947; Hirohito Cleared 


1922: Refugees in Peri] 


The writer is US. secretary 


of transportation. He contrib- 
uted this comment rn The 


uted this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


GENEVA-;- Two hundred 
foousand Christian refugees^ 
Smyrna arc in grave peri! of mas- 
sacre, despite the fact that peace 
negotiations are under wavt»- 
tween foe Powers and Mustapha 


TOKYO — f- Chief Prosecutor 
Joseph B. Keenan absolved Jap 1 
Empetor Hirohito today 
[Sept. 25] of any responsibility 
for the Pacific war in a statement 
to an international tribunal here. 
Tto following was- the prosed 
cation position: “A group of 
gangsters seized control of the 
Japanese government and are rer- 
sponsible for waging war against m 
foe United States. They deceived ¥ 
Hirohito and defrauded the Jap- 
anese people into believing 
“»P»or was with them in wa* 
fors aggressive warfare. ’ ’ 


t m '*•< 






c^JA 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


For Some in Britain, the Weeping Was Overdone 


.* L '-'.Ti- 

r.;:^ s. is 
- ! 

■ : 


■ .'/.*■ 1 
■' n * I 


> 


f> i the Gr 


0«1 


icf. 








L ONDON — The scene is a London 
cocktail parry, not long after the fu- 
neral of Diana. Princess of Wales. On the 
surface, all is as it should be: There are 
canapds, crudiufs and champagne, men in 
suits, a speech from the man whose birth- 
day it is. But if you had watched the 
mournful crowds laying flowers at Kens- 
ington Palace, the conversation might 
strike you as somewhat odd. 

“Wasn’t it ghastly." one guest says to 
another. (He means the funeral, not the 
accident.) “The British press at its 
worst," die other agrees. (He means the 
adulation granted posthumously to Diana, 
not the paparazzi who chased her during 
the last month of her life.) 

A journalist muses abour Nuremberg 
rallies and mass hysteria; a historian says 
that the sight of the mob baying for the 

? |ueen to make a public statement of regret 
or doe death reminds him of the behavior 
of the London mobs in the Middle Ages. 

A former government minister lowers 
his voice when speaking: “1 don’t want to 
say it too loudly," he explains, “but I 
think Charles Spencer should be horse- 
whipped back to South Africa." 

He was referring to the funeral oration 
made by Diana's brother, during which 
Lord Earl Charles Spencer implied that 
the Spencer family was better suited than 
(he royal family to raise the princess's 
son s. Given that Lord Spencer lives 
abroad, has hardly spent much time with 
the young princes over the past few years 
and has not had the most tranquil of 
private lives, the former government min- 
ister thought this a bit rich. 

But then, so did many other people. 
Y ou could have had a similar conversation 
anywhere in Britain since the accident, in 


By Anne Applebaum 


a restaurant, over the telephone, at a din- 
ner party — anywhere, that is. except in 
public. No one spoke critically of the 
princess or her brother on the television 
news. On the contrary, all of the very un- 
British talk was of the “nation mourning" 
or of what the “people" felt about the 
“people's princess." 

Not many newspapers dated criticize 
the motives of those laying flowers, either. 
Stiff upper lips slackened, as editors fell 
over one another to see who could con- 
tribute more money to the charity fund now 
set up in the princess’s honor in between 
printing long, saccharine interviews with 
people who slept on sidewalks for two days 
so they could see the funeral. 

Certainly, no politicians have com- 
plained publicly about the manner in 
which events have unfolded, not even 
when the frequently unfair press criticism 
of the queen or Prince Charles got dan- 
gerously out of hand. 

Prime Minister Tony Blair abandoned 
British reserve altogether, allowing his 
voice to crack when speaking of Diana, 
while the leader of the opposition Con- 
servative Party, William Hague, has help- 
fully suggested Heathrow Airport be re- 
named in her honor. This prompted one of 
the more daring newspaper columnists to 
suggest this was not, perhaps, the best sort 
of memorial: thousands of people com- 
plaining they had “lost their luggage at 
Princess of Wales. ' ’ 

Something much worse, or certainly 
much more powerful, than political cor- 
rectness has taken hold of the British 
media and the British political elite: para- 


lyzing fear of saying anything negative 
about Diana, or the people publicly 
mourning Diana, or the ideas of the people 
publicly mourning Diana. 

Do not be misled by television or the 
British press. The great 19th-century Brit- 
ish prime minister Benjamin Disraeli once 
spoke of Britain as a country of “two 
nations," by which he meant the rich and 
the poor. Britain once again feels like two 
nations: those who ore still weeping in 
public, and those who quietly find the 
public weeping extremely hard to take. 

How to explain the divide? I thought at 
first that it Had to do with access to in- 
formation about Diana. Anyone who 
worked on a newspaper knew, for ex- 
ample, that she courted publicity when it 
was in her interest to do so and dealt 
happily with the correspondents of 
tabloids when she desired their attention 
— which does take the edge off the idea 
that, in Lord Spencer's words, she was the 
“most hunted woman in the world." 

Equally, anyone who had access to old 
clipping files could easily find the less- 
flattering stories — about how the prin- 
cess had. for example, dissociated herself 
from most of her charities a few years ago, 
in most cases by sending a terse fax. 

But plenty of people without any spe- 
cial access to Diana felt the same way. At 
least one banker friend announced that he 
and his other banker friends had been 
supporting one another's skepticism by e- 
raail: frequent messaging, he explained, 
made them feel less isolated amid the 
general public uproar. 

This being Britain, I then assumed the 
divide must be a class thing. The working 
classes were mourning the lost fairy-tale 
princess. The higher reaches of society — 


again, those who knew her or knew 
someone who knew her — were less likely 
to describe her as “England's Mother 
Teresa." 

Thai was until 1 got into a taxi the day 
before the funeral. 

"Going out of town this weekend?" 
asked the driver. 

"No." I said. 

“I sure wish I was," he said empha- 
tically. Far from submitting to the general 
mood of grief, as one would expect during 
what was described as a * ‘national crisis, ' ’ 
he began complaining bitterly about 
traffic. 

Perhaps, then, it was a left/right, La- 
bour/Tory divide? 

Not quite. It is true that committed 
monarchists took the queen's side after the 
anger against her. And the traditionalist 
Prince Charles camp always disliked the 
more * ‘modem’ ’ Princess of Wales. But it 
is also the case that many of my left-wing, 
anti-monarchist friends have felt less than 
pleased about the events. 

"I thought we were a liberal democ- 
racy," fumed one of them, “not a mob 
dictatorship." 

The division probably cannot be ex- 
plained sociologically. I’ suspect it comes 
down to a question of character. Some 
people want to invent a saint; some people 
do not. Along with the banker and the taxi 
driver, I think it is possible to respect the 
princess’s good works, to feel sad that a 
young woman died violently, yet not to 
delude oneself into believing' that she was 
something that she was nor. 

The writer, a columnist for the Sunday 
Telegraph in London, contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post. 


Bill Clinton, Faulkner 
And Southern Baroque 


Bv Carlos Puentes 


P ARIS — During this month, 
which marks the centennial of 
William Faulkner's birth, I am 
reminded of a dinner a couple of 
summers back at William Styx- 
on 's house on Martha's Vineyard. 
The Colombian novelist Gabriel 
Garcfa MArquez and I were guests 
at the dinner Mr. Styron offered in 
honor of President Bill Clinton. 

After an hour or so of political 
talk, the president said that, fmd- 

MEANWHILE 

ing himself surrounded by 
writers, he would like to know the 
favorite novel of each of us. Mr. 
Styron. expectedly and to general 
applause, chose Mark Twain's 
“Huckleberry Finn.” 

Mr. Garcfa Marquez’s choice 
was far less expected: ‘ ‘The Count 
of Monte Crisro," by Alexandre 
Dumas. Why? Because it is the 
greatest novel on education, Mr. 
Garcfa Mfirquez answered. You 
throw a barely literate young sail- 
or into a dungeon of the Chateau 
d’lf and 15 years later he comes 
our knowing mathematics, astron- 
omy, physics, high finance, three 
dead languages and seven living 
ones — as well as all the gossip of 
the current Parisian scene. 

I was about to tell the truth — 
"Don Quixote" by Cervantes is 
my favorite novel — but I bit my 
tongue and opted for second best, 
William Faulkner’s “Absalom, 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Do Hie 


Free Trade’s Benefits 

Regarding "Globalization's 
Depredations Arc Real and Bru- 
tal" (Opinion, Sept. 25) by Wil- 
liam Pfaff: 

- Mr. PfafT s arguments exagger- 
ate the impact of globalization on 
the freedom of national govern- 
ments to manipulate economic be- 
havior. At best, the ability of na- 
tional governments to meddle in 
their subjects’ lives has stabilized 

Second, he ignores the econom- 
\ ic consequences of free trade, 
* which have been overwhelmingly 
positive, most of all for workers. 
Look at die growth in wages in the 
Asian “tiger" nations in the last 
20 years. Does Mr. Pfaff think 
Taiwan's workers would like to go 
back to artisanal manufacture? 

.• No system of economic devel- 
opment is perfect. There are al- 
ways casualties. The evidence 
shows that the damage caused by 
free trade is infinitesimal com- 
pared with protectionist policies, 
particularly in corrupt oligarchies. 

W. REGINALD HALL 
Hong Kong. 

Prosperity and Peace 

- Edward Said’s article (“There 
Can Be No Peace Without Re- 
spect.'' Opinion . Sept. 11 ) plainly 
reflects a deep wound in his na- 
tion's psyche. This is understand- 
able, for despite its strategic lo- 
cation, the glop' of its Islamic 
culture and the immense reserves 


of oil with which it is graced, the 
Arab world has failed to make the 
grade in the 20th century. 

Mr. Said's woe is mine too, for 
1 too am desperate for peace. 
However, without a prior social, 
political and economic conver- 
gence of Palestinian and Israeli 
societies. Middle East peace will 
not happen. The Palestinian 
people must see and feel direct 
benefits from the peace if it is to 
last. There is no greater threat to 
peace than a people that is bitter 
and frustrated. 

Instead of haggling over a hec- 
tare here and a dunam there. Yas- 
ser Arafat should be demanding 
the means to establish a social 
security system whose payments 
to the unemployed would both 
ease their pain and jump-start the 
Palestinian economy. 

Mr. Axafarmust leant, as his 
rivals in the radical Islamic move- 
ments have, that at the end of die 
20th century, the loyalty of the 
citizenry has more to do with 
health care than with die arming 
of the police force. 

And Israel must be prepared to 
pay for peace, not just in terms of 
land but in cash. It must recognize 
that die prosperity of its neighbors 
is a primary Israeli interest. 

When the standards of the Pal- 
estinian police and legal system, 
together with its social security 
and public administration, accord 
with those of modem, enlightened 
societies, not only will the Pal- 
estinians be able to live a decent 


life of independence and democ- 
racy, but many Jews, too, will be 
willing to live under their jur- 
isdiction. This is the way to solve 
the settlements issue. 

Mr. Said is right to blame Israel 
for his woes, but not for the rea- 
sons he cites. The greatest mis- 
fortune to befall the Palestinians 
in the 20th century was not the 
creation of the state of Israel, but 
their subsequent pathological ob- 
session with it. They must get over 
the fact of Israel’s existence and 
learn that living well is die best 
form of revenge. 

JEREMY LPFEFFER. 

Rehovot, Israel. 

Germany’s Future 

Regarding “While Kohl Tours 
New Currency, Many Germans 
Cry: 'Not Again!'" (Sept. 19): 

I found the report comprehen- 
sive and well-balanced. To com- 
pare Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
with Bismarck in regard to Euro- 
pean monetary union is, however, 
unfortunate. 

Bismarck was wary of people 
who talked about “Europe" be- 
cause he suspected that they hid 
their own interests behind it. He 
was confident enough both to de- 
fend German interests and to pay 
due respect to the interests of oth- 
er nations. 

This is an art Germans should 
leam again, instead of wasting 
time on the kind of idiot-proof 
devices Mr. Kohl seems to be 


looking for. Germany's future is 
too high a price to' pay for its 
past 

CLAUDIUS KLEIN. 

Berlin. 

A Troubling BiO 

Regarding “An Unnecessary 
Focus on Religious Persecution “ 
(Opinion, Sept. 13) by Anthony 
Lewis: 

I found Mr. Lewis's article on 


the Freedom From Religious Per- 
secution Act troubling. As an 
American living and working 
abroad, it has become increas- 
ingly clear to me that my fellow 
countrymen and women are mov- 
ing further and further into a self- 
imposed form of global isolation. 

As a Christian minister, I am 
alarmed to see that the religious 
right is the political force behind 
this equivocal act. which appears 
to have the potential to upset die 


delicate balance of international 
relations with countries such as 
China and Saudi Arabia. 

It is clearly not in the best in- 
terest of the United States, nor of 
the Christian community, to ap- 
prove legislation such as this, 
which would only be viewed by 
die global community as a knee- 
jerk reaction by an obstreperous 
element of American society. 

REVEREND BOB WHITE. 

London. 


WUHUME 
SOU PONE 

yum • 



Absalom!" I knew we all wanted 
u> hear Mr. Clinton speak about 
his own land, die South, in which, 
said Katherine Anne Porter, "we 
are the children of a lost war." 

Mr. Clinton then spoke with 
great frankness and emotion of his 
childhood and early youth in 
Arkansas. He spoke of die ten- 
sions within his family and within 
his society. As a teenager, he told 
us, he took a bus to Oxford, Mis- 
sissippi, in order to visit the house 
of William Faulkner just to satisfy 
his certainty that the South was 
more than racism, burnt churches 
and the Klan. It was also the land 
of William Faulkner. The South 
could also produce a great literary 
genius. He went on to quote a 
couple of passages, not the easiest 

At dinner, the 
president quoted 
passages from ‘The 
Sound and the Fury . 9 

ones, from “The Sound and the 
Fury.’ * The next day, Mr. Garcia 
Marquez and I hurried to Mr. Sty- 
ron’s library and checked out the 
accuracy of the quotes. They were 
almost verbatim. 

When I was a young man, Wil- 
liam Faulkner was not regarded as 
a universal or even national writer 
but as a "regional" author, dis- 
missed as a "Dixie GongorisL" 
Well, for a Latin American, to be 
compared to Lois de Gong ora, the 
great baroque 17th-century Span- 
ish poet, was, even if meant pe- 
joratively, no mean tribute. 

But then, was this what the 
American South and Latin Amer- 
ica, Faulkner and we had in com- 
mon? Not the culture of the North, 
where "nothing succeeds like suc- 
cess." but the culture of the South, 
where defeat is not unknown? 

The baroque — a style marked 
by extravagant, complex, ambigu- 
ous and bizarre forms — is the 
aesthetics of the New World, the 
art that permits die vanquished In- 
dians and the enslaved Africans to 
recover their gods and their dreams 
under the domes of Christianity. 

It is also, thanks to Faulkner, 
the literary space where the South 
can recognize itself fully as a mul- 
tiracial, modem society. History, 
in Faulkner's novels, is rooted in 
die present, where we can all 
come together in remembrance 
and desire. For, as he himself put 
it, “The present, you know, began 
10,000 years ago. but the past 
began one minute ago." 

The authors most recent book 
is "A New Time for Mexico." This 
article was distributed by the Los 
Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “Letters 
to the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 




BOOKS 


SIBERIAN LIGHT 

By Robin White. 441 pages. 
S23.95. Delacorte. 

Reviewed by 
Anthony Olcott 

S OME of the best new mys- 
teries today are the detekt- 
iv s being banged out by Rus- 
sians, who are scribbling 
furiously to turn quick baksy 
on their comurymen’s insa- 
tiable appetite far pulp fiction. 
^Flailing about in the moral fog 
' V> of present-day Russia, the new 
Russian mysteries are raw, in- 
tense and — so far at least — 
seldom translated. 

■ Which is why Robin 
White’s “Siberian Light" is 
heartily recommended to any 
mystery fan curious about the 
Russian detekrivs but disin- 
clined to invest the time nec- 
essary to master Russian. Set 
in the oilfields of Siberia, 
White's novel manages to en- 


compass all the paradoxes of 
Russian life today. 

Gregori Nowek, a pedo- 
logist fired for trying to pre- 
vent a pipeline spill, has got- 
ten himself elected mayor, 
largely on the strength of his 
campaign slogan, “Be Hon- 
est, Can I Do Any Worse?" 
Nowek* s village is sunk in 
poverty and decay, its only 
source of income the Amer- 
Rus oil exploration joint ven- 
ture, which, alarmingly, isn’t 
pumping much oil Even 
Nowek’s 16-year-old daugh- 
ter would prefer to become a 
"hostess” in Hong Kong 
rather than remain in that 
■ blighted Siberian bog. 

Some people, though, are 
gening rich: Kaznin, once the 
regional KGB head, now in 
“private security”; Ynfa, 
head of the local mq/zyo; and 
Ryzkhov, a “fixer." Except 
that persons unknown have 
now slit Ryzkhov ’s throat, 


also killing two of Nowek’s 
cops, who stepped in at the 
wrong moment His town has 
no funds io pay their salaries, 
so Nowek frets he should at 
least see where the cops (tied: 
when it becomes clear that 
someone wants desperately to 
hush these murders up, 
Nowek decides to find oat for 
himself what really happened. 
When some stray pebbles 
from the lugs of the killer's 
boot point the ex-geologist 
mayor in -the direction of the 
Americans, Nowek knows 
that the price of truth could 
well be his own neck. In the 
best traditions of both the 
American hard-boiled detect- 
ive story and the new Russian 
detektiv, Nowek gets stabbed, 
beaten and nearly drowned but 
still plods ahead. 

Luce the novel's sex mur- 
derer, its man-eating tiger and 
tihe “terrible secret” of its 
climax. White’s heroine. 


Anna, is one of the many 
* ‘for-Hollywood ’ ’ touches 
thar make "Siberian Light" 
an Americanization rather 
than a genuine detektiv. A 
world-class biologist hying 
to save the Siberian tiger, 
Russian by blood bat Amer- 
ican by birth, and drop-dead 
gorgeous even in taiga boots, 
Anna is also supposed to look 
exactly like Nowek’s adored 
bnt dead wife. 

However, "Siberian 
Light'* is only Americanized; 
it is not false. Indeed, one of 
the puzzles of this novel is 
how an author who muffs so 
many little details — not- 
quite- Russian names, mis- 
translated Russian phrases, 
and sach oddities as Nowek’s 
claim to Anna that Soviets of 
his age “had to memorize”' 
Pasternak’s Zhivago poems 
in school — can get the over- 
all Russian-ness of this novel 
so incredibly, vividly correct. 


BRIDGE 


AlanTmscott 



VTTHE 12ft annual charity 
X game for the Israel Can- 
cer Research Fund was won 
by Selina Schlechter. 

1 Schlechter gained on the 
amftri deal shown at 
, which presented South 
... w a borderline deci si on: 
whether to overcall the open- 
ing one-heart bid with two 
dubs. 

■ If South was vulnerable, 
the overcall would be unwise, 
but as it was most players 
*ere w illing to venture. Since 
. East-West can make a part 
' in hearts or no-trump, 
- • are likely to score badly 
« titty choose to defend. 
“Njfcver, Schlechter passed 
and passed for pen- 
when- her partner re- 


opened with a double. Down 
one would be a good result for 
the declarer, and down two 
good for the defense. 


NORTH (D) 
*886 
OK868 
$ 7854 


WEST 
+ K72 
942 
OQ JM8 
*K1073 


EAST 

• A <2 4 
9Q/1079 
9K93 

* Q 5 

SOUTH 
A J 10 5 3 
9 A 8 
0A2 

*A0*42 

East and West were vutoera**- 

Wen 
Pass 
Pass 


The butting: 

Sana 

Nonb 

East 

Pass 

19 

2* 

Pass 

DU. 

P m 

Pin 




West tod tte mart tour. 


South was sure to lose three 
spade tricks and a diamond, 
bnt the prospects in the trump 
suit were obscure. 

The heart lead was won by 
the ace. Sooth cashed the dia- 
mond ace and surrendered a 
trick in that suit East won and 
played a third round, which 
was raffed. South exited with 
a spade, and the defenders 
took the queen, ace and king. 
West led her remaining dia- 
mond, East discarded and 
South raffed. Dummy was 
entered with aheartleadtotbe 
king, leaving the position 
shown at right. 

South led the club jack from 
dummy, and had no chance of 
i y«iring more than one trick, 
for down two, when East 
covered with the queen- Lead- 
ing a heart and discarding the 
spade jack does not help. 


The right play is to lead a 
heart and ruff with the club 
eight, insuring a second club 
trick and down one. The even- 
tual winners scored 92 out of a 
possible 100, but would have 
received only 26 if South had 
escaped for down one. 


NORTH 


WEST 

♦ — 

988 

9 — 

EAI 

*- 


♦ - 

9 — 


9 Q J 

9 — 


9 — 

+ K1073 


*Q5 


SOUTH 


♦ J 

V- 
9 — 



One reason certainly is 
White's descriptions, which 
capture perfectly the chaos of 
new Russia, where Americ- 
an-style rownhouses are 
plunked down alongside tot- 
tering barracks and bucolic 
Siberian meadows sit 
drowned in spilled oil. 

The deeper and more sat- 
isfying accuracy of “Siberian 
Light,” however, springs 
from White’s sure sketching 
of Russia as a place where 
“ownership meant nothing, 
control, everything, and 
everything, absolutely 
everything, was up for 
grabs," a place where, as 
White points out. bribe-takers 
accept payment by Visa card. 
The most exhilarating part of 
reading the new Russian de- 
lektivs is to see them argue to 
their readers that no czar or 
commissar will lead them 
from what White calls a 
“shadowland,” because 
genuine justice springs only 
from the stubborn insistence 
of individuals to do what is 
right, no matter what this 
might cost them. 

Nowek’s determination 
not to be lied to, not to be 
pushed aside and not to let 
loved ones be trampled into 
the mud by others rushing for 
the trough would be almost a 
clich6 if (his novel were set in 
America. White has done 
such a convincing job of set- 
ting this simple heroism in 
Russia, however, that 
“Siberian Light" gives an 
excellent approximation of 
what it is like to watch the 
crime writers of Russia today 
struggling to build anew mor- 
alityamid the wreckage of 
their shattered history. 


Anthony Olcott, a profes- 
sor at Colgate University who 
is writing a book on Soviet 
and Russian detecdvefiction, 
wrote this for The Washington 
Post. 


Have you missed any of the 
International Herald Itlbune’s 

Sponsored Sections 

this year? 


Auctions in France 


Buflt for Bus ii ess: Bangladesh 
Buft for Business: China 
Bidt for Business: Hong Kong 
Buit for Business: India 
Buflt for Business: Indonesia 
BuR for Business: Japan 
Butt for Business: PMppmes 
Bull for Business: Singapore 
Butt for Business: South Korea 
Bull for Business: Thafland 
Business Education in France 
Business Education m the US 
Business Locations m Germany 
Business Locations ii Vienna 
Business to eBusiness: Balking 
By Spain: Cathedrals 

fly Spain: Gastronomic Bounty of the North 

By Spain: Musevns 

By Spain: Wforfd Heritage Cities 

Cadiac and Chevrolet in Europe 

CaSomia Wines 

Czech RepuMc 

Dubai 

EcfrEfftaency: Busness and tin Environment 
Egypt 

Egyptian Banking and Capital Markets 

Emerging Markets in Centra) & Eastern Europe 

Euro & financial Markets 

European Fine Arts 

Fast Track 97: Asia Business Outlook 

Frankfurt's New Congress Center 

Greek Teteco m munk a toons 

Holdays in Euope: European Drive Around 

Hofctays in Europe: London & Paris Shopping Breaks 

Holdays in Europe: UK Fly and Drive ’ 


Hotel Renaissance 
Hungary 

TFA: Advanced Electronics Showcase 

International Busness Education 

International Education in Benelux 

Hemationa Education in Germany and Austria 

International Education in Switzetind 

International Franchising 

Investing n Austria 

Investing in Austria: Vienna 

Investing in Poland 

Kansai 

Kyoto 

Luxury Real Estate 

Mauritius 

Mitsubishi 

Mobile Communications: GSM and Beyond 
MukflnguaSsm m Europe 
North America Summer Camps 
Office Equipment 

Portugal Update: Lisbon Stock Exchange 

Portugal Update: Telecom 

Russia 

Summer in New York 
Tanzania 

Technology 4 The Environment 
Thaiand 

The Automobile Industry in Europe 

The Interactive Industry 

Trade Fairs & Congresses in Germany 

Travel for Knowledge 

Travel in Asia: Best Beaches 

Travel in Asia: Festivals 

Travel in Asia: Golf 

Turkey: Busness Update 

Uganda: A Regional Powerhouse 

Yachting 


Now available on the IHT Web site: 





TOE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


http://\A/wwjht.com / / IHT/SUP/mdex.html 




PAGE 


international herald tribune 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


At Home in Ireland: 


E A Taste of Old and New 

From Cottages to Apartments 


By J. ML Fenster 

UBUN — The Earls of Enmstal- 
lea don’t live at Florence Court 
anymore. They no longer enjoy die 
view from the 18th-century man- 
sion to the wilds and hills of County Fa- 
tnanagli in Northern Ireland. Nor do they sit in 
the salons, all plasterwork andgood paint- 
ings, waiting for a servant to bring a morsel 
£rom the cavernous kitchen below. The last 
earl left in 1973; these days the National 
Trust, which owns Florence Court, locks it up 
as soon as the last tour leaves. But visitors 
staying at Rose Cottage, a house in the midst 
of the Florence Court gardens, can still rail 
asleep in the hush of the old estate. 

The National Trust, which has accommo- 
dations for guests at about 230 of its histone 
properties and natural preserves in England, 
wales and Northern Ireland, started renting 
Rose Cottage three years ago. It is one of four 
such sites (with a total of 13 cottages) in 
Northern Ireland, all of them either on the 
ocean or attached to great houses. 

In the Republic of Ireland, private property 
owners rent apartments or cottages to va- 
cationers under similar conditions: a cata- 
logue published by the Irish Tourist Board, 
“Ireland Self-Catering Guide," lists historic 
accommodations in addition to modem cot- 
tages available by the score, especially near 
the ocean. 


\ St 


Jfi&u&t. 

NORTHERN 

IRELAND 


■*&**£• f IRELAND ?■: “ 

J i 

: .«• C .FERMANAGH •’ '■ . 

> — <.'-£■ / ' Bertas! -• 

' .EnnisWllen - * ! 

xiA ^ 

/ ~ V ^ 

/ LSTHIM Florence Court 
Dromahair Rose Cottage •; JrJaii • 

Beech . £Tic j 

Cottau 

. IRELAND OUBUN > 

OuWn ;■ 

• - i Bachelor's Walk ; ‘ ' ‘ 

0 Mites 20 . 

The jeew York Tuccs 

To rent a home is to live in Ireland, not 
merely to visit in the isolation of a hotel room. 
The pace is much different; the simplest 
chores reveal correspondingly simple graces, 
and moreover, there is no pressure to get up 
and out in the morning. 

Inspired by my own ancient dream of buy- 
ing a house in Ireland. I decided to rent three 
homes over the course of 10 days last March 
with my parents. Two of the places were in the 
countryside and one was in Dublin. 

Rose Cottage 

The directions on the confirmation read. 
“The key will be on the oak tree by the 
driveway." That was check-in. Rose Cottage 
is just off the lane leading to Florence Court, 
and out of sight of the mansion; a two-story, 
tum-of-the-cenmry brick house with win- 
dows framed in white and lined with lace 
curtains. Built as the head gardener's res- 
idence, it overlooks the estate's formal rose 
garden from nearly every room. 

The interior was renovated in 1994 to in- 
clude two bedrooms and two bathrooms, a 
kitchen, a living room and a dining room. The 
kitchen is fully equipped, with a small table of 
its own looking out on a private corner of the 
garden. The cottage has modem appliances, 
including a washing machine ana a tele- 
vision. 

Florence Court, which is open drily for 
tours from May to August, plus weekends in 
April and September, is surrounded by a 
national forest-park, with marked trails past 
oak trees hundreds of years old, beech groves 
and yews. There are also private stables a 
half-mile from the estate that offer riding. 

The nearest village is Florencecourt, which 
is within walking distance of Rose Cottage. It 
has a business district consisting of a grocery 
store, in which a friendly dog will show you to 
the post office in -the back. The city of Lon- 
donderry is about 90 minutes away, Donegal 
about an hour, making for two good day trips. 
We had things to do in both, mostly involving 
favorite old restaurants and stores. 

Admittedly, it was stupid to have the run of 
an 1 Sth-century estate and then dash out every 
morning in the car to do other dungs; however, 
that was the case. Usually, it was Enniskillen’s 
fault. The 500-year-old casde there is now a 
dazzling military museum; the local profes- 
sional theater was staging "Pygmalion," and 


KIDS 


the cafe called Johnston’s has apple pie well 
worth forsaking an estate for. Late one af- 
ternoon we went to a livestock auction, which 
was unforgettable as entertainment (unlike 
“Pygmalion* ’); weathered farmers standing in 
a semicircle, all tweed coats and rubber boots, 
with a pair of nimble youths to choreograph, 
the anfmals in and out of a muddy pit. 

Beech Cottage 

L eit rim is a rural county in the Republic of 
Ireland, which differs from Northern Ireland 
most obviously in that the roads are worse and 
the brogues less marked. Beech Cottage, lo- 
cated in the countryside near Dromahair, is a 
manor house completely tailored in ivy. It is 
also abusy equestrian from that expanded into 
new bams about four years ago so that the 
original 19th-century stable could be refur- 
bished into a row of four apartments. Little 
was done to the exterior, where cool stone 
walls are cheered up by bright red doors and 
the beginnings of another blanket of ivy. 

Asking over the telephone for the most 
■‘historic’’ apartment, we were assigned to 
No. 4, which nas an exposed stone wall on (he 
interior. On the end of the stable, it overlooks 
the working bams and the show ring of the 
riding academy. 

The first floor of No. 4 is a large, open 
combination kitchen and living room. There 
isn't a dining table, except for the breakfast 
bar that helps define the kitchen area, and so 
one makes oneself very much at home — 
dining off the coffee table in from of the 
television. The two bedrooms, on the second 
floor along with the bathroom, are small, but 
they have an airy, almost Nordic atmosphere, 
with pine furniture and retractable skylights. 

Set back in a glade. Beech Cottage is off a 
main road leading in one direction to the well- 
kept village of Dromahair, and in the other to 
a pristine lake. Lough Gill, and the sea about 
15 miles farther west To stay in one of the 
apartments is to be part of a bustling es- 
tablishment, with pets and people around and 
going about their business. By nightfall, 
though, the work is done and everyone goes 
home. For those who are at home in the stable, 
the quiet is that of the country at night. 

On a Sunday, 1 asked if 1 could go down and 
say hello to the horses. “It's their day off." I 
was told. Guests can easily arrange to ride in 
the ring or cross-country, by the day or week, 
in lessons or on hacking time, but not on 
Sundays. 

Bachelor's Walk 

The Dublin apartment is in a large new* 
building, called Bachelor’s Walk Apart- 
ments, along the Liffey River at the Ha'penny 
Bridge. One of five rented on a short-term 
basis by Hilltop Court Business Services, it is 
on the ground floor, facing a mews that was 
lined by old garages when we stayed there 
(some have since been demolished, to make 
way for a hotel going up on the site). 

Contemporary in decor, and not especially 
Irish in character, the small flat has one bed- 
room, a living room that had a fold-out futon- 
couch during our stay (most units have sofa- 
beds now), a stand-up kitchen and one full 
bathroom. The furnishings are comparable to 
those in a midgrade hotel. However, the nice 
midgrade hotel (Buswells) where we had 
stayed the year before currently charges 
around $225 a night for a double room; the 
flat at Bachelor’s Walk — equally comfort- 
able. equally convenient — costs $92 a night 
or $385 for a week. 

By the time we arrived at Bachelor’s Walk, 
we had quite a little household in tow: half- 
open bodies of everything from Fairy Liquid 
soap to Beefeater's gin to make the place 
seem familiar. 

Bachelor's Walk is truly in the center of 
Dublin. One side of the building overlooks 
the Liffey River, and the nearest cross street is 
O'Connell, die main drag in town The 
farthest walk we took was a 45-minute hike 
home after dropping off the rental car. 
Everything else was within about 10 minates’ 
walk. 

Dublin has changed into quite a hotshot 
city, one where you have to actually keep up 
with the latest One night, after seeing an 
excellent play at a tiny amateur playhouse, we 
started to rouse ourselves to that obligation to 
get with it, thinking about foe trendiest places 
of the moment to go for supper. I had a yen for 
leftover spaghetti, though, fried up in a pan. 
and served with wine imported from Droma- 
hair. Luckily, I knew just where to get 
some. 

J M. Fenster, who writes about history and 
culture, and visits Ireland often, wrote this for 
The New York Times. 



The monastery of San Martino in the Vomero district: streetside shrines dor the Spanish Quarter. 

Naples: Tale of Two Neighborhoods 


Bv John Domini 

APLES — “Questae Napoli." declares 
the waitress. With the city’s trademark 
cynicism, more juice than rind, she says 
her tranoria hires only family because 
strangers entail taxes and paperwork. Blood is 
thicker, and cheaper. This is S’apies. 

Her neighborhood, however, looks little like the 
city tourists know. There is no cluster of medieval 
palazti over Roman paving on a Greek plan. 
There’s no laundry on public display. That Naples, 
the postcard Naples, isn’t far — the Spanish 
Quarter, the ancient seaport at its crankiest, is just 
five minutes downhill by tbe funicular railway. 

My trattoria, new and’ still without a name when 
1 was there in May, is in the Vomero. home to lhe 
city’s upper middle class. Around me stretch broad 
I9th-and 20th -century boulevards. After lunch, for 
my digestivo. I’ll walk to Villa Floridiana. a spa- 
cious and airy park with sweeping views of the 
waterfront, the islands and the sea. 

In the Spanish Quarter and the Vomero one 
encounters Naples at its extremes: die former long 
impoverished, its inhabitants often testing the bor“ 
ders of criminality, and the latter newly booming, 
its population solidly bourgeois. At times, the 
neighborhoods seem to share nothing but their 
hillside boundary. 

The Spanish Quarter takes its name from the 
Spanish viceroys, rulers of the city for 200 years, 
beginning in 1504. Don Pedro de Toledo first laid 
out the thoroughfare still known as Via Toledo, 
now the neighborhood's downhill border, then 
developed the quarter as troop housing. The general 
population flooded in thereafter, but the layout 
retains a military grid. On the map it suggests a 
dollhouse checkerboard. On the street, it seems 
even smaller. Even if there were no foot traffic and 
construction work, if there weren’t the believers 
pausing at streetside shrines and the children scam- 
pering after cats and dogs and hens, and the Vespas 
zipping everywhere, if mothers didn’t sit out on 
their kitchen chairs keeping an eye on their babies 
and vendors didn’t stand on every comer hawking 
cigarette lighters or lottery predictions, water or 
Kleenex or (from a hidden drawer) illegal tax-free 
cigarettes — even if it weren’t for all this un- 
trammelled life in fee streets, the Quarter would 
offer no small physical challenge. Its east-west 
vicoli climb the slopes under the Vomero, and most 
of these alleyways turn into stairs. Its north-south 
parallels rise and fall only slightly less. And none of 
the buildings have elevators. 

Y ET this aerobic clamor conveys unique 
charms. I can think of no other neighborhood 
in Europe that offers so close an approx- 
imation of medieval city experience, footbound and 
communal Every street has its bassi. ground-floor 
apartments of- two rooms or even one, and fee 
inhabitants openly share their lives with passers-by. 
Hole-in-the-wali restaurants bear out tbe urban wis- 
dom that cheap amenities mean good food. 

Nor does any neighborhood this side of Granada 
possess such an Arabian feel. The Spanish arrived in 
Naples just after they’d driven out the Moors, and 
though the original three-story barracks have long 


since been buil: ^p. they retain the same Moorish 
details that marked fee golden age of Andalusia. The 
tw o shopping streets, Rgns Secca and Emmanuels 
de Deo. presets a carnival crash to rival any souk. 

The ruling faith, of courae. comes from Rome. On 
sains’ daysTyoang men vie for the honor of carrying 
the holy etngy* and every day fee power of church 
icons is evident in the streesitie shrines, many of 
which have been b place for 5C years or more: Tbe 
figures of worship, usually a Madonna and child, 
may be composed of sicre-boughi dolls or spangled 


Earlier, the hilltop had been home mostly &> , 
lemons and broccoli. Vomero is Italian for a hand- ; 
held plow, and peasants once worked, perhaps the . 
most beautiful farm terraces on earth there. Even 
now. streetside- vistas can leave a visitor dumb- 
struck. The classic panorama of city, bay and vol- , 
cano sweeps out beneath fee piazza at the end of Via - 
Tito Angelini 800 feet above die Spanish Quarter. , 
Across the street, from the Carthusian monastery. » 
of San Martino, is an even mom spectacular view. . 
San Martino, and the fortress Cartel Sant’Elmo . 


syringe to symbolize release from addiction — bits 
and pieces c? local life. Most sanctuaries hold fresh 
flowers, too. Nobody touches fee coin offerings. 

PROTECTING rts own The quarter protects its 
own. One spectacular crucifix stands at the in- 
tersection of Via Corcordia and Vico Colonne a 
Cariati. a crossing that is pair stairway and part 
street with a stirring view of the lower blocks. Yet 
if a couple of fee inhabitants of fee ouartieri choose 
to meet there, they will keep outsiders from know- 
ing where they're headed by using a well-nigh 
unpronounceable slang fer fee site. 

By Piazza \fo-rec2iv2rio. a homemade mural 
has lasted 3 dozer, years. A celebration of the 
Napoli club’s 19 ST ’ Italian professional soccer 
championship, fee painting links fee ream's star. 
Diego Maradona, to rw o other local gods, the writer 
Eduardo De Filippo and fee actor Toto. Likewise, 
fee gangs here don’t bother patrons of fee Team) 
Nuovo. The Team), on Via Moatecalvario, is or- 
dinary architecturally, but it has a proud history, 
having been in operation since if 24, 13 years 
longer than tbe San Carlo opera house. More than 
feat, it provided early exposure for many young 
artists, including De Filippo, and still features 
groundbreaking work in theater or film. 

But the kind of inner-city self-reliance that keeps 
the Teatro Nuovo from harm can also result in 
stunted horizons. Ten-year-olds can skip school 
and adults can grow- to accept street gangs and purse 
snatchings as a part of Neapolitan fee. 

In the ’90s. under the enlightened administration 
of Mayor Antonio Bassolino. Naples has at last 
begun to address these problems. In particular, 
workers have begun to take down / tubi. the jury- 
rigged scaffolding that has maned the quarter since 
the earthquake of 19S0. 

Now the area is noticeably emerging from its 
cage. Tbe Spanish Quarter Association, a citizens' 
group, has been developed to work with children at 
risk, and blocks are even gentrifying a bit. as down- 
town professionals cake advantage of the location. 
The quarter also now claims a gem of a hotel, die 
Toledo, where I had a comfortable, modem room 
with telephone, TV, desk and bathroom. Above the 


The complex includes, besides a museum, a . 
painting of the descent from the cross that some ■ 
claim is by Caravaggio (guidebooks say it’s by 
Ribera) and a swirling, dramatic ceiling painting of - 
fee Judith story by Luca Giordano. Out in the 
cloister gardens. Fanzago’s switchback stairways 
do their best to equal the stunning setting. 1 

♦'The Vomero’s next stage of development oc- 
curred farther downhill, in and around the Villa 
Floridiana, which is actually a park, unwinding 
along spiral pathways aroand its eponymous cen- 1 
tral mansion, now a ceramics museunLA gift from 
the Bourbon Ferdinand I to his lover, fee estate was •’ 
finished in 1819, lavishly stocked with exotic ‘ 
plants, in particular camellias. 

T HE villa itself was a place of legendaiy : 
sumptuousness. Countess Blesstegton (a'’ . 
writer and sharply observant friend to, among \ 
others. Lord Byron) said. that fee. bafe ‘Would/ 
admit not only of bathing, but of swimming.” . 
Much of feat finery is now gone, though Chinese ; 
vases and French tapestries still adorn the foyer. - 
Most visitors, however, .enjoy a different, mere r 
fragile extravagance: more than 6,000 ceramic; 
works from all over fee world, including feather- : 
perfect Meissen miniatures and fine local ma-j 
jolica. i.^r 

All in all, the Floridiana ’s park and museum: 
offer a textbook case of fee contrast that vivifies ; 
Italian cities. One emerges from roaring and stony j 
man-made constriction into lush greenery, scra- j 

polons artwork and Inspiring vistas. j 

Already comfortable, the Vomero, too, has got- ,• 
ten better over fee last few years. Like fete Spanish , 
Quarter, it has a new grass-roots organization ded- ► 
icated to local amelioration. Recent successes in- -I 
elude a park and pedestrian-only areas and a mod- > 
era hotel, fee Belvedere, built along Via Tito , 
Angelini in such a way feat every room looks out T 
over the city and the bay. ; 

My nameless trattoria, as it happens, was in the , 
opposite sort of place: a heavy traffic zone without , 
an overlook. 

And though I was struck by what the waitress > 


with telephone, TV, desk and bathroom. Above the said, by the way Naples remains Naples, I couldn’t .- . 
Teatro Nuovo. and roofed by a garden restaurant force a connection between the two neighborhoods, . # 
with small palms, lemon trees, cockatoos and tor- other than my rickety table, which mav well have , 


toises, ( the Toledo is often fee choice of visitors 
working in academics or the arts. In fee Vomero, 
gen trifi cation came with the territory. Only those 
with money could move up from downtown, par- 
ticularly during fee cholera outbreak of fee 1880s. At 
feat time, newcomers developed the neighborhood 
hub of Piazza Vanvitelli and its feeder boulevards. 


come from down fee hill. Yet a trip that includes , 
both odd bedfellows, rich in contrasting flavors like ; 
my Lunch of penne and octopus, hits the spot. 

Jofat Donum, a teacher in Portland, Oregon, 
who is working on a book about Naples , wrote this 
for The New York Times. ” 


Japanese Theme Park Puts Ninja Spin on Edo Culture 

Rv A/frtri Tontlranro ^ ^ 10USeS ^ Other in A live.lv mm. .t.- S a 


By Miki Tanikawa 

T OKYO — Children often make 
woeful travel partners when 
dragged to historical places. 
Visiting temples and shrines can 
prove an especially wearying experi- 
ence for children who would rather play 
their favorite video games or take a ride 
on the Space Mountain at Tokyo Dis- 
neyLand. But some of fee country's 
feeme parks provide entertainment at 
once Japanese, culturally instructive 
and fun for children. 

A few hours on fee train to die north- 
east of Tokyo lands visitors at fee hot- 
springs resort of Kinngawa, which is 
also famous for Nikko Edo Village. 

Reproducing the old town of Edo, 
which thrived from the 17th to 19th cen- 
tury in what is now Tokyo, the village 
brings to life fee charms of fee culture 
and entertainment of fee era. Across 50 
hectares (124 acres), neat rows of stores 


and houses line fee 
streets, a ferry drifts 
down a flowing river, 
and kimono-clad wom- 
en and sword-bearing 
samurai pass by. 

Of fee 22 attractions 
and shows staged 
daily, nothing captiv- 
ates children more than 
the ninja spectacles. In 
Ninja-karasuyashyiki 
(crick-house), ninjas 
engage in battle in a 
gimmick-filled house. 

Enemies attack from 
unexpected places, 
combatants reveal 
secret weapons, and a 
retreating ninja disappears through a 
hidden staircase that rises into fee ceil- 
ing. Meanwhile, an aerial battle between 
two ninja groups erupts overhead. Tbe 
spectators walk up a road through cedar 
woods as ninja warders chase one an- 




other in a lively com- 
bat feat accompanies 
provocative ex- 
changes of words. Tbe 
weapons, costumes, 
and the techniques all 
spring from the medi- 
eval period when the 
art or ninjutsu flour- 
ished as different 
schools of ninja vied 
for supremacy. 

Ninja gained force 
at the beginning of fee 
13th century when 
rival clans of samurai 
made use of these 
secret agents to spy 
out, assassinate or 
cany out commando raids against en- 
emies. 

While ninja and the Edo period are 
only loosely connected if at aU, Nikko 
Edo Village successfully plays on fee 
feeme by enticing fans to a broad array of 


ninja-related souvenirs that range from 
daggers, star-shaped throwing knives, 
brass knuckles and bamboo staves to 
more typical souvenirs such as mug cups, 
bags, and T-shirts bearing cartooned 
ninja characters. For entertainment feat is 
more unambiguously Edo, Nihon Demo 
Geino Gekijo presents a visually pleas- 
urable exhibition of Mizu-gei or water 
magic. Against the fine tunes of Japanese 
harp music, water spurts out from un- 


, , . zf . — - . j uic rtsaya tloteL 

ejected plac« m dus show performed rooms start at 13.000 yen (about $109) 
by women dressed in classic kimonos. for adults and 9, 100 for children Te? 

— 81-288-77-11-H. 

