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TEXTILES 



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KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC. 



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The infinite variety of trends in modern textiles keeps pace with 
the times. The wealth of inventiveness in man-made cloths, the 
rich resources in animal fibers and handwoven fabrics from all 
parts of the world add continuously to the vast range of Knoll 
textiles, whetting the imagination of the interior designers. 



Contemporary fabrics are planned for specific roles to meet 
specific needs. Weaves that resist wrinkles, camouflage spotting, 
outlive Methuselah, or simply confine themselves to the practical 
virtues of washability, fast color and low cost wind up in uni- 



versity dormitories, offices and institutions of all types. For the 
home coarse upholstery cottons, heavy denims, mohair weaves 
and textured handwovens have their drapery counterparts in 
translucent but equally sturdy linen fishnet and clean fresh 



country cottons. 



For the total interior plan, a new Knoll series of correlated up- 
holstery and curtain fabrics bring together color, weave and 
design in harmonies of wit and imagination. Typical are the 
heavy homespun linens in muted checks with their blending plain 
textures. Small and brisk prints which appear like weaves at 
the distance melt in pleasantly with plain textured cottons and 
sharp, clear stripes. 



The new low-cost textiles belong in this picture right along with 
the most fabulous ones. They have an important place. With new 
techniques and know-how in weaves, a cloth of great beauty, 
intrinsic quality and design can be mass produced at a low price. 
A whole new range of fabrics has been added to broaden the 
base of good textiles within reach of everyone. Each has its 
balanced color, texture relationship and sensitivity to area in 
the total plan. 



74 



P3 "Saran' stripe woven plastic, 50" 





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P325 Woven grey horsehair upholstery, 27 



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P4 Saran' solid color woven plastic, 36" 




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1 Natural fiber Pandanus' upholstery, plastic ized, 27' 



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K164 



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K531 



K431 



76 




UPHOLSTERY WEAVES, STURDY, LOW COST 



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K380 








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K382 



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* Cartree * upholstery, 54" 

Chinese Coins" upholstery and drapery, 50" 
"Devil" upholstery, 53" 
Mohair upholstery, 50" 
linen crash upholstery, 50" 
Homespun linen upholstery, 50" 
Linen crash plaid upholstery, 50" 
Sempe stripe upholstery, 52" 
Prestini upholstery, 54" 

'Bouret stripe, 50" 
Strengell handwoven upholstery, 40" 

* Bauref stripe, 50" 

Strengell handwoven Silvertone" uphols 
"Canton" shantung weave, 46" 
India silk, handspun, handwoven, 50" 



tery. 40" 



K293 



K600 



LUXURIOUS FABRICS, HANDWOVENS 



77 




K290 13 Mosaic' shantung weave, 48 



" 



K320 3 •Campagna" cotton, 54" 




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K300 46 "Apples" on cotton, 50". K288-43 •Apples" on linen, 50" K1 1 "Chinese Coins" cotton, 50" 




78 



K375 "Bauret" chintz, 50 



" 



K192.-2 "Waves" linen, 50" 




K284 •'Reeds"' cotton, 50 



" 



K527 Linen crash matching weave, 50". K531 Linen crash in plaid 




K190 1 Cross Bars'' cotton, 50" 



K330 3 Shooting Stars' shantung weave, 46' 







K605 5 "Italian" silk, 30" 



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Kl 91 2 •Plantsoon'' linen, 50 



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KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC. 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

ATLANTA 

DALLAS 

BOSTON 



575 MADISON AVENUE 

160 E. SUPERIOR STREET 

64 FIFTEENTH STREET, N.E. 

2909 FAIRMOUNT STREET 

21 CHARLES STREET 









KNOLL FA3RICS AND DECORATOR SAMPLES ARE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 



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ASSOCIATION FOR 
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TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qcca 




Digitized by: 




INTERNATIONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 
TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE/ 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qcca 




CHAIRS 











The modern chair belongs to a modern way of life. New prin- 
ciples of construction, new methods of joining, new techniques 
and materials have contributed to the advancement in chair 



design. 



Compare the lightness of the Saarinen 70 chair in relation to 



its overall dimension. Compare the chair's bulkless look in rela- 
tion to its depth which no overstuffed piece can match in ratio of 
weight to mass. Its form is determined by the simplest, most 
direct use of material in terms of economy, efficiency, purpose 



and, certainly, pleasure. 



Architectural concepts in design have contributed to the classical 
beauty of many of these chairs. The Barcelona chair which opens 
the Knoll collection was designed in 1 929 by Mies van der Rohe. 
It recalls the strength and purity of style with which this same 
architect endowed his Barcelona pavillion. The span of more 
than twenty years since the chair was first exhibited has not 
dimmed its importance but rather secured it as one of the most 
distinguished and elegant designs of our time. 

In linear delicacy and simplicity of form the chairs designed by 
Milan architect Franco Albini express a similar dignity and power. 



Among the American architects, the work of Eero Saarinen has 
profoundly affected the direction and content of contemporary 
furniture design for today's living. His moulded plastic chairs 
mark the beginning of a new tradition in keeping with the 
technological advance of our day. 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 







MIES VAN DER ROHE DESIGN 



250 Barcelona chair 



29'/2 



28V4 





29Va 



House of Philip Johnson reprinted 
from House & Garden, October 1949, 
courtesy of Conde Nast Publications, Inc. 
Photograph by Kertesz. 



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Knoll showroom in Dallas, designed by Florence Knoll 










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70 Chair* 



EERO SAARINEN DESIGNS 



73 Settee 






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74 Ottoman 



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Design Patent 0-158510 Patent Pending 



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71? Chair*, plastic back 



EERO SAARINEN DESIGNS 



72U Chair*, upholstered back 




14 



* Design Patent D-l 58509 Patent Pending 




71 Chair* 71 S Chair with swivel, not illustrated 



' Design Patent D-158508 Patent Pending 



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FRANCO ALBINI DESIGNS 



47 Desk chair, metal 



80 Desk 



4 8 Desk chair, wood 




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BONET, KURCHAN AND HARDOY 





198L Chair, learhe 







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ng-Dining room designed by Florence Knoll for the Detroit Institute of Arts Exhibition for Modern Living. Photograph by Elmer Astleford 



PIERRE JEANNERET DESIGN 92 Chair* 



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652W and 652Uy 2 Armchairs 



654U'/ 2 and 654U Chairs 



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652U Armchair* 





654L Chair, leather 



654W Chair, webbed 



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30 



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Design Patent D-141703 



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132 Chair, metal 132U with rubber cushion, Donald Knorr 



24 






T60U Work chair, upholstered T60 wood, Odetberg Olsen design 



75 Stacking stool, Florence Knoll design 




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667W Stool 




25 





147 Armchair 146 Side chair, Joseph Frank design 130 Stacking chair, Andre Dopre design 



19W 








N20 Chair 



GEORGE NAKASHIMA DESIGNS 



N19 Chair- 








27W 





Top to bottom: 666WSP*, 666USP, 666W Chair 



28 



' Design Pctenl D-141 839 





666U Chair 



Top to bottom: 141, 142, 140 Stacking chairs, llmari Tapiovaara design 












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4 5 Settee 



44S Swivel chair 



44 Arm chair 






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201 Chair, Elias Svedberg design 




Knoll showroom in New York 




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House in the Berkshire*, Marcel Breuer, architect. Reprinted from House & Gorden February 1949. Courtesy of Conde Nast Publications, Inc. Photogroph by Domora 



26 Sofa, Florence Knoll design 





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27 Settee 



25 Chair 



26 Sofa 



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38 Settee 



35 Chair 



37 Sofa 



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22 Settee 



21 Chair 



23 Sofa 



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Knoll showroom in Dallas. Photograph by Arthur S. Siegel 



36 



Digitized by: 




INTFRNATIOMAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 
TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qcca 





J 



Digitized by: 




INTERNATIONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
INTERNATIONAL 



BUILDING 
TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 



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Digitized by: 




INTERNATIONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
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TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qcca 




DESKS, OFFICES 



KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC. 