Other Attractions Chi the other hand, Ojika-en caters to 

ruu • , . , those seeking a genuinely Japanese am- 

Other naeeanrs inrlnHft rhe antv»or_ hipnr>» Tfc* .1 ."v 1 *™ 06 


Between performances, actors from (rides and attractions included) is 5_5G0 

for°nh^f t h0W i “ d . aKractions wil1 Pose yen (about $46) for adults and isOOfor 
for photos with visitors. children up to 12 years old. Tet il-288- 

Because of us proximity to Tokyo, 77-17-77. 7 

Nikko Edo Village is within easy teach Meanwhile, visitors to Kyoto can vis- 

for ra, lore saying there. Forthose who it Toei Movieland, a movie stadS^ 

f ? ?*“ Spa resor t ho f ever ’ toeme park. While recreating rityland- 
Asaya Hotel is among fee largest scapes of fee Edo era like Nikko Edo 
lodgings wife a fall-range of services VUkge, ft aL» ser^ds fee site for 
equivalent to international hotels in ma- maw Snan^Tf aT!/ 

rwim, 1 A AAA . . . ^ HOtfilj eras roll. Spectators can see hatrins nr 


Other pageants include the appear- bience. The traditional inn lodges^iests toaSfe SL? * pfirfesaonals help 
ance on the street of the famous Mfto- in detached units, each overlookmg a °P* DMike-UP , 

komon, down-to-earfe brother of the picturesque Japanese -SET m , : :? . ' • 

first shogun in fee Edo period, a 3-D rates start at 20,000 yen for adults half fees for Movieland in 

movie featuring battles between war- price for children Tel' 81-288 77 ifidi" 2.100 yen for adiilftand 900 t 

ring clans in Medieval Japan and fee fax: 81-288-77-2045.' Telephones mav 7? w 12 3*®*-°^ Tel: 81- ] 

Edo-era jailhouse exhibiting methods not be answered in English but /3 " 864-7716 - j 

employed by the authorities to coerce usually are. „ . , . — — — i 

confession from criminals. Admission for Nikko Edo Village inToky Tanikawa is a Journalist based] 


scapes of fee Edo era like Nikko Edo ; 
village, ft also serves as fee site for - 
many Japanese period movies. As cam- 
eras roll, spectators can see battles or 
scenes of romance. ' < 

Visitors can also step .bade 300 years j 
by wearing Edo-style costume to pose'* 
P^tograph or tour fee park. At the 1 
Make-Over House, professionals help i 
tounsts dress up, apply- make-up and ! 
don a wig. r v'r • 4 

Admission fees for Movieland in [ 
Kyoto are 2.100 yen for adults and 900 ! 


r. ..t 


™D Sws^2o3B5Sy«iSlf2dSi» R £S ** 

131- price for children. Tel: 81-288-77-1641- ^°i?u ,e2 ' 1 ® 5 ' eIlfora<IulB ahii900 i 
*e fax: 81-288-77-2045. Telephon« ™ v ’ » 12 olA Tek *1 - ) * 

S “ EnslSh bot 77,6 -__ ssefe 














Pa ^-ioW^ 


INTE RNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 

THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 


PAGE 11 


Getting a Grip on the Weather 


By Roger Collis 

—International Herald Tribune 


M OST business travelers 
have an urban (if not 
urbane) altitude towards 
the weather. You're in- 
doors most of the time sheltered from the 
elements in a sub-climatic world of air- 
conditioned offices, airport lounges and 
hotels. News of heavy rain means not 
being able u> get a taxi, or gening 
... drenched sprinting to the subway. Snow- 

» ing in New York? Well as long as you 
can land and get to the meeting. 

You've taken the usual precautions: 
stowing a compact umbrella to ensure 
..•••j.S-'V •ha 1 ** doesn’t rain or a heavy coat if 
• ; H fj lp you’re hoping for warm weather. You 
may glance at, say, the European weath- 
ilPrS? 4 er map in the paper, try to figure out the 
— . ■ ' ‘ ,f t symbols for overcast or sunny intervals; 

H is where you ’re go- 
^gii., 1 , ing on a cold front, 

a wa nn front or an 
occluded front? Is 
TH n* high pressure good 

[ * % ' *.'•* jjU news and low pres- 

t ?'■ fit# a sure bad news? Or 

I * v * llft un is it the other way 

j* ♦-> round? 

I Traveling be- 

tween North Amer- 
ica, Europe or Asia, you may check with 
the CNN regional forecast Or simply call 
someone, at the other end before you 
leave. "It's heavy rain here in Hong Kong 
and the number three typhoon signal has 
been hoisted so I guess we're in for a few 
rainy days ahead. What’s the weather like 
in Antibes?" 







wood* 


;7i Mr £ je- 

• _ £ 
■ • - '■ Jiiior aj 

•• — 

Ciirsi SgC 

•- • T r C'l-nij’ip 


■4 cloudy forecasts Weather forecasts 
often seem as indeterminate as executive 
horoscopes. Sometimes, it's hard to tell 
the difference. * ‘The new moon in Aries 
on Monday brings the chance to launch a 
plan or project But money problems 
may raise doubts in your mind about 
someone's sincerity and integrity." "A 
frontal system on Monday will bring 
cloud and rain to western Norway, but 
this will tend to a mix of sunshine and 
showers as it moves across Scand- 
inavia.” Yes, but is it going to rain 
tomorrow afternoon in Trondheim? 

Unless you’re a sailor, pilot, moun- 
taineer or skier, with access to local 
weather forecasts, it’s hard to get hard 
news about local weather. You need the 
meteorological equivalent of a large-scale 
map. What we need is to be able to call up 
one of these slick weather forecasters you 
see on the TV and ask “Yes, but what's it 
v going to be like where I’m going?" 

« Help may partially be at hand in the 
form of MetCall Direct, a new service 
offered by The Met. Office in Britain, 
which allows travelers around the world 
to speak to a live forecaster “about the 
weather as it affects you." 


MetCall Direct is limited now to mar- 
ine forecasting. Bur the ideas is to extend 
the service to areas such as aviation and 
worldwide weather. 

I checked out MetCall on (44-374) 
555-888 to seek advice on a hypothetical 
sailing trip from Antibes across the 
Mediterranean to Corsica, down the 
west coast and through the Straits of 
Bonifacio to the Costa Smeraida on the 
northeast coast of Sardinia. Nice trip if 
you can afford it. 

A computer voice look me through the 
menu (including a fax back option) and 
after entering my credit card details on 
the key-pad. I was put through to a live 
forecaster at the Southampton Weather 
Center in England. I spent at least 15 
minutes on the phone For a flat fee off 1 5 
(S24). 

SMOOTH OOINO “What size is your 
boat?” “Er, 100 feel.” “You’ve got 
power?" “Yes." “Well you can expect 
a smooth crossing over — the weather’s 
going to continue sunny on the French 
coast for the next seven days, but you’re 
going to hit a good force four increasing 
with heavy seas down the west coast of 
Corsica. And you're looking at a north- 
easterly force seven between the islands 
with seas of up to three meters. I suggest 
you call^ us again when you arrive in 
Corsica.” Money well spent if 1 were 
headed that way. 

Jim Ephraums, information services 
group manager at The Met. Office in 
London, says: “We're setting up systems 
which travelers can access from abroad. 
The technology where you can cue in 
your credit card and get through to a live 
forecaster is actually quite sophisticated. 
The marine service we offer is a pilot and 
we expect to move soon into other areas. 
The idea is to provide a team of live 
forecasters able to look at all angles of the 
weather — local forecasts, weather over 
the Atlantic. It's all do-able. 

“I just had a call from a photographer 
on a film shoot down in Hastings. He 
wanted a detailed weather forecast be- 
cause he'd relied on the TV forecast the 
night before and had just wasted 500 
quid messing around in the rain. We 
could offer the technology to business 
travelers who’ve got flights to talk to a 
real forecaster. This is just a taste of what 
we can do in the future.” 

T HE Met Office, along with the 
Royal Mail, is one of the few Brit- 
ish public services yet to privat- 
ized. Its logo is a crown above a weath- 
ercock. And weather reports carry the 
stem injunction: Crown Copyright. It 
offers a raft of phone and faxback ser- 
vices in Britain — MetFax regional five- 
day forecasts; Hurricane Line; interna- 
tional ciiy forecasts, and special aviation 
and maritime forecasts. 

MetWeb is a service on the Internet : 


providing five-day international, avi- 
ation and marine forecasts, along with 
pressure chans, satellite images and re- 
gional weather reports, including world 
weather “bullet points" on "severe 
weather events.” Example: “Monday 
15 September 1997: There’s still plenty 
of rainfall activity over India, the city of 
Pama in Bihar province having received 
158 mm from thunderstorms within the 
24 hours to 0000 GMT today, around 
three-quarters of the September average 
of 218 mm." 

Access to MetWeb is through an elec- 
tronic ticketing system. You buy books 
of electronic tickets with your credit card 
on a phone line. A book of 20 tickets 
with your own ID costs £10. One ticket 
lets you browse the sire for 30 minutes. 
Current weather reports are free but each 
five-day regional forecast costs one tick- 
et. You can top up your book of tickets 
on-line without exposing your credit 
card details on the Internet ' 

“We’re planning nexr spring to 
launch a mobile phone service whereby 
traveler with a GSM phone can receive 
shon message forecasts on the display of 
their phones," Ephraums says. “You 
are limited to 160 characters at a time 
under the SMS system; but you can store 
several messages in the memory. Say 
you are traveling to several cities across 
Europe. We could arrange to send you a 
forecast, every day, or twice a day. at 
points along your itinerary, giving you 
an idea of what to expect en route." 

Look at the Basic Data 

Ephraums' advice to travelers is first 
to look at basic climatic data on what 
weather you might expect for that par- 
ticular time of year, then check the free 
weather forecasts on teletext and in 
newspapers. “Use the Web. If it's going 
to be fine, there’s nothing to worry 
about; if it says it’s going to be bad 
weather or raining, that's the point 
where you need more detail and talk to a 
live forecaster. Assimilate all the other 
information first. 

“Where we could claim lo be unique 
is in developing a wide range of spe- 
cialist services in English. Language 
would be our selling point. The French 
and the Germans have very sophisticated 
weather organizations, but they haven’t 
been in the game as long as we have in 
offering a range of consumer services — 
although the French have an excellent 
telephone weather service. We have a 
high regard for the newly privatized 
New Zealand Met. Office (www.co.nz). 
The biggest weather market is the States 
which is mainly advertising-based and 
therefore free with quite a few websites. 
Weather Channel (www.weatber.cozn) 
is one of the besL American sites tend to 
be very well designed with good graph- 
ics and a large number of locations." 



GOOD TRAVEL DEALS 


QETTINB THESE 


AIR NEW ZEALAND/ 
ANSETT AUSTRALIA/ 
SINGAPORE 
AIRLINES 


Three new types of fare available: Around-the-worid fare that allows 
travel of up to 45.000 kilometers to destinations in Europe, North 
America. Asia, Australia and New Zealand costs from 1 9.630 Hong Kong 
dollars (S2.560); a circle- Pacific fare that allows travel of up to 24,000 
kilometers from the Southwest Pacific to the west coast of North America 
from 20.220 Hong Kong dollars, and a circle- Asia fare from 11 ,670 Hong 
Kong dollars for up to 35,200 kilometers around Asia, Australia. New 
Zealand and the Pacific Islands. 


BRITISH AIRWAYS 

Worldwide 

New around-the-worid fare with South Pacific routing priced from £973 
(SI .550) in economy. £3,499 in business class and £5,049 in first; 
participating airlines: Qantas, American Airlines and Canadian Airlines. 

GULF AIR 

Britain to 

Middle East 

Four promotion offers for travel from London- Heathrow to Doha, Abu 
Djabi, Bahrain or Muscat: automatic upgrade to next class when you pay 
the full economy or business-class fare ; pay the full one-way 1 n economy, 
business or first class for a free return leg; two-for-one in economy, 
business or first class: special round-trip economy fares from £399 
($640). For travel until Dec. 11. 

JAPAN AIRLINES 

Japan 

"Welcome to Japan" fares allow JAL passengers visiting Japan from 
overseas to save at least 50 percent on up to five domestic flights 
(reservations must be made before leaving home). Residents of Japan 
are allowed 50 percent off regular domestic fares when connecting with 
an international JAL (or Japan Asia Airways) flight on a round-trip 
itinerary. For travel from Oct. 20. 

LAUDA AIR 

Asia to Europe 

Travelers to Europe can now buy an airpass that allows 2 to 10 flights 
around Europe via Lauda Air’s Vienna hub. Each coupon costs SI 20 and 
there are no minimum- or maximum-stay conditions. 

UNITED AIRLINES 

* Britain to India 

-t — 

Twenty-five percent off round-trip fares in first or business class from 
London to Delhi saving £1,208 and £655 (SI ,930 and Si .050), re- 
spectively. For travel until Nov. X. 


VIRGIN ATLANTIC 


United States I Boston from £178 (S285); Heathrow-Mlami, £278; Heath row-Los 
I Angeles, San Francisco, £298. Certain conditions apply. You must book 
I before Oct. 2. 




CAPITAL HOTEL 


HYATT REGENCY 
PIER SIXTY-SIX 

HYATT REGENCY 


MARRIOTT 


RAKMSSON-SAS 
PORTMAM HOTEL 


SHERATON 


Beijing 


j Fort Lauderdale. 

! Florida 

| Charles de Gaulle 
I Airport, Paris 

| Bangkok 


London 


Schiphol Airport. 
Amsterdam 


"Club Floor" package for SI 40 per night single or double includes buffet 
breakfast; evening cocktails; use of fitness center, late checkout; 10 
percent discount on food and beverages, laundry and business center. 
Until Dec. 31. 

“Bed and Breakfast" package for SI 69 per night includes "deluxe" room 
and breakfast for two. Until Dec. 24. 

"Park and Travel" package for 550 francs ($92) a night for two includes 
Continental breakfast 15 days' parking and airport shuttle. Until Dec. 31. 

Introductory rates from 4,850 baht ($135) a night for a "deluxe-king" 
room. 

"Superior Business Class'' double for £160 ($256) includes in-room fax 
and modem points; buffet breakfast, use of fitness center; double 
Eurobonus miles; 10 percent off restaurant bills. Until March 1. 

Half-price room rate of 250 guilders ($125) during opening period. Until 
Oct. 31. 


Although ttonfTcwvfuiytoecfcs these oKws,pImm to tor«witmtolhMeon» travel agsfxs may to iraware of ttwa or unabtom took thorn. 


MOVIE GUIDE 


ARTS GUIDE 


Mouth to Mouth 

Directed by Manuel Gomez 
Pereira: Spain. 

Although the comic possib- 
ilities of phone sex have long 
since been exhausted, the 
Spanish farce "Mouth to 
Mouth" still gives this well- 
worn topic a try. The main 
character is an aspiring actor 
who finds that auditioning for 
roles is no less humiliating 
than being paid to talk dirty to 
strangers, and that the phone 
job may actually be the more 
v interesting professional chal- 
y lenge. So Victor (Javier 
Bardem) throws himself into 
this new form of acting ex- 
ercise. Manuel Gomez 
Pereira’s film strives for es- 
capism in its own uneasy 
way, mixing soft-core seduc- 
tion wife giddy pratfalls. For 
instance, there is a zipper mis- 
hap to interrupt one of several 
strained heavy-breathing 
episodes. When elaborate 
plot complications seem 
ready to raise the film to a 
fever pitch it never reaches 
one, despite the strenuous ef- 
forts of Bardem and the rest of 
the cast Events escalate once 
Victor, who took the phone 
sex job without expecting to 
v meet Ms. Right, finds himself 
falling for a femme fatale 
named Amanda (Aitana 


Sanchez-Gijon), who is one 
of his elusive clients. 

(Janet Maslin) 

In and Out 

Directed by Frank Oz; US. 

Kevin Kline resisting an 
overpowering impulse to 
shake his booty to the Village 
People is one of the many 
hilarious gags in “In & Out” 
This manly show of resis- 
tance is an attempt to prove to 
himself that he’s not gay. But 
after setting up its rather 
cheeky premise — is Kline, 
an effeminate Midwest Eng- 
lish teacher, homosexual or 
not? — the movie gradually 
loses steam. And despite its 
attempts to avoid preachi- 
ness, the movie presents us 
with good, decent folk from 
In diana learning that, gosh- 
dumit, gays are human too. 
Kline is Howard Brackett, a 
rather swishy high-school 
teacher in Green] eaf, Indiana, 
who inspires his students with 
poetry and literature. Things 
are looking up. He's popular 
with his students. He's about 
to many his longtime fiancee, 
Emily (Joan Cusack). And 
Cameron (Matt Dillon), a 
former pupil-tumed-profes- 
sional-actor, is up for an 
Academy Award. The good 
news: On national television. 



"Mouth to Mouth" scene. 

Cameron wins the Oscar and 
acknowledges Howard as a 
major influence. The bad 
news: He concludes the trib- 
ute with these words: “And 
he’s gay." Howard and the 
little town of Greenleaf fell 
into stunned sUence. How- 
ard’s first order of business is 
to assure his fiancee, his par- 
ents and the sudden invasion 
of TV journalists that he’s a 
heterosexual, thank you very 
much. But Howard’s prob- 
lems aren’t nearly over, as his 
students sheepishly inform 
him. He’s going to have to 
cure that limp-wristedness. 
Here’s where Kline displays 
his best moments. Holing 


himself np at home, he slips in 
a cassette tape that purports to 
test for homosexuality. Be- 
fore he directed people, Frank 
Oz directed Mappers. He 
seems to be coming along fine 
with his own species — but 
not fast enough. 

(Desson Howe ) 

A Thousand Acres 

Directed by Jocelyn Moor- 
house; US. 

Shakespeare doesn’t play in 
Peoria, at least not in the 
screen adaptation of “A 
Thousand Acres" by Jane 
Smiley. Or even in Iowa, 
which is no closer to home for 
“King Lear." That was the 
underlying inspiration for 
Smiley’s literary experiment. 
Though Michelle Pfeiffer de- 
livers impressively cold fury 
as the stray’s version of 
Regan (now an embittered 
breast cancer patient called 
Rose), and Jessica Lange 
works hard to breathe life into 
its GoneriJ (called Ginny), the 
film remains stilted and un- 
convincing. The story’s latter 
sections are so abrupt and 
emotionless that they seem to 
have been freeze-dried. The 
film plays as a stilted, semi- 
articulate showcase fra its sis- 
terly stars. (Janet Maslin) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Andean shrub 

s Sanctorum 

•Crayola color 
<14 Caspian Sea 
feeder 

151966 Lennon- 
McCartneytune 
WHoWyour 
tongue!" 

IT Refugee’s 
request 

ae "hunter, ’ 

(i960 ram) 
m Author Robert 

Butter 

as Jazz trumpeter 


ss Skeptics 


as City on the Po 
2 * Fate 

ae ftattonal Gallery 

at Sticker 
as Like fraudulent 
accidents 
as MHfc source 
as Cartoonist 
Walker 

ST TTmber or water, 
for instance 
40 Some train 
cargoes 

4« "Undoubtedly" 
4X Like the risk to 
bet on. maybe 




Solution to Puzzle of Sept. 25 


QEDonas □□□□an 
sanmnan □naasaa 
aannnasasaaaaaa 
hub ofloan aaaa 
QQOH SOUQ □□□□ 

asaan □□□□□ oga 
□□□ □□□□ gag 

QnanDHnaQQanaaa 

gaa saaa ^ 

G3b HEjans anaas 
gb0s anno aaag 
cisaci aasaa agg 
pOQDnaasaQnnjniGiia 

UtiQuaaia oasaaaa 

JCIQQLIO □HEJPBGI 


4 »"Whata V’ 

(beach 

comment) 

44 Reno game 
ac'ChuangTzu" 
principle 

cr Prefix with 

sphere 

4 » Infamous pen 

ss Side In a 1960's 
war 

54 Go bad 
58 Chemical suffix 
sa Modem ah- 
munition 
60 Movie scorer 
Straus 

•1 Beclouds, with 
"up" 

tt Controversial 
ripener 
■a Verbose 
•4 Change 
machine fin 
as Rowlands of 

■Ught of Day" 


« One usually 
seen taking a 

bow 

2 Town near 
Bangor 
a They're 
deemed worth 
taking 


4 The People's 
Champ 
• Chick 

e Chicago suburb 
7 Commuter hub 
■ Completely 
IGU 

ie Industrialist 
Guggenheim 
11 Babe Ruth, in 
1914 

it French crown 
13 The One I 
Love" group 
is Barely walk 
is Taylor or Hayes, 
e.g. 

2« Counterfeit 
as Busters 
xr Chamber 

group, perhaps 

so Knock out so to 
speak 

32 Brahmins 

33 Place to see a 
hanged man. 

e.g. 

34 Dawn-tiH-dusk 
ss Marshal under 

Napoleon 
38 Roarer 
am about 

(publicly Yk** 1 *®) 

44 Without a cover 
at night 
48 Gunk 
4a Expanses 
Bd Garnish leaf 



NW Hr Ctuek OmtOmm 

©New York Times/Edited by Will Shorts. 


■ AUSTRIA 

Vienna 

Kuiisthistofisches Museum, tel: 
(1) 525-24403, dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 18: "Land der Bible." 
Exhibits connected with events or 
persons described In the Bible. 
The exhibition also presents mod- 
els of royal residences in Ur, 
Niniveh. Babylon and Jerusalem. 

■ BRITAIN 
London 

Barbican Art Gallery, tel: (171) 
638-8891 , open daily. To Dec. 14: 
"James Ensor." The exhibition 
traces the Belgian Expressionist 
artist's development, taking the 
late 1 880s as a turning point, when 
the artist produced visionary land- 
scapes and an expressionism 
laced with religious themes. Fas- 
cinated by the fantastic and the 
macabre. Ensor used the carnival 
theme as a vehicle for his criticism 
of Belgian society and as an ex- 
pression of his preoccupation with 
death. 


si Pitcher, of a son 
12 Kind of crossing 
H Part of a trunk 


57 — precaution 
■•Subject of a 

grainy picture? 
seNab 


Montreal 

Museum of Fine Arts, tel: (514) 
285-1600, dosed Mondays. To 
Jan. 11: "George Segal." Features 
70 works created between 1957 
and 1 997 by the American artist A 
founder of Pop Art in tile early 
1960s, Segal's presentation of or- 
dinary people In a defined urban 
environment set him apart Apart 
from the white plaster figures of the 
1960s, the exhibition brings to- 
gether pa slsls, drawings and re- 
cent still-lifes. The exhibition will 
travel to Washington. 

B FRANC. TTT . 
Paris 

Musee Cemuschl, tel: 01-45-63- 
50-75, dosed Mondays and hol- 
idays. To Jan. 4: “Pierres d'lmmor- 
tatite." More than 100 Chinese 
Jade pieces dating back to the 1 5th 
century B.C. 

■ DBRUBAMY 

Munich 

KunsthaNe der Hypo-Kultur- 
sttftung, tel: (89) 22-44-12, open 
daily. To Jan. 11: "Cobra." Doc- 
uments the work of the Interna- 
tional art group whose members 
tried to revive Expressionism. 
Founded in 1948, tiie group efis- 
solved in 1951. The exhibition 
brings together 130 works by 
Alechinsky. Appel, Corneille, Join 
and Constant. 

■ ITALY 
Florence 

Palazzo Pftti, tel: (55) 213-440, 
dosed Mondays. To Jan. 8: "The 
Magnificence ol the Media Court." 
Art in Florence In the late 1 6th cen- 
tury under the reigns of Francesco 
i and Ferdnando l. Works on loan 
from Germany demonstrate the 
commercial and artistic exchanges 
that took place between the Med id 
court and the German states. The 
exhibition also features Instru- 
ments showing the experimental 
and scientific Interests of the peri- 
od: astrolabes, compasses, clocks 


and armlllary spheres. 

■ SPAIN 

Barcelona 

Centre de Culture Content por- 
ania, tel: (3) 412-0781, dosed 
Mondays. To Jan. 1998: "Bar- 
celona — Madrid, 1898-1997." 
Documents the artistic and cultural 
relationship between the two cities 
from 1890 to the present time. 
Museu <f Art Contemporani, lei: 
(93) 412-08-10. dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 6: “The Last Gaze: Self- 
Portraits (from Bonnard to Ba- 
con)." Fifteen self-portraits by Pi- 
casso, Matisse, Bacon and Beck- 
mann, among others. 

M ■«ITID» T At¥s~ 

New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 


(212) 570-3791, dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 11 : "The Private Collection 
of Edgar Degas." Documents De- 
gas' activities as a collector. Works 
by Ingres and Delacroix are con- 
trasted with works by Cezanne, 
van Gogh and Gauguin, and De- 
gas's obsession for Manet's art is 
reflected in the set of graphic works 
and paintings that he bought 
New York Public Library, tel: 
( 212 ) 869-8089, dosed Sundays, 
lb Jan. 3: "Tobacco Leaves: Se- 
lections from the Collection of 
George Arents, Jr." The industri- 
alist collected printed wo rks and art 
objects related to tobacco. In- 
cludes works on paper, decorative 
objects, bronzes and paintings. 
Also, "Dry Drunk: The Culture of 
Tobacco in 1 7th- and 1 Bth-Century 
Europe." Books and prints trace 
the growth of tobacco use in 
Europe. 


CLOSIHOSOOH 

Sept. 28: “L'Art dTmiter: Falsific- 
ations, Manipulations, Pastiches." 
Mueee d'Art at d’Histofre, 
Geneva. 

Sepl. 28: "Masterpieces From the 
Plerpont Morgan Ubrary." High 
Museum of Art, Atlanta. 

Sept 28: "Seurat and the 
Bathers". The National Gallery, 
London. 

Sept. 29: “L'Orgueil." Centre 
Georges Pompidou, Paris. 

Sept 29: “Jean-Mlchel Basqulafc 
Oeuvres sur Papier." FondaUon 
Dina Vlemy, Paris. 

Sept. 29: "Fernand Leger." Centre 
Georges Pompidou, Paris. 

Sept. 30: “Phillip King.” FOrte di 
Belvedere, Florence. 

Sept. 30: "Da Padovanino a 
Tiepolo." Museo Civico, Padua. 


FLY BIMflN S 
KEY CITIES 



Biman Bangladesh Airlines offers convenient connections 
to 26 major cities worldwide - from North America 
to South Asia, from the Far East to the Middle 
East, from Europe to the Himalayas. Right on 
top of the world - at down to earth prices. 




BANGLADESH AIRLINES 

Your home in the air 



. V ' > n'. 




PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


tint 1 if the intermarket 


* 7 ? +44 I /l 420 (b48 


irnmmmmmmm 


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


I $*>>**** r4 
iBffpif 

mlail 

F;;::: • -i,|.:. 


REAL ESTATE SERVICES 


Not aB astern countries have the same standards 
of development and growth. 

Vie think Prague Is by for the safest and most promising 

real state market of all eastern Europe. 
WAtMir five vears amerienceon the market . 


incorporating and managing your investment. 

So, before you take any decision, call os, it costs you 
nothing, it could save you a loti 

To contact us — 

hui.ftwibwHt fefoaa tWt ! 

JilJmti ||.nlili[|iiHlirfilO ML +33 140 33 44 90 BM +39 1 35 29 00 » 
WMndfetf fat *33 14033 19 51 

mnrai** mwinaua 

TH. 4420 2 22722 19 A B 

Mffto. 442)207 09 SI VtaHBaSdWewetiOwiB*^* 


Real Estate Services 


YOU OWN A PROPERTY Bi FRANCE 

Our sendees cum tti your 
Maintenance, cleaning, ga rtering, repaics 
tofltMHf) of Ms, gowmmHB tores -Etc 
PLEASE DO HOT HESfTATE TO 
CONTACT US FOR MORE DETAILS 
FAX +33 RM 50 95 M 34 
T#h -*33 fe 50 95 35 35 
7 Donate tie uevii F-741G0 Bossay 


FOR FREQUENT TRAVELERS wishing 
to leave [heir house attended, mtttey 
engineer (already Dal owner) proposes 
periods d residence (or any laralh. 
convariem to Us proprietor h ifs Pars 
area. Fare +33 (0)1 46 45 2S 58 


U31RE valtey-CASTLE COUNTRY 

In a darning vtfap ritfr a* am ences. 
19THCEHT. HOME itei 2 firing roans 
(900 sqfL) 3 todngns. State, 
cenaal healing, mrt condttm. tastily 
decorated. Can be sold United or 
pffiM farrtshaL MUST SEE. Ercfcsed 
oaten tei mawued trees belting a 
rate ion gala ©*sr FR ,950.00a 
TeVFn 433 <D]2 54 20 19 74 
ask for Claude 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL 

GATED COHUMY ESTATE 
2 acre home. Stttaive namfibsaiccC 
adjacent from golf cows? Man res- 
donee, 3 bedrooms tahs. fining room, 
(fining room, modem kdenen. large 
covered patio tei barbeque. pool & 
garten. Separata gueflhouse wth 3 fctd- 
rcorn'Z bath sauna, bar. Separate 
bufdng has 1 bedroom/bath lor SvtHn 
help. (mmaSale occupancy Contiguous 
acreage nth truil trees and Javsn 
avatabte lor adrftiorat home. Conias 
Knsta in US (202) 659-3000 Ext 1) 
or Pv FAX: GSCi 22341 K USA 


Canada 


ELEGANT COUNTY HOUSE in Private 
area cl fas.’Mrratte Si Saveur. Four 
bedrooms, three bathrooms, sauna. MV 
equipped. beaJrfuty fumsted On.y 5 
totems bom teal stu areas, and 35 
raiwjles (ram ite. Trertuant Village . 
AvaiaUetiCTi October 15th BAsri 15* 
USS2O.O0Q DO lor season Tel 514 
737-0860 Fac 514-344-3875 


French Alps 


CHAMONIX VALLEY FRANCE. Lunm- 
ous cento tei great charm, faroasc 
news, large Terrace, fre place. 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, beautiful)-/ furnished. 
S31SK- ConlacL Penny rand 
954463450, Fac 954-763-1053 ISA 


French Provinces 


BURGUNDY 

AUXERRE REGION (FRANCE) 
160 tan from PARIS 

Stoeib XVlIti certury property d 
7K) ayn. Svmg space on 6 ha fend 

swarming pool. terns. part. 500-C&? 


orcterd. oafcowe, XHflh cert, chapel 
ALL W VERY GOOD CONDITION 
Plus caretakers’ cottege and oubiftfcms- 
Pta FF KXJOSOO Write fc 
Doctor Enters, Merry, 

B9230 MONTTGNY-LA-RESIE (FRANCE) 
or phone after 8pm 433 0)3 9B4i 8520 


SOUTH PEFflGOTO 

luxury manor house 

655 sqm • 14 rooms ■ KUpofetone 
wntoR & fnpbce. modem conskuction 
1 contorts, high class Stings, perfect 
ccntSAon. Unspofed h&op new. Noeina 
- opposle. Dtaea Iteropier access. Wifi 
4 ha park and 16 ha forest al aroumL 
USS125O3J00. Fax 33 (0)5 53 40 B3 90 


H9ERBES LUBEROW 
Uttoue bcatte HNOtoai ate, 160 sqm 
torn space. Landscaped Darden. Pool 
fa tots* lac owner +33(0*442263214. 


French Riviera 


CAPFERRAT 

water edge vise - H=HW 
Tuscan style vfla - FF15M 
Modem vfla fcntespe seanea- ■ FF2GV. 

NEAR MONACO 

Magnficeri saavfew. cassra 
siyte villa ■ FP15M 
Beautiful seawew. medi&nanean 
avte rila - Fried 
■Bel? Epotte' house, 
tfirec sea axes - F27U 

HAUSSMANN Group 

Tefc +33(0} 4 32 DO 49 49 
Fa +33 (0) 4 93 89 40 38 


NICE, near UNIVERSITY an! Septra 
Anhpofs heerev. Clamed atrsudan: 
S?flS 200 sqm premises. Very high 
class (an cmdteorirg. video smarts, 
nehrorfi cable + Numens and iceroeii 
For Snanaal ctrestir+d cr sftca-M- 
paidfces lice SSe (fAzu headquai- 
tsasut5idarv tocabcn for emrz&rcf 
ccmpany USS700.CK Ver. reduced 
fees xsstfe. ip iccSCT nanageroert. 
MAKE OFFER cr Fax +3S04 S3520C92 


CANNES - SOUTH OF FRANCE 
EtaJiJ qacc-s PQtTHQUSE 
253 sqm • Fafcufcus mews cverfcwrg 
sea & sands Hugs rracas T35 sq - 
reis&ig pad? covered area, tiq gsage 
+ ffirage bcSees FFgjJoaboc 
With ndependBii stodir rrougO.rC‘1 
Tdl +33 (D}4 93 94 57 63 cr 


5 mins MCE AHPOBT, ST LT. harbour 
French banter owner serts luxsrcus 
4st»m 35 sqm Hal * 20*3 sqm *r- 
roundirc exctic garden 2 bafts, large 
equipped fachei ceOar. 2 garages 
=F1 7M Tel +33 HM 93 fli 5C 42 
AvakMe r«W. OUET LGVELY PLACE 


ST PAUL DE VENCE. pepert/ cn 1 ’fu- 
el 4 bedroems. 4«ar basement 37K 
sqm park pod enei F?2 950.M0 
•VC TeiFax +33 (0f4 S3 20 22 44 


CANNES, seafront, ISO sqm. luxurious 
3a, vw*. pod. (eo teg tenares. gaste 
gcus restate Trt-rpx (0j4 91227927 


Greece 


V0ULA (Panorama ana), 25 km tram 
Athens, 340 sqm. vfia. ama hntutfacfr 
ty. Owner tax -301 96435B4 


London 


HDMESEARCH LONDON Let us 
search (dr you. We find homes / fiats 
to buy and rent and provide caqrorate 
relocation services For ndividuals 
and companies Tat: +44 m 338 
1066 Fax + 44 171 030 1077 
hltpd/wmJiomeisateco uMhom 


VENICE - Aparanerf on GRAND CANAL 
between Accademia Bridge & Palazzo 
Grass! - 1 45 sqm • USOOO.OOO. Box 
0404, IHT, 92521 NaJty Cedax. Franca 


FRANCE 


SWITZERLAND 


18 me Jacob 
Saint Oeranain des Pres 
Paris 6 th 

Luxurious apartments under construction. 

A wide range of apartments from studios to 4 -bedrooin duplex 
offering top quality appointments with basement parkings. 
Several apartments with terraces and private gardens. 

Delivery 4th quarter 199S 


Dgvrioaer 
Olympia France 
[ 12 avenue Kttber Paris !6ch 
0* 33.1.47.553068 


Rffllfrraie Agees 

KauSakit Germain 
21 rue Bonaparte Paris 6 tfi 
tefc 33 . 1 . 44 . 0730.00 


PRESHCIOCS ADDRESS in PARIS 
Sprease ^Seenue $o<A 

(private kne/ 

LUXURIOUS RENOVATIONS in 
HISTORICAL TOWNHOUSE 
120 sq.m, apartment 
160 sqjn. apartment 

Td + 33 ( 0)1 44 55 5000 
Fax + 33 10 ) T 42 60 55 91 



Real Estate 
for Rent 


UGOBA - ALASSW, IN A *fT AfffiA 
a presWow UHO EnjW nfla oM fiO 
sqm srisii spectacular panoramic vIn of 
DIB bay. Lounge, stud®, dtrtng rarai, 
irtKy room, Swatte kteten. 3 * 
rooms. 6 tedroote.SpKkXB retort 

oardan of about 1700 sqm. Price U5S 
TflOOflOO. Direct dedra nth owner: flax 
only) 00 39 2 498 38 00. 


VENICE DefigtfiJ wadous bright U on 
die Gudecca Top 2ndM Dock, Mto - 
mg sfnMt snxfio - prlvae rod wnare 
Dvertrxwng lagoon. Antique funtsted 
Fax +3941 714 571 &TBt 
r.tetevB/BttunoJ 


Monaco 


SUPERB APARTUENT, 240 SQ M., 
Paihouse duplex, panoramic sea new 
and mortars, large recapm room. 

3 bedrooms. 3 bates, top hiy 
fitted tteten. pantry, lainxy roam, 
guest dressing room, large terrace and 
loggias 140 sqm. 2 refers. 2 garages. 

HTEFWEDfA 
Teh +377 93 50 66 84 
FSx: +377 93 SO 45 52 


IMMACULATELY REFURBISHED at a 
cost Of FF7 UiBon - SPECTACULAR 
APARTMENT ■ 388 sqm tel panoramic 
news of the Mediterranean, mounsms 
aid Monaco. Ample parted and storage 
ONE OF THE PREMIER PROPERTIES 
AVAILABLE TOR SALE IN MONACO 
TODAY Reduced transfer toes. For sale 
by owner a a reafisttc price Can: +33 
(5)6 08 37 03 04 or (0)6 60 96 09 QD 
or Fax +377 S3 25 75 36 


Paris and Suburbs 


15 UN & 15 KM WEST OF PARS by 
the A 14. 20 mm St Laare statcit Very 
beaudut 1958 MODERNIST house. J4C 
aim &vmg space on EjOOO sq it garden 
m private domain. Luxurious fstegs. S 
sqm Gvmg, targe fireplace, bay wndoms 
feong Sculh. terraces. 4 bedrooms. 2 
bates. 2 showers. Office Room arte 2 - 
cuzzi I sauna. Outdoor heated swim- 
rrjrg pool Prwate qj»' on Setae W&r 
slung, god. Qurat Greenery CuaJrtv 
0e style Hear shoos USSE50DD0 Te> 
NY 212 219 9565 Fax NY 212 965 153 
Far Pans 01 39 75 74 94 


8 th, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYSEES 
and rue Fg St Home, lor sale m 19th 
cert Haussmarm dyte charader tsJrflng 
OFBCS cr HIGH CLASS apartmerl to 
be refitted (presently filled as tfficesl 
Abort 300 sqm. per level Partial safe 
PCSStae VERY GOOD QPPOffTlMTY. 

COntacr owner rfirect on 
Fax +33 (0)5 56 20 01 69 
Td: +33 (0)6 07 65 65 19 


near, raw high class buddtag, 
de&vBdto end 1997 
Very beadii *ptad-a-tetre‘. 

37 sqm fivng + bedroom com?, 
fed price FF1 ,250,000. 

VU tee decoded apartment 
15 RUE FRANKLIN 
COGEDH +33 ( 0)1 45 24 42 66 


MONTHARTREtABBESSES, exceptional 
tenner artist meter on 3 levels entirety 
and luxury restored 2 years ego- 70 
sqjn Irving room under glass roof (7m 
high ceffngV 4 bedrooms. 2 bates, study 
mezzanine, big fireplace, kitchen fufiv 
equipped, very sunny, al steps axund 
Price- FF4.7M. Teh Office: +33(0)1 
40 83 44 01. Home: +33(0)142 62 68 85 


. AVE GEORGE V 

VERY KGH CLASS 255 SOIL 
Date recaption, 3 bedrooms, 
parang, melds roam. Exduavty 
Alma tamo (0)1 40 70 95 10 



PARIS 16th 

NearTOWDERO&PJCEVCXR 

HUGO. NEW * VERY KGHCIA 55 . 
SeeutiM 2 -room s: sqm. tert toor. 
IDEAL "PIH3 A TERRE 1 Ce*ir and 

S JtBTlRSJ PRICE 
U (fl)1 41 05 30 30 


PARS 160) - NEAR RADIO FRANCE A 
5 mins B N*to hotel 5 StEtue tf Ltoty. 
6te floor, 79 sqm-. dcuSe hing, l bed- 
rooms. smaS larace i tdcccy. Exrep- 
tinnal 1S31 buBJmg and apartmer; 
Taquebn* archftenrre. Lsted hsftrxa' 
monument, us £320000 Fa vsi: cat- 
owner on +33 10)1 4283 7S3 aSr 73D 
pm or Fax ■ i 32 (Oil 45 23 £5 90 
Mention: France s Boucher 


LOUVRE - RIYOU 

(PARIS 1st) bang museum. «i 3c cl" 
■rice 7-rcwn. good bv-ert riarFi. or. 
HOTAtHE (191 44 77 37 63 


PARS 16th, mar BOS da BOULOGNE 
Executive high class tel. dree! t*c7 
owner. 200 sqm., indutog mads Tcm 
3 huge and beanfcl recectcns 5 bed- 
rooms, calm, private tare. Leper flor. 
Scuth-West oriertaton rFSTOXI 
Td +33 (Gil 45 25 14 55. 


HEART OF HARAS. cert M£r; 
camcHey renovated. i 2 K sc ftc'gi 
+ 160 sa ft root terrare Lendr. 2 
bads. 2 bates, s&cter. -ing raw - 
eqappsd custom -is. chested r rr> 
security conoerge mo.-e m 
V earner + 4965 - 2166 - 15 C 5 


W EXCEPTIONAL SUmOUNDailGS to 
greenery, HOUSE 'N PAF-S 
south. 100 sqm. 2 bedrxrc. Exre'.eR 
EOKtocn + pnvate courtyard - 32- 
aAtog d i mere level passSa =314 
Tel +33 icn 4£ BO 46 43 Ve so 2^ta» 


16tt. LONGCH AMP-VICTOR HUGO 

wfi bow. fin$« 4te fez 52776 r; r 
itearanF buifing doutto fcrxr: r Km 2 
bedroems (pas side 3i. wchentrec^fes: 
icon i Eaft P4a:fs war. 5 kjc 
FrSfSSDOO. 7S .3H 44 E Ti F. 


PARS 4th. IE SAWT LOUS. 2 roons 
2nd Hcor. character qj:et 'aep^re 
beams tr.-mg & befirrm 6 i.‘;t 
shjwa 2aea owe- SlH.DDO "t -33 
ICR 447E 7E03 Of *33 «! -SSc 


NEUILLY ■ BARRES. Z5 cr S uIXJ 
nte small garden groundfiocr hch tess 
tuiSng nh guardian & secjrtC. 
PF750.000. OWNER +33 (0)1 42=6 SIT 
Fax +33 (0)1 45612596 hrxra. 4"E7l40C 


SAflfT MAffflE- ware tee ; m sq-r. 
Sal rtearaaer. sunny, fiffy reravasd sti 
Cecoraleb erge (tying 2 teertwms. 
etowed tehea TdFax -33 ;iil 43 74 
15 79 Errar. nteaichfidut-cremRJr 


145 SOIL ON BOIS DE BOULOGNE 
4 te to Resdertai ^3 HI ragesbe 
TeFrax *S 3 iGU 39 B <5 SB 


16 th - AVENUE FOCH - IDEAL ?K- 2 - 
tone, fivtaq + 1 bertacm excefler? - 
Iron Tel +33 ( 0)1 45 53 55 35 . 


600 SOJL MANSION, B.Xv sq t> ;.l 
land, near Eurotfsney, stud t/ cwrar 
FF 5 Mo. Tel -33 (Dll 60 09 11 62 


HEAR DSNEYLAM), 15 B sqm te-jae 
976 sqm. land. Said by owner FFi *!.* 
Tet +33 ( 0)1 60 43 32 36 . after Epm 


PCD A TSWE IN LES HALLES. =W 
3 B sqjn. studio, modem cmentoraes 
Tel 5 tax Owner +33 [ 0 |i 42 93 25 £8 


IBIZA 

IDEALLY LUXURIOUS NEW ESTATE 
Superb sea vim. HUM sqn laid 
600 sqm house: Living, dring. 5 bed- 
roans, 5 marble bafts, poor, caretaker's 
house, garage Si . 000 , 000 . Tel: Paris 
+33 ( 0)1 4553 6756 . Fax [ 0)1 4553 4053 


tBEA - FEET ta SEA. DdgttL oad- 
tionai focatioo. 2^cum apaqrai rift 
100 kjjt. eeal gsdn ovetooi?m 
Direct access t; envue crert. 
USS 135 SO), rex -33 OS 53 4 G S 3 92 
*flp; , 'www -vyxrtj 


COSTA BLANCA. SPAIN. acwteB » 

Tip TKkfcrce Sf«sc+ar v«s 2 
acres. 4 ierts. 5 bates, tort PrUVATE 
SALE. IKE 57500 C. Trt 60 94 56 
Fax 1343 50 73 r 



1 GRYQN/SWi7?ERLAND~|| 


TORRENT, 
big and fiiendly 
CHALET, . 

24 beds. 

TeL +4121^16 73 77 


Pvis Area iMmdshed 




Switzerland 


n LAKEGBEVA&ALPS 

Sae » toresners authorzed 

our xpectotty »Jno#lS75 


ttsore paeoes zitucUc' xets 
‘ te £ :etxos 'rr. P 2 xT: 

REVAC5JL 

52. UontMtort CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-731 15 40 Fax 731 tZ 29 


CHATEAU D'CEX (PEAR GSTAAC) 
Speft 12 rsr-Sa-is resris*3 lxitej 
v .2 TXT. apaftrare to satteweti sris 
Soar n=w 1 «nc txt »* apgn 5 s- 
ptaa*. f-_v *Sed cto 2 tstrxos 
*«; zs. 'rar a £?. : rateXTS =- 


LUGANO -Of) now afco fcr fertgracs 
Are vs. teLliKi oegg.- 
F :-eh» r.e r '.‘is VCL'+TA-N 3 2 rtt 
_“<= u-GAlC 7 * skxjs ra» vte - 
5 sC sq r £r; arseiv? -xrr. 3 ea> 

itfr. xst frgpas 2 4 sedars 


VEfMA *ec £ opwc ehgrt fer- 
njtfwd ttm 7 too tore. Suz tem 
Tty 3K S4 se 41 US#;-42!-3S0G 


French Provinces 


N03KAHPY HAMOBT -0G a»fl, 
arofis ^CC sq-n gads toMUpnr 
ooncaeu. ar tajalbr ■Brians, 
or nfe frjat let tmer 

-33 -76 7T3W 


Germany 


DUSSELD08F, near arpor. KM tor 
tetrea props. £ racers <2 *jn 
sfeis Tjc farts +33 SB* 7 7 *X 







■ f ; AgS 

Rr i Tv1i^r W iPrT 

S 21 


n-TTii~i 



12 ■ MEUOON STATON, 300 Slrt 
bousa iDnan,onijOaDiqia.(Hrik 
ffaCOtT* 433 1^1 7488. . 