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ASSOCIATION FOR 
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INTERNATIONAL 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 



The integration of functional with human needs sets a new 
standard for modern office and factory planning. 



The earliest work of the Knoll Planning Unit, appropriately 
enough, went into the offices of architects who wanted to show 
their clients how convenient, economical and attractive a well- 
designed office can be. In fact, one of the first storage wall units 
was developed in 1 940 as a practical solution for the cluttered 
desk of a busy architect. 



The desk-work requirements of each individual in an office 
demand special detailing which no single desk can fulfill. 
Personal preferences add another consideration. The clean-top 
executive desk and the executive desk of conspicuous activity 
pose individual problems in solution. For one, a long conference 
table serves better than a desk. For the other, a desk cannot 
boast too many drawers nor too much area. Here six-foot long 
wall cabinets set at desk level double the work surface and 
provide extensive storage space behind sliding doors. 



Everywhere special finishes add to the life of equipment. New 
plasticized wood tops and laminations of aluminum foil resist 
burns, water marks, scratches and stains. Often metals substi- 
tute for wood in desk and chair bases. Foam rubber upholstery 
covered with woven plastic outwits wear and soil from constant. 



rigorous use. 



In desks designed for the home, scale and lightness of appear- 
ance are important. The table desk, for instance, suggests new 
variations of routine forms and strictly utilitarian materials. 
In its ingenious use of glass, metal and a light suspension con- 
struction the glass-top desk by Franco Albini achieves a new 
delicacy in design on the simplest of all camp table bases. The 
designer's imaginative approach and experienced eye for prac- 
tical application combine in this rather personal solution of 
working needs whether in the home or the office. 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 




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Executive office, 16 desk and 123 cabinet with sliding doors 



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13 Executive desk, shown with 123 and 121 cabinets 



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1 3 Executive desk, also with center panel, shown with 44S Swivel chair 




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14 Secretarial desk, also with center panel, shown with T60U Work chair 





64 




16 Desk, also with center panel, shown with 4 8 Chair 











17 Desk, 146 Chair 







66 




15 Desk 




67 



i ■ ii. 



68 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES Custom designs by Knoll Planning Unit 








300 Extension conference or dining table, Florence Knoll design 



69 




EXECUTIVE OFFICES Custom designs by Knoll Planning Unit 



71 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN ^ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 










Digitized by: 




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ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
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TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
LIBRARY 



www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qcca 



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Digitized by: 




INTERNATIONAL 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
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TECHNOLOGY 
HERITAGE 
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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE/ 

CENTRE CANADIEN ^ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 




CHESTS, CABINETS, BEDS 



KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 





-<..«> 






In the contemporary plan the emphasis is on room use rather 
than size. The sleeping room takes up little space yet it performs 
many functions: it stores possessions, it adds to the efficiency 
and convenience of living. Furnishing it becomes more and more 
a part of architectural planning. 



Compact units in the living, dining and work areas compensate 
for space deficiencies. Long cabinets and convertible chest- 
luggage racks can replace half a dozen separate furniture pieces 
with a single unit. A desk, a dressing table, a serving area, a 
place for radio and books are screened behind sliding doors or 
in drop leaf cabinets. Long counter tops at table height provide 
useful work areas, and give a sense of horizontal expanse. 



In bed designs there are several innovations in structure 



ing such as the platform frame which supports the foam rubber 
mattress high enough off the floor for easy cleaning yet low 
enough for lounging and sitting. The headboard is covered with 



native fiber Pandanus 



for washability and wear. 



This use of new materials in combination with old has stimulated 
fresh design ideas, and constant research in changing living 
habits and needs has kept them up-to-date. 



Bedrooms are either limited to night use or made sufficiently 
flexible for 24-hour occupancy. The range of convertible beds 
in the Knoll group accommodates many needs. The sofa bed for 
instance performs a double function. Operated by a simple 
sliding device the bed converts easily from day to night use 



without any mechanical complication. Such 



ility in bed 



units is typical of student dormitory rooms, hotel rooms, small 
city apartments and the extra guest room in the home. 