Swttzertand 


GENEVA, UtZURT RffffRSHS) ipto- 
-41 22 735 6320 +41 22 738 267! 


l*’i v . ''Art 

1 - .! . 'H 


+■ rtfT'il:! 

/I-vi" 


1 : *T t< r i 



[•'.[mwr 

B 




SITCAL JfmaKOk l teuas tr nsta 
srci'cn; a. ta£ sa — ijttrgtgux 
1 3 ectert —44 ™ 75 * E72 


Paris Area Furnished 



UONTANA-CRAN 5 . Vatais, LSXs 

asr-rr- 2 isric-j l t? 1 a SK/ 
£ S" Its arxr Snrfisrr 
■ S^ 3.5T AES 3«: tSBJlSs oJTr 
"el -OX’ £ ZLI'ji 1 " 2 T 5 T- 

*.K. = r - if; ::: - :=r ^5 

T^rer. s :=cx -3? CS-:’= :^£ cr 

Fsx -l-s’-JiS 3 £ Z2 


MONTREUX d »*ss s '- 
ea' Severe i.-s can, zsrrrwrt 5 *is 
:s tretoc-s auSc^rvJ =TM SA- 
+41 24 4.44 27 67 


USA General 


HSTORIu IKAIfiJPY RQK 3 A =rs. £ 
inT.H 2THL -ScIlX jX- tr 55- 
:-&l ’rre jre : =r S4MS5SM 


USA Residential 


HOSE SOUND, a r-:es rerr. t 
=s to. Eeato ’Eft: i T rra rrffi 
SiC ? i '2 ' HZ* :-= 2 =ss± 
?X- t: ox-. itz- 
424 SUCK ::’o 4 > 3 i ;4 -jSA. 


MIAMI BEACH, FLA HONE S32S.0QG 

■ Ndrocira 2 rates ^reteirr. 
SsautiW a« pr.ie p:c: £ sns ZiZ 
Sartiara tarrst ~£2ra. 2a-&'-~s£ 
L'SA te S-Vai tnftas 3 o:?a 2 l!CT 


NYC CEfiTRAL PARK VEWS tap* 
«nt 2307 ' sq ft. qsriterjwto, Z -3 rsJ- 
rooras. 3 tahroems. hrg. Jnrq QW 
5 cC-s 2 bafcteiss. 24 hour ejeroar;. 
US 35 L 2 S 5 M negoSatle. Oiros rgfncai- 
*3 Tet 212 S 361 S 7 D Fax. 212501366 S 


MAUI BRICKELL Superr ’ 5 =C sqil 
3 bedrooms. 3 bathrooms, 29 fasig wa- 
fer and Key Siscayne. rarfcnc. pool 
uss 199.000 Please ccnac G. Fte* 
1 fit 35 as 264201 


PALM BEACH. FL Near State Avenue. 
3 bee ra baft. Cw 2400 sq. (l plus map 
aroiftd terrace Urate ^ Otsson. Jrxr- 
Realtor. 561 -833-91 SSrFar -3253 


87 Ft / 26.50 M PILOTHOUSE CUTTER 

Draped by Rod HoBaad & hfioT Afttmteiaa. K^smdtaf96& 
Detroit 1 19 ' 

BwiSatftmUgtoGacniw 
Aron-9iarinf^iBS4Jta63aewiRtwD€atitafr 
A iw>- lriktAped oceao mdse joft. fytag ftr sde b» Vdosra, Spate 
. For more tofopnaQon pieaac cotuacL- 

■- TV Nrtnorfc Crtoop - . • - 

1eL (34 71) 403903 - Rfit (34 71) 400216 ■: 

E-Mrft ueiawki98lla5-lap.cfi ' . 




HOTELS 


Embassy Service 

Y0U8 HEAL ESTATE - 
AGENT IS PAHS 
Tst t 33 (0)1 47J20L3Q.QS 


ATHMEKPAfltS 

PASS PROHO 

As er g o - Tt ‘JTSfaC r ret 
cite S FTper. ifcajer Satires. 
2 A. Hocre r*;‘-4c£**2C 

Tel: +33 {0)1 45 63 25 60 


CECKE’ PARKERS 
rs a S x Sei c-sir ataftaarS. 
zZ Ezss -tars sluts 
Tet +S3 (3)1 « B 3S GD 
Foe +33 [OJJ 42 6S 35 6T 
9 s MpuaabaC 


METRO Pen be NEUiLLY -2 ris) vgy 
ncsi t.T25sc, raoCer, s^cSs rr qres 
P 2 SSS 2 . Seterecr FrZjZQ 

cr ==132 Tet. Ca3 -33 z: 4747 0454. 


IEAR PANTHEON, EE ST* 2-hedroan 
fte. taras. gszsr.. 2 baft roo m s. 
S23E ■ rootr. 7£ +2 13)1 4331 6403. 


ON AVE CHAMPS ELYSSS, B5 sqn 
+ 15 el.h ifirace. vraw. Sl.SSOtyreeft 
win raid serves. Tel -33 (C.S6 6t51 4190 


PORT ROYAL BD. supert. tprieL 3 
beds. 2 baths. prJsr vww, aS ami- 
tes. Ott 15 tar H mo. (0)147074831. 


ATALA 


Telephone • Satellite TV 
Seminar room (batch aval 
laMtt$)-Bar-MnatptAm 
Gastrmomical restaurant. . 


9SOJfto 1400 Jf a day 


ID, rue CMtemmaMf 
75008 Park 

Tet +33 (0)1 45 62 01 62 
Fax: +33 (0)14225 66 36 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 
say homy apartments, superior B 4 B 
registry. many locations. 
Tet 212-475-2090 Fax 212-477-0420. 
wwMoviaufflaoagiDgum 


Hotels 


Lebanon 






• 1 ^ 



BBEATHTXKK WEW OF KW YORK, 
20 ft gtass mat Cratori Pert A CBy. 

( pfcBO, tax, raWb 
For tastoesa, mraam or raneymn 
coaptt. V Mock to Connie Hal 2 To ' 
Lettennan. S to Lhcdte CBflBr Uuse- 
- ora. Theaters. Waakta. Uorrif^r, 3 day 
weekends (mbrinum) or brig term 
Tet 212-262-1551. Fax 71M6M142 


SMMiiiliti 


ST. BAhIHELEMi, F.Wi- OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - t»&h- 
ftulto hBsfde wffli (mis. Our agents 
hare inspected afl ribs posonaly. For 
nsanaitan.on Si Bads. St. Marita, An- 


U LVi | »■ >■ 3 1 ii 

■: M" I 


See SrrtnrJay^e htormarlut 


Tor Aria, Friendships, Lnlcrnaliormi 
Meeting PoiiiL Nannies A Domestic^ 
To odrertwe contort Sarah WcnJiof 
on +44 J71 420 0326 
or la* +44 171 420 0338 
A GREAT DEAL DAPPEXS 
AT THE liYTERMARKET 


4/novncsmeflts 


;t»j: 1 1’ il 


4485 Eaewhere (+8529 29221171 


SEARCHING FOR SHGER A DANCER 
a Join a European toys' band. 19-25 


van old, good looMng & In good stapa. 
Must eing in English. Call PARIS +33 
42of8299or(D)860B7(H09. 


Personals 


HAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be adored, gbrifiad, i»ed and preserved 

a mi me world, novandtorewr. 

Been of Jesus, pay tar ul Saks 
Jude, worinr of mbades, pray for u. 
Satan Jude, hetnr of fte Aopdest pw 
ftr us. Arnea % this prayer rrira times 
a toy, by tee rfc* day. you- prayer «| 
be answered, ft has navar been known 
to tan puUcaaon rnst to prorfcfl UK 


Thank Yd a Sacred Heart Of Jesus & 
thank you St Juds for granting my re- 
quest a tor your bve. Rate, Uand. FL 
Prayer to the Sacred Heart a Si Jude. 
May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be 
adored, glorified, tovstJ & preserved 
Uirouohoit the wetad now & forever. 
Ament Sacred Heart of Jesus pray tor 
us. Si Jude irortrer of mkactes pray tor 
us. SL Jule heftier at the hopeless pray 
ftr us. Recfte ttris 9 times to 9 days- 
(posfere resrts). II has raver tated. 


jtmlb ^^j fcribnnr I Aut0 Rentals 




RENT AUTO DEROi FRANCE: 
WBEKEW) EF500 - 7 days: FF150G. 
PariB 433 ftl )1 43 60 55 65. 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES A TRUSTS 
IMMIGRA110N/PASSP0RTS 



USED 1M0 ARUCUATE dump tntefcl 
ME985-T20, 204ORV, Daub deal en- 
paa, al wheel- drfra, tor underground 
mWn^iiogii conetniatort project*, 16 
units tor knmadtata sale a R3B Japan 
S77D00 par oft Pltadp* aiy Fax to 
81 -550-75-4834 dr cal B1-550-754590 
Nflfcamoto Erterprisas LkL 


UNIQUE CHATEAU In fte heal at Bns- 
Mb, flmounded by 40,000 sqm land. 
Property has corateqe. For hifter ttu- 
rtes contact Madison Properties Tel: 
+322646.1214. 


OFFSHORE COWANES. For to* bro- 
chure or adufce Tet London 44 ift 741 
1224 Fax: 44 1B1 748 6558/633B 

wwwappwoncoi* 


Business Services 


SEU.&BUY 

al over lha wortd wlh INTERNET 
www-webBuobustaeeEroom 

Fti +33 ( 0)5 61 14 85 29 


YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 
Bond SOW - Mai, Phone. Fax. Telex 
Tet 44 171 290 BOM Fax 171 499 7517 


Business Travel 


WtMMdB. Up to SBi cfi. No comm, 
no restrictions. Inqjertai Canadaiel: 

1 ■614*341-7227 Fax: 1414G41-ro£ 


Capital Available 


PfiOJECT CAPITAL 
AVAILABLE NOW 
NO LiMfT 
NOSaaMTY 

FAX: +44 (0)171 470 7213 


Financial Services 


OFFSHQfE Hits • Croats anttaunite 
sueceaatriy your own offshore invest- 
mert fdftP wc M (852 2537-3224 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


Tor 

SOLUTIONS 

Ctrtad 


BANCOR 

OF ASIA 

* guaraftes to secne hndtru 
for vtabte protects. 

VENTURE CAPITAL 

EQUITY LOANS 

REAL ESTATE 

long term eoBerai 

Supported Qtaaneas 


(ComntiBrtxi earned only 14 m Fining) 
BrolHS Comnrisdon Assued 


1 1 1 /. 1 ; (.! 

4£wf 

!L=l|'AIiSa.?! 








No commission UnH 

REWKBfTATire 
Mwded to act as Uabon 
Heaaa rq% h En^sh 

WHIWE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
ftiYNtoMI badtera 
mil Vsnlin Btvd n Sufet BN 
Endno, CrtBbtnta 91 438 ujsjl 




hotaitt Sr. Asm Data O.G. Letysad 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


New Lower 
International 
Rates! 




Germany.... 31 0 

Japan 38$ 

France 330 

UK 190 




• NO Set Up Fees 
■ NO Mfnlmums 
•Six-Second Billing 

• AT&T Quality 

• 24-hour Multi-Ungual 
Customer Service 

The QrigIM 

kallback 

Whare Standard* are SM. not Itotl 

Tel: 1.206.599.1991 
Fax: 1.206.599.1981 

Email: info0kallback.com 
www.kallbaek.ccm 

417 Second Avenue West 
Seattle, WA 98119 USA 


Serviced 


YOUR OFFICE M ROME 
AM) MAJOR OTC9 M ITALY 
TEL- 29 6 8643241 FAX 38 6 86860187 
WWWiXEOnWENETWOHUT 


Your Office in Germany 

ws are til your semes' 

' Complete office senses a mo 


' Ftify equipped cfees for short 

term or long term. 

' Manatanaly trained office 
am pmte s s iotBl stff St your 


■ Car be legdfy used as your 
corporate domefe for Germany/ 
Euope. 

' Yew business operation can start 


Latreo Buninas Services QeAH 
^rnHlaus am Hofrieusanpark 
JifiOtesrasse 22, 

60322 RanHul am Mata 
Germany 
Tet (@9) 955154 
Rk (B) 595770 


Employment 


General Positions Wanted 


MULTILW GUAL COTOBUTricafen 

asaeaas 

aA&K%snk 

Ocintta Untanty, Eastern Europe «- 
wn, looks tor protosslonai ohanemn, 
cv and references available. Ftr 
324248.4690 


WANTED: ENGLISH TEACHER 
FrBnch ,0f bac. 
w Plrt +33 (0)1 69 28 IB IB 



TBEvoaurswaxmmunii 

wanningto RUN A classified AD? 

AflA/lPAOHC 

"®H4|SWm. HONGKONG: 

«--|0«)97l2Mn ^2236478. 

Fxac P69) 971 25020 ^“3250842. 

^ 28749, IHTSK - 


■> , 


. " ^ 





















































































" 1; Ck 3rc "t. 

i?* 0 " *4.|| 

lf ; 

- :-;p. ,.,: u, ,.' Sttt, 

=■■ ht ^'h, ;t ' 




’?Ue 

: Sir, 


the 


? i 


iE 


v Think big? 

You wish to finance a large-scale international project? 

NORD/LB 

NOWUSIrtiCHl USDE1IANX CIROZimtAU 


% 


♦ 


JtcralbSSdbttiK 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


R 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Think twice! 

A second opinion is always smart. 

From a major German bank with international experience. 

NORDKLB 

NORDDEUTSCHt LANDtlBMK CIP07CNTIAU 


r >n f-'l’NuirJ; 
••-•irr... ,3 "< 

weak 0n,r, “' 

•• bc IU 4 Ut 

■ i 


the Gi 


; _ -ii f ri r 

• - r ■-*' ttl!fc 
7 - -IDCij 

■ : -■-■lie; 

*• V ft ; 

-~-j: 

• • "•><* 
*• "“-Wn 

‘ V'inj 
' !* 
■' -vi ir 
TPi 


Weill Builds 
His Dream 
Company 

Travelers Chief Aims 
For ‘Unparalleled 9 Firm 


N! 


‘ By Leslie Eaton 

^ New York Times Service 

-EW YORK — Sanford Weill 
can hardly con tain himself. 
With most of his one-time 
peers on Wall Street hav ing 
burned oat or been booted out, Mr. 
Weill, 64, has scored a coup for Trav- 
elers Group Inc., the company he b uilt 
from cither people’s castoffs. He has 
bought Salomon Brothers Inc., a firm 
known as the biggest, baddest bond 
trader on the Street 
And Mr. Weill, who a decade ago was 
written off as a has-been, is clearly rilled 
with glee. “He's having the time of his 
life,” said James Dimon, his second-in- 
command for IS years and the chief 
executive of Smith Barney Holdings 
Inc., Travelers’ brokerage firm. 

Mr. Weill is gr innin g as he takes on a 
'Challenge that has brought other Wail 
Street powerhouses to grief — buil ding 
a financial-services firm that can do 
everything from advising C hina on bil- 
lion-dollar deals to selling mutual funds 
to amateur investors in Cincinnati. 

He is doing it by trying to swallow a 
firm with a troubled past and a high- 
testosterone culture thai has resisted even 
Warren Buffett’s efforts to tame it. 

The Salomon deal is die culmination 
of a lifelong dream, he said, to build 

WALL STREET WATCH 

what be calls “a great financial-services 
company without parallel.” 

If that means coping with tbe outsized 
egos — and salaries — that characterize 
Salomon, well, “I have experience with 
diverse cultures and getting people to 
work together,” he sain 
From an early age in the Bensonhurst 
vv section of Brooklyn, Mr. Weill was ag- 
• gressive and energetic. 

‘‘He was a member of die Junior 
Davis Cup Team, and he’s been playing 
aggressive boll ever since,” said Mi- 
chael Lipper, president of Upper Ana- 
lytical Services Doc., who Iras known 
Mr. Weill for decades. 

Ar the .age of 27, affer just five years ; ... 
as a stot^brolcaCMr!: Weill opened bis 
own film with some friends, who used . 
every penny they had to buy aseaton the 
stock exchange, said Roger Berlind, 
now a Broadway producer. “We started 
out working around the clock,” Mr. 
Berlind said, “and Sandy’s still doing 
that, from everything I hear.” 

Through the stock-market boom of 
the 1960s and the protracted market bust 
of the 1970s, Mr. Weill began buying 
other brokerage firms, assembling the 
huge network of stockbrokers that be- 
came Shearson JLoeb Rhoades. He was 
famous for negotiating hard bargains 
and for inspiring his work force while 
slashing costs. 

But in 1981, he made a deal drat 
would lead to disaster for him. He sold 
Shearson to American Express Co., the 



EU Concedes Defeat in Banana War 

It Agrees With WTO That Import Policies Broke Rules on Trade 


>WUraAfUarii/11nfln* 


Sanford Weil! of Travelers Group, which bought Salomon Brothers Inc. 

American Express, could not work out 
their differences; in 1985, Mr. Weill 
became unemployed. 

He was not alone, however, he took 
his assistant, the young Mr. Dimon, now 


41. Desmte a reputationfor mthlessness, 
Mr. Wall also is known for his loyalty 
and surrounds himself with old asso^ 
dates from Shearson and elsewhere. 

hi 1986, after a failed effort to buy 
Bank of America, he recognized the 
value of a troubled concern called Com- 
mercial Credit Co., a consumer-loan 
company drat belonged to Control Data 
Systems Inc. In November of that year. 
Control Data sold most of Commercial 
Credit to the public, and Mr. Weill took 
die reins; a year later, he bought the 
company himself. 

In 1988, Mr. Weill bought Primerica. 
die parent of S mith Barney, which had 
been bleeding red ink in the wake of the 
stock-market collapse of 1987. 


The next year, he snapped up the 
small network of retail brokerage outlets 
that bad belonged to Drexel Burnham 
Lambert, the junk-bond house that was 
under pressure from regulators. 

In 1992, he began to buy Travelers, 
which had been plagued by bad real- 
estate investments, and in 1993, be 
bought Shearson from American Ex- 
press for S1.2 billion, which was con- 
sidered a bargain. 

Buying Salomon is an effort to beef 
up Smith Barney’s investment-banking 
business and to establish a global pres- 
ence far a firm that is little known 
outside the United States. 

Tarred with a trading scandal several 
years ago and the defections of some 
important bond traders, Salomon has 
been searching for a buyer and cones 
relatively cheap, or so Mr. Weill seems 
to think 

“This is not a crazy deal,” he said. 


Caap&dtyOvSafFroBi Defkarhrs 

GENEVA — Conceding defeat in rhe 
so-called banana wars, the European 
Union on Thursday accepted a World 
Trade Organization rinding that the Un- 
ion’s banana-import policies broke rules 
on free trade and should be changed. 

The trade group’s Dispute Settlement 
Body on Thursday rejected an appeal by 
the EU after it lost the case, which was 
brought by tbe United States with the 
backing of several South American na- 
tions. 

A pane! of experts derided in April that 
EU banana regulations unfairly favored 
Africa, Caribbean and Pacific nations — 
many of them former European colonies 
— at the expense of banana-exporting 
countries in Latin America 

“The European Community has ac- 
cepted the verdict of the panel and ap- 
peal body in the case related to its ba- 
nana import regime, and has therefore 
joined with other members in die formal 
adoption of these reports by the WTO.” 
an EC statement said. 

Roderick Abbott, an EU envoy, told 
the Dispute Settlement Body that Brus- 
sels would “give a first indication of its 
intentions” on implementing the find- 
ings within 30 days, an official state- 
ment said. 

But trade sources quoted Mr. Abbott 
as saying that Brussels was “deeply 
concerned about the negative economic. 


political and social consequences” of 
aspects of the findings for former Euro- 
pean colonies largely dependent on ba- 
nana exports. 

And the envoy of Sl Lucia in the 
Caribbean, where the fruit provides al- 
most the only source of foreign revenue, 
said that once the ruling was imple- 
mented producers in die region would 
not be able to sell at a price that covered 
their costs. 

The case was brought to the WTO by 
the United States after U.S. banana mar- 
keting companies complained they were 
losing business because of advantages 
enjoyed by EU importers. 

Washington asserted that it was not 
attacking the small fanners of tbe Carib- 
bean. who get preferential treatment un- 
der the EU's Lome Convention agree- 
ments. which mainly covers one-time 
British- and French-ruled territories. 

The U.S. complaint was backed by 
Ecuador — tbe world’s largest banana 
producer — Guatemala, Honduras and 
Mexico, where production costs on 
large plantations are much lower than 
those of the mainly small farmers in the 
Caribbean. 

Several former British colonies, in- 
cluding Jamaica, have warned that the 
action could backfire on the United 
States by forcing small producers to 
switch to coca cultivation, which could 
swamp the United States with cocaine. 


The EU’s 15 member states, which 
differ strongly on die banana policy, 
have already opened informal talks on 
how the ruling might be implemented. 

The German economics minister, 
Gueoier Rexrodt — whose country has 
long sought a change in the EU rules — 
said Thursday that Brussels must im- 
plement the findings. 

The United States says it wants frill 
compliance with the panel’s conclusion 
and will not accept compensation for 
lost trade — one of the possible solu- 
tions under WTO regulations. 

The rules provide for implementation 
“within a reasonable period of time,” 
which trade diplomats said is widely ac- 
~ to be a maximum of 15 months, 
ide diplomats said Brussels, which 
has championed the WTO as a forum for 
resolving trade disputes, had little 
choice but to go along with the panel 
ruling if it wished to avoid undermining 
the organization's authority. 

The EU trade commissioner, Sir Le- 
on Britian, argued in a newspaper article 
this month that as the price of mem- 
bership Brussels had to accept WTO 
findings whether it liked them or not. 

The EU itself has made wide use of the 
WTO dispute settlement procedure, 
which Sir Leon said had helped ensure 
that the United Stales, the world’s biggest 
trade power, also played by tbe rules. 

(AFP. Reuters) 


Glitter Fades as Sales in Asia Slow 


Salomon’s Savior Is Cashing In 



now, to “go beyond Wall Street to I 
a great American institution.” But he 
and James Robinson IQ, the chairman of 


By Jonathan Fnerbringer 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Salomon Brothers 
Inc. is not Warren Buffett’s best deal, if it 
is measured against his own standards. 

But in tire sale Wednesday of Sa- 
lomon Inc. to Travelers Group, the bil- 
lionaire has done well by the standards 
of many investors, especially consid- 
ering die damage done to Salomon in its 
Treasury trading scandal in 1991. 

Mr. Buffett, the vaunted Omaha in- 
vestor, has made killings in stocks from 
Coca-Cola Co. to Capital Cities/ABC 
His average performance over die last 
two decades has been better than what 
be appears to have made so far on Sa- 
lomon, where he took a stake and briefly 
a management role after the scandal. 

Still, his 16.5 percent compound an- 
nual return on the remaining $420 mil- 


lion of his initial $700 miUion invest- 
ment in Salomon surpasses the 14.8 
percent return for the Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index over the same period. 

The Salomon stock drat he Iras since 
obtained at an average $45 a share gives 
him a potential gam of 69 percent, based 
on Traveler’ closing price Thursday of 
$76.25, unchanged. That’s not bad, even 
if the S&P index has gone up more. 

Mr. Buffett's hands-on management 
after the scandal and his credibility with 
federal regulators were crucial to saving 
Salomon and making it an attractive 
takeover target, many analysts say. Mr. 
Buffett has always wanted to buy into 
good management He has had his prob- 
lems at Salomon, but Mr. Buffett wrote 
Wednesday that Sanford Weill, the 
chairman of the Travelers Group, “has 
demonstrated genius in creating huge 
value for his shareholders.” 


By Jennifer Steinhauer 

Net •• York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — In the slick new 
advertising campaign for tbe fall line of 
Gucci apparel, there is nary an Asian face 
among the models seen frolicking in vari- 
ous stages of undress. 

But it was the Asian customer, and 
her powerful spending ability, that' 
helped send Gucci Group’s stock flying 
last year — and her pullback m spend- 
ing is what has led to its recent fell 

The company’s stock traded in the 
United States was at $46.75 late Thurs- 
day, down 62.5 cents, having tumbled 
18 percent Wednesday after Gucci an- 
nounced earning*; that fell short of ana- 
lysts' expectations and said that sales 
for the rest of the year would be sluggish 
because of a slowdown in the Japanese 
market. Other companies that specialize 
in luxury goods have also felt me effect 
of cooling Asian consumer d eman d. 

On Tuesday, LVMH Moet Hennessy 
Louis Vuitton said that its first-half 
profit rose 10 percent, to 1.77 billion 
French francs ($297.4 million) from 
1.54 billion francs a year earlier, but that 
its cognac and spirits business fell almost 
20 percent, and analysts said that the rest 
of me year looked grim in Asia. 

[The jewelry manufacturer Bulgari, 
which gets around 30 percent of its sales 
from Asia, reported a 34 percent in- 
crease in first-half revenue, to 24.4 bil- 
lion lire ($ 14.1 million), on a 27 percent 
increase in sales, to 237.1 billion lire. 

[Bulgari ’s chief executive, Francesco 
Trapani, told the International Herald 
Tribune that although sales growth may 
have slowed in parts of Asia, the com- 
pany’s geographical balance had largely 
protected it from any regional declines. 
He also reported a 24 percent increase in 
sales in Japan, largely on jeweby and 
watches.) 


Rubin’s Preaching in China Yields No trains 

° Lhina Signs 

Mr. Rubin said that he believed a deal ” 

was near that could settle a dispute over T|* T7~ 

whether the official Xinhua press agency Dig JYHZHK 

wonld he allowed to censor, regulate fix C7 


Asian consumers, principally Japa- 
nese ones, account for about 45 percent 
of sales of luxury goods, primarily 
leather items and shoes. 

Now, a variety of factors is keeping 
Asian shoppers ai home. 

Japan’s economy is in a deep slump, 
in part because of a consumer tax in- 
crease in ApriL 

The yen has fallen against the dollar, 
and tbe currencies of a number of South- 
east Asian countries have weakened 
sharply in the past several months. That 
increases the amount of local currency 
that is needed to buy foreign goods. 

As a result, companies such as Gucci 
and LVMH have watched sales of 


Analysts say the rest of 
the year looks grim for 
luxury-goods makers. 


trendy shoes, cognacs and silk scarves 
taper off. For example, in its most recent 
quarter, cognac profits fell 19 percent at 
LVMH because of a 20 percent decrease 
in Japanese shipments. Perfume sales 
have declined, and analysts say that its 
recent acquisition of DFS Group Ltd., 
which sells perfumes in duty-free shops, 
contributed to the problem as sales fell 
50 percent in the first half of the year. 

On Wednesday, four Paris brokerage 
firms cut their recommendations on 
LVMH and at least two U.S. ones did so 
with Gucci. 

“Tbe dominating factor is that high 
interest rates have forced these compa- 
nies into taking a much more conser- 
vative position,” said Ron Leven, cur- 
rency strategist at JP. Morgan in New 
York. 

“In terms of looking at these compa- 
nies’ performance, we don’t think these 


situations are going to turn around 
quickly. * ' The hammering was bitter for 
Gucci, which has been a darling of Wall 
Street since its initial public offering in 
late 1995 at $22 a share. 

“This is a well-run company that did 
not disappoint until today,” said 
Josephine Esquivel, an analyst at Mor- 
gan Stanley, Dean Witter Discover & 
Co., who downgraded the stock Wednes- 
day to neutral from a strong buy. “I am 
not sure we have an easy answer.” 

Makers of luxury goods have kept 
their eyes firmly on the emerging mar- 
kets in Asia. They have hoped to tap into 
a new consumer base whose pockets are 
full of fresh open-market capital and 
whose heads are full of images of ad- 
vertisements for Western products that 
suggest a life of wealth, sex and status 
that can be had through their use. 

In an interview, Bernard Arnault, the 
chairman of LVMH, said the Pacific 
Rim was where he expected to get the 
most growth from some of his recent 
acquisitions, including a 
fume chain. Bat as lucrative as 
markets can be, so can they be risky. 

An economic crisis in Thailand has 
hit its currency hard, and the currencies 
of Malaysia, foe Philippines and In- 
donesia have suffered as well. 

The problems in Japan do not help 
matters. Weak consumer spending has 
hurt the economy — gross domestic 
product contracted at an animal rate of 
11.2 percent in this year’s second 
quarter — and the yen has fallen . 

Domenico De Sole, die chief exec- 
utive of Gucci, was distressed during a 
telephone interview Wednesday, ar- 
guing that the market had unfairly pun- 
ished his company for what he believed 
was a short-term problem. 

“We are still up 29 percent in profits,” 
he said. “We still are one of the most 
profitable companies in the weald.” 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service 


BEUING — U.S. Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin preached tbe virtues of 
competition, open markets^ freedom of 
information, a strong legal system and 
clean-business practices in a. talk Thurs- 
day with Chinese students. 

Later, in a one-hour meeting with 


Robin pressed for steps to reduce ten- 
sions between the two nations, includ- 
ing a reduction of the U.S. trade deficit 
with rhina, a further opening of 
Chinese markets, allowing U.S. cus- 
toms agents to check for prison labor 
goods in accordance with -a 1994 agree- 


ment and progress on human rights. 

Mr. Rnbin’s visit here is designed in 
part to smooth foe way for the summit 
meeting scheduled next month in Wash- 
ington between Presidents Jiang Zemin 
and Bill Ornton. 

“Bonding strong relations is abso- 
lutely critical to global prosperity and 
stability,” Mr. Rubin said in a speech at 
People’s University. “We in the United 
States have an enormous interest in a 
successful- China. ” 

But sources said (hat there was no 
concrete progress naade during the meet- 
ing with Mr. Zhn , even though tbe tone of 
the meeting ■mm friendly and candid and 
the TYeasmy se c re tary was impressed by 
China’s top economic policymaker. 


would be allowed to censor, regulate, fix 
prices for and simultaneously compete 
wife Western electronic economic news 
services. But sources familiar with the 
talks said a deal was not yet complete. 

In other areas, Mr. Rubin reiterated 
the U.S. position on Beijing’s effort to 
join foe World Trade Organization, say- 
ing that foe administration supported 
China’s application but that it could 
only take place on terms consistent with 
WTO standards. Mr. Zhu did not change 
his position, which is that as a devel- 
oping nation China needs time to make a 
transition to foe WTO guidelines. 



CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Sapt25 Libid-Ubor Rates 


Sept 25 


* 


(«J 

Madrid 

Mfln 

Parts 

T«KfP 

Tamrit 


1 ECU 
ISM 


S r OIL 
un 129 too 
3UX5 sum runs 
■ 1.7JH VBU — 
UW — 2IBI 
UfJI XLO um 
WU5 VOX 9H.19 
— lJZBa LBS 
SJfl SO 1W 

nut wue ox 
120 1201 UK 
uss 2JOI van 

urn use vm 

120 OBIS US? 


M 
nwa 
ISO 

am 

M71 vxu 

mu tie* 
mst — 
sms L71UB 
— iiu a 
2UB UK 
&2XB o oar 
Uto MM* 
UU4 122UR 
103 13P-28 


1M OR 
sum* — 

11WTS33U 

sms* 


IF. IF. Tib a Fta 

MSS’ 1205 liOt* MS5 1216* 

— J5J7J5 UBS 2&S JUO* 

«8fl- 12MJ Uri* 127V U8S5* 

3X09 BUM 2302 HOW 22SI7 2420 

U33 402 H VS 1240*0133 — 

turn OSS! U36 ISMS 1L9I 

13BU 3421 HU2S UBS l*7JS 

2KB HUB 400 4S3B- 42854 1»* 

u w u — xn uoo 

UD 01* U544 12443* — MB* 

*HK 1*77* — HW‘ 107 tflM* 
2217 LflIS 70544 15343 M40 

2J2S1 4>m 1 50 10» 


P MB* Ffrac ShrftH Fwc Vta ECU 

1 -mourn 5*u ■ SVu 3M-3V4 lVk-l* 7V* ■ 3U-3¥> !*■* 4K-414 

34n0fltti 5*»-5V» 3S4-3V. Hfc-lft 7-7» 3Vn-3*i. Vi-Mi 4VW-4V* 

frmoidh 5V»-S* 3%-3fc lW-1% 74*-7»ta 37B-3V* Vi-*W 4VW-4W* 

T-year S*r+5V» 3*U-« 1*»-1** 7VS-7i»k 3>VW-» 4W-4W 

sautces: Roofers, Unfits Bank. 

Kales appbatle to interbank departs of SI nSBon aMum (or oqoNXerm. 


UBS J84MS 


CktektReMAnrtfm/an 
PM met Toronto rotes ot 3 PM 
£lb buy one pounds it 


London AUton. Portland Zurich. tUtoge to otoertentots New YtokutA 

i a pjfa 

To buy one dodos ttoffs of 10* HA: natnurtort KA.- natumXrtoto. 


Other Dollar Values ‘ 

Pars 

Grmk'bec. 28005 
HoagKM9> 7.737 
Hmg-foiM 19*07 
36.195 


Pars 

fciutpan 0.9998 
teMtaas 1.3789 
taktasefc. 12483 
BraSntf 1 jOR5 


Maa.paa» 
MZaMndS 
Nanr.bana 
PM. pa** 


OdBOwyim 83151 
OKfctanwi 3339 
OW Ml inaa 63538 
EBPtMWBd 33003 
Ra-moriUm 53895 


■ado. rupfea 
Irish l 

(sort (Ml 
Kmrdter 

Molar, tint. 


forward Rates 


£**•>*« 


MW 

1.6199 

13827 

1.7704 


1.6178 

13804 

1.7669 


300SJI 

(16821 

14986 

03020 

3.1015 


9MQT 

1.6156 

1-3788 

1.7635 


PBAascada 


PvS 

7395 

1-5581 

7.1625 

33-40 

3^2 

18040 


S.Afr.raad 

S.Kar.m 


Soa.S 


. 335 
15175 


Camocr 
Japan*** !■* 
SwtMfcir 


12015 

15581 


TataiS 

TMbaM 

TnridstHra 
UA£ 


tfrdor 

11065 

1.4545 


Pars 

-46905 

91430 

7-5429 

2860 

35.10 

172385. 

34725 

49650 


9**r 

119.12 

1.4551 


Key Money Rates 

uriMStas 
Dbcoaal re* SjOO 

Pfto*raK n* 

Maridfaodt 5H 

ftdoT CDs dMais 560 

180 -dov CP dealan 550 

MlfllDwnrdl 439 

l-ywv manor M £20 

MaarmatarrMI 5X3 

Sfaor manor Ma 
7-yMrTtaaswr aota £07 

10 -yaor Treason onto £13 

3 0 r«ar m—r bond 640 

MHi«Lyacft3MBrlU 


Cion Pm fidSSE 


DbcouMta 


>mAM«rtak 
t«oaUiM«tafc 
lO-ywr Gwt band 

sagge 


MS Son* (unstordaml; One 


l-mantfe tatoiMn* 

matt lolifta* 
WmM 
10-foar Baod 


0-50 

047 

059 

054 

054 

2.13 


£50 

loo 

330 

132 

348 

530 


600 

8Vj 

54 * 

550 

550 

450 

5.17 

536 

497 

£00 

654 

632 

558 

n<n 

044 

058 

054 

054 

2.16 


450 

3.10 

320 

3.31 

347 

651 


Caionnr 

1 mmli Wtoobmk 
34wrtk kriartaak 
1 mattitarM* 
ltftmsar 


tarmHaarata 


3 — aMi tartalt 

6-4 


750 

7Va 

7V» 

74* 

74* 

659 


3.10 

3** 

34* 

3*1 

3h 

544 


700 

7VW 

74* 

71* 

74* 

£61 


X10 

3Vk 

34* 

3Vh 

3Vu 

545 


Oil Deal 

Agence Frattce-Presse 

BEIJING — China has 
signed another major oil con- 
tract with Kazakstan, farther 
evidence of a strategic shift 
by Beijing as it looks overseas 
for secure oil supplies to meet 
soaring domestic demand. 

The $9-5 billion contract 
signed Wednesday gives the 
state-run China National Pet- 
roleum Corp. tiie right to ex- 
ploit foe Ozen oil field in 
southwest Kazakstan and 
build a pipeline into China. 

The field is expected to 
pump 8 million tons of oil a 
year beginning in 2002. 

Tbe Chinese oil concern 
signed a $43 billion contract 
with Kazakstan in June to ex- 
ploit three separate oil fields 
there over the next 20 years. 

Also in June, China signed a 
$13 billion deal for Iraqi oiL 

The deals represent 
Beijing's largest investment in 
foreign markets, and highlight 
the importance it is a ttach i n g 


1 8 y« T OAT 
Sources: Revton. Btooabjra. toftrB 
Lynch. Bank or Tokyo-MllsvbUlil. 


Gold 


AM. PM. or* 


Zurich 32345 32650 +330 

landoa 32115 32460 +150 

NMTYwfc 32640 329.70 -*-190 

US doBars per ounee. London oMttol 

(DocJ 

So u tco R euton 


to establishing ready sources 
of oil, needed to sustain its 
rapid economic growth. 

“Up until recently, China 
was stu! pinning ail its hopes 
on untapped reserves in its 
own Xinjiang region,” said 
the Beijing-based exploration 
manager of a Western oil 
fir m. 

“But so far Xinjiang has 
failed to deliver, and with de- 
mand still climbing relent- 
lessly, China’s finally real- 
ized it had to go abroad in a 
big way. Hence this spate of 
large contracts.” 




OPEN 24 HOURS 


With more than 350 locations 
worldwide, Kinko's provides business 
services just about anywhere you travel. 

• Black & white copies 

• Full-color copies 

• Color laser prints 

• Oversize copies 

• Presentation materials 

• Computer rental stations 

- IBM /Macintosh 

• Major credit cards accepted 


Videoconferencing 

- Schedule your next international meeting 
with Kinko's worldwide videoconferencing 
network and save vourself time and airfare. 


kinko's 

The new way to office. 



Cdi the number listed 
belo w to find the 
location nearest you* 


AUSTRALIA 

TEL 61-2-9267-4255 

CANADA 

TEL (4 16) 928-2745 

THE NETHERLANDS 

TEL 31-20-589-0910 

KOREA 

TEL: 82-2-566-9768 

JAPAN 

TEL 81-3-3507-0009 

CHINA 

TEL 86-10-6595-6388 

UNITED STATES 

TEL 1 -8 00-2-KIN KOS 

[from U.S. & Canada) 

Opening soon: 

THA11AND, ENGLAND, 
ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, and 
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (Dubai) 


°1»7 IMrt. be. M rigtab land Hotel n4 JH Bounty to offer 
ut XfUMd iftHiult of Hrirt IMk he. md tm utad Of 
XMa't vrietH prrcfedo. bn. thr mpyitpK ho*k> 

■i oki ■ MpnOju cunrtaO mUl 


•: 3 


he 

n S 

ng 

iai 

3n 

I” 

XI 

n- 

ut 

to 

ig 

f. 

n 

jt 

h 

o 

n 

e 

it 


• -■ 

jr :-'-. ; , \L~i- 




3IKC{T IffSBMJIHSIIiSII XiFX * OOOPB Off SC S3 F P I» PC' O mT-pTI muT -nmmm mm mmminm mrnrns 


I 


PAGE 14 




bvternahonal herald tribune, Friday, September 26 , 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


Hm/estor’s America 



Inquiry Hits Stock of Intel audits Target 

Review of Company’s Planned Chips & Technologies Takeover Stirs Concerns 



Bloomberg News 

SAN JOSE, California — 
Shares of Intel Corp. and Chips & 
Technologies Inc. fell Thursday 
after an investigation into alleged 
monopolistic practices by Intel 
raised concern over Intel’s plaa to 
buy the fellow chipmaker. 

Chips & Technologies fell 75 
cents to close at $16,125, while 
Intel dropped $2-50 to $93. 125. 

Intel, the world’s largest chip- 
maker, said late Wednesday that 
the Federal Trade Commission 
haH begun investigating it for 
possible unfair practices de- 
signed to monopolize the market 


for microprocessors. The regu- 
latory agency already was look- 
ing into Intel’s pending $420 mil- 
lion purchase of Chips & 
Technologies, and the new in- 
vestigation led to concern that the 
acquisition might face even 
tou gh er scrutiny. 

“The government has some 
leverage over Intel in that it’s 
already investigating die Chips & 
Technologies merger,’ ’ said Mark 
Gidley, an antitrust attorney. 

Still, some analysts expect the 
purchase to proceed. 

“Intel is a very clean company 
on business practices,” said John 


Rutledge of Loomis, Sayks & 
Co. “My best guess is that not 
much will come of this.” 

Mr. Rutledge said the Trade 
Commission had taken no action 
against Intel after a previous in- 
vestigation was begun in 1991. 

Intel has about 90 percent of 
the marke t for microprocessors, 
the teams of a personal computer. 
Chips & Technologies is the top 
maker of graphics chips ased in 
portable computers. 

Shares of i he Intel competitor 
Advanced Micro Devices Inc. 
rose 51 JO to 532.75. Cyrix COrp^ 
another rival, rose 56.25 cents to 


S3Z75. The Federal Trade Com- 
mission, which is chafed with 
promoting fair competition, is 
seeking todoensme whether Intel 
ft r * e r »pK d through unfair or de- 
ceptive practices &> monopolize 
the mama for microprocessors, 
according to an had spokesma n . 
The investigation may have been 
instigated by a competitor's com- 
plaint, antitrust lawyers said. 

Intel officials said they would 
cooperate with the agency ami 


_ that the company’s dom- 
inant position had made it vul- 
nerable to such mquiries. 


Bonds PuD 
Stocks tower 
On Rate Fears 


ComfMbrOwStfFmmPUfatka 

NEW YORK — Stocks and boo* 
fell Thursday as e co no mic 
nited concern about inflation, i 
interest races and gave investors 
incentive to buy. 

Banking companies such as Nstions- 
ftank anrf BancOne were among the 
biggest loses as rising bond yields cut 
the vahre of tbeirbond hokfiags. -- 

“Equities remain extremely sensitive 
to the bond market,'* said Hank He- 
rmann, chief investment officer at Wad-., 
ddl & Reed in Kansas City, Kansas. 


ILS. STOCKS 


Citicorp and First Union to Try Cyberbanking 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Very briefly: 


Kodak to Cut Management by 20% 

; ROCHESTER, New York (Bloomberg) —Eastman Kodak 
Co. said Thursday it planned to trim its management ranks by 
20 percent as the photography company embarked on a cost- 
cutting p ro gr am designed to lift profit amid increased com- 
petition. _ _ 

Ko dak also will reduce its general and administrative staff 
by at least 10 percent, its first tangible moves sinew an- 
nouncing last week that profit in the third quarter could fall as 
much as half from last year's. Kodak shares closed at 
' $62. 1 875, up 56.25 cents. 


emptied 6t Ow Sag F run Dapaeka 

NEW YORK — Citicorp and First Union 
Corp. agreed Thursday to buy stakes in In- 
tegnon Financial Network, a bank consortium 
that is teaming up with International Business 
Machines Carp, to foster on-line banking and 
commerce. 

Integrum, formed in January, distributes 


consumer electronic banking and bill-payment 

i m North 


Canadian Software Firms Slip 


OTTAWA (Bloomberg) — Shares of two Canadian soft- 
ware companies fell Thursday after the companies warned of 
lower profits and slower growth. 

Coguos Inc.'s shares fell 1 4.50 Canadian dollars (SI 0.83) to 
30.65 after the maker of software that helps users analyze and 
manipulate information on databases said its growth over the 
next few quarters would slow even though the market for its 
products remained strong. 

Corel Corp. 's shares fell 1 JO to 5 JO. The company said its 
third-quarter loss widened because of lower sales of its 
WordPerfect and CorelDraw software, and it warned investors 
to expect a large fourth-quarter loss and lower revenue. 


services to 10 of the 15 largest banks 
America, representing 75 percent of house- 
holds. It is owned by IBM and 16 North Amer- 
ican banks. 

The companies did not disclose the financial 
terms or the size of the stakes. 

“We intend to be a leader in the electronic- 
commerce industry,” William Fexmimore, In- 
tegrion's managing director, said. In the next 
several months, he said, toe venture will be “in 
the middle of some very interesting alliances. ' ' 

Citicorp has abandoned its strategy of de- 
veloping proprietary systems as it woks to 


develop large-scale electronic banking services 
for its customers worldwide. 

In recent months, Citicorp opened a site on 
America Online Inc., hired Mining Co. to de- 
velop Internet banking sites and invested in 
Security Fust Network Bank. 

First Union, based in Charlotte, North Car- 
olina, also has moved aggressively to create a 
* ‘cyberbank” that would supplement branches. 
The sixth- largest U.S. banking company, h is 
developing banking services using the Internet, 
direct-access computer and telephone lines. 

Other Integrion owners are ABN- AMRO 
North America, BancOne Corp., BankAmerica 
Corp., Barnett Banks Inc.. Comerica Inc.. First 
Chicago NBD Corp., Fleet Financial Group 
Inc., IBM. KeyCorp., Mellon Bank Corp., 
Michigan National Bank, NationsBank Corp., 
Norwest Cc 
of Canada. 

Washington Mutual Inc. 

The addition of Citibank and First Union was 


a big boost for Integrion and for IBM. whidt are 
balding the computer giants Microsoft Carp, 
ami Irtruit Inc. for control of the nascent on-line 
hanlrrng 

Integrion is also facing off against Mondex 
Inte rnational ami other players for Internet 
commerce and payments systems. 

(AP, Bloomberg ) 


Unilever Merger 


Bloomberg ,Vm 

ROTTERDAM — Unilever, the British- 
Dutch consumer products maker, said Thurs- 
day it would merge Cheseb rough- Pond's USA 
Co., Helens Curtis Ltd. and Lever Brothers into 


?orp., PNC Bank Coip.. Royal Bank 
a, U.S. Bancorp., Visa USA and 


a single American company valued at about 
S3.7 billion and called Unilever Home & Per- 


The hood market does not have uiucfc 
more room to move without a ori ir 
short-term imeiest rates by the Federal 
Reserve BoanL be said. 

That appeared unlikely after the day's 
economic reports. The Commerce De~ . 
partment said bidets for long-lasting 
durable goods such as aircraft and eke- 
trotdc equipment rose more than jot- . 
pected in August;' while a survey of - 
weekly jobless claims stowed a sur- 
prising drop, also suggesting the ecoo- 
omy was expanding ax kbrisk pace. A r 
report from me National Association of . 
Realtors showed that U.S. home resales 
rose unexpectedly in August as nibrt- 
rates continued to decline. 

Dow Jones industrial average 
closed ax 7.848.01, down 58.70, with 
declining issues outnumbering advan- 
cers by a 15 -k>- 13 ratib bn the Big. 
Board. The Standard & Poor's 500- 
stock index closed at 937.93, down 


sons! Care USA. The merger would take effect 
Wednesday. The three companies account for 
nearlv half of Unilever’s U.S. sales. 


6.55, and the Nasdaq composite index 
feO 8.52to l,678.89.Tte30>yca 


-ycarTrcatr 
my bond was at 99 18/32, down 2Q/32, 
with the yield at 6.40 per ce nt, op from 
631 percent. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Japan’s Slumping Economic Outlook Takes Toll on the Yen 


• Japan and the United States have extended the deadline for 
reaching an aviation agreement to next month from Tuesday, 
a State Department spokesman said. 

• General Electric Co. said its GE Capital Services unit 
would combine its container-ship operations with those of Sea 
Containers Ltd. in a joint venture called GE SeaCo Ltd. 

• AT&T Corp. named R.CM Baker to head its international 
operations as it attempted to bolster its prospects oveiscas. 

Bloomberg 


Bloomberg Nens 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
Thursday against the yen as falling 
Japanese bond yields (hove investors 
to seek higher returns elsewhere, but 
it fell against the Deutsche mark on 
revived speculation of a German in- 
terest-rate rise. 

The yield on Japan's benchmark 
bond sank to a record low on ex- 
pectations that continued poor eco- 
nomic performance would keep Ja- 
pan from raising interest rates soon. 

“There’s an underlying convic- 
tion that the Japanese economy is 
very weak and showing the risk of 


decelerating,” said Tim Stewart, a 
currency strategist at Morgan Stan- 
ley Dean Witter. “There have been 
a lot of capital flows into the dollar 
and out of the yen.” 

The dollar rose to 120.825 yeu in 
4 P*M. trading from 120.370 yen 
Wednesday. But it fell to 1.7595 
DM from 1.7728 DM as comments 
by Helmut Schieber, a Bundesbank 
council member, and a report on 
rising import prices reignited talk 
that Germany's central bank was 
preparing to increase lending rates. 

The yield on Japan’s No. 182 
bond, maturing in September 2005, 


fell to 1.89 parent, a record low. 
Thar means an investor buying a 20- 
year U.S. note would get a rerun: 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


3S7 basis points, or 5.S? percentage 
points, higher than on a co mpara ble 
Japanese government bond. 

“The yield scenario is still very 
favorable for the U.S.." said Diego 
Giurleo. manager of foreign-ex- 
change sales at Royal Bank of 
Canada. “The market continues to 
be pro-dollars.” 

The dollar was also buoyed by 


expectations that the Bank of Ja- 
pan's quarterly' umkan survey due 
Wednesday would show that man- 
agers in tiie third quarter were pes- 
simistic about their companies' 
p rospects in the next few months. 

Bearishness on tire Japanese 
economy is helping offset the ef- 
fects of a comment by Japan’s 
deputy f inanc e minister for inter- 
national affairs, Eisnke Sakakihara, 
who suggested that officials of the 
Group of Seven leading industrial 
nations did not want the yen to 
weaken further. 

The dollar fell for a second day 


against the mark after Mr. Schieber 
said, .“Perhaps die time is coming 
where one may have to move from 
an accommodating^poKcy to a neu- 
tral one,’’ according to Bridge 
News. Also touting talk of a rate 
rise was the report that German 
impost prices in. August rose 0.9 
percent from July and 5.4 percent 
from a year earlier. 

Against other currencies, the dol- 
lar slipped to 5.9145 french francs 
from 5.9510 francs and to 1.4490 
Swiss francs from L4590 francs. 
The pound was quoted at $1.6285, 
up from $1.6138. 


i . . . 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


IM’ERNAT10!\AL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

Tire lop 300 mod active shares 
up to the dosing on WaB Street. 

The Associated Press 




i Onwo 





Lb* | 

Lara 

a« 

ir* 

17ft 

IS* - , 

"t+V 

7ft 

7 

7 

-7s 


a iS 

21V 

IV 

-1»V 

•V 

it* 

16* 

14ft 

-ft 

159V 

im 

15V. 

to 

2rir 

24ft 

MV 

-ft 

•’* 

.'4 

j. 

5 

Wft 

iSf 

Jfti 

3SV 

•A 


14V. 

UU 

♦W 

2 

2 

2 

-ft 

TS 

% 

X 

+9v 

-IV 

49V 

<*» 

«n 

-ft 

A 

i2> 

2» 

in 

MV 

-ft 

-mv 

«v 

MS 

4 

*it 

2ft 

lift 


.£ 

-tv 

♦ V 

17ft 

IM 

1SW 

-n 

IP 

1MW 

fl* 

toft 

119ft 

to 

IT* 

'! k 

1*S 

s 

fc 

AS 

+SV 

4W 

»v 

4 

-ft 

17ft 

17ft 

lift 

4V 


nv 

29V 

-IV 

Uft 

17V 

17ft 

♦ft 

VH 

m 

38V 

-V 

4ft 

lft 

it 

to 

1ft 

+IV 

-Ik 

IM 

18 

18 


14ft 

1» 

14ft 

.a 

Sk 

Sft 

» 


ift 

Its 

19s 

*1* 


» 

9ft 

to 

2AV 

24ft 

3M 

*v 

23ft 

77ft 

22ft 

+IV 

2WV 

mv 

8U 

-ft 

SWs 

sw 

59ft 

-9V 

3ft 

2ft> 

Sft 

+14 

ft 

Vft 

X 

ft 

9ftS 

■»S 

,1V 

Kft 

24ft 

2SW 

to 

111 

lft 

19V 

+9V 

2ft 

to 

Ift 

+u 

ft 

ft 

IV 

-VM 

5ft 

5ft 

Sft 

*4V 

4 

Sft 

4 

+IV 

12 

10ft 

lift 

-ft 

2711 

Mft 

M9S 

-vs 

Uft 

nr. 

Hft 

*Ym 

NM 

17ft 

im 

+n 

lift 

lifts 

IMV 

•n 

7ft 

7ft 

7N 

4ft 

4V 

A 

-it 

lft 

IVV 

UU 

-tv 

14ft 

Uft 

lift 

to 

TO 

■ft 

w 

-W 

IV 

to 

8ft 

+n 

in 

1 

Ut 

♦Vs 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

♦ft 

7ft 

FV 

ft 

♦V 

Iriv 

15ft 

15V 

♦ft 

MV 

to 

59V 

-tv 

10 

W 

99V 

-vv 

19ft 

19 

I9H 

♦ft 

ft 

ft 

vs 

-ft 

7ft 

7V 

TV 

+ft 

S 

to 

wv 

♦ta 

ten 

ton 

10ft 

+n 

Zft 

m 

29V 


15ft 

lift 

15 

+ft 

Sft 

Sft 

Sft 

ft 

is 

IV 


9ft 

9ft 

91V 

+5 

mv 

17ft 

179V 

3ft 

3 

av 

♦vs 

4» 

41ft 

<2Vt 

♦vv 

44 

MV 

4M 

♦ft 

5 

4ft 

411 

•ft 

to 

M 

49V 

•ft 

1|Jb 

nv 

Hft 

♦IV 

17ft 

77 

17ft 

♦w 

59V 

Sft 

n 


ft 

tv 

♦te 

.Jh 

inv 

17ft 

db 

■AV 

4)1 

49V 

49k 

to 


2 

21V 


Uft 

AM 

UV 

♦u 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft 

♦tv 

8ft 


89V 

+tv 

(ft 


■ J 

-*v 

ft 


PCS 

n 


NTT a 

■4V 

Oft 


r-an 

♦ft 

A 

TV 

21V 

-tv 


Pfl 

n 

-ft 

lift 

1 9k 

lift 

•Vi 

Sft 

SH 

w. 

♦vv 

Oft 

M 

» 

-ft 

14ft 

IM 

14 

♦9V 

IM 

Uft 

18ft 

♦ft 

12ft 

lift 

Uft 

♦n 

37ft 

17ft 

im 

♦ft 

32V 

lift 

B 

.♦tv 

aft 

ms 

29V 

♦ft 

to 

19V 

to 

•ft 

n» 

Ift 



2V 

2ta 

sts 



to 


-ft 

27ft 

2HI 

FIB 


79V 

71V 

7ft 

ft 

I9V 

». 

TVS 

♦ft 

7ft 

M 

TVS 

♦ft 

Sft 

»V 

TO 

79V 

E? 

♦ft 

+tv 

4MV 

IM 

Mft 

-ft 

Uft 

IM 

1418 

-ft 

14ft 

lift 

wn 

to 

1ft 

1W 

19k 


Ms 

PV. 

EM 


a 

19k 

2ns 

nt 

Etl 

-t> 

•tv 

(ft 

TVS 

7W 

-tv 

18ft 

17ft 

17U 

-9. 

6 

TO 

5ft 

ft 

Uft 

lift 

lift 

♦V 

b 

M 

11 

•111 

uiw 

12 

12V. 

-ft 

79V 

.79* 

79V 

-ft 

19ft 

19ft 

19* 


IM 

inn 

toft 

■ft 

27ft 

Z7V 

27V 

to 

Uft 

av. 


57ft 

S«V 

stu 

-1ft 

ift 

Sft 

59V 

-IV 

MM 

10ft 

WV 

-tv 

Uft 

TO 

EJ 


7ft 

7 

Hfl 

1 


S«k 


m inbM d* Indexes 


Most Actives 


Sept. 25, 1997 




'-=*sr Cbge Op fctf 


iegh Low Latest age Opt* 


High Low Latest Op Optat 


S !* g 

na nvs 


SB 


'*5 

£ 

IN 

1HI 

S24 


m 

m 

A 

A 

iii 

TO 

ft 


£ 


* 

in 

:*» 

Si 

« 

i 


-ft 

*-V 


Dow Jones 


NYSE 


Law Lutes Chge Oort 


•ft 

+ft 


Indw 790148 79»Jt 78*140 7848JJ1 -SL7D 
Tim 3W3.11 3147.48 313842 3139 09 -1822 
ura 34007 24073 23883 23908 -1.10 

Crop 2531.19 253804 251 1 JD 251X42 -1892 


+*• Standard & Poore 


■'4 

-ft 


2£N 2TO 

in i 

SVV 5ft 
SP, Silt 

sv m 

14N Uft 
4ft 4th 
II 12* 
« J9H 
21V 

2 * 

7V 7ft 

.5* n 

M*. 10 

*4 91ft 
10W HU* 
5ft St) 

nit Mu 

511V 51 

Eft M 
14V U 

-»v ft 


lftv 

a 

241 
lft +5V 


T«der 

4 PAL 


r Industrials HZLMimSS 11 04.11 309730 

V 1 Tmncn 404 41 UDOC <00 LA 4J» TO 


Mas 

CO'TTpOQS 

CMCdog 

Mum! 

Cocoa 

AMO 
RJDams 
Trowfu s 
CenBfc* 
a Co 


74383 M*. 
71077 75ft 
SI 331 9T» 
50444 J5ft 
49958 431V 
43497 XJVt 
43014 38W 
43004 TOT. 


RBSSi 


4J735 fjr 


sft *ft 

52ft. -ft 


40 

2ft 

ft 

7ft 

■ft 

iwr« 


■ft 

•iv 

-ft 


Transp. 

UHTifles 

Finonee 

SP 500 
SP100 


694.4T 6S&96 590 M 68129 
208.64 20596 206.07 20520 
>13.19 111J2 111-S2 110.07 
959.78 944.07 944,48 937.93 
927458 912-55 912J5 905.94 


Ainsn 

scroUw 

Medmilcs 

CflIHCAs 


39042 .... 
38397 41 Vi 
38099 23ft 
37845 5214 
37497 47ft 
37382 79ft 


3tft 38'- • 
73v» 73ft 
■ft 9sj 
»» 35 

6tTk 61 Vs 
31 r »V 2714 
34ft 36ft 
•8ft 48ft 

«52» 

39V 39ft 
41 41V: 
22-V 23ft 
50ft 51V« 
45ft 44ft 
28ft 29 


$2 

‘ift 


•*» 

-ft 

■v, 

♦tv 

ft 


Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

S000 bo irintuom- or* per tusMei 
Doc 97 243 38 259- .1-171.534 

Mur 98 271ft 246ft 33 

AtarSS 774ft 2T7ft 273 

JOI98 277ft 275 276 >4 

Sep 9S 272 273 27C. 

Dec 98 270ft 26ffj 249ft aac*. 16536 

Jul9» 33 31.: 33 -- 13 

Ed. setes 40000 7M* sc»es 31 M* 

MMs open ml 31ZD14 op 1.096 


lft 14846 

-: ;uc 

"t 1.9® 


ORAN6E JUKE 3ICTU 

vas97 tlx «75t ran -ass ulsm 

TOX -i£E M59 

teSS 79X TAX 795C *113 4329 

vs» 98 eax 77 :: sax *xc am 

=Sl Lies LXC My: 

MBMtf.sra4.xi:* 


18-TEAR FRENCH GOV. BONOS QHATIF] 

Fngacn-ihrfNOjd 

Dec 97 10004 99JS 99S8 - 006 UZ657 

Mar 91 9914 99. a 9914-004 1930 

Jan9t 9098 9t9» 9892 -(L06 a 

EsL sates: 120496. 

Open rt_- 144587 up 4517. 


Dec 98 9523 95.19 9521 *003 4U07 
Mor99 9514 -ta.13 9114 *004 2WW 
EMecteK 866X7. Pmr.stlro 80544 
Pmr.apnM: 39MU op 7J87 


Metals 

GQLDtKOOQ 


*Vi 

-V» 

*v» 

-IV 

-’V 


NYSE 


Nasdaq 


sw 

tlh +*v 


Canpadh 

Wustrtts 

Trane. 

umy 

n nmee 


49554 49125 49151 
674JE 41428 419.TS 
45882 45427 45425 
296.19 27158 29323 
44809 463-33 44149 


tnMs 


STM 


Nosdoq 


1® 2* 99. 9** 


,W 


NSaTX 


104 

30 


JM 2 
2£V 14 

mv » 

191V 19H 

1I»V 9V, 

Ute 129V 
.41V 4VI 
3MV M 
n 7ft 
14ft 21ft 
99V 59V 

2 

4V 


719 -9V 

Mi -W 
294 .W 

inv *»v 



Transp. 


223001 231751 222129 
110849 110897 1101 JJ 



Vot Mfth 

157142 309 

136544 21V* 
125596 969ft 
101038 57ft 
11336 37ft 
73472 5ft 
5*871 13 
57144 38ft 
OS64 99ft 
53311 19V, 
S2I42 74ft 
49993 6*» 
44618 50ft 
4*093 1 34ft 

45472 SOft 


21ft 22 
1JV« 20ft 
93ft 93fc 
50V. 50ft 
34*9 J7"'» 
4*1 « 

mv ia»u 

3*** 

97ft 98ft 
18ft 19 
72ft 12ft 
6*n 6ft 
5»v 47ft 
132V, 132ft 
39ft »«4. 


-10V 

*ivv 

-2ft 

- 2 », 

-ft 

*:v 

-ft 

*ft 

-lft 

•ft 

-3ft 

♦ft 

♦ft* 


SOYBEAN MEAL OCBOTT 

100 tans- Mon per ton 

CXI 97 22050 216^0 219J0 -a 10 7472? 

Dec 97 206X0 20200 205JO -03 4&S46 

JOT 98 20120 20000 20030 -080 11251 

Marta 19850 196J0 19020 wkJl 10345 

May 98 197 JO 19550 79650 -O® 1159* 

Ju1«8 199.00 197X 19470 -010 6C7S 

Est safes 14000 Weds sales 16229 

Wedft open Ini 1 1 5594 up 2^50 


sr?:: 


3S735 

-1*0 

44 

OSta 

zsx 

X*X X7-C 


S»2 

N--v7? 


=115 

-3-40 


Decta 

33CX XSJC 329-5C 

-160 11*388 

FeiVB 


37.43 a:.:a 

-155 

1S4SD 

Aprta 

Jinta 

ZEX 

3CJ3 E1S0 

+250 

*470 


33JC 3Stta 

-160 

8L810 




+160 

*487 

Data 


33932 

+360 

350 


ESL SCM6CJ0C *t£SKfesX40e 
Wetft cser ot :<»7,lS4cS 03S1 


ITALIAN GOVBtNMEMT BOND OJFFE) 
ITL®o mtaaa - pis atloo pd 
Dec 97 HIM 11113 It024 -051 I225B} 
Marta 112-28 11225 1*112 *002 980 

Est-sates: 4&27S. Ptn-S*ei: 54781 
Pnv.apenW4 1218 8 3 uo 4809 
UBOR 1-MONTH (CMEiO 
S3 mfflao- prs at 100 pci. 

00 97 9*37 943S 9*36 Bncfc. 28520 

No* 97 9434 9831 9*22 -CUH 30274 

Dec 97 9*17 94.14 9415 -002 0101 

Est sates NA Vtate sates 1932 
WedKopeatf 7L229. up*99 - 


Industrials' - 
COTTON 2 (NCTNJ 
SMOOtta.- cent* pvr to 
CM 97 71.98 TIM 71.90 +030 283 

DtC 97 7456 710 7X7% 032 47 m 

Morn 7555 74J0 7485 -035 14948 

Moyta 7605 75 JO R47 -024 4518 

JU9B . 76*3 7600 74.W -033 

EeL sale* 7 JOB INdS SOTO 10X74 
WMi open tat 84550 off 71V 


4170 




KEATINCOfLOUiEJO 


SOYBEAN OIL CaOTl 
40000 lbs- oents per IP 
00 97 2*00 2351 2X6J 

2448 2189 23.97 
2*42 2410 2415 
2*95 2 425 2451 
2600 2442 24*7 
25.10 2*52 2452 


Dec 97 
JOT 98 
Marta 
May 98 
Julta 


-004 12511 
-015 53508 
■017 15060 
-019 8595 

-0.18 5575 
•0.18 4960 


17V. 


AMEX 


AMEX 


EsL stfcs 20000 Wed* sales 16561 
Wetfft open (nt 101.3*0 aH 244 


7ft 


PepOd 


S5S* 


13B 

in 

i*» 

is 

in 

337 

4B4 

in 

717 

ai 


u 

uv 

4 

7ft 

a 

2Sft 25ft 
UV. 12ft 

29ft S 
Ml MV 
lift HW» 
4ft 4ft 
3ft 3 
1ft lft 

J7ft 17ft 
UV 12ft 

a 

27ft 


24ft 

7ft 

«ft 

stv 

nv 

i 

5 

7ft 

a 

75H 

12ft 


-ft 

♦ ft 

♦ ft 
*V 


48487 485.11 48424 -083 

Dow Jones Bond 


133* 

TUMTO 


42S14 94ft 
18241 SV» 


20 Bands 

louusnes 

lOIndusMab 


10404 
101 J3 
10636 


•0.15 
-035 
♦ 005 


„.Lra 
JTSCap 


il47l 23 
I18D 4rt 


1118. ... 
9570 ft 
9009 V. 

HA 55L 
iXl a 


•ss’8: 

31ft 27 ft. ♦W 

4VJ «V + ,v 

ft ft 

2S A 
12 


12 


-V. 

♦** 

♦iv 

♦ft 

♦ V 


4ft 

lift 

A 

3 

1ft. 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

SOOObu iMmun- certs per busM 
No* 97 643 63197 634V: 4ft 97369 

JOT 98 444 435 437V) 

Marta 451 643 44SW 

Mayta 459 453 653ft 

M W 6*5 658ft 660ft 

Est. Hites 43000 Weds sates 40256 
Weds open M 191402, op 1973 


HI GRADE COPPER 0SCM30 

SSOQODt-cpmpa-a. 

Sep 97 9*25 7131 9I4C 4.75 1**1 

0097 9*43 93LOO 9175 -CL90 1108 

Ncv 97 9*50 9175 9435 -lOD 1815 

Dec 97 9415 91flC 9*75 -105 27J83 

J=n 98 9600 9*80 9500 -080 1*147 

Febta 9555 95SS 9515 -Q£S 1*J64 

Marta 9f*0 9*38 9515 -OSS *800 

Apr 93 9515 9519 9515 -045 873 

Marta 9650 94SJ 9630 -040 2143 

Est ssles 10030 Werfi sales 6014 
Weds open ml 5735* off MO 


3ft 26457 
3ft 10909 
-3 9152 

-3ft 10109 


* 2 ; Trading Activity 


j? JZ NYSE 


Nasdaq 


3ft 


U 


8ft 

4ft 

SVv 


4ft 4ft 


27V 

nv 

8ft 

49V 

5V. 


AOteocftO 

Dftcinea 


<*£ Mrond 


4 Not 


974 

Ml 

m 

ii* 

371 

13 


344 


137 


ft ^ 

aw 25 
inv lOv 
z» nit 
lift 11»ft 
4»v 42ft 
1ft lft 
» 2V. 

13ft IW, 


4ft 


28? 


537 

3408 


271 


7ft 


a 

14ft 

ntv 

inv 

42H 

IV 

» 

13 


_ AMEX 


W7 uSmSea 

34ta Total issue 

KSJ2S 

Martcef Sales 


12 


1727 2134 

17D 7103 

1979 1494 

5429 5735 

159 394 

44 J4 


WHEAT tCBOrt 

6000 Ibo mtebnum- cetes per bwteri 
Dec 97 366W 343 365M ♦ft 61^18 

Mflrta 3B0ft 377 379 -ft 2*217 

Marta 3K7 384 3B5U -ft *986 

Ji4« 386ft 383ft 384V -IV. 

Est .Mas 1M00 Weds sates 16092 
Weds open W1 06972 up 1.722 


SILVER CNCMX) 

6000 doy az.- roffi per fcy a* 

Sep 97 47750 47*00 47450 +350 129 

OSW 47410 tlm 78 

Nov 97 47650 *3*» 

Dec 97 42350 47350 47B50 -IX 56277 

jar ta jgaoo +100 22 

Marta 487.00 48200 48*80 -.300 16230 

Mayta 438J0 *400 4B8J0 -100 6248 

Julta 49200 49100 491.90 +100 

Est. sales 14000 Wads sales SU40 
Weds open Int 76686 up 644 


EURODOLLARS {CMER3 
s: mason-psof lOOpct 
0397 9*25 9*24 9*24 

Dec 97 9*19 9*15 9*14 

9*14 9407 9*08 

9*04 9198 9199 

9198 9689 9300 

9X87 9178 93J9 

9304 9676 9177 

9301 9172 9173 -00711*392 

9177 9649 9309 -0.00 97,722 

9171 9142 9342 -009 8*415 

9670 9162 9152 4109 71,460 

9167 9159 9359 -009 57.633 

EsL sates SLA. Weds sates 276080 
Weds open W 2^5*741. up 26513 


Marta 
Junta 
Septa 
Decta 
Mar 99 
JW199 
Sep 99 
Dec 99 
Mar 00 
Jun 00 


•001 26141 
•0J2 582409 
•005 406802 
-006 306801 
-007 238051 
-007 206230 
-008 1*7,204 


Oct 97 
Nov 97 
DOC 97 
Jan 98 
Febta 
Marta 
Aprta 


5440 5515 5651 +127 26536 

5745 5615 5737 *132 *»1 

5625 5650 5017 *127 24284 

3077 5740 5077 +122 26574 

5692 58.10 5092 +1.17 1Z1B 

5017 5750 5017 +1.1 2 6881 

5677 3520 5627 +UQ 


*594 


Ed. stfesHA Weds sates 463S8 
Weds spot ini 150417. op 53 


LIMIT SWEET CRUDE 01 Mino 
IJKIObbL-dcAns perbW. 

Nov 97 2047 1955 2039 +045102429 

Dec 97 2054 2005 2044 +042 61448 

3050 2048 2044 +038 3U83 

2048 2012 2044 *034 16851 

2050 70.25 3043 +034 16017 

1040 2023 2040 *033 BU4 

NA Wedk sates 7*210 


Junta 
Febta 
Mar 96 
Aprta 
EsL 


BRITISH POUND «CMEN) 

66500 pounds. S par pound 

Dec 97 14250 14044 14228 +4144 26447 

Marta 14150 14150 14144 +4144 237 

Junta 14102 +0142 27 

Est. sales NJL weds solas 1917 

Wads open M 26711, off 47 


Wad* open *6386146 off 730 


7 r W 


PLATINUM CNMER] 


10342 


SJtajr ot- Manperlrar «. 




Mwnoad 

DecSnea 


Teter 


KStSS? 


S' N^E 

S W- tern 

so a 

I 4 mmBSora. 


52934 72629 

Jl*3 36.18 

46243 78*48 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40000 lbs.- certs par fa. 

Od 97 4610 *7 JO 67.95 ^U2 2*192 

M37 6740 47.92 +015 0i024 

7100 7057 7052 +0.12 1*047 

73.95 7352 7145 +007 10084 

7040 7010 7037 +015 *497 

70.15 7000 7000 *010 1009 

12.735 Wed* I 


Od! 

Jan 98 

Aprta 
Julta 

EsL sates NJV. Weds sates 2430 
Weds open Ini 11991 up 190 


43900 47100 43140 
428JD 42240 42140 
41100 41230 41240 


■440 

■140 

-240 

-240 


6117 

6200 

671 

3 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMEIO 

100000 doOacs. S par Ota. tfir 

Dec 97 J2« 3237 J244+OP034 4*539 

Marta 3300 3284 3297+0.0024 1543 

Junta .7322 3319 3320+OJ30S6 417 

Ed. sales NJL WVds safes 9485 

Weds open W 46431, off!, 280 


NATURAL 6A5(NMEJ0 
10000 mra Muv, S pw an blv 
CW97 3330 X0Q5 3330 +0311 »915 

HmTJ 3370 1090 1370+0385 5003 

Do< 97 3324 1180. 1326 +0.150 29522 

Jot ta 1390 1150 1290 *0.150 2*5H 

Rbta 2500 1775 2890 +0.110 16082 

Man 2400 2480 2400 +0.125 12022 

BLjw les HA. Weds soles 87394 
Weds open M 246331. up 1.790 


UNLEADED GASOLINE (TIMER? 


Dec 97 
Febta 
Aprta 
Junta 
Aug 98 
EsL 


Oase 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Donors permeMckm 


GERMAN MARK (CMER? 

1 26000 nait* S par awric 

Dec 97 J710 J454 3709*00035 5*916 

Marta -5740 J494 J74D+04Q35 2320 

Junta 4770+04025 2412 

EsL solas HA. Wads sates 29.989 

Weds open M 61440. up L349 


Od97 
Nov 97 
Dec 97 
Jot 98 
Febta 
Marta 
Mrta 
Atoy 98 


AteBtemnfttab Grate) 
142*00 


IS 

W 

293 

147 

B 

HSU 


VIW 12M 
UV w* 
29V 


TMNl 


491 

w 

son 

1C 

527 

HI 


3 

MV — 

I s 

*Sft «M 
Mi S3W 
Uft UV 
2ft 11V 
mv in* 

u 

2ft 2fe 
I ft 
left im 
4ft «V 

1% A 

Wl 3* 
Oft a 
5»V M 
TW 


m 2S. 


PV +fti 
Ik +V 


Dividends 

Catapany 


Weds open Int 9*136 off 277 


^Lan, 

Foraaid 


142500 143100 143200 
143*00 163700 143600 143900 


Copper Canadas (Mob Grade) 
Spot 2DUJ0 206700 


204400 206700 2082ft 2084ft 

200200 209300 211000 211200 


Per Amt Nee Poy Company 


lft 

m 

uw 

m 

8k 

1 

Hft 

6H 

1% 

3M 

a*. 


+ft 

-ft 


IRREGULAR 

gEBto. E.dS 


H-28 M2 
10-10 11-21 
9-24 9-29 
9-24 9-29 


Burnham Fd A 

OancoFncJ 
Commundy FdlB 
Cncy Woman Cr 

EoofeBnehsis 

UquFBm^p 

Moss HIHi&EdTn 


Per Aatt Rrc Pay 


FEEDER CATTLE <CMERJ 
5W00 «».. oats per lb. 


STOCK Spur 
Ujj8verNV4farl uR. 
Urdleuer pic ADR 4 (or 1 spRL 


Mass HRti&EdTx 
Mass HBtAEdTx 


MerirfkmlnsGip 

I HlBvCare 


4V 


II 

W» 


srv +vv 
inv +*v 


INCREASED 

KtomottiFsl Q 08 


273 

MR 

Ml 

11411 

155 

in 

fa 


DB 


144 

m 

942 


8HV 2 a 

B lie 

flft 

IM IM 

int m 

1TB 171* 
£ & 
a % 

A Jfi 
^ ? 

B 3* 
™ 
1 BV 33ft 
■res 6ft 

IV, lft 

4ft 4ft 

% 15 

$ £* 
3111 31 Vv 
7VV 71V 


19V 

2 ftv 


lifts +«k 


CarmaCorp 


SPECIAL 
g ZOO 


10-3 10-20 
10-7 10-15 


Morrison I 

NaiiPemi Bcshrc 
Nlpsco Indus 
^fmareni Bnqi 
PionoarSWEI 
RoOTokeGas 
P-ouaeCo 


13ft 

17N 

18V 

w 

Aral 

21V 

lft 


♦V 

+n 


INITIAL 

to Inc n _ 15625 

Bncpn „ 085 


Sun HrsbwjRcs 

TedrapsSi 


11-7 in 
10-15 1001 


TetJvOpsSev 
TaMtema FtfFnd 
USF&GCarp 


2 ■" 
2 13 
Q 075 
0 .10 

2 - 15 

a m 

Q .13 
M J)42 
M 042 
M 063 

9 - 08 

O 305 

2 -21 

2 ^ 
Q .10 
0 33 

q 2 i 

Q 35 

Q 335 

2 15 
Q .14 
Q 37 


9- 30 IM 

10- 10 10-20 
10-3 10-16 
10-2 10-16 
104 10-16 

10-10 11-25 

9- 30 10-15 

10- 15 10-31 

11- 14 11-28 

12- 15 12-30 

10- 9 10-24 
10-10 1041 

1W1 11-17 
10-31 11-20 
10-10 10-24 

103 11-1 
10-17 ll-l 
12-15 12-22 

10-1 10-15 

104 10-15 
IM 10-23 
10-6 10-31 


Sajta 79*5 7932 79.42 +0.17 


r?30 7642 7683 .033 
NOUta 8030 7930 BOJH +035 

Jonta 81.10 8047 8030 +0J17 

Marta 00.90 BCL43 ao^S +aOJ 

Aprta 80.95 8055 8055 +03S 


1390 

7318 

1984 

3347 

1-812 

<20 


5 fSU 

ISdM 

Tin 

Bl 


64730 

44930 


64600 

45030 


43930 

44730 


44030 

44630 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

115 mBBonjan, 5 per 100 yen 

Dec 97 .8423 3323 3347-03044 7*024 

Marta 3480 3440 3478-03M4 789 

Junta 3591-03044 146 

EsL sales NJL Weds stens 2*824 

Wftds open M 7*979, alt 1361 


5935 5830 5935 *088 17396 

5830 5730 5735 +038 3*209 

5730 5635 5739 +087 13M0 

5770 5730 5730 *037 VM01 

58.10 5730 5830 +087 *264 

5930 5660 5675 +037 *732 

6135 61.10 6135 +032 *051 

6135 4130 61-45 +082 Z533 

plates NJL Weds sates 32,748 - 
Weds open W 10*973- up ill! 


f 


n 


434530 637530 434030 634530 
646030 647030 644030 <44530 


Est «Ses 3391 Wed! sates 6. 222 
Weds open int 19,181, off 100 


HOCS-Uan KMER) 

40000 tes- cams per Bl 
O dW 7030 4937 69.72 -030 10994 

2X2 J?* 3 “» “-57 -a 12 1*449 

Febta 6*77 4*40 6*42 OiZ *138 

Aprta 4175 6130 6137 -022 1369 

Junta 4735 44.75 4*85 035 1.173 

EsL soles *406 Weds sdes 7.795 
Weds open W 29343 off 490 


563030 544030 554530 557530 
547530 568030 562000 562530 
roc Specks Mnb Grade) 

148030 148530 144030 144530 
U3&00 143930 143*00 143530 


PS"” 

Fwvrnttj 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12M00 francs. * per tew: 

-^22 *6954+03031 37,742 

Marta J02S A980 .7025+03031 1310 

JOTta J092+030Q1 ITS 

NA. weds fetes 1MB 

Weds open bit 2MS1 air 9388 


GASOIL OPE) 

its. doiknparaia*lc Im - toft or loo tens 
Od 97 17X30 17130 172JO +X2S 3X170 

NO* 97 17*50 17230 17*25 +2J5 1*494 
DSC 97 175J5 17*00 175-50 +230 1*871 

Jonta 177-25 17X75 17730 +230 11492 

FObta 177.25 77530 177X5 +250 7345 

MCT98 17530 17330 175J3 +125 

Aprta NT. N.T. T7*25 +225 

Est ndecl 1-331. .Prev. sates: 1*799 
Pieu-cpen CnL: 9X0M off 108 


‘At,"-' ' ■ 




*813 

Z3Z1 




Kgh Lro Close Qigr Opbd 


* I 

T2V, +lv 


REGULAR 

BCBFndSvco Q 37 im 10.90 




PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

40300 lbs.- onts pm b 
Febta 6*40 63JS 6387 -032 

Marta 6*15 6330 4140 3.10 

Mayta 4520 6*50 6430 +037 

EdL sates 1318 weds sates 1,194 
Weds open M S33& an 54 


, Financial 

WTWUS (CMER) 

SJ. "»on- pH of 100 pet 

g«2 9S00 9458 8488 undL 

“»ta 9*98 9*94 94.9b 333 

Junta va 89 ondi 

^tates NAPMi sales 1» 
weds open ml 7.74s up 1 13 


MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500300 peson S per pan 
Men .13450 .13410 .12410-30085 3X935 

Mra« .12030 .11980 .11980-00104 *489 

Junta .11640 .11410 .11610-30104 1816 

EsL sates NA Wads setes 9 'JO? 

Waits open M 3*431 off 490 


. BRENT WLdPET 

UA dallanpar band - tote of 1300 bamls 

N0097 JW4 1884 19.14 +<Sn944 

SS IS IS 5g g ^ 

«« 5B 5S 


4281 

2839 

125 


*990 

469 

108 


3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

£500000- pis ol 100 pa 
Dec 97 9230 9254 9286 —002 129361 

Marta 9231 9283 9255 -003 10*894 
Junta 9X49 9X59 9X61 -035.8*571 


JEST i938 7 na 1938 iSS Jg 

e3kS!bAs->ro 


f,^,3*EASUBYrc80n 

Bjto. pts & 448 b or 100 pd 
“»C97 107-41 107-14 107-17 - 23 237354 

E^sajes OlJsoWbds sates 37,779 
"O** Open hd 23M87. up 1823 


22 

in 

Irik 

m 

19V 

8ft 

.lft 


+ft 


554 

H 

in? 


X X 


UV, Uft 
SW 4ft 
U1V Uft, 
4VV 5ft 

*w nv 

lift 11 tv 


SHI 


a 

is 

10D 

» 

nt 

na 

ins 

«n 


lift 

17ft 

A 

av 

r* 

i 


ns 

Im 

15V. 

mv 


T 


a*. A 

20ft 20ft 

mv is 

te ft 


inv +iiv 

386 

M -ft 
»lk -ft 
Hft -h 
7ft 

A : 

Kte -IV 
Mi +SV 

iav 

SSV +*v 
914 

lift +IW 
Hft 

179V >ft 
lift -«V 
lift +v» 
12V. -r. 

I -*» 


299. 

2M 


Stock Tobies Explained " 

' 01111x1 d ' nEW *1 • too to Ihe tari 17 n££? 

■ p ? 1 12 moflttl5 - * - mul rate Incrsotetf an last 

riedoro to Lg -dVkfend w C a aJa ifanifa. sub fed to 15% iw+taidenct fa*. 1 - dlvkland 

1 ' <Hvfcferld ** -few or no 

q dtan taken gt hrioti dWuJend meeting, k - dhritfend dedored or paid this year, an 

a -annual rate, reduced on last dedanrtloa 
■' :"L fce P^^weeta. Tte hlgiMow range begins wfth ihe start nt trodlng. 

nd • nod day deterery p - aritial «vfdooA aaoual rate unknown. P/E - price-earnings ratio. 

Rjdesed-andRWtualftrad. r- Addend dedrawl or paH m preceding 12 months, ptes slock 
dlvWeni ls- stoc k apBLDiuhtend begins wflh date otspCLste- sates, t-diridend paid m 
stock In preradftj 12 months esftnoied cash whie on e»<8vkland or as^BsMbution date. 

a- newy emty te^i. y-tnuBflfl halted. i( -ta bonkraptcy orrraWerstiip or being reorganized 

I!l)*lI^^I? m ^^c ,sea * rt,ies « , ** um, ^ ,, t s ' K t ,0M iiR®i ,es * , M-wti«idlstTflju}*d. 
M - when issued/ w* - wBtl Warrants, x - eadhUond or es+igtits. xdK - ex-dshteutton. 
m - wdhout warrants, y- cteMdcad ana sates in hiti. jh - ytoW. 2 - Hies in fulL 


Food 

COCOA (MCSS 
10 metric tas-S per ton 

Dec 97 

Marta 
Mayta 
Julta 
Sep 90 
Decta 

EM. sates 1321 MA sMes 12.941 
Weds open H T0&13& aH 1,934 


1720 

1484 

1703 

+ 1? 

*0894 

1747 

1713 

1731 

+13 

27.234 

1742 

1739 

1)51 

+13 

1 1.941 

1790 

1740 

17*3 

+ 12 

1589 

1787 

1787 



*510 

1805 

1803 

1803 

+14 

*551 


XJ&TOASURVCCBOT) 
gjwpo Brin- pts & 32nas arm pd 
2*2 >10-19 110-00 1 10-01 -17 3)7,732 

AjOTta 110-00 109-22 109-22 -17 12-156 

rr" 109-11 .17 1 

^“^»90*WW«r, softs 47.251 
w»ffs open M 39*902, up 2*tf> 


^ta 9M4 ?236 tata 40740 **« S^O W-IO -7^ f ’ 

Mar 99 9333 93.00 9334 -031 44340 975.10 u4+? V : 

Junta 9130 93.11 9115 Unde 4L577 EsL sates NA Weds sates 6737a 733 

Est iriro 11*12* Pimr. sales: 7*511 *W»«teenhn9T4Blup4n 

Prw. open W_- 4J9394 up 2390 a+. B ,-» _ 

rTSE 108 OJFFE) 

J-MONTH EUROMASK OJFFE) Qlpvlndnpatet 

DMI mBan-ptsOdOOpd DaW 51403 51583 SIM3 —34 n 

OdW W.43 9642 9442 —031 7.294 Mar» 51883 51833 51783 ^Sn 6 ?o5 

NOV 97 9453 9453 9452 —332 792 EsLsales: 534X p-. ?a . 1-805 

«*47 940 9444 —033 292476 

Marta MK oejo MSI -AAiftiCU -1 — nvn up 419 


COFFEE C (NGP 
3740010s.- arts per to. 

Dec 97 17130 14530 14430 
Mcrta 15830 15380 15*00 
Mayta 15250 14X75 I48JS 
Julta 14400 14250 14350 
Septa 13930 13855 138X5 
EsL sates *181 WMV sates *500 
Weds open H 23.117. up 93 


-X4* ii*n 
-210 *909 
-7-*> 13J1 
-2.45 1.730 

■2.90 446 


5i 5 J?E«URY BONDS (CBOT) 

*pd-SI0(ujw+)te432ad5d lOOpd) 

1 Mai'5-W 115-11 ' 

55?ta ,,iw 11Sfl0 iiMi 

S’* 114-12 -31 

Eg-*des Sawao Kltetfs soes 421-174 
***** upefl UV +7*14* lip 3X105 


30 41X992 
X 34942 
2.113 
1.904 


Morta 

Junta 

Septa 

Decta 

Marta 

Junta 

Septa 

EsL 


.9425 9*20 9421 -034 29*596 
9402 9497 9498 -035 23*181 
9582 9478 9479 -034 18032] 
9462 9558 9459 -034 15MS5 


WtaCMATin 
EFTOOperbjdKpaM 

wp taw -w» ia*«a Sep 97 302i0 Sttlfli) amn „ 

9536 9531 9543 -034 151327 Da 97 30340 30073 SSjSi »«3 

9532 W28 9528 —034 7*840 No* 97 30358 30293 30^1 ,a «5 

9418 9415 9515-033 42.9M rw« Zzl*. 2LL"-2l0 *ta« 

94725 


9418 9415 9415 -033 62.999 Dec 97 5to8 30283 Sajlra* 
. Mteta 30703 30510 


SUGARWORLD 11 (NOE) 

1 1 2300 tos.- cents per to. 
adf7 1025 1A60 1041 
Marta 1144 112* ltx 
Mayta 11*2 11J7 115) 
Julta 11-47 1155 1131 


334 17-734 

EH. sates 44495 WWt sates 4*854 
WteOT open H 1 7042* up 483 


gg*5»"«W. BUND (UFFE) 

“MHAooo-pteouogpa 

M^ta j£S ’S* ,02JU -HI 28*745 
10220 102.14 10234 -3.10 L2S5 

.’Wtt .Pra».t8lBS: 20*249 
"ra-opwiteL- 290030 up 1*064 

long gilt (uffei 

-0.15 2*356 £50000- PtoilSollOOnd 

-036 90885 Septa 118-18 118-12 11*15 W40WTW EUROURA (UFFE) 

4L0* 213M Decta 11 Wm„., 7 +oS 175M IP-1 atatal-ptoatliapa^ 

P»*--POTW.. 177-378 ralSB Junta Z£g S?? 

Septa «3S 9479 9422 «fig OJB4 


203*38, Praw. sates: 243W8 

Prev. open W. 157*935 up 2-«0 

8-MONTH POOR CMAT1F) 
FF5mHlan-pfsai 100 pa 
Decta 94-44 9440 9*42 -032 77.154 

M*r 96 9*22 96.17 94J0-032 3XS37 

Junta 9430 «.« 53^ 

Septa 9485 «30 95*3 _«B 

Decta 95*7 9464 9S45-.QJM S«S 

EM. sales: 50.123. *** 

Open tot: 210519 up *363. 


Junta 30803 30303 30213— nn , ? -S ’ XI 
Septa 30593 3M?3 Vg* 

M»99 030 030 30983 

EsL safes: 39317. 

Open hL- 84130 eltl^DQ. 


I960 


Commodity Index* 


25S2? • 

Futures 

CRB 


Oom 

T-547J0 

1496XQ 

1*408 

^42.99 


•^•WOib 

■rWgja 

>46.90 

2*1 -99 


If 



' V >«3 

**> 










?r Mr.n In ” lr ‘ 
‘ 'S.JjWch, 

., - •= if. . r-^iv , 


’ .-/.^ ^{h' : 

> |. lr ..!; : l«ir.. p 


•Tvi..., . ■ 

r..; J " H. 

:: 




cri, M ; 


■: : :■■■■■' 

- ‘ ■"•^ri -„.•,' 

• ... ■• ... ' > ■ 'ICV iK , 

• 4 ~ 'u' i, . i m -'i. 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


: •"llll.-n T 

• :/y 



Kia Creditors Move 
To Back Receivership 


,T " Hit 


SEOUL — With three days left to 
avert what would be the biggest 
bankruptcy in South Korean history, 
creditors of Kia Group appeared 
Thursday to be moving toward put- 
ting the troubled automotive con- 
glomerate under court receivership 
after the government hardened its 
stance toward the company. 

Kia asked a Seoul court Thursday 
to halt payments on debts at nine 
small units, including Kia Precision 
Works. It asked the court Monday to 
freeze the debts of its four main 
units, including Kia Motors Co. and 
Asia Motors Co., and override cred- 
itors' demands that Kia’s top ex- 
ecutives resign. 

Deputy Prune Minister Kang Ky- 
ung Shik urged Kia’s creditor banks 
Thursday to reject the company’s 
proposals and said the government 
would not bail out the conglomerate, 
which had sales lasr year of Si 3 
billion and is struggling under SlQ 
billion of dcbL 

"Our economy has paid the price 
for Kia,” Mr. Kang said. 

Noting that Kia would be vir- 
tually bankrupt even if its debts were 
frozen, he said it should be put under 
court receivership, a process that 
would guarantee additional loans. 

First Korea Bank and other cred- 
itors said they had yet to decide 
whether to accept Kia's bid for court 
protection. The bankers are to meet 
Friday: Kia’s grace period on its 
debts ends Monday. 

Kia is the latest in a string of 
South Korean industrial groups, or 


t : hue hot, to run into trouble because 
of mounting debts and the country’s 
slowing economy. If it fails, banks 
will be left with billion- of dollars of 
bad debts, heightening concern 
about lenders’ own financial health 
and in all likelihood driving down 
South Korean stocks. 