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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 







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121 Cabinets shown with bookshelves. Living room detail designed by Florence Knoll 



49 










121 Cabinets, hinged doors, Florence Knoll design 




50 




1 23 Cabinets, sliding doors, Florence Knoll design 




51 




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116 Sideboard, Florence Knoll design 




18 





52 






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1 27 Chest 



125 Chest 



1 26 Chest 



36 



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36 



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34 J /4 



53 







1 28 Luggage rack and chests with dressing table and desk compartments, Florence Knoll design 




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54 




1 29 Chest with dressing table compartment 



1 30 Chest with desk compartment 




55 






701 Convertible sofa bed,* as sofa for day. Florence Knoll, Charles Niedringhaus, Designers 




56 



' Potent Pending 




701 Convertible sofa bed, as bed for night 



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704 Bed, single 705 Bed, double 




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700 Daybed, Richard Stein, Product Design Associates 






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Following page: Marcel Breuer house designed for 

Museum of Modern Art Garden, 1949. 
Photograph by Ezra Stoller: Pictor 



59 



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www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 




Digitized by: 




INTF R NAT ION A ( 



ASSOCIATION FOR 
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www.apti.org 



From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca 



\fi<k?4* ■ 




Digitized by: 




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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE / 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qcca 










TABLES 





KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC. 









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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE/ 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qc.ca 



Modern tables place no limitation on adaptability to use. Light 
in construction, convertible, stackable, knock-down, double- 
purposed with tray tops or equipped with devices for folding or 
lengthening, there are few functions to which the table cannot 



be 



In the budgeting of space in the living and work areas designers 
have given special thought to shapes and table heights for easy 
access and movement about the room. Coffee tables with 
rounded corners, curved sides and new elongated forms, and 
low round tables relate agreeably to other pieces providing the 
designer with endless possibilities of arrangement. 

One of the most enduring accomplishments in table designs 
stems from innovations in wood finishes. Hard resistant surfaces 
originally confined to institutional equipment now find a place 
in the home. Side, coffee, dining and conference tables are 
treated with new plastic, burn-resistant finishes which double the 
life of table tops without sacrificing the beauty of the original 
wood surface. 



Imaginative use of materials, old and new, illustrate the trend 
in good design today to improve appearance along with im- 
proved function. Table tops of native slate, marble, glass, stone 
or wood slabs as heavy as a butcher's board give the designer 



wider scope in planning for many uses 



■^■■■■1 



Digitized by: 




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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR 

ARCHITECTURE/ 

CENTRE CANADIEN D'ARCHITECTURE 



www.cca.qcca 



•. \#* 




48 dia 



302 Dining table, Hans Bellman design, shown with 72U 




28 



37 






301 Extension table shown with 146 and 147 chairs 








N12 Table shown with N19 chairs, George Nakashima designs 






60" (.Mends to 78") 







NK4 Extension table, Elias Svedberg design, shown with 666USP chairs 



NK4 Extension table closed 



32 (extends to 63") 




28%' 



40 




106 Stocking table, Formica top, Florence Knoll design 





I 1 5 Coffee table, slate top, Florence Knoll design 



22Va 









42 



N10 Coffee table, George Nakashima design 





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110 Coffee table, Abel Sorensen design 



59V4 



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17 




43 




1 14 Large tripod table, Hans Bellman design 









45 




103 Small tripod table 




NK5 Table with 201 chair 



17 




20%" 



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to bottom: 




JNK7r8K9 Tables 




18 



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56ABC Nesting tables, Abel Sorensen design 



57ABC Nesting tables, Hosken design 



20V 2 



24V* 





46 




50 Tray table, single 52 Tray table, double Abel Sorensen design 



24V 4 



24% 



38'/ 4 




17VV 




47 




1 00 Table 









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NK8 Table 



48 



Digitized by: 




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ASSOCIATION FOR 
PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY, 
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From the collection of: 



CCA 



CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE / 
CENTRE CANADIEN DARCHITECTURE 

www.cca.qc.ca