The benchmark stock index fell for 
a fifth day amid growing concern that 
banks would reject Kia’s proposals. 
The index fell 8.75 points, or 1.33 
percent, to 647, a six-month low. 

■ ‘It’s just too risky in own any Kia 
or banking shares,” >aid Park Jae 
Woo of Donghwa Bank. "If Kia 
fails, it will probably be more dam- 
aging on equities ’ than anything 
else.” 

Standard & Poor’s Corp. said 
Thursday that South Korean compa- 
nies with large debt loads mighl not 
be able to repay their nblieaiions as 
economic growth began to' slow and 
reforms of the financial system 
opened the country to international 
competition. 

“Korean companies have used all 
financial means available to them to 
fund their expansion drives.” said 
Daisuke Fukutomi, a director at the 
raring concern. As a result, he said, 
the companies are "overextended.” 

A First Korea executive said Kia 
and creditors were close lo an agree- 
ment before Kia unilaterally filed 
for court protection. 

Kia said it had had little choice 
but to ask courts to freeze its debts 
for several years and then allow 
them to be repaid at below-market 
interest rates. (AFP. Bloomberg) 


Payoff Scandal Ensnares Nikko 


C.mnirJl n s'ljff Fu/wi, ho 

TOKYO — - A high-profile racketeer- payoff scan- 
dal spread to include the last of Japan's four largest 
brokerages Thursday when prosecutors raided Nikko 
Securities Co. over suspected illegal payments. 

The raid on Nikko ’s headquarters. 10 other offices 
and the homes of its president and chairman by more 
than 200 agents came a day after the arrest of a former 
Yamaichi Securities Co. president. AtsuoMiki, for his 
rule in the scandal, which has also ensnared Nomura 
Securities Co. and Daiwa Securities Co. as well as Dai- 
Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd., a leading commercial bank. 

Tokyo prosecutors said Nikko was suspected of 
having funnelcd 14 million yen (SI 17,000) in illegal 
payoffs to Ryuichi Koike, an admitted racketeer, in 
return for his promise that the brokerage’s annual 
shareholder meetings in 1995 and 1996 would go 
smoothly. 

A government official said Nikko officials had 
admitted to some of the suspected deals with Mr. 
Koike during an investigation by regulators. 

Nikko. the ihird-largest Japanese brokerage concern, 
said it was taking the raids "very seriously and with 
great regret” and would cooperate with investigators. 

Nikko's fop executives are considered almost cer- 
tain to resign en masse, a traditional act of penitence in 
Japan that could soften any penalties that the Ministry 


of Finance decides to impose on the brokerage. 

Daiwa said Wednesday that its president, chairman 
and five other top executives would resign at the end 
of this month. Top managers at Nomura and Ya- 
maichi already have stepped as a result of the scandal. 
Prosecutors said last week that they suspected Daiwa 
of having made 67.3 million yen in illegal pavoffs to 
Mr. Koike- 

Payoffs to sokaiya, racketeers who extort money 
from companies by threatening to expose dubious 
business practices or disrupt shareholders meetings, 
have been illegal since 1983. but companies have 
fonnd it difficult to sever underworld ties. 

The scandal has emerged as Tokyo moves to 
implement its so-called Big Bang financial reforms 
aimed at increasing competition and bringing Japan's 
financial sector up to global standards. 

It is die second big scandal to engulf the four 
leading brokerages in six years. All four, as well as 
many smaller brokerages, were found in ] 99 1 to have 
improperly compensated certain large clients. Top 
executives at Nomura and Nikko at that time also 
resigned after some of their affiliates admitted links 
with a leading gangster. 

Nikko’s shares fell 1 9 yen to close at 506, Nomura 
rose 70 to 1,590. Yamaichi gained 5 to 230, and 
Daiwa advanced 3 to 7 1 5. (Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

' Singapore .Tokyo 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


17000 

j- ■ 2200- - 

22000 - — 

- - -• 

’.6000 

n~ 

21000- - 


15000 - 

vrn -sx- 

lr 2000^ * 

-jP~ ttOO -- 

tac zm-fP 

4 : 


\ 

■"VH TTj- 
1997 

t a s" 170O a'mj 

1997 

J'fs 17000 A M J 
1997 

jTs 

Exchange 

’Index 

Tbw’sday Prav. 
Close Close 

% 

Change 

Hons Kong 

Hang Seng 

*4£3&S9 14.205.4* +3.04 

Singapore 

Straits Timas . 

1,321.09 1,900.51 

. +1.08 

Sydney . : 

AB Ordinaries. 

2JT320 2,758.90 

+037 

Tokyo 

hBduu225 

18^41.96 ta.42Q.G8 -0.42 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

78943 779-41 

.+1JJ7 

Bangkok ■ 

SET- ‘ 

567.36 547.02 

+3.72 

Seoul 

Composite index 

«W» 65S.75 

-1-33, 

Taipei . 

Stock Marital Index 8.994,02 

-2.25 

Manila 

pse • 

ZQBSJ56 2,077.04 

•055 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

S59.22 553.65 

■ +1.Q1 

Wellington 

NZSE-4Q 

2£65£*. 2.551.22 

+0436 

Bombay 

Sensitive index 

3,887.56 3.825.91 

+1.61 


Source: Telekurs 


tnununinul HcnJd Titfnmf 


Very briefly: 


■ Japan's merchandise trade surplus for the first 1 0 days 
of Scpiembja- more than doubled from a year earlier, to 
205.16 billion yen tSI.71 billion), as automakers and 
electronics companies stepped up exports to meet strong 
demand in the United States and Europe. 

• Korea Telecom indefinitely postponed a meeting with 
investors that was scheduled for Thursday, an executive 
said, casting doubt over its plan to sell as much as 1 trillion 
won (SI. I billion) of shares by October. The Seoul 
government said the meeting had been delayed so it could 
discuss the sale with securities firms, but newspapers said 
the government feared that the sale would hurt other 


companies by flooding the market with shares. 

• Daewoo Corp. said its chairman. Kim Woo Choong', 
visited North Korea last week to check on the progress of 
the company’s manufacturing plant there. 

• Burns Ptailp & Ca’s shares plummeted 58 percent to 
close at 90 Australian cents (65 U.S. cents) after it was 
announced that the value of its North American and 
European herb and spice assets had been slashed to 150 
million dollars from 850 million dollars, a far bigger cut 
than analysts had expected. 

• LG Semi con Co., the world’s seventh- largest maker of 
memory chips, plans to invest S14 billion over four years 


to make a new generation of computer chips and mul- 
timedia equipment 

• Taiwan awarded a priority negotiation contract to 
Taiwan High-Speed Railway Alliance, a consortium of 
29 conglomerates including 'Siemens AG, to build the 
island's first high-speed railway for 336.6 billion Taiwan 
dollars (SI 1.8 billion). The project is scheduled for com- 
pletion in 2003. 

■ Toyota Motor Corp.’s chairman, Shoichiro Toyoda, 
said Japan's auto exports would drop nexiyear because of 
automakers’ expansion of production faculties overseas. 

AFP. Bloomberg. Return. Bridge News 


£3 


the 

ng 

lot 

on 

J" 

:xi 

a- 

UT 

to 

•f- 

er 

ut 

th 

to 

in 

te 

st 


-tot. 
--i!r a 


‘-■3.1 

•-•at 
•7 re 

■Jifi 
■’J. hr 


the Talk 







ALFRED RERG SICAV 

Societe dTnvestissement a Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

26, route d'Arlon - L-1140 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 26150 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

An extraordinary meeting of shareholders of Alfred 
Berg Sicav (the ’Corporation 1 ) will be held at 
11.30 a.m. on October 14, 1997 at the registered 
office of the Corporation, 26. route d'Arlon, 
Luxembourg, with the following agenda: 

To amend articles 16, 22, 23 and 25 of the Articles of 
Incorporation mainly to allow for the suspension 
redemptions under certain conditions and to amend 
certain valuation rules. 

The full text of the proposed amendments is available 
at the registered office of the Corporation. 

Shareholders are advised that a quorum of 50% of 
the shares outstanding is required and that the 
resolutions must be carried by a majority of 2/3 of 
the shares represented at the meeting. 

If the quorum is not reached, it is expected that a 
further meeting will be convened at which no 
quorum will be required. 


September 22, 1 997 


The Board of Directors 


Holders of bearer shares wishing to attend the 
extraordinary general meeting have to deposit their 
shares, at least 24 hours before the meeting, with 
Swiss Bank Corporation (Luxembourg) Ltd., where 
proxy forms may be obtained. 


. „ fflSl 

The] 


vs i:.ir.ss > 

LDWieage 


Knowledge of its markets combined with 
creative financial ability makes 
Rabobank International your natural partner. 


Rabobank International, Corporate and Investment Banking, 
S- * TeL (+31-30) 216 28 04. Fax (+31-30) 216 19 76 




ALFRED BERG NORDEN 

Soci6t£ d'lnvestissenfient a Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

26, route d'Arlon • L-1140 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 26149 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

An extraordinary meeting of shareholders of Alfred 
Berg Norden (the "Corporation 1 } will be held at 
11 a.m. on October 14. 1997 at the registered office 
of the Corporation, 26, route d'Arlon, Luxembourg, 
with the following agenda: 

To amend articles 5, 8, 16, 21, 23, 25 and 27 of the 
Articles of Incorporation mainly to change the 
reference currency of the Corporation from the 
United States Dollar to the Swedish Crown and 
amend certain valuation rules. 

The full text of the proposed amendments is available 
at the registered office of the Corporation. 

Shareholders are advised -that a quorum of 50% of 
the shares outstanding, is required and that the 
resolutions must be carried by a majority of 2/3 of 
the shares represented at the meeting. 

if the quorum is not reached, it is expected that a 
further meeting will, be convened at which no 
quorum will be required. • 

September 22, 1 997 The Board of Directors 

Holders of bearer shares wishing to attend the 
extraordinary general meeting have to deposit their 
shares, at least 24 hours before the meeting, with 
Swiss Bank Corporation (Luxembourg) Ltd., where 
proxy forms may be obtained. 


A LSTHOM 

First half 1 997 results: 

• Growth in activity • Improvements in results. 


On September 17, 1997, Serge Tchuruk,. Chairman and CEO, 
presented the first half 1 997 results to the B.oard of Directors. 

Net income amounted to FF 1 .5 billion compared with a loss of FF 0.4 
billion in the first half 1 996. This increase of almost FF 1 .9 billion is due 
mainly to the improvement in income from operations which increased 
by more than FF 2.0 billion totaling FF 2.7 billion for the first half 1 997, 
compared with FF 0.5 billion for the corresponding period in 1 996. 

This development confirms the favorable trends observed during the 
second half 1 996. It reflects the recovery actions undertaken almost 
two years ago. The strong rebound in activity is linked, in particular, 
to the growth strategy implemented for the buoyant telecommunications 
market, coupled with the reduction in operating costs to restore profit 
margins, despite strong pricing pressures. 

The Board of Directors noted that these results were well in line with the 
action plan, of which the objective is to restore profitability. The Board 
also noted that the outlook for income from operations should confirm 
a. progression at the same pace in the second half of 1997 as that 
registered during the first six months. 


trrx 


Anclysis of Results as of June 30, 1997 

With an increase of 9.196 for the first six months of 1997, orders amounted to 
FF88.P billion compared with FF 81.4 billion for the corresponding period in 
1996. At a comparable structure, orders increased by 3.7%. Once again, Ttelecom 
increased significantly with +18%. 

Consolidated net sales amounted to FF 86.8 billion compared with FT? 743 billion 
for the first six months of 1996 (+1796). This rise was due to the increasing 
volume of -orders registered during 1996. At a comparable structure, sales 
increased by 12.6%. AH segments, and notably Telecom with +19% significantly 
improved their performance. 

Each segment positively contributed to the recovery in income from operations, 
as indicated below: 

Income from Operations 

before financial income (loss) 


(in FF billion/ 

First half 1997 

First half 1996 
New structure 

Telecom 

0.6 

(1-3) 

Cables and Components 

1.3 

u 

Engineering and Systems 

0 

(0.1) 

GEC Alsthom 

0^ 

0.7 

Others and inter-segment sales 

0.1 

0.1 

Total 

2.7 

0.5 


The streamlining of the organization into four segments has resulted in the 
following structural changes: 

-integration of Batteries and Components activities into the Cables and 
Components segment, with the exception of Alcatel Mietec and optoelectronic 
components, which remained in the Telecom segment; 

- transfer of the submarine cable activity ta the Telecom segment 


A segment analysis of income from operations highlights the following elements: 

Telecom 

Income from operations returned to a positive level, following the trend observed 
at the end of 1996. Its improvement of dose to FF 1.9 billion, largely contributed 
to the Group’s progress in profitability. The growth rate in the Access and 


Transmission divisions, as well as in Mobile communications, was at the same, or 
higher, level as in 1996. In addition, a sustained rebound in orders occurred for 
submarine telecommunications networks. Finally, the first half 1997 was 
characterized by a significant level of business In the Radio, Space and Defense 
division. 

Cables and Components 

An improvement of more than 15% was registered, with the segment’s income 
from operations benefiting from the strong expansion in telecommunications- 
related areas, be they fiber optics or data cables. Continued restructuring in the 
other divisions have enabled them to maintain their level of performance, as in 
preceding years. 

Engineering and Systems 

Income from operations now includes the activities of the new subsidiary Cegelec 
AEG AAT. The return to break-even at June 30, 1997, reflects also the recovery of 
Alcatel Siette, a former Telecom activity which was transferred to the 
Engineering and Systems segment in 1996. 

GECAIs thorn 

Income from operations was comparable to that of the first half 1996, (+4.3%) 
despite a difficult competitive environment and the weak demand in Europe. 
Thanks to its efforts made during the first six months, GEC Alsthom won several 
major orders, including one for 8 hydraulic turbines for the Three Gorges hydro- 
electric power plant in China, and one for the biggest power plant in Chile 
(740 MW). In rail transportation, GEC Alsthom was awarded an order for 
112 suburban trainsets for the Danish railways, in the framework of an European 
consortium. 


▼ 


Net income returned to a positive level of FF 1,489 million, compared with a loss 
of FF 374 million at June 30, 1996. Combined with the recovery in income from 
operations, this increase includes the following elements: 

- restructuring costs of FF 769 million, compared with FF 246 million at June 30, 
1996, arising largely as a result of provisions made by GEC Alsthom; 

- income tax amounting to FF 578 million, compared with an income tax credit of 
FT 109 million for the first half 1996, reflecting principally the increase in 
income for consolidated companies and the FF 653 million profit arising from 
the revised treatment of tax consolidation in France in 1996. The income tax 
charge for the period takes into account the potential impact of the increase in 
corporation tax rates announced by the French government; the effect on the 
Group's 1997 consolidated accounts should be non-material. 

- capital gains on disposals of financial investments, including part of those held 
in Havas, and disposed of in April 1997 as part of the non-strategic asset 
disposal program. 

In addition, income of equity affiliates in 1997 no longer includes Cofira and 
Havas which were d e-cons olidated in 1996 and 1997, respectively. 

In the framework of the employee shareholding policy established in 1987, the 
Board of Directors decided to reserve for employees a capital increase through 
the issue of a maximum of 1,200,000 shares, at a subscription price of FF 630 
per share, conforming to the authorization granted to them by the Annual 
Shareholders Meeting of June 22, 1995. This operation must be completed 
before December 31, 1997. 


'Safe Harbor" statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 
1995: This press release contains forward-looking statements relating to the 
Group's expectations for an improvement in profitability. Such expectations 
assume that (i) the Group icffi benefit from growth in the telecommunications 
market, and (ii) the Group'S ■ sates volume will increase in several product 
markets. Actual results could differ materially from the above as a result of these 
or other /actors. 


INVESTORS RELATIONS: Tel 33 (0) 1 40 76 10 10 • Fax 33 (0) 40 76 14 05 • Email: http://www.alcatel.com 







■Tlf. IV wmawATOWHB^ *4 _ 




PAGE 16 


Thursday’s 4 F.M. Close 

Nofionwide pftesnol nAecRng Jote trades afeewlwe. 
ThaAssoaattxi Press. 


HH» in ldon On 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 



iS S?l 


US fl fl rg 

« !3 S IS* 

* J 


c 5 af iiffis 


; = * « s 
i. “» j ; IS® 

" I II si I 


lsvh vh dfcvtn 

S4 S?35° 
^ *S SS-c 
se* M.. «p»eP 


ip* »*• am — me 

Iff IK 533$ 
'?.■ a imp 1 
&?. l« SsSL 
g?„§* MBS. 

r £«&, 

23 'ft ill A—Ht* 

[ft jh sag* 

li»« Ur- AXPorr 


in m jgf J£* jfi ♦*: 

*2 1 ft ® E»|» 

- “^ITkfc 1 1 
^2 9 * IS fe S ff* - 

96 ft * , g , §j H -■£ 

*: 3 1 f to P W ,* 
■-* Sat Eg: : s 

II = st £fci 

s i i 1 & i © * 

il 

n is 77 i«i Sv. £>■ - 

$1 m s S'l; £■ fa ■£ US 
y 8 JB I 

Tl 111 IB ZM. Ml » ,;! 

J u 7i >ime 47«w 4i • «!•• l** 

4 ? »s a? " w ft. $ 

4 * ? 11 r? £ ~ 

_ _ 70 S=% ft t .5^ *-■ 

i ” ^ «• ia 5 

IB] |j J! x3 SB £. jfe* -.J 

1 ’J ; la'i if J: * 

a § £ ssJs- Sr? L .-4 

“ : : dlv w 4: 

an 1 ft *2 jfc* 3 ii» •!:» 


S y ?i inf 0 i«i m# V i- 

U 12 me ft4<# ftft’: -» 

H % a £2 Iff ii i £. ;; 

1SJ is _ IIBI «4 <H ^ 

?41 f? 7 an E* $5 fl :5 

^ JS " ffl -T2 -Ti =T*. *:■ 

42Q hS _ in v- t ■ ftla 

3 S s i$ ns at: s- 

fS 8 fl a 8 i'. »?. s: -ft 

_ OB J 71a ;®4 • ft 

JO J2 g M102 - TCjlft iCJ'e 

n SJ . "Jb IJ-I* T- 1 . t>1 J|> 

*0 _ HP Hi !»!«■ -1 


I!Cb« Hr* tmv?z 

ltw 4 ifli ftnilPj 


_ b |I1 q:» “j i ■ _ 

75 t/ - »8 IJ-I T- . T.r. 

SS : ’? is: ift* is-v 

J iS 0 : '5*. 'S*. •_’ 

r J? -fe 2S Ii:.'- _* 

ilEfe fe::; 
*“i J ih & s' 

Ifl. o ^ Ur» «53 |W “' 

JU »i ^ ’S: ?' 5 ; Ji: :•: 

sS ^ ^ 'S :f‘. if'. • 

« D - ;c iv, i.c, 

" “ ^ SS mv *;a. 'lx*. •; 
S » ” i *•. r a -li J i 
2» a 3 '& ; ( v. Sc: S ' -2 : 

w * 9MtS ni 


w% ii4 «m 


iig 8 m 

j » 1 1 

jn a ® n. 


“ r S 5 

1 « U H I 


}•■ T - 1 *B<1 

i~. JJV ton 
n mi &c>* 


» ini ot c,. *r« 

i 1 E k Er “} 

l£ 7317 tr., «i.. ..i 

s iss !?> it; :r* .3 

v j 5?i* gl: SB ■■■_■ 

■ m r 6 ? 


■*»« M» III . 
Ml 41 14 fl 


. . , _ JSUMsail, ■>< .. . 

«> AiaMafo _ Hi ■■• If li t >• 

Sr-i Tht AiartoB 44 1 « i» . n n». TTi 71 • ■'. 

■s; a j SSSB„ « d “ ’^.a: Sr ■?,: .-4 

? ^S3r js?S = 3*rft j* 

ftV» ttWB _ ii 014F 6.) Vl 6 -Ift 

a M Q3 - .4 ^ ^ ►*> 


K3 fl = ,3 IT 
,J4 ” tt B vS S’? 


5-4 Sx SSS, J ?i fi K. 

® S S ^ lb 


.««« s7 , 05 m 10 % iO%w _ 

- - Q S ftH 5 

— j- iii rth iiBft iiv« 

s w '• * 1 JB a :a 
9i| 1 ,Bs a* a- -.a 

1* W ^ US 22fft 72*m M»k 4Vft 


IJB w ASS latft 73»- Mfk 4 0 ft 

2 ‘i s ^ » sr F .a 

KfiiSdS B *‘ a! P , s 

« “ I? IDS* W |W SS .*!■ 


S3ll!8 

^nssa. 


J5f 

S? 58 KS 


a b ^ a &l ja a *4 

» a ft "gj ss. g; p 

« “ a^. '«a C 4 
IS ; I 3 


IS = «§ ■ ■ 3 
4 B i J-l C £ -3 

2 M u - ih an BX SB -B 

: : '« ,B iffi ,«• .u 

- 11 nSJ ^ SS as? 

iSiU^l ffil la 

- j, ,.u iiju iix ni» .1* 

•• 5 $ *a ^ ^ .a 


Hi?! I itll* 


,4 " * # «a s* sa 
m ; - JS si r 

3 |l f 
^^3 ” Iel 

44 in H Tisfi 44%) to* 
4 a u fl S 25 . 

i| j S I|g 

§ i s ii jk E 

j£ | ? s- If 

1 ® a - so 3TC Sm 

inirl 


as. ss :S 

wit gyi ^1 

hSS ft 
^ ES 

ir^ 


S ,a S!K a a ’ - a » * s 
SsS' fs" £a 
|lg& wo | |RKB 

S3 2 * sffd. iSi w . ’a ^2 3® is; 

K ^ He” 'S“fl j® |K « 

Ml 3W BtMYBB iR *4 _ KX| S5L SIw 

£5 «* M*J ra w u imf SB 


ill 


S$.S2 BSf? 

2M 2M BVNY 

« ffi ear 


>»a « ja a S 
<8 “SoK w 


ift & SSS’ 

si as Ha 

iw B3rr 

lift 0Mrjf 

i pH 

ic ^ fe» 

»x 1M1 HmBJt 


M s ? 

1^ U IHlf SJ* 

J 4 § 

|| a is *2 fa 

Ifi 5i = 3 1 


!® If ft n.ffliT 

,1b , It 


ga lip 1|H ^ 

fc Si gs * 

IfH 

|! Bff* JT 1 * 
f ■ a. S3L :S 

■ih m uv» 


ss S' Essr 
ss Ik » 

B^ft fclD" n 
« livi ecfn 

&% Wi fi gft ia 
K m4* BiU 

3 S ^ , - 
93. $ » 

is js n* 

art nvt bSkbm 


: » 3 s fl-- ih as .I? 
' >«. rt 11 T S Jft !B3 jsa, , fi 

f fflgiftSS f ■« 

* vs a * si ss* sf. & ■ , s 

r p. 7 ai a * isf ® ffc as a 

, .4fi M IB »i 5*t « 611 -ft 

t *ffi S r ^-S™ ^ Stnfi 

a la « ^ ns ss- 8h iv. : 
Is i? if d ^ »* » i 

.ii a ft ifh SOL .‘fi 
■ ^ r ,5 »a 34 sa gs -.ns 

- i« 40 « J-& L % ,S 

‘ ’ss flSis 

i ’£ fS “ £ gf. K. ^ 

W C H J 2 ? 11 ? in. m* lx 

. « .i SPSS'S? 3\S- '“r 




















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 17 


: : '$'£NS r 

■» -'3 'ir'On 

*1 ■: £■■ a-K; 

r- # !r; : £. % : 

'■ * K* i; £•■ ' 

. • •>: |V- V. fc 


EUROPE 


sm. 


;/g : g5f 

:■* »r: s» ji- : 
£ &C fr. 5? . 

^ r 

i* £ I • 

•j$su* 

>X' I'll 

•i •. ■ :s 5 

: ■; i*’ V* iii; 

.; {Ji *i 
^ ~ S'- 


Auto Sales 
Spur Fiat to 
46% Gain in 
Pretax Profit 


Carlsberg’s British Unit to Reorganize 

Brewer to Slash Work Force and Invest £40 Million After Bass Merger Fails 


■ i \ ; <* 

1 


Bloomberg News 

TURIN — Fiat SpA said Thurs- 
day thaiits pretax profit jumped 46 
percent in tne first half of the year, 
powered by a recovering car market 
in Italy, and that h returned to a net 
cash position for the first time since 
1990. 

Pretax profit at Europe's second- 
largest carmaker and Italy's largest 
company by sales rose to 2.263 tril- 
lion lire ($1.31 billion) in the first 
half from 1.547 trillion a year ago. 
ik Rat’s improved results reflect a 
” government incentive program that 
has bolstered Italian car sales by a 
third so far this year, with Fiat bold- 
ing on to a stake of roughly 44 
percent of die market. 

The company said sales rose 1 1 .7 
percent, to 44.94 trillion lire. 

Overall, Fiat said it sold 
J ,359.000 cars in the first half, up 
10.8 percent from a year ago. Sales 
gained 27 .S percent in Italy, 1 1.3 
percent in Poland, and 29.5 percent 
in Brazil. Fiat’s share of the Euro- 

K market rose to 12.7 percent 
1 1.8 percent. 

The improved profit and the one- 
time gained helped Fiat swing to a 
net cash position of 775 billion lire, 
compared with a net debt of 2.51 
trillion lire a year ago. 

Fiat shares rose 5 lire to close at 
^ 6,250 lire. 


C.-wrtfntt •wiTa, Fnw l<upuAlx% 

COPENHAGEN — Carlsberg-Tetley PLC 
said Thursday it would cut 40 percent of its 
work force in Britain, close or sell three brew- 
eries and invest £40 million (S64.5 million) 
over the next few years in an anempi to rum 
around the company. 

The move by the British unit of Carlsbera 
AS, Denmark’s largest brewer, follows months 
of uncertainty about its future after a merger 
with Bass PLC, a British brewer, was blocked, 
and it comes amid intensifying competition 
among brewers globally. 

The brewer said it would cut its work force in 
Britain to 2,200 from 3.700 over a two-year 
period and that it might close its Burton brewery 
in central England by April 1999 if a buyer for il 
cannot be found. Breweries at Alloa in Scotland 
and Wrexham in Wales will be shut by May 1998 


and October 1990, respectively, the unit said, 
and it will invest £40 million in its other brew- 
eries over the period. 

The reorganization's costs are to be covered 
bv funds originally set aside for the purchase of 
Bass PLC’s 50 percent stake in Carlsberg-Tet- 
ley. Bass bought the stake from Allied Domecq 
PLC, a British beverage maker and pub op- 
erator. for £200 million in August 1996. 

‘ "This plan will create a future for Carlsberg- 
Tetley as a profitable and viable company with 
a staff of dedicated employees and clear ob- 
jectives.” said Michael Iuul. chief executive of 
Carlsberg International AS. 

Bass said it had contacted Carlsberg-Tetley to 
discuss buying the Burton brewery. ” We’ve just 
recently stoned discussions.” said Philip Mal- 
pass. a spokesman for Bass. An agreement could 
be completed in one to two months, he said. 


Carlsberg said it would maintain its Tetley 
brewery in Leeds and the Carlsberg brewery in 
Northampton in England and that both would be 


The brewer said it regretted having to cut the 
1 .500 jobs but said the plan was necessary after 
the planned Bass merger fell through. 

Carlsberg has had fOO percent ownership of 
Carlsberg-Tetley since Aug. 22, after the Bass 
stake was sold back to the Danish brewer for 
£1 10 million. The buyback came after Britain’s 
secretary for trade and industry, Margaret 
Beckett, blocked the proposed merger on the 
grounds that it would give Bass, which already 
has 35 percent of the £6 billion British beer 
market, too large a share. 

Carlsberg shares closed in Copenhagen at 
377 kroner t $55.89 ). up 2. 

I Bloomberg. AFX. Reuters » 


It’s the End of the Road for British Shoe, Sears Decides 


Reuters 

LONDON — The retail con- 
glomerate Sears PLC posted a firsl- 
half loss Thursday and said it was 
selling its unprofitable British Shoe 
Corp. unit, marking the demise of a 
business that once dominated shoe 
retailing in Britain. 

Sears, which also owns — and 
has said it plans to spin off — Sel- 
fridges department store, decided 
that getting rid of the shoe business 
was the best option but that 150 
Shoe Express stores would have to 
close, putting 600 to 700 jobs at risk. 


according to David James, the ex- 
ecutive chairman who was hired to 
solve British Shoe's problems. 

Sears posted underlying group 
pretax profit of £2. 1 million but had 
a loss of £98.3 million in the half 
after exceptional items. Sales, ad- 
justed for divestitures, rose 1 .7 per- 
cent, to £857.6 million. 

The proposed sale of British Shoe 
marks another stage in the break-up 
of a retail empire built by Sir Charles 
Clore in the 1950s and 1960s that 
once spanned jewelry and gambling 
as well as shoes and fashion. 


? 'This is the end of British Shoe,’ ' 
said Sir Bob Reid, chairman, ‘'it’s 
the end of the Clore dream.” 

Sears said it would take a £150 
million t$242 million) charge this 
year for the sale of British Shoe 
Co/p., which had a first-half loss of 
£19.6 million. 

That charge consists of £80 mil- 
lion to be marked down against first- 
half earnings for “impairment of 
assets of the footwear business.” 
and a provision of around £70 mil- 
lion in the second half to cover the 
restructuring and sale. Sears said it 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INGERSOLL-RANO COMPANY 

rrefto 

Krlrrring la tar ariif rtB nnrDI of 1 1 Aiiprt 
[WT tar B w fc n ip ml unnounrra Out (hr nm 
•hats bom 3 far 2 Met havr brm itcrnfl 
A» from 39 Srajratbcr 1997 nap Cf)R 
hipmifl BapJ sun irpr. 5 iliao nan At. do. 
I nil >rj. and lalaa will be piluilanilt 
•lUainaU' re A) ml ut Lew rhenan Comrunr 
VV, SpuitfnM 172. lOld VT Anrertfero 
drinrry of 2 <6v. cpno <Ki at Clrib 
rrpr. 5 *h»m.'Aftrr 28 Vovrmtvr 1997 ihr 
Miuinlrfrt nf th» drib, refcta hair dm been 
damn/ tj Ik U m of cfv.es no 49. wil hr iM 
The uierid. nkrr Jn k ieOe n of rnrorl wiD 
hr hriil in cafi a [hr i B^ iomI of win hotter? 

F wfhenaorr tbr rmdcrnprvd anoounm 
Ihil m boa 1 October IWT M K*.- Wirirtir 
VI, SrtutWul 172, Aranenbai. diicpn.no. 
Ilkl id Inr Qtftt tamwoil-Ratiil (Swrojnr cacti 
nf». 5 «tuiw Wl br pnvNn with Uffi. 1.22 
net. |i6r. per rtx- dote n»iHL97; eras. $11,13 
p.iJi.l after deduction of 15** l S\-to« - 
SO. 1 1233 « Dflt. 0.23 prt CUR. Uit.rpv. 
In+mpnif la non n c mlnto of ihr Xdhcrlondi 
will hr paid after dedndwn of an adrfninoal 
ISM. LKA-toa f= $0,1125 = Ddk. 0^3) uih 
mktunnrt. 

AMSlEBDAHDErOSnARV 

conrAMV xv. 

Amsterdam, September 23, 1997 


Losses 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Shares in Redland PLC and Laura 
Ashley Holdings PLC fell sharply Thursday after 
the companies posted first-half losses and warned 
of sales disappointments to come. 

Redland PLC said the German home-consmic- 
tion market had declined and that the company 
needed to cut costs as it reported a first-half loss of 
£700.000 (Sl.l million), in contrast to a profit of 
£49 million a year earlier. 

Redland said it would address the * 'significant 
decline” in the German market, mentioned also in 
a recent warnin° by RMC Group PLC. by cutting 
550 jobs at its RBB roofing-tiles unit this year at a 
cost of 50 million Deutsche marks ($28.2 million), 
a charge it will take in the second half. 

Chief Executive Robert Napier said the company 
would take another charge of 50 million DM to cover 


further cost cuts next year to try to reduce RBB's cost 
base by 10 percent. RBB accounts for about half of 
Redland ’s sales of £1.05 billion and for 56.8 million 
DM, or 72 percent, of its operating profit 

The bad news on the German market followed 
Redbnd’s announcement Tuesday that it was hold- 
ing talks to merge its French aggregates business 
with Lafarge SA in a move that may require it to 
take charges of about £ 1 00 million. That was after 
Redland had failed to find a buyer for the unit. 

“It's a no-win scenario for the management,” 
said Simon Brown, an analyst at Williams de Broe. 
He said the “only reason” for holding the stock had 
been the prospect that Redland could float its RBB 
unit or be taken over. 

Although he still sees it as vulnerable to a 
takeover, he cut his 1997 pretax profit forecast to 
£200 milli on from £250 milli on. 


Laura Ashley said problems with getting die 
right products into its clothing stores at the right 
time meant it would not break even this year, its 
third profit warning in six months. 

Its loss for the six months ended July 26 was £4.4 
million, reversing net income a year earlier of £3.4 
million. Sales for the half rose 12 percent, to£174.6 
million. The company has struggled in the past two 
years as a rapid expansion designed to reverse a 
cycle of losses in the early 1990s exposed flaws in 
its supply chain, leaving stores with too much of its 
less popular clothing and a shortage of some best- 
selling home-furnishing lines. 

Laura Ashley said the problems had been caused 
by a lack of discipline and of management control 
over basic operations.Redland's shares closed at 
219 pence, down 64, or 23 percent Laura Ashley 
closed at 59, down 6.5, or 9.9 percenL 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

London 

Paris 

DAX 

FTSE IOO Index 

CAC 40 

4500 - - - - - 

5Z00 

3250 

So) ~ 

5000 r/Uf 

3100 - - - 

43» - f W 

4200 

350 • • 

300 - - -y 1 

4600 - ^VV - - - 

2300 h 



4400 —J— - • - - 

® i /V 

^ A Mj-J a S 

4255 A M j J A S 



Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Copenhagen 

Helsinki 

Oslo 

London 

Madrid 

&filan ^ 

Paris 

StncMwfcw 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sevres Tetekurs 


AEX 

BEL-20 

PAX 

Slock Market 
HEX General 
OBX 

FTSE 10Q 
Stock Exchange 
MtgTEL ~~ 
CAC 40 
SX 16 
ATX 


Thursday Prev. % 

Close Close Change 

904S1 905.16 -0.07 

2,39029 2,389.73 +0.02 
4,148.58 4,102.39 +1.13 

627.77 6 2331 +0.71 

3£91.44 3,562-57 +0.25 

~ 702-75 699.57 +0.45 

5,065^0 5.077-20 -0.23 
623.39 629.39 -0.95 

' 15850 15919 -0.43 

3,00538 3,023.77 -0 .5t 

3,479.19 3,525.13 -1-3 0 
1, 419.17 1,420.21 -0-07 
3,623.86 5,661.72 -1.03 

lnlrnuLi.tn.il HrnlJ Tril'uu 


expected the oet cash effect of the 
plan to be broadly neutral. 

The planned divestiture of British 
Shoe, whose outlets include Dolcis, 
Cable and Shoe Express, follows 
several failed attempts by a former 
chief executive, Liam Strong, to turn 
around the business. Mr. Strong left 
in May after five years in the post. 

Sears also said it expected Bri- 
tain's Monopolies ana Mergers 
Commission to make a decision in 
November on its plans to sell its 
Freemans mail-order business Free- 
mans to Lirtlewoods PLC. 


Very briefly: 

• Poland's gross domestic product grew 7.6 percent in the 
second quarter, mainly because of a surge in construction. But 
the government said floods that affected parts of the country in 
July might affect third-quarter results. 

• Russia will begin selling shares in RAO Rosneft, the last 
major state-owned oil company, by the end of the year, the 
State Property Committee said. Rosneft, the IQth-largesi 
producer, accounts for about 5 percent of Russian oil output. 

• Telefonica de Espana SA and Pearson PLC's Spanish 
publisher Recoletos are buying shares in one another's op- 
erations as they seek to expand their television interests across 
the Spanish-speaking world. 

• France's Socialist-led government will announce changes 
in welfare taxes Friday aimed at increasing the purchasing 
power of the lower-paid by reducing payroll levies and draw- 
ing more revenue from taxes on salaries and savings interest. 

• Skis Rossigno! SA said the decline in its net profit this year 
could exceed the 34 percent drop it saw last year because of 
higher charges and costs for developing products. The news 
sent stock in the world's largest maker of winter-sports goods 
plunging 13.40 french francs, to 122.50 ($20.60). The com- 
pany afro will seek a partner for its unprofitable golf division. 

• Djur gardens IF said a public offering for shares in the 
Swedish ice hockey team Djurgardeo Hockey AB had been 
oversubscribed. 

• Benfield Group is acquiring the rival reinsurer Greig 
Fester for £120 million ($193.5 million) in cash and stock. 

• Thyssen AG's plant-construction unit Thyssen Still Otto 
Aolagentecbnik GmbH won a 700 million Deutsche mark 
($392.6 million) order to build part of a new iron and steel mill 
in Taiwan. 

• British Telecommunications PLC is inviting companies in 

the service and content-provider industries to take part in a 
trial of high-speed interactive networks and services in Lon- 
don next year. Reuters. Bloomberg. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Amsterdam AgxMuntsi 

.rlMiuittiVuSk .16 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Alan Nobel 
Boon Co. 

Bab Wes eva 

CSMcuo 

DordtschePet 

DSM 

Ebevler 

Foil Is Am e* . 

Gdronte 

G-Brocom 

Hagemeyer 

Hetnetan 

Hoogownsan 

Him Douglas 

INC Group 

HUM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NedlordGp 
Ntrtnon 
DceGrinten 
PtiSps Elec 


Rondstod Hdfl 
Robeco 
ROdCBlKD 
Roflnco 
M. ROTH* 

*&!£££ 
Vendor Hd! 
VNU 

WOfeK Klein 


HfcfcoLfflBo 

ISO) 15SJ0 

54.40 53 
331 SO 329.10 

139.90 136 
35.70 35.10 
9330 9130 

109J0 IQflSO 
198 191.70 
32JO 32.10 
8110 81 JO 
4450 4030 

56.40 55 

10230 9930 
34830 347 

125.90 124.30 
6930 87 

91.40 9050 
70 JO 69.10 
5130 5020 
7630 7140 
6620 6550 
5920 5830 

25020 24620 
161 157 

11420 11030 
IS B0 
19320 192-10 
61.10 6030 
19160 19160 
11930 1I8J0 
108 Jfl 10630 
425 423 

77130 117. 10 
4420 ilM 
25230 247.10 


Cbm 0WB 

15730 15620 
5330 *431 
331 330.70 
13820 136.90 
3520 3560 
9110 9330 
10830 109.10 
19320 193 

3220 3110 
82 8110 
6260 61.40 
55.60 56 

10020 1 01 JO 
3460 34830 
125 .4) 1214) 
89 86.90 
9020 9120 
7020 6930 
53 49.90 
25 76 

6560 46 

5920 5920 
26830 249.® 
15960 15660 
11220 11190 
8? B0 

192.10 19420 
60.80 6030 

19340 195 

17820 11320 
10730 100 

42220 42620 
11310 11820 

44.10 4160 
24720 24820 


Bangkok 

Ad* Info Sue 

Bangkok Bk F 

Knjiw Thai Bk 
PTTExpSor 
StomCanenlF 
Siam Com Bk F 

7V*cCT7*Hia 
Thai Airways 
Thoi Form Bk F 
UtdCoaim 


Bombay 

Bata) Auto 
_ Hindud Lever 
. '^HmdusJPettn 
r ■rind Dev Bk 
ITC 

MrfHmmrTel 

Rdtancelnd 

Shite Bklnda 
Steel Authority 
Tato Eng Loco 

Brussels 

Aliraej 

Boreolnd 

8BL 

CBR 

Colruyl 

DeltwIiBLJon 

Eleckobd 

EtedTuflnc 

Fans AG 

Gnwrf 

GBL 

Gen Bon que 

raetlettOTk 

Petroftvi 

Pmteriln 

RoytdcfleHie 

SocGanBdg 

Solvoy 

Tradebd 

UCB 1 


StoMR 30 bbe 388736 
Preview: 381551 
543 527 54L50 526 

132975131 525132920 131825 
480 470 47825 472.75 

106 10425 10420 105 

578 552.75 578 5A3S 

27020 259 269 25S25 

350 341 34925 33920 

27620 27220 27420 271.75 
15 14JS 1420 1420 
32975 324 329 32420 


i BEL-21 todoc 229829 

Previous: 238973 

1585 1515 1M0 1500 

7320 CTO 7300 JOT 

9450 9380 9410 WM 

3175 3720 3750 3135 

18400 18125 18150 18275 
1795 1770 1702 1785 

7630 7570 7600 7620 

3M0 3410 34* MTO 

7290 7210 7250 723} 

3 an 3925 3950 2950 
57^ SoaD 5630 5*« 
14J00 74425 14650 «50 

14660 14500 14500 1£00 
14400 14025 14100 V4100 

49S0 49M ^40 4W0 

9300 9150 9300 9110 

3390 3320 3350 3370 

14900 14850 1«8» ,14875 
124100 122400 123100 123400 


t Copenhagen 

1 300 

CorWwrq B 380 
Codon Fob 917 
Donbco 369 

Deu Drake Bk 708 
Q^SmdbrgB 450000 
OS1912B 312000 

FL5MB 201 

KobLuHhowse 790 
NvoNordlskB 715 
SMtunBerB 10B2JO 
TiDonrakB 356 
TfWBafiro 401 
UnHonmoritA 425 


Frankfurt 

a&? 

5“»VNdB 42650 

Sift" 13480 

BkBetfc « 45 

BASF 

S8SS.S 

l tem 

gjnafta* 6405 

S2*Ben* ]4S60 
“985B 96.90 


Stock M«EfZ7J7 
Pievioos: 423J4 

• 3 7190 W. Si 

I 367 377 375 

' «9 W7 ?15 

364 366 361 

694 702 689^9 

£2222 $Z2$ 

1 300000 308000 300000 
196 200 »0 

788.75 790 TW 

698 705 705 

1069 1075 UNO 

352 352 354 

384 OT 391 
418 425 420 

MX: 4148^ 
Previous: 4WU8 

1600 1410 1» 
227 131-50 23QJB 
42OS0 42150 421J 
131 JO 133.10 13*a 
45.10 45 A5 4iM 
6240 6345 62J0 
7190 73.95 7118 
^90 9740 9U0 
7085 71J0 7075 
79 JO 79J# 8025 
40 40J0 IMO 
1390 1450 1392 

1 53 9 0 158-50 ,141 

ATW 63.90 6100 
14150 14455 144a 
97.50 98J0 95J0 


Deutsche Bonk 11830 
DeuTTetokom 34.15 
DRMSnerBank 81 JO 
Fwoto 312 

FraseiWsMed 128 

Fried Krupp 377 
Gehe 99 JO 

HvHe&gZint 147 JO 
Henkelpfd 10450 
HEW 482 

H Detect KL60 

HoedtSt 78 

Kamodt 657 JO 

Lohmeyer 99J0 
Unde 1275 

LWlhomoR 35 

MAN 559 JO 

Mannesman 871 

Matfgeseflsdnf! 3930 
Metro 8250 

MundiAuecAR 608 
Preussog 50&50 

RWE 8480 

SAPpM 45590 

Sdicring 187 

SGLCarixto 255 
Stenans 123.15 

Springer (AseO ISO 
Suedzucker 892 
mriaen *9 

Veto 1O3J0 

VEW 575 

VtStawogoi 120 


116JB 11730 
3375 3380 
7940 6040 
310 310 

127 12770 
368 377 : 

9780 9780 
V47 14750 
102 10240 
482 482 

8180 8180 
7750 7740 
640 640 

99 99 JO 
126 1275 
3475 3483 
553 552 

B67 86780 
38.90 3980 
81 8180 
58740 604 

504 508J0 
8340 8190 
444 454JO 
184.50 1 855*0 
250 25480 
12230 12115 
1530 1530 

882 892 

406-50 40780 
102.60 108 
575 575 

766 767 

1229 1234 



HW 

Law 

Close 

Pirev. 


High 

Low 

SA Breweries 

137 

130 

137 

130 

UtdUWttes 

7.16 

7.10 


3X30 

34 75 

3X30 

34J0 

VendaroeLxuts 

X4I 

4X8 

Score 

6X75 

63 

6X5D 

6X50 

Vodafane 

3X2 

« 

SBfC 

205 

204 

20 1 

20475 

Wtatbread 

8 

TtgaOati 

69 

4X25 


/a qi 

VflUtanaHdjp 

Wnteetay 

WPP Group 

170 

X98 

247 

357 

X94 

242 


High LOW dm Prev. 


High Low dal* Prev. 


453 446 

IX 221 
7.9S 7.99 


CAG4fcJMSJ8 
Pravtaei: 302X77 


Kuala Lumpur c remate mg 

r PrwriOQK 77941 

AMMBHdgs 840 115 B40 840 

Gerdlna 1040 10 1030 10. 10 

Md Banking 16 15JC 16 15*0 

Mai kid SHn F 6.05 535 685 535 

PetronasGas 935 935 935 935 

Proton 880 8J0 885 BJ0 

Pubic Bk 172 167 2J1 2.70 

Rencn B 334 330 322 332 

Resorts World 7.15 695 7.15 7.10 

RdtnmPM 27 JS 27 27 2775 


Helsinki hex sou q* wage jgi-g 

PnvlMH: 2S82J7 


SET index: 5673* 
Previous: 547 JO 

238 252 238 

175 185 169 

26 27.50 26 

400 410 398 

600 600 600 

119 IX 119 

7050 XJS 30 ?S 
51 JO 56J0 SIX 

113 123 107 

106 110 106 


EnsoA 

HuttamoUl 

Kendro 

Kesko 

MeritaA 

Metro B 

Metso-SeriaB 

Waste 

NokioA 

Orion- VMymas 

OriokurotwA 

UPWlKyrnmene 

Vabnet 


50JD SOM 
213 210 

4880 49.50 
73 73 

23 22JC 
153 156 

47 4BJ0 
141 137.10 
473 47150 
183J0 18150 
9580 97 

144 143 

87.90 8770 


Hong Kong 

Amoy Props 

Bk East Asia _ 


Bk East Asia 
Cajhay Pocfflc 

China Light 
aUcPod&C 
Dan Hern Bk 
Ffefl PncfltC 
Line Dev 
Seng Bk 

nal Irv 

Henderson Ld 
HK China Gas 
HKEJedric 
HKTdecooim 


HyianDm 
Johnson El 

{M2B bw 

new iimiu 
O riental Press 
PeaifOrtanW 
SHK Pirns. 
ShunTakHdB* 
Sins Land Co. 
Sth China Pert 
5+bePocA 
Wharf HOBS 
Wheeftx* 


Jakarta 

AstroM 

Bklnnindoa 

BkNegcaa 

GoCaigGami 

Indocenwrit 

Indofoad 

Indosat 

SaropoeroaHM 

SmenGresK 

retekeww#osl 


1885 1105 
47.10 4440 
2-52 2-50 

1.10 186 
90JD KUO 
585 475 

7.10 6.95 

7 670 

5975 5875 
2BX 2740 
1580 15.55 


835 120 

MJO 2740 
1175 1140 
8575 8425 
2235 21.95 
43 42 

<380 4270 
3170 3480 
7.75 745 
14JS UJ5 
9035 8125 
840 UO 

1570 15J5 
7125 2115 
1785 1675 
4-53 435 

240 232 

72-50 69 JO 
wm ruv; 
2045 2040 
1105 1115 
47 

2J2 2J0 

189 187 

90-50 8875 
5 475 

785 7 

6.90 685 

59 JO 59 

Z7.90 27J0 

i<<n mo 


CoaapadfvMHB 55982 
PrevkW£S345 

342S 3250 3300 3250 

1025 950 1025 975 

975 925 950 950 

9750 9575 9650 9500 

2425 2350 2400 2400 

<450 4150 4375 4125 

8150 8075 8125 8075 

7100 6825 6875 6875 

3225 3100 3150 3075 

3660 3575 3625 3575 


Johannesburg 

Abisa group 31 X 30J0 3170 5l» 

AflfltaSwCoa 1 |76 274 274 277.M 

sigsras “ s uSS 

183J0 ISOg 181 JO 182 

$5Sun MPW U «L95 jtt» 

32JS M US §3 

mil ^ nViail 

RST 90 90 90 92J0 

6325 63 6135 6225 

1 1 ’ll 

3fll 361 360 361 

. H7 134 135 ^ 

1ft 1570 16 16.10 

10 ? ™ 

1780 1770 17 JO 17.10 
107 100 102 

il 40 40J0 «M 
63.50 6275 &3J0 6325 


Skne Oarin' 6.10 

TetekanMol 975 

Teroga 8J0 

Uta&Blneera 1050 

m 410 

London 

Abbey Natl 987 

ABed Domecq 480 

AngBon Water 8.10 

Aroos 6.95 

Asda Group 148 

AisocB; Foods 579 

BAA 573 

Barctays 1570 

Ban SJ0 

BAT tad 575 

Bank Scoftantl 483 

Blue Ode 19 S 

BOC Group 1180 

Boots L74 

BPBlnd- 340 

BrtAerosp 1645 

BritAlreays 474 

BG 160 

Brit Land 575 

Bril Pedro 971 

BSM 473 

BrtSrd 187 

BrlTbtocam 472 

BTR 239 

Bunnah Castrol 10.76 

Burtcn Gp 176 

CaMsWMeu iS 

Cadbury S£tau 548 

CarBonComm AOS 

Ciwrmi Unkm 7J7 

assa? is 

DtoriS 674 

EMrocnnpmeats 458 
EMI Group 5.93 

Energy Group 645 

E n terpris e Ot 6J7 

FamCctonM 136 

GerriAcddeat 9.94 

GEC 190 

GKN 1372 

GtaeoWdkHM 13.77 

GnradaGp 884 

Grand Md 585 

GRE 273 

GreenaJljGp 4H 

Gutamsa 5JS 

GUS 689 

HS^HWs# 1943 

ICI 970 

IropIToboau 349 

LodErokf 170 

Land Sec 9^ 

LegSWap 462 

LtoyrtsTSBGp 7JH 

LuarsVartty IX 

MroksSpencBr 6.12 

MEPC 

Mercury Assei 1272 

HatoneiGrIO 2^ 

Natl Power 5J3 

NtdWBSl 8J9 

Nest 748 

Ncnridi Union 136 

Orange ^ 

P&O 4g 

Pearson 785 

Pftingtoft 1^ 

PowerGen 770 

PreatarFonwfl S36 

PTUderrftot 
RafitracfcCfi 
Rar* Group 345 

ReekmCnim 9.M 

Redland 2|1 

Reed hiS 195 

ReutenHdB5 6.93 

Roam 

RTZreg 986 


UbertyUte 

LfcCJ»5Jrat 

Mkwrro 
Nampak 


Raara 

RTZrea 

RALC Group 9JB 

S 

Saknburt **,?v 

Sdndero 1BJ5 


Scot Power 
Searricgr . 
Severn Trent 


Siebe 1180 

SaWi Nephe* 1^ 

SMI« f77 

SaWM &a 

StoemElec 460 

S fa qac D odi 

StaS^tar a« 

Tate 6 Lyle 4» 

Tesa> 4B1 

Thames Water 832 

3IGraup JIB 

Tl Grow 409 

Urdtever M 

l/M AKunmce 490 

UW News 786 


815 BAD 880 
10 1020 W.10 
1SJ0 16 15*0 
A75 685 525 

925 975 975 

8J0 885 850 

247 271 270 

120 372 372 

695 7.15 7.10 

27 27 2725 

S.90 410 6 

9.10 975 970 

720 8 780 

920 P.70 KUO 

3.96 798 410 

FT-SE 106506540 
PrevtaM: 507770 

895 9.04 899 

472 476 478 

7.93 7.99 885 

626 678 693 

184 185 186 

575 576 547 

5J2 5J6 520 

1A07 1579 1A19 

825 831 848 

819 574 575 

4 87 474 472 

190 194 375 

1170 1173 1176 
863 873 884 

373 378 348 

1613 1684 1675 
683 688 643 

2J5 2J7 2J9 

612 612 626 
9.05 9.17 9.12 

469 471 473 

185 187 1J6 

414 4.16 4.16 

273 27S 277 

1045 1048 1047 

173 175 174 

578 573 574 

581 586 585 

5 543 5 

788 7 JO 748 

64 651 (48 

375 377 378 

676 672 676 

452 452 457 

J80 691 583 

640 673 674 

642 684 656 

175 176 175 

983 920 925 

385 1® 387 

1X1 8 1X29 1X25 
1XW 1144 1X74 
881 878 865 

A75 581 582 

290 292 222 

X98 X9P 414 

582 547 571 

470 687 623 

670 624 620 

19-15 1925 W.10 
983 986 989 

345 348 344 

789 7.99 7.97 

260 242 249 

948 9 JO 9J4 

244 286 248 

456 481 480 
785 776 773 

224 227 226 

606 608 611 
«7 SHi « 

1140 1250 1224 
223 228 283 

A42 543 SJ2 

851 859 856 

785 7J7 788 1 

3JJX27X30 
2.18 219 222 

626 679 686 

725 783 725 

148 140 1 44 

745 747 747 

520 522 574 

629 632 633 

887 9 890 

3.50 144 344 

945 9.70 985 

211 1T9 283 

583 AS6 584 

2J5 2J8 256 

684 6 86 6.95 

326 240 340 

927 9 JO 982 

920 925 1087 

284 237 236 

659 65S 653 

529 571 521 

384 187 X88 

444 464 462 

1822 1850 1X35 


Madrid 

Aceitan 

ACESA 

Aguis Bartetan 

Aroentaho 

BSV 

Bonesto 

Bonklnter 

Bar Centro Hisp 

Ben Popular 

Baj Santander 

CEPSA 

Ccnttnente 

Ca^iMapfre 

FECSA 
Gas Natural 
IbenkDla 
PiytM 
Rspso) 

SeviltanaElec 
Taboaiera 
TeiefaoicD 
IMan Fencaa 
Vbienc Cement 


Manila 


AyokiLond 
BlPtiHpIsJ 
CAP Horan 
ManflaQecA 
Metro Bonk 
Petror 
PCI Bor* 

Ptd Long DW 
San Miguel B 
SMPriroeHdg 


Mexico 

AifoA 
Baiwcl B 
CemevCPO 
Ora C 

EmpMadema 

GpoCanoAl 

GpaFBcamBf 

Gpo Fin Inbuna 

KknbCkikMe* 

TetaWsoCPO 

TdMexL 


27080 27150 
1995 1965 

5990 5900 

8580 8190 

4440 4390 

1545 1525 
8470 8370 
6190 6120 
9700 M10 
4730 6655 

4880 4750 

3030 2960 

8560 8450 
3125 3085 
1275 1240 
7760 7620 
1795 1765 
2755 2685 
6490 6430 

1410 1390 

10550 10300 
4845 4690 

1280 1265 

• 2965 2915 


PSE ted4K 2065J6 
Prove** 267784 

1X50 1X25 1X50 1X25 
1675 1625 1625 1675 
108 103 104 109 

185 160 345 170 

73 74 74 75 

345 327 JO 332J0 335 

445 430 440 4S0 

144 141 144 144 

920 905 910 935 

57 JO 55J0 57 56 

640 620 640 640 


Bata arise 5220.14 
Prevtoas: 521042 

71.10 72.00 71X0 
23X0 2X85 2X35 
3980 40J0 40.00 

1616 1650 1620 
42.00 4280 4120 
6120 6160 6340 
3J0 XS1 X55 
3480 3415 3445 
3690 37.10 3780 
145.90 14600 14680 
1940 19J4 19 JO 


AHeiren Asst 

BcaGomrolW 

BCD Ffdetnnei 

BcaolRoroa 

Benetton 

CiedBonolaao 

Edban 

ENI 

FW 

GereraR Assic 

[Ml 

1NA 


Merita banco 

MoTOwfaon 

CSveW 

Parmalat 

fVsff 

RA5 

Roto Banco 
S Paolo Torino 
Telecom Brio 
TIM 


MIBT ejseedte lggJO 
PlCVtons: 1591980 

16965 14700 14M0 16990 
5005 4960 4990 5035 

7800 7B0 7775 7680 

1775 1690 1752 1700 

29000 28500 28500 28650 
4440 421 5 4»0 4235 

9490 9335 9420 94H1 

11000 10850 10650 11000 
6315 6200 (S 6245 

40050 39600 40000 39900 
19475 19205 19430 1 9550 
2750 2725 2725 2770 

2°2 SSS 

9065 B500 9040 WTO 

14100 13900 1395D I4Q50 
1315 1287 1239 I3M 

935 926 927 927 

2955 2890 2925 2950 

5745 5000 50X JIM 

15820 15600 1SB20 15635 
25100 24650 24750 24700 
13050 12360 12950 12B0 
11B45 11490 11500 11780 
7160 6950 6950 7040 


Montreal 

Mob Can 

TlreA 

0*1 UW A 
CTRntSvc 
Gm Metro 
CMNesfUteco 

hi mlffl 

Investors Grp 
LoMowCOs j 
NafiBk Canada 
Power Carp 
Power HnJ 
OuebearB 
Rogers Como B 

Royal BkCda 


7X6 

7.16 

7.23 

453 

4X3 

X4 

2XS 

242 

245 

868 

8.57 

843 

X9 

4X2 

4X3 


1148 11-59 11J4 
185 TJ6 185 
SAS 52B 5J4 

X7B BJ2 8J2 
451 4J8 4J6 

662 668 670 

SJ0 843 BJ3 
4J5 4X3 428 

475 479 4.78 

8.15 XU X19 
S.10 412 417 

ft 606 603 

X28 X» 3JB 
1745 1749 17.73 
485 4J6 ASS 

7J8 7J3 7J9 


DennankeBk 
Eton 

HoHiundA 
KvoemerAsa 
Hank (Mre 
NonkeSkpg 
Nyaaned 
OrttoAiaA 

PWlmGeoSro 

SB3"* 

Trawcecn un 
Storebrand Asa 


tostrkds kadCK 3597 J4 
Pmtoau 3637 J6 

47M 4814 50 

2940 2914 »JS 

3X35 3840 3X15 
44.10 4430 4480 
18V4 18to 1840 
32J0 32.W 32W 
4140 42 41,70 

43 4440 £85 
2140 21-70 21.70 
1985 1985 19.10 
3945 4014 3985 

3740 4040 3740 
2540 25.70 2670 
8Vt BU 8to 
68V> 6X55 6X60 


OSXtobac 7C85 
PrevtooK 677 J7 

I 131 13250 13150 
I 215 218 215 

3440 2440 2440 
29-50 29.90 2950 
133 123 123 

44 4450 44 

412J0 413 413 

! 417J0 fit 419J0 

259 259 257 

1 16450 165 146 

: 588 59150 593 

453 45550 455 

14B ISO 147 

; 123 1263 123 

340 340 353 

52 53 52 


AvUouide 

AtanraAlj® 

Ajd-UAP 

Baralre 

BIC 

BNP 

Cored Plus 
Conejijur 
Casino 
CCF 
Cetaiem 
Christian Dior 
CLP- Detoa Fran 
Ci«E»Asricoie 


EK-Aquttatne 
EridantoBS 
EwofSsney 
Eirratuona 
Cm. Earn 

Hov® 

bnetd 

Lafarge 

Legnwid 

Ltted 

LVMH 

MfthebaB 

Portals A 

Pernod Beard 

Peugeot Ot 

Ptooud-Prirt 

Promodes 

fienouB 

Re»i 

Rri-PoutencA 

Sanofl 

Trhii 11I dii 

dcnnettier 

SEB 

SGS Thermal 
Se Generate 
Sodexho 
StGoboin 
Suer Lyon Etna 


1069 1018 
24610 239.10 
785 962 

709 776 

399 JO 374.10 
775 745 

430 451 

302 17340 
1065 1054 

3695 3610 

Him. sum. 
34090 33620 
6S5 643 

815 871 

564 556 

1305 1305 

903 893 

822 800 
890 875 

880 8 
665 640 

712 693 

411 40610 
800 746 

452 437 

1263 1223 
2385 2326 
1315 1265 
337.10 332 

45X10 441.10 
29490 290 

>14 779 

2779 7771 
2278 2220 

177 175 

1732 1631 
24580 23540 
558 548 

37540 raso 
665 850 

573 SS4 
855 839 

2867 2781 

927 914 

675 661 

760 735 

195 181 JO 
701 687 

12280 117.10 
377 38110 


1067 1036 
23940 24740 
967 976 

781 783 

39630 39940 
755 775 

45X70 477 

294 27840 
1058 1063 

3610 3685 
(usp. sum. 
337.10 K6 
651 649 

821 826 
559 564 

1305 1301 

B 1 

814 

887 vri 
880 8.10 
6-50 445 

702 702 

«5J0 41110 
760 7B7 

447 JO 4*40 

& 28 
1270 12B3 
33X50 336 

44190 44X10 
29140 29X10 
800 009 

2777 2700 

2260 2288 
17640 17780 
1664 1610 
24020 239 JO 
547 552 

369 363JD 
854 860 

555 582 

Jfi J? 
2822 2806 
918 927 

(M 678 
737 732 

ISO 18140 
691 700 

121 117 

385J0 36740 


BectroiuxB 
Ericsson B 
HermesB 
Incenfive A 
Investa B 
M0D0B 
Nordbanken 
PhtsTOT/pjaftn 
Sandyft B 
Sarnia B 
SCAB 

S-EBortanA 
StaHvfia Faro 

SkonskoB 

SKFB 

SpaibaikaiA 
Sara A 
SvHandeisA 
VMvnB 


570 561 

3M 50 yji sg 
329 325JD 
734 725 

407 402 

285 277 JD 
762 255 

275 270J0 

257 253 

233 229 

197 19X50 

9150 90 

334 326 

327 371 

223 217 

16450 180 JO 
132 JO 127 

258 254 
207 JO 20X50 


565 570 

360J0 367 JO 
327 326 

732 728 

402 406 

278 284 

257 JO 261 

27X50 27X50 
253 256 

23250 23050 
193 178 

71 71 

332 327 

325 37450 
221 22250 
182 18450 
12750 131 JO 
255 25650 
207 209 


Sydney 

Amcor 949 840 X93 841 

AtfZBarsg 1151 11J9 1144 1140 

BHP 16 1548 1X81 1X73 

Boral 415 400 4.12 407 

Brambles Ind. 2945 2948 2940 29.46 

CBA 1748 1749 1722 1740 

CC AmatO 1X51 14.77 1541 1X14 

CoiesMyef 754 647 647 7.10 

Coroalco 635 472 4Ji 678 

CSR X75 XX5 548 5l70 

Faster* Brer* X99 X96 177 XT* 

Goodman FW 2X2 XI 4 X14 X25 

IdAusfiaSa 1X31 1X95 1345 1X16 

Lend Lease 3X67 2840 3X95 3X76 

143 142 

2X40 2148 
242 X38 

741 643 

342 340 

4J1 473 

9.19 9.01 

2)48 2077 


MIMHdre 
KtriAusIBa* 
Mat Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 

Padfic Dunlop 
PtoneerlnM 
Pit Broadnrd 
HioTirto 
St George Bank 
WMC 


9 SH 

850 

&98 

7 

635 

X10 

6X5 

6.10 

849 

843 

843 

845 

1245 

12X5 

1ZXZ 

12X4 

458 

X44 

451 

450 


Sao Paulo — wgwg ig gg Taipei 


BradcscePtd 

BrohraoPfd 

COTigPtd 

CESPPW 

Copei 

Elefrobros 

fcuboncoPM 

UgmServtdOS 


POIlSslaLul* 1 

Sid Nodonoi 

Soura Cruz 

TetebrnsPM 

Trionlg 

Teteri 

TrteScPkl 

Unfcanai 

UsknhKBPtd 

CVRD PM 


Do core 

Daewoo Heavy 

Korea El Pwr 
Korea Each Bk 
LG SemJcon 
Poricng bttoSf 
5ormungDktoy 
SomsurwElec 
ShhitmnBoTili 
SK Telecom 


1045 10.90 
82003 2X1 DO 
56J0 5746 
8X10 8640 
1740 1740 
56X01 57040 
64640 63041 
<6540 47«40 
37840 38041 
29740 30140 
17X00 19O10 
441 4X00 
1040 1040 
137.10 137 JO 
16140 163 JO 
14470 14400 
32X99 32840 
3849 3X70 
1140 11.70 
2630 27.10 


Cm posrte index: 64740 
rintonUUS 

83900 80100 80500 82900 
7200 7TO 7000 7050 

18400 17700 laooo 18300 
6970 6970 6970 7570 

19700 19000 19300 19200 
<900 4400 4550 4750 

37500 36S00 36900 36400 
55000 53500 53800 54600 
44500 43700 44000 4420 
66800 65500 66000 66800 
8000 7300 7330 7930 

410000 377000 409000 39 7000 


Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew 
CerebosPoc 
Criy Devttt 
Cyde Carriage 
Dbry Farm tat* 
DBSF-— — • 

DBS I 

Fnser&Naaw 
HKLand* 
JordMatbeai 
Jard Strategic 
KeppelA 
KeppelBank 
KeppelFeis 
Land 


Patawy Hdgs 
Sembcwang 
SliigAlrlaeign 1: 

Stag Tedi tad 
Sing Telecomm 
Tatlee Bank 
UMIndustaW 
UMOSeaBkF H 
WtogTalHdgs 
^taUXdbftn. 


5Vt*»Tlre«v- WTljOf 
Prevkas: I90QJI 

X30 X30 X30 

X25 X40 XI5 

7X0 950 9.10 

950 940 9J5 

0,92 0.92 651 

1X50 1460 1X40 

346 3J2 X64 

LSD 9 8.70 

3X0 X30 3X2 

755 7 JO 7J5 

340 180 180 

XTO 3^ ito 
X14 X16 X14 

3J0 3J0 344 

7.95 IIUO KUO 
645 640 640 

575 5X5 6 

640 7 6,90 

11 JO 1X40 11J0 
645 645 640 

21140 2040 21.10 
5J1 2J3 2jS 

244 253 242 

241 241 241 

144 146 145 

10X0 1050 1040 
312 XM 3 


Stockholm 

AGAB 
ABBA 
AssiDcsran 
Astra A 
ABO* Copco A 
AutoQv 


SX 16 tadec 3479.19 
Pn vino s. 3525.T3 

121 118 11850 120 
109 10550 10X50 10850 
257 251 25X50 253 
141 13850 139 14050 
250 246J0 247 247 
342 333 33X50 337 


Cathay Lite brn 
OxmgHwc Bk 

aitooTwigBk 
China Develpml 
China Sled 
First Bank 
Formosa PtasNc 
Hue Nan Bk 
tori Coram Bk 
NanYaPtasta 
Shin Koog LHe 
TawonSeml 
Tatung 
UWMkroE 
UMWbridCMn 


Tokyo 

ASnatnato 

ABfitopon# 


AsaMBank 

AaNOem 

Ascfci 

St Tokyo MBsu 
BkYakohoaw 
BridfKctone 
fmwyi 

OwbuBec 
OwaokuBac 
Dairopp Print 

DaMcMKaig 
IMwaBank 
Doftaa Haase 
Date Sec 
DDI 
Denso 

East JaMBiRy 
Efcai 
Fanuc • 

Rj^ Bank 
Ra Photo 


Hochfturttt 

HrtocM 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

ttoVbkodo 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 
Jusco 
Kaftan 
KanMi Etec 
Koa 

KnwsokiHvy 
Korea Steel 

'SSSS3 

Kobe Steel 

Kareaba 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

KjusJuj Etec 

LTCB 

Marubeni 

Maru 

Matsu Contra 

Matau Etec tad 

Matsu EteC Wk 

MlhubtsH 
Mitsubishi Ch 
Mitsubishi B 
MttwfaWEst 
Mitsubishi Hvy 
MSsubWii Mai 
MbsutoshlTr 
Mom 


UMarMlBdB: 177141 
Ptwteat 87744* 

132 13X50 13450 
106 106 107 

7350 7X50 7BJ0 

110 111 J18 

2750 2740 2>.90 
10S 106 107 

5850 58JQ 59 JO 
11X50 11150 116 

57 57 56J8 

69 67 67 

85J0 86 B7 

13350 135 141 

36X0 36X0 3740 
81 JO 81 JO 87 JO 
49 n 49 50 Aim 


NAM 225; 1834156 
Previaae 1842048 

1010 1060 1030 

716 717 723 

3410 3520 3410 

7S5 7SS 
601 604 

958 958 

2240 2300 2260 

490 495 494 

2910 2950 X10 

3560 3580 36« 

2060 2060 2120 

1960 1 770 2020 

2580 2660 2580 

742 730 722 

1320 1360 1X0 

553 573 537 

1240 1250 1290 

700 715 718 

5200a 6200a 6250a 
2940 2980 2990 

3530a 5600a 565tta 
2240 2340 2260 

4710 4760 4900 

1380 1440 1400 

4970 5070 4970 
1570 1590 1590 

1170 1180 1190 

1060 ioeo 1100 

€00 4320 4390 

1420 1470 U20 

320 

432 453 

6320 6450 6290 

453 455 468 

'320a 9450a 9250a 
2810 2840 2E10 

566 565 563 

2150 2170 2200 

1460 1700 1680 

433 

234 241 

662 694 

790 1010 

156 
70S 

«. 464 

7700 7800 7920 

2QS0 2050 2000 
m 586 556 

4)1 410 

1770 1980 1980 

3860 3900 3810 

2120 2140 2150 
1190 1200 1250 

1090 1120 1080 

286 306 

«7 495 

1720 1740 1740 
640 660 637 

635 636 635 

1850 18b0 1690 

716 955 930 


The Trib Index PnceK “ 3:00 PM Var * timi> 

Jan. 1. 1992 - lOO Level Change % change your to data 

% change 

World Index 177.23 +1.70 +0.97 +18.83 

Regional Indexes 

Asta/Pactfic 120.57 +2.52 +2.13 -2.32 

Europe 194.11 +2 63 +1.37 +20.42 

N. America 208.00 -0.31 -0.15 +28.47 

S. America 189.28 +1.62 +0.97 +47.93 

Industrial Indftxas 

Capital goods 224.82 +0 79 +0.35 +31.54 

Consumer goods 195.91 +1 .77 +0.91 +21 .36 

Energy 207.08 +1.31 +0.64 +21.31 

Finance 131.34 +1.79 +1.38 +12.78 

Miscellaneous 184.90 +0 97 +0.53 +14.29 

Raw Materials 187.45 • +1.57 +0.84 +6.88 

Servwe 166.95 +2.52 +1.53 +21 58 

Utmes 171 .64 +1 .72 +1 .01 +19.64 

77m Jmemaifonef Mask/ Trfeune World Slock IndaxG trucks ffwl/S dollar vetoes of 
28(7 internationally orvasrariis stocks from 25 countries. For mow nformabon, a Iree 
booklet is avadbbfe by wrung to The Trib Index.iai Avenue Charles tie Gaulle. 

9SSZ1 Neutty CedBK France. Compiled by Bloomberg News. 


High i 
AUteui Fudosit 1550 

Mitsui Trust 603 

MwntoMIfl 5190 

NEC 1470 

NUroSec 2040 

Nfton SO 

Nintendo 11400 

Nlpp Express 743 

NipponOO 543 

Nippon Steel 272 

Nissan Motor 730 

NICK 177 

UorouraSec 1590 

Nn 1130b 

NTT Date 5340b 

09 Paper 571 

OsoteaGm 292 

Hknh 1B20 

Rohm 14100 

SokuraBk 65a 

Sonkyo 4180 

Sarwo Bank 1570 

Sanyo Etec 203 

Seewn 7900 

SefcuRwy 5050 

SeUsUCharn 909 

Seklsui House 1170 

Seven-Eleven 9220 

Stop 1150 

SWkokaBPrer 1980 

SWrohu 578 

Shto^auCb 3330 

Shlseido 1960 

SbOuoknBlt 
Soflbonk 

Sony 11700 

Sumitomo 
SumBomoBk 

SumltChero 

SatenwEtac 1750 

SumB Metre 257 

SuraB Trust 1270 

TotshoPhorm 3160 

TttetaOieni $80 

TDK 11100 

ToriokuEIPwr 2020 

Tread Bark 986 

To«o Maine 1480 

Tokyo BP+r 2350 

Tckyo Electron 7650 

Tokyo Gas “ 

TokyuGorp. 

Tanen 

Top pan Pitot 
Tornytad 
Tari&a 
Ted era 
ToyoTnrsI 
Toyota Motor 3300 


Neva ridge Net 

Norandolnc 

Norcen Energy 

Nthem Telecom 

Now 

Onex 

Parrcdn Pelbn 
Petra Cda 
PkjeerDome 
Pwxi Petlm 

PrenshSask 
Renaissance 
Rio Algom 
Rogers Carrie! B 
SeaprnmCo 
Shea Cda A 
Simcor 
ToCsrnanEjiy 
Ted B 

Tekis 

Thomson 

TorDanBonk 

Transarta 

TransCda Pipe 

TnmarkFini 

Trizec Hahn 

TVXGdd 

WesteooslEny 

Weston 


87« 8X05 
26.90 2655 
35 34.70 
145 143h 
1155 11.45 
36ta 3X70 
2SH 25W 
2445 241+ 

24X5 23X0 
1X35 13 

104'* 103X0 
3X35 35 

30 29.70 
2SH: 24V. 
49.70 4840 
2X60 2X40 
47Mr 47 
4640 46.10 

26.15 2X40 

50.05 49M 

2945 29X0 
3440 34 
474 474 

18.15 18 

27.05 2645 
00X0 7945 

35 3455 
71* 7X0 

2845 2840 
109(3 108fe 


Vienna 

BoeHer-Uddrti 104X30 
CredBonstPfd 637.90 
EA-GeneraS 33993a 
EVN 1503 

Fteonofen IMen 518X0 
OMV 1846 

OestElektrlz 87940 
VA Store 603.40 

VATectr 2678 

Wtanertterg Bou 2610 


ATX tads: 1419.17 
PrevMoc 14J8J1 

1030 1045 1038 

63T 634 634X0 

31002 799X0 3219 

1460- 1494 1489 

513 517 51X90 

1 B10 1827.90 1849 
87X10 877 87X50 

600 603 603-SO 

2646 7660 2660 

2587 2610 2603 


a* mb;* urn 


Toronto 

AbBMCao. 
Atoerto Energy 
Atom Atom 
Anderson Expl 
BfcAtontrari 
Bk Now Satta 
BamckGoid 
BCE 
BC Teiecanni 
Blodrem Phare 
BarebonftaB 
Cruneco 
CISC 

Cdn Natl RaD 
CdnNdRw 
CdnOaMPei 
OtoPadSc 
Con taco 
Dcfasco 
Dwntor 
Donohue A 
Du Part Cda A 
EriperBrascai 
EaoNevMng 
FokkaRid 
Fdanbtldge 
Oetehe rChal A 
Franco Nevada 
Call Cda Res 
Imperial 05 

| POT 

IPLl 

Uddtaw 

LMwaiGnuo 


Wellington 

AlrNZeaid B 443 195 443 403 

Briertytnvt 1X4 1X3 1X3 1X3 

Cater Holt ad 141 1» 3» 

FtefchQiBJdg X10 X03 5JM 5 

FtetdlChEny 7.10 X90 749 X95 

FtafctiChFdrat 1.96 1.95 1X5 146 

FtakJiCh Paper 349 348 309 109 


Lion Nathan 
TatocomNZ 


193 185 3X3 343 
8.12 841 X10 844 


SB 

ml 


TSE laAffitrMB 698340 
Pmtaas: 701142 

X 2445 24.10 2X10 
VA 3110 33-40 33X5 
20 4755 4745 4745 
10 1X95 17.10 17 

15 5755 5945 

35 6X60 6X90 65* 

70 31(6 3255 Site 

40 4116 41.90 42X0 

X 35* 3X85 3X85 
90 43 4345 4105 

90 2745 27.70 2745 
IV» 49(6 50.10 SO 
90 40.10 40X0 40.95 
It 71.10 71.15 71W 

M 41.40 41M 4145 

90 3X40 36-4 3640 

a * O’* 40W 4150 

tt 31.70 3X05 3X10 
20 2740 27.90 2&15 
12 1145 1145 1140 
•M 32W 3214 3240 

Vt 3X20 3X45 3X30 
90 2355 2340 2X90 
23 2240 2X70 22M 

93 388 3SS 393 

W 2X40 24(6 2X95 

U 2116 22 2X60 

4 2940 30*6 30ta 

to 12 1X80 1X35 
» 7855 7855 80X0 
» 3245 3X90 3X15 
1 * 53X5 5X15 5180 
n 2 m 2140 21.75 
U 3745 37.90 38.10 
» 1940 1945 20X0 
75 7X60 

_ 12 12X0 

25 2540 27X5 


Whon Hatan 11X5 11X5 11X5 1150 


Zurich 


AdeecaB 
AlusutoseR 
Ares-Saawfl 
AtelR 
Baer 

BK Vision 
Clba SpocChern 
CtariantR 
CM Suisse GpR 
EWarawaitE 
EmsOemio 
ESECHdn 
HcHabcnk. 
UKhtetstLBB 
NesttaR 

Novoribr. 

OerHknBuehR 
Parana HUB 
PhannVlsnB 
(SdreraariA 
PtafflPC 
Roche Hdg PC 
SBC R 

SditadterPC 
SGSB 
SMHB 
SutzaR 
Safes RdhsR 
SAIr Group R 
UBSB 
WHefflwfR 
Zurich AsswR 


SPItedHU 362346 
PievtoOK 3661.72 


7170 

2125 

2125 

2149 

S 9> 

545 

554 

554 

1379 

1351 

U6I 

1377 

2385 

TUD 

2380 

2370 

836 

834 

K34 

838 

2230 

WHO 

2200 

7225 

2094 

2070 

2074 

2097 

1176 

1185 

1190 

>200 





1187 

1174 

1177 

1187 

19425 

190 

19175 

19850 

537 

535 

537 

4J4 

4925 

6870 

6890 

4900 

3780 

3950 

3940 

3W4 

1333 

1311 

1319 

1314 

570 

570 

510 

W4 

2049 

2034 

2040 


2279 

2224 

2245 


18650 

1B2 

18450 

184 

1930 

1915 

1715 

1971) 

902 

883 

891 

899 

1789 

1765 

1777 

JUKI 

334 

328 

331 

332 


13150 13150 
38850 38950 

1795 1800 

2480 2480 

849 855 

1080 1080 
21SD 2164 
1722 1935 
1647 1659 
1371 1391 
619 625 


PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


NASDAQ 





Thursday’s 4 P«M. 

The 1,000 mosHroded NatSoffid Mflricet securities 
in toms of Mor vaftift updated Woeo iwr. 

T?B Ass»sw Press. 


DkYH PE IMItt Law UW Out l 


DU YU PE U" QV 


» no pe now Ij* umr Qj»l 


aw __ 

rtp u» sw 


pe :§IW Ism'j** ®**l 


lifln* — , , 
H#l* W 


K UMt 0% 


i KBgH Lew im* twl 


i8| 

.IjJ 

:;lj 


: .? ^ S 

Mil 


a* ah #k wt gt 

| f $ S # 

IS & 3 » b 


: a is a? 

:SHfi 
r ” 

_ £ 408395. 


I 3 re »** 

, W a» 57 -» 


t ii 


= ;lf s f I 

: 1 ! I i« 

-jig I £ a 

- » w #f St Sw 3 

E : JMB B & | 

:-®«f i 3 


rv» s* M 


* = j il 11 i 

i « Il 


m w 

•i IS 


H . mss ii* 
_ 47 no znt nn 


R ^ ♦* 


«u j 


JLJS^ 

Mi 


_ I* fiff 31 I 

20 3 c Si: 74 o 

I 33 

: IS a 14 

40 13 a ^1 c ip- 


s g> * 

pi t~9* -6? 

il. S ^ 

& «?• ••» 

77* 

m ;(•« -s 

iH 

Cf 1 

ST* •* 

n ^ * 


S?3?88«* 

IT* 4 WMti 

39i i 5b «*v3s 

n.* M .■aonafl 

liiar 


E SiJr fe* it 4 
: 8 || £ Jfc 4 

u * i S r f 1 i 

Mlllfcl 


" 3 I T^jg 

I # MO 2 


n Sliia it u n ™ m» aw » +v» 

%,& : rWR js C % 

i!» .jo .4 a* ffl & 2L £!* :S 


Pa Hie jji& £ &2 


IF 


EFF* 


_ .smi wi iavt w *vil 
_ 4B T7SH 3 53H 55 *l[ 


:8 gif 3 3 -i3 

- _ nfi iu 1S% w< .!«. 


_ _ sin io* i» w* >114 

: : HR & S < 


3 3S R ^ 

i. im m -a 


_ 46 W7I WV1 in IT* »tti 

-” 1 ! n gi.d 


_ n raw tt* ir* 2ja» tih 

_ » wj tw in m, •*■ 

_ a 2305 m 15 in *m 

- S -Sffl 17i W MVk JTm 


£? & i. 
Si ss i 
S? S 8 

in n 1 

4M M A 

n mi 


SB 


- a a# 3S* Eft ♦'• T7A 

' ’f » .3?“^ fs 15 S ^ B 3S 

: e »ns f I 

: 4S ^ li « g* g 

» & •s S ’a 

:!SSii»R« g* Ai 
, r : MJR S * B R 

• " 2 § s^ r 33 R SS f K 

« 3 ?i |iKi fn k i ffi 'g 

* J 1 i&4SL 8gi Si 


: I «i m ■& 

ElJIlIl 

pH 

_ isnfi im Jfn S .m 
- as lflEajpi i » * 

::II8ek ; 

iijj|i|15 
: i i £ f £ a 
EfSSIP I 

: 1 1 S R » ‘4 
' m id) IS jSS ' *»» 

" r t ; i & r fe + a 
.. = s fi R i. B 


: 2 ^ © 
JO 7577 ffi 

: ii mm 


4k mm 535T ' S iSp m 51 ^ 

Isa M - 5'il 5 1?^ 


7® M 4 1 * 4Hl _ 

- - JS34 im in in -aw 

- ; (a ia im ri -» 

■ i ljn ft » 2Pi »*w 

n i , B IN* 7\'5 J11W ‘ * 

_ 6 to* -Jo 

“ " 3TO 4*« 4» « •!»= 

' |J Wk 1W Iff » -4 

’ il ill n n Od *w 

- 5B 4fi JU, 4TA .'4 

■ a aw Si 1 am 37H *iw 

s 3 S S3 i* Sk a 


ss- iS& 

ifh 5*W M^Ski 
254 M*4itaaM 
n »i MOM 

r m %£• 

3T‘ 1*4 MOM 
an l»t necwso 


S ts obi Si 

- SSI S’! 
_ _ 3C m 
_ _ 4P3 X- 

_ _ *r ir*i 
-«8 V: 
_ 48 rrs a-: 
. 1; sn a 
_ *» ra x. 


*1 

» 1 nan *«. 

3--1 a-3 -H 

£ -4] 
' '?! 1: S 

J7-k S< 1,1 


. >> S3 !• 

_ r Fit ;s* 

* “ ■ ^ S H 

- _ » KW 

_ _ so •*:« 

_ u 5*s 3± : 
_ 41 ni it* 
_ a in* TSn 
. 34 tas a ■ 
40 U S> 14: S 

_ _ EkC 36* 

_ _ rx. 3S. 

_ _ arse 
_ X ts U: 

- X =54 313 

_ _ 3a :: 


33 ii 

s» sw 


e 

* 3% 
3 «j| ^ 

a w 

14? S' 

8 igls 
- -I P:3 
i||! 

;Sfe 

I w; WJ 

rt '® H 11 

l4| 

_ ij 2 in 

* ’gff’ 
* 

SiRjg 

» ® sr« 


R £a -tt 


r* iTak 4-W 
351 25W 4-. 

'■ii y? 

St 5 ^ W 
51 W O 
If: 1W 
tc-t m .*? 
1;. •■» 

ir» ts*i -■» 

61 Al *f* 
Pm rH 


im 

* BS 


r *r 3 

a£ 4 i^-? 

IBS 

R R 4 


an u< 
sn 4i 
aw m 

8*j a 

&. R« 


7Si« ?L ! » JT 1 * -*W 


ip s 

» -n 


ia ii u 
I o 


BFJ 7 HeBRese _ -33'.: 

£4* JJji MttOi _ r 3 37 m 

2m 11 ucsaoi - r w 

37W 1SW 4USAIB _ It 51 37 J 

if I URf teatr 13 3 ? P3 2 
1J.t H MeffSr - - 5471 U 

to i« weas x 24 jus r. 

3* 9i- Ueaa _ 47 te^svi 


?f . a*. -'•»! 
S Ml -1*1 
J'-i S* 

57 » t* -r! 

?7j 77*“ ^-i 

V* an « 
'■! 7S»w -iwl 


3 i|\ -:wi 

5-i Sr* .‘fti 


= - g £ ik 

i Iiliwl 


- ? f? « i& s 

: % % 

J« 24 6 J® ^ 


Wa 6T VrfcCne 
3D 74 k1CRS.«a 

Wi T2"-i ,-nm: 

19 SHi IVWlUOC 

ai z-j iwiatfL 
S'! ?* K f0 s ,= 

&i l'» MxzUr 
a*m IlKnll 


STK 10*1 .VjOOB 

s»a sn UUEbn 


r f j«- 

= 1 a S R 

ZM l r 34 lEt 

- c :q s-. 

. M 14 01 

~ 4 - Ct, 321 

_ _ 573 51 

- Li -UA 

- r ao If: 

- 16 1713 »"• 


rn -J4 -nj 
’S* >7-» “«i 

37 3?'4 J»1 

TTt ZU •'■■! 
■-m -», 


r* a — . 

:ti 3 1 -fw 
44 1 117, 4, 


A J3 

Tt Cl 2? 

ii nig 
2 

_ «82l xS 
S gn e-t 

f 1 n 51S 

3M m 


9 * 94 
£ # 

R 

Su S a\ 

i» a* 

a* A* *d 

s* »* -? 

J? ■*** 

A4 IB* 

5F. Mi Ji 
Cl 41 ■; -<W 


Si ,*** 

Ff 


us ; sij^i® 

i " «a K3 


= ii! 


■r»# 

* - 3^ 


XnV a -ti 

3n S: 

r« 5 




a»B» at 
U&oiPk tow 

_aa 1S> 


73 V.-5 JT4 
11 »r as i 

a m ;e» 

73 -.73 CJt 
S I£k3l3I f 


i£ ® 
!ir^ w* 


S 3 & IM 
I Sim 


1 40 fl » 
X 23 S 


jr r JS^ir 

Sh in .v.TiHtTi 

r era 


a ’! ! 1 C I 5 * P 

iiSi3 i If I i 


22* VJnncQ 

gJiSSS 3 

’l l 

37 Udoi 
Jji JWWrxAl 


_ 3 *%:: n « 
_ . ff:7T '.« 

4 31 7T4 £7^ 
_ _ 595 57- 
- B .fTi 03? 1 


** 

- 

3 .as =« 


“ aF* 1 S* 

ra :u Hi 

Si Irl 27 : 


4ft IS. -i 
■p» ;ri •« 

,£ ,E» *j* 
r»! 'k“« "-i 
a* m -» 

iu j •' j 
5m 5T-. -t 
S'* =-■ -« 
iai 3i .4? 

J5 Is’ -2 
5i Hr 


,s S® 

ja ns 3a 

1 iSfb 
s J| iw 

_ nffi 1: 

a WSJ 


ci ii-; -<w 
r* si i -■? 

:f«i U* ■*« 
M -a 

C Mi *r<i 
SV 31 

ini in * 

a. ns J j 


~ » fi: 

l«* » .i l j 


3» £d 
57* sr: ♦f* 

T! -2 
S » 

fe- ^ .‘5 

II* M 


: “ r*< ^ 
.. * 5“ *L . 


- 31 

IS * D 


Eg 

1 11 a 


. 3 Oe 

j 17 :x> xt 
. _ n 3*4 
f 3 El C: 
- u wa lr. 


8 Si S ft 

I? * ten 


E ? >8 8* 
: : iSfiJi 


2*1 <7* -==; 

|| f! 

£1 & -r i 

■£1 is* -w 
01 3I.W -■■» 


1 31 11 a 1717 ii* dvi a* 3 
_ 87 IMS ST* Wl n «k 
- £5 JS* Sr.* #*■ «» 1» 
_ «« aft* it* a*!* in* *v, 

0 . . » iih OS 11* »n> 
_ 19 in up* w* im* -u 

'; : i ii £ i 3 

1 * a ll I E ? 


E S s? 

: L 7 .i 

U7B 13 J .'J 


ElSkbfi a 


_ _ UU BW 

- n 4 s aa 

.aim! 


2*w 11 .wiapi 
18H ow JiflSSi 

R 5fi fiSg. 
& iai« 

T* EiiiS 
£; K 5 


|3 _ «ffl H% 

: “ 5Sp 

_ _ n* ni* 


f ife S s 

R ’« » n 
^ |R 3 SSp 


- a E 

_ _ 339 715, 

- 11 1111 .-. 

- 21 MO ffl 
_ It IW 3*1 

- O 1C as 

I * 

_ _ tsi r 7 . 
us 1 > ;w z»i 
.11 'us r r 
_ *7 1575 13 1 
.0 15 7: 

■ n 


■5*3 -A. I 

> >* r ' : i 
s. - > -* 


-1 ■*» n( 

r.-i 

s ^ -ii 

r ,3 

S»i S-w-1r.| 


•, c a - a 

5 1 5 j 

- 1 it 1 


&* aw a 

m o im 

ft 

r r r 




f If IS 1 


T - 4U »i 
#• - _ «s ‘Ji 


5 9 Atuffdl 

-T2'. n Awn 


•ll 


& R SSr 

r r 

Ok A 
h »> |on 


7*1 W» -S 

& & jS 

o'* inw -W 

a R *!5 

? F a 


5 n ’a Je « Sw n* 

_ 2 3,7 on 4* mi ** 

r 1 >*» w a ia *3 

- - IB Wl Iflk l» .11 


kSH -I life 


1*3* 4lW BfflVrda 
n* 17«™ Keane 
«fe Wk BSKflW 
S5l 2015 Bank! 
nfe *2, gannsTdi 


29 17H Srv»s X I.s a 


Si *2 « ; S 

JM 9*k WfO B - 33 

a* r aw 44 ’? ? 

sa* r ra* : * 

ss k esr .11* 3 « 

mi 6*W gfflTcO „ Z7 

435a 2OT SoSBi , 26 

IM |» BesEn r 11 P 

IB 'S & E " 

B't 20fe BiMV mux 
At >r« »Swp, _ m 

*r-3 m famfifl _ _ 

*Ra 9fe BnrtsAi 

U'l 1SW SfOtof _ _ 


t! S -s 

I ES 

I I 5 

J7W 2?l .Ik 


z « a 

MSe J - <34 3<k 

: - M 

_ fi tn Sft* 
. 4 UU«k 


FI 


-Mill 

. E ill I 


ft s a d 


* 17*, NDMCm 
AT* iwao 

^S? BSt 

t 31U Naioli 


Z Z 13459 £ii 

^ - 7al Si 

, 73 173 T^k 

_ 35 AO 19 

, . ® E 

_ _ S77 13. 

, _ 12391 7S4 

X 14 3 £7 iiil 

567 9 Jl K U- 


ii. jp :;i 
si ST jji 


3 ■ g* -«f 
■K fs J ^ 

■At -Xn - 


R &* S? .1 
s r as <4 


25 2t» 2n dtk 

R W »sw -tw 

R R R -3 


ElS^iS 3 

: U 8 8 R 1 
? ; S S a* s? 4i 

ilillli 


as 5 t, 


.U j fD 

- D 


BftftPI 

^ 471* M| IJ *7, 

IF E | a 

ft i £ fc is 

«■£ ar :i 

M I7V> 17U 17H i ■, 


50> Jlu BaTa 

f «B 

l&* 3B luto 

Tti IJfe Moncr 


ZP7 Um BonTno 
Qfe w ftrtfcb 
32* ir* fan^i 

W-: M BaraiOj 
55* Id. OQjg 
Jfli U CBCcBs 
VPk 3T.* CKIGB 

n j.*, cpmqa 

41W B 

W. 61 CH501 
tt a u CCS An 
Jkc MV> (NET 


os* ^ jsr ? t* s, 

PSSfi § I2W Sb 

cr> 4T, a- .7fe fi 30 SbSi 

» X* tw * Wk Ik Wa 

» Bi S) -Ik £*7 B» SSSip 

42 39*1 4*1 .1*1 a» 27 Srt 

2 IS* !*:■ -Ii* u. 9W namWi 


- » 2* rife if** TTfe aw 

- a Is S* Sf, - ,vw 

, _ _ ltd Bfe 331* fll* -fe 

747b 1U 3 74H 7H -IVl 

= 5 « l^s 

1 i 427 3SW S* Si -lfe 


24 1 . 1X4 -*W 


S 27» 21U 71M -U SOW ZP, 

JM 47W fife J4 34** TT 

m n M « »fe WH 


25 24U 24*1 d» in ■ 

lire: id. 10*1 JW TOH 

35 37V. 33 -I, *4 74% 


IM W 
aw m «*w 

&. 9Lr 


35 37V. 33 -|i in 74W Encfi 

li.w Jo 101 J4 «r.l 22 Flees 

x ;ra ni -u in* yvr Eaun 

»* 3o« Xd _ ZTi 12ii Kjf 

It* U>. H. »'i 13** I B&l 

73 6A-. 674 ^ M 5b Sch 

an 3Ti i, .;* Si* m Cam 

2^1 77' S'. -i IB. in* ESdt 

W n ffi -a S HW EnSc 

47* 411, 41m -I JB, fl*a HPA 6 


* ; s 

_ M 


3>a 2«* » 

m 471*1 47b dh 

57k 5k 5Ka -2v> 

im ill, lut m 

a. zs 2 $w * 


- - 1691126 2S 25k A 

_ v sn m nfe ws aw 

_ _ 9854 — 


3T.k m -3U, 

Sb R ta 

so JL •*! 

33** 3294 


s» r ». 
r % fi!? 
r a ® 

3H& 24 SiSPfl 

^.lES Ta 

5w E S?" 

30fe Tfe LCCUM 
klfe m iBK&pn 

»• jo. Crx 

4731 2E, LomRidh 
42fe 1* LcheI 
5*4 Wk LaSr 


_ 48 TO 37 36) 

e s § 

.» 3 fl Si 

: m fe 

* “ S »■** 

104 27 fa HKJOS Sfe 
12, 24 - 9* 77-k 7* 

: BT 1 
r : t &. 

_ _ 32 5b*s a 

Z I uS Pm ^ 

- _ 4A6U 5JF* 47H 

_ 91 I7» 3BW Xfe 

Jl U II Ml M &, 


3a> jr f DranF X 2J 

3IW tj : on 

2£, iTr OcnesAIn 3a L5 

48*W Hit SuS lit 37 

*Bfe 39 m jgtet 2343 21 

is> Ji oiESSs r 

s: 111 min^n Jig _ 

S . ii wSb 

■5 27** Drtc; ]J5 IS 

*ln 2T-t uaaes 

24 12U ttBSO 

klfe life aacen 

^ !K E : 

K il cfflBoon 
it ornseM 

u» 41 e aja a 


33 13 W 1X9 !" 
.16 9 - 529 S ) 

- > 3a.T 42b 

„ _ 32536 ) T 

_ _ 1291134-, 
_ . ip IS' 

. 3 tu :*• 

—• rz 

, X E! »-.« 

* ? > lig &= 

3a 25 - 2221 23 

. la :a:< 

lit 37 H 171 45b 

23*3 Zl t: s£s ^ 

_ _ jm 9i, 

_ is ’n life 

_ - :*66 21m 

=" - fi *a»; 


r 27i 
£ r 55 m u, 
fi. -■* 

r 8? -:4 


Ff& 

K f 7 R fe 
c? |rSm 

3*2 Sc 
kdcnoai 

F£B- 


ril I 


ix a fi 

iii ^ 


§? 

»9 Si S 

m 25" 3fi» 
uia «i 
3S7 3Ii Sfe 


Ki Ufe V2S] 

ur« j*i var«a 
l» 4W VBtfM. 
Kfe ti vgnKfi 
2lb f von 

4TU 14* W*l 

^ Jg, -10? 

57b 2?fe 

zn* B yaCSB 

t&k ZTa vusjX 

ki m viw 
5 efe v*s Sfe, 

99 iS?®p 

& w vtaCo, 

3 171 «QX 
Stfe 19^1 VSnur, 
4Bfe II ViAS I 


•W ft, 25b 


: :<% f a 

: ,9 £ 8 $ 

_ 55 366* 20* 24b 

: 3 ft? 


2 K 

4?. M 


1 1 si 

'Ii ; £i .^! 
& 3* -r; 


a? £4 -:} 

fab i] 

31 <&■ 

O’) Um -■! 


| 1 S 

Si ii jS5 
U, Or SC 3a 

& pm* 

k-t ' StSmi 


_ 47 
<30 21 ^ 


«:• 

S ^ 
,81 Si 

!JW »4 

’SlTOl iSfc. 


_ 30 l^ ^ ^ -if jw 


24W Bfe WF5Fod 
43X4 35 WP On* 
m iDi TKoXa 

f i ir. KoaOsa 
a 12- feawrp 

r ISb 23% 

It 344 HIM 
u in WrowtP 
SPh in mwfa 
Wfe 1515 Wemef 
37W 1FW raw 
8B 48 HOIKS 
47fe n WrJf* 

)>VJ 10 Ksrtwas 
4 »l ftVW 


X OMJM M 

“ IT 

- *S# 3m M 

* jr s 


35* J . J« «l 
:*|| 1 
,ss 8..iS£.-S 

J 15 j SB R S* 
ia. 11 S Jft P 

- - IR 0k S* 


Z2kk 3T* 
Mb Mfe 

41b «b 


14 77 II , 

53 56 

!3 SB 14 Sfe 
3e 6133 5Tb 
Z 6713 Si 
U 77C7 ZBi 

34 «x:i 
a sn icb 


ax p -fe 

Hi k -..*! 

Oa £i -Ii 
S- S' -T?l 


47 633 S, 


h; *: 4S| 
f* *?; 




tSSJ! 5i 

Si^ £ 

fe S 

hi an x; 

SS^ s 

JC 34 31* 

201 774 Sf 
3» n: 37b 
187 klfe Mn 


cn *3fe 
S4- . - a 


^ sail O-I Cb Cm 


=c?g 


31i f? 

377 ■*! 

38 8;*. W 


f: 

c< '- so.w-:= 

41- 'S» 8 30X7 g 

5 ' =1 

e as?.- 


IX SJ 17 

* J } 


>13 29 a> 

3c Sb Sb 

3CK WW 15b* 
5*4 15 Ufe 
fflUM Sb 
»4 akl 
5513 11 3h 


B i 17 m WbOM 

* Ufe mot« 
3ffe IT, WMcFd 
ffl ZC k Wn5aa 

Lsi® 

47b ISj WboKci 

E^BL 

lf-1 Oil HcUKC 

§ E*^S r 

^Ssr 

IT* 5b war 
5T, M xm 
life Tfc XW 
Z7i Uk XonBe 
59b 17b mtetfp 


: 77 B21 o S* 

. . iss » m 

- 3k 660 4M 39 

144 a fi jit Sw 

. 15 Me 41 n 


- * S 5 ■¥ 

Z i j 5S m 71? 

. 37 91D a 5Tb 
_ c u« *1 in* 

:«3f fi 


r- T» 5C3«4 
C| a 7 -, Eraco 
r. "fr Slices 

9 .« Ooa>jW 


lE2 Er 

sm at nb 

*45 Sfe Zfe 

cs=> rib a«* 

an Ok 41 n 
5H5 77 Sm 
54 t. X-I 


jg. ?a% 

3»i (b VneSrtB 


' : s R- 


- - *»»■»• Ob 

. _ t«B 2Jfe 24N 

. S Ml in* 38 


NYSE 


nuaoi 

Hfen Caw SkaCk 


w ™ Pt UD.MSX urn tM CB1I*I 


n, VU PE UW> MB* Uw uokat Oro* I 


Thursday's 4 P.M. 

(Continued) 


Close 


4 Ij 

•'a ii » 


Bt kM PE 100*1 


low law Orw] 


4<l 


no 13 B 

rl & Ii 

35 I g 
Jfc 3 S 
4 } « 


■3fi i fi 

246 53 Ti 

ill 


-lil 

111 

MS 


51 S 


>«?i J8 

ii ill 


(M 2 J 2 '3 44fe Son 3w. fe 

*■ Mir IM 

“'H Ill'll 


5a % 

Div *- 2 « ^ja) 


ifkwb 

LSai Ste> 


ii 


B C vi 


«8 lilies 


a I 

> iu PE ran m* Uw tami do* I 


ȣ*TS nek 


> & ^ 


Mil 

111 


“fe ^ “fe -* 
1* 17? 17*1 

4b. ife 
fc* j* 2?* -*• 


4H = WHl-! 

j, :=rff “Sb to - ,5? 3 l* 2’ 

Si. il-. r™ ?S ^ - fi fe * ? 

a«l8s|-Ife s 

^ f =Hs - : f i | ?a ^r k ^ 

K-’ Sfe :^ni iy 71 “ 11S ]&.' ilfe *.s 

v *. ff8 “* ^ <* »»g 1^ y 

£ if! ft. J J S M I fc I 


tOXOPE WiHbB low loha CUV* 


Q Vi 

Ufe 

€f 


S Ml A 


■6*. — — |3| 

m Q n 


UB Ui 19 

\ 


Ii ff ST ,s a 

jf/Sitiss .d !? 


jfo'gS ^ 

7, 


II 


•I I 

1 I 


JS 2 * ^ y 

a u *« Kv, iw. 

,3* ip it i«k ii*, ut, 

if S £ il & SSL 

^JS !J .s ,« II*. Jli 

_ 24 910* 71 Sfe 


SB . 
JS l 3 i 


18 
1 8 = 
JS £ 


.jS iKl ,Sf .it 

I ? Ii? 2 

3 i4x H Z 

¥ ft 1 


fe pi m, - * fi 

£ el’ S3S!1 h » = 

^ Is 3s^° s 


£ | V ? 

S! !4?* -fe 

& ft & # : 


dtf - J 


1 -fi K 

2 5 S fe fiS 


.is s r 


sjjaf ft? 

«w rjb in ww 


ma: 
JS ?« 

IV =, 

*40 




E K 
I 1 1 2 f 

» r* t 

? ig T 

Mvj »* t 
Sib Oh T 


!4*. 4? - 


g>* low s*Mn 


* 15 8 ffl: fir *.lt 

• " - % B. I|5 :?a 

■ 64 23 il 219* iM* 5?** - im 

«* 4 « 3,J9 ws »:*, &!bi -r*; 

au ii - 447 in n. r* .*1 


Si girlM 
2** fe BoB*« 
g* 1® BS** . 
sir l?5» taSt? 

fef & 

i* I»1S 


a i3 _ g.'E: 'ia is ris 

* i I ' J E £ 89 E 
'I’i a 111' §2 

* « § ^ ii 


C i 

IS: wt 


f g - J 5 fe to ’is #. 

iilllVl 

illifil 

*■« « 1ft 1® *5i 

,3 S 4 5s 9 S5 fe fly - T g 

glslltci 


d " 5?i& g* fly 

t*- iajK r .« fl g e fi «S ® ;g 

I|i-l!:j|i|l6 

1 f 1B 1 1 I il i f ¥ ^ ^ 

iblrlfr 1*2 f-i. ft f .£ 


“ i rife & fe £ 

■; H Svf .iH 


p» uo u ! iJ»2 ffiz flVw ^ *u*l 


a IS IS » i 


*SM 


4« _ fi 


Z ® is 
te ^ % -s 

25 i21 4S 

in Tip* Tin. fe 
* j? m. fe 
PV> *1 28b fe 
fe fe fe _ 


_ (» 498 

?1 fi ¥• 


m ^ 2 * er & ’is |fs « .« u is s ?ss sn jp. 

■ 345 5 « S E es ,7* ^ ^ y j 


IJS fS 1 
J S9 fSc 


■8 4^. 4» fe 

i&I§s 


5 '|l 

,a a 3 

i ft] 


’IM 


MO fl 2 




1* a Ii &, flf £i ^ 

Is r, '• 'S? *?- : 

lw V a wi £,■ jf- iix- .*.s 

4 M ■£« Ufa S? i2 

S H* m 44V). .2 

il.it j? ,s :s 


p I*' fsgis M J3 E %s5- 
JR i. Jek? ^ : «4g,B 

I W 31f -4lft 
••J = K 

r B issgu " 13 R fe 
I? F Bfer .. d! if 8 » ® 




iq Z - 

fl T3 » 

* & l 


I I 


Hi 


ij I s J E I? P. *£ 

3B :? 1 ft 5S. Ii ¥? 1! 


gj 2 
fi. « 

?S». -b 


| 3? 


; ; iafe 

5 8 « fi 5 


?1! ro _ am Sh v *. 

M - iS 2S B’ 5 2* 

3 ij ji np p. “b |£! 

: » 1 W5. fit f?, 1 




♦ik Sftt j 

.« e; 
1 p 


¥i 

'll* 

Ss V 


A I 


111 


i* 9 ? ; 

ill 

HI ‘3 ! 


I i t -i 

M )« I 

IS il 


m 


9& fe 


1H 

3 Et 


vlviifip 

* 3 S Mg Ik 

3 ,3 i 

- 1 fi fi ^ 

J9 ” IKE 


kTfe Ufe SunT 

fe 'd 
fi 

|| Sr 

ssa« 


R gl* 85. :R 

S£ M &'» flu 


•j 7 *0 12 Hi ij ,iv 

s 8 Ju-Ja .a .fc. :? 

IJ 8 ft! £5 fSp ■£ 

-Ik 66 JOb m it; 


». fiS j: 

»ia life Ti 

II! 


E? i« 




a a 

§ ii JI S: 




I ifSb 




- * .it 7 a 3 

»“® I ft? I; .5 

_ — n W Ifli Im I 4 -. . 1 . 


*4JJ alw t unH — U 

^ ^ fe 1 

alia 


: ij R g 

- ,f M*w 17 

.■* II jb f 


111* 

***£$? 


.if '5 S i 

JI 13 fi iff? 

Iftji 

ass ■;! 


f j.’w 

4 

4»7I “Vkl 


g'l'fgg 

U ,T jp, Sfe 


F* £ SET i I « I £■ © 1£ « 
S’S®. ^ ~ 


27 J5 S!?* fi?- 47^- -fe 

? "S-t f K -5 


w uw .« - s is s?. ";■ •? nj car* 

j issifeiij fin 


* “ a 

* 13 £ 


1 gft. Be ga. ; 

: - fe e £ 3 


sKrfl* f 

SJa.2?*4i 

r“Ha 1 


IDO U fl 
j,* ti “ 

}60 M _ 




% fi 

1U u _ 


!2 k 

Pftl 


S3* 

*s 1 •* 


M ^ 8> at is 

SI .!** ,*Pi 9 1 - .a? 

S 't* 'JSt '£; "* 


bk % sbf® «• « ^ 1 e 

yv, jK MwbID 234 *5 Z *% 

i-alKSf a 3 ; Jfe 


^ jJill 


* a j j 
* 1 66 
3 >4 


S' -SCSS 


3 

•3 !&■ 


a3« 


I If 


- Jr »n 

* lT fi g 

JfH « 

l« 7, . u IM 


R SS BSaiZ 

a a s li^s 

fi ^ y 2 

is i r 3 


■898 73 - 

19 

'JS'E « 

II! 


lull 

fflfSt fin 
.ft ft 1 " St 


.. , . uia t£i *■ ilf ;g 
!b : i«e-E3^ 


fll M - 

ttfl ? 

i*3« = 
* a S 


r ? i 

TIP - _ M 


afiaj 

1113 


^ Ii 


'S3 8 


& ,R 
VZ ftt 
S3 & 

|| 


f 4fi S 


|FPi 

f Lit a 

fill 

tit* -w 

JV. fe 

1 1 £ 3 

IP* kb .». 


ffife- ,a,2 2 

h ® fe- - ‘- 3 2 a ih ^ ’< 

Sa % jay " '? H i3.ff& ?!?. ilj; ^ 

5* ^ fe « l ,b "3 ,j r fi fi *5 

jS 1? : i3 life. I!i*. lit: * 

* * fl S g? S*. ia -5 

* i * if p. ft 4 

iu 14 ■ jfii ^ 5,1. 

40 , i» iu life An, JT-' ,2 

s " * S ¥■' 8? ;2 

eS! H ? W F ft. ft. ^ 
52 ,i r iT^firfe iftw ,JT: 


p JR iSS- 1 

Ilf# 

||g 


■* ’ 3 * £5 F as ® ■’ 


S13I 


E . fi jfc .4 

8 I? 

1 1 

ih* ft! J?2 


S- sFSFr a 

1 

a - fS « fe » -a «r 


if* W* dean 

L i 


Oh .lit £t ^ 


ESI EC 


"Srf i 

•si! 

48 1 


1 3fef 

”! 5 jt 3 


i ft y g- 4 

fe K .« 


,JS “ - ® j 

93 u 3 is ? 


r. «*«? 

e, ^ 

S fl 11 

"• S 13 


OTr tS »7 T ' • 

85* B? .*2 

fi I fi* S 


ftl:# ®" i '|a Pf 3 
«•£ S& * 3 ,J . :! , 1 1 - £ 5 . fe -.ft 


i « s a 

il B .: I 


3 fi 25 
6? IV - 
JH IT 


ITS sjj fit #i 

sa»JM * 1 S ,?e a** 3K If** *■» 


Baa* 
S BSR 


_ fe IS 
39 3 JO 


80S a R 

l u T i "- 

Vi 


Efi .3 


«. .3 " ffi ffit SK SC 

Ska g p aa fit- £ 

o li S m Sfe ii" 1 ^ 


1 ® 43 fl 


S S S S3 a jS E ® - 

japmi «*• rS ‘l j£ nw Si ft. '.’) 

sa 5Ts isagj nr js: a* ••*. 

p. riSir .C i* r i«5 <4*. <?. ... .» 

fH* #* I»S? 1* id a law* aw. Mm *4 f rfi 

rn =«E S: :? 


R e 3 g « 4 85 Sft R II 

iiStiijIllll 

1 a ® 3 sL 3 ^ s ^ s r* ^ •? 

S.BI& “b jf7 .3 




- 72 

JB O ij 


& Zff 1% 


55 Bf 8 

sa as! 


”* 5 5*'.\S 


5*»n I kb 
J* 

■J 1**- 

"Ife « 

2fb W5« 


| a | S«£ i|? 

*® e ! S fla =!;■ 


s S fti & 


*J5 


« i j f) gj ft*, ffl* » i 

'4 l( V ,S 1 fj fe :• 



tfiS! 


1 




■ . ■*»! v ’i ■-. 4 

■- Y; k fi; * 

n vTj V 5 4; 

• 

• v *:•>* ?. i» 
£■£.*** ¥ £•• 

• ? ( U. ft C 

. .. is? ft. ft ?• 

■ ~ .S r ?: *' 

• : >?!*$* 

- O t 

■ ::.lllr 

•>> ji: 5. 5 

• Si’ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 19 


'■■ •»! i{‘ r 

. n-, - S'* ! 
■■ : ; 

- m: 

.m 

• *’ s ‘ 

mM 

mu 


■ - V a: •. 

-. : 2 ; • u, » 
^ : 

’ • ! s P, 










































































































— — :. .in t-- tv _____ 







*"•!;- §■ 


rCTEttlWULTO* *, 


PAGE 20 



Edbdhoal StaU/AP 


Martina Hingis hitting a re- 
turn to Sabine Appelmans of 
Belgium at the Leipzig Open. 


Hingis Advances 
At Leipzig Open 


tempos Martina Hingis of 
Switzerland and defending cham- 
pion Anke Huber of Germany 
breezed to easy victories on Thurs- ■ 
day at the $450,000 Leipzig Open. 

Hingis, the world's top-ranked 
women's player, bad little trouble 
against Sabine Appelmans of Bel- 
gium in a 6-3, 6~2 victory that put 
her into the semifinals. 

Huber, who won the title in 1995 
and 1996, climbed into the 
quarterfinals with a 6-2, 6-3 tri- 
umph over Magui Serna of Spain 
and set up a meeting against Iva 
Majoli of Croatia, the world’s 
fourth-ranked player. 

Amanda Coetzer of South 
Africa, ranked sixth in the world, 
also reached die quarterfinals with 
a 6-3, 7-5 victory over Magdalena 
Maleeva. (AP) 


Rafter Overpowers Rios 
At Grand Slam Cop 


tennis The reigning U.S. Open 
champion Patrick Rafter gained the 
semifinals of the lucrative Compaq 
Grand Slam Cup on Thursday by 
powering his way past Marcelo Ri- 
os of Chili. 

Rafter, who raised his earnings 
thus far at die tournament to 
$675,000, was almost untouchable 
on his serve as he beat the world’s 
seventh-ranked player, 6-1, 7-6 (7- 
0). Rafter has won SI 3 million 
over the past month, and has shot 
from a No. 63 ranking at die start 
the year to No. 3 currently. 

Petr Korda of die Czech Repub- 
lic also reached the semis with a 7- 
5, 6-3 triumph over Cedric Pioline 
of France. f AP) 


Klinsmann Is Sidelined 


soccer The German striker 
Juergen Klinsmann has tom lig- 
aments in his right ankle and will be 
out of action for at least a month, his 
Italian club Sampdoria said on 
Thursday. 

Klinsmann, who joined the serie 
A team at the beginning of the 
season, damaged his ankle in train- 
ing earlier this week. He had X-rays 


on Wednesday, and doctors put his 
leg in a cast. The doctors confirmed 


leg in a cast. The doctors confirmed 
tbit Klinsmann would be sidelined 
until late October and would thus 
miss Germany's World Cup qual- 
ifier against Albania in Hannover 
on Oct 11. 

Klinsmann has yet to score a goal 
in a competitive match for the Itali- 
an team and has turned in several 
lackluster performances. But, play- 
ing for the German national team 
earlier this month, be ended a long 
goal drought and marked his 100th 
cap by scoring twice in a 4-0 defeat 
of Armenia. (AP) 


Escorts A Guides 


Hgral b^s^ ribmtg 


Sports 


World Roundup 


A Disparity in Talent 
Will Swing It — Maybe 


Form Book Tips U.S. Side to Win, 
But This Golf Defies Usual Rules 


By Ian Thomsen 

Intemmional Herald Tribune 


070GRANDE, Spain — Teams 
in other sports usually do what's 


expected of them. When will the 
Ryder Cup learn to behave? 

It makes no sense to think that Europe 

will win the 3 2d Ryder Cup this week- 
end. Its best players seem too old, and 
these young people today they just 
aren’t hungry. 

I just heard a Scottish writer picking 
the Americans to win because they have 
the better putters. Almost every way you 
look at it it comes out the same. Of the 
top 13 players in the world, eight will be 
representing the United States com- 
pared with just one from Europe, Colin 
Montgomerie (it’s always Cohn Mont- 
gomerie). If this were soccer, basketball, 
American football, volleyball, handball, 
netball, team table tennis — even Davis 
Cup tennis, which is the closest of all 
equivalents — it would be like throwing 
away money to bet on a close result, 
never mind a European victory. 

Yet, the Ryder Cup refuses to heed 
such warnings. Fans and sports writers 


ThkRtduCup 


who have grown jaded about other pro 
sports approach the Ryder Cup almost 
reverentially, as if it were some kind of 
spiritual retreat for three days. It teaches 
humility to those who need it most and 
rewards performers who go unnoticed, 
or at least unappreciated, in other com- 
petitions. What was it about someone 
like Philip Walton, the least renowned 
of the 24 players, ih at could allow him to 
become one of the principal heroes of 
the European victory two years ago? 
Obviously, there was something more 
to him than anyone would have thought 
In any other spoil Philip Walton never 
gets up off the bench. 

Alas, this weekend is going to test the 
mystical qualities of the Ryder Cup. The 
suspicion is that the myth is going to 
crack, melt and seep into die velvety 
fairways, leaving the Ryder Cup be- 
holden to the same plain factors that 
govern other sporting events. 

For the first half-century, remember, 
the Ryder Cup was as one-sided as most 
Super Bowls. Great Britain & Ireland 
had won the biennial tournament just 
four times through 1977. It began to 
change when players throughout 
Europe were brought in. By 1985 Seve 
Ballesteros of Spain had swung his side 
to a breakthrough 1 616- 1146 victory. 
Europe has won or retained the cup in 
four of the last six meetings, including 
die last time at Oak Hill in New York, 
when the visitors overcame an enor- 
mous 9-7 deficit on die final day of 
singles — the final clinching hole going 
to Walton of Ireland. 

That upset seemed to affirm die up- 
side-down values of the Ryder Cup: That 
it is better to come from behind on the 
final day, as the last two winners have 
done, and it is of no help being the home 
team, because the last two have lost. 
Whenever players think they ought to 
win a particular match, that eveiything’s 
in their favor, that’s when many start 
playing like losers. The pressures are 
emphasized by their unfamiliarity with 
match play, and especially with the 
doubles format over the first two days, 
and with the newfound responsibility of 
playing for team and country. If goffers 
seem unusually smgleminded and tele- 
scopic at all other times, then the Ryder 
Cup has the effect of biting fitted with 
kaleidoscopic glasses. 

An extra, lmpredicred benefit for the 
Europeans has been the cultural makeup 
of their team. This year their 12 players 
represent 10 nationalities or provinces. 


(Remarkably, only five of the Europeans 
are British). Each one will feel as if he is 
something of a national champion, rep- 
resenting his own particular conn try, 
with the fans back home caring much 
mote strongly about his performance 
than, say, Rhode Islanders will be ral- 
lying around Brad Faxon. This sense of 
nationalistic pride, magnified, has helped 
bring out the best in the Europeans. 

Unfortunately for them, they are also 
about to realize another crucial factor. 
The generation of Ballesteros (who no- 
longer plays at the highest level and is 
representing Europe as the nonplaying 
captain), Nick Faldo, Ian Woosnaxn and 
Bernhard Longer are all 39 or 40. They 
were driven by a need to prove them- 
selves against the United States, above 
and beyond the 14 major titles they won. 
Their European descendants clearly 
have not set their sights as high. 

In a way, the best result for the Euro- 
pean Tour might be a drubbing by the 
U.S. this weekend. It would create a 
sense of urgency that has been lacking 
on the European Tour in recent years. 

“We have forgotten how to win be- 
cause we have it too easy on our tour.'' 
JackNicklaus said in 1987 after the U.S. 
had its secood successive Ryder Cup 
defeat. “We bad some marches we 
could have won, but the European play- 
ers are tougher. Because of the all- 
exempt tour now. our guys don't find 
themselves in a position to win very 
often.’' 

Nicklaus’s complaints have been re- 
versed in the last decade. Today h is the 
United States with the tougher tour, a 
weekly competition led by Tiger Woods 
and other young hungry players that has 
left, the Americans in the best possible 
shape The Europeans, by comparison, 
simply haven’t put in the same kind of 
work — they have it much “too easy” 
on their tour, they play some awfully 
poor courses in front of small crowds, 
and resubs in the major championships 
of recent years stand as proof that they 
no longer are quite so driven to prove 
themselves against the Americans. 

This might be a frustrating week for 
Ballesteros. He will have to be careful 
about asking for too much from his four 
older Europeans (including Costantino 
Rocca. also 40) and Jose Maria OJaza- 
bal, who is still recovering from the foot 
problems that sidelined him for IS 
months. Yet, what other choice will he 
have? Among his other seven players, 
with apologies to Montgomerie, there is 
not one major champion. 

Ballesteros pointed out the diffi- 
culties Thursday in trying to predict the 
outcome of the doubles matches, which 
will account for more than half of the 
points this weekend. “In fourballs and 
even in foursomes, in my own expe- 
rience over the years, you look at pairs 
and say for sure we will win one point 
here, two points, three points — and 
then everything comes out the total op- 
posite way, 1 ’ he said after announcing 
his opening pairings. 

He said he had woken up at 5:15 A.M. 
Thursday to finalize his choices. “Be- 
ing captain there is much more pres- 
sure,” Ballesteros said. “When I am 
playing in a major I don’t remember I'm 
waking up at 4 o ' clock in the morning .* * 
By comparison, the U.S. captain, Tom 
Kite, claimed be had made his decisions 
comfortably two days before. 

Maybe the format of the Ryder Cup 
will hide the disparity between the two 
teams, much as it seemed to in 1995. It 


might be, by Ryder Cup standards, that 
there is no disparity. More likely is that 


there is no disparity. More likely is that 
the outcome will reflect the preparation 
of both sides — as h did for the first 50 
years, as it did when Nicklaus was com- 
plaining 10 years ago. If so, the last Ryder 
Cup might have been the last hurrah. 


VENUS IN FURS 

3*HR W0RDWDE ESCORT SERVICE 


CtBSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
SI Baauctanp Plan, London SW1 
T* 0171-584 8513 


EMAHUF1 I FS ESCORT SERVICE 
** FRENCH SPEAKING ” 

LONDON criy 0171 262 2886 AS Carts 


BELGRAVIA 


LONDON 0171 362 7000 

Al cads. Advance booWngs vefcoms 


ALAN. BLACK ESCORT SERVICE, 
Handsome. Stand. Dinner or Cora- 
Oaraon, Based Edhburgh, UK only 
cal 0873 530 056 


EXCLUSIVE BRAZILIAN-FRENCH TO 
Escort Service in London. 
Ptone 0993 m oaoi 


ORCHIDS 

LONDON -EUROPE 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
Cal 022 / 346 00 89 Escort Agency 
IAUSANNE-M0NTTIBJX- BASH. 
ZLHCH ■ CREDIT CARDS 


GABY, FRIENDLY S SOPHISTICATED 

Soil Anrian git Beat 

Sente. Lmkn 0956 5B1 421. 


THE RHEST A THE MOST SWCSS 
IB • 38* KTEHHATONAL 
BEWIFUL A ELEGANT STUDENTS 
SECRETAIRES, ABt HOSTESSES A 
MODELS * 

AYALABU AS YOUR COMPANION 
Escort Agency CredA Cards Wefcome 


APOLLO ESCORTS 

SEJvice©ap*Hwsitrts.corn 

*31-654-228-124 


KRISTY DISCREET ATTRACTIVE 
ftwate Escort & Dtinsr Das Saws fcr 
Men & Women, h London A Hedhsow 
Ten 0856 616 679. 


HEATHER BEAUTIFUL BLOND prtvae 
■escort service. Kennsington 
Tel: 0171 835 1685 or 0171 2S8 2623 


TEL: LONDON 4+ 44 


0171 589 5237 


SECRETS 

24 hr EURQPEWDE ESCORT SERVICE 
Tet +43 62 6070 

Qrt-Y BEAUTY 0*06 AIC M00&S 
A! carts. Advance booUngs wtcmd 
«Bort*^»corteMdtaffetttiat 


ANGEUQUE & FRENDS 
The Best Escort Service 
London 24 h* 0171 536 0059 


JAPANESE ■ BRAZILIAN Escort Sente 
London Heefliraw. Tot 0956 sra 543 n 
0956 401 161 jJ cant 


BARBARA ITALIAN BEAUTY High 
Class, Began Soptattatcd Pitvae 
Escort Seme. London TetflB02 729 B57 


JUUA BEAUTFUL YOUNG Srunene 
Ffenty and wy Steps*. Ponte Boat 
Santa London Tet 0410 772 B16 


SMPLY THE BEST ESCORT 
SERVICE IN EUROPE 


HEWS WGH SOOETYVBWPARB 
COTE t7A2UR7UraCH*GENFieUfOCH 
Hentaoner Escort i Travel 

Vienna **431/535 41 04 al carts 


•"BEHJl - FRANKFURT*** 
"CAR1SMA ESCORT AGENCY" 

Tet 0041-B4B 80 70 77 ■ Cftt CtrtS 


JWJETTE (Stood Glamour Model) 

Educated Dscreai Escort Service 
VFs orff. Cd 0356 5« 9Z1 


BLACK BEAUTY ESCORT SERVICE 
Ereksh* Begars Educated S Frfemfv. 
London & Heafrat oral 9062261. Carts 


IMDELYN OUGHTS ESCORT 
Sense. Models. Actresses. Craft Cards 
Wans 24 Ha 212-25ME2? 


EXCLUSIVE 


AGENCY 

PARIS BRUSSELS LONDON 
Tef LONDON 0044 (0) 
467 497873 


“GUYS & DOLLS ESCORT SERVICE* 
MAANITOMETTALYnjONDOfPPAMS 
UGANQ*GERMANY*SPAW 

WSCANDNAYWT0KY0 

Tet *39 (A 335 61S 0438 Out Carts 


"CONCEPT 2000" 
EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 8 Travel Agency 
FRANKFURT 069 - 955 20 774 


"* MADRID HARIIONY “* 

EXCLUSIVE Top Escort Sent?. Engfcfi 
Tete 34-1-386.35 88 or 90&B1 89JH 


CHAMPERS INFL EXCLUSIVE 
Etogani Escort service - London 
TEUFAX 0171 486 0545 


“"NEW YOUNG ESCORTS'”* 
London's Nunter One Escort Service 
Tet 0171 834 3338 - 2t»n 


Do you live irv Aihens? 


MCOLE VERY PRETTY AND SHAPELY 
Young Blond. Private Escort Service 
London Tet 0410 789 253 


ARBTOCATS Escort Service 

3 SJtouMam St London W1 
0171 25S 0090 


Fur a hand-delivered subscription on thr day 
of publication, tail 00 33 I 4143 9.361 


VALBffflES INTERNATIONAL 
VP EsconSenta photos to «w central 
London c4te 0171 835 0005 al carts 


Hcrali»S;Sribunc. 


, ITUi WMURi IUIW NEVSmPKR , 


• ZURICH • CAROL** 1 
fecort Saves 
Tet 077 / 7W672 


. • „ — Jr* -r 




psKirj :v 

> *"V.l •• • • 






■■■#•* 


P-i r 


•S-WS*. ■ ■ 


ti.-i'.T./jjc -;l 


By Ian Thomsen 

ImermuoMl Herald Tribune 


SOTOGRANDE, Spain — Europe is 
going to seize the early lead or go down 
trying. Or so says Sere Ballesteros. 

* When the 32d Ryder Cup ooens Fri- 
day morning he will send out all but one 
of his aged or vulnerable major cham- 
pions. 

Tom Kite, the U.S. nonphyins cap- 
rain, emphasized the superior depth of 
his team by shying away from his 
strongest pairings for the opening 
round. Those matches will account for 
only four of the 28 points available 
through Sunday, but nonetheless. 
Ballesteros's choices confirmed that he 
would depend on his most famous 
names to win the 14 points Europe 
needs to retain the cup. 

“These are the pairings that in my 
opinion will be the most experienced 
ones, the ones that give me the most 
confidence," Ballesteros said. If the 
Americans gain the advantage imme- 
diately it wifi be an omen for the hosts. 

Jose Maria Olazabai of Spain will 
play in the opening best-ball match 
alongside Costantino Rocca of Italy. 
Rocca had asked for the first match 
because he likes to play fast, but Balles- 
teros will probably want to give Olaza- 
bai as much time as possible to rest 
should he be assigned co play again in 
the foursomes Friday afternoon. 

Olazabai, 31. was considering retire- 
ment before his comeback this year 
from debilitating foot problems. 

Nick Faldo, appearing in a record 
1 1th consecutive Ryder Cup, was paired 
with his fellow Englishman Lee West- 
wood. a Ryder Cup rookie. In the last of 
the four groups will be the odd couple of 
Colin Montgomerie, who has com- 
plained loudly and repeatedly about 
slow play on the European Tour, and 
Bernhard Langer, the 40 year old Ger- 
man who is the most famously slow 
player in the world. 

“It is a good question," Ballesteros 


Jimenez Takes Vuelta Stage 


77n? Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES DE SAN RA- 
FAEL, Spain — Jose Maria Jimenez 
of Spain edged out two of his coun- 
trymen to claim the 19th stage of the 
Tour of Spain on Thursday. 

Jimenez, a member of the Banes Lo 
team, beat Daniel Clavero and 
Roberto Heras by a margin of one 


second at the end of the mountainous, 
184- kilometer (1 i4-mile) route from 
Valladolid to Los Angeles de San 
Rafael. His time was 4 hours, 31 
minutes, 38 seconds. 

Alex Zulle of Switzerland retained 
the leader’s yellow jersey with an 
overall lead of 2 minutes, 46 seconds 
over Fernando Escartin of Spain. 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26; 1997 £ 





Sex 


• * • 


Plea-Bargain Deal 
Gets Albert Out of 
A Higher Charge 




ILm* lamMiltr tanaillhw 


VS. Ryder Cup player Scott Hoch practicing at Valderrama golf course. 


Europe’s Ryder Tactic: 
Seize the Early Lead 


said Thursday when asked about the 
apparent conflict “We all know how 
Longer play's. I always thought if I put 
Langer in the first match ax 9 o’clock in 
the morning, we will all probably miss 
lunch.” 

The timin g means that Langer will 
not be expected to play in the afternoon 
foursomes. Ian Woosnaxn, who has had 
the least reliable season of Europe’s 
major champions, will be expected to 
play in the afternoon, along with Faldo 
and Montgomerie. The question is 
whether Ballesteros can coax four or 
five strong rounds from his best players. 
He confirmed that he plans to use his 
other, less-renowned players at least 
once Friday or Saturday. 

Kite, surprisingly, declined to start 
the British Open champion Justin Le- 
onard. who has been one of the hottest 
American players this summer. Kite 
aiso broke up the successful pairing of 
Davis Love 3d and Fred Couples, but 
that doesn't mean they won’t play to- 
gether in the afternoon foursomes (in 
which partners play alternate shots with 
one shared bail) or Saturday, when the 
doubles formats will be repeated. 

Tiger Woods and his friendly adviser 
Mark O’Meara were paired at their re- 
quest. 

Go IT s greatest team event — widely 
thought to be one of the great sporting 
events in the world — will conclude 
Sunday with 12 singles matches in- 
volving everyone on both teams. The 
Americans must finish with at least 14V4 
points to take the Ryder Cup. 

Here are the opening fourballs for 
Friday morning with the U.S. pairings 
listed first: Love and Phil MickeLson vs. 
Olazabai and Rocca; Couples and Brad 
Faxon vs. Faldo and Westwood; Tom 
Lehman and Jim Furyk vs. the Swedish 
pairing of Jesper Parnevik and PCr-Ulrik 
Johansson; and Woods and O’Meara vs. 
Montgomerie and Langer, which, come 
to think of it, is an especially “odd 
couple, ’ ’ in that both seem to represent 
Felix and neither is Oscar. 


The Associated Press . -iP* ; 

ARLINGTON, Virginia — The U-SgJlji? 1 
sportscaster Marv Albert, whose * 

tractive voice and snappy play-by^^&.joj, : 
delivery have been familiar to imil£ai£E? ; « 

of basketball, hockey and football 
for more than 25 years, pleaded guifty, ^ \ 

Thursday to assault and batter y aft er ?f; > 
prosecutors agreed to drop a chaige c£> .< • 
forcible sodomy. The move cut shot - j 
trial that had bared Albert’s sex life- _ . 

In making the plea. Albert spo ke jg a - ‘ 
somber and low tone, telling QnraifV ; 
jodge Benjamin Kendrick that he had > ; 

done what he was charged with doiqg ! 
last Feb. 12 to a woman in an ArtingbaBv i j 
hotel room. The woman, a longtime ; . - 
lover, said Albert had suddenly become: i * I 
angry, thrown her down on the bed sack * . 
repeatedly bitten her back, then ; 

her to perform oral sex. . *. -i 

Albert’s family and other supporters | 
sax stoically in three, rows of tbe-.'W. 
courtroom, showing no visible reaction. .--2 •; 
His fiancee. Heather Faulkiner, sai wfch 
her hands clasped in her lap. 

Sentencing was set forGcL.24. A&JitLL' 
could receive up to 12 mcmxhs in jail awl;/ 
a $2 500 fine for the single rmsdeoaeas^ V - - 
or count The dropped charge, a felony; ' ’ 

could have brought him five years to ^ 

life. . ■ ‘ _>;•.* - 

' Albert entered the plen a day after 1 
damaging testimony from a second: . 
woman who said he bit her^ daring a ~ . 
sexual advance. The trial, which began >? - 
Monday, inducted testimony that the * 
popular sports broadcaster was fond of • 
engaging in three-way sex, watching ‘ 1 

pornographic videos and wearing wom- . 
en’s underwear. . . . 

After the brief court session, Albert ^ . 

said the plea halted “an endless OTtfcal * - j 
for myself, my wMdafrxl fanrii> > ’ and 1 ;< 


:a*0 


other supporters, and he thanked NBC. 
The network, which had kept Albeit on 
the air after he was charged, had no 
immediate comment on die guilty plea. 

Alben entered the plea without reach- 
ing an agreement on a recommended 
sentence with the Arlington County 
Commonwealth s Attorney, Richard 
Trodden. Albert hod turned down the 
same plea-bargain offer before the trial, 

• Trodden said. - •_ 

Albeit’s 42-year-old accuser had ap- 
proved the plea arrangement. Trodden 
said. The prosecutor also said die testi- 
mony Wednesday by another woman, a 
former hotel employee, Patricia Mas- 
den, was of “profound” significance in 
reaching iherfeal. 

Albert’s chief attorney, Roy Black, 
was clearly caught offguard when Mas- 
den, a former friend of Albert’s, test- 
ified that Albeit had bitten her and tried . 
to force her to perform oral sex. 

She said that in 1994, Albert had 
lured her to his room in the Dallas -Fort 
Worth Hyatt hotel with a request for 
assistance. 

She said he greeted her wearing 
women's panties and a garter belt and 
tried to force her to perform oral sex on 
him. She said she ripped off his toupee 
and fled from him. 

Defease attorneys had fought to bar 
the testimony Wednesday, but the judge ■ 
all owed it To show what prosecutors said • 
was a pattern of conduct by Albert. 

Masden said she got to know Albert 
well during the early 1990s when he 
traveled with the New York Knicks and 
she was the VIP liaison forHyatt Hotels. 
She said he summoned her to his room 
in Dallas , saying he needed help sending * 
a fax. 

When she entered Albert’s room and • 
announced her presence, she heard him ! 
say, “Come on in.” 

“I turned around and I saw him 
standing there. I saw him standing there 
in white panties and garter belL He was 
exposed and he was aroused.” she 
said. 

She said she stood there in shock as 
Albert approached her and began to rub 
against her. 

As she tried to push Albert off her, ' 
she said, “I went to grab his hair and his 
hair lifted off. He. immediately put his 
hands on his hair and I ran out of the 

room.” 


ADVERTISEMENT 


-Memorable Moments from Johnnie Walker: RYDF.R Cl P 


tcilli Ih'iiitml (><illarlu‘r 





' -* t f . j 


ISIMPRE&IVE 
wmu5ViaoR& 
W0NLy9P3&&, 
M2acmwz&.. 


£l*§ * mi 


CAPTAIN KITE, AND A REPUTATION FOR WINNING BIG 

Vnl/n nith ft Sunnuxu. &■ Ithrtn, te,l h liner FSm,h O Intrma&uud HenAj TnW / /Yqfrwnnd Sp*u f Wri/um Iri 





{/mM 





i* \&£> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 



1 j e 


McGwire Hits 

055th, but 

Cards Lose to 


JssfiaSS 


Reds Anyway 


x'rThe Associated Press 

^rfir McGwiie hit his 55th homer 
and jaR isdsscd another one, but Sl 
L ouis lost to Cincinnati, 5-4. McGwire 
palled' to within six homers of Roger 
Mam’s record with four games left 
His iwo-riih hdtnerin the fifth inning 
on Wednesday night in St Lotus off 


ML Roundup 


ID «nd in -7 

Uenara ««S^ 

*>\ New YwkTEP^ 


^DaveBtffba (11-10) ended a string of 19 
'fclale appearances without a homer. 
^McGwire has homered in- 11 straight 


^ New YortrF 1 ^ 

:" s detectives 
on heights o&SL** 
anhanan. whenS^' 

v;.*** ^ seen Sea 
n ; n “ c " a > 1T onilhepS 

‘•■^•-ahhaniBibe^ 
--^aghjoc camera^ 
- -..*. noadBhniy ** 

'^‘^‘JSSS 

e! ^ fc appsa 
--- ™ ^fsdorai 
(wn i pat of wg 
? r'-'-^-r.LxCilScdtrith* 


^McGwire has homered m il straight 
series, and has hit 12 in September. 

He has Ini 107 homers in the last two 
seasons, tweaking Jimmie Foxx’s two- 
season r«XErd for a right-handed bitter. 

Cub* a, : Astro* i The Houston Astros, 
having been assured a tie for the di- 
vision title moments earlier, missed a 
chance to clinch the Central Division by 
losing to the visiting Cobs. . 

Houston's magic number was cut to 
one when second-place Pittsburgh lost 
to the New York Mets, 7-3. 

Brooks Kieschnick ami Tyler Hous- 
ton hit solo home runs for the Cubs. 

Giant* 4, Roddn3 Jh Denver, Brian 
Johnson hit his second game-winning 
home run in seven days as the San 
Francisco Giants moved closer to the 
Western Division title. 



Wire to Wire, Orioles in First 


The AuBCUBtJ Press 

If the Balumcwe'OrioIes are looking 
for something to- build on as they bead 
into postseason play for the second suc- 


cessive year, they might want to con- 
sider their incredible season. 


sider their mcreda»e season. 

“Wire -to- wire — it’s kind of mind 
boggling/* Cal Ripken said Wednesday 
night after the Orioles defeated the Blue 
Jays in Toronto, 9-3. to clinch the Amer- 
ican League East title and become just 


the sixth team in major league histoiy to 
lead their division for an entire season. 


lead their division for an enure season. 

The Orioles, who last won the Amer- 
ican League East title in 1983. join the 
1927 New York Yankees, the 1984 De- 
troit Tigers, the- 1990 Cincinnati Reds, 
the 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers and the 
1923 New York Giants as the only 
teams in history to hold down first place 
from opening day. 

The Orioles Will play the Seattle Mar- 
iners in the first round of the playoffs. 

Sealing their triumph. Rafael Pal- 
meiro hit his 38th homer, a two-run shot 
to right in the seventh inning, and drove 
in four runs as the Orioles scored five 
runs in the sixth. 

BJ. Surhoff s RBI double got the 
Orioles started, and Palmeiro followed 
with a sacrifice fly. 

Lenny Webster doubled to score 
Surhoff, then came in on a wild pitch 
before Roberto Alomar, wearing No. 43 
on his hat in honor of Cito Gaston, who 


was fired earlier in the day as Blue Jays 
manager, capped the inning with a nut- 
scoring double. Alomar played for 
Gaston and the Blue Jays before he 
joined the Orioles as a free agent. 

Surhoff added a run-scoring fielder’s 
choice in the eighth and scored on Pal- 
meiro's double for a 9-3 lead. 

VMum a. Indian* 4 Dwight Gooden 
unproved his career record against 
Cleveland to 5-0 as the visiting Yankees 
beat their coming playoff opponent. 
Gooden (9-5) allowed'four runs and 
seven hits in seven innings 


m Sox a, n gw* 2 Tim Wakefield 
allowed four hits in seven-plus innings 
and Mo Vaughn hit a two-run homer off 
the right-field roof as Boston beat host 
Detroit. 

Scott Hatreberg and Darren Bragg 
each had three hits and two RBIs. 

TWin*7 ( w>tlt* Sox 2 Frank Rodriguez 
took a shutout into the eighth inning and 
Matt Lawton and Many Cardova each 
drove in two runs as Minnesota beat 
host Chicago. 


he made an early exit as the AL West 
champion Mariners lost to the visiting 
Angels. 

Griffey grounded out in the first in- 1 
Ding and was called out on strikes in the- 
third. In the fifth, he hit a drive to the’ 
warning track in right-center, with the 
bail falling a few feet short of the 
fence. 

■row*r»4y Royal* 3 Danin Jackson’s 
bases- loaded bunt with two out in the 
15th inning brought home the winning 
run for host Milwaukee. The game las- 
ted 4 hours and 53 minutes. 

Fernando Vina led off the 15ih with a 
single off Jeff Montgomery (1-4), 
moved to second on Jeff CiriUo’s groun- 
dout and went to third on Gerald Wil- 
liams’s sacrifice fly. After Julio Franco 
and Jeromy Bumitz walked, Jackson 
bunted down the third-base line and slid 
in safely at first ahead of Dean Palmer’s 
throw. 

Rangw* a. Athletic* 4 Darren Oliver 


pitched eight strong innings, and Juan 
Gonzalez drove in a pair of runs as 


Gonzalez drove in a 
Texas defeated host Oi 


Rodriguez (3-6) pitched seven-plus 
nines, allowing five hits and two 


innings, allowing five hits and two 
runs. 

Anguii 9, M win*r * 3 Ken Griffey Jr., 
batting leadoffar his ertvn request, failed 
to hit a home run in three at -bats before 


run-scoring single to give him 128 RBIs 
this season. 

Fernando Tatis and Lee Stevens ad- 
ded RBI singles for Texas. Tom Good- 
win stole home and had a sacrifice fly, 
and the Rangers scored two runs on 
Oakland errors. 


■ ' ' ... Wot Dcarou/TTjr hna 

Cal Ripken awash id the Orioles’ title Champagne in Toronto. 


ja The Giants' magic number for clinch- 
ing the division was cut to two following 
Los Angeles’s 4-1 loss to San Diego. ' 

Johnson, who beat the Dodgers with a 
homer in the 15 th inning last Thursday, 
broke a 3-3 tie with his Iith homer, of 
the season off the Colorado reliever 
Steve Reed (4-6). 

Paidros 4, Dodgers 1 Km Caminiti hit 
a tiebreaking, two-run homain die fifth 
inning as visiting San Diego damaged 
the Dodgers’ playoff hopes. 

The Dodgers, who have lost 11 of 15, 
will finish their season whh four games at 
Colorado. San Francisco has three games 
left, all at home against San Di?go. 


Tony Gwynn, trying for his eighth NL 
batting championship, wear 2-for-4 to 
inarase his average to 374. He is eight 
pdnts ahead of Colorado's Larry Walk- 
er, who went l-for-4 against the Giants. 

M*ts 7, Pirates s Pittsburgh moved to 
■ the brink of elimination in the Central 
Division, as John Olerud hit a grand slam 
in a six-run sixth inning in New York. 

Joe Ran da 's RBI single off Joe Craw- 
ford (3-3) put Pittsburgh ahead in the 
third. But Olerud, who tied a career high 
with five RBIs, singled home the tying 
run in the fifth. 

PNBEes a Brav** i Garrett Stephen- 
son pitched a four-hitter as host Phil- 
adelphia defeated Atlanta. 

Stephenson (8-6) allowed only two 
runners past first base in his second 
complete game of the year. His other 


complete game also was against At- 
lanta, an 8-1 victory on July 15. 

The right-hander retired the first 11 
batters before Randall Simon hit a shot 
back to die mound that glanced off Steph- 
enson's right arm for an infield hit. 

Martins io, Expo* B Russ Morman hit 
a two-run homer and three Montreal 
errors keyed a seven-run first inning that 
carried visiting Florida over the Expos. 

Florida, which clinched the wild card 
spot Tuesday, played without a regular 
in its starting lineup. But the Marlins 
still sent 13 men to me plate in the first, 
knocking Carlos Perez out after a third 
of an inning. 

Morman, who has spent parts of nine 
seasons in the majors, hit his 10th career 
homer — and his first since 1995 — off 
Perez (12-13) in the first for a 4-0 lead. 


Ravanelli Signs With Olympique Marseille 


Reuters 

LONDON — The Italian striker Fab- 
rizio Ravanelli ended speculation about 
his future by signing a four-year con- 
tract with the French first division club 
Olympique Marseille on Thursday. 

His previous dub, Middlesbrough, 
confirmed that the deal, worth £535 
million ($8.6 million), had gone 
through. 

The news ended months of spec- 
ulation that began when Middles- 
brough, beaten as finalists in both the 
League Cup and the FA Cup, were 
relegated from the English premier 


league at the end of last season. 

Ravanelli, who scored 31 goals for 
them during the 1996-97 season after 
his high-profile transfer from Ju- 
ventus. made it clear that he did not 
wish to play for the club in a lower 
league. 

Middlesbrough's manager, Bryan 
Robson, did not attempt to hide his 
relief that the Italian had finally gone. 
“I am pleased the deal has gone 
through,” he said. “Now that Fabrizio 
has found a new club, my players can 
get on with the job without all the 
media attention that he attracted." 


Ravanelli ’s availability had attrac- 
ted several clubs, but many were put 
off by the amount of the transfer fee or 
by Ravanelli’s personal demands. 

Liverpool shied away from the orig- 
inal £75 million asking price, while its 
Merseyside neighbor, Evenoa, was 
also keen to secure his services. 

After being dropped by Italy for a 
recent qualifying match against Geor- 
gia. however, it seemed likely that 
Ravanelli would make a move to a top 
club so that he could press his claims 
for a place in die 1998 World Cup in 
France. 


Scoreboard 


routes KtSUlW 

Major League Standings, 


Vr'A Jcsr*. C EAVrnvnBM . **v. : 

.g A 3‘;« 

-■ r LT Ntfft JOR.Bt wJtawYpik 92 66 .582 A'[ 

rortv’cmn airtf DufraK .79 19 -500 17.. 

~ Boston 77 81 <487 19. 

- .Zm CiSIDDOttser.; Toronto : n .86 456 24 

_J contests. owtralmvwon 

ndwriamf M 72 538 — 

w.'ecr erjcea me CMaas*. ' tj bo. mo n 

.*f i'-ruibccavictsd*? WmuSmu . - - - 77 . *» .490 . 7J« 

; r *r* "*«**«' " «"■ **r • m - iw 

•"v* in ttl Kansas Ply .* 6F 92 4W .WVi 

_ ~ Ntv. lew westmotmou 

- Him L x-SM«le » JO A0 - 

-■ “ — 111111 ^ AnoMra 83 75 J25 5» 

: ' _ M.: iLT.irranMEE Twos • 74 B* AU 14% 


-■ -r AnoMra 
• ; iT.i rrOCffiHEE Tonis 


_ ■ ..v Oaktand. 83 94 J94 26 

v.. ■rfunnAiUiin mild ami 


•* rciirvedthtc: 
: \zn s. ±i iari-l9f4 


“ x-won(fvteJonlttJ«,»^«in Wltdcnnl 

•7>XT1 MXTKHUUL UJUHM 

Alfl% •• • i**r«vuncxi 

“ W L Pet 61 

s-Aflarrio 99 59 427 - 

mmm s w-Rarkfa 92 66 -SB2 7 

New Ycwfc Bfi 73 -541 13% 

Montreal 70 82 481 23 

PNhxMpMa 05 93 411 34 

camMLomnoM 

Houston 81 77 J13 — 

■■ PWstXKgli 78 81 491 3V4 

Ondnnatt - 73 85 M2 8 

a StLmds .71 87 449 10 

I-, Chkapo 67 91 424 M 

^ “ wsrnvraaH 

t, SanRanctoco 88 71 J53 — 

5! % LosAnuetes 85 73 539 W 


- SfZ San Diego 

. SMMH1 cftMf 


Z-. »“■ gi^**wnHvMon1Blft 
-■ -j i* ‘ -:-R6r-vpjn wfkf cud 


82 76 JJ9 5V4 

75 84 -472 13 


; i. -- 


t r- MUBOCAHLSAOUe - 

HawYark 408 301 DOO-B 13 0 

Omtand ool 0Z1 ooo— r » o 

■ Gooden. Lloyd (ffl. Mendoza (9) and 
■‘'Posada; BrAndeaare Colon IS), A. Lopez 
■ Ptonk (9) and 5. Alomar, Dks C6). 

W— Gooden. M. L— BrAndereoa 4-Z 
V HRs— Now Yofk, Raines (4), Jstor 001, 
" finsndo 15). Oflvekmd Manto 03. 

Boston 001 *33 200-4 15 0 

Detroit 100 000 010-2 5 I 

• WtakefleM, Bnmdenbufg (9 and 

HaNeberOr Vuflefc (9k Btoto Duran (O, 
MMyeis OT. Jareta W and Casanova. Jen- 
son (8). W-WfaMM* 12 : 1S.L— Bldr. 16-8. 

• Tmato . . - 000 ZOO • 100—3. 7 I 

<n n itowls c itOrasm(8).RaMyewl9)and 
Wsfasleo Daak Crabtree (6), Rider M, 

. Ainxmav ®, Escobar C9),Rob&w» [93 and 
B-Sonttago. W-XnrdertakM.'JM. L-Cmol 
1-1. HRs 8 bBmib RPalmelta C38). 

TorarJa, Cnn Jr 061, Samuel 0). 

Ml — sol e . 3M 020 010-7 11 2 

Cbkepa 000 MW 00-2 7 0 

FrJtodrigwz. GoanMo OU, RlkMs (8), 
AgeBera (9) and nMflleeflabMiv Fwdham 
U3, J. Darwin (9) and Fafaregog. Machado 
GO. W— FrJiodrfgi»& 34L L-BaWwin, 12- 
15, Sv— AguOera 06}. HR-Mbtoesala. M. 
Conkwa(14K 

Reyais TOO 80 M0 NO 000-3 10 0 

Bxewefsioo on aw w *H 121 

lStaatags J 

Betdiec Service (73, Obon (9), WWsenonf 
OD. BevD 025. J Montgomery 04) and 
MacSarkm* MLSweonay OK A^towart 0 1); 
Fkirie, Hnmbcti W), Ddvfa C5J, Widuncm 17), 
DaJones (83, Fetters (12), Wagner 05) and 
snrmett Matheny (8). W— ^ Wagnec 1-0. L-J, 
MontgamciYi 1-C HRe— Kansas City, Pabner 
C237.M8ennkee. Vina (4). Ju-Franco (TV 
Tan 111 000 «4T — 8 13 0 

OcUand 100 000 003-4 7 4 


D.OBvet Patterson (9) and I. Rodriguez; 
Haynes A Small (B). Groom CB3# Taylor (S3, 
TJJAathewi (9) and MaBna W-O. Oboe 
13-12.L— Haynee 34. HR— Oak, Grieve £3). 
Anaheim 100 123 HJ0-9 13 0 

Seattle 010 000 020-3 5 2 

ICHUi Da .May (8) and Enoamadon; Lba 
McCarthy (53, Cremona (7), Hatzaner (8), 
Tfanfln (9) and R- WHkins, Manana (9). 
W-K. HBL MX L— Lins Ml. 
HRs— Anahdnv Turner (1), Hewed (14). 
Seattle, Sheets (4). 

NATIONAL LEAWJE 

SanFrandsca 100 100 011-4 8 1 

Cetorade 102 000 OSO-3 5 ■ 

Rapfv X Rodrigaez (63, Trenraz (7). X 
Mernreniez-ao and'BJalusonr R^aflewM.- 
Munaz oq, DeJaan (Q, X Reed (9) and 
. JeJteed. W— X Hemahdre. 5-X Lr- X Reed. 
4-6. HRs— San Frendsas Snow (28). X 
Johnson (11). Cotorada Burts (32). 

Attaete 000 000 ooi-l 4 \ 

Pb fl edelp hl a 013 001 01S-S 10 8 

Byrd, Embree IS). C For (63, Ugtenfcerg 
(7). Gather (B) and GMyem Stephenson and 
Eatnfala. W— Stephenson. 8-6. L-Byid. 4- 
4. 

Ondoati 000 801 400-5 8 1 

St Louis 200 020 000-4 9 0 

Burba SoWan (7), Shaw (9) and 
Taubensea Forctyoe Oh Aybarv Fnamturo 
(7). Fossas (7), CWng (7), Eekeniey (9) and 
Manem. W— Burba, 11-10. L— Fatsos. 2-7. 
Sv— Shaw (42). HRs-CbshmatV B Boone 

(7) . St Lreris, McGwire (21). 

Pttbtwrgh 001 008 022-5 8 0 

New York ON 016 Mto-7 > 2 

Cooke, Peters OH, Sadawsfcy (7). Rincon 

(8) and Kendatb MHdd, Crawford (3), 
RJordan (7). Rofos (8) and A Castata 
W— CrawfbrrV 3^ L-Coote 9-15. 
Sv— «o|as (is). HR New Yorit Otarod 
( 21 ). 

See Dtege IN 02S 001-4 9 0 

LesAepsteS 010 ON 000-1 5 • 


J-Homltton, Hofbmm (9) .and Fkdmty; 
■CandlatflD. Reyes (6), HaS HD, Radinsky (9) 
and Plazn, Prince 0». W-J. HamWmvll-7. 
L^-CandW* 10-7. Sv— Hafftnan 07). 
HRs— S 01 Diego. S. Rntey (28), Caminttt 
06). 

Florida 700 001 101-10 t 1 

Mmtmd BM ON 231-9 1! 4 

AJjeNeb Saunders <«, Atfonseca (73, F. 
Heredia ((0. StanHar (8). Vbsberg (9) and 
Natafe CPeroZr Paniooua 0), BuHInger (5), 
DeHart (7). Bennelf (9) and Widger, Chavez 
TO. W-A. Letter, IT -9. L-C. Perez, 12-13. 
Sv— Vasberg (1). HR— FkwWa Morman (1). 
CMcngo 010 010 001-3 11 % 

Houston NO 000. 100 - 4 . B.;0 

MXknto Paltoreon (73. Pfackrtta (83. T. 
Adam (9) ond Houston; Halt, Mag nante (8), 
X Springer (8), T. Morttn (9) Bid Ausimts. 
W— M. dark. 14-8. 1^-Hott 8-12. Sv-T. 
Adam O®. HRs-Chkogrv Klesdmkk (4), 
Houston CD. 


CENTRAL LEABUE 
Yokohrena 1 1, Chunichll 
Yakutr vs. HbixMma. postponed, rain 
PACV1C LEAGUE 

Datoil 1. Oris 5(odled otter two aut& 'm lap at 
stxflv rain) 

Lotte 7, Nippon Ham 2 


BASKETBALL 


EuroLeaque 


X Gtonnl Fambi, Italy. Mapei sX 

9. Philippa Bwdenaire, France Casino si. 

10. FeBx Gwcta Casas. Spain. Lotus iJ. 
ovsRALL 1. Alex Zuefe, Switzerland. 

ONCE 81 h.37m.27s^Z Fernando Esaadn. 
Spain, Krime at 2 m. 46 sj 3. Louiert Outran, 
Switzerland, Lotos 339;4. Enria Zalna, Ibdy, 
Asia SUft S. Roberta Herat Spain, Kdme 
5J4; d. Dredel CJavera Spain Estopcma 6Xb 
7.Man9sSemmnSpaln KetmeAdft a Lou- 
rent Jala be rt Fnrot ONCE M9; 9. GkmjU 
Faiesla Holy. Mapei MsSIr IX Won 
Ledrento, Frtmat, GAN 11DZ 


Kertoade IX VBesse Aadnm 11; Gnningan 
9! RKC WmdwtpcB,- NAC Breda ft Granhchrra 
DoeBnehemft WBlegi 11 Tib mg 7; NEC tfl- 
Imogen & Sparta R reterdam 5.- Foituna Slt- 
tard & VOtendara S; Utrecht 4? MW Maoa- 
McMX 

World Cup 


□ROUP B 

AnKara Turk, 8a Estiidtantes Madrid, Sp^8 

■ GROUP D 

LRibflarm. Slav. 71, AEK Athens, Gr, 74 
ZogtefarCro. 87,Te ams y s lem Bologna It. 92 
OROUPC 

Kinder Bologna, It. 72, Pan Orthaz, Fr. 79, 


SOCCER 


CRICKET 


Japanese Leagues 



W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

SB 

Yakutf 

76 

48 

2 

413 



Yokahana 

67 

56 

— 

545 

85 

Hiroshbna 

63 

60 

— 

-512 

125 

Yoraluri 

57 

70 

— 

449- 

205 

Hanshln 

56 

69 

1 

448 

205 

Chuntchl 

55 71 1 

MOHCUAMM 

437 

225 


W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Seflru 

71 

51 

3 . 

582 

— 

Orix 

62 

56 

3 

525 

75 

Ktotetou 

63 

60 

4 

512 

85 

Da id 

58 

65 

1 

472 

135 

Nippon Horn 60 

68 

1 

469 

140 

Lotte 

53 

67 

2 

442 

170 


ZIMBABWI VS. N8W Z8AKAHB 

SO AMD FINAL TSST, 1ST DAY 
THURSDAK W BULAWAYO. ZIMBABWE 
Zimbabwe: 263-4 


CYCLING 


Tour of Spain 


dmush ranun uawn 

Arsenal A West Ham 0 
Coventry 1, Crystal Palace 1 
Leicester 1, Blackburn 1 
Manchester Untied 2, Chelsea 2 
N e w c ast le 1, EvertonO 
Sheffield Wednesday 2. Derby 5 
Southampton a Leeds 2 
*tamdincw< Amend 18 patois; Manch- 
ester. United IS Blackburn 15/ Leicester 15; 
Chelsaa KV Lhwpaal 1 Z Newcastle 12; 
Leeds 10 b Qystal . Palace lft West Ham 1ft 
Coventry 1ft Derby 9s Tottenham 9i Aston 
VDIo 9) Wimbledon 8; Everton 7; Bolton 7; 
Barnsley & Sheffield Wednesday * 
Southampton 4. 


■DMFUHZOHl 

GROUP 2 

MoktowaGemglal 

axAMMHaar; England 18 points; Italy 17) 
Poland 7> Georgia 7i Moldova 0 
GROUPS 
Matya 0, Cinch Repub He 1 
Stovaktq Spain 2 

OTU dyi l oe ,- Spain 23 polidB Yb 
reaktvfa 2ft Slovakia 1ft Czech Republic 1ft 
Fame Islands d; Malta 0 . 


TENNIS 


THUmom W WHICH. GERMANY 
OUAHTERHNAL® 

Patrick Ratter (2), Australia. M. Maicelo 
Rios Oh CHk, 6-1, 7-6 (7-0). 

Petr Korda , Czech Republic def. Cedric 
PioBne (6), Franco 7-ft d-3. 


TRANSITIONS 


Leading ptockigs In itoHm i«h stage 
hem VUIedodd Los Angetes deSen Ratosh 

1. J. M- Jimenez, Sp. Bo nemo 4h. 31m. 38 s. 

2. DreihH Ctavens Spabv Estepona at 1 s. 
ft Roberto Hem. Spain,. Ketae sJ. 

4 . Pascal Rfdiad, Swttzeriand, Caskio 18 
ft Laurent Jrdabert France ONCE 31 

6. Sergei Ivanov. Russia TVM s.T. 

7. LaurantBrachaRL Franco, Lotus eft 


Redo JC Kerfcradaft NEC Nqmegen 0 
VotendomftGraatocbapDoeltnchemS ’ 
NAC Breda ft Groningen 0 
Heeremrem 2, Twente Enschede 1 
FayanoaRl&VNaBsel 
Willem II TBburg 1 RKC Wocriwiik 2 
A|ax Amstentam 7, MVV Maastricht 0 
STNWMM Aim Amsterdam 21 point* 
Heerenveen 17i PSV Elndhawn IS Feycno- 
ont H Ttemte Enschede 14, Rada JC 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Toronto— F ired .CBo Gaston, manager. 
Named Mel Quean manager torremalnder of 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

ST. unrs-Sgned Walt Jodtetly# general 
monogec to 3-yaar cortract extension. An- 
nounced hiat Tony La Rusm, monogab has 
exentoed Ids option Through toe 1999 seo- 


HATtONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

OALLAS-Tradad G Dank Harper and F£d 
OBannoii to Oriando lor G Dennis Scoff retd 
S5oaanco3h. 

potTLAND trail— Signed C KeMn Cato to 
3-year amtrad: Signed G John Crafty. 

Seattle— Signed F Jerome Kersey to 1- 
yeor contract. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

ATLANTA— Re-signed LB Jamal Form- 
totne. Waived FS Chris SheBng. 

KANSAS city— S igned DE Dexter Noting* 
to 2-two- year conbod. Waived DE Kerry 
Hicks. 

ttOWNT 

NADONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

CALGARY— Returned C Daniel Tkaauk to 
Barrio OHL and G Jean-Sebastten GigoetB 
D Eric Chaimv D Sand Heientus. D Rocky 
Thompson, F Jbn Dowd. F Valeri Karpov, F 
Chris OSulDvan, F Jasper AAattson, F John 
TrtaP and F Greg Pankewfcz to New 
BnmswfcfcAHL 

CHiCAco-Acquired G KM Doubenspedi 
horn Ottawa fdrl998 ftreund draft pkfc. 

Los ANGELES-Retomed LW Josh Green to 
Springfield, AHL, 

PLoStOA— Reassigned G Todd MacDonald 
to Gndnnot, IHL. 

phoenix— R eturned C Trevor Letowsid, C 
Mike PomlcMn D Brad They, D Dan Fodrt 
and D Ted Crowley to Springfield. AHL 
Loaned RW Darrin Kimble to Kansas aty, 
IHL 

Pittsburgh—’ Traded D Jason Woolley to 
Buffalo Siftree for 19N5Hv-n»nd draft pick. ’ 

SAN jose— A ssigned LW NUdas Andersson 
to Kentucky, AHL and D Scott Hannan In ‘ 
Katownre WHA. 

AHERKAN HOCKEY LEAGUE - 

AHL-Amwixxd an uxp unslon team wH ’ 
begin ptay in Saonhxv-Wtotes-BarTe in 1999- 1 
2000 season. 


































PAG 


PAGE 22 


EYTEKVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1997 


POSTCARD 


Bonn Beethoven 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 


B .ONN — Prophets are 
supposed to be shunned 
in their own lands, the pro- 
verb says, so consider the tale 
of Ludwig van Beethoven 
and his birthplace in Bonn. 

For five years, the city au- 
thorities here, where the com- 
poser was bom in 1770, have 
singularly failed to honor him 
with the kind of annual ex- 
travaganza that, say, Bay- 
reuth reserves for Richard 
Wagner (who was bom in 
Leipzig) or Salzburg lays out 
for its native son, Wolfgang 
Amadeus Mozart 
Since finances ran dry for 
the city's annual Beethoven 
Festival in 1992, there has 
been little but his renovated 
birthplace in a downtown al- 
ley and an eponymous con- 
cert hall to remind the visitor 
that this snoozing town on the 
Rhine has any claim to fame 
beyond the politicians who 
practice their art here. 

And even thongh the 
Beethoven Festival is finally 
to be revived this month, the 
program has far less reson- 
ance than, say, the moment 
when Lord Menuhin celebrat- 
ed his 80th birthday here last 
year by conducting a rousing 
rendition of Beethoven's 
Fifth Symphony at the Bee- 
thovenhalie concert hall. 

This year, two orchestras 
will share a program of con- 
certs that started Sunday: the 
Beeihovenhaiie Orchestra 
and the Norwegian Youth 
Symphony Orchestra. The 
musical schedule, following 
symposiums about the musi- 
cian’s work, began with 
“Lenore. 1806” the original 
version of what was to be- 
come “Fidelio." 

Additionally, there is to be 
a program of symphonies, pi- 
ano concertos, chamber mu- 
sic, string quartets and son- 


atas and a competition for the 
Ludwig van Beethoven Con- 
ductor’s Prize. The winner, 
most likely drawn from as- 
piring young conductors 
rather than the ranks of well- 
known artists, will conduct a 
gala concert to end the fes- 
tival on Sunday. 

In a way, the low profile 
reflects Beethoven’s own at- 
titude to Bonn. By the time he 
was 17 years old, he had made 
his first journey to Vienna- to 
study under Mozart, and he 
became far more closely as- 
sociated with that city than 
with his birthplace. After he 
moved to Vienna in 1792, he 
never returned. He died there 
in 1827. 

For all that, 170 years after 
his death, Beethoven’s home- 
town fortunes may be abont to 
be affected by contemporary 
factors that would have 
seemed strange to him: the 
free market, cyberspace and 
the politics of the post-CoId- 
War era. 


□ 


In 1999. a new company 
called International Beeth- 
oven Festivals Bonn Ltd. is 
planned. Its purpose will be to 
attempt to bring private mon- 
ey into a Beethoven project. It 
is hoped that such an effort 
will help Bonn recover from 
the departure of government 
ministries to Berlin, which 
begins in 1999. 

“With Beethoven we 
would like to have a new focal 
point,'’ said Werner D’Hain, 
a spokesman for the city au- 
thorities. 

One idea under discussion 
is to create, somewhere near 
Beethoven's birthplace, what 
D'Hain called “a virtual 
Beethovenhouse" where, us- 
ing interactive computer 
technology, visitors will be 
able to summon symphonies 
from cyberspace or download 
original scores. 



Faulkner Turns 100 With a Global Party 


By Mel Gussow 

New York Tunes Service 


XTEW YORK — From Oxford, 
lN Mississippi, to Pirate’s Alley 
in New Orleans to Rennes, France, 
to Tbilisi, Georgia, scholars and 
other Faulknerians are commem- 
orating the centenary of William 
Faulkner's birth. Faulkner himself 
wouldhave been amazed to think he 
had such a worldwide following. 

In Oxford, where he lived most 
of his life, he was always con- 
sidered s omethin g of a maverick. 
In his early 20s, as an aspiring 
author with little education, no 
known profession and seemingly 
an air of superiority, he was nick- 
named Count No 'Count Late in 
his life, and especially after his 
death (in 1962), Oxford accepted 
him as its most famous native son, a 
fact that is being observed there 
with a weeklong series of lectures, 
exhibitions and parties, culminat- 
ing in the unveiling of a statue of 
him on the lawn in front of City 
Hall. In William Beckwith's life- 
like sculpture, Faulkner sits on a 
park bench, hat on his head and 
pipe in his hand, looking as if he is 
about to launch into a favorite sto- 


ry 


His relatives, devoted to his im- 
age, plan to boycott the Oxford 
ceremony. As his nephew Jimmy 
Faulkner said recently, it is not the 
statue he objects to, but its location. 
“I don’t like the way they went 
about doing it," he said. “They 
ignored the family. They wanted it 
as a tourist attraction, to make dol- 
lars out of him." 

In Oxford, Faulkner has become 
a cottage industry. Jimmy Faulkner 
said the family would have pre- 
ferred that the statue be placed at 
Rowan Oak, the author's home, 
which is 10 minutes from the town 
square. 

As one of Faulkner's closest 
relatives and a frequent hunting 
companion, his nephew (who is 74 
and resembles his uncle) has a slide 
show about the author that he has 
been presenting for more than 20 
years. He is taking his show to New 


Albany, Mississippi, his uncle's 
birthplace, which has its own cel- 
ebration. Faulkner is also being re- 
membered in Pirate's Alley in New 
Orleans, where he wrote his first 
novel, “Soldiers’ Pay.” In New 
York, there was a Faulkner con- 
ference last week at the City Uni- 
versity' Graduate Center, and on 
Monday a group of actors read 
from his work in a literary evening 
at the Algonquin HoteL 

The celebrants in Oxford include 
Shelby Foote, Willie Morris and a 
contingent from the University of 
Mississippi, where there is an an- 
nual Faulkner conference. This 
year’s conference was the largest 
. ever, said Donald Kartiganer, who 
holds a chair in Faulkner studies at 
the university. “A statue to 
Faulkner seems appropriate," 
Kartiganer said this week. “I can 
live with it there." He added, “At 
least he's seated rather than on a 
pedestal." He will give three 
speeches in Oxford, characterizing 
tne author as someone who always 
recognized * ’the power of the past, 
of background, of origins." 

In his lifetime, Faulkner was 
eventually acknowledged as one of 
the most important novelists of the 
20th century, but his journey to that 
rank was filled with impediments, 
many of them provided by his crit- 
ics. For years, his work, including 
his masterpieces, “The Sound and 
the Fury,” “As I Lay Dying,” 
“Light in August” and “Absalom, 
Absalom! , ' ’ were rejected by many 
for the very reason that they were 
untradinonal and experimental. 

Gradually the author's admirers 
overcame the negative reception. 
In common with the character of 
Dilsey in “The Sound and the 
Fury," Fa ulkn er endured — until 
he reached a position of eminence, 
which coincided with his being 
awarded the 1949 Nobel Prize for 
Literature. 

Beginning with his early work, 
Faulkner discovered that his “own 
little postage stamp of native soil 
was worth writing about," and that 
he would never live long enough to 
exhaust it. But he mined it deeply. 





untouched by Ids legacy. 0 , 

Ferns, President Bill CHnton s i 
choice to lead the .National ' En- \ 
dowment for the Humilities, was h ' 
to speak and read from Faulkner in T*. 
New Albany. His favorite is/'Ab- f 
salon?, Absalom!,’ ’ which, 4n His ■* 
mind, is- “the quintessential novel 
of the American - squib." , fi* 
Faulknerians, Heariiagway and 
Fitzerald, his arch rivals in life, m 
nowhere in the same ballpark. 

In his novels, 
myth maker who 


i pxic unwKU taww umn , jijm. 

he said, can be looked at from djf! 
ferent angles, but the; truth is tm- 
assailable. Timmy Rrilkner takes a 

norcrwtal VtMU nfth# asKuM * 



1 

* 


■ .£i.-4&>wc£, 


Lc&rd IVr*» lepra 


W illiam Faulkner and his wife, Estelle, at their home in 1955. 


He filled his imaginary but extraor- 
dinarily vivid Yoknapatawpha 
County with stories of family loy- 
alty and betrayal and a panoply of 
some of the most original char- 
acters on the American landscape. 

Joseph Blotter, the author of 
‘’Faulkner. A Biography." sees 
Faulkner as a universalist rather 
than a regionalist, focusing on, in 
the novelist's words, “the human 
heart in conflict with itself." For 
him, Faulkner’s county was “a mi- 
crocosm ihal led to a macrocosm." 

Before he went to the Fa ulkn er 


conference in Rennes. Blotter said: 
-‘Faulkner is more than of his time. 
He is not just our greatest 20th- 
century novelist Although I take 
my hat off to Hawthorne, Melville 
and James, for me Faulkner is No. 1 
— and if you have an hour I'll tell 
you why.” 

W illiam Ferris, the director of 
the Center for the Study of South- 
ern Culture at the University of 
Mississippi in Oxford, said this 
week, “Faulkner is the great Amer- 
ican writer of this century, and no 
writer of fiction in the future will be 


W ill Uf he laughed and saTd, ^ 
never lied, but at times hestretched 
the hell out of the troth.” 

That started him on A:remi- 

niscence . about the'-rpos of his 
uncle’s work: “W# bade w the 
early 1900s to the 1940s,. around 
here two or three o£$nr gener- 
ations of the same famSy 
in the same house. la .die. winter 
time they would sit around ibe ffo 

stories and legends^dwui family" 
Many times , he would ; read 
Faulkner's stories and recognize 
their origins . “He. wrote-ahout 
things he knew and tbsigs he knew 
about,' but in his stytey in Us ex- 
panded fiction." . ' : ; i . 

Faulkner's life was'fOied with 
sorrow and depression, although as 
Blotter points out^the^athiiffa^er 
had any doubt about the value nThU 
work. He was confronted by the L 
sudden death of a younger brother • 
and his own long unhappy mar. T 
riage. both of which may have con- 
tributed to his alcoholism. Feu Fre- 
derick Karl, the authqrof ‘ *W3Dsm 
Faulkner: American ' Writer,' 1 
many of Faulkner's problems were 
self-inflicted: In: coognba . with 
Hemingway, Kail writes, “he 
conned disaster in order tbhsffll 
whatever die books bad taken from 
him.”' . .. . 


!? 


A ’ 


i 


SEYMOUR HERSH BOOK 


PEOPLE 


The JFK Scoop That Wasn’t: Monroe Papers Called Fakes TKSS'S 

1 X have become ta: 


By Lloyd Grove 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — Seymour Hersh, the 
Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative 
reporter, has been toiling for the past four 
years on “The Dark Side of Camelot.” yet 
another expose of John F. Kennedy, his 
brother Robert and their allegedly seamy 
secret lives among mobsters, spies and 
movie stars. 

But Hersh planned to render those other 
hundreds of books pass£ — and make le- 
gions of historians gasp — by drawing on a 
cache of secret papers provided to him by 
the son of a long-dead New York lawyer. 

The documents "were said to provide the 
strongesi-ever evidence for such rumored 
Kennedy dirt as the annulment of JFK's 
supposed first marriage, the president’s en- 
tanglement with mobster Sam Giancana, 
and — most sensational — his agreement to 
pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in hush 
money to his lover Marilyn Monroe. 

Based largely on the promise of these 
startling revelations, Hersh's publisher. 

Little, Brown, has been gearing up for a 
blockbuster, ordering a first printing of 
350,000 copies for the book's release in 
mid-November. ABC News, working with Hersh, 
has been planning a sizzling documentary far the 
November ratings sweeps. 

But a funny thing has happened on the way to 
best-sellerdom: Hersh — who was in tile habit of 
bringing copies of the secret papers to his interviews 
with Kennedy intimates and flashing them like a 
magician — has concluded at the 11th hour that 



Kennedy and Monroe: Was there a blackmail plot? 


Cusack said he discovered about 300 pages of 
Kennedy papers in his father’s files — papers 
which he claims were authenticated by experts. 

He agreed to let Hersh use the papers in 1995. 
and was later pat on a $25,000 retainer by ABC 
News. “I thought we were all on the same team," 
Cusack said, noting that he has received only half of 
his fee. He added that Hersh hasn’t returned his 


made a final decision," Wes tin said of the 
November program. “It depends on exactly 
what we have." Westin continued. “I don’: 
think it’s a question of enthusiasm. We’re just 
making sure that what we have is compelling 
reporting rather Lhan reviewing things that 
have been said before. And we have to be 
absolutely confident in the accuracy." 

This hedging by ABC is "news to me," 
said a clearly concerned Sarah Crichton, of 
Little. Brown. 

Hersh, of course, could have expected a 
huge media windfall from the Marilyn Mon- 
roe revelation, and until June, was hopeful of 
its accuracy. Among those to whom he 
showed the Monroe documents — in which 
the president seemed to be promising to give 
Monroe, through the screen of her mother, a 
million-dollar trust fund in return for her 
silence — was the author and Kennedy in- 
timate Gore VidaL 

■ ’The marginal notes made by Jack seemed 
very much in his handwriting," Vidal told 
The Post. "You didn 't forget it once you saw 
it — it was son of a vigorous 9-year-old 
valiantly combating dyslexia. ’ ’ 

These notes included, Vidal said, what 
were thought to be the president’s stipu- 

larinnc rn rh» mAntinn " » 


iris, Britain's 
five-girl pop sensation, 
have become tax exiles in the 
south of France, it seems. The 
group, whose debut album 
sold *14.5 million copies and 
whose singles have sold 16.5 
million, are estimated to have 
earned themselves £50 mil- 
lion iSSO million) since their 
first hit just over a year ago. 
The Daily Star newspaper 
said the five had moved to a 
chateau outside Nice to avoid 
a tax bill of £32 milMon. Their 
near neighbors will include 
Elton John, Tina Turner, 
Bill Wyman and Michael 
Douglas. Each Spice Girl — 
Geri HallrweU, Emma 
Bun ton, Victoria Adams, 
Mel B and Mel C — is ex- 
pected to double her income 
to £16 million in 1998. 


□ 



h 




.-**/*•■ 


- 


liiroi/Ibf .toraJWd Ph w 


Hillarv Rodham Clinton LeAnn Runes accepting the Horizon Award. 




cryptic reference to himself; “No mention R” — 


presumably Bobby Kennedy; and "No mention 
SG” — pres 


many of the documents are fakes. “That’s jour- phone calls since late August, when ABC anchor 

lersh Pet 


nalism,” an otherwise uncommunicative Hersh Peter Jennings surprised Cusack with a series of 
said, attempting to minimize the controversy over accusatory questions about his father’s papers dur- 
the secret papers — whose apparent discrediting has ing an on-camera interview, 
required extensive revisions by Hersh to delete them “I totally relied on Seymour Hersh," Cusack 
from the 450-page book. “I’m sony if people want said, “and he continually reassured me of the 
to magnify ana dramatize." He adds, “Big deal." correctness of what was going on. 


But ABC News, for one, thinks it is a big deal. An 
installment of * 4 20/20’ * is featuring a report on ‘ ‘the 
bizaircstory of the ‘Kennedy documents,’ ” says 


an ABC press release. The program will assert that 
if the 


documents, particularly those 

the film siren, are for- 


some of the 
volving the president and 
geries. 

That charge is hotly disputed by Lex Cusack, son 
of the late Lawrence Cusack, a New York tax 
attorney and, according to his son, an informal JFK 
adviser. After his father died at age 66 in 1985, 


s going on, and of the 
veracity and authenticity of documents, and sud- 
denly he totally abandoned it. What would your 
reaction be?" 

“I'm glad he feels burned," Hersh responded. 
“If the experts we’ve hired — not one, not two, but 
three — are saying that he is co mmitting ‘et cetera’ 
. . . that seems appropriate.’ ’ 

Meanwhile, David Westin, president of ABC 
News, said there is no guarantee he will follow 
through on plans to air the document 


haven’t booked anything. We haven't 




presumably the mobster Sam Giancana. 

On an additional handwritten sheet, was a list of 
all of Kennedy's siblings, with the amount toward 
the million dollars they would each pony up to pay 
off Monroe’s blackmail. 

“He was tithing them — $50,000 from one, and 
so on. He then tries to add it all up, and it’s nowhere 
near a million. I thought ir was extremely touching, 
the fact that he couldn't add." 

Vidal said elements such as these gave the doc- 
ument the appearance of authenticity, but stressed 
that be didn't know. “Let us say if Sy Hersh has 
misunderstood all of this and been taken for a ride, 
he’s been taken for a ride by a master. It's b ri l l ia n t 
stuff." 

‘ ‘The last time I talked to Sy,I said, ‘How are you 
doing sleuthing the Monroe thing?*" Vidal re- 
called. “And he said. ‘It may prove all to be 
untrue.’ But if he's having second thoughts about 
any documents, it’s a sign of his integrity as a 
journalist. He's trying to look into the vast cesspool 
of American politics." 

Staff writer David Streitfeld contributed ta this 
report. 


said she would sacrifice any- 
thing for Mideast peace — even her hard-line 
ban on smoking in the White House. Clinton 
said at a newspaper columnists' luncheon that 
she was surprised when the chain-smoking 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel and 
King Hussein of Jordan insisted on observing 
her anti-smoking rule during the 1994 ne- 
gotiations. “Qfconise I’d do anything for 
Mideast peace, even let them smoke in the 
White House,’ ’ she said, “and I found myself 
begging them to smoke." 


□ 


his appearance not be advertised in advance. 

a New York leftist who 
to chirp “Right on!" whenever a political^ 
conversation got lively. Other FBIdocument|r 
show that the New York City Police De- 
partment and the FBI each unsuccessfully 
sought to arrest Lennon on drug charges, and 
that die FBI, under J. Edgar Hoover, had 
contacted Justice Department officials and 
President Nixon's chief of staff, BLR. (Bob) 
Haldeman, about how to deal with Lennon. 


i * 


'* Pn 
•urh 


oil I 


The FBI has grudgingly made public all but 

Lennon. The 


□ 


10 secrer files on Beatle John 

FBI had fought to keep Lennon's file secret on 
the grounds of national security after a pro- 
fessor at the University of California at Irvine, 
Jonathan Wiener, requested the documents 
more than 15 years ago. Wiener, author of a 
1984 book on die late rock star, finall y got the 
documents this week. Among the documents 
surrendered is an April 26, 1972j FBI memo 
from an unidentified agency source describ- 
ing a trip by a Madison, Wisconsin, leftist to 
New York where she met with "Yippie and 
Zippie representatives’’ planning dem- 
onstrations at the August 1972 Republican 
National Convention. Lennon told the activist 
that he would "come to the conventions if 
they are peaceful," and on the condition that 


Garth Brooks has been named best en- 
tertainer by the Country Music Association. 
"Strawbeny Wine,” a song about a teen- 
ager’s first love affair, was named both the 
best country music single and song. The song 
award went to writers Gary Harrison and 
Matraca Berg, while singer Deana Carter 
got the trophy for best single. George Strait 
was named best male vocalist and fis “Car- 
rying Your Love With Me" was named be&'R 
album. Industry voters finally got around to 
acknowledging two of country music's best- 
selling female singers, Trisha Yearwood and 

LeAnn Rimes. Rimes won her first nod from 
the association, the Horizon Award for career 
progress. Yearwood was named best female 
vocalist 


.Kl-\ t" 

^ jJ: 

- 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you’re 
calling from and you’ll get the clearest connections 
home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 
Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone 
charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 
(up to 60%*). Check the list for AT&T Access Number. 


AT&T Access Numbers 



EUROPE 


Amiris «cr 

EZ-BK-mi 


Bale him* 

.JWM 

8-BKWMttl 

** - 


JJ1SHHH0 


Gnus* 

...flMDO-1311 

**. = =£i 

Ireland^ 

Italy* 

.l-fflU-HWifl 
.172-1011 

MAUW-Brtl L 


tasb*±{MBsww)». 
Spain 

7S5-5M2 

..OOMWM1 



I. Just dial the XHStT A ccess Number 
for the country jwu are calling from. 

1 Dial the phone numter you're calling 

5- Dial the calling card number listed 
- above your name. 


..020-795-011 

Switzerland* „ M0D-8WB11 

United Ktegdflin4„ 

• MPWioii 

MIDDLE EAST 

EfflfpT*(CalrB)T - 51M2BH 

Israel ; 17MM-2727 

Sand) Arabia o 1-M0-10 

AFRICA 

GIHUH 

Scofi Africa. 



n 


in the springtime. 


Cant find the Access Number for the country you're calling fiwn? Jwr rak any operator far 
AZ8T DirecT Servlet or visit air Web sla at; Tnt&ffmvjtaxsia/tnritlu 






•m 

'•-TVs tea 




'--A** 


l h 


i Nil h 

■«|l 


-• 


• - — — ■ — ’ •